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Full text of "The Terrapin : [yearbook]"



M'-' 




INETEEN HUNDRED THI 





ANNUAL PUBLICATION OF 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



AT COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



jiahy lee ROSS 

women's IDITOfi^ 




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LIEUTENANT COLONEL J. D. PATCH 




Few men in the brief span of four years have exerted 



as lasting an influence upon the students of the Uni- 



versity of Maryland as the present professor of Military 



Science and Tactics. By his words, actions, and man- 



ner, he has won the respect and admiration of all 



with whom he has come in contact. A gentleman at 



all times he has shown himself a man worthy not only 



of his calling but also of the confidence of the student 



body. In recognition of the many services he has 



rendered the University and the inspiring example he 



has set for all, the editors dedicate this volume of 



the Terrapin to Lieutenant Colonel Joseph D. Patch, 



Commandant of Cadets. 



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A composite picture of the local campus drama anitythe players . . . in 
which the editors attempt to depict by wo\ 
and customs that influence tjf^^undergrc 

\nors, and the routine of his univer- 



succeeded in the ra 



sity life. This is th 



in the sense that the 



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Without an elaborate the 



interpret undergraduate life at 



brances of collegiateHL 





deavoring only to 



five built this 



volume upon the premiS^hat , In aj \r yet rs\\he most lasting remem 



^Hi^^ajuMn tlae ih\ 



vLeveryday experiences. 



M A R Y L A N 



T U D E N T 




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STUDENT LIFE 

ADMINISTRATION 

GRADUATES 

UNDERGRADUATES 

ACTIVITIES 

MILITARY 

DIVERSIONS 

MARYLAND BELLES 

ATHLETICS 

HONORARIES 

MARYLAND GREEKS 



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1939 

1{RRflPlN 

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SOON 




Introduction to 




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The traditional charm of Maryland is portrayed 
by the colonial architecture of the buildings on the 
campus. Well laid plans have made possible the 
rapid growth of the college without the sacrifice of 
its harmonious design. 

The countenance of the campus has undergone 
continual changes hand in hand with the growth of 
the school. In i8^g there were only two buildings, 
the Rossbourg Inn and the Barracks, but by i8g2 
the campus had begun to assume likely proportions 
with the addition of the Home Economics and En- 
gineering Buildings. Morrill Hall and the Old 
Library were added at the same time. Calvert Hall, 
the first men's dormitory, was constructed in 1914 
though it was almost ten years later before the Byrd 
Stadium and Gym-Armory were added. Last fall 
found twenty major buildings on the campus. At 
present there are five new ones under construc- 
tion: a new men's dormitory. Administration, Poul- 
try, Home Economics and General Service Build- 
ings. Likewise, increased enrollment has necessi- 
tated the enlargement of the Infirmary, Dining Hall, 
Engineering Building and the Coliseum. 

Keeping pace with the increased enrollment is the 
constantly changing campus view which will be fur- 
ther altered in the near future as tentative plans for 
new buildings become a reality. 




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JTiEREIN are to be found the highlights 
of the school year, presented by The 
Terrapin's candid camera. A kaleido- 
scopic review of brisk autumn days and 
thrilling football, of spring fever and cam- 
pus romance. From dining hall to coliseum, 
from frat house to classroom, from drill to 
grill, the phantom "photog" pictures all. 
No event was too small, or person too 
great, to escape his revealing lens, for the 
everyday occurrences are those which 
bind the heart and hand of John Student 
to his Alma Mater and supply the breath 
of youth to campus life. 




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RIVE 



Wednesday morning, September 14, 1938, 9 o'clock— Steps of Gym- 
Armory. Mob scene — Freshmen A-K clamorin" for recognition at Mary- 
land, and their rat caps. 

Thursday morning. Same time and scene with Freshmen L-Z. Morrill 
Hall — Come and see the big show! — for males only. Boys' burlesque — to 
you freshmen, physicals. 

Thursday evening — A veritalile Pep rally with Rah-Rah freshmen and 
their "M" BtjolvS in the Coliseum being introduced to the student officers, 
songs, and cheers. 

Friday c\ening. The President's Reception — the climax of Freshman 
Week — and a great success. The 1039 frosh were herded down the receixing 
line. The dance following the reception was for freshmen only so Mr. Rat 
had the attractixe Miss Mouse to himself for one dance. 

Saturday — The Frosh were looking upward — the upper classmen were 
arriving. Saturday exening — The minority of the freshmen were in the 
know — "It's a date at the drill." For those a little slower on the pick-up 
there was that last chance — a dance in Dorm "B." 



26 




Any cut rate courses in calisthenics? 




Vou don't need a course in "Browning" 

^- 27 




Acquiring polish 




the heat's on 



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— 


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V^OMK into my j^arlor,' said the frater to 
the frosh." So might be paraphrased a mod- 
ern version of an ancient nursery rhyme. For 
September and the initial tolling of the school 
bell means the opening of the fraternit\- cjuest 
for new blood, with the unwary "rat" as prey. 
For two weeks following the opening of the 
term, campus luminaries arc shaded into com- 
parative oblivion by the ncwh-imiK)rtant fra- 
ternity rushees, who, basking in the limelight. 



28 




thoroutihly enjoy their parts as leading j^layers 
in their own benefit "show." 

To detach one prospectixe fraternitx man 
from the grouj) and follow him during a tyjjical 
"rush" (la\' might indicatev iiik^ course to be 
thus: His caiw^iis jCTNicu'rViu^wnVvitably throw 

)re "brothers, 
^)rt of passive 
aken in the 
»)f the great 
inds the members, 
natation to "the house" 
for a special repast of chicken salad ("a la 
veal") with more ])la\ful banter and pseudo- 
sales-talk. Adjournment to the trophy room 
follows luncheon. Here, fruits of interfrater- 
nity combat are displayed, still "not to in- 
fluence you, but to stand on our merits." 

EA'ening brings a smoker or stag, and the old 
grads return to tell the l)oys what the dear old 
frat "has done for me, and it can do the same 
for \ou." — And the freshman leaves with 
smoke-filled lungs and a head overflowing with 
admiration for the glorious tradition of his 
host, an impression that may lead to his 
pledging. 

"Come into my parlor," then says the frater 
to the frosh, "You may sweep it for me!" 



What's this, water? 





29 



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r ACP2S unfamiliar to undergraduates yet familiar to 
upperclassmen and old grads meant but one thing — 
Homecoming! All roads led to College Park with class- 
mates, fraternity brothers, and sorority sisters on their 
annual trek to Marj'land. 

Activities got under way with the annual frosh-soph 
tug-o-war. The sophomores, again the winners, suc- 
ceeded in staying on their side of Paint Branch. "Zal's" 
open-house at the Grill was the outstanding social event 
of the week-end and the alums resumed their "Hello" 
habit. 

The game with V.M.L was lost but the spirit (s) of the 
occasion took the edge off our disappointment. A notice- 
able increase in the volume of grandstand echoes vouched 
for the presence and enthusiasm of the alumi. They 
didn't need "M" books. 

The half ofifered a gala display of coeds and floats. 



Reserves romp 



Luck\' tackle 




as Frosh float 



before royal pomp 

30 



Tacky luck 





Deflated 
Elated 
Inflated 




Cheerful little earful 



The band did itself proud with its usual perfect drills 
and music. As they played the Maryland songs every- 
one felt that he was home. 

College Avenue was the scene of action following the 
game. The welcome to the grads and WM.I. was cleverly 
portrayed on every sorority and fraternity house. It 
was a toss-up as to which was most gayly and uniquely 
bedecked for the occasion. The strains of music heard 
up and down the Avenue meant tea dances, followed by 
dinners at the "houses." An increased volume of music 
about 9:00 indicated that the dances were under way 
and another good time at Maryland was to be had. To 
the undergraduates this was just another week-end with 
dances down the hill. To the alums it was a renewal of 
college memories — ones that would have to last until 
ne.xt year when they could come home to Maryland 
again. 



31 



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J\ FEW 3'ears ago Georgetown-Maryland rivalry came 
to the fore, and the annual grid game on Hoya-Terp Day 
has rapidly become the major athletic eventof theseason. 

This year preparations began twenty-four hours be- 
fore the start of the game when a crowd gathered at the 
Administration Building for the unveiling of the "Beat 
Georgetown" drum. Until game time the following 
afternoon, the rumblings of the drum echoed unceas- 
ingly over the campus. 

Later in the evening a bonfire rally at Margaret Brent 
Hall caused Maryland blood to run high and reports of 
Georgetown students in the neighborhood sent many 





Post-game battle 
Pre-game prattle 



Gee ! ! ! 



32 




It was great while it lasted 




rushing to the defense of the terrapin and the drum. 
Much to the disappointment of the protectors the in- 
vading band proved to be merely a rumor and the 
expected display of Maryland spirit was momentarily 
postponed. 

Thousands of fans, giving little thought to their im- 
mediate surroundings of umbrellas, raincoats, drooping 
hat brims, and rain-soaked programs saw Maryland 
lead Georgetown for a few glorious minutes. They also 
saw fast plays, a strong defense, Maryland playing its 
best game, and with slightlj* dampened enthusiasm — a 
Georgetown victory. 

Marylanders s[)lashe(l back to their respective tra- 



ternit>- and sorority houses, somewhat drowned, but 
nevertheless braced by the fact that Maryland was still 
leading the series, and the eternal hope that next year 
Hoya-Terp Day would belong e.xclusively to the latter. 

33 




Time marches on 




SITY NIGHT 



Jr ORMING a meaty filling between two slices of basketball and boxing, 
the sixth annual All-University Night program was on the evening of 
February 18 tastefully digested by some five thousand rabid onlookers. 

In the fertile brains of Production Manager Ralph I. Williams and Pro- 
gram Chairman Lt. Col. J. D. Patch was evolved the theme of this year's 
performance, a presentation of each University extra-curricular activity 
in its own seasonal niche. 

Before a large black and gold calendar, uniquely representing the nine 
months of the school year, cavorted the football squad, the cross-country 
team, coed athletes, Pershing Rifles, and the men's and women's rifle 
teams. Following this came the tumbling squad, the lacrosse team, the 
baseball team, the coed dance group, and tennis and track men, all in 
their cnvn monthh' settings. 

An effective portrayal of June Commencement, featuring the combined 
Men's and Women's Glee Clubs, wrote appropriate finis to the eighty- 
minute school year that composed All-University Night's sixth episode. 



34 




Wrong scent 
The boo(sters) 





What will they think of next year.'' 



Feninies and flags 



35 




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BATTALION.Attention!"'— themajor'scom- 
mand splits the air. 

Captains and lieutenants snap to attention 
in one smooth glide, thoughts centered on im- 
pressing the reviewing officer and setting ex- 
amples for their followers. Junior sergeants, 
with like intent, straighten, assume the ]wsi- 
tion of their superior officers. The basic i)oys, 
those who fill the ranks and hope someday to 
fill the shoes of their prest'ut leaders, stiffen, 



36 




eyes straiiilit lorward, i^aziiiL; into notliin;,;ness. 
The basic hoys, those who fill the ranks hut 
who maintain no fondness for the hour of drill, 
sloueh to attention, e>x's mooch' and wander- 
ing. 

-•asiju Ite^iewlA \ \ \ '^ \ 

jlonel's com- 
"Column of 
Company, 
ieutenants 
his unit as his turn 
..eep It snappy," each pounds into 
his own head. Junior sergeants study each 
movement, their thoughts ahead a year, to a 
time when they will assume command. The 
cadet who cares steps out heartih", hastening 
to obey. The cadet who cares not steps out 
begrudgingly, following where others lead. 
"Column Left!" 

Around the muddy turn passes each unit. 
Captains and lieutenants maintain their gaits. 
"Keep it snappy," — the words repeat them- 
selves. Junior sergeants and the faithful con- 
tinue; "What's a little mud to army men?" 
is their mental comment. "Mud, confound it," 
grumble the disdainful. 

"Column of Platoons, Leading Platoon, 
Squads Left!" 



The last laj) .starts, the review laj)! Officers, 
junior .sergeants, and the men who care become 
tense. "Keej) it snappy," the words shriek 
out — and for the first time penetrate the brains 
of the men who care not. "For the regim(>nt's 
sake, keep it snappy." 

"Eyes Right!" 

The regiment passes in perfect accord. 



W. 




37 




The hunt iirogresses 




Just a Httle snack, no trouble at all 



1 HIS is the story hack of it all. A sororit\ must have 
new pledges to carry on — to get new pledges there must 
be rushing — and to keep rushing within the limits of 
propriety there must be a Panhellenic Council. This 
year Panhel introduced, for the first time on the Mary- 
hnul campus, deferred rushing. 

After months of considering girls and watching their 
activities on the campus, the Sunday arrived for the open 
house tea. It was the new girls' chance to visit every 
sororitx' house, look and \)v looked o\'er. Imitations to 
teas and dinners were issued to the girls at this tea. 

Following the tea was a hue and cry for nickels. Get 
that girl for dinner before someone else gets her. 

Time marched on with a tea, dinner and meeting each 
da\- of the week. From 4:30 to 7:30 ever\l)()d\,- looked 
|)rett>- and i)ut on that |)laster of Paris smik'. From 



38 



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7 :v^() on — tlu' rushers talked the situation oxer and the 
sorority iiirls hushed it o\er. 

The campus youth played their little part on Satur- 
day night. Dates were needed for the ten girls which 
each sorority had as its guests for the week-end. 

The Preference Tea on Sunday gave everyone her last 
chance to make an impression or be impressed. The 
extinguishing of the midnight oil on Sunday marked the 
sororities' decisions as to who should receixe bids. Mon- 
day was a silent period and the new girls had time to 
think the matter over quietly. 

Tuesday, the scene of action shifted to the Dean of 
Women's office. The pledges, wearing white, filed down 
the hill to bufTet suppers at their houses. Nine o'clock 
found them sporting pledge l)uttons. 




(ietting ready lor ilu- kill 

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IME at Maryland marches on in its own inimitalile 
fashion, independent of the outside world. 

The rising bell sounds at 7 :00 and the wake-ye-up 
hell at 8:20. The dormitory clocks hold precedence over 
both Naval Observatory and Grill time. 

The Saturday of the first football game is a red letter 
day. It is the first day of fall (clothes). It is the day to 
get a grandstand view of who goes with whom. October, 
the time for hour exams, marks the organization of the 
Dean's Team. The batting average is high. 





Sloogents 
Two bit.s 



Extra-curricular 



40 



The baiiiu'il 




To classes 




loping 



lagging 



The social season opens with the first Rossbourg and 
a date for this is the heighth of every girl's ambition and 
the test of every boy's purse. Christmas is in the air 
after Thanksgiving and dances, basketball, and still 
more hour exams pass in rapid succession. 

The new year begins after exams when "I know I can 
do better if I try. I'm not dumb." Mid-semester va- 
cation is granted to those students who need tf) sleep off 
exams and the Junior Prom. 

Spring is in the air wlien it's warm enough to walk 
hand in hand tcj the Dair\' and drill. Spring is here 



when it's warm enough to sit on the grass and the col- 
lege wall. 

June — exams are over — the marks aren't known, .so 
everybody's happy. 



41 




JNIO individual is better qualified to rep- 
resent the progressive spirit of Maryland 
University than President Harry C. Byrd. 
His meteoric rise has paralleled and com- 
plemented the spectacular growth of the 
University. Possessing an inspiring per- 
sonality and an energetic administrative 
ability, "Curley" has won the loyalty of 
the entire student body. Few college 
presidents combine such a broad attitude 
toward the undergraduate viewpoint with 
so estimable a record of educational 
achievement. Ever advancing the best 
interest of the Universit}', Dr. Byrd well 
illustrates the maxim that the foundation 
of intelligent education is sound admini- 
stration. 



42 



BOARD OF REGENTS 



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ACK of every university is a gov- 
erning board which directs the vital 
administrative policies. The Board of 
Regents acts as such at the University 
of Maryland. Its nine members form 
committees that determine the general 
policies under which it shall operate and 
establish all positions and fixes salaries 
thereof. The committees act on meas- 
ures concerning the Budget, Endow- 
ment, Scholarship and Fees, Research, 
Extension and Regulations, and other 
related matters. 




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\V. \V. Skinner 

Chairman 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr. 

W. Calvin Chesnut 



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Mrs. J. L. Whitehurst 

Secretary 

John E. Raine 

Harrv H. .Xuttle 



J. Milton Patterson 

Treasurer 

William P. Cole, Jr. 

John E. Semmes 



W ITH the development of a well-rounded 
character as his watchword instead of the mere 
attempt at high scholastic attainments. Dr. 
Thomas H. Taliaferro for years has rendered 
valuable service to both the University and 
the student bod\'. 

In 1907 Dr. Taliaferro first became aftiliated 
with the University as Professor of Civil En- 
gineering. Successi\ely appointed Dean of 
the Colleges of Engineering and Arts and 
Sciences, he was selected last year to fill tlic 
newly created position of Dean of Facult>'. 




44 








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OnL\' twice in his career has Dean of Men 
r.ear>- Kppley left the University of Maryland, 
once in 1917, when he interrupted his under- 
graduate pursuit as track and grid star and 
newspai)er business manager to answer the 
urgent call to arms, and again after graduation 
to accept a position with the Veterans' Bureau. 
Following the latter venture he returned as 
assistant agronomist, rose to chief agronomist, 
and ultimately ascended to his present position. 
Inherent remain his love of athletics and 
agronomy exemplified hy his enthusiastic 
horsemanship and ardent floral cultivation. 




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Ok.AN of Women at the University of Mary- 
land since 1922. Miss Adele Stamp has devoted 
her time to their cultural and educational ad- 
\ancement. Her broad vision and tireless in- 
dustry have made possible the laying of a 
l)ermanent foundation for coeducation at 
Mar\land. A sense of humor, in\alualile in 
her profession, and her understanding of the 
\()unger generation makes her well liked by 
both boys and girls. To all with whom siie 
comes in contact she stands forth as an out- 
standing exponent of fine collegiate woman- 
hood. 



45 




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Dr. LE\'IX B. BROUGHTON, occupying 
his relatively new position as Dean of Arts and 
Sciences, has won the confidence of his students. 
Through the strain of registration, the hesitant 
visits of the recipients of the well-known 
"dean's slips," and the unraveling of adminis- 
trative problems, his patience has never failed. 
Students are always welcome in Dr. Brough- 
ton's office, and therein lies, perhaps, his suc- 
cess as an educator. Dean Broughton's out- 
look is one of progress as exemplified by his 
assistance in developing new curricula and in- 
creasing the faculty staff. 




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In three short years. Dean S. Sidney Stein- 
berg has guided his college to a fully accred- 
ited academic rating for the first time in its 
fifty years' history. 

A believer in student-faculty coordination, 
he has inaugurated an open door policy and 
founded an Engineering Student Council with 
that end in mind. Himself a prominent en- 
gineer, his presentation of outstanding prac- 
titioners whom undergraduates might hear 
has brought the practical side of engineering 
to supplement the theoretical. 





46 



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Dr. THOMAS B. SVMONS, in the rompar- 
ativeh' brief time since his a])pointnient as 
Acting Dean of the College of Agriculture, has 
largely directed his efiforts toward the co- 
ordination of the work of the numerous de- 
partments in the college. Dr. Symons, in 
addition to his new responsibility, has in no 
way neglected the Extension wService of which 
he has been director since its inception in 1914, 
and which is now considered one of the out- 
standing organizations of its kind in the 
country. 



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Miss M. MARIE MOUNT, Dean of the 
College of Home Economics, has worked un- 
tiringly in liehalf of the interest of her college. 
Through her efforts new departments hav^e 
been instituted and old ones improved with the 
result that any student enrolling in this college 
is exposed to the best that modern knowledge 
affords in an old but tried science — -Home 
Economics. Dean Mount and her school are 
progressive, so progressive, in tact, that a few ot 
the stronger sex have ventured into her courses 
from time to time. 



47 



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Internationally known as an econ- 
omist and educator, Dr. \V. Mackenzie Stevens 
has offered services of immeasurable value in 
one of the recent developments of an expand- 
ing LIniversity — creation of the College of 
Commerce. As Dean of the new college, his 
administrative ability, foresight, and powers 
of organization, have all come to the fore. He 
and his staff are meeting a long-felt educational 
need for a well-established commercial cur- 
riculum. To Dr. Stevens go the respect and 
good will of the entire student body with sin- 
cere wishes for continued success. 




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WiLLARD S. SMALL became Dean of the 
C\jllege of Education in January, 1923, and has 
ser\'ed both in that capacity and as Director 
of Summer School at Maryland since that 
date. What leisure time he has is spent in 
reading biographies and current events, or in 
playing golt. He appreciates good music and 
hopes some day to see a substantial expansion 
in the present nui^jic department of the Uni- 
versity. Dean Small's chief interest, however, 
is in the training of future teachers to raise the 
standards of secondary education. 




48 




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rST t\vent\- years ago the Graduate School 
came into being at the l^niversity with Dr. (". 
O. Appleman as its newly appointed Dean. 
Under his leadership and guidance, the Grad- 
uate School has expanded from five to twenty- 
one departments. Last year the enrollment 
was 589, in comparison with \3 the first year of 
its existence. It is a tribute to Dean Apple- 
man's abilit\- and the splendid cooperation of 
the graduate faculty that with this increase in 
numbers there have also been maintained con- 
sistenth- high standards of graduate work and 
requirements for higher degrees. 



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GRADUATE 
SCHOOL 
COUNCIL 



Second row: Hale, Brough- 
ton, Patterson. First row: 
Cotterman, James, Howard, 
Appleman, Mead. 




VJREATL^' responsible for the steady growth of the Grad- 
uate School since its founding some twenty years ago is the 
Graduate School Council, an administrative body appointed 
to assist the dean in the governing of the school's affairs. 
Routine duties include approxing graduate schedules and 
considering applications for graduate degrees. In addition, 
the Council has been unceasing in its efforts to promote a 
spirit of in(li\idual research and to i)ro\ide specialization 
not possible in undergraduate schools. 



49 



STUDENT LIFE 
COMMITTEE |' 




1 HE Student Life Committee is an advisory body, 
interested in furnishing counsel to students on any prob- 
lems other than of an academic nature. 

Among services rendered are recognition of all desira- 
ble campus student organizations, annual inspection of 
dormitories, fraternity and sorority houses and ofY-cam- 
pus eating establishments (through a subsidiary Health 
Committee), and maintaining of a registration bureau 
for students who desire part-time employment. 



Patch, Mackert, Eppley 
Williams, Pollock, Harnian, Ide, Faber, Eichlin 



PUBLICATIONS 
BOARD 




OERVINC in an advisory and supervisory capacity, 
the Publications Advisory Board is the guiding light for 
student journalists. Whatever type problem may arise, 
whether of an editorial or business nature, the faculty 
members of the committee stand ready to lend a steady- 
ing arm or exercise a restraining hand. With such su])- 
port the Diamondback, Terrapin, Old Line, and "M" 
Book have continued to l)e accurate and inii)ressive 
student pulilications. 



Carrington, Allison. Williams, Hannan 



50 




ATHLETIC 
BOARD 



Cory, Eppley, Chairman, Supplee, Kemp, Ri( 
Pollock, Executive Secretary. 



hardsun, 



1 HE Athletic Board, appointed by the president of 
the University, is directly responsible to him for projjer- 
ly administering athletics, formulating policies for rela- 
tions with collegiate rivals, arranging team schedules, and 
supervising athletic equipment and finances in general. 
The board is exceptional!}' well qualified to handle its 
duties since four of its number participated in inter- 
collegiate athletics as undergraduates at the University, 
while the fifth. Professor Richardson, is a veteran of 
thirty-five years' membership. 




RELIGIOUS 

LIFE 

COMMITTEE 



Wittier, Eppley, McKarlanil, \\ hite, (Juigley. 



FOR its effective work in stimulating religious interest 
among the students, the Religious Life Committee 
with its popular new chairman. Dr. C. J. Whittler, 
deserves credit. 

The Committee lost an invaluable director with the 
death of Dr. Theodore B. Manny. However, it has 
carried out successfully his plan for Evensongs, wherel)y 
students are given the opportunity to hear prominent 
speakers from \arious denominational groups and dis- 
cuss with them current religious prolilems. 



51 




ji^j^ " **£ c ' 



/\FTER four eventful years, few prospec- 
tive graduates can boast a record compar- 
able to that of Jim Pitzer, twice president 
of the Class of 1939. Friendly and affable, 
he refutes the ancient maxim that campus 
politicians are scholastically obscure, for 
Jim has peeped into the booksof ten enough, 
between cajjable performances of his pres- 
idential duties, to maintain a 3.5 average. 
Active ODK and Alpha Chi Sigma and an 
able football and lacrosse player, Pre.xy 
Pitzer is the ideal exemi^lification of the 
1939 graduate. 



52 




n 



v_/ 




v-y 



n 



— I 

_ L 



Ralph Aarons, Baltimore; B.S.; Arts and Sciences; Fencing 1 ; AE . . . Kathryn Abbott, District 
Heights; B.S.; Home Economics; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Riding Club 2, 4; Swimming 
Club 1, 2; W.A.A. 1, 2; YAV.C.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; President of Omicron Nu; AZA; ON . . . Clifton L. 
Adams, Silver Spring; B.S. ; Education; Radio Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4 . . . Robert W. 
Adams, San Diego, Cal.; Transfer from New Mexico State College; B.A.; Commerce; TKE . . . 
Kathryn Adkins, Salisbury; B.S.; Home Economics; W.A.A. 1,2; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Vice-President of AZA; AZA; ON . . . Benjamin B. Alperstein, Baltimore; B.A.; Education; 
Boxing 1, 2, 3, 4; Wrestling 1 ; TE* . . . Virginia Amadon, Washington, D.C.; B.S. ; Home Eco- 
nomics; Glee Club 3, 4; Footlight Club 4; AAA . . . Anne Fitzhugh Anders, Frederick; B.A.; 
Education; Swimming Club 1 ; Y.W.C.A. 1,2; Old Line 3. 4; Women's League 2, 4, \'ice-President 
4; Vice-President of Delta Delta Delta; AAA . . Harry D. Anspon, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; 
Arts and Sciences; Band; Orchestra; Episcopal Club; AXS . . . E. Rumsey Anthony, Jr., Chester- 
town; B.S.; Arts and Sciences; German Club 2 . . . Bernice Carmen Aring, Baltimore; B.A.; 
Arts and Sciences; Women's Chorus 1, 2; Terrapin 2, 3; Opera Club 1,2; Women's League 3; 
Sorority Vice-President 4; KKT . . . Virginia Armiger, Pindell; B.A.; Education; W.A.A. 1, 4; 
Riding Club 2, 4; Y.W.C.A. 4; International Relations Club 4 . . .Van S. Ashmun, Chattanooga, 
Tenn.; B.S.; Engineering; A.S.C.E.; Men's League; OX . . . Charles C. Astle, Rising Sun; B.S.; 
Agriculture; Student Grange 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 4; F.F.A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Li\e- 
stockClub 1, 2, 3, 4; Fraternity .Secretary 4; ATP . . . William E. Aud, Poolesville; B.A.; Arts and 
Sciences . . . Mary Lee Aylesworth, Buckhannon, W.\'a.; B.S.; Home Economics; Methodist 
Club; Y.W.C.A.; Home Economics Club; ON . . . John A. Baden, Landover; B.S.; Agriculture; 
F.F.A. . . . Donald E. Bailey, Takoma Park; B.A.; Education; Student Band 3, 4; University 
Orchestra 4; Swimming Club 3, 4 . . . Douglas A. Bailey, Jr., Takoma Park; B.A.; Education; 
Student Band 3, 4; LTniversity Orchestra 4; Swimming Club 3, 4; . . . Betty Burdette Bain, 
Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Home Economics; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Home Economics Club 3, 4; Baptist 
Student Union 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Daydodgers Club 1, 2; Calvert Debate Club 3, 4; AAA; ON . . . 
Alva S. Baker, Catonsville; B.S. ; Agriculture; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Lacrosse 1; Dairy Club 2, 3; ATP 
. . . Helen G. Balderston, Colora; B.S.; Home Economics; W.A.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Hockey 3, 4; In- 
ternational Relations Club 3, 4; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Danforth Fellowship 3 . . . 
Charles Blum Balmer, Lyndhurst, N.J.; B.S. ; Arts and Sciences; Pershing Rifles 1, 2; Inter- 
national Relations Club 3, 4; Newman Club 3, 4 . . . Elizabeth Clark Barber, Gaithersburg; 
B.A. ; Arts and Sciences; Opera Club 3, 4; Women's Chorus 3, 4, Secretary 4; Terrapin Copy Editor 
3, 4; Presbyterian Club 4; .Sorority Treasurer; KA . . . Betty Barker, Washington, D.C.; B.A. 
Education; KKF . . . John C. Barto, Queen Anne; B.S.; Education . . . Donald G. Bartoo 
Hyattsville; B.S.; Engineering; A.S.C.E.; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Jane Beals, Washington, D.C. 
B.S.; Home Economics; KAi; . . . John H. Beers, Washington, D.C; B.A.; Arts and Sciences 
Track 1, 2; Interfraternily Touncil; Football 2; UN . . . Robert Paul Benbow, Sparrows Point 
B..S.; Gjnini/r(V;^lAiY VeAgue 3, Vice-President 3; Business Manager Terrapin 3; Football 1 




54 



Aarons 
Abbott 
Adams, C. L. 
Adams, R. W. 
Adkins 



Alperstein 
Amadon 
Anders 
Anspon 
Anthon\ 



Aring 
Armiger 
Ashmun 
Astle 
Aud 



Aylesworth 
Baden 
Bailey, D. E. 
Bailey, D. A. 
Bain 



Baker 

Balderston 
Balnier 
Barber 
Barker 



Barto 
Bartoo 
Beals 
Beers 
Bcnbow 













JO 



Fred Thomas Bishopp, Silver Spring; B.S.; Arts and Sciences; Scabbard and Blade; SN . . . 
Shirley Biskin, Takoma Park; B.A.; Education; International Relations Club; German Club; 
Swimming Club ; Riding Club ; Daydodgers Club ; <J>i:i; . . . Georgia Blalock, Jonesboro, C,a. ; B.A. ; 
Arts and Sciences; Y.W.C.A.; Methodist Club; Women's Chorus; Terrapin; KA . . . Mary Hedda 
BohHn, \\'ashington, D.C.; B.S.; Education; Rifle 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 3; Women's League 3, 4; 
Old Line 2, 3, 4; ^^W.C.A. 1, 2, 3; \\'.A.A.; Junior Prom Committee; Women's Chorus 2, 3; 
Opera Club 2, 3, 4; AAA . . . Matilda Boose, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Education; Y.W.C.A. 
1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, President 4; Rifle 1, 2, 3, 4; Lutheran Club 1 ; Diamondback 1 ; W.A.A. 1 ; 
Class Historian 2; Class Secretary 4; Home Economics Club 3; Executive Council 4; Vice-Presi- 
dent of Sorority; AOII . . . Ralph Borlik, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Arts and Sciences; Intramural 
Softball 2 . . . Audrey M. Bosley, Baltimore; B.S. ; Home Economics; Y.W.C.A. 1; Riding Club 
1,2; Lutheran Club 2. 3. 4, Treasurer 3; International Relations Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; AOII . . . 
Thelma Penn Bowling, Eaulkner; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; Methodist Clulj; 'S'.W.C.A . . . 
Virginia Pearle Bowling, Wicomico; B.S.; Education; Y.W.C.A. 2, 4; Home Ecf)nomics Club 
3, 4; Camera Club 3, 4; Swimming Club 2; B.S.U. 3, 4 . . . Anna Kathryn Bowman, Annapolis 
Junction; B.A.; Education; B.S.U. 4; Da>'dodgers Club 1, 2, 3; President of Alpha Lambda 
Delta 2; AAA; AAA . . . Ernestine C. Bowyer, Washington, D.C.; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; 
Terrapin 2; Diamondback 1 ; Daydodgers Club 1, 2, Vice-President 2; AAA . . . Robert J. Bradley, 
Hyattsville; B.S.; Commerce; Glee Club 3, 4; Orchestra 3; Boxing 1, 2, 3, 4; Calvert Debate 
Club 2, 3, Manager 3; Track 1, 2, 3; "I'SK; BA>1' . . . Mary Louise Brinckerhoff, Lansdowne, 
Pa.; B.S.; Agriculture; Junior Prom Committee; Old Line 2; Terrapin 2; Riding Club; KKT; ^\0 
. . . Allan Harvey Brown, University Park; B.S.; Agriculture; Calvert Debate Club; AZ . . . 
James Brownell, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Agriculture; Golf 1, 2, 3, 4; Livestock Judging Team 
3, 4; Livestock Club 1, 2, 3, 4; ATP; AZ . . . Lawrence A. Bruns, Relay; B.S.; Agriculture; S.\0 
. . . Joseph Burk, Waterloo, Iowa; B.A.; Arts and -Sciences; Rossbourg Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 
3, President 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; International Relations Club 3, 4; Football 1, 2; KA . . . 
Myrtle Burke, McCoole; B.A.; Education . . . James H. Burnet, Charlottesville, Va.; B.S.; 
Agriculture; Rossbourg Club 2, 3 ... G. Ellsworth Byers, Lonaconing; B.S.; Education . . . 
Evelyn Westover Byrd, College Park; B.S.; Home Economics; W.A.A. 1, 2, 3; Y.W.C.A. 2, 3, 4; 
Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Daydodgers Club 2, 3; Panhel 3; Riding Club 1; 
AOri; ON . . . Harriet Goslee Cain, Felton, Del.; B.S.; Home Economics; Y.W.C.A.; Home Eco- 
nomics Club; AAA . . . Gordon H. Campbell, Chevy Chase; B.S.; Arts and Sciences . . . Robert 
Powell Cannon, Salisbury; B.A. ; Arts and Sciences; Wrestling 3, 4; Cheer Leader 4; International 
Relations Club 4; ^AB . . . Thomas J. Capossela, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Commerce; Scabbard 
and Blade; President of Beta Alpha Psi; KA; HAT . . . Harold Browne Carleton, Washington, 
DC; B.A.; Arts and Sciences . . . Mary Katherine Carson, (lievy Chase; B.A.; Arts and 
Sciences; KKT . . . CharJesiG. Cary, Riverdale; B.S. ; Arts and Sciences . . . James A. Chap- 
pelearj^., ^(T?\sl\ng|[<\n^)Y".; B.S.; Engineering; A.S.M.PZ . . . Irene R. Checket, Baltimore; 

^mera Club 2; International Relations Club 3; \'ice-President of 
4; AX . . . 




56 



Bishopp 
Biskin 
Blalock- 

Hohliii 
Boose 



Borlik 

I?osley 
Bowling, T. V. 
Bowling, \'. P. 
Bowman 



Bowyer 
Bradley 

Brinckerhoff 
Brown 
Brownell 



Bruns 
Hurk 
Burke 
Burnet 
Byers 



Byrd 
Cain 

Campbell 
Cannon 

Capossela 



Carleton 
Carson 
Cary 

Chappelear 
Checket 




57 



Elizabeth Summers Clopper, Elkridge; B.A.; Education; V.W.C.A. 4; Daydodgers 3, 4; KA^ 
. . . Carolyn Clugston, University Park; B A.; Arts and Sciences; Calvert Debate Club 2, 3; 
Diamondback 2, 3; Riding Club 2, 3; Old Line 4; Swimming Club 3; YAV.C.A. 2; KKT . . . 
Charlotte Frances Cohen, East Orange, N.J.; B.S.; Agriculture; Swimming 1, 2, 4, Diamond- 
back \, 2.\^;:£M) . . . Harry Cohen, Baltimore; B.S ; Arts and Sciences . . . Roberta E. Collins, 
Ri\erdale; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; Daydodgers 1,2; Terrapin 2; Swimming Club 2; YAV.C.A. 
3, 4, Riding Club 4; KKP . . . Maurice E. Corbin, Baltimore; B.S.- Engineering; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Swimming Club 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; A.I.E.E. 3, 4; Baseball 1; Fraternity President; ATQ 
. . . EUner A. Cornnell, Cottage City; B.A.; Commerce . . . Julian C. Crane, College Heights; 
B.S; Agriculture; Pershing Rifles 1, 2; Swimming Club 2; Fruit Judging Team 4 . . . L. Eleanor 
Crocker, Baltimore; B.S. ; Commerce; Women's Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4; Opera Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Methodist 
Club 3, 4; Rifle 4; Sorority Treasurer; AA . . . Frank Harford Cronin, Joppa; B.S.; Education; 
Executive Council 1 ; Men's League 2, 3, 4; Football 4; Boxing 4; Track I, 2, 3, 4; Scabbard and 
Blade; OAK . . . Mary Elizabeth Cronin, Aberdeen; B.S.; Arts and Sciences; Y.W.C.A. 3; 
Women's Chorus 3, 4; Opera Club 3; AAA . . . Henry P. Dantzig, Hyattsville; B.A.; Arts and 
Sciences; Riding Club . . . Oscar M. Davidson, Baltimore; B.S.; Commerce; SAM . . . Barbara 
Jean Davis, Chevy Chase; B.S. ; Home Economics; W'omen's Chorus \; Riding Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Y.W.C.A. 2, 4; Old Line 4; Junior Prom Committee; KKF . . William B. Davis, Jr., Wash- 
ington, D.C.; B.S.; Engineering; Scabbard and Blade, Vice-President; A.S.C.E.; Engineering 
Student Council 4; Track 1,2; TBO . . . Doris Elizabeth DeAlba, C.len Burnie; B.S. ; Home 
Economics; Panhel 4, President; Executive Council 4; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; .Swimming 
Club L 2; W.A.A. 3, 4; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Sorority President; ASA . . . Jose 1. Gravede Peralta, 
Camaguey, Cuba; B.S.; Arts and Sciences; Newman Club 3; Swimming Club 2; Extramural 
Swimming 2; Fencing 2; Boxing 3, 4; AS'I> . . . Francis X. Dippel, Baltimore; B.S.; Arts and 
Sciences; Newman Club; Interfraternity Council; Fraternity President; K.\ . . . Maurice R. 
Domenici, Hagerstown ; B.S. ; Arts and Sciences; Newman Club 3, 4 . . . Doris M. Dunnington, 
Che\\- Cha.se; B.S.; Home Economics; Home Economics Club; Terrapin; Y.W.C.A.; Lutheran 
Club; Daydodgers Club; KA . . . Roscoe D. Dwiggins, College Park; B.S. ; Arts and Sciences; 
Baptist Student LTnion; Daydodgers Club . . . Clarence A. Eck, Overlea; B.S.; Agriculture; 
Livestock Club 2, 3; Student Grange 2, 3; Swimming Club 2 , ATI' . . . Robert Edlavitch, Hyatts- 
ville; B.S.; Commerce; Calvert Debate Club 2, 3, 4; SAM . . . Doris Ebert Eichlin, Washington, 
D.C.; B.A.; Education; Daydodgers Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3; Women's League; Mortar Board, 
Treasurer; AAA . . . George H. P. Eierman, Baltimore; B.S.; Commerce; Diamondback, Business 
Manager; Old Line I, 2, 3, Junior Editor 3; Men's League 3; Varsity Debating Team 1,2; Calvert 
Debate Club; Swimming 2; Track 1; Band 1, 2; Cheer Leader 2, 3, 4, Head Cheer Leader 3; 
OAK; nx^V; UAE; <I>K'I> . . . Elies Elvove, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Engineering; A.I.E.E.; Frater- 

H. Alfred Essex, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Engineering; Scabbard 

, 2, 3, THIl . . . Irving J. Etkind, New Haven, Conn.; B.S.; En- 

TE<I> . . . Lydia M. Evans, Washington, D.C.; B.A.; Arts and 

ar Board; KKF; A.\A . . . Lawrence S. Faith, Hancock; B.S.; 



nity .Secretary 2 ; Tlvl 




58 



Clopper 
Clugston 
Cohen, C. F. 
Cohen, II. 
Collins 



Corbin 
Cornnell 



f>^f^ 



Crane 
Crocker 

Cronin. F. H. 



Cronin, M. E. 
Dantzig 
Davidson 



Davis, B. J. 
Davis, W. B. 



DeAlba 
de Peralta 
Dippel 
Domenici 
Dunnington 



Dwiggins 
Eck 

Edlaxitch 
Eichlin 
Eierman 



Elvove 
Essex 



Etkind 
Evans 
Faith 




59 



Rita Virginia Faul, Washington, D.C.; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; Old Line 1,2; Terrapin 3; 
Y.W.C.A. 3; Spanish Club 2, 3; Stage Crew 4, Panhel 4; KA . . . E. Wayne Fitzwater, Swanton; 
B.S.; Agriculture; P.P. A.; Student Grange; Livestock Club; Interfraternity Council; Swimming 
Club; ATP . . . James L. Forrester, Berwyn; B.S.; Engineering; Pootball 1, 2, 3, 4; Lacrosse 3; 
Swimming Club 2, 3, 4; A.S.C.E. 4 . . . Florence W. Fowble, Reisterstown ; B.S.; Education; 
Episcopal Club 1, 2, 3, 4; YAV.C.A.; Swimming Club; AA . . . Harold H. Franke, Washington, 
D.C.; B.S.; Engineering: C.lee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Opera Club \, 2; Preshman Rifle Team; A.S.C.E.; 
TI?n . . . Gordon Freas, Wheaton; B.S. ; Education . . . John G. Freudenberger, Baltimore; 
B.S.; Education; Pershing Rifles 1,2, Scabbard and Blade 4; Diamondback 1, 2, Associate Sports 
Editor 3, Sports Editor 4; Terrapin 2, 3; Sports Editor "M" Book 2; Junior Prom Committee; 
*i:K; nAE . . . Louis Mohler Frey, Mt. Rainier; B.S.; Commerce; Intramurals . . . Paul M. 
Galbreath, Street; B.S.; Agriculture; Pootball 1; Livestock Club 1, 2; Agriculture Economics 
Club 3, 4, President; ATP; .\Z . . . Mary-Louise Ganzert, Washington, D.C.; B.S. ; Commerce; 
W.A.A.; Manager Girls' Rifle Team; Daydodgers Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Y.W.C.A. 1, 4; 
Panhel; President of Sorority; KAS . . . Virginia Gaston, Buckhannon, W.Va.; B.S.; Home 
Economics; Y.W.C.A.; Methodist Club; Home Economics Club . . . Benton R. Gatch, Jr., 
Baltimore; B.A.; Agriculture; Cheer Leader 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Mary Edith George, Mt. Rainier; B.S.; 
Home Economics . . . Alvin B. Goldberg, Brooklyn, N.Y.; B.S. ; Arts and Sciences; Debate 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Men's Manager 2, President 3; Footlight Club 2, 3, 4, Stage Manager and Vice- 
President 4; Co-Manager Bo.xing Team 4; Opera Club 2; Terrapin 2; Latch Key Society; TE*; 
ATo . . . Leon Goldman, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Arts and Sciences; Rossbourg Club . . . E. 
Marvel Gordy, Snow Hill; B.S.; Education; Glee Club . . . Robert Gottlieb, Washington, D.C.; 
B.S.; Engineering; Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Opera Club 2, 3, 4; A.S.M.E. 3, 4; Golf Team 1, 2;TBn . . . 
Arthur Greenfield, Vonkers, N.Y.; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; Diamondback 3, 4; Pootlight 
Club 2, Treasurer 3, 4; Glee Club 3; International Relations Club;TA<l>; AI'Q . . . Ann M. Griffith, 
Rockville; B.S.; Education; Home Economics Club 3, 4; Methodist Club 3, 4; Y.W.C.A. 3, 4; 
Terrapin 4; Women's League 3, 4; International Relations Club 4 . . . Jane Hartje Grindel, 
Frostburg; B.A.; Education . . . Esther B. Gross, Sharpsburg, B.S.; Home Economics; Lutheran 
Club 3, 4; Chorus 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Home P.conomics Club 4; Women's League 4; President 
of Dormitory B; KA . . . Ewing L. Gupton, Jr., Berwyn Heights; B.A.; Agriculture; (^dxert 
Debate 1 ; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Terrapin Swimming Club 3, 4; i:tl>^ . . . Mary Anne Guyther, 
Mechanicsville; B.A.; Education; Newman Club 3, 4; AAA . . . Herbert P. Hall, Washington, 
D.C.; B.S.; Engineering, i;4>i: . . . Norma Irene Hall, College Park; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; 
Glee Club; Riding Club . . . Elizabeth W. Hamilton, L'niversity Park; B.S.; Education . . . 
Sylvia Handler, Kingston, N.V.; B..A.; Arts and Sciences; International Relations Club 3, 4; 
.S()rorit>- .Secretary 3, 4, .\S . . . Marie Hardesty, Newburg; B.S.; Education; Swimming Club 
2, 3; Newman CliitiJ, ^,\3, \: Daydodgers Club 2, 3; Home Economics Club 3, 4; AA . . . Jerome 

.; Commerce; Footlight Club 1, 2, 3; Old Line 1, 2, 3; Editor 4; 

lub 1, 2; E.xecutive Council 4; Treasurer junior Class; President 
'I'AW; OAK; HA»I' . . . Elma Sandra Harris, Washington, D.C.; 




60 



Paul 

Fitzwater 
Forrester 
Fowble 
I'' r. Hike 



Frcas 

Frcudenberger 
Frcy 

C.albreath 
Ganzert 



Gaston 
Gatch 
George 
Goldberg 

Goldman 



Gordy 
Gottlieb 
Greenfield 
Griffith 
Grindel 



Gross 
Gupton 
Guyther 
Hall, H. P. 
Hall, N. I. 



Hamilton 
Handler 
Hardesty 
Hardy 
Harris 

















61 



George J. Harris, Lonaconing; B.S.; Agriculture . . . Doris Ruth Harrison, Baltimore; B.A.; 
Education . . . Margaret F. Hart, Baltimore; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; Swimming Club 3, 4, 
Secretary 4; VAV.C.A.; AOn . . . Jean Marie Hartig, Washington D.C.; B.S.; Home Economics; 
Opera Club 3. 4; VAV.C.A. 3, 4; Newman Club 3, 4; Women's Chorus 3, 4; AAA . . . Cecil L. 
Harvey, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Engineering; Scabbard and Blade 3, 4; A.I.E.E. 3, 4; Radio 
Society 4; Swimming Club 4 . . . Adrienne M. Henderson, Chevy Chase; B.A.; Arts and 
Sciences; Terrapin 2 ; Swimming Club 4 . . . Frances L. Henry, Washington, D.C. ; B.S. ; Arts and 
Sciences; Old Line 1; Daydodgers Club 1, 2, 3, 4; German Club 4; \.W.C.A. 4 . . . Edward W. 
Hepburn, Worton; B.S.; Agriculture; Terrapin Trail Club, President 3, 4; AXA; AZ . . . Elmer 
Heubeck, Curtis Bay; B.S.; Agriculture; Livestock Cluli 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3; Livestock Judging 
Team 2, 3, 4; Interfraternity Council; ATP . . . Millie Locke Hill, Silver Spring; B.S.; Home Eco- 
nomics . . . Albert Hirsch, Frederick; B.S.; Arts and Sciences; Band 1,2; International Relations 
Club 3 . . . Charles C. Holbrook, College Park; B.S.; Engineering; A.S.C.E^.; Pershing Rifles; 
Episcopal Club; Swimming Club; Track; s;x . . . Mary Elizabeth Holt, Washington, D.C; 
B.A.; Arts and Sciences; KA . . . Alvin H. Honigman, Baltimore; B.S.; Arts and Sciences; 
Swimming Club; International Relations Club; TAU . . . Lawrence G. Hoover, H, Takoma Park; 
B.A.; Arts and Sciences; Diamondback 1, 2, 3, 4, News Editor 2, Sports Editor 3, Editor-in-Chief 
4; "M" Book 2, 3, Sports Editor 2, Editor-in-Chief 3; Old Line 1, 2; Men's League 1, 2; Footlight 
Club 3, 4; Executive Council 4; Terrapin 2, 3; IIAE . . . John F. Home, Chevy Chase; B.S.; 
Engineering; A.I.E.E.; 0X . . . William F. Hortman, Jr., Washington, D.C; B.A.; Commerce; 
Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Rifle 1 .. . William Franklin Howard, Baltimore; B.S.; Education; Scabbard 
and Blade 3, 4; Track 2, 3, 4; Men's League t, 2; Vice-President of Class 4; Baseball 2; KA . . . 
Nora Louise Huber, Baltimore; B.A.; Education; Women's Chorus 1, 2; Opera Club 1, 2; 
Women's League 2; Terrapin 1, 2, 3, Women's Editor 3; Calvert Debate Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; 
Panhel 4; President of Sorority; KKF . . . Dorothy Ashley Huff, Chevy Chase; B.S.; Home 
Economics; Home Economics Club 1, 2; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Swimming 
Club 3; Panhel Secretary; President of Sorority; AAA . . . Frances E. Hunter, Chevy Chase; 
B.S.; Arts and Sciences; KKT . . . Evelyn L. lager, Washington, D.C; B.S.; Home Economics; 
Y.W.C.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Riding Club 1; Episcopal Club 1, 2, 4; Terrapin 3, 4; Home Economics Club; 
KA . . . Helen L. lager, Hyattsville; B.S.; Education; Riding Club 1; Daydodgers Club 1,2... 
Henry W. Janes, Anacostia, D.C; B.S. ; Engineering; Swimming Club 2, 3, 4 . . . William E. 
Jarrell, Ridgely; B.S.; Agriculture; Livestock Club 3, 4; AFP . . . Geraldine V. Jett, Chevy 
Chase; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; International Relations Club; V.W.C.A.; AOII . . Clifford E. 
Johnson, Washington, D.C; B.S.; Commerce . . . Henry C. Johnson, Washington, D.C; B.S.; 
Commerce; Men's League 2; Junior Prom Committee; ^X . . . Vivian Helen Johnson, Balti- 
more; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; Diamondback 1, 2; Swimming Club 1, 2, 4; Riding Club 1, 2, 4; 
Rifle 1; Fencing 2; Y.WtCfi. 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Lewis A. Jones, College Park; B.S.; Commerce; 
Scabbaiti-anclfT^aAe; \3VsSl)a\l; Secretary-Treasurer of Interfraternity Council; <J>i;k . . . 




62 



Harris 
Harrison 
Hart 
Harlig 
Harvey 



Henderson 
Henry 
Hepburn 
Heubeck 
Hill 



Hirsch 
Holbrook 
Holt 

Honigman 
Hoover 



Home 
llortni.in 
Howard 
Huber 
Huff 



Hunter 

lager, E. L. 
lager, H. L. 
Janes 

Jarrell 



Jett 



Johnson, C. E. 
Johnson, H. (". 
Johnson, \ . II 
Jones, L. A. 




63 



Stephen H. Jones, Leonardtown; B.S.; Engineering; A.I.E.E. 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Methodist 
Club 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Swimming Club 4; <i>M~) . . . David Robert Joseph, Stamford, Conn.; 
B.A.; Arts and Sciences; Pershing Rifles, 1,2; Opera Club, 2, 3, 4; International Relations Club 
3, 4; Cierman Club . . . Hazel Kalbaugh, Luke; B.A.; Education; Women's Chorus, 3, 4; Opera 
Club 3; VAV.C.A., 3 . . . Ruth Leslie Keefer, Takoma Park; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; Day- 
dodgers . . . Jane Frazer Kephart, Takoma Park; B.S.; Home Economics; Panhel, Secretary 3, 
Treasurer 4; Women's League, Secretary 3; Home Economics Club L 2, 3, 4, Vice-President; 
Y.W.C.A. 1, 2; Riding Club 1 ; W.A.A. 1, 2; President Moriar Board; President KA; Vice-Presi- 
dent ()N;KA;()X; AAA; Mortar Board . . . Mary Eleanor Kephart, Taneytown; B.A.; Education; 
Old Line 2, 4; Lutheran Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; International Relations Club 2, 4; W.A.A. 

1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Richard Kern, Braddock Heights; B.A.; Commerce; Latch Key Society; Rifle 
Team, Manager; ATQ . . . Wilson W. Kilby, Conowingo; B.S. ; Agriculture; Track 1, 4, Manager 
4; Men's League 4; Latch Key Society 4 ... J. Forrest King, Baltimore; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; 
<l^^K . . . Edwin Kraemer, Hackensack, N.J.; B.S. ; Arts and Sciences; International Relations 
Club. . . Robert E. Krafft, Washington, D.C.; B.S. ; Engineering; A. S.M.E.; Scabbard and Blade; 
ex . . . John Krynitsky, Che\y Chase ; B.S. ; Arts and Sciences ; Camera Club 1 ; President AX:l; ; 
AXi;. . . Marcia Ladson, Rockville; B.S.; Agriculture; Women's League 3, 4; Diamondback L 2; 
Swimming Club 1, 2; Daydodgers Club 1; W.A.A. 1, 2; KA^ . . . Alice Lang, East Norwalk, 
Conn.; B.S.; Home Economics; Home Economics Club, 2, 3, 4; Women's Chorus 3, 4; W.A.A. 

2, 3, 4; Rifle 2, 3; KKT . . . Stanley I. Lapidus, Baltimore; B.S.; Agriculture; Intermural Base- 
ball; Basketball ; Track . . . Philip M. Lasswell, Takoma Park; B.S.; Engineering; A.I.E.E. 3, 4; 
Radio Society 4; THII . . . Betty Hall Law, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Home Economics; Women's 
League; AOn . . . Mary Douglas Leard, Norfolk, Va. ; B.A. ; Arts and Sciences; Rifle 3; Swimming 
Club 3; Daydodgers Clulj 3; Y.W.C.A. 3, 4; KA . . . Richard E. Lee, Landover; B.A.; Arts and 
Sciences; Internationa! Relations Club 3, 4, President 4; Episcopal Club, 3 4; Treasurer 4; Swim- 
ming Club 3; Calvert Debate Club 3, 4; U^X . . . Samuel J. LeFrak, New York, N.Y.; B.S.; 
Commerce; Track, Manager; Opera Clui); Latch Key Society, Secretary-Treasurer; International 
Relations Clu!); Diamondback 1; Wrestling Team; "M" Book; Cross Country, Manager; TE<t>; 
MS . . . Harriett Levin, Baltimore; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; International Relations Club 4; 
Junior Prom Committee; Secretary <^SS 3; President <I>SS 4; <I>S2 . . . Ethel Levine, Brooklyn, 
N.Y.; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; International Relations Club 1, 2, 3, 4; <I)i;:2; HIA . . . L. Robert 
Lowe, Pylesville; B.S.; Agriculture; Student Grange 3; Livestock Club 4; AFP; AZ . . . John 
Cameron Lynham, Jr., Hyattsvilie; B.S.; Engineering; A.I.E.E.; Radio Society 4; Swimming 
C;iub 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Richard K. Lynt, Jr., Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Agriculture; 
Opera Club; Glee Club; i:A(); AZ . . . Elnora L. Lyon, Baltimore; B.S. ; Home Economics; Glee 
Club 1,2, 3,4; Opera Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Swimming Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Terrapin 4; Y.W.C.A. 3, 4; Home 

)nomics Club .i^;\I\te\national Relations Club 4; Methodist Club 3, 4, Secretary 4 . . . 

nhesda; B.S. ; Home Economics; Old Line, Women's Editor 4 
president Dormilor\- "B" 3; Paiihel Council 4; Riding Club 1, 2 
KKP . . . Laura Manning, Silver Spring; B.S.; Home Economics 
\\.; KKP ... O. Clifton Martin, Jr., Rockville; B.S. ; Agriculture 
Dairy Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3; Dairy Judging Team 3, 4 
n, rort Chester, N.Y.; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; Class Historian 1, 3; Junior 
amondback 1, 2, 3, 4, Issue Editor 3, Associate Women's Editor, 4; Asso- 
ciate Women's Editor "M" Book 3; W.A.A. 1, 2, 3; Secretary Mortar Board; AAA; HAE; Mortar 
Board . . . 




64 



Jones, S. H. 
Joseph 

K.ilbauiih 
Kt'eler 
KophiUl, J. I- 



Kephart, M. E. 
Kern 
Kilby 
King 

Kraenier 



Krafft 

Krynitsky 
Ladson 
Lang 
Lapidus 



Lasswell 
Law 
Leard 
Lee 

LeFrak 



Levin 
Levine 
Lowe 
Lynham 
Lynt 



Lyon 

MacDonald 
Manning 
Martin 
Maslin 





■^ ^ ^ 




65 



Harry B. Matthews, Jr., Salisbury; B.S.; Agriculture; Grange 3, 4; German Club 2; Newman 
Club 3; API' . . . Irvin C. Mayes, Timonium; B.S.; Education . . . Marian V. Mayes, Phoenix; 
B.A.; Education; Women's Chorus 1, 2, 3; Opera Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Episcopal Club 2, 3, 4; AA . . . 
Francis Thomas Maxwell, Tow son; B.S.; Arts and Sciences . . . M. Elaine McClayton, 
Baltimore; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; \\'omen's League 1,2; Class Historian 4; YAWC.A. 3; Inter- 
national Relations Club 2; AOIT . . . Donald McClenon, Takoma Park; B.S. ; Engineering; 
Radio Society 1,2,3, 4, President 3, 4; Swimming Club 3, 4; Engineering Student Council 3, 4 . . . 
Betty McCormac, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Home Economics; Newman Club; Home Economics 
Club; Davdodgers Club; AZA . . . Frank Russell McFarland, Cumberland; B.S.; Agriculture; 
Livestock Club; Grange; F.F.A.; Danforth Fellowship; Glee Club; API'; AZ . . . Samuel B. Mc- 
Farlane, l.onaconing; B.S.; Arts and Sciences; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 1, 2, 3; AX^C . . . L. H. 
Reisler McGill, Thurmont; B.S.; Engineering; A.S.C.E.; Episcopal Club; Spanish Clulj . . . 
Bell Weir McGinniss, Kensington; B.S.; Home Economics; YA\'.C.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Rifle 1, 2; 
International Relations Club 2, 3; F^resbyterian Chili 4; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; OX . . . 
Harry Wilkeson McGinniss, Kensington; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; KA . . . James G. Meade, 
Port I)ei)osit; B.A.; Education; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Lacrosse 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1; Alft . . . 
Thomas W. Mears, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Arts and Sciences; AXS . . . Joseph M. Mehl, Jr., 
Washington, D.C.; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; Lacrosse 1 ; KA . . . Luther E. Mellen, Jr., Balti- 
more; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; Scabbard and Blade; Interfraternity Council; KA . . . Ralph H. 
Meng, Perry Point; B.S.; Arts and Sciences; Terrapin 1, 2; Interfraternity Council 4; Band 
1, 2, 3, 4; <I>i:K . . . Daniel M. Mermelstein, Baltimore; B.S.; Arts and Sciences; Wrestling 3, 4 
. . . Elaine Michelson, Baltimore; B.S.; Education; Women's Chorus 2, 3; Spanish Club 2; 
YAV.C.A. 4; Swimming Club 4 . . . Catherine Mileto, Annapolis; B.S.; Education; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Chorus 1, 2, 3; Opera Club 1, 2, 3; International Relations Club 3, 4 . . . 
Alma V. Miller, Baltimore; B.S.; Home Economics; Swimming Club 1, 2, 3; International Re- 
lations Club 3, 4; Lutheran Club 3, 4; AOn ... J. William Miller, Boonsboro; B.S.; Commerce; 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Manager 2 ; Opera Club 1, 2; Orchestra 1,2; Footlight Club 3, 4 . , . Thomas 
Edwin Miller, Jr., Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Agriculture; Track 2, 3, 4; Men's League; Junior 
Prom Committee; Lutheran Club; <1>M~); SAO . . . Walter Leroy Miller, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; 
Arts and Sciences; Scabbard and Blade; Pershing Rifles 1, 2; Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; <i>SK . . . 
William Irving Miller, Baltimore; B.S.; Commerce; Latch Key 3, 4; Senior Class Treasurer; 
Manager of Cross Country; KA; HAT . . . David H. Mitchell, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Engineer- 
ing; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Manager 4; Orchestra 3, 4; A.I.E.E.; Opera Club 2; Radio Society 3 . . . 
Eugene F. Mueller, Jr., Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Engineering; A.S.C.E. 2, 3, 4; Scabbard and 
Blade; Rifle 1 ; <I>SK . . . Martin H. Muma, Cumberland; B.S.; Agriculture; AXA; AZ . . . Celia 
Estella Murphy, Walkersville; B.S.; Education; Daydodgers Club 2; W.A.A. . . . Paula S. 
Nalley, Washington. IJ.C. ;\ B.S. ; Home Economics; Rifle 1; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Secret ;ua,»»Tr^asVir*r J;\l<ttJiiW Club 1, 2; Lutheran Club 1, 2, 3, .Secretary 3; Daydodgers Club 
iV 2A3 ; l|ntVri\iti\nVl l\eVa\i\iV Club 3; Treasurer of Sorority 2 ; AAA . . . 




66 



Matthews 
Mayes, I. C. 
Mayes, M. V. 

Maxwell 
McClayton 



McClenon 
McCorniac 
McFarland 
McFarlanc 

McCill 



McGinniss, B. \V. 
McGinniss, H. W . 
Meade 

Mears 
Mehl 



Mellcn 
Meng 

Mermelstein 
Michelson 
Mileto 



Miller, A, \'. 
Miller, J. \V. 
Miller, T. E. 
Miller, \V. L. 
Miller, W. 1 



Mitchell 
Mueller 
Muma 

Miirph\' 
Nalley 




67 



Robert Morton Neiman, New York, X.Y.; B.S.; Commerce; AS* . . . Eileen C. Neumann, 
Freeport, N.V.; B.S.; Home Economics; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Ciiorus 1, 2, 
3, 4; Opera Club 1, 2, 3, 4; AZA . . . Inez A. Nevy, Cumberland; B.A.; Education; Newman Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Swimming Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Opera Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Chorus 1, 3, 4; V.W.C.A. 1, 2; AA . . . 
Robert D. NichoUs, Boyds; B.S.; Agriculture; Agriculture Council 4; Vice-President AZ; ATP; 
AZ . . . Ruth AnnNusbaum, New Windsor; B.S. ;HomeEconomics;Rifle;Y.W.C. A. ;OperaClub; 
Women's Chorus; KA . . . Ned Herman Oakley, Washington, D.C.; B.S. ; Agriculture; Trail 
Club; Scabbard and Blade; Bo.xing; Pershing Rifles . . . Richard J. O'Neill, Baltimore; B.S.; 
Commerce; Men's League 1; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Latch Key Society 4; Lacrosse, Manager; 
Vice-President KA; KA . . . Beverly C. Oppenheimer, Brooklyn, N.Y. ; B.A. ; Arts and .Sciences; 
International Relations Clul) 2, 3, 4; Women's League 4; Treasurer <I>Si:; <J>Si; . . . Michael E. 
Panciotti, L^erby, Conn.; B.S.; Commerce; Newman Club; .\TQ . . . John A. Parks, Jr., Cum- 
berland; B.S.; Commerce; Interfraternity Council 3; Junior Prom Committee; Ai:*; BAT . . . 
H. Ralph Pearson, St. George Island; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; Bo.xing 2, 3, 4 . . . Joseph 
Kemp Peaslee, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Agriculture; Lutheran Club; Junior Prom Committee; 
Uiamondback; Terrapin, Sports Editor; Men's League, President; Dairy Cattle Judging Team; 
Cross Country Team 3; Track 3; <I>A(-); OAK; AZ . . . Fred W. Perkins, Jr., Chevy Chase; B.S.; 
Engineering; Student Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Pershing Rifles 1, 2; A.S.M.E. 3, 4; Diamondback 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Circulation Manager 4; Ai:*; HAE . . . Gladys M. Person, Chevy Chase; B.A. ; Arts and Sciences; 
Y.W.C.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Spanish Club 2, 3, 4; French Club 2; International Relations Club 2, 3. 4; 
Junior Prom Committee; Terrapin 3; Riding Club 1, 2, Vice-President 4; .\on . . . Richard Nelson 
Phelps, McDonogh; B.S.; Agriculture; KA . . . Clarence W. Phillips, Jr., Princess Anne; B.S.; 
Agriculture; F.F.A. 2, 3, 4; Livestock Club 2, 3, 4 . . . Irving Phillips, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; 
Engineering; Band 1 ; Glee Club 1,2; Old Line 2, 3, 4, Art Editor 3, Business Manager 4; Debate 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; A.S.M.E. 3, 4, Treasurer 4; President TE*, TE<I> . . . James Elwood Pitzer, Cum- 
berland; B.S.; Arts and Sciences; Swimming Club 1 ; German Club 1, 2; Football 1 ; Lacrosse L 2; 
Class President 3, 4; Class Treasurer 2; President AXi]; OAK; AX:;: . . . Helen Barr Piatt, Wash- 
ington, D.C.; B.S.; Home Economics; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; W.A.A. 1; Junior Prom Committee; 
,\on . . . Kitty Lee Pollard, Baltimore; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; Spanish Club 1, 2, 3, 4; .\on . . . 
Lloyd Alden Potter, Bethesda; B.S.; Agriculture; Rifle 1; Swimming Club 4 . . . Dan Travers 
Prettyman, Trappe; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; Men's League 2; Calvert Debate Club 2, 3, 4, 
President 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Opera Club 1,2; F"ootlight Club 3, 4, Treasurer 
4; Methodist Club 3, 4, President 3, 4; ATQ . . . Alexander Rabinowitz, Brooklyn, N.Y.; B.S.; 
Education; International Relations Club; Swimming Club; Baseball 1; TE* . . . Herman S. 
Raisin, Brooklyn, N.Y.; B.S.; Arts and Sciences . . . Mary Elizabeth Rawley, College Park; 
B.S.; Education; W.A.A.; Y.W.C.A.; Daydodgers Club; Women's League; AAA . . . Helen Rein- 
dollar, Baltimore;J3^S.j; .^rt\ and Sciences; Women's League, President 4; CaKert Debate Club 

4; KKF; HAE . . . George C. Remsberg, Jr., Middletown; B.S. 

1 ; AFP . . . Elliott B. Robertson, Bethesda; B.S.; Engineering 

President i^X; UN . . . Joseph M. Rochkind, Baltimore; B.S. 

VSports 1, 2, 3 . . . Martin Rochlin, Haltimoie; B.S.; .Arts an< 

\ 3, 4;T.\a. . . 




08 



Neiman 
Neumann 
Ncvy 

Xii>liainii 



O'Xc-ill 
Oppenheimer 
Pnnciotti 
Parks 



Pearson 
Peaslee 
Perkins 
Person 
Phelps 



Phillips, C W. 
Phillips, I. 
Pitzer 
Piatt 
Pollard 



Potter 

Prettynian 
Rabinowit? 
Raisin 
Rawley 



Reindollar 
Remsberg 
Robertson 
Kochkind 
Rochlin 




69 



Martin Rosen, Fort Salonga, N.V.; B.S.; Arts and Sciences; TEil> . . . L. Nat Rosenstein, 

Baltimore; B.S. ; Arts and Sciences; International Relations Club 4; Cahert Debate C'luli 4; 
Riding Club 2, 3, 4; Swimming Club 2, 3, 4 . . . Elizabeth Samson, Takonia Park; B.A.; Arts 
and Sciences; International Relations Club; Women's Chorus . . . Howard Schneider, \'onkers, 
N.Y.; B.S.; Arts and Sciences; International Relations Club . . . Patricia Barbara Lee Schutz, 
Annapolis; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; Women's Chorus 1; Swimming Club 1, 3; Terra|)iii 1, 2; 
Y.W.C.A. 3; Footlight Club 2, 3, 4; Secretary of Alpha Psi Omega; AAA; A>J'Q . . . Elgin W. Scott, 
Jr., W'ashington, D.C.; B.S.; Engineering; Junior Prom Committee; Football 1; Pershing Rifles 

1, 2; Scabbard and Blade; B.S.U. 1, 2; A.S.C.E. 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Vice-President of Frater- 
nit>-; <J>i:K . . . John P. Secrest, Cottage City; B.S.; Agriculture; Terrapin Trail Club . . . George 
E. Seeley, Baltimore; B.S.; Engineering; Scabbard and Blade; A.S.M.E., Secretary 3, President 
4; Manager of Baseball 4; Latch Key 3, 4; Lacrosse 1 ; Swimming Club 2, 3; Treasurer of Frater- 
nity 3, 4; <I>AO . . . Regina B. Shepperd, Upper Falls; B.S.; Education; Newman Club . . . Robert 
Andrew Shoemaker, Woodbine; B.S. ; Agriculture; Student Grange; ATP ... I. Walter Silberg, 
Baltimore; B.S.; Arts and Sciences . . . Fred Lester Simon, Jr., Baltimore; B.A.; Arts and 
Sciences; Camera Club 3; Secretary of Theta Chi; Secretary of Beta Alpha Psi; 0X; BAI' . . . 
Elizabeth Smith, Salisbury; B.A.; Education; Women's Chorus 3, 4; Y.W.C.A. 2, 4; Women's 
League 3; Treasurer of Sorority; ASA . . . John P. Smith, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Engineering; 
A.S.C.E.; ATQ . . . Mildred E. Smith, W'alkersviUe; B.S.; Education; Lutheran Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
W.A.A. L 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Opera Club 1,2; Women's Chorus L 2; Women's League 3; Grange 

2, 3, 4; AA . . . Eleanor S. Snyder, Baltimore; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; Women's League 4; 
Swimming Club 1; International Relations Club 4; AS; . . . Leonard Sollod, Baltimore; B.S.; 
Education; Chess Club; <I>A . . . Ruby Elizabeth Soper, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Home Eco- 
nomics; Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ... Floyd Allison Soule, W'ashington, D.C.; B.S.; 
Arts and Sciences; Pershing Rifles 1,2; Scabbard and Blade; Track 2, 3, 4; Rifle 1, 2, 3, 4;.\TQ. . . 
Edythe Ray Sparling, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Education; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; 
Panhel 4; President of Sorority; ,\on . . . Mary M. Speake, Luray, Va.; B.S.; Education; Opera 
Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; W.A.A. 2, 3, 4; Daydodgers Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Episcopal 
Club 1, 3, 4; KA ... A. Lucia Spehnkouch, Baltimore; B.S.; Home Economics; Hockey 1, 2, 

3, 4, Manager 4; Home Economics Club 1 ; Swimming Club 1 ; KKF . . . Sydney Snowden Stabler, 
Hyattsville; B.S.; Engineering; A.I.E.E.; Scabbard and Blade; Swimming Club . . . Richard J. 
Stakem, Jr., Midland; B.A.; Education; Newman Club . . . Samuel F. Stedman, Catons\ille, 
B.A.; Arts and Sciences . . . Janet I. Steinberger, Baltimore; B.S.; Agriculture; International 
Relations Club 2, 3, 4; Swimming Club 1, 4; Ail; i:.VO . . . Diana Stevan, Baltimore; B.S.; Educa- 
tion . . . John W. Stevens, II, Takoma Park; B.S.; Engineering; Scabbard and Blade; Pershing 
Rifles; Tennis 1, 2, 3; .Swimming Club 4; Secretary-Treasurer of A.I.E.E. . . . Frank V. Steven- 
son, Takoma ParLi-B.S. ;V\r\s and Sciences; Glee Club 3, 4, President 4; Opera Club 3; Orchestra 
? .1 arrrNndn AI)\:in\oV(ll\;i(\k 3; Terrapin 3; AFP . . . Marguerite Stevenson, Takoma Park; 
I^S.\HVmk I'Voi\oi\uc\;V»'\\VY'A. 1; Daydodgers Club 1,2; AAA . . . 




70 



Rosen 

Rosenstein 
Samson 

ScllIU-icIlT 

Scluilz 



Scott 
Secrest 
Seeley 
Shepperd 
Shoemaker 



Silberg 
Simon 
Smith. E. 
Smith, J. P. 
Smith, M.E. 



Snyder 
Soiled 
Soper 
Soule 
Sparling 



Speake 

Spehnkouch 
Stabler 
Stakem 
Stedman 



Stcinberger 
Stevan 
Stevens 
Stevenson, F. \'. 
Stevenson, M. 














71 



Sara Louise Stoddard, Hyattsville; B.S.; Arts and Sciences; Opera Club 1; Glee Club 1, 3; 
Daydodgers Club 1,2; Y.W.C.A. 4; W.A.A. 4; KA . . . Charles R. Stup, Frederick; B.S.; Com- 
merce; ATP; BAT" . . . Evelyn L. Sullivan, Hyattsville; B.A.; Education; VAV.C.A. 1, 2; Day- 
dodgers Club 1, 2, 4; KA . . . Richard S. Sutton, Kennedyville; B.S.; Agriculture; Episcopal 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Grange 1, 2, 3, 4; Livestock Club 2, 3, 4; Livestock Judging Team 4 . . . 
Ellen Talcott, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Agriculture; Daydodgers Club 2, 3, 4; Vice-President 
SAO; AZA; AAA; SAO . . . T. Manning Thompson, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Engineering; 
A.S.M.E. 3, 4; Baseball 1 ... Ira T. Todd, Crisheld; B.S.; Commerce; AS*; BAI" . . . Lucy W. 
Trundle, Ashton; B.A.; Education; W.A.A. 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Daydodgers Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Swimming Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Lula S. 
Trundle, Ashton; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; W.A.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Daydodgers Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Presi- 
dent 4; Swimming Club L 2, 3, 4; Women's Sports 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Beatrice Louise Tucker, Abing- 
don; B.S.; Home Economics; Women's League 3; International Relations Club 3, 4; Y.W.C.A. 

1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Riding Club 1,2; Swimming Clul) 3; Vice-President Mortar Board; 
AOn; Mortar Board . . . Kay L. Turner, Washington, D.C.; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; Riding 
Club; ASA . . . Fredericka Waldman, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Home Economics; Class Secretary 

2, 3; Secretary-Treasurer S.G.A.; Lutheran Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, President 3; Y.W.C.A. 1, 

2, 3, 4; Treasurer .\OII; AOn . . . Gustavus Warfield, College Park; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; 
Calvert Debate Club 2; Terrapin Editor 3; Vice-President S.G.A.; Presbyterian Club, President 
4; OAK; HAP: . . . June Elizabeth Weber, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Education; Women's League 

3, 4; Daydodgers Club 1, 2, 3, 4, .Secretary 2; AAA . . . Carolyn L Webster, Pylesville; B.S.; 
Education; W.A.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Women's Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4; Opera (^lub 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Swimming Club 4; Secretary AAA; President AA; AA; A,\A . . . Charles W. Weidinger, 
Baltimore; B.S.; Education; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Mayer Weinblatt, Balti- 
more; B.S.; Arts and Sciences; Intramural Sports . . . Robert H. Wettje, Yonkers, N.Y.; B.S. ; 
Engineering; A.S.C.E. 3, 4, Secretary 3 . . . Edward Martin Wharton, College Park; B.S.; 
Arts and Sciences; Opera Club 1,2; Swimming Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1,2, 3; AXS . . . Thomas 
P. Wharton, College Park; B.S. ; Engineering; Swimming Club 1, 2, 3, President 2 ; Footlight Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Opera Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4, Treasurer 3; A.S.C.E. 3, 4; President TBH; ATQ; TBFI 
. . . Marion L. Wheatley, Vienna; B.S.; Agriculture; Livestock Club 3; <I>AH . . . Leroy G. 
Willett, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Engineering; A.I.E.E. 3, 4 . . . Arthur E. Williams, Jr., 
Salisbury; B.A.; Arts and Sciences; Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Opera Club 2, 3, 4; Band 2; Swimming, 
ELxtramural 2; Football 2 . . . Patricia Margaret Willingham, Hyattsville; B.S.; Agriculture; 
Riding Club . . . Ethel Jane Wilson, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Home Economics; Y.W.C.A. 1; 
Riding Club 1; Swimming Club 1 ; KKl" . . . Naomi Lorraine Wilson, Fulton; B.A.; Arts and 
Sciences; Y.W.C.A. 1, 2 . . . Fred B. Winkler, Chevy Chase; B.S. ; Agriculture; Pershing Rifles 

Silver Hill; B.S.; Agriculture; Swimming Clul) 2; Lutheran Club 1, 2 
Jr., Washington, D.C; B.S.; Engineering; Pershing Rifles 1, 2, 3, 4; 
.M.E. 3, 4 . . . Frances Wolf, Washington, D.C; B.A.; Arts and 
tt Club; Terrapin; KA . . . 



1,2;AZ . . .Detlef J 




72 



Stodtlard 
St lip 

Sullivan 
Sill Ion 
Talcott 



Thompson 
Toild 

Trundle, L. \V. 
Trundle, L. S. 
Tucker 



Turner 
Waldman 
Warfield 
Weber 

Webster 



Weidinger 
Weinblatt 
Wettje 
Wharton, E. M. 
Wharton, T. P. 



Wheatley 
Willett 
Williams 
Willingham 
Wilson, E. 



\\ ilson, \. L. 
Winkler 
Witt, D. J 
Witt, E. C. 
Wolf 








mM^k 




73 







Wood 



Woodwell 



Yockelson 



Young 



Zalesak 



Edgar Wade Wood, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Agriculture; Football 1, 2, 3; I.acrosse 1, 2, 4; 
Basketball 1, 3; Men's League 2;'^S . . . Lawrence A. Woodwell, Kensington; B.A.; Commerce 
. . . Bernard A. Yockelson, Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Commerce; 'l>\ . . . Jerome Young, 
Washington, D.C.; B.S.; Arts and Sciences . . . Francis J. Zalesak, College Park; B.S. ; Arts and 
Sciences; Scabbard and Blade; Interfraternity Council; President of Fraternity; AS4>; AXS . . . 



COMBINED COURSE STUDENTS 





Cole 



Danforth 



Perdue 



\andervoort 



Wilson 




.B. ; Law School . . . Dorothy Margaret Danforth, Baltimore; 

. 1, 2; May Day \, 2; Women's Rifle Team 1 ; KA . . . Herman 

\v School . . . Susan H. Vandervoort, Baltimore; B.S.; Nursing 

Wilson, Baltimore; B.S.; Nursing School; VAWC.A. 1, 2; Inter- 

2; W.A.A. 1 ; May Day L 2; Women's Chorus 1. 2; KA . . . 



74 




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President Tom Coleman 

Vice-President Richard Lee 

Treasurer James Healey 

Secretary Tempe Curry 

IVNEELING under the yoke of traditional 
sophomore supremacy as well as under the win- 
dows of the women's dormitories, the freshman 
of the class of 194()^()t intotheswimof uni\ersity 
life when his ardent prayers for rain were an- 
swered by his fair classmates. In rapid succession 
were discovered the tragedy of 8:20 classes, the 
welcome relief of cokes at the Grill, and the gay 
sophistication of the Rossbourgs. Soon he be- 
came accjuainted with the noble brotherhoods, 
while she drank tea with the future good sisters. 
In the spring according to another tradition, 
the class ])resented a show for the upperclass- 
nien. It was doonied from the start, for so 
man\- vegetables and fruits were flying at the 
actors that the show was forced to a ver^- dis- 
mal and mess>- end soon after the overture. 
Their prom, also in the spring, rlimaxetl the 
lirst lap in their l(>iir-\-ear journe>'. 



76 



The s()])honiorc found hiniself firmly in- 
Irgrated in activities on campus. His name 
appeared on varsity teams and hers on social 
conimittet's, while the\' fulfilled literary aspira- 
tions and bowed over footlii^hts together. 
.After a frigid ducking in Paint Branch by the 
freshmen, the soph had to regain his dignity 
in .some way. This he did with all the pomj) and 
ceremony of the Sophomore Prom. 

The junior saw an expanding university — 
new profes.sors — new departments — new build- 
ings — everywhere a spirit of advancement. 
He was learning that college was more than 
just a good place to spend four years and some- 
times more. In another year he would be el- 
igil)le for honorary fraternities in recognition 
of years well spent in college. 

The Junior Class gave the university an un- 
forgettable Junior Prom with Flddie Duchin's 
orchestra, which brought forth lovely ladies, 
merry gentlemen, orchids and praises, glamour, 
soft lights and sweet music. And thus on a 
wave of glorj-, the class drifted to the end of 
its third year. 




77 



President Frank Davis 

Vice-President Bud Heyer 

Secretary Barbara Boose 

Treasurer Joe Devlin 



1 HE Class of 1941 went into the second 
quarter of its run around the track of higher 
learning by setting up a tradition of repeats. 
Starting with a return engagement of stars of 
the former year, the class was again led by 
President Frank Davis, supported by Secre- 
tary Barbara Boose, both of whom guided it 
through a hazardous and eventful freshman 
year. 

The annual freshman-sophomore struggle 
was won by the Class of '41 in their first year, 
not by the dint of hard labor but rather by the 
effective use of a greater number of partici- 
pants. In the second year the teams were 




78 




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carefulh- checked Init the class again tri- 
umphed. Because it won the struggle for two 
years in a row, the class is one of the few to 
have its name engraved on the terrapin in 
front of the Ritchie Coliseum. However, their 
ability had not gone only to the defeating of 
the underclassmen. Many sophomores have 
been added to the varsity teams and have 
performed in stellar fashion. 

Yet the Class of '41 has not manifested its 
physical prowess alone. The scholastic achieve- 
ments of its members were recognized by the 
admission of unusually large numbers of stu- 
dents into honor societies at the end of their 
first year. This example of high academic en- 
dea\'or was followed in its ne.xt year. 

Socially, the sophomore cla.ss, after staging 
a very successful Freshman Prom, carried on 
the example of worthy accomplishment l)y 
playing host to the student bod>^ for an e\e- 
ning of carefree dancing to the rhythms of The 
Coquettes led by Janice Williams. Needless 
to say, it was a \er>- no\el prom because the 
orchestra was composed entirely of girls. 



79 



V 



n 



— 1 




President Harry Spicer 

Vice-President Bii.i. Hoi.hrook 

Secretary Mary L^owney 

Treasurer Robert Ayres 




r ROSH Enrollment the Greatest Yet!" 
These headlines were flashed to the student 
body on an unforgettable registration day in 
September, 1938. And an unforgettable day it 
was — the frosh spent endless hours waiting in 
line to register; they were bewildered by 
Inindreds of strange faces which would soon 
bectjme the familiar ones of their classmates 
of '42. A rapid glimpse of the campus, the Grill, 
Fraternity Row, the A and S Building, upper- 
classmen, rat caps, all lent more confusion to 
the "first day of college." 

After two weeks of getting acquainted by the 
"hello habit" came elections. This, their in- 
troduction to college politics, resulted in a 
majority vote for Harr\- Spicer as president to 
lead the Class of '42. I^lectecl to sujii^nrt him 



80 



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was W illiani Ilolhrook as vice-president, while 
Robert Ayres was chosen to take charge of the 
chiss finances. Mary Downey was elected 
class secretarN ; Xirs^inia Mercer represented 
the frosh coeds in the Women's League, and 
Mar}- Ann drilifith was chosen historian. Thus 
their class was organized. 

The traditional lrosh-s(jphoniore tug-cjf-war 
was held on a rainy Homecoming Day. The 
freshmen hoys were full of high hopes of win- 
ning, esi)ecially as their fair classmates were 
present to encourage them. Yet their ho])es 
crashed about them and the\- were doomed to 




defeat and to wearing rat caps until February. 
Months passed — Greek lodge bidding for 
the men; class meetings scheduled but accord- 
ing to tradition, not held; football games, 
thrilling though not spectacular; dining hall 
rendezvous; library dates, much against the 
principles of dormitory rules; e.xams climaxed 
their first semester. On to the second with 
double feature basketball games and boxing 
matches; seeing their college pass in review at 
AU-l niversit^" Xight; coed rushing with its 



stram and excitement. 

With sjiring came the gay social life of for- 
mals, but the most important dance to the 
class was their own ])resentation, the Fresh- 
man Frolic. Amid colored lights and mellow 
music the Class of 1942 asseml)led, swinging 
toward the end of a successful freshman year. 



81 








STARTING life with a tine heritage, Ed- 
die Johnson has already added his share to 
a shining family history. As representa- 
tive of the student body, in the office of 
Student Government Association presi- 
dent, he has been the outstanding political 
figure as well as one of the best known men 
on the campus. Fame has come to Eddie 
tlirough his efforts on the basketball court, 
while on the baseball diamond, as varsity 
second-baseman, he bids fair to emulate 
the career of his famous father. 



82 




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STUDENT 

GOVERNMENT 

ASSOCIATION 





^hm^\ 



Warfieki 



Waldman 



President Eddie Johnson 

T 'ice-Preside7il Gus Warfield 

Secretary-Treasurer Freddie Waldman" 

Members: Barbara Boose, Secretary. Sophomore Class; TilHe Boose, Secretary, Senior 
Class; Tom Coleman, President, Junior Class; Tempe Curry, Secretary, Junior Class; 
Frank Davis, President, Sophomore Class; Doris DeAlba, President, Panhellenic 
Council; Mary Downey, Secretary, Freshman Class; Jerry Hardy, President, OYil^; 
Larry Hoover, Editor, Diamondback; Julius Ireland, President, Interfraternity 
Council ; Joe Peaslee, President, Men's League; Helen Reindollar, President, Women's 
League; Harry Spicer, President, Freshman Class. 



JS^EEPING pace with the times, when constitutional revision seems to be 
the fashion, the Student Government Association of the University of 
Maryland spent much of its time this year making its constitution more 
workable. One of the most outstanding and most discussed alterations was 
the lessening of the scholastic re(]uirement for membership. Instead of the 
2.0 average required heretofore during the term of office, a new ruling was 
introduced whereby an all-time average of 2.0 was necessary. This obviated 
the inconvenience of losing members in the middle of the term because of 
their ineligibility. Another change admitted to the personnel of the asso- 
ciation the Editor of The Diamondback as a permanent and \oting uumh- 
ber. 

Working for the combined interest ot the university and the wellarr of 
the students, the student Ciovernment Association devoted nuuh of its 
time to solving majc^r campus ijrohlcms. One ot the lu'st l)ig jobs was to 
he!]) the freshman class get its i)earings. .S.Ci.A. took charge of its elections, 



84 




B. Boose 




T. Boose Coleman 


Curry 




Davis DeAlba 


Hardy 




Kcphart Feaslee 




Pitzer 


ReindoUar 



and set the Class of '42 firmly on its way. Also, 
as every year, the Association faced the un- 
fortunate recurrent problem of cribbing. A 
committee of three investigated all angles of 
the situation in an effort to reach a satisfactory 
and more permanent solution. 

Representing the interests of the University 
in charity, the S.G.A. made liberal contribu- 
tions at the call of the New England flood 
sufferers and in answer to the President's ap- 
peal for the victims of infantile paralysis. In 
December, the Food Ball, sijonsored by the 
Association for the aid of the local poor, had as 
its novelty an "edible" admission charge. As 
for financial support to campus activities, the 
S.G.A. acted as underwriter for the Student 
Mixer Dance sponsored by the women's 
League, and increased its appropriations for 
the publication of the freshman's Bible, the 
"M" book. 

One of the most significant activities of the 
S.G.A. during the \car has been its reorienta- 
tion by an amendment setting forth anew the 
purposes of the organization. This amendment, 
an expansion of the i)urposcs set forth in the 
previous constitution, includes the following 
objectives: A. To carry on the routine ot stu- 
dent government. B. To render justice to all 
individuals and groujxs on the campus. C. To 
represent the feeling of the student body before 
the administration. D. To lead in stimulating 
honorable conduct, promoting constructive 
schemes to student welfare. E. To work for 
the combined interest of the University. 



85 



MEN'S 
LEAGUE 



Ashman 
Cronin 
Eierman 
Greenfield 

Kilby 
McGiU 
Miller 
Peaslee 

Pitzer 
Vourtee 




Joseph Peaslee, President. Van Ashman, Arthur Car- 
ter, Kenny Clark, Charles Dodson, Arthur Green- 
field, Paul Hutson, Wilson Kilby, Robert Lodge, 
Howard McGill, James McGregor, Arthur Meade, 
Walter Spelsburg. 



1 HE natural exuberance of the stronger sex 
at the University of Maryland sometimes over- 
runs itself and is manifested by such typical 
pranks as strategically placed water bags, lead 
weights rumbling noisily down the halls, young 
bonfires burning brightly in trash baskets, and 
numerous imjiromptu boxing and wrestling 
matches occurring at odd hours of the day and 
night. These conditions justify the existence of 
the Men's League because it acts as a steady- 
ing influence on the activities and excess en- 
thusiasm of the men of the University and 
administers justice and enforces discipline 
where and when they are most essential. 



Academic endeavor has at times been neg- 
lected or ignored by some of the occupants of 
the dormitory and the League has attempted 
to remedy this situation by appointing proc- 
tors to establish quiet hours in order that 
studies might be more earnesth- and efifectiveh- 
pursued. 

Membership in the Men's League is limited 
to class \'ice-presidents, three members of the 
Interfraternity Council, representatives of the 
daydodgers, and dorm proctors. The addition 
of a new men's dormitory to the campus will 
give the League an added responsibility which 
should increase its im])ortance. However, at 
present the necessity of the existence of the 
organization has been questioned by the Stu- 
dent Government Association, largely because 
its few functions do not seem to justif\' the 
maintenance of a separate and distinct group 
since the same functions were formerly per- 
formed b}' the S.G.A. 



86 



President Helen Reindollar 

1 'ice-President Nancy Anders 

Secretary Bess Paterson 

Mary Hedda Bohlin, Ann Ir\iiie, F"rances Rosenbusch, 
\'irginia Mercer, Ann (iriffith, Ann Ames, Ethel 
McCardell, Uoris McP"arland, Doris Eichlin, Esther 
Gross, Elizabeth Harrover, Catherine Gilleland, Ed- 
wina Hambleton, Bertha Langford, Betty Law, 
Lucille Kornmann, \'irginia Wood, Katherine Boh- 
man, Irene Checket, Eleanor Snyder, MarciaLadson, 
Jean Santamarie, Ruth Hedrick, Rita \^ane, Louise 
Ballard, Emma Mike, Louise Gardiner, Beverly 
Reinstedt, Sara Ferrell. 

IhE Women's League, a division of the 
Student Government Association, is the self- 
governing body for the women students of 
the University. The membership, totalHng 



thirty-two, includes representatives from each 
class, sorority, dormitory and ofT-campus 
house. It is the duty of the League to enforce 
observation of those rules and regulations 
deemed necessary by the governing body. 

The League by no means limits its activities 
to discipline. This year it has proven itself an 
instigator of things new. Turning to the social 
calendar we find the League sponsoring several 
functions to acquaint the students with each 
other. It started off the fall with a tea for all 
women students. Student-mi.xers held at vari- 
ous intervals during the year gave a touch 
of informalit>- to campus dances. 

As long as the Women's League and the 
students cooperate, this system of government 
should flourish and become of increasing im- 
portance on the Maryland campus. 



WOMEN'S LEAGUE 



Ames 

(iardiner 

Kornmann 

Paterson 



Anders 
Gilleland 

Ladson 
Reindollar 



Bohlin 

Griffith 

Langford 

Reinstedt 



Bohman 
Gross 
Law 

Rosenbusch 



Ballard 
Hambleton 
McCardell 
Santamarie 



Checket 

Harrover 

McFarland 

Snvdcr 



Eichlin 

Hedrick 

Mercer 

X'ane 



Ferrell 
Irvine 
Mike 
Wood 




87 




wiHifivJ k, Bkouw JR. 



1 N many respects the 1939 Terrapin reminds one of its fabled namesake, 
the tortoise, who geared his speed to an ultimate objective while his legend- 
ary rival, the hare, after leading the field in the early stages, faded and 
relapsed into a state of utter somnolence. Without attempting to draw 
any comparisons from this ancient fiible or cast any reflections upon our 
respected compeers of sister publications, it is none the less apparent to 
the discerning that in this instance the fable is most apt. 

Starting with the premise that a different style yearbook was in order 
at the University of Maryland, the present edition of The Terrapin was 
outlined upon the pattern of informality. Although conforming to the 
conventional where it best seemed to serve the purpose in no instance was 
the old retained unless it was justifiable. Sections dealing with Administra- 
tion, Publications, Mews, and Intramural Sports were completely revised, 
while the di\ision of Student Life was incorporated in the book for the 
first time. Other innoxations were the popular professor contest and the 
page devoted to prominent leaders of campus clubs and organizations. 

As is always the case The Terrapin was the product of no one person 
or group of editors. Invaluable assistance was rendered by persons other 
than the student members of the staff. Therefore, the Editors of The 
Terrapin would like to take this opportunit\- of pui)licK- expressing their 
appreciation to the following: (). Raymond Carrington, an able critic and 
enthusiastic supporter who did much to improve the quality of The 
Terrapin in his role of faculty adviser; Harry Lavelle and Ciordon Bright- 
man of the Thomsen-EUis Printing Co. and the Jahn and Oilier Engra\ing 
Co., respectiveh-, who materially smoothed the rocky path encountered in 
the production of the annual; Bill Hottel {or his many favors in securing 
first-class sports pictures; and lastly, Bill Ellis and Joe Tillertson for their 
assistance and cooperation; to one and all The Terrapin owes a profound 
debt of gratitude. 

88 



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MANASiWQ^-EDITOR 




WOMEN' S>EI)ITOR 



89 



mn 




Third row: Chandk-r, Morris, Ricf, WarfiL-ld, Bordt-n, Flax. Second row: Hall, Harrover, Harrington, Davis, Ross, Brown, Ingraham, 
Barber, Logan, Carrington, Dennis. First row: Osso, Schutrunipf, Wallace, Huffer, Powers, Sargeant. Bond, Bragaw, Jones. 



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Chandler 
Flax 



Powers Jones 

Barber 



Hall 
Rice 



Johnson 
In graham 



ASSISTANT EDITORS 

Elizabeth Barber, Copy Editor; Elizabeth Pow- 
ers and Marguerite Hall, Assistant Copy Editors; 
Mary Jane Harrington and V^irginia Huffer, 
Class Editors; George Flax, Organization Editor; 
Bernice Jones, Sorority Editor; Ruth Richmond, 
Assistant Sorority Editor; Robert Rice, Fraternity 
Editor; Dave Johnson and Wilson Ingraham, 
Co-photography Editors; Charles Morris, Sports 
Editor; Elizabeth Harrover, Office Manager; Ed- 
mond Chandler, Business Editor; Josephine Bra- 
gaw. Feature Editor. 

STAFF 

Eva Brooks, Margaret Reynolds, Elnora Lyon, 
Ann Griffith, Lucille Kornman, Helen Bedell, 
Sugar Langford, Charlotte Eisele, Bill King, 
Lida Sargeant, Worthington Talcott, I)ust>- 
Wallace, Earla Marshall, Mary Vaiden, Margaret 
Seiter, and Philomena Osso. 




llultcr am! I larnn it 
Kichnionil ami Hrajjaw 



Harrington 
Morris 



91 




LAW 



EDITOR' " 



Entering what appeared to be its thirtieth year of pul)Hcation, The 
Diamondback staff planned a huge anniversary year, but the editors' hopes 
were dashed when a careful study of the files of the newspaper in the 
Library revealed that some editor of the past had added a couple of extra 
\-()lunies to the true number, making The Diamondback in reality only 
twenty-eight >ears old. Stifling its disa]:)pointment and brushing away a 
tear, the staff entered its "thirtieth" year of publication. 

The paper began publication in September and, though it creaked and 
grunted a little at first as the staff made adjustments, it was soon trundling 
along with all of the regularity of a metropolitan daily. Despite the fact 
that all other papers seemed to be turning to the new, speedy, but ugly, 
streamline make-up. The Diamondback remained true to its tradition and 
maintained a balanced page structure. One advance, however, was the 
greater emi:)hasis on pictorial coverage of the news. 

Several editorial campaigns were waged with varied success. The paper 
named the "new" women's dorm Anne .Arundel Hall, instigated a varsity 
show, carried on the annual feud with the executive council, and con- 
tinuc'd the traditional belittlement of all i)ul)lications but The Diamond- 
back with a finesse never attained before. 

Finally admitting defeat in its efforts to become serious, The Okl Line 
aped The Diamondl)ack and put out a cheap imitation, i)ut the students 
only laughed at it, since it was nowhere near as good as their semi-weekly 
newspaixT w ith its campus-wide coverage, accurate reporting, million and 
one features, intercollegiate jircss service, and brilliant editorials. Relniffed, 
The Old Line returned to its cli]Ji)ed jokes, lioiler plate cartoons, Knglish 
themes of the staff, and editorials by Editor Jerry Hanh', who "\ iewed 
with alarm . . . and jiointt-d witii ])ri(le." 

92 




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BUSINE&S" Ml^#AGER 




WOMEN'S-EM-TOR 



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standing in rear: Shivoder, Timberlake, Hutson, Fisher, Talmadge, Freudenberger, Morris, Kemp, Tenny, Hoover, Perkins. 

Standing in front: Howard, Rawls, Shirey, McLaughlin, Bell, Gray, Henderson, Ames. Seated in rear: Mangum, James, 

Moon, Paterson. Seated in front: Osso, McFarland, Hottel, Maslin. 



r\ 



1 




94 




Steinberg 

Fisher 



Frcudenberger 
Perkins 



Morris 
Tennv 



Margaret Maslin, Associate Women's Editor; 
John G. Freudenberger, Sports Editor; Murray 
\'alenstein, Assistant Sports Editor; Doug Stein- 
berg and Kaliih Tyser, Assistant Business Man- 
agers; Fred Perkins, Circulation Manager; Re- 
porters: JudsDii Bell, Bill Diggs, Allan Fisher, 
Mary Henderson, Betty Hottel, Harry Hutson, 
Paul Hutson, Leo Jackowski, Lois Kemp, Sugar 
Langford, Charles Morris, Huyett Oswald, Bess 
Paterson, John Rogers, Charlie Shivoder, Don 
Strausbaugh, Dick Talmadge, Morgan Tenny, 
Turner Timberlake. 




Margaret Masi.in 
Associate Women's Editor 




Strausbaugh 
Hottel 



\ alensti'iii 
Langford 



Tyser 
Paterson 



95 




E^©?T©R 



Youngest of Maryland's three publications and living, intrepidly, 
between her two elder brothers. The Old Line in the first nine years of her 
short but colorful career has grown, matured, and prospered. The magazine 
was founded in 1930 by a brave little band with vision and a true love of 
art. 

At first The Old Line appeared about four times a year. But as the 
clamor for culture and rare wit grew louder and yet louder, she became 
senary, and now appears eight times between each September and June. 
Eight times annually the semi-weekly gloom created by the unbelievable 
flood of Diamondbacks is dispersed by her appearance. 

In order to stimulate still further interest in creative arts, The Old Line 
was this year the sponsor of a $100 prize contest, with prizes being given for 
the most outstanding contribution in art, short story writing, poetry, 
humorous and serious article writing. 

High point of The Old Line's year came in the February issue when a 
parody on The Diamondback was the feature article of the issue. So 
closely was the original followed in the reproduction that many thought 
that The Old Line had taken over permanent publication of The Diamond- 
back, an idea which met with approval everywhere it was suggested. 

Each issue of the magazine this year contained at least one short story, 
thus carrying on a i)recedent established three years ago. Humorous 
articles, poetry, and some editorials also were featured. 

In a more serious vein, The Old Line wishes to thank all who helped 
make her ninth year a successful one; a willing editorial staft", a benighted 
and harassed business staff, a slightly screwy brace of cartoonists, and 
the ever-present publications s])irit all had their hand in making IQ.'^H-^Q 
what it was for The Old Line. 



96 



/^^ 





BUSINESS<. MANAGER 




WOMEM^S ME©tTOR 



97 

















\ 


- 




Standing: Lee, St. Clair, Ilardy, MacDonald, Corson, Ramsey, Martin, Sargeant, Griffith, Ingraham, Kerwin. 
Sealed: Richmond, Davis, Smaltz, Shipe, Kephart, Clugston, Paterson, Zurhorst, Hathaway, Sullivan. 




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98 




Tommy St. Clair, Feature Editor; Dick Lee, Art 
Kditor; Kelso Shipe, National Advertising Manager; 
Carl C.oller, Circulation Manager; Editorial Staff: 
Carolyn Clu^ston, Burton I)a\'is, Austin (iisriel, 
Judith Greenwood, Mildred Harbaugh, Norman 
Hathaway, Charles Ksanda, Cecil Martin, Bess 
Paterson, Roy Ramsey, Peggy Smaltz, Margaret 
Wallace, Judy Woodring, Mary Zurhorst; Art Staff: 
Mary Lee Griffith, Neal Hathaway, Bill Ingraham, 
Walter Kerwin, Kitt>' Gilleland; Business Staff: 
Frank Davis, Bill Loker, Ruth Richmond, Lida 
Sargeant, Jack Suit. 



Lee 



Hardy 
St. Clair 




Ingraham 
Goller 



.Shipe 
Ksanda 



Hathaway, Neal 
Kerwin 



99 




Rice, Bell, Hottel, V'alenstein, Kemp, Tenny 



"M" BOOK 



Editor-in-Chief Morgan L. Tenny 

Business Manager Judson Bell 

Women's Editor Betty Hottel 

Sports Editor Murray Valenstein 

Associate Editors Lois Kemp and Bob Rice 

JDECAUSE of the recent and rapid growth of 
the University, the 1938-39 "M" Book was 
compelled to increase both its size and number 
of copies. Although this year's freshman Bible 
was similar in style and make-up to those of 
previous years, because of the college's expan- 
sion it was necessary to make many changes 
and additions to the material. 



The publication includes a complete and cor- 
rected S.G.A. constitution; Women's League 
rules; members and officers of fraternities afid 
sororities, social and honorary; officers of or- 
ganizations; athletic records and schedules; 
and countless other facts needed by students 
and faculty. 

Much credit is due Carlisle H. Humelsine, 
publicity director for the University, and Lar- 
ry Hoover, editor of The Diamondback, who 
were of constant aid throughout the summer 
with advice and criticism. 

While the "M" Book is published primarily 
to acquaint freshmen with the University, it is 
also indispensable to main departments of the 
institution. 



100 



CALVERT DEBATE CLUB 



Third row: Davis, Mc- 
Reynolds, Sachs. Sec- 
ond row: White, Clug- 
ston, Prettyman, Lee, 
Simons, Brown, Phil- 
lips. First row: Fogg, 
Powers, McFarland. 




President t)AN Prettyman 

Vice-President Allan Brown 

Secretary Helen Reindollar 

Women's Manager Carolyn Clugston 

Men's Manager Moses B. Sachs 

IvESEARCH has shown tliat the college graduates most likely to succeed 
are those who haNC taken i)art in forensics or worked on campus publica- 
tions. The achievements of the Calvert Debaters definitely show why this 
fact has been found true. 

The rigid entrance requirements of the club limit nienil)ership to the 
t)est prospecti^-c debaters. Matches with other colleges offer to the mem- 
bers an incentive for self-impn)\c'ment. Maryland was host to teams from 
William and Mary, The Uni\ersity of Richmond, and Iowa State Teachers 
College. On the program this year were trips to New York University, 
Columbia University, William and Mary, University of Richmond, and 
Stinson College. 

New and successful on the campus were the intermural debates spon- 
sored by the Club. Re])resentatives from the sororities, fraternities, and 
dormitories matched wits on such topics as, "Resolved: That woman has 
lost more than she has gained with her new treedf)m." 

These intermural debates ha\e been the means of making the campus 
more debate conscious, the ultimate outcome of which will be a flefinite 
growth in the club's personnel. 



101 



MEN'S GLEE CLUB 



Fourth row: Miller, Tate, 
Kinney, Arnold, Powell, 
VVorden, Kluge, IhiU, 
Cole, Williams. Third 
row: Brauner, Lynt, 
Gordy, Miles, Terl. 
Mitchell, Bowers. 
J. Clark, Sherman, 
Wailes. Second row: Col- 
lison, Filgate, Evans, 
Downs, McFarland. 
Prettyman, Berman, 
Easter, \'ial, McCloskey. 
First row: Swank, Farley, 
R. Clark, Fisher, John- 
son, Stevenson, Keeney, 
Gottlieb, Dammeyer, 
Nichter. 




President Frank Stevenson 

Vice-President Dan Prettyman 

Secretary-Trensurer Robert Kinney 

Business Manager Dave Mitchell 



Ti 



HE Men's Glee Club opened a full season with a concert in Baltimore 
at the Brotherhood Convention of the Lutheran Church of America. Then, 
on October 29th, it combined with the Women's Chorus for the annual sing 
to the old grads at Homecoming. 

For two successive years this organization has been the guest of the 
National Park College. After giving an excellent performance, the men had 
the opportunit>- of dating any pretty student of this college that they 
desired; thus, music and love-making went hand in hand. 

The outstanding musical event of the year was, of course, the Nino 
Martini Concert in February. Not wishing to be outshone by the famous 
Metropolitan Opera Star who thrilled his listeners, the combined Glee 
Clubs sang better than ever before. 

The last of the year found the Men's Glee Club singing in the Dei^art- 
ment of Commerce Auditorium in Washington, in the Calvar\- Bai)tist 
Church under the auspices of the D.C. Bible Classes, and then on a tour 
of the Western .Shore of Marvland. 



102 




Nino Martini was well received 



President Marian Bond 

Secretary Elizabeth Barber 

Treasurer Esther Gross 



Ti 



III'', Women's ("lioriis, uikUt tlu' .miidiince 
of Harlan Randall, opened its season by a joint 
recital with the Men's Cilee Club in Baltimore. 
( )n December 8th the women san^ for a special 
com ocation of the College of Education. Com- 
bining again with the men's dixision, the club 
gave its annual campus recital and an excellent 
])erformance at the Nino Martini Concert. At 
All-l^niversity Night the Women's Chorus 
shared the limelight with the other partici- 
pants and the Maryland Day celebration 
found the club singing for the exercises on the 
campus as well as at the Maryland State 
Society dance. Then at the Floral Show the 
Chorus hel])ed to make it a successful night of 
fashion, flowers, and music. On May 7th the 
Club journeyed to Baltimore to entertain the 
z'\merican Casualty Club, thus ending another 
creditable year. 



WOMEN'S CHORUS 




Fifth row: Neumann, 
Arnold, M. Simpson, 
Crocker, Barber, Nus- 
haum, Newmaker, Al- 
bert . (iross. Porter. 
Fourth row: (iarrett, 
.A ma don, Park. Kyler, 
(lilleland. F. Siinpson, 
Blaloik, Bachman. Har- 
tiji. Jackson. Third row: 
Reinstedt, Holt, Dicus, 
I'leiffer, Hollings worth, 
Raymond. Trundle, 
Koclkc. Kalbaui;li. I<\ an. 
Second row: Iledrick, 
Bond, Pollack, Kennard. 
Denney, l.yon, Hamp- 
shire, Knight, Patrick, 
(iraves, Zimmerman. 
First ro'w: Meng. Ballard, 
Tillman, Emljrey, Osso, 
lones. Mike, Conner, 
Rowe. 



103 



FOOTLIGHT 
CLUB 



President Arthur Greenfield 

Vice-Presidenl Alvin Goldberg 

Secretary Sugar Langford 

Treasurer Dan Prettyman 




Hale Williams 

Directors and Advisers 



r OLLOWING its custom of presenting every 
type of play, from light, sophisticated comedy 
to deep, serious tragedy, the Footlight Club 
continued the policy established last year of 
giving four productions. 

Capacity audiences greeted each perform- 
ance of the Thespians. Although hampered by 
an inadequate University auditorium, foot- 
light technicians were able to set the i)lays with 
scenery that approached professional finesse. 

The year was opened with production of the 
famed comedy of post-revolution Russian no- 
bility, "Tovarich." Carrying leading roles 



were Mildred Baitz and Bert Coleman. The 
play featured many new faces in campus dra- 
matics, and it was directed by Ralph I. Wil- 
liams, who has been in charge of the club's 
work for the past two seasons. 

Immediate!}- following the presentation of 
"Tovarich," the Footlighters were dealt a blow 
by the resignation from the club presidency of 
Leon Yourtee, who was in his second year as 
executive officer of the organization. Arthur 
Greenfield, serving his second season as trea- 
surer of the dramatic grouj), was selected to 
succeed Yourtree. 



Second row: Yourtee, 
Wharton, Prettyman, 
St. Clair, Coleman, 
Greenfield, Schutz, 
Greenwood, Baitz, Es- 
mond. First row: Cook, 
Goldberg, Langford, Ev- 
erly, Kemp, Jackson, 
Royster, Howard. 




104 




I'riiK'ipals of "Gliosis" 




The duchess in "Tovarich" 



The banker and the butler 




Hack stage shuffle 




Stage crew 



Tryouts for membership in the organization 
were attended by a record number of candi- 
dates. More than 125 hopefuls sought en- 
trance on the club's roster. A new system of 
tests was estabhshed for the neophytes. In- 
stead of assigning parts in one-act plays to the 
candidates, each prospect was given a short 
role, which he presented with the assistance of 
a club member. After rigid trials only fifteen 
were taken into the group. 

With the problem of new membership solved, 
the Thespians turned to their next play. In 
contrast to the light-veined "Tovarich," the 



The final touch 




Atmosphere 




Footlighters selected Henrik Ibsen's classical 
and tragic treatment of heredity and social 
disease, "Ghosts." 

"Ghosts" easily car\ed itself an indelible 
niche in the Footlight hall of fame. Ranking 
along with "Berkele>- Square," and "Death 
Takes a Holida\" for dramatic excellence, 
"Ghosts" scored a tremendous hit on the Old 
Line campus. 

Honors in the small cast were taken by 
Judith Greenwood, whose outstanding work in 
Maryland play-acting is becoming legendar\', 
antl Leon Vourtee, veteran Footlight per- 



106 



ionncr. These two Thespians carried ihi'ir 
parts off with breath-takino; ease and skill. 
Assistino- Miss (ireenwood .ind ^'mIrlee were 
Tom Wharton, David Seidel, Margaret Kemp 
and Martha Corcoran. Miss Kemj) and Miss 
Corcoran alternated in their i)art. 

Dr. Charles B. Hale, until two years ago, 
chih director for more than a decade and 
present Footlight ad\iser, was in charge of 
l)roduction. His excellent interpretation of the 
difficult work was hailed by local dramatic 
critics. 

"First Lady," the keen satire of official 




Last minute check-up 




"First Ladies" 



Washington, which Jane Cowl made famous 
on the professional stage, was the early spring 
presentation of the organization. A novel fea- 
ture of the i^roduction was that it was directed 
by student members of the Footlight Club. 
Arthur Greenfield and Leon Vourtee guided 
the cast in an extremeh* successful show. 

"First Lady," distinctly a woman's pla}-, 
featured one of the largest casts in P^)otlight 
history. Twenty-six students were in the pres- 
entation. In lead roles were Judith Green- 
wood and Tommy St. Clair. Da\id Stoddard 
carried the main masculine assignment. 



Specialist 




107 



VARSITY 
SHOW 



President Thomas Wharton 

Vice-President Zelma Truman Denny 

Secretary Mary Speake 

Treasurer Robert Kinney 

Production Manager Frank Stevenson 

Adviser Harlan Randall 




Randall 
Adviser 



StL'\enson 
Producer 



IHE realization of the well-known desire to 
"see ourselves as others see us" came to stu- 
dents of the University as they saw sixty of 
their talented fellow-classmen perform in 
"Come Walk With Me." This first Varsity 
show', sponsored by the Opera Club — a take-off 
on college life — was student written, produced, 
and financed. 

"Come Walk With Me" satirized the leav- 
ing of memorials by students to their "soon to 
be" Alma Mater. The first two acts were con- 
cerned with the duo of weighty problems fac- 
ing the students — where to get the money for 
the memorial — and to whom to dedicate it. 



After much bickering, it was decided that a 
\'arsity show would be given. The star, singu- 
larly enough, was to be the niece of the wealthy 
uncle of Munro Leaf. The underlying assump- 
tion, of course, was that flattery would make 
the old gentleman produce the much needed 
wherewithal. 

The third act was a review covering the var- 
sity talent in singing, dancing, and acting. Six 
original songs, written by Frank Stevenson 
and Joe Peaslee, were featured. One hundred 
students worked on the show under the super- 
vision of Frank Stevenson, assisted by Sam 
Stedman, Joe Peaslee, and Irvin Cook. 



Ihirmonv in the cast 




108 




Filgate and Embrcy tap 

Holland and Hazard tango 




Filbry to Corcoran, "Will you be 
sensible?" 

Diminutive dynamite 




Gilding the lily 

Craftsmen behind the scenes 



109 




Captain Otto Siebeneichen 

Captain Walter L. Miller 

First Sergeant Murrell Lank 

Quartermaster-Sergeant Fred Kefauver 

Business Manager Fred Perkins 

Drum Major Paul Siebeneichen 

OlXTY-ONE boys and three girls began the 
current year one week in advance of the rest of 
the student body. This group was the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Student Band, under thedirec- 
tion of Otto Siebeneichen, which assembled to 
rehearse for Freshman Week early in Septem- 
ber, 1938. The organization welcomed a new 



faculty adviser in the person of Major Hervey, 
under whose leadership the Band has com- 
pleted a most successful and ambitious pro- 
gram. A new soundproof rehearsal room, lo- 
cated in the basement of Calvert Hall, per- 
mitted two hours per week of unrestrained 
practice, resulting in more skilful playing be- 
fore large audiences. 

A feature of the Band participation at the 
football games was the traditional salute to 
the opponents which was combined with sever- 
al new schemes for trick letters spelled out on 
the field. The Band accompanied the football 
team to Pennsyhania and Syracuse, and 
played at athletic events and on All-Univer- 
sity Night and Field Day. A radio concert in 
the fall and two spring concerts on campus, as 
well as participation at special functions, dem- 
onstrated the important position of the Band 
at the University. 

Members of the Band are awarded M letters 
for regular attendance at a certain number of 
games and rehearsals, and four-year members 
are awarded keys. Although still a young or- 
ganization, the Student Band is rapidly be- 
coming an indispensable addition at all Univer- 
sity functions. 



STUDENT BAND 




Ninth row: Hanson, Hart 
Ei^Iitlirow: Perkins, Ken- 
nedy, Day, Uodson, Ke- 
fauver, Aburn. Seientli 
rmv: Brandt, Steinberg, 
H\inan, I'ranford, Har- 
rison, Kuhlman. Sixth 
roic: Hortman, Hunt, 
Maslin, Machin, 
Schwartz, Martin. Fifth 
row: Douglas, Bon Du- 
rant. McDonald, Criner, 
B. Anspon, Woodward. 
Fourth row: Bageant, 
Jenkins, ( ioodman, Long, 
Price, Sicgel. Tliird row: 
Davis, Weber, Hall, \an- 
degrift, Scott, Klug. Sec- 
ond row: Burton, Mint- 
zer, Beaumont, H. An- 
spon, Goff, Ottin, Rice. 
First row: Capt. Otto 
Siebeneichen, P. Sieben- 
eichen, Miller. 



IIU 



President Daniel Pkkttyman 

Vice-President Steimikn Jones 

Secretary Eleanor Lyons 

Treasurer Mary Lice Ayleswortii 



Under the ahk' IradeTsliij) of Dan Pretty- 
man, the Methodist C'kil) lias tlonrished (hir- 
ing the past year, carrying on and enlarging 
upon the program set by its organizer, the late 
Dr. T. B. Manny. 

Chief among Dr. Manny's projects which 
the chill furthered was the Sunday Evensong. 
Its part in these weekh- j^resentations was a 



leading one among the religious clubs, material 
su])port being given by its sponsorshij) of many 
of the series' outstanding religious speakers. 

Within the organization ])rominent lecturers 
were also introduced to discuss various aspects 
of religion. This year, as in years past, rejjre- 
sentatives were sent to youth conferences in 
Baltimore and Washington, as much to j)ro- 
mote good fellowship as to gain new ideas for 
developing the club's activities. The final fea- 
ture of the round of acti^•ities was the annual 
banquet, held in conjunction with the final 
monthl}' meeting of the year. 

In all, Prexy Prettyman and his lieutenants, 
Mce-President Stephen Jones, Secretary Elea- 
nor Lyons, and Treasurer Mary Lee Ayles- 
worth may satisfactorily look back upon a 
complete and successful business and social 
season. 



METHODIST CLUB 



Third row: .\yles\vorth, 
Gisriel, Coffman. Second 
row/Griffith, McFarland, 
Reynolds, Hart, Cole. 
Firsl row: Simpson, Ev- 
erly, Prettyman, Sense- 
man, McCloskey. 




Ill 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS 



Second row: Elvove, Watkins, Folk, W'il- 
lett, Harvey, Etkintl. McClenon, Home, 
Lynham, McKendree, Clarke, Herman, 
Corbin, First row. Marzolf, Jones, Stab- 
ler, Hodgins, Creese, Lanigan, Stevens, 
Mitchell. 



President Sydney S. Stabler 

Vice-President. Stephen H. Jones 
Sec.-Treas. . John \V. Stevens, II 

1 H E Maryland student l)ranch of the Amer- 
ican Society of Electrical Engineers, although 
founded primarily to further the interest of 
upper class engineers in their intended life work, 
does not deal entirely with alternating currents 
and thermodynamics. Just to prove theirversa- 

MECHANICAL 

1 HE American Society of Mechanical Engi- 
neers is one of the most active of the engineer- 
ing societies. The Mechanical Engineers waited 
long for this society, and they are trying to 
make it a success. 

This year a series of lectures was given h\ 

President Georcje E. Seeley '^f^ 

Vice-President . . H. Alfred Essex 

Secretary Robert J. Lodge 

Treasurer Irving Phh-lips 




tilit}', these future electrical geniuses present 
several social afTairs every year, climaxed by a 
banquet in the spring, besides holding monthly 
meetings at which papers are presented on per- 
tinent subjects. The local group was organized 
in 1936 and is active and successful. 

ENGINEERS 

guest speakers. Motion pictures, field trips, 
and \isits with neighboring societies were also 
included in the program. Several of the mem- 
bers climaxed the year's work by taking a trip 
to the Chase Institute of Technology in Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 



Second row: Gallagher, Kestler, Lodgc_ 
Perkins, Phillips, Seeley, Huckcrt, Kssex_ 
Krafft, Witt, Thompson, Chappelear. First 
ro'w: Shi|)e, Yokum, Otten, l.anhani, Wil- 
son, Steiner, Baniman, Simms, (iessford, 
l.ee, Meeks, Carpenter. 




112 



STUDENT GRANGE 



Master Ku iiAKi) Sitton 

Overseer Wavnk Jerome 

Secretary Lois McComas 

Treasurer \'ernon Foster 



Third roic: Siillixan, Swaiin. Fairiiii;t()n, 
Hailcy, Ahall, Pohlhaus, Hamilton, Clal- 
breath, Reiblich, Shoemaker. McFarlaiul, 
Lowe, Bosley. Second row: Miillinix, Mc- 
Farland, Burroughs, Allen, Enfield, White- 
ford, Jenkins. First row: Menke, McComas, 
White, Brosius, Jones. 



ILNCOURAGED 1)> the largest initiation of 
freshmen in many years, this group began a 
program of social activities that included a 
series of parties, straw rides, and barn dances. 
Many of these affairs were held in cooperation 
with other agricultural organizations on the 




campus. In addition a number of eminent 
speakers in the field of agriculture and home 
economics addressed the students at their meet- 
ings on alternate Thursday nights, while Ksther 
Mullinix and Richard Sutton were delegates of 
the local unit at the State meetings in Baltimore. 



BLOCK AND BRIDLE 



1 H E highlight of the year for the local Live- 
stock Club was its election to the national 
Block and Bridle Club at the convention of 
that organization in November. 

1 1 was because of the club's desire to strength- 
en its purpose: promoting interest in the live- 



stock and dairy industries among the students 
of colleges and universities, that its president, 
James McGregor, applied for entrance of the 
clul) into the national Block and Bridle Club. 
The club holds an annual Cattle Fitting and 
Showing contest in the spring. 



President James McGregor 

Vice-President . Joseph Pohlhaus 

Secretary James Brownell 

Treasurer Wayne Fitzwater 



Third row: Astle, Wyvell, Cooly, Hoshall, 
Remsberg, Brownell, Swann, de.-\lba, J. 
McGregor, Pohlhaus, Donn. Second row: 
Chance, Forsyth, F'ostcr, Northam, W. 
McCjregor, Jones, Fitzwater. First row: 
Brauner, Faith, Baden, Phillips, F'lenier, 
Miles. Adkins, Day. Welling. 




113 



CIVIL ENGINEERS 



Third row: Forrester, 
Mueller, Budkoff, Wil- 
son, Lozupone, Coleman, 
Steinberg, Allen, Carroll, 
Cox, Hewitt, Fletcher, 
Kimball, Cochrane, Da- 
vidson, Ernst, Moore, 
Smith, Aud, Janes, Bar- 
ton, Pyle. Second row: 
McGill, Strausbaugh, 
Purdum, Grogan, Par- 
sons, Gerber, Rector, 
Odell, Slicer, Holbrook, 
Wettje, Franke, Davis, 
Lowe. First row: Cran- 
ford, Ashmun, Bebb, 
Robertson, Scott, Booze. 
Northrop, Bryant, Whar- 
ton. 




President Elliott Robertson 

Vice-President Elgin Scott 

Secretary-Treasurer Edward K. Bebb 



-I H E American Society of Civil Engineers is 
the oldest organization in the United States for 
the advancement of the engineering and archi- 
tectural professions. As a result of the efforts 
of local engineering students, the University of 
Maryland Chapter of the A.S.C.E. was founded 
in 1934. 

During the past year the society sponsored 
several oyster roasts and an informal dance. 
Outstanding among the club's social events 
was the Engineers Ball which was held in 
collaboration with the other engineering so- 
cieties. 

Through the efforts of its members, the so- 
ciet}' was able to bring to the campus several 
outstanding speakers, who presented facts and 
ideas not f(nind in the typical engineering text 
book. Among these lecturers was G. Harvey 
Sargeant, editor of Topographic Maps of the 
Geological Survey. In addition to the speeches 
of outstanding engineers, students presented 
talks, illustrated by slides and motion pictures. 

Membershii) in the American Society of 
Civil Engineers is open to all junior, senior, 
and graduate civil engineers. Sophomores and 
freshmen are eligible only for associate mem- 
bership. 



114 




ORCHESTRA 



Wliitteii, McKarlaiu-, Hailcy, Griggs, 
Siegcl, Haywood, I'eregoff, Bailey, Sieben- 
eichiMi, Hart, Dodson, DiiHuy, Aman, 
Hoshall, Arnold, Anspon, Davis. 



U NDER the direction of Harlan Randall and 
the leadership of Otto Siebeneichen, the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Orchestra has demon- 
strated its versatility throughout the year. 

Following a fling at swing for the Home- 
coming Night "Alumni Mi.xer" dance the or- 



chestra reverted to the classics for the Decem- 
ber Campus Concert, then remained in the 
realm of Liszt and Beethoven for the annual 
Floral and Style Show. An about-face again to 
modern tunes for the X'arsity Show. The final 
appearance was at Commencement Exercises. 



PRESBYTERIAN CLUB 



VjATCHING the vision that greater religious 
influences were needed on the campus, and 
encouraged b}' the fine response to religion 
which the student body in general displayed 
this year, a group of Presbyterian students, 




after expressing their desire to form a club, 
converted their ideas into reality in November 
when thirty members agreed on a constitution, 
elected officers, and laid out general plans for 
the 5^ear. 



President Gus Warfield 

1 'ice-President . . Thomas Wharton 

Secretary Marian Bond 

Treasurer Lois Teal 



Third tow: E. Wharton, T. Wharton, War- 
field, Hall, Secrest, Enfield, Goodman, 
Bond, Lennon. Second row: Ross, Powers, 
Dennis, McGinniss, Brosius, Williams, 
Clark, Nichols. First row: Dennis, Bar- 
ber, Jones, Stoddard, Bragaw, Crindel, 
Thurston, Pierce, Clark. 



115 



F.F.A. 



Third row: p'orsyth, Alnutt. Brownell, 
Pohlhaus, Phillips, Baden, Fitzwater, 
Smith, Da>-, Welling, Sequist, Foster. Sec- 
ond row: Astle, Hoshall. Remsberg, IVIiles, 
Chance. First row: Faith, Downes, Osborn, 
Hudson, McKay, Morris, Northam, Ad- 
kins, Liden, Taliaferro. 



President Wayne Fitzwater 

Vice-President . . . .Charles Astle 

Secretary Carroll Forsyth 

Treasurer Louis Ahalt 




1 HIS agricultural organization known as the 
Future Farmers of America is composed of 
students who major in agricultural education. 
Their endeavor is to teach better methods of 
farming and raise the standards of rural life. 



The major interest of the local collegiate 
chapter is the promotion of an F.F.A. Field Day 
for the vocational agricultural students of the 
high schools throughout the state. 



DAYDODGERS CLUB 



Worrying about flat tires, frozen radia- 
tors and 8:20's is just half the fun of being a 
daydodger, the better half being the opjxjr- 
tunity to belong to that snappy organization 
known as the Daydodgers Club. Originally 
started to bring about a closer union between 



the commuters and university life, the club has 
not only succeeded in its original purpose but 
has also developed a closer relationship among 
the daydodgers themselves. 

I n the brief span of its life, the club has carved 
a niche for itself in the campus hall of fame. 



President Lula Trundle 

Vice-Pres., Mary Louise Ganzert 

Secretary Betsy Ross 

Treasurer Betty Rawley 

Women's League Representative 

Doris Eichlix 

Third row: Pohlman. Xalle>-, Todd, Mer- 
cer, Foster, Schulrumpf, Murphy, Gan- 
zert, Swann, Trundle, Griffith, Hall. 
Keefer, Teal, Boyer, Fichlin, Weber, 
Trundle, McCormac, Aiello. Second row: 
Whitall, Goode, Lyon, Rawley, Brookens, 
Ross, King, Talcott. First row: \'aught, 
Tillman, Henry, Speake, McCardcll, 
Groves, B. Cissel, J. Cissel, Marshall, 
Stoddard, Sargeant, Nellis, .Arnold, Amis. 




116 



LUTHERAN CLUB 




Third row: Rice, Kornmann, Brown, Sul- 
livan, Whipp, Hughes. Second row: Kcp- 
hart, Miller, Ahalt, Harrover, Simons, 
Davis. First row: Zimmerman, Iliyliby, 
Steinmeyer, Ackerman, Harrington, Trun- 
dle. 



^^^^ President William Bkown 

' li ' H^B^ f n^^^K^^l ^^ VI I ^1 ^ ^l^^l r/re-Pre^., M.A.RGARET ZlMMEKM.\N 

i-lilBl 1 Hr^^l^^l ^1 1^^— f^i^^^V^wi^PI Secretary Eleanur KEriiART 

j;l^ iH U f^^M^K^^r-, ^m ^^^A I al^^B ^ ^Pl Treasurer ... Lucille Kornmann 

Or(".AXIZED se\en >ears at;<) at the I'ni- tures on sex education h\ prominent speakers, 

versit}' of Maryland, the Lutheran Club has the chil) has done much toward the realization 

become one of the more acti\e organizations of of its chief aim — the uniting of Lutheran stu- 

its kind on the campus. dents into a closer relationship. 

In addition to taking part in the religious The club's activities included a convention 

activities at the University and sponsoring lee- at the University in the fall for nearby chapters. 

EPISCOPAL CLUB 

The Episcopal Club, active at the Univer- lems and plans of work set forth by this council, 

sityof Maryland since 1921, has since its found- In the absence of a regular minister at the 

ing attempted to foster a sjjirit of Christian local Episcopal Church, Canon Raymond W'ol- 

fellowship on campus. The club is an affiliated ven of the Washington Cathedral has taken 

unit of the National Student Council of the great interest in their work and has conducted 

Episcopal Church and is concerned with prol)- many of the meetings during the \ear. 

I s 11 J VEaI^I^*^ -^^ ^ T President Alhert Miller 

^ s ^^J^i l^t t^^mO^a^t j'x^ l;Vf-Pre5/f/e«/ ... .Caroline Gray 

^^W s ^^H' .^^t^M^S^B^^Skd/F i^XH Cnr. Sec. . .Mary Lee Cramblitt 

Treasurer Richard Lee 




First row: Wailes, K. White, McCarilell. 
Hall. .Second row: Short. Logan, Gray, Lee, 
White, IMumer. Third row:i:rnssv\\. Mayes, 
Cissel, Maslin, RingwaUi. Fourth row: Rice, 
Ziirhorst, Fawcett, Bierly. 



117 



Y.W.C.A 



Third row: E. White, B. 
Boose, Ganzert, Groves, 
Smaltz, Hall, Kraft, 
Gray, Davis, Curry, 
Mangum, Marshall, 
Brookens, Reed, Rein- 
stedt. Sparling, T. Boose, 
Dennis, Logan, Grindel, 
Blum, Mercer, F. White, 
Cann. Second row: Cis- 
sel, Henderson, Ross, 
Bohman, Wolf, Nus- 
bauni, Stoddard, Leigh- 
ty, Seiter, Owens, Korn- 
mann, Magruder, Kahl, 
lager, Plumer. First row: 
Ford, Speake, Jones, Mc- 
Cardell, Coffman, Bow- 
ling, Reynolds, Everly, 
Schutrumpf, B. Ross, 
Bodine, Arnold, Repp, 
Hutchins, Amis, Sar- 
geant, Nellis, Rundell. 




President Matilda Boose 

Vice-President Louise Tucker 

Secretary Edythe Ray Sparling 

Treasurer Elaine Danforth 



1 HE University of Maryland has its own branch of the Young Women's 
Christian Association, which aims primarily to better the relationships 
among the women students. 

In addition to holding discussions for personal improvements, the "Y" 
attempts to train its members in the fundamental lines of social work, the 
need for which is demonstrated through inspection tours to reform schools, 
orphanages and other social institutions. 

Aside from the "Y" proper, there is a freshman commission. It is com- 
posed of all the freshman members under the leadership of Florence White, 
who is the chairman of this commission, and under the advisership of 
Louise Tucker. This group operates as a unit, independent of the main 
organization and holds its meeting once a month — ^but is welcomed to the 
meetings of the regular group. 

Filling baskets and collecting clothes for the poor; giving parties for 
the underprivileged children; entertaining freshman girls at teas; and 
sponsoring fashion shows are some of the activities in which both groups 
l)arlicipate. 



118 



President Victor Raphkl 

First Vice-President Joe Poiilhaus 

Recording Secretary Mary Ann Guyther 

Correspondini^ Secretary Catherine Mileto 

Treasurer Dent Abell 

l\ BACKWARD \it'\v through the Terrapin telescope shows the Newman 
Ckib starting the year off in line style. After initiating fifty new members 
into its organization, it joined the Newman Clul) Federation and sent 
Johnny Jacol)s as its rei)resentati\'e to the Middle Atlantic I^rovincc Con- 
vention. 

From then on throughout the year, the Newman Club sponsored a 
\ariety of activities. At Christmas time it was singing with a concert 
presented by the Newman Club Choral Society. In February it was 
hearts and cupids when the club gave a valentine dance. On May 1st it 
was the more solemn celebration of the anniversary of the first mass held 
on campus. 

Besides that, there was the jolly companionship of communion break- 
fasts. Picnics and hikes helped to enliven the long stretches between 
holidays. 

The Newman Club followed actively its serious pursuits also. Its mem- 
bers had the opportunity of hearing s|)eakers discuss such topics as 
"The Catholic Theatre" and "The Church and Science." In the open 
forums, where there were formal and informal discussions, they could air 
their opinions and receive new ideas. Study clubs were also established 
for the help of Newman Club members. 



NEWMAN CLUB 




Standing: Hopkins, Lis- 
ter, E'"ather Mooney, Mat- 
thews, Birmingham, 
Mudd.Aiello, Augustine, 
Peralta, A. Mudd, De- 
torie, D. Aiello, Nevy, 
Moran, Green, Stakem, 
Dorscy, McLaughlin, 
Ryan, Pohlhaus, MiCor- 
mar,RilL'y, Madigan, Ra- 
phel, Mik-tu, Wittier, Fa- 
ther Walsh. Silting: Car- 
rico, Rau, Santaniello, 
Williams, Blum, Cask, 
Webster, Brooks, Osso, 
(llenii, F. Augustine, 
Farina. 



119 



RIDING CLUB 



Third rmi': Price, Mono- 
crusos, Hodsnn, Rundell. 
Pohlman, Schoolfield, 
Bland. Ferrell, Carroll, 
Huddington, Goldsinilh, 
Randall, Eisele, Jullien. 
Second row: Kuhn, Kraft, 
Davis, Smaltz, Gardiner. 
First row: Burr, Plumer, 
Kuhn, WiUiams, Stag- 
gers, Cohen, Bates, Ru- 
bin, Tapper, Hargy, 
Lyon, Hughes, Ladd. 




President \'irginia Blanck 

Vice-President J. Howard Randall 

Secretary-Treasurer Eleanor Kuhn 



UR.XC hunts, breakfast rides and moonlight trips draw equestrians to 
the University Riding Club. An innovation in the clul) this year, the spon- 
soring of free instructions for beginners, has opened membership to would- 
be equestrians. Heretofore, only experienced riders have been eligilile for 
membership. Intermediate and advanced riders are free to ride, unac- 
conii)anied, and their colorful cavalcades are a frequent sight around the 
campus and Prince (jcorge's County. The opportunity offered for partici- 
pation in the University horse show is a great incentive for improvement 
of individual horsemanship. 

For the sake of repetition the club is handitapi)ed by the lack ot a stable 
on the campus. Undaunted by this unfortunate condition the members 
avail themselves of the horsepower of a nearby stable. Following through 
the L'niversity's custom of offering a theoretical background the club 
in\ ites speakers to the campus who give accurate information on horse- 
manship. Interest of the members in the weekly meetings is held liy 
featuring movies as well as speakers. In this manner, the Riding Chil), 
lacking Shakespeare's kingdom, has substituted a perse^•ering will, in 
exchange for its collective horse. 



120 



President Carl Erode 

Vice-Prcsiiloit Joe Corbin 

Secretary Margaret Hart 

Treasurer MuRiEi. Booth 

^JLX^'()XK who witnessed the 193cS homecoming; parade was probably 
greatlx amused by the Swinnnin.L; Club's contribution to the celebration. 
The float created the right impression concerning the club's activities — 
that of a good time. This organization is one of the few on campus whose 
a\owed iiuri:)ose is to have some fim. 

The bi-weekly swims at the Shoreham Hotel's beautiful 'Venetian pool 
offer a real respite after long periods of hard mental work. Whether you're 
a crawl expert or still struggling along dog fashion there is no better diver- 
sion after studying for those all too numerous hour quizzes than accom- 
panying the Swim Club on its splash parties. 

In addition to the regular parties at the Shoreham natatorium, the 
club has numerous special business meetings during the year. 

To further encourage the idea of fun the .Swim Club once again spon- 
sored its annual dance in the Ciym-Armory. This year's affair was well 
attended by campus socialites and thoroughly enjoyed by everyone. 

The club clima.xed its season of social activities with a beach ])arty 
which was a closed affair. After a long day of swimming and sunning on 
the beach, the members entertained their dates at a dance. 



SWIMMING CLUB 




Third row: Lynliaiii. Hos- 
ley, Hart, Wood, Sense- 
man. Second row: Miller, 
Akehunst, Herman, Wil- 
liams, Trundle, Simpson. 
First row: Medbery, 
Kornmann, Downey, 
l.uras. Mullin, Zimmer- 
man, .\pplci;arlh, I'lu- 
mer. 



121 



TRAIL CLUB 




President Edward Hepburn 

Vice-President Orville Greenwood 

Secretary Georgianna Calver 

Treasurer William Ploying 



Fourlli row: Zimmerman, 
\'oris, Trout, Hubel, 
Keeney, Greenwood, 
Rehberger, Dillon. Third 
row: H. Moore, Wyvell, 
J. Moore. Second row: 
Secrest, Watson, Bit- 
tinger, Calver, Owens , 
Byrn,Mudd,Rowe, Hole- 
man. First row: Hepburn, 
Criner, Oakley, Thomas, 
Kercher, Lenimermann, 
Hall. 



OKTTHR be on time or yoii will trail behind" is the Terrapin Trail 
Club's newly adopted motto. The club, one of the more recent on the cam- 
pus, is to all intents, trailing t)ehind no other organization. Enthusiastic 
members and a well-planned schedule of activities contribute to its prog- 
ress and achievements. 

In addition to regular Sunday afternoon hikes, the club took several 
week-end camping trips to neighboring sections of Maryland and Virginia. 
George Washington Forest and the Skyline Drive in Virginia were both 
visited. During the winter, an all-day hike was no hazard to energetic 
members. Also included in the scheduled winter activities of the club was 
a truly enviable pastime — a ski trip in Pennsylvania. Social life took the 
spotlight with a Halloween party and a highly successful Christmas Ho- 
Down where everyone dressed and did exactly as he pleased. 

At Homecoming the club attracted favorable campus attention l)y 
winning the cup for the most unique float. A photograph}' contest was 
sponsored in which entries were limited to ])irtures taken on hikes. 



122 



INTERNATIONAL 




IHE monthly meetings of the International 
Relations Club have gained the reputation of 
being both interesting and educational. The 
main function of these meetings is to bring 
international!}' prominent men in the field of 
politics to the Maryland campus. Probably the 



RELATIONS 
CLUB 

President Richard E. Lee 

1 'ice-President .... Gladys Person 

Secretary Audrey Boslev 

Treasurer John Gable 

standing: Dennis, Perry, Milcto, Lyon, 
Griffith, Hutson, Joseph, Schnuincr, Hon- 
igman, Ehrhch, Dougherty, Mayes, Sil- 
verman, Pyle, Logan. Third row: Kahl, 
X'orkoeper, White, C, Short, Foote, Hart, 
Balderston, Plumer. Second row: Bowling, 
Mullin, White, F.,Vaiden, Beard, Schindel. 
Cissel, Kemp, Gray. First Row: Head, 
McCardell, Jehle, Lee, Steinmeyer. Bosley, 
Maynard, Rawls. 



most outstanding of the guest speakers this 
year was Dr. Diosdado Yap from the Philijjpine 
Islands. As was customary, the International 
Relations Club completed its year of activity 
with an annual banquet in May of this year. 



DER DEUTSCH VEREIN 

X order to more thoroughh" enjoy their study Washington theatre formed a part of their 



I 

and have a greater opportunity to speak their 
adopted language, those students interested in 
German organized Der Deutsch \erein. 

Occasional trips to German movies at a 



social and educational program. The presenta- 
tion of a play, in German, completed a varied 
program that served well to carry out the ob- 
jectives of the club. 




President.. .Carl A. Blumensteim 
Secretarv-Treas.. Howard Fawcett 



Third row: Waite, Hutson. Second row: 
Stern, Witsell, Lehman, Douglass. Long, 
Barnes, Worgan. First ro'w: Goode, Faw- 
cett, Blumenstein, Hodson, Herman, Kra- 
mer, Dr. I'rahl. 



123 



CLUB MOGULS 



Frank Stevenson 

Production Manager of Mary- 
land's first varsity show — com- 
poser of show's songs — President 
of Glee Club — University Quar- 
tette tenor — leads popular dance 
orchestra — would be Sociology 
Professor and direct a college 
glee club — afp. 

Carl Erode 

Leader of Swim Club — aided 
freshman orientation by spon- 
soring class swim at Shoreham — 
promoted the annual dance and 
Mago Vista Beach party — prin- 
cipal desire, a swimming pool — 

ATO. 

Dan Prettyman 

Organizer and twice head of 
Methodist Club, largest Protes- 
tant group — seeks to found Stu- 
dent Religious Council — would 
build campus chapel — Debate 
Club prexy — intermural debate 
originator — trying to found for- 
ensic honorary — ATO. 

\'ic Raphel 

Twicejjx*»«irttrTvtof Newman 
S-WrT— inducted record numlier 
of new members — inaugurated 
local morning mass — now work- 
ing for denominational accord on 
c a m p u s — i n i t i a t e d N e w m a n 
Club at Randolph-Macon — en- 
ergetic — po]iular — 'V:lK. 




124 



Tom W'liAuroN 

Hciuls ()|H'r;i ("liil) and Tan Beta 
Pi — has i)articii)atL'tl in morr ])la\s 
and operas tlian ainonc on campus — 
l)lays c()nu'(ly roles — Past President 
of Swinunin;^ ("lub A'ice-I'resident 
of Presbyterian Club — Ev-ensong's 
strongest supporter — A.S.C.E — TUii. 



Judy Greenwood 

The Footlight Club's first lad\- — 
seven leads in three years — favorite 
part, Mrs. Alving in Ghosts — -seeks a 
new and better auditorium for cam- 
pus — Junior Class Historian — superb 
talent — witty — aaa; a'I'o. 




Richard K. Lee 

International Relations Club Pres- 
ident — built club to record size — se- 
cured outstanding historical movies — 
treasurer of Episcopal Club — debater 
— sees need for Marriage Relations 
Course — would establish fancy-dress 
"Ball of Nations." 



Arthur Greenfield 

Most prominent Maryland actor — 
"First Lady" production manager — 
four years in the Footlight Club — 
three years in Alpha Psi Omega — 
once a Diamondback columnist — 
scintillating personality — -campus 
funnv man — A>ro. 



125 



r^ 



v^>' 





Charles B. Eichlin 

Physics 

Best loved of profs. . . . 
Eats, sleeps, loves phys- 
ics . . . Knows five lan- 
guages . . . Once mem- 
orized five pages of log- 
arithms. . .Gesticulates 
wildly during lecture. 
. . . Thinks sleep a waste 
of time. . .Reads Amer- 
ican history for relaxa- 
tion . . . Phi Beta Kappa. 



James H. Reid 

Marketing 

Coeds' favorite . . . Grad- 
uate of U. of Iowa . . . 
Ridesstudents... thinks 
they are "lazy devils" 
. . . Likes light opera. . . 
and Civil War history 
... 12 years with Good- 
year . . . Very noncha- 
lant . . . Props one foot 
on chair while lecturing 
. . . Friendly . . . has 
loveh' wife. 



Russell B. Allen 

Civil Engineering 

Yale scholar . . . Known 
as "Rusty" . . . Carries 
supply of black cigars 
. . . Avid Fred Allen fan 
. . . Received slide-rule 
for Christmas from se- 
nior civils . . . Wears old 
felt hat . . . and Boston 
accent . . . Tau Beta Pi. 



126 



Charles B. Hale 

English 

Insists he's impractical 
. . . Yet raises tomatoes 
. . . and a mint patch . . . 
Directs foothght plays 
. . . Superb bridge and 
tennis player . . . Sings 
baritone Gilbert and 
Sullivan . . . Uses terrif- 
ic slang in appropriate 
places . . . Reads detec- 
tive stories . . . Con- 
hrmed bachelor. 



Mrs. Claribel Welsh 

I Ionic luoiioiiiirs 

Lovable . . . Immaculate 
in dress . . . Likes Char- 
lie McCarthy. . . Prej- 
udiced in favor of co- 
eds. . . Sings. . . collects 
house plans . . . Illus- 
trates lectures with hu- 
morous anecdotes . . . 
and im]jcrsonations. . . 
Met husband at Michi- 
gan State . . . Tri Delt 
. . . Phi Kappa Phi . . . 
Omicron Nu. 



John Church Mullins 

Fiiunice 

Enthusiastic ... M.A. 
from Harvard . . . Al- 
ways wears a black tie 
. . . Receives daily a pale 
blue letter in feminine 
handwriting . . . Pet 
aversions . . . fuddie- 
duddie professors . . . 
Secretary checks his ex- 
ams for spelling . . . 
Stooge for Stevens . . . 
Regular fellow. 




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UL 



Ky 




ui 




TTyPIFYING Maryland's cadet corps 
and its group of student officers, is Fred 
Bishopp, smiling and genial colonel of the 
regiment. Top ranking officer in one of the 
state's outstanding units, he ably fills the 
position toward which all underclass ca- 
dets aspire. Versatile, he partakes in such 
interests as Scabbard and Blade, Pershing 
Rifles, and a lovely regimental sponsor, 
yet maintains a high scholastic average as 
an engineer. \\ hen in civilian clothes, 
Fred may be recognized by the Scabbard 
and Blade shield and ODK ke\- dangling 
from his watch chain. 



128 





n 



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rvECIPIENT of the highest War Department rating 
since the year 1926, the University of Maryland is justly 
proud of its record and especially desirous of maintain- 
ing its high standard. 

To the capable army ofificers stationed at the Univer- 
sity goes a great deal of credit, for their policy of de- 
veloping campus leaders as cadet officers and permitting 
them to use individual initiative has borne fruit. "It is 
a conceded fact," says Colonel J. D. Patch, head of the 
Maryland contingent, "that our officers compile the 



130 



finest recortls at summer trainint; camp, both from 
point of conduct and leadership." 

Attesting to the capacities of the army and cadet 
officers and also to the fine spirit of a cooperative regi- 
ment during the 19,^8-39 school year are C'olonel Frank 
T. Kellond, officer in charge of R.O.T.C. affairs for the 




Second row: Sgt. Wood, Sgt. Uhrinak, Sgt. Norris. Firsl row: Capt. Maglin, Maj. llervey, Lt. Col. Patch, Maj. Jones, Maj. W'cstfall. 



Third Corps Area, whose stamp of approval leaves the 
way clear for a War Department inspection, and Gen- 
eral F. T. Hines, director of the X'etcrans' Administra- 
tion at Washington, D.C., both of whom were greatly 
impressed by regimental reviews. 

At a similar review the regiment honored Warrant 
Officer William IMcManus, who after twenty years at 
the University was transferred to Third Corps Area 
headquarters at Baltimore. It was fitting that a gold 
watch be presented at this time to the man who, says 
Colonel Patch, "has done more for the Military Depart- 
ment than any other man." 

With the passing of Military Day on May 9th, with 
its competitions and final inspection, this year by 
General Frank Parker, commander of the famous First 
Division, the regiment may look back with satisfaction, 
yet forward with anticijjation for greater years to come. 



131 



RESERVE OFFICERS 

TRAINING CORPS 



REGIMENTAL STAFF 



BiSHOPP 



Flynn 





Davis 

Williams 




Strausbaugh 



Hill 



Stevens 



BiSSET 




132 




Banners unfurled 




COLOR 
GUARD 



Grim reminders 



I'arewell to a Maryland iraditioi 



K.O.T.C. brainl raster? 



133 




Weidinger 

Stabler 
Jackson 



Hewitt 
Harrover 



Harvey 

Watson 



iMacDonaUl 



Gude Kern 

Buddington Webb 



Alperstein 
Baskoff 



Hall 
Foley 



Beers 
Parker 



FIRST 
BATTALION 




Adams 
^'arbougll 




134 



SECOND 
BATTALION 







Jones 



Kobertsun 
McCann 



Zalesak 
Unger 



Tarbett 
Stillwcll 



Ireland 
\ aiden 



Krafft 
Kenvon 



DeArmey 
Vonkers 



Simons 

Carpenter 
Frey 



Cronin 
Irwin 



Oakley 
Criner 



135 



THIRD 
BATTALION 






.^hH^A. 4M^lk 




M^MMM^ 





H. Kreuzburg 



Scott 
Moskey 



Ashnuin 
Chaires 



Capossela 
Mclndoe 



Elvove 
Katz 



Essex 
Thomas 



Farrell 
Smith 




E. Kreuzburg 



O'Xeill 
Hoenes 



Perkins 

Walde 



Seeley 

Justus 



136 




FOURTH 
BATTALION 



Lanigan 



Davis 
Salb 



JdnscliLT 



Freudenberger Soule 

Whiteside Slee 



Howard 
Dunn 



Gerber 
Broolis 



Wilson 

Spelsburg 



Mellen 
Hemmeter 



Gottlieb 
Holmes 



Witt 
Phelps 



BAND 



Grunwell 



Miller 





137 



VARSITY 

RIFLE 

TEAM 



Coach Major Charles Jones 



Manager . 



. W'arrex Davis 




Third nm: Norris, Kern, Hodges, Edgerton, John Marzolf, Joseph Marzolf, Maj. Jones. 
Second row: Haskin, Imus, Soule, Damuth, Preble, Greenip. First row: Davis, Lanigan, 
Jensen, Meeks, Riley, Laughhead. 



r OR the past three years, the varsity ritie 
team has been the recipient of numerous honors 
and has broui^ht t(j the University of Maryhmd 
outstanding trophies in the field of marksman- 
ship. The team has been Corps Area champions 
for three years, winners of the National Re- 
ser\? Officers Training Corps meet for two 
years, and winners of the Hearst trophy for 



two years. 

Among the teams competing with the local 
squad this season were: Georgetown Univer- 
sity, Gettysburg College, George Washington 
University, United States Naval Academy, 
Lehigh, and Marine Guard at the Washington 
Navy Yard. Besides these shoulder-to-shoul- 
der meets, sixty postal matches were scheduled. 



FRESHMAN RIFLE TEAM 



J\T the outset of the season, fifty men joined 
the Freshman rifle squad. Few of this group 
had any prexious experience in high or prep 
schools, necessitating initiation to the art of 
marksmanshi]) by Major .Stewart Hervey, 
Freshman rifle coach. 



In spite of the lack of previous experience, 
the team enjoyed a successful season. It was 
led by Fletcher Jones from Camp Perry, Ohio, 
who consistently raised his team's average 
with exceptionally high scores. 




Coach M.A.JOR -S. D. Hervey 

Manager F. H. JoNES 



Second row: Sgt. Norris, \'alentine, Jones, 
Raymond, Carpenter, Hopkins. First row: 
Davis, Ciristtoki, Waters. Cioodman. 



138 



n 



n 



n 



m 



to 



Captain Warren Davis 

Senior ist Lieutenant Donn Strausbauoii 

Junior 1st Lieiiteminl ToM Riley 

Junior ist Lieutenant Bii.i, McManus 

Senior 2nd Lieutenant Bill Souder 

Junior 2nd Lieutenant Joseph Marzolf 

1 KRSHlX(i Rifles was organized at the Uni- 
\crsity of Maryland in 1935, in order to afford 
recognition as well as special military training 
to outstanding members of the basic R.O.T.C. 
course. Since the founding, its growth has been 
steady, and this year, membership reached 125. 



Initiates to Pershing Rifles are educated to 
the mode of military life when they visit Cam]) 
Meade for the initiation exercises. Typical 
arnn- food is served at the initiation bancjuet, 
and for a few hours the l)arracks are thrown 
open to the inspection of the unit. The evening 
is closed by the formal initiation of the new 
members under an exceptionally l)eautiful and 
impressive ritual. 

Msiting corps area officers who inspect the 
Maryland unit are impressed by the high 
"esprit de corps" and the willing cooperation 




Pershing Rifles has been noted on the cam- 
pus for the number and the success of its ac- 
tixities. Zouave and silent drills have been 
sponsored for the past four years at the All- 
University Night festivities: outstanding visi- 
tors, Sumner Welles and others during the past 
year, were escorted by the Pershing Rifles unit ; 
an annual banquet and, in the spring, a dance 
are held for the members; and the unit marches, 
en masse, in the Army Da}- parade in Washing- 
ton. These are only a few of the organization's 
activities. 



between the unit and the military department. 
Becau.se of these characteristics, the local chap- 
ter is among the leading units of the entire 
national organization. 

Not only has the unit attracted attention 
along this line, l)ut it has also gained national 
recognition in rifling circles. The unit's rifle 
team, com]K)sed mainly of varsity marksmen, 
has won the national meet for the past two 
years. As this book goes to press it is apparent 
that the troi)h\- will remain at Maryland for 
another \ear. 



139 



(i^jQ /c> 




T( 



OP hat, white tie, and tails, tyjiify 
George Lawrence, the Junior Prom 
Chairman, in one of his more festive 
moods. It was largeh* ckie to his efforts 
that this year's prom was such an out- 
standing success. College is not all a 
song and dance to George, however, for 
(luring the past two years he has starred 
on the Varsity football team and earned 
a mid field position on the lacrosse 
sciuad. He spends the remainder of his 
time in attending classes — and incident- 
alh', making good grades. 



14(1 





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Prom royalty 



Prom Chairman 
George Lawrence 

Committee Chairmen 

William Brown 
Elizabeth Harrover 
Lorraine Jackson 
Kelso Shipe 



Breathing spell 



Committee Members 

Francis Beamer 
Jack Brown 
Richard Carroll 
William Cole, III 
Albert Coleman 
Elaine Dan forth 
Armand (joldstein 
Judith Greenwood 



Edwin Harlan 
Samuel Harris 
George Heil 
Norman Holzapfel 
Betty Hottel 
Margaret Kemp 
James Kemper 
Jane Legge 



\'irginia Long 
James McGregor 
Charles Parvis 
Jack Phillips 
Frank Skotnicki 
Sara Ann \'aiden 
Murray \'alenstein 




142 





Big moment 



Whv dance? 



Perfect timing 



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Swinging to the smooth rhythms of maes- 
tro Eddy Duchin, Maryland socialites attended 
a highly successful Junior Prom in the grand 
ballroom of the Willarfl Hotel. 

A novel promenade, featuring flower-laden 
arbors, was led by Kitty Wolfe and Tom Cole- 
man, assisted by Margaret Kemji and George 
Lawrence. The climax of a glamorous evening 
occurred when Duchin went on the air over a 
national network. Opening his broadcast with 
an unforgettable \'ersion of Maryland's "\'ic- 
tory Song," supplemented by a rousing student 
chorus, Eddy com|ileted a sparkling program 
with "Sons of Old Marj'land." 



143 



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Properly enough the founders in 1891 chose the 
name of the Club from the historic old Inn which stands 
on the campus. In days of yore the Inn was the first 
stage coach stop out of Washington to Baltimore and, 
as stops were wont to be in those days, it was a social 
center. The socially inclined students of the early mili- 
tary days recognized the need of a social club and since 
the Rossbourg Inn was the most traditional campus 
landmark that had any indication of early social life 
they appropriately called it the Rossbourg Club. 

This year the Inn is being restored as a clubhouse for 
the faculty and alumni and replicas of the original 
furniture will lie used. The discovery of old maps and 
plans has made it possil)le to reconstruct the Inn in its 
original colonial architecture. 




Rossbourg officers and dates 



lli-kii Forrest, vocalist, with .Artie .Shaw 



144 




Wclcoinini^ (-ominittee for ticket holders 

Dancing to music by Artie Shaw 



lounlain works oxerlime 



n 



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D 



Today the club carries on with its social tra- 
ditions and offers five of the best dances on the 
hill. The increasing popularity of these dances 
has made it necessary to limit admission to 
members onh'. The expansion of membership 
has come a long way from the days when the 
small attendance at the Rossl)ourgs made it 
possil)le to hold them in the Dining Hall. This 
year Marylanders have danced to some of the 
nation's best orchestras: Paul Tremaine, Bunny 
Berrigan, I^ick Mesner and Artie Shaw. 



145 




Ascending ... to the 
heights 



CALVERT COTILLION 



At the Calvert Cotillion the campus "Big-Wigs," or 
the Omicron Delta Kapps, assembled to "swing" to the 
music of the Townsmen on November eighteenth. All 
the ODK's and guests were presented with attractive 
leather dance programs and pennants in the fraternity 
colors of blue and white. 

The dance committee consisted of John Muncks, the 
general chairman ; George Eierman, chairman of the chap- 
eron committee; and Logan Schutz and Leon Yourtee, 
chairmen of the decorations and souvenirs. 




They led the dance 




.\lloi--Malh 



146 




MILITARY BALL 



"March Militaire" 
The life of a Sergeant 



Committee Chairmt'ii: Lewis 
Jones, Elliott Robertson, Donn 
Strausbaugh, Fred Bishopp, El- 
gin Scott, Sidney Stabler, Wil- 
liam Davis, Patrick Lanigan, 
Richard O'Neill. 



INTO the K'iirc of the beacon on the 
night of Tuesday, February 21st, 
stepi)e(l the military-minded to dis- 
i:)Iay their finery and dance from ten 
o'clock till the following morning at 
two. 

To the swing time of Dave McWil- 
liams and his orchestra, displacing 
the march time of the military band, 
danced a representative military gath- 
ering. A(hanced and basic corps uni- 
forms, Army and Marine dress attire, 
civilian tuxedos, and the ladies' eve- 
ning gowns, added to the array of 
bright flags and banners, sprayed 
color over the dance floor. Espe- 
cially appropriate also were the ma- 
chine guns and howitzers placed in 
advantageous positions on the side- 
lines. 

The midnight promenade, led by 
Cadet Colonel Fred Bishopp and 
Sponsor Patricia Flynn, was intri- 
cately planned and maneu\ered, and 
blended handsomely with the entire 
distinctive fla\"or of the Militarv Ball. 



Military maneuvers 




147 



SWIM CLUB DANCE 




Orchestra Chairman James Martin 

Decoration Chairman, Margaret Kibler 

General Committee . . Frances Williams 

Martha Rainalter 

Beryl Mullin 

Ann Esciiner 



L.LIMAXING the Swimming 
Club's social season was the group's 
annual dance which was held in the 
Gym-Armory in the latter part of 
March. Approximateh' a hundred 
couples had a gala time dancing to 
music which was under the direc- 
tion of Maryland's local band lead- 
er, Frank Stevenson. This function 
was limited for the first time to 
members and their friends; and 
since it pro\ed to be so successful, 
it is expected b>- the Swimming 
Club officers to become a tradition- 
al e\ent on the cam])us. 



Around the bandstand 



Even the leader had fun 




148 




Buckv, Bea, and the "Boss" 



Cli[ilon autographs and tosses kisses 



INTERFRATERNITY 



BALL 



Luther Mellon 

Chairman 



J_/ARRY CLINTON and his sensational swing band 
with the famed songstress, Bea Wain, attracted Mary- 
hind fraternity men and their dates to the annual Inter- 
fraternit\- Ball on April the 28th. 

The L'ni\ersity socialites danced to Clinton's sweet 
swing in the Ritchie Gymnasium which was attractively 
decorated in white crej^e i^aper, colored lights, fraternity 
shields and banners, and filled it to its capacity. As a 
feature of this gala affair, each coed received a minia- 
ture interfraternity paddle as a souvenir. 





Jive by Ford Leary 



I,arr\- Clinton 
Bea Wain 



149 




McFarland, Pitzer, Scott 
Aring, Peaslee, Maslin 



JUNE 
WEEK 



General Chairman — Joseph Peaslee. Committee Chairmen — 
Louise Tucker, Samuel McF"arland, Julius Ireland, Luther Mel- 
len, Margaret Maslin, Bernice Aring, Elgin Scott, Doris DeAlba. 
Committee Members — Richard O'Neill, Jane Kephart, Liez Nevy, 
Herbert Hall. John Parks, Mary Hedda Bohlin, Henry Johnson. 
Evelyn B>rd, William Howard, Robert Benbow, Henry Wyatt, 
Mary Speake, Frank Dippel, Thomas Wharton, Betty Law, 
Edith-Ray Sparling, Lester Simons, Nora Huber, Gus Warfield, 
Lloyd McGill, Kathryn Adkins, Margaret MacDonald, Mar- 
guerite Stevenson, Harry Anspon, Jerome Hardy. 



SOPHOMORE 
HOP 



Tf 



.HE Sophomore Prom was one of the 
most unique social events of the year, 
bringing to the campus for the first time 
an all-girl orchestra. There was standing 
room only in front of the bandstand as 
the l)oys, dragging their dates behind 
them, clamored for a glimpse of Janis 
Williams and her Coquettes. Stags 
stood row on row, giving way only to 
the midnight prom led by John Harn, 
Frances Rosenbusch, Frank Davis and 
Mary Jane Haskell. 




Sophomores on parade 
The feminine touch 



150 



FRESHMAN 
FROLIC 



1 HE gay frosh set a precedent 1)\' 
omitting' the usual grand march and 
allowing conxentional swinging to he 
replaced In barbarism when the "jitter- 
hugs" claimed the spotlight at the 
Freshman Prom. 

Decorations, masking the identity of 
the Gym-Armory, created an air of fes- 
tivity, and "The Men About Town" 
set the tempo for a gala evening. 

Hilarity, the keynote of the day, 
made the Prom an important event in 
the annals of the Freshman Class as 
well as a gay meuKjry for all those pres- 
ent. 




'42 Muguls 
Rats romp 



BARN DANCE 



OUNBONNETED maids and overalled men, corn- 
stalks and apple cider lent atmosphere to the Ag hoys' 
night out — the second annual barn dance sponsored by 
the College of Agriculture. To further typify the occa- 
sion small groups gathered together doing square dances 
and Virginia reels. The dance was a complete change 
from the formality of the Rosshourgs, the Prom, and a 
rollicking good time was had 



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Choirc chickens 





A. MORE capable judge than 
Howard Chandler Christy could 
not have been hoj^ed for to select 
Maryland's 1939 Campus Queen. 
For Mr. Christy in his two score 
and more years of illustrating 
and portrait painting has stirred 
millions in admiration of his 
dashing depictions of high-born 
ladies and chivalrous men. His 
contributions to art have gained 
for him numerous awards as well 
as undying fame as creator of the 
famous "Christy Girls" of nearly 
two decades ago. 

The Terrapin and Mr. How- 
ard Chandler Christy, selector of 
five Miss Americas, take pleas- 
ure in presenting Miss Maryland 
and her court for 1939. 







\52 




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MISS MARYLAND 



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J^ozomu J^ainii 









<::A/{aiian <:J\/\aU£.i, 




IjETTER known as "Bud" by his ca'm- 
pus friends, and as "Jarring Jim" or 
"Jumbo" to the sports cohimnists, Jim 
Meade has earned for himself a place in 
the University hall of fame. For three sea- 
sons his thrilling line drives have provided 
excitement for spectators and spurred 
his teammates onward. Although in- 
jured during the past season he attended 
every game, and from the bench su])plied 
his customary incentive and inspiration 
to his team. During the same four years 
Bud strengthened his claim to immortal- 
ity with a sensational career as a midfield 
man on the lacrosse squad. 




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5a(/^ ^oji'.- Mintzer, Minion, Sedlak. Da\is, Morris, Knust, Miifller, Wood, Huss, Heyer, Lumsden, 
Miller, Neilson, Morton, Ochsenreiter, Widener. Third row: Knepley, manager: Abell, Gienger, 
Albarano, Cohen, Brand, Lloyd, Lawrence, Devlin, Krouse, Fox, Race. Second row: DeArmey, 
Mondorff, Boyda, Hewitt, Budkoff, Beamer, Meade, Skotnicki, Brown, Blazek, Dwyer. Front 
row: Shaffer, McNeil, Forrester, Cochrane, Murphy, Bengoechea, Weidinger, Rudy, Smith. 



r OR a team that lined up on paper as one of 
the best teams in the East, the Jackson trophy 
and a frozen victory over Washington and Lee 
combined to form the meagre rehsh enjoyed by 
the 1938 Maryland grid squad. Seven defeats 
by teams from Syracuse to Florida splattered 
a potentially attractive schedule in games that 
often suggested assault and battery. 

As Bud Meade trotted around right end 
early in the second quarter of the Richmond 
game Sei)tember 24, it a])peared to Maryland 
fans to be just another opening game for the 
Terps, for glancing back over the years, it is 
difhcult to find records of Maryland teams los- 
ing their opening games. However, this single 
touchdown was destined to be the only mark 
that the Dobson men made on their foes in the 
first three games. Richmond took tlie situa- 
tion in hand f(;ll()\ving Meade's assault and 
scored before the half was o\er. In the second 



half, Richmond struck twice more and left a 
bewildered Maryland student Iiody holding a 
19-6 defeat. 

Charlie Weidinger was nursing an injured 
knee from the Richmond skirmish, and Frann\- 
Beamer stayed home with a sprained ankle 
when the Terps op])osed the Nittany Lions at 
State College October 1 and absorbed the 
worst licking administered a College Park dele- 
gation in several \ears. The Lions completely 
outiila>ed and outbattered the Terps to a 33-0 
score, and it was in this tilt that the most seri- 
ous blow struck the Maryland camp as Jim 
Meade sustained a broken ankle which lorced 
him to the sitlelines for the remainder ot tlie 
season. 

Six regulars heard radio rei)orts in College 
Park of the shellacking gi\-en their team b\- the 
Syracuse eleven. The Orangemen completely 
flominated the held, swamping the Terrapins 



160 




Ucagy 



Dolison 



l-.iln-i- 




Knepley 



under a 53-0 score. An insijired march by the 
Terps in the second periocK by passes from 
Mueller and Shaffer to DwjVr and Widener 
advanced the ball to the Syracuse nine, but 
lost it on downs on the sixteenX This was the 
solitary threat afforded by the yerps as the 
Hillmen tallied 27 points in the nrst half and 
26 in the second. 

Coach Frank Dobson's men tWned the 
tables the following; .Saturtlay by i)i\mmeling 
the Western Maryland Terrors 14-8 yef ore a 
mildly surprised audience in the Baltimore 
•Stadium, October 15. With their team trailing 
8-0 at the half, the Maryland l)ackfield\con- 
s])ired with the line, and shifting Frank BlXzek 
from end to guard, the\' set about to score twVce 
in the last half, to defeat the Terrors once mtVe 
and retain the .State championship. A secon 
])ermanent l)low was struck the Mar^lanc 
forces as George Gienger, 210-pound sopho 



more guard, was re/ipient of a fractured cheek 
bone. 

By this time I^ondorft' was out with a])i:)en- 
dicitis. 

A stubborn /rew faced X'irginia on October 
22, and they ofisplayed a bit of the Old Liners' 
form as the tirst minutes of ])lay netted a touch- 
down by vii^ue of a 35-yard i)ass from Weidin- 
ger to Beamer. The Cavaliers retaliated with 
powerful loackfield ])lay anfl aerial work which 
gave thgrn a final 27-19 margin over the Old 
Liners. , 

The/alumni found little solace in the rain 
of Hofnecoming Day and the work of the Terps 
agai/st a hard-hitting Mrginia Military In- 
stimte team the following Saturday. Led by 
Pa((d Shu, Junior .All-Southern Conference 

ilfback, the Keydets completely swamped the 
iners under a 47-14 barrage. 

Luckih-, perhaps, Maryland had an open 



161 



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Meade rounding end against Penn State 



date November 5, and Coach Dobson took 
advantage of the breather to send the team 
through a rigorous ten-day session of "con- 
ditioning" for the Florida tilt on November 12, 
at Gainesville. 

The Floridans had absorbed much misfor- 
tune on their own ledger earlier in the season, 
and the Marylanders entered the fray slight 
favorites. Both teams were in the air from the 
beginning to the gun, but with the aid of 
numerous well-placed fumliles on the Mary- 
land team, the 'Gators came out of the fray 
with a decisive edge of 21-7. 

Georgetown fans enthusiastically wagered 
all comers 3 to 1 odds with Ho\'a backers spot- 
ting 13 points in the pre-game rivalry between 



VVeidinger 



Forrester 

Budkoff 

DeArmev 




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Bright 



K. Smith 



Blazek 




Beamer 

Mueller 
D\\ ver 



Albarano (wearing mask) rushes in to stop ("lillette of Virginia 



Pass that led to first touch- 
down against Western Mary- 
land. 




Frank Skotnicki scoring 
against MA. I. 




Skotnicki 

Boyda 

Widener 



Murphy 
Shaffer 




a Georgetown campus boasting an undefeated 
team and the College Park campus suffering 
under six defeats and a lone win. However, 
things had not come to that sad state of affairs 
at College Park, and a stout Liner stand held 
the dangerous Hoya to a 14-7 in a demoraliz- 
ing downpour in Byrd Stadium. 

However, out of the gloom of seven losses 
came one spectacular bit of sterling footliall 




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that was full compensation for the uitrepid 
indix idiials who braved the Thanksgiving Day 
blizzard to see the Terps face the Washington 
and Lee Generals at Baltimore. After failing to 
imj)ress the Lexington boys with their poten- 
tialities in the first half of the game, the Old 
Liners suddenly took up the sword, and led by 
the unsung Rip Hewitt, placing his last game, 
struck three times through the air to win the 
second and last game of the season. 




\ll .,11 ,111' 1 


Brown 


Krouse 


Lawrence 


Cochrane 


Lloyd 




Murphy scoring first touchdown in the 
Washington and Lee game. 






Shipley 



Sinims 



r LASHING an array of talent that landed 
three members of the team on the All-Southern 
Conference Tournament ti\e, the Maryland 
basketball (|uint dribbled through one of the 
most successful seasons in recent \ears, George 
Knepley, captain and outstanding guard in the 
South; hlddie Johnson, center and one of the 
high scorers in the Conference; and George 
DeWitt, flashy forward and leading scorer in 
the District, led the Terps in to the finals of 
the Southern (Conference tournament earl\- in 
March. 

The Old Liners entered the tournament 
March 2nd with eight wins and three losses be- 
hind them, ranking second to Wake Forest, 
the fa\orite with ten against two. Coach Ship- 
ley's five made easy work ol Richmond and 
North Carolina State, both of whom had beat- 



en the Terps earlier in the season. In the finals 
though, the Maryland team lost DeWitt on 
fouls soon after the beginning of the second 
half when Clemson was leading by a one ])oint 
margin. From that time on, the Clemson 
Tigers did not relintiuish their lead, gradually 
forging ahead to a final score of Clemson, v^9; 
Mar\-land, 27. 

The Shiple\men opened with a disa])point- 
ing start b\' leasing to an under-rated Rich- 
mond team, 41 ,-)4 on December 13th. On suc- 
ceeding nights, they defeated two .Southern 
Conference foes, Clemson and Da\"idson, and 
then retired for the Christmas h()lida\s. The 
Terps then ran into some tough teams in the 
North, losing games to Arm\ , I'enn, and Xa\\', 
in succession. 

In the ensuing se\en-game stretch, the Terps 



166 




McFadden, Johnson, UeW'itt, and .Moorman fight for 
ball in Maryland-Clemson final game at Raleigh. 



George Knepley sinks one from side court against Kirhmom 



won the first six, defeating Duke and North 
Carohna twice each, and X'irginia and Hamp- 
den-S\chiey once and losing onh- to North 
Carolina State in Raleigh h\' a 46-40 score. 

Nine men received letters for the season's 
work. Three sophomores, Dick Shaffer, George 




Three X.C. Stale boys and Eddie Johnson 
struggling for the ball in semifinal game of 
Southern Conference basketball tournament. 



DeWitt, and Gene Ochsenreiter were awarded 
their monogram for the first time in l)a.sketball. 
Adam Bengoechea, regular forward; Pershing 
Mondorff, regular guard, Francis Beamer, sub- 
center; and Bill Rea, forward, were the juniors 
on the team. Coach Shipley loses only Ca])- 
tain "Dutch" Kneple>- and Eddie Johnson 
through graduation. 

RESULTS FOR SEASON 

U.ofMd. 0pp. 
Decemlier 1.^ — 

Richmond at RichmcMul ... 34 41 

December 15 — 

Clemson at College Park ... 45 35 

December 16 — 

Davidson at College Park . . 44 27 

Januar\" 4 — 

Pcnns\ Uania at Philadel|)hia 24 36 

Januar\' 7 - 

Arm\- at West Point .... 25 45 

January 1 1 — 

Navy at Annajjolis ... .37 47 

Januar},- 13 — 

Duke at College Park .... 37 34 



167 



Knepley 
Johnson 
Beanier 
Shaffer 





Alondorff scores in \ irj^inia game 

U. of Md. 0pp. 
January 20 — 

North Carolina at College Park 34 32 

January 21 — 

Hampden-Sydney at College 

Park 34 25 

January 28 — 

Virginia at College Park . . 31 21 

F"ebruary 2 — 

Duke at Durham 60 44 

February 3 — 

North Carolina at Chapel Hill 66 41 

February 4 — 

North Carolina State at Raleigh 40 46 

Februar>' 8 — 

Georgetown at College Park . 25 39 

Feliruary 1 1 — 

Washington and Lee at (\)llege 

Park \ 39 37 



168 















U. 


ofMd. 


Opp. 


Feliruar\ 


14— 














W 


illiam 
I^irk 


and M; 


;iry 


at 


College 




49 


57 



20 
53 35 



40 



38 



February 15 — 

St. John's College at Annai)olis 48 

February 18 — 

WM.L at College Park . . 

Fel)ruary 20 — 

Catholic U. at Brookland . 

Feliruar}- 22 — 

George Washington at Tech. 

C.ym 24 37 

February 24 — 

Washington College at College 

Park 47 37 

March 2, 3, 4— 

Southern Conference Tournament at 
Raleigh, N.C. 

Maryland, 47 — Richmond, 32. 

Maryland, 53 — North Carolina State, 29. 

Maryland, 27— Clemson, 39. 




Rea 



DeWitt 

Bengoediea 
Ochsenreitcr 
Mondorff 



169 



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Miller 



Stiener 



Goldberg 



v^OACH Haney L. "Heinie" Miller presented 
his anxious followers with their second unde- 
feated season and second Southern Conference 
chamj^ionship in his three years of coaching- at 
ColleRC Park. 

In the fall with lettermen Benny Aljjerstein, 
Nate Askin, George Dorr, Bob Bradley and 
Newt Cox returning from the 1938 team, pros- 
pects loomed bright for a successful campaign. 
Problems, however, cropped up in finding suit- 
able material for the light-heavy and the heavy 
weights divisions as there was an extreme 
dearth of exj^erienced material in those weights 
on the camjjus. 

The Terps' first meet brought them a 5-3 
victory over the strong Duke octet. In this 
event Frank Cronin began his sensational car- 
reer as a college boxer. Unusually fast, Cronin, 
who had made history for himself and the 
Terps on the cinders for three years before, 
won his first collegiate fight and established 
himself in the regular i:)ositi()n at 155 pounds. 

P\>llowing the Duke meet, the Old Liners 
met with three successive stalemates, tying 



Catholic University at College Park January 
28, X'irginia at Charlottesville February 4, and 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill February 11. 
The Catholic U. fights at College Park before 
a full house at Ritchie Coliseum saw the Brook- 
land underdogs manipulate the seemingly im- 
possible in backing the Terps into their own 
corner for a draw score. 

X'irginia and North Carolina also came up 
strongly in the last bouts to gain draws with 
the Terps. George Dorr, Bob Bradley, Benny 
Alperstein, Nate Askin, Frank Cronin, Newton 
Cox, Morty Steinbach, and Herman Raisin 
saw action in all of these fights. 

All llniversit>- Night, February 18th, drew 
Rutgers lTniversit>' for the nightcap of three 
hours' entertainment. Benny Alperstein sat 
the matches out as Rutgers forfeited the light- 
weight bout because of illness. George Dorr 
ended even with Joe Colonna in the bantam 
division, and Bob Lodge lost to Cilenn Howatt 
in the light heavyweight on a third round 
T.K.O. while the other five members of the 
team won their i)()uts liandiK'. 



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Coach Miller, Lcites, Steinbach, Steiner, mgr., Raisin, l-oclge, Asst. Coach Magliu 
Bradley, Alperstciii. Dorr, Askin, Croniii, Cox. 



Alperstein opposing Uradley of Clenison 
Cox engaging Cason of Clenison 
Cronin leaxing the ring after defeating Hughes 
of S.C. in the final. 




171 




Following the Southern Conference tourna- 
ment at Columbia, S.C., in which the Mary- 
landers collected 15 points to take the cham- 
pionship and three titles to College Park cam- 
pus, the Terps defeated an exceptionally strong 
Army team 4j^-3^ for the outstanding victory 
of the year in the East. At the beginning of the 
final bout of the evening, the Old Liners were 
leading the Cadets 4-3. Steinbach, fighting 
his first season this year, held Lou Taylor to a 
draw with his looping left arm, which the Army 
man could not seem to dispose of. 

Cronin won all of hisfights during the season, 
ending with a Southern Conference title in the 
middleweight division. Newt Cox, after an 
olif-and-on season, took the 165-pound title, 
and Benny Alperstein repeated in the light- 
weight class. 



172 



1939 Record 

Jaiuiar\ 14 — Duke at Durham, 5-3. 
January 28 — Catholic V. at College Park, 4-4. 
February 4 — Virginia at Charlottesville, 4-4. 
February 11 — North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 

4-4' 
February 18 — Rutgers at College Park, 6>2- 

February 24 and 25 — Southern Conference 
tourney. (Won title with 15 points.) 

March 4 — U.S. Military Academy at College 
Park, 4>^-3 1^. 



Ben Jacobs, V'irginia, and Bob Bradlc>- fight a draw in the 
127-pound bout. 





173 





^^ 



ShiplL-y 



Seeley 



M R. SH I PLEY'S liaseball teams have always 
l)een known as outstanding ones, and this sea- 
son's nine was no exception. It packed power 
in every department, with Eddie Johnson, who 
was shifted from second base to short stop for 
his concluding year; and Hugh Keller, holding 
down right field, both making names for them- 
selves in their own right. 

Pershing Mondorff, 195-pound pitcher, 
started many of the games, but the hurling 
limelight fell throughout the season on south- 
paw Earl Springer, crafty junior from Hagers- 
town who promises to be one of the best 
moundsmen ever developed at Terpland. Per- 
haps Springer's outstanding achievements of 
the season were his consecutive shutouts of 
Dartmouth, 10 0, and Rutgers, 3-0, the latter 
game being rained out in the si.xth inning. 

Turk Burns was first string catcher as a 
junif)r, and with the Chumbris brothers. 
Shorty and Lefty, presented a formidable 
murderers' row to any ojiposing pitcher. The 
Chimil)ris combinaticjn finished this year a 
brilliant duo of careers on the Old Line dia- 
mond. -Sherod Robertson, although out nuicli 
of the first ])art of the season with a ]:)ulled back 



muscle, returned to complete his initial year of 
\ arsity work. George Knepley, stellar first 
baseman, was one of the most dependable 
fielders and hitters on the team, and with 
Adam Bengoechea, utility spark plug from 
Utah, completed the lineup for most of the 
games. 

The Terps got off to a slow start with a close 
4-v? defeat by Ohio State in their opener, but 
came back strong to down X'ermont, Mrginia 
Polytechnic Institute, Dartmouth, and Rut- 
gers by high and conclusive scores. However, 
Virginia Military, Boston College, and Mich- 
igan proved too strong for the Marylanders 
though they came back strong against Mich- 
igan to even the score in games with the power- 
ful Wolverines, and again defeated the X'.P.L 
nine by a basketball score. 

Two victories that Coach Shipley is jiroud to 
boast of are those of the Georgetown and Duke 
games. Georgetown, which had beaten the 
Terps in both football and basketball, seemed 
headed for their crowning achie\ement and 
their eighth straight \'ictory, but the College 
Park underdogs pushed four runs across the 
pay liench in the final canto after two were out 



174 




Froiil roic: Burton CuKer, Fritz Mai.st-l, Hugh Keller, Lefty Chumbris, Ailaiii l-tengoeihea. Middle row: Joe Crisafull, ( ieorge Knepley, 
Kddie Johnson, Shorty Chumbris, Sherry Robertson, Arthur Rudy, Bob Burns. Baik rmv: Manager George Seeley, Charhe Woodward, 
Bill England, Pat Mudd, Earl Springer, Charlie Weidinger, Pershing Mondorff. 



to win by an 8-4 marijin. Duke brought an 
undefeated team to College Park and was 
headed well toward another win, leading the 
Terps 8-4 into the ninth. Again the murderers' 
row accounted for four runs after two men had 
l:)een retired l^y the Duke hurler, knotting the 
game at 8 all. In the tenth Newt Co.\ led off 
with a Texas Leaguer, followed by Knepley's 
slashing double which left nothing but the 



cheering to be done for a perfect day. 

Joe Crisafull, the Chumbris brothers, Eddie 
Johnson, and George Knepley are the 1939 
graduates. Banning any "major" mishaj). 
Springer will be back on the mound with Cox, 
Mondorff, Jim Meade, and Woodward for Mr. 
Shipley next year, and with Fritz Maisel, 
Sherry Robertson, Adam Bengoechea, Hugh 
Keller, Art Rudy, and Turk IBurns form the 



RESULTS OF THE SEASON 




>»»-* 



ShurlN C hunibris scoring first run 
of 1939 season against Ohio State. 



Maryland 


3 


Ohio State 


4 


Maryland 


3 


Rutgers 





Maryland 


24 


X'ermont 


5 


Maryland 


10 


DartuKnith 





Mar\lan(l 


22 


WP.L 


5 


INLaryland 


4 


\'.M.I. 


5 


Maryland ( Rain 


) W. e^ L. 




Maryland 


12 


Boston 


14 


Maryland 


4 


Michigan 


2 


Maryland 





Michigan 


6 


Maryland ( Rain 


) Richmond 




Maryland ( Rain 


) \Vm. and Mary 




Maryland 


8 


Georgetown 


4 


Maryland 


24 


X'.P.l. 


8 


Maryland 


9 


Duke 


8 



175 



Weidinger 

A. N. Chumbris 

C. G. Chumbris 

Crisafull 
Johnson 
Knepley 



nucleus of players around which Ship will 
will build his X'arsity nine next spring. 

The organization of a Southern Conference 
loop playofif to be held at one of the North 
Carolina schools was considered at a meeting 
of the Southern Conference Board last fall, 
but final action on the details has not been 
taken by a committee appointed at the meet- 
ing. Whether the tournament is inaugurated 
next season or several years from now should 
be of tremendous importance to followers of 
Maryland teams. 

Although they have been known to have 
their ups and downs in this and past seasons, 
the Terps have had more than average success 
with teams of the Southern Conference, and 
upon entering a tournament with the cream of 
southern collegiate baseball, they should cap- 
ture many a championship, or at least know 
they have gone down swinging before high- 
grade opposition. 





176 




177 



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Heagy, Kaber 



(J'Xeill, mgr. 



V^iOACH Jack Faber turned out this year one 
of the most successful lacrosse teams ever to 
grace the Maryland field. Led by the flashy 
Frederic "Rip" Hewitt, 1938 All- American 
stickman, the Terp ten vanquished in monot- 
onous succession Mt. Washington of Balti- 
more, defending national amateur champs. 
Harvard, Penn State, Rutgers and Princeton. 
Hewitt, senior second attack regular, made an 
unmistakable bid for his second All-America 
nomination by leading in scoring in the first 
major battles, and nipping Princeton for six 
of the Terps' seven tallies. 

Mt. Washington, powerful I^altimore club 
composed of e.\-collegiate luminaries, fell \ic- 
tim to a sensational rout as the Teri)s went 
berserk in a scoring s])ree which netted them 
eleven counters. The Homewood ten was able 
to garner only a single goal in the meantime 
as their ordinariK- fine functioning machine 
failed to click. 

In the rain which has made the Har\ard- 
Maryland games a sloppy tradition, "Doc" 
Faber played subs freely. His charges, how- 
ever, easily piled uj) a 13-3 margin before the 
game was over. For the past three years, the 



Crimson Old-Line tilt has been played in a 
regular deluge of rain, and the scores have been 
as consistent as the weather — so far, so good. 

Mar^'land reaped sweet revenge for a foot- 
ball shellacking when the Old Liners met the 
Lions for the third stick tussle of the season. 
The boys from Pennsylvania, although very 
tough and heavy, were no match for the agile, 
deceptive Terrapins. From the opening gun 
the local lads poured tallies into the Penn 
State net, and only in the fading minutes of 
the game did they ease up enough to allow the 
visitors two goals. The final score stood 18-2. 

St. Johns dropped their last intercollegiate 
athletic match to their College Park rivals 
with a 20-6 upset. The Johnnies were touted 
to throw a wrench into the Terrapin works, 
but were turned back without a chance to 
display their wares. 

Rutgers and Princeton met a similar tate on 
successive Saturdays. Rutgers was shut out 
12-0, and Princeton, co-holder of the national 
title in 1937, penetrated the Maryland de- 
fense four times late in the game. Meanwhile, 
Hewitt and company accounted for se\en in- 
vasions of the Princeton crease. 



178 







Frniil row: John Muncks, Jim Meade, Masrot Dick Breesferd, Fred Hewitt, Bill Cole, Bill Bond, Jack drier. Middle row: Jordan Sexton, 
Jim Heil, Milton Mulitz, Jack Mueller, Leo Mueller. Joseph Randall, Fred W'idener. Buck row: Jack Badenhoop, John (larrett, Charlie 
Allen, (jary Todd, Jim Forrester, Oscar Nevares, Alan Bradley, Bob Brand, Frank Heyer, (jeorge Lawrence. 



As usual, there was little trouble in finding 
superb material for the squad. The Mueller 
cousins, Jack and Leo, played regular deep 
defense. Leo, a junior, played his second year 
as a regular, while Jack broke into pay ball in 
fine style as a sophomore. Jack Grier and 
Johnny Muncks vied for goal, with Grier hold- 
ing the edge at the opening gun. Freddy 
Widener, under the handicap of no previous 
experience, gave way to Mickey Mulitz, regu- 
lar first defense man. Mulitz placed his last 




Uscar Nevares (right lureground) makes second goal in 
rout of Mt. Washington. 



year this season. Jim Meade and George 
Lawrence stole their talents from the gridiron 
this s])ring, and fought nip and tuck for the 
second defense position. Bill Cole and "Rij)" 
Hewitt performed faultlessly at center, with 
Jimmy Heil sulibing effectively. 

In attack positions, sophomores Gary Todd 
and Jordan Sexton broke gracefully in with 
seniors Hewitt and Oscar Nevares. Also high 
in ability in the attack division were sopho- 
more Chick Allen and junior Willie Bond, 

who saw very nearly as much action as 

the regulars. 

RESULTS OF THE SEASON 



Mar\land 


11 


Mt. Washington 


1 


Maryland 


13 


Har\ard 


3 


Maryland 


18 


Penn State 


2 


Maryland 


20 


St. Johns 


6 


Maryland 


12 


Rutgers 





Maryland 


7 


Princeton 


4 


Marxland 


5 


B.A.C. 


6 


Maryland 


5 


Navy 


3 


.Marxiand 




Hopkins 


. . 



179 




^igj0^ 




St. John's — Oscar Nevares (18) turns completely around to score 
against St. John's. 

Muncks 
Meade 
Hewitt 
Forrester 
Lawrence 
Heil 
Hond 



180 



Leo MucIIlt 
Mulitz 
Todd 
Jack Mueller 

Sexton 
Cole 
Grier 
Neva res 




l^. 




Oscar Nevares scores Marjland's seventh goal against 
Princeton at College Park, April 29, 1939. 





■%^Ji^' 



^^i^ 




181 




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Kppk-y 



LeFrak, mgr. 



l\ BE\'V of the finest runners in the South 
fought nip and tuck in three indoor meets with 
national jiine-lioard kuninaries and brought to 
Maryland the collegiate title from the Catholic 
University meet, second place in the Southern 
Conference indoor meet, and fourth in the 
A.A.U. competition in the University of Mary- 
land-Fifth Regiment games at Baltimore. 

The Terp runners scored heavily in the last 
events in the Catholic U. meet to nose out 
Virginia with a team total of 23 points. Jimmy 
Kchoe set the pace in the "Rector's 1,000" to 
win the title and cup from the favored Oldfield 
of Navy. Alan M iller took the 440 in 5 1 seconds. 
Tommy Fields, sensational so])homore dis- 
tance man, set a new record in winning the mile 
against strong competition at 4:31 while Ver- 
non "Whitey" Miller, soph fjuarter miler, took 
second in that race. Joe Murphy, sprint man, 
placed second in the 50; and Eddie Miller took 
the high jump at 6 feet to compile the margin 
of victory. 

A few outstanding indix idual feats featured 
the Fifth Regiment meet. As John Munski of 



Missouri broke the world mark in the mile, 
Chronister and Kehoe paced him in a few sec- 
onds behind the 4:13.5 time set by the record 
smasher. Chronister's earlier effort in the mile 
resulted in his cracking the Southern Confer- 
ence mark by almost four seconds to reduce it 
to 4:16.1, his fastest recorded time. 

The ])owerful squad representing Maryland 
University at the Southern Conference meet 
February 25 captured all fiat races from the 60- 
}'ard dash to the two-mile run, amassing enough 
points to take second ])lace behind North Caro- 
lina. Four records were smashed by wearers 
of the Black and Gold. Besides Chronister's 
new mark of 4:16.1 for the mile, Alan jNliller 
sheared a full second off the Conference quar- 
ter-mile mark, setting a new record of 51 sec- 
onds, and Jimm\- Kehoe beat out two North 
Carolina boys in breaking the halt -mile record. 
Murph},- won the 60-yard dash; Fields took the 
two-mile run, and the mile relay comjiosed of 
Muri)h>-, Eddie Miller, Kehoe, and Alan Mil- 
ler retained the title and reduced the record 
time set last year by the Terps. 



182 









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iA- 



Bcfyt ro«'; Ochsenreitt-i , Mm pliv . Juiii.^, Sijli iij), Hiisted, Coarh Ep|jlf> , L<,-\ \ , i jdHl-i , iJulison, LeFrak, Murphy, Schutz, LUnd, l)e\lin. 
Second row: Howard, Albarano, Kenney, Miller, Steinbach, Daiker, Condon. First row: Miller, Fields, Kehoe, Jaworski, Peaslee, Kliige, 
Miller, Skipton. 



The outdoor season opened with the same 
stelhir runners dominating" the fiekl. Dart- 
mouth met the Old Liners in the hrst meet, 
April 5, which resulted in a 63-all tie. The 
Terps, traditionally weak in the field events, 



Jim Kthoesetsstadium 
mark of 155.8 in win- 
ning half mile. 



Tom Field-sand .Mason Chron- 
ister step to dead heat in mile. 




Joe Murphy wins lOO-yd. dash, Uick Barnes third. 
Dartmouth tied in meet, 63-63, College Park, .-Xpril 5, 1939. 



conceded the Hanover lads all ])oints in the 
pole vault and discus, and a majority in other 
non-running events, hut redeemed themselves 
in the running events in which they swamped 
the Indians. 

\'.P.I. fell victim to the Terps in all di\isions 
in the second meet at College Park. Forging 
ahead early, the Maryland men coasted to an 
85-41 victory. Y.M.I, fared the same at Lex- 
ington the following Saturday, when at the end 
of the meet Coach Geary Eppley was pulling 
regulars from events as the Old Liners had 
already produced a great lead. Final score was 
Maryland 75^2, V.M.I. SO',. 

Joe Murphy became a one man track team 
b\' consistently winning the 100, 220 and the 
broad jump, (iordon Kluge sur])rised himself 
by developing into a point getter in the ja\'elin. 
Ralph Albarano and Charle>" Morris monojio- 
lized the discus and shot with Dick Shaffer 
sharing in the dashes and the discus. Eddie 
Miller in the high jumj:) presents a graduation 
problem for the coach, as the conference chain]) 
has consistently taken first place during his 
three \'arsit\- years. Joe Peaslee, defending 
champ in the two-mile run, ran second to Tom- 
my Fields throughout the outdoor sea.son. Bill 
Howard and IVte Jones represented the Terps 
in the pole \ ault. 



183 




Left to right: Evans, Skipton, Fields, Condon, Peaslee, Kehoe, Miller, manager 





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IW'O outstanding cruss-countr}' men led the 
Terrapin club into victory in one race with 
Virginia, and to close scores with the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina and Navy. Tommy 
Fields, stellar sophomore, and Jim Kehoe, run- 
ning in his second X'arsity season, also account- 
ed for a second place in the Southern Confer- 
ence meet at the end of the season. 

TheX'irginia race featured a tie for first by 
Kehoe and Fields as the Terps paced in the 
whole Cavalier team to win 26 29. Bob Con- 
don fought two X'irginia men the wliole way, 
but succuml)ed to the home stretch kick, and 
trailed the Cavalier duo in for the fifth position. 

Bill Hendrix, North Carolina ace, j)aced 
Kehoe and Fields to the ta])C at Chapel Hill in 



early November in handing the Old Line 
harriers their first defeat, 24-31. 

The lanky Marylander turned in a sensa- 
tional finish to defeat Old field of Navy by mere 
inches, but in spite of his efforts the Black and 
Gold hill an' dalers bowed to the Middies 
24-31. Tommy Fields ended third with Bob 
Condon trailing in ninth as the solitary Old 
Line markers. 

North Carolina won the Southern Confer- 
ence meet with the low score of 28 i)oints as 
Hendrix again bested Kehoe in the six-mile 
course, breaking the four-year-old Conference 
record by 4.8 seconds. Fields placed fourth in 
the meet, giving Maryland second place with 
58 points. 



184 



1 ■ »^» ^. 


r 










"^ 



Bill Miller, Cross-country JNIanager 



n 



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v.-/ 



Condon, Fields, Kehoe on a cross-country jaunt 




Tommy Fields leaping the 
creek 



tlttF^^K^^''^ '*" 



Finishing cross-country race during half time of Virginia game 

185 



Barnes 



Condon 
Kenney 
Morris 



Howard 




Miller going over bar atKJ ft. 2 in. to 
take high jump. 



Evans capturing high hurdles 

XIRC.INIA POLY IS BEATEN AT TRACK, 85-41 
COLLEGE PARK, .Xl'RIL .s. I'W 



186 




Munski, Missouri ace, as he breastei: 
tape. 



Hill l^'itzpatrick, Montgomery Blair Alan Miller, Maryland, taking 440-yard col- 

I ligh, doing 6 feet for second place in legiate dash, 

.scholastic high jump. 



Phil (iraxes, Mason (hronister, Jim Morrison, Jim Kehoe, fieorge 
Connole>-, John Munski. Start of ('iO\ernor's Mile which was won by 
Munski in 4:1,5. ,S, world record for flat track indoors, ('hronister was second 
and Kehoe third. 

Frank Fuller i/c/Zi, \'irginia, setting new mark of .OS. 6 in 70-yard high 
hurdles. 



Howard Passon, Passon .A.C, I'liiladelphia. breaking 
record with \^ feet leap in pole vault. 



MARYLAND-FIFTH REGIMENT MEET 

B.M.TIMORK .AR.^I()R^". MARCH 11, V).V) 



187 




n 



b 



1939 RECORD 

U.oJMd. 0pp. 

Michigan 3 6 

Richmond 8 1 

Richmond 6 3 

Duke 4 5 

North Carolina State 5 1 

North Carolina l^niversity . . 2 7 

Catholic ITniversity 9 




IBopst 



Morris 



In spite of playing what Coach Les Bopst 
termed "a suicidal schedule," the tennis team 
nevertheless completed another successful sea- 
son. 

Led by Allie Ritzenberg, former District and 
Middle Atlantic States junior champion and 
present holder of the National Ciovernment 
Employees championship, the netnien had a 
capable player holding down the anchor post. 
The old standby, boxer Nate Askin, was an 
invaluable cog in the team's smooth running 
machinery. "Little Larry" Lichliter, former 
Washington interscholastic star, delighted 
Coach Bopst with the fine brand of tennis he 



consistently displayed throughout the season. 
The fourth member of the squad, and also a 
scholastic junior with Ritzenberg, Askin and 
Lichliter, was Jay Phillips, who showed grati- 
fying improvement in his second year of \'ar- 
sity play. 

Holding down the fifth and sixth singles 
positions are sophomores Jimmy Burnside and 
Phil Burkom, two players with games that 
speak well for their future. Harvey Kreuzburg, 
senior and \'eteran of three seasons with the 
Varsity, was confined mainly to doubles play. 
Jimmy Hardy, Bob Wilson, and Charlie Mehl 
comprised the remainder of the squad. 



Back row: Iio|)si, I'liil- 
lips, Hardy, Wilson. 
MchI, Swank, Morris, 
mgr. Front row: Askin, 
Burnside, Kreuzburg, 
I.ichlilur, Ritzenberg. 



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188 



McCardell 
Shipe 

Dan forth 
Gatch 
Eierman 
Huber 




CHEERLEADERS 
WEARERS OF THE "M" 



Ralph Albarano 
Benjamin Alperstein 
Nathan Askin 
Richard Barnes 
Francis Beamer 
Adam Bengoechea 
Frank Blazek 
William Bond 
John Boyda 
Robert Bradley 
Robert Brand 
Elmer Bright 
Robert Brown 
Robert Burns 
Mason Chronister 
Angelos Chumbris 
Cleom Chumbris 
Robert Cochrane 
William Cole 



Robert Condon 
Newton Cox 
Joseph Crisafulli 
Frank Cronin 
John DeArmey 
Joseph Devlin 
George DeWitt 
George Dorr 
Frank Dwyer 
Herman Evans 
Thomas Fields 
James Forrester 
William Graham 
George Heil 
Frederic Hewitt 
Edwin Johnson 
James Kehoe 
Hugh Keller 
Francis Kenney 



George Knepley 
Harvey Kreuzberg 
William Krouse 
Robert Laughhead 
George Lawrence 
Lawrence Lichliter 
Edward Lloyd 
James Meade 
George Meeks 
Alan Miller 
Edwin Miller 
William L Miller 
Pershing Mondorff 
Charles Morris 
Francis Morris 
Leo Mueller 
Milton Mulitz 
Joseph Murphy 



Oscar Nevares 
Gene Ochsenreiter 
Joseph Peaslee 
Jay Phillips 
Herman Raisin 
William Rea 
Thomas Riley 
Albert Ritzenberg 
Richard Shaffer 
Harvey Simms 
Roy Skipton 
Frank Skotnicki 
Robert Smith 
Earl Springer 
Morton Steinbach 
Warren Steiner 
Charles Weidinger 
Frederick Widener 



189 



FRESHMAN 




t.:£ S f.„t;§ 







FOOTBALL 



Front row: Holbrook, 
Pappas, Greer, Rigby, 
Jack, Badger, N'ieder- 
niair, Ulman. Middle 
row: Pottorff, James, 
MacKenzie, Steele, War- 
field, Wharton, William- 
son, Hepburn, Atwater. 
Back row: Woods, head 
coach; Shockey, \'ial, 
Burlin, Bowers, Du\'all, 
Longwill, Cordyack, 
Garrett, Barrett, Bryant 
assistant coach; Axtell, 
manager. 



TRACK 



Rear { /(■// lo right): Le 
Frak, Smith, Boyer, Beck- 
er, Talbot, Hopkins, Car- 
ter, Cordyack, Moseley, 
Grigg, Stell, Mann, Trus- 
sell, Portuguese, Jacobs, 
Hammacher, Porter, 
Rigby. Front (left to right): 
Holbrook, Sullivan, Gos- 
sage, Gearhart, McNal- 
ley. Bowman, Bader, 
Warfield, Cronin, Mont- 
gomery, Tilley, Kinlock. 



1^ m's s\ e 










BASKET- 
BALL 



Back row: McCrea, Bud- 
(lini;lon, Piirtrr, I'lnian, 
Wh.irUin, lla>dcn. Front 
row: IhA'all, Woodward, 
Bowers, Garrett, \'an- 
nais. 



19U 



SPORTS 



BOXING 



Back row: Colonel Miller, 
Hughes, Healy, Lainc, 
Captain Maglin. Front 
row: Cardiac, Roseman. 
Alperstein, Holbrook, 
Hare. 





BASEBALL 



First roiv: Hunt, Herlin, 
Dunn, MacKenzie, Ack- 
ernian, W'hipp, DuX'all, 
Wharton, Vannais. Sec- 
ond row: Steele, Bowers, 
Woodward, Garrett, 
Wolfe, Jack, McHale, 
MacDonald, McCrea, 
77»V(/roK'; Coach F'ollack, 
Hiiddington, Enicry, Du- 
\'all, Mosberg, Sunier, 
Giles, Green, Novak, 
King, Ulnian, Arenston. 



LACROSSE 



Standing (left to right:) 
Groff, Lindsey, coach; 
Sagnor, (iaylord, Todd. 
Herman, Kelly, McGreg- 
or, Hadenhoop. Poole, 
Sullivan, Slessinger, 
I'ratt, Musgrave. Kneel- 
ing: Holbrook, Walton, 
\'ial, Hyman, Ayres, 
Hewitt, Cooke, Lauten- 
burger. Sitting (left to 
right): Diamond, Meade. 
Mint zer, D' Antoni. 
liackerach, Jones, Hill. 



wmuMmiSMxmimM^is 







=43>. 



(• i/t 



•r^^'i — >.j0.. .y--^fy 




fe9i|*^li?:5^|^ 



191 



EM 
XU 
TR 
RA 
AL 




Second row: Cline, Cruikshank, Pusey, Maloney, Bailey, Hurley, Joyce, Bowen, Faulkner. First row: Scherer, 
Mehin, Main, Schroeder, Culver, Maisel, Dougherty, Mears, Wheatley, Todd, Corbin. 




Second row: Cannon, Krouse, McNeil, Race. First row: Ayniold, Meade, kockstroh, Markowitz, I oiincili 




Second row: Rogers, MacOonald, l-'usfeld, Uavis, llyinan, Sokal, Sulli\an, Sniilli. First ro'w: Mendclson, 
Rappleye, Meakin, Neinian, Abranis, Rehberger. 

192 



SOCCER 

In its scfoml \ear as a iiicnihrr of the Mar\laiul (.^(jllc.Liiate League, the Terrapin soccer 
team fought its \va\ tlirough a tough ten game schedule to emerge victorious in eight of 
the frays, losing onl\ to tiie strong Towson State Teachers College and Western Mary- 
land on successi\e Frida\s. The record: 

German American A.C 3 Marylanfl 3 

Gallaudet Maryland 6 

Salisbury 1 Maryland ... 4 

University of Delaware 1 Maryland 3 

Blue Ridge College 2 Maryland 8 

F'rosthurg State Teachers College. Maryland 3 

Callaudet Maryland 2 

Towson State Teachers College. . . 2 Maryland 

\\'estern Maryland College 3 Maryland 2 

Johns Hopkins University Maryland 5 

I'nixersit}- of X'irginia 2 Maryland 3 

WRESTLING 

J\ SPLENDID array of grunters and growlers representing the University of Maryland 
won matches from Gallaudet, Johns Hopkins, and Haverford, annexed the District of 
Columbia A.A.U. championship and captured the Maryland State Collegiate champion- 
ship. Bill "Sully" Krouse, heavyweight, and Paul McNeil, light-hea\y, concluded the 
season with unblemished records. Arthur Meade was a constant performer in the 125- 
pound division, and along with Krouse and McNeil, won a title in the District of Colum- 
bia A.A.U. meet. Bernard "Bull" Aymold, Wilford "Buzz" Councill, and Cy Race were 
runners-up in the A.A.L^ tournament, as the Terp team amassed a total of 24 points to 
win the team championship. 

Gallaudet 16 Maryland 18 

Johns Hopkins 8 Maryland 24 

Gallaudet 18 Maryland 16 

Haverford 17 Maryland 18 

Lafayette 21^ Mar\land 115^ 

FENCING 

IHE Varsity fencing team, coached by Bob Neiman, 1937 Middle Atlantic States 
sabre champion, opened its fourth season at College Park with one of the most formidable 
line-ups in the Southern Conference, and potentially the strongest in the histor>- of the 
campus. 

Maryland boasts such outstanding figures in the East as Bob Neiman in the sabre 
division, Dave Abrams in foils, and Bol) Mendelson in the epee. These \eterans were 
supplemented by the addition to the squad of Leonard Meakin and Warren Smith in the 
sabre and Ed. Rehberger in the foil class. 

Jan. 6 — Loyola 

Feb. 3 — William and Mary 

Feb. 4 — North Carolina. . 

Feb. ll^Haverford 11 

Feb. 18 — Johns Hopkins . 

193 



0pp. U.of.M. 






Opp. 


U.ofM. 


7 20 


Mar. 


4— C.C.N.Y 


. 18 


9 


14 13 


Mar. 


11 — Drew University.. 


. 13 


14 


10 '2 16>^ 


Mar. 


13 — North Carolina.. . 


, 10 


17 


11 16 


Mar. 


25 — \ irginia 


23^ 


243^ 


Won by forfeit 











INTRAMURAL 




SOFTBALL 

ALL-STARS 
1938 Champions 



Fro)il row: Skipton, Cook, Gait, 
Main. Rear rote: Anspon, R. Frey, 
Ronisburg, L. Krey, Lewis, Borlik. 



FOOTBALL 



SPARTANS 



Crigg, Bishopp, Morris, Kiiinnicr, 
R. Cronin, Miller, Hopkins. 





VOLLEYBALL 

HVATTSNTLLE 
DAYDODGERS 



Second row: Buddinglon, Melvin, 
Roikstroh, Cook, (ialt. First row: 
M.iiii, Keagy. 



194 



CHAMPIONS 



BASKETBALL 

KOVAI. RASCALS 



Second row: Joyce, McKin, Mehl, 
Rockstroh, Main. First row: H. J 
Anspon, 13. Anspon. 





GOLF 



Left to right: Harmon, Murphy, 
Brownell, Rea, Bryant, Wade. 



BOXING 



Williams, Evans, Roseman, Laine, 
Hughes, Robertson. 




195 



INTERFRATERNITY 




SOFTBALL 

ALPHA TAU OMEGA 
1938 Champions 



Back row: Taylor, BrinckcrhofF, 
Mears, Hancock, Brown, Corbin, 
Elliott. Front rota: Smelser, Harn, 
Benbow, Healey, Holzapfel, Lewis, 
Cartee. 



FOOTBALL 



KAPPA ALPHA 



Rear row: O'Neill, Poole, Lindsay, 
Burk, Mellen, Front row: Bowen, 
Dippel, Allen, Howard. 







yMThW^^ VOLLEYBALL 




Holbrook, (ronin, Schutz, Fields, 
Bishopp. Bcanier. 



196 



CHAMPIONS 



BASKETBALL 



SIC.MA NU 



Holbrook, Cronin, Schiitz, Bish- 
opp, Fields. 





PING-PONG 

ALPHA TAU OMEGA 



Kreiizburg, Smith, Lewis 



THE TERRAPIN SALUTES 



I 




X 1931, when extramural sjiorts were un- 
known here, and the intermural organization 
was in an embryonic stage, Mr. Charles Mack- 
ert assumed the responsibilities of Professor of 
Physical PIducation. Through his effort and 
initiative, the inter- and extra-mural systems 
at Maryland have become known as the best 
in the Southeast, and have served as samples 
in establishing these activities at se\eral out- 
stancHng institutions. 



Mr. Mackert 



197 



HOCKEY 



Second row: Wolf, Park, Balder- 
ston, Butler, Haas, Murphy, Huff, 
DeAlba, Perkins, Smith, Spehn- 
kouch, Meiser, Gilleland. First 
row: Lula Trundle, Lucy Trundle. 





TENNIS 



Left to right: Lula Trundle, Huff, 
Bishopp, Lennon, Lucy Trundle, 
Burton. 



BASKETBALL 



Second row: Meiser, Purnell, Huff, 
Lennon, Perkins, Burton. First 
row: Lula Trundle, Jost, Hyatt, 
Jullien, Wolf, Thayer, Lucy Trun- 
dle. 




198 




RIFLE 



Left In ri^ht: Ganzert, Duncan. 
Kemp, Bond, Bono, Boose, Menke, 



v>iOED interest in in(li\i(lual sports has 
increased greath- in the past year with the 
impetus of tournaments of various kinds. Some 
thirty girls particii:)ated in the fall tennis tour- 



nament in which Hazel Bishopp was the winner 
and Lucy Trundle the runner-ui). 

The second semester saw the start of deck 
and table tennis includinu sing-les and doubles 




r\ 




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u 



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b 



matches with a large number of coeds active. 
Toward spring shuffleboard, golf, darts and 
badminton came to the fore with the intro- 
duction of code-l)all as an innovation. A match 
at North Carolina Universit\- in F"ebruar\- 



climaxed the fencing season. 

One of the highlights of the year in Women's 
Athletics was the All-Track Day in April with 
running and jumping events and a novel three- 
legged race. 




SOCCER 



Sfiond rinv: Liila Trundle, Huff, 

Bisliopp, 'rha\er. Burton. First 

rnu'.- W'oll, Danforth, Jost, Mur- 

ph\ , jiillieii, l.uc\- Trundle, Ken- 
ned\ . 



199 




Third row: Huff, Wolfinger, Gilleland, Ganzert, Hargy, Kephart, Yates, Burton, Lula 
Trundle, DeAlba, Swann, Thayer. Urquhart, Webster, Jost, Smith, Bono, Hughes, Ladd, 
Perkins, Furnell. Second row: Miss Drew, Kennedy, Butler, Bishopp, Lucy Trundle, Spehn- 
kouch, Haas, Murphy, Jullien, Miss Middleton. First row: Patrick, Balderston, Park, 
A. Nordwall, Bono, Hyatt, Rawley, Wolf, Meiser, F. Nordwall, X'aught. 




President Lucy Trundle 

Vice-President Hope Swann 

Secretary-Treasurer Hazel Bishopp 

Recorder of Points Isabel Butler 

Faculty Adinsers . .Miss A. Gwendolyn Drew and 
Miss Dorothy M. Middleton 



1 H E Women's Athletic Association promotes 
all intramural and extramural athletics among 
the women students at the University. The 
program consists of play-days and intramural 
tournaments in the major sports of soccer, 
basketball, hcjckey, tennis, volley i)all, and 
baseball, and tournaments in the minor sports 
of table tennis, deck tennis, golf, and archery. 
The fall hockey season was managed by 
Lucia Spehnkouch, who led the team to vic- 



tories over Western Maryland, American Uni- 
versity, Marjorie Webster, and Trinity Col- 
lege. The successful hockey team consisted of 
Lolly Park, Isabel Butler, Catherine Gilleland, 
Katharine Perkins, x'\lice Haas, Lucia Spehn- 
kouch, Lula Trundle, and Lucy Trundle as 
outstanding players. The team had an im- 
defeated season and was one of the best coed 
hockey teams ever produced at the University. 

Soccer followed hockey as a fall sport with 
Estelle Murphy as manager. After a short 
period of practice the intramural tournament 
was held, with the Senior-Junior team winning. 
Outstanding players among the soccerites were 
Mary Alice Thayer, Marjorie Jost, Catherine 
Huff, Bett>- Jullien, and Hope Swann. 

The basketball season began just before 
Christmas and was managed by Isabel Butler 
and Lula Trundle. The annual intramural 
tournament was dixidetl into two dixisions, the 
sorority and non-sorority leagues. The winners 
of the two leagues pla>ed each other for the 
championship. 



200 



y^ 




TYPICAL SCENES OF WOMEN'S ATHLETIC PROCkAM 



201 




J_yEADER of leaders, Jerry Hardy cap- 
ably qualifies as the typification of stu- 
dent leadership in his capacity as Presi- 
dent of Omicron Delta Kappa, honorar}- 
leadership fraternity. 

In addition to assuming the editorship 
of the so-called campus humor magazine, 
Jerry has coerced his way into the brother- 
hood of Phi Delta Theta, Pi Delta Epsi- 
lon, and Beta Alpha Psi. Lest the reader 
be misled 1)\' this weighty collection of 
fraternity insignia, The Terrapin has- 
tens to reassure mogul Hardy's public 
that he is an extremely prepossessing fel- 
low having, curiously enough for an Editor 
of the (^Id Line, a sense of humor. 



202 




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Faculty: H. C. Byrd, R. W. Carpenter, Ernest Cory, 
Charles Eichlin, Geary Eppley, J. E. Faber, W. B. 
Kemp, C. S. Richardson, Willard Small, William 
Supplee, R. \'. Truitt, R. I. Williams. 

Members: Fred Bishopp, Thomas Coleman, Frank 
Cronin, George Eierman, Jerome Hardy, Joel Hut- 
ton, Edwin Johnson, Albin Kuhn, Benjamin Mc- 
Cieskey, John Muncks, Joe Peaslee, James Pitzer, 
Logan Schutz, Leon Yourtee, Gus Warfield. 

1 HE greatest honor that an undergraduate 
can receive is membership in Omicron Delta 
Kappa, for that is the recognition of his out- 
standing work and worthwhile qualities. This 
honorary rewards leadership and character as 
well as scholarship which is the sole considera- 
tion for admittance to Phi Beta Kappa. 

Undergraduate students receive their mem- 
bership on a point system. They must have 
one major activity, as well as several minor 
ones, with character as a consideration. If 
politics are responsible for the candidate's 
]josition, he is considered ineligible for mem- 
bership. 

In 1914, a small band of men at Washington 
and Lee I'niversity formed this honorary fra- 
ternity which is now national in scope. In 
February, 1927, Sigma Circle was organized on 
the Maryland caniijus and Dr. R. \'. Truitt 
was chosen as adviser. 




Bishopp 



Hardy 



Coleman 



Twice a year outstanding students are 
tapped, together with two faculty members, 
one man of prominence in the state, and one 
person who has achieved national recognition. 
This year, .Sumner Welles, the lender Secre- 
tary of State, who was honored by the local 
group, spoke to the student body on "The In- 
ternational Crisis." 

Sigma Circle is constanth' grateful to Dr. 
Truitt through wliose untiring efforts and in- 
spirational guidance it lias progressed since its 
establishment. 

The Maryland members ot ODK are: 
Jerome Hardy — Editor of Old Line — Treas- 
urer of Junior Class — Pi Delta Epsilon — ■ 
President of ODK — Advocater of a more 
literar\- O/il Line. 
Fred Bi-SHOPp — Colonel of R.O.T.C. — Consis- 
tent anfl earnest interest in militarv affairs — 



204 




SL 



^m 



T 



Cronin 
Peaslee 



Eierman 
Pitzer 



Johnson 
VVarfield 



McCleskey 
Yourtee 



Outstanding scholarship — Chemistry major. 

Thomas Coleman — President of Junior Class 
— Athletics — R.O.T.C. — Engineer — Well- 
known campus figure. 

Frank Cronin — A Southern Conference rec- 
ord holder in track — Phenomenal success in 
initial year of X'arsity boxing — Southern 
Conference champ. 

Geor(;e Eierman — Business Manager of The 
Diamondback — President of Pi Delta Ep- 
silon — Senior cheerleader — Scholarship — In- 
di\-iduaHst. 

Edwin Johnson — President of Student Gov- 
ernment Association — Basketball — Baseball 
— Chairman of Junior Prom — President of 
Phi Delta Theta. 

Benjamin McCleskey— Colonel of R.O.T.C. 



— Captain of Scabbard and Blade — Captain 
of Pershing Rifles — First to hold these three 
honors simultaneously. 

Joseph Peaslee — President of Men's League 
— Trackman — Sports Editor of 1938 Terra- 
pin — poet. 

James Pitzer — President of Senior Class — 
President of Junior Class — Chemist with 
a 3.5 average. 

Gustavus WARFiELD^Editor of 1938 Terra- 
pin — Pi Delta Epsilon — Vice-President of 
Student Government Association — -Scholar- 
shij) — future minister. 

Leon Yourtee — Outstanding dramatic abil- 
ity — most famous role, "Danny" in Xi^Jit 
Must Full — ^Director as well as actor — En- 
gineer — an artist. 



205 



Brown 



Eierman 



Kephart 



Lasswell 



Webster 



PHI KAPPA PHI 

Honorary Scholarship Fraternity 

Founded at the University of Maine in 1897 

Established at the University of Maryland 
in 1920 



College of Arts and Sciences: Ralph Aarons, Har- 
ry Davis Anspon, Rumsey Anthony, Phyllis Geral- 
dine Bollinger, Florence R. Comer, Lydia M. Evans, 
John Alexander Krynitsky, Richard Everett Lee, 
Etta Carolyn Link, James Ehvood Pitzer, Edward 
Martin Wharton. 

Graduate School: Helen Bartlett, Melvin Dunker, 
Jack D. Hartman, Mrs. Frances Hilton Holmead, 
Milton Schechter. 



Faculty: C. O. Applenian, L. E. Bopst, L. B. Brough- 
ton, C. C. Bruce, H. C. Byrd, Myron Creese, H. F. 
Cotterman, David Derr, L. P. Ditman, C. G. Eich- 
lin, Geary Eppley, I. C. Haut, H. A. Hunter, W. B. 
Kemp, C. F. Kramer, Edgar Long, H. B. McDonnel, 
J. E. Metzger, J. B. S. Norton, H. J. Patterson, R. 
G. Rothgeb, A. L. Schrader, W. S. Small, \V. A. 
Stanton, W. T. L. Taliaferro, R. V. Truitt, Claribel 
Welsh, C. E. White, L. G. Worthington, M. V. 
Woods. 

College of Home Economics: Mary Lee Aylesworth, 
Kathryn Abbott, Kathryn Adkins, Jane F. Kephart, 
Belle W. McGinniss. 

College of Engineering: Elies Elvove, Harold Hugo 
Franke, Robert Gottlieb, P. M. Lasswell, Thomas 
P. Wharton. 

College of Agriculture: Allan H. Brown, Earl 
Wayne Fitzwater, Paul M. Galbreath, Marcia Lad- 
son, Ellen Elizabeth Talcott. 

College of Education: Anna Kathryn Bowman, 
Myrtle Grove Burke, Mary Anne Guyther, Hazel 
L. Kalbaugh, Diana Stevan, Carolyn I. \\'ebster. 

College of Commerce: Robert J. Bradley, George 
H. P. Eierman, Ira T. Todd. 



XLACH year on Maryland annals go the 
names of a select group of seniors. To them has 
been awarded one of the highest scholastic 
honors the University offers — membership in 
Phi Kappa Phi. 

The offering of a number of fellowships to 
deserving members and the attempt to stim- 
ulate mental achievement illustrate the funda- 
mental aims of the fraternity — the encourage- 
ment of scholarshij) and development of char- 
acter. The secondary objective of the society 
is to bind the alumni more closely to the college 
and advance a standard of education for which 
institutions of higher learning were estal)lished. 

Members are chosen twice during the year. 
In the fall, only the highest ranking senior in 
each college is eligil)le for selection. At gradu- 
ation, however, those seniors ranking scholas- 
ticalK- in the u])per eighth of the graduating 
class, irrespective of college, become members. 

To its "Phi Kappa Phi's" Marylaml offers 
heartiest and well-deserved congratulations. 



206 



r\ 



r>i 




Aarons 



Al)l)ull 



Adkins 



Anspon 



Aiilhoiiy 



Rurki 



I'ilzer 



Aylesworth 

Bowman 



Bradley 



El\o\e 



Fitzwater 



Franke 



(lalbruatli 

Gottlieb 



Guyther 



Kalbaugh 



Krynitsky 



Ladson 



Lee 



McGinniss 



Stevan 



Talcott 



Todd 



Wharton, E. 

Wharton, T. 



207 





Alice Howard 

Adviser 

Asst. Dean of Wniiu-ii 



President Jane Kephart 

Vice-President Louise Tucker 

Treasurer Doris Eichlin 

Secretary Peggy Maslin 

Historian Lydia Evans 

Faculty: Alice Howard, F. B. Smith, Adele Stamp. 

In the sprini; of 1938, five Junior women were selected for 
membership in Mortar Board. As Seniors, in the past year, they 
have been its active members. Theirs was an honor that signi- 
fied outstanding aliihty and achievement based on scholarship, 
leadership, and service to the University. 

Mortar Board is a National Honor Society for Senior women. 
Its members strive to formulate a spirit of sincere friendship 
among university women, to encourage a high standard of 
scholarship, and to develop a higher type of college woman. 

During the entire week of Freshmen orientation the members 
of Mortar Board aided in the acclimation of new students. In 
addition to assisting at the Dean of Women's annual tea for 
Freshman girls, they have sponsored various social functions 
throughout the year— always with the interest of the Maryland 

coed in mind. 

Included in the scheduled activities was a leadership trainmg 
course. This was invaluable in the training of new organization 
officers in their duties and responsibilities as campus leaders. 
Helping to meet the need for intelligent counseling in regard to 
choice of vocation for women, a Nocational guidance conference 

was sponsored. 

Although the Maryland chapter is relatively new, it is ably 
carrying on the traditions of Mortar Board. Its members aided 
in the induction ..f the chapter at George Washington Univer- 
sity, and have de\cloi)ed a close association with the neigh- 
boring group. 

208 




Senior Women's Honorary 
Society 

Founded at Swarthmore Col- 
lege in 1918 

Established at the University 
of Maryland in 1934 



BaMwiii 
HodiiK' 
Hnnd 

IJovvmaii 
Bradley 

Caiii|il)cll 
Evans 
Ewing 
Goldbeck 
Harrovcr 



Katz 

Kemp, L. 
Kemp, M. 
Kephart 
Kraft 

St. Clair 
Stubbs 
Talcott 
Tulin 
Webster 





cifm 





President. . Dorothv Campbell 

Secretary Molly Tllin 

Treasurer. . Berxice Stevenson 



MARYLAND CHAPTER 

Women's Freshman Honor Society 

Founded at the University of Illinois in 1924 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1932 

Faculty: Susan E. Harman, Frieda McFarland, Adele Stamp. 

Members: Mildred Baitz, Janet Baldwin, Mildred Bodine, Marian Bond, 
Kathryn Bowman, Eleanor Bradley, Elizabeth Burroughs, Lydia 
Evans, Lydia Ewing, Clara Gale Goldbeck, Elizabeth Harrover, Bertha 
Katz, Lois Kemp, Margaret Kemp, Jane Kephart, Jane Kraft, Mildred 
Stubbs, Hope Swann, Betty St. Clair, Ellen Talcott, Carolyn Webster, 
Judy Woodring. 

Pledges: Doris Kluge, Irene Kuslovitz, Doris McFarland, N'irginia 
Mercer, Mary Parlett, Katherine Perkins, Beatrice .Shuman, ("harlotte 
Stubbs, Charlotte White. 

V^ONTRARY to campus o]tinion it appears to be "the thing" 
among the fair coeds to make better than average marks. This 
is shown by the unusually large number of freshmen girls who 
this year met the requirement of a 3.5 a\'erage for menibershi]) 
in Alpha Lamlxla Delta. 

The activities of the chai)ter i)egan this year in October with 
a tea for freshmen women. Dr. Susan Harmon, the guest 
speaker, told of the history and nu'aning of the sorority. At the 
national convention of Ali:)ha Lambda DtJta, which was held 
at the LTniversity of Michigan, the local cha])ter was repre- 
sented by two faculty members and four students. 

209 



n 



u 



r^ 



n 



LU 



/^ 



\^ 



n 



LU 



Franke 



Davis 



Gottlieb 




Elvove 



Phillips 



President Thomas Wharton 

Vice-President William Davis 

Secretary Philip Lass well 

Treasurer . . Professor Mvkon Creese 



Essex 



Wharton 




K^ 



MARYLAND BETA CHAPTER 

Honorary Engineering Fraternity 

Founded at Lehigh University in 1885 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1929 

Faculty: R. B. Allen, Myron Creese, G. C. Ernst, M. A. Pyle, S. S. 

Steinberg. 
Members: Richard Carroll, Alfred Essex, Elies Elvove, Harold Franke, 

Robert Gottlieb, George M. Lapoint, Joseph M. Marzolf, Irving 

Phillips, Ralph Rector, Bowen Shaw. 

vJNE night back in 1885, midst transits and tri-squarcs, a 
group of friendly engineers got together and formed a ckib, 
which they named Tau Beta Pi. In fifty-three prosperous years 
it has become recognized as the leading honorary engineering 
society on the American college campus. 

The ideals of Tau Beta Pi are high scholarship, a fostering 
of mental achievement among the members and it holds all 
engineers in a mutual bond of friendship for life. 

To attain membership within its closely guarded walls is the 
coveted aim of all undergraduate engineers. The key, which is 
known as the "Bent of Tau Beta Pi," when seen dangling from a 
watch chain, signifies a man worthy of being called an engineer. 



211 



Brown 
Davis 
Eierman 
Freudenberger 



Hardy 
Hoover 

MacDoiiald 

Maslin 




Perkins 
Phillips 
Reindollar 
Shipe 



Strausbaugh 
Warfield 



L 




President George Eierman 

Vice-President Kelso Shipe 

Sec.-Treas. . . . Helen Reindollar 




MARYLAND CHAPTER 

Honorary Journalistic Fraternity 

Founded at Syracuse University in 1909 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1930 

Faculty: H. C. Byrd, O. R. Carrington. (ieary Eppley, (i. \V. Fogg, 
C. B. Hale, W. B. Hillegeist, \V. H. Hottel, Reuben Steinmeyer. 

Members: William Brown, Bruce Davis, George Eierman, John Freuden- 
berger, Jerome Hardy, Lawrence Hoover, Ruth Lowry, Margaret Mas- 
lin, Margaret MacDonald, Fred Perkins, Irving Phillips, Helen Rein- 
dollar, Kelso Shipe, Donn Strausbaugh, Gus Warfield. 

oTAFF members doing outstandinsi work on any of the three 
campus publications; the Diamondback, the Old Line, or the 
Terrapin receive recognition for their efforts from Pi Delta 
Epsilon, honorar\- jcjurnalistic fraternity. Since its establish- 
ment on this campus in 19-iO, this fraternit>- has been able to 
bring about a closer relationship among the three staffs and to 
raise the journalistic standards on the campus. 

The members hold regular nionthb- meetings, usually at the 
Lord (Albert I mi. The social highlight of the year was the 
annual Publications' Banquet, modeled after the famous Grid- 
iron Club dinners held in Washington 

212 




KuinniLT 
Miller 
Parks 
Simon 



Stup 
Todd 



TAU CHAPTER 

Professional Accounting Fraternity 

Founded at the University of Illinois in 1919 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1934 

Faculty; C W. Cissel, S. M. Wedeberg. 

Members: Francis X. Beamer, Burton D. Borden, Robert Bradley, 
William E. Brown, Thomas Capossela, Albert Dieffenbach, E. Hoover 
Duff, George Eierman, Cieorge L. Flax, Louis Frey, Jerome Hardy, 
Edward Harlan, James Healey, William Miller, John Parks, Lester 
Simon, Charles Stup, Ira Todd. 

1 O become a member of Beta Alpha Psi iin oKes nuich more 
effort on the part of the appHcant than is normally required by 
honorary fraternities. In addition to the general c]ualifications 
of character, aptitude, and abilitj- in accounting courses, the 
prospective neophyte is rec]uired to pass a rigorous examination. 
Features of this fraternity's meetings are talks by practicing 
accountants and business men. Among the distinguished 
speakers was the Comptroller of the Post Office, William L. 
Slattery, who, on the night of his induction, spoke on the ne- 
cessitx ot liroad cultural training for accounting students. In 
addition to the guest speakers and the usual cjuota of business 
meetings, the fraternity's jirograni included a banquet for the 
actives in the spring. 







President Thomas Capossela 

]'ice-President . .George Eierman 
Sec.-Treas Lester Simon 



213 




Anspon 
Fawcett 



I\rynitsky 
McFarlane 



ALPHA RHO CHAPTER 

Professional Chemical Fraternity 

Founded at the University of Wisconsin in 1902 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1928 

President John Krynitsky 

Vice-President Edward Wharton 

Secretary Samuel McFarlane 

Treasurer Thomas Mears 



Mears 
Pitzer 




Wharton 
Zalesak 



Faculty: J. R. Adams, L. E. Bopst, L. B. Broughton, F. M. Bower, 
H. W. Carhart, G. F. Dittmar, N. L. Drake, A. F. Freeman, Nathan 
Gammon, Jr., M. M. Haring, H. A. Heller, W. A. Home, F. L. Howard, 
W. J. Huff, G. M. Machwart, Leonard Smith, W. A. Stanton, C. E. 
White, J. W. Williams, J. K. Wolfe, P. P. Zapponi. 

Members: Harry D. Anspon, Paul Brooks, Alfred A. Cooke, Howard 
Fawcett, Herman F. Kraybill, Russell Feed, Dr. Hugo W. Nilson, James 
E. Pitzer, Dr. Wm. J. Svirbely, Edmond Young, Francis Zalesak. 

D\' the time Maryland's brilliant young chemists become 
masters of such concoctions as p-aminosaligenin hydrochloride 
and similar compounds, there remains but little in this world 
for them to aspire to except membership in Alpha Chi Sigma, 
professional chemical fraternity. 

Two banquets yearly are held in honor of these chemists. 
One of these feasts is a Tri-chapter affair in conjuncton with 
the George Washington University and Washington profes- 
sional chapters. Twelve-month memberships in the American 
Chemical Society and chemistry handbooks are awarded to the 
most deserving members. 

In April, the work of the year is e.xhibited at a chemical 
show, material evidence of the advancement of the industrial 
and research activities of the fraternity. 




214 



HONORARY AGRICULTURAL 
FRATERNITY 

Founded at Ohio State University in 1897 

Established at the University of Maryland 

in 1920 

President Joseph Peaslee 

Vice-President Robert Nicholls 

Secretary Franklin McF"arland 

Treasurer James Brownell 





Galbreath 



Brosius 



McFarland 



Brownell 



Muma 



Foster 



Peaslee 




'i-A^. 




Faculty: Devoe Meade, Albert L. Schrader, Mark W. Woods. 
Members: Charles C. Astle, J. William Brosius, Allan H. Brown, Walter 

Mason Butler, Jr., Julian C. Crane, Howard G. Crist, Lawrence S. 

Faith, \'ernon R. Foster, Paul M. Galbreath, Ewing LeRoy Gupton, 

Jr., Fred S. Kefauver, L. Robert Lowe, Martin H. Muma, William \'. 

Redding, David F. Sheibley, Marion L. Wheatley, Fred B. Winkler. 

/xSIDE from testing milk and raising prize cattle and poultry, 
students in the College of Agriculture find time to participate 
in extra-curricular activities. For excellence in both curricular 
and campus activities they are rewarded with membership in 
the honorary fraternity, Alpha Zeta. 

The activities of the local chapter included a number of 
educational meetings, a Freshman smoker, and a hot dog roast. 
Its social year was climaxed by a fellowship banquet held in 
conjunction with the Washington Alumni Chapter. 

George Hamilton, of the Agricultural Economics Depart- 
ment, was made an honorary member. The Alpha Zeta medal 
for having the highest average among the Freshmen in the 
College of Agriculture was awarded to George \'ogt. Frank 
McFarland visited the Middle West as Maryland's recipient 
of the Danforth Fellowship award. 



215 



IOTA CAST 

Honorary Dramatic Fraternity 
Founded at Fairmount State College 
in 1925 
Established at the University of Mary- 
land in 1929 

President Mildred Hearn 

Vice-President Leon Yourtee 

Secretary Pat Schutz 

Treasurer Arthur Greenfield 





Schutz 



(loklberg 



Seidel 



Greenfield 



Wharton 



Greenwood 



Yourtee 




Faculty: C. B. Hale, R. I. Williams. 

Members: Mildred Baitz, Irvin Cook, Arthur Greenfield, Judith Green- 
wood, Alvin Goldberg, Mildred Hearn, Joel Hutton, Ra>' Leighty, 
Daniel Prettyman, David Seidel, Patricia Schutz, David Stoddard, 
Thomas Wharton, Leon Yourtee. 

IVEFLECTING a sharp chanp;e of policy, this year's cast of 
Alpha Psi Omega, national honorary dramatic fraternity, has 
broadened its field of activity by bringing to the campus 
speakers of national histrionic importance. 

Representing the cream of the local acting fraternity, the 
requirements for membership in the honorary are necessarily 
strict. To belong, a student must be at least a junior, and ha\-e 
distinguished himself in either the Ojiera or Footlight Clul), or 
in the stage crew work of either of the two organizations. 
Naturally, the roll call includes only a few names, as onl}' the 
tops in campus acting attain membershi]). 

The local chapter of the far-tlung honorar}.- in past years has 
restricted its program to bestowing laurels on outstanding 
performers. However, this year it has attempted to instruct 
would-be actors by bringing prominent Thespians to the cam- 
pus to guide those interested in acting as a career. 



216 




Al)l)ott 



Adkins 



A\ Ic'sworth 



Hxnl 



Kephart 
Xt'iimaiin 



McCorniac 
Mc< iinniss 



President Kathryn Abbott 

Vice-President Jane Kephart 

Secretary-Treasurer Betty Waugh 

Faculty: Dean M. Marie Mount, Mrs. Frieda McFarland, Mrs. 

Claribel Welsh. 
Members: Kathryn Abbott, Kathr\n Adkins, Mary Lee Ayiesworth, 

Betty Bain, Evelyn Byrd, Jane Kephart, Betty McCormar, Bell 

McGinniss, Eileen Neumann, Betty Waugh. 

Alpha ZETA, twenty-ninth chapter of Oniicron Nu, \vas 
estabhshed at the I'niversity of Maryland in 1937. This 
honorary Home Economics fraternity Avas founded at the 
Michigan State College in 1912 to promote scholarship and 
leadership in the field of home economics. The chapter taps 
the seven highest ranking seniors in the fall and the two 
highest ranking juniors in the s])ring. 

The members offered to tutor home economics freshmen 
who needed aid with their studies. In order to encourage 
the freshmen, a cup was awarded to the highest ranking 
freshman in home economics in June. 

217 



ALPHA ZETA CHAPTER 

Honorary Home Economics 
Fraternity 

Founded at Michigan State 
College in 1912 

Established at the University of 
Maryland in 1937 



K^ 





r\ 



<y 





COMPANY I 



Tii 



;i,f-^- 



THIRD REGIMENT 







1 . 


.fii^* 






^ 


4 


tj 


^^^nf^^^LMKv'^^^^^^iy^k .^AJti'J- 





Honorary Military Fraternity 

Founded at the University of Wisconsin in 1904 

Established at the University of Maryland 
in 1922 



^^l:^1if%h> 



Captain John W. Stevens 

First Lieutenant . . Fred T. Bishopp 
Second Lieutenant . Kt.gin W. Scott 
First Sergeant 

Elliott B. Robertson 



Faculty: Colonel J. D. Patch, Ma- 
jor S. D. Hervey, Major Charles 
Jones, Captain \V. H. Maglin, 
Major Chester C. Westfall. 

Members: \'an Ashmun, Thomas 
Capossela, Frank Cronin, War- 
ren Davis, William B. Davis, 
John DeArmey, Alfred Essex, 
J. J. Gude, Herbert Hall, Cecil 
Harvey, William Howard, Lewis 
Jones, Robert Krafft, J. M. Lani- 
gan, Luther Mellen, Walter Mil- 
ler, Ned Oakley. Richard O'Neill, 
George Seeley, Floyd Soule, Syd- 
ney Stabler, Donn Strausbaugh, 
Lewis Tarbett, Emmitt Witt, 
Francis Zaiesak. 



218 



Bishopp 
Capossela 
Cronin 
Davis, W. 1'. 
Davis. W. li. 
Essex 

llarvcy 

Howard 

Jones 

Krafft 

Mellen 

Miller 

Oakley 

O'Neill 

Robertson 

Scott 

Seelcy 

Soule 

Stabler 

Stevens 

Strausbaugti 

Witt 

Zalesak 





Jr OR some thirty-five years, Scabbard and Blade has bent its 
efforts to improving standards of military education and ce- 
menting relations between military departments of American 
colleges and universities. 

The University of Maryland chapter has fallen into step and 
become an exceptionally active one. In fact, at the November 
national convention, at which Elliott Robertson represented 
the campus group, the Marylander's by-laws were adopted as 
standard throughout the country, and College Park was desig- 
nated as the site for the 1940 convention. 

On October 27, National Scabbard and Blade Day, a wreath 
was placed on the tomb of the I'nknown Soldier at Arlington, 
\'a., in honor of the members of the military honorar\- who 
died in the World War. 

A new associate member, Major Chester C. Westfall, was 
inducted last fall, while a similar undergraduate tap])ing is 
slated for early spring. 

Of social note have been a nuniher ot intormal parties and 
a formal dance, all of which ha\e fiilt'iUed the good fellowship 
aim of Scabbard and Blade to supplement the more serious 
purposes. 



219 



Reigning deities of campus Greeks 
were Doris DeAlba and "Bucky" Ire- 
land. 

Tall, serene Doris DeAlba gently but 
firmly piloted the local Panhel group 
through its first attempt at deferred 
rushing yet managed to maintain the 
leadership of her own sorority, Alpha 
Xi Delta, at the same time. Not con- 
tent with these accomplishments, she 
added other feathers to her cap of 
achievement by outstanding athletic 
and scholastic attainments. 

Ireland as president of the Interfra- 
ternity Council administered a record 
fall rush season. Outside the council 
"Bucky" carried his leadership to the 
pine boards, being the mainstay of the 
Theta Chi pin team and reputedly the 
top fraternity bowler. 




220 




^ I ; \ 



n 










/ 


^ 






N 



n 



s 



LL U 



1 



1 



Cassel 
Corbin 

DeArinev 



Dippel 
Esnuind 
Fitzwater 



Fullington 
Gifford 
llarnion 



Healy 
Hciilieck 
Johnson 



Lodge 
Meng 

r<obertson 



Steini'i' 
Wilson 
Zaiesak 




222 



J 


/^ 


<-J 


i 


J 






Julius VV. Ireland 
President 



Luther Mellen 
Vice-President 



Lewis Jones 
Secretary- Treasurer 



Kappa Alpha 
Frank Dippel 
Gary Todd 

Phi Delta Theta 
Edwin Johnson 
Robert Lodge 

Alpha Tau Omega 
Maurice Corbin 
James Healey 



Delta Sigma Phi 
Francis Zalesak 
John De Armey 

Phi Sigma Kappa 
Ralph Meng 
Page FuUington 

Lambda Chi Alpha 
John Clifford 
William Esmond 

Sigma Phi Sigma 
Warren Steiner 
Robert W'ilson 



Alpha Gamma Rho 
Wayne Fitzwater 
Elmer Heubeck 

Theta Chi 

William Towson 
Douglass Cassel 

Sigma Nu 

Elliott Robertson 
Robert Harmon 



v^HARGED with the imixjrtant tasks of 
maintaining a harmonious relationship be- 
tween the I'nivcrsity and fraternities, and 
managing all affairs that pertain to fraterni- 
ties, the Interfraternity Council has, since its 
inception on May 20, 1926, tactfully handled 
all that enters that categor\-. 

Its accomplishments during the past year 
were es])ecially \aried. A seminar, featuring 
Dr. Walter Jaeger of Georgetown University, 
was sponsored during Freshmen Orientation 
\\'eek to better acquaint freshmen with cam- 
pus fraternities. The record pledging of 239 
men was capabl}' supervised. 



In the interests of its member fraternities, a 
representative w-as sent to the National Inter- 
fraternity Council Meeting in New York to 
secure helpful information. 

To foster scholarship the annual trophy was 
again presented, this year to Alpha Gamma Rho. 

By way of charitable undertakings, Christ- 
mas donations by indi\idual fraternities were 
secured by the Council and turned over to 
needy families. 

A perfect social season was also realized 
through the interfraternity Council Ball, an 
affair which marked the termination of the 
1938-39 activities. 



223 



PHI DELTA THETA 




President Edwin Johnson 

\'ice President Kelso Shipe 

Secretary Carl Goller 

Treasurer George Seelev 



Members; Philip Anderson, Charles Berg, Michael 
Birmingham, William Brendle, Robert Cannon, 
Thomas Davies, Prank Davis. Moir Fulks, Jerome 
Hardy, Lawrence Haskin, Brinkley Hayman, Law- 
rence Hodgins, Richard Johnson, Thomas Johnson, 
Stephen Jones, Richard Lansdale, Richard M. Lee, 
Robert Lodge, Edward Miller, John Muncks, Harry 
Offutt, Leonard Otten, Thornton Pfeil, Joseph 
Peaslee, William Piirdum, John Suit, Lewis Tarbett, 
Samuel Tuttle. 

Pledges: Turner Baile\', William Booth, Donald 
Gillett, Ray Hare, Park Holland, James Jones, 
Svend Jordan, Francis Kenne>', Robert King, James 
Kinsel, Lawrence Lichliter, Clifford Little, William 
Loker, Ivor MacFarlane, Daniel McNally, Robert 
Moran, Francis Morris, William Niedermair, Gene 
Ochsenreiter, Henry Pelezar, Robert Pet tit, John 
Prinz, John Scott, David Shaw, George Simons, 
Norwood Sparhawk, Theodore Stell, William Swann, 
Leon V'annais, Theodore \'ial, Kent Ward, Joseph 
White, Ray W'orthington, Elliot Young. 



Faculty: C. O. Appleman, L 
Phillips. 



J. Hodgins, N. E. 



beginning of Phi Delta Theta fraternity, which 
boasts 107 chapters, and a total membership 
of abont 30,000 men. 

During the first thirty-five years, anti- 
fraternity laws throughout the country caused 
many of the chapters to remain sub rosa, or to 
suspend either temporarily or permanently. 
Even the parent chapter at Miami was forced 
to hold its meetings secretly for four years and 
limit its meeting to eleven members in order to 
prevent attracting attention. Chapters at In- 
diana University, Centre College, Alabama 
L'niversity, Georgia LIniversity, Missouri Uni- 
versit>', and others were also forced to remain 
sub rosa until university administrations 
adopted more passive attitudes toward Greek 
clubs. 

71ie Scroll of Phi Delta Theta, the frater- 
nity's quarterly publication, was published first 
in January, 1875. Since that time it has met 
with man}' changes, for a time, being a bi- 
monthly paper and finally a magazine. 

Among the outstanding members of Phi 
Delta Theta are Benjamin Harrison, president 
of the United States, William Allen White, 
author, and Grantland Rice, sports writer. 



\_)S December 26, 1848, six men at Miami 
L'niversity, Oxford, Ohio, met and proposed 
the foundation of a fraternity, the chapters of 
which should be s]5read o\er the entire nation. 
Before the end of the first year, a chapter 
had been established at Indiana L^niversit\-, 
and within the next \ear a (barter was granted 
to Centre College in Kentucky. This was the 



Edwin Johnson 
President 




224 



MARYLAND ALPHA CHAPTER 

Founded at Miami University in 1848 
Established at the University of Maryland in 1930 





Birmingham 


Cannon 


Da vies 


Davis 


( ".oiler 


Hardy- 


Hodgins 


Johnson 


Jones 


Lee 


Lodge 


Miller 


Otten 


Peaslee 


Seeley 


Shipe 


Suit 


Tuttle 



22?< 



THETA CHI 



ALPHA PSI CHAPTER 



Founded at Norwich University in 1856 
Established at the University of Maryland in 1929 




Alt man 
Ashmun 
Baldwin 
Bamnian 



Cassel 
Chapline 
Hitch 
Home 



Button 
Ireland 
Jansson 
Kemper 



Krafft 
Nauss 
Oswald 
Rausch 



Reed 

Sanner 
Simon 

Strausbaugh 



Talcott 
Tcnny 

VYvalt 





i r>, D 




226 




William Towson 
President 




President William O. Towson 

Vice-President DoNN Strausbaugh 

Secretary F. Lester Simon, Jr. 

Treasurer Julius W. Ireland 

Members: Edward Altman, \'an S. Ashmun, Robert 
Baldwin, Richard Bamman, Douglass Cassel, 
George Chapline, Elliot Harwood, Robert Hitch, 
John Home, Carroll S. Hutton, George Jansson, 
James Kemper, Robert Krafft, Allan Nauss, Huy- 
ette Oswald, Charles Rausch, Walter Reed, Staley 
\'. Sanner, Worthington H. Talcott, Morgan L. 
Tenny, Henry F. Wyatt. 

Pledges: Robert Ayres, Anson Biggs, Arthur Carter, 
Harold Earp, Donald Edson, Leonard Fardwell, 
William Hare, \\'ilson Ingraham, George Lauten- 
berger, Arthur Meade, Raymond Nichols, Ells- 
worth Nowell, Donald Onnen, George Pendleton, 
Oakley Roach, Quay Sagle, Richard Trader, Law- 
rence Wilson. 

Faculty: W. B. Kemp, F". M. Lemon. 



LJlRIXCi the early years of the existence of 
Norwich University at Norwich, Vermont, six 
non-secret organizations were founded for 
various purposes and pursuits. In 1853, the 
first secret organization, known as the Regu- 
lators, was established with the thought of 
suppressing certain irregularities which a]3i)ar- 
ently existetl on the campus. 

At the end of three years, the Regulators 
had ceased to exist, and almost immediately in 
their stead grew the first Greek letter society 
at Norwich known as Theta Chi. 



From the moment of founding, i)ul)lir senti- 
ment and fate seemed determined to make the 
life of Theta Chi a difficult one. The founders 
intended it to be a national organization and 
foresaw immediate expansion, but it was not 
until forty-six years later that a Beta chapter 
was established at M.I.T. These forty-six 
years were a continual struggle for the frater- 
nity — the Civil War broke out and man\- stu- 
dents were taken from Norwich; fire burned 
the University buildings, threatening to close 
the school permanently; the enrollment was 
reduced to a dozen men and financial difficul- 
ties almost put an end to the institution in 
1880. Membership in Theta Chi was reduced 
to one active member at that time. 

After these numerous threats on its life the 
fraternity began to grow in strength and num- 
bers until today there are fifty-one chapters. 

The local chapter was originally Delta Mu 
fraternity, a local club. Professor Lemon of 
the English Department was a charter mem- 
ber of the organization and was instrumental 
in obtaining a charter from Theta Chi. Delta 
I\Iu was accejited into the national fraternity 
in 1929. 

Sammy Kaye, noted band leader, is proi)a- 
bly Theta Chi's most popular member. 




227 



ALPHA TAU OMEGA 




President Maurice Corbin 

Vice-President Robert Benbow 

Secretary James Mead 

Treasurer James Healey 



Members: John Brinckerhoff, Carl Brode, William 
Brown, Robert Cartee, Edmond Chandler, David 
Crockett, Ralph Crump, Bruce Davis, Dunreath 
Grover, Wilson Hancock, Norman Holzapfel, Rich- 
ard Hutchinson, Richard Kern, Harvey Kreuzberg, 
George Lawrence, James Martin, Frank Mears, Mi- 
chael Panciotti, Joseph Parks, Charles Piozet, Dan 
Prettyman, William Rea, \\ illiam Seitz, John Smith, 
Floyd Soule, Walter Spelsberg, Richard Stuver, 
Morton Taylor. 

Pledges: Robert Arenston, Charles Barker, Hardy 
Burges, Pelham Burnett, Richard Chapin, William 
Coleman, Jack Councilman, Burton Davis, Francis 
DiBlasi, Ernest Downs, James Dunn, Richard Du- 
vall, Howard Elliott, Jay Emrey, Theodore Fletcher, 
Roman Hales, John Harn, Neal Hathaway, Norman 
Hathaway, Carroll Hayden, Arthur Horn, Samuel 
Jacques, David Johnson, William King, Roger Law- 
she, David Lawrie, Randall Loftis, Donald Maxcy, 
Robert McKeever, Basil Mishtowt, Walter Neal. 
Franklin Peacock, Edward Price, Elmer Reese, 
Eugene Riley, William Rimmer, Terry Shansey, 
Harold Smelser, Elsworth Watkins, Leland Worth- 
ingtfin. 

Faculty: Lawrence \. Howard. Devoe Meade, Al- 
bert L. .Schrader, Charles E. White, Mark W. 
Woods, Mark Welsh. 



llAVING been the first fraternity founded in 
the South after the Civil War, the early growth 
of Alpha Tau Omega was limited to universi- 
ties south (jf the Mason and Dixon line. The 
fraternity was founded at Richmond, Virginia, 
September 11, 1865, and the Alpha or Mother 
Chapter was established at Virginia Military 
Institute. 



In spite of the fact that the early e.xpansion 
of the organization was restricted to the South, 
it was the first fraternit}' of Southern origin to 
establish and maintain chapters in the North. 
The rapid growth of the fraternity is shown by 
the fact that fifteen chapters were founded 
during 1881 and 1882. 

Originally, ATO was intended to be a club 
of college men as well as a college fraternity. 
As a result, community chapters were organ- 
ized without associating themselves with edu- 
cational institutions. Several of these chapters 
were established between 1865 and 1875, only 
to be later reorganized on college campuses as 
active chapters. Membership has never been 
confirmed except by initiation. 

The Mother chapter was considered the rul- 
ing body for several years, until a national 
congress was called in 1870. At the congress of 
1876, Joseph Anderson was elected chief exec- 
utive. Being an able and interested alumnus 
he estal)lished the present form of go\'ernment 
and incorporated the fraternity luider the 
name of Alpha Tau Omega Fraternit\ of Bal- 
timore City, making it the first fraternity to 
become incorporated. 



MAUKICt; CORHIN 

President 




228 



EPSILON GAMMA CHAPTER 

Founded at Virginia Military Institute in 1865 
Established at the University of Maryland in 1930 





Ikiibow 


HrinckerhotT 


Brodc 




Brown 


Cartce 


Chandler 


Crock (it 


Crump 


Davis 


<'irover 




Healey 


Holzapfcl 


Hutchinson 


Kern 


Krciizberg 


Lawrence 


Martin 


Mead 


Mears 


Panciotti 


Parks 


Piozet 


'rettyman 


Rca 


Seitz 


Smith 


Soule 


S|)elsberg 


Stu\er 


Taylor 



229 



KAPPA ALPHA 



BETA KAPPA CHAPTER 

Founded at Washington and Lee University in 1865 
Established at the University of Maryland in 1914 




Allen 

Badenhoop 
Capossela 



Carter 

Cotterman 
Councill 



Duff 
Graham 
Heil 



Heyer 
Howard 
McGinniss 



Mehl 
Mellen 
Miller 



O'Neill 
Pappas 
I'helps 



Saum 
Seal 
Zaino 




2.50 




Ik ASK l)iri>Ki. 
Pirsidfiil 



President Frank X. Dippel 

Vice-President Richard O'Neill 

Secretary Luther Mellen 

Treasurer H. John Badenhoop 



Members: Charles Allen, William Booze, C. \'ernon 
Bowen, Alan Bradley, Joseph Burk, Thomas Capos- 
sela, John Carter, Harold Cotterman, Wilford A. H. 
Council!, George DeWitt, Hoover Duff, William 
Graham, George J. Heil, Frank Heyer, William 
Howard, Parker Lindsay, Charlson Mehl, Joseph 
Mehl, William Miller, J. Leo Mueller, George Pap- 
pas, Nelson Phelps, S. W. Reeves, Robert Saum, 
Jordan Sexton, Frank Thompson, Gary Todd, 
Rocco Zaino. 

Pledges: William Badenhoop, Jack Benecke, Frank 
Blazek, Elmer Bright, Robert Brown, Thomas Car- 
son, Newton Cox, Jack Garrett, Adrian Goode, 
Jack Grier, Landis Hill, Jimmy James, Emmet Kav- 
enaugh, Julius Kaiser, Markland Kelly, Jack Lam- 
bert, Milton Lumdsen, Frank Maclnturff, Fritz 
Maisel, William McGregor, Paul McNeill, Brook 
Meaniey, Alan Minion, Victor H. Poole, Richard 
Ried, Nicklos Santinello, W. A. Seal, Harry Spicer, 
William Sullivan, Ashton Thumm, Bernard IHlman, 
Jack Warfield, Fred Widener, Jack \'oung. 

Faculty: Levin B. Broughton, Ernest Cory, Harold 
F. Cotterman, Charles L. Mackert, Leo J. Poelma, 
Charles S. Richardson, Stewart Shaw, Jesse Sprowls, 
Thomas B. Symons, Reginald \'. Truitt, Thomas 
Taliaferro. 



Kappa alpha was founckd as a local 
organization on the cani])iis of Washington 
College, now Washington and Lee, to promote 
and maintain the customs and ideals of the 
Southern people. \V. and L. was the most 



approjiriatc ])lace for the establishment of such 
a clul), for Robert E. Lee, idol of the South, 
was president of the Ihiiversity at the time. 

Because of its basic purpose, the fraternity 
has limited its expansion to Southern colleges 
and universities, with the exception of two 
chapters in California. For this reason it is 
known as Kappa Alpha Southern, and is to be 
distinguished from the older Kapjxa Alpha 
which was founded many years before. 

During the Ci\il War, the student bofly at 
Washington and Lee decreased to 141 due to 
enlistments, and as a result two of the five 
existing fraternities on the campus became in- 
active. James Wood became interested in the 
situation in 1865. The next year he discovered 
the ritual of one of the dead fraternities and, 
with the help of William Scott, revised it on a 
simpler basis. The first meeting was heUl in 
Scott's home, and his mother and aunt who 
were sympathetic to the cause made the 
original paraphernalia. 

INIunro Leaf, who recently came into the 
limelight with the cartoon comedy "Ferdinand 
the Bull," is a member of the local chapter of 
Kappa Alpha. 




231 



SIGMA NU 




President Elliott Robhrtson 

Vice-President James Lanigan 

Secretary Charles Holbrook 

Treasurer Harry \'ollmer 



Members: Andrew Altman, Charles Barber, John 
Beers, Fred Bishopp, John Brown, Robert Chaney, 
Jack Cherry, Robert Danmeyer, Albert Dieffen- 
bach, James Edgarton, Halbert Evans, Marshall 
Garrett, Robert Harmon, Samuel Hatchett, Freder- 
ick Hewitt, Henry Johnson, Charles Joyce, Henry 
Kimball, David Leonard, Richard Liester, W'illiam 
McMahon, John Morton, Donald Murphy, Oscar 
Nevares, Stedman Prescott, Howard Randel, Edwin 
Schmitt, Logan Schutz, Peter Snyder, Wade \\'ood. 

Pledges: Millard Alley, Kenneth Barnes, Houston 
Bell, Fred Beitler, Richard Burlin, Ralph Burlin, 
Francis Crelly, Craig Diamond, Frank Dwyer, John 
Hargreaves, Bart Hewitt, William Holbrook, Wil- 
liam Jack, John Jones, Holly Keller, Thomas Lewis, 
Fred Roth, Samuel Robertson, Hugh Walton. 

Faculty: G. J. Abrams, L. E. Bopst, A. B. Heagy, 
G. F. Pollock, W. C. Supplee, H. R. Walls. 



L^URINCi 1858, opposition to a society 
known as the "Blackfeet" on the campus of 
V.M.I, caused many organizations to spring 
U]). Outstanding among these clubs was one 
known as the Legion of Honor, the e.xistence 
and activities of which were kept secret for 
three months. On the first day of January of 
the following year, the "Legionaires" adopted 
typical Greek letter characteristics and a 
Greek letter name — Sigma Nu. 

For several years, meetings tjf the organiza- 
tion were held at a large rock in the middle of 
the V.M.I, parade ground. This canu' to he 



known in later years as the Rock of Sigma Nu, 
before it was removed when the ground was 
leveled. 

The second chapter of Sigma Nu was estab- 
lished in 1870, and other chapters followed in 
close succession. Because of anti-fraternity 
laws many of the chapters were forced into 
sub rosa existence and several of them died. 
As a result there were only three active chap- 
ters in 1883; however, a rapid expansion fol- 
lowed this date and today there are 98 colle- 
giate chapters and about 32,000 li\ing mem- 
bers. 

Sigma Nu is particularly notetl for its pio- 
neering activities on the Pacific Coast. It 
claims the first fraternit\' to be established on 
the campus of Stanford University, as well as 
lieing first in the states of Washington, Oregon, 
Idaho and Montana. 

At first the chapters were designated by 
Roman numerals in order of founding, instead 
of in the customary manner. Later Greek 
letter names replaced the Roman numbers. 

Prominent on the roll of alumni Sigma Nu's 
are found the names of Walter F. George, Sen- 
ator from Georgia, and Zane Grey, novelist. 



Kl.LlOTT koilKKTSON 

President 




232 



DELTA PHI CHAPTER 

Founded at Virginia Military Institute in 1869 
Established at the University of Maryland in 1918 



fji^^ 










Altman 


Beers 


Bishopp 


Brown 


Chaney 


Cherry 


Garrett 


Harmon 


Hatchett 


Hewitt 


Johnson 


Holbrook 


Joyce 


Kimball 


Lanigan 


Leonard 


MacMahon 


Murphy 




Nevares 


Schmitt 


VoUmer 


Wood 





233 



PHI SIGMA KAPPA 



ETA CHAPTER 

Founded at Massachusetts State College in 1873 
Established at the University of Maryland in 1921 




Anderson 
Bradley 
Biirnside 
Cook 
Fisher 

Frc'iidcnberger 
Fiigitt 

Fnllington 
Hambletoa 
Hawley 

Jensen 
Jones 
King 
I.ane 
Miller 

MiH-ller 
Kaphel 
Rice 
Scott 
Smith 

Scjiidcr 

I'aliaferro 
T.d ni.idge 
I'lirner 
Watson 




if ?ii €^ 




234 




Rai.i'h Menc; 
President 



President Ralph H. Meng 

Vice-President Lewis Jones 

Secretary John P^reudenberger 

Treasurer Harry B. Hambleton 



Members: Harry Anderson, Robert Bradley, James 
Burnside, Robert Cook, Hugh Downey, John Fetty, 
Allen Fisher, Donald Fugitt, Page Fullington, Wal- 
ter Hawley, W'illard Jensen, Forrest King, John 
Lane, Paul Lanham, Leonard Meakin, Walter Mil- 
ler, Eugene Mueller, Charles Parvis, Victor Raphel, 
Robert Rice, Elgin Scott, Francis Smith, William 
Souder, Boyd Taliaferro, Richard Talmadge, Claude 
Turner, John Wade, Thomas Watson, William West. 

Pledges: Shelton Clemmer, John Corson, Thomas 
Crouch, Sherwood Dann, William Dew, William 
Diggs, Neal Dow, Kenneth Evans, George Filgate, 
Paul Freeze, Nathan Giles, Thornton Gillett, Aid- 
rich Hambleton, James Hardy, John Harrison, 
Jerry Hege, Paul Hutson, William Katzenberger, 
Frank Machin, William Mosburg, Henry Nitzel, 
Edward Novak, Charles Punte, Thomas Riley, 
James Robertson, Rowan Scarborough, William 
Schf)enhaar, Orville Shirey, Garland Williams, 
Jacque Wills, Robert Steele, John Scopi, Roy Skip- 
ton, Gino Valenti. 

Faculty: Eugene B. Daniels, Charles H. Jones. 



It is interesting to note tiiat the eari\- ex- 
pansion of Phi Sigma Kappa was in ])rivately 
endowed .schools. Today there are lifty active 
chapters located over the entire country. 
Four of the chapters are located within thirty 
miles of each other, and the outstanding 
social event of the year is an annual joint 
dance. 

For several years the founders of the organi- 
zation had no permanent place in which to hold 
their meetings, and were forced to assemble in 
vacant storerooms and barns. The first real 
Phi Sig chapter room came into being when 
two of the founders who managed the student 
store gave up their storerooms. The partition 
was torn out with an axe, and the ])lace became 
known as "Hell's Huddle." 

During the World War more than half of 
the members of Phi Sigma Kappa are known 
to have been enlisted in the Allied forces. Of 
this number, 1,114 were commissioned officers, 
mainly in the Medical Corps. Two hundred 
and one University of Maryland members en- 
listed, being the largest number from an\- 
chapter. 

Among the list of outstanding alimmi ai)i)ear 
the names of Henry Siedel Canb}-, jom-nalist; 
Melville Davisson Post, author; and I^aniel 
C. Willard, president of the B. and (). Rail- 
road. 



OlX members of the Class of 75 at Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College are credited with the 
founding of Phi Sigma Kappa. It was not the 
intention of these men that their club should 
become a national organization, and it was 
fifteen >ears later that the first branch chapter 
was established, at Alban\- Medical .School, 
now L'nion College. 




235 



DELTA SIGMA PHI 




President Francis J. Zalesak 

Vice-President Nicholas A. Budkoff 

Secretary Thomas R. Brookes 

Treasurer Thomas C. Carrico 



Members: Marriott Bredekamp, John J. DeArmey, 
John Epperson, George Evering, Jose Grave de 
Peralta, Edward Harlan, Harry Kiernan, North 
Longfield, John Luntz, Charles MacDonald, Donald 
Markline, Benjamin McCleskey, William McManus, 
James Meade, Arthur Moon, Robert Neiman, John 
Parks, Frederick Perkins, Herbert Roesler, Ira Todd, 
Everett \\'ehr. 

Pledges: John Ackerman, Conrado Arosemena, 
Michael Baker, Thomas Baker, Charles Bastian, 
Clarence Becker, William Bollinger, Norman Brandt, 
Robert Edwards, William Filbry, Raoul Grave de 
Peralta, V'incen Hughes, William Oberle, William 
Prfiwell, Mason Shay, Richard Sullivan, Pedro 
IHiides, Howard Valentine, Kenneth Vanous. 

Faculty: John Faber, Charles B. Hale, Augustus J. 
Prahl. 



r OUNDED forty years ago at the City Col- 
lege of New York as a brotherhood of Chris- 
tian men, Delta Sigma I*hi has grown until 
today it stands among the leaders in the field 
of national college fraternities in this country. 
At present there are forty-two active chapters 
well distributed over the United States, and 
one chapter located in Montreal, Canada. 

The outstanding social event of the Mary- 
land chapter, as well as of every chajiter of 
Delta Sig, is the annual Sailors Ball. This 
nautical social event has become a tradition on 
every campus claiming a Delta Sig chapter, 
and the twelve thousand brothers are proud to 
be called "sailors," 



Among the outstanding features of the na- 
tional organization is a unique bureau known 
as the National Placement -Service which en- 
deavors to establish graduate students in the 
fields for which they are best suited. During 
the financial stress of the past few years, this 
service has proven its worth by finding hun- 
dreds of jobs for idle brothers. 

Prior to 1906, chapter names were derived 
from the place where the chapter was located. 
Such names as Keystone, for the chapter at 
Penn State, and Technology for the chapter at 
M.I.T.,vvere later replaced by the Greek letter 
designations. 

Among the more prominent alumni are 
Richard W. Leche, Governor of Louisiana, and 
a group of nationally known band-leaders: 
Hal Kemp, Ted \\'eems, "Skinnay" Ennis, 
Jan Garber, and Sam Brattain. 

Alpha Sigma chapter was installed at the 
University of Maryland in May 1924; it num- 
bers among its alumni the National President 
of Delta Sigma Phi, Dr. Walter H. E. Jaeger, 
formerly on the faculty of the University, and 
now Professor of Law and Director of Gradu- 
ate Research at Georgetown University Law 
School. 



Kkancis Zalksak 
President 




236 



ALPHA SIGMA CHAPTER 

Founded at the College of the City of New York 
in 1899 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1924 





^ 







^ €^. a. r^r^. 



t&Jt-^M^ 



ISudkoft DeArmey ile Peralta Harlan Kicrnan MacDonald 

Markline McCleskey Neiiiian Parks I'lrkiiis Roesler Todd 



231 



SIGMA PHI SIGMA 



DELTA CHAPTER 

Founded at the University of Pennsylvania in 1908 
Established at the University of Maryland in 1916 




Clark 

Coleman, A. 
Coleman, T. 



Derrick 
Garlitz 
Ciupton 



lliimmer 



Kinney 
l.andy 
Peters 



Sloan 

Steinberg 
Weber, B. 

Wilson 




238 




\\ \KKI.N SlKlNliK 

Presideiil 



President Warren Steiner 

Vice-President Herbert Hall 

Secretary Ralph Hammer 

Treasurer Douglas Steinberg 



Members: Harold Axtell, Kenneth Clark, Albert 
Coleman, Thomas Coleman, Daniel Derrick, LeRoy 
Garlitz, Ewing Gupton, James Hartman, Robert 
Kinne>', \\'illiam Landy, Herbert Linsley, Robert 
Pailthorp, Roy Peters, James Sloan, Jack Weber, 
Bond Weber, Robert Wilson. 

Pledges: Cromwell Allnutt, Henderson Bartley, 
Harry Boswell, Randall Crnnin, Daniel Eisenberger, 
Marion Ennis, Richard Evans, Garland Fairbanks, 
Kingsiey Grigg, Frederick Hicks, Wiley Hopkins, 
Fletcher Jones, William Kitchen, Howard Lewis, 
William Maslin, John McLaughlin, Norman Miller, 
Eugene Myers, Harry Ovitt, Carroll Palmer, Rob- 
ert Russell, William Rile\', Frank Seitz, Earl Smith, 
Reeves Tilley, Robert \'an Horn, Donald Wick. 

Faculty: R. B. Allen, O. R. Carrington, Geary Eppley, 
H. B. Hoshall, J. E. Metzger, M. A. Pyle, B. Shipley, 
S. S. Steinberg. 



versity strives to defeat the other departments 
in annual athletic contests. Wood, Needam, 
and Long, the founders, were architects and 
all three possessed a strong loyalty for their 
own department. 

The men spent hours on the water, training 
daily, in order that they might win the rowing 
meet for the architects, and bring honor to 
their department. Exactly who won the big 
race was never determined, but it was a moral 
victory for the designers. 

At the end of the season Long suggested the 
foundation of a fraternity to prevent the close 
friendship, which had developed during the 
training season, from waning for want of a 
common cause to stimulate it. A large number 
of fraternities already existed on the cani])us 
and Wood and Needam were convinced that 
another would only meet with failure. Long 
had faith in his convictions and, with the help 
of several faculty members, he finalK' con- 
vinced the two that the undertaking could be 
successful. 

The University of Maryland chapter of 
Sigma Phi Sigma dates from 1916. This was 
the third club to join the chapter roll, whiih 
now lists eighteen active chapters with a total 
membership of approximatch- 5,000. 



1 HK most common and most poj^ular reason 
for founding a fraternity is of course for the 
])romotion of brotherhood and the strengthen- 
ing of the bonds of friendship. The founders of 
.Sigma Phi Sigma, likenumerousotherfounders, 
had these purposes in mind when they exerted 
their efforts toward establishment of a frater- 
nal organization. 

At the L'niversity of Pennsylvania, rivalry 
between the departments runs high, and each 
of the schola.stic divisions comjirising the uni- 




2.^9 



ALPHA GAMMA RHO 




President E. Wayne Fitzwater 

Vice-President Paul M. Galbreath 

Secretary Charles C. Astle 

Treasurer Charles R. Stup 



Members: Charles C. Astle, Louis F. Ahalt, Aha S. 
Baker, Lloyd C. Bowers, James F. Brownell, J. 
William Brosius, Ralph Y. Burton, Glen M. Bosley, 
Howard M. Bailey, Clarence A. Eck, E. Wayne 
Fitzwater, Carroll M. Forsyth, Vernon R. Foster, 
Paul M. Galbreath, Norborne A. Hite, George W. 
Hoshall, Elmer Heubeck, Jr., William E. Jarrell, 
H. Bradley Jones, Cla\ton P. Libeau, L. Robert 
Lowe, Harry B. Matthews, Frank R. McFarland, 
Joseph S. Merritt, Robert D. NichoUs, Joseph N. 
Pohlhaus, William V. Redding, George C. Remsberg, 
Charles R. Scherer, Robert A. Shoemaker, Charles 
R. Stup, Frank R. Taylor. 

Pledges: Lee Adkins, Norris C. Astle, William Boyer, 
John Baden, William Boyce, Howard Crist, Lee 
Crist, Charles Clendaniel, Marion Chance, Winston 
Day, Edward Dougherty, Thomas Galbreath, \^'il- 
liam Groone, Joseph Jarrell, Charles Jubb, Richard 
Jenkins, Joseph Jones, Elmer Keller, William Kemp, 
Fred Kefauver, William Lowe, Leib McDonald, 
William Miles, Robert Meyer, David Northam, 
Clark Nicholson, Carlton Porter, Jacob Siegrist, 
Paul Sigrist, Samuel Slack, Willis Smith, Robert 
Stevens, David .Sheibley, Hubert Skinner, Frank 
Stevenson, Richard Sutton, Morris Todd, Edward 
Talbott, Charles Treakle, Gist Welling, Scott White- 
ford, William Whiteford, Roscoe Whipp, Gus War- 
field, Karl Reiblich. 

Faculty: Myron Berry, Samuel De Vault, Walter 
England, Arthur Hamilton, Edgar Long, Paul Pfof- 
fenberger, Arthur Thurston. 



V OUNDED as a professional agricultural 
fraternity, Alpha (iamma Rho was changed to 
a social organization in 1917. Previously, 
members of social fraternities were allowed 



membership in AGR, and members of AGR 
were permitted to join the social clubs. Since 
assuming its new form this practice has been 
abolished. 

In 1908, the union of two local fraternities 
at Ohio State and Illinois L^niversities was 
effected and Alpha Gamma Rho was born. 
The club at Ohio State was known as Alpha 
Gamma Rho, and was founded in 1904 at 
Columbus, while Delta Rho Sigma, the Illi- 
nois local, was founded in 1906. 

Shortly after the founding of Delta Rho 
Sigma, members of the two clubs attended the 
International Livestock Exposition in Chi- 
cago. Delegates to this convention found that 
the ideals, purposes, and interests of both 
were nearly identical, and felt that an incor- 
jjcjration would be beneficial. 

After two years of correspondence, repre- 
sentatives of the two locals met in Indian- 
apolis and drew up a constitution. From the 
older club, Alpha Gamma Rho, came the name 
of the new fraternit}', from Delta Gamma Rho 
came the badge; the Illinois local lost its name, 
but it was given the honor of being Alpha 
chapter of the new fraternit\', destined to be- 
come the outstanding social fraternit\- in the 
agricultural profession. 



Wayne Fitzwater 
President 




240 



ALPHA THETA CHAPTER 

Founded at Ohio State University and the Univer- 
sity of Illinois in 1908 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1928 




Astle 


Ahak 


BakL-r 


Bowers BrowEiell 


i5rosius 


Bosli-\- 


Bailey 


Eck 


Forsyth 


Foster tialbreath 


Heubeck 


Hoshall 


Jarrell 


Jones 


Libeau 


Lowe Matthews McFarlaiid 


Merritt 


XichoUs 


'ohlhaus 


Redding 


Renisberg 


Scherer Shoemaker Stevenson 


St up 


Taylor 



241 



LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 



EPSILON PI CHAPTER 

Founded at Boston University in 1909 
Established at the University of Maryland in 1932 




Carroll 
Corrklon 
Daiiuitli 



Esmond 
Hepliurn 
Herbert 



Jacobi 
Jefferys 
Jones 



Ml 



Slillin 



^'ol inn 




in cMf^ 






S- 




242 




John Giffokd 
President 



President John Gifford 

Vice-President Martin Muma 

Secretary William Esmond 

Treasurer Nelson Jones 

Members: Richard Carroll, l^onald Corridon, Donald 
Damuth, Ned Hepburn, Wilbur Herbert, Wilbur 
Jefferys, LeRoy Nelson, Arthur Stillings, Wilbur 
^'ooum. 

Pledges: Marvin Ander, James Bowling, LeRoy Har- 
ris, Thomas Hitch, Herman Kaiser, David Kelley, 
Milton Kimbel, Paul McCloskey, John Meade, 
James Miller, Edward Nylen, Jose Sanchiz, Charles 
Schaefer, \\'illiani \\'hite, Julian Whitman. 

Faculty: John Jacobi, C.eorge D. Quigley. 



Lambda CHI alpha fraternity grew out 
of the Cosmopolitan Law Club which was 
organized at Boston University in 1905. A 
meeting of the club was called on Novemlier 
2, 1909, in order to weigh the possibilities of 
organizing a Greek letter society. This date 
marks as the actual beginning of Lambda Chi 
Alpha. 

All meml)crs ot the club, members of the 
law class of 1912, and an} one interested in the 
profession were inxited to attend the meeting. 
.After length}- consideration, it was decided 
that reorganization into a secret society would 
not i)e beneficial. The three leaders of the 
niovenu'nt then broke a\va\' trom the club and 



started the foundation of a new fraternity, 
similar to the one to which they had belonged 
during their high school careers. 

With the establishment of a branch chajjter 
at Massachusetts State Agricultm-al College 
three years later the organization was greatly 
strengthened. There are now more than eighty 
chapters or Zetas, as they are called, in the 
national organization. 

The rapid growth of the fraternity in the 
early years of its life was due to the fact that 
numerous local clubs were organized with the 
express purpose of joining Lambda Chi Alpha. 
Many non-Creek clubs were also accepted 
into the order in later years, and five chapters 
owe their origin to the National Federation of 
Commons Clubs. When the federation dis- 
solved during the war, charters were issued to 
the more active organizations. Many of the 
locals accepted into Lambda Chi Al]:)ha were 
older than the national fraternity and a firm 
foundation of age was thus established. 

The most prominent members of Lambda 
Chi Alpha are Leroy Prinz, Hollywood dance 
director; Mickey Cochrane, manager of the 
Detroit Tigers; and James V. Aired, Governor 
of Texas. 



''^i 




Mk 



243 



TAU EPSILON PHI 




President Irving Phillips 

Vice-President Milton Mulitz 

Secretary Milton Lehman 

Treasurer Leonard Katz 



Members: Benjamin Alperstein, Lawrence Auerbach, 
Abraham Cohen, EHas Elvove, Irvhig Etkind, Alvin 
Goldberg, Norman Himelfarb, Daniel Horowitz, 
Samuel LeFrak, Marvin Mandell, Arthur Peregoff, 
Alexander Rabinowitz, Bernard Rosen, Martin Ro- 
sen, Alvin Salganik, Norman Tilles, Herbert \'oung. 

Pledges: Sigmund Aiken, Herbert Alperstein, Hyman 
Berg, Joseph Berkow, Stanley Berman, William 
Bralove, Melvin Cohen, Samuel Cohen, Sidney 
Cohen, David Falck, Milton Falkowitz, Herbert 
Ginsberg, Albert Goldstein, Samuel Harris, Gilmore 
Hyman, Bernard Kiawans, Albert Kleiman, Morton 
Littman, Leonard Portuguese, Bernard Rice, Mor- 
ris Roseman, Melvin Savitz, Joseph Weintraub. 



During 1909 and 1910 two groups of men 
in the Department of Pharmacy at Cokmibia 
University sought some way in which they 
might prolong the enjoyment of college life 
after graduation. Fraternities existed on the 
campus at this time hut they were not open to 
Jewish students. 

Neither group knew of the existence of the 
other, and aUjne it was impossible for them to 
establish a club. By chance, members of the 
two grou])s met at registration and began to 
discuss their mutual desires. From that time, 
they realized that neither could exist without 
the other and plans for union began. 

The first conference of the two groups was 
held during lunch hour in a deserted class- 
room. Later the same da\ the leaders met. 



this time in Central Park, and made final 
plans. All they then lacked was a place to 
meet. 

An appeal was made to the L'niversity for 
permission to meet regularly in an empty lec- 
ture room, and within the week permission 
was granted. The first meeting was held Octo- 
ber 19, 1910, in the University library, and the 
name of Tau Epsilon Phi was adopted for the 
new organization. 

In the first years of its life, TEP assumed 
the characteristics of a professional pharma- 
ceutical fraternity. After national expansion 
was begun, however, it became evident that 
a change to a social club would be profitable, 
and this change was made in 1913. 

The outstanding social event of the five 
TEP chapters in this region is an annual Jubi- 
lee, held this year by the University of 
Virginia chapter at Richmond. 

Tau Beta chapter of TEP was founded in 
1925 at the University of Maryland in Balti- 
more, and was transferred to College Park 
two years later. Their present house, which 
was constructed in 1928, was one of the first 
fraternit}' houses built on this cami:)us. 



Irving Phillu's 
President 




244 



TAU BETA CHAPTER 

Founded at Columbia University in 1910 
Established at the University of Maryland in 1926 





Alperstein 


Elvove 


Etkind 


Goldberg 


Himelfarb 


Katz 


Horowitz 


LeFrak 


Lehman 


jMandell 


Miilitz 


Peregoflf 


Rosen, B. 


Rosen, M. 


Rabinowitz 


Salganik 


Tilles 


Young 



245 



SIGMA ALPHA MU 




Abrams Davidson Edlavitrh Farkas 

Siegel Tyser X'alenstein 



SIGMA CHI CHAPTER 

Founded at City College of New York in 1909 

Established at the University of Maryland 
in 1933 

President Oscar Davidson 

Secretary Murray Valenstein 

Treasurer Leo Siegel 

Members: David Abrams, Frank Borenstein, Robert 
Edlavitch, Robert Farkas, Armand Goldstein, 
Ralph Tyser. 

Pledges: Sidney Berman, Alfred Bernstein, William 
Cooper, Eugene Fisher, Robert Hyman, Louis Kline. 
Alvin Lavenstein, Stanley Mann, Albert Molofsk>-. 
Stanley Robinson, Albert Schlesinger, Harvey Stein- 
bach, Marvin Polikoff, Norman Zinberg. 

JNOT because the>- disliked other fraternities 
at the City College of New York, but l)ecause 
they wanted to further the development of 



fraternal spirit among Jews, eight men founded 
Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity. The first years of 
the fraternity's life were not spent in national 
expansion, but rather in strengthening itself 
on the campus of C.C. N.Y. 

Although it was not the original intention of 
the founders to place branch chapters at other 
schools, five students at Cornell University 
were issued a charter for the organization of a 
Beta Chapter. Two years after the club's birth, 
expansion had started, and by 1915 seven chap- 
ters had l)een founded in New \'ork state. 

Members of Sigma Alpha Mu are proud of 
the fact that none of their chapters were ever 
forced to exist siib rosa. In many cases, it was 
the i)olicy of the founders to refuse issuance of 
charters unless an invitation was forthcoming 
from the iniiversit\' authorities. 

The chai)ter at the University of Maryland 
was founded in 1933, and is the youngest of the 
thirty-five active chapters in the national or- 
ganization. 



246 



PHI ALPHA 



EPSILON CHAPTER 

Founded at George Washington University 
in 1914 

Established at the University of Maryland 
in 1919 

President Burton D. Borden 

Vice-President Bernard Aiken 

Secretary Leonard Sollod 

Treasurer Bernard Yockelson 

Members: Howard Bonnett, Sidney Dorfman, Raphael 
Ehrlich, Joseph F"ishkin, George L. Flax, Daniel 
Kaufman, Irving Lipsky, Irvin Schumacher, Fred 
Shulman, Morton Steinbach. 

Pledges: Macy Carmel, Hyman Goldblatt, Carrol 
Markowitz. 

1 HE year 1939 marks the silver anni\ersary 
of Phi Alpha Fraternity — t\vent\-rt\"e years 
that ha\e fostered cherished memories and ac- 
complishments. 

The founders (four of whom are today prom- 
inent D.C. physicians and the fifth a New 
York engineer) can look hack to October, 1914, 



when they, as George Washington University 
undergraduates, founded an organization dedi- 
cated to brotherhood, and destined to grow to 
some thirty undergraduate and fifteen alumni 
chapters by 1939. Outstanding recollections 
of Phi Alphans are the George Washington- 
Georgetown Chapters' reunion of 1924 with 
its \\'hite House reception by President Cool- 
idge, while 1927 calls forth the outline of the 
Executive Mansion at Annapolis and a like 
reception by Governor Ritchie of the annual 
conventioneers. This latter year saw admission 
to Junior Membership in the National Inter- 
fraternity Conference, with which organiza- 
tion the fraternity is now fully afiiliated. 

Interest and enthusiasm of undergraduates 
and alumni has been sustained b}- the presen- 
tation of annual chapter and indi\'itlual merit 
awards. 

Concerning the campus chapter, Epsilon, 
founded in 1919, a house has been secured this 
year, seven new members inducted, and a 
large twentieth anniversary dance ])lanned, 
all designed to place it among the most active 
chapters of a most actixe fraternity. 



Aiken 
Schumacher 



Borden 

Sollotl 



Flax 
Yockelson 




247 



r'\ 



n 



u 



Faul 
Huber 





Irvine 

MacDonald 




Neunian 
Pollard 



Sparling 




248 



J 


r^ 


K^ 


1 


J 




Doris DeAlba 
President 



Dorothy Huff 
Secretary 



Jane Kephart 
Treasurer 



Alpha Omicron Pi 
Edith Ray Sparling 
Kitty Pollard 



Alpha Xi Delta 
Doris DeAlba 
Eileen Neuman 



Delta Delta Delta 
Dorothy Huff 
Anne Irvine 



Kappa Delta 
Jane Kephart 
Virginia Paul 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 
Nora Huber 
Margaret MacDonald 



Alpha Delta 
Eleanor Crocker 
Carolyn Webster 



Kappa Alpha Sigma 
Mary Louise Ganzert 
Dorothy Hussong 



il,\'ERY two weeks representati\'es from the 
five national sororities on campus resolutely 
Hur>- their hatchets of Cireek rivalry and trudge 
up the hill to the Panhellenic Council meet- 
ing, presided o^■er by Doris DeAlba. 

A notable change was made this year in the 
introduction of deferred rushing, a reform 
which proved much more beneficial to all con- 
cerned than the old system which was like 
groping blindly into a grab-bag trusting to 
luck for the results. 

vSeveral new faces made their apjjearance at 



the meetings in 1939. The two locals, both of 
which hope to become nationally affiliated, 
were for the first time represented on the 
council, but had no voting power. Each so- 
rority had a jimior delegate who attended 
meetings and became oriented to the procedure 
so that the next Panhellenic year can be man- 
aged more efficiently. 

An interesting feature of 1939 was the Na- 
tional Panhellenic Convention held in Wash- 
ington, in which all the nearby colleges and imi- 
versitiesha\ing national sororities participated. 



249 



KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 




President Nora Huber 

Vice-President Bernice Aring 

Secretary Lydia Evans 

Treasurer Tempe Curry 

Members; Marian Barker, Muriel Booth, Mary Louise 
Brinckerhoff, Betsy Carson, Mary K.Carson, Carolyn 
Clugston, Roberta Collins, Barbara Davis, Gayle Da- 
vis, Edith Farrington, Elizabeth Harrover, Elizabeth 
Hottel, Frances Hunter, Mary Ellen Hunter, Mar- 
garet Jack, Margaret Kemp, Frances Kercher, Jane 
Kraft, Eleanor Kuhn, Alice Lang, Margaret Mac- 
Donald, Laura Manning, Bess Paterson, Helen 
Reindollar, Ruth Richmond, Elizabeth Archer Root, 
Patricia Royster, Margarette Smaltz, Lucia Spehn- 
kouch, Alden Tucker, Clare Upson, Dorothea 
Wailes, Helen Welsh, Jane Wilson, Virginia Wood. 

Pledges: Helen Bedell, Alice Cann, Charlotte Eisele, 
Mary Ann Griffith, Mariana Grogan, Doris Hughes, 
Margaret Kibler, Doris Kluge, Nancy King, Tillie 
Logan, Jane Maxson, Reba Mclndoe, Mary Milli- 
kan, Betsy Mumma, Mary Powell, Martha Rain- 
alter, Susan Rinehart, Beverly Jean Smith, Betty 
Suavely, Martha Sparhawk, Nancy Stewart, Betty 
Lou Tydings. 

Faculty: M. Marie Mount, Mrs. Evelyn \'ernon. 



When women were admitted to colleges 
where Greek letter fraternities for men had 
already been established, they became frater- 
nity conscious and soon many of these social 
organizations sprang up for women. The sec- 
ond of these to be established was Kappa 
Kappa ( iamma at Monmouth College, Illinois, 
in October, 1870, and when the idea of expan- 
sion, already prevalent among the men's fra- 
ternities, was endorsed by the Kappas the 
question of national goNernmcnt arose. At 
first the Kappas adopted the previously tried 
system of a grand chapter. Later, however, 
they originated the drand Council method 
which is still in general use. .After nearly si.xty- 



nine years of growth. Kappa has grown to 
seventy-four active chapters. 

Kappa was the first sorority to call a meet- 
ing of the Panhellenic Association to which 
national sororities sent representatives. An- 
other interesting phase of the history of Kappa 
Kappa Gamma was the establishment of a 
dispensar}- in France during the World War. 
This work continued for several years until it 
was taken over by a philanthropic organiza- 
tion of local women. 

The Kappas have had two first ladies of the 
land. They are Mrs. Rutherford B. Hayes and 
Mrs. Herbert Hoover, wives of Presidents of 
the United States. Other Kappas less out- 
standing but yet important in their fields are 
Helen Wills Moody, tennis title holder; Mar- 
jorie Weaver, Hollywood starlet; and Mar- 
garet Cuthbert, director of women's activities 
in radio at Radio City, New York. 

The Maryland Kappa chapter. Gamma Psi, 
was officially chartered on this campus in 1929. 
The women initiated at that time had been 
members of Sigma Delta, a local sorority. The 
most outstanding event of the year for Gamma 
Psi chapter was the entertaining of their dis- 
trict at the semi-annual province convention 
of the sorority. 



Nora IIuhur 
President 




250 



GAMMA PSI CHAPTER 

Founded at Monmouth College in 1870 
Established at the University of Maryland in 1929 





Aring 


Barker 


Booth 




B 


rinckerhoff 




Carson, B. 


Carson, M. 


Clugslon 


Collins 


Curry 


Davis 






Evans 






Farrington 


Harrover 


Hottel 


Hunter, K. 


Hunter, M. E. 


Kemp 






Kraft 






Lang 


Mac Donald 


Manning 


Paterson 


Keindollar 


Richmon 


d 




Root 






Royster 


Smaltz 


Spehnkouch 


Tucker 


I'pson 




Wailes 








We 


sh 


Wilson 


Woo,l 



251 



DELTA DELTA DELTA 



ALPHA PI CHAPTER 

Founded at Boston University in 1888 
Established at the University of Maryland in 1934 




Amadon 
Anders 
Bain 
Bland 
Bohlin 

Bowman 
Bowyer 
Burkins 
Cain 
Clark 

Cronin 
Dennis 
Eichlin 

Greenwood 
Guyther 

Hall 

Harrington 
Hartig 

Hollingsworth 
Holt 

Irvine 
Jackson 
Jones 

Lambert son 
Langford 

Logan 
MacLeod 
Maslin 
Meriam 
Peters 

Pyle 
Rawley 

Shelton 
Schutz 
Seiter 

St. Clair 
Wallace 

Weber 




252 




Dorothy Huff 

President 



President Dorothy Huff 

Vice-President Betty St. Clair 

Secretary Jean Hartig 

Treasurer Mary Hedda Bohlin 

Members: X'irginia Amadou, Betty Bain, Mildred 
Bland, Ka\' Bowman, Ernestine Bowyer, Alice Bur- 
kins, Harriet Cain, Caroline Clark, Mary Cronin, 
I)oroth>' Dennis, Doris Eichlin, Judith Greenwood, 
Mar>- Anne C.uyther, Marjorie Hail, Mary Jane 
Harrington, Tre\a HoUingsworth, Bette Holt, Ann 
Ir\ine, Lorraine Jackson, Rose Jones, Edwina Lam- 
bertson. Bertha Langford, Polly Logan, Mary Mac- 
Leod, Margaret Maslin, Martha Meriam, Emily 
Peters, Mary Ellen Pyle, Betty Rawley, Emma 
Shelton, Patricia Schutz, Margaret Seiter, Mar- 
garet Wallace, June Weber. 

Pledges: Evelyn Bullock, Jacqueline Embrey, Sara 
Frances Ferrell, Mary Graves, Edwina Hambleton, 
Laura Hastings, Mildred Heifer, Hope Hevener, 
Catherine Huff, Phyllis Lange, Irene Leighton, 
Lahoma Leith, Mary Louise Park, Mary Roberts 
Patrick, Rita Scheffler, Grayson Smith, Hateva 
Smith, Doris W'illingham, Norma Thompson, Helen 
Crane. 

Faculty: Mrs. Claribel Welsh. 



istence installed two new chapters. Today with 
88 active collegiate chaj^ters it is second in size 
amongst the National Panhellenic Sororities. 
In 1930 the sorority became an international 
organization with the addition of three Cana- 
dian chapters. 

Last summer the Golden Anniversary of Tri 
Delta was celebrated at the eighteenth con- 
vention in Swampscott, Massachusetts. This 
occasion was an important one in the history 
of the sorority, for at this time a bronze tablet 
commemorating the founders of the tri])le 
Delta was unveiled at Boston University. 

Many Deltas have gained recognization in 
various fields. They include Lila Bell Acheson, 
founder and editor of the Reader's Digest 
Magazine; Katherine Lenroot, chief of the 
Children's Bureau of the Department of Labor; 
]\Irs. Henry Wallace, wife of the Secretary of 
Agriculture; and Lucille Foster McMillan, the 
only woman Civil Service Commissioner. 

The life of the lhiiversit\' of Maryland chap- 
ter really began in 1926 when the Alpha 
Upsilon Chi group was recognized as a campus 
organization, but it was not until 1934 that 
the local sorority became Alpha Pi chapter of 
Delta Delta Delta. The local girls have spon- 
sored four annual interfraternit\' sings in 
which the campus sororities and fraternities 
compete for a much coveted silver lo^•ing cup. 



1 HANKSGIVINCj season is one very sig- 
'nificant to the members of Delta Delta Delta 
for it marks the foimding of the fraternity in 
1888 at Boston University. It is particularly 
fitting that this sorority, the first to be hum on 
New England soil, should be connected at its 
founding with such a ty]Mcally New England 
feast. 

After its establishment, Tri Delta began at 
once to expand and during its first year of ex- 




253 



ALPHA XI DELTA 






President Doris DeAlba 

Vice-President Katiirvn Adkins 

Secretary Lucille Kornmann 

Treasurer Elizabeth Smith 

Members: Kathr>n Abbott, Catherine Aiello, Gene- 
vieve Aitcheson, Phyllis Bollinger, Dorothy Davis, 
\'irginia Keys, Harriet Kirkman, Lois McComas, 
Elizabeth McCormac, Esther Mullinix, Eileen Neu- 
mann, Elizabeth Owens, Katherine Shea, Ellen 
Talcott, Lois Teal, Margaret Thurston, Katherine 
Turner. 

Pledges: Dorothy Aiello, Jean Albert, Helen Ander- 
son, Df)rothy Brinson, Vivian Carroll, Clara Marie 
Clark, Elizabeth Clark, Shirley Connor, Alice Deitz, 
Marian Donn, Mary Engel, Ann Eschner, Corinne 
Johnston, Jean Kagle, Geraldine Krider, Mildred 
McDowell, Katherine Perkins, Shirley Pfeiffer, Jane 
Purneli, Mary Stevenson, Louise Teller, Mary 
\^'aters, Aileen Williams, Helen \A'illiams. 



vJNE ni^lit in April, 1893, at Lombard Col- 
lege, Galesburg, Illinois, three girls returning 
from chai)el walked slowly back to their dor- 
mitory discussing the eternal to\nc — boys. 
The girls were dating members of the Sigma 
Nu fraternity and, woman-like, they did not 
want the boys to get ahead of them. They de- 
cided that if the bojs could have secret pledges 
and meetings they could have them too. Thus 
their first idea of a sorority was born. As they 
began to discuss the possibility of their own 
sororit}', deei) interest arose in each and, in 
their desire to have their friends share in this 
venture, each girl brought to the gathering her 
best friends. The plans for the sorority were 
then ln'giin. Tlu' ])ink rose was chosen as the 
symbol for the group because of its similarity 
to the wliite rose of .Sigma \u. The sorority 



emblem, the (luill, was selected to represent 
the maxim, "The pen is mightier than the 
sword." The constitution and by-laws were 
then drawn up and on April 17, 189.^, Alpha 
Xi Delta was founded. 

The first twenty years of the national life of 
the sorority shows two distinct ten-year peri- 
ods. First, the local and intensive growth ; and 
the second, the national and extensive growth. 
To uphold the sincere wishes of the ten original 
founders of Alpha Xi Delta, the early members 
continued to work and plan for nationalization. 
In the year 1901-02 definite plans for nation- 
alization were made, and the national con- 
stitution was formally adopted on April 17, 
1902. The growth of the sorority was carried 
on and now Alpha Xi boasts of tift\-f()ur 
chapters. 

Before joining the national sororit\', the 
local group was known as Delta Xi. In 1934 
Delta Xi was chartered by Alpha Xi Delta as 
Beta Epsilon chapter. This year the chapter 
had much to be proud of in the acquisition of a 
new house and having led all sororities in the 
number of coeds who pledged to tln' (iiiill of 
Alpha Xi Delta. 



Doris Dii.\i,ii\ 

Prrsidcnl 




254 



BETA ETA CHAPTER 

Founded at Lombard College in 1893 
Established at the University of Maryland in 1934 






€i0f) 







Abbott 


Adkins 


Aiello 


Aitcheson 


Bollinger 


Davis 


Keys 


Kirkniaii 


Kornmann 


McComas 


McCorniac 


Mullinix 


Neumann 


Owens 


Shea 


Smith 


Talcotl 


Teal 


Thurston 


Turner 



255 



KAPPA DELTA 



ALPHA RHO CHAPTER 

Founded at Virginia State Normal in 1897 
Established at the University of Maryland in 1929 



Barber 
Blalock 
Bohman 
Bolden 
Bond 

Bragaw 
Brice 
Cissel 
Danforth 
Duniiingtoii 

Faul 
Ford 

Garrett 
Gross 

Henderson 

Holt 

lager 
Jones 

Kempton 
Kephart 

Koenig 
Leard 
Longest 
Nellis 

Nusbaum 

Porter 
Reynolds 
Richards 
Richmond 
Ross, B. 

Ross, M. L. 
Sargeant 

Schulniiiipl 
Smith 
Speake 

Sullivan 
Stoddard 
Wolf 




256 




Jane Kephart 

President 



President Jane Kkphart 

Vice-President Frances Wolf 

Secretary Mary Lee Ross 

Treasurer Elizabeth Barber 

Members : Georgia Blalock, Katherine Bohman, Mary 
X'irginia Bolden, Marian Bond, Josephine Bragaw, 
Mar\- Eiizalieth Brice, Elizaljeth Cissel, Elaine Dan- 
fortli, Doris Dunnington, Virginia Faul, Margaret 
Ford, Esther Garrett, Esther Gross, Mary Hender- 
son, Mary P^Hzabeth Holt, Evelyn lager, Bernice 
Jones, Hildreth Kempton, Judith King, Ruth 
Koenig, Helene Kuhn, Mary Leard, Ann Longest, 
Doroth>- Nellis, Ruth Ann Nusbaum, Bettie Porter, 
Hope Reynolds, Marie Richards, Naomi Richmond, 
Betsy Ross, Lida Sargeant, Doris Schutrumpf, 
Adria Smith, Mary Speake, Sara Stoddard, Evelyn 
Sullivan. 

Pledges: Dorothy Arnold, Randa Beener, Billie 
Bertrand, Betty Burner, Maidee Coffman, Erin 
Ellis, Bette Everley, Betty Flanagan, Pauline 
Harris, Doris Harrison, Virginia Hodson, Anne 
Hoen, Lois Holland, Nellie Lamb, Grace Lewis, 
Barbara McCarty, Doris McFarland, Betsy My- 
rick, Frances Price, Shirley Pyle, Ethel Ruoff, 
Joycelyn Savoy, Ruth Stowell, Laura Wilkins, 
Frances Williams. 

F"acultv: Susan Harman, Alma Preinkert. 



At first Kappa Delta was entirely southern 
with no chapters above the Mason-Dixon line. 
However, by 1908 this plan was abolished and 
numerous chapters were being established in 
the North and West. 

Kappa Delta became a member of the Na- 
tional Panhellenic Congress in 1912. Its 
growth continued to the i)resent size of 68 
active chapters and nearly 17,000 meml)ers. 
As a national philanthrojjy, KD maintains a 
ward in the Crippled Children's Hosj^ital of 
Richmond, Mrginia. 

Foremost among the outstanding members 
of the sorority are Pearl S. Buck, famous 
author; Helen Clare, actress of stage and radio 
fame; Hildegarde Fillmore, fashion editor of 
McCall's Magazine; and Mrs. William B. 
Bankhead, wife of the Speaker of the House of 
Representatives. 

The University of Maryland chapter orig- 
inated in 1924 as Kappa Xi, a local sorority. 
After five years, it was installed as Alpha Rho 
chapter of Kappa Delta. Since 1931 the local 
girls have occupied the historic old Gerneaux 
Hall on the campus. One of the most interest- 
ing accomplishments of the local chapter has 
been the annual "KD Revue," a varsity show 
put on by the members themselves. The Kappa 
Delts have produced ele\en of these musical 
comedies and thej' have alwaj's been rated 
high in the field of local entertainment. 



JjACK in 1897, four Southern belles — stu- 
dents at the State Normal School at F"arm- 
\ille, Virginia — decided to perpetuate their 
friendshij) by organizing a sorority — Kappa 
Delta. The white rose was chosen as the 
sorority flower and olive green and white as 
the colors. Soon many new faces were added 
to the group and in 1902 they further enlarged 
their sororit\- hy adopting a ]5lan of ex]xmsion. 



257 



ALPHA OMICRON PI 




President Edith Ray Sparling 

Vice-President Matilda Boose 

Secretary Helen Platt 

Treasurer Fredericka Waldman 

Members: Barbara Boose, Audrey Bosley, Elizabeth 
Brookens, Evelyn Byrd, Mary Helen Callander, 
Mary Helen Cook, Beatrice Fennell, Catherine 
Foote, Helen Groves, Margaret Hart, Geraldine 
Jett, Betty Law, Martha Jane Legge, Lucille 
Leighty, Earla Marshall, Elaine McClayton, Alma 
Miller, Gladys Person, Kitty Pollard, Elizabeth 
Powers, Jean Ramer, Estelle Rawls, Betty Ray- 
mond, Dorothy Rice, Frances Rosenbusch, Kath- 
erine Short, Louise Tucker, Sara Anne Yaiden. 

Pledges : Jane Anderson, Marian Beck, Hazel Bishopp, 
Vivian Cask, E. Anne Cissel, Carolyn Gray, Mar- 
guerite Hall, Doris Hampshire, Jane Howard, Lois 
Kemp, Ellen Lutzer, Eurith Maynard, Virginia 
Mercer, Jane Page, Nancy Reed, Jeanne Reese, 
Beverly Reinstedt, Billie Jane Rittase, Jeanne San- 
tamarie, Barbara Simons, Mary \'aiden, Florence 
White. 

Faculty: Mrs. Frieda McFarland. 



B. 



►ARNARD COLLEGE, the women's branch 
of Columbia University, was the scene of Alpha 
Omicron Pi's foundin" in the year 1897. Four 
young students, Stella Cieorge-stern Perry, 
Jessie Wallace Hughan, Helen .St. Clair Miil- 
lan, and Elizabeth Heywood Wyman, who 
realized that they would be likely to drift 
apart after graduation, decided to strengthen 
the bond of their friendship by forming a 
woman's fraternity along with several other 
Barnard pupils. Thus AOPi was born. 

The founders chose for their emblem the 
ruby and decided on the Jacqueminot rose as 
the official flower. Carrxing out the theme of 
red, thev made cardinal their coloi- and set 



down the ideals and principles which have been 
followed by every member in every chapter 
which was later established. The founders or- 
ganized the next few chapters in such locations 
that AOPi was .soon classed as a national fra- 
ternity and gained the distinction of being the 
first Panhellenic sorority on the Barnard 
campus. The Alpha O's have grown until they 
now can boast of some fifty chapters and ten 
thousand members. 

AOPi was the first national sorority to appear 
at Maryland, having been established in Octo- 
ber, 1 92-4. The sisters of the red rose and the ruby 
struggled along and worked for several years 
until they finally set up their residence in the 
beautiful colonial house which was built 
through their efTorts and perseverance. For a 
time, the coeds were forced to live in various 
and sundry abodes while their new home was 
under construction, even to the point of laying 
a few bricks on their own toward the comple- 
tion of their future residing place. 

Cha])ters of AOPi are spread from Canada 
to Louisiana and from Maine to California. 
Among the outstanding members are Mar- 
garet Tallichet of the films, .Ada Cami^bell 
Rose, editor of "Jack and Jill," and Dorothy 
Kenyon, jirominent attorney. 



EDrill RaV Si'AKl.INH 

President 




258 



PI DELTA CHAPTER 

Founded at Barnard College in 1897 
Established at the University of Maryland in 1924 




Boose, B. 


Boose, M. 


Bosley 


Brookens 


Byrd 


Callander 


Cook 


Cramblitt 


Fcnnell 


Koote 


Groves 


Hart 


Jett 


Kemp 


Law- 


Lcighty 


Marshall 


MrCla\ ton 


Miller 


Person 


Piatt 


Pollard 


Powers 


Kanier 


Ravvls 


Kavmond 


Rice 


Rosenbusch 


Short 


Tucker 


\aidcn 


W'aldnian 



259 



PHI SIGMA SIGMA 



BETA ALPHA CHAPTER 

Founded at Hunter College in 1913 
Established at the University of Maryland in 1936 




Biskin 

Cohen 
Dix 

Fisch 
Katz 
Levine 

Lowenthal 
Miller 

Oppenheimer 

Powers 
Rubin 
Schultz 



Schwartz 
Tnlin 
Yagendorf 




260 




Harriett Levin 
President 



President Harriett A. Levin 

Vice-President Lee Adele Fisch 

Secretary Rosalind Schwartz 

Treasurer Beverley Oppenheimer 



Members: Mildred Baitz, Shirley L. Biskin, Bertha 
Katz, Ethel Levine, Jean Lowenthal, LiUian Powers, 
Ruth Rubin, Selma Schultz, Molly Tulin. 

Pledges: Rita Abelman, Ethel Cohen, Helyn Cohen, 
Gloria Dix, Pearl Ettin, Esther Feldman, Naomi 
Levin, Gladys Lieberman, Sonia Miller, Lillian 
Rubin, Lenore Schultz, Beatrice Schuman, Natalie 
Shorser, Bette Stone, June Yagendorf. 



Faccltv: Lee 



M 



orris. 



Jr HI SIGMA SKiMA was founded as a non- 
sectarian ori^anization at Hunter College in 
Xew York on Xo\ember 26, 1913. The ten 
^■oung women w ho were its charter members 
formed the sorority to carry on a program of 
l)hilanthropic work, thus, they ga\e no im- 
mediate thought to expanding this work. 

For five years Alpha chapter was contented 
to continue locally, but in 1918 chajiters were 
founded at Tufts College and New York L^^ni- 
\ ersity. Two years later chapters at the L^ni- 
versit\- of Buffalo and Adelphi College were 
added. Al)out this time the need was felt for a 



fraternity publication and the quarterly maga- 
zine. The Sphinx, came into being. 

At least one new cha])ter of Phi Sigma Sigma 
has been founded yearly on campi extending 
across the country, and from Texas northward 
to Canada. 

As the years passed there were formed 
strong alumni organizations, and today Phi 
Sigma Sigma has a number of well-established 
alumni clubs functioning in many cities. 

But with all this expansion the original 
philanthropic aims of the fraternity were never 
forgotten. Many endowments have been 
made to hospitals, libraries, and the establish- 
ment of a fraternity unit at Camp I'nit at 
Croton-on-Hudson was an outstanding ac- 
complishment. In addition, each active and 
alumni chapter carries on some local project 
which aids in social betterment. 

The Maryland chapter of Phi Sigma Sig- 
ma was originally known as the Beacon Club. 
In 1933 it became Beta Phi Sigma sorority. 
After serving a three years' apprenticeship as 
members of a local club, the Beta Phi Sigmas 
were installed on this campus in May, 1936, as 
Beta Alpha chapter of Phi Sigma Sigma. 

The chapter roll of the national sorority 
then totaled twenty-six chapters. Today Phi 
Sigma Sigma has grown to a membership- of 
almost 2500 from the ten girls who put their 
heads together and created the sorority. 




261 



ALPHA SIGMA 




Checket 
Michaelson 



Handler 
Rosenfield 



Hornstein 
Snyder 



Kress 
Steinberger 



Founded at the University of Maryland 
in 1935 

President Irene Checket 

Vice-President Audrey Hornstein 

Secretary Sylvia Handler 

Treasurer Helen Michaelson 

Members: Bernice Kress, Ethel Rosenfield, Janet 
Steinberger, Eleanor Snyder. 

Pledges: Anita Einbinder, Hortense Finkelstein, 
Muriel Cordon, Sue Cusack, Esther Handler, Max- 
ine Harzenstein, Phyllis Harzenstein, Freda Siegal, 
Ruth Surosky, Rita Vane, Miriam Yoffa. 



Alpha SIGMA, a local sorority, began its 
career at the University in Dormitory B dur- 
ing the winter of 1935-36. The twelve char- 
ter members of the club were officially recog- 
nized as Alpha Sigma in March, 1936. 



For the past three years the club has been 
sponsored by Alpha Epsilon Phi, a national 
sorority. This organization now has twenty- 
two chapters and it is the desire of the Alpha 
Sigmas that they be the twenty-third. 

The club had a gala social season this year 
which began when the members moved from 
the dormitory to their own sorority house. 
The sorority had a dance in the fall to celebrate 
this mo\e. On March 11 the members held 
their Founder's Day banquet, while in the 
spring they followed the social whirl with 
another formal dance. 

The Alpha Sigmas haven't confined their 
activities to the social side alone. They have 
also concerned themselves with charit\- work 
and the maintenance of a high scliolastic 
average. 

Florence Orringer, jjroN'ince director tor 
Alpha Kpsilon Phi, \isited the sororit\ in the 
spring. 



262 



ALPHA DELTA 



Founded at the University of Maryland 
in 1938 

President Carolyn Webstkr 

Secretary Margaret Wolfinger 

Treasurer Eleanor ("rocker 



Members: Florence Fowble, Catherine Cilleland, 
Marie Hardest\', Anne Jarboe, Marian Mayes, Inez 
Nevy, Mildred Smith. 

Pledges: Marie Augustine, Shirley Byers, Florence 
Davis, Ruth Evans, Doris Grov'es, Mildred Oursier, 
Philomena Osso, June Schmidt, Frances Simpson, 
EHzabelh Skill. 



In the sijrini; of 1937, a group from the Bal- 
timore Alumnae Chapter of Alpha Delta Pi 
came to the University of Maryland for the 
purpose of establishing a local sorority which 



wouhl in lime hcconu' a chapter of .-\li)ha 
Delta Pi. The chapter was soon organized un- 
der the name oi Al])ha Delta. A constitution 
was drawn up and submitted for the approval 
of the Student Life Committee, after wliich 
Alpha Delta was officialK- recognized as a chib 
on May 12, 1937. 

Twelve women were the charter members 
of the club and in September, 1937, the}' started 
out with the intention of making the year a 
successful one. The building \\\) of the chapter 
was the major consideration. During the year 
there were interesting sidelights such as the 
Christmas tea given by the George Washing- 
ton chapter of Alpha Delta Pi and their first 
Founder's Day banquet. 

The Alpha Delts are now in their second 
year on the campus. The original twelve mem- 
bers have increased to twenty-two, and now 
they await May, 1940, when they will become 
members of Al])ha Delta Pi. 



Crocker 



Fowble 



Gilleland 



Hiirdestv 



New 




Mayes 



Smith 



Webster 



Wolfinger 



263 



KAPPA ALPHA SIGMA 




Hickman 
Hussong 
Johnston 
Ladson 
Menke 



Nichols 
Ryan 
Skinner 
\'oris 



Founded at the University of Maryland 
in 1938 

President Mary Louise Ganzert 

Vice-President Dorothy Hussong 

Secretary Martha Hickman 

Treasurer Clara Gale Goldbeck 

Members : Agnes Baldwin, Jane Reals, Marie Conners 
Elizabeth Clojiper, Betty Johnson, Marcia Ladson 
Margaret Menke, Irene Nickols, Hilda Ryan, Barbara 
Skinner, Anna Voris. 

Pledges: Janet Baldwin, P^dith Christensen, Cather- 
ine Kurzenknabe, Catherine Stubbs. 



Gi 



rROWINO coiitimiall\' i)roniiiu'nt on our 
cami)iis is a local sorority known as Kappa 
Alpha Siiiina. Two years ago with Miss Wilcox 



acting as faculty adviser it was christened the 
Alpha Club; then in September, 1937, its name 
was changed to the present one. 

Affiliated with this local is Mrs. Summers, 
who is acting as housemother of the club's 
chapter room in College Park. Likewise, a 
member of Sigma Kappa national sorority is 
now associated with this group since they plan 
to petition for membership to Sigma Kappa 
ne.xt year. 

The sororit}- scrapbook records a Noel din- 
ner at .Sandy Springs, a luncheon and nautical 
dip at Washington Golf and (\)untr\ Club, 
and feasts at the Congressional Countr\- Club 
and The Highlands. The Kappa Alpha Sigs 
ran Walt Disney a close second this \ear in 
their hilarious presentation of "Ferdinand the 
Bull" for the Interfraternity Sing comiJctilion 
held this \ear. 



264