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Full text of "Testimony of Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam. Hearing"

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TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



HEARING 



BEFORE THE 






COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



EIGHTY-THIKD CONGEESS 

FIRST SESSION 



JULY 21, 1953 



Printed for the use of the Committee on Un-American Activities 



INCLUDING INDEX 




POBL 



UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
43620 WASHINGTON : 1954 



Boston Public Library 
Superintendent of Documents 

APR 2 8 1954 



COMMITTEE OX UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

United States House of Representatives 

HAROLD H. YELDE, Illinois, Chairman 
BERNARD W. KEARNEY, New York FRANCIS E. WALTER, Pennsylvania 

DONALD L. JACKSON, California MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri 

KIT CLARDY, Michigan CLYDE DOYLE, California 

GORDON H. SCHERER, Ohio JAMES B. FRAZIER, Jr., Tennessee 

Robert L. Kunzig, Counsel 

Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., Counsel 

Louis J. Russell, Chief Investigator 

Thomas W. Beale, Sr., Chief Clerk 

Raphael I. Nixon, Director of Research 

li 



EXHIBITS 



Page 

Oxnam Exhibit Xo. 1. — Committee on Un-American Activities memo- 
randum, "Information from the files of the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, United States House of Representatives, subject: G. Bromley 
Oxnam" 3594 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 1-A. — Partial bibliography of books, pamphlets, and 
adresses by Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam, with particular reference to 
communism 3590 

Oxnam Exhibit Xo. 2. — Washington Post, April 5, 1953, A Velde Com- 
mittee File Dissected, article by G. Bromley Oxnam Opp. 3598 

Oxnam Exhibit Xo. 3. — Massachusetts Council of American-Soviet 
Friendship, affiliated with the National Council of American-Soviet 
Friendship, letterhead dated December 15, 1943, listing executive 
board, with Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam as chairman 3607 

Oxnam Exhibit Xo. 4. — National Council of American-Soviet Friendship, 
Inc., letterhead dated March 13, 1946, listing officers and on reverse side, 
the sponsors, in which group the name of Bishop G. Bromlev Oxnam is 
included 1 3608 

Oxnam Exhibit Xo. 5. — Knoxville Journal, Sunday, Xovember 3, 1946, 
pages 8 A and 9 A, article. Who Told the Truth About Oxnam's Red 
Organization Connections? Opp. 3610 

Oxnam Exhibit Xo. 5-A. — Letter, dated August 18, 1953, written to Rev. 
D. B. Cooper, The Methodist 'Church, Fries, Va., by T. Otto Nail, 
editor, the Christian Advocate, Chicago, 111 3610 

Oxnam Exhibit Xo. 5-B. — Letter, dated August 22, 1953, written to Rev. 
T. Otto Xall, editor, Christian Advocate, Chicago, 111., bv Rev. D. B. 
Cooper, Fries, Va I 3611 

Oxnam Exhibit X'o. 6. — -Los Angeles Times, April 26, 1923, pages 1 and 2, 
articles headed, "Teachers Committees Quiz Board Candidates," "Shall 
Radical Head Schools?", and "Oxnam Says He Is Not a Radical" 3612 

Oxnam Exhibit Xo. 6-A. — Letter, dated April 26, 1923, written "To the 

Editor," Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, Calif., By G. Bromley Oxnam. 3618 

Oxnam Exhibit Xo. 7. — Daily Worker, December 1, 1947, page 3, article 
headed, "Leaders in Arts, Sciences Hit Pix Purges," including letter 
of which Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam is listed among the signers protesting 
the firing of the 10 Hollywood writers and directors who were cited for 
contempt Opp. 3624 

Oxnam Exhibit Xo. 8. — San Francisco Chronicle, Tuesday, December 2, 
1947, page 21, article headed, "Film Firings 'Censorship', PCA Warns," 
describing a letter from the Progressive Citizens of America, directed to 
the Motion Picture Association, among the signers of which is listed 
Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam, protesting the firing of the Hollywood 10__ 3625 

Oxnam Exhibit Xo. 9. — Daily Worker, September 24. 1937, page 6, article 
headed, "Ambassador Dodd To Speak at Protest Rally Against Tokyo 
Invasion of China." describing rally to be held on October 1, 1937, at 
Madison Square Garden, under auspices of the American League Against 
War and Fascism and the American Friends of the Chinese People. In- 
cluded among a committee of 38 which sponsored the meeting is listed 
Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam 3626 

Oxnam Exhibit Xo. 10. — Xew York Times, Saturday, October 2, 1937, 
article headed, "Japan Denounced at Rally of 10,000," describing rally 
in subject of Oxnam Exhibit Xo. 9, including Bishop G. Bromley 
Oxnam as one of the sponsors 3627 

Oxnam Exhibit Xo. 11. — American League for Peace and Democracy, 
letterhead, dated April 6, 1939, on reverse side of which Bishop G. 
Bromley Oxnam is listed as a national sponsor 3638 

in 



rV EXHIBITS 

Page 
Oxnam Exhibit No. 12. — The Protestant Digest, June-July 1941, summer 
digest, page listing contents, among which is shown Bishop G. Bromley 

Oxnam as the writer of an article 3641 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 13. — The Protestant, August-September 1942, where- 
in G. Bromley Oxnam is listed among the editorial advisers 3642 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 14. — Soviet Russia Today, July 1945, page 3, wherein 

Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam is listed as a recent contributor opp. 3646 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 15. — A Churchman Evaluates the Crimea Confer- 
ence, article by Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam, as submitted for publication 

in the magazine, Soviet Ru ssia Today 3648 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 16. — Soviet Russia Today, April 1945, article by 
Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam, entitled, "A Churchman Evaluates Yalta," 

published from manuscript described in Oxnam Exhibit No. 15 Opp. 3649 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 17. — National Federation for Constitutional Liber- 
ties, press release dated December 26, 1941, regarding an open letter to 
the President and the Congress opposing antilabor legislation, and listing 

Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam among the signers 3657 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 18. — National Federation for Constitutional Liberties, 
"A Message to the House of Representatives," sponsored by organization 
at the beginning of the 78th Congress (1943), opposing the renewal of the 
Dies committee, printed in leaflet form, and included among eight pages 

of signers to this message is listed Rev. G. Bromley Oxnam 3659 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 19. — Medical Bureau and North American Com- 
mittee To Aid Spanish Democracy, letterhead dated July 6, 1938, 
listing Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam as a national sponsor of that 

organization 3669 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 20. — Medical Bureau and Committee To Aid Spanish 
Democracy, letterhead dated February 2, 1939, listing Bishop G. 

Bromley Oxnam as a sponsor 3670 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 21. — American Committee for Spanish Freedom, 

letterhead dated January 21, 1946, on reverse side of which Bishop 

G. Bromley Oxnam is listed among the sponsors of that organization., 3678 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 22. — The Protestant Digest, June-July 1941 (same 

issue as exhibit No. 12), editorial entitled "Monsignor Sheen and 

Clerical-Fascism," by Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam 3681 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 23. — National Committee To Abolish the Poll Tax, 
letterhead dated March 8, 1946, on reverse side of which Bishop G. Brom- 
ley Oxnam is listed as a sponsor of that organization 3687 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 24. — Committee on Militarism in Education, letter- 
head dated October 1, 1935, listing Bromley Oxnam as being a member 

of the national council of that organization 3691 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 25. — An Open Letter to President Roosevelt, dated 
April 22, 1943, protesting the deportation of Harry Bridges and asking 

that he be granted citizenship, listing Bishop B. Bromley as a signer 3703 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 26. — General Amnesty Committee, hand bill adver- 
tising a general amnesty mass meeting for all political and class war 
prisoners, Wednesday, April 13, 1921, and listing Rev. G. Bromley Ox- 
nam as a speaker for the meeting 3721 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 27. — Los Angeles Times, June 2, 1923, article headed, 
"Bob Schuler Also Quits Mr. Oxnam," containing letter dated June 1, 

1923, to Rev. G. Bromley Oxnam, from Bob Schuler 3722 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 28. — Los Angeles Times, April 26, 1923, reprint of a 
notice of a protest mass meeting against the Criminal Syndicalism Act, 
indicating meeting date, February 11, and listing Rev. G. B. Oxnam as 

a speaker 3723 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 29. — Los Angeles Times, May 19, 1923, article 
headed, "Oxnam Working With Sinclair, School Board Candidate To 

Preside at 'Protest' on I WW Eehalf " 3723 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 30. — American Civil Liberties Union, Southern 
California Branch, letterhead dated June 14, 1923, listing Rev. G. 

Bromley Oxnam as a member of the local committee 3755 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 31. — Methodist Federation for Social Service, letter 
dated March 17, 1928, signed by G. Bromley Oxnam, and listing his 
office with that organization as executive secretary 3756 



EXHIBITS V 

Fag* 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 32. — Methodist Federation for Social Service, letter 

dated April 12, 1946, directed to Members of Congress in protest of 

contempt citation for the Joint Anti-Fascist Refugee Committee, signed 

by Jack McMichael, executive secretary and listing among the officers 

of the MFSS, G. Bromley Oxnam as vice president 3757 

Oxnam Exhibit Xo. 32-A. — Summary of Impressions Following Visit to 
Russia, Summer 1934, from Diary Record of August 25, 1934, by Bishop 
G. Bromley Oxnam 3757 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 33. — Methodist Federation for Social Action, 1947 
nomination ballot for executive committee, listing Bishop G. Bromley 
Oxnam as a candidate for member-at-large 3758 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 34. — Methodist Federation for Social Service, letter- 
head dated October 24, 1928, listing G. Bromley Oxnam as executive 
secretary of the national committee 3764 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 35. — Letter of resignation from the office of vice presi- 
dent of the Methodist Federation for Social Action, dated June 9, 1947, 
to Bishop Lewis O. Hartman from G. Bromlev Oxnam 3765 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 36. — The Epworth Herald, March 3, 1934, article 
headed, "A Decision Must be Made!" by Winifred L. Chappell, secretary 
of the Methodist Federation for Social Service 3766 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 37. — Parade-the Sunday picture magazine, June 28, 
1953, article, "How To Uncover Communists," by Bishop G. Bromley 
Oxnam Opp. 3766 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 38. — Board of Missions and Church Extension of the 
Methodist Church, letter dated May 29, 1947, which went to Methodist 
ministers, enclosing Jerome Davis' book, "Behind Soviet Power," and 
signed by G. Bromley Oxnam and R. E. Diffendorfer; reverse side of 
letter imprinted with favorable reviews of this book 3774 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 38-A — "The Reply the Reader's Digest Refused To 
Publish," bv Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam, with added statement by Dr. 
Ralph E. Diffendorfer 3776 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 39: — Committee on Un-American Activities memo- 
randum, Information From the Files of the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, United States House of Representatives: Subject — Jerome 
Davis, and dated July 15, 1953 3780 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 40: — National Council of American-Soviet Friend- 
ship, committee on education, bibliography on the Soviet Union for 
teachers and students 3788 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 41: — Los Angeles Daily News, March 29, 1952, 
advertisement of Unitarian Public Forum, Friday, April 4, 1952, with 
Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam on the subject, The Clerical Threat to 
American Freedom 3795 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 42: — American-Russian Institute, booklet, An Amer- 
ican Churchman in the Soviet Union, by Rev. Louie D. Newton, with 
introduction by Bishop G. Bromlev Oxnam 3797 

Index __ 3805 



Public Law 601, 79th Congress 

The legislation under which the House Committee on Un-American 
Activities operates is Public Law 601, 79th Congress [1946], chapter 
753, 2d session, which provides : 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States 
of America in Congress assembled, * * * 

PART 2— RULES OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

Rule X 

SEC. 121. STANDING COMMITTEES 



17. Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine members. 

Rule XI 

POWERS A»D DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 



(q) (1) Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(A) Un-American activities. 

(2) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommittee, 
is authorized to make from time to time investigations of (i) the extent, char- 
acter, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States, 
(ii) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American propa- 
ganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic orign and attacks 
the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitution, and 
(iii) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress in any neces- 
sary remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to the 
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such investi- 
gation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such times 
and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, has 
recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance of 
such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and to 
take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued under the 
signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any 
member designated by any such chairman, and may be served by any person 
designated by any such chairman or member. 

RULES ADOPTED BY THE 83D CONGRESS 

House Resolution 5, January 3, 1953 



Rule X 



STANDING COMMITTEES 

1. There shall be elected by the House, at the commencement of each Con- 
gress, the following standing committees : 

******* 
(q) Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine members. 



VI 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM VII 

Rule XI 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 



17. Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(a) Un-American Activities. 

(b) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommittee, 
is authorized to make from time to time, investigations of (1) the extent, char- 
acter, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States, 
(2) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American propa- 
ganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin and 
attacks the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitu- 
tion, and (3) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress 
in any necessary remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to the 
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such investi- 
gation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such times 
and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, has 
recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance 
of such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and 
to take such testimony as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued under 
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any 
member designated by such chairman, and may be served by any person desig- 
nated by any such chairman or member. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



TUESDAY, JULY 21, 1953 

United States House of Representatives, 

Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Washington, D. C , 

PUBLIC HEARING 

The Committee on Un-American Activities met, pursuant to call, at 
2 : 30 p. m,, in the caucus room, 362 Old House Office Building, Hon. 
Harold H. Velde (chairman) presiding. 

Committee members present: Representatives Harold H. Velde 
(chairman), Bernard W. Kearney, Donald L. Jackson, Kit Clardy, 
Gordon H. Scherer, Francis E. Walter, Morgan M. Moulder, Clyde 
Doyle, and James B. Frazier, Jr. 

Staff members present : Robert L. Kunzig, counsel ; Frank S. Tav- 
enner, Jr., counsel; Louis J. Russell, chief investigator; Raphael I. 
Nixon, director of research; George C. Williams, investigator; and 
Mrs. Juliette Joray, acting clerk. 

Mr. Velde. The committee will be in order. 

Let the record show that present are all nine members of the Com- 
mittee on Un-American Activities. 

I desire to make an announcement before the following of the usual 
course of procedure in this hearing. 

Before commencing today's hearing, and in keeping with the rules 
of committee procedure, the Chair would like to make a brief state- 
ment relative to the purpose of the hearing. This may not be neces- 
sary in the present instance, but I feel that committee rules should be 
followed in every respect. The committee has as a witness today 
Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam of Washington, D. C. Bishop Oxnam is 
here at his own request and in keeping with an established policy of 
this committee to grant a hearing to any citizen who asserts that he 
has been in any way adversely affected by virtue of any action taken 
by the committee. This is the fundamental right attached to Amer- 
ican citizenship, and the committee welcomes such testimony. 

Bishop Oxnam has informed the committee that information in its 
files relating to him is in error and that he has been in some way 
harmed as a result of public disclosure of such information. To the 
end that the facts of the allegations may be determined, the committee 
extended an invitation to Bishop Oxnam to appear, which invitation 
was accepted. The committee has made a conscientious effort to carry 
out in all respects the obligations imposed upon it by the Congress. 
These obligations include the charge to investigate subversive activ- 
ities, organizations, and propaganda and to report its findings to the 

3585 



3586 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Congress together with appropriate recommendations for remedial 
legislation. 

The hearing today should not be interpreted by anyone as an inves- 
tigation initiated by the Congress into the field of religion. It is in- 
cidental to this hearing that the witness is a man of the cloth. No 
inference should be drawn from this hearing as to the loyalty or disloy- 
alty of any member of the clergy. The committee has never insti- 
tuted a hearing into any specific establishment of American life, 
whether the institution be labor, education, government, or entertain- 
ment, but has quite properly restricted its investigations and hearings 
to the area of individual representatives of those activities. 

The committee will continue to confine its investigations to those 
individuals whose activities have brought them under Federal scru- 
tiny. A Member of Congress has the individual right of expression 
guaranteed him by the Constitution of the United States. "When act- 
ing in his individual capacity as a Member, his expressions are subject 
only to his own personal convictions. However, the statements of an 
individual Member are not the statements of the committee and can- 
not be interpreted as such unless the Member identifies his remarks as 
representing the committee position or opinion. 

For that reason the Chair will not entertain any personalities in 
today's hearing, although the witness and several committee members 
concerned have engaged in controversy. It is the assumption of the 
Chair that the witness will likewise be expressing his own opinions and 
not those of any church or political organization. Since the present 
House Committee on Un-American Activities was organized at the 
commencement of the present session of Congress, it has been the pol- 
icy of the committee not to admit open oral statements for the record. 
Written statements have been received by the committee on occasion, 
some of which have later been admitted into the record. However, in 
light of the somewhat unusual circumstances attending this hearing, 
and the witness' insistence that he be permitted to make such a state- 
ment, an exception to the general rule has been voted by the committee, 
and the witness today will be permitted to make an opening statement 
not to exceed 15 minutes in duration. 

It should be understood that this does not establish a precedent in a 
matter of written or oral statements and that the standard procedure 
of the committee in this regard will be adhered to in all cases in the 
future. 

It should be said at this point that Bishop Oxnam and the commit- 
tee staff have maintained close liaison in all initial stages leading to 
today's hearing. Counsel for the witness has conferred with counsel 
for the committee, and every effort has been made to accomodate the 
witness in his reasonable requests. 

Following the completion of the prepared statement by Bishop Ox- 
nam, the committee will proceed in regular order to the customary 
interrogation. 

The hearing will be concluded today and the Chair requests that 
counsel, committee members, and the witness be as brief as possible 
during the interrogation. 

The committee is concerned only with determining the accuracy of 
information in its possession relative to the matters under consid- 
eration. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3587 

It is not concerned with factional disputes between various church 
groups or personalities. If the information contained in the commit- 
tee files is inaccurate or misleading, it should and will be corrected to 
reflect the truth or falsity of the data. 

I should mention also that the members of the audience are here as 
guests of the Congress of the United States. In order to conduct this 
hearing in a proper, efficient manner, it is necessary that we maintain 
order. So, therefore, no indications of approval or disapproval of 
anything any member of the committee says or any witness says will 
be tolerated by the committee. 

Mr. Counsel, will you please call the witness. 

Mr. Ktjnzig. Will Bishop Oxnam please step forward? 

Will you please raise your right arm to be sworn, sir? 

Mr. Velde. In the testimony you are about to give before this com- 
mittee do you solemnly swear that you will tell the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Bishop Oxnam. I do. 

Mr. Kuxzig. Will you kindly state vour full name for the record, 
sir? 

TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM, ACCOMPANIED BY 
HIS COUNSEL, CHARLES C. PARLIN 

Bishop Oxnam. My name is G. Bromley Oxman. 

Mr. Kunzig. And your address, please. 

Bishop Oxnam. 100 Maryland Avenue NE., Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Kunzig. I see that you are accompanied by counsel. Will coun- 
sel please state his name and address for the record? 

Mr. Parlin. My name is Charles C. Parlin. My address and office 
is 20 Exchange Place, New York City. I am a member of the New 
York bar. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Counsel, may I interrupt just a moment? It has 
been the usual custom of the committee to ask the witness whether or 
not he objects to being photographed and being televised and also to 
having his picture taken by the newsreels. I believe that you have 
already stated that you are willing to have your pictures taken. 

Bishop Oxnam. I have no objection, Mr. Chairman. I take it that 
the battery of cameras will not remain here through the entire state- 
ment. 

Mr. Velde. Well, I'll ask the cameramen, in order that we might fol- 
low the usual procedure, to take their pictures at the present time and 
then desist after the hearing has commenced. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Parlin, it is my understanding that you have re- 
ceived copies of the rules of procedure of this committee and that you 
fully understand the rules and the position of counsel in this congres- 
sional hearing. Am I correct, sir ? 

Mr. Parlin. I have received the rules, and I think I understand 
them. 

Mr. Kunzig. I believe at this time, sir, Bishop Oxnam has a pre- 
pared written statement to read. 

Mr. Velde. Yes, and I would ask the members of the committee to 
please not interfere" with the bishop's reading, and wait until after 



3588 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

the bishop has finished with his statement to question him, if you 
have any questions concerning it. 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you. Mr. Chairman and members of the 
committee, I have requested opportunity to appear voluntarily before 
this committee, in public session, to secure redress for the damage done 
to me by the release of information in the files of this committee. I 
deeply appreciate the grant of this privilege. Such releases, made at 
various times for a period of nearly 7 years, have contained material, 
much* of which is irrelevant and immaterial, some of which is false 
and some of which is true, but all prepared in a way capable of creat- 
ing the impression that I have been and am sympathetic to com- 
munism, and therefore subversive. 

These files, so released, have been used by private agencies as evi- 
dence of Communist sympathies. A member of this committee appa- 
rently drew that conclusion. Speaking on the work of this committee, 
upon the floor of the House of Representatives itself, he said : 

Bishop Bromley Oxnam has been to the Communist front what Man-O'-War 
was to thoroughbred horseracing, and no one except the good bishop pays much 
attention to his fulminations these days. Having served God on Sunday and 
the Communist front for the balance of the week over such a long period of 
time, it is no great wonder that the bishop sees an investigating committee 
in every vestry. If reprinting Bishop Oxnam's record of aid and comfort to 
the Communist front would serve any useful purpose, I would ask permission to 
insert is here, but suffice it to say that the record is available to any Member 
who cares to request it from the committee. 

If a member of the committee can be so misled by this material, 
it is no wonder that uninformed citizens are similarly misled. 

When I declare, "I believe in God, the Father, Almighty," I affirm 
the theistic faith and strike at the fundamental fallacy of communism, 
which is atheism. I thereby reaffirm the basic conviction upon which 
this Republic rests, namely, that all men are created by the Eternal 
and in His image, beings of infinite worth, members of one family, 
brothers. We are endowed by the Creator with certain inalienable 
rights. The State does not confer them; it merely confirms them. 
They belong to man because he is a son of God. When I say, "I be- 
lieve in God," I am also saying that moral law is written into the 
nature of things. There are moral absolutes. Marxism, by definition, 
rules out moral absolutes. Because I believe the will of God is re- 
vealed in the Gospel of Christ, I hold that all historically conditioned 
political, economic, social, and ecclesiastical systems must be judged 
by the Gospel, not identified with it. This is to say, I reject com- 
munism, first, because of its atheism. 

When I declare, "I believe in Jesns Christ, His only Son, our Lord," 
I am affirming faith in a spiritual view of life. By so doing, I re- 
pudiate the philosophy of materialism upon which communism is 
based and thereby undermine it. I reject the theory of social de- 
velopment that assumes social institutions and even morality are 
determined by the prevailing mode of production. When I accept 
the law of love taught by Christ and revealed in His person, I must, 
of necessity, oppose to the death a theory that justifies dictatorship 
with its annihilation of freedom. I am not an economist, but have 
studied sufficiently to be convinced that there are basic fallacies in 
Marxian economics. Believing as I do that personality is a supreme 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3589 

good and that personality flowers in freedom, I stand for the freeman 
in the free society, seeking the truth that frees. I hold that the free- 
man must discover concrete measures through which the ideals of re- 
ligion may be translated into the realities of world law and order, 
economic justice, and racial brotherhood. 

As a result of long study and of prayer I am by conviction pledged 
to the free way of life and opposed to all forms of totalitarianism, 
left or right, and to all tendencies toward such practices at home or 
abroad. Consequently, I have been actively opposed to communism 
all my life. I have never been a member of the Communist Party. 
My opposition to communism is a matter of public record in books, 
numerous articles, addresses, and sermons, and in resolutions I have 
drafted or sponsored in which powerful religious agencies have been 
put on record as opposed to communism. It is evidenced likewise in 
a life of service and the sponsorship of measures designed to make the 
free society impregnable to Communist attack. 

Loyalty to my family, my church, and my country are fundamental 
to me ; and when any man or any committee questions that loyalty, I 
doubt that I would be worthy of the name American if I took it lying 
down. 

There are three considerations I desire to lay before this committee : 

First, this committee has followed a practice of releasing unverified 
and unevaluated material designated as "information" to citizens, 
organizations, and Members of Congress. It accepts no responsibility 
for the accuracy of the newspaper clippings recorded and so released ; 
and insists that the material does not represent an opinion or a con- 
clusion of the committee. This material, officially released on official 
letterheads and signed by an official clerk, carried no disclaimer, in 
my case, and the recipient understandably assumed it did represent a 
conclusion. I am here formally to request that this file be cleaned up, 
that the committee frankly admit its inaccuracies and misrepresenta- 
tions, and that this matter be brought to a close. 

It is alleged that the committee has files on a million individuals,, 
many of whom are among the most respected, patriotic, and devoted 
citizens of this Nation. This is not the proper place to raise questions 
as to the propriety of maintaining such vast files at public expense, but 
it is the proper place, in my case, to request that the practice of releas- 
ing unverified and unevaluated material, for which the committee 
accepts no responsibility, cease. It can be shown that these reports 
are the result of inexcusable incompetence or of slanted selection — the 
result being the same in either case — namely, to question loyalty, to 
pillory or to intimidate the individual, to damage reputation, and to 
turn attention from the Communist conspirator who pursues his nefar- 
ious work in the shadows while a patriotic citizen is disgraced in public. 

The preparation and publication of these files puts into the hands of 
irresponsible individuals and agencies a wicked tool. It gives rise to- 
a new and vicious expression of Ku-Kluxism, in which an innocent per- 
son may be beaten by unknown assailants, who are cloaked in anonym- 
ity and at times immunity, and whose whips are cleverly constructed 
lists of so-called subversive organizations and whose floggings appear 
all too often to be sadistic in spirit rather than patriotic in purpose.. 



3590 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

I had planned at this point to set forth specifications of what I be- 
lieve is false. The rules of this committee give me but 15 minutes for 
this statement. The specifications cannot be listed in 15 minutes. 
Therefore, I must respectfully request the committee members, or its 
counsel to question me concerning some of the material released by 
the committee, namely: 

First, a release dated July 3, 1946, in which it is alleged I sponsored 
The [American] League Against War and Fascism, and in which it is 
suggested by implication that I would substitute dialectical material- 
ism for religious freedom. 

Second, a release dated September 4, 1946, in which it is alleged 
that I am "referred to as a collectivist bishop," that I presided at a 
meeting addressed "by one B. Gebert, president of the Polish section 
of the International Workers' Order," that I have been "associated 
with several groups in which Langston Hughes has also held mem- 
bership." 

Third, a release dated September 13, 1950, in which quoting the 
Daily Worker as authority, I am alleged to have been invited by the 
Government of Yugoslavia to tour that country, in which I am alleged 
to have written an article for Stalin for a magazine called Classmate. 

Fourth, releases of different dates alleging I have delivered an ad- 
dress to the prisoners of the Indiana State Reformatory, February 
10,1930. 

Fifth, a letter from Mr. Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., dated March 21, 
1953, relative to covering letters alleged to accompany releases. 

Sixth, a release sent out by the chairman of this committee dated 
March 31, 1953. 

Seventh, letters from 2 members of this committee, 1 dated March 
19, 1953, and the other alleging the committee did not release this 
material, dated March 13, 1953. , 

If I may be asked questions concerning these items, I will leave it 
to any fair-minded man whether I have been misrepresented. In this 
connection I would like to file with the committee a bibliography cov- 
ering my personal position relative to communism. 

Oxnam Exhibit No. 1-A 

Partial Bibliography of Books, Pamphlets, and Addresses by Bishop G. 
Bromley Oxnam, With Particular Reference to Communism 

1. The Episcopal Address, delivered to the General Conference of the Methodist 

Church, Boston, Mass., May 1948 (Methodist Publishing House, pp. 33^16.) 

2. How Protestants Fight Communism, Look magazine, October 11, 1949. 

3. How to Uncover Communists, Parade magazine, June 28, 1953. 

4. On What Basis Can Our Differences With Russia Be Solved? America's 

Town Meeting of the Air, September 30, 1947, published by the Town Hall, 
Inc. 

5. The Protestant Contribution to a Christian Peace. An address delivered at 

Reformation Day Service, Cleveland, Ohio. October 27, 1946. 

6. Resolution adopted by the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal 

Church, Columbus, Ohio, 1936, on Social and Economic Questions. 

7. The United Front, a Menace, in syndicated column entitled "Facing Facts, 

September 18, 1935. 

8. Prayer offered at the American-Soviet Friendship Rally, Madison Square 

Garden, New York City, November 16, 1947, appearing in Readers' Scope. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3591 

9. The Christian's Vocation, published by the Woman's Division of Christian 
Service of the Board of Missions and Church Extension of the Methodist 
Church, 1950, Selections, pp. 37, 38, <m-69, 81, 121-128, 49-51. 

10. By This Sign Conquer, A Study in Contemporary Crucifixion and Crusade, 

the Merrick Lectures delivered at Ohio Wesleyan University. Abingdon- 
Cokesbury Press. 1942. pp. 107, 172, and 17.!. 

11. Youth and the New America, published by the Council of Women for Home 

Missions and the Missionary Education Movement, New York, 1928, pp. 107, 
10S; and 110. 

12. The Church and Contemporary Change, the Earl Lectures at the Pacific 

School of Religion, Macmillan Co.. 1950, chap. I. 
18. The Stimulus of Christ, Fleming- H. Revell. 1948. pp. (..",-67. 

14. On This Rock, The William Henry Hoover Lectureship on Christian Unity, 

Harper & Bros.. 1951, pp. 44 and 45. 

15. The Ethical Ideals of Jesus in a Changing World. Ahingdon-Cokesbury Press, 

1941, pp. 12-14, 101, 103-105, 112. 

16. Russian Impressions, privately published by Jesse Ray Miller, Los Angeles, 

Calif., 1927, pp. 88 and 92. 

17. Facing the Future Unafraid. Fleming H. Revell, 1944, pp. 20-22. 

18. Preaching in a Revolutionary Age, The Lyman Beecher Lectures on Preach- 

ing, at Yale University, Abingdon-Cokesbury Press, 1944, pp. 95, 98, 99, 
195, and 196. 

19. Labor and Tomorrow's World, the Fondren Lectures at Southern Methodist 

University. Abingdon-Cokesbury Press, 1945, pp. 131. 132. 135. 

20. Personalities in Social Reform. The Ezra Squier Tipple Lectures at Drew 

Theological Seminary. Abingdon-Cokesbury Press. 1950, pp. 7 and 8. 

21. Behold Thy Mother. The Macmillan Co.. 1944. pp. 41 and 42. 

22. Summary of Impressions Following Visit to Russia. Summer of 1934, from 

diary record of August 25, 1934. 

Second, when I had the honor of debating this issue with the Hon- 
orable Donald L. Jackson, a member of this committee, he said, ''The 
committee, in its work, accumulates all pertinent information rela- 
tive to any given individual whose name is listed in the files. That 
is the only way by which one can determine the philosophical bent of 
any given individual." 

Can the philosophy of an individual be determined by a scissors- 
and-paste process of cutting out clippings that damn \ Why did the 
individual who clipped derogatory statetments concerning me fail 
to clip such announcements as the following: My appointment by the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff to visit the Mediterranean Theater and the Euro- 
pean Theater of Operations during the war; or my appointment by 
Secretary Forrestal as a member of the Secretary of the Navy's Civil- 
ian Advisory Committee; or the announcement that the Navy had 
awarded me the highly prized Certificate of Appreciation for services 
during the Avar; or that I had been invited to be the guest of Arch- 
bishop Damaskinos, then Regent of Greece, and that the King of 
Greece had awarded me the Order of the Phoenix ; or that I had repre- 
sented the American churches at the enthronement of the Archbishop 
of Canterbury; or that I had been appointed by the President as a 
member of the President's Commission on Higher Education ; or 
that I was chairman of the Commission approved by the President 
to study postwar religious conditions in Germany? This might be 
called pertinent information. I have held the highest offices it is in 
the power of fellow churchmen to confer upon me, such as the presi- 
dency of the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America. 
I am one of the presidents of the World Council of Churches, perhaps 



3592 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

the highest honor that can come to a clergyman. I hold positions of 
responsibility in the church I love and seek to serve, among them sec- 
retary of the Council of Bishops. 

We cannot beat down the Communist menace by bearing false wit- 
ness against fellow Americans. The Communist wants a divided 
America, an America whose citizens are suspicious of each other, an 
America without trust, an America open to infiltration. I believe this 
committee will wish to end a practice that plays into Communist 
hands. 

Third, Congress is considering proposals for the reform of investi- 
gating committee procedures. It may, at first, seem drastic to propose 
that the so-called public files be closed out, but is there any need of 
any file other than the investigative files as they have been recently 
described ? Could not all the material that is of value in the public 
files be included in the investigative files ? If, for purposes of educa- 
tion or exposure, the committee decides that public statements must 
be made, is there any reason why a careful statement that will stand 
scrutiny cannot be made by studying the material in the investigative 
files? The committee informs us that it does not vouch for the ac- 
curacy of the public files, that everything in those files is available 
to the public elsewhere. Why, then, should public money be spent 
in maintaining such public files ? Would it not be well for the commit- 
tee to appoint a subcommittee to investigate its own files and those 
who compiled them, and to secure answers to questions such as the 
following : How much duplication is there in the public and investiga- 
tive files of this committee and the files of the FBI ? Is the FBI 
better equipped to get the facts on real subversives? Why was ap- 
pendix IX withdrawn from the public, and why is it under lock and 
key in the Library of Congress? Was it because of inexcusable in- 
accuracies and vicious slanting of material? How much of it is still 
the core of the public files? If there is real misunderstanding, would 
it not be well to ascertain who is misinforming whom and why? 

I respectfully ask the committee to order that my file be corrected 
so as to tell the truth, if that is all that can be done ; that it publicly 
announce its mistakes in my case ; but better, that the public files be 
closed out, and the releases of unverified material described herein be 
discontinued. When Mr. Jackson discovered that he had misunder- 
stood the chairman of this committee with reference to an announce- 
ment concerning possible investigation of churchmen, he in the manly, 
the xVmerican, the Christian way apologized on the floor of the House. 
It takes a big man to admit a fault. I respectfully request Mr. Jack- 
son to apologize on the floor of the House for his unprecedented and 
untrue statements made there concerning me. I will be the first to 
shake hands with him and to call the incident closed. 

I conclude : I believe the churches have done and are doing far more 
to destroy the Communist threat to faith and to freedom than all in- 
vestigating committees put together. I think the chairman of this 
committee, after a friendly interview, concurred publicly in that 
statement when I made it in his presence. This committee might well 
have the cooperation of millions of citizens who belong to the churches 
if it would cease practices that many of us believe to be un-American 
and would turn itself to the real task and the real threat. But those 
citizens will never cooperate in practices that jeopardize the rights of 
freemen won after a thousand years' struggle for political and re- 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3593 

ligious freedom. They will cooperate effectively with agencies every- 
where that honestly seek to build the free society, where freemen may 
worship God according to the dictates of conscience, and serve their 
fellow men in accordance with Christ's law of love. 

Mr. Velde. Thank you. Bishop. 1 do regret that you did engage 
in personalities with a member of this committee in violation of my 
instructions in my opening statement. However, we are in a public 
forum here, discussing things frankly, and 1 believe it is the American 
way to handle this situation. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, will you allow me to apologize if 
I did? The statement was sent to your counsel before the hearing 
and discussed, and I thought that there was no objection since Mr, 
Jackson was speaking upon the work of the committee itself. If 1 
violated the rules, I am very, very sorry and hasten to apologize. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Jackson. 

Mr. Jackson. May I say that I take no personal exception. While 
I do not agree with some of the premises upon which the witness bases 
his contentions, I feel that he should be given every opportunity to 
speak his mind freely. 

Mr. Velde. Thank you, sir. 

We do have some additional questions relative to some of the mat- 
ters which are in your file and some of the matters which have been 
mentioned by you, and we, of course, as representatives of the Ameri- 
can people, want to clear these up. I feel the onl}- way for the com- 
mittee properly to understand the whole situation and for the record 
to be correct is to go into these matters thoroughly in this hearing 
today. Therefore, I direct counsel to ask questions and to follow the 
normal course of procedure of this committee. 

Mr. Counsel, will you please begin your questioning of the witness, 
and I will ask that the witness, as nearly as possible, confine the an- 
swers to the subject matter of the question. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, the original report prepared by pred- 
ecessors to this committee has been put in issue by the witness in the 
statement he just delivered. He also made reference to a detailed 
reply to that report in which he presented, point by point, his personal 
explanations. 

Mr. Chairman, I feel that in the interest of fairness and in the 
interest of creating a record which will present the full picture of 
all viewpoints concerning the matter being heard here today, we 
should incorporate into the record both the statement put out by the 
predecessors to this committee and the answer which Bishop Oxnam 
has caused to be published. Therefore, I request at this time that both 
these documents be incorporated in toto into this record, marked 
"Oxnam Exhibits Nos. 1 and 2." 

Mr. Jackson. One question, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Yes. 

Mr. Jackson. Do I understand this to be the original report and the 
reply of the witness as reported in a local newspaper? 

Mr. Kunzig. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Velde. Is that correct, Counsel ? 

Mr. Kunzig. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Velde. Without objection the material will be admitted into 
the record at this point. 

43620—54 2 



3594 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

(The statement and reply referred to were marked "Oxnam Ex- 
hibits Nos. 1 and 2" and were received in evidence as Oxnam Exhibits 
Nos. 1 and 2.) 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 1 

Information From the Files of the Committee on Un-American Activities 
United States House of Representatives 

Subject : G. Bromley Oxnam 

Public records, iiles, and publications of this committee reveal the following 
information concerning the individual named above: 

The Washington Star of February 10. 1930, carries a news item datelined 
Indiana State Reformatory, February 9. The article refers to a speech made by 
Dr. G. Bromley Oxnam, president of De Pauw University, to the inmates of the 
reformatory. Dr. Oxnam is reported as decrying the practice of nations in 
entering into secret treaties, and declaring that the slogan of "America First" 
must be interpreted as meaning America first in 'world service, and not "to be 
the first to go into Mexico to steal oil lands." 

A letterhead of the League for the Organization of Progress dated February 2, 
1931, reflects the name of G. Bromley Oxnam, president, De Pauw University, 
as a member of the board. The League for the Organization of Progress has; 
never been cited as a front organization. It was an international organization 
founded in Paris in 1912, with headquarters in Bern, Switzerland. The American 
office was located at Yellow Springs, Ohio. The league has long been out of 
existence. 

A letterhead of the National Religion and Labor Foundation, dated 1932, 
reflects the name of G. Bromley Oxnam as a member of the national committee. 

The National Religion and Labor Foundation, which has not been cited as a 
front organization, was founded in 1932 by Francis J. McConnell, Jerome Davis, 
and John A. Ryan. The official publication was Economic Justice. The first 
issue of Economic Justice (November 1!)32) printed a cartoon of Jesus by Art 
Young, New Masses cartoonist. With the cartoon of Jesus appeared these words : 
"Reward for Information Leading to Apprehension of Jesus Christ. Wanted — 
for Sedition, Criminal Anarchy, Vagrancy, and Conspiring to 'Overthrow the 
Established Government.' " The National Religion and Labor Foundation 
apparently is still in existence. There is no record in the public files of this 
committee show inn' Dr. Oxnam's disaffiliation with that organization. 

On January 30, 1933, the Fellowship of Reconciliation released a petition 
addressed to the President of the United States urging the recognition of the 
Soviet Union. The name of G. Bromley Oxnam. president of De Pauw Uni- 
versity, appears as one of the signers. 

The Fellowship of Reconciliation, allegedly a strictly pacifist organization, was 
organized in 15)1.") and is the American section of the International Fellowship 
of Reconciliation. Organized under the alleged motive to reconcile people, it 
maintains that class war is necessary and that all must work for the reorganiza- 
tion of society, and replace the present system of individual capitalism by 
collective ownership. The public records and files of this committee contain no 
further reference to any affiliation of Bishop Oxnam with the Fellowship of 
Reconciliation. 

A letterhead of the Committee on Militarism in Education, dated October 1, 
1935, reflects the name of Bromley Oxnam as a member of its national council. 
Kirby Page, a member of the national council, testified before the Special 
Committee on Un-American Activities on June 15, 1943. He stated that the 
Committee on Militarism in Education was opposed to military education in 
civilian schools. The following is quoted from a letter of the Committee on 
Militarism in Education dated September 22, 1930: 

* * * Militarism in education goes on, accumulating power and tradition, 
aided by War Department money and resources, * * * by propaganda, glorified 
by every device of military romance in literally hundreds of American colleges, 
universities, and high schools, building that blind, unreasoning, emotional 
response to military symbols which has so often swayed and deceived men in a 
crisis. Against this glorification of the military method and machine, the 
peace movement has accomplished little as yet. The spearhead of the struggle 
against militarism in schools and colleges has been this committee. It has waged 
peace with intelligence and courage, showing not only the zeal of the peace advo- 
cate but the sound methods of the social scientist. Specializing on this one issue, 
it occupies a unique place in current peace endeavors, duplicating no other 
agency. * * * 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3595 

The Daily Worker of September '24, 1937, page 6, contains an article about 
a meeting to be held at Madison Square Garden on October 1. This meeting, 
held under the auspices of the American League Against War and Fascism and 
the American Friends of the Chinese People, featured William E. Dodd as the 
speaker. The name of Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam appears as a sponsor of the 
meeting. 

Letterheads of the Medical Bureau and North American Committee to Aid 
Spanish Democracy dated July 6, 1938, and February 2, 1939, list the name 
of Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam as a national sponsor. 

A photostatic copy of a letterhead of the American League for Peace and 
Democracy dated April 6, 1939, reflects the name of Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam 
as a national sponsor. The June-July 1941 issue of the Protestant Digest 
reflects the name of G. Bromley Oxnam as an editorial adviser. A Call to the 
Congress of American-Soviet Friendship, to be held November 6-8, 1943 reflects 
the name of Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam as a sponsor of that congress. 

The Daily Worker of October 6, 1S'44 (p. 9), carries a news item concerning 
a rally sponsored by the National Council of American-Soviet Friendship, cele- 
brating the 27th anniversary of the founding of the Soviet Union and the 11th 
anniversary of diplomatic relations between the United States and the Soviet 
Union. Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam is listed as one of the sponsors. 

A letterhead of the National Council of American-Soviet Friendship dated 
March 13, 194(5, reflects the name of Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam as a sponsor. 

A letterhead of the Massachusetts Council of American-Soviet Friendship dated 
December 15, 1943, reflects the name of Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam as chairman 
of the executive board. 

The Washington Daily News of April 7. 1947. contains a news item concerning 
the National Council of American-Soviet Friendship. In the article, the name of 
Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam is listed as one who had withdrawn from the organi- 
zation. The date of Bishop Oxnam's withdrawal is not mentioned. 

On December 26, 1941, the National Federation for Constitutional Liberties 
issued a press release to the effect that an open letter had been addressed to the 
President and the Congress of the United States, opposing antilabor legislation 
as a dire threat to the unity essential for the defeat of Japan and her axis part- 
ners. The name of Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam appears as one of the signers of 
the letter. 

In January 1943. the National Federation for Constitutional Liberties addressed 
a message to the House of Representatives. This message was a plea for the dis- 
continuance of the Special Committee on Un-American Activities. One of the 
reasons given was : "The Dies committee, by continuing and repeated attacks on 
our great ally, the Soviet Union, has utilized its resources to obstruct the coopera- 
tion of the United Nations, which is a prerequisite for victory." The name of 
Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam appears as one of the signers of the message. 

The Citizens Victory Committee for Harry Bridges issued an undated press 
release in regard to an open letter addressed to President Roosevelt by more than 
300 clergymen throughout the country, urging that the deportation order against 
Harry Bridges be set aside. The letter, dated April 22, 1943, and signed by the 
Rt. Rev. Edward L. Parsons states, in part, "Clearly, Mr. Bridges has aroused the 
animosity of an influential minority because of his successful union activities 
and his political and economic beliefs." The name of the Rt. Rev. G. Bromley 
Oxnam, Methodist bishop, Boston, Mass., is listed as one who joined with Bishop 
Parsons in signing the letter. 

The Citizens Victory Committee for Harry Bridges, located at 1775 Broadway, 
New York City, was 1 of 4 such organizations created for the defense of Harry 
Bridges. The others were : The Citizens Committee for Harry Bridges at 1265 
Broadway, New York City : the Harry Bridges Defense Committee of San Fran- 
cisco,, with branches in Los Angeles, Seattle and Portland; and the Harry 
Bridges Victory Committee of San Francisco. 

The Attorney General of the United States has listed the Citizens' Committee 
for Harry Bridges as a Communist organization. The same classification applies 
to the other three organizations. 

A letterhead of the American Civil Liberties Union, dated February 8, 1946, 
reflects the name of Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam as a member of its national com- 
mittee. A Special Committee To Investigate Communist Activities in the United 
States (Fish committee), in a report dated January 17, 1931, said: 

The American Civil Liberties Union is closely affiliated with the Communist 
movement in the United States, and fully 90 percent of its efforts are on behalf 



3596 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

of Communists who have come into conflict with the law. It claims to stand 
for free speech, free press, and free assembly ; but it is quite apparent that the- 
main function of the ACLU is to attempt to protect the Communists in their 
advocacy of force and violence to overthrow the Government, replacing the- 
American flag and erecting a Soviet Government in place of the republican form, 
of government guaranteed to each State by the Federal Constitution. 

In a report dated January 3, 1939, a Special Committee To Investigate Un- 
American Activities and Propaganda in the United States (Dies committee) said : 

The committee heard testimony with reference to the Civil Liberties Union. 
Some witnesses listed this organization as communistic, while other witnesses 
denied it was communistic. We received in evidence a number of pamphlets 
distributed by the Civil Liberties Union, which speak for themselves. From the 
evidence before us. we are not in a position to definitely state whether or not 
this organization can properly be classed as a Communist organization. 

A letterhead of the American Committee for Spanish Freedom, dated Janu- 
ary 21, 1946, reflects the name of Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam as a sponsor. 

A letterhead of the Methodist Federation for Social Service dated October 4, 
1928, reflects the name of G. Bromley Oxnam as executive secretary, while an- 
other letterhead of the same organization dated April 12, 1946, reflects the 
name of G. Bromley Oxnam as a member of the executive committee. 

The Bureau County Republican of May 18, 1939, carries a front-page story 
concerning the Methodist Federation for Social Service. The following appears 
in the article : 

Five bishops of the new unified Methodist Church in session at Kansas City 
last week alined themselves with the radical Methodist Federation for Social 
Service which conducted a conference running simultaneously for the Uniting 
Conference. Three other bishops, at meetings of the federation, were declared 
to be in sympathy with the organization, making 8 bishops favoring their cause 
out of a total of more than 40 bishops present at the Uniting Conference. While 
the number of bishops endorsing the radical organization was small in propor- 
tion to the total number, yet their influence was tremendous over the entire 
session. It was so strong that no objection to their activities was expressed 
from any quarter. The federation suffered only one defeat and that was when 
the Uniting Conference passed a motion to delete a pronouncement in favor of 
social economic planning from the discipline of the united church. 

The five bishops endorsed the federation's platform for the overthrow of the 
present capitalistic system in the United States and favored its replacement with 
a social-planning order. The pamphlets of the federation, distributed at the 
session, declare that under the new social order private ownership of property 
is to come to an end. Under their system there are to be no capitalists. Private 
property, according to the pamphlets, is to be taken over without compensation 
to the owners and operated by "useful social workers." 

Four prominent bishops of the Methodist church attended the dinner of the 
Methodist Federation for Social Service held at the YMCA Building. The 
bishops occupied seats at the speakers' table and made addresses. A fifth 
bishop. Edgar Blake, of the Detroit area, sent word that lie was unable to be 
present on account of conference work, but extended his best wishes for the 
success of the federation of which he is a member of the executive committee. 

The four bishops who made speeches eulogizing the federation are: 

Bishop Francis J. McConnell, of the New York City area, president, of 

the American Federation for Social Service. 
Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam, formerly of the Omaha area, assigned last 

week to the Boston area. 
Bishop James C. Baker, of the San Francisco area. 
Bishop Paul B. Kern, of the Nashville. Tenn.. area. 

* * * Bishop Oxnam, who as a student got his training from Dr. Harry F. 
Ward, at the Theological Institute, was the first speaker on the program. He- 
was introduced by Bishop McConnell as a man who comes out flatfooted on 
any principle for which he stands and does it without mincing words. Bishop 
McConnell said Bishop Oxnam reminds him of a railroad train which starts 
rather idly, but steams up as it goes along and gradually makes high speed at 
the climax. 

Bishop Oxnam said he thoroughly endorses the Methodist Federation for Social 
Service and the things for which it stands. He read from the masthead of 
the federation's literature the following statement, which outlines the federa- 
tion's purposes : 

"The Methodist Federation for Social Service is an organization which rejects 
the method of the struggle for profit as the economic base for society : which seeks . 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXXAM 3597 

to replace it with social, economic- planning in order to develop a society without 
class distinction ;md privily 

The economic plan referred to by Bishop Oxnam is further elucidated in the 
pamphlet containing the platform of the federation. 

On page 11 the pamphlets declare "•Social economic planni _ i give every- 
body plenty and security.'' 

On page 12 : "Under social ownership there won't be any capitalists and all th- 
returns will 20 direct to the people." 

Pase 1": "The only country that has a corn; - al economic plan is the 

ion." 

Ou page 13 the plan of the Soviet Union of Russia is again com:. n a 

pages ~he pamphlets declare private property will be taken from the 

present owners without compensation. The owners, however, are to be given 

jobs by the useful social workers and it i< said they ousht to feel grateful to be 

permitted to become a part of the planning scheme. 

Bishop Oxnam paid a high tribute r the fe -ration and to its secretary. Dr. 
Ward, whom he regarded as one of the greatest leaders in the new industrial, 
social, economic planning movement. Bishop Oxnam said that as a student he 
took dictation from Dr. Ward in the writins of some of his books known to all 
radical leaders * * *. 

. e Washing! - of November 24. 1 - - ^m date- 

lined Newark, N. J„ November 23, regarding a speech made by Bish* G B mley 

"he Newark Conference of the M 'march. Bishop Oxnam 

is reported to have denounced the Committee on Un-American Activities. He is 

quoted as saying: 

Protestants believe that the conspirators who would destroy our can 

be ferreted out and properly punished better by the painstakins an." 
procedures of the Federal Bureau of Investigation than by the heresay and 
un-American procedures of this committee. 

Bishop Oxnam was evidently referring to a pamphlet issued by the Committee 
on Un-American Activities entitled. "100 Things You Sn old Know A nt Com- 
munism and Religion." wherein it was 1 that the Meth< list Federation 
for Sodal Action, while not an official church unit, is trying to use the presl - 
of the Methodist Church to promote the line of the Communist Party. 

The Washingt 31 ember 8, 194? - • " - a news item 

datelined Buck Hills Falls. Pa.. December 8. in which Bisbor 

id that the House Committee on Ur. ties is un- 

American itself for attempting to pin the Cornmuni- - :ne churchmen 

church groups. Also. Bishop Oxnam is reported as sayinir that such 
"absurd charges" are "disguis ."- to silence men on the pulpit by threaten- 

ins to call them Communist." 

The Daily W I>ecem v er 1. 1947, at page 3. carries a news item regard- 

letter made public by the arts, sciences, and profess : the 

Progressive Citizens of ins the moti rs for 

their "shocking and degrading capitulation to the d - nsible 

House Committee on Un-American Activities." The name of Bishop G. Bromley 
Oxnam appears as one of the signers of this lett 

The \\ York Times of February 24. 1949. pases 1 and 3. contains a news 
item regarding the presentation of the annual award of the Churchman to 
Bishop Oxnam. It was reported that Bishop Oxnam said that th- U 
States must not flirt with Franco to stop Stalin. Bishop Oxnam is quoted as 
saying: "We cannot expert the common man to believe our democratic pro- 
nouncements if we make deals with dictators, or a 
economic, or ecclesiastical reaction." 

The Daily Worker of June 22. 1949. carries a news item dat- I -ton. 

June 21. to the effect that Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam assailed irressional 

witchhunts, and said : 

Freemen may well be alarmed at the action of the House un-American Activi- 
ties Committee in asking for a list of textbo* - hools an<". 
At the very moment calm and critical minds are essential, leaders in the 
of fear become hysterical and adopt procedures destructive of democracy. More 
time rfven to constructive legislation designed to demonstrate the 
of dynamic democracy, and less time to character assassination would produce 
greater benefits. 

The Washington Evening Star of May 26. 1950, carries a news item date 
Boston. May 26. Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam is reported as calling for 
n between Protestants and Catholics to meet the onslaug I : 



3598 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Bishop Oxnani addressed a letter to the Committee on Un-American Activities 
on May 11, 1950. In it, he stated that he never belonged to the American League 
Against War and Fascism. He further stated he thought it would he funda- 
mentally unfair to say he belonged to the National Council of American-Soviet 
Friendship without saying that affiliation with this organization was during the 
war, when Russia was one of our allies. 

In another letter dated May 16, 1950, Bishop Oxnarn states that the American 
Civil Liberties Union is not, and has never been, a Communist organization : 
that the Committee on Militarism in Education was never a Communist organi- 
zation ; that the Fellowship of Reconciliation is an absolute pacifist organization 
and he never belonged to it; that he did belong to the Methodist Federation for 
Social Action but no longer is a member ; that he did serve on the advisory com- 
mittee of the Protestant, but resigned. 

In the third letter he wrote to the committee, dated February 12, 1951, Bishop 
Oxnam stated that he was never a member of the American Friends of the 
Chinese People; that he was never a member of the National Federation for 
Constitutional Liberties and never signed any statement of that organization ; 
that he did authorize the use of his name by the American Friends for Spanish 
Freedom, and that he resigned from the National Council of American-Soviet 
Friendship following the war. 

(See list of cited organizations and publications.) 

Organizations and publications mentioned herein which have been — ■ 

(1) Cited by the Special Committee and/or Congressional Committee on 
Un-American Activities ; 

(2) Cited by the United States Attorney General : 
American Committee for Spanish Freedom (2) 
American Friends of the Chinese People (1) 
American League Against War and Fascism (1) and (2) 
American League for Peace and Democracy (1) and (2) 
Citizens Victory Committee for Harry Bridges (1) and (2) 
Congress of American-Soviet Friendship (1) 

Daiiy Worker (1) 

Medical Bureau and North American Committee to Aid Spanish 

Democracy (1) 
National Council of American-Soviet Friendship (1) and (2) 
National Federation for Constitutional Liberties (1) and (2) 
New Masses (1) and (2) 
Protestant Digest (1) 

Mr. Kunzig. Sir, just a few questions, a few routine questions, for 
the record. 

Would you state where you were born ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir. I was born in Sonora, Calif., August 14, 
1891. 

Mr. Kunzig. Thank you. 

Now, I should like to turn first to discuss the Council of American- 
Soviet Friendship — first the Massachusetts Council of American- 
Soviet Friendship, and also the national council. 

I have here a document marked "Oxnam Exhibit No. 3" for identifi- 
cation which is a letterhead of the Massachusetts Council of the Ameri- 
can-Soviet Friendship dated December 15, 1943, and listing the mem- 
bers of the executive board of which Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam is 
shown as chairman. (See p. 3607.) Were you, sir, chairman of that 
group, and if so, when, and would you explain how you came to be 
chairman? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir. I was chairman of what I thought was 
called the executive committee of the Massachusetts Council of Ameri- 
can-Soviet Friendship. I was chairman — I don't seem to be able to 
find at the moment the release that 

Mr. Kunzig. Take your time, sir. I know you have documents 
there. 




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TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3599 

Bishop Oxnam. That is quite all right. I was chairman of that 
group, I should say, from some time in 1942 to the time that I re- 
signed from it, I think some time in 1943. I would like to find one 
paper here if 3'ou do not mind. 

Mr. Kunzig. Go right ahead. We will wait, of course. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes: thank you, sir. 

Did you wish me now. sir, having stated the approximate dates 
there, to state my relationship to that organization? 

Mr. Kunzig. Pardon me, sir, I did not hear that. I was ques- 
tioned 

Bishop Oxnam. I beg your pardon. Do you wish me now to state 
my relationship to that particular organization? 

Mr. Kunzig. Yes ; would you please. 

Bishop Oxnam. "Would you please note the dates. We were at war. 
Russia was one of our allies. I was approached in Boston asking 
whether or not I would be interested in a small organization whose 
sole purpose would be to deepen friendship between the American and 
the Russian peoples. I stated I was interested in deepening such 
friendship. I was invited to address certain meetings. One was called 
the Salute to our Russian Ally. I think the date of that was Novem- 
ber 8, 1942. I did address that meeting. 

The other sponsors of that particular meeting — I do not wish to 
take too much time because I know this is in the record that has just 
been introduced here. 

Mr. Kunzig. Yes, it is; I want to make it clear, it is in the record 
already. 

Bishop Oxnam. Quite. I think for the public we ought to know 
that Secretary and Mrs. Cordell Hull, Lord and Lady Halifax, people 
of that kind, were likewise sponsors of that meeting. I thought I 
was in excellent company. I thought I was doing a patriotic service. 

During the time that I served with that group I believe no subversive 
act of any kind was committed by any individual related to it, and I 
believe no statement was made at any meeting that I know anything 
about that in any way would be questioned from the standpoint of 
patriotism. 

Mr. Kunzig. Bishop, you were also, as I recall, one of the spon- 
sors of the National Council of the American-Soviet Friendship as 
shown in this document, letterhead of that organization, marked "Ox- 
nam Exhibit No. 4" for identification. (See pp. 3608 and 3609.) 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir; that is correct. 

Mr. Kunzig. In other words, you were not only head of the Mas- 
sachusetts council, but you were a sponsor of the national council ? 

Bishop Oxnam. During the time I served in Massachusetts, I re- 
ceived requests to act as a sponsor of the national organization. I ac- 
cepted. I was invited subsequently to become a member of the board 
of directors. I did not accept that invitation. I was invited to cer- 
tain other service which I did not accept, and subsequently resigned, 
not only from the Massachusetts council itself, when I moved to New 
York, but also from the national council itself. 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Chairman, may I ask a question ? 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Clardy. 

Mr. Clardy. I did not get the dates clearly, Witness. Maybe coun- 
sel can tell me. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes. I was elected a chairman of the Massachu- 
setts Council of American-Soviet Friendship on April 6, 1943. I 



3600 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

mentioned 1942 a moment or two ago. I am sorry. I was looking at 
the first approach by an individual and had his date in mind. 

Mr. Clardy. That caused me to ask the question because I was not- 
sure whether I was incorrect or you were. That was the beginning 
date, and when was the end ? 

Bishop Oxnam. In August 1943, I resigned the chairmanship and 
told the group that I would not have accepted the post had I known 
it intended to undertake a financial appeal. In December 1945', it says 
in this record — I think that date was 1946. I believe this was a typo- 
graphical error. I found that my name was being continued as hon- 
orary chairman. I was then a resident of New York, having gone 
there in 1944. I wrote them pointing that out and requesting that 
be discontinued. 

Mr. Clardy. You have the letter here ? 

Bishop Oxnam. You mean my letter ? 

Mr. Clardy. That you wrote to them. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir; I can produce those letters if you wish. 

Mr. Clardy. Thank you, you have answered my question. 

Mr. Kunzig. You say you resigned because they were undertaking 
a financial appeal ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Not solely because of that. I stated that if I had 
known that this organization was going to involve raising of money 
and so on, that I could not have given the time to do it. That was 
the point that I had in mind. 

Mr. Walter. Bishop, who asked you to join the Massachusetts or- 
ganization ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I will be glad to read from a record that I have 
here, sir. 

Mr. Walter. That is in the record, so don't bother. I have not 
seen the record. 

Bishop Oxnam. I do not think it is in this record. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, I wish to say for the record that 
the 

Mr. Walter. I would like to have an answer to that question. 

Mr. Kunzig. Pardon me, sir. 

Bishop Oxnam. On November 19, Prof. Dirk J. Struik, I think his 
name is ■ 

Mr. Clardy. S-t-r-u-i-k ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
wrote suggesting that an organization be formed — 

To promote Soviet- American friendship both during wartime and in the period 
of postwar reconstruction. A better mutual understanding of the two great 
peoples is not only necessary for victory but is also a prerequisite for a lasting 
peace. 

Mr. Walter. Who is Professor Struik? 

Bishop Oxnam. He was a professor in the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology ; a professor, I believe, of mathematics. I had never 
met him before. When he extended the invitation, I asked my secre- 
tary to phone the Massachusetts Institute. They told me that he was 
a distinguished professor of mathematics. I believe they said he was 
a Dutchman. 

Mr. Walter. What has happened to him ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I do not know what has happened to him. I believe 
he has been indicted, if I recall correctly, in Massachusetts in connec- 
tion with some subversive matters. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3601 

Mr. Kearney. Is he indicted, Bishop, in connection with any espi- 
onage work ? 

Bishop Oxxam. Frankly I do not know. I have had no touch with 
him at all, and during the days there I suppose I met him a half dozen 
times. 

Mr. Walter. The fact oi* the matter is, this professor was a Rus- 
sian spy, was he not? 

Bishop Oxxam. I do not know that, and frankly do not believe it. 
I have seen nothing — I mean, I just don't know anything about it, sir, 
except what I have read in the newspapers. 

Mr. Kunzig. May I state something for the record. Mr. Walter, at 
this point? 

Mr. Walter. I don't want to interrupt. Go ahead. 

Mr. Kunzig. I should like to state for the record that Dirk J. Struik 
has been identified as a Communist Party member by Herbert Phil- 
brick, the FBI undercover man, in public hearings before this com- 
mittee July 23, 1951 ; by Dr. William T. Martin, a former Communist, 
head of the mathematics department at MIT who appeared in public 
hearings before this committee April 22, 1953; by Isadore Amdur, 
another former Communist, who is a professor at MIT who testified 
here April 22, 1953; and finally also by Dr. Norman Levinson, a 
former Communist, who appeared before this committee and who is 
also a professor at MIT and who appeared here April 23, 1953. They 
are official identifications, sir. of Dirk J. Struik. 

Bishop Oxxam. That is quite all right, but you are dealing with 
my relationship to this organization, it seems to me, and I tried to 
answer what my relationship was. and I am of the opinion that that 
organization rendered patriotic service at a time when Russia was an 
ally. I would have had nothing to do with it whatsoever if I had 
thought in any way that it had any other intention. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, also for the record, the National Coun- 
cil of American-Soviet Friendship was cited as Communist by Attor- 
ney General Tom Clark in letters to the Loyalty Review Board, 1947 
and 1918, and by the Special Committee on Un-American Activities in 
its report of March 29, 1944, as early as 1944, and by the California 
Committee on Un-American Activities in 1948. 1 



1 The Xational Council of American-Soviet Friendship was cited as Communist by 
Attorney General Tom Clark in letters to the Loyalty Review Board, released December 4. 
1947, and September 21, 1948 ; by the Special Committee on Un-American Activities in its 
report of March 29, 1944, p. 156 : and by the California Committee on Un-American 
Activities, 1948 report, pp. 321, 322, and 327. 

The California Committee on Un-American Activities, in its 1948 report, pp. 321 and 
322, described the National Council of American-Soviet Friendship as "the successor to the 
discredited Communist front, the Friends of the Soviet Union. The military alliance of 
the United States with Soviet Russia during World War II made it necessary for American 
Communists to discard its old vehicle, the Friends of the Soviet Union, and to replace it 
with the new, streamlined National Council of American-Soviet Friendship. A new tech- 
nique of Communist propagandization and amalgamation of war unity and American- 
Soviet friendship emerged. The program and purposes of the National Council of Ameri- 
can-Soviet Friendship is set forth in one of its wartime pamphlets : '* * * To promote 
better understanding and strengthen friendly relations between the United States and the 
Soviet Union as essential to the winning of the war, and the establishment of worldwide 
democracy and enduring peace'." 

The National Council of American-Soviet Friendship, through its national chairman, 
Corliss Lamont, rejected a request of the House Committee on Un-American Activities to 
examine the books and records of the organization. Mr. Lamont and executive director 
Richard Morford were subsequently subpenaed early in 1946 with instructions to produce 
the books of the organization, and the committee was again refused the records. Both 
Mr. Lamont and Mr. Morford were cited for contempt of Congress, but a grand jury indict- 
ment was returned only against Mr. Morford because Mr. Lamont had asserted that Mr. 
Morford was responsible for the books and files of the national council. Mr. Morford was 
convicted in court and sentenced to a 3-month jail term and a $250 fine. Mr. Morford was 
still listed as executive director of the organization in the Daily Worker of February 7, 
1952, p. 5. William Howard Melish was listed as chairman of the organization on a May 
9, 1949, letterhead and in the Daily Worker of January 30, 1952, p. 8 ; Dr. John Adams 
Kinpsbury was listed as national chairman of the organization in the Worker of November 
17, 1952. 



3602 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Mr. Walter. Bishop, who invited you to join the national organi- 
zation? 

Bishop Oxnam. The invitation, I think, was a form invitation 
signed by Mr. Corliss Lamont; that is my recollection, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Corliss Lamont? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes. sir. 

Mr. Kunzio. Bishop 

Bishop Oxnam. I am just wondering — I realize the impression that 
is being created here, Mr. Chairman, by this kind of procedure. I 
could read at this moment into the record, if you will allow me, a 
statement by Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower to the national council of 
this organization dated November 1945, which reads : 

American-Soviet friendship is one of the cornerstones 

Mr. Velde. Just a minute, Bishop. I think we have been overly 
fair in granting you the privilege of making a statement. 

Mr. Doyle. Mr. Chairman, I object to that ruling by the chairman. 
I think this witness ought to be privileged to read that statement by 
the President of the United States. 

Mr. Velde. All right. 

Bishop Oxnam. This was a message to the national council dated 
November 1945, from then Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower : 

American-Soviet friendship is one of the cornerstones on which the edifice of 
peace should lie built. To achieve this friendship nothing is more important than 
mutual understanding on the part of each of the institutions, traditions, and 
customs of the other. As an American soldier and lover of peace I wish your 
council the utmost success in the worthy work it has undertaken. 

Mr. Chairman, my relationship, I trust, was of similar nature and 
similar spirit. 

Mr. Velde. Certainly you should introduce anything that you want 
to, but my request was that you answer the questions that were put 
to you by counsel as closely to the subject matter as possible. 

Bishop Oxnam. I will try to do so, sir. 

Mr. Velde. In connection with the various organizations and so 
forth for the orderly decorum and procedure. 

Mr. Kearney. Mr. Chairman, do I understand that you are ruling 
that the statement just read by the bishop is not going in the record? 

Mr. Velde. No, no, certainly not. The statement certainly should 
be in the record. 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Chairman, may I address a question? 

Mr. Velde. All right. 

Mr. Clardy. Bishop, as I understand it, you were asked into the 
organization by Professor Struik without knowing anything about his 
background or his Communist connections, as I get it? 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Clardy, when he came to see me or wrote this 
letter, I had never heard of him. I did the only thing, I think, 
that a person would normally do. I did have my secretary phone the 
university to find out who he was. The answer w T as the answer I re- 
ported a few moments ago. There is sometimes an assumption that 
you make many times in these organizations, sir. I suppose we met a 
few times. I do not know the man, and if it be he is involved, as has 
been suggested here, I regret the association far more than I can 
express. 

Mr. Clardy. I am sure you do. but the point I am trying to get at 
is vou associated with him to some extent at least, but nothing that 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXXAM 3603 

he did or said alerted you to the fact that he was a Communist, as 
we have since discovered, did it ? 

Bishop Oxxam. No, sir; if he had 

Mr. Clardy. The reason I am raising that point. Bishop, is this: 
You did associate with him for some time, and the fact that he was 
engaged in some activities that were contrary to the best interests of 
the Nation even to you did not become apparent. I am suggesting 
that merely in pointing out that there is something that this commit- 
tee has a duty to perform. We discovered it. I am sorry that we did 
not discover it before you had that association, because I am sure you 
would not have associated with it had you known it. 

That is all I have. Mr. Chairman. 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you, sir. 

Mr. Velde. Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Kuxzig. Sir, I am puzzled here in one respect. You stated 
that you were active in this group, in the national council, and in the 
Massachusetts council, and you so stated in your reply, published 
in a daily newspaper here in Washington. Yet in 1946 in the Knox- 
ville Journal, is published a letter which you wrote to a Reverend 
Cooper concerning an article in which you had been accused of being a 
member of these various organizations, and your answer at that time 
was: 

As a matter of fact, I never belonged to the organizations mentioned, excepting 
the American Civil Liberties Union, and know nothing about most of them. 

(See Oxnam Exhibit No. 5, opp. p. 3610.) 

I just do not quite understand how you could say that you never 
belonged when you were talking in 1946, and in 1953 you say you did. 

Bishop Oxxam. I can explain it very easily, Mr. Kunzig. 

Mr. Kuxzig. Good. 

Bishop Oxxam. I receive from 50 to 100 letters every day. It is 
something of a chore to answer them every morning. I have been 
plagued through the years by these lists that have come in from 
Mrs. [Elizabeth] Dilling, from the Council of Christian Laymen, and 
the like, asking, "Do you or do you not belong to this or the other." 
This minister, minister of the Methodist Church, wrote me a letter 
because I was announced to speak to the Tennessee State Teachers' 
Association at Knoxville. Some evangelist there whom I do not know 
had protested my coming, and I think had even gone so far as to try 
to organize what he called "Keep Oxnam Out of Town"' clubs. 

Mr. Clardy. I did not hear that. 

Bishop Oxxam. "Keep Oxnam Out of Town" clubs. 

Mr. Sctierer. You say that was a Methodist minister? 

Bishop Oxxam. No; I say that was an evangelist who did this. 
No Methodist minister would do that. sir. I was going there to see 
Mr. David Lilienthal, my friend, at the TVA, and this letter came 
with a list of them. I dictated an answer, and, I am very sorry, I 
made a mistake in that. I said — I think it reads there — that as a 
matter of fact, I never belonged. Is that not what the statement is? 
I never belonged to any of these organizations except the American 
Civil Liberties Union. 

Mr. Kuxzig. Yes. 

Bishop Oxxam. Now, as a matter of fact, there were 2 or 3 organi- 
zations there to which I had belonged. I noted that within a. few days. 



3604 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

I wrote that minister and made a correction to read that I do not belong 
to any of these organizations except the American Civil Liberties 
Union, and that was the way the matter rested. I went there — and you 
may have noticed that two-page spread which the editor put in his 
paper after I had spoken to the teachers — and if you will note the 
reproductions that are there to evidence subversive activities, they 
include the Commission on World Peace of the Methodist Church. 

He even includes this appendix IX, which I believe the committee 
itself has withdrawn, and notes where I am listed in it ; and if you will 
note the others there, I have nothing more to say except to say I made 
the proper correction to the minister, and I think that should close the 
matter. 

Mr. Clardy. May I make a remark? Bishop, I can see Congress- 
men are not the only ones who make those kinds of mistakes. 

Bishop Oxnam. It is an embarrassing thing when one does, Mr. 
Clardy, and I am apologizing for it. 

Mr. Velde. The Chair recognizes Mr. Jackson. 

Mr. Jackson. Bishop, I realize a considerable period of time has 
elapsed since your communication with the gentleman at Knoxville. 
Do your files contain those letters which might be incorporated 

Bishop Oxnam. I wish they did, Mr. Jackson. I have moved, and 
when a bishop moves he usually has a very large file to deal with. 
If you receive 50 to 100 letters a day, you are dealing with 25,000 
letters a year, perhaps, and in 5 years it is an immense file. When I 
left Boston I cleared those files, keeping the matters that had to do 
with character problems and property and the like. Similarly when 
I. left New York. I hoped I had this file. I found that I did not. 
I telephoned this minister and I asked him — or rather I had my 
secretary telephone him and ask him — if he had these letters. He 
said he did have the letters and would send them to me. He sent one 
of them. I phoned him again and asked for the other. He tells me 
he will try to find the other, and I hope to be able to make it a matter 
of record. 

Mr. Jackson. If you do receive them, would you be kind enough to 
let the committee have them? 

Bishop Oxnam. I would be very happy to, sir. 2 

Mr. Kunzig. You undoubtedly know that the National Council of 
American-Soviet Friendship grew out of Friends of the Soviet Union, 
another organization cited by the Attorney General of the United 
States of America, and that came originally from Friends of Soviet 
Russia, another one of these organizations. Do you recall whether, 
as is stated in the Los Angeles Times — I am going back now to Thurs- 
day morning, April 26, 1923 — do you recall whether you presided and 
spoke August 30, 1922, at a meeting in Blanchard Hall out in Los 
Angeles, called by the Friends of Soviet Russia, to raise funds for the 
Russian Independent Corp., and so forth, and so on ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Would you be good enough to show me your photo- 
stat there ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Surely. I hand you a document marked "Oxnam 
Exhibit No. 6." (See pp. 3612X3617.) 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes. sir, I have a copy of that here. I will file with 
the committee from this record — which happens to be a bound record 

2 See pp. 3610 and 3.611. for letters on this subject which were inserted by Bishop Oxnam, 
and were made Oxnam exhibits Nos. 5-A and 5-B. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3605 

of the year 1923, when I was young and was foolish enough to run for 
the board of education in the city of Los Angeles — I am wiser now, 
and I do not think a minister should do that anyway, but I did not 
know better at the time. I ran for the board of education. It was 
rather a bitter campaign. I therefore have a complete record. In this 
record will be the original clipping from the Los Angeles Times and 
a letter written the next day protesting what I thought to be a very 
vicious use of my name. I never authorized my name for that meeting. 
I did not appear at that meeting. I therefore did not speak at that 
meeting. I had nothing whatsoever to do with that meeting, and I 
will be glad to show that to the counsel, or if you wish to take the time, 
I will find the letter and read it, which was addressed to the Los 
Angeles Times the day following. (See Oxnam exhibit No. 6-A, 
p. 3618.) 

Mr. Velde. Bishop, in order to save time and proceed in a regular 
manner, the committee will take — if it is satisfactory with you — your 
information under advisement and insert the pertinent parts in the 
record. 

Bishop Oxnam. I will appreciate it, sir, or I can find it shortly here. 

Mr. Clardy. May I inquire one question ? 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Clardy. 

Mr. Clardy. Did your letter of protest find its way into the [Los 
Angeles] Times also, or do you have merely the copy of the letter 
itself. 

Bishop Oxnam. I have the copy, and I cannot answer your first 
question, Mr. Clardy. The Los Angeles Times reprinted, I think, 2 
long letters addressed to it during the campaign ; I think 1 because the 
Times was of the opinion that what had been stated was libelous, and 
it therefore did reprint the letter in its entirety. However, I cannot 
answer specifically on this without checking it at the moment. 

Mr. Clardy. You could give us an approximate date so we could 
run it down in the Library of Congress. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, I can give you exactly the date, sir; in fact, 
Mr. Kunzig has the date on the photostat there. 

Mr. Clardy. We have the date of the original. I was thinking of 
any possible subsequent date. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. April 26, 1923. 

Bishop Oxnam. I think it is 1923 but I may be wrong. 

Mr. Kunzig. Your testimony is that you never were there and you 
never made any speech to this organization ? 

Bishop Oxnam. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. That is what we are here for today, to get the record 
straight now. 

Bishop Oxnam. Of course this has never been released in your files, 
in any of the releases that I have seen. This is something new to me 
as far as your files are concerned. Why this has been looked up re- 
cently, I don't know. 

Mr. Velde. Well, Bishop, of course that is exactly what we are try- 
ing to do, to straighten out the files so that they conform to the facts of 
the particular case and that is the reason we appreciate your answer- 
ing some questions and will appreciate your answering them, sticking 
as nearly as possible to the questions. 



3606 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you, sir. 

Mr. Doyle. May I ask, as a member of the committee, is this inci- 
dent something about which there lias been no release and about which 
the Bishop has had no previous information from the committee, or 
is it something about which he has had previous information from 
the committee ? I would like to know that myself. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, as far as I understand it and as I dis- 
cussed it with the Bishop some time ago, we tried to make it clear 
again and again and again in relation to the files that there are public 
files of the committee and then there are files of the committee with 
executive testimony or with confidential material in them which are 
not released to the public, all of which files were used by the com- 
mittee in any interrogation of any kind of any witness who appears 
before this committee. 

Mr. Doyle. Well, I realize that, but I do not find it has ever come 
to my attention before. 

Mr. Kunzig. These files have been available, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Chairman, may I mention that I have known 
about this and probably somewhere along the way the Bishop tossed 
a couple of bricks and I am glad to find that you did not. 

Mr. Jackson. I am confident that the Bishop has no objection to 
answering any question that may be related to the subject-matter to- 
day. That is the only way that this matter is going to be resolved. If 
information which was not contained in the public files is information 
which might in the future cause embarrassment, I think that we are 
in agreement, or at least I assume that we should be, on getting it 
straightened out at this time. 

Bishop Oxnam. Do you wish me to answer that, Mr. Chairman? 

Mr. velde. May I ask if you are willing to answer questions re- 
garding any of these organizations that you belonged to in the past? 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I came to get the files as released 
corrected, but I am very eager to have anything that anybody can 
bring up at any time during my life that anybody thinks is necessary 
to be brought out so that that matter can be cleared up once and for 
all. It is extremely embarrassing, sir, to have these matters released 
and then reprinted by private agencies to the damage of one's repu- 
tation. Therefore my answer to you, sir, is, of course. 

Mr. Velde. Certainly, and I am sure the committee members are 
agreed that they want to thank you for your cooperation in that 
regard. 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you. 

Mr. Kunzig. Before going on to another point, I offer Oxnam ex- 
hibits Nos. 3, 4, 5, and 6 in evidence. 

Mr. Velde. The exhibits will be admitted in the record. 

(The. documents referred to marked "Oxnam Exhibits Nos. 3, 4, 5, 
and 6'' for identification, were received in evidence.) 3 



3 Oxnam exhibits Nos. 5-A, 5-B, and 6-A, received from Bishop Oxnam after the hear- 
ig, were ordered to be inserted in the record by the committee. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3607 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 3 
MASSACHUSETTS COUNCIL of 

AMERICAN-SOVIET FRIENDSHIP 

a mmm «•* «• N*u*n*i e— i •* a — m m u-m »««« an nnm *«. n** v*a oh 



mi / 20 Ntjwbuty St., Beaton 16, MuHchuHlti 

Prof. Hugh w. Boob, Vto<»»im«. «nmor» mw December 16, 

Prof. Dirk J. Strulk, S*c"r-Tr*o*urw */»ww»vw. . • 



1945 



Prof. H. W. L Dona 

Dr. Albart C 

M n ay Grant 

R*v. Dana McLaon G rill nr 

William Horrttan 



J cu ph Sol*mo 

Jo**ph Suk 

Dorothea Cook Cory, Emk. 



Lr.IL. Arnold 
Mm. Edwin F. Atkln* 
Prof. J. A. C Foggrnaer A 
Prof. Goorg* O. Blrkhoff* 

mm AJic Stan* flack*** 

Ma. W. L. BovoVi 

Prof. Edger S M grnmon 

Lowrortc* G. Brook* 

Dr. Hugh Cabot 

Prof. Walter B. Cannon* 

williom H. Cory, Jr. 

Pr**. Karl T. Compton* 

Mr*. Chori** A. Cool Ida* 

R*v. Frederick M Blot* 

D*on Lucy Fronklln 

Serge Gopoachkln 

Dr. Bernord I. Goldberg 

Mr*. J. B. Gordon 

Prof. Horrlion Horlcy 

Williom Harrl*on 

Prof. Williom E. Hocking* 

Prof. Howard Mumford Jem 

Mr*. Fanni* Bowdiich Ken 

Dr. S*rg* Kouawvlnky* 

Rlchord Lin*l*y 

Prof. Klrtley F. Mather* 

Prof. F. Molthl*«**n 

AI*iond*r Meyendorff 
Prof. Gaorg* R Mind" 

Alon R. Morw 

Mr*. John R. Nlchef* 

Julio Swift Ovi» 

Prof. Rolph Borton P*rry* 

Mn. William Z. Riplrv 

Dr. Goorg* Sarton 

Rt. R*v. Henry K. Sherrill* 

Robe. Jowph S. Shubow 

Mr*. Arthur A Shurcllrf 

Jowph I. Seitert 

Nlchelo* Slanlmeky 

Ellhu D. Stan* 

Wemn S. Sturgi* 

Nlcholot Vokor 

Mr*. Andrew N. Window 

Dr. Mary E. WooWy* 



Dear Sirs and Brothers i 

The November 14th meeting held at Symphony lfcll to 
our Council was an exciting demonstration of .£••»?££. 
for American-Soviet friendship by Massachusetts citisene. 
S-vShU greeting to the meeting, Oov. »» t0 »?!»" »*":•• 
•The paet of Mo. 00. heralds e new era in 1 n* e "»* 1 "£i tll-r 
relations. We can say to the Russian people that together 
we will go forward to victory and lasting peaoe . 

Close, friendly collaboration between the U.S.A. and 
the US S.R. Is indispensable in carrying out the «ecl- 
Sons of the Moscow Conference. The American labor more- 
m en? with its millions of organized workers, can play . 
tremendous role in implementing these decisions. 

A Ion* list of American labor leaders, headed by 

Snel. to which Massachusetts labor eent delegates. 
Tn^erih Salerno, of the Massachusetts State CIO was a 
f."Sef sJeXer! Among those who sent fleeting, was 
Daniel Tobin, national head of the Teamsters Union. 

The Trade Union Committee of the «""«*»•«"" ?°, UB " 
oil will be glad to furnish speakers for * rle { "P° rt " 
to your uniona on the New York Congress Proceeding a, and 
information about the work of the trade union committee 
of our Council. 

•We hope to hear from you. 




Tr'Y&UAAMtf 



TTaternall^ yuurs, 



uopwa/3 



3608 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 4 

(Part 1) 

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF AMERICAN-SOVIST FRIENDSHIP, INC. 



114 • e i t 32nd (tract 



Chairman 

Corlili Umont 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 

Richard Mortord 
SECRETARY am] TREASURE* 

Prof. Hanry Pratt Falrehild 

VICE CHAIRMEN 

Or. Arthur Up ham Pop. 

William Morrii, Jr. 

Rav. William Howard Maliih 

IOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Harland Allan 

Zlarto talolovic 

Cyril Cath 

Thaodor. Sayar 

Mary Mclaod Barhun. 

Harvay Wilay Corfeatt 

John O. Crana 

Prof. Dorothy Douqlat 

fret Laalia C. Dunn 

I. Z. Gddb^o 

Thomat L Harria 

Raymond C. Inoanafl 

M.ilip J. Jaffa 

Uon Urol 

Samwal B. Laavla 

Howard McKanta 

6aorga MarahaH 
William L McFatrldfa 
John Middlatoti 

Dr. Emily Plaraoa 

Ra». Adam Oaytrn Powa* 

Joaaph P. Salty 

M. I. Shaman 

Harman Shumlln 

Dr. Hanry L S-o^wr 

Edwin S. Smith 

Jaaalca Smith 

Dr. Vilhialmur Stafanaua 

Crahj Vincant 

Hadwa Wall., 



«.w yo,k 16. B . ». a murr4y hill J-2080 

•tent. IS, 1946 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3609 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 4 
(Part 2) 



SPONSORS OF THE NATIONAL COUNCIL OF AMERICAN-SOVIET FRIENDSHIP. INC. 



Irving Abremson 

Louis Adamic 

George F. Addas 

Maiwell Anderson 

John Taylor Arms 

Dr. Frank AydaloHa 

Hon. Jqjeph Clark Baldwin 

Euge*e fc. «Wn«H 

Ho*. William U 8att 

Mai B*dacht 

Mn. Alise S. Bal e s ter 

William Rose Ben*t 

Tha Metropolitan Banjamin 

Or. Hanry Lambart Bibby 

Prof George 0. Birkhoff 

Mn. Lows Bloch 

Mrs. Anita Block 

Or. Sophoaisba §r»ck*<iridg* 

Simon Brainei 

Van Wyck Broob 

fraf. E. W. Burg** 

John P. Burka 

Hon. Arthur Capoar 

Owjrks Chaplin 

Hon. Otcar L Chapman 

Or. Rob*rt C. Cfethlar 

William F. Cochran 

Hon. John M. Coffee 

Or. Hanry S. Coffin 

Or. Karl Taylor Contptoa. 

Aaron Copland 

Norman Corwin 

Joseph Curraa 

Jo Davidson 

Hon. Jotaph E. Davia* 

Or. H.rbart Jon* Davit 

Hugh OaLacv 

Dr. Monro* t. Oeuttch 

Or. Staph** Daggen 

Dr. C. A. Dykjtra 

Prof. Albart Einstain 

Rav. Frank May Eliot 

Mai Epetein 

Or. MTIdred FeirchlTd 

Or. Robart D. Frnld 

Lion Feuchtwanger 

Rav. Joijph F. Ratchar 

Homar Folks 

Wanda Gag 

Dr. W. Horjlay Gentt 

Dr. Caleb F. Gatas. Jr. 

Dr. Thomas S. Gate* 

Daan Christian Gauss. 

Ben Gold 

Dr. Mortimer Grave* 

Dr. Harry Grundfast 



Vr. AMca Hamilton 
Hon. Learnad Hand 
Mn. J. Bordan Harriman 
Moss Hart 
William Hellman 
Dr. A. D. Henderson 
Mrs. Thomas N- Hepburn 
Dr. LatKe Pincknay Hill 
Prof. William Emast Hocking 
Dr. Walter M. Horton 
langsron Hughes 
Dr. Walter Hutlihon 
Hon. Harold L. Ickes 
Hon. Stanley M. Isaacs 
Dr. Millard H. Jencks 
Prof. Howard Mumford jones 
Dr. Lewis -Webstar Jones 
Prof. Lours C. Karpinski 
Helen Keller 
Rockwall Kant 
Dorothy Kanyon 
Dr. John A. Kingsbury 
Serg* Komsevirzky 
Hon. Fiorello H. LeGuerdie 
Mrs. Thomas W. Lamont 
H. Carrmgton Lancaster 
WiJIiam W. Lancaster 
Dr. Irving Lengmuir 
Dr. Emil Lengyel 
Prof. Gilbert N. Lewis 
John F. Lewis, Jr. 
Emil F. Ludwig 
Prof. Robert S. Lynd 
Clifford T. McAvoy 
Judge Lois Mary McBride 
Maurice Maeterlinck 
Fritz Mahler 

Prof. William M. Mattsoff 
Or. Thomas Mann 
Paul Manshlp 
Frank X Mirtel 
Raymond Massay 
Or. Kirtley F. Mather 
Lewis Merrill 
Dr. George R. Mirvpt 
Mrs. Lucy Sprague Mitchell 
Dr. Wesley C. Mitchell 
Charles Michael Mirzell 
Pierre Monteui 
Mme Pierre Monteui 
Bishop Arlhur W. Moulton 
Hon. James E. Murray 
Dr. Philip C. Nash 
Or. Robert Hastings Nichols 
Eugene O'Neill 
lisnop 5'. Aromley OinenT* 



Dr. M„i,on Edwards Park 

Dr. Frederick Douglas Patterson 

Bishop Malcolm E. Peabody 

Hon. Claude Pepper 

P«-of. Ralph Barton Perry 

Dr. E. C. Peters 

Dr. John P. Pete's 

Henry W. Pope 

Michael Quill 

Ar.ton Refregier 

Elmer Rice 

Wallingford Riegger 

Paul Robeson 

Col. Raymond Robins 

Earl Robinson 

Reid Robinson 

Harold J. Rome 

Josoph A. Roton 

Joseph A. Salerno 

Hon. Leverett Saltonstall 

Hon. Sumner Sewall 

Miles M. Sherover 

R». Rev. Hanry K. Sherrill 

Raymond P. Sloan 

T>. P. A. Sorokin 

Marwell S. Stewart 

Canon Anson Phelps Stokes 

Leopold Stokowskl 

Reymond Gram Swing 

Gerard Swope 

Genevieve Tabouis 

Mills Tan Eyck 

Hon. Elba,rt 0. Thomas 

R. J. Thomas 

Dr. Mai Thorak 

S. A Tron* 

Rt. Rev. Henry St. Georg* Tuckar 

Philip H. Van Gelder 

R. E. Van Horn 

Mary van Kleeck 

Prof. George Vernadsky 

8.shop W. J. Wells 

Dr. Harry F. Ward 

Leroy Waterman 

Mai Weber 

D'. Henrv N. Wieman 

Dr. C. C. Williams 

Dr. Charles F. Wishert 

Hon. James H. Wolfe 

Dr. Mary E. Woolley 

0'. Mt< Yergan 

Pes" Mary Yost 

Or. J F, Zimmerman 

0'. J J. Zmrhal 

L»ane Zugsmith 

Dr. Vladimir Kosma Zworykin 



43620 — 54- 



3610 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 5-A 



Christian Advocate . . . 



740 North Ruih Street, Chicago II, Illinois 



T. OTTO NALL, Editor 



LOVICK PIERCE a»d |. IOCAR WASMAIAUCH PvbMihiiit Af< 



CHANT | VEBHULST 
Managing Editor 

EDWIN H. MAYNARD 
N«WI Editor 

GABRIEL I HUKKALA 
Art Edrfar 



August i<>, i;?3 



Reverend D. B. Cooper 
The Methodist Church 
Fries, Virginia 

My dear Brother Cooper: 

In the aftermath of the Cxnasi I'.enrinp before tl-o :, ouse 
Committee on Un-Arerican Activities, the letters which bishop • 
Oxnam wrote to you when yoD were in Tennessee have cone into 
discussion. I believo that in the testimony i<ir.hop Cxnan said 
that he did not lonpjer have copies of these letters. 

I an wonierinn .Aether you have such copies, and 
particularly the second letter which he wrote to you correcting 
a mistake that had been made in 'J e first one. If you have a 
copy of this letter I would be plad to have you send it to me. 

If ynu do not have a copy I wonder if you recall vhether 
the Knoxville paper, I think it was the Sentinel, made the 
correction following Pishop Oxnam 's action in supplyinr addi- 
tional data to you? Your response in this r.atter will help us 
all greatly. 

/Very tru] 

(/ '" , 

-. Otto Hal), Olitor 




T0K:dc 




• n, 



3 i iipll 






- 



3 ; 3 











C 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3611 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 5-B 
August 22. 196* 



Rrr. T. Otto Hall, Editor 
Cnrifitlsn Advocate 
740 North Rush Street 
Ode ago 11, Illinois 

Dear Bro. Hall i 

In reference to your Inquiry of the two letterSBlshep Onta 
wrote no In 1946, I do not h»r« thea. 

The first letter X found and returned to Bishop Omen, be* 
the aooond letter was evidently lost as X eannot find It la ay fllea. 

•Why did Bishop Oxnaa write ae then! - The Knorrllle Journal 
was attaokin* hla frequently In 1946* Copies of theae lettera I, of 
■y own aooord, sent Bishop Cxnaa, that he night know about It* 
he, of course, naturally wrote to thank ae, and In the first letter 
he aade a stateaont whleh X re*d to the Knorrllle Dlstrlet Vttnl store • 
Meeting. Tve Knorrllle Journal ,gtyi a faw hours laser*, pheasd — 
requesting this letter for publlelty. X refused to let thea have It, 
but allowed thea to quota ae as to the content of letter. Thla they 
published the following Sunday, perxiape In October, 1946. 

a shop Oxnaa wrote ae a seeond letter, laaedl&tely, on seeing 
quotation In Knorrllle Journal froa his first letter, correcting 
his flrat letter. X read this to the saaa Knorrllle Dlstrlet Min- 
isters' Meeting (Methodist), X do not know whether it wee published 
In either Knorrllle Journal or Knorrllle Sentinel* If they asked aa 
for It, I would hare given thea the Information, but X wee net seeking 
publlelty nor appointed by Bishop Cxnaa to apeak for hla* All Journals 
referring to Bishop Oxnaa were sent hla by ae for hla lnferaatien. 



Bishop Onwa'i seeond letter of correction aald in effect i 
i 
Civil 



□iiiwp uxnu) • mm 

'I do not belong to any of these organ! sat ions except the laorleta 

Ilrll Liberties Union,* 



Any additional statement should eoac froa Bishop >' xnaa. 
We appreciate your defense of hla, whoa we regard as the greatest lead* 
in Metitodisa and Protestantlsa today. 



Vary alaeerely your*. 



D. B, Cooper 



Copy to i Bishop lxn*n 







3612 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 6 

(Los Angeles Times, April 26, 1923.) 
"Teachers' Committees" Quiz Board Candidates 

RADICAL QUESTIONS AMONG THOSE PROPOUNDED; STENOGRAPHERS TAKE DOWN 

ANSWERS 

As apart of their campaign to elect their own board of education it was learned 
yesterday that leaders of the politically active group of city teachers, representing 
less than 10 percent of the teaching staff of the city schools, sent "quizzing conf- 
mittees accompanied by stenographers, to interview candidates for the board 
of education. Prominent among the questions propounded were interrogatories 
designed to bring out the candidate's attitude on radical subjects The replies 
Were carefully taken down by stenographers of committee members 

Apart from the unprecedented spectacle of teachers seeking to name a board 
of education by such methods, several of those interviewed expressed the opinion 
that the manner in which the questioning was done violated the spirit, if not 
the letter of the law designed to protect candidates from such procedure 

Some of the questions propounded in these interviews, while committee mem- 
bers waited with ready pencil to note the answer, related to educational matters 
Others were purely political and noneducational, as, for instance • 

"The Governor's budget." 

"Availability of Nation and New Republic to schools, or continued discrimina- 
tion against them." 

"Presentation of both sides of important public questions in school " 
The first question has no application to administration of the citv school 
system and relates to a matter with which a member of the Los Angeles Board 
of Education has no concern. 

RADICAL SUBJECTS 

Reference to the "availability" of the Nation and the New Republic, radical 
publications barred from the schools because of their editorial policies durin- the 
participation by the United States in the world war, was apparently inspired 
by refusal by a majority of the board of education several days ago to reinstate 
the magazines. Several of the candidates interrogated by the teacher committees 
said they had never read either publication and, hence, were not in position to 
discuss the matter; whereupon, in at least one instance, the "interviewer" 
recommended the magazines. 

tnTvi?-ii M ^ quest 1 i 1 on .^presents with even greater emphasis the extreme lengths 
to vhich the smal minority of teacher-radicals are prepared to go in their move 
to dominate school affairs of Los Angeles ; for, in this instance, "presentation of 
both sides of important public questions in school" means nothing more or less 
than throwing classrooms open for radical propaganda 

Most of the candidates "interviewed" by the committees were seen in their 
homes. One of the interrogating committees went so far as to ask the candidate 
to sign a document containing answers to the questionnaire which, in addition 
to the questions mentioned, contained the following topics: 

OTHER TOPICS 

Domination of the schools by private interests. G. S Business 

Open expressions of opinion by individual board members in open session 

Secret sessions, when justified ; frequency 

Publicity: Annual reports, bulletins, correction of misstatements in the press 
ing uTmachinerr '' FUnCti ° n ° f thG b ° ard ' r ^ ardin § » i means of influenc 

Professional employees : Where to find persons to fill vacancies in the highest 
Places such as business manager, superintendent, assistant superintendent 
psychological experts, etc. Promotion, how determined? AlmTssfon of new 
teachers from outside of the city or State. On what terms' 1Si,lon or new 

Noneducated employees : How shall wages be determined? Opinion on pa vine 
the minimum union labor wage. p 1Jd - mg 

Means of securing highest efficiency and economy 

Business administration : Relation of board to experts employed 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3613 

Means of improving the business administration. 

What to be done with the reports of the business experts on business reorgan- 
ization (Avery report). 

What to be done regarding future bond issues ; in order to render them less 
frequent ; in order to give public great confidence that money so raised is properly 
spent. 

At least one candidate refused to sign anything. He was not indorsed by 
the "Teacher-Citizen Better Schools Committee." 

An illuminating comment on the unrepresentative nature of this so-called 
teachers' movement, virtually proving the contention of disinterested citizens 
that at least 90 percent of the teachers are not involved in pernicious political 
activities, is made by a bulletin issued ostensibly by the High-School Teachers' 
Association, in which the statement appears : 

"In its sessions the representatives of the high school principals and the 
citizens' group were absent." This admission, while in itself proof that the 
great majority of elementary schoolteachers and high intermediate and ele- 
mentary principles are holding aloof from this dangerous attempt to have politics 
dominate school affairs, does not add that less than one-half of the membership 
of the High-School Teachers' Association voted to indorse a school-board 
ticket. Neither does it comment on the fact that the association itself comprises 
less than half of the total number of teachers employed in the high schools of 
the city. 

Apparently the entire object was, at the time of quizzing candidates, to leave 
the inference that the whole teaching corps was aware of and approved such 
tactics. The effort is now being made to convey the impression that the Teacher- 
Citizen Better Schools Committee represents not only all of the teachers and 
principals, but the citizens' group, which was absent when the program was 
arranged. 

The seven candidates indorsed by the teacher and absent-citizen group are: 

M. C. Bettinger and Mrs. Mary Millspaugh, incumbent candidates, who were 
the only members of the present board of education to vote for reinstatement of 
the Nation and the New Republic ; the Rev. G. Bromley Oxnam, radical orator, 
Miss M. Jessie York. B. L. Clogston, John J. Craig, and William B. Himrod. 

This would-be censorship of candidates for a governing body to be selected 
by popular vote, a censorship tending inevitably to chaos in public school affairs, 
resulted in the formation of a citizens' school committee composed of repre- 
sentative men and women — fathers and mothers in all walks of life whose 
object is neither teacher domination or domination of teachers, but who desire 
proper educational conditions and opportunities for the youth of the community. 

A board of education ticket recommended by the citizens' school committee 
is seeking election on a platform pledging efficient and forward looking admin- 
istration of school affairs, guaranteeing harmonious cooperation with the teach- 
ing body and assuring justice and fair play not only for teachers who seek ad- 
vancement through self -exploitation, but for the vast majority of teachers whose 
fundamental interest embraces the educational advancement of the boy and the 
girl intrusted to their care. 

The citizens' committee ticket consists of two incumbent members of the board 
of education, Irwin J. Muma and Robert J. Odell, and John B. Beman, Elizabeth 
Louise (Mrs. George H.) Clark, Lucia (Mrs. Norman) MacBeth, Frederick R. 
Feitshans. and Frank O. Bristol. 



(Los Angeles Times, April 26, 1923) 

Shall Radicals Head Schools? 

facts about g. bromley oxnam and associates 

his record as supporter of socialistic doctrines 
Advocates Repudiation of Liberty Bonds 

G. Bromley Oxnam was nominated by Mrs. Mary C. Millspaugh on March 26 
last, as a member of the board of education to succeed Elliott Craig, resigned. 
Oxnam received for the post the support of Mrs. Millspaugh, M. C. Bettinger, and 
Miss M. Jessie York, all members of the board of education and all candidates 



3614 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

for reelection on the same so-called teachers' ticket with Oxnam. The others 
on this ticket are John J. Craig, B. L. Clogston, and W. B. Hirnrod. Only the 
stout opposition of President Seaman, Robert Odell, and Irwin J. Muma, the 
other members of the board, prevented Oxnam, the radical, from taking the 
vacant seat. Messrs. Odell and Muma are also candidates for reelection on the 
citizens' committee ticket with J. B. Beman, Frank Bristol, Elizabeth Clark, 
F. R. Feitshans, and Lucia Macbeth. The primaries are next Tuesday, May 1. 

In his address at a YMCA meeting a few months ago G. Bromley Oxnam, who 
heads the so-called teachers' ticket for board of education, and who is said to 
be slated for its chairmanship, if elected, made substantially these statements : 

"The working classes of England practically dominate the Government of 
England today. They can be expected to be in power any day and one of the 
first measures they will rush through Parliament will be a repudiation of all 
war bonds ; this because they believe that war profiteers hold most of these 
bonds and they will make the rich pay for the war by repudiating them. 

"I am afraid that the United States will not do anything so sensible as this 
for at least 10 years, but by that time labor will be dominant enough in this 
country to bring about that same condition. I look to see American Liberty 
bonds repudiated by a workingman's government in this country in about 10 
years from now." 

Early in February of this year circulars were broadcast through Los Angeles 
and vicinity announcing a protest mass meeting against the criminal syndicalism 
law under the auspices of the I WW general defense committee. Among the 
speakers advertised as urging repeal of the law designed to protect the homes 
and property and governmental institutions of California were G. Bromley 
Oxnam, J. H. Ryckman, well-known radical and former law partner of Job 
Harriman, Socialist attorney, R. W. Hendersin, IWW attorney and member of 
the general defense committee and members of the IWW then on trial for viola- 
tion of the criminal-syndicalism law. 

Mr. Oxnam has been endorsed for the school board by a so-called teachers' and 
citizens' committee, which appears to consist of a small minority of radical 
high-school teachers engaged in the questionable practice of using school time, 
school premises, and school machinery in their campaign to elect tbeir own 
board of education. 

In various news articles and editorials published by the Times concerning the 
issues of the school election next Tuesday, attention has been directed to the 
fact that an organized effort to sovietize the schools of this city is being made, 
chiefly by persons now outside of the educational system, among them Mr. 
Oxnam. He openly advocates "teacher councils" in the school system. What he 
says about this and other things appears elsewhere in this issue. 

OTHER SPEECHES 

Mr. Oxnam presided and spoke August 30, 1922, at a meeting in Blanchard 
Hall, called by the Friends of Soviet Russia to raise funds for the Russian in- 
dependent corporation, which was outlawed by the corporation commission. 
With Mr. Oxnam spoke the national educational director of the Amalgamated 
Clothing Workers and a teacher who had been expelled from the public schools 
in this vicinity and had joined the Ferrer School (anarchist). 

At the Hotel Maryland, Pasadent (sic), February 9, last year, Mr. Oxnam 
addressed a meeting of women in which he advocated the women in which he 
advocated (sic) radical doctrines. 

At a meeting at the City Club in May of last year he delivered an address 
in which he advocated the communistic doctrine of electing labor representatives 
to Congress along occupational instead of geographical lines. 

He delivered a radical address April 22, 1922, at a meeting at the clubroom 
of the Severance Club. 

In speaking about a year ago before the Woman's City Club he said that if 
the Russian Soviets and their aims were rightly understood, the people here 
would sympathize rather than condemn. 

Mr. Oxnam attended several meetings held in July of 1922 by the Labor Emer- 
gency Conference. This organization was composed of representatives of the 
Ferrer Modern School (anarchist) Workers' Party, Socialist Party, and Amalga- 
mated Clothing Workers of America. Mr. Oxnam shared the rostrum with A. 
Plotkin, organizer among the tailors, Walter J. Yarrow, oil-strike organizer, 
and Upton Sinclair, Socialist writer. Plotkin was arrested here yesterday on 
suspicion of criminal syndicalism. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3615 

Mr. Oxnam's attitude and speeches have from time to time drawn energetic 
denunciation from various organizations, one of the most sweeping indictments 
of his tactics and methods having been made by Mrs. Frank A. Kelly, first vice 
president of the Republican Study Club, in addresses before that organization. 

Calling attention to Mr. Oxnam's candidacy for the school board, Mrs. Kelly 
vigorously assailed his activities and, particularly referring to the circular 
announcing his presence as one of the featured orators at the IWW protest 
meeting last February, said : 

"This notice needs no comment except to remark that no greater menace to 
life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness exists today than the red flag of 
anarchy displayed by an organization which is exploited by Rev. Mr. Oxnam, 
an organization which includes among its members the IWW and, it is said, 
teachers in the public schools of Los Angeles." 

Although strenuous efforts are being made to convey the impression to the 
public at large that the High School Teachers' Association, which has a mem- 
bership of approximately one-half of the total number of high-school teachers 
in the city schools, is officially back of Mr. Oxnam and his associated candidates 
on the Teacher-Citizen Better Schools Committee, it appears that a minority of 
the teachers' organization is responsible for his nomination and endorsement. 

The movement to advance Mr. Oxnam to a position of such responsibility in 
the educational affairs of the community appears to have begun among members 
of the executive committee of the High School Teachers' Association. Under 
date of February 12 that committee reported the "advisability" of placing Mr. 
Oxnam on the board of education by appointment by the members thereof. 

FOR SCHOOL BOARD 

His name was formally placed in nomination at a meeting of the board of 
education, March 26, by Mrs. Millspaugh. On that occasion he received two 
votes. His appointment was opposed by Irwin J. Muma and Robert J. Odell, 
candidates for reelection, and by C. E. Seaman, president of the board of educa- 
tion. The deadlock among the six members of the school board as to the choice 
of a successor to Mr. Craig has never been broken, although the support given 
Mr. Oxnam by Mr. Bettinger, Miss York, and Mrs. Millspaugh was strenuously 
encouraged by the political minority in the teaching corps. 

Members of the High School Teachers' Association were asked to vote on the 
proposal to urge the board of education to endorse Mr. Oxnam and it was under- 
stood that the names of the teachers voting for him would be kept secret. 

Having failed to introduce Mr. Oxnam on the board without a popular vote 
of the people, merely to fill a vacancy until the expiration of the 2-year term, 
it was decided early in the present campaign to launch him as a candidate. This 
was done in the name of the High School Teachers' Association at meetings 
to which representatives of the Principals' Club and the public were invited but 
did not choose to come. Nevertheless, the campaign literature of the Oxnam 
ticket declares it has the support of the Teacher-Citizen Better Schools Com- 
mittee. As the history of the matter shows the ticket does not represent any 
considerable part of the teaching body of the schools and no element whatsoever 
of the citizens as a whole. 



OXNAM SAYS HE IS NOT A RADICAL 

Verbatim Statement From School Board Candidate in His Own Behalf 

In a special-delivery and registered envelope, with return-receipt requested, 
the subjoined communication was received last night from G. Bromley Oxnam, 
candidate for the school board on the so-called teachers' ticket. It follows 
verbatim : 

Los Angeles, April 24. — (To the editor of the Times) : Heretofore I have 
followed consistently the policy of ignoring false statements relative to me 
personally or relative to my point of view. I have done this because I believe 
that Christianity makes it incumbent upon one who believes in that religion to 
maintain a spirit of good will toward those who attack him. Jesus even asked 
us to "love those who despitefully use us." That may sound a trifle sentimental 
to you, but it is in fact a working principle with me. 

However, there are times when an attack upon an individual involves others. 
That is true now. You are attempting to discredit both the character and motive 



3616 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

of others in your attempt to make the people of Los Angeles believe false state- 
ments relative to me. I therefore ask you in fairness to others to print this letter 
and give it the same publicity as far as location in the paper is concerned that 
you have given your attack. 

First, as to the charges of "radicalism." Allow me to say that Mr. David Bab- 
cock, who is the organizing genius back of the "citizens' ticket" which you are 
sponsoring, told me personally that he had heard many bad things relative to me. 
He said he had asked every person making such statements to put them in writing 
so that he might use them. He said not a person would do so and that he had 
checked the statements and found not one to have a basis in fact. After hearing 
me speak at Trinity Auditorium, he phoned me and said he believed me sincere 
and that he thought we were both working for the same end, namely, a better 
school system, even though we might disagree in minor matters. I admire his 
type of character. He speaks what he believes and knows men may have honest 
differences of opinion, but he does not seek to discredit by innuendo and falsehood. 
He was suggested in a news item some weeks back that I favor syndicalism. 
There is no man in this State more fundamentally opposed to the philosophy of 
syndicalism and the tactics of the IWW than I am. I have lectured dozens of 
times relative to this situation and have consistently pointed out both the menace 
and tragedy involved in the advocacy of force to gain an end. I believe that 
love, and not force, is the social bond ; that love is the only real cohesive force 
we possess. Consequently, by conviction, I am opposed to the central thought in 
IWW tactics. You know this because your reporters have heard me speak 
relative to this. Why, then, do you allow such a misrepresentation of my view to 
get into the minds of the people? I am of the opinion that you know my posi- 
tion. You know I believe in our American institutions and our Constitution. It 
is because I believe in them so sincerely that I resent with all the power I possess 
the attempt of "special privilege" groups to subordinate our institutions to their 
wishes. You know full well the old-time machine control that lived at Sacra- 
mento. You know the story of San Francisco graft. You know that it is the 
attempt of un-American Americans, masquerading under patriotic names, who 
use sacred institutions for selfish purposes that I am attacking. You call it 
"radicalism" to blind the people to the real issue. One word more relative to 
"radicalism." Do you think for one moment that the Methodist Episcopal Church 
would give me positions of trust if I were the person you try to make people be- 
lieve I am? Do you think I would have been given the privilege of speaking 
before nearly 40,000 high-school students last year if your statements were true? 
Do you think the women's clubs, businessmen's organizations, educational insti- 
tutes, and the like would have me address them if I were what you suggest? Do 
you think the Commercial Board of Los Angeles would, upon motion of Mr. Judah, 
have had my address to them published and sent broadcast to chambers of com- 
merce in the Southwest if your statements were true? I do not write with any 
trace of bitterness. I feel sorry for folk who in the interest of what they want 
stoop to misrepresentation. 

Second, as to the attitude I bring to the board of education in the event of 
election. It is true I stand for a reorganization of the board in general keeping 
with the report of Mr. Chester Avery, whom the board employed to draft a plan 
for the proper business handling of the school system. You know what is in that 
report. You know that that report calls for the board to be organized like the 
board of directors in any large business concern, namely, to draft the board, gen- 
eral policies and hire competent experts to carry them out. I will guarantee 
that any unprejudiced businessman in Los Angeles, after facing the present busi- 
ness management of the school system (not because of any particular inefficiency, 
but because of antiquated business organization) and after reading Mr. Avery's 
report would favor such reorganization. As to the teacher's advisory councils: 
Here again you are giving the people a wrong impression. I am as much opposed 
to teacher control as I am to church control, labor-union control, or businessmen 
control. But I do believe, and I think any businessman who considers it will 
believe, that there ought to be some reasonable plan worked out whereby the 
teaching experience of our highly trained teaching staff could be constantly avail- 
able to the board and the administration as advice in determining policy. That 
advice should not be dependent upon the benevolent request of either board or 
administration, but should be given as a regular part of the procedure in determ- 
ining policy. It is not control. It is but sound business. It simply means that 
the board has available the experience of the teachers as advice. Whatever 
you may say is the position of the teachers, that is what their position is as they 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3617 

have explained it to me. In any case, it is my position and you have no right to 
suggest to the people that my position is other than that. I am opposed funda- 
mentally to sectional control by any group. There is yet one other matter and 
that is the question of public meetings of the board. I have favored and continue 
to favor doing public business in the open. I have said that, in the event of 
purchasing property where the public interest might be hurt by previous informa- 
Ki reaching property holders who might raise prices if they knew the schools 
must have the property, I would favor private consideration of the proposition; 
also in the case of character charges that had not been proved, I would favor 
urivate hearing until the charges were proved or disproved. If proved, then the 
community has a right to the fact and the offender should be dismissed. 

This is rather a lengthv letter. 1 trust you will print it. I have no feeling 
of ill will in this matter. I would have ignored your attacks if others were not in- 
volved Your charges of "radicalism" are false. The suggestion of sympathy for 
I W W tactics is false and I believe you know it. Your statements relative to 
my position in educational matters give the people an entirely wrong impression. 
Hasn't the time come in American life when as citizens we can face issues as 
sportsmen, play the game like men, state our ideas accurately to the people and 
let them decide? Must we forever face the problem of misrepresentation? Let 
us have faith in our institutions, let each candidate state his views and have 
them correctly reported, then let the people choose whom they wish. That is the 
American way, I believe. If you will state your position in one column of your 
paper, I am sure the people you attack would be glad to state theirs in a parallel 
column and allow the electorate to decide upon the basis of fact. 

Very truly yours, 

J G. Bromley Oxnam. 



3618 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 6-A 
CHURCH OF ALL NATIONS 

METHODIST EPISCOPAL 

G. BROMLEY OXNAM, Pastor 
Ofice :: 904 Wright & Callender Building 
LosAngeles - - California 



April 26, 192J. 

To the Editor, 

The Los Angel as Tinea, 

Los Angeles, California. 

k*y dear Sirt 

I cannot, of course, aak you to give me spaas to answer 
the false statements in your news artlole of today* I oppreolat* 
the faet you published" my 1 otter. However, I do request tto 
publication of this brief statement of fast. 

1* I nwr made any sueh statements at the I. H. 0. A* 
I do not look for a labor government ia the United States, sad 
never dreamed of repudiation of Liberty Bonds. Ifer doe* British 
labor think of repudiating bonds! Tour information earns mo doubt 
from Better America Federation reports. They are falsa. 

2. Tour ref erenoe to tho Bote! Maryland Itaeheoas is 
■oat inappropriate. I did speak before that distinguished 
gathering four times. In the audienoe sere many conservative 
folk and the response giTsn was evidence in point that your 
suggestions are falae. 

?• Tour reference to the Vernon's Oily Club is false. 
I am distinctly opposed to "the dietatorehip of the proletariat* 
and "the materialistic conception of history." What I said waa 
that if so knee the suffering of the Russian people we would 
hare ayapathy for them. 

4. The references made by Mrs. Forak Kelly and reported 
by you with reference to exploiting the rod flag of anarchy are 
I understand libelous. I trust both of you will sea fit to 
correct any suggestion that I am exploiting such ideas. 

9. I was not present at the mooting your sears dodger 
refers to, and you know it. I stand for a rigorous prosecution 
of any person whsthar I. W. V. or in any other group who commits 
an overt act, or incitea to riot. I truly wish there wore some 
legal way in which a paper could be held responsible for attempt* 
to undermine a person's character. It ia something of the bully 
attitude one finds when a great paper attacks. Surely, my dear 
sir, giving out falae stateaente is pretty elose to the the 
syndicalist doctrine of "cabotage", which X repudiate as yew 
know, together with ite whole philosophy. 

Again thanking you for printing ay letter, and suggesting 
it would be both the American and the wiae eouree to take bask 
your false statements about me ugring "the repudiating of Liberty 
Bonds, I am 

Very sincerely yours, 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3619 

Mr. Kunzig. I mentioned every one, Mr. Chairman. 

(At this point Bishop Oxnam conferred with Mr. Parlin.) 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, in the matter of my last statement, 
I have j ust conferred with my counsel. We made request for informa- 
tion concerning items that were to be brought up here that were not 
in the record so that one could be prepared. It so happens I am pre- 
pared on this particular matter. If a matter should be brought up on 
which I have not records here, I should like to have the privilege ot 
bringing in the matter. . 

Mr. Walter. What possible bearing can certain of these matters 
have on what we are doing here today ? 

Mr. Velde. I think we can answer that question. We are attempt- 
ing to straighten out the record for the Bishop at his request and 
anything that is favorable or unfavorable or that reflects what we 
are doing at the present time in the operation and the organization ot 
Congress, and certainly it should be in the record. Is there objection 
to placing this material in the record ? 

Mr. Moulder. I reserve the right to object to this. The witness has 
not identified the exhibit and has not made any comment or identifica- 
tion of it. He has not testified as to the exhibits. 

Bishop Oxnam. Were you speaking to me ? 

Mr. Moulder. I was speaking to counsel and the chairman. 

Mr. Frazier. May I inquire whether there is anything in question in 
these exhibits ? . 

Mr. Velde. Will counsel please explain the exhibits ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, I feel the exhibits should go into the 
record because otherwise the testimony of the witness, the questions and 
the answers, will be applying to certain documents which will not be 
present. The whole thing is necessary in order to make a full picture 
of it. I have already every single answer which the Bishop has made 
in toto verbatim already in the record. So I feel it is necessary to have 
the entire picture in the record and we are discussing a document which 
the Bishop feels is wrong and his testimony will be in relation to 
that document. Otherwise, the testimony will be remiss in that respect. 

Mr. Moulder. My point is that we should hand the exhibit to the 
witness and then question him. 

Mr. Velde. I think he has already questioned the witness regarding 
these exhibits. 

Mr. Kunzig. You are, of course, prefectly free to say anything on 
these exhibits. We have discussed them before. 

Mr. Velde. Is there objection to the admission of these documents ? 
If not, they will be received in evidence as Oxnam exhibits Nos. 3, 4, 5, 
and 6. 

Mr. Kunzig. I want to turn to the Arts, Sciences, and Professions 
Council of the Progressive Citizens of America.* These, as I know 
you realize, are all the various groups and citations which have ap- 
peared in these files and so we will take them up and discuss them and 
get your viewpoints and get the record clear. 

4 The California Committee on Un-American Activities cites the Progressive Citizens of 
America as a "new and broader Communist front for the entire United States" formed in 
September 1946, at the direction of Communist steering committees from the Communist- 
dominated National Citizens Political Action Committee and the Independent Citizens 
Committee of the Arts, Sciences, and Professions. (See report of 1947, p. 369, and 
report of 1948, p. 354.) 



362.) TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Bishop Oxnam. I had hoped that you were going to deal with the 
items to which I had referred. 

Mr. Kunzig. I have here a document marked Oxnam exhibit No. 7. 
Jt is a clipping from the Daily Worker entitled "Leaders in Arts and 
Sciences Hit Pix Purge," and also one marked Oxnam exhibit No. 8, 
from the San Francisco Chronicle entitled "Victim Firings Censor- 
ship PCA Warns." (See Oxnam exhibits Nos. 7 and 8, opp. p. 3624 
and p. 3625.) I will pass these over to you to examine. They are 
marked for identification. 

That was in the mimeographed report which yon filed in answer in 
the public press, but you never commented upon that or never answered 
that, so we wanted to get that in, to give you that opportunity here 
today. 

The organization has been cited by the California committee on 
un-American activities as a new and broader Communist front for 
the United States, formed in September 1946. Five other signers of 
that letter are identified as Communists. 

Bishop Oxnam. I haven't heard a question. Excuse me. 

Mr. Kunzig. The question is were you associated with those groups 
in any way, and would you explain it so our records would be clear. 

Bishop Oxnam. I have no recollection of any association with that 
group whatsoever because you will remember that meeting that was 
at the Waldorf and so on. Is that the same organization? I can't 
keep track of these. There are so many of them. My recollection is 
that I have had no association with this organization at any time. 

Mr. Kunzig. No association at any time? 

Bishop Oxnam. It isn't quite clear in my mind what he is talking 
about. This citation comes from these different committees. 

Mr. Frazier. We are unable to determine from counsel's question as 
to what organization the Bishop is being charged with being a 
member of. 

Mr. Velde. Will counsel repeat the question ? 

Mr. Kunzig. I will repeat the question. I know the acoustics are 
very bad. The organization known as the Arts, Sciences, and Profes- 
sions Council of the Progressive Citizens of America. 

Mr. Velde. Is the gentleman able to hear ? 

Mr. Frazier. Yes. 

Bishop Oxnam. What article? Is that article in the Washington 
Post? 

Mr. Kunzig. I don't think you covered it in the article. 

Bishop Oxnam. Then it wasn't in the file. 

Mr. Kunzig. Yes ; it is. 

Bishop Oxnam. Would you indicate which one? I have most of 
them here and I haven't seen that. In any case, I have no recollection 
of being associated with that organization and I remember an organi- 
zation, it seems to me, of a similar name that held some conference in 
the Waldorf-Astoria. I knew that that was Communist-related and 
had nothing to do with it whatsoever. 

Mr. Jackson. May I ask a question, Mr. Chairman ? 

Mr. Velde. Yes. 

Mr. Jackson. I am not quite clear in what the association was 
alleged to have been. What was the nature of it ? Was it a meeting? 
Was it a forum, or just exactly what was it? 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3621 

Mr Kunzig. Mi-. Jackson, it was a letter signed by a group of people 
sponsored by this organization, and one of the signers of the letter 
included, as it says here, "Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam." It appears 
in that context. 

Mr. Jackson. What was the date i m 

Mr Kunzig. The date of the quotation of it is December 1, 1»4/. 

Mr. Jackson. As I understand, Bishop, you have no recollection 

° Bishop Oxnam. I have no recollection at all and if the Chair will 
not think me violating the rules, it is precisely this which troubles 
me This kind of thing gets into these files and without having been 
verified or checked, it goes out. I have no recollection of any associa- 
tion with that whatever. , . . i tt 1, iu 
Mr. Frazier. I suggest the counsel submit it to the Bishop ana leu 

him see it. 

Mr. Kunzig. He already has it. 

Mr Velde In the files that we have are reports which are already 
public information. Any citizen can find them. Your name was 
mentioned in a newspaper article, which is public information, and 
what we wanted to know is whether or not the newspaper article is 
correct in listing you as a sponsor of this group. 

Bishop Oxnam. The only way I can answer is that this is a quotation 
from the Daily Worker. Personally, I do not think the Daily Worker 
is good authority for anything. But however that may be here is a 
clipping from a Boston paper dated July 17, 1943, a meeting that I was 
alleged to have attended. Actually, I was not there at all. I was 
listed as being there because my name was related to a committee. It 
«o happens it is the late Secretary Tobin welcoming two representatives 
who visited from Russia during the war. Whether I happened to 
have been there or not, the date is important. I was not. But I am 
listed as though I were there and it seems to me that the date, the 
purpose there— these are all pertinent, but when these are released in 
blanket form this way, an individual can, and frankly I think you 
know he has been damaged because people think you are associated 
with the organizations that you may or may not have been associated 

with. m , , , 

Mr. Velde. Of course, a lot of us feel that we are, by our names 
being listed in the Daily Worker, damaged. A lot of us have been so 
damaged. I think we all recognize the Daily Worker is a Communist 
organ, but what we are trying to do is to clear the record and find out 
whether the things that the Communist organ says are true, and I want 
to repeat to you again the Daily Worker is a public newspaper and is 
available to anyone who asks for it. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman, was this reported by another news- 
paper? Did you have two documents there or simply the one from 
the Daily Worker ? Was the San Francisco Chronicle another one ? 

Mr. Kunzig. The San Francisco Chronicle also carried the story, sir. 

Mr. Clardy. At the same date ? 

Mr. Kunzig. December 2, under a dateline of Washington, 
December 1. 

In any case, I think the Bishop has made clear his position in this. 

I would like to go to the American League Against War and Fascism 
and the American Friends of the Chinese People. Now, the Daily 



3622 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Worker of September 24, 1937, contains an article about a meeting to be 
held at Madison Square Garden and this meeting was held under the 
auspices of the American League Against War and Fascism and the 
American Friends of the Chinese People. 5 (See p. 3626 for Oxnam 
exhibit No. 9.) It lists Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam as a sponsor of the 
meeting. I believe your reply to that was that you never sponsored 
any such meeting ; is that correct ? 

Bishop Oxnam. That is correct. The American League Against 
War and Fascism was one of the organizations started about the time 
they were talking about a United Front. I knew what the United 
Front was. In a syndicated article that went all over the Middle 
West, I wrote concerning the United Front in 1935. I had no as- 
sociation with the American League Against War and Fascism and 
never belonged to it and naturally would not sponsor it. It is true 
I did know Ambassador Dodd. I had called upon him at the time 
of the Hitler blood purge of June 30 and July 1, 1934. I would have 
been happy to have been present at any meeting that Ambassador 
Dodd addressed, but I did not — and I am saying this as definitely 
as I can — give my name as a sponsor to any such meeting as far as 
1 recall. 

Mr. Kunzig. Do you have any explanation or can you assist us 
by giving your viewpoint as to how your name would get into this 



5 The American League Against War and Fascism was cited as Communist by Attorney 
General Tom Clark in letters to the Loyalty Review Board released December 4, 1947, and 
September 21, 1948 ; by Attorney General Francis Biddle, in re Harry Bridges, May 28, 
1942, p. 10, and according to the Congressional Pa-cord of September 24, 1942, p. 76S3 ; by 
the Special Committee on Un-American Activities in reports of March 29, 1944, p. 53, 
January 3, 1939, pp. 69 and 121, January 3, 1940, p. 10, and June 25, 1942, p. 14; by the 
California Committee on Un-American Activities in its 1943 Report, p. 91 ; by the 
Massachusetts House Committee on Un-American Activities, Report. 1938, pp. 298 and 460; 
the Rapp-Coudert Committee, Report, 1942. p. 293 ; and the New York City Council com- 
mittee investigating the municipal civil service commission. 

The American League Against War and Fascism was described by former Attorney 
General Francis Biddle, in a memorandum reprinted in the Congressional Record of 
September 24, 1942, p. 7683, as "the first of three organizations established in the United 
States in an effort to create public sentiment on behalf of a foreign policy adapted to the 
interests of the Soviet Union. Its successor, the American League for Peace and 
Democracy, was established in 1937 and it, in turn, gave way in 1940 to the American 
Pence Mobilization. * * * The American League Against War and Fascis-m was formally 
organized at the first United States Congress Against War and Fascism, held in New York 
City, September 29 to October 1, 1933. The manifesto of this congress called attention to 
the 'black cloud of imperialist war' hanging over the world, and pointed to the National 
Recovery Administration, the Civilian Conservation Corps, and the other policies of the 
Roosevelt administration as indications of America's preparedness for war and fascism. 
Only in the Soviet Union, the manifesto continued, has the basic cause of war — monopolistic 
capitalism — been removed * * * Earl Browder, general secretary and leader of the 
Communist Party, United States of America, called the league a transmission belt of the 
Communist Party." 

The American Friends of the Chinese People was cited as a Communist front by the 
Special Committee on Un-American Activities, in its report of March 29, 1944, pp. 40 and 
147, and by the California Committee on Un-American Activities, 1948 report, pp. 142-145. 

The California Committee on Un-American Activities, in its 1948 report, pp. 142 and 143, 
describes the American Friends of the Chinese People as having been organized "to support 
the Chinese Communist thrust against the National Chinese Government. * * * The 
Friends of the Chinese People was launched January 4, 1933. * * * In January 1934 the 
magazine China Today made its first appearance. The word 'American' was added to the 
organization's name in 1935 as part of the general streamlining process during the Popular 
Front period. J. W. Phillips, Hansu Chan, and Frederick Spencer were coeditors of 
China Today. * * *" 

While the committee's source concerning this statement was the Daily Worker, it has 
been determined that the New York Times, October 2, 1937, p. 8, contained an account of 
a mass meeting held in Madison Square Garden on the previous evening. The account 
states in part : 

"The meeting was called by the American League Against War and Fascism and the 
American Friends of the Chinese People. It was sponsored by 47 labor, civic, and religious 
leaders, among them Bishop William Newman Ainsworth, Bishop Francis J. McConnell, and 
Bishop G. Gromley Oxnam. Nearly 10,000 attended." 

"The Reverend Doctor Harry F. Ward, professor of Christian ethics at Union Theologi- 
cal Seminary, presided. He is national chairman of the American League Against War 
and Fascism." 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3623 

sort of thing and how your name would be listed in the Daily Worker 
as one of the sponsors? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir; I think I can. I can do it in two cases 
if the committee will allow me. Personally, I do not think too highly 
of the California Committee on Un-American Activities and hesitate 
to quote it, but on page 284 of the report of the Tenney committee of 
1953, it states as follows : 

Communist-front organizations not only masquerade behind a respectable 
facade, endeavoring in all cases to conceal the real control and objectives of the 
organizations by claiming to have some humanitarian purpose, but they have 
also made use of the names of loyal individuals without authority. From time 
to time the committee has received letters of protest from persons who have 
been listed as officers of various front orgnaizations and who, in fact, have no 
connection whatever with these movements, their names having been used with- 
out authority and for the deliberate purpose of using non-Communist individuals 
as window dressing to divert suspicion. In such cases the committee is always 
eager and willing to do everything in its power to correct this despicable practice. 

That is one explanation. If the committee wishes, I will be able to 
show what happened in connection with one of those Spanish organi- 
zations where, belonging to one organization that had to do with an 
attempt to send medical relief to Spain during the days of the revolu- 
tion, later on they put my name as a sponsor of an organization, some- 
thing about Spanish action. 

Mr. Kunzig. Supposing we leave that for a moment and we are 
coming to that. 

Bishop Oxnam. I will be glad to, but you asked how this happened. 
I don't know how it happens but I simply say this is pertinent. 

Mr. Kunzig. You mentioned a letter of protest in reading that 
statement. Do you recall whether you sent a letter of protest in that 
instance ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I don't recall having seen the announcement, sir. 
I do not read the Daily Worker. Excuse me, I did not mean to be 
facetious. 

Mr. Kunzig. That is perfectly all right. This was printed in the 
New York Times, which I think is a little different from the Daily 
Worker. 

Bishop Oxnam. I do read the New York Times. 

Mr. Kunzig. The Daily Worker is marked as "Oxnam Exhibit 
No. 9," and the New York Times is marked as "Oxnam Exhibit No. 
10." (See pp. 3626 and 3627.) 

Mr. Cla.rdy. I would like to ask counsel what he was developing? 
I am not sure what the incident is. What were the two papers quoted ? 

Mr. Kunzig. The incident, Mr. Clardy, was an alleged meeting held 
under the auspices of the American League Against War and Fascism 
and the American Friends of the Chinese People, which featured Wil- 
liam E. Dodd as the speaker, and the name of Bishop G. Bromley 
Oxnam as a sponsor of the meeting, which appeared as a sponsor of 
the meeting in the Daily Worker, and the bishop's answer was that the 
Daily Worker should not be regarded as competent testimony. 

Mr. Velde. And counsel read the pertinent part. 

Mr. Kunzig. The New York Times, dated October 2, 1937, goes on 
to say that the meeting was called by the American League Against 
War and Fascism and the American Friends of the Chinese People. 
It was sponsored by 47 labor, civic, and religious leaders, among them 



3624 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Bishop William Newman Ainsworth, Bishop Francis J. McConnell, 
and Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam. 

I think the bishop has made his position clear. He said he did not 
attend and was not present. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman, I think I take issue with the statement 
that the bishop made relative to the California Committee on Un- 
American Activities. I don't know whether the bishop meant com- 
mittees past or present. However, the members of the committee as 
presently constituted are duly elected legislators of the State of Cali- 
fornia, and I am sure that he did not mean to stigmatize all the mem- 
bers in any way. I feel that I must mention that. 

Mr. Kunzig. I should like to offer in evidence Oxnam exhibits Nos. 
7, 8, 9, and 10, which we have been discussing, which are the documents 
that the testimony has related to, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Without objection, they will be received. 

(Oxnam exhibits Nos. 7, 8, 9, and 10 heretofore referred to and 
identified were received in evidence.) 

Mr. Kunzig. Now, one of the points that I want to bring up is the 
American League for Peace and Democracy, 6 a photostatic copy of a 
letter on the letterhead of the American League for Peace and Democ- 
racv, dated April 6, 1939, which reflects vour name as a national spon- 
sor.* (See Oxnam exhibit No. 11, pp. 3638-3640.) 

Your answer, I believe, was that you were never a member, never 
a national sponsor and never had anything to do with the organization. 

Bishop Oxnam. That is right, I think I stated in the Post, and 
that is correct. Isn't that the organization that was the successor to 
the [American] League Against War and Fascism ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Yes. 

Bishop Oxnam. I think that was the organization after the pact 
with Germany, was it not, when they began to change front ? 

a The American League for Peace and Democracy was cited as Communist by Attorney 
General Tom Clark in letters to the Loyalty Review Board released June 1,*1948, and 
September 21, 194S : by Attorney General Francis Biddle in a memorandum printed in the 
Congressional Record of September 24, 1942. pp. 7683 and 7684: by the Special Committee 
on Un-American Activities in reports of January 3. 1939. pp. 69-71, January 3. 1940. p. 10, 
January 3. 1941. p. 21. June 25. 1942. pp. 14-16, January 2, 1943, p. 8. 'and March 29, 
1944. p. 37 : by the California Committee on Un-Amerifan Activities. 1943 report, p. 91 ; 
the Massachusetts House Committee on Un-American Activities. 1938 report, pp. 77 and 
213 : by the Rapp-Coudert committee, 1942 report, p. 220 ; the Special Subcommittee of the 
House Committee on Appropriations, report of April 21, 1943, p. 3 ; the New York City 
Council committee investigating the Municipal Civil Service Commission ; the Pennsylvania 
Commonwealth counsel before the reviewing board of the Philadelphia County Board of 
Assistance, January 1942. 

Attorney General Francis Biddle, in his memorandum in the Congressional Record of 
September 24, 1942, pp. 76S3-7684. stated that."* * * the American League Against War 
and Fascism at Its fourth congress In 1937 became the American League for Peace and 
Democracy. It has been reported that the reason for the change in name may be found 
in the fact that the original organization had become widely identified in the popular mind 
as a Communist-controlled group. The program of the new league reflected the change in 
tactics. References to the Soviet Union were omitted. The first items in the program re- 
ferred to the rights of labor and caHed for the defeat of legislation attempting to compel 
incorporation of trade unions or the inspection of union finances. Guaranties to Negro 
people and the foreign born and the demand for an antllynching law followed. * * * In all 
of these policies the league was following the Communist Party line. The American League 
was composed of national and local organizations. The highest governing body was nomi- 
nally the national congress operating through the national committee. * * * The national 
committee, in turn, was controlled by the executive hoard on which were several Commu- 
nists. Funds were collected from members and affiliates, and J. B. Matthews, former head 
of the American League Against War and Fascism, wrote that when the league could not 
secure sufficient funds in this way it would first call on someone 'ike Corliss Lamont. the 
Communist 'angel,' and in the most extreme cases would call upon Earl Browder. * * » 
The American League for Peace and Democracy * * * was designed to conceal Communist 
control, in accordance with the new tactics of the Communist International. The adoption 
of a new name and the broadening of the proaram to include measures and policies calcu- 
lated to enlist a wider support in no way lessened the Communist control and direction of 
the league." 



nWI h'yi'I 'IT NO. 



.,i. M..n,i.. n,-,„l». I, »i7 p ltt J 



Leaders In 
Arts, Sciences 
Hit Pix Purge 

Sixty-five leader* in the u 

■ ti ru'L'd i hi; motion picture producers for their 

"shocking and degrading capitulation to the discredited and 




1 




















■ 






■ 




■ 








■ 












■ 




■ ■ 














PUnf Ftolpt) 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3625 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 8 



Sm3ftwm$to 

V. y v ^^Ttu City's Only Home-Owned Np 



CCCCAAB 



The City's Oniy Homi-Owned Newspaper 
TUESDAY. DEC. 2. 1947 



Felm Firsngs 
'Censorship/ 
PCA Warns 

WASHINGTON, Dec. 1 <UP> — 
Sixty-five members of the Progres- 




sive Citizens of America said today 



the film industry's dismissal of 10 
Hollywood figures who were cited 
for contempt in the congressional 
Communism hearings "opened the 
door to Government censorship of 
all communication media." 

The House cited the 10 affer they 
refused to answer the question put 
to them by the House un-American 
Activities Committee: Are you now 
or have you ever been a Com- 
munist? 

"The decision of the Motion Pic- 
ture Association of America to purge 
and blacklist those writers, directors 
and producers who deny the Un- 
American Committee's right to in- 
quire into the political opinions of 
private citizens, is a submission to 
Government censorship and dicta- 
tion," the 65 said In an open letter 
to the Industry. 

"We charge that the motion pic- 
ture Industry. In its frightened haste 
to fire the 10 writers and directors 
cited, sets a pattern of purge and 
blacklist violating our. fundamental 
concepts of freedom and justice," 
the open letter said. 

Signers of the letter Included 
Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam, William 
Kose Benet. Deems Taylor, Paul 
Robeson, Dorothy Parker, Louis 
Adamic and Jo Davidson. 



PACE 21 



43620 — 54 



3626 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 9 
(Daily Worker, September 24, 1937, p. 6) 



m 



Rally Against Tok 



Dodd to Speak at Protest 
Invasion of China 



Garden Meeting to Be 

Held Friday, Oct. 1 — 

Expect 20,000 

WKii.m S. Dodd. U. S. Ambll- 
sador to Germany, will speak on 
"The" Preservation of Democracy" 
Friday. Oct. 1 in Madison Square 
Garden, under the auspices of the. 
American League Agetnst.^Wer and 
Fascism and the American Friends 
of the Chinese People. 

Alore'than 30,000 are 1 expected Id 
attend the meeting, which has been 
called to protest Japan's Invasion of 
China and to demand the invoca- 
tion of the Kellogg Pact and tha 
Nine-Power Treaty against the In- 
vaders. 

Other speakers will Include Chao- 
Tslng Chi. Chinese delegate to last 
year's conference of the Institute 
of Pacific Relations; Rabbi Stephen 
8. Wife. Free Synagogue; and the 
Rev. Dr. Dr. D. WlUard Lyon, 
former national secretory of the 
Y.M.C.A. in Chin*. Dr. Lyon, until 
his retirement last year, was Amer- 
ica's foremost missionary In China, 
and his father was ths first Amer- 
ican missionary In that country 

JAFA NRSl SPEAKER 

SCHEDULED 

A Japanese will also speak. He 
will represent those of his people 
who oppose their nation's mili- 
taristic policy of aggression. A 
Korean, member of a nation once 
Independent but now a colony of 
Japan, will describe what Japanese 
oppression has meant to his people, 
and what It will probably mean to 
China if Japan wins her unde- 
clared war. 

A young Chinese girl, eyewitness 
Of the recent bombardment of 
Shanghai, will tell how Japanese 
warships from the harbor and Jap- 
anese warplanes from above pounded 




WILLIAM E. DODD 

the Chinese quarters of the city to 
debris and made of them a ceme- 
tery. The girl is now on her way 
from Shanghai to 8an Francisco, 
and she will fly to New York for the 
meeting. 

Dr. Harry P. Ward, professor of 
Christian Ethics at the Union Theo- 
logical Seminary and national 
chairman of the American League 
Against War and Fascism, will pre- 
side. 

The meeting will open with a 
recital of the songs of old China and 
the new China by a Chinese male 
chorus of 100 voices. The chorus 
will be composed of members of the 
Chinese Musical Society. It will be 
led by Kit Kat Charwood, president 
of the organization. 

RELIGIOUS SPONSORS 

A committee of 38, including three 
bishops of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, is sponsoring the meeting. 
Miss Margaret E. Forsyth, of the 
religious education department of 



Japanese, Korean and 

Chinese to Speak at 

Big Meeting 



Teachers' College. Co' nbia Cnlver* 
sitv. is chairman. 

Cther members are Bishop Fran- 
cis J. McConnell. Ne* York; Blsnoo 
G. Bromley Oxnam. Omaha, Neb.; 
Bishop William Newman Ainsworth, 
M. E. Church. South: Prof. Rein- 
hold NIebuhr. Union Theological 
Seminary; Maricn Cuthbext, na* 
tional board. V. W. C. A.: 
ert Searle. Ne w York Federals 
CTlurTnes; the Rev. Dr. William B. 
Spofford. Church League for Indus- 
trial Democracy ; Dr. Ralph E. Dif- 
fendorfer. Methodist Board of Fbr- 
rlgn Missions; Paul Kern, Municipal 
Civil Service Commission, and Leo- 
pold Oodowsky. nottd pianist. 

Also. Prof. Daniel J. Fleming, 
Union Theological Seminary; Dr. 
Charles J. Hendley. vice-president, 
American Federation of Teachers; 
Sarah Lyon, executive secretary, 
foreign division, Y. W. C. A.; Helen 
Hail. Henry Street Settlement; Mrs. 
Bessie Boyce Cotton. Y. W. C. A, 
and Dale De Witt, Unitarian min- 
ister. 

Also. Dr. Leslie Moss. erf(»or, 
Christian World Faith; Philip J. 
Jafe<\ managing editor. Amerasla; 
Rabbi Stephen S. Wise; the Rev. 
Dr. William Llovd Imes. St. James 
Presbyterian Church: the Rev. Dr. 
A. Clayton Powell. Jr . Abyssinian 
Baptist Church; Mrs. E. P. Roberts, 
national beard. Y W. C. A.; A 
Philip Randolph, president, National 
Brotherhood of Railway Porters: 
Mrs. Donald Ogden Stewart, and 
William Hinckley, chairman, Amer- 
ican Youth Coniress. 

Also. Rev. John P. Davis, Ref. 
Roy H. Wilkins. Rev. James H. 
Hubert. Rev. Shelton Hale Bishop. 
Rev. Lorenzo H. King, Rev. ffimer 
Carter, Dr. Charles A. Pettlonl, Dr. 
P. M. Savory. Katherlne Tarrlll. 
executive secretary. Congregational 
Church Action Committee: Roger 
Baldwin. American Civil Liberties 
Union, and Dr. Harrv F. Watd> 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3627 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 10 



THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1937. 



IjAPAN DENOUNCED 



47 Labor, Religious and Civic 

Leaders Join in Meeting at 

Madison Square Garden 

NATIONAL BOYCOTT URGED 

I Chinese Consul Genarei Deplore* 

United States Arms Embargo 

Againct His Country 



The Japanese military Invasion o 
China wso denounced !ast night £ 
ft mas* meeting in Madison Square] 
Garden. Support In this country ofj 
the Chines* cause wu urged and a, 
naUon-wtde boycott of Japanese 
goods was advocated. 

The meeUng was called by the 
A merican League Againat War and 
| Fascism ejid the American Friends 
' of the Chinos* Faople- *t f*» »P on 
i sored by forty-»**«» labor, civic and 
I religious I**d*r», among them 
Bishop William Nawmaa Alnswortb 
' BUhop Francis J. McConnell and 
i Ri.hnn O. Bromley Oxnarn . Nearly 
"iO.lJOO attendee^ 

, Dr. Tsune-chi Yu, Consul General 
of the Chinese Republic, represent- 
1 lng his Government, expressed its 
I appreciation of the efforts made in 
the United States in behalf of 
CMM. 



He cited Chtentf Kai-ebek's report 
of a shortag* of trained surgeons 
and. medical supplies to alleviate 
siltterlng among ths vltUms of 
Jaoaness troops and warpianea. He 
alao declared that the Chinese are 
bewildered by the application of the 
arms embargo imposed by the 
United State* government, saying 
"this blow ha* been more severe 
than any from our enemy. This 
blow ha* deprived us of that moral 
support which has been so necee-l 
scry to us. It has weakened our 
power to resist the enslavement 
which threaten* us. It has given 
moral and physical encouragement 
to those who would destroy us." 

\ Ths Rev. Dr. Wlllard Lyon. 

. former naUonal secretary of the 
Y.M.C.A. in China, declared Japan 

, wu net justified in using- measures 
cf aggression and armed conquest. 
Joseph Curran, general organiser. 
National Maritime Union, skid the 
lav&slon of China by Japan was an 
open violation of the Kellogg Peace 
Pact and ths Nine Power treaty. 

Rabbi Stephen 8. Wise of the 
Free Synagogue asserted the people 
In this country are* proud to be 
friends of ths Chinese. He charac- 
terised the Invasion of China by the 
Japanese as "flagrant." 

The Rev. Dr. Harry F. Ward, 
Professor of Christian Ethics at 
Union Theological Seminary, pre- 
sided. He is national chairman of 
the American League Against War 
and Fascism 



r 



3628 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Mr. Kunzig. Let me pass this over to you. Do you have any expla- 
nation as to how your name appeal's on the letterhead as a national 
sponsor ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I have no explanation whatsoever other than the 
one I gave you. I did not sponsor any of those united front organi- 
zations. I was fundamentally opposed to it. I did not believe that 
you could cooperate with the Communists for any worthy end. 

Mr. Clardy. May I ask a question, Mr. Chairman ? 

Mr. Velde. Yes. 

Mr. Clardy. Isn't it possible, Bishop, that one of the associations 
indicated earlier to which you belonged and which had the same 
sponsors and because of that fact they may have used your name with- 
out any notification whatever? 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, I have no knowledge of that, Mr. Clardy, but 
it seems to me that kind of thing was done in these organizations be- 
cause it is evident they would do it if they wished to do it. There is 
no morality there to begin with, and in the next place I read to you 
from the committee record which indicated that they had had this 
kind of problem certainly in California. 

Mr. Clardy. Let me tell you something that prompted my question. 
We have had a lot of sworn testimony to the effect that many good 
people have been placed on what they call a "sucker list" and that they 
use those names either by notification or otherwise and it has just 
occurred to me in view of your statement that your name got on one 
of those "sucker lists." I will ask you if you do not agree that that 
is a tenable theory ? 

Bishop Oxnam. It seems to me that might well be so when dealing 
with people who have no morality that they will do anything that 
tends to their ends. 

Mr. Clardy. I am glad you agree with me that they are the most 
godless people on the face of the globe. 

Mr. Velde. When did you first know that your name was used as a 
sponsor of this organization ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I think when I saw it in one of the releases of this 
committee, but it would be difficult for me to recall it. I am sorry. 

Mr. Velde. We did think that you would be interested in knowing 
that your name was used as a sponsor and if it had not been brought out 
yon wouldn't know that your name was used as a sponsor. 

Bishop Oxnam. It is almost impossible to keep up with those organ- 
izations. I think your committee lists hundreds, if I recall correctly, 
and I did not know about it, I am sorry, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now I offer into evidence this document about which 
we are speaking, which is marked "Oxnam Exhibit No. 11," which is 
this letterhead of the American League for Peace and Democracy, 
and I think this has been cited by one of the committees and contains 
a large list of leading Communists, such as Paul Robeson, Dorothy 
Parker, and others who were active in it. And recently it was listed 
in the files of the House Committee on Un-American Activities. 

Mr. Doyle. May I ask this, we cannot hear very well on account of 
the acoustics in the room, but is this the letter dated April 6, 1939 ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Doyle. On the back page of which are listed as many as 150 
sponsors ? 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3629 

Mr. Kunztg. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Doyle, [s that the letter you refer to? 

Mr. Kunztg. Yes. sir. 

Mr. Doyle. Thank you. 

Mr. Kunzig. I would like to turn to the Protestant Digest. In the 
Protestant Digest 7 your name has appeared in the June-July 1941 
issue representing you as a member of the editorial advisers. If I am 
correct, your answer to that was that you were invited to serve on the 
editorial board of the Protestant Digest in March of 1940, but 2 years 
later, in February of 1942, you submitted your resignation. Is that 
correct? (See Oxnam exhibits Nos. 12 and 13, pp. 3641-3644.) 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir; that is correct. 

Mr. Kunzig. 1 believe I am reading directly from your own answer 
that was published. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. Did you kow at the time you were active in it or 
when you were an editorial adviser, that the Protestant Digest was a 
pamphlet which was in many ways subversive? Did you know that 
Louis Budenz. a former Communist, later testified in public hearings 
of the House Committee on Un-American Activities on November 22, 
1946, pages 31 and 32 of the transcript, as follows : 

I learned toward my latter days in the Communist Party from material I 
read in the New Times, which is now the name of the Communist International) 
magazine, that the Communists everywhere plan to wage war on the Catholic 
Church as the base for obliterating all religion. Also, this policy was developed 
in an article to which I shall call your attention setting forth the ideas that 
I learned, namely, of the program to arouse the Protestants arainst the Catholics 
in this country as a means of causing confusion in the United States. 

I have enough confidence in the American Protestant to know that it is not 
going to succeed, but I have to point to this because it is in black and white in 
an official article. I knew about this before I left and pointed to it very 
temperately in my statement as I left. This matter was presented to me in a 



T The Protestant Digest was cited by the Special Committee on Un-American Activities 
in its report of March 29. 1944, p. 48. as "a magazine which has faithfully propagated the 
Communist Party line under the guise of being a religious journal." The California Com- 
mittee on Un-American Activities, in its 1948 report, pp. 93, 225, and 320, cited the 
Protestant Digest as a "Communist publication" later known as the Protestant. 

The June-July 1941 issue of Protestant Digest, above referred to, was published by 
Protestant Digest, Inc., with offices at 521 Fifth Avenue, New York City, under General 
Manager Kenneth Leslie. The August-September 1942 issue of the Protestant (Digest 
dropped from name) listed the publisher as Protestant Digest, Inc., with offices at 521 
Piftli Avenue. New York City, and listed Kenneth Leslie again as general manager. The 
January 1949 (p. 1) issue of the Protestant lists the publisher as Protestant Digest, Inc., 
with offices at 128 Manhattan Avenue, New York City, and Kenneth Leslie as editor and 
managing director. 

In an editorial comment on p. 5 in the April-May 1947 issue of the Protestant, Kenneth 
Leslie defines the purpose of the publication as follows : "It is the purpose, the mission 
of the Protestant to build bridges between communism and Christendom, while being per- 
fectly aware that there are both Communists and Christians who do not wish to build 
bridges * * *." Leslie continues ;•'*** communism is a child of Christendom, Jewish 
and Christian values are the seeds of communism. * * * So also communism is a long 
suppressed and betrayed element in Christian and Jewish church life." 

Louis F. Budenz, former Communist, testified as follows in public hearings of the 
House Committee on Un-American Activities on November 22. 1946 (p 32) : 

"* * * I learned, toward my latter days in the Communist Party, from material I read 
in the New Times, which is now the name of the Communist International magazine, that 
the Communists everywhere plan to wage war on the Catholic Church as the base for 
obliterating all religion. Also, this policy was developed in an article to which I shall call 
your attention setting forth the ideas that I learned, namely, of the program to arouse the 
Protestants against the Catholics in this country as a means of causing confusion in the 
United States. I have enough confidence in the American Protestants to know that that 
is not going to succeed, but I have to point to this because it is in black and white in an 
official article. I knew about this before I left, and pointed to it very temporately in my 
statement as I left. This matter was presented to me in a conference by the comrade who 
worked up the material for this article for the political committee. He advised me the 
aim was to extend the work of the Protestant magazine. That is a magazine whose name 
is Protestant, but which is engaged largely in being anti-Catholic and the responsible 
Jewish organizations have recently condemned it, as you may know." 



3630 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

conference by the comrade who worked up the material for this article for the 
political committee. He advised me the aim was to extend the work of the 
Protestant magazine. That is the magazine whose name is Protestant but which 
is engaged largely in being anti-Catholic and the responsible Jewish organiza- 
tions have recently condemned it, as you may know. 

That is the statement by Louis Budenz, testifying; before this com- 
mittee, as I stated, on November 22, 1946. The Protestant Digest 
was cited by this committee in 1944 as a magazine which has faithfully 
propagated the Communist Party line under the guise of being a 
religious journal. 

Bishop Oxnam. Would you like me now to answer the question you 
have raised ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Yes; if you please. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I would very much appreciate the 
privilege of answering this question once and for all. I realize you are 
pressed for time. 

Mr. Clardy. May I ask a question at this point ? 

Mr. Velde. Yes. 

Mr. Clardy. Bishop Oxnam, this had troubled me as much if not 
more than all the others that are in the files because only- recently we 
have had testimony and I presided in the taking of that testimony 
that will be released as soon as it can be printed, which demonstrates 
clearly that that magazine was published as the result of a Communist 
directive and plot, that it was nefariously started through cleverly 
using some good people and I wanted you to know that because in 
your answer and explanation I wish you would cover thoroughly your 
connection with it. It is most difficult for me to believe that you 
had any knowledge of that and since that testimony has not been made 
public I thought I should tell you about it in advance. 

Bishop Oxnam. I am very grateful to you, Mr. Clardy. 

Mr. Velde. If I may interrupt, Bishop, we have had another roll- 
call and the committee will stand in recess for 20 minutes. 

Bishop Oxnam. Will you allow me to answer this fully when we 
come back? 

Mr. Velde. Certainly. 

(Whereupon a short recess was taken.) 

Mr. Velde. The committee will come to order. Proceed, Mr. 
Kunzig. 

Mr. Kunzig. Bishop Oxnam, I would like to ask you now 

Mr. Velde. I would suggest that you read the last question or let 
the reporter read it and the Chair and committee would appreciate 
it very much, Bishop, if you would limit your answer to the subject 
material as nearly as possible. 

Mr. Kunzig. I think I can make it easier by stating a specific ques- 
tion. Were you an editorial adviser of the Protestant? 

Bishop Oxnam. I was an editorial adviser of the Protestant. This 
matter, however, is of such importance that I requested the Chair to 
answer it properly and Mr. Clardy's statement brought in informa- 
tion that was, of course, new to me, and because of the importance 
of this, Mr. Chairman, there are three matters that I would like to 
stress in connection with the direct answer to the question. 

First, you will please note that my relation to the Protestant Digest 
and to all the other organizations and I say all — there were 2 or 3 that 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3631 

have been named — my relationship was prior to the time that they 
were declared subversive and I had resigned from these 2 or 3 organi- 
zations prior to that time. I want that in the record. 

Mr. Scherer. Mr. Chairman, may I ask a question at this point? 

Mr. Velde. Yes. 

Mr. Scherer. Bishop, weren't they declared subversive because of 
the activities they engaged in during the time that you were connected 
with them? 

Bishop Oxnam. I am not familiar with when these organizations 
were declared subversive, nor do I know that they have ever been 
heard by any committee or by the Attorney General. But to the major 
matter, Mr. Chairman, first regarding the Protestant Digest and then 
the second and I reply to that because it was brought into the question 
by your counsel in his reference to Mr. Louis Budenz. The Protestant 
Digest was a magazine that I had seen upon the stands from time to 
time. There is a Catholic Digest, an excellent digest of Catholic 
magazine articles. I thought there was a proper place for a similar 
magazine among Protestants. 

When I received an invitation from the editor whose name was 
Kenneth Leslie, a man whom I did not know and I think I have never 
met but more than once or twice in my life, he invited me to go on the 
editorial board. He sent me a letter and the names upon the editorial 
board were upon that letter. 

There were the names of Rev. Dr. George A. Buttrick, president of 
the Federal Council of Churches, one of the distinguished ministers 
of this Nation ; Dr. William Ernest Hocking, who was a professor at 
Harvard University ; Dr. Ruf us M. Jones of the American Friends 
Service, one of the outstanding Quakers of this Nation ; Rev. Dr. Rein- 
hold Niebur of the Union Theological Seminary, who is I suppose 
the outstanding theologian in the United States today. I need not 
read the entire list, but there was also Dr. Russell Conwell Barbour, 
the editor of the National Baptist, one of the leaders of the Baptist 
Church. 

Now that letterhead also carried this statement — 

The Protestant Digest wakens those of us who happen to be Protestants to a 
realization of our responsibilities and interests in the world. 

That was signed by Eleanor Roosevelt. I asked Mr. Leslie in a 
letter that I wrote to him just what editorial advice meant : Would it 
mean board meetings regularly ? What would we be called upon to do ? 

He replied that it would be as much or as little as we would want. 

I went into this and I have forgotten when it was, 1940, was it— yes, 
in March of 1940. 

On February 11, 1942, 1 wrote this letter to Mr. Kenneth Leslie: 

I find that the Protestant is engaged in numerous activities related to national 
policy, legislation and the like, and that statements go forth from the magazine 
to the public, quite apart from the magazine itself. Many gain the impression 
that such statements have the approval of your editorial advisers. Several years 
ago, I decided not to serve in bodies unless I could give sufficient time to the 
formulation of policy to justify my name as a board member or adviser. So far, 
there have been no meetings of the group associated with the Protestant, and the 
material that appears is never considered by this group. I think I must ask 
you to accept my resignation and to drop my name from the list of editorial 
advisers. 



3632 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

I resigned. But, why did I do that? 

Mr. Velde. What was the date? 

Bishop Oxnam. February 11, 1942. 

Mr. Velde. How long were you an editorial adviser ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I have stated that I was an editorial adviser from 
I believe March 1940 to February 1942. Please remember this was 
a monthly magazine, that for a time was published only once in 2 
months. Now, why did I resign? Because Mr. Eoger Baldwin of 
the American Civil Liberties Union one day came to me and said, 
"Bishop, I wonder if you know who is really back of the Protestant 
Digest." 

I said, "What do you mean?" 

He said, "I would look into it very carefully. I think that maga- 
zine has Communist support." 

Mr. Eoger Baldwin is a man who knew that whole field intimately. 
I resigned because of what he told me, after having looked into the 
matter. 

Interestingly enough, one of the most influential churchmen, Edwin 
Holt Hughes, who was formerly Bishop here in Washington, was an 
adviser. I called him and told him immediately upon receiving this 
information from Mr. Baldwin that he ought to get his name off 
that list. That is my relationship to the magazine. 

Mr. Frazier. Did I understand you to say that you did resign as 
editor of this magazine prior to the time it had been declared a Com- 
munist-front organization? 

Bishop Oxnam. I was never an editor. I was on the board called 
the advisory board. The board never met, as a matter of fact. One 
ought not to be related to any board that does not meet, but I was on 
that board. I did resign in 1942. I think the Attorney General's list 
came out, if I recall correctly, in December 1947. 

Mr. Kunzig. I might add that the lists are retroactive. 

Bishop Oxnam. I have heard that but I have never been able to 
understand how a list can become retroactive in the sense of saying 
that an organization was subversive 20 vears ago because somebody 
found it subversive 20 years later. I do not understand that, but that 
is apart from this and I realize that. 

Mr. Chairman, the second matter, which is the important matter, 
was the anti-Catholicism of this magazine. I want to make this 
statement here for the record. Personally, I abhor religious division. 
In an hour when faith is under attack around the worlcl, there ought 
not to be religious division. I have been one who has been working 
for the reunion of the Christians of the world. It so happens that 
upon one or two issues I have had to take a stand and some have 
interpreted that as anti-Catholicism. I want the same liberties for 
every Roman Catholic that I want for every Protestant. I want the 
same liberties for the Roman Catholic Church that I want for the 
Protestant Church. We worship the same God. We adore the same 
Christ. We are inspired by the same Holy Spirit. 

Reference was made to this matter and I want to say that there is no 
anti-Catholicism in my spirit whatsoever. There ought not to be 
religious division and I think this may clear this matter, at least for 
the record. Please remember Mr. Louis Budenz was quoted in this 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3633 



matter This comes from an address, an Episcopal address I made 
totl e general council of the Methodist Church in 1948 and which was 
signed by every Bishop of the Methodist Council of Bishops. 

^Here is what I said, in part : 

Protestant churches must continue the present brotherly a^-^^Wng aj; 
onpration with the Eastern Orthodox churches until such time as Protestantism 
?s Self reunited They mav then consider union with Eastern Orthodoxy 
Sh h \t s prayerfully hoped may be consummated When ^ tbe full unum o 
Protestantism and of Eastern Orthodoxy is accomplished and the Chi istans 

all Christians may belong. 

I don't want anything in this record that would suggest anti- 

?SK tnTonly Protestant, I think, who has ever had the 
DrivK of signing a statement with Cardinal O'Connell which we 
SroriSTout tolethH and was signed in Boston^tkrew^ 
Semitism there and Jewish boys were being beaten in the streets 
ThafhSpens to be my spirit and when Mr. Budenz refers to that 
item I would like to refer to this item. , 

Mr Velde. In my opening statement I mentioned of course that 
thfeYs not to be construed by anyone as an investigation of religion 
or of religious freedoms in this country. I regret very much that you 
hroiio-htthesubiectof anticatholicism up at all. 

Bifhop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, it was brought up by your coun- 

86 MfvELDE 6 : As you know, 8 out of 9 members of this committee 
are Protestants. We do not investigate, we do not have , anything -to 
do with matters of religion whatsoever. W ^ ^^ d w ^ p 
nrotection of our constitutional freedoms. The right to woisiup 
SodTs a ri-ht of every person and I do say that bringing the mat- 
ter of catlmlicism or any other faith as represented m this country 
i«j out of order in this particular hearing. , 

Bishop Oxnam. I do not mean to be out of order, but your counsel 
rnfsed that Question and I want to make it clear that there is no 
aXatho^m t my spirit, and what I am saying is precisely 

W M^ ViSL 8 Our g counsel raises the issue of subversive activities, 
citin" the Protestant as a pro-Communist organization 

Bishop Oxnam. Didn't he use the term "anticatholicism ? I think 

^Mr^KuNziG. It was in an article by Louis Budenz, Mr. Chairman. 
I would like to hand you a document marked— - 
Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, Did I make myself clear? 

wcmldn^hire brought that in. Didn't he raise that issue? 
Mr Ktjnzig. We will go right on with the subject. 

]^^lZln^UlHt^t there be order in the room? 

Mr. Velde. Yes. . ,, . . , 9 

Mr Ct ardt Mav I ask a question apropos at this pomt « 
Mr KuNzm! You stated, ^shop Oxnam, that you left this organ- 
ization in February 1942. Can you explain why your name is listed 



I 



3634 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

as an editorial adviser in August-September 1942, as is shown on 
this Oxnam exhibit No. 13 ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Exhibit No. 13, the list on the masthead of the 
-Protestant ? 
Mr. Kunzig- Yes. 

Bishop Oxnam. No, I don't think it is necessary to explain it I 
have the letter here and my recollection of the date of it. Whether 
my name appeared later has nothing to do with me, sir. When did it 
cease appearing, do you know? 

Mr. Kunzig. It appeared a long time after this. We are talking 
about the period of 1942. Did you make any public effort to speak 
against this magazine as a Communist magazine ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Just a moment, it was no Communist magazine, 
so tar as 1 knew so far as the people who were related to it knew, so 
far as I knew In February 11, 1942, I resigned. You are showing 
me an issue of August-September 1942. I did not even know there was 
an issue between February and this. I have heard that the magazine 
was published monthly through May of 1940 and bimonthly, monthly 
again and now quarterly. It has dwindled to a pamphlet size by now 
and is begging for money. I don't know anything about it following 
February 11, 1942. & 

Mr. Jackson. What was the date of the last exhibit? 

Mr. Kunzig. August-September 1942. 

Mr. Doyle. If it was Communist dominated you would expect them 
to take advantage of the Bishop's name in the 6 months, wouldn't you « 

Mr. Velde Mr. Doyle, with all respect to you, we have asked all 
members to follow the written, the regular rules of procedure So 
would -ou please address the Chair? 

Mr. Doyle. I will the next time. I thought there was a lull and 
recess m the meeting. 

Mr. Velde. Proceed, Mr. Kunzig. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, I should like at this time to put into 
evidence testimony given by Manning Johnson, a former member of 
the national committee of the Communist Party, on July 13 The 
testimony was given July 13 and 14, 1953 before this committee.' 

I his is the question as asked by me : 

+vJ?v K f UN f IQ ; You st t ted that the magazine, the Protestant Digest, later called 
£LETE!«?f , 2 t the fV 7 a j; i0US turns of ^Ucy of the Soviet Union and I the 
twists and the turns in the Communist line as it went through the years Could 
you document that, please, with illustrations taken from the magazine? 

Mr. Johnson. Yes, I can. I have here the Protestant Digest, December 1938 
SSiffJS v." th %^ m "» n »8t Party was building the United S a„ we 
find in this edition of the Protestant Digest an article by William Spofford It 
was a reprint from The Witness, September 22, 1938. yynimm »P°irora. it 

Then Mr. Johnson answered further : 

The subject of the article is "Bill Spofford Hails United Front." 

Then later on Mr. Johnson testified : 

,•„ *%!: i 0H f S ° N - } A would lik e to present to the committee an article published 
m the Protestant April-May 1942. The author of the article S David S5 

?e n mnHn? f "t * ?"& he f ° U ° WS tte Communist Party line on reUg on byaT 

reSSfStfaTeone^ 18 ""^ *" Mand " m ^ deTOa ^ and a ?W 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3635 

Mr. Johnson went on in answer to my question which was: 

Mr. Kunzig. Do you have any further documents Mr J f °^^ r ? otestant Digest 

son Exhibit No. 25" and I offer it into evidence at this point. 

Then the document was received in evidence. Then Mr. Johnson 
went on to say: n 

Mr Johnson. I have an article entitled "Two Speeches by Kenneth Leslie. 

artSe is "The Second ^^J^£^ZSl^SffS^^^SS^ 

Russia, and it was in accord with the Communist rai ty a n 

compel America to go along with Soviet Russia on the opening up ui. 

front in Europe. 

Then we marked the document as an exhibit and Mr. Johnson went 

on to say : 

commander in chief of the whole allied forces. 
And then, finally, the question was : 

the same. They dropped the word "Digest a little later. 
The question was — 

SSSESasBflESESHaB 

And the answer by Johnson in the sworn testimony before this 
committee was : 

Of course Mr Chairman, it is to be understood that there were deviations 

the religious field. 

Mr. Moulder. Who is Mr. Johnson? u^™ 

Mr Kunzig. Manning Johnson is a witness who appeared before 

til commiltee. This was about a week ago and was in Washington a 

fe Bi d snopOxNAM. May I answer, please? Might I ask first is the 
counsel testifying? I heard all of this about the Protestant. What 
has it to do with me? I indicated when I resigned and why . Ax* .1 
do not quite understand this long recitation of a witness of a day oi so 

ag Mr Jackson. I think that the relative point is that although, as you 
sav the Protestant was not cited as a Communist publication until 
after your separation, the fact is that the activity of the publication 
which led to its citation was going on at the time that you were an 
editorial advisor. I do not say that you contributed to it in any way 
However, I think that it is relative and material and it cannot be 
deleted. 



3636 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

It seems to me that your statement indicating that you ceased to be 
an editorial adviser before the citation of the publication as being 
Communist-dominated in no way alters the substantial fact that the 
Protestant was before that date engaged in activities which later 
brought it under Federal scrutiny. 

Bishop Oxnam. But when reference is made to the United Front, 
and in 1935 there is a remark in an article where I have opposed it, 
that America must not accept communism in order to oppose fascism. 

Mr. Velde. You are getting out of line. Bishop, and I would like 
to have you answer the questions as nearly as possible. 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you, sir. 

Mr. Velde. In a precise manner and in response to the questions, 
if you can. 

Mr. Clardt. Mr. Chairman, might I ask a question ? 

Mr. Velde. Yes. 

Mr. Clardy. Bishop Oxnam, the testimony that was read to you is 
only a portion of that that I referred to earlier when I made the state- 
ment intended to be helpful to you. But some questions suggested 
themselves to me, and I address these to you in all the spirit of Chris- 
tian charity that I can summon up. 

It seems to me that in view of the fact that you have continually 
attacked all investigating committees, including this one, and that is 
certainly your right, because I am not any more immune to criticism 
than you or anyone else, but the fact that you have done so, and that 
then this committee in taking sworn testimony discovers things such 
as this magazine when an organization or a magazine known as the 
Protestant or Protestant Digest that was Communist in origin and 
inception and in practice in ways that perhaps even you did not see, 
it occurs to me should demonstrate to you, sir, that only a committee 
of this kind is equipped to ferret out the truth which you could not 
discover despite the fact that you were associated with the organiza- 
tion for the period that you were. 

Now, I say that in all Christian charity, but may I address myself 
to another thing that has lain heavily on me ever since you attacked 
the committee like that on February 24 of this year which caused me, 
on the 25th, to take the floor and for about 30 seconds to point out that 
I thought you had been most un-Christian in impugning to me affairs 
which had existed in the past. You did not know me. You had never 
heard of me. I had heard briefly of you, but I really knew nothing of 
you. It was an implication of criticism by association, because I had 
been made a member of the committee which had not acted and with 
which I had nothing to do up to that point, which had not even had 
a hearing because at that time it made it very plain and very clear, to 
me at least, that you were, through this method 

Mr. Velde. Are you asking him a question, Mr. Clardy? 

Mr. Clardy. I will. I am building up to it. I want to ask him some- 
thing very personal on it, and it is a matter of personal privilege, more 
or less, because it troubles me. 

The question is this : When you made that speech and then when we 
exchanged brief communication, why did you not exhibit the spirit 
of charity that I think all of us should have and frankly admit that 
you did not intend to include me or Mr. Scherer in the blanket indict- 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3637 

ment which you delivered against the entire committee and on which 
we had just been appointed? 

Mr Velde. The Chair has previously announced that we are inter- 
ested in concluding this hearing today, and there is no reason why we 
should argue in this particular vein, and I believe the committee will 
affree that we are here to ascertain facts to determine whether or not 
the Bishop has been harmed in any way by the activities of this com- 
mittee, and as I said before, and I regret it very much that the Lishop 
brought personalities into this, in the first place, and I do not think 
that we should pursue any further personalities. And so I ask you to 
withdraw your question if you would, Mr. Clardy 

Mr. Clardy. I bow to the ruling of the Chair. I will talk with you 
off the record after this is over, Bishop. 

Bishop Oxnam. I would count it an honor to chat with you after- 
ward and I would like to show you a copy of the address and explain 
the reason for it, and since the question is withdrawn I cannot say 

further. , . , . . . ,, - . 

Mr Doyle. Bishop, may I ask vou this, please, m view ot the tact 
that vou were on the advisory committee or board of the Protestant 
Dio-est from March 1940, from the beginning of it until February 1942, 
how much did they pay you in salary or compensation for being on 

that? . , ^ 

Bishop Oxnam. As a matter of fact of course there was no remu- 
neration involved. Many groups often ask me. For instance I am 
servino- as an advisory member, I believe, on the Religious Book Club. 
We donot meet. We receive nothing. The experts do the work. It 
is a bad policy and one ought to sit with a group of that kind. 

Mr Jackson. You also contributed to the Protestant? 

Bishop Oxnam. I made an address which they published. It had 
something to do with clerical fascism and they asked if they could 
reprint it and I said they could. . . 

Mr. Kunzig. It is entitled "Monsignor Sheen and Clerical-Fascism. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, that article appeared. _ , 

Mr Moulder. While you were serving as editorial adviser, did you 
contribute or advise in any connection whatsoever with the report 
that was made by Mr. Budenz ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I am sorry I did not get the question, sir. 1 would 
like to wet it. I couldn't quite hear. It is very difficult in this room. 

Mr Moulder. The reference was made to a statement awhile ago 
which was published in the Protestant Digest and I am asking you as 
to whether or not you made any contributions or had any connection 
or knowledge or contributed toward the article whatsoever. 

Bishop Oxnam. I state in the letter of resignation : "So far there 
have been no meetings of the group associated with the Protestant. 

There were letters from Mr. Leslie generally dealing with some 
attempt to work out some national pronouncement of some kind. I 
think there was a banquet organized in New York about Protestantism 
Answers Hate. It had to do with anti-Semitism at the time. That 
was about all the relationship. The editorial board never met. 

Mr. Moulder. Then your answer to that question is No, you did 
not contribute or have any association with Mr. Budenz in the writing 

Bishop Oxnam. Oh, no. I never met Mr. Budenz. I had one letter 
from him, but that is all. 



3638 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



Mr. Velde. Now, you are examining the exhibit that has been pre- 
sented to you. 

Bishop Oxnam. It is not necessary. I know that article, thank 
you, sir. 

Mr. Scherer. Could I see that, Counsel ? 

Mr. Velde. Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Kunzig. I then offer into evidence Oxnam exhibits Nos. 11, 12, 
and 13, which are the documents we have just been discussing involv- 
ing the Protestant and one previous, American League for Peace and 
Democracy, which we discussed earlier before the recess. 

Mr. Velde. Without objection, it is so ordered. 

(American League for Peace and Democracy, letterhead, dated 
April 6, 1939, Oxnam exhibit No. 11 ; the Protestant Digest, June- 
July, contents page, Oxnam exhibit No. 12; and the Protestant, 
August-September 1942, list of editorial advisers, Oxnam exhibit No. 
13 were received in evidence.) 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 11 

(Letterhead dated April 6, 1939) 
The American League for Peace and Democracy 



Monthly magazine: 
April 6th, 1939 



The Fight 



National Office 
268 Fourth Ave., room 701 
New York, N. Y. 
Cable Address 
Amleag, New York 
Tel. AL 4-9784-9785 



Harry F. Ward, national chairman 

Mrs. Victor L. Berger 

Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune 

Howard G. Costigan 

Robert Morss Lovett 

Rev. William B. Spofford 

A. F. Whitney, vice chairmen 



executive board 



James S. Allen 
Rev. Jule Ayers 
George Biddle 
LeRoy Bowman 
Eleanor Brannan 
Joseph Cadden 
Margaret Forsyth 
Walter Frank 
Clarence Hathaway 



Prof. Oliver Larkin 
George Marshall 
Prof. Walter Rautenstrauch 
Rev. William B. Spofford 
Dr. Channing Tobias 
Mrs. A. H. Vixman 
Morris Watson 
Dr. Max Yergan 



See national committee members on reverse side 
[Reverse side of letterhead] 

NATIONAL COMMITTEE MEMBERS 



Grace Abbott 

Devere Allen 

John T. Bernard 

Rev. Dwight Bradley 

Bishop Benjamin Brewster 

Dorothy Detzer 

Jerome Davis 

Prof. Paul H. Douglas 

Sherwood Eddy 

Prof. Albert Einstein 

Prof. Henry Pratt Fairchild 

Francis L. Gorman 

President Frank P. Graham 

Hubert C. Herring 

Rabbi Edward L. Israel 



Joseph Lash 

Prof. Robert Morss Lovett 

Rev. John A. MacKay 

President Wm. A. Neilson 

Jerry O'Connell 

Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam 

Bishop Robert L. Paddock 

Bishop Edward L. Parsons 

A. Phillip Randolph 

Paul Robeson 

Rev. Guv Emery Shipler 

Rabbi Abba Hillel Silver 

Upton Sinclair 

Leland Stowe, and others 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3639 



NATIONAL SPONSORS 



Dr. Howard C. Naffziger, University of 

California Medical School 
Dr. Percival Bailey 
Dr. Anton J. Carlson 
Dr. Arno B. Luckhardt, of University of 

Chicago Medical School 
Dr. Haven Enie' son, of Columbia Uni- 
versity 
Dr. Walter B. Cannon 
Dr. Samuel A. Levine, of Harvard Medi- 
cal School 
Dr. David J. Davis, of University of Il- 
linois Medical School 
Dr. Adolph Meyer 
Dr. Henry E. Sigerist, of Johns Hopkins 

Medical School 
Dr. Andrew C. Ivy, of Northwestern 

University Medical School 
Dr. Frederick Amassa Coller 
Dr. Reuben L. Kahn 
Dr. L. H. Newburgh 
Dr. John Sundwall, of University of 

Michigan Medical School 
Dr. Samuel J. Kopetsky, of New York 

Polyclinic Medical School 
Dr. William H. Park, of New York Uni- 
versity Medical School 



Dr. Thomas Addis 

Dr. Leo Eloesser, of Stamford Univer- 
sity Medical School 

Dr. Jacques J. Bronfenbrenner 

Dr. Carl F. Cori 

Dr. Joseph Erlanger 

Dr. Evarts A. Graham 

Dr. Leo Loeb, of Washington University 
Medical School 

Dr. Harry Goldblatt 

Dr. Carl H. Lenhart 

Dr. Rov Wesley Scott 

Dr. T. Wingate Todd, of Western Re- 
serve Medical S'chool 

Dr. John P. Peters 

Dr. C. E. A. Winslow, of Yale Medical 
School 

Dr. E. O. Rosenow, of Mayo Clinic 

Dr. George Baehr 

Dr. Ernst P. Boas 

Dr. Bela Schick, of Mount Sinai Hospi- 
tal, New York 

Dr. Phoebus A. Levene 
Dr. Florence R. Sabin, of Rockefeller 
Institute for Medical Research 



lawyers' committee 



Hon. Paul J. Kern, chairman 
S. John Block 
Louis B. Boudin 
Maurice P. Davidson 
Hubert T. Delany 
Morris L. Ernst 
Osmond K. Fraenkel 
Arthur Garfield Hays 



Stanley M. Isaacs 

Paul J. Kern 

Carol King 

Vito Marcantonio 

Newbold Morris, Jr. 

Kurt Rosenfeld 

Louis Waldman, and others 



Sherwood Anderson 
Peter Blunie 
Van Wyek Brooks 
Malcolm Cowley 
Countee Cullen 
Theodore Dreiser 
Edna Ferber 
Dorothy C. Fisher 
Lewis Gannett 
Wm. Gropper 
Ernest Hemingway 
Langston Hughes 



WRITERS' AND ARTISTS' COMMITTEE 

Fannie Hurst 
Rockwell Kent 
Sinclair Lewis 
Archibald MacLeish 
Dorothy Parker 
Elliot Paul 
Ernst Toller 
Carl Van Doren 
Stuyvesant Van Veen 
Ella Winter 
Art Young, and others 



SOCIAL WORKERS' COMMITTEE 



Lillian D. Wald, honorary chairman 

Harald H. Lund, chairman 

Helen M. Harris, vice chairman 

Wayne McMillen, vice chairman 

Edith Abbott 

Herschel Alt 

Grace L. Coyle 

Helen Hall 

A. Gordon Hamilton 

Paul Kellogg 



Jacob Kepecs 
John A. Kingsbury 
Mary van Kleeck 
Eduard C. Lindeman 
Owen R. Lovejoy 
Walter Pettit 
Bertha C. Reynolds 
Mary Simkhovitch 
Ethel C. Taylor 
Walter West, and others 



3640 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



PSYCHOLOGISTS COMMITTEE 



Clark L. Hull 
Gordon W. Allport 
John F. Dashiell 
Leonard W. Doob 
Horace B. English 
Franklin Fearing 
I. Kreehevsky 
Zing Yang Kuo 



Herbert S. Langfeld 

Kurt Lewin 

Norman R. F. Maier 

Gardner Murphy 

T. C. Schneirla 

Edward Chace Tolnian 

Goodwin Watson, and others 



women's division 



Miss Dorothy Parker, chairman Mrs. Burgess Meredith 
Mrs. Florentine S. Sherman, vice chair- Mrs. Herman Shumlin 

man Mrs. Brock Pemberton 

Mrs. Ralph Stanwood Foss Minna Harkavy 

Mrs. Burton Emmett Mrs. Monroe Meyer 

Mrs. H. V. Kaltenborn Mrs. Carlton Balliett, Jr., and others 
Mrs. Maxwell Anderson 



MUSICIANS' COMMITTEE 



Pablo Casals, honorary chairman 

Leon Barzin 

Arthur Bodanzky 

John Alden Carpenter 

Samuel Chotzinoff 

Olin Downes 

Alma Gluck 

Leopold Godowsky 

Edwin Franko Goldman 

Louise Homer 

A. Walter Kramer 



Serge Koussevitzky 

Josef Lhevinne 

Daniel Gregory Mason 

Walter Piston 

Fritz Reiner 

Paul Robeson 

Beryl Rubenstein 

Alexander Smallens 

Albert Stoessel 

Alfred Wallenstein 

Efrem Zimbalist, and others 



THEATRE AETS COMMITTEE 



Heywood Broun 
Morris Carnovsky 
Muriel Draper 
Angna Enters 
Benny Goodman 
Martha Graham 
Jed Harris 
Lillian Hellman 
Doris Humphrey 
John Howard Lawson 



Burgess Meredith 
Philip Merivale 
Paul Muni 
Clifford Odets 
Herman Shumlin 
Sylvia Sidney 
Lee Simonson 
George Sklar 
Richard Watts, Jr. 
Orson Welles, and others 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3641 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 12 

MSGR. SHEEN AND CLERICAL-FASCISM 



PROUST AM 



SUMMER 



OIGfST 



Editorials: 



Msgr. Sheen and 

Clerical-Fascism . . Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam I 

Comments on "Save Protestant England" . . 5-13 
Pierre van Paassen Gregory Vlastos 
Henry N. Wieman Donald G. Lothrop 

► Emancipation Proclamation- 1 94 1 James Luther Adams 14 

U.S.S.R. and American Defense . . Kenneth Leslie 20 

I Am an American P«d ™ icr » 24 

Vichyful Thinking Andre Gery 27 

►Why War Aims? Paul Ti,,ich 33 

^►Semites and Samaritans .... Ralph S. Morton 39 

Britain Thrilled by Soviet Defense . Hewlett Johnson 44 

The Negativism of Positivism . . . . Peter Wus+ 47 

►The Vatican and the Nazi-Soviet Pact . . S.R.Herbert 54 

Vital Literature , . ,. .. 

South of God Kenne+h Le$,,e 6o 

Let My People Go Cedric Belfrage 71 

92 
Letters to the Editor 



25c 



324 



43620 — 54 -5 



3642 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 13 

(Part 1) 



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TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3643 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 13 
(Part 2) 



f\ ifc, i 



3644 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 13 

(Part 3) 

T H £■ PfiOIfSIIfif 



4 AM Kg L. A»AMS 
JOSEPH BrAJ'STO? 



Rvth Nan&a An-snen 
Russell C f Barbovs 

L. M. BiRKBEAO 



CHARLES S. BrASSEH 

<S&Mm A. Beat 
bsekars c c'lacsrn 
Jksome Davis 

Mark A. Dawbbi 



£<fif«?d by Keisneth Lesue 
Associate j?<f iiors 
Pierse Vas 



JOSEPH P. FESTCH3E8 

Steehen H. FsrrcsMAsr 

E&SSEST G« ASSAM GfTRJUE 
JOSEEM HaSOUTSWIAK 



Chester E. Hooososj 
Walter M. Hortqk 

e»wj» h. heches 
Hewlett Johnso» 

DoXAEB LOTHSOE 

J. A. MacCau,Wm 
Joki? A. Mackay 

JFOKK MacMuWAE 

Curros Macon 
H, D. A. Major 
Francis J, McCotoell. 
Coneas H MOSHLMAK 
Jamss MorrAtr 
Joseph G. Moore 
Loots D, Nswtoh 
G. BsoMtrv Ox* am 



H. RtfTEEUGE SOOTSWOKTH 

Pavl Ttlueck 



WjfUTELM PAUCK 
E&vras McK< POTEAT 



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GREOOSY VlAStOS 
Rl?EOS W. WEAVER 

Hejs-ry N. Wiemak 



Vol IV 






AUGUST-SEPTEMBER. i$42 



Na? 



INDIA: THE WAR'S DOUBLE EXPOSURE 

Editorial by KENNETH LESLIE 



Lady Em pink 

EMPIRE is an old lady, blind to all but her jewels toward which 
she reaches her greedy hands. Younger empires in the East 
and in the West have bullied her and slapped her, but she has lost 
perspective along with the vitality of her own young days when 
she did the bullying and the slapping. With these graduates of her 
own school of empire now at her throat she would not believe they 
were not still her admiring pupils. She had been so long admired, 
so long, kowtowed to, She dallied with them, played at lovers with 
them, tut-tutted their brutality toward the Jews in the West and 
the Chinese in the Bast (world bearers of humanism). Then she 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3645 

Sir, did you ever contribute to a magazine or publication entitled 
"Soviet Russia Today"? 8 . . _. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir. I wrote one article for Soviet Russia lo- 
day, I think, dealing with the Yalta pact. That article was so changed 
by the editors that when I received a second invitation, I replied that 
I could never contribute another article to any magazine that treated 
an article in that fashion. m 

Mr. Kunzig. You had no way of stopping the publication ot the 
changed version once it was already out of your hands ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I sent my copy to the editor. All respectable mag- 
azines print what you send', or, if there is to be editorial change, they 
send it back to you for your permission. No such return occurred, 
and that was mv only relationship with that group. 

May I point'out that these matters were not in the hies. I ou are 
bringing in a number of items here that were never in any ot the re- 
leased files to which I am referring, and I realize what is being done 
publicly. There is an attempt to build up a relationship that mis- 
represents me completely, sir. 

Mr Kunzig. These are all parts, sir, of the Oxnam files ot the Com- 
mittee on Un-American Activities. This Soviet Russia Today was 

cited as a Communist 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Clardy. . . 

Mr. Clardy. May I point out, Bishop, there is no intention at all to 
do what you are talking about, but to demonstrate one fact, that you 
obviously did not, when you made some statements about what is m 
our files, actually know the facts. That is the purpose. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I have releases to which 1 have re- 
ferred over the period of 7 years that have been sent out officially, and 
I have been referring to those releases. If there is additional informa- 
tion, Mr. Clardy, thank you for letting me know, sir. 

Mr. Velde. Witness, remember, you agreed to answer questions 
about anything, any organizations that you joined. 
Bishop Oxnam. Yes; I did. . 

Mr. Velde. So I see no reason why we should continue. In order 
to get the record straight and to do justice to this matter, we are in 
a public forum, as I mentioned a while ago, and we must do justice. 
We owe it to the American people ; you owe it to the American people, 
and we must do justice. . . 

Mr. Ktjnzig. I wish the record to show, Mr. Chairman, that Soviet 
Russia Today was cited as a Communist front by the Special Com- 
mittee on Un-American Activities report March 29, 1944; also cited 
in report June 25, 1942, which, I believe, was prior to the time of this 
contribution of yours. It was cited as a Communist-front publication 
by the Congressional Committee on Un-American Activities, House 

s Soviet Russia Todav. 1. Cited as a Communist front. (Special Committee on Un- 
American Activities, report, March 29, 1944, p. 167 ; also cited in report, June 25, 1942, 

P '2 21 Cited as a "Communist-front publication." (Congressional Committee on ^-Ameri- 
can Activities H. Rept. 1953. on the Congress of American Women, April 26, 1950 (origi- 

^jS^lfi^fti^t^Jffiindrtiwit organizations "for the sole purpose -of 
carrying on propaganda on behalf of the Soviet Union." (California Committee on Un- 

A TAwS!?SfeSSffii 9 ft&dIS^ Soviet Union and distributed by the Commu- 
nists' P,™|?essive Book Shop 'in Boston. Mass. "The articles and pictures m this magazine 
seek to show the great benefits and advantages enjoyed by R^ian worters^ir^Btag tte 
theme that Russia is the only successful nation in the world today (Massachusetts 
House Committee on Un-American Activities, report, 19d* pp. .JM ana oik.; 



3646 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Report 1953, and also by the California committee in 1948, and the 
Massachusetts House Committee on Un-American Activities in its 
report in 1938. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman, may I ask a question? 

Mr. Velde. May we let counsel finish? 

Mr. Kunzig. I should like to introduce Oxnam exhibit No. 14 into 
evidence at this time. 

Mr. Velde. Without objection Oxnam exhibit No. 14 will be 
admitted. 

(The magazine Soviet Russia Today referred to was marked 
"Oxnam Exhibit No. 14" and received in evidence as Oxnam exhibit 
No. 14.) 

Mr. Kunzig. This states that you were a contributor there, sir, on 
the front page. It is not the article you wrote, but it states you were 
a contributor. 

Bishop Oxnam. Then you are not interested in what I said? 

Mr. Kunzig. If you have it here, I would be glad to put it in the 
record. 

Bishop Oxnam. I do not. I can get it, and I would like to have it 
in because I would like it to be known what I say when I put my 
signature on it. 

Mr. Velde. I suggest he be allowed to examine 

Mr. Kunzig. He said he did not care to, because it is not his article. 
I therefore would like to offer into evidence as exhibit 15 the document 
which you will then send to me, sir, which we will incorporate with 
your permission, Mr. Chairman, in the record, so that exactly what 
the bishop said may be in the record. Is that right, sir ? 

Mr. Velde. I do not know. This is a little bit unusual procedure, 
whether we can admit evidence that has not been prepared. 

Mr. Kunzig. The bishop said he has the document and wishes it be 
made part of the record, and may 1 suggest, it is only fair to make it 
part of the record. 

Mr. Velde. Is it already prepared? 

Mr. Kunzig. He has written an article sometime ago which article 
he has and will send to us, which was in Soviet Russia Today. This 
exhibit here merely lists him as a previous contributor. It says, 
"Amongst recent contributors, Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam." The 
article written for Soviet Russia Today is not here, and Mr. Oxnam 
says he will present it to us, and I think it should be a part of the 
record. 

Mr. Clardy. May I suggest something, Mr. Chairman ? 

Mr. Velde. I would like the judgment of the committee on this 
matter. 

Mr. Clardy. I think the proper method is the usual one, to have it 
received at the conclusion of the hearing when the bishop has it ready 
and have it marked as a late filed exhibit to be included in the record. 

Mr. Velde. May I have some expression of opinion regarding this? 

Mr. Frazier. Mr. Chairman, if the bishop wants to include it, I 
see no reason why it should not be included in the record. Did I 
misunderstand the bishop? Did you say you wanted to submit that 
as a part of the record ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Frazier, thank you, sir. The counsel, I 
thought, was presenting the article I had written as evidence. I find 
that he is not, and it seemed to me that the article itself ought to be in 





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TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3647 

the record instead of the reference that was made here with the impli- 
cations that lie in the subsequent statements by the counsel. 

Mr. Kunzig. And I agreed with you. 

Mr. Velde. Let me ask you, Bishop, this article is a matter of public 
information. It has been published? 

Bishop Oxnam. It was published, sir, but the article that 1 sent to 
them differs from it considerably, and I would like both to be m your 
possession. 

Mr. Clardy. May I inquire 



Mr. Velde. Just a minute. He has explained he sent an article 
in for publication, and it was changed. 

Mr. Clardy. I know, but do you mean, Bishop, that you can give 
us the original manuscript? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir; yes, sir. 

Mr. Clardy. And then a copy of the magazine so that we may com- 
pare the two. . 

Bishop Oxnam. Quite, that is exactly what I had m mmd. 

Mr Clardy. I think that would be excellent, but I am suggesting 
that technically— this is purely a matter of legality— that it should 
be received and marked as a late filed exhibit when you have it ready. 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you very much. 

Mr. Clardy. Could you identify the approximate date? 

Bishop Oxnam. I am afraid I could not offhand, sir. 

Mr. Chairman. Mr. Clardy asked for a date. m 

Mr Velde. The Chair is ready to rule. Oxnam exhibits Nos. 15 and 
16 one of which is the version which was published, and one of which 
is the version that Bishop Oxnam presented for publication, will be 
admitted into the record at this point without objection. 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you, sir. 

(The manuscript presented to Soviet Russia Today and the pub- 
lished version referred to were received in evidence as Oxnam exhibits 
Nos. 15 and 16.) (See pp. 3648 and 3649.) , 

Bishop Oxnam. Do you wish this elate that Mr. Clardy asked about t 

Mr. Clardy. I would appreciate it, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Won't the publication show the date of it? You might 
give us the date. . ,.■,,, 

Bishop Oxnam. In the letter of December 16, 1946, in which they 
make a request is this— that is as close as I can get to nV- In the 
article I contributed to the magazine sometime back I was astounded 
to note the editorial changes that eliminated any word critical in 

nit-lire 

It was prior to December 16, 1946 ; I suppose quite close to that date, 

within months. ..... - ,, 

Mr. Doyle. Mr. Chairman, my impression is that m view ot the 
fact that the Bishop is being confronted with this, as I understand it, 
for the first time now, and that you are calling attention to the fact 
that the front page of this magazine lists him as "amongst recent con- 
tributors." I think it very pertinent to list some of the other con- 
tributors to the same magazine. I notice there there are quite a few 
other recent contributors. There is a United States Senator listed 
here, for instance— two of them. There are two of them listed here 
as recent contributors, and other well-known names to the American 

public. 

Mr. Veij)e. Does the gentleman want to investigate or to 



3648 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 15 
(Part 1) 

A Churchman Evaluates the Crimea Conf erence 

by Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam, President o'f" 

The Federal Council ot the I'hu rches of Christ 

in America and Bishop or The Methodist C hurch, New Y ork Area . 

The agreement reached at Yalta is "applied idealism" of a high <*d*r. 
It reaffirms the inflexible resolve of the United Nations to defeat the 
common enemy . It insists that physical victory is not enough. We must go 
on and win the coral victory that will result in a secure and lasting peSe 
wnicn will "afford assurance that all men in all lands may live out their 
lives in ireedom fro,,, fear and want." T ne Atlantic Charter is referred to 
specifically three times in the official statement of the Crimea Conference. 
It appears taat tne fundamental principles of tne Atlantic Charter are to be 
regarded as a guide to tie United Nations in the forthcoming conference at 
San rrancisco. The Crimea Conference renewed the pledge that all peoples 
shall have tne right to choose tne form of government under which they will 
live; announced plans for the relief ana rehabilitation of liberated peoples- 
reailirmed t,.e rejection of fascism by peace-loving nations; and re-stated ' 
tr.e resolve to extirpate fascism w„erever found; and announced plans and 
tne date for the eagerly awaited Conference of the United Nations in which 
tr.e jumbarton Oaks proposals are to be considered and improved and a general 
international organization of the peace-loving nations of the world estab- 
1 1 s;; ed . 

Underlying these significant announcements are two fundamental facts t 
first, the full participation of tne United states of America in attempts to 
solve the extraordinarily difficult problems of Europe; second, tne apparent 
abandonment of policies wherein individual nations sought to reacn solutions 
in their own interest, with the consequent acceptance of a policy in wnich 
joint action by at least the Big r.iree would be taken. Churcnmen recognise 
tr.e :act taat Russia has been pursuing alternate policies at the same time, 
one oased upon tne assumption that tne United States would not collaborate 
in tne post-war world, the other based upon the assumption tnat the United 
otates would. The first meant unilateral agreements designed to assure 
security for Russia in the post-war world. Ihe other meant tne announcement 
ox tne willingness to collaborate and to reach joint decision. It appeared 
for a time tnat both England and Russia were moving forward upon tne basis 
of individual decision. It appeared furtner tnat tne aloofness of the United 
States might mean a repetition of tne American action that followed the last 
.'.orld '..ar. It is with a great sense of relief tnat churchmen now know that 
tne clear intent of our government is to collaborate and the equally clear 
intent of tne other members of tne Big Three is to move on the basis of 
joint action. It now beooaes necessary that our leaders have the full sup- 
port of the American people to the end that we may progress toward the epal 
of world law and order. 

The religious forces of the world will regard the decisions of the 
Crimean Conference as marking substantial and significant advance toward 
world law and order. I believe they will support our statesmen in these 
proposals. I believe they will support tne plans for a general international 
organization that will no doubt emerge from the forthcoming conference of 
tne United Nations. Religious leaders everywhere realize that the ethical 
ideals of religion must now be translated into the realities of world law 
and order, economic justice and racial brotherhood. It is*signif icant, and 
perhaps symbolic, fact that the Crimean Conference held in the former summer* 
palace of a Czar should seek to build a world in which the common man shall 
come to his rightful place. It is equally significant that tne Conference 
to be held in San Francisco will meet in a city named for St. Francis of 



O N 



| part l) 
(uovlst Russl* Today, April 19A5) 

E IV T S 



v lin \M> COMMBNT ■> 

CHURCHMAN EVALUATES valta Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam 9 

r WORLD TRADE UNION IMn I'aisih I ■ huznetsov 10 

. THE PEACE SETTLEMENl I/. /'. Tarasm I I 

II n \\y 01 iii> i s>R Ll. Col. I'eltr /'• Ancharslty 12 

l vni.ini. THE MAP i>E SOVIET inih ">TR\ William Miindci 14 

IE FORTY-FIFTH MONTH C.ilpt. Strati S . Kvttrnakoff 17 

LTURAL REVIEW Isiilnr Silmridrr 20 

nroM \\ of ti rkmimm in .... . L. Irin 21 

if ti RKMEN REPUBLIC Corliss Lamont -- 

iildren's Biixii) factor) B. Brodovsky 23 

L.HT BATTLI M STALINGRAD Knnslanlin SimonOV 24 

it r i.n isl IONS i\« BRED Theodore Baft' 26 

[BON \XB \n riBOTI, review Jessna Smith 1~ 

SSIAN POETS is new TRANSLATION, review . . . Genevieve Taaaard 2d 

HIRE THE ARCTIC HAS COME ALIVE, rCt'lCU' Ertlflt ('.. Ropes -" ' 

SSII I SMITH, Editor IHEOOORE BAYER, Manuari 



I OM-HIBl TORS 

Bailor G, Bromlti uisim is Pml- 
nl ol Iht frdeial Council of thr 
niche, ol Chriat m America and 

■h .1 ihc Methodial ( hurch. New 

re Area Formerh Bishop of thr 

hurch in Omaha, and more 

rntls in llir B n Area, Hi.hop 

nam ha. lectured and written widely-. 
■i"ii„ I - ooaa ,. ane entitled Russian 
prrssians 

\ uail i \ Ki INfTJtw i. chairman of 
• All-lnion Central Council ,.f Trade 
headed thr s m , rI deleRa- 
n to the World Trade I nion Con- 
ni.r m London. He M.*nt mm years 
the Inilcd Nate ami .tudied at the 
inegie In 

\l P I t.tv.t i. a n.einl.et of the 
.. mtral ( uuncil of Trade 
Itotla an.l «j. t memhei n( the So« iet 
legati ... to the I ondon Conference. 
I r l 01 I t n. I' WHsaaarr ia in 

the K..I Sim. 
Wiiiuu Mtvni i. the author of 

<• So,,, i /.,. /.,„ puhliahed be the 
j| I're.. and the liwimte of Pacific 

latum. He hi- Keen reaearch liu- 
iir at thr American Ruaeian Intti- 
le, >i»itin K lecturer at SvraCMie Uni- 
r-itv, and Irrttiret on '•The Soviet 
' in.n Today" at the leffrrwn School 

s„;,| Science in New York. 

(set. >t»i.ll N. KoClNARoeT. our 

military iinlyat, ia author of the out- 
Thr be 



standing hi.ok on the Red Vrmi 
K»,,,„ , fnhlina Forrrs. 

burnt SCHNIBMR, former literary rd. 
t..r ..t S„,,,i Russia ToJar. ii now 
literary editor of the .Yew tlmssts. H 
in the author of a number of novel* and 
\olumes of poetry and it at present at 
work ..n another novel. The item* in 
thin article were culled from recent 
cables received from the USSR. 

L. Irin and B. Baooovtir are Sox < t 

Kon3tantin Simonov it the vouns 
Soviet writer who hat made a brilliant 
reputation during, the war. Hi- war 
ntoriei A'e Quarter have been translated 
and puhliahed in thia country and his 
play The Russian Peupie was produced 
by the Theatre Guild. 

Uek'ivievt TAOCAU, * member of the 
faculty of Sarah Lawrence College, i- 
one of our leading Aaocricaa poets a- 
well at a proae writer of diatinrti.n. 
She it the author of Tie Life and Mm ' 
of Emily Diciinsun. Her met men 
volume of poetry ia The Lama /'t. .• 

Ernest C. Rorta ia Ruaaian Satcial.-t 
of the Bureau of Foreign aad Oomrst 
Commerce of the United State* Dtnn. 
ment of Commerce. He ia the auth 
of numcrout articlet ia government and 
other publication! aad wat the editor 
aod compiler of Russian Besnomtt 
Sues from 19ZS to 1*40, a bulletin on 
economic and other development* in the 
USSR. 



■•n the rover is Boris Siiolmyrr, one of the best students 
XakkimOt* Xavtl Aiudrmy of thr I'S^k. 



Amomfi Hft-eml 



IRIN \ tltkSWDH, WILLIAM ROSE BtN I I . Mil I EN RKVNII. IIENRIEI1 \ 
BLCKM ASTER, HuLt.ER CAHILL, JOSEPH E. imils, lllliNtiir DRBISBR, 
HiiUsRii nsr, II tRtiLU L. ICKES, RT. RRV. HEWLETT JdIINmiN, iji \n OF 
I WIIRHt R\, Ri.sl \I\IRER. HARRIET MiioRE. SENMilR JAMBS E. MUR- 
RAY, IEXATOR CLAUDE IHTER. ARTHUR UPHAM POPE, D. N. I'RITT. M.P.. 
i.il ENTlN BBYNOLM, isiixir MHNMliER iwi SEOMRRS, HIUTN SBAVER, 
I.R. HENRs, F . IICBRIST, K.OSSTAMTTN SIMONOV, KOGAR SNt.w, JOHANNES 
STBBLB, FRFDERKK I. Mill MIN. ANNA Mil ISE STRONC, ORNRVIBVI Ml, 
i \RN, VALRRY J. TEREMITENkll, SIDNEY vt ERR, MAX WERNER, ALBER1 
RHYS WILLIAMS. ELLA WINTER 

F//./..J ti this iswe from SOI'FOTO except uhere otherwise sprtihc.L 
■• April IsMl F,,i.,r.| aa tad daw nalbn M»rrh .'S |il> at the Put Ornci 

-• N#- \ .„E. N \ . ,„,.j r , •>,, ,, , ,., m., |, .. v^S*,,,,,,,,^, <) i„ ,„ r ,, Jf ., ,,. , . 
IVi.-h^l u^tMj b, ih, s R 1 |„| ,„ (\„ ,,, ■.-.,„ .,_. s ,„„ j, 

S.^i lo, .N. Y. Indniil in Hull. in, .1 n„ Poblu A ■..,.. lofonnaiioa Service 

PRINTED IN U. S. A. 



To Our Readers 

A teacher writes: "Your magazine 
is the best source of information on 
our Soviet ally for class-room use 
that I have found." 

A G.I. Joe writes: "Your maga- 
zine is a source of inspiration." 

A trade unionist writes: "I take 
the greatest interst in your accounts 
of current happenings in the I .S.Sft 
icAirr. / cannot find elsi-where." 

A farm woman writes: "I read 
that article on Soviet rubber and 
could not get it out of mv mintf. / 
foo am experimenting with a wild 
rubber plant." 

A churchman writis: "Your 
magazine is an outstanding exam file 
nf literary sswial significance." 

A government official write,: "I 
find your magazine indispensable." 

In American patriot write,: "Thi 
best insurance to keep our country 
ti ith a friendly attitude toward Rus- 
sia it to hair at /rail a million sub- 

icriben to SRT." 

This is just a random sampling of 
letters received from appreciative, 
readers. That so many different 
type* of people find a inninion 
ground of interest in our page, 
demonstrates, ire believe, that our 
magazine ha, tut mi/MirrorH junction 
in building the national unity and 
the understanding of our aiftps es- 
sential to back up the historic 
(Crimea decisions. 

Every reader uho become, a sub- 
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tribution problems. Fiery new sub- 
si riber helps to extend the influence 
of our magazine into ever larger 
group*. 

Subscribe today — and get Your 
friends to subscribe. If ith each sub- 
scription goes a ropy of the im- 
portant book b\ Dr. Harry Ward 
I see bark page) "The Soviet Spirit." 



SOVIET HI SS| \ TODAY. 

DEPT. KVl 

1 1 4 Ea-t 32n.l St., New York, 16, N.Y. 
Deaf Situ: 

1 rnrlnw $2.00 for which please 
enter my aubM-ription to S >f »'ef Rus- 
sia Today for one year and aend me 
mv copv of The Soviet Spirit hv 
Harry ¥. Ward. 

Name 

ItcMreaa 

City 

Zone Nlllllliir SlMli- 



Ii3620 0-5U (F«c« p. 36W) No. 1 



A CHURCHMAN EVALUATES YALTA 



J 



(JO. 16 (P-rt 2 , 
»t Russif Today, April 19A5) 

THi: vtrmi reached at Yalta i< 
•applied idealism" of a high older. 
It reaffirms the inflexible resolve d the 

United S u uii lu -I leal the i 

enemy. It insists that physical t it mi 

is „.„ enough. We must g 1 and 

win the mtii d t cton thai will tesult 
in .1 secure and lasting peace which 
will "afford av.ur.inct that all men in 
;ill lands in. it live mil their lites in 

freedom t i feai and want." The 

Atlantic Charter - referred to specifi- 
i all) three time* in the official state 
ment ui the Ci mea Conference. It 
appears that the fundamental pi n 
pies ul the Vtlanl , Charter are to r 
retarded as n guide to the United N 
tiuns in rlie San Francisco ciinferenci 

Tne Crimea Conference renewed 
the pledge thai all peoples shall h n 
the right to choose the form of gov- 
ernment under which the) will live: 
annuunced plans foi the relict and re- 
li il lit i'. mi uf liberated peoples; real 
firmed the rejection of fascism h\ 
peace-loving nations; re-stated the re- 
solve • I . . .i-in wherevei 
found; .ni.l announced plans and the 
date fin the eagerli iwaited Cunfer- 
enci d the I nil. 'J Nations in u li . li 
the Dumbarton Oaks proposals ate to 
lie cons dered and unproved an 
eral internal una) organization of tl r 
peace-loving nations established. 

1 nderlving these significant an 
nouncements are run foi 

1 <t, the full p irticipation ■ i the 
X rule. I States of Amei 
I" solve the extraordinary 
problems of Europe; second 
parent abandonment of policies where- 
in :n. I i dual nations sought to reach 
-"Intl. .n- in their own ipten 
the consequent acceptance ol 

ill \t!i : 

Big Three would he taken. I 
men recognize the fact that R 
had to be prepared with alien 



Hlsiioi' (.. JtlMi.MI.K's OW VM 



i!i,,t the I niied St it.-- would mil col 
u-,11 world, the 
inhri I'a ed upon hi i 
the I nited States it mid I he I i - 
emphasized igiermrnts dcigm 
-ure set uriti tor I the pn t 

ttar world. I In ii I i meani - 
nuuncemeni igncss to 

cullalKiratr and to reach joint decision. 
It appeared foi a time thai both Eng- 
land and Russia were moving forward 
upon the basis of iml 

ired furthei thai the il 
of the United States mighi mean i 
n of the Aiiieru .it ai 'i"ii th it 
i 'lie !,■• WVI I Wa h 

n i it mm 

II I 

leaders 

■ 
people to tl progress 

: in and 
order. 

The religious I if the world 

: ' US of 

mean Conferem e as n 

! .n.e toward 

I Irlirvc thev 

statesmen in these pro- 

I eve thi ■ » II support the 

nti rnatkmal or- 

louht e'.iers;e 

conference of 
' ' ' ' Sal Religious leader, 

if the ethical 
ii -t now lie trans- 
lated i" d world law 
and ordet econm r . m ,| racial 
u'gnificanr, and 
perhaps ,h Jt tne Cri- 
: ' "' l iel.l in the former 
summer palace ui . I\ar, mould -eel. 
to build a worl the com- 



n shall comi :.i li 

Il i- e.|o allt ■ I 

ii hel I .ti San Fi 

I foi !si. 
I • in. - - \ i ilrd in !. 

person the pi n. iple I 
us, n..l 

Mr •.!„, «..„: I 

1 II I. 
In,, me the -•■• i ' ' 
i >t , ,.i,i .,■. [here v 

■ 
- dution reachi I 
land. Thi 
I'olish que tiun f 

- 
interests anil lecr.te the I 
of ■ ,.!i parti : ' ■ .1 ii • ■ 
It ;- difficult • 
of the P. : 
: 
the pre-, ir 
among Ann I 

■ • 
i ni i 
air obligated i 

tion lather than I ■ r 

an ordered vt 
proposed tor I' 
I believe rel 
ing in ihe fa. • tint I 
the ^reai nariui ■' 

f.ir-t isioned t,, tal 

Ileal Steps tiro- 

in ,n enemy, and n 

organisation r.trn' ,! • 

uf power and the furthei r\! 

justice. The) hate heel 

seeing in rrnett inj ihe-i ; 

triplet, It I- pi n. iple thai 

men to furtlier a. It, ante. I 

Charter ih.es not represent 

in international relations, hut it m i- a 

first step. Its ideals niu-t lie hi 

beckoning men to further advance. 

Crimea is indeed "applied idealism," 

deserting the support of ideal. -t- and 

realist! alike. 




hltlO O-Sh (fees p. 361,9) No. 2 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3649 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 15 
(Part 2) 
A Churchman Evaluates the Crimea Conference —Z 



Assissi, who revealed in his person the principle tnat must guide us, not 
only as individuals but as nations, namely, "He who would become ti.e great- 
est among you must become the servant of all.'' 

Of course, there will be fundamental difference of opinion concerning 
t; e solution reached in the matter of Poland. There is no satisfactory 
solution to the Polish qu stion. It is impossible t? reconcile the inter- 
ests of Russia, Poiaad and Germany ana 'receive the full support of each 
party involved in the solution. It is difficult to reconcile tne inter- 
ests of tne Polisn landlord and the Polish peasant. The history that lies 
behind ti.e present decision is not well known anong Americans. Easy solu- 
tions are not to be found. Those w.-.o object to the present proposal con- 
cerning Poland are obligated to present a better solution rather than to 
reject the plans for an ordered world because tne solution proposed in the 
ceso of Poland does not suit them. 

I believe religious leaders are rejoicing in the fact that the leader- 
ship of t!.e great nations has been sufficiently far-visioned to take all 
presently practical steps necessary to defeat the cocjuon enemy, but, more, 
to establish tra organization essential to the control of power and the 
furt..er extension of justice. They have been equally far-seeing in renewing 
th>;ir pledge to principles. It is principle that sur.mons men to further 
advance. The Atlantic Charter does not represent the last step in inter- 
national relations, but it was a first step. Its ideals must be held aloft 
beckoning men to further advance. Crimea is indeed "applied idealism", de- 
serving the support of idealists and realists alike. 

Mr. Doyle. No, I do not want to investigate. 

Mr. Velde (continuing). Produce any United States Senators? 

Mr. Doyle. I have heard of Senators' and 

Mi Velde. I think with all due respect to you, Mr. Doyle, we are 
getting out of the realm of this investigation. 

Mr. Doyle. I do not think it is out of the realm of the investigation 
to show the actual fact. We are only naming one person as a recent 
contributor, and there are a dozen or two dozen in the same magazine. 
That is the purport of my question. I just wanted the record to show 
that there are other distinguished Americans who are also contribu- 
tors to that book. I think it is very pertinent and very material to this 
question of the bishop. 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Doyle, will you yield a moment? You have no 
doubt in your mind at all about the fact that that is a Communist maga- 
zine, have you, regardless of who may have contributed to it, good or 
bad? 

Mr. Doyle. Of course this is the first time I have had it called to 
my attention, so I have no knowledge on the fact. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Jackson. 

Mr. Jackson. I believe the gentleman from California has an 



3650 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

excellent suggestion, and I would request permission to read into the 
record the names of those who, together with Bishop Oxnam, have 
been among the recent contributors. 

Mr. Velde. Permission is granted. 

Mr. Jackson. Irina Aleksander, William Rose Benet, Millen Brand, 
Henrietta Buckmaster, Holger Cahill, Joseph E. Davies, Theodore 
Dreiser, Howard Fast, Harold L. Ickes, Rt. Rev. Hewlitt Johnson, 
Capt. Sergei N. Kournakoff, Rose Maurer, Rev. William Howard 
Melish, Harriet Moore, James E. Murray, Claude Pepper, Arthur Up- 
ham Pope, D. N. Pritt, M P, Quentin Reynolds, Ernest C. Ropes, Isidor 
Schneider, Anna Seghers, Edwin Seaver, Dr. Henry E. Sigerist, Kon- 
stantin Simonov, Edgar Snow, Johannes Steele, Frederick L. Schu- 
man, Anna Louise Strong, Genevieve Taggard, Valery J. Tereshtenko, 
Sidney Webb, Max Werner, Albert Rhys Williams, Ella Winter. 

Mr. Clardy. Will the gentleman yield. 

Mr. Velde. I recognized the gentleman, Mr. Clardy. 

Mr. Clardy. I want to ask Mr. Jackson if he did not recognize a con- 
siderable number of those names, and I am specifically excluding you, 
Bishop, from the question — a great many of those are already publicly 
identified as Communists in the files of this committee, do you not 
recognize that? 

Mr. Velde. Let us proceed in regular order. 

Mr. Scherer. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Scherer. 

Mr. Scherer. While they are discussing the contributors to this last 
periodical, I think we missed the fact that the Protestant Digest, which 
has been marked Oxnam exhibit No. 12, in which the good bishop pub- 
lishes the lead editorial on Fulton Sheen, has also an article in that 
same publication entitled, "Let my people go," by Cedric Belfrage. 
Belfrage testified before this committee and was identified as a mem- 
ber of the Communist Party. He is now being deported by the 
Department of Justice. 

Mr. Velde. May we proceed in regular order ? 

I would like to state again that in order to finish this hearing today, 
there is a lot of material which we have to develop, and we must confine 
our questions and answers to the subject matter under discussion, which 
I previously announced, and we would appreciate it if the members 
and the counsel and the witness as well could follow that procedure. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, if we could deal with some of the 
errors that I have tried to point out, we could perhaps clear the record. 
I realize what is being done here, and I am trying to answer, sir, re- 
sponsively, but I particularly referred to errors in the record which 
I think could be cleared if I were questioned upon them. 

Mr. Kunzig. We will come to one now, the National Federation for 
Constitutional Liberties. That was one of the groups listed there. 
The committee's mimeographed report, on which you later answered, 
said that on December 26, 1941, the National Federation for Consti- 
tutional Liberties issued a press release to the effect that an open letter 
will be addressed to the President and the Congress of the United 
States, opposing antilabor legislation as a dire threat to the unity 
essential for the defeat of Japan, and your name appeared as one of 
the signers. (See Oxnam exhibit No. 17, pp. 3757 and 3758.) 

In January 1943, the National Federation for Constitutional Liber- 
ties addressed a message to the House of Representatives which was a 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3651 

plea for the discontinuance of the Special Committee on Un-American 
Activities, and your name appeared as a signer on that. (See Oxnam 
exhibit No. 18, pp. 3659-3668.) 

Now, if I am correct, sir, your answer was that you never at any 
time belonged to the National Federation for Constitutional Liberties 
and never signed any statement for or on behalf of the organization. 

Bishop Oxnam. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. So that as to this organization you never had any- 
thing to do with it at all ? 

Bishop Oxnam. That is correct. 

Mr. Kunzig. Did you have any knowledge that the Marshall foun- 
dation, which is a Communist-cited fund, gave $65,000 to this group 
ami was a large financial backer to this organization ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Since I was not a member of it and had no relation- 
ship with it, I had no knowledge concerning this until you state it. 

Mr. Kunzig. Do you have any idea at all how your name came to 
be used and how your name was listed as a signer in both of these 
messages ? 

Bishop Oxnam. No, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. You will note that the first message was December 
1941, and the second was January 1943. During that period of time 
it was never brought to your attention so that you might disclaim it 
in any way ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I have tried to say that I had no relationship that 
I recall at all with that organization. 

Mr. Velde. Bishop, may I ask you, when did you first learn that 
your name was used in this connection ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Several of these I knew nothing about, sir, until 
I saw the releases of this committee. 

Mr. Velde. Again I want to say and I hope you appreciate the fact 
that this committee has done some service in releasing those files, be- 
cause you, like any other American citizen, would be interested in 
whether your name was used in connection with Communist-front 
organizations. I am sure you appreciate that. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, if that information were sent to me, 
it would be of service, but when that information is broadcast, and 
it is assumed that I belong to organizations I did not belong to, that is 
the disservice that I am requesting the committee to end as far as I 
am concerned. 

Mr. Kunzig. For the record I should like to incorporate into the 
record, and to be brief, the Communist background, the cited back- 
ground of this organization 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, why should that be in? Is that 
pertinent when I have said I do not belong to it ? Why does he insert 
in my record a whole Communist relationship to an organization I do 
not belong to ? 

Mr. Velde. Because we want to get the record straight. We have 
your denial of belonging to the organization, and this will be inserted 
into the record as your denial of belonging to the organization so that 
we finally may get your record straight so that we may inform the 
American people regarding their activities, what you did belong to 
and what you. did not belong to. 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you, sir. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Jackson. 



3652 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Mr. Jackson. May I further clarify ? To what is your denial be- 
ing entered ? It is being entered to this exhibit. It seems to me that 
in order to make the complete record, it is necessary to show on what 
the allegation was founded, and then enter against that the denial of 
your association with the organization. In that particular it is 
important. 

Mr. Velde. Without objection the matter will be so incorporated. 9 

Mr. Kunzig. We turn to the Medical Bureau and North American 
Committee To Aid Spanish Democracy. 10 This was 1938 and 1939, 
and I believe you referred to this earlier. These are letterheads of the 
Medical Bureau and North American Committee To Aid Spanish 
Democracy, dated July 6, 1938, and February 2, 1939, which lists 
the name of G. Bromley Oxnam as a national sponsor, and I believe 
you answer — you may prefer to answer yourself here, if you wish, 
sir. Were you ever a national sponsor? (See Oxnam exhibit Nos. 19 
and 20, pp. 3669 and 3670.) 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I have explained that when the 
Spanish people sought the freedom that we possess, I was in complete 
sympathy with the endeavor of those people to become free. I think 
every American will understand that. Several committees were or- 
ganized to aid them, just as at present I am a member of Congress- 
man Judd's Committee To Aid the Intellectuals in China. If some 
Chinese should some day be proved to be a Communist who has been 
aided by Congressman Judd's committee, I suppose some committee 
20 years from now might be having somebody up asking about that. 

Now, in this matter there was an interfaith division of what was 

9 The National Federation for Constitutional Liberties was cited as Communist by 
Attorney General Tom Clark in letters to the Loyalty Review Board, reelased Dec. 4, 1947, 
and Sept. 21, 1948 : by Attorney General Francis Biddle. in the Congressional Record, 
Sept. 24, 1942, p. 7687 ; by the Special Committee on Un-American Activities in its reports 
of Mar 29. 1944, p. 50, June 25. 1942. p. 20. and Jan. 2, 1943, pp. 9 and 12: by the con- 
gressional Committee on Un-American Activities in its report No. 1115, Sept. 2, i947 p. 3: 
and bv the California committee on un-American activities in its 194S report, pp. 201 
and 327. 

The National Federation for Constitutional Liberties was described by former Attorney 
General Biddle, in a memorandum reprinted in the Congressional Record of Sept. 24. 1942, 
p. 7687 as "part of what Lenin called the solar system of organizations, ostensibly having 
no connection with the Communist Party, by which Communists attempt to create sym- 
pathizers and supporters of their program among those who would never affiliate them- 
selves openly with the party. Membership in the national federation or its affiliates like- 
wise consists of those sympathetic to the stated aims of the organization, who may or may 
not be aware of its Communist control, as well as party members and fellow travelers. 

"* * * in a pamphlet issued by the national federation it is stated that it was organized 
to coordinate several existing organizations concerned with the preservation and further 
realization of democratic rights as guaranteed by the Constitution. * * * Its method of 
operation, like that of International Labor Defense, the legal-aid arm of the Communist 
Party with which it is closely affiliated, is the creation of special committees for specific 
cases. 

"In one of its publications the federation states that it was founded because our con- 
stitutional guaranties are in clanger: as individuals we are powerless, but all together we 
are strong. * * * It demands the end of the Gestapo activities of the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation and the abolition of the Dies committee. 

"* * * Most of the national sponsors and most of the national executive committee 
and many of the local heads of the federation are leaders of Communist organizations or 
are prominently identified with Communist activities. 

"The activities of the national federation have been manifest chiefly in the various 
committees specially created for the defense of certain individuals. The defenses of Com- 
munist leaders such as Sam Darcy and Robert Wood, party secretaries for Pennsylvania 
and Oklahoma, have been major efforts of the federation. * * *" 

10 The Medical Bureau and North American Committee To Aid Spanish Democracy was 
cited as a Communist front by the Special Committee on Un-American Activities In its 
report of March 29. 1944 p. 82. The committee said : "In 1937-38, the Communist Party 
threw itself wholeheartedly into the campaign for the support of the Spanish Loyalist 
cause, recruiting men and organizing multifarious so-called relief organizations." Among 
these organizations, said the committee, was the Medical Bureau and North American 
Committee To Aid Spanish Democracy. 

The organization was also cited as a Communist front by the California Committee on 
Un-American Activities, 1948 report, pp. 319, 335, and 336 : the Massachusetts House 
Committee on Un-American Activities, 1938 report, pp. 394 and 395 : and the Special Sub- 
committee of the House Committee on Appropriations, report of April 21, 1943, p. 3. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3653 

called the American Committee for Spanish Freedom. I did belong 
to that. I despised Franco and that entire regime just as I did Stalin 
and do the regimes in Russia today. 

Now, in the matter of sending medical aid to these people, I have 
no apology for that whatsoever. I did belong, and I find that other 
individuals such as Norman Vincent Peale — Dr. Peale was a member 
of the same committee. We thought we were in a good humanitarian 
organization and were doing our best to help what we thought to be 
a worthy cause. Now, then 

Mr. Scherer. May I interrupt just a minute, Mr. Chairman? 

Mr. Velde. Yes. 

Mr. Scherer. You say you thought. Have you found out since 
that it was a Communist-front organization? 

Bishop Oxnam. I found out subsequently this, that an organiza- 
tion — this was dated November 7, 1946, which was titled the "Action 
Committee To Free Spain Now'" — picked up these other organiza- 
tions, such as the American Committee for Spanish Freedom, and 
listed on the back of this letterhead these organizations which included 
my name. Immediately upon seeing that I wrote this letter: "Will 
you be good enough to withdraw my name from the list of sponsors. 
I have just received your letter of November 7."' 

Now, being in an organization that we believed to be following a 
worthy purpose, and there were distinguished individuals in it — I 
mentioned the name of one of them — the moment that one became 
aware — and that was evident to me because there was reference here 
to the Veterans of the Lincoln Brigade, which I think was tied up in 
the Communist movement. I resigned from it. I have no apologies 
whatsoever for belonging to organizations whose purposes were be- 
lieved to be proper in the interests of serving people who were en- 
gaged in what I think to be an endeavor to become free. I am very 
sorry that Communists have sought to infiltrate those organizations. 
We have to be on the alert, but bringing these matters in years after- 
ward, adding them up one after another, I am afraid, is giving an 
incorrect impression of what my particular position is. I appreciate, 
however, the opportunity, sir, to testify on this matter. 

Mr. Clardy. May I interpose a question ? 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Clardy. 

Mr. Clardy. Bishop, I am prompted to remark in connection with 
that that I, too, was approached to enter those organizations at the 
time. I had no difficulty whatsoever in recognizing them because it 
was in the public press that they were Communist in origin, and I did 
not join. 

Now, that is the point I have been trying to make all along. This 
committee and its membership can serve a useful purpose because some 
of us do have, I think, a little bit better perception of what is going on 
behind the scenes than others. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I appreciate Mr. Clardy's state- 
ment. Some of us would like to have opportunity some day to tell 
what we have been doing in getting at the causes of communism, seeking 
to remove those causes around the world. There is a common service 
that can be rendered, I grant you that, but I do not want anybody to 
think that we were a group of people who somehow could not under- 
stand a situation of this kind, men like Norman Vincent Peale and 



3654 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

others. I do not frankly think this Spanish freedom matter and inter- 
faith was a matter of common knowledge, sir, at that time. If so, you 
had information I did not have, and I am glad you had it. 

Mr. Clardy. It was in Michigan, anyway. 

Mr. Kunzig. I should like to offer into evidence Oxnam exhibits 
17 and 18 which were from the previous group that we mentioned 
which I did not offer into evidence. 

Bishop Oxnam. May I ask what these are? 

Mr. Velde. Will you exhibit them ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Yes, sir. I will show them to you. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I do not recognize this at all. I 
have not seen it. It is going into the record 

Mr. Kunzig. Look at it very carefully. This is the National Fed- 
eration for Constitutional Liberties which we discussed a few moments 
ago. We discussed the documents and I did not at that time off er them 
into evidence, and I am offering them now. 

Mr. Doyle. Of course, Mr. Chairman, may I make this observa- 
tion 

Mr. Velde. Just a minute while the witness examines this — if you 
will, please, Mr. Doyle. 

Mr. Doyle. I am sure he ought to have every opportunity to examine 
them. 

Mr. Kunzig. He can look at any document, Mr. Doyle, at any time. 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, I testified I had no relation to this organiza- 
tion, and I take it I can save the time, Mr. Chairman, by returning 
this. I have never seen this to my best knowledge, and I am certain 
I never saw that. 

Mr. Kunzig. These are the two messages 

Mr. Velde. The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California. 

Mr. Doyle. On account of the acoustics again at this end of the 
committee, I am not sure, Bishop Oxnam, but I thought I heard you 
say something about you presently being on a committee that is helping 
some group in Red China. Did I hear you so to state? 

Bishop Oxnam. No, sir. What I said was that Congressman Judd, 
one of the Members of Congress at the present time, has organized 
a committee to aid Chinese intellectuals who are refugees from the 
present regime in China. I am a member of that executive committee. 
I have not had an opportunity to attend the meetings but have read 
their minutes. It has nothing to do, sir, with Red China except 
refugees from Red China. 

Mr. Velde. At this point we have had another call from the House^ 
and the committee will recess for 30 minutes. 

(Whereupon, at 5:15 p. m., the hearing recessed to 6:05 p. m., 
during which time Representative Francis E. Walter entered the hear- 
ing room.) 

Mr. Velde. The committee will be in order. 

The Chair would like to make an announcement. Due to the fact 
that we have had three rollcalls on the House floor today, our sched- 
ule has been interrupted. Counsel for the witness has to leave to- 
morrow afternoon for Europe, so we will proceed until 7 o'clock and 
take a recess for 1 hour, until 8 o'clock, and then attempt to finish our 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3655 



hearing before midnight, at least, I hope. Is that satisfactory with 

the witness and counsel? . .- 

Bishop Oxnam. That is quite satisfactory with me, sir. 1 trust it is 

with Mr. Parlin. 

Mr. Parlin. Mr. Chairman, I appreciate very much your courtesy 

in this matter. 

Mr. Velde. Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, during the recess I conferred with 
counsel for the Bishop and also with the witness personally, and he 
stated that he wished to put in the record a comment to the effect that 
Wendell Willkie had also contributed to one of these magazines and 
also put in the article on Monsignor Sheen. I respectfully request, 
sir at this time that the witness be permitted to make a statement to 
that effect and give these to me, and I shall offer them into evidence 

Mr Velde. Mr. Counsel, of course this is irrelevant material to this 
hearing but in all fairness to the witness I suppose that we should 
allow this to be inserted in the record at this point. (See Oxnam ex- 
hibit No. 22, pp. 3681 to 3685.) , ,,.,., . ,„. 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Chairman, may I inquire what it is he is talking 
about? I cannot understand. What is the article? 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, you requested me to explain it, and 
I think I can. You recall that the counsel referred to an article that 
I had written for the Protestant Digest. He announced the topic. 
The topic, unfortunately, gives an erroneous opinion— m fact, it was 
not my topic. It was the topic of an editor. The title was "Monsi- 
o-nor Sheen and Clerical Fascism." There is nothing in this article 
that suggests directly or indirectly that Monsignor Sheen is a Fascist 
or a Fascist sympathizer. It deals with an entirely different matter, 
and I would very much like, since the counsel made reference to this, 
to have the article itself appear in the record which is a respectful 
approach to a distinguished leader of the church concerning a pro- 
posal he made relative to a world court, and I also would like to have 
on record that in the Protestant Wendell Willkie also contributed 
an article, and it makes it a little more clear why some others might 
have contributed an article. That is a request, 

Mr. Velde. Without objection those two articles will be admitted 
into the record. Those two articles are printed material and public 
information; are they not? 

Bishop Oxnam. This is in a bound volume. I will have to have it 
photostated for you, if I may, because I have all my other articles in it. 

Mr. Velde. Are there two articles ? 

Mr. Kunzig. One is an article? Is that correct ? 

Bishop Oxnam. One is an article. The other, I do not even know 
what Mr. Willkie said. 

Mr. Velde. That will be marked "Oxnam Exhibit No. 22." 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman. 

(The article referred to was received in evidence as Oxnam exhibit 
22.) u 

Mr. Kunzig. At this time, Mr. Chairman, I should like to offer 
into evidence Oxnam exhibits Nos. 17 and 18, which are several points 

11 Oxnam Exhibit No. 22 appears in numerical order. 



3656 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

back prior to the last break, but I want to get them in the record. It is 
the same type of document that we have had going along — documents 
which we have discussed and which should be in the record because we 
have discussed them back and forth. 

Mr. Velde. Without objection, they will be admitted. 

Mr. Moulder. Mr. Chairman, it is with the understanding that 
Bishop Oxnam denies having any knowledge of his name being used 
in that connection. 

Mr. Kunzig. Yes ; I think the record is clear on that point. 

Mr. Velde. Is there objection, Mr. Jackson? If not, they will be 
admitted. 

(The two messages referred to were received in evidence as Oxnam 
exhibits Nos. 17 and 18.) 

Mr. Velde. Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Kunzig. We were talking, I believe, before the last call, about 
the Medical Bureau and North American Committee to Aid Spanish 
Democracy, and also you then discussed and yourself mentioned a 
more modern Spanish situation of 1946 in which your name was used 
improperly. 

Bishop Oxnam. Quite. 

Mr. Kunzig. I want to hand you Oxnam exhibits Nos. 19 and 20, 
which have to do with this Medical Bureau and North American Com- 
mittee, so that you may see the documents, and I want the record to be 
clear, since we have broken in between here and had a recess, that you, I 
believe, stated that you authorized your name to be used but subse- 
quently resigned when it became apparent to you that the organization 
was other than what you had thought. 

Bishop Oxnam. The Medical Bureau and North American Com- 
mittee, and so on, I tried to explain earlier. I believe I was a sponsor 
of the organization. My recollection is that this was one of the first 
organizations to drive Communists out. I think Mr. Roger Baldwin 
led a movement to insist that there be no Communists allowed in the 
organization. I may be wrong. I was a sponsor. 

Mr. Kunzig. I offer in evidence these documents marked "Oxnam 
Exhibits Nos. 19 and 20," sir. 

Mr. Velde. Without objection, the documents will be introduced 
in evidence at this point. 

(The documents, letterheads of the Medical Bureau and North 
American Committee to Aid Spanish Democracy were received in evi- 
dence as Oxnam exhibits Nos. 19 and 20.) 

Mr. Kunzig. Sir, the American Committee for Spanish Freedom " 
is another one of the organizations which was listed in this com- 
mittee 

Bishop Oxnam. I think I referred to that; did I not? I think 
that is the organization I referred to. 



12 The American Committee for Spanish Freedom was cited as Communist by Attorney- 
General Tom Clark, in a letter to the Loyalty Review Board released April 27," 1949L 

The California Committee on Un-American Activitis in its 1948 report, p. 125, stated 
that "the American Committee for Spanish Freedom, which was avowedly organized in 
July 1944. to fight for legislation ending American diplomatic relations with Spain and 
supplying American military aid for a Spanish revolution." 

* * * The national offices of this organization are located at 55 West 42d Street, New- 
York City (p. 115). "* * * the key position of this Communist front is held by a member 
of the Communist Party. Allen Chase is the secretary. In 1936 Allen Chase was a can- 
didate for Congress in New York on the Communist Party ticket." 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3657 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 17 
(Part 1) 

NATIONM, FEBOMION FOR CONSTUUXICNAL L18ERTS.ES tice-r'cc:- 26, 1941. 

1.400 t St., Ml* Washington. DC - HA.tior.zl 7720 



Saolarlag that ■aafaat af Jaatai as* Mar Ade urtMtl will r*t«lN tfcat 
e*aplata amity of our paopla anion today i« « ranll*/", MS jlwlMrt Aamriaea* 
iipa*< a* opaa lattar to too Praal&eet Mi taa Cor *ro»* »f tit* Quito* Itotoa oaatfaiag 
sanding astl-labor laglalatloa at *a Aire tfcrtat to this aaaoatlal «i«r* 1* «*« •*- 
nouaead today *7 *«• Matioanl fttAaratloa ?&r Oaaatttotlaaal LlWrtlaa. 

fha aignara aaderaad tha otUU| >r the rraaldoot af tha laker - ibdaafery 
ooafarwnoa anion raaohod as ipw it a* fadeaaday beaaiag atrttoa ks laa fcaa ta for 
\h» duratloa of tba war aad rubaitUas all lafeer dlaputoa to aattlaasat ay panaaful 

In ralaaaing tha liat of algaars, Oeorg* Marahall, ft — Ohal i— of tha 
Tadaratloa polatod out that daaplt* tha labor - laduotry a ayaa a an t a blac af anti- 
labor •anatore haro ranawad their caarpelga for anactaaat of rapraaalwa lagiclatlrc. 

*Th« egTtaooct raaohad by tha eoafaranea ta aa lnportoBt oostri button to 
national unity* , Mr. Marahall aaid. *tba eoetlasad lnalataaoa upon aaaaaga af ra- 
praatlwa laglilntloa lapai-llc that unity.* 

Tha opaa lattar atatat la parti 

'...Aaarlea aaada aa aavar bafora tha evict- will lug. whalaaaartad 
cooperation of its workara.... 

•fa caanot forgat th p t one of tha flrat atopa la tha coning of ternea 
and Itcllaa f&asiaa cm tha paeeage of act I -laker legislation aladlar 
to that aow being considered In tha Congrats of tha Ualtad Statea. 

"All of thaaa proposal* raaora, la warylng dagraa, labor's freedom) ta 
arrlwa wolvatarily at agreeaante coTsrlag eapleya r eaployaa relatlaaa. 
Thara la Dot ona of thaaa aatl-labor bills which doaa not take aanp 
aoaa of tha hard aarnad rlghte of Aaerloaa working Baa and wean*.* 

Aaong tha 362 eigne re of tha lattar warai 

Lawraaea Tlbbett, Metropolitan Opaim atari 

Bishop 6. Bromley Cxivam of U>e Me toed let Csuroh. Boston: 

Carl van ooraa, editor) 

Dr. Sophoefteba P. Bracklarldga, former praaldaat, Aaerleaa Aean. a* 

Schoela of Social work' 
Ooaatee Oullea, poat; 
Mlse Oonataaea Blddle, of Philadelphia! 
Sr. frasi Boas, anthropologist; 
1 s-rlng Caaaar, eongwrlter; 
Daaa C.M. HeOoan, Raw York Onlrerslty; 
Miss Katharine Locke, aetraoa: 
Dr. Max Larnar, Williams College: 
•Judga Loulaa Charlton, Blradn«^iaa, Ala.: 
Flatro DIDonato, author; 

Or. Mary I. voollay. rraaldaat Bawrltue, Mt. lolyoka Oella«at 
Dr. ancrwood tddy, authert 
Moaa Mart, playwright: 
Maabi Jaoob talnataln, of Chloa«o: 
laaatt Oowaa, author: 

Dr. Vllllaa A, fallaoa, Traateaat Baarltua, taith Colli cat 
taldo Trank, writar. 

A aeaplata Hat of tha alfaara la attaeaad. 

43620—54 6 



3658 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 17 

(Part 2) 



». ir. *, rieroe iwui, Mperla 
SSward Vearhoase, writer, *«* Tork 
fc.bert Inm, wlter, En Tork 
BsbeT-t Baatl&gs VI ©hole, Vew Tork 
Eajtwell Vurawerg, writer, Brooklyn, V.T. 

Begvae O'Srloa, writer, Philadelphia, P*. 

awj*i« Ow, vlttr, lit Tork 

Ih as an t O'flheel, writar, law Tork 

Blaine Ova®, %»• Tork 

Blehop 0. Broad ay Osaea, Bos too, feit, 

ay-ra Page, writer, Sew Tork 

Bar. Oeorge L. Pains, Boetoa, Mas*. 

Builaa Fatter eon, Chicago. 111. 

isrr. Stephen Peebody, Congregational Church, 3an Joee, 0*1 if , 

Dr. galea Peek, Koedolph Macau ffoeen's College, I#achburg, Ya. 

Dr. J. 8, Peanepeoker, Dean, Interaouatala Union Coliago, Billings, Montana 

anna M.V. PsBnypacker, Philadelphia, Pa. 

lljaal C. Perere, Eew Tork 

3Unry W. Plakhaa, Vewton Caatra, Mas*. 

P. Hewisln Pollock, Tiret Presbyterian Church, Boieaan, Montana 

Bev. A. Clayton Powell, Councilman, Hew Tork 

Ilaar J. Piudt, Veheler Orovew, Ho. 

Phalpa Putaaa, writer, Jeaaloa Plain, Mas*. 

Prof. Harrla Praaklla Sail, Oerrett Biblical Institute, Iwittos, 111. 

Bar. Francis P. Randall, Beodbridge, Coon. 

Br. Bvelyn Baakla, Ljmehburg, ?«. 

Dr. DUlwyn T. Batcliff, University of Cincinnati 

Prof, waiter Xsutenstrauch, Columbia University 

Charlas Bacbt, Xaq., Vew Tork 

J.V. Baad, Portland, Oregon 

Rebecca Bali, Vaw Tork 

Xttoro Balla, playwright, Vew Tork 

Dr. Jft»ee Euegeegger, Cincinnati Ooneral Hoapltal 

Bertha C. Reynolds, Long Island, Haw Tork 

!. H. Reynolds, President, Hendrlx College, Conway, Arkansas. 

L. Vlllard Reynolds, Poplar Ridge, H.T. 

Prof. Bernard 7. Riest, Runtar College, Haw Tork 

Laatar Leake Bllay, Douglaston, L.I., H.T. 

Pradarlc I. Binaldo, Loa Angclse, Calif. 

Mary V. Blttanhouaa, Brooklyn Bureau of Charitlas, H.T. 

Anna Rocheetsr, writar. Saw Tork 

Wellington Boa, writar, St. Oeorge, Staten Ialand, H.T. 

Paul Boaelne, writar, Chi capo. 111. 

Barold J.- Bosa, oongwrlter. Haw Tork 

Bev. Clifton Boyward Bote, Danleleon, Conn. 

Lillian Boat, Brooklyn, H.T. 

Saa Boat, writar, Chicago, 111. 

Benry Both, writar, H.T. 

Balph H. Bouse, City Missionary Society, Boston, Mais. 

Madeline Buthuen, Beverly Hills, Calif. 

Belen 0. Sahler, Haw Tork 

Dorothy Salnsbury, Vaw Tork 

Prof. Philip. L. Schank, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 

Rev. A, J. Scher*; Hew Orleans, La. 

Paul A. Schilpp, Horthwestern University, Cranston, 111 

Pauline 0. Schindler, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Prof. Arthur M. Schloslnger, Harvard University, Caabridge, Masa. 

Isadora Schneider, writer, New Tork 

Prof. T.C. Schnelrla, Hew Tork University 

Mark Schorer, Harvard Unlveraty, C»abrldge, Maas. 

Dr. Harry Schrlckel, University of Cincinnati. 

Irving Schwab, Hew Tork 

Or. Carlton T. Seofleld, Buffalo, V.T. 

Prof. Pranklln B. Scott, Horthwestsrn University, Bvanston, 111. 

Prof, Tlda 0. Seudder, Vellesley Collage 

Prof. Lawreaee Sears, Sept. of Philosophy, Ohio feslsyaa University, Delaware, CMo. 

Zlltebeth Sessions, Keapden, Mass. 

Prank C. Seymour, Lanoastar, Mass. 

Prof. Malcola Sharp, Law School, University of Chicago 

Sidney Sheldon, Hew Tork 

fllmer Shore, V a st Los Angeles, Calif, 

S&auel Sillan, writer, Vew Tork 

Dr. 1. Donald Sisson, Louisiana State University 

Charles Idward Saith, writer, Vew Tork 

Dr. Randolph B. Salth, Director, Cooperative School for Taaehera. Vaw Tork 

Hev. P. Hastings Snylh, Caabridge, Mass. 

Isabel Walker Soule, writer, Bew Tork 

C. A. Stanflald, Esq.. Hot Sprints, Arkaaaas. 

Barrla Starts, playwright, Vaw Tork. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3659 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 18 
(Part 1) 

A Message 
to the House of Representatives 

January, 1943 sees the birth of a new Congress, the 78th Congress of the United 
States. It marks the fourteenth month of our fight for freedom. It heralds the year In 
which victory can be won. 

The year 1943 can be a victorious one for the people of the United States and far 
their allies of the United Nations. In 1943, a united people, of many nations, of diverse 
creeds and races, can destroy forever the tyranny and terror of the Axis aggressors. 

We can succeed only if we are united We know that we must defeat all who 
would divide us. We know that the unity of America, and the unity of America with 
its allies, must be complete. 

That is why we express our grave concern over the possible renewal of the Dies 
Committee by the House of Representatives. 

We have observed the divisive workings of the Dies Committee and its chairman. 
Martin Dies. It is our belief that, on the basis of its record, the Committee must be ter- 
minated, because: 

1. The Dies Committee, by allowing itself to become a forum for the proponents of in- 
tolerance and hatred, has undermined the very foundations of national unity, and 
has violated our pledge that all loyal Americans, irrespective of their racial, relig- 
ious or political beliefs shall be united in common struggle against the enemy. 

2. The Dies Committee, by continued and repeated attacks on our great ally, the Soviet 
Union, has utilized its resources to obstruct the cooperation of the United Nations 
which is a prerequisite for victory. 

& The Dies Committee has attempted, by its unprincipled and unfounded attacks on 
trade unions and their officials, to destroy the American labor movement which is 
a vital and decisive factor in the war effort, and which has made the war record of 
our free workers the pride of the nation. 

4. The Dies Committee not only has deliberately suppressed information concerning 
the activities of Nazi cohorts in this country but has gone out of its way to shield 
such Axis propagandists as Pelley, Winrod, Viereck, Hudson, Kullgren, Sanctuary, 
Edmonson. True, and many others now convicted or under indictment for sedi- 
tion by the Government of the United States. 

5. The Dies Committee, to hide its flagrant fraternizing with fascists, has utilized its 
Congressional prestige to continue an undemocratic, un-American and openly ob- 
structionist campaign of vilification against thousands of the staunchest supporters 
of the war and of the democratic way of life, and has campaigned equally vie- 



3660 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 18 

(Part 2) 
COUGHLBTS "Social Justice'i 

™www K> tnoee wno Government begem a probe at its seditious contonfe) 
WILLIAM DUDLEY PELLE Yt 

"I founded the Silver Logiton In 1933. contiguous with 
the appearance of the so-called New Deal ol the Demo- 
cratic administration, at Ashevllle, N. G; to propagan- 
dize exactly the «amu principles that Mr. Dies and this 
committee at9 engaged In prosecuting right now" 
©toe Committ ee Hearing* Volume 12. pp. 7207-8. Feb- 
ruary 7. 1940.) 

"I subscribe to that so completely . . . with the work 



which has been done by the Die* Committee and 1 
have expressed It outside in publications— that if Its 
work ccntlnues and goes on. the Silver Shirt Legion 
stops. We have no more use for 1L" (Heartens, Volume 
12. p. 7247J 

(Convicted of sedition August 1942. and sentenced to 
10 years In prison.) 



FRITZ KUHN. Loader ol German American Bund: 



"f am In favor of it (the Dies Committee) to be appointed 
again and I wish them to get more money." (New YoA 

AXIS RAQIO 

For many months the short wave monitoring service ol 
the Federal Communications Commission recorded and 
analyzed all broadcasts emanating from Axis-domi- 
nated countries. The Birmingham (Ala.) Age-Herald 
reported "The man most frequently and approvingly 
quoted (on Nazi propaganda broadcasts) is a man who 

* it -it 

MARTIN DIES ON FOREIGN POLICY: 

"I am as anxious as anyone to see the defeat of Hitler, 
and I hope Russia is licked at the same tlmo." (Speech 
before the American Institute of Laundering Conven- 



Worid-Telearam. Dec. e. 1939 J 



has made much of the word 'American.' ... He it (he 
roost popular American as far as the Rome^erlln 

radios are concerned His name Is Martin Dies 

In all their quotations from Mr. Dies, no one has heard 
a single criticism of turn by the Axis radio." 



Bon. October 19, 1941, reported In Cleveland 
Dealer. October 20, 194U 



Sponsored by the 

National Federation for Constitutional Liberties 
1 1 M feeedncr/, Hmt Teds. If. y. 1400 t 

January, 1943 



Sweet R.W. Wosfctaatoe, ft a 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3661 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 18 
(Part 3) 

I hereby Join In tlqnlng the Jowory. 1943 "Mossof « to fie Hoiso of Heprosento. 
flvos," oppotlng renewal of fho Diet Committee; 

THE FOLLOWING HAVE SISNEO THE MESSAGE AS INOfViOUAU. 
ORGANIZATIONS AM LISTED FOR IDENTIFICATION OWLY. 



OR. HAROLD AARON. N.« Yorl. N. T. 
REV. RALPH C. ABELE, St. Loui.. Mo. 
REV. CHARLES I. ACKLEY. New Yort N. Y. 
LOUIS ADAMIC. —iter. Milford. N. J. 
COMFORT A. AOAMS, Consulting Engineer. 

Philadelphia. Pa. 
SAMUEL HOPKINS AOAMS. author. Auburn. 

N. Y. 
6EOR6E P. AOAMS. Profeiior of Philoiophy, 

Univenlty of California. Berkeley. Calif. 
THOMAS ADDIS. Profanor of Medicine. Stan- 
ford University. San Fronciico. Calif. 
EVELYN AOLER. Director War Activities 

United Offlca 4 Profeiilonol Worker! of 

A.narlca. Naw York. N. Y. 
REV. EDWIN E. AIKEN. JR.. Lynn. Mau. 
REV. GROSS W. ALEXANDER. Lyndhunt 

Melhodiit Church, Lyndhunt. N. J. 
EDWARD S. ALLEN, lo-a Stata College. 

FAY E. ALLEN, Mambnr Cry Board of Educa- 
tion, loi Angelas. Calif. 
JAMES ESERT ALLEN. President. N. Y. Stata 

Conference. N A.A.C.P.. No- York. N. Y. 
REV. WILBUR C. ALLEN. Ebana:ar Preibytarlan 

Church. Kimball. W. Vn. 
GORDON W. ALLPORT. P.ofeisor of Piychol- 
oqy. Harvard Univanlty. Cambridge. Mall. 
REV. PAUL JOHNSON ALLUREO, F.nl Preiby- 
tarlan Church. Holly. Mich. 
RABBI MICHAEL ALPER. Ne- Yorl. N. Y. 
CARL ALPERT. editor. Waihmgton. 0. C. 
EARL ALPIGER. Chftoa Unitarian Church Lilt. 

Louisville, Ky. 
OOROTHY ANDERSON, Office Secy.. Ohio » 
Wcitorn Pa. District. Y.W.C.A.. Springfield. 
Ohio. 
REV. WILLIAM C. ANDERSON, Finl Evangeli- 
cal end Reformed Church. Bremen. Ind. 
ROBENIA ANTHONY, teacher. Springfield. 

Man. 
REV. BEDROS K. APELIAN. Fairla-n. N. J 
BENJAMIN APPEL. no.ol.it. Ne- Yorl. N. Y. 
REV. ELMER J. F. ARNDT, Chairmen. Commit, 
t.on on Chriitian Social Act.on. Evangelical 
end Reformed Church. Weblter Grovel. 
Mo. 
LESLIE R. ARNOLO. Chairman. Ne- England 
Chapter. Progressive Librarian! - Council. 
Boston Mass. 
HARRIETTS ASHBROOK. writer. Mitchell. Neb. 
REV. CHARLES AUSTIN, The Church of All 

Naticns Max Yorl. N. Y. 
F. DUKE AVNET, alto-nay. Baltimore. Md. 
WAYNE BACKER. National V.ce-Preiident. At- 
mciatlon of Inlernoi & Med.cal Student!. 
ChlroqO. III. 
PEGGY BACON, art.it. Ne- Yorl. N. Y. 
DONALD W. BAILEY, Profeiior of Psychology. 
Unive-s.ty ol Kansas C.ty. Keniot City. Mo. 
ELIZABETH BAKER, Ne- Yorl. N. Y. 
FRANK E. BAKER. President. State Teachert 

Collage. M,l-eulee. W.i 
HELEN CODY BAKER, -riter. Chicago. III. 
JAMES F. BALDWIN, Profeiior Emeritus, Vaitar 

College. Poughleepsle. N. Y. 
REV. ARCHEY 0. BALL. Haclemecl. N. J. 
REV. LEE H. BALL. Mathodiit Church. Lake 

Mehopac. N. Y. 
REV. ALBERT H. IALLER. Mathodiit Congre- 

gatlonel United Church. Durham. Conn. 
MARTHA H. IALMER. teacher. Portland. Ore. 
REV. ROBERT W. 8ANGALL. St. Taomel - Epls- 

copal Church. Philadelphia. Pa. 
UV. WILLIAM IARLEN. Middletowa Springs, 

Vermont. 
i. L M. BARLOW. Praiident. Citisens Commit- 

tee for the Artt. Ne- Yorl. N. Y. 
A3RIAAN J. BARNOUW, Professor. Coiumb-t 

University, New YoH. N. V. 



REV. NORMAN B. 3AR». Minister Emeritus, 

Chicoqo Pretbytery. Chicago. III. 
JOHN RARROW. libraries. Beree College. 

Bi.ee Ky. 
UONEL C. BARROW. Pretidenl. N. Y. Breach. 

N».C.P.. Ne- Yorl, N. Y. 
JOHN BARTEE. International Repretentative. 

United Automob.le Worlen. Indionapolis. 

Ind. , . . 

REV. JOSEPH BARTH. Vice Prei.dent. Un.ter.ee 

Fello.ihip for Social Juil.ca. Miami. Fla. 
REV. MARSHALL E. BARTHOLOMEW, Pretby- 

terlan Church, Mamlield. Pa. 
DR. PAUL J. BAUERBSRG. Yonla.l. N. Y. 
HOWARD BAY, icenic deiiqnor. Ne- Yorl. 

N. Y. 
JOSEPH WARREN BEACH. Profeiior of Eng- 

l.sh University of Minneiola. Mlnneapol.l. 
IESSYE J. BEAROEN. Nationel T.aaiurer. The 

Counc.l of Negro Women of America. Ne- 

Yorl. N. Y. 
MAX BEDACHT. Gen,„l Secretory. Interne- 

t.onel Worlen Order. Na« Yorl. N. Y. 
REV. C. HARRISON BECKER. Fint Preibyterian 

Church. Morrlton. III. 
ALICE S. BELESTER, Chairmen. United Con- 
ference on High Colt of Living 
REV. O. W. BELL. Melhodiit Church. New 

London. Conn. 
THOMAS BELL, outhor. 8-oollyn. N. Y. 
GRAY BEMIS. E.ecutlve Sec, . South California 

Diitrict. International Worlen Order. Lot 

Anqelal. Calif. 
WILLIAM ROSE BENET. Associate Editor. Sat. 

urdoy Revle- of Literature. Ne- Yorl. N.Y. 
MRS. HAROLD BENJAMIN, Na'onal Social 

Slud.ei Commlttco. A.A.U.W.. College Perl. 



Md. 
DEAN HAROLD BENJAMIN. College of Edu- 
cation. Uni vanity of Maryland. Collage Perl. 
Md. • 
JOHN C. BENNETT. Profeiior. Pacific School 

of Religion. 8erkoloy. Cel.f. 
REV. S. R. BENNETT. Pint Uni-eneUtt CWch. 

Fkjin, III 
ELMER A. BENSON. Appleton. Minn. 
R. W. BERGSTROM. Butlneii Ageni. Local 
1139. United Electrical. Radio I Machine 
Wo.lert of Americe. Mmnoopol.l. Minn. 
ALVAH BESSIE. -Iter. Ne- Yorl. N. Y. 
MARY MCLEOD BETHUNE. Preiidanl. Na- 
tlonal Council ol Negro Women. WeiUnq- 
ton. 0. C. 
OOROTHY BETHURUW. Profr-ssor of Engliih. 

Cnnnrrllcut College. No- London. Conn. 
OR. HENRY LAMBERT BIBBY. Kingiton. N. Y. 
JOHN BICKNELL. Canton N. Y. 
CONSTANCE E. BIOOLE. Bryn Mi... Pa. 
RAY A. BILLINGTON. Profeiior of American 
Hiilory. Smith College. Northampton. Mall. 
OR. CARL A. L BINGER. N,« Yorl. N. Y. 
CLARIDA G. BINGER. teocher, Ne- Yorl. N. Y. 
RAYMONO T. URGE. Chairmen. Depl. of 
Physici. Univenlty of Oolifomia. Berkeley- 
Calif. 
OR. K. A. 1ISHARA, Head of the Syrian Prof- 
eitenl Church of Greater Ne- Yo-l. Brool- 
lyn. N. Y. 
IVAN BLACK, public relatloni counsel. New 

Yorl. N. Y. 
ALICE STONE BLACKWHl. Cambridge. M.u. 
DR. HOWARD W. BLAKE. Ne- Yorl. N. Y. 
REV. MYLES 0. BLANCHARO, Coagragetionel 

Church. Lilbon. N. H. 
TAYLOR BLEDSOE, attorney. Atheville. N. C. 
RABBI MAURICE J. BLOOM. Temple Beta 

Jeeob. Newburgh. N. Y. 
». E. BLOUNT, retired teechar. Oel Pert. HI. 
OR. GEORGE BLUMER. Prafeeeo- Emavitm, 
Yale Medical School. Peeeden*. Calif 



JOHN M. BtY. Registrar. St. Olaf 

Northf.eld. Minn. 
OR. ERNST t. BOAS. Ne- Yorl. N. Y. 
IART J. BOK. Aliociate Profeiior of . 

omy. Harvard Uoivertity. Cembridge. Mem 
JOHN W. BOLLINGER. President. Feiraeve 

Union L.vettocl Commiuioo Co, Flaamjr. 

N D. 
OEAN AHVA J. C BONO. Alfred Urvvevsily 

School of Theology. Alfred. N. Y. 
HUGH A. BONE. Instructor in Gove™ meet. 

Oueem College. Baytida. N. Y. 
EDWARD H. BONSALL. JR, Advitor. Oiriitiee 

Youth Council of Jo-a. Fairfield, lowe. 
REV. LESTER L BOOBAR. Fi.it Method!!* 

Ourch. Banqor. Melne 
PHILIP H. BOOTHROYD. President. LeneJe- 
Co Locel. Farmers Educational and Coop- 
erative Union of Colorado. Lo.eland. Colo. 
ALLEN BORETZ. -riter. Wett Lot Aogelee. 

Calif. 
EDWIN G. BORING. Profeiior of Plychology. 

Harvard University. Cembrldqe. Men. 
LOUIS 8. BOUOIN. atlornay. Na- Yorl. N. Y. 
JEAN I. BOWIE (M.t. W. Rutiell). New Ycu*. 

N. Y. 
RICHARD O. BOYER. -riter. New Yorl. N. Y. 
BAYARD BOYESEN. -'iter. Winchelter. N. H. 
REV. DWIGHT J. BRADLEY. Director. Covad! 

for So-.ol Action. Ne- Yorl. N. Y. 
FREDERICK D. BRAMHALL. Profeiior of Po- 
I. Ileal Science. Univenlty of Colorado. 
Boulder Colorado 
MARY E. BRANCH. Proiidant. T.llotioa Col- 

lena. Austin. Teias 

MRS. LOUIS D. BRANDEIS, Waihington. 0. C 

BLAILSFORO R. BRAZEAL. Chairmen. Depe»«- 

liwat of Economics. Mo.ehouie Collage. 

Atlanta. Georgia. 

ROY BRAZELL. Secretary. Fermer« Uakua. 

No. 641. Volqa. S. D. 
SOPHONISBA P. BRECKENRIOGE. Profeuor 
r.f Public Welfare. School of Social Service 
Admmnt.etinn, Univenlty of Chicago. Clii- 
-aqo. III. 
WILLIAM BRECKSTONE. chamiil. New Yoal. 

N Y. 
JOSEPH BRESSLER. Attiitant Profeuor. Brook- 
lyn Colloqe. B-oollyn. N. Y. 
JAMES L. BREWER. P^cheiter Bar Aiiociatioa, 

R^rhcs'-r. N. Y. 
OR. OOROTHY BREWSTER. New Yorl. N. Y. 
JOHN BRIDGE. Professor. College of the City 

~f Ne- to.l. Ne- Yorl. N Y. 
SAMUEL HUGH BROCKUNIER, Profeuor of 
H.slory. W.n,n Unlvartity. Middlerowa. 
Conn. 
JOSEPH R. BROOSKY, Counsel. Intemetiofiel 

Wo-lo-s O.dor. No- Yorl. N. Y. 
J. E. BROLINE, State Board Member. Sowta 

Dakota Fa— e-i Union. Winner. S. 0. 
JEROME E. BROOKS, editor. No- Yorl. N. Y. 
VAN WYCK BROOKS, writer. Weltport. Conn. 
CHARLES E. BROUGHTON, ed.tor. Sheboyoyja. 

Wii 
JULE BROUSSEAU. novellil. New Yorl. N. Y. 
OR. CHARLOTTE HAWKINS BROWN. Prees- 

dert Palmar Institute. Sadalla. N. C 
DR. ESTHER LUCILE BROWN, Ruuell Sauae 

Foundation. Na- Yorl. N. Y. 
OR. GEORGE L BROWN, Chairmen. Safveoe 

Comm.ltee. Paulsbora. N. J. 

HAROLD BROWN, Secy.-Trees, Moetayae 

Farmers Union. Greet Fells. Moat. 
HAROLD CHAPMAN BROWN. Prates** of 

Philosophy. Stanford University, Palo AJ*x 

Calif. 
OR. SARA W. BROWN. Weshiagtse, D. C 
ALHEO A. BROWNE. Editor. HtkoSete I 

Hillside. N. Y. 



3662 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 18 
(Part 4) 



PI. J. WUCt, Managing Editor. T»e S ofto *! 

Vokeo, Wel.ne. Montene 
BDMUND Dt S. BRUNNER, Profeuo. of So- 
ciology. Columbia Un.veaity. Ne. York. 
HIANK BRUNO. Vic.-Preiident. T.nn.ue. 

Stets CIO. Indultriel Union Council. Mim. 

phis. Tenn. 
ASHLEY BUCK, author. Na. York.' N. Y. 
R1V. EOWIN T. BUEHRER, Third Unitarian 

Church. Chiiaqo, III. 
E. Z. BURDICK, Dean of Slud.ni, Conneoicut 

College. Now London. Conn. 
WALTER J.' BURKE, Secy. Trees, Wisconiin 

Slot* Industrie! Union Council. Milweukoe. 

HENRY M. BURLA&E, Profei.or. Univenity of 

North Carolina. Chapel Hill. N. C. 
LOWS E. BURNHAM. Orgen.ietionel Socy. 

Southern Negro Youth Gongreu. fciirtniru}. 

hem, Ala. 
JANE BURR. Autho-s' leogue of America. New 

York. N. Y. 
SAM BURT. Manager. Joint Board of Fur Dress- 

oa and Dyon New York. N. Y. 
REV. STANARD DOW BUTLER. Harklm.r. H.I. 
REV. ELMER W. BUTLER. Congregational 

Church. I. mend ligue, N. Y. 

WITTER BYNNER. writer. Santa Fa. N. M. 

JOHN L. BUYS. Pro'eiior of Biology. St. Law- 
rence Univ.rr.ty. Canton. N. Y. 

REV. EDWARD A. CAH1LU Fiat Congreg.- 
tionel Society. Chelmsford. Mail. 

WILLIAM CAHN. Ed-tor. Nowf of Ce*Mctl«rl. 
New Haven. Co-n 

IVA CAMPBELL, Democratic Stat* Central 
Committee. F.r;' Dittrict. Detroit. Mich. 

P.EV. FRANCIS C. CaPOZZI. Eplicopal Church. 
Wind Gap. Pa. 

MORRIS CARNOVStCY, actor. New York. N. Y. 

ISABELLA K. CARTER. Ai.ociete Profeuor. 
Univartity of North Caroline. Chepe! Hill. 
N. C 

WILLIAM MORE CASE. Chairman. Narad. 
Conference of Jowl and Chrittieni: Chair- 
men. Conmiuion oft Religion. Nev. Eco- 
nomic "Conference. Reno. Nov. 

©. t. CASEY, attorney, Hope. Ark. . 

THOMAS E. CASEY. Aniitant Chi.f Conduc- 
tor. Order of Railway Conductor!, Division 
No. 44. WiKontin. 

MARRY M. CASSIOY. Profeuor of Social Wei- 
faro. Univartity of California. Barkalay. 
Calif. 

ZECHARIAH CHAFEf. JR. Profattor of U». 
Cambridge. Matt. 

CKAS. G. CHAKERCAN. Attiitant Professor of 
Economrct, Connecticut College, New Lor- 

ROB8RT C" CHAUMAN. Auirfent Profeuor. 

Columbia Univeaify. Ne» York. N. Y. 
D. W. CHAPMAN. State Preiident. Montane 

Forman Union. Greet Felll. Mont. 

HON. LOUISE O. CHARLTON, Honorary 

Fretident. Southern Conference for Human 
Walter*. Krminghem. Ala. 

RAMI ELIAS CHARRY. Garmanh»n Jewish 
Center. Philadelphie. Pe. 

REV. DON M. CHASE, Methodist Church. Red- 
ding. Calif. 

RUSSELL N. CHASE, Pra-.ldant. Ohio Chapter. 
Nattorol Lawyer-. Guild. Cle.el.nd. Ohio. 

AlAflN B. CHRISTMAS. Stela Director. Ponn- 
tylv'ania Farmert Union. Centerport. Pe. 

HAROLD CHRISTOFFEL. Preiident. Allis-Chal- 
mea Workort Union. Local 248. United Au- 
tomobile Workea. C.I.O.. Wul Allit. Wit. 

f»AUl R. CHRISTOPHER. Tenneue* Regional 
Director. C.I.O.. Kno.ville. Tann. 

fa*. BENJAMIN H. CLARK. Fiat Unitarian 
Society. Leconie. N. H. 

ELMER C CLARK, Acting Chairman, Calling 
Diviiion. International Unlcn of Mine, Mill. 
Smelter Worker.. Toledo. Ohio. 

REV MERRILL F. CLARKE. Corrgr.get.onal 
Chriitien Churchet. New Canaan. Conn. 

EARL L CLURA Financial Secretary. Local 
IMS. United Electrical. Radio i Mech.no 
Worker! of America. Honeywell. Minn. 



M, ROBERT COBBLEDICK. Auociat* Profee- 

lor of Econom.ci. Connecticut College. New 

London, Conn. 
CHARLES J. COE. Form Reieerch. New York. 

N Y. 
GEORGE A. COE. R.lir.d Profettor of Educa- 
tion. Cl.remont. Cel.f. 
HAROLD G. COFFMAN. Preiident. George 

W,ll.a-i College. Chicego. III. 
RABBI HENRY COHEN. Galvatton. Tei.i. 
DR. LOUIS H. COHEN, Norwich. Conn. 
NORMAN F. COLEMAN. Mecelaiter College. 

SI. Paul. Minn. 
LOUIS COLMAN, Internetionet labor Oefent*. 

New Yorl. N. Y. 
REV. J. ROSS COLOUHOUN. St. j hn'i Epis- 

cop.l Church. Menketo. Minn. 
DEAN E. N. COMFORT. Oklahoma School of 

Religion, Norman. Okie. 
PHILIP W. L. COX, New York Univenity. New 

York. N. Y. 
REV. C. CLAYTON COMSTOCK. Clyde. N. Y. 
EUGENE P. CONNOLLY. Secy.. N. Y. County 

Committee, American Labor Party. New 

York. N. Y. 
REV. E. M. CONOVER. Director. Interdenoml. 

national Bureeu of Architecture. New York. 

N. Y. 
LINCOLN CONSTANCE. Aniitent Professor. 

of Botany. Univeaify of Cel.fornia. Berkeley. 

C.l.f. 
DR. JEROME E. COOK. St. louit. Mo. 
REV. GEORGE S. COOKE. Unitarian Church. 

Northampton. Mall. 
ELIZABETH SPRAGUE COOLIOGE. Petronen 
of Muiic. Coolidqe Foundation. Library of 
Conqreu Weihlnqton. D. C. 

DR. THOMAS B. COOLING. Detroit. Mich. 
ESTHER V. COOPER. E.ecutivo Secy.. South- 
ern Neo/o Youth Congreu. Birminghem, 

Ale. 
REV. ORLO C CORBETT. Flet Creek Baptiit 

Church. Gilboa. N. Y. 
PAUL COREY, author. Cold Springi. N. Y. 
GIOVANNI COSTIGAN. P.of.nor. Univenity 

of Weihlnqton. Soattle. Waih. 
J. A. COTTON, Former Preiident of Knoiville 

Co.'loeje. Hendonon. N. C. 
FREDERICK A. COUNTS. Aniitant Profauor 

of PlychoJoqy. Univenity of Mittouri. Co- 

lumble. Mo. 
THOMAS L. COWAN. Chairmen. Brooklyn 

Elks Civil Libertiei Leaque. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
GRACE L COYLE. Clevelend, Ohio. 
C M. CRAMLET. Aiiociete Profettor of 

Mathemetrci. Unlveaity of Welhlngton. 

Seattle. Waih. 
REV. FRANK D. CRAKDALL Second Church. 



Sola 



Ma 



REV. HENRY H. CRANE. Central Methodiit 

Church. Detroit. Mich. 
REV. WILLIAM C. CRAVNER. Church of the 

Good Shepherd. York, S. C. 
REV. ARTHUR M. CRAWFORD, Aibury Meth- 
ods Church. Erie. Pe. 
PAUL F. CRESSET. Profeuor of Sociology. 

Wheeton College. Norton. Men. 
RABBI ABRAHAM CRONBACH. Cincinnati. 

Ohio. 
EPHRAIM CROSS. Profauor. College of the 

City of New York. New York. N. Y. 
H. W. CROSS. Vice-Prei.. Comumea Union, 

Sprmqfield. Mall. 
JOSEPH E. CURRAN, Preiident. National Mari- 
time Union. New York. N. Y. 
EDWARD ELY CURTIS. Profeuor of Hiltory. 

Welleiley Colleoe. Welleiley. Men. 
ELIZABETH ARMOUR CURTISS, Lecturer in 

Economic* Welleiley College. Welleiley. 

Man. 
HAZEL MORTON CUSKING, educator. 

Spokene. Weih. 
GEORGE DAHL, Profeuor of Old Teitoment, 

Yale Divinity School, New Heven, Conn. 
HENRY W. L. DANA, profeuor. Cambridge, 

Man. 
REV. JOHN I. DANIEL, Highland Avenue Cor, 

qrwgfitiorr.t Church, Orenge. N. J. 



MARCIA DAVENPORT, writer, Ne. York. NY. 
DR. HAROLD W. DAVEY, labor relation! con. 

•ultent. Chicego. III. 
JOY DAVIDMAN. poet and novel.it. New York, 

N. Y. 
FRED d'AVILA. Editor. Baltimore C.I.O. Newt, 

Beltlmore. Md. 
DAVID DAVIS. Builnen Rep.. Local No. ISS. 

United Electrical. Radio t Mechine Work- 
on of Amerlce. Phlledelphle. Pa. 
REV. EARL C. DAVIS, Petaaham. Mail. 
PRANK C. DAVIS, Aniitant Profeuor .of Pry 

ctology. Univeriity of California, Lot An- 

qcloi. Cel.f. 
JOHN W. DAVIS. Preiident, Welt Virginle 

State Coll.qe. Initltute, W. Ve. 
JOHN P. DAVIS, ettorney. Weihlnqton. D. C 
REV. LEWIS H. DAVIS. Seymour Methodiit 

Church. Seymour. Conn. 
REV. JOHN WARREN DAY. Deen of Grace 

Cathedral. Topeke. Ken. 
REV. ROBERT B. DAY. Flat Unitarian Church. 

Niagara Falls. N. Y. 
W. J. DECKER, Secretary. Sen Dieqo Industrial 

Union Council. San Diego. Calif. 
HUGH DE LACY. President, Wellington Com- 
monwealth Federation. Seattle, Waih. 
ELEANOR DEMING. retired teacher end cemp 

director. New York. N. Y. 
HY OENERSTEIN. Organizer. Locel 16. United 

OT.ce S Profanlonel Workea of America. 

New York. N. Y. 
WALTER OENNIS. Fin.Sec'y.. Local 71. United 

Steal Worken of Americe. Silver Grove. Ky. 
CHESTER MeA. DESTLER. Chelrman. Dept. of 

History. Connecticut College, New London, 

Conn. 
BABETTE DEUTSCH. writer. New York, N. Y. 
REV. CHARLES DE VRIES. Flat Unitarian 

Chu-ch. Wait Uplon, Mail. 
REV. DALE DE WIH, Raglonel Director. Middle 

Atlantic Stetei. American Unitarian Ano- 

ciation. Now York. N. Y. 
REV. JOHN H. DIETRICH. Minister Emeritus. 

Fiat Unitarian Society. Minneapolis, Minn. 
MARJORIE DILLEY. Anociate Profauor of 

Govommant. Connecticut College, New 

London, Conn. 
GEORGE DILLON, writer end editor. 830th 

Signal Service Co.. Ft. Meade. Md. 
HEDLEY S. DIMOCK, Dean. George Wllllemt 

Colleqe. Chicaoo. III. 
W. D. DIZER. Profeuor: Preiident. St. Jamee 

Baptiit Young Peoplei' Union. Boiwell. Okie. 
BELLA V. DODD. Leiligatlve Rep.. Teacher.' 

Union of New York. New York. N. Y. 
STANLEY D. DODGE, Anociate Profeuor of 

Geography. Univeniry of Michigen, Ann 

Arbor. Mich. 
OR. WITHERSPOON DODGE. Greeniville Di- 
rector. Textile Workers Union of Americe. 

Greeniville. S. C. 
JAMES A. DOMBROWSKI, Eiec. Secy, South- 
ern Conference for Human Welfare. Nash- 

villa Tenn. 
DR. ARNOLD DONOVAN, dentiil. New York. 

N. Y. 
ELIZABETH DONNAN, Profeuor of Economics. 

Welleiley College. Welleiley. Men. 
JULIUS DOUBEK. Secy.. Manitowoc Central 

Labor Council, Manitowoc, Wis. 
HARL R. DOUGLAS. Unlveaity of Colorado, 

Boulder. Colo. 
OLIN DOWNES. mullc critic, New York. N. Y. 
MURIEL DRAPER, euthor, New York. N. V. 
THEODORE DREISER, novel!.'. Hollywood. Col. 
DANIEL DRIESEN. Int'l Rep.. Americen Com- 
munications Anociatlon, Waihlngton, D. C 
REV. WILLIAM H. DUDLEY, Congregational 

Church, Homer, N. Y. 
REV. HUBERT N. DUKES, First Congregetlonel 

Church. Jackion, Mich . 
REV. ARTHUR OUMPER. Former Dear, of Trin- 
ity Cathedrel. Newerk, N. J. 
JOHN OUNN. News Editor. Federated Preev 

New York. N. Y. 
ZARA DU PONT, Cambridge. Meet. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3663 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 18 

(Part 5) 



REV. M. O. DYKvtss. Our Sovic< s E.engel cjl 
Lutheran Church. New York. N. Y. 

JCHN OZENIT. businessman. Santa Barbara. 
Calif. 

HORACE A. EATON. Professor of English. 
Syracuse. University. Syracuse. N. Y. 

CLYDE EDDY, author. Port Washington. N. Y. 

C 6. EOEUN. Pro.ident. Plymouth Local 51, 
United Au-c mobile Workers. Oatrolt. Mich. 

REV. J. EARLE EDWARDS. Queens Village, 
N. Y. 

T. L EDWARDS. Hettinger. N. D. 

CHARLES D. E6LEY, Mgr.. Farmers Union Live- 
stock Commission Co, South St. Paul. Minn. 

GILBERT S. EILES, Secy, Central Labor Coun- 
cil. Sheboygan. W,,. 

NAT EINHORN. E.acui.va Secretory. Nin 
popor Guild. Ne. York. N. Y. 

ALBERT EINSTEIN. Princaton. N. J. 

CLARENCE EXLUND. Buffalo. Wyoming. 

MRS. LEWIS A. ELORID6E, Gtaat Nack. L I. 
N. Y. 

DR. LEWIS A. ELDF.I0GE. .<*.., Greet Nack. 
L I.. N. Y. 

SEIA ELDRID6E. Professor. University of Kon- 
tai. Lawrence. Kama. 

REV. FREDERICK M. ELIOT. Unitarian Atiocla- 
tlon. Boston. Man. 

ALBERT I. EI.KUS. composer; educator; Pro- 
feisor of Muilc. Unl.aniry of California. 
Be.keley. Calif. 

HENRY ELLISON, Fraa Praia Corporation. 
Grand Coulaa. Wath. 

CHARLES A. ELLWOOD. Profesio. of Sociol- 
ogy. Duka University. Durham. N. C. 

DR. LEO ELOESSER. Clinical Profauor of Sur- 
9ary. Stanford University. Sen Franciico. 
Calif. 

GECTRUDE ELY. Bryn Mawr. Pa. 

EDWIN S. EMBREE. author. Chicago, III. 

S. ENEE. Imtructor. Dapt. of Economics, L'r.l- 

vanity of California. Lot Angsles, Calif. 
PAUL ENGLE. Assistant Profeisor of English. 

University of Iowa. Iowa City. io»«. 
MRS. ROSS ENSWINGER, Reglstrer. Southarn 

Union College. Wadlay. Ala. 
ARCHBISHOP WILLIAM ERNEST (JAMES I). 

Patriarch. African Orthodox Church, Now 

York. N. Y. 
HUGO ERNST. General Secy.-Troot, Hotel I 

Restaurant Employee. Intamational Alliance 

and Bartender. International League of 

DEAN ALV'lN E. EVANS. Lew School. Univar- 
tity of Kentucky. Leilnqton, Ky. 

REV. ARTHUR WALWYN EVANS, Congrege- 
tlonal Chu'ch. Rocha.tar. N. Y. 

REV. JOHN JARTLE EVERTS. Carnal. N. Y. 

REV. THOMAS D. EWING. Wlndermara Pres- 
byterien Church, Eeit Cleveland. Ohio. 

HENRY PRATT FAIRCHILD, Profe.ior of So- 
ciology. N. Y. University. New York. N. Y. 

REV. ARTHUR W. EARNUM. St. Mary's Parish. 
A.hevllle. N. C. 

REV. ALFRED L. FAUST. First Methodist 

Church, Richnond Hill. N. Y. 
PAUL J. FAY, Profe.ior of Psychology, Da 

Pauw University. Greencostle. Ind. 
DR. ERNST FEISE, Professor of Medicine. Johns 

Hopklm. Baltimore. Md. 
RABBI ABRAHAM L FEIN8ERG, Denver. Colo. 
REV GEORGE C. FETTER. University Baptist 

Church. Minneepolis, Minn. 

SARA BARD FIELD, writer and poet. Los Gotoi. 

Calif. 
JAMES RAY FILES, Chairman. Charter Revision 

Committee. Los Anqelej, Celif. 
REV. JOHN W. FINDLEY. Univerilty Presby- 
terian Church. Purdue University. Wast 

Lateyette. Ind. 
IRVING FINEMAN, writer. Shafttbury. Vt. 
REV WALTER P. FINK. Clifton Unitarian 

Church. Loullvllle. Kentucky. 
REV. JACOB FISCHER, Clifton Unitarian 

Church, Louisville. Kentucky. 
H. H. FISHER. Profeftor of History. Stanford 

University. -Palo Alto. Calif. 



REV. WELLS H. FsTCH, Sacratary, N. Y. Con- 
gregational Christian Conference. River- 
head. New York. 

JAMES L FITZPATRICK. Editor. The Wisconsin 

Teacher, Milwaukee. W.i. 

ABRAM FLAXER. President, Stete, County a 
Municipal Workers of America, New York. 
N. Y. 

LEON FLEISCHER. NAAC.P. Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

REV. JOSEPH F. FLETCHER. Church Leegua 
for Indu.lriel Democracy. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

REV. JOSEPH S. HIPPER. Senior Bishop. Afri- 
can MenXodlst Episcopal Church, Atlanta, 
Ga. 

ELIZABETH GURLEY FLYNN. Secy.. Women's 
Committee. Communist Perty, Now York. 
N. Y. 

MRS. MITCHELL FOLLANSBEE. Illinois' League 
of Woman Voters. Evanston, III. 

THOMAS FOLEY. Field Organiser. United Elec- 
trical. Radio & Mechlne Workers of Amer- 
ica. Anoka. Minn. 

GUY STANTON FORD. Washington, D. C. 

REV. JOHN B. FORSYTH, Rotedale Gardens 
Pre.byterian Church. Plymouth. Mich. 

BERTHA JOSSELYN FOSS. New York. N. Y. 
WALDO FRANK, writer. New York. N. Y. 
MITCHELL FRANKLIN. Profe.ior of Law. 

Tulana University. New Orleens. La. 
GEORGE WILLARD FRASIER. State College. 

Greoley. Colo. 
ROYAL WILBUR FRANCE. Profeisor of Econ- 

nomics Rollins College. Winter Perk. Fla. 
ELIZABETH P. FRAZIAR. Religious Educator. 

Protestant Episcopal Church. Philadelphia, 

Pa. 
IRA HENRY FREEMAN, newspapermen. New 

York. N. Y. 

HARRY W. FREEMAN, attorney. Houston. 
Tu. 

REV. EDWARD SNIVELY FREY, United Lu- 
theren Church, Lemoyne. Pa. 

REV. STEPHEN H. FRITCHMAN. Unitarian 
Youth Comml.slon, Boston, Mass. 

REV. G. SHUBERT FRYE, Presbyterian Church, 
Syracuse, N, Y. 

EVA WATSON FRYE. Syracuse. N. Y. 

LESLIE A, FURLONGS. President. GenW 
Alumni Assocletlon of Shaw University, 
New York. N. Y. 

JAMES L FURRY. Secretary, lerberton Labor 
Union. Barberton. Ohio. 

WENDELL H. FURRY. Harvard University. 
Cambridge. Mass. 

WANDA GAG. Au'hor's League, Naw York, 
N. Y. 

ROBERT F. GALBREATH. New Wilmington. Pa. 

W. HORSLEY GANTT. Baltimore. Md. 

OR, RUDOLPH GANZ. President. Chicago 
Musical Collaaa. Chicago. III. 

LEO GALLAGHER, attorney. Los Angelas. Col. 

DR. MERRITT G. GARLAND. Chairmen of the 
Social Action Committee, E.sei North Asso- 
ciation of Congregational Christian 
Churches. Bredford. Men. 

KATE CRANE GARTZ. Altadena. Celif. 

EDWARD W. GELDREICH, Instructor of Psy- 
chology, Kansas State Teachers College, 

HUGO GELLERT. ertist. New York. N. Y. 

W. W. GERMAN -SR., Louisville. Ky. 

JAMES J. GIBSON. Ai.ociato Profeisor of 

Psychology. Smith College, Northampton, 

Mats.- Captain, Air Corps, Flying Training 

Command. 
REV. CHARLES G. GIRELIUS. Unitarian 

Church. Barnaveld. N. Y. 
WILLIAM GLAZIER. Research Director. Oil 

Workers Organising Campaign, (C.I.O.) 

H-uston. Tot. 
JOSEPHINE M. GLEASON. Vaster Collage. 

Poughkeepsia. N. Y. 
ELIOT J. GLESZER. attorney. Civil Rights and 

Liberties Committee, National Lawyers 

Guild. Hartford. Conn. 



HYMAN N. GUCKSTBN. attorney 

Lew Committee, N. Y. County AmsaStm 

Lebor Perty. New Yost N. Y. 
(EN GOLD. President, International Fur t 

Loathe-.- Workers Union of U. S. & Canada. 

(C.I.O.). Naw York. N. V. 
ALFRED G. GOLDBERG, attorney. Milwaukee. 

Wis. 
DR. ISIDOR GOLDBERG. Louisville. Ky. 
DR. MAURICE GOLDBERG. Naw York. N. Y. 
ICAIIS GOLDBLATT, Field Representative. In- 

ternatonal Longshoremen's and Warehouse- 
men's Union. New York. N. Y. 
BEN GOLDEN. New York N. Y. 
DR. ALEX GOLDMAN. Bron.. N. Y. 
LEONARD H. GOLDSMITH, National CIO 

Representative. Newark. N. J. 
JOSEPH M. GONZALEZ. Morion. Ohio 
ERWIN R. GOODENOUGH. Professor of the 

H.rsory of Religion, Yele University. Nov 

Haver. Conn. 
EVERETT W. GOODHUE. Professor. Dartmouth 

College. Henover. N. H. 
ERNEST GOODMAN, attorney. Detroit. Mich. 
WILLYSTINE GOOOSELL. Associate Professor 

of Educetlon (retired). Teachers College. 

Columbia University. Naw York. N. Y. 
R. A. GORDON. Department of Economics. 

University of California. Berkeley. Calif. 
ESTHER ALLEN GOW. Leegue of Women 

Voters, Columbus. Ohio. 
REV. GEORGE LORENZO GRAMSS, Beyonna. 

N. J. 
REV. JOHN C 6RANEERY. Editor. The Eaueck. 

pator, San Antonio, Texas, 
W. BROOKE GRAVES. Department of Political 

Science. Temple University, Philadelphia. Pa. 
REV. CHARLES S. GRAY, Methodist Church, 

Goylordsvme. Conn. 
WILLIAM D. GRAY, Professor of History, Smirk 

Collage. Northampton. Mas.. 

ROWLAND GRAY-SMITH. Professor of Philos- 
ophy. Emerson Collaqo. Boston, Mesa. 

REV. WALTER F. GREENMAN. Newton. Men. 

REV. CORNELIUS G9EENWAY. All Souls Uni- 
versalis! Church. Brooklyn. N. Y. 

BISHOP J. A. GREGG, Secy, Bishops' Council. 
Kansas City. Kan. 

REV. W. E. J. 6RETZ. Our Saviour's MntWlrf 
Church, Evanston. III. 

BENJAMIN O. GRUENKRG, educator. New 
York. N. Y. 

REV. ALEXANDER J. J. GRUITTER. Episeopel 
Church. Toledo. Ohio 

OR. RETTINA WARBURG 6WMSOM, New 
York, N. Y. 

SAMUEL GRUKR. Secy. Stamford IndustrW 
Union Council. CIO. Stamford, Corns. 

HARRIET GUIGNON. Philadelphia-. Pe. 

RALPH H. GUNDLACH, Associate Professor of 
Psychology, University of Washington. 
Seettle. Wash. 

MARY J. GUTHRIE. Professor of Zoology. Uni- 
versity of Missouri, Columbia, Me. 

J. H. HADLEY, General Chairmen, SAL. Sys- 
tem Fadoretion, Brotherhood of Mainte- 
nance of Way Employees, Temp*. Fla. 

REV. HERMAN J. HAHN, Riverside Salem 
Church. Buffalo. N. Y. 

RABBI J. L HAHN. Congregation Mt. Sinai 
An.hei Emeth. New York. N. Y. 

REV. B. FRANK HALL, Control Presbyterian 
Church. St. Louis. Mo. 

ROYAL G. HALL Professor. Albion College. 

Albion. Mich. 
DR. MARION FRANKLIN HAM. clergymen, 

author. Belmont. Mass. 
OR. ALICE HAMILTON. Professor Emorrrev 

Harverd University. Hedlyme. Conn. 
FRANK H. HANKINS, Northampton. Mast, 
L M. HANKS, JR- psychologist. Bennington 

College, Bennington. Vt. 
ARTHUR J. HANrreY. attorney. AJbwiy. N. Y. 
LEWIS R. HARDY. Loulivillei Ky. 
CARL A. HAUOUIST. Representative. Mir. 

neopolit United Automobile Wcrsevs, CJ.Q, 

Minneapolis, Minn. 



3664 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 18 
(Part 6) 



S. RALPH HARLOW, profeuor. S-r.it*. College. 

Northampton, Man. 
OAWSON M. HARNISH, Secretery of School 

Board. Richland. Pa. 
LUCIUS C HARPER. E.ecufivo Editor. The 

Chicago Defender, Chicago. III. 
MRS. ANTON S. HARRINGTON, Schoherie 

County Committee. Fa-man Union. N. Y. 

Milk Shed. G ltd N. Y. 
OR. CHARLES MORGAN HARRIS. Jersey 

City, N. J. 
OR. 0. L. HARRIS, St. Louis. Mo. 
ELAM HARRIS. Clifton Unita-ian Chutch Lilt. 

Louisville. Ky. 
GERALD HARRIS, President. Alabama Formers 

Union, Birmingham. Ala. 
M. LAFAYETTE HARRIS. Pratidant. Philander 

Smith College. L.ttla Rock. Ark. 
MARGUERITE TJADER HARRIS. Editor. Direc- 
tion, Darian, Conn. 
KOSERT J. HARRIS, Associate Profeuor of 

Government. Louisiana State University; 

Editor. Journal ef Politic*. Baton Rouge, La. 
H. HARRISON, Secy.-Treas. Central Labor 

Union. Jefferson City. Mo. 
REV. JOSEPH HARTE, St. George's Episcopal 

Church, Rochester. N. Y. 
0AVI0 L HATCH. Connecticut College. New 

London. Conn. 
ELMER HAUCK. Secy.Trees. Chein Service 

Restaurant Employees Union, Local 42, New 

York. N. Y. 
KY. EDLER G. HAWKINS. St. Augustine Pret- 

byterian Church. New York. N. Y. 
ROLAND HAYES, concert artist. BrookliiM, 

(XV. TRUMAN L HAYES, Barnstable. Mess. 
AUrlE DAVIS HAYS. New York. N. Y. 
GEORGE HEDGER. Professor of History. Cin- 
cinnati (ranch. A.C.LU. Cincinnati. Ohio. 
TRAVIS K. HEORICK. Publicity Director. Oil 

Workers Organising Cempaign, C.I.O, 

Houston. Teaea. 
KV. ARTHUR HSEJL Unitarien Church. North- 

field. Matt. 
A, J. HEILMAN, aifton Unitarien Church List. 

Louisville, Ky. 
H.ORIEN HEISER. University of Connoeitcut. 
- Norwich; Conn. 
*EV. LEONARD HELIE. First Church In Ro»- 

bury. Men. Brookllne, Man. 
MARION HHLSTERN. President. South Valley 

County Farmers Union. Hinaoele. Mont. 
WILLIAM KEMP. Clifton Unitarien Church List. 

Louisville. Ky. 
KV. G. THEODORE HEMFSLMAN, Clifton 

Unitarian Church. Louisville. Ky. 
CHARLES J. HENDtEY. President. Teachers' 

Union of City of New York, New York. N. Y. 
MftS. GEORGE T. HENDRIE. Birmingham. 

Mich. 
ALICE HENDRJCXSON. Secy.. Mllweuke* 

Chapter. National Federation for Constitu- 
tional Liberties. Milwaukee, Wis. 
HARRY E HENSON. taecher. Coldwetee. Mich. 
MRS. THOMAS N. HEPBURN. Hertford. Conn. 
DR. I. W. HELD. New York. N. Y. 
MEL* J. HelNVYTZ. General Representative. 

Wisconsin State C.I.O. Milwaukee. Wis. 
JEftOME R. HELLEftSTTrlN. attorney. New 

York. N. Y. 
DONALD HENDERSON. General President. 

United Cannery. Agriculture!. Pecking and 

Allied Workers of America. Philedelphla. Pe. 
AMY HkTWES. Professor of Economies. Mounf 

Horyohe College. South Hedley. Man. 
CLYDE V. HICMftSON. Sen Antonio. Tesel 
HOWARD V. HICKS, Financial Secy. Mascot 

Miners Union. Local IBS. Mascot, Tena. 
frHsUr M. HICKS. Protector of cngfllK 

Swsrthmore C ollege. Swarrhmore, Pa. 
ft, A. HICKS. Busmen Repreeeritethre end Secy, 

Tree*. Mldoaet District Cornell No. 12, 

MineMpolit. Mleo. 
fUNLEKCS HEU. Aeeoeie*. fWosaor of 



Cms*. 



REV. JOHN S. HIGGINS. Gathiemane Eplsco- 

oal Chu-ch. M.nnoapolli. Minn. 
REV CHARLES A. HILL. Hartford Avenue 

Baptist Chu-ch, Oat-oil. Mich. 
WALOEMAR B. HILLE. Dl-actor of Music. 

Elmhu-lt Collage. Elmhurst. III. 
REV. CLIFFORD W. HILLIKER. North Congre- 
gational Church, M.ddletown. N. Y. 
RANDALL S. HILTON. First Unitarian Church. 

Alton. III. 
HARRISON S. HIRES, manufacturer. Phile- 

delph.a. Pa. 
ALFRED HIRSCH. Editor. Wisconsin CIO News. 

Milwaukee. Wis. 
IRA A. HOBART, American Legion Post S7«. 

of Cooporstown Dept.. Burlington Flats. NY. 
THAYER KOBSON. publisher. New York, N. Y. 
REV. CHESTER E. HODGSON. Newark. N. J. 
(CATHERINE HOFFMAN, Adminiitrstlva Secy., 

Greater Newark Industrial Union Council. 

C.I.O.. Newark. N. J. 
REV. FRANK O. HOLMES. Unitarian Church. 

Concord. N. H. 

REV. D. D. HOLT, Lynchburg. Va. 

WILLIAM C. HOUK. Assistant Professor of 

Biology. St. Lawrence University. Carlton, 

N. Y 
CHARLES H. HOUSTON, attorney. Washing. 

ton. D. C. 
DANIEL HOWARD. Chairman. Connecticut 

Conference on Social and Labor Leglsletion. 

Windsor. Conn. 
REV. GEORGE G. HOWARD. Hackenseck Uni. 

tarian Church. Hackemack. N. J. 
ARTHUR HOWE. West Orange. N. J. 
BEN HOWE. Jackion Heights. Long Island N.Y. 
REV. LEE A. HOWE, JR. Onelde Baptist 

Church. Oneida. N. Y. 
CLARENCE V. HOWELL teacher. New York. 

N. Y. 
JOHN F. HOYT, Portsmouth, N. H. 
LEO HUBERMAN. author. New York. N. Y. 
MRS. H. H. HUGGINS. President. Louisiana 

Congress Colored Parents and Teachers. 

Baton Rouge. La. 
LANGSTON HUGHES, author. New York. N.Y. 
EDWIN N. HU6HES, librarian, Chicago Teach- 
ers College. Chicego, III. 
S. O. HUKEE. Farmers Union. Winger, Minn. 
J. M. HUNT, professor. Providence. R. I. 
LAURENCE F. HUNT, Program Secy. Herlem 

YMCA. New York. N. Y. 
REV. HAROLD B. HUNTING, clergymen end 

euthor. Greenfield. N. H. 
ELLSWORTH HUNTINGTON, Professor of 

Geography. Yale University. New Haven. 

Conn. 
MRS. A. W. HUNTON. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
W. A. HUNTON. professor, Howerd University: 

Stcy.-Trees Council of United Negro Labor 

Leaders of Washington. Washington. D. C. 
DR. LOUISE M. IN6ERSOLL. Asheville. N. C 
FRANCES A. INGWEILLER. National Fermers 

Union. New Haven, Mich. a 

JOHN ISC Professor of Economic* University 

of Kansas. Lawrence. Ken. 
ABRAHAM J. ISSERMAN, attorney. Nowerk, 

N. J. 
REV. HUSH JACK, Northminster Presbyterian 

Church. Detroit. Mich. 
HULAN E. JACK, Assemblymen, 17 A.D. New 

York County. New York. N. Y. 

REV. EDGAR 1 JACKSON. Bridgeport, Conn. 

REV. F. W. JACKSON. Almond. N. Y. 

LOUIS L JAFFE. Profeuor of Lew, University 
of Buffalo Law School. Buffalo, N. Y. 

REV. W. H. JERNAGIN. Chairmen Executive, 
Board. Fraternal Council of Negro Churehee, 
Washington. D. C. 

GEORGE W. JOEL. Vice-President end Editor. 
The Olel Frees, lex. Mew York. N. Y. 

REV. KDE A. JOHNSON. Methodist Federa- 
tion for Sociel Service. Los Angelas. Calif. 

CHARLES S. JOHNSON. Director. Depertnvarrt 
of Social Sciences. Flsk University. Nash- 
ville. Tenn. 

MV. JAMES ft. JOMNJOH. JR. EbeMW 
A.M.E. Church. Roanoke, Ve. 



VICTOR JOHNSON. Dean of Medlcel Students, 

Univeri.ty of Chicago, Chicago. III. 
VIENA P. JOHNSON. State Secy.. Mlnnesote 

Farmer-Labor Association, St. Paul. Minn. 
DAVID D. JONES. P-etldent. Bonnelt College. 

Greensboro N. C. 
ELSIE VOORHEES JONES. Professor. Ohio 

State University. Columbus. Ohio 
REV. JOHN PAUL JONES. B-ooHyn. N. Y. 
REV. WILLIAM SAFFORD JONES. South Parish, 

Portsmouth. N. H. 
PAUL JARRICO, —Iter. Hollywood, Calif. 
THOMAS JASPER. Assistant Manager. Interna- 
tional Fur i Leather Workers Union, I2S. 

C.I.O.. Now York. N. Y. 
ROBERT JOSEPHY. Vice-President. Local If. 

United Office & Professional Workers of 

America, New York. N. Y. 
HARRY M. JUSTIG, President. Union of Yugo- 
slav Americans. New York. N. Y. 
REUBEN L KAHN. Director of Clinical Labor*- 

lories. University Hospital. University of 

Michigan. Ann Arbor. Mich. 
ARTHUR KALLET. author. New York. N. Y. 
FRANCIS FISHER KANE, former U.S. Attorney. 

Eatta-n District of Ponna.. Philadelphia. Pa. 
ALEXANDER KAUN. Professor. University of 

California. Berkeley. Calif. 
MR. 4 MRS. FREDERICK I. KATZ. Roabury. 

Conn 
WILBUR G. KATZ. Ch.cago, III. 
MARIE L KAYSER, Attadana, Calif. 
VANT W. KEBKER. Geithersburg, Md. 
REV. J. CLYDE KEEGAN. Cody. Wyo. 
HELEN KELLER. Wesrport, Conn. 
PAUL KELLOGG, editor. New York. N. Y. 
MORRIS KEMP, professor. Kansas City. Mo. 
EDITH M. KEMPTHORNE, National Secy. 

Camp Fire Girls of America. New York. N.Y. 
ALBERT J. KENNEDY. University Settlement. 

New York. N. Y. 
BISHOP PAUL ft. KERN, Methodist Church. 

Nashville. Tenn. 
DR. LORIN E. KERR, Public Health Admits!*- 

trotor. Oberlin. Ohio. 

FRANCIS S. KINDER, economist end journalist. 
Denver. Colo. 

REV. WILLIAM f. KING. Nashville, Tenn. 

DR. JOHN A. KINGSBURY. Shady. New York 

FREDA KIRCHWEY. Editor, The Merlon. Mew 
York. N. Y. 

EDWARD C KIRKLAND, professor, Brunswick, 
Maine 

REV. JAMES KNAFP. All Saints Church. Herri- 
son. N. Y. 

HAROLD V. KNIGHT. Editor. Nor* Delete 
Union Farmer. Jamestown. N. D. 

ARTHUR KOBE*, writer. New York. N. Y. 

REV. C FRANKLIN KOCH. Lutheran Church 
House. New York. N. Y. 

HARRY KOGER, International Representative, 
United Cennery. Agricultural. Packing ft 
Allied Workers of Americe. CIO. Suffolk. Ve. 

JULIA CHURCH KOLAR. Woodtide, Long 
Island, N. Y. 

EUGENE KONECKY. Acting Managing Editor. 
Fretomel Outlook. New York. N. Y. 

ALFRED KREYMBORG. euthor. New York. N. Y. 

REV. ALBERT E. KRISTJANSSON. Uniterien 
Church. Blaine. Wesh. 

GEORGE D. KUDLER, New York. N. Y. 

J. K. KYLE. Chairman. Walworth County Pro- 
gressive Committee. Whitewater. Wis. 

REV. RALPH E. KYPER. Uniterien Church, 
Northampton, Man. 

M. S. KNEKLMAN. professor. Pullman. Wesh. 

LEONARD LAGEMAN, Secy.-Treel.. Mint,**** 
State C.I.O. Council, Minneapolis, Minn. 

ALEXANDER* LAING. Assistant Librarian, Dart- 
mouth College, Henover, N. H. 

GRAHAM A. LAING, Protestor of Economic* 
California Institute of Technology. Petedenss. 
Calif. 

EDWARD LAMB. Viee-Prei. National Lawyers 
Guild. Toledo. Ohio. 

KCV. ALFRED M. LAMftfftT. St. Monica's €•»*> 
copel Church. Hartford. Conn. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3665 



CORLISS LAMONT. euthor end teacher. N «" 

fori. NY. , 

MARGARET I. LAMONT. Ne- York. N. Y 
REV. WILLIAM E. LAMPE. Sec-e'en, °' ', ' 
Evanqol.cal and Reformed Church. Ph.la- 

OR." WALTER" LANDAUER. Professor of Ge- 
netics. University of Connecticut. Vain. 

R. 0°HARA LANIER. Acting Piwidwt. Hemp. 

SDWARd'lANDON. e.t.st. N.. Yo.k. N V. 

REV. WALTER LANPHEAR. Chairmen Repub- 
Lean Town Committee. ChepLn Congres- 
sional District 2. Chapl.n. Conn. 

OR. LINDA B. LANGE (retired). Phile Pe 

ALFRED G. LARKE. Secy .-Tree. Great., 
fjjlfolo lndusl..el Union Count, I. C.I.O.. But- 

JOHN' F. LARSON. Secy Trees Local 492 
United Cennery. Agricultural. Peeking - 
Allied Wo'lors Mmneepol.s. M,nn. 

O. S. LATHROP. Secy.. Lee County Taipayen 
Association. Donnellson. low. 

IRA LATIMER. Chicago. III. .... 

REV. ROIERT W. LAWSON. Unitarian Church. 

OR. CATHARINE' 0. LEALLAD. Ne» York NY 
OR. ROBERT WARD LEEPER. piycholog.it. 

Eugene. Ore. 
REV DUBOIS LE KVRE. Firtl Unitarian 

Church Youngsfo-n. Oh,o 
J. A. LEIGHTON. Professor Emeritus, Ohio 

Stele University. Worthington. Ohio 
RABBI EMIL W. LEIPZIGER. N.« Orleen. La. 
DR. EMIL LENGYEU Jeckson He.ghti. Long 

liland. NY. 
WILLIAM ELLERY LEONARD. Profeuor of Eng- 

list, University of Wi.con.in. Mad,.on. Wis. 
KENNETH LESLIE. Editor. Tit. P.otestent. Ne- 

OEAN WALDO E. USSINGER. College of Edu- 
cation Wayne University. Detroit. Mich. 
MERIDEl LESEUEtt. -'iter Minneapolis. Minn. 
RABBI LEE J. LEVINGER. Walla Walla. Wash. 
N LEVINSON. Professor. Messechusett, Intti- 

' lute of Technology. Cembridge. Mass. 
CHARLES G. LE VITA, Editor. City N.-J, 
local III. State. County & Munic.pol Work- 
er, of Amerce. CIO. Ne- York. N. Y. 
GILBERT LEWIS. President. New Cattle County. 

Induslr.el Union Council. Wilmington. Del. 
REV WILLIAM W. LEWIS. Uniterian Church. 

Keen.. N. H. 
W. MORRIS LEZENBY. Secy- Atlantic County 
Centr.l Labor Union. AFl, Atlantic City. 
N. J. , ..... 

PAUL LIEIMANN. Assistant Professor of Bibli- 
cal History. Wellesloy College. Well.sley. 
Mess. 
IYER C. UNO. Minneapolis. Minn. 
KA LINDGREN. Secy. -Trees.. Hennepin County 

CIO. Council. Minneapolis. Minn. 
SAMUEL McCUNE LINDSAY. N,« York. N Y. 
RALPH LINTON. Cheirman. D.pt. of Anthro- 
pology. Columbia University. New Yort. 
N. Y. 
REV. HERMAN J. LION. Marlboro. Mass 
EUGENE J. LIPMAN. Hebrew Union College. 

Cincinnati. Ohio 
PHILIP LOEB. Hn York. NY. 
KATHERINE LOCKE, actresi. Nk York N. Y. 
REV. HARRY LONGIEY, Episcopal Church, 

Charleston. W. Vo. 
REV. P. HENRY LOTZ. Methodist Church. 

Toulon. III. 
MUR1AND R. LOWELL Committeemen. Farm- 
erf. Union. New Yort Milt She**. Mjssmi. 
N. Y. 
UV. EDGAR A. lOWTHSR, Chairmen. Social 
Reletiont Commission. Sen Francisco Church 
Federetion. Sen Francisco. Calif. 
NATALIE LUCCOCK. College Advisor. YWCA, 

Weynss University. Detroit. Mich. 
JOSEPH LUKOVICH, McKe« Rocks. Pa. 
DAVID L tURIE, sociel worke*. Whits) Pleine. 
N. V. 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 18 
(Part 7) 

, FLORENCE H. LUSCOMB. Vice-Chelrm.n. 
C'rvil Liberties Union of Massachusetts, t-em- 

CLIFFORD T.*MC AVOY. L.q:.l-««. DiweJW. 

G-nater N. Y. Industrial Un.on Council. CIO. 

Ne- York. N. Y. , 

ELIZABETH MCCAUSLANO. writer and ert 

critic Ne- York N. Y. 
ELMER MCCLAIN, attorney. Runnymede farm, 

CHARLES m!°MC CONN. Dean. Ne- York Uni- 

.army Ne- York. N. Y. 
REV. F. W. MCCONNELL. Methodist Church. 

Cs>UOe' MCDONALD. Rtl. Secy, local 1152. 
United Electrical. Red.o & Machine W 



ol An 



M.< 



M < 



HOWARD MCKENZIE. 



WILLIAM MC FEE. writer. Broolf.eld. Conn. 
KEV WM. MCGEE. All Soul. Unitarian Church. 

Santa Our Calif. 
JAMES H. MCGILL. businessman. Valparaiso. 

i-P.esidont. Ne- 
York. N. Y. 
WILLIAM '"aYEr" MCKINNEY. businessmen. 

REV^wTlARD L MCKINSTRY. Nentucket 

Unitarian Chu-ch. Nantucket. Mats. 
REV. WAITER A. R MCPHERSON Mors* 

mere Community Ou'clv Ridg«'iold. N. J. 
REV. JOHN A. MACCOLLUM. Walnut Street 

Pre.b/terian Church; President. Ph.ladelphie 

Housing Association. Philadelphia. Pe. 
GEORGE MAC DONALD. President. Hennepin 

County Industrial Union Council. Mmneap- 

HOWAr'o X MACOONALO. B'oolC.ld. Mess 

REV. GEORGE MACKAY, First Congregational 
Society Unitarian. Eastport. Maine 

OR, GEORGE W. MACKENZIE. Phile, Pa. 

MRS. WALTER MADDOCK. Catholic Mission- 
ary Clubs. Bismarck. N. D 

NORMAN R. F. MAJER. Professor. University 
of Michigan. Ann Arbor. M.ch. 

T LOUIS MAJORS. International Represent- 
live United Electricel. Radio & Machine 
Worlers of Americe. Minneapolis. M.nn 

I. MALAMUD, Norwich State Hotpitol. Nor- 

ALBERT MALTZ. «ril.r. Los Angeles. Calif 
DAVID MANDEL. attorney. Perth Amboy. N J. 
ARTHUR J. MANDELL, ettornoy. Houston, les. 
LEWIS F. MANLY. Medford. Mais 
HORACE MANN. Southwest Harbor. Ma.it. 
ROSALIE MANNING. Ne- York. NY 
REV H E. MANSFIELD. Community Church. 

Allenville. Wis. 
OR W. H. MANWARING. Professor Emeritus. 

'Stanford University. Palo Alto. Calif. 
RABII HARRY S. MARGOLIS. Mount Zion 

Temple St. Paul. Minn. 
HERBERT E. MARKS, music publ.she.. New 
York. N Y. „ . 

REV. HAROLD P. MARLEY. Unitarian Church. 

Dayton. Ohio , 

6EORGE MARSHALL. Chairman. Nat I. Feder- 
ation for Conititul.onal L.berties. New York. 

JAMES W. MARTIN, professor. Lesington Ky. 
REV GEORGE T. MASETOA, Wh.tefi.h. Mont. 
KIRTLEY F. MATHER, Professor of Geology. 

Harvard University. Cembridge. Mass. 
REV. WILLIS 0. MATHIAS. Emmanuel Even- 

genical and Reformed Church. Allentown. 

F.O.°MATTHIESSEN. Professor. Harvard Uni- 
versity. Boston. Mess. 

GEORGE MAT1S. Secy.Tr.es. Montgomery 
County Farmers Union. N. Y. Milk Shed. 
Johnsville. N.Y. 

LOWNDES MAURY. attorney. Butt.. Mont. 

REV DWIGHT MAWREY, Chenning Memo- 
rial Church. N.-port. R. I. 

OR. STANLEY MAY. Asocial, Rrofe«c»- «* 
Psychology. Univ.nity of Pifttbsirah. PiHV 
burgh, Pe. ... ... 

REV ROBERT MAYHEW, Grss.nv.ll. Unloa), 
Congrag.tional Chwch. G™.nvilU. Main. 



REV S ROBERT MAYER-OAXES. Unit™.. 

Ourch Frovid-nce. R. I. 
CONRAD HENRY MEHLMAN. Professor H» 

to., of Christianity. Colgate-Rochwlte/ 
D...n.ty School. Rochester. N. Y. 

STEWART MEIGS. President. California ^ Stat. 
Board of Ag-.culture. Ca.pinter.a Cal.f. 

HENDERSON MELIOTT. V.ce President Farm- 
ers Educational and Cooperative Un.on ot 
America Penna. Division. Mercersburg, Pa. 

DR. KARL MENNINGER. autho.. Topeka. K.». 

YEHUDI MENUHIN. v.ol.n.st. Alma. Cal.f. 

LEWIS MERRILL. President. Un.ted Offic. » 
Professionol Workers of America. New Yort. 

REV* HARRY C. MESERVE. Fiat UnitariOT 

Chu-ch. BuHalo. N. Y. 

CLYOE R. MILLER. Professor. Teachers Colleflss. 
Columb.e University. New York. N. Y. 

REV. PAYSON MILLER. First Unitarian Soowty 
o< Hartford W. Hartford. Conn. 

REV. WIIBURN B. MILLER. Fa.'haven Matt 

SAUL MILLS. Secy-Treat.. Greater N. Y. In- 
dustrial Union Council. CIO. New York. NT- 
JACK MINK. Secy.. Washington Industrial 
Union Council. Washington. D. C. 

PAUL S. MINEAR. Ev.nston. Ill 

DR. GEORGE R. MINOT. Professor of Medi- 
cine Harvard University. Boston. Mass. 

BRUCE MINTON. Washington Editor. Nwer 
Messm. Wash.ng'on. D. C 

CHARLES MICHAEL MITZEIL Pi»d.«rl. 
Pennsylvania Fa-mers Union. Shrewsbury. Pe. 

REV ARTHUR NEWELL MOORE. Unitar.an 
W.et, of Houlton. Houlton. Maine. . 

DOUGLAS MOORE. Prolassor of MuJt 
Columbia University. Ne- York. N. Y. 

JOHN'f. MOORE. As.ittent Professor of Eng- 
lish. Connecticut College. New London. 

REV JOSEPH G. MOORE. St. Paul - ! Episcopal 

Church. Evensville. Ind. 
EDGAR M. MOORMAN, Farm Burwu FsxiK^ 

lion. BrooH.eld. Mo. ,_ i ,_js 

JOHN F. MOORS, senior pertnw (r-hrwd). 

Moon & Cabot. Brookline. Mais. 
DAVID L. MOOSE. International R.pr«.nta- 

tiv. Teitile Workers Union. Lumb-rton. N.C 
ELIZABETH MOOS, teacher. Broni. N. V. 
REV RICHARD MORFORD. Esacutiv. Sdcy, 

United Christian Council for D.mocr»cr» 

New York. N. Y. 
BERTRAM MORRIS. Assistant Profaasor of 

Philosophy. Northwestern Umv.rsity. tv»«»- 

FRANK MORRIS. Secy- Hartford Central La- 
bor Union. AFL. Hartford. Conn. 
FRANK E. MORRIS. Professor of Philosophy. 

Connoclicut College. New London. Conn. 
ADOLPH MOSER. Cl.fton Unitarian Cnurcfl 

List. Anchorage. Ky. .«.--__-, 

REV. CHARLES F. MOTT. Methodist Cnurd/. 

Grafton. Ohio , , 

REV. WALTER MUELLER. Stanley Consjr-ga- 

tional Church. Chathom. N. J. 
JAMES MULROONEY. President. Chain Sar- 

vi«c R.steurant Employees Union. Lo«l 42. 

Ne- York. N. Y. 
REV. IRVING R. MURRAY. Unitarian Min.«ter, 

to Students in Greeter Boston. Cambridgw, 

FREDERICK MYERS. Vice-President. N.tic««J 

Maritime Union. New York. N. Y. 
REV. SKILLMAN E. MYERS. First Congt-0*; 

tionel Society. Unitarian. Burlington. Vt. # 
OR. ABRAHAM MYERSON. Boston. Mats. 
DR. SAM NELKEN. Norwich Stat. Hospital, 

Norwich. Conn. 
REV. A. A. NELSON, First Congrswj.«osvJ 

Church. Rockford. Mich. 
L H. NEWIUR»»H. Profsnssof of CfinlcaJ lis- 

««tigation. Uislvwrtity of Michigan, Am, 

Arbor. Mich. 
UAKL NEWCOMER, Profssaarx. Va-twr C«# 

Uoe. Poughke.p»i., N. Y. 
PUDUT NICHOti film writstr .is, cRrwrfw. 

lot '-.g.le. Calif 



3666 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 18 

(Part 8) 



ROBERT HASTINGS NICHOLS, Professor, 
Urn'on Theological Seminary. New York. N.Y. 

ALFRED S. N1CKLSSS. Davenport, Iowa 

KARL S. NIEBYL Atsociote Professor of Eco- 
nomics Taltm University, Naw OHeens, La. 

SEV. KARL NIELSEN. Charleston Unitarian 
Church, Charleston. S. C. 

S. V NKSISV. President. State Board of Di- 
radon, Peene. Division of Farmors Educa- 
. ttorial and Cooperative Union of America. 
£«■! Petersburg, Pa. 

HV. WILLIAM S. NOBLE. North Baltimore 
Church of Christ. North Baltimore. Ohio 

JOHN 1 NOLLEN. Chairmen of War Savings 
Committee for Iowa. Grinnell. Iowa 

(JUVERNf E. NOON. Vice-President. Hennepin 
County Industrial Union Council. Minneapo- 
lis. Minn. 

JOSEPHINE NORDSTRAND. Executive Sac,, 
Wisconsin Stato Conference on Social Legis- 
letion. Milwaukee. Wis. 

MRS. NIXON NORRIS. We Barbara. Calif. 

STERLING NORTH. Literary Editor. Chicago 
DjBy News and New York Pott. Chicago. 
III. 

THEODORE E. NORTON, librarian. Lafayette 
College. Eeston, Pa. 

ROSS M. NOTZ. Board of Directors. Dayton 
Y.W.C.A.. Dayton, Ohio. 

WW). C. NOTZ. Vice-President. Local 947. 
United Automobile Worsen. CIO. Dayton, 
Ohio 

STANLEY NOWAK. Michigan Stata Senator. 
Datroit. Mich. 

CATHERINE OAKES. Assistant Professor of 
English, Connecticut Collage. Naw London. 
Conn. 

JSRRY O'CONNELL, Former Congressmen 
from Montane, Butte. Mont. 

HARVEY O'CONNOR, writer. Chicago. III. 

TOM O'CONNOR, writer. Brooklyn. N. Y. 

HSHOP 6. ASHTON OLDHAM. Bishop of 
Albany. Albany. N. Y. 

OSCAR OPHEIM. Chairman. Farmers Union. 
Local 1103. Bucyrus. N. D. 

REV. EDMUND A. OPITZ, Unitarian Church erf 
Herrirburg, Pa. 

MAH-rAREY LA FAROE OSBORN, Educational 
Director, Albeme Farmers Union, Birming- 
ham. Ala. 

MRS. ERUNG OSNES. Secy.. Huntley Project. 
Farmers Union 573. Pompys Pillar,' Mont. 

H. A. OVER5TREET, Professor Emeritus of Phil- 
osophy, College of The City of Naw York: 
Lecturer, New York School for Social Re- 
search New York. N. Y. 
MARY WHITE OVINGTON, Treasurer. NAACP, 
■asi ns linali Vt ■ 






G. IROMLEY OXMANr !*• Method 



=3 



Tcor D.F. M 

Boston Branch 
stion. Boston, 



•EORGE L PAINE. 

of Fellowship of 

Mass. 
REV. ALBERT W. PALMER, Congressional 

Church, Chicago. III. 
REV. CLAY E. PALMER. First Congregational 

Church. Yankton. S. D. 
WILLIAM B. PALMER. Dapt. of Economics. 

University of Michigan. Ann Arbor. Mich. 
JULIAN PARK, Buffalo. N. Y. 
REV. GEORGE LAWRENCE PARKER. Unitarian 

Church. Carver. Mass. 
Oft. Z. RITA PARKER, New York. N. Y. 
«T. .REV. EDWARD L PARSONS. Bishop of 

California (retired). San Francisco. Calif. 
ROBERT D. PATTON. Professor of Economics. 

Ohio State University. Gilone. Ohio 
IRENE PAULL. Editor. Midwest Labor. Duluth. 

Minn. 
JEROME F. PAYNE. Deputy Postmaster (re- 

tired): Chairman. Local Selective Service 

Board 415. Gouvarnour. N. Y. 
HELEN PEAK. Profaisor of Psychology. Ran- 
dolph-Macon Woman's Collage. Lynchburg. 

RSV. WILLIAM W. PECK. First p.rish Church. 
Unitarian. Groton. Mats. 



EMANUEL PEARSON, Farms* Union. Seco. 
' Mont. 

ANNA M. W. PENNYPACKER. Phila.. Pa. 
MRS. LIONEL C. PERERA. JR. Chairman. 

Board of Directors. Young Men's Vocational 

Foundation. New York. N. Y. 
REV. HAVEN P. PERKINS, Pekin. III. 
E. C. PETERS. President. Paine College. Au- 

STUART' PETTINGILL. businessman. Badlands. 
Calif. 

TERRY PETTUS. Eiacutiva Secy, Washington 
Commonwealth Federation. Seattle. Wash. 

JOSEPH D. PHILLIPS. President. Washington 
Industrial Union Council. Tekome Park. Md. 

S. I. PHILLIPS. Social Studies Instructor. Ells- 
worth Junior Collage. Iowa Fells. Iowa 

RABBI DAVID PHILIPaON, Dean of American 
Liberal Rabbis. Cincinnati. Ohio 

REV. W. HAROLD PIATCHAPP. Clarkson 
Methodist Church. Clarkson. Mich. 

FRANK PIRKEY. Clifton Unitarian Church List. 
Louisville. Ky. 

HERMAN A. POHL. General Secy.-Trees. In- 
ternational Wood Carvers' Association of 
North America. Somervllla. Mess. 

REV. G. A. POLLARD. Highlend Congregational 
Church. Portland. Ore. 

ARTHUR UPHAM POPE. Chairman. Committee 
for National Morale, Naw York. N. Y. 

HENRY W. POPE. Naw York. N. Y. 

GRACE PORTER, Naw York, N. Y. 

KENNETH W. PORTER, Professor of History. 
Vesser College, Poughteapsia, N. Y. 

REV. EDWIN MCNEILL POTEAT, Euclid Ava. 
Baptist Church, Cleveland. Ohio 

REV. A. LESLIE POTTER. Methodist Church, 
New Hartford. N. Y. 

REV. ADAM CLAYTON POWELL JR. Council- 
man of the City of Naw York. Naw York, 
N.Y. 

REV. OWEN W. PRATT, Westminster Presby- 
terian Church. Decatur. III. 

LEE PRESSMAN. General Counsel. CIO. 
Washington. D. C. 

DAVID PREVIANT, attorney. Milwaukee. Wis. 

MELVA L PRICE, teacher. New York. N. Y. 

PHELPS PUTNAM, writer. Jamaica Plains. Mast. 

ELMER K. PYLE. Berks County Farm Bureau 
Association. Mohrsville, Pe. 

MICHAEL J. QUILL. President. Transport Work- 
ers Union of Americe. New York, N. Y. 

MILTON RADER, President. Nature Friends of 
America, East Orange, N. J. 

MELVIN RADER, Deportment of Philosophy. 
University of Washington. Seattle. Wash. 

REV. ROBERT RAILS, Unitarian Church. Delias, 
Tesas 

ROBERT W. RAFUSE. Department of Political 
Science. Mlddlebury College, Middlebury, 
Vt. 

FREDLYN RAMSEY, Assistant Professor of Eco- 
nomics, Connecticut College, New London, 

LEON A. RANSOM. Professor. Howard Uni- 
versity. Washington. D. C. 

BISHOP REVERDY C. RANSOM, AME Church, 
Wilberforce. Ohio 

JACK RASKIN. Secy. Civil Rights Federation. 
Detroit. Mich. 

HARRY J. RATHBUN. Professor of Lew. Stan- 
ford University. Palo Alto. Calif. 

CALLMAN RAWLEY. social worker. St. Louis. 
Mo. 

FREDERICK L REDIFER. Director. Progressive 
Education Atioclatlon, Naw York. N. Y. 

WALTER RAUTENSTRAUCH, Professor of In- 
dustrial Engineering. Columbia University. 
New York. N. Y. 

JAMES B. REED, Assistant Chemist. Frenkford 
Arsenal. Philadelphia. Pe. 

REV. J. W. REED. Methodist Church. Portland. 
Ore. 

6EORGE J. REISS, Union County Central La- 
bor Union. AFL. Elisabeth. N. J. 

H. H. REMMERS. Society for the Psychological 
Study of Social Issues. W. Lafayette. Ind. 



REV. FREDERICK REUSTLE, Van Wyck Avenues 

Congregational Church, Jameice. N. Y. 
BERTHA C REYNOLDS. Consultant in Social 

Work. Long Island City. N. Y. 
L WILLARO REYNOLDS. Minister of Friends 

Meeting. Cllntondele. N. Y. 
OSCAR K. RICE. Assoc Prof, of Chemistry. 

University of No. C, Chepei Hill.. N. C. 
DEAN E. RICHARDSON. Edwin Methodist 

Church. Syracuse. N. Y. 
WILLIAM GORHAM RICE. JR. Professor ot 

Law. University of Wisconsin. Medlson. Wis. 
WALLINGFORD RIEGGER. musician. New 

York. N. Y. 
BERNARD F. RIESS. Assistant Professor of Psy- 
chology. Hunter Collage. New York, N. Y. 
REV. FREDERICK W. RINGE, Evangelical and 

Reformed Church. Temms, III. 
MARY W. RITTENHOUSE. District Secy. 

Brooklyn Bureau of Charities. Brooklyn. N. V. 
KANNA ROADS. Professor of History. Con- 
necticut College. New London. Conn. 
REV. WALLACE W. ROBBINS. Pres. Unlterian 

Fellowship for Social Justico. St. Paul. Minn. 
REV. BENJAMIN C ROBESON. Mother AME 

Zion Church. New York. N. Y. 
PAUL ROBESON, concert artist: Chairmen, 

Council on African Affairs: Enfield. Conn. 
REV. A. H. ROBINSON. First Unlterian Church. 

Plalnfleld. N J. 
EARL ROBINSON, composer. New York. N Y. 
REV. JAMES H. ROBINSON. Church of The 

Metter. New York. N. Y. 
REID ROBINSON. President. International 
Mine. Mill a> Smelter Workers. 



Dam 



Colo 



REV. FREDERICK A. ROBLEE. Bay City, Mich. 

WELLINGTON ROE, Editor. Richmond Labor 
News. Babylon. N. Y. 

JOHN R. ROEBUCK, professor. Medlson. Wis. 

REV. CHARLES 0. ROEKEL, President. Phila- 
delphia Synod. Evangelical end Reformed 
Church. Royersford. Pa. 

HUBERT W. ROGERS. Professor. Lafayette CoL 
lege. Eeston. Pa. 

PAUL SOMAINE. businessmen. Chicago. III. 

REV. CUTHBERT R. ROME. Syracuse. N. Y. 

DR. M. J. ROSEMAN, University of Norffi 
Carolina. Chapel Hill. N. C. 

REV. CLIFTON H. ROSS. West End Congrege- 
tionel Church, Bridgeport, Conn. 

EDWARD ALSWORTH ROSS. Professor Emeri- 
tus of Sociology. University of Wisconsin, 
Medlson. Wis. 

DR. MILTON R. ROSS, dentist. New York. N.Y. 

WALTER ROTHMAN. Librarian. Hebrew Union 
College Library. Cincinnati, Ohio 

REV. RALPH H. ROWSE. Congregational 
Church. Naw York. N. Y. 

ELBERT RUSSELL, professor. Duke University. 
Durham. N. C. 

LAWRENCE J. RYAN. Business Agent. United 
Electrical. Radio and Machine Worker*. 
Local 502. CIO. St. Marys. Pa. 

GEORGE H. SABINE. Professor. Cornell Uni- 
versity. Ithece. N. Y. 

SHIRLEY SAFFRON. President. Local 17. 
United Office end Professional Workers of 
America. Bayonne. N. J. 

HELEN SAHLER. sculptor. New York. N. Y. 

E. DWIGHT SALMON. Professor. Williams Col- 
lege. Amherst, Mats. 

JOHN C. SANDNESS. Board of Directors. 
N. D. Farmers Union. La Moure. N. D. 

FLORENCE L SANVILLE. Wetttown. Pa. 

NICK A. SARROS. Esecutive Board Member. 
District e. United Electrical. Radio end Me- 



of Arr 



iburg. Pe. 
Harvard 



Work: 
GEORGE SARTON. Profe 

versify. Combrldgo. Met 
MAX SAVELLE. Stenford U 

Calif. 

J. HENRY SCATTERGOO0. Philadelphia. Pe. 
REV. ROBERT H. SCHACHT. JR. Providence, 



sity. Pelo Alto. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3667 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 18 
(Part 9) 



AIIAHAM SCHENCK. Secy. In—.. Bee.,* 

Cultu-iiti Un.on. Local !5. New York. N. T. 
REV. A. J. SCHERER. Trinity Evangelicel .nd 

RJtormeJ Church. Now Orleeni. La. 
WILLIAM JAY JCHIEFFELIN. Vice-Preiidenl. 

Am.-, can Bible Society, Now York. N. Y. 
•AULINE G. SCHINDLER, wr.fer. Loi Ang.lee. 

Calif. 
MARGARET SCHLAUCH, educetor. Naw York. 

N. Y. 
ARTHUR M. SCHLESINGER. Profenor of Hin- 

to.y Hotva-d Urbanity. Cmb'idg., Mia. 
HAROLD SCHLOSBERG. Anoci.t. Prol.nor 

of fiychology. Brown Un.ven.ty. Providence. 

R. I. 
THELMA SCHNEE. octeii. Naw York. N. Y. 
T. C. SCHNEIRLA. Amitent Profaiior. of Ply 

chology. Naw York Un.venity. fluih.no. N.Y. 
MARGARET SCHOCH. Hollywood. Calif. 
H. G. SCHRICKEL. P.'tibu'gh. Pa. 
IRVING SCHWAB, etlorney. Naw York. N. Y. 
REV. CLINTON LEE SCOTT. Independent 

Ch„it,on Church. Glouceitor. Mail. 
FRANKLIN D. SCOTT. Prolenor of Hiitory. 

Northwoitorn Univenity. Evoniton, III. 
REV. HAROLD SCOTT. Unitarian Church. 

Flint. M.ch. 

REV. J. H. SCOTT. Proiident. Eail Carroll Bap- 
Sunday School Ai.oc.alion. Lata Provi- 



done 



VIDA D. SCUDOER. P-ofo 



Ma 



ritui. Wallav 



REV. CARL ALBERT SEAWARD, Oiraclor of 
Chrilt Church; Director. Barnard Memorial 
School. Do'cheitor. Man. 

EDWIN SEAVER. author N.w York. N. Y. 

REV. RICHARD W F. SEEBODE. Weitmimter 
Un.ta'inn Church; Chairmen, Rhoda llland 
Inlo-Chu-ch Commimon for Social Action. 
P-Ovidonco. R. I. 

RUTH SEIGIL. Educational Director. Joint 
Boa-d of Fur D-enan and Dyeri. Newark, 
N. J. 

V. FREDA SEIGWORTH. Cleveland. Ohio 

JOSEPH P. SELLY. P-oi.dont. American Com- 
mun.cations Anoc. at.on. Ne- York. N. Y. 

HOWARD SELSAM. Director. School for De- 
mocracy. Na- York. N. Y. 

RHODA W. SEVELY. Edge-ood Anenal Locel 
227. Un.i.d Furniture Worken of Ame-ice. 
Baltimore. Md. 

JOHN P. SEWARD. Ainitent Profaiior of Eco- 
nomic! Connecticut College. New London. 
Conn. 

OR. E. HERDERT SEXTON, denti.t; Member. 
Board of D.recto'i. Weitf.eld Cooperative 
Buying Club. Weitfield. N.J. 

REV. WAITSTILL H. SHARP. Unitarian Church. 
Wrjlleiley Hills. Mall. 

MARY J. SHAW. An.i.ont Profaiior of Philoi- 
ophy. Univernty of Minneiole, M.nneepoL*. 
Minn. 

REV. A. J. SHERER. Trinity Evangelicel Re- 
formed Church. New O-leani. La 

GUY EMERY SHIFLER. Editor. The Churchman, 
New York. N. Y. 

JACOB SHOLTZ. Sacy.. Congregetion Ahoveth 
Ureal. New York. N. Y. 

VIOLA BROTHERS SHORE, writer. Wait Loi 
Angelei. Cal.f. 

REV. PAUL M. SHURTLEFF. Fint Preibyterien 
Church. Black. ell. Okie. 

ELIE SIEGMEISTER. compoier. Brooklyn. N. Y. 

SAMUEL SILLEN. initr„ c to.. New York Uni- 
vanity. New York. N. Y. 

C. LE BRON SIMMONS. Truitee. International 
Brotherhood of Taamiten. Chaufleuri end 
Helper! 663; Praiident. Mlchigen Diviiion. 
National Negro Congreu. Detroit. Mich. 

ERNEST J. SIMMONS, profenor of Compare- 
tivo Literature, euthor. Cornell Univenity. 
Ithaca. N. Y. 

EISA W. SIMON. Ne. York. N. Y. 

LEE SIMONSON. euthor end deiigner. New 
York. N. Y. 

UPTON SINCLAIR, euthor. Paiadene. Colif- 

REV. EDGAR F. SINGER. Scanton. Pa. 

REV. STANLEY E. SKINNER. W.ll.emitown. N.Y. 



REV. EDWIN M. SLOCOMK. Un.lar.ea 

Church. Leilngton. Men. 
REV. ALSON J. SMITH. Method;,! Church. 

Bayport. Long lilend. N. V. 
CARL D. SMITH. Amitent Prof.nor of Gov- 
ernment Wayne Un.ver.lty. Detroit. Mich. 
JAMES IOEN SMITH, Preident. Solebury Co- 
operative Aiiocietion. New Hope. Pe. 
MASON SMITH, Editor. Teael Mer-reclel (U- 

view: Cheirmen. Teiei Nag o People! War. 

time Committee. Auilin. la.ai 
REV. WALTER A. SMITH, Fir*. Unilerien 

Church. Lebannon. N. H. 
ALICE D. SNYOER. Profaiior of Engtiih. Voner 

College. Poughkeepne. N. Y. 
REV. THEODORE G. SOARES. Neighborhood 

Church. Paiadora, Cal.f. 
ELIZABETH W. SOLEY. Derien. Conn. 
HESTER SONDERGAARO, aclreu. Ne- York. 
REV. ROBERT W. SONEN. Fin* Un.terUn 

Church Norfolk. Va. 
HERBERT K. SORRELL. Praiident. Conference 

of Stud.o Unioni. loi Angelei. Calif. 
REV. ALFRED M. SOULE. Marlboro, Mm. 
SIGMUND SPAETH, writer, lecturer, broed- 

caiter New York, N. Y. 
GRETEL SPIRO. Educational Director. Furrier, 

Joint Council of New Yo-k. CIO. New York. 
REV. W. I. SPOFFORD. Secy . Church League 

for Indultr.al Democrecy. New York. N. Y. 
REV. CHARLES W. SQUIRES. Free Baptiit 

Church; author, Limsrici. Me. 
WILLIAM STANDARD. General Couiel. Ne- 

tionel Maritime Union of Ame-ice. New 

York. N. Y. 
JOHN V. STANGER. Baltimore. Md. 
MABEL K. STAUPERS. E.ecutive Secy. Ne- 

tional Aiiocietion Colored Graduate Nuriel. 

Now Yo-k. N. Y. 
ROSS STAGNER. Hanover. N H 
BERTHA KELSO STAVRIANOS. Northampton. 

ARTHUR STEIN. Auiitant. to Socy.Tre.,.. 
United Fodaral Worker! of Amo-ce. CIO. 

LOUIS STEIN, otto-nay. Loi Angelei. Cal-f 
RAYMOND W. STELLHORN. Secretary. Fort 
Wayne Induit-lol Union Council. Fort 



»Va 



. Ind. 



8ERNHARD J. STERN. New York. N. Y 

REV. J. STANLEY STEVENS. The Methodiit 

Church. Mount Kilco. N. Y 
A. E. STEVENSON. Secy.. CIO. Induitnal 

Union Council. Cleveland. Oh-o 

DONALD OGDEN STEWART, author. New 

Yo-k. NY 
REV. A. E. VON STILU. Fir.l Unitarian Church. 

Oklahoma City. Okie. 
OR. WALTER H. STIX. Onclnneli. Ohio. 
JOHN R. STOCKHAM. attorney. St. Lou.i. 

MILDRED X. STOLTZ. Stele D.reclo' of Edu- 

cet.on. Montana Formen Union. Greet Folk 

Mont. 
DEINER S. STOUT. Joffenon Grenge 114. 

Colllen. W. Ve. 
REV. ELBRIDGE F. STONEHAM. Unitarian 

Church. E.eter. N. H 
CHARLES LEONARD STONE. P-ofenor of 

Piychology. Dartmouth College. Hsnove-. 

REV. CARL STORM. All Soull Unitonon Church. 
Lincoln. Nab. 

LYMAN BEECHER STOWE. New York. N. Y. 

LEON STRAUS. Moneger. Fur Floor and Ship- 
ping Clo'kl Union, International Fur & 
lea.her Worken. New York. N. Y. 

ANNA LOUISE STRONG, author. Meulo. CoKf. 

DIRK J. STRUIK. Profenor. MeuchuieH, ln- 
ititute of Technology. Cambridge. Men. 

MRS. W. ENGLISH STRUNSKY. Mew York. 
N. Y. 

JOHN STUART, author. Foreign Editor. Kiev/ 
Meuei. Foreit Hill*. N. Y. 

MAURICE SUGAR. Generel Couniel for 
United Automobile Worken of Ame-ice. De- 
troit. Mich. 



REV. E. LENTON WTCUFFE. Hn> MeikoeW 
Church. Hillidale. Mich. 

CALVIN J. SUTHERUN, Intern.llonel Rapne. 
.enteiive. Internatlonel Union of Mine, Mil 
'. Smelte' Worken; Torrington. Conn. 

RJCHARO M. SUTTON, Profenor. H.v.rford 
College. H.v.rford. Pe. 

SAM. A. SWANSCN, Inlemetionel Ei-J.d Or- 
gnniier. United Electrical. Redio t M.ctteo 
Wo-kerl ot America. Minneapolis. Mine. 

VERY REV. SIDNEY E. SWEET. St. Uuit. Mo. 

ADA B. 7AFT. Chicago. III. 

GLENN J. TALIOTT, Praiident. North Doloi* 

Fn-mo-i Union. Jameitown. N. D. 
ALVA W. TAYLOR, profenor: Secy-Tree*. 

Southern Conference for Human Welfer*. 

Neihville. Tenn. 
REV. JOHN H. TAYLOR. Uniteri.n ChurcK 

Wet-wood. Meu. 
LLOYO W. TAYLOR, Chairmen. Lorain Cou«*y 

Repuolican Central Committee. Ob*rlin. O. 
KATHERINE TERRILU Panora. low. 
LEWIS M. TERMAN. Profenor of Pr/chcloo". 

Stanford Univenity. Palo Alto. Cel.f. 
OR M. C. TERRY, profaiior. Stanford 

Univenity: formerly Captain Medlcel Corp*. 

U. S. A-my. Palo Alto. Calif. 
EDWARD THOMPSON. Chairman of Leg.J*- 

tive Comm.troe. United Canning, Agnctlt- 

tu-e Packing and Allied Worken of Arnee- 

,ca. Local 80. Camden. N. J. 
FREDERICK THOMPSON. Stinlon Beech. C*nf. 
GEORGE l_ THOMPSON. Preildent. levegu. 

for Social Proq-en. Randolph. Men. 
MARK THOMPSON. Dei Moinei. lowe. 
M I. THOMPSON. Editor ond Publnhor of »• 

Uteh Lebor News. Salt Lake City. Utah. 
FRANK THORNE. Clifton Unitarian Chunk. 

REv'^o'lLLON * WESLEY THROCKMORTOH. 

T-inity Methodiit Church. Bakenfield. C*lit 
JOSEPHINE TIMMS. Inte-notionel S«refery- 

T-eaiu-e- American Communication, Alio- 

clat.on CIO. New York. N. Y. 
OR. PAUL TILLICH. Profenor. Union Thooloal. 

cal Somlnary. Now York. N. Y. 
LEONARD R. TITELMAN. Alloona. P.. 
REV JOSEPH H. TITUS. Protoilant fipi»cop»« 

Ciurch Jamaica. N. Y. 
CHANNING H. TOBIAS. New York. N. Y. 
MATHREW O. TOBRINER. etto-ney. San Fr.»- 

EDWARD TOLAN. Proi.dent. Negro You* 
Council 'or Victory end Democracy. Do- 

EOWARO C. TOLMAN. P-ofanor of Prychot 
ocy. Univenrfy of Cal.fo-nlo. S.rk.ley. C*f.f. 

JUSTICE CHARLES E. TONEY. Muniopol 
Cou-t. New Yo-k. N. Y. 

JUDGE EOWARO P. TOTTEN. Member. Thome* 
jTffo-lon Democratic Club of MintuMOt*. 

REV V."m. TOWSEND. Proilding Elder. AMcw 
Melhod.it Epiicopel Chu-ch: Treaiurw. N*> 
o-o F-ate-nel Council of Chu-chel of Anwf- 
co- Socy Financial Board. African M.*- 
od.it Epiicopel Chu-ch of Weehinqro*. 
0. C: L.ttle Rock. Ark. 

E. F. TRACY. Son F-anciico. Calif. 

REV. JACOB TRAPP. Fint Uniteri.n ChurcK 

ROBERT"' C.°TRA VIS. VicP-eiidont. Illinol. 
Stat. Indultnel Union Counc.1. C.IJ3- 
Chicogo. III. . . 

DR. LUCIA TRENT, poet: Former Prtrt.djn*. 
Weltn-n Poet'i Cong-en. San Anton.o. Te*. 

REV. EVERETT S. TREWORGY. Fint P.rirA 

Church. Aihby. Man. 
LILIAN TRICKER. Vice Chairman. Comm.rt**. 

for Racial and ReUgiou. T 



Phtl*> 



JAMKW.' TROYER. City Comminioner; Co»»- 
tv Supervlior- Pelt Grand Regont. «oy*l 
Xccu-um. S.ult St.. M.rie. Mich 

JIM TULLY. writ.-. Cencge Pa-k. Cht. 
FRANK TUTTI.E. motion pictur* director. Hony- 

-ood. Cell' „ 

PEARL D. TUTTLE. New York. M. • 



3668 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 18 

(Part 10) 



ttlSMOMS TUBS. Aeeociet* Fnrfmer of Esse, 

lleh, COMWctiCVt College, New London, 

HV. WIUUM As TYUR. Coisgrtsgerionel 
Otvrch. Garettsont. Celif. 

HUCOUtT A. TYWSS. New Yort, N. Y. 

LOUS TY1QLER, attorney. Athens. Ohio. 

JEAN STAIt UNTtRMEYEK. writer. No. Yoi*, 
N. Y. 

WKLARD UPHAUS, Eiecutive Secretory. No- 
tional Religion end Labor Foundation. How 

ANTHONY VALENTINO. President. Wmo 
Agent. United Cannery. Agriculture. Pecking 
t AIW Workers) of Amarica. Local SO, 
Camdan. N. J. 

BEY. MORGAN W.VAN TASSELL. Oak Grove 
Avenue Community Church. Buffalo. N. Y. 

OSWALD VEBLEN. Professor. Institute for Ad- 
vanced Study. Princeton. N. J. 

CLEO C VELARDE. Financial Secretary, Inter- 
national Union.. Mine. Mill & Smelter Work- 
en. Auiiliery No. 47. Silverton. Colo. 

REV. JOHN M. VERSTEEG. Walnut Hilre- 
Avcndnle Church. Cincinnati. Ohio. 

MARGARET VINTON. Social Activities CW 
tian Unitarian Fe'lowship for Social Justice. 
Los Anqeles, Calif. 

W. W. VUAGNIAUX. Generel Cheirman. Lo- 
eel 621. International Brotherhood of Elec- 
trical Workers. API. Boone, Iowa. 

KATRICE WADLEI6H, Eiacutive Secretary. 
Civil Liberties Union of Massechusetts. 
Boston. Mass. 

SAUL C WALDBAUM. attorney. Philadalphie. 
Pa. 

GEORG J. M. WALEN. Henske. Minn. 

ALICE H. WALKER. Director of Social Service. 
Harper Hospital. Detroit. Mich. 

HERMAN I. WALKER. Treasurer. Good Gov. 
e-nment Council. Newerk. N. J. 

REV. KENNETH C. WALKER. Unitarian Church 
of Albany. Delmar, N. Y. 

BVT. WALLACE. Yakima County Organiser. 
Weshinqton Old Aqe Pension Union, Zillah. 
Wash. 

ALICE HOLDSMIP WARE, writer. New York. 
■ N. Y. 

REV. W. I. WALTMIRE. Methodist Church. 
Omehe. Nab. 

EDA LOU WALTON, professor. New York. N.Y. 

COURTNEY D. WARD. Sacretery. District 
Council No. 6. Brotherhood of Painters. Dec- 
orators & Paperhangert of Americe. Cieve- 

, .lend. Ohio. 

MARRY F. WARD. Palisade. N. J. 

,IYN0 WARD, artist. Palisade. N. J. 

FLORENCE M. WARNER. Professor of Eco- 
nomics. Connecticut College. New London, 
Conn. 

1EROY WATERMAN. Professor. Depertmont of 
Orientel Languages. University of Michigen, 
Ann Arbor. Mich. 

MORRIS WATSON. Editor. The Intensettenel 
Lossa sf ror ia men's and Warehousemen 'e Union 
"ian Frc... 

Stanford. Calif. 

REV. GERALD F. WEARY. Bloomingfon. III. 

REV. ARTHUR L WEATHERIY. Unitarian 
Church. Hillsboro. N. H. 

CLARA WEATHERWAX. writer. Long Beach. 
Calif. 



BJIV. CHARLES C WI1HR. Executive Secre- 
tery. Methodist Federation for Social Ser- 
vice. New York. N. Y. 

MAX WEBER, ortist. Greet Neck. N. Y. 

REV. BRADFORD G. WEBSTER. Gowenda. N.Y. 

FLORENCE WEEO. Sacretery. Washington 
County Unit of Labor's Nonpartisan League 
of Vermont. East Monfpeller. Vt. 

RAMI JACOB J. WEINSTEIN. K.A.M. Tempt*. 
Chicago. III. 

LOUIS WEISNER. Associate Professor of Merhe- 
metics. Hunter College. Brons. N. Y. 

REV. DANIEL M. WELCH. First Uniferlait 
Church. Clinton. Mass. 

REV. MELVIN LOUIS WELKE. First Unitarian 
Church. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

REV. CHARLES PHELPS WELLMAN. Dorchea- 
fer. Mass. 

HILDEGAROE I. WELLS. Esses County Federa- 
tion of Teachers. A. F. of L, Local 4»l. 
Newark. N. J. 

C A WENDELL, Minneapolis. Minn. 

RICHARD G. WENDELL. Associete Professor 
of English and Speecn, Iowa Stete College. 
Ames. towe. 

REV. HAJEN F. WERNER. Grace Methodist 
Church. Dayton. Ohio 

MARY F. WESSELHOEFT. artist. Santa Barbara. 
Calif. 

FRANK W. WEYMOUTH, Professor of Physiol- 
ogy. Stanford University. Palo Alto. Calif. 

PHILIP WHEELWRIGHT. Professor of Phi- 
losophy. Dartmouth College. Henover. N. H. 

REV. ELIOT WHITE. Epiicopol Church, New 
York. N. Y. 

PVT. ROLAND A. WHITE. Former Editor. The 
Dubuque Leader. A F. L: Fort Warren. 
Wvo. 

REV. WAYNE WHITE. Methodist Church. New 
York. N. Y. 

MRS. ROYAL 6. WHITING. Esecutive Secre- 
tary. Congressional Committee for War Vic- 
tims end Services. Weston. Mass 

WILLSON WHITMAN, writer. Woodside. L I. 
N. Y. 

RABBI DAVID H. WICE. Temple B'nei Jethursin. 
Newark. N. J. 

HENRY N. WIERNAN. Professor of Philosophy 
of Religion, University of Chicego. Chicego, 
III. 

M. F. W1LKISON. National Farmers Union. Lo- 
cal 54, Chambersburq. Pa. 

REV. GEORGE IE ROY WILLETS. First Presby- 
terian Church. Caldwall. N. J. 

LEAH B. WILLIAMS. Liberty Rebekah Lodge. 
Powell, Ohio. 

MRS. HOMER L WILLIAMS. American Associ- 
ation of University Women. Perkville. Mo. 

HOMER L WILLIAMS. Platte County Guillen 
Defense. Park villa. Mo. 

J. PAUL WILLIAMS, Associate Professor. Mount 
Holyole College. South Hedley. Mess. 

OR. H. W. WILUAMSTON. President. Okie. 
home Medicel. Oental and Phermeceuticel 
Association. Idabel. Okla. 

REV. CHARLES C. WrLSON. Trinity Episcopal 
Church. Klrksville. Mo. 

HELEN W. WILSON. Bethesda. Md. 

REV. ELWIN L WILSON. Superintendent. Port, 
lend District Methodist Church. Portland. 
Me. 



J. RNLfY WILSON, 6rend Eulted Ruler. Im- 
proved Benevolent Protective Order of EBjs 
of the World: President. National Voters' 
League. Weshington. D. C. 

REV. MARSHALL W1NGHELD. First Congrega- 
tional Church. Memphis. Tenn. 

WARREN WINKELSTEIN. President. Syracuse 
Jewish Community Center. Syracuse. N. Y. 

C. E. A. WINSLOW. Professor of Public Heel*. 
Yele Medical School. New Heven, Conn. 

REV. ALEXANDER WINSTON. First Unitarian 
Church. Jamaica Plains. Mass. 

EFFIE WISE. Secy.Treos, Women's Interna- 
tional Union Label Leegue. Tulsa. Okla. 

G. E. WISE. Director of Farmers' Union Co- 
operative. Greencettle. Pe. 

ROBERT WISHART. Representetive. United 
Electrical. Radio & Machine Worker! ef 
America. C.I.O., Minneapolis. Minn. 

JOHN L Win. Spencer. Wis. 

NATHAN WITT, attorney. New York. N. Y. 

OR. ABRAHAM L WOLBARST. New York. 
N. Y. 

BENEDICT WOLF, attorney. New York. N. Y. 

DR. ABRAHAM WOLFSON, President. Jewish 
Social Service Bureeu. Newerk. N. J. 

REV. ALONZO L WOOD, Chaplain, South 
Kent School. South Kent. Conn. 

COL CHARLES E. S. WOOD, writer; poet; 
oldest living greduate of West Point; Los 
Getos. Calif. 

MAXINE WOOD, N. Y. Stete Educational Di- 
rector. IM, - national Workers Order. New 
York. N. Y. 

OR. THOMAS WOOOY. Professor of Education. 
University of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia. Pa. 

MARY E. WOOLLEY. President Emeritus. Mount 
Holyole College: Westport. N. Y. 

JANE WORTHINGTON. instructor, Connecti- 
cut Colloge. New London. Conn. 

ARCHIE WRIGHT. President. Farmers Union, 
New York M.Ik Shod. Ogdensburg. N. Y. 

HERMAN WRIGHT, attorney. Houston. Teres. 

OUINCY WRIGHT. Professor of International 
law. University of Chicago. Chicego. III. 

REV. JAMES D. WYKER. Federeted Church, 
North Jac'son. Ohio. 

FRED R. YADER. sociologist. Pullman. Wash. 

DR. MAX YERGAN. President. National Negro 
Congress. New York. N. Y. 

JACK B. YOUNG. Secy. Treat, United Elec- 
trical. Sed.o a Machine Workers of America. 
Local 114). Minneapolis. Minn. 

MANOOG S.YOUNG. Chairmen. Netionel Co- 
ordinetmg Committee. Armenian Youth of 
America. Bos'on Mess. 

WILLIAM LINDSAY YOUNG, President. Pert 
Colleoe. Perkville. Mo. 

BENJAMIN E. YOUNGDAHL. Assocat* Profes- 
sor of Soclel Work. Washington University. 
St. Louis. Mo. 

REV. JOHN T. YOUNGER. Cleveland Street 
Presbyterian Church. Nashville. Tonn. 

ARNOLD ZANOER. Association of Llberel Free- 

CLARA ZIMMERMAN. Washington. D. C. 

JACK S. ZUCKER. Netionel Leqitletive Rep- 
resented. United Shoe Workers of Ar.tr- 
ice. C.I.O, Weshington. 0. C. 

DALE ZYSMAN, Eiecutive Secretory. New Jar. 
say District. International Worker! Order. 
Nowark. N. J. 



1123 fcwcVoy 

N«w Yott. N. Y. 



Sponsored by thtt 
•eATTOWAl FEDERATION FOR CONSTTTUTiOf-UL UBERTIES 



1400 L Strw.t. N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3669 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 19 

MEDICAL BUREAU AND NORTH AMERICAN COMMITTEE 

TO AID SPANISH DEMOCRACY 



X ATION AJ. CTOSSOIS 



..„./ 



0» ! 
GRACE ABBOTT 
DCVERE ALLEN 
CONG IOHN T BPBNA 
«LV. UWIGHT I BRADLEY 
BISHOP BCNIAMIN BREWSTER 
DonOTHY DETZER 
JEROME DAVIS 
PROF. PAUL H DOUGLAS 

SHERWOOD EDDY 

PROF. ALBERT EINSTEIN 

PROF. HENRY PRATT FA1RCH1LD 

rRANCIS 1 GORMAN 

PRES. FRANI P'GRAHAM 

HUBERT C. HERRING 

RABBI EDWARD L ISRAEL 

IOSEPH LASH ^" 

PROF. ROBERT MORSS LOVETT 

REV. IOHN A. MACILAY 

PRES WM A NFJLSON 

fur. raromHijELL. 
H OP G BROMLEY OXN AHA 
[ToT robeBT L pAddWT 

BISHOP EDWARD L. PARSONS 
A PHILLIP RANDOLPH, 
PAUL ROBESON <^^ 
REV. GUY EMERY SHIPLER 
RABBI ABBA HJLLEL SILVER 
UPTON SINCLAIR 

ixLANO itowi 



ML HOWARD C HAmiGER 

U. •! C*iil—~ MtJuml Sit— I 
OR. PERCTVAL BAILEY 



DR.' AffTON I. CARLSON 
DR. ARNO B. LUCIHARPT 

•/ V •! Ctutf MO* J Stt—I 
OR. HAVEN EMERSON 

.1 C./.ati. V. CtUtf ♦» 

DR. WALTER B. CANNON 
— SAMUEL A. LEVCIE 

,1 Hwnrd Hldnti Sit— I 
IS 
M.di.mi Sit— I 



OR. SAMUEL A. LEVCIE 
•I N«f«W M*d*re' *-* 

DR. DAVID I. DAVIS 
./ U. .; Mrani A1, 

DR. ADOLF MEYER 

DR. HENRY E. SIGERIST 



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dr FBrorRicr 



ASSA COLLER 

DR. REUBEN L EAHN 
DR. U H NEWBURGH 
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DR. SAMUEL 1 roPETsrr 

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DR. IACOUESJ BRONFENBREXRTR 
DR. CARL F. COR1 _ 
DR. lOSEPH ERLANGER 



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DR. T WWCATE TOOO 

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OR. IOHN P PETERS 
DR. C E A W1NSLOW 



381 FOURTH AVENUE. NEW YORK. N. Y 
PTkxv. MUrrar Hill tsici 



July 6. 1938 



Buhop Frano* I. McCann«3 
Dr. Wallet B Cannon 
Co-Cbjirmrm 

R.v. Herman F. R«U*ia 
Exixmttrt Sfurr " > 
H*l*n W. GUlorri 



Mies Alice Barrows 
2010 Street N,W. 
Washington, D.C. 

Deer Miss Barrows: 

Enclosed please find a. receipt for $20.00, which you 
remitted to us in payment for Dr. Odlo Perez's ex- 
panses , incurred in his speaking engagement In 
Vfeshlngton. 

ThaxfcTou for your prompt attention to this matter. 

With best «rlshee. 

Sincerely your*. 

Film and Speakers Bureau 



Film and Sneakers Bureau 

By/^^^^^— 

Peprl Levenste'n 



uopwa 
no. 16 



CA. ERNST P. BOAS 
DR. BELA SCHfCI 



DR. FIORFNCC R SABIN 

.1 titittlln l;uimu til— I 



3670 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 20 

MEDICAL BUREAU and 
COMMITTEE TO AID 

SPANISH DEMOCRACY • 912 CHARLEVOIX BUILDING • DETROIT • CADILLAC 660S 
BISHOP FRANCIS I. MtCONHEU, DR. WALTER CANNON. C*-Ck«irais...REX PITKIN. Sttniitj, Micfci.m Ch.iter 



February 2. 1939 



Dmt Frlendi 

Events of the past two weeks have shown us 
the tremendous suffering the thousand* of women and chil- 
dren of republican Spain are undergoing in their struggle 
against the fasoist invaders. 

Heartrending appeals for aid have oorae to us. 
the denooratio people of the United States, for food and 
medioal supplies* 

The people of Spain are waging a war against 
Fascism, not only for the protection of their oountry but 
to preserve peaoe and Democracy all over the world. 

Won't you, as a friend of Demooraoy, help 
them in their fight by sending your contribution to this 
off ioe for trans-shipment to those heroio people? 

Thank you* 

Sinoerely yours. 



Mitchell Webb, secretary 



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TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3671 

Mr. Kunzig. You referred to the fact a few moments ago in testi- 
mony that you received a letter from a group called xVction Com- 
mittee to Free Spain Now, and American Committee for Spanish Free- 
dom. That is the one 1 am talking about. You referred to the first 
of the two, and you said you wrote and asked that your name be 
withdrawn. You also stated that previously in your answer in a 
Washington newspaper that you authorized your name to be included 
in what you think was called the Interf aith Division of the American 
Committee for Spanish Freedom. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, I testified to all that a moment or two ago 
and read Dr. Norman Peale's name in that connection, I think. 

Mr. Kunzig. You say you wrote it once, asking your name be with- 
drawn from the list of sponsors. Did you write directly to the Ameri- 
can Committee for Spanish Freedom? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, that was the organization to which I wrote. 

Mr. Kunzig. Did you know a Samuel J. Novick, who was listed as 
treasurer of the American Committee for Spanish Freedom? I will 
hand you a document marked "Oxnam Exhibit 21." (See p. 3678.) 

Bishop Oxnam. No, as a matter of fact, in all these organizations 
my name was used because I was in harmony with what I believed to 
be a worthy purpose. Bishop Lewis O. Hartman of my own church, 
T believe, was chairman of the Interfaith Division, a man in whom 
I have complete confidence, and that was the basis of my name. 

I do not know Mr. Novick — yes, Bishop Hartman's name is listed 
here; is it not? 

Mr. Kunzig. Yes, Bishop Lewis O. Hartman's name is listed there, 
and your name is listed as one of the sponsors. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir, I testified to that. 

Mr. Kunzig. I think the record must show clearly, and to have the 
record clear, I wish to incorporate, Mr. Chairman, the fact that this 
American Committee for Spanish Freedom was cited as Communist 
by the Attorney General in 1949. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, ought there not to be in the record 
when I belonged to it ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Yes. Let us put completely in the record when you 
belonged to it, sir. It was January 21. 1946, the period for which 
activities of this group were cited as subversive. 

Bishop Oxnam. This, Mr. Chairman, brings up a whole ex post 
facto situation where activities are alleged about which no one knew, 
and it is now used as evidence of subversive interest. I personally 
hope that we may have in mind what is being done here. When the 
Attorney General lists this group as subversive, that becomes a public 
matter. Membership after that, I think, is a very serious question- 
But if we raise the question years before, it seems to me that is hardly— 
well, you will pardon me — it troubles me. 

Mr. Velde. Bishop, I am just a little bit puzzled at how you could 
belong to such an organization, having stated that you had been anti- 
Communist all your life, and not realize that the Communist Party was 
infiltrating these particular organizations. Can you explain that ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir; I can explain it. These organizations 
generally were for w T hat we believe to be worthy purposes. You give 
your name to an organization for what you believe to be a worthy 
purpose. This does not mean that an organization is meeting — a 



3672 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

sponsor does not meet with an organization. I never attended any 
meeting of this organization. Now, who will say, with the hindsight 
of the present, "Why didn't you — why don't you understand?" 

I am belonging to organizations now, for instance — General Spaatz 
has one that has to do with people behind the iron curtain or some- 
thing. He wrote me and wanted to know if I would sponsor that 
organization. I was glad to do it. One lends his name. Perhaps 
we ought to come to the place where you lend your name to nothing. 
I think as a matter of fact we are in danger of getting right to that 
place, but please do not think of one sitting with a board and receiving 
reports and all of that — that is not the nature of these organizations, 
and I must say they were no doubt cleverly set up and cleverly handled. 
Perhaps some people are astute enough to know the real Communists 
and what they are doing, but even a committee, as influential as this 
committee — I wonder if it really had the names of the individuals who 
were really the espionage people of danger. I do not know, but I do 
not know whether the Rosenbergs or whether the rest of that group 
were known to the committee. Maybe so. But I have sometimes 
wondered if we are not spending so much time in this guilt by associa- 
tion business that we are not getting at the fundamental matter. Some 
of us would like to help upon that, and as I said a little earlier, sir, 
this whole question of causes — I wish there were opportunity in a com- 
mittee like this to deal with Asia as I think I know it and to make 
some suggestions to remove the causes. 

Mr. Walter. Do you think that lending your name to this type of 
an organization might have indirectly strengthened an organization, 
the purpose of which was to undermine the Government of the United 
States? 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Walter. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, I know, Mr. Walter. I was asking through 
the chairman. I appreciate the question very, very much. When an 
organization is formed, as you believe, for a worthy purpose, the send- 
ing of medical relief to people who are seeking freedom in Spain — 
you lend your name to that. You do not lend your name to what you 
are describing as a subversive organization. 

Now, perhaps one should have some way of finding this out. 
Frankly, during the period that you describe, please remember, we 
were moving through the war 

Mr. Walter. You are talking about a different organization. I 
am talking now about the American Committee for Spanish Freedom. 

Bishop Oxnam. Quite. 

Mr. Walter. A political organization, not the medical organization 
you are talking about. 

Bishop Oxnam. These organizations — this organization had an in- 
terfaith division. Please remember that you are dealing there with a 
question of dictatorship, sir. Franco was surely an ally of Hitler 
during the war. These people were still wishing to get their freedom, 
their political freedom, and one was cooperating with that attempt. 
I think there is no question as to Franco's relationship during the war, 
is there? 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman, the Bishop refers to guilt by associa- 
tion, and I should like to point out that the Communists in their en- 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3673 

deavors in these organizations were attempting to make their propa- 
ganda effective and innocent by association by the use of such names as 
yours, sir, and Norman Vincent Peale. 

Isn't it your considered opinion, sir, that a great many people came 
into the organizations actually to serve the ends of the Communist 
Party, actually to serve the conspiracy, because names such as yours, 
carrying a tremendous prestige, were used and did appear on those 
various letterheads and documents of the organizations concerned? 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Jackson, I believe the Communist Party is a 
conspiracy. I believe the conspirators ought to be discovered and by 
due process tried and if found guilty, punished. I think, however, 
that we are much more aware of the conspiracy itself today than we 
were aware of conspiracy some years ago, and I believe Mr. Clardy 
will make the point, and properly, that is one place that this com- 
mittee has made substantial contribution, but to assume that one is 
thoroughly acquainted with conspiracy — you are dealing with con- 
spirators here whose fundamental purpose is to keep from you what 
they are doing, and I don't believe that Norman Vincent Peale nor 
others in that group would lend their names knowingly to any con- 
spiracy, nor did I. 

Mr. Jackson. I don't think that you fully answered my question. 
My question was : Isn't it a reasonable assumption that a great many 
people were brought into these organizations which we now know 
were Communist dominated organizations, and were brought in by 
virtue of the fact that on the letterheads there appeared the names of 
substantial Americans? 

My question was : Don't you think that the use of those names by 
these organizations did in fact bring into the groups a great many 
American citizens who might otherwise never have been associated 
with the groyp except for the fact that prominent names did appear? 

Bishop Oxnam. Personally, Mr. Chairman, I think that when one 
lends his name to an organization, if the name is of strength he may be 
giving some strength to the organization. He lends his name, however, 
not to an organization that is a conspiracy in his knowledge, and I don't 
think the inference should be drawn later that he did that thing. 

Now, if you wish to say is your name influential here, there, or else- 
where, it depends entirely on how much influence you have and, of 
course, when Wendell Willkie wrote an article for the Protestant, I 
suppose that that gave the Protestant magazine a higher standing in 
some groups than it would have had without it, but I don't like the im- 
plication of guilt here in what is being said. You are really not say- 
ing it and yet it carries from what you say. 

It is like so much of this material that goes out, the release of mate- 
rial that I delivered an address at a penitentiary and said a certain 
thing. As a matter of fact, I never said it. 

Now, when the committee itself does the very thing that you are 
saying I am doing 

Mr. Velde. Bishop, it wasn't the committee that released it. It 
had been in the newspapers and was public information. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I am so glad you put that here. 
An announcement in a newspaper has only the strength of the an- 
nouncement, but when the Committee on Un-American Activities, a 
committee of the United States Congress, takes up a newspaper report 

43620—54 7 



3674 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

and includes it in a file, it has an entirely different standing, and the 
committee, I think, by releasing on its official letterheads is doing the 
very tiling that Mr. Jackson is accusing some of us who may have lent 
our names, because sending out this information is damaging, and 
particularly when it isn't true. 

For instance, when it says I wrote an article on Stalin and names 
the date and page and paper, when I never wrote it — I have heard 
from that all over the United States ; letters have come in about me 
writing a letter on Stalin and saying certain things. I never wrote 
the article, and I gave to this committee a photostat of a paper and 
it was shown to be written by another man, and I subsequently received 
an apology from Mr. Wood, the chairman of the committee. 

Now, 1 think Mr. Jackson is right, when you lend your name you 
do give certain influence, and when the committee lends its name 
in certain statements concerning me it is doing precisely the same 
thing, and that is why I am here asking this record to be cleared. 

Mr. Velde. We will cooperate in every way in clearing the record 
and that is the purpose of this hearing. 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Bishop, don't you feel that when a person whose name 
does lend something to an organization permits his name to be used 
he is charged with a greater degree of responsibility in connection 
with the use of his name than is someone whose name isn't significant? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir, I do agree ; and I think this 

Mr. Walter. Then don't you think that you were, to say the least, 
very careless in permitting your name to be used by anybody that 
saw fit to be using it? 

Bishop Oxnam. I have not allowed my name to be used by anybody 
that saw fit. If you will list all that has been brought in here — you 
have a handful of organizations, and I think I have shown in some 
cases, I believe, these organizations were worthy organizations. 

I don't lend my name loosely, and I don't think this committee 
would like to feel it was lending the committee prestige loosely to 
the circulation of information concerning me. It is the same thing. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Jackson. 

Mr. Jackson. Is it truly spreading misinformation when there 
comes into the possession of a committee of Congress, or any other 
responsible group, material which lists in printed form the name of an 
individual or group of individuals as being associated with suspect 
organizations ? Is there not a reasonable assumption, in the light of 
our personal experiences through life, that in at least some of the cases, 
the use of the name is authorized? In the final analysis a man's char- 
acter is in his own charge and he can neither delegate responsibility for 
its misuse nor escape the consequences of subsequent disclosures of its 
use by unauthorized persons. 

If it is simply a matter of one letterhead, Bishop — and I mention 
this because of your reference to Norman Vincent Peale — that is one 
thing. I do not know whether Mr. Peale's name appears on a number 
of such documents or not, but I am inclined to think that it does not. 

In your case they are not few in number. The total forms a con- 
siderable amount of documentation. 

It appears to me that the committee would certainly be derelict if 
it did not draw upon all available sources for the information it must 
have. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3675 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I have been asked a question by Mr. 
Jackson. I would very much like to answer it. 

One of the proposals I made to this committee had to do with the 
release of such items before an individual was consulted to find out 
whether or no the material was true. Now, there is the funda- 
mental issue. If, for instance, you receive information and then with 
an investigative setup such as this committee must possess fail to 
come even 300 yards to an office to ask whether or not this is true 
and you still release it, that to me is the question, and it would seem 
to me there ought to be some procedure whereby we do not release 
material concerning an individual that is unverified, for which the 
committee assumes no responsibility, and Mr. Wood wrote me saying 
that the release of these files does not represent a conclusion or an 
opinion of the committee, and yet here went out a story that I had 
written an article that I never had written. It did me considerable 
damage, and I could go through listing others. That is what I am 
trying to get at, sir. 

Mr. Velde. Certainly, Bishop, that is not the fault of the committee. 
You must blame that on someone else besides the committee if the 
story went out that was adverse to you and quoted some of the mate- 
rial in the public files. The committee, as I said before, only assembles 
this information which has been made public a long time ago. 

Bishop Oxnam. But, Mr. Chairman, when the committee will send 
out a statement that was not a matter of public information, namely, 
that I had written an article that I hadn't, and I cited the paper, and 
that goes out, sir, with the official letterhead of this committee, and 
the committee says it has no responsibility for it, I can't understand 
that because that article was a matter of public record, it is true, but 
I hadn't written it, and I sent the photostat here which showed that 
another person had written it, and that is the point. 

Mr. Velde. That was an occurrence that happened during the 82d 
Congress. 

Bishop Oxnam. It happened during the time Mr. Wood was chair- 
man of the committee, and he himself sent me a copy of the release 
which had been sent to Senator Wherry, including that, and that 
same release was sent to other individuals upon request, just as, for 
instance, on I think it was March 31 of this year when one of our 
own leaders of our church wrote you for the file concerning me. You 
released that file ; it went to him, and those files have been going out, 
and that, to me, is the embarrassing thing. 

If we could get the files straight, or a man who is concerned could 
be interviewed, I would have come over here to sit down with anybody, 
your investigators, your counsel, or anybody, and talked it over. 

Mr. Velde. Let me say this, that as far as our actions, the actions 
of this committee of the 83d Congress, are concerned, we are certainly 
not responsible for the actions of our predecessors. 

However, I do feel that Judge Wood, in his chairmanship of this 
committee, has been entirely fair and has done everything he could 
in line of his duty imposed upon him, like it is imposed upon us at 
the present time, to expose the persons, to expose subversive propa- 
ganda. Judge Wood is a great American, and he did everything that 
he could to be fair to people who appeared before this committee as a 
witness, and to be fair to the American public. 



3676 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I know I have heard it spoken of 
that there has been distinct improvement in the matter under this 
committee, and one appreciates that very much, but in the case of 
Mr. Wood, I do not know the gentleman. I never met him. It was 
months before I could get even an acknowledgment to the letter, and 
I was requesting respectfully that these files be so changed that they 
tell the truth, and I had to write again and again, and even send tele- 
grams before I could get a response. 

That is what I am talking about, sir, and it puts one in an awfully 
difficult light here to appear to be combating a committee. That isn't 
it at all. 

Mr. Velde. Bishop, I am sure we are trying to accommodate you 
and counsel, and if we go on with this we will not finish by midnight. 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you. 

Mr. Clardy. May I ask a question ? 

Mr. Velde. Yes. 

Mr. Clardy. First, I will preface it this way, that I am sure you 
have no complaint about the speed with which we granted you a hear- 
ing here today. You must assume that as soon as you requested an 
opportunity to appear here your request was granted at once. 

Bishop Oxnam. That is true, and you adjusted the time due to the 
fact that I was going to Europe, and the chairman's telegram was very, 
very cordial. 

Mr. Clardy. I mentioned earlier that we have about ready, as soon 
as the printer returns it, some very important testimony that you were 
discussing before this last question came up, and that is of the methods 
that the Communists used in getting good names as a front. I want to 
recommend it to you because you will discover in that testimony when it 
comes out some very startling facts about groups and about the gen- 
eral plan. 

Now, my question is this : Don't you think that anyone who occupies 
a position in connection with education, or a clergyman, does, as Mr. 
Walter has suggested, occupy a special position that calls for a special 
care in these troubled days in joining any organization, since the 
Communists have spread their conspiracy so far? Don't you think 
that this committee, therefore, is doing a good job in letting all of 
you know who these organizations are and how the Communists 
operate ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Clardy, when this committee published a vol- 
ume called Communism in Action, which, I believe, was largely under 
the direction of Mr. Griffiths, Dr. Griffiths, the librarian in Congress, 
that is, the legislative research librarian, it did an excellent job, and if 
you will pardon me, sir, I could use the method that has been used in 
misrepresenting many of us — I am not saying the committee. 

I could take the description of religion in Russia that appeared in 
that book and show that one was guilty of such sympathy for Russia 
that he ought to be hauled up. What was happening ? It was a correct 
description of what was going on. That is what we need. We need 
the facts, and the kind of volume that you mentioned. 

When we deal with the facts, that is what we need. When we have 
the releases, however, that are not factual, that begins to involve a 
man's personal liberty, and that is the issue I am after here. 

Mr. Doyle. Mr. Chairman. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3677 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Doyle. 

Mr. Doyle. This has apparently been about a 15-minute period of 
observations. I just wish to make the observation, therefore, that I 
think the members of the committee, my colleagues, have manifested 
much wisdom in these last few minutes with the Bishop, and I think 
the Bishop also has given the benefit of much wisdom and suggestions 
to the committee. 

I would be less than true to myself if I didn't say that I think the 
Bishop has given us something to think about, as well as I think we 
have given him something to think about. 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you. 

Mr. Velde. Thank you. 

Now, may we proceed in regular order. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, I should like to offer in evidence, then, 
this document marked "Oxnam Exhibit No. 21," which the witness has 
already seen, American Committee for Spanish Freedom. 

Mr. Velde. Without objection, it will be admitted. 

(The letterhead American Committee for Spanish Freedom above 
referred to was received in evidence as Oxnam exhibit No. 21.) 

Mr. Kunzig. I should like to turn, sir, to another organization en- 
titled "The National Committee To Abolish the Poll Tax." 13 The 
National Committee To Abolish the Poll Tax, I might add, Mr. Chair- 
man, is a cited organization by the California committee as a Com- 
munist organization. 

Your name, sir, is listed as one of the sponsors of this organization. 

I hand you a document marked "Oxnam Exhibit No. 23" so that you 
may see the date, March 8, 1946, in which this cited Communist organ- 
ization has you listed as a sponsor. (See pp. 3687 and 3688.) 

It was cited, sir, so the record may be correct, in 1947, a year after 
this time when you were listed. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I don't know anything about this 
organization. I would like to see the poll tax abolished, as a matter 
of fact. That is an opinion that has no relevance here, but I don't 
know anything about this organization. 

> I do see the name of a lady I know, Mary McLeod Bethune, a dis- 
tinguished Negro leader, and I don't know the others. 

I would have to answer, to the best of my recollection, I have no 
knowledge concerning this, although I do see the name of the Rt. Rev. 
Henry W. Hobson, the Episcopal bishop of southern Ohio here, and 
if I had time — I see here another one, Fiorello H. LaGuardia. And 
I am interested in this, sir ; I find the name of the Most Rev. Robert 
Lucey, of the Roman Catholic Church, in this list. 

I must say it is a pretty good list. Here is Mrs. J. D. Bragg, who 
is the head of the Women's Organization of the Methodist Church. 

I had never seen this before that I recall, but I wouldn't be likely 
to be thought in bad company in the light of some of the names that 
I have read there. 

I must say I don't recall it, sir, and that is the best answer I can 
give. 

13 The California Committee on Un-American Activities in its 1947 report p 45 de- 
scribes the National Committee To Abolish the Poll Tax as "amon? the Communist-front 
organizations for racial agitation" which "serve several other important Communist Party 
purposes. To begin with they are splendid money-collecting media, but more important, 
they serve as special political organizing centers for the racial minority they pretend to 
champion." 



3678 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 21 

(Part 1) 

AMERICAN COMMITTEE for SPANISH FREEDOM 

55 West 42nd Street • New York 18, N. Y. • LAckawanna 4-9814 



NATIONAL OFFICERS: 

BISHOP LEWIS O. HARTMAN 

Cbmrmatt 

DR. RUTH NANDA ANSHEN 

Vic»-Cbnrwum 

S. L. M. BARLOW 



HON. JOHN M. COFFEE 

Vict-Cbm 
BARTLEY C CRUM 

ALLAN CHASB 

SAMUEL J. NOVICK. 

JOSEPH SWEAT 



VUt-Cbmrmsn 

Ttmumtr 
Dktttor 



EXECUTIVE BOARD: 



Tbonu Bouchard 
CH-. Loui. Finger 
Lp— Pomaranea 
Martin Pepper 
Edward Robuuaal 
H«rf*«rt A. WU. 



Artittt & Samviiti Common*: 



BanoattCarf 

PukLmal 
YaDaPaaai 



lltrlmtb Commitut: 

pUT.W.EObDntM 

Or. T. S. Marina 

Dr. Jaka A. Mukv 

P.... WlUJaa Howard ai.ua* 

Dr. A- Clayton PewaU. Jr. 

Dr. W. Staalay Brcr.lt 

Dr. HobartW. Saarla 



Ltior CommiUmv 



EalaaaP.Caa.Ur 

JaaaaaCarraa 

JwBoMs 



Vomn's Commitm 



Mr*. Frrdlaand da 
Mra. Burton Eramatt 
Mr.. B. W. Haaaaca 
All.. Jaraaa 

MmrCasrta Mankdi 
Mra. Uaaal Parora. Jr. 
Mr*. VbKaat Saaaaa 



Cbtpurt: 



January 21, 1946 



H on. John S. Wood, dial -man 

House Committee on Un-American Activities 

House Qffice Bloc. 

Washington, D. C. 

Bear Sir! 

Tour request that this organization voluntarily produce Its 
book* and records for your Committee on January 33rd was not 
wholly unexpected. One of our sponsors, Dr. Norman Vincent 
Peal e, had already been approached by your Committee. This 
approach, If it may be called that, was more in the form of 
a threat than anything else. To quote Dr. Peale himself: 

■I received a long distance telephone call recently from 
a man who identified himself as being connected with the 
House of Representatives "Committee on Un-American Activi- 
ties," commonlv '<nown as the Bankin Committee. This man 
expressed concern that I should be included on the roster 
of a committee known as the American Committee for Spanish 
Treedom. This committee Is headed by Bishop L.O.Hartman, 
resident In the Boston area of The Methodist Church. 

■Starting with Bishops Hartnrn =.nd MConnell, the man 
phoning me went through the entire roll of the committee 
and stated why be regarded each man mentioned as being 
either a Communist In fact or as a 'front" or fellow 
traveler. He asked rae to repudiate the Spanish Committee 
Thv, I cannot Imagine, unless he wanted to use It in some 
way to damage the Spanish Committee a 

"I then told him that I had known Bishops Hartman and 
MeConnell all my life, and that if they are Communists, 
80 am I. He asked why these bishops were always "mired 1 ' 
up with Communists," and I replied that a bishop had to 
associate with all kinds of people, sometimes even church 
committees. He still seemed to mourn my association with 
these "reds." 

•As a matter of fact, T do not care who is on the Spanish 
Committee, or what their social point of view may be. I 
believe conditions in Spain are bad, and I want to do 
something about it. If Joe St -lin himself wants to go 
along with ne on that, It's O.K. with me. That does not 
Dean I have become a Communist." (Sions Herald-Hov.28,1945) 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3679 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 21 

(Part 2) 

-2- 

To: Hon John S. Wood January 21, 1946 

"As a natter of f*.et, I do not car© who is :>n the Spanish 
Committee, of what their social point of view nay oe* I 
believe conditions in Spain are bad, and I want to do some- 
thing about it. If Joe Stalin hinsolf wants to go along 
with no on that, it's O.K.„with me* That does not mean 
I have become a Communist •" 
(Zlons Herald, November 28, 1945) 

Since the House Commit too on Un-American Activities is charged to investigate 
the extent, character and objects of UN-American propaganda activities in the 
United States; the diffusion within the United States of subversive and Un- 
American propaganda that is instigated from foreign countries, or of a domestic 
origin, end attacks the principles of our form of government as guaranteed by 
our Constitution; and all other questions in relation thereto that would aid 
Congress in any necessary remedial legislation, we naturally shall not comply 
with your request* 

By no stretch of the imagination can the American Committee for Spanish Freedom, 
which is devoted to the welfare and interest of the American people, be called 
Un-American* 

For your information, the American Committee for Spanish Freedom is an organi- 
zation that was formed in July, 1944 for the primary purpose of organizing 
support for Congressman John M. Coffee* s Resolution, H» Res. 100, which was 
later amended to H. Res. 312. We enclose copies of both resolutions* 

If your commit teoi would take the time to study these resolutions end speeches 
and would further investigate and make public the documented records in the 
files of the state Department on Axis-Franco relationships, you would be forced 
to conclude that only those who support Franco are Un-American, end that the 
American way would be best exemplified by this country's keeping clean of 
fascist Spain by breaking all diplomatic and commercial relations with the 
Franco reglno* 

We look forward to your support of H. Ros. 312. 

Respectfully yours,. 

(Signed) Lewis 0* Hartnen 

Chairman 

AMERICAN CCJfflOirEa FOR SPANISH FREEDOM 



All members of the House Committoe on Un-.'jierican Actlvit io» 
Hon.' Sam Rayburn, Speaker of the House of Representatives 



3680 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 21 
(Part 3) 
SPONSORS: 



Rev. Mtlvin Abson 
Rev. Charles B. Ackley 
Louis Adamlc 
Samuel Hopkins Adam* 
James Luther Adams 
Stella Adler 
Marian Anderson 
Claudio Arrau 
Bishop J. C. Baker 
Wade Crawford Barclay 
S. N. Behrman 
Albert Bein 
William Rose Benet 
Elmer A. Benson 
Mrs. Nicolai Berezovsky 
Leonard Bernstein 
Alvah Bessie 
Rev. L. M. Birkhead 
Algernon D. Black 
Anita Block 
Isidore Blumberg 
Dr. Ernst P. Boas 
Alexander Brailowaky 
Joseph Brainin 
Van Wyck Brooks 
Prof. Edwin Berry Burffum 
Sam Burt 
Merlyn A. Chraffel 
Stewart Chaney 
Jerome Chodorov 
Thomas Christensen 
Rev. Karl M. Chworowsky 
Walter Van Tilburg Clark 
Mrs. Alma Clayburgh 
Charles Collins 
Rev. T. C. Cooper 
Aaron Copland 
Bishop Fred P. Corson 
Norman Corwin 
William Cosgrove 
John H. Cowles . 
Dr. Leo M. Davidoff 
Jo Davidson 
Rev. A. Powell Davie* 
M. Ft. Davis 
Dal* Dewltt 
Howard Dietz 
Dr. R. E. Diffendorfer 
Dean Dixon 
Mrs. Louis Dolivet 
Guy Pene DuBois 
Vernon Duke 
Frederick May Eliot 
• Clifford Evans 
William Feinberg 
Lawrence Fernsworth 
Jose Ferrer 
Betty Field 

Mrs. W. Osgood Field 
Abram Flaxer 
Eleanor Fowler 
Charles Friedman 
Walter Frisbie 
Stephen H. Fritchman 
William S. Gailmor 
Hugo Gellert 
Mortimer Gellis 
Irving Gilman 
Mrs. Harold K. Ginzburg 
H. Glintemkamp 
Louis Goldblatt 
Mrs. Israel Goldstein 
Ruth Gordon 
D. W. Greene 
James Griesl 



William Cropper 

Chalm Gross 

Rev. Albert R. Hahn 

E. Y. Harburg 

Mrs. J. Borden Harrlman 

Moss Hart 

The Very Rev. H. S. Hathaway 

Mrs. William C. Hayes 

Rev. Stanley B. Hazzard 

Dr. I. W. Held 

Lillian Hellman 

Rev. Warren C. Herrlck. 

George R. Hewlett. 

H. G. Hightower 

Randall S. Hilton 

Rev. Chester E. Hodgson 

Libby Holman 

Leo Huberman 

Alice Hughes 

Rev. M. P. Huntingtpn 

Mrs. Raymond V. Ingertoll 

Stanley M. Isaacs 

Burl Ives 

Nathan Jacobson 

Sam Jaffe 

Crockett Johnson 

Albert E. Kahn 

Aben Kandel 

Cecrge S. Kaufman 

Dr. Foster Kennedy 

Rockwell Kent 

James V. King 

Alexander Klpnis 

Dr. C. Franklin Koch 

Rev. John M. Krumm 

Mrs. James L. Laidlaw 

Harold Lane 

Wilbur Laroe, Jr. 

Kenneth Leslie 
- Rabbi Israel Lever, thai 

Samuel Lewis 

David Lord 

Rev. Donald G. Lothrop 

Louis Lozowick 
' Pierre Luboshutz 

Dr. John A. MacCallum 

Fritz Mahler 

Albert Maltz 

Alicia Markova 

Benjamin C. Marsh 

Elsa Maxwell 

Dorothy McConnell 

Bishop Francis J. McConnell 

John T. McManus 

Lewis Merrill 

Nathan Milstein 

Hortense Monath 

Rev. G. Moore Morgan 

Dr. John R. Mott 

Zero Mostel 

Morris Muster 

Frederick N. Myers 

Mrs. Richard Myers 

Rabbi F. Neuman 

Rev. William L. Nieman 

Isamu Noguchi 

Rev. Rowland F. Nye 

Clifford Odets 

Sarah Oppehheimer 

Sono Osato 

Bjjhjjg G. Bromley Oxnam 

Jack Paley 

Cyrus R. Pangborn 



Rev. E. W. Parmelea 
Rev. Edward L. Parson* 
Rev. B. Pascals 
ElUot Paul 

Dr. Norman Vincent Peal* 
Dr. John M. Pearson 
Wilfrid Pelletier 
W. W. Peters 
A. C. Petty 
Mlshel Piastro 
Gregor Platlgorsky 
Dr. Louis W. Pitt 
Rabbi Benjamin Plotldn 
i Dr. Gordon Poteat 
Rabbi Julius J. Price 
Michael J. Quill 
Rev. David Ralston 
Minnie F. Rands 
Samson Raphaelson 
Kenneth G. Read 
Anton Refregier 
Rev. Thomas Rehorn 
Mrs. Bernard Reiss 
Elmer Rice 
Rev. B. C. Robeson 
Raymond Robin* 
Mrs. Nathaniel Ross 
' Rev. John Saunders 
Dr. Bela Schik 
Mrs. William J. Schieffelln 
Artur Schnabel 
Mrs. M. Lincoln Schuster 
Bernard Segal 
Joseph Selly 
Lisa Sergio 
D. R. Sharpe 
Dr. Guy Emery Shlpler 

William L. Shirer 

Mrs. William L. Shirer 
' Herman Shumlin 

Mrs. Kenneth F. Simpson 

Dr. Joseph R. Slzoo 

Edgar Snow 

Dr. Ralph Sockman 

Moses Soyer 

Raphael Soyer 

Dr. Sigmund Spaeth 

Joseph Stack 

Johannes Steel 

Estelle M. Sternberger 
"Donald Ogden Stewart 

Rev. Stanley I. Stuber 

F. M. Swing 

Genevieve Taggard 

Alva W. Taylor 

Frank E. Taylor 

Max Torchin 

Mark Van Doren 
Pierre Van Paassen 

Erwin Wagner 

Nym Wale* 

J. Raymond Walsh 

Charles Weldman 

Kurt Weill 

Louis Weinstock 

Henry N. Wleman 

Rev. Claude Williams 

James Waterman Wis* 

Mrs. Stephen S. Wis* 

Dr. Gregory Zllborg 

Mrs. Gregory Zllborg 

William Zorach 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3681 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 22 
(Part 1) 



PR0T€STfl fl T DIGEST 



James L Adams 
S. R. Herbert 



Russell C. Barbour 
L M. Birkhead 
Charles S. Bradeh 
Bernard C. Clausen 
Jerome Davis 
Mark: A. Dawber 
Frsderick M. Eliot 
Hewlett Johnson 
Rufus M. Jones 
Donald Lothrop 



Edited by Kenneth Leslie 
Contributing Editors 

Pierre van Paassen 
Editorial Advisers 

J. A. MacCallum 
John A. Mackay 
John Macmurray 
Clifton Macon 
Francis J. McConnell 
R. S. Meadowcroft 
Conrad H. Moehlman 
James Moffatt 
Louie D. Newton 



Walter M. Horton 
Paul Tiluch 



G, Bromley Oxnam 
A. Clayton Powell 
Edwin McN. Poteat 
Leonhard Ragaz 
Raymond Robins 
Ve>a D. Scudder 
Douglas V. Steere 
Gregory Vlastos 
Rufus W. Weaver 
Henry N. Wieman 



Vol. Ill 



June-July, 1941 



No. 12 



MSGR. SHEEN AND CLERICAL-FASCISM 
Editorial by BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

It is not a far cry from the assumptions of finality to 
those authoritarian practices that destroy opposition, and 
reveal the essence of Fascism. Dictatorship is repugnant 
to free men, whether it be that of a state or of a church. 
It makes little difference whether it be a brown shirt, a 
black shirt, a red shirt, or a shirt with the collar on back- 
wards. Lei the church remember that the political shirt- 
makers are sewing at once with a double thread, "a 
shroud as well as a shirt." If religionists march the 
road' of dictatorship it will become the march of death. 

THE opinions of the distinguished Monsignor Fulton J. Sheen 
are entitled to respectful consideration. He is at once a 
thoughtful personality and a spokesman for one of the great 
Christian churches. 



3682 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 22 
(Part 2) 

2 PROTESTANT DIGEST June-July 

Recently, writing upon the question of post-war political 
and social organization, he said: ". . . there should be created 
an international organization which will respect the rights of 
God, assure mutual independence of peoples, impose fidelity 
to agreements and safeguard the true liberty and dignity of the 
human person." 

Seeking to implement this proposal, he calls for a legisla- 
tive and executive body, "a judicial body which would pass 
final judgments on the problems submitted through democratic 
processes by the legislative bodies" and a coercive body to 
assure obedience to decisions. 

Then follows a statement that is the occasion for this edi- 
torial: "The judicial body would be composed exclusively of 
representatives of religious groups, and would be empowered 
to direct nations to the higher good of the human community 
. . . the point of having such a judicial body of this kind is to 
insure that in the future war be declared by ethical and moral 
groups and not by political groups, as they are at present . . . 
too long has politics set limits to religion; it is now time for re- 
ligion to set limits to politics and to politicians." 

Monsignor Sheen is willing to leave to the Jewish and 
Protestant religionists their right to nominate their representatives 
to this judicial body. He assures us the Catholic Church is an 
organization peculiarly qualified to name its representatives, 
and because of its catholicity offers "a sure token of impar- 
tiality." 

What happens to democracy when churches seek to set 
limits to politics, and how a body appointed by a church when 
declaring war can avoid becoming political, he does not explain. 

But such a proposal raises serious questions. Does the 
Roman Catholic Church really look forward to the day when it 
will choose judges for a World Court, and if so, does it antici- 
pate similar action in choosing judges for lower courts? Is the 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3683 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 22 
(Part 3) 

1941 MSGR. SHEEN AND CLERICAL-FASCISM 3 

World Court, or judicial body proposed, to be composed exclu- 
sively of Christians? What of Hindu, Mohammedan, Buddhist, and 
other religious bodies? 

If it be wise to turn to the Church for choice in judicial 
matters, by what logic do v/e avoid asking the church to choose 
our executives and legislators? What happens to the democratic 
principle of all the people participating in choosing their repre- 
sentatives? In a word, is there implicit in this suggestion the 
repudiation of democracy, and the setting up of a new dicta- 
torship? 

The suggestion that Jews and Protestants name their repre- 
sentatives is a generous one. But Jews and Protestants are not 
suggesting such procedure. 

Furthermore, it is a little difficult to reconcile this "right to 
nominate" with the theory of the state expounded by Ryan and 
Millar in The State and the Church. Commenting upon the En- 
cyclical of Pope Leo XIII entitled The Christian Constitution o/ 
States, the Rev. John A. Ryan says: "In a genuinely Catholic 
State, public authority should not permit the introduction of new 
forms of religion; but when several denominations have already 
been established, the State may, and generally should, permit 
them all to exist and to function. The reason is that the attempt 
to suppress them would on the whole be injurious to the com- 
monwealth." 

Without discussing the implications of this statement b.y 
Dr. Ryan, it must be seen at once that the basic principles of 
the Bill of Rights are repudiated. However, it is apparent that in 
a genuinely Catholic world, the right of the Protestant church to 
exist appears to be denied Of what use is it to suggest the 
lesser right "to nominate"? 

Here is the essense of the proposal: One church, if the 
above quotations represent it, thinks in terms of choosing officers 
who shall "pass final judgments on the problems submitted 



3684 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 22 

(Part 4) 

4 PROTESTANT DIGEST June-July 

through democratic processes by legislative bodies." It rests 
finally upon certain assumptions, chief of which is that the 
Roman Catholic Church is the one true church, the one body 
commissioned by Our Lord to teach all nations, the one organi- 
zation possessing the right to speak with final authority in the 
realm of religion. In history this assumption has been associated 
with a practice, namely the control of the State wherever power 
to control exists. 

I do not believe that American Catholics will give assent 
to this proposal, to whom the assumptions on which it rests must 
be as repugnant as they are to Evangelical Christians. Neither 
American Catholics nor American Protestants believe that the 
doctrine of the separation of Church and State is but a "shib- 
boleth." [This was the epithet used by Archbishop Spellman of 
New York.— Ed.] 

It is very difficult for one who has cooperated in every effort 
to unite Catholic, Jew and Protestant, who has spoken out against 
those intolerances manifest in Ku Klux Klan and similar organi- 
zations, to be forced to raise a word of warning. The Roman 
Catholic Church, quite properly, has been given freedom in this 
land of freedom. It has been given freedom by the people. In a 
democracy final political authority rests in the people. The church 
is dependent upon the civil liberties of democracy for the free- 
dom to preach and teach. Democracy is dependent upon the 
church for those great over-mastering ideals that will insure that 
men given freedom will not abuse it. But the church places its 
own freedom in jeopardy if it ridicules the separation of Church 
and State; if it continues to insist upon the public support of 
private schools; if it countenances practices tantamount to boy- 
cott in endeavors to deny free speech to those with whom it 
disagrees; if it cooperates with "genuinely Catholic" states in 
suppressing evangelical churches and their institutions as in 
Spain. It is hardly good sportsmanship, much less Christianity, 
to demand freedom for Catholics in lands predominantly Protes- 
tant, while justifying denial of freedom to Protestants in lands 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3685 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 22 
(Part 5) 

1941 COMMENTS ON "SAVE PROTESTANT ENGLAND' 5 

"genuinely Catholic." Coughlinism is not Catholicism, yet 
Coughlinism is but a crude expression of the more refined as- 
sumptions of clerical-Fascism. 

It is not a far cry from the assumptions oi finalUy to those 
authoritarian practices that destroy opposition, and reveal the 
essence of Fascism. Dictatorship is Tepugnant to free men, 
whether it be that of a state or ot a church. It makes little dtf* 
ference whether it be a brown shirt, a black shirt, a red shirt QT 
a shirt with the collar on backwards. Let the church remember 
that the political shirt-makers are sewing at once with a. double 
thread, "a shroud as well as a shirt." If religionists march the 
road of dictatorship, it will become the march of death. 

Can we not unite as Catholic, Jew and Protestant sin- 
cerely affirming faith in democracy, and in the spirit of Christ 
and the prophets, seek to discover the bases of a Just and 
durable peace? Is it not possible for the Church, separated from 
the State, to render a spiritual service absolutely impossible 
when assuming the functions of the State? The world awaits a 
revelation of the principles upon which permanent peace may 
be organized. It calls for the unifying force essential to world 
law and order. It desperately needs the motivating force essen- 
tial to brotherhood. Is it not enough for the church to reveal the 
Way, the Truth and the Life of Our Lord, win the allegiance of 
men until they walk in that Way, incarnate that Truth, and live 
that Life, and following the command of the Christ find its life by 
losing it, rather than to attempt to become both State and 
Church? 



3686 TESTIMONT OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Mr. Scherer. It is a Communist organization ; that is obvious, isn't 

it? 

Bishop Oxnam. I don't know that this is a Communist organiza- 
tion. All I am told is by counsel, and that this has been cited. 

It would seem to me if there could be some method whereby these 
organizations could be heard, and in the American way they could 
present their testimony to a committee of this kind, then if they say 
they are cited, well and good ; but the Attorney General's list, I think, 
wasn't made up on the basis of hearings, was it ? 

Mr. Scherer. Well, of course, if the other people were like yourself, 
whose name appears on the list, they couldn't very well testify as to 
the name of the organization if they didn't know anything about it, 
could they ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I suppose you could call in the whole group and if 
you thought there were subversion there you would get it sooner or 
later. 

Excuse me, sir ; I didn't mean to answer back. 
Mr. Kunzig. May I continue? 
Mr. Velde. Proceed. 

Mr. Kunzig. I should like, also, to put on the record the names of 
Julius Emspak, whom you didn't mention, who is mentioned as a Com- 
munist Party member, and Donald Ogden Stewart, who is mentioned 
as a Communist Party member. Let's keep the record straight. 

Bishop Oxnam. I only read the names I knew there, and I didn't 
read all of them, as a matter of fact. 

Mr. Velde. May I say to the audience again that if another dem- 
onstration like that takes place, either of approval or disapproval, I 
shall ask the sergeant at arms and the members of the Capitol Police 
force to escort anyone who makes such an indication of approval or 
disapproval out of the hearing room. 

Bishop Oxnam. I am sorry, Mr. Chairman, my remarks occasioned 
that. I didn't mean it in any way other than just the statement of 
fact. 

Mr. Kunzig. I offer in evidence this document marked "Oxnam 
Exhibit No. 23," Mr. Chairman, and wish to make it clearly under- 
stood for the record that this National Committee To Abolish the Poll 
Tax is a cited Communist organization. 

Mr. Velde. Without objection, it willbe admitted into the record. 
(The letterhead of the National Committee To Abolish the Poll Tax 
above referred to was received in evidence as Oxnam exhibit No. 23.) 
Mr. Kunzig. I turn to the Committee on Militarism in Educa- 
tion 

Mr. Moulder. May I ask a question? 
Mr. Velde. Mr. Moulder. 

Mr. Moulder. Do I understand your answer to this question was 
that you did not authorize the use of your name in this connection? 
Bishop Oxnam. I said I have no recollection of that at all, sir. I 
don't recall ever having seen that document or having relationship 
with the organization. I wish I could answer definitely. I simply 
don't recall. 

Mr. Velde. If you do find out later that you did belong to this or- 
ganization, the committee would appreciate it very much if you would 
notify them of your recollection. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3687 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 23 

(Part 1) 

NATIONAL COMMITTEE TO ABOLISH THE POLL TAX 

127 6 ST. S E. • WASHINGTON 3. D. C. • JNCOLN 4820 • 4821 

JENNINGS RERRY •*'"t»INE SiRYVER 



Chcrawo 

OR WILL ALEXANDER 
HON GEORGE H. BENDER 
MARY MeLEOD BETHUNE 
VIRGINIA EOSTER DURR 
V.ce Ckrimwi 

OINA BLOCH 

TrMfaMCf 

March 8, 1946 



i'e'.y »• $♦-.••••'* 



Your letter of Pebruary 14 finally reached us through the forwarding 
process. Ve no longer have an office in Sew York. 

Ve do not have a list of speakers whom *© supply for meetings. v ery 
frequently, however, we can and are very glad to secure a speaker for 
speelflo gatherings. There is no fee for this. An organisation mi*ht 
be asked te pay traveling expenses for someone te come from a near by 
city. 

We were very pleased to hear of your Interest in having a meeting on 
the poll tax question. Prom the stand point of the status of anti- 
poll tax legislation, it would be fine to have one this Spring when 
H.H, 7 the federal anti-poll tax bill will probably be on the senate 
floor, and the focus of considerable attention. Every effort now Is 
being made to get it up after action on the 65 cent minimum wage amend- 
ment, which would probably mean In April. The bill passed the House by 
an overwhelming vote last June, and was reported favorably by the Senate 
Judiciary Committee on October 5th. We are very hopeful of a victory in 
the Senate. 

If you can, have your meeting while the bill Is pending, the topic would 
be timely later, but the question would be handled In a different manner. 
Therefore, we oan not very will suggest any particular speaker until your 
plans are batter orystallsed, but we will be glad to cooperate with you. 

Separately we are sending you a collection of our materials on the poll 
tax. These are available In quantity, if you should want to order them 
for distribution. 

Since rely yours. 



Kuh— £ ^~r- 



uopwa 27 Mrs. Catherine ^hryver 



K3RTY-ONE -dc<y 'tp/etenltliv* MlioMl oiq«».ul«x»l o" o«»» «p->»w ««d tupp:>» tfc« .o<l of •». N.i.onal C:-»">.»»» •« Aool.iS M>« 
RaM T,. StO'K ol ««t.o«»lly l.o.« .'d...d„.ll •:» *»d«ne <«d luppo't H Tk»,. *•*.*« ..II b. It.u-d -" '•>• >»•<•• ol lh.| |K«.I. 



3688 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 23 

(Part 2) 
SPONSORING ORGANIZATIONS 

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority • Alpha Phi Alpha • American Ci.<l Liberties Union • Amenun Federal on ot' Leber • 
American Fede-etion o* Labor Women » Au>il'ar.et • A-ier.cen U-i.tarlen Ycuth • B-ctt-e-t-ood c-l Reload Tre.nmen • 
Church League tor l-dutt'iel Democracy • C; cod Vo'e-t League of America • Co-rj-ei* ol l->du»»r,«l Orgeniietiont e 
Conqrett ol Wc-men t Auxiliaries • Council Ageintt Into'ere-ice in A~erice • Delta Slqma Thate e Farmen Educe' ; onal 
s-d Cooperate Union e Fraternal Council o> Negro Churchet • Improved 6enevo : «nt an-J Protective Oder of Eli ol 
•it World • I- dependent CJIiltrs' CaxitniHee of the Art». Science* end r> Uitiont • Inte'netlonel Labor De'ente • 
League e' Woman Shoopert • He fiats* I A>«ocIa*ion fo- -h* Adva-ce-ic-' o< Colo-ad People • Netimal Atiocletlon c' 
Colored Graduate Nurtee. Inc. • HjticW Bar Au» la-ion • Nat. oral Con'conce if Social Worl • Na'ical Council 
-J Nagro Wor.>on • National Farm Leber Union • Na-.cn v Fode'ation fir Coniiituticnal Libert, at • Ne-.'oe Fea<ve 
♦ : c« of Sa'tement. • National Intercollegiate D'ij- Coun: . • Na'.onel Lawyers Gu d • Na'lcal Ne-'c Bbtineit 
.cogue • National Negro Congrats • National U'Lan League • Ne'lona 1 Wo»m Trade Unr-n Lenguo • Pa. »ey 
i.eb - r E'eCLtlvet Attocletioa • Southern Conference : jr Humer Welfare • Southern Negro Youth Conqrcit • T «'i«"d 
►«n • United Chrittien Council for Democracy • United Council ol Church Women. Natiene' Board • W-t» s C — -.* in 
Service Divitlo" of 'he Metnodilt Church • Young Women t C-' »' en Allocation 

SPONSORS 

George F. Addot a Hon. Cr«*. W. Aadonen. Jr. e Mm. Sherwood AnrJo-ton e C. A. Armitrong a El,;, Aultin a 
Hi". Joeaph Dark Baldwin • Harry C. Betei • William Rote Brret • Barry Bingham •' Uzrtra t.. B'vd 
• Mrt. J. D. Bragg • Irving Brant • Rebo. Bernett R Brieve' • Hor. Arthur Carper • ?. T, Cerle'co • 
Robert R. Church • Or. Edwin L Clarke • Dr. fiuf js C C cment • William F. Cochrn- • W Hem H. 
Crawford a Hon. William L (Wo* • Or. Dale DaWiH a Or. J. Frank Oobia • Or. Charlat R. Drew a Mi Elizabeth 
Dutonbary a Stanley Eerl a Thomas H. Eliot a Judqe Henry (llenbogen e J u liui Empek a Robert Ourent Fel'd a 
Marshall Field • Hon. Joeaph E. Finerty a Albert J. Fitsgereld • John Anton Ford e Dr. Clerk Foreman • 0'. Harry 
(marten Fotdicl • Hon. Jeaoph Gavdqaa • Mr*. Lot Geyt/ a R av . Frarct J. Gilligen a Rabbi Solomon Goldman a 
Dr. Itraol Goldttein a b>. Frank P. eVan am a Dean Leon Green e William Green a Dean William H. Hattle • Hon. 
Vnute Hill a Rt. Rav. Henry W. Hefaeon a Charlat H. Hgutton. Jr. a Dean Herbert C. Huntake' • Edward H. 
Hun veld a Norman E. Iteees a Raw. Jr V. Jemiton e Rev. W. H. Jemegin • Or. Mordacei W. Jh^tc • Paul 
Kellogg o Atty. Sen. Robe. W. Rouen/ a BStfeap Paul Kern a Hon. Fiorallo H. La Guerdia • Ju'iut G. Luhrjen a 
Most Reverend Robort Lueey • Mn. Dorothy S. McAllittar a Bohop Frende] J. McConnell a Francit E. McMahon e 
? I.;ebem Mogee » Hon. Warran 6>. Magnuton e Hon. VJto Marcentonio • George Manhall • Hon. Jamet M. Mead • 
George Moony a O. W. Moody. Jr. a R» v . A. J. Murphy a Philip Murray • Rev. I. George Nece • Mrt. L. L. 
O Ccnnell • Bishop G. Bromley Qnnam a R». Rev. Edward L. Penont • JanwM G. Petton a Nelton Poynter a A. 
Philip lUrraolph e Emit Rievc a Read Robmton a Mrt. Eleo«or Sooeavelt e Li. Comdr. Chat. Sealy (rat.) a Rabbi 
Abba HiKel Sihre- e B<thcf> 0. H. S-r., a Rabbi Morr.t i*op a Donald Ogdon Stewart e R.v John » Th^^rr^p a 
R. J. Tfcomei e Mn. M. E. Ti!h/ e Or. Channing H. Taoww e Daniel J. rTobin • M-i Harry B. Tour a Dr. French. E. 
To-nwnd a Otwald Ga'rlion Vi"ard e O'ton Wel'ei • D- Charlat H. Wetley e A. F. Whitney • Geome Wlbon • 
Dr. J. Finley Wilten e f Stephen S W„, * D- Ma. Ye- m- e Louise Young 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Kunzig. I now turn to the Committee on Militarism in Edu- 
cation, 14 which was another one of the groups that you brought up to 
our attention, sir. 

In 1935 a letterhead of the Committee on Militarism in Education 
reflects the name of Bromley Oxnam as a member of its national 
council. (Seep. 3691.) 

Kirby Page, a member of the national council, testified before the 
Special Committee on Un-American Activities on June 14, 1913. 
He stated that the Committee on Militarism in Education was opposed 
to military education in schools, and so forth. 

u The Committee on Militarism in Education has not been cited by any official body 
as a Communist front. It might be noted that the Committee on Militarism in Education 
was identified as part of the "United Front" of organizations which signed the call for the 
United States Congress Against War, held in New York City, September 29 to October 1, 
1933, and which led to the formation of the American League Against War and Fascism. 
(Massachusetts house committee on un-American activities, report of June 1938. p. 462.) 

The United States Congress Against War and the American League Against War and 
Fascism have been cited as Communist by Attorney General Francis Biddle, Special Com- 
mittee on Un-American Activities, California committee on un-American activities, and 
Massachusetts house committee on un-American activities. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3689 

Now, you stated, I believe, in a Washington newspaper, sir, that 
you admitted belonging to the orgnization but saw there was nothing 
wrong with it. 

Now, I would like to ask you to clarify this situation involving, 
I believe, again, something you testified about earlier, the Knoxville 
Journal. In the Knoxville Journal you stated "I never belonged 
to the organization mentioned and knew nothing about it." 

Is this another one of the organizations you mentioned previously 
where you say now you belonged to it but previously you said you 
had not belonged ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I testified to that clearly and named 
the organizations, indicated I had written a letter correcting the origi- 
nal statement, and if you will pardon me, sir, it is coming in again 
apparently to raise a question as to my veracity. 

The Committee on Militarism in Education has never been cited 
as a Communist or subversive organization. I did belong to it. I 
happen to believe in a strong national defense, but I have never been 
convinced that compulsory military training is a wise contribution 
to it. I may be wrong. It is debatable. 

Mr. Velde. In other words, your statement as quoted in the Knox- 
ville Journal was made by you but it was incorrect ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I stated, Mr. Chairman, that they quoted a letter 
that I had written ; that the letter was in error ; that I wrote a letter 
correcting it, and that is in the record earlier in the afternoon. 

Mr. Velde. Well, I am a little bit puzzled. Did you make the state- 
ment at any time which is quoted in the Knoxville Journal ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir; I testified I had written a letter to a 
minister and had said, I think — I could quote it exactly if I could get 
the record — actually I never belonged to any of these organizations 
except the American Civil Liberties Union. I sent a letter correcting 
that. There were 3 or 4 organizations there not Communist. This 
is one, the League for the Organization of Progress, never cited by 
this organization; and I think the Fellowship of Eeconciliation — I 
was never related to that. There was another one there ; I have for- 
gotten what it was. 

Mr. Velde. I am a little bit puzzled, too. I am not certain whether 
or not you have listed these organizations in your listing included in 
Who's Who, that you admittedly belong to. Did you ever list these 
organizations ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Oh, no. These organizations where you serve, 
like in the Committee on Militarism in Education, you would fill 
Who's Who with a dozen pages of it if you tried that. These organi- 
zations, of course, are not listed there. 

Mr. Kunzig. You said the organization was not cited. That is 
partially correct. Let me state for the record that the Committee on 
Militarism in Education has not been cited in the sense you said as a 
Communist front; however, it must be noted that the Committee on 
Militarism in Education was cited as a Communist front because the 
first United States congress against war held in New York City 
September 29 to October 1, 1933, led directly to the formation of the 
American League Against War and Fascism. That was cited by the 
Massachusetts House Committee on Un-American Activities. 

Also, I might note for the record, sir, that the Garland, G-a-r-1-a-n-d 
fund, which is a cited Communist group furnishing money to various 

43620 — 54 8 



3690 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

organizations of the United States of America, furnished over $10,000 
to the Committee on Militarism in Education. So the group was tied 
in one way or another, Mr. Chairman, with subversive activities. 

Bishop Oxnam. I object very strenuously. Here was a legitimate 
organization and now by a series of associations there is the apparent 
attempt to make it appear that I was related to an organization about 
which there was some question. There was no question about that 
organization. 

Mr. Velde. I previously asked that when you answer the questions 
if you didn't belong to the organizations, say so, and if you did, to say 
so. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I want to do that, but when there is 
read into the record all this, what is the purpose? 

Mr. Velde. We do want to get through by 12 o'clock. I will appre- 
ciate the cooperation of the members of the committee and counsel, as 
well. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman, if the organization received funds 
from a Communist source, I believe that is certainly relative to the 
makeup or to at least some of the leadership of the organization 
concerned. 

In the case of the Committee on Militarism in Education, here is an 
organization which received $10,000 from a fund which was cited as 
Communist, and that is certainly relative to the matters under discus- 
sion. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, are you ruling that I am denied the 
privilege of saying anything? I want to abide by your orders, sir, 
but that is not quite the way we do things in this country. 

The Garland fund has been called Communist by somebody. It 
makes a contribution to an organization. I would like to have the 
facts rather than these statements. That organization was a worthy 
organization. I did belong to it and I don't think the organization 
ought to have its reputation attacked in this fashion. 

I beg your pardon, sir. You have been very kind to me. 

Mr. Velde. You did belong to the Garland 

Bishop Oxnam. No, I had nothing to do with the Garland fund 
ever. I was a member of the Committee on Militarism in Education. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman, in order that the record may be ab- 
solutely clear, and I don't know at the moment the citation on the 
Garland fund 

Mr. Kunzig. I have it right here, sir. 

Mr. Jackson. I wouldn't question that. 

Mr. Velde. Counsel, will you please read it. 

Mr. Kunzig. The full title is the American Fund for Public Service, 
otherwise known as the Garland fund, established in 1922. It was a 
major source for the financing of Communist Party enterprises such 
as the Daily Worker and New Masses, official Communist publica- 
tions. Federated Press, Russian Reconstruction Farms, and Interna- 
tional Labor Defense. William Z. Foster, present chairman of the 
Communist Party at the time this was written, and Scott Nearing, a 
leading writer for the party, served on the board of directors of the 
fund. 

That wns the 1944 citation of the Special Committee on Un-Ameri- 
can Activities. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3691 



It was also cited as a Communist front by the California committee, 
and is listed as giving more than $1,500,000 in furtherance and support 
of left-wing and Marxist projects. 

It had as its trustees the leaders of the Communist Party in America, 
and that is cited by the Massachusetts House Committee on Un-Ameri- 
can Activities in 1938. 

I offer in evidence this document marked "Oxnam Exhibit No. 24," 
relating to the Committee on Militarism in Education. 

Mr. Velde. Without objection, it will be received. 

(The letterhead of the Committee on Militarism in Education, dated 
October 1, 1935, above referred to, was received in evidence as Oxnam 
exhibit No. 24.) 

OXNAM EXHIBIT XO. 24 

COMMITTEE ON MILITARISM IN EDUCATION 

2929 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY 



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October 1, 1935. 



Dear Friend: 

The enclosed Issue of our news bulletin gives you, 
among other things, a rather detailed story on Senator Nye's 
and Congressman Kvale 1 s Introduction of bills intending to 
outlaw compulsion In R. 0. T. C. units in our civil schools 
and colleges. The second enclosure, which is a reprint of 
the text of the bills, briefly outlines suggestions for 
arousing and giving expression to public support for their 
proposed Defense Act amendment. 

Additional copies of this reprint, together with 
copies of other folders now being propared, are available 
for those willing to assist In the drive for the passage of 
the Nye-Kvale measure. How many copies oay_ we. send, y^u? 

Mow that most Senators and Congressmen are "back 
home", I would especially call your attention to the sugges- 
tion that small delegations of voting citizens be organized 
to call upon them to urge that they use their influence In 
securing the passage of the Nye-Kvale bills. Will you under- 
take such fin effort In your Congressional district? 

Already the Hearst press has attacked Senator Nye 
and Mr. Kvale for having introduced their bills. The Hearst 
writers seek to discredit the Nye-Kvale measure by making 
much of our organization's interest in and support for It, 
All these Hearst charges we shall answer in a subsequent Issue 
of our r.ews bulletin. Meanwhile, the best answer to Hearst 
and his company will be an overwhelming denand for favorable 
Congressional action upon these bills which promise to restrict 
the extensive militarism which has encroached Itself upon Amer- 
ican education since the War. 

Please pive your active cooperation to this drive, 
and do not hesitate to let us know when we can serve your 
local needs. 



Sincerely yours 



/^"'£c*^<x>— K__^ 



ICJ.133 



Secretary. 
/ 



3692 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Mr. Doyle. Mr. Chairman, may I make this observation there? 

Mr. Jackson's observation seems to me to be very material to know 
whether or not the Committee on Militarism in Education had any 
notice or knowledge of the fact that the Garland Fund was Commu- 
nist. If it did and then received these funds, that is one thing, but 
there certainly is no showing here yet today that the Committee on 
Militarism in Education during the time that the bishop was a mem- 
ber of it had any knowledge of this Garland Fund being Communist 
or Communist infiltrated. 

(At this point Bishop Oxnam conferred with Mr. Parlin.) 

Mr. Jackson. Is the date of this donation or grant to the Committee 
on Militarism in Education available, or is it obtainable? If it is, I 
think it certainly should go into the record. 

Mr. Doyle. It would be very material to have that. 

Mr. Velde. Do you have the date on that, Mr. Counsel? 

Mr. Kunzig. I have the date of 1935 as the date that Bishop Ox- 
nam's name appears on the letterhead, and the date on which the 
money went to the organization was in 1925 and 1925. In 1925 and 
1926 the organization received money from the Communist fund. 

Bishop Oxnam. It is very hard for me to believe the organization 
was subversive back there in 1922, and so on. I can't understand 
this. I wasn't a member of the Committee on Militarism in Educa- 
tion at that time, as you know. 

Mr. Kunzig. I think it is important to keep in mind, Mr. Chair- 
man, that the Garland Fund didn't give its money around for any 
other purpose except to foster the purposes of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Frazier. I understand Bishop Oxnam wasn't a member of the 
committee at that time ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Velde. No, I think you admitted 

Bishop Oxnam. I was a member in 1935, or thereabouts. I was 
president of DePauw University. We were very much concerned 
about the whole question of militarism in education at that time, 
and we, of course, were opposed to it. Of course, that was not back 
there in the twenties. I was living in California at that time. 

Mr. Moulder. Did you have any information concerning the docu- 
ment referred to by counsel ? 

Bishop Oxnam. None at all. 

Mr. Moulder. You are referred to here as an executive in the organi- 
zation. What do they call the relationship there? You were a 
member of the committee, is that it ? 

Mr. Kunzig. He is listed, sir, as a member of the national council of 
the committee. 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, I don't know what that means, but I was not 
a member at that time and had no knowledge of this gift, and I think 
the whole question of the organization giving it might well be con- 
sidered. I don't know. 

Mr. Velde. When did you cease to be a member of this organization ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I can't answer that, Mr. Velde. I have no idea. 
I was related to it simply during that time when there was the danger 
of militarism moving its way into our educational system. Educators 
all across the Nation were related to that endeavor. 

Mr. Velde. Did you ever resign from the organization ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Frankly, I can't recall at the moment whether I 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3693 

did or not. I don't know whether the organization is in existence 
now or not. I doubt that it is. 

Mr. Velde. If you do recall in the future, would you please notify 
the committee ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, I would be glad to. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, I turn now to the Citizens' Victory 
Committee for Harry Bridges. 13 The Citizens' Victory Committee 
for Harry Bridges is one of a group of committees 

Bishop Oxnam. Could I save you time, Mr. Chairman, by saying 
I don't belong to it ? 

Mr. Velde. Just a minute. Allow counsel to finish his question. 

Mr. Kunzig. The Citizens' Victory Committee for Harry Bridges 
issued an undated press release and then a dated letter, April 22, 1943, 
signed by the Right Reverend Edward L. Parsons, which also had the 
name of one G. Bromley Oxnam listed with Bishop Parsons as one 
of those who signed the letter for Harry Bridges. (See Oxnam 
exhibit No. 25, pp. 3703-3708.) 

This organization, sir, is one of a group of cited organizations 
concerning Harry Bridges. 

The bishop emphasized before from his answer, and this is the 
problem I wanted to raise, sir : 

You stated at one point in the newspaper, "I can't say whether 
I ever signed the letter," and then in the next sentence you say, "The 
important thing is, I never signed the letter," and I wanted to ask 
you which was the correct statement. 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, you didn't read what is in the record, if you 
will pardon me, Mr. Kunzig. 

This allegation, which is one of the releases of this committee, 
alleges that the committee, the Citizens' Victory Committee for Harry 
Bridges, released a letter that had been sent out by Bishop Parsons. 
Now, I take it organizations can release letters that others have 
written if those letters are made public, and the clear facts are these, 
if you will read, I think, what was said here. 

Whether I signed the letter that Bishop Parsons wrote and which 
this committee may or may not have released, I do not know. I do 
know that I never signed any letter for the Citizens' Committee for 
Victory for Harry Bridges. I was never related to that organization 
and never signed any letter for it. I would not have done that and, 
therefore, it is perfectly clear I cannot say whether I ever signed the 
letter referred to — drafted by Bishop Parsons — for my files covering 
letters written in Boston are not available to me here. Nor do I 
know if the Citizens' Victory Committee referred to in the record 
ever used Bishop Parsons' letter. The important matter is that I 
never belonged to that organization and never signed any letter for it. 

Mr. Kunzig. So to get the record absolutely straight, if the Citi- 
zens' Victory Committee for Harry Bridges had your name listed 



15 "The files of the Special Committee on Un-American Activities show that the Commu- 
nist Party urged the formation of Bridges defense committees as a part of its official 
activities, that party members were selected to form such committees, that Bridges defense 
stamps were sold in the party units, that party members were assessed $1 toward the 
Bridges defense fund, and that Bridges defense pamphlets were sold at Communist book 
shops. 

"* * * we su b m it that the various committees formed for the defense of Harry Renton 
Bridges ; i. e., Harry Bridges Defense Committee, Citizens Committee for Harry Bridges, 
Harry Bridges Victory Committee, and the Citizens Victory Committee for Harry Bridges, 
must be classified as Communist-front organizations." (From Special Committee on Un- 
American Activities Rept. No. 1311 Mar. 29, 1944, p. 97.) 



3694 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

at the bottom of this letter, they were using your name without any 
authority ? 

Bishop Oxnam. No, that is not the matter at all. If Bishop Par- 
sons wrote a letter dealing with a subject and asked me to sign it, 
I may well have signed it. I don't know whether I did or not. If 
another organization used that letter I have nothing to do about it. 
I have never signed a letter for that organization. 

Mr. Kunzig. I am trying to get it clear. If another organization 
used that letter which had your name on it, you gave them no au- 
thority so to use and they were using it without your permission? 

Bishop Oxnam. Quite, quite; thank you. 

Mr. Kunzig. That is correct? 

Bishop Oxnam. I didn't understand your point. 

Mr. Kunzig. I wanted to 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, you were helping me. 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Chairman, may I ask him just one question before 
we adjourn? 

Mr. Velde. One question if you make it brief. 

Mr. Clardy. I will. 

Think about this during the recess, Bishop, because you left me 
confused as to what was in the letter that you probably did sign or 
send to Bishop Parsons. I will let you answer that after dinner. 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you, sir. 

Mr. Velde. The committee will stand in recess for 1 hour until 
8 o'clock. 

(Whereupon, at 6:55 p. m., the committee recessed to reconvene 
at 8 p. m. the same day.) 

EVENING SESSION 

(At the hour of 8 : 08 p. m., of the same day, the hearing was re- 
sumed, the following committee members being present: Representa- 
tives Harold H. Velde (chairman), Donald L. Jackson, Kit Clardy, 
Gordon H. Scherer (appearance noted in transcript). Francis E. 
Walter (appearance noted in transcript), Morgan M. Moulder (ap- 
pearance noted in transcript), Clyde Doyle (appearance noted in 
transcript), and James B, Frazier, Jr. (appearance noted in tran- 
script).) 

Mr. Velde. The committee will come to order. 

Let the record show at this point I have appointed a subcommittee 
consisting of Mr. Jackson, Mr. Clardy, and myself, as chairman, for 
the purposes of this hearing. 

I am sorry that the other members have not been able to return, 
but I hope that they will be able to return in the very near future. 
So, we will continue the hearing with the members of the sub- 
committee. 

When we recessed, I believe that the gentleman from Michigan, 
Mr. Clardy, had proposed a question. If the gentleman will repeat 
that question — or would you like to have the reporter 

TESTIMONY OF G. BROMLEY OXNAM, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, CHARLES C. PARLIN— RESUMED 

Mr. Clardy. I will put it in a different fashion. 

Witness, as I understood your testimony, subject to your correc- 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3695 

tion, you were attempting to tell us, it appears, that while you signed 
some letter that apparently approved the idea of clemency, or what- 
ever he was seeking, for Bridges, you did not, however, write a letter 
authorizing the circulation and the broadcasting of that letter as 
was done. Do I correctly understand what you were saying? 

Bishop Oxnam. No, sir; that is not quite correct, Mr. Clardy. 

Mr. Clardy. That is why I said I was confused. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Clardy. That is what it seemed like to me. Will you tell us 
what the facts are? Did you write a letter which, in effect, did ap- 
prove of the idea of the stopping of the deportation proceedings of 
Harry Bridges ? 

Bishop Oxnam. No, sir. What is alleged here in the files of the 
Committee on Un-American Activities is that a letter by the Right 
Reverend Edward L. Parsons states in part : 

Clearly Mr. Bridges has aroused the animosity of an influential minority 
because of his successful union activities and his political and economic beliefs. 

I do not know what was in that letter. I do not know whether 
I ever signed that letter and stated so in this Washington Post 
article. 

I said that my files were not available to me and that was the 
reason I stated that. 

I then stated that I had never written or signed any letter for the 
committee that is referred to — the committee — that is alleged to be 
subversive. 

Now, whether the committee used a letter or had it reprinted, or 
published, written by Bishop Parsons, I do not know. 

(Representative Gordon H. Scherer entered the hearing room at 
this point.) 

Have I made myself clear now, sir ? 

Mr. Clardy. No ; you haven't 

Mr. Velde. No. 

Mr. Clardy (continuing). Because you did not answer the question. 

Mr. Velde. You haven't answered the question. 

Bishop Oxnam. Then I don't understand your question, sir. 

Mr. Clardy. That is what I was afraid of. 

The question is this : Whether you wrote any or a lot of letters — 
or did you at about the time irrv olved in this episode actually approve 
of the objective of preventing the deportation of Harry Bridges? 

Bishop Oxnam. I never expressed myself upon that subject. I did 
not know whether Harry Bridges was a Communist or not a Com- 
munist. I understand that the Supreme Court has dismissed all of 
this matter. I don't know upon what grounds. 

I may be wrong on that. 

What I am trying to say here is that your committee refers to a 
letter alleged to have been written by Bishop Parsons, a letter I am 
alleged to have signed. 

Air. Clardy. And on which 

Bishop Oxnam. I state I don't know whether I signed that or not. 
I don't have my files. 

Mr. Jackson. The question 

Bishop Oxnam. Just a minute. Let me conclude, if you don't 
mind. 



3696 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Now, if the committee or Mr. Bridges gave publicity to any letter 
signed by Bishop Parsons, that is a matter about which I know 
nothing. I don't know whether they did or didn't. I know that I 
had nothing whatsoever to do with that committee at any time. 

Mr. Clardy. Well, you still leave me in the dark as to whether you 
actually approved the idea of preventing the deportation of Harry 
Bridges. 

Bishop Oxnam. I've just said I have never expressed myself upon 
that subject, because I simply don't know the facts. I don't know 
whether he should have been deported or why- 



Mr. Clardy. Well, why leave any doubt in our minds 

Bishop Oxnam. I'm saying here 

Mr. Clardy (continuing). As to whether or not you signed the 
letter at that time ? 

Bishop Oxnam. You state I did sign a letter, and I'm trying to say 
I don't know whether I did 01 not, because I simply don't have the 
files before me. 

Mr. Clardy. What was in the letter you signed ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I don't know. I never saw the letter. I mean, I 
have no recollection of it at all. 

Mr. Ktjnzig. May I give you exhibit 25 and ask you if that refreshes 
your memory? 

Mr. Velde. Just a minute. May we let the witness examine the 
letter? Perhaps it will refresh his recollection on the subject. 

Bishop Oxnam. No, sir; I have no recollection concerning this at 
all. I'm sorry. 

Mr. Clardy. Well, then, possibly 

Mr. Velde. You cannot categorically state you did not sign a letter 
in defense of Harry Bridges? 

Bishop Oxnam. Nor can I state I did, sir. I simply do not have a 
recollection concerning that matter. 

Mr. Jackson. The question, Mr. Chairman 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Jackson. 

Bishop Oxnam. And it seems to me, sir — is it pertinent in any 
case? 

Mr. Clardy. Well, certainly. 

Bishop Oxnam. Suppose a citizen did sign a letter opposing the 
deportation of an individual. Why is it here ? 

I don't have any recollection of doing it, but suppose one was of 
the opinion those proceedings were subject to question. 

I don't mean to debate the matter, but just why is it here? 

I can't understand it. 

Mr. Velde. We are trying to clear the matter up, Bishop, and we 
want to know the exact facts, if you recall them. I am sorry you do 
not have any recollection 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, it's very difficult, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde (continuing). Of the matter. I wish you could make 
some statement or that you could make some statement regarding this 
letter and regarding your position at the time, some definite state- 
ments, so that we might clear up this matter before the Congress and 
before our committee. 

Bishop Oxnam. You see, Mr. Chairman, you're asking questions 
that go back 30 years — a question regarding Los Angeles that wasn't 
in your files, as far as any release was concerned. There's this entire 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3697 

record being made here and read, item after item. I understand 
what's happening, and it is simply difficult — I want to tell you the 
truth. I've sworn to tell it. I don't recall in that particular instance, 
and I've said that. What more can I say ? 

Mr. Velde. Again, may I ask you : If you, through the examination 
of your files, or in some way may correct your memory, if you do find 
out if you did write the letter or can definitely state that you didn't 
write the letter, we would appreciate knowing 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you very much. 

Mr. Velde (continuing). That information so that we might clear 
this up as a matter of record. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Jackson. 

Mr. Jackson. The Bishop has asked a question as to why any dis- 
cussion relative to Harry Bridges is at all pertinent at this time. 

(Representative Clyde Doyle entered the hearing room at this 
point.) 

Mr. Jackson (continuing) . It is well established in sworn testimony 
that over a long period of years Mr. Bridges and other known Com- 
munists succeeded in wrecking a major industry on the west coast of 
the United States, namely, the shipping industry in the San Francisco 
area. His activities have been consistently activities designed to fur- 
ther the cause of the Communist Party. 

Included among the signers 

Bishop Oxnam. Could I see that? 

Mr. Jackson (continuing). Of this letter, there are identified mem- 
bers of the Communist Party. 

For that reason, it is very definitely relative to this interrogation to 
determine if your name was used and how the use of your name was 
obtained. 

Mr. Doyle. Mr. Chairman, may I 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Doyle. 

Mr. Doyle. Apropos my colleague's observation, I am sure that 
we don't want to keep on asking this witness any line of questions, 
after he has sworn under oath that he is not a member of this or that 
organization, with any thought in mind that by keeping on question- 
ing him, inferentially at least, that he might be telling an untruth. 

I am sure there is no thought on the part of any of us, with the 
bishop here being under oath when he says he is not a member, has 
not been a member, or he has not joined this or that, that would cause 
us to question him further. It isn't because we doubt the veracity 
of the bishop's statement. At least that is my position. 

Mr. Velde. Well, certainly, Mr. Doyle, the members of the com- 
mittee agree with you 

Mr. Doyle. I know you do. 

Mr. Velde. And I don't think 



Mr. Doyle. I thought it would be just appropriate 

Mr. Velde (continuing) . At the present time 

Mr. Doyle (continuing) . At this point to make it clear. 

Mr. Velde (continuing). There is any reason we should mention 
the fact that we dispute the veracity of the bishop. 

Mr. Doyle. I know, but the bishop has now raised that point, to 
my hearing, 5 or 6 times, as to why we keep on questioning him. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I didn't 



3698 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Chairman. 

Bishop Oxnam. I didn't raise 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Clardy. 

Mr. Clardy. I didn't finish my interrogation a while ago, but I feel 
impelled to tell the Congressmen it isn't a question of whether he did 
belong or did not belong to a certain organization. The question is 
whether he is unable to remember whether he wrote a letter recom- 
mending against deportation of Harry Bridges. That is the prob- 
lem. 

^ Representative Francis E. Walter entered the hearing room at 
this point.) 

Mr. Clardy (continuing). I should like to remind the bishop of 
something else, which he will discover in the testimony which will be 
released later. I happened to be presiding a few days ago, Bishop, 
when a man by the name of Harry Bridges was again identified as a 
member of the Communist Party, and that is one of the reasons why 
I was endeavoring to discover, to the best of your knowledge, exact- 
ly what took place. I was hopeful you could give me a more ex- 
plicit and direct answer, because it is extremely important, so far 
as I am concerned, to discover whether or not you did recommend 
that the Communist, Harry Bridges, be kept in the United States. 
I am hopeful he will be deported at the earliest possible moment be- 
cause I think he is a danger and menace to our Nation. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I was not raising the question I 
think that has been referred to here. I was raising this: When I 
say I do not belong to an organization, then to have read into this 
record a long description of that organization — after I've said I don't 
belong to it — I don't understand the purpose of it. 

If someone asks if I belong to a certain organization and I say I 
do not, isn't that the record? 

Why do we have to have this lone: list of citations so that somebody 
can read that in relation to my name? 

That's the question, and I — maybe the only way you can do it — I 
don't know — but it troubles me. 

Mr. Velde. Well, may I respectfully submit to you, Bishop, that 
you have agreed before to answer questions relative to these various 
organizations, and I hope that you will keep that agreement. 

It is in an attempt to clarify your complete record, your complete 
file, that we are asking you these questions, because it has puzzled 
members of the committee as to how you could be listed as a sponsor 
for these various organizations, how you could be listed as a member 
of these various organizations, without some knowledge that they were 
Communist organizations or Communist-inspired organizations, and 
that is the thing we want to clarify — not only for your information but 
for vour benefit as well. 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, in the case of the Stockholm Peace Appeal, 
for instance, I believe that was Communist inspired and Communist 
directed. 

(Representative James B. Frazier, Jr., entered the hearing room at 
this point.) 

Bishop Oxnam. I was instrumental with others with putting the 
World Council of Churches on record so that it warned all the churches 
of the world concerning that matter, and similarly in the national 
council, where everyone has known ; but we go back here into situations 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3699 

of organizations and assume that one had facts that I think people 
didn't have. 

In the matter of the poll tax that was referred to earlier, I've been 
advised — and I believe this to be correct — that Congressman Bender 
and Congressman Jennings were entertained in a banquet in Washing- 
ton by this organization in 1947 at the Statler Hotel. 

Mr. Walter. What does that prove ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes ; what does it prove in connection with me ? 

Mr. Walter. Yes. 

Bishop Oxnam. That's just the point. 

Mr. Walter. That is it. 

Bishop Oxnam. I said I had no recollection of belonging to that 
organization, but in 1947 reputable members of this body were 
involved. 

Now, why does my name get tied up with these things and somebody 
says I have to explain ? 

I can't understand it. 

Mr. Velde. For this simple reason there might be a few cases where 
Communist members, in politics, religion, or in any other field, belong 
or have belonged to Communist fronts ; but it is very apparent to me 
at least that there are so many of these front groups with which you 
have been associated that we want to find out whether or not you had 
any knowledge of them or whether you were used as a tool or just 
what happened exactly. That is the reason why we are trying to clear 
this matter up. 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, the poll-tax organization, I'm told, was not 
a Communist front in 1947 at the time that letter referred to was 
involved, and I don't know whether it was or not. 

Mr. Walter. Bishop 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes. 

Mr. Walter. Getting around to something more concrete, what 
useful purpose did you feel was served by describing the immigration 
law as asinine ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I don't think I ever so described it. 

Mr. Walter. Well, according to the Boston Herald, March 12, 1951, 
edition, you said that the act was asinine; and then here is a direct 
quote : 

"You cannot fight totalitarianism with measures of a totalitarian nature," the 
Bishop said. "Application of the alien screening law" 

That is the provision of the law that makes it as difficult as it is 
possible for me to devise language to keep Communists and other sub- 
versives from coming into the United States. 

You said : 

"Application of the alien screening law not only is futile, but also produces 
bizarre results." 

He cited the case of a German bishop recently barred from entry to attend a 
council of bishops of the United States. He was banned on the ground that he 
had once associated with a charitable organization which had Nazi sponsorship. 

Under the law, that just couldn't possibly happen because the 
Attorney General of the United States has discretionary power to 
admit anyone to attend conferences of that sort, and the fact that 
a man was a member of a charitable organization would not prevent 
his entry into the United States. 



3700 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Now, my question is- 



Just a moment, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. All right. 

Mr. Walter. My question is: What useful purpose did you feel 
you were serving by making an unwarranted, unjustifiable attack on 
the law of this land ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Walter, I would be happy to answer that if 
you would give me opportunity. 

First of all 

Mr. Walter. Well, here, I will 

Bishop Oxnam. No; no. 

Mr. Walter. Here 

Bishop Oxnam. You are handing me newspaper records, sir, and, 
with the utmost respect to the newspaper profession, very few Ameri- 
can reporters write shorthand. You will find quote marks put around 
statements that I, personally, at times do not wish to take responsi- 
bility for. 

If this committe would follow a policy, when you have a question of 
that kind 



Mr. Walter. Now, let's not criticize the committee 

Bishop Oxnam. I am not criticizing- 

Mr. Walter (continuing). Every time you are asked a question. 

Bishop Oxnam (continuing). The committee. 

Mr. Walter. Let's answer the question. 

Bishop Oxnam. I am answering 

Mr. Walter. I want to ask you did you make that statement ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I don't 

Mr. Walter. Well, look at it. 

Bishop Oxnam. I don't care to. 

Mr. Walter. Look at it. 

Bishop Oxnam. I don't care to look at it. 

I wish to check it with a speech I have of record. I keep my 
speeches. 

Mr. Velde. Well, that is the reason I was trying to interrupt Mr. 
Walter 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you. 

Mr. Velde (continuing). To find out whether or not you do recall 
making that statement. 

Bishop Oxnam. I would have to check it. I speak many times in 
a week. I don't use the word "asinine" in public speech. 

Mr. Walter. Well, now 



Bishop Oxnam. I don't believe- 
Mr. Walter. Just a minute. 
Bishop Oxnam. I don't believe- 



Mr. Walter. Whether you use the word "asinine" or not, you said 
something about the law which is not true and I am amazed that a 
clergyman would make a statement that isn't borne out by the facts. 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, Mr. Chairman, the McCarran-Walter Act, as 
you know, has been seriously criticized across this Nation. 

Mr. Walter. And that is the point. That is what I want to find 
out, because I have asked one person after another to put their finger 
on the thing that is wrong with the law. Nobody has been able to 
do so. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3701 

Last week at a meeting of the Judiciary, Mr. Javits, a Congressman 
from New York, speaking for the Jewish organizations, stated that the 
charge that the law was anti-Semitic was not true. On the following 
day, Monsignor Swanstron, the head of the Catholic Welfare, respond- 
ing to the question, said that the law is not anti-Catholic. Now, 1 want 
you to point out, those men having pointed out it is not anti-Semitic, 
not anti-Catholic, wherein it is asinine. 

Bishop Oxnam. I just finished saying that I don't recall having 
used that word. 

If you will give me that material 

Mr. Walter. I will be very happy 

Bishop Oxnam. I'll be happy to send you- 



Mr. Walter (continuing) . To give it to you. 

Bishop Oxnam. No, sir. 

Mr. Walter. You may have it. 

Bishop Oxnam. No, sir ; I'll give it to you when I have had oppor- 
tunity to check the speech. 

Mr. Walter. I want you to have it. 

Don't you want it ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes ; I would be happy to see it. 

Mr. Clardy. May I interject one question, Mr. Walter ? 

Mr. Chairman, may I have permission to ask a question ? 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Clardy. 

Mr. Clardy. Bishop 

Bishop Oxnam. I beg your pardon, sir. 

Mr. Clardy. That is all right. 

Mr. Velde. Did you wish to examine this paper ? 

Mr. Clardy. My question hasn't anything to do with that. 

Bishop Oxnam. To whom shall I 

Mr. Clardy. It is going to be more direct. It has nothing to do 
with the exhibit at all. 

Mr. Walter. Just a minute. Before you- 



Mr. Clardy. Mr. Walter, I am going to ask a question 

Mr. Walter. Just one question. 

Mr. Clardy. All right. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Walter. 

Mr. Walter. Could you have taken the position, if you were prop- 
erly quoted, that you were opposed to the immigration policy of the 
United States because you were not concerned with the number of 
Communists coming into this country ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Walter, I'm going to answer that question, 
and I want to answer it calmly. 

I tried to say earlier that 1 believe the Communist Party is a con- 
spiracy. I believe that every conspirator ought to be discovered and, 
in due process, tried and, if found guilty, punished. 

I've tried to say that I'm fundamentally opposed to communism, 
and always have been. 

I believe the churches are moving in upon the causes of communism, 
and I'm proud of the fact that, sir, so far as I know, no Protestant 
country has been seriously infiltrated by communism. 

I think we've been doing a significant piece of work. 

When you, therefore, suggest, by implication, that I might be in- 
terested in letting Communists come into the country, my answer is : 



3702 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

I'm fundamentally opposed to the whole Communist movement and' 
would do everything within my power to keep them out. I'm not ■ 

Mr. Walter. Well, take a look at this newspaper article and see 
how much of that is authentic, will you ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I told you, Mr. Walter, I would be happy to check 
the speech against the record and see whether this is a correct report 
of what I said or not. This is back 2 years ago. I speak constantly. 

Mr. Walter. Well, I was trying to bring this up to a current situa- 
tion, because we have been talking about things that occurred many, 
many months and years ago — and that I am opposed to, I will say to 
you very frankly, but this is something that occurred just a year ago. 

Bishop Oxnam. Do you say, Mister 

Mr. Walter. Don't you remember? 

Bishop Oxnam. Are you saying — no; this occurred 2 years or 
more 

Mr. Walter. What is the date of that ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Are you saying 

Mr. Walter. What is the date \ 

Bishop Oxnam. The date is March 12, 1951. 

Mr. Walter. Well, this, as far as this committee is concerned, is 
current. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes. 

Mr. Chairman, I think the President of the United States suggested 
in the campaign that this act 

Mr. Walter. Well, he was busy gathering votes, and I am sure 
you haven't been. 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, you wouldn't call him interested in letting 
Communists in, would you ? 

Mr. Walter. No ; but 

Go on. 

Bishop Oxnam. I'm sorry, Mr. Walter, because I respect you, and 
you know I wrote you a letter asking you for full information con- 
cerning the McCarran- Walter bill, because I wanted to study it. 

Mr. Walter. Well, if you read everything I said, you are certainly 
educated by this time. 

Bishop Oxnam. No ; all you sent me was the article in the Reader's 
Digest. 

Mr. Walter. And all I asked you about was the speech. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, I should like to offer in evidence this 
document marked "Oxnam Exhibit No. 25," which is an open letter 
regarding Bridges which we have been discussing for some time. 

Mr. Velde. Without objection, it is admitted. 

(The document referred to was received in evidence as Oxnam 
exhibit No. 25.) 

Mr. Kunzig. Now, sir, there are a few matters at an earlier period 
we want to question you about in regard to this whole general picture. 

I have here a document, marked ''Oxnam Exhibit No. 26," which re- 
fers to a mass meeting, in which it lists two speakers, back in the early 
1920's, in Los Angeles, Harriet Dunlop Prenter, a well-known Com- 
munist, and yourself, Rev. G. Bromlev Oxnam. (See Oxnam exhibit 
No. 26, p. 3721.) 

Did you make a speech with this well-known Communist, or perhaps 
it lies beyond your recollection ? 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3703 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 25 
(Part 1) 

An Open Letter to President Roosevelt 

April «. 1943 
My DEAft Ml President: 

I am addressing you on behalf of the clergymen, whose names are attached . 

We respectfully ask that you set aside the deportation order against Harry Rezuon 
Bridges, President of the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union. 
Congress of Industrial Organizations, and afford him full opportunity to beco s nr a citizen 
of the United States of America. 

Considerations of justice and the welfare of our country in this time of crisis, move 
us to make this request. An examination of the history of the case against Mr. Bridges 
and his record since our entering into the war, convinces us that his deportation will 
be an injustice to him and a material loss to our national war effort 



Mr. Bridges has twice been placed in jeopardy by bearings called by the 
Service to determine whether charges that he is an undesirable alien and entertains befieis 
inimical to the Constitution and Government of the United States have been proved. 
These charges have twice been dismissed, once by Dean James M. Landis, again by the 
Board of Immigration Appeals. 

The first hearing in 19S9 before James M. Landis, then Dean of the School of Law 
of Harvard University and now National Director of Civilian Defense, was p a rt i cular ly 
thorough. In his report, Dean Landis characterized the testimony against Mr. Bridges at 
unreliable and much of it as motivated by personal animus. He further said in part: 
"Bridges' own statement of his political beliefs is important. It was given not only with- 
out reserve, but vigorously as dogma and faiths of which the man was proud and which 
presented in his mind the aims of his existence—. That Bridges' aims are energetically 
radical may be admitted, but the proof fails to establish the methods be seeks to employ to 
realize them are other than those that the framework of democratic and constitutional gov- 
ernment permits." 

Dean Landis' ability and integrity as one of the outstanding jurists of the country are 
beyond question. His opinion was arrived at after eleven weeks of extensive testimony. 
It substantiates the findings of a previous investigation conducted by the Immigration Ser- 
vice in 1936, and is itself substantiated by the unanimous vote of the Board of Immigra- 
tion Appeals in reversing the opinion of Inspector Sears, in charge of the second hearing 
in 1941. 

It is difficult, in the face of this evidence, to understand the summary action of the 
Attorney General. We feel that such summary action by an ofhcial. nullifies the purpose 
for which hearings are held and is at variance with the pattern of American justice. 

Mr. Bridges' record since Pearl Harbor confirms the opinion of the Board of Immi- 



3704 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 25 
(Part 2) 

grackm Appeals and our own belief in his loyalty. He was the first to call for labor unity 
to win (be war. He b tbe author of two plans which the government has put into opera- 
tion and which have markedly increased the efficiency of our maritime transport. Following 
his advice, his union has surrendered important contractual rights in order to speed the 
loading of carges. Under his leadership his union has won high praise from government 
officials and ranking officers of the Army and Navy. The Office of War Information, in a 
radio broadcast, said in part:— "Their (International Longshoremen's Union) hard work 
and their application of the union plan of labor-management cooperation, helped to score 
important victories over the Japanese Navy." 

This is a record of which any citizen would be proud. It prompted Mr. John B. 
Hughes, tbe radio commentator, to write in "Liberty" magazine, September 19, 1942: 
"One business man told me be thought the deportation of Harry Bridges would be disas- 
trous. He thought Harry Bridges has done more than any other person to increase pro- 
duction far war—and that without his personal leadership, work in the vital war industries 
on the West Coast would lag far behind." 

Clearly, Mr. Bridges has aroused tbe animosity of an influential minority because of 
his successful union activities and his political and economic beliefs. Equally clearly, 
the whole nation is today reaping the benefits of his -onion activity. We know that you, 
Mr. President, yourself a church man, believe with , that is no more place in our 

American Hfe far political and economic persecution than there is for -ligious persecu- 
tion and vigorously condemn both as disruptive of our unity and subvr of our national 
effort. 

We therefore again respectfully ask you that as an act of justice and for the national 
welfare, set aside the deportation order against Mr. Bridges. 



Most respectfully, 



Rt. Rev. Edward L. Paksons 



2901 Broderkk Street 
Sen Francisco, California 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3705 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 25 

(Part 3) 



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ttr. CMAILB L CAIMAfT 
riaakrH^ak Ckafck. Ctawr Cam*. Mi. 

tf*. IALPM M. CAIMrCHAM. 

LiHala. N. T. 

If*. J. MANCUN CAim 



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M*. AlfUD H. COOHS 

Ma^aralv.lla. Haw Tart 

If*. <wo*et M. COtSMM 

Wkila ialpkar SsHaaK, N. T. 

■J*. J. HA1IT COTTON 
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CkicAf*. HI- 

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MV. WILUAM & CtATNia 
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u*. i. p. ciAWfoie 



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If*. WOlCOTf CUTLM 
St. Jaka-, Ckarck. CuMi " . ••"«■ 

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St. Crr»M Cpixapal Ckarck. Ckrlrail. U,r>.»aa 

M*. fBWIN T. OAHLMM 
Km b(M Ckarck. Spacakk. N. V. 

UV. IAU C DAVIS 
Ua.kMMk far.* Miarirar. Nkjrkkara. Maak 



43620—54- 



3706 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 25 
(Part 4) 



UV. LOWtU Z. HAZZAIS 

liioo-i Walaw Uomroo,. Ik nm it ll l m , 



U» CHAIUS » OfTWUlSl 
lortv I:. Urio am,. (1 ol fko fc.pt.. Ho"*> 
Mia.o. Sociotf. No. Tort. N. T. 



IT. BfV CHAIUS I OlUttSI 
(«*'•«•• IVop ol Ha rroouturi [p«co«ol Cko- 
com ol Now Tort. Now To.-*. N. T. 



IP UIILAIS J. SOtDAMIo* 



UV. JOHN C MANMfiT 
tdrto.. "Too booocipoojr. - too AoteM. Tax 



UV. OMRLB A. Hill 



UV., CUFKM0 w. Mum 
Co*or*rt**el Ctock. IHilrtii., M. T. 



UV. Cl o B l ol t MO— MM 
Cooo-or, H i N i rTn l CWtit. IWX. H. A 



uv. thomas d. iwn»s 

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UV. A. D. UOT'I 
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IP AU6JO IUU FAUST 
f.rv Utrkodat Ctwck. IkJoaowJ Hill. M. T. 



uv. w. t. j. matx 



uv. cmaojb s. chat 




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uv. john w. fmoin 

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■IV. JOWrH 0. HfTCHt. 

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UV. JOHN I. FOUVTM 
tooodolo 6o«toa. rVokbrtorlo. Coorc*. tVroioofo. 



UV. COMUM •UfHWAV 
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UV. JAMB I IIMoU 
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UV. AIMAMO •USIHRO 
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UV. CtOTO V. GkHTAPlOo. 
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Or. Mo. 

UV. AUHT J. HAUJIMTOM 



UV. .MAS J. JACE90H 

uv. Hi«rr d. jonb 

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lf» JOHN OAIPNH 
G.«io» c.i» Commo».k/ Ctwco, Goran C»f. N. V. 



UV. FUKI A. HAMIUOM 

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Soe». Miokooor. cdotofioo. 
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UV. JOUOH HAITI 

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UV. JOHN H. MATT 

rooorototf CkorcA ol tVokv.ll*. Gtonillo Cootar. 



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•ACTS OMUF A. LAKSH 



UV. JOHN HOVJAW LATHnOC 
rwif UkAonoo Oordk. orooUpm. N V. 

i*» mwiv smith mm 

lowoio. N. J. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3707 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 25 
(Part 5) 



tmmm • uom 



LTI >ATIOM MIUJS 
f-o IMm C aaQi»Q H i«aal Sock*, W H«frt«.<. 
Hartto*. Coaa. 



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RT. CM. ARTHUI W. WOUITOM 
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s*« Lata Or. utaa 

UV. W. IAIIB MU8JLUI 
Staalay Co~»»aoa.ioa.l Oarea, CWMwt. N. J. 

uv. nriM» a. uuiauT 
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C«i«b~o> taaaa. 

UV. UULLMAM I WTOtt 

•art ..^toa. Vt. 



UV. A. A. KtUOai 
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. C.'JL W. tttMU 



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Mr. OXM 8. 




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UV. SOWIK WcHUl rOTtAT 

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C*«c» Am**. Taiaa. 

IT. UV. WILLIAM P UHIN«tO« 
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Jaavaiea. N. V. 



UV. DAMIU ITblAN IIDOU1 
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•KUOalplua. »a«a. 



UV. MEKIT I ICMIN. 
■P-of &*>•'•** Colgata Diataftf School. 

Iw^lf N. V. 



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F-al V**ar*a Oartl. Mala. N. V. 



3708 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 25 
(Part 6) 



MV. CAUl H ITWICM 

(vassal. cal a-d Itlomn Ckvtk. Ni> Tort. N. T. 



Uad.atxi. v«. 



aiv. cmajui c wuett 

Na'<o«al t.*c'i-* Socroler? of 
fedo'ation lor Social Serv«« 



UY JCMN K. TATIO* 



■AMI JACOt J. WtlNIUIN 

' A U T.-pi.. Ox-ioo. II 



■fV. IO«S£ I. THOUrtOM. freaHia. N. H. 



aiv nuce t. wiMOT 

Ml llaKkwd Meikodral Ck..cV 
Ml, llandWd. Oo 



•IV. F. HASTINCS SMYTH 
Soc>alr el Ike CeikoW Co *"**«*•'* .Ilk (Artgl***) 
Cn>k'.dgi. u.ra 



1EV. W. f TOyilNION 
ii. Sec , Morro. Memorial Hm lot Da Ao^d 
(Melhod'lll. idgertoo. W.et. 



UV. 1. KIlMtt SOOillH* 


■IV. JACOI TtAff 


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tt» AtTKUl u. souls 


UV. tVHITT I TUWOieV 


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f.tl Pei.ek Ck.ick. Aii.br Uaa 


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8IV HHCST C TUTHIU 


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IEV. JOHN C SKMCta 


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itV. WHUAM • i*HlT 


• (V UISH II UttAH 


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Ne. Toil. N. V. 



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uv HAaoio wan 

Seer CoaiC'l lof Soc>el te<<y»r»*>rC»toe. 
t lalomed Ck.>ck. Col«r-b.a Uo. 



atv. CMAlltJ C WIUON 



■tv itAOfoto touns 



forlla.d. Me. 



Bishop Oxnam. No, sir ; it does not lie beyond my recollection. 

Mr. Kunzig. I pass that over to yon, sir. 

Bishop Oxnam. If yon will pardon me just 1 minute, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. Please take all the time you wish. 

Bishop Oxnam. You see, Mr. Chairman, this is what I'm getting 
at : This material over 30 years ago has been used again and again and 
again, and here it is in 1953 coming back. Fortunately this is some- 
thing upon which I can deal. 

There is a dodger that should have been shown which alleges that 
I was to speak at a certain place. No doubt the counsel has this. 

Fortunatety 

Mr. Kunzig. There it is, sir. 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, there it is. 

Well, I have the same one. 

Now, here I am quoting to you from a letter dated April 29, 1921, 
which was addressed to Bishop Adna Wright Leonard, where this 
question was raised, and in the letter I quoted another letter which 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3709 

clears this matter, I think, completely. It was dated April 11, 1921. 
It was addressed to Mr. Louis Allen, 2117 Adair Street, Los Angeles: 

Dear Sir: In view of the fact that I distinctly told you I would not speak at 
the general amnesty meeting if it were in any way associated with the IWW, or 
if the name "class war prisoners" was used, I find it will be impossible for me to 
speak for you. 

I have just seen the dodgers you sent out, in which the object of the meeting 
is distinctly stated as calling for the freedom of class war prisoners. 

My position was clearly enough stated to you — namely, that I did not favor 
the freeing of any man who broke the law. I am in favor of freeing con- 
scientious objectors, who committed no crime other than refusing to take arms 
contrary to their convictions. I think you are making a bad mistake in putting 
both groups in the same class. 

Thank you for the books you sent me. I shall read all of them. 

Will you kindly send me a bill? 
Very truly yours. 

Wow, in the letter to Bishop Leonard, "Not only did I send this 
letter, but I did not speak at the meeting. It looks to me that men 
of Mr. Johnson's standing — that was the man who reported that — 
would be more careful." 

Now, sir, it's just my good fortune that I happen to have that 
letter. If you asked me without this, I would have to say I don't 
recall. That's the embarrassing place in which an individual is put 
in these matters. 

I was not at that meeting — I answer your counsel — and I was not 
at it for the reason I have never cooperated with people who talk 
in terms of class war prisoners. A man who conscientiously believes 
that he can't bear arms — I've disagreed with him; I've never held the 
pacifist view, but I respect him if he's honest and my Government does ; 
and that meeting was pointed out to me as a meeting for the release 
of conscientious objectors. When I found it wasn't I wrote the letter 
to which I have just referred. 

And that is my answer, sir, to that matter. 

Mr. Velde. The committee appreciates you are able to explain 
that incident in that manner. 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you, sir. 

Mr. Velde. I am sure that will clear up the file relevant to that 
matter. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now, sir, with regard to that period of time, I believe, 
as you mentioned previously in passing, somewhat humorously earlier, 
you said you had run for the school board 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes ; that's right. 

Mr. Kunzig. At that time ; and I think you will agree there was a 
great deal of controversy at that period of time. 

I have here a document marked "Oxnam Exhibit No. 27," referring 
to Eev. Bob Shuler, president of the Ministerial Union, pastor of 
Trinity Methodist Church, and apparently he pulled away from your 
candidacy, saying : 

While I find it impossible to longer support your public ambitions, I want you 
to know that I still retain the same feeling of respect and esteem for your 
ability, your honesty and your sincerity. I know, however, that you are 
dreadfully wrong. I have 3 boys and 2 girls to whom I must answer, and I 
confess that your public attitude in an hour of national peril and your associa- 
tions with a mighty attack being made by these forces upon our Government 
are too much for me. 



3710 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

This is a press release. 

(Representative Morgan M. Moulder entered the hearing room at 
this point.) 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes ; I am quite familiar with it. 

Mr. Kunzig (continuing). From the Los Angeles Times. (See 
Oxnam exhibit No. 27, p. 3722.) 

Bishop Oxnam. And is there a question ? 

Mr. Kunzig. The question is: Were you associated with such or- 
ganizations or groups ? 

Bishop Oxnam. What organizations ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Here is one, sir, involving the IWW, which was a 
cited Communist group. It lists "Protest mass meeting against the 
criminal syndicalism act at Symphony Hall, 232 South Hill Street, 
February the 11th," in that period of time, in 1923. It lists Rev. 
G. B. Oxnam, speaking together with members of the IWW. (See 
Oxnam exhibit No. 28, p. 3723. ) ^^ 

Did you speak at that group and did you work with the IWW? 

Bishop Oxnam. I'll be happy to answer that, sir. 

I did not speak at that meeting. I never worked with the IWW. 

I have been a university professor, and have lectured in the field of 
the comparative study of the labor movements of the world. The 
IWW, which is really a part of the syndicalist movement, has advo- 
cated, for instance, as one of its weapons, the use of sabotage. Sabo- 
tage for them was striking when they were on the job. 

I don't know whether the chairman wishes me to go into this. It 
would take a considerable period of time. I'll simply say I never had 
anything to do with the IWW. 

This incident, however, raises a very important question, Mr. Chair- 
man, and I can give you the reason quickly as to why that was in the 
paper, if you wish it. 

Mr. Velde. Bishop, what we would like to know is, Can you explain 
why these various people have attacked you ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes; quite. 

Mr. Velde. Will you make your explanation? 

Mr. Jackson. Excuse me. 

Mr. Velde. Just a minute. 

Mr. Jackson. I think, Mr. Chairman — again I would observe — I 
don't know, but I am inclined to believe — possibly this may be going 
into factional group disputes which, as I recall in the opening state- 
ment, were matters which were not to be admitted. 

I suggested this possibility for the consideration of the Chair. I 
don't know that is the case. I don't know, of course, what Bishop 
Oxnam has in mind in this connection. 

Bishop Oxnam. I would very much like to answer this, because I 
don't want any doubt left in this record concerning the matter. I can 
answer it briefly, I think, and I would like to read from the record, 
too. I think perhaps 

Mr. Velde. The Chair would appreciate 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes. 

Mr. Velde (continuing). It if you would 

Bishop Oxnam. I think perhaps Mr. Jackson would know for a 
considerable period of time there was great disturbance in the mari- 
time situation on the Pacific coast, back there in 1923. 

Maybe you can't remember that far back, sir 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3711 

Mr. Jackson. Thank you very much, sir. 

Bishop Oxnam. But, in any case, what had happened was there was 
a strike in San Pedro. 

I have this from Captain Plummer, himself. You may know the 
distinguished police officer, Captain Plummer, who was at one time 
the warden of San Quentin Penitentiary. 

That strike was broken by the police department of the city of 
Los Angeles that went to San Pedro and arrested, without warrant, a 
large number of people, running into several hundreds. Personally, 
I believe that was fundamentally wrong. 

We held a meeting in an auditorium in Los Angeles to protest that 
violation of what we believed to be our American procedures. 

Now, that strike did involve IWW men. 

Personally, I believe in our Constitution and I don't want it violated, 
even when one comes to an IWW. 

Because I attended that meeting, which was addressed by Upton 
Sinclair, Bob Shuler withdrew his endorsement of me for that cam- 
paign. 

Now, I would like to close this by reading a paragraph, Mr. Chair- 
man. Because I had publicly condemned the IWW philosophy, the 
IWW method, at that time, to make myself perfectly clear, a Mrs. 
Kate Crane Gartz — Mrs. Gartz was the daughter of the Crane family 
that owned the great hardware, plumbing, and so on of this country. 
She was a wealthy woman. She was very much of left-wing per- 
suasion. She wrote me a letter seriously criticizing me because I had 
publicly condemned the whole IWW way of life — and this is the para- 
graph. Now, this was dated June 5, 1923 : 

Now, as to the IWW, you suggest I be specific. Space nor time permit. A 
brief word, though : I have carefully read most of the literature of this move- 
ment prior to the war. You cannot deny that literature did teach the use of force 
as a legitimate method to attain the new industrial day. You cannot deny that 
official publications did advocate the use of sabotage, nor can you deny that such 
methods were used. I do not mean wholesale, like the propagandist press, the 
other side presents, but I mean in fact. 

Mr. Velde. May I interrupt there ? 

Do you have the date of that particular letter? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes ; I read it, sir — June 5, 1923. 

Mr. Velde. Thank you. 

Bishop Oxnam (continuing to read). 

I have always pointed out the distinction between the method of IWW to gain 
its goal and the goal itself, but it did advocate a wrong method from my viewpoint. 
I, therefore, have been and am opposed to its philosophy and tactics. 

I wish I could take time to enlarge upon this. 

Now, I know that since the war and the coming of the Criminal Syndicalist 
Act there has not been an official advocacy of force. In fact, I have been in- 
formed again and again the IWW repudiate force. Perhaps I am unjust, but I 
have felt this repudiation was rather a matter of expediency than conviction 
since the other method was justified but a short time since. 

I do not want to do any group an injustice, but so far I have not been able to 
change my mind on this matter. My mind is not closed, but so far the data 
available have not change it. 

I believe Mr. Sinclair said at the meeting you refer to that he could not accept 
the IWW philosophy, or words to that effect. 

I think, Mr. Chairman, reading from the record at that time, in 
response to a person who criticized me for criticizing the IWW, that 
I have made it abundantly clear what my view was then and is now. 
The whole idea of sabotage is fundamentally 



3712 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Mr. Walter. At that time you were all of 21 years of age ? 

Bishop Oxnam. No ; I was more than that, sir — 1923 plus 9 would 
make me 32, 1 think. 

Mr. Kunzig. I have one further document here marked "Oxnam 
Exhibit No. 29," which is a story in the Los Angeles Times of May 19, 
1923, in the same period of time, with regard to your campaign there, 
saying : (See Oxnam exhibit No. 29, p. 3723.) 

OXNAM WORKING WITH SINCLAIR 

Public announcement was made yesterday that G. Bromley Oxnam, radical 
candidate for the board of education on the so-called teachers' ticket, will pre- 
side at the meeting called by Upton Sinclair, Socialist author, to be held this eve- 
ning at Walker Auditorium, to protest against the methods employed by author- 
ities in handling the IWW strike at the harbor. 

Bishop Oxnam. That is the meeting to which I referred, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. That is the exact, same meeting 

Bishop Oxnam. And may I say, if Mister — well, Mr. Jackson knows 
if you engage in politics in southern California and the Times is not 
for you, it is vigorously against you. There is no reference here to 
the fact that A. J. Wallace, the Lieutenant Governor of the State of 
California, was for me; that Mrs. Urquhart, the president of the Cali- 
fornia State Federation of Women's Clubs, was. I could bring you a 
list that would quite give respectability to what we were trying to do, 
but the issues of a campaign, sir, back in 1923, being brought into this 
hearing in 1953, it seems to me, raises some question as to the record. 
This has never been in your record before. 

Mr. Velde. At this point- 



Mr. Doyle. Mr. Chairman, may I 

Mr. Velde. At this point 

Mr. Doyle. Ask this. 

Mr. Velde. Just a minute, please. 

At this point, in a public hearing, it has usually been the custom of 
the committee and the chairman to announce that any names men- 
tioned should not necessarily infer that they are connected in any way 
with subversive activities, and I would like to put that in the record at 
this point. That is still the feeling of the committee. 

Mr. Doyle. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Doyle. 

Mr. Doyle. May I ask this question : I don't find these documents 
which are being introduced in my file here as exhibits, and I, very 
frankly, can't follow the line of questioning very systematically on 
any formal basis. Are they in our files ? 

Mr. Frazier. No. 

Mr. Doyle. I don't find them. 

Mr. Frazier. No. 

Mr. Doyle. Well, why aren't they ? 

What I am saying is this, very frankly 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Doyle. I don't like the idea of us producing for this witness 
documents way back in the year 1923 for the first time. 

I think it is very important practice for us to do it. 

Mr. Velde. Well, Mr. Doyle, may I remind you that the witness 
has requested 

Mr. Doyle. That is all right. The witness 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3713 

Mr. Velde (continuing) . An opportunity to appear before the com- 
mittee 

Mr. Doyle. I know the witness has- 



Mr. Velde (continuing). And the committee 

Mr. Doyle (continuing). Requested an opportunity 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Doyle, if you will give me the courtesy 

Mr. Doyle (continuing) . To appear before the committee 

Mr. Velde (continuing) . Of listening to me 

Mr. Doyle. And the witness has been given that opportunity, and 
he should be confronted with these documents. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Doyle, the witness has requested a hearing 

Mr. Doyle. That is right, and we are giving him one. 

Mr. Velde. And we are attempting to do the best we can to give 
him a full and complete hearing, to let him have the opportunity to 
explain, deny, or admit any of these associations he has actually had 
in any of the front groups 

Mr. Doyle. Well, the witness is being confronted 

I have a right 

Mr. Velde (continuing). Before this committee of the Congress. 

Mr. Doyle. I have a right, Mr. Chairman, to express my opinion 
as to this procedure. 

I also regret very much that I don't have, as a member of the com- 
mittee, a copy of the exhibits that are being produced to the witness. 
I think I am entitled to know what the exhibits are 

Mr. Jackson. I might say, Mr. Chairman 

Mr. Doyle (continuing) . So that I may also act on the facts. 

Mr. Walter. Well, Mr. Chairman, may I 

Mr. Velde. All right, Mr. Walter. The Chair recognizes Mr. 
Walter. 

Mr. Walter. I don't know of any case where the witness has been 
told in advance of the type of evidence that this committee will dis- 
cuss; and, furthermore, we are here only because the bishop has re- 
quested this hearing. Is that correct ? 

Mr. Velde. That is right. 

Mr. Walter. Now, I am of the firm opinion that the bishop is one 
of the most intelligent men — if you will excuse me — that I have seen 
here; and I am sure that if he doesn't know, he will say that he 
doesn't know. 

Why be disturbed because he hasn't in advance seen something about 
which he is being interrogated ? 

If he doesn't know, he will say, "I don't know." 

Mr. Doyle. And then we raise the question as to why he doesn't 
know. 

Mr. Walter. No ; we don't. 

Mr. Doyle. We have just done it in the last few minutes. 

Mr. Walter. No. 

Mr. Doyle. We have done it repeatedly. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. The committee will be in order. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. The Chair recognizes Mr. Jackson. 

Mr. Jackson. I would like to say, as far as I know, that none of us 
have that information before us. However, I have in front of me a 



3714 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

general outline of the information upon which the interrogation is 
based. 

Some of the information relative to the California aspect of this 
was developed by me, because I felt and I feel that we should put these 
matters on the record and get the answers, yes or no. If there is 
nothing to them, let's find out, because they were and are matters of 
public knowledge. 

As to the distribution of some of this material, I might say to the 
gentleman from California that the time element involved was such 
that it was not possible to get photostats made for each member of the 
committee. 

Mr. Doyle. Well, of course, then that explains why I don't have a 
copy of it and why the witness wasn't given advance information. 

I understand from the statement of the gentleman from California, 
then, why the other procedure wasn't followed. 

Mr. Kunzig. May I point out also, for the record, sir, that each con- 
gressman has this brief, in which item No. 4 states the very fact that 
Mr. Jackson just said. 

Mr. Walter. And for the first time in the history of the operations 
of this committee we have in advance been furnished with information 
concerning the scope of the inquiry. 

Mr. Velde. Yes ; the Chair 

Mr. Kunzig- That is true. 

Mr. Velde (continuing) . Would like to concur with Mr. Walter. 

Mr. Walter. This is the first time, that I have been kept in the dark, 
because I have not seen any 

Mr. Velde. Of course, that is not true, Mr. Walter. 

Mr. Walter. Of course it is true. 

Mr. Velde. We do this on a nonpartisan basis and, whether it is 
wrong or right, the committee members have seldom been furnished 
with the information concerning a particular witness. 

Mr. Doyle. Well, I think I have made my position clear, and the 
statement by the gentleman from California explains why that ma- 
terial was not available to the members of the committee and to the 
witness, but it just was not available and I think I have a right to 
expect it would be, and I wanted to make my position clear. 

Mr. Jackson. I trust the explanation satisfies the gentleman on that 
point. 

Mr. Doyle. Yes, after a fashion. 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Clardy. 

Mr. Clardy. The witness 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes. 

Mr. Clardy. Actually, we have almost forgotten you in this discus- 
sion here. 

Mr. Velde. The committee will be in order. 

Mr. Clardy. As you see, we are engrossed in our work. 

May I ask you this, prefacing it with this statement : I understood 
that you wished us to give you an opportunity to explain everything 
that we might have in this public file. 

Now, I came to the hearing today believing that the greatest service 
we could do to you as well as to the committee would be to explore 
and examine upon everything that we had, and I am going to ask you 
about that in a moment. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3715 

You have listed some items in your opening statement that, as a 
member of this committee, I never heard of in all the time I have 
been on the committee, and I have interrogated all the rest of the mem- 
bers and they never heard of them either. So, get that memory of 
yours working until I get to you and question you on that. 

But the question I want to ask you now is this : Don't you think the 
procedure we are following in exploring these things so you may clean 
the record is the best service we can perform for you ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Clardy, I appreciate that question and the 
spirit that lies back of it. 

Frankly, I think the best service that could be rendered to me as an 
individual, and to all the citizens of the United States, would be to see 
that these files are evaluated and verified before they are released to 
anybody. 

Mr. Clardy. Well, may I interrupt you ? 

I am not talking about the general thing. I am talking about your 
own file that has been laid out to the public. 

Now, there are some things — and you made statements that you 
knew everything that was in the files. You really didn't, as you have 
already demonstrated here, and we are bringing those things in, too. 

So, my question is: Don't you think that the best course that we 
could follow in your self-interest would be to do exactly what we 
have been doing ? 

If you tell me otherwise, I might be inclined to go along and suggest 
that we just desist. 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, Mr. Clardy, if I express my opinion 
frankly — when a citizen finds files are released that he believes mis- 
represent him, it would seem to me, instead of going through all this, 
which has taken a day of the committee 

Mr. Clardy. But you asked for it. 

Bishop Oxnam. I did, but you are asking me what would be ideal. 

That it would be much better to allow an individual to come over 
here, or somebody to come over, to see the man and to check the files 
before they are released. 

Now, you say, sir, I referred to items that you never heard of. 

Mr. Clardy. Yes. 

Bishop Oxnam. I have before me the file that was released by Mr. 
John S. Wood, the chairman of this committee — not only to me, but 
to others — and from that file I listed the items, and if, sir, we could 
have begun — and it is presumptuous for me to suggest it as a com- 
mittee procedure, and I am not doing that ; I am answering your ques- 
tion — if I could have had opportunity to have stated to the committee 
what I believe to be incorrect in the files that I know have been re- 
leased, we could have cleared that I think quickly. Then if the com- 
mittee wanted to subject me to questions concerning all of these 
questions, of course, I must stand that because I have requested the 
privilege of coming and you have full right to know concerning every- 
thing else. 

That, it seems to me, would have been a little easier ; but what you 
are driving at, sir, I agree and I appreciate. 

Mr. Clardy. Thank you. 

Mr. Walter. Well, don't you 

Will you yield to me at this point ? 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Walter. 



3716 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Mr. Walter. Don't you think we ought to treat this so-called raw 
information just as does the Department of Justice treat the same 
kind of information? 

It is information that ought not be released. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir; I agree with you thoroughly, and it is 
because I think, in my case and in others, that this kind of informa- 
tion has been released that I am petitioning the committee to clear 
my own file and that of others, involving the National Council of the 
Churches of Christ, for instance. 

It has surprised me to find that this committee would release a file 
headed, "The National Council of the Churches of Christ in Amer- 
ica," but it has. 

Mr. Walter. That is the kind of information that is for the ben- 
efit of the members of the committee solely, to evaluate as we see 
fit 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir ; I think you're exactly right. 

Mr. Walter (continuing). Without reaching any conclusion at all 
with respect to it. 

It has always seemed to me that we ought to evaluate it in our own 
concept and use it in connection with our own reports, but not as it 
relates to individuals. 

Bishop Oxnam. I would not be here, sir, if that had been the prac- 
tice of the committee, and I appreciate what you say and agree with 
it. 

Mr. Walter. Well, nobody agrees with me, ever. 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, I am agreeing with you, sir. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Jackson. 

May we have order. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman, this hearing has a number of unusual 
aspects. In the first place, Bishop Oxnam is probably the first wit- 
ness — at least the first witness in my memory — who had a degree of 
censorship over the report concerning him in that there were certain 
items to which he objected and a notation to that effect was entered in 
the report. 

I believe that the absence of the general disclaimer, which had long 
been the practice of the committee, I might add, to put a disclaimer on 
the report stating that it was not the conclusion of the committee — and 
this is my understanding of the matter as to why it was dropped in the 
instance of your report — was due to the fact you had an opportunity 
to go over the material. 

The disclaimer is now a part of the first page of every report that is 
going out, which meets the objection, or one of the objections, which 
you have entered. 

However, I say there is an unusual circumstance here in that there 
was an element of censorship of the report — and I don't know when 
that has happened in any other case, with the exception of yours. 

I merely wanted to bring that point in because I think it is impor- 
tant that you realize that is currently a policy of the committee. 

BishopOxNAM. Mr. Chairman, may I say I appreciate Mr. Jack- 
son's statement ; but, unfortunately, it is not in accord with the fact. 
These reports were released, in my case, from 1946 and there was no 
opportunity given to reply until I had written Mr. Wood — I have 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3717 

forgotten the year ; I can look it up, but I think it was back in either 
1950 or 1951 — requesting that these be changed and made right. 

Then there was included a part of the letter, I think, that I wrote 
to Mr. Wood, and I think also I have the letter here from Mr. Taven- 
ner, and I hoped I might be questioned about it, in which he refers to 
the disclaimer and also to an action of the committee which insists that 
not only you have this disclaimer at the beginning but it be included 
in the report. 

Well, now, the letter he wrote was written prior — if you will pardon 
me, sir, I'm only saying this because I happen to know — to the release 
of the report concerning me on March 31, accompanied by a letter 
signed by the chairman of the committee. In other words, after the 
action had been taken, the disclaimer was not attached to a report that 
I know about, and the material was not included in the report itself, 
in accordance with the order. 

And I think, sir, that if you take the report on the National Council 
of the Churches of Christ, it simply begins by saying : "This committee 
has never made an investigation," and then lists prominent individuals 
related to the national council, with all of the kind of citations that 
have been brought here concerning me this afternoon, and there's 
something wrong there; and, gentlemen, instead 

Mr. Walter. Well, now, will you yield to me at that point? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Are you under the mistaken impression that the law 
imposes upon us the duty to look only into Communist activities? 

Bishop Oxnam. I think 

Mr. Walter. You see 

Bishop Oxnam. Un-American activities, sir. 

Mr. Walter. There is another phase. We are concerned with activi- 
ties that aid and abet Communist movements and with people who 
assist Communist movements, wittingly or unwittingly. 

I am not going to express my own opinion about your membership 
in these organizations, but we are concerned with the machinations 
of the Communist Party which result in naive people fronting all sorts 
of activities which have as their ultimate result the destruction of our 
republican form of government. 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, you see, both of my sons were overseas 

Mr. Walter. Well, I am not interested in that. 

Bishop Oxnam. In the Army 

Mr. Walter. I don't care whether they were or not. 

Bishop Oxnam. And I want- 



Mr. Walter. So let's not get off on a tangent 

Bishop Oxnam. I am not 

Mr. Walter (continuing). Every time a question is asked. 

Bishop Oxnam (continuing). Getting off on a tangent. 

I am going to ask, if I may, sir, why a report on the National Council 
of the Churches of America is released by this body without the kind 
of disclaimer that is said to accompany all of the reports now. 

Mr. Velde. Well, let me say again, Bishop, the public information 
that is in the files of this committee is a collection of information 
already released to the public. Any person could get the same infor- 
mation about you, or about me, by going to the Congressional Library, 
for instance ; and that is what our files, our public files, consist of — just 



3718 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

a collection of information that was written, newspapers or informa- 
tion listed on letterheads, and so forth. 

I want to say, too, that these files, these public files, have largely been 
responsible for the prosecution and conviction of known espionage 
agents, including Alger Hiss. 

So, we must continue — or at least it is my opinion that we must 
continue — the system of collecting and assembling this public infor- 
mation. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I've never objected to that. I have 
objected to the release of it before it is verified. 

Surely this great committee when it puts something out on its letter- 
head involving an individual would wish to verify it before it puts it 
out, even though it says that it is public information. 

When you list that I wrote an article on Stalin, which I did not 
write, the Congressional Library does not have information to that 
effect. 

Mr. Moulder. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Moulder. 

Mr. Moulder. As I understand the bishop, it is your contention that 
the issuance of that information amounts to a verification because of 
its release by the Committee on Un-American Activities. Is that your 
contention 

Bishop Oxnam. My contention 

Mr. Moulder (continuing). That it amounts to an indirect verifi- 
cation ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Quite. 

Mr. Moulder. Let's put it that way. 

Bishop Oxnam. When it's on the letterhead of this committee, with 
Congress back of it, people understandably believe that it represents 
an opinion unless the disclaimer is clearly there, and it hasn't been in 
my case and in many others. 

Mr. Moulder. In other words 

Mr. Walter. Well, the right 

Mr. Velde. I assure you it will be from now on. 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, I appreciate that. 

Mr. Velde. As the gentleman from California, Mr. Jackson, has 
stated, it has been rumored that the disclaimer on any of the articles 
that are listed in our reports should be printed in the body of the 
report ; and I think that is one thing that you recommended that we 
do 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes. 

Mr. Velde. And we certainly appreciate that recommendation, and 
it is being done at the present time and will continue to be done. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, for my own information — and I'm 
very sincere here — what is the purpose of releasing this public infor- 
mation, for which the committee does not vouch ? What is its purpose ? 

Mr. Velde. This information is not released by the committee. It 
has been released previously- 



Bishop Oxnam. Well, it is 

Mr. Velde. And it is 

Bishop Oxnam. Released when it goes out in connection with your 
letterhead. 

Mr. Velde. In response to a question a while ago, you indicated that 
you didn't know about your being listed on letterheads of certain 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3719 

organizations until you learned through our files that you were listed. 
I feel that you, as a good American citizen, should appreciate the fact 
that our committee made this knowledge about you available. 

Bishop Oxnam. 1 do appreciate it, but would have appreciated it 
more if you would have sent it to me instead of released it to others 
because it has been used by private agencies. I will not mention them 
here, but one private agency has used this material seriously to harm 
one's reputation — and it got it from this committee. That's what I'm 
getting at, sir. 

Mr. Walter. May I 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes. 

Mr. Walter (continuing) . Ask you a question at that point, Bishop ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter. In the statement you made, you said in your second 
paragraph, "Those 'files' so released have been used by private agen- 
cies as evidence of Communist sympathies." 

What private agencies used these files? 

Bishop Oxnam. The American Council of Churches, for one. 

Mr. Walter. And what other private agencies? 

Bishop Oxnam. The so-called Council of Christian Laymen, headed 
by a gentleman named Gene — I mean Verne Kaub of Madison, Wis. 

Mr. Walter. Is that a private agency? 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, it's 

Mr. Velde. I hope, Mr. Walter, we won't get into further inquiry 
along that line. 

Let's proceed in regular order. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Chairman, I still wish to inquire 

Mr. Velde. All right. 

Mr. Walter. What other private agencies? 

Bishop Oxnam. If you will allow me, sir, I think I can file a list 
of 20. 

Mr. Walter. But these aren't organizations, are they? 

Bishop Oxnam. The American Council of Churches is an organiza- 
tion, I should judge, of about 170,000 people, perhaps. 

Mr. Walter. What object would they have in using files of the 
Committee on Un-American Activities to injure you? 

Bishop Oxnam. I'll be glad to answer that if the chairman will 
allow me to do so. 

Mr. Walter. Oh, yes. 

Mr. Velde. Certainly. 

Bishop Oxnam. The American- 



Mr. Doyle. Well, Mr. Chairman 

Mr. Velde. Will you yield there? 

Mr. Doyle. I expect 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Walter has asked a question, and the Bishop wishes 
to answer it. 

Mr. Doyle. I just want 

Mr. Walter. Well, I am not through, Mr. Doyle. Just wait a min- 
ute until I get an answer. 

Bishop Oxnam. The American Council of Churches 

Mr. Doyle. I think 

Mr. Walter. I don't care what you think. 

Mr. Doyle. I want the record to show 

Mr. Walter. Well, Mr. Chairman 



3720 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Mr. Doyle. I think it is 



Mr. Velde. Regular order. Let's give the bishop an opportunity 
to answer the questions. 

Mr. Doyle. I think the question 

Mr. Walter. Well, you don't know. 

Mr. Doyle. Well, I can say what I think. 

Mr. Velde. The Chair does not recognize any member of this com- 
mittee until the bishop has had an opportunity to answer the question 
of the gentleman from Pennsylvania, Mr. Walter. 

Proceed in regular order. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, the American Council of Churches 
was really organized as a small group to attack the National Council 
of Churches, which is composed of 30 of the great communions of this 
Nation, with a membership in excess of 34 millions. 

Mr. Walter. Well, we are going very far afield. 

Bishop Oxnam. No; I am going to say why it attacked me. I was 
one of the presidents 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman, I am going to object to this statement. 
It is going into exactly and precisely the phase of factional church 
disputes which, in the chairman's statement, was placed outside the 
interrogation. I think the committee will open itself to very serious 
criticism from all sides if this particular matter is discussed, and I 
would have the same objection to any interfaith discussion. 

Mr. Clardy. May I agree with the gentleman from California and 
say I don't want to have any part in that kind of fight. 

Mr. Walter. Well, of course, I am the last person in the world to 
precipitate that sort of thing, but I am looking at the bishop's state- 
ment, and these arguments are all 

Mr. Jackson. I still register my objection. 

Mr. Walter. This statement says : 

These "files," so released, have been used by private agencies. 

Now, Bishop, are these church groups private agencies ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, I was using the term, sir, to make it clear 
that they are not irovernmental agencies. 

Mr. Walter. Oh, all right. Then that is all. You have answered 
the question. 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you. 

Mr. Velde. The Chair would appreciate it if we could proceed in 
regular order, and 

Bishop Oxnam. I didn't care to press that, Mr. Chairman. I asked 
if you wanted me to answer the question, and I didn't wish to deal with 
it myself. 

Mr. Velde. Let us proceed in regular order and within the jurisdic- 
tion of this committee. Let's not get into any religious arguments 
of any kind. We all believe in freedom of religion, freedom to wor- 
ship as one chooses, and I am sure the bishop does, too. 

Bishop Oxnam. Exactly. 

Mr. Velde. So this 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, I should like to offer in evidence the 
documents marked "Oxnam Exhibits Nos. 26, 27, 28, and 29," which 
were the subject of this discussion for about the last half hour. 

Mr. Velde. Without objection, they will be admitted. 

(The documents referred to were received in evidence as Oxnam 
exhibit No. 26, Oxnam exhibit No. 27, Oxnam exhibit No. 28, and 
Oxnam exhibit No. 29.) 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3721 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 26 

GENERAL AMNESTY 

MASS-MEETING 

For all Political and Class War Prisoners 



-TO BE HELD IN- 



BLANCHARD HALL 

233 S. Broadway 

WEDNESDAY. APRIL 13th. 1921 



AT 8:00 P. M. 



speakers: 

Harriet Dunlop Prenter 

of Toronto Canada 

Rev. G. Brombey Oxnam 

AND OTHER GOOD SPEAKERS 

J. H. RYCKMAN. will take the chair at 8 P. M. sharp. 

UNDER AUSPICES 

ADMISSION FREE, general amnesty committee 



43620—54 10 



3722 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 27 
(Los Angeles Times, June 2, 1923) 

Bob Shuler Also Quits Mr. Oxnam — Radical Activities of the School Board 
Candidate Too Much for Him 

Rev. Bob Shuler, president of the Ministerial Union, pastor of Trinity Meth- 
odist Church, and until yesterday one of the warmest supporters of G. Bromley 
Oxnam, radical candidate for the board of education, yesterday notified Mr. 
Oxnam that he is withdrawing his support of Mr. Oxnam's candidacy and will 
do all he can to undo the effect produced by his work to date in Mr. Oxnam's 
behalf. Dr. Shuler sets out in his letter that he is prompted to this repudiation 
of Mr. Oxnam because of the latter's presence and actions at the Sinclair- 
I. W. W. meeting, as set forth in the letter of Col. LeRoy Smith, printed in 
yesterday's Times, and because of the character of Mr. Oxnaon's reply to a 
patriotic question propounded to him by the Sons of the Revolution. 

Dr. Shuler's repudiation of Mr. Oxnam follows closely that of Dr. Gustav A. 
Briegleb, pastor of the Westlake Presbyterian Church, and another prominent 
churchman who has supported Mr. Oxnam until the nature of the latter's 
radical activities became apparent to him as a result of the Sinclair meeting. 

One of the questions propounded by the Sons of the Revolution to all candi- 
dates for the school board was this : "Do you approve the use of histories in 
our schools, written primarily from the American standpoint, without unfair- 
ness to other countries?" To this question Mr. Oxnam replied "No," Mary C. 
Millspaugh, another candidate on the Oxnam ticket, qualified her affirmative. 
William B. Himrod, another candidate on the Oxnam ticket, made a qualified 
response. To the question "Do you approve direct control by the people on all 
questions as in a strictly democratic form of government?" all school board 
candidates replied flatly "No" except Mr. Oxnam, Mr. Timrod (sic.) , and M. C. Bet- 
tinger, another candidate on the Oxnam ticket, who qualified their negatives 
and John J. Craig, another candidate on the Oxnam ticket, who failed to reply. 
"Direct control by the people on all questions" is one of the fundamental prin- 
ciples of the Soviet or Communistic form of government. 

Following is the letter of Dr. Shuler to Mr. Oxnam, verbatim : 

Los Angeles, Calif., 

June 1, 1923. 
Rev. G. Bromley Oxnam, D. D., 

2211-A Cambridge Street, Los Angeles, Calif. 

My Dear Mr. Oxnam : I have just finished reading the letter addressed to 
Dr. Byron H. Wilson by Col. LeRoy F. Smith and have also noted your answer 
to the questionnaire sent out by the Sons of the American Revolution anent 
the teaching of American History in our public schools. With a heart hurt to 
the depths, I am writing you to say that the facts are now such that I cannot 
go farther with you in your candidacy for the school board. 

As you know, I endorsed your candidacy in the May magazine. Yesterday we 
mailed out 14,000 copies of the June number, carrying the same endorsement. 
I have never been able to think with you, but I have believed in you. I have had 
implicit confidence in your ability, your honesty, and the sincerity of your motives. 
Therefore, I have remained with you and for you, even when my better judgment 
prompted otherwise. But the issue is now so clearly drawn that I can go no 
further. 

While I find it impossible to longer support your public ambitions, I want 
you to know that I still retain the same feeling of respect and esteem for your 
ability, your honesty, and your sincerity. I know, however, that you are dread- 
fully wrong. I have 3 boys and 2 girls to whom I must answer, and I confess 
that your public attitude in an hour of national peril, and your associations with 
a mighty attack being made by these forces upon our Government, are too much 
for me. 

Never in my life have I faced a necessity that grieved me more than this, but 
my love for America and her institutions has made a demand upon me that has 
been for several days insistent and has grown today to be imperative. It there- 
fore becomes my duty, painful and almost tragic for me, to correct so far as 
possible the influence that I have set going through my endorsement of your 
candidacy. 

Yours ever, 

Bob Shuler. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3723 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 28 
(Los Angeles Times, April 26, 1923, p. 1) 



Do IV e IV ant Oxnam On the Board of Education? 



The Criminal Syndicalism Law Must Go I ! ! 

YOU ARE INVITED TO ATTEND A 

PROTEST MASS MEETING 

AGAINST THE 

CRIMINAL SYNDICALISM ACT 

Sunday, Morning, Feb. 11, 10 o'clocK 
SYMPHONY HALL, 232 So. Hill St 

SPEAKERS : 

R. W. HENDERSON (blind L&wyer from laKersfield) 

REV. G. B. OXNAM and J. H. RTCKHAN. of Los Angeles 

Members of I. W. W. now on trial will addrea* the meeting 
35 GENERAL DEFENSE COMMITTEE 




Facsimile of I.W.W. "Protest Mass Meeting" Announcement 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 29 

(Los Angeles Times, May 19, 1923) 

OXNAM WORKING WITH SINCLAIR 

School Board Candidate To Preside at "Protest" on I. W. W. Behalf 

Public announcement was made yesterday that G. Bromley Oxnam, radical 
candidate for the board of education on the so-called teachers' ticket, will preside 
at the meeting called by Upton Sinclair, Socialist author, to be held this evening 
at Walker Auditorium to protest against the methods employed by the authoriies 
in handling the I. W. W. strike at the harbor. 

In another column, the same publication printed resolutions adopted by the 
executive committee of the Los Angeles High School Teachers' Association 
defending Oxnam against the charges of radicalism made against him. It is this 
association which recently issued instructions to public-school teachers of Los 
Angeles to use school time, school premises, and school machinery in the cam- 
paign to elect a teachers' board of education. 

Mr. Kunzig. Bishop Oxnam, sir, back in this period of time, in 
Los Angeles, you were, I believe, a member and perhaps still are of the 
American Civil Liberties Union, 16 is that correct? (See Oxnam ex- 
hibit No. 30, p. 3755.) 

i9 The California Committee on Un-American Activities, in its 1948 report, pp. 107-109, 
stated : 

"In its 1943 report to the legislature, the legislative committee investigating un-Ameri- 
can activities in California reported the following finding : 'The American Civil Liberties 
Union may be definitely classed as a Communist front or "transmission belt" organization. 
At least 90 percent of its efforts are expended on behalf of Communists who come into 
conflict with the law. While it professes to stand for free speech, a free press, and free 
assembly, it is quite obvious that its main function is to protect Communists in their 
activities of force and violence in their program to overthrow the Government.' " [This 
quotation may be found on p. 92 of the 1943 California report.l 



3724 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Bishop Oxnam. The American Civil Liberties Union- 



Mr. Kunzig. I just asked you whether you were or weren't. 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, just a moment. 

Mr. Kunzig. You can explain afterwards. 

Bishop Oxnam. Quite. 

Mr. Kunzig. Were you or weren't you ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir; I was. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now, please explain your answer. 

Bishop Oxnam. The American Civil Liberties Union, I think, was 
organized in 1923. I think it was organized because of the very 
serious violations in the field of civil liberties that had occurred in 
southern California at that time. I could be specific, if necessary. I 
may say, very frankly, that I met with the group and was with it but a 
very short time — I think less than — I couldn't say — 3 or 4 months 
perhaps at the most — and the reason was this: I thought they were 
more interested in creating problems than in solving problems. That 
is, I feel the Civil Liberties Union renders its great service when a 
civil liberty is put in jeopardy if it takes the matter, in the proper way, 
to the courts of the United States, where a man's civil liberties are 
ever protected. 

I resigned from the organization almost immediately, and I have 
checked since — that is the reason I can speak this way — the records of 
the American Civil Liberties Union in California will show from 1924 
to 1928, when I left southern California, I was not a member of the 
organization, not upon its board of directors and had nothing to do- 
with it. I was for that brief period. 

Now, since then, when I came to Boston, I believe I joined the 
American Civil Liberties Union again — I think in 19 — it may have 
been 1940. I went to Boston in 1939 in, I think, the summer. I have 
been a member of the American Civil Liberties Union since that time. 

I believe it to be one of the organizations of this country rendering 
very valuable service in the maintenance of the civil liberties of this 
country ; and if there were time, I would like to read into the record 
statements from Thomas E. Dewey concerning it, from General Mac- 
Arthur concerning it, from President Truman, from Gen. Lucius B. 
Clay, and men of that kind, includinga message sent by the Presi- 
dent of the United States, President Eisenhower, to a recent meet- 
ing where several of the agencies standing for civil liberties, I be- 
lieve, were meeting in Philadelphia, a message from the President 
commending these agencies for what they were doing. 

I am a member of it. 

Mr. Kunzig. Bishop, you are just jumping a little ahead of time 
because nobody is saying anything, for the moment, against the Amer- 
ican Civil Liberties Union. 

The next thing I want to ask you about is in regard to the American 
Civil Liberties Union back at an earlier period of time. I think you 
will admit there was a little difference in an earlier period when a 

The 1948 California report continues with a description of an antitotalitarianism reso- 
lution within the ACLU during the Stalin-Hitler pact ; a protest against the resolution 
by 17 "liberal leaders" ; the comment by the California committee that "undoubtedly the- 
American Civil Liberties Union was resorting to drastic Communist strategy in retreating 
during the Stalin-Hitler pact" ; a listing of various officials of the ACLU ; a discussion of 
Open Forum, a bulletin of the ACLU's southern California branch. The California report 
concludes : "The Senate Committee Fact-Finding Committee on Un-American Activities- 
reiterates the findings of former legislative committees concerning the Communist charac- 
ter of the American Civil Liberties Union" (p. 110). 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3725 

certain Harry P. "Ward was chairman of the American Civil Liberties 
Union. 

Bishop Oxnam. I think it was Harry F. "Ward. 

Mr. Kunzig. Harry F. "Ward ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. Yon know he is a good friend of yours ; is that right ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Just a minute. Don't put answers in my mouth, 
please. 

Mr. Kunzig. Just answer the question. 

Bishop Oxnam. I will. 

Mr. Kunzig. Is he a good friend of yours ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I will have to answer that question by telling you 
when he was and what my relationship is with him now. 

Mr. Kunzig. "Well, please do that. 

Bishop Oxnam. Professor Ward came to the Boston School of 
Theology, I believe, in 1914. I was a student. He was a brilliant 
teacher. He was an inspirational personality. He made an extraor- 
dinary contribution to the students of that institution. I was very, 
very fond of him. I took dictation from him as a part-time secretary 
in the dictation of one of his books. I knew his family. Professor 
Ward was a leader in the social movement of the Methodist Church 
and over a long period of time rendered, I believe, very valuable 
service. 

There came a time in my mind when I believed that Professor Ward 
had shifted his views concerning the whole Communist question. I 
found myself in fundamental disagreement with Professor Ward as 
early as 1928. 

In 1932 I had to propose, I believe — no ; it was 1928 that I proposed 
the message that was drafted by the Methodist Church for the resolu- 
tion on the social question. It was in opposition to Professor Ward's 
proposal, but what I proposed was carried by the Methodist Church. 

In 1936 I drafted the resolution that put the Methodist Church on 
record as one of the earliest denominations in oposition to communism 
and to fascism. We were, but nobody had ever said that before, and 
I wanted it in a clear resolution. 

From 1936 — and I'm not sure I saw Professor Ward even then — I've 
seen Professor Ward once — I know since 1936 — I think probably since 
1932. 

Now, then, he Avas an inspirational teacher, to whom I owe very, 
very much. He was a dear personal friend. When he shifted his 
views, as I believe, I had to break with Professor Ward. He under- 
stood it. 

I can bring for the committee, if it wishes, the letters that I wrote 
to him back at that time indicating a complete break in — in the matter 
of what he was standing for and what I believed we should stand for. 

So, when you ask me if he is my friend, I can't say yes or no to 
that. I have to recount this, and Professor Ward was a member of the 
American Civil Liberties Union, and when that organization 

Mr. Kunzig. He was the head of it at that time, wasn't he? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes. Well, I don't know whether he was in 1923. 
He may have been. I don't know, but what I am saying is 

Mr. Kunzig. Here is the document. 

Bishop Ox nt am. In 1940 when the American Civil Liberties Union 
took action barring anyone who believes in totalitarianism from the 



3726 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

organization, Professor Ward resigned in protest, which indicated, I 
think, his attitude upon several matters; and I believe others were 
expelled from the organization. 

It was one of the first organizations, I think, to take action barring 
Communists really from its membership. 

Mr. Kunzig. We are not denying that in the slightest, sir. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now, this same Professor Ward was also head of the 
Union Theological Seminary ; is that right ? 

Bishop Oxnam. No, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. That is not correct? 

Bishop Oxnam. He was a professor in the Union Theological 
Seminary. 

Mr. Kunzig. And a most influential one ? 

Bishop Oxnam. He was a professor there. I wouldn't say "most." 
There are many men there. It has a distinguished faculty. When 
you have men like Reinhold Niebuhr, and men of that kind, you don't 
use the word in regard to any of the faculty. 

Mr. Jackson. A most. 

Mr. Kunzig. A most 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, "a most" is a contradiction in terms gram- 
matically, isn't it ? 

Mr. Jackson. I wanted to get the phraseology correct. 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Clardy. 

Mr. Clardy. May I address a question ? 

Mr. Velde. Yes, Mr. Clardy. 

Mr. Clardy. I have mentioned repeatedly, Witness, the testimony 
which is about to be released. I want to direct your attention 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir ; I am listening carefully. 

Mr. Clardy. To one portion of it — that portion which specifically 
says that when the Communist Party was organized in 1919 Dr. Ward 
was already a convinced Communist, with a few insignificant, minor 
reservations. 

I am quoting verbatim from the testimony, and then 

Mr. Velde. Whose testimony ? 

Mr. Clardy. Yes; that is the testimony by Benjamin Gitlow, who 
was one of the founders and organizers of the Communist Party in 
the United States. 

Now, I shall not go on beyond that, except to direct your attention 
to that part, because immediately following the portion I have read 
to you — and it will be possibly in the first 15 pages or so of that part 
of the transcript devoted to his testimony, because it is on page 29 
of the typewritten — is a delineation of the part that Dr. Ward — 
Rev. Dr. Ward — followed in connection with the syndicalist and 
other movements. 

I ask you to read that particularly, because you will discover 
through all that time of your association with him he was a 
Communist. 

Now, I want to make it abundantly clear that what I am saying is 
in no way intended to reflect a belief that I thought you were a Com- 
munist or persuaded to be such, because I don't believe that, but I am 
trying to make the point to you that you have lived with any number 
of these people, including Dr. Ward, and your awareness was not, I 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3727 

think, up to what it should be ; and I am calling it to your attention 
so that you will see this committee, in doing this, is endeavoring to 
alert not just you, but the entire Nation to what has been going on 
under their nose in an effort by the Communist Party to destroy the 
dearest thing we have, our religion here in the United States. 

I ask you to read that and then confer with me, if you will. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman 

Mr. Velde. Just a minute. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes ; thank you, sir. 

Mr. Velde. Will you submit that for him to read, or will 

Mr. Clardy. Oh, the entire testimony is out. As you know, We 
released it as soon as it was ready for printing ; but I will be glad to 
show him this from my notebook here as soon as this is over, if he 
wishes it. 

Mr. Velde. All right. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, in 1936 one was alerted and in 1928 
I referred to the fact I was in opposition to Professor Ward's resolu- 
tions. 

I am reading from a letter wrote to Bishop Charles Wesley Flint, 
July 19, 1936, referring to Professor Ward : 

He takes the Communist position as to objective, if not as to method. I re- 
pudiate it. Too often they — his associates — prefer a fight to an advance. They 
would rather throw bricks than build with them. Unless we are willing to build 
in their precise blueprint — I should say redprint — way * * * 

These were my attitudes and that, I think, may possibly suggest it. 

Mr. Velde. Do you have a copy of that particular letter ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I can get it, sir. This was a letter that was ad- 
dressed to Bishop Flint on that date. It is one of his, and I got this 
from him. I can get the letter, if you would like to have it. 

Mr. Velde. And if the witness will please submit it to the com- 
mittee for its perusal 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, you have made several requests, and 
I haven't noted them. Will it be possible for the record to indicate 
them so that I may fulfill my promises in this matter ? 

Mr. Velde. Yes ; the record will so indicate. 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you, sir. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman, may I ask, before that is put away, 
what was the date of that statement? 

Bishop Oxnam. The date of that was July 19, 1936. 

Mr. Jackson. I have in front of me, Bishop, an article, a news- 
paper article, I should say, under date of May 15, 1939. This is 
a little out of order because it is going into the MFSA, but I think it 
is apropos to bring this particular point out at this time. This was 
the session in Kansas City of the newly organized federation and, as 
I understand it, from reading it very briefly, it was either an organiza- 
tion meeting of the federation or something of that sort. It states 
here — and I merely ask you whether or not this is correct, sir, in light 
of what you just said : 

Bishop Oxnam paid a high tribute to the federation and to its secretary, Dr. 
Ward, whom he regarded as one of the greatest leaders in the new industrial- 
social-economic planned movement. 

It goes on to say — 

Bishop Oxnam said as a student he took dictation from Dr. Ward in writing 
some of his books known to all leaders. 



3728 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

My question is whether that is substantially correct or completely in 
error, or what are the facts relative to that newspaper report ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, that is a quotation from the Bureau 
County Republican. I have stated that I categorically denied what 
was reported concerning that particular meeting. 

I'm sorry to say that — well, I needn't go into it. I just make that 
statement. 

Now, it's quite true Professor Ward was a very dear friend through 
the years, and I'm perfectly willing to pay tribute to Professor Ward 
for what he did for the Methodist Church during a certain period. 
He's an old man now of 80 years or so of age. When, for instance, 
the Methodist Federation under his leadership and Bishop McCon- 
nell's attacked the 12-hour day in steel and the 7-day week and the 
24-hour day on the change of shift, I believed that was a very valuable 
service; and while Bishop McConnell was seriously criticized all over 
the Nation for it, it seemed to me it was something worthy of the 
highest praise. 

And if you will let me say, sir, in a single sentence, I think the 
reason why the term that describes American business today cannot 
be used to describe American business of 50 years ago — in a word, 
we're not using the term "robber baron" any more ; we're thinking of 
responsible leaders in industry. One of the main reasons why that 
great shift has occurred and why there is a new conscience, I think, is 
because of the preaching of the church that sought to apply the 
religion of Jesus to the American economic life. 

Now, to come back to Professor Ward, at that particular meeting, 
I don't doubt for a minute that I said some very kind words concerning 
Professor Ward in his service to the church. I do not accept the 
quotation in that report. That report, I'm sorry to say, was vicious 
and was false— and I think I could prove that, if I have to. 

Mr. Velde. Well, now, Bishop, it so happens that the report comes 
from the largest weekly newspaper that is printed in the United States. 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, it has about 7,000 circulation, doesn't it? 

Mr. Velde. Yes, and the editor of that newspaper, who is now 
deceased, through all my information, was an able, outstanding, patri- 
otic American citizen. I hesitate to have you say that article is an 
absolute false report. Now, I wonder if you could make any other 
statement concerning that, other than it is a vicious statement. 

Bishop Oxnam. I can only say, sir, that report was a false report. 
1 don't mean to say anything about a man who's gone. I didn't know 
he was gone until recently, until somebody announced to me that he 
was dead; but I happen to have a letter here from the minister in 
that church during the time this gentleman was editing that paper, 
and I do not care to put it into the record but, if I must, I will, because 
I think it will bear out precisely what I have been saying concerning 
that matter. 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Chairman, may I ask a question ? 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Clardy. 

Mr. Clardy. Well, Bishop, I think I know the part you are object- 
ing to — some comments about you other than that — but didn't you 
just a moment ago say that the factual part, dealing with whether or 
not you delivered a tribute to Dr. Ward, Reverend Dr. Ward, was true 
or not, was true? You admit that is true — you did deliver such 

Bishop Oxnam. I don't doubt 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3729 

Mr. Clardy (continuing). A tribute? 

Bishop Oxnam (continuing). For a moment I said some words in 
praise of Dr. Ward, his service to the church in days gone by, and the 
like. 

You see, while I had personally come to the conviction that I could 
no longer go along with him, I don't think when you're dealing with a 
friend of many years, who's had distinguished leadership in the 
church, that you're called upon publicly to call him a Communist 
under the circumstances of that particular meeting 

Mr. Clardy. Well, J wasn't asking that. 

Mr. Velde. That is what puzzles me. How can you, then, say that 
this article, which was written by a person who attended the convention 
in Kansas City, was there personally, was a falsity when you admit 
you did give words of praise to him, as is contained in this article? 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, if you will take the article, as it 
was quoted in the Washington Post report, I'll take up sentence by 
sentence, if you wish, and show that those sentences were false, be- 
cause what was attributed to me there was not only false but an illus- 
tration that he quotes Bishop McConnell as using was so ridiculously 
turned around that it would be very interesting evidence if you had. 
time for me to present it to you. 

Mr. Clardy. Well, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Clardy. 

Mr. Clardy. May I conclude with what I started? 

(At this point Bishop Oxnam conferred with Mr. Parlin.) 

Mr. Clardy. May I have your attention a moment, sir ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes ; I am sorry. It is very difficult to check these 
records and pay attention to nine men. 

Mr. Clardy. I am not asking you to check any records. I just want 
to get one point completely clear. 

Wouldn't you amend your blanket indictment of that newspaper 
by saying that it was at least factually correct as to whether or not 
you did deliver that kind of eulogy of Dr. Ward ? 

Bishop Oxnam. No, sir. because the words that are used here went 
far beyond anything that I would have said. 

You read them a minute ago. I can't quite find them at the moment. 

Mr. Clardy. I am not asking you to quote the words nor am I asking 
you to approve the language, nor even the general meaning, other than 
one thing: Didn't they correctly report you as having delivered some 
kind of speech that praised the Reverend Dr. Ward ? 

Bishop Oxnam. If the counsel will read what he read there, I'll 
be able to say, sir, whether I made that kind of tribute. 

Mr. Clardy. No; I am not asking you anything about the news- 
paper report, except from one standpoint: They said you made a 
speech that praised the Reverend Dr. Ward. Now, is that or is that 
not true ? 

Bishop Oxnam. You're making me say, sir, I made a speech 

Mr. Clardy. I'm not 

Bishop Oxnam. Praising Dr. Ward. I said to the committee that 
I no doubt used some words of tribute in connection with Professor 
Ward. I admit that. Let's put it in correctly. 

Mr. Clardy. All right. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes. 



3730 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Mr. Clardy. To that extent wouldn't you agree that the Bureau 
County Republican was factually correct? 

Bishop Oxnam. If you feel better about it, Mr. Clardy, in that 
particular matter 

Mr. Clardy. No. 

Bishop Oxnam. I'll be happy to say that. 

Mr. Clardy. You won't make me feel either way, sir. I just want 
the truth. 

Bishop Oxnam. That is what I am trying to state. 

Mr. Clardy. Well, I think that is so, but you are making it hard for 
me to drag it out. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman, I should have said — and I want to 
correct any portion if any portion of what I said is in quotation 
marks — it is not quoted. It is a statement — a general statement 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes. 

Mr. Jackson. Not in quotation marks. I want to make that 
clear 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes. 

Mr. Jackson. That this statement is an interpretation of what 
took place and is not carried as a direct quote. 

Mr. Velde. The counsel will proceed. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, I should like 

Mr. Clardy. I don't want to monopolize, but I would like to finish 
that. Every time I get started something happens. 

Just one more thing, Bishop, and then I am done. 

I am puzzled to think that you would say here that you knew that 
Dr. Ward was a Communist quite a few years prior to the time you 
delivered these kind remarks. Now, didn't you at any time, after 
you discovered it and the time you delivered those remarks, think it 
incumbent upon you to make that information known — if not to this 
•committee that you didn't like, but to the FBI that you mentioned, or 
to the Attorney General, or somebody else — because any Communist, 
whether he be in the church or out, sir, is a danger to this Nation, and 
I wondered if you didn't realize that you had, as an American citizen, 
the duty and the responsibility, if you had information and belief 
on that, to pass it on, whether it was to this committee or not ? Didn't 
that occur to you, sir ? 

Bishop Oxnam. First of all, I didn't say he was a Communist. I 
said he takes the Communist position as to objective. 

In the next place, back there in those days, I don't think we thought 
of this situation as we do now. 

Mr. Clardy. Well, I did, sir. 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, I am glad you did, sir. I wish I had. I did 
not see that as a clear and present danger at that time. My only posi- 
tion is bringing this into the open and answering it with the Ameri- 
can answer is the best way to strike down communism, in the long run, 
anyhow. 

Mr. Clardy. That is what we are trying to clo, sir. 

Bishop Oxnam. Right, and that is the best answer I can give to you, 
and I am sorry, Mr. Clardy. 

Mr. Clardy. Well, you do not have to be sorry. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Jackson. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman, inasmuch as the matter of the Bureau 
County Republican has been brought into issue, I have here an edi- 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3731 

torial from the Bureau County Republican, dated April 9, 1953, en- 
titled, "Our Opinion, A Double-Bladed Knife." I respectfully re- 
quest that it be inserted into the proceedings of the committee at this 
time. 

Mr. Velde. Is there objection? All right, it will be recorded in the 
record. 17 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, is that something that involves me? 

Mr. Jackson. It relates to this meeting and to "your answer" in 
the Washington newspaper relative to the Bureau County Republican. 

Bishop Oxnam. You see, I am sure this is quite all right, but if you 
would allow me to introduce the citations when I received honorary 
degrees and what has been said about me, since I am called in question 
apparently, the record would be an interesting one. When I men- 
tion anything, there seems to be immediately something going into 
the record to defend it. Maybe I am wrong on that, but 

Mr. Doyle. Mr. Chairman 

Mr. Velde. I wonder, Bishop — just a minute, Mr. Doyle, please. 
I wonder if you would be satisfied if we would introduce into the 
record at this point your statement in Who's Who in America. 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, I don't wish that particularly to be put into 
the record, sir. 

Mr. Velde. Well, that includes all of the information that you gave 
apparently. 

Bishop Oxnam. No ; I would prefer to let that go. I was just rais- 
ing the question of why, when I mention an organization, we immedi- 
ately have somethong put in to defend it when there is so much that 
could be put in regarding one's services — he hopes it has been — so it 
will balance that up. 

Forget that ; I beg your pardon, sir. 

Mr. Velde. It seems to me that that is a fair way to do this appar- 
ently. Every organization you belong to of which you are proud — as 
all members of the committee have done, I believe, and we are all in 
Who's Who, you submitted to Who's Who for insertion in their 
book 

Bishop Oxnam. Would it not be better to let me submit to you some 
editorials from some of the great newspapers of the country, if you 
want to do that kind of thing ? They might be more in keeping with 
this kind of matter. 

Mr. Walter. We are going very far afield. 

Bishop Oxnam. I think so. 

Mr. Velde. I realize that, of course, and the committee appreciated 
the things you would like to submit to it for consideration. 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you, sir. I appreciate that. 

Mr. Doyle. Mr. Chairman, may I raise this question, please : Again 
the acoustics are not so clear so that Mr. Jackson's observation — that 
was that he proposed to introduce an editorial wherein the bishop is 
mentioned, is that true ? 

Mr. Jackson. That is correct. 

Mr. Doyle. Why should it not be read so he can answer it ? 

Mr. Jackson. I would be quite willing 

Mr. Doyle. Why should he not be presented with it so he can have 
a chance to answer it ? 



17 Mr. Jackson's question was later withdrawn and the editorial was not filed. 



3732 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Mr. Walter. What does an editorial prove ? I ask the question in 
all seriousness. 

Mr. Jackson. I am giving an answer. The original report of the 
committee to which the witness took exception dealt with a story in 
the Bureau County Republican. 

Mr. Walter. Where is that, if I may ask ? 

Mr. Jackson. Some place out in Illinois, I guess, some place 'out in 
the Midwest ; but to get back, the report set forth certain facts relative 
to this paper, to this meeting, and the answer which appeared in a 
Washington newspaper, and the material which was contained in this 
article was brought into question by Bishop Oxnam. 

In return the newspaper filed its answer which represents the only 
answer or the only opportunity to answer which the newspaper has 
had since the appearance of the material in the report. In other 
words, it is in answer to Bishop Oxnam's answer, and if you are going 
to maintain a balance, it seems to me that it is 

Mr. Walter. No ; let us get the bishop's 

Mr. Velde. The editorial has already been admitted into the evi- 
dence, and I asked if there were any objections to it. No one had 
objections 

Mr. Frazier. We object. 

Mr. Doyle. I object to it unless it is read and the bishop has a chance 
to answer it. 

Mr. Velde. The gentleman must recall that I asked if there were 
any objections. 

Mr. Doyle. I am sorry. 

Mr. Frazier. Mr. Chairman, at that time I asked what the contents 
were. 

Mr. Jackson. May I suggest that the editorial be read? 

Mr. Clardy. The bishop is reading it now. 

Mr. Velde. Suppose we let counsel read it. 

Mr. Walter. Do not keep it to yourself, Bishop. I want to know 
what is in it myself. 

Mr. Chairman, can we not save a little time? What do we care 
what this weekly newspaper says? Let us ask the bishop a question 
and get his answer, not an answer from some country editor. Let us 
get his answer. 

Mr. Jackson. I am certainly not inclined to labor the point. It is 
not that important. However, inasmuch as the newspaper had been 
charged with false reporting on a certain occasion — and this is the first 
opportunity where the editor of a newspaper answers that charge — 
it seemed to me that it might well go into the record. However, as I 
say, I am not inclined to labor the point. If there is serious objection, 
I will withdraw my request. 

Mr. Velde. The gentleman from California withdraws his request 
for the admission of this article into the record. We will now proceed 
in a regular order. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, I should like at this time to read official 
testimony before this committee taken July 8, 1953, pages 133 and 134, 
where Manning Johnson, whom we formerly mentioned, was a member 
of the national committee of the Communist Party at the time of his 
membership from about 1930 up to 1940, who testified as follows 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, does this involve me? I want to 
be alert if it does. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3733 

Mr. Kunzig. It involves Dr. Ward, sir. 

Mr. Velde. Let counsel ask his question, please. 

Mr. Kunzig. It involves Dr. Ward. 

Mr. Moulder. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Just a minute. 

Mr. Moulder. May I ask if the bishop was present- 



Mr. Velde. Just a minute. Will you wait until the counsel states 
his question? 

Mr. Frazier. I object to its being read if the bishop was not present 
and does not know anything about it. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, this refers to testimony — this is in 
the usual course of procedure before this committee. Here is sworn 
testimony as to the fact that this man, Dr. Ward, was a Communist. 
Dr. Ward, the testimony will show here, was an active member of the 
Methodist Federation for Social Service of which this witness was 
an active member, and this is most pertinent, sir. 

Mr. Velde. Was an active member? 

Bishop Oxnam. Was my name mentioned in this testimony, may I 
ask? 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Chairman, regular order. May I suggest to the 
other member, I am not sure, and I want to find out from counsel 
whether this is a portion of the Manning Johnson testimony taken 
when I presided or when Mr. Scherer presided? Was it the New 
York 



Mr. Kunzig. New York City, sir. 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Scherer presided on that. I have read it, but I 
did not remember which session 

Bishop Oxnam. May I ask again, was my name mentioned ? 

Mr. Velde. Counsel will proceed to ask the questions. 

Bishop Oxnam. It is read before you answer the question, you see. 
Was my name mentioned in it ? 

Mr. Velde. I do not know whether it was or not, but it does not 
matter for this particular occasion. Will the counsel proceed to read 
the evidence and ask a question. 

Mr. Kunzig. Manning Johnson testifies : 

Fight magazine was the official organ of the American League Against War 
and Fascism. In the April 1934 issue, on page 34, it reads as follows : "This 
means that those who would use what resources are available in the churches to 
fight the development of fascism must be prepared to show the people in the 
churches that there is no way out under the profit system and that the only way 
they can get the better life that is within their reach is to take ownership and 
control out of the hands of the few, put it into the hands of the many, and develop 
a planned economy for the purpose of realizing the classless society. Then the 
emotions and ideals that will otherwise be misled by the Fascists will be directed 
to the defeat of the real enemy of the people, the capitalist system, and will 
be given a constructive outlet in the building of a new order. To work at this 
task the American League Against War and Fascism needs to get members in all 
religious organizations." 

Question. Mr. Johnson, who was the chairman of this American League 
Against War and Fascism? 

Answer. The Reverend Harry F. Ward. 

Question. Did you know him personally? 

Answer. Yes, I did. 

Question. When you were a member of the Communist Party did you know 
him as a member of the Communist Party? 

Answer. Yes, he was a member of the Communist Party while I was a member. 

Question. Did you meet with him as such? 

Answer. Yes, I did. 



3734 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Question. Would you characterize him as a prominent member of the Com- 
munist Party? n . _ 

Answer. I would say that he is the Red dean of the Communist Party 
in the religious field. 

Is it not a fact, sir, that Reverend Ward was an official of the Meth- 
odist Federation for Social Service and later Social Action for some 
period of time ? 

Bishop Oxnam. That is correct. 

Mr. Kunzig. Do you happen to know what period of time, if it lies 
within your knowledge ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I should judge that he was a member from the be- 
ginning, which I should think was in 1907. I do not know the exact 
time when he retired from the organization. 

Mr. Kunzig. I believe it was 1940 ; does that sound correct ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I would not be a bit surprised. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now, I have here a document which is a letterhead of 
the Methodist Federation for Social Service, and I wanted to ask you 
again, to get the record clear since there was some confusion — this 
is one of the points that you had raised — what position or positions 
did you have in the Methodist Federation for Social Service? (See 
Oxnam exhibit No. 31, p. 3756.) 

Bishop Oxnam. I was a member of it for a number of years. When 
I was appointed to New York City as the bishop there, I was elected 
a vice president of the organization 

Mr. Kunzig. When was that ; do you know the year ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I cannot give you the year, I am sorry. I went to 
New York City in 1944, and may I say that I resigned on June 9, 
1947, as vice president and as a member of the executive committee. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now, did you have any other position? Were you 
ever executive secretary of the organization ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Kunzig, if you will look at that photostat, you 
will fincl that I was not the executive secretary of the organization. 
You will find Professor Ward's name over on the other side. You will 
note that that is the 20th anniversary, and they appointed a special 
committee composed of Dr. Ernest F. Tittle, who was pastor of the 
First Methodist Church in Evanston for so many years, and myself. 
He was to be chairman and I was to be secretary. They put on that 
letterhead that I was the executive secretary of the 20th anniversary 
celebration. I was never the executive secretary of the organization. 
That was a celebration of the 20th anniversary, and I think up to that 
time no one will question the service that the Methodist Federation 
had really rendered to the church. 

Mr. Velde. At what time were you vice president of the organ- 
ization ? 

Bishop Oxnam. That was sometime between 1944, 1 think, and when 
I resigned June 9, 1947. 

Mr. Velde. You do not remember any more definitely ? 

Bishop Oxnam. No; I could find out, possibly, but that was largely 
a nominal matter where the bishop, being from New York — Bishop 
McConnell, I think — was the president. He had been in New York 
many, many years, and when I came there I was elected a vice presi- 
dent. I was not present at the meeting, and the name continued until 
there was good reason for me to resign from the federation, which 
I did. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3735 

Mr. Kunzig. I have a document marked "Oxnam Exhibit No. 32" 
which is a letterhead of the Methodist Federation for Social Service. 
The letter is written April 12, 1946, and that lists you as the vice presi- 
dent. Would that be the correct time? (See Oxnam exhibit No. 32, 
p. 3757.) 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, I stated I resigned on June 9, 1947, and that 
may be the time. I told you I could not remember — I can find out. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now, the executive secretary at that time on the same 
letterhead with you is Jack Richard McMichael. Do you know Jack 
McMichael ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, I did. 

Mr. Kunzig. The Reverend McMichael? 

Bishop Oxnam. That is quite right. 

Mr. Kunzig. Do you know him to be a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Bishop Oxnam. I did not know that he was a member of the Com- 
munist Party, but I found myself in such fundamental opposition to 
Jack McMichael that I had to face one of two decisions, either to stay 
in and get him out or to get out myself, and it seemed to me wiser to 
resign and sever all relations because I was a little fearful it would 
take a bit longer to get him out than I had time to give. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, I should like to read testimony taken 
again from Manning Johnson in New York City, July 8, 1953 : 

Question by Me. Scherek. Mr. Johnson, do you know any other person who was 
an officer of the Methodist Federation at any time who was a member of the 
Communist Party? 

Mr. Johnson. Yes, sir, the Reverend Jack McMichael was a member of the 
Methodist Federation. 

Mr. Scherer. Did you say Rev. McMichael? 

Mr. Johnson. I understand that he attended and graduated from divinity 
school ; yes, a reverend. 

Mr. Scherer. What was his connection with the Methodist Federation? 

Mr. Johnson. He was executive secretary of the Methodist Federation for 
Social Action, I believe up until 1953. 

Mr. Kunzig. I note you say the Methodist Federation for Social Action, whereas 
a moment ago you were referring to it as the Methodist Federation for Social 
Service. Could you clarify that point and explain just what those two organiza- 
tions were? 

Mr. Johnson. They were one and the same organization. It was just a 
change of names. It was first called the Methodist Federation for Social Service 
and later it changed its name to the Methodist Federation for Social Action. 

Mr. Scherer. How did you know that Reverend McMichael was a Communist? 

Mr. Johnson. Well, during the period that I was a member of the Communist 
Party, during the thirties, Jack McMichael was a member of the national commit- 
tee of the Young Communist League, and he was also a member of the Com- 
munist Party, and from time to time he met with the now fugitive Communist 
Gilbert Green who was the head of the Young Communist League at that time, and 
he attended occasionally meetings of the national committee of the Communist 
Party with Gilbert Green. 

Mr. Scherer. Was Reverend McMichael still a member of the Communist Party 
when you left the party? 

Mr. Johnson. Yes, he was. 

Mr. Scherer. Was this not the same organization with which Bishop Oxnam 
was identified? 

Mr. Johnson. Yes, for many years. 

Now, I have testimony, sir, from Leonard Patterson, L-e-o-n-a-r-d 
P-a-t-t-e-r-s-o-n, also executive testimony before the committee on 
July 7, in New York City of this year. 

Mr. Kunzig. When you were in the Young Communist League did you ever 
know one Jack McMichael? 



3736 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Mr. Patterson. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. What position did he hold in the Young Communist League? 

Mr. Patterson. He was a member of the New York District of the Young 
Communist League and was a member of the top fraction of the Young Com- 
munist League and the Communist Party in the American League Against War 
and Fascism. Also he was a member of the top fraction of the American Youth 
Congress that was organized around 1934. 

Mr. Kunzig. You knew him then as one of the leading members of the Young 
Communist League? 

Mr. Patterson. Yes. 

Then he identifies a picture of McMichael as the McMichael whom 
he recognized and whom he knew at the time was a member of the 
Communist Party. 

Both those witnesses, sir, in sworn testimony before this committee 
identified Jack McMichael as a Communist. 

Mr. Clardy. May I interrupt, Mr. Chairman? 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Clardy. 

Mr. Clardy. Counsel, do you have before you there the testimony 
taken when I was presiding here last week of Benjamin Gitlow, deal- 
ing with the same subject? 

Counsel, I am addressing the question to you. 

Mr. Kunzig. Pardon me, sir. 

Mr. Clardy. Do you have the Gitlow testimony taken last week 
on the same subject? 04, 

Mr. Kunzig. No. 

Mr. Clardy. Without laboring the point, Benjamin Gitlow testified 
last week : > f 

McMichael became the cell head, but Dr. Ward continued to be prominent. 
The Methodist Federation for Social Action was already in the grip of this 
Communist Party cell and was therefore an instrument through which the Com- 
munist Party operated on the religious field. 

There are more things. It was that also that I had in mind, Bishop, 
that I had in mind when I referred earlier — and I want it known 
that I will be glad to welcome an opportunity to go over that part 
with you. 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you, sir. 

Mr. Chairman, since this has been read, may I say that I did every- 
thing that I could to get Mr. McMichael out of the organization. 
Certain information reached me to this effect. I talked to Mr. 
McMichael. He said that it was absolutely false and wanted the 
source of the information. I was unable to give him that source 
because it was confidential. We had 

Mr. Velde. Bishop, may I interrupt? Why did you attempt to 
get him out of the organization ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Because frankly I believed that Jack McMichael 
was so tied up with the Communist group that whether or not he 
were a Communist, I couldn't prove w-hether he was a member of the 
Communist Party or not, but I was sure that that organization ought 
not to be under that leadership any more, and I did everything I 
could. Others talked to Mr. McMichael. He denied this completely. 
Now, that raises quite an issue, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Will you yield at that point? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes. 

Mr. Walter. What caused you to reach the conclusion that 
McMichael was a Communist? 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3737 

Bishop Oxnam. Sir, I hope you will not press that question. I 
-will be glad to state it to this committee if I could meet it in executive 
session. The source of that information was strictly confidential, 
and I think I would be betraying a trust if I said it in public. I 
would be glad to convey it to the chairman of this committee. I am 
not hedging here at all, but I think I have an obligation because the 
source was of such a nature — I think the chairman would be the first 
to recognize this. I will not refer to the source other than that. 

Mr. Walter. You couldn't make it much plainer. 

Mr. Velde. I don't think the witness should be required to answer 
except in executive session. We appreciate that. 

Bishop Oxnam. I will be very happy, sir, to give you the source 
of that. 

Mr. Scherer. Bishop, at the time you got this information that 
Reverend McMichael was a member of the Communist Party, you 
reported it to the FBI, did you ? 

Bishop Oxnam. It was not necessary to report it there. Don't mis- 
understand me, sir. I am trying to keep a confidence here which I 
will be glad 

Mr. Walter. You have said it very well, I assure you. 

Bishop Oxnam. It is very difficult not to answer your question. 

I may say, Mr. Chairman, and this is very important because I feel 
I am on something of a >ot in this connection: In the Methodist 
Church when anv i dividual has information that justifies prosecu- 
tion and the 1 elimination of an individual from the church, he may 
report tha:, to what we call an investigating committee, if there is 
ground for charges — the charges are formulated, and he is tried. 

Now, there are members of this committee who are members of the 
Methodist Church and have that information. It would have been 
possible with that information, which we do not have, to have filed 
charges to have prosecuted Jack McMichael. He would have been 
removed from the Methodist ministry if there could have been evi- 
dence of the fact of belonging to the Communist Party. By that I 
mean a man must be disloyal to his ordination vows to be a Communist, 
which involves being an atheist. 

Mr. Scherer. He is still a Methodist minister today, is he not? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir, and if somebody will give us the evidence 
that he belongs to the Communist Party, charges will be filed against 
him — this is the first time we have ever heard anything, and please 
remember, this is simply testimony. We have not heard the answers 
yet. I take it for granted this is true from what I have heard, but it is 
not the way we do things in a Methodist court. It would have to 
be proved. 

Mr. Velde. Bishop, the committee, of course, cannot vouch for the 
veracity of any of the witnesses that come before it. This is 
merely 

Bishop Oxnam. I am sure that is true, but the assumption is that 
what is said is true, you see, and in one of our courts you would have 
to have not only the statement, but you would have to have the truth. 

Mr. Jackson. This is testimony taken under oath. 

Bishop Oxnam. Of course. 

Mr. Velde. May we have a recess for 10 minutes ? 

(Whereupon, at 9:52 o'clock p. m., the hearing recessed to 10:10 
o'clock, p. m.) 

43620—54 11 



3738 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Mr. Velde. The committee will be in order. 

Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, I should now like to ask the witness : 
Bishop, you say, as I recall your testimony a short time ago, that you 
broke with Ward or were not in sympathy with Reverend Ward's 
ideas, I believe it was 1928 as you gave the date, roughly ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, he had brought in resolutions for the general 
conference with which I disagreed, and I was chairman of the sub- 
committee. We brought in another report, and ours was adopted. 

Mr. Kunzig. For how long a period of time were you active in the 
Methodist Federation for Social Service and later the Methodist Fed- 
eration for Social Action? 

Bishop Oxnam. I cannot answer that. I was a member for many 
years. 

Mr. Kunzig. Roughly. 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, I suppose from the time I graduated at the 
school of theology until the time I resigned membership here. I 
contributed to it. You see, in the Methodist Church we regarded the 
Federation for Social Action as — what shall I say — a body that was 
raising questions constantly, out in front of the church. The church 
went as fast as it wished to go, but we thought this group out there 
raising social questions was rendering service, and an official com- 
mission commended it in 1932. After that I think the situation 
changed, and as you know, the general conference of our church 
in 1952 requested the federation to move out of the Methodist Building 
in New York City, to change its name, and it was always an unofficial 
organization of the church. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now, for many of those years that you were active 
in the Methodist Federation, Reverend Ward was also active. He 
was an official, was that not correct? 

Bishop Oxnam. That is correct ; yes, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. Did it not — how shall I phrase it — perturb you to 
be serving as an active official yourself in this organization with 
Reverend Ward who was one of the top officials of it when you had 
these ideas that you had about Ward and when you had — and I think 
it might be pretty fair to say — suspicions that he was either a Com- 
munist or seriously bent along those lines ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, of course, and we, staying inside, tried to 
change that organization. That is the way probably we should have 
done. When I left it in 1947 — frankly a bishop has considerable 
work to do — there were others, I thought, who could take care of that, 
or should. In any case, I left it. Perhaps I should have stayed in 
until Jack McMichael was fired, I do not know. I do believe that 
the federation rendered the church and the church at large a very 
valuable service up to 1932. My counsel here happened to be chair- 
man of the committee of the general conference that called for the 
federation to move out of our building and so on. 

Mr. Kunzig. But you said it rendered service until 1932, roughly 
1932? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. From 1932 to 1947, as I recall, you said June 1947, 
I believe, roughly, when you left? 

Bishop Oxnam. That is right. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3739 

Mr. Kunzig. During that period of time McMichael was active, 
Ward was active, both in leading positions, and you had these view- 
points about them and what you thought they believed. Why did 
you not try at that time to get them out, all during those years £ 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, you see, you don't quite understand what this 
organization really was. It was a very loose arrangement. I think 
perhaps 5,000 members who contributed to the bulletin — the rela- 
tionship generally of individuals to it was to receive the bulletin that 
came out once a month. Once a year there would be an annual meet- 
ing in which they discussed every kind of question, debated them, came 
to their conclusions, and the like. I am frank to say that with what 
we now know, I think organizations should be much more carefully 
supervised than they were at that time. I don't suppose that I at- 
tended during that period a dozen meetings of the Methodist Federa- 
tion for Social Action, and during the time I was vice president I do 
not suppose I was in more than 2 or 3 meetings, and that is, I suppose, 
something that somebody should be criticized for. I think one should 
belong to fewer organizations, know them intimately and exercise 
a controlling factor in them if you can. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Jackson. 

Mr. Jackson. Is it true — and this is a question, since I am not 
positive about this — but is it true that the Philadelphia Annual Con- 
ference of the Methodist Church in 1920 or 1919 protested against 
the pro-Bolshevism of Dr. Ward? Do you have knowledge of that? 

Bishop Oxnam. I do not know. I do not know. I know that in 
1924 at the general conference there was considerable protest concern- 
ing Professor Ward, growing out of some situation, Mr. Clardy, in 
Michigan. I do not recall quite what it was. We felt that it was an 
unfair attack upon Professor Ward, and he was defended in the gen- 
eral conference. I say up to 1932 the federation had rendered very 
valuable service. 

Mr. Walter. May I interrupt you at that point ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes. 

Mr. Walter. I notice you have called him Professor Ward, and 
members of the committee have called him Dr. Ward. Where does 
he get the "Professor Ward" ? 

Bishop Oxnam. 'He was a professor in the Boston University 
School of Theology. He was subsequently a professor in the Union 
Theological Seminary, and served there unitl his retirement, and I 
believe is still on retiring allowance from the Union Theological 
Seminary in New York City. 

Mr. Walter. During those periods when he was an instructor, he 
was a member of the Communist Party ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I do not know, sir. I have heard this testimony 
here, and it confirms the suspicions that some of us got, and I re- 
corded my own back there in 1936. 

Mr. Walter. During what period of time did you have the sus- 
picion that he was a Communist while he was acting as a theological 
professor in Boston University and at Union ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I did not believe he was a Communist. I did not 
believe he was a Communist when he was at the Boston University 
School of Theology. I do not know he is a Communist now. This 



3740 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

testimony is quite overwhelming, but when Dr. Ward went to Russia 
and came back and wrote a book called In Place of Profit, I began 
to have serious intellectual doubts because in that, if I recall correctly, 
he justified a lottery on the grounds that it was contributing to a 
certain valuable social end. Well, when a man's ethics begin to be 
as confused as that, something has happened somewhere, and that is 
the best answer I can give, sir. 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Chairman, may I ask a question ? 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Clardy. 

Mr. Clardy. In that connection, your mentioning of the trip of the 
Reverend Harry Ward to Russia, I am minded to call your attention 
to another bit of testimony that really startled me, that runs to this 
effect, and I ask you to look for it particularly. It says that when 
Dr. Ward was in Russia, he conferred with Joe Stalin and that the 
question in the witness' mind was as to whether Joe Stalin taught 
Dr. Ward what to do in invading the field of religion or whether it 
was the other way around, and he ended up by believing that they 
probably both learned something from each other. 

Now, that was in an early day. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Clardy, there are several great Americans who 
have conferred with Joe Stalin. 

Mr. Clardy. But not on this subject. 

Mr. Velde. That is bringing in a matter of guess, conjecture. 

Mr. Clardy. No the witness was in Russia at the time and talked 
with people who were present and may have been present himself, 
for all I know, at some of the conferences. 

Mr. Velde. I am sorry. 

Mr. Clardy. This was not speculation, and it was Mr. Kornfeder 
who gave the testimony. It is a most startling thing, and I am 
still appalled at the manner and the devilishness with which they 
were able to put into practice in this association the things that they 
did. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, did I misunderstand Mr. Clardy. I 
think he did not say did he — or did he — that I was in Russia at the 
same time Professor Ward was there ? 

Mr. Clardy. Oh, no, no, I did not even mention you. 

Bishop Oxnam. I thought he said that, and I wanted to correct that 
completely. 

Mr. Clardy. I am still talking about the Reverend Harry Ward. 
I mentioned him by name. I know you have been to Russia a number 
of times, but as far as I know you were not there in company with Dr. 
Ward. 

Bishop Oxnam. No ; I was not. 

Mr. Clakdy. He was in company with a number of people, including 
Mr. Kornfeder. 

Bishop Oxnam. I wish, Mr. Chairman 

Mr. Doyle. Mr. Chairman, I suggest we go ahead. 

Mr. Velde. You were referring, when you mentioned the witness, 
to the witness Mr. Kornfeder, is that correct ? 

Mr. Clardy. Oh, but definitely. 

Bishop Oxnam. Oh, I thought he meant me. I beg your pardon. 

Mr. Velde. I was a little bit confused. 

Mr. Clardy. You did not look very shocked, so I did not think you 
misunderstood me. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3741 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I know we must get on, but when 
I returned from Russia in 1934 I put down 10 impressions of the situ- 
ation as I found it. I do not know whether the committee would 
appreciate for the record those critical impressions of one who went 
there trying to study or not, but they do explain my personal attitude. 
I would not wish to read them, but I think they are significant enough 
in the light of all that has been said here, perhaps, to be in the record. 

Mr. Velde. I am sure that the committee would appreciate your 
giving us that information, and we will consider it for insertion into 
the record. ( See Oxnam exhibit No. 32-A, p. 3757.) 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you, sir. 

Mr. Doyle. May I ask, Mr. Chairman, at that point? What year 
were those 10 impressions written by you ? 

Bishop Oxnam. August 25, 1934. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, may I continue ? 

Mr. Velde. Proceed. 

Mr. Kunzig. I am confused at one point here, Bishop, because you 
said that you left the Methodist Federation in June of 1947. I have 
here a ballot in front of me which is a Methodist Federation for Social 
Action ballot, nominations for executive committee. (See Oxnam 
exhibit No. 33, pp. 3758-3763.) Then it says that these officers were 
elected by the national membership meeting in Kansas City, Decem- 
ber 27 to 29, in 1947. Your confirmation is requested, and then it lists 
various people, and among them it lists under members at large of 
the executive committee, No. 30, Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam, bishop, 
New York area. I hand this to you marked 

Bishop Oxnam. It is unnecessary to hand it to me, sir. I have the 
letter that I wrote resigning as a vice president and member of the 
executive committee at that time, and I will be glad to file it. There 
must be some error there. 

Mr. Velde. If you care to read it, we will be glad to hear it, the 
letter of resignation. 

Mr. Walter. What is the organization ? 

Mr. Kunzig. The Methodist Federation. 

Bishop Oxnam. It is very difficult, Mr. Chairman, to shift from 
one matter to another and have to pull files this way when I have no 
help, but I will do the best I can. 

This is June 9, 1947. It is a long letter, but I will read the first of 
it, which I think is all you will wish, and I will file the whole letter 
if you wish. 

Bishop Lewis O. Habtman, 

581 Boyleston Street, Boston 16, Mass. 
My Dear Bishop Hartman : I regret exceedingly that I must resign as a 
vice president of the Methodist Federation for Social Action. 

I go on stating why, because of the attacks upon John Foster Dulles, 
upon Martin Neimoeller and upon Kogawa. These gentlemen were 
my personal friends, and I simply could not have my name upon an 
organization that in addition to the other reasons that I have men- 
tioned to you 

Mr. Walter. How long were you a vice president ? 

Mr. Velde. Just a minute. May we introduce that into the record 
first, if you will. 

All right, proceed. 

Bishop Oxnam. I beg your pardon. 



3742 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Mr. Walter. How long were you an officer ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I cannot answer, sir, but I could find out. I know 
the terminal date, and I know that the first date could not have been 
before 1944, and I would judge from what Mr. Kunzig has said that 
it was probably 1946, but I am not sure of that. I can find out, of 
course. 

Mr. Velde. What is the next exhibit number ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Thirty-five. 

Mr. Velde. Will the clerk mark the letter Oxnam Exhibit No. 35, 
and without objection it will be introduced into the record at this 
point. 

(The letter referred to was received in evidence as Oxnam Exhibit 
No. 35. Seep. 3765.) 

Mr. Kunzig. Now, sir, in addition to your name on this ballot of 
December 27-29, 1947, there appears the name of a Miss Winifred 
Chappell, C-h-a-p-p-e-1-1, Miss Winifred Chappell. 

Bishop Oxnam. What year was this, please? 

Mr. Kunzig. This is 1947. 

Bishop Oxnam. I think she was dead at that time. 

Mr. Kunzig. Well, her name appears here, dead or alive. 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, I don't think she was alive at that time. I 
may be wrong. 

Mr. Velde. May we have order, please. 

Mr. Kunzig. I have here also another exhibit marked "Oxnam Ex- 
hibit 34" which is a letterhead of the Methodist Federation for Social 
Service, October 24, 1928. It is the letterhead where you are listed 
as executive secretary of the 20 years celebration, and it lists as secre- 
tary of the group Harry F. Ward and Winifred Chappell, again. (See 
Oxnam exhibit No. 34, p. 3764.) Did you know 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, her name was Chappell. 

Mr. Kunzig. Do you know Winifred Chappell ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, I had met her. 

Mr. Kunzig. How many years did you know her ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I do not know. I simply met her. She was one 
of the — what is her name? Was she an associate secretary there? I 
do not know how long she served. 

Mr. Kunzig. She is listed as a secretary. 

Bishop Oxnam. She had been in youth work in the church and 
went into that for Professor Ward, I think. I did not know her 
well enough to do other than — I mean, well enough to give any other 
impression than I know her, that is all. 

Mr. Scherer. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Scherer. 

Mr. Scherer. Did you know that Winifred Chappell was a member 
of the Communist Party ? 

Bishop Oxnam. No ; I did not know it, and if I had, I would have 
done everything to get her out. 

Mr. Scherer. Well, I can tell you that in the testimony taken in 
New York she was identified positively as a member of the Communist 
Party during the time that she was associated with the Methodist 
Federation. 

Bishop Oxnam. Then may I ask some of these gentlemen who have 
this kind of information to make it available for a Methodist court. 
We will take the proper steps. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3743 

Mr. Scherer. It will be available, I assure you. 

Bishop Oxnam. It means that the persons who make these allega- 
tions would have to come, testify probably subject to cross-examina- 
tion, and confront the witnesses. We proceed that way in our courts. 

Mr. Walter. What type of youth work was Winifred Chappell 
doing? 

Bishop Oxnam. I think she was in the organization that was known 
as the Epworth League at that time, but I may be wrong. 

Mr. Walter. Epworth League ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Jackson. 

Mr. Jackson. May I ask, what was your capacity at the time Wini- 
fred Chappell was active in the Epworth League ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I was the pastor, I believe, of the Church of All 
Nations, in Los Angeles. 

Mr. Jackson. In Los Angeles ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Scherer. Were you a member of the Methodist Federation at 
that time, Bishop ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I testified that I was a member from the time I 
was in college, I think, on up to the time I resigned. 

Mr. Jackson. Are you familiar, sir, with a statement in the Epworth 
Herald, I believe, which was written by Winifred Chappell ? I will 
read it to you 

(See Oxnam exhibit No. 36, p. 3766.) 

Bishop Oxnam. You don't need to read it. I have read it, and I 
deplore it, and I do not know why these matters are constantly brought 
up in connection with me. I suppose you are saying I was a member 
of the federation. Others here are members of the Methodist Church, 
and they were all related by association. 

Mr. Jackson. Bishop, here was an example, and I am going to ask 
permission of the committee to read it. 

Mr. Walter. I would like to hear it myself. You and the bishop 
apparently know what it is, but the rest of us do not. 

Mr. Velde. I am sure I do not. 

Bishop Oxnam. She was advising somebody to avoid the draft; a 
deplorable thing to me. 

Mr. Jackson. This is a statement credited to Winifred Chappell. 

It says : 

Young church fellows of draft age must decide something when war breaks 
out. In general, these youths have 4 choices instead of 2, as most of them think. 
First, they can conform, yield to the draft, play the game of the warmakers, 
be cannon fodder, get shot or gassed or blinded or del egged or dearmed, but if 
possible beat the enemy to shoot, gas, blind, dearm the fellows on the other side 
first. 

In the second place, they can be conscientious objectors and go to prison. A 
few score did that during the World War. A few hundred or thousand will do 
it next time. That takes even more courage than to go over the top. It takes 
just as much physical courage. The CO's in some prisons during the World War 
were subjected to extremely cruel treatment. But now a third choice, hardly 
so much as even heard of during the World War, appears in this possibility — 
stay out of jail. Why thus separate yourself from the masses? Why thus let 
yourself be put out of the game? Accept the draft, take the drill, go into the 
camps and on to the battlefield or into the munitions factories and transporta- 
tion field. But sabotage war preparations and war; be agitators or sabotage; 



3744 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

put down tools when the order is to make and load munitions ; spoil war mate- 
rials and machinery. 

The fourth choice is merely a further development of the third. It calls for 
sabotage but with a deliberate, conscious, informed intent to get rid of the pres- 
ent economic system, of which war is a part, and to build a new world, the 
existence for which peace is a necessity. If you will make this choice, make 
it now and begin to meet before war breaks with others of like purpose and of 
iron will to carry out the purpose. This means knowing what selfish capitalism 
is like, not just in general, but in particular ; not flinching even from knowing 
by name and specific deed the big profiteers who have betrayed the people, how 
they have profited from the starvation of children ; how they have called upon 
police and militia, clubbed and gas-bombed and machineguuned to put down 
the workers when they have cried for bread. 

That article, as I understand it, was in the Epworth Herald; is 
that correct, sir ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, if Mr. Jackson will state what he 
thinks of that, he and I will be in complete agreement, and I wish 
he would state it. 

Mr. Jackson. This is from the Epworth Herald, is that correct? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes ; that is correct. 

Mr. Jackson. That was a publication of the church for the Epworth 
League ? 

Bishop Oxnam. That is right. 

Mr. Jackson. What action was taken either within the Methodist 
Federation or within the Methodist Church in the form of disciplinary 
action relative to this statement? 

Bishop Oxnam. I think none. We do not discipline people for 
statements, much as I deplore that. It should never have been there. 
She was not an editor 

Mr. Walter. Did she continue her work among the youth after 
she wrote that article ? 

Mr. Scherer. She continued in the Methodist Federation. 

Mr. Velde. Just a minute. The question was asked of the witness. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I cannot answer questions that in- 
volve individuals in an organization now of nearly 10 millions. We 
have some 25,000 ministers. Frankly, I said that I did not know 
Miss Chappell well. I do know that she was in the federation for a 
considerable period of time. 

Mr. Scherer. Now, Mr. Chairman, may I answer Mr. Walter's 
question ? 

Mr. Velde. Yes ; Mr. Scherer. 

Mr. Scherer. The testimony taken by the committee in New York 
indicated that after she wrote that article she continued as an officer 
of the Methodist federation. 

Bishop Oxnam. That is exactly what I said, I think. 

Mr. Moulder. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr Velde. Mr. Moulder. 

Mr. Moulder. Were you in a position to exercise any control or 
authority over 

Bishop Oxnam. None whatsoever. 

Mr. Moulder. Over Miss Chappell ? 

Bishop Oxnam. You see, a Methodist bishop is not a disciplinary 
officer. Our ministers are responsible to what we call the annual 
conference. 

Mr. Walter. Yes, but when your attention was called to such a 
shocking thing, as I think this was, why did you not see to it that 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3745 

the proper official took tlie disciplinary action that should have been 
taken against that kind of a person ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, Mr. Walter, I do not know when that ap- 
peared, but you see, I have not been a bishop through all of the years, 
and a minister in Los Angeles, Calif., does not exercise, I think, the 
authority that perhaps you think I possess. 

Mr. Walter. Well, if the woman had made that kind of a state- 
ment in my community — and I am not an official in a church — I would 
have seen to it that somebody took the kind of action that would have 
taken her out of a job where she had anything to do with the training 
of youth. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, I think you are quite right, sir. 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Clardy. 

Mr. Clardy. May I ask you some questions that tie in with one 
portion of that statement that was from the pen of Miss Chappell? 
She condemned what she called the capitalist system. You have 
here tonight repeatedly said that you thought the federation per- 
formed a noble service — you may not have used the word "noble", 
but I got that impression — up until 1932. Were you not aware of the 
fact that during the period not only up to 1932 but after that date 
that the words put out by the MFSA carried that same theme song 
attacking our economic system and by subtle means praising the col- 
lectivist system ? I am not going to bring you the myriad examples 
that I have. I have examined the record carefully, and I am 
thoroughly and utterly convinced that they were carrying out, as 
Mr. Kornfeder and others said, the Communist Party line, but did 
you not, yourself, know that savage attack, sometimes subtly and 
sometimes brutally, upon our economic system? 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, if I may be permitted to answer 
that, so I will be understood, I would be privileged to answer it. It 
will take more than just a "yes" or "no." You noted the question. 

Mr. Velde. Certainly. I am sorry, I did not hear the question. I 
was talking of something else. 

Bishop Oxnam. May I say first regarding my own belief and then 
relate it to your question ? 

Mr. Clardy. I was not speaking of your beliefs. I was asking if 
you had not noted 

Bishop Oxnam. You see, Mr. Chairman, I believe the American way 
has been, let us say, a dynamic way. We have never been pledged to 
what you may call dogmatism. We speak of our economic system. 
Now, just what is that system ? This will take just a moment. 

In the American system, for instance, we have a public-highway 
system. I think it is the best in the world. It is collectively owned. 
I do not want somebody calling it Socialist. I believe it is American, 
and it is good. 

Mr. Walter. The highway system is collectively owned ? 

Bishop Oxnam. The public-highway system is owned by the people; 
yes, sir. We have a public-school system which is owned by the people. 
I do not want it called socialism. I believe it is American, and it is 
good. I will not call the roll, but when I see the lighthouses when I 
fly in here, and I know of that service, I am proud of those men. It 
is true it is a governmental service, but I think it is American, and it is 
good. Run it all the way down until you come to the national parks. 



3746 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Now, personally I believe it is better to have the national parks 
handled as they are handled than to have them privately owned and 
privately run. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Chairman, what has this to do with the question ? 

Bishop Oxnam. He has asked me a question, sir, that involves an 
economic system, and if you will let me answer it, I am coming to it 
very quickly. 

Mr. Clardy. May I interrupt you ? What I said was merely inquir- 
ing, sir, very simply, if you did not detect traces of the type of attack 
that Miss Chappell was making upon our system, spread throughout 
the publications of the federation, throughout the time that you were 
with it? 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, may I conclude in a sentence? I 
was going to refer to those aspects of our system which involved certain 
answers. I was going to refer to the public corporations, and I was 
going to refer to organizations like the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission and the like. Personally I believe that in the overwhelming 
percentage of America enterprise, private enterprise in the long run 
will result in greater creativity, greater productivity, and make a 
greater contribution to freedom than any system man has known. 

Now, that is my position. 

Now, to answer your question, sir : Professor Ward believed that the 
capitalist system was evil. He believed that there was a sinful prin- 
ciple at its heart. During the period up to 1932 that was not stressed 
over much. It did come to the fore from then on, and you recall that 
they even changed the masthead, the statement as to the objective of 
the federation, until it was changed frankly in objective, so that you 
could call it a Socialist objective. I disagreed with that fundamen- 
tally. That was a part of this disagreement that I am talking about. 

Now, there was one answer there, either get out or try to change it. 
I did the best I could. I did not change it, and I am sorry. I left 
the organization when I stated, but I want my own position clearly 
understood here regarding what I believe to be the free way in the 
economic order. 

Mr. Clardy. I understood that. 

Mr. Velde. Did you ever cast a vote for Jack McMichael as execu- 
tive secretary of the MFSA ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I do not believe I ever did. I told you that I 
doubted I had attended more than 2 or 3 meetings from the time that 
I was in New York City. I do not believe I ever voted for him. I do 
not think I could have voted for Jack McMichael for the executive 
office. I felt it was a mistake to have him there. 

Mr. Clardy. Mr. Chairman, I did not finish. 

Mr. Velde. Proceed, Mr. Clardy. 

Mr. Clardy. The reason I asked you the question as to whether you 
had not detected that undertone, and sometimes it was even more than 
that, criticism, against the American system was because of something 
that you published in 1933, and I shall not labor this long. It is 
entitled "Preaching in the Social Crises." 

You will recall that the first item, the first article that you selected, 
was one entitled, "Preaching and Socialism," by Kirby Page. I pre- 
sume — and I am quite sure — that you are not aware that he has been 
tied in with the Communist operations by this committee. Believe 
me, he has. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3747 

Bishop Oxnam. Frankly I do not believe in the case of Kirby 
Page — and I would like to hear his testimony 

Mr. Clardy. You will discover how he is named when the testimony 
I mentioned earlier is released, but here is the point I am trying to 
make : In 1933 when this book was published, in the first paragraph 
of the first article in the book by Kirby Page I find this significant 
sentence : 

It is supremely tragic that at this late day evidence must still be produced 
that socialism is much closer akin to the Christian gospel than capitalism. 

Now, I shall not labor it further, but on down : 

The ship of capitalism is sinking and will carry down with it all institutions 
that fasten themselves like barnacles to its hull. 

And the point is that the church is to be destroyed, as you know, with- 
out my telling you, by not cutting free from the American system of 
capitalism. 

Now, that suggestion to me that is of that time you probably did 
not understand that the federation publication was preaching this 
same doctrine. Am I correct in that ? 

Bishop Oxnam. No, sir; you are not correct. Those were lectures 
delivered at the Boston University Conference on Preaching. You 
remember in 1933 that we had just gone through an upheaval in this 
country that was very, very serious. We brought to that conference 
the best speakers we could who would deal with the question of re- 
ligion and the social crisis. You will find men in that volume taking 
exactly the opposite point of view. 

Mr. Clardy. Bishop, may I interrupt you ? I have read this in its 
entirety many times. There are 5 articles out of the 12 — one of which 
is by you — which deal with the question of economics, and every one 
of them takes the Socialist stand. That is the reason why I brought 
it up. The two succeeding articles, if you please, are by Jerome 
Davis and Harry F. Ward, both of whom have been identified as 
Communists. 

Mr. Velde. The Chair would like to make a statement. I think that 
we are getting to irrelevant material, and as we should finish 

Mr. Clardy. I beg your pardon, Mr. Chairman. I was merely 
asking the one question, and I am done with it, and that has been 
answered sufficiently. 

Bishop Oxnam. I wish, sir, you had read my introduction to that 
book. 

Mr. Clardy. I have, and do not misunderstand me : I am not accus- 
ing you of being a Communist or anything akin to it. Far from it ; 
but I do think that you were muddled in your thinking and unclear in 
your understanding. 

Now, that is all I am going to say. 

Mr. Velde. May we proceed in regular order. 

Mr. Ktjnzig. Mr. Chairman, I want to state officially for the record, 
in addition to the identification of Winifred Chappell that I have 
already read into the record, she was also identified in testimony within 
the last 2 weeks by Manning Johnson to have been a member of the 
Communist Party. 

I also would like to read at this point the testimony of Leonard 
Patterson in executive testimony before the committee on July 7, 1953, 



3748 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

in New York City, testifying this time with regard to Rev. Harry F. 
Ward. 

Question. Let me ask, did you ever know in your work in the Communist Party 
a Rev. Harry F. Ward? 

Answer. Yes. 

Question. Did you know him well? 

Answer. Yes, I worked with him. 

Question. Would you explain to the committee just how you worked with him 
and where ? 

Answer. In New York City, I believe it was in 1933 or 1934; I think it was 
1933; Dr. Ward, Earl Browder, myself, Victor Jerome, Manning Johnson, and 
other top leading members of the Communist Party were assigned to a top 
fraction. In other words, a top policymaking body of the Communist Party, by 
the central committee of the party, to prepare — 

And then Mr. Scherer said : 

Did you say Dr. Ward was a member of that fraction? 

Mr. Patteeson. I said that. To prepare for a conference to sponsor a broader 
conference against war and fascism to be later on in the year of 1933. This top 
policy body met at 799 Broadway, where many of the party front organizations 
met at that time, and again there was a conference held in Chicago. I believe 
that was the Second Congress Against War and Fascism. I believe that was in 
1935. I may be a little wrong in the dates, but research will show that we also 
had a meeting of this fraction while the congress was there, and I was, together 
with Dr. Ward, in this top fraction meeting in Chicago also. 

Question. This is a top fraction meeting of the Communist Party? 

Answer. Yes, a meeting where only selected top leading Communist Party 
members could attend. It was a policymaking body. 

Question. Was Rev. Harry F. Ward present? 

Answer. He was present and an active member of that body. 

Question. And therefore you knew Rev. Harry F. Ward as a member of the 
Communist Party and as a very important member of the Communist Party? 

Answer. Yes. 

Question. Was he still a member of the party at the time you left the party? 

Answer. To my knowing, yes, he was still active in the Communist Party 
front organizations like the National Negro Congress. In fact, I believe in 
1935 or 1936 they had a meeting of the congress in Philadelphia, and he was 
present there and participated in Communist Party fraction. 

Question. As far as you know at the time you left the party he was still a 
member? 

Answer. Yes. 

Question. And you know of his participation in Communist-front organiza- 
tions subsequent to the date of your leaving the party; is that right? 

Answer. Yes, I know he was active in most of the party front organizations, 
and he was used many times to spearhead a call for such organizations. In 
other words, he would be among the sponsors to get other so-called professional 
people, liberal ministers, and the party would be able to attract other people that 
it could not attract otherwise. 

That is the testimony of Leonard Patterson with regard to Rev. 
Harry F. Ward. 

Mr. Scherer. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Scherer. 

Mr. Scherer. Do you have that part of the testimony of that wit- 
ness who testified in New York that while Dr. Ward was a professor 
at the Union Theological Seminary in New York, he sent two young 
graduate ministers down to Baltimore for their assignment to 
churches and at the same time for their assignment as functionaries in 
the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Kttnzig. I remember very well the testimony, Mr. Scherer, as 
I was there, of course, too. I do not have that at the moment. We 
could look it up at the moment if you wish to go on to another matter. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3749 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, may I ask, I thought we were here 
to correct my files. This is all interesting information, and it seems 
to me places such an obligation upon this committee to make it pos- 
sible for those within the church who have authority to take action, 
that if that cooperation can be given, we can take it, but why it is 
involved in my case, I find it a little hard to understand. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. All right, Mr. Jackson. 

Mr. Jackson. It seems to me that this relates — it does relate di- 
rectly to the Methodist Federation for Social Service. It is irrefu- 
table evidence that in the policymaking echelons of the Methodist 
Federation for Social Service there were those who were there to do 
the work of the Communist Party. It cannot be overlooked I think, 
Bishop, that during at least a portion of the time that this was going 
on, you were also a member of the Methodist Federation, and, I be- 
lieve, an officer of the federation. 

Bishop Oxnam. And, Mr. Jackson, you didn't know anything about 
this until this testimony under subpena came in. The church doesn't 
have the power to subpena these former Communists. We cleared up 
that organization as far as the church is concerned. There is official 
action taken concerning the Methodist Federation for Social Action, 
and in 1936 I wrote the resolution that called upon all agencies that 
are not regular agencies of the church, to put in their title the term 
"unofficial." I personally wrote that and through the years they 
always did that. 

Mr. Jackson. It is true we did not participate in this testimony 
until it was developed. We felt justified in issuing a report. 

Bishop Oxnam. But your report came to no conclusion and any- 
body reading that report cannot tell what the opinion of the committee 
is. If that report had actually brought in data and had come to a 
conclusion, we could move, but I do not think that report came to any 
conclusion. It presented a great deal of material from Mr. Steele, 
Mr. Woltman, and so on. I may be wrong on that. 

Mr. Jackson. There has been evidence over a very long period of 
time that there were activities within the Methodist Federation for 
Social Action which appeared to be Communist directed and now I 
may add, from what we had in the way of background material, we 
now have the sworn testimony indicating that which was believed 
to be the case was indeed the case. 

Bishop Oxnam. How can that be helpful to those of us in the church 
facing this kind of a situation ? 

Mr. Jackson. I think the committee has been of great service in 
bringing forth the fact that the Methodist ministers, in one case as I 
understand your testimony, an active member, an active pastor at the 
present time is or has been a member of the Communist Party. I be- 
lieve that unless this committee had been functioning, unless this testi- 
mony had been taken, that matter might have gone on and on and on 
and have been unknown for all time to come. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, was Jack McMichael called before 
the committee ? Did he have any opportunity to answer that ? I am 
not pleading for him, but did he have a chance to answer what was 
alleged ? 



3750 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Mr. Velde. As far as I am concerned, Mr. Jack McMichael has 
never been called before this committee. 18 

Bishop Oxnam. Then this is given to the public all over the Nation 
before the man accused has had so much as an opportunity to answer. 

Mr. Scherer. Do you concur that Reverend McMichael is a member 
of the Communist Party today ? You said so yourself. 

Bishop Oxnam. That isn't correct at all. I am dealing with proce- 
dures and I was dealing with procedures when I made the statement. 

Mr. Scherer. On the basis of the testimony we had in New York, 
sworn testimony of any number of witnesses, and on that basis how 
could any reasonable person come to any other conclusion than that 
Dr. Ward and Reverend McMichael are dangerous Communists ? 

Bishop Oxnam. That isn't it. 

Mr. Scherer. What is it? 

Bishop Oxnam. That a man is accused before a decision is reached, 
and I do not believe this is a court. 

Mr. Velde. This certainly is not a court, but what I am puzzled 
about, Bishop, you have your suspicions regarding these people, Dr. 
Ward and Reverend McMichael, for some years. What did you do 
about it? It seems to me your obligation as an American citizen 
should be to report that to some investigative agency, whether it be 
this body or whether it be the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the 
ONI or G-2. 

Bishop Oxnam. I told you I had discussed the question of Jack Mc- 
Michael and I would be glad to tell the committee with whom in execu- 
tive session. 

Mr. Velde. Your confidence will be respected. 

Mr. Walter. I don't know Jack McMichael and a moment ago I 
heard his name mentioned the first time. Is he the man who assigned 
two young clergymen to Communist cells ? 

Mr. Scherer. That was Dr. Ward. 

Mr. Walter. And Dr. Ward assigned these clergymen to Commu- 
nist cells? 

Mr. Scherer. At the same time they took their ministerial posts in 
Baltimore. 

Mr. Velde. Let us try to conclude before midnight. 

Mr. Scherer. May I ask this question ? I haven't taken too much 
time. 

Mr. Velde. All right. 

Mr. Scherer. In the magazine section of the newspaper of a couple 
of Sundays ago, Bishop, there is an article by Bishop G. Bromley 
Oxnam entitled "How to Uncover Communists" and in that article 
you particularly attack the committee. 

Bishop Oxnam. Would you quote the article? 

Mr. Scherer. Yes; in that article you say that the uncovering of 
Communists in religion should be left to the clergy and now you admit, 
don't you, that 

Bishop Oxnam. Would you quote just what I said, sir? 

Mr. Scherer. Just a minute. Here today you admit that you were 
unable to cope with it in the Methodist Federation for Social Action, 
of which you were a part. 

u At a later date, Rev. Jack R. McMichael was subpenaed and he testified in public 
hearings on July 30 and 31, 1953. His testimony is being- reviewed at the time of this 
printing by the Department of Justice for possible perjury charges. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3751 

Bishop Oxnam. Well, are you asking a question ? 

Mr. Scherer. No ; I am making a statement. 

Bishop Oxnam. I beg your pardon then. 

Mr. V elde. I would like to ask the question : Do you now feel that 
the church authorities are able to cope with the problem, in view of 
the statement that you have made? 

Bishop Oxnam. I could wish that the article could be in the records 
so that it would be known what I did say. 

Mr. Kunzig. May the article that was in Parade be marked as "Ox- 
nam Exhibit No. 37," please? 

Mr. Velde. Without objection, it will be introduced in the record 
at this point. 

(Document referred to was marked as "Oxnam Exhibit No. 37" and 
received in evidence (see opp. p. 3766).) 

Mr. Scherer. I might call your attention to a speech or statement 
you made a few weeks ago when you challenged the committee to prove 
that there was one Communist member of the clergy. 

Bishop Oxnam. I think I said to name any one Communist who held 
a position of major responsibility in any church. 

Mr. Clardy. Didn't you say you didn't know any ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I made two statements. One was much earlier in 
which I said that I did not know of a Communist in the Methodist 
Church, and the second had to do with the Philadelphia speech. 

Mr. Scherer. I don't exactly know whether it was Philadelphia or 
not. 

Bishop Oxnam. And there was a great meeting of a good many 
thousand people and I made reference to the fact that I would chal- 
lenge anybody to name a Communist who held a position of major 
responsibility in any of our churches. I still haven't heard. There 
may be such a person. If so, I regret it. 

Mr. Scherer. How about Beverend McMichael ? 

Bishop Oxnam. We do not consider that McMichael had a large 
position. That is an unofficial position. 

Mr. Scherer. Was he not executive secretary of the Methodist 
Federation and Dr. Ward a prominent person in the Union Theologi- 
cal Seminary ? 

Bishop Oxnam. The Union Theological College is not a Methodist 
organization. It is not a regular organization of the church at all, 
and has been so known through the years. 

Mr. Jackson. Would you say that Dr. Ward is an eminent church 
personality ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, Professor Ward was a distinguished person, 
I would say, as a student. He never had any executive responsibility 
in the church, I think. 

Mr. Walter. You say that he did not occupy an executive position 
of responsibility. Do you feel that a man molding the minds of young 
clergymen occupied a far more important position than did a man in 
an executive post ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I think that he did exercise considerable influence 
and I have testified to my break with him and what I tried to do. It is 
very easy for someone with hindsight to suggest what an individual 
should have done at a particular time. I wish in the light of the pres- 
ent situation that we should have handled that matter much earlier. 
We did not have this kind of testimony, please remember, and it may 



3752 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

be that some way must be developed whereby this kind of information 
can reach church groups in such fashion that proper steps can be taken. 

Mr. Walter. Do you know of any way other than this way in 
developing that very thing? 

Bishop Oxnam. I think that a committee investigating un-Ameri- 
can activities, such as this committee is doing, if the procedures are 
carefully scrutinized so that a man's name is not blazoned across the 
country before he himself has a chance to be heard in matters of that 
kind, all of that could be handled very easily. 

This standard volume which is published by the Cornell University 
in its civil liberty study written by Prof. Robert K. Carr of Dart- 
mouth, and the study was financed by the Rockefeller Foundation, 
has constructive suggestions that it seems to me would solve those 
problems and conserve the values that all of us realize exist in this 
kind of procedure. 

Mr. Clardy. Might I ask a question at this point, Mr. Chairman? 

Mr. Velde. I had already recognized Mr. Doyle. 

Mr. Clardy. I yield to the gentleman from California. 

Mr. Doyle. May I have a moment, please, Mr. Chairman ? 

Mr. Velde. Yes. 

Mr. Doyle. For the benefit of the witness I think it is appropriate, 
Mr. Chairman, to call the witness' attention to the fact that this com- 
mittee has just adopted a set of rules that apply to witnesses and 
attorneys appearing before the committee, and I call special attention 
to rule No. X, and I am not ashamed of the fact that I personally 
put a lot of work on it, and this rule does make a requirement for 
this committee to notice that any person named for the first time 
before this committee as a Communist or a Fascist or a subversive has 
an opportunity to be heard, and that rule requires this committee, 
within a reasonable time after a person is first named before this com- 
mittee, to get notice by a registered letter of the fact that a statement 
that he has been so named has been made, and the date and the place 
of the statement, and the name of the person who made the statement 
and the person has 15 days in which to personally appear before this 
committee or send some communication to the committee so that 
reputation, if he fears it has been damaged, can be protected. 

I make that statement, and no doubt the people in this room who 
have heard this discussion today may not realize that the committee 
is trying to improve its conduct right along. I wish to state I am 
not satisfied with what we are doing, always, but we are making 
headway. 

May I call the witness' attention to the fact that in 1952, on Feb- 
ruary 17, this committee, apparently with diligence and much work, 
published this statement that the Methodist Federation for Social 
Action was Communist. 

Mr. Velde. May I interrupt there ? In the course of the statement 
the Methodist Federation for Social Action is named as a tool of the 
Communist Party, I think. 

Mr. Doyle. I realize that, but in this booklet of 87 pages published 
by our subcommittee and in which the Methodist Federation for 
Social Action is mentioned, we make no comment that that organiza- 
tion, in this book at least, was Communist. 

One thing more and I think the record should show that this testi- 
mony at New York and here in Washington to which so much atten- 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3753 

tion has been given, and possibly rightly so, about Dr. Ward and 
about Reverend McMichael which was taken here in July of 1953; 
in other words, this committee had no knowledge so far as our record 
was concerned of the attitude of Dr. Ward or Reverend McMichael 
until, may I say, we were getting ready for this hearing, in which you 
recall you requested to be heard and you are having your wish 
fulfilled. So it is a difficult matter to get evidence on Communists. 
It is not an easy thing, even for our expert investigators. It is not 
an easy thing at all. 

One further observation, Mr. Chairman, it is 11 o'clock. This wit- 
ness has mentioned a dozen times, I think, that he wanted to have 
his record clear and identified and corrected, if it should be cor- 
rected, and I think before we take more time to prove who Dr. Ward 
was and who Reverend McMichael was, that the witness ought to 
understand when he leaves this room whether or not he has any 
corrections to make in his record. I understood that is why he came. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Doyle, I think this matter should be taken up in 
executive session. 

Mr. Doyle. What should be ? 

Mr. Velde. The matter of correction of any of the records. 

Mr. Doyle. What I mean, Mr. Chairman, is : Has the witness any- 
thing further to say on his record or has the committee anything 
further to ask him about his record. 

Mr. Velde. Yes ; certainly they do. We have a lot of other mate- 
rial to go into and I would appreciate it if we could get down to the 
subject matter. 

Mr. Doyle. I thought the subject matter was the files of the com- 
mittee, and that is what I am interested in, getting that before we 
adjourn. I think we have proved adequately enough that Mr. Ward 
and Mr. McMichael were off color and probably Communists, but 
that doesn't prove that this witness was a Communist. 

Mr. Velde. No one has asserted that he was. Let us proceed. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I am sure you will pardon a com- 
ment on what Mr. Doyle said. 

Mr. Clardy. To concentrate on something that you have said, you 
mentioned some criticism of the committee procedure and I think 
that is very much in point and something that ought to be discussed. 
I want to ask you this : Didn't you, just a few minutes ago, suggest 
that because the church lacked what this committee possesses, the 
power of subpena, that you could not uncover these things that we 
were inquiring about ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir; I did. 

Mr. Clardy. With that in mind, would you not agree with us that 
because we do have the power of Congress, the power of subpena and 
the power to investigate which the church does not, that we are far 
better equipped? I am not talking about files or anything else, but 
aren't we better equipped to do the job for you and for the Nation 
as a whole ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I have always believed there is a 
proper place for congressional investigation. It is a part of our 
American system. I have been dealing with what I believe to be an 
unfortunate handling of the files. 

Mr. Doyle has just made reference to the rules. I read them. I 

43620—54— — 12 



3754 TESTIMONY OP BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

think anybody reading those rules will recognize distinct improve- 
ments. 

Mr. Clardy. May I interrupt you to tell you that those rules are the 
rules that this committee has been following to my personal knowledge 
since I went on the committee in January of this year ; that they were 
followed prior to that time with one exception, and that exception was 
considered in the early meeting of this committee, and that has to do 
with the notification of persons who are identified as Communists in 
open hearings. 

Aside from that, and I am glad to hear you say that you like what 
we have done, the procedure is identical with what we have been fol- 
lowing. We merely put it in writing. 

Bishop Oxnam. I am happy to know it, but Mr. Chairman, you 
will let me say this, that Mr. Dies, who had some experience in this 
matter I believe, has just introduced a bill into the House which goes 
much farther than any of the rules. I am not sure his recommenda- 
tions are wise. I am not competent, really, to say. I think Mr. 
Keating and Mr. Javits have done the same and when reference was 
made to the Methodist Federation in the matter of the 100 questions 
about communism and religion, you will remember that was pub- 
lished in 1948, and the Methodist Federation was referred to as a tool 
of the Communist Party. 

I have here a letter signed by Mr. John S. Wood, dated May 10, 
1951, in which Mr. Wood says the following : 

This committee has made no investigation of the Methodist Federation for 
Social Service or its successor, the Methodist Federation for Social Action, 
and therefore is unable to furnish you information in regard to that organiza- 
tion. 

Now maybe the chairman of the committee, Mr. Wood, did not know 
what had gone on, but here was an official statement 3 years after 
the organization was called a tool of the Communist Party. Now I am 
not debating except to say that procedures that can be so inaccurate 
as that, I should think need to be checked and particularly in the 
matter of the files where material is released about an individual before 
it is verified. That is why I came here. 

Mr. Clardy. Do you think any good purpose would have been served 
in the Alger Hiss case, and this has no reference to you, if every step 
in the investigative process, everything that went into the files had 
been called to his attention as the committee went along, and don't 
forget it was this committee that brought that man to heel 

Bishop Oxnam. I notice that Professor Carr gives this committee 
credit for that. 

Mr. Clardy. Do you think that the procedure you are suggesting, 
do you think that would work in an investigation of a Communist? 
Don't you see that you would utterly as you quoted me in Parade, 
utterly destroy the investigative process. I said that. I meant that, 
not only for that but for other reasons. We have sat here and taken 
abuse day after day and week after week and month after month and 
if you had gone through the fire and furnace that we have you would 
understand what we have gone through. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Clardy, I think we are getting irrelevant. 

Mr. Clardy. I don't think so, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. It is interesting. 

Mr. Clardy. Not only is it interesting but it is important. I want 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3755 
OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 30 

NATIONAL OfFKARi w wi Lu»,i. tna 

S^^ American Civil Liberties Union g^L- 

«- HJi— _A " C "~* SOUTHERN CAUf ORNIA BRANCH R„ C |BC Ow . 

^7T"£<v~"" 540 Wilcox Building. Los An K el« SsTTEET "" 

WUDLTalA 



June 14. 1923 



Dear Ft 1 anas: 

following-up your offer to ear/e on the Member- 
•talp Corn-ait tee of the Own Liberties Union, we enclose 
several olrculars, with membership blanks, and ask yon 
to distribute thss eaonff your friends. 

As our greatest means of obtaining new mentors will 
be the "personal oontaot" of members of the eotnlttec, 
with non-members, *e request that you not only distribute 
these olrculars, but that yon advise ua .mediately hew 
many more circulars you will be willing to distribute* 

You will receive a uotlee of our next msetlng-in 
a few days. Awaiting your reply, we renala 

Tours very truly, 

-MESICAM CIVIL LIBERTIES UN10B 

By: William D. ft 



vbtB/vb 

the record to show that it is in point because I believe that it is neces- 
sary to point out some of the misconceptions that the good witness 
possesses. 

Mr. Velde. Proceed. 

Mr. Kunzig. I would like to offer into evidence Oxnam exhibits 
Nos. 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, and 36. They are all the documents we have 
been talking about for the last half hour, but I haven't had a chance to 
put them into evidence until this moment. 

Mr. Velde. Without objection, they will be put in the record. 

(Documents heretofore referred to as Oxnam exhibit Nos. 30, 31, 32, 
33, 34, 35, and 36 were received in evidence. Oxnam exhibit No. 37, al- 
ready accepted in evidence follows in numerical order.) 



3756 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 31 
^ TWE NTY YEARS OF SOCIAL SERVICE 

Cljc tfjletbobtst Juration for foetal berime 



150 FTFTH AVENUE. NEW YORK CITY 



NATIONAL COMMrTTtt 

r P. TITTLE. Chairman 

C BROMLEY OXNAM. E.'< 



S-<f 



P. W ADAMS. Sp'ta«6eld. M.sa 
O. V AUMAN. Ckj.ajn 
KAY AllfN. Honaril. N Y. 
M. P. BURNS. PUidelfka 
L. H BUCBEE. Minneapolis 
KING D BEACH. Ca»ea;o 
DAN B BRUMMITT. (.kja 
STELLA W. BRUMMITT. Crucaras 
EMKLR BJORNBERG. Chicasw 
P. O BECK, t.ensto* 
E W 8LAXEMAN. Berkeley. CI 
W. C BARCLAY. Oueac* 
JAMES C BAKER. Ufbana. III. 
GEO A. COE. Cladon. Cil. 
R E DlrTENDORFER. New York 
EDW T. DEVINE. H'ubiiui 

D. P DIEFENDORJ\ E. Orassjs. N J 

E. P. DENNETT. Sao Francisco 
A. E. DAY. Pinjbursh 

P. C. DINGER. Oak Part. IU. 

P. B FISHER. India 

R- W. CRAHAM. Ctestoo. Ion 

V. E. J. CRATZ. Cfc^crj 

W. M. CILBERT. MscUsoo. N. I 

A. A. HHST. Dconr 

PAUL HUTCHINSON. Otacaao 

L. O HARTMAN. Boaton 

H. S HAMILTON. Bone. Idaho 

E. S. HAMMOND. Sale. On. 

BAEELLE HORTON. Lake Bliaf. Ill 

A. V. HARRIS. No York 

C. P. HARCRAVES. Ctucaao 

FRANC KINGDOM. Laoamf. M..h 

LOUISA UT2EL. Viclor. Oko 

I C. LAZENBY. Milwaukee 

J. V. LANCDALE. Btooklen 

H E. LUCCOCK. No. York 

JESSE LACKLEN. Bill oia. Moru 

C. S. LACKLAND. Mcsd.illr. Pa 

AMY LEWIS. N— York 

W H. MeMASTER. Allaaoor. Okao 

mary Mcdowell. awat» 

H. H. MEYER. New York 

A E MONGER. Sou* Brad, bid 

EDW. LAIRD MILLS. Portland. Ote 

J. R MACEE. Seattle 

O. H. M.t.lLL. Seattle 

P. M. NORTH. New Yofk 

O. T. OLSON. Baliissore 

EARL ROADMAN. Mitotell. S D 

W. J. SHERMAN. San Franeiaco 

W. B 8PAULDINC. IMIiop. Mom. 

C. D. SEINNER. Tula. Okla. 

W. L. STTDGER. Kansas dr. 

ROBT L TUCKER. Columbia! 

W. P. THIRKIELD. Cbanaoooja 

WORTH M TIPPY. New York 

L. K WILLMAN. Wilkea-Barrt. Pa 

HERBERT WELCH. Cores 

V O WARD. Maaoeaoolat 

JAMES M. YARD. New York 



ANNIVERSARY CELEBRA TION 

KEYNOTE: Face luuea— Back the Federation! 

OBJECTIVES. Every Methodist minister who kno»i that the religion 

of Jesus require; the transformation of human society. 

a wpporaog n a t i i a f a i i. 

Every minister who u not lure, but wants- to know. 

• BsiHttiel ekwswfkraj 

Ac least ooo lay swaavsW in every local church. 



EXECUTIVE (jOUUTCTm 
I J MeCONNELL 
H F RALL 
CEORCE ELLIOTT 
HERBERT N SHENTON 
RALPH B LKMY 

TREASURL* 
CILBERT Q LsSOURD 

EaKUTAJUB 
HARRY P. WARD 
WINIFRED L. CKAPPELL 



■tvroh 17. 1028. 



Dear Heater of the federation: 



Oar celebration of the Twentieth Anniversary of the Methodist 
Federation for Social Service began In earnest in this section Mon- 
day. The preachers of Boston ar.d vicinity met at the Wesley an 
Building, and Professor Ward delivered a compelling message, shot 
through with prophetlo fire, and characterized by penetrating anal- 
ysis. We were tremendously helped. 

A luncheon followed and Professor Ward spoke relative to the 
future of the Federation. This was followed by a consideration of 
the most effective plan for securing additional members for the 
Federation. Our plan is to assign the names of the non-members la 
the conference to the members, and to request each member to Inter- 
view five or six non-members and present the question of Joining the 
Federation. Can you not get a group to do something like this In 
your section? The Hew York office will give counsel on request. 

News is oomlng in from many seotions of the country . At 
Cleveland Dr. John H. Blackburn presented the matter to the minister- 
ial association, and got several members. Wade Crawford Barolay Is 
taking time to solicit members, as is Kiss Vary Samson of the Board 
of Home Missions In Philadelphia. Splendid meetings have been held la 
Chicago and Hew York. Pittsburgh, Philadelphia and Colorado ooni'er- 
ences have fine programs under way. It appears that ths anniversary 
will be a prominent aotlvity In oitles all the way from Seattle to lew 
York. The Kansas City part of the program is also moving along. 

As you know, this is a voluntary organization, and dependent upoa 
the services of Its loyal members. Von' t vou help? You can send In m 
list of names who might be Interested In the Bulletin membership, or 
full membership. You can solicit your friends. You oan send items to 
the Advocates. In a soore of ways the Individual oan help. 



Will you not write us at once renewing your own membership, If Its 
expiration is near at hand, telling us whatever you are doing, or will 
do, for the Anniversary? And don't forget that we are eager to have 
at least one lay member In every looal church. 




Ww/ 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3757 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 32 



THE METHODIST FEDERATION FOR SOCIAL SERVICE 

150 IIKI1I AVENUE (UNOFFICIAL) NfcW YOKK II, N. V. 

Tel. WAlkin, 9-75JO ,*Vj. 



OFFICERS 

LCWW O. HANTMAM 



JAMES C BAKER 



O. BROMLEY OXNAM 

■'CI*MllOI"T 
TMSLMA tTIVINl 

mcoiidiho iictn.a. 
GILBERT o. LtsoURO 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

LESTER w. AUMAN 

JAMES C. BAKE* 

WADE CRAWFORD BARCLAY 

MARY McLKOD BETHUNE 

CHARLES W. BRASHARIB 

HAROLD C. CASE 

WILSON O. COLE 

GILBERT S. COX 

HENRY HITT CRANE 

OWEN M. SEER 

CORLISS F. HARORAVSS 

ROBERT C I. OWE 

OAVIO O. JONES 

LEWIS O. HARTMAN 

JOHN C. LAZENBT 

OILBERT O. LISOURD 

FRANKLIN H. LITTELL 

EOOAR A. LOVE 

BTANLEY S. McKEE 

O. BROMLEY OXNAM 

•SORQE L. POOR 

ROBERT R. POWELL 

H. M. RATLIFF 

LLOYD H. RISING 

MIRIAM RISTINC 

CHARLES E. SCHOFIELO 

CHESTER A. SMITH 

THELMA STEVENS 

MRS. M. E. TILLY 

RALPH B. URMY 

EOOAR M. WAHLBERO 

WILLIAM T. WATKINS 

WAYNE WHITE 

RUTH F. WOLCOTT 

YOUTH MEMBERS 



ANN FITZFATRICK 
SARAH B. HESTER 
LLOYD O. WHITE 
'FBENZA L. S. WOODS 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
JACK RICHARD McMICHAEL 



April 12, 1946 



Soar Congressmani 



On more than one occasion our gcvsTBtseat ha* expressed i tt 
support for the Danish opponents, of Franco, who was la fact 
a fascist ally of our Axis enemies, at whoso hands so aany 
of America's flnost youth gavo tholr lives. Our government 
has Jolnod with tho United Rations in Its unanliaous Judgment 
that the Franco Falangist roglmo is in effect an outlaw regime 
■brought to powor by tho aid of Fascist Germany and Italy* 

Mow sensational chargos havo boen aado that Franco Spain la 
harboring wantod Bail war criminals and Hail scientists who 
aro busy in Spain developing hideous weapons of war intended 
to ho uaod against Franco, Am or lea and othor democratic lands* 

Peoples everywhere are today asking what America Is prepared 
actually to do against this roglmo whoso fascist loader has 
boon so contemptous of the Unltod Statos, of dODocracy and of 
tho Unltod Nations* 

How Important It is that we mako clear for all to sea our honest, 
uncompromising opposition to Franco and our support of his 
Spanish enemies, whoa our own government has encouraged] We 
understand that tho Joint AntL-Fasclst Hefugoo Coomittoo has 
oxlstod proeisoly to glvo old to thoso anti-Franco Spaniards* 
That a stupid blunder It would bo if at this tlmo tho Congross 
wero to clt» for contgngt the members of the Executlvo Board 
of the Joint Antl-Fasclst Refugee Committee which has helped" 
to save the lives of many of our Spanish friends! die sodas 
ospocially true In vlow of tho contention that tho moabers of 
tho Board aro not tho logal custodians of tho books and records 
demanded by tho wood~Bankln Commlttoo on Un-Jmorican Actirltlos* 
Will you bo prosontwhon this mattor comos to a votoT Will you 
spoak and vote against tho proposed contempt citation, romomw 
boring and pointing out tho apparent and sorioua relationship 
of such a citation to our presont standing in tho Unltod lations! 

Yours most sincoroly, 



JBM/rr 




r /• ffc l^c&^S 



B. «tefflehsvsl 
tlvo Soorotasjr 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 32-A 

Summary of impressions following visit to Russia, summer, 19S4, from diary 

record of August 25, 1934 

1. I am impressed by the apparent fact that their political education has gone 
down. There is exceptional ability manifest by worker, by peasant, and young 
people in the discussion of political and economic matters. Like young funda- 
mentalists, tbese people are saturated in Marx, know the answers in terms of 
Communist dogma, and are absolutely "certain" they are right and scientifically 
correct. 

2. I am impressed by the fact that revolution was a much easier task here than 
it would be in the United States. Our middle classes have a standard of life these 
people never knew. Classes are not fixed in the United States. Our leadership 
is infinitely abler. Our businessmen possess an efficiency and adaptability un- 
known to prerevolution Russians. 

3. I am impressed more and more by the treatment of minorities. They are 



3758 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

gagged, at times starved. How can an opposition idea get underway, even if 
true? Here dogma comes in. Opposition ideas cannot be true. We have the 
truth. 

4. I am impressed by the strange contradiction between the vast conceptions 
of social organization and the apparent advance, and the extraordinary in- 
efficiency in carrying out detail, in preventing waste, in developing sanitation, 
and a score of snch matters. Those impressed by organizing skill as shown in 
Red Square parade must remember that is military, a machine, and does not 
call for individual initiative and decision, as well as care. Everything seems 
allowed to deteriorate. 

5. I am impressed by the intellectual isolation of the people. This is a funda- 
mental contradiction of so-called scientific spirit. 

6. I am impressed by the need of Americans to See America First. People 
should know our own social work, our own schools, our own factories ; and 
they would be less impressed by work that is distinctly inferior but is held 
up in Russia as superior. These Russians assume we are coming to find out 
how it is done. 

7. I am impressed by the fact that a Communist state appropriates all the les- 
sons, the costly experiments, the trial and error learnings of capitalism. Let us 
see later how much advance technically they will themselves make. 

8. I am impressed by the danger to the creative mind. He, if in opposition, is 
silenced, killed. 

9. Art, to date, while we are told it is 'flighting wings" has done practically 
nothing. Perhaps the new ideas will manifest themselves in new concepts in 
art, but not yet. 

10. I am impressed by the paralyzing consequences of bureaucracy, when the 
order of the bureaucrat is in the hands of the ignorant, who denied freedom to 
exercise creative judgment and reasonable adaptability, a person generally un- 
imaginative, blocks the traffic of a great arterial street, because the order he 
received said, "Traffic north and south when green light burns ; traffic stops when 
red light burns." But signal got out of order. Green shows steadily for north 
and south, red for east and west. East and west must stand still until signal is 
repaired or order rescinded. 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 33 

Methodist Federation for Social Action 

baixot 

Nominations for Executive Committee 

These officers were elected by the national membership meeting in Kansas City, 
December 27-29, 1947. Your confirmation is requested. 

President (vote for 1). Check 1. 

Bishop Robert N. Brooks, New Orleans area ; former editor, Central Christian 
Advocate. 
Vice presidents ( vote for 6 ) . Check 6. 

Bishop James C. Baker, vice president, MFSA ; bishop, Los Angeles area. 
Bishop Lewis O. Hartman, former president, MFSA ; bishop, Boston area. 
Bishop W. Earl Ledden, president, New York State Council of Churches; 

bishop, Syracuse area. 
Bishop Francis J. McConnell, bishop, Portland area ; former MFSA president. 
Dean Walter G. Muelder, Boston University School of Theology. 
Bishop William T. Watkins, bishop, Louisville area. 
Recording secretary (vote for 1). Check 1. 

Miss Thelma Stevens, recording secretary, MFSA; executive secretary, de- 
partment of Christian social relations, woman's division of Christian 
service. 
Treasurer ( vote for 1 ) . Check 1. 

Dr. Gilbert Q. LeSourd, associate secretary, missionary education movement. 
Assistant treasurer (vote for 1). Check 1. 

William W. Reid, editor, The Pastor magazine. 
(Officers are automatically members of the executive committee.) 
These were nominated by the national membership meeting. If you wish to 
make a substitution, please cross out the names you wish deleted and add the 
substitutes. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3759 

Members at Large (Vote for 40). Check 40 

1. Dr. Wade C. Barclay, member, MFSA administrative committee ; past editor, 

Social Questions Bulletin. 

2. Rev. Lee Ball, member, MFSA administrative committee; Lake Mehopac, 

N. Y. 

3. Dr. Albert Barnett, professor, Garrett Biblical Institute ; vice president, 

Alabama MFSA. 

4. Rev. Samuel G. Beers, Waterloo, Wis. 

5. Mrs. Theodore Berry, committee on economic relations, central jurisdiction, 

department of Christian social relations, WDCS. 

6. Dr. Charles F. Boss, Jr., executive secretary, commission on world Peace, 

Chicago. 

7. Bishop Charles W. Brashares, Des Moines area. 

8. Dr. James P. Brawley, president, Clark College, Atlanta, Ga. 

9. Mr. Harold Burns, editor and publisher, New Wilmington, Pa. 

10. Dr. Gilbert S. Cox, president, upper Iowa MFSA ; Waterloo. 

11. Dr. Henry Hitt Crane, Central Methodist Church ; Detroit. 

12. Dr. Ralph Diffendorfer, executive secretary, department of foreign missions, 

board of missions. 

13. Dr. Karl Downes,* president, Samuel Houston College ; Austin. 

14. Rev. Paul DuBois, president, New York east conference, MFSA. 

15. Mr. E. J. Fricke, president, Indiana State conference, MFSA. 

16. Rev. Paul Friedrich, member, MFSA, administrative committee ; New Bruns- 

wick, N. J. 

17. Rev. Owen Geer, Vermont Square Methodist Church, Los Angeles, Calif. 

18. Dr. Corliss P. Hargraves, executive secretary, interboard committee on mis- 

sionary education. 

19. Rev. Robert Howe, Pittsfleld, Mass. 

20. Dr. David Jones, president, Bennett College, North Carolina. 

21. Mrs. J. D. Kilgore, Tracy ton, Wash. 

22. Mr. Chester Kingsbury, president, Pacific Northwest conference, MFSA; 

printer ; Seattle, Wash. 

23. Rev. Franklin H. Littell, director, student religious association, University 

of Michigan. 

24. Dr. Edgar Love, member, MFSA administrative committee; superintendent, 

department of Negro work, board of missions, and church extension. 

25. Rev. James May, former executive secretary, YMCA; Georgia Institute of 

Technology ; Georgia. 

26. Dr. Clyde Miller. Teachers College, Columbia University ; copresident, New 

York City MFSA. 

27. Mrs. Floyd Mulkey, president, Chicago MFSA. 

28. Dr. C. C. McCown, professor emeritus, Pacific School of Religion. 

29. Rev. G. S. Nichols, president, Iowa-Des Moines conference, MFSA. 

30. Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam, bishop, New York area. 

31. Rev. Edward Peet, officer, Greater Hartford, MFSA. 

32. Dr. Arthur Raper, economic analyst, United States Department of Agri- 

culture. 

33. Rev. H. M. Ratliff, Mission, Tex. 

34. Miss Matilda Saxton, secretary, central jurisdiction, department of Christian 

social relations, WDCS ; Trenton, N. J. 

35. Dr. Charles Schofield, editor, adult publications, Board of Education, 

Nashville. 

36. Miss Mildred Thomson, social worker ; president St. Paul MFSA. 

37. Mrs. M. E. Tilly, member President's Committee on Civil Rights ; secretary, 

department of Christian social relations, WDCS, Southeastern. 
3S. Rev. Andrew S. Turnipseed, president, Alabama Conference MFSA. 

39. Dr. Willard Uphaus, director, Religion and Labor Foundation. 

40. Rev. Charles Webber, secretary, Amalgamated Clothing Workers. 

41. Rev. Wayne White, New York City ; member of MFSA administrative com- 

mittee. 

42. Dr. Elwin Wilson, district superintendent, Portland, Maine. 

43. Dr. Ruth Wolcott, Spirit Lake, Iowa. 

Youth Members : 

44. Mr. George Harper, director, National Conference Methodist Youth. 



•We are sorry to announce the death of our friend, Dr. Downs. 



3760 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

45. Mrs. Ann Fitzpatrik Klein, Garrett Biblical Institute, Illinois. 

46. Miss Snippy Sharpnack, Mount Union College, Alliance, Ohio. 

(Every standard conference chapter elects one member to the executive 
committee.) 

Nominations for National Committee 

(Annual conference chapter presidents are automatically members of the 

national committee. Standard conference chapters elect five members to the 

National Committee. Standard local chapters elect two members to the 
national committee.) 

Members at Large (Vote for 150) 

These were nominated by the national membership meeting. If you wish to 
make a substitution, please cross out the names you wish deleted and add the 
substitutes. 

1. Rev. Merrill R. Abbey, First Methodist Church, Madison, Wis. 

2. Rev. Albert Allinger, Methodist Church, Cranford, N. J. 

3. Rev. Lester Ward Auman, Jackson Heights Methodist Church N. W. ; member 

ad interim committee of the MFSA. 

4. Rev. DeWitt C. Baldwin, director, Lisle Fellowship, New York City. 

5. Rev. Archey D. Ball, pastor, Paterson, N. J. 

6. Prof. Irwin R. Beiler, Allegheny College, Meadville, Pa. 

7. Prof. John F. Bender, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Okla. 

8. Mr. J. E. Perry, clothing manufacturer, Columbus, Kans. 

9. Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune, president, National Council of Negro Women, 

Washington, D. C. 

10. Dr. Henry L. Bibby, physician, Kingston, N. Y. 

11. Dr. Hiel D. Bollinger, secretary, department of student work, Board of 

Education, Nashville. 

12. Dr. Harold Bosley, dean, Duke University School of Theology. 

13. Mr. E. P. Bowen, General Secretary, Cooperative League of U. S. A. 

14. Dr. Edgar S. Brightman, professor of philosophy, Boston University School 

of Theology. 

15. Dr. Edwin A. Brown, Methodist Church, Urbana, Ohio. 

16. Dr. Emory Bucke, editor, Zion's Herald, Boston, Mass. 

17. Rev. George A. Burchem, Methodist Church, Modesto, Calif. 

18. Mr. A. M. Butler, attorney at law, Dows, Iowa. 

19. Rev. J. George Butler, South Park Methodist Church, Hartford. 

20. Rev. Wendell R. Carter, Methodist Church, Beaver Falls, N. Y. 

21. Miss Winifred Chappell, Peoples' Institute of Applied Religion. 

22. Rev. Don Chase, Methodist Church, Redding, Calif. 

23. Rev. James Chubb, assistant secretary, General Board of Evangelism, Bald- 

win City, Kans. 

24. Rev. George Clary, Sr., Trinity Methodist Church, Savannah, Ga. 

25. Dr. George A. Coe, professor emeritus of religious education, Union Theo- 

logical Seminary ; now residing in California. 

26. Rev. Elbert Cole, director religious education, University of Chicago. 

27. Rev. Elbert M. Conover, director, Interdenominational Bureau of Architec- 

ture, New York City. 

28. Dr. Russell M. Cooper, professor, University of Minnesota. 

29. Rev. Alva I. Cox, executive secretary, board of education, Northeast Ohio 

Conference. 

30. Dr. Clarence T. Craig, professor of New Testament, Graduate School of 

Theology, Oberlin College. Ohio. 

31. Rev. Albert Curry, Friendship Park Methodist Church, Pittsburgh. 

32. Mr. Gloster B. Current, secretary, National Association for the Advancement 

of Colored People, Detroit, Mich. 

33. Mrs. J. W. Curry, Christian social relations secretary, South Carolina 

Conference. 

34. Rev. Mark A. Dawber, executive secretary, Home Missions Council. 

35. Rev. Harry Denman, Board of Evangelism, Nashville, Tenn. 

36. Miss Doris P. Denison, department of Christian education of adults, General 

Board of Education, Nashville, Tenn. 

37. Rev. Mark Depp, Centenary Methodist Church, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

38. Rev. James Dombrowski, executive secretary, Southern Conference Educa- 

tional Fund, New Orleans, La. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3761 

39. Rev. Caxton Doggett, director of student work, Board of Missions. 

40. Rev. M. E. Dorr, Grace Methodist Church, Dayton, Iowa. 

41. Rev. James E. Dunning, First Methodist Church, Los Angeles. 

42. Rev. L. L. Dunnington, Methodist Church, Iowa City, Iowa. 

[Methodist Federation for Social Service, 1947 ballot, p. 2] 

43. Miss Clara Dutrow, secretary-treasurer, West Oklahoma MFSA. 

44. Rev. Harold Ehrensperger, editor, Motive Magazine, Nashville. 

45. Dr. Guy Fox, administrator, Denver Public Schools, Colorado. 

46. Rev. Edwin Garrison, Methodist Church, Wabash, Ind. 

47. Rev. Victor V. Goff, director, Wesley Foundation, University of California, 

Berkeley. 

48. Rev. Albert Green, Methodist Church, Lamar, S. C. 

49. Mr. John M. Grove, Frederick, Md. 

50. Rev. Armand Guerrero, Methodist pastor, Chicago, 111. 

51. Mr. Carey Haigler, regional director, CIO, Birmingham, Ala. 

52. Rev. William Hairston, Methodist Church, Reidsville, N. C. 

53. Mr. Martin Hall, author and lecturer, Los Angeles, Calif. 

54. Dr. Royal Hall, chairman, division of social sciences, Albion College. 

55. Rev. Paul G. Hayes, McCabe Methodist Church, Bismarck, N. Dak. 

56. Dr. John Haywood, president, Gammon Theological Seminary, Atlanta. 

57. Rev. L. B. Hazzard, professor of religious education, Illinois Wesleyan 

University. 

58. Rev. R. K. Heacock, pastor, Methodist Church, Llano, Tex. 

59. Rev. A. A. Heist, director, American Civil Liberties Union, Los Angeles, Calif. 

60. Rev. Myron Herrell, Methodist Church, Hayward, Calif. 

61. Rev. Chester Hodgson, Methodist pastor, Newark, N. J. 

62. Dr. Mary Alice Hoover, physician, Tacoma, Wash. 

63. Mr. George A. Home, consulting engineer, New York City. 

64. Miss Elizabeth Howe, Bellevue, Pa. 

65. Mr. I. H. Hull, secretary, Indiana Farm Bureau Cooperative Association, 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

66. Dr. Harold Hutson, professor, Ohio Wesleyan University. 

67. Dr. Charles Wesley Iglehart, professor, Union Theological Seminary, New 

York. 

68. Mrs. Grace Jenkins, president, Portland District, MFSA, Oregon. 

69. Miss R. Elizabeth Johns, secretary, Student Christian Movement, New Eng- 

land region, Boston. 

70. Prof. Emmett S. Johnson, Wesleyan College, Macon, Ga. 

71. Rev. Andrew Juvinell, Methodist Church, Stockton, Calif. 

72. Bishop Paul J. Kern, Nashville area. 

73. Rev. Plaine Kirkpatrick, Methodist Church, Indianapolis. 

74. Rev. John Kirby, Methodist Church, Fairhaven. N. J. 

75. Rev. George S. Lackland, pastor, Indianola Methodist Church, Columbus, 

Ohio. 

76. Prof. John C. Lazenby, Wisconsin State Teachers College, Milwaukee, Wis. 

77. Prof. C. F. Littell, Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. 

78. Rev. Nat G. Long, Methodist Church, Atlanta, Ga. 

79. Mrs. Ford H. Longsdorf, officer, Louisiana Conference, MFSA. 

80. Dr. Halford Luccock, professor, Yale Divinity School, New Haven, Conn. 

81. Mr. Jesse Mall, locomotive engineer, Hoisington, Kans. 

82. Rev. Ray F. Magnuson, pastor, Waverly, Nebr. 

83. Mr. William P. Mason, shoe manufacturer, St. Louis, Mo. ; district lay leader. 

84. Miss Ethel K. Miller, librarian, Hendrix College, Conway, Ark. 

85. Dr. John C. Millian, Petworth Methodist Church, Washington, D. C. 

86. Rev. Theodore Miner, Methodist Church, Fishkill, N. Y. 

87. Mr. William Mitch, United Mine Workers, Birmingham, Ala. 

88. Rev. Dr. Alfred Moore, executive secretary committee on world literacy and 

Christian literature, Foreign Missions Conference. 

89. Rev. John V. Murray, Jr., pastor, Bethune, S. C. 

90. Miss Eleanor Neff, associate secretary, department of Christian social rela- 

tions, Woman's Division of Christian Service, New York. 

91. Miss Candis Nelson, dean emeritus, Seattle Pacific College. 

92. Rev. J. Pierce Newell, district superintendent, Madison, Wis. 

93. Dr. Charles Noble, dean, Syracuse University, New York. 

94. Miss Marian L. Norris, secretary, Wesleyan service guild, Woman's Division 

of Christian Service, New York. 



3762 TESTIMONY OP BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

95. Rev. Spencer B. Owens, district superintendent, Albion, Mich. 

96. Rev. James Pless, Methodist Church, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

97. Mrs. G. W. Porneroy, Louisiana Conference, secretary of Christian social 

relations, Woman's Division of Christian Service. 

98. Rev. Fred G. Poole, executive secretary, board of Education, Detroit Con- 

ference. 

99. Mrs. Fred G. Poole, social worker, division chairman, Christian Social Rela- 

tions for Wesleyan Service Guild, Detroit. 

100. Rev. George Poor, Methodist pastor, Seattle, Wash. 

101. Rev. Robert Powell. Mount Union College, Alliance, Ohio. 

102. Dr. Karl Quimby, Ridgewood. N. J. 

103. Dr. Harris F. Rail, professor emeritus, Garrett Biblical Institute, Evanston, 

111. 

104. Mrs. W. H. Ratliff, Sherard, Miss. ; president, Southeastern jurisdiction, 

Woman's Division. 

105. Rev. W. Neal Raver, chairman, social action committee, New Jersey Con- 

ference. 

106. Rev. Ensworth Reisner, pastor, Milwaukee, Wis. 

107. Dr. Lloyd H. Rising, University Methodist Church, Lincoln, Nebr. 

108. Miss Miriam V. Ristine, executive secretary, bureau of social welfare, 

Woman's Division of Christian Service, New York. 

[Methodist Federation for Social Service, 1947 ballot, p. 3] 

109. Dr. John Rustin, Mount Vernon Place Methodist Church, Washington, D. C. 

110. Rev. Don Schooler, Epworth Methodist Church, Chickasha, Okla. 

111. Dr. Harvey Seifert, professor, Graduate School of Religion, University of 

Southern California, Los Angeles. 

112. Rev. Claude Singleton, director, Wesley Foundation, University of Georgia, 

Athens. 

113. Dr. W. A. Smart, professor, Candler School of Theology, Emory University, 

Georgia. 

114. Prof. Huston Smith, Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. 

115. Mr. Chester A. Smith, executive committee member, New York Conference, 

MFSA. 

116. Rev. Eugene L. Smith, St. Mark's Methodist Church, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

117. Rev. Kenneth Smith, Colorado Springs ; executive committee member, Colo- 

rado Conference MFSA. 

118. Rev. Vaughn Smith, director, Wesley Foundation, University of Oklahoma, 

Norman. 

119. Dr. Ralph Sockman, Christ Methodist Church, New York City. 

120. Rev. Elgar Soper, New Windor, Md. ; president, Baltimore and Washington, 

D. C, MFSA chapters. 

121. Rev. Carl Soule, World Peace Commission, Chicago, 111. 

122. Miss Martha Stewart, secretary-treasurer, Texas Conference MFSA. 

123. Miss Elizabeth Stinson, Macon, Ga. 

124. Rev. Everett M. Stowe, Committee on Friendly Relations Among Foreign 

Students, New York City. 

125. Dr. Samuel H. Sweeney, St. Mark's Methodist Church, New York City. 

126. Rev. Daniel Taylor, Methodist pastor, Vancouver, Wash. 

127. Dr. Joseph W. Thompson, St. Joseph, Mo. 

128. Rev. D. W. Throckmorton, pastor, Modesto, Calif. 

129. Rev. Dr. Ernest F. Tittle, First Methodist Church, Evanston, 111. 

130. Rev. Frank Toothaker, pastor, Oakland, Calif. 

131. Dr. Edgar M. Wahlberg, pastor, Dearborn, Mich.; chairman, MFSA labor 

commission. 

132. Dr. Harry F. Ward, professor emeritus of social ethics, Union Theological 

Seminary; former secretary, MFSA. 

133. Rev. Bradford G. Webster, pastor, Gowanda, N. Y. 

134. Mr. Charles E. Wegner, executive secretary, Goodwill Industries, St. Paul, 

Minn. 

135. Rev. Wilson Weldon, Methodist pastor, High Point, N. C. 

136. Rev. Bruce Wendt, Methodist pastor, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

137. Mr. Paul Wengert, farmer, Idaho Falls, Idaho. 

138. Dr. John Clark Williams, pastor, Sabina, Ohio. 

139. Rev. Morgan Williams, First Methodist Church, Kankakee, 111. 

140. Dr. R. S. Wimberley, attorney at law, Lumpkin, Ga., officer, South Georgia 

Conference MSFA. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3763 

141. Dr. Loyd Worley, First Methodist Church, Stanford, Conn. 

142. Rev. Nelson Wurgler, Methodist pastor, Marfa, Tex. 

Youth Members : 

143. Mr. Robert F. Barker, vice president, Wesley Foundation, Ohio University. 

144. Mr. Robert Bobilin, Adrian College, Michigan, former chairman, youth 

section, MFSA. 

145. Mrs. Dorothy Burnham, Southern Negro Congress, Birmingham. 

146. Mr. George Crawford, founder, Austin local chapter, Texas. 

147. Miss Helen Crotwell, teacher, Fort Valley, Ga. 

148. Mr. Robert Eddy, president, Troy Conference MFSA; New York. 

149. Mr. Harry Jurey, former chairman, young adult fellowship, East Oklahoma 

Conference; now in California. 

150. Mr. Richard Stein, Yale University, New Haven, Conn. 



The minimum annual contribution for voting membership is $5 for adults and 
I for youths (25 years of age or under). 
I vote for all nominees except where otherwise indicated. 



(Signature) 



(Address), 



(City) (State) 

[Methodist Federation for Social Service, 1947 ballot, p. 4] 



3764 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



I TWENTY 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 34 
Y fc A K S OF SOCIAL 



SERVICE j 



Cije ffletijofctait JeUcratton for foetal ^crbue 



HO FTFTH AVENUE. Nl W YORK aTY 



NATIONAL uimmii 111 
'• TITHE. rk«,»« 
BROMLEY o«NAM 



P. W. ADAM5. Sp.»,IWJ. U« 
O. %', AUMAN. d.. w 
HAY ALLLN. Hwi.ll. N. Y. 
M. P. BURN*. pVLU,.,. 
t M BUi.UFP. Mmn.^»U 
KING I) utAl H. Ch«.»> 
DAN BKUMM1TI. n„v. 
»TELLA » RRUMMITT. Ik* 
FJ.TIHR BKIRSIKRi;. IP,,.,,,, 
' O KVX. I„.w 
E- W. BLAKEMAN. rViL.1., Ol 
W. C BARCLAY. Ck».», 
JAMES I: BARER. UiK.n.. Ill 
<JEO. A. <OE. Ulnvhia. fy 
* E IXfTENDORIER. N<. Yot 
EOW. T. DEVINE. W^,„j,« 

0. F. DIET ENDORF. E Oca.. N J 
E. P. DENNETT. Sn (.«.«, 

A. I. DAY. F.i.K.,1, 

P. C. EBINCER. Ou C.il. 10 

P. B. FISHER. IrJ^ 

R V. GRAHAM. Ciuur.. In. 

W. I. ;. CRATZ. Ckoo 

W. M. GILBERT. M,d*c. N. I 

A. A. HB8T. rvnrt. 

PAW. HUTCHINSON. Caaaaa 

1. O. HARTMAN. Boaoa 

H. 8. HAMILTON. Baa. I<M. 
E. t. HAMMOND. Un>. Om. 
HASSLU HORTON. ULi BJ«T IH 
A. W. HARRIS. N<w Y«i 
C P. HARGRAVES. Lavaa. 
/RANK KINGDOM. Laa«a«. 1_ 
LOUISA UTIEL. VkWt. Oka 
J. C LAZENSY. Mih**. 
I. W. LANGOALE, BraoUr» 
H. R. UXXXXX. Nn> Tart 
ISM LACKLRN. Ml**. M-» 
a I. LACKLAND. McaKOW. Pa. 
AMY LEWS. Mr. Ten. 
V. Ft McKASTEt. ABImo. Ob. 
MARY VkSOWKU, CUo*» 
M H. MEYER. Mr. Tart 
A. I MOWOHR. iMk ML IW 
ED*/. LAIRD MILU. rartUnJ, Cm 
1. R MACEE. Bare* 
a N. McGHJ, Saab 

p. m. mm Nc y»» 

O. T. OLSON. Bakloan 
EARL ROADMAN. MtcMI. « D 
W. j. SHERMAN. So. F>M»e. 
V. I. SPAUUXMO. BVlnq,. Ha 
C. D. SKINNER, Tato. oil. 
V L. (TIDCZR. * in c« F 
SCOT I TUCKER, Cduada* 
W. P. TMRKIELD. d - M1 
WORTH M. TIPPY. N™ Tort 
L. K. VtLLMAN. WilaerBerre. Pa 
HERBERT WELCH. Korea 
V. O. WARD. Hamiolai 
IAMB M YARD. Nr* York 



i^NNIVKKSAKY CELEBRATION 



KEYNOTE: 
OBJECTIVES. 



Face luuca Back tht Federation! 

Every M.ihcdm miniHei oho know, that the religion 
of Jesus require, the transformation ol human toady, 
a •upporttOR mrrobef. 



• BuUn 

At least om by 



turf, but wanu to know, 
i cvrfv local cKur^h 



EXECUTIVE 

f J M.CONNfll 
H F. RAIL 
CrORCL ELLIOTT 
HERBERT N SHENTOM 
RALPH B LTRMY 

TREASURE* 
GILBERT Q LaSOURD 

SECRETARIES 

HARRY P. WARD 
WINIFRED I. CHAFPCU 



October 24. 1928. 



. u*kM. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3765 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 35 

June 9, 1>47 



Bishop Lewis 0. Hartman 

681 Bay le ton Streut 

Bos too 16, Massachusetts 

i'y dear Bishop Hartman s 

I regret exceedingly that I »u*t resign as a 
vice president of the Methodist Federation for Sooial 
Action. Through the years, the bulletin of the Methodist 
Federation for social Action hae boan justly proud of its 
aoouraoy* People night disagree with its position, but 
it was vary seldom that its statement of fact oould be 
questioned. The larger bulletin, carrying artiolea, 
editorials, and personal viewpoints, actually does not 
lend itself to the research aoouraoy that character ited 
the former bulletin* However, the recent attaoka upon 
Mr. John Foster pullea, Martin Nlemoeller, and others, 
have been of auoh a nature that I do not care to hove my 
name appear aa one of the officers of the organization 
sponsoring these attacks* 

I mad© public refer once to the situation at 
the banquet of thu Methodist Federation for Social 
Aotion held at the New York Bast Conference* I recog- 
nise the right of anyone to atate hie views, but regret 
exceedingly that a Christian leader such as Mr* Dulles 
should be ao attacked witliout so much as a ooumunication 
being written to him or a conference being sought to 
test the accuracy of the position taken* I had planned 
to withhold ay resignation until I hou opportunity to 
oheck all of the material upon which those who were 
responsible for thia attack baaed their opinions. How- 
ever,, when a second article comes out, quoting William 
Howard llelish, it appears that the policy of the paper 
is to continue its attaok upon Mr* Dulles without, us 
I say, so much as calling upon hi© or seeking first- 
hand to know at least his side of the oase. 1 wish to 
diaassoolate myself with thia method, and therefore an 
resigning as an officer of the Federation* 

Ever sincerely yom a. 



C* Bromley Oxnan 



OBOisdr 

co The Rev. Jack R* MoMiohael 



3766 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 36 



132 (4) Manh 3. 1931, 



The Epwobth Herais 



Young rhurrh fellows of draff age 
most deridt something when ««r 
break* oui. I **? when rather than ■/. 
for though the pending war could even 
vet be Mopped if enough people Hid 
the neee*»ary thing about it, the fact 
is that lo-dav the peaee forces are do- 
ing almost nothing, while the war 
makers are a* busy as beet and the 
forees that make for war are running 
forward headlong. 

In general these youth have four 
choices instead of two as most of them 
think. First they can conform, yield 
lo the draft, plav the game of the war 
makers, be cannon fodder, get shot or 
gassed or blinded or delegged or He- 
armed — but, if possible, beat "the 
enemy** to it and shoot, gas, blind, de- 
arm the fellows on the other side first. 

In the second place, they can be 
conscientious objectors and go to 
prison. A few score did that during 
the World War; a few hundred or 
thousand will do it next time. That 
takes even more courage than to go 
over the top. It takes just as much 
physical courage— the C O.'s (Conscien- 
tious Objectors) in some prisons dur- 
ing the World War were subjected lo 
extremely cruel treatment. And, in 
addition, it takes moral courage of a 
type and degree impossible in peaee 
time to measure or comprehend. When 
■he country is suddenly set toward war 
—when movie by persuasive picture 
and radio by persuasive voice, when the 
press, the pulpit, the schoolroom, the 
conversation of all the people, the en- 
ticements of the blonde or the brunette 
beauty, are for "patriotism." for de- 
fense of one's country, for bayoneting 
the enemy, what unspeakably dear 
thinking and brave doing it takes to 
be i C. O.! 

If the fellow's parents are with him 
it help* some— unless the burden of 
having them held traitors offsets the 
help it gives. His preacher must be 
with him. If you will be a C O., in- 
sist that your pastor stand back of you. 
Our church has spoken. Just now, while 
peace is still here, the tide in the church 
is running pretty strongly in the direc- 
tion of refusal to bear arms. Also In 
the schools that point of view is get- 
ting something more than a hearing- 
Several Methodist youth at this very 
hour are forfeiting their greatly de- 
aired college course*, because they re- 



A DECISION MUST BE 
MADE! 

Br WINIFRED L. CHAPPELL 

Secretary, Methodint Federation 

for Social Service 

fun* preparation lo participate in the 
war game. In at least one or two of 
our universities some student* and fac- 
ulty members are preparing to see to 
It that the resources of the public speak- 
ing, the literature, the chemical, and 
technological departments are not used 
for war, not, at least, without the public 
knowing all about il. In Creat Britain 
the famous Oxford Union has publicly 
stated that it will not, in the event of 
war, defend king and country. 

But now a third choice, hardly ao 
much as even heard of during the 
World War, appears in this, possibility: 
Stay out of jail-*-why thus separate 
yourself from the masses? Why thus 
let yourself be put out of the game? 
Accept the draft, take the drill, go into 
the camps and onto the battlefield, or 
Into the munition-) factories and trans- 
portation work— hut sabotage war 
preparations and war. Be agitators for 
eabotage. Down tool« when the order 
is lo make and load munitions. Spoil 
war materials and machinery. 

If, thinking realistically of this third 
way, you shrink violently back because 
you sec that it means deceit, lies, by 
word and deed, the an«wer Is that if 
*ou choose the first way, the "honor- 
able" way of patriotism, then also will 
you have to lie and deceive— that's part 
of war. Nor will you wholly escape 
these ungodly practices if you make 
the second choice. Very likely, for in- 
stance, you will bo called on to give 
evidence against other C. O.V Will vou 
do it or will you lie in their behalf? 

The fourth choice Is really a farther 
development of the third. Il calls for 
sabotage but with the deliberate, con- 
scious, informed intent to get rid of 
the present economic system, of which 
war is a part, and to build a new world 

10 the existence of which peace is a 
necessity. 

If you will make this choice, make 

11 now and begin to meet, before war 
breaks, with others of like purpose and 
of Iron will to carry out the purpose. 



This means knowing what selfish 
capitalism is like, not just in general, 
but in particular — not flinching even 
from knowing by name and specific 
Heed the big profit takers who have be- 
trayed the people — how they havo 
profited from the starvation 'of chil- 
dren; how they have called upon police 
and militia, club and gas bomb and 
machine gun to put down the worker* 
when they have cried for bread. 

And il is not enough to know about 
capitalism. Also you mnot know with 
mind and emotion and will to achieve, 
the kind of new society you want. 
Those who would build the new world 
must look with wide, appraising eyes at 
the good earth's resources and at man's 
brilliant achievements in converting the 
resources into u»able and beautiful 
forms, and al man's organizational 
power and knowledge to transport ihe 
things garnered and made to meet the 
needs of the remotest people*. They 
must want desperately that all the peo- 
ples of the world should be set free 
forever from poverty and given a 
chance al culture, beauty and spiritu- 
ality. 

Youth In the Christian church must 
wake up, or they are not going to be 
the leaders in the programs here de- 
scribed. We church folk are gelling 
little or no teaching or' training in the 
hard matter of turning Ihe war situa- 
tion, when it is here, into a deliberate 
program for a new social order. It is 
well, then, for Ihe fellows who are ear- 
marked for cannon fodder and for 
aiming their targets (largeU being a 
soft word for the most diabolical equip- 
ment for killing that an age of science 
and technology can devise) al the boys 
in the enemy camp, to begin lo make 
contact with others with ihe same Ideals, 
and begin to study these possibilities— 
and others yon may think of — In the 
light of Christian teaching*. 

High ideals will give zest to ihe lask 
— but il is a grim way. Perhaps church 
boy» (and though I write of boy*, the 
girls have almost precisely Ihe same 
choices lo moke) are right In thinking 
that for them there are bul two choices 
— war or jail. 

(Editor** Note: 4a in the cat* of the 
article* by Al Hamilton and Ouvn Ceer 
in "Thm Herald" for February 17. brief 
repliet to thit article* for or against, tcill 
be welcomed and printed.) 



Mr. Kunzig. There are a few other things. On May 29, 1947, you 
sent a letter which is marked here as "Oxnam Exhibit No. 38." (See 
pp. 3774 and 3775.) I believe you sent a letter to "Dear Fellow 
Workers" of the board of missions and church extension of the Meth- 
odist Church, in which you sent out a book. Since you have discussed 
this fairly recently, I think you know the book to which I am referring. 
It is Behind Soviet Power, by Jerome Davis. 

( Colloquy that ensued was ordered stricken from the record by the 
committee.) 

Mr. Kunzig. I would like to offer in evidence as Oxnam Exhibit No. 
39 the record of Communist- front affiliations of Jerome Davis which 
occupies some 11 pages [typewritten] here, 10 or 11 pages, and I would 
like to offer that in the record. 

Mr. Frazier. May I inquire as to the pertinency of the introduction 
of that particular article ? 

Mr. Doyle. I would like to raise this point; if it is material that 
the first question and the answer with reference to Mr. Davis be 
stricken, might it not be well to keep this out of the record until some- 
one checks to know what the fact is ? 



ffllBIT NO. 37 



On t he 250th onniversory of 
t he birth of John Wesley, his 
church's founder, a leading 
Methodist clergyman outlines 
a sound new program that tells 



How to Uncover 



without throwing mud on innocent people. Here is a 



nd pr 




He Has a Program to Protect Us All 

. . . from (olse attacks on our reputations. Yet Bishop Oxnam (above) says: Communist 
conspirators must be discovered, tried, and if guilty, punished. 



y>,OMMUNISM is a I 

M danger. It constitutes the most men- 

I acing challenge to freedom and faith 

X^>4 of recent centuries. 

Governments of free societies are 
obligated to protect themselves from subver- 
sion That the Communist Party i 
spiracy, no informed man would den 
spirators must be discovered, tried, and. if 
found guilty, punished. 
That is plain truth. 

Congress has the right and the duty to con- 
duct investigations to secure the information 
upon which sound legislation may be based. 

Upon this, nearly all Americans are agreed. 
t But we dare not. in the name o; combatting 
Communism, allow the practices 0/ trie police 
state to be established in our free state 

Some investigating committees have set up 
or condoned practices that strike at the very 
foundation of American freedom. 

The "files " on individuals prepared by its 

staff for the House Committee on Un- 

11 point. 

Thej are not made up of evidence collected 

irs They are cora- 

tuo often, of newspaper clippings. 

letterheads, or mere hea I 

It Could Happen to You 

Such files are released yet the Committee 
.illty for their ac- 
Ime ■ re- 

quotlne from the House Cornmittei 

American Actii 

^ Thusan r interviewed, never 

the pub:., ' tally released, but 

•"> respon- 

, un-American, and a threat to the 
liberty of each of US. (Suppose it happened 
to you]) 
Can we I 

American citizen (rum 
We must What good does it do to cry out 
;.. totalitarian thre 1 freedom II 

munist could want eeusdivided, 

:,/ trust, tearful, defensive 

What can be done? 

Some time ago the Chairman ol the House 
Committee mi tin-Ami 1 
Harold Velde, ol Illlnol asked me to propose 



Communists 



By Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam 



OF THE METHODIST CHURCH 



'must" article for every American man and woman . . 



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BISHOP SHEEN, ofi oth 
olic Church, is top eleriea 
foe of Reds (see story) 



REINHOLD NIE8UHR 



SIDNEY HOOK, of New 

York University, shows 
holes in Reds' arguments. 




AS APPEARING IN 



^ 41 




THE SUNDAY PICTURE MAGAZINE 

1*3620 0-5b (F.ee p. 3766) Ho. 2 

: 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3767 

Mr. Clardy. For your information, Mr. Doyle, may I point out 
that Jerome Davis was identified by two witnesses. That I know. 

Mr. Doyle. All I know, Mr. Clardy, is that we have withdrawn, 
we have stricken from the record about Mr. Davis being a Commu- 
nist. And if this record tries to tie him up, even indirectly, with 
being a Communist and if we had to strike the reference the first time 
maybe we had better keep this out until we know what the fact is. 

Mr. Jackson. Since that remark was stricken, the gentleman from 
Michigan has indicated that there are two identifications of the indi- 
vidual in question as a member of the Communist Party. That is 
quite a different thing from the somewhat indefinite, to me, mention 
that was made which I requested to have stricken. 

Mr. Doyle. Well, of course, if those identifications are from reli- 
able witnesses, unimpeachable testimony, that is another thing. I 
don't know what that testimony is, nor the reliability of the witness. 

Mr. Jackson. May I ask the gentleman from Michigan if those 
identifications were taken from witnesses under oath ? 

Mr. Clardy. In the New York hearing. Mr. Scherer will vouch 
for my accuracy, and you will find it in the testimony which will be 
released. 

Mr. Velde. Is there objection to the introduction of the public files 
concerning Jerome Davis? 

Mr. Doyle. What have the files about Jerome Davis got to do with 
this witness? 

Mr. Velde. Does the gentleman object? 

Mr. Doyle. I do not want to impede the efficiency of the commit- 
tee, but I don't know what pertinency it has to this witness. 

Mr. Velde. Will the gentleman answer? Does he object to the 
introduction of this public file ? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, of course, the chairman is in a position to state 
what the pertinency is. I don't know, but it seems to me that unless 
this witness is being tied in with Jerome Davis in some way, why 
encumber the record with the record of Jerome Davis ? That is my 
point. 

Mr. Clardy. May I state that Mr. Doyle was not present at the 
hearings in New York and could not be expected to know because the 
testimony is not yet in printed form. It is in typewritten form. 

Mr. Doyle. I was not invited to go to New York. I do not want to 
have it shown that I was expected to be there. May I ask the gentle- 
man from Michigan a question ? 

Mr. Vei.de. Are you reserving the right to object? 

Mr. Doyle. I reserve the right to object and ask this question : Does 
the testimony in New York show that Bishop Oxnam in some definite 
way is tied up with Jerome Davis ? 

Mr. Clardy. I did not make any suggestion of that kind at all. 
We are talking about whether Jerome Davis had been identified as a 
member of the party and I give you my word he has. 

Mr. Doyle. Then why introduce that with this witness ? 

Mr. Clardy. I think we will get to that when counsel gets along. 

Mr. Velde. Does the gentleman object to the introduction of this ? 

Mr. Doyle. I think I do at this time until some satisfactory state- 
ment as to whether it should go in is made. 

Mr. Scherer. I move that it be put in the record. 

Mr. Clardy. I second the motion. 



3768 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Mr. Velde. All those in favor signify by saying "Aye"; all those 
contrary signify by saying "No." The ayes have it and the motion 
is carried. 

Proceed, Mr. Kunzig. 

Mr. Kunzig. This should be marked as "Oxnam Exhibit No. 39," 
Mr. Chairman. 

(Document referred to was received in evidence as "Oxnam Exhibit 
No. 39.") 

(See pp. 3780-3788.) 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, this letter dated May 29, 1947, from 
the Board of Missions and Church Extension of the Methodist Church, 
signed G. Bromley Oxnam and R. E. Dilfendorfer says : 

Dear Fellow Workers : The extraordinary statement issued by the Federal 
Council of the Churches of Christ in America entitled "Soviet-American Rela- 
tions" begins with the striking sentence, "War with Russia can be avoided and 
must be avoided without compromise of basic convictions." Furthermore, the 
rapid spread of Russian influence throughout the world is a most significant 
challenge to the World Mission of Christ. 

There is a moral obligation to become acquainted with the facts involved in 
our present relationships with Russia. Too much of the material that appears 
is partisan. Wise policies do not emerge from emotional reactions unrelated 
to facts. 

As a Methodist minister 

And this was sent to Methodist ministers, to continue : 

As a Methodist minister you and your people are having increasing influence 
in shaping public opinion in the Nation. We are of the opinion that Jerome 
Davis' recent book entitled "Behind Soviet Power" makes a substantial con- 
tribution to understanding of Russia. It shoidd be read in conjunction with 
other authoritative volumes, particularly in connection with the Federal Council 
of the Churches of Christ's statement referred to above, as well as with Vera 
Micheles Dean's discussion in the July-August 1946 Headline Series of the 
Foreign Policy Association, entitled "Russia — Menace or Promise?" 

In order that our national policy may be at once democratic and Christian the 
reading of "Behind Soviet Power" will help you to understand the difficult issues 
now confronting us to the end that international peace may be preserved and 
progress be made toward world order under the United Nations. 

"Behind Soviet Power" is sent to you without obligation. If, however, you 
desire to help defray the expense of getting the book to you, please put a quarter 
in the enclosed coin card and mail it at once to Dr. Albert E. Beebe, treasurer, 
150 Fifth Avenue, New York 11, N. Y. 
"Very sincerely yours, 

(Signed) G. Bromley Oxnam, 

President, Division of Foreign Missions. 

(Signed) R. E. Diffendorfeb, 

Executive Secretary. 

P. S. Additional copies of "Behind Soviet Power" may be secured at whole- 
sale rates by writing to Jerome Davis, 489 Ocean Avenue, West Haven, Conn. 

Did you send that book to the Methodist ministers throughout the 
country ? 

Bishop Oxnam. If you will rephrase that question, I will answer it 
in the affirmative. When you ask "Did you send it?" I did not. This 
was sent by the order of the administrative committee of the Board of 
Missions and Church Extension of the Methodist Church. I was the 
president of the Division of Foreign Missions and did send that letter. 
It was actually sent by the board itself. I must take responsibility as 
I was president of the board and did sign the letter, but when you use 
the term "you sent it," I have to say it was sent by the Board of Mis- 
sions and Church Extension of the Methodist Church. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3769 

Mr. Velde. Would you describe the composition of that committee 
which decided to send this book out? There isn't any inference that 
any of those members of the committee are subversive. 

Bishop Oxnam. The Board of Missions and Church Extension of 
the Methodist Church is charged with the responsibility of admin- 
istering the entire missionary program of the Methodist Church 
throughout the world. It is one of the most important agencies of 
the Methodist Church. It is supported by the benevolent funds of the 
Methodist Church. Its members are chosen by the general conference 
of the Methodist Church and certain other agencies under the law of 
the church. The executive committee is very large, composed I think 
of possibly as many as 150 or 175 persons. 

The administrative committee is charged with deciding administra- 
tive actions rather than policy actions. It meets about once a month. 
1 would judge there may be as many as 30 members on the administra- 
tive committee. Have I answered your question, sir? 

Mr. Velde. Yes, I think that is an answer except that I would like 
to know in this particular matter where this book was O. K.'d, how 
many were present? 

Bishop Oxnam. I cannot answer that, sir. I was not present myself. 

Mr. Scherer. May I see the exhibit, counsel ? 

Mr. Kunzig. The exhibit so far is not in evidence. It is the letter, 
Oxnam Exhibit No. 38, Mr. Scherer. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman, may I ask a question? 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Jackson. 

Mr. Jackson. Do you know upon whose recommendation this par- 
ticular book was selected? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, 1 do. 

Mr. Jackson. Which individual selected the book — or was it a 
matter of a subcommittee selection? 

Bishop Oxnam. Dr. Ralph E. Diffendorfer, who was the executive 
secretary of the division of foreign missions, a gentleman who was 
responsible for founding the International University, a Christian 
university, in Japan, generally regarded as one of the ablest mission- 
aries of the last generation, and who is dead now, said he thought it 
would be well for our people to understand the challenge to our faith 
that lies in the whole Communist movement. He felt this book would 
make a contribution to it. Methodist preachers know how to read 
books and can read critically. I said that I thought if this book went 
out it ought to be accompanied by the statement, at least by the state- 
ment that was issued by the Federal Council of Churches of Christ in 
America on American-Soviet relations. I had chaired that committee 
that had drafted this statement. It is no secret, however, that it was 
written by Mr. John Foster Dulles. We went over it sentence by 
sentence. Very few changes were made or are ever made in anything 
that Mr. Dulles drafts because he is extraordinarily effective in those 
matters. That particular statement contains one of the severest con- 
demnations of communism that I think you will find. It is an intel- 
lectual condemnation of communism. 

I suggested that other books might be sent and we agreed upon this 
one of Vera Micheles Dean of the Foreign Policy Association. We 
thought it an excellent document. 

Mr. Kunzig. I don't think you sent Vera Micheles Dean's book. 
You just recommended that they might get it. 

4::620— 54 13 



3770 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Bishop Oxnam. I am not quite sure. 

Mr. Kunzig. That is what the letter says. 

Mr. Clardy. Did I understand you to say that you regard this as a 
good book and one that did not defend Russia ? 

Bishop Oxnam. What I said was that we regarded that as an excel- 
lent factual presentation of a situation by a competent scholar, and I 
would repeat that, sir. 

Mr. Clardy. Have you read it ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, of course I have read it. 

Mr. Clardy. And I have read it and I have extensive notes and I 
regard it as one of the most arrogant pro- Communist statements that 
I have been privileged to read. 

Bishop Oxnam. You are expressing your judgment and it differs 
from the judgment of some of the people, qualified people in this 
Nation on foreign issues and the Foreign Policy Association. 

May I ask, Mr. Chairman, what is the point of that? 

Mr. Velde. Counsel will proceed. 

Mr. Doyle. May I ask one question so that I will understand the 
counsel's question. What was the connection of John Foster Dulles 
with this book or letter ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I said that the statement that we sent out accom- 
panying this, that statement went out with the book, if I recall cor- 
rectly, and that was the statement of the Federal Council of Churches 
of Christ in America on "Soviet- American Relations." It was pre- 
pared by a large and representative commission. But I said it was no 
secret that Mr. John Foster Dulles had written it, that it contains an 
intellectual condemnation of communism that is very, very significant, 
and the whole point of that, Mr. Chairman, has been completely mis- 
represented. 

Our reason was to let our ministers know what the challenge of 
communism is in terms of what I may frankly say is a sympathetic 
presentation of the point of view to understand what is behind Soviet 
power. 

Mr. Kunzig. May I go ahead, Mr. Chairman ? 

Mr. Velde. Proceed. 

Mr. Kunzig. I want to make one point clear since there may be 
some confusion. You are not suggesting that Mr. Dulles sent out 
this book ? 

Bishop Oxnam. No. 

Mr. Kunzig. Let us make that very clear. 

Bishop Oxnam. I have made that clear. 

Mr. Clardy. Make it clear that he did not send out the book or 
approve the book. 

Mr. Velde. Will you answer the question ? Did John Foster Dulles 
have anything to do with the book ? 

Bishop Oxnam. No, and I particularly made that statement when 
I discussed the matter with Mr. Jackson. 

Mr. Clardy. I am sorry. I didn't get that at that time. 

Mr. Kunzig. I have a document marked "Oxnam Exhibit No. 40" 
for identification, and this document is a bibliography on the Soviet 
Union for teachers and students. It says it is a list of sources of 
supplementary teaching materials. It is put out by the committee on 
education of the National Council of American-Soviet Friendship, 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3771 

Inc. There is no need to go further except to say that this is a cited 
Communist-front organization. 

Mr. Chairman, on page 3 of the supplement attached to the bibli- 
ography and recommended as reading for teachers and students by 
the National Council of American-Soviet Friendship is quoted "Rus- 
sia, Menace or Peace"' and "By Vera Dean, Foreign Policy Association, 
1946." (See pp. 3788 and 3789.) 

Would you care to examine that, sir ? 

Bishop Oxnam. What does it say? I have here a book "Behind 
Soviet Power" by Jerome Davis and it has the numbers DK 2626 D299. 
It is in the Congressional Library. Are you recommending that we 
take it out and throw it into the street? This Congress is appropri- 
ating the funds for that book to be there. 

Mr. Kunzig. Nobody is recommending that, but we are wondering 
why you sent this to all the Methodist ministers throughout the United 
States of America. 

Bishop Oxnam. I will be glad to tell you if you will let me. 

Mr. Jackson. I think the reason was explained because you wanted 
to give them this viewpoint or a viewpoint so that they could study 
the material in relation with other material. 

Bishop Oxnam. We wanted them to see the real menace of this 
situation in terms of a sympathetic statement of the case. 

I would like, if you will allow me, to have put in the record Dr. 
Ralph E. Diffendorfer's full explanation of this which will answer 
your question once and for all. 

This book is recommended by John R. Mott, one of the distinguished 
laymen of the church ; by Grove Patterson, editor of the Toledo Blade ; 
Daniel A. Poling, 18 the editor of the Christian Herald ; Raymond Gram 

18 (The following is inserted as a footnote by the committee :) 

Christian Herald Magazine 

Published by Christian Herald Association 

The Leading Christian Family Magazine 

27 East 39th Street, New York 16, N. Y. 

Daniel A. Poling, Chairman and Editor 

February 19, 1954. 
The Honorable Harold H. Velde, 
United States Congressman, 

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. 
My Dear Congressman Velde : My attention has just been called to a paragraph in the 
testimony of Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam in the public hearing before the House Committee 
on Un-American Activities, July 21, 1953. Though I had read this report with some care, 
I had missed the point in question. 

Bishop Oxnam is testifying in the matter of the book. Behind Soviet Power, by Jerome 
Davis. In this connection he asked that "Dr. Ralph E. Diffendorfer's full explanation" be 
put into the record, and continues as of the report : "This is recorded by Dr. John R. Mott, 
one of the distinguished laymen of the church, by Grove Patterson, editor of the Cleve- 
land Blade ; David A. Poling, the editor of the Christian Herald : Raymond Gram Swing, 
a well-known newscaster ; Raymond Robbiss, colonel, commanding American Red Cross 
Mission to Russia. They were all on the board at the time we saw the document." 

It is true that I recommended this book and that my words of commendation were widely 
published. I have also expressed publicly my deep regret at having done so. Also I have 
confessed that I spoke in commendation of this book without even reading the manuscript. 
When my long-time and highly regarded friend, Dr. Diffendorfer, wrote to me of the book 
and told me of plans to circulate It widely, and assured me that it was a manuscript I 
would wish to support, I supported it. It was some years later that I actually read the 
book and found it to be, in my opinion, a belittling of and an attack on American freedom 
and the institutions of our way of life. I am not to be excused for mv endorsement of the 
Jerome Davis book. But I learned my lesson well. I would not care to have Bishop 
Oxnam's statement appear in the final record without this explanation. Also, and equally 
important, is the fact that I was not a member of the board to which he refers, and I am 
sure that he did not wish to imply that I was a member. 

In various statements I have committed myself to the proposition that if I and others 
do not wish now to be judged by past relationships and statements, we should frankly 
state our withdrawal from such relationships and make abundantly clear our present-day 
position. 

I am sending a copy of this letter to Bishop Oxnam. 
Sincerely, 

/s/ Daniel A. Poling. 



3772 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Swing, a well-known newscaster; Raymond Robbins, colonel com- 
manding American Red Cross mission to Russia. They were all on 
the back at the time we saw the document. 

Mr. Velde. What would you like to have inserted ? 

Bishop Oxnam. This statement of Dr. Ralph E. Diffendorfer, who 
cosigned this and was the executive secretary of the board of missions 
and church extension of the Methodist Church, explaining the whole 
matter be put into the record, because I think it is sufficient answer. 

Mr. Velde. The committee will receive it for insertion in the record. 
(See Oxnam exhibit No. 38-A, pp. 3776-3779.) 

Mr. Jackson. What was the date of the citation, Mr. Kunzig, of 
the National Council of American-Soviet Friendship, if you have it? 

Mr. Kunzig. The National Council of American-Soviet Friendship 
Mas declared subversive in 1944. (See footnote 1 on p. 3601.) 

Mr. Jackson. What was the date ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Of the publication of the book, Russia — Menace or 
Peace, by Vera Micheles Dean ? 

Mr. Jackson. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. That was published in 1946. 

Mr. Jackson. In other words, it is 2 or 3 years following the citing 
of the National Council of American-Soviet "Friendship in 1944. This 
was included in their bibliography for teachers and students, is that a 
correct statement ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Yes, sir. 

Bishop Oxnam. It should be pointed out that at this particular 
time the Secretary of State of the United States of America in the 18 
months of his service traveled some 70,000 miles for the purpose of 
maintaining what was called the grand alliance of the great war, try- 
ing to keep together the permanent members of the Security Council. 
At this very time that was what was being done by the Government 
of the United States of America. I could defend this book upon 
an entirely different basis. I do not want to do it because our pur- 
pose was not that. Our purpose was, frankly, to acquaint our people 
with the challenge that does lie in communism to our faith, but this 
matter of not noting dates and of recommending that a book appears 
in somebody else's bibliography, really it doesn't become us. 

Mr. Jackson. Might I ask you if the National Council of American- 
Soviet Friendship would recommend a book that was not sympathetic 
and in accord with the Soviet foreign policy ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I think it would recommend a book because it be- 
lieved it was telling the truth concerning the facts there. I would 
recommend a book that tells the truth. I believe that was a good book. 
I may be wrong. Mr. Clardy feels that there are items in it, and per- 
haps we can discuss it when we will have our conversation. 

Mr. Clardy. Are you talking about the Vera Micheles Dean book ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes. 

Mr. Clardy. I want to tell you that when they defend what she does, 
the handling of human beings in Russia 

Bishop Oxnam. What? 

Mr. Clardy. The way they have handled human beings in Russia, 
I think when you read that you must keep that in mind. 

Mr. Velde. May we proceed in regular order and question the wit- 
ness on the subject matter on which we are inquiring? 

Mr. Doyle. I want to make this one further remark, and I believe 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3773 

it is pertinent. You have given the other members the chance to dis- 
cuss books. I think from my personal experience we have had plenty 
of talk about book burning in Washington and I hope that no member 
of this committee is getting into a mental attitude of where we are 
going to think in terms of book burning or book destruction. I think 
it is very unfortunate that this kind of question should arise. 

Mr. Clardy. You are not suggesting that that was in my mind, Mr. 
Congressman? 

Mr. Doyle. I think it is very unfortunate that this kind of ques- 
tion comes up. 

Mr. Clardy. Have you read the book ? 

Mr. Doyle. No, but when John Foster Dulles and Mr. Mott recom- 
mend it 



Mr. Clardy. He didn't recommend it. 

Mr. Kunzig. I should like to offer into evidence at this time Ox- 
nam Exhibits Nos. 38 and 40, which we have just been discussing. 
Exhibit No. 38 is the letter addressed to "Dear Fellow-Workers," and 
exhibit No. 40 is the recommendation of the National Council of 
American-Soviet Friendship. 

Mr. Velde. Is there any objection? Without objection, they will 
be admitted in the record. 

(Documents referred to were received in evidence as Oxnam Ex- 
hibit Nos. 38 and 40.) 



3774 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 38 
(Part 1) 

Board of Missions and Church Extension 
of The Methodist Church 

ISO Fikth Avrwt/E new York II.N.Y. 



Divthioi" ur Ponr.ioN Mis si 



Dear Fellow-workers I 



May 29, 1947 



The extraordinary statement issued by the Federal Council of the Churches 
of Christ in America entitled "Soviet-American Relations" begins with the striking 
sentence, "War with Russia car. be avoided and must be avoided without compromise of 
baslo convictions." Furthermore, the rapid spread of Russian Influence throughout 
the world is a most slgnlfioant challenge to the World Mission of Christ. 

There Is a moral obligation to beoorae acquainted with the faots involved 
In our presort relationships with Russia. Too niuoh of the material that aorears is 
partisan , lkise polioies do no.t emerge from emotional reactions unrelated to facts. 

As a Methodist minister you and your people are having Increasing influ- 
ence In shaping public opinion in the nation. We are of the opinion that Jerome 
Davie's recent book entitled "Behind Soviet Power" makes a substantial contribution 
to understanding of Russia. It should be read in conjunction with other authorita- 
tive volumes, particularly in connection with the Federal Council of the Churches of 
Christ's statement referred to above, as well as with Vera Michelss Dean's dlscus- 
sion In the July-August 1946 Headline Series of the Foreign Policy Association, 
entitled "Russia - Menace or Promise?" 

In order that our national policy may be at once democratic and Christian 
the reading of "Behind Soviet Power" will help you to understand the difficult Issues 
now oonfrontlng us to the end that international peace may be preserved and progress 
be made t©M»rd world order under the United Nations. 

"Behind Soviet Power" Is sent to. you without obligation. If, however, you 
desire to help defray the expense of getting the book to you, please put a quarter 
in the enolosed ooin card and mall it at once to Dr. Albert B. Beebe, Treasurer, 
160 Fifth Avenue, Mew York 11, N. Y. 



yours, 



on of foreign Missions 




Executive Secret* 



P. S. Additional ooples of "Behind. Soviet Power" may be secured at wholesale rates 
by writing to Jerome Davis, 489 Ocean Avenue, West Haven, Conn. 

A World Service Aobncy of The Methodist Church 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3775 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 3S 

(Part 2) 
"Behind Soviet Power" 

A Review in Zion's Herald By Walter G. Uuelder, Dean of Boston 
University, School of Theology 

What does Russia mean to us in America? This is a question which 
must be answered intelligently if we are to plan an intelligent foreign 
policy. The peace of the whole world depends on what we do to and with 
Russia. Jerome Davis' book is of inestimable value in relation to these 
issues. His knowledge about and acquaintance with the Soviet Onion goes 
back to its earliest days and before. As a man who has command of the 
Russian language, Dr. Davis has been able to" penetrate through the "iron 
curtain" of American linguistic ignorance and to participate in the drama 
of Russian life on an intimate basis. 

The book is rich in up-to-date concrete material. Facts, inci- 
dents, events, biographical sketches, and interpretations of crises. It 
is a significant survey of historical development and present realities. 
In a fascinating and readable form, Dr. Davis outlines the problems and 
prospects of a constructive and peaceful relationship with the Soviet 
Union. Now that the situation with Russia has become so critical, it is 
urgent that all Americans get a fresh understanding of the factors that 
provide the key to resolving misunderstanding. 

For Dr. Davis the key is primarily Stalin. This man should be un- 
derstood if Russia is to be understood. "He symbolizes the wishes and as- 
pirations of the masses of Russian people." It may be argued successfully 
that too much of a role is assigned to Stalin in this book which deals 
with the secret of Russian power. But certainly Stalin is the focus of 
Russian economic and political purpose. If Mr. Davis' theses are right, 
then American foreign policy needs fundamental revision. We are inclined 
to believe that he is essentially correct. (By Jerome Davis, N. Y.: 
The Readers Press, 1946) 



A Comment by President W. J. Hutchins 

"Your book ("Behind Soviet Power") is thrillingly interesting. 
One sees the long, pathetic epic struggle of a great people. You speak 
with authority and not as the numberless scribes. Your knowledge of the 
language, your long and varied experience in Russia, your acquaintance 
with the spiritual vernacular of the people fit you admirably to serve as 
interpreter. Your sympathies do not blind you to the hardness and ruth- 
lessness of certain acts, but you do help us to understand the reasons 
behind the acts." 



3776 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 3S-A 
(Part 1) 

THE REPLY 

THE READER'S DIGEST 

REFUSED TO PUBLISH 

BY 
BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



A gentle rejoinder to Stanley High's article 

"Methodism's Pink Fringe" 

To which is appended a statement 

By Dr. Ralph E. Diffendorfer 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3777 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 38-A 
(Part 2) 

STANLEY HIGH 
AND "BEHIND SOVIET POWER" 

Bv RALPH E. DIFFENDORFER 



What did Dr. High say in his 
article "Methodism's Pink Fringe" 
regarding the distribution to Meth- 
odist preachers of Jerome Davis's 
book Behind Soviet Power? The 
following are his words: 

"Dr. Davis's book, Behind Soviet 
Power, is one of the cleverest, most 
all-out pro-Soviet books yet pub- 
lished in America. It was sent, free 
of charge, to all the 22,000 Method- 
ist preachers in the United States 
by two prominent Federation mem- 
bers. With the book went a letter, 
signed by these high officials, and 
written on the official stationery of 
the Methodist Board of Foreign 
Missions and Church Extension, 
recommending that the book be 
read." 

If written correctly (i.e. to give 
the correct impression and if refer- 
ence had been made to this distri- 
bution at all in a "Pink Fringe" 
article) the paragraph might have 
been somewhat as follows: 

"In his Foreword to Behind Soviet 
Power, Dr. Davis says as the pur- 
pose of his writing the book: 'It is 
the job of every thinking, respon- 
sible, American citizen to know 
what Russia means for us.' 

"In the introduction, Joseph E. 
Davies, formerly Ambassador of the 
United States to Russia, says: 'This 
book contributes much to enlighten 
public opinion. . . . Those who are 



concerned with being honestly and 
intelligently informed about our 
ally, the Soviet Union . . . will find 
much of value in it.' 

"On the cover of the book are 
endorsements by Dr. John R. Mott, 
Grove Patterson, Editor of the 
Toledo Blade, Dr. Daniel A. Poling, 
Raymond Swing, and Col. Ray- 
mond Robins. Dr. Mott says: 'It 
is necessary, timely, fair-minded. 
Should be read by all.' Dr. Poling 
says: 'The most challenging and at 
the same time most objective study 
on Russia.' " 

The book was sent free of charge 
to all Methodist ministers on 
authorization of the Administrative 
Committee of the Division of For- 
eign Missions of the Board of 
Missions and Church Extension of 
The Methodist Church. With -the 
book went a letter signed by 
(Bishop) G. Bromley Oxnam, Presi- 
dent of the Division, and Ralph E. 
Diffendorfer, Executive Secretary 
of the Division, written on the 
official stationery of the Board of 
Missions and Church Extension of 
The Methodist Church. This letter, 
dated May 29, 1947, was as follows: 

"The extraordinary statement 
issued by the Federal. Council of 
the Churches of Christ in America 
entitled 'Soviet- American Rela- 
tions' begins with the striking 
sentence, 'War with Russia can 



10 



3778 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 38-A 
(Part 3) 



be avoided and must be avoided 
without compromise of basic con- 
victions.' Furthermore, the rapid 
spread of Russian'influence through- 
out the world is a most significant 
challenge to the World Mission of 
Christ. 

"There is a moral obligation to 
become acquainted with the facts 
involved in our present relation- 
ships with Russia. Too much of the 
material that appears is partisan. 
Wise policies do not emerge from 
emotional reactions unrelated to 
facts. 

"As a Methodist minister you 
and your people are having increas- 
ing influence in shaping public 
opinion in the nation. We are of 
the opinion that Jerome Davis's 
recent book entitled 'Behind Soviet 
Power' makes a substantial contri- 
bution to understanding of Russia. 
It should be read in conjunction 
with other authoritative volumes, 
particularly in connection with the 
Federal Council of the Churches 
of Christ's statement referred to 
above, as well as with Vera 
Micheles Dean's discussion in the 
July- August 1946 Headline Series 
of the Foreign Policy Association, 
entitled 'Russia — Menace or 
Promise?' 

"In order that our national policy 
may be at once democratic and 
Christian, the reading of 'Behind 
Soviet Power' will help you to 
understand the difficult issues now 
confronting us to the end that 
international peace may be pre- 
served and progress be made toward 



world order under the United 
Nations." 

A comparison of these two state- 
ments makes necessary very 
little additional comment. It 
might be pointed out, however, 
that the intent of sending out 
Davis's book was just the opposite 
from the implication given by 
Dr. High. 

It would appear in High's para- 
graph that the book was recom- 
mended to be read by Methodist 
preachers because of its pro-Soviet 
character and that the sending of 
it was an endorsement of Sovietism 
by these "high officials." Nothing 
could be further from the truth. 

The most significant statement 
in the above letter is "... the 
rapid spread of Russian influence 
throughout the world is a most 
significant challenge to the World 
Mission of Christ." The word 
"challenge" is well known in the 
missionary world and it is always 
used to indicate a force which 
Christianity must take into account 
and never indicates propaganda on 
behalf of any point of view. For 
instance, if one used the statement 
that "Pan Islam is the greatest 
challenge to Christianity in the 
Middle East, Southern and South- 
eastern Asia," no one would ever 
think that the user of that sentence 
was advocating the merits of Islam. 
The meaning is quite the contrary. 

It will be noted, also, that the 
letter accompanying Dr. Davis's 
book asks that other material be 
read in connection with his book. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3779 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 38-A 
(Part 4) 



The statement of the Federal Coun- 
cil was prepared by Dr. John Foster 
Dulles and in one paragraph prac- 
tically condemns communism. 
Everyone is acquainted with the 
point of view of the Foreign Policy 
Association. 

When Dr. High's article was 
ready for publication a researcher 
from the Reader's Digest called me 
on the telephone and read what 
Mr. High had written. She asked 
my judgment on one or two mat- 
ters. In this conversation I called 
attention to the letter that was 
sent with the book and begged 
that, if reference was made to the 
distribution of Behind Soviet Power, 
the letter also should be published 
and that comments should be made 
on the statement "a most signifi- 
cant challenge to the World Mission 
of Christ." I further stated that 
the appeal in the letter was to get 
acquainted with the facts and that 
there was no justification what- 
soever for including this project in 
anything that had to do with the 
Methodist Federation of Social 
Action. The intent of the distribu- 
tion was to arouse Methodists to 
the importance of understanding 
Russian communism as a challenge 
to Christianity. 

The association of Bishop Oxnam 
and myself, the signers of this 
letter, with membership in the 
Federation in connection with this 
project was entirely uncalled for 
because the Federation had abso- 
lutely nothing to do with it. Both 
Bishop Oxnam and myself later 



resigned our membership in the 
Federation. The letter regarding 
the distribution of the Davis book 
was dated May 29, 1947. I resigned 
from the Federation on July 20, 
1948, because of a difference of 
opinion regarding the interpreta- 
tion of an address I made before 
the General Conference of The 
Methodist Church in Boston in 
May 1948. At that time^I advo- 
cated the policy that all mission- 
aries going into countries where 
communism was an issue should 
be trained in Russian ideology and 
practices of communism so as to 
be able to meet the issue intelli- 
gently in their fields of labor. My 
letter of resignation called the 
comment of the Federation on this 
speech "untrue and misleading" 
and "treated flippantly my stand 
on this matter in a manner entirely 
uncalled for." In this letter of 
resignation, I also objected to the 
criticism of the address of Mr. 
John Foster Dulles before the 
same General Conference. The 
Federation Bulletin reported Mr. 
Dulles "as advancing the country 
along the road to war." The fact 
is, the speech of Mr. Dulles before 
the General Conference was an 
appeal to the world not to be 
stampeded into war — just the 
opposite of the Bulletin's inference. 
Thus, any intelligent person can 
see that Dr. High's use of the 
sending of Davis's book in connec- 
tion with his article on "Method- 
ism's Pink Fringe," was entirely, 
unwarranted. 



12 



3780 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 39 

Information From the Files of the Committee on Un-American Activities, 
United States House of Representatives 

July 15, 1953. 
Subject : Jerome Davis. 

The public records, files, and publications of this committee contain the follow- 
ing information concerning Jerome Davis. This report should not be construed 
as representing the results of an investigation by this committee nor findings of 
this committee. It should be noted that the individual referred to is not neces- 
sarily a Communist, Communist sympathizer, or fellow-traveler unless otherwise 
indicated. 

In an article entitled "U. S. Union Visits to U. S. S. R., Now 10- Year Tradi- 
tion," the Daily Worker of March 2, 1937 (p. 2) reported as follows : 

"The invitation from the Central Council of Trades Unions of the U. S. S. R., 
made public several days ago by the National Committee of the American Friends 
of the Soviet Union, calling for a delegation of American trade unionists to 
visit the Soviet Union this May Day, recalls that it is exactly 10 years since 
the first such delegation of American workers went to the U. S. S. R. 

"At that time, in the spring of 1927, the United States had not extended 
diplomatic recognition to the workers' republic. 

* * * * * * * 

"Equally notable was the representation of progressive economists and sociol- 
ogists * * * and Jerome Davis, now president of the American Federation of 
Teachers." 

In public testimony before the Special Committee on Un-American Activities 
on September 9, 1939, Benjamin Gitlow said that about 1925, "the party, upon 
instructions of the Communist International, started the work of organizing 
what was to be known as an impartial delegation of American trade unionists, 
who were not Communists, who would visit Soviet Russia, travel over the coun- 
try, investigate conditions, and submit an impartial, unbiased report to the 
American people on what were the actual conditions in Soviet Russia * * * the 
traveling expenses and all of the expenses involved in the organization of this 
delegation were paid by Moscow, and when its report was printed, the payment 
for printing the report also come from Moscow." On the list of the American 
Trade Union Delegation to the Soviet Union, which Gitlow submitted with his 
testimony, Jerome Davis is listed on the technical and advisory staff as "Jerome 
Davis, Ph. D., professor, practical philanthropy, Yale University, expert in 
Russian affairs; author, The Russian Emigrant, etc." (Public Hearings before 
the Special Committee, pp. 4699-4700.) 

The Daily Worker of July 1, 1936 (p. 3), listed Jerome Davis as one who was 
scheduled to speak at the American Youth Congress, and a pamphlet entitled 
"Youngville, U. S. A." (p. 63), lists him as a member of the national advisory 
committee of that organization. He also signed the "call" to the Congress of 
Youth, as shown in the Proceedings of the Congress, July 1-5, 1939 (p. 2). 

The American Youth Congress was cited as subversive and Communist by the 
Attorney General of the United States in letters furnished the Loyalty Review 
Board and released to the press by the United States Civil Service Commission, 
December 4, 1947, and September 21, 1948. The group was redesignated by the 
Attorney General, April 27, 1953, pursuant to Executive Order No. 10450. The 
organization was cited previously by the Attorney General as "controlled by Com- 
munists and manipulated by them to influence the thought of American youth" 
(Congressional Record, September 24, 1942, p. 76S5 ; also cited in re Harry 
Bridges, May 28, 1942, p. 10). The Special Committee on Un-American Activities, 
in its report of June 25, 1942 (p. 16), cited the American Youth Congress as "one 
of the principal fronts of the Communist Party" and "prominently identified with 
the White House picket line * * * under the immediate auspices of the American 
Peace Mobilization." 

The Daily Worker of March 19, 1938 (p. 2), listed Dr. Davis as one of those 
who signed a petition to the Japanese Ambassador from the International Labor 
Defense; Equal Justice of November 1938 (p. 4) listed him as a sponsor of the 
Christmas drive of the ILD. 

The Attorney General cited the International Labor Defense as subversive and 
Communist in letters released June 1 and September 21, 1948. The group was 
redesignated pursuant to Executive Order No. 10450. The group was cited pre- 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3781 

viously by the Attorney General as the "legal arm of the Communist Party" 
(Congressional Record, September 24, 1942, p. 7086). The special committee in 
its report of January 3, 1939 (pp. 75-78), cited the International Labor Defense 
as "the legal defense arm of the Communist Party of the United States." The 
congressional committee in its report of September 2, 1947 (pp. 1 and 2), cited 
the International Labor Defense as "part of an international network of organi- 
zations for the defense of Communist lawbreakers." At a conference held in 
Detroit, Mich., April 27-28, 1946, the International Labor Defense and the Na- 
tional Federation for Constitutional Liberties merged to form the new front, 
Civil Rights Congress. 

Jerome Davis' book, Behind Soviet Power, was offered for sale at the head- 
quarters of Soviet Russia Today, 114 East 32d Street, New York City, as shown 
in the June 1947 issue of that publication (p. 30). In a letter which was pub- 
lished in the July 1947 issue of Soviet Russia Today (p. 3), Jerome Davis wrote 
that "I want to congratulate you on the high quality of your magazine in the 
past few months. It has such tine articles that I have recommended them to my 
students for reading." 

Soviet Russia Today was cited as a Communist-front publication by the special 
committee in its report of March 29, 1944 (p. 167), and the congressional com- 
mittee in its report on the Congress of American Women, October 23, 1949 (p. 108). 

The Daily Worker of June 17, 1948 (p. 7), revealed that Dr. Davis was sched- 
uled to speak at a meeting of the National Council of American-Soviet Friend- 
ship ; he sent greetings, under the same auspices, on the 31st anniversary of the 
Russian Revolution (Daily Worker of November 10, 1948, p. 11). 

The National Council of American-Soviet Friendship was cited as subversive 
and Communist by the Attorney General in letters released December 4, 1947, 
and September 21. 1948. The group was redesignated pursuant to Executive 
Order No. 10450. The special committee, in its report of March 29, 1944 (p. 156), 
cited the National Council of American-Soviet Friendship as "in recent months, 
the Communist Party's principal front for all things Russian * * *." 

Dr. Davis was one of the sponsors of the Cultural and Scientific Conference 
for World Peace, arranged by the National Council of the Arts, Sciences and 
Professions, and held in New York City, March 25-27, 1949. as shown in the 
conference program (p. 14). Identified with Oberlin College, Jerome Davis 
was listed as one of the sponsors of a conference of the National Council of the 
Arts, Sciences and Professions, held October 9-10, 1948, as shown by a leaflet 
entitled "To Safeguard These Rights * * *" which was published by the Bureau 
on Academic Freedom of the National Council. A mimeographed list of signers 
attached to a letterhead of July 2S, 1950, listed Dr. Davis (with address given as 
Boulder, Colo.) as one of the signers of a resolution against atomic weapons 
issued by the National Council. Dr. Davis was listed in We Join Black's Dissent, 
a reprint of an article from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, June 20, 1951, by the 
National Council of the Arts, as a supporter of a rehearing of the case of the 
Communist leaders before the Supreme Court. He was scheduled as a speaker 
at a "restore free speech" rally of the National Council on July 25 (1951), at 
Carnegie Hall, as shown by the Daily Worker of July 23, 1951 (p. 3). He 
endorsed a resolution of the National Council of the Arts, Sciences and Profes- 
sions calling for a hearing of Tunisia's demands in the United Nations as reported 
in the Daily Worker. June 2, 1952 (p. 3). The Worker, February 8, 1953 (p. 15), 
reported that Dr. Jerome Davis, past president of the American Federation of 
Teachers, former Yale faculty member, and author of Peace, War, and You, spoke 
at a meeting sponsored by the Philadelphia Council of the Arts, S.iences and 
Professions during the preceding week. Dr. Davis' speech was quoted at length 
in this article. 

The National Council of the Arts, Sciences and Professions was cited as a 
Communist-front organization by the congressional committee in its Review of 
the Scientific and Cultural Conference for World Peace, arranged by the National 
Council, and held in New York City on March 25, 26, and 27, 1949, April 19. 1949 
(p. 2) ; in this same review, the Scientific and Cultural Conference for World 
Peace was cited as a Communist front which "was actually a supermobilization 
of the inveterate wheelhorses and supporters of the Communist Party and its 
auxiliary organizations." 

The Protestant Digest magazine for January 1940 (p. 1) and February- 
March 1941 (p. 1) and the Protestant for June— July 1942 (p. 1) and December- 
January 1946-47 (p. 1) list Jerome Davis as an editorial adviser. 

The Protestant Digest, later known as the Protestant was cited as "a magazine 
which has faithfully propagated the Communist Party line under the guise 



3782 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

of being a religious journal," by the special committee in its report of March 
29, 1944 (p. 48). 

In an article which appeared in the January 19, 1948, issue of the Daily 
Worker, it is noted that "Dr. Jerome Davis, well-known educator, reports that the 
people of Europe are seeking a new social order, socialism, [and] he praised what 
he saw in the Soviet Zone in Germany." Excerpts from Dr. Davis' article which 
was written for the January People's Lobby Bulletin, ai*e quoted as follows : "I 
found all Europe seething with unrest and postwar difficulties. The fundamental 
problem was not a conflict between communism on one side and democracy on 
the other as we have been led to believe in the United States. The real clash 
■was between the old order ("things as they used to be," private ownership of 
production) and an emerging new social order. The representatives of the new 
■order want socialization — they are, in essence, for socialism. In this great 
conflict the United States is ranged on the conservative side. Nowhere in Europe 
is there great hysteria against Russia as there now is in America. Prof. Harold 
Laski, former chairman of the British Labor Party executive told me that he 
thought America was the real danger spot in the world today. I was privileged 
to visit the Russian Zone in Germany. It appeared to me that in many ways 
Russia had done a better job in her zone than we had in ours." 

The booklet, Can You Name Them? (p. 3) lists Jerome Davis as having en- 
dorsed the American Committee for Democracy and Intellectual Freedom, and 
a mimeographed sheet attached to a lettei'head of the organization dated January 
17, 1940, lists him as one of those who signed a petition sponsored by the group. 
The American Committee for Democracy and Intellectual Freedom was cited 
as a Communist front which defended Communist teachers by the special com- 
mittee in its report of June 25, 1942 (p. 13). 

On a letterhead of the Fourth Annual Conference of the American Committee 
for Protection of Foreign Born, Washington, D. C, March 2 and 3, 1940, Jerome 
Davis was listed as a sponsor. A letterhead of the group concerning bills which 
were to be brought up in Congress in January 1940 listed Dr. Davis as a member 
of the organization's advisory board. In 1950 he signed the American Com- 
mittee's statement against denaturalization, as reported in the Daily Worker 
of August 10, 1950 (p. 5). 

The Attorney General cited the American Committee for Protection of Foreign 
Born as subversive and Communist in letters released June 1 and September 21, 
1948. The group was redesignated pursuant to Executive Order No. 10450. The 
special committee in its report of March 29, 1944 (p. 155), cited the American 
Committee for Protection of Foreign Born as "one of the oldest auxiliaries of 
the Communist Party in the United States." 

Dr. Davis endorsed and was a delegate to the American Congress for Peace 
and Democracy, as shown on an official letterhead of January 6-8, 1939 and 
in the Daily Worker for January 6, 1939 (p. 2). A letterhead of the national 
labor committee of the American League for Peace and Democracy dated 
February 8, 1939 listed Dr. Davis as vice chairman of the national committee of 
the league ; the league's letterheads of July 12, 1939 and May 18, 1939 list him 
as a member of its national committee. He was listed also as a national sponsor 
of the league on a letterhead of April 6, 1939, according to a photostat in com- 
mittee files. 

The special committee, in its report of March 29, 1944 (p. 105), cited the 
American Congress for Peace and Democracy as a Communist front advocating 
collective security against the Fascist aggressors prior to the signing of the 
Stalin-Hilter pact. The American League for Peace and Democracy was formed 
at the above congress. 

The American League for Peace and Democracy was cited as subversive and 
Communist by the Attorney General in letters released June 1 and September 
21, 1948. The group was redesignated pursuant to Executive Order No. 10450. 
The group was cited previously by the Attorney General as established in the 
United States in 1937 as successor to the American League Against War and 
Fascism "in an effort to create public sentiment on behalf of a foreign policy 
adapted to the interests of the Soviet Union. * * * The American League for 
Peace and Democracy * * * was designed to conceal Communist control, in 
accordance with the new tactics of the Communist International." (Congres- 
sional Record, Sept. 24. 1942, pp. 7683 and 7684.) The special committee, in 
its report dated January 3, 1939 (pp. 69-71), cited the American League as "the 
largest of the Communist 'front' movements in the United States." 

A letterhead of the Committee to Defend America by Keeping Out of War dated 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3783 

August 10, 1940, contains the name of Jerome Davis in a list of the sponsors of 
that committee. 

"After Stalin signed his pact with Hitler, the Communist-led Committee To 
Defend America by Keeping Out of War * * * came forth to oppose the national- 
defense program, lend-lease, conscription, and other 'war-mongering' efforts." 
(Special Committee, report, March 29, 1944, pp. 99 and 105.) 

A booklet entitled "These Americans Say : * * * " lists Dr. Davis as one of 
the representative individuals who advocated the lifting of the embargo on 
arms to Spain ; the Coordinating Committee to Lift the Embargo prepared and 
published the booklet. 

The special committee, in its report of March 29, 1944 (pp. 137 and 138), cited 
the Coordinating Committee to Lift the ( Spanish ) Embargo as one of a number 
of front organizations, set up during the Spanish Civil War by the Communist 
Party in the United States and through which the party carried on a great deal 
of agitation. 

Jerome Davis was a member of the National Advisory Committee of Common- 
wealth College, as shown on a letterhead of January 1, 1940 ; he endorsed the 
reorganization plan of the college, as shown in Fortnightly, the publication of 
the college (issue of Aug. 15, 1937, p. 3) . 

Commonwealth College was cited as Communist by the Attorney General in a 
letter released April 27, 1949. The group was redesignated pursuant to Executive 
Order No. 10450. The special committee, in its report of March 29, 1944 (pp. 
76 and 167), cited the Commonwealth College as a "Communist enterprise". 

Jerome Davis signed the "call" to the Conference on Pan-American Democracy 
as shown by News You Don't Get for November 15, 1938 (p. 3). A pamphlet 
entitled "Economic Trends and the New Deal in the Caribbean" published by 
the organization in 1942, names Jerome Davis as a member of the executive 
committee of the group. 

The Conference on Pan-American Democracy (known also as Council for Pan- 
American Democracy), was cited as subversive and Communist by the Attorney 
General in letters released June 1 and September 21, 1948. The group was redes- 
ignated pursuant to Executive Order No. 10450. The Special Committee on 
Un-American Activities, in its report of March 29, 1944 (pp. 161 and 164), cited 
the Conference on Pan-American Democracy as a Communist front which 
defended Carlos Luiz Prestes, a Brazilian Communist leader and former member 
of the executive committee of the Communist International. 

Dr. Jerome Davis was a member of the Labor Advisory Committee of Con- 
sumers Union as shown by a letterhead of the organization dated September 28, 
1939, and an undated circular, Workers as Consumers. 

Consumers Union l9 was cited as a Communist front headed by the Communist, 
Arthur Kallet (whose party name is Edward Adams). Ben Gold and Louis 
Weinstock, both well-known Communists, were also members of the labor 
advisory committee of Consumers Union. ( Special committee report, March 29, 
1944, p. 153.) 

In 1936, Jerome Davis was dropped from the faculty of Yale University 
School of Divinity, according to the Daily Worker of October 23, 1936 (p. 2), 
which reported that "Dr. Jerome Davis, whose book, 'Culture and Capitalism,' 
contained a chapter criticizing directors and trustees who hamper academic 
freedom, has been dropped from the faculty of the Yale Divinity School. These 
officials, Dr. Davis s'aid in his book, are largely drawn from banking, utilities, 
and big business and turn thumbs clown on any free discussion of economic 
and social problems." 

The following reference to Dr. Davis' dismissal from the Yale University 
School of Divinity is found in Edwin Seaver's column, Books of the Day in the 
November 16, 1936, issue of the Daily Worker (p. 7) : 

"The current issue of the New Republic has an eight-page supplement on the 
Yale- Jerome Davis case. Professor Davis, it will be recalled, was recently 
dismissed from the Divinity School of Yale University, after some 12 years' 
service as an associate professor, during which period a full professorship was 
denied him. 

"The New Republic supplement, entitled Yale on Trial,' prints a statement 
by Yale University and the report of an investigation made of the case by 

19 After the date of this hearing, in its annual report for the year 1953, H. Rept. 1102, s.°.d 
Cong., the committee made the following statement : "After hearings and thorough study the 
committee finds there is no present justification for continuing this organization as one'that 
is cited and future reports and publications will reflect that this organization has been 
deleted from the list of subversive organizations and publications." 



3784 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Profs. Charles A. Beard, Paul H. Douglas, Colston E. Warne, and Edward A. 
Koss. 

"The university says that 'no abridgment of academic freedom or liberty 
of speech is involved in this case.' The investigation proves this is a lie. 

"Among Professor Davis' crimes are: (1) a notable book on Capitalism 
and Its Culture; (2) a study of prisoners in the Connecticut jails; (3) the 
instituting of workers' educational classes in New Haven; (4) speaking on 
behalf of the Soviet Union; (5) condemning the Insull interests as racketeers; 
(6) inviting Senator Nye to speak at Yale; (6) [sic] accepting the findings 
of Professors Fay and Barnes on the question of responsibility for the origins 
of the World War. 

"The American Association of University Professors presents unimpeachable 
evidence that Professor Davis' dismissal from Yale is a clear-cut case of 
suppression of academic freedom. Yale University has not heard the last of 
this matter by a long shot. 

"Coming back to Prof. Jerome Davis. There's an article by him in the big 
third anniversary issue of Fight. It's about the status of the college teacher 
today." 

In 1937, the United Cannery, Agricultural, Packing and Allied Workers, meet- 
ing in national convention in Denver, Colo., passed a resolution protesting dis- 
missal of Jerome Davis, professor at Yale University and president of the 
American Federation of Teachers, because of his liberal social opinions and 
activities. (Public Hearings before the Special Committee on Un-American 
Activities, October 25, 1038, p. 1970. ) 

In 1044, the Special Committee on Un-American Activities reported that the 
United Cannery, Agricultural, Packing and Allied Workers of America was one 
of the unions affiliated with the CIO in which it found Communist leadership 
"strongly entrenched" (Rept. 1311, March 29, 1944. pages 18 and 19). It is 
noted also that the Food, Tobacco and Agricultural Workers (successor to the 
United Cannery, Agricultural * * *) was expelled from the CIO, effective March 
1, 1950, on grounds of Communist domination (CIO Fact Sheet for the Press. 
12th Constitutional Convention of the CIO, Chicago, 111., November 20-24, 1950). 

A circular entitled "and tell the folks that I'll be home if * * *" issued by 
Friends of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, named Jerome Davis as one of those 
who endorsed the drive to bring the wounded boys home. 

Friends of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade was cited as a Communist front 
organization by the special committee in its report of March 29, 1944 (pp. 82 
and 125). 

In November 1937, Friends of the Soviet Union issued what it chose to call 
the Golden Book of American Friendship with the Soviet Union and in addition, 
a 100-page edition of its official publication, Soviet Russia Today, eulogizing 
Soviet Russia on its 20th anniversary. (Public Hearings, vol. 1, p. 518.) From 
the same source, we note that Jerome Davis was one of the speakers on the pro- 
gram when the Golden Book was presented to President Kalinin at the 20th 
anniversary celebration, sponsored by the organization, Friends of the Soviet 
Union. Anniversary greetings from Dr. Davis are found in the November 1937 
issue of Soviet Russia Today (p. 77), and an article by Dr. Davis entitled "The 
Soviet Union in 1938" is found in the November 1938 issue of that publication 
(p. 38). 

The Golden Book of American Friendship with the Soviet Union was cited as 
a "Communist enterprise" signed by hundreds of well-known Communists and 
fellow travelers by the special committee in its report of March 29, 1944 (p. 102). 

Citation of Soviet Russia Today is found on page 2 of this memorandum. 
[P. No. 2 refers to typewritten memorandum ; see pp. 3645 and 3781 of this 
publication.] 

Friends of the Soviet Union was cited as Communist by the Attorney General 
in letters released December 4, 1947, June 1 and September 21. 1948. The group 
was redesignated pursuant to Executive Order No. 10450. The special committee 
* * *, in its report of January 3, 1939 (p. 78), cited the Friends of the Soviet 
Union as "one of the most open Communist fronts in the United States" whose 
purpose "is to propagandize for and defend Russia and its system of government." 
It "is a section of an international movement directed from Moscow." The 
Friends admit "they penetrate our industrial sections." 

The name of Jerome Davis appeared in a list of national sponsors of the 
Medical Bureau and North American Committee to Aid Spanish Democracy on a 
letterhead of the organization dated July 6, 1938. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3785 

The special committee * * *, in its report of March 29, 1944 (p. 82), cited 
the Medical Bureau and North American Committee to Aid Spanish Democracy as 
a Communist-front organization. 

A press release issued by the National Emergency Conference for Democratic 
Rights. February 23, 1940, named him as a member of the board of sponsors of 
that organization : he signed an open letter of the organization, as reported 
in the Daily Worker of May 13, 1940 I pp. 1 and 5 ) . On the program of the Second 
National Negro Congress which was held in October 1937, the name of Jerome 
Davis appears as one of the discussion leaders of the congress. Dr. Davis signed 
an open letter to American liberals, as shown in the Daily Worker of February 
12, 1937 (p. 2) and in Soviet Russia Today of March 1937 (pp. 14-15). A 
Letterhead of Russian Reconstruction Farms, Inc., dated March 20, 192G, shows 
that Jerome Davis was a member of the advisory board of that organization. 

The National Emergency Conference for Democratic Rights was cited as a 
Communist-front organization by the special committee * * * in its report of 
March 29, 1944 (pp. 48 and 102). The congressional committee * * *, in its 
report of September 2, 1947 (p. 12), cited the National Emergency Conference 
for Democratic Rights as follows: "It will be remembered that during the days 
of the infamous Soviet-Nazi pact, the Communist-built protective organizations 
known as the National Emergency < onferenc^, the National Emergency Confer- 
ence for Democratic Rights, which culminated in the National Federation for 
Constitutional Liberties." 

The National Negro Congress was cited as subversive and Communist by the 
Attorney General in letters released December 4, 1947, and September 21, 1948. 
The group was redesignated pursuant to Executive Order No. 10450. The group 
was cited previously by the Attorney General who noted that A. Phillip Randolph, 
president of the congress since its inception in 1936, refused to run again in April 
1940 "on the ground that it was 'deliberately packed with Communists and 
Congress of Industrial Organizations members who were either Communists or 
sympathizers with Communists.'" (Congressional Record, Sept. 24, 1942, pp. 
7*687 and 7688.) The special committee * * *. in its report of January 3, 1939 
(p. 81), cited the National Negro Congress as "the Communist-front movement in 
the United States among Negroes * * *." 

The special committee * * *, in its report of June 25, 1942 (p. 21), cited the 
"Open letter to American liberals" as follows : "In March 1937 a group of well- 
known Communists and Communist collaborators published an open letter bear- 
ing the title given above. The letter was a defense of the Moscow purge trials." 

Russian Reconstruction Farms, Inc., was cited as a Communist enterprise 
which was directed by Harold Ware, son of the well-known Communist Ella 
Reeve Bloor, by the special committee * * *, in its report of March 29, 1944 (p. 
76). 

He was an advisory editor of Champion magazine, according to the October 
1936 issue (p. 2). 

Champion was cited by the special committee * * * as the "official organ of the 
Young Communist League and also of the International Workers Order" (report, 
June 25, 1942, p. 17). 

Identified as a writer and lecturer of New York, Prof. Jerome Davis w r as named 
in the Daily Worker of February 1, 1951 (p. 2) as a sponsor of the American 
Peace Crusade ; a February 1951 letterhead of the crusade listed him as an initial 
sponsor. 

The congressional committee * * *, in its statement issued on the March of 
Treason, February 19, 1951, and House Report No. 378, on the Communist "peace" 
offensive, April 1, 1951 (p. 51), cited the American Peace Crusade as an'organi- 
zation which "the Communists established" as "a new instrument for their 
'peace' offensive in the United States" and which was heralded by the Daily 
Worker "with the usual bold headlines reserved for projects in line with the 
Communist objectives." 

Dr. Davis, author and lecturer. West Haven, Conn., signed an open letter urging 
defeat of President Truman's arms program which was sent to Senators and 
Congressmen by the Conference on Peaceful Alternatives to the Atlantic Pact 
(letterhead of August 21, 1949). He also signed a statement calling for inter- 
national agreement to ban use of atomic weapons which the Committee for 
Peaceful Alternatives issued, as shown by a statement attached to a press re- 
lease of December 14, 1949 (p. 5), in which source he was identified as a visiting 
professor, University of Colorado ; West Haven, Conn. 

The Conference for Peaceful Alternatives to the Atlantic Pact was cited as a 
meeting called by the Daily Worker in July 1949, to be held in Washington, D. C, 
and as having been instigated by "Communists in the United States (who) did 

43620 — 54 14 



3786 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

their part in the Moscow campaign" by the congressional committee * * * in its 
report on the Communist "peace" offensive, April 1, 1951 (p. 56). 

The congressional committee * * *, in its report referred to above, cited the 
Committee for Peaceful Alternatives to the Atlantic Pact as an organization 
which was formed as a result of the Conference for Peaceful Alternatives to the 
Atlantic Pact, and which was located, according to a letterhead of September 
16, 1950, at 30 North Dearborn Street, Chicago 2, 111. ; and to further the cause 
of "Communists in the United States" doing "their part in the Moscow campaign." 

Dr. Jerome Davis, West Haven, Conn., was a sponsor of the Mid-Century Con- 
ference for Peace, as shown on the call to the conference. An undated leaflet 
entitled "Prominent Americans call for * * *" received by this committee on 
September 11, 1950, lists Professor Davis of Boulder, Colo., as one of the endorsers 
of the World Peace Appeal. 

The congressional committee * * *, in its report on the Communist "peace" 
offensive, referred to on page 9 of this memorandum, cited the Mid-Century Con- 
ference for Peace as a meeting held in Chicago, May 29 and 30, 1950, by the Com- 
mittee for Peaceful Alternatives to the Atlantic Pact and as having been "aimed 
at assembling as many gullible persons as possible under Communist direction 
and turning them into a vast sounding board for Communist propaganda." 

In this same report, the congressional committee * * * cited the world peace 
appeal as a petition campaign launched by the Permanent Committee of the 
World Peace Congress at its meeting in Stockholm, March 16-19, 1950 ; as having 
"received the enthusiastic approval of every section of the international Commu- 
nist hierarchy" ; as having been lauded in the Communist press, putting "every 
individual Communist on notice that he has the duty to rise to this appeal" ; and 
as having "received the official endorsement of the Supreme Soviet of the 
U. S. S. R., which has been echoed by the governing bodies of every Communist 
satellite country, and by all Communist Parties throughout the world." 

In response to a questionnaire issued by the Committee for a Democratic Far 
Eastern Policy, Dr. Davis answered in favor of recognizing the Chinese Commu- 
nist government, as shown in Far East Spotlight for December 1949-January 
1950 (p. 25). 

The Committee for a Democratic Far Eastern Policy was cited as Communist 
by the Attorney General in a letter released April 27, 1949. The group was re- 
designated pursuant to Executive Order No. 10450. 

Dr. Davis spoke at the 15th Annual Conference of the Teachers Union, an 
affiliate of the United Public Workers of America (Daily Worker, issues of 
March 23, 1951, p. 4 and April 9, 1951, p. 9). He was scheduled to sepak at the 
convention of the Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, as shown in the Daily Worker 
of September 11, 1950 (p. 9). 

In 1946 the United Public Workers of America was formed by a merger of the 
United Federal Workers of America and the State, County and Municipal Work- 
ers of America, both of which were found to have Communist leadership "strongly 
entrenched" by the special committee * * * in report 1311 of March 29, 1944 
(pp. 18 and 19). The International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers 
was cited in the same manner in the same report of the special committee. Both 
unions were expelled from the Congress of Industrial Organizations on February 
15, 1950, on charges of Communist domination (CIO Fact Sheet for the Press, 
12th Constitutional Convention of the CIO, Chicago, 111., Nov. 20-24, 1950). 

Jerome Davis signed a brief in behalf of John Howard Lawson and Dalton 
Trumbo which was submitted to the Supreme Court of the United States in the 
October ,1949 term by the Cultural Workers. Lawson and Trumbo were 2 of the 
Hollywood 10 who were cited for contempt of Congress as a result of their 
refusal to affirm or deny Communist membership before this committee. 

Jerome Davis was one of the sponsors of a meeting in New York City, arranged 
for the purpose of greeting the new Soviet Constitution (Daily Worker of No- 
vember 30, 1936, p. 5). 

The following reference to Jerome Davis was made in the special committee's 
report of March 29, 1944 (p. 75) : "A tabulation of some of the benefactions of 
the American Fund for Public Service reveals the extent to which it was a major 
source for the financing of Communist Party enterprises * * * The Vanguard 
Press was established by the fund with a donation of capital amounting to 
$139,000. A series of propaganda books on Russia, edited by Jerome Davis, was 
one of the first large publishing projects of the Vanguard Press." 

The New York Times of May and June 1943 contained several articles con- 
cerning a libel suit for $150,000 which Jerome Davis brought against the Curtis 
Publishing Co. and Benjamin Stolberg. ( See New York Times of May 18, 1943, 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3787 

p 27 ; May 20, 1943, p. 46 ; May 25, 1943, p. 24 ; May 28, 1943, p. 13C ; June 2, 
1943, p. 3 ; June 3, 1943, p. 23 ; June 4, 1943, p. 9 ; June 8, 1943, p. 23 ; June 9, 1943, 
p. 23C ; and June 10, 1943, p. 23C. ) 

According to these articles, the Saturday Evening Post of September 2, 1939 
(pp. 5, 6, 32), printed an article about Mr. Davis, written by Benjamin Stolberg. 
Mr. Davis stated that the article had called him a Communist and a Stalinist, and 
because of it, he did not receive appointment to a position with the National 
Youth Administration which had been promised him by Aubrey Williams. 
Arthur Garfield Hays was counsel for Davis. 

The Times reported on testimony of witnesses both for and against Mr. Davis. 
Among the witnesses who testified for Davis, Dr. Sherwood Eddy stated that 
Davis was a "loyal American who has always attacked the evils of communism 
as I have." Mrs. Florence Curtis Hanson, former secretary-treasurer of the 
American Federation of Teachers, testified that she did not consider Dr. Davis 
as a Communist but felt that he was "motivated by humanitarianism" and was 
not "tagged with the Communist label." Dr. Halford E. Luccock, professor of 
Homiletics at Yale Divinity School, testified that Dr. Davis had the reputation 
of being a liberal, not a Communist, and added that Dr. Davis had criticized 
Soviet Russia for its "disregard of the human value of free speech and its intol- 
erance of religion," and was against the use of violence and terrorism. Dr. 
Ned H. Dearborn, executive vice president of the National Safety Council, and 
former dean of education at New York University, denied that Dr. Davis had 
been defeated in 1939 for the presidency of the American Federation of Teachers 
on the issue of communism. 

Those who testified in the trial against Dr. Davis were: Matthew Woll, vice 
president, American Federation of Labor, who stated that he was "frank to say 
that some of the Communists believed Dr. Davis was a Communist" ; Eugene 
Lyons who said that Davis' book, The New Russia (1933) showed a type of 
Soviet propaganda by its omission of certain data in presentation of Russian 
conditions ; Dr. Edmund A. Walsh, vice president of Georgetown University, who 
said that Davis "accepts the ultimate objective of communism and belongs psycho- 
logically and morally to the group that advocates it" but is short of 100 percent 
in his advocacy ; Dr. John L. Childs, professor of education at Teachers' College, 
who said that he had resigned from the Teachers Union in 1938 because it was 
dominated by or controlled by the Stalinist or Communist Party group. 

It was brought out in some of the testimony, according to the Times that 
William Green, president of the American Federation of Labor, had written a 
letter to Davis on January 11, 1939. asking him to take decisive action against 
communistic influences reported in the Teachers Union. Local 5, New York. Mr. 
Davis said, "personally I didn't think the charges were true." 

Many excerpts from Mr. Davis' book, Capitalism and its Culture were read 
during the trial. One of the excerpts, as quoted in the Times articles, gives 
something of Davis' views at the time : "There is of course no certain guaranty 
when capitalism will be overthrown. If the people wish to remain subservient 
serfs in a profit economy they can do so. A revolutionary transition era may 
necessitate a measure of dictatorship, but the country should always be con- 
trolled primarily for the benefit of the workers both of hand and of brain." 

On June 7, Davis increased the amount for which he was suing to $250,000. 
On June S, the case went to the jury, Justice Carew charging the jurors "* * * 
no man has a legal right to be a Communist." The jury failed to agree and 
was discharged. Harold Epstein, of counsel for Davis, moved immediately to 
set a new trial for the following Monday, because Dr. Davis was departing for 
Russia on June 25, and was unlikely to return before February. Judge Carew 
denied the Monday trial, but without prejudice to application before the judge 
in charge of calendar assignments. 

Mr. Davis did go to Russia as a special correspondent for International News 
Service. The Washington Post of November 29, 1943 (p. 1), contains one of his 
articles on the Nazi massacre at Kiev ; and another article by Mr. Davis, with a 
Moscow dateline, concerning the impact of American supplies on the Russian 
war and home fronts, appeared in the Washington Post on February 20, 1944 
(p.3B). 

Jerome Davis gathered questions from the members of an unofficial United 
States labor delegation to Russia in 1927 for an interview of 5 hours which they 
had with Stalin, according to Robert W. Dunn, in an article by Virginia Gardner 
printed in the Daily People's World of April 3, 1953 (p. 7M) and the Daily Worker 
of March 22, 1953 (pp. 3 and 12). Davis was identified in these sources as a 



3788 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

professor at Yale University in 1927, previously in charge of YMCA work in 
Russia early in World War I. 

Reviews of Dr. Davis' book, Peace, War. and You are found in the December 
21, 1052, issue of the Sunday Worker (p. 7M), and the February 9, 1953, issue 
of the Daily People's World (p. 7). 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 40 
(Part 1) 

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TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3789 



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3790 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



Mr. Kunzig. Do you know Eev. Stephen H. Fritchman ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, I do. 

Mr. Kunzig. Did you, on occasion, speak at Kev. Stephen H. Fritch- 
man's church in Los Angeles? (See Oxnam exhibit No. 41, p. 3795.) 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I am going to answer this and I 
think you are going to reprimand me, sir, but this is a very vicious 
procedure. Dr. Fritchman held a very high position in the Unitarian 
Church. He was the editor of the Christian Register. He subse- 
quently became 

Mr. Velde. Would you be good enough to answer the question ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I cannot answer it without doing myself damage 
and there has been enough of that. 

Mr. Velde. The reason I ask you that is that it has been standard 
procedure to ask the witness to answer the question first and not 
make 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir ; I did. 

Mr. Kunzig. Was that on April 4, 1952 ? 

Mr. Velde. Now will you proceed ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir; thank you. Dr. Fritchman was the editor 
of the Christian Register, which is the official paper of the Unitarian 
Church. He, I believe, was dismissed from that office. He became 
the pastor of the First Unitarian Church of Los Angeles. When I 
lived in Los Angeles I knew the minister of that church who was 
named Backus. I had hoped we could have good relations between 
the churches called the Unitarian and the Trinitarian. 

I received an invitation to lecture at a forum which was held at the 
First Unitarian Church. I also lectured at the Santa Monica forum 
and at the Westwood Hills Methodist Church. I had no knowledge 
whatsoever that Mr. Fritchman was in any way related to the Com- 
munist Party. 

May I say this, that since that time and I will not name the men, 
but two prominent officials of the Unitarian Church have conferred 
with me and gave me information that gave me grave doubts concern- 
ing Dr. Fritchman, and had I known what they informed me I would, 
of course, not have lectured at his church. I did not know before that 
time what they alleged and 1 take it what is going to be done now is 
going to be the same procedure that somebody is going to say that 
he was identified by somebody else as a Communist and they will begin 
to draw inferences as far as I am concerned in the matter of lecturing 
in his church. I think that that is basically unfair and I respectfully 
request that kind of procedure, if it is a procedure, end. 

Mr. Jackson. In all of the city of Los Angeles there is perhaps no 
individual who has been so closely associated with the Communist 
Party or Communist-front organizations over a period of many years 
as has Reverend Fritchman. He appeared before the committee over 
a year ago and declined to answer questions as to his membership in 
the Communist Party on the grounds of the fifth amendment. His 
record has been so spectacular that it seems almost unbelievable to me 
that even the most cursory examination of it by anyone on the street 
corner would not have indicated to the reader that he had appeared 
before the committee and had declined to answer. 

Bishop Oxnam. How did he appear, please ? 

Mr. Kunzig. How? 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3791 

Bishop Oxnam. "When was it, I meant ? I am sorry. 

Mr. Kunzig. September 12, 1951. 

Mr. Jackson. The Fritchman file has not been declassified by the 
committee and I do not want to go into detail on what his testimony 
was, but he refused to cooperate and relied upon the provisions of the 
fifth amendment, which he had every right to do. 20 

Bishop Oxnam. I have stated all the facts that I know in this 
matter. I don't know whether we can abbreviate this or whether 
we have to have the long process of all of this and never get to the 
questions I came to consider. 

Mr. Kunzig. We have talked about many of the questions you came 
to consider, pages and pages and pages of them, as I think you will 
agree. 

Mr. Frazier. I suggest that the bishop be allowed to deal with 
the questions that he has come here to answer. His counsel will have 
to leave in a very few minutes. 

Mr. Clardy. We put in at the beginning the two-page printed docu- 
ment in which you went, one at a time, down the line with the faults 
that you found with the file, and then we have put in your suggestions 
in Parade, which you yourself suggested. 

Now I think that has covered most of the documents that we had 
intended to ask you about. Now, aside from the two articles or two 
things you mentioned that I told you I had never heard of, is there 
anything else that we haven't covered at the moment ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I simply referred to these items because 15 minutes 
would not allow me to deal with them and I had wished to deal with 
them, and how can I clear the record if you don't know what I believe 
to be false in it ? 

Mr. Velde. We have made an exception in this particular case to 
allow you some time to explain your objection to the file, and in 
all fairness I must say that that was at the insistence of the gentleman 
from California, Mr. Jackson, that we do depart from the regular 
committee rules and inasmuch as you have been granted the privilege 
of inserting these articles and giving us the various articles and com- 
plaints that you have, they are in the record and I do not think there 
is any reason that we should go into anything further at this time. 
We do want to get this hearing over with. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, so do I, very, very much, but I 
listed certain items that have not been considered here at all and which 
illustrate the method of the files that I think is objectionable. 

Mr. Jackson. Do you mean over and above objections to the informa- 
tion released by the committee in which you publicly answered certain 
of the items in the file? Whether these are over and above those 
things which are already in the record, is the point that I am making 
because of the insertion at the outset of the hearings of all of those 
things which related to the report and to your answers. 

Bishop Oxnam. Some are and some are not. 

Mr. Jackson. Those particular items which were covered in the 
original report and in your newspaper reply have been given entry 
into the record. I was wondering if there are other matters which are 
not covered in that case. I for one have no objection to 

20 The testimony of Stephen H. Fritchman was released by the committee on July 31, 1953. 



3792 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Bishop Oxnam. I wonder if I could run down the list very briefly 
and close the matter. I have been here all day hoping that one might 
deal with some of these items, and it is getting toward midnight. I 
am tired and so are you. 

Mr. Kunzig. I would like to make this statement for the record. 
We have dealt with many, many of these items which you raised. 

Bishop Oxnam. I mentioned seven. 

Mr. Kunzig. You mentioned seven specific items, some of which 
we dealt with, and you mentioned also in your answer in a Washing- 
ton newspaper a whole large group, many of which we went into in 
detail. We have gone through many of these for hours. I do not 
want any implication that we have not touched any of these. 

Mr. Velde. And recommendations that you made to me in a per- 
sonal letter which was taken up before the full committee and 
considered. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes; I received a letter from you. 

Mr. Velde. I can see no further reason why we should go into this 
in this manner. After all, this committee is composed of members 
who are elected by the people and who are obligated to dp a duty 
which was imposed by the full House of Representatives and of 
course we are trying to do the job the best that we can in that fashion. 

We welcome your criticism and always have from any individual. 
We have had criticism from other people on the other side which we 
must pay some attention to, in all fairness. So I say that I think we 
have been more than fair in recognizing your objections to the file 
of this committee and I ask, therefore, that we proceed in regular 
order and ask that counsel will ask any further questions that he 
might have. 

Mr. Doyle. As I understand, I object to your ruling, Mr. Chair- 
man, because if this witness feels he has a material point in connec- 
tion with the files concerning him and which have not been presented 
yet and that is why we are here, I request that this witness have the 
opportunity to present any material point involved of the files which 
has not been presented, either by our counsel or by him. That was the 
purpose of this meeting. I think you ought to reconsider your ruling, 
Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Jackson. I think all matters have been touched upon to which 
there were objections. 

Mr. Clardy. I think I asked the witness to tell me those items that 
had not been covered by the method we suggested, and he did not 
give me a clear answer. I would like to ask if I am not right about 
this. I think there are only two things in there, really, and those are 
things on which I have no knowledge and I cannot find anything 
about it and if you would reverse the ruling, find out from him when 
and where and how the things got out into the public view. 

Mr. Veede. How long will that take, Bishop? 

Bishop Oxnam. I will take but one instance and I think I can do it 
in 3 minutes, if you will allow me to do it. 

Mr. Velde. Certainly. 

Bishop Oxnam. I have made reference to the article which T think 
was most unfortunate, but this will indicate the misrepresentation 
that occurs because I think of incompetency or slanted selection, and 
T am now quoting from a release that Mr. Wood himself made. 

Mr. Clardy. When was this, Bishop? 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3793 

Bishop Oxnam. This was October 26, 1951. The Washington Star 
of February 10, 1930, carries a news item datelined Indiana State 
Reformatory, February 9. 

The article refers to a speech made by Dr. G. Bromley Oxnam, 
president of DePauw University, to the inmates of the reformatory. 
Dr. Oxnam is reported as decrying the practice of nations in entering 
into secret treaties and declaring that the slogan of the "America 
First" must be interpreted as meaning "America first in world serv- 
ice" and not "to be the first to go into Mexico to steal lands." 

Mr. Velde. Was that a quotation from a newspaper ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Part of that is a quotation from a newspaper. 

Mr. Velde. Would you name the newspaper and the date of it ? 

Bishop Oxnam. This was the Washington Star as of February 10, 
but actually the Indiana newspaper carried it extensively. 

Now, the point I am trying to make is this : That by selecting that 
particular quotation, putting it in there and I will show it was not 
a quotation in a moment, and not including what was available to a 
research staff in the newspaper which is something that was avail- 
able at the very same time, this condemns me, whereas if they had 
quoted what was available in the full articles of the Indiana news- 
paper, they would have given the people an entirely different 
impression. 

Now, I read to you what did appear in the Indianapolis Star of 
February 13, 1930. This was available to your research staff : 

The words referred to were taken from two different sections of the speech 
and combined by the reporter. I stated that one of the causes of war was selfish 
nationalism. I said, "There is a right kind of nationalism. It is the nationalism 
that manifests itself in such love of country that one is willing to give all he 
possesses, his life, if need be, to lift the life standards of his people. It is the 
kind of nationalism one feels when viewing America with its poignant line, 
'Land where my fathers died.' " 

I interject this statement that since my father's death I could understand the 
meaning of that splendid line. 

"It is the kind of nationalism one feels when he looks upon the towering sky- 
line of New York when returning from Europe and knows that that is his 
country, not a Shylockian people bent upon grasping gold, but after all a people 
of idealism. There is a right kind of nationalism, but there is a wrong kind, 
and that is selfish nationalism. It is revealed in the slogan 'Germany Over All,' 
'Britannia Rules the Waves,' 'Ourselves Alone,' or 'America First.' If we mean 
by 'America First' 'America first in world service,' it is a sublime slogan, but 
if we mean America first and because our oil reserves may some day be depleted, 
we will allow certain groups to stir up public opinion that we will enter Mexico 
and steal her oil reserves because we need them, then that slogan will do for 
us what it did for Germany a short time ago." 

I will stand back of that statement. 

Now, I suggest to you, sir, these two quotations say two fundamen- 
tally different things, and when President Coolidge sent Ambassador 
Morrow to Mexico you solved that problem. 

Mr. Velde. Were you misquoted in any of the files? 

Bishop Oxnam. That isn't the question, sir. 

Mr. Velde. I think it is definitely. Were you misquoted in the 
Washington Star ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, when you take one quotation from 
a newspaper that puts me in a bad light, an accurate quotation from 
a newspaper, and do not quote from another newspaper available at 
the same time that reports what I did say and puts me in a different 
light, that is a procedure that misleads anybody, you included. 



3794 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Mr. Velde. I have to insist. Did you say that you were misquoted 
in the Washington Star ? 

Bishop Oxnam. No. That quotation, I said, put together 2 sen- 
tences completely apart so that they did not say at all what I said. 

For instance, Mr. Jackson recommended to the American people that 
they read Jerome Davis' book. That is a clear sentence that is in 
there. But taken out of there, that is what it says, but actually Mr. 
Jackson did not say that at all. 

Mr. Jackson. We were discussing a matter which had been 
thoroughly aired, a matter on which the previous allegation was dealt 
with in the reply which was inserted in toto in the record. I had 
thought we were going to go to a point which had not been covered in 
order that we might get it clarified. 

Bishop Oxnam. I did not take up Mr. Jackson's letter and Mr. 
Tavenner's letter because I think we would be in debate and could not 
do it in 3 minutes. I am perfectly willing to call this a day. I think 
it would be significant. You cannot hear that and unless there are 
other matters which you want to present, I will call it a day. 

Mr. Velde. It seems to be the concensus of opinion of the committee 
that we should hear all of the objections that you have. As I say, I 
would like to get out of here myself, but if you do have any objections, 
regardless of the time, will you do it ? 

Bishop Oxnam. Would you let me send a communication to the 
committee and the committee can consider the communication and 
do what it will. It would be saying what I would be saying now and 
I would be doing it in a formal fashion. 

I would request permission to file a bibliography of what I have 
written on communism and Communists. I would appreciate the 
privilege of having that included. (See Oxnam exhibit No. 1-A, 
p. 3590.) 

Mr. Velde. Is the gentleman from California satisfied, or do you 
insist? 

Mr. Doyle. If he is satisfied, of course I am. 

Bishop Oxnam. I will say I am satisfied at this hour. I would 
have much preferred to have gone down the line earlier but I cannot 
trespass upon this committee forever. You gentlemen have duties 
tomorrow. You have said I might send a letter, and under those 
circumstances I am satisfied. 

Mr. Kunzig. I have a document marked "Oxnam Exhibit No. 41" 
which was back when we were discussing the Fritchman situation 
which was the listing of Bishop Oxnam being at Fritchman's church, 
and I should like now to offer it into evidence. 

Bishop Oxnam. I stated I spoke there. 

Mr. Velde. Without objection, it will be so admitted. 

(Document referred to was received in evidence as Oxnam exhibit 
No. 41.) 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, there are just 2 or 3 small matters. I 
have a document called An American Churchman in the Soviet 
Union by the Reverend Louie D. Newton, president of the Southern 
Baptist Convention. This is a publication of the American Russian 
Institute, which is cited by Attorney General Clark in 1949 as Com- 
munist. 

There is in this pamphlet an introduction by Bishop G. Bromley 
Oxnam. (See pp. 3797-3799.) 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



3795 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 41 

(Los Angeles Daily News, March 29, 1952) 



— J* --4.- DAILY-HEWS n 

UNITARIAN 

tfU W Itk St. Jm»I Eott ©f ¥ f— I 

Rev. Stepnen H. FritchnaR 

Ckurck School «•«) Hyr*«cy— 104S a.M. 

PORTRAIT OP AN AMERICAN: 
LUTHER IURIANK 

Seme* br Mr. FriHhm«»— 11:00 an. 

GEORGE IERNARD SHAW ON 

"PEACE OR WAR" 

Dramatic ■»o*itrnj — 1:00 a.m. 
JIFF COKEY DAVID WOLFf 

AKiNC IARTOM BAM WMN 

UNITARIAN TIME ON KFWi— 10:15 P.M. 



UNITARIAN PUBLIC FORUM 
Friday. April 4, • P.M. 

BISHOP 6. IROMLEY OXNAM 

MMhodttt Church. New Y»rk Area 

"THE CLERICAL THREAT 
TO AMERICAN FREEDOM" 



Admiiiion Pre 



;»l! action — QutitUne 



Th/g Ckurck Wtlcawn P«r>oin ef 
All facts q*4 Cr#*4t 



WAR 2 9=1951 



The question is, do you recognize this book marked as "Oxnam 
Exhibit No. 42," and did you write that introduction, sir ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I do recognize it and I did write it, and having 
answered the question, may I explain it, Mr. Chairman, in accordance 
with your procedure ? 

Mr. Velde. Yes. 

Bishop Oxnam. Dr. Louie D. Newton is one of the most distin- 
guished ministers of the Baptist Church. He was the president of 
the southern convention. Dr. Newton went to Russia. I have been 
related to the national council. We have always hoped that some 
day our Southern Baptist brethren might be in the national council. 
Dr. Newton is a dear, personal friend. When he returned from 
Russia, he asked me if I would write an introduction to a booklet he 
was bringing out describing his visit. I would suggest the commit- 
tee read it. I would like it introduced. 

I had no knowledge of what organization was to publish it. When 
it came out, I noticed it was put out by this agency. I have no rela- 
tion to that. I wrote an introduction to a booklet written by a friend, 
a distinguished clergyman. 

Mr. Kunzig. Your statement is that you did not know that this 
introduction would be put out by the American-Russian Institute ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I did not know who was to publish that document. 
I wrote that for a dear friend and a distinguished leader of the church. 

Mr. Kunzig. Do you know the date, to the best of your recollection ? 
There is no date published on this book. 



3796 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Mr. Clardy. My information is that it was 1952, but I cannot state 
that positively to be correct. 

Bishop Oxnam. I think that it is not correct. 

Mr. Clardy. I would like to know because, in the Soviet magazines, 
that was advertised continuously during the year 1952, but they did 
not tell the date in which it was published. Incidentally, I find it a 
considerable apology for the Soviet Russian system. 

Bishop Oxnam. If you do, let me say I do not. This man is funda- 
mentally opposed to communism. He was a journalist, was trained 
as a journalist and was writing this as he saw it. 

Mr. Kunzig. Was it within the last 5 or 10 years ? 

Bishop Oxnam. I will be glad to check and give you the date so it 
will be accurate. I should judge it was within the last 5 years, but 
I wouldn't want to say without checking the record. 

Mr. Kunzig. I should like to offer this pamphlet, An American 
Churchman in the Soviet Union, and ask that it be marked as "Oxnam 
exhibit No. 42." 

Mr. Velde. Without objection, it will be admitted in the record. 

(Pamphlet referred to was received in evidence as Oxnam exhibit 
No. 42.) 

Mr. Kunzig. I have a photostatic copy marked "Oxnam exhibit 
No. 43" 

Bishop Oxnam. I have been a lot of trouble to this committee. I 
am sorry. Forty-three exhibits is amazing. 

Mr. Kunzig. Let me first ask, Did you know Dr. W. E. B. DuBois, a 
Negro leader ? 

Bishop Oxnam. No, I simply cannot say. I am afraid I don't 
know. I have heard his name. 

Mr. Kunzig. Did Dr. DuBois ever speak at your church? 

Bishop Oxnam. I think not. 

Mr. Kunzig. Can you explain this exhibit marked "Oxnam exhibit 
No. 43"? 

Bishop Oxnam. What year are you talking about ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Let me show it to you. It states that he was listed 
to speak. The question I asked you was did he ever speak at your 
church. 

Bishop Oxnam. Frankly, I cannot answer that. It is way back. 
This was in 1927. I would have to check the records of the church. 
I do not recall ever having met Dr. DuBois. I cannot answer that. 

Mr. Velde. At the present time your recollection is that Dr. 
DuBois 

Bishop Oxnam. I have no recollection of it, but when somebody 
brings up a document that is 26 years back, that is a little difficult for 
anybody, even from this committee, to answer. 

Mr. Velde. I think the Chair would defer receipt of that until the 
bishop has had an opportunity to check it. 

Mr. Kunzig. I think it should be withdrawn. 

Bishop Oxnam. Mr. Chairman, I am leaving for Europe. I hope 
it will not be a discourtesy if I have to get this information after I get 
back. I do not think I could do it in a day or two before I go. 

Mr. Velde, I am sure that the committee will wish you godspeed 
upon your journey. 

Mr. Clardy. It may interest you to know some of us are going over 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3797 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 42 

(Part 1) 



10c 



An 

AMERICAN CHURCHMAN 
IN THE SOVIET UNION 



by 



The REVEREND LOUIE D. NEWTON 

President of The Southern Baptist Convention 



With an Introduction by 

Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam, 

President of the Federal Council of 

the Churches of Christ in America 

and a Statement 

About Religion in Russia, issued 

by the Union of Evangelical 

Christian Baptists of the V.S.S.R. 



A Publication of 

The AMERICAN RUSSIAN INSTITUTE 

58 Park Avenue, New York 16, N. Y. 



3798 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 



OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 42 
(Part 2) 



Introduction 



by 
BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

President of the 
Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America 

DR. LOUIE D. NEWTON, distinguished and devoted preacher, President 
of the Southern Baptist Convention, begins his interesting and inform- 
ing report on Soviet Russia with the statement,"! am not an expert on Russia." 
Unlike some visitors to Russia, Dr. Newton is wise enough to know that a 
brief sojourn in that vast and complex land does not give an individual the 
right to pose as an expert. His articles are honest reporting by an honest man. 
In them is no pretense. He tells what he saw, and allows the reader to draw 
his own conclusions. Dr. Newton had his eyes open. He did not enter Russia 
wearing glasses that give everything a roseate hue nor glasses so smoked by 
prejudice that they reflect simply the views held before the trip began. 

Dr. Newton believes that he was free to go where he pleased, to see 
whom he pleased, and to ask what he pleased. Other members of the 
delegation hold the same opinion. He reports that his Baptist co- 
religionists are of the opinion that they are free to preach what they 
believe and to pratice their beliefs without any hindrance of the State. De- 
scriptions of the ruined cities, of the devastated areas, are vivid, and should 
be read with care in these hours of tension. The Russian people suffered 
perhaps more than any people during the War. They felt the full impact of 
the German attack, and were crushed beneath brutalities so bestial as to beg- 
gar description. The story of the sixteen Partisans, re-told in speech at once 
heart-breaking and challenging, should be pondered by Americans. 

The "Yearbook of American Churches, 1945" reports 72,492,669 church 
members in the United States. This is the largest number of church members 
and the highest percentage of church members to population in the history 
of the nation. Many millions more are related to the churches, because, in the 
majority of Protestant denominations, but a small percentage of the children 
are included in the membership. Consequently, a discussion of religion in 
the U.S.S.R. is of great interest to the American people. 

In 1926, after interviews with many leaders of the Soviet Government, 
an American Commission was requested to report its impressions to the 
Russians. It fell to me to discuss religion. I tried to point out that dogmatic 
atheism was as unscientific as dogmatic theism. I sought to stress the social 
teachings of Jesus and His insistence that men and not things were the goal 

13] 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3799 

OXNAM EXHIBIT NO. 42 
(Part 3) 

of social living, His proclamation of the solidarity of the human family, His 
stressing of the supremacy of the common good. I argued that democracy itself 
rested upon the basic Christian teaching of the supremacy of personality. At 
the close, a distinguished leader in education arose and said, "I understand 
you are a man of the schools, but I do not understand you. Religion is a tool 
used by the capitalist to keep the worker in subjection. It is superstitution. 
It is not necessary for us to attack it; we shall train the children of tomor- 
row in the scientific attitude of mind and in a philosophy of materialism. 
Religion cannot survive." But religion was attacked. 

Recently a fundamental change of policy was announced. 

Has the innate yearning of the Russian people for God, their deep mysti- 
cism, proved stronger than the attack of the Atheists? Is Russia about to make 
a fundamental contribution to the religious life of the world? In a word, 
during the decades of struggle to establish social justice, has Russia held 
fast to an underlying faith in the Father of us all, to a basic loyalty to Jesus 
of Nazareth, and now are such faith and such loyalty ready to summon the 
world to the social application of the ethical ideals of religion? Or is all this 
a political accommodation upon the part of the Soviet Government to the 
actualities? 

Dr. Newton does nol attempt to answer these questions. He describes what 
he saw in churches and reports 'what he learned in interviews. 

The Church leadership in the United States of America among the Protes- 
tant communions looks forward to increasing participation of the Eastern 
Orthodox Churches in the World Council of Churches and to fuller coopera- 
tion by such Protestant communions as the Baptist Church with the Baptist 
Church in Russia. The .Eastern Orthodox Churches and the Protestant com- 
munions are fundamentally democratic in organization, in spirit, and in 
doctrine. It is possible that the cooperation now developing between the 
Protestant communions and the Eastern Orthodox Churches, involving such 
nations as Great Britain, the United States of America, and Russia may 
provide the unifying force so essential to the United Nations. 

With so much at stake, understanding must be reached. The report of 
Dr. Newton is a contribution to this understanding. I trust it may be widely 
read. 

In the extraordinary statement on Soviet-American Relations recently 
released by the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America, it is 
declared, "War with Russia can be avoided, and must be avoided without 
compromise of basic convictions." The report deals with the unavoidable 
tensions that do exist in the realm of belief, and calls upon both the American 
and the Russian people to renounce, in their efforts to spread abroad their 
ways of life, the method of intolerance. It deals with the avoidable tensions 
and the method of adjustment. It then considers national interests and inter- 
national cooperation, and calls for an interchange of views or a flow of 
understanding from one people to another. Dr. Newton has made significant 
contribution to this high end, and his booklet deserves careful consideration 
by thinking Americans. 

[4] 



3800 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

to see what they are doing with Uncle Sam's dollars too, and don't for- 
get the little private session you and I will have when we get back. 

Bishop Oxnam. We will have a good time, and you told me you 
were Irish, and we will have a wonderful time. 

Mr. Kunzig. I have no further questions to ask this witness, Mr. 
Chairman. 

Mr. Jackson. I have no further questions, but I would like to ask 
that we interpose the citations in each instance of the various organi- 
zations, and I request that in cases of organizations where there are 
citations that those citations be included at the appropriate point in 
the record. ■ 

Mr. Velde. Without objection, that will be so done. 

Bishop Oxnam. Does that include organizations to which I do not 
belong? 

Mr. Jackson. My motion deals with the organizations upon which 
you have been questioned and in which there are exhibits. 

Mr. Velde. Does the gentleman reserve the right to object? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes, unless our printed record also shows the date on 
which it was f and to be subversive, if it was. In other words, that 
the finding of the Attorney General will show the date upon which he 
arrived at the conclusion that it was subversive, if it was. 

Mr. Velde. The gentleman knows that the files include those facts. 

Mr. Doyle. I have seen some files that do not include that fact. 

Mr. Jackson. I have no objection to that. 

Mr. Doyle. Mr. Chairman, may I ask this question ? 

Mr. Velde. Let us get this matter straightened out first. Does the 
gentleman have objection to the listing of the citation if the date of 
the citation is mentioned? 

Mr. Kunzig. The date is mentioned in every instance. 

Mr. Clardy. I think there is cross-examination that identifies that, 
but I think it is customary to have it in and I would like to see it 
there. 

Mr. Doyle. I think I will not object to that. 

In answer to a question I think it has been very unfortunate and 
a lot of organizations have been referred to which, only by inference, 
could this witness be entitled to have any connection with, even in- 
directly. I was hoping that it would not be printed and go out in 
the United States. It will be taken inferentially and we all know 
it will. Those people will not read the fact that he was never a mem- 
ber of it, and the fact that his name was identified with it will be 
enough for them and the fact that he has testified he was not a mem- 
ber of it, and we have no evidence that he was a member, and I think 
that is the damnable part of it. I use that language because I feel 
just that way about it. 

Mr. Velde. I understand the gentleman has no objection, so, with- 
out objection, the citations as asked by the gentleman from California, 
Mr. Jackson, will be inserted after each organization, and may the 
Chair say this, I believe that if the bishop would not object to having 
this material in the record along with your denial, and it may be true 
as the gentleman from California says that some people may not read 
the bishop's statement regarding this but unfortunately the chairman 
cannot do anything about that. (See footnotes 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 
12, 13, 14, 15,'and 16.) 

Mr. Doyle. I was going to add to Mr. Jackson's request that it be 
plainly stated in our print, whatever we make opposite every list in 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3801 

which the bishop's name appears, that he has testified that he was 
not a member of this organization, and then if that page is torn out 
and used by some sneak thief we cannot help it, but I believe the 
bishop is entitled to that protection. 

This witness has said in a statement and said 2 or 3 times, that 
he was never a member of the Communist Party. I did not hear any 
member ask him plainly whether or not he ever had been. I want 
to ask him whether or not he has ever been. 

Mr. Clardy. I want to object to it and I think that being in the 
record leaves a bad inference. I object. 

Mr. Doyle. I ask that if this committee has any evidence that this 
witness was ever a member of the Communist Party that we now 
produce it. We have tied him up with a lot of organizations that 
we know have been identified as Communist fronts and so that there 
will be no question about what this committee has in the way of evi- 
dence, whether or not this witness was ever a Communist, I am ask- 
ing that if we have any such evidence we now produce it. That will 
be helpful in clearing this man's record without any mistakes in this 
hearing. 

Mr. Clardy. May I ask the bishop a question ? 

Mr. Velde. Yes. 

Mr. Clardy. You have been here all day and haven't you heard us 
make it abundantly clear what we think about that, and aren't you 
satisfied with what we have said? 

Bishop Oxnam. I appreciate what Mr. Doyle has said. I do recall 
what Mr. Clardy has said, but it seems to me that the record that 
included what Mr. Doyle has said might be helpful. I don't know if 
this committee learned how its documents are misused by organizations 
that deliberately seek to destroy one's character, and it seems to me 
that that protection of that kind should be given, and I am not speak- 
ing for myself but for others, and it is a very valuable matter, and I 
appreciate this and understand what Mr. Clardy said. 

Mr. Velde. What was the gentleman from California desiring in the 
listing of these citations? Will you ask unanimous consent or move? 

Mr. Doyle. I move that the record show in these hearings that this 
committee has no record of any Communist Party affiliation or mem- 
bership by Bishop Oxnam. 

Mr. Jackson. I second the motion. 

Mr. Velde. Is there objection to the motion of the gentleman from 
California ? If not, the motion is carried. 

Mr. Doyle. I make the further motion that after every listing of 
the bishop's name in any group which we have discussed today that it 
be clearly printed wherever the bishop has denied membership that he 
did deny membership, and let the record stand on that so that any 
person reading the list of names in this publication, in our committee 
publication, will see it right before him that the bishop said he was 
never a member of that organization. We cannot do less. That is 
what the bishop testified to. Why not let the people know what he 
testified to? 

Mr. Jackson. We have been here for many, many hours taking testi- 
mony of denial or affirmation in the instances where it was pertinent. 
The record is voluminous, and it will speak for itself as I believe it 
should speak for itself. Therefore, I am constrained to object to the 
motion. 

43620^54 15 



3802 TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 

Mr. Doyle. May I say that my distinguished colleague from Cali- 
fornia well knows that there will be some pages of what we print that 
will be read and some pages not, and many times in the testimony of 
this witness that he was not a member of this organization or that one 
it will never be read by the people. They will read portions and they 
will never read his testimony that he was not a member. Consequently, 
the bishop will again be done a rank injustice. I see no harm. It will 
not cost us any more money to say that Bishop Oxnam was not a mem- 
ber of that organization. 

Mr. Velde. After the citation ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. It is only one line to print, 

Mr. Velde. Does the gentleman from California object? 

Mr. Jackson. Yes, on the ground that the positive denial is a matter 
of testimony. It is set forth not only once in most instances but several 
times due to duplicating questions from committee members or 
counsel. It is affirmatively set forth in all instances where the bishop 
was not a member of the organization, and it is so positively affirmed, 
and I believe that will be perfectly clear to anyone who reads the 
record that such a denial was in there, I am constrained to 
object to the motion largely clue to the fact that it might establish 
precedent for further hearings where we would be forced into the 
position of having to annotate or make substantial additions to the 
actual physical testimony which is taken. Therefore, I object. 

Mr. Clardy. It is doing the very thing that everybody objects to, of 
making this committee draw conclusions they should not be drawing. 
What are you going to do in the case of the organizations to which the 
bishop freely and frankly admitted he belonged ? Are we going to put 
in yes, he belonged to that organization? You are doing him a 
disservice. 

Mr. Doyle. Of course, the gentleman from Michigan is again 
wrong. I am not asking any such thing as he has indicated. The 
gentleman from Michigan and my distinguished colleague from Cali- 
fornia want our printed record to be as clear as crystal that this 
witness has testified that he is not a member of this organization, 
identified the organization. Can that hurt anybody ? 

Mr. Jackson. On ground that the printed words will be just as 
clear as crystal, I object. 

Mr. Velde. The question is on the motion of the gentleman from 
California, Mr. Doyle. 

All those in favor of the motion signify by raising their right hand ; 
all those opposed to the motion signify by raising their right hand. 
Those in opposition are greater in number. The motion is defeated. 

Bishop Oxnam. Before Mr. Jackson goes, may I be permitted one 
word ? I would like to say this, Mr. Jackson ; you suggested that you 
were going to call on me after our debate. That did not work out 
but I would like to sit with you some day and point out the total amount 
of time that I have given to any one of the organizations referred to 
here today and add it up and if it amounts to more than 3 months in 
30 years of service I will have to say that there was some truth in the 
statement that I served the Communist front down through so many 
years. But if it shows that the total is less than 3 months, I am sure 
you would feel that the statement you made was an exaggeration and 
certainly after all it did not really represent your heart and, may I say, 
your mind. 



TESTIMONY OF BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM 3803 

Mr. Jackson. May I say with relation to the meeting which lias been 
mentioned, that when the hearing elate was finally established it oc- 
curred to me that I was in something of a quasi- judicial capacity as a 
member of the committee and it would probably not be appropriate to 
have such a meeting until after these hearings had been held. That 
is the reason we did not get together. 

Mr. Clardy. I will ask some other questions when you come into 
my office, and at that time I shall want you to set at rest a number of 
things that have been troubling me. I think you have some fair idea 
of what they are. You have indicated and I told you that I am partly 
Irish. I am one of the Protestant members of this committee. Your 
statement might have left a different impression. 

Bishop Oxnam. Oh, no ; there are many Irish Protestants, sir. 

Mr. Claedy. So I suspect. I could ask him questions the rest of 
the night and keep him from sailing, but I will not do that. 

Mr. Yelde. Mr. Walter, do you have any further questions ? 

Mr. Walter. No questions. 

Bishop Oxnam. I would like to thank you personally for your 
courtesy throughout the day. I know at times I have talked at length. 
At no time have you rapped the gavel, and I appreciate that very much. 

Mr. Velde. I hope you appreciate that the chairman has a duty 
which is not always easy, not only to the members of the committee 
but to the Congress and the country as well. 

Bishop Oxnam. Yes, sir ; I do appreciate that. 

Mr. Velde. I want to say to the witness that the members of the 
committee appreciate the manner of ironing this matter out and as I 
have stated before if you have further information about any of these 
matters the committee will appreciate hearing it. 

Bishop Oxnam. Thank you very much. 

Mr. Velde. The committee will stand adjourned. 

(Whereupon, at 12 : 20 a. m., Wednesday, July 22, 1953, the hearing 
was adjourned.) 



INDEX 



Individuals 

Page 

Aaron, Harold 3001 

Abbey, Merrill R 3700 

Abbott, Edith 3039 

Abbott, Grace 3038, 3009 

Abele, Ralph C 3001, 3705 

Abramson, I rving 3009 

Abson, Mel vi'n 3080 

Aee, Goodman opposite 3024 

Aekerly, George A 3705 

Acklev, Charles B 3001, 36S0 

Adamic, Louis 3009, opposite 3010, opposite 3024,3025,3001,3080 

Adams, Carlyle 3705 

Adams, Comfort A 3061 

Adams, Edward 3783 

Adams, F. W 3756, 3704 

Adams, George P 3001 

Adams, James Luther 3641, 3644, 3080, 3681 

Adams, Samuel Hopkins 3001, 3080 

Addes, George F 3009, 3088 

Addis, Tliomas 3039, 3001, 3609 

Addison, Charles Morris 3705 

Adler, Evelyn 3001 

Adler, Stella 3080 

Aiken, Edwin E., Jr 3001, 3705 

Ainsworth, William Newman 3622, 3624, 3026. 3027 

Aleksander, Bozhidar opposite 3046 

Aleksander, Irina opposite 3046, opposite 3649, 30.10 

Alexander, Gross W 3001,3705 

Alexander, Will 3087, 3091 

Allen, Devere 3038, 3009 

Allen, Edward S 3001 

Allen, Fay E 3001 

Allen, Harland 3008 

Allen, James Egert 3001 

Allen, James S 3038 

Allen, Louis 3709 

Allen, Rav 3756, 3704 

Allen, Wilbur C 3001, 3705 

Allinger, Albert 3705, 3700 

Allison, George D 3705 

Allport, Gordon W 3040, 3661 

Allured, Paul Johnson 3001, 3705 

Alper, Michael 3001, 3705 

Alpert, Carl 3001 

Alpiger, Earl 3001 

Alt, Herchel 3039 

Amdur, Isadore 3001 

Ancharsky, Peter P opposite 3049 

Anderson, Charles W., Jr 308S 

Anderson, Dorothy 3001 

Anderson, Marian 3080 

Anderson, Maxwell 3009 

Anderson, Mrs. Maxwell 3640 

3805 



3806 index 

Page 

Anderson, Sherwood 3639, 3670 

Anderson, Mrs. Sherwood 3688 

Anderson, William C 3661, 3705 

Anshen, Ruth Nanda 3644, 3678 

Anthes, Philip E 3705 

Anthonv, Robenia » 3661 

Apelian, Bedros K 3661,3705 

Appel, Benjamin 3661 

Archibald, Sanford 3643 

Argow, W. Waldermar W 3705 

Armitage, William T 3705 

Arms, John Taylor 3609 

Armstrong, C. A 3688 

Arndt, Elmer J. F 3661,3705 

Arnold, Leslie 3607 

Arnold, Leslie R 3661 

Arrau, Clandio 3680 

Ashbrook, Harriette 3661 

Atkins, Mrs. Edwin F 3607 

Auer, J. A. C. Fagginger 3607 

Aunian, Lester Ward 3757, 3760 

Auman, O. W 3756,3764 

Austin, Charles 3661 

Austin, Elsie 3688 

Avery, Chester 3616 

Avev, Clarence F 3705 

Avnet, F. Duke 3661 

Aydelotte, Frank 3609 

Avers, Jule 3638 

Babb, Hugh W 3607 

Babeock, David 3616 

Backer, Wayne 3661 

Backus, E. Burdette 3705 

Bacon, Peggv 3661 

Baehr, George 3639, 3669 

Bagnall, Robert W 3705 

Bailey, Donald W 3661 

Bailev, Percival 3639, 3669 

Baker, Elizabeth 3661 

Baker, Frank E 3661 

Baker, Helen Cody 3661 

Baker, James C 3596, 3680, 3705, 3756-3758, 3764 

Bakke, Jane 3643 

Baldwin, DeWitt C 3760 

Baldwin, James F 3661 

Baldwin, Joseph Clark 3609, 3688 

Baldwin, Roger 3626, 3632, 3656 

Baldwin, Roger N 3755 

Ball, Archey D 3661,3705,3760 

Ball, Lee H 3661,3705,3759 

Bailer, Albert H 3661 

Balliett, Mrs. Carlton, Jr 3640 

Balmer, Martha H 3661 

Balokovic, Zlatko 3608 

Bansall, Robert W 3661 

Barbour, Russell Conwell 3631, 3644, 3681 

Barclay, Wade Crawford 3680, 3756, 3757, 3759, 3764 

Barker, Robert F 3763 

Barlen, William 3661 

Barlow, S. L. M 3661, 3678 

Barlow, William 3705 

Barnes, Professor 3784 

Barnes, Roswell P 3691 

Barnett, Albert 3759 

Barnett, Eugene E 3609 

Barnouw, Adriaan J 3661 

Barr, Norman B 3661 



INDEX 3807 

Page 

Barrett, Edward E 3705 

Barrow, John 3661 

Barrow, Lionel C ?^^ 

Barrows, Alice 3669 

Bartee, John 3661 

Barth, Joseph 3661 

Bartholomew, Jesse E 3705 

Bartholomew, Marshall E 3661, 3705 

Barton, Anne 3795 

Barton, Lane W 3705 

Barzin, Leon 3640 

Bates, Henry C 3688 

Bath, Cyril 36Q8 

Batt, William L opposite 3598, 3609 

Bauerberg, Paul J 3661 

Baxter, Robert 3705 

Bay, Howard 3661 

Bayer, Theodore 3608, opposite 3646, opposite 3649 

Beach, Joseph Warren 3661 

Beach, King D 3756, 3764 

Beard, Charles A 3784 

Bearden, Bessye J 3661 

Beardslee, Lyndon S 3705 

Beardsley, John 3755 

Beck, F. O 3756, 3764 

Becker, C. Harrison .- 3661 

Bedaeht, Max 3609, 3661 

Beebe, Albert E 3768, 3774 

Beecher, Lyman 3591 

Beers, Samuel G . 3759 

Behrman, S. N 36S0 

Beiler. Irwin R , 3760 

Bein, Albert 3680 

Bek, Alexander opposite 3646 

Belester, Alice S 3609, 3661 

Belfrage, Cedrie 3641, 3650 

Bell, Oliver W 3661. 3705 

Bell. Thomas 3661 

Beman, John B 3613, 3614 

Bemis. Gray 3P61 

Bender, George H 3697, 3699 

Render, John F 3760 

Benedetto. John D 3705 

Benet, William Rose__,. 3609, 

opposite 3624, 3625, opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650, 3661, 3680, 3688 

Ben.iamin, Harold 3661 

Benjamin, Mrs. Harold 3661 

Beniamin, Metropolitan 3609 

Bennett, A. G. Bramwell 3705 

Bennett, John C 3661 

Bennett, Rocer W 3705 

Bennett, S. R 3661 

Bennett, William R 3705 

Benson, Elmer A 3661, 3680 

Berezovsky, Mrs. Nicolai 3680 

Berger, Mrs. Victor L 3638 

Bergstrom, R. W 3661 

Bernard, John T 3638. 3669 

Bernstein, Leonard opposite 3624, 3680 

Berrv, Mrs. Theodore 3759 

Bessie, Alvah 3661, 3680 

Bethune, Mary McLeod 3608, 3638, 3661, 3677, 3687, 3757, 3760 

Bethuruw, Dorothy 3661 

Bettinger, M. C 3613, 3615, 3722 



3808 INDEX 

Page 

Bibhv. Henrv Lambert 3G09, 3661, 3760 

Bicknell, John 3661 

Biddle, Constance 36.17 

Biddle. Constance E 3601 

Biddle, Francis 3622, 3624, 3652, 36,88 

Biddle, Ceorce 3638 

Billings, Taul B 3705 

Billincton. Rav A 3061 

Binaer. Carl A. L 3601 

Binner, Clarida G 3661 

Bingham, Barry 3088 

Birse, Raymond T 3061 

Birkhead, L. M 3044, 36S0, 30S1 

Birkhoff, Georse D 3607, 3609 

Bishara, K. A 3661 

Bishop, Shelton Hale 3626, 3705 

Biornherci. Esther 3756, 3764 

Black, Algernon D 3680 

Black, Ivan 3661 

Blackhnrn, .John IT 3756 

Blackman, John C 3705 

Black-well. Alice Stone 3607, 3661 

Blake. Fdjrar 3596 

Blake, Howard W ' 3661 

Blakeman, E. W 3756, 3764 

Blanchard, Leslie 3691 

B'ancharrl. Myles D 3661 

Bledsoe. Ta ylor 3661 

Blitzstein, Marc opposite 3624 

Bloch, Dina 3687 

Bloch, Mrs. Louis 3609 

Block, Anita 3609, 3680 

Block. S. John 3639 

Bloom. Maurice J 3661, 3705 

Bloor. E'la Reeve 3785 

Blonnt. R. E 3661 

Blnmbere:. Isidore 3680 

Blnme, Peter 3639 

BlnmPr, George 3001 

Blv, John M 3601 

Boas. Ernest P 3639, 3661, 3609, 36S0 

Boas, Franz 3657 

Bohilin. Rohert 3763 

Rodanzkv, Arthur 3640 

Bok. Bart J 3661 

BoUincer, Hiel D 3760 

Bollinser, John W 3661 

Bond, Ahva J. C 3661 

Bone. Hn"h A 3061 

Bon^all. Edward! H., Jr 3661,3705 

Boohar, Lester L 3661, 3705 

Boothrovd, Philip H 3661 

Boretz. Allen ■ 3661 

Borcese, O. A 3642-3644 

Borins. Frlwin G 3661 

Bosley, Harold . 3760 

Boss, Charles F„ Jr 3759 

Bouchard. Thomas 3678 

Bondin, Louis B 3639, 3661 

Bonwman. J. Burt , 3705 

Bowen, E. P 3760 

Bowie, Jean L 3661 

Bowie. W. Russell 3691, 3705 

Bowman. LeRov 3638 

Boyd, John Taylor, Jr opposite 3624 



INDEX 3809 

Page 

Bovd, Norma E 3G88 

Boyden, Mrs. W. L 3607 

Boyer, Richard O , 3661 

Boyesen, Bayard 3661 

Braden, Charles S 3644, 36S1 

Bradley, Dwight 3638, 3661, 3669, 370f> 

Bragg, J. D 3677 

Bragg, Mrs. J. D 3688 

Brailowskv, Alexander 3680 

Brainin, Joseph 3642, 3644, 36S0 

Brainhall, Frederick D 3661 

Branch, Mary E 3661 

Brand, Millen opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650 

Brandeis, Mrs. Louis D 3661 

Brannan, Eleanor 3638 

Brant, Irving 3688 

Brashares, Charles W 3757, 3759 

Brawley, James P 3759 

Brav, James A 3643, 3644 

Brazeal, Blailsford R 3661 

Brazell, Roy 3661 

Breckenridge, Sophonisba 3609, 3657, 3661 

Breckstone, William 3661 

Breines, Simon 3609 

Bressler, Joseph 3661 

Brewer, James L 3661 

Brewster, Benjamin 3638, 3669, 3670 

Brewster, Dorothy 3661 

Brewster, Edward H 3705 

Brickner, Barnett R 3688 

Bridge, John 3661 

Bridges, Harry 3595, 3622, 3693, 3698, 3702-3704, 37S0 

Briegleb, Gustav A 3722 

Brigham, John W 3705 

Brightman, Edgar S 3607, 3760 

Brin, Alexander 3607 

Bristol, Frank O 3613, 3614 

Broach, Howell Hamilton 3691 

Brocknnier, Samuel Hugh 3661 

Brodovsky, B opposite 3649 

Brodsky, Joseph R 3661 

Broline, J. E 3661 

Bromley, Charles L 3705 

Bronfenbrenner, Jacques J 3639, 3669 

Brooks, Jerome E 3661 

Brooks, Lawrence G 3607 

Brooks, Robert N 3758 

Brooks, Thomas E 3705 

Brooks, Van Wyck 3609, 3639, 3661, 36S0 

Brophy, Joseph 3691 

Broughton, Charles E 3661 

Broun, Heywood 3640, 3670 

Brousseau, Jule 3661 

Browder, Earl opposite 3610, 3622, 3624, 3748 

Brown, Charlotte Hawkins 3661 

Brown, Edwin A 3760 

Brown, Edwin E 3705 

Brown, Esther Lucile 3661 

Brown, George L 3661 

Brown, Harold 3661 

Brown, Harold Chapman 3661 

Brown, Sara W 3661 

Browne, Alfred A 3661 

Browning, Robert Evans 3705 

Bruce, H. S 3662 

Brudick, E Z 3662 



3810 INDEX 

Page 

Brummitt, Dan B 3756, 3764 

Bruinmitt, Stella W 3756, 3764 

Brunner, Edmund De S 3662 

Bruno, Frank 3662 

Buck, Ashley 3662 

Bucke, Emory 3760 

Buckmaster, Henrietta opposite 3624, opposite 3646, opposite, 3649, 3650 

Budenz, Louis 3629-3633, 3637 

Buehrer, Edwin T 3662, 3705 

Bugbee, L. H 3756, 3764 

Burehem, George A 3760 

Burgess, E. W 3609 

Burgum, Edwin Berry 3680 

Burke, John P 3609 

Burke, Walter J 3662 

Burlage, Henry M 3662 

Burnham, Dorothy 3763 

Burnham, Louis E 3662 

Burns, Harold 3759 

Burns, M. P 3756, 3764 

Burr, Jane 3662 

Burrows, Millar 3705 

Burt, Sam 3662, 3680 

Butler, Allan M opposite 3624, 3760 

Butler, Elmer W 3662 

Butler, J. George 3760 

Butler, Stanard Dow 3662, 3705 

Buttriek, George A 3631 

Buys, John L 3662 

Bynner, Witter 3662 

Cable, Warren Canfleld 3705 

Cabot, Hugh 3607 

Cadden, Joseph 3638 

Caesar, Irving 3657 

Cahill, Edward A 3662,3705 

Cahill, Holger opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650 

Cahn, William 3662 

Calkins, Charles L 3705 

Callister, Mrs. J. Henry 3691 

Campbell, Donald S 3705 

Campbell, Eva 3662 

Cannon, Walter B 3607, 3639, 3669, 3670 

Caplin, Jonah E 3705 

Capozzi, Francis C 3662 

Capper, Arthur 3609, 3688 

Carhart, Charles L 3705 

Carleton, R. T 3688 

Carlson, Anton J 3639, 3669 

Carmichael, Ralph M 3705 

Carnovsky, Morris 3640, 3662 

Carpenter, John Alden 3640 

Carr, Robert K 3752,3754 

Carter, Elmer 3626 

Carter, Isabelle K 3662 

Carter, J. Franklin 3705 

Carter, Wendell R 3760 

Cary, Dorothea Cable 3607 

Cary, William H., Jr 3607 

Casals, Pablo 3640 

Case, Harold C 3757 

Case, William More 3662 

Casey, G. P 3662 

Casey, Thomas E 3662 

Cassidy, Harry M 3662 

Cavert, Inez M 3691 

Cerf, Bennett 3678 

Chafee, Zechariah, Jr 3662 



INDEX 3811 

Page 

Chaffel, Merlyn A 3680 

Chakerian, Charles G 3662 

Challman, Robert C 3662 

Chalmers, Ruthven S 3705 

Chan, Hansu 3622 

Chaney, Stewart 3680 

Chaplin, Charles 3609 

Chapman, D. W 3662 

Chapman, Oscar L 3609 

Chappell, Winifred 3742, 3743, 3745, 3747, 3756, 3760, 3764 

Charlton, Louise 3657, 3662 

Charry, Elias 3662, 3705 

Charwood, Kit Kat 3626 

Chase, Allen 3656, 3678 

Chase, Don M 3662, 3705, 3760 

Chase, Russell N 3662 

Chase, William J 3705 

Chi, Chao-Tsing , 3626 

Child, Dudley R 3705 

Childs, John L 3787 

Chodorov, Jerome opposite 3624, 3630 

Chotzinoff, Samuel 3640 

Christensen, Thomas 3680 

Christmas, Alvin B 3662 

Christoffel, Harold 3662 

Christopher, Paul R 3662 

Christy, Bayard H 3691 

Chubb, James 3760 

Church, Robert R 3688 

Chworowsky, Karl M 3680 

Chiang Kai-shek 3627 

Clark, Arthur T 3705 

Clark, Benjamin H 3662, 3705 

Clark, Elizabeth Louise (Mrs. George H. Clark) 3613,3614 

Clark, Elmer C 3662 

Clark, Tom 3601, 3622, 3624, 3652, 3656 

Clark, Walter Van Tilburg 3680 

Clark, Edwin L 3688 

Clarke, Merrill F 3662, 3705 

Clary, George, Sr 3760 

Clausen, Bernard C 3644, 3631 

Clay, Lucius B 3724 

Clayburgh, Alma 3680 

Clement, Rufus E 3688 

Clogston, B. L 3613, 3614 

Clothier, Robert C 3609 

Cluka, Earl L 3662 

Coates, Robert opposite 3624 

Cobb, Henry Everton 3705 

Cobbledick, M. Robert 3662 

Cochran, William F 3609, 3688 

Coe, Charles J 3662 

Coe, George A 3662, 3756 3760, 3764 

Coffee, John M 3609, 3678, 3679 

Coffin, Henry S 3609 

Coffman, Harold G 3662 

Cohen, Henry 3662 

Cohen, Louis H 3662 

Cole, Elbert 3760 

Cole, Wilson G 3757 

Coleman, Norman F 3662 

Coller, Frederick Amassa 3639,3669,3670 

Colling, Thomas B 3662 

Collins, Charles - 3680 

Collins, G. L 3705 

Collis, Ralph Hall 3705 

Colman, Louis 3662 



3812 INDEX 

Page 

Colquhoun, J. Ross 3662, 3705 

Comfort, E. N 3662 

Compton, Karl Taylor 3607, 3609 

Comstock, C. Clayton 3662 

Condit, Edward M 3705 

Connolly, Eugene P 3662, 3678 

Conover, E. M 3662, 3705, 3760 

Constance, Lincoln 3662 

Convis, Lewis A 3705 

Cook, Jerome E 3662 

Cooke, George S 3662,3705 

Coolidre, Mrs. Charles A 3607 

Coolidge, Elizabeth Sprague 3662 

Coons, Alfred II 3705 

Cooper, D. B 3003, opposite 3610, 3610, 3611 

Cooper, Esther V 3002 

Cooper, Russell M 3760 

Cooper, T. C - 3680 

Copland, Aaron 3609, 36S0 

Corbet t, Harvey Wiley 3008 

Corbett, Orlo C 3662 

Cordner. George M 3705 

Corev, Jeff 3795 

Corev, Paul 3662 

Cori, Carl F 3639,3609 

Corson, Fred P 3680 

Corwin, Norman 3609, 3680 

Cosorove, William 3680 

Costisran, Giovanni 3662 

Costigan, Howard G 3638 

Cotton, Bessie Boyce 3626 

Cotton, J. A 3662 

Cotton. J. Harry 3705 

Comzhlin 3660 

Counts, Frederick A 3662 

Cowan, Thomas L 3662 

Cowles, John H 3680 

Cowlev. Malcolm 3639 

Cox, Alva I 3760 

Cox, Gilbert S 3757, 3759 

Cox, Philip W. L 3662 

Covle, Albert F 3691 

Covle, Grace L 3639, 3662 

Craig, Clarence T 3760 

Craig, John J 3613,3614,3722 

Craik, Charles E., Jr 3705 

Cram, Mrs. J. Sergeant 3691 

Cramlet, C. M 3R62 

Crandall, Frank D 3662, 3705 

Crane, Henry Hitt 3662, 3757, 3759 

Crane, John O 3608 

Cravner, William C 3662,3705 

Craw. Harold E 3705 

Crawford, Arthur M 3662, 3705 

Crawford, B. F 3705 

Crawford, George 3763 

Crawford, William H 3688 

Creighton, Thomas opposite 3624 

Cressey. Paul F 3662 

Cronbach. Abraham 3062 

Cross, Ephraim 3662 

Cross, H. W 3662 

Crotwell. Helen 3763 

Crum, Ba rtley ' 3678 

Cullen, Countee 3639, 3657 

Curran, Joseph 3609, 3627, 3662, 3678 



index 3813 

Page 

Current, Gloster B 3760 

Curry, Albert 3700 

Curry, Mrs. J. W 3760 

Curtis, Edward Ely 3(i62 

Curtiss, Elizabeth Armour , 36G2 

Cushing, Hazel Morton 3662 

Cushruan, Ralph S 3705 

Cuthbert, Marion 3626 

Cutler, Wolcott 3705 

Dade, Malcolm G 3705 

Dahl, George 3662 

Dahlberg, Edwin T 3705 

Damaskinos, Archbishop 3591 

Dana, Henry W. L 3607,8662 

Daniel, John I 3662 

Darcy, Sam 3652 

Dashiell, John F 3640 

Davenport, Marcia 3662 

Davey, Harold W 8662 

Davidman, Joy 3662 

Davidoff, Leo M 36N0 

Davidson, Jo 3609, opposite 3624, 3625, 3680 

Davidson, Maurice P 3639 

Davies, A. Powell 3680 

Davies, Joseph E 3609, opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650,3777 

Davies, Raymond Arthur opposite 3646 

Davies, W. Ellis 3678 

d'Avila, Fred 3662 

Davis, David 3639, 3662, 3669 

Davis, Earl C 3662, 3705 

Davis, Frank C 3662 

Davis, Herbert John 3609 

Davis, Jerome 3594, 3638, 3644. 3669. 3681, 3691. 3766-3768, 

3771, 3774, 3777, 3779-3787, 3794 

Davis, Lewis H 3662 

Davis, John P 3626, 3662 

Davis, John W 3662 

Davis, Joseph N. C 3706 

Davis. Lewis H 3706 

Davis, M. R 3680 

Dawber. Mark A 3044, 3681. 3760 

Dawson, William L 3688 

Day. A. E 3756, 3764 

Day, Gardner M 3706 

Day, John Warren 3662, 3706 

Dav, Robert B 3R62 

Dean. Vera Micheles 3768, 3769, 3771, 3772, 3774, 3778. 3789 

Dearborn, Ned H 3787 

De Berminsham, Mrs. Ferdinand 3678 

Decker, W. J 3662 

De Kruif, Paul 3670 

DeLacv, Hu^rh 3609, 3662 

Delany, Hubert T 3639 

Deming, Eleanor 3662 

Denerstein, Hy 3662 

Denison, Doris P 8760 

Denman, Harry 3760 

Dennett, E. P 3756, 3764 

Dennis. Walter 3662 

Depp, Mark 3760 

DeSilver, Albert 3755 

Destler, Chester McA 3662 

Detweiler. Charles S 3706 

Detzer, Dorothy 3638, 3669 

Deutsch, Babette 3662 

Deutsch, Monroe E 3609 

Devine, Edw. T 3756, 3764 



3814 INDEX 

Page 

DeVries, Charles 3662, .3706 

Dewey, Thomas E 3724 

De Witt, Dale 3626, 3662, 3680, 3688 

Diamond, Moses opposite 3624 

DiDonato, Pietro 3657 

Dieffenbach, Albert O 3607 

Dies, Martin 3660, 3754 

Dietrich, John H 3662 

Dietz, Howard 3680 

Diffendorf, D. F 3756,3764 

Diffqendorfer, Ralph E 3626, 

3680, 3756, 3759, 3764, 3768, 3769, 3771, 3772, 3774, 3776, 3777 

Dillard, James H 3691 

Dilley, Marjorie 3662 

Dilling, Elizabeth 3603, opposite 3610 

Dillion, George 3662 

Dimock, Hedley S 3662 

Dixon, Dean 3680 

Dizer, W. D 3662 

Dobie, J. Frank 3688 

Dodd, Bella V 3662 

Dodd, Martha opposite 3624 

Dodd, William E 3595, opposite 3610, 3622, 3623, 3626 

Dodge, Stanley D l 3662 

Dodge, Witherspoon 3662 

Doggett, Caxton 3761 

Dolivet, Mrs. Louis 36S0 

Dombrowski, James A 3662, 3760 

Donnan, Elizabeth 3662 

Donovan, Arnold 3662 

Doob, Leonard W 3640 

Dorchester, Donald H 3706 

Dorr, M. E 3761 

Doubek, Julius 3662 

Douglas, Dorothy 360S 

Douglas, Harl R 3662 

Douglas, Paul H 3638, 3669, 3784 

Douglass, Truman B 3706 

Downes, Olin opposite 3624, 3640, 3662, 3678 

Downs, Karl 3759 

Drake, Alfred opposite 3624 

Draper, Muriel opposite 3624, 3640, 3662 

Dreiser, Theodore 3639, opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650, 3662, 3670 

Driesen, Daniel 3662 

Drow, Charles R 3688 

Dubinsky, David opposite 3766 

DuBois, Guy Pene 36.80 

DuBois, Paul 3759 

DuBois, W. E. B 3796 

Dudley, William H 3662 

Duggan, Stephen 3609 

Duke, Vernon 3680 

Dukes, H. N 3706 

Dukes, Herbert N 3662 

Dulles, John Foster opposite 3598, 3741, 3765, 3769, 3770, 3773, 3779 

Dumper, Arthur 3662, 3706 

Dunn, John 3662 

Dunn, Leslie C 3608 

Dunn, Robert W 3755, 3787 

Dunning, James E 3761 

Dunnington, L. L 3761 

DuPont, Zara 3662 

Durr, Virginia Foster 3687 

Dusenbery, Elizabeth 3688 

Dutrow, Clara 3761 

Dybvik, M. O 3663 

Dykstra, C. A 3609 



INDEX 3815 

Page 

Dzenit, John 3663 

Earl, Stanley 3688 

Easton, David 3634 

Eaton, Horace A 3663 

Ebinger, F. C 3756, 3764 

Eddy, Clyde 3663 

Eddv, Robert 3763 

Eddy, Sherwood 3638, 3657, 3669, 3691, 3787 

Edelen, C. G 3663 

Edmonson 3659 

Edwards, J. Earle 3663, 3706 

Edwards, T. L 3663 

Egley, Charles D 3663 

Ehrensperger, Harold 3761 

Eiles, Gilbert S 3663 

Einhorn, Nat 3663 

Einstein, Albert opposite 3598, 3609, 3638, 3663, 3669, 3670 

Eisenhower, Dwight D 3602, 3724 

Ekins. Grove F 3706 

Eklund, Clarence 3663 

Elder, J. Edwin 3706 

Elderkin, Noble S 3691 

Eldridge, Mrs. Lewis A 3663 

Eldridge, Lewis A., Jr 3663 

Eldridge, Seba 3663 

Eliot, Christopher R 3706 

Eliot, Frank May 3609 

Eliot. Frederick M 3607, 3644, 3663, 3681 

Eliot, Frederick May 3680 

Eliot, George Fielding opposite 3598 

Eliot, Thomas H 3688 

Elkus, Albert I 3663 

Ellenbogan, Henry 3688 

Elliott, George 3756, 3764 

Ellison, Henry 3663 

Ellsworth, Mrs. F. O 3755 

Ellwood, Charles A 3663, 3691 

Eloesser, Leo 3639,3663, 3669 

Ely, Gertrude 3663 

Embree, Edwin R 3663 

Emerson, Haven 3639, 3669 

Emerson, Thomas I opposite 3624 

Emmett, Mrs. Burton 3640, 3678 

Emspak, Julius 3686, 3688 

Enee, S 3663 

Engle, Paul 3663 

English, Horace B 3640 

Enswinger, Mrs. Ross 3663 

Enters, Angna 3640 

Epstein, Harold ~ 3787 

Epstein, Max 3609 

Erlanger, Joseph __ 3639, 3669 

Ernest, William (James I.) 3663 

Ernst, Hugo ~ 3663 

Ernst, Morris L ~~ ~~_ 3639 

Evans, Alvin E ~~~~ ~~ " 3663 

Evans, Arthur Walwyn !__"_ _ _ 3663 

Evans, Clifford """" II ~I 3680 

Everts, John Bartle _ "~ " _~ ~~ 3663 

Ewing, Thomas D ~ ~ 3663,3706 

Fairchild. Henry Pratt 3608, opposite 3624, 3638, 3663, 3669 

Fairchild, Mildred 3609 

Farnum, Arthur W " ~ — — - ~ 3663 3706 

Fasanella, Ralph "I":::""":___" opposite 3624 

t ast, Howard opposite 3624, opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650 



3816 index 

Page 

Faupell, A. D 3706 

Faust, Alfred Luke 3663, 3706 

Fay, Paul J 3663 

Fay, Professor 3784 

Fearing, Franklin 3640 

Feild, Robert D 3609 

Feild, Robert Durant 3688 

Feinberg, Abraham L 3663 

Feinberg, William 3680 

Feise, Ernst 3663 

Feitshans, Frederick R 3613,3614 

Fenn, Don Frank 3706 

Ferber, Edna 3639, 3670 

Fernswortb, Lawrence 3680 

Ferrer, Jose 36S0 

Fetter, George C 3663 

Feuchtwanger, Lion 3609 

Fiebiger, Judson E 3706 

Fiene, Ernest opposite 3624 

Field, Betty 3680 

Field, Marshall 3688 

Field, Sara Bard 3663 

Field, Mis. W. Osgood 3680 

Files, James Ray ' — 3663 

Findley, John W 3663,3706 

Fineman, Irving 3663 

Finerty, Joseph E 3688 

Finger, Louis 3678 

Fink, Walter P 3663 

Fischer, Jacob 3663 

Fisher, Dorothy C 3639- 

Fisher, F. B 3756, 3764 

Fisher, H. H 3663 

Fisher, Irving opposite 3598 

Fisseone, Joseph 3607 

Fitch, Wells H 3663 

Fitzgerald, Albert J 36S8 

Fitzpatrick, Ann 3757 

Fitzpatrick, James L 3663 

Flaxer, Abram 3663, 3680 

Fleischer, Leon 3663 

Fleming Daniel J 3626 

Fletcher, Joseph D 3706 

Fletcher, Joseph F 3609, 3644, 3663 

Fletcher, Norman D 3706 

Flint, Charles Wesley 3727 

Flipper, Joseph S 3663 

Flynn, Elizabeth Gurley 3663 

Foley, Thomas 3663 

Folks, Homer 3609 

Follansbee, Mrs. Mitchell 3663 

Forbes, Mrs. J. Malcolm 3691 

Ford, Guy Stanton 3663 

Ford, John Anson 3638 

Foreman, Clark opposite 3624, 3688 

Forman, Harrison opposite 3624 

Forsyth, John B 3663, 3706 

Forsyth, Margaret E 3626, 3638 

Fosdick, Harry Emerson 3688 

Foss, Bertha Josselyn 3663 

Foss, Mrs. Ralph Stanwood 3640 

Foster, James E 3706 

Foster, William Z 36H0 

Foulke, Hugh B 3706 

Fowler, Eleanor 3680 



INDEX 3817 

Page 

Fox, Guy -, 3761 

Fraenkel, Osmond K 3639 

France, Royal Wilbur 3663 

Frank, Theodore T 3706 

Frank, Waldo 3657, 36(53 

Frank, Walter 3638 

Frankfurter, Felix 3670 

Franklin, Lucy 3607 

Franklin, Mitchell 3(563 

Frasier, George Willard 3663 

Fraziar, Elizabeth P 3663 

Freeman, Harry W 3663 

Freeman, Ira Henry 3663 

Frey, Edward Snively 3663, 3706 

Fricke, E. J 3759 

Friedman, Charles 3680 

Friedrich, Paul 3759 

Frisbie, Walter 3680 

Fritchman, Stephen H 3644, 3663, 3QS0, 3706, 3790, 3791, 3795 

Frye, Eva Watson 3663 

Frye, G. Shubert 3663, 3706 

Furlonge, Leslie A 3663 

Furry, James L 3663 

Furry, Wendell H 3:63 

Gag, Wanda 3609, 3663 

Gailmor, William S 3680 

Galbreath, Robert F 3663 

Gale, Zona 3691 

Gallagher, Leo 3663 

Gannett, Lewis 3639 

Gantt, W. Horsley 3609, 3663 

Ganz, Rudolph 3663 

Gaposchkin, Serge 3607 

Gardner, John— 3706 

Gardner, Virginia 3787 

Garland, Merritt G 3663 

Garrison, Edwin 3761 

Gartz, Kate Crane 3663, 3711 

Gass, John 3706 

Gates, Caleb F., Jr 3609 

Gates, Thomas S 3609 

Gauss, Christian opposite 3598, 3609 

Gavagan, Joseph 3688 

Gebert B 3590 

Geer, Owen M 3757, 3759, 3766 

Geldreich, Edward W 3663 

Gellert, Hugo 3663, 3680 

Gellis, Mortimer 3680 

German, W. W., Sr 3663 

Germany, Willis H .„ 3706 

Gerson, T. P 3755 

Gery, Andre 3641 

Geyer, Mrs. Lee 3688 

Gibson, Edmund H 3706 

Gibson, George M 3706 

Gibson, James J 3663 

Gifford, Helen W 3669 

Gilbert, Charles K 3706 

Gilbert, George B 3706 

Gilbert, W. M 3756, 3764 

Gilligan, Francis J :;r,ss 

Gilman, Irving 36S0 

Ginzburg, Mrs. Harold K 3680 

Girelius, Charles G 3663. 3~06 

Gitlow, Benjamin 3726, 3736, 3780 

Glazier, William 3663 

Gleason, Josephine M 3663 

43620—54 16 



3818 INDEX 

Page 

Gleszer, Eliot J 3663 

Glickstein, Hyman N 3663 

Glintemkamp, H 3680 

Gluck, Alma 3640 

Godowsky, Leopold 3626, 3640 

Goff, Victor V 3761 

Gold, Ben 3609, 3663, 3783 

Goldberg, Alfred G 3663 

Goldberg, Bernard I 3607 

Goldberg, B. Z 3608 

Goldberg, Isidor 3663 

Goldberg, Maurice 3663 

Goldblatt, Harry 3639, 3669 

Goldblatt, Louis 3663, 36S0 

Golden, Ben 3663 

Goldman, Alex 3663 

Goldman, Edwin Franko 3640, 3670 

Goldman, Solomon 3688 

Goldsmith, Leonard H 3663 

Goldstein, Israel 3688 

Goldstein, Mrs. Israel 3680 

Gonzalez, Joseph M 3663 

Goodenough, Erwin R 3663 

Goodhue, Everett W *. 3663 

Goodman, Benny 3640, 3670 

Goodman, Ernest 3663 

Goodsell, Willystine 3663 

Gordanier, Millard J 3706 

Gordon, Mrs. J. B 3607 

Gordon, Linley V 3691 

Gordon, R. A 3663 

Gordon, Ruth opposite 3624, 3680 

Gorman, Francis J 3669,3670 

Gorman, Francis L 3638 

Gow, Esther Allen 3663 

Gowan, Emmett 3657 

Gradv, Robert Cowan 3706 

Graham, Evarts A 3639, 3669 

Graham, Frank P 3638, 3669, 3670, 368S 

Graham, Gordon O 3706 

Graham, Martha 3640, 3670 

Graham, R. W 3756, 3764 

Graham, Richard V 3706 

Grambs, Georee Lorenzo 3663 

Granbery, John C 3663, 3706 

Grant, A. Raymond 3706 

Grant, Sidney 3607 

Gratz, W. E. J 3706, 3756, 3764 

Graubart, David 3706 

Graves, Mortimer 3609 

Graves. W. Brooke 3663 

Gray, Cbarles S 3663, 3706 

Gray, William D 3663 

Gray-Smith, Rowland 3663 

Greeley. Dana McLean 3607 

Green, Albert 3761 

Green, Gilbert 3735 

Green, James D 3706 

Green, Leon 3688 

Green. William opposite 3598, 3607, 3688, 3787 

Greene, D. W 3680 

Greenman, Walter F 3663, 3706 

Greenway, Cornelius 3663, 3706 

Gregg, J. A 3663 

Gregg, James E 3706 

Gretz, W. E. J 3663 

Grieser, Ralph 3706 

Griesi, James 3680 



INDEX 3819 

Page 

Griffiths, Mr 3676 

Grimson, Bettina "Warburg 3663 

Gropper, William 3639, 3680 

Grove, John M 3761 

Gruenberg, Benjamin O 3663 

Gruetter, Alexander J. J 3663 

Gross, Chaim 3680 

Gruber, Paul opposite 3646 

Gruber, Samuel 3663 

Grundfest, Harry 3609 

Guerrero, Armand 3706, 3761 

Guignon, Harriet 3663 

Gundlach, Ralph H 3663 

Gustafson. Cloyd V 3706 

Guthrie, Ernest Graham 3644 

Guthrie, Mary J 3663 

Gwathmey, Robert opposite 3624 

Hadley, J. H 3663 

Hagen, Uta opposite 3624 

Hahn, Albert R 3680 

Hahn, Herman J 3663 

Hahn, J. L 3663 

Haigler, Carey 3761 

Hairston, William 3761 

Halifax, Lady opposite 3598, 3599 

Halifax, Lord opposite 3598, 3599 

Hall, B. Frank 3663 

Hall, Helen 3626, 3639, 3670 

Hall, Martin 3761 

Hall, Royal G 3663, 3761 

Hallington, Albert J 3706 

Hallquist, Carl A 3663 

Ham, Marion Franklin 3663 

Hamilton, A, Gordon 3639 

Hamilton, Al 3766 

Hamilton, Alice 3609, 3663 

Hamilton, Charles G 3706 

Hamilton, Frank A 3706 

Hamilton, H. S 3756, 3764 

Hammond, E. S 3756, 3764 

Hammond, John, Jr 3643 

Hammond, P. M 3706 

Hand, Learned 3609 

Hendl, Walter opposite 3624 

Hankins, Frank H 3663 

Hanks, L. M., Jr 3663 

Hanney, Arthur J 3663 

Hanson, Florence Curtis 3787 

Harburg. E. Y 3680 

Hardy, Lewis R 3663 

Hann-aves, Corliss P 3706, 3756, 3757, 3759, 3764 

Harkavy, Minna 3640 

Harley, Harrison 3607 

Harlow, S. Ralph 3664 

Harnish, Dawson M 3664 

Haroutunian, Joseph 3644 

Harper, Fowler V opposite 3624 

Harper, George 3759 

Harper, Lucius C 3664 

Harriman, Mrs. J. Borden 3609, 3680 

Harriman, Job 3614 

Harrington, Mrs. Anton S 3664 

Harris, A. W 3756, 3764 

Harris, Charles Morgan 3664 

Harris, D. L 3664 

Harris, Elam 3664 



3820 index 

Page 

Harris, Gerald 3664 

Harris, Helen M 3639 

Harris, Jed 3640 

Harris, John H 3706 

Harris, M. LaFayette 3664 

Harris, Marguerite Tjader 3664 

Harris, Robert J 3664 

Harris, Thomas L 3608 

Harrison, H 3661 

Harrison, William 3607 

Hart, Moss 3609, 3657, 3680 

Harte, Joseph 3664, 3706 

Harten, T. S 3678 

Hartman, Lewis U 3671, 3678, 3679, 3741, 3756-3758, 3764, 3765 

Hastie, William H 3688 

Hatch, David L 3664 

Hathaway, Clarence 3638 

Hathaway, H. S 36S0 

Hatt, John H 3706 

Hauck, Elmer 3664 

Hawkins, Edler G 3664 

Havden, Joel 3691 

Haves. Carlton J. H 3691 

Hayes, Roland r__ 3664 

Hayes, Truman L, 3664 

Hayes, Mrs. William C 36S0 

Havs, Aline Davis 3684 

Havs, Arthur Garfield 3639, 3787 

Hays, Paul G 3706,3761 

Haywood 3761 

Hazzard, Lowell Z 3706 

Hazzard, L. B 3761 

Hazzard, Stanley B 3680 

Heacock, R. K 3761 

Hedger. George 3664 

Hedrick, Travis K 3664 

Heeb, Arthur 3664. 3706 

Heidelberger, Michael opposite 3624 

Heilman, A. J 3664 

Heinvitz. Mel J 3664 

Heiser, Florian 3664 

Heist, A. A 3756,3761,3764 

Held, I. W 3664, 36SO 

Helie. Leonard 3664 

Heller. Robert opposite 3624 

Hellerstein, Jerome R 3664 

Heilman, Lillian 3640, 3680 

Heilman. William 3609 

Hellstern, Marion 3664 

Heminsw^y. Ernest : 3639, 3670 

Hemp. William 3664 

H Q mpelman, G. Theodore 3664 

H ndersou, A. D 3609 

Henderson, Donald 3664 

Henderson. R. W 3614, 3723 

Hendley, Charles J 3626,3664 

Hendrie, Mrs. George T 3664 

Hendrickson, Alice 3664 

Henry. John M 3691 

Henson, Harry E 3664 

Hepburn, Mrs. Thomas N 3609,3664 

Herbert, S. R 3641,3681 

Herrell, Mvron 3761 

Herrick, Warren C 3680 

Herring, Hubert C 3638,3669 

Herring. John 3691 



INDEX 3821 

Page 

Berriot, Edouard opposite 3598 

Herriott, Frank W 3706 

Hestenes, John M 3706 

Hester, Sarah S 3757 

Hewes, Amy 3664 

Hewlett, George R 3680 

Hickerson, Clyde V 3664 

Hickerson, J. Allen opposite 3624 

Hicks, Howard V 3664 

Hicks, Philip M 3664 

Hicks, S. A 3664 

Hier, Florence 3664 

Higgins, John S 3664, 3706 

High, Stanley 3776, 3777 

Hightower, H. G 3680 

Hill, Charles A 3664, 3706 

Hill, Knute 3688 

Hill, Leslie Pinckney 3609 

Hill, T. Wesley opposite 3610 

Hille, Walderaar B 3664 

Hilliker, Clifford W 3664, 3706 

Hilton, Randall S 3664. 3680 

Himrod, William B 3613, 3614, 3722 

Hinckley, William 3626 

Hires, Harrison S 3664 

Hirsch, Alfred 3664 

Hiss, Alger 3718, 3754 

Hobart, Ira A 3664 

Hobson, Henry W 3677, 3688, 3706 

Hobson, Thayer 3664 

Hocking, William Ernest 3607, 3609, 3631 

Hodgson, Chester E 3644, 3664, 3680, 3706, 3761 

Hoffman, Katherine 3664 

Hollingsworth, L 3755 

Holman, Libby opposite 3624, 3680 

Holmes, Frank O 3664, 3706 

Holt, D. D 3664 

Homer, Louise 3640 

Hook, Sidney opposite 3766 

Hoover, J. Edgar opposite 3766 

Hoover, Mary Alice 3761 

Hoover, Kenneth E 3706 

Hoover, William Henry 3591 

Home, George A 3761 

Horton, Isabelle 3756, 3764 

Horton, Walter M 3609, 3644, 3681 

Houk, William C 3664 

Houston, Charles H 3664 

Houston, Charles H., Jr 3688 

Howard, Daniel 3664 

Howard, George G 3664 

Howe, Arthur 3064 

Howe, Ben 3664 

Howe, Elizabeth 3761 

Howe, Lee A., Jr 3664,3706 

Howe, Robert C 3757 

Howe, Robert 3759 

Howell, Clarence V 3664 

Hoyt, John F 36B4 

Huherman, Leo 3664, 3680 

Hubert, James H 3626 

Hudson 3659 

Hudson, Manley O 3691 

Hudson, Roland O 3706 

Huebsch, Mrs. B. W 3678 



3822 index 

Page 

Huff, William Henry 3642,3643 

Huggins, Mrs. H. H 3664 

Hughes, Alice 3680 

Hughes, Edwin Holt 3632, 3644 

Hughes, Edwin N 3664 

Hughes, John B 3704 

Hughes, Langston 3590, 3609, 3639,3664 

Hukee, S. O 3664 

Hukkala, Gabriel I 3610 

Hull, Clark L 3640 

Hull, Cordell opposite 3598, 3599 

Hull, Mrs. Cordell opposite 3598, 3599 

Hull, Hannah Clothier 3091 

Hull, I. H 3761 

Hullihen, Walter 3609 

Humphrey, Doris 3<i40 

Humphrey, J. K 3706 

Hunsaker, Herbert G 3688 

Hunt, J. M 3664 

Hunt, Laurence F 3664 

Hunting, Harold B 3664 

Huntington, Ellsworth 3664 

Huntington, M. P 3680 

Hunton, Mrs. A. W '___ 3680 

Hunton, W. A 3664 

Hunvald, Edward H 36S8 

Hurst, Fannie 3639, 3670 

Hutchins, W. J 3775 

Hutchinson, Paul 3756, 3764 

Hutson, Harold 3761 

Ickes, Harold L 3609, opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650 

Iglehart, Charles Wesley 3761 

Imes, William Lloyd 3626 

Ingalls, Harold B 3706 

Ingersoll, Louise M — 3664 

Ingersoll, Raymond C 3608 

Ingersoll, Mrs. Raymond V 3680 

Ingweiller, Frances A 3664 

Irin, L opposite 3649 

Isaacs, Norman E 368S 

Isaacs, Stanley M 3609, 3639, 3680 

Ise, John 3664 

Israel, Edward L 3638, 3669 

Isserman, Abraham J 3664 

Ives, Burl 3680 

Ivy, Andrew C 3639, 3669 

Jack, Hugh 3664 

Jack, Hulan E 3664 

Jackson, Edgar S 3664, 3706 

Jackson, F. W 3664 

Jacobson, Nathan 3680 

Jaffe, Louis L 3664 

Jaffe, Philip J 3608, 3626 

Jaffe, Sam 3680 

James, Philip opposite 3624 

Jarrico, Paul 3664 

Jasper, Thomas 3664 

Javits, Congressman 3701, 3754, opposite 3766 

Jayson, Alice 3678 

Jemison, J. V 36S8 

Jencks, Millard H 3609 

Jenkins, Grace 3761 

Jennings, Congressman 3699 

Jernagin, W .H 3664, 3688 

Jerome, Victor 3748 

Joel, George W 3664 

Johns, R. Elizabeth 3761 



index 3823 

Page 

Johnson, Bede A 3664 

Johnson, Charles S 3664 

Johnson, Crockett 3680 

Johnson, E. A 3607 

Johnson, Einmett S 3761 

Johnson, Hewlett 3641, 3642, 3644, opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650, 3681 

Johnson, James R., Jr 3664 

Johnson, James Weldon , 3691 

Johnson, Manning 3634, 3635, 3732, 3733, 3735, 3747, 3748 

Johnson, Mordecai W 3688 

Johnson, Victor 3664 

Johnson, Viena P 3664 

Jones, David 3759 

Jones, David D 3664, 3757 

Jones, Elsie Voorhees 3664 

Jones, Henry D 3706 

Jones, Howard Mumford 3607, 3609, opposite 3624 

Jones, Jesse opposite 3598 

Jones, Mrs. Jesse opposite 359S 

Jones, John Paul 3664, 3706 

Jones, Lewis Webster 3609 

Jones, Rufus M 3631, 3681, 3691 

Jones, William Safford 3664, 3706 

Josephy, Robert 3664 

Judah, Mr 3616 

Judd, Congressman 3652, 3654 

Jury, Harry 3763 

Justig, Harry M 3664 

Juvinell, Andrew 3761 

Kagawa, Toyohito opposite 3598 

Kahn, Albert E 36S0. 3789 

Kahn, Reuben L 3639, 3664, 3669, 3670 

Kallet, Arthur 3664, 3783 

Kaltenborn, Mrs. H. V 3640 

Kandel, Aben 3680 

Kane, Francis Fisher 3664 

Kanin, Garson opposite 3624 

Karpinski, Louis C 3609 

Kastorea, Katherine 3643 

Katz, Fannie Bowditch 3607 

Katz, Frederick L 3664 

Katz, Mrs. Frederick L 3664 

Katz, Wilbur G 3664 

Kaub, Verne 3719 

Kaufman, George S 3670, 3680 

Kaun, Alexander 3664 

Kayser, Marie L 3664 

Keating 3754 

Keating, Kenneth opposite 3766 

Kebker, Vant W 3664 

Keedy, Allen 3706 

Keegan, J. Clyde 3664 

Keil, Donald T 3706 

Keller, Helen 3609, 3664 

Kellernian, Robert P 3706 

Kellogg, Paul 3639, 3664, 3G88 

Kelly, Frank A 3615. 3618 

Kemp, Morris 3664 

Kempthorne, Edith M 3664 

Kennedy, Albert J 3664 

Kennedy, Foster 3680 

Kenny, Robert W 36S8 

Kent, Rockwell 3609, opposite 3624, 1 3639, 3670, 3680 

1 Name incorrectly spelled "Rockell Kent" in this reference. 



3824 index 

Page 

Kenyon, Dorothy 3609 

Kepees. Jacob 3639 

Kern, Paul 3626, 36S8 

Kern, Paul B 3596, 3664 

Kern, Paul J 3639, 3761 

Kerr, Lorin E 3664 

Kilgore, Mrs. J. D 3759 

Kinder, Francis S > 1 3664 

Kins, Carol 3639 

Kins, James V 3680 

Kine:. Lorenzo H 3626 

King, William P 3664 

Kingdon, Frank 3756, 3764 

Kingsbury, Cbester 3759 

Kingsbury, John Adams 3601, 3609, 3639, 3664 

Kipnis, Alexander 3680 

Kirby, John - 3761 

Kirchwey, Freda 3664 

Kirk, Albert E 3706 

Kirklanrl, Edward C 3664 

Kirkpatrick, Plaine 3761 

Klein, Ann Fitzpatrick ~ 3760 

Knapp, James 3664 

Knehelman, M. S 3664 

Knight, Harold V - 3664 

Koher, Arthur 3664 

Koch. C. Franklin 3664, 36S0 

Kogawa 3741 

Koger, Harrv 3664 

Kolar, Julia Church 3664 

Konecky, Eugene 3664 

Kopetskv, Samuel J 3639, 3669 

Kornfeder, (Joseph) 3740, 3745 

Kournakoff, Sercei N opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650, 3789 

Koussevitzky, Serge 3607, 3609, 3640, 3670 

Krahl, Adolph M 3706 

Kramer, A. Walter 3640 

Krechevsky, I 3640 

Kreymborg, Alfred 3664 

Kristjansson, Albert E 3664 

Kroll, Leon 3608 

Krum, John M 3680 

Kudler, George D 3664 

Knhn, Fritz 3660 

Kullgren 3659 

Kuo, Zing Yang 3640 

Kuznetsov, Vassily V opposite 3649 

Kyle, J. K 3664 

Kyper, Ralph E 3664 

Lackland, G. S 3756, 3761, 3764 

Lacklen, Jesse 3756, 3764 

Laeeman, Leonard 3664 

LaGuardia, Fiorello H 3609,3677,3688 

Laidlaw, Mrs. James L 3680 

Laing, Alexander 3664 

Lains:, Graham A 3664 

Lamb, Edward 3664 

Lambert, Alfred M 3664,3706 

Lambert, Plaine 3706 

Lamont, Corliss opposite 3598, 3601, 

3602, 3608, opposite 3610, 3624, opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3665 

Lamont, Margaret I 3665 

Lamont, Mrs. Thomas W 3609 

Lampe, William E 3665 

Lancaster, H. Carrington 3609 

Lancaster, William W 3609 



index 3825 

Page 

Landauer, Walter 3605 

Landis, James M 3703 

Landon, Edward 3665 

Lane, Harold 3680 

Langdale, J. W 3756, 3764 

Lange, Linda B 3665 

Langfeld, Herbert S 3640 

Langh, Philip A 3(06 

Langmuir, Irving 3(i09 

Lanier, R. O'Hara 3G65 

Lanphear, Walter 3665 

Larke, Alfred G 3665 

Larkin, Oliver 3638 

Laroe, Wilbur, Jr 3680 

Larson, John F 3665 

Lash, Joseph 3638, 3669 

Laski. Harold 3782 

Lathrop, John Howard 3706 

Lathrop, U. S 3665 

Latimer, Ira 3665 

Laurence, Paula 3678 

Lawson, John Howard i 3640, 3786 

Lawson, Robert W 3665 

Lazenhy, J. C 3756, 3757, 3761, 3764 

Leallad, Catharine D 3665 

Lenvin, Samuel B 3608 

Ledden, W. Earl 3758 

Leeper, Robert Ward 3665 

LeFevre, DuBois 3665 

Leighton. J. A 3665 

Leiper, Henrv Smith 3706 

Leipziger, Emil W 3665 

Lengvel, Emil 3609, 3665 

Lenhart, Carl H 3639, 3669 

Leonard, Bishop 3709 

Leonard, Adna Wright 3708 

Leonard, Willam Ellery 3665 

Lerner, Max 3657 

LeSeuer. Meridel 3665 

Leslie, Kenneth 3629, 3631, 3635, 3637, 3641-3644, 3665, 36S0, 3681 

LeSourd, Gilbert Q 3756-3758, 3764 

Lessinger. Waldo E 3665 

Levene, Phoebus A 3639, 3669 

Levenstein, Pearl 3669 

Leventhal, Israel 3680 

Levin, Deana opposite 3646 

Levine, Samuel A 3639, 3669 

Levinger, Lee J 3665 

Levinson, Norman 3601, 3665 

LeVita, Charles G 3665 

Lewin, Kurt 3640 

Lewis, Amy 3756, 3764 

Lewis, Gilbert N 3609, 3065 

Lewis, John F., Jr 3609 

Lewis, Samuel 3680 

Lewis, Sinclair 3639. 3670 

Lewis. William W 3665, 3706 

Lezenby, W. Morris 3665 

Lhevinne, Josef 3640 

Libby. Frederick J 3001 

TJpbmann, Paul 3665 

Lilian thai. David 3603 

Lind, Tver C 3065 

Lindeman. Fduard C 3630. 3001 

Lind^ren, Bea 306^ 

Lindhorst. Frank 3T06 

Lindsay, Samuel McCune 3665 



3826 index 

Page 

Linn, Otis L 3707 

Linsley, Richard 3607 

Linton, Ralph 3665 

Lion, Herman F 3707 

Lion, Herman J 3665 

Lipman, Eugene J 3665 

Littell, C. F 3761 

Littell, Franklin H 3757, 3759 

Litzel, Louisa 3756, 3764 

Locke, Katherine 3657, 3665 

Loeb, Leo 3639, 3669 

Loeb, Philip opposite 3624, 3665 

Long, Nat G 3761 

Longley, Harry 3665, 3707 

Longsdorf, Mrs. Ford H 3761 

Longstreth, W. E 3707 

Lord, David 3680 

Lothrop, Donald G 3641, 3644, 3680, 3681, 3707 

Lotz, P. Henry 3665, 3707 

Love, Edgar A 3757, 3759 

Lovejoy, Owen R 3639 

Lovell, Moses P - 3707 

Lovett, Robert Morss 3638, 3669, 3691 

Lovett, Sidney •___ 3707 

Lowder, Virgil E 36IJ1 

Lowell, Murland R 3665 

Lowther, Edgar A 3665, 3707 

Lozowick, Louis 36S0 

Luboshutz, Pierre 3680 

Luccock, Halford E 3691, 3756, 3761, 3764, 3787 

Luccock, Natalie 3665 

Lucey, Robert 3677, 3688 

Luckhardt, Arno B 3669 

Ludwig, Emil F 3609 

Luhrson, Julius G 3688 

Lukovich, Joseph 3665 

Lund, Harald H 3639 

Lurie, David L 3665 

Luscomb, Florence H 3665 

Lyman, Eugene W 3707 

Lynd, Robert S 3609, opposite 3624 

Lyon, D. Willard 3626, 3627 

Lyon, Peter opposite 3624 

Lyon, Sarah 3626 

Lyons, Eugene 3787 

MacArthur, General 3724 

MacBeth, Lucia (Mrs. Norman MacBeth) 3613, 3614 

MacCallum, j. A 3644, 3680, 3681 

MacClennon, Charles F 3707 

MacCollum. John A 3665 

MacDonald, George 3665 

MacDonald, Howard A 3665 

MacDonald, Ramsay opposite 3598 

Mackay, George 3665 

Mackay, John A 3638, 3644, 3669, 3678, 3681 

Mackenzie, George W 3665 

MacKinnon. John G 3707 

MacLeish, Archibald 3639 

MacMurray 3644, 3681 

Macon, Clifton 3644, 3681 

MacPherson, James 3707 

MacPherson, Walter Henry 3707 

Maddock, Mrs. Walter 3665 

Maeterlinck, Maurice 3609 

Magee, Elizabeth 36S8 

Magee, J. R 3756, 3764 

Magnuson, Ray F 3761 

Magnuson. Warren G 3688 



index 3827 

Page 

Mahle, Carl W ,.- 3707 

Mahler, Fritiz 3609, 3680 

Maier, Norman R. F 3640, 3665 

Major, H. D. A 3644 

Majors, T. Louis 3665 

Malamud, I 3665 

Malino, Jerome A 3707 

Mall, Jesse 3761 

Mallsoff, William M 3609 

Maltz, Albert 3665, 3680 

Manclel, David 3665 

Mandel. William opposite 3649 

Mandell, Arthur J 3665 

Manley, Lewis F 3665 

Mann, Horace 3665 

Mann, Thomas 3609 

Manning, Rosalie 3665 

Mansfield, H. E 3665 

Manship, Paul 3609 

Manwaring, W. H 3665 

Marcantonio, Vito 3639, 3670, 3688 

Margolis, Harry S 3665 

Markova, Alicia 3680 

Marks, Herbert E 3665 

Marley, Harold P 3665, 3707 

Marsh, Benjamin C 3680 

Marshall, George 3608, 3638, 3657, 3665, 3678, 3688 

Marston, Frank 3707 

Martel, Frank X 3609 

Martin, James W 3665 

Martin, William T 3601 

Masaryk, Thomas opposite 3598 

Mason, Daniel Gregory 3640 

Mason, William P 3761 

Masrda, George T 3665 

Massey, Raymond 3609 

Mather, Kirtlev F 3607, 3609, opposite 3624,* 3665 

Mathews, J. B 3624 

Mathias, Willis D 3665, 3707 

Matthiessen, F. O 3607, 3665 

Matis, George 3665 

Maurer, James H 3691 

Maurer, Oscar E 3707 

Maurer, Rose opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650 

Maury, Lowndes 3665 

Mawrey, Dwight 3665 

Maxwell, Elsa 3680 

May, James 3759 

May, Stanley 3665 

Mayer-Oakes, S. Robert 3665, 3707 

Mayhew, Robert 3665, 3707 

Maynard, Edwin H 3610 

McAllister. Dorothy S 3688 

McAvoy, Clifford T 3609, 3665 

McBride, Lois Mary 3609 

McCausland, Elizabeth 3665 

McLain, Elmer 3665 

McConn, Charles M 3657, 3665 

McConnell, Dorothy 3680 

McConnell, Francis J 3594, 

3596, 3622, 3624, 3626, 3627, 3644, 3669, 3670, 3678, 3680, 3681, 3688, 

3691, 3728, 3729, 3734, 3756, 3758, 3764. 

McConnell, F. W 3665, 3707 

McCown, C. C 3759 



2 Incorrectly spelled Klrley Mather. 



3828 index 

Page 
McDonald, Claude 3005 

McDonald, Duncan 3755 

McDowell, Mary 3756, 3704 

MeFee, William 3065 

McFetridge, William L 3008 

McFettridge, William 3607 

McGee, William 3665, 3707 

McGill, James H 3665 

McGill, O. H 3756, 3764 

McKee, Stanley S 3757 

McKellar, Kenneth opposite 3508 

MeKenzie, Howard 3608, 3065 

McKinney, William Ayer 3005 

McKinstry, Willard L 3665, 3707 

McMahon, Francis E 3088 

McManus, John T 3080 

McMaster, W. H 3756. 3764 

McMichael, Jack opposite 3598, 

3735-3737, 3739, 3746, 3749-3751, 3753, 3757, 3765 

McMillen, Wayne 3639 

McPherson, Walter A. R 3005 

McWilliams, Carey opposite 3024 

Mead, James M 3688 

Meadowcroft, R. S I__ 3081 

Mealley, John E 3707 

Meany, George 3088 

Meaney, George F opposite 3706 

Mehlman, Conrad Henry 3005 

Meigs, Stewart 3065 

Meikeljohn, Alexander 3691 

Melish, John Howard 3707 

Melish. William Howard 3601, 3608, opposite 3646, 3650, 3678, 3707, 3765, 3789 

Mellott, Henderson 3005 

Menninger, Karl 3065 

Menuhin, Yehudi 3665 

Meredith, Burgess 3640 

Meredith, Mrs. Burgess 3640 

Merivale, Philip 3040 

Merrell, Lloyd F 3707 

Merrill, Lewis 3609, 3665, 3680 

Meserve, Harry C 3665, 3707 

Meyendorff, Alexander 3007 

Meyer, Adolph 3639. 3669 

Meyer, H. H 3756, 3764 

Meyer, Mrs. Monroe 3640 

Middleton, John 3608 

Millar 3683 

Miller, Clyde R oppposite 3624, 3665, 3759 

Miller, Ethel K 3761 

Miller, Jesse Ray 3591 

Miller, Mrs. Marion M 3691 

Miller, Orie O 3691 

Miller, Payson 3665, 3707 

Miller, Wilhurn B 3665 

Millian, John C 3761 

Millikan. Robert A opposite 3598 

Mills, Edw. Laird 3756, 3764 

Mills, Saul 3605 

Mills, Victor G 3707 

Millspnugh, Mnry 3613, 3615, 3722 

Milstein, Nathan 3680 

Mi near, Paul S 3665 

Miner, F. Theodore 3707,3761 

Mink. Jack . 3665 

Minot, George R 3607,3009,3005 

Minton, Bruce 3065 

Mitch, William 3761 



index 3829 

Page 

Mitchell, Lucy Sprague 3009 

Mitchell, Walter 3707 

Mitchell, Wesley C 3609 

Mitzell, Charles Michael 3609,3065 

Moehlman, Conrad H 3642-3644, 3681 

Moffatt, James 3644, 3081 

Mollegen, A. T 3707 

Monath, Hortense 36S0 

Monger, A. E 3756, 3764 

Monteux, Pierre 3609 

Monteux, Mine, Pierre 3609 

Moody, O. W., Jr 3688 

Moore, Al f red 3761 

Moore, Arthur Newell 3665 

Moore, Douglas opposite 3624, 3665 

Moore, Harriet opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650, 3789 

Moore, John F 3665 

Moore, Joseph G 3644, 3665 

Moorman, Edgar M 3605 

Moors, John F 3665 

Moors, Mrs. John F 3691 

Moos, Elizabeth 3665 

Moose, David L 3665 

Morford, Richard 3601, 3608, 3665, 3707 

Morgan, Arthur E 3691 

Morgan, G. Moore 3680 

Moriarty, J. Arthur 3607 

Morris, Bertram 3665 

Morris, Frank 3665 

Morris, Frank E 3665 

Morris, Newhold, Jr 3639 

Morris, William, Jr 3608 

Morse, Alan R 3607 

Morton, Ralph S 3641, 3643 

Moser, Adolph 3665 

Mosiman, S. K 3691 

Moss, Leslie 3626 

Mostel, Zero 3680 

Mott, Charles F 3665 

Mott, John R 3680, 3771, 3773, 3777 

Moulton, Arthur W 3009,3707 

Muelder, Walter G 3758, 3775 

Mueller, Walter 3665 

Mueller, W. Ralter 3707 

Mulkey, Mrs. Floyd 3759 

Mulrooney, James 3665 

Muma, Irwin J 3613-3615 

Muni, Paul 3640, 3670 

Murphy, A. J 3688 

Murphy, Gardner 3640 

Murray, Gilbert opposite 3598 

Murray, Irving R 3665,3707 

Murray, James E 3609, opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3050 

Murray, John V., Jr 3761 

Murray, Philip 3607, 3688 

Muste, A. J 3691 

Muster, Morris 3680 

Mvers, Frederick 3065 

Myers, Frederick N 3680 

Myers, Mrs. Richard 3680 

Myers, Skillman E 3665, 3707 

Myerson, Abraham 3665 

Nace, I. George 3688 

Naffziger. Howard C 3639, 3669 

Nail, T. Otto 3610, 3611 

Nash, Norman B 3707 

Nash, Philip C 3609 



3830 index 

Page 

Nearing, Scott 3690 

Neff, Eleanor 3761 

Neilson, Karl_ 3707 

Neilson, Wm. A 3638, 3657, 3669 

Neimoeller, Martin 3741 

Nelken, Sam 3665 

Nelles, Walter 3755 

Nelson, A. A 3665,3707 

Nelson, Candis 3761 

Nelson, Roscoe 3707 

Nenman, P 3680 

Newburgh, L. H 3639,3665,3669,3670 

Newcomer, Mabel 3665 

Newell, J. Pierce 3658, 3761 

Newhonse, Edward - 3658 

Newman, Robert 3658 

Newton, Harry J 3707 

Newton, Louie D 3644, 36S1, 3794, 3795, 3797-3799 

Nichols, Dudley 3665 

Nichols, G. S 3759 

Nichols, Mrs. John R - 3H07 

Nichols, Robert Hastings 3609. 3658, 3666 

Nickless, Alfred S 3666 

Niebuhr, Reinhold 3626, 3631, 3691, 3726. opposite 3766 

Niebyl, Karl S 3666 

Nielsen, Karl 3666 

Nieman, William L 3680 

Niemoeller, Martin opposite 3598, 3765 

Nissley, S. R 3666 

Noble, Charles 3761 

Noble, William S 3665, 3707 

Nosnchi, Isamu 3680 

Nollen, John S 3666 

Noon, Luverne E 3666 

Nordstrand, Josephine 3666 

Norris, Marian L 3761 

Norris, Mrs. Nixon 3666 

North, F. M 3756, 3764 

North, Sterling 3666 

Northrup, Isaac Noyes 3707 

Norton, Theodore E 3666 

Notz, Rose M 3666 

Notz, William C 3666 

Nowak, Stanley 3666 

Norwood, Rose 3607 

Novick, Samuel J 3671, 3678 

Nurnberg, Maxwell 3658 

Nye, Senator 3784 

Nye, Roland F 3680 

Oakes, Catherine 3666 

O'Brien, Eugene 3658 

O'Connell (Cardinal) 3633 

O'Connell, Jerry 3638, 3666, 3669 

O'Connell, Mrs. L. L 3688 

O'Connor, Harvey 3666 

O'Connor, Tom 3666 

O'Dell, Robert J 3613-3615 

Odets, Clifford 3640, 3670, 3680 

O'Planagan, Michael J 3670 

Oldham, G. Ashton 3666 

Olmsted, Frank 3691 

Olson, O. T 3756, 3764 

O'Neill, Eugene 3609 

Opheim, Oscar 3666 

Opitz, Edmund A 3666, 3707 

Oppenheimer, Sarah 3680 

Orvis, Julia Swift 3607 



INDEX 3831 

Page 

Osato, Sono 3680 

Osborn, Margaret LaFarge 3666 

Oser, Martha 3658 

O'Sheel, Shaemas 3658 

Osnes, Mrs. Erling 3666 

Overstreet, H. A 3666 

Ovington, Mary White 3666 

Owen, Blaine 3658 

Owens, Spencer Baker 3707,3762 

Oxnam, Bishop G. Bromley 3585, 35S6, 3587-3S03 (testimony) 

Pach, Walter 3666 

Packard, John C 3755 

Packard, Marie 3755 

Paddock, Robert L 3638, 3669, 3670 

Page, Kirby 3594, 3691, 3746, 3747 

Page, Myra 3658 

Paieharp, W. Harold 3707 

Paine, George L 3658, 3666 

Paley, Jack 3680 

Palmer, Albert W 3666 

Palmer, Clay E 3666,3707 

Palmer, William B 3666 

Pangborn, Cyrus R 3680 

Park, Julian 3666 

Park, Marion Edwards 3609,3691 

Park, William H 3639,3669 

Parker, Dorothy opposite 3624, 3625, 3628, 3639, 3640, 3669, 3670 

Parker, George Lawrence 3666, 3707 

Parker, Z. Rita 3666 

Parkhurst, Elbert M 3707 

Parlin, Charles C 3587-3803 

Parmelee, E. W 3680 

Parrett, Albert B 3707 

Parsons, Edward L 3595, 

3638, 3666, 3669, 3670, 3680, 3688, 3691, 3693-3696, 3704 

Pascale, B 3680 

Patterson, Carl 3691 

Patterson, Frederick Douglas 3609 

Patterson, Grove 3771, 3777 

Patterson, Leonard 3735, 3747, 3748 

Patterson, William 3658 

Patton, James G 3688 

Patton, Robert D 3666 

Pauck, W T ilhelm 3644 

Paul, Elliot 3639, 3680 

Paull, Irene 3666 

Payne, Jerome F 3666 

Peabody, Malcolm E 3609 

Peabody, Stephen C 3658, 3707 

Peak, Helen 3658, 3666 

Peale, Norman Vincent 3653, 3671, 3673, 3674, 3678, 36S0 

Pearson, Emanuel 3666 

Pearson, John M 3680 

Peck, William W 3666, 3707 

Peet, Edward L 3707,' 3759 

Pelletier, Wilfrid 3680 

Pelley, William Dudley 3659, 3660 

Pemberton, Mrs. Brock ' 3640 

Pennypacker, Anna M. W 3658, 3666 

Penneypacker, J. S ~ 3658 

Pepper, Claude 3609, opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650 

Perera, Mrs. Lionel C, Jr 3666, 3678 

Perera, Lionel C 3658 

Perez, Okio ~_~~_~~_~ ~ 3(559 

Perkins, Haven P 3666) 3707 



3832 index 

Page 

Perkins, Louis 3707 

Perkins. Palfrey 3~07 

Perry, J. E 3~00 

Perrv, Jennincs 3687 

Perrv, Ralph Barton 3007. 3009 

Peters, E C 36*9. 3006 

Peters, John P 3609. 3639, 3009 

Peters. W. W 3080 

Pettingill, Stuart 3606 

Pettioni. Charles A 3026 

Pettit. Walter 3039 

Pettus, Terry 3000 

Petty, A. C 3080 

Phiihrick, Herbert 3001 

Phillips, Gordon 3707 

Phillips, Jospph D 3000 

Phillips, J. W 3*22 

Phillips, S. I 3006 

Phillipson, David 3000 

Piachapp, W. Harold 3*06 

Piastro, Mishpl 3680 

Piatigorsky, Gregor 3080 

Pierce, Lovick 301 

Pierson. Emilv - 3008 

Pinkham. Henry W 3058. 3707 

Pious, Minerva opposite 3024 

Pirkey. Frank 3000 

Piston, Walter 3 n 40 

Pitkin, Rex 3670 

Pitt, Louis W 3080 

Pless, James 3702 

Plotkin, A 3014 

Plotkin, Benjamin 3080 

Plummer, (Captain) 3711 

Pohl. Herman A 3000 

Pol. Heinz 3*42. 3*43 

Poling. Daniel A 3771. 3777 

Pollard, G. A 3000. 2707 

Pollock, P. Hewisin 3658, 3707 

Pomerantz. A. L 3*24 

Pomeranee. Leon 3078 

Pomerov. Mrs. G. W 3702 

Poole, Fred G 3702 

Poole. Mrs. Fred G 3702 

Poor, Georgp L 3707. 3757, 3762 

Pope. A rthur TTnham 3608, opposite 3046, opposite 3649, 3050, 3066 

Pope. Henry W 3609, 3000 

Fonppr, Ma rtin 3078 

Porter, Grace 3*00 

Porter, Kenneth W 3006 

Posel, Yella 3678 

Poteat, Edwin McNeill 3644, 3660, 3081, 3707 

Poteat, Gordon 3642-3644, 3080 

Potter, A. Leslie 3606 

Powell. Adam Clayton, Jr 3008, 3626, 3644, 3658, 3666, 3078, 3081 

Powpll. Rohert R 3757, 3702 

Povnter, Nelson 3088 

Pratt, Owen W 3666 

Pratt, Schuyler 3707 

Prenter, Harriet Dunlop 3702, 3721 

Pressman, Lee 3006 

Prestes, Carlos Luiz 3783 

Previant, David 3066 

Price, Ira M 3091 

Price, Julius J 3680 

Price, Melva L 3666 

Pritt, D. N opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650 



indbx 3833 

Page 

Prudt, Elmer J 3658 

Putnam, Irving Ellsworth 3707 

Putnam, Phelps 3658, 3666 

Pyle, Elmer K 3666 

Quill, Michael 3609, 3666, 3680 

Quimby, Karl 3762 

Rader, Melvin 3666 

Rader, Milton 3666 

Rafuse, Robert W 3666 

Ragatz, Leonhard 3644, 3681 

Raille, Robert 3666 

Rail, Harris F 3658, 3756, 3762, 3764 

Ralston, David 3680 

Ramsey, Fredlyn 3666 

Randall, Francis P 3658, 3707 

Randau, Carl opposite 3624 

Randolph, A. Philip 3626, 3638, 3669, 3670, 3688, 3785 

Rand, Minnie F 3680 

Rankin, Jeannette 3755 

Ransom, Leon A 3666 

Ransom, Reverdy C 3666 

Raper, Arthur 3759 

Rapp, Alfred Harry 3707 

Raphaelson, Samson 3680 

Raskin, Evelyn 3658 

Raskin, Jack 3666 

Ratcliff, Dillwyn F 3658 

Rathbun, Harry J 3666 

Ratliff, H. M 3707, 3757, 3759 

Ratliff, Mrs. W. H 3762 

Rautenstrauch, Walter 3638, 3658, 3666 

Raver, W. Neal 3762 

Rawley, Callman 3666 

Rayburn, Sam 3679 

Read, Kenneth G 3680 

Recht, Charles 3658 

Redifer, Frederick L 3666 

Reed, James B 3666 

Reed, J. W 3658, 3666 

Refregier, Anton 3609, 3680 

Rehorn, Thomas 3680 

Reid, William W 3758 

Reiner, Fritz 3640 

Reis, Rebecca 3658 

Reisner, Ensworth 3762 

Reiss, Mrs. Bernard 3680 

Reiss, George J %qqq 

Reissig, Herman F 3669 

Rella, Ettoro 3658 

Remington, William P ~~ 3707 

Remmers, H. H 3666 

Reneau, L. W ZZZZZI_ 3707 

Reustle, Frederick ~~~~ ~~ sqqq 3707 

Reuther, Walter Z__ZZZZZ_ZZ___Z_ opposite 3766 

Revell, Fleming H _ _ 3591 

Reynolds, Bertha C ZZ_ZZ_ZZZ_ZZZZ~3639, 365S, 3666 

Reynolds, J. H _ 3g 5 § 

Reynolds, L. Willard Z_Z__Z_Z_ZZZZZZZ_ZZZZZZZZZ~365S, 3666 

Reynolds, Quentin opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650 

Rice, Elmer 3609 3680 

Rice, Oscar K 3ggg 

Rice, William Gorham, Jr ZZ_ZZ Z_ZZ_~_Z ZZ_ 3666 

Richardson, Dean E J~__ 3§QQ 

Richardson, Hilary G ZZZZZ_ZZ_ 3707 

43620—54 17 



3834 index 

Page 

Ricks, James Hogue 3691 

Rideout, Daniel Lyman 3707 

Riegger, Wallingford 3609, 3666 

Riess, Bernard F 3658,3666 

Rieve, Emil 3688 

Riley, George A 3707 

Riley, Lester Leake 3658 

Rinaldo, Frederic I 3658 

Ringe, Frederic W 3666,3707 

Ripley, Mrs. William Z 3607 

Rising, Lloyd H 3757, 3762 

Ristine, V. Miriam 3757,3762 

Rittenhouse, Mary W 3658,3666 

Robeson, Roadman Earl 3757,3764 

Roads, Hanna 3666 

Robbins, Henry B 3707 

Robbins, Raymond 3609, 3644, 3680, 3681, 3771, 3772, 3777 

Robbins, Wallace W 3666 

Roberts, Mrs. B. P 3626 

Robeson, Benjamin C 3666, 3680 

Robeson, Paul 3609, opposite 3610, opposite 3624, 3625, 3628, 

3638, 3640, 3666, 3669, 3670 

Robinson, Alson H ■ 3666, 3707 

Robinson, Earl 3609, 3666 

Robinson, Edward 3678 

Robinson, James H 3666 

Robinson, Reid 3609, 3666, 3688 

Roblee, Frederick A 3666 

Rocbester. Anna 3658 

Roe, Wellington 3658, 3666 

Roebuck, John R 3666 

Roekel, Charles D 3666 

Rogers, Hubert W 3666 

Rogge, O. John opposite 3624 

Romaine, Paul 3658, 3666 

Rome, Cuthbert R 3666 

Rome, Harold J 3609, 3658 

Roosevelt 3622 

Roosevelt, Eleanor 3631, 3688 

Roosevelt, President 3595 

Ropes, Earnest C opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650 

Rosebury, Theodore opposite 3624 

Roseman, M. J 3666 

Rosenberg, Ethel 3672 

Rosenberg, Julius 3672 

Rosenfeld. Kurt 3639 

Rosenow, E. C 3639, 3669 

Roson, Joseph A 3609 

Ross, Clifton H 3666, 3707 

Ross, Clifton Hayward 3658 

Ross, Edward A 3666, 3784 

Ross, Lillian 36o8 

Ross, Milton R 3666 

Ross, Mrs. Nathaniel 3680 

Ross, Sam 3658 

Roth, Henry 3658 

Rothman, Walter 3666 

Rowe, Cuthbert R 3707 

Rowse, Ralph H 3658, 3666 

Rubenstein, Beryl 3640 

Rubin, Jay 367 8 

Ruegsegger, James 3658 

Russell, Elbert 3666 

Russell, William K 3707 



index 3835 

Page 

Justin, John :i7G2 

Ruthven, Madeline 3658 

Ryan, John A 3594, 3683 

Ryan, Lawrence J 3666 

Ryan, W. Carson 3691 

Ryckman, J. H 3614,3723 

Ryecroft, W. Stanley 3644, 3678 

Sabin, Florence R 3639, 3669 

Sabine, George H 3666 

Saffron, Shirley 3666 

Sahler, Helen 3658, 3666 

Sainsbury, Dorothy 3658 

Salerno, Joseph A 3607, 3609 

Salmon, E. Dwight 3666 

Saltonstall, Governor 3607 

Saltonstall, Leverett 3609 

Samson, Mary 3756 

Sanctuary 3659 

Sandness, John C 3666 

Sanville, Florence L 3666 

Sarros, Nick A 3668 

Sarton, George 3607, 3666 

Saunders, John ! 3680 

Savage, F. Waldo 3707 

Savelle, Max 3666 

Savory, P. M 3626 

Saxton, Matilda 3759 

Sayers, Michael 3789 

Scarlett, William J 3691 

Scattergood, J. Henry 3666, 3691 

Schacht, Robert H., Jr 3666, 3707 

Schenck, Abraham 3667 

Schenk, Philip L 3658 

Scherer, A. J 3658, 3667, 3707 

Schick, Bela 3639, 3669, 3680 

Schieffelin, William Jay 3667 

Schieffelin, Mrs. William J 36S0 

Sehlipp, Paul A 3658 

Schindler, Pauline G 3658, 3667 

Schlauch, Margaret 3667 

Schlesinger, Arthur M 3658, 3667 

Schlosberg, Harold 3667 

Sdhnabel, Artur 3680 

Schnee, Thelma 3667 

Schneider, Isidor opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650, 3658 

Schneirla, T. C 3640, 3658, 3667 

Schoch, Margaret 3667 

Schofield, Charles 3757, 3759 

Schooler, Don 3762 

Schorer, Mark 36n8 

Schrickel, Harry R 3658, 3667 

Schubart, Mark opposite 3624 

Schultz, Paul P., Jr 3707 

Schuman, Frederick L 3642, 3643, opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650, 3789 

Schuster, Mrs. M. Lincoln 3680 

Schwab, Irving 3658, 3667 

Schwengel, E. H 3707 

Scofield, Carlton F 3658 

Scott, Clinton Lee 3667 

Scott, Franklin B 3658, 3667 

Scott, Harold 3667, 3707 

Scott, J. H 3667 

Scott, Roy Wesley 3639, 3669 

Scudder, Doremus 3755 

Scudder, Vida D 3644, 3658, 3667, 3681 



3836 index 

Page 

Seabury, Helen 3691 

Seabury, Mary 3691 

Seaman, C. E 3614, 3615 

Searle, Robert 3626. 3678 

Sears, Lawrence 3658 

Seaver, Edwin opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650, 3667, 3783 

Seaward, Carl Albert 3667 

Seebode, Richard W. F 3667,3708 

Seely, Charles 3688 

Segal, Bernard 3680 

Seghers, Anna opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650 

Seifert, Harvey 3762 

Seifert, Joseph I 3607 

Seigil, Ruth 3667 

Seigworth, V. Freda 3667 

Selly, Joseph P 3608, 3667, 3680 

Selsam, Howard 3667 

Sergio, Lisa 3680 

Sessions, Elizabeth 3658 

Sevely, Rhoda W 3667 

Sewall, Snmner 3609 

Seward, John P 3667 

Seymour, Frank C 3658 

Sexton, E. Herbert _— 3667 

Shahn, Ben opposite 3624 

Sharp, Malcolm 3658 

Sharp, Waitstill H 3667 

Sharp, William MacDonald 3708 

Sharpe, D. R 3644, 3680 

Sharpnack, Shippy 3760 

Shaw, George Bernard 3795 

Shaw, Mary J 3667 

Shayon, Robert opposite 3624 

Sheean, Mrs. Vincent 3678 

Sheen, Monsignor 3637, 3641, 3655 

Sheen, Fulton 3650, 3681, 3682, opposite 3766 

Sheen, Warren P 3708 

Sheldon, Charles M 3695 

Sheldon, Sidney 3658 

Shenefelt, Arthur 3708 

Shenton, Herbert N 3756, 3764 

Shepard, John 3670 

Sherer, A. J 3667 

Sherman, Mrs. Florentine S 3640 

Sherman, M. B 3608 

Sherman, W. J 3756, 3764 

Sherover, Miles M 3609 

Sherrill, Henry Knox opposite 3598, 3607, 3609 

Shipler, Guy Emery 3638, 3667, 3669, 3680, 3708 

Shirer, William L 3680 

Shirer, Mrs. William L 3680 

Sholokhov, Mikhail opposite 3646 

Sholtz, Jacob 3667 

Shore, Viola Brothers 3667 

Shore, Wilmer 3658 

Shryver, Katherine 3687 

Shubow, Joseph S 3607 

Shuler, Bob 3709, 3711, 3722 

Shumlin, Herman 3608, 3640, 3680 

Shumlin. Mrs. Herman 3640 

Shurcliff, Mrs. Arthur A 3607 

Shurtleff, Paul M 3667 

Sibley, H. Norman 3708 

Sidney, Sylvia 3640, 3670 

Siegmeister, Elie 3667 



index 3837 

Page 

Sigerist, Henry E . 3608, 

3639, opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650, 3669, 3670 

Sillen, Samuel 3658, 3667 

Silver, Abba Hillel 3638, 3669, 3670, 3688, 3691 

Silvertborn, Katherine V 3691 

Simkhovitch, Mary 3639 

Simmons, C. LeBron 3667 

Simmons, Ernest J 3667 

Simmons, Henry A 3708 

Simon, Elsa W 3667 

Simonov, Konstantin opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650 

Simonson, Lee 3640, 3667 

Simpson, Mrs. Kenneth F 3680 

Sims, D. H 3688 

Sinclair, Upton 3614, 3638, 3667, 3669, 3670, 3711, 3712, 3722, 3723 

Singer, Edgar F 3667 

Singleton, Claude 3762 

Sisson, E. Donald 3658 

Sizoo, Joseph R 3680 

Skinner, C. D 3756, 3764 

Skinner, Stanley E 3667, 3708 

Sklar, George 3640 

Skop, Morris 3688 

Sloan, Raymond P 3609 

Slocombe, Edwin M 3667, 3708 

Slonimsky, Nicholas 3607 

Smallens, Alexander 3640 

Smart, W. A 3762 

Smedley, Agnes opposite 3624 

Smith, Alson J 3667 

Smith, Asbury 3708 

Smith, Carl D 3667 

Smith, Charles Edward 3658 

Smith, Chester A 3757, 3762 

Smith, Edwin S 3608 

Smith, Eugene L 3762 

Smith, Houston 3762 

Smith, James Iden 3667 

Smith, Jessica 3608, opposite 3646, opposite 3649 

Smith, Kenneth 3762 

Smith, LeRoy 3722 

Smith, Mason 3667 

Smith, Randolph B 3658 

Smith, Vaughn 3762 

Smith, Walter A 3667 

Smyth, F. Hastings 3658, 3708 

Snow, Edgar opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650, 3680 

Snyder, Alice D 3667 

Snyder, G. Franklin 3708 

Soares, Theodore G 3667 

Sockman, Ralph 3680, 3762 

Soderberg, E. Hilmer 3708 

Soley, Elizabeth W 3667 

Sondergaard, Hester l 3667 

Sonen, Robert W 3667 

Soper, Elgar 3762 

Sorokin, P. A 3609 

Sorrell, Herbert K 3667 

Soule, Alfred M ; 3667 

Soule, Arthur M 3708 

Soule, Carl 3762 

Soule, Isabel Walker 3658 

Southworth, H. Rutledge 3644 

Soyer, Moses 3680 

Soyer, Raphael 3680 

Spaatz, General 3672 

Spaeth, Sigmund 3667, 3680 

43620 — 54 18 



3838 index 

Page 

Sparling, Clyde V 3708 

Spaulding, W. B 3756, 3764 

Speers, T. Guthrie 3691 

Spellruan, Archbishop 3684 

Spencer, Fanny Bixby opposite 3610 

Spencer, Frederick 3622 

Spencer, John C 3708 

Sperry, William B 3708 

Spiro, Gretel 3667 

Spofford, William B 3626, 3634, 3638, 3667, 370S 

Squires, Charles W 3667 

Stack, Joseph 3680 

Stagner, Ross 3667 

Standard, William 3667 

Stanfield, C. A 3658 

Stanger, John V 3667 

Stanley, Clifford L 3708 

Stanton, E. Lester 3708 

Stanpers, Mabel K 3667 

Stavis, Barrie 3658 

Stavrianos, Bertha Kelso 3667 

Steel, Johannes 3644, opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650, 3680 

Steele, Mr 3749 

Steere, Douglas V :___ 3681 

Stefanson, Vilhjalmur 3608 

Steiger, A. J opposite 3646 

Stein, Arthur 3667 

Stein, Louis 3667 

Stein, Richard 3763 

Steinmetz, Philip H 3708 

Stellhorn, Raymond W 3667 

Stern, Bernard J 3667 

Sternberger, Estelle M 3680 

Stettinius, Edward, Jr opposite 3598 

Stettinius, Mrs. Edward, Jr opposite 3598 

Stevens, J. Stanley 3667, 3708 

Stevens, Thelma 3757, 3758 

Stevenson, A. E 3667 

Stewart, Carroll 3708 

Stewart, Donald Ogden 3667, 3670, 3680, 36S6, 3688 

Stewart, Mrs. Donald Ogden 3626 

Stewart, Martha 3762 

Stewart, Maxwell S 3609 

Stidger, W. L 3756, ?764 

Stinson, Elizabeth . 762 

Stix, W T alter H 3667 

Stockham, John R 3667 

Stoessel. Albert 3640 

Stokes, Anson Phelps 3609 

Stokowski, Leopold 3609 

Stolberg, Benjamin 3786, 3787 

Stoltz, Mildred K 3667 

Stone, Charles Leonard : 3667 

Stone, Elihu D : 3607 

Stoneham, Elbridge F 3667 

Storm, Carl 3667 

Storm, Carroll 3708 

Stout, Deiner S 3667 

Stowe, Everett M 3762 

Stowe, Leland 3638, 3669 

Stowe, Lyman Beecher 3667 

Strand, Paul opposite 3624 

Straus, Leon 3667 

Streich, Paul H 3708 

Strong, Anna Louise opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650, 3667 



index 3839 

Page 

Struik, Dirk J 3600-3602, 3607, 3667 

Strtmsky, Mrs. W. English 3667 

Stuart, John 3667 

Stuber, Stanley I 3680 

Sturgis, Warren S 3607 

Sugar, Maurice 3667 

Suk, Joseph 3607 

Sundwall, John 3639, 3669, 3670 

Sutcliffe, E. Lenton 3667 

Sutherlin, Calvin J 3667 

Sutton, Richard M 3667 

Swan, Alfred W 3708 

Swanson, Sam A 3667 

Sweat, Joseph 3678 

Sweeney, Samuel H 3762 

Sweet, Sidney E 3667 

Swins, F. M 3680 

Swing, Raymond Gram 3609, 3771, 3777 

Swope, Gerard 3609 

Tabouis. Genevieve 3609 

Taft, Ada B 3667 

Taft, Clinton I 3755 

Taggard, Genevieve opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650, 3680 

Talbott, Glenn J 3667 

Tarasov, M. P opposite 3649 

Tasman, Eric M 3~08 

Taubman, Howard opposite 3624 

Taussig, F. W opposite 3598 

Tavlor, Alva W 3644, 3667, 26S0 

Taylor, Daniel 3762 

Tavlor, Deems opposite 3624, 3625 

Taylor, Ethel C 3639 

Tavlor, Frank E 3680 

Tavlor, John H 3667,3708 

Taylor, Lloyd W 3667 

Tedcastle, Arthur T 3"08 

Ten Broeck, William D 3755 

Ten Eyck, Mills 3609 

Tenney 3622 

Tereshtenko, Valery J opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650 

Terman. Lewis M 3667 

Terrill, Katherine 3626, 3667 

Terry, M. C — 3667 

Thi^'- ield. W. P 3756,3764 

The'^ias, Elbert D 3609 

Thomas, Norman 3691 

Thomas, R. J 3609,3688 

Thompson, Edward 3667 

Thompson, Frederick 3667 

Thompson, George L 3 r >67 

Thompson, John B 3708 

Thompson, John R 36S8 

Thompson, Joseph W 3708,3762 

Thompson, Mark 3667 

Thompson, M. I 3667 

Thompson, Roger E 3708 

Thomson. Mildred 3759 

Thorek, Max 3609 

Thome, Frank 3B67 

Thrasher, T. R 3708 

Throckmorton, Dillon Wesley 3667, 3708. 3762 

Tibbett, Lawrence 3657 

Tillieh, Paul 3641, 3642, 3644, 3667, 3681 

Tilly, Mrs. M. E 3688,3757,3750 

Timms, Josephine 3667 



3840 INDEX 

Page 

Tinker, Wellington H 3691 

Tipple, Ezra Squier 3591 

Tippy, Worth M 3756,3764 

Titelman, Leonard R 3667 

Tittle, Ernest F 3369, 3734, 3756, 3762, 3764 

Tittle, Pearl D 3667 

Titus, Joseph H 3667, 3708 

Tobias, Channing H 3638, 3644, 3667, 3688 

Tohin 3621 

Tobin, Daniel J 3607,3688 

Tobriner, Mathew O 3667 * 

Todd, T. Wingate 3639,3669 

Tolan, Edward 3667 

Toller, Ernst 3639 

Tolman, Edward Case 3640,3667 

Tomlinson, W. F 3708 

Toney, Charles E 3667 

Toothaker, Frank 3762 

Torchin, Max 3680 

Totten, Edward P 3667 

Tour, Mrs. Harry B 3688 

Townsend, Frances E 3688 

Townsend, V. M 3667 

Tracey, E. F -'— 3667 

Trapp, Jacob 3667, 3708 

Travis, Robert C 3667 

Trent, Lucia 3667 

Treworgy, Everett S 3667, 3708 

Tricker, Lilian 3667 

Trone, S. A 3609 

Troyer, James W 3667 

True 3659 

Tully, Jim 3667 

Truman, Harry S 3724 

Tucker, Henry St. George opposite 3598, 3609 

Tucker, Robert L 3756,3764 

Turnipseed, Andrew S 3759 

Tuthill, Ernest C 3708 

Tuttle, Frank 3667 

Ture, Rosemond 3668 

Tyler, William A 3668, 3708 

Ty'nes, Hercourt A 3668 

Tyroler, Louis 3668 

Untermeyer, Jean Starr 3668 

Uphaus, Willard 3668, 3759 

Urban, Leigh R 3708 

Urmy, Ralph B 3756, 3757, 3764 

Urquhart, Mrs 3712 

Vakar, Nicholas 3607 

Valentino, Anthony 3668 

Van Dorn, Carl 3639,3657 

Van Doren, Mark opposite 3624, 3680 

Van Dusen, Henry P 3691 

Van Gelder, Philip H 3609 

Van Horn, R. E 3609 

Van Kirk, Walter W 3691 

Van Kleeck, Mary 3609, 3639 

Van Paassen, Pierre 3641, 3644, 36S0, 3681 

Van Tassell, Morgan W 3668, 3708 

Van Veen, Stuyvesant 3639 

Varnadsky, George 3609 

Veblen, Oswald 3668 

Velarde, Cleo C 366S 

Verhulst, Grant I 3610 

Versteeg, John M 3668 

Viereck 3659 



1 Spelled Mathrew O. Tobriner in this reference. 



INDEX 3841 

Page 

Villard, Oswald Garrison 3688,3691 

Vincent, Craig 3608 

Vinton Margaret 3668 

Vixnian, Mrs. A. H 3638 

Vlastos, Gregory 3641, 3644. 3681 

Vonstilli, A. E 3667 

Vorhees, Frederick F 3708 

Vuagniaux, W. W 3668 

Wadleigh, Beatrice 3668 

Wagner, Erwin 3680 

Wagner, O. Walter 3708 

Wahlberg, Edgar M 3757, 3762 

Wald, Lilliam D 3639,3670 

Waldbaum, Saul C 3668 

Waldman, Louis 3639 

Walen, Georg J. M 3668 

Wales, Nym 3380 

Walker, Alice H 3668 

Walker, Herman B 3668 

Walker, Hudson 3608 

Walker, Kenneth C 3668, 3708 

Wallace, A. J 3712 

Wallace, R. T 3668 

Wallenstein, Alfred 3640 

Walls. W. J 3609 

Walser, Kenneth 3691 

Walsh, Edmund A 3787 

Walsh, J. Raymond 3680 

Waltmire, W. B 3668, 3708 

Walton. Eda Lou 3668 

Ward, Courtney D 3668 

Ward, Harry F 3596, 

3597, opposite 3598, 3609, 3622. 3626, 3627, 3638, opposite 3649, 3668, 
3708, 3725-3729, 3733, 3734, 3736, 3738-3740, 3742, 3746-3748, 3750, 
3751, 3753, 3755, 3756, 3762, 3764. 

Ward, Lynd 3668 

Ward, V. O 3756, 3764 

Ware, Alice Holdship 3668 

Ware, Harold 3785 

Warne, Colston E 3784 

Warner, Florence M 3668 

Warner, George A 3708 

Warner, Walter R 3708 

Washabauch, I. Edgar 3610 

Waterman. Leroy 3609, 3668 

Watkins, William T 3757, 3758 

Watson, Goodwin • 3640 

Watson. Morris 3638, 3668 

Watts, Richard, Jr 3640 

Waymouth, Mary 3668 

Weary, Gerald F 3668 

Weatherly, Arthur L 3668 

Weatherwax, Clara 3668 

Weaver, Rufus W 3644, 3681 

Webb, Mitchell , 3670 

Webb, Sidney opposite 3646, opposite 3649. 3650 

Webber, Charles C 3668, 3708, 3759 

Weber, Max 3609, 3668 

Webster, Bradford G 3668, 3708, 3"62 

Weed, Florence 3668 

Wegner, Charles E 3762 

Weidman, Charles 3680 

Weigle, Luther A 3691 

Weill, Kurt 3680 

Wcinstein, Jacob 3R57 

Weinstein. Jacob J 3668. 3708 

Weinstock, Louis 3680, 3783 



3842 index 

Page 

Weisner, Louis 3668 

Welch, Daniel M 3668, 3708 

Welch, Herbert 3708, 3756, 3764 

Welday, H. A 3708 

Weldon, Wilson 3762 

Welke, Melvin Louis 3668 

Welles, Orson 3640, 3688 

Welling, Richard 3691 

Wellman, Charles Phelps 3668 

Wells, Hildegarde B 31568 

Wendell, C. A 3668 

Wendell, Richard G 3668 

Wendt, Bruce B 3708, 3762 

Wengert, Paul 3762 

Werner, Hajen F 86fiS 

Werner, Max opposite 3646, opposite 3640, 3650 

Wesley, Charles H 3688 

Wesselhoeft, Mary F 3668 

West, Walter 3639 

Weston, Robert 3708 

Weymouth, Frank W 3668 

Wheelwright, Philip 3668 

Wherry, Senator 3675 

Whitaker, Robert 3642, 3643, 3708 

White, Eliot 3668, 3708 

White, Lloyd D 3757 

White, Luke M 3708 

White, Roland A 3668 

White, Wayne 3668, 3708, 3757, 3759 

White, William Allen 3691 

Whiting, Mrs. Royal G 3668 

Whitman, Willson 3668 

Whitney, A. F 3607, 3638, 3688 

Wice, David H 3668 

Wieman, Henry N 3609, 3641, 3644, 366S, 36S0, 3681 

Wilke, Harold 3708 

Wilkins, John P 3708 

Wilkins, Roy H 3626 

Wilkison, M. F 3668 

Willard, C. Lawson, Jr 3708 

Willets, George LeRoy 3668 

Williams, Albert Rhys opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650 

Williams, Aubrey 3787 

Williams, C. C 3609 

Williams, Claude 3680 

Williams, David Rhys 3708 

Williams, Homer L 3668 

Williams, Mrs. Homer L ... 3668 

Williams, J. Paul 3668 

Williams, John Clark 3762 

Williams, Leah B 3668 

Williams, Morgan 3762 

Williamston, H. W 3668 

Willits, Will 3708 

Willkie, Wendell 3655, 3673 

Willman, L. K 3756, 3764 

Wilson, Bvron H 3722 

Wilson, Charles C 3668, 3708 

Wilson, Elwin L 3668, 3708, 3759 

Wilson, George 3688 

Wilson, Helen W 3668 

Wilson, J. Finley 3668,3688 

Wimberley, R. S 3762 

W'ingfield, Marshall 3668 

Winkelstein, Warren 3H6S 

Winrod 3659 

Winslow, Mrs. Andrew N 3607 



index 3843 

Page 

Winslow, C. E. A 3639, 3668, 3669 

Winston, Alexander 3668 

Winter, Ella 3639, opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3650 

Wise, Effie 3668 

Wise, G. E 3668 

Wise, Herbert A 3678 

Wise, James Waterman opposite 3624, 3680 

Wise, Louis Waterman opposite 3624 

Wise, Stephen S 3626, 3627, 3688, 3691 

Wise, Mrs. Stephen S 3680 

Wishart, Charles F 3609 

Wishart, Robert 3668 

Witt, John L 3668 

Witt, Nathan 3668 

Wolbarst, Abraham L 3668 

Wolcott, Ruth F 3757, 3759 

Wolf, Benedict 3668 

Wolfe, David 3795 

Wolfe, James H 3609 

Wolfson, Abraham 3668 

Woll, Matthew 3787 

Woltman, Mr 3749 

Wood, Alonzo L 3668 

Wood, Charles E. S 3668 

Wood, L. Hollingsworth 3691 

Wood, Maxine 3668 

Wood, Robert 3652 

Woods, Prenza L. S 3757 

Woody, Thomas 3668 

Wooley, Mary E 3607,3609,3657,3668,3691 

Worley, Loyd 3763 

Worthington, Jane 3668 

Wright, Archie 3668 

Wright, Henry opposite 3624 

Wright, Herman 3668 ; 

Wright, Quincy opposite 3598, 3668> 

Wurgler, Nelson 3763 

Wust, Peter 3641 

Wyker, James D 366S, 3708 

Yader, Fred R 3668 

Yakhontoff, Victor A 3789 

Yard, James M 3756,3764 

Yarrow, Walter J 3614 

Yergan, Max 3609, 3638, 3668, 3688 

York, M. Jessie 3613 

Yost, Mary 3609 

Young, Art 3594, 3639 

Young, Bradford 3708 

Young, Jack B '_'__ 3668 

Young, Louise 3688 

Young, Manoog S 3668 

Young, Owen D "opposite 3198 

Young, William Lindsay 3668 

Youngdahl, Benjamin E 3668 

Younger, John T 3668, 3708 

Yu Tsune-chi 3627 

Zander, Arnold 3668 

Zeitlin, Morris opposite 3646 

Zilborg, Gregory 3680 

Zilborg. Mrs. Gregory 3680 

Zimbalist, Efrem 3640, 3670 

Zimmerman, Clara 3668 

Zimmerman, J. F 3609 

Zmrhal, J. J 3609 

Zorach, William opposite 3624, 3680 

Zucker, Jack S 3668 



3844 index 

Page 

Zugsmith, Leone 3609, opposite 3624 

Zworykin, Vladimir Kosma 3609 

Zysnian, Dale 3668 

Organizations 

Abolish Peonage Committee of America 3643 

Action Committee To Free Spain Now 3653, 3671 

Adrian College, Michigan 3763 

Alabama Methodist Federation for Social Action 3759 

All-Union Central Council of Trade Unions opposite 3649 

Allegheny College, Meadville, Pa 3760 

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority 3688 

Alpha Phi Alpha 3688 

Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America 3614, 3759 

American Association of University Professors 3784 

American Civil Liberties Union 3595, 3596, 3598, 3603, 

3604, opposite 3610, 3626, 3632, 3688, 3689, 3723-3725, 3755, 3761 

American Civil Liberties Union, Southern California opposite 3610 

American Committee for Democracy and Intellectual Freedom 3782 

American Committee for Spanish Freedom. 3596, 3653, 3656, 3671, 3672, 3677-3679 

American Council of Churches 3719, 3720 

American Federation of Labor 3607,3688,3787 

American Federation of Labor Women's Auxiliaries 3688 

American Federation of Teachers 3626,3784,3787 

American Friends of the Chinese People 3595, 3598, 3621-3623, 3626, 3627 

American Friends Service 3631 

American Friends for Spanish Freedom 3598 

American Fund for Public Service. {See also Garland fund.) 3690,3786 

American Institute of Laundering 3660 

American League Against War and Fascism 3590, 3595, 3598, 

opposite 3610, 3621-3624, 3626, 3627, 3638, 3688, 3689, 3733, 3736, 3782 

American League for Peace and Democracy 3595, 3598, 3622, 3624, 3628, 3782 

American Peace Crusade 3785 

American Peace Mobilization 3622,3780 

American Round Table on India opposite 3610 

American-Russian Institute opposite 3646, opposite 3649, 3794, 3795, 3797 

American Society for Russian Relief 3789 

American-Soviet Friendship Rally. (See also National Council of Ameri- 
can-Soviet Friendship. ) 3590 

American Unitarian Youth 3688 

American Youth Congress 3626, 3736, 3780 

America's Town Meeting of the Air 3590 

Arts, Sciences, and Professions Council of the Progressive Citizens of 

America 3619, 3620 

Baptist Home Mission Society 3706 

Bennett College, North Carolina 3759 

Board of Education, Nashville 3759, 3760 

Board of Evangelism, Nashville, Tenn 3760 

Board of Missions 3759, 3761 

Board of Missions and Extensions of the Methodist Church 3768, 

3769, 3774, 3777 

Boston University Conference on Preaching 3747 

Boston University School of Theology 3725, 3739, 375S, 3760, 3775 

Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen 3688 

Building Service Union, AFL 3607 

California State Federation of Women's Clubs 3712 

Canadian Broadcasting Corp opposite 3646 

Candler School of Theology, Emory University, Georgia 3762 

Central Council of Trade Unions of the USSR 3780 

Chicago Interdenominational Council of Negro Churches 3643 

Chicago University 3643 

Chinese Musical Society 3626 

Christian Social Relations for Wesleyan Service Guild 3762 

Church Extension of the Methodist Church 3591 

Church League for Industrial Democracy 3626, 3688 

Citizens Committee for Harry Bridges 3595, 3693 



index 3845 

Page 

-Citizens Victory Committee for Harry Bridges 3595, 3598, 3693 

•Civil Rights Congress 3781 

•Civilian Conservation Corps 3622 

Clark College, Atlanta, Ga 3759 

•Colgate-Rochester Divinity School 3643 

Colorado Conference, Methodist Federation for Social Action 3762 

'Colored Voters League of America 3688 

Columbia University opposite 3624, 3626, 3639, 3759 

Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons 3669 

Commercial Board of Los Angeles 3616 

Commission on World Peace of the Methodist Church 3604, opposite 3610 

Committee for a Democrat Far Eastern Policy 3786 

Committee for Peaceful Alternatives 3785, 3786 

■Committee on Friendly Relations Among Foreign Students, New York City_ 3762 
Committee on Militarism in Education. 3594, 3598, opposite 3610, 3686, 3688-8692 

Committee to Aid the Intellectuals in China 3652 

Committee to Defend America by Keeping out of War 3782, 3783 

Commonwealth College 3783 

Communist International 3629, 3780, 3783 

Community House, Detroit, Mich 3706 

Conference on Pan American Democracy 3783 

Conference on Peaceful Alternatives to the Atlantic Pact 3785 

Congress of American-Soviet Friendship 3595, 3598 

-Congress of American Women 3645, 3781 

Congress of Industrial Organizations 3607, 3688, 3703, 3761, 3784-3786 

Congress of Women's Auxiliaries 3688 

Consumer's Union 3783 

Coordinating Committee to Lift the Embargo 3783 

Cooperative League of U. S. A 3760 

Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa 3761 

Cornell University 3705, 3752 

-Council Against Intolerance in America 3688 

Council for Social Action of the Congregational Christian Churches, 

New York 3705 

Council for Social Reconstruction, Evangelical and Reformed Church 3708 

Council of Bishops 3592 

Council of Christian Laymen 3603, 3719 

Council of Women for Home Missions 3591 

Crozer Theological Seminary 3643 

Cultural and Scientific Conference for World Peace 3781 

Dartmouth College 3752 

Delta Sigma Theta 3688 

De Pauw University 3594, 3610, 3692, 3793 

Dial Press opposite 3649 

Drew Theological Seminary 3591 

Duke University School of Theology 3760 

East Oklahoma Conference 3763 

East Tennessee Educational Association opposite 3610 

Emory University, Candler School of Theology 3762 

Epworth League 3743, 3744 

.Farmers Educational and Cooperative Union 3688 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 3592, 

3597, 3601, 3652, 3730, 3737, 3750, opposite 3766 

Federal Communications Commission 3660 

Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America 3591, 

opposite 3598, opposite 3610, 3631, 3648, opposite 3649, 3768-3770, 
3774, 37777-3779, 3797-3799. 

Federated Farm-Labor Party opposite 3610 

Federated Press 3690 

Fellowship of Humanity 3706 

Fellowship of Reconciliation 3594, opposite 3610, 3689 

Ferrer Modern School (socialist) 3614 

Food, Tobacco, and Agricultural Workers 3784 

Foreign Missions Conference 3761 

Foreign Policy Association 3768-3771, 3774, 3778, 3779, 3789 

Fraternal Council of Negro Churches 3643, 3688 



3846 index 

Page 

Friends of Democracy opposite 3610 

Friends of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade 3784 

Friends of Soviet Russia 3604, 3614 

Friends of the Soviet Union 3604, 3645, 3780, 3784 

Gammon Theological Seminary, Atlanta 3761 

Garland Fund. (See also American Fund for Public Service. )__ 3689, 3690, 3692 

Garrett Biblical Institute 3759, 3760, 3762 

General Board of Education, Nashville, Tenn 3760 

General Board of Evangelism, Baldwin City, Kans 3760 

General Conference of the Methodist Church 3590 

Georgetown University 3787 

Georgia Institute of Technology 3759 

German American Bund 3660 

Goodwill Industries, St. Paul, Minn 3762 

Graduate School of Applied Religion, Cincinnati, O 3706 

Graduate School of Religion, University of Southern California, Los 

Angeles 3762 

Graduate School of Theology, Oberlin College, Ohio " 3760 

Harry Bridges Defense Committee 3693 

Harry Bridges Defense Committee of San Francisco 3595 

Harry Bridges Victory Committee of San Francisco 3595, 3693 

Harvard Medical School opposite 3624, 3639, 3669 

Harvard University 3598, opposite 3824, 3631, 3703 

High-School Teacher's Association, Los Angeles 3613, 3615 

Home Missions Council 3760 

Home Missions Council, Bureau of Architecture 3705 

Illinois Wesleyan University 3761 

Improved Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks of the World 3688 

Independent Citizens Committee of the Arts, Sciences, and Professions...— 3619, 

3688 

Indiana Farm Bureau Cooperative Association , 3761 

Indiana State Reformatory 3590, 3594, opposite 3598, 3793 

Industrial Workers of the World— opposite 3610, 3614-3618, 3709-3712, 3722, 3723 

Institute of Pacific Relations 3326, opposite 3649 

Interdenominational Bureau of Architecture, New York City . 3760 

Inter-Faith Division of the American Committee for Spanish Free- 
dom opposite 3598, 3671 

International Fellowship of Reconciliation 3594 

International Labor Defense 3652, 3688, 3690, 3780, 37S1 

International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, CIO 3703 

International News Service 3787 

International Union of Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers of America___^_ 37S6 

International University 3769 

International Workers Order 3590, 3785 

Interstate Commerce Commission 3746- 

Jefferson School of Social Science opposite 3649 

Johns Hopkins Medical School 3639,3669 

Joint Anti-Fascist Refugee Committee 3757 

Ku Klux Klan 3684 

Labor Emergency Conference 3614 

League for the Organization of Progress 3594, opposite 3610, 3689 

League of Women Shoppers 3688 

Lisle Fellowship, New York City 3760 

Los Angeles Board of Education 3612 

Los Angeles High School Teachers Association 3723 

Louisiana Conference, Methodist Federation for Social Action 3761 

Massachusetts Council of American-Soviet Friendship 3595, 3598, 3599, 3607 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 3600,3601 

Massachusetts State CIO 3607 

Mayo Clinic 3639, 3669 

Medical Bureau and North American Committee to Aid Spanish Democ- 
racy 3595, 3598, opposite 3610, 3652, 3656, 3669, 3670, 3784, 3785 

Methodist Board of Foreign Missions 3626 

Methodist Church, Board of Pensions 3705- 

Methodist Federation for Social Action 3598, 

3727, 3728, 3733-3736, 3738, 3739, 3741, 3744-3746, 3749-3752, 3758.. 
3759, 3761-3764, 3779. 



inde:$ 3847 

Page 

Methodist Federation for Social Service 3596, 

3597, 370S, 3742, 3749, 3754, 3756, 3757, 3764 

Mid-Century Conference for Peace 3786 

Ministerial Union 3709 

Missionary Education Movement 3591 

Motion Picture Association of America opposite 3624, 3625 

Mount Union College, Alliance, Ohio 37G0, 3762 

Mount Sinai Hospital 3639,3669 

Municipal Civil Service Commission 3626 

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People 3688, 3760 

National Association of Colored Graduate Nurses 3688 

National Bar Association 3688 

National Brotherhood of Railway Porters 3626 

National Citizens Political Action Committee 3619 

National Committee of Protestant Associates 3643 

National Committee To Abolish the Poll Tax 3677, 3686, 3687 

National Conference Methodist Youth 3759 

National Conference of Social Work 3688 

National Council of American- Soviet Friendship 3595 r 

3598, 3599, 3001, 3604, 3607, 3608, 3609, opposite 3610, opposite 

3646, 3770-3773, 3781, 378S, 3789. 

National Council of Negro Women 3688, 3766 

National Council of the Arts, Sciences, and Professions 3781 

National Council of the Churches of Christ in America 3716, 3717, 3720 

National Emergency Conference for Democratic Rights 3785 

National Farm Labor Union 3688 

National Federation for Constitutional Liberties 3595, 

3598, 3650-3652, 3654, 3657, 3660, 3688, 3781, 3785 

National Federation of Settlements 3688 

National Intercollegiate Christian Council 3688 

National Lawyers Guild 3688 

National Maritime Union 3627 

National Negro Business League 368S 

National Negro Congress 3688, 3748, 3785 

National Recovery Administration 3622 

National Religion and Labor Foundation 3594, opposite 3610, 3759 

National Urban League 3688 

National Women's Trade Union League 3688 

New York Conference, Methodist Federation for Social Action 3762 

New York Federation of Churches 3626 

New York Polyclinic Medical School 3639, 3669 

New York State Council of Churches 3758 

New York University opposite 3624, 3787 

New York University Medical School 3639, 3669 

Northesst Ohio Conference 3760 

Northfield Seminary, East Northfield. Mass 3706 

Northwestern University Medical School 3639, 3669 

Oherlin College 3760, 3781 

Office of War Information 3704 

Ohio Wesleyan University 3591, 3761 

Oxford University opposite 3598 

Pacific School of Religion 3591, 3759 

Peoples Educational League opposite 3610 

Peoples' Institute of Applied Religion 3760 

Portland District, Methodist Federation for Social Action 3761 

Princeton University opposite 3598 

Principal's Club. Los Angeles 3615 

Progressive Book Shop, Boston, Mass 3645 

Progressive Citizens of America 3597, 3619, 3620, opposite 3624, 3625 

Railway Labor Executive Association 3688 

Religian and Labor Center of Cleveland 3707 

Religious Book Club 3637 

Republican Study Club 3615 

Rockefeller Foundation 3752 

Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research 3639 



3848 index 

Page 

Rockefeller Institute School 3669 

Russian Independent Corp 3604 

Russian reconstruction farms 3690, 3785 

Samuel Houston College, Austin, Tex 3759 

Sarah Lawrence College opposite 3649 

Seattle Pacific College 3761 

Second Congress Against War and Fascism 3748 

Silver Legion 3660 

Socialist Party 3614 

Society of the Catholic Commonwealth (Anglican) 3708 

Sons of the American Revolution 3722 

South Georgia Conference, Methodist Federation for Social Action 3762 

Southern Baptist Convention 3794, 3798 

Southern Conference Educational Fund, New Orleans, La 3760 

Southern Conference for Human Welfare 3688 

Southern Methodist University 3591 

Southern Negro Youth Congress 3688, 37o3 

Southwest Texas Conference of Methodist Church 3707 

Stamford University Medical School 3639, 3669 

State, County, and Municipal Workers of America 3786 

Stockholm Peace Appeal 3698 

Student Christian Movement 3761 

Syracuse University opposite 3649, 3761 

Teacher-Citizen Better Schools Committee, Los Angeles 3613, 3615 

Teachers' College, Columbia University 3626,3759 

Teamsters Union 3607 

Tennessee State Teachers' Association 3603 

Tennessee Valley Authority 3603 

Texas Conference, Methodist Federation for Social Action 3762 

Theater Guild opposite 3649 

Theological Institute 3596 

Townsend Plan 3688 

Trade Union Committee of the Massachusetts Council 3607 

Troy Conference Methodist Federation for Social Action 3763 

Union Theological Seminary 3622, 3626, 3627, 3631, 3706, 

3707, 3726, 3727, 3748, 3751, 3760-3762, opposite 3766 

United Cannery, Agricultural, Packing and Allied Workers 3784 

United Christian Council for Democracy 3688 

United Council of Church Women National Board 3688 

United Federal Workers of America 3786 

United Mine Workers 3761 

United Public Workers of America 3786 

United States Congress Against War and Fascism 3622, 3688 

University of California, at Berkeley 3761 

University of California Medical School 3639, 3669 

University of Chicago 3760 

University of Chicago Medical School 3669 

University of Colorado 3785 

University of Georgia 3762 

University of Illinois Medical School 3639, 3669 

University of Michigan 3759 

University of Michigan Medical School 3639, 3669 

University of Minnesota 3760 

University of Ohio 3763 

University of Oklahoma, Norman, Okla 3760,3762 

University of Southern California, Graduate School of Religion, Los 

Angeles 3762 

Vanguard Press 3786 

Veterans of the Lincoln Brigade 3653 

Washington University, St. Louis, Mo 3762 

Washington University Medical School 3639, 3669 

Wesley Foundation, Ohio University 3763 

Wesley Foundation, University of California, Berkeley 3761 

Wesley Foundation, University of Georgia 3762 

Wesley Foundation, University of Oklahoma, Norman 3762 

Wesleyan College, Macon, Ga 3761 



index 3849 

Page 

West Oklahoma Methodist Federation for Social Action 3761 

Western Reserve Medical School 3639, 3669 

Williams College 3643 

Wisconsin State Teachers College 3761 

Woman's City Club, Los Angeles 3614, 3618 

Women's Christain Service Division of the Methodist Church 3688 

Women's Division of Christian Service 3761, 3762 

Women's Division of Christian Service of the Board of Missions 3591 

Workers' Party 3614 

World Council of Churches 3591, opposite 3598, 3698, 3799 

World Peace Commission, Chicago, 111 3762 

Yale Divinity School 3705, 3761 

Yale Law School opposite 3624 

Yale Medical School 3639, 3669 

Yale University 3591, 3598, 3763, 3780, 3783, 3784, 3787, 3788 

Young Communist League 3735, 3736, 3785 

Young Men's Christian Association 3614, 3618, 3626, 3627, 3759 

Young Women's Christian Association 3626, 3688 

Publications 

Abingdon-Cokesbury Press 3591 

Amerasia 3626 

Birmingham (Ala.) Age-Herald 3660 

Boston Herald 3699 

Bureau County Republican 3596, opposite 3598, 3728, 3730-3732 

Catholic Digest 3631 

Central Christian Advocate 3758 

Champion 3785 

China Today 3622 

Christian Advocate 3610, 3611 

Christian Herald 3771 

Christian Register 3790 

Christian World Faith 3626 

Churchman 3597, opposite 3598 

Classmate 3590 

Cleveland Plain-Dealer 3660 

Daily Peoples World 3788 

Daily Worker 3590, 3595, 3597, 3598, 3601, opposite 3610, 

3620-3623, 3626, opposite 3624, 3690, 3780, 3782, 3783, 3785-3787 

Economic Justice 3594 

Emancipator, San Antonio 3706 

Epworth Herald 3743, 3744, 3766 

Equal Justice 3780' 

Far East Spotlight 3786 

Fight 3638, 3733, 3784 

Indianapolis Star 3793 

Knoxville Journal 3603, opposite 3610, 3611, 3689 

Knoxville News-Sentinel opposite 3610 

Knoxville Sentinel 3611 

Liberty 3704 

Look 3590 

Los Angeles Daily News 3795 

Los Angeles Times 3604, 3605, 3612-3615, 3618, 3710, 3712, 3722, 3723 

Motive Magazine, Nashville 3761 

Nation 3612, 3613 

National Baptist 3631 

New Masses 3594, 3598, 3649, 3690 

New Republic 3612, 3613, 3783 

New Times 3629 

New York Times 3597, 3622, 3627, 37S6 

New York World-Telegram 3660 

Parade 3590, 3751, 3754, opposite 3763 

Pastor Magazine 3758 

Peoples Lobby Bulletin 3782 

Presbyterian Tribune, Utica, N. Y 3705 



3850 INDEX 

Page 

Protestant opposite 3610, 3G29, 3630, 3634-3638, 3642-3644, 3673 

Protestant Digest 3595, 3598, opposite 3610, 3629-3632, 3634-3638, 

3641, 3643, 3650, 3655, 3681, 3682, 3781 

Reader's Digest 3702, 3776, 3779 

Readers* Scope 3590, opposite 3598 

St. Louis Post-Dispatch 3781 

San Francisco Chronicle 3620, 3621, 3625 

Saturday Evening Post 3787 

Saturday Night opposite 3646 

Social Justice 3660 

Social Questions Bulletin 3759 

SOVFOTO opposite 3646, opposite 3649 

Soviet Russia Today 3645-3647, opposite 3649, 3781, 3784, 3785, 3789 

Toledo Blade 3771, 3777 

Washington Dailv News 3595 

Washington Post 3597, opposite 3598, 3620, 3624, 3695, 3729 

Washington Star 3594, 3597, opposite 3598, 3793, 3794 

Witness 3634 

Zion's Herald 3760 

o 



iliiii?" 

3 9999 05445 31»»