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Full text of "The Terrapin : [yearbook]"

TERRAPIN 194 3 




0. R. 



i/iupliij Editor 
'ijmdfTj~7 t(triso r 




From the doors of the Administration Building. 




THE TERRAPIN 



NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY-THREE 




The 

Annual Publication 

of the Student Body of 

the University of Maryland 

College Park 

Maryland 




DEDICATION 




HEX soMK i>f;ave thk walls of tliis 



T'iii\('i'sit y. to serve on ;i!iy of tlic m;niy fi<^hting fronts, there will still he tliose of us liere who 



will cherish the uiepiiX'H^ "f our fellowship. It is when thoniihts of you return to us, tlnit 

presence of students means l(» a Iniversitv. For it is hv absence 



we will reanze 




that the true ell'ect of i)resence can best be felt. 

The sludciils instill the breath of beiuL; intCwmitJf'wiild ordinarily be a cold mass of 
buildiiifjs, thereby K''^''nfi power to that which could not oth(>rwise call itself a leachinir 



instituliun. The students ui\-e life to the memories which this volume attemi)ls to record. 
Hecause"^jf^jtsr*Iife and ])ower-giving iuHuence, and lu'cause of your very necessity, it is 

k'-ii§«)!id volume 
of the 'I'kuuaI'IX foi- the war vears of l!)l'-2 and l!)l.'{. 




The library was a favorite meeting place. 




Changing the Guard. 



MEN IN THE SERVICE 
FROM THE GLASS OF '43 



John Franklin Adams 
Julian B. Anderson 
Fred. L. Bach 
Charles A. Bechtold 
Robert F. Bierly 
Anson W. Biggs 
Alfred D. Bonifant 
Thomas E. Bourne, 
Edward A. Boyer 
Alan W. BrylawskiM 
Philip N. Buddingtm 
Harry M. Butler 
Richard D. Carr 
Nicolas M. Cartagena 
D. Harry Chambers 
Paul Chmar 
Luther B. Conrad 
J. Stuart Cooley 
Charles W. Crawford 
Joseph M. Crockett 
Joseph M. Decker 
David R. Fetters 
Louis Flax 
Clemens W. Gaines 
Charles P. Gay 
Ulrich A. Geller 
Harold N. Gilbert, , 
John D. Gilmore 
Vernon R. Gingell 
Norman M. Glasgow 
Henry Glassner 
William M. Goldenzwei 
Francis A. Gray, Jr. 
Thorton F. Green 
Ramon Grelecki 
Herbert J. Gunther 
Kenneth D. Hall 



6S?T.v^. 





Carl A. Harris 
Joseph C. Harry 
William C. Heathcote 
Conrad Hohing 
Joseph L. Hoopengardner 
Max V. Hunt 
Ellsworth A. Hurlock. Jr. 
^^obert W. Ireland 
Irvin W. Katz 
ward L. Keller 
Richard H. Kent 
Guy S. Kidwell 
Lester Kiefer 

Frederick H. Kohloss -^^V 
William H. Krehnbr^ 
Donald E. Lacey 
Harrison Lee 
Judson D. Lincoln 
Joseph G. Lindamood, 
Robert L. Maisel 
Joseph V. Mariner 
mes N. Marsden 
William H. INLittingley, Jr. 
ul R. Mattix 
obert C. McKee 
Daniel M. McNally 
John F. Miller 
John T. Mitchell, Jr. 
Keith N. Montgomery 
Geoffrey M. Nairn, 
George J. Newgarden' 
Paul \\. Newgarden 
W. Bradford Norris 
Juan L. Oliver 
Elmer H. Owens 
Alex Passen 
Thomas A. Payne 





Arthur G. Phillips 
William H.Pindell 
William L. Port 
Kenneth L. Ports 
Page B. Pratt 
Henry J. Rassier 
Mark Raum 
Orlando Ridout, IV 
Elmer C. Rigby 
John B. Riley 
Robert M. Rivello 
William O. Roach, Jr. 
Norman H. Rosenberg 
George J. Ross 

dgar A. Schaeffer 

,oy M. Shipp 
Tames G. Sneeringer 
Burt Solomon 
Edward H. Steinberg 
William C. Stevens 
William S. Stewart 
Eugene J. Sullivan 
Daniel W. Talmadge 
John K. Tate 
Robert J. Torvestad 
Daniel C. Triplet t 
Homer E. LThland 
Bernard LUman, Jr. 
James E. Updegraff 

lilton H. VandenBerg 

Reginald C. Vincent 

Frederic B. W'arder 

Glen E. Weston 

Donald F. Whinerey 

Paul M. Wimert, Jr. 

Willis H. Young, Jr. 




Prcaidoil of llir I'ltinrsitji 



It woi I.I) UK i>iKKI(ri,T to :i|)|)r;iisc tlic coiil rilmlimi IIimI rrcsidciit Ihiin Clifton 
Hynl liiis made to the (Jevelopincnl of tlic I Hi\ crsily of Marx Ijiiiil since he |-etiiriieil 
to liis Ahna Mater in lOl'-J as inslniclor in l-;ii;;hsli and l'<>(>tl>ali coai-h. Since then 
"( nrly" has heen the motivatin;; force w henev cr action was neecled and I lie iiKMhTii 
and well-e(|iiippe(l l)iiildiii>;s now in <'olle;,'e l':nk and Haltiinorc -land as a lrii)nle 
to his tireless etTorts and farsi>,'htedness. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

Composed of prominent people in State affairs . . . governing body of Uni- 
versity . . . establish policies and pass on aspects of University affairs . . . 
scope of activities greater than any other board in country . . . by law is 
the State Board of Agriculture . . . serve without remuneration . . . 



Henry Holzapfel, Jr. . . . Chairman . . . 
Alumnus, Class of '93 . . . board member 
since 1912 . . . Vice-President of the Po- 
tomac Edison Company of Hagerstown. 

Rowland K. Adams . . . Vice-Chairman 
. . . Associate Judge of the Supreme Bench 
of Baltimore . . . Regional Director of the 
Third Region, O.C.D. 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst . . . Secre- 
tary . . . President of the (General Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs . . . only woman 
member of the University of Maryland 
Board of Regents . . . member State Board 
of Agriculture, and Maryland Council of 
Defense and Resources. 

J. Milton Patterson . . . Treasurer . . . 
Director of State Department of Public 
Welfare . . . former member of Maryland 
Legislature. 



First row: Mrs. John L. Wliitt-hurst, J. Milton Patterson, Rowland K. Ailanis, W. Calvin 
Chesniit. Si'coiid roir: William P. Cole, Jr., John E. Semmes, Philip C. Turner. 



W. Calvin Chesnut . . . graduate of 
Maryland's Law School . . . federal judge 
. . . one of first judges to render decision 
affecting the N.R.A. 

William P. Cole, Jr. . . . member of 
LTnited States Court of Customs . . . active 
alumnus . . . agriculture among his hobbies. 

John E. Semmes . . . prominent Balti- 
more attorney . . . Phi Beta Kappa at 
Princeton . . . member of numerous State 
Commissions. 

Philip C. Turner . 
Maryland Farm Bureau . 
land farm leader. 

Dr. E. Paul Knotts 
Maryland's School of ^ledicine . 
President of Denton Rotary Club. 



President of 
Active Mary- 

. graduate of 
. past 





Henry Holzapfel, Jh. 
Chairman 




MISS Al.M \ II I'lillNkKlM" 



1)|{. KDCAU I-. l.ONCi 



Ml!. liAini:^ r. ( asmauiw 



ADMINISTRATION 



JJh. Lon(; has Tiiio i.MFOHTANT .loij ot' pass- 
ing iij)()ii the a|)i)licati()n.s of all students 
wlio cuter the Iniversity. Miss Preinkert 
supervises the reijist ration and records of 
all students. She is resjXJiisihle for tiie 
preparation of class schedules, the student - 
faculty directory, and assists with the I lu- 
versity catalo<iue. As head of the (le|)art- 
nienl of business management Mr. Cas- 



harian has chariic of all accountinji; and 
])lant inaiidenancc for the I niversity. 

]Mr. Ilintz. as librarian, liandles the 
thousands of |)ul»lieations in Maryland's 
fine library. Mr. Hut ton. purchasin<i; 
aii'cnl. directs the buyinji of University 
needs. Mr. Russell, chief en.ii'ineer. sujier- 
vises the general service depart nieiit and 
plant operations. 



MU. T. A. liriTOX 



Ml{ ( \l!l. W K. MINI/ 



MU IIKUBKUT A. lU'.SSEI.L 




III 



DEAN OF MEN 



DEAN OF WOMEN 




jl-Ci^Y^^J^^ti^-U^ 




^J^-l^ 



/V-O-^^t^A-^ ^,^^,ic^.-»->-u^ 



One of the busiest and best liked men 
on the campus is James H. Reid, Acting 
Dean of INIen and assistant professor in the 
College of Business and Public Administra- 
tion. Mr. Reid completed his undergrad- 
uate work at the University of Iowa and 
came to the University of Maryland after 
receiving his Master of Arts degree in 
Economics at American University. 

Dean Reid's duties are many and varied. 
He handles housing for men students; ap- 
proves student applications for admission 
in the enlisted reserve; and has charge of 
student employment. He also acts as 
financial adviser for tlie Student (lovern- 
ment Association and serves as counsellor 
to all men students of the University. 



The office of Dean of Women has been 
filled since Id'i'i by Miss Adele H. Stamp. 
Her main interest is to give friendly and 
able assistance to women students and to 
help them solve their problems — personal, 
financial, or social. She received her Bache- 
lor of Arts degree from Tulane University 
and her ^Master of Arts degree from the 
University of INIaryland. 

Miss Stamp is Chairman of the Educa- 
tion Committee for the Maryland Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs. National Treas- 
urer of Alpha Lambda Delta, and a board 
member of Deans of Women, and League 
of Women Voters. She is keenly inter- 
ested in the formation of volunteer train- 
ing units for girls who desire to participate 
activelv in the war effort. 



11 



GRADUATE 
SCHOOL COUNCIL 



I \ linS A CiRADUATE SCHOOL WilS Oliiaili/A'd 
at tlic I niversity of Maryland to jnovid** 
iiistrudioii towards tlu' Master's and Doc- 
tor's dciiivi'. Activities of I lie school are 
under the siii)er\ision of a ( liailiiatc ( 'ouii- 
cil wliicli is coiiii)()sed of the faculty who 
are instructors in the school. 

'I'he (Graduate School otters instruction 
to college "iraduates, holders of Master's 
degrees, and advanced undergraduate stu- 
dents at College Park and in Haiti more. 
Degrees awarded are blaster of Science. 
Master of Education, Master of Business 
Adniinislialion. Master of Alls, and Doc- 
tor of I'hilosopliy. 

The Dean of the ("iraduatc School is Dr. 




('. (). Apj)lenian, who is also chairman of 
the (iraduate School Council, and director 
of the departments of Pathologx- and Hot- 
am' of the T'niversit V. 



Fir.ll roir: ( 'iillcriii:iii. Appli'iii.iii. I'attiTson. Sirdiiil run: Mali', S(c\ciis. .laiMc's, ItciLJaiiiin. lirciUf;litoii. Mraile. 




\l 



STUDENT LIFE COMMITTEE 




yVi/j roir: Alk'ii. \V\-sor, 
\\ liite, Shaiignessy, 
Uc>id. Bottom row: Prein- 
kcrt. Ilarman, Leslie, 
Ide. 



1 HE Student Life Committee is the 
medium through which student and ad- 
ministrative affairs are coordinated. It is 
the duty of the committee, acting as an 
advisory board, to render all final decisions 
on student problems. 

Members are: Dr. William A. Griffith, 



Dean Adele Stamp, Professor R. B. Allen, 
Dr. Norman E. Phillips. Dr. L. H. James, 
Dr. I. D. Barrett, Col. Robert E. Wysor, 
Dean J. H. Reid, Miss Rosalie Leslie, Dr. 
G. W. Prange, Dr. S. E. Harman, Profes- 
sor C. F. Kramer, and Miss Frances Ide. 



Professor Randall leads 
a eomniunity sing. 




13 



IN MEMOUIAM 




P R () F i; S S U R C II A R L H S G . E 1 C II L I X 

DLUINC; TlIK YKAHS THAT T H K I, ATE CHAKLES (;. p:i(nM.\ SKKVED AS 
A PROFESSOR IN THE I'insK s DEPARTMENT, HE EXSHRIXED HIMSELF 
IN THE HEARTS OF ALL WHO KNEW HIM. FOR HIS I'NTIRIXC EFFORTS 
IN THEIR l!i;iIAl.K, MAHVI.ANI) STUDENTS WILL ALWAYS REMEMHEK HIM. 
THROl (HI HIS TEA( IIINC, I'li'^SICS OPENED A NEW WOK'l.I) K ) IMS IM PILS. THE 
INIXERSITV TERNEI) l() III\I LOU AI)\ 1( E,' \ISITIN(; SIIDENTS ATTENDED HIS 
EE<'Tl"RS:S. HE NE\ ER FORCOT A FACE AND NEVER CALLED THE ROLL. HIS 
LECTURES, SMOKE 'i PIPi;, liALI) HEAD, AND SL'i SMILi: WERE UNFORCJETTARLE. 

MR. EicHLiN HAS Li;i r cs A (;i{i:.\r iii;KMrA(;i: a iiehitace of all that 

TYPIFIES AN Ol TSTANDI \<; lEAC IIEK AND S( llOI.AU. Ill; HAS LEFT I S .V 
MEMORY TO CARRY ON, WIIK II, IN ITSELF, WILL HE AN INSPIRATION 

TO UOTH FACULTY AND STl DENTS. 



14 



INTRODUCING THE STUDENTS 



As A RESULT of the present confiict the 
University of Maryland athipted an ac- 
celerated program of study so that indi- 
viduals would receive their degrees in 
two and one-half years. Students of the 
school were leaving to join our country's 
armed forces; those who remained were 
preparing themselves to become tech- 
nicians and war- workers. 

In this manner "Old Liners" went to 
war, and looked to the future for the re- 
turn of bull sessions, formal dances, fra- 
ternity and sorority life, and the bene- 
fits of a peacetime education. 

Tenting fabric .stretKjfh in Home Ec. 

Maryland fosters lab work in manif different fields: 
PIn/sics. Zoology. Foods, and Cheiriistry. 





15 



^^'^^^^^^^^ THE COLLEGE OF 

Trains students in liberal arts and sciences . . . instruction leads 
toward vocational, professional, or cultural goals . . . establishes basis for further study in 
professional schools or other universities . . . 



In addition to PHoviDixf; a broad lil)eral 
training, the College of Arts and S(i(Mices 
is playing an increasingly iin|)orlaMt role 
in the University's accelerated program. 
Of especial valne in I he war program are 
the courses offered in chemistry, pliysics, 
l)olitical science, history, and foreign lan- 
guages. 

One of the main pinposes of a liberal ed- 
ucation, however, is to teach men and 
women how to Wvr willi themselves and 
how to lav the foundation for a well- 



rounded and successful life. Therefore, 
although the College of Arts and Sciences 
is ueiliier a professional nor a vocational 
school, it does provide through its many 
and varied courses the fundamental requi- 
sites, scientific methods, and pro|)er per- 
spective, u])on which [o establish a well- 
balancefl life program. Prospective stu- 
dents of law. medicine, nursing, teaching, 
public administration, theology, and public 
heal til. all pursue courses in this college. 



War necessitated Febrvari/ gradimtion. 




16 



ARTS AND SCIENCES ^^^ 



JH 



^^9^ 

"^^w 















i 


XSLSM 


^Si 


^gj 


m 


m 


^M^au^ 4 



17 





:^^'^^^^r2^:^^ 



Dr. \Vi--l..ii I!. Chirk Dr. Niitliaii Dnikr 

Dr. Hay KliicnslKif;(r Dr. Wesley (iewi'lir 

Dr. Charles Hale l)r. Lawrenee Ildwiinl 

Dr. L. H. James Or. f'arl Jcislyii 

Dr. MiMinir II M:nliii Dr. IJuviuomiI M.in.MTi 



Dr. I'ritz Marti 
Prof. Harlan Uandall 



Dr. Norman I'liillips 
Dr. .\clolf Ziicker 




18 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Ellsworth G. Acker 

Baltimore 

B.S. 

Freshman Cross Country; Frcslinian 
Track. 

Norman H. Alshan 
Brookhjn, X.Y. 
B.S. 
Hillol Foundation; Soccer. 

Charles H. Audet, Jr. 

Waierbury, Conn. 

B.S. 

Fred L. Bach 

Washington, D.C. 
B.S. SX 

Pres. Senior Cla.ss; Vice-Pre.s. Sigma Nu; 
Art Editor Old Line; Newman Clul); In- 
terfratcrnity Council; Freshman Track; 
Freshman Football. 



Cynthia Baylin 

Baltimore 
B..\. 
Social Chairman .\lpha Sigma. 



AS 



B.A. 



M. Joan Bell 

Hyattsville 



KA 



Sec. Presbyterian Club; Daydodgers 
Club; Sec. International Relations Club. 



Shirley Ber.man 

Baltimore 
B.A. A2 

Terrapin; .\utunm Carnival; Defense 
Council; Treas. .Ailpha Sigma; May Day 
Committee. 

Robert Fou.st Bierly 
University Park 



B.A. 



ATT 



John Franklin Adams 

Washington, D.C. 
B.A. ex 

Scabl)ard and Blade; 2nd Lieut. KOTC; 
11 Club; Track. 

Jeanne Amlicke 

Passaic, N.J. 
B.S. AAn 

Y.W.C.A.; X^ewman Club; Women's 
League. 

Anna Yirgini.\ Auslund 

Bethesda 
B.A. AAn 

W.R.A. ; French CIul>; Pan-Hel ; Terrapin ; 
M Book. 

Ruth Barsky' 

Mount Vernon, N.Y. 
B.A. <I>SS 

Women's League: International Relations 
Club; Sec. Phi Sigma Sigma. 

Charles A. Bechtold, Jr. 

Laurel 
B.S. <i>H, <I>K<I> 

Vice-Pres. Men's Glee Club; .Accompa- 
nist Glee Club; Davdodgers Club; Clef 
and Key; Capt. ROtC. 

Walter J. Benavent 
San German, Puerto Rico 
B.S. 
Vice-Pres. Spanish Club. 

Marcella Marie Biebuscii 
Silver Spring 
B.A. 
Women's Chorus. 

Margaret E. Bond 

Chen/ Cha-^e 
B.A. KKF 

Treas. Wtimen's League; Treas. Riding 
Club; Treas. Kappa Kappa Gamma; Ter- 
rapin; Sophomore Prom Committee; 
Maryland Beauty Queen, 19^2; Mary- 
land Homecoming Queen, 1942; 1st Vice- 
Chairman Student Board. 












Remember 'way back when you were Just one of the 
1100 rats in the fall of 1939? You felt strange and a 
little homesick and were bewildered by the endless 
lines of registration. You wandered wonderingly 
about the new buildings in search of non-existent 
rooms, and felt foolish when you barged into a senior 
lecture. CAA students zoomed overhead while you 
sat in class and started the pursuit of that elusive 
parchment. 





k\ 





CoLLhdi-: (fi- Arts amj Scie.\(:es 



L^a 




MaUV Ci.AKK IJOMIAM 




A. 1)k.\ii;nt HoMi ant 


Greenbelt 




Silver Spring 


I!. A. 




U.S. 


i )i;itni»mili;nk. 




Men's (ilic (lull; CUf auil Kev; Journal 
flnl.. 


\{\\ MOM) IJUAIJ.SUAW 






lilrerddle 




M \H\ Elizabeth Brooks 


U.S. 




W(i.sliiii(it(»i. D.C. 


Boxing. 




15. A. 


M AKCAHKT WasIIINC;TON BkOWN' 


T.OI'ISE HrCKNER 


/,</ ridia 




Tdkiiiiia Pari: 


n.\. 




H>. 


N('wiii;iii ( lull. 




l)av(luilf,'cT.-s Clulj; I're.'.b.vti.Tiau (lub. 


IIkrhkut Ct. Cakiiaht, J 


H. 


Herniece Brown Chambers 


WashinijlDii, D.C. 




WiishiiKitiin. D.C. 


\S.\. IN. OAK. 


IIAK 


HA. AAll 


Kilildl- l)i:iliimullia<l<; K(lit(ir M 


Hook; 


I'au-Ilrl;l)a.v.l(Hlf,',Ts(luli. 


S.(;..\.; EpiM(i|ial (liili; S\\ lininiiif; 


Clul.; 




|{ii»liiiniii^'li Cliili; l''nvsliiii.in l-'o( 


illiall; 




I'icslimaii l.acnissc; I'n ^. Old I.iii< 


• Xet- 


I'.ML CllMAK 


work; Sec. Oniicroii Ddtii K.-ippa 


I'ri-s. 


liochrille 


I'i Delta Kp.silon; Si-r^'ranl-al 


-.\rms 


Senior Cliis.s. 




U.S. 

I)a\ tliHl^'cr> ( 'lul». 


1). IIaHRY ClIAMIilCKS 






I'utoii.si-iUc 




.V. SlATKK Cl.AKKl-: 


U.S. 




Wasliiiuitdii. D.i ' . 

Tcnni.s Team; Seryeanl-at-Arui^ .luuior 


Mauy Alice Ct.ahk 




Class. 


Rirhmond. I'd. 






n..\. 


.\AII 


Davis IT. Cohkhav 


Metlioili>t ( liil); 'r<-i'iapiii; SpaIli^l 


Clul). 


(f7<'/) liuniic 

B.S. 

Men's Clee Clul>; Radio Cluli; Kpiseojial 


Jane M. Cooper 




Clul); Intrauiurals. 


Halt) more 






n.\. 




A.NN Iv CUISWELL 

Riverdale 


RoliKUT V. ('oHMAfK 




HA. 


\l'it.'<liiii!il(iii, D.i . 




Wuuien's Chorus; Inlernalional Keliilions 


U A 




Clul.. 



^..« 






That bewildering Freshman Mixer, 39 




College of Arts and Sciences 



Joseph McLain Crockett 
College Park 



B.A. 



HAE 



Terrapin; Old Line; Diamonflhack; Scab- 
lianl and Blade; 2nd Lieut. ROTC. 



Hakry Kirk Dansereau 

Claremont, N.H. 

B.S. 



Polly Ann Day 
Washington, D.C. 



B.S. 



KKr 



William Earl Dixon 
Edgetrater 
B..\. AS* 

Swimming Club; Newman Cluli; Man- 
ager Baseball. 



William M. Eareckson, III 

Baltimore 

B.S. 



Rosadean Flaks 

Baltimore 
B.A. *2S 

Riding Club; Hillel Foundation. 



Bertram Joseph Frankel 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

B.S. 



Daniel W. Goldman 
Washington, D.C. 



B.S. 



TEn 



Gilbert H. Cullen 

Baltimore 

H.S. 

Freshman IJoxing; Lacrosse: Swininiinf; 
Club; Pros. Old Line Network. 



B.S. 



Joseph L. Dantoni 
Baltimore 



John F. Diehl 
Hagerstoiru 



B.A. 

Diamondliaek. 



ATQ 



IIAE 




^Md£ 



Veronica Doyno 

Woodcliff Lake, N.J. 
B.A. ' Aon 

Newman Club; Wumens League; May 
Dav Committee. 



B.A. 



Margaret Ann Engel 
Washington, D.C. 



AXQ 



Elsie M. Flom 

Baltimore 

B.A. 



Henry Glassner 

Baltimore 

B.S. 



Ellen Frances Gray 

Washington. D.C. 

B.A. 



Soon after the reception tea in the newly restored 
Rossborough Inn we paved Ray Grelecki's political 
road for him by electing him to the chairmanship of 
our class. Fraternity rushing was a new and thrilling 
experience for us, and showed us a bit of the social 
side of college. That was the year our famed alum, 
Charlie Keller, returned; we honored him with a 
trophy and a review of the regiment. 





College of Arts and Scjences 











LaKHV (jl ENTIN (iUKKN 

Riverdale 
H.S. AM' 

Oliver R. Glytiier 
College Park- 
US. <I>Ae. OAK. IIAK 
Sce.-Troas. Omicron Delta Ka|>|>:i: Inlii- 
fratrrnity ("tumcil; Circulation Maiia^iT 
Old Lillr; I'rcs. Sophoinorc Class; l*rrs. 
.Junior Class: I'rt-s. Phi Dt-lta Tliita; 
Krrsliinan Track ; S.G.A. 

Pauline Hardy 

Cllc/e Park 
B.A. IIIM'. II A r. 

Women's KditorOld Line; Terrapin; May 
Day Committee; Vice-I'res. Mortar 
Hoard; I'res. Mortar Board; Sec-Treas. 
I'i Delta Kpsilon; French Cluh; Freshman 
( oiineil of V.W.C.A.; Orchcsis. 

I.KiciiToN Ernest Harrei.i., .Ik. 

I' nirvrsUii Park 
HA. UK 

I'res. Welsey Clnh; Stndent Religious 
.\cti\ itii's Conmil; I'ershing Rifles. 

Frederick L.vndis Hill 

WdshinqUm, D.C. 
H.S. KA 

Lacrosse; Footlall; Intramiirals; M Clnl>. 

James Eden Horn 
Bcthesda 

Frcsliman Hasketliall. 

RouERT W. Ireland 

Washington, D.C. 
H.S. ©X 

Intraninrals; Defense Hall; .Viitnnin Car- 
nival; Sec. Theta Chi. 

Hetty C. .Iacohy 

WiLiliinqton. D.C. 
\\.\. KKP 

I'res. Kappa Kap|)a (lamma; Prcs. l*an- 
llel. 



ArL.V (i. (ifll.D 

Baliimore 
Its. AAA. A'FQ 

I'res. Delta Delta Delta; Pres. Footlight 
Chili; Historian Footlight Clnli; Chair- 
man .\utiimn <"arni\al; \'iee-l'res. I'an- 
llel; Chairman Defense Hall; Pres. Alpha 
Psi Omega; \iee- I'res. .\lpha I'si Onii'ga; 
Historian .lnni<ir Class; Junior I'rom 
Committee; I'n-shman Week Committee; 
Who's Who; Dr. Hale Awanl for Dra- 
matics. 

15.\i(iin<i Dacmak Hansson 

lidllinitirr 

HA. 

('.\RL Harris 

IVa.tliington, D.C. 
HA. ^X 

I.atch Ke\'; Swimming Cluli; Manager 
Foothall. ' 

\'ernox T. Hart 

lialtimorc 
HA. -I>1K 

.Junior Manager Tennis. 

Hi;tty E. Hoffmaster 

Frederick 
H.S. 

1)a\ID S. HlRWITZ 

Detroit. Mich. 
B.A. 



Irwin .Iacohs 
W'a.sliiiiiiliin, D.C 



H.S 



■I'A 



Stndent Hand; (ierman Cluli; Ross- 
horough Cluh. 



Marik M.srilyn Janof 

W'a.ihinglon, D.C. 

B.A. 



Greek handshakes and pledge pins, '39 




College of Arts and Sciences 



Frederick M. Johnson 
Takonui Park 
B.S. ATQ, OAK, HAE 

Editor '43 Terrapin; Sports Editor 'ii 
Terrapin; Swimming Club; Daydodgers 
Club; Vicc-Pres. Pi Delta Epsilon; Fresh- 
man Soccer; Who's Who; Rossborough 
Clul>. 



Miriam Kellman 

Baltimore 
B.A. ^'^'^ 

Women's League; House Pres. Plii Sigma 
Sigma. 

Dorothea Theresa Kilmaix 

Bethesda 

B.A. 

Joseph G. Lindamood, Jk. 

Laurel 

B.A. 

Marianne R. Maas 

Silver Spiiiig 

B.A. 



Nancy Masters 

Glenhurnie 

B.A. 

International Relations Club; W.l{..\. 
Women's Chorus. 

R.\Y Mattoon 

Woodstock 

B.A. 

Betty McCauley 
Maugansville 



B.S. 

Riding Clul) 



SAO 



William Francis Keller 
Cumberland 

B.S. 

Terrapin. 

Charlotte Melcher Kidd 

Ruxion 

B.A. 

Vice-Pres. Footlight Club; Clef and Key; 
Women's Chorus; S.G.A. Seminar; May 
Day Committee. 

Charles T. Lempke 

Washington. D.C. 

B.S. 

Student Orchestra; Student Band; Old 
Line. 

Frances Long 

Chambershurq, Pa. 
B.A. K^ 

Y.W.C.A.; Swimming Club; Canterbury 
Club; International Relations Club; 
Junior Prom Committee; May Day Com- 
mittee. 

Mary Katherine Martin 

Tacoma, Wash. 
B.S. AOn, S.\0 

Pres. S.M.A.C; See. Clef and Key; Pres. 
Women's Chorus; Hist. Footlight Club; 
Ilist. Senior Class; Cheerleader; Fresh- 
man Week Committee; Sec. Alpha Omi- 
cron Pi. 

Marjory' Mattingly' 

l]'asliingfon, D.C. 

B.A. A FA, <I>K<I' 

Margaret E. McCathran 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. S.\0, A FA 

Tho.mas S. McCeney' 

Silver Spring 
B.A. :2X, <I>AK 

Pershing RiHes; Men's Glee Club; Clef 
and Key. 



One warm fall evening we declared war on the sophs, 
and found them waiting for us in front of the Chem- 
istry Building. Al Ruppersberger, our president, 
emerged from the fracas with a new haircut — sopho- 
rnore style. A few weeks later Homecoming arrived 
and we joined the rest of the students in welcoming 
back the grads. Our grid team met defeat almost 
every week and Coach Dobson resigned at the end of 
the season. 










<* •*» 



"^ 












College of Arts amj Sciexces 



Alma Mkuuax 
Baltimore 

Muriel Ellen Miller 

lidlfiiiiorc 
U A. kKl" 

l)i;iiii(in(ll>a('k: Spanish Cluli; Suplioiiiurc 
I'rimi ('(iiumiltcc; Junior I'roni (imi- 
niilln*. 

Ruth Morgan 

Paicrsim. X.J. 
1!.A. -I'i:!' 

IiitiTiiational Hflations Chil). 

John W. Neumann 

Sllrer Spriu;/ 
15. A. 'I'AW 'I>K<I'. 'Mil" 

IVrnii)in;Ua.vdo(ij,'(Ts('lnli; Riissli(iriin/,'li 
(lulj; Track. 

Jeannette Owen 

Chen/ ( 'liasr 
B.A. AZA. IIAK 

Women's Kilitor Tirrapin; Art Kditor M 
Hook; Krcslinian Week Commit tec; Muy 
Day ("onimiltee: Junior Prom ("om- 
milli'c; Cli'f anil Ki'V; Daydodficrs CIul). 



Frank Savacje Mkrvine 

Takonia Park 
B.A. AI'U 

Kootliglit (lul). 

.losKi'ii IIkkman Mintzer 

Calslnll. \.y. 
HS. <I'H1 

IlilU'l Kiiundaliiin: InlranuiraU; Softball; 
Haskctl>all. 



Henky Wadsworth Moore 

l\ (i.sliiiKjIon. ]).( . 

HA. 



I'atl W. NEWfJARnEN. II 
Muxlihujloji. D.C. 
U.S. AXl". IIAE 

KiHi- Tram; I'lrsliinK Uiflrs; A.I.Ch.E.; 
PhotoKrapliy Kditor Terrapin: Ciym- 
na.stlcs. 

Ann Pater.son 

HA. KKP. IIAR 

Editor Old Line; Mortar Hoard; Vice- 
Pres. Kappa Kappa (!amnia. 








Thomas Alan 1'ayne 

Wa.shitKjtdu, D.C. 

H.S. 

■-'iid l.i.Mit. KOTC. 

Mary-Stuart Price 

Chen/ Chase 

HA. AZA 

French Chili; Sec. Daydodgers (lull. 

Mildred Radin 

Ml. W'nion. A'.)'. 
H.S. Ai: 



Farmers frolic at Ag. Barn Dance, '40 . ■ \^ 



Ki( iiAui) M. I'eck 

Damascnx 
B.S. -MI^. \XS 

Florence Primm 

W'ashiiujton. D.C. 

H.A. 



M AUK 1{\1 M 

U'dshiiifitdii. D.C 
H.S. 

I'lTshiuK IJilles. 




^ N" 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Dan G. Rice, Jr. 

Temple Hills 

B.A. 

Daydodger.s Chil); Rosslifiroufjli Cliil>; 
Program Director Old Line Network. 

Nelle Price Robertson 
Onancnck. ]'a. 

Swimming Clul). 

Doyle Roy.\l 

Washington, D.C. 

H..\. 

Soccer; Tenni.s; Ba.sketljall; .\<lv. ROTC. 



M.\RY Ellen Ruff 

Bandallsioum 

B.S. 

Irene Jean Scher 
Washington, D.C. 

B..\. .\i: 

Sec. Alpha Sigma; May Day Committee. 



Harold Leonard Seidman 

Baltimore 
B.A. iJAM 

Sports Editor M Book; Sports Editor 
Dianionilback; Pres. Sigma .VIpha Mu. 

Kathryn Gertrude Sheely 
Baltimore 

B.A. 

Biding ('lub. 



J. Craig Shields 
Ahington. Pa. 



B.S. 

Intramurals. 



ilX 



Kenneth A. Richer 

English Consul 

B.S. 

Jack Rothstein 
Baltimore 

B.A. 

Intramurals. 

Nancy Tyler Royal 

Worcester, J/o.v.v. 
B.S. AAA 

House Pre.s. Delta Delta Delta; Riding 
( 'lub; Women's Chorus; Women's League; 
.Jimior Prom Committee; May Day Com- 
mittee; Homecoming Committee. 

Ruth Eleanor Schene 
New Rochelle, N.Y. 
B.S. KA, HAE. S.\0 

Treas. Clef and Key; Sec. S.M..\.C.; 
Women's Chorus; Diamondbaek; Wo- 
men's League; May Day Committee. 

Henry Irving Scott 
Cheri) Chase 



B.S. 



<i>A0 



John Anthony Serid 

Baltimore 

B.S. 

Newman Chili. 

Shirley Cynthia Sherman 
Flushing, X.V. 

B.A. <i«i;s 

Hillel Foundation; House Manager Phi 
Sigma Sigma; Recording Sec. Plii Sigma 
Sigma; Corresponding Sec. Phi Sigma 
Sigma. 

LOY M. SlIIPP, Jr. 

University Park 
B.A. }:;X 

Pres. Latch Key; Manager Boxing; Capt. 
HOTC. 



The fabulous, still remembered, "Blue Dogs" won the 
intramural touch tourney that fall, which was Just 
cause for celebration in the Grill. We ushered in the 
Christmas season with Hal Kemp at the Rossborough 
and the next day left for home. When we returned 
we found the threat of finals staring us in the face. 
After that ordeal, those of us who could chisel bids 
went to the Junior Prom. 






jfWiifimiL. 









% "^^ 




U-M: 








College of Arts and Sciences 




«& f» 



ig 





■^ <c; 









HA. 



M AUTIIA I, ADD Sl-AHIIAWK 
i\ (Islliri(jlt)U, D.C. 



KKF 



WiLijA.M II. Stellhokn, .Ii{. 

Baltimore 
U.S. >;x 

Tr'ack. Cntss ('(inntr\'. 



LoUKAINE TllO.MAS 

IIugcrMown 
B.S. 

ROBKHT .IaMKS ToliVKST.M) 

('t)liii(ir Manar 

n.\. 



Ho.MKH EdW.VRD I^HLANI) 

Oicrti Chase 

U.S. Ai:<i>, .wi:. <i>K<i> 

1st Lieut. HOTC; Pre.s. Fro.shiiiaii (lu'in- 
istry Clul); Pros. DayiUidpcis (liil): 
A.I.Cli.K: Junidr I'rom ('iininiilt<'i'; Slii- 
dent Dcfi'iise Council; Diaiiioiulhack; 
Social Director Delta Sijiina Plii: Soiial 
('hairinaii Day<lo(ij;er.s Club. 



El'OKNE ^I. VuEELANi) 

R id (/e wood, X.J. 



B..\. 

HaskctLall. 



<l>A0 



\\ II.I.IAM Iv Waxtek 

Baltimore 

B..V. 

TJiTii Weinsteix 
IhoiddilH. .V.)'. 



B A. 



'lO 



liilUl I'oiiiiilalion; \'ice-Pres. Plii Sinina 



W'u.Li.^.M 1'. Sted.man, Ju. 

Catonsville 

B.V. 

Diaiiioiiilhack: Viee-Prc.s. Spanish Club; 
Kre.sliinau 'renni.s; X'ictory Council; Viee- 
Pres. S.(;..\.; !,alcli Key; Inli'rnational 
Kelation^ Club; Debate" Keproentativo. 

\ViLi.i.\.M Seijiv Stewakt 
II' a.sliinyton, D.C. 
B.A. 
Capl. HOTC; Persbiiig Rifles. 

\Vl I.I.I AM ]•]. ToLLKY 

K ashtiKjtoii, D.C. 

li.A. 

Daydoil^'crs Club; Trail Club. 

Fl,()HK\( K TiilXKEL 
I'rnntlciicc. R.I. 

li.A. 'p:^:!; 

Mii.TON II. \'.\ni)enHekc; 

R alt i more 
B.S. KA, -hill, OAK 

I.«i<rosse; Pres. Omieron Delta Kappa; 
Scabbard and HIail.-; M Club; Kxecutivc- 
Council S.(;..\. 

FuEDERic: 15. Wahder 

( hen/ r/(fl.sr 
B.A. MX 

1'V<'sliuiaii Hilie 'I'eaui; Per>liin^ HiHos; 
Capl. liOTC. 

SoNiA Weisbekc; 

Raltimore 
HA. 'I'll' 

House Mana;;er of Phi Sif;ina Sij;ina. 

GUNTIIEH .VdoLE WeKNER 

B.S. A>1"L> 

Der Deutsche X'erein; I*'ootli^ht Club; 
Clef and Kev. 



"Include Me Out" hits the boards, '40 




College of Arts amj Scie.\ces 



B.S. 



William F. Wheeler 
Hampstead 



AFP 



Mildred White 

Hyattsrille 
B.A. AOn, nAE 

Associate Editor Old Line; Writing Club; 
Presbyterian Club; Vioe-Pres. Alpha 
Omicron Pi; May Day Committee. 



Mary Yeager 

Hagerstown 
B.S. KA, :s.\o 

Riding Club; Episcopal Club. 



Ira White 

Hyattsville 

B.S. 



Charles Randolph Wolfe 

Washington, D.C. 
B.S. s> 

Swimming CluV); Intranuirals; Treas 
Sigma Nu. 



G. Blaine AVix 
Xeir York, X .Y. 

B.A. ex 

Interfraternity Council; Sec. Tlieta Chi. 




In the early spring the Footlighters gave "A Bill of 
Divorcement," and there was a flower show in the 
Coliseum. Emma Otero gave a recital on campus. 
ADPi, Sigma Kappa, and Gamma Phi joined the 
ranks of our Greek societies and our College of Com- 
merce received national recognition. This was the 
year a Nazi Baron addressed us, and though he tried 
hard, none of us could see his views. 



'^^^^^^^^THE COLLEGE OF 




'2« 



AGRICULTURE 




^.(T^. lI^' 




Dr. Ilariild F. ( 'ottcnuim 



JNever before in the history of the 
nation have such great demands been 
made upon the farmer and his wife. Not 
only is the American farmer being called 
upon to feed his own country but in a very 
large measure he is also helping to keep our 
far-flung Allied armies supplied with neces- 
sary foodstuft's. 

During the past year the College of Agri- 
culture, working closely with the Extension 
Service and the Experiment Station, has 
made an all-out attempt to help in every 
way possible in the war effort throughout 
Maryland. The resident instruction, exten- 
sion, research, and regulatory divisions of 
the University were all a part of that effort. 

Many of the graduates of the College of 
Agriculture this year have entered the 



Prof. .Xrtluir ^^. .\halt 
Dr. licinald Bamford 



Dr. ("harlcs Appleman 
Prof. Ray Carpenter 




29 




Dr. Kriiivsl Ciiry 
Dr. M..rlcv .lull 



Dr. Suiiiiirl Di'\aiilt 
Dr. W illinin Ki'inp 



Dr. Kr.-.l.-rirk l,<-liila(li Dr. Charles Maliciii-y 

Dr. K.niictl. 'I'lirk Dr. M.irk Wcl.sli 




armed stTvicr.s as coinini.s.sionod oHiccr.s. 
It i.s expected that most of them will re- 
liii'ii lo tlu'ir auriciilliii'al wDrk at'lcr the 
war. Tiiey liax'e hecii trained for positions 
as livestockmen. daii ynicii. Iiorlicullurists, 
soils and ci-oj) (eclinolo<i;ists, teachers, 
couidy aiients, and .scientists in State, 
Federal, and commercial work. In achU- 
tion, throutiii tlieir own oruanizations. the 
students in the ( Ollei^e ot" .\<;ricnltur«' sup- 
plemented the instruction that Miey re- 
cei\'ed in classi-ooins and lalioi alorics. 

The nninci'ous warlinic measures now 
lieiuii' carricfl out in llic slalc and llic na- 
tion lia\"e iii'catlx' added lo llu' res])onsi- 
hilities of the Kxteusiou Service and its 
force of workers. In the inci'eased food 
production programs, and other cami)ai,<;iis 
such as scrap collection, conservation, and 
fire prevention, the countN' and home 
demonstration agents in tlie counties and 
.syjecialists have carried information lo 
rural ])eoi)le llii-ouuliout the state. The 
\ ictory (iarden campaiyn was one of the 
most intense carried on durinji; the year. 

The work of the Kx])eriment Station was 
also directed to research that would help 
in the war ett'ort. l"'or exami)le. dehydra- 
tion of fruits and veyelahles. .so that they 
could be shipped to all i>arts of the world, 
with less weight and in condition to ki-ep 
in all .sorts of climates, was one of the most 
iin])()rtanl contril)ul ions made l>y llu- Kx- 
periment Station staff. 

Reguhilory functions, such a^ ciinlrol ot 
in.s(>ct j)ests and iliseases of i)lants and ani- 
uuds. and Ihe gradiut:; and slandardi/alion 
of fai'ui pnnlucts. were carrieij on largely 
hy the .same personnel as Ihc other lines 
of work. 



30 



College of Agriculture 



Lee William Adkins 

Berlin 
B.S. ATP 

F.F.A.; Student Grange; Pres. Agricul- 
ture Council; Methodist Club; Clef and 
Key; Glee Club. 

Nevin S. Baker 

New Windsor 
B.S. ATP, AZ 

Block and Bridle; Student Grange; 
F.F.A. 

Robert Harold Benson 
Clarksrille 
B.S. AFP, AZ, <i>K<I> 

Rifle Team; Pros. Alpha Gamma Rlio; 
Chancellor .^,l|)ha Zeta; Supervisor Block 
and Bridle; Student Livestock Show; 
Treas. Junior Class. 

Paul C. Betts 

Seaford, Del. 
B.S. XX 

Footlight Club; Clef and Key. 

Donald M. Boyd 

Back Bay Beach, Siidlei/ 

B.S. 



Nicolas M. Cartagena 

Caqtias, Puerto Rico 
B.S. AAT 

Swimming Club; Spanish Club; Xewnian 
Club; IMock and Bridle; Terrapin. 

Charles W. Crawford 

College Park 
B.S. " AAT 

Student Grange; Pershing Rifles. 

William E. Crow 
Towson 



B.S. 



ATP 



Julian B. Anderson 

Laurel 
B.S. nK 

Basketball; Soccer; Intramural.s; M Club; 
Pres. Pi Kappa; 1st Lieut. ROTC; Block 
and Bridle; Interfraternity Council. 

Blair B. Barger 

Upper Marlboro 

B.S. 

Alice Ruth Bentz 

Boonshoro 
B.S. SAO 

Pres. Sigma Alpha Omicron; Glee Club; 
Lutheran Club. 

L. Carroll Biser 

Hager.itoipn 



B.S. 



S\ 



Student Grange; F.F.,\.; Block and 
Bridle. 



Alan W. Brylawski 

California 

B.S. 

Footlight Club; Clef and Key; Day- 
dodgers Club; Diamondback. 

J. Stuart Cooley 
Benri/n 



B.S. 



*A0, AZ 



Hartley- D. Crist 

(ilenelq 
B.S. ■ AFP 

F.F.A. ; Baseball; Soccer; M Club. 

Richard V. D. Eck 

Chicago. III. 
B.S. 
Daydodgers Chdj. 



Almost equal to Hollywood's version was the Foot- 
light Club' s production of "Brother Rat." Prentice's 
line about the drug store was repeated for weeks. The 
cindermen raised Maryland banners high when they 
literally and figuratively ran away with the Penn 
Relays, and the lacrosse team came out on the long 
end of a 12—3 score against Navy. Again finals came, 
after which we went home feeling very worldly, for 
we would soon be sophomores. 




i»t <««' 



i . 

















C L L K a E OF A G H I C U LT r R E 













()lim;i< H. (ioKK, Jk. 

Cambridge 

U.S. 

Ulnck Miiil Hriilli'; .'^tiiilriit ( liaii(,'<'; (aii- 
I.TliiirvCliiL. 



S. I^EONARD HaNDEN 

Baltimore 
B.S. 

I'llll.Il' R. HOGUE 

lirandi/ifine 
M.S. <I>A(-) 

1-M'"..\.; TriMs. Hl...kaii.l ISrl.llr, 

Ma.\ V. Hint 

(('(/■''■"■'■. ^'"• 
M.S. .Viil 

Kootliall: Ha.s..l)all: l.st Lieut. KOTC: 
S<al>l)aid and Blade; F.F.A.; Viee-1'res. 

M Chill. 

Lester Kiefer 

Baltimnrc 
U.S. <l>Ki;. i;.Vt) 

Pre.s. Feiuinf; (lub; Pres. Phi Kappu 
Sigma; ^nd Lieut. KOTC. 

Til ADDKIS .1. KOTT 
./(inidicd, .V. )'. 

U.S. i.\() 

Philip Mattinci.y 
Rlrerdcdc 

U.S. nK 

Russell Mizel, Jr. 

Kensinqton 
W^. <1'A(-) 

lilnck and Uridle; Tia<k: Uasehall; Swiiii- 
iiiiiif; Chih; Sutler; Canterhurv Cluli; 
\1 Cluh. 



Fn.\\( IS .V. (iHAV, .)n. 

I.il>iiili(ircii. I II. 

B.S. .\rp 

Lt. Col. IIOTC; Agrieultural Keommiics 
Clul); Student (iranK<'; CantiTliury Cluh; 
Seahliard and Blade. 



.1. IIaN.skn Ilol'K.MAN 

Ridqebi 
B.S. 
I'.I-'.A.; Student Uanil. 



AZ 



AI. f'l.ARK TIl'DSOX 

Drliiirare 
B.S. S^'l 

Inleifraternil V ( ouiicil. 

U \HI! \H \ .1. KKLL()<i(; 

II iishunitiin. D.C. 
U.S. AAA 

See. Riding Clul>; S\\ iinriiin^.' (liih; ( "an- 
terhurv Cluh. 

Harry E. Kohau, .hi. 

(uliiKir Miiiiiir 
U.S. i\o 

Daydddger.'i ( luh. 

Theodore Leizmax 

BaUimorc 
U.S. 1AM 

Maryland Line 
B.S. All- 

F.F.A.; Uasehall; Baskell.all. 

TTauhy I. Neiman 

\\ tisliiuqlon. D.C 
U.S. AZ 

Davdnd^-er. (luh; Slu.li-nl (irantfe; 
F.K.A.;Tnas. l.ullieran Cluh. 



The last All-University Night, 




College of Agriculture 



Robert L. Nixon, Jr. 

Memphis, Tenn. 

B.S. 

Elmer H. Owens, Jr. 

Hanover 

B.S. 

2nd Lieut. ROTC. 

Arthur G. Phillips 

Lonaconinq 
B.S. ' .\AT 

Diamondback; Student Hand; M Book; 
Men's Glee Club. 

James Murray Pkicel 

Glen Ann 
B.S. .VIT, \Z 

Swimming Club; F.F..\.; Bloek and 
Bridle; Student Grange. 

NoRVELL S. Ralston 

Bowie 

B.S. 

Kenton C. Reynolds 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 

Block and liridle. 



Aaron Rosenstadt 

Haiti more 
B.S. TE<I>. i:AO 

Sec.-Treas. Glee Club; Terrapin; See. 
Tau Ep.silon Phi; Hillel Foundation; 
.June Week Committee; Student Mu.sieal 
Activities Committee. 



Robert Sandler 

Baltimore 

B.S. 



Edison Noland 

Westernport 
B.S. nK 

Men's Glee Club; Trail Club; Student 
Band. 

Gilbert W. Perry" 

Annapolis 
B.S. 
Pre.s. Swimming Club; Daydodgers Club; 
Intramurals; Homecoming Committee. 

Kenneth L. Ports 

Walkersville 
B.S. AFP 

F.F..\.; M Club; Student Grange; Foot- 
ball; Softball; 1st Lieut. ROTC; Soccer. 

Patrick J. Quinn 

Toipsun 
B.S. AFP, AZ 

Vice-Pres. S.G..\.; Pres. Newman Club; 
Block and Bridle; Boxing; Chairman 
Student Victory Coimcil. 



B.S. 



SN 



Henry J. Rassier 
Washington, D.C. 

Orlando Ridout, IV 

Annapolis 
B.S. A5;* 

Pershing RiHes; Bloek and Bridle; Viee- 
Pres. Student (irange. 

Charles W. St. Clair 

Rocks 
BS. AFP 

Edcjar a. Schaeffer 
Westminster 
B.S. AZ, OAK, <J>K<J> 

Pres. Bloek and Bridle; Pres. .Vgrieultural 
Economies Club; Capt. ROTC; Scabbard 
and Blade. 



We returned in September to find that the university 
had lost a faithful friend, Mr. Hillegeist, whose por- 
trait now hangs in the main hall of the administra- 
tion building. We greeted our friends, and lorded 
over the new rats in true sophomore style. Over the 
summer the Kappa Deltas had built their French 
Normandy style house and the student publications 
had moved to better offices in the administration 
building. 







I k ^ 





-5=^' 



^ 












<^ mm 







College of Agriculture 



Ei(;knk S. Sciii.osnaci.k 

Arrident 
HS AIT, AZ 

Hldik ami Bridle; Student (iraiigo; Pres. 
r.l'.A.; I'Vesliinan Soecrr. 



HS. 



ClIAKI.KS PllILlI' SkI.TZHH 

Siller Spr'uKj 



ATI' 



Sliidcnl Maud; Master Student (iraiif.'r; 
liffjiiiii'iital liii>;lir. 

JaN'K LlHAV Snow ACKE 

Cumberland 
U.S. i;TE. IIAK. <I-K<I> 

Tn as. Mortar IJi la n I : Scc.-Ticas. \V . I! . A . ; 
I'rcs. \V.R..\.; Wonien'.s Editor DiaiMond- 
liack: Sec. Trail Clul); Stiidi-nt (irange; 
TrailCluli. 



ATI'. AZ 

Student 



^^ AUKioN ('. Smith 

II iiodshoni 
M.S. 

I'M'. A.: Block and Brid 
(Jranfie; Student Hand. 

('lyi)E W. Stki'hio.ns 
Halethorpe 

U.S. 

Er(;f:NE Sullivan 

Wuhjewood, X.J. 

U.S. i:X, OAKMIAK. AZ 

Manafiinj; Editor of Diarnondhaik; Lateli 
Key; Manager \'arsity Baseball; New- 
man Clnli; Davdodfjers Clnl). 

Joyce J. Uthus 

Tfi/iift.^rillr 
B.S. xo 

Donald F. Wiiim.;i<i.;v 
^'d.th'nuiton. D.C. 
B.S. 
(apt. l{()T(;l'er.sliinKKiH'-i- 

Pail M. Wimeut, Jh. 

WeMmitisIrr 
H.S. ATU 

Treas. Alpha Tan Omcfia; IV<s. and \ iee- 
I'res. Biding; Cliili; Sindent (Iraiifjc: 
Uloek and Bri.lle; Scaliliard and Blade; 
I'ersliinf; Bides; I.ntlieran Cliili. 



luvi.N 1'. Schloss 

liuUimore 
R.i^. AZ. .|'K-I' 



Joseph M. Shaw 

Frederick 
BS. AZ 

Block ami Bridle; F.E.A. 

P.\l L K. SlGRIST 

Princess Anne 
BS. 

Newman fliili; Block and Bridle; E.E.A. 

Jo.sEi'H M. Steger 

JlyaUsville 

B.S. 

WiLLL\.\i ('. Stevens 

Takoma Park 

B.S. 

1st Lieut. KOTC; Scahl.ard and Blade. 

Daniel W. Tal.maixje 
('he.ihirc. Conn. 



B.S. 



API* 



.Newman Clul); -.'nd laeul. |{()T('; Intra- 

ninrals. 



Glen E. Weston 

Collef/e Park 
B.S. 
'2nd Lieut. KOTC; Weslev Cluli; I'.-r.sliinp 
Kitles;l)a.vdodf;ersCluli. 



John R. Willl\.ms 

Ifi/iilt.villc 



B.S. 



IIK, AZ 



Hv\!A\ \\ . Zk.mel 

Ualtimore 

B.S. 



John Charles Thomas sings, '41 





Every afternoon before the Administration Bnildinij the ROTO presented formal i/iiard mount. 




Leonard Williams 

Silver Spring 
B.S. 



Some of us ventured to Penn that fall to watch Penn 
trample us, thus setting the stage for further defeats. 
The student body lost one of its best loved members 
that year, when Fritz, our police dog, never without 
a brick in his mouth, had to be destroyed. The third 
term campaign was in full swing and we showed our 
preference for Willkie in a student poll. 



THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS 




•<ir 



86 



& PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 




Training in foreign and international problems . . . 
offers specialized office technique . . . emphasized study 
oj economics . . . develops social leadership and execu- 
tive ability . . . 



of the college, students may enter such 
fields as business organization, personnel 
management, state administration, and 
international exchange. 



With a new name, a new dean, and new 
teaching personnel, IVIaryland's College of 
Business and Public Administration, nee 
College of Commerce, made its debut at 
the end of the summer semester. 

Under Dean J. Freeman Pyle, a well- 
defined program was put into ett'ect. The 
College now bases all its training in va- 
rious fields of specialization in the study 
of economics, which is the background for 
all administrative problems and structures. 

Instruction is now ottered in Business 
Administration, Secretarial Training, Pub- 
lic Administration, and in departments of 
Foreign Trade and Human and Natural 
Resources. From these five main divisions 




Dr. O. E. Baker Dr. James C. Doclifia; 

Prof. Eiincs C. Ravsuii 



37 





C L L E r; E OF B I S I V E S S A \ D 












CiiAui.Ks K. IJahkku, .Ik. 

Wasliinqlon, D.C. 
U.S. ■ ATQ 



Thomas E. IJoi knk, Jh. 

I'nirrrsiti/ I'drh 
lis, i;X. MAT 

M;u\vlaii(l Miuik Coopi'ialiv r. 

WaLTEU E. CllHISTMAS 

Calrerl Hi I In 
H.S. 

Manl.-.Ti.l Mncik ('oiipcr.aivc; Day- 
(iinl^crs Chil); U(isslM)r<iii^li CIiili. 

Martin Ikvinc Coiikn 

Baltimore 

B.S. 

IntiTiuilidiial Ri'latioiis ('liil>: Hillcl 
l''()iin<latioii: ( 'olK'^iatt' ("liainlxT of ( "om- 
incrcc. 

IJi UToN F. Dams 

Baltimore 
U.S. ATQ, HAE 

.liiiiior I'rcini (iiiiimittcc; Inli'riiatioiial 
Kclaliuns Cliili; Biisini'ss Manager '4:i 
Tiriapin; Old Line. 

.Iamks E. Degges, Jr. 

ll'dnhinritoti. D.C. 

U.S. i;x 

.liinior I'ldin ('i)iiiiiiitt<'c; ColU'fjiate 
( "liainlKT of ('omnirrct'; Latch Key; 
Junior >raiiat;<T Uoxiiit;. 

WlLLIA.M J. FULTOX 

Ro.^elle Park. X.J. 
Its. I'XA 

liascliall; Sec. Collegiate ('lianil)er of 
< (iiiinierce; VIee-Pre.s. Laiiil>ila (hi 

.\l|,lia. 

(llAULES 1'eaUS(JN (i.^V, Ju. 

rFa.s7/(Hf//oH, D.C. 
U.S. KA 

('apt. KO'I'C; lTilranniral>; Collegiate 
Cliamlier of Coniniene; Kos.slioroiigh 
* Inli; Daydodgers Chilt. 



JosKPii George Berlix 

Silrer Spring 

B.S. 

Kknnktii n. Uransdorf 
11 a.slunijtiin, D.( . 

U.S. i;N 

James R. ("okk.man 

Caion.irille 
B.S. 



.V. TJint) ("iTLEK 

Atlantic Citif, S.J. 
B.S. BTi: 

I'res, Ilillcl Koiindalion; Kroliinaii Foot- 
Iiall; Stndi'iit I{eligious .Vctixities C<nin- 
cil; Mi'ii's League; Collegiate Chamber 
of Coininerce. 



D.vMi) Messick Dayton 
Hiralrc 

U.S. nK 

Intramurals; Men's Glee Cliih; Clef and 
Key. 

Harry D. Fisher 

Takoma Parle 
U.S. UA>r 

.Student lianil; Boxing. 

("l.KMKNS \V. (lAIXES 

Kdijcirdod 



M.S. 

Scahliard and Blade. 



.\TQ 



John" Doiiii-.vs (Jii.mouk, .Jr. 

Waxhington. D.C. 

B.S. IN, OAK 

Trea.s. Sealihard and Mlade; Sergeant-at- 
.\iins M Clnh; I're.s. .Men's Li'ague; I'oot- 
liall; Basketball; Boxing; Track. 



Herb Gunther, Southern Conference 175'lb. champ 




Public Ad m r \ i s t r a t i on 



Norman Milton Glasgow 
Hyattsrille 
B.S. 
Wrestling. 



Harry Randolph Gordon 
Chevii Chase 



B.S. 



0X 



David Harry Greenberg 

Baltimore 
B.S. TE* 

Vice-Pres. Tau Epsilon Phi: Sec.-Treas. 
Latch Key; Manager Boxing. 

J. Charles Harry' 
Pylesrille 
B.S. ATQ, OAK, BTS, .\Z, <i>HS 

Pres. Interfraternity Council; Vice-Pres. 
S.G..\.; Pres. Beta Gamma Sigma; Treas. 
.Vlplia Tan Omega; Chairman Sophomore 
Prom; Collegiate Chamber of Commerce. 

William T. Higgins 
Hurlock 



B.S. 



AS* 



Freshman Lacrosse; Collegiate Chamber 
of Commerce. 

Sylvan L. Katz 

Washington, D.C 

B.S. 

Pershing Rifles; Collegiate Chamber of 
Commerce. 

William H. Krehnbrink 

Baltimore 
B.S. AX* 

Pershing Rifles; Swimming Club; Treas. 
Men's League; Treas. Rossborough ('lul>; 
Junior Prom Committee; '2n(l Lieut. 
ROTC; Newman Club. 

Thoma.s J. Lanahan, Jr. 

WuKhinqton, D.C 
B.S. ' XX 

Latch Key; Newman Club; Collegiate 
Chamber of Commerce; Manager Cross 
Country; Clef and Key. 



WiLLi.^M Martin Goldenzweig 

Washington. D.C. 
B.S. ^A 

Vice-Pres. Beta Gamma Sigma; Pershing 
Rifles; Daydodgers Club; Hillel Founda- 
tion; Collegiate Chamber of Commerce; 
2nd Lieut. ROTC. 

Thornton Francis Green 

Rirerdale 

B.S. 

Intramurals. 

Robert B. Hammond 

Keedysville 
B.S. OX. BA*!" 

Pres. Beta .\lpha Psi; Collegiate Chamber 
of Commerce; Student Band; .\uditor 
^L^ryland Book Cooperative. 

William C. Heathcote 

Baltimore 
B.S. KA 

Capt. ROTC; Scabbard an.l Blade; 
Autumn Carnival. 

Harry' a. Karr 
Washington, D.C. 



B.S 



*A0 



James Kinsel 

Washington. D.C. 

B.S. <i>Ae, OAK 

Pres. Rossborough Club; Pres. Calvert 

Debate Club. 

Donald E. Lacey 

Chen/ Chase 
B.S. ' 0X 

Student Band; Daydodgers Club; Mens 
(dee Cluli; Swimming Club; Maryland 
Book Cooperative; Old Line; Diamond- 
l)ack. 

Saul Laniado 

yew York. N.r. 
B.S. TE* 

Intramurals. 



Winter came and we pushed through the mud to the 
SGA Food Ball. The Glee Clubs went caroling around 
the campus spreading cheer for what promised to be 
an eventful holiday. It was that winter that the new 
gate on the north side of the campus was opened. 
January was a musical month — Kaye at the Junior 
Prom, Byrne at the Rossborough. and, a bit more 
serious, Hans Kindler in the Coliseum. 


















College of Business and 











.» 




Wai.tkk R. L()N(;a.n"i;cki;u, Ju. 

liraiirliiille 

H.S. 

IVrsliiiip Kifles: DajdoilKiTs diili; Cul- 
N'Hiate Cliiiinlicr of ("ommcrcc. 

Anne L. Maxwkli, 

BreuihedsriUe 
B.S. 

Wunii'ii's I.i'affue. 

.loiiN F. Miller 
lialiimorc 
U.S. rx. IIAK. OAK 

l*r('s. Si;;ina ("lii; Prt's. ( 'aiilcrhnry <'lul>; 
( 'lialniiaii Junior I'tdiii ( uiiiiiiitlcc; (apt. 
UOTC; Trra-s, S<i]>liomort' Class; l*r<'s. 
Marvland Hook ('oopcrativc; IiiliM'fra- 
h-niity Council; IJiisiiU'Ss Manager !)ia- 
inondliack; Tieas. Sigma Chi. 

Keith Montgomery 
H g Ellennhitrfi, Wcmh. y-^ \ 



\\ 11.1,1 \M II. M A ri'iN<;LEY, .Ik. 

II asliiiKitiiii. I).( '. 
IVS. Al'l' 

Inlraniurals; ^ikI Lii'ut. KOTC. 

Swift M( Kiwkv 

II (t.tllilKltdll. D.C. 
U.S. 
Collegiate ( lianiliir of ConinuTce. 

RonKHT M. Mii.i,i;u 

WdsllilKjIllll. IK( . 

US. WW. Mil" 

Davdoilgeis Cluli. 

.loiix Joseph MiRi'in. .In. 

U'aslii)i(/t()ii. D.C. 

U.S. 

Newman Club; Olil Line; Collegiate 



BAH' 



Collegiate Clianiher of Conimeree; 


Intei-- 


C 


lanilierof Commerei-. 


fi-atiTnity Conneil; I'res. Landn 


.'i Chi 






.\lplia; Inlranuirals. 






l?<)liEHT WlL.M.S PeTZOLI) 


DoN.M.i) E. Xewkll 

Ceufrrrille 




H 


Silver Sprlin/ 
S. 1 


\i.<: 








Intramiiral.s. 






Alexander S. Rabins 


Page H. Phatt 






Chel'tea. Ma.i.i. 


15 1; Wush'nuiton, ]).(' . 


KA 




U.S. 


See. Kappa .\lplia; InlraiMiiral 
J.ielll. HO'I'C. 


*; 1st 




Im)\\ AHl) ('. RolilNSON, .Ih 


Wii.Li.v.M Oakley Hoacu, 


.lu. 




( ullcijc I'ark 



l{ g Haltimore 



H\ 



Sophomore I'rom Committee; .Itmior 
rroni Committee; Diamonilhaek; Ter- 
rapin; I'ershing Hides; Collegiate Cliain- 
lier of Conimeree; ISosshorongh CInli. 

Russeli, M. Hi \in- 
BeltsnUc 

\grieiillnral Keononiie.s Cluh; Intra- 
innrals; Daviloilgers Clid); Collegiate 
i 'harnln-r of ( 'ommer-ee. 



U.S. HX 

Lateh Key: Diamondhaek: Maryland 
Uook Cooperative; .Manager Uieros.se; 
'IVeas. Theia Chi; Kreslnnan l.aero.ss<'. 



('l>AHE\(K .v. Scil.UMAN, .Tu. 

lidltliiKirr 
U.S. KA 

Treas. Kappa .\lpha; \ iee-l'ris. Koss- 
liorongh ( Inh; .Junior I'rom Connnittee; 
Stndinl Morale Committei'; .liniior l{ep- 
resenlative Uossliorough Cluli. 



Clef and Key's "Frantic Physician," '41 




Public Ad m i n i s t ra t i on 



Bernard Frederick Schier, Jr. 

Old Greenivich, Conn. 
B.S. A AT 

Men's Glee Cluh; Collegiate Chamber of 
Commerce; Clef and Key; Interfraternity 
Council; Pres. Alpha Lambda Tau; Sec. 
Alpha Lambda Tau. 

Wendell E. Shawn, Jr. 
B S. Sterensville jik. iue 

Associate Editor Diamondback; Wesley 
Club; Men's Glee Club; Trail Club; Sec. 
Pi Kappa; Collegiate Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

James Gibbons Sneeringer 
Gettysburg, Pa. 
B.S. 
Newman Club; Pershing Rifles; Day- 
dodgers Club; Collegiate Chamber t>f 
Commerce; 1st Lieut. ROTC. 

Edward H. Steinberg 
College Park 
B.S. ^X, IIAE. OAK 

1st Lieut. ROTC; Treas. Interfraternity 
Council; Pres. Canterbury Club; Col- 
legiate Chamber of Commerce; Student 
Religious .Activities Council; Business 
Manager Old Line; Junifir Prom Com- 
mittee; Freshman Soccer; Intramurals; 
Vice-Pres. Sigma Chi; Vice-Pres. Pi Delta 
Epsilon. 

Daniel Cleveland Triplett 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 

Collegiate Chamber of Commerce. 

Carl E. Vincent 

Sali.shurii 

B.S. 

Wesley Club; Collegiate Chamber of 

Commerce; Maryland Book Cooperative. 



John Reed Scott, Jr. 

Taknma Park 
B.S. BA>1' 

Daydodgers Cub; Terrapin; Rossborough 
Club; Men's Glee Club; Daydodgers 
League. 

Norman Starr Sinclair 
Washington, D.C. 

is.s. 

Daydodgers Club; Collegiate Chamber 
of Commerce. 



George Francis Sprott 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
B.S. ATQ 

Vice-Pres. .Alpha Tau Omega; Treas. 
.Alpha Tau Omega; Pres. Collegiate 
Chamber of Commerce: Old Line; Riding 
Club. 

John K. Tate 

M iddletoirn 

B.S. 

Mens Glee Cluh; '2nd Lieut. ROTC; 

Swimming Club; Collegiate Chamber of 

Commerce. 

Bernard Ulman, Jr. 

Baltimore 
B.S. KA. OAK 

Lt. Col. ROTC; l.st Lieut. Scal)bard and 
Blade; Footliall; Basketball; Lacrosse; 
Pres. M Cluh; Kappa Alpha Minstrel. 

Reginald C. Vincent 

pAitontown, .v../. 
B.S. .ATQ 

Lt. Col. ROTC; M Club; Vice-Pres. 
.Junior Class; Capt. Scabbard and Blade; 
Football. 



Frederick E. Wurzbacher, Jr. 

Baltimore 
B.S. <1'A(-) 

Sec. Phi Delta Theta; Collegiate Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 



That was the year Maryland received much deserved 
publicity. Some of us posed for Life's, "To Do or Not 
To Do," while others found themselves in the "Your 
University" series of the Baltimore Sun. Dr. Younger 
of Engineering was awarded the "Spirit of St. Louis" 
Award for Achievement in the field of aeronautics. 
Herb Gunther slugged his way to the 175-pound 
championship in the Southern Conference boxing 
tourney. 







s^^^^^^^^THE COLLEGE OF 




4-2 



EDUCATION 




(Xn^v^.^>-t-dL C //J^"^ 



1 AKING THE STATEMENT of Johll Dewey 

that "what the best and wisest parent 
wants for his own child, that must the 
community want for all its children," the 
College of Education is making an effort 
to meet the needs of several types of stu- 
dents. 

The College of Education is preparing 
students to teach in high, preparatory, and 
vocational schools; for work in specialized 
education and institutional fields in insti- 
tutions of higher learning; for educational 
work in the trades and industries; and for 
those who desire to become home demon- 
strators, club or community recreational 
leaders, and social workers. 

The college also offers courses for those 
students whose major interest is in other 



Develops teachers for the nation . . . offers courses in 
modern theory and practical application . . . furnishes 
data on latest methods to those already in field of edu- 
cation . . . 



fields but who desire courses in education; 
for graduate students preparing for teach- 
ing positions requiring an advanced degree 
and for positions as elementary and high 
school principals, educational supervisors, 
attendance officers, school administrators, 
counselors and other positions. 

Today an enlightened citizenship is 
needed if we are to solve the many baffling 
problems which face a troubled world. 
Perhaps of even greater importance is the 
fact that we have a new generation which 
should be prepared to deal with post-war 
problems. Upon the public schools will 
fall much of the responsibility of this enor- 
mous task, and the College of Education is 
trving to meet that challenge. 





Prof, fJlen D. Brown 



Prof. Edna B. McNaughton 



43 




C L L E G E F E 1) U C A T 1 .\ 



^ 







LoKKTTA Joy Asiikv 

Crellin 
H.S. AAM 

Wi'slrv Clnli; V.W.C.A.; Swimmiii),' 
(•1iiIk'\V.K..\.;S.-c. Alpha Drita I'i. 

Mah(;akkt Elizahf;tii Hoiton 

Hd.rhiin/. .V. ) . 
H.S. AAII 

Woiiii'ir.-. I.cayilr; Wi'^lry <'lill>. 

I'atkick .losF.rii Cakolan 
Xrir York. .V.)'. 
H.S. 
\'icc-l'rrs. Xfwinan (liil.; Track. 

15. Mkhnahd Coiikn 

lUiHimorc 

B.S. 

Preston Jamks Daisey 

lii.thop 

H.S. 

Irilci-iiatiunal Relations ('liil>. 



Mary Dinn 

Hudllsrilli' 

B.A. 

I)ay(l<n!f,'('r.s Clnli; Iiilrriiatiiin;il Ilria 
latioiis Chill. 



Rhoda Betty Eskwitii 
liroohli/n. .V. )'. 

HA. a:^: 

l)iaiiH>n(ilta<-k; Wonirn's Lfaj;uc; 'Pn-as. 
Alpha Sigma; I'an-IIil liipriMiitativr; 
I'rcs. .VIpliH Sij;nia. 



(iI.OHIA I. CiOTTLlElt 
Ocransidr. \ . )' . 

B.S. .I'll; 



Marie Beall 

DcimaxcuK 
B.S. AAA 

May Day Chairman; Juniiir Cla.^s \ir\y- 
rcscntalivr to Women's Leaunc; Junior 
Prom CommittiT; \V.K..\.; CheerU adrr. 

MiKiKi. Fran( es Brockmax 

Rirerdale 

B A. 

l)ay.lo(lp-rs Chil,: Uillr Chih. 

Loris George Chacos 

ll'dsliiinitiin. D.C. 
B.A. .hAW 

Kooll)all;Tra<-k;MChil.. 

l-tTMKlt H. CoNR.M) 
Ifiillidcii/slnini. I'd. 
B.S. ATLi. OAK 

Cadet Col. of KOTC; Seal.hani ami 
Bla.le; Koothali; Wrestling!; Tnuk: M 
Chil,. 

AxTiiow L. l)i; (huistopher 

Peek-srillr. X.V. 

B.A. 

Iiitr'anuiral Sjiorts. 

I.Al HA H. l)l RST 

Limaconing 
B.S. 

Home iM-onoinie^ ( Inli; Women's I.<<'afHH'. 

Mii.i)ui:i> I'm link (i \h\in 

liisinii Sun 
B.S. AAII 

l)i:irnoniliiaek; Swimmini: Chilt; \N'e>lev 
Chill. 

lialtimore 
B.A. KA, OAK 

I'res. S.(;.A.: l.t. ( ol. ROTC; M ( lul.; 
Kootli.ill: Boxing; I.aerossi'; Sealilianl 
ami HIaile. 



Dunn in mat action, '41 




College of Education 



Herbert J. Gunther 

Baltimore 

B.A. 

Treas. M Club; Baseball; Boxing: Foot- 
ball. 

Mari M. Ellicott Hess 

Point Pleasant, N.J. 
B.A. KA 

French, German. Swininiinfj. ('lul)s; In- 
ternational Relations ("hil>; Autumn Car- 
nival Committee; May Day; Freshman 
Week Committee; Canterbury Club; 
Victory Council. 

Joseph L. Hoopengardner 

Brunswick 

B.S. 

Football; Baseball; M Club. 

Lucille Humphreys 

Baltimore 
B.A. KD 

Swimming Club; International Relations; 
Old Line; AVomen's Chorus. 

Irvix W. Katz 

Baltimore 
B.A. <I>AK 

Footlight Club; Vice-1'res. Phi Delta 
Kappa. 

Alma Barbara Laurer 

Baltimore 
B.S. riME 

JUDSON DULEY LlNCOLN 

Takoma Park 
B.A. 1^'\>. <1>AK, OAK 

Scabbard and Blade; M Chib; Boxing; 
Wrestling; Cross Country; Track; Day- 
dodgers Club; 1st Lieut. ROTC. 

Robert L. Maisel 
Catonsnlle 
B.S. 
Soccer, Intramural S])iirts. 



Janet Heggie 

Tow.'ion 
B.A. AAA 

Treas. Delta Delta Delta; Swimming 
Club; May Day Committee Chairman. 



B.S. 

Rifle Team. 



Conrad Hohing, Jr. 

Lonaconing 



2X 



Charles Lingo Hudson 

Snow Hill 
B.A. <I>KS 

Wesley Club; Baseball. 

George W. Jarmoska 

Jersey Shore, Pa. 

B.S. 

Football; Basketball; M Club; Intra- 
murals Manager. 

Katherine E. Krafi'T 

Washington, D.C 
B.S. ■ 'I'K'S' 

Daydodgers Club; Presbyterian Club. 



B.A. 



Audrey B. Levy 
Washington, D.C. 



'J>i;2 



Ernest A. Loveless, Jr. 

Clinton 
B.A. <1>AK 

Daydodgers Club; Rossborough Club: 
Pres.-Treas. Phi Delta Kappa. 



Arnold Mermelstein 

Baltimore 

B.S. 

Riding Club. 



We went literary when Robert Frost and Carl Sand- 
burg addressed us, and saw ourselves as war corre- 
spondents after listening to Eric Severeid speak. The 
Selective Service Act was passed and the men began 
to wonder how long they could stay in school. Pi 
Kappa won the Inter fraternity Sing competition 
against fifteen other Greek clubs. Summer rolled 
around and the big question in our minds was: enlist 
or enroll? 













\„3ll<K« 

















..'.\ 



V 



/ _ 








College of Education 



IIahhikt Elkanor Mohkis 

( ' pperco 

B.A. 

I.iilliiniii Cluli; Women's League. 



lis. 



Alkx Passen 
Baltimore 



\i;ii 



I'athhia Hlizabktii Rhhauds 

j3 j; Takoma Park ^^^ 

Sec. Alplia Xi D.ltii; Y.W.C.A.: Pan- 
Hcl; Sec. 'I'crnipin Trail ('liil>; 
.Iiiniiir I'roni (Oiiimiltec; Daydoilfjers 
("liilj; Tennis. 

How Mil) V. ScilWAKZ 

jj g HtilluiKirc ^""''1' 

Latch Key; Kre.shinan Baseljall Maiiaf;er; 
liiteifiaternity .\ctivities. 

IIkhhkut Silnku 
lialtimore 
H.S. 
Glee Club; Clef and Key; Hillel Chil.. 

Mahy George St.wropoulos 

Baltimore 
HA. 
(;ieeCliil): Clef and Key. 

Lottie Elizabeth Stevenson 

Takoma Park 

li.A. 

Clef and Ki y ; \ ieo-l're.s. Wdnien .s Chor- 
us; See.-Tr<';is. Daydndger Leajjue; Wo- 
iiirn's League; l)a\"dndgers ("luh; Pres- 
Kyleriaii ( 'luh. 

Louise-Makik I'.mali 
jj g H yattsrille Hill.i v-j-g 

Women's Clmnis; Old Line; >Liy Day 
CiiiMnuttee;\V.H..\. 



Wii,i,.\ Lek. Ott 
B.S. Ilifattxrille \^|, 

Women's Rei-reation .V.ssooiation. 

S.VI.l.lK RaK I'lllLLIPS 

Darlirtijton 
B.S. 
Inlernalliinal Relations Club. 

Pearl Josephine Rom.m 

Takoma Park 

M.S. 

Women's I{ifle Team; Lutheran Clnb; 
See. Hook C()operati\*e. 

Samuel W. Si;ii)kl 

S(ilisl/(iri/ 
H..\. l.\.\l. 'I'AK 

Haseliali; Hook Cooperative. 



B.S. 



Evelyn S.mith 
\ortli Ea.it 



SK 



Treas. Sipma Kappa; Mav I)av ('om- 
ndttee; W.H.A.; Methodist Club." 

S.vMfKL (". Stf;klinc; 

Baltimore 
B.S. ALII, «^AK 

Pres. .\lpha K|)silon Pi; International Re- 
lations Club; Collegiate Chumber of 
Commeree; Intraninral .\thleties. 

Elizahi:i':i I,. Sikatmann 
H ^ Diiiitltilk vj^ 

I'res. Sigma Kappa; W.H.A. May Day 
Committee; \'iilory Conneil; Pan-IIel; 
Lutheran, (iertnau ( 'lubs. 

Hahhau.k Ja.ne W.\gner 

H.A. Rirerdale ,\2^ 

Cor. Sec. Alpha Xi Delta: Yicc-Pres. and 
Sec. Presbyterian Cluli; Davdodgers 
Club:V.W.C.A. 



Elec'T.v .Tank Wii.ll^.mson 

lAhertji Toirii 
H.S. 



One against Connecticut - and a broken 
ankle for Duvall. '41 







I 




^4// seniors loerc rt'</iiired to take a rompulsory course in II ar I'rodudiun Training. 



Three months later we left the ranks of the under- 
classmen to become juniors. We had passed the half- 
way mark. Jack Faber headed the athletic depart- 
ment and Mr. Reid became Acting Dean of Men. 
Another campus favorite left us when Mike, the cop, 
was appointed a special guard at Glenn Martin's. 
The football team, under the triumvirate, boosted 
our hopes when they defeated Hampden-Sydney, 
18-0, in the opener. 




s^^^^^^^* THE COLLEGE OF 




48 



ENGINEERING 




iJuRiNG THE PAST YEAR the College of 
Engineering has directed its activities to 
the furthering of the war effort. Its cur- 
riculum has been expanded to meet the 
demands for trained engineers, who will 
build the airplanes and the battleships, 
operate the transportation and communi- 
cation systems, and construct the muni- 
tions and industrial plants which are so 
necessary to the war jjrogram of oiu" 
country. 

The college has also been utilizing its 
faculty, laboratories, and shops to train 
workers in every specialized branch of the 
armed forces. It has trained pilots for the 
Army and Navy, inspectors for aircraft 



Provides vital technical knowledge . . . conducts special 
courses in defense work for non-college men . . . main- 
tains research program . . . 



factories, and skilled men and women for 
work in war industries. 

Under the guidance of Dean Steinberg 
efficient preparation and participation 
have been the keynote of this college's 
entire program. 



in 





Prof. George Corcoran Dr. Wilbcrt Huff 

Or. .lolm Younser 



49 





C L L E G E F E N G I N EERI NG 






Redfielo W. Allen 
Silrer Spring 



A.S.M.E. 



B.S. 

Ki.woou Hates 

Annapoiin 

B.S. 

.\.I.K.K.; M Clul.; Tennis Trani; Wr-U-v 
Clnl). 

Anson Wesley Buios 
]\'(i.'<hiniito)i, D.C. 

H.s. ex 

.V.S.C.E.; Terrapin; Pershing Rifles. 

RiciiAHi) R. Bkansdorf 
\l asliini/toii, D.C. 
B.S. 
A.I.E.E. 



Ralph Mosiier Rirlin 

Port Deposit 
B.S. 
Footliall; Lacrosse; .\.I.<'li.K. 



IN 



Howard L. Cromwell 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 

Da.vdiidfiers Club; Wesley Club; Vice- 
Pres., Program Chairman A.I.Ch.E.; 
I{ossboronf,'li Cluli; Your I'niversitv 
Clnl>. 

A.N DREW S. Deminc;, Jr. 

Washington. D.C. 

B.S. 

(Iiainiian ,\.I.E.E.; Freshman Track; 

Boxin;;. 

C. Raymond Dietz 

Chc.^acd Park 
B.S. TBI!, <I'K'1> 

A.S.M.E. ; Tan Beta Pi; IMii Kappa Plii. 



RiciiAni) W'aliku .Vr.mstroxg 

II (iixl .teres 
BS. IX 

.V.S.M.E.; Soccer; Wn-stMnf!; Krcsluuan 
I'ootball, Boxing, Ljicrossc; Cheerleader. 



Clakenci; Edward Hecker 

Haiti more 

B.S. a::;'!' 

A.S.C.E.: Pres. Dilla Si^nia I'M: Inter- 
fratcrnitv Council. 



Daniel l'. 1{<jotiie 

Washington, D.C. 
B.S. IN 

("apt. Baselmll Team; Ki>otl)all; Inter- 
fraternity Council; Track; Basketball; 
Pres. Sigma Nu. 



1).\\ II) 'riMoruv Huowx 
Millersville 
B.S. 
A.S.M.E. 

IIakry Millaway Hltler 
Kdnionston 



B.S. 



AXi: 



Donald D. Davis 

Iielt.'<rllle 
B.S. 
Pres. I)ay<lodgcrs League; Social Chair- 
man Davdodgers Club; Treas. Wesley 
(bib; A.i.Ch.K. 

Leland Arthir DePue 

Takoma Park 
B.S. 
Sec. A.I.Ch.E. 

Roland A. Khneu 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 



ROTC Summer Camp, Colonel Dunn scrubbing, '41 




College of Engineering 



Howard F. Emrich, Jr. 

Baltimore 
U.S. AS* 

A.S.C.E.; Daydodgers Chil); Riding 
Club; Fencing. 

David Robert Fetters 

Baltimore 

B.S. 

A.S.M.E.; Scabbard and Blade; Soccer; 

Basketball; Lacros.se; Capt. ROTC; M 

Club. 

James Edward Forbes 

Baltimore 
B.S. K.\ 

Vice-Pres. Kappa Alpha; Interfraternity 
Council; Junior Prom Coniniittce; Men's 
League; Lacrosse. 

Samuel Fradin 

Baltimore 
B.S. AEn 

A.S.M.E.; Hillel Club; Inlranuirals; 
Pres. Alpha Epsilon Phi. 

Ulrich a. Geller 

Chevy Chase 

B.S. 

Pershing Rifles; Scabbard and Blade; 

Rifle Team; A.S.M.E.; Capt. ROTC. 

Charles ly. Gransee 
Linthiciim Heights 
B.S. 
A.S.M.E. 

Norman E. Hathaway 

College Park 
B.S. ATQ, HAE 

Vice-Pres. Alpha Tau Omega; A.LCh.E.; 
Presbyterian Club; Engineering Student 
Council; Associate Editor Old Line; Pres. 
Pi Delta Epsilon; Publications Coimcil; 
Boxing. 

Charles Fiske Hochgesang 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. TBn, <I>K<I> 

A.LE.E.; Pershing Rifles; Radio Society. 



David A. Falck 

Baltimore 

B.S. 

.\.LCh.E.; Hillel Foundation; Pershing 

Rifles. 

Louis Flax 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 

Per.shing Rifles; A.LCh.E; 2nd Lieut. 

ROTC. 



B.S. 

Daydodgers Club. 



Kenneth Foss 
Relay 



AS* 



Richard Harrison Funke, Jr. 

Baltimore 
B.S. TBn 

A.S.M.E. 

Vernon Ragan Gingell 

Fairharen 

B.S. 

Pershing Rifles; A.S.C.E.; Intramurals; 

Boxing. 

Morris W. Green 
Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 

A.S.C.E. 

Charles R. Hayleck, Jr. 

Baltimore 
B.S. AS<I> 

Lutheran Club; A.S.M.E.; Intramurals. 

Leon D. Hoffman, Jr. 

Dayton, Ohio 
B.S. ■ 0X 

Pres. Theta Chi; Vice-Pres. Latch Key 
Society; Manager Track; Treas.; 
A.S.M.E.; .Junior Class Float Committee; 
Junior Prom Committee; Interfraternity 
Council; Intramurals. 



Something new was added when those of us lucky 
enough to have cars had to register them and dis- 
played those little parking permits. Dan was busy 
putting traffic tickets on "misparked" cars. At 
Homecoming that year we danced to Bobby Byrne 
Friday night and the next day watched the frosh 
dunk the sophs in Paint Branch. The team beat 
Florida by one point in a thrill-packed game. 




M"h£ 





C L L E G E F E X G I A' E E /? J \ G 



Ellswoutii a. IIlulock, Ju. 
Baltimore 
B.S. 
A.S.M.E.: 1st Lieut. ROTC. 

I'liouNTON Ennells 1kki..vnu 

Baltimore 

B.S. 

.\.S.M.E.: Lutheran Club; CaiiuTa Cliil); 

<";i|it. ROTf; Krcsliman Lacrosse. 

Elliott Katzen 

Baltimore 

B.S. 
.\.S.M.E. 

Ri( iiAiii) H. Kknt 

Baltimore 
M.S. Ilill, OAK 

A.S.C.E.; Pres. Tail liila I'i. 

Guy S. Kidwki.i., .In. 

Haijeratown 

B.S. 

.V.S.M.F;.: CariiiTa Chili; I'n's. Liithi-raii 

CUih. 

Kkkderick H. Koiiloss 

Bcthcsdo 

B.S. HK 

('apt. UOTC; 1st Sfit. I'crshiiiK Rifles; 

Sec. luterfraternity Coiiniil; I'ledfje 
Ciiairiiiati l*i Ka[>pa; Business Manager 

M Book: See. .X.S.M.E.; News Editor 
Diamondhaek. 

IlAlil(^ S. Kk.VSI HK, Jh. 

Il(i(jrrsliiirii 

U.S. 
.X.S.C.E. 

('ll.\l(Li:s CooKK I,()\K 

Holbiiroiiil 

B.S. 
.\.S.>LK. 



B.S. 



KuuiN W. 1.N(;lis 
Baltimore 



GX 



.\.S.^LE.; Vlee-Pres. luterfraternity 
Coimiil; Vice-lVes. Tliela Chi. 



luVINC K.\HIK 

W'dsliiiHitiiii, DC. 
B.S. TBII, 'Mil;. 'l'K<l> 

A.LCh.E. 



How.vui) Li;k Kki.i.ku 

Baltimore 
B.S. KA. OAK 

Lacrosse: Vice-Pres. Sojihomore Class; 
\'iee-Pres. Sc-nior Class; Pres. Kappa 
.Mpha; See.-Trcas. Oinicroii Di'lla Kappa; 
A.S.C.E.; M Chih: lulerfratmiilv Couii- 
.■il. 



Jackson A. Kkssin(;kr 

Silver Sjiriiifi 

B.S. 
Sec. A.S.M.E. 

Willi \\i ( ). Kim; 
]\ tishiiKjtoii, D.C. 
M.S. 
A.S.NLE. 



ToLHF.HT II. KoMCSHF.RG 

lldsliiiK/loii. D.C 
B.S. TE«I> 



(iRoHcK. William Kkwis. Jr. 
( 'licrji ( Ini.sc 
B.S. 
A.S.^r.E. 

Loiis .\. l,()/.ri'()\K 

Cheri/ r/)(/.v(' 

B.S. 

Dav.l.ML'.-r^Cluh; A.S.M.K. 




Wright helps frounce 
Western Maryland, '41 



College of Engineering 



Edward Warren Lusby 
Arlington, Va. 

B.S. 
A.I.E.E. 

Joseph V. Mariner, Jr. 

Baltimore 

B.S. 

Scabbard and Blade: Capt. ROTC; 

Mechanical Engineering Council; La- 

cro.sse. 

Lawrence J. Mattingly 

Wa.sliin(itn)i, D.C. 

B.S. 

Russell Whitney McFall 

Benri/n 



B.S. 
.\.I.E.E. 



<l>Hi;. TBII 



Daniel M. McNally 

Wofihington, D.C. 

B.S. <J>AG, .\xi: 

.\.I.('li.E.; Freshman Track; Cajit. 
ROTC. 

Geoffrey MacD. Nairn, Jr. 

Wheaton 

B.S. 

Scal)liard and Blade; Intraninral.s; Vice- 
Pres. Uavdodgers Club; .-V.S.C.E.; l.st 
Lieut. R()TC; Pershing Rifles. 

E.mmet D. Owens 
Wa.^liiiiflton, D.C. 
B.S. 
A.I.Ch.E. 

John B. Riley' 

Waxhiiuiton. D.C. 

B.S. 

.'V.S.M.E.; Davdodgers; Pershing Rifles; 

;Jnd Lieut. ROTC. 



Edmund Frank Magill 

Baltimore 

B.S. 

James N. Marsden 
Chevy Chase 
B.S. 
2nd Lieut. ROTC. 

Paul R. Mattix, Jr. 
Silver Spring 



B.S. 



<I>A0 



Freshman Boxing; 1st Lieut. ROTC; 
A.S.M.E. 

Robert C. McKee 
Chev]i Cha.ie 
B.S. AXi. TBII, <I>Hi;, <1>K* 

A.LCh.E.; 2nd Lieut. ROTC; Day- 
dodgers Club. 

J. T. Mitchell, Jr. 
Washington, D.C. 
B.S. 
1st Lieut. Pershing Rifles; Freshman 
Rifle; Davdodgers Club; Wesley Club; 
l.st Sgt. Pershing Rifles; Student Band; 
A.S.M.E.; Drum Major ROTC Band; 
Platoon Sgt. Pershing Rifles; 1st Lieut. 
ROTC. 

(lEORGE J. NeWGARDEN, III 

Washinqton, D.C. 
B.S. ATQ 

Pres. Alpha Tau Omega; Treas. A.S.M.E. 
Interfraternity Council, Pershing Rifles; 
Capt. ROTC; Rifle Team; Engineering 
Council. 

George E. Reynolds, Jr. 

Ken wood 

B.S. 

.\.I.E.E.; Sec. -Treas. Radio Society; 

Sec.-Treas. Camera Club. 

Robert M. Rivello 
Jf'a.fhington. D.C. 
B.S. TBn, <t>K'i>. OAK 

Capt. Pershing Rifles; Lt. Col. ROTC; 
Rifle Team; Engineers Student Council; 
A.S.M.E. 



Some of the campus radicals tried to outdo the Ross- 
borough Club by starting a "Club '42," but failed 
without even a decent start. November brought the 
Footlighters "Ladies in Retirement," and the dismal 
end of our gridiron rivalry with Georgetown. The 
beat of the drum echoed across the Park all during 
the night before that bitter clash. Lord Halifax spoke 
at ODK tapping and men from the Air Corps were 
here every week. 








S. .tl 



i; 







IL^ 













*» > 





College of E n g i n e e n / n g 



G. ^'I( T(JH RODGERS 

liuUiinore 
H.S. 

I'ai L Johnson Smith 
Silver Sprint/ 



B.S. 



Pres. A.S.C.E. 



James Robeht Sph ku 

Toll-son 
H.S. Ai;-1' 

('Arc Club; Krcsliman Lacrosse; A.S.d.E. 

Ray Stafford 

Ea.ston 
H.S. 0X 

A.I.K.E. 

IIknuv CiU.bekt Thompson 
lialtimurv 
B.S. 
.V.l.K.K.; liitraiiiurals. 

Kenneth M. Uglow, Jr. 

WasJiinijton, ]).('. 

B.S. <l>Hi:. TBI! 

A.I.E.E.; Engineering Student Council; 

Pres. Radio Society. 

James Edward Updegraff, Jr. 
licriri/n 
B.S. 
Swiuiuiiug Cluli; Dayiloilfjcrs Cluli; 
Senior Uepre.seulative A.S.M.E.; Capt 
UOTC; Inlrauuirals; 'ind Lieut. Per- 
shing KiHes. 

('ii;or(!E Conner Webster 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. X.X, TBH, 'Mil'. 'I'K'I' 

Pres. A.S.^LE.; Sec. Tau Beta Phi; 

Junior-Senior Dance Committee. 

Donald 1'. Wiiittkmohk 
Greenbelt 
B.S. 
A.S.C.E. 



Hugo G. Sheridan, Jr. 

Ifi/tittsrillr 
B.S. TBII. 'l'K'l> 

.\.S.M.E.; Davdodfjers Chil); Chairman, 
Transportation Committee, UaydiMigers 
League; Presbyterian Club. 

BiHT Solomon 
U'dsliinijtitn. D.C. 
B.S. 
A.LCh.i:.; -ind Lieut. UOTC. 

John Robert Spielman 

U'a.fliinf/lon. D.C. 
B.S. 'Mir. TBIL 'I'K'I' 

A.S.M.E.; Pres., Scui.ir .Vdvi^ur I'lii Kla 
Siguui. 

George Ray Stcntz, Jr. 

W(i.'<liiiitlttin, D.C. 
B.S. A'Pti 

Footlight Club; A.S.M.E.; Uavdodgers 
Club; Clef and Key. 

John Bonar Tucker 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 
A.S.M.E. 



Guy Nor.man Ullman, II 
Washinfiton, D.C. 



B.S. 
A.S.M.E. 

l">i>\\ AHD J. Warren 
. Irhiitu.s 
B.S. 
A.S.C.E. 

H.vKiiv Kknnady Wei.i.s 

lUiltimoie 
B.S. 
A.S.M.E. 



rx 



\\'0. 



Willis Harold Young, Jr. 

Rirerdalc 
B.S. 
.•V.S.^LE.; Stuilinl \'ief-Cliairiuan. 



Varsity Show, "Interruption, Please." '42 





Chemical dcwoiislratiim illunlrafed hemic principles of Klectroh/.six. 



Remember that "Oh, no, it couldn't be!" feeling 
when you heard the news that second Sunday after- 
noon in December? Almost overnight the school was 
converted to a wartime basis. A student Defense 
Council was set up and ROTC guard duty became 
something more than half-hearted gesture. Air-raid 
wardens were appointed and we stumbled around in 
our first blackout. We listened more seriously to the 
recruiting officers who came here. 



^^^^^^^ THE COLLEGE OF 




56 



HOME ECONOMICS ®^^^^ 




i„i.. ,->^. 



Gives background for home-making, and for earning a 
livelihood . . . teaches advertising, design, merchandis- 
ing and many other fields for future career women . . . 



nation of waste in every home-making 
task. 

Marie Mount, Dean of the college, has 
made the program a success through her 
congenial personality and deep under- 
standing of student needs. 



C6t'&ru^ Wtyvui:^ 



Ihe College of Home Economics gives 
to Maiyland's women students an educa- 
tional program based upon personal de- 
velopment and practical experience in 
homemaking and home management. In- 
formation on good gi'ooming, becoming 
dress, nutrition, and food preparation are 
but a few of the items which constitute this 
curriculum. 

In cooperation with the country's war 
effort, this college has reorganized its pro- 
gram to fulfill the demands for experienced 
home-makers. Realization of the fact that 
in order to have strong homes we must 
build a strong nation has placed emphasis 
on conservation, preservation, and elimi- 




Mrs. Curry X. Caples 
Mrs. I'Vieda ^McKarlaml 



Miss Vienna Curtiss 
Mrs. Claribel Welsh 



57 




College of Home Ecoxom ics 





: -^ 





t^ \ ' y 





Maiuan LorisK Hkck 
W axhlnifion. DA'. 

U.S. .\oii 

('(ir. S<'C. .\()l'i; Sim-, ami N'icc-l'rcs. 
V.\V.('..\.: Trias., N'ic.-I'rr.s.. IVs. 
Home Kc. ('Iiil>; Ui(liii(;. IiitiTiiational 

l{.laliims(liil>-. 



Sium.Kv LiKi.i.A Bennett 
AiKicostia. D.C. 
H.S. 
Sec. Historian Baptist Stuili-nt IniDn. 

KLIZAliETll M. l{l HKK 

Unirer.fiti/ I'lirl: 
H.S. AAII 

Himic Kciinniiiirs, Iiilrirwiliiiiial Ucla- 

t icills ( 'lllllS. 

Ann-Revell Chadeayne 

SI. Loiii.'i. -l/o. 
U.S. KKT 

Ui Til Cohen 

]l'(i.shin(ifon. D.C. 

lis. 

Lois Robehta Davis 

M'd.slilm/loii. D.C. 
Its. .VZA 

Trcs. .\lplia Xi Delta: I'an-HilUnie 
Couneil: Women's League; Swimming 
Cli.li. 

KuA.NCES De.M.VHKK 

Colli (jf Ilciiihl.-t E.tlatv.i 
U.S. .\ZA 

Home Ke<inoinies, Davilodgers Chilis; 
Y.W.C.X. 

HiTii Dnsi! 

lialtiiiKirc 

U.S. 



I'livi.i.is Hkilock 

Clllllll J nil II 

U.S. 

Mahcahi:! M. Hoiian.w 

( '(il<iii.-<rillf 
B.S. KKl" 

Clef anil Key; Terrapin; Jr. I'nun Cimi- 
mitlee. 

Eileen H. (auk 

./('.s-.s(/y>.v 
U.S. 
Home Keononiies, Wesley CUilis. 

Jane Amy Ciiapin 

iWi.thiiKiton, D.C. 
B.S. AAA 

See.-Treas. S.(;..V.: See. Mortar Board: 
Viee-Pres. Clef and Key: See. Women's 
Chorns; Treas. Kootlight Club. 

M.Mi.iDHiK h. Cook 

L'lilicr.^iti/ Pari: 
B.S. AAA 

See. Kootliglit CUil); Pan-Hellenie Coun- 
eil; May Day Committee; Freshman 
Wec-k Commlllei-; Jr. Trom Committee; 
See. Delta Delta Delta; Home Kionomics 
Club. 

Maky .I.\nk Dawson 

U'dsliliifiloii. D.C. 



B.S. 



KKl' 



Sorority Registrar; Historian Sophomore 
Class: See. .lunior Class; See. Kappa 
Kappa (iaiiuiia; Hiinie Keonomies Club 

Elizaueth Jean Donoiii e 

U'd.iliiniitoti, D.C. 

B.S. 

Home Keonoiiiir-, Daydodgers Clubs. 

Fu\N( Es Jean Di nbeki; 
/'(j.s-.vrt/r, .v../. 



B.S. 



•Mi; 





* I. 




Lord Halifax becomes an ODK, '42 




College of Home Economics 



Betty Lou Fike 

Washington, D.C. 
B.S. r<l>B 

Home Economics Club; Historian; In- 
ternational Relations flub; Swimming 
Club; Cor. Sec. Gamma Phi Beta. 

Rita Frey 

Catonsrille 

B.S. 

Old Line; PVeneh Club; Women's Chorus; 
Home Economics Cluli; Diamondback; 
May Day; Pres. Margaret Brent Hall; 
Women's League; Homecoming. 

Jennett Lucile Giovannoni 

Washinqton. D.C. 

B.S. 

Doris Marie Green 

Washington. D.C. 

B.S. 

Patricia Hardie 

Indiantown Gap, Pa. 
B.S. .\Z\ 

Women's League; Swimming Club; Vice- 
Pres. Alpha Xi Delta. 

Mary' Catherine Henley 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 

Dayiloclgers, Home P^conomics Clubs. 

Nancy B. Holland 

Cumberland 
B.S. KA 

Pres. Kappa Delta; Pres. Mortar Board; 
Vice-Pres. Women's League; V.W.C.A.; 
Pan-Hel; Home Economics Club; Epis- 
copal Club; Sec. Women's League. 

Louisb: a. Jone.s 
Takoma Park, D.C. 



B.S. 
Trail Club. 



AAA 



B.S. 
Home 

Club. 



Evelyn Mary- Foerster 
Wa.thingion. D.C. vj^ 

Economics ( lub; Daydodgers 



B.S. 



Mary Gautier 
Washington, D.C. 



A* 



Beulah May- Gisriel 

Baltimore 

B.S. 

Home Economics Club; Methodist Club; 
Daydodgers Club; Y.W.C.A. 

Elizabeth S. Haase 

B.S. Baltimore vj^ 

Sec. Sigma Kappa; Pres. Omicron Xu; 
Sec. Lutheran Club; W.R..\.; Home 
Economics Club; May Day; Women's 
League. 

Mary- D. Harris 

Bel Air 
B.S. 
Pres. Women's League; Pres. Margaret 
Brent Hall; Comm. WL\SG; Episcopal 
(lub; Home Economies Club; Treas. 
Omicron Nu; Women's Chorus; Spanish 
Club; May Day; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee; Danforth Fellowship. 

Frances Evelyn Hidnert 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 



B.S. 



Marianne Hunter 

Bethesda KKF 



Diamondback; Old Line; Women's Chor- 
us; >Liy Day; Freshman Week Com- 
mittee, Social Chairman Kappa Kappa 
Gamma. 

Mary' Jeannette Kaylor 
15 1^ Hagerstown j^^ 

Lutheran Clul); Y.W.C.A.; Home Eco- 
noiuics Chib. 



After the first period of adjustment we settled into 
our speeded up college life. The week-ends were filled 
with farewell parties for friends going into the service. 
The traditional All-University Night was cancelled, 
but finals still harried us. After exams we strutted at 
our Prom and danced to Woody Herman's music 
again the next night. Sigma Phi Sigma became Iota 
Sigma and talked of going Sigma Chi. 






off/, 



.J» S 

^4 -J! 











',a^ 



a*, 



sF'' 













College of Home Economics 



Jeanne Kepner 

Chevy Chase 

B.S. 

Mabel Klebold 
U.S. College Park .^^n 

Ticas. Women s Clidnis: Sec. Social 
Cliairiiiiin Alpha Delta Pi; Clef anil Key; 
Operella. 

SiiiHhEY M.vcKay 

jj c; Wash'nKjton, D.C . ^Oll 

Student Government As.sociation; Home 
Economics Chib; May Day Committee; 
Sec. Senior Class; Pan-IIellenic Coiiiicil. 



MVUTI.K JkaN KlI.l.I.NCSWOKTll 



B.S. 



Mdiilnissct. X . ) . 



I'll- 15 



Miriam Mednick 

]{ c; Xorfolk. ]'a. 

I lome Economics Club. 



'Ml' 



Ellen C. Notz 

Washinytoii, D.C. 

B.S. 

Home Economics, Xewman, Spanish 

Chil.s. 

Jean M. Persons 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 

Rosaleen Pifer 

Silrer Spring 
B.S. ' KA, IIAE 

.\s.sociatr WdnuTi's Editcir. Terrapin; 
Da.vdodfiers. Home Economics Clubs; 
V.\V.C..\.; Women's Chorus. 

Catherine M. Ritchie 
]Va.'<hingi()n. D.C. 
B.S. 
Daydodgers Club; W.R.A. 



Terrapin; Diauinndiiaek; Junior l*roiu 
Coinniiltee; Ma.v Day Conunitli'e. 

C'aklyn H. Lowe 

Stewari.stoirn. Pa. 

B.S. 

Women's League; Studi'ut (iranf;<-; Home 
Economics. Canterbury Clubs. 

Mvuil-'iN (iF.NK Mason 

B.S. Qiiirn .Innr ^A 

Home Kccinoniio, Swiminiii); Clubs; 
V.W.C..\.; Women's Liafiue; May Day 
Committee. 

Caroline Tandy Menc 

]\'a.'<hitigt()n, D.C. 

B.S. 

Wonu-n's League; Women's Chorus; May 

Day Committee. 

Sylvia Perlstein 

l\ (isliington. D.C. 

B.S. 

Nancy Jean Phillips 

l{ ^ L'nirersiti/ Purl: AAA 

Margaret Price 

Chiiltaroi/, IV.Va. 

1!.S. 

^■i(■e-Fres. Kappa Delta; Canterbury 

Club; ^'.W.C..\.; Home Economics Chib; 

lnlernatiim.il Ki'latinns Club. 

Katiiehink L. Roi.iMi 

Crcenbclt 

B.S. 

Davdodgers Club; Home Economics 

Club. 



Dorothy A. Hi ndles 
\]'usliingti>n. D.C. 
B.S. T'l'H 
Treas. (iaiuma I'lii H<la; I'an-Ilel; Can- 
terbury Club; 11 e Eeouomirs Club; 

Inlirnalional Kdalions Club; Terr.ipin. 



Footlighters' "Ladies in Retirement," '42 




College of Home Economics 



Martha Rawlings Seidenberg 
Washington. D.C. 
B.S. 
Swimming Club. 

Ruth Anne Sleeman 

B S Frostburg j^^ 

Women's League; Lutheran Club; Inter- 
national Relations Club; Home Eco- 
nomics Club; Y.W.C.A. 

LoRA Marie Stauber 
gg JJmveraity Park kKT 

Old Line; Home Economics Club. 

Lois Gertrude Suit 
College Park 
B.S. 
Women's Recreation .Association. 

Ruth Marie Vollaxd 
B.S. Hyattsville kKF 

Diamondback; Home Economics Club. 

Charlotte E. Warthen 
B.S. Washington, D.C. ^gn 
Home Economics Club. 



Charlotte Elissa Weikinger 
Bg Washington, D.C. kKT 

Da3'dodgers Club; Women's Chorus; 
Home Economics Club; Terrapin; Old 
Line; Sec. Maryland Nutrition Com- 
mittee; Baptist Student I'nion. 

Doris Wood 
gg Wa.shington, D.C. kkf 

Treas. Women's League; Women's Chor- 
us; Clef and Key; Treas. Freshman 
Class. 



Jean Frances Sexton 
B.S. f'/'^'W '^'''««'' AAA 



Daydodgers Club; 
Club; Riding Club. 



Home Economics 



Reta Elizabeth Smith 

Waterbury, Conn. 

B.S. 

Women's Chorus; Trail Club; Footlight 
Club; Clef and Key. 

Betty G. Steely 

gg Hyattsrille 43^ 

Calvert Debate Club; Riding Club; 
Footlight Club; Daydodgers Club. 

Doris M. Thompson 

gg Catonsville ^qII 

Pres. Alpha Omicron Pi; Home Eco- 
nomics Club; Pan-Hel Council; Junior 
Prom Committee; May Day Committee; 
Terrapin; Y.W.C.A. 

Roberta Wathen 
Calvert Hill 
B.S. 
Women's Chorus: Clef and Key. 

Betty Eileen Wascher 
g g Englewood, N.J. ^qH 

Women's Chorus; Trail Club. 

Harriet Whitson 
gg Keic Gardens, JV.y. AAA 

Canterbury Club; Home Economics 
Club. 

Elizabeth Jean Wood 
B.S. Washington, D.C. ^^n 

Women's Recreation Association; Home 
Economics Club; Trail Club; Presbyte- 
rian Club. 



Anne Lacey Young 
Washington Grove vj^ 

Economics Club; Canterbury 



B.S. 

Home 

Club; Riding Club. 



Maryland was a guest at the Eastern Intercollegiate 
Boxing Tournament and walked off with the team 
championship, but no individual champions. Clark 
Shaughnessy came here for a one-year stand, and 
Dean Stevens left the College of Commerce, which 
became the College of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration, under Dean J. F. Pyle. We bade goodbye and 
good luck to the first wartime graduating class in 
early June. Three weeks later we were seniors. 







r . 1^ 














^^^^^^^^^^^ THE 



SCHOOL OF 




Matcrnii}! traniiiKj is 
part iif tlir ciirriciihiiii. 



«sJ 



NURSING ^ 



Nursing as a wartime profession offers 
a patriotic challenge to every American 
woman. The vital duty of caring for the 
sick and wounded in the armed forces is 
one of which anyone can be justly proud. 
In keeping with wartime tempo, the Uni- 
versity of INIaryland Nursing School has 
accelerated its course of study without 
sacrificing its high standards. ^Monthly 
it sends units of well-trained, efficient 
nurses overseas to render aid to our men 
in the Army, Navy, and Marine Corps, 
and to bear high America's emblem of 
humanitarianism and mercy. 



i 




'S'W 



Mi>s Awii; t liicino.N 




Nursen relax — between hospital duties and iiistnicliou. 

63 





.S' r; // r> o l o f N r n s i \ g 







.Tank Eliza hktii Adams 
lialiimore 



Ethel Wkbstp:k Bearo 
Gettynhiirn, Pa. 



Ada Brown 

London, ]\'.]'a. 



Mauciehite Elsie Ik kh 

Leonia, X.J. 

B.S. 



Mary Estelle Davis 
New Market 



Perry Ruth Douciier 
Ilintou, If. I 'a. 



Martha Carroll Fanning 
Xeir York, \. )'. 



Doris Louse Gerwig 

EllicotI City 

U.S. 



fc s 



Much experience is gained in the clinic 



Mary Evelyn Allen 
Lexington, S'.C. 



Tn\i\ I.ENoRA Bennington 
Delta, I'a. 



Rebecca Ann Brown 
London. MM 'a. 



Klohence Hstelle Darden 
Hertford, N.C. 



Amy Lee DeShane 

Galena 



Evelyn Dolores Eselhorst 

Dinnliiik 



Rt TH Elizabeth Forsyth 
Baltimore 



Eloise Josephine Goode 

Maddu.r 

B.S. 




X 



School of N u r s i h' g 



Eleanor Louise Gordner 

Jerseytown, Pa. 

B.S. 



Phyllis Moore Holbrook 
Asliland, W.Va. 



Bernice Mae Horner 
Nanticoke 



Betty Mae James 
Baltimore 



Catherine E. Kurzenknabe 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

B.S. 



Ula Virginia Maxwell 

Salem, W.Va. 

B.S. 



Mary Alice Michael 

Washington, D.C. 

B.S. 



Ruth Mae Misener 
Baltimore 



Elizabeth Harlan 
Catonsville 



Sara Frances Hollister 
Denton 



Miriam Elisabeth Hutchins 

Barstow 

B.S. 



Frances Anita Jones 
Cardiff 



Clara Gertrude Lebeck 

Cumberland 

B.S. 



Idona Elizabeth Mehring 

Taneytown 



Ruth Marguerite Michaels 
Westernport 



Pauline Martin Moore 
Denton 












As seniors we helped usher in the first summer 
semester system. Remember the hot nights and how 
hard it was to study? Some of us took a heavier 
schedule and graduated in October. The social sea- 
son was anything but formal. Shirt-sleeve dances, 
the Beachcombers Ball, and other occasions gave us 
the social freedom we needed. The Autumn Carnival 
marked the zenith of the S.G.A.'s activities and the 
end of the semester. 




School of N u r s i n g 



.M AUdi i;mTK M \iiiK 1'anmi.i, 

H'itisldll, 1(1. 



'riiKi.MA Ann Pkice 
Johnstotrn. I'll. 



M AiiiK Teresa Sacakuia 

I'lirrti) Hicit 



^Iaiujauet Fi.ohknc !•: Si-.i.i.xeh 
Jes.sups 



MiHiAM Klizahktii Stii.tz 
Frcdrrick 



Anna Faith Wieceut 
.1 aiiKiivd, .V. )'. 



SUIHLEV N'lHClMA 1'kaTI 

Baltimore 



C'l.AHA ("i EN EVA Roberts 

Street 



Rita Dohotiiy S( iiwinger 

JitiltiiiKirc 



Klizaiseth Jane Smith 
Somerset, Pa. 



Helen Wellham 

Thniorer 



Fhances Danhv \Vii,i.iam> 
Cumberland 



Susan Makcakkt ^'eaceh 
Thoma.s, M'J'd. 



The children's nursery provided valuble 
knowledge for student nurses. 




THE SENIORS 



Rcr. Peter Marshall ira.i tapped for ODK. 




%_. f H^^^^^^^^^H JBHH8 






^^^H^^""^"""- 



The Penjisylrania Militarj/ Institute provided the 
nutsic for the Military Ball. 



Carl Harris, trcuxiinr; Sliirley MeKa,\-, sn-nhiry; Frfderick 

Bach, president; Howari! Keller, rice-president; Mary Katherine 

Martin, Itistoriiiu; Herbert Carhart, sergeanl-at-aniis. 



Ix THEIR LAST YEAR the senior.s lived for 
the expressed purpose of getting the most 
out of schooh With the .soon to be realized 
future of armed service, industrial work, 
and general activity as American citizens 
constantly in mind, the seniors really tried 
to make this year a genuine climax to a 
successful college career. 

In spite of these trying times, the fourth- 
year students were able to get the most out 
of lectures, laboratories, discussions, and 
extra-curricular campus activities. 

Leaving a commendable record behind 
them, they went forth to do their part in 
making a world in which other young men 
and women may have the opportunity, in 
years to come, to attend schools of higher 
learning, and to develop themselves ac- 
cording to their own free wills. 



67 



SENIOR ACTIVITIES 




The cumpti.i cliniaxcd tiiinuncr ttocial actirities iritli the Beuchcoinbcrs Hall. 
SrniofK celehralcd "June in Januarif iritli the Snoir Hall and the Militari/ Hall. 




68 



THE JUNIORS 



RoliiTt Boulter, treasurer; 
William Helbock. presi- 
dent; Robert Hill, vice- 
president. 




Early in the summer it was found neces- 
sary to replace missing class officers, due 
to the withdrawal from school of the presi- 
dent and vice-president elect. Bill Hel- 
bock became president, assisted by Bob 
Hill, previously elected Mary Jane Chase, 
and Bob Boulter. 

The success of the Junior Prom proved 
that the class' reputation for giving fine 



proms was well founded. Hal Mclntyre's 
band played for the dance, which was held 
in the Willard Hotel Ballroom. Trans- 
portation difficulties were neatly solved 
by prom chairman Ted Beuermann, who 
made arrangements by which special street 
cars took the formal-clad Juniors from 
campus to the dance and back. 



Mortar Board Tappiiu/. 



Bill Stednian swears in John Watson as neir Student Board Chairman. 




69 



JUNIOR PROM 




.1 larf/r croird dd/icril at "StntjilKuitjfrs Hall. 




70 




"After the tiall was over. 



Ox January 15, with the help of the Capi- 
tal Transit Company, a migration took 
place which was one of the great epics in 
Maryland's history. Two thousand stu- 
dents took time off from their studies and 



spent the evening in strap-hanging, danc- 
ing, meeting people, and "mixing" so- 
cially. In spite of the war, the Junior Prom 
was a great success. 



President Helbock and Prom Chairman Beuermann with other class officers. Chase and Hill, enter the last 

lap of the promenade icith their dates. 




71 



THE SOPHOMORES 



Kil ItiiliT. pivsidont ; Jaiu' 
Hoswcll, secTc'tiiry ; Bob 
Kisliton, treasurer; John 
Hensoii. vice-president . 




SophiiiiKirc Ilonienimiiifi pnniram piidrd in Paint 
Branch, JoUowed hij mud battle. 




1 iii; I.AHCKST OF ALL the classcs, the sopho- 
iiioi'cs slniicd oil' tlic year willi a l)aii,t>' — 
much to tlic dismay of (lie tVosli. traiH- 
lioiially green and unschuoled in rehition- 
sliips with the "sii])ei'ioi'" second-year stn- 
(h'nls. 

Never l)efore lias an incoming chiss met 
sueh a well -organized ratting jjrogram as 
did this year's freslimeiL I'nder the sa- 
distic wings ot' I'resident Kd Rider, head 
ratter, Al Crowell. and \'ice-I'resident 
John Hensoii, a complete and vigorous plan 
of systeinal ic "indoetrination" of tlic frosh 
was (leveloj)ed. Traditions were inaugu- 
rated which included the wearing of pig- 
tails liy rahl)its. Mack and gold ties liy 
rals. and the ])ri\ilege of using Willow Oak 
Walk iiy up|)erclassmen. 

Socially ll:c class went formal to the 
So])liomorc I'rom. ariaiigc<| hy llcm^y 
Frieke. Holt Hisliton handled I lie fmids for 
the class, wliile .lane Hoswell took diligent 
notes as secictar\'. 





.1 shirt-sleere dance hi/ the SoijIiDinorcs rounded out 
(I complefelj) infurm(d siDutner nDciciI aeasou. 



A jam reunion enlivened intermis- 
sion at the Sophomore Prom with 
Bob Diehl on the bass and Buddi/ 
Ehrlieh on the trumpet. 



FROSH VERSUS SOPH 




.S'o/)/(N arise (ritiii llic depths <if Paint lirancli to "ijct" the (rush. 



Sororities held a "shower" (iiisirering freshmen 
praijers for rain. 




Under sophomore snperri.iion, Jreshiiien leant 
.lelf-expression . 



74 



THE FRESHMEN 




First row: Ray Haiuiley, 
president; Jean Smith, 
Slimmer semester secre- 
tary; Bobbie McKee, sec- 
retary, fall semester; Ben 
Wilson, summer semester 
president. Second row: 
Alan Stocksdale, treas- 
urer; Bob Beckett, vice- 
president. 



The registrafum crush wax followed by an introduction 
to the S.G.A.for the still-bewildered froxh. 



With early October there descended 
upon the canipu.s some thousand rats and 
ral)bits, who added a bright note with 
their freshman caps forced on them by 
ruHng sophomores. Black and yellow ties 
flew in the fall wind, and the new frosh ran 
all over campus from teas, meetings, and 
dances, to classes, drills, and the Grill. 

The strain and "rain" of ratting were 
bi'ought to an end by the victory over the 
sophomores, masters of rat race, in the 
traditional tug-of-war over and through 
Paint Branch. Thus the colorful parades, 
prayer services at the girls' dorms, and 
adventures to the obstacle course disap- 
peared for the duration. 

The freshmen were led through their 
first year in college by Ray Handley, as- 
sisted l)y Bob Beckett, while "Bobbie" 
McKee took notes. 




75- 



OMIGRON DELTA KAPPA 



SICniA ("IKCLE 

Ilonorary Leadership F rater n it ij 

Foiiiidcil a! \VAsHi\(iT()\ AM) Lee Univeksity in 191Jf 

E.stahli.s-hi(l at flic l'\i\ kksitv of Mahvlaxd /// 1937 



il 



m^ 



T 



Omicrox Dklta Kai'I'a is a mumi's na- 
lioiial honorary socifty wliicli recofiiiizes 
outstaiidiii.n leadership and ability in schol- 
arship, athletics. i)iil)licati()ns, and other 
extra-curricular activities that make up 
colle.ue years. All I hat leads to furtheriuii' 
ideals of heller citizenshij) and actixc par- 
ticipation in conunnnity and school life is 
whole-heartedly supported hy Ihis society. 
This year, as ^laryland ti-adition has 
always dictated. Oniicron Delta Kappa, 
in cooperation with Mortar lioard. opened 
the Vniversitys formal social season by 
sponsoring the Calvert Cotillion. With the 



sweet and swiui^ i-hythni of ^lorgan Baer 
and his orchestra, the Cotillion was one of 
the most outstanding lie and tails, ten-to- 
two (hvnces of the year. 

The society's tajjpinn' is always one of 
the most ini])ortant ceremonies on the 
cam])us calendar and this yi-ar ])ro\'ed to 
be no exception. In keeping with the mili- 
tary temjx) set by the rest of the I'nixcr- 
sily. the fi'aternity added ^lajor (uMi. 
Milton .V. Keckford and Rvv. Peter Mar- 
shall to its list of ilhisli'ious honoi-ary mem- 
bers. Undergraduate students ta|)|)ed at 
the same ceremony were Felix ( ardegna, 



I'clir M(ii:-<liall «(/(// (\v6r.y 0.1). K. /■ 



(ippilKI. 




76 




First roil-: Bach, Beiiermann, Oardegna, Carhart, Conrad. Scrond row: Currin, Gilnioie, (jrelccki, Giinther, Harry, Hunt. Third roic: 
John.son, Keller, Kent, Kinsel, Lincoln, Miller. Fourth row: Rivello, Schaeffer, Steinberg, Sullivan, VandenBcrg, Vincent. 



Edgar Schaeffer, Clifton Currin, Herbert 
Beuermann, Frederick i\I. Johnson. Regi- 
nald Vincent, William Helbock, Fred 
Bach, Herbert Ginither, Robert James, 
Max Hunt, Judson Lincoln, and Joseph 
Decker. 

Officers for the past year were: Milton 
VandenBerg, president; Charles Harry, 
vice-president; and Oliver Guyther, sec- 
retary-treasurer. 



Members: Fred Bach, Herbert Beuermann, Felix 
J. Cardegna, Herbert Carhart, Luther Conrad, 
CHfton Currin, John Gihnore, Ramon Grelecki, 
Herbert Gunther, Charles Harry, William Helbock, 
Max Hunt, Robert James, Frederick M. Johnson, 
Howard Keller, Richard Kent, James Kinsel, 
Judson Lincoln, John Miller, Robert Rivello, Nor- 
man Rosenfield, Edgar Schaeffer, Edward Stein- 
berg, Eugene Sullivan, Bernard Ulman, Milton 
VandenBerg, Reginald Vincent. 
Faculty: R. B. Allen, H. C. Byrd, R. W. Carpen- 
ter, E. N. Cory, W. H. Gravely, C. B. Hale, L. V. 
Howard, W. B. Kemp, P. E. Smith, R. V. Truitt, 
R. E. Wysor. 



77 




MORTAR BOARD 

Senior ]]'(>)iifn'.s IIoiKinirij Socicli/ 

Fniniiltd (it SwAKTiiMoHK College /// I!) IS 

Estdhllslicil (it the Vs\\YMsv\\ OF Mahvlam) in l9.JJt 



Membership in Mohtak Hoaiji) is one 
of tlic liiiiliest honors that a junior woman 
student can receive. KUyihihty is based 
upon outstandinff scholarsliip. leadership, 
and service. 

This year Mortar Hoard (Hrecled its 
ener<>y toward the war efi"orl, and with the 
cooperation of the AVonien's League spon- 
.sored a lecture hy the leaders of the 
WAACS, >YAVKS, SPAliS. and Signal 
Corps. 

Other projects of the year included a 
"Smarty Party" for all sophomore women 
with a '2.7 average, selling chrysanthe- 
nuuns at Homecoming, selling punch at 
the Footlight Club plays, having a .silver 
service display, and cooperating with Onii- 
cron Delta Kappa in sponsoring the Cal- 
vert Cotillion. 



Because of the accelerated program of 
the University, it was necessary for Mor- 
tar Board to conduct two tapi)ing cere- 
monies. Cadet-Colonel Day in Jamiary 
and May Day in the spring semester. .Vt 
graduation a scholarship award of $5 in 
defense st;im])s was given to the senior 
woman with tiie highest four-year average. 

The officers and members for this year 
were: Nancy Holland, president; Polly 
Hardy, vice-president; Jane Chapin. .sec- 
retary; Jane Showacre, treasurer; and Ann 
Pater.son. historian. 

Mk.mhkrs: .Jiic(|iielinc Hro])hy, Ruth Hiicliaiiaii. 
.lane Chapin. ^hiry .lane Chase. Kditii Diinford, 
Pauline Hardy. Nancy Holland. Barhara Nutwell, 
.Vnn I'atersoii, .lane Showaere, Mary Ellen Wolford. 
Kaitlty: Mrs. Frances T. Casharian. Miss Rosalie 
l^eslie. Miss I{ol)erta Mack. Dean .\iiele H. Stanij), 
Mrs. Alice-Janet Thnrston. 



Firxl row: Rropliy, Rmlianan, ('liapin. Chase, Duiiforil. Secoiiil rnir: Ilanlv. Ilolliiiid, 
Nut Hill, I'atcrson, Showacre, Wolford. 




78 




First row: Cardegna, Currin, 
Dietz, Esher, Funke, Kabik. 
Second row. Kent, Marsden, 
McKee, Pierce, Rivello, Sand- 
ler. Third row: Scott, Sheridan, 
Solomon, Tucker, Uglow, Vial, 
Webster. 



TAU BETA PI 



MARYLAND BETA CHAPTER 

Honorary Engineering Fraternity 

Founded at Lehigh University in 1885 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1929 




1 AU Beta Pi, the foremost honorary so- 
ciety for engineering stndents, was estab- 
Hshed on the Maryland campus in 19'-29. 
Seniors in the highest fifth of their class 
and juniors in the highest tenth of their 
class wear the Bent of Tau Beta Pi. Other 
qualifications for membership are high 
standards of integrity, adaptability, and 
leadership. 

Because of the accelerated program 
three tappings were held this year. These 
took place in the summer, winter, and 
spring. During the winter the Maryland 
and Johns Hopkins chapters held joint 
initiation banquets at which time promi- 



nent engineers and national officers were 
guest speakers. 

Officers were Richard Kent, president; 
Russell McFall. vice-president; George 
Webster, secretary; Myron Creese, treas- 
urer; and Charles Dietz, cataloguer. 

Members: Bruce Burnsidc, F. J. Cardegna, Clif- 
ton Currin C. R. Dietz, Joseph Esher, Richard 
Funke, Randolph Harding, C. F. Hochgesang, I. 
Kabik, R. H. Kent, J. X. Marsden, R. C. McKee, 
Carson Moyer, E. D. Owens, Edward Pierce, Robert 
Rivello, Henry Sandler, Edwin Scott, H. G. Sheri- 
dan, B. Solomon, William Sturges, J. B. Tucker, 
Kenneth Uglow, Peter \\a\, George Webster. 
Faculty: Russell B. Allen, George Corcoran, 
Myron Creese, Wilson Greene, Wilbert HufiF, M. A. 
Pyle, S. S. Steinberg, John Younger. 



79 



BETA ALPHA PST 



TAl ( IIAPTKR 

Professional .iccoiiniiiuj FratiTHifi/ 

Fuinulrd (it the University of Illinois /// I '.)!'.> 

Established at the Uxiveksity of Mahyland //; J'J.JJf 




hirst roir: Bourne, FisliiT, }Iarry, Ilanuiioml, Lamlicrt. Scmiiil mw: 
Lazinskv, Milli-r, I'etzulcl. Kolnik, Scott, Sinclair. 



Beta Alpha Psi is a national acconntinii 
fraternity wliich i.s recognized by tlie 
American Institute of Accountancy. To 
become a member, a student must major 
in accountinff and have a high schohistic 
average. An "A" average is ref|uired for 
sophomores, while a "B" average makes 
juniors eligible. An examination is given 
to all prospective members. 

A night meeting is held every month at 
which time honorary members are tli(> 
speakers. One of the speakers this year was 
Lieutenant Cissel, a former professor of 
accounting at the University and now a 
member of Uic \ii\y department. 

Two l)an(|uels are held during Ihe yeai', 
and Frank Shallenberger was the speaker 
at the full b;m(|iict. "Mr. Shiilletiberger is 
the ( Ompt roller lor |{rager-Kiseiil)erg. and 



was the past-president of the Maryland 
As.sociation of Certified Public Account- 
ants. At the baiuiuet Mr. Shallenlierger 
and Dr. Rayson were initiated because of 
outstanding work in the accounting field. 
Dr. Ray.son is profes.sor of accounting in 
the College of Business and Public Ad- 
ministration at the University. 

The officers of the fraternity were ^lar- 
vin Lambert, president; Robert Petzold, 
si'cretary; John Scott. vice-j)resident ; and 
llarrv Uisher, treasiiier. 



Mkmukhs: 'I'lioiiiiLS lk)uriH', Ihirry l"'i.s!ier, U(>1)itI 
|{. ilainnioiKl, Xorvell II. Ilawkin.s, M. .Io.sc])h 
i/Minherl, Irviii Liiziiisky, Loi" MaiscI, Roljcrt Mil- 
ler, Holicrt lVt/.()l<l, David Roliiil<, Noniian Hosoii- 
fifld, .luliii Scott, Xorman Sinclair. 
F.\(ri/rv; Charles Heiitoii, .Ir.. liarvey Casljarian, 
I'nnes ( '. liavsoii. 



80 



T 



SIGMA ALPHA OMIGRON 



Honorary Bacteriology Society 

Founded at Washington State College in 1925 

Established at the University of Maryland in 19-32 



Sigma Alpha Omicron, an honorary bac- 
teriology fraternity, strives to promote 
vigorous interest in bacteriology and to 
encourage fellowship among students in 
this field. Beta chapter at the University 
of Maryland was established in 193'2 and 
honors those students who are carrying at 
least eight credit hours in bacteriology and 
who have a "B" average in their work. 

During the past year, the fraternity ef- 
fected many changes in the chapter con- 
stitution which allow greater flexil)ility of 
operation. Group luncheons at noon meet- 
ings have brought the students into closer 
cooperation with the faculty members of 
Sigma Alpha Omicron. 

Informative talks on specialized branches 
of the bacteriological field given by men 



prominent in bacteriology were the high- 
lights of the several open meetings. The 
social events of the year included a picnic 
and a banquet at the close of the winter 
semester. At the banquet the News-Letter 
made its annual appearance as the chap- 
ter record of the year. 

Officers were Alice Bentz, president; 
Robert Sandler, vice-president ; Betty Mc- 
Caulev, secretarv. 



Members: Alice Ruth Bentz, Donald M. Boyd, 
Polly Ann Day, Matthew H. Fusilo, June Hastings, 
Roy E. Keeny, Lester Kiefer, Harry E. Korab, 
Thaddeus J. Kott, Mary Katherine Martin, Mar- 
garet McCathran, Betty McCauley, Robert Sand- 
ler, Ruth E. Schene. 

Faculty: Mrs. Margaret T. Goldsmith, P. A. 
Hansen, L. H. .James. 



First row: Bentz, Boyd, Kiefer, Korab, Kott. Second row: M.irtin, 
McCatliran, MrCanlev. Sanrller. Schene. Wheeler. 




81 




ALPHA ZETA 



Ifoiiordrj/ AiiriciiJtitrdI Frdfi'niiti/ 

Fdinidctl (if Ohio Statk r.NiVKHsiTv in 1897 

KttiahlisJicd <il the r\i\i:HsiTV of ^Iakvi.am) /// 1920 



Al.l'llA ZkTA has TlIK DISTINCTION of 

beiiif? llio only honorary afiricultural fra- 
ternity at Maryland. Heciuirements of 
menibership are an all-time average of '2.8 
enrollnuMil in the College of Agricnlture, 
liigh standards of clianicter, and leader- 
shij). No one is considered for membership 
until the second semester of his sojjhomore 
year. 

Leaders this year were ciiancellor, Rob- 
ert Hen.son; vice-chancellor, Eufiene Schlos- 
nagle; scribe, James Prigel; treasurer. ^Nlel- 
vin Baker; and censor, Edgar Schaeffer. 
Faculty advisors were Dr. Kenneth Turk 
and Mr. .\. li. Harrelton. 



Memukks: Ne\iii Hakcr. .lohii l$eiiiiett, Roherl 
Benson. Paul Hctts. Stuart C'ooley. William ("row, 
Paul Duke. Roheit Hill, Hansen Hoffman. Carroll 
Horine. Kenneth Jewell, Richard W. .Jones, Edwin 
Kelly, Emory l.ett'el, .John Millijian, Raymond 
Mueller, Harry Neuman, .James Prii;el. .James 
Sauni, Edfjar Schaeffer, Irvin Schloss, Eujiene 
Schlosnagle, .Joseph Shaw, Warren Smith, Eugene 
Sullivan, Ered Timmerman, .John Williams. 
F.\cllty: \. M. -Vhalt. (". (). Ai)i)lemaii, H. R. 
Hird, .V. E. IJrueckner, C. .J. Ikirkhardt, R. W. Car- 
penter, R. 15. Cort)ett, H. F. Cotterman, M. S. 
Downey. -V. J}. Hamilton, W. B. Kemp, \. O. 
Kuhn, E. H. Leinbach, I'. R. I'offenherKer, F. E. 
Potter, (;. D. Quigley, R. (i. Rothgel), A. L. 
Schrader, A. H. Snyder, S. P. Stabler, K. L. Turk, 
E. A. Walker, W. P. Walker, C. S. Williams, M. W. 
W'oods. 




l-'irxl rail-: Bilker. IViiiwIt. Brn- 
Min, !?ctts. CiMilcy. SitoikI row: 
Duke. IIiitTiii.iii. .limes. Neil- 
ni;iii. I'lifjil. 7'/i/ri/ roK'.- Seliaof- 
fcr. Sililo,Mi:i,!;li'. Sliaw, Smith. 
Sullivan. Williams. 



82 



Top row: Chadeayne, Dunberg, 
Haase. Bottom row: Harris, 
Hiilland, Sleeman, Weikinger. 




OMIGRON NU 



ALPHA ZETA CHAPTER 

Honorary Home Economics Fraternity 

Founded at Michigan State College in 1912 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1937 



Initiation into Omicron Nu, home eco- 
nomics honor society, is the highest honor 
a girl in the College of Home Economics 
can receive. This society has as its purpose 
the encouragement of high scholarship as 
well as an active interest in the field of 
home economics. Those students with 
straight "B" averages who are in the upper 
fifteen per cent of the Senior Class, or in 
the upper five per cent of the Junior Class, 
are eligible for membership. 

This year, Omicron Nu and the Home 
Economics Club worked closely together 
and succeeded in sponsoring a Red Cross 
Dav. 



There were two sets of officers: in the 
fall. Betty Haase was president; Mrs. 
Frieda IVIcFarland, vice-president; INIary 
Harris, treasurer; and Ann-Revell Cha- 
deayne, secretary; in the spring, Ann- 
Revell Chadeayne was president; Louise 
Marks, vice-president; Irene Zaladonis, 
secretary; and Ruth Lee Thompson, treas- 
urer. Mrs. Mark Welsh served as faculty 
advisor. 

Members: Ann Revell Chadeayne, Frances Dun- 
berg, Elizabeth Haase, Mary Harris, Nancy Hol- 
land, ]\Iasako Nagoa, Ruth Sleeman, Charlotte 
Weikinger, Irene Zaladonis. 

Faculty: Mrs. Curry N. Caples, Mrs. Frieda 
McFarland, Dean Marie Mount, Mrs. Mark Welsh. 



83 



ALPHA CHI SIGMA 



ALPHA RIIO CHAPTER 

Prqfc.i.'iioucd Chemical Frafcnn'ti/ 

Founded at the TxivERSiTY OF Wisconsin in 1902 

Established at the rxivKUSiTY of Marylaxd in 192S 




First row: Bird, 
Butler, Curriii, 
Green, McNally. 
iSccnml row: Peck, 
Scott, Lhlaml, 
W.itson. 




Alpha Chi Sigma, professional chemical 
fraternity, was one of the most war- 
minded organizations on tlie campus (hir- 
ing the past year. At the hi-weekly meet- 
ings, the members thscussed new })hases of 
cltemistry and api)licati()ns of old methods 
to further the war elforl. Tlie group pur- 
ciiased a $l,()(((l war hond to crown its 
already war-conscious activities. 

To he eligible for membership, a studcnl 
must have chosen clicinislry as his j)ro- 
fession, and (•oiii])leled one and a half years 
with an average of at least 'i.') 

Activities were led by the following of- 
ficers: president, Stuart Haywood; vice- 



president, John Van Hook; secretary, 
Daniel Draper; and treasurer, Clifton 
Currin. Richard Peck, an active member 
in the chapter, served as national secretary. 

Members; Byron Mini, Harry IJiillor, Clillon 
Cnrriii, .1. I). Draper, ('. M. Kakcr, l.arry (irei'n. 
Hohert Ilaycs, Stuart Haywood, .1. (). \'an HooV;, 
Carl Kelley, G. W. Kclley, .1. .1. l.an.kT. HoIhtI 
McKee, Dan McXally, (!. N. Nikoloixmlos, l.loyd 
E. I'arlvs, Itidianl lVcl<, K. H. IVlersoii, Uol.ert 
Preston, E. J. Scott, .loliii Stcrliiif,'. H. K. riiland, 
Kdwanj W:dloii,.Ioliii Watson, Alfred WJiiloii, Car- 
roll Woudrow, Ivlniond (i. \'oiMif;, .loiiii ^'ollrtree. 
Faculty: Marry 1). Anspon, L. E, Hopst, L, B, 
Hroii^'lilon, Iv <'. Donaldson, X. I-. Drake, Ken- 
neth Hamlin, M. M. ilariiii;. W. .1. Hull', (J. F. 
Madi^an, I!. \\ . NiUon, \V. .1. Svirl.ely, ('. K. 
Wliile. 



84 



ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA 

MARYLAND CHAPTER 

IVomoi's Freshman Honor Society 

Fonndcd at the University of Illinois in 192^ 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1932 



An honor sought by all freshman 
women is membership in Alpha Lambda 
Delta, the women's freshman honorary 
fraternity. Students who have received a 
3.5 average during their first semester or 
by the end of the freshman year are eligible 
for membership. 

In keeping with the accelerated pro- 
gram, the members voted last spring to 
elect officers at the beginning of each se- 
mester. Only those who are freshmen or 
sophomores are allowed to vote, since they 
are the active members. Juniors and se- 
niors are known as "Collegiate Alumnae." 

Continuing as a service rather than a 



social organization, the club aided with 
registration during both the summer and 
fall semesters. 

Each year the honorary gives a gift of a 
book to the senior x\lpha Lambda Delta 
member who maintains the highest aver- 
age for four years. 

Members: Margaret Beattie, Maraline Behrend, 
.Jane Boswell, Agnes Carlson, Dorothy Cosebooni, 
Shirley Friedlander, Miriam Gerla, Vera Hartman, 
Dorothy Jackson, Gwendolyn Likely, Ruth Lingle, 
Vivan Lowy, Wanda Pelczar, Arline Raskin, Vir- 
ginia Raymond, Mary Spielman, Ellen Stabler, 
Ruth Startzman, Nancy Troth. 
Faculty: Miss Marian .Johnson, Dr. Susan Har- 
man, Miss Roberta Mack, Mrs. Frieda McFarland, 
Mrs. Norman Fhillijis, Miss Adele H. Stamp. 



FirH rov: Bchreiul. Boswell. 
Carlson, ('(isfboom, (lorla. Hcr- 
ond row: Hartman, .Jackson, 
Likely, Pelczar, Raskin. Third 
row: Spielman, Stabler, Smitli, 
Startzman, Troth. 




85 



PHI ETA SIGMA 



}\ (it loiHtl Mill s Frr.sliiiKiii Iliiiiiir Suciiii/ 

Foinidcd (it llir IMx khsitv of Illinois //( I92S 

Chartered at the Ixn eksity oi" ^Iauvland //( lOJfU 



1 III Kta Si(;ma is tlic incii's iialioiiiil 
fresliman honor society. TIic priinaiA' re- 
<|uireinent for ineinhership is sclu)larsliip. 
Any student at tlie University havinij' a S..) 
averajje for either the first semester or the 
freshman year is eligible for membership. 

Phi Eta Sigma in.stigated two new l)roj- 
eet.s this year. One project was a survey to 
aseertain the mimix'r of inembei-s taking 
an active i)art in campus affairs. The sec- 
ond project was llie inlrodiictioii of a new 
program of pledging. 

Officers were R. Byron Bird, president; 
J. l{oi)ert Ksher. vice-president; .Vrnold K. 
Seigel, .secretarv-treasurer; Ilenrv J. Sand- 



ler, historian; .lolin \{. Spielman, .senior 
advisor. 

Mknuuchs: Howlaiui .Vdaiiis, Paul .Vrtluir, .Vrtliiir 
Haliard. Tiicodure IJar.ss, Cliarle.s Heclitold, Martin 
Hell, Byron Bird, Felix J. Cardefjiia, Bernard 
Colieii. .loliii ('uinherlaiid, ("lifton Currin. Paid 
Duke, Sidney Et'ro.s.s, Natlian Ehrlicli, .lose])!! 
E.slier, (lilhert (iude, Joseph Hack, C'har!e.s Harry, 
Ilaniiltoii Mohhs, Morton Hyman, Irvinj^ Kahik, 
Harry Kalin, Irvin I.azinsky, (ieorjje Lund<|iiist, 
.Mian Lnrie. .^lan Macjitierson, Riis.sell McFall, 
Rol)ert McKee, .Joseph Mintzer. .lolm NenTiiann, 
Richard Peck, Kdward Rider, Henry Sandler, 
Arnold Seigel, Morton Siltjerstein, Dwight Smith, 
Ernest Solljerjf, .John }\. S])ielnian. .Jolm Stimtz, 
Kenneth t'f^low, Milton \'andenBerg, Edward 
Zeif^ler. 

Fa( I i.TV: H. Clifton Mynl. Carl W. E. Hintz, S. S. 
Steinher". 



First tow: Beohtold, Hell. Mini, ('iinlcfjiiii. Cnlicn. < "liirilirrhuiii. St'onil ran-: Curriii, Kjirlic-lj. Ivslicr, Maik, 

Il.'irrv. Tlyiimn. Third roir: Kaliik. Ljizinsky. Mintzi'i- Xi'iiiimnn, Peek. Kiilrr. SiiiiilliT. l-'iiiirtli row: Scificl. 

Silvcrstcin. Sollicrj;. Spielman. Stiintz, Ik'""'. Vjindciilii'if;. 




f 



4> 
H 

T 



® 



86 



BETA GAMMA SIGMA 



Honorary Commerce Fraternity 
Founded at the University of California //( 1913 
Chartered at the University of INIaryland //; 1940 



JjETA Gamma Sigma is a national honorary 
business fraternity which was organized in 
1913 through the amalgamation of three 
local honorary organizations at the Uni- 
versity of California, the I'niversity of 
Illinois, and the University of Wisconsin. 
The chapter at the University of Maryland 
w'as established in 1941 and the nation- 
wide membership of the fraternity at the 
present time is in excess of 10,000. 

The fraternity was established for the 
purpose of promoting leadership and schol- 
arship among students in the various col- 
leges of business and public administration 
and to promote the advancement and 
spread of education in the science of busi- 
ness throughout this nation. 

Membership in Beta Gamma Sigma is 
confined to not more than ten per cent of 
the members of the Senior Class in the Col- 
lege of Business and Public Administra- 
tion, having an average of 3.0 or al)ove and 
to not more than three jier cent of the 



highest ranking members of the Junior 
Class. Election to membership is usually 
held in the spring semester. Beta Gamma 
Sigma is the only fraternity of its type that 
is recognized by the American x\ssociation 
of Collegiate Schools of Business. 

Acting as a purely honorary organiza- 
tion, the fraternity has no regularly sched- 
uled activities except an annual banquet 
and initiation at which time undergrad- 
uates and honorary members are taken 
into membership. 

The officers for the past year were 
Charles Harry, president; Roljert Miller, 
vice-president; and Dr. Charles L. Benton, 
of the staff of the College of Business and 
Public Administration, who served as 
secretary-treasurer. 

Members: A. Budd Cutler. William Ellis, William 
M. Goldenzweitj, J. Charles Harry, Robert M. Mil- 
ler, Robert W. Petzold. 

Faculty: C. L. Benton, D. Dillard, A. G. Gruchy, 
J.F. Pvle.J.H.Reid. 



Cutler, Goldenzweig, Harry, Miller, Petzold. 




87 



PI DELTA EPSILON 



MARYLAM) tllAlTKR 

Tfoiiorarij Journalistic Frafeniiti/ 

Foinuird (it Syracuse ITniversitv /// I'.io'.) 

Eslablislu'd at the Uxiversity oi' Makvi-a\d /'/( 11)30 




First roir: Aii<lrcae, 
IJailt'v, HriuTinann, 
{'iirliarl, C'olliTiiinn, 
(nicki'll, Davis. 
Second row: Diohl, 
Frey, CrnJiam, 
Ilardy, Hastings, 
Ilatl.iiway. Hill. 
Third row: Jaiksiiii 
Jolin.soii, Karr, 
Koliluss, Mi'lo, 
MilliT. Nowgarden. 
Fourth row: thvon, 
Pifer, IJeifl, Sclienc, 
Slla^^^l, Sullivan, 
Whitr 



XI DiOLTA Ki'siLoN. li(ni()r;n'\' joiinuilistic 
society, includes tor nieiiil)cr,sliip those 
stiKlciits who hii\c (lone oulsl;in(hiii; work 
on I'liiNcrsily ])nl)lic;il ions. F;icully nu-ni- 
hers also aic honored willi nieinhership 
when Ihey have nieriled recoynilion l)y the 
t'ratcrnily. 

'J'lie .society iiav(> a I'lihlicalions IJan- 
(|iiet at the (•h).se of I lie semester at wlnCh 
awards were given to senior members ol' 
the publications stall's who had done meri- 
torious work during their college journal- 
ist ie careers, editorships were Ixvstowcd, 
and oilier ^lalV po>ilions \aealed l>y out- 
tt'oing' seniors wci'e lille<l. 

The ollieers for I he |)ast year were Nor- 



man llathaway, presideid; Edward Stein- 
b(>rii. \ice-])r<vsideid ; and Pauline Ilardy, 
secret a r\-treasurer. 



Mi;\nii:ns; .ImiicI Aiiiircjic, Leslie l?;iiic.\ . Hcrhert 
Heiieriiiaiiii, .)ac(| in-line IJroi)liy, Herl)erl Carliart, 
M.-irtlia \\\\\ ("otterinaii. .)()se])li Crockett, iiiirtoii 
|)a\is, .loliii Dielil. I{ita Frey, Jane (ianiljrili. 
( i ran I ham (Iraliani, Pauline Hardy. .June Hastiiijj.s, 
Xorniaii Hathaway, Uuhert Hill, Dorothy .laekson, 
[''rederick M. .lohn.son, Harry Karr, Frederiek 
Kohloss, John ^h'le. John Miller, j'anl Ne\vf,'arden, 
Jeannette Owen, .\nn I'aterson, Kosaleen Pifer. 
Harltara Heed, Fdward Rider, Ruth Schene, Wen- 
dell Shawn, Jane Showacre. Fdward Steiiilierj/. 
F,ii;:eni' Sidlivan. Mildred White. 

F\( I i,rv:Il.C.Hyrd.(). R.<'arrin.;ton.l{.i\ Fhrens- 
herger. ('. H. Hale. (i. l.iind. R. (i. Sleinniever, 
H R. Warlel. \\. F. Wv>or. .I.unes II. Reid. 



88 



LATCH KEY 



Or(/(uiizcd at 

rXIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

ill 1938 



Officially ordaixed as an honorary fra- 
ternity, the Latch Key Society was or- 
ganized as an oiit.nrowth of ^Maryland's 
extra-cnrricuhir s])orts system. It now acts 
as official host to visiting teams, settles 
managerial dispntes, and replaces all va- 
cancies which arise wlien managers droj) 
out of school. 

From a very small group the society has 
grown to include freshman, junior, and 
.senior managers of the ten T'niversity 
teams. With this growth in size has come 
a corres])onding increa.se in activities and 
prestige, which has far exceeded the ex- 
pectations of the society's charter members. 

Like all other campus organizations, the 
Latch Key Societv with manv of its mem- 



bers in the armed forces has suffered a 
great loss of managerial material. How- 
ever, although war iuis forced it to operate 
on a small basis, the .society's importance 
to the University has not been impared, 
and it still remains the Supreme Court for 
managerial jiroblems and di.sputes. 

President. Robert Hill; vice-president, 
Edward Smou.se; and secretary-treasurer, 
Lou Culiner. 

Members: Samuel Hurcii, Louis Culiner, .loiiu 
Doliler, .Vrtliur Ejjstein, Rol:)ert Forre.ster, David 
(Ireenlierg. Carl Harris, Hastian Hello, Roljert 
Hill, Lee Hotfnian, Ko])|)el Jeffrey, Thomas Lana- 
han, Kenneth ALiskell, Byron Nutlle, Eugene 
Peter, Kdward Rohinson, .lames Saum, Edward 
Smouse, Eufjeiie Sullivan. I'eter \\:i\. Richard 
Wheiton. 




First roir: Biircli, ("iiiiiicr, 
Dolilcr. Kpstcin, (Jreen- 
Ikt;,'. Harris. Sirnnil rnir: 
Hclld. lldftiiiaii, .JeftVcy, 
Lanaliun. Maskcll, Saum. 
Third rnir: Slii])]). Sciil- 
maii. Sniousc, Siillix'an, 
\ial. Wholton. 



80 



SIGMA TAU EPSILON 



MAKYLAM) CIIArrKU 

Ilonorarjj ]]'()iiicn's Rccrcdtnui Assocuttioti 
Foiniili'd at fill' r.NivKUsrrY of Mahvi.am) //( J9'f0 



OKiMA Tai' Kpsii.on, [\\c \\()inc\]'s lioii- 
orary recreation association, a jjiodiut of 
the Maryland campus, was estahlislicd in 
1940 under tiic guidance of Miss (Iwen- 
dolyii Drew of the Women's IMiysical Edu- 
ciilioii l)ej)artnieut. The organizalion is 
the governing hody of the Women's Recre- 
ation Association and was founded because 
of the reahzed necessity for an lionorary 
society to activate leadership and interest 
in recreation. The ^laryland chapter is 
contacting IocmI colleges lo promote the 
orgaiii/.atioii of other Sigma Tau K])sil()n 
chapters; among tliem the (ieorge \\asli- 
ington I niversity. 

Si)ortsmanship, cooperation, voluntary 
l)articii)ation in W.K.A. activities, and a 
scholastic average of '■2.;> are the (|ualiHca- 
tions for memhership. I nlike most hon- 
oriiries, the fraternity takes its memhers 
from no single class or enrrieulum. 

Sigma Tau Kjjsiion and the AN omen's 
Recreation Association cooperate in all of 
the eoeirs ;iet i\'ities, inehiding the weekly 
id'ter-dinner dances, and haskcthall, had- 
minton, l)owling. tennis and softl)all loui'- 



naments. For their ])articipation in sports 
the girls are awarded K-tters, syml)oiic of 
achievement in athletics. 

Among the year's outstanding events 
was the Second Annual S(|uare Dance, at 
whieli liundreds danced the "old" way. At 
Homecoming Sigma Tau Epsilon s])on- 
sored a hockey game ])etween the AN.H.A. 
and the Alumni. A wiener roast for the 
I'ndergrads and the defeated Grads fol- 
lowed the game. \\ tlie Women's Recre- 
ation Association lunciieon in .\})ril, an 
initiation of new nienihers was held and 
ofKcers were installed. .Vs a sidelight, 
Sigma Tau Kpsilon i.ssued a iuunorous 
X('U'S-Liitci\ which rivalled the (fid Line in 
wit and "scooped " the D'kiiiioikIIxicI: with 
its chatty news. 

Officers who led these activities were: 
Hannah Stevens, |)resident ; l''dith I)un- 
foi'd, \iee-j)resi(lenl ; and Louise I mali, 
secretary-treasurer. Dr. Rachel Henton 
served as an acli\e and in.spiring advisor. 

MK.\nii;us: Ivlilh Duul'ord, \ iruinia l{:i>iniin(l. 
Jean Hiideliiis. .huie SliowatTe, Ilamiali Stc\rns. 
Louise Marie rniali. .lane Williaiiisoii. 




ItiKli'liiis. SliimaclX', 
Sltncii.-., I ni;ili. 
Willi.inisim. 



90 



ALPHA PSI OMEGA 



IOTA CAST 

Honorary Dramatic Fraternity 

Founded at Fairmount State College in 1925 

Established at the University of Maryland //( 1929 



As AX honor society Alpha Psi Omega 
does not attempt to take the place of any 
organized dramatic group, but is intended 
as a reward for achievement in drama and 
its associated arts. 

The members of Alpha Psi Omega are 
selected from the Clef and Key and from 
the Footlight Clubs, or any other dramatic 
group that may be formed. Excellence in 
labt)r and service is the primary qualifica- 
tion. Writers, actors, electricians, prop 
girls, and others that aid in production are 
eligible for membership. A system of 
points is used to determine the merit of 
prospective members. Points are gained 
by work on a play, or activity in the club 
apart from actual dramatic participation. 
It is necessary that a prospective actor 
member shall have taken several minor 
parts, or two leading parts combined with 
a minor. The backstage worker, of course, 
is judged l)y other criterions. A total of 



one hundred points must be collected be- 
fore the undergraduate is eligible for mem- 
bership in Alpha Psi Omega. Members of 
the faculty who show interest in the dra- 
matic groups are eligible as honorary mem- 
bers. 

The fraternity is not permitted to pro- 
duce a play that would offer competition 
to any other dramatic group on the cam- 
pus. During the past year, the Iota cast 
laid plans for the production of a play. 
White Devil, by John Webster, which was 
sponsored by the Footlight Club. Through 
the medium of Alpha Psi Omega, dra- 
matic functions are furthered at the Uni- 
versity. 

The officers for the year were Aria Guild, 
president; and Jean Forbes, secretary- 
treasurer. 

Members: Aria (iuild, Jean Forbes, Frank Mer- 
vine, Edith Simmons, (ieorge Stuntz. 
Faculty: Dr. Charles Hale. 



Forljes, Guild. Stuntz, Mervine. 




91 



PHI KAPPA PHI 



Jlotionirji Sch()l(irsln /) Frdtcnnti/ 

l-'oKiidcd (li llic I'mnkusitv of M.\i\k /'// IS!>7 

Estnlilisluil (il the I'mx KKsiTV OK Maio I.AM) /'// I'.IJO 



r riMllKHlNC; TlIK I ri.Kll.l.MKN r of its 
motto, ■"tlic love ot' Icaniiiiii rules [\\r 
worM." I*lii l\a|)|);i IMii alVords rccomiitioii 
and (Mu-ouraiieiiUMit of sii])('i'ioi' scliolaislii]) 
ill all fichU of iiiii\'orsity sliidy. McinKci-- 
sliij) is ('NlciHJcd to seniors who rank in the 
U])i)('r ten per cent of llicir rcsix'ctixc col- 
leges. 

I''orinerly lappings were held once a 
year, hut the aeeelerated program now 
necessitates a tappinu' eaeh semester. The 
first, a I la IK I net -in it iat ion. was held October 
'2(1. 'Ihirty-oiie students were presented 
pins Ky Professor .Vrtliiir Aliall. president 
of the society. .\s the loi)-rankinfi' scholar, 
Kay Mattooii received a twenty-five dollar 
war hoiid. .Vfter the ])resentation. Dr. 
^^esle\• (iewehr. miest speakei' of tlu>e\'e- 



nint;. discussed the ■■.\.s]jecls of the ( 'om- 
iny Peace. " 

A luncheon meetinii, January .'50. was 
the occasion foi' the second initiation, 
which KroiiL^lit nineteen new memlicrs into 
the uroup. At this meetinti the |)ri/,e for 
the hiiiliest all-lime average went to Hen- 
jamin Cohen. "Scholarship" was the to])ic 
of an address hy Dr. J. Freeman Pyle. The 
third initiation took i)lac-e in the spring. 

Phi Kap])a Phi is a national organiza- 
tion with ()\('i' forty-eight chapters. It was 
founded in 1S!)7 at the I nixersity of Maine 
and has had an acti\'e cha|)ter on the 
Maryland campus since 1!)'2(). In addition 
to its activities in honoring scholastic 
achievement through memhersiiij). the 
honorary awards several fellowships. 



Mkmmkhs: ('i)Ue<je i>J AijriciiUurc: Kolx-rt IkMisoii, 
.lolin I). Cooley.Jr., Harry Xfwinan. Iviiiar Scliaef- 
ier, Irviii Scliloss. .lane Sliowacre. I'dUcijv of Arts 
(111(1 Sririirrs: Cliarli's IJccliloid, Kli lirowii, Mar- 
fjiirel Hniwii, {'.ijuin ( Inircliill. I'.llcn (ii'ay. Daxid 
Iliirwit/, Marjory Maltinj^ly, Kriu'sl Mat toon, 
Joscpli Miiitzcr, .Foliii Xeumaiiii, HiclianI I'ock, 
Mil.lr.-.i n.uVm. Wiliiain 'i'ollcy. Ilonicr llil.ni.l. 
Mittoii \ aiidciiHerj;. ( 'ollciji' of l{ii.fliii:-<.f diitl I'lili- 
lic Ailiiiiiiixtnilioii: .loscpli Harry, Kol)t'rl Miller. 
Rol.crt I'd /.old. Cnllnir of Kiliinilioii : Savillc All- 
iiiill. Hcrnard ('olicii, Uaiiioti (irflccki. ( atlitriiu' 
Krall'l, Kolx'rl Maiscj. ('i)lli(ic of Eiiiihiiirniij: \{,\y- 
moiid Did/.. (Iiarli-N lloclicsanfr. Irxilij; Kaiiik. 
Hirliar.l l\rnl. i{ii-,M.|| M.d'all, MoKcrl McKcc. 



Kiiiiiid Owens. Ilnuo Slieridan. .lolm SpcMlman. 
Joliii 'I'lickcr. Kcnndli Ifilow. (ieorge \Vt'i)ster, 
Rohcrt KiNt'llo. CoHri/r tif Ilomr Kcoiioiiiir.s-: Kli/.a- 
l)dli llaase, Mary Harris, .lean Persons. Irene 
/aladonis. 

FAcri.TV Mkmhkhs: .V. M. Aliall. ('. A. Appleinan. 
('. 1,. Henlon, I,. K. Hopsl. I.. H. Hron.-lilon. II. C. 
Hvrd, ('. N. Caples, K. N. Cory. H. V. Cotterinan. 
('. Iv Cox. Myron Creese. 1,. I'. Dilniaii. I,. 1,. 
(;ro». I. C. Haul, II. .V. IlnnUr. W. 15. Kein]), 
C. I'". Kramer. Kdi;ar l.on.u. I'". 15. McNaiiiililon, 
M. M. Moniit. K. 1). Myers. .V H. i'reinkerl. C. W. 
Pranfie, K. (i. Kolli-el). .V. I.. Sehrader. \V. C. 
Svirhcly H. V. Irnitt. \V. P. Walker W. P. WalU. 
Clarihe'l WeUli.C. K. While, Mark W Is. 



9(2 




Top row: HfclituUl, Benson, Hrown, Cohen, Cooley, Deitz, Uunherg. Second roir: Gray, Grelerki, Haase, Harry, Hochcsang. Hurwitz, 
Kabik. Third row: Kent, Krafft, Maisel, Mattingly, Mattoon, McFall. McKce. Fourth roir: Miller, Mintzer, Neumann, Newman, 
Owens, Peck, Persons. Fifth row: Petzojd, Railin, Rivello, Schloss, Schaeffer, Sheridan, Showacre. Sixth row: Speilman, Tolley, Tucker, 

I'glow Uhland, \'andenRerg. AVelister. 



93 



HOYAL INSPECTION 




Arririiii) amidst a mHitari/ i/iin vo- 
/(//(', KlrKj Peter of ViinosUiria 
lixited the campitx to ntudy the iini- 
rcrniti/ from the .standpoint of a<iri- 
ndturr. After a dincitngion irilh aijri- 
culliirc heads, the driefiatloii Inured 
the cain pus. 



CEMENT CONSTRUCTION 



The framework that looms behind the Adminis- 
tration Buildinfi is that of the new gi/m-ar- 
iiiori/. Slowli/. hut surely, it is progressing 
toirard that day when it will he another of the 
hcmitiful Maryland buildings. 





SPORTS AND 
M ILITARY 





Fifty years of football . . . the team . . . 
the season . . . Boxing . . . Basketball . . . 
Lacrosse . . . Wotnen's Sports . . . Military 
Staff . . . Signal Corps . . . Pershing Rifles 
. . . Scabbard and Blade . . . Rifle Team 
. . .Sidelight Shots. 




^ 



iir 



t^r 




^ 



<j 



i^ 



t^ 



s 



PORTS AND MILITARY—these two names fit together 



today better than at any other time in our country' ^Xtt* 
a fiigantic team. The old conception of the soldier 
superior officer, is as outmoded as the flying wedge 
be a man of initiative and individuality, but he mus 
the tactical unit, the military's team. 



, V ^^^^^ \.^j^^^ifi reality. 




member of 



victor 




Ordinate his abilities, both innate and acquired, toward his team's 



's decisive defeat. 



e military and that laid down by the athletic coach are not 



dissimil 

effective striking force possible. 



eld men of diverse chara 



Thus the athletic and the military aspects of life at th 




i/4nto the most 



been combined in 



a section dedicated to teamwork. 



96 




97 



EVERY MAN AN ATHLETE . . . 




II iiiiiiiii Inirdlcs ircrr iiscil irlicii ii'f cmldii't fiiiil llic iHitiinil i>l>st(iclcs. 



LWV. Ol'KXlXC OF TIIK SUMMER SEMESTER 

foil IK I the ineml)ers of the UOTC regiment 
dressed in every variely of t;yni clothes, 
spreailiiiu' themselves hither and yon over 
the eami)us, doing all sorts of strange 
things. These men were working to throw 
ofV the sot'tening eH'eels of years of study 
aiul hilc liours. They were devek)ping eo- 
oidiualion of hi'ain and lii'awn in an clVoi't 
lu lid liicir pari in |)r('|)aral inn for aclix'c 
|)ari icipal ion on the many I'mnls on wliicii 
oni' men are fighting. 

Sponsored at dill'ei'ciil limes throughout 
tlie year hy tlie Athletic and the Military 
l)eparlm<Mil>, the program was well de- 



veloped and well directed to the desired 
end of physical fitness. \N(' ])laycd foot- 
hall, haskethall, and soccer. Sjjrawiing 
bodies fell here ami thciH-. learning the 
])rincii)les of tumhiing; j)aiiting men stuni- 
l)lc(l through track meets and cross-coun- 
try runs and clumsy t"orms struggled 
thioiigli the dillicultics of gynmastics. ^^e 
hoxcd and wrcsllcd. did exercises ami 
grundiled and |)ei'si>nc(|. Dopile the fact 
that we ■■goldlirickcMJ" \\liene\"ei' |)ossil)le, 
more than a few sharpened I heir reflexes, 
while many develojjed heretofore unantici- 
]>ated lung capacities. 



98 



CLARK SHAUGHNESSY 

Director nf Athletics 19], 2 




'H^^^^ ^^^^s 




HERE FOR A YEAR 



University Administration, enthusias- 
tically supported by alumnae and students, 
finally opened the door to fame through 
football. To build a winning team and a 
good physical training program was the 
task accepted by Clark Shaughnessy, 
famed coach and staunch advocate of the 
mighty "T." 

Shaughnessy brought an enviable and 
almost legendary record of success in 



building winning football teams. 

The same material which struggled in 
1941 to win three setups, tie one game, and 
lose five, became a sensation. The once 
sluggish sciuad added new tricks, new 
plays, and with amazingly bolstered mo- 
rale won seven and lost two games. 

After less than a year on the Maryland 
camjius, Shaughnessy resigned to become 
head football coach at Pittsburgh. 



99 



MARYLAND CELEBRATES 




M iinihuiil'ti jirs1 faiitlxtll tcinn: IH92. 



liiK VKAH ISD'^ SAW iiiK ( i;i;ati()\ of tlie 
first t'oolhall team al I he old Maryland 
Af'riculliii'al ('()lle<>e, now Ihr College Park 
lirancli of the liiiversity of Maryland. 
The team was uimsiiall_\' successful and 
won the state ehainpionshii). 

After dishaiidment for a year, M.A.C 
again won the championshij) in ISflti. The 
opponents wci'c foi' tiie most part high 
schools, although M.A.C did play St. 
Johns, (iallandet College of \\ashington. 
and the rnixcrsily of Maryland, at l?alli- 
niore. In the game with the liiller the oj)- 
p()Ilenl^ took achantage of the ajiproach- 
ing darkness, when M.,\.('. was wit Inn 
'■1 \ai"ds of the goal line, and allowed lince 



extra j)layers to take i)laces in the line. 

From 19().> to 1!)0S the football eleven 
claimed IT. (\ Byrd who advanced from 
right end through (|uarterl)ack to the jxtsi- 
tion of the team ca])tain in li)()7. From 
lObi to 19;U ■•Curly" was c-oacli at Mary- 
land. I'nder him the foothall teams pro- 
gressed so far that they played the l)ig 
teams — Yale, Princeton, the Xaval .\cad- 
cmy. CoriU'll, and l\'nn Stale. The li-am 
suH'crcd reversals hecause of the war. hut 
nianagfil jo w ni the state championsliii) in 
1!)17. I-'or years Maryland remained un- 
I tea ten in the stale, losing n\ore games than 
I hey won onl\ four times -lihil. li)'-2.5, l})"-27, 
and WV.Vl. 



1(H) 



50 YEARS OF FOOTBALL 




I- rimi riiir: Micr, liigliy, Januiiska. ( miriicl, ( Dlniori-, \ iiiccmI, Dittmar, * h(i\:nirs, .laiiics. Wiiylil. Sirnml niir: .Mmil, B\ nl, llii-iiiii_r. 
Couch, O'Xeill, Hoopengardner, Keat. Hagerman, Tucker, DuBois, Smedle\-, Barnes. Third rote: Gordy, Boothe, Hufnian, Moreliead, 
Smith, FilippeUi. Clayland, Lucikaliaugli, Chacns. Fourth roir: Werner, Helbock. Port, Xardci, Phillips, Harris. Fliek, .\udet. Gunther, 

Mallonee. 



WITH A RE-MADE TEAM 

Johniiji (lilriiiiir ca/r/^r.v one deep in Connecticut tcrritorij. 




"Reds" being stopped after a .■oiicdl yuiii aijainM Coniierticiit. 



LINERS GRIND NUTMEG 



MARYLAND 34^CONNECTICUT 

MD. COXX. 

l.'i First (lo«Ti.s .7 

l(H Not yards gained rusliin;; 46 

H Forward passes attempted 12 

y Forward passes completed 5 



215 Yards gained on eonipletcd passes 

2 I'asses intereept<'d l>y 

(I Avi-rage rnni)aek f>f kiekoffs 

.'i NimmImt of pnnts 

31 Average dislane<' of pnnts 
14 Average rnnlia< ks of iiunls 

2 Opponents" fumliles reeovi'red 

20 ^'ards lost f>enalties 

Maryland: 7 7 14 0—34 
Conneetieut: (I 0— I) 




43 


23 
8 

45 
7 
4 

20 



Ori( "Om) Linkhs" opeiu'd tlic l!)4'-2 sea- 
son on Sc'])l<'iiil)(M' '27 wlii'ii they iiiiNcilcd a 
streamlined version of tlie "'I'"" format ion. 
Tlie impressive 340 seore was not the only 
outstandinfj; feattne of the afternoon as 
the team li\<'d tip to a liiyli ])re-seasoii 
ralinu. l-'roin onr standpoint l)i,y-tinie foot- 
liall liad liit (he Marvhmtl eami)ns. and we 
e\'en talked of |)ost -season liowl iiame. 

Tlie t;ame was an aerial all'air from the 
openini; whistle, wilii Tonnny Mont ])ass- 
inii the invaders diz/.y. These smart pass 
plays set up all hut one lonehdown and 
directlv scored three. 



X Shaufjhnessjf croitnx Mdiilijn Ilidier, Coniiidl Queen. 




Wright .starfiiig off on a ^0-yard punt return behind .s((/('.v/'(/rfon/ blocking against Lakehnrst. 



DEFLATING LAKEHURST BLIMP 



1 HE BIG RED TEAM again took to the air 
with a sharp attack that defeated the 
Lakehnrst Naval Air Station. The dam- 
age was done in two (|uick first-period 
thrusts. "Reds" Wright cracked off tackle 
for the first score after four minutes of 
playing time. Maryland next hit pay dirt 
when Bill Helbock travelled 20 yards 
around end to add six more points. This 
play was also set up by a pass. The Jack 
Banta-Paul Spencer combination domi- 
nated Lakehurst's last minutes of play 
when the Blimps threatened repeatedly, 
but to no avail. 



MARYLAND 14— LAKEHURST 



MI). 

9 
831,2 
13 

6 
107 

1 
21 
37 
85 

4 
45 



LAKEHURST 

12 

125 
23 
11 

146 

... 

Yartis gaincrl runback of intercepted passes 

Punting average (from scrimmage) 45 

Total yards kicks returned 90 

Opponents' fumbles recovered 2 

Yards lost by penalties 35 

Marvland: 14 0—14 
Lakehurst: 0— 



First downs 

Net yards gained by rushing 
Forward passes attempted . 
Forward passes completed ... 
Yards gained by forward passes 
Forward passes intercepted by 



The crowd cuts up at a pre-game pep-rally. 




^w:.' #s' 



J^^- 



i •^j 



#• I 



\\ liijlil .starts (iff DH a .iO-ijard run (uiiun.st Riitc/crs. 



ROUGHSHOD OVER RUTGERS 





MARYLAND 27 




RUTGERS 


13 




MI). 










HI 


TCKIi- 


I.'i 


I''irst downs 










.5 


■>z\ 


Net viirrls rushing. . . 


.ii 


140 


Varils passing 










Ml 


:«ii 


T<ilal varils pained 










l)-i 


5 


NnniluT of punls 










11 


4:i.a 


.\viTaf;r yarclaK"' puiiN 










:i(i.l 


!tl 


^■a^(l^ piirils rrliinicd 










:,i 


n 


,\\rra^;i' distance kiclcolfs 










55 


.V.' 


Varils kickoH's rctnrnrd . 

( Iw'll fllltlt'll>^ 












I 


* * " i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' 11 S 

< *pp<ini-nts" fnmlilcs rcrov 


cred. 





K) 


^ Jird- pi-nalizcd 










:i.5 




Marvlanil: » 





'.'(1 


7— -27 








Rutgers: 7 


t) 


(1 


c— i:! 








With thh chidihon sitiatiox well in 
lumd. our ""red liot" tcain rolled into Hal- 
liiiiorc St;idiuni to moel :i sli-oii^; Kiitijors 
t'l('\('ii. riiscorcd upon in two prex'ious 
tiiiMU's. I lie Id'ncis wnr due for a surpri.se 
wlicii Ilaidld (dinicrs. s|)ccdy Kutifers 
liack. took the kickoti' on \\\^ own .")-yard 
line and rushed !)7 yanls to cross our ijoal 
ai'ler a lew short seconds. Maryland 
wanned u|) alter the o|)eninL; of the second 
half and ran nj) twenty ])i)iiits to overcomo 
what had looked like a convinciiiii' load. 
Scoring honors were di\ided lielwceii 
■■Rods"' Wri^lil and Kinier Itiiihy. 



. I Imnjirc thai irill lir luiiij rnnriiihcrcd. 




Joe Muha of 1.31.1 . ahoul to he stopped 1)1/ half the Old Line team. 



BROTHER RATS SPILL "T" 



Our 

pire was shattered wlien powerful Joe 
INIulia, "All-American Keydet," and ten 
other men roared to a i^lorious triumph for 
tlie mihtary schooL This game marked the 
first loss of the season and toppled Mary- 
land from the ranks of the unbeaten. 
Muha, the one-man offensive, scored only 
one of the four touchdowns, but this big- 
package of TNT had a hand in every 
V.M.L tally. Except for one long march 
in the second period, the Liners made 
little headway running or passing in the 
Lexington mud. 







MARYLAND 


V.M.I. 


29 




MU. 














v. M.I. 


(i 


First 
YanI 


ddwiis 










U 


(iO 


s ^'ained rushing 


205 


;!2 


F<ii« 


ard passes attempted. - - 










18 


i) 


Forward passes completed . . 










■y 


U(i 


Van! 


!s by forward passing. . 










1+4 


1 


Forw 


ard passes intereeptefl liy 










5 


41 


Print 


ing average from serimmii 


ige. 








;w 


1 


Opjii 


jnents' fumbles recovered 













25 


Yard 


Is lost l)y penalties 










M 






Marvland: 





0- 


- 










V.M.I. : 7 1.'! 


7 


•2— 


-29 







Curd triek.s became more complicated. 



% 




CARNIVAL TIME 




The Dai/dixliirrs' JliHil took- first prize. 
Jud Lincoln <is the isolationixf polilldan. 



Tiif: AuTUMX Carnival climaxed Mary- 
land's summer semester. Friday nif^lit saw 
a Torchlight Parade and llie Queen of the 
Carnival crowned. The next event was the 
Houser Review in Byrd Stadium. 

Saturday's victory was celebrated at the 
Corn Iluskers Hail, while a Sunrise Service 
concluded MarvhuuTs Autunui Carnival. 





lief ore wood rationing. 



Aftennutli at the i/rill. 



Kay Martin typified Carnirul .fpitit. 







HOMECOMING 1942-- 



Alumni registration and the freshmen victory in 
the annual tug-of-war marked the beginning of Home- 
coming. The clever decorations that adorned frater- 
nity and sorority houses added color to the campus. 
Between halves, the game with Connecticut was high- 
lighted by patriotic floats, the crowning of Maryland's 
Beauty Queen, marching sponsored by the military de- 
partment, and speeches. Dancing in the gym-armory 
celebrated Homecoming and a Maryland victory. 





Quarterback 19^2 meets Quarterback 1892. 



Betty Bond reigned as Homecoming Queen. 



The KA-Tri-Delt float took fir.it prize. 




"■I* it 



The Band in a new formation. 
The Tri-Delts presented a Women s Army. 





Andy Schnehli/ {.Yo. 19) take.i panK for long nciin ai/aiiitit Western Mari/ldnd fi.v J)an lioothc blocks 



FREE STATE TRACK MEET 



MAUVI.AXD 51 W.MD. 

Ml). 

i;i Kit'-i (liiwiis 

3I'i ^'jrriU ^'aiii('(l ru>liiri;4 inct' 

I!) I''nr\var<l passes aUcmpli'd 

10 l'"orwar<l passes <*iiiniilrtr)l 

20(! ^ arils Ijy forward passing. 

.'I I'"(tr\var(! passes iiilercepl*'*! Ii\' 

■H Piititin^' a\'era^e fnini seriiiiiiia^e 

'2 Oppdiieiils* fuiiil)l<'s re(*<)\-ere(l , 
70 ^ arils liisl l)y penalties . 

Miirylanil: C III -.'i; .".I 
Wesii-riiMarvlaiiil: (1 O 




W.MII, 

\ 

-Mi 

1.") 

(i 

.)! 
II 

.■u 

I-,' 
II 



vji'i' TO W'KN'di". \\\v only ilcfcjil lliiis t";ir. 
we lirld ii field day in llir U;dt iiiiorc Sla- 
diiiin as oiir learn s\\aini)e(l the \\est(>ni 
Maryland Terrors, .'il 0. The lioys from 
Westniinsler held ns lo a single touclidown 
in llie lirsl liall'. Iml from llie l)ei>innini;' of 
the second half nnlil llie end of the ii,aine. 
^laryland scored so fast thai the Terrors 
were nnalile to set np any defense. The 
only Terroi- "llireal" was in the lir>l (|nar- 
ter when NNCslern Maryland made two 
lii'st downs and carried the hall well into 
our leri'ilorv. 



State rinilri/ rcdchtil IikjIi i>>t(h the ntijlit l>t'fore. 




Bill Helbock Jhinks left mil uiji-unst I'liirida with fine hloekiiKj. 



ALLIGATOR BAGGED 



Inspired by the crushinc; victory over 
Western Maryland, the Red and White 
added another game to our hst of wins by 
defeating a strong Florida eleven. During 
the first half Maryland was kept busy on 
the defensive. For the first score in the 
second half offensive Tommy Mont com- 
pleted a pass to "jVIonk" Mier from the 
Florida ''2'2-yard line. A few minutes later 
Mont intercepted a Florida pass and then 
tossed an aerial to Bob James for the sec- 
ond and last touchdown. Florida tried a 
comeback several times, but each drive was 
ended by a fumble or an interception. 



MARYLAND 13— FLORIDA 



MD. 






FLA. 


10 


First (Icjwn.s . . 




15 


IH7 


^'ards gained nisliiiig (net). 




151 


7f» 
7 


\'ar(ls passing 

Xiirnlicr of punts 




HO 


m 


Avcr.'igc- (listaiici- (if punts 




39 


•M) 


Punts rcturiic<i 







1 

3 

35 


Own fuinhh's n'cdvcred 

Opponents' funil)les recovered. . 
Penalties (yanls) 





.35 


15 


Passes attempted 




15 


(i 


Passes completed 




4 




Marylarul: 1( 7 


(i— 13 






Florida: 1) 


0— 





The Glee Club made it.t outdoor debut at the Florida game. 





Rigby returns kickoff to oii-ijnrd line irilli (iarritt. Long, and Morijun Icaninij down on liiin. 



DIXIE BARBECUE 



MARYLAND 27 VIRGINIA 12 

MD. VA. 

15 Kirst ilciwns l-l 

234 ^■.■lrcls f,Miiii-d nisliiiif; (net 1 113 

24 I-'orwar^i passes attempted i7 

12 Korward passes completed H 

171 ^'ards auhivd passing 10!) 

4 Korward passes intercepted. , .'i 

42 Yards (.'allied intercepted passes. iii) 

38 I'lintiii); averape from .serimmape . . 42 

231 Total yards kicks returned. . . 161 

1 OpjKiiK'nts" fumlili's reeoverefi 1 

11,1 ^ ank lo-l on penalties io 

.Maryland: 7 7 G 7—27 
Virninia: (i I) (!— I'i 




OuH MODEL "T" ROLLED illto aiul oVCr 

\'irginia in a whirlwind collision of tlie 
"T" machines. The yaine became a pass- 
ing duel between j)ass masters Mont and 
(lilletle. ^Vorkin,^■ behind a su|)erior line, 
INIont bested his ri\al in completions, con- 
ni'cting for l.'! out of IS, while (dllette pro- 
duced only l;! out of "27. Tlie iiame was 
\'iri;iiiia"s for three minutes. In this time 
the ('avali(M-s marched (I!) yards for the 
number one score. This was the be.yiiminfj 
of the Old Dominion massacre, for the 
Liners oiil i)lay('(l their opi)onenls for the 
remainder of tiie name. 



Jdclc Ditlmiir helped in an all-night drum session. 




Picking up four yards against Duke. 



NIGHTMARE OF BLUEDEVILS 



In the encounter with the Duke "Bkie 
Devils," we swallowed a second surprise 
dose of high scoring poison. After a top- 
heavy score of 50-0 last season, we sought 
a victory in this game more than any other 
of the year. 

The most outstanding feature of the 
afternoon was a 52-yard sprint by Duke's 
Davis into pay territory. Maryland made 
only one threat to the enemy goal, when in 
the final period the Old Liners pushed the 
ball as far as the 6-yard line only to lose 
the ball and meet defeat. 



MD. 

9 
110 

ii 

25 

\i 
u 



y 

35.8 
49.5 
119 




"Cuiley" sold a football for a war hojid. 



MARYLAND DUKE 42 

DVKE 

First downs 11 

Net yards rushing 218 

Net yards forward ,25 

Forwards attempted 6 

Forwards completed 3 

Intercepted by 3 

^ ards interceptions returned 33 

Punts (number) 7 

Punts (average) 43.1 

Kickoff average 50.3 

Yards kicks returned 208 

Yards punts returned 141 

Maryland: 0—0 

Duke: 14 7 7 14—42 




^ * •/ / I • 



9a ^ 



«-»-: 



V ?n 



Maryland 



tthcrcd after a ID-i/anl (jain against Washington anil Lee. 



GENERAL MAYHEM 



MAKVl.AND 32 W. AND L. 28 



Ml>. 








W.,lcL. 


Hi 


I''irst iliiwiis 






8 


25:s 


^.irils fi.iincil riisliiii); liict) 






:u 


197 


Yards j^ained passing 






■iiii 


■i\ 


Pusses attrniptcd. 






■2i 


14 


Pusses coiiiplctcd 






11 


.'i(i 


Punting' a\Tra^('. , 






:{.-> 


I.-. 


'^'urils. ninl)a(k kicks 

Kiiinlilcs 

Opixinrnts' fiimliles recovernl 
N ards Idst li\' penalties. . , 

Maryland: -HI (i 


(1 (i- 


~:h 


'20 




\Vasliin;;lciM & I.ce: (1 7 


7 U- 


~-iH 






J HK Washington and Lee "Generals," 
cannoiiadint;' aerials all over Byrd Stadium, 
almost caught up with the Old Liners in 
the final seconds of a tlirill-])acked home- 
coming battle. In the first period Maryland 
worked smoothly and definitely outclassed 
its opponents, while Washington and I^ee, 
trailing l)y li) jxiinls niul a])pareiilly l)a<lly 
beaten at the half, started a snappy over- 
IkvhI game to score '■-Jl ixiiiijs ni llic liiial 
(|uai'ter. 'I'lu> 7,.")00 s|)(vlal(>rs were iionU'r- 
ing on hysteria when I lie Ked and White 
fumbled a last iiuniilc ki<k(ilV and the 
(ienerals failed lu ((inii)!!-!!' a i)a>> that 
might ha\e won llicgamt-. 



I'arl (if the lldiitfciiiiintg crotnl. 




Firxt rnir: Harris, Brenner, Chovanes, Conrad, Dittniar. Secnnd row: Gilniore, Hellxxk, James, .larmoska, Mier. Third row: Mont, Nardo, Kighy, 

Vincent, Wright. 

THE CAMMANDOS. Froid row: Jolinson, Clayland, DeBinder. Luria, Goldberg, Shules, Gordy. Bail.- mw: Woods, Baldi, Swindell. Bohenko, 

Leung, Shalowitz, Banks, Loucks. 




113 



BOXING 



row THE TiiiHD TIME ill three years the 
boxing season at ^Maryland opened witli- 
oiit a eoaeli. Faeulty advisor (ieorge Quiy- 
ley and Ilerl) (Inntlier took over tlie early 
season eoaehing duties and ran the team 
until Tom Canipagna arrived from Chi- 
cago. 

Proving himself to be an exceptionally 
capable coach, Campagna whipped the 
boxers into shaj)e for the first match with 
the U.S. Coast Guard. Although only three 
lettermen were back on the s(juad tlie sea- 
son started with a bang and a victory. In 
this match we started the group of heavy- 



weights w liicli later gained fame as "dyna- 
mite row." 

The next match was with the Green Ter- 
rors of AVestern ^laryland and we felt a 
little uneasy as to the outcome because of 
the fine re])utation of the AVestminster 
coach, Harry Jetfra, and the outstanding 
record of the fighters. However, the team 
scored two knockouts to take a well-canu'(l 
^Yr^^Yl win. Ed Reider and Herb Gun- 
ther each turned in first round knockouts 
in the AVestern Maryland match. 

Loss of fighters at V.P.I, prevented us 
from keeping the BIacks})urg engage- 



'JOM {\\MP.\GNA, Coach. 



LOV SHIP1>, Manager. 






Herb Gunther gires Richard- 

ttim of the Coast Guard a stiff 

right hook. 



115 




K(i))ih()iirts mi.res i1 up iritli lldllace 
of Siirlli ( (irhhiKt. 



1!()\1N(; S( IIKDI l,K 

Jiin. !) — I'.S. ('(>(i>t (liiiinl 

Jan. \i — Wcslrni Maryland at Wcstiniiislcr 

Jan. 10 — r.S. Military A( mli-inv at Wist INiitit 

Jan. 30 — Virjfinia at ( 'liarln(lcs\ iiii' 

Fell. C— l.iiikliav.li Stalf Trailicrs ( '(il|ij;r 

Fel). 1!) — Catliolic 1 niversily . 

Fell. H) — Ncirtli Cinilin.-i 



M.I. 

•^ 

V, 

i; 



Op,,. 
3H 




Herb (liuilhcr jiiittinii away another opponent. 



incnt, hut at West Point we turned a neat 
trick hy defeating the Cadets for tlie first 
time ill two years. Althou<ih Kd Reider 
was (leeisioned in a close match, heavy- 
weifjhts (lihnore. Guntlier. and Rodman 
prcxhiced ('ii()U,<;li wins to put Maryland 
out in front of the .Vnuy. 

It was a cocky Maryland crew that 
headed for Charlottesville and suH'ercd its 
only loss of the season. Althouiih Iteider 
and Cucrrant fouuht hard and clo.se 
malcluvs, tlic Cavaliers annexed the first 
fivefi.nhls to take the nod. 

Lockhavcii Tcachci's Collei;e. which 
liioiii;!;! ;i hiii'hly-ratcd Icaiii licfc. caught 
us on the i-clinimd and siilVcrcd a O^/^lJ^g 
.setback. The lca(liri> only hroughl five 
hoNcrs wllli lliciii ;iii(l Marxland went to 
\\ itrk on I lirni with a royal will. 

\\ (' watched llic win oNcr (iitliolic I ni- 
vcrsitv with satisfaction and sori-ow . for in 



I Id 




spite of our enthusiasm over the () 2 score, 
as it was the last appearance of Jolmny 
Gihnoi-e and Herb Guntlier in a INIaryland 
fight ring. Herb was a 175-lb. Southern 
Conference champion and one of tlie great- 
est boxers ever to don Old Line gloves. 
Gilniore never lost a college fight and drew 
only one. 

In spite of the loss of three starting 
boxers to the armed forces, Maryland put 
an exceptionally good team in the ring 
against North Carolina and c-ame through 
w ith a O-'J score. This match featured the 
last appearances of Ed Reider and Ray 
Ciccone, who went into the service. 

^Maryland's delegation to the Eastern 
Intercollegiates jjlaced only Tom Jones 
and Len Rodman in the finals, where they 
both dropped close ones. 



(•iicrraut meets -stilf opjidsitioii in the Coast Gmird's 
Hi}sirell. 

Reider and Miirplii/ of tlie Coast Guard exchange 
hloirs ill a Jint fiijllf. 




117 



BASKETBALL 



1 1{(JS1M:( TS FOR A (;OOD UASKKTliALL YEAH 

had Coach Sliiplcy confident as the sea- 
son oiHMU'd. Veterans who liad phiycd 
tofjethcr for the hist three years were hack 
as well as caj)ahU' newcomers from last 
year to l)olster and strengthen the expe- 
rienced nucleus. Prospects seemed <i;ood 
as the ca<>ers took the Hiclnnond Spiders 
in the initial fray, and went on to defeat 
the I'niversity of North Carolina and, in 
an extra period, put away Virginia's team. 
^Vitll a three-game winning streak and the 
undisputed Conference lead we then went 
Nortii to play Pennsylvania and lose our 
first game hy two poiids. 



We hit the road again to go South where 
our luck I'au out as we ran into ho! Wash- 
ington and Lee and V.M.I, teams for our 
first Conference losses. Tommy ^lont and 
Ernie Travis were hekl ahnost .scoreless 
in these games. Tlirillcr of the year was 
against the highly rated (ieorgc Washing- 
ton five which was well in front of the Con- 
ference and flying high. A 4() 4,S win was 
the best that the Colonials could do in a 
game that was scheduled to he a walkover. 

We poured it on the Tars while ^Icmt 
and Travis accounted for 4;5 of the team's 
(58 points in the highest .scoring game of the 
year. Army caught us on an off night for 



B.\UXEY MTTLK, Manager 




118 







The hall flies in midair 
agai7jst North Carolina. 





lidil'. Jtnlils iiHilir liiisl,-il (uninisl I ininiin. 



Traits tiiid the rudch (li.'<ciis.-< struictm. 

;i four-point win, hut \vc canu" hack to |)ut 
oil a I hrillinu, show against Duke. The Blue 
Devils led Ihc Cout'cnMice at llu- time hut 
Maryland wen! in scrappini; and c"inu' 
within three jxjints of knockiim o(V tlie 
league leaders. 

Now it was our turn to win. I'^irst to fall 
was Washini^toii and Lee which had l)eateu 
us earlier in the soa.son. The (leneral.s 
couhl not cope with Mont as lie siiow- 
hirded in ten i^oals lo lead the team to a 
.■j;? ;5() win. \N c iiexi look the measure of 
\ iruinia and North ( arolina l)y suiislantial 
marniiis. 

.\ltli()Ui;li Maryland looked lo the 
(leorii'etown yaine with mis^ixiims. we jMit 
on oiir i)esl defensi\(' i;anie of the season, 
and had the lioyas lied ii]) at the half after 
leadiiin most of Ihc |)eriod. Su|)erior height 
and e\])erieiice made the dilference as the 
( ieornclow n men slowly |iiilled away lo 
win a hard-foiiuiil lial 1 1<'. 

^Villiam and Mary iiroui:1il up a team, 
minus the services of tiiree regulars. A\e. 



120 




too, had lost Schuerliolz and Baitz to the 
services, but we were steadier in a shaky 
game and came up with a win as Bob 
James and Tom Mont turned in briUiant 
performances. Our last appearance of tlie 
season was a heartbreaker as we dropped 
a close one to V.M.I, with the same mar- 
gin as in the first game. 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

Md. 0pp. 

Dec. 16— Richmond, College Park 3? 28 

Jan. 1 — North Carolina, College Park . 47 40 

Jan. 9 — Virginia, College Park .... .53 45 

Jan. 13 — Penn.sylvania, Philadelphia. . 49 .51 

Jan. 15 — Wa.shington an<l Lee, Lexington 40 50 

Jan. 16 — V.M.L, Lexington 34 35 

Jan. 23— George Washington, Washington, D.C. . 43 48 

Jan. 30 — Navy, .\nnapolis 63 53 

Fell. 6— Army, We.st Point 40 44 

Feb. 12— Duke, College Park 43 46 

Feb. 13— Washington and Lee, College Park 55 35 

Feb. 15 — Virginia, Charlottesville 56 42 

Feb. 16— North Carolina, Chajjel Hill 40 31 

Feb. 20 — Georgetown, College Park 35 45 

Feb. 23— William and Mary, College Park 51 36 

Feb. 25— V.M.L, College Park 35 36 



Jim Kinsman jiyhts for the ball ayaui.st Viryiniu. 

Werner. Trarin and two V .M .1. men struggle for the 
hall. 




121 



LACROSSE 



WliKN ("().\( II Ai, IIkacy sent out the 
call \'nv laci"().s.st>, forty incii answci'cd, and 
on the first of ^Nlarch trainiiifj; began for the 
first game wliicli was only three and a lialf 
weeks away. Prospects for a successful 
team were liood, for, althoui>li a innnl)er of 
tlie l)rilHant players who had made such a 
good record dm-iuti; the summer were gone, 
there was a strong nucleus of veteran let- 
termcn and talented newcomers about 
which a strong combination could be l)uilt. 
In the close attack there were Bob Stock- 
bridge and Carroll Rowny, in the mid- 
field Jack Hoyert. Bill Taylor an.l Bill 
Tarberl, and in the close defense there 



were Hud Keller and Jack Dittmar who 
had already won their monograms. These 
veterans were supplemented by Bob Case 
and Ed Looper in the attack, Otts Lund- 
vall and Lloyd INlallonee in the midfield, 
and John Uabai, Warren Kierman. and Mel 
I'delewit/ in the defense. It was on the.se 
men that Coach Heagy made his plans. 

It .soon became apparent that it was 
going to be a task getting ready for the 
opening fray, for when the field wasn't 
muddy it was blanketed with snow. Some- 
thing else that held us up was lack of hel- 
mets. These had been sent out to be re- 
j)aired and wi-re not returned until a week 



A I, I1KA(;V, Cmirh 



Hon I'OlUiKSTKH. Muuaijrr 






Carrol Ruwny tests his stick before practice. 



123 




Old Liner teammates fight for the hall in practice. 



Maryland closes in to take the ball from Drcxel. 




Trying for a goal in Drcxel game. 



before our first f^anie with Drexel. The 
Techmen brought an experienced crew, 
one that had played much hicrosse and we 
were set for a tough battle. We got one. 
After the first period, in which Jack Hoyert 
marked up the only goal, we got to work 
and rolled up a 12-0 score. Although we 
shut the visitors out, it was a fighting game 
all the way from the first wliistio to the 
final gun. 

In tlie first game, although the midsea- 
son edge was not apparent, we showed 
that we had a real contender on the field. 
Every department showed u]) well, and the 
over-all team play was exceptionally good. 
The attack frequently moved tlie l>all into 
the payott' territory and only an alcrl niid 
fighting defense ])revented a higher score. 
One of the brightest sjjots of tlic learn was 
the defense with liill Taylor in the goal. 
Taylor, a converted midfielder, was poised 
and assured in the cage, and lived up to all 



Vl\ 




As stick-handling was learned by the squad. 



The Maryland goalie gets practice in defense. 



the requirements of a good goalie. The ex- 
perienced Keller and Dittmar, aided and 
abetted by Eierman and Rabai, proved a 
tough combination for opposition attacks 
to solve. In the midfield Lloyd Mallonee 
and Otts Lundvall were two of the best 
players in recent years. Al Ruppersberger, 
who had been used in substitute roles, 
turned out to be another of the topnotch 
players. 

We were fortunate that Captain Jack 
Faber, who has coached many other Mary- 
land stick teams to greatness, was sta- 
tioned nearby, for he frequently found an 
afternoon to come back and lend a hand. 
Our squad hoped for an extra good chance 
at national honors as they went through 
this season. 




125 



WOMEN'S SPORTS . . . 



With imk coopkhation of (l:i\ (l()(l<;i rs, 
(lorinitoi'N . and sorority niemhers. recre- 
ational a(ti\ities Hourislied on eanipus 
lliroiit;iiout a war-worn year. 

Early in tlie summer, tlie Women's Rec- 
reation Association, in conjunction with 
the ^largaret Brenters. ])hinne(l a treasure 
hunt to welc'ome freshmen and new stu- 
dents. The freslunan mixer, as always, 
was a success: hut the social hit of the 
W.li.A. year was the inaui^uration of 
the after-dinner orchestra dances. These 
dances continued llirou,i;hout the term, 
first in the Field House, then in the (iyni- 
.\rniory. 

\\ ith the fall .semester came a new head 
of the women's j)liysieal education depart- 
ment. Dr. Irene Barrett, and her stafi'. Dr. 



Itachel Benton and Miss Jean Tenney. 
Af^ain the W.R.A. social whirl heyan with 
dorm parties for freshmen, the freslunan 
mixer, and tlie after-dimier dances were 
contimied. Hockey season liciian, liie high- 
point of wiiich was the \arsity-ahmuii 
Homecoming game. 

Chief among the other activities of 
\V.|{..\. was the military marching pro- 
gram for coeds, headed hy Lieutenant 
Davis of the Military Dejiartment. Bas- 
kethall, fencing, archery. \'olleyl>all. had- 
minton. and howhng tournaments were 
also sponsored. 

Officers were: Jane Showacre, i)resi<lent; 
Hannah Stevens, vice-president: Doris 
l>und()uist, secretary: and Betty IJryan, 
treasurer. 



The (///-/.v /()()/,■ up ilrilliiiii hi hrcp up irltli tin- limes. 





Leg exercises und arrheri/ were dircrse. hut iiecessarij, athletic pursuits. 



Basketball and badmnitdu ti)urnaments were popular and well attended. 




U7 




cheerleaders: Soiter, Armstrong, Scales, Libby, Scheiio, Stecn, I'owoU, Croiinvfll, Bcall. 

WEARERS OF THE "M 



9 9 



Adams, John, F. 
Anderson, Julian 
Barnes, (leortje W. 
Baitz, Edward 
Bates, Elwood 
Benson, Robert 
Boothe, Daniel 
Brandt. Marshall 
Bransdorf, Kenneth 
Breinier. .lolin 
BurUn, Ralph 
Byrd, William 
Chacos, Louis 
Chovanes, Edward 
Clarke, Slater 
Conrad, l>uther 
Cooley, .1. Stuart 
Couch, (leorge 
Crist, Hartley 
( iirrin. ( liftnti 
Decker, .l()se])h 
Dekf)wzan, Jack 



Dittmar, Jack S. 
Duliois, Oscar 
Enj^lar, Carlos 
Fetters, Robert 
Flick, Paul 
Forbes, James 
Fulton, William 
Gilniore, John 
(lordy, Irving' 
Grelecki, Ray 
Gunther, Herbert 
Harris, Carl 
Hafjerman, Thomas 
Helbock, William 
Hill, Landis 
Hott'man, Leon 
Hoyert, John 
noo])eii)^ardner, Joe 
Hudack, Clark 
I lulinaii. Jack 
Hunt, Max 
James, Robert C 



Jarmoska, George 
Jones, Thomas 

Kehoe, Stirling; 
Keller, Howard 
Knepley, Robert 
l.icbniati, Leonard 
Lincoln, Jndson 
ALain, Robert 
Maisel. Robert 
Mallonee, Lloyd 
Maskell, Kenneth 
McDonald, Leib 
Mier, Harry J.. Jr. 
Mizell. Russell 
MonI, Thomas 
Nardo, Anthony 
Xewf^arden, (ieorge 
O'lJrien, Richard 
Owiiijis, Dorsey 
Reith, William A. 
Rivello, Robert >L 
Rodman, Leonard 



Rosenfield, Xorman 
Rowny, Carroll 
Royal. Doyle 
Schnebly, Andrew 
Sehuerholz, Donald 
Schwarz, Howard 
Steiner, Carlton 
Stockbridge, Robert 
Sulliva!!, Eugene 
Sunier, Henry 
Tarberl. William 
Taylor. Preston William 
Tucker. Hubert 
Ulman, Bernard 
VandenBerg, Milton 
\'in<-ent. Reginald 
Werner. Hubert 
Whellon. Dick 
Wright. John (). 



128 




*^ 




THE REGIMENT 




129 



R.O.T.G. 
STAFF 



liiK .Mii.iTAin i)i;i'.\HT.\iK\T liiid |)crlia|)s 
the <ireat('st rcsixmsihility on I lie cainiJiis. 
To it was (Mil iMislcd the (l('\cl(i|)in<'nl of 
iiicii stiiilciits iiilo suhjccls lit for army 
traiiiiii.u. 'I'liis cuIIcmI for a complete rexisioii 
of the exisliiiii KOTC" set-iij). 

Tlie I'liiversity function wliich directly 
rehited tlie students to the armed services 
was the achninistration of Knhsted Re- 
serve ('or])s orii'anization hy the Military 
l)e])artm('nl . Startinu, in the summei'. and 
continuinii with increasing' volume, enlist- 
ments were accepted in K.l{.('. with the 
aim of kee])inii,' in school those Ix-st fitted 
for collciie training. IlowcNcr. in late 
Tehruary, the Military, actinji' for the War 
Department, called the Enlisted Reserve 
Corps to active duty, and in four days over 




(oi.om:!, lioBKiii i;. w^s()li, .)«. 



l.'JO hoys left forCamj) I.ee. \'a. 

One means adopted to achieve these 
ends was compulsory "Junior Army." This 
move was made in tlu' ix-lief that the addi- 
tional vi'ar of intense training: would bene- 



Flmt roir: LiiMiti-naiit Smith, Captain Qiiinn, Mrs. Ilolm, Colonel Wysor. Colonrl Criswold, l.iiMitrnant rinkcrtnn, Lieuli-naiit 

Davi.s. Smtnil ruir: Mr. Kicc, Licnti-nant liarki-r. Captain Cassrll, Liciilcnant Waldcn, Captain Holilcr, Liinitcnant Dnnlap. Thirii rnw: 

Serfteant Sculx), Serjeant Dod.son, StrKranI Norri.s, Corporal Christian.srn. Scrficant lirowi-r. Sergeant Mose.s. Servant Kox, Sergeant 

^^e(i^ain. Fourth rnw: Cadet Major (iilhert. Sergeant Seilieneiehen. Sergeant Koherls. Cadet Cajitain Seliaetfer, Sergeant Cullen. 





CADET COLONEL LUTHER CUXKAD 




Cadet Ma.ioh 

IL\ROLn GiLBKHT 

Ri'fjlnu'itltil All jilt ail I 



Cadet Captain 

Edgar Schaeffer 

!*liiii ami O iH'raliinis Ojfici'r 



THE CADETS 



fit iVIaryland men when called into service. 

Still other plans were made for individ- 
ual physical development. A new and more 
difficult obstacle course, which tested re- 
flexes and strengthened the body, was con- 
structed. Through compulsory physical 
education the regiment participated in 
boxing, wrestling, football, basketball, 
cross-country, soccer, and track. 

Because of wartime orders, the staff of 
army men on duty as instructors at the 
University changed considerably, the ma- 
jority leaving for camps or overseas duty. 
Their places were taken by men from other 
details, with new ideas and the ability to 
take over where the others had left off. 

We said goodbye to the seniors in Febru- 
ary, wishing them the best of luck as they 
left for training in Officers Candidate 
School at Fort Benning, Gn. We felt as- 
sured that the training they had received 
would prove invaluable to them in their 
efforts to get commissions in the Army. 



Much raluuhJc c.vperieiice iron (jaiucd with different ti/pcK of ireaixms <m the tiring range. 




FIRST BATTALION 




Cadet Lt. Colonel 

Ramon Grelecki 

Commanding 

Cadet Captain Cadet 1st Lieut. 

Pai I, W. Nehoauden William C. Heathpote 

Exi-culive Officer Battalion Ailjiitant 





COMPANY "A" 

inil I,t. Henry J. Kassier. iw\ l.t. Kdward 
L. Hover. 1st l,t. Homer E. lldand. 

Capt. William S. Stewart. 



COMPANY 'ir- 

•>n(l l.t. Tlioma.s .\. Payne, inA l.t. Paid 
Climar. 1st T.t. Kdward H. Steinlierj!. 

Capt. (ieorge J. Newgarden. 



COMPANY 'C' 

iind l.t. I.ister Kiefer, ■Jnd 1.1. Kieliard D. 
Carr, l.st l.t. .lames (i. Sneeringer. 

Capt. .John V. Miller. 



( OMPANY "D" 

^ind l.t. William H. Mattin»;ly. ■in.l l.t. 

.Io.sepliM.Cr.>ekett, 1st l.t. Pa^;.' H. Pratt. 

Capt. William 11. Piii.lell. 



132 




SECOND BATTALION 




Cadet Lt. Colonel 

Reginald C. Vin'Cent 

Commanding 

Cadet 1st Lieut. 
David K. Fetters 
Battalion Adjutant 



Cadet Captain 
Charles A. Bechtold 

Executife Officer 

Cadet 2nd Lieut. 

Juan L. Oliver 

Battalion Supply Officer 



COMPANY "E" 

Capt. Paul M. Wimert, 1st Lt. Robert 
S. Lee. 



COMPANY "F" 

Capt. Charles P. Gay, 1st Lt. Fred. L. 

Bacli, 2nd Lt. Paul R. Mattix, 2nd Lt. 

William M. Goldenzweig. 



COMPANY "G" 

Capt. Loy M. Shipp, 1st Lt. L.B.Stevens, 

2nd Lt. Burt Solomon, 2nd Lt. .\nson W. 

Biggs- 



COMPANY "H" 

Capt. Clemens W. Gaines, 1st Lt. Thomas 
E. Bourne, 2nd Lt. Robert C. McKee, 
2nd Lt. Glen \Y. Weston. 




133 



THIRD BATTALION 




Cadet Lt. Colonel 

Fr.\nxis a. (iRay 

Commaiutiitg 



Cadet Captain 

FkEDEKICK W.VUDKIi 

Excciilire Officer 





COMPANY -V 

•Jnd Lt. J. Stuart Cooley. •iiu\ Lt. lyOiii.s 
Flax, 1st Lt. Ceoffrey M. Nairn. 

("apt. James E. I'pdegraff. 



COMPANY J" 

^iid Lt. Oilaiidd Hidoiit, :>nd L(. Kinier 
11. Own.s, 1st Lt. Kennrlli Hall. 



COMl'ANY "K" 

'2n<l Lt. Jiidson I). Lincoln, 'Jnd Lt. 
Charles W. CraHford. 1st Ll. Frederick 
IL Kohloss. 

Capl. 1 Iriili .\. (idler. 



( OMl'ANY "ir 

•,'iid Ll. Dovlc I'. Hoyal. ^ii.l Ll. Mark 
U.inm. Isl Ll. .lolm K. Talc. 

Capl. Dniiald I'. Wliiiicrey. 



134 




FOURTH BATTALION 




Caiit't Lt. Colonel 

Bernard I'lman, Jr. 

Commciiidiiig 

Cadet Captain Cadet 1st Lieut. 

Robert \V. Ireland .Julian B. Anderson 

E.rcriitirr Offirrr Baltidinii Adjiilaiif 



JUNIOR I 

1st Lt. Xicola.s M. Cartagena, 2nd Ll. 

Herbert .J. Gunther, 2nd Lt. Daniel W 

Talniadge. 



JUNIOR II 

Capt. Max V. Hunt, 2nd Lt. William H. 
Krehnhrink. 2nd Lt. .John F. .\dams. 



PERSHING RIFLES 

('apt. Robert M. Rivello, 1st Lt. .John T. 
Mitehell. 



SIGNAL C ORPS 'A" 

Capt. Daniel M. McNally, 1st Lt. Vernon 

G. Gingell, 2nd Lt. James X. Mar.sden. 

2nd Lt. Guy S. Kidwell. 



SIGNAL GORPS "B" 

Capt. Joseph V. Mariner, 1st Lt. Ells- 
worth A. Hurlock, Jr., 2nd Lt. John B. 
Riley. 





r-s* te^ 




135 



SIGNAL CORPS 



Maryland's "pole cllmukhs" arc inem- 
bers of one of the few signal units estab- 
lished in the State Universities. The two 
companies are composed entirely of engi- 
neering students. That the Army has great 
faith in these addicts of the slide rule is 
seen hy the fact that the Signal Corps has 
much more modern equii)ment than does 
the Infantry Regiment. Commanded by 
Colonel (iriswold, the engineers are doing 
a job that Maryland may well be proud of. 




The Morse eode iru.^ luaxiered. 



Captain Quitui and Captain Williams cooperate on the romwiitiicatinn.i set. 




136 



SCABBARD AND BLADE 



COMPANY I THIRD REGIMENT 

Honorary Military Fraternity 

Founded at the University of Wisconsin in 1904^ 

Established at the University of Maryland in 1922 

OCABBARD AND Blade was the pivot point 
of social and military life of members of 
the Advanced ROTC. For the first time 
our chapter represented the national fra- 
ternity at Armistice Day ceremonies at 
the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. 

During the past year Reggie Vincent 
served as captain, assisted by Bernie 
Ulman, first lieutenant; John Gilmore, 
second lieutenant: and Judson Lincoln, 



first sergeant. 



Members: John Adams, Anson Biggs, Luther Con- 
rad, Joseph Crockett, David Fetters, Clemens 
Gaines, Ulrich \. Geller, Donald Gilbert, John 




CADET LT. COLONEL 
RECilNALD VIXCEXT 

President 



Gilmore, Francis Gray, Ray Grelecki, William 
Heathcote, Max V. Hunt, Judson Lincoln, Joseph 
Mariner, (Jeoffrey Nairn, AVilliam Pindell, Edgar 
Schaeft'er, William Stevens, William Stewart, 
Bernard Ulman. Milton VandenBerg, Reginald 
\'incent, Donald Whinerev, Paul Wimert. 



First roxp: Conrad, Crockett, Fetters, Gaines, Hunt. Second rote: Lincoln, Mariner, Pindell, Schaeffer, l"lman, Whinerev. 




d^g^f^ 



137 




Fir.sl mil-: Mitilirli. UiM-Ild, lldli). Snoiid row: (liens, Thomas, Lauibtit, Jiiikin.-.. Sandtrs, Mraio. \ial. TliinI roir: Kriikr, K»l)bins, 
■Westfall, Hopkins, Lloyd, Alicrcrombie, Englo, Duteil, .\llen. Fourth low: Van Wagner, Lipske, Warwick, Clem, Garner, Lane, Carter, 
Selimid, Dyas. Fifth riiir: (iraliani, .1. A. Dierkiph, O'Ktlly, Caslin. Mussclnian, Everson, Carolan, Kiilton. Macario. Sixth row: Kelson, 
Cllassman, Conrad, Lurie, Hroneislias. VanPiltin, Parkis, Patrick, Kcno. Sereiilh row: Crone. Brooks, Hradford. Chancy, Turner, Weir, 
Keller. Lund<|uist, Stiles. Eighth row: Byrd, Kynier, Horcll, .Jacohson. I'lalo. Slaiin. Tiliis, Biirlicston. Arps. Xiiith row: (iaiiics. Smilli, 

Mallis, Duke, Kideway, Ilarrcll, Pear, Lee. 



PERSHING RIFLES 

X EHsniNc; Rifles appeared in the fall 
foi' I lie first time as a .sei)aral(' unit 
in I lie cadet re,<>inuMil . 

Two formal dances and two l)aii- 
quets made up the social calendar 
of I he future officers and I hey also 
part icipalcd in (•crciuonics ;il llonic- 
coniino and on .\rmistice Day. IVr- 
sliino liillcs au'ain s|)oiisor('d I lie rei^'i- 
mcnlal lioxiiiff toui'iiaincnl . Thi-onoli 
its efforts thirty tons of scrap metal 
were eoilccted. Wiuuino' first j)lac<" 
in the rei^iniental lilood donation 
drive climaxed an outstanding; year. 

I'cr.iliiiKj liijlr.s ijrrrts ti illiiiiiliirii. 




138 



RIFLE TEAM 



The group of sharpshooters who in- 
habit the top floor of the Agricultural 
Building finished the season with the out- 
standing record for East Coast colleges. 
Winning from such a top-notch competitor 
as Lehigh, the Maryland rifle team copped 
second place in the Third Corps Area. 
Colonel Griswold had as fine a group of 
"dead shots" squeezing the triggers as 
have ever been on a Maryland team. Led 
by Wessels, who was a high scorer in the 
countrj^ with a 194 record, the team also 
had such fine shots as Cliff Currin, Paul 
Newgarden, Joe Decker, and Bud Geller, 
on the firing line. 

For the first time in many years Mary- 
land lost twice to (leorgetown, but the 




Geller and Xeirciardcn, All- Americans. 



team overcame these setbacks, and took 
on all competitors to climax an eventful 
year by winning the Hearst trophy. 



Front row: (alter, Fiicke, Griswokl, Geller, Newgarden. Back roir: Clarke, .Jenkins, Hello, Decker, Currin, Icker. 




139 



JUST IN CASE 



Although not connectei) with the Tni- 
versity of Maryhuul, a division of Chemi- 
cal AVarfare of the V.S. Army took over the 
Rossboroiifjh Inn, a chissroom, and some 
University j)roi)erty for several months 
this year. Firemen and members of Civilian 
Defense were instructed in the art of ex- 
tinguishing iiigh explosives, with Army 
men as instructors. Several shows were 



given on the University ])roperty last sum- 
mer to show the effects of an air-raid ajid 
the tactics of the fire-fighters. 

The unit moves from state to .state to 
give demonstrations and instruction in case 
of an air-raid. Flame throwers, incendiary 
homhs, and thermit bombs are an impor- 
tant part of I lie ecjuipment of the Chemical 
Warfare Division. 



lioiiih (uid jhiine-ihrnwiuii luetics trcre dcmunatrateil. 




('liUiiiii fire-fKjhtern irrrc Iralnrd inlli u iniidcl 
sinicliirc. 




I) hAisrin jiriiiiKiiid imi-s.'i mdi/luiii iiiimmj tht' 

ROTC students taking his "sho)t course." 



SOCK '"EM" 
BITE "EM" 

JMajor Francois D'Eliscue, who trains 
rangers and commandos, visited the cam- 
pus one day last summer to show us how 
modern-day soldiers are toughened for 
combat. One hundred and thirty-three 
pounds of dynamite, the diminutive D'Elis- 
cue left us with our heads in a whirl but 
with a grim determination to get ourselves 
in the best possible physical condition. 




^..s 




The Major demonstrates 

silencint/ techniques on 

••Boots." 



Geller is uncerenioniou,sIy 
disarmed. 



HOW DO YOUR FEET FEELP 



('(ijildiii W'illiamti prenciit.s 
his crituiiir of the problem. 




. \Ui'r llir Jir.sl Ini miles the leii-iiiiinitr rest 
l>iri(iit iids (iri.iidiishi liioknl fnrirurd Id. 



The nt)()ti niral ints al-ai appirci- 
uted after niarchiiiy all inornitKj. 




GOVERNMENT 

AND 

ORGANIZATIONS 



Student Government . . . Women's 
League . . . The Beauties . . . Dramatic 
Organizations . . . Musical Organizations 
. . . Social and Religious Clubs . . . The 
Publications . . . Terrapin . . . Diamond- 
back . . . Old Line . . . M Book . . . The 
Dormitories. 




i3We '^JfK; iWlx; -^"W; 




m m m m m 




ARTICIPATION IN EXTRA-CURRICULAR activities 



provides an outlet for self-assertion and enables tfv^ stu 
like interests. These activities truly educate those 
supplement to the time-honored class instruction^'X^He ledf\ 
thus ^ains the ability to think and lead. 




ge i&eafxvith people of 



tnoM perfect 
Wlows and 

i 



Aside from the creative activities, there are things to be gained in the student political 

remembering names and for meeting people is acquired. A good 
tent is obtained from actual practice in governing, and thus the 
^socially and mentally for his place in society. 




mghtiiejpiaf^iiikerror method in 



^- 



student extra-curricular life, and it is these lessons that go^^^v^ctji^lfB^^^Aip the truly 

yricttlah'^activitie's are secured. 



educated citizen. When all of these benefits of extra-ctn 



finally gets the true meaning of college life outside the classroom. 



one 



lU 




145 



TWILIGHT OF THE S.G.A. 




KAMON <;HELECKI 




Ix si'iTK (JF BKi.\(i the hatlk'ficid t'oi- po- 
litical theorists and the means of contact 
between administration and students, tlie 



rUK STl DKNT liOAKl) 
Seated: Nnlwill, liiiil. ISoiid. Sldiidiiiij: Diililcr. RidiT. Watsuii. 



Student (Government Association did uet 
tilings done. 

One of its first actions, and undonhtedly 
the one which liad the most \iolent reper- 
cussions, was the eslahlishment of a Semi- 



Thr last of llir Stii)lriit dnrrrniiiciit Assdcuilioii's iiirHiiKjs. 




146 



liar in Student Goveriunent Problems. One 
outgrowth of this course was the much- 
discussed new Constitution — industriously 
developed, proudly presented, carefully 
explained, and irreparably defeated. 

The other change carefully planned and 
presented by this class was the Provisional 
Organization. This scheme was ratified by 
the student body and was put into effect 
at the start of the new year. The new setup 
provides for a smaller number of members 
on the Student Board, the iiaiiie by which 
our S.G.A. shall henceforth be known. 
Members of the Student Board are the 
Cadet Colonel, chairman of the Victory 
Council, Dean of Men, and Dean of Wo- 
men. This new organization clearly shows 
the influence of wartime conditions and the 
stresses resulting therefrom. 

The S.G.A. was faced with a prol)lem in 
the matter of a limited budget for the sum- 
mer semester. In spite of this it pursued 
its duties and wound up with the crowning 
achievement of the Autumn Carnival, lield 
prior to the fall semester. 



Perhaps the most lasting contribution 
was the organization of the Old Line Net- 
work, the on-campus radio system, set up 
during wartime and in spite of great tech- 
nological difficulties. 

Easily one of the most discussed student 
leaders in Maryland history President Ray 
Grelecki was responsible for much of the 
progress of the S.G.A. and for most of the 
talk about it. He worked diligently, side- 
by-side with Vice-President Bill Stedman 
and Secretary -Treasurer Jane Chapin, to 
insure democracy in all waj's of life on 
campus. 

Ray Grelecki, president; Pat Quinn, vice-president; 
.Jane Chapin, secretary-treasurer; .John Gilmore, 
president of Men's League; Mary Harris, president 
of Women's League; Milton VandenBerg, president 
of O.D.K.; Nancy Holland, president of Mortar 
Board; Bert Carhart, editor of the Diamondhack: 
Charles Harry, president of Interfraternity Council; 
Fred Bach, president of Senior Class; Shirley ^lac- 
Kay, secretary of Senior Class; Bill Helbock, presi- 
dent of Junior Class; Mary Jane Chase, secretary 
of Junior Class; Ed Rider, ])resident of Soi)homore 
Class; Jane Boswell, secretary of Sophomore Class; 
Ben Wilson, president of Freshman Class; Jean 
Smith, secretary of Freshman Class. 



Top row: Bacli. Boswell. Cliapin. ThasP. riilmorc, Harris. Bottom row: Harry, MarKay. Qiiitin. Rider. Sterlman, VandenBerf;. 




147 



DORM RULERS 




Firxl riitr: Slrciiiiiii, Stricklcr, Iliilland. Mi( ',i!li^lir-. Harris, Hntid, Ilaasc. Iluiilcr, \aii Ness. I'icrsiiii. Sicoiid mir: J<'nkins. Mi-rkc-l, 

Dove. St<ill. Wolfson, Froy, Durst, C'sonka, Krniiev. Margolis. Third row: Jarnigan. Wolfo. Ilothman, Hlock, Li Tell, ^"^enc•h, Boswell, 

De I/Cafli. luiiirlh rnir: Thompson, Sliowacre, Wvnsch, Maxwell, Cartel!, Harlian, Andersnti, Xiitwell, Necille. 



iliVKin i"m\i:hsitv has a ditv to it.s resi- 
dent women students. Rules and proced- 
ure must he set uj) tlirouyli which an or- 
derly and healthful cain])iis ,s()cial life may 
be practiced, without the suppression of the 
coeds. Fre(|uenlly this inevitable fund ion 
of university administration is a .source of 
uneii(lin<i contiMition and violation. In 
view of this fac-t, I he women students of 
the University of Maryland are indeed for- 
tunate. 

Maryland's NVomeu's Coinmittee is a 
demoeral ic, self-^ON'ei'ninjj, oryanizat ion 
with rej)re.seiitai ion from each house for 
women students on or near campus. Day- 
dodger fjirls, vitally interested in all Wo- 
men's Coinmiftee decisions other than 
those rcf^ardinfi, campus residence, arc also 
a part of its organization. 



"^riie conunittee, known ]>rior to the in- 
troduction of the provisional government 
as Women's League, served faithfully in 
making W()rk;d)le regulations for cam])us 
residences, and in establishing a mobiliza- 
tion point through which the University 
could contact each girloncampus. Theconi- 
mittee sj)()ns()red an assend)ly for women 
students to see and hear representatives 
from the WAACS, WAVES, and SPAKS 
and organized all women students for work. 

("iMHMUonies for feminine expression were 
also featured throughout the year. Typi- 
cal examj)les were the noxcl Coed ( "apers, 
and (iirl's ("adet Colonel Day. 

Studeid oflicers who led these varied yet 
vital activities were. liarl)ara Nutwell, 
president; Dorothy McCallisler, vice-|)resi- 
dent; and Dorothy Merkel, secretary. 



iH 



THE NAVY PICKS 

OUR BEAUTIES 



LUCKY BAG 

UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY, ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND 



United States Naval Academy 
Annapolis, Maryland 
February 12, 1943 

Mr. Frederick M. Johnson 
Editor, 1943 Terrapin 
College Park, Maryland 

Dear Fred: 

Thanks for a rare pleasure, Fred. We at the 
Naval Academy find Maryland women most attractive. 

The Lucky Bag staff was most delighted to judge 
your beauties, and we are pleased to announce 
Miss Doris Thompson, the winner, and her court. 
Miss Betty Wacher, Miss Nettie Garman, Miss 
Edith Dunford, and Miss Mary Harris. We hope 
that this selection will be approved by the 
men of Maryland University, who are in a 
better position to make an accurate analysis of 
the girls' attractiveness than we. 

Best of luck in meeting your deadlines, Fred. 



Sincerely 


yours. 




C7'o„ 






Donald S. 


Lindbe 


rg 


Managing 


Editor 





149 




DORIS /'I/C.lfPSOjW av Miss AUnLuJ 




J^ETT 



SCHER 



EDITH DUNfORD 



151 




sirrriE carman 



.^\IARy HARRIS 



\'>i 




MOST CLUBS CARRIED ON 




153 



FOOTLIGHT CLUB 




AULA (ail.l). /V,v,-,/,«/ 



iliAni.i i\ Dkckmukk' llic Footlii^lit Clul) 
opt'iicil llio season hy j>r(i(lucin,<;' Owen 
Davis' murder comedy. "Mr. and Mis. 
North." .Vria (inild and Frank Mervine. 
as linshand and wife, ke])t the aniiieiice al- 
ternately rolling ni the aisles and sit t in^ on 
tlie edgx- of tiieir seats hy tossinj;' ahont wit 
and (h'ad eorp.ses with eloek-like reiinlarily. 
Snpportiiiii ])hiyers were Dot tie ANillis. Joe 
Decker, Eleanor Block, and .lohn Stnntz. 
A few l)ou(|uets must he thrown in the di- 
rection of Bill Breau. who played the dunih 
detective with ,<>reat success. 

The next Footli.iiht jircsental ion was 
madeu]) of three one-act plays, an experi- 
ment which ])ro\('d to he hiyidy successful. 



Fir.ll roir: Sliiiitz. Mmliii, Slimz, l'url>f>. Kiild. (iuild. Kitlinljrink, Murviiu-. Kiuk'liiis. Srcnml row: Love, NUKfc, C(mi|>it, lii\ lawski. 
Wolowitz. Scitcr, Hloclv. Third row: Scltzir, I'ciwill. (".over, AVilliamowslii. Davi.s, Hastings, Stccn, Campbell, Decker. Int-ni. Ur<mn. 




154 



Decker 




The first play in the threesome was "Dou- 
ble Demon," a farce by A. P. Herbert 
which poked fun at women in general and 
the British Courts in i)articular. John 
Stuntz, undaunted by an almost all-girl 
cast, turned in an excellent performance as 
the henpecked husband, while Eleanor 
Block, veteran Footlighter, did equally as 
well in the feminine lead. Such new names 
as Bobbie McKee, Marilyn Henderson, 
Louise Owings, and Marty McKim com- 
pleted the cast. 

Saroyan's "The Hungerers," second in 
the series, struck a somber note. Mr. 



"Oh/ of the Frynaj Pan" altio 
offered studies in anatomy. 




McColltiiii (liicclcd I lie cast of l''raiik Mer- 
vine, Fred .loliiisoii. Holn'iia Cooper, and 
(itlicrs to prcsciil a liit wliicli tlic audience 
enjoye<l iininenscly. 

Last, hut i'ar from least, was Eugene 
OXeiTs well-known "Tlic Lonj;' Voyage 
Home." Aria (iuild lieajied laurel upon 
laurel as the "])ick-up gal" in the water- 
t roll I (li\-e, while Jack Davis, as gullihle 
( )nic, suceumhed to her charms in excellent 
fashion. Dick Seltzer. Jean Forbes, Ben 
Williamowski. and Charles Cover gave 
very creditahlc pcrt'orniauces in support of 
the stars. 

The last play of the season was the well- 
known current hit, "Kind Lady." The en- 
tire cast gave an excellent j)erformance 
wliicli will he long remembered by the 
audience. 



No pidduclioii is complete without the 
iianl-woiking. uiisimg stage crews. Lender 
^Ir. l)uj)ler"s direction. i)ro])s. lights, and 
scenery were all in ])lace and working 
smoothly, (ieorge Stunlz. versatile stage 
manager and actor, kept tlie crews organ- 
ized .so that the show might go on. 

Armed with i)aint brushes and hauuucrs, 
Jimmie Sehene. Lynn (ro.ss, Jean Forbes, 
and Jane O'Homk built .scenery, while 
Fraiuvs AVhyte, ^largaret Hughes, ami 
Jean Rudelius provided the ])roi)s. Jack 
Frost manipulated the switchboard, and 
Isabelle Boswell and Doris Phipps ai)plie(l 
the greasepaint. 

Cooi)eration l)etween l)ackstage, actors, 
and directors made another successful year 
possible and kept the Footlight Club in its 
coveted position in the campus spotlight. 



Frank Mcrrliic ahinii li> throw ihiiHjs in "Mr. and Mrs. Xorth." 




156 



ROSSBOROUGH CLUB 



In spite of wartime curtailments, such 
as the gasohne shortage, and general ac- 
celeration in studies, the Rosshorough Club 
managed to hold its head high throughout 
the past year. 

Sonny Dunham played at Thanksgiving, 
creating an atmosphere of wholesome gay- 
ety for a laugh-starved campus. The in- 
tegral part played by the Rossborough 
Club in our University existence was 
proven at this time. Prexy Jim Kinsel had 
intended to discontinue operations of the 
club with the Christmas dance, due pri- 
marily to the difficulty in securing orches- 
tras for a one-night stand. However, its 
absence was too strongly felt l)y the stu- 
dent body and upon the suggestion of Dean 
Reid, the newly elected officers labored in- 
cessantly to reincarnate the fifty -two-year- 
old institution, with the result two more 
dances were held during the spring semester. 




.lAMES KINSEL, Pn:'<i,ln,l 

First semester officers were president, 
James Kinsel; vice-president, Clarence 
Shauman; treasurer, William Krehnbrink; 
secretary, Vitale Paganelli. Second semes- 
ter officers were president, George Keifer; 
vice-president, Robert Stockbridge; treas- 
urer, George F. Sprott; secretary, John 
Rabai. 



LdM Rossborough dance of the '4 J season. 



Prlmpinfi In the "lailies' lounge." 




157 




S.M.A.G. 



Firxl roir: liini, K<i-(ii>liicll. I )i'cktT. Second mir: Klclmlil, 
K^nidall. Mill-till. 



TiiK Student Musical A( tivitiks Co.m- 
.MiTTKE is tlic coiilrol liroii]) tor cjunijiis 
musical oriianizations. It secures the joint 
l)U(lfi;et for these ornniiizatious from I lie 
Student IJoard and adjusts the linancial 
afi'reenients between the oriianizations. 

'I'lie eoniniittee is made up of tli(> presi- 
dent and treasurer of the Men's (dee ( "lul). 
the Women's Chorus, the Student Hand, 
an<l I he ( Icf and Key. 

'V\\\- uroup sponsoreil llie well-reinem- 
hered eouuuunity sinys which were so ])o])- 
ularout of doors in the summer. 'I'hey were 
held in the natural amphitheater on the 
eampus with Professor Randall leading. 
l'o|)nlar and ])ati-iotic souys, ami the 
ohh'f Innc^. >U(li ;i^ those i)y Ste|)hen l'"os- 
ler. held I he st nde nt>' interests. Kred l?ach. 



senior class |)resident at the ])ian(). and 
Ruth liuchanan with lier accordion helped 
furnish the needed accompaniment. 

Musical eveniui>s were also ])lainied and 
held with theOrchestra and (dee ( hihspro- 
vidiuii' well-attended entertainment. With 
the eonnnnnity siniis and the ol her mn>ieal 
proiii'ams, the committee ke])l in touch 
with student tastes. S])ecial etforts were 
made to eater to the e\])resse(l musical 
wants of the si udents. 

I'resideid for the fall term was Kay 
Martin, while Joe Decker acted as treas- 
urer. In I lie spring Louis Zekiel was elected 
|)resideut and Wanda I'elczar mo\-ed iido 
ihe treasurer's position. Mr. Ilarlaii Itan- 
(lall acted as facult\ advisor. 



I.-,H 



CLEF AND KEY 



The auditorium is dimmed; up go the 
footliglits and a bicycle comes careening 
down the aisle with a maniac astride it. 
Members of the audience suddenly stand 
up and begin to make stump speeches; the 
orchestra jjlays the overture, and fire- 
crackers explode in the front row. The an- 
nual Varsity Show is on and it's every man 
for himself! 

This zanniest and most phenomenal of 
all campus productions is presented every 
year by Clef and Key, the largest musical 
organization on the campus. It includes in 
its membership some of the most talented 
students in the University and, in addi- 




Jim Patterxoii n.v "Hairs Curlirkti 



Firxl row: Betts. Woelper. Sta\r()ptmlo.s, Martin, Chiipin. Griiver, Pekzar. Mason. Pittinan. Strniiil row: Harvey, Phipps. Jnhnson. 
Agon. Glic'knian, Zekiel, Stevenson. Davis. Third rair: Kless. Troxell. Honifant. Fredrickson. Peterson. l{ae. GoUlsniitli. 




tion, l)(>tli the men's and women's chorus. 

This year's ^'arsity Show was entitled 
"Lick mine boots. Peasant!" It was a sa- 
tire on the Student (iovernment Associa- 
lioiiiind its olliccrs. .)iin Patterson phiyed 
tlic part of Hairs (iarlicky, sludciil presi- 
dent ; ^Vanda, the licaiil it'ul spy, was phiyed 
hy Wanihi Pelc/.ar; and tlic part of WiUie 
Perren, son of a Halliinore i)oHtician, was 
taken l)y Jack I)a\is. The show was a 
liowling success 1 It was written and di- 
rected by Louis Zekiel; the nuisical score 
was orif^inated by Marsh Steitling and Fred 
Krhiicli. The sets were (lesi<fned by Ruth 
Schene and pnxhiction was handled In' 
Joseph Decker. 

"Lick mine l)()ots. Peasant!" was a 



worthy successor to the IB^-i N'arsily Show 
"Literrujition, Please." The show was 
written, directed, and produced by the 
student members of Clef and Key, and it 
was a joli well done. 

In i)re\i()us years. Clef and Key has pro- 
duciNl an ()|)erelta. This year, howe\er, 
the organization donated part of its l)ud- 
get to the future Student I'nion Building. 
Instead of going to the expense of putting 
on an operetta, the clul) sponsored a cam- 
pus concert for the students. 

The officers were Joe Decker, president; 
Jane Chai)in, who ser\-e(| as \ie('-j)resi(lent ; 
Kay Martin. secretary; Ruth Schene, treas- 
urer; while Thomas McCeney acted as 
historian. 



Student "dead" iindir "Hairs Garlicky'.s" regime. 
Tap dancer created xen.iation. 



Jean Forbes inahes up (in actor. 
Pelczar, the blonde spy, i.i captured. 




OLD LINE NETWORK 



"Can't" was not in the vocabulary of the 
hardy crew who worked through a hot 
summer and a strenuous fall to put Mary- 
land's radio station, the Old Line Network, 
on the air. 

Twice before, students had tried to get 
a network and failed, so "it can't be done" 
was the cry when President Gi-elecki called 
for students to start the broadcasts. 

Some few believed that the idea was 
feasible, even with priority restrictions, so 
throughout the summer, with Gilbert 
"Rip" Cullen as general head, and elec- 
trical wizard George Reynolds working 
with wire and solder, the embryo Old Line 
Network staff struggled. Early in the fall, 
with many of the technical difficulties 
solved by representatives of the Intercol- 
legiate Broadcasting System, the network 
went on the air for test broadcasts, and by 
the time of the inauguration of new student 



officers in January the station was conduct- 
ing broadcasts daily. 

Graduation in February brought changes 
in the station's personnel. Bert Carhart 
took over the leadership of the network 
and Dave Hill assumed the headache of 
technical director. Extensive work was 
done on the programming, and a regular 
timed schedule of broadcasting was set up. 
The outlook for the network at the close of 
the spring semester seemed bright, but 
many hazards faced the Old Line Network 
before it could become an established 
activity. 

Those who deserve mention for the 
work they did in the early days are Jean 
Brengle, Bill Groome, Dan Rice, John 
Benson, Leighton Harrell, Marge Ranney, 
Lyle Merrikan, Monk Mier, Jean Forbes, 
Webb Clayland, Dick Whelton, Emanuel 
Nieolades and George Rawling. 



The Military Ball "wa.^i picked up" from behind the -palms. 

wr 



Uncle Don reads the funnies. 




161 




l-'ir.il niir: ll(.l>t. UciMMiNladl. I''i-:iru..\\\ Kan.lall. C li( rhi. ,1,1. U. ('.•iriMcU. .larulis. Saciiil roir: Mrnr/.r. Swiii.li'll. 1':iII,tm,ii. Shaw. 
Da.vtoii. St. Clairr, Maim. Strnrtt, Dimuvan. (Iiiofiins. Kurtz. Third rntr: ('. ( iirniaik. (niniii, Uraluvc. Jarivl, Scull. Srliiimakrr, 
Ilullidav. Stimlz, (Idixlsprcd. HiirUr. I'liillips. Fiiiirlli roir: Lewis, Krrv. Drckir, Xolaiid. H. Hcclitdld. Ji-liU-. ()!t. Kl.v. Klindcrick. 

Ki.ld. Williams. 



MEN'S GLEE CLUB 




XRESII KUO.M 1' AIMK II'.VI'ION ill Vwi\ 

Wii ring's I'lcjisiiic 'rimcC Aw ( 'liil> ( Oiilcsl. 
tlie Miiryl.-md's Mcn"-^ (ilcc Cliil) nt' forty 
\()ic('s coiiliiiurd its work (luriiiii; tlu* siiiii- 
iiKM- stMiH'ster l)y pcrfonniiiy ;it tlie Priiicv 
( i<'(ifu("'s Coiinly Hoiid iiiid Sliiiii]) U;illy. 
held ill (lie ( 'olisciiin. Il \\;is also I'caliircil 
III (•oiiiiniiinly sinus. Knlii on ;iiid oil caiii- 
|>iis. and in on r on I door Uoiisci' Ucxicw. 

'I'li(> clnl) saiiii al ( ircciilx'll . ("aiii]) 
Meade. ('Ii('\y (liaM- .liiiiior ( 'olli-iic i"(.r 
(lirls. and al llic I loiiiccominu, and Florida 
I'oothall i;aiii("s. In .lannary llu* uroup ]»ar- 
licipatcd in llic annual conccrl. 

( )lii(('rs were |)\\ i^lil JMMrnow . prc^idcnl : 
( iiarlcs .\. Kcclilold. \ic('-pi-('si(lcnl : .\aroii 
Kosciisladl. sccrclaiy: Uoix'il ((nniack. 
liiisincss manager; .Vrtluir llolsl , liiiraiian. 




First row: Otto. Hrangle, Martin, liaiiilall. lilackwcll. IIiilil.s, I'ylc. Seamil rciir: IJiisst-y. Sclinuik r, McKit. Eiiu-ry. L.ivc, Wiutrniiuiv, 
Fell, Custer, Kloss, Greenwood. Third row: Koster, H. Pratt, Biielier, ("i. Pratt, Uean. Linf;le, llardie, Powell, (iriiver. fmirlh row: 
lientz, Pelezar. Fifth roir: Ulooni. McLeoii, Masters. Si.rlh row: Brown, Kre(lri<-k.son. Sniitli. Scrnith rnir: Brown, Lntz. Harlow, 

Hoffa, Twigg. 

WOMEN'S CHORUS 



In spitk of transportation (lilliculties 
the Women'.s Cliorus jjrovidod entertain- 
ment in many nearby commnnities, as well 
a.s on campus. 

Under the competent leader.ship of Pro- 
fessor Harlan Randall the chonis sany for 
the citizens of Greenhelt on Sunday eve- 
ning in the Greenbelt Community Church. 
It also provided a lighter and brighter hour 
for recuperating soldiers at the branch of 
Walter Reed Hospital which was formerly 
National Park College. 

With the jMen's Glee Club the chorus 
presented several programs. We all recall 
how effective the community singing was 
at Christmas time and also the fun in front 
of Anne Arundel Hall. At the chorus' two 



big concerts of (Ik^ year it was joined by 
the IMen's Glee Club and the result was 
a triumph. The big Music Festival was the 
highlight of the year. Given the last week 
in April it concludetl with a concert and 
dance. Later, joining with the Men's 
Chorus, the annual ban(|uet was given. 

Perhai)s most entertaining for the sixty 
members was the visit to the Stage Door 
Canteen. This afforded a good time for all, 
and concluded a liiglilx' successful .sea.son. 

Leading the chd) in its nuuiy activities 
were President Irene Fredrickson; Nice- 
President Ann Lutz; Secretary ^Marjory 
Carey; Treasurer N'ivian Smith; and Li- 
brarians Loui.se Love and Jean Bloom. 



163 



STUDENT BAND 



Mahvland's Student Band t'uniishe.s 
iiuicli more tluiii a niusical Diitlct for tal- 
entril stiidonts. It pi-oxides iiiarcliiii^' mu- 
sic for the ROTC, and for this reason eaine 
to be (lesitjnatod a ])art of the Heiiinient. 
But the Mihtary Department, hein<i very 
exaetinsi in its nnisical taste, demanded 
nuich more work than the usual four diill 
hours. The hands i)erf()rmanees were not 
limited to the mihtary functions, its notes 
heinji; heard at all Maryland football j'ames 
in ('olIe<>e Park, Baltimore, and \Vashin<;- 
ton. .Vt the Florida game the Men's Glee 
Club joined the band in a rendition of 
"The Star Spangled Banner," and again 
at Ilonieeoming it got together to do the 



"Stars and Stripes Forever" and "This Is 
My Country." T1k> usual "M" formation 
on llic atlilctic field was supplemented at 
Homecoming by a "\"' design with the 
Cdee Club as the three dots and a dash. 

.\t the basketball-ljoxing double-headers 
in the winter, the band also helped the stu- 
dent l)ody present Maryhmd songs. In ad- 
dition to ])laying at the games, the band 
provided th(> nnisical baekgroinid for the 
now famous tapping ceremonies of Omi- 
cron Delta Kapi)a, honorary leadership 
fraternity. Decoration Day and Maryland 
Day ceremonies would have been "lost" 
without the l)an(rs support. Extra prac- 
tice on ^Nlondavs and Wednesdavs made it 



Fimi row: Sgt. H. B. Jones. Second row: Sgt. Otto Si'ibeneiclien, Capt. R. 11. Stcen, 1st Lt. .1. C. Slidman. Third row: Mann, Loose, 

Hoher, Groer, Mcssinger, Pierce. Fourth row: Grohaker, Levy, Langello, Klawans. Ueclitold. Fifth row: Ehrlich, .S. Cook, .\uber, 

Kagleson, (Jerken. tS/j/A row; Brckctt. Winters, Messineo. Kriiiznian, Cnlien. Snriifh nnr: Kramer, Siiiioii, Kolniek, Sliear, ('. Cook. 

Kif/hlh row: Rliodcrii'k. Halliilay, Sparriiw. Mniil. Snuiirsr. \lnlh roir: >t:irtiiii). Hiilirs. liniridafje. Cullon, Scott. 




Uii 



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A winter concert between hakes at the basketball game. 



possible for the band to give several con- 
certs during the year. 

Maryland's band impressed everyone 
with its precision and fine playing, and 
much credit goes to Sgt. Otto Seibeneichen 
for his patience and leadership. A new ad- 
dition was made this year to the uniform 
of the band members, that of wearing a 
black and orange fourragere. Until this 
year the crack Pershing Rifles was the only 
company to wear special insignia. 

One of the most colorful and skillful stu- 
dents in this year's band was little Freddie 
Ehrlich. A swing trumpeter of high calibre, 
the little hep-cat could alwaj^s be counted 
on to blare forth with a wild collection of 
hot licks the minute "Dismissed" was 
given to the band. 

Philip Tawes conducted the drill as cap- 



tain of the band, and each practice re- 
sounded with the well-meant and helpful 
corrections of Bob Steen, second-in-com- 
mand, who served in the traditional role of 
the tough First Sergeant. Never before 
had the Maryland Student Band been so 
well fronted. In parades the unit was put 
through its paces by not one, but two 
skilled baton-twirlers — head drum major 
Herbert Jones, and assistant drum major 
Robert Wooleyhan. Thanks to their dual 
dexterity, seldom did a moment pass in 
which some fancy stick handling wasn't 
shown. 

Maryland's Student Band was more 
than a meager collection of inexperienced, 
uninspired horn-blowers and drum-thump- 
ers. It was a well-organized, well-led unit 
which served the school in many ways. 



165 




Fir.it row: Topfnnf!. Hctls, Powfll. Slilis. Urckill, KiplinfiiT. Kiih, Klitcnic Kay. (ary. (Hdk. Walker. I!, (ary, Ndrris, VanPetten, 
Klirlicli. S, ('(piik. Second roir: U.iiiilal!. Dirlil. Hird. Uiilcr. Wallace, (iinkliii. Ilmvlaiul. Walker. Kliixleriek. Koilf-ers, llnrii. Power. 



ORCHESTRA 



Alavays kk.\i)y to hekvk l)y as.sisting with 
or i)artici|)atin.t; in cainjjiis social and musi- 
cal ati'airs. the Sludcnl Orclicstra was one 
of our most a<-li\(' organizations. The 
firou]), composed of ihirly-oiic ])ieces, ac- 
companied al o|)erellas, i)iayed tor recej)- 
lioiis and teas, and i)aii ici|)ale(l wiiji (lie 
other nnisicil chilis in I lie \-ery snccesst'nl 
eoiieert held ni .laimary. W this concert 
Marjory ( areys performance on I he \ iliia- 
liarp was ontstandini;. The orchestra also 
played in the Marylaiul Room of the Home 
Econontics linildiiiij. al I he Rossltoron.nh 
Inn, and for Dean Stami)"s 'I'ea in Deceni- 
her. 

Mr. Ilarlan Kandall, director. h;is de- 



voted nine years of fruitful effort in huild- 
in<i' and strengthening; th(> orchestra. Dur- 
ini; the last year the major eini)liasis has 
heen ])laced on increasnm the \ariety of 
selections playe(l. Mr. Randall was as- 
sisted t his yeai' liy .1. M. I'ow ci'. celelirateil 
midwest \iolinist and leachei'. Mr. Power's 
])resence was es|)ccially ai)precialed in the 
li.i>ht of Ihe size and calilier of (he slrini^ 
section, which had .several featured artists. 
Simon Klitenic. IVahody Institute violin- 
ist, was a fre(|uent sohdsl and a bulwark of 
lh(> strinii section. 

Roherl Rird ser\ed a> |)residenl. .\iinie- 
Rnth To])pin,if was .s(>crelar,\ and (harles 
( Ook was lreasiir<'r. 



Ifif) 




/■'/;■.•.■/ roir: Li'slii", (u'Wclir. .Idlinsun, Hamilton. Sccoiiil rotr: 
Raniiall, H(.lm. White. Harinfj. Rciil. 

BAPTIST 
STUDENT UNION 



RELIGIOUS LIFE 
COMMITTEE 

1 HE Religious Life Committee did 
much during the year to stimulate .student 
interest in the power of rehgion during 
times of stress sucli as we are now passing 
through. 

The committee sponsored vesper and 
interdenominational services and a re- 
ligious emphasis week, participated in by 
both faculty and students. 

Orcaxized with Roberta Kells as 
president. Warren Kubler vice-president, 
and Doris Ballard .secretary, the Baptist 
Student Union held daily noon medita- 
tions in addition to weekly Bible discus- 
sion groups. In close cooperation with the 
Washington B.S.U. a concert was held 
and many members participated in the 
various retreats which were held during 
this last vear. 



I'irsI rnir: Maring, Tor- 
niy. McCartney, Mead, 
Ilenilerson, Rees. Sccoml 
row: Kcll.s, McGlothen. 
Hecknian. Bennett. Wil- 
liams. Third row: Seviotir, 
BechtoUi, Halli.lay. Selt- 
zer. Foi/rtli rnir: C<x-ee. 
Reehtolil. Heatty. 





I iriil rnic: Ukhardson. Silver. Second 

row: Hastings, 11. Lingle, J. Lingle. 

Thlril roir: \'ial. Ualliilay. Williams, 

IJci.l. 



PRESBYTERIAN 
CLUB 

1 HE Pre.sbyterian Cluh, in cooperation 
witli tlic Religiou.s Council, led .several 
Evensonj; programs. Di.scu.ssion groups 
and talks by monihers of the faculty, 
among lliem Dr. Rurlioe and Dr. Marti, 
were part of the hi-monthly meeting. 

John Williams was j)resident ; Ren Silver, 
vice-president: Joy Jones, treasurer; and 
Rarhara Wagner, .secretarv. 



CANTERBURY 
CLUB 

Under the le.\dership of the Rev. Na- 
thaniel .\cton. the Canterbury Club com- 
pleted a successful year of religious work. 
The members made a trip to the National 
Cathedral and were entertained with pic- 
tures of Chinese Missionary work. Ned 
Steinberg was president; Dottie McAllis- 
ter, secretary: and Frances Pfeitfer, treas- 
urer. 



First row: Slccnian. DnrsrU. 
Fickf, K. Kuril. Haliiiiir. H. 
Kord. Ki'|)li;irl. I,<i«r, Brown. 
Sernnd row: Hlackman, .\Ic- 
Callislcr, Owinj^s, (ollcnnaii, 
Haniiii^', Crane, Sell, Knmn. 
Wilnicr. Tliiril row: livv. .\ct<in. 
I'. Kislicr, Mastrn, SniMiK'ni^'. 
I'. ('<Kik, Kiirz. Davis, Lim^'. 
(nnry, Tixid. HastinKs. Kails. 
h'nurlh row: lioliiTtsnn, l,\ilz. 
MoniM'nisos. Holnian, .Iiiiii"-, 
Wnlfcnl. Kill.i.1.1. I'riir. V. 
Siiiitli. I'iflh row: Itiiloiil. .Mil- 
ler, ReynoliLs, nicrmun, Slein- 
Imt^t. Hishlon. 




First row: Schumacher, Holm, 

Dysinger, Kahl, Bcntz. Sccnnd row: 

Xaegele, Turner, PViscIi, Beitler, 

Loose, Gralton, Kahler, Duvall. 




WESLEY CLUB 

Under the leadership of President 
Leighton Harrell, the AVesley Club during 
the past school year established the first 
Sunday school for Protestants ever held on 
the campus. The club was represented by 
delegates at the annual Youth Conference 
which was held at Western Maryland Col- 
lege in June. Officers were Ernest Otto, 
vice-president; Elizabeth Gruver, secre- 
tary; and William Sampselle. treasurer. 



LUTHERAN 

CLUB 

Planning its program in line with cur- 
rent conditions, the Lutheran Club has 
emphasized student participation. Its suc- 
cess was attributed to increased member- 
ship, to Presiflent Russell Schumacher, 
and to the help of Advisor Dr. Holm. 

Other officers were Elaine Dobihal. vice- 
president; Alice Bentz. secretary; and 
Charles Frisch. treasurer. 




First row: Sliawn, B. Fell. D. 
Fell, Robie, McKenzie, Patter- 
son, Gruver. Second row: Sehell- 
has, RaMieh, Lange, Lund- 
qiiist, Harrell, Carpenter, Re- 
side, Seeman.", Dougherty, Vin- 
cent. Third roir: Kellon, Johns- 
ton, Brown. Morrissey, Gra- 
ham. Smith, Masters. Fourth 
row: Hall .-Xring. Frey, Mc- 
Dearmon, Baker. 



NEWMAN CLUB 



Ah in I'AST VKAUs. llic Xcwniaii Clul) 
afiJiiii played an iin|)iirlaiil |)aii in Ilic so- 
cial and spiritual dcvriopiiu'iil of its iiiciii- 
hers. 'IMiis Catliolic (»ri>aiiizat ion held 
mectiiif^s once every two weeks, at wliicli 
syx'cial speakers lectured. Debates, gen- 
i-rai discussions, and sjx'cial projects were 
carried on under tiie t'rieudly i;uidance of 
Father Terrance. .\ si)eciai discussion 
clul> was also instituted I'oi' those nicinher.s 



interested. Holy Mass was cclchrati-d on 
Sundays and Holy Days. 

'i'he last election saw I'at ("arolan es- 
tahlished as ])resident; Betty Mauley as 
vicc-jjresident ; Mary Jaue Chase, record- 
ing secretary; Margaret Kellug, corre- 
sponding secretary; Staidey Kotula, treas- 
urer; and lialpli Mirnaid and -lane \e- 
nived, t wo nicnilicis at lai'gc. 



Fir.ll row: ("iirtin. Wiscnhorn, Laskowski, Kins, Doyle, llainc, Manley. Sladcr. Wolfe, Roloson. Nemzck, Marron, .luild. Notz. Second 

row: Xestor, .Vniador, ("oliill, <*honianaril. Slieridan, Stapj), Dyas, {'o(lo\'iil. Ilojjaw. Hesen. Thiril rotr: Mosser, (lentry. Sweeney. 

Carolan, I'aiilovsky, (Irlliicr. Harris. Knox, I)i\on, Talniadfje. Fourth roir: .\iidet, Sullivan, Kirk. Aiidct. Kazzalari, Mullen. Wnnder. 

Kri'linlirink. Myers. I'okrywka. Fiflli row: Malier, Sneeringer, Siliaeflc, Scliarle, Dacfjer. AniliTson. Dunn. Kotiila. 




170 



HILLEL CLUB 



HiLLEL Foundation was the only religi- 
ous group on the hill supporting a house cf 
its own. The Jewish students made it 
the center of their religious, athletic, and 
cultural activities. Services were held 
there, as were socials, meetings, and weekly 
forums. The latter were uiuisually lively 
and were frecjuently led hy prominent 
guest speakers, often distinguished mem- 
bers of the University faculty. The club 
published a newspaper, which developed 
journalistic skills, and was of real service 
to the members. The members partici- 



pated in University intramural sports and 
ran a tennis tournament of their own. 

Rabbi Louis Youngerman, new .spiritual 
director, Avas always on hand to give coun- 
sel and real friendship, in addition to his 
regular duties as religious leader. Secular 
activities were under student officers, in- 
cluding Bill Birnbaum, president; Irma 
Rosten, vice-president; Sylvia Bravman, 
treasurer; (irace Rosen, recording secre- 
tary; and Betty Cohen, corresponding 
secretarv. 



Birnbaum. Cutler, Rahlji Youngerman, Eostin, Waliluian, Bravman. 




171 




I'ir.il rnir: Clark, Cost-lxxim, Wolfonl, 
Slccinan. Kt)rfi. I*rirc. Sfcntid row: Hi*!!. 
Siiiitli. II.K'kinan. Krrct, Saffcll. Tliiril 
roir: TcmIiI. Staiitirr, I'fiiirir. Hastings. 



Y.W.G.A. 



luv. Y.W.CA. uiu ITS I'AHT ill the na- 
tional war cil'ort liy placiiiii' emphasis on 
wonieirs duties diiriiiii wartime, liepre- 
sentatives from IJritaiii. France, Ku.ssia, 
and China sjxike to the i;i-ou]) through tlie 
year U|)on I he war woik of women in these 
countries. 

The oflicers of the orj^anization were 
Mary WoH'ord, i)resident; Marian Heck, 
vice-president; Frances Pfeitt'er. .secretary; 
and Luann Detar, treasurer. 



I. R. C. 



1 () I'HOMOTE AX r.NDERSTAN'DIN(i of world 
attairs the International Itelations Club 
encouraged round-talile discussions of per- 
lineid su])jects. The.se were led by guest 
speakers who sj)ecianzed in the fiehls of 
history, sociology, and j)olitical science. 
The oflicers of the club were: Betty Ander- 
son, president; Barbara Xutwell. vice- 
president: Mary Hess, secretary: and Ben- 
jamin Sihcr. treasurer. 



f'irsf tnir: Harsk\. Hraxinaii. 

Topping. Aiulcrsiiii. Start /.man. 

lOarp. liativs. Sfrdiid row: <'(Kik. 

ijiiiiitrrn. WilcMX. ('ardd/c. 

Sliair.r. 





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First row: Vincent, Greenfield, Reed, I)i-. 
Cooper. Second row: Fulton, Sprott, Mac- 
Veigh, Barker. Third row: Hallcr, Lam- 
bert, Albaugh, Rayson, Guest Speaker. 
Fomth row: Shawn, Baxter. 




GERMAN CLUB 

Highlights of an active year of Der 
Deutsche Verein, German Club, were the 
spring and fall social events. Beginning, 
intermediate, and advanced students 
mingled at twice-monthly meetings of fun 
and cultural background. Programs were 
planned by Dr. Dieter Cunz and Dr. 
Adolph Zuker, faculty members; Robert 
Bishton, president of the club; and secre- 
tary-treasurer, Bobbie Corwin. 



COLLEGIATE CHAMBER 
OF COMMERCE 

The collegiate Chamber of Commerce 
strives to create a closer relationship be- 
tween students of the College of Business 
and Public Administration and the busi- 
ness world by inspecting business houses, 
through lectures, and by open forum dis- 
cussions. Officers for the fall term were 
George Sprott. president; Bill Fulton, vice- 
president; KoUi.sou Hall, treasurer; and 
Mary Greenfield, secretary. 




First row: Cunz, Dawson, 
Brown, Bishton, Hodes, Jones, 
Corwin. Second row: Seltzer, 
Daly, Kramer, Hall, Hyatt. 
Prahl. Banta. 




hirst row: BuchiT, Sasso, Vial. Ilcside, Jarna^'in, Walker. Maxfield. Second row: Cohen. Dr. Dcxison, ISond, Liiehhen, Williams. Uinf; 
Rogers, Wimerl. Third row: Watkins, Valliant, Cecil. Reynolds, (iraliam. 



RIDING CLUB 



liiK HiDixc; C'lih c.vx ho.xst of liaviiij> 
one of the larfi,e.st iiUMiil)erslii])s on caiiipus. 
Fox hunt.s and inooiilii;lit rides were a few 
of the diversions tlial promoted it.s popu- 
larity. 

.\t vai'ious limes I lie memhers were in- 
vited to attend and |)artieipate in the hnnts 
and liorsc siiows of nei^hhoi'ini; ridiiiii,' 
chiKs in Maryland and Xiryinia. To nniin- 
tain interests on liie campns. tlie chih sne- 
eessfnlly sponsored I lie animal si)rinn 
liorse show and also a \-erv interestinii' 
•lynikliaiia. The .ii;realest handicap for the 
liiding Chil) is the necessity of nsini; the 
inade(|nale facilities of neai'hy stahles. 



Plans are heinii made to hriny horses to the 
University so that more of the members 
may take part in the activities of the ehih. 
To furliier the knowlediic of horseman- 
sliij) and the finer ])oinls of riding, the clnh 
invited several experts on the snl)jecl and 
also well-know II individuals in riding cir- 
cles. The lecliires were siip])lemeiiled li>' 
movies. The memhers who are experienced 
I'iders ujn'e free insi riicl ioii< to those who 
are no\ices or mtermedialc riders. The 
oHicers of the chil> were: ("arl I.uel)l)eii, 
president: .loe lioyers. vice-president: and 
Uet l\ Uoiid, Ireasiirer. 



174 




Seafnl: Schaeffer, Baker, W. Smith, 
Milligan, Cain, Burcli. Standing: 
Hall, Standiforci, St. Clair, Holter, 
Ahalt, Bowling, .Johnson, Mueller, 
Sultenfuss, Schlosnagle. 



F.F.A 



BLOCK AND BRIDLE 

XllGHLIGHT OF THE YEAR for the Block 311(1 

Bridle Club was a gala livestock show in 
November. The club also sponsored a 
float for the Homecoming Day parade and 
an intramural livestock judging contest, 
followed by a banquet in honor of the 
Maryland Intercollegiate Livestock Judg- 
ing team. Officers for the year were Edgar 
Schaeffer, president; Emory Leffel, vice- 
president; Carl Luebben, secretary; and 
Phil Hogue, treasurer. 



Although many of its members entered 
the armed forces, the F.F.A. ably main- 
tained standards of previous years. In ad- 
dition to the annual banquet in April, the 
clul) was host to the high school judging 
teams of the state. President Eugene 
Schlosnagle received the Danforth Fel- 
lowship Award. Other officers for the year 
were: Nevin Baker, vice-president; James 
Prigel, secretary; Warren Smith, treasurer. 



Seated: Warwick, Hogue, Baker, 
Smith, Hall, Maxfield, Milligan, 
Leppert, Burch. Standinij: Vierling, 
St. Clair, Schlosnagle, Bucher, 
Gaither. Doughty. 





First roir: Almlt, St. Clair. Cottcrman, Seltzer, Reid, Silver. Second row: Seltzer, 'rittman, Sclilo.s- 

iiaple. Lepperts. Deniaree. Wilson, Maxfield. Third row: Rogers, Halter, UakiT, Milligan. Uiireli, 

Ilanilltiin. Teeter. Foiirlh rn)r: Bennett, Smith. Warwick, Klitenie. < "ain. 



STUDENT GRANGE 



With a tkiim.kd .mkmbehsiiii', tlie Stu- 
dent (iraiij^v (>x]K'riciico(l tlio iiio.sl .succo.s.s- 
fiil year .since its cslahlislimeiit. At tlic 
helm were IMiilip Seltzer, master; Martha 
Ann Cottermaii. lecturer: Orlando Uidout. 
overseer; ( arlyn howc. .secretary; and 
James I'rigel, treasurer. 

'i'iic organization is priniaiily i'or ai;ri- 
<Millni'(' and iionic ccononiics students, hut 
also iiiclndcs tlio^c trom othci' colleu'es. 
The student chili is allihalcd with the 
County. State, and National (iraniics. 

'I'he l)iji;jfest cxcnt of the chd» was the 
^ValerIuelon l*aily in the summer to which 
the stndent> and faculty families of the 
Collej^e of Afiriciilture were invited. Slipi 



Park with its swings and sliding boards, 
haseliall. hadmintou. and horseshoes fur- 
nished the .setting. 

The bi-monthly meetings inchided the 
initiation of new members, installation of 
officers by Dr. Harry .1. l*atterson, former 
president of the I nixcrsify. Pet Peeve 
Xight, fireside chatters, and the inevitable 
games of bingo and donnnoes. One un- 
usual meeting was the ■■|^>ngh-It-Nite"" 
at Sligo ( "aliin. 

in conjnnclion with the Home Meo- 
noinics Club the (irange held a ('hristmas 
])arly and the members con! riinited arti- 
cles w liicli weri" given to soldiers recuperat- 
ing in I'orl Meade Hospital. 



170. 




FirKl row: Decker, Nairn, Price, Scott. Second row: \'an Maitre, Beachy, Burke, Stevens, Mattinglv, llawlcy. l)a\'is, Burnside, Hartman. 
Third row: Agen, Sears, Margolis, Eslier, Cook, Miller, (iriffith, Gcrle, Heckman. Fourth row: Mcndiim, Van Ness, Broome, Goklsworth>-, 
Wehr, Stuart, Hill, Davidson, Miller. Fifth row: Brockman, Wilcox, Stewart, Harder. Sixth row: Eck, Tolley, Goldenzweig, Howard, 

C'rininier, Kise, Marsden. 

DAYDODGERS CLUB 



1 HIS CLUB RAPIDLY BECAME ONE of the 

most active social organization.s on the cam- 
pus; the group doing its part in arousing 
Maryland spirit in the large body of day 
students. Membership was greater this 
year than it has ever been before. 

Much of the success of the Daydodgers 
Club was due to the efforts of President 
Joe Decker. Joe was assisted by Vice- 
President Jeff' Nairn and Secretary Mary 
Stewart Price. The social calendar of the 
club was arranged and directed by Chair- 
man Don Davis. 

The activities of the group this year have 
included such outstanding successes as the 



Daydodger ]Mixer Dance ft)r the Freshman 
Class, the Christmas formal, numerous 
hikes and bowling parties. In order to cut 
down the consumption of many indigesti- 
ble cold sandwiches, a special room for the 
use of Daydodgers was ol)tained in the 
cafeteria through the efforts of the club. 
During the past year a transportation 
exchange committee was sponsored to help 
students w^ho were having difficulty in 
commuting to and from school. The com- 
mittee was very helpful as the O.P.A. gas 
and tire ruling proved more than just an 
inconvenience. 



177 



A.S.M.E. 




First tow: (^>ok. lloHiiian, Hclliock, lljinling, Mattix, doling, Iiif,'lis. Allin, Haylcck. Stuiitz. Kiiif;, Kidwell. Smiiiil row: Granseo, 
Brown, Fradin, HoulUr, Eckcrt. Wliiti-. Diet/., D. Frey, R. Fre.v, Fishhine, Cohen. Third row: Tinker, Konigsberg, Speilnian. Lozupone. 
Kes.sin(>er, Lewis, Baylor, (iottlic^li. Mover, Miehaclson. Fotirih row: Wells, Webster, Mariner, McGill. Hoffman, Love. Hell. Sensor, 

Sherwood, Frayer, Green. 



As TlIK h.XKGEHT ENGINEERING CLUB On 

tlic caini)!!.-^, the .Vmerican Society of Me- 
chanical Kiiji,iiicer.s participated in many 
varied activities thi.s year. In A])ril a con- 
vention of the eastern yroii]) of the Student 
Board of .V.S.M.K. \v:is hchl at the Uni- 
versity. 'I1ic colU'ii'cs wliich attended were 
(leor<j:e Wiishiiiiiiou I 'iii\-crsity. North 
Caroliiiii Sl.iU'. Ihc I iiixcrsity of \'ir.uinia. 
Dnkc rni\crsity. < alholic riii\crsity, ami 
Johns ll()|)l\ins. Tlic |)r()i;ram inc Imlcil the 
reachng of competitive studeiii |)apers and 
tlie j)re.sentation of awards. As a <iraiid 
finale, a dance was held in the evenin<>'. 

Althoiiiiii the war eomplicalcd trans- 
pdilaliiin facilities. Ilie cluli was still alile 
to take ii'ips to nearKy imlii-'h'ial jilaiits. 



A.S.M.E. held a farewell nieetinu' for 
Profes.sor (ireen who teiniiiiated three 
years of .service as honorary chairman of 
the organization. l)urini>' tliese years in- 
terest in the clnh was stimulated to such 
an extent that the membership was tripled. 
I'rofes.sor (Ireen is eoiineeted willi the 
National .V.S.M.E. in Wasliinulon. 

In the social field. .V.S.M.lv promoted 
the "Slide Rule Shullle."" which proxcd to 
he very successful. 'I'lie uni(|ue decora- 
tions were cartoons and caricatures of enyi- 
neeriiitj; pi'ofessors and machines. 

l.eadini; A.S.M.K. to success were Car- 
son Mover. i>i-esident; Uaiidoli)li llardinii. 
\ice-|)i'esidenl ; I'ailli llalpine. si-cietai'y ; 
Uov Kckerl. ticasurcr. 



178 



First row: Scott, (iurkles, Steiding, 
DePue. Davies, (ioldberg. Second 
row: Atkinson, Peterson, McDear- 
mon. Fine, Xikolopoulos. Currin. 
Wilcox, Sandler, Wilkinson. 




fciiii»iif'"^'fii^' 



A.I.GH.E. 



, ,.- ^, 1^ .^^ 



Ihe American Institute of Chemical 
Engineers held various technical meet- 
ings throughout the year, with such 
speakers as Dr. Hylton Brown, w'ho spoke 
on the "Explosion of Carbonaceous Dusts 
and Metal Powders." The student club is 
a branch of the national organization of 
A.I.Ch.E. 

Leading the grouj) to success were ]Marsh 
Steiding, president; Robert Just, vice- 
president; Leland DePue, secretary; Har- 
old Atkinson, treasurer. 



A., o. v^. Hi. 



1 HE NINETIETH ANNIVERSARY of the 

American Society of Civil Engineers, the 
oldest engineering society on the campus, 
was celebrated last year. Under the direc- 
tion of its officers: Paul J. Smith, president; 
Morris Green, vice-president; Kenneth 
Simpson, secretary; and George Keat, 
treasurer; the A.S.C.E. chapter at the Uni- 
versity attended the regional conference 
held this year at the Catholic University. 



First roir: Green, Smith, Simpson. 
Keat, Maxcy, Latimer, Kirk. Sec- 
ond row: Forrester, Emricb, W'arrcn, 
.\rmacost, Hoskinson, Nairn, Ham- 
ilton, Biggs, Campbell, Sturges. 
Third row: Wliittcmore, Loomis. 
Todd. Skinner, Fisher. Fourth row: 
Keller. Hcuvny. Kent. Becker. Bov<'r. 




^^ 








^^^^^^^^I^^^^^^Byfls i^v 





TRAIL CLUB 

"Kkepixg fit koh dkI'Kxsk"* was the 
tli<Miie of the Terrapin "^Prail (liil). ^^llile 
(111 mystery hikes, tlie chil) trekked to 
(ireenlx'll l^ake. liiinit Mills, or followed a 
sircniii lliroiiuli I lie comit I'ysidc. A s(|uare 
(lance or ()\'eriiii;lil hip added \'ariely (o 
the Sunday iiikes. 'I'he otiieers were James 
lirid<>e, president; .lames Keister, vice- 
])resi(leMt: Patricia ^IcVunallcMi, s<H'relary; 
and \\ illiain 'I'ollev, treasurer. 



Kiiiiling: Kriz. Ur.iiiMluif. Wiii^lmv. 
Ki-.viiolils. Firxt roir: Morcll, Wry- 
inaii. Molton, IIimIkits, HimIiko- 
sang, Eslicr. TIic>iii|>miii, I'rirc. Sec- 
ond row; lloil^iiis. Corcoran. Car- 
<!ft;iia. Mi'\'cr'.. Huriisidf. .Irlilr, 
Mt'rrikrn. StatFonl. Driniiit;. 



A.LE.E. 



The American Institctk of Ei.f( tukal 
E.N'ci.NEEHS sought to inform its members 
of developments in tlie engineerinji; fields. 
Outside speakers addressed the group and 
nienil)ers weiH- encouraged to parlici|)ale 
in the |)rograms so as to gain exjjerienee in 
public speaking. 

The oHicci's of tli(> group were Andrew 
Denuning. j)resident; Russell M( I'all, vice- 
president; and (leorge lieynolds. secretary- 
treasurer. 




l-'irst niir: Hrooinr, Scars. Mi*iit)uin. 
r. McAiiall.ii, (i. M.Atiullcii. 
Itiiilicr. SiTiiiiil rnir: Sliowiicn-, .\rm- 
slroii);. Hrowii, I^iinli, Cinioliman, 
Kern. TliinI row: Kcislcr. (!iilils- 
wortliy. 'I'ollcv. Ilriildc Diiki*. 
l>:i\iMiii. Kl.y. Tilii>. Shawn. Wells. 
Wliorlcv. 



Fir.st roir: Robio, Armstmng, Q\iin- 

tero, Morrisse.v, Holnian, Jnhnsdii. 

Second roir: Glickman, Fanner, Eiii- 

brev. Davidsim, Belts. Kloss. 




SPANISH CLUB 

A BETTER KNOWLEDGE of tlie Latin- 

Ainerican countries was the aim of the 
Spanish Club. Speakers from the Latin- 
American Embassy and the sponsors of 
the club, Miss Leslie and Dr. Franklin, 
reviewed customs and history for the stu- 
dents. Leaders of the club were President 
Eneas Quintero and officers: Bill Stead- 
man, Marjorie Robie, and Carlos Baco. 



HOME ECONOMICS 
CLUB 



1 HE Home Economics Club was or- 
ganized for the purpose of creating inter- 
est in Home Economics subjects. Social 
programs were arranged in coordination 
with the Student (irange. Officers of the 
year were ^Marian Beck, president; IVIar- 
tha Ann Cotterman, vice-president; Betty 
Stanley, secretary; and Betty Rowley, 
treasurer. 



Front row: Ford, Kephart, Walker. 
Manley, Beck, Cotterman, Stabler. 
•Second rouj; Henderson, Giles, Shade, 
Demaree, Brooks, (iibson, Boswcll. 
Thiril rnir: Sharp. Rudclius. Hardinf^:. 
Rolpli. Fell, Whitlow. Rivcnbiirgh. 





MAIU.AUKT l»l{i;.\T HALL ( I |i|Rrj 
h'iml row: Halilcs. WiH'lpcT, .liillitiV. I.yiiii. Hurtoii, Mi'l- 
liiif^tT, (iijIdluT^, I''islicr. Smmd roir: Iliiirs, Sinitli. ('s(»nk;i. 
I);iviil.soii. Lewis, I'l'lc/.ar. Arnistroiif;, Kickr, Sliilniaii. 
Alli'ti. Carprntcr. (iiisrr. lUrn. (isscll. KiiIkiiiI. Wi-isci- 
Liirn. MiirriMiii. Third roir: ^'imiif;. Kniincr. I'lcy, l>iir>l. 
I{*-si<!c. Carr. Hfid. l-'tmrlh rair: .]vui\\uiis, Corsaiiiti, Kol ii*. 
Ricli, Stcwiirl. Miirdrllc. Uccliiicr. I'iflli rnir: Uacim Saii- 
mcni^', DoMlial. lilackmaii. Karp. Kriiiiiliansl. Sijlli row: 
Hiirnstcin. Hiitl'iiiastcr.lldoppaw, Wcllinfiloii, I'ost, Hanics. 
Setiiilh row: Rji'liarilsoM. ^diiiij;. ('(ink. Lasswcll. Ki(jhlli 
row: Larry. Mnrrisscy. nuttiii^'cr. Hrowii. Carlsuii. 



ANNK ARINDEL HALL (Lcweri 

Kay, Kmlir.v, Stcvrns, RivenliurKli. Scales, Otto, 



Firxt row: Mums. Kay, r/iiilir.v, Mcvriis, itiveniiurKli. scales, uiio, 
lildoni. Hall, Barsliip. Sla\T(ij)<mlis. Nnt/„ Reiiilieii. ("ustcr. Stern. Foster, 



I-'roeliiicli. Kinery. Itowliii^'. Stroml nui 

liryaii. .lacksun. .lacksoii. liiKfls, Hall, NListiTs, Se<>: 

NL Kosler, Wolpcrl. (ii>rHne. Third row 

T'ourth row: Crostliwait. Pedlow 



M.[\\vell, Moswell, Harinan, 

mans, \ ale. Hatton, 

>Lixfiel<l, Raniiey. Freeze, 



Feiiliv'. Fuelis. Siliinicll. Sienion. toiirlli row: ( rostliwait. I'edlow 
.larnaf-'in. Hiiies, Jenkins, Li'vin, Rohertson. Fifth row: Seliell 

,( li 1 1 -1 w-( 111 irc \l '1 1'l iimii \- .T-ifiitiu I •itiir<i .N I i*/» r/n*' ■ f>ri(rso\* 



R 



has, lioolli, Haslin^'s, Malain])liy, Jaeiihs, Lanfje. Si.vlh row: (Irigsby. 
Hanfonl. Hent/. Hulnian, Mi'tealfi'. M. .lenkins. Hateli. ("ii<'ssnian. Sir- 
riifh roir: Noll. Nein/.ek. Sliowaere, (Irainf,'er, Williams, (iliekman. F.ighth 
roir: \i. .Jackson. Kinj;, Henj,'li', Dan^'litery, Brown. Hansson Slieel.v, Sin- 
clair. Zepp. >Li^'innis. .\inlh roir: Farmer, Ho\ise Molliers, .\rps, Dowell, 
Olfutt. Nilson, Striiifjer 




THIRD STRAIGHT 

ALL-AMERICAN YEARBOOK 



Once again the Terrapin was given the AU-Ameri- 
can rating by the National Scholastic Press Associa- 
tion. This well-deserved tribute to the excellence of 
the 194'2 yearbook is a cherished award. It is not only 
an acknowledgment of the oi'ganizational ability of 
Editor-in-Chief Jerry Prentice, of the continued striv- 
ing of Women's Editor Ruth Lee Thompson, and of 
the creative powers of Copy Editor Orville Shirey, 
but is also a commendation of the entire staff of hard- 
working writers, typists, photographers, and jacks- 
and-jills-of-all-trades who shared the hardships of 
publishing a fine yearbook. 




RS 



(iERALD E. PRENTICE 

liU'J Terhai'in- Editor 



POLICY HOLDE 

The Publications Board 



1 HE Publications Board serves student 
publications in an advisory capacity. It is 
composed of (.'hairman James H. Reid, 
Acting Dean of Men; Adele H. Stamp, 
Dean of Women ; Dr. Charles White, Chair- 
man of The Student Life Committee: and 



O. R. Carrington, faculty advisor to stu- 
dent publications, in addition to the presi- 
dent of the Student Government Associa- 
tion and editors of the three major publi- 
cations. The board establishes the policies 
under which student publications function. 



(). Raymond Carrington, 
.lames H. Roid, A.lok' H. 
Stamp. Charlos E. Wliito. 




183 



GUARANTEED TERRAPIN STEW 





I'KKDKKICK M. JOHNSON 

Kililor 



In HKCOKDINC A VKAIi's ACTIVITIKS at Jl 

\\;irliiii(' Miiixcrsil y the TKUHAriN has 
lacked iiotliiiii; in potential material. Every 
(lay some iiru and uiuisiial e\'ent was takin,<>' 
j>lacc. \N (• have tried to jxn'tray these 
events and chanuos as they aH'eeted thedif- 
tcrciit litanches of stndent life. We have 
attempted to make this a jjiihlieation for 
the stndents following; ilic ideas set forth 
in I he dedication. 

ilic N'olnnic is dixidcd into fonr "iiooks." 
each di\ision i)ai;(' designed similar to the 
title pauc. and each cox'crini;' one of the 
lonr phases into which iinixcrsily life may 
l)c di\-i(led. Inno\alion^ lia\c liccn added 
^urh a> the fraternity ^caU. Ihc ilhi>tratcd 
>cnior clas> hi~.tory Ihron^ih Ihc senior sec- 
tion, and Ihc informal |)ictnrc-< on the fra- 
Icrnily and >oroiit_\' |)afies. 




.Joannettc Owen 


.John Mi-le 


U'nmen's Editor 


Managing Editor 


Burton F. Davis 


Paul .Newgarclen 


Business Manager 


Phnlographii Editor 



■•".DrroHs: FrcdiM-ick M. .Intin^dii, (•<iiti)r; .IcjiTiiictto 
Owen, woincn's editor; Hurloii F. Davis, l)usiiiess 
inaiia^cr; .loliii Melc. inaiiauiiif; editor; Paul Ncw- 
ijanleTi, i)ii()to<ira|)liy editor. 

Asso( lATK HDrrous: .laiiel Andrcie. Stanley .Is- 
rael. Martha \\\\\ ( 'otieriiiaii. .Mt'ied Daiiejifier, 
Audrey Dufidale. .lune Ilastinjis. Mary Klleti \Vol- 
I'onl. 

Tin; Staik: I^oIktI i?olim;in. Holier! Hi>litoii, 
Kli/.alielli Heeker. .lean Mlackinaii. Klizalietli Kar- 
ris, Herbert (arliarl. Sojiliie ( "liloi)i<-ki, Lorraine 



1S4 




As the Terrapin became a rcaliti/. 



('line, Joseph Crockett, Edith Dunford, Chff'ord 
Eisele, Clariee GHcknian, Charles Loiicks, Elinore 
McDonnell, Rosaline Pifer, Betty Jane Pratt, 
Geneva Pratt, Margaret Pyle, Barbara Reid, June 
Rightor, Elizabeth Ring, John Ring, Pat Schindell, 
Dale Sherman, Alan Stocksdale, Samuel Whitehead 
Bert Williams, Shirley AVilson, Peggy Ann Zeigler, 
Leslie Bailey. 



First row: Stocksdale, Rightor, Hambright, Davis, Owlm, Johnson, Lenetska, Packman, 
McCeney, MacVeigh. Second row: Dunford, Cotternian, Wilson, Carani, Esterson, 
G. Pratt, B. J. Pratt, Richards, Cosebooni, McKim. Third roiv: Andreae, Pedlow, 
Cockran, Stringer, Lange, Glicknian. Standing: Cohill, Mele, Crockett, Newgarden, 
Scott. Dyas, Loiicks. Hcckcr. 



Danegger 

Hastings 
Wolford 

Asrael 
Pifer 

Crockett 
Cotterman 

Glickman 





185 



OR YOUR DIAMONDBACK 




IIEUBKKT (;. ( AIUIAiri', Kilitor 

r)i:i,ii:\ iN(i THAT a newspapkh has otlier 
fiiiicl ions Ix'sidcs printing); ])r<)l'essi(iiial press 
releases for cainpus i'lmclions. the issues of 
the 19-4'"2-43 Dimiunidlxtclc tried to iniri-or 
tlie lite which went on about it. In a cam- 
pus someliiiu's stormy with poHties, the 
Dianioiidlxich- tried to maintain a j)olicy of 
telhn.i; its readers tlie facts, and not shiehl 
the truth in suhterfut^e. 

The e(htors, the statt". the l)i<tnii)H(lhack 
retained its |)()siti()n as an independent 
news organization on the cam|)us. S.(i.A. 
activities W(M-e .iii\-en more pul)h('ily tliaii 
ever before, covered for their news value 
and not as an obHgation. 

1 )itferences arose; the /^m/»o/*<//>ar/.- main- 
tained its j)osition; its e(Htt)rs h-arned \)\ 
experience. The workinf>s of I lie slalf were 
sinoolhcd (Mil, and at tiie midyear chanii(> 
of ('(litors. the DkiiiihikIIxicI: continued to 
function as a wartime |)a]»er in a wartime 
universitx'. 




Kufjciu- Sullivan 


.lane Sliowacre 


Mdtiiicfiinj Editor 


11 'out en's Editor 


.lolin MilliT 


Edward Rider 


Hii.iiiie«.i Manager 


19.iS Editor 



Its editorial ])olicv constructive and 
critical, its features sparked by the wit of 
"Tortoise .Shells," its news policy as truth- 
ful as the stati' c-oiild make it, the Dianioiid- 
Ixicl: and its stati' tried to till a bi<j job on 
t he Maryland campus. 

I'lnrroKiAi, Staki": Siiiiiiiirr-f<ill: IIitIhtI Ciiriiart. 
(•(Iil(ir-iii-cliicl' : Kiifjem' Sullivan, ma!iai;iii;,' I'dilur; 
.lane SIkpu acre, u uiiuii's ('(iildr: .laccnu-liiK' l?ri)|)liy. 



18(! 




The Diatiioiidhack puts anoilicr Issue to bed. 



feature editor; Harold Seidinan, sports editor; John 
Miller, business manager; Theodore Beuerniann, 
advertising manager; Grantham (Jraham, circula- 
tion manager; Cynthia Wilmer, morgue editor. 
Spring: Edward Rider, editor-in-chief; Jacqueline 
Brophy. managing editor; Dorothy Jackson, wo- 
men's editor; Jane Gambrill, feature editor; Leslie 
Bailey, sports editor; Theodore Beuermann, busi- 
ness manager; Barbara Reid, advertising manager; 
Margaret Hemple, circulation manager; Jack 
Shawn, associate editor. 



Standina: Bailey, Rider, Sherman, McGiiirk, Smith. Scheeler, Ring, Ever.son, .Johnson. 
Shawn. Seated: Troxell, Fester, Emory, Bnipliy. .Jackson. Gamt)rill, Hooppaw. 



Hro]jhy 

Beuermann 
Sliawn 

Hailey 
(lamlirill 

(■rahani 
Dugdale 

.Jacks( Ti 





187 



THE SAME OLD LINE 






u^^ ^"^- 



N'cii SU'inhcrg 
Buifincss Manager 



ANN PATTERSON, Kdilor 



J HE Old Line, addicted to i)jissinf!; dead- 
lines, printin<>' old and new jokes, cln'diiii;' 
the Diamondhach for its fre<|nent errors, 
and ehitterinii np tlie Post Oflice witli a 
ma<jazine at diti'ereiit limes each seiiolastic 
year, considered ilsclf the literary and 
huinorons i)nl)Hcal ion icpi'esentativc of 
tlie s Indents of Maryland I'. 

C'liaracteristic of I he atmosphere per- 
vaclinf? from the Old Line oflice, from wliicli 
their \'aried stories and lauiili-prodncini; 
jokes eniinate, was the conseienlions dri\- 
mg of editor Ann I'aterson, the socializinu 
of Hoi) Hill, I he complacency of Xed Stein- 
herii, and I'olly I lardys constant snnle and 
indnslry. Associate Kdiioi- Mihh'ccl >\'liilc 
wrote and |)laiinc(l, winir llairy Karr. cir- 
cnlal ion cdilor. mcicly planned. 




An inleresliny warlime addition to the 
maiia/.ine was the ('olleii'c N iciory (am- 
])ai<in, which informed Old Line readers of 
colleuiate and iiidi\id\ial coiilriltnt ions to 
the all-ont wai-cll'ort. 

The Old Line was a pio\inn uroniid for 
sIndcnU with journalistic aspirations, and. 
as such, pi'ovides a real ser\ice to a collcn'c 
u il li a lihcral arl > cun-iculum. 



188 




Rare action in the Old Line office. 



Members: Editorial staff: Janet Andreae, Joseph 
Crockett, Norman Hathaway, associate editor; 
Mildred White. Art staff: Fred Bach, Janaes Mann, 
Elinor McDonald, Phillip Seltzer. Advertising staff: 
Robert Hill, Barbara Kejihart, Donald Lacey, 
Phyllis Palmer, Edward Steinberg. Paul Williams. 
Circulation staff: Harrv Karr, Robert Boulter. 



Hill 

Reed 

Carr 

Martin 



Andreae 
Seltzer 
White 



Boulter 
Hathaway 




First rote: Hardy, Hill, White, McDonnell, Seltzer, Patterson, Bach. Secoiid roit: 
Boulter, Woodring, Wiley, Palmer, Lacey, Kepliart, C. Seltzer, Karr, Smith. 




189 



FRESHMAN BIBLE . 

The "M 



9 9 




Book 



I'lU'.l) KOLOSS, Editor 
JMaKVI-ANd's AWrALHANDMOOK t'oT tivsll- 

meii took on a uiiiciue and warlike asjKX't 
this year !)y heinji; dedicated not to one per- 
son. Iml lo all the Iniversity s t'ornu-r stn- 
dcnts wlio lia\(' nivcn llieir lixcs that sncli 



an institution as llic M Hook niiiilit eon- 
tinue to sui-vivc. 

Tliron.uiiout llie entire |)ul)liealion was 
stressed the part we. as the eolIe<re students 
of America, nnist l)lay in lliis nation's war 
efi'orl. It enipliasized llial since we are 
here on liori'owed time and are the only 
trained personnel of the future, it is neces- 
sary that we settk" down (|uickl\' and take 
oui' colleye oljUgations seriously. 

Altliouiih ])riorities cut down consider- 
alily on tiic size and make-u]) of the hook, 
it still held all the heli)ful hints and inside 
information of the past, and played an in- 
tegral part in the introduction i)f the new 
st udcnis to this camj)us. 



Sh;nvn. Wulfcinl. Sihdiim'. Hiilir. Chirk. ( urriTi^'tim. 




190 




FRATERNITIES 

AND 

SORORITIES 



?0 



Interfraternity Council . . . The Fraterni- 
ties . . . Olympian Life . . . The Rushin' 
Front . . . The Panhellenic Council . . . 
The Sororities . . . Student Life . . . Air 
view . . . parties . . . dances . . . informals 
. . . ratting . . . dorm shots. 





a 



n 




fREGARIOUSNESS SHOWS ITSELF in many types of 
animals, but never with more purpose and forethou^jft.\ 
together for the common good and to further divisK 



of modern society. In some branches of human societyif hasbecome tl 



will of one man who assumes the privilege of dictating how the division of labor shall take 




How the 



place 



and so 




m of society that we are fighting. 
, the form in which we believe, is well exemplified in the fraternities 



taryland where men and women learn to live and cooperate 
with one another. These social organizations provide for^lu^;l^}ti%itf ci^fct between free 



minds which is of invaluable aid to a ivell-routided life in 



free social amtact that we present the fraternities and sororities. 




this idea of 



192 




193 



INTERFRATERNITY 

COUNCIL 




ClIAHLKs IIahkv, I'n.iidriil 

A W()HKi.\(; KXA.MPi.E of representative 
government was the Interfraternity Coun- 
cil. Composed of t wenty-eifjht nuMi. tlic 
council opciiitcd towards tlic betterment 
of relations among the member fraternities 
and between the Ixxly and University 
Administration. 

Kacli inoiitli I lie council nicl at a dif- 
ferent I'ratciiiity lioiisc. where it discus.sed 
c\iir<'iil fralcriial ])roblcnis, i-nsli iiilcs. 
memberslii|) i)rogress. and orders froni 
.Vdministiat ion. 

'Pile coniicil sponsored a tennis tourney 
and baskctl)all and Softball comix-t it ions. 
In addition to llie awards given lo the 
victors in these athletic contests, llic lia- 
teinity with the highest s<'holaslic aNcrage 
received a j)la<|ue. as did the club with the 
most nicniliei's in act i\it ics. 

Tlic main achiexcnicnl > of I he year wei-e 
the \-er\- suceessl'nl I ntcirr.ilcrnil \- l?all. 



Xbd Steindkhc 

Vin'-PrrsidrnI 



Edwahi) In(;i.is 
Si-rri-lary 



Fred Koiiuiss 

Trfusiirvr 




and tlic line manner in wliicli the revised 
pledging I'ules wci'c carried out. SptM'ial 
em])liasis was placed on insuring e((Ual and 
fair ])le(lging by all. and (lie residts were 
gratifying. 

The council, cenlei'ing the work of 
twelve Ulcus social fraternities, was led liy 
I'resident Charles Harry. \ ice-l'resideni 
\'a\ Inglis. Secretary I'red Kohloss, and 
Treasurer Ned Steinberg. 

New ()llicers. amiouiiced at the Inler- 
fraleriiity Hall, wcic I'.d Smousc, presi- 



V.)\ 




*Ar-) 


i:x 


(")X 


\TL1 


KA 


IN 


ppersberger 


Miller 


Hoffman 


Lfiililjcn 


Davis 


Bdotlu" 


Vreeland 


Raliai 


Smouse 


Hawkins 


Stockliridfic 


Latimer 



(lent; Jack Dittmar, vice-president; Jim 
Kearney, secretary; and Max Kerschen- 
steiner, treasurer. 

Members: Phi Delta Theta; John Ru])persberger, 
Eugene Vreehmd. Sigma Chi; John Miller, John 
Rabai. Theta Chi; Lee Hoffman, Edward Smouse. 
Alpha Tau Omega; (^arl Leublien, Hamner Haw- 



kins. Ka])pa Al])ha; Charles Davis, Robert Stock- 
bridge. Sigma Nu; Daniel Hoothe, Roberts Latimer. 
Phi Sigma Ka])pa; John Watson, John Thomas. 
Delta Sigma Phi; James Sfhaefle, Williford Eppes. 
Alpha Gamma Rho; Robert Benson, John Bennett. 
T>ambda Chi .\.l])ha; John Norris, Keith Mont- 
gomery. Alj)ha Lambda Tau; Max Kerschen- 
steiner, Bernard Schier. Pi Kappa; James Kearney, 
Davis Davton. 



<1>SK 
Thomas 

Watson 



Ar<i> 

Eppos 
Sehaefle 



Bennett 

Hensnil 



AXA 

Montgomery 

Norris 



AAT 

Seiner 
Kerseliensteiner 



nK 

Dayton 
Kearnev 




195 




I'carltj" fumed chef, couk.s up another .siirpri.ie. 



THE MARYLAND ALPHA CHAPTER OF ^ZaQJ/ 

was founded at Miami University in 1848 
and established at the University of 
Maryland in 1930. 



T" 




Headed by Sam Briuii. the Phi l)olt> had 
a banner year. Includinii' in Ihcii- incinhci-- 
ship athletes, campus leaders, and puhii- 
cations men. the ehil) left its mark in hoth 
the social and extra-curricular acli\ities 
at the I niversily. 

Mi:>nti;us: (iforiic Unrtics, (ieoriic IJaiier. William 
IJclts. Marsliall Mruiult, Piiillii) Mii(l(liii>,'toii, Sam- 
uel IJiirch, llllioll 15iirr«ii<j:lis. Max Callaway. 
I.oiiis ('liac()>. .IdIiii ('layiaiKJ. Stuart Cooley, 
Charles Davis, Hiid Kriilianit. Doreiit Farley. 
William Ilelhock, I'liilij) lIoj;ue, Merlon Jarhoe, 



IIarr\' Karr. Cicorjic Kieffcr. James Kiiisol. Charles 
Kiiell. Frank Kooiitz, Charles Kraiis, Riciiard 
Lodge. James Mann. Paul Mattix. Daniel McNally, 
John Mier. Russell Mi/.ell. Thomas Mont. Anthony 
Nardo. John Neumann, William I'arker. Kohert 
I'crilhi. Klmcr IJi-hy. Janic-. MnlK-rts. All.ert Rnp- 
IHTshcruer, Jr., John Ruppcrsheruor. Jr.. Walter 
ScluMich, Henry Scolt. .lulian Terrett, I'cter \'ial. 
Eufiene Weelaml. i?(iyi| \\'aler>, Jr.. Roderic-k 
Watson. William Wnr/l)aciier, Jr. 
I'lkixjks: Howard Austin. Richard Ho/.nuin. Frank 
Hrinkman, John Carey, Raymond Ciecone, Marion 
Curren, John Davis, Fuj^ene F<li,'elt. Menry Flsnie, 
John Falirner, Kdf^ar Farrell. Jack Frost, Weiford 
darner, James (iill. Stanley (Jreen, William 



196 





(irooine, Keith Hord, Grason Jones, Carl Jiillien, 
Carlton Marcus, John Mullen, John R. Newman, 
Charles Phillips. Russell Potee, Kenneth Prentice, 
Robert Quigley, William Rujjpersherger, Eugene 
Sibley, Ernest Travis, Earl Uhler, John Wright. 
Faculty: John E. Smith, Norman E. Phillips, 
C. O. Appleman, Lawrence J. Hodgins. 



First rou': Bftts, Biirch, Chacos. Cooley, Earnhardt. Secnml row: Hogue, Karr. Kinsell, Lodge, Mann, Mattix. Third row: lIcNally, 
Neumann, Mizell, Roberts. Ruppersherger. Fourth row: Scott. Terrett, Vreelanil, Watsnn, AVurzliacIier. 




197 




THE GAMMA CHI CHAPTER OF 2^2^ 

was founded at Miami University 
in 1855 and established at the 

University of Maryland in 1942. 




/'/r.v/ rf»»-; Anil-.! niiii;. liftN, l^-ih>i-iiKtiin. liniilti-r. Hounir, Hratlshaw . Sinintl nur: i'\:irk, De^^cs. I)(il)Ii-r. KckiTt. (ioi-lirimur. Har- 

liautrli. Hani-. Tliinl rmr: llrisr, lloliiii),'. Jaiiifs. Kidwi'll. MaliiT. McCi'iicy, Millrr. I'nurlh roir: .Morrrll. Haliai. Kiili. Sliipp. Sill-> 

Stffii, Sti'iiiluT);. Fifth mir: Stt'llliiirii, Sullivan, Tmlil. I lliiian. Waiiiiaii. Wilry. 




198 




Although the white cross has only 
been on the campus for the past year, the 
Sigma Chis have managed to Hve up to 
fraternity traditions. 

In pubhcations were Jack Miller, Gene 
Sullivan, Ned Steinberg, and Bob Hill. 
Ted Beuermann acted as Junior Prom 
chairman while Bob Steen and Dick Arm- 
strong were among the cheerleaders. The 
Sigs also contributed members to the Foot- 
light (1ut), Canterbury, and the new 
Maryland Book Cooperative. 

Ted Beuermann, Ned Steinberg, Gene 
Sullivan, and Jack Miller were members of 
O.D.K. 



So ended a most successful year for the 
Sigma Chis. 

Members: Richard Armstrong, Charles Audet, 
Leo Bailey, Paul Belts, Herbert Beuermann, Rich- 
ard Blackwell, Robert Boulter, Thomas Bourne, 
Harold Bradshaw, Michael Clark, James Degges, 
John Dobler, Roy Eckert, Olin Gochenour, Daniel 
Harbaugh, George Harmon, John Harris, Robert 
Harris, John Heise, Robert Hill, Conrad Hohing. 
James James, George Kidwell, William Kirk, Ed- 
mond Maher, Barton Marshall, John Miller, 
Thomas Moore, Charles Morell, Raymond Muller, 
Allan Muse, John Rabai, William Rich, Loy Shipp, 
David Sills, Robert Steen, Edward Steinberg, 
William Stellhorn, Merle Strauss, Eugene Sul- 
livan, Willis Todd, Guy Ullman, Jere W'annan. 

Pledges: John Armiger, John Burns, Lawson 
Cantrell, Calvin Carter, Donald Clianey, James 
Cutts, Lewis Doetsch, Henry Drawve, Edmund 
Flanagan, Sterling Graham, Rogers Hall, Russell 
Hardy, Meredith Helm, Bill Holroyd, James Hurtt, 
Alexander Koch, Alan Mayer, John Mc(^ool, Wil- 
liam Nairn, Jose])h Roberts, Thomas Rymer, 
Thomas Shilling, Frederick Safford, AValter Smith, 
Robert Stader, Earle Toense, William Vaughn, 
Donald Wilhelm, John Winter, Win Weldon. 

Faculty: O. Raymond Carrington, Harry B. 
Hoshall, Milton A. Pyle, Burton Shipley, S. S. 
Steinberg. 



A too seldom occurruKj uiterlude. 



Manpower shortage. 




199 




\l riliiKj «'()/-(/.v ()/ iri.sdoiil. 




THE ALPHA PSI CHAPTER OF VtJ/.Xi 

was founded at Norwich University in 1856 
and established at the University of 
Maryland in 1929. 



luE (•().Mi.\(; ()!■ AniMX tniiii(l President 
Lee HoHiiiiin at I lie liclin successfully 
steeriui; I'oily pledj^es throu.nli I lie i)(irlals 
of Tlicla ("lii. 'I'licia CliiVs i)lc(li;c cliair- 
maii, Kay liaudley, was elected president 
of llie council. The hrotliers excelled in 
spoils hy wiiiniiii; the Interfraternity foot- 
hall chauipionshi]) and also ea])ture<l the 
( )|)cn l-<'iiuiic pla(|uc. 

riicii cainc i'clirnafy, gradual ion and 
till' dc|)ai-tinij; .seniors. Al'lcr llial. Ihc 



draft took some nicnilicrs a> ihd the re- 
sei'\'es. '1\) olfsel loss(>s in nianpowt-r, 
l)rolhcrs Downcs and Williams n-turned 
after an ahsencc of two semesters. 

Thouiih the future l)e dark. Theta Chi 
can look i)rondly hack on an oidslaiidiiiii; 
year. 

Mk-MHKUs: .IoIhi Ailams, William .Vdkiii.s, .\iison 
liiuus. Hicliard Mrown. I''iii;ciic Clark, Warren 
l'',lrciiiaii. Ilarrv (iordun, l{. W. Ilanimoiid. 1{. 1$. 
Il.inirn 1. Icon llolliii.iii, I'.d. IiiL'lis. I{(>l>crl Irc- 



200 





land, Donald Lacey, Barney Nuttle, Harry Red- 
mond, Oakley Roach, Robert Rohrs, Ed. Robin- 
son, Ed. Smouse, John Soniniers, Ray Stafford, 
Phil Tawes, Frederic Warder, Harry AVeaver, 
Douglas Willev, Blaine Wix. 



Pledges: AVhipjjle Ablie, John Beachboard, Ernie 
Bowker, Donald Brundajje, James Conrad, AVil- 
liam Cooper, Giis de Hossen, Joseph Dobson, Fred- 
erick Dowdy, Robert Dyas, Edniimd Early, George 
Edgeworth, Roliert Ester.son, Robert Fillipelli, Ned 
Fisher, Thomas (Jraliam, Robert Grogan, Ray- 
montl Handley, James Hoffnagle, Norman Hop- 
kins, Ed. Knjan, Robert Knnkel, Robert Lamb, 
Donald Lloyd, Walter Longanecker, William Mc- 
Ciisker, Wayne Miessner, Ed. Moore, Arthur Pal- 
mer, George Phillijjs, Richard Phipps, Jack.son 
Powell, Frank Redinger, Talbert Sigafoose, James 
Shields, James Turner, Frank Wiegel, Ed. Wickers, 
Robert Wilkenson, Melvin Williams, Ed. Wunder. 
Faculty: Edward F. Quinn, William B. Kemp. 



Fir.ll row: ,\danis, .\dkin.s, Biggs, Clark, Gordon. Second row: R. B. Hammond, R. \V. Hammond, Hoffman, Inglis, Ireland, Lacey. 

Third rmr: Rn.nrh. Rnliinscm, Snioiiso. Stafford. Warder, Wi\. 




iQl 




THE EPSILON GAMMA CHAPTER OF ^^ i ^^ 
was founded at Virginia Military Institute 
in 1865 and established at the University 
of Maryland in 1930. 




hirst riiir: Alicrii. Allen. IJarUir. liM\trr. I!i>liliiri, I!(]Ihii:iii. (arroll. Clarke. ScccikI rnir: ('(iiiniil. l)avi>. Diclil. Dunn. Kisrli'. Kvans. 

(laiiii-.s. (irrcn. Third row: IIa>,'iTinan. Ilaiiy. Hawkins. Hunt. .Jacoli.srn. .Idliiison. Karl. Law. I-cuMmmi. Fnurlh rnir: Martin. Maxcy, 

Maxsdii. Mill-. Miriliaiil. N(\v>;arilcn. Niirris. Quick, l-'ifth mir: Kccso. Siull. Sprnlt. 'rirr,\ . \in<cnt. Wells. Winierl. ^ nunt;. 




-20>J 





The A.T.Os. were outstanding men in 
pnI)lications, in sports, in government, in 
leadership, and in fraternity life in general. 
Headed by Colonel "Boots" Conrad, twelve 
of the brothers strutted in Advanced Army 
uniforms while many held positions in 
varsity sports. The year was climaxed 
when four of the brothers were tapped for 
O.D.K. 

Members: Frank Ahern, Samuel Allen, Charles 
Barker. Rollison Baxter, Albert Blackwell, Robert 
Bishton, Rot)ert Bohnian. Kenneth Bromley, 
Walter Buck, Peter Carroll, Slater Clarke, Roger 



Cohill, Luther Conrad, William Dalrymple, Ken- 
neth Day, Joseph Dantoni, Robert DeBinder, 
Douglas Deitrick. Donald Delahay, Robert Diehl, 
George Dunn, Clifton Eisele, John Evans, Clemens 
Gaines, Harold Gilbert, Patrick Gogarty, William 
Green, Thomas Hagerman, Herbert Haller, Charles 
Harry, Hamner Hawkins, Max Hunt, Edwin Jacob- 
sen, Robert James, Robert Jermain, Fred Johnson, 
Herbert Jones, Richard Jones, William Karl, 
Arthur Law, Edward Looper, John Love, Carl 
Luebben, George Lundquist, William MacGowan, 
Earl Mackintosh, George MacVeigh, John Mac- 
Veigh, John Martin, Donald Maxcy, Frank Max- 
son, Albert Mead, John Mele, Charles Merchant, 
Clark Mester, George Newgarden, Bradford Norris, 
John Norris, George Quick, Robert Reese, Carl 
Richmond, John Ring, John Schindel, Andrew 
Schnebly, William Scull, Harold Skinner, George 
Sparrow, George Sprott, Alan Stocksdale, John 
Terry, John Valliant, Reginald Vincent, John 
Wardle, Harry Wells, Paul Wimert, Charles Winn, 
Howard Yeager, Alex Young. 

Pledges: Lee Curry, John Kingsbury, Edward 
Mason, Lloyd Mitchell, Robert Roulette, Robert 
Weir. 

Faculty: Mylo S. Downey, Lawrence V. Howard, 
De Voe Meade, Albert L. Schrader, Robert V. 
Shirley, Mark Welsh, Charles E. White, Mark W. 
Woods. Earnest A. Walker, W. Paul Walker. 



Miliiary tactics: — practical application . 



Setting Grandpa right. 




aos 




Hi rule I'lman. rti-foiindrr of the "M" 
.Ixfiuciaiion, (lispUn/s the insiytiid. 



THE BETA KAPPA CHAPTER OF £\A. 
was founded at Washington and Lee University 
in 1865 and established at the 

University of Maryland in 1914. 

Ihk KA s had many loading jjositioiis in 
sports and <i;overnnient. From their house 
lu'liiiul the (ivm-Armory, the l)ooniiiig, 
persuasive voice of S.Ci.A. I'rexy Ray 
(irclccki could he heaid wlu'ii lie was not 
too liusy Willi scoi-ini>' his nunu'rous la- 
crosse goals, or attending O.D.K. lappings, 
wliere hrollicr Mill \ aiidciilierg, also of 
hicrosse fame, presided. In aihiition to 
these two, there w(M'e twelve other K..\s. 
who wielded the liig stick for Mr. l-'aher. 
(Jay cavoilings around cami)ns were led 
liy (liapler President Howard Keller, 
\ ice-l'residciil .lames I'Orlies. Secretary 
.\oiiiiaii Horn, and 'I'reasiirer (larciice 
Schaiiinaii. 




Mknuikhs: Kohcrt (asc. .lului (icKowzau, .lactc 
Diltiiiar. Cliarles Daxis. \Va<lc Dorst-ll, .lames 
Korhfs, ( 'iiarlcs (lay, I{ay ( iiciciUi. liiciianl Ilam- 
l)lol<in. .loliii llaiiswald. \\'iiiiaiii 1 la/lcliiirsl. Wil- 
liam Ilealhcote, Frederick Heine, (ieorne Hill 
I.aiidis Mill. Norman Horn. Kmiiu'tt Kaxanauuii 
Hoy Kcciicy, Howard Ivcllcr. Artliiir i,ini(i\all 
Cliarles Maddox. ClilVonl Olscii, William Osl.iini 
.Ir.. I'ajic I'ralt. .lames Saiim. Hieiianl Scliall 
Clarence Scliauman. (Jeorf^e Scliwessinuer. Hiissel 
Silverlliorne. Howard Smedley, Kdwanl Smilii 
'iliomas Smool. Holierl St iickliridue. \\illiam Tar 
lierl. William Taylor. I Bernard I I man. Mil I on \ an 
deiiHerL', Carl \<in /.ieliii-~ki. lien Wilson. 



iOi 





Pledges: John Bowersox, Charles Burton, John 
Cochrane, Ben Coster, Jr., Louis Dubbert, Paul 
Duke, Robert Geis, Hohnes Hawkins, Arthur 
Heise, Wiihani Mariner, Richard Patrick, John 
Reidy, Wayne Reynolds, Samuel Saltsman, Donald 
Schuerholz, Lewis Shaw, Rudy Vincenti. 
Faculty: Levin B. Broughton, Harold F. Cotter- 
man, William W. Cobey, Ernest N. Cory, George 
\N. Dunlajj, William H. Gravely, Leo J. Poelma, 
Stewart B. Shaw, Jesse W. Sprowls, Reginald V. 
Truitt. 



Firxt row: Case, deKowzan. Davis, Forbes, Gay. .Sfrowrf rou: Grelecki, Hambleton. Hauswald, Hazelluirst, Heathcote, Hill. Third row: 
Olstn. Osburn, Pratt, Saum, Schauman. Scliwessinger. Fourth row: Silverthorne, -Tarlifrt, Taylor, VandenBerg, AVilson, Von Ziclinski. 









205 




THE DELTA PHI CHAPTER OF ^JM 

was founded at Virginia Military Institute 

in 1869 and established at the University 
of Maryland in 1918. 




Fir.ll row: Alexander, Bacli, Riser, Braiisdurf, Burlin. Scroiul row: C'arliart, f'niimvell, Kiifjlar, CJilnuire, IlarrLs. Third roir: Hollami, 
Keal, Latimer, Hassiar, Sliielils. Fourth row: Suiiier, Thomas, Webster, Wlieltim, Wolfe. 




206 




^^^ 



First on College Avenue, always a 
leader on campus, the White Star of Sigma 
Nil sparkled during its twenty-sixth year 
in College Park and lured its 400th mem- 
ber into the clan. 

In a wartime school, the Star did its 
part, having many brothers in Advance 
llOTC. 

Danny Boothe served twice as chapter 
president and Fred Bach prexied the mid- 
year seniors to the war fronts. O.D.K. 
claimed Carhart, Bach and Gilmore. 

"C. H." Harris was varsity football 
manager and John Gilmore starred at end 
and hung up letters in three other sports. 



Bert Carhart lost sleep to edit the Dia- 
mondback. 

Yes, the White Star shone over the cam- 
pus! 

Members: Nathaniel Alexander, Lee Anderson, 
Fred Bach, Carroll Biser, Robert Biser, Richard 
Bond, Daniel Boothe, Kenneth Bransdorf, Ralph 
Burlin. Herbert Carhart, George Cary, Roy Crom- 
well, William Ellett, Carlos Englar, John Flynn, 
.John Gilmore, Herbert Harden, Carl Harris, .John 
Himes, Harvey Holland, Richard Hoddinott, Ed- 
ward Hiirson, Thomas .Jones, William Kauffman, 
George Keat, Dean Keith, James Kinsman, James 
Kiirz, Robert I^atimer, Alan Macpherson, John 
Mattingly, Donald I'rice, Henry Rassier, Car- 
roll Rowny, Craig Shields, Henry Sunier, Jack 
Thomas, George Webster, Robert Webster, Rich- 
ard Whelton, Keith Williams, Randolph Wolfe, 
Bruce Younger. 

Pledges: Ralph Beach, Richard Carlson, Ed- 
ward Chovanes, George Couch, Leslie Daly, Oscar 
Dubois, Harold Evans, James Flynn, Clark Hudak, 
Jack Huffman, Sterling Kehoe, Stewart Know, 
Arthur Peregoy, Joseph Redman, Charles Short, 
Carl Sturges, Charles Taylor, Hubert Tucker, .John 
Warson, Hubert Werner. 

Faculty: George J. Abranis, Leslie E. Bopst, 
Albert Heagy, George F. Madigan, Henry R. Walls, 
Albert Woods. 



Three o'clael: in the innniiiiii. 



And thcji studied (Y) until dniru. 




207 




Till- pnralr lihrari/ (jrts a pcni.'nil. 



THE ETA CHAPTER OF ^^i\ 

was founded at Massachusetts State College 
in 1873 and established at the University 
of Maryland in 1921. 




1 UK iioxoH OF HEi\(; tilt' first Student 
< liairmnii in tlu' new war ii()\'(M'iim(Mit was 
bestowed upon fraternity president .lolni 
Watson. 

In I lie ranks of the advanced ROTC" 
were Dick Harr, Ed Pierce, and (liuck 
Jones. Kd Pierce" ])ecaine the fraternity's 
shining hfjht in the schohistie fiehl when he 
was lapped l)y Tau Beta Pi in February. 

The Old Line, in their satire on would- 
he H.M.O.Cs.. kej)! \ite I'aganelli in Ihc 
liniehjilit when llicy selected him as one of 
tlu'ir examples. Panaiiclli succeeded Art 



Farnham. ensiyii in the r.S.N.I{.. as .sec- 
retary of the Rossliorounh and ke])l that 
l)osition ill the fraternity. 

Regardless of what the future nuiy hold 
in store for them, the Phi Sigma Kaj)pas 
plan to uphold their part of Maryland's 
campus life. 



Mkmukks: WalU-r .Vik-ii. l{i<li:iiil IJarr. .laiiios 
l$r<i\vii, (iiles Cliapin, Henry l>irrl«)|)li. Williaiii 
Diinncllv, Aiiiinr Farniiaiii, Ilowani (Jorsane, 
(iillu'it <i\i(li>. \. 'I'iiomas Hart, ("iiarles .loiies, 
.loliii Merwin. William Myors, Aii;,'iist Noack, 
Willis Ndiari. \ italc l'af;aiiclli. I'Mwanl I'ierce, 



■£08 





Henry Price, Bart Rogers, Robert Ryan, Milton 
Smith, Paul de Tainhle, John E. Thomas, David 
Thomas, Richard Wainwright, John Watson, 
Maurice Wehr, Robert Wright. 

Pledges: Eugene Clark, Douglas Cook, Robert 
Guynn, Larry Henry, Hal Lowry, Frank Purdue, 
Donald Turkal. 

Faculty: James H.Reid. 



First roir: Allen, Barr, Brown, Chapin, Dicrkopli. Siroiid roir: Karnham, Guile, Hart, Jones, Myers. Third row: Xolan, Pierce, Price, 
Roger.s, Ryan. Fntirth roir: tie Tamble. Thomas, Thomas, Watson, Wright. 




209 




THE ALPHA SIGMA CHAPTER OF Z\Zj*I^ 

was founded at the College of the City of 

New York in 1899 and established at the 
University of Maryland in 1924. 




Delta Sigma Phi started out its first 

suimncr semester witli Ai'l Xaylor iit llie 
wheel. A very successful rush week hejiau 
a big seasou of" social fuuctious, which iu- 



chidcil \\i'('k-(Mi(i (liinccs. smokers, and trijis 
to Ocean ( it y. 

AVheii the fall semester rolled aroiuul. 
rushing started again and all the new 
])ledges and old alums gjithered tor a rous- 
iuii' Ilomecomiu"'. Stonev Schaefle look 



Firxl rnir: IJimUit. Hrc\vi-i-, l)nnc;i!i. Kinrrii-k. Kpix's. l'';irlci\v. Srcniid riiir: Fdss. Hiiilsun. Knliiiliriiik. MiUtcad. Naylor. Kidoiit, 
Unwell. 'I'liinl niir: Jaiiu-^ Scliaclli'. .Iciliii Scliacfic-, Sc-liwartz. Si)lccr. 1 lilnml, Waf;iicr. 




'210 




1943 with an explosive dance. Uncle Sam 
and graduation took ciuite a toll of mem- 
bers, but hopes are high for the coming 
vears. 



over the gavel at this time, and at the 
Sailors Ball the shipwrecked Delta Sigs 
took over a tropical island and rolled in 
the swells of Davey Jones' locker. The 
fraternity travelled en masse to nearby 
football games, and many of the boys went 
to Duke. On December 10, the annual 
Founders Day banquet was celebrated 
and faculty members and well-known 
alums were feted. 

For the first time the Delta Sigs were all 
together on New Year's and welcomed in 



Members: (larence Becker, John Bell, DeCorsey 
Bolden, Phillip Brewer, .Joseph Dianda, William 
Dixon, Howard Donahue, Kenneth Duncan, How- 
ard Emrich, Williford Eppes, Frank Farlow, Gar- 
land Fairbanks, Kenneth Foss, Henry Frathwol, 
Philip Grill, William Hansbarger, Charles Hayleck, 
Robert Hesen, Duke Hudson, David Kephart, 
William Krehnbrink, Vaughn MacDonald, Andrew 
McCauley, Hal Milstead, Arthur Naylor, Lewis 
Naylor, Reeve Pratt, Pabst Poulton, Charles Prof- 
fen, George Rasch, .James Rice, Orlando Ridout, 
Thomas Rowell, .James Schaefle, .John Schaefle, 
Howard Schwarz, -James Spicer, Homer Uhland, 
Warren Wagner. 

Pledges: Malcolm Canijjbell, Robert Del^awder, 
Rex Feaster, George Garver, Kenneth I^yons, 
Calvin Petit, Robert Wannan. 

Faculty: Charles B. Hale, Augustus .J. Prahl. 



The Delta Sifis held their infuniial initiutioii at the Tri-Deli house. 




211 




THE ALPHA THETA CHAPTER OF AI/P 

was founded at Ohio State University and the 
University of IlHnois in 1908 and estabhshed 
at the University of Maryland in 1928. 



A \VAH-.MiM)i:i) i'i{ATKHMTV ill a war-loni 
world. Alplia (^aiiiina Hlio went all out for 
the war ctl'ort !)>■ l)U\iii.n' a $1,")()(» War 
lioiul, and hy jjlaciiin' a <ireat minihcr of 
the brothers in (lie various military re- 
serves. 

IIi>;li scliolarslii|) yaiued the hiterfra- 
ternity ("up, and a well-knit softhall 
team caijfured the Interfiaternity Lea<iue 
(•liami)ionshij). (ieiie Schjosnaule merited 
and won the Danl'oitli l-'ellowship for 
afirieuilural achievement. 

Thus the A.(i.l{s. contiiuied ttieir stud- 
ies III soil and crop principles. 




Members: Nevin Halter, George Harnes, .loiiii 
lU'iinetl. l{()l)i'rt IJciisoii, William ("assedy. Hartley 
Crist, .loliii (row, Witliam Crow, Paul Diilcc, Wil- 
liam Elisor, Edwin Francisco, Louis Fries, Rohert 
(iill)ertson. Fraru'is (iray, .John Ilovert. .Ir.. David 
.Jenkins, Emory I.eti'et, l.ieh McDonald, Fred Mars- 
clialtv, Deward Porterfield, Kennetii Ports, .lames 
l*rij;el, .Iose|)li Rofiers, Charles St. Clair, Enjjene 
Sclilosnauie, I'liilip Selt/er, Warren Smith, Daniel 
'I'alinad^e, Wiiliani 'I'aylor, (lerard Warwick. 
W illiam Wheeler. 

Pl.KDCKs: 'rrnnian .Viialt, Elwood .Vrmacost, Wil- 
liam Haker, Itohert Cain, Carl (rouse, .lohn Dono- 
I'rin. .lo.seph Doujiherty, Roliert Dou>;herty. Ciiaries 
hlliy. Lawrence (iroer. (ieorne Horxalii. ('ceil Hol- 



2li 





ter, William Hines. Robert Leffel, Vernon Leon, 
Norman Le])pert, Xewton ^Iaf2:ness, Eugene Mar- 
tin, William McKenzie, Goerge Pavlovsky, Jack 
Piersol, William Pusey, Gilbert Plummer, Robert 
Scott, Rol)ert Sjience, Irving Spry, Stanley Stan- 
ford, John Tschantre, Clinton Wells, Robert Wend. 

Faculty: Arthur Ahalt, ]\Iyron Berry, Samuel H. 
DeVault, Walter England, Arthur B. Hamilton, 
Edgar F. Long, Paul R. PoflFenberger, Arthur S. 
Thurston, James P. Outhouse. 



First row: Baker, Barns, Bennett, Benson, Crist, Crow, Duke. Second rotr: Ensor, Francisco. Gilbertson. Gray, Hoyert. .Jenkins. Leffel. 
Third rnv: McDonald, Marschalk, Porterfield, Ports, Prigel, Roger, St. Clair. Fourth row: Schlosnagle, Seltzer, Smith, Talmadge, 

Taylor. Warwick, ^^'heele^. 




!213 




THE EPSILON PI CHAPTER OF J\,2\.A. 
was founded at Boston University in 1909 
and established at the University of 
Maryland in 1932. 




Firxt row: Cjipizola. (liapiicll, Cniik. l-"iit(is. Srnuitl row: Fox, Fulton, II('rilaf,'<'. Mariniliim. Thiril row: Messiiifjcr. Morris, I'litinan. 

Taokett. 




214 




Even though the Lambda Chis were 
some distance from the actual campus, 
they were in nearly every field of student 
activity. In dramatics, Aza Stanton and 
Jack Davis were prominent; Davis play- 
ing one of the leads in the Varsitj' Show. 
In sports, Pete Karangelen did outstand- 
ing work as a lineman on the freshman 
football team while Bill Fulton pitched 
varsity baseball. 

The men at Lambda Chi made every 
effort to forward the progress of the fra- 



ternity. During the summer semester, 
a well-rounded social program was carried 
out to be followed iii the fall semester by 
rushing and Homecoming. 

The Hitch trophy for scholarship was 
presented by the chapter to Keith Mont- 
gomery, who along with Jack Davis re- 
ceived the fraternity service award. 

More than ever before, the Lambda 
Chis made their influence felt in campus 
life. 

Members: Richard Brooks, Angelo Capizola, Stan- 
ton Cha])pel, LeMar Chilson, Charles Cook, Stanley 
Cook, Roland Cupioali, John K. Davis, Nicholas 
Fotos, Rex Fox, Robert French, William Fulton, 
Harold Heritajfe, Duke Kazlauskas, Alfred Meren- 
dino, Reid Messinger, Keith Montgomery, .John 
Morris, Robert Putman, John Tackett. 

Pledges: Henry Abbott, Donald Balderson, Byron 
Benson, Manning Claggett, Alexander Cushing, 
Roliert Davison, Walter Flensburg, Ellsworth 
Hihn, Peter Karangelen, Robert Lange, Richard 
Skoog, Aza Stanton, Thomas Stinchcomb. 

Faculty : George Quigley . 



"Lemme in, Yxn Juingrn'.' 




215 




Cram sesxinn 'iraii pnst hidtli 



THE TAU CHAPTER OF J^J^TL 

was founded at Oglethorpe University in 1916 
and established at the University of 
Maryland in 1934. 

1 II K WAR MAY IIAVK HEE\ all Julclcfl 111- 

ceiitive to the Tans for they enjoyed the 
most successful year since their fouiuHiiL!:. 
Dwight Fearnow led the I)rotliers in ac- 
tivities wlieii he look over (lie leadership 
of the :\Ien"s (dee Cluh. Tall. l)loiid 
"Honest Max" Kerschesteiner was selected 
for llic most trusted ])o.sitioii of the Inler- 
fralernity ("ouiicil when he was elected to 
fill the position of treasurer. 

The fall semester opened with a toiicli- 
down when the fraternity entered a team 
in the intramural football leaj.;ue. Home- 
coming followed and a lloal. which look 
third honors, was Ituill under I he tireless 
eH'orls of Hud Weslon. 1'lie I.alin element 




was well represented in I lie fralei-nity 
which liad the distinction of haxing hroth- 
ers Baro. Segarra. and (aiiageiia from 
Puerto Uico. 

Hours of relaxation on cold winter nights 
were pas.sed enjoyahly either l>y sitting 
around the new fir(>place or ])laying in the 
newly const rucled hadmiuton court. 

Many of the hrolhers left school lo join 
the armc(l forces, liul many <U\\ remain 
to carr\' on Ihe liadilion of Ihc .Mpha 
l,amlida 'I'aus. 



'21fi 





Members: Carlos Baro, Richard Bangham, Nico- 
las Cartagena, Richard Chiles, M. Paul Comulada, 
Charles Crawford, Leonard Dickson, Dwight O. 
Fearnow, Max Kerschensteiner, Milton Kiu-tz, 
James Libertini, Robert A. Little, Jr., Dante Ma- 
cario, Andrew Messineo, Eminett Nanna, Daniel 
Neviaser, Charles W. Pearce, Arthur G. Phillips, 
Donald Pilcher, George Reiser, Elmer Alexander 
Reno, William Rever, Bernard F. Schier, Jr., Luis 
Segarra, Richard Serra, (larence Underwood, Nel- 
son VanWie, Carroll Weston, Charles R. White. 

Faculty: Ralph O. Gallington, Carl W. Gohr. 



First row: Baco, Cartagena, Comulada. Crawford, Kcarnow, Kerschensteiner. Scroiid roir: Kurtz, Liliertine, Pearce, Phillips, Reeser. 

Thin! row: Rever, Segarra, Serra, Schier, Von Wie, Weston. 




ill 




THE i.i.J\ FRATERNITY 

was founded at the University of Maryland in 1940. 



Pi Kappa has branched out from its 

glee club association and now lias repre- 
sentatives in iiOvernnuMit, dianiaties, and 
l)nl)licati()ns. The Diaiiiondlxtck is slati'etl 
1)\- brothers Ed Rider, editor-in-chief; 



h'ir,il mil-: AlMT<Toml)ic, AndiTson, Haili'V, Hrnson, Davtoii. DvckiT. Srrond row: (iaiiuvs, Ilarri'll. Kcurncy. KdIiIdss, Lihlwv. I.ipski. 
Third row: Malum. Mattin),'l.v. I'atliTsoii, I'mnilly. Uidcr. l{iclf»cway. Fourth row: S<'liic(lcl. Taylor. White. Williams. Zfkirl. 





dent, and Johnny Williams, leader of the 
Presbyterian Club, were outstanding in 
religious activities. 

Altogether, Maryland's newest frater- 
nity looks forward to still greater achieve- 
ments on campus next year. 



Jack Shawn, associate editor; and Les 
Bailey, sports editor. 

Clef and Key prexy, O.D.K. member 
Joe Decker, was assisted by Lou Zekiel, 
author and director of the Varsity Show, 
and Jim Patterson, one of the shows lead- 
ing men. 

Fred Kohloss edited the "M" Book and 
shared Interfraternity Council secretarial 
duties with Jim Kearney. Brad Anderson 
displayed his talents in basketball and 
soccer, with Jack Libby leading cheers 
from the sidelines. 

Leighton Harrell, Wesley Club presi- 



Members: David Ahercromhie, Bradley Ander- 
son, Leslie Bailey, John Benson, .James Bridge, 
David Dayton, Josejih Decker. Jack Gaines, Leigh- 
ton Harrell, James Kearney, Frederick Kohloss, 
John Libby, .\Iexander Li])ske, Robert Mahon, 
Phillip Mattingiy, James Patterson, George Prowd- 
ley, William Priiitt, Edward Rider, Owen Ridgway, 
Robert Schiedel, Wendell Shawn. Edmond Taylor, 
Otis White, John Williams, Louis Zekiel. 

Pledges: Richard Adams, Robert Beckett, Nel- 
son Bennett, Arthur Brinkley, Joseph Bronushas, 
Donald Clem, Welton Davis, George Fredericks, 
Donald Fulton, Conway Gibson, James Graham, 
Norman Grabner, Raymond Hegal, Lynn Johnson, 
David Lambert, Robert Leatherman, Leroy Lyons, 
Daniel ^lahoney, Kenneth, Maskell Charles ]\Io- 
scliel, James Myers, John Newman, Robert Nichols, 
Wharton Nichols, Ralph Quinones, WilliamSchmid, 
^larsliall Van Wagner. ' 



All throuf/h .ftudi/ hour. 



No ration on bull tie.'isions. 




219 




THE EPSILON CHAPTER OF ^ £\. 

was founded at George Washington University 
in 1917 and established at the University 
of Maryland in 1919. 



lllE Phi Ai.i'iiAs wkkk (•ai)alily glided 
through their most successtiil your hy 
Prexy "Long Hair" Marvin Saikir. The 
realizalinii Ihal the war would lake many 
men from llicir I'aiiks gave tlic hrotliers an 
added inccntixc lo dduhic llicir mcmhcr- 
>lii|) of I he |)r('\i(>us ycai'. 

In llic field of sporls the banner of Ihe 
IMii Al|)lias (lew lii-li. 'riieiretlorts in soft- 
hall hronglil llieni llie eliampionslii]) of Ihe 
inli'amnrals and I lie work of pledge Mai'- 
l!n |{ell on llie freslunan Kaskelhall learn 
ke|)l Ihe fralernily i-epi-esenle<| in major 
sports. 




Willie (iohleiizweig, who wrote \\\v min- 
utes and was in .\dvane(> U()'l'('. did lii.s 
utmost to impress Colonel ^^yso^ with his 
military ahilily. lirother Hermird Lieher- 
man did not wait for the end of the seme.s- 
tcr hnt joined Inele Sam"s fighting men 
in the fall. 

Military and >ports wcrt" not the fra- 
ternilys only aceomi)lishmen(s. In Ihe 
seholastic field Ihe lirolhers >el a new 



i'iO 




mark of 2.6 for succeeding brothers to 
attain. 

Although the war may change many 
things, the memories of good fellowship the 
Phi Alphas enjoyed in the fraternity will 
remain witli them throughout the years. 



Members: William Cohen, Jerome Glazer, Wil- 
liam Goldenzweiff, Irwin Jacobs, Clifford Kaslow, 
Joseph Levin, Eli Leibow, Abraham Pollin, Marvin 
Sadiir, Arnold Seigel, Sidney Selis, Morton Silber- 
stein, Stanley Stein. 

Pledges: Martin Bell, Jack Cohen, Irving Line, 
Stanley Ostrow, Robert Stein, Ross Wheeler. 



First ;■()»'.■ Cohen, (ioldenzweig, Jacobs, Kaslow, Second row: Lichow, Pollin, Seigel, Silherstein. 




2'21 




■■'Hf:fM 



THE TAU BETA CHAPTER OF 



TE# 



was founded at Columbia University in 1910 
and established at the University of 
Maryland in 1925. 




Spurrki) on 15V TiiK EXAMPLE of Chancel- 
lor "Iggy" Elias, who was cliainnan of the 
book committee of the \'ietory Council, the 
Teps went on to new goals in the fields of 



Fir.yf rnir: Hailiaracli, liraliivr. Klias, Kpstciii, Kzriiu', Ki-riwirtli. Srroiul run: (iiililniaii. liuiialil (iixicliiian. Koljcrt (iDoilinaii. S. tioixi- 
inati. Grcenberg, Jeffrey. Third row: Konig.sbiirg, Laniailn, Lazinskv. Nalili'. Unluirk. Uiidirk, Shapiro. 







) 



^7 









222 




activities. Dave Greenberg was co-man- 
ager of the A'arsity Boxing, but not to be 
outdone. Art Epstein and Kap JeflFrey 
became junior managers of the tennis 
team. The Teps were well represented in 
the Latch and Key in which Ensign-to-be 
Dave Greenberg served as secretary -treas- 
urer and Art Epstein and Kap Jeffrey were 
active members. Tal Konigsberg held the 
honor of having the highest average in the 
Junior Class in the College of Engineering. 
In the field of sports Irwin "Foggy" 
Noble earned his numerals in lacrosse and 
also was on the varsity football squad. 
Bert Freiwirth scrubbed for the manager- 



ship of the boxing team. Billy Lewis 
played frosh basketball and "Character" 
Leizman was a member of the freshman 
football team. The 145-pound ROTC box- 
ing championship was copped by Billy 
Evans. 

David Rolnick joined Irv "the Brain" 
Lazinsky by being elected to Beta Alpha 
Psi, national accounting honorary. The 
boys, knowing that they may have been 
spending their last days at school, joined 
to create countless memories for the future. 

Members: Robert Bacharach, Daniel Bralove, 
Irvinff Elias, Arthur E])stein, Marshall Ezrine, 
Bertram Freiwirth, Daniel Goldman, Robert Good- 
man, Solomon Goodman, Da\-id Greenberg, Kop- 
pel .Jeffrey, .Judah Klein, Tolbert Konigsberg, Saul 
Laniado, Irwin Lazinsky, Irwin Nable, David Rol- 
nik, Martin Rudick, Irvin Shapiro. 

Pledges: Bernard Berman, Stanley Bralower, 
Irvin Cushner, Richard Davis, Leonard Eisenberg, 
Herbert Finn, Stanley Himmelstein, William Kahn, 
Murray Leizman, Norman Levin, AVilliam Lewis, 
Bernard Schecter, Benson Schwartz, Howard 
Shear, Lee \'ogelstein, Stanley Wymizner. 



ShiniiK/ lip the (jlory boirls. 




223 




Collcye Park tradition, JaithfuUij pursued. 



THE SIGMA CHI CHAPTER OF ^XTLIVL 

was founded at the College of the City of 

New York in 1909 and established at the 
University of Maryland in 1933. 



SiOMA Alpha Mi opened its doors to 
eleven men for Maryl;iii<I"s first, regular 
summer semester. The S.A.Ms, j^roeeeded 
in their usual cainjius activities, including: 
the accession of Len Seidnuin, S.A.M. 
Prior, to the position of editor on the Dia- 
inoiidhdck sport staff; renewal of the almost 
extinct in>litulion of the \\c('k-en<l house 
party liy Lou Miller, social chairman and 
new I'rioi-; athletic teams, led hy Captains 
Leizmaii and Levenson, that displayed 
their prowess on many occasions; IJol) 
Borenstein and Ted Sherhow with 3. .3 




averages; three men. Mike Wolfson. Dave 
Snyd(>r, Pershing Itiflenum. and Hill liirn- 
haum in Advanced Army, former vice- 
prexy of Ilillel and now president; (lordon 
Salganik and Sid Sachs, 4.0 man, who was 
awarded a tncdal foi' top fi'osh scholar>lnp 
honors wci'c added I o I lie ranks. 

The fall .semcstci' marked the return of 
twenty-one men to make a bigger and bet- 
ter year for Sigma Alpha Mu. Lou Miller, 
Saiidv Harris, and Irv Reamer constituted 



224 




the new council to guide the future of a 
group critically imperiled by a wartime 
situation. The military services deprived 
S.A.M. of some of their men, but S.A.M. 




will remain on campus throughout the 
duration; for wherever there is a charter 
and a man wearing the octagon, there is a 
fraternity chapter. 

Meaibers: Bill IJinihaum, Bob Borenstein, Har- 
vey Blumenthai, Mark Coplin, Walter Fair, ]\Ier- 
rill Gann, Sandy Harris, Ted Leizman, Bill Leven- 
son, Irv Lewis, Dick London, Lou Miller, Irv 
Reamer, Sid Sacks, Gordon Salganik, Morton 
Saruhin, Len Seidnian, Ted Sherbow, Dave Snyder, 
Mel Udelewitz, Mike Wolfson. 

Pledges: SamSeidel. 



First roir: Birnbaimi. Hliiiiu-ntluil, Coplin, Fair, Gann, Harris. Second row: Leizman, Levenson, Lewis, London, Miller, Reamer. Third 

roif: Saruhin. Seidnian. Slierbow. Snyder. Udelewitz. Wolfson. 




225 




Firnt row: Beese, IJcr^cr. (*. (Oniiaik, K. (Urmack, (iorddn, Hii<lsnn. Stconil roir: Kicfrr. Mrarrs, Olt. UaiiiM^y. Seidel. 



THE ALPHA ZETA CHAPTER OF 



^KZ 



was established at the University of Maryland 

at College Park in 1940; and was founded at the 
University of Maryland Law School in 1899. 





liii; Pill Kaim'as iiiulcr tlic ciipable 
•iiiii lance of HolxM't ("ormack ciijoyi'd a 
successful seas(jii. I'lie social calendar was 
Iiifililifihted by the reception for (Governor 
Herbert U. ()"('()n()r. Alpha Zeta Aluninus 
of I'lii Ka|)|)a Siniiia. which followed the 
I'liiversily War Mond Rally. 

'I'hc cha|)ter achicxcd honorable nien- 
lioii for chaj)ler .scholastic slandiny in I'hi 
Ka])])a Si<;ina fraternity. 



MKNOiKHs: .laiiu'sC. lieesf. .Ir.. IJicliiiid I',. lU-rucr. 
(liMrli's M. ( 'oTiiiack. .Ir.. Rolu-rt \. ('ormack. 
Hurry II. (;:iiiil.lc. Williiim (;<.r<l(.ii. Willunl 1). 
iliilil);inl. ('. biiin<> HikIsoii. l.t'strr |{. Kcifcr. 
l-'.dwMnI i). Mearcs. Warren K. Olt. Norman V. 
IJaiiiscy. Ivlwani Scidi'i. ( '. Willard I'liomas. 

I'l.KDdF.s; (iary M. Ur.iiiford. Holicrl S. liiirns, 
D.iii.i .1. Keller, Raymond M. O'Kclly, Henjamin 
S. SiKer, Ileiirv I'. Tiirner. .Ir. 



'2'2(i 



'Ma 

Culiner, Fradin, Ingber, Macht, Margolis, Passen, Sterling, Zemel. 



THE DELTA DEUTERON CHAPTER OF XxtlxJ. 

was founded at New York University in 1913 
and established at the University of 
Maryland in 1941. 




Alpha Epsilox Pi almost reached the 
goal of every fraternity when it had all but 
one of its members living in its house. 
Perhaps the greatest asset of the fraternity 
was having four of its original founders 
still active in the chapter. 

Through the tireless efforts of Allen and 
Alex Pearson, the fraternity kept a re- 
spectable scholastic average. Samuel 
Sterling passed many an hour lecturing on 
progressive education, but failed to impress 




his brothers. Louis Culiner began his col- 
lege career in the College of Commerce, 
but then changed his major to Army — the 
only brother to be in the Advanced ROTC. 
With the Army taking its toll in the col- 
leges, the AEPis expect to lose many of 
their members, but regardless of what may 
occur, the fraternity hopes to remain 
active throughout the war years. 

^Iembers: Louis Culiner, Samuel Fradin, Nathan 
Ingber, Allan Madit, Isadore Margolis, Alex Pas- 
sen, Samuel Sterling, Hyman Zemel. 

Pledges: William Apfelbaum, Morton Bernstein, 
Elliott Curtis, Morton Don Felson, Selwyn Heller, 
Stanley Kramer, Roliert Schwartz, Paul Suttle- 
man, Irving \Varsinger. 



227 



OLYMPIAN LIFK 




.lle.v lidrlhn's sinUiiKj shuirr. 

. I.s ( liiirlie Harri/ hdiiilnl mrr the i/dit'l Id Ed Snioiise 
at thr liilrrfml Hall. 

Rofari) (lanre.i iirre Inlil ilnrliii/ nisliliui. 



The liitrrfnit Hull ira.i ii jiopiildr (ifftiir. 

I'iniic.s diiil sicdh fri/s iirrr .f/xvisored bi/ i bone f rain 
iritli llir r'ujhl rdtion coupons. 

We lidd d iirll-led com mini it i/ sIikj at Ihr lidll. 



THE RUSHIN' FRONT 

The participation of the Axis and the 
Allied Nations in a world-wide conflict set 
an example for the sororities on the Mary- 
land campus this fall. Rushing, as usual, 
brought about war between the feminine 
clubs on the hill. When the smoke of bat- 
tle cleared, all enmities ceased, inter- 
sorority spirit prevailed and peace was 
declared until next rushing period rolled 
around. 



Riishees respecf fully retreal. 




Oh //('.v, we alwaijg sing after di)incr. 




The trap is set. 



PANHELLENIG COUNCIL 




Hktty Ja( ohy 
Frrsidiiit 



liiK I'A.\-IlELLf:xic Council at Mary- 
land serves the j)urp()se of jjroinoting" a feel- 
in<f of sisterhood and <(t()i)eration aniony' 
the ten sororities on campus. For the fur- 
therance of tliis ])uri)ose, nieetin.<>s were 
hcM inonl hly at tiie \arious sorority houses 
wher'c all llic ])rohlenis eonfronlini; the 
(ireek organizations were discussed and 
uniform ])oh'eies deeide(l uixm. 

Following the ])hin inaugurated hist 
year, Mrs. Wychoff and Mrs. Pierce, whih- 
rusliing was in session, issued and fih-d in- 
vitations and bids, and helped to solve the 
rushees' problems. 

1 )u ring rushing, t he council also ser\('d as 
mediator and court in the event that \iola- 
lions of lushing regulations occurred, and 



Altl.V (il 11.1) 

I ' in--}*rvsidcnt 




.\NN.\ \. .\l SLAM) 

Sirrilari/ 



Ki Til Itl I II \s w 
Trt'ii.tnrrr 




otfenders were snliiccled to specdic penal- 
ti<'s. IVIeetings of the gronj) were held once 
a week during tin's period in order to super- 
\ise rushing and correct any difliculties 
that might arise at that tinu-. 

Two sororities. l*hi ."^igma Sigma and 
.Vlpha Sigma, were admit ted to theeouneil, 
thus hringing representation to every so- 
rority on campus and inci'easing inter- 
( ireek >pirit and coo|)crat ion. 

During the -econd week-end in Max the 



230 



Pan-Hellenic Council participated in the 
May Carnival. Cooperating with the 
Women's League they held a fashion show, 
following which Dean Stamp, Dr. Ehrens- 
herger, and Colonel Wysor judged a 
beauty contest from among the sisters of 
the various sororities. On Saturday after- 
noon the sister organizations lined College 
Avenue with booths to sell War Bonds. 
Stamps, and chances to throw a dart in 



the Fuehrer's face. Then, putting on the 
"glamour powder" for the evening, the girls 
opened the doors of their houses for dances, 
to which the diminishing male population 
was invited. 

Officers were: Betty Jacoby, president; 
Anne Ausland, vice-president; Ruth Bu- 
chanan, treasurer; and Aria Guild, sec- 
ret a rv. 



Fir.vf row: Bennett, Biesecker, Braxman, Coseboom, Davis. Second row: Eskwith, Graves, Garman, Herman, Jans, Kephart. Third row: 
MaeKay, MaeMorris, Piicknian. Pi'ciffcr, Ri\'onhnrgli, Seiter. Fourth row: Spire, Stratmann, Tlinmpson. Topping, Mae Weinstein, 

Whitlow. 




231 




^^^ 



THE BETA PHI CHAPTER OF £^l\1.L 

was founded at Wesleyan Female College 
in 1851 and established at the 

University of Maryland in 1940. 



Alpha Dki/ia Pi \vel(():\ii:i) a new liouse- 
motluM-. Mrs. L. II. Allen, at the start of 
the summer semester. ^Nlrs. Allen was 
fonnei'ly at the Kappa Sii^nia house at the 
I iiiversity of New ^Mexico. 

Many social events filled the summer 
hours. Navy men were fre(|uently enter- 
tained at Sunda\' dinners. A dance was 



^iven for the men from Fort Meade. Tliurs- 
(hiy afternoons the A.D.l'is went to (ireen- 
l)elt Lake for ])icnics. .\t the .\ntumn Car- 
nival, .leainie Amiicke's jalopy, decorated 
with lea\es and stiramcrs, was part of the 
l)arade. 

The dnnuny. which was shot and liurned 
in the honfirc precedinu the Homecoming 



M IS. Allen hud her athiiirers. 



M usiecd talent "ijircs uut. 




iSi 



game, was created by Anna Ausland, Mil- 
dred Garvin, and Betty MacMorris, wlio 
termed him "General Jerk." Mart Pierson 
represented the chapter in the Homecom- 
ing court. 

As an award for winning second place 
in the national sorority magazine contest, 
a white leather Bible was presented to the 
chapter. 

On December 18 Loretta Ashby was 
married at the house. The ceremony, the 
first one ever lield in the house, was beau- 
tiful. Another event of the holiday season 
occurred when the participants of the Uni- 
versity's caroling service were invited to 
the house for hot chocolate and cookies. 

The various University war efforts could 
count on cooperation from the A.D.Pis. 



A donation of $25 was given to the Com- 
munity Chest War Fund. More than half 
of the members donated blood in the cam- 
pus blood drive. Mildred Garvin repre- 
sented the chapter on the Campus Victory 
Council. 



Members: Jeanne Amlicke, Loretta Ashby, Anna 
Ausland, Violet Beebe, Margaret Boulton, Eliza- 
beth Burke, Bernice Chambers, Mary Alice Clark, 
Mildred Garvin, Vera Gatch, Mabel Klebold, Betty 
MacMorris, Willa Olt, Mart Pierson, Mary Rhoda 
Tackett, Vera Tompkins, Marie Weschler, Mildred 
Whitlow, Elizabeth Wood. 

Pledges: Jane Adams, Jane Bacon, Doris Carson, 
Isabella Corwin, Ruth Dawson, Eleanor Ficke, 
Cecile Hale. Emilie Martinsky, Jane Mastin, Jean 
McComas, Ann McGlothen, Betty Morrison, Betty 
Ott, Barbara Rogers, Marian Simson, Katherine 
Smith, Phyllis Whitcomb. 



Firxl riiir: Aniliike, Ashby, Ausland, Beebe, Bouton, Burke. Second rou': Chambers, Clark, Garvin, Gatc}i, Klebold, MacMorris. Third 

row: Ott, Pierson, Thompkins, Weschler, Whitlow, Wood. 




233 



THE GAMMA PSI CHAPTER OF XXXvJ. 
was founded at Monmouth College in 1870 
and established at the University of 
Maryland in 1929. 



®-* 




Kappa Kaim'a (Ia.mma has not only heen 
occupied in inakiiiy coiitrihiitions lo col- 
lege work, i>iit lias heen ontliusiastically 
devoting' nmcli time to wai- work. In 
Fel)niary, the cliaplcr Ixmuiit a war hond 
and on several occasions the Kapi)a Keys 
sang at Fort Meade. In caniiJiis activities, 
the Kappas remained outstanding. 



Me.mhkhs: Until Aidridue, Hetty Hcjiloy, Pegjry 
HohiiiiMii, Hetty Bond. \ irfiiiiia Honiiam, Xun 
Revell Cliadcaync. Mary Jam- Cha.se. Martiia .\iiii 
("otterniaii. Mary .lane Dawson, Polly Day, Mir- 
iam En.sor, Nettie (Jarnian. Martha I.onise Han- 
kin.s, Nancy Ilobson. Marilyn Iliiher. Marianne 
Ilniiter, Hetty .lacohy, Ann I.ykes. Kllen Miller, 
\'iri,'inia Molden, Lucille Moncrietf. Ann I'aterson, 
.loan I{odfj;er.s, Mary .Jane Rod^;crs, Mary (). Sliu- 



Xeifie GaniKiii atul Doris Wood roitmilrdli 
on thai "iiiiirfiiiKil nrrrssifi/." ■•<hiilii. 




!2S4 



mate, Mary Howard Simmons, Peggy Snoiiffer, 
Martha Si)arlia\vk, Marie Stauher, Ruth \'olhui(l. 
Aim Vrooman, Charlotte Weikinger, Doris Wood, 
Jane Woodring. 

Pledges: Dorothy Anderson, Medora Byrn, Eliza- 
beth Cissel, Barbara Cozier, Betty Dial, Virginia 
Galliher, Marilyn Henderson, Jeanne Hovey, Mary 
Pat Howe, Eleanor Jenkins, Jane Kudlich, Betsy 
McCoy, Marguerite Pearson, Barbara Philips, 
Caroline Reid, Claire Rich, Elizabeth Ring, Dale 
Sherman, Martha Souder, Maryanna Snyder, 
Miriam Tittmann, Louise Vance. 

Faculty: Miss M. Marie Mount, Mrs. Curry N. 
Caples, Miss Helen C. Williams. 




Firxl row: .\Ulricli, Begley. Huhanan, Bonil, Bonliam, C'liadeavne, Chase. Second row: Dawson, Day, Ensor, (iarman, Hankins, Hobson, 
HiilnT. TliinI roir: Huiitrr, .Jacul)y. I^ykt's, Miller, Patterson, Roiiger.s, Rogers. Fourth row: Shumate, Simmons, Si)arha\vk, Staiiber, 

VollancI, Weikinger, Wooil. \V Iring. 




335 




1 LI 




THE BETA BETA CHAPTER OF i ^Ij 
was founded at Syracuse University in 1874 
and was established at the University of 
Maryland in 1940 



The Gamma I'liis, Troin their lofty posi- 
tion on the liill, coiKluctcd ;i hiisy year in 
campus and war work. 

The girls started oil" the semester by 
having a Founder's Day hancjuet ;ind cele- 
bration at which twenty-one chapters of 
the sisterhood were represented. 

The sororities' Ilomcoming float, which 
represented a I SO snack bar with the 



theme "Praise the Lord and Pass the Boys 
Nutrition."' recei\ed second |)ri/e. 

For their part in the wai' etiort the 
(iannna Phis, with R\\[\\ Buchanan in 
guidance, conducted classes in war gases 
and incendiaries for campus air-raid war- 
dens, organized a chemical warfare exhi- 
bition, and acted as hostesses at many 
I S( ) dances. 'I'he girls were also inarching 



I'lirlirs (iriiiiiiil Clnislimis time were onhj jKirl af the (tdiiiiiid I'his' m-firitirs. 




'i:ui 



entlmsiasts. 

Barbara Nutwell, Women's League 
president, planned and conducted all the 
festivities of Cadet-Colonel Day, at which 
both she and Ruth Buchanan were tapped 
for Mortar Board. 

Marg Hemple was assistant circulation 
manager of the Diamondback and Bobbie 
Reed earned her Pi Delta Epsilon key by 
her hard work on the business staff of the 
same campus publication. 



Members: Betty Anderson, Mildred Beck. Frances 
Becker, Georgianna Benjamin, I'hyllis Brooks, 
Ruth Buchanan, Dorothy Cockerville, Betty Lou 
Fike, Virginia Gibson, Gerakline (iladville, Mary 
Greenfield, Mary Elizabeth Marker, ]\Iargaret 
Hemple, Joan Jans, Myrtle Killingsworth, Joyce 
Murdock, Barbara Nutwell, Barbara Rivenburgh, 




Dorothy Bundles, Mildred Sears, Margaret Sher- 
man, Ruth Startzman, Elsie Stevens. 

Pledges: Louise Burke, Marjorie Carey, I^uann 
DeTar, Elaine Dobihal, Margaret Hughes, Betty 
Jenkins, Mary Lee Johnson, Janet Lingle, Ruth 
Lingle, Marjorie Mason, Mary Jean McCarl, Inez 
McLeod, Alice Miller, Joan Murphy, Wanda Pel- 
czar, Jane Plitt, BarV)ara Reed, Joyce Reside, Pa- 
tricia Schindel, Frances Ann Schroeder, Lois Ann 
Todd, Marjorie Yale, Ruth Vial, Margaret Weiden- 
hamer. 

Facl'lty : Miss Frances Ide. 



First row: Anderson, Beck, Becker, Brooks, Buchanan, Cockerville, Fike. Second row: Gibson, Gladville, Harker, Hemple, Jans, Kil- 
lingsworth, Murdock. Third row: Nutwell, Rivenburgh, Bundles, Sears, Sherman, Startzman, Stevens. 




237 



THE BETA ZETA CHAPTER OF 2^Z\. 
was founded at Colby College in 1874 
and established at the University of 
Maryland in 1940. 





TllK M:\V1.V I-IMSIIKI) SOHOHITV HOUSE 

lu'liiiul tlio (liiiiny liall helonfi's to Sigma 
Kai)j)a. Tliis iiroup look an active part 
in the \arions drives and |)atriotic coii- 
tcsls on the hill. Seventy-five |)er cent 
of tlie uirU were lilood donors in tliis year's 



elfort. Hy saving Iheir money, tiie Sigma 
Kapi)as amassed tlie grand total of $'-2().()() 
wliicli was giviMi to the \'ictoi-y Conneil. 
At their nickel hop. •'^7. 00 was collected 
for the Red Cross. I.nc,\ Jane Stewart rep- 
res(Miled the sororilv as a candidate for 



MayaziiicK irrrr of firsl hitrrcst 
— ilini (■(iiiir llii' IiiidIcs. 




War Bond Queen and was chosen Pledge 
Queen from among all the different so- 
rorities. 

In the social world, the Sigma Kappas 
held several formal affairs this year. In 
October, there was a reception in honor of 
Mrs. Mary Shelon, the new housemother. 

Other activities on the hill found the 
Sigma Kappas taking part. Margaret Car- 
penter was the treasurer of the W.R.A. and 
the religious chairman of the Methodist 
Club. Jean Ingraham was a member of 
the Footlight Club. The secretaryships of 
Physical Education Major Club and the 
W.R.A. kept Doris Lundquist busy. A 
member of Phi Kapjia Phi, Betty Haase, 
was also the president of Omicron Nu. 




Members: Geraldiiie Beits, Shirley Boulanger, 
Celeste Bowers, Dorothy Farmer, Elizabeth Haase, 
Peggy Haszard, Norma Hatch, Jean Hofstetter, 
Peggy Hurley, .lean Ingraham, Betty Jullien, .Joyce 
Kephart, Doris Lundquist, Bernice Mead, Dorothy 
Metcalfe, Elizabeth Monocrusos, Peggy Morrissey, 
Catherine Schlittler, Evelyn Smith, Lucy Jane 
Stewart, Elizalieth Stratmann, June Thearle, 
Annie-Ruth Top])ing, EdithTurner, Claire Vincent, 
Lois Walker, Ann Whyte, Anne Young. 

Pled(;es: Lucille Bowser, Margaret Carjjenter, 
Elaine Craley, Janet Fisher, June Foster, Virginia 
(nibisch, Doris Marucci, Shirley Middlebrook, 
Katherine Murgia. Patricia Wolfe. 



Fiml row: Forrrster. Haase, Hurley. Inprahain, Kei)liart. Liinriquist. Scmiid rnw: Sniitli, Slratman, Tliearle, Tojuiiiif;. Walker, Wli.vte, 

Voiiiifi:. 




239 





THE ALPHA PI CHAPTER OF / \ / \ / \ 
was founded at Boston College in 1888 
and established at the University of 
Maryland in 1934. 



The Tiji Dki/I's kinisiikd llic year willi 
flyiiifi; colors. .VI Homecomiiiii they col- 
laborated on a Hoat willi tlic K.Vs. and 
formed the Tri Delt Conipany "D." 

Fonnder'.s Day was celebrated by the 
Maryland chapter and the ^Vashins•t()n 
Alliance with a ban(|nel in Washini^ton. 
In January the annual Honor's Hantpiet 
gave recognilion lo eacii 'X\v\ t'<>r lier work in 



Ihc ( lia])lcr and on canipns, and also served 
as a farewell to tlie yraduatinfi; .seniors. 

.Vrla (luiid and Jane ('hai)in were cho.sen 
as members of Who's Who in .Vmerican 
(-olleyes. and Edith Dnnford was tapped 
for Mortar Board. 

Mkmukus; Marie Hcall, .lane ("lia])iii. Dorotliy 
Clark. Marjorif Cook. Dorothy Cosclxiom. Ik'vcrly 
Conner, I'eKs;v Cnrlin. Kditli Dnnford. Dorolli\- 



.(// srt to ijii nil II (/(/.v/r.v.v siriiili-riilr. 




24U 



Douglas, Marjorie Falk, Janet Fishack, Aria Guild, 
June Hastings, Janet Heggie, Anne Johnson, Allene 
Jones, Claire Kenney, Marianne Maas, Betty 
Manley, Dorothy McCallister, Nancy Phillips, 
Doris Phipps, Barbara Riley, Nancy Royal, Vir- 
ginia Royal, Jeanne Rudelius, Eleanor Seiter, Jean 
Sexton, Sylvia Shade, Gabie Temple, Harriet Whit- 
son, Dorothy Willis Krehnbrink, Martisha W'ilson. 

Pledges: Carlos Barnes, Jean Burnside, Betty 
Burns, Doris Chapman, Lorraine Cline, Barbara 
Crane, Betty Crane, Jean Lou Crosthwait, Jane 
Cushman, Ann Ewens, Jane Grigsby, Ann Hanford, 
Dorothy Hargrove, Jacqueline Hooppaw, Pauline 
Johnson, Veatrice Johnson, Jane Linn, Rolierta 
McKee, Martha McKim, Louise Owings, Peggie 
Pyle, Peggy Quarnquesser, Louise Richards, Jean 




Roberts, Kay Sasse, Kathleen Shaughnessy, Bar- 
bara Sienion, Jacciueline Spinney, Elizabeth Stader, 
Jean Stout, Bertha Williams, Peggy Ziegler, Jac- 
queline Zepp. 

Faculty: Mrs. Claribel Welsh. 



First row: Beall, Cha])in, Clark, Cook, Coseboom, Curtin. Second row; Dunford, Douglas. Falk. Fishack, Guild, Hastings. Third row: 
Heggie, .Johnson, .Jones, Kenney. Maas, McCallister. Fourth row: Phillips, Phipps, Riley, X. Hoyal, V. I?oyal. Rudelius. Fifth roir: 

.Seiter, Sexton. Temple, Whitson. Willis. Wilson. 




241 



THE BETA ETA CHAPTER OF A.iI1jZ\ 
was founded at Lombard College in 1893 
and established at the University of 
Maryland in 1934. 



Ww'^'^'^-i 





1 MIS VKAH I'KoVKi) iiii exceptionally out- 
staiidiiiii one tor AI|)lia Xi Delta, which has 
contril)iit('(l nuich lo the warefiort. Some 
ineinbers knitted for the Red Cross, others 
worked for the I SO. Kate Sclinioll was 
elected War Hond Queen and the Alpha 
Xis collected the i>reatest anionnt for the 
Red Cross Nickel Hop. 



In activities Jeannette Owen was 
women's editor of the Tkhuaimn while 
Maraline Behrind contrihuted to the Old 
I. inc. X'irginia Raymond was a meml)er of 
Alpha Lambda Delta and the \\.\{.\. 
honorary. 

The social activities were numerous and 
all verv successful. 



Sororiti/ life —rooiiiiiKilr'fi rlolhcs. rooiininilrs' help 




242 



Members: Mary Lou Aiello. Maraline Behrend, 
Helen Beisecker, June Cameron, Lois Davis, Fran- 
ces Demaree, Dorothy Graves, Beryl Gompers, 
Patricia Hardie. Ellen Jeffers, Grayce Martin, 
Evelyn Menduni, Lnelda ^Murray, Mary-Stuart 
Price, Virginia Raymond, Patricia Richards, Cath- 
erine Schmoll. Phyllis Sliney, Olive Jean Smith, 
Betty Steely, Anne Turcotte, Jane Turner, Barbara 
Wagner. Ernia Welsh, Jeanne Wirsing, Mildred 
Witz, Millicent Wright, Dorothy Zimmerman, 
JeannetteOwen, Barbara Kurtz. 

Pledges: Kathlyn Bailey, Christy Clark, Mar- 
garet Coggins, Vivian Custer, Phyllis Dougherty, 
Josephine Dowell, Margaret Earp, Marjorie Em- 
hrey, Mary Foster, Geraldcan Jarnigan, Malinda 
Kieny, Ruth Lamond, Kathleen Malamphy, Gloria 
Mellinger, Helen Merritt, Holley Murray, Harriet 




Olker, Ruth Osann, Carolyn Post, Catherine Ray, 
Elizabeth Root, Betty Lou Reid, June Rightor, 
Margaret Richardson, Mary Sewell, Patricia Spel- 
lacy, Phyllis Stortz, Natalie Titrington, Shirley 
Wilson, Betty W'ard, Jacqueline Richards, Betty 
McDonald, Mildred Adams, Nancy Spies. 



First row: Aiello, Behrend, Biesetker. Cameron, Davis, Demaree, Graves. Second row: Hardie, Jeffers, Kurtz, Martin, Mendum, Owen, 
Price. Third row: Raymond, Richards, Schmoll. Sliney. Smith, Steely, Turcotte. Fourth row: Turner, Wagner, Welsh, Wirsing, Witts, 

Wright, Zimmerman. 




■243 




•"m 



Alpha O.michon Pi. under llic leadership 
(•f Frcsideiil Doris Thompson, conducted 
nniny ])liilanthropic- activities (hirin<f the 
year. Workinf>' with other active and akim- 
nae chapters, tlie <i;irls jiide<l in supporting 
the social service department of the Fron- 
tier Nursing Service which was established 
l)y Aljjha Omicron I'i and cares for the 
])eoj)le of tlie Kentucky mountains. The 
chaj)ter"s Clothes Line Committee col- 
lected toys and clothes to further this 
work. N'arious projects, such as selling niag- 

GettiiKi set fur a hif/ time. 



THE PI DELTA CHAPTER OF A^OJ-i. 
was founded at Barnard College in 1897 
and established at the University of 
Maryland in 1924. 

azine sul)scri])ti()ns. raisi-d ni'cessary funds. 

In the social world Jean Scheller and 
Phyllis Wolfe led the IVIilitary Ball and the 
Junior From respectively. 

On the hill, Kay Martin presided at 
meetings of the Women's Chorus and the 
S.M.A.C\. while Marian Beck held the 
reins for the Home Economics Cluh. Vir- 
ginia Hutchinson, Jay Andreae, and Mil 
White, who was associate editor of the Old 
Line, worked for the campus publications. 
The Senioi- Class secretary ship and the 
Sophomore Class secretaryship were held 
by Shirley MacKay and Jane Boswell. 

"/•'i»»/ fnr tlliiiiiillt." 




•^'U 



Three A.O.Pis were active inemhers of 
Alpha Lambda Delta — Nancy Troth, Ellen 
Stabler, and Jane Boswell. 

New Pi Delta Epsilon initiates were 
Mil White and Jay Andreae. Dorothy 
Merkel was inangurated as secretary of 
the Women's Committee. 

Members: Janet Andreae, Marian Beck, Jane 
Boswell, Frances Bradley, Mary Conklin, George- 
Anna Diehl, Veronica Doyno, Jean Engelbach, 
Irene Fredrickson, Jacqueline Hood, Virginia 
Hutchinson, Jo Ann Jarnigan, Shirley MacKay, 
Kay Martin, Dorothy Merkel, Marcelle O'Shaugh- 
nessy, Muriel Rothnian, Lina Mae Saum, Jean 
Scheller, Vivian Smith, Ann Speake, Emily Spire, 
Doris Thompson, Nancy Troth, Ruth Walton, 




Charlotte AVarthen, Mildred White, Betsy Jo Wil- 
son, Phyllis Wolfe. 

Pledges: Betty Atkinson, Jean Blackman, Claire 
Booth, Thelma Booth, Libby Dove, Frances Haz- 
zard, Margaret Kelly, Lee de Lashnuitt, Dorothy 
Powell, Susan Randall, Jean Smith, Ellen Stabler, 
Ann Stillwagen, Betty W'ascher. 
Faculty: Mrs. Frieda McFarland, Mrs. Kathryn 
Scott. 



First row: .\ii(lreae, Beck, Boswell. Bradley. Diehl. Doyno. l^econd rnw: Engelhaeh. Hood. Hutchinson, Jarnagin. MacKay, Martin. 
Third row: Merkel, OShaughnessy, Rothman, Saura, Scheller, Speake, Spire. Fourth row: Thompson. Troth. Walton, Warthen, White, 

Wil,«on, Wolfe. 




245 



THE ALPHA RHO CHAPTER OF J\ZA 

was founded at Virginia State Normal in 1897 
and established at the University of 
Maryland in 1929. 




1 HE Kappa Deltas sj)eiit a very liusy 
year in war work and cainpus activities. 
Second prize for lioiise decorations during 
Honieconiint; was awarded to tlieni for 
their "Fort K.D." In the line of war work 
I hey acted as hostesses at a service (hmce 
for I lie oflicers of Fort ^Yashington, do- 
nated blood to the Ited Cross during the 
cani])us drive, and bought their share of 




war bonds and stamps. 

Funds were also donated to a diildreirs 
hospital in Virginia to maintain ten beds 
throughout the year for ])alients in the 
orthopedic ward. 

On campus pul)lications Jackie Br()i)liy 
served as managing editor of the Diainoiid- 
biirk. Xancy Holland, Jackie Bro])hy. and 
Marv Fllen Wolford attended Mortar 



GetiiiKj the facts slrtiiijht Iwforv (joinfi to bed. 




246 



Board meetings, while Lynn Cross, Jimmie 
Schene, and Jane O'Rourk went to every 
Footlight Club practice as members of 
the unsung l)ut hard-working stage crew. 

Members: Dorothy Barnard, Joan Bell, Jean Ben- 
nett, Jacqueline Brophy, Jeannette Kaylor Byler, 
Lynn Cross, Carol Marie Davis, Helen DeLoach, 
Harriett Ford, Frances Long Freet, Virginia Giles, 
Faith Halpine, Constance Hartnian, Vera Hartman, 
Mari Hess, Elizabeth Hine. Nancy Holland, Lu- 
cille Humphreys, Jeanne Johnson, Barbara Kep- 
hart, Jane O'Rourk, Phyllis Palmer, Frances Pfeif- 
fer, Rosaleen Pifer, Margaret Price, Betty Rowley, 
Betty Saffell, Ruth Schene, Ruth Sleeman, Betty 
Smith, Caroline Smith, Virginia Todd, Mary Ellen 
Wolford, Mary Yeager. 
Pledges: Evelyn Baliles, Mary Ball, Betsy Bundy, 




Catherine Cochran, Jean Coney, Patsy Lee Cook, 
Gertrude Davidson, Catherine Ford, Jean Heck- 
man, Virginia ]\IcCeney, Elinor McDonnell, Louise 
Ridgeway, Betty Lee Saumenig, Marean Shea, 
Lucille Stewart, I^ucille Stringer, Ruth Ann Wagy, 
Helen Walker, Jane Wells, Marie White. 
Faculty : Dr. Susan Harman, Miss Alma Prein- 
kert. 



First row: Barnard, Bell, Bennett, Br()i)liy. Cross, DeLoach. Second roir: Ford, Giles. C. Hartman, V. Hartman, Hess, Holland, Hinii- 
phries. Third row: Johnson, Kephart, I'fcilfer, Pifer. Price, Rowley. Saffell. Fourth row: Schene, .Sleeman, B. Smith, ('. Smith, Todd, 

Wolford. Yeager. 




247 





THE BETA ALPHA CHAPTER OF ^2u2^ 

was founded at Hunter College in 1913 
and established at the University of 
Maryland in 1936. 



liiK Phi Su;.ma Skj.mas have Ix'cii out- 
staiuliiiK lliis year for their diversified war 
interests. They inaugurated tlieir pro- 
gram with the organization l)y Itosalynde 
Kohnhicr. of the first Red Cross classes 
begun on canipus, ])roc'eeded to purchase 
and maintain a mobile kitchen unit for tlie 
Army and continued the project by acting 
as hostesses at many Fort Meade dances, 
("anipns ac-tivities, not to be neglected 



entirely for the war drive, had the support 
of Footlight Club's Ahna Finklestein and 
Terrapin's Hit a Lenetska and Cherie Pack- 
man. 

The traditional Hou.se Mothers' Ban- 
quet for the liousc mothers of all fraternal 
organizations on cani|)us and the first 
bridge party of the year for sorority repre- 
sentatives were highlights of the school ses- 
sion as was the Washington Birthday dance. 



'Cut it out. iiiiu'rr kiUhuj me 




^ 



~V 




248 



The remainder of the time the girls spent 
seUing and buying stamps at the Univer- 
sity War Stamp Booth, knitting socks and 
sweaters for the boys in the Army and 
serving at local USO canteens. 



Members: Ruth Barsky, Annette Bernstein, Syl- 
via Bravnian, Frances Dunherg, Bal)ette Feklnian, 
Ainia Finklestein, Rosadean Flaks, Elsie Fioni, 
Zelda Goodstein, Gloria Gottlieb, Charlotte Hill, 
Muriel Horrowitz, Phyllis Kolodner, Rosalynde 
Kolodner, Rita Lenetska, Bernice Margulis, Mir- 
iam Mednick, Alma Merican, Ruth Morgan, Char- 
lotte Packman, Arline Raskin, Anita Sesansky, 
Marion Shapiro, Shirley Sherman, Florence Spivak, 




Evelyn Wasserman, Ruth Weinstein, Sonia Weis- 
herg'. 

Pledges: Betty Barban, Lila Berkman, Bernice 
Byron, Roberta Cooper, Sylvia Kahn, Irene Kap- 
lan, Marcel Katz, Aileen Le\'in, Vera Margolies, 
Ruth Singer, Charlotte Sherman, Lucille Stein, 
Sarah Weintraub, Mignon Zucker. 



First row: Barsky. Bernstein, Bravman, Dunberg, Finkelstein, Flaks. Second row: Flom, Goodstein, Gottleib, Hill, Horrowitz, K. Kolod- 
ner. Third rote: P. Kolodner, Lenetska, Medniek, Merican, Morgan, Packman. Fourth rou-: Raskin, Sherman, Spivak, Wasserman, 

Weinstein, Weisberg. 




249 




Ammia Si(;m.\ has takkx an active part 
in war work. 'I'liis year the <iirls donated 
l)lo(i(l. coiitriliMlc*! nioncv to the Red 
Cross and Cominnnil y War Fund. 

The sorority participated in many other 
activities. Every year Alpha Siys liohl 
their annual Mother's Day Tea. The girls 
help with the "clean up" caini)aign .spon- 
sored by the Women's League, and cooper- 
ated with the Student liook Committee. 
A haskethiiU teaiii was formed so that the 
sorority might lake part in intersorority 
games. 



\ 



THE XTl2^ sorority 

was founded at the University of 
Maryland in 1935. 



Memuf;ks: ('yiitlu;i liayliii. Sliirlcy liennan, Elea- 
nor Block, Myra Colieii, ^hlrJ;e^y Dopkin, Sylvia 
Feltlinaii. Marjorie Heriiiaii, .\ii<lrey Hop)). .Icaiinc 
Ka]>lan, Mildred Hadin. Irene Seller, Ruth Siiiir, 
A'iviaii Snielkinsoii, (lloria Waldnian, Kstelle Wolo- 
wit/. Until \V()l])oii. 

Pi^KDcKs: Rlioiia Heneseh, Evelyne Bressler, Bev- 
erly Brody, Anne Freeman, Lucille Gorfiiie, Kuth 
Levy, ILiiniah Lee Needle, Rosahelle Reiser, Jean 

^'aloin, i-orraine Zeniil. 



First tow: Hiivlin, Ui-rm.iii. lilnck, ('ulii-n, l)u|ikiM. I'Vliliiiaii, llcriiuin, Hupi). Scmiiil roir: K:ipl,iii. liailiii. Sclu-r, Sliiir. Siiiflkinson, 

W:ililiiiaii. Wolfson, Wolowitz. 




250 



AROUND THE HILL 




The mid-campiis tunnel was a favorife rendezvous. 
DiehVs Orchestra gave Thursday tea-dances all summer. •'During the halves'' at the Rossborough. 




Various local establishiiinit.s were centers of 
att ruction. 

Parties ircrc nliolesowelj/ enjoi/eil lii/ all. 

Siiiiir entertained their date.i at fratentiti/ 
liiin.\-e.i (Inrnuj internii. s:\-ion. 

The dorm boi/.s cooked in their rooms 
trhen the proctor'.t hack was turned. 

Thi.s line looks act null i/ an.rious to eat. 




Bert Williama tries to "get in the swim" as the rats 
prai/ for rain. 

Students found it hard to drag themselves awatj from 
the Junior Prom and hoard the u-aiting street cars. 

Friday afternoon ironing in the dorms preceded the 
week-end dances. 



The instructor crpected all chemistry crperiments to 
he written up individually. 



A puhlic .^have was a douhly effective method of hazing. 



The girls tool: a physical fitness program. 



253 




This air view, taken just before the luiii on i>rirate Jli/iiifi. slioies the eaiii pus approximaielii as it is now. 
The neir arniorij is just l)ei)itj started In'hind the Adniinistraliim Ijuildin;/ at the riijht. The stadium is in the 
lower riyht-hand corner and the junction of College ^Lveniie and the lioulerard can he seen in the lower center. 
From there the campus crtends ojf t'l the upper left. 





The freshnKiu tuij-af-war team tmitjed to rictori/. 



Ill i-aicitniut rats were tiiren a "practical" hair cut. 



APPRECIATION 

Mr. O. Raymond Carrixgton, faculty adviser, 
alumnus and artist, whose valuable advice and many 
hours of labor helped make this book the success 
it is. 

Mr. Harry Lavelle and Mr. Edward Huttox, 
of the Tliomseri-EIIis-IIutton Company, whose aid 
and cooperation in printing this volume were indis- 
pensable. 

ISIr. C. Gordon Brightman, of the Jalui and Oilier 
Engraving Company, for his aid in layout, picture 
selection, and copy presentation. 

Mr. Harry Baliban, ]\Ir. M. ^NIerin, and ]Mr. 
Pinkerton, of the Mcrin-Baliban Studios, for their 
fine portraits in spite of great production handicaps. 

Mr. a. Bodine, of the Baltimore Snn, for his many 
fine pictures. 

Mr. Julian Chisholm, University of Maryland 
Photographer, for the many hoiws of extra time he 
spent on our work. 

The Staff of the Lucky Bag, for its time and 
interest in selecting our Miss Maryland of 1943. 

. . . and to the staff of the Terrapin, and all those 
students and faculty members whose extra effort 
made this publication possible. 



^255 



INDEX 



Admiiiislration Officers 


1(1 


A^'riciiltiire. < Olli'i^e of 


,!!l 


A.I.Ch.K. 


I7!» 


A.l.E.K 


18(» 


Ali)lia Chi Sitfina 


84 


Ali>lia Dilta I'i 


'iii'i 


Ai|)lia ICpsiloii I'i 


'2^27 


Alpha ( iaiiiiiia Hho 


'2 1 -2 


Aljjha Lanihda Delta 


S.") 


Alpha LaiiihdaTaii 


•2 Hi 


Alpha Oiiiicroii Pi. 


•214 


Alpha I'si Oinena 


!)I 


Alpha Si<;iiia 


'2."iO 


Alpha Tail Oiiicfia 


•2(t'2 


Alpha XiD.lta 


^li'^i 


Al|)ha Zeta 


S'2 


Arts and Science 


IS 


A.S.C.K. 


17!) 


A.S.M.E 


17,S 


Aiitiiinii Carnival 


IDIi 


lian.i. Shi.iciil 


Kit 


Hapl i>l Si iidirit I riion 


i(;7 


Haskelhall 


1 IS 


IJeauties 


1 U) 


i$eta Alpha I'si 


so 


Ik'ta (iaiiiiiia Sijinia 


S7 


Block and Hridic 


17.5 


Hoard of Rej^ents 


!» 


Uoxinff . . 


114 


Husiness and riil)lic 




Ad mi nisi rat ion. College of. , 


37 


IJvrd, rrcsidcnl 


8 



1()8 
1-2S 
140 
1,5!) 



Canlcrhnry ( inl) 

Cheerleaders , 

Civilian Defense 

( Icf and Key 

Cdllenialc ('handier of 

Conunercc 1 715 

Daydodf^jcrs Clni) 177 

Dean of Men II 

Dean of Wonicn 1 1 

Dedicalion l 

Delta Delia Delia 240-'2 H 

Delta Sinnia I'lii •^2IO-'21 I 

Diainiiiidbuch- lS(i 

Divisions 

Administration . 10 

(lovernmenl and 

Or^'ani/.ations. ... \\'.\ 

S])()rlsand Military M.5 



1 )<)rmilories. \\ omen 

I'Mncation, College of 

Knfjineerinn, Collej^e of 

Koothali 

K()otlif;ht Clul) 

Fraternities 

Freshman Officers. 

Frosh ^■ersus S(>])h 

Fnhire Farmers of America . . 

(■arnnia I'iii Beta 
(icrnian ( lul) 

( iradnates 

(Iraduate School Conncil 
(Iranjie, Stndent 

Ilillel Fonndation 

Homec-omin^; 

Home Kconomics Clnh 

IloiTie Fcononiics, Collejie of 

Inlerfraternily Conncil 
I nlcrnal ioiiaj McJal ions 

.luniors 

.Innior Prom 

Ka{))ia Al|>lia 

Ka|i])a Ka])|)a (ianinia 

Ka]>])a Delta 

Lacrosse 

I.andxia ( hi .Mpiia 

Latch Key . 
Lntheran Clnh 

Marjiarel HrenI Dormitory. . 

MHook .". .. 

Men's (lice Clul) 

MethodisI Clnh 

Militarx' Division 

Miss Maryland 

Mortar Hoard 

\ e \\ 1 n M n ( I n 1 1 

Nurses 

Nursing;, School of 

Old Line 

< Hd Line Network 
( )mi(ron Delia Kappa 
( (micron Nm 
Orchestra. Student 

ran-IielConncil 
I'crsliinj; Hilles 
Phi Alpha 

I'll! Dcltii Thrla 



18-2 
4!! 

V.) 

101 
1.5 t 
lid 
7.5 
74 
17.5 

'2.'!(i 

17;{ 

IS 

1-2 

I7<i 

171 
107 

ISl 
.57 

1!>4 
17-2 

()!) 
70 

'2(U 
'2.'!4 
'246 

1'2'2 
214 

80 
16<) 

18^2 
1!)() 
1(!'2 
10!) 
1 -2!) 
144 
78 

170 

(J.S 

188 

Kil 

70 

s:i 

1(1(1 

'2.'{0 
I.SS 
■2-20 

i!)(; 



Plii F'ta Sii;nia 


86 


Phi Kapi)a Phi 


i)-i 


Phi Kappa Sigma 


226 


Phi Si^'ina Ka|)])a 


... .208 


Phi Signni Si<;ma 


.248 


Pi Delta Epsilon 


88 


Pi Kiijijia 


218 


Presltylerian ( 'lid) 


168 


Piil)li(atioiis Hoard 


. 183 



167 



Helifiioiis Life Committee . 

Hiding Clul) 174 

Rifle Team 139 

Rossl)oroiii;h Clul) 1.57 

Rnshin" Front 22!) 

Scahhard and Blade 137 

Seniors (i7 

Senior Officers 67 

Siuiiia Ali)ha Mu 224 

Siijma Al|)lia Omicron 81 

Simiia Chi 198 

Sii;iiia Tan F])silon 90 

Siyiua Kapp:i . 23!) 

Siuma Xu 206 

Si^Miia Tan F^psilon 90 

Si<,'nal Corps 136 

S.ALA.C 1.58 

So])homores 72 

Sorority Rushing. . 229 

SiianishChil) 181 

!).5 

140 



S])()rts Division 

S.d.A 

StiidenI Cirange 176 

Student IJfe 

Student Life Committee. . . 

S.M.A.C 

Sorority Rushing . 

Tan Beta Pi 

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Trihnle to Men in .\rnied 

Forces 7 

We.irers of tlu' "M" I-2S 

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Women's Ciioriis 163 

Women's Committee 148 

W (iMicn's Sports l'2() 



251 

13 

158 

229 

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222 
184 
201 

ISO 



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17-2 



256