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Full text of "The Terrapin : [yearbook]"

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THIS FORTIETH EDITION OF 
THmf^ff5^nW!Wi^^&DnED BY 




MAR 

RAYM'mm^^[£^mmm&'n acted 

AS THE FACULTY ADVISER 



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of the Unioersiti^ ofMaryland at 



College Park, Maryland 



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Dedication 



To the memory of Willard M. Hillege/'st. loyal friend and loyal 



Marylander, the editors respectfully dedicate The 1941 Terrapin. 



Although we no longer see his friendly smile or feel his warm 



handclasp, we know that the splendid character which was his 



has left a guiding mark upon this campus, and that through 




the years it shall serve as an inspiration to all who knew him. 




As a state and as a University, we, the 
editors, present this fortieth volume of 
the Terrapin. 

Located in a border-line state, Mary- 
land University is the meeting place of 
South and North, of East and West. Here 
accents blfnd and customs fuse. Here 
visions widen and interests deepen. 

It is our hope that in these pages you 



will find not only a word and picture por- 
trayal of campus life, but also the very 
personality — the intrinsic spirit — of the 
University itself. 

Maryland University is enriched by a 
glorious heritage, and stimulated by an 
inspiring present. 

Yesterday meets today in a jiledge for 
the future! 



The Co 




following the seasons, will bring b^ 



n .... the frosh 



rity, and student life. Winter^ 




football crowdi 



us- eimrossed in 



f,hut stiffer /Jttols .... meetings .... clubs .... mud 
hm'shed roaS: 
, . . . Miss JAanjland was chosen i\f^.^ 



\ifl^jpll^^ankIlkore mud. In tfie Spring 



drills were resumed 



and the seniors h 




ictorious . . . . ROTC 
last "fling" during June Week. 



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kNNAPOLIS. "the Ancient City", noted for 
Its stately residences, its gaiety, and its culture, grew up around the State government 
and the Naval Academy. Today its life is still centered around these tioo institutions. 
Besides being Maryland's Capital. Annapolis is a busy trade center. Among its 
activities, fishing and packing of seafood play a predominant part. Oyster boats, some 
freshly painted, some badly in need of repair, line the docks. Many buildings 
erected in the early history of the town are now being restored to their original 
splendor and the neiu structures are designed to harmonize with the old ones. Anna^iolls 
is determined to keep the pictures(]ue atmosphere which pervades this small town. 




\ossborough Inn still serves as a popular meeting place 




and with it co 



tember comes 



umn and the freshmen 



Organized orientation . . . endless hours of registration . . . inescapable entrance exams . . . 
"Curley's" reception . . . S.G.A. annual assemb\g . . . upper ciassmen mix the freshmen . . . fresh' 



men meet student pastors at Euensong . . . faculty officiallg meets frosh as classes begin . . . bonfires 



and pep rallies prep for fall as sports take the spotlight . . . varsity games draw 
big crowds . . . tea flows at sorority rushing while fraternity rushing is deferred 
and preferred . . . cross-country and soccer take attention as the season closes. 



The coming of September brought to 
the campus a migration of approximately 
fifteen hundred "rats and rabbits." This 
great army of invaders Hterally "BHtz- 
krieged" the A & S Building for three 
days. During that time they were chased 
from one line to another, and back again, 
filling out hundreds of cards and yards of 
paper on which they told their life his- 
tories and planned their futures. Just as 
they were despairing of ever seeing the 



sun again, they reached the last line and 
then weakly staggered into the fresh air 
clutching their paid bills, and muttering 
something about bombs. The final step 
of this trying experience led the typical 
"Robert Rat" out of the door wearing a 
rat hat and carrying his "M" Book. Thus, 
equipped, he was ready to meekly submit 
to the wiles and whims of his worthy su- 
perior — the Sophomore. 

"Roberta Rabbit" received her first 





Here come the rats 



taste of social life Wednesday night, Sep- 
tember eisj;hteenth, when a l)it of mass 
orientation took place at Anne Arundel 
Hall. That same nit^ht recreation was fur- 
nished for the men students in the Armory. 
Vet all was not fun for the new students. 
Language qualification tests, and schol- 



astic aptitude tests proved bewildering 
and freshmen considered them a neces- 
sary c\il. However, the real excitement 
and one of the main highlights of the 
week's activities was the President's re- 
ception where the freshmen stood in a 
scemingb' endless line to eagcrh- shake 



Minds measured 



funds treasured. 





On the screen 



. . opening scene. 




the liaiid uf our own "Curley" Bynl. It 
was there that the students were individ- 
ually introduced to the faculty members 
in order to i)roniote a feeling of good w ill 
and friendship. To top off the evening's 
enjoyment, refreshments and music were 
generously offered. The followinu after- 
noon, the women students were again 
given a chance to make or break friend- 
ships, when they attended a tea given by 
the Dean of Women in the Field House. 

The climactic affair of the Orientation 
Week was the Student Government As- 
sembly and the Freshman Mixer. Ritchie 
Coliseum was overflowing that night as 
the confused freshmen were introduced to 
the campus leaders, who welcomed them 
and explained the acti\ities of the many 
different organizations. 



. . . brinfis damp hair. 




Earnest prayer . . 




Maryland's gain. 




Student Life Committee 

1 HE Student Life Committee, whicii worlvcd behind the 
scenes of Freshman Week, is an all-im])ortant factor in 
extra-curricular Hfe at the University. The committee is 
composed of nineteen members of the faculty. This group 
is continually growing in imjjortance in its endeavor to 
maintain the friendly relationship between the student 
body and the administration. 



Before-class stroll 




''^^j^K 



Lefttoright: EICHLIN. DREW. GRIFFITH. HARMAN, STAMP, JOHN- 
SON, WHITE, PREINKERT, EPPLEY, POLLOCK, JAMES, ALLEN. 



17 




DR. HARRY CLIFTON BYRD 
President 




yv^t>^cZyw.G_ 



Du. IIaukn (". Hyrd celebrated hi> fifth .inni\iTsar\ as Presidi'iit of 
tlu' I'liixcMsity of Maryland on l-\'l>ni.n'\ Ji of this \car. Indi-r his 
capable and in.s|)irin.u leadershi]), the enrollment durinii this period at 
College Park has donbled and i;reat achancos ha\ e been made in phy- 
sical e(iui|)ment and the leachini; force. Dr. H\rd's ni.uu contacts 
with the l'ni\ersit\' as student, athlete, coach, and faculty member 
have all contribuUd in ui\in;^ him tlu' rich background of experience 
needed lor his present i)osition. 

18 



Henry Holzapfel, Jr. . . . alumnus . . . has sent three sons to 
Maryland . . . loves people and trees. Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 
. . . first and only woman member of the Board . . . wins prizes 
for gardening . . . ardent clubwoman. J. Milton Patterson . . . 
heads Board of Public Welfare . . . great interest in Rotary Clubs. 
William P. Cole, Jr. . . . alumnus . . . lawyer . . . Congressman . . . 
hobby — farming. Harry Nuttle . . . Farm Board President . . . 
Eastern shoreman . . . son on campus. W. Calvin Chesnut . . . 
Graduate of Maryland Law School . . . judge in Baltimore. John 
Semmes . . . new member of Board . . . fought in World War . . . 
able lawyer. Rowland K. Adams . . . another new member . . . 
another Baltimore judge. 

Chairman of the Board . . . intensely interested in Uni- 
versity since graduation . . . helped write present char- 
ter . . . has often represented Government abroad . . . 
does chemical research . . . has two prides — his beauti- 
ful garden and his grandson, the apple of his eye, whom 
he plans to send to MarN-land. 

NEW PLANS WERE FORMULATED BY THE . . . 



Board of Regents 





W. W. SKINNER 
Chairman 



Top row: MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST, Secretary; J. MILTON 
PATTERSON, Treasurer; ROWLAND K. ADAMS, W. CALVIN 
CHESNUT. Bottom row: WILLIAM P. COLE, JR., HENRY 
HOLZAPFEL, JR., HARRY H. NUTTLE, JOHN E. SEMMES. 



19 







Jwm the J^ew Admimstmtm ^uildmg 




Zltcsc Officers Quided Affairs 




MISS ALMA H. PREINKERT 



DR. EDGAR F. LONG 



MR. H. T. CASBARIAN 



Alma Preinkert . . . Registrar . . . with the University since 
192 1 . . . her registration system is one of the best in the country 
. . . Dr. Edgar F. Long, acting Director of Admissions . . . mem- 
ber of the faculty since 1925 . . . friend of all the students . . . 
Harvey T. Casbarian, Comptroller . . . graduated from South- 
eastern University- . . . C.P.A. . . . Purchasing Agent Thomas A. 
HuTTON . . . came to the University in 1919 . . . taught English 
and historj' in South Dakota . . . Librarian Carl W. Hintz . . . 
came here 1937 . . . graduate of DePauw University . . . received 
A.M.L.S. at Michigan 1935 . . . Herbert A. Russell, Chief Eng- 
ineer . . . Consultant Engineer at University of Pennsylvania 
for twleve years before coming to Maryland in 1937 . . • H. L. 
Crisp, retiring Superintendent of Grounds. 



MR. T. A. HUTTON 



MR. carl W. E. hintz MR. HERBERT A. RUSSELL 



MR. H. L. CRISP 





DEAN LEVIN B. BROUGHTON . . . CONTRIBUTED GENIAL DIGNITY TO THE 



DR. JOHN C;. JENKINS 
Professor of Psychology 



DR. CHARI.KS B. HALE 

r4ifessor of English 




College of Arts and Sciences 



A (.RADIATE of the old Mar\lan(l Ai^ricul- 
tural College in I9()S, Dr. L. B. BrouLihton 
returned to the canii)us in 191 1 as associate 
professor of chemistry, following three years 
of service in the Maryland l-~xperiment Sta- 
tion. In ic)i,s he was a|)]X)inted {professor of 
chemistry and in 1929 liecame chemist for the 
State of Maryland. He was appointed Dean 
of the College of Arts and Sciences in 1938 and, 
in addition, is a nu'nihcr ol the Cieneral Ad- 
niinistrati\e Board, tiie Craduate Council, 
,ind llie I)()anl of Athletics. 

Dean Broughton is an active member of the 
National .Vssociation of Onicial Agricultural 
Chemists and at the |)resent time is serving as 
j)resident of th.it org.uiization. Dr. Broughton 
continues to teach his favorite subject, organic 
chemistr\', and is an active member of the 
.\ini'ri('an ("hcinical Society. 

Dr. I ire High ton i> a nirniln'i" dI K.ip|)a .\lph.i, 
I'lii K,!]!]),! I'lii, Aljilia Ciii Signi.i, ,ind .Sigma 
Xi fr.itcrnilirs .md takes an acti\e i).nt in the 
local kotar\ chapter. 



DR. NORMAN E. PIIII.LIP.S 
\sNochile Priifi'.ssor of Zoolofty 



DR. WESLEY M. (;E\VEIIR 
ProfesBor of liUtory 





DEAN S. SIDNEY STEINBERG . . 



MR. MYRON CREESE 
Professor of Electrical Engineering 




AN ACTIVE CONSULTANT HEADED THE 

College of Engineering 

With eight years of practice in civil engi- 
neering, both in the tropics and in the United 
States, Dean S. Sidney Steinberg became an 
instructor at the old Maryland State College 
of Civil Engineering in 1918. In 1920 he became 
Professor and head of the department of civil 
engineering. He was named Dean of the Col- 
lege of Engineering in 1936. 

In addition to being editor of the A)iiinal 
Proceedings of the American Road Builders 
Association, Dean Steinberg is president of the 
Planning Division of the American Road 
Builders Association, chairman of Engineer- 
ing of the Maryland Trafific Safety Committee, 
and regional adviser for Maryland and the 
District of Columbia for Engineering Defense 
Training. 

A graduate of Cooper Institute of Tech- 
nology, Dean Steinberg is a member of Tau 
Beta Pi and Sigma Phi Sigma fraternities. 



DR. JOHN E. YOUNGER 

Professor of 

Mechanical Engineering 





DR. HAROLD F. COITERMAN 

Assistant Dean Aftriculture. Professor 

of Af^ricultunil F.diication 

DR. ERNEST N. C:ORV 
Professor of Entomoloflty 



DIVERSIFIED ACTIVITIES CENTERED IN THE 

College of Agriculture 



DEAN THOMAS B. SIMONS 



)R. I.. H. JAMES 
Professor of liacteriology 




DR. FREDERICK H. LEINBACH 

rofessor of Animal Husbandry 



A niLKiENT worker, findinsi relaxation in 
his chosen profession, Dr. Thomas B. Synions, 
who carries with him a t\pical Knglish air, was 
i^raehiated from the t)lcl Maryland Agricuhural 
College in 1902. Later in the same year, after 
a siiort i)cri()d of i;ra(iuate work at ("ornell 
Tniversit}', he joined the Maryland facult\- 
as Assistant I'.ntomoloi^ist. 

Dr. Syinons is a fellow in tlic American 
Societx for the Ad\anccmcnt ol Srirnix", and 
since 1913 has been director ol the Kxtension 
Service with hcad(]iiarters at CoUci^e Park. 
He was appointed to liis |)resent i)osition as 
Dean of the (\)lle.<;e of .\i;riculture in ig.V)- 

Dr. Symons hroui^ht distinction to himseit 
and tin' State of Marxland w ht'n he waselected 
('.rand Directorol l-.psilon .Si^ma I'hi, national 
honor.irx Kxtension .Serxice lratt'i'iiit\ in 1040. 

Recently Dr. S\ nions was nuuk' chairman 
of the State Soil Conservation C'onnnittee and 
is a nunil)er of other state atiricultnral jiroups. 
He i> an acli\e member of the State (".range 
and is a member of the Executive Committee 
of Land ( ".rani ( dlleges. 

Dr. S\ mon> with student atlairs is ably 
assistcil b\ I *i'. 1 l.irold (nitrrm.m. ,issi>t,mt 
dc.m and prolcssoi" ol a.uricnil nral cdncalion. 



I>K. SAMl I.I, li. l»i\ .\l l.l 
ProfeHHor of Ailrlcullural EconomlcH 




DR. MORLEY A. JULL 
Professor of Poultry Husbandry 



DR. KENNETH L. TURK 
Professor of Dairy Husbandry 



DR. WILLIAM B. KEMP 

Professor of Agronomy 

MR. RAY W. CARPENTER 

Professor of Agricultural Engineering 

DR. MARK WELSH 
Professor of Veterinary Science 




THE PROGRESSIVE, SCHOLARLY HEAD OF 

THE College of Commerce was 



Wne of the most widely traveled men on the 
campus, Dr. MacKenzie Stevens, has pub- 
lished a number of books on commerce and 
finance. Several have been printed in Chinese 
and Portuguese. While teaching in the Univer- 
sity of Nanking from 1934 to 1936, Dean 
Stevens served as advisor to the National 
Governor of the Republic of China. 

A graduate of the University of Illinois, Dr. 
Stevens received his M.B.A. from North- 
western University and his Ph.D. at American 
University. He came to Maryland in 1937 as 
chairman of the Department of Business Ad- 
ministration and Economics, and in 193N was 
appointed Dean of the Commerce School. 

Dean Stevens, a member of Phi Kappa Phi 
and several other Greek letter organizations, 
is also president of the Washington Chapter 
of the American Marketing Association. 



MR. S. M. WEDEBERG 
Professor of Accounting 




DEAN Mackenzie Stevens 



DR. ALLAN G. GRUCHY 
Professor of Finance 






MR. CLEN BROWN 
Professor nf Industrial Kducation 



EXERTED REMOTE BUT DEFINITE CONTROL 

OVER THE College of Education 



DEAN HAROLD BENJAMIN 




MISS EDNA B. McNAUGHTON 

Professor of 
ome Economics Education 



ARLKS L. MACKERT 

Professor of 
il Education for Men 



MISS C;WENIM)L^ N A. DREW 

Professor of 

Women's Physical lUIiication 



PORMER farmhand, lumlicrman, sin;j:er, com- 
mercial fisherman, and miHtar\- leader during 
the Great War, Dean Harold Benjamin has 
reflected his pioneer parentage in a career that 
has led to many important responsibilities and 
offices, and a reputation as one of tlie foremost 
leaders in contemporary education. 

Outstanding as an author, humorist, and 
speaker, "Benny," as lie is known lo his inti- 
mates, was in cJiargc of tlu' ("enter ot k.duca- 
tion at the University' of Minnesota, where 
persons from the entire state could receive spe- 
cial courses in related sui^jects. in 1939 this 
tall westerner wrote as a joke, Sahertooth Cur- 
riculum, a light, humorous outlook on educa- 
tion which was hailed the leading I'lhicational 
publication of the year. 

Master of I'rcnch, (lerman, and .Spanish, 
Dean Htnjamin acted as an interpreter at the 
ran-.\merican .Scientific Congress in the late 
spring of 1940. 

In .iddition to being educ.itional consult. uit 
foi- the r.\'..\. ,niil till' I'duc.itional Policies 
( Onuuission, this .iluunui> ol .St.niiord and 
Oregon is an .uillioril\ on lolk songs and re- 
laxes 1)\ |)l,i\ ing a guitar .uid singing. 



26 




DEAN MARIE MOUNT 




CONTINUED TO PRESENT A PRACTICAL 
PROGRAM FOR THE 

College of Home Economics 

A BACKGROUND of Study at Vassar, Indiana, 
Columbia, and Chicago Universities, and ex- 
perience in teaching, managing a dining hall, 
and dietetic service all add to Dean Mount's 
capabilities as head of the College of Home 
Economics. 

At the suggestion of the National Defense 
Commission last fall, each state appointed a 
Nutrition Committee, and Dean Mount was 
appointed chairman of the Maryland Com- 
mittee. The first meeting of this committee 
was held at College Park last November. 

In addition to being the owner of a popular 
tea room in Washington, Miss Mount is a 
devoted golfer and an all-round sportswoman. 
Her friendliness adds to her popularity with 
the students. This, augmented by a long 
career of service to the University, makes her 
one of the most popular personalities on the 
campus. 



MRS. CLARIBEL WELSH MISS FRIEDA W. McFARLAND 
Professor of Foods Professor of Textilesand Clothing 



AN AMIABLE GENTLEMAN OF THE OLD 

SCHOOL WAS . . Dean of Faculty 

OINCE joining the staff of the University of 
Maryland as a professor of Civil Engineering 
in 1907, Dr. T. H. Taliaferro has performed 
many valuable services to the school. 

When in 1938 the office of Dean of Faculty 
was created. Dr. Taliaferro was selected for 
the position. Prior to this appointment. Dr. 
Taliaferro was Dean of the College of Engi- 
neering from 1916-1920, and Dean of Arts and 
Sciences from 1927-1937. 

Dr. Taliaferro is a graduate of the Virginia 
Militarv Institute. 




DEAN THOMAS H. TALIAFERRO 



27 




DEAN GEARY F. EPPLEY'S BIGGEST JOB STILL 
REMAINED THAT OF . . . 



Dean of Men 



Dean of Men 



An outstanding graduate of Maryland State 0)llcgc, who dur- 
ing his college career excelled in athletic, military, and ])ul)lica- 
tion activities, Gear>- Eppley, Dean of Men, returned to the 
campus after serxing as a Major in the Arnn . In addition to 
being track coach, this tall "Swede" serves as Chairman of the 
Stutlent Life Coniniittec, and has this year returned to his posi- 
tion in the regular Arnu'. 



Miss AdhlI'; Stamp came to Maryland as Dean of Women in 
1922. Since then she has played a significant part in bettering 
conditions for women students on campus. She loves flowers, 
and kee])s ht-r \ases lilk'd both ,it Ikiihc and in the office, ller 
hobb\ i> traxeling. .Siie is acti\e in women's clubs, reads extcn- 
si\el\', and attends the theatre fre(|uentl\ . 



Dean of Women 




DEAN ADELF STAMP LENT CHARM AND GRACIOUS 
TOLERANCE TO THE OFFICE OF . . . 



Dean of Women 



28 




DEAN CHARLES O. APPLEMAN 



One of the most distinguished and loyal 
members of the faculty is Dr. Charles O. 
Appleman, Dean of the Graduate School since 
the establishment of that department in 1919. 
He is also head of the departments of pathol- 
ogy and botany. A graduate of Dickinson 
College, Dean Appleman received his Ph.D. in 
Bacteriology at the University of Chicago. He 
also specialized in botany and plant physiology. 
As well as being a business man's golfer, the 
vice-president of the local Rotary chapter 
spends much of his spare time in his garden at 
College Park. Prior to assuming his duties at 
Maryland University, he traveled widely, cov- 
ering Mexico, Canada, and most of the United 
States. 



Graduate School Council 



The Graduate School Council, which is 
headed by Dr. C. O. Appleman, Dean of the 
Graduate School, is primarily concerned with 
establishing requirements for degrees and in- 
vestigating and approving candidates. 

Under the direction of this group, a booklet 



of abstracts of doctors' theses and the titles of 
masters' theses was published for the first time 
this year. 

Among the degrees conferred was that of 
Master of Education, which was given for the 
first time this year. 



Back row: ZUCKER, HUFF, HOWARD. JAMES. BROUGHTON. 
Front row: BYRD, APPLEMAN. STEVENS. HALE. 




Student Government Association 




BARBARA BOOSE 

Secretary-Treasurer 

JOHN RKCKORD 
President 

NORMAN MILLER 
Vice-President 



1 III", Student Government Association was headed this year by 
John Reckord, president; Norman Miller, vice-president; and 
Barbara Boose, secretary-treasurer. This organization served 
more than ever as the connecting link between the student body 
and the administration of the University. 



Annual Food Ball proved successful. 



Our campus problems were discussed in weekly meetings. 




A backward glance over the accomplish- 
ments of the year shows that the Student Gov- 
ernment Association has been extremely ac- 
tive this year. These accomplishments in- 
clude: assistance with one of the best Home- 
coming programs in the history of the Univer- 
sity; a greater and more efficient supervision 
of class elections; consolidation of the various 
musical groups under a Committee on Music; 
presentation to the University of a portrait of 
Willard M. Hillegeist, late Director of Ad- 
missions; sponsorship of the Food Ball. 

The membership of the S.G.A. is composed 
of the presidents and secretaries of all four 
classes, presidents of the Panhellenic Council, 



Interfraternity Council, O.D.K., Women's 
League, Men's League and Mortar Board and 
the editor of the student paper. 

Members: Barbara Boose, Secretary-Treasurer S.G. 
A.; Kitty Brice, President Panhellenic Council; 
Marjorie Brock, Secretary Sophomore Class; Caroline 
Gray, President Women's League; Mary Ann Griffith, 
Secretary Junior Class; Oliver Guyther, President 
Sophomore Class; William Holbrook, President Junior 
Class; Robert Meyers, President Men's League; 
Norman Miller, Vice-President S.G.A. ; Joseph Mur- 
phy, President O.D.K.; Elizabeth Powers, Secretary 
Senior Class; John G. Reckord, President S.G.A.; 
Kenneth Reecher, President Freshman Class; Robert 
Rice, President Senior Class; Jean Santamarie, Presi- 
dent Mortar Board; Orville Shirey, Editor of the Dia- 
mondback: Ann Speake, Secretary Freshman Class; 
Walter Spelsberg, President Interfraternity Council. 



First row: BRICE, BOOSE, BROCK, GRAY, GUYTHER, HOLBROOK. Second row: MEYER, 

MILLER, MURPHY, POWERS, RECKORD, REECHER. Third row: RICE, SANTAMARIE, 

SHIREY, SPEAKE, SPELSBERG. 







^% ^% f^ 



^^^^ 






31 



Government for Students . , , 




CAROLYN GRAY, President Women's League 
BOB MKYKR, President Men's League 



Men's League 



UndI'^k tlic leadership of I^ol) Meyer, presi- 
dent, and Carl Bacharach, secretary, the 
Men's League chalked ii|) a year of .e;enuine 
achiexcnu'iit. The Lca.mie is conii)ose(l of one 
man from each (lorniitor\- section and one 
from each academic class. Proctors of the uni- 



versitN' hold the jiositions of honorar\- mem- 
bers. This \ear, for \hv first time, the l)a\- 
dodgers were represent I'd in the League. 

An initial allotment from the Student ('.o\- 
ermnent Association was received 1)\' the 
Men's League this \ear. This fund enabled 
the League to present camjius movies and to 
finance its weekh- dances in the Girls' Field 
House. The Men's Lea;-;ne installed a greatly 
needed imi)ro\ cment, the inauguration of dis- 
ciplinary action, .\nother improvement was 
their ])lan to award medals to outstanding 
men students, tlu' u inners to he determineil 1)\' 
a point system. 

The League contimied its upkeep of the tele- 
phone system which was installed last year 
and also super\ised the three recreation rooms. 
In all that it did, the League tried to jjromote 
good will among the student body. 

Mkmhkrs: James Barrett, Carl W. Bacharach. Elmer 
Bright. Jame.s Bryan, Coleman Cook, Abraham B. 
Cutler, John Dennis, John Dobler. Bruce Douglas, 
Frank l)\v\er, Thomas (".alhrealh, .A.'ihton darrett, 
Frank Hc>er, Joseph B. Jarrell, John W. Jones, Wil- 
liam Krouse, John l.nniz, Boh Meyer, Pershing Mon- 
dorff, Cicorge Moore. Robert Oakes, Carroll Rade- 
baiigh, Robert Searls, Bernard I'lman, and John 
Whit ten. 



First row: ilKYKR. DIRM. President MKVKR.S. Secret-.ir.v-Trensiirer UACIIARACII. DOl'CI.A.S. BARRKTr. Secoml 
row: CAI.MRKAIII. R AtJKHAI (ai, ,1 ARRKI.l., liR^AN. MONDORIF, I l.M AN. <;RA V. DKNMS. W lirn KN. 





Women's League 



First row: BARSKY, BOLDEN, CARROLL, COHEN, DASHIELL. DAWSON, FELDMAN. 
Second row: GRAY, HAMBLETON, HART, HYATT, JULIA, LOAR, LOWE. Third row: 
McFARLAND, MENG, MERLER, MIKE, PATTERSON, PATRICK, PFEIFFER, POWELL. 
Fourth row: RADIN, RAINALTER, REED, SANTAMARIE, STEVEN.SON, TROUT, 

UPSON, WOOD. 



One of the first accomplishments of the 
Women's League this year was the pubHshing 
of "To Do Or Not To Do," a social bluebook 
of etiquette suited to the needs of women stu- 
dents here. A copy of the booklet was made 
available to each woman student, and gained 
recognition by being featured in one of the 
national weekly pictorial magazines. 

Following the example of the preceding 
group, the League sponsored a circus complete 
with a fortune teller, animals, and pink lemon- 
ade. All women students and faculty wives 
were entertained at a spring Garden Party at 
the Rossborough Inn. 

A new function wai tmdertaken just before 
sorority rushing in the inauguration of a Pan- 
hel pre-rushing meeting for freshmen and new 
girls. Dean of Women, Miss Adele H. Stamp, 
and one representative of each sorority gave 
brief talks and tried to answer any questions 
the girls had concerning sororities. 



For Homecoming, League members pre- 
pared a float. The Parade of Women's Prog- 
ress. Community Carol Sing was sponsored 
just before the Christmas holidays. Other ac- 
tivities included participation in the Com- 
munity Chest Drive, the entertainment of 
faculty guests in the Dining Hall, and spon- 
soring a series of after-dinner dances in coop- 
eration with the Men's League. 

Members: Ruth Barsky, Mary Virginia Bolden, 
Vivian Carroll, Elaine Cohen, Jean Coney, Ruth 
Dashiell, Alice Dawson, Esther Feldman, Ann Fields, 
Elizabeth Funk, Carolyn Gray, Edwina Hambleton, 
Dorothy Hart, Charlotte Hellstern, Hilda Hyatt, 
Nancy Julia, Carolyn Lehmkuhl, Margaret Loar, 
Carolyn Lowe, Doris McFarland, Caroline Meng, 
X'irginia Mercer, Emma Mike, Virginia Lee Miller, 
Margaret Neil, Ann Paterson, Mary Roberts Patrick, 
Shirley Pfeiffer, Mary Powell, Mildred Radin, Martha 
Rainalter, Barbara Reed, Jeanne Santamarie, Joyce- 
lyn Savoy, June Schmidt, Elma Staley, Lottie Steven- 
son, Maxine Trout, Clare Upson, Doris Wood. 



33 





Experimentation brings perfection. 




Careful preparntion of 
specimens was iniporcant. 

Fragrance to the gladiola 
by plant breodiiiU. 

Practical theory in study 
of thermal dynamics. 

Fieldstudyin tree pruning. 





C.A.A. planes interrupted class routines. 

Well-equipped zoology labs proved fascinating. 

Costume design featured in new Home Ec unit. 

Defense program created new interest in applied 
engineering. 



Between club meetings and bull ses- 
sions, we occasionally managed to tuck in 
a few hours of concentration on the dusty 
old textbooks. When we were in our 
intellectual mood, we gleefully popped 
questions at the profs, took lecture notes, 
and spied on the private lives of protozoa. 




The Frosh 

Class of '44 



KENNKTII REF.CHER 
President 

ANN SPEAKE 
Secretary 

BARNETT BROUGHTON 
Vice-President 



Jr ROM the traditional confusion of the presi- 
dent's reception, freshman mixer, rat caps, and 
sophomore hazings, the bab}' class of '44 
emertjed intact — the larsj;cst class e\cr to en- 
ter the university. 

At the annual tug-of-war the frosh gleefully- 
baptized the sophomores in the muddy waters 
of Paint Branch. As a climax to this triumph, 
their Chase and Sanborn lloat, "It's Frosh," 
won them the prize for the f)est Homecoming 
float. 

March fourteenth blared forth in big red 



letters on the freshman calendar, for it marked 
the date of the Freshman Prom. In an armor\" 
well camouflaged b\' the class colors, blue and 
silxer, the frosh danced to the sweet swing of 
Hermie Ko-Ler's band. The youngsters de- 
served the praise they received for putting on 
the most orderly prom in years. 

When the excitement of the prom had 
pas.sed, the frosh once more settled down to 
serious stud\ing. Then as the \ear wore on 
and the greenness wore ofT, the freshmen found 
themselves an integral part of the imi\ersity. 



Officers and dates enjoyed the prom 



They had a downhill battle 





The Sophs 

Class of '43 



MARJORIE BROCK 
Secretary 

OLIVER GUYTHER 
President 

JACK MILLER 

Treasurer 

BUD KELLER 
Vice-President 



XDOTH as freshmen and as sophomores the 
class of '43 has concentrated on defying tra- 
dition. Last year, led by their rebellious presi- 
dent, they decided not to wear their rat caps. 
Although their leader was rewarded by a star- 
tling, if somewhat unartistic, Indian-style head 
shave, their spirit was subdued not at all. 
Their defeat in the tug-of-war, as well as the 
wind's blitzkrieg on their float decorations, 
served only to bind them closer together. Their 
enthusiasm reached an all time high at the 
Freshman Frolic which they agreed to be the 
best dance of the year. 



As sophomores the class of '43 formulated a 
new set of rat rules. They lost the tug-of-war 
to the freshmen, but only by a technical 
victory ! 

Characteristic of the class was the original- 
ity they displayed in the prom decorations. 
The guests entered by way of a gangplank, 
and danced in a nautical setting to the music 
of Reds McCarthy. 

With two years of struggle and success be- 
hind them, the members of the class of '43 
eagerly look forward to their years as upper 
classmen. 



An uphill fight with the frosh 



Prom band swings out 



Prom royalty 




Anne Arundel 




First row: MEISER. BOWMAN. 
BROWN. SCALK.S. (iORTNEW. 
Will IKKORI). .Second row; IIKAD- 
I.KY, ROIXJKRS. Ill NIER. MIS.S 
(.ROSS. LADI). KAMI,. MRS. 
I'HELPS. OTTO. SMITH. .STEV- 
ENS. Third row: COPENlIAl ER. 
DENNIS. NICIIOES. NICHOLS. 
RANNEY. RI\ENHIR(;. HAASE, 
KNUniT. IMCKERINC;. STRAT- 
MANN. R^()N. McKENNON. 

Kourlh row: McDANIEL. Rl P- 

i>ersber(;er. bai er. dincan. 

McCAlLEV. ROWI.ES. SHOW- 
ACRE. BENTZ. Fifth row : BARRY. 
MAXWELL. ROBERTSON. (ML- 
llERI'. DOI'KIN. ZEI'P. c:()NRAI), 
POWELL. Sixth row: HVATI'. 
NORKOEPER. CATLINt;. BRILL. 

LI dwk;. (;riffin. jii.lien. 

Seventh row: MisKELI.V. REMS- 
UER(;, ADAMS. KANE. MASTERS. 
M SI.EMTZ. CONEY. IIOSWEI.L. 
KiUhth row: RISSELL. NOTZ. 

DORSEY. (;ro\es. MAKOVER, 

BERKOWICH. CLARK. HERMAN. 

CAN'TZ. MiKENNEY. 

.MCALLISTER. 



Annic .XkindI';!. II.m.i., tin- newest wonu-n's 
dormitorx on the campus, was im.minKiusly named 
by the students after Lad\- Anne, \\il\' of ihe lirst 
Lord I>,ihiniorc-. llcr hi:,;li si)iritc-d l)caut\ and 
character gained for her the lo\e and a(hnir.ition 
of both the colonists and her countrymen. Iler 
charm and i^raciousness, we feel, is expressed in the 
beaut>- and ditinity of this building. 



Tlial paiisi- — lu'forf dinnt>r 
\\iiiting for .Santa Chins 




r ^ 



Bringing home the laundry 



Down the hill to classes 



This beats studying 
in the dorm 




First row: RESPESS. FIELD, FREY. 
HARRIS, DURST, BARSHIP, 
UDELL, APPLEBAUM. Second row: 
CROSS, RUFF, SANDS, SCHIN- 
DEL, HART, YOUNG, PHILIPS, 
STRAUSS, WEAKLEY, BLOCK, 
AMEDEE, WILMER, MISS MARY 
CORSE. Third row : MARR, HUBER, 
WOODRING, LEWIS, ENGLAND, 
ARMSTRONG. WOLFE, KOONS, 
PALMER, ARDIS, DAY, HEISE, 
GLICKMAN, SKLADOWSKY, 
DOLAN, EVES, LILLARD, HOF- 
FECKER, ALLEN. Fourth row: 
YOUNG, GRAY, BUCHANAN, 
WELCH, NICOL, FUNK, HOFF- 
MASTER, HASTINGS, ALLEN, 
MULLIN, BOWLING, JENKINS, 
KIRK, ABSHIRE, CARNIN, SUL- 
LIVAN, MARTIN, LYNCH, CHAND- 
LER, SMITH. 







Margaret Brent 

Mistress Margaret Brent, after whom 
Maryland's first dormitory for women is 
named, was the first ardent advocate of 
women's rights in Maryland history. Her 
leadership in the development of early 
Maryland should i^roxe an inspiration to 
the young women of this state who look 
to their uni\ersit\- for higher education. 




39 




Behind the scenes — the night before 



Aw, come on in our parlor 



Jmtemity Kusking 
Started Jt All . . . 




Dlkix(. Rusli Week, the Fraternit\ Men — ■ 
capitalized, underlined, and exclaniatinn 
jjointed — were a strange and wonderful sight 
to behold. At dawn of the first da>" of this 
event, the\ jumped eagerly down off their 
Tireek pedestals (staggered sleepy-eyed into 
their eight-tens would lie more accurate), and 
started the big campaign a-roUing. 

With the friendly, well-if-it-isn't-nn-old- 
pal-Joe! smile of an experienced politician, 
they slapped backs and ga\e out invitations 
and arranged meeting places until both the\' 
and the rushees were dizz},' and dazed. 

Armed witli food, smokes and the l)est ten 
jokes of the year, the Greek Letter Men con- 
centrated with admirable enthusiasm on drag- 
ging the more eligible frosh into their folds. 
Luncheons, smokers, and rush dances lured 
the rushees into the fraternitv houses. And 



Touftli fight, but of course WE won 




there they were met by an array of honorary 
keys and medals and trophies that impressed 
even the non-fraternity minded ones. 

Unselfishly dedicating Rush Week to the 
Noble Cause, the Fraternity Men provided 
their rushees not only with cigarettes, but with 
advice and dates as well. The frosh got their 
first real taste of college life, and they discov- 
ered that it was actually as much fun as the 
movies picture it. 

With Silence Day came the Pause that Re- 
freshes. For the frosh it meant the opportu- 
nity to review the pros and cons of each fra- 
ternity and to make their final choice. For the 
members it meant twenty-four hours of hop- 
ing and praying that the pledges they wanted 
would want them. 

The next morning bids were given out. And, 
proverbially speaking, everyone was happy 
about the whole thing. 




Spare the paddle and spoil the pledge 

It was all just a game 



Singing their resistance away 



Tabulating affiliations, or who pledged where 




Interfraternity Council 



MiiMBiiKs: I'hi Delia Theta; W illiam Jaik Suit, Neil 
B. Collings. Theta Chi; d. Blaine W'ix, Henry L. Gay- 
Lord. Alpha Tail Omega; Robert S. Cartee, Charles 
Harr\-. Kappa Alpha; Charles B. Allen, Clarence A. 
Thumm. Sigma Nu; Peter Snyder, J. Howard Ran- 
dall. Phi Sigma Kapjja; William Diggs, Arthur Farn- 
ham. Delta Sigma Phi; Clarence Becker, \'incen J. 
Hughes. Sigma Phi Sigma; Hiram Spicer, Norman 
Miller. Alpha C.amma Rho; Leib McDonald, H. 
Bradley Jones. Lambda Chi Alpha; Nelson R. Jones, 
James H. Miller. Alpha Lambda Tau; Lacy Hall, 
Robert Mohlc. 



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COLLINGS 



SUIT 



XVil 
CARTEE 



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K.\ 



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THUMM 



MII.I.KR 





WALTER K, SPELSBERG 
President 



1 HE InterfraturnitA ("ouiiril li.id a \cry suc- 
cessful year undrr tlu' IcKUTsliip (if W'.ilter K. 
Spelsberg, president; Rohurl .\\ res, \ icc- 
presiflent: and Robert (". Rice, .secret. n'\- 
treasnrer. 

Fur the iirst lime, the council jjiit otil tlie 
Interfraternit\- Handbook whicli was pre- 
sented to each Ireshinan in .m endeaxor to 
stinuil.ite interest in fr.iternities. Tlu' h.imb 
book exphiiiU'd the colle:.;e fraternitx' system, 
inchidiMl I'li^h i-nle>, .nid i)resented .i bird's-ej'e 
\ ieu ot I'ach tr.iternitx on tlie canii)iis. The 
council ho|)ed th.it the Ireslinien, with some 
idea of wh.it <i I'r.iternitx w.is, would tinil rush 
season more enjoxable and would be better 
able to jiidije for himself the merits of the va- 
rious Ir.iternities at the conchision ot rush 
week. 



42 



Deferred rushing was also installed as a 
change from the previous year's system of 
rushing. Under this system, invitations could 
not be presented to freshmen until Monday of 
the sixth week after school started. During 
the sixth week, no freshmen were allowed in 
fraternity houses, and no rush functions were 
held until Friday when a I^otary Dance was 
given by all houses. Wide open rushing com- 
menced on Saturday and terminated on Sun- 
day of the seventh week. As a result, each 
freshman had an opportunity to visit each 
fraternity and judge for himself the qualifica- 
tions of each house. 

The Interfraternity Sing sponsored li}' Delta 
Delta Delta was again supported by the Inter- 
fraternity Council. The council also cooper- 
ated with the Community Chest Dri\e and 
the S.G.A. Charity Ball. 

Again the group kejjt in close touch with 
councils of Georgetown and George Washing- 







ROBERT R. AYRES 
Vice-President 



ROBERT C. RICE 
Secretary-Treasurer 



ton Universities. Maryland's members, who 
were guests at the George Washington Uni- 
\ersity Prom, had the pleasure of dancing to 
the music of Dick Rogers and his Orchestra. 

On April 25, the annual University' Inter- 
fraternity Ball was held in the Gym-Armory. 
Tommy Reynolds and his "Band of Tomor- 
row" supplied both jive and sweet swing. 
Although as usual there was very little space 
per person for dancing, everyone enjoyed the 
e\'ening to the utmost. 



SN 

RANDALL 
SNYDER 



4>SK 

DIGGS 

FARNHAM 



AS<I> 

BECKER 
HUGHES 



ATP 

BRADLEY 

MacDONALD 



AXA 
JONES 
MILLER 




A AT 

HALL 

mohle' 







4.^ 




Delta Theta 




MARYLAND ALPHA CHAPTER 

Founded at Miami University in 1848 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1930 



Ai tlu- hull of tlio Fraternity houses is the 
home of the Phi Delts. The>- were in the cen- 
ter of things in more ways than one .. . "Prexy" 
Jack Suit was not only a member of ODK, 
but also manager of the basketball team . . . 
Paul Jarboe did his l)it in the house by keep- 
ing the books, helping Mr. Shipley with the 
basketball team as the senior manager . . . 
Brother Worthington basked in the linieli;.;ht 
as the freshman manager . . . Joe White heli)ed 
along as one of the assistant managers . . . 
Gene Ochsenreiter was one of the top scorers 
in the Southern circuit. . . . "Ox" was flanked 
by "Art" \\'oodwar<l and ".\sh" Garrett, 
which made a formidal)le lri(j . . . "Lanky 
Brink" Hayman deserved a lot of credit in his 
capacity as house manager. He l<ei)t the Phi 
Delt house looking like a ntw \)\u . . . "Lord 
Chesterfield" Baile\- was one of those semi- 
mad people who t(jok great delight in ])la\ing 
contract bridge . . . Jimmy Jones was another 
frequenter of the bridge tal)le; ho may ha\e 
thought that bridge shar|)cns the legal mind 
. . . Walt Kerwin's humor did its bit to keep 
the house in good spirits. It was fortunate 
that Walt worked for the Old Line so that the 
whole campus got tlie lienetit of his liunior 



. . . Two l)o\ s b\- the name of Larrx did all 
right for themselves. Larr\- Hodgins accom- 
plished the almost impossible h\ exceeding a 
3.5 in engineering, while Larr>- MacKenzie 
played on the football team . . . The Phi Delts 
claimed they had the most even tempered man 
in the world residing in the house. Johnnie 
Gunner was one of those fellows everyone 
liked, and he had ho])es of getting into the 
Arm>- after graduation . . . Jack Prinz prepared 
for his i)articipation in the .\rni\ by taking the 
very jjopular C.A.A. course. Jack will be long 
remembered for his speed in intramural ath- 
letics . . . The Phi Delts got around socially as 
well as otherwise — ^"Pcarley's Mock Wed- 
ding" was, as always, one of the high spots of 
the social season. 



Mknuu K>: 'ruriH-r Ii,iilc\ , William Brt-ndle, I'liilip 
BiiddiiiKlDii. Neil CDJlings, Ashton Garrett, Donald 
Giilett, John Gunter, Oliver Guyther, Brinkley Hay- 
man, Lawrence Hocljjins, Duke jarohs. Paul Jarhoe, 
James Jones, Harry Karr, Waller Keiwin. Robert 
King, William Lane, Lawrence Licliliter, William 
Loker. Paul Mattix, .Samuel Mills, Russell Mi/ell. 
Robert Moran, Gene Ochsenreiter, Henry Scott, 
Reamer Sewell, George .Simons, Jack .Suit, William 
Swann, Krnest Trimble, 'I'heodore \'ial, Jose()h White. 
Arthur Woodward. R.ninund Woriliingion. 



44 



Pledges: Whitney Abell, Robert Bentley, William 
Betts, William Booth, Samuel Burch, Dick Cleveland, 
Walter Duke, Jack DuVall, John Eichnor, John Elliot, 
Walter Furst, David Galliher, PhilipHogue, Jim Horn, 
Charles Knell, Larry La Roche, Robert Latimer, Larry 
MacKenzie, Boyd Madden, Bill Mann, Bruce Mathias, 
George Miller, Thomas Mont, Arthur Motley, Charles 
Palmer, George Pinto, Richard Price, Jack Prinz, 
Fletcher Rawls, James Roberts, Bob Roudabush, Al 
Ruppersberger, Walter Schendel, Benjamin Scott, 
George Simler, Dewitt Smith, Julian Terrett, Jack 
Thomas, Richard Tryon, Warren X'andervoort, Peter 
\^ial, Gene Weeland, Julian Waters, John Wells, Her- 
bert Wise, John Wright, William Wurtzbacker, Eliot 
Young. 

Faculty: C. O. Appleman, J. Y. Bryan, L. J. Hodgins, 
J. M. Lemon, N. E. Phillips. 

Housemother: Mrs. F. J. Fisher. 




First row: BAILEY, BRENDLE, BUDDINGTON, COLLINGS, GILLETT, GUNTER, GUYTHER. 

Second row: HAYMAN, HODGINS, JACOBS, JARBOE. JONES, KARR, KERWIN. Third row: 

LANE. LICHLITER, LOKER, MATTIX, MILLS, MIZELL, MORAN, OCHSENREITER. Fourth row: 

SCOTT, SEWELL, SIMONS, SUIT, TRIMBLE, VIAL. WHITE, WORTHINGTON. 




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45 





Chi 



ALPHA PSI CHAPTER 

Founded at Norwich University in 1856 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1929 



IjEING surrounded 1)\' sororities left its mark 
on the Theta Chi's, if there was anything they 
liked better than a part}- it was twf) ]iarties . . . 
Prexy "Doug" Cassel, the uian with the big 
cigar, was always active in ram|)us life; he was 
a past officer of the !nterfraternit\ ("ouncil and 
a |)()hti(ian deluxe . . . George "Duck'" Jansson 
spent all of his wakiim hours with a little lass 
from the AOPi house, and still got a t,.H average 
. . . Another ol Tlu'ta ("hi's brain children was 
Orr Reynolds; the poor boy was heard to moan 
over one B . . . "Oak" Roach was the original 
laughing boy; one look at that smiling face of 
"Oak's" was enough to cure the worst case of 
blues . . . "Krusher" Ayres di\idi.'d his time 
between wrestling and ser\ing as X'ice-l'resi- 
dent of the lnterfraternit\- Council . . . "Bull" 
Fardwell spent two years listening to Blaine 
W'ix, "The Streamlined Paid Bun\an," talk 
about his amorous actixities, and thm he set 
out to try them . . . "Sheriff" Scott graduated 
from being Pledge Marshall to Treasurer . . . 
Guy Gantz was one of those people who had to 
go u\) the hill rii^ht in tlu' middle of a six no- 
trump hand: he was the Business Manager of 



the Footlight Glub . . . I'.lliott Harwood won 
his spurs with the Thespians in more than one 
way, officially he was Stage Manager . . . Huy- 
ette Oswald and Jim Fanning were inseparable 
companions; the\ saw a lot of campus scener\- 
froni that red car of "Ozzic's" . . . Bill 
"Charmer" Wilson had an inii)osing list of 
actixities, but they couldn't keej) him awa>" 
when there was a part\' going on . . . Cliarlie 
Rausch was the House Manager and one ot 
those iix-it l)0\s . . . The President-elect Hank 
C.a\-Lord swore he was going to lose that 
name of "Hermit" . . . George Lautenberger, 
the big social splash, said he didn't like glam- 
our l)o\' for a name ... 1 larold Farp and Anson 
Biggs were two more of those mad, hard-work- 
ing engineers, but wIumi the time hir i)I.i\' 
canu' the\ i)la\ed well . . . Hob Baldwin alw.iys 
looked as though he had just stei)])i'd out of a 
band box but still lound tinu' to be an acti\'e 
niembiT of the Pidiiioiidhdck Business Staff 
. . . ( leorge I'endk'ton was the kind ol gu\' w ho 
took his bridge too seriously and got kiddt'd 
for it . . . ("lirls, dates, activities all combined 
to make .1 hot-bed of .uti\ it\ out of the Theta 
Chi house. 



46 



Members: Edward Altman, Robert Ayres, Robert 
Baldwin, Anson Biggs, Douglass Cassel, Harold Earp, 
Donald Edson, James Fanning, Charles Fardwell, Guy 
Gantz, Dwight Gait, Henry Gay-Lord, Harry Gordon, 
Elliott Harwood, Lee Hoffman, Norman Holland, 
Robert Ireland, George Jansson, Donald Lacey, George 
Lautenberger, William Merriken, Edward Newton, 
Ellsworth Nowell, Huyette Oswald, George Pendleton, 
Charles Rausch, Orr Reynolds, Oakley Roach, Edward 
Robinson, John Scott, Worthington Talcott, Philip 
Tawes, Paul Trice, Robert Tufft, Daniel Whipple, 
Lawrence L. \\'ilson, Blaine W'ix, Elton Young. 

Pledges: Louis Anthony, Robert Downes, Warren 
Eierman, Guy Fontaine, Robert Hatfield, August 
Herlth, Edwin Liglis, Edward Martin, Hugh 
McLaury, Henry Meredith, John Z. Miller, Walter 
Nichols, Byron Nuttle, George Riggin, Elijah Rinehart, 
Carroll Rowney, Frederick Warder, Harry Weaver. 

Faculty: C. Wilbur Cissel, William B. Kemp, Frank 
M. Lemon. 




Housemother: Mrs. Nancy Smith. 



First row: ALTMAN, AYRE.S, BALDWIN. CASSEL. EARP. FANNING. Second row : GANTZ, GALT, 

GORDON. HARWOOD. HOLLAND. IRELAND. Third row: JANSSON, LACEY. MERRIKEN. 

NEWTON. NOWELL. OSWALD, PENDLETON. Fourth row: RAUSCH. REYNOLDS, ROACH, 

TALCOTT, TAWES, TRICE. WILSON. 





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47 




a Tau Omega 




EPSILON GAMMA CHAPTER 

Founded at Virginia Military Institute in 1865 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1930 



r'orR blocks down from the stoplight, in the 
red l>ri(k house with tlie l)i;>; white pillars, live 
the ATO's ... As we entered tlic door, Presi- 
dent-elect Mort Taylor, smiling, in spite of his 
evident lack of hair, greeted us . . . The Hatha- 
ways, Neal and Norm, sat over in the corner 
worrying about pu!)lication problems . . . Ted 
Fletcher loudly proclaimed the beauties of the 
Eastern Sho', while Conrad Arosemena and 
Ro Hales were doing the same for Panama and 
New York, respectiveK- ... in the phone booth, 
P)ud .Spelsberg could be found moi;ulling and 
l)la\ing "Worthy Grand Knife" . . . Wilson 
Hancock saw all the latest mo\ ics . . . "Chick" 
Barker told everybody everything while Elmer 
Reese vociferousK- agreed with everybody 
about everything . . . Jim Dunn nursed his 
gridiron and wrestling wounds . . . "Senator" 
Jim .Mead extolled the virtues of the "Great 
White Father" while Dick ibitchinson inislicd 
back his hair in readiness for tiu' cxcning meal 
. . . Dave Johnson a((|uirc(l gra\ Iiairs worry- 
ing about I he 'i"i;Kk.\piN deadline . . . I'pstairs 
the "Key Bo>s," Frank Peacock, Hob Cartee, 
Jerr\- Prentice, and "Bossie" Mishtowt strug- 
gled with an accounting |)rol)lcm . . . "Doc" 
Riley bandaged the brothers' cuts and bruises, 
while John Hance and liurt I )avis listened to 
the latest recordings and discussed the swing 
bands . . . "Ri|>" Hudson thrcilcncd to |)ut a 



"Figure Four" on rotund "Mayor" Martin 
. . . John Stexens and "Gunnioze" Gannon 
sweated over an engineering assignment, or was 
it that poker hand that caused the perspira- 
tion? . . . Jay Emrey worked on the Junior 
Class budget while dreaming of spring and 
baseball . . . Art Horn strutted in his Army uni- 
form and Rill Christopher nonchalantly took in 
the world . . . Johnn\- Harn strolled toward the 
Tri-Delt house and thought up wisecracks . . . 
"Howd\ " l^lliott mumbled organic formulas as 
he started toward the Margaret Brent Dorm 
. . . Va\ Chandler zoomed overhead as Ralph 
Crump e\i)lained the mechanisms of the 
plane's motor . . . "Bus" Smelser dodged 
water bags . . . Johnny Lewis and Bill Rimmer 
went in for "Dayhopping" . . . These were the 
ATO's, an integral part of the campus whirl, 
and the\' realb- enjoyed it. 

Members: ("onrado Arosemena, John .\ver\', Charles 
Barker, Roliert Cartee, Ediiiond Chandler. William 
Christopher, Slater Clarke, Ralph Crump, Joseph 
Dantoni, Burton Davis, James Dunn, Howard Elliott, 
Ja>- Kmrc\', Tlicixlore Fletc-her, Roman Hales, Wilson 
Hancock, John Harn, Charles Harr\', Neal Hathaway, 
Norman Hathaway, Annesley Hodson, Arthur Horn, 
Richard Hutchinson, na\id Johnson, William King, 
John Lewis, C.erard Martin, Towler Maxson, James 
Mead, Basil Mishtowt, George Newgarden, Franklin 
Peacock, C.erald Prentice, I'Jnier Reese, F,u^;ene Riley, 
William Rimmer, Harold .Smelser, Walter .Si)clsberg, 
George Sprot t , John .Stevens, Morton F. TQ\lor. 



48 








|R»« m^ jF^' f^^ 

tfsai!«rT JP*»i*i k«^* ^-^J I**** lisp»-f ff '*•**! 






First row: AROSEMENA. BARKER, CARTEE. C:HANDLER, CUIRISTOPHER, CLARKE. C:RUMP. 
Second row: DANTONI, DAVIS, DUNN, ELLIOTT, EMREY, FLETCHER, HALE.S. Third row: 
HARRY, HATHAWAY, HATHAWAY, HODSON. HORN, HUTCHINSON, JOHNSON. Fourth row: 
LEWIS, MARTIN, MAXSON, MEAD, MISIITOWT, PEACOCK, PRENTICE. Fifth row: REESE, 
RILEY, RIMMER. SMELSER. SPELSBERG, SPROTT, STEVENS, TAYLOR. 



Pledges: John Brenner, Walter Buck, Perry Chap- 
man, Robert Clark, Luther Conrad, John Cragoe, 
James Crockett, Joseph Crockett, Kenneth Daniels, 
Charles Davis, Clarence Doughty, George Dunn, 
Clemens Caines, William Cannon, Rowland Halstead, 
John Hance, Ray Hyson, Fred Johnson, Arthur Law^ 
Carl Luebben, Paul McCloskey, John Mele, Walter 
Mullikin, John Normyle, Kenneth Reecher, Carl 
Richmond, Harry Rimmer, Joseph Snyder, Robert 
Stuart, Reginald \'incent, William Volbers, John 
Wardle, Harry Wells, Alex Young. 

Faculty: Lawrence V. Howard, DeVoe Meade, Al- 
bert L. Schrader, Mark Welsh, Charles E. White, 
Mark W. Woods, Robert Y. Shirley. 

Housemother: Mrs. Eleanor Brehme. 




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First row: ALLEN. BADKNIIOOP. HAKKR, BRADLEY. BOOZE. t:ARTER. FORBES. Second raw: 

GARRETT, HEYER, HILL. HORN, KAVANAUGH. KEI'HART. MACIIEN. Third row: POOLE, 

PRATT, RECKORD, SAUM, SULLIVAN, THl'MM, WALLOP. 



Kappa Alpha 




BETA KAPPA CHAPTER 
Founded at Washington and Lee University in 1865 
Established at the University of Maryland in 1914 



r*OK nian\- \cars KA has Ijcen one of ihe 
stronj;h<)l(ls of Maryland lacrosse, and this 
year was no exception . . . .\n impressive list of 
KA's followed "I'rexN* (hick" .Xili'ii onto the 
field . . . Lane lis 1 lill, ■'iJiill" ( '..irrclt. "S(|uirt> " 
Mcfiregor, "Ash" Thiinini, and liill (irahain 
were all hack logs for Maryland's fa\orite 
sport . . . Hill (iraham had a little .uronj) con- 
sisting of Bill Sullivan, "("hick," and "S(]uirt\ " 
on Saturdays to indulge in duck-hunting dow n 
on the Shore. They swore that Rill was known 
as the ( "hincoteague i)la\l)o\. That made .it 



least two of liiem in liie house, .is it was ru- 
mored that Page Pratt was thi' i)ia>l)o\- of 
Ocean ("it\' . . . iiiil Badenhoo]) spent the sum- 
mer being a hfegiiard and a('(iniring romances 
to t hink al)oul w hen it got too cold lor h.ithiiig 
suits . . . John Rcrkord was one ol K.X's out- 
standing liids for campus lame as Colonel of 
the R( )']■(■ and President of the S.G.A. The 
l)o\s began to cill him their tin soldier . . . Bob 
"Brud" Saum, another coming Napoleon, was 
Lieutenant Colonel and president of Scabbard 
and Blade . . . John ( .irler was one i>i those 



50 



lads that did his best to see there was never a 
dull moment. He was an electrical engineer and 
spent his spare time practicing, by wiring the 
beds . . . Al Bradley had quite a time convinc- 
ing the boys that he was not directly respon- 
sible for bringing the quarantine on the house, 
but they still called him "Measley" . . . Bob 
Porter must have been really fond of Mary- 
land and KA; he tried to leave once, but came 
back from Florida, much to the joy of the bas- 
ketball and track coaches . . . Bernie Ulman 
was no drawback to either the basketball or 
the football teams . . . The KA's never worried 
about Bud He^er on the football field; they 
had seen him drive that car, and they were 
sure that "Lucky Teeter" was a good name for 
him . . . "Otts" Meade was called the "Sena- 
tor," but more recently for some reason was 
called the "Hyattsville Flash" . . . "Bud" 
Kephart and "Doug" Wallop saw to it that 
publications were not neglected . . . They were 
on the Old Line staff; in fact, "Bud" was the 
business manager . . . "Spook" Poole was house 
manager, and he saw to it that the boys got 
their vitamins so that Maryland would not 
lose any lacrosse games. 





Members: Charles Allen, William Badenhoop, Wil- 
liam Bagby, Jack Baker, Alan Bradley, William Booze, 
John Carter, James Forbes, Jack Garrett, Adrian 
Goode, William Graham, Frank Heyer, Landis Hill, 
Norman Horn, Julius Kaiser, Emmett Kavanaugh, 
Roy Keeney, Howard Keller, George Kephart, \'al 
Machen, William McGregor, Brooke Meanley, J. Leo 
Mueller, Arthur Meade, Victor Poole, Page Pratt, 
John Reckord, Robert Saum, Clarence Schauman, 
William Sullivan, Ashton Thumm, Bernie Ulman, 
Milton Vanden Berg, Doug Wallop. 

Pledges: Maurice Baldwin, Arnold Barden, George 
Barnes, Elmer Bright, Barnett Broughton, Thomas 
Butler, William Bush, Coleman Cook, George Cook, 
Nelson Cox, Jack Dittmar, Hap Dunlap, Omer Dur- 
rett, Mearle DuVall, Ernest Eckels, David Frey, 
Robert Frey, Ellis Frye, Jack Goss, Chester Grass- 
muck, Ray Grelecki, Russell Hardy, Frederick Heine, 
William Helbock, Bob Hill, Radford Hyde, Robert 
James, Leslie Lawrence, James LaCroix, Donald Lud- 
wig, Milton Lumsden, Joe Mariner, Paul McNeil, 
John Merceron, Allen Minion, Clifford Olsen, Wimp 
Orpwood, Peter Raine, Dick Reid, Jay Saum, John 
Saunders, Robert Searls, William Taylor, Ernest 
Travis, Carl von Zielinski, Stanchfield Wright. 

Faculty: Levin B. Broughton, William Cobey, 
Ernest N. Cory, Harold F. Cotterman, Charles L. 
Mackert, Leo J. Poelma, Stewart B. Shaw, Jesse W. 
Sprowls, Thomas B. Symons, Thomas Taliaferro, 
Reginald V. Truitt. 




Sigma Nu 




DELTA PHI CHAPTER 
Founded at Virginia Military Institute in 1869 
j] Established at the University of Maryland in 1918 



Around tlie campus, due to their |)in, the 
Sigma Nu's are often called the snakes, and it 
seemed rather in keeping that they should 
ha\e had trouhk' with rats . . . The boys set u]) 
a rifle rantic in the l)ack\ard, and when the 
rats ran through they were met 1)> lead . . . An 
attempt to replace the rifle remedy with a cat 
met with tailure . . . Jack Jones was soon look- 
ing lor the cat with a gun, and since that time 
the Sigma Xu's ha\'e c.dletl Jack "'!"(ini ("at" 
. . . Maryland's \'arsit>' football team was 
stud(k'd with Sii^ma Xu's . . . "Sully" Krouse, 
Dick liurlin, and "Jelh lielK" Morton were 
rocks in the line . . . An unusual number of 
campus moguls resided in the Sigma Xu house 
. . . C'.eorgc Moore was varsity football man- 
ager, ,ni(l ()i)K ,nid Senior kepresentati\e 
to the Men's League . . . J.ick ( "lu'rrx was man- 
ager III' the ( ',il\ ei't I )cb,ite ( lull and one of the 
coming stars in the {'"ootlight Club . . . Hill 
Ilolbrook was \ ice-president of the I'reshman 
Class, jjresident of the Soi)homore and Junior 
Classes and ;i member of the Track and Box- 
ing teams as well . . . Smoothies of the house 
were Don Murphy, "Prex\" Pete Sn\(ler, .i\u\ 
"Marsh" (ijirrett, commonly known .i> the 
"\ ulture" . . . Hon client so uuk h of his i inie 



on clothes and his car that the boys called him 
the "Baltimore Blue Blood" . . . "Squire" 
Diamond came from Ciaithersiuirg, but com- 
merce was as close as he came to farming . . . 
"Skeeter" Bell came from Williamsport and 
he hopes to write M.D. after his name some 
day . . . Sam Hatchett studied to make a 
future out of electrical engineering, but it was 
strongly suspected that a KD will also have 
something to do w ith his luture . . . ( )ne of the 
most notict'able of the Snakes was "Little 
Robbie " Robertson, and it was not due en- 




52 



tirely to his carrot top, for he did a very good 
job of handHng the finances of the house . . . 
Athletically — socially — and scholastically, 
the Snakes really crawled into everything. 

Members: Andrew Altmann, Fred Bach, Houston 
Bell, Ralph Bridges, Daniel Boothe, Amos M. Burlin, 
Ralph M. Burlin, Herbert Carhart, Jack Cherry, 
William Craig Diamond, Frank Dwyer, Neal Edwards, 
Marshall Garrett, John Greenip, Robert Harmon, 
Carl Harris, Samuel Hatchett, Fred M. Hewitt, Wil- 
liam Holbrook, John H. Jones, Joe Joyce, Holly Kel- 
ler, Henry Kimball, William Krouse, Philip Kurz, 
James Lanigan, Richard Leister, Thomas Lewis, Wil- 
liam McMahon, Don Mintzer, George Moore, John 



Morton, Julian Murphy, Don Murphy, Howard Ran- 
dall, Henry Rassier, Samuel Robertson, Peter Snyder, 
Hugh Walton. 

Pledges: Ralph AUnutt, William Benner, Everett 
Bennett, Harold Berry, Bernard Coyle, William Crow, 
William Ellett, Thomas Fields, John Gilmore, Ray 
Glasgow, Kenneth Hoddinott, Sterling Kehoe, Deane 
Keith, William Layton, Alan Macpherson, Warren 
O'Neil, Donald Price, Fred Roth, Jack Snyder, Rich- 
ard Whelton, William White, Charles Wolfe. 

Faculty: George J. Abrams, Leslie E. Bopst, Albert 
Heagy, George F. Pollock, William C. Supplee, Henry 
R. Walls, George F. Madigan, Albert W'oods. 

Housemother: Mrs. T. P. Ledbetter. 



First row: ALTMANN, BACH, BELL, BOOTHE, BRIDGES, BURLIN, CARHART. Second row: 
CHERRY, DIAMOND, DWYER. EDWARDS, GARRETT, HARMON, HARRIS. Third row: HATCH- 
ETT, HEWITT. HOLBROOK, JOYCE, KIMBALL, KROUSE, KURZ. Fourth row : LANIGAN, LEWIS. 
McMAHON, MINTZER, MOORE, MORTON, MURPHY. Fifth row: RANDALL, RASSIER, 
ROBERTSON. SNYDER. WALTON. 




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53 





igma Kappa 



ETA CHAPTER 

Founded at Massachusetts State College in 1873 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1921 



If you see a station wagon load of wild men 
roaming around the campus, that will he the 
Phi Sig's. Don Bierer just had to get a station 
wagon as his diversified interests kept him 
going between the Tkrrapin office and the 
Kappa house . . . "Hank" Anderson was a 
paradox as he was a farmer, but \er\' much a 
smoothie and a druL^store cowboy . . . Jim 
Hurnside, the llii Si;^ wolf, was (juite a tennis 
player . . . Xcil Dow was the very correct cor- 
rector of tile house . . . The Phi Sig's "jive" 
grou]) was lead by Hill Diggs, who was i)resi- 
dent of the Rossborough Club . . . "Kenny" 
Evans took time from his boxing to lend his 
\()i(e to the cry for more swing . . . Anch' 
"Jeep" Il.unblclon and \'ile Paganelli, the 
spaghetti bender, were ride men, Andy on tiie 
bass \iol and \ iti' on the sax . . . Ponnny \\ at- 
son, better known as "Bump," had the doubt- 
ful distinction of lia\ing had three sister pins 
out at once; |)ower comes in small i)ackages 
. . . The Didiiioiidlxick was practicali\- a Phi Sig 
niono|)ol\. Allan {•isher bowed out to ( )i"\ ilk' 
Shirey, the present cililor . . . D.ixc "Shaiit\" 
Sheridan is not bom Pemis\ l\ ani.i, but it was 
rumored that he was \er\- interested in l\lmire 



. . . Bill Schoenhaar's love afTairs read like the 
"Tale of Two Cities" . . . Bob Steele is called 
the CoUingsdale wonder, alwa>s keeps up his 
letter a day correspondence . . . Bill Katzen- 
berger had been lecturing for two \-ears on the 
evils of the fair sex and AOPi in i)articular, 
but later he had a very strong tie there . . . 
Jack Harrison did not localize himself; they 
called him the "Kastern Shore Sailor" for ob- 
vious reasons . . . "Ham" Rau was always 
talking up a part},-, and he could do it too 
because he was the treasurer . . . Dick Nor- 
mant was going to med school so he was all for 
the parties . . . Bo>(l Taliaferro was right in 
his southern-gentleman atmosjihere . . . Every 
now and then "Dictator" Rice took time- off 
from all his ,icti\itirs and (lrop|)ed into the 
house . . . Yes, the Phi Sig's and their station 
wagons got into e\er\ thing. 



MiiMHKRs: Harr\- \V. Anderson, David R. Batson, 
Donalds. Bierer, James B. Burnside, Charles T. Crouch, 
John K. Custis, Clayton -S. Dann, William B. Diggs, 
Jr., Neal Dow, Jr., Kenneth J. Evans, Arthur C. Farn- 
liam, .Allan C. l-'isher, Jr.. Thornton C.illett, J. Aldrich 
Hanihlelon. John T. Harrison. Jerry C. Hege, William 
J. Ilojips, John 1 liit( iiiiiMin. Will, ud Jrnx-n. William 



54 



Katzenberger, Donald J. Kendall, Jr., Lloyd S. Noel, 
Richard B. Norment, III, Vitale W. Paganelli, Ham- 
mond Rau, Robert C. Rice, William Schoenhaar, 
David L.Sheridan, Orville C.Shirey, Robert B. Steele, 
Thomas B. Taliaferro, Jr., Thomas Watson, Jr., 
William V. West. 

Pledges: Richard Barr, Donald Boyd, Melvin Brad- 
ley, William Browneli, Donald Call, W^ebb Clayland, 
James Crammond, Clifton Currin, Robert Davis, Carl 
Eicker, Stuart Freyburger, Harold Gilbert, Vernon 
Hart, William Hutchinson, William Johnson, Charles 
Jones, Jr., George Keat, William Kirk, Donald Ma- 
gruder, Jack May, Lee Mazzotta, William Myer, 
Edward Price, Henry Price, Raymond Quinn, Arnold 
Rawling, Owen Ridgway, Robert Ryan, Frank Sheri- 
dan, James Shields, Robert Trippe, Joseph Tupy, 
Charles Waite, George Wannall, John Watson, Law- 
rence Wilhelm, Tom Wolf, Robert Wright. 

Faculty: Robert W. Jones, James H. Reid. 




First row: ANDERSON, BATSON, BIERER, BURNSIDE, CROUCH, DANN, DIGGS. Second row: 
DOW, EVANS, FARNHAM, FISHER, GILLETT, HAMBLETON, HARRISON. Third row: HEGE, 
HUTCHINSON, JENSEN, KATZENBERGER, KENDALL, NOEL. NORMENT. Fourth row: PAGA- 
NELLI, RAU. RICE, SCHOENHAAR, SHERIDAN, SHIREY, TALIAFERRO, WATSON. 



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55 




Sigma Phi 




ALPHA SIGMA CHAPTER 

Founded at the College of the City of New York in 1899 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1924 



Piloted this jear by Clarence Becker, the 
Delta Sigs completed a successful year . . . 
John "L()\cr" Ackernian ])layed baseball, was 
Junior Rejjresentative to the Rossborough 
Club, and knew a Miss Couliette . . . "Prexy" 
Becker, an engineer and a trackman, went to 
Baltimore each week-end . . . Dave Bell was 
trombonist, pre-med, and corres])onding sec- 
retary . . . Jack Benecke, the (Knamic social 
chairman ami jjoli-sci major, worried ahoLit 
getting (haflcd . . . "Silent Bill" Bollinger, an 
engineer, played cowboy records . . . Bill Dixon 
was called "Wolf" l)\- his brothers . . . Tonx- 
"Cowboy" Kdwards wore boots and belonged 
to Block and Bridle (Mub, a natural Ag major 
. . . Delta Sig's l->astern ".Sho'man" was Bill 
Higgins, always iiroke, a jitterbug, and an 
economics major . . . "Pretty Boy" Josh 
Hughes, an engineer, was known maiiiK- as a 
boxer. The boys wondc'red why he went to 
Baltimore . . . Another i)re-me<l was Bob 
Johnson who worried ,ibout the (h'alt and 
organic chemistr> . . . Nice-president Bill 
Johnson, called "I'lniU'll" by the boys, \\a> 
sergeant-at-arms of the Senior (lass, and 
played the jjiano . . . "Jud" Lincoln was also 
a boxer . . . John l.imt/. was sergeant-at-arms 
of frat, engra\ ing editor of 'ri:i<i<Ai'i\, and he 
liked blondes . . . Bill !\Ie>er was a daydodger 



and also liked blondes . . . Art M(jon worked 
in the drugstore when not working on his car 
. . . Bill Oberle was a bridge fiend, and majored 
in math . . . Mike Pennella planned to go into 
the Arm\- in June . . . Lann> Ridout was 
grand custodian of the furnace . . . John Dex- 
ter Rogers, 111, known as "Buck." was frat 
treasurer, card fiend, and fencing manager . . . 
Howard Schwarz was junior manager of base- 
ball and pledge master . . . Bob Spicer, an 
engineer, came from Tow^on . . . Dick Sul- 
li\an, the genial house manager, was a track 
miler, and dro\e a 1932 Ford -when it ran . . . 
Howard "Chops" X'alentine was mechanical 
engineer and rush chairman . . . L.dnnmd 
Besche was weighl-lilter and also icei)ox 
robber . . . "Car" Fairbanks was the Softball 
artist of the club . . . Charlie I layleck was also 
a si)orts enthusiast . . . (Mark Hudson, known 
as "Duke," admired a certain co-eil mogul 
from a distance . . . Stanle\ Kihn. called 
"Blackie," was a ])h\sical-ed major, and .1 
track man . . . P>ill Krehnbrink was a com- 
niei'ct' student Iroin I Salt iumri' . . . Bill Rt'(ld 
w <is seen at the dining ii.dl with t ra\ s . . . Walt 
Rutherford went home cont iiniousI\- to see 
Jeanie . . . Manx p.utit-s ni.ide up their social 
calend.u', which w <is climaxed i)\' the amuial 
Sailcjrs' Ball. 



56 



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First row: ACKERMAN. BECKER. BELL. BENECKE. EDWARDS, HIGGINS. HUGHES. Second 

rowrlNSLEY. R. JOHNSON. W. JOHN.SON. LUNTZ. MEYER. OBERLE. PENNELLA. Third row: 

RIDOUT, ROGERS, SCHWARZ. SPICER. SULLIVAN, VALENTINE. 



Members: John Ackerman, Clarence Becker, David 
Bell, John Benecke, George Bollinger, William Di.xon, 
Robert Edwards, William Higgins, Vincen Hughes, 
Robert Insley, Robert James, Robert Johnson, Wil- 
liam Johnson, Judson Lincoln, John Luntz, William 
Meyer, Arthur Moon, William Oberle, Michael Pen- 
nella, Orlando Ridout, Herbert Roesler, John Rogers, 
Howard Schwarz, Robert Spicer, Richard Sullivan, 
Howard Valentine. 

Pledges: Edmund Besche, William Burdick, Gary 
Buschman, Douglas Dayhoff, Howard Emrich, Willi- 
ford Eppes, Garland Fairbanks, Dixon Forsythe, Paul 
Freeze, William Gordon, Karl Gumnick, John Haber- 
cam, John Hall, Christopher Hastie, Charles Hayleck, 
Charles Horn, Clark Hudson, Harold Jeffers, Stanley 
Kihn, William Krehnbrink, Charles Lutman, Kenneth 
Maskell, William Mattingley, Andrew McCauley, Wil- 
liam McCullagh, Arthur Naylor, William Redd, 
Robert Rossberg, Walter Rutherford, Jack Smith, 
Jack Teel, James Updegraff, William Wales, Warren 
Wantz, Charles Yost. 

Faculty: J. E. Faber, Jr., Charles B. Hale, Augustus 
J. Prahl. 

Housemother: Mrs. Florence Mooers. 



57 




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First row: ARMSTRONG. IH)S\VF.LL, C:LAKK, COI.KMAN, I)K<;C;F.S. DOBLER, DORN, KISKN- 
BF.R<;KR. Second row: FRFHF.RICK. t;ARI,irZ. HARTMAN, HICKS. JONES. KELLY, LEWIS. 
MASLIN. Third row: MYERS. McCARTY. MA7,UR, J. MILLER. N. MILLER. OVITT. RABAI. 
RILSSELL. Fourth row: SCHWAB. SHOEMAKER. SPICER. STEINBERG. VAN HORN. WEBER, 

WICK. 



Sigma Phi Sigma 




DELTA CHAPTER 
Founded at the University of Pennsylvania in 1908 
Established at the University of Maryland in 1916 



Tin; lioNs from Si-nia I 'li i Si-nia were- varied of sieo]) . . . Ilill I?laik heating out boogie- 
in (heir interests, an<l as \vc arrixcd at the cor- woogie rlntlnn on the i\ories . . . "Clothes 
iier of I'rinceton and Xorw ich .\\fnues, we Horse" Cariil/ conld lie found balaneini; tlie 
might have found the foiUnving: "Reds" Mil- hooks . . . "IVellN Hoy" Coleman <lr()i)i)ing in 
ler, thed>namic "Pre\>%" nisliing hetween tlie to see if e\er\ thing is under control and then 
SGA, ROTC, and the Cohseum and event- anil)ling out to his ghost car to head for Ta- 
ualK tr\ing tostudx . . . Kenny Clark wonder- konia i'ark . . . Jim .Sloan disi ussin;..; the rela- 
ing about the gang in lialtimore and iiis "med" ti\f nurits of the (dlle:.^e ol l.n;.,;ineerin;..; and 
school possibilities ... Al Mazur searching for Commerce . . . "Buck\ the Sailor" Lewis 
an emptN- couch so he can get i 7 ' _• miiuites dreaming of the sea and .Xordwall . ... On the 

58 



second floor in suite two, Jack, "Ten Percent" 
Miller worrying over the future and a sorority 
brunette . . . Bill Maslin struggling with engi- 
neering and worrying about the Ford . . . 
Across the hall "Ferdy" Frederick, the campus 
cut-up, chuckling at something or someone, 
perhaps his bunkie, John Rabai . . . Jake "the 
Gator" Hartman in his room dreaming of 
Florida or reading English . . . Brother P. K. 
Kelly, the Army brat, with a collection of 
articles of war and stories . . . Reese Shoe- 
maker, the only Frederick member with his 
pin . . . "Brother Boo" Boswell, either at a 
meeting or just talking, and Harry Spicer the 
Prom boy and his 3.5 . . . On the third floor we 
saw Bob Van Horn thinking of his love in 
Baltimore . . . John McCarty, the "Cumber- 
land Wolf," wondering about which one to date 
for the Prom . . . Bob Russell, their 3.5 engi- 
neer, playing cards and working a j^roblem on 
the slipstick . . . Dan "the Deacon" Eisen- 
berger and Jack Weber playing bridge with 
Mrs. Reed . . . The wrestler "Dickee" Arm- 
strong working on the fourth problem for Dr. 
Eichlin . . . "Wings" Myers talking about the 
RAF . . . Jimmy Degges worrying over the 
Commerce Department and ready to refight 
the Civil War for the dear 01' South . . . Harry 
Ovitt with his thoughts of Kitty . . . "Lum- 





bering" Jim Schwab just taking it all in . . . 
Bob Dorn and Don Wick, the boys from 
Hyattsville, ever present at the house . . . Fred 
Hicks, the southern accent boy and lastly Ned 
Steinberg, always thinking of Emily . . . Thus 
we left the Sigma Phi Sigma's and their Co- 
lonial House. 

Members: Richard Armstrong, William Black, Harry 
Boswell, Kenneth Clark, Albert Coleman, James 
Degges, John Dobler, Robert Dorn, Daniel Eisenber- 
ger, John Frederick, LeRoy Garlitz, James Hartman, 
Fred Hicks, Fletcher Jones, Palmer Kelly, Arthur 
King, Francis Lewis, William Maslin, Alexander Ma- 
zur, John McCarty, Jack Miller, Norman Miller, Jr., 
Eugene Myers, Harry Ovitt, John Rabai, Robert 
Russell, James Schwab, Henry Scott, Reese Shoe- 
maker, Harry Spicer, Edward Steinberg, Robert Van 
Horn, Jack Weber, Donald Wick. 

Pledges: Cromwell Allnut, Bernard Aymold, Frank 
Baker, Richard Bartlett, William Bates, Thomas 
Brown, James Bryan, Gilmore Carter, John Cordyack, 
Piatt Covington, Randall Cronin, John Dunham, 
John Emory, Leon Etzler, Kingsley Grigg, Charles 
Haines, Kenneth Hall, Daniel Harbaugh, Wylie Hop- 
kins, Alvin Jewell, James Kennedy, Harry Korab, 
Thomas Lanahan, Robert Montgomery, Thomas 
Moore, Thomas McCeney, William Riley, Robert 
Rothenhoefer, James Shank, Loy Shipp, David Sills, 
Robert Steen, Merle Strauss, Eugene Sullivan, James 
Tessier, Reeves Tilley, Howard Trussell, John Ver- 
kouteren, Albert Wilcox. 

Faculty : R. B. Allen, O. R. Carrington, Geary Eppley, 
H. B. Hoshall, M. A. Pyle, B. Shipley, S. S. Steinberg. 

Housemother: Mrs. Kenneth Reed. 




Alpha Gamma Rho 



ALPHA THETA CHAPTER 

Ohio State University and the University of Illinois 
in 1908 

had at the University of Maryland in 1928 




The boys from AGR house were a h(jmo- 
geneous lot . . . Ag majors, had girls at home, 
and were assistants at the dairy . . . Their dig- 
nified "Prexy," Brad Jones, was also president 
of the Grange . . . Assistant chief Treakle 
seemed to he the sleepless woikUt, hut lie man- 
aged the (hiir\ . . . Then there was "()1 RiuK " 
Reiblich with the si)arkling hlue eyes . . . 
"Ches" Ernst, star soccer man and also a run- 
ner . . . The smooth api)earance boy was "Dea- 
con" Adkins . . . "Joe College" Benson was the 
house ace dresser . . . "Twizzle" Bosley, the 
house mascot . . . Boyce, who had trouble with 
a Goucherian . . . Bill Boyer, the innocent 
offering of Harford ("ount>- to the l'. of M . . . . 
Don iirauner, tiie llNattsNiUc ho\ , with his 
pin missing . . . "^'ank" Chance, the missing 
hnk between Eastern and Western "Sho" . . . 
Charlie Clendaniel the i)ig 3.5 man who never 
studic(l . . . Grinning Tommy (^.albreath who 
"got around" . . . Tlie A( iR's assistant mascot, 
Gus Gies . . . Dick Jenkins merloaded his 
coupe . . . Pete Jones, chief woman hater . . . 
The boy who (h'op|)cd around sometimes, 
( hick Jubb . . . "I'uH" l\in;^. tlic >o( i,d i hair- 
man who (li(hi't attend dances . . . "I'"u/z\" 



Libeau who split peas to save money . . . 
Mac McDonald, the three letter man . . . Bob 
Meyer, the j\Ien's League leader . . . Bill 
Miles, the good looking gentleman . . . "Doc" 
Northam, high average man . . . Red haired 
Porter whom you saw at Chaney's . . . Boy 
from Rocks, Charle>- St. Clair . . . "Duke" 
Talbott who had St. Mary's on his mind . . . 
"Doc" Tax lor with his model A . . . A. M. 
Todd, Jr., the hat check boy with his air mail 




60 



letters . . . Religious Aiort Welling . . . Harpo 
Whipp, whose hair was his greatest liability . . . 
Rush chairman "Buck" Whiteford, the tall, 
dark, and handsome lad . . . We'll always re- 
member them and their green neon sign. 

Members: Lee Adkins, Robert Benson, Glenn Bos- 
ley, William Boyce, William Boyer, Donald Brauner, 
John Carter, Marion Chance, Charles Clendaniel, Lee 
Crist, Chester Ernst, Thomas Galbreath, Donald Gies, 
Richard Jenkins, Bradley Jones, Joseph Jones, Charles 
Jubb, Roland King, Clayton Libeau, Leib McDonald, 
Robert Meyer, William Miles, David Northam, Carl- 
ton Porter, Karl Reiblich, Charles St. Clair, Edward 
Talbott, Frank Taylor, Morris Todd, Charles Treakle, 



Maurice Ward, Gist Welling, Roscoe Whipp, Scott 
Whiteford. 

Pledges: John Bennett, \'ernon Bolte, Louie Brosius, 
George Cairnes, Herbert Frantz, Robert Gilbertson, 
Irving Gordy, Frank Gray, Robert Gritzan, Raymond 
Gross, Oakley Hall, Jack Lee, Emory Leffel, Fack 
McGolerick, Richard Jones, X'ernon Miller, Byron 
Osborne, Dorsey Owings, Kenneth Ports, Doty Rems- 
burg, Patrick Quinn, Philip Seltzer, Lloyd Simpkins, 
Thomas Stevens, \''ernon Sultenfuss, William Taylor, 
Phillip Thompson, Earl Uzzell, Robert H. Walters- 
dorff, John Whalen, Morgan Whiteley. 

Faculty: Myron Berry, Samuel H. DeX'ault, Walter 
England, Arthur B. Hamilton, Edgar F. Long, Paul 
R. Poffenberger, Arthur S. Thurston. 




First row: ADKINS, BENSON, BOSLEY, BOYCE, BOYER, BRAUNER. CHANCE. Second row: 

CLENDANIEL. CRIST, ERNST, GALBREATH. GIES. JENKINS , JONES. Third row: JONES. JUBB, 

KING, LIBEAU. McDONALD, MEYER, MILES. Fourth row: NORTHAM. PORTER. REIBLICH. 

ST. CLAIR, TALBOTT, TAYLOR. Fifth row: TODD. TREAKLE, WARD, WELLING. WHIPP, 

WHITEFORD. 

5^1 1^ «^ ^^ 



CT W^' ^J*^f ^**- if -^4 








^M 






61 




da Chi Alpha 



EPSILON PI CHAPTER 

Founded at Boston University in 1909 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1932 




The Lambda Chi Alpha house is that white 
house on the other side of the tracks, that is 
they are on the other side of the tracks as far 
as location goes, but in other \va>'s they are 
very much in the swim . . . Jim Miller, the 
Prexy, swore that his flock was as crazy as 
they came and gave points to proxc it . . . I)(jn 
Corridon was once very much of a social light, 
Init he had the misfortune to get tied up with 
one woman . . . I )()n Daniuth, the sliort man 
of the Fraternity, looked as thou;^h he were 
walking around in a trench. The "Beagle" was 
constantK" pla\'ing around with all kinds of 
guns, bill liie boys did nni think that liad any- 
thing to do with his engagement to one of the 
Alpha Xi Delta girls . . . Bill Fulton came to 
Mar\land as All-State High pitciier from N.J., 
and was on tlie mound for the \arsily tliis 
year. One of Bill's few faults is gullibility. He 
still thinks he bought a real first edition of the 
"Pickwick Pajjers" from that salesman . . . 
Nelson Jones was a strong advocate of Na- 
tional Defense, and would like to i)e in tiie 
Army after graduation. Nelson held the all- 



time record for drill sitting ... A cotton-top 
with a fiery temjier was Herman Kaiser; he'd 
flare ujj over nothing, but it took even less to 
make him forget. Herman spent three years 
going to Penn State every week-end before 
he found that Annie didn't Uxe there . . . On 
Blue Mondays, Dave Kelh' used his anuiteur 
magic to keep the house from going craz>" . . . 
Howard Klug had a Ford that he took ai)art 
regularly, I)ut ne\er got back togetluT the 
same wa\', and the boys thouglit he was tr\ing 
to find some \\a\ to make it run without gas 
... In what little time Howard liad left, he 
acted as tiic Cajjlain ol the Band . . . lul .\\ len 
was an accounting major, who couldn't keep 
liis o\\ n Iniances in order . . . Joe Sanchiz, the 
Spanish ("hib Dictator, was(iuitea l)o\ where 
the women wt-re concenu'd. Ma\ be it w ,is t h.it 
beautiful ilunnb.i th.it L;ot them. Joe gave 
several exhibitions in the Shorcham .md Max- 
flower . . . Dixon Ramirez, another of tlie Pan- 
.\meric.in I)oys, originalb' attended .S\ r.icuse, 
l)ut it got too cold tor iiim tliere so he came to 
Maryland. Now he is tiiinking of moving 



62 



farther South . . . One of the postofifice's chief 
sources of profit was Pledge Master Charley 
Schaefer. He was the only college student in 
captivity that wrote and received two letters 
per day, "Old Faithful" ... In spite of the dis- 
tance of the Lambda Chi house from the cam- 
pus, they are part of it. The Lambda Chi's 
know the campus and the campus knows them. 



Members: William Chapman, Don Corridon, Donald 
Damuth, William Fulton, Robert Gearhart, Wilbur 
Jefferys, Nelson Jones, Herman Kaiser, David Kelly, 
Howard Klug, Stewart Kyttle, John Meade, James 
H. Miller, Edward W. Nylen, Dixon Ramirez, Abner 
Rowe, Jose Sanchiz, Charles Schaefer. 

Pledges: Theodore Allison, Bernard Balch, John 
Beveridge, Richard Brooks, William Gray, Robert 
Muma, William Park, William Pearce, John Tackett, 
Richard Viceroy, Harvey Webster. 

Faculty: George E. Walther, George D. Quigley. 




First row: CHAPMAN, CORRIDON, DAMUTH, FULTON, GEARHART. Second row: JEFFERYS. 
JONES, KAISER, KELLY, KLUG. Third row: MILLER. NYLEN, RAMIREZ, ROWE, SANCHIZ, 

SCHAEFER. 




/^ f^ ^^ 

'^ O C" 




,^ D C5 ip 



63 




Lambda Tau 



^ 



TAU CHAPTER 

Founded at Oglethorpe University in 1916 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1934 



IViakyland's baby fraternity worked hard to 
establish itself on the cani|)us. The chapter 
■was \ery lii(k\- to have James "Aloe" Hani- 
nietl, one of liie charter members of the club, 
working for them. "Moe" was much more 
than a houst' mana;^cr. 1 Ic asMimcd a hitlicrly 
.iltiliide toward the boys . . . Tliat fellow who 
lianded \ou your book U]) in the lil)rary was 
Jack Chaney; he intends to make a future out 
of this kind of work. Jack is (juite an artist, 
but \ er\- bashful ai)out his talents . . . Art 
critic ("liff Saltznian i;ainc(l :ill of his art 
knowledge from his collection of l*clt\ 's i^irls. 
He is all set to be one of the biij, L;uns in a\ia- 
tion, is an aeronautical cn;.;ineer, has his 
license and owns part interest in a plane . . . 
Bob Hierl\- was one of the lucky boys that 
I'nclc Sam wantt'd, and lie now calls I'ort Sam 
Houston home . . . An\' time that \(iu did not 
ha\e tf) listen to airplanes from ( liff, I'anl ("oe 
and "i'rc\\" i?ob Mohic wduld corner you on 
boats; I'aul and l>oli Imill a coujile of sail- 
boats . . . ()ther than lioat^- I'aul li\i'd, slept 
and lo\ed bacterioloj^y . . . John ("rone was in 



advanced army and an engineer, but they do 
say he had most of his interests off camjnis. 
the same thing went for Lac\' Hall . . . Ho!) 
Stalcup was one of the fellows who planned to 
spend his future di'K ing in tiic soil, in other 
words, he was an "Ag" major, but he took no 
chances of meeting Bob BierK's fate and is in 
advanced ROTC . . . \'ice-])resident .Adrian \'an 
I luizen is a Dutchman and \"er\' i)roud ot it, but 
paradoxicallj" he is going to teach the Knglish 
language . . . P)ob Wiggins, the boy who han- 
dii'd the rmances for tlu' h'aternit\ , wds .i grail 
student in .\ cV S. lie sold thousands of 
"Ter])" bars from behind the counter in tiie 
book store . . . .\lpha Lambda's "Amiie Oak- 
lex " was Howard bugitl who burni'd a lot of 
|)ow(lcr tr\ ing to si'c how close he could come 
to th.il lilllc M.ick s])ol on tlu' t.u'get . . . Xor- 
man (rone was one ol tlu' new boys in the 
house, and his brother, John, h,id .ill he could 
do to see he did not ih) stunts in the middle of 
the floor, because Norman is tumbler at heart, 
and s|)ends all of his spare time in the g\ m 
rolling around on llu' m.ils. No n>attt"r how 



64 




JF^^-"^-^ '^ 







First row: CHANEY. COE. FEARNOW, HALL. Second row: MOHLE, 
SALTZMAN, VAN HUIZEN, WIGGINS. 



much noise Norman made, Dwight Fearnow 
always made himself heard above it. Dwight 
was a member of the Glee Club and an aspir- 
ing Nelson Eddy . . . Max Kerschensteiner 
commuted to Prince George's Island every 
week-end to fish, or so he said, but the boys 
had their doubts . . . Alpha Lambda Tau may 
be the newest club on the hill, but with work- 
ers such as they have in the house, they should 
not be the smallest very long. They have just 
taken their first step by moving into a new 
house. 



Members: Robert Bierly, Jack Chaney, Paul Coe, 
John Crone, Lacy Hall, James Hammett, Robert 
Mohle, Ernest Saltzman, Robert Stalcup, Adrian Van 
Huizen, Robert Wiggins, Robert Yeatman. 

Pledges: Norman Crone, Dwight Fearnow, Robert 
Hurley, James Jordan, Max Kerschensteiner, Cecil 
Martin, Warren Simonds. 

Faculty: George Fogg, Coleman Headley, Charles 
Murphy, Roger Snyder. 





w^* ^^^ W^-- 



i. 



' i . 



^-> 



\k 




ii 



life ^i J. 




First row: BERMAN. BERNSTEIN. FARKAS. LEVENSON. MOLOFSKY. 
Second row: POI.IKOFF, SAGNER. SEIUMAN, SPERLING. ZINBERG. 



Sigma Alpha Mu 




SIGMA CHI CHAPTER 

Founded at College of the City of New York in 1909 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1933 



In its .sL'NL'iUli \x>ar on tlit- .Mar\ land campus 
the Si^ma Chi chai)tcr of .Sitima .\l])iia Mu had 
eighteen actives and six iirosiiccliNc nicni- 
hers . . . I he Ixiys in ihv i)rick iionst' hack of 
the campus engaged in all ol the ( anipus ac- 
tivities from Footliglil ( liili to intrainurals. 
As we rememlKT tlic l)o\^ at tiu' SAM iiousc 
vvc recall: I"" rank Borenstcin was pre\\ this 
year, was an acti\c mcmlicr of the SAM's 
steering committee ot the i'j4() n.iiional con- 



\enlion . . . i)hnnu'd to he an econonnst. 
He ahva\s apjieared to he the man w iio just 
stei)i)ed out of tlu' collar ad ... 1 i.u'\e\' Stein- 
hacii was treasurer hut planned to he a !a\v\ er 
. . . had to hi"- credit ,ni intrannir.il tennis 
ch.iinpionslii|). "Norm" /inhiT;..^. tiie secrt'tai'X', 
majored in "pre-med" . . . said his main i)li\'- 
sical exercise was ])ullinii; himself from .i "W 
to an ".\" . . . We also rememher " lr\ " Jacohs 
who spent a gootl deal of in"> tinie at the Fuot- 



66 



light Club, majored in political science . . . Al 
Molofsky seemed to run to the social side ha\- 
ing been on the Junior Prom Committee, and 
also played a bit of lacrosse . . . Alan Sagner 
argued a lot, would take any side of an argu- 
ment, planned to be an economist, and spent 
spare time covering sports events for the Dia- 
mondback . . . Bob Farkas majored in psy- 
chology . . . also was intramural handball 
champ . . . Polikofif, like Al Sagner, covered 
sports events for the Diamondback, and spent 
the rest of his time in the Footlight Club . . . 
"Stan" Berman hoped to be a statistician, 
liked music, was secretary-treasurer of the 
Glee Club and also active in Clef and Key . . . 
Al Bernstein was the club smoothie, planned 
his future career as a plant pathologist . . . 
"Stan" Mann spent the fall season playing 
intramural touch football, and was then en- 
grossed in the C.A.A. — hoped to be another 
Lindbergh . . . Merhle Fox, the Eastern "Sho" 
boy, played soccer; he was a quiet boy, usually 
attended dances stag . . . "Lou" Gorphine was 
the mechanical-minded one in the house even 
though he took pre-law. He was Footlight 
Club technician . . . Ted Leizman was the 





farmer from New York. He majored in "Ag" 
and spent much of his time in Washington — 
it must have been a girl . . . "Irv" Lewis was 
a "pre-med" major. He looked like PZd. G. 
Robinson, and was one of the smooth dressers 
. . . The house steward was "Len" Seidman 
who also frequented the Dia»wiidhuck office. 
He was an English major and planned to get 
in the advertising game . . . One of the latest 
members, "Mike" W'olfson, had the Army on 
his mind . . . also was on the frosh rifle team 
. . . The past year was a memorable one for the 
boys at the SAM house . . . one of the high 
spots was co-sponsoring the national conven- 
tion in Washington where they were awarded 
the National Achievement Cup for 1940. 

Members.- Stanley Berman, Alfred Bernstein, Frank 
Borenstein, Robert Farkas, Merhle Fox, Lewis Gor- 
fine, Irv'ing Jacobs, Theodore Leizman, William Lev- 
enson, Irvin Lewis, Stanley Mann, Albert Molofsky, 
Marvin Polikoff, Alan Sagner, Leonard Seidman, 
Ahin Sperling, Harvey Steinbach, Myron W'olfson, 
Norman Zinberg. 

Pledges: Norman Alshan, Martin Bagedonow, Robert 
Borenstein, Martin Cohen, Eugene F"ink, Theodore 
Sherbow. 



67 




'!*.l*.. 



Epsilon Phi 




TAU BETA CHAPTER 

Founded at Columbia University in 1910 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1925 



To say TEP is to say boxing in llie same 
breath, because for some years now, TEP has 
always had one or more of their members 
either on the sciiiad or managerial staff of the 
boxing team . . . "Hotsy" Alperstein was a 
mainsta>' oi tlie Ixjxing team as well as presi- 
dent-elect of the (lull , . . The brothers realh- 
got a biii kick out of i lots\'s Tango in AU- 



Uni\ersity Night; he was \er\ uunh afraid 
that he would never live it down. Init since a 
good man\' of the boys followed him around 
on all of the boxing tri])s, it was imjiroliable 
that the\ thought of him as an\thing but a 
he-man . . . Bill Braloxe was a quiet sort of 
fellow, and spent a good deal of time collecting 
])i])es, hut he did get arfuind: Pledge Master 



First row: ALPERSTEIN. BRALOVE. GOLDMAN. (JREENBERf;. II ARW OOI). lI'iMAN. Siiiind 
row: KLAWANS. KLEIN. KONIGSBERC. LITMAN. ROSENSTADT. SALCiANIK. lll.LES. 



o o c>. 



f^ 



r^ ,C ^ O f^ <^ fTtt 



if%4kiii 




^ ' 



o .^iMli.^r.^MdM^Ai 



68 



of the Club, member of A.S.IM.E., Freshman 
tennis manager, and a member of Latch Key ; 
all of these were in Bill's list of activities . . . 
Danny Gendason was a member of the Glee 
Club, a potential officer and hoped to become 
a doctor some day . . . Don Rose, one of the 
few farmers in the house, was constantly hav- 
ing blackouts so that he could play with his 
favorite hobby, photography . . . Dan Gold- 
man had quite a reputation as a sage . . . He 
sat back and heard the pros and cons of an 
argument, and then got to the heart of the 
question in a few well-chosen words. His ac- 
curacy may have come from haxing been man- 
ager of the Rifle Team . . . President Dan Har- 
wood was quite the TEP mogul, what with 
having been manager of Track, a member of 
Hillel, Latch Key and in advanced ROTC, it 
was a wonder that he managed to keep ujj in 
"pre-med" . . . Bernard "Bunny" Klawans 
was the sleeping beauty of the house . . . The 
boys claimed that if he did not get at least 
eighteen hours of sleep a da}', it affected his 
disposition, but he did manage to take enough 
time away from his beauty rest to jjrepare 
himself for a future in aeronautical engineering 
. . . "Bunny" shared membership in A.S.M.E. 
with Bill Bralove . . . Norman Tilles was a 
happy-go-lucky lad and did a good job as one 
of the boxing managers. That big smile he 
constantly wore did a lot to make him a good 
vice-president . . . Alvin Salganik was treasurer 
of the fraternit}', and his nature was very 
much in keeping with his office. He was the 
efficiency expert, and any waste hurt his soul 
. . . Stanley Berman worked very hard feeding 
the TEP boys, so hard that when he got to 
more than two percent of his classes a week, it 
was considered a minor miracle, but Stan did 
turn out for intramural athletics . . . "Gil" 
Hyman was the New Yorker, and it must have 
been in his blood to be a play-boy . . . Arnold 




Litman promised to be a military genius. He 
loved to wear that ROTC uniform and made 
a positive religion out of Pershing Rifles . . . 
i\rt Peregoff wasn't an undergraduate, but he 
was a hot accounting student and a graduate 
fellowship kept him around the house . . . 
Judah Klein spent his time helping Harwood 
with the track managership . . . Dave "Pop" 
Greenberg was the popular kid with the ladies, 
and was also one of the boxing managers . . . 
These TEP's didn't do badly in boxing or in 
anything else for that matter. 



Members: Isadore Alperstein, William Bralove.Dan- 
iel Gendason, Daniel Goldman, David Greenberg, 
Daniel Harwood, Gilmore Hyman, Bernard Klawans, 
Judah Klein, Tolbert Konigsberg, Arnold Litman, 
Donald Rose, Aaron Rosenstadt, Alvin Salganik, 
Stanley Samuelson, Norman Tilles. 

Pledges: Edward Baitz, Daniel Bralove, Sidney 
Canton, Louis Culiner, Arthur Epstein, Samuel Gold- 
hagen, Eli Gottleib, Arnold Horowitz, Koppel Jeffrey, 
Saul Laniado, Milton Luria, Robert Mandelberg, 
Leonard Michaelson, Bennie Millstein, David Rolnik, 
Marvin Sadur, Walter Schwartz, Irving Seigel. 

Housemother: Mrs. R. C. Brownell. 



69 




KNTKRTAINMKNT of 
a varifd and stimulat- 
ing character displayed 
versatility of sorority 
members. 



TEA, supposedly informal but inevitably a bit stiff, marked 
rush week. 




ZkeitCifc Started With 
Sorority Kusking 



DINNKR constituted the sorority ackiiowledflrnenl that 
ftood food still plays prominenl part in daily life. 




Ar three minutes to four on Xoxeniher tlflh, 
some 500 freshman coeds and transfers were 
runnin;-; an ai)])ro\in_ti fm,s.;cr o\er already per- 
fect eyebrows and retrarini; red H])s w itii red- 
der li|)sticks. Cione were tlie traditional saddle 
shoes, who()])\' socks, and "slopju' Joes," for 
so])histi(-ated tea dresses ami \eiled hats had 
come into tiieir o\\ n on the Maryland campus 
— at least for the da>-. The occasion, of course, 
was the Panlu'llenic opt'ii-liouse teas — the 
formal he.uinnini.; ol sororit\' rusliin;^. 

Followini; the tested .tnd appmxed pro- 
(•(.'(hirc, the |)nis|)e(tiM' rushees tripped around 
in llic iii>liimar\- rain to the \-arious houses, 
pausin;^ only lon;^ enoui;li in each one lor .111 
int.ike of tood and i>ro])a.yanda. .\s the X-ra\' 
stai'es ol the actixo lunaied deei) into them, 





HEN PARTY relieved lack of masculine com- 
panionship with dummy whose costume was 
influenced by spirit of 1941. 



PLEDGING marked climax of rush week excite- 
ment. Most girls gave serious thought to final 
decision. 



the new girls crossed their fingers and mentally 
reviewed Dale Carnegie's fatherly advice. 
However, by the end of the afternoon their 
once spontaneous smiles had stiffened into 
perpetual grins, and their chatter sounded 
like an anaemic echo of earlier conversations. 

And this was only the beginning of a long 
week of rush parties. The rushees found the 
bombardment of luncheons, teas, and dinners 
so exciting that even their dreams were in- 
vaded by the Greek alphabet. Every part\' 
was different, ranging from Chinese dinners, 
sans chairs and tables, to hulu skirts and pine- 
apples. As a result of this five days' blitzkrieg, 
the new students were convinced of only one 
fact: each sorority admitted it was the best on 
the campus. 

The traditional "overnights" climaxed the 
week. It was then that the actives made their 
supreme effort, sharing everything with the 
rushees — from their make-up to their men. 

When the strain of rush week was at last a 
thing of the past for another year, every soror- 



ity-minded person on the campus beamed mer- 
rily. Each active was happy because her house 
had gotten the best girls, and every pledge, 
because her sorority was the truly outstand- 
ing one. 



PUNCH BOWL more useful adjunct to rushing 
party than usual witches' cauldron. 





ELIZABETH POWERS, rreasurtr; MARV E. HRICE, President; EDWINA 
ilAMBLETON, Vice-President: BETSY CARSON, Secretary. 



Panhellenic Council 



1 HE PanhelleiiirCouncil functioned smootliK' 
and successfully during the past year. W'itli 
Kitty Brice as president, and assisted l)y the 
other ofificers who were Edwina Hambleton, 
vice-president; Lil)i)\ Powers, treasurer; and 
Betsy Carson, secretary-, tlie ("ouncil formu- 
lated new rush rules and promoted a friendly 
relationship among the sororities. During 
rushing the organization acts as a court to 
hear the cases of those who \iolate the official 
regulations. 

The offices of the ("ouncil rotate among the 
sororities, each of wliic ii is represented by its 
president, rush chairman, and junior repre- 
sentative, who is elected by each sororit>-. 

For tlu- jjurpose of ac(|uainting the jiledges 
with inter-sorority life, a Junior Paiilicllcnic 
Council was formed this year. Three memi)ers 
from each sorority pledge class are chosen to 



Ann 

AUC;USTINF. 

EVANS 

FISK 



KKT 

CARSON 

RAINALTER 

ROYSTKR 



P'l'B 

BRERETON 

RICIIMONU 

SlIKI'ARI) 




72 



Sorority problems were discussed 
at the bi-monthly meetings. 




EiSS^ 



attend the meetings. The Junior 
group, under the guidance of the 
vice-president, was inculcated with 
the spirit of friendship which per- 
meates sororities on campus. 

The annual progressixe dinner and 
dance, held at the sorority houses, 
climaxed a noteworthy year in the 
history of Maryland's Panhellenic 
Council. 



Members: Alpha Delta Pi; Marie Augus- 
tine, Ruth Evans, Alice Fisk. Kappa Kappa 
Gamma; Betsy Carson, Martha Rainalter, 
Patsy Royster. Gamma Phi Beta; Mar- 
garet Brereton, Barbara Richmond, Sara 
Shepard. Sigma Kappa; Helen Bell, Edith 
Christensen, Charlotte Stubbs. Delta 
Delta Delta; Lucy Gundlach, Edwina 
Hambleton, Laura Hastings. Alpha Xi 
Delta; Dorothy Aiello, Harriet Kirkman, 
Margaret Thurston. Alpha Omicron Pi; 
Ellen Patterson, Elizabeth Powers, Jeanne 
Santamarie. Kappa Delta; Randa Beener, 
Kitty Brice, Betty Burner. 



BELL 
CHRISTENSEN 
STUBBS 



AAA 

GUNDLACH 
HAMBLETON 
HASTINGS 



.\EA 

AIELLO 
KIRKMAN 
THURSTON 



.\on 

PATTERSON 
POWERS 
SANTAMARIE 




KA 

BEENER 
BRICE 
BURNER 




73 





^> ^ f^ 





^ /I ^ ftfV/5 

^ ^ ?J fl 

Firsl row: ASIIBY. Al^aSTINK. AlSLl Nl). Bl TLKR, CLARK. CLINITK. Si'cnnd row ; E\ ANS. FISK. C;lLLE- 
LANI). KLEBOLl), McCARRON. O.SSO. Third row: OTT, RICE. .SCHMIDT. .SILVER. SKILL. WOLFINCiER. 





Alpha Delta Pi 



BETA PHI CHAPTER 

Founded at Wesleyan Female College in 1851 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1940 




A l-AMli.lAK i)rick structure whicli has housed 
several Greek grcniiJs on the Maryland campus 
is now the home of the ADPi's. Ruth Kvans 
was i)usy running the chai)ter when not in the 
coini)any ot the hoy across the street, whose 
attentions she lias now enjoxcd tor six years. 
Between the swains at Maryland and ( ".eortje- 
town. "Dickie" Rice's mind was in a wliirl. 
especially with a hit; (juiz coniiii;-; up the next 
day. l)Ut mere exams held no terrors lor 
"Dickie," as she and two of her sisters, Ruth 
Evans and Betty Jean .Sii\er, were all nu-m- 
hers of the honorarx iiacteriolojiy sociel\ , 
S.A.O. I5ett\-, that i-^irl from Atlanta, i^ave 
lectures on how to sis^n out propi'rly, while 



laut^hinti at the read\- wit of tall, dark Mar\- 
Peahody, who lives on Peabody Street in 
Wash in.u ton. 

Musical-minded Loretla Ashl)\ ])la\ed a 
catch\' sw ins; tune on the i)iano w hile Marj;aret 
W'olfuiL^i'r tried a l)it of "rus^-cuttini;." "Mas;" 
took tinu' off from her duties as chapter treas- 
iwvv. Willi ()lt, the physical education major 
from 1 1\ ,itts\ ille, lu'lped ujihold ADPi's rep- 
ul.itioii foi- cr.ick athletic teams. The ,ulam- 
our :-:irl of the cidud was Mar\' .Mice Clark. 
smooth and slei'k memliei'. who sjient much ol 
hei- time d.mciuL; and dating. Aim.i Ausland 
had that air of lo\ i'-ind>loom as she tried 
\ainl\ to concentr.ite on her l"rench assign- 



merit, when her mind was wandering down the 
street to the Lambda Chi house. Elizabeth 
Skill showed plainly that her mind was in 
Florida by making sketches of palm trees and 
lagoons in her notebook. 

The AD Pi with the vivacious personality 
was June Schmidt, who dropped her accounts 
and ran when she heard the telephone ringing. 
Diminutive Marie Augustine kept everyone 
amused by telling of her latest escapades. Two 
Home Ec students, Alice Fisk, from Washing- 
ton, and Mabel Klebold, local lass, sang sweet 
and low by way of practicing for the Women's 
Chorus. "Phil" Osso, Crabtown native, who 
took a rest after three years' work on the 
Diamondback, spent much of her spare time 
at the AGR House with a curly-haired blond 
lad. Caroline Clinite, whose sweet disposition 
endeared her to her ADPi sisters, watched all 
the activity while knitting on a green sweater 
with the diligence of a Madame Defarge. 
Kitty Gilleland and "Ibby" Butler were en- 
gaged in a heated discussion about women's 
athletics, their favorite topic, while Kitty told 
the group about "Ibby's" antics on the ice- 
skating rink. Cay McCarron, whose heart was 



HBfci 





in Georgetown, complained of housemaid's 
knee which she acquired when scrubbing 
floors at the Practice House. Maxine Trout, 
dark-haired English major from Frederick, 
sat quietly and smiled. 

Anna Freeman and Ruth Meehan rehashed 
their newly acquired knowledge of cooking, 
sewing, and other domestic subjects, as day- 
dodger Berniece Chambers prepared to shove 
off for Washington and home. Everyone 
gathered around the piano to sing a sorority 
song when Loretta Ashby abandoned swing 
for a tune familiar to all Alpha Delta Pi girls, 
and harmony reigned. 



Members: Loretta Ashby, Marie Augustine, Anna 
Auslund, Isabel Butler, Mary Alice Clark, Caroline 
Clinite, Ruth Evans, Alice Fisk, Catherine Gilleland, 
Martha Johnston, Mabel Klebold, Philomena Osso, 
Willa Ott, Imogene Rice, June Schmidt, Betty Jean 
Silver, Elizabeth Skill, Margaret Wolfinger. 

Pledges : Sara Bennett, Mary Louise Brown, Berniece 
Chambers, Clare Cinque, Anna Freeman, Cedella Ful- 
ton, Miriam Howard, Bettie Jones, Julie Jones, Rachel 
Jones, Betty MacMorris, Catherine McCarron, Ruth 
Meehan, Mary Peabody, Maxine Trout. 

Faculty: Miss Mary Johnson. 

Housemother: Mrs. Mabel Blackwell. 



75 




Kappa Gamma 



GAMMA PSI CHAPTER 

Founded at Monmouth College in 1870 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1929 



After we mastered the Kappa buzzer sys- 
tem, we rang the required number of "longs" 
and "shorts" to summon the president, smil- 
ing Betsy Carson, who was kept busy manag- 
ing the affairs of the chapter, but was still able 
to save her week-ends for a budding barrister 
from Baltimore. Second in command, we 
found Judy Woodring, with her preference for 
blond men. Patsy Royster, who took minutes 
for Kappa, distinguished herself by her spar- 
kling conversation. 

Clare Upson, with her English background, 
kept the pledges on the straight and narrow- 
path, while Barbara Davis combined artistic 
ability with cooking classes. The demure ap- 
pearance of Alice Cann l)eliL'd lier penchant 
for novel pranks aiul practical jokes. There 
was never a (hill moment when Martha Slicl- 
ton was around, with her giggles, jokes, and 
tales of mental hygiene class at St. 1 Jizabeth's. 

The style of Kappa's lingo was set by Mar\ 
Ann Cirirtith. Her vivacious |:)ersonality made 
her a perfect social chairman. Jessie Halstead, 
smallest Kappa, claimed to ])refer Mary- 
land's niiid to Xortii Dakota's snow. I Icli-n 
Bedell, on the other hand, found the lure ol 
Virginia University so strong that it was an 



effort to concentrate on studies. Alice Strib- 
ling brought the influence of Hawaii to the 
house, with her native costumes, leis, and hula 
dances. The dark-eyed girl with the smooth 
clothes and characteristic laugh was Charlotte 
Eisle, while the attractive blond who kept 
track of the Kappa pennieswas Betsj'Mumma. 
Beverly Smith had been a disturbing element 
among Maryland men since her arrival on the 
campus, and Nancy King rested on her laurels 
as a former beauty queen. Enthusiasm in an}*- 
thing she attempted was characteristic of Mary 
Powell, with whom jirom-leading became a 
habit. Elmire Pearson, with her quiet l)eauty, 
could be gay when the occasion demanded. 

The tall, mysterious girl with the read\ 
laugh was Betty Lou Tydings. Ruth Lee 
'rhoni|)son watched the mail for those letters 
from Har\ard Law School. Doris Kluge was 
known for her sul it U- humor. \\'e found with her, 
Lucile Hanlon, the daydodger with the con- 
tagious giggle, and "Fluffy" Sparhawk who 
was always ready for fun. 

As we took our departure, we saw rush 
chairman M.utha Rainalter with one eye on 
the door, looking for that Mar\ land .ilnm who 
coaches wrestling. 



76 



Members: Helen Bedell, Peggy Bohanan, Alice Cann, 
Betsy Carson, Janice Collings, Barbara Davis, Mary 
Jane Dawson, Charlotte Eisele, Barbara England, 
Mary Ann Griffith, Jessie Halstead, Lucile Hanlon, 
Betty Jacoby, Nancy King, Doris Kluge, Ellen Miller, 
Betsy Mumma, Ann Paterson, Shirley Patterson, 
Elmire Pearson, Mary Powell, Martha Rainalter, 
Frances Richmond, Patsy Royster, Martha Shelton, 
Beverly Smith, Martha Sparhawk, Alice Stribling, 
Ruth Lee Thompson, Betty Lou Tydings, Clare Upson, 
Ruth VoUand, Doris Wood, Judy Woodring. 

Pledges: Betty Bond, Betty Catling, Betty Cham- 
berlin, Mary Jane Chase, Martha Ann Cotterman, 
Margaret Duncan, Miriam Ensor, Josephine Franklin, 
Nettie Garman, Hildwin Headley, Marilyn Huber, 
Marianne Hunter, Nancy Julia, Celeste Karlstad, Mar- 
jorie Kempton, Phyllis Mcllhenny, Vivian Mcllvaine, 
Joan Rodgers, Josephine Welch, Jane Woodring. 

Faculty: M. Marie Mount, Mrs. Evelyn Vernon. 

Housemother: Mrs. John Hill. 





First row: BOHANAN, CANN. CARSON, COLLINGS, DAWSON, EISELE, ENGLAND. Second row: 
GRIFFITH. HAL.STEAD. HANLON. JACOBY, KING, MILLER. MUMMA. Third row: PATERSON 
PATTERSON, PEARSON. POWELL, RAINALTER. RICHMOND, ROYSTER. SHELTON. Fourth 
row: SMITH, .STRIBLING. THOMPSON, TYDINGS, UPSON, VOLLAND. WOOD. WOODRING. 





V 




77 







^Kr 



,♦ 



^ C\ f 





First row: BARTLETT. BRF.RETON. HROSIl S. DODI), HALL. Second row: 111 (;I1K.S, KILLIN(;S\V<)R TH, 
LOAR, McGILL. PARLETT. Third row: RKIIIMONU. RUNDLES, -SIIEPARI). SLLLIVAN, VVIIITE. 



Gamma Phi Beta 




BETA BETA CHAPTER 

Founded at Syracuse University in 1874 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1940 



Cjamma Phi's first year on the caniiJiis turned 
out to be a lot of fun for the nienibers and a 
big siR-cess, a lart^e part of whieli nia\- be at- 
tributed to Sarah She|)ard. "that ;-;irl from 
Birmingham, with the Southern (hawl, " ami 
witty Peggy Brereton, from St. Louis. Other 
assets to the group were two transfers, M\rtle 
Killingswortii, from Soutliern Cahloruia. and 
Louise Wat kins, from X'andcrbih. 'These four 
girls were able to contribute ideas fiom wideK 
sejiarated chapters, and tlius mai-;e Peta 
Beta's initial \ear easier. 

.Almost an\timc coiiM be lieard a famili.ir 
"two hearts," "three spades," or "jjass"; tliis 
usually came from i'at I)o(ld's room w lu-rt- 



she, tcmi)oraril\ throwing thoughts of her pre- 
med courses to the wind, entertained ('aroline 
McCiiil, the chapter's social chairman, sjxirty 
Peg Banhll, and Dot Rimdles, wlio was con- 
stantl\- ilcmanding, "Ha\e you heard the lat- 
est?" at a ganu" of con\ ersation.d bridge. 

President P).uli,ua Richmond came in inter- 
mitlently thiMULihoiit ihi' w ei'k to see liow 
tliinus \\iM"e |)rogi"essing and to c.itch uji on her 
knitting. When lama Ibighes. who kept the 
girls on the lookout tor ])rops for Footlight 
("lub |il,i\'-. ,ind cli. inning Barbara Barttett 
\i^itl•d the house, the "g.ib-lests" began. 
These generalK tuiiu'd into nuisic sessions 
when Bett\ .Morton, ace pianist, arrixed. 



78 



Here Jeanne Kepner's soprano shone. Ruth 
Buchanan was often sent over to the dorm for 
her accordian with which she expertly enter- 
tained the sisters. The girls not only sang and 
listened to music, but also turned to compos- 
ing. Two of the memlters wrote a catchy tune, 
"The Beta Beta Babes." 

Margaret Loar, house president, kept things 
running smoothly between trips to Washing- 
ton to "mail a letter," at which times Dot 
Brosius, her assistant, took over and reminded 
the girls of quiet hour, house duties, and other 
details. 

Dotty Haislip and Betty Lou Sulli\an, pe- 
tite pair of roommates, were really good when 
it came to drawing figures for Hcjme Ec 
courses. And speaking of figures, Marjorie 
Reside is a prominent one. The Gamma Phi's 
were proud of the fact that she was the one 
girl on the honor roll in the College of Com- 
merce. Secretaries Mary Parlett and Betty 
Hall and Margaret Ann Sherman, the chap- 
ter's fourth Alpha Lambda Delta, also did 
their part in maintaining the scholastic status 
of the group. 

Alice Logan was one of those rare person- 
alities who didn't mind using her car to take 





IJUUJL 



the girls anywhere they wanted to go. Joan 
Moon was also popular among the group 
because of her good disposition. Mildred 
Sears, promising journalist, represented Gam- 
ma Phi on the Diatnondhack. She will never 
forget the thrill of inter\iewing Helen Hayes 
when several of the girls met her behind stage 
at the National. 

Charlotte White, Gamma Phi's activity girl, 
dropped in between club meetings to interrupt 
Betty Lou Fike who was usually engrossed in 
the latest novel. Lovely George-Anna Diehl 
came over from Margaret Brent every day in 
order to chat with the girls, and keep up on 
the news of Gamma Phi. 

Members: Barbara Bartlett, Margaret Brereton, 
Dorothy Brosius, Patricia Dodd, Dorothy HaisHp, 
Betty Hall, Erma Hughes, Myrtle Killingsworth, 
Margaret Loar, Caroline McGill, Mary Parlett, Bar- 
bara Richmond, Doroth\' Rundles, Sara Shepard, 
Betty Lou Sulli\an, Louise W'atkins, Charlotte White. 

Pledges: Margaret Banfill, Peggy Bleth, Eleanor 
Bradburn, Ruth Buchanan, George-Anna Diehl, 
Betty Lou Fike, Hannah Ganger, Janet Harman, 
Jeanne Kepner, Alice Logan, Eleanore Mackie, Joan 
Moon, Marjorie Reside, Margaret Sherman, Dorothy 
Wood. 

Faculty: Miss Frances Ide. 

Housemother: Mrs. Mary S. Watson. 



79 




Kappa 



£SsBB^ 



BETA ZETA CHAPTER 

Founded at Colby College in 1874 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1940 



Ai.riinrdii the Sij^nia Kappas lia\e been a 
national at Maryland only since April, I0-|.(), 
this year was very successful for the grou]). 
As president of the cha])ter, F.dith Christcnsen 
dashed anjund iwnn the lunise and official 
business to her experiments at the chemistry- 
lab. Phyllis Newmaker, who was often seen 
working in the office in the Home Kc building, 
served as vice-president. .Standing less than 
five feet tall. Muriel .Xndcrson was seldom 
without her bhuid escort when she was not 
teaching the young liow to sjjrout at (ireen- 
belt. 

Norma C'cjrnneii, whose background in the 
Foods lab stood her in good stead when plan- 
ing important dinners, also kept the records 
for t 1k' sorority. Some of ( .ililoniia's sunsliini' 
came along wilii Marguerite Goss when she 
transferred from S.icramcnlo junior College. 
Lydia i'.wing, an Alpha Lambda Delta, 
usually made a dash for the piano after din- 
ner. Another honor student, whose hobb\- was 
c(jllecting cups and ribbons won in horse 
shows, was Clara C.ale Goldbeck. 



Outstanding for her red-gold tresses and 
New ^'ork wardrobe was Irene Nichols, while 
Hilda Ryan, a February graduate, was best 
known for her congeniality. Lee Pohlman 
managed her students in jiractice-teaching so 
well that the pledges chose her to preside at 
their meetings. The girl with the 1()\ eh' alto 
voice who took an acti\e i)art in the \'arsity 
.Shows was Rita Monocrusos. Ruth W'l'gman 
obtained <i job as a Home I^conomist in Haiti- 
more after fmishing school at tlu' end of the 
first semester. Mildred and Charlotte Stubbs 
were the carrot-to|-)ped sisters with straight 
A axerages. Mildred did the corresjjonding 
for Sigma Kappa, and presided at the P'rench 
Club meetings, \\ liilc ( liarlottt' kc])l the rli.i|)- 
ter mone>' and ser\ed as I'an-llel representa- 
ti\e. ()ut to relie\i' the suffering of mankind, 
Margaret Clarke, who jil.iNed .1 \ iolin in the 
rni\ersit\- orchestra, will start training at 
L'niversit>' Hosjjital ne.\t year. Kvehn Foer- 
ster liked to get around; so she iiad the task of 
])lanning .Sigma Ka])pa's social 1 unctions. 
Dorothy Foerster played the piano as Ora 



80 




<i^ L . 



First row. ANDERSON. BELL, CHRISTENSEN. CHRISTENSEN, CLARKE, CORNNELL. EWING. 
Second row: FOERSTER, FOERSTER, GOLDBECK. GOSS. HETTINGER, JULLIEN. KNIGHT. 
Third row: MONOCRUSOS. NEWMAKER, POHLMAN, SMITH, STUBBS, STUBBS, WEGMAN, 

WOOD. 



Hettinger strummed on her steel guitar. 
Equally at home on horseback or dancing at 
a Naval Academy hop was dashing blond 
Betty Jullien. Journeying from Syracuse Uni- 
versity to attend Maryland, Doris Wood 
became an enthusiastic sportswoman. 



Members: Muriel Anderson, Helen Bell, Celeste Bow- 
ers, Helen Carnin, Edith Christensen, Hilde Christen- 
sen, Margaret Clarke, Norma Cornnell, Virginia E. 
Davis, Lydia Ewing, Dorothy Foerster, Evehn Foer- 
ster, Janet Gaston, Clara Gale Goldbeck, Marguerite 
Goss, Elizabeth Haase, Ora Hettinger, Elizabeth Jul- 
lien, Marguerite Monocrusos, Phyllis Newmaker, 
Adrienne Nichols, Thelma Pohlman, Hilda Ryan, 
Evelyn Smith, Charlotte Stubbs, Mildred Stubbs, 
Ruth Wegman, Doris \\'ood. 

Pledges: Esther Balton, Betty Bryan, Barbro Hans- 
son, Anza Knight, Louise Love, Suzanne Morse, Mary 
Pell, Catherine Ann Young. 

Housemother: Mrs. Thomas Sloane. 




^C:?- 



81 




Delta Delta 




ALPHA PI CHAPTER 

Founded at Boston University in 1888 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1934 



Wai.kixc; down College A\enue, we saw a 
grouj) of coeds on their wa\- to the Tri-Delt 
house. Leading, the procession was l^dwina 
Hamhleton, wlio headed l)otli lier cliapter and 
Junior Pan-Hel,\\ hile her (juiet dignity marked 
her as an ideal leader. With her was Norma 
Thompson, without tlie hird dogs. That 
smooth, dark-haired girl was Laura Hastings, 
who looked lost without a piano. Auburn- 
haired Marjorie Cook, one of Maryland's 
beauties, was with her faNorite cheer-leader. 
Peggy Bailey, witli her mind in Annapolis, 
looked ])reoccupied. Bette Holt's spontaneous 
giggle was l)ursting out next to Irene Leighton, 
who was (juiet even when she was hilarious. 

Next we saw Margaret Da>', muttering, 
"Purl one, knit two, and drop tlirce. " Tlie 
tall, well-tailored girl was Lnnna .Shelton, 
bacteria-conscious i)resident of S.A.O. Martha 
Meriam Brown and Tre\ a 1 lolliiigsuorth 
lager were chatting aiidut husbands, the prict' 
of vegetal)les, and how to get rid u\ tal llc-lalc 
gray. ".Sandy" l)alt()ii wouM be along as soon 
as she got that weekly phone cill from \c\\ 
Haven. The girl with the be.intifni blond 
hair was Mar\- Roberts I'alric k. 'V\\v\\ canu' 
Lucy ("lundlach and Ahic l.nrkins who hanlK 
looked natural without their cMoit of \ r( )'s. 

I'h\llis i lawns was resi)onsiblc lor llial 
blitzkrieg of laughter as Marjorie I bill mtcrt'd 
with a book on lab ti'clmi(|nc. bxinnd her w a> 



Dust\ Hruns, the riding enthusiast who likes 
U) sing. .Someone was j^estering ( "irayson -Smith 
by yelling about webbed feet from Lastern 
Shore. Margaret Seiter, w ho di\ ided her inter- 
ests between KA and Sigma .\u, was listening 
to Marguerite Dunlap reminisce about dear 
old .■\labama \]. There was W'inkie -Schmidt, 
noisily waving to iCImer. Lolh Park had ap- 
peared wearing her cheer-leading sweater, 
while she and Irma Tennant speculated about 
their future careers as Navy wives. .Allene 
Jones walked in accompanied b\ Xanc\ Phil- 
li])s, the blond Irom 11\ atts\ille. .\rri\ing in 
a llurr\ was Dottie Hart, the usual bandanna 
on her head. llo|)e Hexener, who could talk 
enthusiasticalh' about basei)all, Anna])olis, or 
horse racing, and ("laire Kenne\", the acti\ities 
girl, were now among those ])resent. Here was 
Helen ("rane, with a diamond on the proper 
finger. The last Tri-Delt to arrive was DustN 
Wallace Scott, who pro\ ed her consistenc\ b\' 
being late to Iut own wedding which >he m.m- 
.I'ji'd to wedue in bi'tui'iMi semesters. 



Mi.Nnu:Ks: l\Tarsueritc l^aile\-, Kieanor I-5ateiiian, 
Martha Urnwn, I Icloii Hrims, .Mire Biiikins. Marjurie 
('(ink, IIcUm) Ciaiu-, Ruth D.iliim, Margaret Dav', 
M.ui;ueritc 1 )iiiilap, .Aria ( '.iiild. I.in\- ( iiindlarh, Mar- 
jorie Hall, Mflvvina Hamhleton, Doris Hart, l.aiira 
Hastings, I'lnilis Havens, Hope Hevener, Treva Hul- 
liniisworth, Bette Holt, .Mieiie Jones, Claire Keniiey, 
Irene I.eij;htoii, Mnr\' Louise I'ark, Mary Rol)erts 
I'.iiiiik. N'anr\' PhilHps. Wilheliniii.i Schmidt. Mar- 



82 




Kirsi row: BATEMAN, BRDWN. BRUNS, BURKINS, COOK, CRANK, 
DALTON. Second row: DAWSON, DAY, DUNLAP, GUILD, GUND- 
LACH, HALL, HAMBLETON. Third row: HART, HARVEY, HAST- 
INGS, HAVENS, HEVENER, HOLLINGSWORTH, HOLT. Fourth 
row: JONES, KENNEY, LEIGHTON, PARK, PATRICK, PHILLIPS 
SCHMIDT. Fifth row: SEITER, SHELTON, SMITH, TENNANT) 
THOMPSON, WALLACE. 



garet Seiter, Emma Shelton, Grayson Smith, Irma 
Tennant, Norma Thompson, Margaret Wallace. 

Pledges: Gladys Abshire, Berenice Connor, Marie 
Beal, Alice Dawson, Edith Dunford, Peggy Gammon, 
Betty Gilbert, Mary Ellen Gilbert, Marian Harvey, 
June Hastings, Janet Heggie, Carolyn Lacey, Louise 
Ladd, Harriet LaRoche, Helen Leibrand, Roberta 
Leighton, Mary Constance Martin, Mary Moser, 
Ruth Ramsdell, Nancy Royal, Eleanor Seiter, Jean 
Sexton, Edith Simmons, Jill Siposs, Elizabeth Sul- 
livan, Phyllis Warner. Dorothy Willis, Margaret 
Letitia Wilson. 

Faculty: Mrs. Claribel Welsh. 

Housemother: Mrs. Rachel Dinsmore. 




83 




Alpha Xi Delta 




BETA ETA CHAPTER 
Founded at Lombard College in 1893 
tablished at the University of Maryland in 1934 



After being ushered into tlie spacious livint; 
room of the colonial Alpha Xi house, the 
southern hospitality of the chajjter was im- 
mediately felt. The two red-haired Alpha 
Xi's, I*at Melton, Norfolk lass whose Child 
Study and Foods Books were waiting upstairs, 
and Gina Calver. "Ag" student and Terrapin 
Trail enthusiast, couldn't resist swinging out 
to the rh>thni of "Scrub Me Mama with a 
Boogie Beat." Petite, (hirk-haired Dot Aiello 
and Aileen \\ illianis, future school-marm with 
musical leanings, were ])racticiiig sororit) 
songs at the piano in the sunrooni, trying to 
drown out the noise of the phonograph in the 
ne.xt room. 

Harriet Kirkman, the blonde with the cheer- 
ful disi)osition, was at the bridge table with 
Sherry Pfeiffer, the Xew Jerse\ girl who ha:- ,i 
closet full of clothes; while Honie-lCc Helen 
Williams and athletic Kitty Perkins completed 
the foursome. .StateK' Mary ICngel surveyed 
the bridge hands before leaving to spend an 
evening o\er her accounting jjroblems. Bett\' 
Owens was a strong l)clic\cr in the "'("lood 
Neighbor" policx', since she sa\ed her .Satur- 
day nights for the lio\ from home who li\ed 
next door. ( Onip.uing notes u ith Bet t\ .ibout 



the ordeals (jf the Practice House was Dot 
Davis, whose s])arkling diamond indicated 
that she would soon l)e a])i)lying the knowl- 
edge she had gained b>' stiid\ing Home Eco- 
nomics diligently enough to become a nienil)er 
of the honorary, Omicron Nu. Alice Dietz was 
telling of the trials of practice-teaching, and 
how none of her students could pass the tests 
she gave them. Her roommate Margaret Zim- 
merman, the fair-haired .\i])ha Ni with the 
melodious voice, was sitting in a corner with a 
dreamy expression on her smiling tace. Tall, 
brunette Clara Marie Clark was oft to a meet- 
ing of the Presbyterian Club, conunenting on 




^ 



84 



how convenient it was to live at the house after 
having daydodged for three years. Maryan 
Donn, efficiency personified, was rounding up 
the pledges to plan some new project. 

On the love-seat before the fireplace, Kay 
Shea, the brunette from Massachusetts, chatted 
with Mary Waters about the evils of the new 
conscription program, while Nadine Watson 
put in a good word for her beloved Eastern 
Shore. Jerry Kreider, smartly dressed day- 
dodger, and Louise Teller, the vivacious 
blonde, were sprawled on the floor busily ex- 
amining the pictures of the girls to be placed 
in the Alpha Xi scrapbook. 

Tangoing to the strains of Perfidia were 
Shirley Conner, one of the 1941 beauty con- 
testants, and Jeannette Owen, girl with the 
braid, who made such artistic posters for the 



Terrapin. Margaret Thurston, following in 
her father's footsteps by seeking a career in 
Floriculture, entered the room, gavel in hand, 
to call her sisters to the chapter meeting. 

Members: Dorothy Aiello, Georgianna Calver, Clara 
Marie Clark, Shirley Conner, Dorothy Davis, Frances 
Davis, Alice Deitz, Maryan Donn, Milbrey Downey, 
Mary Engle, Harriet Kirkman, Geraldine Kreider, 
Mildred Melton, Jeannette Owen, Betty Owens, Kitty 
Perkins, Shirley Pfeiffer, Pat Richards, Kay Shea, 
Louise Teller, Margaret Thurston, Barbara Wagner, 
Mary W^aters, Nadine Watson, Aileen Williams, Helen 
W'illiams, Sarah Yates, Margaret Zimmerman. 

Pledges: Betty Benjamin, Helen Biesecker, Loretta 
Boyan, Lois Davis, Grace DeLucia, Frances Demaree, 
Shirley Eclov, Beryl Gompers, Pat Hardy, Jackie 
Hohman, Ellen Jeffers, Barbara Kurz, MarjorieLovell, 
Maryan Moore, Carol Remsberg, Kate Schmoll, Betty 
Steely, Jane Turner, Erma Welsh, Jeanne Wersing, 
Millicent Wright, Dorothy Zentz. 

Housemother: Mrs. T. J. Randolph. 




First row: AIELLO, CALVER, CLARK. CONNER, DAVIS. DAVIS, DEITZ. Second row: DONN, 

DOWNEY, ENGLE. KIRKMAN. KREIDER. MELTON. OWEN. Third row: OWENS, PERKINS, 

PFEIFFER, RICHARDS, SHEA, TELLER. THURSTON. Fourtii row: WAGNER. WATERS, 

WATSON, WILLIAMS, WILLIAMS, YATES, ZIMMERMAN. 






la«», --^ 





85 




, .Alpha Omicron Pi 




PI DELTA CHAPTER 

Founded at Barnard College in 1897 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1924 



XHE colonial brick l)uil(lin.t; with the ini])()s- 
ing white columns, the hrst sorority house 
one sees on College A\enue, is the home of the 
AOPi's. Leading the group was "Libby" 
Powers, whose typical puns accented her con- 
versation. Jeanne Santamarie was a favorite 
with her sisters as well as with the towering 
prexy of Phi Sig. Five minutes before meeting 
time, "Bobi)ie" Boose, one of Maryland's 
beauties, was busy tyi)ing u\) tlie chapter min- 
utes. "Marge" Hall caught u\) on lier social 
lik- with luimerous jaunts to tiie i*hi Delt or 
Theta ("hi house. Mar\ X'aiden, better known 
as "Little One," managed to keej) the sorority 
coffer filled, while Flossie White's cjuiet gra- 
ciousness m.ide her a charming social chair- 
man. 

Each branch of I'licle .Sam's delense was 
represented in the .\()l'i house, with (linnx 
Mercer wearing the (Hamond ol a Marine 
lieutenant and Mary I K'len ("ook s|)ortiiig a 
ring from a >'oung .\rnu officer, while a Xa\\' 
miniature sjjarkled on the third linger of 
Kurith ^L-lynard's left hand. "Frederick call- 
ing" was the cry that sent Mal)el .Simi)son 
racing to the phone. "Bc\" Reinstedt rushed 
to get reach for her date, while M.irian Beck 



frantically searched for her lipstick which 
hai)pened to be right on the dresser. 

Jeanne Reese, moaning about the weather, 
was hurried along by Betty Raymond, who 
w'as ready to dri\e home. Doris Hampshire, 
the party girl, played the ])iano until her date 
arri\cd. Jane Howard told a joke in her inimi- 
talile manner; and Jean Ramer's solitaire 
shone more brightly because it was the newest 
one in the AOPi house. Betty Brookens, the 
sweet-natured girl who attended all the Foot- 
light i)la\s, was more interested in the actors 
than the acting. Jane Page, the lass with tlie 
scjuthern drawl and the big brown eyes, chat- 
ted with distinguished looking "Kitten" Foote, 
lire-nied student who maintained AOi'i rjuiet 
hours. Another A()l'i Ironi the sunny .Soutli 
was rillen Patterson, who stuchfd Home Kco- 
noniics with an e\x' to tlie luture. 

Floisc Webb diMiissed her numerous ])r<)b- 
lems of the heart with ( "aroK n ( ".ra\ , w ho told 
many stories of the strange excuses which 
tardy coeds had given her at Women's League 
meeting. .Among those missing were Lee llen- 
drickson and Micke\- Kuehle, w lu) were out 
carh- and late with those two swains from the 
Theta C"hi house. 



86 



Members: Marian Beck, Barbara Boose, Betty Brook- 
ens, Mary Helen Cook, Virginia Ditzel, Catherine 
Foote, Carolyn Gray, Doris Hampshire, Marguerite 
Hall, Lillian Hendrickson, Jane Howard, Virginia 
Hutchinson, Marie Kuehle, Earla Marshall, Eurith 
Maynard, Virginia Mercer, Jane Page, Ellen Patter- 
son, Elizabeth Powers, Jean Ramer, Betty Raymond, 
Jeanne Reese, Beverly Reinstedt, Jane Robinson, 
Jeanne Santamarie, Mabel Simpson, Mary Vaiden, 
Charlotte Warthen, Eloise Webb, Florence White. 

Pledges: Janet Andreae, Mary Biackman, Marjorie 
Brock, June Colberg, Mary Conklin, Susan Cashing, 
Marjorie Dawson, Dorothy Decker, Dorothy Duff, 
Jacqueline Evert, Maryan Green, Alice Hynson, Joy 
Jones, Shirley MacKay, Kay Martin, Kathleen Molo- 
hon, Dorris Pitts, Lina Mae Saum, Jean Scheller, 
Peggy Smith, Ann Speake, Emily Spire, Doris Thomp- 
son, Clara Vawter, Elaine Westlye, Betsy Jo Wilson, 
Phyllis Wolfe. 

Faculty: Mrs. Frieda McFarland, Miss Kathryn 
Terhune. 

Housemother: Mrs. Maclane Cawood. 




First row: BECK, BOOSE, BROOKENS. COOK, DITZEL, FOOTE, GRAY. Second row: HAMP- 
SHIRE, HALL, HENDRICKSON, HOWARD, HUTCHINSON, KUEHLE, MARSHALL. Third row: 
MAYNARD, MERCER. PAGE, PATTERSON, POWERS, RAMER, RAYMOND, REESE. Fourth row : 
REINSTEDT, ROBINSON, SANTAMARIE, SIMPSON, VAIDEN, WARTHEN, WEBB, WHITE. 




S^^ 




87 




a Delta 




ALPHA RHO CHAPTER 

Founded at Virginia State Normal in 1897 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1929 



XAOLDING forth in their new home, the KD's 
enjoyed a successful >ear. Kitt\- Brice, busy 
presiding over the sorority and Pan-Heh still 
found time to visit the Sigma Xu house fre- 
quently. Bettie Porter kept on her toes train- 
ing thirty-three new pledges, while Bernice 
Jones took the chai)ter minutes and enjoyed 
cokes and bowling. Helene Kuhn kept the 
KD accounts straight, and Mary Henderson 
hurried back from week-end jaunts to write 
for the Diamondback. Naomi Richmond was 
well-laden with jewelry as she proudly dis- 
played a Phi Sig pin and diamond ring. 

Dottie Xellis enjoyed a bit of relaxation at 
the A(iR house while Lida Sargeant, with her 
manner of quiet efficiency, devoted her efforts 
to the Terrapin, V.W.C.A., and Mortar 
Board. Doris Schutrumpf consistently made 
the honor roll, while dinger Bolden s|)ent 
spare moments with lier football hero, Elmer 
Rigby. Da\'dodger Betty Cissel dropped in to 
chat with Maidee Coffman and Hope Rey- 
nolds, future teachers. Betsy Ross toiled in 
the zoology lab, Erin Ellis studied textiles, 
and Randa Beener attended Pan-Hel meetings. 

Doris McF"arland stayed active in campus 
organizations, and still maintained her place 



on the honor roll, while Anne Hoen, another 
honor student, knitted and played bridge 
between classes. Petite Betsy M\rick and 
Eileen O'Xeil engaged in a game of double 
solitaire, while Ruth Dashiell saw that quiet 
hour was obserxed. Kay Barker managed the 
Daydodgers' Club, and Alice James devoted 
her spare time to the Dianioudhack. 

f^etty Burner, smarth- dressed W'.ishing- 
tonian, was (jften seen at the Phi Delt house, 
while Xellie Lamb preferred the Delta Sigs, 
and Barbara McCart> was attracted by the 
Sigma Xu dances. Swimming enthusiast, 
Heidi Hermann also went to (lernian ("lub 
meetings, while Ruth Stowell's frefjuent trips 
to the Naval Academy did not keej) her trom 
enj()\ing the night life on c;im])us. 



Mf.mbkrs: Katherine Barker, Randa Beener, Mary 
\'ir^inia Bolden, Mar>- Klizaheth Briie. Betty Burner, 
Belt\' Cissel, Margaret Clarke, Maidee ColTman, Ruth 
Dashiell, F>in KIlis, Mary Henderson. .Adelheid Her- 
mann, Ruth Herson, Mari Hess, \anc\- Holland, .Anne 
Hoen, .Alice James, Bernice Jones, Hildreth Kemi^ton, 
Helene Kuhn, Xellie Lamb, Barbara McCart\', Doris 
McFarland, Betsy Myrick, Dorothy Xellis, Kileen 
O'Neil, Bettie Porter, Hope Reynolds. Naomi Rich- 
mond, Betsy Ross, Lida Sargeant, Dori.s .Schutrum|if. 
Betty .Smink. Ruth Stowell, Molly Thompson. Mary 
Ziegler. 



88 



Pledges: Sara Allen, Joan Bell, Eleanor Bergeron, 
Doris Bryant, Ralston Coulliette, Jeanne Craig, Bette 
Ann Crockett, Nancy Duby, Marjorie Edsall, \'ir- 
ginia Fesmire, Virginia Giles, Margaret Jane Gortner, 
Faith Halpine, Elizabeth Hine, Frances Hodge, Lucille 
Humphreys, Jane Laughead, Frances Long, Jacque- 
line Lovell, Gene Mason, Jean Meredith, \'irginia Lee 
Miller, Mary Paiithorp, Frances Pfeififer, Alice Pflu- 
ger, Rosaleen Pifer, Mary Prescott, Margaret Price. 
Edna Rayburn, Margaret Richmond, Margaret Ann 
Rogers, Betty Rowley, Ruth Sleeman, Ellen Taylor, 
Patricia \^'ard, Mar>- Louise Wilson, Katherine Wolfe. 
Mary Ellen Wolford, Mary Veager. 

Faculty: Susan Harman, Alma Preinkert. 

Housemother: Mrs. Marguerite Howell. 



First row: BARKER. BEENER. BOLDEN. BRICE. BURNER. CISSEL, 
CL.\RKE. Second row: COFFMAN. DASHIELL. ELLIS. HENDERSON. 
HERMANN. HERSON. HESS. Third row: HOLLAND. JAMES. JONES. 
KUHN. LAMB. McCARTY. McFARLAND. Fourth row : M YRICK. NELLLS. 
O'NEIL, PORTER. REYNOLDS. RICHMOND. ROSS. Fifth row: SAR- 
GEANT, SCHUTRUMPF, SMINK, STOWELL. THOMPSON. ZIEGLER. 



^C^i^ 








©s^/^r^f^"^ 









^ 



89 




« 

4 



ilfSigma Sigma 




BETA ALPHA CHAPTER 

Founded at Hunter College in 1913 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1936 



A M I i)V in contrasts was the group of i^irls 
at the Phi Sit^nia Sigma house, lixing jjroof 
that it took all types to make a well-rounded 
sorority. First we see Rosalind Schwartz, 
archon of the chapter, who looked forward to 
a career in law. "Roz"])ossessedresoinTetulness, 



poise, and charm in abundance. Lillian Powers 
had fun being collegiate, while she was con- 
stanth- associated with a i)iano, a kinder- 
garten, and the sororit\' social calendar. Molly 
Tulin who Inirst forth unexpectedly into the 
realms of creatixe jjoetry and music, had the 



First row: BAR.SKY, DUNBF.Rt;. FELnM.\N. FL.\KS. FLOM. (JLASF.R. CiOTTLIEB. .Second row: 
KATZ. KELLMAN. LEVIN, LEVY, MEDNICK. MERICAN. POWER.S, SANDMAN. Ihlrd row: 
SCHWARTZ. SHERMAN. STONE, TRINKEL. Tl LIN. WEISBERCJ. YAGENDORF. ZIMMERMAN. 




^^-^^0^^^^ 



90 



knack of combining good grades and good 
times. 

June Yagendorf, trim and pretty, waited 
each day for "the" letter from a Maryland 
alum. Bertha Katz graduated with an average 
that sounded like a warning yell on the fairway 
of a golf course. Efficient and stable, Naomi 
Levin, the vice-president, was a handy person 
to have around in times of stress. 

A vivacious, all-around girl was Esther 
Feldman, whose Eastern Shore accent put the 
New Yorkers to shame. When the Phi Sig 
girls were in need of a friend, they turned to 
Bette Stone, a grand sport who was never 
seen without a chuckle. Frances Dunberg, as 
pretty a potential dietitian as ever hit the 
campus, got good practice by managing the 
sorority cuisine. Master of spontaneous wit 
and humor, Harriet Sandman, was versatile 
enough to combine chapter correspondence, 
profound philosophy, and a mean conga. 
Gloria Gottlieb was a mad mathematician 
when it came to Phi Sigma Sigma's accounts; 
she had a faculty for avoiding the use of red 
ink in the books. The only red-head in the 
house was Shirley Sherman, who counted her 
words and made her words count as recording 
secretary. Sorority worry-wart, Sonia W'eis- 
berg, was the efficient house manager whose 
mission in life was to keep people from dancing 
on the rugs. If you say the name "Alma Meri- 
can" fast enough, you will get a two-word 
description of the girl who could always be 
counted in for a novel prank or the latest 
movie. 

Audrey' Levy had her hands full between 
daydodging and going steady, yet she had an 
amazing store of energy. The only Southerner 
in a house full of Yankees and still fighting in 
the Civil War was Mickey Mednick. Mickey 
was a paradox, Norfolk belle and Chemistry 
major. Mimi Kellman's favorite pastime was 
interpretive dancing, but she was out to seek 
happiness and insisted that she would find it. 



Elsie Flom, affectionately called "baby- 
face," embodied youthful exuberance and 
charm. She deserved all the flattery she got. 
Skillfully camouflaging a sparkling wit under 
a calm, reserved exterior, Rosadean Flaks had 
the art of choosing and wearing clothes well. 
Foremost exponent of the pompadour, Seena 
Flaser apt at sewing, fixed electrical appli- 
ances, and learned dance steps before they 
were invented. 



Members: Frances Dunberg, Esther Feldman, Rosa- 
dean Flaks, Elsie Flom, Seena Glaser, Gloria Gottlieb, 
Miriam Kellman, Naomi Levin, Audrey Levy, Miriam 
Mednick, Alma Merican, Lillian Powers, Harriet 
Sandman, Rosalind Schwartz, Shirley Sherman, Bette 
Stone, Molly Tulin, Sonia Weisberg, June Yagendorf. 

Pledges: Myra Ander, Shulamith Atkin, Lorraine 
Blankman, Sylvia Bravman, Babette Feldman, Sylvia 
Feldman, Alma Finkelstein, Florence Guttman, Rhoda 
Haas, Muriel Horrowitz, Dorothy Jones, Marilyn 
Klein, Phyllis Kolodner, Bernice Lieberman, Bernice 
Margulis, Florence Mayerberg, Rosalind Michelson, 
Sylvia Michelson, Eugenia Schumacher, Shirley Sklar, 
Florence Spivak, Rose Udell. 

Housemother: Mrs. Ernest Andrews. 




91 



Alpha Sigma 



Founded at the University of Maryland in 1935 



Vv ELL, we don't have a street number, but 
it's right U]i the hill behind the Gym-Armory." 
These directions led us to the Alpha Sigma 
house where we met "Prexy" Bernice Kress, 
who was the center of attraction because of 
her antics. A future Kngiish teacher, vice- 
president, Esther Handler, spent much of her 
time reading letters from Ohio State. 

Al)()Ut twent>' creaky boards up the hall 
li\ed Ruth Surosky, the terpsichorean artist. 
Ruth's "roomy" was Cynthia Baylin, the 
flaxen-haired social chairman, who was often 
seen horseback riding in Druid Hill Park on 
Sun(la\- mornings. A belle of the southland 
was Horlcnse Finkelstein. Mildred Radin was 
the house president with the Saks Fifth Ave- 
nue clothes. Irene Scher was always on the 
run, traxeling from X'irginia to Cornell and 



back again. Shirley Berman, the artist of 
Alpha Sigma, had official control of the scrap- 
i)ook which she filled with nian\ of her origi- 
nals. 

One couldn't tell whether .Sue C>usack com- 
muted or iixed with the Alpha Sigmas, since 
she spent -so much time at the house. .Muriel 
Goodman liad a heart that stretched all the 
way to X'irginia, especiallj' when violets ar- 
rived directh' from Charlottes\ille. 



Members: Cynthia Ba\lin. .Shirle\- Berman, Hor- 
tense Finkelstein, Muriel (Goodman, .Sue Gusack, 
Esther Handler, Bernice Kress, Mildred Radin. Irene 

-Scher, Ruth .Surosky. 

Pledges: Shirley Berkowitz, Elaine Cohen, Margery 
Dopkin, Rhoda Eskwith, Marion Greenberg, Marjorie 
Herman. Bernice Herson, Bette Liebling, Leatrice 
.Strauss, Gloria W'aldnian. 




First row: B.W'LIN. BERMAN. FINKELSTEIN. GOODMAN, GOROON. 
.Second row: HANDLER. KRE.S.S, RADIN. SCHER. SUROSKY. 



92 




Upper left: Guilding the lily 

Upper right: Spiral stair scene 
Lower left: Card cuties 

Lower right: Tables turned 



. . . And Ended In lnforn]ality . . . 



It starts like this 



A sorority pastime 





lootball 




DuVall gains 5 yards against Virginia 



1940 NOVEMBER '9*o 



T U e WE D TM u 




i 2 
5 6 7 8^ 
12 13 U I5(I6)( 
19 20@>22 23 
26 27 28 29 @^ 



wo wins and seven defeats hardly 
K' sl()r\ of the Old Liner 
fo()tl)ail team ^^^W^f^SSf^W' •'" n'lusiial coacliini; set-up 
the Liners canu^^^^^j5Jr.-'^l"l»pi'iK l*<-''i" '<"•' quarter, 
oiits^aining \'.^L1., shmipiii!; ai^ainst the H()\as, toi)i)ins; a 
Rutsiers eleven, and txini; the (leneralson .i9t)-\anl adxance 
in tlu' I'mal tiU paikt'd the Terrapin season lull of thrills 
and spills ualore. 



')4 



Under one of the most unique coaching sys- 
tems throughout the realm of college football, 
the Old Liners grid eleven galloped through a 
season that gave the critics a chance to top 
new heights. With Jack Faber, Al Woods, and 
Al Heagy handling the tutoring activities, 
Maryland's coaching duties came nearer to 
the All-Maryland idea. 

The Athletic Board, with the selection of 
Mike Lombardo as bo.xing mentor and Cole- 
man Headley as head man in the Terp track 
factory, has put every major sport on the 
campus under the leadership of ex-Maryland 
athletes. Under the complete direction of 
Geary Eppley as director of athletics, Mary- 
land men held the complete spotlight in the 
Terp athletic situation. 




We needed rose-colored glasses on that play 



at M^^yla^d University 



Athletic Board 

CORY, BROUGHTON, 
KEMP, EPPLEY, SUPPLEE 




95 




These Coached . . . 



This triumvirate of Jack Fabcr, Al 

Woods, and Al Heagy coached the 

1940 Maryland football team 



TllorcH the season was not the Ijest, the cheerleaders this year car- 
ried on with their traditional high-spiritedness. Employing their ver- 
satile ingenuit\ , the\ trained a group of students to stage impressive 
and unusual card tricks to brighten the dull moments between haK'es. 



These Cheered 



HOWARD. SCHF.NE. I'RINZ. SNYOER, 
PARK, BRIIXJE.S, MF.l.SF.R, .SIMONS, 





UuVall goes over for Maryland's first touchdown of tlie season 





Manager George 



orge Moore ^^^ ^^f^^^^^^W^^ 



JVIaryland's football forces opened the sea- 
son on the wrong end of a 7-6 score, losing to 
an aggressive Hampden-Sydney eleven. The 
Terrapin forces yielded the first touchdown in 
the closing minutes of the second period. After 
a sparkling return of one of Joe Murphy's 
booming punts, Walt Sprye passed for the 
touchdown, and they converted, taking the 
lead at 7-0. 



In the third period Maryland's power began 
to show when Murphy got away for a dazzling 
30-yard run through the entire Hampden- 
Sjxlney defense. Two plays later. Merle 
Du\'all crashed over for a score, but Wide- 
ner's try for the e.xtra point went wide. Mary- 
land's belated offensive was cut off by the 
final gun, leaving the score at the end of the 
game 7-6. 



First row: MIER. BERRY. L. MUELLER, J ARMOSK A. HOOPENGARDNER, ULMAN.WIDENER, 
GRELECKI, GUMNICK, J. MUELLER, VINC:ENT. Second row: GIENGER, DWYER, GARRETT, 
CORDYACK, HUNT, McNEIL, HEYER, MORTON, KROUSE. Third row: CONRAD, UuVALL, 
MURPHY, RIGBY, JACK, SHAFFER, CHACOS, MacKENZIE. GUNTHER, DUNN, DUNLAP. 
Fourth row: MOORE, SMITH, LUMSDEN, O'NEIL, MAXSON, BACH, BURLIN, BRIGHT, 
BLAZEK, MILLER. SHOCKEY, GILMORE. 



a 



© ft 55 © 



i"^*^'^ 



a 



p. T- 



a 



et 



f=^^ •^JH. ^^ 'fc* -- ^^ (—^ ^ 



-•w 



^- '^Sr^ 




DuVall blocks for Rigby on 
end Vun in Penn game 



After a disai^pointing opener, the Tcrp 
squad entrained for Philadelphia to face a 
hit^hK- tooted Pennsx, Kania team. Before a 
crowd of 51,000 the Quakers proceeded to 
uijjiold their rejjutation \)y runnint; roui;h- 
shod over an outclassed lVIar\ land eleven. 

The Mar\land l)o\s thrilled the immense 
lludn;^ hy holdinj^ I'din to a single touchdown 
durini; the lu'st (juarter. l)nt then the stronj^ 
Quakers' attack warmed up and scored at will 
throiiLih the remainrler of the contest, pilin;^ 
up se\ en touchdowns, a held :.;oal, and si.\ con- 
versions for a total of 51 iK)ints. 

The strong Quaker line comi)letel\' liottkd 
any semblance of attack tlu' Terps could nuis- 
ler, keeping the Old Liners in their own terri- 
tory most of the afternoon. .S|)arkcd liy Rea- 
gan's all-round hrilliance and the wonderful 
line |)lay of Frick and Mendelson, Penns\ 1- 
vania was su])reme in e\er\- deiiartment of the 
game. 



l.ittic Joe Muri)h\- ga\e a courageous per- 
formance, running, kicking, and passing in his 
usual fine stxle in a hojieless attempt to stop 
the Quaker a\alanche. .Mso outstanding was 
l^oh Smith's fine game in tlu' line. Hob played 
thiMugli most of the i),ittlc. doing nioi'c th.in 
his share to stop tlu' rushes and smashing line 
pla\s of tlu' PennsN 1\ .mia b.icklield. 

Twice during the aftiTnooii the Tirp attack 
did I'cicli the IV'iin ,V'->'i''d line, lull once an 
intercepted pass i)ogged down the ollense and 
again a first down, short b\ inches, nipped the 
.Mar\ land team's bid for fame. 



98 



ru.:.: 






♦♦ «f.»< i: ■ ■ 



Half-time floats and parade add color to Homecoming Day 



»-* 



w ' i 



^ '^ i' 



♦, 



A^-"*^ 



Bob Smith intercepted a Dudley pass, and 
scampered 55 yards for a score. But Virginia 
retaliated, and marched to two touchdowns 
in quick order. 

The Terps' great improvement was due 
mainly to the sensational play of Bob Smith, 
and Maryland's main offensive threats were 
Merle Du\'all and Joe Murphy. 



Joe Murphy 



The Riding Club steps out 



Inspired by Homecoming the Terrapin eleven 
un\eiled a hard charging line in holding a 
highly favored Mrginia team to a 19-6 score. 
The Old Liners showed a tricky and alert of- 
fense that kept the Southerners in a continual 
frenzy. 

Virginia scored through the air in the open- 
ing session for the only score in the first half. 
In the first couple minutes of the third period 



99 





mecoming 1940 



ARV Ann Griff! IH and Bob Rice, at the 
helm of Homeconiini; proN'ided a "hot time" 
for grads and undergrads that chiy. The har- 
rassed "P"rosh" ])n)\e(l their worth 1)\- winning 
the time-honored Tiig-of-W'ar from the Sopho- 
mores. AlcCaw's soceerites and jini Kehoe's 
cross-country men staged a cknible win for 
Maryland, while the annual Alumni Ball in 
the Gym-Armory that evening climaxed the 
celebration. 




"Boots" catches ii lonft one 
.State Moguls 

A mob (>cttinj> the ftatc 

That yearly mud pack 




Sigma f Sigs all decked out 
Our band is "Red Hot"! 



Foreign theme on a home product 
. . . and so are our Grads 



DuVall worlis hard for a small gain 





Conrad blocks as Murphy gets away on a fake kick 



W\KM sunn>- skies and a torrid Florida 
eleven combined to hand the Maryland co- 
horts their fourth straight setback of the year. 
In a "homecoming" game filled with sensa- 
tional passing and thrilling goal line stands, 
the Terrapins were defeated 19-0. 

()iitplaying their rivals during the entire 
first half, hoi)es for a Black and Gold \ iclorx 
were high. Joe Murphy, as usual, featured in 
the fray with his great punting, while the stout 
Terp line was outcharging the Gator front 
wall, it was Maryland that brought the crowd 
t(j their feet with the first offensive thrust ui 
the day, this coming in the second jjcriod as a 
result of a 23-yard run !>> Miir])h\. The at- 
tack fizzled, however, .md the OM Liners 
failed to score. 

Seemingly refreshed after the half time in- 
termission, the home team suddenly started to 



click on ail cylinders. Throwing pass after pass, 
the Southerners reached deei) into Maryland 
territorx . .Mitclicll, Gator back, plunged over 
for the first score. 

After ha\ ing their goal line crossed, the Ter- 
rapin defense seemed to melt awa\'. Florida 
(juickly iHished across two more scores, both 
coming as the result of a great aerial attack. 

Although the Tcri)s again tasted defeat, the 
tc.un looked more impressive than before. The 
line pla\ , si)arke(l i)\' Smith. Morton. a\u\ 
Heyer, was especialK line; Miir|)li\ was again 
the main threat in the backfield with his kick- 
ing, passing, and running jirowess a constant 
worrv to the Florida defense. 



102 



Fifteen thousand people braved a cold, 
damp Baltimore evening to see Maryland's 
victory-starved eleven finalh* triumph over the 
favored Western Maryland eleven 6-0. 

Taking advantage of a poor Terror punt, 
Maryland forged deep into enemy territory. 
Failing to gain through the line, DuVall faded 
back and passed to Murphy, who scored 
standing up in the end zone. Loud were the 
cheers from the Terp rooting section as they 
witnessed the Black and Gold forge into the 
lead for the first time since the season started. 

The Old Line crew continued to threaten 
during the remainder of the first half, but were 
unable to cross the double line. The Western 
Maryland offensive was practically nil, and 
the struggle settled down to a punting duel, 
with Murphy holding a decided edge. 

The second half was featured by the vicious 
line plunging of Don Shockey, and the more 
spirited play of the green shirted lads from 
Westminster. The enemy provided some anx- 
ious moments, but failed to score because of a 
staunch Maryland defense. 




Dark Victory 



The Terrapin forces were handed a rude 
shock when, in the closing moments of the 
game, Merle DuX'all had to be carried from the 
field with a twisted knee. This victory, though 
costly, gave the Terps their thirteenth win of 
the series between the two schools and the 
state crown. 



Milton Lumsden 



George Gienger 



Dick Shaffer 




103 



xiiic jinx that seemed to lie followini;' the 
Mar\huul ele\en continuetl to make its pres- 
ence felt as the Terps lost another liearthreak- 
ing encounter to a highly faxored WM.I. team 
1 8-0. 

(^utriishing the Cadets approximatcK' four 
to one, but unable to produce the necessary 
spark needed to score, the defeat was indeed 
"one of those things." 

In the first half the Old Line consistently 
threatened the Southerners with an attack 
teatured In' hue blocking and (|uick o])ening 
line i)la\s. However, Muha, WAl.I. back, 
grabbed a DuX'all i)ass and scampered sixty 
\ards to a touchdown. This run left the Ter- 
rapin forces gasping, but far from disma\ed, 
as their team again took the offensive and 
seemed destined for a score. Especially heart- 
ening was Joe jMurphy's great punting. 

The second half was a repetition of the first, 
with Maryland forcing the play and X'.M.I. 
striking with lightning rapiditv to push over 
two more touchdowns. 

Maryland certainly deserved to fare lietter 
than the score indicated. Too much credit 
cannot be given to the great play of Bob 
Smith and Johnny Cordyack, both boys fea- 
turing the contest with their clean tackling and 
general all-round brilliance. 




Bob Morton 



Frank Blazek 




Out on -.1 toot 




Card tricks 



JjRiNGiNG with them one of the most power- 
ful teams ever to grace the greensward of B\rd 
Stadium, the mighty Georgetown team ran 
themselves ragged in piling up a 41-0 win over 
the home forces. 

During the first quarter it looked as though 
the Terps would make it interesting, but the 
true story soon unfolded. Scoring once in the 
first quarter, twice in both the second and 
third quarters, and finally once more in the 
last, the Hilltoppers more than settled the 
issue in making 23 straight wins. 

Dashing Jackie Doolan thrilled the specta- 
tors with long, twisting runs. Castaglia and 
Lro were also continual causes for Terrapin 
embarrassment. 

Only twice did Maryland seem to really 
threaten. Once was when the>- reached the 
Georgetown 13-yard line after a series of passes 
and again when Murphy recovered an enemy 
fumble on their it,. Each time the Hoya re- 
serve power was too much, and the Terp 
attack faltered. 

Taking the place of injured Joe Murphy, 
who was kept out until the last period with an 
injured knee, Elmer Rigby plaj-ed as though 
inspired and won for himself the praise of 
teammates and spectators alike. 






Full house 




Suspended animation 




105 




A tuuchdown pass . . . almost 



JVIaryland's student !)o(l\ will rcniemljer 
this year's Thanksgiving Day long after they 
have forgotten their holiday turkey. The Ter- 
rapins, finally !)>■ taking advantage of the 
"breaks," shocked Rutgers, in fact the entire 
football world, by rushing the Scarlet warriors 
ofif their feet and triumphing 147. 



On the second i)la\ of the game, Joe Mur- 
piu' started to his right and, behind perfect 
blocking, swept around the Rutgers left end. 
Once past the line of scrimmage Murj^hy 
needled his wa>' down the side line, and out- 
ran the Scarlet secondar\- for a 57-yard touch- 
down run. The con\ersion was successful and 
the Teri)s led 7 o. 

The inspired Maryland forward wall then 
proceeded to comi:)letely bottle Rutger's highly 
\ainited attack. It was a thrilling sight for the 
few s])ectators, to see the Black and (icild 
clicking in all de])artments of the game. 

Both teams continued to set a fast pace, and 
there was plent}- of action throughout the sec- 
ond and third quarters. In the last period, 
after a dri\e down the field, Mar\land scored 
again, and the Old Line spirits were soaring 
high. At this point Rutgers, unable to gain on 
the ground, started throwing long "despera- 
tion" passes. In the last minute ot i)la\' a pass 
in the end-zone netted a touchdown for the 
"Raritan" boys. 

Without doubt, the clima.x of the season was 
reached for the Maryland squad. In sending 
Rutgers home nursing a decisixe defeat the 
Terps succeeded in salvaging an otherwise 
drab season. 



Leo Mueller 



Fred Widener 



Bill Krouse 



Frank Dwver 




"Progressive action" in the 
Washington and Lee game 




Outstanding Juniors — 

Merle DuVall and John Cordyack 



CxONTiNUiNG to show their late season im- 
provement, Maryland's 1940 football season 
came to a close as the Terrapins outplayed a 
rangy Washington and Lee team but were 
held to a 7-7 tie. 

Stopped in the first half by the timekeeper's 
gun, the Terps were forced to come from be- 
hind in the last minute of play. With the ball 
resting on their own i-yard line and but 
three minutes to play, things looked rather 
bad. However, Murphy, Rigby, and Ulman 
combined to carr}' the ball deep into "Colonel" 
territory. Ulman finally plunged over for the 
tally from the i-yard line. With the game 
resting on his trusty toe, Harold Berry calmly 
converted the extra point. 

Washington and Lee had forged to the front 
earlier in the final period when they culmi- 
nated a long march with a touchdown pass 
from the 2-yard line. 

Playing his last game for Maryland, Bob 
Smith was the best lineman on the field all 
afternoon. Joe Murphy, also closing a long 
and glorious football career, was Maryland's 
main threat on the offense. 



107 





Fields takes first in 
Southern Conference 



C^OACH "Swede" Eppley's cross-countrx run- 
ners turned in a fine record for the 1940 season. 
The books show two wins and two losses. To 
add color to the story, Maryland may boast of 
playing host to the Southern Conference 
Championship meet, and of producing the 
champion of that tourney: Tom Fields. 

The University's harriers out-pointed \ ir- 



Cross Country 



Graduation Losses 



Shoiu Their Effects 



ginia and Washington and Lee, and lost to the 
Conference champs, North Carolina, and 
Georgetown. The Carolina stretch was a close 
contest, and would have been xirtorious had 
not Kihn been stricken and forced to drop out. 
Amazing Tommy Fields crossed the line 
first in all four meets as well as the chamjjion- 
shi]) run, and ran a close third in the Nationals 
at Michigan State. Cronin and Ochsenreiter 
are to be commended for stellar performances, 
while Montgomer}-, Condon, Cooley, and 
Kihn are the other runners who ileserve credit 
for the good work. 



Cronin and Ochsenreiter on the home stretch 



Tommy starts for another victory 





High scorer — Max Schroeder 



Spectacular is the word for Maryland's 
varsity soccer team. The 1940 season, the first 
year for this sport on a varsity basis, shows a 
record of seven wins and one loss. 

Coach McCaw's hooters lost their one game 
to Temple, one of the finest teams in the coun- 
try-. Perhaps the most exciting contest was the 
High Point tete-a-tete. With one minute to 
go, score tied, Bob Main rang the bell with the 



Soccer 



'Stew" McCaw's Team Comes 

Through With Brilliant Record 



winning goal. The Delaware tussle was 
another tough battle, but Maryland broke a 
late tie to win 2-1. 

Pershing Mondorflf played wonderful ball 
all season to merit honorable mention for All- 
American. Schroeder and Main tied for scor- 
ing honors with five goals apiece, while Mel- 
vin, McDonald, and Maisel worked hard as 
ball-feeders. Much of the credit for this year's 
fine record must be given these men who, along 
with Cruikshank, Radebaugh, Tierney, Ernst, 
and Tilley, worked out McCaw's plays to 
perfection. 




Back row: PORTS, CRUIKSHANK, 
MONDORFF, MAISEL. BAILEY, 
RADEBAUGH. CLINE. KELLER, 
McDonald. McCAW. Second 
row: BENTZ, ANSPON, MAISEL, 
BRANSDORF, MELVIN, BOWMAN, 
CLENDANIEL. Frontrow: MIZELL, 
TILLEY, SCHROEDER. ERNST, 
TIERNEY. MAIN. BENSON, 
ARMSTRONG. 



loy 




First row: LEVY, MONT, HELBOCK, BENNER, TAYLOR, BRENNER, 

EVANS, <;oach SURGENT, Second row: SIMLER, JAMES, HE.SSOR. 

FREIXAS, DITTMAR, JENKINS, FlTZ(;ERALn, DANIELS. 



Frosh Football 



Formed the Groundwork 

for Next Year's Varsity 




Cven friim Inn- ilif ijMim' iliilii i look luu numl 



OATi RDAY, November 19, tliirt\-nine fresh- 
men gridders sto])ped traininii after coniplet- 
ins a rather sorrx canipai;,;!! w hicli sliowed one 
tie and four losses in fixe encounters. 

After weeks of i)rei)aration, the Little 
Liners, coached !)>■ Lero> ^hu•kart and his 
aides, Mike Surgent and ("oleninn Headle\-. 
met Dickinson .Scmin.iry loi' their lirsi en- 
counter. .XhhouLjii the .MarN'iaiui .-^tiu.ul out- 
l)la\c(l their o])ponents, they were forced to 
accept a 7 7 draw. 

On successive Saturda\s, the 'rcrpU't> met 
Washington and \.vv, \'.^LI., Georgetown, 
,ind Western Maixl.ind. i>ut each L;ame re- 
>ultt'd in a win lor iht' oi)i)osing sciuad. liow- 
e\er, the freshman s(|uad developed a lot ot 
promisin;,^ material for the next year's \arsit\ 
>(|u,id, which after .ill i> tlu' i)rimar\ lunction 
ol Ireshinan looth.dl. 



110 




. . . MeanwhileThis Happened 





„^RU^HUomot•*oHS^RMlDO■s \] 







LIFli photographer Sanders . . . the results of . 
his work. 



Our "Don'ts" made LIFE 



Our mud gave preview to winter 




WINTER 



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H 



ARPER'S FERRY, at the junction of 
Virginia, Maryland, and West Virginia, is located in the mountains of West Virginia, 
get it is closely associated with Maryland's history. 

During the Civil War, John Brown's famous raid on Harper's Ferry, which was 
conducted from a nearby base in Maryland, did much to affect the conciliatory attitude 
of the state. However, when the Southern states seceded, the citizens of Maryland still 
stood for the preservation of the Union. 

As one surveys the valley from the crest of an overlooking hill, the bridges over the 
Potomac form an interesting pattern, while the valley and the winding river make a 
background of profound beauty for this historic town. 




\men's dorms, Margaret Brent, portrays suaoe dignity 




nter blows 



across the campus, sweeping all into activities. 

Typists, copy-ivriters . . . and anyone else who wanders along by the publication offices . . . 
honoraries sayiny the magic word . . . footlight members in the limelight . . . Clef and 
Key striking a new note . . . enthusiastic applause for the Varsity Show . . . an operetta 
with costumes, wigs, and songs too . . . basketball games vying with boxing and 
wrestling matches for audience appeal . . . the excitement of All-University Night . . . 



Rossboroughs with big name bands ... the bawk-eye rifle team . . . campus clubs . . 
swinging 'n' swaging at the Junior Prom . . . and the success of the Calvert Cotillion. 



All American! Yes, that's the story. Se- 
lected by the National Scholastic Press Asso- 
ciation as one of the outstanding yearbooks in 
the country, the 1940 Terrapin brought to 
the University for the first time, the honor rat- 
ing of "All-American." Each year college 
annual publications, belonging to the Associa- 
tion, submit their year's work to the board of 
judges for critical analysis and rating. It was 
from this vast number of entries, from schools 
all over the country, that our last year's staff 
won that coveted award. So, hats off to the 
editors and staff of the 1940 Terrapin! 




Advice from the publications board was 

given by Mr. Carlisle Humelsine and 

Mr. O. Raymond Carrington. 




All-American 



'ihe tierrapin 

'■• :-;,■■: ' ... ~...t, -..JJ 

ail ainfiitnn Jjonor Rating 

'■■"•'■ '■ y ..i. J. < ..,„/ .s. 1 ,1. \ \ 



The editors of the 1940 All-American 

Terrapin, Robert C. Rice, Editor, 

George L. Flax, and Elizabeth Harrover. 




ii; 



A year-Ion^ task that will 
give the students something 
to look back on is formed by 
the publication of . . . 



The Terrapin 





JERRY PRENTICE 




DAVID JOHNSON 



LIDA SARGEANT 



New (jffices — desks not meant for feet — 
floors not meant for trash — and a newly 
eqiii])|)e(l darkroom all formed distractions 
for this year's editors. 

After becoming acclimated to these new 
surroundings, the staff set to work, using 364 
flash bulbs, 1144 pieces of film, and 4998 
pieces of co|)y ]:)apcr during the course of the 
year. Although all yearbooks must contain 
essentially the same material, it is the hojie of 
each editor and staff to ])r()duce a book as 
different as possible irom an>' previously i)ub- 
lished. Following tradition in this respect at 
least, the editors this year ha\e tried to m.dce 
this book more distinctive as well as more 
readable. 




JOHN LUNTZ 



Progressing chronologically with the sea- 
sons, the 1 94 1 Terrapin presents the activ- 
ities of the University as they are met during 
the school year. Several new features ha\e 
been added to this volume. For the first time 
a tour-color photogra|)h has been used loi' the 
h^ontispiece wliile the (li\ ision ])ages ha\e been 
made more informal, each leading gradu.dU' 
into the following section. Feeling the need of 
some mention of the State as a whole, scenes 
of t\pical portions of the State have been in- 
cluded on these division i)ages. Most sjiec- 
tacular of innovations is the June Week sec- 
tion wiiich includes all the activities that oc- 



118 



curred after the book proper had gone to jjress. 
This insert will be mailed out to all students 
sometime in late June. Never before has this 
been used in an}^ college yearbook in the coun- 
try, and it is hoped that underclassmen as well 
as seniors will better remember the carefree, 
relaxed moments of June Week. 

Members: David O. Johnson, editor; Gerald E. Pren- 
tice, managing editor; Lida Sargeant, women's editor; 
John Luntz, associate managing editor; Elizabeth 
Powers, sorority editor; Eva Brooks, copy editor; 
Donald Bierer, sports editor; George Pendleton, fra- 
ternity editor. Associate editors: Dorothy Aiello, 
Bessie Arnold, William Maslin, Paul McCloskey, 
Ruth Lee Thompson. 

Photography Staff: Bill Ingraham, chief; Don Car- 
roll, Lloyd Iddings, Paul Newgarden, Peter Snyder, 
George Travis. Editoral board: Margaret Bohanan, 
Betty Bond, Doris Bryant, Elizabeth Chamberlin, 
Berenice Connor, James Crockett, Joe Crockett, 
Clarice Glickman, Pauline Hardy, Frederick Johnson, 
Elizabeth Jullien, Carolyn Lacey, John Neumann, 
JeannetteOwen, Ann Paterson, Rosaleen Pifer, Martha 
Rainalter, Barbara Reed, Frances Respess, Ann 
Speake, Louise Teller, Doris Thompson, Mary Vaiden, 
Jane Woodring, Judy Woodring, Millicent Wright, 
Sarah Yates. 



First row: JOHNSON, SARGEANT, PREN- 
TICE. Second row: GAINES, GRUVER, 
GLICKMAN, RICE, BROOKS, THOMP- 
SON, WATHEN, BARNARD, JONES. Third 
row: ROSENSTADT, BROWNELL, RAIN- 
ALTER, MARTIN, CHAPIN, AIELLO, 
MASLIN, PENDLETON. Fourth row: JIM 
CROCKETT, LUNTZ, McCLOSKEY, 
WOODRING, HUBER, CHAMBERLIN, 
TELLER, JOE CROCKETT. 





THOMPSON McCLOSKEY 
PENDLETON AIELLO 
POWERS JOHNSON, MASLIN 
HARDY ARNOLD OWEN 




Their long-time feud is climaxed as 
the Old Line editor urites about . . . 



The Diamondback 








ORVILLE C. sniREY 



JUDSON BELL 



OiNGLY and by twos and by threes they came 
steaHng softly into the building, every Sunday, 
every Wednesday evening. With fierce deter- 
mination in their eyes and a deadline immedi- 
ately before them, they entered their sumptu- 
ous suite of offices. After that — well anything 
was likely to happen. 

These members of the Didnioiidhdck Staff 
were likely to sit before typewriters and sud- 
denly write reams of copy, or perhajjs the\- 
just sat. When insi)iration failed them, thc>- 
drew on their ojiium i)i])es and dreamed. .\11 
the while more of them were arriving and soon 
the office would overflow. They oozed into the 
hallway and past the doors of the other i)uli- 
lications offices. 




TURNER TIMIJERLAKE 

When tilings got dull the\' were likeK' to 
throw a typewriter around (tiie\' would have 
thrown the editor, hut no one was sure who he 
was, and if anyone knew, tlu'\ couldn't find 
him). They seemed to hi-, for tiu' nioment, 
di\inel\' hai)])}' in their world ol ( "aslon Mold 
Condensed in complete fonts of all sizes. Their 
woman's editor. ordinariK' a sane, quiet young 
lad\ , was \ery likel\ to cail an\one \\\i .it his 
home some Sun(la\- night at ele\en-tliirt\ to 
ask, "What do \()U think of tiu- rni\c'rsit\- 
of .M.u\ l.uid/ " And after .ui unintelligible 
answer was given, the |)oor xictini would 



'II 



merely sigh and quietly go back to bed. 
^ The staff's endurance was great, and 
strangely enough the paper came out on time 
— every Tuesday and every Friday — and some- 
times it was even pretty good. 

Members: Orville C. Shirey, editor-in-chief; Lola 
Mangum, women's editor; Judson Bell, business man- 
ager; Turner Timberlake, sports editor; Mary Ann 
Griffith, circulation manager; Mary Henderson, asso- 
ciate editor; Alice James, feature editor; Doris Mc- 
Farland, Judy Woodring, news editors; Harry Bos- 
well, Paul Hutson, assistant business managers; Mar- 
vin Polikoff, Alan Sagner, assistant sports editors. 
Reporters: Carey Singleton, Jack Bierly, Marjorie 
Brigham, Carolyn Gray, Jane Showacre, Jane Orr, 
Jack Diehl, Mary Bonham, Arthur Phillips, Bernard 
Balch, William Stedman, Anne Maxwell, Ted Allison, 
Sylvia Michelson, Alice Kahler, Fred Kohloss, Jackie 
Brophy, Rhoda Eskwith, Mildred Sears, Ruth Bu- 
chanan, Betty Bond, Jean Frothingham, James 
Schaefle, Jane Woodring. Sports reporters: Harold 
Seidman, Fred Kohloss, Rosalie Lyon, Bert Carhart. 
Business staff: Jack Miller, Bob Baldwin, Jimmie 
Schene, Dody Schene. Circulation staff: Bob Ayres, 
Charles Raymond, Shirley Patterson, Betty Jacoby, 
Helen England, Grantham Graham, Helen Griffin, 
Marilyn Huber, Celeste Karlstad, Marion Sargent, 
Cynthia Wilmer. 





WOODRING SAGNER 

POLIKOFF GRIFFITH 

HENDERSON JAMES 

McFARLAND BOSWELL HUTSON 



First row: MANGUM, BELL, GRIFFITH, TIMBERLAKE, SHIREY, HENDERSON. Second row: 
KARLSTAD, ENGLAND. PATTERSON. JACOB Y, SHELTON. WOODRING. WOODRING. EIERMAN, 
PALMER. BO.SWELL. Third row: ORR, BONHAM. PHILLIPS, BROPHY, GRIFFIN, RODGERS, 
HUBER, KAHLER, WILMER, SARGENT, MILLER, MILLER. Fourth row: SCHENE. DIEHL, 
JAMES, HUTSON, ALLISON, BIERLY. SCHENE. On left: CARHART, SAGNER, ROBINSON. BALCH. 




So . . . the harassed Dbk. 
editor retaliates by reviewing 



The Old Line 





CHARLES KSANDA 



GEORGE KEPHART 





MARGARET WALLACE SCOTT 



WALTER KERWIN 



luE Old Line ])ur,sue(I a brilliant l)ut erratic 
course under the occasional direction of Editor 
Charles Ksanda, and contrived to pull itself 
out of the limbo of thin.e;s-to-be-Tncnti()ncd- 
with-a-sigh-of-regret to which it had been 
reconciled by cherubic Tommy St. Clair, the 
apostle of sweetness and light. With Ksanda 
writing several powerful editorials and t^rind- 
ing out short stories under a collection of ni\ s- 
tifying pseudonyms, the quality of the maga- 
zine improved considerabK'. For the first time 
within the memory of the oldest inhabitant, 
Rip Hewitt, Ksanda sponsored two literary 



issues to satisf\- the campus intellectuals, liolh 
of them. 

.\rt editor Walt Kcrwin inipnned iiis tccii- 
nique greatly and hauled the Old Live art to an 
unusually high level, meanwhile, drawing with 
enough spice to please the students without 
horrifying the easily bruised ])ul)Iirati(>ns 
board. 

The humf)r, which sulTerod a stunnint; blow 
at the hands of former editors, remained in a 
critical condition, iirobabK' because most of 



122 



the jokes were Business Manager Bud Kep- 
hart's brain children. Poor little orphans! This 
year's Old Line definitely presents a challenge 
to editors to come in several respects. It will 
be difificult for Ksanda's successors to match 
his genial half-wittedness and incomparable 
technique in makeup and type arrangement. 
It will be equally difficult for future business 
managers to match Kephart's remarkable 
business mismanagement. 

Members: Editorial staff: Norman Hathaway, asso- 
ciate editor. Herbert Bridge, John Clunk, Bill Gum- 
ming, Alice Kahler, Claire Kenney, Carolyn Lacey, 
Cecil R. Martin, Ann Paterson, Jane Ruggles, Kaye 
Shanahan, Jeannette Vaught, Doug Wallop, John 
Whitten. Art staff: Dusty Bruns, J. Clunk, Bill Mc- 
Cullagh, Bill Ingraham. Advertising staff: Neal 
Hathaway, advertising manager; Jack Baker, John 
Clunk, Lucy Gundlach, J. M. Snyder, George Sprott. 
Office staff: Lucille Hanlon, office manager; Gladys 
Abshire, Evelyn Bowers, Phyllis Havens, Nelle 
Robertson. Circulation staff: Joe White, circulation 
manager; Oliver Guyther. 





First row: WALLOP, HATHAWAY, KEPHART, 
KSANDA. SCOTT, KERWIN. LACEY. Second row: 
VAUGHT, CLUNK, HAVENS, KAHLER, McCUL- 
LAGH, BOWERS, WHITTEN. ABSHIRE, MARTIN, 
RUGGLES 



WALLOP HATHAWAY 

LACEY RUGGLES 

PATERSON WHITE 

CLUNK MARTIN 





Condensed information and advice was 
given to freshmen by the staff of the . . . 



M Book 



TURNER TIMBERLAKE 



TiiK 1940-41 issue of the 'M' Book was a larger 
book. With different cover designs, the 'M' 
book broke all traditions built up by past frosh 
handbooks. Led by a capable staff with Tur- 
ner Timberlake as editor-in-chief, Neal Hath- 
away, business manager, Doris McFarland, 
women's editor, and Alan Sagner as sports 
editor, the handbook presented a new trend. 



The handbook was unique in design from 
cover to cover, being streamlined with a mod- 
ern spiral binding which was a great improve- 
ment over previous editions. The 'M' Book's 
pages were larger, and hence the makeup of 
the entire book was much clearer and more 
unified. 

The helpful associates were: Jack Bierly, 
Marjorie Brigham, Allan Goldman, Cynthia 
Wilmer, Elroy Boyer, Arthur Phillips, Emma 
Weakley, Marvin Polikoff, Fred Kohloss, 
Marion Sargent, Elizabeth Funk, Bert Car- 
hart. 



First row: McFARLANI). TIMBF.RLAKK. BRIGHAM. KOHLOSS. 
Second row: AISLANI). GOLDBKRC;. WILMF.R. PHILLIPS. 




124 




Pi Delta Epsilon 

MARYLAND CHAPTER 
Honorary Journalistic Fraternity 
Founded at Syracuse University in 1909 
Established at the University of Maryland in 1930 



At the monthly meetings of Pi Delta Epsilon, national journalistic hon- 
orary, the members of the local chapter had the good fortune to hear sev- 
eral well-known speakers and to eat. At the first banquet of the year, each 
member was served half (?) of a fried chicken. Among the guest speakers 
were Phil Love of the editorial stafif of the Washington Star, and Joaquin 
Muirhead, journalist from Chile, who answered many questions about his 
country. After hearing about Chile the editors of the various publications 
are anxious to go there. 

To be eligible for membership in Pi Delta Epsilon, one must have been 
outstanding and active in journalistic work for two years. At the annual 
spring Publications Banquet new members were tapped. The officers for 
the year were: Allan Fisher, president; Bud Kephart, vice-president; Lola 
Mangum, secretary-treasurer. 



Members: Judson Bell, Allan Fisher, Mary 
Ann Griffith, Mary Henderson, David 
Johnson, George Kephart, Walter Kerwin, 
Charles Ksanda, Lola Mangum, Robert 
Rice, Lida Sargeant, Orville Shirey, Turner 
Timberlake, Jeannette Vaught, Margaret 
Wallace, Judy Woodring. 
Faculty: H. C. Byrd, O. R. Carrington, 
R. Ehrensberger, G. F. Eppley, G. W. 
Fogg, C. B. Hale, W. H. Hottel, R. G. 
Steinmeyer. 








First row: BELL, FISHER, GRIFFITH, HENDERSON. 

Second row: JOHNSON, KEPHART, KERWIN, KSANDA. 

Third row: MANGUM, RICE, SARGEANT, SHIREY. 

Fourth row: TIMBERLAKE. VAUGHT, WALLACE. 

WOODRING. 




125 



The disillusioned lover, Walter 
Neal, drinks to drown his sor- 
rows in "Second Man." 




Beliind the scenes with 
Werner and Stuntz. 



Make-up helped Aria 
Guild make her man. 



Footlight Club 



iiii'. Footlight Club stepped in line with the 
expansion program of the countr\ and Uni- 
versity this past year with new members, new 
faculty aflvisers, new plays, new equipment, 
and new i)lans for the future. 

The officers, who enthusiastically furthered 
the work of past administrations, were Elliott 
llarwood, stage manager; Marjorie Cook, 
secretary; Dusty Wallace, treasurer; Mar- 



\in Polikoff, i)ul)li(it\ manager, and Marian 
llar\ey, historian, all under the capable lead- 
ershi]) of President Walter Neal. 

Two new faculty members, E. Parker Dup- 
ler, of the Sjiecrh I)ei)artmcnt, and William 
(i. McC'cjllom, of the English Department, 
directed some of the plays and emi)hasized 
new techiiiial nielliods of stage-production. 
With Dr. Charles B. Hale directing the last 



126 



play and Ralph Williams as faculty adviser, 
the Footlight Club produced some of the best 
plays in its history. 

These productions encompassed the time 
range from "The Beaux Strategem" of the 
period 1707 to the twentieth century "On 
Stage." With its offerings predominantly 
comedy, the Footlight Club was the cause of 
much high humor on the campus during the 
year. 

The first show of the season was S. N. Behr- 
man's "The Second Man" which was pre- 
sented in November. The play, universally 
recognized as Behrman's most brilliant com- 
edy, depended for its humor on witty lines and 
clever situations. It has had tremendous suc- 
cess, both in England and America, with such 
famous names as Noel Coward, Raymond 
Massey, Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontaine 
starred in the various professional produc- 
tions. The local cast included four of the Foot- 
light Club's veteran thespians. Bert Coleman 
portrayed the role of the flippant short story 




Directors McCOLLOM, HALE, and DUPLER. 

writer, Clark Storey; Lorraine Jackson ap- 
peared as the wealthy middle-aged widow, 
Mrs. Kendall Frayne; Austin Lowe, a char- 
acter part, was played by Walter Neal; and 
Earla Marshall enacted the role of IMonica 
Grey, a vivacious impetuous creature. This 
was Director McCollom's initial attempt with 



Marshall makes amends to her disappointed lover. 



Coleman takes command as the plot thickens in "Second Man." 




127 



s>>m- 



V --^ 






3».< -S.-.-;, 



?!i«W?'\- 



^jr;^ 



"t 



Cherry helpless to aid after Aria (luild accidentally 
killed the prostrate Guy (iantz in "Second Man." 



tlif P'ootli^lit ("lul), and to him and Mi'. 1 )n- 
plcr, wlio staj:;e(l tin- |)la\', k*'^'^ nuich credit lor 
its success. 

"On Stage," tin- Drama Clnli's second pres- 
entation, api)eared in januar\-. Mr. Mc('ol- 
loni a^ain directed while Mr. Dujjler sujjer- 
vised the teclmical work, jack ( "lierry jjor- 
tra>ed .Mor;.;an Crawford, ihe pki\ wrii^iit, in 
this, his first ai)i)carancc before local foot- 
lights, and (ieiie llow.ud pla\e(l the jj.irt ol 



128 




Edward Gibson, the dramatic agent. The 
feminine leads were taken by Marian Harvey 
as Eleanor Chandler, a charming writer, and 
Aria Guild, who became an irresponsible 
young woman with marital difficulties. The 
comedy centered around a playwright whose 
characters in real life lived their own lives, 
ignoring his plans and specifications in his 
play. 

For their third play the Footlighters pre- 
sented the eighteenth-century comedy of man- 
ners, "The Beaux Strategem." Chosen for the 
two fortune seeking gallants, Thomas Aimwell 
and Francis Archer were Bert Coleman and 





Suave "Aimwell" met the Captain . . . 

while "Archer" met the butler. Risque 

bedroom scene proved to be anti-climax 

as "the letter" proved exciting. 



Frankness predominated as climax 
is reached in "Beaux Strategem." 



George Filgate. Jack Cherry appeared as 
Squire Sullen and the feminine lead, Mrs. 
Sullen, was taken by Edith Simmons. Others 
in the cast were Earia Marshall as Dorinda 
Bountiful; Guy Gantz as Will Boniface, Jean 
Forbes as his daughter Cherry, and Walter 
Neal as the comic servant. Less important 
roles were taken by Bill Ingraham, Irving 



Wives were won and changed 
in hilarious "Beaux Strategem.' 





Bert Coleman's character in "Beaux Strategem' 
is masked by his courteous manners. 



Jacobs, Dusty Bruns, Louise Love, and Jack 
Snyder. An AKiM makeup artist helped per- 
form the difficult task of transforming college 
students into eighteenth-century actors; the 
director was E. Parker Dupler who also de- 
signed the stage sets. The production attracted 
much attention because this play is rarely per- 




A little light on the subject 



formed, even by professionals. 

Through a special appropriation the organi- 
zation was able to purchase much-needetl new 
equipment which should prove of great help 
to future presentations of the club. 



Back row: FINKLESTEIN. SEITER. WERNER. PATRICK, FILGATE, STELL, VALENTI, COOK, POLIKOFF. SNYDER. 

COLEMAN. .Second row: LOVE, EHRLICH, KELL.S. KENNEY, HARWOOD, MARSHALL, HOWARD, SIMMONS, GUILD, 

BOllRNE. Front row: FORBES, THOMAS, WARNER, HARVEY, NEAL, COOK, WALLACE, GANTZ. 





S.M.A.C 



WHITTEN, HERMAN, 

MR. RANDALL, POWELL, 

STELL. 



The Students' Musical Activities Committee was organized this year in 
order to consolidate the activities of the music groups on campus. The 
presidents and treasurers of the Men's Glee Club, Women's Chorus, 
Student Orchestra, and Clef and Key compose the committee. All the 
financial affairs of these groups were governed by this body whose chair- 
man was Ralph Davis, while Ted Stell acted as the general treasurer. 



Student Orchestra 



One of the most active organizations on the campus, the Student Orches- 
tra, took part in many university functions during the year. Its first ap- 
pearance was in the operetta, "The Frantic Physician." During All-Uni- 
versity Night the orchestra provided the musical background for many of 
the scenes and was an important part of May Day and graduation day 
programs. The affairs were guided by Jack Whitten, president; Marian 
Loomis, secretary; Ralph Davis, treasurer; and Fritz Maile, conductor. 



LOOMIS, duBUY, SUTCLIFFE, 
HAYWOOD, AMEDEE, SHANK, 
DAVIS, WHITTEN, BROWN, MAZ- 
ZOTTA, MATHER, McCULLAGH, 
HUNT, PHILLIPS, MORTON. 




->-^'-«v 



Clef and 




The "Frantic Physician" was 

well produced and directed . . . 

held many laughs for the 

responsive audience 



An Operetta 



The "Frantic 
Physician" confides 



LxLia- and Ke>- opened its season with the operetta, "The 
Frantic Physician," by Moli^re-Gounod. It was directed by 
Professor Harlan RanchiU, with the assistance of Robert Rigal 
and E. Parker Dupler. 

This fast nioxin.ij farce l)rought several newcomers to our 
stage in broadlj' humorous roles. Marcella Biebusch, Helen 
Bruns, Harriet LaRoche, and William Ilandley carried their 
first local parts \ory (Tedital)l\-, while \eteraiis X'ictor Buhl, 
Milton Cole, and John Walker took their roles with animation 
and success. David Lawrie, also a new xoice, w.is abb as- 
sisted b\' the Court Chorus, which was comjwsed of the 
Women's Chorus and the Men's ( ike ( hib. 

132 




Key Produced 



A Varsity Show 

"No Trouble At All," Clef and 

Key's annual student musical, 

ivas humorous burlesque on 

campus life and the draft 




With Rigal directing, the rehearsals were always interesting 

Clef and Key's second presentation of the year, its annual varsity show, 
"No Trouble At All," was written by Walt Schendel. Mr. Robert Rigal 
directed and Ted Stell produced the show, while the music and lyrics were 
composed by Jake Powell and "Wimp" Orpwood. 

A college campus was the scene of the difficulties which arose when college 
officials schemed to save their woman-shy football star from the draft. Com- 
plications arose but everything ended happily. 



The Clef and Key group stopped rehearsal long enough for this pose 





First row: BF.CHTOLI). LKMEN. WALKER. DAVIS, WORDEN. EASTER, POWELL, FARLEY. CLARK, 

EA.STER, WILLIA.MS, ROSENSTADT. FEARNOW. WILLL\MS. McCLOSKEY. Mc.NEMAR, WARD, 

JEHLE, BlllL, C:<)LE. Second row: CRONIN, JONES. ANDREWS. IIYSO.N. GOLDMAN, CJALBRFATH, 

BE.NEZE, LUCAS. BERMAN. TEUBNER, STRINGER. CLARK. DAY. HANDLEY. 



Men's Glee Club 



John Charles Thomas thrilled crowd . . . and 
Director Randall 



The concert . . . and the quartet 




Althoi"(;h always an acti\c ()r!.;anization, 
the (jlee Club (Hitdid it.self this \car. They 
opened their season by singing at the annual 
conxiMition of the Daughters of the American 
Rexolution at ("onstitulioii Hall. In January, 
the I'lub ga\"e their annual ranipus concert, 
and tlu'\- were awarded by a long-awaited trip 
to National Park College. 

They sang at the Xa\ al Academy and held a 
Cf)nccrt in conjunction with (icorge Washing- 
ton I ni\ crsit\ in ("onstilution Ilall. The club 
reccixed such an oxation at the John Charles 
Thomas Concert that he consented to sing 
with them. It is estimated that during the last 
three years the club has sung before total au- 
dit'iices of si\t\-ti\e thousand peo|)lc. and they 
lia\c been acclaimed as one of the best glee 
clubs in the Kast. The club olticers were AKvyn 
I'owtll. president; Milton Cole, vice-presi- 
dent; .Stanley Berm.m, secretary; (ieorge 
.Stringer, business manager; Charles Bechtold, 
aci'ompanist , and 1 l.uian Randall, diri-ctor. 



The Chorus enjoyed the 
Thomas concert too. 



IVTaryland's Women's Chorus was under the 
direction of Harlan Randall and was accom- 
panied by Mrs. Mildred C. Gavin. The chorus 
participated in many campus activities includ- 
ing the campus concert, All-University Night, 
and the John Charles Thomas Concert. Sev- 
eral organizations, such as the Federation of 
Women's Clubs of Prince Georges County and 
the Maryland State Society of Washington 
were also entertained by the group. 

Solo work of the season was carried by Helen 




Women's 
Chorus 



Yelton and Dorothy Aiello. The officers of the 
year were Emma Mike, president; Lolly Park, 
vice-president; Alice Fisk, secretary; and 
Beverly Reinstedt, treasurer. 



First row: RANDALL, BENTZ. WATHEN, BERKOWICZ. BIEBUSCH. MIKE. CHAPIN. CAFFERTY, DERRICK 
MRS. GAVIN. Second row: ORR. BROWN, .STEVENSON. LIKELY, DLFVALL. JEFFERS, AIELLO, RAWLINGS, 
WILLIAMS. Third row: CRI.SWELL, HUMPHRIES, SMITH. MENG. PARK. SCOTT, FULTON. OTTO. HERSON. 
Fourth row : KLEBOLD, NEWMAKER, IIOBBS, HAMILTON. MARTIN, BLACKMAN. YELTON. HOLLAND, ARNOLD. 




Student Band 



New instruments, faces, and formations 
increased the popularity of the Band 




Gabriel and his friends 



The band that plays the blues 



Maryland, My Maryland 








Till': student band has always been one of the 
school's outstanding musical organizations, 
and this year was no exception to the rule. 
The hand was the largest in the history of the 
University and was composed of sixty-four 
men and two girls. 

Not only was the band larger than in pre- 
vious years, but the (juality of music rendered 
reached a new peak. At registration time all 
incoming students with a musical knowledge 



136 





Music in the raw 



The finished product 



were welcomed in the student band and, from 
this group, the director moulded one of the 
University's finest bands. 

This year marked the fourteenth that the 
band has been under the direction of Sergeant 
Otto Siebeneichen. He was assisted by Lieu- 



tenant Gordon L. Judd, also of the Univer- 
sity's military department. 

Officers of the band were: Paul Siebeneichen, 
drum major; H. J. Klug, captain; R. Goff, 
first sergeant; C. Beaumont, quartermaster 
sergeant; and T. Hall, business manager. 




First row: Sgt. OTTO SIEBENEICHEN, PAUL SIEBENEICHEN. Second row: VECERE, ELLSWORTH, NOLAND. RAINE, BEAU- 
MONT, RICE. SMITH, VICINO, GOFF, DAVIS. McCALLISTER. JONES. Third row: MACPHERSON, TAWES. MAZZOTTA, 
FISHER, STEINBERG, DONALDSON, HALL, KLUG, HALL, SCOTT. Fourtli row: BLUMENSTEIN, BROWN, SHANK, MUR- 
PHY, ST. CLAIR, GUMMING, HARRIS, GOODE, LIPKE, RASKIN, GRIGGS. Fiftli row: CHAPMAN. CUNNINGHAM, SELT- 
ZER, JENKINS, FISHER. GARY, STEEN,STEDMAN, THOMAS, BAKER. Sixth row: SMOUSE. HOFFMAN, PHILLIPS, EVANS, 
FRIEDMAN, WISEMAN, MASLIN. SEAMAN, GUNTER, OLTMAN, CHILSON. 



137 




Porter and McDonald fought for 
ball in South CaroHna game 



Basketball 



'Ship" and team on bench 



Gilmore gets ball in 
William and Mary game 



We cheered, we hoped, we prayed . . . then 

climaxed the season with a 26-18 win. 



Hard hit h\- injuries, graduation losses, and 
lack of reser\e material Coach Shipley found 
himself opening the season without the ser- 
vices of any of last year's regulars. In fact, 
Gene Ochsenreiter was the only member of 
the squad who could claim any appreciable 
amount of collegiate basketball experience. 

Using their usual ciuick-hrcaking style of 
pla\' the Mar\land squad composed of Och- 
senreiter, Gilmore, and Ulman as forwards; 
Woodward, F"etters, and Porter at center, and 
Wharton, Garrett, McDonald, Jarmoska, and 
McHale as guards, often fell prey to more ex- 
perienced quints. In fact, Mr. Shipley in pre- 
dicting a scarcity of victories, proved himself 
far from wrong — the Old Liners only garnered 
one seal]) in twenty-two contests. 

The only rays of sunshine in the darkness of 
the worst season that ever befell a Maryland 
basketball team was the fine work of Ochsen- 
reiter, and Arthur "Hawk" Woodward. The 
latter, showing great improvement as the sea- 
son wore on, was indeed a godsend to "Ship," 
and gave great promise for next year. 

Opening against the University of Rich- 



mond, the Terps immediately proceeded to 
drop their first game 4S-36. The southern 
club was com])letel>' at home on their minia- 
ture court, and were in the lead from the be- 
ginning. The "Old Liners" then tra\eled to 
Baltimore where they engaged Hopkins. 
Hopes were high for a win, but the \isiting 




Manager, JACK SUIT 



l.?S 



team proved a disappointment, and failed to 
even excite the victors. 

Showing their wares before a home crowd 
for the first time, the Terps showed improve- 
ment, but the game ended in a 48-43 victory 
for the "Tiger" lads from Clemson. 

The Black and Gold quintet next provided 
the opposition for Pennsylvania's formidable 
crew. Playing one of their best games of the 
year, Maryland was only able to keep it inter- 
esting until half time, then faltering, they 
bowed 43-32. 

Returning home, the cagers hooked up 
against the "Blue Devils" of Duke, and after 
leading at the half, the Maryland attack sud- 
denly seemed paralyzed, as the Southerners 
coasted to a 43-17 win. 

A week-end trip to Lexington proved to be 
disastrous, as the Terps were jolted both by 
V.M.I, and Washington and Lee. Neither 
southern five seemed to be exerted in winning, 
and it began to appear as though the Old Line 
cagers could just not win. 




Gordy broke up hug-ball play by Duke 

Spills marked the Connecticut game 



First row; McDONALD, JARMOSKA. OCHSENREITER, WHARTON, WOODWARD, McHALE. 
Second row; SHIPLEY. GILMORE. PORTER. FETTERS, GARRETT, ULMAN, SUIT. 





One way to take a nose dive 



Ball-hawk scramble 



Try as they might, the Terps were no match 
for their ancient rivals, Georgetown, as they 
found themselves on the wrong side of a 51-34 
score. 

Heading South for their swing through 
Dixie, the Black and Ciold l)asketeers engaged 
in five contests. However, signs of southern 
hospitality were no place to be seen, as all the 
Maryland boys could al)sorb besides the sun- 
shine were five consecutive drubbings. Just 
about everbody realized l)y this time that hope 
for a single victory- in Conference play was 
very slight to say the least. 

Returning home and swallowing a trio of 
setbacks, the Terrapins opened the annual All- 
University Night program when the>' drew 
Connecticut University as their opjKJnents. 
Sticking doggedly to the heels of the Nutmeg 
lads the Black and Gold crew was plenty close 
throughout. Woodward thrilled the partisan 
crowd by going on a scoring spree that netted 
eighteen points, but Connecticut tunu-d on 
the steam and settled the affair 52-43. 




Our rooters were "red hot!' 



140 



The old saying, "Good things come to those 
who wait," came true for the benefit and pleas- 
ure of all Maryland cohorts. The sweet taste 
of victory was finally allowed a club that had 
been fighting tough breaks all season long. 
Washington College, the last rival of the year, 
was the only school to feel the snap of the 
"Terrapin" as they went down 26-18. 

With a record of only one win out of twenty- 
two games the most comforting thought pos- 
sible seems to be the hope for improvement 
next year. With a crack freshman squad 
promising a wealth of material for the future, 
Coach Shipley will have more of a chance to 
give Maryland a winning basketball combine. 



Under-basket scramble with Duke 





Richmond Spider aims for Terp web 



Ochsenreiter got this tip-off — Rutgers got game 





Fast work bv Holbrook wliik- 



Charlie Dorr works on heavy bag 



. as does heavyweight Rodinan. 



Boxing 



Mike Lombardo took over coaching, duties 

as Gunther and Alperstein starred. 



\Aniii C\)l(jncl Har\cy "Heinic" Miller 
called to active service at the beginning of the 
year, the Maryland niittmen found themselves 
under new leadership for the first time in man\- 
a season. lIo\ve\er, Colonel Miller's loss was 
minimized by the fact that Mike Lombardo, 
assisted b>' Benn\- Al])erstein, took over the 
coaching reins. Although this year's grouj) of 
boxers lacked somewhat in polish, they were 
a courageous group, showing the spirit and 
grit that has been a mark of Maryland boxing 
since the sport was organized here. 

On hand for the opening match were \et- 
erans George Dorr, "Hotsy" Alperstein, and 
George Pyle. The other weights were cajJabK 
held (low 11 \)\ a rugged cro]) of so])lioniores. 

Entertaining .South Carolina in the initial 
tilt the Terj) gladiators succeeded in sending 
the .Southerners back home nursing their in- 
jured feelings. The bouts were featured i>\ the 
fine work of heavyweight Len Rodman, wIkj 
stojjped the Gamecock's highly-regankil Alex 
Urban in the third round. Len, after absorb- 
ing punishment in the earlier rounds, sank a 




Coach I.ombardo shows 'eni liow 



142 



flurry of rights into Urban's body and had him 
on the ropes when it was stopped. Alperstein, 
Pyle, and Gunther also showed flashes of form 
that left Coach Lombardo very satisfied. 

Fresh from their triumph over South Caro- 
lina, the Terps battled a 4>^-3>^ win from the 
tough Coast Guard Academy team. After 
winning three out of the first four contests, 
the Maryland contingent dropped two of the 
remaining bouts and were held to a draw in a 
third. Unfortunately the victory proved to be 
a costly one, as Bach, highly-touted Terp 
155-pounder, suffered a broken thumb and 
was lost for the rest of the year. 

After a two-week layoff tluring exams the 
Terps set full sail for \'irginia, but when the 
smoke cleared, the referee had only raised a 
single black and gold glove in token of victory, 
as the Southerners topped the card 6}4-i}4. 
"Hotsy" Alperstein completely baffled Vir- 




Last minute tips 
Manager Norman Tilles 




Left to right: RODMAN, GUNTHER, CORDYACK, ALPERSTEIN, HOLBROOK, QUINN, SCARBOROUGH, DORR, LINCOLN. 

Coach LOMBARDO. 



143 




The Coliseum ring was a familiar 
sight for many fights 



ginia's Marshall, while Dorr took a draw in his 
bout, for the only Maryland points. 

Catholic University brought its strong 
squad to College Park and succeeded in down- 
ing their hosts in a hard-fought meet 5-3. After 
Lincoln and Dorr had dropped their matches, 
Rill Holbrook, making his first appearance of 
the year, defeated Catholic U's formidable 
135-poi^inflc Leo Gaffney. Bill, proving to be 
the stronger finisher, earned the referee's nod. 
Alperstein and Cunther were the other Terj) 
victors, while ("harlie- Dorr, wfll alicad until 
the last round, dropped a close one to Bartone. 

SuriirisingK- enough, the TeriJS could ilo 
no better than earn a draw with Western 
Maryland. The Terrors i)ro\ idt'd une\i)erti'(l 
strength in the heavier weights and came from 
behind to catch a draw. 

All-University Xight found the University 
of North Carolina ])ro\idini; the opposition 
for the Maryland ringmen. The home team 
was victorious, 5-3, in what proved the most 



Before-bout suspense 



Gunther lands blow to head of Joseph of 
Citadel as he wins 17.t championship 




Smiles before C.U. bouts 

Pat Quinn spars with Andy Gennett 
of the Gamecocks 

Holbrook mixes with Gaffney of C.U. 



sensational meet of the year. Little Jud 
Lincoln, showing a world of courage, kept 
the spectators in a constant roar as he received 
an all-even verdict from his Tarheel opponent, 
Hugh Walston. 

Alperstein, fighting as tough a boxer in Jim 
Jones as he faced all year, was extended all the 
way in defeating his man after three torrid 
rounds. Herb Gunther thrilled his followers 
with the cleanest knockout of the season 
when he exploded a right hook on the chin 
of Maurice Bobbitt. 

Climaxing the boxing season was the South- 
ern Conference Tournament, held at Columbia, 
South Carolina. It was here that Gunther and 
Alperstein, the most consistent Terp punchers, 
rose to their greatest heights. Gunther, taking 
full advantage of his terrific right hand, beat 
the veteran of Citadel, John Joseph, in the 
finals, while the popular "Hotsy" bowed in the 
finals only after a great fight — a fair end for 
just a fair season. 




Hotsy's left was "right"! 



Rodman after knocking 
out Al Henson of S.C. 



Gunther after his KO 
of Mike Bobbitt of N.C. 



Lincoln and Walston 
of N.C. had fine scrap 



1 




^1 


t. 




^H 


h 


v ^M 


B^B ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 


] 




L'^S 









Oh. for the life of a dypsy! 




niversity Night 

Before a crowd that filled the Coliseum to the 
very rafters, three hundred and fifty students of 
the University of Maryland presented the annual 
All-University Night. 

The program, combining eight acts, gave an 
insight into campus activities in which under- 
graduate members participate. Featuring a pa- 
triotic theme, this eighth annual show was un- 
doubtedly the most colorful ever presented. High- 
lights of the program included impressive drills 
by Pershing Rifles and a thrilling finale with the 
national colors and a giant Uncle Sam. 




Bilateral symmetry 

The man on the flying trapeze? 
Just a bunch of bull 

Big noise on big night 



147 




The Coliseum was the scene for the 1941 
Southern Conference championships 



Wrestling 



Grapplers won five, lost four, tied one . . . host 

for Southern Conference . . . McNeil crowned 

king, undeafeated in forty-one matches. 

Undkk the masterful tutoring of coach James 
Doughis, Maryland's grunt-and-grapple crew 
stepped into the varsity limelight for the sec- 
ond straight year. Once again the Old Liner 
schedule was packed with outstanding teams. 
Opening with I'cmi .State, followed hy Gallau- 
det, Hopkins, Rutgers, 1- r;inklin and Marshall, 
Haverford, Duke, ("icttysburg, and closing 
with Davidson, the Terps at least had an 
eventful season. 

Although winning five, losing four and t\ ing 



McNeil made Soutliern (Conference his 
forty-first -straight win 



one, the mat situation wasn't as bright as in 
prcxious years. Paul McNeil was doomed as 
the only sure Liner bet, and lived ii]) to jire- 
season prediction by copjiing the conference 
Iight-hea\\weight title in hisfort\-first straight 
win. 

In the open ill- duel ag.iinst I'enn -Stale with 
( ieorge Maxwell in the 1 21 class, Bobby Searls 



14.S 






First row: MAXWELL, SEARLS, HODSON, 
ROCKSTROH. Coach DOUGLAS. Sec- 
ond row: HURLEY, DUNN, LEITES, 
WIDENER, McNEIL, KROUSE. 



mui< 



Bill Krouse as he pinned Szot of Rutgers 




Intricate leg art by Jim Dunn 



in the 127, Rip Hodson in the 135, Henry 
Rockstroh in the 145, Jimmy Dunn in the 155, 
Fred Widener in the 165, "Izzy" Leites in the 
Hght-heavy bracket, and Paul McNeil filling 
in the top weight class, the Terrapins were 
outclassed 31-3. After picking up wins over 
Gallaudet and Hopkins by the scores of 27^^- 
4^ 2 and 29-5 respectively, the Terrapins tied 
a favored Rutgers crew 16-16. In the closing 
five matches the Terrapins were whipped by 
F. and M. 31-3, set back by Haverford 12-11, 
nipped Duke 21-11, swamped Gettysburg 
29 3, and sank the Davidson matmen 37-3. 



McNeil on top against Rutgers 
Rockstroh tries near-arm roll 





Rifle Team 



JVIaryland's varsity riflemen compiled one 
c)t the finest records of an\' Terp squad, 
winning; twenty-one of twenty-three postal 
matches, taking; five shoulder duels, and clos- 
ing the season by winning the Third Corjis 
Area Intercollegiate Championship for the 
seventh time. 

Two sophomores, Paul Newgarden and Bud 
(ieller, captured the high scoring honors, lea\- 
ing Lt. Col. Chester C. W'estfall and Sgt. Fa\- 
Norris with an arra\ of targetmen that again 



First row: GELLKR. CLARK. RIVELLO. NEWGARDEN. REITH, 

GOODMAN, CARPENTER. -Second row: Lt. Col. WESTFALL. IMUS, 

HODGES, HA.SKIN, JONES, M.\RZOLF, HALL. Sgt. NORRIS. 



may he outstanding for the Terj) team ne.xt 
year. 

Georgetown, Western Maryland, Drexel 
Tech, the Marine Corps, and George Washing- 
ton fell before the Terp fire of Ray Hodges, 
Larry Haskin, Paul Newgarden, Frank Car- 
penter, James Clark, Bob Benson, \h\(.\ ("icller, 
Alden Inius, Jack IVIarzolf, Bob Rands, Guy 
Goodman, and Joe Decker, while the Middies 
of Anna]iolis upset the Old Liners in a shoulder 
<luel. 



Maryland-Sth Regiment Games 



Heavy snow kept down crowd, but records fell 



Don Lash won cup for two-mile win 




Kehoe set new 
record in <>60 

Meadows lost . . . 
interested crowd 




MoHomry ^mtemitks and Somitks 



Omicron Delta Kappa 

SIGMA CIRCLE 

Honorary Leadership Fraternity 

Founded at Washington and Lee University in 1914 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1927 



Omu RON Delta Kappa, national leadership society, was 
founded at Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Virginia, 
December 3, 1914. The motives which guided the founders 
sprang from a desire to bring together in one body, working 
together for the general good of the institution, all leaders from 
the diversified fields of college endeavor. These founders had the 
firm conviction that an honor society so conceived, and properly 
organized, would give student and faculty members alike the 
maximum l^enefit from the association. Likewise, it was felt that 
through cooperative effort for leadership, the needs and interests 
of the institution might better be served, making on the whole an 
improvement in our democratic way of life. 

Now^ embracing forty-six student chapters all over the country-, 



Dr. Stringfellow Barr and four undor- 
graduateR were honored at the fall, tapping 





Allan Fisher . . . Editor 1940 Dia- 
mondback . . . President Pi Delta Ep- 
silon . . . editorialist. 
William Holbrook . . .President 
Sophomore Class . . . President Ju- 
nior Class . . . trackman. 
David Johnson . . . Editor 1941 Ter- 
rapin . . . Vice-president Senior Class 
. . . Treasurer Junior Class . . . pho- 
tographer. 

George Moore . . . Manager of foot- 
ball . . . Secretary of O.D.K. . . . East 
ern shoreman. 

Joseph Murphy . . . Southern Con- 
ference record holder in track . . . out- 
standing in football . . . President of 
O.D.K. 

Gerald Prentice . . . Business man- 
ager 1941 Terrapin . . .Vice-president 
Junior Class . . . actor . . . accountant. 

Robert Rice . . . Editor of 1940 Ter- 
rapin . . . President Senior Class . . . 
President Phi Sigma Kappa . . . Vice- 
president O.D.K. 

Orville Shirey . . . Editor 1941 Dia- 
mondback . . . President Phi Sigma 
Kappa . . . scholarly journalist. 
Jack Suit . . . Manager of basketball 
. . . President Phi Delta Theta . . . 
aviator. 



Omicron Delta Kappa, as a leadership organ- 
ization, can, and will, in these difficult times 
take on added significance. 

The University of Maryland chapter, Sigma 
Circle, this year has endeavored to fulfill these 
high codes and ideals of its founders, and with 
the leadership of Joe Murphy as president, 
Robert Rice as vice-president, and George 
Moore as secretary-treasurer, the local chap- 
ter held weekly meetings throughout the year. 

The faculty members, acting as advisors, 
took an active interest in the group this past 
year, and as a result, the meetings, though 
informal and relaxed, assumed a new efficiency 
in dealing with such problems as student dress, 
sidewalks, name plaques for buildings, and a 
revised point system for membership quali- 
fications. 

Representing Maryland's Sigma Circle at 
the Biennial Congress held at Baton Rouge, 



Louisiana, in the middle of March, were 
Robert Rice and Allan Fisher. While at the 
Congress, the Maryland, George Washington, 
and American University delegates jointly 
extended an accepted invitation to the dele- 
gates to be their guests in Washington, D.C., 
for the 1943 Convention. 

At the fall tapping, Dr. Stringfellow Barr, 
a nationally known educator and president of 
St. John's College, was the guest speaker and 
at that time was tapped for honorary member- 
ship to Omicron Delta Kappa. 

Members: Allan Fisher, William Holbrook, David 
Johnson, George Moore, Joseph Murphy, Gerald 
Prentice, Robert Rice, Orville Shirey, Jack Suit. 
Faculty: R. B. Allen, F. B. Bomberger, H. C. Byrd, 
R. W. Carpenter, E. N. Cory, C. G. Eichlin, G. F. 
Eppley, J. E. Faber, W. H. Gravely, C. B. Hale, L. V. 
Howard, W. B. Kemp, C. A. Kirkpatrick, C. S. Rich- 
ardson, W. S. Small, P. E. Smith, W. C. Supplee, R. V. 
Truitt, V. J. Wycoff. 



153 



Mortar Board 



Senior Women's Honorary Society 
Founded at Swarthmore College in 1918 
Established at the University of Maryland in 1934 



Si;k\u 1'., Leadcrshii), Scholarship . . . these are the i)riiuii)les of 
Mortar Board, and the i)resent chapter, although small, has a credit- 
able record of services. The girls helped with Freshman Week, initi- 
ated a tutoring system, sponsored a (lispla> of siher, conducted a 
second annual ("harm Schof)!, and recognized high scliolarshi]) at a 
"Smart>- Part\" for all ui)i)er classmen with a three point average or 
better. 

Other projects during the >ear includetl seUing chr>santhemums 
for Homecoming Day, entertaining the George Washington chapter, 
having a dinner meeting in h(jnor of the Mortar Board National 
Editor, and feting our newly tapped successors at Mrs. K's Toll 
House Tavern. 

The officers thisyear were: president, Jeanne Santamarie ; \ ice-presi- 
dent, Margaret Scott; secretary, Judy Woodring; 
treasurer, Lida Sargeant; historian, Carolyn Gray. 
Faculty members included Dean Adele Stam]i, Miss 
Kathcrine Terhune, and Miss Roberta Mack. 



First row: Carolyn Gray . . . President Women's 
League . . . Vice-president Episcopal Club . . . Dia- 
mondback . . . "M" Book . . . Laughs in the face of 
trouble. Elizabeth Powers . . . Secretary Senior Class 
. . . .Sorority Editor Tkrkai'in . . . President Alpha 
Omicron Pi . . . Historian ,Si)[)honiore, Junior Class . . . 
The punster. Second row: Jeanne Santamarie . . . 
President Mortar Board . . . May Day Chairman . . . 
Varsity Cheerleader . . . Vice-president Alpha Omicron 
Pi . . . The girl with the clothes. Lida Sargeant . . . 
Women's Editor TrcKRAPiN . . . President Y.W.C.A. 
... Pi Delta Epsilon . . . Vice-president Daydodgers 
Club . . . i^ractically lived in the Terrapin office. 
lliird roic: Margaret Wallace .Scott . . . Women's 
Editor Old Line . . . I'i Delta Epsilon . . . Secretary 
Delta Delta Delta . . . Treasurer Footlight Club . . . 
The married coed. Judy Woodring . . . News Editor 
Diatnondhmk ... Pi Delta l^psiion . . . \'ice-prcsi(lent 
Kappa Kappa Gamma . . . June Week . . . Alpha 
Lambda Delta . . . Old Line ... A poetess. 

154 






Tau Beta Pi 



MARYLAND BETA CHAPTER 

Honorary Engineering Fraternity 

Founded at Lehigh University in 1885 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1929 




Members: Frank Blazek, Victor Buhl, Frank G. Car- 
penter, John E. Cordyack, Douglas Custer, Howard C. 
Filbert, Jr., William Gannon, Lawrence H. Haskin, 
Jr., Lawrence Hodgins, Jr., John C. Marzolf, Donald 
S. Onnen, Robert Searls, Thomas Watson. 
Faculty: Russell B. Allen, Myron Creese, George 
Ernst, Wilbert J. Huff, Norman H. Moore, John A. 
McLaughlin, Milton A. Pyle, Sidney S. Steinberg, 
Robert Wickersham, John E. Younger. 



First row: BLAZEK, BUHL, CUSTER. Second row: FILBERT, GAN- 
NON, HASKIN. Third row: HODGINS, WATSON, ONNEN, MARZOLF. 




L-trl ff^« W^'^W f'«n<5 








J.HE man who wears the Bent of Tau Beta 
Pi is highly respected in engineering circles 
and industry because he has shown that he has 
leadership, character, and a keen mind. 

Beta Chapter was established at the L^ni- 
versity of Maryland in 1929. At present there 
are seventy-two chapters in the country- lo- 
cated at outstanding engineering colleges. 

Smokers were held at the Phi Sigma Kappa 
house this year before the fall and spring tap- 
pings for the boys who were eligible for mem- 
bership. At the tappings, the seniors in the 
upper quarter of their class, and the juniors in 
the upper eighth are elected. Elections are 
based mainly- on scholarship and character. 
At the fall initiation banquet the members and 
the new initiates had the pleasure of hearing 
Professor Charles Matthews from the Uni- 
versity of Tennessee and national secretary of 
Tau Beta Pi. The fall initiation this year was 
held with the Johns Hopkins LTniversity 
Chapter. 

Prominent engineers gave interesting lec- 
tures at several of the regular meetings this 
year. Ofhcers for the past year were : Howard 
C. Filbert, Jr., president; William F. Gannon, 
vice-president; John C. Marzolf, secretary, 
and Professor Myron Creese, treasurer. 



155 



Beta Alpha Psi 



TAU CHAPTER 

Professional Accounting Fraternity 

Founded at the University of Illinois in 1919 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1934 



Beta Alpha Psi is the oiiK' recognized national accounting 
fraternit>-. it is the connecting link between accounting students 
and the American Institute of Accountancy. To become a mem- 
ber of this organization, one must be an accounting major. Soph- 
omores must have an "A" average while juniors onK- need a 
"B" average to be eligil)le. 

At one of the monthly meetings the members of Beta Alpha 
Psi initiated Henry S. Owen, a prominent Washington C.P.A., 
as an honorarx nicml)er. Regular monthl\- luncheons were held 
along with the monthly meetings. Heading the group this year 
were Franklin Peacock, president; Ralph Frey, vice-president; 
and Bert Anspon, secretary-treasurer. 



^ i!!>. o n^ 




^ 



} C^ f!^, f^, 




^ m. r\ ^ 




Mkmbers: Bert Anspon, Albert 
Carry, Bob Cartee, Garwood 
Chamberlain, John Daiker, 
Ralph Frey, W'ylie Hopkins, 
Basil Mishtowt, John L. Muel- 
ler, Franklin Peacock, Jerry 
Prentice, Gino \'alenti, Ernest 
Wagner, Raymond W'orthing- 
ton. 

F.\culty: Harvey T. Casbarian, 
Charles Benton, Wilbur Cissel, 
Arthur Peregoff, S. M. Wede- 
berg. 



rirs( row: ANSPON. CARTEK. OAIKF.R, 
I'KKV. Si'icinil T«\\: HOPKINS. MISII I ()\\ T. 
.MllXLER. PE.U;01:K. Third row: PREN- 
TICE. VALENTl. WACJNER. WORTHINGTON. 



156 



Sigma Alpha Omicron 

Honorary Bacteriology Society 

Founded at Washington State College in 1925 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1932 



First row: CRAGIN, LANGE. Second row: EVANS, 

MAHRER. Third row: HALL, SHELTON. Fourtli 

row: HESLOP, SILVER. 






Members : Frances Burke, Lexey Jane Cragin, 
Ruth Evans, Charles Fogle, Marjorie Hall, 
Robert Heslop, Irene Kuslovitz, Phyllis 
Lange, Mary Elizabeth Mahrer, Imogene 
Rice, Emma Shelton, Betty Jane Silver. 
Faculty: L. A. Black, H. L. Bodily, J. E. 
Faber, L. H. James. 



Members of Sigma Alpha Omicron, honor- 
ary bacteriology society at the University of 
Maryland, were especially busy during the 
year, and a number of interesting programs 
were provided. 

These programs included two addresses by 
Dr. L. H. James, head of the department of 
bacteriology at the University. Dr. James 
reported on the convention of the Society of 
American Bacteriologists, and on the subject 
"Hints on How to Find a Job". This topic 
was of vital importance to the senior mem- 
bers who were soon to be among the unem- 
ployed. Another meeting of interest included 
a talk by Dr. Paul Knight of the department 
of entomology, who showed a mo\ ie on "The 
Life Cycle of the Tick". 

The fraternity newsletter to inform mem- 
bers and alumni of the activities of the group 
was greatly improved during the year. The 
fraternity's annual award, a one year mem- 
bership in the Society of American Bateriolo- 
gists, was presented to an outstanding major 
in bacteriology. The annual banquet was held 
at The Madrillon on April 22. 

Officers for the year were: Emma Shelton, 
president; Betty Jean Silver, vice-president, 
and Lexe>' Cragin, secretary. 



157 



Alpha Zeta 



Honorary Agricultural Fraternity 

Founded at Ohio State University in 1897 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1920 

Ri-.i'KKSKNTKi) in forty-two colleges of agriculture, the fraternity 
of Alpha Zeta endeavors to pick men for membership who show 
promise and interest in outstanding contributions to the field of 
agriculture. On various campi the requirements vary slightly, 
and in some universities the organization is more social in nature. 
In all. iiowever, rigid scholarship re(|uirenu'nts are upheld with 
the belief that future leaders arise from tlie scholars of toda\-. 

The Maryland chapter, under the able giii(huice of President 
Lee Crist, made its annual scholarship award to Robert Benson, 
secured a permanent plaque for scholarship winners in the Dean's 
office, and held several open meetings. A pul)lic meeting was also 
held in a freshman lecture class in order that the students might 
become better acquainted with the ideals, i)urposes, and quali- 
fications of an Alpha Zeta man. At the regular bi-weekh meet- 
ings, members of the farult\- gaxe the undergraduates opjiortuni- 
ties to see and hear about their sjiecial research i)rol)lems on 
agricultural subjects. 

I'robabK- the iiighlight of the year was in late sjiring when 
thirteen new pledges successfull>- completed their "goating" 
period, and were formally initiated before a large grouj) of mem- 
bers, .ilumni, and faculty uKMubers. The other officers were: 
Tom Reid, \ice-president; James Beattie, secretar>-; Robert 
Rappleye, treasurer; and David Johnson, chronicler. 




Mkmhkrs: James M. Beattie, 
William W. Buyer, John D. 
C'ooley, Jr., Lee S. Crist, Jorge 
de.Alha, l-Vank H. Hoffman, 
l)a\i(l (). Johnson, Robert C. 
Meyer, Robert D. Rappleye, 
Frank Sam Reid. J. Thomas 
Kcid, John J. Ryan. Jacob C. 
Siegrist, Samuel T. -Slack, 
George B. \'ogt. Jack E. Weber, 
Charles M. Chance. M. F. Ell- 



Flrsl row: BEATTIE. CHANCE, COOLEY, 

CRIST. deALBA, HOFFMAN. JOHNSON. 

Scoinil r<>« : MKVKR. RAPPI.EYK, S. RKH), 

T. REHJ. RYAN. SLAt:K. WEBER. 



f^ .© O C% i^. .0.- fT^.. 




^ f!^ ^. f^ 



158 



Omicron Nu 



ALPHA ZETA CHAPTER 

Honorary Home Economics Fraternity 

Founded at Michigan State College in 1912 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1937 



BOLDEN 


BOSS 


COOK 


DAVIS 


DIXON 


FUNK 


McFARLAND 


SANTAMARIE 


SCHUTRUMPF 


STEVENSON 


THOMPSON 


WEIL 




Members: Mary Virginia Bolden, Emma Boss, Mary 
Helen Cook, Dorothy Davis, Adele Dixon, Elizabeth 
Funk, Doris McFarland, Jeanne Santamarie, Doris 
Schutrumpf, Bernice Stevenson, Ruth Lee Thompson, 
Margaret Weil. 

Faculty: Mrs. Frieda McFarland, Dean Marie 
Mount, Mrs. Mark Welsh. 

Omicron Nu, the honorary Home Economics 
fraternity, draws its membership from the 
highest five per cent of the Junior Class in the 
spring, and from the highest fifteen per cent of 
the Senior Class in the fall. The girls, all of 
whom must have at least a B average, elected 
for their officers this year: Doris Schutrumpf, 
president; Mrs. Frieda McFarland, vice-presi- 
dent; Bernice Stevenson, treasurer; Mary 
Helen Cook, secretary; and Dean Marie 
Mount, editor. 

Of the many activities during the year the 
establishment of a Bureau of Call was perhaps 
the most unique. A list was compiled of girls 
interested in working after school. As calls 
came in, the girl at the top of the list was noti- 
fied. When her assignment was completed, her 
name went to the bottom of the list. The 
Bureau of Call was extremely helpful to girls 
with limited allowances and to those who 
wanted practical experience. 

Another aid to Home Economic students 
was the special fund the fraternity had for giv- 
ing financial assistance to those girls who could 
not otherwise continue school. Money for this 
fund was raised by selling fruit cake, which the 
members of the group made themselves. Omi- 
cron Nu completed the year by giving a medal 
to the freshman in the College of Home Eco- 
nomics with the highest scholastic average. 



159 



Alpha Chi Sigma 




ALPHA RHO CHAPTER 

Professional Chemical Fraternity 

Founded at the University of Wisconsin in 1902 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1928 



FIrsr row: CI.AKK. DRAWBAIIGH, HUGHES. Second row: 

MARZOLK. PRICK. .STRF.F.P. Third row: VIAL. WALTON, 

W.VrsON. Fourth row: WHIIK. Will TON, WOODROW. 

YOUNG. 




Members: Frank Carpenter, Richard Clark, Harry 
Doukas, David Drawbaugh, Jr., Stuart Haywood, 
Robert Henry, Vincen Hughes, John Hutchinson, 
Carl Keliey, John Marzolf, Edward Price, Robert 
Rand, Samuel Streep, Howard Trussell, Theodore 
Vial, Edward Walton, Thomas Watson, Jr., Kenneth 
White, Alfred Whiton, Carroll Woodrow, Edmond 
Young. 

Faculty: L. E. Bopst, L. B. Broughton, N. L. Drake, 
M. M. Haring, W. J. Huff, G. M. Machwart, G. F. 
Madigan, Hugo Nilson, W. J. Svirbely, C. E. White. 



Thls year marked the thirteenth anniversary 
of the establishment of Alpha ("hi Sitinia fra- 
ternity on the campus. To be eligible for mem- 
bership in the chemical fraternit>' one must be 
a major in chemistry, have superior grades, 
and have completed one and a half years in 
chemistr\-. The fraternity endeavors to find 
the member in a mutual bond of friendship, to 
further the cause of chemistry, and to aid 
members in solving some of their problems. 

Two dinners were held during the year — 
one in conjunction with George Washington 
University and the other with the Washington 
Professional Chapter of .Mpha Chi Sigma. 
Several smokers were also held. The annual 
"Chem Show" held in tlu' spriiis.; attracted a 
largu audienic. 

Tlu' officers were: l)a\iil Di.iwbaugh, presi- 
di'iil; Alfred Wiiitoii, \ ice-i)rcsident; Edward 
Wailoii, recorder, and John C. Marzolf, 
trcasuri'r. 



10(1 



Alpha Lambda Delta 

MARYLAND CHAPTER— Women's Freshman Honor Society 

Founded at the University of Illinois in 1924 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1932 



After Orientation Week, in which the Alpha 
Lambda Delta girls assisted generously, all 
freshmen women were invited to a tea in 
order to acquaint them with the purpose of 
Alpha Lambda Delta. This fraternity is com- 
posed of all freshmen women who make a 3.5 
average or above. 

The officers for the year were: Martha Jane 
Orr, president; Margaret Susan Clarke, vice- 
president; Audrey Pringle, secretary-treasurer. 

Faculty Advisors: Miss Grace Lee, Dr. Susan Bar- 
man, Mrs. Frieda McFarland, Mrs. N. E. Phillips. 



Members: Isobel Adkins, Janet Baldwin, Katherine 
Barker, Mildred Bodine, Eleanor Bradley, Lydia 
Ewing, Elizabeth Funk, Clara Gale Goldbeck, Betty 
Hall, Bertha Katz, Doris Kluge, Irene Kuslovitz, 
Doris McFarland, Virginia Mercer, Martha Jane Orr, 
Mary Parlett, Katharine Perkins, Kathleen Shanahan, 
Bernice Stevenson, Charlotte Stubbs, Mildred Stubbs, 
Molly Tulin, Charlotte White, Judy Woodring. 

Pledges: Gladys M. Allen, Elizabeth Anderson, 
Ruth M. Blackwell, Mary Jane Chase, Lucille S. Day, 
Shirley Eclov, Margaret McCathran, Jeanette Marr, 
Evelyn L. Mendum, Blanche Morgan, Kathryn Nico- 
let, Joan Rodgers, Margaret Sherman, Jean A. Wil- 
burn, Shirley Wilcox, Jessie Woodwell, Irene Zaladonis. 



First row: ADKINS, BALDWIN, BARKER, BODINE, BRADLEY, CAMPBELL. Second row: EWIN3, FU.VK, GDLO- 

BECK, HALL, KATZ, McFARLAND. Third row: MERCER. ORR. PARLETT. PERKINS, PRINGLE, SHANAHAN. 

Fourth row: STEVENSON, C. STUBBS. M. STUBBS. TULIN. WHITE. WOODRING. 





Beta Gamma Sigma 

Honorary Commerce Fraternity 

Founded at the University of California in 1913 

Chartered at the University of Maryland in 1940 



First ruw:<:ARKY,l'KA<;OC;K. Second row: 

FREV, SIIIKLDS. Third row: JARBOF., 

SILVERMAN. Fourth row: WAGNER. 







Members: Frank Carey, Jr., Ralph Frey, Paul Jar- 
boe, Franklin Peacock, Leonard Shields, Norman 
Silverman, Ernest W'agner. 

Faculty: Allan J. Fisher, Alpheus Marshall, \V. 
Mackenzie Stevens, S. M. W'edeberg. 



Beta Gamma Sigma, national honorary 
scholastic fraternity in commerce, was foimded 
in 19 13 through the consolidation of three 
local honorary groups at the Universities of 
California, Illinois, and Wisconsin. This 
organization is o]:)en to lioth men and women 
students. At tlie i)resent time tliere are over 
10,000 members throughout the countrx-. 

Alpha chapter was founded at tlie I'liivcr- 
sity of Maryland in 1940. The fraternity was 
established to encourage scholarshiji and lead- 
ership among the students of business admin- 
istration and commerce. 

It is the onl\ honorary societ\' recognized 
1)\ llu- .Xnierii.in Association of Collegiate 
Schools of Business, to which the I'niNersity 
of MarNJand was aihiiitted in tlic spring of 
1940. Only juniors in tiie highest two per 
cent of tlieir class, and seniors in the highest 
ten \)vv cent of tlieir class are eligible for 
membership. 

.\t llu' initiation b.mciuel iield on ianii)ns 
on Jamiar> 17. Mr. \li)heus Marshall, bom 
the l'ni\ersit> of X'irginia, .md Mr. W. Mac- 
kenzie Stevens, originall\ from tlu' I'nixersity 
of Louisiana, now Dean of the College of Com- 
merce, were the guest speakers. 



162 



Phi Eta Sigma, the men's national freshman 
honor society had a very successful year in the 
capable hands of Harry Boswell, president, and 
Robert McKee, vice-president. During Fresh- 
man Week, the members helped to orient the 
new students and to ease the work of the 
registrar. 

David Barker represented the chapter at 
the national convention held at Southern 
Methodist University. On March 13, at a 
banquet held at Lord Calvert Inn, Dr. H. C. 
Byrd was tapped as an honorary member. 
The speaker of the evening was Lieutenant- 
Colonel Robert E. Wysor, professor of Mili- 
tary Science and Tactics, who spoke on the 
present war. 

Perhaps the cooperativeness of the members 
is best shown by the following incident. The 
boys had waited patiently for hours in the 
cold for the Terrapin photographer, only to 
find that they had to sufifer the same agony 
again a few days later, because the first picture 
had been developed in turpentine. 



Phi Eta Sigma 

National Men's Freshman Honor Society 

Founded at University of Illinois in 1923 

Chartered at the University of Maryland 
in 1940 



Members : Theodore Allison, Rodney Andrews, David 
Barker, Theodore P. Barss, Charles Bechtold, Harry 
Boswell, Felix J. Cardegna, Frank Carpenter, Albert 
Carry, Richard Clark, B. Bernard Cohen, George 
Cook, John Cordyack, Clifton B. Currin, James P. 
Duke, Jerome Grollman, Joseph Harry, Wilson In- 
graham, Irving Kabik, George Kelley, Charles Ksanda, 
Paul McCloskey, Russell McFail, Robert McKee, 
Alan C. Macpherson, Cecil Martin, John Marzolf, 
Ernest R. Matton, Valgene Milstead, Joseph Mintzer, 
John Neumann, Richard M. Peck, Edward Price, 
Robert Rice, Norman Silverman, Hiram Spicer, John 
R. Spielman, Edward Stavitsky, Stanley Steinberg, 
LaRhett Stuart, Kenneth Uglow, Milton Vanden Berg, 
George Yogt, Ernest Wagner, George Webster, John 
Whitten. 

Pledges: Sidney Efross, Harry M. Hutson. 

Faculty: H. Clifton Byrd, Carl W. Hintz. 



First row: McCLOSKEY. HARRY, BOSWELL. McKEE. KABIK, UGLOW, MARTIN. Second row: CARDEGNA, 
ALLISON. PECK. SPIELMAN, DUKE, SILVERMAN, WAGNER. Third row: BARSS, MATTOON, COHEN, WHITTEN. 





Club Activities 



The clul)s made the old lil)rar\- lounge their official 
meeting place this year. The lounge was fittetl out with 
new lamps, new o\erstuffed furniture, rugs, and tables. 
The only trouble was that it was made too comfortable, 
and the club jjresidents had some trouble keeping their 
club members interested enough to stay awake during 
the business meetings. 



164 




Rossborough Club 



The crowd watches as Gene Krupa and his 
band beat out jungle music 



Started in 1891, the club has continually fur- 
nished outstanding music for outstanding 
dances on the Maryland Campus. 



165 




Rossborough -goers spent much 
time "just listening" 



We Clstened 



♦ ♦ 





Charlie Barnet and Ford Leary were good team 
for the (Ihristmas Rossborough 



Officers were: JOHN ACKKRMAN. junior rep- 

riscntative; CLAYTON I.IBKAl', secretary; 

1511 1. WILSON, vice-president; BILL DICJGS, 

president: PKTK SNYDKR, treasurer. 




Barnet swings out 




Bobby Byrne and orchestra furnished pleasing swing 



. Wkile Zkey fmd 



For half a century the Rossborough Club has 
provided the cream of social entertainment 
for Maryland students. Five times a year the 
Rossborough members dance to the music of 
some of the best combinations in the popular 
music world. 

This year was a constant succession of name 
bands. Jack Teagarden and his blues band 
opened the Rossborough season with a smash. 
In spite of the fact that the Christmas dance 
fell on Friday the thirteenth, Charlie Barnet, 
the King of Sax, made this a lucky day for 
Maryland. 

Next on the list of entertainers was the 
rapidly rising young maestro, Bobby Byrne. 
The Easter dance saw Krupa, the drummer 
boy, beating the 1941 Rossborough season to 
a climax. 



Krupa all beat out 




First row: WIIITK. ClIKRRY. SHANAIIAN. TIIRNKR. SLEKIII. Mr. FO(;(;. llACiKDONOW. 
Second row: WORTHINCJTON, VALENTI, STAVITSKY. Mr. WIKSF.LL. EllLOIN. 



Calvert Debate Club 

. . . drew larger crowds off campus than on. 

line varsit>- debate team made l)()th a south- 
ern and a northern trip this year — meeting 
I 'ni\crsity of .South ("aroh'na, Uni\ersit>' of 
l-"lori(hi, Rollins, and Miami on the former trip 
and Bucknell, .\rm\, Brown, Harvard, and 
M.l.'I". on the latter. 

Ofificers were: Charlotte White, picsident; 
Jack Cherry, manager; Herman l-.luidin, \ iee- 
l)resiclent, and Doris McFarland, secretary. 

In the intr.iiniirals ni.any interesting sug- 
gestions were made in the debate on "ResoKed 
that the initiatixc in marriage proposals should 
come from the women, rather than liie men." 
(If the women should take this resolution seri- 
ously, the men li.id i)et ter lortil \ ihemseKes 
against an unexpected leap >ear. ) 

Biggest event of the \ear was the award 



dinner which was followed 1>\ a formal debate 
with Ilar\ard on the subject ot ''The Pan- 
.\merican I'nion." This was a brilliant affair 
with a number of .South .Xniericaii .\nibas- 
sadors present. 




Cliorrv led in :iii informiil dvbatf 



168 



First row: THOMPSON, WOODRING, 
HUBER, ANDREAE. SCHELLER. HUT- 
SON, WHITE. Second row: WALTON, 
O'NEIL, SHERMAN, SHANAHAN. 
HESS, MENDUM, WILCOX. Third 
row: NUTWELL and .STERLING. 




International Relations Club 



lo promote internationalism, the International Relations Club pre- 
sented to the student body the Ministers from the Philippines and 
Siam, and Dr. Gordon Prange as guest speakers. At one of the meet- 
ings the topic "Pan-American Union" was debated between Drew 
University and Maryland. A banquet in the spring was the main 
social activity. The affairs were administered by Charlotte White, 
president; Harry Hutson, vice-president, and Ruth Lee Thompson, 
secretary-treasurer. 



Home Economics Club 



jBie activities of the Home Economics Club this year were wide and 
varied. Members cooperated with the National Defense Program, 
contributed to the International Fellowship Fund, and did local char- 
ity work. A representative was sent to the National Home Economics 
Convention in Chicago. Under the guidance of Barbara Boose, presi- 
dent; Edwina Hambleton, vice-president; Bernice Jones, secretary, 
and Marian Beck, treasurer; the membership was doubled. 




First row: BARBARA BOOSE. MARIAN 
BECK, RUTH SLEEMAN, EVELYN BOW- 
ERS, BETTY HAASE, OLIVE J. SMITH, 
REBECCA PRATER, EDITH JANET, 
SEALES, JEAN WHITFORD. Second rov/. 
JANICE COLLINGS, MARGUERITE DUN- 
LAP, ANNE YOUNG, BETTY GILBERT, 
MARY ELLEN GILBERT. VERA M, 
TOMPKINS, ALMA BAUER, FRANCES 
DEMAREE, BEULAH GISRIEL. Third 
row: PHYLLIS McILHENNY, MELVA 
BEARD, MARY PEABODY, BETTIE 
JONES, BETTY MITCHELL, KATE 
SCHMOLL, EILEEN CARR, CONNIE 
HINES. Fourth row: HELEN WILLIAMS, 
INEZ LEWIS, MURIEL ANDERSON, 
ADELE DIXON, ELIZABETH WOOD, 
LAURA DURST, BETTY ROMERO, 
MARY HARRIS, RITA FREY, ANN 
SPEAKE, MARY BLACKMAN. Fifth row. 
DORIS THOMPSON, KATHERINE 
ROLPH. 




First row: IIAIJDAWAY. DOWNS. 
Ill 111,. KARI». RINKIIAKI. RK1>D. 
I1()()/,K. Second row: ll()l)(;IN.S. 
KIMBAI.L. DAVID.SON. CLARK. 
IMIS. Dean .S TKLNIJERt;. Third 
row: KIMMF.R. Rl SSKI.L. TILLEV. 
WILLIAMS. Professor F.RNST. Cl'S- 
i KR. Fourth row: HALDWIN. SIllL- 
MAN. <,R()\FS. ROBKRTSON. Pro- 
fessor ALLFN. CORDVACK. 



/\. ^. \^» t. 



Seizing the opportunity to get out of the Engineering building for awhile, many of 
our civil engineers attended the regional conference of the American Society of ("i\ il 
Engineers which was held at Johns Hopkins University this year. Among the guest 
speakers on cami)us during the year were representatives from the U.S. Coast Cieo- 
detic Survey. The officers were: William Booze, president; Charles Young, vice- 
president; Samuel Robertson, secretary; Robert Russell, treasurer. 



Thk A.S.M.E. has concluded another eventful \car. Highlighting 1941 was a joint 
meeting with the George Washington and Catholic l^niversities. Several mcnibers 
of the society attended the National ConNcntioii in New ^'()^k during the fall 
and the entire grou]) was i)resent at the Eastern Sectional Convention at the 
University of Pittsburgh, May 9-1 1. The officers were: Lawrence L. Wilson, 
president; Frank C,. Blazek, vice-president; Charles R. Beaumont, secretar\-, and 
Howard C. Filbert, treasurer. 



A.S.M.E 



FIrmt row: DAl'DT. Prof. (;REEN. 
BLAZKK.. BKADMONT. WIL.SON. 
FILBFRT. Dr. YOINGER. SEIBKN- 
F.iCIIFN, FI.NTON. Second row: 

.STrsTZ. hf(;f. iilnkridcf. val- 

E.NTINE, IIODDINO 11'. M AT- 
T1N<;LY. smith, LANK;AN. Third 
row: TIMBFRI.AKE. KI.AWANS. 
CrRTIN. Kl R/, DORR. DARI.IN(;, 
HITCH, Wl i III RSI'OON. SAl.l/,- 
MAN, HALL. Fourth row: HASKIN. 

HiiTON, <;ri:fnf. dow. si TFR, 

KOHLOS.S. FBFRIIART. BR \LO\ F. 
HAWKINS. I.FWIS, SCHMIDT, 
EVANS. Fifth row: RISFS, POWFLL. 
FREEZE, SFARLS, IIRII>(;FS, WAN- 
NALL, SlIIVODFR. ONNFN, 
MEVFR. CARR. 





Riding Club 



First row: AITCHESON, APPLEGARTH. HAVENS FINKELSTEIN, KLEIN, SARGENT, 
BECK, ROYAL, GREENMAN. Second row: FRISBIE, TURNER, LaROCHE, HALSTEAD, 
CRAIG. LU.SSIER. Third row: .SMITH. STRIBLING. Fourth row: DICKINSON, HYSON, 
BUDDINGTON. Fifth row: STEVENS, WIMERT, GALES, MERMELSTEIN, BATES, IRWIN. 



Spring horse show proved big event 



^Through the addition of coeds, who are tak- 
ing horsemanship in their physical education 
courses, the Riding Club of the University 
increased its membership to thirty this year. 

The purpose of the club is to advance the 
knowledge of riding, horsemanship, and horses 
in general and outside speakers were brought 
in to talk to the club members on equestrian 
subjects. Several of the members showed 
horses at the Chevy Chase, Fort Myer, and 
Pikesville Horse Shows, and in the spring the 
club sponsored the annual spring horse show 
at the University. 

Officers for the year were: Bill Stevens, 
president; Paul Wimert, vice-president; Helen 
Bruns, secretary, and Betty JuUien, treasurer. 



A full quota of events helped make 
Horse Show successful. 




Three Musketeers? 





Daydodgers Club 



boasts largest membership on campus. 



First row: BUCKNER, LKllMAN. ROSS. WKSTON, I.IHBY. FOR- 
RESTER. NEUMANN. COOLEY. ECKERT. I)EC:KER. Seiond row: 
COLDSWORTHY, RICHARDS. GRUVER. GILBERTSON. CALLEN- 
DER. CARROLL. CHILSON. LOC;AN. BRK;MA.M. Third row : .STEVEN- 
SON. KIRZ. IHLANI). FORBES. SHAW. VAN WIE. .SCHUTRUMPF, 
MESS. RANNEY. RESIOE. PR.\TER. WILCOX. Fourth row: MAL- 
COLM. BARKER. RANDS, GROOVER. BEAUMONT. WARD. 
TOUCHET. -STEVENS. CliRTIS. MENDUM. Fifth row: H.ALL, 
ALLNUTT, SELTZER. KRAFFT. SEARS. PAILTHORP. 
BROOME. HAHN, WACNER. 




Spring formal was well attended . . . 

as was the Valentine dance. 



Thk daydodgers, headed 1)\ Ka\- Barker, 
with (lino X'alcnti assisting, opened the \ear 
with a nickelodeon dance on October 4 in the 
Ci\m-.\rnior\ , which adik'd in bringing the 
nienibershi]) to 175, the largest for any organi- 
zation on cam])us. The two following dances, 
])lanncd i)y social chairmen Howard Ooniwell 
and Bnd Uhland. assisted by secretary Betty 
ilall and treasurer J ininu Malcolm, were well 
attended ihougli closed to nu'nibtTs and their 
dates. The second semester's social program 
was begun with a X'alentine dance in the (i\ ni- 
.\rmor\-, followed on March JN b\- their first 
annual Spring Formal. Later social e\cnts 
included Novelty Night and a ha>-ride. 

In an effort tf) secure recognition for all (la\ - 
dodgers, the club obtained rejiresentation on 
the MtMi's League, and in .iddition worked to 
obtain a Student Activities Buikling and rep- 
resentation on the Executive Council. 



172 



A.I.E.E. 



First row: TIERNEY, GRIGGS. 
MEHRING, LOPATA, WITKOWSKI. 
Second row: CRUMP, HATCHETT, 
HODGINS, FANNING, OWENS, Mc- 
FALL. McCUSKER. Third row: 
WORDEN, BRAND, STEVENS, 
WEBSTER, WICK, HARMON, 
GODWIN, DEMING. 




The local chapter of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers was headed 
by Ralph Crump, chairman; Robert Harmon, assistant chairman; John Worden, 
secretary-treasurer, and Professor Hodgins, councilor. At one of the monthly meet- 
ings Dean Kouvenhoven of Johns Hopkins gave an illustrated lecture on pole-top 
resuscitation while discussions of problems pertinent to their work were led by the 
members at the other meetings. To close their social season the annual spring ban- 
quet was held at Lord Calvert Inn. 



Although one of the newest groups on the Maryland campus, the Student Chap- 
ter of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers has established itself solidly and 
has gained popularity with the students in that field. At their monthly meetings 
these embryo chemical engineers were given opportunity' to discuss "shop" and the 
many problems peculiar to their profession. Officers during the year were: John 
Marzolf, president; Jay Trexler, %'ice-president; Thomas Watson, secretary; Samuel 
Streep, treasurer. 




A.I.Ch.E. 



Frist row: MACHWART. TREXLER, 
MARZOLF, STREEP. BILBREY, T. 
WATSON, HUFF. Second row: D. 
GOSS, .STEED, MALCOLM, J. WAT- 
SON. GLAZE. SCHLENOFF, HATH- 
AWAY, BAKER. Third row: RAW- 
LING, HASELBARTH, HUGGINS. 
HUTCHINSON, PETERSON, HAY- 
WOOD, CARPENTER. Fourth row: 
BREDEKAMP, STAINES, YEAT- 
MAN, SOLOMON, BLONDHEIM, 
UHLAND. Fifth row: WOLF, FLAX, 
GASSINGER, DAVIS. Sixth row: 
RAUM, ATKINSON, McNALLY, 
DEPUE, McKEE, SHERWOOD. 




First row: BOSWELL. DOBLKR. 
.SC;HAEFFER. TACKETr. AYMOLI), 
V I N C E N r. R r !• I> E R S B E R G E R. 
BR0C;K. HAWKINS. MOORE. ERH- 
LICK. Second row: ANSPON. VAL- 
ENTI. FISHER. IIAI.L. BALCII. 
DAMl'TII. MOODY. SILVERMAN, 
ROSENTHAL. SKEEN. MILLER. 
Third row: MR. WEDEBERG. MR. 

rem). cham berlin. moore. 
vo(;el. rim.mer. MucKENZIE. 

REESE, SALC;ANIK. SINCLAIR, 
Fourth row: DR. BENNETT. MR. 
Ml LLIN. DORN. BENNETT, JONES, 
BENTON, C;HERRV. DR. WYCOFF, 
DR. SIEVENS, STOCKBRIDGE. 
SANCHIZ, DR. GRIC:HV, DR. GAY. 
MR. <;ISSEL. 



C C. of C» 

The Collegiate Chamber of Commerce endeavored to jiromote closer relationships 
between business men and students and to give a practical insight into modern busi- 
ness. The largest undertaking this year was a trip through the industrial plants in 
New York City. With the aid of its officers, Bert Anspon, president; Harry Boswell, 
vice-president; Albert Ruppersberger, secretary, and John Dobler, treasurer, the 
club supported a clean-up and fire prevention week on campus. 



Spanish Club 



^VnEN the strains of a conga or a rhumba were heard, a passerb> would know that 
the Spanish Clul > was having another meeting. Each meeting during the year closed 
with dancing to Spanish and American music. Participation in Modern Language 
Night, and the Varsity Show clima.xed the season. Although the national Spanish 
honorary, Sigma Delta Pi, has not been established on this campus, the activities of 
the club are guided by material which is sent from this organization. The clul) this 
year was under the direction of Jose Sanchiz, president; James Malcolm, \ i(c-i)resi- 
dent; Martha M. Brown, secretary, and Francisco Lanza, treasurer. 




First row: NEUMANN. 
RAMIREZ., AROSEMENA. 
YATES. MALCOLM. Second 
row: O'NEIL, AR Tl RO. 
SAMI'ER. ARIAS. WAN!/,. 



First row: MALCOLM, CHRISTEN- 
SEN, WERNER, TOUCHET. Second 
row: SHANAHAN, STRATMANN, 
PRAHL, KENNEDY, BAUMER, 
OTTO, WHITTEN. MEADE, RYAN, 
KRAMER, HESS, HERMAN. 




German Club 

IJer Deutsche Verein was represented in the Convention of the Federation of Ger- 
man Clubs at Temple University in Philadelphia. Also during the year the organi- 
zation sponsored several picnics and a Christmas party. Dr. Adolf Zuker, Mr. 
Andre Liotard, and Dr. Gordon Prange were the nuclei for a most interesting pro- 
gram. The officers' panel included: Gunther Werner, president; Mary Lou Touchet, 
vice-president; Hilde Christensen, secretary, and James Malcolm, treasurer. 



Under the able leadership of Mildred Stubbs, president; Jack Bierly, vice-presi- 
dent; Frances Lucas, secretary; Helen Carnin, treasurer; la club frangais completed 
a very interesting year. One of the outstanding activities was the annual intercol- 
legiate meeting with the French Clubs of Hood and Western Maryland. At the 
regular meetings the members enjoyed games, songs, and speakers. A presentation 
of the French movie "Mayerling" was shown again by popular request. 



French Club 




First row: STUBBS, OSSO, CARNIN, 
LUCAS, STUBBS, FALLS, BIERLEY, 
BAUMER. Second row: MENDUM, 
OTTO, BODINE, VALLE, BRIGHAM. 
Third row: WILCOX, TROUT. 
ADKINS, LYON, McKINLEY, 
AUSLAND, LIOTARD, BROWN. 




Members dry off for photographer at weekly meeting of the club 



Swimming Club 




Shorehatn pool center of club's activities. 



Only one requirement is needed for niember- 
shi]) in the Swimming Club — the desire to for- 
get studies now and then and have a good 
time. That this desire is held by quite a few 
is shown 1)>- the fact that the membership of 
the club has grown to sixty. 

The clul) meets bi-monthl\' for a swim at 
the Shorchain Hotel, and all are assured of a 
woiKJi'rful time, whether the>' do the Austra- 
lian ( rawl (ir the dog i)addle. Deserting the 
I )()()] for a w liile, a dance, which has become an 
annual alTair, was held in the spring at the 
( "i\in-.\rmory and pro\ed a big success. Cli- 
maxing the year's social events was a beach 
party, held exclusively for members and their 
dates. 

Officers of tile Swimming Club this year 
were: Hon Mint/er, i)resident: Carl Harris, 
\ice-i)resident; Heidi Ikrnian, secretary, and 
Hon Murphy, treasurer. 

'riiiirsdny nifiht crowd . . . 
diving board antics 



First row: FRANTZ, MILLIGAN, 
KELLER. DUKE. Jr., GORDON, de- 
ALBA. Second row: SMITH, DONN, 
OUTHOUSE. MEADE. REID, LEIN- 
BACH. HOFFMAN, CLARK, Jr., 
HIRT. Third row: RIDOUT, KING, 
BOYCE, BOYER, SIEGRIST, 
EDWARDS, COOLEY. 




Block and Bridle 



A FITTING, showing, and livestock judging contest and a banquet in honor 
of the University Livestock Judging Team at which Dr. Byrd was the guest 
speaker were highhghts of this year's Block and Bridle Club program. The 
club furnishes practical experience for students interested in animal and 
dairy husbandry. The officers this year were: Thomas Reid, president; 
William Boyce, vice-president; Jorge deAlba, secretary; Da\id Northam, 
treasurer. 

Future Farmers 

lo develop leadership, cooperation, and citizenship are the purposes of the 
University Chapter of the Future Farmers of America. SjDeakers at the meet- 
ings during the past year included Dr. H. A. Bone, professor of political 
science, Roland Ward, teacher, and W. A. Ro.ss, executive secretary of the 
F.F.A. The officers were: Charles Clendaniel, president; Gist Welling, 
vice-president; David Northam, secretary; Cecil Keller, treasurer. 



First row: NORTHAM, KELLER. 
CLENDANIEL, WELLING. AHALT, 
GRAFTON. Second row: WARD, 
MYERS, WHIPP. STEVENS, LANE, 
SIMPKINS. Third row: TALBOTT. 
JONES. ADKINS. HALL. BAKER. 
SCHLOUSNAGLE. Fourth row: 

MILES, SMITH, SMITH. MUELLER, 
BAITY, LIBEAU. 





I'irsi row: s<:haefff.r. c;ray, boyf.r. 
(;Ai.nRi:.\rii. llebben. c:airnes. 

KIMPF. SeCdnil row: AKELY, POFFEN- 
lti;R(;ER. DKTORIE. OR. DeVAL'LT, 

<:<)|)I)In<;t()n. Bennett. Third row: 

CRO.N. M)I)MAN. SMITH. \V.\LKER. 

Fourth row: MILLER. HAMILTON. 

Bl'RDETTE, MOSELEY. 



Ag Economics 



TiMO jiurpose of the Agricultural Economics Clul) is to foster a closer rela- 
tionship between faculty and students and to help the members in their par- 
ticular fields. Led by Bill Boyer, the club held monthly meetings with promi- 
nent speakers from the U.S.D.A. and our campus. Two annual picnics added 
to the social attraction. Other officers were: Joe Jones, vice-president; Edgar 
SchaefTer, secretary; Frank Gray, treasurer. 



Good eats and gobblers gave country atmosphere. 



Ag Barn Dance 



A.Mli) shocks of corn, bales of hay, yellow 
l)umpkins, and caged turkey gobblers, danced 
farmerettes and farmers in overalls and sun- 
bonnets. The occasion was the tourth annual 
barn dance, sponsored by the "Ag" Council 
in the Ciyni-.Xrniory. The faculty was there 
dressed in keeping with thi' rural setting. .\ 
grand march for judging the most tyjiical 
farmer's costume was the highlight of the eve- 
ning. Mr. Rigal, the proud winner of the 
faculty costume prize, entertained the gather- 
ing with his own interi)retation of "She's 
Funny Tiiat Way." Cider and doughnuts 
were served as refreshments. .\ X'irginia reel 
in which everyone ontiTc<l was another at- 
traction of a very |)leasant evening. 




178 




First row: BEARD, ZIEGLER. ARMSTRONG. KOONS, KUHN. BURNER, MAYNARD, PAGE. HOWARD. 
Second row: BIESECKER. TELLER. KREIDER. AlELLO. REINSTEDT. VAIDEN. MERCER. Third row: 
LEWIS, DAVIS, ARNOLD, CISSEL, BOLDEN, WHITE. SARGEANT. OWENS. ROSS. THOMPSON. 
SCHMOLL, ADAMS, O'NEIL. BECK. Fourtli row: DEMAREE. ARDIS, JONES, MITCHELL, HOLLAND, 
CHASE, R. THOMPSON. DASHIELL, GARMAN, CATLING. 



Y.W.CA. 



. . . Informative talks and gay parties 

combined to make the year interesting. 

VvHEN the Y.W.CA. had its opening tea 
for all new women students on campus, Lida 
Sargeant, president, introduced the other 
officers who were Florence White, vice-presi- 
dent; Betty Owens, secretary, and Mary \'ir- 
ginia Bolden, treasurer. Miss McNaughton, 
the faculty advisor, then told the guests about 
the purposes of the organization. 

The semi-monthly meetings were alter- 
nately business and social. As guest speakers, 
the club had the pleasure of hearing Mr. 
Andre Liotard, French instructor at Mary- 
land; Miss Mary Johnson, assistant dean of 
women; Mrs. Louise Pfeutze, national secre- 
tary of the Y.W.CA., and Alden Harrison of 
the Washington Star. 

On the social side a treasure hunt was held 



in the fall in which the girls turned the campus 
upside down to find the booty, a luscious box 
of candy. The annual card party was held in 
February at which the sorority with the high- 
est average score was given a silver cup. To 
highlight the social season and bring the activ- 
ities of the organization to an end a hot dog 
roast was held in Sligo Park. 

Sorority girls competed for cup 




179 




Firsi rem: IIARTIIOLOM A V, RAVBURN. Dl'BY. MUDI), MAHRKR. MONTGOMKR V. TITUS. UeLl'CIA. 
UROI'IIY. Second row: DETORIE, DOLAN. BOWLING, CARNIN. OSSO. HAMILL. Father WALSH. 
Father TF.RRENCE. RIIOADS. WHYTF,. BEAICHAMP, (;OMPERS. MEEHAN. Third row: SCHAEFLE, 
(;()SS. MERINER. M A'I"I HEWS. WARING, GIES, TSGHIFFELY, ABELL, KAIIOE, McGliSKER, KELLY. 
Fourth row: CONDON. TALMADGE. SNEERINGER. BAGIl. Ol'INN. SULLIVAN. JERMAIN. MASKELL. 



Newman Club 



. . . sponsored weekly masses 
and discussed problems per- 
tinent to Catholic students. 



l^resident; Oliver Cjuythcr, \ice-i)rc.siclcnt; 
Anna Lee Mudd, secretary, and Patrick 

(Juinn, treasurer. 



Newman club opens its meeting witli u sonft 



Ihk Newman (lul) promoted the interests 
of Catholic students on the cani|)us. Holy 
Mass was iiiaiiL;urate(l a few years aL;o at the 
University, and op|)orI unities were .ui\en to 
those Catholic students wiio desired to discuss 
religion and educational problems. 

Dramatic and choral ( hihs have l)een estab- 
lished. On the less serious side, Christmas, 
Valentine's Day, and Maryland Da\ were the 
occasions for fricndK' iiiatherings. A special 
Newman ( lub lloat added color to tiie annual 
Homecoming celebration. 

Officers of the ijroiip were: James Hamill, 




180 




KEMP, EPPLEY. LEE, WHITE. WOODS. 



Religious Life Committee 



The religious activities on the University of Maryland campus center in the 
denominational clubs and in the Y.W.C.A. The Committee on Religious 
Affairs and Social Service acts as a coordinating agency between these 
clubs. These groups were organized and conducted under the supervision 
of either the student pastor for the denomination or a faculty adviser. 

XXEADLINING the activities of the Presbyterian Club this year was a joint 
meeting with the George Washington Presbyterian Club. Two Evensong 
programs were also directed by the club at which the Rev. Keith Custis and 
Rev. J. Herbert Garner were the principal speakers. Officers: Guy Goodman, 
president; Barbara Wagner, vice-president; Joan Bell, secretary; Erma 
Welsh, treasurer. 



Presbyterian Club 




First row ; Reverend CUSTIS, THURS- 
TON, WELCH, BELL. GOLDS- 
WORTHY, ABSHIRE, POWERS, 
CiOODMAN. Second row: WOODS, 
LOVELL. WILLIAMS, EDSALL. 
KRAFFT. BUCKNER. RUNDLES. 
Third row: BARSS, WILLIAMS. 
MATTOON. FILBERT. WARD, 
SELTZER, PAILTHORP. 
SHANAHAN. 




First row: KlUWELL. POWKLL. 
KAMI., Mrs. LOWE. Rev. LOWE. 
Dr. III(;|IIIV. .Second row; .SCHU- 

M.\(:iiER, iiv.soN. T\vi(;<;, lewis, 

GLOTFELTY. 



Lutheran Club 



The Lutheran ("lul) under the sponsorshij) of Or. Oscar F. Bhickwelder of 
Washington was host to the area conference of the Lutheran Student Asso- 
ciation of America this fall. Four delegates were sent to the North Atlantic 
regional conference in Washington. The social season was climaxed by a 
hay-ride. Officers of the group were: Mary Catherine Kahl, president; Ralph 
Bridges, vice-president; Mary Powell, secretary, and (Ui\- Kidwcll, treasurer. 



Episcopal Club 



The Episcopal Club was piloted through the year l)y Bill Maslin, president; 
Carolyn Gray, vice-president; Charlotte White, secretary-, and Carolyn 
McGill, treasurer. MonthK- corporate communion breakfasts, and the annual 
intercollegiate religious conference with Kpisco])al Clubs of neighboring 
colleges were the main religious endeaxors of the club. Just before Christ- 
mas vacation a carol ser\ice was held at .St. .Xndrew's Church. 



Flmt row: (;ORK, .STEINBERC;, Rev. 
ACTON. C;RAY. MA.SI.rN. HOVER. 
WELLIN(;. .Seci>nil row: ALLEN. 

iioeke<:ker. ui.ack. iikard. 
miller. sl'kake. wilmer, kirk, 

I'lllLLM'S. IIROWN. REYNOLDS, 

TOMUERLIN, ilAMN, .SAR<;ENI', 

TIlOMf.SON, IIECiriOLI), .SCIIIN- 

DEL, WEAKLEY, BENNETI'. 




First row: ALLEN. BENNETT. KU- 

BLER. KEELS. ROWLES. LILLARD. 

Second row: ELLIS. LUCAS, CLUNK. 

WILLIS. DORR, WEARE. 




Baptist Student Union 



\Ihis year the Baptist Student Union was headed by Warren Kubler, presi- 
dent; Erin Ellis, first vice-president; Clayton Libeau, second vice-president; 
Ernest Wegmen, treasurer, and Robert Willis, secretary. Weekly meetings 
were held at which Howard Reese, Baptist Student Union state secretary 
from Washington, lead the Bible discussion group. Daily prayer meetings 
were held at lunchtime in the Old Library lounge. 



XHE Hillel Foundation was unique in being the only club to support a house 
of its own. Sunday supper forums, with prominent speakers, were held once 
a month ; the members participated in intramural sports and sponsored sev- 
eral dances. The officers, Daniel Harwood, president; Bernice Kress, vice- 
president; Lillian Powers, secretary, and Maurice Schlenoff, treasurer, 
aided in conducting the weekly services. 

Hillel Foundation 




First row: DRUZ, GLASER, HAR- 
WOOD. Second row: SCHIFF. SIL- 
VER. MICHAELS. SCHLENOFF, 
BURKOM. 




I irst row: DONN, SMITH. SHOW ACRE, CALVER. COE. GOSS. TOOLE. EDWARDS. Second row: PRUITT. 

RICHARDS, duBllY, CALVER, BITTINGER. HEAD. CRONIN. CRONIN. BROOME. BAUMER. Third row: 

ROWNY, PALMER, YOCUM, SMOOT, SECREST, PROUTY. 




Trail Club 



Sunday hikes were only for ihr most fncrfiftic 



Under Georgianna Calver as president, Jane 
Wynell as vice-president, Hdward Rehbertier 
as treasurer, and Rosemary Byrn, secretary, 
the mcmliers of the Trail ("lub, with their 
packs on their hacks journeyed out to the 
Kensington Mica Mines. In October the 
1'railers traxeled to White Oak Canyon which 
is located in llu- beautiful Sk\ lint' trrritor\- of 
X'irs^inia. 

i\()\rnibcr saw a llallowe'en costume ])art>' 
at Sli^o Cabin, and a hike to Scott Run, \'ir- 
i;inia. A week-end trij) to (\-itoctin, ^bu•^ land, 
and ,m all-da\- hike uj) the picluresiiue I'o- 
toniac were the acti\ities for December. 1a i- 
denlK the Trailers suffered \er\- few casualties 
(in tlu' lirsl trijis. i)(.'caust' the second semester 
was inau;4uratrd with a hike to iiurnl Mills. 
.\ trij) to ,Sk\liiU' and a week-end jaimt to 
I )o\ le Ri\er Cabin wereenjo\ed w hilr the \ear 
t'ndcd with a trij) to lloinr Ouarr\ . \'iri;inia. 



184 



The Juniors 

Class of '42 




Left to rifeht: JERRY PRENTICE, Vice-President: WILLIAM HOLBROOK, 
President; MARY ANN GRIFFITH, Secretary; JAY' EMREY', Treasurer. 



As freshmen, the Class of 1942 was completely 
dominated by the sophomores after the annual 
tug-of-war. But "every dog has his day" and 
the Frosh had theirs at the Freshmen Frolic, 
and also when Nancy King, a member of the 
class, was named "Miss Maryland." Officers 
of the class were: Harry Spicer, president; 
Bill Holbrook, vice-president; Mary Downey, 
secretary; Bob Ayres, treasurer; Virginia Mer- 
cer, representative to the Women's League, 
and Mary Ann Griffith, historian. 

Deciding to get revenge after their first 
drenching by the Class of '41, the class, now in 
its second year, turned the tables on the rebel- 
lious Class of '43 and after a series of struggles 
throughout the first part of the year, pulled 
them through the "deep" of Paint Branch. 
They were guided by Bill Holbrook, president; 
John Lambert, vice-president; Virginia Mer- 
cer, secretary ; Carl Bacharach, treasurer ; Mary 
Powell, representative to Women's League, 
and Jane Howard, historian. 

Fourteen sophomores were initiated into 
Phi Eta Sigma, the national Freshmen men's 
scholastic honorary, thus installing the chap- 
ter at Maryland. 



The Sophomore Prom, led by Bill Holbrook 
and Doris Wood, Harry Spicer, prom chair- 
man, and Mary Powell, was a big success with 
its novel lighting effects and banners of red 
and white. 

Landside victory made Bill Holbrook presi- 
dent again, while other officers elected were: 
Harry Spicer, chairman of the Junior Prom; 
Jerry Prentice, vice-president; Mary Ann 
Griffith, secretary; Jay Emrey, treasurer; 
Edwina Hambleton, representative to the 
Women's League, and Jane Howard, historian. 

The juniors again sponsored the biggest 
social event of the 3'ear, the Junior Prom, 
which was held as always, between semesters, 
at the Willard Hotel. Even the largest ball- 
room in Washington proved too small for the 
large crowd that attended the dance. 

The decorations consisted of red and white 
flowers representing the class colors, the class 
banner and the Maryland Seal. The prom- 
enade was led by Harry Spicer with Mary 
Powell, and Bill Holbrook with Beverly Smith, 
while the sweet swing and sw'ay rhythm of 
Sammy Kaye insured the success of the dance. 



185 




DANCING was also enjoyed when you had the inclination 
and could find the space 



Zkeir Prom 



PROM CHAIRMAN Harry Spicer posed 
with Mary Powell 



CHAPERONES proved easy marks for students 
worrying about final grades 






LEADERS President Holbrook and Prom Chairman Spicer 
displayed their ladies of the evening 



ms Zerrific 




PROMENADE, big moment of every Prom 




SAMMY KAYE "took a ride" on his clarinet 



AUTOGRAPH HOUNDS crowded around Sammy Kaye 



DR. BYRD enjoyed a "wolfing session" with last year's 
Women's Editor 





Moguls resting between dances 



Calvert Cotillion 



Jjii': iiienil)ers of Oniicron Delta Kappa, 
otherwise known as tlie "moiiuls" of I lie cam- 
pus, initiated the sjirins; dance season uitli the 
formal of the year, the Calvert Cotillion. 

C\juples danced to the sophisticated swinp; 
and slow, smooth music of the popular Watson 
Powell's orchestra, while from above huijc tjold 
and siKer ODK keys twinkled on ro\al i)lue 
backjLirounds on all sides of the armory, (dn- 
tinnini; the ])atriotic color scheme in the rest 
of the decorations were red, white, and blue 
streamers radiating from a central wheel. 

On the stroke of midnitiht, the band struck 
up martial tunes and school songs, and the 
floor was cleared for a ])romenade. Joe Mur- 
phy, president of the leaders' organization, led 
the prom with X'irginia Smith. Dr. Truitt, who 
has taken pride in working with the ODK's 
every year to i)erfect the Cotillion, directed 
the crisscrossing, ]iicturcsf|uc patterns that 
the marching couples formed. 



One dance where you could "dance" 




188 



SPRING 





H 



ORSE RACES, fox hunting, and steeple- 
chases are synonymous with the name of Maryland. Renowned for their looe of horses, 
fAarylanders are both ardent spectators and participants in these sports. 

Perhaps the most exciting and colorful steeplechase of the year is the traditional 
Maryland Hunt Cvp which, held euery spring in the Worthington Valley, covers a four- 
mile course. Here the onlookers gather to watch the red-coated riders gracefully take the 
jumps on their thoroughbred mounts. 

Adjacent to this course is the Green Spring Valley where the Green Spring Valley 
Hunt Club was organized in 1892. The scene pictured here is typical of this lush country- 
side which is noted for its magnificent estates and fine horses. 




\student campus life, reflects the morning sun 




ring arrives 



at Maryland with more than the usual flowers 



With spring come the selection of the beauty queens 



spring sports . . . breathless 



track stars 



lacrosse . . . hoarse yells from baseball fans 



net balls 



birdies 



on the golf course . . . cadets marking time 



the glamour of the Interfraternity ball 



. . . Scabbard and Blade . . . Pershing Rifles . . . all the traditional looeliness of May 
Day . . . the extended June Week . . . appearance of seniors in their caps and gowns. 



OINCE Colonial days Maryland women have 
been known for their exquisite charm and 
bearing. And since 1934 the editors of the 
Terrapin have been paying due respect to the 
coed beauty on the campus by setting aside 
pages in the book for a "Miss Maryland." 

Various methods of selecting our "Miss 
Maryland" have been tried, but this year, as 
last, the student body as a whole was given a 



chance to select their twelve favorites by bal- 
loting. It was from these twelve; Barbara 
Boose, Marjorie Brock, Shirley Conner, Mar- 
jorie Cook, Helen Crane, Lois Holland, Gerry 
Kreider, Earla Marshall, Elmire Pearson, 
Betty Smink, Beverly Smith and Mary Yeager 
that the nationally famous artist, A. Varga of 
Esquire Magazine, has kindly chosen a "Miss 
Maryland" and her court of five. 




Mas Merin and his assistant spent careful 
hours photographing the 1941 beauties. 




Rapidly gaining fame and popularity in his own par- 
ticular field of painting is A. \'arga, whose photographic 
techni(iue in his work in Esquire has attracted wide 
attention and admiration. Because of his unusual abil- 
ity t(j recognize and to create beautiful women, the edi- 
tors of the TioKRAl'lN could think of no better critic 
than X'arga to judge their Miss Marxland contest. Hy 
this competent authority Miss Maryland and her court 
of 1941 has been chosen, and now it is with jjleasure 
that we present . . . 



• i»N n>c> 



dVarQd 



llr. J«rr/ PranUe* 
Ukrw^lnc Editor 
19U T«nrmpln 
UnW^ralty of UryUikl 
Ca\Uc» Pkri., IkrylMd 

D*«r tfe". PrantlMi 

TtM phoiofnpKa ten (mmi Jttd^vJ ftnd jmur rcprviMiU- 
tlr« froA Um J«hn ud OllUr Cibcrm*liit Oom^uif 
«Ult«d ^r attkllo, /mUH*/. 

All Um (lr>« pl:tur«il an rary «tar«la( ajid It ««a 
dlffleult to Mka a «al*etion of 9a1/ alx. llo«a*«r, 
}«u •111 rind iba nuabarvd photofnF''* aBcloawd. ■• 
folloaai 1) ei>lr« PMra^n; 3) Bavarlf teltht 1) 
Halan Cruai 1) Ikrjorta Bro«kt f) IhrT T#*^ri 6) 
UrU Itafatell. 






l«)-l 




Slmire Pearson as mi 



SS MARYLAND OF 1 94' 




. . . f^ci^erly Smith 




. . . Melen Cram 




. . . M^rjme ^rock 




. . M^^!/ V^^0^^ 




Sarla M^^skall 



1940-41 Wearers of the "M" 



Charles Allen 
isadore xa.lperstein 
Robert Ayres 
Harry Baugher 
Harold Berry 
Frank Blazek 
Elmer Bright 
Philip Burkom 
Ralph Burlin 
James Burnside 
Carl Cline 
Robert Condon 
Luther Conrad 
John Cordyack 
Randall Cronin 
Tom Cruikshank 
Thomas Devlin 
Charles Dorr 
Mearle DuVall 
Frank Dwyer 
William England 
Chester Ernst 
Edgar Faulkner 
Robert Fetters 
Tommy Fields 
AsHTON Garrett 
John Garrett 
George Gienger 
John Gilmore 
William Graham 
Herbert Gunther 
Frederic Hewitt 



Frank Heyer 
James Hardey 
John Harn 
Norman HATHA^VAY 
George Heil 
Raymond Hodges 
William Holbrook 
Joseph Hoopengardner 
Max Hunt 
Vincen Hughes 
Alden Imus 
George Jarmoska 
Willard Jensen 
Cecil Keller 
Stanley- Kihn 
William Krouse 
Stanley Levy 
Robert Laughead 
Judson Lincoln 
Milton Lumsden 
Robert Main 
Frederick Maisel 
Robert Maisel 
Jack Marzolf 
Leib McDonald 
William McGregor 
Dick McHale 
Paul McNeil 
Robert Melvin 
Norman Miller 
Vernon Miller 
Robert Montgomery 



George Moore 
Robert Morton 
Jack Mueller 
Leo Mueller 
Joe Murphy 
Gene Ochsenreiter 
Patrick Quinn 
Charles Radebaugh 
Elmer Rigby 
William Riley 
Henry Rockstroh 
Leonard Rodman 
Doyle Royal 
Leonard Schroeder 
Jordon Sexton 
Dick Shaffer 
Donald Shockey 
Roy Skipton 
Albert Slesinger 
Robert Smith 
Jack Suit 
Richard Sullivan 
Lou Tremex 
Norman Tilles 
William Tilley 
Bernard Ulman 
GiNO Valenti 
Reginald Vincent 
\\^iLLiAM Watson 
Fred ^Videnkr 
James Wharton 
Arthur Woodward 



201 




Track 



Getting an early start on the nineteen fortx- 
one season, the Maryland track team pilrd up 
points on the boards with a first in the South 
Atlantic A.A.U.'s, a third in the Southern 
Conference, and a runner-up position in The 
Maryland Fifth Regiment Armory meet. 

At the end of the season Coach Geary Ep- 
pley, now Major Eppley, turned over his 
coaching duties to Coleman Headley, an ex- 
Marx land star. The new Mar\iand Coach 
made his debut with i)lcnt>- of veteran material 
on iiand and a promising cro]) of newxomers. 
Tommy Fields and Joe Murph\- were con- 
sistently in the money. Fields, in the mile and 
two mile races, never failed to place, and Mur- 
phy was just as consistent in the sprints. 

Missing Jimmy Kehoe, Mason Chronister 
and Alan Miller from least year's fine scjuad, 
Coach Headley had good men in GeneOchsen- 
reiter, "Whitey" Miller, and Hob Mont- 



gomer}- for the 440 and SSo; Lou Chacos and 
Tom Devlin in the dashes; "Boots" Conrad 
and Dick Shaffer in the discus and ja\"elin 
events; and Bill Holbrook in the pole \ault. 
In the hurdles, \\'illis Smith and Mel Leon- 
berger were unpredictable, but came through 
in many pinches, while the high jumpers, John 
Gilmore and Bob Porter, placed consistently. 

W inning ele\ en and t>ing one out of the 
thirteen e\ents, the ll\ ing Tarheels of North 
Carolina set back the Terrapins 93-33 in the 
first outdoor meet of the season. Cramped 
legs due to a long ride, arnn t\])hoi(l shots, a 
mudd}- track, antl the fact that the Tarheels 
were in really good form all worked together 
to make the Terps' opening a dismal affair. 

Joe Murjjhy was the only Maryland man 
to win an e\ent and though some of the others 
were close tiu'\' (Hdn't ])a\' olt. Tonmn- I'^ields 
lost lor tile llrst time to his old ri\ al Morrison 



First row: MA.SLIN. KIIIN. 
ADAM.S. MIZKLL. MKRRI- 
KKN.IILI.K Y.SMn ll.l'RINZ. 
.STII.I.IIOKN. Sll Al'l'l: R. 
I'll I.DS. Sciond row: llOi.- 
IIROOK. MII.I.I.R.(.II.N(.i.K. 
CONDON, MONI<;()MKRY, 
CRONIN, HOPKINS. DKVLIN, 
CORDYACK. IIRKJII'. CHA- 
CON. Ihlrd row: IIARWOOI), 
DORN, .SKII'i'ON, KRN.Sr. 

lkonhkr(;i;r. morton. 

MOSKI.KY. CONRAD, Ili.A- 

ZI'.K. <. 11, MORI.. I'ORIKR. 

MIRI'HY; Coiichi'H I'KIKI--- 

FF.R and HKADLKV. 



? 



>»"■<< 1 ^?V't 






.t 






? V v-^tT ^ # ^ ^ % 





Joe Murphy furnished only bright spot in 
the North Carolina meet. 






J .-.vv^v'/j^Xv 




Coach Coleman Headley 



Manager Dan Harwood 



and Gene Ochsenreiter was only a stride be- 
hind Cathey of Carolina. 

John Gilmore and Bob Porter tied with a 
Carolina boy for first place in the high jump, 
but the rest of the field events were a trifle sad. 
Dick Shaffer took a second in the javelin and 
"Boots" Conrad and Jack Prinz each took a 
third in the discus and the broad jump re- 
spectively. 

In a holiday contest against the Keydets of 
Virginia Military Institute, the Maryland 
tracksters fared much better than in the pre- 



vious week, sinking the Soldiers 65^ to 60^3. 

Although the score was close, the Terps' 
victories were decisive. Joe Murphy, Mary- 
land's speed king, did the hundred in ten sec- 
onds flat, and Tommy Fields the blonde Terp 
star, copped both the mile and the two-mile 
races. "Boots" Conrad came through to give 
Maryland a first in the discus and a third in 
the shot put. 

Sharing field honors were Dick Shaffer, Bob 
Porter and John Gilmore. Shaffer won the 
javelin on the last throw and Porter and Gil- 



203 




Fields took this two-mile, besides 
the mile in the VV. and M. Meet. 



Smith ahead in the hurdles. 



Ochsenreiter took the 880 against 
VV. and M. 



more outclassed everyone else to tie in the 
high jump. 

In the \\'illiam and Mary meet the Terps 
swept the Hat races from the loo-yard dash to 
the two-mile run, losing only in the 120 high 
and 220 low hurdles. Maryland showed well- 
rounded performance in the field events also, 
winning all hut the discus and pole vault. 

Maryland's Southern Conference cham- 
pions turned in their usual sterling perform- 
ances; Mur])hy annexing the 100 and 220, 
and Fields taking his specialties; the mile and 
two-mile. The Terps really cleaned up in the 
880, 440, 220, javelin, and broad jumps; 
taking all three positions in these events, and 
by so doing gave an indication of further suc- 
cesses on the cinders later in the season. 



Rest for the weary at the V.M.I. meeC. 




Champion Tommy Fields 
prepares for practice trot. 






Top row: MURPHY, CONRAD, SHAFFER, OCHSENREITER. HOL- 
BROOK. Second row: MILLER, CORDYACK, CONDON, BLAZEK, 
CHACOS. Bottom row: SMITH, PORTER, GILMORE, LEONBERGER. 



Prinz's second needed against V.M.I. 



Murphy's points in 100-yard dash useful in win against V.M.I. 





Lacrosse 



Facing the difficulty of retaining the Na- 
tional Intercollegiate Lacrosse Champion- 
ship lor the third successive year, the 1941 
Terp squad had a real problem before them. 
Losing a total of eight ^■aluable men, Coach 
Jack Faber, assisted by Al Heagy and Leo 
Mueller, found it a little hard making proper 
replacements during the early part of spring 
practice, but able reserves and freshmen of 
last year brightened the situation as the sea- 
son rolled on. 

Led by last year's veterans. Bill Graham at 
defense, Jordan Sexton and Jack Mueller in 
midfield, and Al Slesinger at attack, the Ter- 
rapins steamed over their first five opponents 
in monotonous fashion. 

Opening against the Indians of Dartmouth, 
the slightly ragged Terrai)ins were two goals 



behind before they got their machine going. 
In front 3-2 at the end of the first quarter, the 
Dartmouth team soon began to fall off as the 
Terps warmed up to their job of the afternoon. 
With Slesinger leading the attack in the sec- 
ond stanza, the score piled uj) to a lour-point 
lead for the home team at half time. Seem- 
ingly refreshed, Marj'Iand took all of the of- 
fensive in the third quarter and banged in 
seven goals, but a tightened Indian defense 
held ofT any scoring in the final period, lea\ing 
the score 15-7. 

Though not marked iiy the usual rain, the 
Harvard-Maryland game did end, for the 
fifth straight year, in favor of the Terps. .Again 
opening slowly, the Terrapin attack gradually 
gained momentum. With Landis Hill, Ray 
Grelecki, "Ironhat" Carter, Jack Mueller and 



FlrstrowiMrRI'IIV.CARTKR. 
MUKM.KR. COSIKR, I'AVK- 

sicii. iiii.i.. (;ri;i.k(;ki, 

M 1 N r 7. K R . S f c n d r i> \v ; 
ROW NY. KKl.l.KR. IIAI.I.. 

bkii)(;k.s, marinkr. kacii- 
aracii. foriiks. slksin- 

(;KR, WIDKNKR. Third row: 
CRAIIAM. rillMM. .SK.X- 
TON.VIAI,. KKnKRS.COOK. 
Bl'RI.IN. CARRKir. VAN- 
DKN HK.R(;. Mi(,RI.(;()R, 
Al.l.KN. 




Things always looked pretty 
good from this bench. 






Head coach Jack Faber and 
assistant Al Heagy 



Al Slesinger leading the attack, the third 
quarter advantage was increased as the Crim- 
son lads tired of the hot pace, and the game 
ended in a 14-2 victory. Noticeable for the 
opposition was the wonderful work of the 
Harvard Goalie. 

Measles took the toll of the Loyola team 
before it even got to College Park, and though 
their subs tried hard, they were no match for 
the smooth attack that the Terps presented. 
Though peppered with substitutions from the 
bench, the Old Liners scored almost at will 
and the game ended 17-5. 



Playing an Easter-holiday game with the 
Nittany Lions of Penn State, the Terrapins 
showed a machine-like offense in beating the 
visitors 12-3. Scoring six points in the first 
quarter, three in the second, and one and two 
in the third and fourth respectively, the Mary- 
land team showed a well-balanced squad, and 
only during the second half did the Lions show 
up very well against the Terrapin stickmen. 

Sweeping through Rutgers lo-i made it five 
straight for last year's Intercollegiate Champs, 
and definitely showed that this year's team was 
well on the way to another National crown. 



207 




Slesinger scored first goal of 
season against Dartmouth. 



Missiii;^ from last year's sciuad were goalies 
Mark Kelly and Jack Grier, defensemen Leo 
Mueller and Mickey Mulitz, midfielders Bill 
Cole and Jimmy Heil and from the close-at- 
tack Oscar Xe\ares and Bill Bond. These 
vacancies, besides being filled by the others of 
last year's regular squad, were ably filled by 
reserves Fred W'idener at close defense and 
Chick Allen at the midtield position. The re- 
maining positions were filled by Jim Forbes, 
goalie; Bob Fetters, close defense; and Milton 
X'anden Berg and Raymond Grelecki at close- 
attack. Supplementing these regulars were 
the reserves composed of: Carl Bacharach and 
Rali)h Bridges, goal-tenders; Ash ton Thumm, 
i<ali)li lUirliii, Ted \'ial and Bud Keller, de- 
fense; Landis Hill, Ben Coster, John Carter 
and Jack Garrett, midfieUl; while Jim Ba\c- 
sich, Joe Mariner, Carroll R(nvn\' and Cole- 
man Cook rounded out the squad at the at- 
tack positions. 



Garrett scored against Loyola. 





Sexton scored in first quarter 
of 10-1 rout of Rutgers. 




Baseball 



Hit hard by graduation, Head Coach Bur- 
ton Shipley opened the early baseball practice 
sessions with most of last year's reserves, but 
the lack of veterans gave the Terj:) diamond 
mentor many troubles. With the pitching 
staff holding the key to the entire situation, 
it seemed that early season defeats showed the 
twirling department weak. Later, wins over 
Vermont and Connecticut proved that the 
pitching problem might develo]) faxorably. 

Art Woodward, the only letterman in the 
entire mound group, headed the Old Liner 
parade. Bill Fulton, Maryland's mighty left 
hander, got the not! on the port side while Max 
Hunt, Jim Mead, and Harry Crouthamel 
roundefl out the staff. In the receiving divi- 
sion, I'o]) Wharton was slated to do the mask 
and i)a(l dut\ , hut ga\e way to Ken Bransdorf 



and Herb (nmther, and retired to his old hot 
spot, third base. Bransdorf, who came up 
from last year's cub combine, held the number 
one position. 

Pitching problems, however, were not the 
only difficulties of Coach Shipley; for the in- 
field gave many headaches too. Mearle Du- 
\'all, formerly a catcher, was switched to the 
initial sack job, where he proved to be the out- 
standing slugger on the team, and in earK- sea- 
son games blasted the horsehide at a terrific 
clip of .400. Dick McHale was slated for the 
keystone spot and with the aid of Leib Mc- 
I^onald, who performed at short stop also, the 
midsection was well under control. Carl Rade- 
baugh, a transfer student, broke into the line 
up with some sensational fielding to take the 
ace infield position. After Roscoc Whii)]) had 



First row: C. WOODWARD, 
IIRANSDORK. CROl TIIA- 
MKL. CaNTIIER, CIIANOK. 
(;ARRKI"I'. Si-cnnd rii« : l)u- 
VAI.I,, Mi-DONAI.D. WII.VR- 
I'ON.RADKIIAl CM. DWVKR. 
WIIIIM'. MillAI.K. Third rii»: 
JARKOK. Manaitcr-. Ill NT, 

mkad, kilion, hootiik. 
iio()I'kn(;ari)Ni;r, ki.k.in, 
A. woodward, maisix. 

SMI'lll. I:N<;I,AND. Cosuh 
SIIII'I.KY. 





m 













)1 



j^^<^) ^*^-^I^'->'^jP '^''"''^ 






"Pop" got a nice hit against 
Vermont. 



proved a better outfielder than a third base- 
man, Pop Wharton filled in the right side and 
gave an outstanding performance during the 
season. 

In the outfield Frank Dwyer, Fritz Maisel, 
Roscoe Whipp, Bill England, Bull Garrett, 
and Danny Boothe led the group with Whipp, 
Maisel, and Dwyer getting the regular jobs. 
Whipp, an infielder, gave the Terps a better 
batting punch and a far better defensive club 
by switching to the garden spot. 

After dropping three straight to Ohio State, 
Harvard, and Dartmouth, the Old Liners 



jumped on Vermont and Connecticut for two 
straight wins. In the opening games, the Ter- 
rapin hurling staff slumped and the batting hit 
the same stride at the same time. However, 
behind Art Woodward and Bill Fulton the 
Old Liners sank the Mountaineers no and 
the Yankees 5-3. With Mearle DuVall carry- 
ing the mighty bludgeon and Radebaugh the 
fielding spark, the Terrapins were a tough nut 
to crack. 

Then came a four-game losing streak that 
opened with the Michigan Wolverines and 
closed with the Washington and Lee Generals, 



211 



Whipp nipped Harvard run at third. 
DiiVall scored against Dartmouth. 




and once again the pitching ])r()I)k'm reopened. 
Fulton went to the showers in two opening 
assignments, being unable to get by the initial 
stanza. Woodward either walked to defeat or 
was the \ictini of some terrific eneni\ bom 
bardmcnts. In the W. and L. tussle, W'oodwan 
showed a world of stuff, i)ut again had troul)le 
finding the plate and went down to defeat 
7-4. Tn the -Syracuse game, Fulton had the 
same trouble and the Orangemen tallied four 
times in the initial session to take adxantage 
of the situation. 

On the diamond, the Terrapins wore the 
same shoe that fitted on the basketball court, 
but time and time again the ( )ld Liners i)la\ed 
brilliant ball: not winning them all, but at 
least they got one in here and tlu're. 



Floating power. 



Birds of a feather flocked together. 






First row: BOOTIIE. BRANSDORF, DuVALL. DWYER, ENGLAND. 

Second row: FULTON, HUNT, GARRETT, MAISEL, McDONALD. 

Third row: McHALE, RADEBAUGH, WHARTON, WHIPP, 

WOODWARD. 



Hunt missed by inches in the 
Dartmouth game. 



DuVall made it safe against Connecticut. 





Tennis 



Suffering the loss of last year's three to]) 
men, and the resiiiiiation of loni^-tinie coach 
Leslie Bopst, the '41 Maryland tennis team 
only had a fair outlook at the first of the season. 
After a short period of indoor practice, the 
newly appointed coach, Alan Kershner, had 
his charges playing on the recently completed 
composition courts before the middle of 
March. Though missing last year's greats 
Allie Ritzenberg, Nate Askin and Ja\ Phillips, 
this year's squad proved to have no room tor 
complaint. Built up around veterans Phil 
Burkom, Doyle Royal, Griff Baugher, Jim 
Hardey, Jim Burnside, augmented with the 
services of Klwood Bates, Hy Berg and Slater 
Clarke, the squad showed rapid improvement 
during the early'part of the jjractice sessions. 



First achieving prominence in 193S. and 
continuing with practicalh' the same group in 
1939 and 1940, Maryland tennis reached an 
enviable position. In fact, last year's squad 
was judged the best that had ever represented 
the University. 

Facing the records of three previous top- 
notch teams and a tough schedule of thirteen 
matches jjIus the Southern Conference at 
Durham, the untried '41 scjuad went con- 
scientiously to work. Sweeping o\er Lafay- 
ette in the first match of the season 8-0, and 
then following this with wins over Richmond 
Si, William and Mar\- twice, 8-1 and 9-0, 
and Washington and Lee 7-2 clearly showed 
the true caliber of the team that was hidden 
in earlv season obser\ation. 



First row: SALfJANlK, ROYAL, CLARKE. BURKOM, BERG. Second 
row: BATES, BAUGHER. HARDEY, BURNSIDE. Coach KERSHNER. 





First row: BURKOM, 
CLARKE, BURNSIDE. 
Second row: ROYAL, 
BAUGHER, HARDEY. 




Burkom and Royal in doubles against Richmond. 




Manager Salganik and Coach Kershner in 
conference. 




Golf 



Professor Mackfrt, determined to give golf 
an added impetus in the campus sports pro- 
gram for the second }ear, appointed Dr. Kline 
as faculty manager, and secured the use of Bea- 
ver Dam Country Club as a practice course for 
the home team. .\1 Houghton, pro at Beaver 
Dam, and coacli of last year's successful 
scjuad, a.uain materially aided the hoys in 
smoothing up their game, in his position as 
coach. 

Winning the first match of the year 4-2 
against an experienced Loyola squad, the Old 
Liners gave an early season indication of being 
al)le to hold their own with any and all lotal 
teams. Returning from last year's squad were 
Julian Murphy, Bob Harmon, Henr\ Kimball, 
and Larry Hodgins. New blood was intro- 
duced by three promising sophomores, Leon- 
ard Liebman, dale Holmes and M. .\. Cook. 



With this interested aggregation it should be 
witli little difficulty that Professor Mackert 
establishes golf as something more than a 
passive week-end pastime. 




.\ pretty practice putt. 




(i.Lirh MOl ClITON. IIonGINS, 

< OOK. Ml KIMIV. IIAKMON. 

I.IKU.MAN. llOLMlvS. Dircclor 

MACKERT. 



The Frosh Showed Up Well... 



BASEBALL 

First row: L. ROBERTS, 
KNEPLEY, WRIGHT, BARNES, 
BENNER, EVANS, WEAVER, 
WEBSTER, TRAVIS, WOLFE. 
Second row: FREAS, 
SHAEFFER, SCHURHOLTZ, 
HAVRILLA, MINES, BUCK- 
HOLTZ, DAVIS. STUART, 
KINSMAN. Third row: POL- 
LOCK, coach, WISE, WRIGHT, 
DAYHOFF, NUTTAL, MICH- 
AELSON, HUTCHINSON, CUL- 
LINER, J. ROBERTS, EPSTEIN. 
Fourth row: BETTS, BURCH, 
BURNS, BALDWIN, FRIEXAS, 
GRASSMUCK, VREELAND, 
ZIEGLER. 




TRACK 

First row: KEHOE, HORN, TAY- 
LOR, JEFFERS, HELBOCK, 
SIMLER, ALEXANDER. Second 
row: BAKER, EMSHWILLER, 
GILBERTSON, HAINES, 
STARR, BATHON, GRAYBEAL, 
SENSER, BORENSTEIN, La- 
ROCHE. Third row: Manager 
DORN, KELLY, WRIGHT, 
ROTHCHILD, O'BRIEN, Coach 
KEHOE, THOMAS, GUGEL, 
ODETTE, Manager MASLIN. 




LACROSSE 

First row : EIRMAN, LAW- 
RENCE, GOSS, FINK, DITT- 
MAR, RAINE, TARBERT, 
TAYLOR, OLSEN. Second row: 
HESSON, DUNN, DEMPSTER, 
ARMACOST, HAZLEHURST, 
DELAHAY, HOYERT, MONT, 
SLADE. Third row: GILL, 
INGLIS, D. FREY, WALKER, 
BROUGHTON, BRYAN, 
DANIELS, R. FREY, VERNAY, 
TRYON, Coach HEWITT, 




ja^t'yla^d Women in Sports. . . 




GOI.K RULES say "eyes on the ball," Terrapin said "smile." 




OUTDOORS the modern dancers exhibited \'enus-lil<e form. 
AR(;ilKRY gave coeds a cupid's view on the world in general. 




OoNTiNUiNc; to promote women's sports, the 
Women's I'liNsical ICdiication Department, in 
conjunction with the Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation, presented a complete and well-rounded 
program of athletic activities for the Maryland 
coeds. All of the familiar sports were again 
featured, and howling, includetl in the ]jro- 
gram for the hrst time, was enthusiastically 
accepted i)\ the girls. 

The season was opened by hockey games in 
which the Maryland girls defeated Wilson 
Teachers' College, and tied George Washing- 
ton University. Intramural and intraclass 
contests were held in basketball and xolley- 
ball while team and individual tournaments 
were conducted in l)owling, tennis, table-ten- 
nis, archery and golf. -Shoulder matches were 
shot out on the Maryland range with George 
Washington and Beaver GoUege. In tiic .\11- 
l 'ni\crsit>' Xight Program the modern dance 
group presented "Marching to Glory, ' an 
intcr|)retati\e dance ot a negro church con- 




SHUFFLEBOARD— a sally pastime for landlocked 
lovelies. 




UPWARD AND ONWARD might be a theme apropos 
to this modern dance group. 





gregation which was heartcdh- applauded by 
the audience. 

Even though the athletic schedule was full, 
many of the girls found time to ride, and to go 
to the numerous parties sponsored by the 
W'.A.A. Both men and women physical edu- 
cation majors had a rollicking time at the 
Christmas part\- gixen jointly 1)\ the two de- 
partments. An ice-skating party at the Uline 
Arena and a swimming party at the Shore- 
ham to|)i)ed off the social season. ( )n a little 
more serious side, eight delegates were sent to 
Penn State to rei)resent the \\'..\.A. at a sports 
conference held there in April. 

Women's Athletics ha\e grown tremen- 
doush' in importance on the Mar>land cam- 
pus. Indeed, they ha\e come a long way since 
])articipation in a game of crocjuet was a stren- 
uous sjiort for a frail, young college girl. 



BASKETBALL helped while away dull mid-winter hours. 



RACOUETS of any type were acceptable when carried by 
coeds. 



BULL'S-EYES were not an uncommon sight on the local 
range. 





GROUP INSTRUCTION on Maryland's rolling campus was helpful to future divot-diggers. 

BOOTS AND SADDLES combined with smiling coeds 
off to the hunt. 



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STRIKES AND SPARES made physical education 
classes hard to miss. 





R O T C 



Colonel 

ROBERT E. WYSOR, JR. 

P. M.S. & T. 



First row: Wll.LlAM.S, JONES, 

WE.STF.\LL, WY.SOR. ELLIS. 

Jl 1)1). Second row: NORRIS, 

M.\RS. MARTIN. LIIIRINAK, 

KELLEY. 



University of Maryland's acting P. M.S. <S: T. is Lt. Col 
R. E. Wysor, Jr. . . . has been on campus for three years . . 
after graduation from X'irginia Military Institute received his 
commission in the Marines . . . entered the Army in 1912 . 
saw action in the World War with the army of occupation . 
has been with the ROTC for fifteen years ... is married and 
has three children . . . his informalit},- and sul)tle humor add 
to the ])oi)ularit\- of this respected I*. M.S. «S: T. 




jVIilitary Day this year meant more than 
just a day for competitive drill. It symbolized 
all that National Defense means to the young 
men of America. For the regiment it was the 
last big day of a year which saw the rapid 
growth of the department. Many former stu- 
dents returned to the University as members 
of the enlarged ROTC teaching stafif; this 
enabled the staff to place greater emphasis on 
the significance of that department today. 
The increasing importance of the ROTC regi- 
ment may be found in the fact that all senior 
military students were ordered to report for 
active duty with the regular army in June. 
Rated "excellent" by the War Department, 
the Maryland ROTC regiment prepares to 
play its part in National Defense. 



Prepares 

for defense 






Cadet Colonel 
JOHN G. RECKORD 
Cadet Lt. Colonel 
THOMAS E. WATSON 



Cadet Major 
GINO VALENTI 




Pass in . . . Review! 



V^fc 






S: 



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-^ - ^« 



First Battalion 

^^ ^D ^& ^^k 

H^T ^^ ^^T ^^T 

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Ciidc'f Li. l^oluiiL-l 

ROBERT W. SAIM 

Commanding 

Cadet Majf>r (^adet 1st Lieutenant 

SIANLF.V M. FR.VNK A. UWVKR 

WiiALKN Battalion Adjutant 
Executive Officer 



Company '•A"~CAPTALN LAWRENCE J. 
IIOI)(;lN.S;IstLT.J. IIOWAR!^ RANDALL; 
2nd LT. RAYMOND L. HOD<;KS; 2nd LT. 
SAMLEL C. STREEl"; 2nd LT. R.VLPII 
DAVIS. 

Company "B"— CAPTAIN ERNEST C. 
WAGNER: 1st LT. RICHARD S. REID; 
2nd LT. MICHAEL PENNELLA; 2nd LT. 
VADEN J. IIADDAWAY; 2nd LT. DON.\LD 
.S. ON.NEN. 

Company •'C— CAPTAIN ROBERT R. 

WESTFALL; 1st LT. LACY HALL; 2nd 

LT. ALDEN E. IMUS. 



^^9 1^^ 4^^ 

Second Battalion ^^ ^^ ^T^ 



iB^ l^^F ▼^^ ^^9 ^^^ 



m^m mm 





#«r# m^ 



t:adel Lt. Colonel 

WILLIAM F. (;annon 

(Commanding 

Cadet Major t:adet 1st Lieutenant 

EDWARD M.LLOYD ELMER F. BRICillT 
Eiecutive Officer Battalion Adjutant 



Company "D" CAPTAIN ARTIU'R W. 
HORN; 1st LT. DAVID <;. DRAWHAKJII; 
2nd LT. WILLIAM P. .lOIIN.SON; 2nd LT. 
LEONARD T. .SCIIROEDER; 2nd LT. 
ROBERT A. (;R0VE.S. 

Company -E "CAP IAIN JOHN I). CUS- 
TER; 1st LI. JACK F. CHERRY; 2nd LT. 
WILLIAM E. McMAHON; 2nd LT. HER- 
MAN A. TAPPER; 2nd LT. JOHN L. 
CRONE. 

Company "F" CAPIAIN NORMAN A. 
MILLER; iHt LT. W OR I IIIN<. ION II. 
TALCOIT; 2nd LT. NORMAN II. .SIL\ KR- 
MAN; 2nd l.'l. Rli:llARI) A. CLARK; 2nd 
l.l'. CIIARI.l S W. WANNAN. JR. 









Third Battalion 



Cadet Lt. Colonel 

LAWRENCE H. HASKIN, Jr. 

Commanding 



Cadet Major 

THOMAS E. HITCH 

Executive Officer 



Cadet 1st Lieutenant 

JAMES M. BEATTIE 

Battalion Adjutant 



Company "G" C:APTA1N NELSON R. 
JONES; 1st LT. ALLEN V. MINION; 2nd 
LT. JAMES R. FINTON; 2nd LT. HENRY 
J. ROCKSTROH: 2nd LT. J. LEONARD 

MEAKIN. 

Company "H"— CAPTAIN ROBERT DuB. 

RAPPLEYE; 1st LT. WILLIAM J. SUIT; 

2nd LT. ERNEST C. SALTZMAN. 

Company "I" CAPTAIN JOHN J. RYAN; 
1st LT. DANIEL J. HARWOOD; 2nd LT. 
RICHARD T. SKEEN; 2nd LT. JAMES E. 
HAMILL; 2nd LT. FRANCIS W. GLAZE, Jr. 




^61 ^^ tffc 




0f A ^ 





^ ift ^ 1^ 4^ 



Fourth Battalion 



Cadet Lt. Colonel 

JOHN C. MARZOLF 

Commanding 



Cadet Major 

HUGH G. DOWNS 

Executive Officer 



Cadet 1st Lieutenant 

ROBERT D. MATTINGLY 

Battalion Adjutant 



Company "K"— CAPTAIN ROBERT C. 

RICE; 1st LT. JAMES B. BURNSIDE; 2nd 

LT. JOHN M. POWELL. 

Company "L" CAPTAIN DAVID C. 
KELLY; 2nd LT. RICHARD C. McDEVITT; 
2nd LT. JOHN N. BAUERNSCHMIDT; 2nd 
LT. RALPH F. CRUMP. 

Company "M"— CAPTAIN PAUL O; SIE- 

BENEICHEN; 1st LT. WILLIAM K. BREN- 

DLE; 2nd LT. TURNER G. TIMBERLAKE; 

2nd LT. ROBERT L. JONES. 




5W ^PS ^^ ^? 



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^"-9^' 









OLD-TIME TANKS, though useless in warfare, 
made interesting pictures. 




BULLETINS were cussed and discussed -usually before 
breakfast. 





'CIVIES," put on for dates, felt unnatural to seasoned 
soldiers. 



Summer Camp 



RESCUES, real and simulated, gave plenty of subjects for 
first aid practice. 





MENIAL TASKS were oftentimes unavoidable, even by 
the most talented "dodgers." 



CARDS, favorite pastime of service men, found its niche. 



CLEAN GUNS, required by regulations, were pains in the 
necks of future officers. 






'JUST BUI-L" was indulged in by everyone on anything. 



THE COLOR GUARD was an acceptable form of 
flag-waving. 




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1 



PRA(;TICAL training demonstrations aided the 
nei'dfiil rapid training of men. 

TO DRII.f, and llu'wliolo I'niversitv seemed to shoulderarms. 




ROTC Band 





Captain Alvin B. Rice 



Future generals on review . . . wFiile the band played on. 




Military Ball 



Drum and bugles, with the "Sergeant's' 
chides, kept the band pepped up. 




National defense was the theme of the Mili- 
tary Ball this year — one of the most impres- 
sive dances held on the campus. The Gym- 
x\rmory was decorated with American flags, 
sand bags, pup tents, and machine guns. Even 
the favors, charm bracelets of guns and shells, 
for the girls, carried out the war-time theme. 
In place of the usual corsage each girl received 
a huge white gardenia with her favor. 

Colonel John Reckord and Betty Catling, 
and Lieutenant Colonel Frank Dwyer and 
Betty Raymond led the Grand March under 
an arch of crossed sabers which were held b>- 
senior officers of the ROTC. 

The most significant event of the evening 
was the tapping of Scabbard and Blade. 



Scabbard and Blade 



COMPANY I THIRD REGIMENT 

Honorary Military Fraternity 

Founded at the University of Wisconsin in 1904 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1922 

Cadet Captain Robert Saim, who lieadt'd Company I-3, Scaljbard 
and Blade, military honorar\-, was aided 1)\ First Lieutenant Cuno 
\'alenti, Second Lieutenant Frank Dwyer, and First Sergeant William 
McMahon. 

The big e\enl ot llie ctjmpany's year was the national conxention 
of Scabbard and Blade in Washington, at which Mar\land's com])an>' 
was the host. Captain Sauni was chairman of tlu' conNcntion com- 
mittee while Jack Cherr\- arranged the dance which was held at the 
Raleigh Hotel. Lieutenant Colonel Withers Burress, United States 
General Stall, and Lieutenant Ral])h 1. Williams, of the Lni\crsity 
of Maryland, were made honorary members of Scabbard and Blade 
at the annual ball last fall. New members were tapped at the annual 
Military Ball, which was held in the Gvm-Armor\- on Februar\ 21. 



That feminine toucti was appreciated. 



Solemn tribute to last war's unknown. 
Even the parade was fun. 




230 




if^*j' ^^^ • ^^^ ^B^ ^if ^W» 

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0^ #i A ^1 tf^ ^ A 

^pT T^-' '^^P wf^ rl^ 9^^ T^TTT 

"^w ip^ ^B'^ Ip^ ^^ ^f^^ ^^w 

First row: BEATTIE. BRENDLE, BLIRNSIDE, CHERRY. CLARK. CRONE. CRUMP. Second row: CUSTER, 

DWYER. FINTON. GLAZE. HALL. HAMILL. HASKIN. Third row: HITCH, HODGES, KELLY, LLOYD. 

MARZOLF. MATTINGLY. McMAHON. Fourth row : MINION, ONNEN, POWELL. RANDALL, RECKORD, 

REID, RICE, SAUM. Fifth row: SCHROEDER. SIEBENEICHEN, SKEEN, SUIT. VALENTI, WATSON, 

WESTFALL, WHALEN. 





Members: James Beattie, William Brendle, James 
Burnside, Jack Cherry, Richard Clark, Carl Cline, 
John Crone, Ralph Crump, John Custer, Frank 
Dwyer, James Finton, Francis Glaze, Jr., John 
Greenip, Lacy Hall, James Hamill, Lawrence Haskin, 
Jr., Thomas Hitch, Raymond Hodges, David Kelly, 
Jr., Edward Lloyd, John Marzolf, Robert Mattingly, 
William McMahon, Allen Minion, Donald Onnen, 
John Powell, Howard Randall, John Reckord, Rich- 
ard Reid, Alvin Rice, Robert Saum, Leonard Schroe- 
der, Paul' Siebeneichen, Richard Skeen, Jack Suit, 
Gino Valenti, Thomas W'atson, Jr., Robert Westfall, 
Stanley W'halen. 

Faculty: Major Paul Ellis, Lt. Robert Jones, Jr., 
Lt. Gordon Judd, Lt. Harold Kelly, Lt. Edward 
Quinn, Lt. Col. Chester Westfall, Lt. Ralph Williams, 
Col. Robert Wysor, Jr. 




231 




First row: MITCHFXL, HENRY. .S( ;||()KNHARR, W. RILKV. RECK- 
ORI). MATTINGLY. MOORF.. DOW, McKlNSTRY. PFFFFFRKORN. 
(;<)()1)MAN. Second row: KA TZ. (;RAIIAM. LONCIANKOKER. HOC;iI- 

<;esan(;. <;in(;ell. komloss, bailey, rand.s. rivello. gel- 

LER. NAIM, FI.AX. IIADDER. KREMBRINK. Third row: FILBERT. 
HELLO. REITH. WOLFE. RIDOl'l'. J. RILEY. TOLSON. WARDER, 
MEREDITH. BEVERID(;E. CRAWFORD. FARMIAM. WHINEREY. 
BYRNE. Fourth row: .SMITH. KEI.STER. R. JONE.S. DAYHOFF, 
SlN<;LErON. WESTON. TREXLER. WRIGHT. EBNER. KEARNEY, 
LEE. STEWART, FAL'GHT, SNEERINC;ER. Fifth row:TAYLOR. PEAR, 
HARDEN, KUNDE, 1). SNYDER, JEFFERS. EDWARDS, BRIDGE. 




ENGLAR, RAUM. GAITHER. HOLLAND, HOPE. CALDER. Sixth row: 
GAINES. GONLON. PRIGKETT. HARBAUGH. PROUDLEY. BARSS, 
J. SNYDER, VIAL, RIDGEWAY, RKU LI. PANTALEO. BOYD, BELL, 
KAIGHN. Seventh row: RUTH. WESTERHEAD. TARBERT. SANDERS, 
W.\T.SON. GIBBLE. ROCKWELL. PRi:iTT. RUTHERFORD, PEN- 
NINGTON, llERR, MAHON. FRANTZ. ROBINSON. Eighth row: 
LAMBERT, SHILLING, LORENZ, BUSHMAN, VERKOUTEREN. 

Pershing Rifles 

jVIaryland University's war strength com- 
pany of Pershing Rifles was captained this 
year 1)\ John Reckord who was assisted by 
First Lieutenant Robert Mattingly, Second 
Lieutenants Neal Dow. William Rile},-, Samuel 
Moore, and First Sergeant X'ernon McKinstry. 
The activities for the \car included retreat 
rmations; two banquets, one at Lord Calvert 
Inn and one at Fort Meade; an impressive 
silent drill in All-l 'ni\ ersity Night, a sham 
Kiltie on Mititar\- Day, and an annual formal 
dance in the Women's I'ield House. 



Il:i/.in)i was .still thi- hy-word in 
tlu- selective P.R.'s. 



♦ ♦ 



A^djslow We Call Tmls to the year 

ijyVER trying to give Maryland students the unique in yearbooks, 
the Terrapin this year is presenting for the first time in the history of 
school annuals a section which will make your 1941 Terrapin a com- 
plete volume of the events of the school )ear just finished. In the 
main it will bring back to you those relaxed, carefree days usually 
designated as June Week, and a few of those special events that were 
an intrinsic part of school life at Maryland, but which in the past 
could never be included because of the date of publication. With the 
insertion of this supplement in your own book the volume will give 
you a complete "memory" of the school year for 1940-41. 




As our books were given out. 



233 



The Women Had May Day . . . 

With dances hv courtesy of tlic I'lnsical I'.diicalion I)ci).irtnient , music 1)\- the 
W'onuMrs Cliorus, and the theme furuisheil by the Juiiidr j^irls MaN I)a\-, "tliat 
annual presentation to tlie st-nior girls," got under \va\ . I^arhara I^oose was chosen 
c|ueen li\ the Juniors and lier subjects for tlu' (hi\- were a grou]) <it H.ulil-hearted 
Enghsh peasants who entertained tlie(|ueeii .md her court witii songs and dances. 

The annual tapi)ing 1)\- Mortar Board was in a sense a reciprocal presentation 
tu tile Juniors ,nid in jjarticuhir to those nine girls who were tapped in the closing 
ceremonies of the da\ . 




OVKR Till-- 1111,1. llic Morlar lioards k'd llu' « hiti--clail seiiiurs to llic festivities in tlie valloy. 
I'KOl I) I'\RI,N1'.S and oilurs walilud tin- peasants. "1?()I?IMK '. AS (.)IKKN. nihd om r i In- piasanl subjects. 




^^h^: 




INI'OKM \l \'y\ was keynote t<i lliis ihoriis Uriiiip. 





234 




MACHINK (;LIN.S and camouflage i>.i\f trie k.\ erteit. 





ATI At^k heloif the spectators sh<i 




INDIVIDUAL COMPKTITION was at least cut-throat. 



DUMMY TANKS gave realistic "Blitz" atmosphere. 
COMPETITION was finally narrowed down considerably. 



Military Day 

JVlATTRESs-PRESSED trousers had a slight 
waffle-Hke effect, but the crease and the leg- 
pohshed shoes were there. The day — May 7 — 
annual strutting of the school's Department 
of Military Science and Tactics. The usual 
reviews and competitions were offered, but as 
if to accentuate the underlying spirit of the 
day, a fully equipjjed 12th Infantry unit 
demonstrated the latest defense weapons, the 
P.R.'s and the Juniors fought to a "draw" in 
the sham l:)attle — the first warlike note here 
since 1917. 



235 





Our Spring Sports Results . . . 

Thrilling Ldcrosse <>anH' uitli Princeton, and A FIRST This year's sports final and 

annual Field Day uere the bi^&est events completed results 

BASEBALL 

March 29 M:irylan<l . . . I Ohio State 7 

March 31 Mar\laiul .3 Harvard 5 

April 2 Marxlaiui . t, Dartmouth 13 

April 3 Mar\laiicl ...11 \ i-niiont o 

rRINCrniN C VMi: b<si .if till- \iar. April 4 Maryland . . 5 CoiiiR-cticut 3 

__ A|)ril .s Mar\laiid (rain) X'.M.l. 

^^ - T-^^ftJlidi ^ April 1 1 Marsland ... 5 Michigan 13 

l»!|i^lL^''^^T^y*' l|AJTy''R '^w^it^^ "^'iy^ "rrf i *A *.\pril 12 Marvland... 2 Richmond 3 

^♦_J5rLjj^|Jyf3^;^B4^'^'*wMB^^?MS^'^ April 15 Maryland... p, Syracuse 8 

^'^-':'f'.ffi^flti^^~^'tiSl^ t v^ . April 17 Maryland. . . 4 Washington and Lee.. 7 

— .-ilKitfi/ April iS Mar\land .10 William and Mary ... . 6 

.\pril 23 Maryland ... X Rutgers 10 

>*i •^'^ ^-'"^y^C^^ \*M? ^'tf?W?^ April 24 Mar\ land . . . 2 West X'irginia 10 

l^^y • ji i , Wif?j^t -^ByB'-r?^'^ April 25 Marx land.. .s N'orth Carolina 4 

)J)i^^t^^j^*'- ,Tr«i"' ■ " til fjfgP'^^m ^^^^Wi m /f *-\|>ril 30 Marsland. . . 1 ( leorge Washington. . . 7 

[il^^HBR^pJbLj •gefe>jjB t .^ i'. _' ... ,^^pVi_LJBh& '^'''V '^ Mar\land . . . 12 Washington College. .. 1 1 

^^*^^^^^^^^ ' '' '^^ ' ■■■■■•-■-^* ^^■•Jr^*^^^" iM;,y 5 Maryland... K \irgiTiia I'oly q 

May 6 Maryland... (> Richmond U 12 

**■'■ W . ^'J -j3H May 10 Maryland... 7 Ceorgetown 9 

1^ ^^. ' ^^ '.^C *May 12 Maryland. . . 4 Washington and Lee.. 2 

" ^ «r *Mavl', Marvland..4 \.M.l 5 

iP ' ■» ,.T ^•v ', ■*% *May 14 Maryland... 6 Navy 9 

"'"" May 17 Mar\ land . . 10 C.eorge Washington .. . S 

*May 20 Maryland . . . (i ( ieorgetown 9 

*May 23 Maryland ... 3 Temple 12 

*May 24 Maryland ... 2 Lafayette 6 

TRACK 

(;KNK OCIISKNRKirKR as conference champ. *.\\n\\ 5 Maryland. . .33 N'orth Carolina 93 

•j^ *April 12 Mar\land . . .65-} Lexington t>o}/i 

jH April 19 Maryland. . .90 William and Mary. . . .36 

jf April 29 Maryland. . .^-i, Catholic V 33 

"If^ d^^» '^'■'y ^ Maryland. . .h'i \'.1'.1 45 

r-j I JP^ ^^^^B* *Mav 5 Mar\land . . .59-% X'irginia 66|:3 

'r i^*&^ w J^Sy- * A *May 10 Maryland. . .35'^ Duke 90K 

_^^^^"i» _^^^^ *May l5 iS: 17 Third place in Southern Conference meet. 

May 24 X'arsity squad first |)lace, Kreshnian s<|uad second 
\li~ ^4P^^^^^ ^^^^^\ place in D.C. .\..\.II. meet. 

'-■r m^^'^^m^'T^^^^i. ^ ^^^^. ^^kJ* A. lacrosse 

i^ j^ March •; I Marylanil , . . i s Dartmouth 7 

r^5fc1**% 1 A|)ril 3 Maryland. .. 14 Harvard 2 

<( m^^^B <^^ April k Maryland. .. II Loyola 3 

■S .April 14 Mar\laiul . . 12 I'eim State 3 

..^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^ _, A|)ril 19 Maryland ... 10 Rutgers I 

^^^^^^■^^~^^^^^^^*^"* -''• ".April 23 Marvland... 4 .\riny 6 

.April 26 M.irvland. . , 10 Washington \.\ 4 

.April 28 Mar\land 12 Duke 5 

May 3 Mar\ land , . . (> I'rincelon 5 

*May 9 Maryland . . 5 Ml . Washington 13 

TOMM'S' EII'.I.DS made his wins monotonous. "May 17 M.uyland... 3 Johns 1 lopkins 10 

..^ TENNIS 

e.Xprii 2 Maryland . . . « l.af.iyette I 

"^ .Ajjril II Maryland... 7 Richmond I' 2 

__ ^^yT , t 'April 14 Maryland... 8 William and Mary I 

_^ ^^^^ - •' ■^ .April 17 .Mar\lanil . . . 9 William and Mary..,. O 

^.> ^^^V^^^^ ^B^ < 4^- .April 21 Mar\land... 8 Washington and Lee. . I 

J^ tf!% W^' ^^^ W\_ \MVi April 23 Maryland... 7 Catholic C 2 

^ ^ ^'^"■^^S Sl^^ ^^^? .April 25 M.nxland... 9 I lampden-Sydney O 

^ ^ W^ T^BJ^^V ^I^^B .April 26 Maryland... Duke 7 

I 1 / I I ^I^^^K ^^^^V '^ -^1"''' ^'^ Mar\ land . . . 6^ C<eorgeto\vn 2>/i 

y L* -^ \M 1^^^^^^^ l^^^VT J tf^ ^'''^' '^ Mar>land... 8 Ceorge Washington .. . 

' - J^ '•%J Bi^^^^H'' ^^^^^U'' V *May 8. 9. 10 Thiril place in Southern Conference meet. 

f *Ma\ 13 Marylaiul. . 8 Johns I lopkins I 

■| * 'Max i.s Marylan<l . . 4 ('■eorgetowii 5 

W '.\l.i\ 24 .Maryland... o Navy 9 

M (;OLF 

^^«^ ^^^^^Bnr ^ ^ .\pril Muryl.md 4 Loyola 2 

^SH ^^^^^Bl^ I^^B .\pril 23 Marvl.inil . . Western Maryland. . . >^ 

4aH ^^^^H ^^H Johns Hopkins 

^^^^^^ ^^ .\|iril 30 M.oyland . . 4 l. of Baltimore 5 

May I Maryland... I C. of \'irginia 8 

.\la\- 5 Marxlaml. 2'i \irginia IVch 3>f 

.May 8 Maryland d Catholic C o 

Ill(;il SCHOOLS had bi^ lime on I'ield Day. May 10 l-'irsi place in Western .Maryl.iiul Invitation 

^yi rournament. 

^^ ^L^y 14 Maryland ... 6 Catholic U o 

May If) & 17 .Second place in ALiryland Intercollegiate Ciolf 
^0. Pournainenl. 

J^O May 21 Maryland... 2'^ Cicorge Washington C 3Ji 

. ,^ ^*«i^ J^ m^^ A NLiy 24 M.irxland. . . 7"i Western Maryland l >/i 

"^ ^'^^ ^^ ^^^B^I^B * '"'''Ved away from liunie. 

2.U) 





June Week was the 
best yet . . . 

(Jthers may have had exams, but June 
Week for the senior was an excuse to forget . . . 
grades, professors, the Army, jobs, and >'es, 
even sleep was forgotten as the Class of 1941 
had their last fling. 




AMATEURS, but it made the ducks jealous. 




PICTURES were the most popular souvenirs 



THE WIND broke up several of these games 



GOOD MUSIC, even though it was June Week 




"It was a ball !" was the oft-heard expression 
of jutlgment on any of the various June Week 
festivities, planned this year by Chairman Bud 
Kephart and Class President Bob Rice. P'rom 
the baccalaureate services on Sunday to the 
commencement exercises on Saturday there 
was never a let-up in the variable program, 
but we will let the pictures tell you that story. 




(illK Kl \ .lud li\iiius tilli'd I'liipcy palates. 




KRIKNDS gave advict- ;iiul iiiiiiir;ii illations. 




^-^ 



DK. "CI Kl.l-.^ " lalkod ici many of \hv parents. 
I'\l<l N IS had lln'ir piiiiic after the graduation. 





M.\RC;niNC was good practice for the draft. 



OOMK l)k'ar\-(.'\c'(l, soiik' weepy, some ratlier 
awed, and all feeling just a tinge of serious 



sness 

to 

e 



a\\e-u, >iii(i ail leeiiiig jiisi a iinge oi seriousness 

mixed with sadness, the Senior (dass (lied into 

Ritchie Coliseum on June 7 at 10:4.^ for the 

|)ur])ose ol being graduated. Welcomed 1)\' 

(ioxernor O'Conor, and adchessed 1)\ .Mr. 
i>....i \' Ar.,N'..i< i"„.i 1 e :4.- \ .f. ,,:.,. v. 



to the 
gowns were returned to 



loxernor () I onor, and addressed 1)\ .Mr. 

*aul \'. McNutt, Federal .Secmit\ .\dniinis- 
trator. the ("lass ol 1<)41 was wx-ll on its way 
to success h\- the end of the lengthy i)r<)gram. 
Picnic lunches were ser\ed on the ui)i)er 
cam])us . . . |)arcnts were intioduiiM 
lacult\' . . . caps and gowns were rel 
the l)ooU store . . . and cars were filled with 
collegiate luggage tor tin- l.ist time. 

During the week, main niemi)ers of the 
("lass of '41 received recognition tor their 
onl>tanding work. The following is a list of 
those honors and awards, and their recipients 
.IS presented at the annual assembly. The 
Silvester Mi-dat for t'xcellence in athletics 
went to Hoi) .Smith; tlu" Mar\land Ring, for 
outstanding work in athletics during the \ear, 
went to Tommy I'iclils: lU'rn.ird 1.. (vo/'wy 
Aw, u"d. lor the M'liior in engineering who h.is 



2S.S 



Most of us waited four years for this day . . . 



shown the greatest improvement in scholar- 
ship, to Laurence J. Hodgins, Jr.; the Edward 
Powel trophy for lacrosse to John Mueller; 
the Louis W. Berger Award for baseliall to 
Bill England, Jr. 

On Class Night, the Citizenship Medal for 
men, offered b>' Dr. H. C. Byrd, was awarded 
to John Reckord; the Citizenship Prize, 
offered for women by Mrs. Albert F. Woods, 
went to CaroKn Gray, and the ser\ice award 
went to Lida Sargeant. Earla Marshall anfl 
Bert Coleman were again presented the Dr. 
Charles B. Hale Trophy for dramatics and 
Mildred Stubbs won the Omicron Nu cup for 
scholarship. At the close of these exercises, a 
parting gift of a new flagpole was presented 
to the school by the graduating class. 




THE SPEAKERS brought worthy acclaim. 



GRADUATION brought a full house, a quota of bunting, and glory for all graduates. 



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KVAN.S. KWINC, KARI.KY. (;l.OI'Kl:l, T V. (;0I.I>HK(:K. IIASKIN. Koiirlh row : KALUAICII. 
KATZ. KSANDA. I.ICAS. MAISKI.. MAR/.OLK. MiCONN ACillK. Fifth row: Ml;llRIN<;. 
RAI'l>I,l:VK. RO^STKR. RYAN. .SANDMAN. SAMAMARIK. SUlli row: .SCIH IRl MI'K. 
SIIIKI.DS. SII.\ I RM \V. I I I, IN. W \<.NI R. WOODRINC. 



Phi Kappa Phi 



240 



lb gain membership into Phi Kappa Phi is 
to receive one of the highest scholastic honors 
the University of Maryland offers. Since the 
Maryland chapter was established in 1920 
more than five hundred students have achieved 
recognition by this organization. 

At the tappings, which are held twice a year, 
only the top-ranking seniors in each College 
are eligible in the fall, while in the spring those 
in the upper tenth of the graduating class of 
each college are selected. 

The primary purpose of the society is to en- 
courage scholarship and to develop character. 
Secondary objectives of the organization are 
to bind its alumni closer to the University, to 
form friendships, and to interest its members 
in promoting higher scholastic standards in 
education. 



Faculty: C. O. Appleman, L. E. Bopst, H. C. Byrd, 
L. B. Broughton, T. A. Chapman, C. E. Cox, H. F. 
Cotterman, Myron Creese, L. P. Ditman, C. G. Eich- 
lin, Geary Eppley, L. L. Gross, I. C. Haut, H. A. 
Hunter, W. B. Kemp, M. C. Kemp, C. F. Kramer, 
Edgar Long, M. M. Mount, R. D. Myers, W. D. 
McClellen, H. B. McDonnell, E. B. McNaughton, 
J. B. S. Norton, H. J. Patterson, R. G. Rothgeb, W. S. 
Small, A. L. Schrader, W. A. Stanton, W. J. Svirbely, 
\y. M. Stevens, T. H. Taliaferro, W. T. L. Taliaferro, 
R. V. Truitt, E. P. Walls, C. E. White, Claribel Welsh, 
M. W. Woods, L. G. Worthington, J. P. Wintermover, 
W. P. Walker. 

Graduate School: Lester Phillip Guest, C. Kerby 
Stoddard, Mark Schweizer, Albert Tepper, Harriet 
Frush, Arthur P. Wiedimer. 

College of Agriculture: Mrginia Brown, Robert 
Rappleye, George Vogt, Jorge deAlba, Lexey Cragin, 
John J. Ryan, Lee Crist. 

College of Arts and Sciences: John Whitten, 
Belmont Farley, Dorothy Campbell, Elizabeth Curtis, 
Richard Clark, Judy Woodring, Bertha Katz, Eleanor 
Bradley, Katheryn Riedel, Lydia Ewing, Clara Gold- 
beck, Molly Tulin, Patsy Royster, Harriet Sandman, 
Ruth Evans, Charles Ksanda, David Worgan. 

College of Commerce: Ernest Wagner, Norman 
Silverman, Leonard Shields, John McConnachie, 
Robert Rice, Frank Carey. 

College of Education : Mildred Stubbs, Mary Glot- 
felty, William Gumming, Nellie Nordwall, Helen 
Kalbaugh, Mildred Bodine, Isabel Butler, Frances 
Lucas, Frederick Maisel. 

College of Engineering: Howard Filbert, John C. 
Marzolf, Victor Buhl, Frank Blazek, Arthur Mehring, 
Lawrence Haskin. 

College of Home Economics: Bernice Stevenson, 
Mary H. Cook, Doris Schutrumpf, Dorothy M. Davis, 
Jeanne Santamarie. 



JOHN M. WHITTEN 
Arts and Sciences 




HOWARD C. FILBERT 
Engineering 




BERNICE STEVENSON 
Home Economics 



MILDRED V. STUBBS 
Education 




VIRGINIA BROWN 
Agriculture 



ERNEST G. WAGNER 
Commerce 



241 





DAVID JOHNSON, Vice-President; ELIZABETH POWERS, Secretary; ROBERT 
RICE, President; ALICE BURKINS, Historian; JACK MUELLER, Treasurer. 



The Seniors of 1941 



Tmc Class of 11J41 set its first fallering foot oii 
the campus in September, 1937, and like all 
other classes was beset 1)\- the determination 
to cut out a sjiecial niche for itself in the annals 
of Maryland histor\-. Led by Frank Da\"is, 
who carried the class throuijh three successful 
vears, '41 ni.ide a brilliant start \)y wiiuiiiiL; 
the tujLi-of-war. The i-reshnian i'lolic that 
year was one of note, and a few cou|)les even 
came in form.il attire. 

In its second year, the class again cnuTL^cd 
\ictorious in the animal struggle, and as a con- 
seciuence the numerals "i()4i" were engraved 
on the Terrapin memorial. I i)setting ])re- 
cedent, the .Sophomores pre.sented an all-girl 
orchestra at their prom. 

As Juniors, the Class of 1941 entered wholc- 



lieartedly into acti\ities and studies with an 
e>e on the flashing pins and ke\s of the \a- 
rious honoraries, but managed to take time 
out for staging a memorable iirom to whi(-h 
Cilen ( "ira\- brought his Casa Loma rln ihms. 

For the tirst time, the Juniors and Seniors 
])ooled their resources and combined the Ju- 
nior-.Senior ( '.erm.ui and Comnu'nrement Ball. 
In this \\a\ the Class of i()4i pl,i>i'd ,1 larger 
])art in June Week than jjreceding classes. 

I )nring its l.ist undergraduate \ ear at Mary- 
land, the Class of 1941 chose Bob Rice as its 
l)resident. lie steered a straight course to the 
port of graduation, from which each classmate 
set out into llu' open sim of lifi', fortified by 
four \-ears of xalu.ibU' experience .md hajjiiy 
memories. 



242 




AND SCIENCES 



Arts and Sciences has made rapid growth in the 

nd is today the largest college in the University. 

een established to provide a liberal, broad educa- 

to provide the foundation for further study in the 

fessional {Schools in Baltimore or at other universities. 

of Arts and Sciences is divided into one Lower 
in which the work of the first two years is given, and 
pper Divisions, grouped under the following departments: 
logical Sciences, Humanities, Physical Sciences, and Social 
Sciences. 




Janet King Baldwin 

Berwyn 
B.S. AAA 

Maryland Chemical Society. 



Charles Burke Allen 

Towson 
HA. KA 

I'res. Kappa Alpha; Lacrosse; 
Intcrfraternity Council; Chair- 
man Freshman Prom Com- 
mittee; Intramural Athletics. 



Melvin Anchell 
Baltimore 

B.S. 
International Relations, Swim- 
ing Clubs; Intramural Athletics. 



Mary Elizabeth Brice 

Millburn, N.J. 
B.A. KA 

Pres. Kappa Delta; I'res. Pan- 
He!.; Spanish, Swimming Clubs; 
Treas. V.W.C.A.; "M" Book. 



Eleanor Bradley 
Upper Darby, Pa. 
B.S. AAA 

Cjerman, Trail Clubs. 



Frances Marie Augustine 

Seat Pleasant 
B.A. A An 

Pan-Hel.; Sec, V'ice-Pres. New- 
man Club; Daydodgers' Club; 
Homecoming Committee. 



Bessie Leeada Arnold 
Takoma Park 
15. A. 
Women's Chorus; Sec. Day- 
dodgers' Club; V.W.C.A.; \'ice- 
Pres. Baptist .Student Union; 
Terrapin. 




243 




^ A 




^l^y\ ^f^^ 




Seniors 1941 



Warren Daniel Brill 
North Beach 
B.S. 
German, RossboroiiKh Clubs. 



Eva B. Brooks 

Baltimore 

B.A. 

Copy Editor Terrapin. 



Sylvia Brooks 

Annapolis 

B.S. 



Ritchie Buckingham 

Washington, D.C. 

B.A. 



Dorothy M. Campbell 

Riverdale 
B.A. A.\A 

Swiiiiiiiing. I'resbs tirian Clubs. 



Alice Virginia Cann 

Baltimore 
B.A. KKI' 

I'rcnrli ( hil); Nbiy Day Coin- 
niitlec. 



Betsy Carson 
Chevy Chase 



B.A. 



KKT 



Pros. Kappa Kapp.i Ci.iriima; 
Sec. Pan-Ilel. 



Jack W. Chaney 

Annapolis 
B.A. .\AT 

German Club; -Sec. .\lplia Lamb- 
da Tau. 



Edith A. Christensen 

Washington, D.C. 
B.S. ^K 

German Club; Pan- 1 lei.; Pres. 
Sigma Kappa. 



ElizabethMacKenzieCissel 

Washington, D.C. 
B.A. KA 

Daydodgers' Club; \'.\V.C.A. 



Clara Marie Clark 

Takoma Park 
B.A. ASA 

Presbyterian, Daydoilgers'Clubs. 



Kenneth J. Clark 

Baltimore 
B.S. X'I'l- 

X'ice-Prcs. Sigma Phi Sigma; 
Newman Club; Men's League. 



Richard Alvan Clark 

Alexandria, Va. 

B.S. .\\r. 'Mii: 

C.lee Club; Scabbard and Blade. 



Paul M. Coe 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. A.\l' 



244 



Albert S. Coleman 


Charles R. Dorr 


Washington, D.C. 
BA. S*!;, A'}'a 


Washington, D.C. 
B.A. 


Footlight Club; Interfraternity 
Council. 


Daydodgers,' Swimming, Glee 
Clubs; Boxing. 


Elizabeth June Curtis 


David G. Drawbaugh, Jr. 


Ellicott City 
B.S. 


Hagerstown 
B.S. AXi; 


Episcopal, Daydodgers' Clubs; 
Clef and Key. 




Frank I. Davis 


Leslie W. Dunbar 


Poolesville 


Baltimore 


B.A. ^Ae, OAK, nsA 
Pres. Freshman, Sophomore, 
Junior Class; Vice- Pres. Phi 
Delta Theta; Varsity Debate 
Team; Pres. Calvert Debate 
Club; Chairman Homecoming 
Committee; Old Line. 


B.A. 
Calvert Debate Club; \'arsity 
Debate Team; Pres. Social Prob- 
lems Forum. 


Ralph Fletcher Davis 


Dorothea Eleder 


Wright, N.Y. 
B.S. 


Baltimore 
B.A. 


Band; Orchestra; Swimming 
Club. 




Margaret Warren Day 

Chevy Chase 
B.A. AAA 


Ruth Estelle Evans 

Baltimore 

B.S. A An, SAO 




Women's League; Pres. .Mpha 
Delta Pi; Pan-Hel. 


Frances A. Dicus 


Lydia Frances Ewing 


Arlington, Va. 


Takoma Park 


B.A. 


B.S. SK, AAA 


French Club; Women's Chorus. 


W.A.A,; ."Archery, Episcopal, 
Swimming, Terrapin Trail Clubs. 


William B. Diggs, Jr. 


Belmont Greenlee Farley 


Baltimore 
B.A. <I>SK 
Diamondback; Business Mana- 
ger "M" Book; Interfraternity 
Council; Pres. Rossborough Club. 


Washington, D.C. 
B.S. 






245 



Seniors 1941 





Allan C. Fisher, Jr. 
Cumberland 
B.A. 'l'i;K, IIAE 

Editor Diaiiiondback; Prcs. Pi 
Delta Kpsilon; Opera, < lice Clubs; 
Sec. I'hi Sigma Kappa. 



Daniel J. Harwood 

Baltimore 
B.S. TE* 

Pershing Rilles; Manager Track; 
Pres. Tau Epsilon Phi; Pres. 
Hillel; Junior Prom Committee. 



k 



Ellen Catherine Foote 

Chevy Chase 
B.S. .\()ll 

International Kclations, Swim- 
ming Chibs; Women's League. 



Clara Gale Goldbeck 

Chevy Chase 

B.S. IK, A.\A 

Maryland Chemical Society; 

RiHe; kiding Club. 



John B. Hayman, Jr. 

Pocomoke City 
B.A. <I'A0 

Intcrfraternity Athletics; Intra- 
mural .Athletics. 

Mary Dawson Henderson 

Rockville 
B.A. KA, IIAK 

Assoc. Editor Diamondbaik; 
Episcopal Club; Sec. Riding 
Club. 



'/■^ 




*»•. 



Marjorie Elizabeth Hall 

Washington, D.C. 
B.S. AAA, ^AO 



James Edward Hamill 

Bethesda 

U.S. 

Pres. Newman Club; Swimming 

Club; .Scabbard and HIade; 2nd 

Lieut. ROTC. 



Treva F. Hollingsworth 

Washington, D.C. 

H.A. AAA 

Daydodgers', Riding, Spanish 
Clubs; Women's Chorus. 



Bette Evora Holt 
Takoma Park 



B.A. 



AAA 




Joseph Harris 

Baltimore 

U.S. 

Vice-Pres. American Chemi<'al 
.Society. 



Marian Harvey 

College Park 
B.A. AAA 

Hist, l-oollinlit ( lub; ( Ic-I ,uiil 
Key. 



Harry Hutson 

Cumberland 

B.A. 

International Relations, I'ool- 
light Clubs; Diamonilhack; De- 
bate Team. 

William Henry Isaacs 
Washington, D.C. 

U.S. 
.American ( heniical Society. 




246 






m Sj|j«^ 



f f 












William Purnell Johnson 

Glen Burnie 
B.A. AS* 
Vice-Pres. Delta Sigma Phi; Sgt.- 
at-Arms Senior Class; Home- 
coming Committee; Glee Club. 


Bernice Edith Kress 

Baltimore 
B.A. AS 
Pres. Alpha Sigma; \'ice-Pres. 
Hillel; May Day Committee. 


Bobby L. Jones 
Relay 
B.S. 
2nd Lieut. ROTC. 


Charles Fernand Ksanda 
Washington, D.C. 
B.S. HAE, 'I>H2 
Editor Old Line. 


Harry E. Kaplan 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 


Helene Louise Kuhn 

Baltimore 
B.A. KA 
Riding, Swimming Clubs; Y.W. 
C.A.; Treas. Kappa Delta. 


Victor Kassel 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 
B.S. AE 
International Relations, Ger- 
man, Riding Clubs; Hillel; Pres., 
V'ice-Pres. Alpha Epsilon. 


Vernon M. Lesley 
Atlantic City, N.J. 

B.S. 


Bertha Katz 

Washington, D.C. 

B.A. 'i'SS, AAA 


Naomi Levin Levin 

Baltimore 
B.A. <J>SS 
International Relations Club. 


Daniel Kindler 
Passaic, N.J. 
B.S. 
C.A.A.; Pershing Rifles; Intra- 
mural Athletics. 


Stuart C. Levine 

Baltimore 

B.S. 

German, International Relations 

Clubs; Hillel. 


Harriet V. Kirkman 

Catonsville 
B.A. ASA 
Presbyterian Club; Student 
Grange; Pan-Hel.; Women's 
League. 


Thomas H. Lewis, IV 

Maplewood, N.J. 

B.S. 2N 



\ 



247 



£ 

^ 

il^ 


1 

lid 


Cv 




^ 


^ 
^ 








Seniors 1941 



Laura Elizabeth Luber 

Washington, D.C. 

B.A. 


J. Leonard Meakin 
Washington, D.C. 
B.A. 
C.A.A.; Clef and Key; Author- 
Producer \'arsity Show 1940; 
2nd Lieut. ROtC; Swimming 
Club. 


Irving Madorsky 
Washington, D.C. 
15. S. 
American Chemical Society. 


Martha Putnam Meriam 
College Park 
B.S. AAA, 111' A 
Sec. Spanish Club; I'rcs., Sec. 
Delta Delta Delta; Junior Prom 
Committee. 


Jeanne A. Makover 


Robert A. Miller 


Baltimore 
B.A. 


Branchville 
B.S. 
Swimming. Daydodgers' Clubs; 
Pershing Rilles; Boxing; Fresh- 
man Rillc Team. 


Lola Marguerite Mangum 

Silver Spring 
B.A. riAK 
Women's Editor Diamondback; 
Sec.-Treas. Pi Delta E|isilon; 
DaydoHgcrs' C'hil). 


Bernard Milloff 

Silver Spring 
B.S. 'J>A 
International Relations. C.erman 
Clubs; Clef and Key;C.A.A. 


Alexander Mazur 

Shelton, Conn. 
B.S. i:-!'!' 


Samuel M. Mills 

Hebron 
B.S. 'I'AW 


G. Franklyn Mclnturff, III 
Washington, D.C. 

MaiiaKcr Tennis; Boxing; Cross 
( oiintiy. 


George C. Moore, Jr. 
Queen Anne 
B.A. IN. OAK 
.Sec.-Treas. O.D.K.; Manager 
Football; Men's League; Latch 
Key; Inlramural .\lhletics. 


William E. McMahon, II 

Washington, D.C. 
B.A. i:N 

S(.d)li.ird and Hl.ide; Soci.d 
rnilikins I'oriini; Kossborongli 
( lul>; Cha )lain -Sigma Nii; 2nd 

Lieut. i<(r-c. 


John Morton 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
U.S. IN 
!■■ not ball ; Lacrosse ; Rossborough, 
Swimming Clubs. 



248 



H. Elizabeth Nichols 
Baltimore 

B.A. 
Y.W.C.A.; International Rela- 
tions, Presbyterian Clubs. 



Bettie V. Porter 

Baltimore 
B.A. KA 

V.W.C.A.; Women's Chorus; 
Presbyterian, Swimming Clubs; 
Vice-Pres. Kappa Delta; Ter- 
rapin. 





B.A. 



Irene Nichols 
Washington, D.C. 



UK 



Fencing; W.A.A.; International 
Relations, German Clubs. 



A. Manley Powell 

Baltimore 
B.S. nK 

Pres. Glee Club; Vice-Pres. Clef 
and Key; Pres. Pi Kappa. 



Louise K. Nichols 
Hurlock 



B.A. 



AAA 



Marjorie Nielson 
Stamford, Conn. 

B.A. 
Riding, German, Swimming, In- 
ternational Relations Clubs. 



Theodore W. Norcross, Jr. 

Chevy Chase 

B.A. 



Michael Pennella 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. AE<b 

Pershing Rifles; Newman Club; 

2nd Lieut. ROTC. 

Thelma V. L. Pohlman 

Landover 
B.A. ZK 

Riding, Swimming, Daydodgers', 
German, Newman Clubs. 



Betty Raymond 

Washington, D.C. 

B.A. AOn 

Clef and Key; Women's Chorus; 

Y.W.C.A. 

John G. Reckord 

Baltimore 
B.A. KA 

Pres. Student dovernment As- 
sociation; Colonel ROTC; Cap- 
tain Pershing Rifles; Scabbard 
and Blade. 

Richard S. C. Reid 

Chevy Chase 
B.A. KA 

Scabbard and Blade; Freshman 
Baseball; Track; Swimming 
Club; 1st Lieut. ROTC. 

Orr E. Reynolds 
Washington, D.C. 



B.S. 



ex 



Alvin Blair Rice 

Greenwich, Conn. 

B.A. 

Student Band; Episcopal Club; 

Pershing Rifles; Scabbard and 

Blade; Intramural Athletics; 

Captain ROTC. 








t^y 




■*- «' 



249 



Seniors 1941 




Barbara Ann Richmond 
Chevy Chase 

B.A. r-m 

Pan-Hel.; Daydodgcrs', Inter- 
national Relations Cliib;^; Pres. 
Gamma Phi Heta. 



Naomi Mae Richmond 
Cottage City 



B.A. 
FootiightClub;Y.\V.t.A. 



KA 



Harriet Mildred Sandman 

Rockville Centre, N.Y. 
B.A. *S2 

Women's League; Sec. Phi Sig- 
ma Sigma. 



June C. Schmidt 

Randallstown 
B.A. .\An 

W'.A.A.; Swimming Club; \'.\\'. 
C.A. 




Matilda J. Richetts 

Catonsville 

B.A. 

Albert Ritzenberg 
Washington, D.C. 
B.A. 
Tennis Team; Terrapin. 



Alice C. Robertson 

Washington, D.C. 

B.A. 



Walter Henry Schuler 
Washington, D.C. 

B.A. 

Betty Jean Silver 

Atlanta, Ga. 

B.S. AAn, llAO 

V.W.C.A.; Riding, Presbyterian 

Clubs. 

Walter Karl Spelsberg 
Clarksburg, W.Va. 
B.S. ATQ 

Pres. Interfraternity Council; 
Men's League; Lutheran. Rid- 
ing Clubs; hitramural .Athletics. 



/f \' ,' "> i 




Patsy A. Royster 

Bethesda 

B.A. KKP, W^K 

Sec. Kappa Kappa Ciamnia; 

Footlight Club; Paii-llel. 



Shirley Anne Stapf 

Baltimore 

B.S. 

Daydodgcrs', French, Irilerna- 



tional 
C.A. 



Relations Club 



^■.\\■. 



Marjorie E. Ruppersberger 
Baltimore 
B.S. 
Women's League; Sec. Swim- 
ming Club; Lutheran Club; 
\'.W.C..'\.; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee; Freshman Week Com- 
mittee. 



Worthington H. Talcott 

Chevy Chase 
B.A. BX 

Fencing Team; Pros. I lef and 
Key; Swimming, Riding Clubs; 
Terrapin. 



Isl Lieut. ROTC;T< 





250 




%^y 'i^ 




-fl C5 





Richard Edward Tiller 
Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 

Molly B. Tulin 
Hartford, Conn. 
B.A. <I>SS, AAA 

International Relations, French 
Clubs; Clef and Key; Sec. Al- 
pha Lambda Delta; Sec. Phi 
Sigma Sigma. 

F. Margaret Wallace 
Washington, D.C. 
B.A. AAA, nAE 

V'ice-Pres. Mortar Board; Sec. 
Delta Delta Delta; Women's 
Editor Old Line ; May Day Com- 
mittee; Freshman Week Com- 
mittee; Treas. Footlight Club; 
Terrapin. 

William W. Watson 
Catonsville 
B.A. 
Wrestling. 

John Moss Whitten 
Wilmington, Del. 



r $ 



B.A. 

Pres. Orchestra. 



<I)HS 



Howard F. Wilds, Jr. 
Baltimore 

B.S. 

Irene Leora Wilson 
Mt. Rainier 
B.A. 
Methodist Club. 



Judy Woodring 

Chevy Chase 

B.A. KKF, nAE, AAA 

Sec. Mortar Board; News Edi- 
tor Diamondback; Vice-Pres. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Junior 
Prom Committee; Women's 
League; Old Line; Riding, Epis- 
copal Clubs. 

June Lee Yagendorf 

Elizabeth, N.J. 
B.A. 'I'SS 

Sec. Phi Sigma Sigma. 

Stanley N. Yaffe 
Baltimore 

B.S. 
German, International Relations 
Clubs; HiUel. 





ICULTURE 



ral C'(jlleiie is the adniinislralixe unit ol ihc I ni- 
oled especialh' to the agricultural industries and life 
.^^tate. Its four ijrincipal functions nia\ l)t' (k'si;^nated as 
(lent Instruction, Research, iCxtension, and RcLiulatory. 
The courses in resident instruction ])ro\ ide trained jjcrsonnel 
for as^ricultural and allied industries. The courses aim to tit stu- 
dents for one or more of the fields requiring specialized training 
and, in addition, provide sufficient of the cultural subjects to 
give them a broad general education. 

Student organizations include the .Student ('.range, Aljjha 
Zeta, honor fraternity, and the Agricultural Student Council, 
which represents the agricultural student body as a w hole. 



Harry W. Anderson 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 'MK 

Block and Hridlr ( liili; l.i\r- 
stock Ju<l^;i^^! riain. 



James Monroe Beattie 

Beltsville 
B.S. A/ 

Set. Alpha Zcta; Siahhard anil 
Blade; 1st l.ieut. ROTC. 



Donald S. Bierer 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 
li.S. 'MK 

Livestock Judging Team; Block 
and Bridle, Riding Clubs; Sports 
Kditor Terrapin. 



Glenn Miles Bosley 
Sparks 



U.S. 

.Student Grange. 



Air 




252 



Virginia Lombard Brown 
Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 
Baptist Student Union; Swim- 
ming Club; W.A.A. 

Georgianna E. Calver 

North Beach 
B.S. ASA 

Pres., Sec. Trail Club; Swim- 
ming, Block and Bridle, Day- 
dodgers' Clubs. 

Charles M. Chance 

Easton 
B.S. ATP, AZ 

Block and Bridle Club; Student 
Grange; F.F.A.; Baseball; Dairy 
Judging Team. 

Hilde Marie Christensen 

Washington, D.C. 
B.S. XK 

Sec. German Club; Swimming 
Club. 

Charles E. Clendaniel 
Stewartstown, Pa. 



B.S. 
F.F.A. 



A IP 

Soccer; Methodist Club. 



Lexey Jane Cragin 

Greenbelt 
B.S. SAO 



B.S. 



Lee S. Crist 
Glenelg 



AFP, AZ 



Thomas Cruikshank 

Galena 

B.S. 

Block and Bridle Club; Soccer 

Team; Livestock Judging Team. 

Jorge M. deAlba 

Mexico D.F., Mexico 
B.S. AZ 

Sec. Block and Bridle Club; 
Spanish Club. 

Maryan Singleton Donn 

Hollywood 
B.S. ASA 

Block and Bridle, Terrapin 
Trail, Swimming, Daydodgers' 
Clubs; Student Grange; Nlay 
Day Committee. 



Seniors J 94 J 




m^^i^ 





Marshall H. Downes 
Centerville 

B.S. 
F.F.A. 



William B. Durm 
Baltimore 
B.S. 
Men's League. 



Laura H. Eyler 
Baltimore 
B.S. 
Swimming, Riding Clubs; Hock- 
ey; Women's Chorus; Rifle. 

Charles E. Fogle 
New Windsor 

B.S. 



253 




p 




i ' 



Seniors 1941 



Ian Forbes, Jr. 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 



John D. Garrett 

Baltimore 
B.S. KA 

Lacrosse; Block and Bridle Club. 



Jack L. Gordon 
Riverdale 

B.,S. 
Block and Bridle Club; Baseball; 
Livestock Judging. 

Howard Milton Gross 
Raspeburg 
B.S. 
Block and Bridle Club. 



H. Bradley Jones 

Sharon 
B.S. .M'l' 

Student (".range; F.F..A. 

David C. Kelly, Jr. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 
U.S. .\X.\ 

I'ershing Ritles; .Scabbard and 
Blade; Swimming Club; Intra- 
mural Athletics; Diamondback; 
Capt. ROTC. 

Robert W. Kolb 
Baltimore 

B.S. 
Pershing Ritles; Intramural .\th- 
lelics. 



B.S. 



Phyllis S. Lange 
Washington, D.C. 



i:.\t) 



Lelia Marguerite Goss 

Lanham 
B.S. IK 

Swimming, Methodist, Terrapin 
Trail Clubs. 



Clayton P. Libeau 

Manassas, Va. 
B.S. ATI' 

Sec. Rossborough Club; Steward 
Student ('.range; \ice-l'res. Bap- 
tist Student I'nion; .Swimming 
Club; Freshman Baseball ;I■M■^.^. 



Elliott B. Harwood 

Baltimore 
B.S. (-)X 

Footlight, Camera Clubs; 2nd 
Lieut. ROTC. 



Lawrence D. Lichliter 

Washington, D.C. 
B.S. -I'AH 

Tennis; Intramural .\thletics; 
-Agriculture Kconomics Club; 
C..-\..-\. 




David O. Johnson 
Takoma Park 
B.S. AT12, OAK, AZ, II AK 

Trcas. Junior Class; \'ice-I'res. 
Senior Class; Photo Fditor I'HO, 
Editor 1941 Terrapin; C..\.-\. 



Mary Elizabeth Mahrer 
Wilmington, Del. 



B.S. 

Newman, C.erman Clubs. 



AO 



254 



Calvin S. Martin 


Robert DuB. Rappleye 


Rockville 
B.S. 
Band. 


Washington, D.C. 
B.S. AZ 
Pershing Rifles; Treas. Baptist 
Student Union; Treas. Alpha 
Zeta; Fencing; Freshman Track. 


Robert C. Meyer 


Karl F. Reiblich 


Pasadena 
B.S. ATP, AZ 


Woodlawn 
B.S. AFP 


Pres. Men's League; Executive 
Council. 


Student Grange. 


Norman A. Miller, Jr. 


Thomas Reid 


Chillium 
B.S. 2*2 


Siebert 
B.S. AZ 


Pres. Latch Key; Pres. Demo- 
cratic Club; Manager Football; 
Pres. Episcopal Club; Chairman 
Inter-Denominational Council; 
Track; N'ice-Pres. S.(i.A.; Inter- 
fraternity Council; Pres. Sigma 
Phi .Sigma. 


\'ice-Pres. Alpha Zeta; Danforth 
Fellowship; Pres. Block and 
Bridle Club; Superintendent Fit- 
ting and Showing; Pres. Agri- 
culture Council; Livestock Judg- 
ing Team; Dairy Cattle Judging 
Team. 


John T. Mullady 


John Jerome Ryan 


Washington, D.C. 
B.S. 


Rockville 
B.S. AZ 
Captain ROTC. 


Clark O. Nicholson 


Carl August Sachs 


Dickerson 


Washington, D.C. 


B.S. 


B.S. 


State Pres., National \'ice-Pres. 
F.F.A.; American Farmer De- 
gree F.F.A. 


Intramural Athletics. 


Carl E. Nordeen, Jr. 


Rowan L. Scarborough, Jr. 


Mt. Rainier 


Silver Spring 


B.S. 


B.S. 


Freshman Cross Country; Track. 


Track; Boxing. 


Carroll Martin Radebaugh 


J. David Schaffer 


Towson 


Laurel 


B.S. 


B.S. 


Newman Club; Intramural Ath- 
letics; Soccer. 


Riding, Block and Bridle Clubs. 









255 





▲1k^lk 



Raymond Maxwell Scoville 
Silver Spring 
B.S. 
Track. 

Emma Shelton 

Chevy Chase 

U.S. AAA. :c\o 

Pres. Sigma .Alpha Omicron. 

James H. Skinner 

Barclay 

B.S. 

Stiuli'nt ("irange. 

William Jack Suit 
Bennings, D.C. 
B.S. <1>A0. OAK 

Circulation Manager Old Line; 
Interfratcr^it^■ Council; Man- 
ager Basketball ; 1 st Lieut. ROTC ; 
Pres. Phi Delta Theta; Latch 
Key. 

T. Boyd Taliaferro, Jr. 
Hyattsville 



Frank Whilmore Taylor 
Ridgely 



B.S. 



ATP 



B.S. 

Track; V.F..\. 



^^K 



Margaret Jane Thurston 

Riverdale 
B.S. AZA 

Treas. Presbyterian Club; Pan- 
Hel. 

H. Charles Treakle 

Street 
B.S. ATP 



Charles W. Wannan, Jr. 
Washington, D.C. 
B.S. 
2nil Lieut. ROTC. 



Jack E. Weber 

Oakland 
B.S. I*!, AZ 



Seniors 1941 





MERGE 





,i *.-» <©•' 







Charles Mitchell Barr 

Easton 

B.S. 

Collegiate Chamber of Com- 



The College of Commerce has taken full ad- 
\antage of the proximity of two large metro- 
politan centers to study the problems of eco- 
nomics and commerce. The curricula offered 
is both technical and vocational and provides 
professional training in economics and busi- 
ness administration. 

Advisory Councils, composed of outstand- 
ing leaders in each major field of business, 
greatly aid the teaching force in providing a 
well-rounded and practical curriculum. 



Andrew Taylor Altmann 

Washington, D.C. 
B.S. ^N 

Rossborough Club. 



Bert Anspon 
Washington, D.C. 

B.S. n\r 

Pres. Collegiate Chamber of 
Commerce; Sec.-Treas. Beta Al- 
pha Psi; Orchestra; Episcopal 
Club; Soccer. 



Leon Altschuler 
Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 
International Relations Club; 
Collegiate Chamber of Com- 



Bernard Lewis Aymold 

Baltimore 

B.S. 



Caroline Louise Barry 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 

Episcopal, Riding Clubs; Y.\V. 

C.A. ; Baptist Student Union. 








B.S. 



John E. Boice, Jr. 
Washington, D.C. 



<I>KS 



Collegiate Chamber of Com- 
merce; Diamondback; Terrapin. 






257 









i^k^ 



Seniors 1941 



Alan Thomas Bradley 

Baltimore 
B.S. KA 

Intramural Athk-tics; Lacrosse. 



Milton Bunevich 
Washington, D.C. 
li.s. 
Collegiate Chamber of Com- 
merce; International Relations 
Club; Intramural Athletics. 

Robert Burke 
Hyattsville 

U.S. 

Collegiate Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

Frank W. Carey, Jr. 

Dundalk 
B..S. WVZ 

Collegiate Chamber of Com- 
merce; Diamoiiclback. 



Robert S. Cartee, Jr. 

Hagerstown 

B.S. ATQ, BA1' 

I'res., Treas .Alpha Tau Omega; 

junior F'roiu Coinmillee. 



Edmond Thayer Chandler 

Westmoreland Hills 
U.S. ATQ 

IC<litor "M" Book; Swimming 
Club; C.A..'\.; Terrapin. 



Jack Foster Cherry 

Washington, D.C. 
B.S. IN 

Scabbard and Bla<le; Debate 
Team; 1st Lieut. ROTC; Foot- 
light Club. 



John J. Clunk 

Hyattsville 
U.S. 

Daydodgens' Club; Old Line; 
Baptist Student I'nion. 

Irvin Cook 

University Park 
B.S. A'ru 

Clef and Key; Business Manager 
Footlight Club; Intramural Ath- 
letics. 

Donald C. Corridon 
Washington, D.C. 



B.S. 



.\XA 



John Alexander Daiker 
Washington, D.C. 
B.S. BA>r 

Collegiate Chamber of Com- 
merce; Intramural .Athletics; 
Track. 

Francis J. Detorie 
Washington, D.C. 
B.S. 
Collegiate Chamber of Com- 
merce; .Agriculture Economics, 
Newman. International Rela- 
tions Clubs. 

Frank Arthur Dwyer 

Baltimore 
B.S. IN 

Scabbard and Blade; Football; 
Basketball; Baseball; 1st Lieut. 
ROTC. 

Raphael H. Ehrlich 

Washington, D.C. 
B.S. <I'A 

Clef and Key; International Re- 
lations, Footlight Clubs. 



258 



Herman Ehudin 

Baltimore 
B.S. "tA 

Varsity Debate Team; \'ice- 
Pres. Calvert Debate Club. 

Mary Louise Engel 

Washington, D.C. 
B.S. AZA 

Swimming Club; Collegiate 
Chamber of Commerce. 



John D. Eyler, Jr. 
Baltimore 
B.S. 
Lutheran, Swimming Clubs. 



Ralph Wylie Frey, Jr. 

Mt. Rainier 
B.S. B.\1' 

Intramural Athletics; Collegiate 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Guy G. Gantz 

Hagerstown 
B.S. 0X 

Collegiate Chamber of Com- 
merce; Business Manager Foot- 
light Club; Newman Club; 
Terrapin. 

John B. Gunter, Jr. 

Johnstown, Pa. 
B.S. -I'Ae 

Band; Collegiate Chamber of 
Commerce. 



Frank N. Heyer, Jr. 

Baltimore 
B.S. KA 

Football; Wrestling; Men's 
League; Vice-Pres. Sophomore 
Class. 



William Joseph Hopps 

Baltimore 
B.S. <I>SK 



Gene Howard 

Baltimore 
B.S. ATQ 

Head Cheerleader; Footlight, 
Riding Clubs; Freshman La- 
crosse; Junior Prom Committee; 
Men's League. 

Richard F. Hutchinson 

Chevy Chase 
B.S. .\TQ 

Newman Club; Collegiate 
Chamber of Commerce. 

George W. Jansson 
Baltimore 

B.S. ex 

Collegiate Chamber of Com- 



Paul E. Jarboe 

Mechanicsville 
B.S. <I>A0 

Manager Baseball; Latch Key; 
Newman Club; Treas. Phi Delta 
Theta; Collegiate Chamber of 
Commerce. 



Joseph Michael Joyce 
College Heights 



B.S. 

Newman Club; Soccer. 



riN 



George O. Kephart 
Takoma Park 
B.S. KA, IIAE 

Business Manager Old Line; 
\'ice-Pres. Pi Delta Epsilon; 
June Week Chairman. 









259 



Seniors 1941 





William Earl Krouse 


John L. Mueller 


Bethesda 


Baltimore 


B.S. rx 


B.S. BAV 


Football; Wrestling. 


Football; Lacrosse; Basketball; 




Treas. Senior Class. 


John E. Lewis 


Huyette Beck Oswald 


Silver Spring 


College Park 


B.S. .VTQ 


B.S. ex 


Collegiate Chamber of Com- 


Collegiate Chamber of Com- 


merce. 


merce; 1st Lieut. ROTC; C.A. 




A.; Diamondback. 


Edward M. Lloyd 


Franklin K. Peacock 


Washington, D.C. 


Bridgeton, N.J. 


B.S. i:x 


B.S. ATLi, BA>r, nri; 


Football. 


Collegiate Chamber of Com- 




merce; Pres. Beta Alpha Psi; 




International Relations Club; 




Chairman Accounting Commit- 
tee. 


John Gilroy Luntz 


Charles A. Rausch, Jr. 


Baltimore 


Baltimore 


B.S. Ai:<I' 


B.S. ex 


Pershing Rifles; Men's League; 




Terrapin; Collegiate Chamber 




of Commerce. 




John A. McCommachie 


Robert C. Rice 


Baltimore 


Jefferson 


B.S. 


B.S. fI>i:K, OAK, HAE, <I'H:^ 




Pres. Senior Class; Pres. Phi 




Sigma Kappa; Vicc-Pres. Omi- 




cron Delta Kappa; Sec. -Treas. 




Interfraternitv Council; Editor 




1940 Terrapin. 


Clarence Marcus 


Alvin Cyril Salganik 


Indiana, Pa. 


Baltimore 


B.S. 


B.S. TK<I> 


Band; Orchestra; Collegiate 


Collegiate Chamber of Com- 


Chamber of Conmicrce. 


merce; Pershing Rifles; Manager 




Tennis; Late h Key. 


Allen V. Minion 


Jose Cristobal Sanchiz 


Newark, N.J. 


Panama City 


B.S. 


Republic of Panama 


1st Lieut. HOTC; Freshman 


B.S. .\XA 


Football; Scabbard and Blade. 


( Dllegiatc Chamber of ( Om- 




merce; Newman, Spanish, Dem- 




ocratic Clubs. 




260 




^^m f«*«? 








Robert Warfield Saum 
Lanham 
B.S. KA 

Collegiate Chamber of Com- 
merce; Captain Scabbard and 
Blade; Sec. Kappa Alpha; Lieut. 
Col. ROTC. 

John H. Seippel 
Evanston, 111. 
B.S. 
Pershing Rifles. 



Rodney L. Senseman 
Silver Spring 
B.S. 
Pres. Methodist Club; C.A.A.; 
Collegiate Chamber of Com- 
merce; Boxing; Track. 

Leonard J. Shields 

Atlantic City, N.J. 

B.S. 



Norman Harold Silverman 

Washington, D.C. 
B.S. -tHi;, BFS 

2nd Lieut. ROTC. 



Richard Tinney Skeen 
Baltimore 

B.S. 
Pershing Rifles; Scabbard and 
Blade; International Relations 
Club; 2nd Lieut. ROTC. 



Peter F. Snyder, Jr. 
Silver Spring 

B.S. 5:n 

Treas. Rossborough Club; Cheer- 
leader; Pres. Sigma Nu; Inter- 
fraternity Council. 

Morton Field Taylor 
Perryville 
B.S. ATQ 

Pres., Sec. Alpha Tau Omega; 
Swimming. Riding Clubs; Inter- 
fraternity Council; Diamond- 
back; Terrapin. 

William B. Thurston, III 

Relay 

B.S. 



Norman D. Tilles 
Baltimore 
B.S. TE* 

Vice-Pres., Treas. Tau Epsilon 
Phi; Collegiate Chamber of 
Commerce; Manager Boxing; 
Calvert Debate Club ; Latch Key. 

Gino Valenti 
Washington, D.C. 
B.S. BAT 

Pres. Clef and Key; \'ice-Pres. 
Junior Class; \'ice-Pres. Col- 
legiate Chamber of Commerce; 
Major ROTC; 1st Lieut. Scab- 
bard and Blade; Business Man- 
ager, Treas. Footlight Club; 
Manager Cross Country, Track. 

Ernest G. Wagner 
Hyattsville 
B.S. *HS, BA'F 

Pershing Rifles; Collegiate 
Chamber of Commerce; Captain 
ROTC. 



Raymond L. Worthington 

New Milford, Conn. 
B.S. <I'A0, BA»r 

Pres. Camera Club; Manager 
Baseball; International Rela- 
tions, Calvert Debate Clubs; 
Latch Key. 



261 




UCATION 



e i^uidancc of some ol the loremost educational leaders 
ntr\ , the Collesie of l-Idiication offers to its students 
uul practical trainini; in niaiu' fields. 
of Arts or Bachelor of Science degrees are given in 
Arts and Science, Agriculture, Commercial, Home Economics, 
Industrial and Physical F^ducation. Opportimity for obser\ation 
and supervised teaching under competent critic teachers is pro- 
vided by arrangement with school authorities in surrounding 
counties and the District of Columbia. 

In conjunction with the Summer School at College Park and 
Baltimore, the College of Kducation offers special courses for 
teachers in service. 



Ellen Carr Adams 
Aberdeen 

H..JL. 

Presbyterian, International Kr- 
lations Chilis; V.W.CA. 

Vivian E. Applegarth 

Honga 

U.S. 

.Swimming, .Newman, Riding 

('lnl)s; .\Iav Dav Committee. 



Hope D. Beauchamp 
Pikesville 



M.S. 



Judson Bell 

Aberdeen 

11 A !■; 

ManagiT Diamoiul- 



Businoss 

h.uk; Industrial Kducation Club. 




262 



Susan Elizabeth Benson 

Relay 

B.S. 

Jack Stealton Bierly 

Sabillasville 

B.A. 

Vice-Pres. French Club; "M" 
Book; Diamondback; Episcopal 
Club. 

Mildred Virginia Bodine 

Silver Spring 
B.A. AAA 

Daydodgers', French Clubs ;Y.W. 
C.A. 

Mary Virginia Bolden 

Oakland 
B.S. KA, ON 

Vice - Pres. Women's League; 
Treas. Y.W.C.A.; Riding, Home 
Economics, Episcopal Clubs; 
House Pres. Kappa Delta. 

Barbara Boose 
Washington, D.C. 
B.S. AOn 

Sec. Freshman, Sophomore, Ju- 
nior Class; Sec.-Treas. S.G.A.; 
Pres. Home Economics Club; 
Tennis Manager; Sec. Alpha 
Omicron Pi; Y.VV.C.A. 



Camilla A. Boward 

Clear Spring 

B.S. 

Elmer Francis Bright 

Baltimore 
B.S. KA 

Football; Track 



Ethel Mae Broome 
Washington, D.C. 

B.A. 
Daydodgers' Club. 

Philip Burkom 
Baltimore 
B.S. 
Tennis. 



Isabel Reed Butler 
Edmonston 



B.S. 



AAn 



Pres. VV.A.A.; Hockey; Basket- 
ball; V'oUeyball; Soccer; Day- 
dodgers', Swimming, Modern 
Dance Clubs; Rifle; Fencing; 
VV.A.A. Honor Society. 



Seniors 1941 









Maidee Elizabeth Coffman 


William K. Camming, Jr. 


Washington, D.C. 
B.S. KA 


Port Deposit 
B.A. 


Y.W.C.A. ; Hockey Team ; Meth- 
odist Club. 


Band; Old Line; Presbyterian 
Club. 


Alice E. Deitz 


Hester Ann Farlow 


Baltimore 
B.S. ASA 


Salisbury 
B.A. 



263 




3» rz. 








Seniors 1941 



George H. Gienger 


Hilda Mae Hyatt 


Brentwood 


Damascus 


li.S. 
Football. 


B.S. 
Hockey; Soccer; \olleyball; Bas- 
ketball'; W'..A..A. Honor Society; 
Women's League; Swimming, 
.Methodist Clubs. 


Catherine E. Gilleland 


Helen Kalbaugh 


Chevy Chase 

U.S. AAn 


Luke 
B.A. 


W'.A..^.; Women's League; .Mod- 
ern Dance Clul),- W.A..^. Honor 
Society. 


French, Opera, (ilee Clubs. 


Mary L. Gloffelty 


Mary E. Kane 


Oakland 


Silver Spring 


B.S. 


B.A. 




Newman Club; V.W.C. A. 


Carolyn Barnes Gray 


Reita M. Lanahan 


Poolesville 
B.A. Aori 


Washington, D.C. 
B.A. 


Pres., Sec. Women's League; 
Mortar Board; Dianiondback; 
"M" Book; \'ice-Pres. Episcopal 
Club; Swimming, International 
Relations Clubs; V.W'.C.A. 


Newman, Daydodgers' Clubs; 
May Day Committee. 


T. Nelson Haase 


Mary Rebecca Lennon 


Baltimore 


Baltimore 


B.A. 


B..S. 


I'ersliing Rillcs. 


W.A.A.; Hockey; Basketball; 
Tennis; Presbyterian Club. 


Marguerite Hall 


Francis Albert Lewis 


Baltimore 
B.A. AOII 


Sykesville 
B.S. l.|>i; 


Episcopal Club; Juniiir I'rnm 
Committee; .Sec. .Alpha Omicron 
I'i; Terrapin; May Day Com- 
mittee. 


Wrestling; Democratic Club. 


Robert F. Hurley 


Frances N. Lucas 


Hyattsville 
B.S. 


Berwyn 
B.A. 


Manager Wrestling; Ciyninas- 
tics; Intramural .Athletics. 


Pres., Soc. I'rench Club; .Swim- 
ming Club. 



264 



Eleanore Wilson Mackie 

Fair Hill 
B.A. r<l>B 

Episcopal, Riding Clubs. 



Frederick C. Maisel, Jr. 

Catonsville 

B.S. 

Pres. Intramural Association; 

Soccer; Baseball; 2nd Lieut. 

ROTC. 



Marguerite S. Monocrusos 
Baltimore 

B.A. i:k 

Riding, Swimming Clubs; W.A. 
A.; Terrapin. 



Robert L. Mohle 

Berwyn 
B.S. AAT 

Swimming, Episcopal Clubs; 
Interfraternitv Council. 



Pershing L. Mondorff 
Emmitsburg 

B.S. 
Football; Basketball; Baseball; 
Soccer. 



Joseph Murphy 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. OAK 

Football; Track; Pres. Omicron 

Delta Kappa. 



Charles J. R. McClure 

Baltimore 
B.A. <i>KS 



Janet M. McFadden 
Mt. Rainier 
B.S. 
Newman, Daydodgers' Clubs. 

Virginia L. McLuckie 

Cumberland 

B.S. 

Home Economics, Methodist 

Clubs; Y.W.C.A.; Women's 

Chorus. 



Edward T. Naughten 
Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 
Boxing; Intramural Athletics; 
Swimming, Newman Clubs; 
Capt. ROTC. 



Frances Leone Nordwall 
College Park 
B.A. 
W.A.A.; Basketball; Hockey. 



Ellsworth B. Nowell 

Linthicum Heights 
B.A. 0X 

Swimming, Methodist Clubs; 
Sec. Theta Chi. 



Philomena Osso 

Annapolis 
B.A. AAII 

Diamondback; Women's Chorus; 
Newman Club; Sec. .\lpha Delta 
Pi; Fencing; Terrapin. 



Jane Claire Owings 
Riverdale 
B.A. 
French Club. 












i& ^1 



265 



Seniors 1941 




Lillian Powers 


Lida Esther Sargeant 


Jersey City, N.J. 
B.A. <i>i':c 

International Rtlations (liil); 
May Day Committee; Women's 
League; Sec. Hillel; Junior I'rom 
Committee. 


Silver Spring 
B.A. KA, IIAE 
Treas. Mortar Hoard; Editor 
Kappa Delta; Pres. V.W.C.A.; 
"M" Book; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee; Old Line; X'ice-Pres. 
Daydodgers' Club; Women's 
Kdilor Terrapin. 


Jean Ramer 


Wilhelmina Schmidt 


Bethesda 
B.S. AOn 


Maryland Park 
B.S. AAA 


Manager Kille; Sec.-Treas. W. 
.\.\.\ .Modern Dance, Riding 
Clubs;Diamondbacl<;N'.\V.C.A.; 
\\'.A..A. Honor Society. 


Swimming Club. 


Jeanne Reese 


T. Leonard Schroeder 


Washington, D.C. 


North Linthicum 


B.A. Af)ll 


B.S. 


Spanish Cliili. 


Intramural .Association; .Soccer; 
Scabbard and Blade; IwX Lieut. 
ROTC. 


Hope Reynolds 


Rosalind Schwartz 


Rising Sun 
B.A. KA 


New York, N.Y. 
li.A. <i.:^r 


Y.W.C.A.; Treas. Methodi.st 
Club; International Relations 
Club;\olleyball, 




Henry Jacob Rockstroh 
Catonsville 

U.S. 


Mary Sgrignoli 

Garwood, N.J. 

B.A. 


Wrestling; Track; Intramural 
Athletics. 


l-'renc li Club. 


Betsy Ross 


Richard William Shaffer 


Takoma Park 
B.S. KA 
Pres. Daydndgers' Club; ^■.\\■. 
C.A.; May Day Committee; 
Terrapin. 


Johnstown, Pa. 
B.S. 
Loot ball; Basketball ; Track. 


Mary Julia Ryon 


Kathleen E. Shanahan 


Waldorf 
li.A. 


Riverdale 
B.S. AAA 


V'.VV.C.A.; International Rela- 
tions, Opera Clubs; Womin's 
Chorus. 


Calvert Debate, C.erman, Inter- 
national Relations, Day<lodgers' 
Clubs; Old Line; Sec.-Treas. 
Social Problems Forum. 




266 




Katherine Jean Shea 

Holyoke, Mass. 
H.A. AZA 

Newman Club; Treas. Alpha Xi 
Delta. 



Arthur-retta G. Smith 

Greensboro 
B.S. AAA 

May Day Committee; Interna- 
tional Relations, Home Eco- 
nomics Clubs. 



Maxine Eleanor Trout 

Frederick 

B.A. 

Terrapin Trail, French, Meth- 

odi.st Clubs; Women's League; 

Ba.sketball; Hockey; N'olleyball. 

Mary E. Waters 

Odenton 
B.S. ASA 

Y.W.C.A.; Daydodgers' Club; 
Sec. Alpha Xi Delta. 




'W- "^ 




Robert H. Smith 
Woodlynne, N.J. 
B.S. 
Football. 

Mildred Virginia Stubbs 
Mt. Rainier 

B.A. SK, AAA 

Pres. French Club; Senior .Ad- 
visor Alpha Lambda Delta. 

Herman Alexander Tapper 
Baltimore 

B.S. 
Intramural Athletics; 2nd Lieut. 
ROTC; Pershing Rifles. 



Helen I. Yelton 

College Park 

B.A. 

Women's Chorus. 

Harriet Curry Ziegler 

Kensington 

B.S. 



Margaret C. Zimmerman 

Frederick 
B.A. ASA 

Lutheran Club; Women's Chorus. 




267 




NEERING 



urpose of the College of Engineering is to train 
ractice the profession of Engineering. It endeav- 
iic time to equi]) them for their duties as citizens and 
n ])ubhc service and inchistry. 
urricula of the college has loeen adjusted in scope and 
)jectives to meet the new economic conditions which now face 
the engineering graduate. Courses are offered in chemical, civil, 
electrical, and mechanical engineering, with an aeronautical 
option offered in the latter. 

Laboratories are now well equipped for efficienc>' in instruction 
and practice. In addition to the Bachelor's and Master's degrees, 
Professional degrees are also awarded. 



John N. Bauernschmidt 
Baltimore 
B.S. 
2nd Lkut. ROTC; A.S.M.E. 



William Charles Booze 

Baltimore 

B.S. K.\ 

Pres. .A.S.(".K.;\'icc-I'res. Kappa 

Alpha; l-Dothall. 



Frank John Blazek 

Baltimore 
B.S. rmi 

Vice-Pres. A.S.M.E.; Football; 
Lacrosse; Track. 

William Bralove, Jr. 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. TE<I> 

Warden, -Scribe Tau Epsiloii 
Phi; Manager Ireshnian Tennis; 
Latch Kev;A.S..\LE. 



> 




^MikM 


fr 


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268 



John Douglas Custer 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. Tim 

Captain ROTC; Scabbard and 

Blade; Pershing Rifles; A.S.C.E. 

William M. Darling 
Washington, D.C. 
B.S. 
A.S.M.E. 



Louis R. Daudt 
Wilmington, Del. 

B.S. 
Rossborough Club; A.S.M.E. 



Donald C. Davidson 
Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 
A.S.C.E. 



George Walter Dorr 
Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 
Boxing; A.S.M.E. 



Hugh G. Downs, Jr. 
Hagerstown 

B.S. 
Glee Club; Major ROTC; A.S. 
C.E. 

Howard C. Filbert, Jr. 

Baltimore 
B.S. TBI! 

Pres. Tau Beta Pi; Intramurat 
Athletics; Pershing Rifles; Treas. 
A.S.M.E. 

James R. Finton 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 

2nd Lieut. ROTC; Scabbard and 

Blade; A.S.M.E. 

William F. Gannon 
Westernport 



B.S. 



TBI 



Nice- Pres. Tau Beta Pi; New- 
man Club; Intramural Athletics; 
A.S.M.E. 

Francis W. Glaze, Jr. 
Hyattsville 

B.S. 
Scabbard and Blade; Chemical 
Engineers' Club; 2nd Lieut. 
ROTC. 



Seniors 1941 















& 









Victor E. Buhl 

Baltimore 

B.S. TBn, nK 

Glee Club; Clef and Key; A.S. 
C.E. 


John W. Clark, Jr. 
Hancock 

B.S. 
Glee, Swimming Clubs; A.S.C.E. 


John Merriken Carter 

Baltimore 
B.S. KA 
Sgt .-at-Arms J unior Class ; Fresh- 
man Lacrosse. 


Ralph F. Crump 

Frostburg 
B.S. ATQ 
Pres. A.I. E.E.;2ndLieut. ROTC. 



269 




Seniors 1941 



Vaden J. Haddaway, Jr. 
Woodlawn 
B.S. 
2n<l Lieut. ROTC. 



Thomas Addison Hall 
Washington, D.C. 
B.S. 
StiKlentBand;A.S.M.E. 



Robert Brooks Harmon 

Takoma Park 
B.S. 1\\ 

Interfraternity Council; Intra- 
mural Athletics; Golf; Vice- 
Chairman .A.I.E.E.; Track; Dia- 
mondback. 



Larry J. Hodgins 

College Park 

B.S. <i>A(-), TBn 

Capt. ROTC; A.S.C.E.; Golf 

Team. 



Junius O. Hutton 
Chevy Chase 
B.S. 
A.S.M.E. 



Alden Elon Imus 

Mt. Rainier 

B.S. 

2nd Lieut. ROTC; Rifle Team; 

A.S.C.E. 



^i 



Lawrence H. Haskin, Jr. 

Takoma Park 
B.S. <I>A0, TBI! 

Rillc; Lt. Col. ROTC; Scabbard 
and Blade; A.S.NLE. 



Willard C. Jensen 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. <I>SK 

A.S.C.E.; Scabbard and Blade; 

Rifle Team. 



%*- " 




Samuel Earl Hatchett 

Washington, D.C. 
B..S. SN 

A.LE.E. 



Edward C. Hawkins 

Catonsville 

B.S. 
A.S.M.E. 



Nelson R. Jones 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. AX A 

Capt. ROTC; Interfraternity 

Council. 



Holly M. Keller 

Bethesda 
B.S. I'N 

Swiniming Club; C..A.A.; .\.\. 
E.E. 




ur^ 



Frederic M. Hewitt 

Baltimore 

B..S. i;N 

I'ootball; Lacrosse; Men's 

League; A.S.C.E.; Clef and Key. 



Henry F. Kimball. Jr. 
Washington, D.C. 



B.S. 

A.S.C.E.; Golf Team. 



IN 



270 



Bernard B. Klawans 

Annapolis 
B.S. TE4> 

Swimming Club; Intramural 
Athletics; Manager Tennis. 



Donald Spoerer Onnen 

Baltimore 
B.S. TBn 

Scabbard and Blade; A.S.M.E.; 
2nd Lieut. ROTC. 




James M. Lanigan 

Washington, D.C. 
B.S. rx 

Scabbard and Blade; Pershing 
Rifles; Rifle Team; Swimming, 
Newman Clubs; A.S.M.E. 



John Marvin Powell 
Dorsey 

B.S. 
Scabbard and Blade; A.S.M.E. 
2nd Lieut. ROTC. 



Robert W. Laughead 
Bethesda 
B.S. 
Pershing Rifles; Rifle Team. 



William Rimmer 

University Park 
B.S. ATQ 

A..S.C.E.; Rossborough Club. 




John C. Marzolf 
Washington, D.C. 
B.S. AXi;, TBn 

Pres. Chemical Engineers' Club; 
Scabbard and Blade; Rifle Team; 
Commander ROTC. 



E. Clifford Saltzman 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. A AT 

A.S.M.E.; C.A.A.; 2nd Lieut. 

ROTC. 



Robert Douglas Mattingly 
Riverdale 
B.S. 
A.S.M.E.; Pershing Rifles; Scab- 
bard and Blade; 1st Lieut. 
ROTC. 



Arthur C. Mehring 
Capitol Heights 
B.S. 
A.LE.E. 



Charles A. Shivoder, Jr. 
Carney 
B.S. 
Diamondback; .'\.S.M.E. 



Paul Otto Siebeneichen 
Washington, D.C. 

B.S, 
Scabbard and Blade; A.S.M.E.; 
Drum Major Band; Capt. 
ROTC. 




ti - * 



Carl William Meyer 

Baltimore 

B.S. 



A.S.M.E. 



Stanley Herbert Smith, Jr. 
Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 
Daydodgers' Club; A.S.M.E. 









mMi^ 



271 




Samuel C. Streep 

University Park 
M.S. .Wl 

Trca.s.Chemiial HnKiiK'frs'Club; 
Swimming. Uaydodgers' Clubs; 
Cross Country; M.C. Alpha Chi 
Sigma. 

Walter Hart Suter, Jr. 

Baltimore 

U.S. 

Freshman Lacrosse ; I^ossborough 

Ciub;A.S.M.I-:. 



Jack H. Thompson 
Chevy Chase 
U.S. 
A.S.M.E.; Rossborough Club. 

Turner G. Timberlake 

Magnolia 
B.S. II AK 

Sports Kdilor Diamondback; 
2n(l Lieut. R()TC;Sec.A.S.NLE.; 
Editor ".M" Hook; Intramural 
Athletics. 



Thomas E. Watson, Jr. 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. <I.i:K. THM, AXS 

Scaljbard and Blade; Lieut. Col. 
KOTC. 



Lawrence L. Wilson 

Baltimore 
B.S. WX 

Pres. .■\.S.^LE.; Chairman En- 
gineers' Ball; IVeas. Theta Chi; 
Inlranuiral Athletics; Methodist 
Club; Baseball: Terrapin; \'ice- 
Pres. Rossborough Club. 

Fred L. Witherspoon, Jr. 
Silver Spring 
B.S. 
.\.S.M.E.: Rossborough Club. 

John F. Worden 

Berwyn Heights 

B.S. 

Glee Club; Sec.-Treas. A.I.E.E. 



Charles M. Young 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 

Track; Bo.xing; \'ice-Pres. A.S. 

C.E. 



-^ # 






ME ICONOMICS 



lirfl aii^^^Hie College of Home Economics is to train 
u omen il^Wtme-making. The second aim is professional — 
ratiqi^pr earning a livelihood. 

e of Home Economics is organized into the Depart- 
Foods and Nutrition; Textiles, Clothing; and Art; and 
Home and Institution Management. It also maintains a home 
management house in w^hich students gain practical experience 
in home-making during their senior year. 

The Home Economics Club is affiliated with the American 
Home Economics Association. Students of high scholarship may 
be elected to Omicron Nu, national Home Economics honor 
society. 



Muriel Etta Anderson 

Washington, D.C. 
B.S. SK 

Home Economics, Book, Epis- 
copal, Daydodgers' Clubs; May 
Day Committee; Hockey; Stu- 
dent Grange. 



Helen Scott Black 

College Park 

B.S. 



Helen Edith Bondareff 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 

Home Economics, Davdodgers' 

Clubs. 



Emma Boss 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 




273 





Seniors 1941 



Lillian Elizabeth Brookens 
Hyattsville 



B.S. 



Aon 



Swimming, Daydodgers' Clubs; 
Rifle Team ;Y.W.C.A. 



Alice K. Burkins 

Castleton 
B.S. AAA 

Opera Club; V.W.C. A. 



Evelyn Byron 
Shepherdstown, W.Va. 



B.S. 



A'Po 



Helen Virginia Chaires 

Queen Anne 

B.S. 



Adelaide Emma Coe 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 

Trail, Home Economics Clubs; 

Terrapin. 



Mary Helen Cook 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. AOII.ON 



Norma Lurene Cornnell 

Washington, D.C. 
B.S. I'K 

1 lome lieonomics, lipiscopal, 
I)a\(lodgers' Clubs; -Sec. Sigma 
Kappa. 



Dorothy Davis 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. AZA 

Danforth Fellowship; I lome 

Economics Club. 

M. Adele Dixon 

Brunswick 
B.S. UN 

Stu<lenl Band; Home Econom- 
ics, Methodist Clubs. 



Milbrey Downey 

Williamsport 
B.S. AZA 

Student (irange; Home Eco- 
nomics Club. 



Marguerite C. Dunlap 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. AAA 

Old Line; Home Economics, 

Daydodgers' Clubs. 



Bernice Jones 

Takoma Park 
B.S. KA 

Sec. Home Economics Club; Sec. 
Kappa Delta; .Sec. V.W.C.A.; 
May Day Committee; Sorority 
Editor Terrapin; I'an-Hcl. 

L. Inez Lewis 

Lantz 

U.S. 

\V..\..\.; Home Economics, 

Lutheran Clubs; Y.VV.C.A. 



Margaret T. Loar 

Cumberland 
B.S. I'M? 



274 



Mary E. Lung 


Elizabeth Owens 


Smithsburg 


Linthicum Heights 


B.S. 


B.S. AZA 




Sec. Y.W.C.A. ;W.A.A. 


Earla B. Marshall 


Patricia May Pierce 


Hyattsville 


Washington, D.C. 


B.S. Aon 


B.S. 


Footlight, Swimming, Daydodg- 


Daydodgers', PresbyterianClubs. 


ers' Clubs; Y.W.C.A.; Clef and 




Key; Terrapin. 




Catherine H. McCarron 


Elizabeth Powers 


Washington, D.C. 


Hyattsville 


B.S. AAH 


B.S. Aon 


Home Economics, Newman 


Mortar Board; Sec. Debate 


Clubs. 


Club; Sec. Clef and Key; Pres. 




Presbyterian Club; Treas. Pan- 




Hel; Pres. .iMpha Omicron Pi; 




Historian Sophomore, Junior 




Class; Sec. Senior Class; Sorority 




Editor Terrapin. 


Dorothy Ann Medbery 


Daphne Reynolds 


Washington, D.C. 


Washington, D.C. 


B.S. 


B.S. 




Episcopal Club. 


Emma M. Mike 


Jeanne Santamarie 


Flemington, N.J. 


Merion, Pa. 


B.S. 


B.S. Aon, OX 


Fencing; Pres. Women's Chorus; 


Pres. Mortar Board; Pan-Hel.; 


Y.W.C.A.; Women's League; 


Chairman May Day; Women's 


Clef and Key; Swimming, Pres- 


League; Cheerleader; Women's 


byterian, Home Economics 


Chorus; Y.W.C.A. 


Clubs. 




Marjorie Lillian Miller 


Doris E. Schutrumpf 


Fort Monroe, Va. 


Washington, D.C. 


B.S. 


B.S. KA, ON 


Swimming, Lutheran, Home Ec- 


Pres. Omicron Nu; Y.W.C.A.; 


onomics Clubs; W.A.A.; C.A.A. 


Women's League; Home Eco- 




nomics, Daydodgers' Clubs. 


Dorothy Nellis 


Margaret Ellen Seiter 


Takoma Park 


Towson 


B.S. KA 


B.S. AAA 


y.W.C.A.; Daydodgers', Home 


Y.W.C.A.; Women's League; 


Economics Clubs; May Day 


Pan-Hel.; Treas. Deha Delta 


Committee; Terrapin. 


Delta; Swimming, Presbyterian, 




Home Economics Clubs; Ter- 
rapin. 







275 




/ / 




Mable Simpson 

Frederick 
B.S. AOn 

Home Economics, Presbyterian 
Clubs. 

Mary Angeline Skidmore 
College Park 

li.S. 



Mary Eloise Webb 

Mount Airy 
H.S. Aon 

Home Economics, Episcopal, 
Swimmini; ("liibs. 

Ruth Rosina Wegman 

Baltimore 
B.S. IK 

V.W.C.A.; Baptist Stiulcnl 
L'nion; Women's League; Inter- 
national Kelations Club. 



Bernice Stevenson 


Margaret Weil 


Takoma Park 


Alexandria, V^. 


B.S. .\.\A. ON 


l'.,s. 


Treas. Alpha Lambda IJella; 
Treas. Omicron Nu; Home Eco- 
nomics, Daydodgers' Clubs; \. 
VV.C.A.; Women's Chorus. 


Women's League; Swimming 
Club. 


Isabella Irene Tomberlin 


Helen E. Williams 


Hyattsville 
B.S. 
1 lonu- Economics Club. 


Rockdale 
B.S. AZA 
Student Grange; Home Eco- 
nomics, Methodist Clubs. 


Catharine May Trundle 


E. Clare Upson 


Frederick 
B.S. 
Student Grange; Home Eco- 
nomics, Lutheran Clubs; Y.W. 
C.A.; Women's Chorus. 


Towson 
B.S. KKP 
Women's League; International 
Relations Club. 


Evelyn Nadine Watson 


Marcia Vorkoeper 


Brandywine 
B.S. AZA 


Washington, D.C. 
B.S. 


Student Grange; Home Eco- 
nomics, Swimming Clubs. 


Swijnming. International Re- 
lations, Home Economics Clubs; 
V.W.C.A. 




276 




New roads and buildings confused upperclassmen . . . thrilled the freshmen. 



277 



'■."M 




. . . A )id fundi y, as wc put the last pages of this year's TERRAPIN on the presses, ice have a 
few minutes to think over the year — a year that passed all too swiftly — a year seeDiiiigly 
filled ivith an iiiiconnnon )!iiiiiher of headaches. But through all the turmoil that oisued, 
we remember the thoughtful guidance and ready assistance rendered by nuiny persons 
"behind the scenes." It is to these persons that the editors now express their . . . 



Appreciation 

Mr. O. Raymond Carrington, faculty adv'iser, alumnus and artist, whose most 
\aluahle advice and striking art work helped make this volume its apparent success. 

Mr. William II. Hottel for his continued interest in the Terrapin and his par- 
ticular assistance in the sports i)ages. 

Mk. Harkv p. Lavelle and Carroll Hutton, of theThomsen-KUis-Hutton Co., 
whose patience and \aluahlc experience in ]M-inting and la\-outw()rk have been of 
inestimable \alue. 

Mr. C. (iORDON Brkihtman, of the Jahn and Oilier Engra\-ing Co., for his refresh- 
ingK' new ideas on jiresentation of cojiy and pictures. 

Mr. \'in( km .SiiI';khan, Mk. IIakkn iK\i.ii!A\ and Mr. M. Mi:ki\ of the Mrrin- 
Haliban Studios for their fnie portraits and indix iihialistic "HeautN" i)irtures. 

M R. I liCNKY Tick, of tlu- Kin^scraft Co\er Co., for a co\er truK distinctiNc both in 
design and construction. 

Mr. .\. \'AR(iA, artist [nr Esquire, for his time and interest in seUntinu our Miss 
Maryland for ii;4i . 

. . . and to those innunierabk' students and facuU\- memiiers wiiose extra coopi-ra- 
tion and time made this volume possible. 

278 



A 

Administrative Officers 21 

Ag Economics Club 158 

All-University Night 146, 147 

Alpha Chi Sigma 160 

Alpha Lambda Delta 161 

Alpha Zeta 158 

Annapolis Scene 10 

Anne Arundel 38 

B 

Band, Student 136, 137 

Baptist Student Union 183 

Barn Dance 178 

Baseball, Freshman 217 

Baseball, Varsity 210-213 

Basketball, Varsity 138-141 

Beauty Contest 193-200 

Beta Alpha Psi 156 

Beta Gamma Sigma 162 

Block and Bridle 177 

Board of Regents 19 

Boxing, Varsity 142-145 

C 

Calvert Cotillion 188 

Calvert Debate Club 168 

Chemical Engineers 173 

Civil Engineers 170 

Classes 34, 35 

Clef and Key 132, 133 

Clubs. 164-184 

Collegiate Chamber of 

Commerce 1 74 

Cross Country 108 

D 

Daydodger Club 172 

Deans of Colleges 22-29 

Dedication 6, 7 

Diamondback 120, 121 

Divisions — 

Autumn 9-111 

June 233-240 

Winter 113-188 

Spring 189-280 

Dormitories, Men's Ill 

Dormitories, Women's 38, 39 

E 

Electrical Engineers 173 

Episcopal Club 182 

F 

Faculty 18-29 

Football, Freshman 110 

Football, Varsity 94-107 

Footlight Club 126-130 

Fraternities 44-69 

Fraternity Rushing 40, 41 

French Club 175 



Index 

Freshmen 13-16 

Introduction 13 

Officers 36 

Orientation 36 

Promenade 13 

Future Farmers of America. .177 



G 

German Club 175 

Golf 216 

Graduates 243-276 

Graduate School Council 29 

Green Spring Valley 190 

H 

Harper's Ferry Scene 114 

Hillel Foundation 183 

Homecoming 100, 101 

Home Economics Club 169 

Honorary Fraternities and 

Sororities 151-163 

I 

Interfraternity Council 42, 43 

International Relations Club. .169 
Introductory Note 8 

J 

June Week 233-241 

Juniors 185-187 

Officers 185 

Promenade 186, 187 

L 

Lacrosse, Freshman 217 

Lacrosse, Varsity 206-209 

Lutheran Club 182 

M 

Margaret Brent 39 

Maryland — 5th Regiment 

Games 150 

M Book 124 

M Club. _ 201 

Mechanical Engineers 170 

Men's Glee Club 134 

Men's League i2 

Military Section 222 

Ball 229 

Band 229 

Battalion 224, 225 

Faculty 222 

Pershing Rifles 232 

Scabbard and Blade, . . . 230, 231 

Summer Camp 226-228 

Miss Marvland Contest. . .193-200 



N 



Newman Club 180 



O 

Old Line 122, 123 

Omicron Delta Kappa 152 

Omicron Nu 159 

Operetta 132 

Orchestra, Student 131 

P 

Panhellenic Council 72, 73 

Pershing Rifles 232 

Pi Delta Epsilon 125 

Phi Delta Epsilon 241 

Presbvterian Club 181 

Publications 118-124 

Publications Board 117 

R 

Religious Life Committee 181 

Riding Club 171 

Rifle Team 150 

Rossborough Club 165-167 

S 

Scabbard and Blade 230, 231 

Seniors 242-277 

Officers 242 

June Week 233-240 

Soccer 109 

Sophomores 37 

Officers 37 

Prom 37 

Sororities 74-92 

Sorority Rushing 70, 71 

Sorority Sidelights 93 

-Spanish Club 70, 71 

Student Government 

Association 30, 31 

Student Life Committee 17 

Student Musical Activities 

Committee 131 

Swimming Club 176 

T 

Tau Beta Pi 55 

Tennis, Varsity 214, 215 

Terrapin 118, 119 

Track, Freshman 217 

Track, Varsity 202-205 

Trail Club 184 

V 

Varsity Show 133 

W 

Women's Athletics 218-221 

Women's Chorus 135 

Women's League 33 

Wrestling 148, 149 

Y 

Y.W.C.A 179 



279 



THOHStN-ILLIS-HUTTON Ca 



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