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Volume ;Cl3Vl, Number 1 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE 




SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1952 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



College Releases Student Union Plans; 
Garfield Club Announces Dissolution 



College Operates 
Cltth Dining Room 
For N on- Affiliates 

Kahn Criticizes Trustees 

For Neglect of Issue; 

Ex-Club Men Unite 



by Charles Fisher '54 

Saturday, Feb. 2— The Garfield 
Club went out of existence as a 
social unit at midnight, January 
31. The college took over the for- 
mer Club facilities in Currier Hall 
today as a dining hall for non- 
affiliates. 

The move grew out of the Club's 
December resolution to disband 
unless positive steps for total 
rushing wei'e instituted by the be- 
ginning of Spring Term. 

Total Rushing League 

Following the Club's dissolu- 
tion several non-afflUates formed 
plans for an organization to carry 
on action for total rushing and to 
Include non-afniiatcs, students in 
fraternities, faculty, and alumni 
Interested in reform of the col- 
lege social system. 

At the same time, former Club 
members were given the oppor- 
tunity to sign a pledge agreeing to 
turn down fraternity bids until 
totul i"ui>l*iiiie uii campus 'utcuiiies 
a fact. More than 145 non-affili- 
ates have signed the agreement. 
Club Dissolution 

In a Currier Hall meeting last 
night, Harold Kahn, '52, president 
of the former Garfield Club, offi- 
cially dissolved the non-fratem- 
Ity organization by a simple de- 
claration to that effect in his cap- 
acity as president. Following the 
declaration, all physical property 
of the Club immediately reverted 
to the college, owners of Currier 
Hall. Beginning with breakfast to- 
day, the college undertook the 
serving of meals In Currier Hall, 
retaining the Club's kitchen staff 
and waiters. 

Commenting on the Club move, 
Kahn termed the idea of the Club 
as a strong. Independent social 
unit "a social myth" and critic- 
See Page 4, Col. 3 



Matthews Urges 
Ideas in Science 



Ideas, Experimentation 
Needed for Progress 



Thursday. January 31 — Pro- 
fessor Samuel A. Matthews of 
the Biology Department em- 
phasized in a lecture entitled 
"Gadgets and Ideas in Science" 
the importance of ideas and ex- 
perimentation over the develop- 
ment of gadgets. Matthews, chair- 
man pro tempore of the faculty, 
delivered his lecture In the 
Thompson Biology Laboratory. 

Too many scientists spend their 
time playing with gadgets instead 
of Investigating and proving 
ideas, according to Matthews. 
These "push - button scientists" 
fall to realize that basic scientific 
principles spring from ideas and 
not from doodads. Although these 
devices are useful and necessary 
tools, they must not be given pri- 
mary importance, but must be 
relegated to their proper position. 

After developing his idea by 
pointing out the achievements of 
men who worked through experl^ 
mentation, Matthews closed by 
saying that gadgets have provided 
new methods of precision and are 
of tremendous value. Ideas, how- 
ever, should be proven by experi- 
ment with the aid of gadgets for 
true scientific advance. 



Ex-Club Men on Spring Street 




President lOmeritu.s Hul Kann 'S2 reads the Adviser from the 
steps uf Mike's College Restaurant, 

Non-Affiliates Assemble on Spring 
Street for Post-Dissolution Lunch 



Friday, Feb. 1— In a mass ilemonstration, the members of the 
cx-Gariield (Mub unanimously t-liose the two Spring Street eating 
emporiums, Mike's and the Gym Lunch, for their first meals as 
non-affihates today. 

Tlie crowd reached its |)eak sliortly after twelve o'clock. 
Amid flashing cameras and loud applause, Hal Kahn, '52, on the 
steps of Mike's, read the Adviser to the assembled throng. 

Positive Step ^ '- 

Kahn summed up the situation 
in these words: "As of this mom- 



ent we haven't been told person- 
ally by the college about the food 
situation, and we've come to the 
only two places left for us. We'll 
have to eat here until we get fur- 
ther word from the administra- 
tion. If they tell us their plans 
about feeding us, we'll definitely 
cooperate in every way." 

Matt Markotlc, '52, approving 
the student downtown gathering, 
said, "I see this as a positive step 
showing the unity of the non- 
sifllUates -Nmii-is-thcJ^i m f ^''- -fur- 
ther definite action. Continuation 
under this system is impossible." 
Situation Unsatisfactory 

Sam Humes, '52 felt that: " So 
tar, the college has given no in- 
dication as to eating facilities. The 
situation is very unsatisfactory, 
nor do I look to the prospect of 
communal eating. I am disap- 
pointed in the college's inadequate 
action." 

Ted Cochinos and Jack Rose 
were heard to say: "We'd like to 
see this every day, and we'll give 
them what they're looking for. 
We just wish they wouldn't come 
down in a body. We will be open 
breakfast, lunch, and supper. We 
re prepared so there'll be no 
waiting." 



Rev, Cole Chosen 
As New Chaplain 

Smith College Minister 
To Begin Next Term 

The Trustees recently armounc- 
ed that the Rev. Mr. William G. 
Cole will replace Acting Chaplain 
Claude Roebuck as Williams Col- 
lege Chaplain. Mr. Cole is pres- 
ently Chaplain and Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Religion at Smith Col- 
lege and will begin his work here 
next fall. 

Besides his work at Smith, Mr, 
Cole has done chaplain's work at 
Western Reserve and Columbia 
University. He is married, and has 
three sons aged nine, five, and 
two. His extra-curricular activi- 
ties include golf, singing, and 
playing several roles in Smith 
theatrical productions. 

Mr. Cole, a graduate of Colum- 
bia University and Union Semi- 
nary, plans to receive his PhX). 
in Religion this June. As the 
topic of his thesis for completion 
of his studies, he has chosen, 
"The Interpretation of Sex in 
Theology and Psychoanalysis". 



Gargoyle, i4fnfcerst Honor Society 
Discuss Williams' Social Difficulties 



Callaghan Lists Problems 

Of Deferred Rushing; 

Foehl Outlines Plans 

Amherst, Feb. 4— Amherst Pres- 
ident Charles Cole and Williams 
Treasurer Charles A. Foehl, Jr., 
were the principal speakers at the 
annual Gargoyle-Scarab dinner to- 
night at the Lord Jeff Inn, in the 
absence of Williams President 
James P. Baxter. III. who was 
unable to attend. 

Discussion at the meeting cen- 
tered on recent developments in 
the fraternity situation at Wil- 
liams. Mr. Foehl reviewed the 
problem here and outlined the 
plan of the trustees for deferred 
rushing, freshman dining, and a 
Student Union building, while 
President Cole explained the Am- 



herst system of deferred rushing. 
Callaghan Speaks 

William D. Callaghan '52, presi- 
dent of Gargoyle, spoke on the 
pros and cons of deferred rushing. 
Howard Burnett, president of 
Scarab, acted as toastmaster and 
opened the meeting to informal 
discussion at the conclusion of the 
talks. 

Scarab is the senior honorary 
society at Amherst, and its re- 
quirements for membership and 
services to the college closely 
parallel those of the Gargoyle So- 
ciety at Williams. The custom of 
annual meetings between these 
two groups was established in or- 
der to provide an opportunity for 
an interchange of ideas on current 
problems. The place of meeting 
alternates each year between Wil- 
liams and Amherst. 



WCA to Sponsor 
Second Embassy 

'Religion's Answer 
Final Panel Topic 



This year's second Embassy, 
.•sponsored by the Williams Chris- 
tian Association, will be held 
Monday and Tuesday evenings, 
February 11-12. Besides the in- 
formal discussion groups at all 
fraternities and Currier Hall on 
these two evenings, a panel dis- 
cussion will be held at the Faculty 
Club at 4:30 p. m. Tuesday. 

The eight clergymen participat- 
ing in this term's Embassy in- 
clude the Rev. George W. Web- 
ber, dean of students at Union 
Theological Seminary in New 
York City: the Rev. Father George 
B. Ford of Corpus Christi Church 
in New York: the Rev. A. E. D. 
Fredericks, former Police Commis- 
sioner of Madras. India, and re- 
cently of Cambridge University; 
and the Rev. William Sites, Pro- 
testant chaplain at the Veterans' 
Hospital in Northampton. 
"Religion's Answer" 

Rabbi Perry E. Nussbaum of 
Pittsfield, the Rev. Richard Nie- 
buhr Jr. of Cornwall, Corm., the 
'"-■v. WilUcm Han-.iltor., Chapliiir. 
of Hamilton College, and the Rev. 
Robert Appleyard of Watertown, 
Conn., are the other visiting min- 
isters. Doctors Nussbaum, Ford 
and Hamilton will lead the Faculty 
Club panel on "Religion's Answer". 

Dr. Webber will be at the Place- 
ment Bureau on Monday and 
Tuesday to interview students in- 
terested in the ministry. Appoint- 
ments can be made in advance. 

Members of the Embassy will be 
at the Bete, Chi Psi, DKE, Delta 
Phi. DU. Phi Gam. Sig Phi and 
Zele houses on Monday night. The 
other fraternities and Currier Hall 
will be covered the following eve- 
ning. 



Garfield Members 
Resign UC Posts 

Council Selects Henry 
To Fill Vacated Post 



PLANS mCLVDE DINING 
HALLS, LOUNGES, SNACK 
BAR, WAREHOUSE SPACE 

by Gene Cowcll '54 
Saturday, Feb. 9- The Buildings anil Ground Gommittee of the 
Hoard of Tiustees announced today that architects have begun 
plans for the Student Union Ijuildinn ])roposed by the Trustees 
on January 22, 1952. Williams Treasurer Charles A. Foehl stated 
that the college is "rushing all jjlanning, in the hope that groimd 
may be broken this summer and building finished by the fall 
of 1953". 

Architects are considering the area lying between the Fresh- 
man Quad and the President's house us a possible location. Tlie 
Trustees decided the Student Union and freshman eating facili- 
ties should be incorporated in the same building. Several major 
criteria for construction of tlie Student Union include a dining hall 
large enough to aeeomniodate 



Frosh Trio Boosts 
Ike for President 

Group Hopes to Influence 
Local Primary Voters 



Wednesday, Feb. 6 — UC Presl- 
di'nt Richard Duffleld '52 an- 
nounced the resignations of the 
five Garfield Club representatives 
from the Undergraduate Council 
tonight. James Henry '52 was 
unanimously elected treasurer of 
the Council to fill the vacancy 
created by Kahn's resignation. 

Scholastic Committee Chairman 
Peter Mezey '52 and Rules Com- 
mittee Chairman Sonny Madden 
'.")2 agreed to file reports of their 
respective committees on March 3 
when all UC groups make their 
reports of the year's activity. Offl- 
c tally, however, they will not be 
members of the UC. Paul Fukul 
'b3 and Donald Marshall '53 are 
t!ie other Club representatives who 
ri\slgned from the student govern- 
ing body. 

To Study Quotas 

The Rushing Committee, head- 
ed by Elliot Curtis '52, will Inves- 
tigate the problem of maintaining 
the 80-20 ratio and the so-called 
junior-senior rule for restricting 
fraternity membership. The UC 
committee will make its report 
Monday. 

In an attempt to study fines 
restrictions on Hell Week, dis- 
cipline head Bob White '52 was 
asked to make recommendations 
to the Council Monday for en- 
forcing the two day hazing period. 



Tuesday, Feb. 6— The newly 
formed Eisenhower-for-President 
Club held an organizational meet- 
ing under the direction of Dick 
Bcatty '55, Duane Sargisson '55, 
and Garret Schenck '55 tonight. 
AppioAiiiirtLely lui L> SLuueiits and 
townspeople were present at the 
gathering in the Theta Delta Chi 
house. 

Beatty opened the meeting by 
telling of the goals of the group. 
The Ike enthusiasts will try to 
influence Independent and Repub- 
licin electors of the Wllliamstown 
and North Adams areas to choose 
delegates pledged to General 
Eisenhower for the Massachusetts 
primary. The group has received 
sanction from tlie state and na- 
■jonal. 

Future Plans 

Tentative plans for the future 
were outlined by Schenck, who 
explained that the committee 
plans to send two letters to the 
local voters. The first, which wiU 
present a strong appeal to vote 
for Ike. will be sent out in two 
weeks, and the other, which will 
explain the complicated ballot, 
will be mailed shortly before the 
primary election. 



Wesleyan DV Chapter 
May Face Suspension 

Defies National's Ruling, 
Initiates Negro Student 



a tiestniian class of 300 with 
separate dining facilities for up- 
perclassmen, faculty, alumni, par- 
ents and guests and a large cen- 
tral kitchen to supply both dining 
liall.s with the best food at the 
lowest possible cost." 

Recreation Areas Planned 
The plans call for freshman so- 
cial facilities, including a game 
room, one large lounge which 
could accommodate lecture and 
film audiences, and a smaller 
lounge. Lounge space will be pro- 
vided for Student Union activities, 
and w^ill be adaptable, in some 
cases by subdivision, to such ac- 
tivities us lectures meetings, 
dances, and films. 

A snack bar open to all students, 
including freshmen, will be con- 
structed in the building, and of- 
fices are planned which will house 
as many student activities and 
organizations as design and con- 
struction permit. 

Music A Possibility 
Together with plans for Stud- 
ent Union game facilities, in- 
cluding ping-pong and billiards, 
one college official said that piped- 
in phonograph concerts may be 
installed in the new buildings. If 
social units so desire, warehouse 
and refrigeration facilities open to 
all campus social groups may be 
housed in the Union. 

Representatives of the Boston 
architectural firm of Perry, Shaw 
and Hepburn, Kehoe and Dean 
have been engaged to draft build- 
ing plans. Requests for government 
allocation of restricted materials, 
such as steel, will be made at the 
proper time. 

The Trustees making the report, 
are Mr. Henry Flynt, Sr., of 
Greenwich, Conn., chairman of 
the trustees' committee on build- 
ings and grounds, Mr. Aurthur 
Santry of Boston. Mr. G. Dykeman 
Sterling of Maplewood. N. J. and 
Mr. Ferdinand K. Thum of Wy- 
omissing, Pa. 



Middletown, Conn., Jan. 19 — 
Despite the house's possible sus- 
pension from the national frater- 
nity a Negro. Edgar F. Beckham of 
Hartford, was one of the seven 
pledges taken into full member- 
ship at the Wesleyan chapter of 
Delta Upsilon. 

Joseph M. Proud, president of 
DU at Wesleyan and a resident 
of Wllliamstown, announced that 
the house was going on its own 
policy "to initiate on the basis of 
character and personality alone." 
Breaks National Rule 

A rule of the national organiza- 
tion provides that an alumni mem- 
ber may bar a prospective candi- 
date. In ignoring this rule by ac- 
cepting the student over a dis- 
senting alumni vote, the chapter 
faces possible suspension from the 
national fraternity. 

Beckham holds two of the uni- 
versity's major scholarships and 
was a high school honor student. 
He was elected "boy governor" of 
Connecticut at the American Le- 
gion Boys' State in 1950 and 
served as Mayor pro tern of Hart- 
ford's junior City Council. 



Mitchell, Widing Gain 
Regular Commissions 

Pair First in ROTC Unit 
To Receive Positions 



Given regular commissions In 
the United States Air Force last 
week. James K Mitchell, Jr. '52 
and J. William Widing. Jr. '52 
became the first Williams Air 
ROTC applicants to be so hon- 
ored. 

Both Widing and Mitchell ap- 
peared before a selection board 
last fall and underwent a series 
of rigorous physical and mental 
exams. Their commissions will be 
awarded upon graduation In June. 

Widing. cadet commander of 
the ROTC unit, is a member of 
Gargoyle, Phi Beta Kappa, and a 
former Managing Editor of th« 
Record. Mitchell, a physics major. 
is a cadet captain in the ROTC, 
Regular commissions are awarded 
on the basis of exceptional aca- 
demic and character records. 



I 



\ 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY. I'KIJRUARV 9, 1952 



North AJunii, Muisachubeits W.lhamstown, Massachusetts 

uueceJ us seconu-ciu.s n.^ue, isovc.nuei ^., IV-<4, at Itie ,.ost ott,ce at 



Auunii, MoasiiCMusetis. Huulistieu 

;ileyB yeui. iuusLriplion price $3.00 
pel >eut. i\ei.oia wii.i-c, JBsup nun. v«."iuim=.ow 
RlCORD Ottice - t'lione U 



wuiiiu unU nuruei, inc., INuim 
^/vcuiiesuuy anu iuluiuuy during Ine cui 

uil, Vv.llluiuatown, li-.tvliune / 

uuilor - Phone 981 -JK 



Letters to the Editor 



I 

I 



New Issues 



tOilOK.AL BOARU 

. , .li .ca Editor 

Jonn H. Allan 53 

k'","" r '^oiTe'; li Managing Editors 

K,..i-iu C. t-oi.er ^^ -■- News Editor 

V«uoouiiuye A. uuench 3J 

l,,on,.s A. ueisne ;3D ^j.,^^^ 

Kqv Kolngian, Jr. 53 ._ P ^^ 

r.euer.^K. A. lerry, Jr. 53 rcu.u 

Assistant cuitors; Richard T. Antcun '53, Thomas H. S. Brucl<er 53, 
jumes J. Lasnmore '53 

Stoft Hho.ojrapiiers; R. Wyman Sanders '54, Charles Eichel 54 

bturr curiuun.st: 1"°'"°^ ""gh" '53 

Associate Lonors; 1954 - Q. Abbot, W. R. Aiken, J. brownell, t- Cowe», 
N L.o,.ovun, U. uav.s, C. cliiot, C. Hsher, C. huster, H fo dman, 
k: oo.UMein, A. home, J. Mem, J. Marr, C. OlMette, W. Warden, 
Vv. vyeuuucl< 
tditonal iiutr; 1954 - W. Redman; 1955 - R. Carey, C. Headley, 
. nepi^enstaii, f. Munn, J. Nearney, D. ,.,e,*,ei, H. Max, W McLaugh- 
lin, IS. /vioore, L. INicnois, I. Uviatt, IN. i%eevcs, J. kudd, J. bouse, 
h.'i.iCiuon, K. bniitn, c. von aen bteinen, K. vviiicux. 

BUSINESS BOARD 
,„.„ K|„,_ i.'cj Business Manager 

^e^^^i;l:Ke''.3 : ::::::::::::::::::::::.:: Assistant Business Monoger 

kouer, u. Louiier 33 Assistont Business Manager 

jo.in r. jo.,ns,on, II '54 Advertising Manager 

Hurold b. Hrutr, Jr. '54 Assistant Advertising Manager 

(.un.s V. hlus 34 Circulation Manager 

kicnurd C. Scnaub '54 Treasurer 

Business itott; 1954 - J. Gushee; 1955 - H. Lindsay, H. Moser, G. Olm- 
sieo, J. Innes, k. Cnoavnck, IN. l-aulkner, H. Smith 



Volume XLVl February 9, 1952 Number 1 

EDITORIAL 

DISSOLUIION 

,u iiiidiiighl, Jaiiua.y bi, iy.3i, uif L,.trriekl Club wont oi^t 
of e.MSU'iicc in LiccoruiuiCf witii ii.s risuiuiion ot UccemlKT a. 
iNow, [Here e.xi.sis on uie Wiiiunns ciunpns a siUuition wliero one 
one ()r e\ery li\e nndergraaiu.tes lia\e no wliere to go .soeially. 
llie caiiipils IS elearly uiviuett inio iwo groups, traiernity men 
aiKl .loii-alliliates. Liglity per cent ol tlie students lead normal 
soeuil lives wliile a twenty per eent niinonty are lett unprovided 
lor. m reality uiieiiual soeuU opportimuy lias existed on the 
vmiiams eampn.s lor many years, i Ue l^lubs aetion has only 
remuveil tue veil ol liyiJoerisy tiiat e.\isted as long as ever) 
uiioer^raduaie eould be promised inemDershii) in one ot the 
si.\ieeii e(|ual eampus soeial uinis. ny dissolving, the Club has 
simpiy caned a spade a spade. Aow, no one will eome to \Vil- 
Uauia suuering under the illusion that he will be insured oi 
equal social oppordiimy. Ihe Clubs dissolution provides the 
ouis.der witn a more aeeuraie piciure ol tiie true social situation 
at Williams, ine Ulub recognized that a social unit loniided 
on txic laise supposuion tnat unoid, disai)])oiiUed men wJio want 
to be suMiewiieie else can never be innlicu into a strong organiza- 
tion. It IS better to nave no noii-ahiiiate social hieiliiies tiian to 
atttmiK to institute a 'strong organized society to which 90% 
01 us members do not want to belong. 

THE NEW UNION 

The Buildings and Grountls Commitiee ot the Board ol 
Trustees released some preliminary proposals and ideas con- 
cerning the new Student union hmiui.ig today. This addition to 
tue campus adds nothing incompatible to tiie drive lor complete 
memoersaip, but, on the other naiid, it does not get to the core 
ot tue social problem at Williams, l he new building will not 
eliminate tlie unbid, disappoimed man. as long as this man exists, 
tiiere will be agitation lor e(|nal opportunity for social and 
cultural development. We view the Union as a treat that will 
provide a more pleasant Williams College and which will help 
create a more even-Keeled weekend lite lor undergraduates. The 
social system problem has remained m the high clouds of 
discussion tor tiie past six years. Ihe Union represents a concrete 
proijosal vvliieli will no doubt create new torces and ])ressures 
mat may lead to problems that will lorce the desired goal of 
a single Williams. 

We commend the administration hir its decision to build 
a Union that will provide ample and pleasant facilities. The 
building must be attractive enough to niuKe stiitlents use it from 
tlie Start. A half-way job will not draw the students and would 
not be worth the expense. The Union must offer social and 
recreational facilities as good as any ijrovided by the fraternities 
in order to get men from dilferent houses to get together in 
the new building. The proposed plans indicate that this is the 
type of structure that the atlmlmstratioii is contemplating. The 
siiacK bar lor morning colfee or a sandwich after the Hicks should 
be the biggest student drawing card. If it is at all possible, 
student postal bo.xes should be placed in the Union. This add- 
ition would insure the use of the building by at least .SOU students 
per day. Altogether, the game rooms, activity offices, lounges, 
weekend informal dances and other Uiiitm functions should 
attract at least 750 men dail)'. 

The site between the Presidents home and the Freshman 
QuadraiH'le is the best po.ssible choice nnd''r tin; circumstanees. 
Actually the Park Street lot is inneh big.ger than it appears and 
will allow for expansion of the plant slionltl increased food 
expenses force the institution of eommnnal dining. The Union 
will be piaclieally in the center of the campus within a con- 
venient three minute walk from the llbrarv or Hopkins Hall. 

We commend the administration on its decision to spend the 
necessarily large aiiiount to provide a building that will be 
pleasant enough to attract a large number of Williams men. In 
the long run, an expensive building that is used extensively will 
gain more than an unused imattractive campus center. 



Letters to the Editor 



I'o the liditor of the Williams UeeonI: 

Some eminent Williams thinkers liaM' siiggesletl that the 
split on campus was no ordinary split, hut in tact iiuplieil the 
existence ot two worlds - one a .scholastic antl the other a social, 
witn Ihe two revDhing ahont tlillerent poles. Insleail of the 
social eomnmnity eompleineiiting, it has diM'rged ami snblraeted 
the colleges lioni acatlemic hie. Ol e(|nal importance to the 
tiemoralizalion hi the tiarliekl C:lnl) is ihe lael that Iraterinl) 
selectivity has protlueetl Iraternil) norms which snhtract Iroin the 
vigor with whicii a stiitleiit might apply himsell to classroom work. 
It tloesn't seem to me that the Irnslees' moves are going to 
close the gap between the social and academic ends ol the college. 
As long as there is rejectivity anil e.velnsivity, no Iraternity 
"de-emphasis" is going to make the college a eoliesi\e body. Our 
present atlvocates of 'conniiiiiialism ' will admit that as long as 
oiir present selective system reinahis, there will always be a 
strong teinptatioii to leave a Stiulent Union lor those Iraternity 
Irientls to be hmntl in the separate houses. The Trustees' reeom- 
menilations, insleati of being positl\t' nunes alieatl, are rather 
desparate last iihnnte measures to savf al all costs that okl way 
of hie they knew at Williams. It's like tlnowing sandbags into a 
shaky tlike to slave oil the onslauglit ol a menaeing llootl. Soiiie- 
tiines the bags work, but usually the water wins, antl only 
alterwards tlo people decide they iiati better start all over again 
and btiiltl a gootl concrete dam. 

Deny Ivriise's recent letter spoke of the gradual attrition 
of Williams values unless 101)'? riishing was ellected. Does it 
not now seem that our values will be pr()gressi\ely negated, as 
Deny Kruse suggesteil, iintler the impact ol the trustees moves? 
A Stutlent Union antl I'leshnian segregation eonld be excellent 
things, but ask an .\mlieist man for his liirki tlescriptioii of 

'lining up delegations", belore yim form an opinion about 
ilelerred rushing. In atltlition eo'iiimimal eating is a natural 
protlnet ol this "I'laternit)- de-emphasis" program and will 
tiestroy a large tiegree of our small milt \ allies. H\- these values, 
I mean the warmth, strength, and soeial inatiiritv derived from 
constant eompanionslhp with a house ol (it) to 71) meinbeis. 
I still l)elie\c that small units, ineliidiiig 100', of the college, can 
,ifler the most positi\f social baekgroniitl. The present system 
or the aiionviiiilv of ciimnmiialism are negating alternatives to the 

lulv step that should be taktn. 



The Shorb plan is now the most practical way to iiitrodutc 
10(1',! rushing. It ilivides the freshmen class in hall on the basis 
of bids reei'Uftl anil each hiaise must take at least a third from 
each half. Ihe Shorb plan allows a degree ol selectivity, hut dwa 
not lead to tlie damaging situation that the straight bounce phm 
would ha\e. Ihe student body imist take llieir problem in hand 
again, direct the course of the college in a more positive way 
than the trustees have done, and at least vote on the Shoih 
plan. Were it put into effect, we might retain our small niut 
\aliies; the proposed student union eoiilil be the unilying focal 
point of a college lib- In which our social and academic ends were 
no longer anlagonistie to each other. 

George V. Sumner, Jr. 



iTHE NEAREST FLICK 



by liiKcc I'liliiicr '5-1 

.S((/. - If \'ou can't get a ride to Smith or some other W'ateriu;' 
spill, cheek In on "Little Kgvpt " at Ihe W'aklen. A vicarious thrii] 
Is better than none, and this one has list lights and torso-twistiu;' 
(on a inodilied scale.) 'I'he double leatiire ineliidi'S "The lUil 
Madge of Courage", a great show and a natural lor the Lnglisli 
S bo\s. Well ailed ami photographed, it sticks to the book almiist 
won! lor wind. 

Sim iiikI .Midi. - \\\ .Vmerieau in Paris" is one of the best 
inusieals e\er produced, ollering iiiusie bv (Gershwin, dancing hv 
Ciene Kellv anil Iwo thousand haiidpieked exhas, anil exiili, 
scenerx in the stvles of modern artists. The eellnloiil moguls li.ul 
the good indginent to inelnik Leslie Caron. who steals the show. 
.\s lor loiso-twistiiig, von ought to see her surround a straight- 
backed chair. 

7'l(('.v., \\'('(/., (ind riiiii. - '\ Slieetear Xaincil Desire" is an 
excellent pletine from an excellent play. Kim llimter, well-breil 
Marlon lirando and Mrs. Laurence Olivier star, ablv supported hy 
a line group ol lilt-pla\ eis. BeanlilulK' acted and directed, the 
lilin blends deeaviiig Southern belles, mmnbling Marlon, and the 
local inhabilants ol a rnn-dowu section ol New Orleans into a 
brilliant hour and hall ol entertaimneiil. Though it is less of a 
moral teaser than ".\ Place in the Sun", it is even more depressing. 
Despite the oNerall accent on tragedv. "Streetcar " features Marlon 
branilo in some lirst-rate comedy.. 



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TelephoneTroy — Adorns 82563 



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new 



January 20, 1952 
To the Editor of the Williams Record: 

Why must the Chapel be lockeil save for Sunday Vespers':' 
On my first return to Williams in three years yesterday, I was 
sorry to find the tloors locked. Let's not forget tliat the enduring 
strength of Williams in days to come will not be in matters 
economic, military, jiolitical, governmental, or social, but in things 
spiritual, moral, and ethical. The first half of this century has 
been plagued with wars, greed, envy, and man's inhumanity t( 
man notwithstandiug technological advance, because we forgo 
we are creatures and not the Creator. In a college of Icarninr 
such as Williams it is tragic to find all buildings open but one 
"Unless the Lord build the house, they labor in vain that build it.' 

Newton P, Darling, Jr, '48 



Why wait until 
morniKg? 

When you can gel the oul- 
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THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1952 



Colgate Edges Muirmen, 49-35; 
Worthington Sets Record in Relay 



Swimmers Seek Win 
Against Springfield 

By Jack Marr 
Hiimiltuii. N. Y., Jan. 19 — 
PluKued by a recent influx of in- 
juries Coach Bobby Muir's mer- 
men received llieir first defeat of 
the season at the hands of the 
unbeaten Red Raiders of ColKate 
today. Outstanding for the Eph.s 
was Joe Worlliintiton wlio. in addi- 
tion to winnini; tlie 440 yd. dash, 
set a new pool record in the 150 
yd. medley relay. 

The meet was one of the closest 
.seen at Alumni Pool in many a 
day, and the outcome remained 
undetermined until tlie final relay, 
when the Eplmien, forced to com- 
IJi'te uBjinst freshmen as well as 
varsity, ran out of Kas. Colgate's 
stellar captain, Jaclc White, won 
three events to share the spol- 
Ught witli rccord-brealier Worth- 
inf^ton. 

Kphs Start Fust 
The Muir-men opened fast with 
a victory in the initial relay as 
Ephs Byerly, Jclfre.vs, and Belash 
easily downed llieir Colwate rivals, 
and Don Jones followed with an 
outslandinK win in the 220. After 
Colnate's White had won the first 
of his three events, talcing the 50 
yd. dasli. WorthiUBton came 
lln'ounh Willi Ills record-breaklii!! 
perforiVL.iice to will the 150 yd. 
medley and place the Ephs in the 
van. 

However liere tile tide besan to 
turn as tlie Red Raiders won three 
straicht events to take a com- 



Eph Squashmen Bow 
To West Point, 6-3 

Jan. 19— The Army squash 
team, led by Captain R. B, 
KiHK and Dan Hutcheson, in- 
vaded Williamstown loniBht, 
and took a liard-fouBlit match 
6-3 to add to their previous 
victories over MIT. Pordham, 
and Yule. 

CaiJtain Ray George, Chris 
Tlioron, and Tom Brucker won 
their matches for Williams, 
wliile both Dorie Friend and 
Leii Adkins lost on match point 
.scores in the tight contest. 
Since the Williams match, the 
cadets from West Point have 
traveled to Amherst, trouncing 
til'' Jeffs 9-0. 

Tlie return of number one 
Iran Dick Sciuires to the squad 
definitely brightens the team's 
prospects for the remainder of 
the season. 



mandlng lead. Williams battled 
back as Charley Douglas won the 
200 yd. breaststroke, and Worth- 
ington won his second event of 
tile day in the 440. Colgate man- 
power, however, proved too strong, 
as the Scarlet went on to win the 
filial relay and the meet. 

Ephs Meet Springfield 
With three wins in four starts, 
the Purple will seek to better their 
mark with a win over powerful 
Springfield today. The visitors, 
having bowed only to Harvard, 
should provide strong opposition 
as the Ephs seek to regain their 



SpringfieldDowns 
Williams Matmen 
In 18-13 Decision 

Ephmen Hunt First Win 
At New London Today 
Against Coast Guard 

By Jack O'Kleffe 

Jan. 19— The Williams wrest- 
ling team suffered its third defeat 
of the .season dropping an 18-13 
decision to Springfield today at 
La.sell Gymnasium. The Maroons 
well balanced team proved to be 
the deciding factor as the Purple 
could win only three matches. 

Dick Gordon, although hamper- 
ed by a weak knee, turned in an 
excellent performance for Wil- 
liams as he pinned George Dyer 
in the 167 lb. match. Bob Hershey 
and Captain Bill Callaghan also 
showed fine form as they won de- 
cisive victories over their oppo- 
nents in the 130 and 157 lb. classes 
respectively. 

Springfield Takes Early Lead 
Springfield, by winning three of 
the first four matches, built up a 
commanding 13-3 lead. New Eng- 
land champion Sam Coursen pin- 
ned Rod Cover in the 123 lb. class 
and Ted Bienkowski at 137 lbs. 
pinned Bill Williams. Bill Bock 
decisioned Bob Shorb in a very 
close 147 lb. match. 

The Purple narrowed the gap 
with the wins by Callaghan and 
Gordon, but Chandler downed 
I Hugh Murphy in the 177 lb. bout. 
I In tlie finale Jack Ordeman tied 
I Lacey Jones to give Williams its 
I final points. 
I See Page 4. Col. 3 



Shawmcn Meet Jeffs Tonight; 
Purple Cagers Defeat Cardinals 



Ephs Win 59-29 
To Rout Wesmen 



NY AC Tops Purple 
In N.Y. Encounter 

Jan. 19— Coach Al Shaw'i Wil- 
liams Basketeers opened the race 
for the 1952 Little Three Crown 
with a bang as they decisively 
trounced the Wesleyan five 59-29. 

The Cardinals, sporting a rag- 
ged zone defense, were completely 
outcla.s.sed after the first period, as 
tlie highscoring Ephs made a rout 
of the game. Bill Suessbrick and 
Herb Smith sparked the Williams 
scoring, netting 15 and 14 points, 
respectively, while Hawkins and 
Creer both hit double figure: 

Williams Scoring: 

PG 



HOW MANY TIMES A DAY 

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INHALE? 



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IF YOU'RE AN AVERAGE SMOKER 
THE RIGHT ANSWER IS OVER 200! 



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EXT RA ! ATTENTION ALL COLLEGE STUDENTS 

Every Sunday Evening over CBS 

THE PHILIP MORRIS PLAYHOUSE 

Presents an Outstanding College Student 

Featured with Famous Hollywood Stars 

in the PHILIP MORRIS Intercollegiate Acting Competition 

f/A/ 



z PHILIP MORRIS 




also. 



Smith 
Hawkins 
Avery 
Suessbrick 
Creer 
Shudt 
Miller 
Totals 



6 
4 

5 
5 
1 
1 
22 



FT 
2 



TP 
14 
11 

1 
15 
10 

6 



Bill Sucssbrif-k, startins^ at the 
center slot aeainst the Lord Jeffs 



a'J 
g the 
with 
New 



3 

5 

4 

15 
New York, Feb. 2 — Openin 
second halt of their .season 
an encounter against the 
York Athletic Club, the Eph cag- 
ers bowed 75-63. Herb Smith'; 
twenty point total was to no avail 
as the Purple were outclassed 
after a clo.se first half. 

After trailing by only three 
points at half-time. Williams was 
deluged by a rapid burst ot New 
York baskets at the outset of the 
third canto, thus enabhng the 
home club to gain the verdict. 
FG FT TP 
Smith 6 8 20 

Belshe 



Lazor 

Hawkins 

Avery 

Suessbrick 

Hall 

Creer 

DePopolo 

Shudt 

Campbell 

Miller 

Totals 



3 

1 
2 

8 
1 

14 



19 tii 



DON'T FORGET 

HOUSEPARTY 

IS COMING 

GET YOUR 

HAIRCUT 

AT 

THE WILLIAMS 
BARBERSHOP 



Varsity Runners Win 
In N.Y. Encounter 

Boston, Jan. 19— Tony Plan- 
sky's Mile Relay Team entered 
and won their event at the an- 
nual Knights of Columbus In- 
door Track meet at the Boston 
Garden today. The batonmen 
placed first covering the dis- 
tance in 3.36:6. Al Fletcher, 
Ted Cypiot, "Tex" Freese, and 
Pete Cosgriff comprised the 
quartet whicli outlasted teams 
from 'Worcliester Polyteclmic 
Institute. University of Massa- 
cliusetls. and Bowdoin. The 
ne.xt competition for the Win- 
Ler Track ieam will be the 
I.C.A.A.A.A. meet in New York 
on February 23. 



Join Our Growing 

List of Satisfied 
Williams Customers 

KRONICK'S 
ESSO SERVICE 

Opp. Howard Johnson's 
State Rd. 



OBJETS d' ART 
for her 




Imposing Line-up 
Threatens Purple 

1 Undefeated Williams 
Frosh Battle RPl 



Feb, 9~In a determined effort 
i(j break the Little Three dead- 
hxk scored last year between 
Williams and Amher.st, the Eph 
lioopslers will meet the Sabrinas 
in tile first of this season's pair 
of i;umes tonight at 8:15 in the 
LaSalle Oym. After Icsing to the 
Purpie at Amherst earlier in last 
year'.s season, the Jeffs ended the 
year by journeying to Williamr-- 
town and upsetting the home 
team, thus tying for the Little 
1 hrec Championship. 

The only member of the Am- 
herst starting five in the i951 
contest who will not be in the 
line-ui) tonight is Bob Hawkins, 
last year's captain. The remain- 
ing four return intact along with 
.sophomore Tony Mahar. who gen- 
erally L'cts the job of guarding 
the opiJonent's high scorer. 

Lanky Sterling 'Weaver, who has 
averaged 15 points per game this 
season, and Captain Derry Ben- 
nett, who scored 13 points m last 
season's upset win over the Ephs, 
pace the well-balanced Sabrina 
attack. The other starters are 
Howie Fisher or George Sliglit at 
center and Ken 'Wright or Frank 
Mafiee at forward. 

Itocky Amherst Schedule 
The Lord Jelf record of six wins 
and four losses doesn't appear too 
impressive, but the defeats were 
incurred at the hands of two 
strolls; Ivy League powers. Col'.im- 
bia and Yale, and two formidable 
small college powers in New Eng- 
hnd. Bowdoin and Trinity. 

On the 'Williams side of the 
ledger. Co-captain Wyn Shudt is 
tlie only returning regular. The 
EpfiS w.i; fed the less of last 
year's big forward line w'nieh in- 
cluded Bob Lar.son. Harry Sheehy, 
and Don Speck which proved de- 
cisive in the Purple victory over 
the Jelfs in 1951. 

Sophs Spark Ephs 
'Williams' Coach Al Shaw stated, 
"We expect a very hard game with 
Amherst. They have more height, 
but we could win if we're able to 
control the backboards." 'With Co- 
captain Diz Cramer out with a 
chronic shoulder injury, the Eph 
line-up will include Shudt. E*ll 
Suessbrick, and the sophomore 
trio. Herb Sniilli. Jack Hawkins, 
and Walt Creer. 

The Purple record of seven n ins 
and five losses includes a one- 
point victory over Massachusetts 
and a rout of Wesleyan, 59-29. 
The Wesleyan clash was the tir.^t 
Little Tlirce contest, and il gives 
See Page 4, Col, 1 




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GORDON DOVER, oxford button-dotcn 

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INCORPORATED 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1952 



i4rmy, Hamilton 
Down Eph Sextet 

Team Faces Tough Slate 
In Weekend Clashes 



Following recent losses to Ham- 
ilton and Army, the Williams Col- 
lege HocKey leam, with a record 
ol one win m six games, are talc- 
ing part in a weet-end twin l),ll 
wiih Norwicli and Middlebury. In- 
cluded in the season's schedule 
will be additional contests with 
Amherst and Hamilton Colleges 
on February 23 and 27 respectively. 

A fast, hard-checking Hamilton 
sextet turiied bacli Coach Bell's 
skaters by a tj-2 score at the RPI 
F.eldhOLise on January IG, Ihe 
Hcmiiion hne fired three goals 
past goalie Bud Hudson in the 
first nme minutes before Epli de- 
lenseman Ken Perry scored at 
the ten-minute mark. Hamilton 
tallied then- final goals in the 
second period, whue Jo.mny Beard 
ended the scoring at 2;,>,'5 of the 
final canto. 

Army Victorious 

The team travelled to West 
Point on January 19 where it took 
an 8-0 druubaig at the hands of 
a well-trained, fast Army six. Led 
by center Fisterman, who turned 
in the "Hat Trick" for the Point- 
ers, the Cadets scored twice in 
the opening period, five more 
times in the second, and a fmal 
goal m the last period. 

Last evening, Williams faced a 
mediocre Norwich team, which 
ciiried a 3-2 record into the game. 
I'onight, the Eph skaters travel 
to Middlebury where they are sure 
to meet stift' competition from the 
Panther sextet. It is feared tliat 
regular goalie Bud Hudson will be 
side-lined for the remamder of 
the season due to mjuries sustain- 
ed m a recent automobile accident. 



Basketball 



the Snawmen an early lead in the 
race for the coveted crown. To- 
nighi's game will be the 80th re- 
newal of the spirited rivalry which 
started in 1901. Williams holds an 
edge in the series, having won 42 
as against 37 for Amherst. 
Probable Staring Line-Ups 
Williams Amherst 

Hawkms, i f , Magee or Wriglit 
Smith, f f, Weaver 

Suessbrick, c c, Fislier 

Creer, g g, Bennett 

Shudt (Captain), g g, Mahar 

Frosh Five Undefeated 

The freshman five will encount- 
er the RPI Frosh in the prelimin- 
aries at 6:30. The yearling quintet 
face the Engineers backed by a 
resounding 57-39 victory scored in 
mid-December. 

The freshman line-up will in- 
clude Captain Tony Moro at cen- 
ter, Ronny Wilson and Fred Brod- 
erick at forwards, and John Gray 
and Sandy Laitman at the guard 
posts. The Coombsmen enter to- 
night's game boasting an 8-0 
won-lost record, and hope to ex- 



Debaters to Compete 
In Hofstra Tourney 

Hempstead, N. Y., Feb. 9— 
In a contest believed to be 
the biggest one-day tourna- 
ment of the year, members of 
the Williams Adelphic Union 
will match wits with orators 
from tliirty easterxi and mid- 
western colleges and univer- 
sities at Hofstra College today. 
Representing the Ephs will be 
Rich..rd Antoun '53, Richard 
Huppertz '54, Louis Kleinrock 
'53, and Bruce Campbell '52. 

The subject under discussion 
will be "The Federal Govern- 
ment Should Adopt a Perma- 
nent Program of Wage and 
Price Controls." Trophies will 
go to the best single debater 
and to the best team. This 
tournament is the first on the 
Williams schedule after yester- 
day's debate with Wesleyan at 
Griffin Hall, when Walt Flah- 
erty '53 and George McAleenan 
'52 opposed two Middletown 
orators. 



Jackson Elected 
WMS President 



Loening Vice-President 
Of Executive Board 



Friday, Feb. 1 — WMS announced 
»hat William Jackson '53 has been 
elected to the presidency of its 
executive board. Mike Loening '53 
was selected vice-president of the 
board while Bob Auchincloss '53 
takes over as business mrnat.cr. 

Further election results place.i 
Harry Montgomery '54 as secretary 
rounding off the executive t^ide of 
the staff, while Art Muir '53 lends 
►he production crew as program 
manager. John Cardie '54 was 
nrmed to the staff as toclinical 
adviser. 

John Loomis '54 fills the role 
of chief announcer, and Pete Wal- 
lace '53 heads the technical de- 
partment as chief engineer. Other 
lewly-appointed officers include 
publicity director, Don Winston 
'53; publicity promotions, Al Fiil- 
kerson '54; chief controller, Neil 
Cooper '54; chief program Tian- 
iger. Brad Grinnell '54; and head 
printer, John Lewy '54. Alon? with 
the announcement of officers, a 
list of freshman compets admitted 
to the staff was posted. 



Club Dissolves . . . 

ized the Trustees of the College 
for their "neglect" of total rush- 
iiig, "the most important social 
issue on campus." 

"riici-a Must Be a Change" 

Said K.hn, "When the Garfield 
Club announced Us plan to dis- 
.iolve last December, it was made 
clear that such thought had been 
given long and serious considera- 
tion. We felt that it was more 
important to dissolve a social myth 
th.in to enjoy any social benefits 
which are derived from being 
labeled a 'large, strong, indepen- 
dent social unit.' 

"On January 31, the myth with 
all its fine labels still existed. 
Though the Trustees of the Col- 
lege certainly indicated that they 
were capable of making positive 
and progressive moves (deferred 
rushing and a new student union), 
they continued to neglect the most 
important social issue on campus 
— the fact that 20 percent of the 
college is rejected from the social 
system. 

"By dissolving, we have, I think, 
made things quite clear. There 
will be no more rationalization to 
the effect that everyone at Wil- 
liams has equal social status. I 
think that most of the non-afliili- 
ates feel that by such action as 
the Garfield Club took there will 
necessarily be no 'dying out' of 
the problem at hand; that every- 
one will realize that very soon 
there must be a change." 

Reform League Organizes 

To carry on action for total 
rushing, former club men elected 
representatives to the non-affliliate 
committee of the proposed college- 
wide "League for Total Rushing". 



Wrestling . . . 

This afternoon the matmen v/ill 
seek their first victory as they 
travel to New London to take on 
the Coast Guard Academy. Be- 
cause of numerous injuries to key 
men. the Cadets boast only a 
single victory as against two de- 
feats to date. 

Since the Mariners have also 
bowed to Springfield, losing Satur- 
day 19-11. today's match like last 
year's, is a tossup. Last year the 
Coast Guard Academy downed 
Williams 17-13, in a thriller that 



was not decided until the final 
tend their winning skein to nine. bout. 




WE NEED 
3 WILLIAMS 
SENIORS 



We want three top flight Williams ernduates — men with 
the potential to handle, after a reasonable period of 
training, positions of responsibility in our Banking, 
Trust, Bond and Administrative Departments. As one 
of the nation's largest, most progressive bank and trust 
companies, we need college men for such varied activi- 
ties as miarket research, sales, management and invest- 
ment of trust funds, purchase and sale of government 
and municipal bonds, advertising, public relations, per- 
sonnel management and investment and credit research. 
If you have poise, a pleasant personality and believe 
you will enjoy contacts with leading business men. The 
Northern Trust Company offers you exceptional oppor- 
tunities. You will work with friendly people in modern, 
pleasant surroundings in the heart of Chicago, the 
second largest city in the nation and the center of highly 
diversified industry, commerce, transportation and 
finance. Draft eligibility does not eliminate you from 
consideration. Investigate these opportunities. 

Contact William O. Wycoff to obtain a copy of our 
descriptive booklet "Big City Banking" and to arrange 
an appointment with E. L. Hall, Vice President, who 
will be on campus February 19. 

THE 

NORTHERN TRUST 

COMPANY 

;0 South LaSalle Street 
Chicago 90, Illinois 




BUTLER 
Coal & Grain Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 
Adams, Mass. 



Those chosen Include seniors 
Aaron Ka teller and Arnold Levin; 
juniors Robert Bauer, Paul Fukui, 
Lewis Remick, and Seth Schaplro; 
sophomores Martin Barrett, Peter 
Goldman, and Walter Weeks; and 
Ireslinicn Clarendon ElUcott, John 
Gardner, and Eric Gustafson. 

Speaking for the non-affiliate 
committee, Arnold Levin '52, presi- 
dent of Phi Beta Kappa, felt that 
lire present social system "was 
actually hurling Williams College", 
and urged that all students, fac- 
ulty, and alumni interested in pro- 
.notiiig total rushing join the new 
,)r!;aniz..tion. 

"Improve Williams" 

Said Levin, "The keynote be- 
hind the league is the wide feel- 
ing that our present social system 
is poor and is actually hurting 
Williams College, both internally 
and in the eyes of outsiders. In 
improving tile system we improve 
Williams. We want and hope to 
get support from all who share 
our view that deferred rushing, 
although a step in the right direc- 
tion, does not solve the problem. 
Total rushing will do this, we feel. 
Faculty and alumni are Invited to 
join as well as all students, fra 
ternity men and otherwise." 



19th Year 
60 Days -$500. 

(Incl. Steamer) 

Bicycle, Motor, Kail and 
Faltboat tours for students; 
also trips for college credit, 
self^lrive motor groups, and 
living-in families. 

See More—Spenil Leum 

AIKXICO 

35 Day adventure trip $300 
45 Day study trip $350 

OniENT 

44-64 Days incl. First Class 
Steamer from $882 

THE WEST 

Canada, Alaska, Ranch trips 
from 35-70 Days from $450 

SITA is America's largest organ- 
ization for edurational travel. 



Scholarships and ojiportunities 

for free li" 

students. 



' opi 
for free trips available to selected 
' ints. 

Your local repretentativm art 



STUDENTS MTEtlUTIOIUl 
lUVEl USOCItTION 



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NEAREST T-Bar area, smoothest, best 
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Do not jjdge snow conditions by those 
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Phone Williamstown 550 or Hancock Center 4-4663 

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Glasses & Martini Pitchers 

Pin-Up Lamps - Special at $1.25 

GEORGE M. HOPKINS CO. 

66-68 Spring Street 



Williamstown 



Tel. 29 R 



THAT YOU 



DID YOU KNOW 
HAVE A PLACE IN 



NEW YORK? 



It's the Williams Club at 24 E. 39th St. Its pleasant 
rooms are yours at special undergraduate rotes . . . 
Your date will love the Ladies Cocktail Lounge and 
Dining Room . . . and you will feel right at home in 
the bar. 

The Williams Cluh 

24 East 39th St. 
Undergraduates are always welcome 

It's Your Club - We Hope You'll Use It. 



Be Hapr>y- GOju ItiCIOr! 






^-C«eolNeW 




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Volume XLVI, Number 2 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE 




3^je£(rfj&^ 



WEDNESDAY, FEliHUAUY 13, 1952 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Six Records Fall As Eph Mermen Win 



Ski EventSf Two Dance Bands, 
AMT Production, Jazz Concert 
To Highlight Carnival Activities 

ski events, dances, cucktail socials, a jazz concert and a 
Georf^e Bernard Sliaw comedy are among some of the events 
promised this weekend for the WOC's annual Winter Carnivay. 

Ski competition starts the weekend festivities, weather per- 
mittiiif;, with a slalom-event on Siiec]! Ilill 9 a.m. Friday, a cross- 
country race 2 p.m. starting at (^ole field, and on Saturday a down- 
hill contest on the Thunderholt Trail and jvunping at Godell Hol- 
low at 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. 

Two Hands at Dance 

Billy Butterfield, his trumpet and orchestra, along with Teddy 
Wilson's combo highlight Friday's dance in the gym. The two 
will alternate, with Butterfit-ld [jroviding smooth dance rhythms 
and Wilson, cool piano jazz. The dance gets under way at 9 p.m. 
and lasts until 1:30. During the dance the house winning this 

year's snow sculpturing contest O 

will receive a keg of beer, and the 



Stone, Good Star j]V[ar tin Equals Two N.E, Marks; 
assic ppjjj^^j^ ^^p Springfield, 45-30 

Q 

Opponents Take 
Only Two Firsts 



weekend's most beautiful date, 
Judged Impartially, will become 
Carnival queen of '52. 

Saturday night at 8:15 sees Di- 
xieland Jazz in Chapln Hall with 
an all-star group, headlined by 
Max Kaminsky, Dick Carey, Eddie 
Safranskl, Don Moreno, and Fred- 
die Ohms. 

Another feature on the house- 
party calendar, the AMT produc- 
tion of Shaw's "Pygmalion" Is set 
for a three-night run beginning 
tomorrow. Curtain time each night 
Is 8:30. 

Saturday afternoon and night 
house cocktail parties and dances 
take over the social scene. Psi U, 
Zeta Psi, and Beta get together for 
cocktails at the Zetes and a dance 
at the Beta House. A cocktail en- 
tertainment at Chi Psi. a dance at 
the Saints, and milk puncn at the 
Kap house, feature another social 
combo. 

The DU's. Dekes, and AD's com- 
bine for a dance at the AD house 
and cocktails at the DU's Refresh- 
ments at Slg Phi and a dance at 
the Phi Delt house are the back- 
ground for another trio. Joined by 
the Phi Gams. The Phi Sigs and D. 
Phis Join with cocktails at the 
former and a dance at the latter. 
Theta Delt plays solo with its own 
party and dance. 



Freshman Marks 
Best Since 1948 



Class Average Hits 3.3; 
54 Make Honor Roll 



UC Outlines Hell 
Week Time, Fines 

Rushing Committee Urges 
Quota System Change 

Monday. Feb. 11— Defining the 
times at which the first days of 
the formal Hell Week will start, 
the UC also announced at their 
meeting tonight the methods of 
discipline for violations next week. 
Wednesday and Thursday. Feb- 
ruary 20 and 21, will begin of- 
ficially at 12 noon and fines of 
50 dollars will be levied for in- 
fringements. 

The Rushing Committee recom- 
mended lifting of the house quotas 
for all classes in college this 
spring. Advising a quota of 1/14 of 
the class for each house in 1956 
and after, the committee advo- 
cated removal of the rule pro- 
hibiting Juniors and seniors from 
Joining a house. 

As soon as the individual houses 
vote on the quota resolutions, the 
UC will make a recommendation 
to the administration. After the 
alumni heads are consulted, the 
administration will come to a fi- 
nal decision. 

To compensate for Carnival 
dance costs, a tax of 110 dollars 
will be levied on each house show- 
ing enough attendance. Individuals 
will pay a maximum of $4.80. Non- 
afflUates have the option to buy 
tickets In advance singly or In 
blocks of 30 at $4.00 each. Stag.s 
will be admitted at $2.40 apiece, 
and faculty members are Invited. 

The marriage course, a series 
of six lectures by Rev. A. Grant 
Noble and Dr. Coughlln. will start 
Tuesday, February 19, at 9 p.m. 
In St. John's Church. 



Monday, Feb. 10 — Attaining a 
scholastic average of 3.301 for the 
fall semester, the Class of 1955 
boasts the highest first term fresh- 
men marks in the past four years. 
Dean Scott announced today. 

A total of 54 men qualified for 
the freshman honor roll, and 
James Colberg and Carl Rosen 
reached the perfect 5.0 grade. The 
totnl represents not only a record 
number, but also a new high of 
17.70'f of the class on the list. 
\on-Affiliates Lead 

Of the freshmen who made the 
honor roll. 20 wei-e non-affiliates 
Theta Delta Chi led the fraterni- 
ties with six honor freshmen und 
Beta Theta Pi followed closely 
with five pledges in this category. 
Both Delta Kappa Epsilon and Phi 
Sigma Kappa had four freshmen 
in the better than 4.0 averase 
group. 

Although the Freshman Class is 
almost 60'f private school grad- 
uates, only 23 of the freshmen on 
the honoi' roll were prep school 
alumni while 31 were high school 
graduates. The Choate School 
i holds the highest rating with three 
ilumni on the list. 

The totals by dormitories were: 
Williams Hall, 25; Sage Hall. 18; 
and Morgan Hall, 11. Those fresh- 
men achieving 4.8 averages were: 
Lawrence Frank, Eric Gustafson, 
Malcom Nelson. Hedrlck Smith, 
Lee Snyder, and Seymour Vestor- 
mark. 



Few Tickets Remain 
For Comedy-Satire 

Wednesday, Feb. 13— Tickets tor 
the Cap and Bells production of 
"Pygmalion", opening tomorrow 
nisiht on the .stage of the Adams 
Memorial Theater, are "almost 
.sold out", accoidinii to Production 
Manager William Schneider '53. 

Le.s.s than a hundred seats still 
remain for the Shaw comedy, 
which ends Saturday. 

Leading Roles 

Taking leading roles in Shaw'.s 
satire of London society are: Bux- 
ton student Mary Lathrop as Eliza 
Dooliltle the .social-climbing flower 
girl, John Stone '52 and C. Allen 
Good '53 playing Henry Higgens 
and Colonel Pickering, two middle- 
aged phonetics experts, and Seth 
Schapiro in the role of Alfred Doo- 
litlle, Eliza's panhandling father. 

Supporting players include: 
Wallace Thomas '52 as Freddie 
Eynsford-Hill. Eve Child as Mrs. 
Higgens. Virginia Hewett in the 
role of Miss Clara Eynsford-Hill, 
Sally Long playing Mrs. Pearce, 
Lydia Hewett as Mrs. Clara Eyns- 
ford-Hill. and Esther Barrow in 
the part of parlormaid. 
Minor Roles 

Pilling "walk-on" roles are Wal- 
ter Alexander '54. Timothy Beard 
'53. Thomas Bell '55. Nancy Du 
Val, William Du Val '52, Robert 
Ferguson '53, Thomas Hammond 
'65. Gilbert Holzman '53. and Janet 
Welanetz. 

In order to cut time and facili- 
tate production. Director William 
J. Martin has split Shaw's comedy 
into three acts instead of five, as 
originally written. 

Behind the Scenes 

Students directing behind-the- 
scenes crews for the Cap and Bells 
production include: Charles Ham- 
ilton '52, .stage manager; David 
Hudson '53, scenery crew head; 
Thomas Pelrce '53. lighting crew 
manager; John Larson '53, prop- 
erty director; and Timothy Beard 
'53. costume manager. 

Others include: box office man- 
ager, Peter Camp '52: sound man- 
agers, Jack Marshall '53 and N. 
Bradley Grinnel '54; make-up 
crew director, Martin Conovitz 
'53; program manager, C. Allen 
Good '53; and house manager, 
Charles Leanord '53. John Stone 
'52 designed the scenery for the 
Shavian classic. 




Jeffrey, Byerly Reduce 
Old College Records; 
Jones Double Winner 



Left to liffht: Dave Bv.-'r.y, n:ok Martin, Co-C ntain Rick Jeffrey. 

Dean Scott Reprimands Freshmen, 
Likens Quad to 'Garbage Dump' 



< that anybodv would be 
ooininentf^fl Oenit Srott 
disa]5pi()val of the slovenly coii- 



Saturdaw I'^eh. 9-'lt is unbelievabl 
!ibl<:' to live' in sueli sc1f-in;ule sfjiial'ir" 
todav, as he expressed otRcia" 
ditioii of the fieshinan (|iuid. 

One particiilarlv iiiifortuiiate aspect of the situation, said 
the dean, lies in its unfavorable impact on vi.sitois to the col- 
lege. Tiie scene repulses not oiilv parents and families of pro- 

- - '^spective students, but "after the 

trustees saw this last weekend. 



News Bureau Elects 
D'Oench President 

Thursday. February 7— The staff 
of the Williams News Bureau 
chose Woodbridge D'Oench '53 as 
president end Kay Kolligian '53 
as vice-president for the next year 
at their annual election. The new 
sports editors are John Dighton 
'53 and Peter Sterling '53. Stephen 
Kaufman '53 became the feature 
editor, and John Wright '53 the 
new photography editor. 

The new editors have instituted 
a policy of reorganization in order 
to put the News Bureau on a 
"lighter" schedule. Plans Include 
weekly meetings for the whole 
staff and more feature articles on 
Williamstown and the college. 



'Operation Tusk Force' Commmences Once Again 
In Mid-winter Hunt for Columbus' Sepulchre 



Safari to Lenox Site 
Finds Dirt, No Bones 

by Kay Kolligian '53 

During a dull, depressive and 
soundless afternoon, with the thick 
overhanging clouds oppressively 
low in the still, silent sky, a group 
of nine stalking, sinister figures 
advanced stealthily toward the 
dreary tract of land known as the 
House of Columbus (and that's 
not Christopher.) 

Even without such an Edgar 
Allen Poe emphasis, Columbus, 
loxodonta africana extraordinary, 
(translated: "helluva big eleph- 
ant") has again become a topic of 
conversation on the Williams cam- 
pus; and the whereabouts of his 
now century-old remains has 
brought about, with renewed in- 
terest and vigor, weekly "safaris" 
into the deep, dark, dank, dreary 
depths of the Lenox, Mass. estate 
where our loxodonta is supposedly 
burled. 

"Operation Tusk Force" 

For any who came late, "Oper' 
ation Tusk Force" began last sum- 




its a wonder that they will build 
anything more at Willis ms." 
Nothing Comparable 

Dean Scott went on to appeal to 
the self-respect of the freshmen, 
and added thst he had never seen 
such a condition at any other col- 
lege. "In eleven years at Yale", he 
recalled. "I never saw a beer can 
thrown out a window." 

Since the ground is frozen, there 
is no way that the Building and 
Grounds Crew can remove the 
beer cans and other refuse until 
"■pring. The Dean mentioned that 
for three years no solution for the 
problem has been found, but he 
could not conceive "how anybody 
would live in a garbage dump." 
Reflects on College 

In conclusion, the Dean express- 
ed his wish that the freshmen 
would live up to their first term 
scademic record in the other as- 
pects of college life. The condition 
of the quad, he remarked pointed- 
ly, "reflects both on the college 
and on the individuals involved". 

When asked to comment, a 
Freshman who wLshed to remain 
unidentified said. "In reference to 
the Dean's statement about Yale. 
I don't think a Yale Fieshman has 
the strength to throw a beer can 
out the window. I also thtak that 
the blame must be shared by the 
P-Ladies. who leave our rooms in 
such a condition that we have to 
get rid of the mess somehow." 



Saturday. Feb. 9—400 specta- 
tors at Lasell Pool watched a rare 
exhibition as Dick Martin, Rick 
Jeffrey, and Dave Byerly combined 
to set six records and tie two in 
pacing the Purple swimmers to a 
45-;!0 win over Springfield. 

Aftei- Ephs Byerly, Jeffrey, and 
Belash won easily over the visitors 
*n the opening medley i-elays. Don 
Jones suiged ahead of Springfield's 
Ycrzyk in the last few yards to 
cop the 220 yard free style. 
Martin Breaks College Marks 
Then in the 50 yard free-style 
Dick Martin, swimming in his 
first meet after a long period of 
ineligibility, broke the Williams 
and pool records by four tenths of 
a second and tied the New England 
record with his 23.2 effort. 

Martin continued his record- 
breaking, after Springfield's stand- 
out. Huddleston took the dive, by 
racing to a wm in the 100 yard 
free-style event in 51.1 seconds, a 
maik which broke the Williams 
and pool records of 53 seconds 
and tied the New England record. 
Byerly Smashes Own Record 
Dave Byerly broke his own re- 
cently-set Williams record in the 
200 yard back stroke as he edged 
Robbins of Sprmgfield. 

Co-Captain Rick Jeffrey turned 
in the fourth and final record- 
breakmg performance of the day 
in the 200 yard breast stroke, cut- 
ting the college record by 3.8 sec- 
onds, from 2.31 to 2:27.2. 

Jones Double Winner 
Don Jones and Joe Worthlngton 
clinched the Eph victory in the 
440 yard tree-style race by easily 
placing first and second respec- 
tively. The meet ended with the 
visitors winning the 400 yard free- 
style relay. 

This afternoon the swimmers 
play host to the Connecticut team 
See Page 4, Col. 4 



F ve Wi'Kams nen art u -id Mililiid 
renew searrh for e'ephani tomb. 



Bull Moose" tin foregriiund) 



mer when Mr. Richard Happel of 
the Berkshire Eventog Sagle, 
stumbled onto the trail of a long 
lost elephant in the vicinity of 
Lenox. 

Back in 1851, Columbus very in- 
considerately up and died. Unable 
to transport the six-ton creature 
any great distance, the owner 



gave the remains of the "belua 

maximus" to Williams College for 

the natural history museum. 

Lost: One Elephant 

But wait - the best is yet to 

come! Somehow, after the carcass 

was buried to rid the skeleton of 

the putrifying elements, Columbus 

See Page 4, Col. 1 



Chapel Conmiittee 
Changes Program 

Undergraduates, Faculty 
To Conduct Services 



IRC Names Abrams, 
Loening New Officers 

IRC elections held February 
4 resulted in the naming of 
Richard Abrams '53 and Mich- 
ael Loening '53 as President and 
Vice President respectively, suc- 
ceeding George Balkind '52 and 
Arnold Levin '52. Louis Remlck 
'53 was elected Program Chair- 
man. Donald Holt '54 Secretary 
and John Whitney '53 Treasur- 
er. 

Retiring President Balkind 
announced that the IRC plans 
a Round Table talk on Franco- 
Germany by Professors Shu- 
man and Godfrey. 



Monday, Feb. 11 — The Chapel 
Committee, headed by William 
DuVal '52 announced that local 
speakers will conduct many of the 
Sunday night services this term 
at the Thompson Memorial Chapel. 
Students, faculty members, and 
local ministers make up the new 
list of speakers for the Spring 
Term. 

In line with the new policy. 
Reverend Geirge Bellby. pastor of 
the First Cor. regatlonal Church 
of Williamstown and a graduate 
of Union Theological Seminary, 
spoke at the chapel service Sun- 
day. 

Students and Facu'ty to St/eak 

Durtag the term t '.east two 
students and four 'acuity mem- 
bers are scheduled to speak, with 
selected students conducting the 
sen'lces. The committee has also 
planned a service devoted to religi- 
ous music, simll.ir to the trsMll- 
tional pre-Chrlstir %s carol service. 

Speaking for the committee, 
chairman DuVal felt that the 
policy will give Chapel services 
more significance to the interested 
.student. 



THE WILLIAMS lUaiORD, WKDNKSDAY, FKBUUAUY 13, 1952 



f b« Mnii^§ 3eU£(r4 



THE PERSONAL SLANT 



North Adams, Masbachubetts Williamstown, Massachusetts 

'Entered as second-class matter November 2"/, 1944, at the post office at 
North Adams, Massochusetts, under the Act ot March 3, 1879." Printed by 
L.umb and Hunter, Inc., Nortn Aaams, Massachusetts. Published 

Wednesday and Saturauy during the college year. Subscription price $5.00 
per year. Record Ottice, Jesup Holi, Williumbtown, 
RECORD Office - Phone 72 Editor - Phone 981 -JK 



Volume XLVl 



February 13. 1952 

EDITORIAL 



Number 2 



No Need For Quotas 

The Stalling Coininitti.'e voted on May 6, 1951 in luvoi ol the 
following nioiioii; "that the Committee . . . lecoiiimend tliat the 
Unuei'giin-Uiate (.A)uncil, toUowiug coiisultation with the Graduate 
Coiiiniitiee ot \\illuinis Soeiai Units, estal)lish trateiiiity quotas, 
sul)|eet to the appiosal ot the Collej^e Adininistiution. " We diere- 
toie urge tlie IjL,, the Giaduate Conunittee, and the College Ad- 
niinistraiioM to examine the eonsiderations. 

Because ot tlie tlissolution ot the Garfield Club, we feel it 
is fairly ohvious that there is no need to maintain the 80-20 fra- 
ternny men — nun-alliliates latio. This rule was instituted in the 
first place to guarantee a strong non-fraternity social group. 
Since there is no longer any such organization, there is also no 
longer any need for maiiitainuig its strength. All of the arguments 
voiced in the Sterling Committee report in favor of the present 
system are based on the existence of the Garfiekl Club. The Club's 
dissolution has caiiseil the bottom to drop out of all these argu- 
iiients. 

It has been argiu'd that any rela.xing of the present quota plan 
will eliminate the situation where the non-affiliate body is com- 
posed of both minority and iion-iniiiorit\' groups. If the quotas 
are abandoned along with the institution ' of deferred rushing, 
practically all the men in non-minority groups will be taken into 
fraternities. The implications of such a development are "alarm- 
ing to many in the Williams lamilv." If the present ((iiota svsteni 
is concealing present fraternity \ alue judgments, then it is better to 
drop the i|uotas and present a \alid picture of fraternity ])redjn- 
dices. Deferred rushing and the ri'ininal of t|uotas will hiruish 
concrete proof of the superficialitv and predjudice that govern 
the selection of fraternity men. 

Some on the Sterling Committee argued that the feeling o 
rejection becomes e\ en more acute as tin- number left out of frat 
eniities becomes smaller. The feeling is pretty acute now witi 
one in five left out. lint the maintenance of (piotas would stag 
nate any ino\e to increase gradually the number in houses iinti 
the number of unpledged men becomes so ridiculously small that 
liberal mintletl fraternities would invite these few to join This 
essentially is what has hajDiicned at Princeton and at Amherst 

For the fraternities' sake, it will be financially iiecessary to 
abandon the present 80-20 ratio. Despite what the college says 
It will do through the institution of Campus Business Manage- 
ment, all houses will have to take more members from the upper 
three classes to remain monetarily solvent. 

If any quotas are placed on individual houses to prevent any 
one fraternity from becoming <)\erwheliniugly large in contrast 
to the other 14 houses, we urge that each house be permitted to 
take more than one-fifteenth of each freshman class. This allow- 
ance wil permit a fov hous.'s to take tlu^ last few unim'ited men 
should there be only a very small number of them. This ad- 
mittedly, is bringing total rushing in through the back door', but 
the back door is a better entrance than nony-at all. 



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Williamstown 



Tel. 29-R 



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THAT YOU 



DID YOU KNOW 
HAVE A PLACE IN 



NEW YORK? 



It's the Williams Club at 24 E. 39th St. Its pleasant 
rooms are yours at special undergraduate rates .". . 
Vc'ir date will love the Ladies Cocktail Lounge and 
Dininc) Room . , . and you will feel right at home in 
the bar. 

The Williams Club 

24 East 39th St. 
Undergraduates are always welcome 

It's Your Club - We Hope You'll Use It. 



by Chuck Lange 

There is a danger thai the Williams eanipus will resolve it- 
sell inlu its traditional lethargy now that the Trustees ha\(' re- 
inlorci'd tlie sialus i|no ol the soeiai system. I.el us not delude 
onrscKes iiilo thinking that the sto|)-gap measures of deferred 
rushing and freslmiaii eating will pro\e acceptable to either the 
liaternities or non-alliliates. liach group has an equal stake in op- 
posing this comproinise. 

liie thssaiislaclion of die non-alliliati's is e\'incetl by llii' 
commendable dissolution of the Carfield Club. Its erstwhile iiiein- 
bers realize only too well that their feeling of rejection and 
second-rate citizenship will continue so long as the slinlent hiidy 
is fraternity-oriented rather than colk'ge-oriented. Under the new 
set-up, freslnnen will be more fralernilv-nhndeil than ever, since 
they will look lorwartl to (he tlay when the\' can enjo)' tlii' gra- 
cious li\ ing of the eating-clnb. 

I'iiiaiuUd I'hivut 

Fraternities, on the othi'r hand, are faced with the probli'iii 
of total rushing slipping in the back door. Many fraternity dining 
lialls are linanciallv in llii' retl alread\', anil with the elimination 
of a Ireshnian delegation, oM'rhead anil opriatiug e.vpensi's 
will loree the fraternities to accept the upper-class uon-alliliates 
to avoid baukruplcN'. It is naive to expect the college to lu-lp fra- 
ternities by iiieans of a CUM central warehini.se, when the pro- 
posed e.\pciulitures on the lu'W Student Union are woefully in- 
adequate. 

Connnnnal eating is the on!)' wa\' in which (he dilemmas ol 
both tile Iralernities and the non-allilia(es can be resoK'ed. The 
financial ad\antagc for the fraternities is ob\ ions, since it would 
eliminate the inevitable iusoKency with which they are con- 
fronted. 

('()//('gc ( '\iilij 

It is the social benefits ol communal ealing, however, that 
would justify such a radical mine, by gatlu'ring the college com- 
munity together three timi's a day on a standing ol soeiai i'(|nali- 
ty, more would bi' done to create a si'iise ol ciiininiinit\' on a vol- 
untarx' basis than b\' any artificial plan of regulated rushing. It 
is impossible (o legislate social (olerance; onh' by being thrown 
in with the so-called "turke\s" will those who like to withdraw 
within their exehisixe shells realize that exervone has some 
to oiler. 

The biggest obstacle (o instiditing a sxsteiu of connnunal 
eating is the fraternity man's selfish relnsal to sacrifice the benc- 



;hing 



li( of eating in a small group, wliiih he now enjoys. Many un- 
dergraduales remember willi distaste the barbaric eating eondi- 
(ions in the freshman and sophomore eommons at Princeton, 
which they experienced dining the iuhiinous lootball weekend in 
195(1. 

Smatl /)i/iiiig Rotimn 

It is unlorlnna(e tha( (he undergraduate body cannot have 
the similar experience of ealing a( (he Uarsaril (hadnate School. 
The (lining room (here ca(ers (o hundreds ol sdidenis, yet is 
planneil and operated so as lo afioril a high standard ol civilized 
dining. One of i(s inos( atdaebvi' features is (he dixision ol (he 
dining room iiilo sexeral aleoxcs sealing abou( KM) s(iideii(s in 
each at small tables. If ten such dining seclions I'onid be built 
in(o (lie S(uden( Lhiioii, much of the small group atmosphere 
xvoukl he retained. 

Tliere is no reason xvliv the desireable decorinn couhl not 
be niaintained by eoulinuing (o have stndenl waiters and coats 
and lies a( tliimer. The (|nahlx' ol hiod could be upheld so long as 
(he lU; prompled (he adiuimsliaiion, while board bills eoulil be 
decreased by hiur or lixi' dollars a week. This laKer benelit would 
alloxx students of a wider economie hackground to come to Wil- 
liams. 

Cdllc^c-Cciilfifd Arliiilic.s 

The psychological elleet a( the present (iiiie ol 800 students 
heading west on .Main S(. and 200 students heading east every 
meal-time is xcrv demorali/ing lo the 200. Their sense of re- 
jection xxdiild be greadv niiligaled il (hey shared attraclive com- 
mon eating and social lacilKies xvKh (he x\hole college. 

Campus uniix' xvould also be sdenglhened by (wo corollary 
iiioxcs. Tirsl the organi/.alion iil inlramnral spoiis on a college 
xvide basis ralhei (ban a Iralernhy basis. Secondly, tlie 
seleelion ol (he f'iidergiadiia(e Council from (he sdident body 
as a xyhole rather lliaii (hidiigh Iralernily representadon. 
I''ni(('niilics till Triiil 

Such a package |)laii xuinid do nineli to dexclop a 
.sense ol eollegi' loxaltx' on (he pait ol the nudergraduad'S. 
alfiliales ucmld liaxe a grea(ei pride In (heir eiillege. while 
(he leeling thai tliex' xvi'ic on an niie(|ual slaniling xxidi (he fra- 
(eriiKx' men. 

T'raleniilies, moreoxcr, xvould he strengthened in (be long 
run. 'Thev would no longer base (heir appeal on such superficial 
values as ealing hieilides. 'The Iraiernitv svsiem xvould be forced 
(o s(an(l or lall on its supposed merits ol lelloxxship anil eoninion 
interests, by siiixixing lliis lest (he Iralernides xxduld justify their 
existence. Collapse xvonid indicate thai thev are anachronisms 
of a by-gone age. 



basic 

Non- 
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•■a 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD, WEDNESDAY, FE15HUAHY 13, 1952 



Villiams Wrestlers Lose Decision; 
Coast Guard Tops Purple, 18- 12 



Bill Callaghan, Shorb, 

Edwards, Gordon, Win ; 

Pins Decide Match 

By Jtti'k Marr 

New Loiuioii. Conn., Feb. - 
Iter di"opi)lnK the first threu 
iiU-hes to a slronB Const Guixrci 
iim. the WiUhims wrustlcrs 
inu'cd back to win four straight 
Jills, only to I0.SI' tile final bout, 
id Willi it the match. 
Despite winniiiK four of the 
■ hi bouts, the Ephs. In failiiiH 
pin a single Cadet, could only 
luiss lli points while their ru'nls 
inered 18. Ephmen Shorb, Cal- 
luin. Gordon, and Edwards all 
cisioned their opponents, but 
ri'c of the Purple's four los.ses 
re pins. 

I'lirple Koiinees Back 
After Cadets Allen and Faiieher 
1(1 iiinned Ephs Cover and La- 
inche. and Coast Guard's Welsh 
1(1 decisloned Bill Williams, Bob 
lb (iiiined a close deci.sion over 
il, inner Reif. Captain Bill Calla- 
han followed with a win over 
oast Guard's Lonti to narrow the 
rorinK nap. 

Dirk Gordon then came tliroUKh 
.villi a fine win in downinK Cadet 
Htadllander, and Dick Edward.s 
rowed the home clubs maruin 
a sinijle point in downiiiB 
.SIr.vlfeler in another close contest, 
t'adet Olin Livel.v. however, up.set 
tile Ephs hopes by iiinniiiK HuKh 
Murphy in the unlimited division. 



Purple Skaters Face 
Strong Clarkson Six 

l.iioklnt! lor its second win of 
the sca.son the Williams hotk- 
ey learn tackled highly rated 
Clark.son CoUeKe lust night at 
the R.P.I. Field House. 

Hi.ving recently edged a fast 
'loronto team 2-1, the Clark.son 
Golden Knights, according to 
C(jach Frank Bell, should have 
provided close to the best op- 
position the Purple .skaters 
would encounter. Last year's 
Tri-Slate League champions, 
Clarksoii has already downed 
Middlebury, 8-« in the only o- 
Iher League game it has played 
(O date. 



Ski Team Places 
Sixth at Hanover 



Collins, Callahan Score 
In Dartmouth Carnival 



Sunday. February 10 — (Hanover, 
N, H.i: Competing in a strong 
fleld of ten top-flight skiing pow- 
ers, the Williams ski team, paced 
by Ned Collins '52. edged a strong 
St. Lawrence aggregation for sixlh 
place in the Dartmouth Winter 
Carnival meet this weekend. 
See Page 4. Col. 3 



Eph Sextet Bows 
To Norwich, 7 - 2 

Beard, Bartlett Register 
Scores on Small Rink 



Cagers Drop JefF Till, 55-45 



Northfield, Vt., Feb. 8— Coach 
Bell's hockey team dropped 
a 7-2 decision to Norwich Univer- 
sity tonight, the sixth loss for the 
Ephs in seven contests this season. 

Reiilaelng Hud.son in the nets. 
Rod Starke held the Gold and 
Black pucksters to a single .score 
in each of Ihe first two periods, 
while George Bartlett beat goalie 
Home laic in the opening frame 
on a sinking blue-line shot that 
caught the corner for the fii'st 
Williams marker. 

Undersized Kink 

Purple skaters, not u.sed to the 
unusually .small playing surface of 
the Norwicli ice. failed to ci'ack 
Ihe opposing defen.se in the fre- 
(|uent first period drives. At the 
mid-point of the second period 
the home team began to stifle the 
ebbing Williams attacking spark, 
and fired an amazing total of 
thirty shots at the Williams cage 
before the frame ended. 

In the third period, while Nor- 
wich was marking up fiv? goals. 
Ihe visiting Ephs were .seldom al- 
lowed to bring the puck out of 
their defensive zone. With only 
.fifty seconds of playing time re- 
maining. John Beard flashed the 
red blinker behind the Norwich 
cage with a backhand thrust of 
Jim Harvey's pa.s.s. to record the 
final score of the game. 




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Est. 1873 

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Phone 161 

Plumbing, Heating and Oil Burners 
Williamstown, Mass. 



Join Our Growing 

List of Satisfied 
Williams Customers 

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Opp. Howard Johnson's 
State Rd. 



Indians Rate Among Nations Best 
Hoopsters Meet Siena Tomorrow; 

'roiiioriDW iiinhl. e(.iacli .\1 Sliaw's eap'rs move out of the 
small colli'i^e class when tlic\ Irascl Id .\lbanv to clash witli the 
hinhlv touted Siciia liidiaiis. 

Siena, alter lop|)liiii; iiiilK-alcii Sctoii Hall hom its liilili perch 
anioiij; the nation's top ten teams, was at one time ranked si,v 
tcentli in the comitrv. However, the Green and Gold's hij^h 

national rating took a spill when 
the New York AC. .sprang a 33-29 
upset last week to lower Siena's 
i .slate to 15-4. 



EXPERT SHOE REPAIRING 



We give the 
highest quality workmanship 

On your way to 
the post office stop in at 

SALVATORE SONS' 

Spring Street Est. 1901 




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i BeHapt>y- . 



Defensive Specialists 

Coached by Dan Cunha. the In- 
dians have been one of the coun- 
Iry's perennial Catholic cage pow- 
ers. Amassing a 91-20 record ov- 
er the past four years, Cunha's 
aggregations have put together the 
remarkable record of ranking 
tenth, eighth, fifth, second, and 
sevenlh in the nation in defense o- 
\'er the past five seasons. 

Among the ba.sketball elite 
which the Indians ha\e scalped 
ihls year are Manhattan (twice ■, 
Colgate. Temple, Arizona State, 
Cr.nisius, and Fordham. 

Billy Barren Night 
Tomorrow night Siena will be 
honoring one of its all-time ath- 
letic greats, their G'l" Negro cap- 
tain, Billy Harrell, with a "night". 
^ terrific rcbounder and jumper 
c'e.spile his comparatively short 
stature, Harrell has been the key 

See Page 4, Col. 3 



Victors Capitalize 
On Closing Drive, 
Height Advantage 

Smith Leads Shawmen, 

Gets 20 Points; Shudt, 

Hawkins Also Excell 



Bill Redman 

Feb, 9 .'Vfter leading by one 
point at Ihe end of a close first 
half. Amherst pulled away from 
^"il'iams in the third period to 
win 5S-45 in a Little Three en- 
•.■^unte!■ tonight before a capacity 
crowd at Lasell gym. The victory 
out the Lord Jefis in the lead in 
the Little Three race with a 1-0 
'•ecord ahead of Williams' 1-1 and 
Wes:Hyan'.s 0-1. 

Led by Howie Fisher's seven 
'luick points. Amherst moved out 
to a 41-34 advantage at the three- 
'luarter mark and was never head- 
ed. A bucket by Walt Greer and a 
free throw by Herb Smith brought 
Williams to 41-37 at the start of 
the final stanza, but Derry Ben- 
nett, the cool Amherst captain, 
broke the contest wide open with 
eight points in the last quarter. 
Bennett Leads Jeffs 

The dillerence between the two 
teams pro\ed to be the Amherst 
height advantage and the superb 
play of Bennett. The Sabrina lead- 
er was devastating under the de- 
fensive backboard, directed the 
semi-freeze put on by the Jeffs 
near the end of the third quarter, 
and clinched the victory with his 
scoring spree in the closing min- 
utes. 

The scoring of Fisher and Ster- 
ling Weaver and the floor game 
of Tony Mahar also helped to 
give Sabrina the edge. Bennett. 
Mahar. and Ken Wright played 
the entire 40 minutes for Amherst. 
Smith Hieh Scorer 

Outstanding for the Ephmen 
was Herb Smith who kept his 
team in the game by scoring 20 
points on a variety of fine shots 
from all over the court. The per- 
formance of Jack Hawkins in the 
fourth quarter also was notable 
as he harried the Amherst attack 
with Interceptions and inspired re- 
bounding. 

Williams started quickly and 
scored the first five points of the 
g; me on a foul conversion by Walt 
Creer. two of the same by Captain 
Wyn Shudt. and a fleld goal by 
Smith. After five minutes, Wll- 
See Page 4, Col. 2 



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MOBILGAS MOBILUBRICATION 

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LS./M FT- Ludcy Strike Means Fine Tobacco 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1952 



Paragraphs 
In the News 



Beta Theta Pi recently named 
named Rick Avery '52 house vice- 
president to fill tlie post vacated 
by Joe Stewart '52, the newly 
elected house president. 

George McAleenan '52 and 
Walt Flaherty '53 lost to two Wes- 
leyan debaters wlule supporting 
the question, "Slioiild the United 
States send an ambassador to the 
Vatican?" Pi-iday evening. 

Arthur B. Hudson '53 was elect- 
ed president of Chi Psi at a re- 
cent house meeting. Other ofBcers 
named for the coming year are: 
Thomas Williams 53, vice-presi- 
dent; Edward Cypiot '54. secre- 
tary; f.nd Edward Miller '54, 
treasurer. 

Alumni Fund secretary Charles 
B. Hall '15 announced that the 
1951 fund drive netted the college 
''115,227, the highest figure in the 
h'stoi-y of the college. A total of 
3.617 alumni contributed to the 
campaign. 

Intramural Baslietball Standings 
First Division 

Team W L PCT. 

Phi Sigma K-ppa 2 1.000 
Delta Kappa Epsilon 2 1.000 
Psi Upsilon 1 1 .500 

Theta Delta Chi 1 1 .500 
Delta Upsilon 1 1 .500 

Phi G.imma Delta 1 1 .500 
Sigma Phi 2 .000 

Delta Psi 2 .000 

Second Division 
Alpha Delta Phi 3 1.000 
Chi Psi 3 1.000 

K ppa Alpha 2 1 .667 

Delta Phi 2 1 .667 

Beta Theta Pi 1 2 .333 

"hi Delta Theta 1 2 .333 
Zeta Psi 3 .000 

Garfield Club 3 .000 

I dropped out) 



Elephant . . . 

got LOST! All recollections of the 
exact whereabouts of the 12 thou- 
."and pound beast was forgotten - 
for one-hundred years. 

After extensive research into 
m- ny yellowed documents, legends 
old wives' tales, etc. combined with 
a few dubious eye-witness reports 
.''nd mystical prophesies, "Opera- 
tion Tusk Force" got underway. 
Included in the chase for the prize 
loxodonta (worth some $25.00 to 
the Williams Record) were var- 
ious groups from Williams. "I feel 
like a 'bull-moose' " exclaimed one 
of many itinerants on the first of 
the Teddy Roosevelt-type big game 
hunts. 

About a week ago, with the balm 
of Spring upon us, "Operation 
T-F" was resumed. With the skill 
of experts, and the stamina of 
the proverbial "bull-moose", dig- 
ging commenced. Picks and shov- 
els hit the semi-frozen turf. Pro- 
fuse oaths struck the air! And 
four hours later, six feet of sod 
had been unearthed — but still no 
signs of the pet loxodonta . . . .And 
the shades of evening wore on the 
dank earth was replaced, and for 
the time being, at least, the House 
of Columbus remained undisturbed 
by mortal hands. 

BRING 
YOUR CAR 
TO US FOR 

EXPERT SERVICE 

€lM<t 

GENUINE FORD PARTS 



You'll lik* our 
PrOfflpf S«IV/C0 



You'll lik* our 
fttffionaMt Pr/cts 



You'll Ilk* our 
fMf(i^i Way of 
Doing Bw/flMS 



HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATED 



Frosh Hoopsters Gain Ninth Straight Win, 
Down R.F.I., 57-42, Despite Moros Loss 



Wilson, Broderick Sink 

11 Each; Team Scores 

27 in First Period 



Saturday, Feb. 9— After jump- 
ing off to an early first period lead, 
the Williams Freshman basketball 
te.-.m coasted to a 57-42 win over 
the R.P.I. Frosh. It was the ninth 
victory in a row for Bobby Coombs' 
men, who played without the serv- 
ices of their tall center Tony 
Moro, who was injured in prac- 
tice. 

Though hurt by Moro's absence, 
the frosh had little trouble in 
downing the shorter Rensselaer 
quintet. 

Fred Broderick was instrumental 
in puttting the Purple out in front 
as he scored nine quick points in 
the early minutes to help the Ephs 
take an 11-3 lead. 
Wilson, Henry Control Rebounds 

With Ron Wilson and J. C. 
Henry controlling the boards, Wil- 
liams led 39-15 at half-time. The 
Engineers tried to get back into 
the game in the second half but 
heir efforts fell short and the 
Purple coasted in with the re- 



Amherst . . . 

iams led 10-3. 

The Jeffs, however, fought back 

slowly and grabbed the lead at the 

end of the quarter on consecutive 

buckets by Mahar and Weaver. 

Ihe teams battled evenly through 

the second period, and the half 

ended with Amherst leading 27-20. 

Williams 

Hawkins, If 2 3 7 

Belshe 

Smith, rf 7 6 20 

Avery 

Depopolo 

Suessbrick. c 

Hall 2 2 

Lazor Oil 

Shudt, Ig 2 2 6 

Campbell 

Creer, rg 3 17 

Miller 10 2 

Totals 15 15 45 



serves playing most of the last 
(luartcr. 

Meet Siena Today 

Sneden of RPI was high .scorer 
for the evening as he racked up 
15 points. The WiUiams scoring 
was evenly divided as Wilson and 
Broderick each counted U and 
Henry put in nine. 

Today the Freshmen will ptit 
their nine game winning streak 
on the line as they take on the 
Siena Frosli at Lasell Gymnasium. 
Siena boasts a strong quintet and 
without the services of Moro. the 
Purple will have their work cut 
out. (Henry and Broderick will 
probably start at the forwards, 
Wilson at center, and Grey and 
Laitman at the guards.) 

Ski Team . . . 

Collins scored individually with 
a sixth in the downhill event, ne- 
gotiating the 3800-foot Moose 
Mountain course in 70.2 seconds. 
Pete Callahan '52 garnered tenth 
place in the downhill, as Middle- 
bury speed merchant Doug B\u'- 
den led the fleld in a record shat- 
tering performance. 

Third in Downhill 

In the team scoring, the Eph- 
men showed to best advantage in 
the downhill, taking third behind 
Middlebury and the host college. 
The squad, coached by Ralph 
Townsend. Olympic and F. I. S. 
itar. placed a strong seventh in 
;he jump, but came home a dis- 
ippointing eighth in both the sla- 
lom and the cross-country events. 



Siena . . . 



figure in the Indians' attack for 
the past three seasons. He holds 
the all-time Siena sophomore scor- 
ing record with 311 points, and 
last year garnered 220 more. 

Other probable Indian starters 
are seniors Glenn Bissell, Bill Ra- 
pavy. Bill Hogan. and sophomore 
Tom Pottenburgh. With Hogan 
.standing 6' 3" and Pottenburgh 
stretching 6' 9", Siena will hold a 
big height edge over the Ephs. 



Swimmers . . . 

whicli lias liad a disappointing 
season. Though Coach Muir was 
optimistic as to the outcome, he 
added that the return of former 
national intercollegiate backstroke 
champion DeQroot to the U-Conn 
leam would strengthen them 
greatly. 

The siunmary: 

300 yard medley relay— Won by 
Williams (Byerly, Jeffrey, Belash). 
rime: 3; 00. 

220 yard free-style — Won by 
lones (W); 2-Yorzyk (S); 3- 
Worthington (Wi.Tlme; 2:17.8. 

50 yard free - style — Won by 
.Martin iWi; 2-Coleman (Si; 3- 
Jones (SI. Time: 23.2. 

Dive — Won by Huddleston (Si; 
!-Rcgers (Wi; 3-Post (Wl. Win- 
ling points: 104.97. 

100 yard free-style — Won by 
Martin (Wi; 2-Coleman (S); 3- 
Cumlcr (SI. Time: 51.1. 

200 yard backstroke — Won by 
Byerly (Wi; 2-Robbins (S); 3- 
Matzger iWl. Time: 2:25.2. 

200 yard breaststroke — Won by 
Jeffrey (W); 2-Yorzyk (S); 3- 
Douglas (WI. Time: 2:27.2. 

440 yard free-style — Won by 
Jones (Wl; 2-Worthington (W); 
3-Yorzyk (SI. Time: 5:01.5. 

440 yard tree-style relay — Won 
by Springfield (Culmer, Jones, 
Butt. Coleman). Time: 3:44.4. 



TOP NOTC H 
REPAIR WORK 

LUPO 

SHOE REPAIRING 

At the end of Spring St. 



L. G. Balfour Co. 

FRATERNITY JEWELRY 
Stationery Progromg 

Bodgei Ringa Steim 

Jewelry Gifts Fovon 

Club Pint Keyl 

Medolf Trophief 

Write or Call 
CARL SORENSEN 

30 Murray Ave. Woterford, N. Y. 
TelephoneTroy — Adams 82563 



Eph Squashmen 
To Face Indians 

Squires Back in Lineup; 
Frosh Defeat Harvard 



Wednesday, Feb. 13 — Coach 
Chaffee and number one man Dick 
Squires, recently declared eligible, 
will lead the Williams squash 
team to Hanover for its match 
with the twice-defeated Dart- 
mouth nine today. Both teams 
have been defeated by Army by a 
score of 0-3. 

Dartmouth's first three, Addis, 
Fisher i.nd Foster are highly re- 
gai-ded, but the rest of the sqiuid 
is reputedly not loo impressive. 
Starting for Williams will be; 
Squires, Soapy Symington, Chris 
Ihoron. Captain Ray George, 
John Brownell, Tom Adkins, Todd 
Tillinghast, Doric Friend and Al 
Fulker.son, in that order. 

Frosh Crush Harvard 

Satinday, Feb. 9 — In a hard 
fought Freshman squash match 
liere today. Williams defeated a 
Harvard aggregation by a score of 
8-1. with George Kesel, playin,; 
number one, losing the only 
match, to Paschal. 

The win was not nearly as easy 
for the Purple as the score in- 
dicates, since four of the yearlings 
were carried to five games. 



Why wait until 
morning? 

When you can let the out- 
standinc news of the day everir 
evenlnc tliroufh the (uU lea«e4 
wire Associated Press service la 

North Adomi, Mau. 
On lole ot 5 p.m. on ell 
Williamitewn Newutandt 



COMIC VALENTINE:; 
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Phone Williomstown 550 or hiancock Center 4-4663 

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EBRUARY 15, 1952 




CHARLIE KELLER'S 
CHILDHOOD 



A DAY WITH A 

YOUNG 
ACTOR 



HOW THEY LIVE 
AT COLLEGE 



25 CENTS 



je^0f^ 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Ski Meet 



it Dartmouth 
s Fourth Place 



^: 



r at the Winter 
oUow. 



found; 
Service 

xliiv that Wil- 
dy was found 
3eta Theta Pi 
tlie head. 
: with |ira\cr.s 
u tlic Thomp- 



Eastern Colleges 
Initiate Advanced 
Teacher Training 

Williams Joins Program 

For Study At Harvard 

School of Education 



Wednesday, Feb. 20 -Williams 
and 19 other Eastern colleges 
have joined with the Harvard 
Graduate School of Education, 
and the Harvard and Radcliffe 
Graduate School of Art.s and Sci- 
ences to inaugurate a cooperative 
proRram to train elementary and 
secondary school teachers. The 
purpose of this pronram is to in- 
crease the number of qualif ed 
college graduates enterlnu the 
public schools' teaching ranks. 

The Fund for the Advancement 
of Education Is supportinti the 
program with $78,000 annually 
for three years, $45,000 tor fellow- 
ships, and $33,000 to support the 
instruction and administration of 
the plan. 

President James B. Conant of 
Harvard ha.s announced that fel- 
lowships will be granted to grad- 
uates of the twenty colleges in 
the program. The graduates will 
spend a year at Harvard investi- 
gating the ways of relating the 
liberal arts program with grad- 
uate study in education while 
serving apprenticeships in teach- 
ing. 



Noljle and Dr. E. J. Couehlin. a 
local practitioner, are leading the 
course. 

Tlie opening lecture was given at 
9 p. m. last night in the SI. John's 
parish house, but .iuniors and 
seniors may still enroll. There will 
be six Tuesday night meetings, 
terminating the week before Eas- 
ter recess. 

InformalUy Stres.scd 

Allhougli the course has been a 
Williams standby since the war, 
this year's series hopes to attract 
more participants by emphasizing 
a greater degree of informality 
and a broader view of the sub.iecl. 

Dr. Noble is handling the moral 
and spii-itual aspects, while Dr. 
Coughlin is lecturing on the phy- 
sical side of the marriage. The 
first part of the meeting is a 
half hour talk by cither Dr. Noble 
or Dr. Coughlin. while the remain- 
der is devoted to an open discus- 
sion, with the added altractlon 
of refreshments. 

Proposed Topics 

Among the topics .suggested la.st 
Wednesday by the house repre- 
sentatives are the questions of 
preparation for marriage, sexual 
behavior before and after mar- 
riage, and p.sychological ad.lu.st- 
ments to the marital status. 

On the physiological side, it 
was proposed that Dr. Coughlin 
consider in his talks such problems 
as child training and the relation- 
ship of sexual behaviour to parent- 
hood. 



merica present views of Paris and 
Prague, as well as cities in Italy 
and Russia. 

'Timl Room" Favorite 

Perhap.s the most popular paint- 
ing on display is the work of an 
American Negro, Jacob Lawrence. 
His "Pool Room " is drawn in such 
great detail that it even .sliows 
the smoke of a liglited cigarette 
curling up from the edge of a pool 
table. 

Tne scenes vary from a large. 
See Page 4, Col. 3 



Kirie Found 

Investigators found the body ly- 
ing face upward on a couch in the 
room. Some four feet aw-ay, be- 
neath a double-decker bed, lay a 
'jolt action .22 caliber rifle, its 
muzzle under the edge of a rug. 
One shot — a "short" shell — 
liad been fired from it. 

Officials completed their on-the 
scene investigation by 8:30 last 
night, but continued to work un- 
til early this morning at a Spring 
Street funeral home. 



John Hewett Qualifies for Coveted 
American Alpine Club Membership 



Wednesday, Feb. 20 — John He- 
wett '53. recently elected to the 
American Alpine Club, became 
the youngest alplni.st in the his- 
tory of the organization to receive 
such an honor. Despite his youth. 
Hewett has a long and impressive 
list of ascents to merit his mem- 
bership. 

The Club itself is a select or- 
ganization of 406 mountain cHmb- 
ers. the vast majority of whom 
are residents of the United States. 
It maintains headquarters in New 
York City and supplies its mem- 
bers with much climbing infor- 
mation, some in its regular pub- 
lications and .some on request. 
Rerommend and Approval 

In order to qualify for member- 
ship in the American Alpine Club, 
an applicant must have .sufficient 



climbing experience, be recom- 
mended by at least two members, 
and approved by the Club as a 
whole. 

Hewett was nominated for mem- 
bership by Adams Carter, his close 
friend and climbing companion. 
He first met Carter when the 
latter became a teacher at Milton 
Academy. Hewett's prep .school. It 
was under Carter's influence that 
John became an avid and expert 
climber. 

As a member and later president 
of the Milton Academy Moun- 
taineering Club. John gained his 
fir.st actual climbing experience. 
He was active in the organization 
when Carter joined the Milton 
faculty, and the two have led 
climbing groups on trips to the 
west for the past two years. 



.nd .state offi- 
:ed on the case 
T. Mullen of 
hern Berkshire 
<aminer: Asst. 
E. Levine of 
State Detective 
\1. Whittemoi'e 

1 last night by 
pector Richard 
eld and noted 
School pathol- 
Dea. 

-mber of Beta 

Theta Pi. was the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Millard Romaine of 3726 
Davenant Ave.. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

April Draft Test 
Applications Due 
Before March 10 



Gen. Hershey Announces 
Student Opportunities 
For Draft Deferment 



Wednesday. Feb. 20 — In a let- 
ter released by the Selective Ser- 
vice Examining Section it was 
announced that all eligible stu- 
dents who intend to take the Col- 
lege Qualification Test in 1952 
should file applications at once for 
the April 24 examination. 

Following the instructions of the 
bulletin, which can be obtained 
at the Student Aid Office, the 
.student should fill out his ap- 
plication and mail it no later than 
midnight. March 10. It was point- 
ed out that early filing will be to 
the .student's advantage. 

Results to Local Board 

Results will be reported to the 
student's local board for use In 
considering his deferment, accord- 
ing to the Educational Testing 
Service, which prepares and ad- 
ministers the tests. 

Previously, Major Gen. Hershey, 
Director of Selective Service, an- 
nounced that under existing reg- 



Ireland Captures 
Skimeister Award 



Participants, Spectators 
Hail Meet as Success 



Saturday, Feb. 16— Attracting 
three of tne top ski teams in the 
country, ihe Williams Wlnler Car- 
nival scorned the .snowless wastes 
of Willlamstown and took to the 
.slopes of Mount Greylock and 
Goodell Hollow. The best in ski 
thrills awaited the comparatively 
few spectators who braved the 
cold and the climb to watch the 
eienls. The team title finally 
iveni to MIddlebury after a nip 
and tuck battle with Dartmouth. 

Tlie winner's captain. Dick Ire- 
land, won Saturday's jumping to 
give his team the margin of vic- 
tory over the Indians — 587.63 
to 584.33. Ireland, who also plac- 
ed sixth in the downhill and 
seventh in the slalom, received the 
coveted Williams Skimeister Tro- 
phy for the best individual show- 
ing over the two day competition, 
Collins Stars 

Williams repeated and possibly 
exceeded its fitlne showing at the 
Dartmouth Carnival last week, 
lops 01 the class B teams, the 
Ephmen scored heavily In the 
downhill, placing third, ahead of 
such powerful competitors as New 
Hampshire and Bowdoin. 

Ned Collins '52 was the indivi- 
dual star for the host team. He 
placed seventh in the downhill, 
fourteenth in the slalom, and 
ninth in the jumping. Stu Chase 
and Pete Callahan in the slalom 
and Doug Wilson. Bob Tucker, and 
Joe Foote in the cross country 
w-ere also outstanding for the 
Ephs. 

Burden Combined Winner 

Doug Burden of Middlebury, 
winner of both the downhill and 
the slalom the previous week, was 
forced to be content with seconds 
this time, bowing to Kirby of 
Dartmouth in the former and to 
team-mate Gale Shaw In the lat- 
ter. Burden and Shaw were one- 
two in the Alpine combined. 

After falling behind MIddlebury 
in Friday's events. Dartmouth 
staged a strong comeback in the 
Nordic events on Saturday. Trem- 
blay. Agan. and Drury of the In- 
dians took the first three places 
in the Nordic combined, but the 
Blue and White stayed close e- 
nough for Iicland's winning jump 
to piovide the margin of victory. 

Victorious mentor Bobo Shee- 
hen praised Williams coach. Ralph 
Townsend, for his preparation of 
See Page 4, Col. 2 



Faculty Club Dance 
Attracts Large Crowd 

Saturday Feb, IB— Wliile the 
rest of the campus was in the 
middle of the 'Winter Carnival 
festivities, the faculty enter- 
tained themselves at the Facul- 
ty Club dance which ran from 
nine last night until one o'clock 
this morning Total attendance 
was estimated at 60 persons by 
Richard O. Rouse, entertain- 
ment committee chairman in 
charge of the dance. 

For the sake of contrast to 
the sub-zero weather that had 
prevailed for the last few days, 
the profs planned their deco- 
rations around a spring motif. 
A large and potent punchbowl 
provided a continual fountain 
of enjoyment, as the professors 
and their wives danced to the 
music of Al Trudel and his 
band. 



THE Willi WIS UECOUD, U'l: ONKSUAV, FKMHUAHV 13, 1952 



Paragraphs 
In the News 



Beta Theta Pi ii'ct'iuly iiiimod 
named Kick Autv 'o'J house vice- 
president tci till i:u' v)ost vacated 
by Joe Stewart 5'!. the newly 
elected house president. 

George MeAleeiian '52 and 
Walt Flaherty '5;i lost to two Wes- 
leyan debaters while supporting 
the question, ■■Should the United 
States send an ambassador to the 
Vatican'?" Pi'iday evi ning. 

Arthur B. lludsou ■SS was elect- 
ed president of Chi Psi at a re- 
cent house meetiu!;, other officers 
ramed for the comins year are; 
Thomas Williams 53, vice-presi- 
dent; Edward Cypiot '54, secre- 
tary: ;;nd ICduard Miller '54. 
.rea.surer 

Alumni Fund secretary Charles 
B. Hall '15 announced that the 
1951 fund drive netted the colle;!e 
'■115, l^T, the hiuhest fiKure in the 
h'stoiT of the collcKc. A total of 
3.617 alumni contributed to the 
campaisn. 

Intramural Basketball Standing:s 
First Division 

Team W L PCT. 

Phi Sic;ma K ppa 2 1.000 
Delta Kappa Epsilon 2 1.000 
Psi Upsilon 1 1 .500 

Theta Delta Chi 1 1 .500 

Delta Upsilon 1 1 .500 

Phi Gimma Delta 1 1 .500 
Sigma Phi 2 .000 

Delta P-^i 2 .000 



Second Di\'ision 



Alpha Delta Phi 
Chi Psi 
K ppa Alpha 
Delta Phi 
Eeta Theta Pi 
"hi Delta Theta 
Zota Psi 
Gnrheld Club 
'dropped outi 



1.000 
1.000 
.667 
.667 
.333 
.333 
.000 
.000 



Elephant 



got LOST! All recollections of the 
exact whereabouts of the 12 thou- 
sand pound beast was forgotten - 
for one-hundred years. 

After extensive research into 
m ny yellowed documents, legends 
old wives' tales, etc. combined with 
a few dubious eye-witness reports 
."lid mystical prophesies, "Opera- 
tion Tu3k Force" got undei-vv,iy. 
Included in the chase for the prize 
loxodonta 'worth some $25.00 to 
the Williams Record) were var- 
ious groups from Williams. "I feel 
'ike a ■bull-moose' " exclaimed one 
of many itinerants on the first of 
the Teddy Roosevelt-type big name 
hunts. 

About a week ago, with the balm 
of Spring upon us, "Operation 
T-F" was resumed. With the skill 
of experts, and the stamina of 
the proverbial ■■bull-moo.se^', dig- 
ging commenced. Picks and .,hov- 
els hit the semi-frozen turf. Pro- 
fuse oaths struck the air! .And 
four hours later, six feet of sod 
had been unearthed — but still no 
signs of the pet loxodonta . . . And 
the shades of evening wore on the 
dank earth was replaced, and for 
the time bi?ing, at least, the House 
of Columbus remained undisturbed 
by mortal hands. 



BRING 
YOUR CAR 
TO US FOR 

EXPERT SERVICE 
GENUINE FORD PARTS 



You'll lik* our 
h9m^\ Servfc* 



You'll lik« our 



You'll iika our 

fr/Mi//x IVtfX of 
Do/fljT Bvsltttss 



HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATED 



Frosh Hoopsters Gain 
Down R.P.L, 5742, 

Wilson, Broderick Sink 

11 Eacli; Team Scores 

27 in First Period 

Saturday. Feb. 9 After jump- 
ing olf to an early llrst iieriod lead, 
the Williams Freshman basketball 
te. m coasted to a 57-42 win over 
the R.P.I. Fresh. It was the ninth 
victory in a row for Bobby Coombs' 
men, who played without the serv- 
ices of their tall center Tony 
Moro, who was in.iured in prac- 
ace. 

Though hurl by Muro's absence, 
the frosh had little trouble in 
downing the shorter Rens,selaer 
fltiintel, 

Fred Broderick was instrumental 
111 puttting the Purple out in front 
as he scored nine quick points in 
the early minutes to help the Ephs 
take an 11-3 lead. 
Wilson, Henry Control Rebounds 

With Ron Wilson and J, C. 
Henry controlling the boards. Wil- 
liams led 39-15 at half-time. The 
Enginecrs tried to get back into 
the game in the second half but 
heir efforts fell short and the 
Puriile coasted in with the re- 



Amherst 



lams led 10-3. 

The Jelfs, however, fought back 
slowly and grabbed the lead at the 
end of the quarter on coiLsecutive 
buckets by Mahar and Weaver. 
Ihe teams battled evenly through 
the .second period, and the half 
ended with Amherst leading 27-2G. 
Williams 



Hawkins, If 


2 


3 


7 


Belshe 





(1 





Smith. rf 


7 


i; 


20 


Avery 











Depopolo 











Sue..sbrick. c 











Hall 





2 


2 


Lazor 





1 


1 


.'■■liiidl. Ig 


2 


2 


6 


Campbell 











Creer. rg 


3 


1 


7 


Miller 


1 





2 


Totals 


15 


15 


45 



Ninth Straight Win, 
Despite Moro's Loss 

ser\es playing most of the last 
liUarter. 

Meet Siena Today 

Snellen of HPl was high .scorer 
'er '.lie evening as he racked up 
15 points. The Williams scoring 
was evenly divided as Wilson and 
Broderick each counted 11 and 
Henry put in nine. 

Today the Freshmen will put 
their nine game winning streak 
on the line as they lake on the 
Siena Frosh at Lasell Gymiiasiiun. 
Siena boasts a strong ttuintet and 
without the services of Moro, the 
Purple will liiu'e their work cut 
out. I Henry and Broderick will 
lirobably slaii at the forwards, 
VVilsiin at center, and Grey and 
Laitman at the guards,) 

Ski Team . . . 

Collins seorccl individually with 
a sixth in Ihe downhill event, ne- 
gotiating the 3800-fool Moose 
Mountain course in 70.2 .seconds. 
Pete Callahan '52 garnered tenth 
place in Ihe downhill, as Midiile- 
bury Sliced merchant Doug Bur- 
den led Ihe rield in a record shat- 
leriiig performance. 

Third in Downhill 

In Ihe team .scoring, the Eph- 
men showed to best advantage in 
Ihe downhill, taking third behind 
Middlebury and the host college. 
The .squad, coached by Ralph 
Townsend, Olympic and F. I. S. 
• lar. placed a strong seventh in 
he jump, but came home a dls- 
ippoiiuing eighth in both the sla- 
lom and the ero.ss-eountry events. 



Swimmers 



Siena 



nvin-e in the Indians' attack tor 
ihe past three sea.sons. He holds 
Ihe all-time Siena .sophomore scor- 
ing record with 311 points, and 
las! year garnered 220 more. 

Other probable Indian starters 
are seniors Glenn BLssell, Bill Ra- 
pavy. Bill Hogan, and ,sophcmore 
Tom Pottenburgh. With Hogan 
standing 6^ 3" and Pottenburgh 
stretching 6' 9". Siena will hoM a 
big height edge over the Ephs. 



which has had a disaiipointing 
.season. Though Coach Milir was 
optimistic as to the outeome. he 
.aided lli.il Ihc return of former 
ir.lional intercollegiate backstroke 
ehamiiion DeOroot to the U-Comi 
.earn would strengthen them 
grcatly. 

Tlie siiinmary; 

300 yard medley relay -Won by 
Williams iB.verly, JclVrey, Belaslu. 
rime; 3; 00. 

220 yard free-style -Won by 
tones iWi; 2-Yoriiyk iS); 3- 
Worthington iWi.Time; 2:17.8. 

50 yard free - style — Won by 
Martin ' W ' : 2-Coleman iSi; 3- 
. Jones 'Si, Tune; 23.2. 

Dive Won by lluddleston 'S'; 
:-Kigers 'W'l; 3-Post 'W'. Win- 
ling points; 104.97. 

11)0 yard free-style Won by 
■Martin 'W'; 2-Colemari 'Si; 3- 
Cumlcr 'S '. Time: 51.1. 

2111) yard backstroke -Won by 
Byeily 'W; 2-Robbins 'Si; 3- 
\Iatzger ' Wi. Time; 2:25.2. 

20U yard bivaststroke — Won by 
.Jellrey ' W ' ; 2-Yorzyk (St; 3- 
Diniglas I Wi. Time; 2:27,2. 

440 yard free-style- -Won by 
Junes iVV. 2-Worthington 'Wi; 
3-'i'orzyk 'Si. Time: 5:01.5. 

440 yard free-style relay -Won 
by Spriiigfieki 'Culmer. Jones, 
Butt, Coleman I, Time: 3:44.4. 



TOP NOTCH 
REPAIR WORK 

LUPO 

SHOE REPAIRING 

At the end of Spring St. 



I L. G. Balfour Co. 

( FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

' Stationery Programi 

Badges Rings Stainf 

Jewelry Gifta Favor* 

Club Pini Kayi 

Medall TrophiM 

Write or Call 
CARL SORENSEN 

30 Murray Ave, Waterford, N. Y. 
TelephoneTrov — Adams 82563 



Eph Squashmen 
To Face Indians 



Squires Back in Lineup; 
Frosh Defeat Harvard 

Wednesday. Feb. 13 — Coach 
Chalice and number one man Dick 
Sciuires, recently declared eligible, 
will lead the Williams .squash 
team to Hanover for its match 
with the twice-defeated Darl- 
inoulh nine today. Both teams 
liave been defeated by Army by a 
.score of (>-3. 

Darlniiailh's llrst three. Addis, 
Fishei iiul Foster are highly re- 
gaitleil, but the rest of the .squad 
is repiitedly not too impressive. 
.Starting for Williams will be: 
.S(|uires, Soapy Symington, Chris 

1 horon. Captain Ray George, 
.lolin Browncll, Tom Adkins, Todd 

rillmghast. Done Friend and Al 
l''iilker.son, in that order. 

I'rosh Crush Harvard 
Saturday, Fell. 9- In a hard 
fought Freshman .squash match 
liere Uiday. Williams defeated a 
Harvard aggregation by a .score of 
H-1. with Cieorgi' Kcsel, iilayin,; 
number one. losuu; the <uily 
match. 1.1 Paschal 

The um was not nearly as "Asy 
lor the I'liriile as Ihe score in- 
dicates, since four of the yearlings 
were earned to five games. 



Why wait until 
morning? 

When you can gel the u^ t. 
staiidiiig news uf the day e\> <y 
evening lliruugh the full leui .-d 
wire Associated Press service a 

iSl)p ulrauarrt|il 

North Adami, Mom. 
On tola af 5 p.m. on oil 
Williomitown Ntwistonrfi 



COMIC VALENTINE 
and Intriguing Gifts 

at 

MARGE'S 
Gift Shop 



.Jiimii.y Pcilk 



NOW! 

4350 FT. OF UPHILL 
TRANSPORTATION 



750 ft. vertical rise, 2300 ft. T-bor, two 900 ft. tows, 
NEW 250 ft. novice tow 

NEAREST T-Bar oreo, smoothest, best 
protected from wind and sun! 

Do not |jdge stiow contlilmns Ijy those 
in WiNiamstown. J, P. has had 20" when 
There was none m town 

Phone WiNiamstown 550 or fHancock Center 4-4663 

LIFT OPERATES DAILY 

HANCOCK ♦ ♦ MASSACHUSETTS 



ilHlif K SnUMG CIGAREm in AliimATCOlLEGES 




Copvfighr 10^?. TirniTT * Mvpii TonArm Co 



leer 



BRUARY 15, 1952 




CHARLIE KELLER'S 
CHILDHOOD 



A DAY WITH A 



r r u^^ T. ' n T y^i 



HOW THEY LIVE 
AT COLLEGE 



25 CENTS 



ttafi^ 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Ski Meet 



1 1 Dartmouth 
s Fourth Place 



r at the Wintrr 
ulluw. 

hund; 
Service 

i(la\ til, it \\ il- 
j\ was loiintl 
ict.i Thcta I'i 
the lirail, 
: with pia\ ri-, 
II till' 'riidiiip- 



Eastern Colleges 
Initiate Advanced 
Teacher Training 

Williams Joins Program 

For Study At Harvard 

School of Education 

Wednesday. Ft-b. ;;0 Willuiins 
and 19 ollior Eastern collenes 
liave joined Willi the Haiviird 
iliaduale School of Kclueation, 
aid llie Haivaid and Radcliffe 
' Graduate School of Arts and Sei- 
I'licc.s to inaunuiate a cooperative 
lnoKram to train elementary and 
seecmdary school leacliers. The 
l>iirpose (if this prouram is to in- 
I'M'ase the nuinher of (luallfied 
college Kraduat.cs cnleriiii; llic 
public .schooLs' teaehinu ranks. 

The Fund for the AdvaiuemeiU 
"f Educalion Is support ine the 
liioKram with $78,000 annually 
for three years. $4.'j.000 for fellow- 
ships, and $:i;i.000 to .support the 
instruction and administration of 
the plan. 

President James B Coiiant of 
Harvard has announced that fel- 
lowships will be granted to urad- 
uates of the twenty coUckcs in 
the proKram. The graduates will 
spend a .vear at Harvard investi- 
MtttiR the ways of relatlni; the 
liberal arts proKiam with Kiad- 
imte study in education while 
•servlnR apprenticeships in teach- 
i"ti 



Noble ,111(1 Dr. 10. J. Couiihlin, a 
I.ical iJr.irtitionei . are leadini: the 

(■nurse 

The opeiiim; lecture was i;iven at 
.! p 111, l.isl iiiiilit 111 Ihe St Jiihn's 
parish li.iUM' bill juniors and 
sen (US may .si ill enroll There will 
br si\ 'I'licsday iiiiihl nieeliii'is. 
Icrlllllialllli' the week before Kas- 
ler recess 

lMl(irii)alil> .Stressed 
AUlloU!;h the course has lii'cli a 
Williams standby since the war. 
this .vear's .series hopes to alliact 
more participants Ijy emphasizinii 
a (-■realer dcuree of informality 
.Hid a broiidei Mew af Ihe siibiccl , 
U;- Noble is handliiic the iiKiral 
and spiritual aspects, while Dr. 
Cdiiuhlin is lectiirini; on the |)liy- 
sical side of the marriaKC. The 
first part of Ihe meetinc is a 
half hour talk by either Ur. Noble 
or nr. C'oUKhlin. while the remaiii- 
dei is devoted to an open di.sciis- 
s.oii. with the added attraction 
(if refreshmenls. 

I'ropnsed Toplos 

Ainor.!' the loiiics suBuested last 
Wednesday liy the house repre- 
sentatives are the questions of 
preparation for marriuBC. .sexual 
behavior before and after inar- 
riaue. and ps.vcholoKical ad.iust- 
ments to the marital .status. 

On the ph.vsloloslcal .side, it 
was iiroposed that Dr. CoilRhlin 
consider in his talks siicli problems 
as child trainiiii! and the relation- 
ship of sexual behaviour to parent - 
hood 



ineiica iireseiil Mews of Paris and 
Trai^ue. as well as cities in Italy 
and Russia, 

"INmiI Kooiu" I'avorite 

Perhap.i the most popular paint- 
mi; on display is the work of an 
American NcKio. Jacob Lawrence. 
His "Pool Room" is drawn in such 
:;reat delall that it e\en shows 
ilie sinok,' of a liiihted cigarette 
ciirliiu; 111) from tlie educ of a pool 
table. 

Tile scenes \Avy from a lariic. 
See Paue 4. Col, :i 



Klflp Kounrt 

liucstiiiators found the body ly- 
.iii; face upward on a couch in the 
; ooni Some four feet away, be- 
iiealii a double-decker bed. lay a 
loll action .22 caliber rifle, its 
iiui/./le under llie cd^e of a nm, 
( )ne shot a "short" shell - 

laid been fiivd from it 

officials compleled their on-the 
scene investigation by 8:30 last 
nii;lu. but continued to work un- 
til early this mornint; at a Sprint; 
.siieel funeral home. 



John Hewett Qualifies for Coveted 
American Alpine Club Membership 



Wednesday, Feb. 20— John He- 
wett ',53. recently elected to the 
American Alpine Club, became 
the youngest alpinist in the his- 
tory of the oiKanization to receive 
•such an honor. Despite his youth. 
Hewett has a lont> and impressive 
list of n.scents to merit his mem- 
bership. 

The Club itself is a select or- 
Kanization of 406 mountain climb- 
ers, the vast ma.iorlty of whom 
are residents of the United States. 
It maintains hindquarters in New 
York City and supplies its mem- 
bi-'rs with much climblnu infor- 
mation, some in its remilar pub- 
lications and .some on request, 
Kecommend and Approval 

111 order to qualify tor member- 
ship in the American Alpine Club, 
an applicant must have .sufficient 



(liinbui!; experience, be recom- 
niended by at least two members, 
and approved by the Club as a 
whole. 

Hewett was nominated for mem- 
bership by Adams Carter, his close 
friend and climbliiR companion 
He first met Carter when the 
latter became a teacher at Milton 
Academy. Hewett's pi"ep school. It 
was under Carter's influence that 
John became an avid and expert 
climber. 

As a member and later president 
of the Milton Academy Moun- 
taineerini; Club. John gained his 
first actual climbiiiK experience. 
He was active in the oru'anization 
when Carter .toined the Milton 
f.iriilty. and the two have led 
climbini; Ki'oups on trips to the 
west for the pa.st two years. 



nd state offi- 
:ed on the case 
T, Mullen of 
hern Berkshire 
iaminer; A.sst, 
E, Li'vine of 
State Detective 
VI. Whittemoix" 

1 last niuhi by 
pector Richard 
aid and noted 
School palhol- 
Dea. 

-mber of Beta 
Ihet.i Pi. was Ihe .son of Mr. and 
Mrs. .Millard Romaine of 3726 
Davenant Ave.. Cincinnati. Ohio. 

April Draft Test 
Applications Due 
Before March 10 

Gen. Hershey Announces 
Student Opportunities 
For Draft Deferment 



W(>diiesday. Feb. 20 — In a let- 
ter released by the Selective Ser- 
vice Examininf; Section it was 
announced that all eligible stu- 
dents who intend to take the Col- 
lege Qualification Test in I9,')2 
.should file applications at once for 
the April 24 examination. 

Followini; the instructions of the 
bulletin, which can be obtained 
at the Student Aid Office, the 
student .should fill out his ap- 
plication and mail it no later than 
midnii;ht. March 10, It was point- 
ed out that early fihnu will be to 
the student's advaniawe 

Kesulls to Local Board 

Results will Ix' reported to the 
student's local board for u.se in 
eonsiderins his deferment. accord- 
Ins to the Educational Testins 
Service, which prepai-ps and ad- 
ministers tlie tests. 

Previously. Ma.tor Gen. Hershey. 
Director of Selective Service, an- 
nounced that under exIsthiR reg- 



Ireland Captures 
Skimeister Award 



Participants, Spectators 
Hail Meet as Success 



.Sauiiday. h'cb lU .'^Itraclmi; 
three of iiie to|J ski teams m the 
coumiy, the Williams Winter Car- 
nival scorned the .snowle.ss wastes 
of waiiamstown and took to the 
slopes ol Mount Greylock and 
Ooodell Hollow. The best in ski 
ihriUs awaited the comparatively 
liw spectators who braved the 
lold and the climb to watch the 
eiiiiis The team title finally 
i\cm to Middlebury atlei a nip 
and tuck battle with Dartmouth, 

riu- winner's captain. Dick Iri- 
Uuui, won .Saturday's jumpuu; to 
im his learn the marRiii of vic- 
tor. \ over tlie Indians - 587,63 
U) .184 33 Ireland, who al.so plac- 
ed sixih in the downhill and 
s(\(nth in the slalom, received the 
coveted Williams Skimeister Tro- 
imy for tiie besi individual show - 
.n:: over the two day compelilion 
(.'utlhis Stars 

Williams repeated and possibly 
exceeded its fillne showins at the 
Daitiiiouth Carnival la.sl week, 
lops ol llie class B teams, the 
Ephmen scored heavily in the 
downhill, plarini; third, ahead of 
such powerful competitors as New 
H.,mpshire and Bowdom 

Ned Collins '52 was the indivi- 
dual star for the host team. He 
placed seventli in the downhill, 
fourteentli In the slalom, and 
ninth m tlie jumplni;. Stu Chase 
and Pete Callahan m the slalom 
and Doiu; Wilson, Bob Tucker, and 
Joe Foote in the cro.ss country 
were also outstandini; for the 
Ephs, 

Burden Ciinihined Winner 

Dous; Burden of Middlebury. 
winner of bolli the downhill and 
the slalom the previous week, was 
forced to be content with seconds 
thi.s time, bowuii; to Kirby of 
Dartmouth in the former and to 
team-mate Gale Shaw in the lat- 
ter. Burden and Shaw were one- 
two in the Alpine combined. 

After falliiii; behind Middlebury 
ill Friday's events. Dartmouth 
staged a stioii- comeback in the 
Nordic events on Saturday. Trem- 
blay. Asian, and Drury of the In- 
dians look tlie first three places 
in the Nordic combined, but the 
Blue and White stayed close e- 
noutih for Iii land's winninM .lump 
to provide the marmn of victory. 

Victorious mentor Bobo Shee- 
lien prai.sed Williams coach. Ralph 
rownsend. for his preparation of 
See Paue 4. Col 2 



Faculty Club Dance 
Attracts Large Crowd 

Saturday I'rb 1(1 While the 
rest of the campus was in the 
middle of the Winter Carnival 
festivities, ilie faculty enter- 
tained themsilves at the Facul- 
ty Club daiKi which ran from 
nine last na^hi until one o'clock 
this mornim; Total attendance 
was estimated at 60 persons by 
Richard O Rou.se. entertain- 
ment commitH'c chairman In 
charge of the dance. 

For the sake of contrast to 
the sub-zero weather that had 
prevailed for the last few days, 
the profs planned their deco- 
rations around a spring motif 
A larRe and potent punchbowl 
provided a continual fountain 
of en.ioymeiit. as the professors 
and their wives danced to the 
music of Al Trudel and his 
band 



Paragraphs 
In the News 



Beta Theta PI recently named 
named Rick Avery '52 house vice- 
president to fill tlie post vacated 
by Joe Stewart '52, the newly 
elected house president. 

George McAleenan '52 and 
Walt Flaherty '53 lost to two Wes- 
leyan debaters while supporting 
the question, "Should the United 
States send an ambassador to the 
Vatican?" Px-iday evening. 

Arthur B. Hudson '53 was elect- 
ed president of Chi Psi at a re- 
cent house meeting. Other officers 
named for the coming year are: 
Thomas Williams 53, vice-presi- 
dent; Edward Cyplot '54, secre- 
tary; and Edward Miller '54, 
■i-reasurer. 

Alumni Fund secretary Charles 
B. Hall '15 announced that the 
1951 fund drive netted the college 
•■115,227, the highest figure in the 
h'stoi-y of the college. A total of 
3,an alumni contributed to the 
campaign. 

Intramural Basketball Standings 
First Division 

Team w L 

Phi Sigma K- ppa 2 
Delta Kappa Epsllon 2 



Frosh i 
Down 

Wilson, 
11 Eacl 
27 in 

Saturday, 
Ing oSt to an 
the William 
team coaste 
Ihe R.P.I. p 
victory in a 
men, who pi 
ices of th( 
Moro, wlio 
vice. 

Though h 
the frosh 1 
downing th 
quintet. 

Fied Brodi 
in puttting t 
as he scorec 
the early mi; 
take an 11-; 
Wilson, Hei 

With Roi 
Henry contri 
liams led 39 
Engineers ti 
the game in 
heir efforts 
Purple coas 



Psi Upsilon 
Theta Delta Chi 
Delta Upsilon 
Phi Gamma Delta 
Sigma Phi 
Delta Psi 



Second Division 



Alpha Delta Phi 
Chi Psi 
K: ppa Alpha 
Delta Phi 
Beta Theta Pi 
■"hi Delta Theta 
Zeta Psi 
Garfield Club 
'dropped out) 



3 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 








1 
1 
1 
1 

2 
2 
1 



1 
1 

2 
2 
3 
3 



Elephant . . . 

got LOST! All recollections of the 
exact whereabouts of the 12 thou- 
."and pound beast was forgotten 
for one-hundred years. 

After extensive research Into 
m- ny yellowed documents, legends 
old wives' tales, etc. combined with 
a few dubious eye-witness reports 
nnd mystical prophesies, "Opera- 
tion Tusk Force" got underway. 
Included in the chase for the ijrize 
loxodonta (worth some $25.00 to 
the Williams Record) were var- 
ious groups from Williams. "I feel 
like a 'bull-moose' " exclaimed one 
of many itinerants on the first of 
the Teddy Roosevelt- type big game 
hunts. 

About a week ago, with the balm 
of Spring upon us, "Operation 
T-F" was resumed. With the skill 
of experts, and the stamina of 
the proverbial "bull-moose", dig- 
ging commenced. Picks and shov- 
els hit the semi-frozen turf. Pro- 
fuse oaths struck the air! And 
four hours later, six feet of sod 
had been unearthed — but still no 
signs of the pet loxodonta . . . And 
the shades of evening wore on the 
dank earth was replaced, and for 
the time being, at least, the House 
of Columbus remained undisturbed 
by mortal hands. 



WHEN THINKING OF A PARTY 

IT'S THE 

COLONIAL PACKAGE STORE 

GOOD STOCK OF WINES AND LIQUORS 

Fine Champagne that you can afford 

Also 

Your Favorite Beers 



Tel. 863-M 



Route 2, Williamstown 



THE GYM LUNCH 

Spring Street 
Appreciates 

the 

Patronage 

of 

You and Your Date 

During 

Ttie Winter Carnival 



Lamb's Stationery Store 



'Typewritten is Well Written' 



500 Orchids 

GIVEN AWAY FREE 

on Friday ofternoon to the first 500 
guys with their date 

No strings attached 



STU DENT SUPPLIES 
COLLEGE STATIONERY 

At The 

Bemis Store 

REMINGTON TYPEWRITERS 
All Makes Repoired 



BRING 
YOUR CAR 
TO US FOR 

EXPERT SERVICE 
GENUINE FORD PARTS 



You'll lik* our 

fr«flipf fcrv/ct 



You*ll lilc* our 



You'll Ilk* our 



HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATED 




Conri<^t I«<:. Xaaam ft Mnu Touixo Ca 



Leer 



Editora 
Pete Plckard and Ted Terry 

Feature Writem 

Dick Duffleld, George Klnter, Charlie Plsher 
Kreag Donovan, Al Home, Tom Adklns 

Head Photographer 
Charles Eichel 



Photoirraphen 

Charlie Friend, Dave Qray, John Leech, 
Sanders 



BUSINESS BOARD 



Wy 



John Notz, Jr. '53 
Dudley M. Baker '53 



Business Manager 

Assistant Business Manager 

Robert O. Coulter '53 

Assistant Business Manager 

John P. Johnston, II '54 Advertising Manager 

Harold Q. Pratt, Jr. '54 

Assistant Advertising Manager 

Curtis V. Titus '54 Circulation Manager 

Richard C. Schaub '54 Treasurer 

Business Staff: 1954 - J. Oushee; 1956 - H. 
Lindsay, H. Moser. G. Olmsted, J. Innes, R. 
Chadwlck, N. Faulkner, H. Smith 



TACONIC LUMBER 
& HARDWARE 



LUMBER HARDWARE 



BUILDERS' SUPPLIES 



Office and Yard 



George W. Schryver 



20 Water Street 



Telephone 122 



WHERE WILLIAMS MEN MEET 
IN NORTH ADAMS 

THE RICHMOND 


WHY WAIT UNTIL M0RNING7 

When you con get the outitonding newi of Hi* 
doy eveiy evening through the full leosad wir* 
Afiociated Preei lervicet in 

The Transcript 

NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 
On tale ot 5 p.m. on oil Williomitown Newitlonde 




why worry? 
McClelland has it 

LARGEST STOCK OF CLASSROOM 
AND OFFICE EQUIPMENT IN TOWN 

PRINTING FACILITIES FOR 
POSTERS, PUBLICATIONS, ETC. 

A COMPLETE LINE OF ART 
AND DRAFTING MATERIALS 

McClelland 

Phone - - - 544-W 


The Quonset Club 

Five miles from Smith 
on the rood to Amherst 




SocraUr preached: 

"THE BEST SEA50N 
FOR FOOD 15 HUNGER. 
FOR DRINK, THIRST." 

Cicero 

Score one for Soc. He's absolutely right 
. . . thirst knows no season. That's why 
anytime is the right time for Coke. 




PCin^ft # r>pWvr#o 



lOnUO UND£« AUTHOmiY OP THI COCA.C0LA COMPANY lY 

BERKSUIBE COCA COLA BOTTLING CO. 

lro( / »Hll<»t. © 1951, THE COCA-COIA COMPANY 



je£(rfj&^ 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Ski Meet 

It Dartmouth 
s Fourth Place 



r at the Winter 
ollow. 



louni; 
Service 



jday that Wil- 
iy was found 
3eta Theta Pi 
the head. 
; with prayers 
n the Thomp- 



Ireland Captures 
Skimeister Award 



Participants, Spectators 
Hail Meet as Success 



Jid state offi- 
:ed on the case 
T. Mullen of 
hern Berkshire 
tamlner ; Asst. 
E. Levine of 
State Detective 
VI. Whittemore 



Eastern Colleges 
Initiate Advanced 
Teacher Training 

Williams Joins Program 

For Study At Harvard 

School of Education 



Wednesday. Feb. 20— Williams 
and 19 other Eastern colleges 
have joined with the Harvard 
Graduate School of Education, 
and the Harvard and Badcliftc 
Graduate School of Arts and Sci- 
ences to Inaugurate a cooperative 
program to train elementary and 
secondary school teachers. The 
purpose of this program is to in- 
crease the number of qualified 
college graduates entering the 
public .schools' teaching ranks. 

The Fund for the Advancement 
of Education is supporting the 
program with $78,000 annually 
for three years, $45,000 for fellow- 
ships, and $33,000 to support the 
Instruction and administration of 
the plan. 

President James B. Conant of 
Harvard has announced that fel- 
lowships will be granted to grad- 
uates of the twenty colleges in 
the program. The graduates will 
spend a year at Harvard investi- 
gatftig the ways of relating the 
liberal arts program with grad- 
uate study in education while 
serving apprenticeships in teach- 
ing. ' 



Noblo and Dr. E. J. Coughlin, a 
local practitioner, are leading the 
course. 

Tlie opening lecture was given at 
9 p. m. Ia.st night in the St. John's 
palish house, but juniors and 
seniors may still enroll. There will 
be six Tuesday night meetings, 
terminating the week before Eas- 
ter recess. 

Informality Stressed 

Although the course has been a 
Williams standby since the war, 
this year's series hopes to attract 
more participants by emphasizing 
a greater degree of informality 
and a broader view of the subject. 

Dr. Noble is handling the moral 
and spiritual aspects, while Dr. 
Coughlin is lecturing on the phy- 
sical side of the marriage. The 
first part of the meeting is a 
half hour talk by either Dr. Noble 
or Dr. Coughlin. while the remain- 
der is devoted to an open discus- 
sion, with the added attraction 
of refreshments. 

Proposed Topics 

Among the topics suggested last 
Wednesday by the house repre- 
sentatives are the questions ot 
preparation for marriage, sexual 
behavior before and after mar- 
riage, and psychological adjust- 
ments to the marital status. 

On the physiological side, it 
was proposed that Dr. Coughlin 
consider in his talks such problems 
as child training and the relation- 
ship of sexual behaviour to parent- 
hood. 



merica present views ot Paris and 
Prague, as well as cities in Italy 
and Russia. 

"Pool Room" Favorite 

Perhaps the most popular paint- 
ing on display is the work of an 
American Negro, Jacob Lawrence. 
His "Pool Room" is drawn in such 
great detail that it even shows 
the smoke of a lighted cigarette 
curling up from the edge ot a pool 
table. 

The scenes vary from a large. 
See Page 4, Col. 3 



Rtne Fmmd 

Investigators found the body ly- 
ing face upward on a couch in the 
loom. Some tour feet away, be- 
neath a double-decker bed, lay a 
bolt action .22 caliber rifle, its 
muzzle under the edge of a rug. 
One shot — a "short" shell — 
had been tired from it. 

Officials completed their on-the 
scene investigation by 8:30 last 
night, but continued to work un- 
til early this morning at a Spring 
Street funeral home. 



John Hewett Qualifies for Coveted 
American Alpine Club Membership 



Wednesday, Feb. 20— John He- 
wett '53, recently elected to the 
American Alpine Club, became 
the youngest alpinist in the his- 
tory of the organization to receive 
such an honor. Despite his youth, 
Hewett has a long and impressive 
list of ascents to merit his mem- 
bership. 

The Club Itself is a select or- 
ganization of 406 mountain climb- 
ers, the vast majority of whom 
are residents ot the United States. 
It maintains headquarters in New 
York City and supplies its mem- 
bers with much climbing infor- 
mation, some in its regular pub- 
lications and some on request. 
Recommend and Approval 

In order to qualify for member- 
ship in the American Alpine Club, 
an applicant must have sufficient 



climbing experience, be recom- 
mended by at least two members, 
and approved by the Club as a 
whole. 

Hewett was nominated for mem- 
bership by Adams Carter, his close 
friend and climbing companion. 
He first met Carter when the 
latter became a teacher at Milton 
Academy, Hewett's prep school. It 
was under Carter's influence that 
John became an avid and expert 
climber. 

As a member and later president 
of the Milton Academy Moun- 
taineering Club. John gained his 
first actual climbing experience. 
He was active in the organization 
when Carter Joined the Milton 
faculty, and the two have led 
climbing groups on trips to the 
west for the past two jrears. 



I last night by 

pector Richard 

eld and noted 

School pathol- 

Dea. 

.-mber of Beta 

Theta Pi. was the son ot Mr. and 

Mrs. Millard Romaine ot 3726 

Davenant Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

April Draft Test 
Applications Due 
Before March 10 

Gen. Hershey Announces 
Student Opportunities 
For Draft Deferment 



Wednesday, Feb. 20— In a let- 
ter released by the Selective Ser- 
vice Examining Section it was 
announced that all eligible stu- 
dents who intend to take the Col- 
lege Qualification Test in 1952 
should file applications at once for 
tlie April 24 examination. 

Following the instructions of the 
bulletin, which can be obtained 
at the Student Aid Office, the 
student should fill out his ap- 
plication and mail it no later than 
midnight, March 10. It was point- 
ed out that early filing will be to 
the student's advantage. 

Results to Local Board 

Results will be reported to the 
student's local board for use in 
considering his deferment, accord- 
ing to the Educational Testing 
Service, which prepares and ad- 
ministers the tests. 

Previously. Major Gen. Hershey. 
Director of Selective Service, an- 
nounced that under existing reg- 



Saturday, Feb. 16— Attracting 
three of the top ski teams in the 
country, the Williams Winter Car- 
nival scorned the snowless wastes 
of Williamstown and took to the 
slopes of Mount Greylock and 
Goodell Hollow. The best in ski 
thrills awaited the comparatively 
few spectators who braved the 
cold and the climb to watch the 
events. The team title finally 
went to Mlddlebury after a nip 
and tuck battle with Dartmouth. 
The winner's captain, Dick Ire- 
land, won Saturday's jumping to 
give his team the margin of vic- 
tory over the Indians — 587.63 
to 584.33. Ireland, who also plac- 
ed sixth in the downhill and 
seventh in the slalom, received the 
coveted Williams Skimeister Tro- 
PUy for the best individual show- 
mB over the two day competition. 
Collins Stars 
Williams repeated and possibly 
exceeded its tlflne showing at the 
Dartmouth Carnival last week, 
lops 01 the class B teams, the 
Ephmen scored heavily in the 
downhill, placing third, ahead of 
such powerful competitors as New 
Hampshire and Bowdoin. 

Ned Collins '52 was the indivi- 
dual star for the host team. He 
placed seventh in the downhill, 
fourteenth in the slalom, and 
ninth in the jumping. Stu Chase 
and Pete Callahan in the slalom 
and Doug Wilson, Bob Tucker, and 
Joe Foote in the cross country 
were also outstanding for the 
Ephs. 

Burden Combined Winner 
Dnug Burden of Mlddlebury, 
winner of both the downhill and 
the slalom the previous week, was 
forced to be content with seconds 
this time, bowing to Klrby of 
Dartmouth in the former and to 
team-mate Gale Shaw in the lat- 
ter. Burden and Shaw were one- 
two in the Alpine combined. 

After falling behind Mlddlebury 
in Friday's events. Dartmouth 
staged a strong comeback in the 
Nordic events on Saturday. Trem- 
blay, Agan. and Drury of the In- 
dians took the first three places 
in the Nordic combined, but the 
Blue and White stayed close e- 
nough for Ireland's winning jump 
to provide the margin ot victory. 
Victorious mentor Bobo Shee- 
hen praised Williams coach, Ralph 
Townsend, for his preparation of 
See Page 4. Col. 2 



Faculty Club Dance 
Attracts Large Crowd 

Saturday Feb. IB— While the 
rest of the campus was in the 
middle of the Winter Carnival 
festivities, the faculty enter- 
tained them.selves at the Facul- 
ty Club dance which ran from 
nine last night until one o'clock 
this morning. Total attendance 
was estimated at 60 persons by 
Richard O. Rouse, entertain- 
ment committee chairman in 
charge of the dance. 

For the sake of contrast to 
the sub-zero weather that had 
prevailed for the last few days, 
the profs planned their deco- 
rations around a spring motif. 
A large and potent punchbowl 
provided a continual fountain 
of enjoyment, as the professors 
and their wives danced to the 
music of Al Trudel and his 
band. 



Paragraphs 
In the News 



Beta Theta PI recently named 
named Rick Avery '52 house vice- 
president to nil the post vacated 
by Joe Stewart '52, the newly 
elected house president. 

George McAIeenan '52 and 
Walt Flaherty '53 lost to two Wes- 
leyan debaters while supporting 
the question. "Should the United 
States send an ambassador to the 
Vatican?" Fi-iday evening. 

Arthur B. Hudson '53 was elect- 
ed president of Chi Psl at a re- 
cent house meeting. Other officers 
named for the coming year are: 
Thomas Williams 53, vice-presi- 
dent; Edward Cypiot '54, secre- 
tary; end Edward Miller '54, 
vreasurer. 

Alumni Fund secretary Charles 
B. Hall '15 announced that the 
1951 fund drive netted the college 
'115,227, the highest figure in the 
h'story of the college. A total of 
3.617 alumni contributed to the 
campaign. 

Intramural Basketball Standings 
First Division 
Team w L 

Phi Sigma K-ppa 2 
Delta Kappa Epsilon 2 



Psi Upsilon 
Theta Delta Chi 
Delta Upsilon 
Phi Gamma Delta 
Sigma Phi 
Delta Psl 





1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 



Second Division 



Alpha Delta Phi 
Chi Psi 
K ppa Alpha 
Delta Phi 
Beta Theta Pi 
"hi Delta Theta 
Zeta Psi 
Garfleld Club 
I dropped out) 



PCT. 
1.000 
1.000 
.500 
.500 
.500 
.500 
.000 
.000 

1.000 
1.000 
.667 
.667 
.333 
.333 
.000 
.000 



Frosh i 
Down 

Wilson, 
11 Ead 
27 in 

Saturday, 
ing off to an 
the William 
tei.m coaste 
the R.P.I. F 
victory in a : 
men, who pi 
ices of th( 
Moro, who 
vice. 

Though hi 
the frosh 1 
downing th 
quintet. 

Fred Brod( 
in puttting t 
as he scored 
the early mil 
take an 11-3 
Wilson, Her 

With Roi 
Henry contrc 
liams led 39 
Engineers ti 
the game in 
heir efforts 
Purple coasi 



Elephant . . . 

got LOST! All recollections of the 
exact whereabouts of the 12 thou- 
.'and pound beast was forgotten - 
for one-hundred years. 

After extensive research Into 
m- ny yellowed documents, legends 
old wives' tales, etc. combined with 
a few dubious eye-witness reports 
end mystical prophesies, "Opera- 
tion Tusk Force" got underway. 
Included in the chase for the prize 
loxodonta (worth some $25.00 to 
the Williams Record) were var- 
ious groups from Williams. "I feel 
like a 'bull-moose' " exclaimed one 
of many itinerants on the first of 
the Teddy Roosevelt-type big game 
hunts. 

About a week ago. with the balm 
of Spring upon us, "Operation 
T-F" was resumed. With the skill 
of experts, and the stamina of 
the proverbial "bull-moose", dig- 
ging commenced. Picks and .^hov- 
els hit the semi-frozen turf. Pro- 
fuse oaths struck the air! And 
four hours later, six feet of sod 
had been unearthed — but still no 
signs of the pet loxodonta . . . And 
the shades of evening wore on the 
dank earth was replaced, and for 
the time being, at least, the House 
of Columbus remained undisturbed 
by mortal hands. 



BRING 
YOUR CAR 
TO US FOR 

EXPERT SERVICE 
GENUINE FORD PARTS 



You'll file* our 
Prompt Stnk§ 



You'll liico our 
RtasoMbh ffr/cts 



You'll liico our 
Mmily Way of 



HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATED 



Amhei 

lams led 10- 
The Jeffs, 
slowly and gi 
end of the q 
buckets by 
rile teams b 
the second i 
ended with A 

Hawkins, 1 

Belshe 

Smith, rf 

Avery 

Depopolo 

Sue3.sbrick. 

Hall 




Breakfast in Bed 



Still jubilant over the success of his first 
private showing, garrulous, bandy-legged painter 
Robert Seaman (pronounced Rowbear Seemawi 
summed his triumph with simple modesty: "I 
pick up where Rubens left off and carry things 
much further." The critics, who are still dribbling 
over Seaman's colossal canvas. "Breakfast in 
Bed", were inclined to agree. Said one: "He 
makes the hard line quiver with life; he can 
plunge with equal, ease into the voluptuous depth 
of the Baroque or the flat surfaces of modern- 
ism." 



Seaman's artistic pose is as unconventional 
as much of his work. Explaining his unorthodox 
gymnastics before the canvas, the energetic ar- 
tist said slyly, "I paint what I feel. It takes 
strength." Large, knobby hands, in contrast to 
the long and delicate fingers usually a.ssociated 
with his vocation corroborated the artist's state- 
ment. Aware that the reporter was looking at his 
hands, Seaman gestured toward a pile of house- 
painter's brushes, and remarked with pride that 
he had long ago rejected small bristles. 

Wlien told that LEER was planning an ar- 



SPEAKING OF 

Leer Visits 



tide on his work. Seaman insisted that the re- 
porter must watch him at work. Ushered Into 
the inner studio, the Leer interviewer sat by as 
Seaman, with quick, powerful strokes, dipped his 
brush into another masterpiece. His feverish 
activity cea.sed as .suddenly as it had begun, and 
Seaman announced with a sigh that the artistic 
urge had left him. Turning, the master painter 
stomped out of the room and left the reporter 
either to contemplate the newly created canvas 
or depart. 

Asked in an earlier interview what had in- 




Cbpvrijhi |i)!j, LicciTT & Mnu Touco Co 




.i> 



«ssAv., 








J^l^lOtfj^ 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



••I started to paint an apple, and one thhm led to another 



PICTURES 



The Burning Bush 



Ski Meet 

It Dartmouth 
8 Fourth Place 



Lawrence Art Gallery 



spired liis sensuous 5 x 12 feet "Breakfast in 
Bed", Seaman said with a characteristic ,shrug, 
"I like apples. They're Rood to eat, so I started 
to paint an apple and one thing led to another." 
"The Discussion on MarriaRe", while con- 
taining obvious Freudian overtones (note the 
stairs which dominate the center of the picture), 
still puzzles local experts, who are uable to un- 
derstand the comparison between th<- cold fish 



and the female form. Seaman's somewhat warp- 
ed imagination produced a startling and original 
subject in a style reminiscent of George Braque's 
overlapping, transparent planes. 

Drawing from the Bible for the subject of 
his provocative surrealistic work, "The Burning 
Bush", the artist imparts his passion for life to 
the famous phrase from Ecclesiastes. He has cap- 
tured the awe with which man viewed the mira- 



cle of the burning bush, and the very flames 
seem to shimmy like a belly-dancer before the 
observer. 

Seaman's next project? To produce an illus- 
trated edition of Henry Miller's "Ti'opic of Can- 
cer" which will rival Rockwell Kent's graphic 
presentation of Boccaccio's "Decameron," 





r at the Winter 
ollovv. 



Service 



)dav that VVil- 
iy was foinid 
3eta Theta Pi 
the head. 
: with prayei.s 
n tlie Thonip- 



Ireland Captures 
Skimeister Award 



Participants, Spectators 
Hail Meet as Success 



The Discussion on Marriage 



m-^iit^t-i. 



In idle hours the creator wistfully contemplates 
pression in four dimensions. 



nd state offi- 
:ed on the case 
T. Mullen of 
hern Berkshire 
taminer ; Asst, 
E. Levine of 
State Detective 
VI. Whlttemore 



Eastern Colleges 
Initiate Advanced 
Teacher Training 

Williams Joins Program 

For Study At Harvard 

School of Education 



Wednesday, Feb. 20— Williams 
and 19 other Eastern colleges 
have joined with the Harvard 
Graduate School of Education, 
and the Harvard and Radcliffe 
Graduate School of Arts and Sci- 
ences to inaugurate a cooperative 
program to train elementary and 
secondary school teachers. The 
purpose of this program is to in- 
crease the number of qualified 
college graduates entering the 
public schools' teaching ranks. 

The Fund for the Advancement 
of Education is supporting the 
program with $78,000 annually 
for three years, $45,000 for fellow- 
ships, and $33,000 to support the 
Instruction and administration of 
the plan. 

President James B. Conant of 
Harvard has announced that fel- 
lowships win be granted to grad- 
uates of the twenty colleges In 
the program. The graduates will 
spend a year at Harvard investi- 
iktfhg the ways of relating the 
liberal arts program with grad- 
U»te study in education while 
serving apprentlce.shlps In teach- 
ing. 



Noble and Dr. E. J. Coughlin, a 
local practitioner, are leading the 
course. 

The opening lecture was given at 
9 p. m. last night in the St. John's 
parish hou.se, but juniors and 
seniors may still enroll. There will 
be six Tuesday night meetings, 
terminating the week before Eas- 
ter recess. 

Informality Stressed 

Although the course has been a 
Williams standby .since the war, 
tills year's .series hopes to attract 
more participants by emphasizing 
a giealer degree of informality 
and a broader view of the subject. 

Di-. Noble is handling the moral 
and spiritual aspects, while Dr. 
Coughlin is lecturing on the phy- 
sical side of the marriage. The 
first part of the meeting is a 
half hour talk by cither Dr. Noble 
oi- Dr. Coughlin, while the remain- 
der is devoted to an open discus- 
sion, with the added attraction 
of refreshments. 

Proposed Topics 

Among the topics suggested last 
Wednesday by the house repre- 
sentatives are the questions of 
preparation for marriage, sexual 
behavior before and after mar- 
riage, and psychological adjust- 
ments to the marital status. 

On the physiological side, it 
was proposed that Dr. Coughlin 
consider In his talks such problems 
as child training and the relation- 
ship of sexual behaviour to parent- 
hood. 



merica present views of Paris and 
Prague, as well as cities in Italy 
and Russia, 

"Pool Room" Favorite 

Perhaps the most popular paint- 
ing on display is the work of an 
American Negro, Jacob Lawrence. 
His "Pool Room" is drawn in such 
great detail that it even shows 
the smoke of a lighted cigarette 
curling up from the edge of a pool 
table. 

The scenes vary from a large, 
See Page 4, Col. 3 



Rifle Found 

Investigators found the body ly- 
ing face upward on a couch in the 
;oom. Some four feet away, be- 
neatli a double-decker bed, lay a 
bolt action .22 caliber rifle, its 
muzzle under the edge of a rug. 
One shot — a "short" shell — 
had been fii'ed from it. 

Officials completed their on-the 
scene investigation by 8:30 last 
night, but continued to work un- 
til early this morning at a Spring 
Street fimeral home. 



John Hewett Qualifies for Coveted 
American Alpine Club Membership 



Wednesday, Feb. 20 — John He- 
wett '53, recently elected to the 
American Alpine Club, became 
the youngest alpinist In the his- 
tory of the organization to receive 
such an honor. Despite his youth, 
Hewett has a long and Impressive 
list of ascents to merit his mem- 
bership. 

The Club Itself is a select or- 
ganization of 406 mountain climb- 
ers, the vast majority of whom 
are residents of the United States. 
It maintains headquarters In New 
York City and supplies its mem- 
bers with much climbing Infor- 
mation, some in its regular pub- 
lications and some on request. 
Recommend and Approval 

In order to qualify for member- 
ship In the American Alpine Club, 
an applicant must have sufficient 



climbing experience, be recom- 
mended by at least two members, 
and approved by the Club as a 
whole. 

Hewett was nominated for mem- 
bership by Adams Carter, his close 
friend and climbing companion. 
He first met Carter when the 
latter became a teacher at Milton 
Academy. Hewett's prep school. It 
was under Carter's influence that 
John became an avid and expwrt 
climber. 

As a member and later president 
of the Milton Academy Moun- 
taineering Club. John gained his 
first actual climbing experience. 
He was active in the organization 
when Carter joined the Milton 
faculty, and the two have led 
climbing groups on trips to the 
west for the past two years. 



I last night by 
pector Richard 
2ld and noted 
School pathol- 
3ea. 

, _ . — mber of Beta 

Theta Pi, was the son of Mj-. and 
Mrs. Millard Romalne of 3726 
Davenant Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

April Draft Test 
Applications Due 
Before March 10 

Gen. Hershey Announces 
Student Opportunities 
For Draft Deferment 



Wednesday. Feb. 20— In a let- 
ter released by the Selective Ser- 
vice Examining Section it was 
announced that all eligible stu- 
dents who intend to take the Col- 
lege Qualification Test in 1962 
should file applications at once for 
the April 24 examination. 

Following the instructions of the 
bulletin, which can be obtained 
at the Student Aid Office, the 
student should fill out his ap- 
plication and mail it no later than 
midnight. March 10. It was point- 
ed out that early filing will be to 
the student's advantage. 

Results to Local Board 

Results will be reported to the 
student's local board for use in 
considering his deferment, accord- 
ing to the Educational Testing 
Service, which prepares and ad- 
ministers the tests. 

Previously. Major Gen. Hershey, 
Director of Selective Service, an- 
nounced that under existing reg- 



Salurday, Feb. 16— Attracting 
three of the top ski teams in the 
counuy, the Williams Winter Car- 
nival scorned the snowless wastes 
of Williamstown and took to the 
slopes of Mount Greylock and 
Goodell Hollow. The best in ski 
thrills awaited the comparatively 
few spectators who braved the 
cold and the climb to watch the 
events. The team title finally 
went to Middlebury after a nip 
and tuck battle with Dartmouth. 
Tile winner's captain. Dick Ire- 
land, won Saturday's jumping to 
give his team the margin of vic- 
tory over the Indians — 587.63 
to 584.33. Ireland, who also plac- 
ed sixth in the downliill and 
seventh in the slalom, received the 
coveted Williams Skimeister Tro- 
phy for the best individual show- 
ing over the two day competition. 
Collins Stars 
Williams repeated and possibly 
exceeded its flfine showing at the 
Dartmouth Carnival last week, 
lops 01 the class B teams, the 
Ephmen scored heavily in the 
downhill, placing third, ahead of 
such powerful competitors as New 
Hampshire and Bowdoin. 

Ned Collins '52 was the indivi- 
dual star for the host team. He 
placed seventh in the downhill, 
fourteenth in the slalom, and 
ninth in the jumping. Stu Chase 
and Pete Callahan in the slalom 
and Doug Wilson. Bob Tucker, and 
Joe Foote in the cross country 
were also outstanding for the 
Ephs. 

Burden Combined Winner 
Doug Burden of Middlebury, 
winner of both the downhill and 
the slalom the previous week, was 
forced to be content with seconds 
this time, bowing to Kirby of 
Dartmouth in the former and to 
team-mate Gale Shaw in the lat- 
ter. Burden and Shaw were one- 
two in the Alpine combined. 

After falling behind Middlebury 
in Friday's events. Dartmouth 
staged a strong comeback in the 
Nordic events on Saturday. Trem- 
blay, Agan. and Drury of the In- 
dians took tlic first three places 
in the Nordic combined, but the 
Blue and White stayed close e- 
nough for Ireland's winning jump 
to provide the margin of victory. 
Victorious mentor Bobo Shee- 
hen praised Williams coach, Ralph 
Townsend, for his preparation of 
See Page 4, Col. 2 



Faculty Club Dance 
Attracts Large Crowd 

Saturday Feb. 16 — Wliile the 
rest of the campus was in the 
middle of the Winter Carnival 
festivities, the faculty enter- 
tained themselves at the Facul- 
ty Club daiioe which ran from 
nine last nisht until one o'clock 
this morning Total attendance 
was estimated at 60 persons by 
Richard O. Rouse, entertain- 
ment committee chairman In 
charge of the dance. 

For the sake of contrast to 
the sub-zero weather that had 
prevailed for the last few days, 
the profs planned their deco- 
rations around a spring motif. 
A large and potent punchbowl 
provided a continual fountain 
of enjoyment, as the professors 
and their wives danced to the 
music of Al Trudel and his 
band. 



<i: 



Paragraphs 
In the News 



Beta Theta PI recently named 
named Rick Avery '52 house vice- 
president to All the post vacated 
by Joe Stewart '52, the newly 
elected house president. 

Georce McAleenan '52 and 
Walt Flaherty '53 lost to two Wes- 
leyan debaters while supporting 
the question, "Should the United 
States send an ambassador to the 
Vatican?" Friday evening. 

Arthur B. Hudson '53 was elect- 
ed president of Chi Psi at a re- 
cent house meeting. Other officers 
named for the coming year are: 
Thomas Williams 5.S, vice-presi- 
dent; Edward Cypiot '54, secre- 
tary; and Edward Miller '54, 
treasurer. 

Alumni Fund secretary Charles 
B. Hall '15 announced that the 
1951 fund drive netted the college 
■■115,227, the highest figure in the 
h'story of the college. A total of 
3,617 alumni contributed to the 
campaign. 

Intramural Basketball Standings 
First Division 
Team W L 

Phi Sigma K- ppa 2 
Delta Kappa Epsilon 2 



Psi Upsllon 
Theta Delta Chi 
Delta Upsllon 
Phi Gamma Delta 
Sigma Phi 
Delta Psi 



Second Division 



Alpha Delta Phi 
Chi Psi 
K ppa Alpha 
Delta Phi 
Beta Theta Pi 
■"hi Delta Theta 
Zeta Psi 
Garfield Club 
'dropped out) 



3 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 







1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 



1 

1 

2 
2 
3 
3 



PCT. 
1.000 
1.000 
.500 
.500 
.500 
.500 
.000 
.000 

1.000 
1.000 
.687 
.667 
.333 
.333 
.000 
.000 



Elephant . . . 

got LOST! All recollections of the 
exact whereabouts of the 12 thou- 
.'and pound beast was forgotten - 
for one-hundred years. 

After extensive research into 
m- ny yellowed documents, legends 
old wives' tales, etc. combined with 
a few dubious eye-witness reports 
end mystical prophesies, "Opera- 
tion Tusk Force" got underway. 
Included in the chase for the prize 
loxodonta (worth some $25.00 to 
the Williams Record) were var- 
ious groups from Williams. "I feel 
like a 'bull-moose' " exclaimed one 
of many itinerants on the first of 
the Teddy Roosevelt-type big game 
hunts. 

About a week ago. with the balm 
of Spring upon us, "Operation 
T-F" was resumed. With the skill 
of experts, and the stamina of 
the proverbial "bull-moose", dig- 
ging commenced. Picks and shov- 
els hit the semi-frozen turf. Pro- 
fuse oaths struck the air! And 
four hours later, six feet of sod 
had been unearthed — but still no 
signs of the pet loxodonta . . . And 
the shades of evening wore on the 
dank earth was replaced, and for 
the time being, at least, the House 
of Columbus remained undisturbed 
by mortal hands. 



BRING 
YOUR CAR 
TO US FOR 

EXPERT SERVICE 

€Utd 

SENUINE FORD PARTS 



You'll lilc* our 
fronpf ^erv/ct 



You'll liko our 
R«aioM&/t Mcts 



You*ll liko our 
i>«l!l0 lvs/iM« 



HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATED 



fxQsk J 

Down 

WiUon, 
11 EacI 
27 in 

Saturday, 
Ing off to an 
the William 
term coaste 
the R.P.I. P 
victory in a i 
men, who pli 
ices of the 
Moro, who 
ilce. 

Though hi 
the frosh 1 
downing th 
quintet. 

Fi-ed Brodi 
in puttting t 
as he scored 
the early mil 
take an 11-3 
Wilson, Her 

With Roi 
Henry contrc 
liams led 39 
Engineers ti 
the game in 
heir efforts 
Purple coasi 



Amhei 

lams led 10- 
The Jeffs, 
slowly and gi 
end of the q 
buckets by 
Ihe teams b: 
the second ] 
ended with A 

Hawkins, 1 

Belshe 

Smith, rf 

Avery 

Depopolo 

Suessbrick, 

Hall 

Lazor 

Shudt, Ig 

Campbell 

Creer, rg 

Miller 

Totals 



HOW MANY TIMES A DAY 

DOYOU 





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lenses exactly to the pre- 
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If we ore your opticians 
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Smart styling 



Sole distributors of Bouih fir Lomb Oprlcol Supplfot 

Hoosac Valley Optical Co. 

New Kimball BIdg. 
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leading brand . . . PROVED by outstanding 

nose and throat specialists. 



RENTON'S BAKERY 

Delicious — 

♦ BREADS 

♦ ROLLS 

♦ CAKES 

Serving Williams Fraternities 
74 Holden Street North Adams 



EXTRA ! ATTENTION ALL COLLEGE STUDENTS 

Every Sunday Evening over CBS 

THE PHILIP MORRIS PLAYHOUSE 

Presents an Outstanding G)llege Student 
• Featured with Famous Hollywood Stars 

in the PHILIP MORRIS Intercollegiate Acting Competition 



gjgjflj ; ™ 

^ PHILIP MORRIS 



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FOR 



FAIRFIELD^S FARM 



♦ ♦ ♦ 



GUERNSEY MILK 



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Telephone 121 



Williomstown 



7 1 



( iii;sTi;Krii;iJ> 
(■,iu;sii;uiir;it) 



(!hi: 



iii.sTi; 



-^"-/vr-'^^^jn 



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l^tus 



Cbesle 



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PR' 



OPRIETOR 



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LAMB 

& 

HUNTER 

INC. 

Planned Printing 
North Adams, Max. 

Tel. 3930 



Join Our Crowing 

Lilt of Satisfied 
Williamt Cuatomera 

KRONICK'S 
ESSO SERVICE 

Opp. Howard Johnson's 
State Rd. 




4%^ SKI JUMP 

^ CONTEST 

Sunday FEB. 24 1 P.M. 

Swedish, Norwegian 
Canadian and U. S. Start 



SRATTt'eflOltO, VERMONT 



])on't sell the 
ittle one. short 




FOR 

HAIRCUTS 

WILLIAMS 

MEN 

KNOW 

IT'S . . . 



MODERN DAIRY 



State Street 



NORTH ADAMS 



T 

I hky'hi-: both good basketball 

I players. But if wc were to 

i'l'lgc tlicin the wa\' wc judge 

tclcplionc ec|uipnient, we'd take the 

small one. 

You sec, tclcplionc equipment occu- 
pies valuable space, uses costly mate- 
rials. Paring down its si/.c helps keep 
down the cost of telephone service. 
Take voice amplifiers, for example. 
Telephone engineers put the squeeze 



on size, came up with a new small 
type. When 600 of these new ampli- 
fiers arc mounted on a frame two feet 
wide and eleven feet high, thev do a 
job which once recjuired a roomful of 
equipment. Size was cut — but not 
performance ! 

Tliis is one of many eases where the 
Bell System has made big things small 
to help keep the cost of telephone 
service low. 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 





Fine 
Liquor 

Open till 1 



Two miles from 

Williamstown 

On Route 7 



Phone 267 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



Ski Meet 

It Dartmouth 
s Fourth Place 



r at the Winter 
ollow. 

hund; 
Service 

xiav that Wil- 
dy was found 
3eta Theta Pi 
the head. 
: witli prayers 
n the Tliomp- 



Ireland Captures 
Skimeister Award 



Participants, Spectators 
Hail Meet as Success 



m state offi- 
:ed on the case 
T. Mullen of 
hern Berkshire 
taminer; Asst. 
E. Levine of 
State Detective 
\i. Whittemore 



Eastern Colleges 
Initiate Advanced 
Teacher Training 

Williams Joins Program 

For Study At Harvard 

School of Education 



Wednesday, Feb. 20— Williams 
and 19 other Eastern colleges 
have joined with the Harvard 
Graduate School of Education, 
and the Harvard and Badcllffe 
Graduate School of Arts and Sci- 
ences to inaugurate a cooperative 
program to train elementary and 
secondary school teachers. The 
purpose of this program is to In- 
crease the number of qualified 
college graduates entering the 
public schools' teaching ranks. 

The Fund for the Advancement 
of Kducatlon Is supporting the 
program with $78,000 annually 
for three years, $45,000 for fellow- 
ships, and $33,000 to support the 
instruction and administration of 
the plan. 

President James 3. Conant of 
Harvard has announced that fel- 
lowships win be granted to grad- 
uates of the twenty colleges in 
the program. The graduates will 
spend a year at Harvard Investl- 
gatftig the ways of relatuig the 
rtberal arts program with grad- 
uate study in education while 
.serving apprenticeships in teach- 
ing. 



Noble and Dr. E. J. Coughlin. a 
local practitioner, are leading the 
course. 

The opening lecture was given at 
9 p. m. last night in the St. John's 
parish house, but juniors and 
seniors may still enroll. There will 
be six Tuesday night meetings. 
terminntinR the week before Eas- 
ter lecess. 

Informant)' Stressed 

AlthouRh the course has been a 
Williams standby since the war, 
this year's series hopes to attract 
more participants by emphasizing 
a greater degree of informality 
and a broadei' view of the subject. 

Dr. Noble is handling the moral 
and spliltual aspects, while Dr. 
Coughlin Is lecturing on the phy- 
sical side of the marriage. The 
first part of the meeting Is a 
half hour talk by either Dr. Noble 
or Dr. Coughlin, while the remain- 
der Is devoted to an open discus- 
sion, with the added attraction 
of refreshments. 

Proposed Topics 

Among the topics suggested last 
Wednesday by the house repre- 
sentatives are the questions of 
preparation for marriage, sexual 
behavior before and after mar- 
riage, and psychological adjust- 
ments to the marital status. 

On the physiological side, it 
was proposed that Dr. Coughlin 
consider In his talks such problems 
as child training and the relation- 
ship of sexual behaviour to parent- 
hood. 



merica present views of Paris and 
Prague, as well as cities in Italy 
and Russia. 

"Pool Room" Favorite 

Perhaps the most popular paint- 
ing on display is the work of an 
American Negro, Jacob Lawrence. 
His "Pool Room " is drawn in such 
great detail that it even shows 
the smoke of a lighted cigarette 
curling up from the edge of a pool 
table. 

The scenes vary from a large. 
See Page 4, Col. 3 



"Kine Found 



Investigators found the body ly- 
ing face upward on a couch in the 
ioom. Some four feet away, be- 
neath a double-decker bed, lay a 
bolt action .22 caUber rifle, its 
muzzle under the edge of a rug. 
One shot — a "short" shell — 
had been fired from it. 

Officials completed their on-the 
scene investigation by 8:30 last 
night, but continued to work un- 
til early this morning at a Spring 
Street funeral home. 



John Hewett Qualifies for Coveted 
American Alpine Club Membership 



Wednesday, Feb. 20— John He- 
wett '53, recently elected to the 
American Alpine Club, became 
the youngest alpinist in the his- 
tory of the organization to receive 
such an honor. Despite his youth, 
Hewett has a long and Impressive 
list of ascents to merit his mem- 
bership. 

The Club itself is a select or- 
ganization of 406 mountain climb- 
ers, the vast majority of whom 
are residents of the United States. 
It maintains headquarters in New 
York City and supplies Its mem- 
bers with much climbing infor- 
mation, some In Its regular pub- 
lications and some on request. 
Recommend and Approval 

In order to qualify for member- 
ship in the American Alpine Club, 
an applicant must have sufficient 



climbing experience, be recom- 
mended by at least two members, 
and approved by the Club as a 
whole. 

Hewett was nominated for mem- 
bership by Adams Carter, his close 
friend and climbing companion. 
He first met Carter when the 
latter became a teacher at Milton 
Academy, Hewett's prep school. It 
was under Carter's Influence that 
John became an avid and expert 
climber. 

As a member and later president 
of the Milton Academy Moun- 
taineering Club, John gained his 
first actual climbing experience. 
He was active in the organization 
when Carter Joined the Milton 
faculty, and the two have led 
climbing groups on trips to the 
west for the past two years. 



1 last night by 
pector Richard 
Jld and noted 
School pathol- 
Oea. 

, _ — mber of Beta 

Theta Pi, was the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Millard Romaine of 3726 
Davenant Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

April Draft Test 
Applications Due 
Before March 10 

Gen. Hershey Announces 
Student Opportunities 
For Draft Deferment 



Wednesday, Feb. 20— In a let- 
ter released by the Selective Ser- 
vice Examining Section it was 
announced that all eligible stu- 
dents who Intend to take the Col- 
lege Qualification Test in 1952 
should file applications at once for 
the April 24 examination. 

Following the instructions of the 
bulletin, which can be obtained 
at the Student Aid Office, the 
student should fill out his ap- 
plication and mall it no later than 
midnight. March 10. It was point- 
ed out that early filing will be to 
the student's advantage. 

Results to Local Board 

Results will be reported to the 
student's local board for use in 
considering his deferment, accord- 
ing to the Educational Testing 
Service, which prepares and ad- 
ministers the tests. 

Previously, Major Qen. Hershey, 
Director of Selective Service, an- 
nounced that under existing reg- 



Salurday, Feb. 16 — Attracting 
three of tne top ski teams in the 
country, the Williams Winter Car- 
nival scorned the snowless wastes 
of Williamstown and took to the 
slopes of Mount Greylock and 
Goodell Hollow. The best in ski 
thrills awaited the comparatively 
few spectators who braved the 
cold and the climb to watch the 
events. The team title finally 
went to Middlebury after a nip 
and tuck battle with Dartmouth. 
The winner's captain, Dick Ire- 
land, won Saturday's jumping to 
give his team the margin of vic- 
tory over the Indians — 587.63 
to 584.33. Ireland, who also plac- 
ed sixth in the downhill and 
seventh in the slalom, received the 
coveted Williams Skimeister Tro- 
phy for the best individual show- 
ing over the two day competition. 
Collins Stars 
Williams repeated and possibly 
exceeded its nflne showing at the 
Dartmouth Carnival last week, 
lops ol the class B teams, the 
Ephmen scored heavily in the 
downhill, placing third, ahead of 
such powerful competitors as New 
Humpshire and Bowdoin. 

Ned Collins '52 was the indivi- 
dual star for the host team. He 
placed seventh in the downhill, 
fourteenth in the slalom, and 
ninth in the jumping. Stu Chase 
and Pete Callahan in the slalom 
and Doug Wilson. Bob Tucker, and 
Joe Foote in the cross country 
were also outstanding for the 
Ephs. 

Burden Combined Winner 
Doug Burden of Middlebury, 
winner of both the downhill and 
the slalom the pievious week, was 
foi-ced to be content with seconds 
this time, bowing to Klrby of 
Dartmouth in the former and to 
team-mate Gale Shaw in the lat- 
ter. Burden and Shaw were one- 
two in the Alpine combined. 

After falling behind Middlebury 
in Friday's events, Dartmouth 
staged a strong comeback in the 
Nordic events on Saturday. Trem- 
blay, Agan, and Drury of the In- 
dians took the first three places 
in the Nordic combined, but the 
Blue and White stayed close e- 
nough for Iieland's winning jump 
to provide the margin of victory. 
Victorious mentor Bobo Shee- 
hen praised Williams coach, Ralph 
Townsend, for his preparation of 
See Page 4, Col. 2 



Faculty Club Dance 
Attracts Large Crowd 

Saturday Feb. IB— While the 
rest of the campus was in the 
middle of the Winter Carnival 
festivities, the faculty enter- 
tained them.selves at the Facul- 
ty Club dance which ran from 
nine last night until one o'clock 
this morning. Total attendance 
was estimated at 60 persons by 
Richard O. Rouse, entertain- 
ment committee chairman In 
charge of the dance. 

For the sake of contrast to 
the sub-zero weather that had 
prevailed for the last few days, 
the profs planned their deco- 
rations around a spring motif. 
A large and potent punchbowl 
provided a continual fountain 
of enjoyment, as the professors 
and their wives danced to the 
music of Al Trudel and his 
band. 



Paragraphs 
In the News 



Frosh i 
Down 



Bcla Tlietu Pi ii-ccntly niimed 
named Kick Avery '52 house vici'- 
president to fill llu' post vacated 
by Joe Stewart 52, the newly 
elected house president. 

George >Ic.\leeiian '52 and 
Walt Flaherty '5:f lost to two Wes- 
leyan debaters while supporlint; 
the question. "Should the United 
States send an aniba.ssador to the 
Vatican?" Pi-iday evening. 

Arthur B. Hudson '53 was elect- 
ed president of Chi Psi at a re- 
cent house mectinR, either officers 
ramed for the couiini^ year are: 
Thomas Williams y.i, vice-presi- 
dent; Edward Cypiot '54, secre- 
tary: end Edward Miller '54, 
a'easurer. 

Alumni Fund secretary Charles 
B. Hall '15 announced that the 
1951 fund drive netted the colle;;e 
'•115,227, the highest fisure in the 
h story of the colleBe. A total of 
3.617 alumni contributed to the 
rampaign. 

Intramural Basketball Standinirs 
First Division 

Team W L 

Phi Siiima K- ppa 2 
Delta Kappa Epsilon 2 



Psi Upsilon 
Theta Delta Chi 
Delta Upsilon 
Phi G.imma Delta 
Sigma Phi 
Delta Psi 



Second Divi.sion 



Alpha Delta Phi 
Chi Psi 
K ppa Alpha 
Delta Phi 
Beta Theta Pi 
"hi Delta Theta 
Z-'ta Psi 
Garfield Club 
'dropped out) 



Elephant . . . 

got LOST! All recollections of the 
exact whereabouts of the 12 thou- 
.--and pound beast was forgotten - 
for one-hundred years. 

After extensive research into 
m ny yellowed documents, legends 
old wives' tales, etc. combined with 
a few dubious eye-witness reports 
.-'Ud mystical prophesies, "Opera- 
tion Tu.~,k Force" «ot undeiw,iy. 
Included in the chase for the prize 
loxodonta i worth some $25.00 to 
the 'Williams Record) were var- 
ious groups from Williams. "I feel 
'ike a 'buU-moo.se' " exclaimed one 
of many itinerants on the first of 
the Teddy Roosevelt-type big !,'ame 
hunts. 

About a week ago, with the balm 
of Spring upon us. "Operation 
T-F" was resumed. With the skil 
nf experts, and the stamina of 
the proverbial "buU-moo.se". dij;- 
Bing commenced. Picks and shov- 
els hit the semi-frozen turf. Pro- 
fuse oaths struck the air! And 
four hours later, six feet of ,sod 
had been unearthed — but still no 
signs cf the pet loxodonta . . . .\nd 
the shades of evening wore on the 
dank earth was replaced, and for 
the time being, at least, the House 
of Columbus remained undisturbed 
by mortal hands. 



BRING 
YOUR CAR 
TO US FOR 

EXPERT SERVICE 

€14UC 

GENUINE FORD PARTS 



You'll lik* our 



You'll liko our 



You'll liko our 
Fr/Mi/// IVax of 
Do/ng Byshtss 



HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATED 



LEER Photoquiz 



Scoie yourself as foUowB; 20— Ueuu's List. 
19— College Average, 18— Disciplinary Warninn. 
17 or less— Join your favorite service. 




Copvtuhi 10^:. l.prtr.iTT * Mvrti To«*fco Co 



I 





'111 sill' for .sluclciit iiiiioii 
1 1) 'Mew liockcy rink 



cil'liiniicy's fi-oiil hiwn 
'c|i lim al 111,. iKiich 




a ' Puslicr KrafI 

b' l.ulhr] Mallsfifld 



f ' i'!ininc\' Baxter 
(1 ' a ijfnriuin 




'a I Williams UC 
b' 1952 Dckes 



c il'limnc'.v i.iiri liis pals 
'd' IBKi; Saints 



Eastern Colleges 
Initiate Advanced 
Teacher Training 

Williams Joins Program 

For Study At Harvard 

School of Education 



Wednesday, Pt'b. 20 -Williams 
and 19 oilier Eastcin collcues 
have joined with the Hai-vard 
Oiaduatc Scliool i)f Kdiicalion. 
and the' Haivaid and Kiidcliffe 
Oiaduale School of Alts and Sci- 
ences to inaUBiiiate a coopoiative 
pioKiam to train olcmentaiy and 
secondary school teachers. The 
pviipose of this proHiam is lo in- 
ciea.se the number of qualified 
college Kraduates cnterini; the 
public schools' teachinM ranks. 

The Fund for the Advancement 
of Education is supportini; the 
proMiam with $78,000 aiiniially 
for three years. $45,000 for fellow- 
ships, and $;);). 000 to support the 
instruction and administralion of 
the plan. 

President James B. ConaiU of 
Harvard has announced that fel- 
lowships will be Rranted to Rrad- 
uates of the twenty colleges in 
the proKiam. The graduates will 
spend a year at Harvai'd investi- 
KatfnR the ways of relatiUK the 
liberal arts program with grad- 
uate study in education while 
serving apprenticeships in teach- 
ing. 



Noble and Dr. E. J, Couijhlin. a 
local practitioner, aie leadini; tlie 
couise. 

1 lie oiJcniiw lectuie was Kiven at 
:i |) m. last niKht in the St. John's 
parish house, but .juniors and 
senioi's may still enroll. There will 
be six Tuesday ninhl ineetinKs. 
lerininatini; the W(M<k Ix'fore Eas- 
ter recess. 

Informality Stressed 

Alllioui;h the course has been a 
Williams standby since the war. 
this year's series hopes t,o attract 
more participants by cinphasiziHK 
a greater dcRree of informality 
and a broader view of the sub.iccl. 

Ur. Noble is handlini; the moral 
and spiritual aspects, while Dr. 
CouKhlin is Iccturini; on the phy- 
sical side of the maniaKC. The 
first part of the meet ins; is a 
half hour talk by cither Dr. Noble 
or Dr. C'ouKhlin. while the remain- 
der is devoted to an open di.scus- 
sion. with the added attraction 
of refreshments. 

Proposed Topics 

Amoni; the topics siiKKcsted last 
Wednesday by the house lepre- 
sentatlves arc the questions of 
pieparation for marrlaKc. .sexual 
behavior before and after mar- 
riane. and ps.vcholouical ad.iust- 
ments to the marital status. 

On the phy.sloloKical side, it 
was pioposed that Dr. CouKhlin 
consider in his talks such problems 
as child traininp; and the relation- 
ship of sexual behaviour to parent- 
hood. 




' a I proposed Freshman 

dining hall 
ibiWest College rebuilt 



'c ifresidenl Baxter's home 
'd' Weston Field latrines 




'ai hope chest 

'bi Melville exhibition 



t i Phihney'.s brief ca.se 
d ' Lasell lockei" 




Chief Royal's night 

stick 

Deke senior 



'c I Phhmey Baxte 
I d i a frankfurter 



ttOfj^ 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Ski Meet 

il Dartmouth 
s Fourth Place 



r at the Winter 
ollow. 



hund; 
Service 



xlav that Wil- 
dy was loiind 
ivt-.i Tlicta ]'i 
tlic licad. 
: witli pruM'rs 
n tlif Tlionip- 



.nd state offi- 
:ed on the ca.se 
T. Mullen of 
hei-n Berkshire 
iaminer: Asst. 
E. Ljcvine of 
State Detective 
VI, Whittemoi-e 



Ireland Captures 
Skimeister Award 



Participants, Spectators 
Hail Meet as Success 



merica present views of Pai'is and 
PraKue. as well as cities in Italy 
and Russia. 

"Pool Koom" ruvorite 

Perhap.s the most popular paint- 
Inn on display is the work of an 
American Negro, Jacob Lawrence. 
His "Pool Room" is drawn in such 
.great detail that it even shows 
the smoke of a lighted cigarette 
curling up from Ihe edge of a pool 
table. 

Tne scenes vary from a large. 
See Page 4. Col. 3 



Rifle Found 

Investigators found the body ly- 
ing face upward on a couch in the 
: (lom. Some four feet. away, be- 
neaih a double-decker bed. lay a 
boll action .22 caliber rifle, its 
iniizzle under the edge of a rug. 
1 )ne shot — a "short" shell — 
had been fired from it. 

Officials completed their on-the 
scene investigation by 8:30 last 
nighl. but continued to work un- 
til early this morning at a Spring 
Street funeral home. 



John Hewett Qualifies for Coveted 
American Alpine Club Membership 



Wednesday, Feb. 20 — John He- 
wett '53. recently elected lo the 
American Alpine Club, became 
the youngest alpinist in the his- 
tory of the organization to receive 
such an honor. Despite his youth. 
Hewett has a long and impressive 
list of ascents to merit his mem- 
bership. 

The Club itself is a select or- 
ganization of 406 mountain climb- 
ers, the vast ma.iorily of whom 
are residents of the United States. 
It maintains headquarters in New 
York City and supplies lis mem- 
bers with much climbing infor- 
mation, some in its regular pub- 
lications and .some on request. 
RecommonH and Approval 

In order to qualify for membcr- 
,ship in the American Alpine Club, 
an applicant must have sufficient 



climbing experience, be recom- 
mended by at least two members, 
and appioved by the Club as a 
whole. 

Hewett was nominated for mem- 
bership by Adams Carter, his close 
friend and climbing companion. 
He first met Carter when the 
latter became a teacher at Milton 
Academy, Hewett's prep .school. It 
was under Carter's influence that 
John became an avid and expert 
climber. 

As a member and later president 
of the Milton Academy Moun- 
taineering Club. John gained his 
first actual climbing experience. 
He was active in the organization 
when Carter .tolned the Milton 
faculty, and the two have led 
climbing groups on trips to the 
west for the past two I'ears. 



1 last night by 
pector Richai'd 
Jld and noted 
School pathol- 
Dea. 

- _ ....mber of Beta 

Thela Pi. was the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Millard Romaine of 3726 
Davenant Ave.. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

April Draft Test 
Applications Due 
Before March 10 

Gen. Hershey Announces 
Student Opportunities 
For Draft Deferment 



Wednesday, Feb. 20 — In a let- 
ter released by the Selective Ser- 
vice Examining Section it was 
announced that all eligible stu- 
dents who intend to take the Col- 
lege Qualification Test in 1952 
should file applications at once for 
Ihe April 24 examination. 

Following the instructions of the 
bulletin, which can be obtained 
at the Student Aid Office, the 
student ,should fill out his ap- 
plication and mail it no later than 
midnight. March 10. It was point- 
ed out that early filing will be lo 
the student's advantage. 

Results to l^oral Board 

Results will be reported to the 
student's local board for u.se in 
considering his deferment, accord- 
ing to the Educational Testing 
Service, which piepnres and ad- 
ministers the tests. 

Previously. Ma.ior Qen. Hershey. 
Director of Selective Service, an- 
nounced that under existing reg- 



Sauiiday. Feb. 16- -Attracting 
three ijf tne lop ski teams in the 
couniiy. the Williams Winter Car- 
nival scorned the .snowless wastes 
of WjUiamstown and took to the 
slopes of Mount Greylock and 
Goodell Hollow. The best in ski 
ihrill.s awaited the comparatively 
few spectators who braved the 
cold and the climb to watch the 
events. The team title finally 
iveni to Middlebury after a nip 
and luck battle with Dartmouth. 
The winner's captain. Dick Ire- 
land, won Saturday's jumping to 
aive his team the margin of vic- 
tory over the Indians — 587.63 
10 S84.33. Ireland, who also plac- 
ed sixth in the downhill and 
seventh in the .slalom, received the 
coveted Williams Skimeister Tro- 
phy for the besi individual show- 
.iisi over the two day comixHition 
Collins Stars 
Williams repeated and possibly 
exceeded its fifine .showing at the 
Dartmouth Carnival last week, 
lops ol the class B teams, the 
Ephmen scored heavily in the 
downhill, placing third, ahead of 
such powerful competitors as New 
Hampshire and Bowdoin 

Ned Collins '52 was the indivi- 
dual star for the host team. He 
placed .seventh in the downhill, 
fourteenth in the .slalom, and 
ninth m the jumping. Stu Chase 
and Pete Callahan in the slalom 
and Doug Wilson. Bob Tucker, and 
Joe Foote in Ihe cro.ss country 
were also outstanding for the 
Ephs. 

Burden Ciimhined Winner 
Doug Burden of Middlebury, 
winner of both the downhill and 
the slalom the pievious week, was 
forced to be content with seconds 
this time, bowing to Kirby of 
Dartmouth m the former and to 
team-mate Gale Shaw in the lat- 
ter. Burden and Shaw were one- 
two in the Alpine combined. 

After falling behind Middlebury 
in Friday's events. Dartmouth 
staged a stiong comeback in the 
Nordic events on Satuiday. Trem- 
blay. Agan. and Drury of the In- 
dians took Ihe first three places 
in the Nordii' combined, but the 
Blue and White stayed close e- 
nough for Inlands winning .jump 
to provide the margin of victory. 
■Victorious mentor Bobo Shee- 
hen praised Williams coach. Ralph 
rownsend. for his preparation of 
See Page 4. Col. 2 



Faculty Club Dance 
Attracts Large Crowd 

Satuiday Feb 16— While the 
rest of the campus was in the 
middle of Ihe Winter Carnival 
festivities, the faculty enter- 
tained them.selves at the Facul- 
ty Club daiiic which ran from 
nine last niL'hl until one o'clock 
this morniim. I'olal attendance 
was estimated at 60 pei'sons by 
Richard O. Rouse, entertain- 
ment committee chairman in 
chaige of Ihe dance. 

For the sake of contrast to 
the sub-zero weather that had 
prevailed for the last few days, 
the profs planned their deco- 
rations around a spring motif. 
A laiRc and potent punchbowl 
provided a continual fountain 
of en.)oyment. as the professors 
and their wives danced to the 
music of Al Trudel and hl.s 
band. 



Paragraphs 
In the News 



Beta Theta PI recently named 
named Kick Avery '52 house vice- 
president to fill the post vacated 
by Joe Stewart '52, the newly 
elected house president. 

George McAleenan '52 and 
Walt Flaherty '53 lost to two Wes- 
leyan debaters while supporting 
the question, "Should the United 
States send an ambassador to the 
Vatican?" Fi-iday evening. 

Arthur B. Hudson '53 was elect- 
ed president of Chi Psl at a re- 
cent house meeting. Other oflicers 
named for the coming year are: 
Thomas Williams 53, vice-presi- 
dent; Edward C'ypiot '54, secre- 
tary; rnd Edward Miller '54, 
treasurer. 

Alumni Fund secretary Charles 
B. Hall '15 announced that the 
1951 fund drive netted the coUese 
''115,227, the highest figure in the 
h'stoi-y of the college. A total of 
3.617 alumni contributed to the 
campaign. 

Intramural Basketball Standings 
First Division 

Team W L 

Phi Sigma K- ppa 2 
Delta Kappa Epsilon 2 



Psl Upsilon 
Theta Delta Chi 
Delta Upsilon 
Phi G.imma Delta 
Sigma Phi 
Delta Psi 



Second Division 



Alpha Delta Phi 
Chi P.si 
K ppa Alpha 
Delta Phi 
Beta Theta Pi 
"hi Delta Theta 
Z^ta Psi 
Garfield Club 
'dropped out) 



PCT. 
1.000 
1.000 
.500 
.500 
.500 
.500 
.000 
.000 

1.000 
1.000 
.667 
.667 
.333 
.333 
.000 
.000 



Frosh i 
Down 

Wilson, 
11 Ead 
27 in 

Saturday, 
ing off' to an 
the Williami 
te.m coastei 
Ihe R.P.I. F 
victory in a i 
men, who pli 
ices of the 
More, wlio 
■Jce. 

Though hi 
the frosh 1 
downing tlv 
(lulntel. 

Fred Brodi 
in puttting t 
as he scored 
the early mil 
take an 11-3 
Wilson, Her 

With Ror 
Henry contrc 
liams led 39. 
Engineers ti 
the Kame in 
heir efforts 
Purple coasi 



Elephant . 



got LOST! All recollections of the 
exact whereabouts of the 12 thou- 
.^and pound beast was forgotten - 
for one-hundred years. 

After extensive research into 
m- ny yellowed documents, legends 
old wives' tales, etc. combined with 
a few dubious eye-witness reports 
.ind mystical prophesies, "Opera- 
tion Tusk Force" got underway. 
Included in the chase for the prize 
loxodonta 'worth some $25.00 to 
the Williams Record) were var- 
ious groups from Williams. "I feel 
like a 'bull-moose' " exclaimed one 
of many itinerants on the first of 
the Teddy Roosevelt-type big game 
hunts. 

About a week ago, with the balm 
of Spring upon us, "Operation 
T-F" was resumed. With the skill 
of experts, and the stamina of 
the proverbial "bull-moose", dig- 
ging commenced. Picks and shov- 
els hit the semi-frozen turf. Pro- 
fuse oaths struck the air! And 
four hours later, six feet of sod 
had been unearthed — but still no 
signs of the pet loxodonta . . . .'^.nd 
the shades of evening wore on the 
dank earth was replaced, and for 
the time being, at least, the House 
of Columbus remained undisturbed 
by mortal hands. 

BRING 
YOUR CAR 
TO US FOR 

EXPERT SERVICE 
GENUINE FORD PARTS 



You'll Ilk* our 
Prtfflpf S«iv/c« 



You'll liko our 
fttasonab/f fr/cii 



You'll lik« our 
Fr/Mif/x Wox of 
Do/n0 tm\f»t% 



HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATED 



Amhei 

iams led 10- 
The Jeffs, 
slowly and si 
end of the q 
buckets by 

The teams bi 
the second i 
ended with A 

Hawkins, 1: 

Belshe 

Smith, rf 

Avery 

Depopolo 

Siies.sbrick. 

Hall 

Lazor 

Shudt. Ig 

Campbell 

Creer, rg 

Miller 

Total.s 





Limited accommodations demand all the wiles of a tidy Dutch hon)emake. 



The gracious garb of a southern planter 
blends with a New England intellect 




Modern Design 
for Campus Life 



Wilh 
miss 



studied informality the Berkshire host brings 



a little bit of Victorian gentility to ins sliy Va.ssar 



"You never want to lake your clothes too 
.seriou.sly", said Anthony Speaker King, as he 
ad,iusteri his suspenders so that his trousers 
dropped an eiglUli of an incli over his white 
spals and palent leatlu-r shoes from Lupo'.s 
Men Shopi)!' When he was voted the most 
distinguished looking undergraduate last month, 
Anthony attributed his polish to the ca.sual man- 
ner in which he donned his appai'el. "A man has 
got to look like he's bwn poured into his 
clothes", said tlie pi-ominent dandy. "Ever since 
I was a kid I liad a knack of looking right ai 
liome in my attire. Of eoui.se. you must re- 
member it's the man that makes tlie clothes." 

The LEER interviewer had just caught Kim: 
a,', he stei)ped out of his shower in a black .silk 
bathrolx' trimmed with Ermine. While his valet, 
administered tile final touelies. LEER had a 
cliance to inspect his liaiid embroidered lace 
-horts with -Binky" on the back. Then tlu- repor- 
ter spied Anthony's latest creation. Hanging on 
the chain from the ceiling was his latest crea- 
tion -■ a Bikini swim suit with laces on the side 
and a mink collar. No wonder lie is the .sartorial 
pride of the campus! 






The House of Walsh offers this attractive 

s'^i package for only $99 



....J..1 n ., -11 .1 lifCojmo, Anlh ny 
proudly wears the traditional garb of his achieve- 
ment 



Anthony combines gay campus colors with 
the cliarm of an Old World troubador 




» t*. it\, t 



Copvriuhf lOSJ. ItfifliTT H Mvfii Tmacco Co 






Je^xrf^ 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Even as a bntjc he knew wliut lie 
wanted 



A fruitful childhooci included ro- 
mance 



Early in life he began formative habit-s 





jl Ski Meet 

It Dartmouth 
s Fourth Place 



A brief financial setb.ick forced Uie boy to supplement his dwindling 
diet, but soon an Olco Marperine scliolarship set him to Yale and solid 
success 



Graduation spelled a new life for Charley. 
\aliantly in the cruel commerci: 1 world 



as the youth struggled 



The Childhood of Charley Keller 



Cliarley Keller, aullior. athlete, gourmet, and 
stiitesman. today stands as the biggest unknown 
in the confusion of pre-convention politics. 
"Choose Charley" clubs spring up daily all over 
the country as enthusiastic young political ama- 
teurs, in a common hunger for a "solid man" 
in the White Hou.se, look more and more to 
Charley. Cynical politicos, ward heelers, and 
committee men are looking and a.sking questions. 
Said Ohio's Bob Taft, another candidate, "What 
Is this man? How docs he stand? Can he run?" 



This week LEER takes a look at Keller the 
man. in an attempt to show how his life back- 
ground molded his present stature. 

Charley is playing coy. as support for his 
campaign begins to gain momentum. Last week 
in Paris as International Food Surplus Direc- 
tor. Charley tossed a terse "no comment" to 
reporters who cornered him outside his favorite 
French pastry shop. 

As a white-bucked undergraduate at Yale. 
Charley first showed the executive ability which 



his supporters feel make him a natural for the 
White House. New Haven remembers Charley 
as the man who put Skull and Bones on its 
feet. As Club treasurer during his senior year, 
he cut food costs to the bone by purchasing 
unbelievably cheap supplies from new and un- 
tried .sources. Said Charley in later years, laugh- 
ing heartily over his college days. "It's an old 
trick I learned as a kid when my candy allow- 
ance ran low." <See Picture' 

A natural athlete Charley was a four-letter 

11 



r at the U'inter 
ollow. 



hund; 
Service 



)dav that W'il- 
iy was found 
ieta Theta Pi 
the head. 
: with pra)'ers 
n the Thonip- 



nd .state offi- 
:ed on the case 
T. Mullen of 
hern Berkshire 
:aminer; Asst. 
E. Levinc of 
State Detective 
•/l. Whittemoi'e 



Eastern Colleges 
Initiate Advanced 
Teacher Training 

Williams Joins Program 

For Study At Harvard 

School of Education 



Wednesday, Feb. 20— Williams 
and 19 other Eastern colleges 
have joined with the Harvard 
Graduate School of Education, 
and the Harvard and Eadcllffe 
Graduate School of Arts and Sci- 
ences to inaugurate a cooperative 
program to train elementary and 
secondary .school teachers. The 
purpose of this program is to in- 
crease the number of qualified 
college graduates entering the 
public .schools' teaching ranks. 

The Fund for the Advancement 
of Education is supporting the 
program with $78,000 annually 
for three years, $45,000 for fellow- 
ships, and $33,000 to support the 
instruction and administration of 
the plan. 

President James B. Conant of 
Harvard has announced that fel- 
lowships win be granted to grad- 
uates of the twenty colleges in 
the program. The graduates will 
.spend a year at Harvard investi- 
gatlhg the ways of relating the 
liberal arts program with grad- 
v»te study in education while 
serving apprenticeships in teach- 
ing. 



Noble and Dr. E. J. Coughlin. a 
local practitioner, are leading the 
course. 

The opening lecture was given at 
9 p. m. last night in the St. John's 
parish hou.se. but .juniors and 
.seniors may still enroll. There will 
be six Tuesday night meetings, 
terminating the week before Eas- 
ter recess. 

Informulity Stressed 

Altliough the course has been a 
Williams standby .since the war, 
this year's series hopes to attract 
more participants by emphasizing 
a greater degree of informality 
and a broader view of the sub.ject. 

Dr. Noble is handling the moral 
and spiritual aspects, while Dr. 
Coughlin is lecturing on the phy- 
sical side of the marriage. The 
first part of the meeting is a 
half hour talk by either Dr. Noble 
or Dr. Coughlin. while the remain- 
dei' is devoted to an open discus- 
sion, with the added attraction 
of refreshments. 

Proposed Topics 

Among the topics suggested last 
Wednesday by the house repre- 
sentatives are the questions of 
preparation for marriage, sexual 
behavior before and after mar- 
riage, and psychological ad.iust- 
ments to the marital status. 

On the physiological side, it 
was proposed that Dr. Coughlin 
consider in liis talks such problems 
as child training and the relation- 
ship of sexual behaviour to parent- 
hood. 



merica present views of Paris and 
Prague, as well as cities in Italy 
and Russia. 

'Tool Room" Favorite 

Perhap.i the most popular paint- 
ing on display is the work of an 
American Negro. Jacob Lawrence. 
His "Pool Room " is drawn in such 
great detail that it even shows 
the smoke of a lighted cigarette 
curling up from the edge of a pool 
table. 

The scenes vary from a large. 
See Page 4. Col. 3 



Rifle Found 

Investigators found the body ly- 
ing face upward on a couch in the 
room. Some four feet away, be- 
neath a double-decker bed, lay a 
bolt action .22 caliber rifle, its 
muzzle under the edge of a rug. 
One shot — a "short" shell — 
had been fired from it. 

Officials completed their on-the 
scene investigation by 8:30 last 
night, but continued to work un- 
til early this morning at a Spring 
Street funeral home. 



John Hewett Qualifies for Coveted 
American Alpine Club Membership 



Wednesday, Feb. 20— John He- 
wett '53. recently elected to the 
American Alpine Club, became 
the youngest alpinist in the his- 
tory of the organization to receive 
.such an honor. Despite his youth. 
Hewett has a long and impressive 
list of ascents to merit his mem- 
bership. 

The Club itself is a select or- 
ganization of 406 mountain climb- 
ers, the vast majority of whom 
are residents of the United States. 
It maintains headquarters in New 
York City and supplies its mem- 
bers with much climbing infor- 
mation, some in Its regular pub- 
lications and .some on request, 
Rerommend and Approval 

In order to qualify for member- 
ship in the American Alpine Club, 
an applicant must have sufficient 



o ~ 

climbing experience, be recom- 
mended by at least two membei's, 
and approved by the Club as a 
whole. 

Hewett was nominated for mem- 
bership by Adams Carter, his close 
friend and climbing companion. 

1 He first met Carter when the 
latter became a teacher at Milton 
Academy, Hewett's prep school. It 
was under Carter's influence that 
John became an avid and expert 
climber. 
As a member and later president 

I of the Milton Academy Moun- 
taineering Club. John gained his 

j first actual climbing experience. 
He was active in the organization 
when Carter joined the Milton 
facility, and the two have led 
climbing groups on trips to the 

I west for the past two years. 



I last night by 
pector Richard 
;ld and noted 
School pathol- 
Dea. 

, „ ..._mber of Beta 

Theta Pi. was the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Millard Romaine of 3726 
Davenant Ave.. Cincinnati. Ohio. 

April Draft Test 
Applications Due 
Before March 10 



Gen. Hershey Announces 
Student Opportunities 
For Draft Deferment 



Wednesday, Feb. 20 — In a let- 
ter released by the Selective Ser- 
vice Examining Section it was 
announced that all eUgible stu- 
dents who intend to take the Col- 
lege Qualification Test in 1952 
should file applications at once for 
the April 24 examination. 

Following the instructions of the 
bulletin, which can be obtained 
at the Student Aid Office, the 
student should fill out his ap- 
plication and mail it no later than 
midnight. Maich 10. It was point- 
ed out that early filing will be to 
the student's advantage. 

Results to Local Board 

Results will be reported to the 
student's local board for use in 
considering his deferment, accord- 
ing to the Educational Testing 
Service, which prepares and ad- 
ministers the tests. 

Previously, Major Oen. Hershey, 
Director of Selective Service, an- 
nounced that under existing reg- 



Ireland Captures 
Skimeister Award 



Participants, Spectators 
Hail Meet as Success 



Saturday. Feb. 16 — Attracting 
three of the top .ski teams in the 
counuy. the Williams Winter Car- 
nival scorned the snowless wastes 
of Williamstown and took to the 
slopes of Mount Greylock and 
Goodell Hollow. The best in ski 
thiills awaited the comparatively 
few spectators who braved the 
cold and the climb to watch the 
events. The team title finally 
went to Middlebury after a nip 
and luck battle with Dartmouth. 
The winner's captain. Dick Ire- 
land, won Saturday's jumping to 
Bive his team the margin of vic- 
tory over the Indians — 587.63 
to 584.33. Ireland, who also plac- 
ed sixth in the downhill and 
seventh in the .slalom, received the 
coveted Williams Skimeister Tro- 
phy for the best individual show- 
ing over the two day competition. 
Collins Stars 
Williams repeated and possibly 
exceeded its Hfine showing at the 
Dartmouth Carnival last week, 
lops 01 the class B teams, the 
Ephmen scored heavily in the 
downhill, placing third, ahead of 
such powerful competitors as New 
Hampshire and Bowdoin. 

Ned Collins '52 was the indivi- 
dual star for the host team. He 
placed .seventh in the downhill, 
fourteenth in the slalom, and 
ninth in the jumping. Stu Chase 
and Pete Callahan in the slalom 
and Doug Wilson. Bob Tucker, and 
Joe Foote in the cross country 
were also outstanding for the 
Ephs. 

Burden Combined Winner 
Doug Burden of Middlebury. 
winner of both the downhill and 
the slalom the iJievious week, was 
forced to be content with seconds 
this time, bowing to Kirby of 
Dartmouth in the former and to 
team-mate Gale Shaw in the lat- 
ter. Burden and Shaw were one- 
two in the Alpine combined. 

After falling behind Middlebury 
in Friday's events. Dartmouth 
staged a strong comeback in the 
Nordic events on Saturday. Trem- 
blay. Agan. and Drury of the In- 
dians took tlie first three places 
in the Nordic combined, but the 
Blue and Wliite stayed close e- 
nough for Inland's winning jump 
to provide tlie margin of victory. 
■Victorious mentor Bobo Shee- 
hen praised Williams coach. Ralph 
Town.send, for his preparation of 
See Page 4, Col. 2 



Faculty Club Dance 
Attracts Large Crowd 

Saturday Feb. IB— 'Wliile the 
rest of the campus was In the 
middle of the Winter Carnival 
festivities, the faculty enter- 
tained themselves at the Facul- 
ty Club dance which ran from 
nine last night until one o'clock 
this mornins Total attendance 
was estimated at 60 persons by 
Richard O. Rouse, entertain- 
ment committee chairman in 
charge of the dance. 

For the sake of contrast to 
the sub-zero weather that had 
prevailed for the last few days, 
the profs planned their deco- 
rations around a spring motif. 
A large and potent punchbowl 
provided a continual fountain 
of enjoyment, as the professoi-s 
and their wives danced to the 
music of Al Trudel and his 
band. 



Paragraphs 
In the News 



Beta Theta Pi recently named 
named Rick Avery '52 house vice- 
president to fill the post vacated 
by Joe Stewart '52, the newly 
elected house president. 

George McAleenan '52 and 
Walt Flaherty '53 lost to two Wes- 
leyan debaters while supporting 
the question, "Should the United 
States send an ambassador to the 
Vatican?" Fiiday evening. 

Arthur B. Hudson '53 was elect- 
ed pre .dent of Chi Psl at a re- 
cent house meeting. Other officers 
named for the coming year are: 
Thomas Williams 53, vice-presi- 
dent; Edward Cypiot '54, secre- 
tary; end Edward Miller '54, 
treasurer. 

Alumni Fund secretary Charles 
B. Hall '15 announced that the 
1951 fund drive netted the college 
"115,227, the highest figure In the 
h'story of the college. A total of 
3,617 alumni contributed to the 
campaign. 

Intramural Basketball Standings 
First Division 
Team W L PCX. 

Phi Sigma K' ppa 2 1.000 
Delta Kappa Epsilon 2 l.ooo 
Psi Upsllon 1 1 .500 

Theta Delta Chi 1 1 .500 

Delta Upsilon 1 1 ,500 

Phi Gamma Delta 1 1 .500 
Sigma Phi 2 .000 

Delta Psi 2 .000 



Second Division 



Alpha Delta Phi 
Chi Psi 
K: ppa Alpha 
Delta Phi 
Beta Theta Pi 
^hi Delta Theta 
Zeta Psl 
Garfield Club 
I dropped out) 



1.000 
1.000 
.667 
.667 
.333 
.333 
.000 
.000 



Elephant . . . 

got LOST! All recollections of the 
exact whereabouts of the 12 thou- 
.''and pound beast was forgotten - 
for one-hundred years. 

After extensive research Into 
mny yellowed documents, legends 
old wives' tales, etc. combined with 
a few dubious eye-witness reports 
nnd mystical prophesies, "Opera- 
tion Tusk Force" got underway. 
Included In the chase for the prize 
loxodonta (worth some $25.00 to 
the Williams Record) were var- 
ious groups from Williams. "I feel 
like a 'bull-moose' " exclaimed one 
of many Itinerants on the first of 
the Teddy Roosevelt-type big game 
hunts. 

About a week ago, with the balm 
of Spring upon us, "Operation 
T-F" was resumed. With the skill 
of experts, and the stamina of 
the proverbial "bull-moose", dig- 
ging commenced. Picks and shov- 
els hit the semi-frozen turf. Pro- 
fuse oaths struck the air! And 
four hours later, six feet of sod 
had been unearthed — but still no 
signs of the pet loxodonta . . . .\nd 
the shades of evening wore on the 
dank earth was replaced, and for 
the time being, at least, the House 
of Columbus remained undisturbed 
by mortal hands. 



BRING 
YOUR CAR 
TO US FOR 

EXPERT SERVICE 
GENUINE FORD PARTS 



You'll file* our 
franpf 5«iv/(f 



You'll iilc* our 



You'll Ilk* our 
FffMcffx Way •! 
IMag B9ibi$ss 



HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATED 



Frosh i 

Down 

Wilson, 
11 Ead 
27 in 

Saturday, 
ing off to an 
the Williami 
team coastei 
the R.P.I. Fi 
victory in a 1 
men, who pli 
ices of the 
Moro, who 
•.ice. 

Though hi 
the frosh 1 
downing th 
quintet. 

Fled Brodi 
in puttting t 
as he scored 
the early mil 
take an 11-3 
Wilson, Hen 

With Ror 
Henry contrt 
liams led 39- 
Engineers tr 
the game in 
heir efforts 
Purple coasi 

Amhei 

iams led 10- 
The Jeffs, 
slowly and gi 
end of the q 
buckets by 
The teams b: 
the second 1 
ended with A 




Currently marking time 
at Williams College, Char- 
ley, is shown here in po- 
ses typical of his new du- 
ties as lunch hall moni- 
tor and Softball instruc- 
tor. He teaches on the 
side. 




soft ball star. Commented Yale coach Herman 
Hickman ". . . he was all over the field. I've al- 
ways emulated his form." 

Forced out of college when Papa "Pork" 
Keller's fortune went down the drain after 
the crash of '29, Charley invested his meager 
savings in a basket of apples and opened a 
fresh air business in a small New England col- 
lege town. Competition from a chain of Greek 
restaurants forced the young businessman to 
the wall and into the teaching profession. 

12 



Bravely volunteering In the Coast Guard at 
the first hint of trouble in 1945, Charley began 
a meteoric rise to military fame as a blimp pilot 
over the troubled North Atlantic waters. At 
the end of the war he emerged a national hero, 
raised to highest rank, a party to decisions that 
rocked the world. 

Since his return from France.Kelier has been 
markirg time at Williams College as lunch hall 
monitor, Softball player, and teacher. "I'm Just 
marking time," he said to reporters. 



Carnival Attracts 400 

Well iced mountains and martinis have 
lured 400 recorded females to Williams for this 
famous winter weekend. The LEER returns miss- 
ed the magic 500, but many non-affiUates are 
entertaining unpubliclzed lovelies, due to the 
mass boycotting of the Old Garfield Club list. 

A traditional favorite, Smith again leads 
the pack with sixty-eight entries in a fast heat. 
For the first time since Helen Hokinson, one de- 
fiant fraternity, the callous Kaps, managed to 
shut out the Northampton girls. A genteel score 
and a half of Vassar delegates nudged aside 
Holyoke for second place honors, as South Had- 
ley sent a scant twenty-five. Skidmore and 
Wellesley made faint bids for fame with twelve 
and nine offers i-espectlvely while distant North- 
western sent six. 

Among the fraternities the well bred Saints 
took the lead in lust with thirty-four contribut- 
ing brethren. Hot on their necks were the Alpha 
Dclts inviting thirty-three visitors. The Phi Delts, 
Slgs, and Zetes drew thirty-one per house. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI 

White, T., Carole Hager, Bradford 
Johnston, Gail Potts, Vassar 
Starke, Mel Shallow, Northwestern 
Plske, Vicki Keppler, New York 
Schauffler, Diane Sawyer, Colby Jr. 
Hollington, Joanne Prescott, Vassar 
Lynch, Greg Wilson, U.S.M.C. 
DuBols, Mary Teen, Durham. N. C. 
Brown, Pat Brook, Vassar 
Gerhardy, Diane Krant, Vassar 
Canning, Mary Joss, Smith 
Smith, Judy Iselin, Baltimore, Md. 
Gehret, Mandy Spackman, Vassar 
Lindsay, Lois Devine, Wilmington, Del. 
Coleman, Martha Goodell. Smith 
Stolz, Marcia Kraft, Middlebury 
Alden, Cornelia Duffy, Smith 
Stites, Frances Cummins, ManhattanvlUe 
Middletoii, Tinkle Ungcr, Holyoke 
Gushec, Peggy Luchiesh, Mai-ymount 
Herman, Sue Slater, Wellesley 
Squires, Joan Snodgrnss, U. of Michigan 
Missimer, Marion Parsons. Temple U. 
Peirce, Bunny Morell, Dartmouth 
Miller. Barbara Miller. Endlcott Jr. 
Wigdale. Carol Moore. Northwestern 
Somerby, Joan Comfort, Va.ssar 
Baker. Joyce Bartche, Bennett 
Puffer. Nancy Plncek, Northwestern 
Lazor, A.. Mary White. Bennett Jr. 
Hugo. Murilyn Full, Vas.sar 
Symington. Bally Walker. New York 
Plummer. Gee Bauer, New York 



BETA THETA PI 

Nel.son, Laurie Nath, Smith 
Gunther. Barbara Ca.scment. Poughkeepsie 
Bennett, Pat Green, Smith 
Romalne. Pat Sweeney. Vassar 
Powell, Sandy Zelinkoff, Bradford 
Wight. Narda Griffiths. Skidmore 
Arnold, Liz Morse. Mt. Holyoke 
Zeigler. Pat Green, St. David's. Pa. 
Miller. Ann Fosnockt. U. of Rochester 
Jackson, Elaine Wallbank, Smilh 
Tillinghnst. Gini Hess. Wells 
Renin, Nancy Goze, Smith 
Krehbiel, Anne Eshelman, Smith 
Burgoyne. Joanna Turner. Willirmstown 
St. Clair. Dusty Pruyn. Smith 
Woodbury. Anne Moody. Colby Jr. 
Moltz. Pat Leahy. Bangor. Me. 
Kelsey, Essie Lundine, Providence. R. I. 
McDermott. Gretchen Storch. Bradford 
Nichols. Margaret Gen.ser. Albany State Teachers 
Avery, Kit Carson. Albuquerque. N. M. 
Continued on Page 17 



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Basking In the wintiy sun of Willlamstown's famed snowy paradise, two 
college students, Bezo and Pete, admire the beautiful Berkshire landscape. 
The fleecy, majestic coverlet of snow never melts. 



Skiers' Paradise 



Long known as a spectacular ski center, Wil- 
llamstown's winter wonderland annually attracts 
thousands to its silky snow slopes. Nestled in 
the bosom of the Berkshires, this typical New 
EnRland village offers both scenic and sporting 
splendor to the fortunate tourist. The snow never 
melts. 

As the crowds stream down from the majestic 
Taconic Trail and along lovely old route seven 
into "the village beautiful" they are treated to 
the sight of silvery human snow birds plum- 
meting down the sheer slopes of Sheep Hill. One 
of the nation's most fabulous ski areas, the 
slope is constantly thronged with cold weather 
.sports enthusiasts from the four corners of the 
elobe. 

At nearby Cole Field Rink, the world-re- 
knowned Williams hockey team may be seen 
practicing at almost any hour of the day or 
night under the expert tutelage of their auburn- 
haired mentor. Frank Bell. 

But most of all are the gay throngs of 
young men and women who flock to the Sheep 
Hill warming house for carefree parties and 
social activities amid singing and dancinu. 




After a day of vigorous and exultant exercise in the great out of doors, Bezo and Pete mingle 
gay throngs of young people who sing and dance in he Sheep H II warmng house, after the 
set. 



with the 
sun has 

13 



tit!Cffj^ 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Ski Meet 

it Dartmouth 
s Fourth Place 



r at the Winter 
ollow. 



found; 
Service 



)day that VVil 
dy was found 
3eta Theta Pi 
tlie head. 
: wifli prayers 
n the Thomp- 



Ireland Captures 
Skimeister Award 

Participants, Spectators 
Hail Meet as Success 



nd state offi- 
:ed on the case 
T. Mullen of 
hern Berkshire 
{aminer; Asst. 
E. Levlne of 
State Detective 
W. Whittemore 



Eastern Colleges 
Initiate Advanced 
Teacher Training 

Williams Joins Program 

For Study At Harvard 

School of Education 



Wednesday. Feb. 20— Williams 
and 19 other Eastern colleges 
have joined with the Harvard 
Graduate School of Education, 
and the Harvard and Radcliffe 
Graduate School of Arts and Sci- 
ences to inaugurate a cooperative 
program to train elementary and 
secondary school teachers. The 
purpose of this program is to in- 
crease the number of qualified 
college graduates entering the 
public schools' teaching ranks. 

The Fund for the Advancement 
of Education is supporting the 
program with $78,000 annually 
for three years, $45,000 for fellow- 
ships, and $33,000 to support the 
instruction and administration of 
the plan. 

President James B. Conant of 
Harvard has announced that fel- 
lowships will be granted to grad- 
uates of the twenty colleges In 
the program. The graduates will 
spehd a year at Harvard investi- 
gatfhg the ways of relating the 
ftbei-al arts program with grad- 
uate study in education while 
serving apprenticeships in teach- 
ing. 



Noble and Dr. E. J. Coughlin. a 
local practitioner, are leading the 
course. 

The opening lecture was given at 
9 p. m. last night in the St. John's 
parish house, but juniors and 
seniors may still enroll. There will 
be six Tuesday night meetings, 
terminating the week before Eas- 
ter recess. 

Informality Stressed 

Although the course has been a 
Williams standby since the war, 
this year's .series hopes to attract 
more participants by emphasizing 
a greater degree of informality 
and a broader view of the subject. 

Dr. Noble is handling the moral 
and spiritual aspects, while Dr. 
Coughlin is lecturing on the phy- 
sical side of the marriage. The 
first part of the meeting is a 
half hour talk by either Dr. Noble 
or Dr. Coughlin. while the remain- 
der is devoted to an open discus- 
sion, with the added attraction 
of refreshments. 

Proposed Topics 

Among the topics suggested last 
Wednesday by the house repre- 
sentatives are the questions of 
preparation for marriage, sexual 
behavior before and after mar- 
riage, and psychological adjust- 
ments to the marital status. 

On the physiological side, it 
was proposed that Dr. Coughlin 
consider in his talks such problems 
as child training and the relation- 
ship of sexual behaviour to parent- 
hood. 



merica present views of Paris and 
Prague, as well as cities in Italy 
and Russia. 

"Pool Room" Favorite 

Perhaps the most popular paint- 
ing on display is the work of an 
American Negro. Jacob Lawrence. 
His "Pool Room" is drawn in such 
great detail that it even shows 
the smoke of a lighted cigarette 
curling up from the edge of a pool 
table. 

The scenes vary from a large. 
See Page 4, Col. 3 



l£ltle Pound 

Investigators found the body ly- 
ing face upward on a couch in the 
room. Some four feet away, be- 
neath a double-decker bed, lay a 
bolt action .22 caliber rifle, its 
muzzle under the edge of a rug. 
One shot — a "short" shell — 
had been fired from it. 

Officials completed their on-the 
scene investigation by 8:30 last 
night, but continued to work un- 
til early this morning at a Spring 
Street funeral home. 



John Hewett Qualifies for Coveted 
American Alpine Club Membership 



Wednesday, Feb. 20^ohn He 
wett '53, recently elected to the 
American Alpine Club, became 
the youngest alpinist in the his- 
tory of the organization to receive 
such an honor. Despite his youth, 
Hewett has a long and Impressive 
list of ascents to merit his mem- 
bership. 

The Club itself is a select or- 
ganization of 406 mountain climb- 
ers, the vast majority of whom 
are residents of the United States. 
It maintains headquarters In New 
York City and supplies its mem- 
bers with much climbing infor- 
mation, some in its regular pub- 
lications and some on request. 
Recommend and Approval 

In order to qualify for member- 
ship in the American Alpine Club, 
an applicant must have sufficient 



0-" 



climbing experience, be recom- 
mended by at least two members, 
and approved by the Club as a 
whole. 

Hewett was nominated for mem- 
bership by Adams Carter, his close 
friend and climbing companion. 
He first met Carter when the 
latter became a teacher at Milton 
Academy, Hewett's prep school. It 
was imder Carter's influence that 
John became an avid and expert 
climber. 

As a memt)er and later president 
of the Milton Academy Moun- 
taineering Club, John gained his 
first actual climbing experience. 
He was active in the organization 
when Carter joined the Milton 
faculty, and the two have led 
climbing groups on trips to the 
west for the past two years. 



1 last night by 

pector Richard 

3ld and noted 

School pathol- 

Oea. 

- ..u...u...^. „ ■•■vmber of Beta 

Theta Pi. was the son of Mr. and 

Mrs. Millard Romalne of 3726 

Davenant Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

April Draft Test 
Applications Due 
Before March 10 

Gen. Hershey Announces 
Student Opportunities 
For Draft Deferment 

Wednesday, Feb. 20 — In a let- 
ter released by the Selective Ser- 
vice Examining Section it was 
announced that all eligible stu- 
dents who intend to take the Col- 
lege Qualification Test in 1952 
should file applications at once for 
the April 24 examination. 

Following the instructions of the 
bulletin, which can be obtained 
at the Student Aid Office, the 
student should fill out his ap- 
plication and mail it no later than 
midnight, March 10. It was point- 
ed out that early filing will be to 
the student's advantage. 

Results to Local Board 

Results will be reported to the 
student's local board for use in 
considering his deferment, accord- 
ing to the Educational Testing 
Service, which prepares and ad- 
ministers the tests. 

Previously, Major Ocn. Hershey, 
Director of Selective Service, an- 
nounced that under existing reg- 



Saturday, Feb. 16 — Attracting 
three of the top ski teams in the 
country, the Williams Winter Car- 
nival scorned the snowless wastes 
of Williamstown and took to the 
slopes of Mount Greylock and 
Goodell Hollow. The best in ski 
thrills awaited the comparatively 
few spectators who braved the 
cold and the climb to watch the 
events. The team title finally 
went to Middlebury after a nip 
and tuck battle with Dartmouth. 
The winner's captain, Dick Ire- 
land, won Saturday's jumping to 
give his team the margin of vic- 
tory over the Indians — 587.63 
to 584.33. Ireland, who also plac- 
ed sixth in the downhill and 
seventh in the slalom, received the 
coveted Williams Skimeister Tro- 
phy for the best individual show- 
ing over the two day competition. 
Collins Stars 
Williams repeated and possibly 
exceeded its flfine showing at the 
Dartmouth Carnival last week, 
tops ot the class B teams, the 
Ephmen scored heavily in the 
downhill, placing thii-d, ahead of 
such powerful competitors as New 
Hampshire and Bowdoin. 

Ned Collins '52 was the indivi- 
dual star tor the host team. He 
placed seventh in the downhill, 
fourteenth in the slalom, and 
ninth in the jumping. Stu Chase 
and Pete Callahan in the slalom 
and Doug Wilson. Bob Tucker, and 
Joe Foote in the cross country 
were also outstanding for the 
Ephs. 

Burden Combined Winner 
Doug Burden of Middlebury, 
winner of both the downhill and 
the slalom the previous week, was 
forced to be content with seconds 
this time, bowing to Kirby of 
Dartmouth in the former and to 
team-mate Gale Shaw in the lat- 
ter. Burden and Shaw were one- 
two in the Alpine combined. 

After falling behind Middlebury 
in Friday's events, Dartmouth 
staged a strong comeback in the 
Nordic events on Saturday. Trem- 
blay. Agan. and Drury of the In- 
dians took the first three places 
in the Nordic combined, but the 
Blue and Wliite stayed close e- 
nough for Inland's winning jump 
to provide the margin of victory. 
Victorious mentor Bobo Shee- 
hen praised Williams coach. Ralph 
Townsend, for his preparation of 
See Page 4. Col. 2 



Faculty Club Dance 
Attracts Large Crowd 

Saturday Feb. 16 — While the 
rest of the campus was in the 
middle of the Winter Carnival 
festivities, the faculty enter- 
tained themselves at the Facul- 
ty Club dance which ran from 
nine last night until one o'clock 
this morning. Total attendance 
was estimated at 60 persons by 
Richard O. Rouse, entertain- 
ment committee chairman In 
charge of the dance. 

For the sake of contrast to 
the sub-zero weather that had 
prevailed for the last few days, 
the profs planned their deco- 
rations around a spring motif. 
A large and potent punchl)owl 
provided a continual fountain 
of enjoyment, as the professors 
and their wives danced to the 
music of Al Trudel and his 
band. 



Paragraphs 
In the News 



Beta Theta PI recently named 
named Kick Avery '52 house vice- 
president to fill tlie post vacated 
by Joe Stewart '52, the newly 
elected house president. 

George McAleeiian '52 and 
Walt Flaherty '53 lost to two Wes- 
leyan debaters while supporting 
the question, •■Should the United 
States send an ambassador to the 
Vatican?" Pi-iday evening. 

Arthur B. Hudson '53 was elect- 
ed president of Chi Psi at a re- 
cent house meeting. Other ofBcers 
ramed for the coming year are: 
Thomas Williams 53, vice-presi- 
dent; Edward Cypiot '54. secre- 
tary; End Edward Miller '54, 
treasurer. 

Alumni Fund secretary Charles 
B. Hall '15 announced that the 
1951 fund drive netted the college 
'■115.227, the highest figure in the 
h'stoi-y of the college. A total of 
3.617 alumni contributed to the 
campaign. 

Intramural Basketball Standings 
First Division 

Team W L PCX. 

Phi Sigma K-ppa 2 1.000 
Delta Kappa Epsilon 2 1.000 
Psi Upsilon 1 1 .500 

Theta Delta Chi 1 1 .500 
Delta Upsilon 1 1 .500 

Phi G.imma Delta 1 1 .500 
Sigma Phi 2 .000 

Delta Psi 2 .000 



Second Division 



Alpha Delta Phi 
Chi Psi 
K ppa Alpha 
Delta Phi 
Beta Theta Pi 
"hi Delta Theta 
Zeta Psi 
Garfield Club 
'dropped out) 



1.000 
1.000 
.667 
.667 
.333 
.333 
.000 
.000 



Elephant . . . 

got LOST! All recollections of the 
exact whereabouts of the 12 thou- 
.»and pound beast was forgotten - 
for one-hundred years. 

After extensive research into 
m- ny yellowed documents, legends 
old wives' tales, etc. combined with 
a few dubious eye-witness reports 
.ind mystical prophesies, "Opera- 
tion Tusk Force" got underway. 
Included in the chase for the wrize 
loxodonta < worth some $25.00 to 
the Williams Record) were var- 
ious groups from Williams. "I feel 
Uke a 'bull-moose' " exclaimed one 
of many itinerants on the first of 
the Teddy Roosevelt-type big game 
hunts. 

About a week ago, with the balm 
of Spring upon us, "Operation 
T-F" was resumed. With the skill 
nf experts, and the stamina of 
the proverbial "bull-moose", dig- 
ging commenced. Picks and shov- 
els hit the semi-frozen turf. Pro- 
fuse oaths struck the air! And 
four hours later, six feet of sod 
had been unearthed — but still no 
signs of the pet loxodonta . . . ,\nd 
the shades of evening wore on the 
dank earth was replaced, and for 
the time being, at least, the House 
of Columbus remained undisturbed 
by mortal hands. 

BRING 
YOUR CAR 
TO US FOR 

EXPERT SERVICE 
GENUINE FORD PARTS 



You'll lik* our 
frompf %vNk% 



You'll liko our 
RMlontfUf fr/cM 



You'll liko our 
Fr/Miffy MTtfX 0^ 
Do/ji0 f f s/mss 



HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATED 



Wilson, 
11 EacI 
27 in 

Saturday, 
ins! oil' to an 
(he Williams 
tei.m coastei 
the R.P.I. Pi 
victory in a i 
men, who pli 
ices of the 
Moro. who 
vice. 

Though hi 
the frosh I 
downing thi 
quintet. 

Fred Brodi 
in puttting t 
as he scored 
the early mil 
take an 11-3 
Wilson, Her 

With Ror 
Henry centre 
liams led 39' 
Engineers tr 
the game in 
heir efforts 
Purple coasi 

Amhei 

iams led 10- 
Thc Jells, 
slowly and gi 
end of the q' 
buckets by 
Ihe teams bi 
the .second i 
ended with A 

Hiiwkins, 1: 

Belshe 

Smith, rf 

Avery 

Depopolo 

Suessbrick, 

Hall 

Lazor 

Ehudt, Ig 

Campbell 

Creer, rg 

Miller 

Totals 



*^^ 



With a brutality and Insensitivlty In no way 
commensurate with its glorious past the ad- 
ministration of these United States has begun a 
barbarous assault on tlie fri:gile flower of its 
pristine youth. Our army is drafting the college 
student! 

The crude unknowing brute which men call 
the U. S. infantry has forced the hand that 
blended the perfect Gibson to mix the mash 



EDITORIAL 



of a cheap K ration supper. How can the feet 
that tripped so lightly to the music of Lester 
Lanin be asked to slop through the mine fields 
south of Seoul':' How can the thumb that drew 
a spade to fill the fateful flush be driven to 
draw a bead on a dreary pea.sant sniper'? 

White House Philistines have pa.ssed a bill 
which yanks the flowering stem of culture and 
sophistication from its roots and tramples it in 



a Koiean foxhole. How can we ask the youth 
that lurched so gaily from the bistros of Boston 
to the eggnoKS of Oyster Bay to lurch in tlie 
cockpit of a dusty Thundcrjefj' 

Surely the battleground was meant for o- 
thers. You can't cross the epistomoloBical gulf 
in a landing barge! 





A winsome las.s o! 18;):; gatlu rs courage to 
plunge into the briny depths. 



Proud of her well-made dinghy, a 1952 
bathmg beauty stands upon the deck in 
modern swim attire. 



Trends in Beachwear 

A century ago, less of the female form was 
revealed at the beach than one sees today at a 
formal dance. But woman has been gradually 
shedding her clothes ever since in response to 
the unyielding pressure of fate. The Bikini 
bathing suit currently worn on the Riviera is 
little more than a penwiper and a shoestring. 
Women have been emancipated and the fashions 
of 1952 reflect the triumph of honesty, virtue arid 
a new respect for the status and functions )( 
womanhood. 



14 




Copyrijthr lO^I. tir,r.tTT A Mvtil TolACCO Co 




John Stone, currently staninB in the Adams Memorial Theater's production 
of "Pygmalion", is regularly served breakfast in bed by a nurse from the 
C(K)ley Dickinson Alcoholic Ward. He balks at takinK his pills even when 
they are washed down by Gilbey's coffee. 



LEER Spends a Day 



Promising 



Young 



with 
Aclor 



a 



It is not ea.sy to be a Promisiiii; Youni; Ac- 
tor. The well known critic Brooks Barnes lia.s 
I'volved the now famous "three point index of 
Success" which briefly summarizes some of tlie 
<iualilies which a man must have. To fill the 
bill he must first have all the qualities of an 
Air Corps Staff Officer. That is he must be "le- 
al" to the verge of fanatici.sm "honest" to the 
cdBC of hypocrisy, ".sympathetically undeistand- 
ini!" to the brink of mawkishness. and "willinn 
to subordinate himself" to the very border of 
oblivion. Secondly, he must be an expert in many 
fields, including art, music, geophysics, physio- 
botony, neuro-siuuery. palcospastoloiiy. and ap- 
plied seismology. Tliirdly. for audience i ppeal 
and publicity purposes, he must be loothily, sexy, 
a bit unbalanced, athletic, da-shing and a bit 
vil. .lolui Stone fills all these leouircment.s. 



He has been forged out of the steel from which 
all our greatest actors, such men as Claude Jar- 
mon Jr. and Randolph Scott, have come. 

Stone was born at a young age, of average 
l)arents. From birth he was esrmarked for the 
.s.age. He was the only baby on his block with 
sparkling blue eyes, an inherent knowledge of 
' oophysics, and pencil-line wax mustache. At 
the age of two he gave the first indications that 
h s person lily was .suitable for a stage career 
when with diabolical cunning he lured his 
cr ppled maiden aunt to the head of the cellar 
stairs, and then hurled her to her death in the 
bi'sL Richard Widmark style. 

At the age of four, John became an adven- 
turer, developing the characteristics of a Pro- 
mising young actor through extensive travel. As 
'v't' ng a man carrying on in the best tradi- 




A lover of all animals, John plays after rehearsal 
with his devoted cat Mephistopheles. 





The versatile actor plays Mike Hammer in the film adaptation of 
"My Gun is Quick '. 



Absorbed by his studies, Jolin attends such advanced courses as 
basket weaving. 

15 



tit(ffi^ 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Ski Meet 



It Dartmouth 
s Fourth Place 



r at the Winter 
ollou'. 



hund; 
Service 



xlav that Wil 
dy was foiuid 
3eta Tlicta Pi 
tlie lieaci. 
: witli prayers 
n the Tliomp- 



nd state offi- 
:ed on the case 
T. Mullen of 
hern Berkshire 
<amnier; Asst. 
E. Levine of 
State Detective 
VI. Whittemore 



Eastern Colleges 
Initiate Advanced 
Teacher Training 

Williams Joins Program 

For Study At Harvard 

School of Education 



Wednesday. Feb. 20-Williams 
and 19 other Eastern colleges 
have ioined with the Harvard 
Graduate School of Education, 
and the Harvard and Badcllffe 
Graduate School of Arts and Sci- 
ences to inaugurate a cooperative 
program to train elementary and 
secondary .school teachers. The 
purpose of this program i.s to in- 
crease the number of qualified 
college graduates entering the 
public schools' teaching ranks. 

The Fund for the Advancement 
of Education is supporting the 
program with $78,000 annually 
for three years, $45,000 for fellow- 
ships, and $33,000 to support the 
Instruction and administration of 
the plan. 

President James B. Conant of 
Harvard has announced that fel- 
lowships will be granted to grad- 
uates of the twenty colleges in 
the program. The graduates will 
spend a year at Harvard investl- 
gatJhg the ways of lelating the 
liberal arts program with grad- 
uate study in education while 
serving apprentlce.shlps in teach- 
ing. 



Noble and Dr. E. J. Coughlin. a 
local practitioner, are leading the 
(■nurse. 

The opening lecture was given at 
!) p. m. last night in the St. John's 
parish house, but juniors and 
seniors may still enroll. There will 
be six Tuesday night meetings, 
terminating the week before Eas- 
ter recess. 

Informality Stres.sed 

Althougli the course has been a 
Williams standby since the war, 
this year's series hopes to attract 
more participants by emphasizing 
a greater degree of informality 
and a broader view of the subject. 

Dr. Noble is handling the moral 
and spiritual aspects, while Dr. 
Coughlin is lecturing on the phy- 
sical side of the marriage. The 
first part of the meeting is a 
half hour talk by either Dr. Noble 
or Dr. Coughlin, while the remain- 
der is devoted to an open discus- 
sion, with the added attraction 
of lefreshments. 

Proposed Topics 

Among the topics suggested last 
Wednesday by the house repre- 
sentatives are the questions of 
preparation for marriage, .sexual 
behavior before and after mar- 
riage, and psychological adju-st- 
ments to the marital status. 

On the physiological side, it 
was proposed that Dr. Coughlin 
consider in his talks such problems 
as child training and the relation- 
ship of sexual behaviour to parent- 
hood. 



merica present \iews of Paris and 
Prague, as well as cities in Italy 
and Ru.ssia. 

"Pool Koom" Favorite 

Perhap.s tlie most popular paint- 
ing on display is the work of an 
American Negro. Jacob Lawrence. 
His "Pool Room" is drawn in .such 
great detail that it even shows 
the smoke of a lighted cigarette 
curling up from the edge of a pool 
table. 

The scenes vary from a large. 
See Page 4. Col. 3 



Kifle Found 

Investigators found the body ly- 
ing face upward on a couch in the 
room. Some tour feet away, be- 
iicatli a double-decker bed, lay a 
'joll action .22 caliber rifle, its 
muzzle under the edge of a rug. 
Due shot — a "short" shell — 
had been fired from it. 

Officials completed their on-the 
scene investigation by 8:30 last 
night, but continued to work un- 
til early this morning at a Spring 
Street funeral home. 



John Hewett Qualifies for Coveted 
American Alpine Club Membership 

o 

Wednesday, Feb. 20 — John He- i climbing experience, be recom- 
wett '53, recently elected to the I mended by at least two members, 
American Alpine Club, became ! and approved by the Club as a 
the youngest alpinist in the his- | whole, 
tory of the organization to receive 
such an honor. Despite his youth, 
Hewett has a long and impressive 
list of ascents to merit his mem- 
bei'ship. 

The Club itself Is a select or- 
ganization of 406 mountain climb- 
ers, the vast majority of whom 
arc residents of the United States. 
It maintains headquarters in New 
York City and supplies its mem- 
bers with much climbing infor- 
mation, some In Its regular pub- 
lications and some on request. 
Recommend and Approval 

In order to qualify for member- 
ship in the American Alpine Club, 
an applicant must have sufficient 



Hewett was nominated for mem- 
bership by Adams Carter, his close 
friend and climbing companion. 
He first met Carter when the 
latter became a teacher at Milton 
Academy. Hewett's prep school. It 
was under Carter's influence that 
John became an avid and expert 
climber. 

As a member and later president 
of the Milton Academy Moun- 
taineering Club. John gained his 
first actual climbing experience. 
He was active in the organization 
when Carter joined the Milton 
faculty, and the two have led 
climbing groups on trips to the 
west for the past two years. 



1 last night by 
pector Richard 
aid and noted 
School pathol- 
Dea. 

. „ ...^mber of Beta 

Theta Pi, was the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Millard Romaine of 3726 
Davenant Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

April Draft Test 
Applications Due 
Before March 10 



Gen. Hershey Announces 
Student Opportunities 
For Draft Deferment 



Wednesday, Feb. 20 — In a let- 
ter released by the Selective Ser- 
vice Examining Section it wa.s 
announced that all eligible stu- 
dents who intend to take the Col- 
lege Qualification Test in 1952 
should file applications at once for 
the April 24 examination. 

Following the instructions of the 
bulletin, which can be obtained 
at the Student Aid Office, the 
student .should fill out his ap- 
plication and mail it no later than 
midnight. March 10. It was point- 
ed out that early filing will be to 
the student's advantage. 

Results to Loeal Board 

Results will be reported to the 
student's local board for use in 
considering his deferment, accord- 
ing to the Educational Testing 
Service, which prepai-es and ad- 
ministers the tests. 

Previously, Major Oen, Hershey. 
Director of Selective Service, an- 
nounced that under existing reg- 



Ireland Captures 
Skimeister Award 



Participants, Spectatom 
Hail Meet as Success 



Saturday, Feb. 16 — Attracting 
three of tne top ski teams in the 
country, the Williams Winter Car- 
nival scorned the snowless wastes 
of Williamstown and took to the 
slopes of Mount Greylock and 
Goodell Hollow. The best in ski 
thrills awaited the comparatively 
few spectators who braved the 
cold and the climb to watch the 
events. The team title finally 
went to Middlebury after a nip 
and tuck battle with Dartmouth. 

The winner's captain. Dick Ire- 
land, won Saturday's jumping to 
give his team the margin of vic- 
tory over the Indians — 587.63 
to 584.33. Ireland, who also plac- 
ed sixth in the downhill and 
se\enth in the slalom, received the 
coveted Williams Skimeister Tro- 
phy for the best individual show- 
.ng over the two day competition. 
Collins Stars 

Williams repeated and possibly 
exceeded its flflne showing at the 
Dartmouth Carnival last week, 
lops ot the class B teams, the 
Ephmen scored heavily in the 
downhill, placing third, ahead of 
such powerful competitors as New 
Hampshire and Bowdoin. 

Ned Collins '52 was the indivi- 
dual star for the host team. He 
placed seventh in the downhill, 
fourteenth in the slalom, and 
ninth in the jumping. Stu Chase 
and Pete Callahan in the slalom 
and Doug Wilson. Bob Tucker, and 
Joe Foote in the cross country 
were also outstanding for the 
Ephs. 

Burden Combined Winner 

Doug Burden of Middlebury, 
winner of both the downhill and 
the slalom the piv .'ious week, was 
forced to be content with seconds 
this time, bowing to Klrby of 
Dartmouth in the former and to 
team-mate Gale Shaw in the lat- 
ter. Burden and Shaw were one- 
two in the .Alpine combined. 

After falling behind Middlebury 
in Friday's events, Dartmouth 
staged a strong comeback in the 
Nordic events on Saturday. Trem- 
blay, Agan, and Drury of the In- 
dians took the first three places 
in the Nordic combined, but the 
Blue and White stayed close e- 
nough for Ireland's winning jump 
to provide tlie margin of victory. 

Victorious mentor Bobo Shee- 
hen praised Williams coach, Ralph 
Townsend, for his preparation of 
See Page 4, Col. 2 



Faculty Club Dance 
Attracts Large Crowd 

Saturday Feb. IB— Wliile the 
rest of the campus was in the 
middle of the Winter Carnival 
festivities, tlie faculty enter- 
tained themselves at the Facul- 
ty Club dance which ran from 
nine last night until one o'clock 
this morning Total attendance 
was estimated at 60 persons by 
Richaid O. Rouse, entertain- 
ment committee chairman in 
charge of the dance. 

For the sake of contrast to 
the sub-zero weather that had 
prevailed for the last few days, 
the profs planned their deco- 
rations around a spring motif. 
A large and potent punchbowl 
provided a continual fountain 
of enjoyment, as the professors 
and their wives danced to the 
music of Al Trudel and his 
band. 



Paragraphs 
In the News 



Beta Thpta Pi ri'cently niimed 
named Rick Avery '52 house vice- 
president to fill the post vacated 
by Joe Stewart '52, the newly 
elected house president. 

George McAlreiian '52 and 
Walt Flaherty '5:! lost to two Wes- 
leyan debaters while supporting 
the question. "Should the United 
States send an ambassador to the 
Vatican?" Fi-iday evt-ning. 

Arthur B. Hudson '53 was elect- 
ed president of Chi Psi at a re- 
cent house meetiUK. either oHicers 
named for the coming year are: 
Thomas Williams 53, vice-presi- 
dent; Edward Cypiot '54, secre- 
tary: end Edward Miller '54, 
■a'easurer. 

Alumni Fluid secretary Charles 
B, Hail '15 announced that the 
1951 fund drive netted the collese 
'•'115,227, the highest figure in the 
h'stoiT of the college. A total of 
3.617 alumni contributed to the 
campaign. 

Intramural Basketball Standings 
First Division 

Team W L 

Phi Sigma K- ppa 2 
Delta Kappa Epsilon 2 



Psi Upsilon 
Theta Delta Chi 
Delta Upsilon 
Phi G.imma Delta 
Sigma Phi 
Delta Psi 



Second DivLsion 



Alpha Delta Phi 
Chi Psi 
K ppa Alpha 
Delta Phi 
Beta Theta Pi 
"hi Delta Theta 
Zeta Psi 
Garfield Club 
'dropped out) 



PCT. 
1.000 
1.000 
.500 
.500 
.500 
.500 
.000 
.000 

1.000 
1.000 
.667 
.667 
.333 
.333 
.000 
.000 



Elephant . . . 

got LOST! All recollections of the 
exact whereabouts of the 12 thou- 
.■^and pound beast was forgotten - 
for one-hundred years. 

After extensive research into 
m ny yellowed documents, legends 
old wives' tales, etc. combined with 
a few dubious eye-witness reports 
r>nd mystical prophesies, "Opera- 
tion Tusk Force" got underway. 
Included in the chase for the i^rize 
loxodonta i worth some $25.00 to 
the Williams Record) were var- 
ious groups from Williams. "I feel 
like a 'bull-moose' " exclaimed one 
of many itinerants on the first of 
the Teddy Roosevelt-type big game 
hunts. 

About a week ago, with the balm 
of Spring upon us. "Operation 
T-F" was resumed. With the skill 
of experts, and the stamina of 
the proverbial "bull-moose", dig- 
ging commenced. Picks and .-,hov- 
■els hit the semi-frozen turf. Pro- 
fuse oaths struck the air! And 
four hours later, six feet of sod 
had been unearthed — but still no 
signs of the pet loxodonta . . . .\nd 
the shades of evening wore on the 
dank earth was replaced, and for 
the time being, at least, the House 
of Columbus remained undisturbed 
by mortal hands. 

BRING 
YOUR CAR 
TO US FOR 

EXPERT SERVICE 

€tKcC 

GENUINE FORD PARTS 



You'll lika our 
frojnpf 5eiv/c« 



You'll liko our 
ffioionobh Pr/cfs 



You'll liko our 
fr/fflrf/x l¥oK of 



HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATED 



Frosh i 
Down 

Wilson, 
11 Each 
27 in 

Saturday, 
ing olt to an 
the William! 
te.. m coastec 
the R.P.I. Pi 
victory in a I 
men. who pli 
ices of the 
Moro, who ■ 
vice. 

Though hi 
the frosh 1 
downing thi 
quintet. 

Pretl Brod( 
in puttting t 
as he scored 
the early mil 
take an 11-3 

Wilson, Her 
With Ror 
Henry contrc 
llams led 39- 
Engineers tr 
the game in 

heir efforts 
Purple coasi 



Amhei 

iams led 10- 
The Jells, 
slowly and gi 
end of the q 
buckets by 

The teams b; 
the second i 
ended with A 

Hawkins, 1: 

Belshe 

Smith, rf 

Avery 

Depopolo 

Sue.vsbrick, 

Hall 

Lazor 

Ehudt, Ig 

Campbell 

Cicer, rg 

Miller 

Totals 



^-x 




16 



S!«S! 



( 111 4 



'^ 



lion.s of Admiral Byrd and Johnny Welsmuller, 
he now sported u fierce scowl, a .shaggy wulnu 
inuslaclie, and a .45 pistol strapped to the wionj 
side of .30 .30 cartridge bell. He travelled ex- 
lensively tor three years, and 11 was during thlj 
period that lie developed .some of his most en. 
clearing cluiracteristics. While he was hunting 
Keniinoles In the Florida Everglades, Stone ex. 
hibited true "iKjyalty" and "Subjugation of SolJ," 
He had ordt'ied his safari to pioc<>cd hiini'l'or. 
ward. Lads! "I. When by an unfortunate happen, 
stance, they came upon an : ere or .so of qiiiclt. 
.sand, he stood .saluting at rigid iilteiillon until 
the last wooly pate had disaiipeared from si"!ii. 
Above all, he developed a re:il feeliii; nf 
"Honesty" and "Sympathetic Understand:; ;;," 
While travelling across the Sahara by lnsul:il«i 
laniel at the age of 12, he came ucio.sk a uuui 
whose black tongue. bu!g iig eyes, and li. irt 
rendiiHA screams of "Water! water!" caused .l.iiui 
lo ob.scrve to his chauffeur that the man .viis 
■thirsty, by George," Although there was pli iity 
111 water in the reserve tank, it hapiiened I., b,. 
Monday, iwa.sh dayi. 

Aiiplying the basic princi|)les of HO'I'C im,. 
Ulcni solving. John neatly dispatched low bird m 
once. Dismounting, he instructed his lauiul s.s 
lo do the washing where the man could see, ' u.s 
mcouraging him with the knowledge that tl.re 
was water in the vicinity. When the job was (Imih-, 
•Stone poured the water in the sand beside lie 
num. gave him u shovel and a yiird.stick, . lul 
rode on. This was in direct compliance v ili 
Manual (i785(i.'i-H76 which stales, under he 
l.i'udiug of "Food Service' Liquid division i", if 
,1 man is found in the Sah.ira dying of tli ,i. 
;iiid it is Monday, do your uuthorized lain. ,iy 

see form (i.i authorized wear for desert tni li 
;iiu1 pour the soapy water clo.se lo the d\ nit 
mall, Wlu'ii retrieved. 11 will have been pun: .-d 
l>y descent through the sand," 

From the ages of 18-20. Stone acfiuircil 
!(,rinal learning at Williams College, After fli, 
iiig every other course, he earned a D- in div la 
1-2 and thus launched his theatric career 
lore his freshman year was done, he had ;i- 

UiiKiing reeard for postcards from the D i:i 
suggi'stmg conferences, postcards from the 1> ;ui 
recommending tran.sfer. and letters from ilie 




A noted athlete and athentuier, .lohii kr.'ijs 
111 sha|)e with coordination exercises. 



The young dilettante relaxes after rehears- 
ing 1' .scene from his current hit, "Pygma- 
lion". 






{ .m,: 



('v> 



trl 



11 - i 



<•''- 



(, .1- 



1!,5<! \\A\'' 



ikETTE^ 



^^'l 



^tV^t'a'^V.^^iMVU 



^ 



. ^/ CbeslcTfieW 

SIGNED p^oPW^^^^ 






4. 



; C»ti,n„^„ 



-T^STE 

rfield bSL!^ 



•"d only Che^is 



..on 



Copvridhr 1012. l.ifir.iTT Ac MvrM TotACCO Co 



Ueaii, llie President, and the Board of liuslees 
rather boldly communlcallng the coUoKe to func- 
tion fiiiilfully without his further facilitation. All 
tliese John placidly isnored, for an actor can- 
not be concerned with the mundane trivia with 
which ordinary mortals are concerned. Finally, 
the administration listed him as officially miss- 
inn, and from that day to this he has placidly 
maintained the status quo, assimllutinu know- 
](.(lKe In whatever field hai)i)ens to .strike his 
fancy. 

Stone's daily routme at the picsent is cen- 
tered around Pygmalion, the play in which he 
starring at the Adams Memorial 'I'heatre this 
weekend. At 11 o'clock his breakfast, consisting 
of drops.pills. a bowl of iwaimt butter with sugar 
iiiid cream, and pale Gllbey's coffee, is served 
by Blanche DuBois, an attendant at the Cooley 
Dickenson alcoholic ward. (Jnce on his feet, he 
driven to Williamstown where he attends 
ba.sket-weaving class. 'I'liis is a course attended 
l)y most of the college misfits, IricludinR Arnold 
Air Society Woodbridge U Oench. oiganist Hojcrl 
Harrow, and embryonic minister C. Edward 
.unge. For relaxatioti, and to make up six years 
,f con.secutive PT cuts. John u.ses his arthritic 
md alcohol soaked fingers to construct com- 
lilicated and pagoda-like card houses. 

This out of the way, Stone eats a light sup- 
|)er in the ward, and is escorted to the theatre 
for the evening's rehearsal Here he re.My 
comes into his own. After a mere three weeks 
he has the first scene almost cold Willi a min- 
imum of assistance from the prompter, be is now 
ible to run through it, sto|)ping only to ,si)ray 
ills throat with Gilbey's and to sign the auto- 
rraph books of the horde of bobby soxi'is who 
ni.sh squealing to the stage when he first stag- 
i:ers onto it. 

The director is hoping that by curtain time 
on Friday night that Stone will know the en- 
lire first act, but insiders are giving good odds 
that this is out of the question. What will ha))|K'n 
vhen the curtain rai.ses on the second act is 
anybody's guess. However, Ken's Market and the 
fSquare Deal have reported an abnormally high 
run on the .softer genera of vegetables and on 
llie more elderly variety of egg Cliief lloyal. 
nnlicipatiiig .some sort of good humored out- 
Jivak. has called on the crack Pitlsfield Bar- 
racks of the Stat^' Police for a.ssistance 



Van de Vate, Liz Cashman, Vassar 
Klein, Pat Simon, Conn. College 
Maikgraf , Lynn Ahrens, Bradford, J,C. 



Ingersen, Joan Henley, Wellesley 
Carson, Dory Wells, New Hampshire 
Towers, Dona Jean Avery, Cornell 
Rosen, Dorry Lisus, Emma WlUard 




Director Bill Martin ix^iiisters .jubilant en- 
lliusia.sm during a speech by Stone. 



TIIKTA DELTA CHI 

Carm, Jo Dean, Williamstown 
Stephens, Jane Johnson, Smith 
Brody. Jean Radel, N. Y. 
Morgan, Nina Heald, Smith 
Ciood, Betty Schulman, Buxton 
Kelly, Carol Roberti, North Adams 
Oliphant, Joan Dunlap, La.selle Jr. 
Gordon, Audrey Du Bois, Mt. Holyokc 
Humes, Elizabeth Dill, Baltimore 
Evans, Margie Scott, Smith 
HuddlesUjii, Shirley Brown. Conn. College 
Greenewalt, Nancy Perry, Boston 
Conheim, Elaine Schondort, Wellesley 
Holton. Mary Sage, Ethel Walker 
Palon, Lina Hol.schuh, Elizabeth N, J, 
Murphy, Sue Habert, L. I. 
Zeckhau.sen, Chris Schavier, Bryn Mawr 
Wi.gner, June Willis, Lynbrook L. I. 
Collins, Madge Mezey. Skidmore 
Mer.selis, Pat Dowd, Brooklyn 
Johnson, Ann Tillinghast, Boston 



ZETA PSI 

Dinkey, Diaiine Webb. Skidmore 
Meeder, Sue Beard. Vassar 
Coulter, Judy Slocum, Smith 
Na.son, Mrs. Nason, Smith 
Gordon, Dee Fox, Colby Jr. 
Illegible, Peg Blinder. N. Y. C. 
Palmer, Sarah Bond. Colby Jr. 
Kruse, Joyce Maynard. Radcliffe 
Abrams, Terry Wingate, La.selle J. C. 
Hillyer, Joan Thorns. Hol.voke 
Cavanaugh, Retta Hastings, Md. 
Hewett, Ellen Spairy. Smitli 
Montgomery, Nancy I'Vnn. Wellesley 
Copiierhead. Jinny Dalir. Radcliffe 
Hau.ser. Valerie Hunt, Colby 
Gresinger. Peggy Ackerman. Pine Manor 
Doheny. Laurel Custard. N. W. 
Brucker. Margaret Cox. Gaucher 
Ander.son. Carol Coslcllo, Holyoke 
Smith, Dianna Scott, Va.ssar 
Clifford. Shirley Hamilton. Radcliffe 
Dighton. J. Foxliall Parker. N. Y. C. 
Redmond. Joan Rothbart, Bennington 
Lund. Barbara Young. Colby Jr. 
Allix. Carol Ritter, Wheaton 
Rcdfieki. Polly Fawcett. Pine Manor 
Schmitt. Lumi)y Moritz, H.B.S. 
Proeb. Cathy Ryan, Weybeloe Normal 
Cardie. Owen Ol.sen, Vassar 
Muir, Laura Graves. Smith 
Sausc. Peggy Ackerman. Pine Manor 
White, Nancy TomiJkins. New Rochelle, N, 
Poster. Sally Brandegee. Chatham, N. J, 



PHI SIGMA KAPPA 

Cariienter. Sally McLerdon. Smith 
Brrgan. Judy Beach. Benninglon 
Hiidd. Bonne Ayraull. Lasell 
rnus. Molly Marble. Va.ssar 
Kaufman. Carol Allen. Maisun Des Mines 
Jevon. Belsy Sutton, Wellesley 
Christman, Jean Holt. Rodgers Hall 
Senlner. Mary Lou, Wellesley 
Padwe, Beth Levine, Great Necker, L. I 
Levitt. Karen Gershenzang. Fieldston 
Ambard. Virginia Wilder. Lasell 
Schwab. Pat Cojieland. Skidmore 
Arbuckle, Julie Card. Brooklyn 
Laitman. Julie Field. New York 
Yeide. Carole Taylor. New HamiJshire 
Porter, Ava. Hartford, Conn. 
Sibbald, Charlotte Coe, Smith 
Wcndt. Alison Murphy. Vassar 



PSI VPSILON 

Bumsted, Betty Stevenson, Cos Cob, Ct, 

James, Mary Joslyn, Conn. College 

Hatch, Janle Graham, Smith 

Stockford, Mary Kclleher, Smith 

Leone, Barbara Lindbergh. Smith 

O'Leary, Jane McKenzie, Belmont, Mass 

Alexander, Sally James, North Carolina 

Gribi, Eve McClure, Holyoke 

Ro,ss, Diane Gilmoie, Smith 

Fitch, Bickley Flower, Smith 

McGlaughlin, Mitzle Arnold, Smith 

Whitney, Sally Wheeler, Colby Jr. 

Robertson, Toni Cushing, Sarah Lawrence 

Free.se, Nancy Hopfenbeck, Smith 

Judge, Diane Gates, Middlebury 

Mitchell, Elise Larkin, Ansonia, Ct. 

Hulse, Nancy Huppertz. Green Mountain 

MacNicol, Peggy Toomy, Old Greenwich, Ct. 

Lewis, Judy Myers, Va.ssar 

Beard, Dot Montgomery, Holyoke 

Miller, Paula Holden, Smith 

Burke, Caroline Hawley, Turners Falls, Mass. 

Auchinloss, Marty Moore, Smith 



ST. ANTHONY HALL 

Ordeman, Pat Vandenbuig, Time Inc. 

Flench, Polly Thryller, Vassar 

Tomkins, Sybil Rex, Conn. College 

Boocock, Pamela Walters, Va.ssar 

Potter, Mary Milano, White Plains H. 8. 

Cart, Mary Carol White, Tobe Cobum 

P. Smith, Sue Logan, Holyoke 

Montgomery, Maiy Barter, Bradford 

Cooke, Sarah Smith, Bradford 

Loizeux, Sarita Van Vleck, Brussels Prep. 

Donoho, Kitty Fishface, Poughkeepsie Vocational 

D. Friend. Pat O'Brien. Notre Dame 

Shorb. Weeny Miller, Va.s.sar 

Olmstead, Sally Davis, Smith 

Beatty, Darcey Hilbert, Vassar 

Estes, Joan Wise, Hollins Finisliing 

Seed, Anne Williams, Conn. College 

Whittier, Clair Li.st, Smith 

Whitcford, Barbara Jenkins. Ranc-Macon 

Barber, Mickey McTide, Bradford 

Tasker, Gretchen Yogurt, W. S., Conn. 

Reeve.s, Alice Thomas, Finch Jr. 

Craig. Caret Corcoran. K. Gibbs 

Seaman. Katlierinc Edgar. Smith 

C. Friend. E. Raymond. Holyoke 

Co.sgriff. Holy Stair. Smith 

H. Smith. Virginia Mackcy, N. A. 

Fitz. Anyl Bloch. Pownal Trade School 

S. Hoyt. Jane Nichols. Smith 

Town.son. Jean McKelvey. Rochester 

Johnson. Joey Saltenstall. Smith 

Reese. Lila May Babbin. Wheaton Bible 

Terry. Sue Smith. Mill Neck. L. I. 

Griffenljcrg. Alice Wanton. Vassar 

SIGMA PHI 

Brayton. Donna O'Harc. Sarali Lawrence 
Maythom. S;.riy Talton. U. of North Carolina 
Mo.ser. Barbara J. Hodges. Summit. N. J. 
Johnston. Carol Kritzman. Welle.slcy 
Dunn. Jean Hardy, Smith 
Harvey. Lanie Logan. Ye Okie Mill 
William.son, Janet Swafford. Smith 
Thomas. Jane Kuhn. Briarcliff 
Chapman. Wendy Witlierell. Cornell 
Adkins. Gail Hall. Hol.voke 
Harris. Emmy Adkins. Norwich. Conn. 
Rice. Ann Roesing. New Trier 
Hughes. Anne Walker. Smith 
Warden. Peggy Dow. Reading. Pa. 
Stone. Carol Hitclrcock. Smith 
Ingersoll. Nancy Gramm. Hartford 
Continued on Page 22 

17 



^^crtit 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Ski Meet 

it Dartmouth 
s Fourth Place 



r :it the Winter 



^ound; 
Service 



iilav tlial Wil- 
iy was ionncl 
3eta Theta Pi 
the head. 
: witli prayers 
11 tlic 1 liDinp- 



Ireland Captures 
Skimeister Award 



Participants, Spectators 
Hail Meet as Success 



nd .state offi- 
:ed on the case 
T. Mullen of 
hern Berkshire 
(aminer: Asst. 
E. Levine of 
State Detective 
M. Whittemoi'e 



Eastern Colleges 
Initiate Advanced 
Teacher Training 

Williams Joins Program 

For Study At Harvard 

School of Education 

Wednesday. Feb. 20 -Williams 
and 19 other Eastern colleges 
have .ioined with the Harvard 
Graduate School of Education, 
and the Harvard and Radcliffe 
Graduate School of Arts and Sci- 
ences to inaugurate a cooperative 
program to train elementary and 
secondary school teachers. Tlie 
purpose of this program is to in- 
crease the number of qualified 
college graduates entering the 
public .schools' teaching ranks. 

The Fund for the Advancement 
of Education is supporting the 
program with $78,000 annually 
for three years. $45,000 for fellow- 
ships, and $33,000 to .support the 
instruction and administration of 
the plan. 

President James B. Conanl of 
Harvard has announced that fel- 
lowships will be granted to grad- 
uates of the twenty colleges in 
the program. The graduates will 
spend a year at Harvard investi- 
gatttig the ways of relating the 
liberal arts program with grad- 
uate study in education while 
serving apprenticeships in teach- 
ing. 



Noble and Dr. E. 
local piactitioner. 
course. 



J. Coughlin. a 
are leading the 



Tlie opening lecture was given at 
9 p. m. last night in the St. Jolin's 
IJarish house, but juniors and 
.seniors may still enroll. There will 
be six IXiesday night meetings, 
terminating the week liefore Eas- 
ter recess. 

Informality .Stressed 

Altlioimli the course has been a 
Williams standby since the war. 
this year's series hopes to attract 
more particiiJants by emiihasizing 
a greater degree of informality 
and a broader view of the sub.iecl. 

Dr. Noble is handling tile moral 
and spiritual asiJects. while Dr. 
Coughlin is lecturing on the phy- 
sical side of the marriage. The 
first part of the meeting is a 
half hour talk by either Dr. Noble 
or Dr. Coughlin. while the remain- 
der is devoted to an open di.scus- 
sioii. with the added attraction 
of refreshments. 

Proposed Topics 

Among the topics suggested last 
Wednesday by the house repre- 
sentatives arc the questions of 
preparation for marriage, sexual 
behavior before and after mar- 
riage, and psychological ad.iu.sl- 
mcnts to the marital status. 

On the ph,v,sioloRlcal side, it 
was proposed that Dr. Coughlin 
consider in his talks such problems 
as child training and the relation- 
.ship of sexual behaviour to parent- 
hood . 



merica present views of Paris and 
Prague, as well as cities in Italy 
and Russia. 

"Poo! Koom" Favorite 

Perhap.-i the most popular paint- 
ing on display is tlie work of an 
American Negro. Jacob Lawrence. 
His "Pool Room" is drawn in such 
great detail that it even shows 
the smoke of a lighted cigarette 
curling ii]) from the edge of a pool 
table. 

Tne scenes vary from a large. 
See Page 4, Col. 3 



Kifle Found 

Investigators found the body ly- 
ing face upward on a couch in the 
loom. Some four feel away, be- 
neath a double-decker bed. lay a 
boll action .22 caliber rifle, its 
muzzle under the edge of a rug. 
One shot — a "short" shell — 
liad been fired from it. 

Officials completed their on-the 
scene investigation by 8:30 last 
night, but continued to work un- 
til early this morning at a SiJring 
Street funeial home. 



John Hewett Qualifies for Coveted 
American Alpine Club Membership 



Wedne.sday. Feb. 20 — John He- 
wett '53. recently elected to the 
American Alpine Club, became 
the youngest alpinist in the his- 
tory of the organization to receive 
such an honor. Despite his youth. 
Hewett has a long and impressive 
list of a.scents to merit his mem- 
bersliip. 

The Club itself is a select or- 
ganization of 406 mountain climb- 
ers, the vast ma.lority of whom 
are residents of the United States. 
It maintains headquarters in New 
York City and supplies its mem- 
bers with much climbing Infor- 
mation, some in its regular pub- 
lications and some on request. 
Koeommend and Approval 

In order to qualify for member- 
■shlp in the American Alpine Club, 
an applicant must have .sufficient 



climbing exiJerience. be recom- 
mended by at least two members, 
mid approved by the Club as a 
wliole. 

Hewett was nominated for mem- 
bership by Adams Carter, his cIo.se 
friend and climbing companion. 
He first met Carter when the 
latter became a teacher at Milton 
Academy. Hewett's prep .school. It 
was under Carter's influence that 
John became an avid and expert 
climber. 

As a member and later president 
of the Milton Academy Moun- 
taineering Club. John gained his 
first actual climbing experience. 
He was active in the organization 
when Carter joined the Milton 
faculty, and the two have led 
climbing groups on trips to the 
west for the past two years. 



1 last niglit by 

pector Richard 

aid and noted 

School iiathol- 

Dea. 

..„...,....t. „ wii-mber of Beta 

Theta Pi. was the son of Mr. and 

Mrs. Millard Romaine of 3726 

Davenant Ave.. Cincinnati. Ohio. 

April Draft Test 
Applications Due 
Before March 10 



Gen. Hershey Announces 
Student Opportunities 
For Draft Deferment 



Wednesday. Feb. 20— In a let- 
ter relea.sed by tlie Selective Ser- 
vice Examining Section it was 
announced tliat all eligible stu- 
dents who intend to take the Col- 
lege Qualification Test in 1952 
should file applications at once for 
the April 24 examination. 

Following the instructions of the 
bulletin, which can be obtained 
at the Student Aid Office, the 
•student should fill out his ap- 
plication and mail it no later than 
midnight. March 10. It was point- 
ed out that early filing will be to 
the student's advantage. 

Results to Local Board 

Results will be reported to the 
student's local board for use in 
considering his deferment, accord- 
ing to the Educational Testing 
Service, which piepares and ad- 
ministers the tests. 

Previously. Major Gen. Hershey. 
Director of Selective Service, an- 
nounced that under existing reg- 



Salurday. Feb. 16 -Attracting 
three of the top ski teams in the 
country, the Williams Winter Car- 
nival .scorned the snowlcss wastes 
of Williamstown and look to the 
.slopes of Mount Greylock and 
Goodell Hollow. The best in ski 
thrills awaited the comparatively 
lew spectators who braved the 
(Old and the climb to watch the 
events. The team title finally 
«eni 10 Middlebury after a nip 
and luck battle with Dartmouth. 
The winner's captain. Dick Ire- 
land, won Saturday's jumping to 
L'lve his team the margin of vic- 
tory over the Indians — 587.63 
to 584.33. Ireland, who also plac- 
ed sixlh in the downhill and 
seventh in the slalom, received the 
coveted Williams Skimeister Tro- 
phy for tile best individual show- 
ing over the two day comiietition. 
Collins Stars 
Williams repeated and possibly 
exceeded its fifine showing at the 
Darlmoutli Carnival last week, 
lops ot the class B teams, the 
Ephmen .scored heavily in the 
downhill, placing third, ahead of 
such powerful comvietitors as New 
Hampshire and Bowdoin. 

Ned Collins '52 was the indivi- 
dual star for the host team. He 
placed seventh in the downhill, 
fourteenth in the slalom, and 
ninth in the jumping. Stu Chase 
and Pete Callahan in tlie slalom 
and Doug Wil.son. Bob Tucker, and 
Joe Foote in the cross country 
were also outstanding for tlie 
Ephs. 

Burden Combined Winner 
Dour Buiden of Middlebury, 
winner of both the downhill and 
the slalom thi- previous week, was 
forced to be content with seconds 
this time, bowing to Kirby of 
Dartmouth in the former and to 
team-mate Gale Shaw in the lat- 
ter. Burden and Sliaw were one- 
two in the .Mpine combined. 

After falling behind Middlebury 
in Friday's events, Dartmouth 
staged a strong comeback in the 
Nordic events on Saturday. Trem- 
blay. Agan. and Drury of the In- 
dians took the first three places 
in the Nordic combined, but the 
Blue and Wliite stayed close e- 
nough for Inland's winning jump 
to provide tlie margin of victory. 
Victorious mentor Bobo Shee- 
lien praLsed Williams coach. Ralph 
Townsend. for his preparation of 
See Page 4, Col. 2 



Faculty Club Dance 
Attracts Large Crowd 

Saturday Feb. 16 — Wliile the 
rest of the campus was in the 
middle of the Winter Carnival 
festivities, the faculty enter- 
tained themselves at the Facul- 
ty Club daiue which ran from 
nine last ni.tht until one o'clock 
this mornini; Total attendance 
was estimated at 60 persons by 
Richard O Rou.se. entertain- 
ment committee chairman in 
charge of the dance. 

For the sake of contrast to 
the sub-zero weather that had 
prevailed for the last few days. 
the profs planned their deco- 
rations around a spring motif. 
A large and potent punchbowl 
provided a continual fountain 
of enjoyment, as the professors 
and their wives danced to the 
music of Al Trudel and his 
band. 



Paragraphs 
In the News 



Beta Theta Pi recently named 
named Rick Avery '52 house vice- 
president to fill the post vacated 
by Joe Stewart '52, the newly 
elected house president. 

George McAleeiian '52 and 
Walt Flaherty '53 lost to two Wes- 
leyan debaters while supporting 
the question. "Should the United 
States send an ambassador to the 
Vatican?" Pi-iday evening. 

Arthur B. Hudson '53 was elect- 
ed president of Chi Psl at a re- 
cent house meeting. Other officers 
named for the coming year are: 
Thomas Williams 53, vice-presi- 
dent; Edward Cypiot '54, secre- 
tary; end Edward Miller '54, 
•,-reasurer. 

Alumni Fund secretary Charles 
B. Hall '15 announced that the 
1951 fund drive netted the college 
"115,227, the highest figure in the 
h'stoi-y of the college. A total of 
3.617 alumni contributed to the 
campaign. 

Intramural Basketball Standings 
First Division 

Team W L 

Phi Sigma K- ppa 2 
Delta Kappa Epsilon 2 



Psl UpsUon 
Theta Delta Chi 
Delta Upsilon 
Phi G.imma Delta 
Sigma Phi 
Delta Psl 



Second Division 



Alpha Delta Phi 
Chi Psl 
K ppa Alpha 
Delta Phi 
Beta Theta Pi 
■"hi Delta Theta 
Zeta Psl 
Garfield Club 
'dropped out) 





1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 


1 
1 
2 
2 
3 
3 



PCT. 
1.000 
1.000 
.500 
.500 
.500 
.500 
.000 
.000 



Elephant . . . 

got LOST! All recollections of the 
exact whereabouts of the 12 thou- 
.''and pound beast was forgotten - 
for one-hundred years. 

After extensive research into 
m- ny yellowed documents, legends 
old wives' tales, etc. combined with 
a few dubious eye-witness reports 
nnd mystical prophesies, "Opera- 
tion Tusk Force" got underway. 
Included in the chase for the prize 
loxodonta i worth some $25.00 to 
the Williams Record) were var- 
ious groups from Williams. "I feel 
like a 'bull-moose' " exclaimed one 
of many itinerants on the first of 
the Teddy Roosevelt-type big game 
hunts. 

About a week ago, with the balm 
of Spring upon us, "Oper.Tticn 
T-F" was resumed. With the .skill 
of experts, and the stamina of 
the proverbial "bull-moose", dic- 
ging commenced. Picks and shov- 
els hit the semi-frozen turf. Pro- 
fuse oaths struck the air! .And 
four hours later, six feet of sod 
had been unearthed — but still no 
signs of the pet loxodonta . . . And 
the shades of evening wore on the 
dank earth was replaced, and for 
the time being, at least, the House 
of Columbus remained undisturbed 
by mortal hands. 



BRING 
YOUR CAR 
TO US FOR 

EXPERT SERVICE 

€IKCC 

GENUINE FORD PARTS 



You'll lilc* our 
frOfflpf 50fv/c0 



You'll lilco our 
ktasottabk Prkts 



You'll liko our 
FrlMdly Way pf 
Do/itg Byj/mif 



HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATED 



Frosh i 

Down 

Wilson, 
11 Each 
27 in 

Saturday, 
ing otf to an 
the Williams 
te,-.m coastei 
the R.P.I. Fi 
victory in a 1 
men, who pli 
ices of the 
Moro, who ' 
■,.ice. 

Though hi 
the frosh I 
downing th( 
quintet. 

Fred Brodc 
in puttting t. 
as he scored 
the early mil 
take an 11-3 
Wilson, Her 

With Ror 
Henry contrc 
liams led 39' 
Engineers tr 
the game in 
heir efforts 
Purple coasi 



Amhei 

iams led 10- 
The Jeffs, 
.slowly and gi 
end of the q- 
buckets by 
The teams bi 
the second ] 
ended with A 



LEER PHOTOCRIME 

Featuring Sherlock Barbour 

Locker Room Blues 





Inspector Sherlock Barbour examines the corpse of an unidentified 
Williams College freshman, distinguished only by the laundrymark 
"SCHULTZ" on his left ear. His neck has been snapped by the screen 
window of the towel room in Lasell Gym. After examining the body 
and the locker room. Inspector Bai-bour says. "I smell something foul 
here." 



Towel room attendant Wiley Sexton, the only eye witness, de.sci ,)i,s 
Schuitz's death: "I was Just sittin' there listenin' to the Bo.sU)n I il- 
harmonic. This guy reaches for a towel and - Whump! Down iw 
comes! Heh. Well, that's the way the ball boimces There w;^ ii t 
nothln' I could do." 




Copyiiiht lOH. UuiiTT & Mviu Tmuxa Co 



BRING 
YOUR CAR 
TO US FOR 

EXPERT SERVICE 
GENUINE FORD PARTS 



J. Paul Sheedy* Switched to Wildrool Cream-OU 
Because He Flunked The Finger-Nail Test 



You'll lika our 

h9mp\ Service 



You'll like our 

J{e05onob/e Pr/cei 




f 



)f/ioiesa(e ?a\i& 
Products 

Norcross-EIdfidge 

INCORPORATED 

North Adams, Mass. 
Rutland, Vt. 



You'll liko our 
frhttdly Way of 
thing Business 



HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATFD 



POOR PAUL WHS having a fowl time. Even his best gal didn't 
give a hoot for him. "Wise she hate mc so?" he asked his 
roommate. "Simple, you stuffy old bird — because your hair's 
always ruffled upl Better try Wildroot Cream-Oil hair tonic. It's 
non-alcoholic. Contains soothing Lanolin. And does tree things: 
Relieves annoying dryness. Removes loose, ugly dandruff. 
Grooms hair neatly and naturally all day Ion);. (Even limb-ers 
up your scalp. And helps you pass the finjjcr-Nail Nest-er, 
Test!)" Paul got Wildroot Cream-Oil and now he's I 'owling 
success. So why don't you take a taxi-dcrmist to any drug or 
toilet goods counter to get a bottle ot tube of Wildroot 
Cream-Oil. It's your hair's best fritndl And ask for it at your 
barber shop. Then there's no talon how the thicks'll go for you. 



* o// 3 / So. Harris HillR,/.. WHIm 



r ///<■, v. V. 



Wildroot Company, Inc.. Buffalo I], N. V. 




REAL WESTERN 
Cowbo/ Pants 



HAVING A PARTY? 
Your local dealer for . 




Imported & Domestic 
LIQUORS - BEER - WINE 

■^ Ginger ale 

•^ Soda 

■^ Groceries 

tAt Party delicacies 

Open 'til 10 p.m. Friday & Saturday 

The SQUARE DEAL Store 



43 Spring Street 



Phone 128 or 129 




Real cowhanda prefer Lee Riden 
... so do folks everywhere. Snug- 
fitting, true Western style . . . made 
of rugged I.<ee Cowboy Denim, good- 
looking, comfortable, long-lasting. 
SANFORIZED for permanent fit 
and good looks. 

Men'a Lee Rider PaoU 



^f^^ 



19 



tj^ofh 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Ski Meet 

It Dartmouth 
s Fourth Place 



r at the Winter 
ollow. 



hund; 
Service 



xlav tliat W'il- 
dy was foiintl 
3eta Theta Pi 
the heail. 
: witli piavi'i-.s 
n the TliDinp- 



Ireland Captures 
Skimeister Award 

Participants, Spectators 
Hail Meet as Success 



nd state offi- 
zed on the case 
T. Mullen of 
hern Berkshire 
<ammer: Asst. 
E. Levine of 
State Detective 
W. Whittemore 



Eastern Colleges 
Initiate Advanced 
Teacher Training 

Williams Joins Program 

For Study At Harvard 

School of Education 



Wedne.sday. Feb. 20 -Williams 
and 19 other Eastern colleges 
have .joined with the Harvard 
Graduate School of Education, 
and the Harvard and Eadcliffe 
Graduate School of Arts and Sci- 
ences to inaugurate a cooperative 
program to train elementary and 
.secondary school teachers. The 
purpose of this program is to in- 
crease the number of qualified 
college graduates entering the 
public .schools' teaching ranks. 

The Fund for the Advancement 
of Education is supporting the 
program with $78,000 annually 
for three years, $45,000 for fellow- 
ships, and $33,000 to support the 
instruction and administration of 
the plan. 

President James B. Conant of 
Harvard has announced that fel- 
lowships will be granted to grad- 
uates of the twenty colleges in 
the program. The graduates will 
spend a year at Harvard investi- 
gatftig the ways of relating the 
liberal arts program with grad- 
uate study in education while 
serving apprenticeships in teach- 
ing. 



Noble und Dr. E. J. Coughlin. a 
local practitionei-. are leading the 
course. 

The opening lecture was given at 
9 p. m. last night in the St. John's 
parish liouse. but juniors and 
seniors may still enroll. There will 
be six Tuesday night meetings, 
terminating the week before Eas- 
ter lece.ss. 

Informality Stressed 

AllluniKh the course has been a 
Williams standby since the war, 
this year's series hopes to attract 
more participants by empliasizini; 
a gieater degree of informality 
and a broader view of the subject. 

Di-. Noble is handling the moral 
and spiritual aspects, while Dr. 
Coughlin is lecturing on the phy- 
sical side of the marriage. The 
first part of the meeting is a 
half hoiu- talk by either Dr. Noble 
or Dr. Coughlin. while the remain- 
der is devoted to an open discus- 
sion, with the added attraction 
of refreshments. 

Proposed Topics 

Among the topics suggested last 
Wednesday by the house repre- 
sentatives are the questions of 
preparation for marriage, sexual 
behavior before and after mar- 
riage, and psychological adjust- 
ments to the marital status. 

On the physiological side, it 
was proposed that Dr. Coughlin 
consider In his talks such problems 
as child training and the relation- 
ship of sexual behaviour to parent- 
hood. 



menca present views of Paris and 
Prague, as well as cities in Italy 
and Russia. 

"Pool Room" Favorite 

Perhap.s the most popular paint- 
ing on display is the work of an 
American Negro. Jacob Lawrence. 
His "Pool Room" is drawn in sucli 
ureal detail that it even .shows 
the smoke of a lighted cigarette 
curling up from the edge of a pool 
table. 

Tile scenes vary from a large. 
See Page 4. Col. 3 



Kifle Found 

Investigators found the body ly- 
ing face upward on a couch in the 
:oom. Some four feet away, be- 
neatli a double-decker bed, lay a 
!)olt action .22 caliber rifle, its 
muzzle under the edge of a rug. 
Dnc shot — a "short" .shell — 
liad been fired from it. 

Officials completed their on-the 
scene investigation by 8:30 last 
night, but continued to work un- 
til early this morning at a Spring 
Street funeral home. 



John Hewett Qualifies for Coveted 
American Alpine Club Membership 



o 

climbing experience, be recom- 
mended by at least two members, 
and approved by the Club as a 
whole. 

Hewett was nominated for mem- 
ber.sliip by Adams Carter, his close 
friend and climbing companion. 
He first met Carter when the 
latter became a teacher at Milton 
Academy. Hewett 's prep school. It 
was under Carter's influence that 
John became an avid and expert 
climber. 

As a member and later president 
of the Milton Academy Moun- 
taineering Club, John gained his 
first actual climbing experience. 
He was active in the organization 
when Carter joined the Milton 
faculty, and the two have led 



Wednesday, Feb. 20— John He 
wett '53, recently elected to the 
American Alpine Club, became 
the youngest alpinist in the his- 
tory of the organization to receive 
such an honor. Despite his youth, 
Hewett has a long and impressive 
list of ascents to merit his mem- 
bership. 

The Club itself is a select or- 
ganization of 406 mountain climb- 
ers, the vast majority of whom 
are residents of the United States. 
It maintains headquarters in New 
York City and supplies its mem- 
bers with much climbing infor- 
mation, some in its regular pub- 
lications and some on request. 
Recommend and Approval 

In order to qualify for member- 
ship in the American Alpine Club, | climbing groups on trips to the 
an applicant must have sufficient I west for the past two years. 



i last night by 
pector Richard 
aid and noted 
School pathol- 
Oea. 

,....^, „ ...»,mber of Beta 

Theta Pi. was the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Millard Romaine of 3726 
Davenant Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

April Draft Test 
Applications Due 
Before March 10 

Gen. Hershey Announces 
Student Opportunities 
For Draft Deferment 

Wednesday. Feb. 20 — In a let- 
ter released by the Selective Ser- 
vice Examining Section it was 
announced that all eligible stu- 
dents who intend to take the Col- 
lege Qualification Test in 1952 
should file applications at once for 
the April 24 examination. 

Following the instructions of the 
bulletin, which can be obtained 
at the Student Aid Office, the 
student should fill out his ap- 
plication and mail it no later than 
midnight. March 10. It was point- 
ed out that early filing will be to 
the student's advantage. 

Results to Local Board 

Results will be reported to the 
student's local board for use in 
considering his deferment, accord- 
ing to the Educational Testing 
Service, which prepares and ad- 
ministers the tests. 

Previously. Major Oen. Hershey. 
Director of Selective Service, an- 
nounced that under existing reg- 



Saturday, Feb. 16— Attracting 
three of the top ski teams in the 
country, the Williams Winter Car- 
nival scorned the snowless wastes 
of Wiiliamstown and took to tlie 
slopes of Mount Greylock and 
Goodell Hollow. The best in ski 
thrills awaited the comparatively 
few spectators who braved the 
cold and the climb to watch the 
events. The team title finally 
*ent to Middlebury after a nip 
and tuck battle with Dartmouth. 
The winner's captain. Dick Ire- 
land, won Saturday's jumping to 
give his team the margin of vic- 
tory over the Indians — 587.63 
to 584,33. Ireland, who also plac- 
ed sixth in the downhill and 
seventh in the slalom, received the 
coveted Williams Skimeister Tro- 
phy for the best individual show- 
ihK over the two day competition. 
Collins Stars 
Williams repeated and possibly 
exceeded its fiflne showing at the 
Dartmouth Carnival last week, 
lops ol the class B teams, the 
Ephmen scored heavily in the 
downhill, placing third, ahead of 
such powerful competitors as New 
Hampshire and Bowdoin. 

Ned ColUns '52 was the indivi- 
dual star for the host team. He 
placed seventh in the downhill, 
fourteenth in the slalom, and 
ninth in tlie jumping. Stu Chase 
and Pete Callahan in the slalom 
and Doug Wilson. Bob Tucker, and 
Joe Foote in the cross country 
were al.so outstanding for the 
Ephs. 

Burden Combined Winner 
Doug Burden of Middlebury. 
winner of both the downhill and 
the slalom tlie previous week, was 
forced to be content with seconds 
this time, bowing to Kirby of 
Dartmouth in the former and to 
team-mate Gale Shaw in the lat- 
ter. Burden and Shaw were one- 
two in the Alpine combined. 

After falling behind Middlebury 
in Friday's events. Dartmouth 
staged a strong comeback In the 
Nordic events on Saturday. Trem- 
blay. Agan. and Drury of the In- 
dians took tlie first three places 
in the Nordic combined, but the 
Blue and Wliite stayed close e- 
nough for Ireland's winning jump 
to provide the margin of victory. 
Victorious mentor Bobo Shee- 
hen prai.sed Williams coach. Ralph 
Townsend, for his preparation of 
See Page 4, Col. 2 



Faculty Club Dance 
Attracts Large Crowd 

Saturday Feb. 16 — Wliile the 
rest of the campus was in the 
middle of the Winter Carnival 
festivities, the faculty enter- 
tained themselves at the Facul- 
ty Club danie which ran from 
nine last ni.uht until one o'clock 
this mornini; Total attendance 
was estimated at 60 persons by 
Richard O. Rouse, entertain- 
ment committee chairman in 
charge of the dance. 

For the sake of contrast to 
the sub-zero weather that had 
prevailed for the last few days, 
the profs planned their deco- 
rations around a spring motif. 
A large and potent punchbowl 
provided a continual fountain 
of enjoyment, as the professors 
and their wives danced to the 
music of Al Trudel and his 
band. 



Paragraphs 
In the News 



Bi'iii Tlu'ia i'l ri'ceiuly namod 
nami'ct Kick Avi-ry Ty> house vicu- 
pri'.siclent to till ihi' post vaciitcd 
by Joe Stewart nj, the newly 
elected house pii'sident. 

Cieorse :»lr.\lfeiian '53 and 
Walt KlaluTty '53 lost to two Wes- 
leyan debaters while supportiuf; 
the question. "Should the United 
States send an ambassador to the 
Vatican?" F'riday ewnins. 

Arthur B. lludsiiri 'SS was elect- 
ed pri'sident of Cli; Psi at a re- 
cent house ineetm« i )ther offlcers 
rnmed for the coiiiii.:4 year arc: 
Thomas Williams .•.;:. vice-presi- 
dent; ICUwurcl Cypiiit '54. secre- 
tary; rnd Kdwanl Miller 54, 
'.reasurer. 

Alumni Fund secretary Charles 
15. Hall '15 annoiuiced that the 
1951 fund drive netted the colle-e 
■■115, 'ja:, the hishest fisure in tlie 
h story of the collose. A total of 

^.617 alumni contributed to the 
campaign. 

Intramural Baskethall StandinRs 
First Division 
Team \v l 

Phi Sisma K ppa L' 

Delta Kappa Epsilo 

Psi Upsilon 

Theta Delta Chi 

Delta Upsilon 

Phi Gimina Delta 

Sigma Phi 

Delta Psi 



Frosh I 
Down 

Wilson, 
11 Each 
27 in 

Saturday, 
ini! olf to an 
'he VVilliani; 
te. Ill ecastec 
'he H.P.I. F) 
\'ict{)r.\' in a i 
men, who pli 
ices of the 
Mold, who ■ 
.ice. 

riuHigh ht 
the frosh 1 
downini; th. 
iiuintet. 

Fred Brodi 
m pultting t 
as he scored 
I he early mil 
lake an 11-3 
Wilson, lien 
With Ror 
Henry centre 
liams led 39- 
Engineers tr 
ihe Kame in 
heir efforts 
PuriJle coasi 



THE MAKING OF A CHAMPION 



Second Division 



Alj.Mia Delta Phi 
Chi Psi 
K ppa Alpha 
Delta Phi 
Beta Theta Pi 
""hi Delta Theta 
Z'Ma Psi 
Onrfield Club 
'dropped outi 





1 
1 
2 
2 
3 
3 



Elephant . . . 

got LOST! All recollections of thp 
exact whereabouts of the 12 thou- 
sand pound beast was forgotten - 
for one-hundred years. 

After e.xtcnsive research into 
m ny yellowed documents, legends 
old wives' tales, etc combined with 
a few dubious eye-witne.ss report.-i 
nnd m.vstical prophesies, "Opera- 
tion Tii.-.l: Poivc" sot und.-.-A„v. 
Included in the chase for the i^rize 
loxodonta i worth some $25.00 to 
the Williams Record i were var- 
ious groups from Williams. "I feel 
'ike a 'buU-moo.se' " exclaimed one 
of many itinerants on the first of 
the Teddy Roosevelt-type bia :ame 
hunts. 

About a week ago, with the balm 
of Spring upon us. "Opera tirn 
T-F" was resumed. With the ski! 
of experts, and the stamina of 
the proverbial "bull-moose", dii;- 
ging commenced. Picks and sho-/- 
els hit the semi-frozen turf. Pro- 
fuse oaths struck the airi -Vnd 
four hours later, six feet of sod 
had been unearthed — but still no 
signs cf the pet loxodonta . . . .\nd 
the shades of evening wore on the 
dank earth was replaced, and for 
the time bi-ing, at least, the House 
of Columbus remained undisturbed 
by mortal hands. 



iRING 
YOUR CAR 
TO US FOR 

EXPERT SERVICE 

€Ut€C 

GENUINE FORD PARTS 



Big UoubcHi liked it m the .luiiide. In the 
lush tropic undergrowth life was ea.sy, and Boo- 
boo spend most of his lazy days romping with 
his jungle playmates, particularly his affec- 
tionate pal the giant dingo Hannibal. But then 
came the white man wlio captured Boohoo and 
Harmibal and shipped them down the river In 



Leer Visits the Berkshire Angel 

bamboo cages. 

Boob(X) had never been mad before, but 
when they kicked his friend Hannibal he .saw 
red. He pitted his mighty strength against the 
bars of his cage, ripping them apart, and ran 
rampant through the camp. Only ttie sloe-eyed 
Pnt, daughter of the liunti'r. could calm Booboo 



by leediiig liiin bananas out of lur hand. 

When liodboo armed in New York In n^, 
.separated from his raven haired love bs tin, 
wily promoter. Phiiieas BUisler. who packed Inn, 
off to his trainiiii'. I'liini) in the Bi'rksliires Inem 
he coiilil lest the brute against "amateur" i'..!i|.|i|j 
athletes. 



You'll lik» our 
Prompf 5erv/c« 



You'll lik* our 
Hiasonabh fikn 



You'll lik* our 
frhndly Way 9f 
Doing BusImss 



HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATED 




Copynshi lov. I.innirt * Mvm To.«rco Co 




lurhllul III ihi- li'sMT iinim^ls, BcidIjixj 
s "()u(l lUi'lit to his bi'sl friciui 



At fir.sl H(xjboo rpmalned simple and faith- 
ful u> his JuiiMli; pasl. On sumiy days lie would 
don his loincloth and swhii? joyously from tree 
to tree, chanlint,' his iinmltivc .sonijs. Visitors 
from Pownal and Uooslck Falls often walx;h(!d 
HooiKH) sit on lop of an old Wllliamslowii elm, 
slill niuMchhm bananas with his beloved Han- 
nibal 

■| lien Uooboi) joined the Saint House. 'Iherc 
lif eaine face to face with civilization. He stai'ted 
to shave and wear clothes. He took up reading 
and strained his eyes struuKllnp, over the lelt(!rs 
111 the t'ledKcs' Manual. 

One day at a small Informal Kel-toKcther on 
llie .Saint lawn, he was intioduced to firewater. 
He liked tin- taste. One drink led to another 
and .soon Booboo, iinhaiiijy In his foremn abode, 
succimibed lo the power of whiskey, and l)ei:aii 
keeijliiK a Bennini;lon mil m his tree 
beraii keepini' a Beniiini!U)n hIiI in ins tree. 

hi ihe viiw. Booboo had become a monster. 
Al first he had loyed willi his oiJiionents and 
Uiiined them Kenily i„ ihe „,,,i al i|„. delmht 
of Ihe crowd. But under the influence of the 
•Saint house hi' bee;, me a savamv He wa.sn't 
liaijpy unless he flattened his opponent's nose 
against tlie floor. The crowds bowd him. 

Then came Hooboos bifiKcst test Fear.some 
Middle Bleau. Ihe ijride of Drury Hmli Hchool 
ehallenr.ed hlin to a liiihl to a finish. When the 
fateful nuiht came, Bm Booboo lurched into the 
rin«, still shakini! from liis last biiiue. Goaded 
by the crowd, he luiwed at Middle, but Bleau, 
known as the Fivnch wrlKKlcr, slli)|)ed by the 
chami) and pinned the meat brute to the floor. 

Today Booboo .sailed for home, slill munch- 
llUi ins Ijallaila, 




Booboo adhers to a strict trainini; diet as 
he welKhs m before the bm match 




Kwu a lueat champion can lose tlie touch one 



Eastern Colleges 
Initiate Advanced 
Teacher Training 

Williams Joins Program 

For Study At Harvard 

School of Education 

Wednesday. Fob. 20 Williams 
.111(1 1!) other Eastern collem-s 
have joined with the Harvard 
Ciradiiale School of Kducalioii, 
and the Harvard and Hadcllffe 
Ciiaduale School of Arts and Sci- 
ences lo Inaumirale a cooiierative 
piduram lo train elementary and 
secondary .school teachers. The 
purpose of this proBiam is to in- 
crea.se the luimber of ciuallfied 
college liiaduales enleriiiK the 
public .schools' teachini; ranks. 

Ihe Fund for the Advancement 
of Education Is support inc. the 
proKiam with $7«,n(IO annually 
for three years. $4,'i,oni) for fellow- 
ships, and SSH.nOO to siii)i)ort the 
instruction and administration of 
the plan. 

President .himes B. Coiiaiit of 
Harvard has announced I hat fel- 
lowships will be Kianled to itrad- 
uates of the twenty coUckcs in 
the proiunm. The liiadiiates will 
spend a year at Harvard Inve.sti- 
uatniK the ways of relatinK the 
liberal arts proKiam with iirad- 
URtc study In education while 
serving appientice.shii)s in teach- 
ing 



Sni''r ,111(1 1)1 !■: J roU:;lllin, a 
I.ici;! pi,tctitionrr. are leadm!; the 
course 

■file npcnini: lecture u;is ;:i\en .it 
.,' p 111. l.isl iih'hl in Ihe St John's 
i;arish Imu.se. but .iiinliirs and 
,M'ii Ills may .still enroll. There will 
be six Tuesday nlchl meellmjs, 
li'iniliialiniu Ihe wec.k before Eas- 
ier recess, 

Iiil'ormalUy .Stressed 

Allluiueh Ihe course has Ijeeii a 
Williams standby since Ihe war, 
lliis year's series hopes to attract 
iiiori' iwrtic'ipaiils by emphaslzini! 
a 'Ji'ealer deurec of informality 
and a broader \iew of Ihe sul).ii'Cl. 

I);. Noble Is handllnu the moral 
and si)lrilu:il asijecls. while l>v. 
Coimhllii Is Icclurin}; on Ihe phy- 
sical side (il Ihe marriatie. The 
first pall of the meetitm is a 
half hour talk Ijy either Dr. Noble 
or Ur. CoUHhlm, while the remain- 
der Is devoted lo an open dfscus- 
sioii. with the added allracllon 
of refieshnienls. 

rroiiosed 'r()|)irs 

Anionsi Ihe topics sutiiiesled last 
Wednesday by the house repre- 
.sentatives are the questions of 
preiiaration for marrlase, ,sexiial 
behavior before and after mar- 
rlaue, and iw.vcholoulcal ad.iust- 
ments lo the marital status. 

On the physiological side, it 
was pioposed that Dr. Coughlin 
consider in his talks such i>roblpms 
as child Iralnim,' and the relatlon- 
shii) of sexual behaviour to parent- 
hood. 



?"iier,ca preseiu \ lews of Palls and 
Praijue, as well as ritles ill Italy 
and Ru.ssia. 

"INioI Kuoin" l-'avoritc 

Perhap., the most iiopuUir paint- 
um on display is ihe work of an 
American Nciiro, .Jacob Lawrence. 
His "Pool Room " Is drawn in such 
lAi'eat detail Ihal il e\fn shows 
the smoke of a lluhted ciKarette 
ciU'liiiM up from the edge of a pool 
table. 

Tile scenes vary from a lariie. 
See I>ai;e 4, Col, 3 



Kllle I'diind 

finest igators found the body ly- 
.iii; face upward on a couch In the 
:.ioni Some four feel away, be- 
ra'iilli a double-decker bed, lay a 
mil action :2'2 caliber rifle. Its 
iiuizzle under tlie edce of a nm. 
I ine shot a "short" shell 

had been flix'd from it 

Officials completed their on-the 
scene investigation by 8:30 last 
iiii;hl. but continued to work iin- 
lil early this morning at a Sprinu 
Street funeral home. 



John Hewett Qualifies for Coveted 
American Alpine Club Membership 



Wednesday, Feb. I>0--John He- 
wett '.'j3, recently elected to the 
American Alpine Club, became 
the youngest alpinist in the his- 
tory of the oiganization to receive 
such an honor. Despite his youth, 
Hewett has a long and impressive 
list of ascents to merit his mem- 
bership. 

The Club it-self is a ,select or- 
ganization of 40(i mountain climb- 
ers, the vast ma,iority of whom 
are residents of the United States. 
It maintains headquarters in New 
'Vork City and supplies its mem- 
b.^rs with much climbing infor- 
mation, some in Its regular pub- 
lications and some on request 
Itrrointnrnfl and ,'\p|iroval 

In order lo tiuallfy for member- 
ship in the American Alpine Club, 
nn applicant must have sufficient 



climbing experience, be recom- 
mended by at least two members, 
and approved by Ihe Club as a 
whole. 

Hewett was nominated tor niem- 
bershlp by Adams Carter, his clo.se 
friend and climbing companion. 
He first met Carter when the 
loiter became a teacher at Milton 
Academy, Hewetl's pivp school. It 
was under Carter's influence that 
John became an avid and expert 
climber. 

As a member and later president 
of the Milton Academy Moun- 
taineering Club, John gained his 
first actual climbing experience. 
He was active in the organization 
when Carter .joined the Milton 
r.iculty. and the two have led 
Climbing groups on trips to the 
west for the past two years. 



21 



^£Ofj^ 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Ski Meet 

It Darlmotith 
s Fourth Place 



r at the Winter 



^ound; 
Service 



)(lav th.it Wil- 
J\ uas liiiiiid 
i<'la Tluta I'i 
the hrail 
: with pi.ncis 
II the 'rhiilll|V 



Ireland Captures 
Skimeister Award 



Participants, Spectators 
Hail Meet as Success 



nd state offl- 
:ed on the ca.sc 
T. Mullen of 
hern Berkshire 
<aminei-. A.ssl. 
E. Lcvine of 
State Detective 
VI. Whitleiiioix' 



i last night by 
pector Richard 
3ld and noted 
School palliol- 
'Jea. 

.. ...V mber of Beta 

Theta Pi. was Ihe son of Mr, and 
Mrs. Millard Romaine of 3726 
Davenant A\e., Cincinnati. Ohio. 



April Draft Test 
Applications Due 
Before March 10 

Gen. Hershey Announces 
Student Opportunities 
For Draft Deferment 

Wednesday. Feb. 20~-In a let- 
ter released by the Selective Ser- 
vice Examining Section it was 
announced that all eligible stu- 
dents who intend to take the Col- 
lege Qualification Test in 19,')2 
should file applications al once for 
the April 24 examination. 

Following the Instructions of the 
bulletin, which can be obtained 
at the Student Aid Office, the 
student should fill out his ap- 
phcaiion and mall it no later than 
midnight, March 10. It was point- 
ed out that early filing will be to 
the .student's advantage. 

Kesults to Local Board 

Results will be reimrted to the 
student's local board for use in 
con.slderlng his deferment, accord- 
ing to Ihe Educational Testing 
Service, which prepares and ad- 
ministers the tests. 

Previously. Ma.lor Qen. Hershey, 
Director of Selective Service, an- 
nounced that under exI.stiiiR reg- 



.SaMiiday. 1-eb l(i -Attrattuil; 
three 1)1 tile top .ski teams m the 
couuny. the Williams Winter Car- 
nival scorned the .snowless wastes 
of VV.Uiamstown and took to the 
Slope- 1,1 Mount Greylock and 
OoiKii-i: Hollow, The best in ,ski 
thrills awaited the comparatively 
few specuilois who braved the 
ivikl and the rlimb to watth the 
eveijis 'i-he team title finally 
iMi.' Ill .Middlebury after a nip 
aiKi tuck battle with Dartmouth. 
ll.e winner's captain. Dick Ire- 
land, won Saturday's .lumping to 
^ive his team the margin of vic- 
tor.-, over the Indians - 587.63 
lu :ia4 33 Ireland, who al.so plac- 
ed sixth m the downhill and 
se\i nth ill the slalom, received the 
COM ted Williams Skimeister Tro- 
p||.^ for uie besi individual show- 
.111 over the two day competition 
Collins .Stars 
Willuiiiis repealed and po.ssibly 
I'xceeded its fifine showing at tlie 
Dartmouth Carnival last week, 
lops ul Ihe class B teams, tlie 
Ephmeii scored heavily in the 
downhill, placing third, ahead of 
such powerful competitors as New 
H,.mpshlre and Bowdoln. 

Ned Collins '52 was the indivi- 
dual star for tlie host team. He 
placed seventh in the downhill, 
fourteenth in the slalom, and 
ninth in tl.e .lumping. Slu Chase 
and Pete Callahan m the slalom 
and Doug Wilson. Bob Tucker, and 
Joe Foole in the cro.ss country 
were al.so .nitstaiidini; for the 
Ephs. 

Burden Coinhinecl Winner 
Doug Btirdm of ^hddlebuly. 
winner of buih the downhill and 
the slalom tlir previous week, was 
forced to bi rn; tent with seconds 
this lime. I'Mwui!; to Klrby of 
Dartmouth .;, ihe former and to 
team-mate Gale Shaw in the lat- 
ter. Burden .uid Shaw were one- 
two in the .Mpiiie combined. 

After talhiii; behind Middlebury 
in Fiiday'.s event.s. Dartmouth 
staged a slruiiL: conreback in the 
Nordic events on Saturday. Trem- 
blay, Agan, and Drury of the In- 
dians took t!;e first three places 
in Ihe Nordir combined, but the 
Blue and Wliite stayed close e- 
nough for Ii. land's winning ,iump 
to provide t!ie margin of victory. 
Victorious mentor Hobo Shee- 
hen praised Williams coach. Ralph 
I'own.send, foi his preparation of 
See Page 4. Col, 2 



Faculty Club Dance 
Attracts Large Crowd 

Saturday Feb. 16 — While the 
rest of the campus was in the 
middle of the Winter Camival 
festivities, the faculty enter- 
tained themselves at the Facul- 
ty Club daim which ran from 
nuie last nii:lit until one o'clock 
this mornin.: Total attendance 
was estimati'd at 60 persons by 
Richard O Rouse, entertain- 
ment committee chairman In 
charge of the dance. 

For the sake of contrast lo 
Ihe sub-zero weather that had 
prevailed for the last few days, 
the prof.s i)lanned their deco- 
rations around a spring motif. 
A large and |x)tcnt punchbowl 
provided a continual fountain 
of en.ioyment. as the professors 
and their wives danced to the 
music of Al Trudel and his 
band 



Paragraphs 
In the News 



Beta Tlieta Pi recently named 
named Rick Avery '52 house vice- 
president to nil tlie post vacated 
by Joe Stewart '52, the newly 
elected house president. 

George McAleeiian '52 and 
Walt Flaherty '53 lost to two Wes- 
leyan debaters while supporting 
the question, "Should the United 
States send an ambassador to the 
Vatican?" Fi-iday evening. 

Arthur B. Hud.soii '53 was elect- 
ed president of Chi Psl at a re- 
cent house meeting. Other officers 
ramed for the coming year are: 
Thomas Williams 53, vice-presi- 
dent; Edward C'ypiot '54, secre- 
tary; end Edward Miller '54, 
'treasurer. 

Alumni Fund secretary Charles 
B. Hall '15 announced that the 
1951 fund drive netted the college 
"115,227, the highest figure in the 
h'story of the college. A total of 
3.617 alumni contributed to the 
campaign. 

Intramural Basketball Standings 
First Division 

Team W L 

Phi Sigma K- ppa 2 
Delta Kappa Epsilon 2 



Psi Upsilon 
Theta Delta Chi 
Delta Upsilon 
Phi G.imma Delta 
Sigma Phi 
Delta Psi 



Second Division 



Alpha Delta Phi 
Chi Psi 
K ppa Alpha 
Delta Phi 
Beta Theta Pi 
•"hi Delta Theta 
Zeta Psi 
Garfield Club 
'dropped out) 



PCT. 
1.000 
1.000 
.500 
.500 
.500 
.500 
.000 
.000 

1.000 
1.000 
.667 
.667 
.333 
.333 
.000 
.000 



Elephant . . . 

got LOST! All recollections of the 
exact whereabouts of the 12 thou- 
.'and pound beast was forgotten - 
for one-hundred yeare. 

After extensive research into 
m- ny yellowed documents, legends 
old wives' tales, etc. combined with 
a few dubious eye-witness reports 
Olid mystical prophesies, "Opera- 
tion Tusk Force" got underway. 
Included in the chase for the prize 
loxodonta (worth some $25.00 to 
the Williams Record) were var- 
ious groups from Williams. "I feel 
like a 'bull-moose' " exclaimed one 
of many itinerants on the first of 
the Teddy Roosevelt-type big game 
hunts. 

About a week ago, with the balm 
of Spring upon us. "Operation 
T-F" was resumed. With the .skill 
of experts, and the stamina of 
the proverbial "bull-moose", dig- 
ging commenced. Picks and shov- 
els hit the semi-frozen turf. Pro- 
fuse oaths struck the air! And 
four hours later, six feet of sod 
had been unearthed — but still no 
signs of the pet loxodonta . . . And 
the shades of evening wore on the 
dank earth was replaced, and for 
the time being, at least, the House 
of Columbus remained undisturbed 
by mortal hands. 

BRING 
YOUR CAR 
TO US FOR 

EXPERT SERVICE 

€lH<t 

GENOINE FORD PARTS 



You'll lilc* our 



YouMI liko our 
Rtasonahh Prkw 



You'll Ilk* our 
FrlMcf/x Way of 
Mug Btshtss 



HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATED 



Frosh i 
Down 

Wilson, 
11 Each 
27 in 

Saturday, 
ing olT to an 
the William! 
tc. m coasle( 
(he R.P.I. Pi 
victory in a i 
men. who pli 
ices of the 
Moro, who ' 
lice. 

Tliough ht 
the frosh 1 
downing thi 
quintet. 

Fred Brod( 
in puttting t. 
as he scored 
the early mil 
take an 11-3 
Wilson, Hen 

With Ror 
Henry centre 
liams led 39- 
Engineers tr 
the game in 
lieir efforts 
Purple coast 



Amhei 

iams led 10- 
The Jeffs, 
slowly and gi 
end of the qi 
buckets by 
Ihe teams bi 
the second i 
ended with A 

Hawkins, ll 

Belshe 

Smith, rf 

Avery 

Depopolo 

Suessbrick. 

Hall 

Lazor 

Shudt, ig 

Campbell 

Creer. rg 

Miller 

Totals 



Henry, Dee Battles, Vassar 

Beard, Jane Canning, Smith 

Potter, Marian Huglies, Dana Hall 

Pickard, Barbara Brown, Northwestern 

Catto, Claudia Abbey, Vassar 

Bartlett, Marguerite Picketts, East Greenwich 

Ball, Mlki Friedman, North Adams 

Roe, Margot Mann, Briarcllff 

Lafove, Carolyn Bonn, Cleveland 

Lange, Karen Hansen, Bryn Mawr 

Sterling, Nancy MacDonald. Holyoke 

Flaherty, Barbara Smith, Mnrymount 

Sheldon, Susan Chequer Laselle Jr. 

Loomis, Skippy Frackenpolil, Millbum, N. J. 

Stephens, Charlie Doscher, Hunter 

Barber, Michey Bell, Mt. Holyoke 

Macomber, Jo Ann Hamaiin, Indiana V. 

Brandi. Doris Knighton, Oakwood 

Austell, Sally Chappell, Riverside 



DELTA PHI 

West, Jeanne Yates, St. Agnes School 
Westergaard, Joan Holt, Sprague Electric 
Moss, Pat Morrison, Smith 
Doughty, Charlote Haase, Vassar 
Perrin, Edna Grabiak, Penn. State 
Ci-aig, Carol Schater, Bowling Green 
Moore, Elberta Gibbs, Randolph-Macon 
McAloon, Nancy Glass. Boston 
Stevens, Sue Hunt, St. Agnes School 
Carter, Letty Morrison, Mount Holly 
Blackwell, Mary Freeman, Vassar 
St. Amant, Margaret Kraft, Centenary J, C. 
Livingston, Virginia Clowes, Mt. Holyoke 
Hoover, Janet Pratt, Colby Jr. 
Withington, Barbara Foster, Smith 
Balklnd, Jean Reeves, Smith 
Cave, Rocky Cook, Skidmore 
Worrest, Barbara Dole, Mt. Holyoke 
Jones, Ann Lampheer, Smith 
Loening, Ann McGregor, Mt. Holyoke 
Ferguson, Anne Hetherington, Vassar 
BuiToughs, Trudy Overholt, Vassar 
Donahue, Eileen Saurwein. New York City 
Prime, Jessica Long, Washington, D. C. 



DELTA UPSILON 

Evans, Lish Lamberton, Beaver College 

Thompson, Charlotte Lamson, Skidmore 

Delaney, Jane Tinder, Bennett Jr. 

Widing, Helen Judson, Bradford 

Wright, Connie Meehan, Conn. College 

Schottin, Barbara Dohn, Westminster College 

Petersen, Lee Roberts. Smith 

Kolligan, Dorothy Buracker, Holyoke 

Stark, Mynette Sheller, Wells College 

Treuttner, Sara Stringer, Smith 

Dorsey, Nancy Daniels, Smith 

Schreier, Shirley Urquhart. Wheaton 

Basil, Thalia Nicholas, Smith 

Sullivan, Jeanie Gordon, Holyoke 

Lyon, Carol Pyne, Wheeler 

Reid, Alotta Schmidt, Hoboken, N. J. 

King. Jeanie Stisser. Holyoke 

Colbin, Ann Wakkler, Pembroke 

Tufts, Gail Robertson, Bennett 

Little. Nancy Smith, Wells 

Mabie, Bunnie Wilson. Pine Manor 

Briggs, Sandi Verkerke. Skidmore 

Emerson. Shirley Clark. Skidmore 

Pettengill. Rutle Swan, Abington, Mass. 

Berry, Pat Benson, Abington, Mass. 

Howard. Marianna Moran. Smith 

Feltes, Anne Raymond, Pine Manor 

Kulsar, Barbara Gestwick, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Smith. Jerry Wiss, Smith 

Brennan. Pat La Croix. Brockton, Mass. 



KAPPA ALPHA 

Cain, Jean Sharkey, South Orange, N. J, 
Miller, Barbara Carlson, R. I. State 
Latham, Marty Sanford, Providence 
Porter. Jill Sheawin, Sarah Lawrence 

22 



M 



t5 « 



F^i 



Gurney, Lorraine Nichols, Time, Inc. 
Cobb, Betsy Von Furstenburg, Hilton Hotels 
Couch, Buster Rial, Vassar 
Griswold, Diane Humilton, Baltimore 
Sillcox, Sweetie Laub, Endicott 
Irwin, W., A Quart, Distillery Prep. 
Saunders, Judy Tompkins, Farmington 
Regan, Lucy Battel, Bennett 
Campbell, Anne Druminond, McQiU 
Heilman, Louisa Smith, Wheaton 
Mauck, Happy Hyde, Dana Hall 
Miller. Ginny Robertson, Holyoke 
Murray, P., Judy Hackwell, Skidmore 
Brown, Joanna Koehlcr, Radcliffe 
Wilkie, Haldis Jergensen, McGiU 



PHI DELTA THETA 

Martin, Jacquie Bailey, Skidmore 
Robert-son, Nancy Toole, New Hampshire 
Rounds, Sophie Ruderman, B'ton 
Fletcher, Sonia Parker, Simmons 
Nelson, D. M. Gro.ss, Smith 
Sammond, Pat Cutler, Vassar 
George, Barbara Guerin, Conn. College 
Melcher, Jinny Kurtz, Colby 
Connolly, Susan McCauley, Garllnd 
Hall, Sally Raymond. U. of Mass. 
Sikorsky, Yvonne Franz, B'ton 
Virden, Pat O'Keefe, Holyoke 
Jones, Bonnie Parsons, Smith 
Morrison, Buy Geff, R. I. School of Design 
Olson, Katie Webster. Conn. College 
Qulnn, Kitty Wade, Westfield, N. J. 
L'Hommedieu. Sarah Knight, Smith 
Ringer, Nancy Lee, B'ton 
Lee, Barbara Fucchscl. Columbia 
Mills, Robin Hansen, Smith 
Maui-o, Janet Metzel, North Carolina 
Sullivan, Nancy MacMillan, Wellesley 
Burgher, Nancy Levericli, Smith 
Garfield, Ann 'Wick, Vassar 
Weedon, Barbara Schwanda, B'ton 
Hammond, Milly Shaw, Bennett 
Woods, Sue Bartel. Skidmore 
Blackwood. Phyllis Hodill, Smith 
West, Marcy Ann Dryden, North Carolina 
Blanchard, Anne Atfield, Smith 
Umbach, Jeanne Pollou. Wellesley 
PHI GAMMA DELTA 
Schreck. Joel Wells. Southbridge. Mass. 
Williams. Jo Ann Ewig. Skidmore 
Bryant, Barbara Archer, Marymount 
Thomas, Su.san Scott, Smith 
Palmer. Isnbellc Tether, Bronxville 
Duffield. Nancy Du Val. Williamstown 
Kent, Jean Marden, Hunter 
Brownell, Sally Duff, Wellesley 
O'Kief fe, Jane Collins, Bradford Jr. 
Ellis, Dartie Russel, Bennington 
Walters, Shipley Newlln. Cazanovia Jr. 
Hagerman, Joyce Steinmctz. U. of Delaware 
Max, Marcia Lind.say, Wellesley, Mass. 
Henry, Mouse <?), Pine Manor 
Carter, Sonja Olsen, U.N.H. 
Colbert, Barbara Braden. Smith 
Chapman, Pat Walker. Pittsficld H. S. 
Deely. Sue Doyle. St. Luke's 
Donovan, Cathy Bellefleur, Springfield 
Chapman. Gloria St. Andre, Sea Cliff. N. Y. 
Ada, Lorry McCarthy, Holyoke 
Brandegee, Carol Hill, Columbia Pi'esbyterian 



CHI PSI 

Whitehead. Libby Humphrey. Holyoke 
Miller. Kay Parke. Smith 
Collins, Glenn Candy, Wellesley 
Doyle. Ginny Wilson, Conn. College 
Yeaw, Mary Zisette, Smith 
Jeffrey, Ellen Head, Conn. College 
Montgomery. J., Anne Johnson, Norwich, Ct. 
Martin, Sylvia Stump, Hollywood, California 
Taylor, Betsy Turner, Pembroke 
Campbell, Ruby Rump. Bowery Grammar 
Cramer. Bonnie Tristschler. Holyoke 



( ;iii:sr!;Kriii.!> 



Camp, Carolyn Odell, Lasell Jr. 

Dalby, Cynthia DeWap, Lasell Jr, 

Bayer, Ann Jonas, Smith 

Willcox, Nancy Colbourne, Skidmore 

Everett, Lisa Starr, Barnard 

Wilkes, Caiol Conrad, Holyoke 

Shaw, Lynn Hughes, Ardmore, Fla, 

Hlbblc, Polly Bancroft, Conn. College 

Sims, Joan Hagey, Smith 

Montgomery. W., Lois Morri.son, Pine Manor 

Heekin, Barbara Barrett, Mlddlebury 



DELTA KAPPA EPSILON 

Fall, Lou Ullman, Cleveland 

White, Adelaide Scott, N. Y. 

Barker, Susan Smith, Smith 

McGrath, Florrie Collins, Marymount 

Drennan, Adelaide Cobb, Briarcllff 

Peacock, Pat 'I'horne, Colby Jr. 

Banta, Kay Bell, Nortliwestcm 

Leinbach, Cary Ogle, Hathaway Brown 

McGuchris, Nora Palen, N. Y. 

Sterhig, Lynn Sickley. Conn. College 

Ladds, Liz Sessions, Smith 

Rice, Judy We.st, Bradford 

MacWhorter. Mary Jane Turner, Wash. D. C. 

Breckenridge, Bobbie Meyer, Wellesley 

Butterfield, Marge Kramer, Smith 

Salmon, Peggy Buckley. Smith 

Callahan. Kay Bulow, Wash. D. C. 

Simp.son, Marty Price. Eliz., N. J. 

Gray. Sue Laeri, Holliris College 

Reed. Nancy Crampton. Bryn Mawr 

Mccnan, Sally Adams, Smith 

Wyman, Betty Rowe, Vassar 

Calkins. Pat Smith, Smith 

Pierson. Betty Lou Givens. Bradford 

Lewis. Joyce Weber, Port Washington, N. Y. 

Wilson. Julie Mayfleld. Conn College 



p^ VMI (wWJ 0»' 



taU rrwIlM Mnrmt* 21, If** »l •* 
tKlH"! ur^ rtW All ul Mor'h J. 1 I 



Photoquiz Solution 

If you don't think tliis is funny, ihi an.swei to 
every question is id), 

Photocrime Solution 




Shrewdly noticing that the corpse's hand cluu 
a copy of "Ix)ve Among the Ha.VKtacks" rather I 
a towel. In.spector Barbour deduced that Wll- s 
picture of the story was a lie. The victim 1 id 
snatched the book from Wiley, who brought he 
window down on his neck to stop him. Wiley ■- .u 
sentenced to the electric chair. Scott was convic "d 
as an accessory after the tact for having lent if 
book to Sexton. He I'eceived three months in ;ic 
Williamstown Jail. 



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(;m.STi;i(i ii;ii) 

RflTlI' 

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Copvn/tht l0^2. bccirr & Mvtu Tmacco Co 




Campus Int(;rviews on Cigarette Tests 

No. 32... THE YAK 





"Some people ^m ^K^M-_ 



for laughs 





BRING YOUR DATE 
(Special Students') 

Smorgasbord 
at the INN 
THIS SUNDAY NITE 
6 to 7 

Price 2 bucks (including tax) 

C^ \juaawtuf Inn 



OFFERS 



SaS 



ISTANCC 




I MOVING 
I STORAGE 
\ PACKIKG 

la___ — 



rir's fill liMi sii(iliisli(Mlc(| Id |,c ainiiscd liy 
slap-slick <(inic(ly! I rmii ilif iniiiiiti- llic cuiiain 
Weill up. lie knew lliiil ydii just can'l jii(lf;i- 
cij;;nrll.- iiiililiios liy iiiii- faM puff (ir a siiifilc. -wift 
siiiir. Those eapers may fool a flush — liut 
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niillioiis of sniokeis af;ree: 'I'lieie's hut one 
true lesl of li^aiclle iiiililiiess! 

irslhrnfiisil)/,- li-sl . . . Ihe .iO-Day Camel 
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as yiiiii steady -iiiuke. on a ilav-aftei-day. 
pack-afler-pack basis. .\<> snap imi^nii'iilsl Oiiee 
you've tried Canii'ls for SO days in your ■■T-Zoiu;"" 
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• PACKING 

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Wanted at all times 

Loads or Part Loads 

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After all the Mildness Tests... 

Camel leadt all oliier bramis bfUffions 



BASTIEN'S 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

The Official Williams College ring 

Fine Williams seal Glassware 

Jewelry Diamonds Watches 

Watch Repairing Framing 



45 Spring Street 



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ti^oti^ 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Ski Meet 

It Dartmouth 
s Fourth Place 



r at the Winter 
ollow. 

found; 
Service 

xlav that Wil- 
dy was found 
Beta Theta Pi 
the head. 
i with palavers 
II the Tlionip- 



Ireland Captures 
Skimeister Award 

Participants, Spectators 
Hail Meet as Success 



.nd state offi- 
led on ttie case 
T. Mullen of 
hern Berkshire 
taminer; Asst. 
E. Levlne of 
State Detective 
vr. Whittemore 



Eastern Colleges 
Initiate Advanced 
Teacher Training 

Williams Joins Program 

For Study At Harvard 

School of Education 



Wednesday, Feb. 20— Williams 
and 19 other Eastern colleges 
have joined with the Harvard 
Graduate School of Education, 
and the Harvard and Radcliffe 
Graduate School of Arts and Sci- 
ences to Inaugurate a cooperative 
program to train elementary and 
secondary school teachers. The 
purpose of this program is to in- 
crease the number of qualified 
college graduates entering the 
public .schools' teaching ranks. 

The Fund for the Advancement 
of Education Is supportlnK the 
program with $78,000 annually 
for three years, $45,000 tor fellow- 
ships, and $33,000 to support the 
instruction and administration of 
the plan. 

President James B. Conant of 
Harvard has announced that fel- 
lowships will be granted to grad- 
uates of the twenty colleges in 
the program. The graduates will 
■■ipend a year at Harvard investi- 
gatftig the ways of relating the 
liberal arts program with grad- 
uate study In education while 
serving apprenticeships in teach- 
ing. 



Noble and Dr. E. J. Coughlin. a 
local practitioner, are leading the 
course. 

The opening lecture was given at 
9 p. m. last night in the St. John's 
parish hou.se, but juniors and 
.seniors may still enroll. There will 
be six Tuesday niuht mectinus, 
terminalinK the week before Eas- 
ter recess. 

Informality Stressed 

AllhouBh the coui'.se has been a 
Williams standby since the war, 
this year's .sei'ies hopes to attract 
more participants by emphasizing 
a greater degree of informality 
and a broader view of the subject. 

Dr. Noble is handling the moral 
and spiritual aspects, while Dr. 
Coughlin is lecturing on the phy- 
sical side of the marriage. The 
first part of the meeting is a 
half hour talk by either Dr. Noble 
or Dr. Coughlin. while the remain- 
der' is devoted to an open discus- 
sion, with the added attraction 
of refreshments. 

Proposed Topics 

Among the topics suggested last 
Wednesday by the house repie- 
sentatives are the questions of 
preparation for marriage, sexual 
behavior before and after mar- 
riage. and psychological adjust- 
ments to the marital status. 

On the physiological side, it 
was proposed that Dr. Coughlin 
consider in his talks such problems 
as child training and the relation- 
ship of sexual behaviour to parent- 
hood. 



nierica present views of Paris and 
Prafuc. as well as cities in Italy 
and Russia. 

"Pool Room" Favorite 

Perhaps the most popular paint- 
ing on display is the work of an 
American Negro, Jacob Lawrence. 
His "Pool Room" is drawn in such 
great detail that it even show's 
the smoke of a lighted cigarette 
curling up from the edge of a pool 
table. 

Tile scenes vary from a large. 
See Page 4, Col. 3 



Uifle Found 

Investigators found the body ly- 
ing face upward on a couch in the 
;oom. Some four feet away, be- 
neatli a double-decker bed. lay a 
'jolt action .22 caliber rifle, its 
muzzle under the edge of a rug. 
One shot — a "short" shell — 
had been fii-ed from it. 

Officials completed their on-the 
scene investigation by 8:30 last 
night, but continued to work un- 
til early this morning at a Spring 
Street funeral home. 



John Hewett Qualifies for Coveted 
American Alpine Club Membership 



23 i last night by 

pector Richard 

2ld and noted 

School pathol- 

Dea. 

tbuiiiaiiic, it member of Beta 

Theta Pi. was the son of Mr. and 

Mrs. Millard Romaine of 3726 

Davenant Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. 



Wednesday, Feb. 20 — John He- 
wett '53, recently elected to the 
American Alpine Club, became 
the youngest alpinist in the his- 
tory of the organization to receive 
such an honor. Despite his youth, 
Hewett has a long and impressive 
list of ascents to merit his mem- 
bei'ship. 

The Club itself is a select or- 
ganization of 406 mountain climb- 
ers, the vast majority of whom 
are residents of the United States. 
It maintains headquarteis in New 
York City and supplies its mem- 
bers with much climbing Infor- 
mation, some in its regular pub- 
lications and some on request. 

Recommend and Approval 

In order to qualify for member- 
ship in the American Alpine Club, 
an applicant must have sufficient 



climbing experience, be recom- 
mended by at least two members, 
and approved by the Club as a 
whole. 

Hewett was nominated for mem- 
ber.ship by Adams Carter, his close 
friend and climbing companion. 
He fiist met Carter when the 
latter became a teacher at Milton 
Academy, Hewett's prep school. It 
was under Carter's influence that 
John became an avid and expert 
climber. 

As a member and later president 
of the Milton Academy Moun- 
tnineerlng Club, John gained his 
fir.st actual climbing experience. 
He was active in the organization 
when Carter joined the Milton 
faculty, and the two have led 
climbing groups on trips to the 
west foi' the past two years. 



April Draft Test 
Applications Due 
Before March 10 

Gen. Hershey Announces 
Student Opportunities 
For Draft Deferment 

Wednesday. Feb. 20— In a let- 
ter released by the Selective Ser- 
vice Examining Section it was 
announced that all ehgible stu- 
dents who intend to take the Col- 
lege Qualification Test in 1952 
should file applications at once for 
the April 24 examination. 

Following the instructions of the 
bulletin, which can be obtained 
at the Student Aid Office, the 
student .should fill out his ap- 
plication and mall it no later than 
midnight. March 10. It was point- 
ed out that early filing will be to 
the student's advantage. 

Results to Loral Board 

Results will be reported to the 
student's local board for use in 
considering his deferment, accord- 
ing to the Educational Testing 
Service, which prepares and ad- 
ministers the tests. 

Previously, Major Gen. Hershey, 
Director of Selective Service, an- 
nounced that under existing reg- 



Salurday. Feb. 16 — Attracting 
three of the top ski teams in the 
country, the Williams Winter Car- 
nival scorned the snowless wastes 
of WiUiamstown and took to the 
slopes of Mount Greylock and 
Goodell Hollow. The best in ski 
ihiillh awaited the comparatively 
lew spectators who braved the 
cold and the climb to watch the 
events. The team title finally 
neni to Middlebury after a nip 
and tuck battle with Dartmouth. 
The winner's captain, Dick Ire- 
land, won Saturday's jumping to 
give his team the margin of vic- 
tory over the Indians ~ 587.63 
to 584.33. Ireland, who also plac- 
ed sixth in the downhill and 
seventh in the slalom, received the 
coveted Williams Skimeister Tro- 
phy for the best individual show- 
ing over the two day competition. 
Collins Stars 
Williams repeated and possibly 
exceeded its fltlne showing at the 
Dartmouth Carnival last week, 
lops ol the class B teams, the 
Ephmen scored heavily in the 
downhill, placing third, ahead of 
such powerful competitors as New 
Hampshire and Bowdoin. 

Ned Collins '52 was the indivi- 
dual star for the host team. He 
placed seventh in the downhill, 
fourteenth in the slalom, and 
ninth in the jumping. Stu Chase 
and Pete Callahan in the slalom 
and Doug Wilson, Bob Tucker, and 
Joe Foote in the cross country 
were also outstanding for the 
Ephs. 

Burden Combined Winner 
Doug Burden of Middlebury, 
winner of both the downhill and 
the slalom tlie previous week, was 
forced to be content with seconds 
this time, bowing to Kirby of 
Dartmouth in the former and to 
team-mate Gale Shaw in the lat- 
ter. Burden and Shaw were one- 
two in the Alpine combined. 

After falling behind Middlebury 
in Friday's events. Dartmouth 
staged a strong comeback in the 
Nordic events on Saturday. Trem- 
blay, Agan, and Drury of the In- 
dians took the first three places 
in the Nordic combined, but the 
Blue and White stayed close e- 
nough for Ireland's winning jump 
to provide the margin of victory. 
Victorious mentor Bobo Shee- 
hen praised Williams coach, Ralph 
Townsend. for his preparation of 
See Page 4. Col. 2 



Faculty Club Dance 
Attracts Large Crowd 

Saturday Feb. IB— Wliilc the 
rest of the campus was in the 
middle of the Winter Carnival 
festivities, the faculty enter- 
tained themselves at the Facul- 
ty Club dance which ran from 
nine last night until one o'clock 
this morning. Total attendance 
was estimated at 60 persons by 
Richard O. Rouse, entertain- 
ment committee chairman in 
charge of the dance. 

For the sake of contrast to 
the sub-zero weather that had 
prevailed for the last few days. 
the profs planned their deco- 
rations around a spring motif. 
A large and potent punchbowl 
provided a continual fountain 
of enjoyment, as the profe.ssors 
and their wives danced to the 
music of Al Trudel and his 
band. 



Paragraphs 
In the News 



Beta Theta Pi recently named 
named Rick Avery '52 house vice- 
president to All the post vacated 
by Joe Stewart '52, the newly 
elected house president. 

George McAleenan '52 and 
Walt Flaherty '53 lost to two Wes- 
leyan debaters while supporting 
the question, "Should the United 
States send an ambassador to the 
Vatican?" Piiday evening. 

Arthur B. Hudson '53 was elect- 
ed president of Chi Psl at a re- 
cent house meeting. Other officers 
named for the coming year are: 
Thomas Williams 53, vice-presi- 
dent; Edward Cypiot '54, secre- 
tary; and Edward Miller "54, 
vreasurer. 

Alumni Fund secretary Charles 
B. Hall '15 announced that the 
1951 fund drive netted the college 
'115,227, the highest figure In the 
h'story of the college. A total of 
3,617 alumni contributed to the 
campaign. 

Intramural Basketball Standings 
First Division 

Team W L 

Phi Sigma K-ppa 2 
Delta Kappa Epsilon 2 
Psi Upsllon 1 1 

Theta Delta Chi 1 1 
Delta Upsllon 1 1 

Phi Gamma Delta 1 1 
Sigma Phi o 2 

Delta Psl 2 



Second Division 



POT. 
1.000 
1.000 
.500 
.500 
.500 
.500 
.000 
.000 



Alpha Delta Phi 
Chi Psi 
K ppa Alpha 
Delta Phi 
Beta Theta Pi 
"Phi Delta Theta 
Zeta Psl 
Garfield Club 
'dropped out) 



Elephant . . . 

got LOST! All recollections of the 
exact whereabouts of the 12 thou- 
,<^and pound beast was forgotten - 
for one-hundred years. 

After extensive research into 
m- ny yellowed documents, legends 
old wives' tales, etc. combined with 
a few dubious eye-witness reports 
nnd mystical prophesies, "Opera- 
tion Tusk Force" got underway. 
Included in the chase for the prize 
loxodonta (worth some $25.00 to 
the Williams Recoi-d) were var- 
ious groups from Williams. "I feel 
like a 'bull-moose' " exclaimed one 
of many itinerants on the first of 
the Teddy Roosevelt-type big game 
hunts. 

About a week ago, with the balm 
of Spring upon us, "Operation 
T-P" was resumed. With the skill 
of experts, and the stamina of 
the proverbial "bull-moose", dig- 
ging commenced. Picks and shov- 
els hit the semi-frozen turf. Pro- 
fuse oaths struck the air! And 
four hours later, six feet of sod 
had been unearthed — but still no 
signs of the pet loxodonta . . . .And 
the shades of evening wore on the 
dank earth was replaced, and for 
the time being, at least, the House 
of Columbus remained undisturbed 
by mortal hands. 

BRING 
YOUR CAR 
TO US FOR 

EXPERT SERVICE 
eENUINE FORD PARTS 



You'll liic* our 
fronpf 5«fv/c0 



You'll liko our 



You'll liko our 
fMw% fVj/lMS 



HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATED 



frosh \ 
Down 

WiUon, 
11 Each 
27 in 

Saturday, 
ing off to an 
the Wiiliami 
tCi-m coastei 
Ihe R.P.I. Pi 
victory in a i 
men, who pli 
ices of the 
Moro, who • 
dee. 

Though hi 
the frosh I 
downing thi 
quintet. 

Fred Brodf 
in putttlng t 
as he scored 
the early mil 
take an 11-3 
Wilson, Hen 

With Ror. 
Henry contrt 
hams led 39. 
Engineers tr 
the game in 
heir efforts 
Purple coasi 



Amhei 

iams led 10- 
The Jeffs, 
slowly and gi 
end of the qi 
buckets by 
The teams bi 
the second i 
ended with A 

Hawkins, 1] 

Belshe 

Smith, rf 

Avery 

Depopolo 

Suessbrick, 

Hall 

Lazor 

Shudt, Ig 

Campbell 

Creer. rg 

Miller 

Totals iK 



^ 



The editors of "The Williams Worker", 
"Slime", and "Leer" extend their thanks 
to Lamb and Hunter, Printers and the 
Greylock Photo Engraving Co. for mak- 
ing these magazines possible. 



(;iti;sTf,Kin;ui> 

(;(li''i;«lllU,l) 



M;-: 



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Chi; 



■:nfi!i-P 



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'i!,<ii.ui n. 



-2''- 



^FMTTE^ 



'GOtTTt MYtOZ TOBACCO CO. 



\<i^\ 



ChesteTfie^* 



\pce 



tl^^X HO UWP^^JIte- 



i,V 



Lx; 






AFTER 



..an 



d only 



•— '" ;. ij has it! 



Ci)p»ri«lii 101!. iKKiiTT ft Mnu Touon Co 



irtr^ Willi 



Volume XLVI, Number 3 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE X<4E| 







l^j^i^afj^ 



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1952 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Middlebury Wins Carnival Ski Meet 



STONE, LATHROP EXCEL 
IN SHAW'S "PYGMALION" 

♦ /(// .\itliiir Lctill. Jr. ,52 

We all had a "bloocly" hikkI tiiiiu last week at tlie AMT pio- 
diic'tioii of Sliaw's •PyK'nalioii '. A hcMiililullv-balaiiced and well- 
rounded east presented lor the eaniival erowd a divertinjr spectaele 
ol a eockney llowei-f^irl who develops in six months into an almost 
pirteet lady of lashion through the aj^eney of a skilled phonetician 
who has taken her in hand. 

'Hiis is not one of Shaw's best plays-iior, by a Ion;; shot, one 
of his easiest to prodnee. II a p\ay has depth and signifieance, it 
should survive outside, as well as in the theatre. Tragedy or eoin- 
cdv, lantasy or laree, it should stay with us from }o<)tli);hts to 
strcc't. However transitory its impression, it must, if it is to with 



Hucko's Concert |Victors Nose Out Dartmouth 

AMT Production 
HighlightCarnival 



Butterfield, Wilson Play 
At All-College Dance; 
Anne Williams Crowned 



CARNIVAL QUEEN 



stand criticism, convince us that its allegiance is to life. JlilariousI 
ellective in the theatre, "Pygmalion" may be said to expire \vi 
the tenancy ol our .seats. 

Superb Cast q- 

Such a play put-s the burden of 
production squarely on the shoul- 
ders of the cast. It cannot stand 
by iUself. but must depend entirely 
upon the oriKlnality and resource- 
fulne.ss of the players. Probably 
I'VKmalion ought to be rehearsed 
by a company of well-blended 
Kcniuses for a year before the cur- 
lam Is raised. But our theatre is 
not orsanlzed for such heroic en- 
terprises. What we got at the AMT 
lasi week was not perfect, but it 
was original, inspired at times, 
and extremely hlKh-minded — 
all in all, one of the most accomp- 
lished Jobs seen around here for 
many a day. 

Where there is so much sub- 
stance I much of 11 unrefined and 
aimless, to be sure i the manner of 
the performance Is a thing of 
lirsi, importance. Under the direc- 
iion of William Martin, the man- 
ner of this one was unapproach- 
able. It's always a delight to .see 
such a degree of technical pro- 
ficiency on an amateur stage. 
Stone Stars 

The part of Professor Hlggins, 
who takes up the flower girl, tea- 
ches her to talk like a duchess, 
passes her in society, and forgets 
meanwhile that she is a human 
being, is at best, hard enough. The 
hero may all too readily appear to 
be oppressive, selfish, and unkind. 
John Stone avoided this inaccu- 
rate interpretation by portraying 
Higgins as a sort of childlike gen- 
ius. And it is this quality In Hig- 
gins that makes him appear will- 
ful, stubborn, and forgetful of o- 
Ihers. 

See Page 4, Col. 1 



ii 




Eastern Colleges 
Initiate Advanced 
Teacher Training 

Williams Joins Program 

For Study At Harvard 

School of Education 



Wednesday, Feb. 20— Williams 
and 19 other Eastern colleges 
have joined with the Harvard 
Graduate School of Education, 
and the Harvard and Radcllffe 
Graduate School of Arts and Sci- 
ences to Inaugurate a cooperative 
program to trato elementary and 
secondary school teachers. The 
purpose of this program is to in- 
crease the number of qualified 
college graduates entering the 
public .schools' teaching ranks. 

The Fund for the Advancement 
of Education is supporting the 
program with $78,000 annually 
for three years, $45,000 for fellow- 
ships, and $33,000 to support the 
Instruction and administration of 
the plan. 

President James B. Conant of 
Harvard has announced that fel- 
lowships win be granted to grad- 
uates of the twenty colleges in 
the program. The graduates will 
spend a year at Harvard Investl- 
gatlhg the ways of relating the 
liberal arts program with grad- 
u»te study in education while 
serving Bpprentice.shlps In teach- 
ing. 



Anne Williams. Connrrticut Col- 
lege freshman, is shown t'ollow- 
ins the reremonics at which she 
was named Winter Carnival Queen 



Dr. Noble Directs 
Marriage Course 

Minister, Physician Give 
Lectures, Guide Talks 



Wednesday. Feb. 20— The Rev- 
erend A. Grant Noble met with 
representatives of the campus 
fraternities last Wednesday to 
decide what topics are to be dis- 
cu.ssed in the foith-coming series 
ci lectures on marriage. Doctor 
Noble and Dr. E. J. Coughlin, a 
local practitioner, are leading the 
course. 

The opening lecture was given at 
9 p. m. last night in the St. John's 
parish house, but juniors and 
seniors may still enroll. There will 
be six Tuesday night meeting.s. 
terminating the week before Eas- 
ter recess. 

Informality Stressed 

Although the cour.se has been a 
Williams standby since the war, 
this year's series hopes to attract 
more participants by emphasizing 
a greater degree of informality 
and a broader view of the subject. 

Dr. Noble is handling the moral 
and spiritual aspects, while Dr. 
Coughlin is lecturing on the phy- 
sical side of the marriage. The 
first part of the meeting is a 
half hour talk by either Dr. Noble 
or Dr. Coughlin. while the remain- 
der is devoted to an open discus- 
sion, with the added attraction 
of refreshments. 

Proposed Topics 

Among the topics suggested last 
Wednesday by the house repre- 
sentatives are the questions of 
preparation for marriage, .sexual 
behavior before and after mar- 
riage, and psychological adjust- 
ments to the marital status. 

On the physiological side, it 
was proposed that Dr. Coughlin 
consider In his talks such problems 
as child training and the relation- 
ship of sexual behaviour to parent- 
hood. 



fciunday, Feb. 17-With an excess 
of 400 dates invading Williams- 
Lown. this weekend, the WOC 
spjnsoi-ed Winter Carnival ran 
smoothly despite the weather, 
back of snow dissolved all snow 
•sculpture plans, but enough was 
found for a successful ski meet. 

The bands of Billy Butterfield 
and 1'eddy Wilson took the spot- 
light at the Friday night dance 
and the coronation of the Carni- 
val Queen climaxed the evening. 
Saint Anthony's candidate, Anne 
Williams of Connecticut College, 
reigned supreme. 

Concert, Play 

After a day at the ski meet and 
the usual round of house cocktail 
parties. Williams men and their 
dates were offered varied enter- 
tainment on Saturday evenmg. A 
jazz concert by Peanuts Hucko 
and his outfit, and the AMT pro- 
duction of Shaw's "Pygmalion" 
oulii played to capacity crowds. 

Dances at the Beta. Phi Delt, 
Delta Phi, Theta Delt, AD and 
daint houses attracted many 
couples and stags later in the 
evening. Sunday brought the 
grand finale with milk punch 
parlies and jazz bands holding 
lorth at many fraternities. 

Art Museum Shows 
Pictures of City Life 

Alumni Invited to Attend 
Special Sunday Exhibit 

Thur.sday. Feb. 14 — "The City." 
an exhibition of paintings depict- 
ing various aspects of cities and 
city life, went on display at the 
Lawrence Art Museum today 
where it will remain until March 
6. The collection is being circu- 
lated by the Museum of Modern 
Art in New York City. 

While the great majority of the 
works concern New York, modern 
artists from both Europe and A- 
merica present views of Paris and 
Prague, as well as cities in Italy 
and Russia. 

"Pool Room" Favorite 

Perhaps the most popular pamt- 
ing on display is the work of an 
American Negro, Jacob Lawrence. 
His "Pool Room " is drawn in such 
great detail that it even shows 
the smoke of a lighted cigarette 
curling up from the edge of a pool 
table. 

The scenes vary from a large. 
See Page 4, Col. 3 



Williams Cops Fourth Place 




Captain Ned Collins '52, outstanding Williams skier at the Winter 
Carnival, placing ninth in the ski jump at Goodell Hollow. 



Sophomore Dies of Bullet Wound; 
College Plans Memorial Service 

Tuesduij, Feb. 19 - Police officials confirmed today that Wil- 
liams sophomore Millard Romaine, Jr., whose body was found 
yesterday morning in a third-floor room of the Beta Theta Pi 
house on Stetson Court, died of a bullet wound in the head. 

A short memorial service tor the dead student with prayers 
ami readings was scheduled for noon Wednesday in the Thoin])- 
son Memorial Chapel. 

D.A. Investigation ^ 



Ireland Captures 
Skimeister Award 



Participants, Spectators 
Hail Meet as Success 



Ponding results of an investi- 
K„tion by the office of the Berk- 
shire County District Attorney, 
officials working on the case de- 
clined further comment on cir- 
cumstances surrounding the death. 

Romaine's body was found 
shortly before 11:30 a.m. yester- 
day by a fraternity brother in 
an unused room on the third floor. 
House members immediately no- 
tified local police who. in turn, 
called in state detectives and the 
District Attorney's office. 
Rifle Found 

Investigators found the body ly- 
ing face upward on a couch in the 
loom. Some four feet away, be- 
neath a double-decker bed. lay a 
bolt action .22 caliber rifle, its 
muzzle under the edge of a rug. 
One shot — a "short" shell — 
liad been fired from it. 

Officials completed their on-the 
scene investigation by 8:30 last 
night, but continued to work un- 
til early this morning at a Spring 
Street funeral home. 



John Hewett Qualifies for Coveted 
American Alpine Club Membership 



Wednesday, Feb. 20— John He- 
wett '53. recently elected to the 
American Alpine Club, became 
the youngest alpinist in the his- 
tory of the organization to receive 
such an honor. Despite his youth, 
Hewett has a long and impressive 
list of ascents to merit his mem- 
bership. 

The Club itself is a select or- 
ganization of 406 mountain climb- 
ers, the vast majority of whom 
are residents of the United States. 
It maintains headquarters in New 
York City and supplies its mem- 
bers with much climbing Infor- 
mation, some in its regular pub- 
lications and some on request. 
Recommend and Approval 

In order to qualify for member- 
ship in the American Alpine Club, 
an applicant must have sutficient 



climbing experience, be recom- 
mended by at least two members, 
and approved by the Club as a 
whole. 

Hewett was nommated for mem- 
bership by Adams Carter, his close 
friend and climbing companion. 
He first met Carter when the 
latter became a teacher at Milton 
Academy, Hewett's prep school. It 
was under Carter's influence that 
John became an avid and expert 
climber. 

As a member and later president 
of the Milton Academy Moun- 
taineering Club, John gamed his 
first actual climbing experience. 
He was active in the organization 
when Carter Joined the Milton 
faculty, and the two have led 
climbing groups on trips to the 
west for tlie past two years. 



Among county and state offi- 
cials who first worked on the case 
were Dr. George T. Mullen of 
North Adams. Northern Berkshire 
County medical examiner; Asst. 
Dist. Atty. Samuel E. Levlne of 
North Adams : and State Detective 
Inspector Howard M. Whittemore 
of PitUsfield. 

They were joined last night by 
State Detective Inspector Richard 
Cotter of Springfield and noted 
Harvard Medical School pathol- 
igist. Arthur E. O'Dea. 

Romaine. a member of Beta 
Theta Pi. was the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Millard Romaine of 3726 
Davenant Ave.. Cmcinnati, Ohio. 

April Draft Test 
Applications Due 
Before March 10 



Gen. Hershey Announces 
Student Opportunities 
For Draft Deferment 



Wednesday. Feb. 20— In a let- 
ter released by the Selective Ser- 
vice Examining Section it was 
announced that all eligible stu- 
dents who intend to take the Col- 
lege Qualification Test in 1952 
should file applications at once for 
the April 24 examination. 

Following the mstructions of the 
bulletin, which can be obtained 
at the Student Aid Office, the 
student should fill out his ap- 
plication and mail it no later than 
midnight. March 10. It was point- 
ed out that early filing will be to 
the student's advantage. 

Results to Local Board 

Results will be reported to the 
student's local board for use m 
considering his deferment, accord- 
ing to the Educational Testing 
Service, which prepares and ad- 
ministers the tests. 

Previously. Major Ocn. Hershey, 
Director of Selective Service, an- 
nounced that under existing reg- 



Saturday, Feb. 16 — Attracting 
three of the top ski teams in the 
country, the Williams Winter Car- 
nival scorned the snowless wastes 
of Williamstown and took to the 
slopes of Mount Greylock and 
Goodell Hollow. The best in ski 
thrills awaited the comparatively 
few spectators who braved the 
cold and the climb to watch the 
events. The team title finally 
went to Middlebury after a nip 
and tuck battle with Dartmouth. 

The winner's captain, Dick Ire- 
land, won Saturday's jumpmg to 
give his team the margm of vic- 
tory over the Indians — 587.63 
to 584.33. Ireland, who also plac- 
ed sixth in the downhill and 
seventh in the slalom, received the 
coveted Williams Skimeister Tro- 
phy for the best individual show- 
mg over the two day competition. 
Collins Stars 
Williams repeated and possibly 
exceeded its flflne showing at the 
Dartmouth Carnival last week, 
lops ol the class B teams, the 
Ephmen scored heavily in the 
downhill, placing third, ahead of 
such powerful competitors as New 
Hampshire and Bowdoin. 

Ned Collins '52 was the indivi- 
dual star tor the host team. He 
placed seventh in the downhill, 
fourteenth m the slalom, and 
ninth m the jumping. Stu Chase 
and Pete Callahan in the slalom 
and Doug Wilson. Bob Tucker, and 
Joe Foote in the cross country 
were also outstanding for the 
Ephs. 

Burden Combined Winner 

Doug Burden of Middlebury, 
winner of both the downhill and 
the slalom the previous week, was 
forced to be content with seconds 
this time, bowing to Kirby of 
Dartmouth in the former and to 
team-mate Gale Shaw in the lat- 
ter. Burden and Shaw were one- 
two in the Alpine combined. 

After falling behind Middlebury 
in Friday's events. Dartmouth 
staged a strong comeback in the 
Nordic events on Saturday. Trem- 
blay. Agan. and Drury of the In- 
dians took tlie first three places 
m the Nordic combined, but the 
Blue and White stayed close e- 
nough for Ireland's winning Jump 
to provide the margin of victory. 

Victorious mentor Bobo Shee- 
hen praised Williams coach, Ralph 
Townsend, for his preparation of 
See Page 4. Col. 2 



Faculty Club Dance 
Attracts Large Crowd 

Saturday Feb. IB — Wliile the 
rest of the campus was in the 
middle of the Winter Cai-nlval 
festivities, the faculty enter- 
tained themselves at the Facul- 
ty Club dance which ran from 
nine last night until one o'clock 
this morninK. Total attendance 
was estimated at 60 persons by 
Richard O. Rouse, entertain- 
ment committee chairman in 
charge of the dance. 

For the sake of contrast to 
the sub-zero weather that had 
prevailed for the last few days. 
the profs planned their deco- 
rations around a spring motif. 
A large and potent punchbowl 
provided a continual fountain 
of enjoyment, as the professors 
and their wives danced to the 
music of Al Trudel and his 
band. 



THE WILLIAMS HECOIU), WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1952 



North Adams, Mus%nchusetK Wilhomstown, Massachusetts 

"Entered as second-clcss matter txlctvmbtjr 2^, 1944, ot the post office at 
North Adams, Massachusetts, under the Act of March 3, 1879." Printed by 
l.omb and Hunter, Inc., North Adam.., Mausochusetts, Published 

Wednesday and Saturuuy during the college yeor Subscription price $5.00 
oer year. Record Ottu-e, Jesup Holi, W.tliamjtown, 
RECORD Office • Pnone 72 

EDITORIAL BOARD 



John H. Allon '53 
Charles E. Lunge '53 
Richard C. Porter '53 
Woodbndge A. D'Oench '53 
Thomas A. Belshe '53 
Kay Kolligian, Jr. "53 
Frederick A. I erry, Jr. '53 
Assistant Editors; Richard 

James J. Cashmore '53 
Staff Photographers: 
Staff Cartoonist; 
Associate Editors; 

K. Donovan 



Editor - Phone 981 -JK 



Editor 



Managing Editors 
News Editor 



Sports Editors 

Feature Editor 
T. AntLun '53, Thomas H. S. Brucker '53, 



R, Wyman Sanders '54, Charles Eichei '54 

Thomas Hughes '53 

1954 ^ Q. Abbot, W. R. Aiken, J. Brownell, E. Cowell, 

G. Davis, C. Elliot, C. Fisher, C. Foster, P. Goldman, 



R. Goldstein, A Home, J. Klein, J. Marr, C. O'Kieffe, W. Warden 
W. Weoduck 
Editorial Staff; 1954 - W. Redman, 1955 - R. Carey, C. Headley, 
t. Heppenstall, P. Hunn, J. Kearney, D. Krehbiel, P. Max, W. McLaugh- 
lin, R. Moore, L. Nichols, 1. Oviott, N. Reeves, J. Rudd, J. Souse, 
H, Sheldon, R. Smith, E. von den Steinen, R, Willcox. 

BUSINESS BOARD 

Business Manager 

Assistant Business Manager 

Assistant Business Manager 

Advertising Monoger 

Assistont Advertising Manager 

Circulation Manager 

Treasurer 

Gushee, 1955 - H. Lindsay, H. Moser, G. Olm- 
sted, J. Innes, R. Cnadwick, N. Faulkner, H. Smith 



John Notz, Jr. '53 
Dudley M. Baker '53 
Robert O, Coulter '53 
John F. Johnston, II 54 
Harold G. Pratt, Jr. '54 
Curtis V. Titus '54 
Richard C. Schoub '54 
Business Staff; 1954 - J 



Volume XLVl 



Number 3 



February 20, 1^52 



EDITORIAL 

Hell Week Fol de Rol 



will bi'niii toilav iiinl to- 
l\' 1)1 dishiiit; out a lot ol 



The fifteen William.s I'lateinitie 
morrow to indiilne in their yearly 1 

hazing to tlie uuinitiatetl Ireshiin'ti in what is kMowi'ras llejl Week 
Sn|)|5(i.seillv cle.sij,'ned to strem^tlien lioiise nnilv, Hell Week ac- 
compli.slie.s one ol' tlie ^reate.st amounts oi wasted effort that the 
campus e.\perienees duriiiir the year. Tlie worst feature of the 
hazins,' period is that it deducts a week from the |)ledi;es' normal 
stnd\' time. This \'ear, the eollei;e alumni associatioTi re(|uested 
postpoiicmeut ol the initiation ceremonies from the first weekend 
of tin' second term until l''cbriiarv 2'5. The i;tantinir of this re(|iiest 
oiih' made the matter worse. Now. instead of the fiesluucn nn'rely 
startiut; the term on the wroni; foot with the first week's assii;n- 
meuts neglected, the |iledires must Ix' interrnpled in the mitUlle of 
the stretch riirlit before hour e.\ams. The C^erman, (^hemistrv. and 
Physics Deiiartments usually scbediile two liom- tests and a half 
hour test sometime durinjr each ternt. Tliis year's Hell Week cuts 
into the middle of the first of diese e.vajniiiations. Rightly eiioui;h, 
tlie collei^e shortened the customary Hell Week to two da\'s so 
that tlie traditional liazinu; period is not only a token of its former 
self. Still, this token, eomini; as it does in the middle of some 
freshman e.\auis. is an e.\;uiiple of bad planning. In the future we 
liope that Hell Week will be seliednled at its proper time, that is. 
at the \'ery beyiuniiin of the second term. We also feel that the 
shortened period of hazint; sliotild be continued, since house 
unity must be built up diirini; the entire year and caiuiot be pro- 
duced in a week of scariim the freshmen. 

if house unity is the desired result, the fraternities should 
follow the example of Beta Tlieta Pi and institute a "Help We<'k' . 
The Betes this year are vohmti'erini; to aid Williamstown ami 
North .\dams welfare oriranizations. The uiemliers do this work on 
a voluntarv basis, and the entire tratcrnity is |)articipatiuf; in the 
venture. House unity and spirit should increase more with upper- 
classmen workiiii; with tlie pletln;es rather llian against them. Tliis 
example of the lieta house should Ih'couk' the nniyersal I'jractiee 
oil the Williams campus. If all the eneru;\ of Hell Week must be 
dirowii tiround, then put it to a useful task and j;et .something 
constrMcti\ (' rather than destructive accomplished. 

A little lia/inj; mav be ;i trood thiui;; lor some of the "wise" 
members of the pledge classes, but the wholesale i)svcholo,!i;ical 
unrest that is forced on almost all the uninitiated is uncalled for. 
Quoting from a letter to tlie lUiCORD, written by Junior C>lass 
President Robert Shorb dininir his freshman year, we a^ree that 
"the process ol surroundinir a pledi^e with a uuniber of stone- 
faced, ob-so-serious upperelassmen. who then turn on a diatribe of 
questions and criticism, probinjr for a weak point in the pledt;e's 
character is bad enouyli, but the extent to which it is carried is iar 
worse." This foolishness is the fol de rol tliat makes Hell Week 
so iufintile. Hazing may be all rii^lit as lonj^ as it is fairly comical, 
even to the freshmen who are forced to go throui;h with it, but 
these prying (|uestioiis are certainly niinecessary. Nobody can reg- 
ulate this malpractice except be officers of the individual houses. 
We feel that any disconcerting thrusts into the jiersonal matters 
of a pledge are entirely out of jilace in fraternity initiation.s. The 
initiators .should limit tlieir actions toward the freshmen to siieli 
humorous trivia as re(|uiring a pledge to collect a coin .s(|uashed by 
the Minuteman, but should not harass the freshmen about their 
personal lives. Resides, this sort of <|uestionning usually reveals the 
upperclas.smen who haye been frustrated in their attempts lor 
leadership and who are trying to raise their self-esteem through the 
use of this novel power. This is hardly a mature attitude for upper- 
classmen to take. This weekend, we hope that fraternity initiators 
will exeicise more sensiti\'e judgment in their efforts to emphasize 
the lowly state of the pledges. 



Letters to the Editor 



Alumni (Contributions 

Feb. 1-1, 1952 
To llif Editor ()/ thr Williaim HECOlil): 

It is with great regret that 1 am writing to advise you that, 
for the ijresent, at least, 1 do not feel that I can make any more 
eoutribntions to Williams. Aftei reading wiMi some eire the con- 
tents of the Report of the Committee On (.'ainpns Problems, 1 can- 
not help but beliex'c that money 1 may haye available for educa- 
tional institutions would be better used elsewhere 

1 ha\'e a profound alfectiou for Williams and a sense ot grati- 
tude for the education 1 recei\'ed there, but even those cannot 
oyercome m\' distaste for the principles embodied in tlitj Report. 

If there is one jirime issue in the world totlay (and lor the 
past two decades) it is that of totalitarianism \s. democracy, and 
except hir the physical threat posed by the totalitarian powers 
themselyes, 1 feel that the greatest danger to our way ol hie is 
from nndeiuoeratic practices in our own country. These nraeliees 
are being encouraged and fostered at Williams as a result ol this 
Report. 

1 realize that tlie situation is no different than it has been tor 
the past generation, at least, but the world has moyed on and the 
crisis has become greater-aiid vet Williams remains unmoved. 
When this position' is contrasted with the Irailblazing in human 
freedom at some colleges, and eyen with the more moderate, but 
refreshing, changes m'atle at Amherst and Princeton, 1 can only 
reach the conclusion that surely money can be put to better use 
than at Williams. 

I hiund particularly distasteful that section of the report read- 
ing: 'If the character of die fraternities were to be chaiigetl as 
liroposed, it is doidittui if such Alumni support would be forth- 
coming in a future jierioil of fin;incial stress . . ." That statement 1 
would be ashamed to show to anyone who might feel as 1 ilo, that 
the .American Dream is something more than a selling teclini(|iie to 
entice the innocent. 

It is with a real ))ang that 1 write this letter, but in view of 
the ileeision r<'aelied, I cannol do odierwise. 1 can only express 
the hope that those who fought against the reiiort will, at a later 
date, emerge as the domintmt group so that I can reinstate luv 
contiibntions to Williams. 

Very truly yours. 
Fred 11. Roth '21 



Keep Chapel Open 



EXPERT SHOE REPAIRING 

Wa give th« 
highest quality workmoni hip 

On your woy to 
the post office stop in at 

SALVATORE SONS' 

Spring Street Est. 1901 



Feb. 9, 19.52 



To llir Editor of the Willidiiis liECOHP: 

\s undergraduates we woiiltl like to add our protests to those 
of Newton P. Darlington, jr. IS. against the practice of locking the 
Chapel uhen it is not being used for services. We believe the 
Chapel should remain the oin' building on the eainpns where the 
undergraduate can go day or night for (|uiet devotion and medita- 
tion. 

If the college is truly concerned with the religious life of the 
student, it should iinmediateh' discontinue the ])ractiee of locking 
the Chapel and should jirovide lighting in the evening as well. 

Oilier than thi' need lor a |)lace lor student devotion and med- 
itation the College should eonsiiler the efleet which the presence of 
a locked Chapel must litive upon the visitors to the (x)llege and 
pidspeci i\ (' students and their parents. We .should open the Chapel 
up now. 

Franklin D. Rudolph, Jr. ',52 
Chester R. Jones, .54 
R. W. Reunett, '55 
Charles .Schmidt. '5'5 
Timothv Mann, '52 
|. L. W'ilbourn, ,55 
Charles S. Telly, ',54 
David W. Hudson, '5.3 
Ronald S. Seller, '55 
Samuel Humes, "52 
Jay H. Gates, '55 



I 



THE NEAREST FLICK 



hil Bruce Palmer 
Wcdncsdaij (iml Tlwrsdai/ A dreadful series of events leads to the 
great Whiskey Panic of fortv-five on the island of Toddy in Scot- 
land in the English flick "Tight Little Island". Rravely the islanders 
rally and with the aid of a wrecked ship they restore the proper 
alcoholic ratio to their homeland. The ratio .seems to run .some- 
where around a (|uart a day per person. The dark forces of the 
revenue department seek to combat this on purely moral grounds. 
Needless to .say they meet firm, wily resistance. Love rears its 
head, just why it should is hard to say, hut it adds rather than 
detracts from the story. Joan Greenwood, who was in "Kind 
Hearts and Coronets", is the female involved. She plays hard-to- 
get' in a decidedly female dog-like manner, but relents in the end. 
Tliere is plenty of humor invoKcd in the flick, provided by a group 
of pretty colorful characters, all fanatically devoted to Scotch. Tlie 
film was around last year and if you missed it then, take it in. 
Tltev teil me this is a prere(|uisite for all Kappa Betes. If you get 
nabbed by an ABC man. don't give your right name; tell them yon 
go to Vassar and just dropiied by for the show. 



Undergraduate Democracy 

February 12, 1952 
lo llir Editor of the Willintm HECORD: 

My attention has been called to the action of a combined Phi 
Hela Kapi)a-C;argoyle Committee which "registered their senti- 
ment l)y endorsing complete fraternity membership". 

II in making Hiis decision they were influenced by a desire to 
sp;U(' any undergraduate the heartache which non-inembcrship in 
a Iraferiiitv is assumed to cause, how can they logically oppose 
siiiiilarly complete membership in Phi Beta Kap|)a and Gargoyle':' 
The maddest of FDR New Dealers have never attempted to 
abolish the possibility of heartache in the case of die citizenry at 
large, but apparently what those paternalistic vote-grabbers balked 
at does not faze the regimenters of Billville. 

.\t a meeting of the Williams Alumni Club of Washington a 
vear or so ago the principle speaker, a member of die faculty, told 
lis a sob story in the course of which he pictured "a young man 
whose whole life was embittered" because he failed to get a bid 
from a fraternity. My reaction to that maudlin noii.scnse was to 
wonder what luid happened to erstwhile recinirements of member- 
ship in the Williams faculty. 

Here in the nation's Capital the President has luncheon and 
dinner guests every day. Should the fact that 1 have never re- 
ceived such an invitation break my heart and embitter me't' Can 
yon imagine the Congress being .so asinine as seriously to try to 
enact legislation making citizenship automatically entitled to plant 
their legs under the Truman table? 

In my day the Junior Class perched atop the fence in front of 
the labs, while the Senior Class members of Gargoyle walked be- 
hind them, tapping those men whom they wanted in the honorary 
society. Can would-be abolitioinsis of heartache conceive of any- 
thing more cruel than that? Done in die blazing sunshine before a 
(^ommencemeut crowd! 

In view of their endorseiiieiit of complete fraternity meinber- 
sliip, how can CJargoyle this June fail to tap every member of the 
Junior Class? 

Hayden Talbot, '03 



Coinplimrnf.s nf 



THE 
HALLER 

INN 




4%^ SKI JUMP 



^ CONTEST 

Sunday FEB. 24 1 P M. 

Swediih, Notweqian 

CancuJian and U. S, Sln-s 



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Rental of Punch Bowls, ladles & cups foi 
ycrr Weekend parties. 



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Williamstown 



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Phone Williamstown 550 or Hancock Center 4-4663 

LIFT OPERATES DAILY 

HANCOCK ♦ ♦ MASSACHUSETTS 



WE NEED 
3 WILLIAMS 
SENIORS 



We war»l three top fliuhl Williams RraJuates — men with 
the potential to handle, after a reasonahle perioii of 
IraininK, positions of responsibility in our Bankinu, 
Trust, Bond and Administrative Departments. As one 
of the nation's largest, most proKressive bank and trust 
companies, we need college men for such varied activi* 
ties as market research, sales, management and invest* 
meni of trust funds, purchase and sale of government 
and municipal bonds, advertising, public relations, per. 
sunnel management and investment and credit research. 
If you have poise, a pleas.int personality and believe 
you will enjoy contacts with leading business men. The 
Northern Trust Company offers you exceptional oppor- 
tunities. You will work with friendly people in modern, 
pleasant surroundings in the heart of Chicago, the 
second largest city in the nation and the center of highly 
diversified industry, commerce, transportation and 
finance. Draft eligibility does not eliminate you from 
consideration. Investigate these opportunities. 

Contact William O. Wycoff to obtain a copy of our 
descriptive booklet "Big City Banking" and lo arrange 
an appointment with E. L. Hall, Vice President, who 
will be on campus February 19. 

THE 
NORTHERN TRUST 
Mi'X COMPANY 



loy 



\fiieii\ 



50 South LaSalle Street 
ChicaRo 90, Illlnola 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD, WEDNESDAY, EEUHUARY 20, 1952 



^urple Cagers Drop Two Games 
On Road Over Carnival Week-end 



Nationally Rated 
Siena Tops Ephs 

Billy Harrel Sparks 
Opponents' Offense 

Alljiuiy, Feb. 14 — Billy Hariul 
i.il the Sleiui Indluns pioved lo 

[,!■ Kio much for u mime Willuuns 
iski'lbiiU iL'iim lonmlit as tlu'y 
oiiiiceci Uiu visitors G9-45 be- 
,1 11 ciowd of 4,000 ill the Al- 
uiy Armory. It was a case of too 
iiii'li lieinht as Coach Al Shaw's 
rii were definitely outcla.ssed by 
K' nationally ranked .squad. 
-Siena jumped oft to a quick 10- 
lead as Glenn Bis.sel and Bill 

iv.ipavy each liit on two .set shots 

and Bill Hotian converted on a 
ip lii. The Indians eoiniiletely 
DUtiolled the back boai'ds; and 
Ills, plus the fact that tliey hit an 

iiiiazini! peicentiii^e of tlieir .set 
lols 1,'ave the home team an 18-10 
lid at the end of the period. 
Sec Page 4, Col. 4 



Freshman Sparks 
Middlebury Team 

Last Quarter Rally 
By Williams Fails 

Saturday, Keb. lU— A 6'4" Mid- 
dlebury ireshman .spelled the dif- 
ference toniKht, as the William.s 
baskelbiiil team went down to a 
n.,rrjw 55-50 defeat on the Mid- 
diebuiy Court. Sonny Deimis was 
tae licshinan. and his 28 points 
were too much for the Ephs to 
match. 

As usual. Hei-b Hmlih was tlie 
i.Mdink point-RCtter foi' the Pur- 
pie, out ins 17 points were not 
enouKli to keep Al Shaw's ag- 
l,re(4,aiun Iroiu UroppniB below the 
•jOU mark tor the lirsl lime this 
season. Walt Ci'eer witli 1'2 points 
also .stood out tor the Ephs. 

Tlie Purple started quickly in 
the fiist quartei-, and only the 
plienomenal sliootinsi of Dennis 
See PaBe 4, Col. 5 



Siena J.V. Downs frosfc, 42- 40, 
Snapping Winning Streak at Nine 



Wednesday, Feb. 13--Puttin(i an 
ludefeated leeord on tlic line to- 
uKht anainst llie Siena J. V. 
.squad, the William.s freshman 
luopsters saw their nine-name 
wumint? .skein snapped by the 

arpshootinn aiigicnation from 
upstate New York in a 42-40 
hcarlbi'eaker. 

I'he Eph fieshmeii, feelinn the 
loss of six-foot-six pivot ace Tony 
Moro. shelved for the season by 
1111 ankle injury, ovci'came a six- 
l)i)int deficit to lead at half-time 
l)y a 25-22 marBin. With bit; Ron 
Wilson in lire scorini; van. this 



lead was expanded to 30-27 at the 
end of a slow lliiid period. 

hi the hnal quarter, however, 
llie Indians staiied a Harrison fi- 
nish and the tiame developed in- 
to a see-saw battle until Eph 
Kuaid Charley Shaw knotted the 
I count at 40-40 with a jumping 
I one-liander late in the pei'iod. 
llie Redmen swuiik into a three 
minute weaving fi-eeze around a 
1 pressing Williams defen.se, and, 
1 with Iwo .seconds reniainiiif. cen- 
ter Ed McGraw tallied the win- 
' ninn basket on a .set shot from 
' outside. 



Frosh Wrestlers Win, 
Top Darrow, 25 - 18 

fcalurday, Feb. 16, — The 
l''re.ihman wrestling team pul- 
led up from behind today to 
liand a defeat to the Darrow 
bcliuoi 28-18 in an unscheduled 1 
uiec'i.. Uairow made a strong ■ 
s.iuwing in the lightweight 
cia.sses by winning the first foui- 
iii...cnes to lead tlie fiosh 18-0. 

llie freshmen made a quick 
ieuuvery, liowever, forged a- 
iicad oy Winning all the re- 
maining inatches. Turning in 
victories lor the fi'osh were 
Itoberi Little, John Gardner, 
Morton Weinberg, Rod Willcox, 
John Barker and Allan Reed. 



Eph Swimmers Split Two Meets 



Clarkson Crushes 
Eph Sextet, U-3 

First Line Sparkles 
In Offensive Drives 



Tuesday, Feb. 12— Notching five 
Hoals in the first period, Clark.son's 
liusllini-' hockey team overwhelm- 
ed Williams 11-3 tonight at the 
RPI Aiena. Foi' the iceless Ephs, 
it was the seventh loss in eight 
starts. 

Altliough the score does not in- 
dicate it. this was one of the bet- 
ler showings which Coach Beir.s 
Charlies have turned in this sea- 
.^011. Sparkling offensive drives 
by tlie improving first line con- 
slantly kept goalie Ray Naud in 
trouble. 

Pike, Beard Score 

As llie Golden Knight's net 
tender was peering intently af- 
tei- a rebound shot. John Pike 
.?liol the puck neatly into the 
nets at 13:33. Late in the first 
frame, with Clarkson one man 
short as a result of a slashing pen- 
ally, the Bellmen set up a power 
play and scored again on John 
Be..id's hai'd lift shot. 

Leading 5-2. the visiting sextet 
went to work in the second frame 
See Page 4, Col. 4 



Relay Win Gives 
Bowdoin Victory 

Polar Bears Set Mark 
In Taking Final Event 

By Jud Klein 

Brun.swick, Me., Feb. 13 — Bow- 
doin 's freestyle relay quartet swam 
the 400-yard final event in lecord- 
bii'aking time this afternoon to 
provide the deciding seven points 
of a 42-33 upset victoi'y over Wil- 
liams. 

The Polar Bear four.some of Gil 
Wishart, Tom Lyndon, Charlie 
liildreth, and Bob McGrath clip- 
ped 1.2 seconds oH the old New 
England inark held by Williams to 
win with a meteoric 3:33.9. 
.Martin Cups Two 

Juggling his material paid olf 
lor Bowdoin mentoi- Bob Miller. 
As usual, the Ephs' Dick Martin 
bl. zed to victories in the 50 and 
100-yard freestyle events, but 
sprinter McGrath. shrewdly saved 
for the 220 freestyle and the 200- 
yard backstroke, became a double- 
winner for the Polar Bears. 

Williams' medley I'elay team of 
Dave Byeiiy. Rick Jellrey, and 




l>i: k Mariin. ace l-ipli free- 
slyur, who set a New England 
ftiord 'i'iiui-sday in the :;:!0 yard 
i veiil. 



Chaffeemen Top 
Dartmouthlndians 



Frosh Hockey Loses 
Opener to Deerfield 

Wednesday. Feb. 13— The 
freshman hockey team dropped 
iheii' season opener last Wed- 
nesday lo Deerfield. 8-2, on the 
winner's rink. A fire in the bus 
en route and an obvious lack 
of expei'iencc in playing to- 
gether failed lo stop the Eph- 
men from making a good show- 
ing, despite the one-sided .score. 
The fiisl line of Fiske. Cluett, 
and Leinbach; defenseman Bill 
Irwin; and goalie Pete Max. 
guarding the nets for the fir.st 
lime, all showed promise foi' 
future competition. 




Th« Program includei asiignmenis in machine operation ond production funclioni. 



Introducing 



THE NEWEST MEMBER OF THE G-E TRAINING FAMILY 

A Program for Developing Manufacturing Leaders 



At General I'.lcctric, with its :()0.()0() pr(Hiucts, 
millions of dollars inusr be spent annually for ma- 
terials alone . . . ami more than lOO.OOO people in 119 
plants eoniprise its mnnufacturinfr orjrani/.ation. 

WHAT MANUFACTURING IS 

Muniif.ictunnjz comprises all the activities essential to 
translarinf! engineering designs into finished prixhicts. 

This means that there are satisfying, reu iinling caieers 
in manufaeturing supervision and as technical specialists 
in such important areas as purchasing, manufacturing 
engineering, prcxliietion, and wage rate work, and in the 
.specialized functions within each one. These include tech- 
nical specialties: value analysis, materials handling, opera- 
tion planning and nieth<xls analysis, inventory control, and 
motion time study. 

Men holding such jobs arc finding them challenging 
because of the skills, imagination, and nnderstaniling they 
require . . . are finding them rewarding in prolessional 
prestige and personal achievement. 

AIMED AT THE NEED 

lo train men lor such positions is the objective of the 



.Manufaeturing Iraining Progniin, newest mcinbcr of the 
well-Unoun group of comprehensive Compan\'-\vide train- 
ing programs Test, Chemistry and Metallurgy, Physics, 
Business Training, and Advertising. 

At the conclusion of the Program, members fit into 
some phase of (ieneral I'.lectric manufaeturing, with their 
on-the-job progress being carefully followed to assure the 
most effective utilization of tlieir skills. Recently, our 
Ci-I''. manufacturing groups surveyed ilieir future leader- 
ship requirements. Within the next five years, their needs 
for new leaders in direct supervision alone will exceed 
1300 men! 

OPPORTUNITY . . . AND YOU 

If a career in manufaeturing at ( ienerni Flectric interests 
you "-and if you have a technical ediiearion or a general 
education with marked technical emphasis talk with the 
General I'.lcctric representative when he visits your 
campus. Meanwhile, send lor our booklet that describes 
G-li manufacturing and the program in detail. Please 
address your request to Dept. 283-2.!, General lilectric 
Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 




GENERALBELECTRIC 



Team Drops Match 
To Potent Harvard 



Satui-day. Feb. 16~Bolstered by 
the return of Dick Squires to the 
Purple lineup, the varsity .squash 
team managed lo gain an even 
split in two matches last week 
against Dartmouth and Harvai'd. 
Fresh from a seven lo two victoi-y 
over the Indians on Wednesday. 
111.' Ephmen bowed to a powerful 
Harvard squad by the same .score 
on Saturday, 

Kuy George Wins Twice 

Playing in the number one spot 
at Hanover. Squires defeated Pos- 
ter. 3-0, while Symington and 
George also gained victories of 3-1 
and 3-2 I'espectively. Brownell. 
number five for the Ephmen. shut 
See Page 4. Col. 4 




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Conducted Tours 



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cHiclal bonded agents for all lines, has 
rendered efficient travel service on a 
business basis since 1926. 

See your local travel agenf for 
folders and details or write us. 



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Natators Trounce 
(/. Conn,, 52-23 

Martin Smashes Record 
In 220 Yd. Freestyle 

By Jud Klein 

Wednesday. Feb. 13^Sparked 
by Dick Martin's i'ecord-breaking 
peiformaiiee in the 220-yard free- 
style, coacli Bob Muir's Eph tank- 
ers administered a 52-23 thumping 
to the University of Connecticut 
this afternoon in Lasell Pool. 

Martin's 2:12.3 clocking shatter- 
ed llie existing Lasell Pool, 'Wil- 
liains, and New England intei'col- 
legiale records for the 220. The 
previous New England mark of 
2:12.5 was .set by Bowdoin's Doug 
-.11 two years ago. 

Four 1-2 Finlsties 
Except for Jefl Beckingham's 
new Connecticut backstroke rec- 
ord of 2:'J4.3. the U Conn forays 
into the point column were few 
and far between. Williams .scored 
1-2 finishes in four events, with 
Marlm and Joe Worthington fir.st 
.uiniiig llie trick in the 220. 

Max Rogers and Al Post com- 
iiined for eight points in the div- 
ing. Martin and Belash bettered 
Conneclicut's entries in the 100- 
yard sprint, and Charlie Douglas 
and Bob Brayton monopolized the 
breastslroke for the Ephs. 

Worthington Wins 440 
Connecticut's Jim Zuccardy fin- 
ished first in the 50. but Belash 
and Hank Molwitz claimed the 
place and show spots for the Eph- 
.nen. Likewise. Dave Byeiiy and 
Al Melzger neutralized Becking- 
iiam's win in the backstroke by 
taking second and third. 

Worthington copped a first in 
the anti-climatic 440 freestyle, 
aid Don Jones. Bela.sh, Sam Kim- 
beiiy. and Martin outdistanced a 
Connecticut fouisome in the final 
400-yard relay to enlarge the gap 
even more. 

iL. G. Balfour Cc 

I 

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I Jewelry Gifts Favors 

Club Pins Keys 

Medols Trophiei 

Write or Coll 
CARL SORENSEN 

30 Murrov Ave Wateftotd N V 

TelephoneTroy — Adorns 8?5rA^ 



Join Our Growing 

List of Satisfied 
Williams Customers 

KRONICK'S 
ESSO SERVICE 

Opp. Howard lolinson'.s 
State Rd. 




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Pouch Tobacco Co., Wheeling, Wert V«. Dept. 39 






THE WILLIAMS RECORD, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUAHY 20. 1952 



"Pygmalion" . . , 

b„oiii.' mjoclect a highly hiclh'i- 
diiul charm unci humor into the 
P-.rt, ar.d remude the professor 
into quite iih eiitertainhig and 
lilieahle Kiiy. His bits of business, 
elfin smile, and vocal flexibility 
were valuable contributions lo the 
prodticlion. His exceptional tim- 
ing brouBht down the house in 
the final act when he mounted a 
hassock and thundered "Victory, 
victory . . ." 

This was, by no means, a unique 
or lucky momeiit. A smile, a flick 
of his hand, or a dramatic pause 
brought to life many lines which 
miKht have remained obscured by 
a less sensitive ivading of the part. 
His movements, fin'lhcrmore, were 
at such dizzyinK speed that every^ 
thing had a tendency to seem 
much funnier than it really was. 
Stone's poli.shed performance re- 
tlected, not only a keen under- 
standint! of the part, but also a 
r^.ther thorout^li awareness of the 
underlying Shavian philosophy 
a. id frame of mind. 

Lathrop Shines in Debut 

The character uf Eliza Doolittle 
was not only faithfully imagined, 
but freely and finely projected by 
Mary Liithrop. student at the Bux- 
ton School, who made her initial 
appearance on the AMT stase last 
week. Her Eliza was a woman of 
feelinn. temperament and idio- 
syncrasy. rauKing in mood and 
manner as a creatiue ranges in 
life. The tran.sform;ition she ef- 
fects between the cockney flower- 
Rirl and phonetic doll is fully and 
be.jUlifully resourceful. 

M ss Lathrop's best scene came 
in tl"-3 second act as Mrs. Higgins' 
tea where Eliza makes such a 
brave showing with all the h's 
going well. Her "bloody" is the 
climax of slips which Shaw has 
rigged to give them both a diver- 
ting and a pathetic interest. This 
part requires a great deal of ver- 
.satility — vocal and emotional. 
Miss Lathrop appeared to have 
plenty of both. 

Good, Schapiro Excel 

The part of Col. Pickering was 
injected into Pygmalion for 
purposes of contrast and tech- 
nical ai'tifice. As such, it presents 



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ceraiin difficulties not easily over- 
come, 'there i.re long moments 
wiiere lie is on stage with little to 
say or do, and other moments 
wnere he serves as merely a foil lo 
uie impetuous Higgins. Allen Good 
was generally successful in his 
iiaiiuung of the role. He hud an 
unusual amount of stage ease 
aim added considerable utility to 
a Highly contrived part. 

oetii ochapii'o captivated every 
lUL'.r.oer oi the audience by his 
jroad and ricii portrayal of the 
uusanan, Allied Doolittle. Though 
so.netinics wavering in accent, 
,.;cnapiro compensated for this de- 
iiciency by his every move and 
gesture. Acting as a Shavian 
mouthpiece, Schapiro infused 
lengthy speeches with a humor 
and color that was elevating and 
delightful. 

."Mettlesome I'erforinuiice 

In the part of Mrs. Hiygiiis, 
Eve Childs gave a mettlesome per- 
formance of grace, sympathy, and 
lightness which was ideal for both 
the character and tlie audience. 
Her natural ease and stage pre- 
sence made hers perhaps the most 
finished and professional perfor- 
m.aice of the evening. 

A good ca.st. excellent direction. 
George Bernard Shaw. :ind the 
houseparty spirit combined to give 
us all a merry giggle and a smart 
.sendoff on the 1952 theatrical sea- 
son. 



Deferment 



Squash 



You'll like our 
Frienrf// IVay of 
Do/ng Svs/ness 



HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATED 



Ski Meet . . . 

the meet. Due to the lack of snow, 
Townsend spent many sleepless 
n. gilts and busy hours rinding 
good runs with sufficient .^now to 
luerit the exceptional comiietition. 
The presence of Middlebtn'y. 
Dartmouth, and New Hampshire 
- tops in class A skiing - together 
with the fine work of Townsend 
and Jolin Hewitt "a'l served to 
give the 19o'2 Winter Carnival 
some ot the best ski competition 
seen at Williams. 



FWconia 



Caftftonlt. 



I Mittersill 



Aerial Tramway •Alpine lift 



Deluxe Chalet on ski area 

Skf ichool — open ilopej — froil*. Writ* 
Winter Sport* Director for Informotion. 
fHANCONIA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



aUuio..s Students now receive de- 
.ennenis ratiier than postpone- 
.iiu.us of their Induction. Student 
defei.iienls must be reviewed at 
.he cmi of each academic year, 
dtudeuus not receiving further 
ueliraients may enlist in the ser- 
,.!..' 01 their choice. 

Student t'lassH'icutioiis 

Hcrsliey explained that a stu- 
dent who is ordered to report for 
induction should immediately re- 
(li.esi, his college to give his local 
board official notice that he is a 
full-time student doing satisfac- 
tory work. Students who have met 
one or both of the requiremiuits 
for a II-S d.'ferment have a right 
of appeal if tlieir local board does 
not defer them. 

The II-S deferment may be 
granted to tho.sc students who are 
in the prescribed upper portion of 
their class or who made a score of 
70 in the draft test. The I-S de- 
ferment is granted to those stu- 
dents called up for induction who 
are not eligible tor a II-S status. It 
may not be renewed, but the stu- 
tleiit may apply for a II-S status 
when it expires. 



Art Show 



panoiamic view of "Prague" by 
Kolioschka to Macllver's minute 
ly detailed "Hopscotch." This 
painting presents a mere bit of 
chalked pavement "nostalgically 
recaptured." 

John Marin, probably the best- 
known artist represented in tlie 
snow, contributed his "Region of 
Brooklyn Bridge Fantasy." S. L. 
r'ahson. director of the Museum, 
.uinounced that the Mu.seum will 
oe open Sunday from II a.m. to 
1 p.m.. before the alumni lun 
ciieun. He extended an invitation 
to all alumni, as well as the public 
.it large, to visit the new exhibi 
tion. 



Why wait until 
morning? 

When you can tet the out- 
standing news of the day ever; 
evening through the fuU leased 
wire Associated Press service in 

al)r alrauafripl 

North Adams, Moti. 
On sole at 5 p.m. on all 
Williamitown Newsstands 



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0,1. ins opponent, a-0, wliile TIU- 
inghast, friend and l''ulker.son con- 
tributed the other Williams vic- 
tories. 

Coach Chalfee's team met with 
less success against Harvard on 
Saturday, Squires, Symington, and 
Ihoron all met defeat against the 
luglily rated llrsl three for the 
Crini,son. Only Captain Kay 
George, who scored an upset in 
the number four position, and 
Tad Tillinghast managed to .score 
wins for the Purple, 

Hockey . . . 

as they suctched their lead by 4 
more goals. They scored twice 
more in the last period while Ted 
Mitdiell was garnerini; the last 
Eph score. 

ToniglU the .sextet will face a 
tougli Middlebury squad on BPI 
ice. Middlebury. twice victor over 
last year's hockey leam, holds an 
impressive record of wins this 
season as well as a near upset of 
the topflight RPI team. 



Middlebury . . . 

a .-ubstaiitial lead. The freshman 
.seii.sation .scored eiglit of his teams 
1 1 points in this period, and at the 
teii-mmute mark Williams led 

14-11. 

Tins lead failed to stand up. 
however, as the home team drop- 
ped 111 eight straight points to o- 
peii up the second quarter, and 
pull away into a five point lead, 
which they retained for most of 
the remainder of the game. 

The Purple made a tremendous 
bid for victory in the second half, 
as they continually attempted lo 
whittle away at the Middlebury 
margin. Better rebounding, and 
the shooting of Smith, Sue.ssbrick, 
„!id liall .sparked this rally, which 
l.nally culminated in a 48-48 lie 
with less than two miiiules re- 
.nalnmg in the game. Dennis, a- 
;ain came through, however, as 
lie sank three free throws lo ice 
ihe game. 
k"pt Ibeni fioni pulling ;iway to 



Siena . . . 



Captain Wyn Sliudt hit on two 
quick .set shots early in the sec- 
ond period and Dick Hall scored 
al.so narrowing the gap to 22-16. 
The Indians, however, began to 
roll again after this brief Purple 
flurry; the combination of height 
and the playmaking of Harrell 
and Bill Hogan wore down the 
Williams team, and Siena boast- 
ed a 42-22 margin at the half. 

The Indians slowed up the play 
in the third period, and both teams 
substituted liberally late in the 
game, with the Purple 2nd string- 
ers outscoring the Albanyiles 19- 
11 in the final frame. 



Swimming . . . 

John Belush romped over token 
oppiisilioii 111 the initial race, and 
Cluirlie Douglas and George Bal- 
kiiul provided a 1-2 lini.sli for tlie 
Muirmen in the breastslroke. 
Olheiwlse. il was pretty much 
liowddin. 

Dive Mark .Set 

New Kngland diving champ 
Larry Boyle broke a Polar Bear 
record with 121.1,') points while 
linisliini; ahead of the Ephs' Max 
Rogers and Al Post. 

Other Williams point-getters 
were Joe Worlhinglon with a .sec- 
ond in the 440-yard freestyle and 
a third in the 220. John Beard 
with a third in the 440 freestyle, 
antl Byerly with a third-place fin- 
ish in the 200-yard back. 



— — ta 

YxQ^ Swimmers^ 
Win Dual Meet; 
Star in NEAAA]i\ 

Defeat Albany Academy I 

Latham Leads .Squ&d f 

With Twin Victoriei 



Saturday. Feb. 16— Th,. (mM 
man swimming leam imiticmI 
double laurels today, deb niing /u.l 
biiny Academy this afternoon 3i.l 
ao and taking three fir;t at tht| 
New England As.soeiation Amal«u| 
Athletic Union meet In I'ittsIleKl 
loiiighl. 

Williams' co-captain. Ci.iie i^.l 
tliam, was the day's out uuidlujl 
performer as he won Ihi' 2(U.r 
yard fii'estyle and lied lur Hrjl 
Willi his teiumnate Pete llunit 
the 100 yard freestyle agaiiistAl.] 
bany Academy. This eveniUB, h\ 
lliani captured the NEAA,\U isj.] 
yard individual medley clu.inpion.l 
ship. 

Win Over Allianv 

.liilin Newhall o:>ened ilie Al-I 
bany Academy meet with a vit.l 
tory for the frosli in the iiO-yartl 
fn-estyle. The leam of Petr Hum I 
.Idlin Newhall. William iMuiphvl 
and James Smith eombineci to to)! 
Albany in the 200-yard relay. 

Pete Hunt came through tor il 
fiist plaei' in the Massachusetlil 
state lOO-yard freestyle cliamp.r 
ionship at Pittsfield tonighl whik 
the foursome of Parker Murray, 
Smith. Hunt, and Murphy gather- 
ed in another victory In the NE 
AAAU .luiiior 200-yard relay 
championship. 



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Volume XLVI, Number 31 i /j-^ 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE 



College Celelyraiing 
Alumni Homecoming 



Fraternities Fete 
Grads at Dinners 
lnitiations,Parties 

Athletic Events, Flicks 
Entertain Homecomers ; 
Tippy Committee Meets 

Suluidiiy, Feb. 23— VLsiliiiK al- 
umni ill WiUiiimslowii Ihi.s week- 
end found im extensive .schedule 
of eveiiUs centered around frater- 
nity initiations last nielli and to- 
iiiHlit. Athletic events at Lasell 
Oym this afternoon, committee 
meclinns last niuht and this morii- 
iiiK at Jesup Hall, and a .sermon by 
the Rev. Gerald B. O'Grady Jr. 
40 in Thompson Chapel tomur- 
idw morniiiK have also been list- 
ed as weekend hiiih six)ts. 

A joint mcetiiiK of the Tipiiy 
Committee and the Under^rad- 
iiate Council at the Faculty House 
yesterday afternoon included dis- 
cussion of UC proposals on chunn- 
I's in rushinn quotas. Tliis was 
followed at 8 p, m, last niKht by a 
ineetinB of the Alumni Executive 
Committee in Jesup Hall. 
Full .Sports Slate 

All cla.s.s«s are oiJcn to alumni 
this moi'nin){. Members of the 
K.xecutive Committee, however, 
will be holdinu another meeting at 
9 a.m. An hour later, they will 
meet with representatives of rcK- 
lonal alumni groups to nominate 
;iii alumni tru.stee. and at 12:30 
pin. both bodies will Kather for a 
special luncheon at the Faculty 
House. 

This afternoon Al Shaw's cagcrs 
meet Worcester Polytech at 2 p.m. 
on the La.sell floor, followed theiv 
at 4 p.m. by the Wesleyan wrestl- 
iiii; match. Meanwhile, al 3:30, the 
pool and .squash courts swing in- 
to activity, with Wesleyan's mer- 
men and the Hamilton racket 
squad furnishinu the opposition. 
House Activities 

Fraternity banquets are .set for 
6:30 toniuht all over campus, 
and several parties will be held 
afterwards. The Chi Psis. liavinK 
initiated their new members last 
night, plan to dedicate a new par- 
ty room to the late John C. Good- 
body '37. while afternoon cock- 
tail parties and house alumni 
meetings have been announced by 
a number of the fraternities. 
See Page 4, Col, 1 

Alumni Gifts Set 
All-Time Record 



$11S,277 Total Tops 
'50 Fund Drive Mark 



Saturday, Feb. 23 — Alumni con- 
tributed $115,277 to college cof- 
fers In a record-breaking 1951 
fund drive which ended at mid- 
night on January 31, Tire total 
although surpassing the cam- 
paign's goal by only $277, nearly 
doubled the previous all-time re- 
cord of $82,000, ,set in the 1950 
drive, Charles B. Hall '15, Execu- 
tive Secretary of the Alumni Fund, 
Indicated that the 3,617 donors 
responding to this year's appeal al- 
so constituted a record. 

Proceeds from the drive have 
been turned over to tlie Board of 
Trustees for general application 
to college expenses. No specific 
objectives are cited in applying 
for contributions, and the cam- 
paign is waged chiefly through 
mall and phone calls by class a- 
gents and regional committees. 

The 1952 campaign will be 
launched in Williamstown with a 
meeting and dinner on the weelt- 
end of the opening home football 
game, Mr. Hall has revealed. Un- 
til 1950, the yearly appeal had 
been opened with a ceremony in 
New York, and the move to Wil- 
liamstown was made last fall to 
bring alumni closer to the campus. 




O'Grady to Lead 
Morning Chapel 

Williams Alumnus Holds 
Chaplaincy at Trinity 

Saturday, Feb. 23— The Rev. 
Ueraid B. o'Grady, Jr. '40, Chap- 
unn and A.ssislant Professor of 
iteiiM.oii at Trinity College, will 
speak at tlie Thompson Memorial 
Ciiapel .service, at U a.m. on Sun- 
aay, Mr, O'Grady is well known on 
Lhis campus through pa.st chapel 
and tmoassy appearances. 

Ill addition to his pastoral du- 
nes, his teaching, and student ad- 
visory tasks, Mr, O'Grady has en- 
couraiied students of all faiths to 
organize exira-curricular clubs, 
With the result that Trinity now 
has a Newman Club i Roman- 
Catholic I . a HiUel Society ■ Jew- 
isli', a Prouesiani Fellowship, anu 
a caiiierouiy Club 'Episcopal'. 
\i iiiiams (iraduiite 

Mr. O'Grady graduated from 
Williams with a B. A. in philo.so- 
pny in 1940. A member of Chi 
j'si, he was active in the Glee 
CIliU, the Choir, the Philosophl- 
See Page 4, Col, 2 



Rumbling, Canvas 
Fail to Halt Work 
At West College 

Pre-Blaze Pipes Warm 
Masons as Frame of 
Roof Goes in Place 



by Krcag Donovan. '54 

Saturday, Feb, 23— The current 
rumblings from within the walls 
of West College are indications 
of considerable reconstruction. All 
is not as mysterious as the cloth 
coverings, placed on the windows 
to keep out the cold, might seem 
to indicate. 

Protruding from the west wall of 
the building, a noisily vibrating 
pipe is evidence of the constantly 
beating cement mixer. A squad of 
masons is presently erecting walls 
of tile blocks on the second and 
third floors, and these stories have 
already begun to reveal their e- 
ventual patterns. 

Middle Stories Advanced 

Steel door frames, the basic 
pipes in the plumbing system, and 
the metal framework of the stair- 
ways are now in place. Th^ heat- 
ing .system is still in service and 
many of the workmen are kept 
warm by the radiators of the pre- 
blaze structuie. 

As yet the first and fourth 
floors of this dormitory show little 
of the rejuvenation of the middle 
stories. When the steel frameworl; 
for tlie cupola was hoisted into 
place Tuesday, it marked the be- 
ginning of the actual reconstruc- 
tion of the roof. Previously, the top 
of the building had been left as a 
bare, concrete surface. 

Despite the fences and signs of 
secrecy, the rebuilding of West 
College is progressing normally 
(ind rapidly. Completion of the 
building is expected before the 
return of the .students next fall. 



UC Recommends 
Major Alterations 
In Rushing Plans 

Council Also Discusses 
CBM Plan, Hell Week, 
Houseparty Violations 




%j^itOtj^ 



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1952 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Monday, Feb. 18— Elimination 
of the 80'(-20'i ru.shing ratio was 
the first of three amendments to 
the present ru.shing system pro- 
po.sed by members of the Under- 
Riaduate Council tonight in Jesup 
Hall. The Council apiJioved the 
changes and decided to bring 
I hem before the Tippy Commit- 
tee on February 22. 

It was argued that, since the 
Guifield Club no longer exists as 
a social unit, there is no need to 
prevent this group from becoming 
smaller than 20'* of the college. 
Me.nbers approved a suggestion 
oiuit tiie quota of each house be 
■ aisea to 1 U of the incoming 
cla.ss. 

CB.tl Discussed 

Ihe new quota, altliough not 
applicable to post-season rushing, 
IS believed to encourage the tak- 
ing 01 more men into tlie houses 
anu also to prevent one house 
iiom taking loo many. The third 
cnaime lavored was the abolition 
ui the rule slating that juniors 
and seniors not in fraternities 
.iiiiy not join. 

docial unit representatives stat- 
ed thai the Campus Business 
Management plan, a system wliere 
oy the college could purchase 
food wholesale for all fraternities, 
was viewed witli favor by most of 
the student body on condition 
iliat the college would meet cer- 
Lain recommendations. This, to- 
See Page 4, Col. 1 



TCC Names Remick 
To 1952 Presidency 

Tuesday, Feb. 20 — Lewis P. 
Rem.ck '53 has been selected 
10 lead the Thomp.son Concert 
Coinmittee during the coming 
year. ALso elected were John 
T. Overbeck '54. Secretary; 
Jo.seph P. Fell '53. Treasurer; 
•lliomas C. O'Brien '55, Pub- 
licuy M..nager; and Larry H. 
iiacKStaff '64, Concert Mana- 
ger. I'lie next concert is sched- 
uled for March 4 and will tea- 
LuK' liegiiiald Kell, the noted 
ciarinetLst. 



Vlashburne Jars 
Town with lusty 
Vlindow Dressing 

Books on Sex, Liquor 
Dominate Suggestive 
Houseparty Display 



by Charles Elliot '54 

Sunday, Feb. 17 — In a bold but 
financially unsuccessful effort to 
prove that even a book store can 
be a popular resort during House- 
party. Washburne's emporium on 
Spring Street provided flaming 
additions to the tone of the fes- 
tivities with an array of various 
books on sex, drinking, and fairy 
tales this weekend. 

With a sign, conceived by Ida 
Kay. "Ennui? Incompatible-Try 
these for your weelcend reading 
pleasure", the display included 
such best-sellers as "Physical At- 
traction and Your Hormones", 
"Ideal Marriage- Its Physiology 
and Technique", and "Fertility 
and Sterility in Marriage". 
Washburnc Away 

In addition to the drinkers* 
manuals, "Bottoms Up" and Cock- 
tall Guide", the display hinted 
at the mentality of the customers 
with the old favorites "Winnie the 
Pooh" and "Alice in Wonderland", 
Several crossword puzzles were on 
sale also, but merely collected 
dust. 

Blushing and stammering, Ray 
Washburne denied any compli- 
city with the plot. "It wouldn't 
have happened if I liad been here." 
he claimed, "I'm never one to 



Wesmen Upset Williams 
At Middletown 69 - 57 




.lohn Marzocxo. Henry Sutton and Gil Rathbun as they will ap- 
pear in Wednesday's performance on Moliere's "The School For Wives". 



Players Incorporated to Present 
"School for Wives" Here Feb. 27 



Saturday. Feb. 23— "The Scliool 
for Wives", a famous French com- 
edy by the 17th century playwrite 
Moliere, will be produced by Play- 
ers Incorporated at the Adams 
Memorial Theatre Wednesday, 
February 27, at 8:30 P. M. Players 
Incorporated is a travelling com- 
liany from Washington. D. C. 
which takes professional theatre 
to people all over the country. 

Walter Kerr, author and direc- 
tor of the recent musical hit 
"Touch and Go" and drama critic 
for the Herald Tribune, directs the 
liroduction, which has a cast of 
fifteen actors. The three leading 
roles of "The School tor Wives" 
are: John Marzocco as Oronte; 
Henry Sutton as Henriques: and 
Oil Rathbun as Chrysolde. 

Produce Many Classics 

Players Incorporated have pro- 
duced many classics in the past 
few years, and their repertoire in- 
cludes 200 performances of Shake- 
speare's "Much Ado About Noth- 
ing", and G, B, Sliaw's "Arms and 
the Man". With these two plays 
and many others, the troupe has 
toured virtually the entire country. 



"The School for Wives" has fre- 
quently been acclaimed as the best 
play ever written by Moliere who. 
in turn, has been called the great- 
est writer of comedy in Frencli 
history. All of Moliere's dramas 
were written in the 17th century 
and he forms part of the trio of 
Cornellle. Rasine and Moliere 
whose works dominated this "Gol- 
den Age" in French literature. 
Criticized at First 

When first produced. "The 
School for Wives" was strongly 
criticized for not having conform- 
ed to the standard of the typical 
contemporary comedy. In place of 
slap-stick and physical action. Mo- 
liere substituted psychological 
drama and a subtle type of humor. 

Once the "School for Wives",be- 
came established, it was presented 
regularly at the Comedie Fran- 
caise In Paris. 

Tickets will be on sale for $1.20 
at the AMT box office from 10:00 
A. M. to 5:00 P. M. every day until 
the performance. Although phone 
orders will not be taken, mail or- 
ders are acceptable if a check or 
money order is enclosed. 



flaunt sex." Shifting all respon- 
sibility to assistants Ida Kay and 
Rick Wheeler '52. Wa,5hburne con- 
tinued, "I'm too old to be interest- 
ed In .sex. but Ida and Rick. . ." 

Clarifying the situation, Wheel- 
er declared that "the minute Ray 
walked out, Ida and I stripped the 
window while the old cat's away, 
the mice will play", Ida Kay, un- 
fortunately, could not be reached 
for comment, 

Wheeler maintained that "two 
Buxton youngsters were the first 
ones attracted to the display, and 
after that it snowballed, for no 
one could resist it". Sales records 
showed, however, that only three 
persons were sufficiently snowed 
to purchase one of the specimens. 
Faculty Approved 

Among those notables who com- 
plimented the mutinous assistants 
for the eye-catching spectacle, 
Wi'ie Clay Hunt and A. Grant No- 
ble. Wheeler imagined that they 
had different motives, however. 

Washburne remarked that he 
W;is skeptical at first, but fin- 
ally managed to see some .sense 
in 11. "I'm thankful there were no 
nudes", he .said. "I draw the line 
there". 



Purple Key Smoker 
Tomorrow at AMT 

Fall Awards to Follow 
Talk by Buck O'Neill 



Saturday. Feb. 23 — The Purple 
Key Society will hold an athletic 
smoker at the Adams Memorial 
Theatre Sunday at 3 p. m. Admis- 
sion is free and alumni, students. 
faculty and townspeople are in- 
vited. "Varsity letters and fresh- 
man numerals tor the spring and 
fall seasons of 1951 will be award- 
ed by Coaches Walters, Chaffee, 
Plansky and Coombs. 

Professor Charles B. Keller will 
be maste' ,. ceremonies for the 
smoker le principle speaker will 
be "Buck" O'Neill, captain of the 
1901 Williams football team and 
the only Eph to be named to the 
Football Hall of Fame. 

Another feature of the program 
will be the showing of two full- 
length films sent through the 
courtesy of Paul Brown, coach of 
the Cleveland Browns professional 
football team. The first movie is a 
color film of the 1951 Brown- Col- 
lege All-star game In Chicago 



Eph Five Rallies 
In Third Quarter 
To Narrow Gap 

Wesleyan Attack Shines 
As Victors Gain First 
Little Three Triumph 

By Gerry Davis '54 

Middletown. Conn. Feb. 20— A 
devastatingly accurate Wesleyan 
set-shooting offense handed Coach 
Al Shaw"s Purple quintet their 
second Little Three loss tonight 
by the score of 69-57. 

For Williams, this was their 
fifth successive loss, giving them 
a season record of six and eight, 
with a one and two mark in Little 
Three competition. 

Wesleyan Leads 

A red headed substitute. Nelson, 
playing In place of the injured 
Teachout, spelled the difference as 
he hit for 18 points, mainly on 
long, one-handed shots in the first 
and second periods, to spark the 
Cardinals to a 40-23 half-time lead 

While Wesleyan was amassing 
tills margin as the result of a 
phenomenal 47 per-cent shooting 
average the Ephnien could do little 
save futilely foul the opposition, 
resulting in Herb Smith's piling up 
four personal fouls midway 
through the second quarter while 
Bill Sue.ssbrick committed three. 
Williams Rallies 

A revamped Williams team took 
the floor for the second half and 
quickly proceeded to put themselv- 
es back In the game. Willi Smith 
sitting on the bench. Bob Depopolo 
took over at the right forward po- 
sition and spearheaded tlie third 
period offensive which saw the 
Ephmen outscore Wesleyan 19-9 
and narrow the gap to 48-42 with 
ten minutes to play. 

In spite of a full court press 
which was employed throughout 
the final quarter, the Ephmen 
found themselves once again sty- 
mied by the Wesleyan offense. 
Points were traded on an even ba- 
sis for the first five minutes of 
tlie period, but two quick baskets 
by the Cardinal's May, who was 
high scorer with 20 points, with 
four minutes to go put the game 
on ice, giving Wesleyan their third 
\iclory against ten losses. 
W.r.I. Next 

The Williams basketball team 
retunis to Lasell Gym Saturday 
afternoon when tliey will take on a 
veteran Worcester Polytechnic In- 
stitute team before the Homecom- 
ing gatherins al 2:00 p,m. 

Although highscorlng Richie 
Howard is no longer with the visi- 
See Page 4, Col, 3 



College Mowrns 
Millard Romaine 



Roebuck, Baxter, DuVal 
Lead Chapel Service 

Wednesday. Feb. 20 — Approxi- 
mately 500 members of the student 
body and faculty attended a me- 
morial service for Millard Romaine 
at noon today in the Thompson 
Memorial Chapel. The sei'vlce was 
conducted by President Baxter, 
the Reverend Claude Roebuck and 
William DuVal '52. 

Following the Invocation by the 
Reverend Mr. Roebuck and the 
Lord's Prayer in unison. President 
Baxter read Old Testament selec- 
tions from Psalms 23 and 103. and 
Isaiah 40. The congregation then 
sang "We Come Unto Our Father's 
God". 

New Testament readings were 
given by Bill DuVal from the Gos- 
pel according to St John. Ro- 
mans 8, and Revelations 20. Ap- 
propriate prayers preceeded an- 
other hymn. "Oh God Our Help 
in Ages Past". The service was 
concluded with the Benediction by 
the Reverend Mr. Roebuck. 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1952 



North Adams, Massachusetts Williamstown, Massacl"i'.i»»fs 

"Entered as second-class matter November 11, 1944, at the r"-* ottire oi 
North Adorns, Mossachusetts, under the Act of March 3, 187v f''.nii..J b\ 
Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Adams, Massachusetts. HublisheH 

Wednesday ond Saturday during the college year. Subscription price $5 OO 
per year. Record Office '--"-» Hnll. Williamstown. 
RECORD Office - P lone 72 Editor - Phone 981 -JK 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

John H. Allan '53 Editor 

Charles E. Longe '53 

Richard C. Porter '53 Manoging Editors 

Woodbridge A. D'Oench '53 . . News Editor 

Thomas A. Belshe '53 

Koy Kolligian, Jr. '53 Sports Editors 

Frederick A. Terry, Jr. '53 . Feature Editor 

Assistant Editors: Richard T. Anti,un '53, Thomas H. S. Brucker '53, 
James J. Cashmore '53 

Staff Photographers: R. Wyman Sanders '54, Charles Eichel '54 

Stoff Cartoonist: ,,_.^ Thomas Hughes '53 

Associate Editors: 1954 - Q. Abbot, W. R. Aiken, J. Brownell, E. Cowell, 
K. Donovan, G. Davis, C. Elliot, C. Fisher, C. Foster, P. Goldman, 
R. Goldstein, A, Home, J. Klein, J. Marr, C. O'Kieffe, W. Warden, 
W. Weadock 
Editorial Staff: 1954 - W. Redman; 1955 - R. Corey, C. Headley, 
E. Heppenstall, P. Hunn, J. Kearney, D. Krehbiel, P. Max, W. McLaugh- 
lin, R. Moore, L, Nichols, 1. Oviatt, N. Reeves, J. Rudd, J. Souse, 
H. Sheldon, R. Smitli, E. von den Steinen, R. Willcox. 

BUSINESS BOARD 

John Notz, Jr. '53 Business Manager 

Dudley M. Baker '53 Assistant Business Manager 

Robert O. Coulter '53 Assistant Business Manager 

John F. Johnston, II '54 Advertising Manager 

Harold G. Pratt, Jr. '54 Assistant Advertising Manager 

Curtis V. Titus '54 Circulation Manager 

Richard C. Schaub '54 Treasurer 

Business Staff: 1 954 - J. Gushee; 1955 - H. Lindsay, H. Moser, G. Olm- 
sted, J. Innes, R. Chadwick, N. Faulkner, H. Smitli 



Volu.ae ALVl 



Barber, L. H., Jr. 

Blschoff, R. N. 
Crittenden, R. J. 



Balklnd, G. W. 

Andrews, D. 
Bingham, R. L. 
Carrlnfcion, R. B. 

Duval, R. P. 
Hayden, M. P. 



Brace, C. L. 



Brody, J. A. 
Dalton, R. P. 



Campbell, B. N., Jr. 



Beatty, B. McL. 
Butz, R. B. 
Heekln, K. P. 
Kamenetzky, I. 



AUber, R. Z. 
Barber, K. 'W., Jr. 
Belash, J. W. 
Catto, H. E., Jr. 
Chapman, D. S., P-52 
Foster, D. 
Grlflenberg, E. D. 
Humes, S., IV 
IngersoU, J. P., Jr. 

Kraft, R. M., Jr. 

Levin, A. N. 



Casson, A. F. 

Lange, C. E. 
Marshall, D. G. 



Conovltz, M. 
Germond, A. R. 
Harrison, D. K. 



PeU, J. P. 
Friend, T. 'W., in 
Good, C. A., in 

Antoun, B. T. 

Goldstein, D. P. 

Brayer, W. H. 
Harrington, M. G. 
Howard, R. W. 
Hughes, T. H. 
Jackson, 'W. C, Jr. 

Abrams, R. J. 
Baker, D M. 
Burke, P. O. 
Canning, Q. 
Chapman, L. W. 
Craig, P. T. 
DePopoIo, K. 
Dighton, J. B. 
Dunham, R. D. 
Freeman, J. H. 
French. R. H. S. 
Frost, O. M. 



Number 5 



Class of 1952 

5.00 

Duffleld, J. R. 
Gessner, A. W. 
Jones, R. E. 
Markgraf, J. H. 

4.S0 
LaBranche, A. S. 

4.75 

Cornell, P. H. 
Gurney, A. R., Jr. 
Haas, J. 

4.60 
Kahn, H. L. 
McElroy, J. J., Ill 
Melcher, J. H., Jr. 

4.50 
Preese, J. W. 
Moore, J. K. 

4.40 
Dewey, J. E. 
O'Keeffe, D. W. 
Olmsted, P. B. 

4.25 

Haskell, J. S. 
Kinter, G. L. 

4.20 

Kulsar, J. R. 
Martin, D. S. 
Mitchell, J. K. 
Oaks, P. L. S. 
Procter, A. W., Jr 



February 23, 1952 



Markotic, Z. M. 
Simpson, W. R. 
Walters, R. P. 



Schur, E. M. 

Levitt, A., Jr. 
Wallis, K. W. 
Widing, J. W., Jr. 



Missimer, W. C, Jr. 
White, R. F., Jr. 



Smith, W U. 



Redfleld R. L., Jr. 
Warner T. B. 



Maim T. C. N. 



Reinbrecht G. H., 
Rich, R. L. 
Sharpe, W. P., Jr. 
Weil, R. L. 



Jr. 



4.00 

McMath, J. N., Jr. 
Meeske, D. S. 
Mezcy. P. 
Mitchell, E. T., Jr. 
Montgomery, J. R., 
North, J. H. 
Olson, G. G. 
Ordeman, J. T. 
Phillips, J. J. 
Powell, J W. 
Schad, T. 



Schreck, A. B. 
Shudt, E. L. 
Smith, E. P. 
Stevens, H. W., II 
IllStewart, J. W., Jr. 
Sumner, G. C. 
Thoron, C. 
Waesche, R. H. W. 
Walch, D. W. 
Wheeler, R. W. 
WUson, D. E. 



Class of 1953 

5.00 

4.80 

Stuart, R. W. 

4.60 
Jones, D. P. 
Kronick, P. L. 
Kruse, P. H., Jr. 
Pike, J. A. 

4.40 

Loening, M. J. 
Muir, A. H., Jr. 
Norwood, H. H. 

4.33 

Llnnett, E. S. 

4.25 

4.20 

Klein, S. W 
Larson, J. 
Matzger, A. D. 
Morrison, R. K. 
Opotowsky, M. L. 

4.00 
Greenewalt, D. 
Hammer, D. E. 
Johnson B. T., Jr. 
Hecox, L. A. 
Johnson, B. T., Jr. 
Kaufman, S. E. 
Klelnrock, L. J. 
Klopman, R. B. 
Lewis, J. E. 
McGlll, R. E., Ill 
Mersells, J. O., Jr. 
Miller, 8. J., Jr. 



Whitney, J. A. 
Yeide, H. E., Jr. 

Stege, G. R., lU 
Terry, P. A., Jr. 
Utiger, R. D. 



Porter, R. C. 
Wadsworth, D. vanZ. 
Worthlngton, J. E. 



Remick, L. P. 
Stltes, T. B. 
Sucoff. E. M. 
Wallace. P. W. 
Welchll, R. D. 

Miller, W. O. 
Notz, J. K., Jr. 
Palmer, D. B. 
Pelrce, R. T. B. 
Shorb, R. H. 
Slysh, B. 
Sterling, P. D. 
Townson, B. 
Wight, B. W. 
Wllkle, O. H. 
Williams, L. T., Jr 
Wright, J. MbK. 



Beurd, J. E. 



Dickens. W. A. 
Starke, R. D. 



Collins, C. J. 



Ames, R. P. 
Cavanaugh, F. H., Jr. 
Cook, C. D. 
Foote, J. 

Johnson, A. B. 

Aiken, W. R., Jr. 
Bergen, P. D'O. 
Brennan, W. D. 
Chase, O. S 
Donovan, A. K. 
EUsh, H. 

Abbot, Q. S. 
Adolph, P. J. 
Blackwood, A. C. 
Briggs, T. B. 
Clarke, M. G. 
Cooper, N. S., Jr. 
Craig, W. L. 



Colberg, J. E. 

Frank, L. D. 
Gustafson, W. E. 

Anderson, W. IT., Jr. 
Moro. A. W. 

Coleman, J. R. 
Cooper, A. J. 
lielnbach, G. E. 



Ringer, J. P. 

Carey, R. W. 
Cohen, M. A. 
Doughty, W. H., IV 
Pall, W A. 



Arbuckle, L. D., Jr. 
Bell, T. R, 
Ford, J. R. 
Freeman, P., Jr. 
Henriques. J. E.. Jr 



Clast of 1954 

5.00 

4.80 

Thrasher, R. W. 
Umbach, L. C. 

4.67 
Bletter. B. 

4.60 

Hackstaflf. L. H. 

4.50 

Ballnskl. M. L. 

4.40 

Hawkins, M. 
Henderson, T. S. 
Home A. D. 
Johnston J. F., Ill 



Klein, V. J. 



Wolfson, S. 



Knickerbocker. P. T. 



Montgomery, H. M., Jr. 
Stahl, G. H. 
Weeks, W. T. 



4.33 

4.20 

Pessenden, P. P. 
Gulick, B. P 
Held. J. P. 
HoUlngton, R. R. 
Melder, K. E. 
Miles, B. N. 

Elliot, C. K., Jr. 
Goldmftn, P. L. 
Hall, B. T. 
Kleppner, D. 
Kooncs, C. K., UI 
Loizeaux, P. T. 
Meeder, P. 

Class of 1955 

5.00 
Bosen. C. 

4.80 

Nelson, M. A. 
Smith, H. L. 

4.60 
Pomerance, L. J. 

4.40 

Montgomery, D. B. 
Montgomery, W. A. 
Pohle, a. A. 
Sosnow, B. E. 



Lyden, J. A. 

Rogers C. McP. 
Bomaine, M. 
St. Clair, D, A. 
Sullivan, R. C. 
Weeks, W. Q. 



Jr. 



Murdock, B. M 
Nelson, R. A. 
OKleffe, C. DeW. 
Selig, S. F. 
Stanley, R. S. 
Titus, C. V. 
Zimmerman, H. B. 



4JS5 



4.20 

Prance, A. L. 
Oehret, J. P. 
Hall, P. R. 
Kinds, H. E. 
Leech, 4. W. 

4.00 
Hoover, W. 
Hoyt, P. S. 
KeUey, D. J. 
Mirak, B. 
Moore, R. W. 
NichoU, L. H. 
O'Brien, T. C. 



Snyder L. D. 
Vestcrmark S. D., Jr. 



Sterling, D. W. 
Stranahan, B. B. 



Tufts, D. W. 
WaUace, R. W. 
Weinberg, M. J. 



Moak, P. V. D. H. 
Murphy, W. H. 
Whitney, P. J. 
Zeuner, R. W. 



Paterson, D. R. M. 
Piatt. L. S., Jr. 
Pratt, J. M. 
Rowley. J. P. 
Virden. H. W., Jr. 



AN OPPORTUNITY TO 
LIVE IN WILLIAMSTOWN 

At the present time there are several attractive homes 
for sale, varying in size from six to twelve rooms. 

Also o few of those desirable old houses which need 
renovating 

Any one of these would make a delightful permanent 
home or a choice summer home in this beautiful town. 

Fine houses and apartments are available for summer 
rentals. 

Write for detailed description or call for an appointment 
to inspect these offers. 

MARY L. DEMPSEY, Real Estate Agent 

256 West Main Street Tel. 264 

Williamstown, Mass. 



BARaiN SUBSCRIPTION 

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For the 2nd Semester to 

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$3.00 

Detach and send to Williams Record 

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ALUMNI! ALUMNI! 

CARL JONAS 

of the Class of 1936 

has written in 

"JEFFERSON SELLECK" 

a truly distinguished novel 

about a very real person. 

Buy a copy today for quiet reading back home. 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



Spring Street 



Raymond Washburne 



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I L. 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1952 



Eph Matmen Defend Little Three Squashmen Score Skiers to Defend Swimmers Meet 
Crown Against Powerful Wesmen Sweeping Victory EasternCollegiate Bid For Record 



Purple Seek Initial Win; 

Callaghan-Graham Bout 

To Highlight Match 

Saturday, Feb. 23-The Wil- 
liams matmen, seeking to i-elaln 
the Little Three title for the fourth 
consecutive year, make their first 
venture Into league competition 
this afternoon when they taniilc 
with the undefeated Wesleyan 
Cardinals In th Lasell Gymnasium. 

Of Williams' four losing encoun- 
ters to date, only one has been in 
the home gym. Springfield noted 
out the Ephmen on that occasion, 
18-13. Harvard defeated the Pur- 
ple, 20-15, In the season's opener, 
and a strong Bi'own squad rolled 
to a 21-10 victory. Two weeks uno 
the Coast Guard made It loss num- 
ber four for Ed Bullock's charges, 
winning, 18-12. 

In Wesleyan, the Ephs will be 
meeting possibly their toughest 
opponent. In compiling an out- 
standing 5-0-1 record, the Car- 
dinals have downed the Coast 
Guard, M. I. T., Tufts, Boston 
University, and Amherst, while 
tying Springfield. 

Three Wesmen Undefeated 

Wesleyan boasts three men a.s 
yet unbeaten in this season's com- 
petition: Captain Jack Graham 
at 157 lbs., Henry Cha.se at 177, 
and Gerry Callahan in the un- 
limited division have yet to taste 
defeat. The remainder of the Car- 
dinal lineup will Include several 
other experienced and well-tniin- 
cd grapplers. 

The day's top event promises to 
be the 157 lb. battle, where the 
defending New England champion 
;ind Williams captain, Billy Callag- 
han, places his unblemished rec- 
ord on the line against unbeaten 
Graham. 

Bullock's probable lineup will be 
Rod Cover, Bill Williams. Georpe 
Dimock. Bob Shoib, Callaghan. 
Dick Gordon or Dick Edwards, 
and Hugh Murphy or Jack Ordc- 
man. 




Over Trinity, 8 - 1 1 Class B Standing 



Ms^mmi^. 



Team Excells, As Ephs 
Whitewash Opponents; 
Adkins Only Loser 



Sophoimire Dick Gordon who 
Hill be wri'stiine in the 167-lb.- 
c'liiss against Wesleyan. 

Frosh Hoopsters 
Defeat Boy's Club 

Wilson, Gray Lead 
Second Half Spree 

Wednesday, Feb. 20~-Led by the 
second half scoring of Johnny 
Gray and Ron Wilson, the Wil- 
liam.s Fre.shman basketball team 
pounded out a 67-55 victory over 
the Pittsficld Boy's Club in the 
La.scll Gym tonight. Gray and 
Wilson each accounted for 14 
points while Fred Broderick net- 
ted 11. 

Eight of Broderick's points came 
in the first quarter to give the 
Ephs an early 18-15 lead. The 
visitors kept pace with the Frosh 
in the second period with some 
.sharpshooting by their ace center. 
See Page 4, Col. 3 ' 



Hartford, Conn., Feb. 19 — The 
Williams College squash team 
bounced back from their loss to 
Harvard, trouncing Trinity Col- 
lege 8-1. The Chaffeemen had lit- 
tle trouble this afternoon as they 
easily defeated the weak HlUtop- 
pers, wlrming all but three matches 
by shut out scores. 

Dick Squires, playing in the 
number one position, started the 
proceedings by downing Stewart in 
three games 15-11, 15-11, 17-15. 
"Soapy" Symington and Chris 
rhoron had to extend themselves 
a little more as they won to four 
and five games, respectively. 
See Page 4, Col. 2 



Ephmen Aim to Retain 
1951 Title; Norwich 
To Lead Challengers 

Lydonvllle, Vt., Feb. 22— 
Cheered by the Winter Carnival 
showing, Williams ski mentor 
Ralph Townsend and eight of his 
Eph proteges this afternoon begin 
a three-day struggle to retain 
their Eastern Intercollegiate Ski 
Association Class B crown. 

Of the eight other schools com- 
peting — Norwich, Harvard, Bow- 
doln, Maine, Colby, Yale, Amherst, 
and M. I. T. — Townsend figures 
Norwich, who topped the Purple 
over the Christmas holidays, to 
present the strongest challenge. 

The Williams skiers are facing 
Harvard and M. I. T. for the first 
See Page 4, Col. 4 



Plansky Receives Track Honors 
For N.E. Sports Hall of Fame 

Saturday, Feb. 23 — In 1920, a young man named Tony Plansky 
Kraduated from Georgetown University, carrying with him one of 
the most brilliant athletic careers known to the nation at that 
time. On the gridiron, as well as on the cinder-paths, the big boy 
from South Boston excelled to a perfection which caused many to 
liken the "Georgetown Great" to the immortal Jim Thorpe. 

Plan.sky's name found mention on .several of the mid-1920 
All-America erid teams. In track, he captured the National De- 
cathlon Championship in 1924; he took the intercollegiate honors 
for the .same events in 1925. 1926. and asain in 1928 when he 
placed fir.st in the Penn Belays. 

After a professional football career with the New York Giants 
had brought further acclaim, Plansky entered the professional 
ba.seball ranks where he en.toyeri two very succe.ssful years. 

With such an illustrious record, it was with fitting 'tribute 
that Tony Plansky should be elected to the New England Sports 
Hall of Fame, for in the minds of many sports fans of yesteryear, 
Plansky remains as the greatest all-around athlete ever developed 
in New England. It was All American Benny Friedman who said 
of Plansky: "He was one of the most magnificent athletes I have 
ever known." 



Be Haf>f>/-GO UKKYl 

am . i 



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really enjoying your smoke is the taste of a 
cigarette. You can taste the difference in the 
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Lucky . . . for two important reasons. First, 
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LBADINO MANUFACTURER OF CiaARETTXS 

LS./M. FT- Lucky Strike Means Fine Tobacco 




Scphoniorr Max Rogers, top 
Williams diver in the meet with 
the Wesmen. 



Frosh Pucksters 
Shut Out Vermont 

Xrwin Tallies Three 
To Pace 5 - Win 



Wednesday, Feb. 20 — Pete Max's 
j flawless goal-tending and Defense- 
I man Bill Irwin's hat trick set the 
, pace for the Freshman Sextet's 
first victory, a 5-0 triumph at Ver- 
mont Academy today. 

Captain Irwin and the first line, 
composed of Gary Leinbach, Frank 
Isenhart and Mac Fiske, account- 
ed for all the Eph goals, as Max 
made twenty saves in his second 
game as goalie. 
I Irwin Scores First 

I Giving the Freshmen a needed 
I spark, Irwin's quick unassisted 
tally at 1:26 of the first period 
was followed with another solo 
later in the same stanza. 

Leinbach, on a pass from Fiske, 
opened the scoring in the second 
frame. The same combination then 
set Irwin up lor his third goal. In 
the final period, Fiske scored on 
a pass from Rick Smith. 



Why wait unHI 
morning? 

When you can ret the out- 
Ntaiidiiig news uf the day every 
evening (hruuffh the full leased 
wire Assuciated Press service in 



«d,ln' (iratismpt 

North Adorns, Mass. 
On sole at 5 p.m. on oil 
Williomsi'own Newsstands 



Wesleyan Today; 
In Medley Relay 

Martin Duels Barth 
In Feature Contest 

By Jacli Marr 

Sat., Feb. 23— A powerful Wes- 
leyan swimming team will invade 
the Lasell Gymnasium pool this 
afternoon as the Eph mermen 
open their drive for the 1951-62 
Little Three title. Wesleyan, with 
five victories in seven starts should 
provide strong opposition for the 
twice-beaten Ephs. 

I'he Cardinal standouts include 
Captain Dick Barth in the dashes 
and Jan Vandenberg in the dis- 
tance events. Barth, imbeaten this 
year, will be hard pressed in his 
duel with Williams record-break- 
ing Dick Martin, while Vanden- 
berg, a consistant double winner 
all season, may meet his match in 
Ephs Don Jones and Joe Worth- 
ington. 

Todays meet may provide an- 
Ephs Seek New Record 
other Williams record, as the med- 
ley relay combine of Dave Byerly, 
Rick JeiTrey, and Dick Martin or 
Don Jones could easily better the 
pool and Williams records. In the 
Connecticut meet the record was 
narrowly missed, and the return of 
the then-injured Rick JeiTrey may 
provide the needed spark. 

Another record po'-sibility exists 
in the 50 yd. dash where Dick 
Martin, recent bi'eaker of three 
records will be facing Dick Barth, 
who may force him to his best 
time of the season. In the diving, 
Ephs Max Rogers and Al Post face 
Redbird Bill Meyer. Here Rogers, 
a consistant point-maker all sea- 
son, should gain the nod. 

Track Squad to Run 
In N. Y. Tournament 

Now York. Feb. 22 — Twelve 
members of the Williams win- 
ter track squad will compete 
in a total of six events in the 
I. C. A. A. A. A. championship 
meet in Madison Square Gar- 
den this weekend, according to 
Coach Tony Plansky. 

Eph entries tentatively in- 
clude Jack Brody, Al Fletcher 
and Bill Miller in the sixty- 
yard dash, George Steinbrenner 
and Dick Walters in the hur- 
dles, Ted Cypiot and George 
Kelsey in the high jump, and 
Joe Rice in the mile. In addi- 
tion. Plansky has listed Pete 
Cosgriff, Dana Fearon, John 
Freese and Bob Jones in an 
unusually strong field in the 
600. 



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/ FRATERNITY lEWELftY 

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Jewelry Gifts Fovon 

Club Pin. Keyi 

Medols Tropiiiet 

Write or Call 

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TelephoneTrov Adams 8256^ 



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It's the Williams Club at 24 E. 39th St. Its pleasant 
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THE WILLIAMS RLCOKI) SAlUkl)A^, I LIJ KUAKT Z3, X^Zti. 



uc . .. 



gether with the rushing chaiiyes, 
will be discussed by the Tippy 
Committee. 

Hellweek Viulationii 

Dick Duttield emphasiised the 
importance of entoifing the rules 
for "Hellweek". He stated that 
certain violations hud already 
been reported and that It these 
continued appropriate fines 
would be imposed 

Jim Henry opened tlie business 
of the meeting with a report on 
the Gul. He suggested that im- 
provement could be made by en- 
couraging more freshmen to com- 
pete for positions lUid by improv- 
ing the advertising. However, Hen- 
ry stated that the Gul was in a 
better positij.i fiiuu.cially than 
many other coUewe yearbooks. 
Houseparty Disorder 

Dick Duffleitl also said that sev- 
eral violations of house party 
rules had been reported. He ad- 
vised fraternity representatives to 
urge their mc.nbers to cooperate 
with the administration in the 
future as much as possible. 

The Council also decided to de 
lay action on joininf, the Nation 
al Student association until the 
new U.C. takes olfice. 



Chapel . . . 

.ai Uii.oii, and several other ac- 
,..iaes while here. Previous to 
.iia.- \\c had been chorister and 
ijiijis„ at the St. Thomas Choir 
.jciioo. lU New York City, and had 
.mUieJ organ at the Washington 
J.*i.hedral. 

He eari.ed his degree of Bjch- 
..'.or oi ciacied Tneology at the 
Episcopal Theology School. Cam- 
... -uge. wiassuchusetis. in 1943. 
.vn.ie there he served as assis- 
.aiu Episcopal Chaplain at Har- 
<ix:A. After graduation Mr. O'Gra- 
dy beoamj Episcopal Cliaplain at 
Cjrnell. and served there as act- 
ing Chapiain for all Army per- 
sonnel in the college training 
pr jgr. ms, also doubling as chap- 
lain for navel personnel. 



Squash 



Weekend . . . 

Len Walters will be at Jesup to 
show films of last fall's Little 
Three football games, starting at 
8:15 tonight. A similar program 
will be offered tomorrow at 3 p.m. 
in Jesup Auditorium, when the 
Purple Key smoker will present 
Buck O'Neill '01 along with foot- 
ball films of the Cleveland Browns 
in action. 

For the second successive Home- 
coming, the chapel service will be 
held at 11:00 a.m.. Sunday, and 
will be followed at 1:15 by an al 
umni luncheon at Currier Hall, 
where athletic awards will be 
presented. It has also been an- 
nounced that the Lawrence Mu- 
seum's exhibit of contemporary 
oils and water colors will be open 
from 11: a.m. — 1 p.m. tomorrow. 



Frosh . . . 



Skiing 



Ray George, John Brownell, and 
Tom Brucker, playing in the 
fourth, fifth and sixth slots, shut 
out their opponents. Brownell 
turned in the afternoon's most 
impressive match as he won 15-5, 
15-4, 15-4. 

Tom Adkins was the only Wil- 
liams loser as he lost three straight 
games after winning the opener 
Todd Tillinghast and Allan Pul- 
kerson, rounding out the squad, 
turned in the fifth and sixth Wil- 
liams shut outs. 

Summary : 

1. Squu-es ^W) defeated Stew- 
art (Ti: 15-11, 15-11, 17-15. 

2. Symington (W) defeated 
Hewson iT>: 15-12, 13-15, 15-11, 
15-6. 

3. Thoron (W) defeated Drew- 
Bears IT>: n-14. 15-9, 11-15. 14- 
17. 17-15. 

4. George (W) defeated Read 
IT): 15-10. 15-10, 15-10. 

5. Brownell (W) defeated Buf- 
fum (T): 15-5. 15-4. 15-4. 

6. Brucker iWi defeated Hun- 
ter (T): 15-11, 15-9, 15-11. 

7. Murphy (T) defeated Ad- 
kins iW): 9-15, 18-16. 15-11. 15-4. 

8. Tillinghast (W) defeated 
Bernhard iTi: 17-14,15-11. 16-10. 

9. Fulkerson (W) defeated 
Minot (T): 15-6. 15-10. 18-15. 



McMahon. T'he halftimc intermis- 
sion found the Purple protecting 
a slim 30-28 edge. The yearlings 
returned to score 23 points in the 
third quarter to boost their lead 
to a comfortable 53-41. Through- 
out the final period Coach Coombs 
substituted freely and the second 
stringers held Pittsfleld to 13 
points while they garnered the 
same number. McMahon led the 
losers with 22 tallies on a variety 
of jump shots. Bouressa scored 14 
points to place second. 



Wesleyan . . . 

tors, W.P.I, has a strong team, in- 
cluding nine lettermen from last 
year's squad, whicli bowed to Wil- 
liams 53-47 on the losers' court. 
This season W.P.I, has a 5 and 6 
record to date, including among 
their victims Tufts and Upsiila 
while bowing to M.I.T., Trinity, U. 
of Mass., B. U., and Coast Guard. 
Leading the Poly attack are Co- 
captains Mehalick and Chapman, 
while Hall at center and Brown at 
guard have been outstanding of- 
fensively, as well as defensively. 
Rounding out the W.P.I, lineup is 
Bloom with Fratioso and Mac Liir- 
en much used reserves. Williams 
scoring in the Wesleyan game: 



time today. Otherwise, Townsend's 
crew has beaten all the entries 
during the current season, with 
the exception of Norwich. 

The winner of this meet, along 
with the Western and Canadian 
Class B district titlists. qualifies 
for the Class A championships at 
.St. Lawrence next week. 
Collins Heads Ephs 

The seven higlicst flnlsliers of 
the ten schools competing in the 
"A" tournament are automatically 
classified as Class A for next year, 
while the bottom three ranking 
colleges are dropped back to "B". 
Last winter Williams won the 
Eastern Class B crown, but failed 
to place among the top seven in I 
the "A" tourney. 

The eight-man Eph entry, head- 
ed by Captain Ned Collins, con- 
sists of Sandy Brown, Pete Calla- 
han, Bob Tucker, Stue Chase, Neil 
Chase, Doug Wil.son. and Joe 
Poote. 



W A L £ N 



SUN. 
Boh Hope 



MON. - TUE. 

Hedy LaMarr 



in 



"MY FAVORITE SPY" 



WEDNESDAY - THURSDAY 
2 Features 

*'Walls of Malapaga" 

Best Foreign Picture of 1950 
also 

"Four Days Leave" 

Made in Switzerland 





P.O. 


F.T. 


T.P 


Smith 


2 


2 


6 


Lazor 


3 


1 


7 


Hawkins 


4 





8 


Avery 











Hall 


1 





2 


Suessbrick 


1 





2 


Sluidt 


1 


4 


(i 


Campbell 


2 


1 


5 


Creer 


4 





8 


Depopolo 


5 


3 


13 


Totals 


23 


11 


57 




"Just a little friendly advice . . . 
Don't forget tlie Angostura*!" 

AROMATIC BITTERS 
MAKES BETTER DRINKS 

*P.S. And dorCt you forget how the real 
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Old Fashioned arc temptingly brought 
out by a dash, or two of Angostura. 




an 



d on 1 rode . . . . 




and greater was my thirst 

Tennyson; Hoiy Graii 



The farther you go the more 
you need refreshment. That's why 
you'll hear folks say, "Let's have 
a Coke and get going." It's one 
way to get somewhere. 



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Campus lulcrricius on (Ai>(tretLe Tests | 

No. 33. ..THE SHEEP 



"They can't 
pull the wool 
over my eye^ 




1 hry tried to fool him with the "quick-trick" 
cifjarctic mildness tests — hut he wouldn't go astray! 
We know as well as he there's only one fair way to 
test cigareltemildness. And millionsof smokers agree! 

It's the srnsihle /ex/. ..the UO-Day (Daniel 
Mildness Test, which simply asks you to try Camels 
as your steady smoke, on a day-after-<lay, 
pack-after-pack hasis. No snap judgments. Once 
you've tried Camels for 30 days in your "T-Zone" 
(T foi Throat, T for Taste I. you'll see why . . . 

After all the Mildness Tests . 




Camel leads all other brands ttybiiiidns 



MEET OLD ACQUAINTANCES AT MIKE'S 

DURING ALUMNI WEEKEND 
Always A Friendly Greeting and Good Food 



Visit TACONIC PARK for fine meals and beverages 

COLLEGE RESTAURANT 




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N'olume XLVl, Number 6 



WlLLrAMS COLLEGE 




%ti^Ofj^ 



WEDNESDAY, KEBHUAHY 27, 1952 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Buck O'Neil Talks 
At Sports Smoker 



£vent Concludes 
Alumni Weekend 



Frank Thorns Presents 
Spring, Fall Awards 

Sunduy, Feb. 24 — As the con- 
clusion of Alumni Weekend, thi' 
annual fall athletic smoker was 
held this afternoon in the Jesui) 
Hall auditoiium. "Buck" O'Neill 
02. captain of the Williams foot- 
ball and track teams fifty years 
ano was Buest speaker. 

Followinii a shoi-t movie of the 

1950 Cleveland Browns. George 
Hteiiibrenner '52 president of the 
Puiple Key Society, started the 
formal pait of the meeting by 
introducinK Profe.s.sor Keller, who 
acted as niastei' of cciemony. hi 
turn Prankie Thoms was intro- 
duced, and after a brief comment 
on the present Williams athletic 
activity, proceeded to distribute 
the athletic awai'ds. 

Spring Letters Also Awarded 
Since the spi'inK letters and 
nenieraLs had not yet been Kivcn 
out, members of the 1951 varsity 
and freshman ba.seball. Kolf. ten- 
nis, lacros.so, and track teams weii; 
Kiven their individual certificates. 
Immediately aflci' this the three 
fall sports, football, soccer, and 
cios.s-counti'y were recognized and 
awards were given. Small gold 
footballs, which had been donated 
by alumni who wish to lemain 
anonymous, were also distributed 
to the members of Len Watters' 

1951 Little Three Champioiiahip 
team. 

After being introduced by Prof. 
Keller, Mi-. O'Neill proceeded to 
uive a brief sketch of his own life 
and the conditions under which 
he became connected with Wil- 
liams, At the end of his talk. 
"Buck", in giving his view on pie- 
sent-day football, concluded that 
it is getting "out of hand" and is 
"becoming a business, not a game." 



Baxter Addresses 
Assembled Alumni 
At Annual Dinner 

Dick Squires Receives 
Rockwood Tennis Cup; 
Salmon Gets Medal 

Sunday. Feb. 24— Home coming 
festivities were officially bi'ought 
to a clo.se by the annual alumni 
banquet held in Currier Hall this 
aftei-noon. Over 160 alumni and 
sons of alumni were piesent to 
hear tlie report on the cunent 
fund cainpaign by J. B. Angevine 
'11. fund chaiiman. and to wit- 
ness the piesentation of awards. 

Following the luncheon, the Wil- 
liams Octet entertained the as- 
sembled alumni with a series of 
.songs, after which President Bax- 
ter welcomed the group. He quick- 
ly summed up the successes of 
the college year to present, es- 
pecially in regard to scholarship. 
Awards 

Two students and two alumni 
were recipients of awards made by 
President Baxter. The Belvidcre 
Brooks Memorial Medal was a- 
warded to football captain, Sal- 
mon '52 as the greatest ci-edit to 
Williams on the football team. 
Richard Squires '53 was awarded 
the Rockwood Tennis Cup as win- 
ner of the college tournament. 

The class of 1903 was awarded 
the Meredith Wood Cup as the 
class with the greatest number of 
contributors to the fund drive. The 
James C, Rogeison Cup, award- 
ed to a student or alumnus of 
outstanding merit in any field, 
went to William E, Park '30. He 
was a membci- of Gargoyle while 
at Williams and later attended 
the Union Theological Seminary. 
Mr. Park was instrumental in 
founding the Mt. Hermon and 
Northfield schools. 




Buck O'Neill at Key Smoker 



Antoutif Goldstein 
To Head Debaters 



Williams Ties Wesleyan, 
Amherst in Little Three 



Saturday, Feb, 23 — Membeis of 
the Adelphic Union elected Ri- 
chard Antoun '53 president and 
Donald Goldstein '53 vice-presi- 
dent, Robert Goldstein '54, mna- 
ager of debates, Charles Telly '54, 
secretary, and Louis Kleinrock 'S3, 
treasurer, at their meeting Thurs- 
day, 

The Little Three debate ended 
today in a three-way tie between 
Williams, Amhrst, and Wesleyan 
on the topic, "Resolved: We should 
have a permanent program of 
wage and price control". 

Ronald Dubin '53 and Goldstein, 
who took the affirmative side, won 
against Wesleyan, while Wyman 
Proctor '52 and Antoun argued 
the negative side of the question 
and defeated Amherst twice. 



Tippy Committee 
Recommends End 
Of House Hazing 

Alumni Group Suggests 
Measures to Improve 
Community Relations 



UC To Help WMS 
Broadcast Jeff 
Basketball Game 



Monday, Feb, 25 — Mike Loenlng 
oix'ned the Undergraduate Council 
meeting at 7:30 tonight when he 
urged the U.C. to appropriate 
funds which would enable W.M.S. 
lu broadcast tne Amherst basket- 
ball game on March 8. Loening 
said he hoped the U.C. would pay 
for what W.M.S. was unable to 
cover with advertising. The Coun- 
cil approved the appropriation 
and instructed Jim Henry to see 
if the funds were available. 

Dick Duffield read a request 
from Dean Scott to begin work on 
choosing next year's junior ad- 
visors. The committee for this job 
will consist of Bartlett, Beard, 
Curtis, Duffield, Kahn, Kinter, 
bazoi', and Shorb. House repre- 
sentatives weit' urged to prepare 
their lists of possible candidates 
as early as possible to insure full 
consideration. 

Chapel Change 

The chapel committee submitted 
a suggestion that chapel be moved 
up from 7:30 to 12:00 noon each 
Sunday. Duffield a.sked house 
presidents to find out how their 
memoers felt on this issue. 

Since the U.C. voted unani- 
mously in favor of the propo,sed 
changes in rushing rules last week. 
It was suggested that house presi- 
dents urge their representatives 
to the Tippy Committee to vote 
for the amendments. 



Ephs Topple Worcester 
In Tense 53-52 Battle 



Chi Psi Dedicates 
New Party Room 

Johnson Directs Work; 
Plaque Honors Grad 



Friday, February 22 — The Tippy 
Committee, a group comprised of 
the giaduate heads of Williams 
,social units, I'ecommended unani- 
mously this afternoon to do away 
with all pre-initiation hazing and 
replace the traditional Hell Week 
with a Help Week. 

Meeting with the Undergiad- 
uate Council, the Tippy Commit- 
tee proposed this change as a 
measure to gain more beneficial 
lelations with surrounding com- 
munities and to accomplish some- 
thing useful with all the energy 
that is now devoted to hazing. 
No RushinK Quota.s 

UC Rushing Committee Chair- 
man Elliot Curtis '52 reported 
the UC recommendations con- 
cerning the elimination of frater- 
nity quotas to the Tippy Com- 
mittee for its consideration. Ac- 
cording to the proceduie set up by 
the Sterling Committee, the i-ec- 
ommendations of both these com- 
mittees must be given to the ad- 
ministration which will make the 
final decision. 

The Tippy Committee stated 
that it would make its report on 
quotas before the beginning of 
post-sea.son rushing this spring. 

In an effort to strengthen dis- 
cusion between the graduate and 
undergraduate groups, the Tippy 
Committee Invited members of the 
1952-53 Undergraduate Council to 
attend a meeting in New York City 
this spring. No definite date was 
set for the meeting. 



Saturday. Feb. 23— As the high- 
light of their alumni home-com- 
ing festivities, the Chi Psi's ded- 
icated a new room in their cellar 
to the late John L. Goodbody '08. 
an active elder of Chi Psi who 
who died last year. 

Started last winter under the 
direction of Douglas Jolin,son '51. 
all the woik on the room was done 
by the Chi Psi undergraduates. 
Last summer the corporation of 
Chi Psi built the new stairway 
which leads into the I'oom. 

Large Bar 

Functioning as a site for par- 
ties, the room is constructed of 
plywood panel walls, with a gray 
cement floor. A .spacious bar, com- 
plete with brass rail and dark red 
linoleum covering, provides tlie 
main attraction. 

Fluorescent lights inset in the 
ceiling and corner tables with 
seats built in the walls add a club 
atmosphere. Hanging on the wall 
adjacent to the bar is a plaque in 
honor of "Uncle John", as he was 
known to the Chi Psi's. 



Dean's Office Posts 
Scholarship Ratings 

Tyng, Regular Scholars 
Excell in Class of '54 



by the Dean's office of the scho- 
larship students' grades revealed 
that the Sophomore class had the 
highest average for both Tyng 
and regular scholarships, with 4.49 
and 3.84 ratings, respectively. It 
also indicates that the freshman 
Tyng scholais got a higher aver- 
age than the three upper classes 
had in their freshman years. 

The Tyng average of 4.48 and 
the legular of 3.8 gave the cla.ss of 
'52 a second place for both groups. 
The freshman Tyng scholars' 
unusually high 4.38 average rank- 
ed behind the senior average, but 
the freshmen with regular scho- 
larships only attained a 3.34 aver- 
age, putlng them last in that 
group. The Junior class had av- 
erages of 3.74 for the holders of 
regular scholarships and 4.05 for 
Tyng Scholars. 




Walt Crcer takes around Wor- Dick Hall puts up a unc-hander 
(•ester's Bruwn, in .Sat. game. against W.P.I. 



College Heads Meet; 
Discuss Acceleration 

Pentagonal Conference 
Assembles at Bowdoin 



"Hell Week'' Jars 
Routine Activities 



I 

'Betas Give Aid to N.A.; 
Psi U Shaves Heads 



Brun.'^wick. Me. Feb. 22 — Pres- 
idents and senior administrative 
oificers of five New England col- 
leges met today to discuss accel- 
eration and other common pro- 
blems at their schools. Represen- 
ted ai the Pentagonal Conference. 
Held at Bowdoin. w-ere Williams. 
Amherst. Wesleyan. Bowdoin. and 
Dartmouth. 

This is the ninth successive 
,vear that these institutions have 
met. The conterence opened yes- 
terday with a general meeting 
and a faculty reception. 

Simultaneous with lire meetings 
of ihe administrative officers were 
sessions of the treasui'ers of the 
live schools. The treasurers dis- 
cussed scholarship policy and o- 
tner means of financial aid. 



R.P.I. to Present 
Famous English 
Ballet Performers 



Dame Ninette deValois 

Directs Sadler's Wells 

Theatrical Company 



Wednesday. Feb. 27 — England's 
woiid famous Sadler's Wells Tliea- 
trc Ballet will appear in Troy for 
one performance on the night of 
Maich 12. according to R.P.I, pub- 
licity officers. The traveling Lon- 
don company, which has broken 
all attendance recoi-ds in its two 
American tours, will be presented 
al the R.P.I. Field House. 

Directed since its birth by Dame 
Ninette deValois. the group has 
received the highest acclaim from 
critics and public, and its fore- 
most stai-s. such as Margot Fon- 
tcyn and Moira Shearer, are class- 
ed with the outstanding names 
of contemporai'y ballet. 

Active Since 1931 

The company's name is derived 
from its base at London's Sadler's 
Wells Tlieatre, a structure dat- 
ing back to Shakespeare's day. Its 
ballet histoi-y started in 1931 and, 
except for a brief wartime shut- 
down, it has operated successfully 
evei- since. Last summer the bal- 
let gioup. which works in a.sso- 
ciation with the government Aits 
Council, was featured at the Fes- 
tival of Gieat Britain, 

Two weeks befoi-e the tickets for 
the March 12 presentation in Troy 
weie put on sale, forty pages of 
mail and telephone ordeis had 
been received, and officials state 
that the demand continues to be 
heavy. Seats are still available, 
however. 



Wednesday, Feb. 27 — The usual 
routine of campus activities was 
changed considei-ably last week 
by the advent of the annual fra- 
lernity hell week. Several of tlie 
iJiojects assigned to the hapless 
pledges contributed much to the a- 
musement of the whole student 
body. 

Tcvliaps the mast spectaculai 
house in tire humoi'ous hazing de- 
partment was Phi Delta Theta. 
While one of the pledges sat as- 
tride a large snow mound on the 
front lawn and shouted the time, 
others wei'e seen wheeling such 
vehicles as baby carriages and 
children's carts to their cla.sses. 

Scalping 

The annual rivalry between the 
Theta Delts and the Psi U's pro- 
duced some bald freshmen in the 
foimers delegation. Wlien sent to 
Si.eai a mounted fish from the Psi 
U clininy room tlrree Theta Delt 
iieupnyies were caught, and all 
emerged with shaved heads. 

On ihe more sei'ious side of tire 
iCdger, tlie Betas instituted a help 
week instead of the usual hell week 
I'li? members, as well as the pled- 
ges, volunteered their services to 
the cHy of North Adams and spent 
Thursday in a snow clearance pro- 
ject. 

After the initiations on Friday 
and Saturday evenings, the var- 
ious fi-aternities settled back to 
the noi'mal college life. 



Language Groups 
Meet in Currier 



Speaking English Banned 
At Dinner Gatherings 

Three nights a week the Col- 
lege sets up at Currier Hall spe- 
cial dinner tables for language 
students, in order to give them a 
better speaking knowledge of 
French. Spanish, and Gei'man. 
There are usually several language 
instructors present, who join in 
the dinner conveisation where no 
English is the rule. 

The Spanish table leads off the 
weekly schedule on Monday night, 
with the Flench taking over on 
Tuesday and the Geiman on Wed- 
nesday. Tlie dinner, to which all 
students aie invited, is served at 
6:30 p.m.. and usually ends with 
coffee at about 7 p.m. 

Some knowledge of the lan- 
guage is advi.sed unless the diner 
cares to starve to death. These 
language meals were orlghially 
started by the now extinct Oar- 
field Club and have been continu- 
ed by the college. 



Hawkins' Baskets 
Provide Triumph 
In Overtime Play 

Smith Captures Scoring 

Honors, Paces Team; 

Visitors Rally Late 



by Jud Klein '54 

Saturday. Feb. 23 — Jack Haw- 
kins sank the second of a pair of 
fi'ee thiows with only 19 seconds 
remaining in a double overtime 
pei'iod to provide Williams with 
a 53-52 victory over Worcester 
Polytechnic this afternoon. A Win- 
ter Homecoming throng of nearly 
1000 jammed Lasell Gym to wit- 
ness the loosely played, but hair- 
raising contest. 

The win snaps a four-game los- 
ing streak for Coacli Al Shaw's 
cagers. The Ephmen remain inac- 
tive now until Friday night, when 
they take on a highly-touted 
Spi-inpfield quintet hei-e. 

.Smith Hot Early 

Hawkins, playing in an unac- 
customed substitute role, also 
came through three times to tie 
the score in the pressure-laden ac- 
tion after W.P.I, rallied to forge 
ahead for the first time with just 
five minutes remaining. The Eph 
foiward ended the afternoon with 
a game total of ten points' four 
of th»m coming in the cHmatic 
second overtime session, after en- 
tering the fray in the second per- 
iod. 

It was sophomore scoring ace 
Herb Smith, however, who held a 
iTvamped Purple lineup together 
throughout a poorly played first 
half. Outscoring the entii'e W.P.I, 
team foi' tlie first two quartei-s. 
Smith counted on eight of eleven 
shots to spark single-handedly the 
Ephs to a 25-16 halftime advan- 
tage. 

Switch from Zone 

Switching from their previous 
zone defense. Worcester took ad- 
vantage of a cooled-off Smith to 
stage a late third period i-ally 
which enabled them to take a 
41-40 lead willi five minutes re- 
maining, when substitute Doug 
McLaren netted seven straight 
points. W.P.I, center Hai-ry Brown 
a bulwark under the boards all af- 
ternoon, scored on a hook and a 
tup to bring his total to 20, second 
beliind Smith's 21 points in the 
game's personal scoring. 

Successful fi-ec tlirows by Haw- 
kins and surprise-starter Bob De- 
Popolo, and a comer set by Co- 
Capt. Ed Shudt kept the Eph def- 
icit at one point. Then with 58 
seconds left. Walt Creer sank his 
end of a double foul to tie the 
score at 45-45. Brown's last- 
See Page 4, Col. 1 



Dean's List Students 
Hit Four Year High 

Wednesday. Feb. 27 — Dean 
Robert R. R. Biooks annotmces 
that 285 undei-graduates, the 
highest number in four years, 
attained averages of 4.0 or bet- 
ter during the fall term. The 
college as a whole had an av- 
erage of 3.51 This number of 
students on the Dean's List rep- 
i-esents a I'eocrd of 27.84% of 
the college. 

The Cla.ss of 1952 led the 
four present classes with 90 
membeis a new high of 40.18'f. 
Other class totals are: Juniors. 
78: Sopliomore. 63; and Fresh- 
man. 54. 83 non-affiliates made 
the List, while among the fra- 
ternities. Phi Delta Theta and 
Delta Psi were high with 19. 
closely followed by Theta Delta 
Chi. Phi Gamma Delta, and 
Delta Phi, with 18, 17, and 16 
respectively. 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESDAY, I'EIUUIAHV 27, 1952 



f tic Wiling J^Soti^ 

North Adams, Mo^sachusetts iVilliamstown, Mqjsarhuwtts 

Entered os second-doss matter Novembei 27, 1941, at the post office at 
North Adams, Massachusetts, under the A. t at March 3, 1879." Printed by 
Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Ado ns, Massachusetts. Published 
Wednesday and Saturday during the college .ear. Subscription price $5.00 
oer venr Rprord Office, Jesup Hall, William- town 
RECORD Office - Phone 72 Editor - Phone 981 -JK 



N'olmnu XLVI 



Nuinlxr fi 



Kfbnmrv 27, 1952 



Letters to the Editor 



Reals on Fraternities 



,„ , . Fcliiiiaiv 20, 1952 

/ () the tdilor of the Willium.i F.ECOHD: 

III the Williaiiis REC;OFD of Feb. 20 Ilavdfn Talliot '03 
.stoics a Sonne! point at^aiiist diose who lecoiiimfiulcil coinpletf 
hateniitv nicnibfisliip on the jrionnd that ihi' evil to In- rcnicclied 
is the piMsoiial hcailach<'S of thosi- who don't get into fratcinitie.s. 
Bill he is wiony in snpposiii^ that failnic to ijet into other liroup.s 
is Inllv analojrons to failure to net into fraternities. The difference 
is this: the noii-fraternitv itndent at Williams not only fails to 
make a Irateruitv, hut in .» very real and painful sense he feels 
e.\eluiled from membeishio in the collej^e commnnitv. Tliis is be- 
cause in the absence of eollei;c provision of physical facilities for 
the social life of all Williams students, the social dimension of 
campus activity has necessarily become centered in the fraternities 
as pri\ate orfanizatious. This is the institutional evil for which the 
proposed Student Union is the correct atteinpt at solution. 

Where Mr. Talbot fails to ackiiowledije a irciuiine evil, Fred 
II. Hotb '21 withdraw' from his rcs])onsibility as an ahininus to 
combat from within the imperfections of his Alma Mater. I do 
not 'lere discuss his thoujilitless assumption that the fraternities 
at Williams are irrevelant to the meanini^ of the institiition and 
hence that it is shod.ly j'Tonnd to be concerned to maintain the 
kind of college that most alumni will support. Quite apart from 
this. I deplore the h- ir ^veather loyalty so moralistically proclaimed 
bv Mr. Roth. Whar no.ssible evidence is there of the "profound 
affecfioii h)r Willi: ms" which he boasts when he withdraws his 
iirac'ical support ( n the occasion of a connuittee rejiort of which 
he (rsani)ro\es? T.^e test of loyalty is remaiuini; within the family 
evei> when von ft el forced to condemn what some of its nienibers 
have done. Mr. F.ith dunks the test. 

L. W. Reals '29 
Talbot Answered 

February 21, 1952 
To the Editor of tlte Willinni.t RECORD: 

I could not sleep last niiiht after readini; Mr. Talbot's letter. I 
could Tiot slec]-) because 1 was laui^hini;. Reyardini; total Cart'oyle 
Mild Phi Hete enrollment, membership in said honor societies is 
based noon three years of actual academic and extra-curricular 
:ichie\eiiieuts: it is not dependent upon twenty minutes of idle 
chatter, leiHjth of nose, color of skin, size of bankroll, state of 
wardrobe, family pediirree, announced candidacy for freshman 
football, or ability to hold hard liquor. 

If Williams is attemptiin; to rid itself of the appellation of 
"rich man's school," Total-Tapnim; Talbot '0.3 and .i^nti-Eciuali- 
tarian Loeb '27 are not setting the fiiu'st of e.vaniiiles. 

Harold Zimmeiuiaii 54 



Current Williaiiij^iana 



Bi/ John H. Alhiii 

Back in the beKiiminj^ of No\cmber, the REC^ORD ran a 
cartoon depictinf; what humorously was thought to be "what the 
average Williams man wears." Picturinj; a fairly frrotesc)iie under- 
siraduate, the cartoon exhibited a stranjje assortment of rep and 
non-Ivy attire. But just how "shoe" is the average Williams student':' 
Intrigued bv the (juestion and also re(|uired to write a )iaper on 
the subject for History 9-a, 1 determined to take a poll and estab 
lish some facts about the averasfe E))h wardrobe. 

Emplovinjr the random samplini; method of tondiictin)i a 
poll,! inter\iewed some fifty underi;raduates selected by taking 
every twentieth man from the collejre address book. The end 
result is supposed to be within five to eight per cent of the sartorial 
situation on the campus. 

This poll proved, of coiuse, that Williams is a j^retty re]5 
place. But the degree of the standardization is (juite smprising. 
The dress uniform— grey flannel slacks, a tweed or Shetland coat, 
an Oxford cloth shirt with buttondown collar, a striped tie, argvles, 
and plain toed shoes, can b(^ worn by over in'i\etv per cent of the 
nndergraduate body. If statistics interest you, wade through a few 
of these. Sixty-six per cent own at least one Oxford grey Haniu'l, 
single breasted .suit. Worsteils and tweeds follow next in popu- 
larity. Single breasted suits outmimber double brea.sted models 
by four to one. The average undergraduate owns two and three- 
fifths winter suits and one and three-fifths tweed or Shetland S))ort 
jackets. Corduroy seems to be definitely out of taste as over two 
thirds do not own sport coats of this type. Bla/ers and plaids are 
not the rage that advertisers claim, as only one-fourth own prep 
school or college blazers and only one-fifth sport have tartan 
jackets. Cashmere sport coats are way down the line with a small 
six per cent owning this tyjie. The average total nuinber of sport 
jackets lies somewhere between two and three per student. 
92% Wi//i Fhiwel Pants 

In pants flannel is by far the most popidar material. Gabardine 
comes next in liiu'. The number of odd dress slacks varies a good 
deal with indi\'idual students, the lowest number being zero and 
the highest ten pair. The median liiu' falls close to three. .X luxury 
item, DAKS are found only in a six per cent minority, the same 
.si.x per cent that wear cashmere coals. Only eight per cent of the 
college do not own a pair of odd grey flannels or an Oxford grey 
flannel suit. 

The Williams shirt preference is overwhelmingly the Oxford 
cloth, buttondown collar model. Only eight per cent fail to own 
at least one of these. The individual coimt of dress shirts with all 



styles of collars varies a good deal, the lowest number recorded 
being six and the highest, twenty-four. The average number of 
student shirts is approxiinateb twcKf anil a half. Only a tenth ol 
the students have bought pink coloicd shirts, hut twenty per cent 
own at least one of the round collar type, I'ractically no one seems 
to buy more than two of this latter style. Fi\c-sixths ha\c solid 
blue Oxfords. Figures prov<' that the freshman who wants to get 
the really correit collegiate wardrobe should purchase bis white 
and blue buttondowns in a ratio of lour whiles to one bine, al- 
though some tasteful dressers have been known to viokile this rule 
at limes. Oidv the Brooks Brothers and (lliipp shoppers (lilleen 
per cent of the polices) weai the pulloN'cr shle shirt. E\eryone 
has at least one white shirt, oddly enough. 

Ninety per cent ha\e argyle hose, and a slightly larger per- 
centage possess solid color, ribbed, woolen socks. Three-fourths ol 
the students own more woolen socks than those made oul ol any 
other material. Twenty-five per cent have silk hose, but the ma- 
jority of these are used onK' on formal occasion. Nylon doi's not 
seem to be popular with manv, but those who ha\e any socks ol 
this material usually stick pretiominantlv to it. One student claims 
ownership to ninety pair of soiks, but sixteen pair is ;i much more 
a\'erage figure. 

William B. Jones and Richmoud II. ()'!lile\ in their \()luine 
of advice to eastern collegi' coeds entitled, "Weekend, :i Cirls' 
Cuide to the College Weekend " say of the average Williams man's 
footwear: "The man who hasn't got on his white bucks, properly 
sculled of comse, is an outcast. Tlu'V usually appe;n' betore the 
ice is out of the river in the spring and ne\ei conn- oil till its time 
for galoshes again." If this statement is true, then a large forty- 
foiu- (ler cent of Williams men are outcasts. When the large num- 
ber of non-white buck wearers becomes well known, undergrad- 
uates will probably rush out and buy up the local supply to get 
Williams back in the kind reg;u(l of true l\y Leaguers [ones and 
O'Riley. Plain toe cordovans are the most popular tlress shoe with 
sixty per cent having at least one jjair of this Uiie. Scotch grains 
follow next at the fortv-six i^er cent mark. Loafers seem to be just 
as popular percentagewise as white bucks. 

Striped Ties All But Uuicersvl 

Neckwear is a difiicult item to poll. First of all, nobody wants 
to coimt up all his countless ties and secondly, nobody knows the 
diderence between wool chalets and ancient madders or between 
reps and regimentals. In spite of these dilliculties, nin<'ty-h)ur jier 
cent acknowledge owniership to at least one striped tie, and the 
majority have a small number ol solids, plaids, bows, knits, foul- 
ards, chalets and ancient mailders. Most of the polices merely 
lnin|5ed tlu'sc last three categories into the single tvpe ol sniiill pat- 
terns in general. For a sim|)le explanation ol dillerenti'S in textine, 
material, pattern, and worth see either the House ol Walsh or the 
Williams Co-op. The foin-in-h;m(l knot beats out the larger Wind- 
sor by ten jicr cent of the undi'rgradnates on cam|5ns. Most Wind- 
sor tiers, however, stipulate ;i half-Windsor or a very tight full 
Windsor. Loud, large pattern ties are in evidence in only a twen- 
tieth ol the men polled. Some, however, admitted concealing a 
few for vacations in the Midwest. 

/•'(■((• \'r,s7,v. Hats. Black Shoes 

A lew final details. Oidv an insignificant lour per cent ever 
wear a vest matching a suit. A fifth have plaid or tattersoll waist- 
coats, but ninety-five per cent state that thev generally never wear 
a \est. Four per cent admit donning a felt hat when it is not rain- 
ing, but the rest limit wearing any sort of dress head wear to such 
inclement weather. Black shoes are worn only for .\FIU)TC. Naval 
Reserve, and formal occasions Fortv-six per cent find tlieinscKes 
more clothes-conscious since entering VVilliams, thirty-four per 
cent are imchanged, and twenty per cent are less clothes conscious 
at Williams. 



I In spite of the degree that Williams men conform to this pat. 

tern of tweedy, lollegiate dress, ther<' is a leeliug that to dress 
in the "Princeton Charlie" fashion is .somewhat degrading. For ex- 
ample, a lunior, after listing all the preii'(|nisite.s of a collegiate 
waidrobe including lhirt\' icgiuieiit;il lies, said, "I'm definitely not 
shoe.'" Or a gri'v-llanneled member of Ihi' (Mass of 19,54 stated; 
"I refuse to go 'joe (.'ollege. " Students who own the luiiforiu hiil 
to see to what a great degree they conform with the clothing pat. 
.eriis of Williams. 

Ol Williams inslilulious, clothing is most impoilanl in rehition. 
ship 111 the fraternity. The suecessbil rushee wears the rep uiiihirin 
hir Ihe most part. The ni;ui with a loud lie ;mil a coiiluiov coal 
has two strikes against him Iroiii Ihe sl;ul. II this in:ni shonlil get 
into a liouse, he will he "nioliled" into coulorrnilv. Fraternities b;isc 
;i giiiiil deal ol their jndginenl on a in:ui's clolhing because il oljcis 
:in eas\ methiid of (|uiek e\:iluation. I''ralirnilies aie laled in part 
In- this degree of stanilariliz:ilion. SI. ,\nlhiinv I hill, known in thi' 
fall ol 19.'3S as "the housi' with the dark suit rush," is still the sliong. 
hold ol collegiate tastes according to Ihe results ol Ihe poll. 'r|„, 
iiiiii-:illiliates :ire the most nnci)llegi;ile group. ( )l the eight pef 
cenl who do not own a single button down shirt, lliree-lonrlhs of 
llieiii are non-fialeniily men. .Ml the men who do not own gicy 
llannels :ue in the s:une group. Ol Ihe men polled who do |„)( 
;illeiiipl to follow Ihe pattern, only one was im upperclass, fraler- 
vitv iii:ni. No ilillerences behveeu the majorily ol Ihe houses could 
lie seen in the results ol Ihe poll. 



THE NEAREST FLICK 



Bij liiiiee I'cdiiiei 

WFDNESDAV :niil rill'RSDAV - Ihe foreign Hicks w 
h'w :niil far between, but :ire usikiIIv a cut al)o\e Ihe .Xineric.in 
prodncl "The Walls ol Nhilapaga" is no exception. Starring |e,ur 
(iabin. 'The (;abli> ol (;:nil," who is older lli:ui (irilleii Hall anil 
Isa Miranda a striking ll:iliaii actress, piesinii:ihl\- soniewh.il 
vouMger than either (Trillin or (iabin. The film centers aroniid 
CeiKKi :iih1 Is:i, who pla\s a mother with a hall-grown danghler. 
|eaii oils onto the scene :uiil begins to dominale Ihe lamiU' be- 
coming riiin:inlicall\' iinoKcil. Unlike the Hollywood happv end- 
ing higged to e\erv bo\-meels-girl silualion. this film liandli's llii' 
problem ol two middle-ageil lovers, both disilhisionetl and jii- 
cap:ilile of creiiting ;i \outhliil, carefree roiiKince. The happv-eiiil- 
ing iii'M'T hiis a real ihaiice. The Hick is :i re:il show, the acliiii( 
iiialine. skilllnl and subdned. Well photographeil (at least I 
Ihonglil so) and slighlK ilillereiil, this is :i lop-notch show, a good 
one to see il von want to watch Ihe best loreign ino\ie of last year. 

|nst b\' wa\' ol contrasl. there is :i double fe;iliiie and I don't 
mi'an ".\ Phiee in The .Son'. Ibis lillle gciii !•< oiii' ol Ihosi' fright- 
ening jobs that I'ame out dining the hist war. "Four Days Leave" 
is Ihe title, starring ( :i misuse ol Ihe word, so help me Kazan) 
('orni'll Wilde. Von know the story, s;iilor on le:i\e in the big cilv 
girls, girls, girls and :dl kind ol lnnn\ things li;ip|)en, :ill pretty 
cleini-cnt yon know, like people lalliiig ilimn :uiil confusion :id 
iiifinitinn. :iil nansenm. Not exactly an arlfilm. 

FRIDAY and SATURDAY - Over Ihe lop everyone, a Wiir 
Hick. "Fixed Ha\onels " w itii Richard Basehiut :inil Michael O'Sheii, 
Bazookas and sin, ill iirins lo Ihe right of vuii. loreign t\pes ilviii); 
b\' llie car-lo:iils to Ihe left of von, with liaselnirt iiiid O'Shea go- 
ing into Ihe breach once inure. Pretty exciting aclindlv, consider- 
;ible violence ;inil Hag-wa\ ing. I e;m think ol worse ways to spend 
an evening, but not too manv. You could do worse, though, it'.'i 
not the worst war Hick 1 ever saw. .Medium good. 



DID YOU KNOW 
THAT YOU HAVE A PLACE IN NEW YORK? 

It's the Williams Club at 24 E. 39th St. Its pleasont 
rooms are yours at special undergraduate rotes . . 
Your dote will love the Ladies Cocktail Lounge and 
Dining Room . . . and you will feel right at home in 
the bar. 

The William Club 

24 East 39th St. 
It's Your Club - We Hope You'll Use It. 

Undergraduotei ore olwoyi welcome 



STUDENTS 

Themes and Tlieses Typed 
Neat, Prompt, .Accurate 

Carbon Copy Free, 
If Desired 

Called for and delivered 
at No Extra Cost 

S .75 per thousand words 
Call .314.3-W after 5:00 p.m. 




BUTLER 
Coal & Grain Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 
Adams, Mass. 




I 
^^ College Men! 

CHOOSE A CAUSSn 

in the U.S. Air Force 



/^ti"^-. 



"We alu>ay$ get the carriage 
trade . , . it's that extra aash of 
Angoatura* in onr dninksl" 

AROMATIC BITTERS 
MAKES SETTER DRINKS 
•P.S. If a good horse sense to use a 
dash or two of Angostura to bring oul 
the true flavor of Manhattans and Old 
tathiontdt. Try Angostura in soap too! 



Aviation Cadet Program Offers 
for Collegians Now Preparing 

Here is a real man-size opportunity! You 
can choose — immediately— between being a 
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f • Take transcript of col- 
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2« Appear for physical 

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U.S. AIR lOIUI 




THE WILLIAMS HKCOHD WEDNESDAY, FEUaUAUY 27, 1952 



Sqmshmen Lose to Philadelphia ! 
In National Team Championships 



Squire* Gains Only Win 

At Major Tournament 

Ephs Best Hamilton 

Ihe Williams squash team lost 
U) Pliiludc'lphia in the first round 
„t the National Teams Cliamp- 
lonshllJsi n New Haven Thursday. 
The 4-1 defeat eliminated the 
liphs from the tourney which 
liiid teams participatirm from 
Yule. Harvard and major cities 
lliroutihout the country. 

Dick Squires, playins number 
line, scored the lone Williams win. 
He won his extended matcli in the 
lillli game, 18-17. Soapy Symini;- 
lun, Chris Thoron, Ray George 
iiiid John Brownell were the losing 
Ephs. 

Without using the first five men 
Williams downed Hamilton 6-0 at 
home, Saturday. Tom Brucker, 
Tom Adkins, Tod Tillinghast Al 
[•'ulkerson, Dorey Friend and Hank 
S'lirier who represented Williams 
;ill won their matches in straight 
names. 

This afternoon the Williams 
sciuash team will face a strong 
Yale squad in a home encounter. 
Yale, whose lone defeat was a lj-4 
loss to Army, is ranked among the 
lop team in squash circles. Tlie 
Eph racqueteers lost to Army G-3 
earlier in the sca.son but were 
playing without Dick Squires at 
the time. 

The number one match should 
prove to be the best of the day, 
with Squires meeting Blair Mur- 
l)hy. 




Winter Track Team 
Runs in IC4A Meet 

New York, Feb. 2'i — Coach 
Tony Plansky took his winter 
tiack team to New York to- 
night where they competed in 
lire IC4A track meet. Though 
the team did not fare well a- 
gainst the stiff competition, 
ihey bettered their times in the 
mile relay, and qualified in ,sev- 
eral trial heats. 

The mile relay team of Cos- 
griff, Cypiot, Jones and Preese 
did theii- best time of the sea- 
.son, 3.31. George Kelsey failed 
at 6'1" in the high jump, and 
Jack Brody and Dick Walters 
took Ihii'ds in the trial heats 
in the (JO yard high hurdles. 



Kpli sciuash star, Ditk Squires, 
whii will play a bic role In the 
match with Yale today. 

woe Announces 
Fraternity Skiing 

Giant Slalom Competition 
To Take Place Today 



Barely recovered from its Win- 
ter Carnival efforts, the Williams 
Ouling Club has determined to 
make use of the snow that has fi- 
nally arrived by holding an inter- 
fraternity .ski meet. This meet, the 
See Page 4. Col, 1 



Frosh Wrestlers 
Bow to Wesmen 



Saturday, Feb. 23— The Wil- 
liams freshman wrestlers met de- 
feat today against a strong Wes- 
leyan agregation, 19-15, in the La- 
sell Gym. The Purple got off to 
a bad start as the first three de- 
cisions went to the visitors. John 
Kern, Charles Bradley, and Bob 
Savadove were the Eph losers. 

Captain Bob Little gave the 
home hopes a boost when he came 
through with his fourth straight 
pin of the year. However, a de- 
fault by Rod Wilcox, together with 
the defeats of Al Speidel and Herb 
Ladds, put the final damper on 
Williams aspirations. Heavyweight 
Al Reed registered his third pin 
in a I'ow to give Williams its sec- 
ond bright spot in an otherwise 
bleak day. 



Swimiiier8DownWesmen,41-32 



Wesleyan Matmen 
Beat Purple, 19 - 9 

Early Cardinal Wins 
Fatal to Grapplers 



Facing one of the most, power- 
ful clubs in New England, the 
Williams wrestlers today bowed to 
the Wesleyan matm.en by the 
.score of 19-9. After dropping the 
day's first three matches, the 
Ephs battled back to take three 
straight bouts and move back in- 
to the running. 

As usual, it was the Williams 
middle weiglit men who proved 
strongest. Bob Shorb. Dick Gor- 
don, and Captain Bill Callaghan, 
consistent winners all season, were 
the only winning Ephmen today. 

The match opened disastrously 
for the Eplis, as Cardinals Dave 
Sims pinned Eph Rod Cover. 
Wesmen Morrison and Kauter fol- 
lowed with wins over Ephs Dimock 
and Williams in the 130 and 137 
lb. matches. At this point the Ephs 
trailed 13-0. 

Bob Shorb then gained the first 
Eph victory by decisioning Wes- 
leyan's Al Stuhl. Bill Callaghan 
followed with a win over Card 
Jack Graham at 157 lbs, and Dick 
Gordon made the score 13-9 with 
a win ovei- Wesleyan's Ed Dewey. 




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Dun Jones, whose two wins Sat- 
urday, were instrumental in the 
win over Wesleyan. 

Frosh Swimmers 
Defeat Cardinals 



Saturday Feb. 23— The Williams 
Freshman swimming team defeat- 
ed the Wesleyan frosh 51-24 
today before a large homecoming 
crowd at the Lasell Gymnasium 
pool. In downing the Card swim- 
mei-s. Coach Bob Muir's yearlings 
caiJtured seven firsts and set a 
new Williams Freshman record. 

George Montgomery swam the 
200 yard backstroke in 2:29.3, 
ne rly 9 seconds under the old 
record of 2:38. Co-captain Gene 
Latham won easily in the 440 yd. 
freestyle event as did breast stroke 
star Eric Gustafson while John 
N.'vvliall and Pete Hunt were both 
hard pressed to beat Phargeson. 
Wesleyan's outstandmg swimmer. 



Relay Team Sets 
Regional Record 

School Diving Mark 
Erased by Rogers 

b.v Bill lledman 

Saturday, Feb. 23— The Wil- 
liams swimmers started off with 
a record breaking perfoi'mance 
in ihc 300 yard medley relay and 
were never in serious trouble there 
after as they successfully opened 
defense of their Little Three title 
by downing Wesleyan 41-32 to- 
day in the Lasell Pool. The Ephs 
clinched the meet in the 440 yard 
freestyle with Don Jones beating 
Vandenberg of Wesleyan wlio set 
a record for his college in the 
event last week. 

The medley relay team of back- 
stroker Dave Byerly, breaststi'oker 
Rick Jeffrey, and freestyler Dick 
Martin erased the exi,sting college 
pool, and New England records by 
po.stini; a mark of 2:57.1, two and 
one-tenth seconds faster than the 
old Niw England record. This was 
tile fourth New England standard 
that Purple swimmers have tied 
or broken this year, Martin hav- 
ing accounted for the other three 
in the freestyle events. 

Rof^ers Breaks Record 

With a sensational display of di- 
ving, sophomore Max Rogers 
cracked the college record in his 
event with 102.25 points. The old 
record was 94.15 points set last 
year by Al Post who placed third 
today. 

Otlier winners for Williams were 
Jones in the 220 freestyle, Mar- 
See Page 4, Col. 2 



Eph Skiers Cop Eastern Class B 
Crown for Second Straight Year 



Lydonville, Vt.. Feb. 25 — Des- 
pite the lo,ss of team captain Ned 
Collins, shelved by a last minute 
knee injury, Ralph Townsend's 
Purple skiers completed a success- 
ful defense of their Class B East- 
ern Inter-collegiate Ski Associa- 
tion crown today. 

The Ephmen, minus Collins, fin- 
ished at the head of a strong eight 
team Held m win a bid to the 
Class A tourney at St. Lawrence 
this weekend. Townsend's pro- 
teges piled up a healthy 19-point 
margin over runner-up Bowdoin 
in tile final team standings. 
Tucker, Callahan. Wilson Star 

Veterans Bob Tucker, Pete Cal- 
lahan and Doug Wilson paced the 
Eph entry in tire three-day. four 
event meet, Wilson finished a 



strong first in the cross-country, 
trailed by Tucker in fourtli place, 
Joe Foote. eighth, and Neil Chase, 
nmth. 

In the jump, Callahan, Tucker 
and Foote brought home the sec- 
ond, third and fifth slots, res- 
pectively, in a blanket finish, while 
Neil Cha.se took fifteenth. Calla- 
han led the Ephs to a third-place 
showing in the downhill, running 
fourth, ahead of Tucker, ninth, 
and Stu Chase, fourteenth. 

Tucker garnered his fourth 
place with a fifth in the slalom, 
as Bowdoin skimeister award win- 
ner Richard Church copped the e- 
vent. Callahan and Stu Chase 
ran seventh and eighth, respect- 
ively, as the Ephmen finished 
third to wrap up the tourney title. 




, . . wear it without for sports. 



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ARROW BI-WAY 

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THE WILLIAMS HLCOUn WKDNESUAV, FKUUUAUY 27, 1952 



Basketball . . . 

st'cuiid jump shut failed after u 
Worcester freeze, and the game 
moved into overtime. 

The visitors' Earl Bloom netted 
two free throws, but Creer sank 
one for the Ephs as Brown left 
the game with his fifth personal 
foul. Hawkins and Bloom traded 
clutch one-pointers, but Eph 
liopes tumbled when Smith foul- 
ed out. 

With 1:10 remaining in the first 
extra period. Bill Suessbrlck 
counted a charit.v toss, after miss- 
ing one only 20 seconds earlier 
to create a 48-48 deadlock. Jeff 
Miller fell short on a foul shot for 
the Purple with 19 seconds left, 
forcing a second five-minute o- 
vertime session. 

Hawkins Tallies 

After netting a pair of one- 
pointers to again drop the Eph- 
men behind. 50-48, W.P.I. 's Hank 
Valis joined the sideline exodus, 
becoming the tliird Worcester 
man lost via tlie foul route. Haw- 
kins made both the basket and 
free throw good, and Shudt chip- 
ped in with anotlier to give Wil- 
liams a 52-50 margin. 

Worcester sub Don Hoeh swish- 
ed a hasty set with 1:05 remaining 
to ag.iin knot the score, and there 
it stood until Hawkins' game 
winn.ng effort. 



House Skiing . . . 

Palmodo Giant Slalom Trophy 
Race, has been set for 3:00 p.m. 
this afternoon. The slalom course, 
laid oat by ski coach Ralph Town- 
send, is located on Sheep Hill 
which is now in excellent skiing 
condition. 

The meet is open to all connec- 
ted in any way with Williams, ski 
team members, faculty members, 
and ordinary snow bunnies. The 
Giant Slalom is not too difficult 
for the plucky beginner, the Out- 
ting Club states. Each house may 
send four members, with the fast- 
est three in the preliminary run 
making up the house team. Ski 
team members may enter the meet 
on an individual basis, although 
they may not compete on a house 
team. 

Ski poles from tlie House of 
Walsh and Jolin Jay's "Skiing in 
the Americas" from Ray Wash- 
burne's will be awarded to the 
winners. 



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Swimmers . . . 

tin in tlu' 100 freestyle, and Jef- 
frey in the breaststroke. Joe Wor- 
thing ion in the 220 freestyle and 
Charley Douglas in the breast- 
stroke took seconds for the Ephs. 
Post, John Belash, Sam Kimberly, 
Al Malzger, and John Beard also 
look thirds in various events. 

Wesleyan also had a record 
breaker in Cliuck Chadwick who 
set a Cardinal ix'cord in the 200 
backstroke, covering the distance 
in 2::i0,;i. 

Summaries 

300 yard medley relay — Won 
by Williams iByerly, Jeffrey, Mar- 
tin). Time, 2:57.1. 

220 yard fi'eestyle — Won by 
Jones iWms.); 2, Worthington 
iWms.); 3. Vandenberg iWes.l. 
Time, 2:15.5. 

50 yard freestyle — Won by 
Barth iWes.); 2, Chadwick (Wes.) 
3. Belash iWms.i. Time, 24.2. 

Diving — Won by Rogers iWms.) 

2. Meyer <Wes.); 3, Post iWms,). 
102,25 points. 

100 yard freestyle — Won by 
Martin iWms.i: 2. Barth iWes.); 

3, Kimberly (Wms.). Time 51.3. 
200 yard backstroke — Won by 

Chadwick iWes.i: 2, Shepherd 
iWes.i; 3, Matzger (Wms. >. Time, 
2:30.3. 

200 yard breaststroke — Won by 
Jeffrey iWms.i: 2, Douglas 
I Wms. 1 ; 3. Ginn i Wes. i . Time, 
2:32.6. 

yard freestyle — Won by 
I Wms. 1 : 2, Vandenberg 
3. Beard tWms.). Time, 



440 
Jones 
I Wes. 
4:57.8 

400 



yard freestyle relay — Won 
by Wesleyan (Podoski, Fabian, 
Chadwick. Barth i. 



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Phi Gam, Chi Psi 
Control Fraternity 
BasketballLeague 

Biddle, Williams Capture 

College Squash Loop 

For Chi Psi House 

Wednesday, Feb. 27— The Phi 
Gams, boasting a well balanced 
team, remained on top of the 
Tuesday division of the intramur- 
al basketball league, when they 
won their fourth straight con- 
test of the year. The fine play- 
ing of Doug Foster. Terry Cana- 
van and Bob Ouchterloney was 
instrumental in the 25-8 victory 
over a weak Saint Anthony team. 

The Dekes remained in a second 
place tie with the Theta Delts by 
virtue of a close 17-16 overtime 
win against the Phi Sigs. 
Theta Delts Win 

Cal Collins led the Theta Delts 
to a convincing 26-10 win over the 
Sig Phis, which kept them even 
witht he Dekes. The DUs evened 
up their record for the year as 
they edged Psi U, 19-15. 

The Chi Psis continued to pace 
the Thursday league as they beat 
the D Phis 23-18. Paul Doyle led 
the winners with 12 points. The 
Alpha Dells, who have played one 



less game, remained in a virtual 

lie for first by their 21-15 win 
over the Phi Dells. Endy Perry 
and Bill Mi.ssimer, who gave the 
AD.s a distinct height advantage, 
were an important factor in the 
wauier's third straight win. In 
other Tlnusday activity Jim Zeig- 
ler and John Hall led the Betas to 
a 20-10 win over the Kaps. 
Chi I'si Cups Squash 
■Ihe Chi Psi squash team, com- 
posed of Craig Biddle and T'om 
Williams, won the college intra- 
mural tournament. The Sig Phis 
placed second as they lost to the 
Chi Psis in the finals of the 16 
team tournament. 



Basketball Standings 

Tuesday League 
W. 
Phi Gamma Delta 4 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 3 
Tlieta Delta Ciii 3 

Phi Sigma Kappa 2 

Delta Upsilon 2 

Sigma Phi 1 

St. Anthony 1 

Psi Upsilon 



Thursday League 
W. 



Chi Psi 

Alpha Delta Plii 
Kappa Alpha 
Beta Theta Pi 
Phi Delta Theta 
Delta Phi 
Zela Psi 



L. 

1 
1 



3 
3 

4 

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Executives Appointed 
To Head Boys' Club 

Wednesday, Feb. 27--Suc- 
ceeding Bruce Van Dusen '53 
and Howard Babcock '53, 
George Kel.sey, Jr. '54 and Wil- 
liam St. Ainant '54 have been 
appointed co-executives of the 
Williamstown Boys' Club. Kel- 
sey is a member of Beta Theta 
Pi, wliile St. Amant is in Del- 
la Plii. The Boys' Club a branch 
of the Will'ams Christian As- 
tiociation. provides recix'atlon 
for youngsters ni the WiUiams- 
town area. 

Year-round Activity 

Touch football, swimming, 
basketball, hiking and Softball 
are some of the activities which 
the 192 youngsters in the Club 
enjoy. During the winter the 
college opens Lasell gym and 
its basketball and swimming 
facilities to the organization. 



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f tr^ Willi 



\ oliiiiK- XLVI, Number 7 

Eight Fraternities 
Vote in Officers 
For Coming Year 

Fetterolf, Carter, Stege, 

l.azor, Dighton, Kaufman, 

Hartnett, Post Chosen 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE 




3R^£orit 



SATUHUAV, MARCH 1, 1952 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



I'riday, Feb. 29 — Willi fi'esliniiui 
mitJiillonfi out of the way. cmn- 
piis fniternillcs an' bu.sylnu Uiciii- 
.iclvi's with ousting the Incumbciii 
liuusc onU'crs ill favoi' of youiiKcr 
juiiloi-sopliomoiv slates. Eitjht 
ihiii.se.s held electlon.s thi.s past 
ucck. and the rest ai'e expected 
Id follow step before the oi-Baniza- 
111)11 of the new UnderKiadiialc 
Council. 

Alpha Delta Phi. one of Ihc 
ihrcc fraternities to elect last 
:iif,ht. chose Michael Lazor '5;i as 
i!n new president, ond Bruce Van 
Du.seii '53 as vice-pre.sideiit. RoKer 
[iniwn '53 was selected secretary. 
.Stese llcilds l>sl V 

Psi Upsilun cho.se Oeor(4e StCKe 
,):) as president, with John Judt;c 
■:i:) and Daniel Fitch '53 as First 
jiid Second Vice-Presidents, re- 
-liectivi'ly. Robert Cloutier '54 is 
ilie new Recordinn Secretary at 
IM U. while Don Holt '54 takes 
liver the olliee of Correspoiidini; 
Secretary. 

C'rt'orne Hartnell '53 was elevat- 
iil lo the presidency of Delta Up- 
Mlon. and Michael Rayder '53 be- 
came Vice-President. Robert Sul- 
livan '54 was elected Correspond- 
ing Secretary, while Geort^e Kam- 
.sey '55 takes over the duties of 
HiTordinc Secretary. 

n Phi Selects Post 

Al Post '53 became the new 
head of the Delta Phi hou.se in 
Wednesday niKht's balloltinii. and 
.Michael Loeninu '53 ro.se to the 
vice-pie.sidency. Robert Ferjjuson 
■.')3 was voted in as Treasurer. 

Phi Sluma Kappa elected Sto))h- 
en Kaufman '53 President. Rich- 
•ud Jevon '53 Vice-President. Don 
Jones '53 Social Chairman. Pied- 
ciick Beriien '54 Secretary. 
Dichtiin Zete Prrsidrnl 

John Dlttlilon '53 takes over 
tlic presidency of Zeta Psi. while 
John Allan '53 rl.ses lo Vice-Pres- 
ident. Philip Meeder '54 becomes 
I he new Treasurer. Arthur Muir 
53 CorrespondiiiK Secretary, and 
Bruce Palmer '54 Recording Sec- 
retary. Richard Abrams '53 as- 
sumes the duties of Historian. 

Phi Gamma Delta .selected Dana 
Carter '53 u-s President. Robert 
Kills '53 as Treasurer, and Her- 
lierl Smith '54 as CorrespondhiK 
Secretary. John Brownell 54 and 
Ralph Smith '54 will fill the ollices 
of Recordins Secretary and His- 
torian 

Theta Delta Chi chose Peter 
Fetterolf '53 as President, with 
David Palmer '53 eaminK the 
title of Vice-President. 



Proiessor Max Lerner Discusses 
Leading Figures in '52 Campaigns 



Temporary Student Union 




Group Asks UC Poll 
On New Rush Plan 



Total Membership Club 
Keeps Issue Alive 

Wednesday. Feb. 27— The Lea- 
gue For Total Membership today 
took a major step in its drive to 
keep complete rushing a live Lssue 
on the Williams campus with a 
proposal that the UC poll the stu- 
dent body on the McClellan Plan. 

The LeaRue. headed by Arnold 
Levin '52. was formed February 1. 
simultaneous with the dis.solutlon 
of the Garfield Club. Split into 
three divisions — student, alumni 
and faculty — it numbers approx- 
imately 150 non-affiliate members 
at present. 

The League's policy i.s handled 
''y an executive committee of 
twelve and three volunteer sub- 
commlttes. Bob Bauer '53 head.s 
Ihc publicity end. while Aaron 
Kntcher '52 and Lewis Remick '53 
"'e in charge of organization. 
Seth Shapiro '53 is readying plans 
for organizing the incoming class 
0' '57, the first freshman class 
under deferred rushing. Until de- 
ferred ru.shlng comes into effect, 
"at present our main objective Is 
to enlist support from within the 
fraternities themselves", Bauer 
declared. 



Cow Deadline Set 
For Late March 

Features Cartoons, 
Rudolph Criticism 

Saturday. March 1 Final pub- 
lication date for the Purple Cow. 
campus humor magazine which 
has birii revived by a number of 
eneiKi'tic students, has been set 
for Wednesday. March 2G. al per- 
cisely 12 n(x)n. In his announce- 
ineiil of the final date. Editor Ron 
Hubin 53 emphasized that the 
nine of release would have a spe- 
cial significance of its own. but 
declined further comment on the 
matter until a later date. 

The 36 page rival to .such well 
known college humor publications 
US Dartmouth's "Jack O'Laiitern" 
and the "Harvard Lamijoon". pro- 
mises depth in its short stories, 
cartoons, and Jokes. 

Collerls Fuculiy Gems 
Featured among the many car- 
toon spreads is a .series of Art 
Kdilor Bob Seaman's '54 "Blind 
Dates" Winter Carnival Queen 
Anne Williams has also been se- 
lected as "Cow Girl" and will be 
featured in a full page |)hotograph. 
■Ruminations" gives a variety 
of comments about the general go- 
uigs on around town. Included as 
a special feature w'ill be a collec- 
tion of often intentional, but 
more often unrehearsed remarks 
by members of the faculty in the 
class room. 

Costs 35r 
On I lie more .serious side Mr. 
Frederick Rudolph '42 reviews 
"God and Man at Yale." The issue, 
contains selections both serious 
and humorous from the works of 
students, parents, and the facul- 
ty. In the future Dubiii expressed 
the hope that .some of the alumni 
might feel the urge to contribute. 
The first of a series of four is- 
sues scheduled for publication in 
March. May, October, and Decem- 
uer of 1952. the Purple Cow will 
lio on sale Mareh 26 for 35c a 
copy or at the regular subscrip- 
tion rate of three for a dollar. 



Reginald Kell Quartet 
To Appear in Chapin 

Saturday. Mar. 1--The De- 
partment of Music and the 
Thompson Concert Committee 
announced the presentation of 
Reginald Kell. clarinetist, on 
Tuesday evening. March 4. Mr. 
Kell will be assisted by a cham- 
ber group of Joel Rosen. Piano; 
I.sadore Cohen. Violin: and Hel- 
en Bulkls. Cello 

One of the world's outstand- 
ing clarinetists. Kell will offer 
a varied program of the works 
of Beethoven. Mendelsohn, 
Brahms and Milhaud. This is 
the third year that the Regi- 
nald Kell Chamber Players 
have toured the country, and 
they have in the past received 
excellent reviews. The concert 
will be presented at 8:15 p.m. 
in Chapin Hall and will be open 
to the public witliout charge. 



Noted Liberal Attacks 
Present Arms Race 

ruesday. Feb. 26~-Sponsored by 
the Williams Lecture Committee. 
Dr. Max Lerner. Professor of A- 
inerican Civilization at Brandeis 
University, lecturer at New York's 
New School of Social Research, 
and columnist for the "New York 
Post", delivered a speech on "1952: 
Men and Ideas" in Je.sup Hall at 
8 p.m. this evening. 

Dr. Lerner. Professor of Politi- 
cal Science at Williams from 1938 
to 1943. called the campaign year 
a "year of .shows", particularly 
in this era of television. 

Taft Called Archaic 

In a run-down of the various 
Republican candidates. Dr. Lcmer 
called Senator Robert A. Taft 
"one of the greatest minds of the 
nineteenth century." maintaining 
that the Ohioan's political policies 
showed little progress from those 
of his father. William Howard 
Taft. 

"Taft's .strength lies in the past 
failures of the Republican can- 
didates." said the lecturer, as he 
characterized Thomas E. Dewey's 
11)48 campaign as "positive geniu.s 
111 snatching defeat from the very 
.laws of victory." 

Favors Warren 

Dr. Lerner. speaking frankly 
from a liberal's viewiJoint. named 
Governor Earl Warren of Calif- 
ornia the only non-conservative 
Republican candidate. He called 
General Eisenhower a con.servative 
attempting to remain above po- 
litical conflict. 

Douglas MacArthur. he feels, 
will make a strong impression at 
the Republican convention and 
may prove like "the man who 
came lo dinner." His nomination, 
however, would involve a liighly 
dangerous experiment with a 
"man on hor.seback". 

Truman To Run? 

If corruption remains a major 
issue. Dr. Lerner believes that 
President Truman will not run, al- 
though he does want another 
term. Senator Esles Kefauver of 
Kentucky and Govenor Adlai 
See Page 4, Col. 1 



European Schools 
Oder Study Plan 

Famous U.S. Educators 
Lead Summer Group 



Aiming lo achieve a wider mu- 
tual understanding among stu- 
dents of various national origin, 
the leading universities of Eu- 
rope are at present preparing to 
receive this summer the largest 
number of foreign students since 
World War II. 

Programs of international sum- 
mer courses and seminars, con- 
ducted entirely in English, are, 
al present, in the developmental 
stage in Eiigland. France. Scan- 
dinavia. Portugal, Spain, Italy, 
Greece, Turkey and Israel. A 
wide range of di.scussion topics 
includes language, literature, art, 
music, and political and economic 
theory, while a special journalism 
group, under Dr. Robert W. Des- 
mond of the University of Calif- 
ornia, will cover a practical ex- 
perience a.ssignment. 

Priced from $565 

In addition, each program fea- 
tures visits to art and music fes- 
tivals, theatre, opera, concerts and 
ballet. All-inclusive prices for the 
tours to Europe, covering a mini- 
mum of four countries, begin at 
$565. 

Leadership of the entire pro- 
gram is In the hands of noted 
educators from Columbia and 
Harvard Universities, Pennsylvan- 
ia State College, and others. Fur- 
ther Information on the program, 
which is also open lo students 
from Western Europe and the 
Near and Middle East, may be ob- 
tained from Travel and Study, Inc., 
no East 57th Street, New York 
22, N, Y, 




Improved Alumni 
House to Double 
As Student Union 



A view of the interior of the Alumni House which is to serve as 
the Student Union temporarily. 



Fine Acting, Comic Situations Make 
'School for Wives 'Highly ZestfuF 

III/ All Lain 

Siipcrl) acting aiciiiiiited Icir llie siKCcss dl tlic I'lavi'is lii- 
cor))oi"at('(l priKiiic'tioM ol '"Hie School I'^or Wises" Wcdiit'sclay 
( vi'iMnt; 111 the WIT. :\ rclrcsliiiinK iiiicliillcrc'tl ,stat;e was graced 
hv Ihc prcscricc ol this prolcssioiial-st'c'iiiiiii^ amateur cast. Tliis 
was an anilc i^roii|i ol plavcrs who wuri' orijiiiial. spirited anil 
roii.sistentu liiiiiiv. .\ hiniiK \ersalile asseinblat^i'. they eoiiibiiied 
acriihatic ability with a line eciiiiie sense (o ^i\e a blend ol eller- 
\eseeiit action and talk. 

Here was a cast which took lull acKaiilU'ie ot the potential 
hysteria of the aiichcnce. 'I 1m' idiosMicrasies ol the characters and 
the eoinic situations the\' represented were so shrewdly reali/ed 
by these actors that tlie\ struck tlic audience as acce])tablc realism 
and coiivincint; (heater; tboii^jh in lad tliev were oiilv tij;!it Iraiiie- 
. -Oworks constructed to convey a cri- 



Babcock Chosen 
WCA President 



Van Dusen Secretary, 
Burgher Treasurer 

Wednesday. Feb. 27— Howard 
Babcock '53 was elected President 
of the Williams' Christian Asso- 
ciation succeeding Jack Harris '52. 
Biuce Van Dusen '53 replaces Jim 
Henry '52 as Secretary, and Dave 
Burgher '53 takes over the treasu- 
rer's position vacated by Hodge 
Markgraf. '52. 

Besides his duties connected 
with the WCA. Babcock is also a 
member of the varsity soccer and 
biiseball teams, a member of the 
Student Activities Council and 
Business Manager of the Gul. Van 
Dusen lias earned a position on 
the varsity lacrosse squad, and a- 
long with Babcock shared the 
managerial duties of the Wil- 
liamslown Boys' Club. As past 
head of the Activities and Welfare 
Committee of WCA, Burgher also 
headed the Scout Fraternity, is 
president of the Plying Club, and 
a member of tlie SAC. 

Some time in tlie near future 
Pii'sident Babcock hopes to ar- 
range conferences witli similar re- 
ligious organizations in such 
scliools as Wesleyan and Amher.st. 



Ileal perception which by force of 
isKiil and literary maneuvers evol- 
\e.s into a rather clear-cut phil- 
osophy . 

Production '(Tnpretentions' 

Wednesday's production bore 
ihroughout a delightful aura of 
happiness. Full of sympatliy for 
young love and natural gaiety, 
Moliere's creation becomes a high- 
ly zcstful and unreflective exer- 
cise. It is to the credit of the cast 
that much humanity permeated 
this unpretentious comedy. Agnes 
is thus .seen as a charming inno- 
cent, and even Arnolph is a sym- 
pathetic figure whose debacle 
comes when he desires something 
contrary to nature and common 
sense. 

We have here a leal and rather 
interesting plot with no creeping 
investigations which fail to fur- 
ther the action. The naive con- 
fessions of Agnes together with 
the unguarded confidence reposed 
by Horace in his rival, and tlie 
stifled rage of Arnolph against 
both, form a series of comic scenes 
of the most amusing, and at the 
same time, of the most i-efined 
description. 

Vehicle for .\rnulph 

Wlien you get right down to it. 
this engaging comedy is pretty 
much a solor affair. Arnolph mo- 
tivates and .sustains the action 
almost continually. He is onstage 
for all but four minutes of the 
performance and he delivers no 
See Page 4. Col. 5 



Cap & Bells Begins Preparations 
For Pirandello s Play, 'Henry IV 



Conovitz to Take Lead; 

Bryant Directs AMT's 

New Italian Tragedy 

Now in rehearsal, Luigi Piran- 
dello's modern Italian tragedy, 
"Henry IV" opens on the .stage of 
the Adams Memorial Theatre for 
a three-day rini beginning March 
26 

Director David C. Bryant, Jr. 
described the season's fourth stu- 
dent production as one of the 
most difficult undertaken in re- 
cent years because of complex plot, 
varied characterization, and lavish 
scenery and costoming. 
Casting Problems 

The large number of Important 
speaking roles in the play further 
complicated the director's pro- 
blems. The list of principles in- 
cludes Martin Conovitz '53 as 
Henry IV, Sally Long as the Mar- 
cliloness Matilda Spina, Dorothy 



Sprague as Frlda, and Joseph De- 
wey '52 as Baron Belcredi. 

Other students taking major 
parts are Theodore Weems '55 as 
Dr. Genoni. Daniel Miller '55 as 
Harold. John Johnston '54 in the 
role of Landolph. Thomas Bell '55 
as Ordulpli. Gilbert Holtzman '53 
playing Berthold. and Timothy 
Beard '53 as John. 

Friens Insanity 

The plot is based around action 
which sees a modern-day Italian 
aristocrat, pretending in.sanity, 
assume the role of King Henry W. 
tenth century German emperor. 
His family. In efforts to cure him, 
drive him to disaster. 

Set in modern-day Italy, the 
three-act tragedy takes place a- 
galnst the background of a re- 
constructed tenth century palace. 
William Schneider '52 designed 
the play's two sets. Production 
manager is John Lar.son '53, and 
Dave Hud.son '53 is stage manager. 



Student-Faculty Control, 
New Kitchen Facilities 
Planned for Next Fall 



Saturday. March 1 — Beginnuig 
next fail, a temporary Student 
Union will be in operation at the 
IJicscm Alumni Hou.se near the 
loot of Spring Street, Following 
the Alumni Banquet last Sunday, 
the Executive Committee of the 
Society of Alumni offered the col- 
lege the use of its building until 
a permanent Student Union can 
be constructed. 

At present, the Alumni House 
consists of three large lounging 
rooms and a small bar. The only 
alterations w-ill be the addition of 
a wing at the east end of the 
building to house the West College 
Room and a .small kitchen with 
.sandwich and snack facilities. 
Rustic Decor 
Constructed in 1941. largely 
through the work of Ralph Per- 
kins '09. the building bears a pre- 
vailing rustic and colonial at- 
mosphere. The large and high- 
ceilinged Dodge Memorial Room 
which comprises the present east 
wing is graced by ceiling beams, 
an upright piano, a deerhead. and 
a large fireplace topped by a win- 
ter view of Mt. Greylock done ui 
oils by Dwight Shepler '28. 

A smaller but equally impressive 
north room is similar in decor, 
with writing desks, game tables, 
a fireplace and two large murals 
of Colonel Eph Williams by Stan- 
ley Rowland. These two large 
lounges are joined by a low-ceil- 
inged. intimate room which leads 
off the entrance hall and contains 
;i iliir SHiT-rol lahlps. and i\ wealtl^ 
of photographs and sketches on 
the walls. 

Alumni Retain Use 
At present, the house also con- 
tains a small kitchen, a cloak 
room and a lavatory, along with a 
powder room and rooms for three 
faculty members upstairs. The new 
wing will lead olf the Dodge Room, 
and its addition should tuni the 
building into a creditable .social 
center for alumni and students. 

The house is expected, however, 
to revert to the use of the alumni 
on big weekends such as last 
week's Homecoming. 

Before students can secure the 
use of the building, an effective 
system of management must be 
decided upon, Ii is probable that 
a joint board oi students and fac- 
ulty will be selected to handle the 
affairs of the Union 



College Ike-Men 
Initiate Campaign 

Treadway Opens Drive 
As Group Organizes 



Thursday. Feb. 28— Backers of 
General Dwight D. Eisenhower for 
President gatliered at the Wil- 
liams Inn tonight for an organ- 
izational meeting of the Berkshire 
County campaign. Tlie meeting 
was sponsored by the Williams 
College Ei.senhower-for-President 
committee, and was open to all In- 
terested. 

Speaking at the meeting was 
Richard Treadway of Stuibridge 
who is a member of the Massachu- 
setts Eisenhower committee, and 
who has taken a leave of absence 
as President of the Treadway Inns 
to devote full lime to the cam- 
paign. Another speaker was Atty. 
Harry Glovsky of North Adams, 
Eisenhower Chairman for Nor- 
thern Berkshire County. 

The Williams committee, head- 
ed by James P Baxter. Ill, is 
sending 2000 letters lo registered 
Independanl and Republican vot- 
ers in the area urging their sup- 
port. Its appeal centers on the 
statement that "El.senhower is 
not only the man to unify the 
country and restore strength and 
prestige to the national admin- 
istration, but is also the man to 
bring us lasting peace". 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATUKDAV, MAHC;J1 1, 1952 



fire Mill^i l^sofj^ 

North Adorrii,, Mo^buchuiells /Vdliumjirawn, Mqssachus«tts 

"Entered as second-class matter Novnmber ?-7, 1941, at the post office at 
North Adorns, Mossachusetts, under the Ai t of March 3, 1879." Printed by 
Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Ado ns, Mossochusetts. Published 
Wednesdoy and Soturday during the college ear. Subscription price $5.00 
per veor. Record Office, Jesup Hall, William; own, 

RECORD Office - Phone 72 Editor - Phone 981 -JK 

EDITORIAL BOARD 



Editor 



Managing Editors 
News Editor 



John H. Allon '53 

Charles E. Longe '53 

Richard C. Porter '53 

Woodbridge A. D'Oench '53 

Thomas A. Belshe '53 

Kay Kolligion, Jr. '53 Sports Editors 

Frederick A. Terry, Jr. '53 .' Feature Editor 

BUSINESS BOARD 

John Notz, Jr. '53 Business Manager 

Dudley M. Baker '53 Assistont Business Manager 

Robert O. Coulter '53 Assistant Business Manager 

John F. Johnston, II '54 Advertising Manager 

Horold G. Pratt, Jr. '54 Assistant Advertising Manager 

Curtis V. Titus '54 Circulation Manager 

Richard C. Schaub '54 Treasurer 



Volume XLVI 



March 1, 1952 



EDITORIAL 

Vote on McCIellan Plan 
A Vital Necessity 

Action to proiiurtc tlio is.sue of total fiatcmity membership 
reached a i)eak last month with the all-collcire vote on the .stniif;ht 
bomice plan and then dropped almo.st out of e.xistence on the 
canii«i.s. Final examinations, the Trustees ainionncement of coni- 
mun:'l freshman eatinij and plans for a Student Union, house- 
part\, hell week, and the Rmuaine misfortune have all eomhined 
to draw tlie center of campus attention a\\a\' from the (|ni'Stion of 
coinplete fraternitv membership. Hut this issue, this matter of 
vital concern just will not be forced into the baeku;ronnd for lonjr. 
.Afjaii the issue has come to the forciiround. 

(.'ertainlv the Leai!;e for Total Membership has a \alid arj^u- 
nienf for proposing another student \'otc on the 100'/ member.ship 
P'()hl"ni at this time. Nothini; in the last \()te would indicate that 
the vote was an all inclusi\i' Note that determined that all wavs 
and means for this reform would be nnacci'iitable to Williams 
underjiradnates. jannarv's xote merel\- proved that the so-called 
"straight bounce |)lan" was not the most desired plan. In all fair- 
ness to the advocates of complete memberslu'i") who felt the straight 
bounce would lead to too i^reat a decree ol house strati! ication. 
another vote nmst be planned. This vote must determine whether 
there are enouL'h backers of a more egalitarian ]ilau to ]iut total 
membi'rship into effect. 

In view of the Trustees' action to institute deferred rushiui; 
and communal freshman dinius^, it becomes more imperative that 
a vote on a plan designed to eliminate lunise stratification be 
considered as sooji after the new Underijradnate Coimcil takes 
over on March 10 as jiossible. Such spe<'d is called for because 
of the limited amount of time between the time the 1952-53 
(Council jrnins control and the beninninsr of Sjirinn Vacation. 

Deferred rnshinn will obviouslv cause an increase in the 
percentage of frato'rnitv men from the nppi'r three classes. \Vhen 
the new svstem of sophomore rushing uoes into effect, both the 
houses and the men beinu rn.shed will know more about the 
actual situation of house ranking. The houses will know which are 
the most desirable men, and the rnshees will know which houses 
are the best. Athletes will be drawn to athletic houses to a jr'eiiti'i' 
degree than is now the case. All the stratification that will result 
from deferred rushing will be harmful to the Williams social 
system. Perhaps the greatest advantage of Freshmen Week pledg- 
ing is the residtant comiiarative etiualitv of houses, where each 
is a small cross section of Williams as a whole. Broadening of 
liersonalitv and contacts with all tyjies of students are the great- 
est arguments against stratification. If some egalitarian plan such 
as the McCIellan Plan is not seriously considered and ado))ted 
before deferred rushing becomes a realitv, the advantages which 
Williams now enjoys under non-stratification will be lost. Wi- 
urge the present Undergiaduate Council and its successor to 
consider that deferred rushing will bring stratification unless the 
student body accepts some e<|ualizing plan before the fall of 1953. 




Letters to the Editor 



Union Exterior 

Fehruarv 9, 1952 
To the Editor of the Record: 

Congratulations on vour sensible and moderate editorial "Tlie 
New Union". I particularlv like vour idea that "the huilding must 
he attractive cnouaJi to make stmlenln use it jrom the utart". 
(italics mine). 

In inv opinion, "attractive" needs to be interpreted primarily 
in terms of those who will use this building, not in terms of a 
theory of architecture which has jilagued this campus for aiiprox- 
imately a hundred years. Why is it that the Art Department 
caimot in good conscience, much as it would like to do so, wax 
enthusiastic about the design of anv building erected for Williams 
students since the Lawrence Hall octagon (1846)? Lehman Hall 
and the S[)uash Comts, jierhaps; the interior of the Theater, cer- 
tainly, but as certainly not its exterior. The Science Labs are 
excellent remodelling jobs, and the Biology Lecture Hall is 
exactly what I mean by 'attractive", though the outside does not 
create anv such expectation. 

We have been bewitched (bothered and bewildered) by 
Georgian and Gothic dreams. We have taken an attitude which 
would have prevented, in their day. the invention of the very build- 
ings we have sought to imitate. But even good imitations (Chajiin) 
sometimes make inefficient solutions for modern use. Fortunately 
for the futme. today'.s costs preclude a repeat of such extrava- 
gances. 

Perhaps I am mistaken, but 1 believe there is strong and 
growing .student sentiment (bv no means a merely local peculiar- 
ity) for a fine modern building on the Williams campus. Not one 
of glass and concrete, but one showing a fresh use of traditional 
materials deriving from the needs of the building itself. To 
be clear, I mean a building like the new MIT dormitory, rather 
than tlie new CJraduate Center at Harvard. We could have had 
a theater comparable to Wisconsin's, outside as well as inside. 
Now we have another chance in the Student Union, and the site 
chosen olfers fascinating po.ssibilities. Vassar. plagued by much 
worse architecture than ours, has an interesting new dormitory 
whicli, I am informed, the girls would rather live in than in the 
several earlier confections. 

Tlie most important thing about our new Student Union 
if seems to me, is that it should be attractive to Williams students. 
its exterior as well as its interior. Tliose of us who are older 
.shoidd remember that time marches on - even in institutional 
architecture where it is likely to be very heavy-footed. 

Sincerely, 

S. Lane Faison, Jr. 



Open Letter to the UC 

Fchrnary 28, 1952 
Open Letter to the UC: 

liie piupose of this letter is to request that the UC sponsor 
another vote on the (|nestioii of total niembcr.ship in fraternities, 
this time under a plan which will be more acceptable to all 
parties - tlie Mctllellaii Plan.' 

We teel that since the last college vote, two very ijnporlant 
lacts are evident. Tlu' first is that niaiiy votes against the plan 
»l total menihersbip were not against total nienibeisliip, hut rather 
against the "straight hoimcc system" which some advocates ol 
total membership could not, in all good conscience, accept as an 
inprovemeiit. 

The second is the action of the Board of Trnst<-es which in- 
stitutes deferred rushing and freshman cDinniniial i-ating as ol 
J953. Assmning about fifty men to he about the avcrag<' imniinuj]. 
which each liou.se at Williams needs to break even on dining room 
and kitchen costs, the Trustee clirectivo means that the lift)- men 
Number 7 '"'"'.' ^^' *'.''^'-'" f''"'" t'l'' upper three classes instead of, as prev ious- 
ly, from four classes. Allowing lor some .scholastic mortality and 
other reasons for dropping out of college this means that each 
Iraternity must then pledger// k'asi twenty men at the proper time, 
and thus insure their own financial sob ency. 

This means, in effect, that iwaih/ all Williams men will in 
the future be pledged to houses; probably no more than ten or 
fifteen men will be left out each year. We'fi'i'l that a veiy strong 
case could be made out, iu the name of humanity, iinre and 
simple, tor the adoption of total rushing. For the "left-outs" after 
1953 tlie situation will be nearly iutoleralile; instead of having 
about twenty per cent of the college to consort with, these men 
will be 111 the muiority of about five per cent. They will he iirae- 
ticaliy incapable of any activity, and we fed, seriously emotionally 
ctamaged by knowing that they are the one man out of twenty 
wlio was considered impossible to live with by fiffeeii different 
ami imlependeut luiits of theii fellow Williams liieu. 

Furthermore, absorbing these men nierely means that each 
louse would hav e to take only one, or at most two more men We 
leel that the true Ix-iiefits of Iraternity living and .sociability will 
not be (hiniaged by the addition of these one or two men since 
111 tact the traternity's Ireedom to reject is alrc^ady seriously ini- 
pairetl l)v delerred rushing, which in turn hirces large delegations 

We leel that adoption ol total uieiiibership will serve to im- 
prove the campus situation gi-nerallv ami .stop the harmhil publi- 
city cucnlatmg that "Williams thinks this is LS.52 and not 19.52" 
We leel that this adoption hv the student body of Williams will 
not <>i,lv impair the Iraternitv s benehts to anv serious extent but 
will improve the academic and .social climate here on campus 

-Vccordingly we are suggesting that the UC vote to have a 
campus-wide vote on the .McCIellan plan, and endorse this plan 
It will, we leel, retain a certain amount of selectivity which men 
111 ratennties so want, while at the same time it will not result iu 
a dangerous stratification or "typing of houses," such as many 
feared the straight hounce would. The .McCIellan Flan comes 
closest we feel to recouciling those two inipoitaiit points of "iiicln- 
sion instead of exclusion" and fuller campus dcmocracv, on the 
one hand and tlir' right of a man to choose his friends, and select 
Ins Inothers . on the other which we will continue to respect in 
accordance with this plan. 

Sincerely, 
~ — ... JiThe Executive Committee, 

'Vr} Ml Ti V . ^., „ ,„ ^-'"'''K"'' f'"' Total .Membership 
Ld .Note: The .McCIellan Plan, originated bv JI. Ijnice McCIel- 
lan 45, former Assistant Director of Admissions, is a plan hii 
complete nienihership under which the preliminarv stages of 
iiisliing are the same as at present, with all non-affiliates going 
to all houses. On the basis of second period bids, the non-affiliates 
are divided into three groups, judging by the number of bids 
received: 1) those with the most bids (theoretically 11 to 15)' 
■■i) tlio.se with the medium number of hitls (theoretically fi to 10 ■' 
aiicl 3) those with the lowest iftunber of bitis ( tlii-oreticallv to 5) ' 
he houses rank the men prelerr'ntiallv, wiHiin each group, and 
the n(,n-aftiliatesr:ink the houses ,>r<-leientiallv from top' to bottom 
.Matching and houuciug them lakr^s place, separately by groups 
with each fraternity getting one third of its delegates from eaeli 
group. 

Speed Deferred Rushing 

^, „ „ ,. ,. February 27, 1952 

To the Editor of the RECORD: 

Wfl.vter"' ^""'""'"^ ''''"''' '" "'"'"'" '" "" "/"'" letter to President 

r R '1 IT, '.'■"'.''■/" "■"■"'',' '^'''"'' '^2 Ex-president of the former 
i-,arfielcl Club, inlormmg him of the decision of the trustees 
concermngcelerred rushing, you said that you would welcome any 
suggestion that might he of help in solving the above mentioned 
problem. I beiewitb respectfully submit a suggestion that might 
help implement the Fnistees' decision. 

It seemed that die only tiling that was holding hack deferred 
rusliiug was the construction of a freshman dining hall After 
iiispectmg the fac;ilities iu Curric-r Hall it looks as if that hall 
c:",ikl feed up to five hundred people. \V,. already have the man 
lo run that type of program in Mr. Bush, a trained dietitian. So 
Wr'flZ''"' '. '^ it i\P"f il;!'- t" liave deferred rusbing in the 
fa 1 of 1952 ,nste:.d of the fall of 19.53. Under this plan all noii- 
iithhates would eat in Currier Hall. 

If this isn't ])ossihle then it might be feasible to feed the 
upper class ii.m-aHiliates in the Alumni House. If the kitchen 
taei ities m the Abunni J-Iouse aren't ade(|iiate then the College 
could fix It up on a temporarv basis until such time that the new 
eating hall would be huilt. 

In offering this suggestion it might appear that I am being 
impulsive and a hit over anxious, but this is because I and others 
liave been frustrated in our attempts to see the will of the College 
community put into effect. I am writing this letter with the hope 
that the suggestions made when put into effect would relieve the 
present situation and that it will jret fair consideration from you. 

Sincerely, 
Seth Schapiro '53 

Ray's Praise 

^ . February 26, 1952 

To the Editor of the RECORD: 

I noticed that the distinguisbed name of C. Elliot is buried 
way down among the "a.ssociate editors" of your worthy journal. 
Because of the rich contribution he made to your February 23rd 
issue in his brilliant article on sex-as-hiiind-in-Spring-Street win- 
dows we think he should be summarily elevated to .some point 
nearer to the one you so deservingly hold. 

Of course in this instance we are prejudiced, hut we think 
that articles as pithy as this help much to give the HRCX)RD a 
special kind of color which it has sadly lacked in the drah days 
of the recent past. 

Everyone liere was deeply appreciative of the spirit, accuracy 
and fine jmirnalistic style that the aforementioned Mr Elliot 
blendtHl together so neatly in this small masterpiece. I 

Raymond Washburno 



ANNOUNCING 

Annual 

Williams Art Contest 

$50 IN PRIZES 

for information 

call 
5. Lane Faison 

or 

Dick Abrama 

ZETA PSI 



Why wait until 
morning? 

When you can tet the out- 
standing news of the day every 
eveiiinfi throue:h the fuU leased 
wire Assuciated Press service in 

iLi}v iEruutirri;it 

North Adams, Mass. 
On sal« at 5 p.m. en oM 
Williamitown Newsstonds 



L.G.Ba 


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THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, MARCH 1, 1852 



HEADLINER 



By KolUKlaii 

111 Seplember, 1950, the WilUiims College athletic staff was blessed 
with the addition of former Olyiripic tompetltor, Ralph Townsend, 
who was appointed to fill the capacity of sklinit coath. Today, after 
only a >«''>«■ *"<• " '"'"■ ""^ "niastermlnd" is on the verge on closing 
out one of the most successful skiing seasons Williams College han 
known in many a year. 

Replacing former coach, Jim Parker, Townsend also assumed 
handlinK of frosh football with Bobby Coombs and this Spring, he 
will take over reins for the varsity lacrsse team. Hwever, It Is the 
winter sport In which the diminutive mentor excels. 

With the loss of only Captain McWilliams from last year's squad 
(and with the arrival of long awaited decent skiing conditions) Town- 
send has been able to bring along and develop many of the potentially 
talented men into top-notch performers. Sophomore Joe Foote has 
reifived well-deserved praise for his remarkable improvement in both 
the cross country and jumping events. Bob Tucker is another who has 
eorne a long way under the two-year tutelage of Ilalph Townsend, a- 
long with a host of others. 

Placlni! sixth at the Dartmouth Winter Carnival was. In Ralph's 
mUid, the hiKh point of the sea.son, as the Purple were able to pull 
ahead of two Class A teams, SI. Lawrence and Syracuse. Captain Ned 
Collins, and Pete Callahan w,.>re both Instrumental in the team's top 
showing. 

Last week at Lyndonville, Vermont, without the services of the 
injured Ned Collins, the WilMams stalwarts successfully defended 
tlic c;iass B title, finishing well aliead of the runner-up Bowdoin crew. 
Both the jumping and cross country events were monopolized by Wil- 
liams winners, as the Ephmen for the second year in a row earned a 
pliue in the Class A finals. 

Tills week-end finds Coacli Townsend leading Ills crew of "snow- 
men" into the A ranks where tlie Ephmen will oppose nine top col- 
lege teams. Middlebui-y, Dartmouth. New Hampslilre, Vermont, Sy- 
racuse. St. Lawrence and R.P.I, are the other U.S. entries, while from 
north of the border in Canada come stars from McGlll and Laval Uni- 
versities. Should the William'; men place in any one of the first 
seven spots, then they would be automatically eligible for Class A 
rating come next winter. 

Townsend feels that the team spirit this year has been exception- 
ally high and he could not emphasize enough that "the success 
axhievcd by the skiing team this year has been duo to th fact that 
they have worked together as a unit, as a group, — as a team. Indi- 
vidualism (tempting as it may bei and all the glory that goes with 
heing the Individual star have been sacrificed for teamwork!" And 
jjisl take a look at the results: a very bright showing at Dartmouth, 
a victory at Lyndonville, and high hopes for success against the top 
skiing powers of the East. 

The cioss country and downhill competition will be running at 
While Face Mountain. close-b.\ New York's beautiful Lake Placid. 
The slalom and jumping events take place at Canton, N. Y., sight of 
St. Lawrence University. 

Hopes a re that Ned Collins' wrenched knee will be well healed 
for the non-intercollegiate "Harvard Slalom" at Bromley on March 9. 



Purple Grapplers 
To Climax Season 
In Amherst Match 



Schellenger, McGrath, 
Tank Pace Sabrinas 
In Little Three Battle 



Saturday, Mar. 1 — The Varsity 
and Freshman Wrestling squads 
journey to Amherst this after- 
noon for the traditional Little 
Three battle which will close out 
the mat season at each school. 

Dethroned as Little Three 
champions for the first time In 
four years by Wesleyan last Sat- 
urday, the Purple Varsity Is still 
.seeking its first win as against 
five losses. Amherst numbers a- 
niong their victims Tufts, M.I.T., 
and B. U. while losing to Wes- 
leyan. Comparative scores derived 
from the Wesleyan matches indi- 
cate a close contest, the Sabrinas 
See Page 4, Col. 2 



Frosh Racquetmen Face 
Jeff Yearlings Today 

Tuesday, Feb. 16 — Travelling 
to Middletown today the Wil- 
liams freshman squash team 
easily whitewashed a weak Wes- 
leyan .squad 9-0. The victory 
enabled the yearlings to cap- 
luie one leg on the Little Three 
crown. The Wesmen were pow- 
erless against the Eph frosh, 
dropping all twenty-seven 
games played. 

This afternoon the fresh- 
men will try for the Little Three 
championship, playing host to 
an Amherst team which has al- 
so trounced Wesleyan by a 9-0 
score. With few changes. Coach 
Chaffee expects to send the 
same men into the Amherst 
match who swept the Cardinal 
encounter. The provisional 
lineup comprises Kesel, Cluett, 
Lindsay, Wierdsma, Schenck, 
Heppenstall, Quinn. Forten- 
baugh and T. WTilte. 



Squash Team Bows to Yale; 
Purple Defeats Cardinals, 9-0 



Williams Mermen Meet Amherst 
For Little Three Championship 



Martin, Jones, Rogers 
Spark Purple Squad 
In Sprints, Diving 

by Ted Oviatt 

Saturday, March 1— The Wil- 
liams varsity swimmers travel to 
Amherst today for their final 
meet of the season. The Little 
Three championship will be at 
stake, since both teams have 
trounced Wesleyan. 

Past performances seem to give 
the Ephmen a slight edge, but the 
rivalry between the two schools is 
always sufficient to foil compara- 
tive time predictions. Both teams 
made good showings against the 
Bowdoin natators and lost by 
slight margins. 

Martin Favored 

Williams star Dick Martin is 
expected to bring home victories 
in both the 50 and the 100 yard 
free-style, although he will en- 
counter strong opposition from 
Tate and Krudenier of Amherst. 
John Belash and Sam Klmberly 
serve to give added strength to 
the Eph sprint department. 

Two outstanding performances 
against Wesleyan last week give 
Williams high hopes in two other 
events. If they can repeat these 
feats, Don Jones in the 220 yard 
free-style and Max Rogers in the 
diving are likely winners. 
Amherst Hopes 

The Jeffs, spear-headed by 

Wasie. holder of the New England 

record, look for a clean sweep of 

the backstroke. Carbour will be 

See Page 4, Col. 4 






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Co-Captain Juliit Uelash who 
leads Bob Muir's squad against 
Amherst today. 



Trackmen in K. of C. 
Meet at New York 

Saturday, Feb. 1 — Five mem- 
bers of the Williams track team 
are entered in the New York 
Knights of Columbus track 
meet scheduled tonight in Mad- 
ison Square Garden. They will 
compete in both the mile relay 
and the high jumping events 
against teams from Holy Cross 
and NYU. Primed tor the dis- 
tance event will be Al Fletcher, 
Ted Cypiot, Bob Jones, Pete 
Cosgrlff, and "Tex" Freese 



Face Lord Jeffs 
Today in Title Tilt 

Ephmen to Defend 
Little Three Crown 

by Ned HepenstaU '55 

Wednesday, Feb. 27— The Wil- 
liam.s squash team split two mat- 
ches this week, travelling to Wes- 
leyan yesterday to trounce the 
Cardinals, 9-0, in an effort to re- 
tain their Little Three champion- 
ship, but bowing to a visiting 
Yale team 7-2 today. 

A highly-touted Yale team 
came lo Williamstown with a re- 
cord .showing but one loss, a 5-4 
defeat at ihe hands of Army, 
which had in turn beaten the Ephs 
G-3. Oi added interest was the 
attraction of the Squires-Murphy 
match, which determined the 
number two-seeded man in the 
comiim intercollegiate matches. 
Murphy Beats Squires 

A packed gallery was on hand to 
watch Dick Squires, Purple ace, 
battle Blair Murphy, Yale's top 
man. Squires had beaten Murphy 
over Clirlstmas vacation, but had 
lost in the intercoUegiates last 
year. Murphy bested Squires in 
three straight games, 15-14; 15-11, 
and 15-6, keeping the upper hand 
in every game with his aggressive 
game and tricky corner shots. 

"Soapy" Symington, playing 
number two, beat Ewing of Yale 
3-1 in a hard-fought match. 
"Soapy's" varied serves and cross 
court game kept Ewing on 
the defensive all throughout the 
See Page 4, Col. 3 



Hamilton Skaters Edge Ephs, 5-2; 
Beard Scores Twice For Purple 



Norwich Here Today 
For Return Contest 




Captain Jimmy Harvey, ace cen- 
ter of the hockey team, who has 
sparked the attack 'throughout 
the season. 



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Clinton, N.Y., Feb. 27 — Hamilton's 
Blue and White sextet came from 
behind tonight with a three goal 
final frame to pace an underman- 
ned Williams liockey team 5-2 
The win was Hamilton's fifth of 
the season, and the second at the 
expense of the Bellmen. 

Showing their customary first 
period strength, the Ephs scored 
after only a minute of scrimmage 
as John Beard streaked inside 
Hamilton defensemen to slap in a 
Pike-Harvey pass set up. Bod 
Starke, Purple goal tender, shut 
out the opposition until at 2:03 
of the second frame Wing Tom 
May hit the cage with screen shot. 
Beard Nets Second 

Less than three minutes remain- 
in the second period when the 
Williams first line followed a tie- 
breaking Hamilton marker with a 
goal of its own. Beard, again tak- 
ing passes from Pike and Harvey, 
rifled a corner shot through goal- 
ie Gauder's pads to even the count 
at 2-2. 

With injuries having cut the 
Williams line up to a single de- 
fense and two lines without re- 
placements, the team's chronic 
3rd period collapse was inevitable 
Jim VanDyke. left wing for the 
victors, stickhandled the disk past 
See Page 4. Col. 3 



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THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, MARCH 1, 1952 



Holden '42 Speaks 
On Bank Career 



Placement Bureau Opens 
Alumni Guidance Talks 



Fate of Oldest College Observatory 
Unknown as Astronomers Move Out 

Inj Hali>h Aikrii '5-/ 
■"I'Ir' lirst pi'iiiiaiii'iit Anu'iicaii ohsi'iAutorv is still staiidiiiH," 
Professor T. 11. Salloril proudly proi'laiiiicd in lfiS,S, in an ailclress 
coiniiK'inoratiiiij; tlic (ilticth aniiixcisuiv of tlu- Hopkins Obstnv- 
iitoiy. It .stands toilav on the .south side of llii' Ik'rksliiic (,)uad, 
and, while astrouoMiital activities takt' place in niodeiu (|Maiteis 
ill the jilivsics hiiikhiin, it leinaiiis a curious and little-known 
part of the caiiipns' past. 

The explorer will find on the first iloor a central rotunda and 
two winjis. The heinis|)herical ceiliuii of the rotunda is dark blue, 
and paper stars pasted on it represent Williams' limited claim to it's 

beine the oldesi pianetariuai O — — • 

this country. Antique astronom- 
ical equipment is scattered about; 
some of the original instruments 
ai-e still in the west wing. 
Dome Lost 
Up in the revolving dome is a 
telescope mounted there in 1852; 
the fate of the orisiinal one, and 
also of the hemispherical dome 
which the present water-tower 
affair has since replaced, remain 
one of the astronomy depart- 
ment's unsolved mysteries. 

A look out the window tells the 
reason for the building's present 
d.suse. Trees hide the southern 
skies, while at night the lights of 
the campus and Spring Street 
make observation in other direc 
lions impossible. Most of the ma- 
teriiii, wonderful in its day, is 
now outdated, and the building 
coniuins no heat or running wa- 
ter, i'he last class before the move 
to the physics building met there 
in liij fall of 1950. 

Once Busy 
Eijcted at a cost of $2,075 in 
1838, largely through the efforts 
of professor Albert Hopkins, who 
quarried some of the stones for 
ils walls himself, it once stood in 
the center of the Berkshire Quad 
and was the scene of much ac- 
uiviiy. Although the off-campus 
I'ield Memorial Observatory stole 
its thunder for a while after 1882, 
that fell into disuse, and in 1922 
astronomical activity moved back 
to the old building. In the mean- 
time, it had been moved to its 
present position, where the Smed- 
ley Terrace was built around it 
in 1908. 

Plans have been suggested for 
preserving this distinquished relic 
as an astronomical museum. The 
central rotunda could be convert- 
ed into a small-scale plantearium 
while the wings might house dis- 
plays of Early American instru- 
ments. But, at present there is 
little activity in the oldest as- 
tronomical observatory still in 
existance in the United States. 



Wednesday, Feb. 27— "A Career 
in Banking", a speech given to- 
night in the Chi Psi House by 
Herbert Holden '42, Assistant 
Cashier of the National City Bank 
of New York, was the first in a 
series of vocational guidance talks 
sponsored by the Placement Bu 
reau. These talks will be given 
periodically by alumni who have 
been successful in their various 
fields, and a question and dis- 
cussion period will follow each. 

President James Phinney Bax- 
ter III '14 and Paul Wright '27 
nead of ihe math department at 
Groton School, will be the princi 
pal speakers on the topic. "Tea 
ch«ng as a Career", to be discussed 
on Wednesday, March 5, at 7; 30 
r". M. at the Kappa Alpha House, 
ihe subject of graduate study 
and college teaching will be cov- 
ered by President Baxter, while 
Mr. Wright, a member of long 
standing of the Groton family, 
will iittack the problem from the 
piep school side. 



Lerner . . . 

Stevenson of Illinois appear as the 
most popular candidates if Mr. 
Truman declines the nomination. 

Dr. Lerner, who said, "I'm just 
mild about Harry," named his 
choices for the Democratic nom- 
ination: Justice William O. Doug- 
las of the Supreme Court, and for- 
mer OPA administrator Chester 
Bowles. 

Stressing the fact that all can- 
didates are bound by an environ- 
ment of Cold War diplomacy- and 
economics. Dr. Lerner condemned 
the present arms race as the 
world's most serious problem. He 
stated, however, that future his- 
torians will praise the Truman 
administration for its vigorous 
policy, citing the Atlantic Pact, 
NATO, and the Marshall Plan as 
especially strong points. 

In closing. Professor Lerner rec- 
ommended that the U. S. level oft 
its re-armament program, make 
use of economic and ideological 
weapons and present to the world 

STUDENTS 

Themes and Theses Typed 
Neat, Prompt, Accurate 

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Phone 132 



Wrestling . . . 

oowmg 18-6 while the Ephmen 
were defeated 19-9. 

Schellenger Undefeated 

Outstanding for the Sabrina 
varsity ir.atmen have been Spike 
Scnelienger In the 130 lb. class; 
tla Tank at 147; and Captain 
Gieg McGrath. 177, defending 
New England champion, who was 
upset by Wesleyan's Corky Chase 
two weeks ago. Schellenger is un 
defeated this year and should fig 
ure strongly in the New Englands 
at Springfield next weekend 
Coach Bullock will go along with 
his regular lineup of Cover, Di- 
mock, Williams, Shorb, Callaghan 
Gordon, Edwards and Murphy. As 
m the Wesleyan match, Dick Ed 
wards will wrestle in the unlimit' 
ed division, while Hugh Murphy 
goes in the 177 pound class. 

The Freshmen will also employ 
their regular lineup of Kern, Brad- 
ley, Savadove, Little, Wilcox, 
Speidell, Ladds, and Reed. The 
outstanding Jeff frosh grapplers 
and Mark Schellenger and Dean 
Tank, younger brothers of the var- 
sity stars. A three way tie for the 
Frosh Little Three crown could 
result should the Ephs triumph, 
Amherst having defeated the Wes- 
men decisively two weeks ago. 



Squash . . . 

iatti,cn. Ciiris liioroii bowed by a 
j-i ocuie to vVoou, a wen rounded 

iLi^ii capittin Bay George lost 
.lis luauii in the number live po- 
oi„.Oii u-i, i»ti.er lighting to win 
til,; Liiiiu game 18- n. aopliomore 
joiui urdwueii won tne second 
.nai/cn oi ine uay tor me Purple, 
eii.jj.oyuig nis siyie oi coiner snots 
M uu>vii uie Kuie Captain, Nick 
aiauy. uispiuymg varied steady 
ga.ue.s, i.ne oottuiii lour Yaie men 
eacn ueieaied apns Adkins, Bruck- 
ivci, iimugaast, Kiiu l-'uikerson 
uy o-u scores. 

un iuesaay the team took the 
initial step m reiainmg their Lit- 
tle luree iitie by taking the mea- 
sure of tne Cardinals at Wesle- 
yan K-u. m the match played on 
tne small, warm Wesleyan courts, 
tne furpie won all but three of 
the 3U games played, showing 
superior iinesse and experience 
m their games. 

Squires Beats llentz 
Williams junior star Dick 
Squires, defeated Cardinal ace 
John Hentz in a close 3-2 match. 
After the home team senior got 
tne upper hand and was ahead 
:i-i, tne speedy Squires exhibited 
nis smootn, steady game, wearing 
out iientz and winning the next 
two games and the match. 

iMumoer three man Chris Tho- 
ron was the only other Epn to lose 
a game, as he came from behind 
to ueieai Wesleyan's Jim Sailor 
j-i. ' soapy ' Symington, Ray 
ocorge, John Brownell, I'om Ad- 
i^iius, J.0111 Brucker, Tod Tilling- 
.laot, ana Ai li'ulkerson all blank- 
^u uie.r opponents by 3-0 scores. 
;\iniierst Here Today 
m.s aitdnioon the Purple meet 
rtiiiiierst in tne Lasell courts in 
„ luatcn wnicn will decide the 
^i...c iiiree Championship, the 
j,=.io, iiaviiig defeated Wesleyan 
i-«. /iiiinerst holds victories over 
ii'inity, M.I.T.. and Dartmouth 
.;i autiitiou to vVesleyan, but has 
ari>Pijea four contests, to Yale, 
rtriiiy, ilarvard, and Navy. 

JuQged by comparative scores 
against irmity, Yale, Army. Dart- 
mouth, and Wesleyan, the Ephs 
noid the edge over the Sabrinas. 
ihe spirited Jeffs, however, led 
by their number one man John 
Dickinson and Captain Grant Les- 
chin, can be easily underestimated, 
Coach Chaffee warns. Against 
Amherst today Chaffee will send 
the veteran lineup of Squires, 
Symington, Thoron, George, 
Brownell, Adkins, Brucker, Til- 
linghast, and Pulkerson. 



Snow Brightens 
Sheep Hill Hopes 

Canning Feels Ski Slope 
May Not Lose Money 

Monday, Feb. 25— Gordon Can- 
ning '53, student manager of the 
Sheep Hill ski run, announced to- 
day ihat the local slope may be 
able to pay tor itself this winter 
for the first time in three years. 
Shjep HUl Wi.s formerly operated 
oy tiie Williams Outing Club, but 
was later turned over to college 
administration because of the 
large losses incurred in recent 
years. 

Poor conditions in the past few 
years have strictly curtailed the 
amount of skiing in this locality, 
allowing only five of an expected 
forty-two days last year. The 
management of the run was op- 
pressed with similar conditions 
this year until the advent of the 
phenomenal flurry which blan- 
keted illiamstown two weeks ago. 

Last weekend proved to be a 
blessing as 280 skiers Invaded the 
slopes to test and perfect their 
abilities. Response to night skiing 
last Friday did not reach expec- 
tations, but the management plans 
to continue this opportunity on 
Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday 
nights as long as there is suffi- 
cient snow. 



Porter Cops Giant Slalom Trophy; 
Betes Edge Kaps for Team Title 



Travel Bureau Elects 
Phelps to Presidency 

Tuesday, Feb. 26— The Tra- 
vel Bureau held its annual e- 
lection of officers today at 5:30 
in Jesup Hall. Elected president 
was Charles Phelps '53, a mem- 
ber of Sigma Phi. The other 
two officers are John Mabie 
■54, vice president, and Steve 
Livingston '54, business mana- 
ger. 



Hockey . . . 

Starke at 1:11 to give his team 
a one goal margin. 

George Crowley, wing for the 
second Hamilton line, scored at 
mid-period, beating Starke on a 
long shot from the left side of the 
rink. At 19:25 the third goal of 
the period, picked up by Tom 
May. concluded the scoring with 
Williams trailing 5-2. 

Assuming that weather per- 
mits, the team will take on Nor- 
wich at the Cole Field rink Sat- 
urday night at 7:30. Having drop- 
ped an earlier encounter to Nor- 
wich 7-2, the team will have to 
flght to win this one. 



Swimming . . . 

swimming in the number two spot 
for Amherst in this event, while 
Dave Byerly will carry the Wil- 
liams colors. 

Geitner of Amherst and Rick ■ 
Jeffrey will battle it out in the 
200 yard breast-stroke, while 
Baum of Amherst and Douglas of 
Williams will be equally close for 
the third spot. 

Coach Muir feels that the out- 
come of the meet could well be de- 
cided by the final relay. Although 
Amherst, with Waste. Geitner, and 
Tate, will be very strong in the 
opening medley, the power of the 
Williams aggregation makes this 
race a toss-up. 

The 400 yard relay will be an- 
other close one, and this provides 
an exciting setting for the event 
that perhaps will decide the Little 
Three championship. 

Frosh Underdogs 

At the same time the Eph 
freshmen will oppose the Lord 
Jeff yearlings in a Little Three 
contest. Amherst has the edge, but 
the performances are close enough 
so that anything can happen. 

Pete Hunt appears to be the best 
in the field in the 100 yard free 
style. In addition Gene Latham in 
the 200 yard free-style and Eric 
Gustafson in the 200 yard breast- 
stroke are also possible Eph win- 
ners. 



Players . . . 

less than eight monologues. In 
Jie guise of J. Robert Dietz Ar- 
nolph is both easily comprehend- 
ed and directly sympathetic. In- 
asmuch as Mollere wrote no ex- 
tensive stage directions, Dietz' in- 
terpretation was extremely ori- 
ginal and high-handed. Bits of 
Da.siness such as his ladder climb, 
cane waving, and variety of ex- 
pressive motions made the lines 
seem even funnier than the way 
Mollere wrote them. 

Every once in a while we run 
into one of those extremely talene- 
ed performers whose very pre- 
sence on stage, tor no apparent 
reason at all, is enough to send us 
into paroxysms of laughter. Louis 
Camuti. Jr. as the notary falls in- 
10 thi.s category. Perhaps it was 
his cal-likc walk, his facial ex- 
pressions, or the way he spoke 
nis lines; I'm not quite .sure 
which; but Mr. Camuti was cer- 
tainly a very funny fellow. 

The .sporting cast headed by 
William Kearns as Alain, Bren- 
nan Moore as Horace, and Pat 
Barnett as Georgette were equal- 
ly effective. They gave the pro- 
duction a pace and rhythm which 
the original verse version must 
have had considerable difficulty 
to sustain. The delightful variety 
of walks, capers and gambols dis- 
played by this dynamic group 
was original and hilarious. 



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Sanders, Dor»ey Trail 
Victor; Phi Gams Top 
Tuesday Cage Loop 

Wednesday, Feb. 27— Negotla. 
ting a tough 20-8ate course In 
40.8 seconds. Al Porter '52 flitshed 
to victory In tlie WOC-sponsored 
Palmedo Giant Slalom Trophy 
Race on Sheep Hill today. 

Porter's individual victory was 
not enough to boost the KA en- 
try Into the team title, as the 
Betes placed John Hewett '53 and 
Larry Hecox '53 among the top 
ten to head the house standings. 
The Saints placed behind the 
Betes for show position, followed 
by DU in fourth and Sig Phl 
rounding out the first five. 
Sanders Second 

Non-affiliate Warren Sanders 
'54 was second to Porter indivl- 
dually with a mark of 44.6 sec- 
onds, while Tommy Doisey '53 
came home third in 45.5. Hewett 
and Blake Middleton '54 look 
fourth and fifth place honors, 
respectively, in the 75 man sturt- 
ing list. 

Top time of the day. however, 
was turned in by Coach Ralph 
TowiLsend. Olympic and F.I.S. star 
who sailed over the coui'se In 39 
seconds flat. 

Fijis Undefeated 

Elsewhere on the Intramural 
sports scene, the Phi Gams main- 
tained their unblemished record 
in Tuesday League basketball 
competition with a spectacular 
20-8 victory over the Phi Slgs, as 
Bob Ouchterloney outscored the 
losers with ten points. 

The Dekes and the Tlieta Dclt« 
remained deadlocked for second 
place in the division, both teams 
sporting 4-1 records. The Dekes 
knocked off the weak Saint ag- 
gregation, 29-12, while division 
scoring leader Cal Collins hit for 
nine points to lead the Theta Delts 
to a 25-16 romp over the Psl U's, 



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Volume XLVI, Number 8 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE 




IR^^afit 



MARCH 5, 1952 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Purple Swimmers, Wrestlers Defeat 
Amherst Opponents, 42-27, 19-11 

New Amherst Total Rushing Plan 
Stresses Flexible Quota System 



Proposal Secures 
Conditional Favo 



Undergraduate Leaders 
Vote Approval, 28-14 



by Charles Elliott '54 

Amherst, Feb. 25— A petition foi- 
total rushlnn won conditional ap- 
IHOval by undergraduate leaders 
here tonliiht. The new plan em- 
phasizes the fact that no house 
is forced to take men they do not 
want. 

Designed by three upperclass- 
men. the proposed proRram in- 
tends to miike It mathematically 
Ijosslble for all freshmen who de- 
.siie to afflllat* with a fraternity 
to Join a house this year. 
New Quota System 

A revised .system of determln- 
iiiR quotas constitutes the basis 
of the plan. Any freshmen de- 
.siiing to Join the Lord Jeff Club, 
Amherst's counterpart of the old 
Garfield Club, are free to do so at 
any time during the rushmg sea- 
.soii, which starts Sunday. 

Under the program submitted, 
no change in the present rushing 
procedure would take place until 
I he final night when appointments 
for the last rushing and bidding 
are made. 

Quota Determination 

At this time a quota is deter- 
mined by dividing the number 
of men desiring to affiliate with 
fralernities by 13, the number of 
liou.ses at Amherst. If this num 
ber of men is not evenly divisible 
by 13. the quota is set so that 
the number of men left over, 
termed a surplus. Is no more than 
12. 

After setting the quotas, the 
legular rushing .schedule would 
then continue until only two pla- 
ces remained open in the whole 
ystem. These places could both 
be in one house or divided between 
two houses. 

Pledging of Surplus 

Pledging of the surplus would 
occur by raising the quota so that 
the number of the surplus would 
exactly equal the vacancies thus 
created In the houses. If the sur- 
IJliis left over after determining 
ih( original quota were 12, the 
quotas of 12 houses would be 
See Page 4, Col. 2 



Text of Amherst Rushing Petition 

As an iMclividiiai, 1 believe that die rushing quota should 
he set so (hat it is niatheinatically possible for every fresliinan 
who wislies to do so to be accepted into a fraternity. 

lo do this we reeonnnend that the liMC adopt the foUow- 
iiiK system: 

1 ; m> thioiinh the rushiii)^ procedure as it now stands until the 
ni^;lit when ap|)uiiitineiits lor hiial rushhif; and bidiiij; axe made. 
!5et no iiiiota. 

2) At tins time all men who want to join the Lord |eif Chib 
must liotily .Mr. Davenport of tJieir intention to do so; for diis 
insiiiiij; period tliey cannot ehaiij;e their miiids, 
■ij Set i|iiolii at tins time by Uividinj; the number of men who 
(•\piess uesire to joiii a Iraternity by iti; if the total is not evenly 
divisible by 13, .set the quota so as to leave a surplus of up to 
12 men. 

•4} Continue rushinj; as scheduled until diere are only two 
places left open in the wliole system (either two in one hou.se 
or one in each ol two Iraternities). 

.5) Ihen raise the (|uota so tliat there arc exactly enough vaeaii- 
eies 111 the house delegations to iillow jjledgiiig of tlie surplus, 
'llial is, il there were ten men more wishing to join fraternities 
Mian places in the original ((uota, laise the quotas of 10 houses 
l)\ one each. 

ti; Decide which houses shall have their quota raised by lot; 
houses which ha\e not lilled their original (|tiota not to be 
eligible. 

7; naieniities arc not re(|uiied to fill their quotas, 
>>) .\t any time during the rushing season, aUditional freshmen 
iiiav iiKiicatc tliat they wish to join the Jell Club and do so. 



Cap & Bells Chooses 
Schneider President 

Council Appoints Weeks, 
Good To Top Positions 

Friday, Feb. 29— The Executive 
Council of Cap and Bells, Inc. e- 
lecled William Schneider '53 presi- 
dent of the organization for the 
coming year. C. Allen Good '53 
was chosen to contmue as secre- 
tary, while Francis D. Weeks '53 
became treasurer. 

Members of the new council are 
Schneider In charge of stage man- 
agement: Good and Martin Con- 
ovltz '53, acting; Weeks, business; 
Timothy P. Beard '53, costumes 
and makeup; David W. Hudson 
'53, lighting; and John Larson '53, 
props and lighting. 

President-elect Schneider stated 
that the first Job of the new Cap 
and Bells management will be to 
select a series of five plays for the 
'952-53 season Cap and Bells will 
again produce three of the pre- 
sentations, while the AMT Com- 
mittee will handle the other two. 



Hershey Sets March 10 Deadline 
For Selective Service Examination 



Mttirmen Capture 
TenthConsecutive 
Little Three Title 



National Head(|uarteis of tlie Selective Service System an- 
nounced that applications for the .April 24 Selective Service quahfi- 
catioii Test must be postmarked no later than midnight, March 10. 
(Jeiieral Lewis li. Hershey s ollice estimates that upwards to 
1(X),0(M) iiieii will take this test, which will be that last given dur- 
ing the current academic year. The results will he used by the 
local boards in deciding the students' deferment status. 
Applicat ion Instructions 
following the instructions of a bulletin which may be ob- 
tained along with tile application, the student .should fill out his 
a|)plicatioii immediately and mail it in the envelope providetl. It 
should be empliasiziil that oiih those students who have not yet 

O taken the deferment test are eli- 
gible. 

Many students have been con- 
fused in differentiating between 
the 1-S and 2-S deferments. The 
2-S classification which is con- 
sidered on the basis of class 
standing or the Qualification test, 
is discretionary on the part of the 
local board and may be granted 
each successive year. 

The 1-S classification is provi- 
ded for by law. Any college stu- 
dent ordered to report for induc- 
tion while satisfactorily pursuing 
a full time course Is entitled to 
this deferment until he finishes 
his academic year. He may be 
given only one such deferment, 
and it is his duty to notify his lo- 
cal board of his status when he 
receives the order for induction. 



UC Hears Final 
Committee Report 

Entertainment Committee 
Announces Dissolution 



Monday, March 3— The Un- 
dergraduate Council armounced 
tonight that its Entertainment 
Committee had been dissolved be- 
cause of failure to direct the social 
life of the college effectively. In 
its report the committee gave four 
reasons for its failure. 

First, the committee lacked in- 
fluence because not all social u- 
nlts were repi^sented. Second, 
many of the reports and recom- 
mendations submitted to the ad- 
ministration were not acted upon. 
Third, the committee could not 
enforce their rules. It could only 
recommend action to the houses. 
Finally, the problem of the mflux 
of students from other colleges 
during housepartles could not be 
met successfully. 

Recommends Party Rules 

In the report of the Discipltoe 
Committee new rules for house- 
parties and disciplinary action 
were recommended. The playtag 
of bands and organized drinking 
on the Sunday of houseparty 
would be abolished because of the 
complaints of several townspeople, 
if the new regulations go toto ef- 
fect. The committee also stated In 
its report that, while the house 
rules concerning drtaking and cur- 
few need not be changed, they 
should be strictly enforced. 

The committee also felt that 
the responsibility for conduct dur- 
ing houseparty should not fall 
solely on the house president. 



Martin Sets N. E. Mark 
In 50 Yd. Freestyle, 
Pool Record In 100 

by Jack O'Kieffe '54 

Amherst, March 1 — Winning 
seven out of nine events, the Wil- 
liams College swimming team 
crushed the Amherst mermen 48- 
27 at Pratt Pool this afternoon. 
Dick Martin broke records in the 
50 and the 100 yard free-style e- 
vents to pace the Purple swim- 
mers to their tenth straight Little 
Three Championship. 

Williams started in fine style, 
taking the first five events. Dave 
Byerly and Co-captains Rick Jef- 
frey and John Belash won the 
300 yard medley relay. Don Jones 
came from behind to edge Don 
Wasle of Amherst In the 220 yard 
free-style, turning In a fast 2.15.2. 
Martin Sets N. E. Record 

The New England record for the 
50 yard free-style was eclipsed 
when Martin won the event in 23.1 
knockmg one-tenth of a second off 
the former mark. Previously he 
had tied the record when he did 
23.2 in the Springfield meet. 

Max Rogers and Al Post formed 
a neat "one-two punch" in the 
diving, taking eight points in the 
event. Their efforts gave Williams 
a comfortable margin of 23-9. 
Pool Mark Broken 

Martin, deciding that one rec- 
ord was not enough for an after- 
noon's work proceeded to set a 
new Pratt Pool mark for the 100 
yard tree-style. Turning in 51.2, 
he came within one-tenth of a 
second of his own New England 
record. Jeff Mercer Tate barely 
edsed out Belash for second place. 

The Sabrinas took their only 
fir.st in an mdividual event when 
Mike Cabour beat Byerly in the 
200 yard back-stroke. Sophomore 
Charlie Douglas put on a flne ex- 
hiljitlon when he nosed out Cap- 
tain Rick Jeffrey m the 200 yard 
breaststroke, making it another 
1-2 nnlsh for WiUlams, 
Jeffs Win Relay 

Joe Worthington managed to 
edge teammate Jones to take the 
440 yard freestyle. The meet look- 
ed like a rout until the Amherst 
400 yard freestyle relay team took 
tlic last event. 

The next meet for Coach Bob 
Muir's natators who finished the 
season with a 6-2 record, will be 
the New England Championships. 

Don Jones, 220 and 440 yard 
freestyle winner last year, will be 
defendtag his titles in this meet. 
See Page 4, Col. 4 



•SAC Elects French, 
Notz, Cain to Posts 

Monday, March 3— The Stu- 
dent Activities Coimcil today 
■.■lected Robert French '53, man- 
user of the Glee Club, Its pres- 
ident for 1952-53. Jolm Notz 
'53, business manager of the 
Handbook, was chosen treasur- 
er, while the post of Secretary 
went to George Cain '53, treas- 
uier of the Outing Club. 

Charles Phelps '53, president 
of the Travel Bureau, Dudley 
Baker '53, assistant business 
manager of the RECORD, and 
Bruce Van Dusen '53, treasur- 
er of the WCA, were elected to 
the executive committee. 

The SAC consists of one rep- 
resentative from each non-ath- 
letic organization on campus. 
Its purpose is to promote the 
interests of all these organiza- 
tions, and to supervise their 
management, debts, and obli- 
uations. Posts on the executive 
committee are divided equally 
between profit and non-profit 
groups. 



Preston Assumes 
woe Leadership 

Outing Club Also Selects 
Hewett, Cain, Monteith 



Thursday. Feb. 28 — The Wil- 
liams Outing Club, holding its an- 
nual elections this evening, chose 
Frederick Preston '53, a member of 
Kappa Alpha, as President, replac- 
ing Donald Martin '52. Preston has 
been a member of the Outing 
Club for three years and served 
last year as Chairman of Trails 
and Cabins. 

Elected vice-president was John 
Hewett '53 who has headed the 
Rock Climbing Division of the 
Outins! Club for the last two years. 
Hewett was recently appointed a 
member of the American Alpme 
Club, an organization known 
throughout the world. George 
Cain '53 was elected Treasurer 
while Weldon Monteith '53 was 
chosen Secretary. 

Board Chosen 

The old executive board also ap- 
pointed men to fill the positions 
they leave with the new elections. 
These are: Publicity. Joseph 
Foote '54; Trails, Charles Phelps 
'53; Cabins. Robert Savadore '55; 
Winter Camival, Lawrence Um- 
bach '54; Skeet Shooting, Theo- 
dore Cart '53; Winter Sports, 
Blake Middle ton '54; Piograms, 
Ralph Smith '54; Membership, 
Thomas Maythem '54. 

The retiring board also named 
four members-at-large, Donald 
Rand '53, Putte Westergaard '53, 
Gordon Canning '53, and Craig 
Biddle '53. 



Selectmen Seek New Policeman For Williamstown; 
Financiers Slice RoyaPs Request For Two Men 



Chief Makes Appeal 
On Population Basis 

by Kreac Donovan '54 

Saturday, March 1 — Chief Ro- 
yal announced that the Williams- 
town Finance CImmittee has ap- 
proved the addition of another 
officer to the local police force. 
Although the new man has not 
yet been named. It is expected that 
the Board of Selectmen will be- 
gin shortly to consider applica- 
tions. 

Originally, Royal had requested 
two additional officers. He noted. 
In his 1951 Police Dept. Report 
that "standard police procedure 
is to have one officer per thou- 



sand population." The chief went 
on to explain that he and his two 
assistants could not adequately 
supervise the area's 5,000 popula- 
tion. 

Partial Solution 

Town financiers, after exam- 
ining the matter, decided to halve 
the Police Department's request. 
Royal had previously revealed 
that the addition of one man 
would "partially solve the pro- 
blem." 

Currently, the Wllliamstown Po- 
lice Force consists of Chief Royal, 
Officer Melvin F. Thomason and 
Officer Stephen L. Polrot. Besides 
their Water Street office, the force 
is equipped with a station trans- 
mitter, and two 1950 Pontiac radio 



cars. 

Standard procedure for the pre- 
sent staff is to have two officers 
on duty at all times, one cruising 
in a radio car and the other in 
the office. 

A fact little known by th com- 
munity is that Wllliamstown has 
one of the best trained small town 
police forces In the nation. Both 
officers are currently enrolled in 
an 11 week training course given 
by the Federal Bureau of Inves- 
tigation in North Adams. 

In addition to this program, the 
force makes use of the State Po- 
lice Training School In Framing- 
ham, which offers the only state 
course in the country run exclu- 
sively for municlpallltes. 



Grapplers Down 
Amherst Matmen 
For First Victory 

Edwards Pins Blackburn 

In Heavyweight Match 

To Clinch Triumph 

by Jud Klein '54 

Amherst, Mar. 1— The Williams 
wrestling team staved oS the 
ihreatenmg ignominy of a win- 
less campaign in a last-chance 
effort, as they topped arch-rival 
Amherst, 19-11, this aftei-noon. 

The victory leaves Ed Bullock's 
grapplers with a final season's 
mark of 1-5, and a second-place 
finish in the Little Three. Wes- 
leyan broke the Ephs' three-year 
hold on the loop title a week ago. 
Edwards Clinches Win 

Purple heavyweight Dick Ed- 
wards pinned Amherst's Tom 
Blackburn in 2.04 of the final 
match lo clinch the Williams tri- 
umph, after New England cham- 
pion Greg McGrath had brought 
the Lord Jeffs within range by 
decisioning Hugh Murphy in the 
preceding m lb. contest. 

rhe Ephs' Rod Cover opened 
ihe meet with a quick pm on the 
Sabrinas' Joe Perez, but undefeat- 
ed Spike Schellenger countered 
with an ^mhorst five-pointer 
against 130-pounder George Dlm- 
ock. 

Amherst Gains Lead 

Jim Daughterly gave the Jeffs 
a br.ef lead by decisioning Bill 
Williams. 9-2. Ephmen Bob Shorb, 
Bill Callaghan, and Dick Gordon 
scoi"ed successive decisions, how- 
ever, to put the Purple back in 
front, 14-8. 

The summaries: 123 lbs. Cover 
(W) pirmed Perez lA) 4.03; 130 
lbs. Schellenger lAi pinned Dim- 
ock (W) 8:10: 137 lbs. Daughterty 
(Al declsioned Williams (W) 9-2; 
147 lbs. Shorb tWi declsioned 
Gove lAi 2-1: 157 lbs. Callaghan 
iV/i declsioned Kune (A) 6-0; 
167 lbs. Gordon iW) declsioned 
Patten (A) 7-1: 177 lbs. McGrath 
lAi declsioned Murphy iW) 3-0; 
Heavy Edwards (WJ pinned 
Blackburn lAl 2:04. 

Moynihan Orders 
Romaine Inquest 

Receipt of Pathologist's 
Report Brings Action 

Friday, Feb. 29 — Berkshire 
County District Attoniey Stephen 
A. Moynihan annoimced today 
that a formal inquest into the 
death of Williams sophomore Mil- 
lard Romaine. Jr., will be held 
March 26. 

Moynihan ordered the inquest 
this afternoon after receiving a 
pathologist's report from Dr. Ar- 
thur E. O'Dea. of Harvard Uni- 
versity. Local newspapers reported 
unofficially that O'Dea's report 
"may indicate suicide". Moynihan 
emphasized that an inquest was 
not at all unusual in a case of 
this type, "especially where there 
has been so much publicity". 
Found Feb. 18 
Romaine was found Feb. 18 in a 
I third-floor room of the Beta Theta 
j Pi House on St^'tson Court, dead 
I from a bullet wound in tile head. 
I A bolt-action .22 rifle lay under a 
bed. One shot — a "short" shell — 
had been fired from it. 

Later in the week. Investigators 
found a box of such shells In the 
student's East College room. One 
was missing from the box. 

The college held a memorial 
service for the dead student Wed- 
nesday, February 20. 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 1952 



f tie Milli^i 3a^£cr4 

North Adorns, Mus^-uchu'-ettt. Villinmstown, Massachusetts 

'Entered as second-clnss motter Nov^mbe* 71. 1944, at the post office at 
North Adams, Massachusetts, under the A- f of Mnrch 3, 1879." Printed by 
Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Adc ns, Mossachusetts. Published 

Wednesday and Saturoay during the college ear. Subscription price $5.00 
oer year. Record Office. Jesup Mali, Willidm- t»wn, 

RECORD Office - Phone 72 Editor - Phone 981 -JK 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

John H. Allan '53 Editor 

Charles E. Longe '53 

Richard C. Porter '53 , Managing Editors 

Woodbridge A. D'Oench '53 ....... ,.,., News Editor 

Thomas A. Belshe '53 

Kay Kolligion, Jr. '53 Sports Editors 

Frederick A. Terry, Jr. '53 Feature Editor 

Assistant Editors; Richard T. Antcun '53, Thomas H. S. Brucker '53, 

James J. Cashmere '53 
Staff Photographers: R, Wyman Sanders '54, Charles Eichel '54 

Staff Cartoonist: Thomas Hughes '53 

Associate Editors: 1954 - Q. Abbot, W. R. Aiken, J. Brownell, E. Cowell, 

K. Donovan, G. Davis, C. Elliot, C. Fisher, C. Foster, P. Goldman, 

R. Goldstein, A. Home, J. Klein, J. Marr, C. O'Kieffe, W. Warden, 

W. Weodock 

BUSINESS BOARD 

John Notz, Jr. '53 Business Manager 

Dudley M. Baker '53 Assistant Business Manager 

Robert O. Coulter '53 Assistant Business Manager 

John F. Johnston, II '54 Advertising Manager 

Harold G. Pratt, Jr. '54 Assistant Advertising Manager 

Curtis V. Titus '54 Circulation Manager 

Richard C. Schaub '54 Treasurer 



Opinion Survey Shows Approval 
Of Tippy Committee Suggestion 
To Alter Hell V/eek Tradition 



hil Cluiilcs EUioll 



Volume XLVI 



March 5, 1952 



Number 8 



EDITORIAL 

Thanks To The Alumni 

The Executive Clomuiittec of the Society ol Aliiinui has oll'ered 
the .'lunini House to the luiderf^radnates for their use nutil the 
new Student Union becomes a reality in the fall of 1953. Openiuf; 
this building to underpaduates is (|uite a break in tradition and 
is a sacrifice on the part of the ahnnni body wlio view the bnild- 
inj; traditionally as a sacrosanct area strictly olf bounds lor stu- 
dents. For its generous offer of its Willianistown !K'ad(|uarters, 
we niiist thank the E.xecutive Committee and the rest of die body 
of alunnii who are willing to see their building receive the hard 
use that undergraduates will give the center during the next fall 
and spring terms. We appreciate greatly tliis contribution by 
the alumni to die needs of undergraduate life at Williams. 

On the other side of the picture, undergraduates who will 
.see that the building receives a great deal of n.se, esiieciallv on 
weekends when informal dances may be held, must see to it that 
the building is taken care of during its one vear lease to the 
college student bodv. The board of facultv and student governors 
should be chosen soon after the new Undergraduate Council 
convenes next week and should begin planning the activities that 
will be carried on in the center so tliat inaximnm use can be 
gained from this contribution from die Society of .MnmiLi. The 
efficiency with which the Alumni House student center is run will 
prove a good test case for the new largei- building that will be 
constructed on [-"ark Street next vear. 

THE NEAREST FLICK I 



/)(/ Bruce I'ulmcr 
Wedncsdui/ and Tliursdcn/ I went away for the weekend but they 
made me write this anyway. Cal tells me he's got a reshowing of 
a niiddle-aged musical, "Royal Wedding". Song, dance and laugh- 
ter with aged Fred Astaire, |ane Powell, Peter ( l-look-like-a-Yalie) 
Lawford and, of all people, Winnie Clmrcliill's daughter Sarah. 
How she got in the picture 1 haxe nu idea, but it's a good show. 
For the low-brows, Ed Wyun's son. Keenan injects huniorous-ty[)e 
stuff. Everybody gets manietl but Keenan, he's the comic, you 
see. The only comics that get married and live happily etc. are 
Hob HoiH' and Red Skelton. Kennan never gets married. Faultless 
Fred nimble-foots through e\ervthing from an Afro-Cuban stomp 
to a Viennese waltz witli equal grace. Some guys just never giow 
old. Jane Powell gets olf some ni^per-register warbles and a few 
duets witii Fred. Pretty good plot for a musical with technicoloi- 
and all the works. Huge sets and a cast of millions. Not C|uite as 
good as "American in Paris", but pretty fair. 

The double feature "The Galloping Major" makes the whole 
business a pretty great show. This is a kind of different "Tight 
Little Island", lots of the same |5eople, different story. Horses 
instead of booze, needless to say it lacks something, but comes out 
as a pretty funny show. With die exce)ition of "The Lavender Hill 
Mob" I have seen very few British comedies that I thought were 
really uproarious.! don't think this is hilarious, but it has its mo- 
ments. The Boy Scout sincerity of some of the characters is more 
frightening dian amusing sometimes. Despite this there is a cer- 
tain amount of good humor; it makes a good show along widi 
"Royal Wedding". , , ,. 
Fridiiii and Saturdati Another double feature, "Rhubarb and 
"Cross-something-or-other". I've never seen either one so, but I \e 
read the book called "Rhubarb" by H. Allen Smith. All about eats 
and baseball teams and nymphomaniacs, prettv .strange story as 
you may guess. The storv was very fuim\- and the movie coidd be 
too - but vou know Hollywood. It had a lady weight-lifter in it 
and a cat, who inherits a fortune and a baseball team. People who 
have seen it told me that it's great, I think I'll see for myself. The 
co-feature stars Rhonda Fleming. She's stacked; take it from there 
— your guess is as good as mine^_ 



The Tippy Caiinmittee studying undergraduate |)robleins 
reeenflv urged to abolish all pre-initiatiim hazing, and to replace 
the traditional Hell Week with a Help Week. Such a modification 
would necessitate a change in one of the college's oldest traditions, 
.'\u opinion survey e<indncted by the UK(;()R1), reveals varied 
campus reaction to this proposal. 

Michael Lazor '53, AD- .\ constructive Hell Week is an excel- 
lent idea. It would be impractical, however, to attempt a substan- 
tial project if Hell Week were to last from only Thursday to 
Saturday. If Hell Week were reinstated as die first full week of 
the second term, it would be possible to aecom|)lisli something 
worthwhile. Instead of atteiii])ting local projects as did the betes. 
I would recommend improxcmeiits in the physical slant ol our 
fraternity. 

Dean Hiihcit H. II. hrooks- - I believe that the process of pre- 
paring a pledge for initiation as well as die ceremony itself should 
be one in which both the dignity of the indisidnal and the prestige 
of the house are enhanced. Few, if any, elements of die present 
Hell Week serve this purpose. The substitution of |)sycli(>logical 
pain for physical abuse is merely a subtler means of degrading the 
individual. 1 am delighted that the Tippy (Aiinniittee has empha- 
sized the need for a (iroeednre in which iiidi\'idual initiates, with- 
out loss of jjersonal freedom or dignity, join with odiers in a 
constructive common effort. 

Can/ Lcinhach '55 - DKF. - Now being in a position to look 
at it from both sides, 1 beliexe that Hell \Veek aptly serves its 
purpose of uniting die pledge classes of the \arious houses. But a 
Help Week would be beneficial to both the neighboring towns- 
people and college-town relations. Therefore the best solution 
would bi' a eomhinatioii of the two: A "help" program combined 
with inforiual meal-time hazing. 

Tom Ecaii.s '52, DU- 1 feel diat Hell Week, originally designed 
-o con\ ince the fraternity pledge ol bis sub-hunian status, should 
today serve the purpose of instilling cohesion and spirit in the 
pledge group. If this can be done wliile fostering eonstnictive 
ends siinultaiieously, so iniicli the better. 

Reverend A. Grant Noble - 1 diiiik. on the whole, that diere 
v\'as a completely different atinos|)bere in the days when Hell 
Week was started and that it is out of place now. I'"verythiiig else 
ill college life has changed and so should Hell Week. It is a phase 
of college life in which we are far behind. The college would be 
kee|)ing up with the times with a Help Week, .'\t any rate, some 
Form ot constrneti\'e work should be instituted for the good of 
the communitv, the college, and the bouses. 

Robert Cloiitier '54, Psi U - I am in favor of a constructive 
Hell Week. However, just what is constructive and what is not, is 
open to debate-. The Tippy Committee seems to be taking a dark 
view of some of the proceedings taking place during the tradi- 
tional hazing jieriod. Shovelling snow is indeed generous, but I fiiul 
it difficult to generate any sort of congenial spirit regarding the 
city of Nordi Adams, long a Foreign Legionaire outpost. Tliere is 
certainly room for more sober and constructive activities during 
Hell Week, but let's not overlook die constructiye nature of hazing 
itself, when it is moderated with iiitelligenee and a sense of 
humor. Let's eliminate the iron maiden and the thumb screws, 
but don t shovel snow for North .\dams! 



ANNOUNCES 

A Spring Term RECORD Editorial Staff 

Competition 

Open to Freshmen 

Compets Meet Tonight 

at 7:30 p.m. 
in Jesup Hall Offices 

WRITE 

News — Features — Sports 



TYPING DONE 

French and English 

Phone: W'mstown 193-M 





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Attention 
Seniors 



JfOR those interested in discussing the possibilities 
of domestic and foreign banking as a career, we are 
pleased to announce that interviews for positions 
with The National City Bank of New York will be 
held on the Williams campus March 20. Why not 
take the time to look into a field that offers many 
varied opportunities to men with liberal arts majors? 
Inasmuch as March 20 is the only date on which 
our representative wall be on the campus to conduct 
interviews, may we suggest that you contact the 
Office of the Placement Director to arrange an 
appointment for an interview? Also available at the 
Placement Director's office is a copy of our booklet 
"Careers for College Men" which will give you an idea 
of the potential open to you at National City. 




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THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 1852 



Cagers Score Upset Over Springfield 58 - 57 



Squash Team Trounces Amherst 
For 2nd Straight Little 3 Title 



( 

Eph Team Shows Depth 

In Taking 7-2 Win; 

Freshmen AUo Win 

by Ned Heppeiutal '55 

Saturday. Mar. 1 — The Williams 
Varsity Squash team trounced tlic 
vLsltlng Amherst nine 7-2 today to 
win their second straight Little 
■lliree Championship. The Fresh- 
iiiuii also won handily, besting the 
Lord Jell Frosh 8-1 and taking 
another Uttle Three Title. 

Dick Squires bi'eezed through 
Ins match with the Jells' top play- 
er Dickinson, outplaying him to 
win in three games. 15-12, 15-7. 
and 15-14. Chris Thoron moved 
up to play number two in place of 
Soupy Symington, who was un- 
able to play because of death in 
Uu' family, and had no trouble 
Willi Walter, taking him in three 
straight game.s. 15-6. 15-9, and 
16-7. 

Brownell, Georre Win 

I'he Purple continued to rack 
lip points as Captain Ray George 
and John Brownell easily topped 
their opponents in straight games. 
Tom Brucker. however, was upset 
by the JelTs' Gardner. 3-1. 

The Ephs came right back as 
lorn Adkins. Todd Tilllnghasl. 
unci Al Fulkerson all racked up 
\iins while the Jeffs were getting 
tliL'ir last point on Townsend's win 
over Hank Schrier. On Friday 
Coach Chaffee will take the team 
to Harvard where Dick Squires 
will lead the squad into the Inter- 
collegiate Championships. 
Frosh Win Easily 

Ihe Freshmen successfully end- 
ed a 4-1 season as they decisively 
bested the Amherst Yearling team 
8-1 in the Lasell Courts. Captain 
See Page 4. Col. 6 



Freshmen Wrestlers 
Bow to Jeffs, 15-14 

Amherst, Mar. 1— Winning 
four and drawing one of eight 
matches. WiUiams' freshman 
wrestling team went down to 
defeat 15-14 today at the hands 
of Amherst. All the Eph wins 
came on decisions, while Am- 
herst scored their points on a 
pin. a forfeit, a decision and a 
draw. 

For Williams. Bob Savadove. 
Captain Bob Utile. Rod Will- 
cox and Al Reed declsloned 
their opponenUs. while Herb 
Ladds drew with Dave Lemel in 
the 177 lb. division. Amherst 
Cplain Mark Schellenger con- 
tinued his undefeated ways, 
topping Charlie Bradley 10-0. 



Eph Skaters Bow 
To Norwich, 7 - 2 

Saturday. Mar. 1— Cold weather 
save Couch Bell's win starved skat- 
ers the seeming advantage of play- 
ing tonight, for the first time this 
.sea.son. on "home ice". A hard 
skating Norwich sextet was too 
much for the Ephs. however, as 
the 7-2 final score in its favor 
duplicated the lesult of a previous 
encounter between the two clubs. 

In an effort to give more scor- 
ing potential to the team. Coach 
Bell attempted a line change 
wliich saw Captain Harvey shifted 
to the second line and Dewey 
Renolds elevated to the first. Four 
Norwich goals in the first period 
See Page 4. Col. 3 



Eoh Casers Seek 
Little Three Tie 
In Jeff Contest 



Ephs Could Gain Triple 
Tie by Downing Rivals 
In Year's Key Game 

In what is undoubtedly their 
most imiJortant game of the year, 
the Williams basketeers will meet 
the powerful Amherst cagemen 
Saturday at the Sabrina gym. 
Since a victory in this game will 
give the Ephs a triple tie for the 
Little Three down, the Purple will 
go all out to win this contest. 

When the two clubs met on Feb- 
ruary 9. it was the Sabrinas who e- 
merged the victors, but only after 
a fighting game. Despite the dis- 
advantage of playing on Amherst's 
home court, the Ephs are now gi- 
ven a good cliance to upset the 
Jeffs as a result of their fine 
sliowlng against Springfield. 
Ephs Win Two Straight 

Since the first Amherst game, 
the Ephmen have split four games. 
After dropping contests to Mld- 
dlebury and Wesleyan. the Shaw- 
men bounced back to nip W.P.I. 
in double overtime, and followed 
this with a one-point victory over 
Springfield. 

Amherst, however, enters the 
game fresh from a lopsided win 
over R.P.I, which they downed 
Saturday 70-46. Other Amherst 
games since the Williams con- 
test include wins over Wesleyan 
and Brown, and losses to Army 
and New Hampshire. The Cards 
have finished their Little Three 
season with a 2-2 mark. An Eph 
win Saturday would give both Wil- 
liams and Amherst the same 2-2 
mark, and would create a triple tie 
in the small school circuit. 




Walt Greer drives around Springfield's McClements to score in 
Friday's 58-57 Purple win. Waiting for a possible rebound is Mike Lazor 

Frosh Hoopsters Down Pittsfield; 
Humble Darrow School, Fort Dix 



Saturday. March 1 — Coach Bob- 
by Coombs' high-flying freshman 
basketball team added three more 
games to its win column this 
weekend. After downing Pittsfield 
High 56-47 last night, the yearling i 
hoopsters played a double-header 
this afternoon, beating Dari'ow | 
School 40-25 and trouncing Fort | 
Dix 66-44. I 

Pittsfield took a fast opening 
lead, but the Williams play im- 
proved greatly and the Purple led 
28-17 at the half way mark. When 
the high .schoolers' Jack Brennan 
fouled out early in the second 
stanza, the high scoring of Ron 



We conducted a poll of '41 graduates to find out: 

HOW HAVE THEY MADE OUT IN 
10 YEARS WITH GENERAL ELECTRIC? 



Here are the results; 

1. TRAINING. On ihe average, college graduates who 
came with General Electric in 1941 have laken between 
three and four Company-run training courses. Some have 
taken as manv as seven. These have included courses in 
business management and accounting, in sales, manufac- 
turing, and in many phases of engineering. Graduates re- 
port that this training has been a big help in furthering 
their careers. As one expressed it: "These courses arc 
essential to certain fields of endeavor — so essential I am 
still signing up for aildilioiial courses." 

Olhar comment*: "These programs are not the purely 
academic ones nf school days. They are practical, interest- 
ing, enable one In do a lietler job and enjoy il more.'' 
"The G-E Sales Training Program was definitely instru- 
mental in helping me find my present position." The train- 
ing programs have been a very essential link between my 
college training and my present work." "I wish I could 
have known then how valuable these courses were going 
to be later." "They ronlirmcd my original opinion that 
G.E. offered the best training for engineers.!! 

2. EXPERIENCE. These graduates have had an average 
of three different rotating assignments in various phases 
of tlie Company's work. A typical example included assign- 
ments in radio test, in motors and generators, and in the 
industrial control development laboratory. Graduates ex- 



press three main benefits derived from ihe G-E rotational 
job programs; 

a. They provided opportunities for deciding on a deft- 
nite field of interest. Typical comment: "I didn't know 
what kind of work I wauled to do. Rotating assignments 
helped me make up my mind." 

b. They conipleinenled college triiining with practical 
experience. "Tliey helped me reali/e methods of manu- 
facture and testing of different apparatus." 

c. They provided valuable associations and conlarts. 
"Changing jobs five times brought me a variety of friends 
and contacts I'm still grateful for." 

3. PROGRESS AND ADVANCEMENT. 88 per cent 
reported that they felt their progress in General Electric 
has been satisfactory. Nine per cent described their progress 
as "average, so-so,'I with three per cent reporting "un- 
satisfactory." 

Commenit: "It's been no Horatio Alger success story, 
but I feel pretty good about it." "If next 10 years have 
the same trend, will be very happy." "Satisfactory and 
entirely fair.'- "I don't know anyone on the outside who 
has done any better in the same time." "Satisfactory. 
I've been a G-E salesman, field engineer, and am now 
group leader in a G-E design engineering departmenl." 
"I have felt like a kid in a candy story owned by his 
father. There are lots of choices and his only problem it 
to pick out what he likes best.'* 



Wilson and Charlie Shaw paced 
the freshmen to their eventual 
victory. 

Bossidy Stars 
Larry Bossidy. Pittsfield's stocky, 
.six foot forward, was easily the 
outstanding man on the floor. A 
rough and tumble scrapper, he 
scored fifteen points on six baskets 
and three foul shots. 

In today's dual program. Coach 
Cooinub uacu a different squad for 
each game. Opening against Dar- 
row. the frosh quintet was led by 
Bert Sosnow who tallied 11 points. 
He was assisted in the Williams 
win by George Ramsey who hoop- 
ed nine and Fred O'Leary who 
dipped in seven counters for the 
freshman team. 

Fort Dix Falls 

The Coombsmen played what 
their coach referred to as 'their 
best half of the season" in the 
opening session against Port Dix. 
Completely overpowering the army 
company, the freshmen led 41-16 
when the mid- way buzzer sounded. 
High scorers in this tilt were Wil- 
son with 16. Broderick with 14, 
Laitman witli 13 and Henry with 
11 points. 

Playing for the Fort Dix quintet 
were two Williams graduates, Don 
Speck '51 and Howie Smith '51. 
Speck pbyed forward for last 
years Eph hoopsters, while Smith 
wa3 ii gjard on tlie varsity foot- 
ball .squad and played intramural 
basketball. 



Franconia 



Cannon Mt. 



i Alpine Lift 



• Deluxe Chalet on ski area 

Ski tchool— opftfi ilopct — tralli. Writ* 
Winter Sporit Direcler tor Information. 
fKANCONIA. NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Creer Hoops 17; 
Hawkins, Lazor, 
Dominate Boards 



Ephs Clinch Victory On 
Basket by Depopolo; 
Smith, Shudt, Excell 



by Bill Redman '54 

Friday. Feb. 29— The Williams 
basketball team staved ofl a last 
quarter rally by Springfield to up- 
set the highly-touted Maroons, 58- 
57. in a thrilling contest tonight 
in Lasell Gym. The victory boosted 
the Ephs' i-ecord for the sea.son to 
the .500 mark, nine wins against 
the .same number of defeats. 

With less than two minutes re- 
maining and the score deadlocked 
at 55-55. Co-captain Ed Shudt 
converted on a toul shot. Shortly 
thereafter Bob Depopolo picked up 
a loose ball and sank a one-hander 
while falling away from the basket 
to put the Purple ahead 58-55. 

Ephs Put On Freeze 
Captain Jim Pelcher a consistant 
performer for Springfield all eve- 
ning, popped a jump shot with one 
minute remaining to bring the 
score to 58-57. At this point Wil- 
liams started a freeze, but after 
committing several fouls, the Ma- 
roons managed to tie up Shudt. 
A Springfield man took the tip 
but travelled with the ball and 
Williams retained possession for 
tlie few remaining seconds. 

The Ephs grabbed a quick 9-1 
lead in the first five minutes and 
were on top 17-10 at the quarter 
mark. Mike Lazor. Jack Hawkins, 
and Herb Smith were outstanding 
for the Ephs under the backboards 
while Walt Creer, Hawkins, and 
Smith led the scoring during this 
period. 

Sehutts Sparks Maroon Rally 

Rangy Al Schutts. high-scoring 
Maroon center, was held to a 
single field goal In this period as 
three Purple players converged on 
him whenever he received a pass. 
However in the second quarter he 
broke loose for 14 points on a 
series of jump shots and tip-ins 
to pace a flurry which gave 
Springfield a 37-36 halftime lead. 

In the third stanza the Wil- 
liams attack gained momentum, 
and witli Walt Creer pumping in 
See Page 4. Col. 6 



TOP NOTCH 
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*fbef« and $tat»mants in this advertisemeni wen compiled from o questionnaire tubmifted fo '4 1 graduates still wi/h 
Genera/ Electric. Participants returned questionnaires unsigned, enabling them to be full and frank in their answer*. 



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THE WILLIAMS HECOKD WEDNESDAY, MAHCH 5, 1952 



Overwhelming Williamstown Vote 
Approves Fluoridination of Water 

hij Hill \V mile II 
l''liii)iiiliii;itiiiii. llic process ill adiliim lluoriuc to 'liiiikiiiii, 
water ti) pivM'iit tixitli lU'cav, was rcLviitlv appicnctl 1)V Williuiiis- 
towii voters 1)V a \i)te ol .'302 to (). A siiiii ol $1,500 was appro- 
priated to canv out the projjrain. 

Dr. Aiulreu H. Kiiowhind and Dr. Da\id A. Frank, hotli 
local dentists, spoke at the town iiieetiiii^ in support ol fluoridina- 
tion antl poinli'd (lot the siieiess whieh many othei eounnunities 
have had with similar proi;rains. Wisconsin has heen a leailer in 
this lield and has reported up to ()5 percent reduction in ca\ities 
anionic children. 

Objections to fluoridination . 

have decreased markedly in the 
last few years as the program has 
established itself as safe and ben- 
eficial. Those objections which 
still linger come mostly from 
those who feel thai any form of 
medication is a personal matter 
and should not be forced upon the 
individual. 

Dentists point out that, while 
fluorine can be applied directly 
10 llie teeth, it is not as effective 
as when added to drinking water 
and can never hope to benefit 
nearly as many people. These ben- 
efits stand out clearly in light of 
estimates which sliow that 75 per- 
cent of the population needs den- 
i.,l attention. 

Entirely Safe 

Flouridination may be carried 
out witli complete safety and has 
recpiv'ed the support of Dr. T, V, 
O. Limy. Director of Health at 
Vvill.ams. Fluorine is a natural 
elernjnt found in most drinking 
walci- although the amount is ap- 
pr,jx..nately one-tenth that need- 
ed to effectively prevent decay. 

Ihose who profit most from 
such a program are small child- 
ren whose teeth are still in the 
process of forming. Adults who 
have just started using fluoridin- 
ated water will benefit to some 
excent but it is the next genera- 
tion which will receive the great- 
j.^t protection. 

Low Cost 

The fluorine compound which 
is added to the water is relatively 
Simple and the process does not 
require a large initial investment. 

Although Williamstown voters 
have approved fluoridination, 
the program has yet to be 
passed by the Massachusetts Board 
of Health. Their approval, how- 
ever, is almost a certainty. 



Join Our Growing 

List of Satisfied 
Williams Customers 

KRONICK'S 
ESSO SERVICE 

Opp. Howard Johnson's 
State Rd. 



Amherst . . . 

raised by one each. 

The houses which enlarge their 
quotas in this manner are de- 
termined by lot. No house which 
lias not filled its original quota is 
eligible, but fraternities are not 
compelled to complete their quo- 
tas. 

Leaders Vote 

Submitted to two Amherst socie- 
ties. Sphinx and Scarab, and to 
the Student Council, 50 under- 
graduate leaders voted on the 
plan. Out of 45 returns, 28 sup- 
ported the proposal, 14 were op- 
posed, and three abstained. 

Several of those voting in favor 
of tlie plan expressed reservations 
about certain provisions of the 
program, especially point four of 
the ixuition. Many who cast neg- 
ative ballots agreed with the plan 
ill principle, but disagreed with 
its mechanics. 

President Cole praised the plan 
■because it gives the fraternities 
a chalice for 100 per cent rushing 
w.thout forcing them to take any 
men they may not want. Although 
I have certain reservations, after 
a surplus glance it looks like a 
good plan." 



STUDENTS 

Thi'nies and Theses Typeil 
•Xeat. Prompt, Accurate 

(.'arhoii Clopv I''ree. 
II Desiri'd 

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I KATiHNtTY lEWELRr 
Stotioncry Programs 

Badges Rings Steins 

Jewelry Gifts Favors 

Club Pint Keyi 

Medals Trophies 

Write or Call 
CARL SORENSEN 

30 Murray Ave, Waterford, N. Y 
felephoneTrov — Adorns 82563 



BERKSHIRE OPTICAL 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIAN 
No. Adams 1136 



COMPANY 




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and prompt 
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Movie Cameras, Projectors and Line of Still Cameras 
74 MAIN STREET NORTH ADAMS 



Sigs Clioose Howard 
As House President 

Friday, Feb. 29- Robert Ho- 
ward '&J WHS cliosen president 
of Sigma Phi tonight, while 
John Beard '53 was elected 
\'iee-pi'esideiit. Howard is pres- 
eaiiy serving as a junior advl- 
sjr, wlule Beard is vice-presi- 
de. a of the J,A,'s, 

Selected as pledge-master 
was Alger Cliapman '53, while 
Joseph Foote '54 was appointed 
ireasuier. Tiie remaining house 
elections will be held during 
the next two weeks. 

The elections at Sigma Phi 
brings to ten the number of 
campus fraternities which have 
chosen their house officers. 
Kappa Alpha, Beta Theta Pi, 
Delta Kappa Epsilon, Phi Delta 
'I'lieta and Saint Anthony will 
select their officers within tlie 
next few weeks. 



Hockey . . . 

prompted a return to normalcy in 
the second period. 

Starke Excells 

John Beard, picking up his third 
goal in two games, registered tlie 
initial Williams' goal at 6:44 of 
the opening period as he fired the 
rebound of defenseman Doug 
Reed's long shot through a cage 
front scramble. 

Excellent goal play by Rod 
Starke held Norwich to three goals 
in the final forty minutes of play. 
sS. liy in the final frame John 
Pike retaliated with a brilliant 
solo .score. Skating in on the cage 
I'roni the left, the Williams wing 
drew Goalie Home out of his 
cage, then angled the disk behind 
-lim for the Eph's second goal. 

Williams will play its final 
game of tlie season next Fi'iday 
against RPI following a Tuesday 
night return contest with Middle- 
bury. 



BRING 
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INCORPORATFr* 



Phacdrtis philosopliized: 

You will 50on break tlie bow 



Recipe for relaxation— take the 
contents of one frosty bottle of 




BOmED UNDER AUTHOBirV OF THE COCA-COIA COMPANY BY 

BERKSHIRE COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. 

"Ccitm" h a TtMfi lr<Kt»-mcrk. © 1952, THE COCA COIA COMPANY 



Stoddard Gives Talk 
On Sugar Influences | 

Art Professor Explains 
Effect on Arcftitecture 

Thursday, l''eb. ^8 Associate 
Professor of Art Whitney S. Stod- 
dL.rd di.scu.ssed the inlluences of 
Snger's twelfth century school of 
artists on Gothic architecture be- 
fore a capacity audience in Law- 
rence Hall this afternoon. This 
was tile fifth in the annual spring 
series of eight lectures by mem- 
bers of the faculty. 

Professor Stoddard pointed out 
that the .sculpturing, done at the 
..bbey of Saint-Denis, in the prov- 
ince of Ile-de-France, by Suger 
and liis students, formed the basis 
for subsequent Gothic architec- 
lural development. He went on to 
investigate the possible sources 
which may have influenced Suger's 
style. 

The lecture was illustrated by 
slides of the cathedrals of Saint- 
Denis, Chartres, Notre Dame de 
Paris, Reims, and others, as Pro- 
fessor Stoddard traced the origins 
of Suger's architecture to the 
French Province of Burgundy, 

Swimming . . . 

The Summary: 

300 yard medley relay — Won by 
Williams iByerly, Jeffrey, Belash), 
Time, 3;04.5, 

220 yard freestyle — Won by 
Jones iWi; 2, Wasie (A); 3, 
Graeber lAi.Time, 2:15,2, 

50 yard freestyle — Won by Mar- 
tin 'Wi: 2, Tate lAi: 3, Krudc- 
nier lAi. Time. 23.1. i New Eng- 
land Record!. 

Diving — Won by Rogers (W); 
2. Post 'Wi; 3. Apthorp (A), 



Amfierst Frosft Down 
Epfi Natators, 38 ■ 37 

In a thrill-packed meet, the 
Amherst Preshmaii swimmers, 
led by Bud Pray and Bruce 
Beaven, won their sixth 
straiglit victory this year at tlie 
expense of the Eph freshmen 
by a narrow 38-37 marghi. Dis- 
qualifications of Fred Paton 
who had .seemingly taken a sec- 
ond in the 200 yard freestyle 
and Tom Gresinger who looked 
like a third place winner In 
the dive, cost the Purple the 
meet. 

Gene Latham was outstand- 
ing for the Ephmen as he 
splaslied to victory in the 200 
yard freestyle and placed sec- 
ond in the 150 yard individual 
medley. Pete Hunt and Parker 
Murray won the 100 yard free- 
style and dive respectively, and 
both swam a leg on the win- 
ning freestyle relay team. 

John Newhall, Mort Cohen, 
Bill Murphy, George Montgom- 
ery, Andy Anderson, and Eric 
Guslafson were other scorers 
for the Purple. 



Points 75.8. 

100 yard freestyle — Won by Mar- 
tin iWi: 2, Tate lAi: 3, Belash 
iWi. Time, 51.2. iNew Pratt Pool 
Record I. 

200 yard backstroke — Won by 
Cabour lAi: 2, Byerly iWi; 3, 
Simon lAi, Time, 2:22.2, 

200 yard breaststroke- -Won by 
Douglas iWi: 2, Jellrey iW>, 3, 
Gcistner lAi. Time, 2:27.8. 

400 yard freestyle — Won by 
Worthington iWi; 2. Jones iWi; 
3. Graiber lAi. Time, 5:03,2. 

400 yard freestyle relay — Won 
by Amherst iTate. Krudenicr. 
Simon. Wasiei. Time, 3:41.5. 



Basketball . . . 

seven points the Ephs pulled 
away to 50-45 ut the end uf the 
period. The final quarter started 
with a bucket by Hawkins and f,,,j, 
throws by Depopolo and Smiih, tg 
give the Purple a commundliig 54. 
45 margin. This set the stage tw 
the Springfield rally, and while 
Williams was scoring one puuii on 
a free throw by Shudt, the Ma- 
roon team dropped through flve 
field goals to knot the count at 
55-55. 

Hard-driving Crcer was tlie in- 
dividual star foi- Williams Willi n 
points and a smooth floor game 
but the entire team showed line 
balance in turning in its best per- 
formance of the year. 
Wilhams 





PQ 


FT 


TP 


Hawkins, f 


3 


2 


8 


Lazor, f 


2 





4 


Depopolo 


3 


3 


9 


Smitli, c 


4 


3 


a 


Sluidl, g 


2 


2 


ti 


Campbell 


1 


1 


3 


Creer, g 


7 


3 


17 


Avery 











Totals 


22 


14 


58 



Squash 



Creorge Kesel, playing number 
one, trounced the Jeff star Don 
McDonald 3-0 in a one-sided 
matcli which the agile Kesel domi- 
nated. 

The sole Williams I0.S.S was suf- 
fered by number two man Mark 
Cluett as Amherst's MacDougall 
bested him 3-2. Dave Lindsay and 
John Wierdsmii at the number 
three and four slots were both 
carried to five games, rallyini; lo 
win 3-2. Quinn, Schenck, Forim- 
baugh. Heppenstall, and Wlut* 
contributed the other Williams 
victories 



HOW MANY Trn/IES A DAY 

DO YOU 




IF YOU'RE AN AVERAGE SMOKER 
THE RIGHT ANSWER IS OVER 200! 



-*v\\ 



,,«t<j ■ 



-r^M«- 



.xOO 



•.c^*** 






*t>^ 



,,»<>»'^ 



.o« 



Itl' 



,>N- 



♦..•»<■' 



»;,« > 



Yes, 200 times every day 

your nose and throat are 

exposed to irritation . . . 

200 GOOD REASONS WHY 

YOU'RE BEHEROFF SMOKING 

Philip Morris! 

PROVED definitely milder . . . PROVED 

definitely less irritating than any other 

leading brand . . . PROVED by outstanding 

nose and throat specialists. 



EXTRA ! ATTENTION ALL COLLEGE STUDENTS 

Every Sunday Evening over CBS 

THE PHILIP MORRIS PLAYHOUSE 

Presents an Outstanding College Student 

Featured with Famous Hollywood Stars 

m the PHILIP MORRIS Intercollegiate Acting Competition 





CALL 
FOR 



PHILIP MORRIS 



f b^ WilH 



Volume XLVI, Number 9 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE 




3^^^xrfj&^ 



SATUKUAY, MARCH 8, 1952 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



All-Smith Choir, Williams College 
Glee Club Present Joint Concert 

o 

Waesche, Nelson Placement Bureau 
Take Solo Parts Deplores Apathy 

Bach's B Minor Mass Poor Student Response 
Featured on Program Causes Embarassment 



Navy Call to Take I i4ir Force Slices 
Martin, Swimming Training Program 



rtiilurday, Mnreh 8— The All- 
Hiiulli Clioir iiiKl the Williuliis Col- 
ore Glee Club will present a joint 
iMiicei't of choral music lomonow 
al ;t:15 p. m. in tl'e John M. Gieen 
Hall of Smith College. Fealuied 
(111 the piouram will be selections 
fnm the Mass in B Minor, by J. 
s Bach, sunii by the combined 
Sniitli-Williams Ki-oup. a total of 
aliproximately 150 voices with oi- 
v.m accompaniment. 

Also on the proKrum are selec- 
tions by William BiUiuKs. Jiicobus 
(lallus and Francois Couperin. to 
be .sung by the Williams Glee Club. 
aloiiB with .several folk sontis ar- 
ranned by Poulenc and Mlshkin. 

Waesche. Nelson to Solo 

All numbci-s sunn by the Wil- 
liams club, with the exception of 
the .selection by Couperin, will be 
done without accompaniment. The 
oiran accompaniment for this se- 
lection will be played by Alex 
Post '53. Woodward Waesche 'SU 
will sinti a .solo part in the work 
l)j' Couperin. and Mac Nel.son '55 
Mill be the .soloist in one of the 
Poulenc folk songs. 

Aside from its significance to the 
two college groups, the concert 
will be an event for the two con- 
ductoi-s. Mi.ss Iva Dee Hiatt, Di- 
rector of Choral Music at Smith, 
and Mr. Walter Nollner. Conduc- 
tor of the Williams College Glee 
Club- Miss Hiatt and Mr. Nollner 
Iwih studied at the Un.ve*fsity of 
California and have known each 
other for many years. This will 
mark their first joint concert. 

riie Glee Club is currently en- 
!;aKed in one of its most active 
.seasons, culminating in a concert 
to be given by the group in Chapin 
Hall on May 14. Other future en- 
luigements Include joint concerts 
with the Wheaton College choir, 
the Women's Choral Society of 
New Haven, the choir of Colby 
.lunior College, and the Vas.sar 
College Glee Club. 

Bushnell to Speak 
In Faculty Series 
At Sunday Chapel 

Williams English Prof. 
Gives Second Sermon 
In Revamped Services 



Saturday. March 8 Bucominc 
increasingly disturbed over the 
IJoor tui'noul of seniors answering 
job interviews, the Placement 
Bureau has stated that it is em- 
barrassing to have recruiters feel 
it necessary to call off a visit to 
the campus because of the appar- 
ent lack of interest. So far the 
Bureau has organized interviews 
for only 34 seniors on the "Active 
List". 

In two instances visitors can- 
celled their plans due to the short- 
age of interested .students, and two 
other recruiters kept their engage- 
ments only becau.se they had pre- 
viously plaiuied to be in the North 
Adams area. William O. Wyckotl. 
head of the Bureau, added that 
employers are interest<>d in .seniors 
"regardless of draft status." 
Kegrets Student Apathy 

An especially discouraging in- 
stance is the fact that, in view of 
the widespread interest in adver- 
tising, only six men signed up for 
a conference on this .subject last 
week. It was pointed out that if 
it were po.ssible to acquaint seniors 
with each company's offers better 
iv.sults might be obtained. 

It was suggested that .seniors 
on the Active List who have al- 
ready taken jobs, been accepted to 
graduate school or who are reluc- 
tant to accept interviews should 
ask to have their names placed on 
the Inactive List so that the Bu- 
I'eau may concentrate on those who 
need help. 

Talk on .lournalisni 

Next in a series of vocational 
guidance talks is a speech entitled 
"Journalism as a Cai-eer". to be 
given by Lawrence K. Miller '31. 
Editor of the Berkshire Eagle. The 
talk will lake place at 7:30 Wed- 
nesday night in Currier Hall. 

The Placement Bureau is spon- 
.soring an exhibit in Stetson Li- 
brary, consisting of vocational lit- 
erature of interest to seniors. Ma- 
terial from graduate schools and 
many corporations is included. 



Saturday. March 8— Professor 
Nelson S. Bushnell '20 of the Eng- 
lish Department will speak al the 
chapel service tomorrow evening. 
This will be the second in a series 
of sermons by members of the fac- 
ulty. David Mills '52 will conduct 
ihp service. 

Graduating from Williams in 
ISao, Professor Bushnell entered 
Harvard Law School. After a pre- 
liminary law career, he decided 
that he preferred teaching to a 
legal practice. He received his 
Ph D. degree from Harvard in 1928 
and has been a member of the 
Williams faculty since 1931. 

Taught in India 

During World War II. Professor 
Bushnell served with the Air Force 
in India. Lured by the stories of 
Kudyard Kipling, he had enter- 
tained a desire to visit India, and 
considered the opportunity offer- 
ed him by the goveinment very 
fortunate for him. 

In 1949-50, Profes.sor Bushnell 
WHS granted a leave of absence 
fiom William!!, and returned to In- 
dia as a lecturer In English Llteia- 
iiire at St. Steven's College in 
t)elhl. He considers this school the 
closest counterpart to an institu- 
tion like Williams In India. 




Professor Bushnell 



Ballet Comoanv 
Offers "Coppelia" 

Saturday. March 8— "Coppelia". 
one of the ballet woild's most fam- 
ous productions for the past 70 
years, will be piesented in a full 
length thi-ee-act performance by 
the internationally known Sadler's 
Wells Theatre Ballet on Wednes- 
day. March 12 at the RPI field 
house in Troy. The ballet will be 
directed by Dame Ninette deVal- 
ols. and boasts a company of fifty 
dancers supported by a full sym- 
phony orchestra. 

Headed by such outstanding 
soloists as Romayne Austin. David 
Blair and Svetlana Beriosova. the 
production has been acclaimed by 
the Montreal Star as combining 
"all the charm of the old version 
with a freshness and atmosphere 
of youth and enthusiasm that is 
wholly delightful." 



Co-Captain Elect 

Loss of Star Sprinter 
May Deprive Williams 
Of Olympic Prospect 

Saturday, March 8— The 1952- 
.i3 Williams swimming team may 
l)e dealt a severe blow this June 
in the lo,ss of co-captain and ace I 
sprinter Dick Martin. This is the ! 
Uire outlook facing the Eph swim- j 
mers. for Martin, victim of a mix- | 
up in Navy records, may be called 
out of the PittsHeld Naval Reserve 
unit to active duty. 

As Martin has not yet received 
his orders, the prospect of his be- 
ing called is still in the neai'- 
rumor stage, but Martin feels that 
there is a good chance that he will 
be summoned. Should he receive 
such orders, he would have the 
right to appeal his case, and might 
be granted a deferment in order 
to finish his .studies. 

May Miss Olympics 

If Martin is called, the Eph mer- 
men would be hard pressed to find 
a replacement. Recently elected 
Co-captain for next season along 
with Don Jones, Martin has set 
records in three events this season 
and is highly regarded as a pros- 
pect for the Summer Olympics at 
Helsinki this July. 

Coach Bobby Muir, when ques- 
tioned about Martin's Olympic 
chances, remarked: "I have had 
several boys make the Olympic 
team, and 13 boys have won na- 
tional championships in various 
events. I believe he iMai'tin) 
could make the 1952 Olympic 
team with the proper opportuni- 
des." 

This winter Martin has smash- 
See Page 4. Col. 4 

Educators Discuss 
Teaching Careers 

Baxter, Wright Stress 
Educational Requisites 



Processing Stage 

Speed-up Plan Halves 
Waiting Time; Interim 
Deferments Planned 



Saturday, March 8— Lt. Col. 
John C. Lawrence, Professor of 
Air Science and Tactics, has an- 
nounced that the processini; for 
civilians entering Air Force flight 
training has been reduced from 
tour months to four weeks. 

The accelerated program will 
enable the accepted cadets to start 
training within three to five 
months after applymg. Thus tlie 
former seven to ten month wail- 
ing period is eliminated. 

Lawrence also announced that a 
complete medical examination may 
now- be given at the nearest Air 
Force ba.se on the same day that 
the applicant tlrst visits his re- 
cruiting .station. If physically ac- 
ceptable, the applicant is sched- 
uled for early testing to determine 
his potential flying ability. 

Tho.se qualifying as aviation 
cadets are immediately given a 
tour month Selective Service de- 
ferment while awaiting class as- 
signment. In order to qualify as a 
cadet the applicant must be be- 
tween 19 and 26)2 years of age. 
single, and have two or more years 
of college. 



Yacht Club Votes 
F. Taylor Mauck 
New Commodore 



Sailors Enter Eastern 
Intercollegiate Regatta; 
Seek McMillan Cup 



Wednesday. Mar. 5 — President ' 
James P. Baxter III and Paul W. I 
Wright '27. head of the mathe- ' 
matics department at Groton 
School. Groton. Mass.. spoke to- j 
night on "Teaching as a Career', 
in the second of a series of in- ' 
formal vocational guidance talks 
sponsored by the college Place- 
ment Bui'eau. | 

Outlining advantages of teach- 
ing on the college level, President 
Baxter stressed the young instruc- 
tor's opportunities for research, his 
congenial living conditions, and 
his opportunities for close student- ' 
teacher relations. 

Speaking from twenty years ex- 
perience at an Eastern prepara- ; 
tory school, Paul Wright empha- i 
sized that the teacher on the sec- 1 
ondary level should have "real in- 
terest in academic pursuits", a 
sound college background, and "a 
real desire to teach youngsters." 



Saturday. March 8 — At the 
■i'acht Club's 23rd annual election 
of officers, held last Monday night 
ill Griffin Hall. F. Taylor Mauck 
'53 was chosen to succeed William 
R. Maclay '52 as Commodore of 
the club. Douglas Reed '53 and 
Jerome Cook '53 were chosen to 
replace Douglas Burgoyne '52 and 
John Clai'cy '52 as Vice-Commo- 
dore and Reai-Commodore. 

In an innovation of voting pro- 
cedure, sophomores John Beard 
and Stuart Chase were elected 
Secretary and Treasurer, replac- 
ing John R. Kimberly '52 and ..'ei- 
ome Cook '53 who had held these 
posts during the past year. 
Ephs to Sail in Easterns 

For the first time in eleven years 
the Williams Yacht Club has qual- 
ified with four other Northeast 
colleges to represent the New Enp- 
laiid di.strict in the Eastern Initr- 
collegiate Championships. On April 
5 and 6 this race "covering fifty 
miles I will be sailed in Chesapeake 
Bay. The team with the highest 
average at the end of the two days 
will be awai'ded the McMillan CutJ. 
the trophy for the Eastern Inter- 
collegiate title. 



BillvilWs Barbers Face Rival; 
MaXy Mystery Barber, Panics 
Tonsorial Parlors with 35c Cut 



Baxter Aids Drive 
To Nominate Ike 




Tresidenl James I*. Baxter III, 
Chairman of local Ike club. 



Houses Complete 
Votes for Officers 



Pres: Connelly, Jackson 
Preston, Shorb, Sterling 



Saturday. March 8-- As the re- 
sult of five elections held during 
the past week, all fraternities have 
now completed the selection of 
officers for the coming year. 

Beta Theta Pi has decided on a 
slate of: president, William C. 
J; ckson '53: vice-president. Peter 
,S, McKlnney '53: secretary. Hugh 
G Nevin Jr. '54: recorder. John A. 
Lyden Jr. '54. 

Tlie new officei's chosen by Delta 
KapiJa Epsilon are: president. Pe- 
ter D. Sterling '53: vice-president, 
Walter Flaherty '53: secretary. 
Frank A. Isenhart Jr. '55: treasur- 
er. Cliaiies I. Brown Jr. '54: and 
pledgemasters. Robei't D. Dunham 
'53 and Wentworth J. Mai'shall 
Jr. '53. 

Preston Heads KA 

Those who will serve as officers 
this year for Kappa Alpha are: 
president. Frederic B. Preston '53: 
first vice-president. Robert L. Sill- 
cox '53: second vice-president. Ar- 
thur F. Murray '53: seci'etary. 
George H. Wilkie '53: and trea.sui-- 
er. Michel L. Balin.ski '54. 

Elections at Phi Delta Theta re- 
sulted IS follows: president. Peter 
F. Connelly '53: vice-pi'esident. 
Robert K. Morrison '53; treasurer. 
Walter H. Irwin '53; alumni sec- 
retary. William R. Burrows III '53: 
and recording .secretary. Robert D. 
Utiger '53. 

Heading Saint Anthony Hall are: 
president. Robert H. Shorb '53; 
treasurer. Robert H. French '53. 



College President 
To Address N.A. 
Eisenhower Club 



Anticipates Republican 

S'weep Should General 

Receive Nomination 



.Saturday. March 8— President 
James P. Baxter III will speak 
Monday evening at an organiza- 
tional meetmg of the "Eisenhower 
for President" Club for the North 
Adams - Clarksburg - Florida dis- 
trict. The meeting will be held at 
the Richmond Hotel in North Ad- 
ams at 8:00 p. m. 

Setting forth his reasons for 
lending his support to General 
ELsenhower, the President has as- 
serted. "I came to know General 
Eisenliovi'er by doing some work 
for him in 1942 and in 1946-47. 
and by serving with him on the 
Service Academy Board in 1948- 
49. His qualities of leadership, ad- 
ministrative ability, and grasp of 
foreign and domestic problems im- 
IJiessed me deeply. No great Amer- 
ican leader today seems to me so 
human, .so dh'ect and .so kindly. 
Ike .\ppeuls to All 

"If nominated. I believe he can 
sweep the country, polling not only 
the full Republican strength, but 
most of the Independents whose 
support is needed for victory, and 
the many Democrats who frankly 
admit it is time for a change of 
party. 

"Almost everyone agree-; that if 
General Eisenhower is nominated 
he will be elected. But it will take 
organization, hard woi-k, and I'eal 
grass roots effort to ti'anslEte the 
strong popular sentiment nto 
delegate strength." 

Lauds Student Effort 

On the local scene President 
Baxter is chairman of the "Eisen- 
hower for President" organization, 
recently founded by students un- 
der the leadership of three fresh- 
men. Richard S. Beatty, Diiane T, 
Sargis.son. and Garret Schenck 
and since augmented by many 
townspeople. 

He has stressed the importance 
of the town-wide canvas being 
conducted by the students, as well 
as the value of the experience. As 
a Williams undergraduate in 1912. 
President Baxter gained similar 
experience as secretary of the 
"William Howard Taft for Presi- 
dent" organization. 



hij Al Home 

ht over a century of student — Sprini^ Street relatioms, few 
have risen to challenge the supremacy of that redoubtable avenue 
and lived to tell of it. Max, the Mysli'ry Barber, is one of the rare 
siicce.ssfid e.\eeptions to this rule. Hut his career has just begun, 
and much evil may vet befall him. 

Ma.\ (that, of course, is not his real name, but only a clever 
pseudonym) is the daring and talented voung tiiidergratluate who 
has put the fear of God into Willianistown's once confident bar- 
bers with liis masterful 3.5e hairculs. At last count, the heads of 
seven students bear his uninistakeable imprint, and the Mystery 
Baiher is confident that a tenth customer will go under his scis- 
sors before the end of the month. 

No Foriiuil Tniiiiinii 
Max's brilliant career was humelied on ii sudden impulse less 
than two months ago, when his roommate returnctl from a local 
esfahlishnient (which shall it-main nameless) with a haircut he 
deemed unsatisfactory. "Why. 1 can do better than that!" e.xclaim- 
eil the Mv.stery Barber, whipping out paper shears, a pocket comb, 
and an old bed sheet. He topped off his first production with a 
pair of cli|)pers bori'owcd from the counter of a local pharinacy, 
and he's been in business ever since. 

See Page 4. Col. 1 



Mansfield Addresses 
History 16 Students 

New Series to Broaden 
Post-Civil War Study 



Bermuda Holiday 
Attracts Students 



Travel Bureau Arranges 
Pan American Flight 



Monday. Mprch 3 — Professor 
Luther S. Mansfield gave the .sec- 
ond in a new series of History 16 
lectures this evening before the 
combined History 16 sections. The 
topic under discussion was; "Liter- 
atui'e in the Post-Civil War United 
States". 

These lectures are a division of 
the regular History 16 course, 
which consists of the study of 
American busiress in the years 
following the Civil War and of 
business trends in the 1920's. The 
History Department has instituted 
these lectures to "broaden the 
analysis of these areas of study". 

First-Hand Insight 

Members of departments other 
than history have given fullest 
support and cooperation. This af- 
fords the students the opportunity 
to gain first-hand insight into the 
various aspects of American life 
Wesleyan would win. Both of 
See Page 4. Col. 4 



Saturday. March 8 — Under the 
sponsorship of the Williams Travel 
Bureau ai Pan American World 
Airways. Eph undergraduates w^ill 
journey to Bermuda during the 
ten-day sprin. vacation to partici- 
pate In the tilth annual "College 
Week". 

To cover exiJcnses of the vaca- 
tion. Pan American chai'ges $176. 
which Includes almost evei'ythini! 
except meals Covered by the 
charge is the round trip to Bur- 
muda from Irilewild. food and 
drink aboard the plane, rooms on 
the Island, the Bermuda head tax, 
gi'ound transportation on Ber- 
muda, breakfasts and a bicycle 
for use during the visit. 

Facilities available for students 
on the island include volley ball, 
swimming, tennis, golf, moonlight 
boat rides and a chance to meet 
interesting companions. A tea 
dance and a College Week Ball 
are plenned for student visitors by 
Pan American in an effort to facil- 
itate inter-college relation^!. Vas- 
sar. Wellesley and many other 
women's colleges whose vacations 
coincide with the "College Week" 
will be represented in the group. 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY. MARCH 8, 1852 



North Adami, Mossochuset*s /Vtllmmstown, Mn&sochusatts 

'Entered as second-dnss matter ^I<'v^^r»hel Zl , 1941, at the post office ot 
North Adams, Massachusetts, under tfie AM of March 3, 1879." Printed by 
Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Adc ns, Mossochusetts. Published 

Wednesday and Soluruay during the college eor Sub.'icription price $5.00 
oer year. Record Otfire. Jesup Holl, Willianr own, 

RECORD Office - Phone 72 Editor - Phone 981 -JK 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

John H. Allan '53 Editor 

Charles E. Lange '53 

Richard C. Porter '53 Managing Editors 

Woodbridge A. D'Oench '53 News Editor 

Thomas A. Belshe '53 

Kay Kolligion, Jr. '53 ^ Sports Editors 

Frederick A. Terry, Jr. '53 - .- ... 

Antcun '53, 



WE PERSONAL SLANT 



Letters to the Editor 



Assistant Editors: Richard T 
James J. Coshmore '53 

Staff Photographers: 

Staff Cartoonist; 



Feature Editor 
Thomas H. S. Brucker '53, 



R. Wymon Sanders '54, Charles Eichel '54 

Thomos Hughes '53 

Associate Editors: 1954 - Q. Abbot, W. R. Aiken, J. Brownell, E. Cowell, 
K. Donovan, G, Davis, C. Elliot, C. Fisher, C. Foster, P. Goldman, 
R. Goldstein, A. Home, J. Klein, J. Morr, C. O'Kieffe, W. Warden, 
W. Weoduck 

Editoriol Staff: 1954 - W. Redman; 1955 - R. Carey, C. Heodley, 
E. Heppenstoil, P. Hunn, J. Kearney, D. Krehbiel, P. Mox, W. McLaugh- 
lin, R. Moore, L. Nichols, T. Ovtott, N. Reeves, J. Rudd, J. Souse, 
H. Sheldon, R. Smith, E. von den Steinen, R. Willcox. 

BUSINESS BOARD 

John Notz, Jr. '53 Business Manager 

Dudley M. Baker '53 Assistant Business Manager 

Robert O. Coulter '53 Assistant Business Monoger 

John F. Jonnston, II '54 Advertising Monoger 

Harold G. Pratt, Jr. '54 Assistant Advertising Monoger 

Curtis V. Titus '54 Circulotion Monoger 

Richord C. Schoub '54 Treasurer 

Business Staff: 1954 - J. Gushee; 1955 - H. Lindsoy, H. Moser, G. Olm- 
sted, J. Innes, R. Chodwick, IN. Faulkner, H. Smith 



Volume ALVl 



March 8, 1952 



Number 9 



EDITORIAL 



If You Don't Want Harry 

ur if you fet'l strongly about any otlu-r caiiclidatc lor tiu' 
luitioii's highest oliice, tueu e.xercise tlic Dasic responsibility of 
every citizen and make sure you will be al)le to \ote in ne.xt Nov. 
embirs presidential election, .-\ppro.\iniately 50'* of the present 
until rgradnate body will be ot voung age anil because of the wide 
\ariety ol registration regulations across the country, many stu- 
dents will lose their voting franeUisc unless they register over 
Spring X'acation. .\ five minute call at tlie office of your home 
town clerk will gi\e yon all the iiilonnation you need alxiiit pri- 
mary and national elections and about ahseiitee ballots. .Members 
ot the Class of 195:3 will lia\e lo cast their votes by absentee 
ballots and inan\' of those graduating m June will be in the armed 
forces and will na\e to make similar arrangeinents. 

iNovember may seem a long wa\' off, but a more immediate 
and pressing problem is that ot Stare primaries. At present the 
presidential candidates of the two major national parties arc still 
very much up in the air of political speculation and undergrad- 
uates may find that tliey can east decisive primary \otes during 
Easter vacation. We commend heartily the political awareness ot 
those on campus who ha\e formed chilis around college to tluow 
their weight behind the candidates ot their choice. But the five- 
hundred odd votes represented by the present upperclassnien 
are etjually as important as the propagaiuui value ot such organ- 
izations. A sense of social awareness and political responsibihty 
was exhibited by undergraduates during the past few months witli 
the votes on fraternity membership at Williams. But as college 
represents in capsule form the society as a whole into which we 
will soon matriculate, it is -.ital that we assuiue the habits of good 
citizenship as soon as we are eligible to exercise our political 
rights and responsibilities. 

Mountain Slopes Claim Victims 
From Novice Ranks As Three 
Exchange Boards For Crutches 

by Ned HcppcnstaU 

As central New England's most prosperous winter for skiing 
in recent years comes to a close, it is of interest to note the 
physical repercussions on the eager but unenlightened Williams 
men who have "hit the slopes". With the exception of Coach 
Towiisend's star captain, .Ned Collins, who has been inactive with 
a wrenched knee, by and huge the accidents have affected "green" 
skiers. 

A typical sufferer is Sandy Brown, who (according to his 
associate skiers-not him) was breezing merrily down a Dutch 
Hill slope when an attractive and (juite adept female skier 
whizzed past. Perhaps for fear of the severe blow to his pride at 
being outdone by the weaker sex, or perhaps in an attempt to ex- 
hibit to his iniknown companion his prowess "on the boards", 
Sandy hastened his descent flew past the girl, lost the trail, and 
1 leaded toward a tree. Result: a broken leg. 

Broiulci/ Takes Friend 

On Friday a brave but inexperienced Doric I'rieiid hazarded 
the treacherous Bromley slo|ies, suffering a badly-sprained ankle 
and an even worse-sprained ambition. Soon after f)orie took his 
fatal fall, two hefty ski patrolmen came and carted him off on a 
toboggan past staring people to the first aid station. Doric was 
beginning to think that the four dollars he had paid for the tow 
had not been completely wasted in \ iew of tiie excellent medical 
service he was receiving. 

He was indeed shocked when, after a pretty attendant asked 
him a few <|uestions in which she learned that he was an inex- 
perienced skier, he was casually dismissed with the advice that he 
should take skiing lessons. Having trawled meekly out of the first 
aiil station, he was given the attention he .so badly needed by a 
kind ladv who very heartilv sympathized with him in his pained 
maltreatinent from the station, and his spirits were brightened. 
When he got a letter recently from the kind lady asking him to 
come to the "beginner" ski lesort she owned, he was convinced 
of the hard-bitten cmnmerciali.sm of the mountain merchants. 

Sportsiiuiii Maimed 

C Harold Mott, well known for his grouse and duck shooting 
triumphs, re'ceiitly suffered a similar iiidignitv while developing 
his new winter interest. Unable to afford the gilded slopes of Mt. 
Tremblant or Stowe, he sustained his injnrv. (liagnosed as a club 
foot by Dr. Urniy. in the modest pastures of Dutcli Hill. 

Mistaking a sturdy oak for the 189(5 House, Mott crashed into 
the timber, and was oniv saved from hirther peril by a toboggan 
brigade from Pine Oibble School. With the aid of Cal King's taxi 
service, the victim has been able to maintain his perfect classroom 
attendance record. 



bij Ted Tern/ 
In the social "no inan'i land" between complete Iraternity 
memliership anil the status ijuo, the anxious policy makers ol 
Williams have found solace in the proposal hir deferred rushinu. 
'lliis plan provides no solution for the present problem, while 
creating a new list of potential ills. 

Deferred ru.shing stalemates any efhirt to provide gratis fra- 
ternity membership tor all iindergiaduates. The bitterness of re- 
jectioii at the end of a year will greatly exceed the disappointment 
of first week exelusion. The other side ol this proposed coin is a 
threat to the fraternity. Weakened by attrition, rather than 
altruism, the individual house will he forced to bid men normally 
unsolicited by the members, in terms of total absorption, the 
greatest probable accomplishment will be a vicious 90-10 ratio ol 
membership. 

A C'oW Winter for Treshnien 

The plan reduces the initial college year to nine months of 
spartan severity. Denied access to the entertaimiicut and transpor- 
tation offered by the fraternity, the freshman will inherit the dis- 
mal social facilities of Spring Street or the limited offerings ol a 
student union. His lot will hi weighted with the frantic and ex- 
tended struggle to enter the fraternity of his choice. In place of 
fostering class spirit, prolonged anxiety and competition will stress 
the individual and his cliijue, both fashioned to make the candi- 
date palatable to fraternity tastes. 

For the houses deferred rushing spells linaneial anemia. Out 
of the urge for self preser\ation the fraternity will acijuiescc to 
unwanted increases in delegation ijuotas. .\s a by-product of the 
new teclmiiiuc, desparatc rivalry and elaborate chicanery will 
appear, bring ailditional rushing expenses as baggage. The re- 
sulting evil will be the effect upon the atmosphere ol the indivi- 
dual houses. Group or "package ' joining on the part of the fre.sh- 
nicn, well congealed in cliques after a long, lonely year, will in- 
crease the polarization of fralernitics in their types and interests. 
Inevitably the fraternity will fail in its dlmiiishing attempts to 
maintain a mixed pattern within the hibric of its membership. 



To the Editors of LEER; 

We of the ARIK)W diiiik LEER is terrific. In fact, everyone 
(HI the ARROW staff reads l.EER. We ha\e set aside a day clevo- 
ted entirelv to reading LEKH We have jiarticularly enjoyed such 
revealing articles as "(Charlie Keller's (Childhood'. Tliis should 
certainlv win a Pulitzer Prize lor a story that long needed telling. 
The staff wishes to express its appreciation for your frank and 
fearless journalism. We all look like the fine young woman on 
Page 14. (Editorial Page) 

Unhesitatingly yours, 

Andy "the creep " Rygg 

Carolyn Bradley 

Anne Bradden, misanthropist (wot the hell, 

wot the hell) 

Pliyl Bryson 

Ellie "Pyggic" Bailey 

Jo "Cantilevi'i ' Bridges 

Pat "toujours gai ' Nauman 
.\iiil Remember! 

"Lilies that fester smtU far worse than weeds." 
(F. S. F. from W. S.) 
Pennsylvania College for Women Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



'/',) the Editor of the liECOlW: 

1 was very interested to read in the Williuuis HECOHD of 
Feb. 27, 1952 the article by John II. Allan in which he comments 
the irony of humorous references to the "dies unifomr' of (1,^ 
average 'Williams student. This article has scored a pertinent point 
1 believe, in bringing to the fore an observation of fact which so 
many are prone to self-consciously deny. 

Reliable polling techniiiues and valid conclusions Uierefrom 
are two entirely dilferent processes, however. Whereas we may 
find evidence of uniformity of dress on the Williams campus, 
1 hardly think that any conceivably significant percentage ot 
haternitv members will agree that "ol Williams institutions, 
clothing is most important in relationship to the fraternity." jj 
seems a great error to assume that a convention of dress can be 
interpreted as a motive hir evaluation of the worth of fraternity 
nieinbers. 

If this be the case, however, there are a great many of us in 
fraternities who must he resigned to remain as "outcasts " witli 
"two strikes against us from the start." But we shall continue tu 
liel that there are a few Williams institutions which have signj. 

Iiie of fraternities that lie 

Byron W."Wight '53 



lieaiit meaning in relationship to the va 
deeper than the level of clothing 



•;■„ the Editor of the HECOIW: 

■Apropos of the controversy over recent house party antics, I 
cite Walt Whitman's "Democratic Vistas" as a future source of 
inspiration for om \isiting maidens: 

"Democracv in silence, billing its time ponders its own ideals 
not of literature and art only— not of men only, but of women. 
Tiie idea of the women of .America, (extricated Irom tills daze, 
this fossil and iiiihealtli\' ail which hangs about the word ladij.) 
dcM'lop'il, raisi'd to liecoiuc the robust ei|uals, workers and, it may 
be e\eii practical and political deciders with the men greater tliaii 
man, we may admit though through their di\ ine maternity, always 
their towering, emblematical attribute— but great, at any rate, as 
mail, in all ileparlments; or, rather, capable ol iieing .so, soon as 
tliev realize it, and can bring themselves to give up toys and fic- 
tions, anil laiincii hirtli. as men ilo. amid real, independent, stormy 
life." 

Tom Beal '52 



DID YOU KNOW 
THAT YOU HAVE A PLACE IN NEW YORK? 

It's the Williams Club at 24 E. 39th St. Its pleasont 
rooms are yours of special undergraduate rates . . 
Your date will love the Ladies Cocktail Lounge and 
Dining Room . . . and you will feel right at home in 
the bar. 

The William Club 

24 East 39th St. 
It's Your Club - We Hope You'll Use It. 

Undergraduatei ore always welcom* 



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V 



Attention 
Seniors 



Jf OR those interested in discussing the possibilities 
of domestic and foreign banking as a career, we are 
pleased io announce that interviews for positions 
with The National City Bank of New York will be 
held on the Williams campiis March 20. Why not 
take the time to look into a field that offers many 
varied opportunities to men with liberal arts majors? 
Inasmuch as March 20 is the only date on which 
our representative will be on the campus to conduct 
interviews, may we suggest that you contact the 
Office of the Placement Director to arrange an 
appointment for an interview? Also available at the 
Placement Director's office is a copy of our booklet 
"Careers for College Men" which will give you an idea 
of the potential open to you at National City. 



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THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, MARCH 8, 1952 



HEADLINER 



By KulliKian 

Btkck In UetcmbBr, the luss ol Hit Cramer dealt a severe blow tu 
Coach Al Shaw'K hopes tor nioidiiit- a team whieh eould perhaps come 
close to eiiualiiliiK the perl'ormaiu'e of his great Larson-Sheehy qulii- 
let. The preseiiee of Cramer alonu with Kd Shiidt gave Shaw two 
well seasoned and poised veterans to paee a team whieh would obvi- 
ously lack experienee and ronlldenee. The sophomore trio of Hawkins, 
freer, and Smith coupled with the veteran Williams ro-eaptains mlRlit 
very well have turned the tide in our favor on more than one oecasion 
where live or six points made the dilTerencc. 

However, with Cnimer out of action due to a chronic shoulder 
injury, Shaw was foreed In experimenl with a number of variations 
In his line-up in an attempt to find a winninK combination. 

Ho often has eome the ery from armchair strategists — "Well just 
wait till next year." With a winning: frosh live, sperulatlon for 1953 
could hardly be avoided. However, no coach is in a position to dream 
about what's to happen come next year, lleie and now are his main 
worries, and his Job is to deal with the situation at hand. 

In liiiht of Ihl.s fact, I feel that with the relatively "green" squad 
Al Shaw found available for his Til-.'ja team, he ha.s woi'ked wonder.s 
to keep them al the .500 maik. 

TunlKht it's Amherst. The bie one! The last one. Making the trip 
with the Williams squad will be co-captain Cramer, uniformed and 
ready for action against the powerful .lell quintet. Not only has his re- 
turn strengthened the suuad, but also it has given a certain rejuvena- 
tion of spirit. They'll be going all out for the win tonight. Let's get 
down and give them all the support we can. 

Picture, if you will, the Hlorious maKUiflcence of the Lasell basket- 
ball court UPSTAIRS. With all the advantages of the proverbial 
"bandbox", this floor provides the site for all intiamural contests 
ihrouKhout the year. Poor 'Harry Hoop"! So many frustrations of 
ihls would-be court flash are only heightened by low-hanwing rafters, 
pregnant floois, close-by radiators, and supporting pillars. In addition 
to these, we find nine other obstacles i teammates included i racing 
about the floor with "an intent to kill" manamnK their every move. 

With the intra-mural league championship in the balance, the 
DKE'S met the Dll's, (Nulf said'.' I The combatants took the floor 
amidst a flourish of sanguinary oaths, and the battle was on. After 
an 11-11 half-time score, the even pace was kept throughout the sec 
»nd half as well. With but a minute remaining in the combined 
urestllng-football-basketball display, a tie score still prevailed. As the 
seconds waned, the referee's blast sounded and I'KTE STERLING 
strolled to the foul line for the "Old Crow's ". I'ete's toss was good and 
the Columns of Kpsilon struggled through with an fH-17 victory. 

My apologies to Capt. O. M S.. Ill and the winter Uack team 
for recent omission of the results of the Knights of Columbus track 
meet in N. Y. a week ago. With due respect to my former boss. I'd 
like to .say that the Williams cindermen represented one of the only 
small college entries on the program. Running in a heat with teams 
Irom N. Y. U., Holy Cross, Pcnn State and St. John's the Purple mile- 
relay team trailed the victors bv a scant four .seconds, posting their 
best time for the entii-e season. George Kelsey placed fifth in the high 
jump. 




Captain Kay George of the Wil- 
liams College Squash team will be 
one of four entries at Harvard to- 
day. 



Skiers Compete 
In Bromley Meet 

Townsend Enters Four 
In Giant Slalom Field 



Saturday, Mar. 8 — Coach Ralph 
rownsend's skiers compete with 
the East s best teams in the Har- 
vard Collegiate Giant Slalom 
at Big Bromley today. Th,.' meet 
is comprised of two run.i, one to 
be lield this morning and the 
other in the afternoon. 

A field of more than ten teams 
is expected for the annual event, 
including Harvard. Vermont, Nor- 
wich. Bowdoin. Mlddlebury, Dart- 
mouth, and other Eastern Colleges 
which will vie with the Ephs for 
ti'am honors. 

Still handicapped by the lass of 
Captain Ned Collins. Townsend 
will enter only four skiers. Bob 
Tucker, Stu Chase, and Pete Cal- 
lahan, Williams' three leading 
point-getters in slalom events this 
year, and Putte Westergaard will 
compete for the team and indivi- 
dual titles at Bromley. 



Squashmen Enter 
National Tourney 
To End Campaign 

Four Men to Compete 
In U.S. Championship; 
Squires Seeded Third 

by Bob Goldstein 

Friday, Mar. 7— Coach Clarence 
Chaffee .sent a four-man Williams 
delegation down to Harvard today 
to take part In the National Inter- 
collegiate Squash Championships. 
Representing Williams are Dicii 
Squires. Soapy Symington, Ray 
George and John Brownell. Chis 
Thoron, the number three man, 
chose not to make the trip. 

The tournament is based on In- 
dividual play; no team champion- 
ship will be decided. Chaile; IJf- 
ford of Harvard, runner up last 
.year, will, in all probability, oe 
.seeded fli'st, while Blair r/urphy j 
of Yale and Squires will receive [ 
either .second or third r.'-.nking. . 
Squires-Murphy Rivalry j 

The keenest rivalry at the tour- 
ney will be between Squiies and 
Murphy. The two have split two 
decisions this year, and if neither 
is upset, they stand a good chance . 
of meeting in the semi finals. La.si 
year Murphy, seeded third, tupped 
Squires 3-1 in the third round. 
None of the other Williams en- 
trants have participated before. 

Coach Chaffee is quite optimis- 
tic over the chances of his teo.m 
He feels that "Squires should 
reach the semi finals", and al.so 
exclaimed that "This is the strong- 
est team we have entered in tl e 
IntercoUeglates in some time". 
Upsets Possible 
Aside from the four probably 
seeded stars. Coach Chaffee ex- 
pects to see several others provide 
some .stiff competition for any op- 
ponent. Among those falling into 
this category are Jim Bacon and 
Dave Watts of Harvard: Sandy 
Ewing of Yale: Cecil North of 
Princeton: and Symington i>nd 
George, of Williams. 



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Martin, Jones Chosen Captains 
For 1952-53 Swimming Team; 

Dun Joins ami Dick .Martin luivi- iH-eii chosen co-captains 
lor the iy.52-53 Williams swininiiiig tiani. The two stand-out 
iialators will succet-d captains jtllrc) and Belash for Coach 
Dob Miiirs cohorts. 

lioth Jones and .Murtiii are seasoned veterans, having been 
under the able direction of Coacli Muir since freshman year, 
riicy represent the strong Williams hit-style duo; Martin swims 
the 50-yd. and l(H)-yd. events, while Jones excells in the 220-yd, 
and 440-yd. matches. 

lieconls lull lieforc Martin 

After establishing himself as a consistent winner a year ago, 
Dick Maitin was faced with an ineligibility status tliis year 
uliieh kept him out of action until February. However, he 
broke back into the line-up at a torrid clip. 

In his first jneet, agaiiist SpringlicUl, .Martin nipped sec- 
onds off bi'^'i pool rec(Hds for tlie short distance dashes, tying 
the New gland recoids in both events. A week later against 
the University of Coniiecticut, the laiiky junior entered the 
220-yd. dash only to post anothei iicord breaking time. 
Joucs Holds Diml Victories 

DoiJ Jones, who also co-captained his freshman squad, has 
iilaved a very important lole in kee|)iiig the Purple mermen on 
their wiimin'g wavs for the jjast two years. The stockv, well- 
built ■■fiogmaii" has not only been a steady victor m scheduled 
meets, but also has failed very snco'ssfully in the New Eng- 

A year ago Jones emerged as the only dual winner in the 
NEISA. competition. Since his victory last year, loiies only 
loss iii the 440 yd. I'vent has come at the hands of teainmate 
J,,,. Worthiiigton. Along with Martiii, loiies is a second bright 
iKjpe foi- Williams in the New iMiglands. 



Eph Five Meets Amherst Tonight; 
Win Means Little Three Title Tie 




High flying forward Herb Smith 
who will start tonight against the 
highly-touted Amherst five. 



Class A Ski Results 
Delayed by Scoring 

According to Coach Ralph 
Townsend. the final results of 
the Class A skiing tournament 
held at St. Lawrence College 
last week will not be made of- 
ficial tor two weeks by the N. 
I.S.A. The delay is due to sev- 
eral mtstakes in method and 
manner of scoring by improper- 
ly orientated tabulators. 



Cramer Rejoins Squad 
After Earlier Injury; 
Frosh Face Jeff Cubs 

by Pete Goldman 

Coach Al Shaw's varsity cagers 
will be fighting to repeat last 
year's tie for the Little Three titl"? 
when they take on a favored Am- 
herst club on the Sabrina court 
tonight. The Ephs show a single 
\ictory in three title contests to 
date. 

The Jeffs, who carry a in-7 oai'd 
into the final game, saw then- 
hopes jarred when the Wesleyan 
Cai-dinals eked out a one-point up- 
set victory in Middletown two 
weeks ago. However, the host ag- 
gregation boasts a height advan- 
tage over the Ephs which enabled 
them to pull out a 56-45 wm in 
I their first encounter with the 
I Shawmen earlier in the season. 
I Ephs Given Strong Chance 
I According to Shaw, the Ephs 
I have a fair chance for a victoiT 
I and a three-way title deadlock, 
given the brand of offensive re- 
bounding they displayed against 
Springfield last Friday. The Wil- 
liams coach points to six-foot-flve 
pivotman Howie Fisher, forward 
Sterling Weaver and team captain 
Derry Bennett as the key men in 
the Sabrina attack. 

In addition to this trio, which 
accounted for 41 Jsil markers in 
See Page 4, Col. 2 



A wonderful case of 

"dual personality'^ 

ARROW GABANARO 








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THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, MARCH 8, 1952 



Barber . . . 

I'noi- to his successful debul, 
Max had iccoivcd no instruct'on 
m Ihe art of h irciittnit'. Bill his 
pioficiency causes him Utlk sur- 
prise. ••AfU'i- all." he eAplauis. 
-I've been hvaina my hair cut for 
over nineteen years." 

Asliiiiishini: Ti-ihnique 

The cultinM method lie has 
painstakiUBly developed over a 
period of weeks is remarkably 
blrai!4ht-forward. He simply places 
his .scissors al the middle of tiie 
head at the back, and heads for 
one ea:-. Then he leverses his fleld 
by cuttinsj toward the other ear. 
Finally, he step.s back to survey 
Ihe damage, and evens thiiUis oil 
all around. 

The Mystery Barber is quick to 
add th'ii he runs his comb up and 
down, 'because if you run it back 
and lorward you aet a ciu gash 
m the hair." His particular spe- 
cialty is a short .semi-crew cut--- 
■Ihe shorter it is. tlie morn money 
you save." 

Shuns Haste 

Always eager to please his cus- 
tomers. MuX is careful to i)rovide 
a Wide selection ul recent maaa- 
nines. and favors .soft music as a 
backwround to lus clipping. He 
deplores, however, the tendency of 
his patrons to lere the chair be- 
fore he is throu.nh, "A good hair- 
cut takes a half hour." the Mys- 
tery B..;bcr insists. "I'm very par- 
tial to short haircuts." 

Max is also partial to Vitalis. 
which he endorses per.sonally. 
despite his customers' preference 
for Cit';ini-Oil. The Mystery Bar- 
bers Ljmplete service even in- 
cludes a .special dandrulT treal- 
menl. performed by nuuiing a 
brush up and down the patron's 
head. "It's just like shining a 
shoe." he says, with ,i,'reat satisfac- 
■iion. 

Seeks Faeully Clients 

hi Ills relentless search for new 
worlds to conqtiei-. Max has be- 
come nearly obsessed '.vith the 
idea of adding several faculty 
scalps to his collection. To his 
first faculty customer, he has of- 
fered .1 free bottle of hair tonic 
and a swig of Seagram's t;) ease 
the ppin. His other great ainbi- 



Basketball 



the hrsl iiieetiim of the two teams. 
Coach Rick Wilso.i will go with 
Ken Wright al forw, id and Tony 
Mahar at guard. Shaw will cotinler 
with Wyn Shiidt. Walt Creer, Herb 
Smith and Jack Ha'.vk.ns. with 
Mike Lazor. Bob DePuiiolo or the 
recuperated U\/. Cramer in the 
fifth slot. 

("rumer to Mike Trip 

Cramer, who has been sidelineu 
through most of the season with 
a sliuiilder injury, will make the 
trip to Amherst with the team, out 
whellier he will be able lo .start 
remain'; in doubt. 

T'he freshman hoopstei.< also 
travel to Amherst today where 
they will open the defense of their 
Little Three title. The Ephs al- 
ready have one leg on the crown, 
having defeated Wesleyan at. 
Lasell Gymnasium earlier ui the 
.season. 

.Icils Have Height Ech;e 

Amherst has a high .scoring 
team, as shown last Saturday in 
roUiu'.! up 89 points against the 
U. of Mass. frosh, and will possess 
a def'uite height advanta'je with 
six-foot-four Jev Baskin and 6-'J 
Bud Allen. Ill ;,u;ird Pete Scott, 
they hove n deadly set .-.hot artist, 
while Fred M.' re and Gerry Ben- 
son, lounding oiii the lineup, are 
highl.v-vated 1..^;erisive players. 

C'jach Bobby Coombs' eliarges 
go into this, their flnai game, 
boasting one of the finest records 
of any W,lliams fre.shmau team, 
with 13 wins and a single loss to 
a poueitu! Siena Jayvee .squad. 
The services of scoring ate Tony 
More, shelved since the W esleyan 
game, will be sorely mi.s.scd, but 
the venrhiiRS are out to c'.o.se oH' a 
I'ccord :.?:>son with -i coveted Little 
Three title win. 



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Wrestlers Travel 
To Springfield for 
N.E. Tournament 

Callaghan Defends Title; 

Springfield, Wesleyan 

Head Team Entries 



Martin . . . 



tions .ire to buy his flrsi, i^air of 
chppi'vs. and to hire a I^-lady as 
his I'lipicurist. 

Although birbering is still large- 
ly a hooi)^' with iMm Mp,\ takes 
great pride m his handicrafl. Ask- 
ed his opinion of Sta-N(!et. an 
inexpensive device for peisonal 
naircutting. he snarled. "That 
gadget would drive all us experts 
out of work,' 



Prid-y. March 7— The Williams 
Wrestling Team journeys to 
Springfield today to comiiete in 
the two-day New England iham- 
pioiiships. Heading the Purple del- 
egation will be Cap. Bill Callag- 
han, defending champion in hte 
157 pound class. 

The Williams lineup is experted 
to consist of the same grou!) that 
downed Aaihersi, with the exiep- 
tioii of the 137 potiud class In 
which Malcolm Kane. TjiV/ La 
Braiichi . and Bill Aldeu arc all 
in the running, due to the injury 
of George Dimock. Pilling out the 
Williams roster are Rod Cover, 123 
lb; Bill Williams, 130 lb.: Bob 
Shorb. 147 lb.: Callaghan, \W\ lb.: 
Dick Gordon, Hi7 lb.: Hugh Mur- 
phy. 177 lb.: and Dick Edwards, 
unlimited. 

Coach Ed Bullock declined to 
comment on Williams' chances, 
saying only that he thought de- 
fending champion SprnigPeld or 



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and 220. and has tied llie New ; 
England mark in the 100. In the ^ 
coursi' of setting these marks he | 
has broken all Williams and Pool j 
records in these events. | 

hi commenting on these murks. 
Coach Mulr added: "Martin is the 
greatest swimming prospect in 
sprint swimming i50, 100. 220 1 
with whom I have had the privi- 
lege of working in the past Sfi 
years. If Martin is called by the 
Navy. Williams will lo.se a great 
swimmer, and the Olympic team 
a great prospect." 



History 



these teams defeated Williams 
during the regular season, 
through instruction of specialists 
in their fields. 

Students in History Hi study the 
nature of American busiiu'ss usiii!'. 
such volumes as Dreiser, 'I'lie 
Titan; Lewis. Babbitt: and Mc- 
Closkey. American Conservatisin 
in the Ase i>f Knterprise as back- 
ground material. 

Professor William E. Pierson 
will review "Art and Architecture 
in the Post-Civil War United 
States" on March 10 at 7:30 o. m. 
Lectures on the 1920 period have 
been .scheduled for April. 



Middlebury Subdues 
Williams Sextet, 11-2 

Middlebury, VI., Mur. 4— The 
Williams hockey team suffered 
its 11th defeat of the season to- 
day as the powerful Panthers 
of Middlebury 

Ihe injury-ridden Ephs, 
playing without the .services of 
Captain Jim Harvey, could do 
little to slop the strong Puii- 
Iher sextet. The only bright 
spots in an otherwise dismal e- 
vening came in the first period 
when Ted Mitchell, faking the 
Middlebury defense aside, 
flashed across the net to score 
cleanly, Ted Irwin scored the 
other Eph goal. 



LAMB 

& 
HUNTER 

INC. 

Planned Printing 
North Adams, Ma«i. 

Tel. 3930 



J. Paul Sheedy* Switched to Wildroot Cream-Oil 
Because He Flunked The Finger-Nail Test 



Why wait until 
morning? 

When you can get the out- 
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evening through the full leased 
wire Associated Press service in 

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Nortli Adami, Matt. 
On loU ot 5 p.m. on oil 
Williomitown Nowiitondi 




uanuruii. Helps you pass the lingir-Nail 
Tc-it. Paul got Wildroot tream-Oil and now lie's out lurlle- 
necking all thi-' time! So don't stick your nctk out... ((it 
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goods counter lor a hoide iirtube ot Wildroot Otam-Oil. 
And ask lor it on your hare at your lavurile liarbir shop. 
Then you'll rc-ally he in the swim. 



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\V ildr.iot Company, Inc.. llulialo 1 1, N. \. 



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You'll like our 
Fr/enrf/y Vluy of 
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HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATrn 




i^tr^ ttilli 







3^j^^xrrit 



\ uluinc Xl-VI, Niiiubc'i- 10 



'^^/■J> 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE 



*>A-^y 



WEDNESDAY, MAHCH 12, 1952 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



UC Election Names Sterling '53 to Presidency, 
Designates Lazor Secretary, Howard Treasury 



MatmeiiTakeSecoiid 
In NE Champ ion ship 

0- 

Springfield Hosts j 
Cop First Place 

Capl. Callaghan, Shorb, 

Edwards Gain Titles 

For 26 Point Total 



.SinliiBfield, MiiiTli 8 C'Dijpiiu; 
(hico individual cliampionsluiw 
in riich division, llic Willianis var- 
■sily and fri'sliinaii wn'slliii!' 
s(|ua<ls placed Ki'cond lo llic laisl 
Spimcficld aKK legation in bdlli 
biMckct.s of the New England In- 
incolk'Biale tourney lliis weekend 

Hill CalhiBlian. Bob Sluirb am 
Diek Edwards paced Ed Bullocks 
vaisily proteups to a 26-poinl to- 
tal, six behind the Maroons' win- 
niiii: score. Callaiihan clo.sed out m 
biillianl colleKO Ki'i^pplini; career 
Willi hi.s foui'th consecutive New 
Kimhind championship, decision- 
mi.; Coast Oiiarri's Pi'ilz Umu. in 
tlic l.')7 pound final. 

Kdwards Triumphs 

The most spoctaculai- sliowniii 
of till' day. howevei'. was turned 
111 by Edwards. Wrestling in the 
unlimited class, the vrtenui pin- 
ned f."o;Kst Guard's second-sced-.'ii 
1 Mill Lively in his first oulinK. 
.Hid cinnc back tonlKhl to ciJk«- ii 
7-4 decision from top-ranked .Jer- 
ry CiilIaBhan of Wcsleyan. 

Junior Bob Shorb annexed his 
first varsity New E:ni;land crown 
Willi an ca.sy victory over Cadet Al 
Relf in the 147 pound title bout. 
Bill Williiims and Dick Cordon ad- 
ded consolation round victories. 
Williiims taking a referee's deci- 
sion from Wesman Bobby Morrison 
the 130-pound bracket while 
• iordon ijained a victory over the 
Ixad .Jeffs' Mike Pallon iil 1(17 
■ niiinds. 

Frosh Take Triiile ( rowii 
For the freshmen. Bob Little 
sliirted the ball rollinc for the 
luniier-up Eph enti-y with a 4-1 
victory over Wesle.van 147-i)ounder 
CieorKe Edwards. John Barker du- 
plicated Little's performance with 
a decision over the Maroons' Ma- 
■-oii in the 157-pound final. 

Ahui Reed raptured the third 
individual win for the .vearlinur,. 
winiiinn an easy victory over 
Const Guard heavyweiiiht Olson. 
Hod Willcox reached the final 
round in the 167-pound catesory. 
hut wa.s pinned by Springneld's 
Nemo ace Jim Granberrv in one 
minute flat. 

Herb Ladds nl.so bowed in the 
champion.ship round, IosIpk to 
Uick Noble of Wesleyan on a de- 
cision, while Bob Savadoi'e drop- 
ped a consolation round bout in 
the 130-pound bracket. 




Flying Club Asks 
$im SAC Loan 
For Newer Plane 



New UC Head 



Council May Underwrite 
Bank Loan; Burgher 
Proposes Repayment 



Bill Callaghan 



Quartet to Present 
Concert in Chapin 

Local Group to Perform 
Music for Brass, Piano 

A concert "^f music for Ijias'-- 
and piano will be held at 8:1,") 
p 111 in Chapin Hall Friday eve- 
ning. The iierformrnce. roquirini; 
no admission ehai'MC. will feature 
two members of the Williams fac- 
ulty and the wife of a third. 

Irwin Shainman. n.ssistant pro- 
f<'ssor of music, will be heard on 
the tnimix't. and Uavid Mead, in- 
structor of mathematics, will iilay 
the horn. Mary Johnson, wife of 
Manley Juhn.son of the Enulish 
DeiJarlment. will be al the piano 
in her .second concert appearance 
on caminis. Mrs. Johnson is a 
nieniber of the faculty of the Jiil- 
liard School of Music. Ro'oert Roy 
will play the trombone. 

Perform Nollner's Sonata 

A three part fantasia by 
B.vrd will be the openinK piece in 
the ix'iformaiice. followed by a 
".Sonata for Horn and Piano" by 
Beethoven. The third slection is to 
be a "Sonata for Trumi^et and Pi- 
ano" by Hindemith. 

A feature of the iirofuam will be 
the performance of n "Sonata for 
Piano" by Walter Nollnei'. Mr. 
Nolliicr is a member of the Wil- 
liams Colletie Music Department. 
The concert will clo.se with the 
pUiyiUK of a "Sonata for Trumpet. 
Trombone and Horn" by Francis 
Poulcnc. 



High School Age Students Adjust 
To Ford Foundation Collese Plan 



Youths Excell in Marks, ,, 
Participate in Campus 
f^xtra-curricular Life 



of readiiiK introduced in most 
• hlRh .school senior courses. 
i The Ford Rioup made the ad- 

I .iiistmeiit to college life with the 

Hi(!h .school ape bov.s and girls I f'"™" P'>s<^ »■'' "if"' dnssmales. ac- 
=»'■(• ad.(u.stinB wtII to college en- j '""'''•'"R l" t'^'" Columbia report, 
vironmcnt according to reports ""•- ""'V '" I'csPPft to their sitidies 



fi'om the five miiversitles and col 
'PRe.s cooperating with the Ford 
Foundation for the Advancement 
of Education. The foundation in- 
stituted a proRi-am last fall for 
youths of high scholastic ability to 
see If they can adopt them.selves 
to college life. 
The 51 Ford fi-e.shmen at Colum- 



Init also in connection with par 
ticipation in extra-curricular and 
social nctivitips. 

The fifteen Ford Rirls at Ooiich- 
er college in Baltimore fared 
eqiiallv well. For the purpose of 
evaluation a control group was es- 
tablished of freshmen obt-'Inine 
the .same .scores In the College 



bia aie bettering the average of ' Board aptitude test.s as those 
the freshman class as a whole. The ', i>mone the Ford group. 
RToup excelled In mathematics. Obtain Higher Grndes 

while doing poorly In English be- The girls in the Ford group 
cause they lacked the wide range See Page 4, Col. 6 



Monday. March 10- At the first 
ineeling of the Student Activities 
Council under the direction of its 
new olliccrs. Flying Club President 
Dave W. Bur!,'her asked for a 
$1400 loan for the purchase of a 
newer second-hand plane. The 
loan, if granted, would then be 
■idded to the $400 which would be 
received from the sale of the plane 
now 111 use. and the faster, more 
eiriclent one would be bought. 
When the original proiiosal came 
111), the Plying Club asked for a 
direct loan. but. due lo the finan- 
cial status of the SAC. the execu- 
tive committee, which met .several 
days iiKO. decided that such a loan 
was imiJo.ssible, Burtdier then 
worked out a plan whereby tlu> 
loan would be made by the Wil- 
lamstown Bank and would be un- 
derwritten by the Activities Coun- 
cil. 
Meniiiers I'ersonally Kesponsiblr 
Besides the undcr-writinu the 
SAC will have an agreement with 
•he twenty members of the Flying 
Club by which they will be per- 
■onally responsible to the SAC if 
anything goes wrong. The plan 
also slates that if the new plane 
is bou,«ht. the debt must be reiiaid 
in two to three years. To insure 
this i-epayment in the quickest 
possible time, the flying rates will 
be raised lo $4.00 per hour, and 
the iJlaiie will be a\'ailable and 
ready for a larger number of fly- 
ing hours. 

The council decided Ihi.s after- 
noon to think the problem ovei- 
in a little more detail and come lo 
their final decision in the very 
near future. Several minor pro- 
blems concerning liability and col- 
ILsion must be considered first. 

Michigan Reveals 
Rushee Scarcity 

New Dorms Draw Men 
Away from Fraternities 

Ann Arbor. Mich.. March 10 — 
Fraternity rushing .seems to bring 
up all .sorts of varied problems on 
the nations' campu.scs. At the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, fraternities 
are running into diiTiculty trying 
to get enough men to pledge, the 
Michigan Daily reports. 

The university's new dormitories. 
IJossessing more than adequate 
facilities, have caused students to 
feel that they can satisfy their in- 
dividual tastes and needs .satis- 
factorily in the college residence 
halls. 

During the recent rushing sea- 
son on the Michi.gan campus, resi- 
dent of the new Gomberg House 
placed an ad in the Daily an- 
nouncing "rushing hours for all 
aflilintes who desire to pledge." 
One of a .series of buildings known 
as the new "South Quad." Gom- 
berg is putting up stiff competi- 
tion for the fraternities which 
wish to pledge men who feel more 
than satisfied where they are. 
Must Slay Solvent 

The university plan of building 
plush dormitory facilities has 
cau.sed the number of Michigan 
fraternities to drop considerably 
since the pre-war period. Accord- 
ing to a university ruling, houses 
which cannot remain solvent fi- 
nancially must close. A number of 
fraternities have been forced to 
dissolve from a lack of men who 
wished to pledge. 

In the last rushing campaign. 11 
See Page 4. Col. 2 




President Fills Posts 
On Rules Committee 



! Peter I). Sterling '53. newly el- 
j ected President of the 1952-53 Cn- 
dergraduate Council. 



hij Krcii'i DiiiKiKiii HI 

Monday. Maicli 10- IVtir U. Sletliiiir '5.3, Presideiil ol IX-lta 
Ka|)|)a I'^psiliiii. was elected Frcsidiiii iil the Uiidc'rj^ruduate 
(Council Iliis c'xeiiiiig. Di'cplv sciioiis aliinil his new rispoiisibility, 
I'cli' voiced the hope that he iiiit;hl eunliiiiie to be as successful 
as llie oiilgohiu. presicU'iit. J. Hiehard DiiHield '52. 

\ resident ol .Majilewood, .\eu Jersey, Sterhiig is a grad- 
iinle ol (.'oliiinbia Hif^li Seliool. Pete plavs varsity hiolball, is a 
iiieiiihei' ol the lliiiioi- .S\sleiii Coiniiiillee. a Junior .\ilvisor, and 
aeti\c' on ihe track team and the News Bureau. 
LiiZdi Sccrciiiiti 

The UC also named Michael l,a/oi 'o3 as its new secretary 
and Robert W. Howard '53 to the olliee ol treasurer, .\ppoiiited to 
the Kules and Xoiiiiiiatious Coiniiiitlee l)\' President Sterlini; were 
Peter U. CoiiiiolK' '53. (;eoii;e !•'. Ilartiiett '53 and Peter L. 
I'elteroll '53. 

Lazor, a native ol N'ortli Tarrxtouii. .\e\v York, is an aluinniis 
ol North Tarrvtowii llil^li School. Besides haxinti; |)laved varsity 
iootball. .Mike' is Presidi'ut ol .\l|)lia Delta J^lii, President of the 



State Action Bans TSA Confidential^ 
Labels Book As 'Ohsene, Libelous' 



inj Kiciig Uuiitican ol 
I'rida), Mar. 7— -\lassacliusetts book dealers have been dc- 
lugeil b\ recjiiesls lor copies ol 'U.S.A. Confidential," despite 
Ihe states Icj^al action to oaii sales. W'aslibiirncs Hook Store on 
Spring Stri'et has leportetl that it sold out its slock of this book. 
.State detectixe, aetnig umUr orders Irom Coininissioncr of 
Public Safety Daniel 1. .Miirphy. ba\c' been "advising" stores not 
to sell or rent the book. W'aslibuine was warned last week, but 
It 1s riunored (hat be continued to sell tbe hook, and that one of 
the last copies went to Police Cliiel Hoyal. 

.\liirpli)' chaiacteri/.ed the book as ' loul, obseiie and libelous,' 
and bas announced that it was up to the district attorneys or the 

O attorney general lo proceed in 

such ca.s^'s. Authors Jack Lail and 
Lee Moilimer are being thiea'"n- 
ed with libel suits in two oilier 

JeSUp riall UlllCe l Mr.' LaH lias maintained tluu 

the i«a.ssachu.selts action iS "re- 

\'enge" for wlial the boot; said 

a'oout Bay Slate politicians and 



Watters Acquires 
Hall Office 



Coach to Use Quarters 
To File Data, Movies 



The college has recently sup- 
plied football Coach Len Watters 
with a re-decorated olliee on the 
second floor of Jesup Hall to pro- 
vide ample filing siJacc for per- 
.^oiuil correspondence and a place 
to interview alumni, prospective 
freshmen, and visitors. 

Wallers reports that his new 
lieadquarters will be ideal for daily 
football conferences during the fall 
season and his famed Sunday 
niBht meetings where strategy for 
the next week's game is mapped 
out. Commenting on his new quar- 
ters. Watters said, "At least we've 
got a place to work where people 
can find us. . . ." 

Since his arrival at Williams. 
Wallers has been collecting con- 
siderable data on each football 
game played plus an ever-increas- 
in; amount of correspondence. Up 
til'; now he has been forced to file 
thrill all at home. Watters recent- 
ly became disturbed at the grow- 
inij amount of paper piled in his 
cellar. "I looked at all that .stuff 
piled close to my oil burner fur- 
nace and I began to wori-y a bit...." 



IJolice, Al one i:ioint ill llie book. 
the authors characterize Muiiiliy 
li.mself as "Dover's Dan." 

" Defyth'e State"" ' 

Denying tliat he has acted un- 
der orders from the State Ho'asc 
or Boston City Hall, Murphy 
maintains that "distribution of 
tills book can be the foundation 
of criminal and civil actions." 

The Associated Press reported 
tliat an executixe of the Crov.ii 
PublishuiK Company of New Yoik. 
publishers of the book, urged book- 
sellers lo defy the stale police or- 
der. Meanwhile, Murphy is receiv- 
ing "many complaints from people 
who are mentioned in the book." 
An Anachronism 

\.ritlcn by the authors of "Chi- 
cago Conridenlial" and "New York 
Confidential." this work states 
that: "Maiisachusetts is the place 
where publishers pay to get books 
banned. But little else is ever 
bothered" 

The authors regard New Eng- 
land as an anachronism, deca- 
dent and broke." They suggest 
that "Maybe the Plymouth Rock 
should have landed on the Pil- 
See Page 4, Col. 4 



Junior .Advi.sors and was President 
of his Freshman Cla.ss. 
Howard Active 

Piesideiil of Ihe Sigma Phi 
House. Howard is a res;denl of 
Stamford. Conn., and a graduate 
of Stamford High School. He is 
active in llie WCA. the Scout Frat- 
ernity, and the Washington Glad- 
den .Society. Bob played varsity 
football, freshman basketball and 
h s run on the varsity track squad. 

Connolly. President of Phi Del- 
ta Thela. has played football and 
baseball, is a member of the New- 
miin Club and is a Junior Advisor. 
Ti lltioir, rresidtiit uf ThtLU Delta 
Ciii. iilayed frosh foolb.ill and is 
active in (lie Boys' Club work for 
;he WCA. 

DulTield Congratulates 

In addition lo being the Presi- 
dent of Delta Upsilon. Hartnett is 
Sports Editor of the 'Gul" and a 
member of the Newman Club. He 
has been a cheerleader, is a Junior 
Ad\'isor. and was Co-Captain of his 
fro.sli .swimming team. 

Retiring President of the Under- 
graduate Council. Duffleld offered 
his warmest congratulations to the 
new delegates lo the Council, and 
in particular to the ncv; officers. 
He also reminded them of the re- 
siionsibility which their posts en- 
tail. 



Duf field Discusses 
UC Organization 

Outlines New Committee 
To Initiate Legislation 



Adelphic Union to Send Proctor, Telly ' 
To Little Three Tournament Runoff Sat. 



Wednesday. March 12 — Wil- 
liams will send down a two-man 
team to lake part in the Little 
Three debating I'un off Saturday. 
T« o Adelphic Union members. Wy 
Proctor '52 and Charles Telly '54 
will defend both the atflrmative 
and negative positions on the 
topic Resolved; That the United 
States .should adopt a permanent 
policy of price and wage control. 

The original Little Three tour- 
nament ended In a three way tie. 
The Williams negative team of 
Proctor and Dick Antoiin '53 de- 
feated Amherst and lost to the 
Wesleyan afflrmatlve. At the same 



time an airirmative team of Don 
Goldstein '53 and Ronald Dubin 
'53 took the decision from the 
Wesleyan negative, while bowing to 
a strong Jeff duo. 

On March 30 a Williams team 
of Richard Duflleld '52 and Bill 
Bi-ayer '53 will travel down Boston 
way to meet the inmates of Nor- 
folk pri.son in a debate on the 
baseball resen'e clause. Norfolk 
previously defeated the team of 
Arnold Levin '52 and Don Gold- 
stein in a close decision, as the 
topic of .socialized medicine was 
discussed. 



Monday, Maich 10- J. Richard 
Duflleld '52 n ' iring President of 
the Undergraciiiate Council, dis- 
cussed the piublems and future 
business of the new Council in his 
final report to ilie UC. 

Opening with the question of 
Ihe responsibility of the UC. Duf- 
fleld pi'oposed a .solution to this 
problem of representative govern- 
ment. He determined that the fra- 
ternity representatives .should de- 
cide all routini business, and that 
issues of major importance should 
be referred to tin- student body for 
a vote. 

^ New Comniiltee 

After viewing tlie efficiency of 
the present Council. Duffleld sug- 
gested the institution of an Exec- 
utive Committee which might out- 
line work and initiate legislation. 
The new committee would be com 
posed of the UC officers and the 
chaii-men of all the current com- 
mittees of the Council. 

Duffleld further urged propor- 
tional representation on the UC 
for the non-afflliates. This mo- 
tion was followed closely by a pro- 
posal for a vote on a new plan for 
total membership In fratcmilies. 

Al.so contained in Duffleld's re- 
port was a plan foi' Ihe revision 
of membership on the Di.scipline 
Committee. He suggested that all 
UC committees should contain on- 
ly Council members. 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESDAY, MAHCU 12, 1952 



Noirti Adunii, ivVussu^i iu:.t'lla (V titiunibluwn, M']WUt-riui«lli 

'Lntered ub iet.uiiU-clUbi niuiter iNuvumbt'i I'l , 1^4*, ut the post ottjce at 
North Adumi, Mobiuchuietis, unuei the A' t ol March i, 1679.' Printed by 
uumb and Hunter, Inc., Norm Auc n^, Mu>>sucnusett!>. Published 

NAednesUuy and buturuuy during the coHt'ye ear. Subscription price $t>.00 
per year. Kecord uiticu, Jeaup rljit, Willtuni; uwn, 
RbCORD Otfice - Pnone 11 bditor - Phone 981 -JK 




\ oluiac XLVl 



\laivl. 12. \sm 



NimuIht 10 



EDITORIAL 

Another Sedition Act 

III 179-1, Uu' li'ili'ialist I'ail) |),i.smiI tlic Si'clitioii Ail wlik-h 
|)io\ idt'tl tliat .iiiMiiU' will) wiDU', iiUiTi'il, or piihlisliiil any 

talsi", .scaMilaloiis, ami inalicioiis wiiling . . . against tlic govcTU- 
ini'iit ol till' Uiiitril Status, or I'ltliiT lioiisf ol taiiigivs.s ..., or 
till' I'ri'siilfiit ol liif L'liiU'il Stall's, witli iiiti'iit to ili'laiiii' thi' 
saitl i;o\i'iiiiiu-iii. slioiilil hr piiiiislii'tl with a line ami iiiiprisoa- 
inriil. I'liiis llir r cili'ralist I'arlv iiii'uiil to sili'iicf all opposition 
lo Us liolil on Ihr goN I'niiui'iit. Ii)ila\, 15-1 \'t'ars lalri, this 
[jrolili'in ol siippnssing tlii' ili'iiioi'ratii- liglil ol Iri'i' spi'i'cli lias 
nit a lot closer lo lioiut'. .Nlassacluisi'tts t .oiiiiiiissioiu'r ol I'ublic 
Sali'ly IJaiiirl I. Miirpliy lias orilori'il liis Stati' ileti'Cti\i'S to 
"aihisi' hooksi'ili'r'. against si'lliiig or rrntiiig tlic book ■■U.S..\. 
t.DiilHli'iilial. l\a\nii)iiil \> asliliiirni', proprii'tor ol tlii' Ciolli'ge 
DooKslori'. was iioniii'il ri'ci'iitU' that lii' .slioiilil not si'U tlii' soliiine. 
i.a)iiiiiiissioiK'r Muipli)-, liowt'M'r, lias ailnnili'il that a hookscllor 
cannot hi' prosccnuil until a conn lias ailjiiilgcil the hook "lihclous 
ami oDsi'iii'. -Mnipiiy, wlio is rclcrrcil to in llic hook as "D('\cr's 
IJan has issiiril iliis aiKicc to gi\i' Massaclinsi'tts hookscUcrs 

till' hi'iH'lii ol (1111 rxpi'ili'iicr in tlii'sc iiiatti'is. Ill a case like 
tills uiirri- lur pciMiii siippri'ssing tlir sale ol llic hook is rclcrrctl 
to ill the \oiiiiiir 111 a iliiogauMN «a\. uc uiiiilil pri'lcr to rcail 
aooiil it ami Uicn sic il ilic accii.scd can ili'h'iiil liiniscll Iroiu the 
assaults ol llii' uiilci. CJtneiuisi' Murphvs ruling will hi'coine 
amitlier seililioii ail ili'signeil lo (Uicml llic present Uc\er 
Aihninislralioii. II (he Sum ol M.issaeliiiseus can pro\ e that 
authors I, ail anil Moriinier lia\i' libelleil siale ollicials, llieii llie 
scale shoiikl go alii'ail ami sue ilic wriri'is. L'lilil that lime that Ihc 
hook is proM'il ""toiil, lihi'lons. anil ohsieiie. Miiiplu iiiiist allow 
tiie sale ol ' L'.S.A, l.onliiiential lo go on iiiiiiuiiesleil. 

Mr. \\ asliluune lias ileciiieil lo eoiuniiie selling llu' hook 
nnlil a Massaelinseiis court lU'ciucs toi or against liii' auliiors, 
il aii\ ease is ever hroiiglit against liii'iii. ror oils relnsal to how 
to till' snpri'ssion ol the Ireeiuini ol I'.xpressiou, hi' ilesi'rxes onr 
coiigraliilatioiis. llic Oasic tenei ol lieeiioin ol speech ami pres.s 
has oeconie so eonliiscU h\ ine recent .Massacliusetts law-iiiakers 
mat Ills staiiil hecoiiu's all tin iiiore siguilicaiil. Ihc lirst aiiieml- 
ini'iil lo the L iiiteil Slates consuimion stales that "Congress shall 
make no l;iw . . . ahriilging tnc Ircciloni ol spi'celi, or of tlie press.' 
I'roiii tins siinpie postulate, .slassacnnselis legislators have cretiteil 
a mass ol ceiisorsiiip statutes that coukl easily \eto the aiueml- 
iiient in practice. 

I he DooK ilsell. siiggesli\el\ honml in a vellou co\ci". is ol 
the lowest lorui ol jonriialisni. UiiliKe the works ol tlii' iiiiick- 
rakcrs ot the I'rogressne era who in\ cstigatcil the social ills of 
that perioil using empirical ineliiods. "L.S..\. C'onlidentiar is 
pine sciisalioualisin. liie riglit lo ii'iiiler tliis jiiilgnienl, liow- 
e\cr, is the iuiporlaiil issni' mat imist not he sliieleil. l.ihel and 
censorship are two difterent ihiiigs. If .Massachusetts can prmi' 
the authors guill\' ol the lirst. men tlic) arc Iree lo sue tlieiii. 
lint until the case has been pro\eil, wo as lice citizens led it is 
onr right to dislingnish tlii' valuable works Iroiii literary chalt. 

Lonely Yassar Miss Seeks Aid 
From Local Cavaliers In Drive 
To Cram Her Dusty Mail Box 

III the interests ol Berkshire elii\ahv. a gallant but aiioin\ - 
nioiis slndeiit siihinitled tlic iollowinij; plea lo llic RECOHD. 
Dear Sir: 

1 have chosen you from aiiiong thoiisamls to be my represent- 
ative in the i)iggest campaign ever to hit the Vew Ess .Mail. This 
letter is the kev-iiotc — an appeal lo the si'ii.sc of hniiior and 
clii\alrv of lodav's college man; von, ami all yo*"' friends. It 
will cost von \irtnallv iiolhing. It may repay you in b'abnlons 
l)i\"idciitls. Here's how. wli\'. anil wherclore, ill easy-to-t'ompre- 
lieiid language: 

Reason: l'"or the last llircc weeks I liaxc reeeiveil in my niail- 
l)o.\ ads, church schedules, aunoimceineiils of while elephant sales, 
anil bills, Mv roommates, on the other hand, ha\e receivi'd such 
juicy items as love-lelleis, letters from aeqiiaintaiiccs, cocktail 
invitations, anil Bills. The lollcge reci'iitly made the rash an- 
nounci'ineiit that every girl rcci'ivi's a luininnun avi'rage of live 
letters a ikiw I calculate iii\ present dclicil. based on these three 
lean weeks, lo be somewheri around the ininimnin ol sevenly, 
while iii\ alorcstiid roommales are wav aheail ol the gaine. 

UesoKc: I ha\'e now decideil lliiit the Time has dome when 
1 must rcpa\ mv colleagues lor their wi'lter ol good lortnne, and 
the college for its unhinndeii stateinenl. I am tlicrelore orgaiii/ing 
a Rexciige see below) uliicli needs Noiir wholeliearted coopera- 
tion. Therelore: 

Result: I am organi/.ing a campaign of Letters for Lucy, the 
smashing climax of which is lo he L-D;i\', the 27tli of March. 
On this ikiv I should like lo see in\ mail so crammeil with com- 
mmiicalions thai there is no looiii cM'n to fit in a single postcard 
aililressed to a room-iiiatc. Woiiltln't VOl' like lo eonlribiite to 
tills inagnifieeiit cause'.-' Here's all vou iiave to do: 

Revenge: Write a letter. Any sort of letter. It may be 
iiiimoroiis. pliilosophieal. ilowu-riglit insiiiling, or passionate (not 
loo iiiiich ol this last, please.) Send it - liineii to arrive tlie 27tli-U): 
l.iiev Bioiigi'l. |rwrll House 
N'assar (lollcge, I'ongiikeepsic, N. ^. 

Heplv: I'Acrv ietler will lie ausweieii, provided return ail- 
dress is given anil iegilile. Il will i)e answered, witli jirofii.se thanks 
and cliarming vvil, wliatever the vein in vvliich it was written. 
.\nii hir tiiose interesled, there is tiie following corollary: 

lU'vvaril: To tlie man who writes tiie most hiscinaling leller 
(to 1)1' jiidgeil on l);isis of motive, content, and laik ol literary 
elfort ) 1 shall extend au invitatiou h)r some convenienl week- 
end to come to Vassal and see life at its most stiniuiating. Do 
not hesitate if von are siiv of sncli a sight-unsei'ii offer - you may 
ciieerfuliv refuse, though it vvoniil be much more fun not to. 
There's notliing like new evperieuces. and l)esidi's 1 liave i)ig 
i)r()\vu eyes. 

Reeiiiit: Ail vonr friends :mil tlieir friends and let's make tliis 
the l)iggest, most liiiarions oiislangiil of mail ever seen l)y liie 
sttitistieiaus of \'assar! Hememher. don't be |irevi()iis: hell's gotta 
break loose on the 27tli. So: 

Restore: inv faith in tin postal department and in the col- 
lege man. 1 am counting on .All of You! j 

Sincerely, Lucy ' 



1)1/ liiili (Uiniit^tiiii 

I iiavc a leeiirreiil nigiumare. 

I am at licmiiiigtou. I slanil at tlie iiottom of a neat stair- 
well ami Ciill upstairs. 'Hicic is laugiiler al liie end of a long hall. 
A lace peers Uoii, hums a eigaretie, and vanishes. I do a jig; I 
wear liiiiuv clothes and make inniiy laces ;md tell Iniiiiv gags, the 
face reappe;irs, :isKs hir ;i iiialeli. and vaiiislies. I wake up slmking. 

The explanation is suiipli : .Mv metcor-iike palli throiigii Ihc 
liennington e;ieloiuix is lraie,;iit Willi hiiliues. I have never i|uiti' 
grasped the heiiniiigtoii idiom. Bui llirough convi'rsation with tiie 
man who owns one, 1 here pass on, in cominemoration ol Ben- 
iiingtons new leriii hegmmng toikiv, my gleanings ol iipproai'hes 
to tue Ciirl of Henuinglon. 

T'HK I'DSK: .V'maii w.iiks into ;i room; lie s;iys liltle, he 
sits ([uietly, iiut soiueliow veil know lie is Uncouvenlioiiai. I'er- 
lia])s it is till' wav he smokes ills cigarette llirough his nose. The 
ginmiie is unimportant; the nsult is fatal lo the p;ilpilaliiig heart 
of the Heimmgton "lille". "lleie is a man," she says tliickiy to her- 
self, "who does wliatever lie likes in spite of conventioii. " .\nd 
lier I'ves glow dim red slits. 

'I'lie man iias snecessfnlly ;issiiiiieii ihi' btisic ciiaraeler ol 
Uiicoiiventiim. Il is not I'lioiigii to iiierei) a-couventional, one 
iiinsl siiow it. Sanilais in the winter, snow slioes in liie sunnner, 
anil iicicr, ncccr an exphuKilion. Scorn those who ipicstiou ;iiiy- 
lliing you ilo as lii)i)eli'sslv, hriplesslv, implesslv enhnigled hv the 
Serpent Convention, anil le.in back letting the green incense 
smoke curl gracehillv Iroiu vonr vvalei pipe, ^ou are ;i man 
vvilliout fciirs! 

II IL UHKSS: .\iiytliing Simply, anything, it takes a bit of 
pr;ietice lo i)e iihle to iliscerii "anytliing , but if yon never bang 
lip vour clothes, ;ind il vou ker|) vonr drawers inordinantly mi'ssy, 
yon will liml that b)' iiieri'iv putting on whiitever comes lo hanil, 
von can achieve the necessaiy "spoiitani'ilv ". II aiiv objection is 
ever raised to the clothes sou are wearing sav iimdiiUy, ' Tiiey re 
comlorlahle. " .\iiil li't that slaiiil for ilsell. Vou iiiusi show al least 
that (/(IK do not lliiiik Cod wears grev llaiinels. 

till'; ROOM: Wandi'i down to the .\rt .Miisenm ami pom 
paint in the most ilecorative manner vou can onto some canvas, 
llaiig It on vour wall and lelcr to il in llie pressence ol young 
lieiuniigtoii lemali'S as "post-l'ollock . 

this sets the iiiooii lor vour room, build iiookcases out ol 
old bricks stolen Ironi West C oliegi', ami use saw-horses to stuiiv 
oil. Have piiimlive sculplmcs around liie room vviiicii vou like 
"h)r their Ireedom '. Wasliiiiiiiie's sells an excellent small volume 
ol Chinese love poems in he.intilnl himliiig. Us ;i steal lor two 
bucks: 

I ,;iilv : Ihc cock luis crowed; il is lull ihivliglil 

Lover: Il was not the loek tlitil eiowi'il, it was llie Im/./.ing ol 

those green flies. 
I, ally: The easlerii skv glows; il is broad daylight. 
Lover: That is not tile glow of dawn, but the rising ol the 

moon's light. The gnats lly ilrovvsily; it would be sweet to 

share a ilreani with vou. 
Lady: yiiiek! i'.o lionie! Lest 1 liavi' cause lo hate you! 

'I'lie last line can be oimiiiled in re;iiling, but llie overall el- 
lect in either case is miiijiie, the scales tip. 

.\n excellent plan has been developed by a friend, and I 
lepetil il here in its eutirty. I'lrst vou must buy a copy ol James 
Joyces "Ulysses in a seconil-haiiil liook store in New York, look- 
ing siiarpiy lor a beaten copy. Unless you have extraordinary 
hick, il will next lie necessary lo leave your copy out in the riiiii 
lor al least two weeks, ami upon bringing it inside, "earmark 
eaielnllv eadi page i)y rubbing it between \i)ur hands. Once 
tile book iias acqnireii a brutally weii-ri'ail look, take il to the 
lihiarv wiiere vou must liiiil an olisciire tiiesis on "Ulysses" done 
i)V souieoiie lor his Fii.D. at Oxloril, anil into the margin ol vonr 
carelnllv prepared volume, von copv slo|)py "jottings , the most 
beanliliilly liirned |)lir;i.si's that appear in the thesis. .Make a fi'vv 
;illiisions lo Sanskrit proverbs, and copy ti lew strong criticisms. 
Tiieii the hook is leailv to be thrown on your ilesk. The ellecl 
is a strong one. Here is a book vim liave obviously read a tlioii- 
saiid tiiiies (you can suggest this i)v meiitioning that vou never 
gel tireil ol it); it is worn anil liionglitover (wiluess tiie notes), 
llie cheapness ol the eilition shows that it is the guts, not the 
cover, tlial yon are iiiteresteii in. 'ilie girl's eves will i)urii 
fiercely wilii liored envv. and vou have niched another crevice 
into her soul." 

"The lact that Bruce I'aliiiei, the inventor ol this luelhod. 
has been notably imsiicccssfnl vvitii il is not so inucii the fault ot 
the coiiceplioii. It is rallicr due lo tile ililliciilty of looking aes- 
llielieallv wan wiien \'on weight over 2110 iiis. The giinmic is sound. 

THK (:()N"\i",R'S.\TI()N: Ndlluiig really iroii-clad can be 
said here. The joii is to fiml vour own best field ol Uneonvi'iition. 
A lew raiiiloin notes iiuiv givi you some iilcas: 

Knovvii till obscure school ol modern dance tiuil relet to all 
others as "insincere; hollow loriii". 

Call Kaffa meaningless and pr;iise Dostoyevsky as the lore- 
rmiiier ol l''reuil. (Tiiis is eipiaiiv good in reverse, in whicli case 
vou mereiv refer lo Kalka as elaboraliug I'reuil.) 

II is not a hail iilea to have been in love with a girl whose 
parents ohjecteil to vou liecanse vou were going to be a com- 
poser (writer, painter, actor, sculptor, etc.) Tins gives von a 
strong iiasis tor cvnii-ism and hate ol convention. 

The truth, alter all, is ilolelnllv siiii|)li'. II von don I like the 
Beiiuinglon wav ol liie. the artilices will do von no good, lor 
yon can never enter into them with conviction and ahamloii, .\iid 
if vou ill) like the Beimingtou wav of life, wliv — damn these 
Burmese sandals . . . they re so cold in the winter — it conies 
naturally. 



College Press Releases Headline 
Ivy League Morality; Wellesley 
Decides 'Death Over Dishonor' 

/;(/ /((;//</( Uktii ".</ 

Shoving ;isiile cainpiis elections, hieiilty leas, and picsij,., 
lial slaleineiils. recent ciislern college releases lieadliue i hmigj,^,, 
morals ;iiouuil the Ivv League circuit. 

I he Wellesley "News" n potts that Wellesley and Howili,,,, 
debaters last inoi'ilh decided tiial "woiiieii should preh i tlt;,||, 
to dishonor", while press surveys al Daitmoiitb, (:olll„■^.|i^,||| 
ami the Universilv ol I'eniis) Ivaiiia revetii siiilliiig sccUoimI pi,,,!; 
erv .Old tiie sigiu'lic;inee ol ' the frateinilv pin. 
Dchtildis Htitlir 

Wellesley di'h;ileis resorled lo ;dgchra lo prove the |h.|||„. 
itv ol death iivei disiiiinor. Said one girl, "Dishonor is a iirgaln,. 
action, wliiie lietilh in iieitber ;illiriiialive nor negative tlicn,. 
fore il ;i woiikui sulleis disiioiior il siiblrtiets Iroiu lier lol;il wuiiL 
while il she siiHers dc;ilii li'r lolal woilli remains the sauu',' 

liowdoiii deiialeis came ii;iek lighting ;is they cilr,| tli,. 
imporlanee ol dislionoieil women liuoiighonl iiistory; Wli,.,,. 
would we he wilhonl lli'leii of Trov:'" Bovviloin howev i i , siwu 
Weill down to dcleat. 

h'nizrii .V((( Eiiiilantl 

Bill New l'',iiglaiid girls cling lo llien honor, .il le.isi i| il,,. 
lesulls of two polls coiidlicti'd by Dinlmoiith anil lUiivi i ity ul 
reuiisvlvania stmlenls can be beiieved. llie polls, hovvev i i jils,, 
poiiil out tli;it, once out ol New l'".iiglaiid, "liie tenipei .il ,iu. „| 
ol Ihc average coed rises ;is the laliliide drops. 

While oiily -l.'Vi of New l';iiglaml"s college wonienliood i«\m\ 
CI pelling '"ininioral", "(fi liowii on lirst dale kissing ,iinl .s;, 
consider pelling poor b)r liie repiihilioii. Bui in ihe (,)iiakei Sliil, 
.")()'■ ol the girls hivor petting, .iiid .■)()'■ liml kissing on Ihe lii ,1 ilali 
'".igiecahle . I'V. sav limt petting iielps ;i girls lepiihilion. 



Letters to the Editor 



WASHINGTON CONFIDENTIAL 



till 



alitor of the BLCORD: 
On ,\prii 2n(i. ihiriug this year's Spring Recess, tiie Ahmiiii 
of Williams in the Wasliiiigtoii area are planning to entertain 
tile nndergradiiates ol that area al a party at the Hotel Bnrlingttjii, 
at '):'5() p.m. in the Eineralil Room .... 

There will be no speecbes anil no formal entertainment. We 
plan to have a purely social gathering. The uuilergradnates will ot 
course lie tiie guests ol the Alumni and there will he no charge 
to tiieiii. Tliev are all cordially invited ami are asked to iiriiig 
either tiieir father or a friend who niiglit be intersted in going 
to Williams, 'niere will be no ciiarge hir iion-Williains fathers or 
for prospective stiitlents. 

Very truly yours, 
Alex L, Brodhcad, Jr. 
Sec'y-Troas. Williams 
Ass'n of Washington. 



•2,5 
Alninni 



ESCAPE 

from ihe rigours of ifte 

Williamstown winter in BERMUDA 

RELAX under a warm sun! - in BERMUDA 

BEAUTIFUL WOMEN, hundreds of them 

in BERMUDA 

Comfortable Accomodations — Low Prices 

in Bermuda 

Call Mac McCormick, 868 Now! 

The Williams Travel Bureau 

Pan American World Airways 



L. G. Balfour Co, 

fRATtRNITY JEWELItT 
Stationary Progromi 

Bodgvi Ringi Stains 

Jewalry Gittt Favon 

Club Pini Kayt 

Madolt Trophiat 

Wnle or Coll 
CARL SORENSEN 

JO Murray Ave Woterford, N V 
TalaphoneTrov — Adams 82563 




EXPERT SHOE REPAIRING 

We give the 
highest quality workmanship 

On your way to 
the post office stop in at 

SALVATORE SONS' 

Spring Street Est. 1901 



NEW — Tourist Round Trip Air 

»357-'Os»s'o««424-«o««o. 



Choice of over 1 00 
Studtnt Clots Tours trAC 
Travel Study Tours * JTJ 
Conducted To urs "p 

Univenlly Travel Company, 
official bontJatJ aqanli for all linat, hat 
rartdtrid afficiani traval tarvica on » 
buiinaii baiit linca t92&. 

S«e your local travel ag»nf lor 
foldtrs artd dttoils or wrifm us. 



UNIVERSITY TRAVEL CO. 

"-rvord Sq., '" •---•-- ''-■ 



5 1 St Consecutive Year 

Non-frotit Cducotlonol fnifltuMart 
Approyad by Amerfran Bai Attotlatlon 

Three-year Day and Four-year Evening LL.B. Course. 

MocJified accelerated program available. 
TERMS COMMENCE JUNE 9th and 16th and SEPT. 29th 

£or/y Inquiry and Enrol/menf Advisable 

375 PEARL ST., BROOKLYN 1, N.Y. 

Near Borough Hall Telephone: MAin 5-2200 



Folding Canvas Cots 

$5.50 UP 

Rental of Punch Bowls, ladles & cups for 
your weekend parties. 

GEORGE M. HOPKINS CO. 



66-68 Spring Street 



Williamstown 



Tel. 29 R 



HEADLINER 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESOAV, MARCH 12, 1952 



Purple Skiers, Class A Members, 
Finish Sixth in Harvard Slalom 



It) Tiini lii'lshi' 

III Idokiiil! Iiii'l' '•"'' "»' l">st 
,. iiMJii "I "i"'"'"' siiorts, I can't 
hi'lp IhjI miliic tlic wa.v in wliuli 
III!' varsil.v wri'sllinK leant has 
liiiii alliiwcil til sink into the 
iliplhs "1 ohscuiity. Wliilc ii-coids 
«(.ic hciiiK liniki'ii in swinnninK. 
^iiiil llic sciuasli team was bcinu 
r-iiikcil anioni! Ihi- liip lour <"■ live 
i„ (hi' KiiMili-.v. wrt'stliTs. Jiainiu'r- 
, ,1 hy ii-ciirrcnl injuiii's was struB- 
^liiili alonii, nariDwIy tlioppiiiK 
Mialrli alter match. 

I.asi week. Ilic mapiJlcis linally 
;,iMc Ihioiinh with a vicloiy. ;i 
,>iniiicinK (jL'ci.suin over Amlicist. 
ijui lliis proved Ui be only a wai m- 
,|) lor Ihe brillianl elloil lliey iJiil 
I,, nil 111 llieir second place liin-li 
i.iiiirilay in Hie New EiiKlaiulo, 
,11 accoinplislimc 111 Ihal sliiiulil 
:.,iik iieai- Hie lop in Williams 
.nhicveinenls in Iliis or any ullici 
*.ir 

It si-eins hard tit lii>lic\c that iin> 

ini iinild lia\c lllc run (it iiail 
Ipii-.dis that hesi-t this year's siiiiail. 
I hi' diiininK mat< li atainst liar- 
v.trd more or h'ss pointed tliis out. 
ulii'ii rete Sutlierland. last year's 
iiesliinan .\. I'. < liatnpion was in- 
iiiiril. and Itii'U I'jiwards was riiletj 
uvi'r\M'iKlil in liis niatcti and had 
til liirteit. 'I'lits seeini'd to set the 
li ,11(111 tor the Kphs. as they drop- 

(1 (lose decisions lo Sprinijficld. 
V\i'sl('\an. Coast (iiiard. and Urowii 
I MKceedini: meets. 

nuilllf.'. I Ills sielic 111' dcleal.s. only 
i^iplain Bill CalhiKan inaiiiincd lo 
will consislenlly and was cx|K'Clcd 
1,1 win Hie N K clianipioii.ship 
Iloui'MT. witness Bob Slioi'M. who 

I. Ill siilit even in six match, and 
link Kdwards. normally a 170 
I'liundcr. wreslliii!' uiiliniitcd Holh 
'.M,n N K lilies in llicii divisior..s 
.iiiil iJick (iofdoii. a consistcnl 
Aiiiiii'i all year, .iiid Bill Williams 
look thiid.s ill their weiKlil cla.s.scs 

Ihc result was that the Piiipli' 
( .mil' out .seven points ahead of the 
Coast Guard, and eiKhl ahead ol 
W'lslcyun for a iioleworlhy ai.il 
ill illiaiil Icani victoi'y. 



Bromley, N, H., March U - Hac- 
iiiK i,.s iiicmber.s of Class A for tlie 
lirsl lime, the Williams skiers add- 
eil another link to their .slriim of 
line showings as lliey iilaced .sixth 
111 Ihe Harvard IiilcrciilleKiali. Sln- 
lom held hcii' today. 'I'lie Purple 
slaiidoiil was Pete Callahan who, 
ill placiim ninth in a hime neld, 
^.sparked the Williams bid for points 
j In placiim sixth the Ephs de- 
feated such powerful clubs as Hur- 
vaid. Amhcist, Prmcclon, Yale, 
! Union, and M.I.'l., while bowlni; 
only to the strong Middlcbury, 
Uaitinouth, Norwich. Cornell, and 
I it.iM, .s()uads. 
Williams skier becau.se of the in- 
jury to Ca|)laiii Ned CoUin.s. came 
I through With a line performance 
I 111 placmi! iiiiilh, competing in a 



Held tliat included Middlebury'.s 
IJick lieland as well a.s .several oth- 
er Cla.ss A stars. Another biiiiht 
luihl for the Kplis was .sophomore 
'Sill Clia.se who, in linishinK scven- 
U'cnlh, lived up lo the promi.sc he 
has shown In prevlou.s meuUs. 

'Ihe oilier lilplimen responsible 
for the Purple's fine .sliowint; in- 
cluded Uavc Tucker who placed 
ihirtleth. John Monlbomery who 
lini.shed Ihirty-.sevenlh. and Pulle 
j Wesli-ruaard wlio placed forly-sev- 
I'lilli. 

I Kphs in Class A 

i f)n Friday and Satuiday, Mai'ch 
1 and 2, the liphs placed eighth 
in the SI. Lawrence Class A Meet, 
lo become members of Cla.ss A for 
I he followini! year. 



Squires Reaches Finals in Squash 
Tourney, Bowing to Ufford 3-1 

hi/ lioli (.'.(tUlsliin '.)■/ 
Caiiiluid.^i', Maich'O - llurv.iid's Charlie I'lldiil. |ilayiiii; on 
Ins liiiiiu' ciiiiils. |iiini'(l llial liis liist scciliiii^ was well I'lici'iU.'d. 
.i.s 111' ilelcalcd llmd scdcd Dick S,|iiii,'s ,,| U'lHiains l.J-1.5, l.'>(j, 
1")T 1.") 12 lr«la\ In uiii 111, N.ilii.iiai liitini.llcoialc S(|iiasli 
< li.llii)liolislii|i, 

I llipiil |iii'\i(>iisK li.iil liiatni si\th iaiikeil Stcvo Foster of 
l*'iil Ill III llic siiiii liiials l.")."). l,")-(i. l,-)-12. wliiic the Wil- 
li, mis M'v h.id lilllc Iriiiihlr with jiin li.niin ,,1 llai\arcl. Iriiiiiic- 
.111- liiiii I.-) ."i. l.-| (j. 12-1.), 15-14. 

/./i/i\ Hi mil iiil lioiiiiil 
Ml liioi \\ illi.iiiis pl.ncis iii.idr a himmI sIkiwiiio in ihr .Na- 
liiiii.ils. Ml 'j,,„hI. ill I, 111. thai ( aiacli Cl.ni'iK I- t:li,i|l(c coiniiii'iilccl. 
I lii^ !■■ die lirsi mil Inns h.iM i\ii diiiii- in this liiiii iianieiit". 

The inllliil III Hi hilllid .ill Idlll I'lpllinili still ill die l llliuillir. 

.iliai'^ Willi till' liiiii (aiiiiMiii |il.i\,is and three I'^lis. 

Sn,i|n S\ iiiiir^liin, si'iiuiil Linked Williaiiis phuir. topped 

iliipkiii'- nl Wisl.'x.iii II, till liisl n ,1 l.Vti. !.")-(). I,-).|1. His 

MCiilllI iciiMid III. ill h piii\,'d (MM I'.isiii as lie put iiilt Jack 

Wheel. I .il Viiih.rsl 1."-) I. I.") HI I.-) III. Sviniii.,;tiiii (iiiallv liowcd 

III \ddiMil D.iiliiKiulli ill lis.' .^aiii. s. IT I.")' S-|."). I,'5-,S. 1(1-1.5. 1.5-12. 

(wiirj;! /'ii//s ( /;vc/ 

Ml. 1 d.lialiie^ lliinler (il IriiiiU 15-1(1. 15-12, 15-S. in the 
iip.'tiiiM.; i.iiind. \\ illiains (!iptaiii lias taiii*.,^!' went on lo pull 
■ III III.' liiii^.'sl upsets (il the l(iiirn.'\ . 

\l.'.liii'4 liiiiilli si'dcd Bill (..iiiiit ol 'rotoiitd, ticornc eami' 
1 1. II 1 1 1 11 hi I id, .ill. 1 l.isiii'^ tun III his (irst (hiec .panics, to win 1 1-1.5. 
See Paw •). Col. 5 




Lord Jeffs Beat Williams Cagers 
To Capture Little Three Honors 



Frosh Drop Final 

To Jeffs, 6S-41 



Amherst Captures Title; 
Laitman Tops Scoring 



Amherst. Mar. 8 — Capltaliziim 
on their superior heinhl and a sec- 
ond ix'i'iod injury to Williams 
S(.'0rlnK ace Ron Wilson, the Am- 
hcist yeurliiiKS gained posse.s.sion | 
of the Little Three Pi'cshman title 
tonight, by defeating the defend- 
ing champion Ephmen 68-11 

J. C. Henry got the Purple oIT 
lo a quick two point lead on the i 
'.-lame's first scoring play, breaking 
ilirough lo diop in a layup, b'ul 
this was the only time the Wil- 
liams team was to be in front, Bati 
."Mien counlei.'d for the I^oid .I.'irs 
with a .lump shot and Geri-y B.'ii- 
.son notclied a two-hand pop I'l 
give the home team a two point 
mai'Bin. Aftei' Gray evened the 
lount with a long .set. Allen ami , 
Baskin sparked a .scoring sequeiic:' 
that gav.' Amherst a 15-11 lead at 
Ihe quarter mark 

Wilson Hurt 

On the opening play of the sec- 
ond peiiod Wilson spi'ained liis 
ankle imdei' the Amherst basket 
and was replaced by Ramsay. Tills 
(luai'ter developed into a contest 
of guards, a.s Pete Scott ijut in 
See Page 4. Col. 1 , 



RPI Drubs Skaters 
In 21-2 Massacre 

Troy. N.Y.. Mar. 7- RPI's ag- 
gressive hockey team closed this 
year's campaign with win num- 
ber thirteen tonight leaving a 
bewildered Eph sextet in the 
depths of a 21-2 onslaught. It 
was al.so the lasi Williams game 
of the season. 

Freshman wing Frank Chiar- 
elli of RPI eclipsed the Eastern 
Collegiate scoring record by 
notching four goals to bring 
nis season'.s total to seventy-se- 
.en. His equally sen.sational 
leammate. centei' Abbie Moor? 
lucked up six goals to insure his 
nip on second place honors in 
Collegiate .scoring. 

For the Purple. John Pike 
; lid Jim Kaivey each netted a 
s|)ecl:icular solo .shot while Ted 
Mitchell sparked the team's of- 
fi'n.se. George Bartlett and Doug 
Heed played well al defen.se. 



Frosh Skiers Take 

Burr Burton Meet 

Mallcliestel', VI,. March 8 
The froHhinaii ski team blasted 
out a victory today over the 
Burr Burton School taking fii'st 
place and lying for .second and 
fourth in the down hill race of 
just under a half mile. Injur- 
ies loi'ced the cancelling of the 
lliree other events scheduled 
foi the .sloiX'S of Big Biomley, 

Sherman Hoyl skiied to lop 
h.inor.s with a Lime of 52 sec- 
onds while William Prime fol- 
knved clo.se behind to tic for 
second with David Orwell of 
Burr Burton. Hovey Clark and 
Ueoi'Ke Olmslead also scored 
liir the frosh in a three-way tie 
1 ,11 fourth. 

Phi Gams Leading 
Basketball League 

AD, Chi Psi's Tied 
In Thursday Loop 

The Phi Gams continued on 
their winning ways in Intiamural 
Basketball, downing the Theta 
Dells, one of their main challeng- 
I'ls for the Tuesday league cham- 
pionship. 13-8 on March 4. while 
the .second place Dekes just 
squeaked past the DU's. 18-17, 

Ihe AD'S and the Chi Psi's 
v.iaind up lied for the Thursday 
liai'ue champion.ship when AD 
(lumped Chi Psi 22-14. on March [ 
i; The Beta's clinched third plac? | 
by handing Phi Dell a 21-18 de- , 
leal, whicli sent them lo fifth place 
Willi the KA's, 

Tuesday League 

W, L, 
I'hi Gamma Delta 6 

Delta Kappa Epsilon li I 
Theta Delta Chi 4 2 

Delta Upsilon S .i 

Phi Sigma Kappa :i t 

Psi Upsilon 1 .'i 

Sigiiia Phi 1 5 

Saint .Anthony 1 5 

Thur.sday League 

W, L, 
Alplia Delia Phi 5 1 , 

Chi Psi .-) 1 I 

Beta Theta Pi 4 2 ' 

Delta Phi .i 3 I 

Phi Delta Theta 2 4 

Kappa Alpha 2 4 

Zeta Psi J 



Creer's 16 Points 
Heads Eph Attack 

Big Third Period Spurt 
Sends Jeffs to Victory 



MAKE RESERVATIONS 
NOW FOR VACATION 

RAIL — Call Mac McCormick at 868 

AIR — Call Steve Livingston at 304W or 666 

The Williams Travel Bureau 



Seconds after ii trieplionc alert to a ncarliy 
Air Koicc base lo ■•scranilile."' pilots hustle 

10 llieir jets. In ininiiles. llie sitihliy. swepl- 
liaek inlerceplors lliun.ler skyward. 

This is Ihe real liiiiifi. I'ilols call it a "hot 
scrainlile." Live aniino rides in llieir fiiiiis. 

11 slarls when an ,\ir Force radar station 
(leleels an airerafi wliieh cannot he identi- 
fied. A Icdepli.ine call hy (liipcl wire gal- 
vanizes the jet crews into action. 



Modern air defense reijnires liijlilninp-fasf, 
dependalile eoinniiiiiicatinn. That's why 
our radar defense system is interlinked by 
a well of direct lelephone lines. 

Some of today's eollef!;e graihiales will he 
pilolinj; Air Force jets. Others will he wel- 
ronied into the Hell System where they can 
help, in peaci' or war, in the Iremendoiis 
joh of nieeling the cominiinieatioiis needs 
of our nalion. 



tRING 
YOUR CAR 
TO US FOR 

EXPERT SERVICE 

and 

GENUINE FORD PARTS 



You'll lik* our 
frompt SfviM 



YoM*N lik* our 
RMSMflU* hk§i 



Why wait until 
morning? 

When you can set ttie out- 
standing news of the day every 

eveniin; fhrou^ti the full leased 

I 
wire Associated Press service in | 

(Tin' iTrimsirrtiit 

North Adams, Moss. 
On sole at 5 p.m. on all 
Williamstown Newsstands 




BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 



You'll Ilk* our 
frknify Way •/ 
IhUig Btibitii 



HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATED 



li.v Kay Kullician 

Ainliei.sl, Sat.. Maicli 8 Blessed 
Willi iwi) second-.strinuers in the 
persons ul Frank Matiee and .Inn 
Clync, Ih.' Amher.st CoUene basket- 
ball team wa.s able to tiounce a 
-ciapijinr Williams .squad G7-58 at 
llie Pratt Caste. toniKht. Maftce 
and Clync, witli 14 and 10 |>oinis 
respectively, were the key men in 
the Jifls triumph for the Little 
Thr. :■ basketball title. 

Thi iliird period told the tale. 
After oaiely keepins; pace with the 
Ephnifii in the first half, the rc- 
juvinated .Jeffs, led by Wea'er. 
Maiicc and Clyne came back with 
a rusli. Amherst jumped oul wi:li 
a five-|)oint lead. After Diz Cram- 
er had dribbled the lentilh of the 
couii to score. Amherst came on 
Willi more. Weaver hooiied three 
baskets and as many fi'ee thi'ows. 
while Masiee and Clyne were sink- 
inn seieii ijoints apiece. 
Williams Leads 
Opciiinii with a stroni; zone de- 
fense, the Shawmen were able to 
bottle up the Amherst offense .suc- 
cessfully. Neither of the Jeffs hi-.;h 
scorers. Fisher oi- Weavei'. co.ild 
break loose for clear shots around 
the basket. On the streimth of i\v,i 
baskets and seven foul shots, ihi' 
EiJhs led ll-(i as the first period 
clo.sed 

With the leboundin;; of La/.or 
and Hawkins. Williams was able 
to control the defensive back- 
boards for a sood part of the nist 
half. A driving lay-up and two 
free throws by Walt Creei' 'luvo 
Williams a short-lived eisht point 
spread, but two tips by Pishei' and 
Ken Wrinht'.s one-hander closed 
Ihc uap lo an 18-16 .score. 
"Dead Eye" Magee 
The Ephmcn kept a four point 
margin as I lip minutes of the sec- 
ond quarter waned, but with liu' 
clock showinn but a minute and 
a half to play. Frank Matiee pm 
on his one-man show. Three times 
the Amherst Kuard handled tii,' 
ball, and each time he let fly vviln 
lone one-hand set .shots. The !>ix 
quick markeis enabled the home 
club to close the Map and the 
scoreboard rend 27-27 as the teams 
left the floor at halflimc to the 
sti'ains of "Lord Jeffrey Amherst" 
blarinB in the background 
rhird Period Dmisive 
Then came Ihr fatal third peri- 
od. Grabbinii rebound after re- 
bound. Amherst eomiUetely domi- 
nated the play.outscorinu the Ephs 
25 points to !l With a 14 point 
advantage to cushion any .sudd.^n 
Williams spree. Amherst was con- 
tent to allow the visitors to take 
Ihe offensive ScrappiuR to the 
final whistle. Williams could elos ■ 
the uap by only five points, as 
Mike Lazor dumped in seven 
points in the last foui- minutes of 
play. 

Williams sc..; iiis!: 

FG FT TP 
Hawkins, if 2 15 

DePopolo 2 5 9 

Lazor. If .-J 5 n 

Cramer 2 4 

Avery 

CTCrmanetti 

Smith, c 4 2 It) 

Hall 

Sues.sbrick 

Shudt. I'M 1 1 :j 

Campbell 

Belshe 

Crcer. In 5 6 It; 

Miller 

19 20 58 



DID YOU KNOW 
THAT YOU HAVE A PLACE IN NEW YORK? 

It's the Williams Club at 24 E. 39th Sf Its pleasant 
rooms are yours at special undergraduate rates . . 
Your date will love the Ladies Cocktail Lounge and 
Dining Room . and you will feel right at home in 
the bar 

The Williams Club 

24 East 39th bt. 
It's Your Club - We Hope You'll Use It 

Undergroduol-es ore always welcome 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESUAY. MAUCU 12, 1952 



HoudiniLikeThief 
Burglarizes Co-Op 

Locked, Empty Register 
Baffles Investigators 



Monday. March 3— A burglar 
broke into the Williams Co-op 
and stole $50 in cash and an un- 
determined amount of merchan- 
dise, last nlBht. Police as yet have 
no clues as to the intruder's iden- 
vity. 

Jack Henderson, operator of the 
store, reported that his tailor. 
Giacomo Cattoli. had discovered 
the theft when he arrived for 
work at 8 a. m. thi.s morning. Cat- 
toti found the dooi from the roof 
to a pentiiouse atop the one story 
structure had been forced open. 
Further investigation disclosed 
that the burslar had left by a 
rear door on the first floor. 
Cash Register Locked 

Mr. Henderson was unable to 
explain how the cash register from 
which the money was stolen had 
been locked by the bandit before 
he left. The only way to lock tiio 
register, Mr. Henderson explained. 
is with a key which was not in the 
store at the time. 

After he had called Chief of 
Police Royal. Mr. Henderson dis- 
covered one set of tracks ap- 
proaching and one leaving the rear 
of the establishment. Chief Royal 
checked all fingerprints found m 
the store but was unable to reach 
an immediate conclusion. 



Williams Scouts Pick 
Morrison President 

Robert Morrison '53 was e- 
leeted president of the Williams 
Scout Fraternity. Other officers 
include Wesley Pelkey '53. Vice- 
president. Robert Sillcox '53 
Secretary and Pete Cook '55. 
treasurer. The members also de- 
cided that the former position 
of Service Chairman would be 
included among the duties of 
the vice-president. The group, 
at its next meeting, intends to 
investigate the loss of their 
Scout Cabin on the Taconic 
Trail. 



Park Interprets Life 
As Functions of Math 



Cites Pythagoras, Euclid 
As Teachers of Truth 



Davila, Noted Chilean Statesman, 
To Speak on ''Latin America Today'' 

l)r Carlo.s Oavila, noted Cliilean writer, lecturer, and 
dinloinat will speak tomorrou iiiglit at 8 p.n.. ''J tl"' J.fsnp "aU 
ai'dilori.uM ..M -Latin .\n.erica Today". Dr. Davilas talk is 
spoii.sored l)v tlie Williams I.eetiiie Coiiiiiiittee 

A graduate (il tlie 
arv degrees from two 
spai 



Squash . . 



Univi'islty oi Saiitiaj;o, Cliile, witii lionoi- 

Aineiii'aii' universities. Dr. Da\ila's career 

thirty years oi publie and private serv lee on two ctmtiiieiits. 

Founder aiid director of the . . 



Fresh Quintet . . . 

eight Sabrina tallies on long set 
shots, while Sandy Laitman and 
Johnny Gray hit for six. The end 
of the period saw Amherst with a 
bO-20 lead. 

Allen and Baskin broke the 
game wide open in the third quar- 
ter, dominating both backboards 
and making possible a Lord Jeti: 
fast break that ran the Purple rag- 
ged and made the .score 54-28 at 
the ten minute mark. 

Williams employd a full court 
press through most of the final 
period, but to no avail as the 
Sabrinas jealously maintained pos- 
session 01 the ball until the clos- 
ing miimtes, when play became 
sloppy on both sides. Sandy Lait- 
man netted four more points in 
this time to lead the Williams 
scoring with a total of 11. while 
Scott and Allen shared Amherst 
pointmaking honors with 18. 

P.O. F.T. T.P. 



Thursday. March 6 — "Man is a 
prisoner within his own ideas of 
reality ... he must pursue each 
truth to fi^ee himself." concluded 
David Park, assistant professor of 
phy.sics, speaking this afternoon 
on "Pythagoras Bound." The sixth 
in the spring term series of faculty 
lectures given in the biology lec- 
ture hall, the talk was based on 
the principle of Pythagoras that 
mathematics is the key to reality. 

Park traced the attempts of 
man from Euclid to Einstein to 
•relate the human to the divine 
nature of mathematics." In clos- 
ing, he cited Einstein's philosophy 
that, since experimentation alone 
fails to reveal the fundamental 
truths of the world, the philoso- 
pher should combine "the reason- 
ing mind and an idea of what is 
re:,l," to understand "the reality 
of lite." 



Michigan 



Santiago newspapers "La Nacion 
and "Los Tiempos", Davila was 
Chilean Ambassador to the United 
States from 1927 through 1931 and 
provisional president of Chile in 
1932. 

For three years, 1943-1946, he 
was a member of the Council of 
the United Nations Relief and Re- 
habilitation Administration. Dr. 
Davila became one of the IB mem- 
bers of the UN Economic and Se- 
curity Council, meeting at Luke 
Success in 1946. He was at the 
same time representative of Cliile 
on the Inter-American Financ'ial 
and Economic Advisory Committee 
and author of the "Davila Plan" 
approved by the Committee, which 
created the Inter-American Devel- 
opment Commission, headed by 
Nelson Rockefeller. 

Dr. Davila has received honor- 
ary degrees from Columbia Uni- 
versity and the University of 
Southern California, Los Angeles. 
At the present time, he writes a 
weekly column for a chain of 
South American newspapers and 
has been described as "perhaps the 
most widely read writer in the 
Republics to the South." 



Gray 

Laitman 
Bioderick 
O'Leary 
Wilson 
Ramsay 
Williams 
Shaw 
Sosnow 
Henry 
Totals 



3 
4 
1 
1 
2 
1 


1 
1 
14 




3 



5 

1 

4 
13 



6 
11 



4 
7 

1 
2 
6 
41 



houses were found to be in a 
"crucial position" because of the 
scarcity of rushees. The absolute 
minimum number of men that 
must be pledged is 350 if the 
Michigan houses are to remain in 
existence, according to one Michi- 
gan Inter --fraternity Council 
, spokesman. 

i Other reports indicated that 
I spring season pledging w'ill reduce 
this number to somewhere nearer 
the number of men who are will- 
ing to leave the new Michigan 
dormitories. Alumni support was 
also suggested as a means for re- 
maining solvent should some 
houses fail to pledge very many 
men. 



Chapin Exhibit Shows 
Development of Books 

The Chapin Library is cur- 
rently showing a display of the 
development of the book as a 
me..ns of communication. Ar- 
ranged and prepared by Mar- 
tin K. Howes. Acting Custodian, 
the exhibit contains tablets da- 
ted as early as the year 2350 
B.C. 

Both the establishment of 
printing presses, after the in- 
vention of printing in the mid- 
dle of the fifteenth century, 
and the rapid growth of this 
new means of communication in 
the last thirty years are shown 
on a specially designed map. 



Banned Book . . . 

grims." 

Turning to the field of educa- 
tion. Lait and Mortimer sum- 
marize their views in this way: 
"Americans are over - educated 
boobs, no longer taught the three 
R's. which are 'bourgeois and old- 
fashioned.' Now we learn how to 
conform while the schemers and 
dreamers overrun our schools and 
colleges." 

Throughout the surrounding 
area, the authorities have also be- 
gun to crack down on the book- 
sellers. The "advice" to cease sales 
reached at least one local estab- 
lishment in the phraseology of an 
order. 

Law Suits 

In Tulsa, Oklahoma, Sheriff H. 
Blaine has stated that a $500,000 
libel suit will be filed against Lait 
and Mortimer. They describe Tulsa 
as "practically lawless" and criti- 
cize Blaine's law enforcement. 

Meanwhile, in Seattle, Dave 
Beck, international vice-president 
of the powerful A. F. of L. Team- 
sters Union, notified all book deal- 
ers in Washington that he will 
bring immediate suit against them 
for libel if they a.ssist in tlie sale, 
circulation, or distribution of this 
book. 



16-13. 10-15. 15-14. He was then 
topped by Dewey of Yule, 12-15, 
.7-10, 15-14, 15-11. 

Krownell .Also Surprise 

Sophomore John Brownell also 
proved a surprise as he turned 
back two opponents before suc- 
cumbing to Potter of Navy, 18-17, 
l,>>-6, 13-15, 15-14. Brownell was 
entered in the Intercolleglates only 
when Chris Tlioron decided not 
lo make the trip. 

The number five ranked Eph- 
man won his first two matches 
handily, turning back Dartmouth's 
Bill Fisher 15-5. 15-9, 15-7 and Bill 
Banks of Amherst 15-10, 15-13, 
8-15, 15-6. II took the Middies's 
number two player to knock Brow- 
nell out of the tournament. 
Wood I'resses Squirt's 

Runner up Dick Squires drew a 
lirst round bye. and then preceded 
to route Dickenson of Amherst, 
giving up only 19 points. The next 
match saw Sciuires up to the oc- 
casion in an encounter which 
must have proved (luite monoton- 
ous for the scorer. WatUs of Har- 
vard bowed to the Eph star, 11-15, 
15-11. 15-11, 15-11. 

Sciuires' toughest match, aside 
from the one with Utiord, came 
in Ihe quarter finals. Wood of 
Yale battled all the way. but 
couldn't quite make it. Squires 
winning 15-14, 15-13, 10-15, 15-13. 

The tournament lost niuch of 
its color when two of the top play- 
ers Eli Blair Murphy and John 
Hentz of Wesleyan were sidelined. 



Ford 



TO^ NOTCH 
REPAIR WORK 

LUPO 

SHOE REPAIRING 

Af th« and of Spring St. 



averaged .3 point liigher i 
those in control group tor the ii„, I 
term at Qoucher. "Tlu' social aj. I 
jiistment of the Ford scholars w 
been good so far," states i|k 
Qoucher report. In addition the, 
have participated widely in ^_ 
lege activities. Of nine oliices optj 1 
to freshmen. Ford student.^ vie» I 
nominated to four and electtd in 
three. 

This program, instituted In 8{» I 
tember 1951, is paying tlii' way(|»| 
200 boys and 15 girls. The sludeni, I 
range in age from 15 to w^ ,nj I 
have not completed high school 
Tlie Ford Foundation hopes] 
tlirough tills plan to shed light on 
the controversy whether ygu,^ j 
people can profit from being cata. 1 
putted from the middle of high ■ 
.school into college life. 

Treated the Same 

The students ai-e treated in ex. 
actly the same maimer as all 
others; they are not .sei;iegat«i 
into special dormitories but are 
scattered among the other enter- 
Ing freshnu'ii. The Ford Kounda- 
lion plans to continue the expert, 
ment for several years uiiiil dea. 
nlte conclusions may be drawn. 



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lOrriED UNDEB AUTHORITY OP IHE COCA-COLA COMrANY lY 

BERKSHIRE COCA-COLA HOT TLING COMPANY 

"Cokt" it a rthfnj trtidm-mark. © 1951, THE COCACOIA COMfAMY 




AN OBSERVATION— B. C. 

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PubUUitt Syrtu .. ^ < 



And what better companion coulcl 
anyone liave than a handy picnic cooler 
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It's a sure way to travel refreshed. 




HUKKI^ 



f tr^ mnii 



Volume XLVl, Number 11 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE 



Purple Basketball Squad Elects 
Lazor Captain at Annual Dinner 




JS^tJ^jafb^ 



SATURDAY, MAHCH 15, 1952 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Monday, March 10 — Michael 
Uizoi' '53 was elected varsity bas- 
ketball captain for the 1952-53 
..rason during the caBcrs' annual 
banquet at The Springs this eve- 
ninK. The captain-elect is also the 
new president of Alpha Delta Phi 
and has recently been named sec- 
retary of the Undergraduate Coun- 
cil. 

Lazor, a Junior from North 
Tarrytown. New York, has been a 
member of the varsity basketball 
team for two years, following a 
season on the freshman squad. 
His election climaxed a sea.son in 
which Lazor served as a substitute 
in the early games but clinched a 
.starting berth in the late contests, 
taking over the center position. 
Good Kebounder 

Superior rebounding ability ad- 
aptable to a zone defen.se won 
Lazor a starting position in the 
Springfield game. At Amherst, he 
proved his value by repeatedly 
out-rebounding such Lord Jelf 
stalwarts as Howie Fisher and 
Derry Bennett. Lazor al.so display- 
ed oifensive power as he scored 1 1 
points in the Ephs' last quarter 
bid for victory. 

In addition to his newly elected 
jobs as AD head, UC secretary and 
basketball captain, Lazor is presi- 
dent of the Junior Advisors. In 
his Freshman year he was class 
president. During his first two 
years he played football as an 
end. Lazor has also served as house 
treasurer and on various UC com- 
mittees. 



Beilby to Discuss 
Personnel Work 

Wyckoff Announces 
Interview Schedule 



Wednesday. March 12— Under 
the sponsorship of tlie Placement 
Bureau, William O. Beilby '31 will 
conduct the fourth in a series of 
vocational guidance speeches by 
alumni, entitled "Personnel Work 
I Career". The talk will be 
given Wednesday at 7:30 p. m. at 
the Zeta Psi house. 

Al.so included in the Placement 
Bureau's schedule of activities for 
next week are interviews with rep- 
resentatives of The National City 
Bank of New York: Chubb & Son, 
New York general insurance un- 
derwriters; several large chain 
stores and the John Hancock Mu- 
tual Life Insurance Co. A new- 
comer to the list of interviewers 
this year is the Port of New York 
Authority Inc. 

Manufacturers Most Popular 

Attendance at the occupational 
interviews averages about eight 
students per day, according to 
Placement Bureau Director Wil- 
liam C. Wyckoff. Every ten days 
I he Bureau supplies to the 50% of 
the seniors who request it a bul- 
letin giving Information on the in- 
terviews scheduled for the next 
week and a halt. 

So far the most popular Inter- 
1 views among seniors have been 
t liose with representatives of man- 
ufacturing companies. Wyckoff re- 
ixirts that 85 to QO";; of the com- 
lianies sending representatives to 
Williams do not require their 
lirospective employees to have a 
deferred draft status. 



Bank Moguls Display 
Unsigned $5 Check 

Wednesday, March 12— An 
made out to "cash" and dated 
unsigned check for five dollars, 
•'2/27 1952," appeared today be- 
side a teller's window at the 
Willlamstown National Bank, 
over a note reading: "Is this 
your check? Given to Adams 
Memorial Theatre." 

Nelson Domln, president of 
the bank, said that "undoubted- 
ly someone made out the check 
in a hurry," and was confident 
that whoever made the mistake 
would vohmteer his signature. 
The bank has no other way of 
tracing the check's origin. 




Mike Lazor '53, newly elected 
captain of Varsity Basketball. 

Editor Discusses 
Journalism Jobs 



Miller Stresses Small 
Town Advantages 

Wednesday Mar. 12 — Speaking 
tonight in the Currier Hall lounge 
Lawrence K. Miller '31, editor and 
co-owner of the "Berkshire Eagle". 
Pittsfield. Mass.. outlined the ad- 
vantages for the college Braduate 
on a small-town newspaper. 

Mr. Miller's talk was the third 
in a series of informal vocational 
guidance lectures sponsored by the 
collcKe Placement Bureau. 
Chance for .Advancement 

"The .smaller the situation the 
better for the young reporter", 
commented Mr. Miller. "A good 
reporterial job on a small town 
paper can lead to any number of 
good positions elsewhere." He 
went on to cite a number of well- 
known journalists who first re- 
ceived their start on .small publica- 
tions. 

The young reporter, according 
to editor Miller, has a better 
chance to show his abilities on the 
small-town daily with its limited 
staff and varied work. "Many able 
youngsters go years without ad- 
See Page 4, Col. 5 

Davila Discloses 
Economic Threat 



New World Must Unite 
Against Europe, Africa 



Thursday. March 13 — "The 
whole standard of living in our 
countries lof the Western Hemis- 
phere! is threatened by competing 
economies" stated Dr. Carlos Da- 
vila. Chilean writer, diplomat, and 
former member of the Council of 
UNRRA. at a lecture tonight un- 
der the auspices of the Williams 
Lecture Committee titled "Latin 
America Today," 

"Europe is an historical expres- 
sion and . . . Africa does not exist 
anymore." according to Dr. Davila. 
We are living in a three-world 
panorama of Eurasia, Eurafrica, 
and the Americas. The United 
States and Latin America must 
band together against the rest of 
the world if we are to maintain 
our present standards of living. 
Eurafrica n Development 

The Eurafrican development is 
one of the chief threats to Ameri- 
can conomic power and the United 
States is aiding it revealed Dr. Da- 
vila. "Marshall plan dollars" have 
been siphoned off for African 
Improvement to the tune of nearly 
one billion dollars including such 
items as two million to build up 
diamond mines of French poss- 
essions. 

An attempt is in process to tele- 
scope into 10 years the develop- 
ment in Africa which required 300 
years for Western Europe, 100 for 
the U. S., and 30 tor Russia. These 
state-operated, slave labor projects 
already export as much cotton as 
the United States and large quan- 
tities of such Latin American ex- 
port Items as coffee, sugar, ba- 
nanas, cocoa and tobacco. 



Jeff Club Stages 
Walkout in Fiery 
CommitteeDehate 

Nonfraternity Delegation 
Exits as Council Denies 
Hearing on Club Motion 

Amherst, March S — Representa- 
tives of the Lord Jeff Club walked 
out of a Hou.se Membership Com- 
mittee meeting tonight as a result 
of the refusal of the HMC to re- 
consider a proposal to put tire 
club's rushing under faculty super- 
vision. 

"I'lic plan was put forth at a re- 
cent forum, Including faculty and 
.student views, which discus.sed the 
club's membership in the HMC. 
The Lord Jeff representative ex- 
plained that separation from the 
Committee was necessary because 
the club could not rush on an 
equal basis with frateiTiltie.'i. 
Cites Club's Beliefs 

He clarified this by citing the 
beliefs that "every .student is en- 
titled to equal intellectual and so- 
cial opportunities" and that "no 
.student has the right to judge the 
merits of another student". There- 
fore, he said, the Lord Jeir Club 
should not be forced to abide by 
the same rushing rules which ap- 
ply to the fraternities. 

Tlae HMC formally expressed 
the hope that the Club representa- 
tive would continue to attend the 
meetings as a participatini! mem- 
ber. The Committee explained 
that no further action could be 
taken on the proposal until its 
next meeting with the Graduate 
HMC. 



AMT to Present 
Luigi Pirandello's 
*Henry the Fourth' 

Drama Class Students 
Stage Separate Shows 
At Drury Auditorium 

Saturday, March 15 — "Henry 
IV", a modern drama by Luigi 
Pirandello, will be presented at 
the AMT on the evenings of March 
26-28. The Cap and Bells produc- 
tion stars Martin Conovitz '53, 
with Mrs. Sally Long, Joseph 
Dewey '52 and Theodore Weems 
'55 in other leading roles. 

Supporting players include Mrs. 
Dorothy Sprague, Thomas Bell '55, 
Gilbert Holtzman '53, Daniel Mil- 
ler '55, John Johnston 54. Timothy 
Beard '53 and Wallace Thomas '52. 
Peter Johnson '53 and Donald Holt 
'54 take walk-on parts. 

Perform at Drury 

Anton Chekhovs "The Proposal", 
produced by Drama 3-4 students 
and starring Conovitz, Mrs. Rob- 
ert Waite and Allen Good '53. will 
be given in North Adams at the 
Drury High School Auditorium 
Friday afternoon, March 21. This 
same pl&y has already been pre- 
sented at North Adams State 
Teachers' College and the Wom- 
en's Faculty Club. 

On the same program, Drama 
1-2 classes will pre.sent the clown 
scene from Shakespeare's "Mid- 
summer Night's Dream", with 
Seth Schapiro '53, Charles Telly 
'54, Robert Burroughs '54, Gerald 
McGowan '53 and Kenneth Perrin 
'54 in the cast. 



Theodore G. Mehlin\R. H. Bastert Tells 
To Speak in Chapel Of American Frontier 

Holder of Four Degrees Speaks on J. Turner's 
Heads Astronomy Dept. New History Theory 



Saturday. March 15 — Professor 
Theodore G. Mehlin, Field Me- 
morial Professor of Astronomy at 
Williams, is scheduled as Chapel 
speaker at the evening .services 
tomorrow. Professor Mehlin. sole 
member of the Astronomy Depart- 
ment, holds degrees from Drake 
University, the University of Chi- 
cago and Amherst College. 

Mehlin won his graduate degree 
in astronomy at Yale, after which 
he returned to Drake to teach for 
six years. He arrived at Williams 
ten years ago. and aside from his 
regular teaching he conducted sev- 
eral V-5 and V-12 classes in navi- 
gation during the war. 

With the additional interest in 
navigation that has occurred in 
the past year, Mehlin has found 
it necessary to increase the class 
to tliree sections. He has written 
a textbook in astronomy which he 
uses in his classes in manuscript 
form but as yet has not had pub- 
lished. 



T^hursday, March 13 — Before an 
a.ssemblage of eighty students and 
faculty members at the Thompson 
Biology Laboratories today. R. H. 
Bastert lectured on "The Ameri- 
can Frontier." Mr. Bastert, a lec- 
turer tor the Williams History de- 
partment gave the next to last lec- 
ture in tlie Faculty Lecture Series. 
'Ihe lecture began with a descrip- 
tion of the mode of thinking of 
the American historian previous 
to the Civil War. Bastert pointed 
out that the generally accepted 
theory was that all American pro- 
gress in the new nation had it's 
foundation in Europe. This was 
due to the hold over of ideas 
brought over by the early settlers. 
New Tlieory After Civil War 

.'^fter the Civil War. there evolv- 
ed a new theory brought to light 
by a young graduate student, 
Fredrick Jackson Turner. Turner's 
new theory was that all progress 
in the new nation was due to what 
See Page 4, Col. 3 



Student Aid Office Explains Alaska 
Summer Employment Opportunities 

.Saturday. March 15-Tlic United States Snieltinj; Refininj^ and 
Mininj^ Coinpan\' of Fairbanks, .\laska has announced summer 
job ()p]M)rtunities for college men at its placer operations in the 
territorv, according to Henry N. Flynt, Jr. Director of Student .\id, 
Applicans for omplovment may ap|)lv to the USSR & M Boston 
office for "referral' slips wliicb insuii' .some dej^ree of centaint\' of 
employment by the Fairbanks office. 

The company operates eis;lit placer dredges within a ,30 mile 
radlouB of Fairbanks, hires men,,, 



as carpenters, mechanics, dredge 
hands, dozer operators, laborers, 
and kitchen help. Wages vary from 
$367 to $498 per month. Room and 
board is provided by the company 
for $2.25 per day. 

All hiring is done at the com- 
pany's offices in Fairbanks. Appli- 
cants must be at least 18 years of 
age and must pass a physical ex- 
amination. Selection of the suc- 
cessful candidates for the Boston 
office's referral slips will be based 
on the date of the student's ap- 
plication and the dale that he can 
arrive in Fairbanks. 

The company reserves the right 

to lay off any worker it has hired 

and will not be under an obligation 

to hire anyone with a referral slip 

i in ca.se of a company shut down. 

W. Warren Salter, a Concord, 



Mass. High School teacher and an 
employee of the company last 
summer, lias informed Mr. Flynt 
that he is offering rides to Alaska 
to a limited number of men in 
June for $200. 

Salter states that there are also 
construction jobs with other com- 
panies that pay $2.73 per hour. 
These jobs, however, entail Join- 
ing the Union and paying over $40 
per week for room and board. The 
salmon, railroad and lumber in- 
dustries also hire summer help, 
Salter said. 

The Fairbank "Daily Miner" 
predicts another boom year, but 
Mr. Flynt advises students who 
cannot afford to gamble the trans- 
portation costs and high living 
expenses of Alaska to "consider 
the matter carefully," 



Baxter Lauds Ike 
In Campaign Rally 



Chief Royal to Gain 
Extra Man on Force 

Saturday, March 15 — Chief 
George Royal's Willlamstown 
police force will receive a fourth 
man as soon as the town Board 
of Selectmen announces its 
choice for the post. The three 
candidates, Archie Donnelly, 
Stewart George and Charles 
Noyes, appeared before the 
board last night and a decision 
is expected shortly. 

Of the three applicants, only 
Donnelly, a steamfltter who has 
acted as special constable fur 
several years, has had any pre- 
vious police experience. Selec- 
tion, however, according to Se- 
lectman Hiram W. Forbes, will 
be based largely on the candi- 
dates' attitudes toward police 
work. 



Museum Exhibits 
Student Paintings 

Lawrence Hall Display 
Includes Lithographs 



Professor Lane Faison, Director 
of Lawrence Art Museum, an- 
nounced that an exhibit of art 
work done by Williams students 
opened Wednesday in Room 9 of 
Lawrence Hall. The exhibit coin- 
cides with a display ot British 
lithiograplis which were sent to 
Williams by the Museum ot Mod- 
ern Art in New York. 

The student exhibit is under the 
joint sponsorship of Comment 
Magazine and the Lawrence Art 
Museum. Professor Faison stated 
that visitors will have the oppor- 
tunity to express their opinions on 
the various entry. Included rn the 
display are works done by Stephen 
Gordon '55. Robert Seaman '54. 
Richard Duval '52 and Charles 
Gunther '55. 



Committee Seeks 
Course Revisions 



Eleven Changes Asked 
By Curriculum Group 

Wednesday. March 12 — The in- 
auguration of eleven new courses 
is among I'le changes in course 
offerings which the Cun-iculum 
Committee will present to the fac- 
ulty for final action in its meet- 
ing this afternoon. Most ot the 
changes have been mitia ted by the 
various departments. 

Among the new courses recom- 
mended is Comparative Literature 
3. a study of modern European 
novels in translation. This would 
be a junior course, limited to fif- 
teen. Tlie chemistry department 
has requested two new senior and 
graduate courses. Advanced Or- 
ganic Chemistry il5) and Chem- 
ical Thermodynamics fl7). 
Five in Political Science 

The Committee is recommend- 
ing acceptance of five new courses 
in the political science depart- 
ment: Political Theory (5-6). the 
Far East il3). Contemporary 
Pi-oblems in U. S. Foreign Policy 
Making il4i. Proletarian Move- 
ments in Westeni Europe 1 1 7 > . 
and the Political Problems of 
Europe i20). 

Also up for discussion will be a 
new, special philosophy study, the 
Philosophy of Logic. The religion 
departmnnt imsreouested two new 
courses, 9 andlffTto be titled Re- 
ligion and Social Ethics, 
Other Chahges 

Various other changes being 
recommended are the changing 
ot pre-requisite and coiTelation 
courses in the art, English. Ger- 
man, and psychology departments; 
the opening ot Art 1-2 and Music 
1-2 to freshmen, with the consent 
of the department; re-arranginc 
several geology courses : and brack- 
eting German 11-12 and Re- 
See Page 4, Col. 3 



Calls Taft Green 
In Administration 



Likens Ohio Senator 
To Pierce, Harding 



Noith Adams, March 11 — Gen- 
era! Dwight D. Eisenhower not 
only would draw more votes than 
Senator Robert A. Taft, but also 
is better qualified to become Presi- 
dent. ,J;iines P. Baxter III a.sstrted 
at a rally of Berkshire County 
Republicans at the Hotel Rich- 
mond last night. 

"No presidential candidate." 
President Baxter stated, "has any- 
thing like General Eisenhower's 
preparation in the field of foreign 
affairs and national defense." Mr. 
Baxter, w ho has known Eisenhow • 
er since 1942. reviewed the Gen- 
eral's record in handling difficult 
administrative ta.sks, and scored 
Senator Tatt's inexperience in this 
field. 

Cites Precedents 

"Of the senators who liave be- 
come presidents." Mr. Baxter re- 
minded his audience, "the most 
successful have liad diplomatic or 
administrative experience, eiihcv 
as governors of states or in tire 
army. Among the senators whose 
experience — like Sen. Tatt's and 
President Truman's — was confined 
to tile senate, we have had iuch 
outstanding failures as Pierce. 
Buchanan, and Harding." 

"William H. .Seward was the I\';r. 
Republican of 1860." the Puiit.xr- 
Prize-winniiw historian continued. 
'He was not only a great senator, 
but had served two successful 
terms as governor of New York. 
Yet the Republican convention in 
Chicago passed him o\'er for a 
man named Abraliam Lincoln — 
and certainly none of us has ever 
regretted t.liat decision." 

Pick a Winner 

Mr. Baxter averred that he was 
"not here to run down any re- 
spectable candidate." but thai "in 
U. S. politics it has always been 
fair to question: which candidate 
is most likely to win'.'" Using the 
analogy of a football game, he 
commented that both Taft and 
Eisenhower would plug the line 
well, "but Ike can make end runs 
that are bound to bring in mil- 
lions of extra independent votes." 

"A five-star general is at the 
disposal of his government tor 
lite," Mr. BaNter remarked. "We 
as supporters must be prepared to 
win the nomination tor him 
whether he is here or not." 



Drama 3-4 Class 
Gives Production 

"La Marguerite" Stars 
Mary Lathrop in Lead 



Saturday. Msrch 15 — La Mar- 
guerite, a ccutcmporary French 
play by Sala loii. was presented 
Monday afternoon at the Adams 
Memorial Thrntir by members of 
the Drama 3-4 class. The play, 
directed by Cliarles Hamilton '52. 
was a theatre-in-tlie-round pro- 
duction, and attracted about sixty 
interested language students and 
faculty members. 

In the title role as La Mar- 
guerite was Mary Lathrop. a st'.i- 
dent at the Buxton school. Others 
taking part' were: Le Docteur. 
Daniel Harkins '53. the stranger. 
Bray Redecker''55. and Le Vieux. 
John Wilbourn '55. 



Don't Leave Lonely 

Lucy Letterless; 12 

Days Left Till L-Day 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, MARCH 15, 1952 



North Adams, Masiachusetts /Villiamstown, Mqssachus«tts 

'Entered as second class matter Novembei 27, 1941, at the post office ot 
North Adams, Massachusetts, under the A' t of March 3, 1879." Printed by 
Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Ado ns, Mossochusetts. Published 
V^'ednesdoy and Scturoay during the college ear. Subscription price $5.00 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, William; own, 

RECORD Office - Phone 72 Editor - Phone 981 -JK 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

John H. Allan '53 Editor 

Charles E. Lange '53 

Richard C. Porter '53 Managing Editors 

Woodbridge A. D'Oench '53 News Editor 

Thomas A. Belshe '53 

Koy Kolligion, Jr. '53 Sports Editors 

Frederick A. Terry, Jr. '53 Feature Editor 

Assistant Editors: Richard T. Antcun '53, Thomas H. S. Brucker '53, 

James J. Cashmere '53 
Staff Photographers: R. Wymon Sanders '54, Charles Eichel '54 

Staff Cartoonist; Thomas Hughes '53 

Associate Editors: 1954 - Q. Abbot, W. R. Aiken, J. Brownell, E. Cowell, 

K. Donovan, G. Davis, C. Elliot, C. Fisher, C. Foster, P. Goldman, 

R. Goldstein, A. Home, J. Klein, J. Morr, C. O'Kieffe, W. Warden, 

W. Weadock 

BUSINESS BOARD 

John Notz, Jr. '53 Business Manoger 

Dudley M. Baker '53 Assistant Business Manager 

Robert O. Coulter '53 Assistant Business Manager 

John F. Johnston, 11 '54 Advertising Manager 

Harold G. Pratt, Jr. '54 Assistant Advertising Manager 

Curtis V. Titus '54 Circulation Manager 

Richard C. Schaub '54 Treasurer 

Volume XLVI March 15, 1952 Number U 



Letters to the Editor 



LOEB REVISITED 

To the Editor of the RECORD: 

With .so inaiiv articles a])pcarinir in tlic Williain.s Coilcire 
RECXJRD opcniv Favoring .sociali.stic tciidcncie.s, in connection 
with the fraternity system in particular. 1 am writinir to call 
attention aj^ain to a teles^iam from William Loeb, '27, of Man- 
cliester. New Hampshire. 

This concise messajre is as soimd as any editorial matter that 
I liave seen ap|)ear in your ])iiblication in recent years. I am 
writinjr as an older akimnus to suggest that tliis message from 
Mr. I,oel) he repeated, if possible, on the front page of yom' 
RECX)HD. To my mind, it should tend to straighten out a lot of 
vouthful, clouded thinking among the student body. You shonld 
vyell be able to afford to give it sjiace a second time. 
Darwin's Dai/ 
"Coiigratidations to the student body on defeating the equal- 
itarian i)ro])osal that all students be taken into fraternities. 
Regardless of any faidts the fraternity system might ha\e, the 
entire ]5rocess of life is selective, the able coming to the tO]5 and 
the imable falling to the bottom. While a res]5onsibility rests on 
society to ameliorate the lot of the unable, attem]5ting to do away 
with the selective process results in a levelling down which in 
the end results in a miserable mediocrity and the sort of economic 
sterility which is best exemplified by tlie current-day England, 
strangled by socialization. 

Yom- cam)-)us \ote was perhaps indicative that students of 
19.'52 are going to reject the reactionary e(|na!itarian doctrines 
in fa\'or of the idea that e\eiy man has a light to rise as high 
as his talents and contributions to society allow." 

William Loeb '27 - Pres Union Leader Corp. 

Manchester, New Hampshire 
Sincerely, 

T. H. Irwin '18 
Editor's Note: The controx ersial Mr. Loeb was mentioned by 
Joseph and Stewart Alsop in their "Matter of Fact" column in 
the New York Herald Tribune on March 10, describing the politi- 
cal atmos|>here in New Hampshire as it affects the presidential 
campaigns. We re|3rint this paragraph only to shed light on this 
outspoken leader of the opposition to the editorial policy of the 
RECORD. 

"And there is nothing reassuring about the peculiar brand of 
journalism represented by tlie ]5oIitically potent "Manchester 
Union Leader,' whose pnbhsher, VVilliam Loeb is always carrying 
a loaded pistol with him, and is given to publishing (with pious 
disclaimers of anti-Semitism) photostats of his birth certificate to 
)irove that he is not a Jew. Rnt it should also be pointed out 
that . . . the Eisenhower supporters believe that both the slimv 
pamphlets attacking him and the ferocious assaults on him in 
Loeb's pa]5er will actually helji their candidate." 



Letters to the Editor 



"FOOLS RUSH m . . ." 

To the editor of the Rl'X.'ORI); 

1 am fa.seinaled by the special aiticle in your March 8 issue 
on Ma.^, the Mystery Bail)er, and should like to take acKantage 
of yom- columns to re(|nest a personal intcr\iew with him. 1 leel 
(|iialilied for this prixilcge by a lieati of (dwindling) hair which 
is itsell a long-standing product ol the amateiu' barber's art — 
that subtlest lorm of art whieli conceals its own workings. 

Ill the siiinmer ol UBS my wile was iiassing an idle hour 
watching mv young son undergo a so-called professional haircut 
in Coulee (Jitv, Washington, .\ppalled by the tarriff (outrageous 
at that date by New England standards) she determined herself 
to master the techni(|iie she had been observing, and to take over 
the family barhering. On our next wedding anniveisary 1 pre- 
sented her with a set of standard shears, comb, and clippers, a 
gift not, 1 regret to state, received in the same elevated spirit 
with which it was made; and ever since I have enjoyetl my hair- 
cuts at lu'r hands for free — if you want to call it that. Long c\- 
perieuce has dexeloped in me a calmness of spirit and a thickness 
of skin resistant to all excejjt frontal attacks, making me ;m ideal 
K.F.\'. (l"irst Faculty N'ictim) h)r Max's ministrations. I slionki be 
glad to submit myself to his hands in return for the proffered 
bottle of hair tonic; the acconipaiiying anaesthetic (lotion 1 should 
prefer to finesse — at least until after Lent. 
Sincerely Y'ours, 

Nelson S. Rushnell 

Saint Soph Wins Clothes Contest 
SampleSy Circulars Snow Victor 

by CItiulcs fisher 

"This has got to stop", sophomore Peter Loiseaux grimly 
warned this week as some 200 adx'crtisements, circulars, frei' offers, 
catalogues, and samples began pouring into his mail box at an 
ayerage late of twenty a da\'. 

Loiseaux's troubles started from the moment he (licked up 
an air-mail special-delivery letter (joslimuked Phoenix, .Arizona, 
from the "Society for lmpro\cment of Men's C;lothes in College 
Fraternities." The Society had named him "The liest-Dressed 
Fraternity Youth in America" - a distinction that Pete, grinning 
shyly, tried to duck. 

"Well Equipped Wardrobe" 

Rut the letter was ex]ilieit, citing his !?.-37,797.fi9 wardrobe 
as "well eipiipped even for St. Anthony's Hall, . ." The letter con- 
tinued, "We think that you would be interested to know whv we 
chose you . . . here are our reasons. You own: 17 jiairs of shoes 
(1.3 ])lain-toed cordovans, ;3 scuffed white buckskins and 1 jiair 
moccasins), 94 neckties (,5.5 regimental stripes, .32 imported ancient 
madders, 6 silk foulards, and i Official Delta Psi String Tie) . . ." 

The list continued: '. . . .« shirts, 77 pairs of imixirted English 
Argyle socks, 3 tu.xedos, 5 full-dress suits. 9 US.\-AFROTC dress 
uniforms, 7 Rrooks Brothers gray llaiinel suits. 6 pairs of gray 
flannel DAKS, .36 silk handkeicliiefs, 3 Chesterfields, iS raccoon 
coats (one for each football game) 7 hand-made felt hats (one 
for each day of the week) 4 Harris Tweed and 5 cashmere sijorts 
coats. . ." 




■'" *•'*"■■- •* Lt'st''drows 
The list grew " 7 ordinary English tweed coats ( for 'rough- 
ing It) 9 silk scarves, 7 ski parkas (Austrian hand-made) 14 
Brooks Brothers seersucker suits, 12 Palm Beach suits, 15 pairs of 
knee-length nylon shorts (for hiking) 13 pairs Austrian ski-boots. 
14 imported Irish liiiiii suits, 12 imported silk bathrobes, 6 polo 
coats, 2 plaid and S "Glo in the Dark" bathing suits, 7 beachrobes, 
17 tattersoU vests, 13 inlaid ski caps, 6 hand-made riding boots, 
4 pairs imported riding pants, .33 plaid horse blankets, 6 riding 
jackets and 365 silk pajamas (one for each night) ..." 
"The Priee of Fame" 
Loiseaux's satorial achievement soon brought letters from all 
oyer the country which daily threatened to swamp local Post 
Office facilities. Most of the writers tlid their best to lure Pete out 
of Williamstown and into more profitable fields, educational, busi- 
ness and military. "Pete's got to pay the jjriee of fame" decided 
two unidentified Phi Delt swimmers, both long-time admirers of 
Loiseaux's wardrobe. 

From the military attache, French Embassy, Washington, 
came an inspiring letter to "Mr. Pierre Loiseaux" ugring a career 
in the French Foreign Legion. The letter extolled past glories of 
such I,egion regiments as "the 12th Foreign Infantry Regiment 
which distinguished itself early in the war losing nine-tenths of 
its men . . ." or "the three Legion units which fought with distinc- 
tion in Tunisia . . . loosing two-thirds of their personnel . . ." The 
letter concluded hopefully . . . "It should be emphasized that vol- 
unteers in order to enlist must report to Legion Headepiariers, 
I Sibi-bel-Abbes, Algeria, or any Legion iiost in France, Germany! 
/)(/ Bruce Palmer i "'' Austria . . . The volunteer must reacli anv of these places by 

Saturday - A double feature, ' Silver City" based on an excellent i his own means . . ." 

short story from tlie Saturday Evening Post involving, oddly j Careers and Cures 

enough, a silver mine, e.-:i)loding dynamite and gun-play. Other ' As the letters iioured in, many new careers opened for young 

forms of play circulate around Yvoime Decarlo, who supplies some Loiseaux. Among them were opportunities in horology ( watch- i 
lush pectoral picturesqueness. The most exciting sequence is a i making), hampster breeding, private detective training, meat, 
scene where "good" versus "bad" punch each other knock-kneed j cutting, taxidermy, modeling, cliild care, Swedish massage, pro- 
iii a saw-mill, o|ierating at the time. In between the whirling saw- i fessional baking, radio repair, basket weax'ing. dwarf trees, real ! 
blades. There is local scenery, not counting Yvonne, in Technicolor. | estate, law, art, music, woodcraft, salesmanship, writinsr, chinchilla i 
The second half of the bill is the Walt Disney full-length breeding, mid-wifery, philosojihy. cray fishing, welding, capon 
cartoon, "Ichabod and Mr. Toad", a great piece of whimsey based raising, auto mechanics, Jaiianese. aiiplied hviinology, iiractical 
on stories by Washington Irving and Kenneth Graham. Played for nursing, voice training, excess hair removing, and care for the 
action and color all the way, it makes good entertainment. Ring insane. 

(Jrosby narrates "Ichabod " with some incidental music. Rasil , Hig/ier Education 

Rathbone narrates the ca]ierings of "Mr. Toad", excellently per- One of the best educational bargains ofiered Pete came from 

trayed by some new actor named Kinter. 1 ijredict he'll go far. , the Neotarian College of Philosoiihv, Kansas City, Missouri. A 
In short, a good double-feature. personal letter from Minor C. Hutchison LL.B., Ph.D., President 

Sundaii and Mondai/ - "Distant Drums " Gary Cooper battles and Founder, promised Pete a thirtv-week home-training course in 
Indians by the thousands in the Everglades of Florida. Pretty well "Spiritual Enlightenment and Soul Growth" leading to a Ph.D. in 
played, especially by Cooiier who looks right at home. The whole "Neotarian Philosophy" - for 250 dollars payable in advance, 
works tapers off to the usual smash climax, but not until Gary "Remember", said Dr. Hutchison, "the possesion of a Doctor's 

spends ten minutes underwater, grappling with one of the heavies. Degree DOES carry with it the ad\ antage of distinction and pres- ' 
an original inhabitant wi -Iding a hunting knife. Cooper finally tige. This coveted degree is not bevoiid your reach ... It is not 
handles him and the female lead as well. i necessary to go away to an expensive college in order to acquire 

Tuesday - Cal has been going pretty strong for the revival move- the Neotarian's Doctorite . . . Bememher, the Neotarian Fellow- 
ment this vear and many of the old films have been pretty good, ship and College of Philosophy is incorporated as a religious and 
"Mr. Smith goes to Wasliiiigton" falls into that category, with educational institution, under the Laws of the State of Missouri 
lames Stewart handling tli' title role. Jean Arthur is Ba.shful and has the full legal right to grant the degrees which it offers . ." 
Jim's gal. This o!d-tim<'r is one of the earlier jobs by Frank Capra, ' Tobacco Ranisher • ■ • . 

who is one of the best, when it comes to comedies. | Apparently the word got around that Loiseaux, whose vices ' 

Wednesdai/ - Another revival, and this one came close to Academy arc limited to an occasional before-dinner Highland Fling was I 
.Award honors as 1 remember. "Asphalt jungle" - life and death an incurable chain smoker. But Gustaf Gustafson had the cure 
in the big city is the kind of picture you can .see again. Tlie eo- in his world-famous Tob.icco Bani.sher (trial size $8.85). The 
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THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, MARCH 15, 1952 



HEADLINER 



By Kolliglan 

WITH the Ides of March upon us, and the flisi days of spring 
, pcepinn "over tire hill". Couch Bobby Coombs and Co. benin the 

llonK. hard climb as another diamond season looms in ilie near future. 

With practice netting underway as of Monday afternoon, a total 
[of lliirleen pltchlnK aypirants have reported to the cane for their 
Idally worltouts. Coming baclc for their second year of varsity mound 
Iduly will be MH"* Patter and John Beard, both of whom proved to 
Ibc Bobby's mainstays a year ai40. Should Howie Babcock perfect 
Icontrol of a slightly wild right wing. Coombs would liave a third 
Lop i)erformer. Howie's sot plenty of speed along with an excellant 
IchanKC up. 

Alone wllh 'he battery roinkinatiuns, 23 iiifieldcrs and out- 
I fielders have appeared, eager lor artive duty. With three veteran 
louirii'lders and a number of soph rrrruils ,Coombs should have little 
I trouble in the outer Barden. "Its the infield that's going to hurt," 
Isuiil Bob. Captain Billy Callaghan returns as the lone infield hold- 
Lvir. and the Kph eoaeh will have to dig deep to pull up another 
|)'unil>inatlun that will equal the lO.'il combination in hitting power as 
I uell as in the lleidlng strength. 

While still on the subject of baseball, I noticed a few days ago 
I that a certain "young man's academy" on the outskirts of North- 
jainpton has sanctioned a trip down into the land of cotton for its 
] liasclKiil team. Amherst (;ollege announced last Thursday that Florida 
I Mould be the starting point for eleven exhibition games to be played 
I by the Lord Jeff nine over the Spring vacation. Well! 

* • . * , 

I -roGETHER with the election of Mike Lazor at the annual basket- 
I * ball banquet last Monday nlKhl. Al Shaw's squad posted their 
j ballots for an all-opponent team. They are: Bill I'revy, Ma.ssachusetts ; 
] .Allan Shutls. Springfield; Steve May, Wcslcyan; Bill llogan, Siena; 
I Hilly Ilarrel. Siena. 

I'revy, breaking all sorts of scoring records down at U. of Mass. 
I i(ir the past four years, was one of the greatest basketball figures in 

till- liistory of the school. Allan Sliutts, a Collier's selection for all- 
I ICaslcrn honors, will he hack for another big year next season, 

as will Steve May of Wesleyan. the only Little Three selection. May 
I «as the main reason why the Cards were able to top Williams in 

their encounter at Middletown. Ilarrel ami llogan topped a star-stud- 

(Icil .Siena line-up for another fine sason, 

* • • • * 

pviCK SQUIRES will be unable to participate in the annual college 
.squash touninment which reaches its quarter-final round next 
week. After meeting Harvard's Charlie Urtord in the finals of the 
Nationals a week ago. the Williams star became aware of a number 

i of twisted ligaments and broken blood vessels in his left knee, causing 

I a .swelling which has yet to .subside. 

* • ' ♦ • 

Th intramural basketball league will seek to wind up their '52 
festivities come next week. With the unique situation of title ties in 
both leagues. playotTs will t.ike place on Tuesday. The "men from the 
Lodge I Chi I'si of coursel will seek to overpower the ADs. but Jack 
Kiirkcr and his army of "llrobdignagians " i Perry. Missimer, Somerby, 
ISowers, etc. I will he slightly favored in this one. The Phi Gams hope to 
have "Lumpy" Miles back in the line-up as they meet the UKEs for 
the second time. The respctive winners will battle for the school 
championship. 



Excellent Performance in Nationals Epbs Complete Basketball Season; 
Climaxes 1951 - 52 Squash Season j Maroon Upset Tops 9 - 10 Record 



Team Wins Little Three; 

Squires Places Second 

In National Tourney 



Saturday. March 15— Although 
unable to duplicate the record of 
last year's team, ranked second 
nationally, the Williams squash 
team climaxed a successful season 
with the best showing of any Pur- 
ple squad In history at the Inter- 
collegiate Championships. 

In amassing a record of four 
wins and four losses over the year's 
play, the Ephmen played the finest 
college teams in the country, los- 
ing their four matches to Yale, 
Harvard, Army and Princeton, 
ranked numbers one to four re- 
.spectlvely in the nation. 
Beat Dartmouth 

Opening the schedule without 
the services of number one man 
Dick Squires, the Purple dropped 
two straight matches, to Princeton 
and Army by identical scores of 
3-6. Outstanding in these contests 
was Captain Ray George, who fm- 
ished out the season losing only 
See Page 4, Col. 2 



Intercollegiate Squash 
Group Elects Squires 

Cambridge, March 7 — Follow- 
ing the banquet tonight which 
oflicially opened the National 
Collegiate Squash Toumey, the 
Intercollegiate Squash Associa- 
tion held their annual elections. 
Selected to succeed graduating 
President Cecil North of Prince- 
ton was Richard Squires of 
Williams, seeded numlDer three 
in the tournament. 

Also elected was Daniel Hut- 
chinson of Army t« the posi- 
tion of Vice-President. Hutch- 
inson, a .sophomore, and Squires 
play in the number one slots 
for their respective teams. This 
marks the first time in the his- 
tory of the association that a 
member of the Williams squad 
has received the association 
presidency. 



Cosgriif to Captain V/inter Track; 
Cindermen Run in Cleveland Meet 

Friday. Maith 1-1 - lOlcctcil captain of tlic 19.52-53 winter 
track team, Pete C;()snriir, veteran of tliree year's service under 
tlie direction of Coacli Tony Flansky, will succeed Georf^e 
Steinbrenner as leader of the winter trackmen. Diuinj^ the past 
winter, (losf^iilf lias lield down tlie anchor position on the mile- 
relay team, postiiij; <|uarter-mile times under 51 seconds. 

Last fall. Pete was a consistent scorer for the Purple cross 
country team. For two years he has been a mainstay on the 
Williams sprinj^ track team, speeiali/inj^ in the distance events. 
Cleveland K. of C. 

Tonight, the Williams mile relav team is scheduled to take 
part in the Knijjhts of (^olnnilnis j^ames in Cleveland. Repre- 
senting the l-'nrpie will be captain-elect (^'osfirilf alonj^ with 
Hob |ones, Al Fletcher, and so])homore Ted Cypiot. The Eph- 
men will also enter George Steinbrenner in the liurdlcs. 

Ill the hurdle events, the Williams entry will be competing 
again.st national standouts Dillard and Attlesey. lU'iiewiiig a two 
vear rivalry, FHI man I'^red Wilt, of the NY.'VCJ, will compete 
against ex-Wisconsin distance inau Don Gelirniann in the dis- 
tance events. Along with Reverend Bob Richards, Laz and 
Cooper will vie for top honors in the poll vaulting competition. 

Williams is the lone New England entry at the Cleveland 
games, with most of the entrants coming from the Rig Ten and 
other mid-Western schools. 



Smith Leads Scorers; 

Purple Tops Wesleyan 

Mass. in Key Wins 



Ski Team Attains Class A Rating 
With Successful Winter Showing 



By Pete Goldman '54 

Coach Ralph Townsend's varsity 
skiers, handicapped by an unco- 
operative weather man and the 
injury Jinx that struck every- 
where on the winter sports scene, 
improved on their championship 
showing of last year. In the eyes 
of Coach Townsend, the Ephs 
turned in a highly creditable sea- 
son's record. 

Townsend. an Olympic and 
F. I. S. star in his own right, saw 
his charges get off to a slow start 
over the Christmas holidays with 
a last-place finish in the Inter- 
collegiate Ski Meet at Lyndon- 
ville. Vermont. After their inaus- 
picious debut, however, the skiers 



took ninth place in a 22-team 
starting field in the Hanover Re- 
lay Race. 

Take First at Amherst 
Shifting into high with a first- 
place .showing in the Amherst 
Carnival meet, the squad rolled 
through the winter carnival cir- 
uit with a sixth at Dartmouth 
ind a fourth behind Middlebury. 
Dartmouth and New Hampshire 
in the Williams invitational. 

At the eleventh hour before the 
Class B Eastern Intercollegiate 
meet, the injury menace, whicli 
had been kind to the detendim? 
ihampions earlier in the season, 
shelved Collins with a wrenched 
See Page 4. Col. 3 



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AMERICA'S LEADING MANUFACTURER OF CIOARETTKt 



By BUI Redman '54 

In the process of rebuilding after 
one of the most successful seasons 
in Williams history, the 1951-52 
basketball team closed out the 
campaign with a record of 9 wins 
and 10 losses. Coach Al Shaw sta- 
ted. "The loss of Sheehy, Larson. 
Speck, and Morse from last year's 
starting five created a huge gap. 
but the boys did a fine Job." 

The Purple started the season 
with tliree easy victories before 
runninj! afoul of the strong Queens 
and Hofstra teams in the Hofstra 
Tournament over the Christmas 
holiday.s. They split four games 
in early January and then hit 
their iieak just before finals by 
beatiii;^ Bill Prevey and Co. from 
Massachusetts, 58-57 and downing 
Wesleyan 59-29 in their outstand- 
ing defensive performance of the 
year. 

Ephs Upset Springfield 

Following this the Ephs hit the 
doldrums with five consecutive de- 
feats including Little Three losses 
to a powerful Amherst team and 
revamped Wesleyan. Siena, spark- 
ed by Captain Billy Harrell drub- 
bed the Shawman 69-45 in the 
worst defeat of the season for>the 
squad. 

The Purple came back to edge 
Worcester Polytech 53-52 and up- 
set the highly-touted Springfield 
aggregation, which included All 
New England center Al Schutts. 
58-57. The final game of the sea- 
son saw the Ephs up against the 
Lord Jeffs from Amherst for the 
second time. At half-time the score 
was tied but the superbly-balanced 
Sabrina team pulled away in the 
third period to win 67-58. 

Smith Leading: Scorer 

With Co-captain Diz Cramer 
out for almost the entire season 
due to a chronic shoulder injury. 
Co-Captain Wyn Shudt and Soph- 
omores Herb Smith. Walt Creer. 
See Page 4. Col. 1 



Freshman Basketball Team Closes 
Campaign With Only Two Losses 

o 

Frosh Height Should 
Aid Varsity in '53 



DKE's Top Phi Gams; 
Playoff to Decide Title 

Tuesday. March 11 — After 
edging out the DU's in a thriller 
last week, the DKE intramural 
basketball team went on to 
down the previously unbeaten 
Phi Gam five. The DKE aggre- 
gation, having suffered but one 
loss tied up the Tuesday League 
race, forcing a play off between 
j the same two teams. 

Chuck Salmon led the "Col- 
umns" with a total of eight 
points, while freshmen Charlie 
Freeman and Harvey Bolton 
notched six apiece. Bob Ouch- 
terloney garnered six for the 
losers. 



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INCORPORATED 



Saturday. March 16 — Despite 
the loss to the Amherst quintet. 
Coach Bobby Coombs' freshman 
basketball team completed a win- 
ning season, with thirteen victories 
to their credit against only two 
losses. The two losses, to Amherst 
and the Siena Junior Varsity are 
partly due to the loss of center 
Tony Moro and forward Tom 
White. 

Although the team ended with a 
13-2 record tlie loss to Amherst 
prevented retaining the Little 
Three title. In the opening Little 
Three contest the frosh easily 
downed Wesleyan in Lasell Gym 
a 68-47 score. With Moro sidelined 
with a broken ankle and Ron Wil- 
son hurt early in the second per- 
iod, the Jeffs capitalized on the 
Eph lack of height, and scored a 
68-41 win in the second Little 
See Pa.ae 4. Col. 1 



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THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY. MARCH 15, 1952 



Stiff Competition Spells Downfall of Sextet; 
Beard Tops Scoring; Starke Stars in Nets 

Ed Wcadoik '54 

A siiij^le vittorv in thirti'on attempts obviously limits any 
praise for tlie reeoril ol C^oacli Hell and his skaters. In spite ot 
a lack ol spectator su[)port, however, and an almost continuous 
strmn of resoundiun defeats, the spirit of the si|uad was amazing;. 

Uepeatcdiv tliKinj^hoiit the season the sextet tackled the best 
collegiate teanrs in tlie nation, and cauii' up with tjoals in almost 
every encounter. |ohn Pike, Capt. Harvey antl Ted Mitehell pro- 
vided the offensive drive while the "^ 



defensive combination of Doug 



I warts Jerry Schauffler, Dewey 



Reed and Georsie Bartlett con- j j^^^^^^^,^^ ^^^^ ^^^ j,.^;,^ ,.o^j„jj ^^ 
tended with top NCAA scorers In i ^j^^ ^j^^^ ^j regulars. A lack of 



most of the games. 

Starke Shines at Goal 

Sophomore Rod Starke, leaving 
his spot at defense by mid-season 
to take over net tending duties 
from injured Bud Hudson, accom- 
plished a spectacular bit of read- 
justment to emerge as a topflight 
goalie by the close of the season, 
averaging over thirty saves per 
game. 

John Beard, high scorer for the 
team, along with second line stal- 



depth on the team combined with 
a series of injuries deprived Wil- 
liams of a third line. This absence 
led to an inevitable third period 
exhaustion of the first two lines. 

Traditionally poor skating con- 
ditions at Williamstown did little 
to help a team that needed prac- 
tice, but it was the extremely stiff 
competition the Purple faced in 
such teams as Brown, St. Lawrence 
and RPI that was the fundamental 
difficulty. 



Basketball 



and Jack Hawkins started almost 
every game. Bill Suossbrick who 
played with a brace on his back 
was tlie fifth starter through the 
first three-fourths of the season. 
Mike Lazor won the nod for the 
lifth position in the last few games 

In scoring Smith was easily the 
standout as he led in field goals 
with 94. tree throws with 67. total 
points with 255. average per game 
13.4, and total for one game, 21 a- 
gainst Worcester. He was followed 
in toual points by Creer with 181, 
Hawkins with 124. and Shudt with 
103. 

Among the frequent shooters, 
Hawkins led in accuracy by mak- 
ing 41.5 per cent of his field goal 
attempts good. Smith and Haw- 
kins led the regulars in free throws 
accuracy, each hitting 65 per cent. 
Scorir.g Totals 

Player G FG FT TP 

Smith 19 94 67 255 

Creer 19 74 39 187 

Hawkins 19 49 26 124 
Shudt 19 33 37 103 

Suessbrick 15 35 26 96 
Hall 17 19 29 67 

Lazor 19 24 18 66 

Depopolo 17 18 16 52 
Cramer 4 13 8 34 

Campbell 19 8 9 25 

Miller 14 5 5 15 

Avei-y 17 3 4 10 

Germanetti 9 4 8 

Belshe 7 2 2 6 



Totals 



19 381 286 1048 



Frosh . . . 



Three game. 

Coach Coombs said tht this 
team at full strength compared 
favorably with the unbeaten frosh 
quintet of 1947-48. He added that 
he expects Moro, whose 150 points 
in only eight games, gave him tlie 
high-scoring honors. White, Wil- 
son, second to Moro in scoring, 
Henry, Gray, Laitman, Broderick, 
Shaw, and Ramsey, to make strong 
bids for varsity berths next year. 
Varsity Coach Al Shaw said, "I 
am looking forward to a lot of help 
from the freshman team. They 
have plenty of height, which may 
help to remedy this year's lack of 
rebounding strength." 



Squash . . . 

to his opponent from Yale. 

Dartmoutli witnessed tlie res- 
toration ot the regular Williams 
lineup of Squires, Symington Tho- 
ron, George, Brownell, Brucker. 
Tillinghast, and Fulkerson. Squires 
celebrated his return to action by 
leading the Purple to a 7-2 victoiy 
over the Indians at Hanover. 
Defend Little Three 

Harvard handed the Ephmen 
their second defeat of the season 
before a houseparty crowd by a 
7-2 count, as only George and 
riUlnghast were able to win 
against the powerful Crimson. 
Trinity and Wesleyan were easy 
marks as the Purple rolled into 
high gear, swamping the opposi- 
cion by 8-1 and 9-0 scores. 

Soapy Symington and sopho- 
more ace John Brownell were the 
only Ephmen able to gain vic- 
tories as the Yale juggernaut 
swept to a 7-2 triumph in aveng- 
ing its previous year's defeat. A 
successful defense of the Little 
Three Crown through a 7-2 de- 
feat of Amherst ended the season's 
dual matches before the Intercol- 
legiates at Harvard. 

Squires Bunner-up 

While three other Ephs reached 
the third round of competition be- 
fore being eliminated in the Na- 
tional tournament, it was Dick 
Squires who stole the show by 
fighting his way up to the finals 
before he was defeated 3-1 by 
first-seeded Charlie Ufford of Har- 
vard. This marked the first time 
in Purple annals that anyone had 
progressed beyond the quarter- 
final round. George, Brownell, and 
Symington were the other Eph- 
men to compete with such success. 

Prospects for next year are very 
bright. Coach Chaffee will have 
the nucleus of returning lettermen 
Squires, Symington , Brownell, 
Brucker and Fulkerson about 
which to mold his team, with a 
number of good Freshmen comint; 
up from the Little Three Cham- 
pion Yearlings to fill out the squad. 
Help will also be expected from 
upperelassmen Friend, Billings and 
Schrier. 



Bastert ... 

lie called the American Frontier. 
According to Turner's hypothesis, 
the importance ot the land In the 
westward expansion, was the chief 
fuctor in deciding American pro- 
gress. 

Turner's theory might be sum- 
med up in his own words: "The 
frontier shaped America no less 
than it shaped the pioneer". It was 
lurner's theory that the tree lands 
of the West served to decrease the 
economic restraints of the east, 
and that vices of the West were 
temporary and that cultural ad- 
vancement would come later. ^^^ 
Lecturer Disagrees 

After explaining all this, Bastert 
proceeded to give his reasons why 
he and many other modern his- 
torians believed that Turner's liy- 
pothesis was incorrect. He closed 
his lecture with the following 
statement. 

"I place my trust in the minds 
of men, seeking solutions by in- 
tellectual tools rather than by 
drift and habit, bold to find new 
ways of adjustment, and strong in 
the leadership that spreads new 
ideas among the peoples of the 
world; committed to the faith in 
peace on earth and ready to use 
the means of preserving it. Amer- 
icans, I hope will, not disagree." 



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THE 

RICHMOND 



Ski 



ling . . . 

knee. The Ephs. however, led by 
Pete Callahan, Doug Wilson and 
Bob Tucker, defended their "T' 
crown successfully to clinch a 
oertli in tire Class A toumey. 
Attain "A" Bating 

An eiglrth-place finish at St. 
Lawrence notched an "A" rating 
for the skiers for next season as 
vViiliams replaced Syracuse in tlie 
upper bracket of the E. I. S. A. 
Despite tire loss of seniors Collins, 
Callahan, Wilson and Neil Chase, 
rownsend looks for a 1952-53 sea- 
son at least as good as the past 
one. 

The coach points to the return' 
ing veterans, headed by Bob Tuck- 
er, Stu Chase, Joe Foote and Gor- 
don Brown, and a group of promiS' 
ing freshmen moving up to the 
varsity. Including Billy Prime, 
Sherman Hoyt, George Olmsted, 
Hubby Clark, Nick Schroeder and 
Bill Gould. 



Matmen Trounce 
Jeff in Seasons 
Triumphal Finale 

Saturday. March 15— A lino 
showing in the New England 
Championships and the dual meet 
defeat of Amherst were the only 
bright spots of the 1951-2 Wrestl- 
ini! season, which saw the Purple 
matmen emerge with a 1 and 5 
record. 

Misfortune befell the Ephmen 
in their first contest against a 
strong Harvard team, as ace 
heavyweight Pete Sutherland was 
injured and knocked out of com- 
petition for the entire season. Tlie 
Purple then dropped three in sue - 
cession to Brown by a 10-21 count. 
Springfield 13 - 18. and Coast 
Guard 12-18. 

Lose Little Three 

Wesleyan was the next Williams 
opponent as the Purple sought to 
defend their Little Three Crown 
of three years tenure. Despite in- 
dividual victories by Bill Callag- 
han. who went through the season 
undefeated, Bob Shorb and Dick 
Edwards, the Ephmen were de- 
feated 19-9 as Wesleyan won the 
Little Three Title. 

Amherst was the scene of the 
final dual meet and the only Pur- 
ple win of the campaign, as the 
Ephs routed the Sabrinas 19-11. 
gaining second place in the Little 
Three. In the New Englands. Wil- 
liams finished second to Spring- 
field, due to the excellent perform- 
ances of Callaghan, Shorb and 
Edwards, who annexed individual 
championsliips, and of Dick Gor- 
don, who gained a third place. 



Curriculum . . . 

ligion 8. 

The Committee Is also consider 
ing a plan to institute a foreign 
language requirement. Under this 
a reading knowledge in one for 
eign language would be required 
for graduation, to be met either 
by passing a qualifying examina- 
tion or by passing a 3-4 course in 
the language. 



Tel. 776 



Mr. and Mrs. 
A. L. Roberts 



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Next to Phi Gam 
On U.S. Route 7 



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NATIONAL 

BANK 

Member Federal Deposit 
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Journalism . . . 

vaiicement on the big city sheets ', 
commented the Plttsfleld editor. 
We, however, don't try to 
hide our reporter's talents under 
a basket. . . 

Living Conditions 

Noting that many reporters who 
first started out with city papers 
later switched to small town 
dailies. Miller pointed to the rela- 
tive comforts of the small town 
way of life. "But frankly," warned 
tlie editor, "it won't be easy at 
first for the married man. Have 
you ever tried supporting a wife 
and kids on fifty dollars a week'?" 

Mr. Miller urged anyone start- 
IrK out in journalism to pick his 
paiier carefully, avoiding the tab- 
loids and the chain paper whose 
news slant, fixed editorial policy 
and "frank sensationalism" ac- 
cording to the Berkshire editor, 
destroy the paper's integrity. "Get 
on the right paper", he empha- 
sized, "not one which has the in- 
teKiity of a Five and Ten Cents 
store window display." 

Cut Throat Competition 

"Sensationalism has no part in 
the small town paper" continued 
Mr. Miller, taking his own paper 
as an example. The small town 
paper, without local competition, 
can avoid sensationalism, the edi- 
tor stressed. "Cut throat competi- 
tion among city dailies brings in 
.seii.sationalism while integrity is 
one of the strengths of a monopoly 
like ours . . We can avoid being 
dogmatic in our editorials and 
flamboyant in our stories. . ." 

"Independence, freedom from 

outside pressure, a chance to help 

the community — these are some of 

the advantages of our monopoly 

' position. . ." 



Kitchens Undergo 
1952 Impromptu 
Health Inspection 

Urmy Appraisal Reve«|| j 

Current Record Top,; 

Four Unit* Perfect 



Tuesday, March 11— Within th( 
last two weeks the various soci«i 
units on the campus undcrw™. 
their annual kitchen sanitation ii, 
spection by Dr. Thomas Uimy ai;-; 
Mr. Kenneth Rogers. No yrevioa 
warning of the inspection wiu 
given to any house. In order that 
all those weaknesses which shouH 
be corrected might be dlseoverej. I 

Dr. Urmy pointed out that ol | 
the sixteen kitchens considered, 
four received a perfect .score am 
five others could achieve .sucli « 
mark with a few minor ami inpj. 
pensive improvements. Alliioueli 
more drastic steps are needed i 
the remaining houses, the jeconi 
tills year is far superior lu <.,. 
that has been compiled sime tl.i 
inspections were first made 

Considered in the appraisal nm 
the elllclency of the structural I,,. 
cilities I including the wall-, vm- 
dows. lighting and ventilation 
tlie method of cleaning dishis aiiu 
utensils, the storage and piepau. 
tion of the food and drink, am: 
the cleanliness of the employes 
The scores for the various kitchfii- 
will not be released publically, bu: 
each house will receive its po .son,.. 
report containing suggestioii.s for 
improvement. 



Campus Intervieivs on Cigarette Tests 

No. 34... THE FERRET 




D 



escendcd from a long line of distinguislied 
researchers, this studious scholar has hurned too many 
gallons of midnight oil to gloss over a suliject lightly. 
Especially such an iniporlant item as cigarette mildness. 
He burrowed into the matter with his usual resolution 
and concluded that a "quick puff" or a "fast sniff" 
doesn't offer much evidence. Millions of smokers agree 
there's hut one true test of cigarette mildness. 

h't the sensible (e«t...the 30-Day Camel Mildness 
Test, which simply asks you to try Camels as your 
steady smoke on a dny-aflcr-day, pack-aftcr-pack hasis. 
No snap judgments! Once you've tried Camels for 
30 days in your "T-Zone" (T for Throat, T for Taste) , 
you'll see why . . . 




After all the Mildness Tests . . . 

Camd bods all other bramb bftiiiians 



fbi^ mnii 



\'()liime XLVl, Number 12 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE 




l^titoti^ 



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19, 1952 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Air Force Team 
Inspects College 
AFROTC Vnit 

Four Officers Examine 
Training, Supervision; 
Unit Expands Activities 

Saturday, March 15 — An inspcc- 
lioii team of four USAF officers, 
headed by Col. A. T. Prontczak, 
conducted the annual federal in- 
spection of the Williams APROIC 
unit today and yesterday. The 
KToup came from headquarters, 
I'irst Air Force, located at Mitchell 
Air Force Base. Long Island. 

Inquiring Into the trainlny; and 
administration of the unit, the 
team attended all ROTC classes 
Friday, Including an officer devel- 
opment course In which student 
lectui'ers spoke. Today was devot- 
ed to discussions and conferences 
Willi unit officers. 

Superior in Past 

Yesterday President James P. 
Baxter III held a luncheon at his 
liome for the inspectors and tlie 
officers of tlie Williams unit. Last 
evening members of the college 
ROTC staff held an informal gath- 
ering at the Faculty Club in honor 
(if tlie visitors. 

For the last three years the 
Williams unit has won superior 
ratings. Since that time these 
awards have been eliminated. 
However, Col. John Lawrence, 
ROTC commander, said, "I'm con- 
fident that due to our increa-sed 
activity piogram, doubled enroll- 
ment, and overall high caliber of 
perfoimance. we will present as 
good a showing this year as we 
liave In the past." 

Increased Activity 

The inci-ea-sed activity program 
includes a mimeographed ROTC 
newspaper, called the "Military 
Secret." which is put out monthly 
by a staff of six undergraduates 
headed by Arthur Levitt '52. It Is 
about ten pages in length. The 
Rifle Team, also new. has already 
conducted several mail matches, in 
which scoi'es are mailed between 
teams. 

The recently installed drum and 
bugle corps and honor drill team 
will perfoim when drill begins 
again sometime after spring vaca- 
tion. Last year's enrollment of 
about 200 in the Williams unit has 
neaiiy doubled this year, and 
future expectations are even high- 
er. 

WCA Aids Drive 
For Youth Center 



Committee Raises Funds 
To Rent Opera House 

Tuesday. March 18 — In an effort 
to improve the limited recreational 
facilities now offered to Williams- 
town high school students, the 
local chapter of the United Chris- 
tian "i'outh Movement is making 
plans to convert the now unused 
Williamstown Opera House, locat- 
ed on Water Street across from 
Grundy's Oarage, Into a youth 
center. 

Members of local churches have 
formed a committee which agrees 
to give over the center, when 
completed .to the town on a non- 
denominational basis. 

ColIcKe Owned 

Raising $400 to rent the opera 
house Is the greatest problem fac- 
ing the committee at present. 
Owned by the college, the building 
was recently leased to Mr. Fred- 
erick Moore, proprietor of the Ta- 
conic Lumber Co, 

With the backing of the college 
and several civic organizations as- 
sured, the Williams Christian As- 
sociation plans to employ students 
now engaged In town chuich work 
on the project. Donald Clark '54 
and Graham Humes '54 are acting 
as advisors to committees of local 
high school students In charge of 
raising money and generally fur- 
thering the plan. 

Before the construction of the 
Adams Memorial Theatre, all col- 
'ege stage productions were held 
In the opera house which wa.s also 
used many times by various trav- 
elling stage companies. 



WMS To Broadcast 
'Othello' Recording 

Wednesday, Mar. 19— John 
Cardie '54, WMS production 
manager, announced today that 
the college radio station will 
broadcast a tape recording of 
last year's AMT production of 
"Othello" from 2:30 to 5:30 
Sunday afternoon. 

The Shakesperian tragedy, 
the AMT's third production of 
the 1951-52 season, will be 
broadcast, according to Cardie, 
"as a help to the frosh In Eng- 
lish 1-2 who are reading the 
play." 

Featured In Shakespeare's 
classic aie Martin Luthy '51 In 
the title role. Raymond Smith 
'52 as lago, and Jane Flory 
a.s Desdemona, Following the 
broadcast, a short summary of 
the play's highlights will be 
given. 



College Negates 
Moves to Hasten 
Deferred Rushing 

Inauguration of Program 

To Await Construction 

Of Freshman Center 



Flying Club Buys 
New Cessna 140 



Cost Met by Loans, 
Sale of Old Plane 

Monday. Maich 17- David Bur- 
gher '53, president of the Flying 
Club, announced the purchase of 
a new club plane at a meeting in 
.Jcsup Hall this evening. The plane 
a used Ces.sna 140, is expected to 
be capable of greater speed and 
operating economy than the one 
previously used. 

Finance to meet the $1800 price 
for the new plane was derived 
fi-om three souices. The sale of the 
club's, Aeionca bi-ought $400 
while $700 was loaned by members 
of the oiganization. A Williams- 
town bank loaned the final $700, 
to be repaid quarterly by the club. 
This loan was underwritten by 
the SAC. 

First Attempt Falls 

Pi-eviously the Plying Club had 
asked for a direct loan of $1400, 
but this proposal was tui-ned down 
by the SAC due to lack of funds. 
The executive committee of the 
council however, suggested an al- 
ternative plan whereby the loan 
might be made by a bank and 
undei-written by the SAC. This 
plan was altered so as to reduce 
the amount of the loan and relieve 
some of the pressuie on the coun- 
cil. 

A new constitution was read by 
Peter Mczey '52. After dtscussion 
of several articles and by-laws, 
the document was ratified and 
.signed by the 15 membeis pre- 
sent. Included in the rules and by- 
laws wei-e regulations aimed at 
better regulating reservation of the 
plane, and more equal allotment 
of flying time. 

Fines To Be Levied 

In order to aid in raising money 
towaid payment of the club debt, 
certain fines were thought advis- 
able. Also. It was decided that full 
charge should be made to those 
who signed for the plane at defi- 
nite houis and who fail to make 
use of it. 



Sunday. Maixih 16— President 
James P. Baxter III said today 
that after consulting with student 
Kioups, trustees, alumni and fac- 
ulty members he found "no ade- 
quate grounds" for attempting to 
institute deferred rushing before 
completion of a student union 
building and f i-eshman center in 
1953. 

"We want to start deferred 
rushing off under the best pos- 
.sible auspices." he said, "not in a 
makeshift or hasty fashion," 
Discussed Matter "Afresh" 

The Williams trustees voted last 
January 19 to inaugurate deferred 
lushing when the new building 
projects are completed in the 
autumn of 1953. 

The president .said he had "dis- 
cussed the matter afresh" with 
I the Undergraduate Council and 
I members of the Sterling Commit- 
tee in tlie light of some student 
feeling that defei-red ru.shing 
.should be put into effect at once. 

He .said that neither group con- 
curred with the pi-oposal. 

Therefoi'e. he said, "there seems 
to me to be no adequate grounds 
for me to recommend to the 
Board of Trustees that they re- 
considei- their action of January 
19." 

President Baxter also discussed 
the question March 12 at a 
luncheon meeting with members of 
the steering committee of the 
League for Total Membership and 
Associate Professor James M. 
Burns. The proposal to advance 
to next fall deferred rushing and 
separate fieshman dining was 
made by Seth L. Shapiro '53 in a 
recent letter to the editor of the 
RECORD. 

The League for Total Member- 
ship is composed of students, 
faculty mcmbei-s. and alumni whn 
favor the adoption of a system of 
complete fraternity membership at 
Williams. N. Arnold Levin '52 is 
chairman of the steering commit- 
tee, which comprises 12 members 
elected from the membership of 
the League. 

Support McCleUan Plan 

Louis P. Remick '53. member of 
the steering committee, reports 
that the league Is currently devot- 
ing Its efforts to the adoption by 
the college the McCleUan Plan to 
prevent stratification of fratei-nity 
houses under a system of defen-ed 
rushing. 

Remick added that the forth- 
coming student union building 
"will aid In pioviding social facili- 
ties, as did the Garfield Club, but 
win not be a solution to the piob- 
lem. We of the league think that 
total rushing Is the only solution 
to the basic problem of the non- 
fraternity man." 



Baxter Signs Freedom Message 
Broadcast to Communist Peoples 



Appeal Requests Russia 
To Revive Principles 
Of 1917 Revolution 



cr 



Wednesday, March 12 — Presi- 
dent James P. Baxter HI was 
among a group of 60 prominent 
Americans who signed a message 
which was bioadcast to the Rus- 
sian people today calling for a 
"new triumph of freedom" In the 
Communist country. 

The message, commemorating 
the thirty-flfth anniversary of the 
democratic Russian Revolution of 
March 12, 1917. was sent to Rus- 
sia and all countries behind the 
Iron Curtain by the Voice of 
America. Radio Pi'ee Europe, and 
other Western information .serv- 
ices. 

Senators Join 

Signed by well-known citizens. 
Including a bi-partisan group of 
U. S. Senators, the message maiks 
the overthrow of Czar Nicholas 
and the establishment of a repub- 



lic later destroyed by an armed 
Communist coup. 

The signers stated "We re.iect 
as a libel on all humanity the 

' Kremlin's efforts to convince us 
that the ideals of liberty and jus- 

I tice which inspired you in March 

1917. no longer live in your hearts." 

Recall Liberty 

' They recalled that the first acts 
of the revolutionary government 

I at that time provided freedom of 
speech, press, and assembly, liber- 
ated political prisoners, ended re- 
ligious and racial restrictions, 
abolished the secret police, and 
set up machinery for establish- 
ment by universal suffrage of a 
constituent assembly. 

"We know." the message con- 
cluded, "that until the democratic 
principles which inspired you 
thirty-five years ago achieve their 
secure triumph, the United States 
and other free nations, as well as 
the nations held in captivity by 
See Page 4, Col. 3 



BrooksOutliiieslNewRegulation 
Designedto*^Quiet'Houseparties 



Chapin Exhibit Honors 
Harriet Stowe Classic 



Display Features Copies 
Of 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' 



Wednesday. March 19— The one- 
liundredth anniversary of the pub- 
lication of Harriet Beecher Stowe's 
"Uncle Tom's Cabin" will be ob- 
served tonight in Chapin Memorial 
Librai-y at 7:30 p. m. Mr. Luther 
S. Mansfield. Associate Professor 
of English, delivers a talk In con- 
nection with the librai-y's display 
of original and early editions of 
'Uncle Tom." 

Mr. Mansfield's lecture will be 
followed by scenes from Florence 
Byerson and Colin Clement's 
"Harriet." 

The exhibition, prepared by 
Martin K. Howes, Chapin Library 
Custodian, includes a first edition 
copy of "Uncle Tom's Cabin" pub- 
lished in 1852 by John P. Jewett 
and Co. of Boston. Prior to 1852, 
the book had appeared in serial 
form in the "National Era," a 
leading anti-slavery weekly. 

Foreign Translations 

Included in the exhibition will 
be an early English edition of the 
novel in 13 weekly parts with illus- 
trations by George Cruikshank 
along with "The Uncle Tom's 
Almanac." Early editions in 
Flench and German, contempo- 
rary criticisms, an early dramatic 
version, and other writing by Mrs. 
Stowe form the remainder of the 
exhibition. 

Mrs Stowe's first published lit- 
erary work, "Prize Tale; A New 
England Sketch", published at 
Lowell, Mass. in 1834 is perhaps 
her best known work besides 
"Uncle Tom's Cabin." A first edi- 
tion of this novel, one of four 
copies owned by public libraries, 
will be on display. 

Over 6,000,000 Copies 

"Uncle Tom's Cabin," hailed as 
the "Iliad of the blacks," was im- 
mediately a best seller and was 
translated into 40 foreign lan- 
guages. It seems probable that 
over three million copies of the 
book have been sold in the United 
States with the total world-wide 
distribution probably exceeding 
six and a half million, 

A year after the publication of 
"Uncle Tom," Mrs. Stowe prepared 
a "Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin" in 
which she accumulated a large 
number of documents and testi- 
monies against the slavery evil. 
Two variant copies of the first 
edition of this book are on exhibit, 
one in paper covers and the other 
In original cloth boards. 

The scenes from "Harriet," di- 
rected by William J. Martin of the 
Adams Memorial Theatre, will cast 
Eve Child as Harriet. Other roles 
will be played by Dorothy Little, 
Jean and Betsy Bi-yant, Timothy 
Beard '53, Robert Burioughs '54, 
John Stone '52, Russell Carpenter 
'54, and Seth Schaplro '53. 




Dean Robert R. R. Brooks, who 
announced a new set of college 
social rules at Monday's UC meet- 
ing. 



West College Gets 
Bogus Chimneys 

Structures to Reproduce 
Original 1791 Edifice 

The construction of four false 
cliimneys on top of West College 
during recent weeks may appear 
cui'ious since the building will have 
neither fireplaces nor a heating 
system of its own when the pres- 
ent i-econstruction is completed ')y 
the opening of college next fall 

Interviewed bricklayers failed to 
give any explanation for the new 
addition which did not adorn the 
building before It was gutted by a 
Christmas vacation fire in Janu- 
ary. 1951. 

Member of the art department, 
however, revealed that the 16 foot 
brick structures were necessary to 
insure architectural and historical 
suitability. Built in 1791. the orig- 
inal West College belonged to a 
period when heating was done 
completely with fireplaces. Hence 
chimne.vs were an indispensable 
part of construction. 

Practical Uses 

Mr. Peter Welanetz. Superinten- 
dent of Buildings and Grounds 
stated, however, that the chim- 
neys will have other than aesthetic 
value. Although no fireplaces are 
to be installed in the reconstruct- 
ed suites, the chimneys will be 
used as outlets for the air circulat - 
ing ducts from the stairwells. 

Vents will also open into the 
chimneys from the bathroom ven- 
tilation system or from the sewer 
gas venting system. Exhaust from 
the emergency lighting plant in 
the basement will also be conduct- 
ed out one of the chimneys, which 
will also serve as foundations for 
lightning i-ods. 

Another change designed to 
achieve a greater degree of his- 
torical accuracy is seen In the 
changed cupola which is higher 
and nari'ower than its predecessor. 



Plan to Cut Down 
Uninvited Visitors 



College Inaugurates 
Guest Card System 



Monday. March 17— A new set 
(if college rules designed to limit 
1 he influx of uninvited visitors on 
liouseparty weekends, keep Sun- 
day houseparty activities "small, 
informal and quiet," and restrict 
the number of social occasions 
financed out of house funds, has 
been announced to the UC by 
Dean Brooks. Commenting on the 
new rules. Dean Brooks said that 
the houseparty visitor problem has 
increased in all New England col- 
leges since the war. He indicated 
that several other colleges will 
soon join with Williams in estab- 
lishing a guest card system, under 
which identification of visitors at 
fraternity dances will be enforced. 
Sunday Parties 

Siiiee the holding of joint fra- 
ternity functions on Sunday makes 
it dilTicult for house officers to 
maintain the necessary decorum. 
all activities on Sunday have been 
confined to single fraternities. 
Anything which might attract 
outside attention has been ruled 
out by the Dean. 

In line with the report of re- 
tiring Chairman George Bartlett 
of the UC Entertainment Commit- 
tee that its operations have been 
ineffective. Dean Brooks an- 
nounced that he has taken over 
the job of handling applications 
tor social functions in fraternities. 

Curfew hour for women in Pi-a- 
ternlty Houses have been stand- 
ardized for the entii'e college. 



Air Society Plans 
InitiationProgram 

Unit to Name Squadron 
After Colonel Cosgrove 



Dever Denies Ban on 'USA ConfidentiaF 
Publisher Charges 'Official Intimidation' 



Saturday, Mar, 15 — Reversing a 
previous statement Gov, Paul A, 
Dever declared that the contro- 
versial book, "USA Confidential" 
has not been officially banned, 
Dever told the press last night 
that "There has been no ban nor 
pressure directed against the 
book," 

However, Samuel Post, of the 
Crown Publishing Co., publishers 
of 'USA Confidential", has charg- 
ed Massachusetts State authori- 
ties with "official intimidation" of 
book distributors. Ci'own has offer- 
ed to defend any bookseller if 
charges are brought against him 
for selling the book. 

Murphy's Ban 

The conflict arose when Com- 
mtssioner of Public Safety Daniel 
I. Murphy told Massachusetts 
booksellers to refrain from selling 



Wednesday. March 19 — The Ar- 
nold Air Society, an honoraiv or- 
ganization within the Air Fores 
ROTC, will conduct its first initia- 
tion ceremonies on April 15 at the 
Faculty Club. The main speaker 
of the evening will be Colonel 
Cosgrove, former head of the 
ROTC unit at Williams. 

Due to Col. Cosgrove's close 
connection with the Williams unit 
and his interest in its improve- 
ment, the Air Society group has 
decided to name their squadron in 
his honor. Since his departure. 
Cosgrove has advanced in rank 
from Lieutenant-Colonel. 

To be initiated this year are 
seniors George Bartlett. Peter 
Callahan, Ricliard Duffleld, Arthur 
Levitt, Donald Martin, George Mc- 
Aleenan, William Mitchell. Charles 
Scholtz. Richard Somerby. George 
Steinbrenner. Heni-y Stevens, and 
William Widing. Juniors to be in- 
itiated are James Cashmore. John 
Dlghton, Robert Ellis, Kay Kolli- 
gian, Hugh Weedon, and John 
Wright. 



the "expose." The governor stated 
that Murphy had "merely passed 
out advice." 

Murphy's "advice" was stimu- 
lated by Harvard graduates who 
were concerned with the book's 
attacks on their school. Several 
faculty members of the Harvard 
Law School, however, declared 
that Murphy had acted beyond his 
jurisdiction. 

Washburn Elated 

Raymond Washburn, owner of 
the College Book Store, declared 
that he was elated to hear Dever's 
statements. During the so-called 
ban. Washburn continued to sell 
the books, saying "Murphy had no 
authority to ban it." "However." 
he stat<>d. "as State Commissioner 
of Public Safety, he may dis- 
courage people from selling it." 



Town Names Street 
After Williams Head 

Tuesday. March 18 — A new 
road in Williamstown has been 
named after President James 
P. Baxter 3rd of Williams Col- 
lege. 

"Baxter Road " was adopted 
unanimously by the town as the 
name of a thoroughfare which 
runs through the new Park Hill 
housing development overlook- 
ing Park Street. New houses on 
the development have been 
built by Dr. Tliomas V. Urmy. 
Williams health director; Prof. 
Irwin Shalnman: and Williams 
Coaches Len Watters. Robert 
Muir and Frank Bell. 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19, 1952 



North Adams, Massachusetts A/illtamstown, Massachusetts 

"Entered as second-class matter November 27, 1944, ot the post office at 
North Adams, Massachusetts, under the A, I of March 3, 1879." Printed by 
Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Ado ns, Mossochusetts. Published 

VA'ednesdov and Saturday during the college ear. Subscription price $5.00 
per year. Record Office, Jesup Hall, Williams own, 
RECORD Office - Phone 72 Editor - Phone 981 -J K 



Volume XLVl 



March 19, 1952 



Number 12 



EDITORIAL 



Non-Affiliate Representation 

For ()\iT a liioiitli the uoii-lratcniitv nicii at Williams ha\(.' 
luul no voice in campus <j;o\cniniciit. Since tlic ri'sit;nation of 
the C^artiekl Chil) reprcseiitati\cs from tlie Undi'ri^raduale Coun- 
cil, tlie colletje i;(i\ crnmenta! hoclv has hi'cn composed strictly of 
fraternity men. One fifth of the eollcne has no sav in student 
affairs. If the collci^e desires to seek out nou-affiliate opinion on 
some important issue such as the ])laiininn of the new Student 
llnion it can turn to no official source h)r its information. .Mthoiiirli 
it is true that the ( Garfield CMuh i^ave up its riijht of re|)resentati()u 
of its own fri'e will, it is also true that it is unlair that oni' out ol 
every live stuileiils should have no voice in campus gONcnimcnt. 
Ortainlv all Williams men should be represented if the Vmlcr- 
<S,raduiitv Ooimcil is to li\e up to its name ami not become an 
Intcrfidtcnuli/ ( ;ouncil. 

We do not pi'0|5ose to jjamper the non-affiliates who i;ave up 
their UC ])osts of their own fiec will. The whole college however, 
must be represented on the student i;o\erninii; board. Therefore 
we urjre the present Undert^raduate Council to study means tor 
leestablishiuir all-iollej^e inemhership to the UC. We see two wavs 
of doinir this. The non-alhliates could vote by clas.ses and elect 
one reiiresentative ]Kt class. This would gi\c this fifth of the 
eolk'ne one sixth of the votes on the UC. It would mean that one 
man would speak for fifty fellow students. This is aliiu)st <'.\actly 
the same ratio of representative to represented that the Irateiiiitii'S 
enjoy at presi-nt. If the non-affiliate election were carried out on a 
class basis anti ukmi who do not eat at (^mrier Hall were insured 
llu' ri<;ht to vote in these elections, no stigma of hypocrisy coidd 
be attached to e.\-Garfield CJlnb men who fa\ored the CHub's 
dissolution. 

The other solution to this problem would be to change the 
(iresent basis for ehoosinu; UC members. This would entail takius; 
UC membership out of the houses. .Although this miij;ht seem 
unfeasible at first, it would l)e entirely possible to have house 
officers working under the Dean's office take chari^e of enlorciiii; 
house social rules while a se]5aratc bodw elected from the eolley;e 
as a whole and perhajis includin<; certain campus activ ities, nm 
the political life of Williams. This action would rciluee the houses 
to a true social unit status and woukl tleeniphasize the political 
importance of fiatcruities on campus. 

Sonic change from the present situation is needed. ;\tl Wil- 
liams must take ])art in the nninins; of imdcri^radiuite affairs. The 
Undergraduate Comicil iinist tlecide to undertake one of these two 
alternati\es to reinstate lull campus representation. 



THE OTHER DAY 

h[j R. liiKcc CiininiilDu 



Letters to tk Editor 



THIS SIDE OF PARADISE 

To the Editor of the HECOUD: 

Let it be known that, bv definition of llu' Treasurer's O'li^'f 
of Williams College, the suite of looms known as 15 Morgan Hall 
is considered to he l,u.\urious Qnarteis. 

Let it further he known: 

That by dismissing one of vour roommates, vou loo can 
ehanne you lousv dump into similar Lirvurious (,)uarters. 

That henceh)ith those entering the (ahoved name) siute 
will treat it with the icspecl due LuMirious Quarters, takmj^ care 
not to notice the holes in the wall, the ciacks In the eeilinn, the 
broken leirs on the ehaiis, (he slantint; beds, the ma/.e ol eleclrical 
wiling fioin the onK' outlet, the ultra modeiii ,t;as jet stumps, the 
ultra Inxmions healiiiji s\stem, or an\' oilier litlle (hinj^s thai would 
detract from lh<' Luxmionsness of our fashionahle (|narlers. 

That we, Rodney Owen McWhiimcv and |ohn McKee I'latt ol 
thesi' said i,uxurious (,)naiters, will entertaiii anv reasonable 
liroposals hv any personnel of this or any entry of Williams (.'olleire 
h)r rcNcrtinn tlies<' aho\c' described Luxurious (,)uarters hack to 
the C:oimno'n Dinnp they used to he, at Ihc conmion rent we irsed 
to pay. 

Hewai'c! The Treasurer's Ollice ina\' decide to make yom- 
rooms Luxurious (,)uarters loo. 

Hodnev Owen Mc\Vhiiine\' ',55 
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Collegiate Columnist Attacks 
Fraternity Brand of Selection 

In a colmnii answering the telegram of William Loch '27 to 
the HECOHI). l)a\'e Cuiiiff of The \rw llampslikc. underm-ail- 
nate news]iaper of the univt-rsitv of the same name, \()iced dis- 
au;reement with Loeb on the ineanini; ol selectivity. 

Admitting that, as Loeb said, "the entire process of life is 
selective", Camiff declared that the main point is that "one imist 
be intellinenth' selecti\(>", 

Mclliitd.s of Sclccliiiti/ 

Ciunff pointed out that beh)re humanity invenled morality 
and peace, it selected bv criteria of strennth. abilil\' to kill, and 
unsciiipuloiisiu'ss. Now. he inaintained. "all societies attempt to 
clestroN' the natural principle of siirx ival ol the littest. " 

Modern societies, "postulating the iheorv that tlii' mind is a 
m()ralit\'. In this way. potential brain power is directed towards 
man", tries to "keep its brains happv", and also demands a high 
"activities which tend lo create, not to desliov' lile. ' 

Kraternities. however, o))erate on neither the exiremes of sel- 
I'ctiv itv on standards ol stir'untli nor of "inlellit;ence. moralitx', 
and creativity". The fraternilv criteria, (amiff concludes conslituti' 
"affability, connections, and linaneial status," ri'snitinij in "mis- 
erable mediocrity". 



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SHIRTS • TIES • SPORTS SHIRTS • UNDERWEAR • HANDKERCHIEFS 



The other day my attention was ealli'tl to an old f'rieiul of 
mine who had spent a suTnmer tourina; Europe and was still re- 
coverinj^ from his French accent. lie is a likeable chap hut impres- 
sionable to a fault and since he lias been back there have been 
moments when even his hi'st friends have crini^ed. 

Me was easier to brinir fruit to a buddinp; romance the seeds 
of which were sown on fi)rcij;;n soil. Torn between a range of poses. 
he pondered several epistulary approaches to the young lady. Ik'i 
name was Wendy. 

Tlic Contincnlii] Approach 
Chere Wendie, 

Ah, it has been so long! 1 remember well Capri . . . and vou. 
The olive trees in bloom and the intimate piaza, C'est tres char- 
mant! Ah, those supeih people! I knew those people. I used to 

walk in the hills after tea at the hotel. But around us both you 

and me — the aziire-hhu- sea. the robins-egi;-blue sky, those 
emerald colored hills. There was a beauty. Gone now. But ))er- 
haps you and I shall meet as^ain. \ j^lass of wine ... a small cafe , . , 
von , , . and ... I . . , 

The Cnoil-fcUotc Approach 
Hi Wendy! 

Boy it's great to he back in the old country, eh! It was great ' 
to he in Europe, too! Well, how have vou been'? I've been "kickin' i 
around"! But it's great to be back in college again, even if Europe ! 
was fun, too! I met Tetl the other day. Yon remember Ted, don't 
vou? He's a riot! I think vou met him, but anyway, he's (). K, 1 
sure would like to see you again! We could really gc?t together 
and have a great time! Well, take care of yourself, kid! Don't 
take any uranium knickles (ha), and , , , 

The Tom Soul Approach 
Wendy — 

The melting snow is rmuiing in gentle tricklets over the win- 
dow next to me. Outside the rpiiet of the cool bleak day sends 
small children scurring to their homes and the warm firesides. It 
is beautiful, winter. Oil, severe, cold winter! Honest winter! The 
pure snow purges the heart, which, turning like the friglitened 
doe at eventide, follows a hidden trail to its home, its seclusion. 
How beaiitifid it must hi' to find one cherished thing to fiirust in 
our storm-tossed world. I recall now a distant wind that blew 
across the stillest Seine, and vou were there , , . Paris ami von . , . 
Praniatic Talc Approach 

\ man was walking along the cold, dark jiuigle path, lie held 
his coat tight against the wind that whipped through the wet trees, 
and he sfiuinted against the swirling leaves. His face was thin and 
(lale, his hands honey and bhu-. He fought on a way, then suddenly 
sat down, drawing his coat tighter. His hair was blown and 
matted, and bis thin hands kneaded the coat. "It's been a long 
time now," he thought, "It was one of those sunny Paris days in 
June . . . 

The I'liniii/ Fable Approach 

Wendy, I was walking along a wigglv little road on a for- 
gotten island, when I came across a jollv aardvark. 

"Hello, Aardvark. " I laughed. 

"Hello, Hinnan. " he chuckled. 

"How are you, .Aardvark, " 1 chortled. 

"Not so well," he giggled . . . 



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On and on go the possibilities of letters to the othe 
Europe the backgrouii(l, there shoidd be no limit. 
And my friend's letter? 
Dear Wendy, 

You tnav not remember me, but . . , 



s<'x. With 




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The difference between "just smoking" and 
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PRODUCT OF 

AMERICA'S LEADINO MANUFACTURER OF CIOAR«TT«« 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19, 1952 



T)e Gustibus 



MEAR YE! HEAR YE! Look lively, cliaps! Slep forward all ye 

" coui-aKBOus aspirants of physical combat, "lis Rugby time 
(iiice again. 

With the glories of the past gridiron season complete and filed 
away In the nnnals of Williamsiana, there appealed recently a 
iiminiscenl but curious spectre. It was the shadow of football's aged 
iiiicestor, Rugby! 

As the spring approaches, and vacation draws near, students at 
miiiiy colleges head southward, destination: Berniuda. Kach year 
.,t this time, also, Fan- American Airlines (purely lor publicity rea- 
sons) provides an all expense paid trip for any and all comere' 
representliiK their college In the Hermuda Invitalionai Kugby Matches. 
Having visions of the island's luxurious splendor, two men from Wil- 
liams set to work to form an "lOph fifteen". (That's a new one. Ed. 
note: Each team will field l") combatants.) With entries from Har- 
vard, Yale, and Princeton it was decided by Coaches Jack Melcher 
and Kudy (iarfield. of AII-Ann-rica Chess fame, that their team also 
would provide a feature atlracdon lor i'an-American. (With all 
cvpenses paid, why not'??) 

poR THOSE who are unaccniainled with the game of Rugby, may 
I enlighten you. Each team Is "equipped with" 15 gladlator.s. 
lined up on an oversized football field with an oblate .spheroid at the 
line of ".scrummage". (Yes the word is ".scrummage") Somebody 
yells "GO!" and all Hell breaks loo.se. After the fir.st 15 minutes of 
play if thei-e are no serious casualties, llie contest is stopped — lack 
of .spirit. At half-time, grounds crews are employed to clear the field 
of all debris which may have collected ^ arms. toes, teeth, etc. Score 
Is kept according to how many men are killed on each side. 

Unlike our football, time-outs are not allowed. Forward passing 
is illegal as Is duwnfield interference. After the bail is put in play 
al "scrummage" a "scrum" starts. With neither team wearing any 
lirotective equipment, the offensive team attempts to put the in- 
flated hide over the opponents goal line by any means they are, 
physically capable of. ramiliar to the l{erniu<la affairs are many 
performers either obviously in need of or <'ompietely saturated with al- 
coholic stimulants — for medicinal purpose of course. 
P rUANGELY enough, a decided lack of intcwst thwarted the hopes 
of Lords Melcher and Garfield. "The trouble was," stated 
playcr-coach-manager Melcher. "everyone was afraid that once we 
i;ot down there, that we might really have to play." If spirit and sup- 
port arc high enough next season, however, the invitation still holds. 
What .say, you athleU's — "A spot of tea after the bloody Ijout?" 
Fairfax Weatherehlld, 11 



^ymmgion Takes College Squash 
Title in 3-2 Win Over Brownell 



Williams Swimming Team Seeks 
New England Title Saturday 



Champ Humbles George 

In Semi-finals; Squires 

Forced to Withdraw 



Wednesday, March 19— In a 
thrill packed finale, decided in the 
fifth match, Charles "Soapy" 
Symington defeated John Brownell 
to win the 1952 Williams College 
Squash Championship. 

After dropping the first game, 
Symington won two straight 15-11 
and 15-C to take the lead. Brownell 
evened the count with a 15-8 vic- 
tory in the fourth game, but Sym- 
ington bested the sophomore in 
the last contest to cinch the title. 

In reaching the final round, 
Symington downed, in order, Pete 
Pickard, Hank Schrelr, and Tom 
Adkins, after drawing a first 
round bye, and then blasted third 
seeded Ray George off the court, 
3-0. 

Squires Forced to Default 

Brownell, displaying winniii;! 
form, earned the right to meet 
Symington in the finals by van- 
(lui.shing five opiionents, including 
a 3-0 semi-final win over Tom 
Blacker. 

Top-seeded Dick Squires, last 
year's title holder, was forced to 
default in the third round to John 
Malcolm '52 due to a .serious \v>.i 
injury. Playing in the finals of the 
National Collegiate Squash Tour- 
nament, Squires broke a blood \ cs- 
.sel in his knee, and was ordered 
by his physician to withdraw. 




Recently . Crowned . College 
Squash t'hampion, Soapy Sym- 
ington. 



Williams Racquetmen 
Face English Squad 

A group of squash players 
from Cambridge University in 
England will lake on members 
of the Williams team here on 
March 22. The visitors will 
bring a five man squad and a 
manager. 

The British team, which has 
been practicing with American 
balls and American type courts, 
will arrive in America on 
March 19. The Englishmen are 
reported to have a strong team. 




* 



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drink beer, 12 out of every 13 who tasted Schaefer liked it No wonder more people are drinking Schaefer America's oldest lager 
bMr~th«n ever before in Schaefer's 110-year history. 



Make it 



Clear... ma 



ke \\ cicnae/Qi 



Milers, Steinbrenner 
Show in KofC Meet 

Monday. March 17 — Compet- 
ing in the Knights of Colum- 
bus Invitational Track meet in 
the Cleveland Arena on Friday, 
the Williams Winter Track 
squad placed fourth in the mile 
relay. George Steinbrenner also 
placed third in his heat in the 
45 yard hurdles. 

The Relay team of Fletcher, 
Cypiot, Jones and Cosgriff rep- 
resented the smallest school in 
the College Division of 14 teams 
The winning time was 3.28, set 
by Michigan Normal and Loyo- 
la of Chicago. Stelnbi-eiiner 
covered his distance in 5.9s to 
place third in his section be- 
hind Big Ten Champ McNulty 
of Illinois who timed 5.8s. 



Basketball Loops 
End In Deadlock 



Inter fraternity Volleyball 
To Begin This Week 

Closing the regular season with 
a victory over the previously un- 
I beaten Phi Gams, the Deke cagers 
finished In a fir.st.-place tie with 
the Fiji's in Tuesday League in- 
tramural play. The Thursday di- 
vision which clo.sed its scheduled 
activities arch 6 al.so wound up in 
a dead heat between the AD's and 
the Chi Psi's. 

i The Dekes' 22-14 win over Phi 
! Gam. v\'ith Chuck Salmon's 10 
points setting the pace, made the 
victors slight favorites in the forth 
coming playoff game. The teams 
had identical 6-1 records for the 
season. 

AD's Also Favored 
Meanwhile, the once-defeated 
AD's were given the edge over 
the Chi Psi's by virtue of a 22-14 \ 
victory in their last outing. The 
underdogs, however, present the 
top one-two scoring punch in in- 
tramural circles in Paul Doyle and 
Ken Heekin. Neither divisional 
playoff date had been set at press 
time. 

Elsewhere in the Tuesday brac- 
ket, the Phi Sigs i4-3i and the 
DU's 1 4-3 > were awarded forfeit 
victories over Psi U 1I-61 and 
Theta Delt i4-3) respectively. The 
Sig Phi's and the Saints tini.shed 
with a double forfeit and a tie 
for sixth place with 1-5 cards. 
See Page 4. Col 2 



Bowdoin Presents 
Major Opposition 

Eph Hopes Depend 
On Martin, Jones 

by Jud Klein, '54 

Sunday, Mar. 16— The NEISA 
championships, scheduled for Mar. 
21-22 at M.I.T., figure to develop 
into a private two-college affair, 
at least in the eyes of Bob Muir. 
The Eph swimming coach, as well 
versed as any on the water sport 
hei cibouts. sees only one major 
barrier — Bowdoin — between the 
Pui|)le and the coveted New Eng- 
land intercollegiate team title. 

Williams' chances depend main- 
ly on their ace freestyle pair of 
Dick Martin and Don Jones, the 
meet's only two-event winner a 
yeai' ago. Although Trinity's and 
Brown's 48 points apiece of a 257 
total was tops last year, Muir 
thinks a less-evenly matched field 
should force the winners score 
this time well into the 50's. 
Jones Eph 220 Candidate 

If Muir dares use Martin in the 
opening 300-yd medley relay, 'Wil- 
liam.s .should walk away with the 
event. In order to save the strap- 
ping sprinter for later tests, how- 
ever. Muir likely w'ill start Dave 
Byeily, John Belash, and Rick 
Jeffrey. The latter trio has post- 
ed limes about on a par with the 
other top entries. 

Jones is defending 220-yd. free- 
style champion, but Brown's Jim 
Cameron holds a dual-meet de- 
cision over him. Bowdoin's Bob 
McGrath and Amherst's Roy Gree- 
ber also are strong in the event. 
Other Eph possibilities in the 220 
are John Beard. Joe Worthington, 
and even Mariin. who holds the 
New England record. 

Martin Holds 50 Mark 

Martin also holds the New Eng- 
land 50-yd. sprint record, but fa- 
ces strong competition from Ralph 
Brisco of Brown, Merc Tate of 
Amherst, Wesleyan's Dick Barth, 
winner last year, and McGrath, 
the previous record-holder. 

The Purple's Max Rogers will 
probably rate no better than a 
third or fourth in the dive. De- 
fending champion Larry Boyle of 
Bowdoin, Springfield's Pat Hud- 
dleston, and Brov\n's Dick Pfann- 
kuc appear to be the cream of the 
divers. 

See Page 4, Col 2 




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Your dote will love the Ladies Cocktoil Lounge and 
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Undergraduates ore always welcome 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18. 1952 



College to Award 
Funds to Seniors 

New Faculty Committee 

To Designate Students 

For Graduate Aid 

Wedncsdiiy, Miuch 19 — Mole 
tlmn $10,000 ill prizi^s and griid- 
uate scholuiships for the comiiv; 
>e 1- are at stake for outstanding 
Williams seiiiois who file upphca- 
tions by March 25. 

Winiit'is of the awards, some of 
them providing for study abroad, 
will be decided Manh 27 by a i4- 
man faculty ComiiiiUee on Prli'.es 
and Graduate FcUowships. 
StreamliniiiK Move 

The new commilU'e, headed by 
President James P Baxter III, 
was created in a streamlinhiK 
move to replace six separate com- 
mittees which for years had divid- 
ed the Job of making awards. 

Under the old sysiem. President 
Ba.xter said, "There was the con- 
stant risk that we did not always 
give the necessary information to 
all possible candidates or that we 
did not always have before us the 
best possible candidates." 

Applicants for awards must file 
papers by March 25 with Henry 
i'lynt, Jr.. student aid director. 
Scholarship Awards 

AmoiiB this year's awards, total- 
ing more than $10,000, are the 
Horace F. Clark Prize scholarship, 
providing two one-year graduate 
tcholarshlps of $500 each in any 
field of study: the Conant- Har- 
rington prize "to that senior best 
suiied for graduate study in bic- 
logy": and the Hubbard Hutchin- 
son Memorial scholarship for two 
years of graduate study at $3,000 
a year. 

The winner of this Hutchinson 
scholarship should have shown 
creative talent in music, writing, 
or painting, but applicants of out- 
standing ability in philosophy cr 
the sciences will be considered if 
there is no satisfactory applicant 
in the arts. 

Other scholarship awards in- 
clude the Charles Bridgen Lansing 
scholarship in Latin and Greek, 
the John Edinund Moody scholar- 
ship, providing for two years of 
study at Oxford University in Kng- 
lanri. and the Cavvoll A. Wilson 
scholarship, also providing for 
post-graduate study at Oxford. 



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Swimming . . . 

The 100 yd freestyle could de- 
develop into a re-run of the 50. 
Hie same favorites rule, with 
Martin again owning the best 
lime. Belash, John Beard, and 
Sam Kimberly also are Williams 
entries. 

Amherst's Don Wassie appears 
as a good bet to ivpeat his win of 
a year Lgo in the 200-yd. back- 
stroke, although McGrath has 
ttliippi'd him. Bowdoin's Bob Ar- 
wezon and the Eplis' Dave Byerly 
aiso might surprise. 
Jeffrey, Douglas in Breaststroke 

Muir rates the breaststroke one 
of his strongest events, with Jef- 
frey and Charlie Douglas slated 
to enter. Springfield's Bill Yorzyk 
owns the only clocking better than 
Jeffrey's fastest. 

The only loss which Jones has 
suffered in the 440-yd. freestyle 
since his victory in last year's 
New- Euglands came at the hands 
of teammate Worthington. Outside 
competition likely will come from 
Wesleyan's Jan Vandenburg and 
Tom Lyndon of Bowdoin. 

Huwdoin Relay Favorite 

Muir intends to send Worthing- 
ton into the 300-yd. individual 
medley against .such versatile stars 
as Cameron, Yorzyk, and Arwezon, 

Bowdoin should cop the final 
400-yd. freestyle relay without 
much trouble, but the Purpda 
quartet of Martin. Jones, Belash, 
and either Kimberly or Beard 
could easily cop second. 



Intramurals . . . 

Edging into the cage spotlight, 
the interfraternily volleyball race 
got underway Monday, as the Psi 
U's faced the Betes, Phi Sig squar- 
ed off against AD. Phi Delt met 
Zeta Psi and the Kaps took on a 
power-laden faculty aggregation. 

The long overdue consolation 
round of the inter-house squash 
tourney has been delayed again 
by the lack of suitable runoff date. 
The Phi Delts and the Zetes ad- 
vanced to the quarter finals with 
victories over Phi Gam and DU. 
respectively, in the second round. 
The Phi Delts meet the winner of 
the Saint-Beta contest, while the 
Zetes take on the Psi U-D Phi 
victor. 

The winner of the consolation 
round takes on the Sig Phi's foi 
.-;econd place in the final standings. 
The Sigs fell before the Chi Psi's 
in the championship final. 



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Opp. Howard Johnson's 
State Rd. 



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Badges Rings Steins 

Jewelry Gifts Fevers 

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Medols Trophiet 

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Folding Canvas Cots 

$5.50 UP 

Rental of Punch Bowls, ladles & cups for 
your weekend parties, 

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Williamstown 



Tel. 29 R 



KAPS Score 31-23 
Quiz Win Over DU 

Wednesday. Mar. 12— Kappa 
Alpha defeated Delta Upsilon in 
the WMS int<.'rfraternity quiz 
this evening. The Kap delega- 
tion of Al Home '54 and Jack 
Haas '52 and the DU represen- 
tatives, Bink King '53 and Tay- 
lor Bnggs '54, both aii.swered a 
large percentage of the ques- 
tions as is indicated by the high 
score, 31-23. 

Quizmaster John Looinis '54 
and announcer Bill Ma.son '55 
will preside over the clash to- 
night at 9:30 p. ni. when tlie 
representatives from Phi Gam- 
ma Delta meet a team from Phi 
Sigma Kappa. The winner of 
this particular phase of the 
eliminations will enter the 
semi-final round of the quiz. 



Baxter . . . 

Communist tyranny, cannot return 
to the paths of peace and progress. 

"We hold the profound convic- 
tion that in spite of every difliciil- 
ty, you, like all who have tasted 
freedom, will find the way to n - 
gain it so that a liberated Russia 
may assume her normal place in 
the international community and 
the liberated Russian iJeoples may 
again make their great contribu- 
tion to the welfare and happiness 
of mankind." 

Others among the 60 signers 
were former President Herbert 
Hoover. Senator Herbert H. Leh- 
man, Senator Margaret Chase 
Smith. William Green, head of 
the A, P. of L., Phihp Murray, 
head of the C. I, O,. and Norman 
f homas. socialist party head. 



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evening through the full leased 
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On salt ot 5 p.m. on all 
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HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATED 



Flynt Announces Numerous Jobs Open to Students 
Desiring Summer Work; Urges Application 



Student Aid Office 
Releases Job List 


5 

any capable junior or .senior. 

Tlie National Park Service at 
Yilluwstoiie NatiJiial Park offers 
tliiee types of work for the "rug- 
ged outdoor type"--trail work, fire 
control aid positions, and tree sur- 
gery. The.se jobs pay about $l.a5 
per hour for a 40 hour week. 

Among sales jobs offered, the 
Vick Company requesUs salesmen 
to sell their product in a twelve 
week summer program. Open to 
sophomores and juniors, the job 
will pay $25 for a five day week 
phis expen.ses which include a car, 
travel expenses, meals, and hotel 
accommodations. A $7.5 bonus will 
be given for those completing the 
full program. 

File of Summer Jobs 

Flynt stres.sed many opportun- 
ities may be found by consulting 


the files In his office. These files 
of jobs held by Williams students 
in the past two years are available 
lo all interested. 


Wednesday. March 19- -Since 
the number of summer job open- 
ings is Hearing its peak. Student 
Aid Director Henry N. Flynt, Jr., 
has urged all interested students 
to take ad\'anta.ge of the available 
opportunities by spring vacation. 
He stated that after vacation the 
choice of .lobs will be narrowed and 
4reatly reduced. 

To date many requests ranging 
from mining jobs in Ala.ska to po- 
sitions as life guards at camps and 
beach clubs have been received. 
In fact a situation for the summer 
as beach club manager on Nan- 
tucket Island has been offeivd to 


In Flynt's files, the company, th,. 
type of work, the name of the stu- 
dent, and the .salary are given 
Flynt pointed out that a student 
not only can gather ideas on the 
jobs avadable, but also can, u.se 
this information to make contiacts 
necessary for .securing the jolj 

The work study program offer,, 
juniors who want jobs after gi.id. 
nation an opportunity to : i-ek 
summer employment with the idea 
of continuing permanently alter 
graduation. This apprentici inp 
gives the interested junio' a 
chance to become acquainted v. m, 
the line of work the company of- 
fers. 


TOP NOTCH 
REPAIR WORK 

LUPO 

SHOE REPAIRING 

At the end of Spring St. 


— 


^ 


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WILLIAMS COLLEGE 




3R^^0fit 



SATUHDAV, MARCH 22, 1952 



PRICE 10 CENTS 




Opinion Survey Reflects Student 
Reactions to Campus Rules 

1)1/ Ned Hcri:cs '5.5 

SalMiday, Miir. 22-l'()i- llic past .sc\cial weeks, nimois liiive 
(jeeii (iiciilalinn Ireelv around llie eaiiipus rejrardiiijr new rules to 
|„. IrMcd 1)V tlie FaciiKv Discipline Connnittce to curl) the imnien- 
sitv ami intensity ol Williams ( :(illcir(. social life. Since last Monday 
iijj,lii ||,e new ruliuji; has beecmie llje topic ol considerable dis- 
i.iissiiin. Tlie rollowiun arc sanjples ol the more iiitereslin<; student 

(.onion (.annnit; 5:J Alpha Delt: The new 
social rules released hv the Dean's Office liave 
caused unith eoniplainl Iroin the student body, 
hut I think that when they ha\<' heen tried, we 
will find ()Ut that thev do not reallv make as 
unich dillerenee as inauv students think they 
will. In general the rules arc rules of conduct 
that the student should follow on his own in- 
itiati\'e; since he hasn't done so recently, the ad- 
miiiisiation is justified in cnUireinn Iheni. Altlioui^li the regulations 
are nmrc iiarsh than neccssar\' in souk' places as in SuuiUiv nij^hl 
curlew, it is ridiculous to think that honseparties are ruined for- 
ever. 11 wccojnparc Williams' soei.tl rennlations with those of otiu'r 
collei'/s. we can appreciati- jiisl how liberal our administration 

n'all'. i'^. 

Minfard lioiul. Nou-Alliliale; The Dean's suj^^i'^iti"" that 
hoiiM iiarties be made more <|uiel .md subdued seems to h<' a well- 
luseil idea. Williams has tradilionallv been a "i^entleman's collej^e", 
and lie best way to insur<' preservation of this heritaj^c is to pro- 
lilhil uninvited quests from creating; rowdy scenes on the Williams 
niMi|iiis. I'or this reason, the nuest-eard svslejn seems to me an 
(.xeeliiul innovation. 

\notlier idea which 1 leel would promote i^eutlcmauK con- 
duel al Williams would be tlu' pres<'neeol nKMC parties. 1 feel that 
if mine parties (possibly moutlix' dances) were to be held bv the 
variiiiis houses the teudencv would be to cease "Koinj; o\crboard" 
at auv sinijle celebration. This would seem to be prehuable to a 
svsleiii where each party is to be looki'd forward to as "a bit; l)last". 

//kWi Wiitloii ':y^. I'hi Delt: I think tlial we 
lia\e (jnly onrseKcs to blame lor Ibc action taken 
In the aduiiuistratioii. Tbe students lia\e not 
sIkiwii responsibilit\' in cither eoutrolliui; ttiiui;s 
i)U weekends or in pimisliiuj; iillcuders. We all 
seek .1 well-ordered eonimnnit\'. I'p until now 
this has been left to the iudi\idnal and he. il 
seeuis. has lailed. 

Il(iw<'\cr, 1 do not ai^rcc with the action that 
lliaf has been taken bv the adniiiuslralion. It will satish' 
people, but il will not, b\ and lari^e. remedy the situation. This ac- 
tinri liiuts the responsible people and. 1 feel, atlccts tin' irrespon- 
sihle people very little. 

Ouite clearly. Inul the stiulent body attempled l<i remedy the 
excesses of campus social actixitics (uior to the administration 
edict, there would ha\c been ample t;rounds on which to object 
sln)iii;lv to the action just taken. L'nfortnuateK'. the student IxiiK 
aid Hieir reprcseutatixcs on the I'.C. elected to (l<i nothini; - 
lieuee the shortened curfew, etc. ll<iwe\cr. the door seems bv no 
uieaus closed to an\ iutellincnt. responsible, and workable solution 
Id the probelm which will be henccforlh |irescnlcd to tbe eolleije 
uilhonlics by the V. C. I feel \crv di'linitclv that the students 
uaisl la<-e realistically the problem of niaintainiuu; an orderly col- 
:ei;e ronununitv. If al this point, tbcv ciintinue to ii;nore the ]ivo- 
1)1( in lliex' can hardly consider themselves worthy of tx'ini; di(iu;;hl 
uiat\uv individuals, and they will liaxc to suffer the conse(|nences. 
See Page 2, Col, 1 




lot of 



kl. 



Purple Cow to Hit 
StandsWednesday 

Assorted Waggery 
Yitalizes Magazine 



Saturciay. Mar. 22 — Reviving a 
William.s tradition dating back to 
901. the Purple Cow will make 
tidjut on the stand.s and in 
ho ni.iils al noon Wednesday. 
arrl) 2(1. Almo.st a thousand .sub- 
ibi'r,s, largest number in the 
ou's forty-flve year history, will 
Pcoivp this nrst Issue at that 
ime 

l>spi!e a popular maxim to the 
ontrai-,-, the new Cow's princlnle 
b!'i n "to plea.se everybody". 
■'•oKhiic to Editor Ron Dubtn '53. 
IH' ir.aterlal Included In this 
sue runs the gamut from sophls- 

ated Innuendo to "he - she" 
lies, with contributions received 
■om alumni, faculty, and .stu- 
cnts. 

Piper on Evlta 

AiLson c. Piper's article on E\n 
I'on. along with Fred Rudolph's 
''licism of William F. Buckley's 
'oli. Ood and Man at Yale, will 
W'-spnt the scholar's side of the 
illiams campus. Among the stu- 
•n'. efforts distributed throu^'h- 

™ Cow's 36 pages Is a wealth 
■■^Ketches and cartoons by Bofc) 
aman '54 and a large staft. with 
"■iry and prose by such wrlteis 

Pi'te Ourney '52. 
■With "C-Day" 96 hours off. the 
Y publicity campaign will in- 
IM the playing of a record call- 
, ^^°* Mc How to Milk a Cow" 
'■'• WMS and a 15-second flick 
,„ ' "" Walden. A .subscription 
'Wn will be enclosed in the 
J '1 the hope that new orders 
material wUl be forthcomlnis. 



Teran Discusses 
Modern Germany 

Unity of Country Cited 
As Soaght-After Goal 



Monday. Mar. n— Gerald Ter- 
an '48. a Christ resident officer in 
Bavaria for the past four years. 
dellvei-ed a lecture on "Germany 
Today" to German Club member'; 
in Griffin Hall this evening. 

An English ma.ior while at Wil- 
liams. Mr. Teran served as "Fath- 
er Confessor, bottle washer, coun- 
selor, and all-around man" in the 
U. S. High Commissioner's pro- 
gram of German "re-orlentation 
and democratization". He helped 
run town meetings and forums, 
and conducted showings of "trav- 
elogue-type" movies of the U, S, 
Unity Main Problem 

In citing unification of Ger- 
many as the ma,ior problem of the 
occupying powers, Mr. Teran af- 
firmed that, "German unity is the 
one thing on which all Germans 
agree. East as well as West Zone. ' 

For this reason, the U, S. 1.-= 
having considerable trouble in 
gaining West German support of 
NATO. Mr. Teran called the unity 
problem "a thorn for the West" 
whereas Russia is In a position to 
make the big move toward unifica- 
tion which may "ruin all our 
efforts over there," 

The speaker set German unem- 
ployment at one million in addi- 
tion to the 9-12 million refugee;. 
expelees. and displaced persons 
who represent a burden to the 
rapidly Improving German econ- 
omy. Communists have made sac 
cessful appeals to youths who are 
left without Jobs due to the strong 
apprentice system and lack of 
I trade schools. 



Crawf'd Explains j VC Selects Five 
Sound Recording Committee Heads 



To Science Club 

Demonstrations of Higli 

Fidelity Magnification 

Illustrate Discussion 



Tuesday. March 18— Professor 
Franzo H. Crawford described the 
lirocess of "Electrical Repi-oduc- 
tion of Sound" today at 4:30 be- 
fore a capacity audience at the 
pli.vsics laboratory. Using instni- 
uicnLs constructed by members of 
Ilie Williams Science Club, Profes- 
.S(ir Crawford illustrated and dis- 
cussed the quality of reproduction 
clilainatale from various needles 
and loudsiJcakers. 

In demonstrating the tremen- 
dous wear on a needle. Professor 
Ciawford stated that playing a 
microgroove record for 3000 houis 
with even such a high-quality 
pickup as a diamond is equivalent 
lo dragging the needle "from here 
to San Francisco", He stressed 
the importance of excellent mag- 
nification, concluding the lecture 
by showing the effect of volume 
and quality of reproduction on 
systems containing single loud- 
siJeakeis and the superior systems 
whifh combine many smaller 
siJcakers. 



for Coming Year 

Council Elects Preston, 
Shorb, Fetterolf, Stege, 
Beard to Top Positions 

Monday, Mar. 17 — Members of 
the Undergraduate Council ap- 
IJroved the Rules and Nominations 
Committee's slate of 1952 commii- 
tee chairmen tonight at its regu- 
lar weekly meeting, held at the 
home of Dean Robert R. R. 
Brooks. 

The Council chose Robert H. 
Shorb '53 to head the important 
Discipline Committee. Shorb, wlio 
succeeds Robert F, White, Jr, 'i2, 
is president of Saint Anthony and 
the junior clafis. 

Beard Heads Entertainment 

John Beard. Jr, '53 was chosen 
to head the Entertainment Com- 
mittee and Frederick B, Preston 
'53 succeeded Elliot Curtis '52 as 
chairman of the Rushing Com- 
mittee. 

The U. C. appointed George U. 
Stegc III '53. president of Psi Up- 
silon, and Peter L. Fetterolf '53, 
president of Theta Delta Chi, to 
chairman of the Scholastic 
and Rules and Nominations Com- 
mittees, i"espectively. 



Thieves Loot Hart's; B/cau, Local Barber, 
Cash, Camera Stolen Dies After Sickness 



Board of Health Leads Campaign 
To Clean Up Local Restaurants 



Curtis to Give Sermon 
On History In Chapel 

Saturday, Mar. 22~Mark H. 
Curtis, instructor in history, 
will discuss the compatibihty 
of historical studies with Chris- 
tian faith tomorrow evening in 
Chapel, This is the fourth in 
a series of ,sermons by Williams 
faculty members. Conducting 
the .service will be Douglas G. 
Burgoyne '52. 

A graduate of Yale Univer- 
sity in 1942, Mr. Curtis came 
to Williams in February 1950 
after doing graduate work at 
Yale for three years. At Wil- 
liams he is an instructor in 
Euiopean and English Hlstoi-y. 



Ludwig Concludes 
Faculty Lectures 

Talk Explains Attitude 
Toward Modern Writing 



Pharmacy Tfieft Baffles 
Billville Constabulary 

.Monday. Mar, 17 — In the latest 
of a series of robberies on Sprint; 
Street, two unidentified thieves 
broke into Hart's Pharmacy last 
night and made off with a camera 
and $50 in cash. 

According to a statement by 
Police Chief George Royal, the 
burglars g[iined entrance by fo'.'c- 
ing the cellar door, went up.stans 
and looted the cash register. They 
apparently made their exit the 
same way they had come, via the 
cellar entrance. 

Police Deny Rumor 

Earlier in tlie evening, two 
prowlers had been spotted in the 
vicinity of the House of Walsh, 
according to store officials. The 
clothing store had previously been 
burglarized five times. 

The police department denied a 
rumor that, acting on a false lead, 
they had lain in waiting at the 
House of Walsh, across the street 
from Hart's while the pharmacy 
was being victimized. 



Known to Two Decades 
! Of Williams Students 



Saturday, Mar. 15 — Zenophil E. 
Bleau, member of the Bleau family 
of barbers well known to Williams 
students and alumni, died early 
tl.ia moiTiing after a lingering ill- 
ness. He was proprietor of the 
barber shop below Currier Hall. 

Boin in I,apraie, Canada, Mr. 
Bleau moved to North Adams ni 
1907 and came to Williamstown 
in 1932. Upon arriving in Wil- 
liamstown he opened his own bar- 
ber shop on Cole Avenue, and 
later mo\'ed it to its present site 
on Main Street. During World 
War I. Mr, Bleau served with the 
army in the Philippines and 
China. Among his survivors is 
Mederic Bleau, owner of the Col- 
lege Barber Shop on Spring 
Street. 

The funeral service for Mr, 

Bleau was held Monday morning 

! at 9:00 at the St. Raphael's 

Church and burial took place at 

I the East Lawn Cemetery. 



Faculty House Offers Professors 
Various Luxurious Accommodations 



/)(/ Ilauk Shehlrn '.5.5 

Salindav. Mar. 22— ,\lth()n<j;h the Williams facrdty house re- 
mains a invsteiy to most Williams men thiouj^hont their stay at 
collet;e. this hnildiiii; is without a doubt a prominent feature of 
the campus. Hidden behind a rather ordinary e.\terior — sometimes 
describetl b\' the more critical as a "Ldorificd gas station" — the in- 
side is indeed most im|iri'ssi\c. 

In the center of the building one finds the loiuigc with a 
ceilinji two stories high. This ceilinu; is made of pecky cypress 
with pine cones on the coiner of the cornice. To cover the floor 
Clark Williams '92 donor of the building. pro\idcd four Kaslia- 
noor nigs woven in Hulgaria. ()\er the fireplace hangs a portrait 
of Mr. Williams pictincd at his South (Carolina estate. 
Basement for Rcercaliim 

Perhaps the most outstanding feature is the Gothic tapestry 
hanging on the wall opposite the fireplace. This has been described 
,is a very rare early sixteenth centur\' tapestry woven in Tournai 
repi'csenting "Mope" or "The Consolation of the Three \'irtues." 

In the basement of the building lecreatiou facilities are |)ro- 
\ide(l for the lacult\'. These include two bowling alleys, ping pong 
tables, billiard tables, and two .shuffle board courts. On the 
second floor there are two guest rooms that may be reser\ed hv 
any club member. Another outstanding featiuc is the dining room 
where club members may gi\(' piixatc paifics. The building was 
furnished b\' Mr. Williams with mau\' pieces from his home anil 
fioni other southern estates. 

Waterman Board Chairman O 



Thursday, March 20 — Before a 
near capacity crowd in the Thomp 
son Biology Laboratory today, Mr, 
Jack B. Ludwig. instructor in Eng- 
lish, delivered the final lecture 
in ihe Faculty Lecture Series, Mr, 
Ludwig's talk entitled. "Art and 
The Audience", pointed out the 
attitude of the modem public's 
attitude toward modern literature. 

Mr. Ludwig accredited the ori- 
gin of the present attitude toward 
modern literature to the change 
from art as art to art as a craft. 
This was brought about when au- 
thor:; '"pped writing for the de- 
sires o ,5atrons, and yielded to the 
requirements of the publisher, the 
reader and the reviewer. 

He then pointed out the diverse 
schools of thought about modern 
writing, sa.ving that literature is 
called obscure, unrealistic, and in 
some cases fantasy. He concluded 
with the statement that the scien- 
tist gets complete freedom and is 
never .judged for his accomplish- 
ments, and all that the artist asks 
is not to be pre-judged. 



donnelly Receives 
Police Force Post 



Inspechon to Empliasize 

Clean Eating Facilities 

Sanitary Provisions 



Saturday, Mar. 22 — After many 
years of apathy toward the sani- 
tation problem of Willlamstown's 
restaurants and drugstores, the 
Board of Health has decided to 
undertake a "clean up or shut 
down" campaign. This action is 
being directed by chairman Lois 
Demayo. and he will be assisted by 
Dr. Thomas Urmy, who recently 
became a member of the board. 

Last f;ill all restaurants in this 
area received a special sta'^e in- 
spection, after which it was re- 
ported that, although 70"- of them 
were in respectable condition, the 
remainn;': 30';; needed much im- 
provemmt. Some establishments 
received scores as low as fifty out 
of a po : ible one hundred points. 
Individual Scores Not Released 

No flf ures for individual res- 
taurant^ will be released, since the 
Board ol Health hopes that it can 
accomplish what is needed in a 
"gentleman-like" manner. In gen- 
eral the cleanliness of the facili- 
ties and the sloppy handling of 
the food are the two things which 
must bf improved. 

During the last few years this 
same problem has arisen numer- 
ous times, but lack of action by 
town officials resulted in no im- 
provements. The Board has mow 
taken complete control and has 
the authority to force action from 
the drugstores and restaurants. 

As a part of the general "clean- 
up" and sanitation program, the 
Board plans to conduct a rabies 
clinic sometime next week. 



Sanford's Mission 
To Hold Opening 
Gathering Sunday 

'Faith Healing' Couple 
To Present Ten Talks 
At St. John's Church 



Gendarmerie Purchases 
New Pontiac Cruiser 



The faculty house is run by a 
Board of Governors, headed by 
Prof. AUyn J. Waterman. Under 
this group are several committees 
including the entertainment com- 
mittee headed by Prof, Richard 
O. Rouse. This group sponsors 
square dances, Friday night open 
houses, and occasional lectures. 
Individual professors often hold 
informal discussion groups in the 
building to supplement ordinary 



classroom work. 

Contrary to current rumors the 
kitchen is not staffed by an ex- 
chef from the Ritz or by a rela- 
tive of Harry Hart. Mrs. Stack- 
poole is the housekeeper, and she 
hires extra help only on special 
occasions. About twenty men eat 
at the house dally although the 
whole faculty is Invited. Member- 
ship is automatic to all faculty 
See Page 4, Col. 3 



Saturday. Mar. 22 — The Wil- 
liamstown Police Department, 
which hitherto has never consist- 
ed of more than three men, had 
its compliment raised to four last 
week with the appointment of 
Patrolman Archie W. Donnelly. 
Donnelly received a pei'manent 
position on the force following an 
interview with Chief of Police 
George Royal and a vote of the 
town selectmen. 

Of the three candidates who 
applied for the opening, only Don- 
nelly had any previous police ex- 
perience. He has held the post of 
special officer for the past five 
years while working as a plumber 
and steam fitter in North Adams, 
holding the office of vice-presi- 
dent of the Plumbers and Steam 
Fitters Union. Local 578. At the 
present time he is attending 
weekly P, B, I. classes In North 
Adams. 

Steve Polrot at Police School 

Another member of the force. 
Patrolman Steve Polrot. has tak- 
en a short leave of absence to at- 
tend an Intensive four week course 
at the State Police School in 
Framlngham. Entirely voluntary, 
the school Is open to all law en- 
forcement personnel who wish in- 
struction In various specialized 
phases of police procedure. 

Chief Royal also announced the 
acquisition by the department of 
a new Pontiac sedan .which will 
be put Into service as soon as in- 
stallation of a 2-way radio Is com- 
pleted. 



Saturday, Mar, 22— "The Power 
of God in Daily Living", a preach- 
ing and healing mission conducted 
by the Reverend aird Mrs, Edgar 
Sanford. will center around a 
series of services at the St. John's 
Church, March 23-27. 

Operating on the principle that 
the diseases of many people lie in 
their minds, not in their bodies, 
the mission alms (o help individ- 
uals apply faith to everyday life. 
The leaders of the mission claim 
they see "no conflict between the 
use of spiritual means in healing 
and medical practice". 
Not a Cult 

Mrs. Sanford asserts that the 
mission is not a cult or a fad and 
it does not bear any relation to 
Christian Science. Interested in 
theories only as they apply to the 
practice of healing, she beli-Eves 
that "the church universal is suf- 
ficient framework for the develop- 
ment of the recreating power of 
God." 

Author of "Healing Light" and 
"Oh. Watchman' Mrs. Sanford 
claims to have Iconed "through 
experiment and ijvayer those ad- 
.iustments to Gori that set free 
His power to heal". "Healing 
Light", which has sold nearly 
100,000 copies, tells of various 
people she has heliied and healed. 
Conduct Classes 
Although Mi^Satpford is the 
rector of parl^nSm 'Westboro and 
Hopklnton. Mass.. Mrs. Sanford 
conducts classes and gives lectures 
In several cities and other commu- 
nities The Reverend and Mrs. San- 
ford have Just returned from a 
mission in Charlotte. S, C. and 
similar conferences have been 
held throughout the United States 
and in England and Canada. 

The mission has scheduled a 
morning talk each day by Mr. 
Sanford. followed in the evening 
by a series of lectures by Mrs 
Sanford. Holy Communion viU 
also be celebrated Aach morning. 



l^ai 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATUHDAV, MARCH 22, 1952 



f tjc Willing l^S0fi^ 

North Adams, Massachusetts A/illinmstown, Massachusetts 

"Entered as second class matter Novprnhc 27, 19*11, at the post office at 
North Adams, Massacfnjsetts, under the A' r of March 3, 1879." Printed by 
Lamb and Hunter, Inc., North Adc nb, Mossachusetts, Published 

N^'ednesdoy and Saturday during the college ear. Subscription price $5.00 
per vear. Record O^hru, Jesup Hall. Willinm- ov 
RECORD Office - Phone 72 

EDITORIAL BOARD 
John H. Allon '53 
Charles E. Longe '5 3 

Richard C. Porter '53 

Woodbridge A. D'Oench '53 

Thomas A. Belshe '53 

Kay Kolligian, Jr '53 

Frederick A. Terry, Jr. '53 



Editor - Phone 981 -JK 
Editor 

Managing Editors 

News Editor 

Sports Editors 

Feature Editor 



\ oluiiR* XLVl 



March 22, 1952 



NumhtT J 3 



EDITORIAL 

Hang on the Bell, Nellie . . . 

\l(>n(la\', till' .uliiiiiiistratidii aiiiiimiici'il its new set ul social lulcs 
to the C'oii.sti'niatioii of some and to tlic ri'llcl of others. It was evi- 
dent that the situation deinancled a ehaime h)r some time l)eeanse 
ol tile e\'er inereasiiiy; disregard tor student social rnles. Student 
jfowrmiient was nnahle to eope ade(|natelv uith the situation, and 
the Dean's Oltiee and the Oiseipline (.'ominittee were loncd to 
.step in. The new rules re|)resent almost entireU a desirabli' step 
toward an imprmeinent o\-er the social situation that existed prior 
to Mouihiv niL;ht. \t iiiiK' one point do we dissent IVom auri'einent 
with the remilatioiis and think that a niore liberal snbslitiiti' wonld 
he better. 

Kstablishin-^ (lie i;nest card s\'stein to close Williams week- 
ends to the uninvited, 'prolessional' weekentler will ipiiet down 
lionseparties ami result in what is a more pleasant time for a 
laiije number ol Williams men. Since other colleges are '^I'ini^ to 
institute the same svstem and since the collen<' is still allouini^ a 
number of quests (the exact figure is b\- no means sacred for all 
time) to come to Williams on housepart\- weekends. Miere is no 
reason to find fault with this rule. Indeed, the undernradnates 
must aid die Dean's Office in seeint; that this rule is carried out in 
order to make Williams weekends more enjoyable. I'olice are 
iiecessar\- to enforce this rule, hir Iraternitx- officers. Iia\ ini; dates 
themselves in man\' cases, wonld be powerless ai;aiiist a mob of 
outsiders who wished to muscle their wa\' into a house dance. 

The restrictions placed on Suiida\ lraternit\' social lunetions 
diirint; hoiisepart\ are easib' understandable. Tliex were put into 
effect niainlv to maintain the obser\aiice of tlii' traditional mores 
ol the town. The new role will not cut down on the actual amiiunt 
of partvini;. but will only lessen outside noise. The tovMispeopU^ 
at least deserve this much. 

The new regulations on lionse taxes for li(|iior make certain the 
riiilit of each individual to choose for liimsell whellier or not he 
will drink. This rule will not alter apprcciabb' the campus situation, 
but it will t;i\e e\('r\- student the ueniiine op])ortnnit\- to decide 
for himself what kind of a time he is sjoiiii; to ha\"e on a Williams 
weekend. N'o bouse needs to lia\c more than fi\e occasions per 
\'ear that rei|nire a blanket house tax. (.'asli-on-the-barrel b\' onlv 
those who want to particiiiate is the onb' wa\' to be lair to all. 

Regular Weekend Curfew . . . 

The ureat maioritv of tlie rnles have a i^ood deal of reason be- 
hind them. The drinkini; tax rule insures tlu' riijht of a i^erson 
to exercise his own personal jndtjment. the i;nest card rule will 
eliminate one of the i;reatest .sources for tlu' dei;en(ration of Wil- 
liams lionseparties. (|nietiii'4 Snnda\' lesti\ities will |ilease the 
towns|5eo|ile. and the eaih Siindax' in'uht curfew for h(nisepart\' 
weekends will sjet things back to normal at a more reasonable 
time. But the new curfew lor ici^nlar weekend iii<^hts is too harsh. 
Except lor the trianmial lionseparties. Williams is a prettv dead 
place socialK'. This lack ul social activity causes a mass exoilns 
from the campus e\er\- uerkend, while those that do stav in Wil- 
liamstown ha\e nowhere to yo besides their fraternitv houses. 
Massachusetts blue laws prevent students from ijoini; out to nearln- 
bars, and so tliev must make the longer trip to New York State il 
thev want to stav out )iasl the house deadline. This will jirobalilv 
end in a i)roblem that is ol iiiiich greater concern tlian the amoniit 
of adverse publicit\' thai llie later curfew caused. lionseparties 
were a problem that needed to be checked, but ret;ular weekend 
beha\ ior presented no e\ idence that a clianm' was needed. Staiid- 
ardi/iiit; the curfew hours lor all honsi's helps ]ire\ent confusion. 
Iiiit cnttin'4 down the lidiirs for women in the fraternities to 1 a.m. 
liears shades of the "lights out. it's ten oeloek. boys ' routine thai is 
fittinji; for a vonnyer i;i"ii|'. W<' f*''"' t'l-'t •> 2;00 a.m. curfew would 
be more sensible and all ".^ether within the riijlits ol collef;<' a'^e 
people who ha\e not '^is.ii fair cause for this particular stvinfi;enc\. 

However, the new Williams social rnles arc now in efhet. 
Mass breakini; of these lules will lead only to a t;reater number of 
dismissals. We think nll■^l of the rules are an improvenient, but 
as hir the reynlar weekrnd curfew hours, we concur with the idea 
ol Lincoln when he said 'We think the . . . decision is erroneniis. 
We know that the court lliat made it has often (nerruled its own 
dieisions. and we shall do what we can to have it overrule this. We 
offer no resistance to it." 



Blue Law Survey ... 

The administration must be told that diis solution is not accep- 
table to the student body. In turn, tlie student body must take 
some positive action on its own part to reiiiedv the |rrobl<'m. 

Pflc SIitHii^ '.5.'1 Deke: In lii;ht of the alarmini; number of 
incidents and ijrievances marriny cnrrent Williams social life. I 
feel that the new disciplinary regulations were ine\ital)le. Some 
new rnles were needed; the administration has satisfied this need 
perhapv to a seemin^K <hastic depee in some cases. Now that 
these measures liave been imposed, it is up to the students, re<r;i|.d. 
less ot their |)ersonal opinions, to ni\e the regulations the guts tliev 
re(|uire to be effecti\e. 

John Iimr/i '.5.5. Sie I'hi: These new rules that onr admin- 
istration has showered mi us are a fine example of the (ironiession 
in society tliat has been developiiii; over the ])ast se\eral vears — 
proi;ression into a iioli' ' state, where all your friends are picked 
for \oii and all voin- ,r iions are watched to see that thev do not 
varv with the pattern .et 1)\' the yoxeriiini; l)od\'. This college is 
suppose to train us for the world, and if this is what we arc to face 
I do not want any part of it. 

Hrrl) Smith '.5.3. Saint; By the time a boy or yirl reaches the 
eolleUe asje, it liardb seems necessary to impose on them the 
strict first-date curfew of the fonrteen-vear-ojd. 

Chris Wliitr '.5.3. Zela Psi-Tlie new rules seem an indircet 
attack on the iii()ffensi\e heterosexual activity whidi exists on 
campus todav. I can ;iccept passively the "sjuesl" rnles and (may 
Carrie Nation pin a lose on me) (hinkinn rules, l)nt niv very 
haecceitas rebels at;aiust the red fap-a-Na/i aiitlioritarianisin of I 
the curfew. The Iiasis lor the limitations imposed on visitint; (|uail | 
seems non-existent in Ihe lielit of the low Kin.sev ratini; here 'bouts. I 
Charles ()r\ille MotI .53. ;ilthoiinh dceliru'nij comment on this poll, 
was so helirlesslv, utterly ;uid nneontrollabl\- mad, he said to me; 
"I'm so helplessly, utterly, and mieontrollalilv mad!". Mv lesiiltant 
feelint's niav be snmmari/ed in the immortal words spoken at 
Kitty Hawk, N. C, in UX)"; ",SIie won't never fly, Orville." 



Letters to the Editor 



1066 AND ALL THAT 

To the Kditor of the HKCOlil); 

The manner in which the new rules were imposed upon the 
student IiikK' makes a niockerv of the idtniistie prolest;itioii that 
student noverniiicnt exists to cmmi tlu' slinlitesl decree at Wil- 
liiuMS. Hules ;ue made to correct evils. The onlv reason we can as- 
sign to the admiiiistratioii's reticence to explain the Iciiiale curlew 
clause is their desiie to side-step eiiibmassiiii; dociiuienlation. 
The iiKiture man castini; even a cnrsorv i;laiiee ;U the new rules 
can discern tlu' tliouiihts which losteri'd them. 

It is always me;iiiini;ful to look to the past hir tried and practi- 
cal solntiuns to prohlenis. Mcilieval mores, though nccasioiudlv 
unwieldy, always faced social difficulties with laudable straii^bl- 
lorvvartlness ami simplicity. .No I'uibarasscd skirtini; ol the icnlral 
problem hv our h'udal hirheais! Thev iiiveutcti a device which can 
lie turned to with lbc> assnrily of past success: the chastity belt. 
.\nv u;i)veriiiu'j, hod\ which, recoiling Irom the pi'rlidiousness ol 
its iivvii tlionnlits. obtains solace in restrictiun the actions ol others, 
would do well to resort to such mechanical salei;uards. 

I'lowiiii; thr(ii|ij;b the nioniss of recent administrative einbar- 
assinent, the esseiiti;d issue is obvious. Thi' suliitidu is even more 
obvious. If the problem the administration implies exists in lact, 
the curlevv is but a harrvinj; force; if the pruhleui does not exit 
neillier slioulil the curlew, 

lioherl Hruce Carrinnton '.52 
C;liarles l'"r;uicis Nasoii, |r. '.52 
liruce Ihuniltun Palmer '5-1 



To Ihe I'dilor of the RKa)RD; 

The student both' of Williams should be justK alarmed at the 
eucroachment of the .Administration upon uiideri;radnate rit^lits. 
The new conduct rules, spetihcally Ihe limilation ol Irateruitv 
parlies and the eiiforceiiieiit ol an arhitrarv iiirli'W. are uncalled 
tor. (.,'apilali/iii,n on the impression left bv a draiii;ilic and tr;i<j;ic 
Wiiitei- Carnival, the culletje hopes to push llirout;h a set ol rci^u- 
lalious which will limit to some dci^ri'c Ihe Ireedom ol tlu' stiulent. 
The important point is not that the possibility ol evasion miij;ht 
still exist niidi'r these new rules, but that the college is takini; oul 
of the sludent's hands the rit^ht to dircrt bis own iiehav ior. 'I'lu'sc 
rules V iolatt' the principles of personal responsibility which Wil- 
liams trii's to bister in tlie iiuik'iu;iadiiale. ;\s we learn in onr l'',ph 
Williams llaiiilhook— "It is the aim of the collei^e to develop in 
the students a sense of personal respoiisibibtv lor t;o(id order. The 
colleL;e insists on i;ood taste luid i;enlleinanly conduct. 'I'lie rules 
are lew and explicit. . ." Not only are these new restrictions con- 
trary to ihe spirit of the schoiil. but the\- will punish the whole 
for ilie tnnis'j;ressioii of a distinct minority. 

I ask what these rules hope to cure, except )iossiblv to show 
the iiidi<,;iiatioii ol a rii;hteoiis faculty. .\re they worried about 
the fraternitv curfew hecause their i)ii])ils aren't ijettini; I'lioueb 
sleep or hceause of rmnored promiscnitvr' 1 think not. Do thev 
think bv enmeshing a social function or parly in red tape and reg- 
ulalion. they are curing an ev il? I doubt it. Not only are these new 
rnles unjiislified and pointless as a cure, but they presuppost' an 
evil that does not I'.xisl. 

.Mso. if we must have new rules, wliy not have the collei;<' 
state the specilic grievances and situations vvliicb it wishes reme- 
died to Ihe Underyradnate (aiuncil, and then let Ihe I'C and the 
student liodx' determine what ri'i^ulatiou it thinks ahsohilely lue- 
essarv to remedy the specific evil 'I'o m;ike the \JC. merely a 
strong arm man lor an athninistration dictalum iiiiderim'iies Ihe 
initiative as well as the responsibility h>r effective stiulent noveiii- 
ment. 

What I would like answered is: 

(1) What are the specific f^rievaiices which make the 

rnles necessary':' 
Does tlie .Ulministratiou reallv believe that their new 

rnles will cure some existing evil':' 

If rei^ulation is reallv necessary, why can it not eon;e 

from our own Underi;raduate Council in which we 

have some voice'? 

Peter (Josirriff '53 



(2) 
(•3) 



To the Kditor of the HECORD: 

Cheers for T. II. Irwin 18 and his line letter! Ills kind ol star- 
spaiiiiled. 100 |ier cent .\mericiui thiiikini; is just what tlu' doelor 
ordered to protcet us eloiidv-lieaded voimt;iiiis trom the salinon- 
cdlored Ueaction of E(|n;ditv that links evervvvliere these days, 

Mr. Irwin is really on his toes all rinlil; the Iriiternitv system 
dues indeed pre])ure our untried, t^rav-flanncled souls hir th" 
s(|iiared circle ol life, and as such is a real blcssini^. Rejection 
is sometliiiii; we're all bound to face eventuallv, whetber it con- 
cerns the T<'m|ieraiice Leaj^ne or the North Kickapiio (aill Club 
and Maieliiiig Society. 

Rut while the traternities are nobly doiiii; their |)art in sliow- 
inH the thorny road ahead, tlie le;icliiim melliods here at Williams 
are woefully inadeipiate in this vital department and even redo- 
lent of l''(|ualitarian doctrines. The hicidtv pi'rsisls in wasting 
valuable lime with abstruse intellectual trivia, when what thev 
should he doinu; is teachiuii us how not to be rejected bv clain|->iii'4 
ddvvu and dispensiui^ E grades to the dullards who don't sport 
white bucks (scuffed, prc'ferablv) ;iiid at least uiie change of 
blue denim. With tlie lesson ol lejeclion in the classroom, wed nil 
he ready to face the sniuu; fates in jinlime. 

I do hoiic that sometbing will lie (hiiie soon along these lines 
because, just now I'm worried sick that society will be too much 
hir a |ioo tvro like me c(>iue,graduatioii. Thanks again to Mr. Irwin 
and bis muse, William Loeb. 

E. S. Liiiett. '53 



The Adams Memorial Theatre 

WILLIAMS COLLEGE Williamstown, Mass. 
Presents 

HENRY IV 

(THE LIVING MASK) 
by Luigi Pirandello 

Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 
March 26, 27 and 28 

8:30 Sharp Ticket $1.00 tax exempt 

For Reservation Phone Williamstown 538 



SKI 

MAD RIVER GLEN 

liE.sr IN SPRING: 

\ lime of corn snow and tan- 
ning sun. Chair l,ifl midway 
station ;ill(iws yon lo ski <iu 
upper elevations where snow 
Lists loug<'st. I'or fol<lers: 
\l;id Hiver (;leii, Waitsfield, 
\ermoul 



III The "Snow Corner" 
iij Sew Eiifihiml 



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On sal* at 5 p.m. on oil 
Williamstown Newsstands 



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INCORPORATED 



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Prearranged Independent or 
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Rosasco's Travel Agency, Inc. 

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Phone 399 90 Main St 



W A L D E N 



SUNDAY & MONDAY 
Burt Lancaster in 

"TEN TALL MEN" 

in Technicolor 
added- Mc McGoo Cartoon and Tom and Jerry 

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY 
J. Arthur Rank's 

''The Clouded Yellow" 

Starring Jean Simmons 

NOTE - 2 Evening Performances for the above 
Features at 7:15 and 9:10 

THURSDAY & FRIDAY 
2 Big Features 

"DOUBLE DYNAMITE" 

With Groucho Marx and Jane Russell 
also "WARPATH" in Technicolor 




Look! Another man switched to Kentucky Club— 
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pIpcK mil how lo gn Ihcm al big Mvlnga. Mall 
Pouch Tobacco Co., « hcpling. Well Va. Depl. 39 



i 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATUH13AY, MAHCH 22, 1952 



Golf, Lacrosse Squads 
Prepare to Head South 



Captain Squires 



MacManusJaylor 
ToTopCandidates 

imksmen to Tour 
Southern Colleges 

.Siiturday, March 22— Eiiilil iis- 
|)i.:uit.s to the Viii-sily Golf SdUiUl 
^;,] iouniey below the Musoii- 
l)i\i)ii Unp m'Xt wi't'keiul lo com- 
pile In Uuee malclies on tlieii- 
iiiiuuul sprint! Viiciitlon trip. Re- 
luvnini! U'tleimen Flunk M;ic- 
Maiius. Ted 'I'liyloi', Don Rand 
;,iiil Jim Tompkins will lead the 
LiiMcland invasion, as the Rolfeis 
jii'iiiiey to Southern Pines, Chaiiel 
HiH and Charlottesville lo nieei 
til,' South's outstanding linksmen. 

Siiulliern Pines. North Ca'rolin.i 
uill be the Purple Golfers first 
siiip where they will spend three 
(Ijys uettinu in shape, Thursday 
iii;d Friday will find Coach Bax- 
ters forces at Chapel Hill where 
lliry meet Duke and North Caro- 
lina on successive days. A meet 
uiili Viruinia at Charlottesville on 
Saturday will close out the 'rip. 

romposinf! the .squad lo make 
till trip, in addition to the four 
See Pane 4. Col. 2 

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SITA 



Steinbrenner Enters 
U.S. - Canadian Meet 

iVIuntreal, rnday. March 21 
Captain Georwe Sleinbren- 
ner is the only Williams entry 
in the International Invitation- 
al Championships. The meet, 
lealurlny a picked Broup of 
American and Canadian .stars, 
will be held in Monlit'al's For- 
um, and is one of the indoor 
season's annual highlights. 
Stcuibrenner will represent the 
U. S. A. in the 50 yard high 
and low hurdle events, a.s he 
did a year ago. 

The meet promises lo be 
very close and a lop altraclion 
of the board season for thous- 
ands of Canadian fans. Last 
year the U S. .squeaked oul a 
one point triumph by virtue of 
a sweeij in the mile event by 
Don Gehrmann. Fred Will, 
and Don McEwen. This year. 
Will and Gehrmann will again 
be enlered. aloiiB with many of 
the top Olympic prospects of 
both countries. 



Townsend Plans 
Four Game Trip 

L'Hommedieu Leads 
Returning Veterans 

Saturday, Mar. 22— "The calen- 
dar may say it's spring, but I'd 
feel moi-c at home with my ski 
team right now." Thus was the 
«ry comment of lacros.se coacli 
Ralph Townsend as he ruefully 
, watched a fresh fall of snow force 
;inollier indoor practice session 
I for his 45-man .squad. 
I The new mentor, whose back- 
I log of lacrosse experience other 
tlian as a spectator is limited lo 
I one year of freshman tutoring, 
• lias due cause for concern. A rug- 
ged four-game spring trip, which 
will pit ihe Ephmcn against 
Army ilndoorsi, Maryland, North 
Carolina, and Virginia at two-day 
intervals, begins Saturday. The 
See Page 4. Col. 2 



Dekes, ADs Clinch Hoop Titles; 
Faculty Sets Hot Volleyball Pace 



- 94» FIFTH *V(., NEW TOMC t? • MU 7-02I4 



By Pete Goldman 

By virtue of victories in division- 
al playoff games, the AD's and the 
Dekes clinched their ri'speclive 
league crowns in intramural bas- 
ketball play, and advanced to the 
post-vacation encounter for ^he 
college championship. 

The AD s squeezed oul a 24-22 
win over tlie stubborn Chi Psi's 
on Tuesday lo break the firsl- 
lilace deadlock while the Dekes 
counlei-cd with a 24-17 victory a- 
gainst the Phi Gams to wrap up 
the Tuesday League title. 



Meanwhile, the faculty entry 
in the Monday-Wednesday intra- 
mural volleyball looi) jumped oul 
ahead of the pack with victories 
ill their first two games. Led by 

I the front-line slams of Al Shaw 
and Frank Bell and the field gen- 

I eralship of geologist Robert Rams- 
dell, the faculty downed the Kaps 
in their curtain-rai.scr and went on 
to o\er\ylielm the Phi Dells on 
Wednesday. 
Elsewhere in Monday-Wednes- 

[ day competition, the AD's dropped 

i See Page 4. Col. 3 




Squashmen Elect 
Richard Squires 



Purple Star to Captain 
Team For '53 Season 



■Wednesday, March 19 — Richard 
C. Squires '53. who since his 
freshman year has been a leader 
in Williams racket sports, was 
unanimously elected captain of 
the 1952-3 Squash Team al an 
after-dinner meeting al Coach 
Chaffee's home. This year Squires 
lost only two matches in the regu- 
lar sea.son and bowed lo top-seed- 
ed Charlie Uflord of Harvard in 
the finals of the IntercoUegiates. 
Al the tournament he was elect?d 
President of the Intercollegiate 
Squa.sh As.socialion. 

Despite the fact that Squires 
came to Williams with almost no 
experience in squash he developed 
rapidly under the tutelage of 
Chaffee. 

Roikwood Winner 

In tennis Squiies has won the 
j Rockwood Cup for three consecu- 
tive years. He teamed up with 
Tom Kent last spring to win 
the New England Inlercollegiale 
Doubles Championship, losing to 
Amherst's Wesley in the .singles. 



HEADLINER 



- Al Jarvis. U)o. 

i>t so quickly — the men nut 

^ from the sidelines — theiie 
'^ ho mold and inspire their 

recall with little diffirulty, 

ive given more than their 
(allege has been proud to 
~.ky, C'harlie Caldwell, and 

mentors. And there is still 
ilcpended on him, Clarence 
.irmth of friendship which 



CHESTERFIELD-umsr 



MARYLAND 



SELUHG CIGARETTE IN AMERICA'S COLLEGES 



hij Kiiij Kiillifiiun, jr. 

IN THE HISTORY of Williams College, there have been a num- 
ber of outstanding figures in the field of sports, men who have 
lai.sed Williams lo the place it now occuple^ m the small college ranks. 
Immediately brought lo mind are such pi rformers as Harry Fisher. 
Benny Boynton. Pete DeLisser. slashing and crashing their way to 
fame; and there was Bill Fowlc. Bill I'ult 

But there are those you don't think 
present on the field, but wat^liini; anxious 
are the minds behind the teams, the men 
players. Williams fans, younjf and ctid ea 
a long line of uutstandini; eoiches Hh<i 
share in developing men which Williani>. 
claim. "Uncle .lack" Coombs, Tony Fla 
Ken Watters are hut a few of tlie color! ii 
another. To those who have known and 
(liafTec has provided a leadership and \ 
will not be forgotten, 

IN 1924, Challee graduated from Brov.n University where he had 
earned letters in football, basketball, ba.seball. and tennis. He 
reminisces about the time when the Brown basketball team travelled 
to Williamslowii back in 1924. "The great Harry Fi.sher was playing 
for Williams thai year," Chafe recalls, "and we got killed, 41-11." 
Chafe, I might add. playing forward foi the Bruins scored nine of 
their eleven points. Chaffee earned himself a top position on the tennis 
team in his junior year, and thus embarked on his court career. For 
two years he played in Ihe number one and two spots for Brown. 

In 1937, Clarence Chaffee came to Williams. Omitting the war 
years, during which he served as an .Air lorce Major, Chafe has had 
ten seasons in tennis and s(iuash here at Williams, in addition to three 
.\ears as head soccer coich. In Tennis, h' has compiled a truly amaz- 
ing record, taking six Little Three Chamiiionships. Against Amherst, 
his teams have won eight of the ten mairhes. 

IT WAS in 1946. Chaffee's first ,y< , ; back after the war. that 
Williams rmished second behind ;. powerful Yale team in the 
IntercoUegiates. Dick Hole and Fred Scnijner, playing in Ihe doubles 
finals, were on the verge of victory with a number of match points, 
but the two Yale greats. Carl Badger and Billy Ylivasaker edged them 
in the grueling four hour marathon whicli ended after 72 games. Five 
limes. Williams has walked off with the N E. I doubles championship, 
and twice with ihe singles crown. 

Our victory against North Carolina last Spring was, in Chafe's 
mind his greatest team victory. The match with Amherst was almost 
e(|ually as gratifying as Dick Stiuires and Tommy Kent slammed Billy 
Smith and Kd Wesley of Amherst preventing the Jeffs from taking the 
< uvcted "Eight-Point" Trophy. 

IN SQUASH two years ago. the win over Harvard's lop national 
ranking team marked another great moment in Ihe career of 
the Williams coach. Thai team, led by such stand-outs as Captain 
I-fichie Allen and Rog Dickinson "was the finest team I ever coached." 
.■^aid Chafe. "Four of the men had never held a squash racket before 
they came to Williams." And by the time Ihey left, they could be 
ranked with the best. "In Rog Dickinson, I found the greatest competi- 
tor I've ever had the privilege to cosich. He'd go for anythin cause 
he never wanted to be beaten." 

Dick Squires. "Soapy" Symington, and Captain Hank Norton will 

provide the nucleus for the 1952 

squad, with a number of promis- 
ing sophomores coming fast. On 
Sec Page 4, Col. 2 





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*FROM THE REPORT OF 



*iiil***ifc»««iii»M. 



' "It happens every time he for- 
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ManhatUns!'' 

Af60S%. 

AROMATIC tITTERS 

MAKES BETTER DRINKS 

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— lor adding ttsi lo joups and taiuet.. 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 1952 



Rat Chase Fails 
To Trap Animal 

Monstrous Rodent Lurks 
In Morgan Basement 

by Les Nichols 

Friday, March. 21- Nerves of 
students In MorKiin Hall neared 
the breaking point today as a de- 
termined investigation by college 
officials failed for tlif tilth straight 
day to locate what one terridsid 
student described as "the biggest 
lat I ever saw." 

Panic-stricken students, dissat- 
isfied with the efforts of Superin- 
tendent of Buildings and Grounds 
Peter Welanetz's hand - picked 
crew in combing the cellar of the 
dormitory, threatened to take 
matters into their own hands. 

Morganites I'anicked 

Discovering the rat last Sunday 
on the third floor, Tim Tully '55 
estimated the rodent to' be "at 
least 15 inches long and 6 inches 
thick." Tully claims that the rat 
ran out of an old rug, and dis- 
appeared down a hole in the floor. 
An investigation by Chief Royal 
determined the opining to be 
exactly 2 13/16 inches wide. 

Almost immediately after TuUy's 
discovery, students from all over 
the building reported seeing 
rambling rodents of various sizes 
on landings, in halls, and in bath- 
rooms. Blind leads required sev- 
eral hours' investigation before all 
of the wary frosh would return to 
their rooms. Tlie most promising 
lead, however, was eliminated 
when a search of the closet used 
by the building's cleaning ladies 
to store their equipment failed to 
reveal mice, rats, or any other 
form of diversion. 

Bob Carey '55, under police 
questioning, claims to have heard 
"unusual scratchings" near his 
room for several weeks prior to 
the appearance of the rat, but, 
attributing the disturbance to the 
shuffling of cards in the next 
room, never mentioned it. Local 
police liave requested a geiger 
counter from the. state police, m 
the hope that the mysterious nois- 
es will lead them to the fugitive 



Headliner ... 

ihe southern trip, an 11 game 
sehcdiilc is on tap before getting 
into the regular season. Having 
lost six of his Hrst nine from last 
ye.r's team, Chaffee has set to 
work in an attempt to come up 
with another winning squad. Ills 
final comment: "I've never beaten 
■Vale yet in tennis. I've beaten all 
the rest — and I want to get Yale, 
too!" 

Here's Hoping! 



Golf . . 



veterans of last year's New Eng- 
land championship team, are Ed 
Mauro, Tom Belshe, Steve Kauf- 
man and Manager Bruce Bracken- 
ridge. These four are the outstand- 
ing contenders for the two unfilled 
positions on the six-man team, 
with Mauro. the star of last year's 
Frosh team, conceded the best 
chance. 

Coach Dick Baxter feels that 
the team has excellent potential 
m spite of the loss of Bill Rodie, 
New England Individual Champ- 
ion. 



Lacrosse . . . 

regular campaign opens April 26 
at Yale. 

13 Lettermen Back 

Townsend is cautiously non- 
committal about Eph prospects 
this spring, but is obviously pleased 
by a large preliminary turnout of 
45 candidates, almost double that 
of a normal spring-football year. 

Included are 13 returning letter- 
men from last year's varsity whicli 
won four and lost three: defense- 
men Pete Ingersoil. Dick Ca/e, 
and Capt. Ptge L'Hommedieu; 
midfielders Hodge Markgraf, Duke 
Curtis, Neil Cha.se, Ed Shudt, and 
Ted Johnson; attackmen Ted 
Mitchell, Steve Whittier, Dave 
Harrison, and Bruce Van Dusen; 
and goalie John Sylvester. 

A host of candidates, headeu 
by goalie Rod Starke, are on hand 
from the freshman team which 
Townsend piloted to a 4-1 mark 
last spring. Also back are Tony 
Stolz, Cal Collins. Don Bayer, Lar- 
ry Donoho, Dave West, Stu Chase, 
Hugh Murphy. Dave Wliiteford. 
and Jolin Loomis. 



Intramural . . . 

the Plii Sigs and the Zetes, while 
the Psi U's kept pace by downing 
! Beta and Phi . Sig. The Betes 
handed the Kaps their second 
straight loss on Wednesday, while 
the Phi Delts prepped for the 
faculty contest with a win over 
tlie hapless Zetes. 

Phi G.ims Take Two 
In Tuesday-Thursday league tKe 
'hi Gams opened with trlumplis 
over the Dekes and the Saints, 
while D. Phi waylaid the Sigs and 
the Theta Delts; DU clipped Chi 
Psi and Sig Phi. The Theta Delts 
had opened with a victory over the 
Saints, and the Dekes came back 
to trounce the Chi Psi's on Thurs- 
day. 

Commenting on his team's sav- 
age play, one faculty star said, 
"Nice guys don't win pennants. We 
may not take the championship, 
but you can bet we'll have a hustl- 
ing ball club all the way." In ad- 
dition to the trio of Shaw. Bell 
and Ramsdell, the faculty starters 
included "Hammerln' Hank" 
Flynt, Dave Pynchon. Galen Jones 
and George "the giant" Dorion 

Faculty Club . . . 

members, and some local citizens 
are invited to join. 

Wlien he turned the keys over 
to President Baxter on January 
6. 1939. Clark Williams expressed 
the hope that the building would 
be a place where faculty friend- 
ships would be made and would 
increase. 

Contributed to Squash Courts 

Although the faculty house is 
the biggest single memorial to 
Clark Williams, the donor had 
ilso contributed to other projects 
including the squash courts. How- 
ever. Mr. Williams had always 
been especially interested in aid- 
ing the faculty and had often in- 
vited faculty members to visit his 
southern estate. It was in appreci- 
ation for these things that some 
of the faculty members presented 
the donor with the tea and coffee 
service which is now in tlie din- 
ing room. 

In the 13 years since the dedi- 
cation tile building has indeed 
lived up to the hopes of the donor 
— that it would be a place where 
the faculty would gather and 
cement friendships. 



I L.G.Balfour Co. 

I fUATlKNItY ItWtLRY 

1 Stationary Pro9roni« 

Bodgn Ringi Staiiu 

Jawalry Gitii fovon 

Club Pint Kcyl 

Madoli TrophiM 

Writ* or Coil 
CARL SORCNSEN 

30 Murroy Ave Water tord, N Y 
TelephoneTrov ~ Adarrw 8256- 



j/^>./^ 



U^'i 



( 



^ CoHegeWen! 

CHOOSS A WRf SR 

;,„ the U.S. Air force 



AIRCRAFT 
OBSERVER 



Aviation Cadet Program Offers Special Opportunities 
for Collegians Now Preparing for MiHgtary Service 



Here is a real man-size opportunity! You 
can choose — immediately — between being a 
Pilot or Aircraft Observer in America's 
swiftly-expanding Air Force. The Air Force 
encourages candidates to stay in school 
and graduate. However, seniors and stu- 
dents with two years or more of college 
who anticipate early entrance into military 
service can insure their future and serve 
their country best by applying for Aviation 
Cadet Training today. You receive the 
finest training and experience when you fly 
with the U. S. Air Force— experience that 
pays off in later years. 

WHO MAY APPLY 

AGE— Between 19 and 26'/i yeart. 

EDUCATION— At leotl Iwo years of college, 

MARITAL STATUS— Single. 

PHYSICAL CONDITION -Good, especially 

eyes, ears, henrt, and teeth. 

HOW TO QUAUFY 



f . Tnke transcript of col- 

i' fin croditfl and copy of 
l>irl.h certificate to your 
m-areat Air Force Base or 
Uecruiting Station. 




2. Appear for phyeical 
I'Xiiinination at your near- 
est Air Baae at Govern- 
ment expense. 




3* AccompIIflh Flying 
Aptitude Tests and en- 
list for two years onlyl 



, 4* The Selective Service 
I Act awards you a four- 
month deferment while 
awaiting aU«« VAai^n* 
lueut 



5* Immediate assign- 
ment to Aviation Cadet 
Training Classes startuig 
May 27, July 19, August 
19 and Owtober 2, 1952. 



6« Attend Aviation 
Cadet Training School 
for one year — either as 
Pilot or Aircraft Observ- 
er. Get $105 monthly plus 
food, housing, uni/ormst 
and other benefits. 

7* Graduate and win 
your wingal Commis- 
sioned as a second lieu- 
tenant, you begin earning 
$5,000 a year. In addi- 
tion, you receive $250 
uniform allowance and a 
30-day leave with pay. 



WHERE To Get More Details 

VIlH your iworett U. S. Air Force Bote or U. S, Army-U. S. Air 
force »ecruihii» StoKon or write dirtcl to Ayiallon Codot, HoaJ- 
qearleri, U. S. Mr force, tVaiMngtoe 25, D. C 



:ttS. AIR FORCE 




Taconic Lumber & Hardware 

Headquarters for 

Quality Merchandise 

since 1889 

GEORGE W. SCHRYVER 
Telephone 122 



PI 



ensure. 



the sov vei 



of k 



uman 



Alexander Pope, 
January/ aiui Jlay 



To quiet tKinking or quick action, 
ice-coid Coca-Cola luiiigs tlie 
pleasure of real refreshmenti 





BOntEO UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-rn- r -^mpamv n" 

BERKSHIRE COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANT 

"CoAo" II a r»gii^«r«d ^rade-mork. (Q) 195:/, THt COlA-COLA COMPANY 



Campus Interviews on Cigarette Tests 




No. 35.. 
THE LARGEMOUTH 
BASS 




Always a sucker for attractive bait, our aquatic 
brother went off the deep end anti got caught 
on the quick-trick cigarette hook! But he wormed 
his way out when he suddenly realized that 
cigarette mildness can't be tossed off reel lightly. 
Millions of smokers have found, too, there's only 
one true test of cigarette mildness. 
It's the sensible lesl-the 30-Day Camel 
Mildness Test, which simply asks you to try 
Camels as your steady smoke on a day-after-day, 
pack-after-pack basis. No snap judgments! 
Once you've tried Camels for 30 days in your 
"T-Zone" (T for Throat, T for Taste), 
you'll see why . . . 

After all the Mildness Tests... 

Camel leads all other hnmbirAif/Mas 




f hi^ WilU 





l^teofi^ 



WEDNESDAY, MAHC;H 26, 1952 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Debaters to Face \Eisenhower Tops Presidential Poll, Enll Swimmers Scuire fiR PoinK 
Harvard, Norfolk Garnering 57 Per Cent of Votes; C^^ ™ * l?^? ^ , ^^ 

Taft Distant Second, Warren Thirdl^^^^^^P^^r^^OlShLnainpionsmp 



Frosh Team Meets 
Hotchkiss in April 



Wednesday. Maich 26 — Tlie 
Adelphlc Union has scheduled two 
special debates and a touinument 
during the SprlnB vacation, while 
the freshmen debaters will meet 
Holehklss Prep on April 13. 

Riehard Duffleld '52 and Wil- 
liam Brayer '53 will meet Norlolk 
Pri.soii Sunday on the topic, Re- 
solved: That the reserve clause In 
ba.sebull be condemned. They will 
uphold the affirmative. 

To Meet Harvard 

On the same day Walter Flali- 
ert.v '53 and George McAleenan 
•52 will travel to Cambridge to 
meet Harvard University. Williams 
will take the affirmative side of 
the question, Resolved: That the 
United States should send an am- 
ba.s,sndor to the Vatican. 

The topic which has been stress- 
ed this year. Resolved: That the 
United States should adopt a per- 
manent policy of price and wane 
control, will again be di.scu.ssed on 
April 3-5. The Adelphic Union has 
selected Arthur Proctor '52, Rich- 
ard Antoun '53, Donald Goldstein 
'53. and Ronald Dubln '53 for 
the tourney. 

Tourney at Princeton 

The tournament is being held 
at Princeton University and is un- 
der the sponsorship of the Eastern 
Forensic A.s.sociatlon. Proctor and 
Antoun will speak on the nega- 
tive .side of the question and Gold- 
.steiii and Dubin on the affirma- 
tive. 

On April 13 a freshman trio of 
Steve Gorden. William Hoover, 
and Prank Rosenbach will engage 
Hotchki.SK Prep. They will uphold 
the amnnatlve of the topic. Re- 
.solved: That the United States 
was in error in using military 
force in Korea. 

Tomorrow afternoon at five 
o'clock tryouts will be held on the 
top floor of Griffin Hall to pick 
the team for the Williams Tourna- 
ment on April 26-27. Participat- 
ing in this tourney will be Am- 
herst. Weslcyan. Smith, Benning- 
ton. Barnard. Mt. Holyoke, Har- 
vard. Dartmouth. Middlebury. 
Trinity, and Connecticut. 



Poll Results 




Candidate 


No. of Per- 


Cent 




Votes of 




To. 


Votes 


Ei.senhower 


401 


57.1 


Taft 


108 


15.3 


Warren 


24 


3.3 


Truman 


21 


2.9 


Stevenson 


20 


2.8 


W. Douglas 


19 


2.6 


Kefauver 


18 


2.5 


MacArthur 


8 


1.1 


Sta.ssen 


7 


1.0 


Ru.ssell 


6 


0.8 


P Douglas 


6 


0.8 


Others 


50 


7.2 


No Choice 


19 


2.6 



VC Ratifies Names 
Of Committeemen 



Group Discusses Quotas 
At Meeting With Baxter 



Monday, March 24 — Meeting af- 
ter dinner at President Baxter's 
house tonight, the UC approved 
aijpointments to the Discipline and 
Scholastic Committees and discus- 
.sed UC representation for non- 



Democratic Students 
Pick Truman in '52 



Stevenson, W. Douglas 
Trail by Few Votes 



Thursday, March 20— With al- 
most 70 per cent of the student 
body voting today in a RECORD 
liresidential prefeience poll. Gen- 
eral Dwight D. Eisenhower proved 
a 57 per cent favorite, trouncing 
Oliio's Senator Robert Taft by a 
margin of four to one. 

With Eisenhower and Taft mon- 
opolizing almost 72 per cent of 
the campus vote, runners-up Ear! 
Warren. Harry Truman. Adlai 
Steven.son. William Douglas and 
Estes Kefauver garnered only M 
per cent of the ballots cast. 
Other Candidates 

Other candidates who placed in 
the RECORD poll were Dougla.s 
MacArthur. Harold Stas,sen, Paul 
Douglas, and Richard Russell. 
They accounted for 3 per cent of 
the student vote. Widely scattered 
write-in and "no-choice" ballots 
made up 9 per cent of the vote. 

401 students backed winner Eis- 
enhower. 264 Republicans. 120 In- 
dependents, and 17 Democrats. 
Runner-up Taft received 92 Re- 



« ■ ^^2«.a a W'B «w 




Epli swimming stars Don Jones and Dick Martin wiio accounted for 
31 of tlie 68 points scored by ths Ephs in the New Englond Chompionships 
lost weekend. 

New Xoiv^ Shows Promise, Bogs 
Down in Predecessor s Weakness 



Muirmen Sweep 
5 of 10 Events; 
Martin Wins Two 



Bowdoin Distant Second; 

UConn's DeGroot Sets 

Backstroke Record 



clianges in rushing quotas 

The UC plans to meet in New 
York with the Graduate Commit- 
tee on Campus Porblems during 
April to review suggestions of the 
1951-52 Rushing Committee. | 

Quota Changes | 



7)1/ Fred II. .S(r)cA-i/ig 
CollciJc luMiior consi.sts of the gentle ait of prickinf^ .sacred 
l)iil)hk's. Williaiiis stmlciits iir<' cxticniclv delt at this art, as any- 
one who attends the Waldcii will testify. (Or witness Bob Car- 
fraternity member.s and possTble '"''^'''^""' ''' ^"dependent, and 3 rington's dissection of Beniiiiit;t()n College mores in a recent issue 

Democratic votes. of the Record.') Hence there i.s room at Williams for a humor 

Party Choice : magazine, a publication which centers on the job of gracefully 

389 students, more than half iMiderniining all that is supposed lo be reyered: the faculty; the 
voting, declared themselves Re- pmple hills; goat rooms; complete membership sclienies; football; 
publicans. 233 said they were In- fraternity national olHces: the swiMiiiiiiig team; and so on. 
dependents and 72 classified them- Tlie old Cotr was a llo]) because its editors h)rg()t that lam- 

selves Democrats. Republican can- pooniiig is what college students do Iiesf, and because they naiyely 
p ... . • tb . I , didates received about 84 per cent 1 assumed that any remark or cartoon antouiaticallv became hilar- 

„ .„~ • ^ ? i'"';'?^.'" ,, '"^^'"^ of the Independent vote. Only to i ious as soon as it had been iilaced between the c<)\ ers of a maga- 
system mclude Iiftnig the college ' ■■ ! i^ 



Frosh Chem Tops 
New Gut Parade 



History Course Proves 
Tough for Yearlings 



Although many of the freshmen 
taking the ChemLstry la cour.se 
will probably argue quite vehe- 
mently to the contrary, statistics 
released by Dean Scott's office 
prove beyond any doubt that this 
course was the biggest freshman 
■gut." Close behind the 39.1':! of 
enrolled students i-cceiving A's in 
the Chemistry la course were the 
lecords of 29.8 and 16% posted 
''.V Spanish la and History la 
frosh. 

On the other hand, the course 
proving most difficult for a stu- 
dent to rate an honor grade was 
the History l cour.se in which 3 
out of 101 enrolled students re- 
ceived A's. Economics and Air 
Science and Tactics ranked next 
"1 the scarcity of A's. 

Math Proves Hai;dest 

The course producing the great- 
est number of failures during the 
las^ term was Math 1, in which 
15" of the students received the 
Rrade of E. Another thorn in the 
side of many students was Biology 
J In which 9% of the students 
fniled. German 1 and Physics 1 
*e'e next in order of difficulty 
«''fh 7 and 6% respectively failing 
the courses. 

However, many of the courses 
issued no failing grades at all. 
peven coursies, Spanish, Chemistry 
Physics la. History 1 and la, 
»nd Air Science and Tactics gave 
™ E's. The English course, with 
:" ^rollment of 285 students, is- 
'ued only two falling grades. 



quota tor fraternity membership, 
setting new Individual house quo- 



per cent of those polled will be 
able to participate in the cominis 
national election. Poll results. 



tas and eliminatinB the rule which | however, show that there was no 
prevenus Juniors and Seniors from 



becoming fraternity members. 

Robert Shorb '53 heads the 1952 
1953 Discipline Committee which 
includes George Bartlett, Richard 
Duf field and Elliot Curtis, '52; 
Michael Lazor. John Beard. Robert 
Howard and Peter Sterling, '53: 
Rod Starke and Peter Loizeaux. 
'54; and Gary Leinbach '55. 
Preston Heads Committee 

Fred Pieston was appointed 
chairman of the committee for 
investigating the problem of non- 
affiliate representation on the UC 
which may lead to a new means 
of election to the UC for the whole 
campus. 

The members of the 1952-53 
Scholastic Committee are George 
Stege. chairman: John Dighton 
and Dana Carter. 



Jack Rose Buys Out 
Gym Lunch Partner 

New Proprietor Pledges 
Best Possible Service 



appreciable difference between the 
choices of voting and non-voting 
students. 

Among Democratic candidates, 
Illinois's Adlai Stevenson polled 
one vote less than President Ti-u- . Tuesday March 25— Jack Rose 
man. Coming as somewhat oi a welcomes "all the same faces and 
surprise were the 11 write-in votes maybe some new ones" to the Gym 
for Supreme Court Justice Wil- Restaurant, as he rounds out his 
liam Douglas. flrgt full week as new owner. Rose, 

VVrlte-In Choices who recently purchased the local 

The other 56 write-in votes restaurant from Ted Cochinos. be- 
were widely scattered. Mentioned ' came sole proprietor on March 17. 
among them were Senator Paul . Jack and wife Sylvia pledge 
Douglas. Socialist Norman Thorn- their crew of nine to "our best 
as, New Jersey Governor Alfred ■ possible service" and promise that 
Driscoll '25, and members of the ^ they will raise their prices only 
Williams faculty. Senator Robert i when forced to by increased food 
Kerr of Oklahoma, who is an an- j costs. Rose will maintain the 
nounced candidate for the Demo- 1 credit policy of the Gym and in- 
cratic nomination, was the only i tends to continue baking all his 
See Page 4. Col. 4 pastry at the restaurant. 



Pirandello's 'Henry IV to Open at AMT Tonight 
With Conovitz in Lead of Famous Italian Tragedy 



Few Tickets Remain 
For Modern Classic 



Wednesday, March 26 — Ticket.s 
for the Adams Memorial Theatre 
production of Luigi Pirandello'.-^ 
"Henry IV". opening tonight ;it 
8:30. are at a premium, accordin:; 
to Publicity Manager Fiank Week.s 
'53. A limited selection remains 
available for the initial perform- 
ance of the three-day run. 

Taking the lead role as Henry 
IV In the modern Italian tragedy 
Is Martin Conovitz '63. Other prin- 
ciples include Wallace Thomas '52 
as Marquis Di Nolll. Joseph Dewey 
'52 as Baron Belcredl, Sally Lon,' 
playing Donna Matilda Spina. 
Dorothy Sprague In the role of 
Frlda, and Theodore Weems '55 as 
Doctor Oenonl. 

Modern Tragedy 

Cast in other major roles are ern-day Italian aristocrat, pie- 
Daniel Miller '55 playing Harold, tending insanity, assume the role 
John Johnston '54 as Landolph. of King Henry IV. tenth century 
Thomas Bell '55 as Ordulph, and German emperor. His family, in 
Gil Holtzman '53 in the role of | their attempts to cure him, drive 
Berthold. Donald Holt '54. Peter ' him to disaster." 
Johnson '53. and Tim Beard '53 Set In Palace 

complete the list of characters. I Set in Italy of today, the three- 




Scene from the Adorns Memorial Theotre ^iroducfion of Pirandello's 
"Henry IV" opening tonight for a three doy pre-vocotion run of the college 
fheofre. The performance stars Mortin Conovifx '53 In the title role of 
this Itolion tragedy. 



William Schneider '52 designed 
the sets. Production manager is 
John Laeson '53. while David 
Hudson '53 is stage manager. 

The first English version of 

j "Henry IV" appeared in London 

in 1922 under the title of "The 

Mock Emperor". January 21. 102J 

Describing the plot of "Henry act tiagedy takes place against marked the debut of the classic 

IV". Director David C. Bryant the background of a reconstructed In the United States, when it ran 

said. "Here is a tragedy based j palace, home of the "Insane" aris- in New York as "The Living 

around action which .sees a mod- tocrat. Cap and Bells President i Mask". 



zine displaying those two magic 
words. 'Turple" and "Cow." 
Selectivity Essentia! 

Humorous writing is something 
rare and special: it's easy to get 
"just a wonderful idea! " — but it's 
enormously difficult to execute this 
idea. I'd guess that the editor of 
a successful Cow would feel oblig- 
ed to reject 90'; of his contribu- 
tions, and then work like a dog 
at revising and polishing the 109; 
he considered usable. The former 
Cow, dedicated to monthly appear- 
ances, looked as though its editor 
used all 100'''; of the contributions 
without any serious re-workins;, 
threw in a few items from back 
issues, and finally dashed off a 
bunch of fillers during a visit to 
the printer. 

The new Cow has been launched 
with gre.'' gusto, but a cool eye 
will immediately . th^t it is 
distressingly uneven. In places it 
shows signs of promise: but many 
of its pages are gloomy reminders 
of what caused its predecessor to 
expire. 

Three Hits 

There are signs of hope in the 
new magazine's plan to appear 
only four times a year, and in Us 
attempts to achieve variety. This 
issue ha.s been rescued, tor ex- 
ample, by the editorial policy of 
including two serious articles: a 
succlnt. informative little essay on 
Argentina's Eva by Anson Piper: 
and a sober but devastating edi- 
torial on God and Man at Yale 
by Fred Rudolph. There is also 
more than a glimmer of hope in 
the third item which is worth 
reading: an engaging "Ballad" 
See Page 4, Col I. 

Capital Grads to Fete 
Students on April 2 

Williams College students 
who will be in the Washington 
area over the Spring recess are 
invited to a party which will 
be given by the Williams Alumni 
Association of Washington, D. 
C. The party will begin at 5:30 
P. M. on Wednesday. April 2, 
and will be held at the Burling- 
ton Hotel on Vermont Avenue. 

Beer and cocktails will be 
served free to all undergrad- 
uates and to any prospective 
students or their fathers. No 
formal entertainment or 
speeches are planned, in order 
that guests may leave at any 
time for other evening commit- 
ments. 



by Jud Klein '54 

Cambridge. March 22— Led by 
double-winner Dick Martin, Coach 
Bob Muir's Eph tankers exploded 
for five out of a possible ten first 
places to run up a huge 68-point 
total while romping to their ninth 
New England Intercollegiate 
Swimming Association champion- 
ship in eleven years, this after- 
noon at M. I. T.'s Alumni Pool. 

Bowdoin's 49 points were good 
for a distant second in the team 
standings, while Amherst copped 
the third position with 29 and 
Springfield fourth with 27. Last 
year's co-winners. Brown and 
Trinity, followed with 26 and 24 
points respectively. Other scores: 
Wesleyan 13, Connecticut 9. Mas- 
sachusetts and host M. I. T. 5 each, 
and Boston University 2. Ha'y 
Cross. Worcester Polytech. md 
Tufts failed to qualify tor the 
finals. 

Jones Dethroned in 440 

Martin edged Brown's Ralph 
Brisco in both the 50 and 100- 
yd. freestyles with comparatively 
slow clockings of 23.7 and 52.1 to 
become the meet's only two-event 
winner. 

Don Jones. Williams co-captain 
elect along with Martin, pulled a 
twn_Tiict/>.f,v _stnpt^ ye«r R?o, t'ltt 
repeated as champion in only t'ne 
220-yd. freestyle with a 2:l.i.O 
time. Jones finished second. 
and fellow-Eph Joe Worthington 
fourth, behind Wesleyan's Jan 
Vandenberg in the 440. 

Douglas Cops Breaststroke 

Sophomore Charlie Douglas. 
overshadowed by teammate Rick 
Jeffrey practically the entire year, 
emerged a surprise winner in the 
200-yd. breaststroke with the fast- 
est clocking of his career, a bril- 
Uant 2:27.4. as Jeffrey finished 
fourth. 

The Eph 300-yd. medley relay 
See Page 3. Col. 6 



American Hostels 
Sponsor Contest 

Essay Winners to Trek 
Through U.S., Europe 

Wednesday. March 26 — Five 
scholarship trips at liome and 
abroad, with all expenses paid, 
will be awarded to the persons 
writing the best essays entitled 
"Wliy I Would Like to Go Hostel- 
ing in America." it was announced 
recently by Justin J. Cline. Execu- 
tive Director of American Youih 
Hostels. 

First prize consists of an ••Ight 
week trip across the United States 
and Canada or a credit of i',-M 
toward an Euroiiean trip. Other 
winners will tra\el across Mexico, 
Nova Scotia. New England, and 
Wisconsin or receive credit toward 
European trips. 

Must Join AYH 

Entries should contain 1000 
words or less and be postmarked 
no later than April 15. 1952. .\n 
application for membership in 'he 
hostel group must accompany each 
essay. Full infoimation and np- 
plication forms for the scholar- 
ship may be obtained from Na- 
tional Headquarters. American 
Youth Hostels. Inc. 6 East 39th 
St.. New York 16. N. Y. 

Hostellng, which is "under your 
own steam" travel, derives its 
name from the low cost overnight 
accommodations, "hostels", avail- 
able to those who hold hostel 
pa.sses. Hostelers travel light, 
carrying their gear in saddle bags 
on their bicycles or in packs on 
their backs and usually prepare 
their own food. 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26, 1952 



f Ijc Willing }atf04 

Norrh Ailciins, MijssdChuietts /Villtamstown, MqisQchus«tts 

(Entered os se'unil class nialttr Novembei 27, 1 94't, at the post office at 
North Atlams, Mvjssachusetts, under the A' t of March 3, 1879." Printed by 
L.umb and Hunter, Inc., North Auo ns, Mossochusetts. Published 

Nrt'ednesdoy and Saturooy during the college ear. Subscription price $5.00 
per veor. Record Office, Jesup Halt, William; own, 
RECORD Office - Phone 72 Editor - Phone 981 -JK 

\oliiim' Xl.Vl Maicli 26. 19.52 Number 14 

To the Williamstown Sanitary Commission: 

111 .spile (il tlir IT bc'cr bottles, 29 bvvr cans, 1.5 coke hiittlcs, 
and ii.s.sDitcil milk linttk'S, .sauce pans, old brooms, \vliiske\' liottles, 
l:t;lil bulbs, overshoes, boaids, pillows, towels, bowls, Iro/.eii 
oraiiire jiiiee cans, soi^ji;v cartons, rotten apples, and otlicr niis- 
cellaiieons retnse revealed l)\- the sprini; tbaw on tlie \arsily ten- 
nis courts and on the I'ark Street .side ot Sau;e Hall, tbis area is 
not to be coiisideird as a possible site for a new town i^arbage 
clnnip, 

I'o tbe tieslmieii; This list of rubble is iiidictiiient cnoush- 



Old Guard Spokesman Fears 
Cultural Decline With Death 
Of Coat And Tie On Campus 

hij Boh French 

Provoked bv recent sartorial observations in tbe RFXIORD, 
I have diseeineil a lisiim tide of barbarism wbich tbrealens to 
shatter the very core of modern society, ()\er die nation rolls tbe 
hideous wave; we sit si-cnie in sc(|nestered stront^bolds, hut tbe 
insidious evil ina\ no lonsrer be ignored. Even at tbis \erv moment, 
somewbeic a tallered banner sinks hi the nalherinu; dusk, another 
ontpost of ci\ ili/atioii has fallen. C;entlenien,'tlie coat and tie arc 
disappearini; IVoni die .\nierican scene, .MI VKS; von are iiiered- 
iiloiis. von raise voiir eyebrows, \'on inhale sharply, but it is all too 
horribly true, 

I rejieat, the eoat and tie are disaiipeariiis;. The lieriiiis^bone 
jacket and the silk cravat have heard their deatbknell, .\nil do 
I'ot be so iiai\e or siiiiif^ as to sni")|iose for a simple instant tbat 
' ha\'e drawn my e\ ideiice from isolated areas or stranij;e lands far 
f-om Williamstown. No, friends, it is on jnst such campuses as 
ours that we nnwitlinu;lv hasten die demise of this time-hdiiored 
apparel. Look about von and deny if yon can that the midernrad- 
nate bra/enl\- attends his classes in dishabille. Cnidj^iimK- lie dons 
the traditional attire for his e\ eiiiiii; meal. The midweek post-honr 
test (late at Bennington sees ]iropriet\' saciiliced to a misiinidcd 
.'C'lise of coiiifdit and the infornial, .Supplanting the sha<j;u;v Harris 
tweed and die jreiitK' patterned foulard is the sweater and open- 
lecked shirt, .And after that? I besitate to mention it in this 
jonrnal, but the evidence cannot be sjainsaid, .\fter tliat follows 
in rajiid succession the train of sartorial atrocities which cnliiiinafe 
hi the lavc-tintcd scarf and the trii")pled)reasted, wrap-aronnd, 
slash-front, shawl-collar Carribbean-ijrecn Konfi-Jac, fi.rionsly 
styled for the frantic fiat man in fire proof ;j;abardine. 
The Passin'^ of the I'leeed 

When' are the soft tweeds and friendh' llanuels of our fore- 
fathers? Where are the stripes, the knits, the narrow bows? For- 
saken bv die Philistine, discarded by the uncoiiscions underfirad- 
nate, we must rally to the standard if we are to prexcnt the coat 
and tie from sinkim; into the miirk\- ol)li\ioii of a foriiotteu old- 
time custom. Let us onward to the defense while the breath of 
life can kindle onr sonl to the preserxation of our birthrit;bt, Wbich 
of yon would be haunted in his dotage b\' the nawini^ tlioufrht 
that a more responsible ireneratioii has cause to criticise our 
Icf^acy? Resist the odious attempts to throttle s^ood taste and 
aesthetic values. Wear your coats and ties. 



Letters to the Editor 



REORGANIZE UC 



WE OTHER DAY 



by R. Bruce Carrington 

According to a report appearing 
in the March 16th TIMES iSec, 1 
p 23:1) Pravda is dissatisfied with 
the Russian drama. I have 
ahvays toUowed with great inter- 
est the reports ot what Pravda is 
and isn't satisfied with, and I 
tliink it is rewarding, I remember 
the wonderful report of a mpeting 
held in some town assembly a 
while back to denounce jazz. The 
comrades were shouting each other 
down and proclaiming that jazz 
was as 'bourge" as they come, 
when in came a jazz band playing 
"Struttin' with Some Barbecue", 
whereupon everyone leaped to his 
booted feet and cheered Ru.ssianly. 
The result was that until Pravda 
really lowered its verbal boom, 
peasants throughout those old So- 
cialist Republics were digging po- 
tatoes in syncopated time, 

Pravda, however, won out that 
time, and it looks as if it is plan- 
ning another victory. It wa.s ciuot- 
ed as calling playwrights ■un- 
realistic", and spoke of the plays 
as being full of "false negative 
types of persons who needed clean- 
ing in the clean water nf sharp 
sat're." They denounced .slereo- 
tvpes, and demanded that play- 
wrights create fresh ncu- dramas 
with fresh new Russia, In the 
light of these suggestions. I would 
submit to Pravda the following 
short play for their consideration. 
The scene takes place in the Wil- 
liamstok Inflrmariski somewhere 
in Russia: 

DARKNESS BEFORE DIFSK 

• The setting is a durk stone cor- 
ridor water drips from the walls 
In a staccato prolatriate rhythm 
Doors lead off the corridor. A 
Comrade Nurse is coming down 
the hall. One of the side doors o- 
pens, and another Comrade Nurse 
emerges. They meet, slyly) 

1st Comrade Nurse: 'Sadistically) 
Ho, Comrade Nurse! That little 



comrade boy in the end room, , . 
I fixed him! 

2nd Comrade Nurse: i Cackles i 
What did you do? Give him the 
Molotov cocktail — laxitivski? 

1st Comrade Nurse: fChartling) 
Pour doses! It serves him right! 
He is only faking to get labor 
cuts! 

2nd Comrade Nurse: (Looks upi 
Here comes the Comrade Doctor, 

Comrade Doctor: (Enters DR, He 
is dressed in dismal shades of 
black and grey. On seeing nurses 
he stops,) Ah, Comrade Nurses, 
get the whirlatov ready, we 
have a case of measles coming 
in. 

Both Comrade Nurses: (Clapping 
hands) Yes, Comrade Doctor, ho 
yes! 

ALL EXIT, The stage is empty for 
a moment, then a bell rings. 
Two doors fly open, and Young 
Comrades in nightshirts stagger 
out of their rooms, 

1st Young Comrade: iLooktag 
down corridor! Quickly, the food 
for the others! 

2nd Y Comrade: (Shaking and in 
high fever) Yes, the food for 
the sick ones, (They both stag- 
ger towards the end of the cor- 
ridor. The 1st Comrade Nurse 
appears and hands them pails; 
they start delivering them to 
rooms,) 

Comrrde Doctor: (Who has enter- 
ed while pails are being deliver- 
ed. He is smiling) What a won- 
derful treatment, eh. Comrade 
Nur.se? 

1st Comrade Nurse: (Kneading 
hands) Beautiful, Comrade Doc- 
tor, 

2nd Y Comrade: (Suddenly collap- 
sing) My stomach! 

Comrade Doctor: (Rushing to 



I o tlu' Kilitor of the KECOHD: 

The editorial in the March 19 edition ol the Uecord broiiKht 
to the limelight one of the most basic problems now oii the Wil- 
liams Colle.nc campus, namelv, tbe present system ol representa- 
tion on the UiiderKiaduate Council, .\s of now, representation is 
based primarily on social unit delenatioiis (president ol each 
of the 15 houses, represi'iilatives of certain campus acti\'ities, 
and class presidents), One-llfth of the student body, the non- 
alliliates, have no \()ice in the Council, 

Under die status <|uo at Williams t:olle}^e, non-allillate repre- 
sentation is impossible, since the former members ol the (Jar- 
field i:liib on I'cbruarv t expressed then' desire to remain no longer 
as a social unit. Therefore, to acceiit ri'preseiitation (in a coiineil 
composed of house presidents would be, in elleet, to i;i\c the tiar- 
field Club a rebirth. There is one alteriiati\e, that is to choose 
deleirates by classes. 

We, die undersij^neil, recommend as a solution to this problem 
that each class select four delegates as its represiitati\'es on tbe 
VC. Under this .s)stein the ckiss prt'sidents, who are now iircsent 
ill the Council, would retain their ])osts, and would be joined by 

the \ ice-presidents of each class, the honor co ittee represeuta- 

li\es, and a fourth delegate, .Also represented ou the Council woukl 
be the leaders of die campus activities, who are now scrvui}!; on 
the Council, 

Naturally, this solution would only jjiove workable it class 
elections received more enthusiastic siip|)ort from each member ol 
the student body. Under our recoinmendation, with class elections 
ineauinir more than merely popularity contests, the students, we 
hope, would realize the importance of the elections, and would 
select the most ciiialified meiiibers of their class, 

.\ll class functions would be handled by the tour UC repre- 
seiitati\es, and the present system of class orj^ani/ation by social 
units would be abolished. The four elected ollicers would ha\e 
the power to select other lueinbers of their class to aid them in 
runniiiti; lunise parties and other class functions. 

We also uri^e the acce|itaiice of the sugj^estion that "enlorce- 
meut of house social rules" could be accomplished by "house 
ollicers working under the Dean's office". 

We oiler this as the most feasible solution to tbe present UC 
))roblein. 

Robert Goldstein '54 
Barry Broker '54 
Mar\in Schill '54 

THE BEAUTIFUL AND DAMNED 

To the Kditor of the KEt:()nD: 

C;ontrratulatioiis to the student body on defeathii; the ctuiali- 
tariaii proposal that all students be allowed the same social oj)- 
portimities. He<;arclless of am other faults the fraternity system 
iiiiUht lia\e, the basis of life is discrimination, with the rich, yoini};, 
and pretty risini; to die top, and die unfortimate and miserable 
mediocrity beiiiy trampled on tbe bottom. While responsibility 
rests on society to ameliorate the lot of the "unable", attempting 
to do away with discrimination would defeat our whole puipose 
in the first place by lessening our superiority based on natural law, 
siir\i\al of the fittest, and cut-tbroat competition. 

Your campus vote was |)erhaps uidicative that the stuilcnts of 
19.52 are willing to ensure that Bilbo, Talmadge, Uaiikin. and 
L, is.. Smith ha\c not li\ed in vain, 

Peter Oaks '52 



him I Where does it hurt? 
There? 

2nd Y Comrade: (Screams) 

Comrade Doctor: Aha!, Quick 
Comrade Nurse! To the Whirl- 
atov! (They both run out glee- 
fully carrying the boy. 

The stage is deserted except for 
the 1st Young Comrade who 
stands looking after them. From 
the other direction enters a Very 
Young Comrade.) 

Very Young Comrade: Where is 
the Comrade Doctor? 

2nd Comrade Nurse: (Entering 
stage) What do you want? 

V Y Comrade: (Looking greenish) 
I don't feel very well. 

2nd Comrade Nurse: A likely story. 
You want labor cuts don't you? 

V Y Comrade: I have a tempera- 
ture. 

Comrade Doctor: (Re-entering i 
Where does it hurt? Here? 

V Y Comrade: No Up here. It's 
my head. 

Comrade Doctor: Ha! (Reassur- 
ingly) I have just the thing for 
you, 

2nd Comrade Nurse: ( Giggling i 
The whirlatov? 

Comrade Doctor: (Narrowly) The 
whirlatov, 

V Y Comrad: The Whirlatov for 
my head? 

Comrade Doctor: (Rubbing hands, 
talking to himself) A magnifi- 
cent socialist experiment! 

V Y Comrade: But for my head, . , 

Comrade Doctor: Maybe the Stalin 
prize ! 

V Y Comrade: I hate water, I get 
sick when It rains, , , 

Comrade Doctor: My picture in 
Pravda, A bonus for me! 

V Y Comrade: But. , . 

Comrade Doctor: To the whirla- 
tov! EXIT ALL cheering, carry- 
ing Very Young Comrade, who 
IS weeping softly,) 

END 



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Shakespeare scribed— 

Tkere a not a minute 

ol our lives 

snoula stretcn 

witnout some 

pleasure 

Anthony tuU Ck0pmlrt 
A minute's enough to stop at the 
familiar red cooler for • Coke. PleMOM? 
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T>e Gustibus 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26, 1952 



BY JOVE - I'll be blessfd if we dicUrt find ii touch of Jolly /)lld 
England in oui- back yuid uiice ;iniiiii this pu.sl week-end. 
Peiclied atop our vaiilane point on the fouith flooi' of the Hopkins 
Obscivutoi-y. we were able to view the Koinus-on many miles below 
at the SpriiiB Stieet squash courts with \hw greatest of ease, as 
■•MasUT" Chaffee's racciuetmeii gave oui- visitoi's from Cambridge, 
England a lather rough time uf it with a 5-1 trouncing on Satui-day 
afternoon. Such was the throng that invaded the gallery that we 
vi.fie forced to our lofty retieat. 

I'eerlng through our BO-iiuh rcfriulinK telescope, we were able 
to catch a bird's-eye view of oiu- of the most oxcitiiis matches of 
the afternoon, between Captain Kuy (leorije and I'eter Gautler- 
Smilh. I'layine i" the numlier three position, the Knglishman pres.sed 
Georifc several times with terrific l)a('khand and corner shots, and was 
able to take two of tlu- first tlnec eiimes. Upon a number of ota'asions, 
we were nearly vaulted out of our crows ncsl rest by the tremendous 
ovations rendered hy the spectators. The slender, dark-haired "Tom- 
nij" came back again and again with drives on seemingly hopeless 
shots to down the Williams captain. (iautier-Sniilh took the lead in 
games twice, but in the fourth and fifth contests, he tired, and 
George was able to take the final pair of games by handy margins. 
i KfER the match had been completed, wc .swooped down fiom the 
" Weathcrchild domicile to si)cak with a lew of the visitoi's from 
uciDss the Atlantic , We were csijccially attracted to a lad named 
Tony Swales, playing iiumbcr toui- for the Britishers. The good-looking, 
well-built Englishman levealed the pleasant surpri.se which he had 
expciienced on the tiii) to America thus far. "It's nothing quite at all 
like what we had expected," came his griiming reply. "So far, we've 
really had an exciting time. Aflei- landing here in the United States 
on Thui-sday, we stopped at New Haven foi- our first match," con- 
tinued Tony in his thick English brogue. "With time at a pitmium, 
our visits at each college will be very short. Up to now everything 
has been wonderful; everything, that is, except the scores of our 
matches. We do hope to win one oi- two befoic wc head back home, 
wc really do!" 

Master Swales informed us of the very respectable 11-2 won- 
lost record which his team had iiimpiled against competition in 
England. "I'm afraid that our fortune from here on in will definitely 
be much less impressive." he commented after they bad dropped their 
sci'ond match in three days. 

"In England, our courts are a cood three feet wider and perhaps 
a foot or so longer than the American alleys. " Your roving reporter 
(from the WEATIIEKCIIII.I) KN TEKI'KI.SESI also found that the 
English squash hall was smaller and less lively than the American- 
type ball. We were informed further of still another difference be- 
tween the British and the American game. While we fill nine positions 
in mat«'.h competition, the "Tommies" compcle with a roster of only 
five. 

IIAVING lost their mat<.'h with Yale, .six-zipp. the boys fiom Cam- 
bridge made Williamstown their second stop. Dartmouth, Har- 
vard. Princeton, plus ii number of top Canadian teams will keep the 
Britishers quite busy for the remainder of their three week .iouiney 
to America. 

After the affair was all over, a spot of tea was definitely in order! 

i'tnidix W'cdllicrchihl. II 



Dixie Tennis Trip 
Starts This Week; 
Play Six Matches 

Varsity to Oppose Duke 

In Opening Encounter; 

Chaffee Pessimistic 



I'ete Goldman '54 

Wednesday, March 26— The an- 
nual .southern junket of Clarence 
Chalfce's tennis squad gels under- 
way this week with a ten-man 
varsity delegation journeying to 
William and Mary for a brief pic- 
scason woi'kout. 

The Jaunt will involve a total 
of .six matches in seven days, fol- 
lowing the two-day practice ses- 
sion in William.sburK. In the sea- 
son's cui-tain i-aiser Tuesday, the 
Ephs will be underdogs as they 
squared otf against the Blue Devils 
of Duke University. 

Flay North Carolina 

Wednesday, Chaflfee's proteges 
move to Chapel Hill to open a two- 
day stand against i)owerful North 
Carolina. Fi-iday's card finds the 
netmen matched again.st Virginia, 
followed by the Country Club of 
Virginia on Saturday. The windup 
Monday, before the i-eturn trip 
north, pairs the Ephs with Wil- 
liam and Mary. 

For the Dixie tiip. Chaffee has 
designated ace Dick Squires as 
number one man. followed by 
captain Hank Norton, Soapy Sym- 
ington, John Brownell. Tom 
Brucker. Al Pulkerson, Pete Pick- 
aid, Al Ca.sson, Jim Ziegler and 
Gordon Canning. Brownell, Pul- 
kerson and Ziegler are sophomore 
newcomers to the varsity. 

Squires a (Question Mark 

Squii-es has asserted that he 
will be ready to play on the tour, 
despite an injuied knee suflered 
late in the squash season. Chaffee, 
however, remained dubious about 
his star's condition as the team 
prepared for the trip. 

Chaffee, now in his eleventh sea- 
See Page 4, Col. 5 



Swimmers Cop New Eiiglands 



Dick Gordon, '54 
Wrestling Captain 

New Leader Elected 
At Annual Banquet 

Thursday, Mar. 20— Richard S. 
Gordon '54 was elected Captain of 
the 1952-53 WiUiams wrestling 
team at a dinner held tonight at 
Elwal Pines. A resident of Nar- 
taeith, Pa., Gordon is a member of 
Chi Psi and is al.so active in the 
Williams Outing Club. 

Wrestling at 167 pounds this 
year, Goi'don won four of five duel 
matches and flni.shed third in the 
New England Championships. 
Hampered by a weak knee, he 
started slowly, not wrestlint; 
against Harvard and losing al 
Brown. 

He improved rapidly, however, 
and won four consecutive matches, 
pinning his Springfield opponent 
and decisioning his adversaries 
fiom the Coast Guard Academy, 
Wesleyan, and Amherst. 



Steinbrenner Outruns 
Field in Low Hurdles 

Montreal. March 22 — George 
Steinbrenner, Williams' only 
representative in the Interna- 
tional Invitational Champion- 
ships, outran all other Ameii- 
can and Canadian entries to 
take a fli-st place in the fifty 
yard low hurdles. His winning 
time of six .seconds defeated 
such outstanding runners as 
Van Bruner. Big Ten Champion 
and Crosby, Canadian National 
Champion. 

In the high hurdles the Wil- 
liams captain was ruled third 
in his preliminary heat in a 
blanket finish with Crosby and 
the Canadian collegiate cham- 
pion. 



Five Ways to Begin Careers with General Electric 

HI 





1. TEST ENGINEERS PROGRAM— gives engineering graduates 
opportunilies for careers not only in engineering but in all 
pha,ses of the company's bu.siness. Rotating assignments plus 
opportunities for further classroom study. 



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2. BUSINESS TRAINING COURSE— open to business administra- 
tion, liberal arts and other graduates.. .for careers in accounting, 
finance, administration. 







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3. MANUFACTURING TRAINING PROGRAH-for developing man- 
ufacturing leaders. Open to graduates with a technical educa- 
tion or a general education with technical emphasis. 




5. PHYSICS PROGRAM— the gateway hy which physics majors 
begin G-E rareers. Program graduates have gone into such fields 
as research, development, manufacturing, design, marketing. 



4. CHEMICAL AND METALLURGICAL PROGRAM— offers rotating 
assignments and studies for chemists and for chemical and 
metallurgical engineers. 

If you are interested in entering one of these five 
basic General Electric programs after graduation, 
talk with your placement oflpicer and the G-E 
representative when he visits your campus. Mean- 
while, send for further information: 

• On Test, Chemical and Metallurgical, and Physics 
Programs, write to Technical Personnel Services 
Dept., Schenectady, N. Y. 

• On Business Training, write to Business Training 
Course, Schenectady, N. Y. 

• On Manufacturing, write to Manufacturing 
Personnel Development Services Department, 
Schenectady, N. Y. 





Squashmen Down 
English Team, 5-1 

Purple Hands Cambridge 
Second Loss on Tour 



Saturday, March 22— The Wil- 
liams Squash team ended its sea- 
son today by trouncing a visltins 
Cambridge University team, 5-1. 
The Britishci's, who had previously 
lost to Yale, were hindered by a 
lack of familiarity with American 
squash. 

"So;py" Symington, playing 
number one. easily disposed of 
Tony Starte. the Cambridge ace, 
15-B, 15-12. 15-13. while captain 
Ray George, playing number two, 
ttent five games to edge Peter 
Gautier-Smith in a clo.se match. 
Brownell Beats Engrlish Captain 

After losing the first game, John 
Brownell rallied to win the next 
Ihiee games from Cambridge Cap- 
lain Peter Robinson. 17-18. 15-a, 
15-6. 15-8. Tom Brucker made a 
marvellous comeback after losinii 
his first two games to Tony 
Swales. winninR 15-9 in the fifth 
same. 

Senior Tom Adkins played his 
usual retrievii-.B game to beat 
Ii hn Luc:.s of the visitors in three 
games. 18-16, 15-4. 15-8. Al Pul- 
kerson. who was sick most of the 
week, lost in the number six slot 
in three sames to Ian Sherbine. 



of Summer 
Viicalion Pleasures 
5 SPECIAL CRUISES to 




38 days 



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asiiore provi<lin;i visits to 

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Kvervlbiiij; voirvc <lreauR'd a 

holiday ehoutd be big, coiu- 

fortable sliips . . .outdoor tiled 
Bwimmir.g pools; broad sun 
decks ... a joyous round of 
particB, entertainment, sports 
. . . superb food . . . every facility 
for rest and play. 

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Boston 9, Mass. 



Win Ninth Crown 
In Eleven Years 

Medley Trio, Jones, 
Douglas Cop Firsts 

Continued Krom Page 1 

trio ol Dave Byerly. Co-Captain 
Jeffrey and John Belash, bested 
Trinity and Springfield in the 
opening event with a flashy 3:00.:). 
Worthington, Rogers Place 

Woithington took third for the 
Ephmcn in the individual 300-yd. 
medley behind Bob Arwezon and 
Charlie Hildreth, both of Bowdoin. 
In the dive. Max Rogers' 83. CK 
point elfort was good for a solid 
fouilii behind Charlie Huddleston 
of Spiingfield ' 98.53 1. defendint' 
champion Larry Boyle of Bowdoin 
197. ni. and Brown's Otto Pfann- 
kuch '85.76). 

Bowdoin triumplied in the 400- 
yd. freestyle relay as expected, but 
was hard-pressed by the Purple 
four.some of Jones, Belash, John 
Beard, and Martin. Martin, in the 
anchor slot, just failed nipping 
the Polar Bears' Bob McGrath 
after spotting him piactically half 
the pool. The winning time was 
3:36.5. 

DeGroot Sets Mark 

Bob DeGroot of Connecticut 
turned in the only record-breakins 
time of the day as he churned the 
200-yd backstroke distance in 
2:14,2. well below the previous 
mark of 2:19.0 set last year by 
.'Vmhcist's Don Wasie, who was no 
belter than fourth this outini;. 

In a special event not included 
in the team totals, the Eph rvauv, 
man 400 yd. fi-eestyle relay team 
of Gene Latham. Pete Hunt. Pai'k- 
er Murray, and John Newhall fin- 
ished thiid behind Trinity and 
3pi ins field. 

The summary: 

300 yard medley i-elay — won by 
Williams I Byerly, Jeffi-ey, Belash i : 
2. Trinity: 3, Springfield: 4. Am- 
herst: 5. Massachusetts: 6. Con- 
necticut. Time. 3:00.3. 

220 yard free-style — Won by 
Jones I Williams I: 2, Cameron 
'Browm: 3. McGrath iBowdoin: 
4, Gi-aeber iAmher.st): 5. Mason 
iTi-inityi: 0. Vandenberg (Wes- 
See Page 4, Col. 1 




20 Percent 
Reduction 

ALL 
33 13 45 78 RPM 

ALBUMS 

during this week of 

our 16th Anniversary Sale 

THE 
MUSIC HOUSE 

34 Bank Street 
North Adams, Mass. 



SKI 




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BEST IX SPRING; 

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/ii Thr "Siuiic Corner" 
oi iVcic Eiig/anrf 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26. 1952 



Stocking Labels Stories Ambiguous, Stale; 
Slams 'Childish' Ideas on Humor in Sex 



Continued From Page 1 

I with a Klorious ■'Superefraln") 
uboiit ii mouse with iiii olivf-pick- 
ins4 lull, by someoiif who culls 
h iiisell' A. R. Qurney, Jr. 

As lor the rjsl of the magazine. 
we 1. let's be eliurituble and say 
that the layout is atireeable. the 
cover is appropriately (lashy. the 
proofreadlnB is f.,ir, and we realize 
ihut Dubiii and his colleagues ha^e 
worked hard at the formidable 
job of sheer mech.inics which 
faces an editorial sUilt. But all 
this hard work niaki's one regret 
even more the low quality of what 
appears. 

Some Misses 

The "feature" story, for in- 
stance, "The Old CoUcKO Try", by 
someone who calls himself N. I. 
Bud, simply isn't clear about what 
it is tryins to do. Is it a satire on 
parents of sub-frcshmen'J on Wil- 
liams'? on the collegiate worship 
of clothes and other mere exter- 



Swimming . . . 

ieyam. Time, '2:15.0. 

50 yard free-style- -Won by Mar- 
tin I Williams i; 2. Brisco i Brown); 
3. Tate 1 Amherst I ; 4. Coleman 
.Springfield); 5, Lyndon iBow- 
uoini; 6, Wishart iBowdoinl. 
lime, 23.7. 

D i V i> — Won by Huddleston 
ibprmBfieldi; 2, Boyle Bowdoini; 

3, Pfannkuclc i Brown i ; 4, Rogers 
. Williams i; 5. Godfrey ( Trinity i; 
0, Meyer iWesleyam. Points 98.53. 

100 yard free-style— Won by 
Martin iWlUiamsi; 2, Brisco 
lUiOwni; 3, Barth iWesleyani; 4, 
Toole I Trinity I ; 5, Wisliart (Bow- 
lime 52.1. 
doin); B. Hildretli iBowdoinl. 

200 yard backstroke — Won by 
UeGroot i Connecticut) ; 2. Plum- 
mer iM. I. T.i; 3, McGruth IBow- 
doinl; 4, Wasie i Amherst i- 5, 
Cornfoot cMass.); 8. Grant iTrin- 
i.yi. Time, 2:14.2 inew meet and 
pool record! 

200 yard bieastslroke — Won by 
Douglas t Williams I ; 2, Parrott 
'Trinity I; 3. Yorzyk i Springfield ) , 

4, Jeffrey iWilliamsi; 5, Aren- 
berg iBrowm: 6. Wills iBrown). 
■lime 2:27.4, 

440 yard freestyle — Won by Vaii- 
denbei'K iWe-sleyani; 2, Jones 
IWilliamsi; 3, Arwezon iBow- 
doinl ; 4, Worlhingloii iWilliam.si; 

5, Graeber 'Amherst); 6, Mc- 
Namee i Connecticut i . Time 4:37.... 

300 yard individual medk'v - 
Won by Arwezon iBowdoim; 2. 
Hildreth .Bowdoini; 3. Worthin;- 
ton IWilliamsi; 4, Geithner lAm- 
hersti; 5, Sexton IB. U.i; 6, Si- 
mon I Amherst 1. Time 3:40.6. 

400 yard freestyle relay — Won 
by Bowdoin ilngraham, Lyndon, 
Wishart. McGrathi; 2. William:,: 
3. Amherst: 4, Springfield: li. 
Brown; 6. Trinity. Time 3:36.5, 



I L.G.Balfour Co. 

I 

f FRATERNrTY JEWELRY 

t Stationery Progromi 

Badges Ringi Steins 

Jewelry Gifti Favors 

Club Pint Keys 

Medals Trophies 

Write or Colt 
CARL SORENSEN 

30 Murray Ave Woterford, N Y 
TelephoneTrov — Adams 8256^ 




"He h ralher nearsightod — but 
he never forgets the Angostura* 
in a ManhattanI" 

AfCOS%. 

AROMATIC BITTEKS 
MAKES BETTER DRINKS 

*P.S. Smart hosts use their heads when 
they use Angostura to bring out the trut 
flavor of Manhattans and Old Fashioneds 
Try Angostura in soups and sauces, too 



nals'? Or is it a satire? It lacks 
focus as humor or criticism. And 
as narrative it builds up to the 
climax of an interview with Prof. 
Copeland, and then abruptly stops, 
I'lic reader feels bewildered, and 
mildly cheated. 

The feature called "Simpres- 
iioiiism" f. lis flat on its face; a 
Uale idea carried out with stale 
Uustrations. The drawings spread 
jver the magazine's center pages 
are not made entertaining merely 
by labelling them "Cowtoons." 
They tend either to use frightfully 
ancient gags las in the one about 
storing bathtubs i or to be so poor- 
ly drawn that their point— if any 
—is lost las in the one depicting 
a chapel interior). The page en- 
titled "Blind Date" exhibits the 
type of cartoon which was worked 
to death in the old Cow; one 
hopes that the new Cow can 
escape from this rut into more 
imaginative and more carefully 
executed cartooning such a.s Bod 
Stites' nice set of parodies called 
"Blood Bank." 

More Misses 

"Love Among the Ruins," a poem 
about the love affair of a garbage- 
collector, . . . need I say more'.' The 
subject is hilarious, simply hilar- 
ious; therefore the poem treating 
the subject will necessarily be a 
booming success, say the editors, 
who apparently never thought of 
returning it to the authors for 
much-needed cutting and revision, 

Ihe photography section is a 
new idea, and a good one. The por- 
trait of M, rch's Cow-Girl would 
embcUisli any dormitory wall. But 
the collection of pictures on Page 
27 is downright embarrassing. Two 
of them are just dull, one of them 
We have seen many times before, 
and the other two are associated 
in our minds witli horrifying news 
releases which accompanied the 
s. me or similar pictures in recent 
years. There is nothing liumorous 
in the pain-wracked faces of star- 
ving women in India, or in plight 
of g r!s who ha\'e been driven to 
prostitution. . Will the Cow editors 
NEVER get over the childisli no- 
tion that sex is intrinsically fun- 
ny? i Nor is there anything amus- 
ing in Williams students using 
these pictures to parade their ig- 
norance of the world in which 
they live. 

Help Needed 

As for the thirty "fillers" i scraps 
of prose or verse set off by cow 
f„cesi. all but eight or nine should 
have been stored in a desk 
drawer until the editors could re- 
\'iew them under the sober light 



Phi Sigs Win WMS 
Quiz, Beat Phi Gams 

vveiu.esday, Marcli 26 -Phi 
S.gma Kappa became the third 
semi-linalist in the WMS In- 
terfralernity Quiz last Wednes- 
day by defeating Phi Gamma 
Delta 32-23, Dick Porter '53 
and Art Levitt '52 were the vie- \ 
torious Phi Sig combination, 
while Dick Wulters '52 and Jim 
Colberg '53 represented Phi 
Gam. 

The other survivors of the 
quarter •rinal round to date are 
Kappa Alpha and Delta Kappa 
Ep,silon, Tonight Sigma Phi 
takes on Zeta Psi at 9:30 over 
WMS to determine the fourth 
semi-finalist. 



of another day. 

There is a cartoon on page 22 
showing copies of "Comment" 
committed to flames and thereby. 
I presume, symbolically predicting 
tile end of the Cow's literary rival 
As a former member of C^ommenl's 
editorial board, I can vouch for tlie 
fact that the magazine turned 
down a large percentage of its con- 
tributions, and that most of the 
material which was ultimately 
printed had been re-worked many 
times. The t'ow's board will ha\e 
to be equally rigorous if they ex- 
pect their magazine to eliminate 
Comment or even if they hope to 
save it from the fate of its pre- 
decessor. 

Since the undergraduates will 
probably respond more enthusias- 
tically to the new Cow than I do. 
I am not worried about any ill 
effects which this sour review may 
have on sales. Let me close by 
wisliing the new Cow well. Its edi- 
tors liave opened the magazine 
with a desperate plea for contri- 
butions; they clearly need help. I 
hope Williams students will res- 
pond with vigor and that future 
i.ssues will make this one look 
iick even in their eyes. 



Why woit until 
morning? 

When you can get the out- 
standing news of the day every 
evening through the full leased 
wire Associated Press .service in 

(Ebr (Sraufirript 

North Adams, Mau. 
On sale at 5 p.m. on all 
Williamstown Newittandi 



5 1 St Consecutive Year 

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Modified accelerated program available. 
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375 PEARL ST., BROOKLYN 1, N. Y. 

Near Borough Hall Telephone: MAin 5-2200 




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the thoroughbred of pipe tobaccos 



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Poll . . . 



candidate wiiose name appeared 
on tlie poll and who received no 
votes. 

An Eisenhower supporter com- 
mented on his ballot, "Although 
I am a eonllrmed Democrat, the 
time lias come for petty party dif- 
ferences to be ca.st aside and a 
general liouse cleaning started af- 
ter 20 years of one party govern- 
ment ..." 'I'aft supporters op- 
po.sed tlie general's nomination on 
the grounds thai Eisenhower is 
needed in Europe, his stand on 
domestic issues "are all but. un- 
known", and "a civilii.n. not a 
general, is best for the White 
House." 

Ike vs. Bub 

Duane Sargisson '5.'), a leadrv o; 
the campus Ei.seuhower Club, said, 
"We are most gratified at Ike's 
marvelous showing ..." A Taft 
supporter. Jay Gates '55, com- 
mented, "I am considerably sur- 
prised and encouraged at the 
strength showed by such a con- 
servative candidate as our Bob 
Taft in this den of liberal'sm." 

Prof. James Burns of Uie poli- 
tical science department who is an 
alternate delegate to the Demo- 



Tennis . . . 

son as tennis coach, was fur from 
optimistic about Williams' chances 
in the South. 

Little I'hree Kiivorltcs 

Despite a potentially powerful 
Amherst sciuad, however, the men- 
tor is considerably more cheerful 
about Little Three prospects. 
Chahee looks for a tiglit race, but 
pre-seiuson odds indicate a repeal 
of the Ephs' title perforiniince of 
two years ago. 

Last season, the netmen «arner- 
ed one victory in five starts on 
tlie Spring tour. A loss to Harvard 
ill tlu- regular season's opener was 
followed by an eight-game win- 
ning streak, snapped in the finale 
by Amherst's upset victory. 

cratic convention, reminded. "As 
was proven in '48, making a enoice 
among a large field of candidates 
in March is a very dill'ereiit lliing 
from making a choice between 
two candidates in November, . ." 



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STOP 
WORRYING 

about cigarette irritation 

PHIUP MORRIS ... and onl5( 
Philip Morri8...is entirely tree oi 

a source of irritation used in aj 
ojier leading cigarettesl -" 



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PHIUP MORRIS Kivcs )OU 
MORn SMOKING PLKASURE 
than any other leailinj; br.irul. 
VcJ-YOU'll BE GLAD TOMORROW, 
YOU SMOKED PHILIP MORRIS TODAYI 



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You'll love 

"I LOVE LUCY" 

starring 
^^ LUCILLE BALL and DESI ARNAZ 

'** The new TV laugh not over CBS 



PHILIP MORRIS 



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KHIDAY, MAHCIl 28, 1952 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Levitt Acclaims Conovitz' Role Eph Vacationers ! Tigerlopfcs Fail 

In Henry IV; Calls Production '"" - - 

Too Ambitious; Good in Parts 



l).v Arthur l.i'vitt. Jr. 

luua Pinindcllo's icfloclivi- li'^iKcdy. Henry IV, is a dilficull 
piny too dilficult for Ihi- AMT llu'.spian.s— perliaps loo difficult for 
iiiiy last. EximsliiK the fuiidamciilal ideas of llic aullior witli re^al■d 
to riMity a>"l illusion, tlic play is iilso iiitfiidcd lo voice Uie aspii'a- 
tioir ■.! the individual to cix-ate liis own world in this sloi'm-to.ssed 
unjvi )si'. Such an undeitakiiiK piovfd too aiiibitious for the Cap and 
Bell.-. |)layei\s. 

A bi-illiunt solo peifoi'mance by Martin Conovitz and a generally 
eoniF' lant supportiim cast did make for aii enterlaininK and worth- 
while I'veninBI but .somehow failed to suslaiii the electric atmospheie 
whirli mu.st iiecossaiily pace such a iJiodnction. The i-esult was a per- 
foriiii'ice cxcitiiiK and IhrilliiiK at inoment.s; rather tedious and self- 



COIll' 

Th 
in tl 
to bi 

BCOPI 

phil" 



at other.s. 
plot, about u man who lives 
past and imanines him.self 
a mediaeval emperor, sjives 
lor a Ki'cat deal of obscuif 
nphical bantc'i-inK. loBical 
chaiiii. and bitinK saliie on mod- 
ern 
to 111' 
sion 

div 
.sam 
lesN 
hott 



iety. We are Kradually led 
I remendou.sly ironic conclu- 
hat to be mad and exist in 
am is far pi'efei-able to beinti 
and haviuR to "live in cease- 
ire.ss and anxiety to know 
iue's fate will turn out." 
C'onovitz I'ersua.sivi- 
Marlm Conovilz. in the I'ole of 
the Hamlct-like Henry. I'Uiis the 
wlini' Kamiit of madness with a 
IiImIi <ioi;i-ee of di'amatic peisua- 
siveiass. His pi'0.icction of Henry's 
slow awareness of the full horror 



openinK .seconds of the final act 
where he i)roduces the play's most 
electric moment. In this .scene 
where he heals Matilda's pictui'e 
call to him. Conovitz effectively 
commmiieales the terror of Henry, 
who for a few moments is uncer- 
lain whethei- he is mad or not. 
Deeply Moving 

Perhaps the most deeply moving 
moment of the play is e.stalMish- 
ed by Conovitz' .sensitive and un- 
derstandinf! rcadinR of the Irish 
piiest spiH'ch ill the final scene. 
His shift from a tone of ijathos 
to one of disillusion and irony is 
a clever and effective bit of theat- 
rics. 

Such moments, and there are 
others, are unevenly dispersed 



of Ins IraKcdy. of the ii'ony of his I throuehout the play. Henry's ear- 
situaiion. and of the true worth ) lier (luasi-monoloKucs do not pro- 
of lii.s friends and enemies, is rcK- ..iect the .same .sen.se of pathos and 
islcri'd with harrowing perception. | irony which chai'actcrizes his per- 
Hi.. best scenes i'ome in the sec- 1 formance in the final acts. This 
011(1 act whei-o he explains to lii.i ■ is due. I am sure, to the obscurity 
four .servants the trick he has i of some of Pii'andello's ideas ind 
played upon them all. and in the ' See Paue 4. Col. 3 



Vassar's Lucy Blodgett Awaits L-Day, 
Judges Ephs Witty, Frustrated, Sexy; 
Dartmouth, Yale Writers Prove Prudes 

/)(/ Art Ijritt. '52 
I'liimlikecpsic. Marcli 22— TwciiIn- letlcrs. an aNC, and innlli- 
lliiiat'^ lia\c ci)ii\ iiiccd Mi.ss Lii('\ Itlod^cll (iil "Letters for l,iie\ 
iaiiie) that W'illiains men rank liit;li on se\ appeal and low on 
;-iiini'it. Iiitei\ie\\c(l 111 lier native lialiitat. 21.3 |e\vett House, the 
^ assar vamp bewailed the lact that her pleas to some sexcii dil- 
'eieiil eastern men s eollcfjes had lieeii so disastrously iniseonstrued 
"What I intended inereK' as a ^iiiuniek lo ijet interestiiit; 
ellers," laineiitcd Lncv, "earned ine a broken <late with a piiri- 
aiiical Yalie, an iii(lit;naiil ecHtorial li'oiii the Oarlinoutli I)ailv. 

md countless letters from students <i 

arking both a sense of huiiioi- and 
1 sense of fair play." 
Poncil Loiii 

One Williams student in par- 
icular attracted Miss Blodgett's 
itlenlion. "deer Lucy." write-s the 
:i)hmcn. "i like year leter; Al.so 
cell yor pikter in the vas.sar book. 

like yu veury much. I think yu 
<il a cents of humer, ha ! Sicerely. 
'encil Loui. Box 526." 

From her erstwhile Yalle friend 
i'ilh whom she had intended to 
peiKl the past weekend. Lucy re- 
<iiecl the foUowinu telcKram: 
)I;arEST LUCY. THE GLARING 
'HBLICITY GREETING YOUR 

See Page 4. Col. 1 *w 

IVilliams Students Workmen Resurface 

Section of Route 43 




To Enjoy Holiday 
Trip to Bermuda 



Beach Parties, Athletics 

To Highlight Schedule 

Of Island Vacation 



Charles Elliott '54 

Friday. March 28 — Under the 
wulchful eye of the Travel Bureau, 
vh'hl students will forsake muddy 
Williamstown tomorrow tor the 
beautiful beaches of balmy Bermu- 
da. Ably chaiwroned by Mac Mc- 
Connick '52, the ki'oup will take 
oir via Pan-American provided all 
pass customs, and will return Ap- 
ril 8. 

The island has prepared for the 
invasion by scheduling two Col- 
IcKc Weeks, featuriuK beach and 
coiktail parties, trips around the 
island, tennis and nolf tourna- 
ments, and a formal dance. Girls 
from Bradford, Wells, Vassar, and 
Holyoke ought to provide suitable 
entertainment for the Williams 
regiment. 

riaces of Interest 

Main center of attraction in the 
Clown colony, accoi'dlng to a vct- 
eran. lies in and ai-ound the Elbow 
Beach Surf Club with its accom- 
modations for dancing, diinking. 
and swimming .Collectivism has re- 
placed individualism in that 
gioups of females from each school 
give open house cocktail parties 
in the afternoons. 

Othei- activities which visitors 
have found worthwhile include vi- 
.slts to famous Crystal Caves, com- 
plete with stalactites and stalag- 
mites, and to Devil's Hole, whei'e 
exotic fish abound. 

In addition to its distinction as 
the oldest .self-governing British 
colony. Bermuda is noted for its 
ultra-low price of alcohol. 



To Achieve Total 
Membership Goal 



Recent "Bicker" Period 

Reverses Two Year 

Rushing Standard 



Princeton, N. J., March 25 — 
Total rushing of sophomores at 
Piinceton appears to have receiv- 
ed a setback as the trend toward 
complete membership in the Pros- 
pect Sti'eet clubs begun by the 
present senioi- class and continued 
last year by the cla.ss of '53, .seems 
to have been reversed for the time 
being. 

Two years ago, the class of '5L! 
petitioned the eating clubs to take 
all or none, and succeeded in forc- 
ing through 100'.; memtaer.ship. 
Last year's "bicker", or rushing 
period, was hailed by Princeton 
Dean Francis Godolphin as ach- 
ieving this .same goal "without 
tension". This time, in the "bick- 
I er" period starting February 7. the 
728 sophs failed, despite agitation 
by campus leadei-s to bring about 
total membership. 

Financial Trouble 
1 Some of the clubs fell it neces- 
sary to take in large delegations 
I to meet rising food costs. At pre- 
I sent, weekly board bills in the 
I clubs avei'age over $18. Moreover, 
I it is feared that under the present 
I system one or two of the seven - 
I teen clubs may become "dumping 
I grounds" for unwanted Tiger 
j sophs. 

I That the Court Club was able 
j to take in only seven new mem- 
I bers this year, suggests the possi- 
: bility that several of the less pop- 
I ular clubs may be forced out of 
I existence by rising costs and dwin- 
' dling enrollments. 



College Pharmacy Gun Club Stages 
Reports Robbery \Six House Dinner 



Burglars Leave Clues; 
Police Remain Baffled 



^erform at Drury 

"ap and Bells Presents 
Shakespeare, Chekhov 



Pi'iday. March 28 — Member.? of 
11) and Bells presented two short 

lays tor the student body of Dru- 

y High School in North Adams 
St week. The performances given 
ere the play within-thc-play 
ene from Shakespeare's "Mid- 
immcr Night's Dream" and the 

Marriage Propo.sal" by Cliekhov. 
Hoth play.s were under the di- 
ition of William J. Martin, In- 
niclor in the Adam.s Memorial 

liealie. Willlaras .students taking 
'■'s in the productions wei^ 

liarles Telly '.'i4, Charles Fisher 
Charles McGowen '54, Robert 

hnoiighs '54, and Seth Schapiro 



Macadam Top Replaces 
Present Tar Covering 



Student Sponsored ' 

The plays wei-e given under the [ 

'onsorship of the Drury Hipth 
^hool Dramatic Arts association. I 

hl.s organization of about 60 stu- j 
nts has announced that it plans ' 
attend the Cap and Bells per- 

™ance of Pirandello's "Henry 

'" being presented at the AMT , 
's week. 



Monday, March 24 — Workmen 
of the Kullahur Brothers Con- 
struction Company, Sai'ris Falls, 
Mass., started preparations today 
for resurfacing of Route 43, which 
connects South Williamstown with 
Hancock, New York Route 22, and 
points south. 

The prcicct is being financed by 
the state under a secondary feder- 
al grant-in-aid. and will entail a 
cost of $325,000. State plans call 
for the complete replacement of 
the present two-lane, trap rock- 
and-tar surfaced road with a new 
macadam .surface. 

Engineers will lay the founda- 
tion of the new road slightly to 
the south of its former location, 
and have designed the new high- 
way to allow for wider shoulders, 
moderation of the steeper grades, 
and smoother curves. Under fed- 
eral regulations, no curve of the 
artery will have less than a 1000 
foot radius. 



Sunday. Mai'ch 23 — Continuing 
Williamstown's crime wave, two 
burglai's broke into the College 
Pharmacy tonight and stole $25 
in cash and an undetermined a- 
mount of merchandise. Police are 
still baffled as to the identity of 
the culprits. 

Accoiding to proprietor Joseph 
(Uea.son. the intruders came 
thiough the back window and 
climbed down the shelves at the 
rear of the store, using a step 
ladder. The bui'glars made then- 
exit through the back door, which 
had been locked from the outside. 

The only available clue found 
thus far consists of two bottle 
openers, left by the burglars. 
These were found in the back of- 
fice of tlie store, along with an 
empty quart bottle of beer, two 
m.ugs, and a saltcellar, all belong- 
ing to the pharmacy, and indicat- 
ing that the thieves were in no 
hurry. Gleason commented that he 
would be glad to return the open- 
ers to their owners on request. 



Sharpshooters Enjoy 
Bear, Coon Meat 

Thursday. March 20— The Wil- 
liams Gun Club sponsored a din- 
nei at the 1896 House as the first 
in a scries of functions in which 
the club and local shooting en- 
thusiasts will .ioln interests. Club 
President Ted Cart '53 headed the 
planning foi' the dinner, tlie chief 
attraction of which was the serv- 
ing of bear and coon meal ob- 
tained by various membei's of the 
community this fall. 

"Whip" PeriT. who w-as in 
charge of obtaining the food 
brought out thirty pounds of bear 
meat and three coons for the 
twenty-two people to en.ioy. It was 
the first time that many of the 
guests had tasted such rustic del- 
icacies. The Gun Club held .shoots 
every Sunday afternoon of the fall 
in Thanatopsis Glen to which peo- 
ple of the community were invited, 
and next year a closer joint re- 
lationship Is planned. 



Capt. Barry Announces Weekend 
Flight for ROTC Upperclassmen 



Group Leaves April 18 

From Westover Field; 

Plans Several Stops 



Monday. March 24 — Captain 
Russell J. Barry, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Air Science and Tactics, an- 
nounced recently that twenty Wil- 
liams upperclassmen will partici- 
pate in a weekend flying trip, 
April 18-20, as part of a program 
to acquaint ROTC students with 
the practical aspects of aviation. 

The trip is scheduled to cover 
several thousand miles, and air- 
minded undei'graduates will have 
an opportunity to take over the 
controls of their plane during 
flight. 

Leave From Westover 
The tioupe will leave from West- 
over Field, located near Spring- 



field. Mass.. early Friday evening, 
and will fly to an as yet undecided 
base in Ohio or Michigan. The trip 
will take approximately four hours. 

Barly Saturday afternoon, the 
men will embai-k again to travel 
to a similarly undecided destina- 
tion, in either Florida. Alabama 
or Missouri. 

Visit Officer's Clubs 

At both the northern and south- 
ern stop-ovei's. students will have 
an opportunity to look over the 
bases. Captain Barry stated that 
the group will probably be able 
to find some social activity at the 
officer's clubs. 

The men will depart on Sunday 
for Westover. Barry announced 
that pieferential rating for the 
trip will be given to seniors, al- 
though .some .iunlors may be ad- 
mitted. 



Bradley Scheduled 
For Spring Dance 




Mary Scott, Spring Houseparty 
vocalist. 



Romaine Inquest 
Indicates Suicide 



County Coroner States 
Death Self-inflicted 

Wednesday, March 26 — In the 
public inquest held today in Wil- 
liamstown district court concei'n- 
ini; the death ol Williams sopho- 
more, Millard Romaine, Jr., Dr. 
George T. Mullen, Berkshire Coun- 
ty medical examiner, testified that 
in his opinion, "It was certainly 
suicide". 

To back up his conclusion. Dr. 
Mjllen noted that wounds indi- 
cated that the .22 caliber rifle, 
fo.ird near the body, had been 
filed "at close contact." He men- 
tioned that Romaine. whose body 
was found Monday morning. Feb- 
ruary I'i, in a third floor i-oom of 
the Beta Theta Pi house, might 
have lived "as long as four or 
five hours" after the shooting. 

Previous testimony by students 
and local and state police officials 
"points to a suicide verdict", local 
papers indicated tonight. Special 
Justice Henry W. Kaliss. pi-esid- 
ing judge, is expected to announce 
his official decision within a week 
or so. 



Music Department 
Schedules Recital 



Talertted Undergraduates 
Featured in Program 



Friday, Mai'ch 28 — As its first 
post-vacation concert, the Music 
Department will present a student 
i-ecital, Friday. April 11. at 8:15 
p.m. in the Currier Hall Lounge. 

Although many of the partici- 
pants in the recital are music stu- 
dents, the concert will also include 
undergraduates not in the depart- 
ment chosen purely on the basis 
of talent and interest. The depart- 
ment also expressed tlie hope that 
these recitals would continue rep- 
ularly in the future. 

Piano Recitals 

Opening the recital. Robert Blum 
'53 will play a piano selection. 
Bach's "English Suite No. 2 in A 
Minor". Immedi.'tciv following. 
James Ford '55 and Paul Kronick 
'53 will present the "Sonata for 
Flute and Keyboard", by Handel 
Beethoven's "Sonata in D Minor". 
Opus 31. No. 2. will be played as 
a piano solo by Donald Jones '53. 
the only music ma.1or in the group. 

After Mozart's "Sonata in F 
Major" by pianist Richard Duval 
'52, James West '55 and George 
LaMore '53 will accompany cellist 
David Bilhorn '55 and pianist Kro- 
nick with violins on "Ti-io Sonata." 
Closing the pi'ogram will be a 
piano solo by John Overbeck '54, 
Fauie's "Theme and 'Variations in 
C-Sharp Minor." 

No admission will be charged for 
^ the program, .sponsored by the 
I Thompson Concert Committee. 



Classes to Hold 
Cole Field Picnics 



Junior Class Plans 
Chapin Jazz Show 



Friday. March 28— On the band- 
stand foi- Spring Houseparty. May 
2-4. will be Will Bradley and his 
orchestra, featuring vocalists Mary 
Scott and Hal Jones. The Junior 
Class housepai'ty committee has 
also scheduled the annual class 
picnics and a tentative jazz con- 
cert. 

Bradley, who has been a band- 
leader most of his life, with the 
exception of a brief intei-lude dur- 
ing the war, has been featured 
with his group all over the coun- 
try. Since la.st May, he has played 
in the East for many college 
dances, 

Danceable Music 

Bradley is a firm believer that 
peo|)le who come to dances should 
get dance music instead of novelty 
tunes and progressive tempos. 
Therefore he specializes in melodic 
and danceable music. 

Ted Cart '53, who heads the 
dance committee, plans to have 
Trahen's, a New York firm take 
care of the decorations in the 
gymnasium. No definite plans for 
the decorations have been decided 
as yet. 

Cole Field Picnics 

The tresiiman and sophomore 
classes will have their picnic Sat- 
urday morning on the lower level 
of Cole Field — weather permit- 
ting. For entertainment, the com- 
mittee, headed by Robert Shorb 
'53, plans free beer, a tug-of-war, 
beer relays, and a soft ball game. 

On the upper level of the field, 
the juniors and seniors will have 
their picnic, complete with beer 
relays and a soft ball game, but 
omitting the tug-ot-war. Picnic 
lunches will be provided by the 
various fraternities and the Cur- 
rier Hall kitchen. 

According to Don Rand '53. in 
chaige of the musical activities of 
the houseparty. the dance com- 
mittee hopes to have another jazz 
concert along the lines of the Win- 
ter Carnival jam .session. 



Naval Reservists 
Leave for Cruise 



Contingent of Eph Gobs 
Face Rugged Training 



Sunday. March 23 — Complying 
with the two-week "training 
cruise" requirements of the U.S.N., 
a complement of twenty-two uni- 
formed Naval Reserve Williams 
undergraduates bid farewell to the 
campus at 7:00 a.m. this morning. 

A crew of four lesei'vists headed 
for the Great Lakes Naval Ti-ain- 
ing Base, while the rest of the 
men embarked for Bainbridge. Md. 
following Saturday evening send 
off celebrations. 

Busies in the Morning 

At their respective ba.ses. the as- 
piring sailors will face a rigorous 
5:30 a.m. rising hour, closely fol- 
lowed by a series of classes. After- 
noon activities will include forty- 
foot leaps into a diving tank, flre- 
flghtlng practice, and calisthenics. 

No actual cruise is provided for 
in the annual two-week program 
but one day is reserved for a tour 
of inspection on either a destroyer 
or an escort ship. 



SUBSCRIBERS 

With this issue, the RECORD 
suspends publication until Sat- 
urday, April 12, 1952. 



2 

fire Wiiii^nii 3a^£04 

North Adams, Massachuietts Willi. imitown, Mnssachusatts 

"Ontered as second doss matter November 27, iy4t, at the post office ol 
North Adams, Massachusetts, under the A. t of March 3, 1 879." Printed by 
Lamb and Hunler, Inc., North Ado tis, Mossochusetts. Published 
Wednesday and Saturooy during the college ear. Subscription price $5.00 
per year. Record Otlice, Jesup Hall, Williams own, 

RECORD Office - Phone 72 Editor - Phone 981 -JK 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

John H. Allan '53 Editor 

Charles E. Lange '53 

Richard C. Porter '53 Managing Editors 

Woodbridge A. D'Oench '53 News Editor 

Thomas A. Belshe '53 

Kay Kolligian, Jr. '53 Sports Editors 

Frederick A. Terry, Jr. '53 Feature Editor 

Staff Photographers; R. Wyman Sanders '54, Charles Eichel '54 

Staff Cartoonist: '."; Thomas Hughes '53 

Associate Editors: 1954 - Q. Abbot, W. R. Aiken, J. Brownell, E. Cowell, 
K. Donovan, G. Davis, C. Elliot, C. Fisher, C. Foster, P. Goldman, 
R. Goldstein, A Home, J. Klein, J. Marr, C. O'Kieffe, W. Warden, 
W. Weodock 
Editorial Staff: 19i4 - W. Redman; 1955 - R. Corey, C. Heodley, 
E. Heppenstoll, P. Hunn, J. Kearney, D. Krehbiel, P. Max, W. McLaugh- 
lin, R. Moore, L. Nichols, 1. Oviatt, N. Reeves, J. Rudd, J. Souse, 
H. Sheldon, R. Smith, E. von den Steinen, R. Willcox. 

BUSINESS BOARD 

John Notz, Jr. '53 Business Manager 

Dudley M. Baker '53 Assistant Business Manager 

Robert O. Coulter '53 ' Assistant Business Manager 

John F. Johnston, II '54 Advertising Manager 

Harold G. Pratt, Jr. '54 Assistont Advertising Manager 

Curtis V. Titus '54 Circulation Manager 

Richard C. Schaub '54 Treasurer 

Business Staff: 1954 - J. Gushee; 1955 - H. Lindsay, H. Moser, G. Olm- 
sted, J. Innes, R. Chadwick, N. Faulkner, H. Smith 
Assistant Editors: Richard T. Antoun '53, Thomas H. S. Brucker '53, 
James J. Cashmore '53 

Volume XLVl March 28, 1952 Number 15 

Non-affiliates Should Elect 
U. C. Representatives 

In the Mait'h 19 i.s.siic of the Rl'XiOIUJ, uticiitioii was called 
to the eiirreiit need lor noii-affiliate re|ireseiit;itioLi on the Under- 
pachiate Council. Two methods lor nicetinir this piohlcni were 
cited; 1) nou-trateniitv men could liold election.s bv classes to 
choose one UC representative per class, or 2) the entire niake-np 
of the council could he altered so that UC nieinbers are selected 
aecordini; to .sonic nicHiod other than a house represcnlative 
system. 

Non-affiliates who led the recent ino\i' h)r Garfield Club's 
dissolution feel that the second ])lan is the onlv one under which 
tliev can rii;httidlv sit in on the cotineil. Tlicv leel that the UC 
is made u]) of iik uibeis of a social svsteni of which thc\' are not 
a part and with which thev disai^rec. To ;iceept council nieinher- 
shi|i under the present svstein would, tliev think, show that die 
uoii-alliliates condone the social svstein as it now stands. We leel 
diat tin's not eiitirelv true and that certain ]-)oiiits show diat iion- 
alliliate council nieinhershi]) are more im|)ortaiit to die eolleije 
than their refii.sal to remain on the outside of student noxeriiinent. 
It is true that the uKijoritv of the \'otint; inemhers of the UC 
are frateruitv representatives, but it is also true that 2o't of the 
votini; members represent either classes or certain caiii|)iis activi- 
ties. The addition of 4 non-fraternitv ineinhers would increase 
this figure to 3;> I/;3!? so it would be e\en more a UC and not an 
intertraternitv council. The simple mecli;iiiieal details of the laii^c 
uiajoritv of council business would be i;rcallv facilitated if llic 
non-alfiliates were re|5reseiitcd. The i^rcat iiuiss ol work done In 
the UC consists larjrelv of coniuumicatini; material from campus 
orfjani/.ations such as the Placement IJureau to die college iiiulci- 
graduate body. If anytliiu!; \ital to the li\es of underf^raduales 
comes before the council, the UC members usually refer the 
material tpiestion back to a student referendum. To accom]5!ish 
these two functions the UC) niust be set up so that its members can 
fjet in touch with dieir eoustitucuts easilv. The loj^ical way to do 
this is bv elcetinj^ representatives from all the various diniiifr cen- 
ters on eaini)us. If central catinir were in effect then a coniplele 
re\aini)iiiu of the (jrcsent method of selectiuf; UC members could 
be undertaken. 

The non-affiliates will be able to further their cause betlcr 
from within the council than from without. For e.vaniple when the 
college now wishes the opinioi, of the non-fraternity men on such 
imi)ortaut issues as recommendations for die new student uiiiuii, 
the administration has no where to turn. In the case of the all- 
college Bowdoin plan tax, llie non-affiliates will bo made to ])ay 
their share although diex- have no \oice in die decision to levy 
this assessment. The non-:iffiliates are willina; to s^iNc up a voice 
in the running of their iiw n affairs to gain solidarity behind tlieir 
move for complete mcinhcrship. We feel, however, that the non- 
affiliates can still work toward this objective as members of the UC; 
The uon-affiliates will be belter off helpin<» to make decisions that 
affect die entire undergraduate body rather dian letting such de- 
cisions be made by men who may not hold the same opinions at 
all. By becominu; affiliated with the Uudernradiiate Council, the 
ntm-fraternity men will help dieir own lot as well as that of Wil- 
liams student government. 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD FRIDAY. MARCH 28. 1952 




Spring Houseparty 1952 A.B. (After Brooks) 



10 the Kditor of the liliCORD: 

llie lollowmg tri'atise was found by nie in the wreckage; ol 
a flying saucer wliicli had craslied in the \iciuity of die Cascades. 

11 IS reprimecl in its eiiuiet)'. i\o scientific explanation lias hecii 
aljle to account lor the lact that it describes an e\eiit which will 
not take place until next .May. 

:ff:;t " .■'& fl: " (tins part was luidecipherable). ft continues, ". . . 
aiKl tlieii we iiescenuca lu an ele\ation of seven dioulsKs, direetly 
above tlic liamlet ol Williainslowii. There was a sign above a 
Uiugy mile street wliieli sanl, 'VVi'lcoine to Spring Uonseparly! 
We could not liiid tue iiieaumg ul this m the dictionary ol I'nmi- 
tivc leriiis' so we decided to aiiglit and iiilorin ourselves. 
Vichii W (Iter 
"Our lirst contact with tliu strange inhabitants was a shock 
to us. Uiiiloiiuca police were Deatnig an oildly-garbed individual 
(messy wlnte shoes) who clutclied desperately at ii glass bottle 
labeled \icliy Water. Ihey linall)' succeeded iii overpowering 
liiiii by sheer loree oi iininbeis. ihey tlieii took the bottle away, 
and, shoutiug triumphaiitl}', carried it oil to a large, ugly, bricK 
and liinestonc building. 

"Disgusted by this display of \iolehce (wc could only as- 
sume that It bad soinefhing; to do with their religious customs as 
It was their holy day) wc loUowed a tliorouglilare until we came 
upon some rather spacious pillared dwellings. Taking acKautage 
ol our m\isibilily, we enteretl one. We came into a large room 
lilletl with sombrely tiressed people. I'heir bclia\ior was \ery 
peculiar, ihey all seemcil to he standing in small groups ol not 
more than sescii. Members ol each gron|) would glance; nervously 
Iroiu tmic to time at the other groups, then at the iiiaiiy time- 
pieces 111 the room. Kueh group wonki lliiich from contact with 
tlie others. I'licy all kept imittering some uniiitclligible chant 
which was barely audihie. One of thein had the mislortmie to 
stumble and stagger a little. The otliers in the room glanced 
aromid in tear, cursing him. One of die females swooned as if 
die sight w iTc too iiuicii for her. By this point we were so siekeiied 
by Uie entire spectacle that wc decided it best to return to our ship 
and our supply ol Krypton Cin. After duo formalities (how good 
it tastes! J we have decided to head north. There is nothing to 
won)' auoiil, however, as Ai'iiio can sleer as well when he lias 

had (The document ends here) 

• Robert C Burroughs 



TURN THE CRANK 

III die lulilor ol the BKCOBD: 

Belemng to Peter Cosgrills fine letter of die March 22 edi- 
tion ol the hecord, 1 cant help but feel that he made one major 
error. In geiu'ral i agree with his \iews, but that iinst sentence, 
"The student boti)' ol Williams slioukl be justly alaruieil at the 
encioaelnneut ol the adiiiinislratioii upon undcrgraelnate lights ', 
was i|uite a shock. Just what arc these "niidergraduate rights' we 
hear about so often? Arc the)- not mere illusions of sell-goveni- 
meiit, representing a rather feeble attempt by the admiuistration 
to bring np their youthful, shiny-faced boys in a spirit of democ- 
racy where an authoritarian lack of leadership prevails? How can 
ail)- one student, or even all students, lay any claims to specific, 
inherent rights of self-go\eniiuent or even personal integrity'r' 

Our rights are just the limitations, or lack of limitations, the 
adniiuistratiou gi\es us to assure that we grow up in onr educa- 
tional .system widi just enough delnsioi'i of independence to 
assure that our natural, youdilnl tenileucies for expression and 
independence will be smoothed (i\er; and the administration can't 
help but leel thai our personal integrity is only in reality a grow- 
ing ego which must be conti'olled. 

Vou see, we have no "rights ', no morality of our own - Uie 
adiniiiistratiou takes care of that. .\s students we study our texts, 
go to our lectures, take our faclnal, memory e.xams which don't 
test understanding but rather our ability to retain factual doe- 
trine. 

And the adiniuistrahon grants iis a few house parties, an 
undergradnate council, and there is our college. We haven't an 
institution but a machine with a weU-known iiame. The admiui-' 
stiatiou turns the crank and oiil comes the finished product, coiii- 
plete widi facts, a delusion of iiideiiendencc, and name attached. 
That is the \Villi:ims graduate, and the adiniiiistratiou, being 
proud that its name has been allixed to another product, eontiiines 
to turn the crank, set the rules, and adjust the morality in such a 
way diat no graduate will enrl up too iii(lependcnt of what the 
college eonsiilers die norm. 

In conclusion, it seems to me that the admuiistration assumes 
teaching is more imiiortant than learning, directing the student 
more important than self-development, control more iin]K)rtant 
diaii independence and integrity. The college can't project their 
maturity onto us - we must find it for ourselves. Control never 
de\eloi)es integrity, but nioro olleii fanaticism, and yet the admin- 
istration, led by the sui)eilati\c |)ressures of our backwood trustees 
and alimini, can't seem to see this. 

,\iid so we can expect more restraint, less independ(;iice, and 
consequently more artificiality and hypocrisy in social life. The 
words "undergraduate rights" are meaningless. 

Richard Hall '54 



'De Gustibus 

Evaluation Of A Coed 



If she's a freshman 

She blushes at naughty 
jokes. 

She s&ys, "Oh please 
stop that." 

She wants to marry a 
football player. 

She thinks midnight is 
late. 

She reads "What every 
youriB girl should know 

She won't date a boy 
who has every had a 
drink. 

She tells her mother 
everything. 

She likes to smooch 



Her motto: 
Knows Best. 



Mother 



She drinks Cokes on a 
date. 



Sophomore 

She smiles at naughty 
jokes. 

She says. "Oh please 
.slop." 

She wants to marry a 
movie star. 

She thinks midnight is 
pretty late 

"How to Win Friends 
and Influence People." 

She won't date a boy 
who has just had a 
drink. 

She tells her roommate 
evei-ythlng. 

She likes to smooch 

Her motto: Death Be- 
fore Dishonor. 

She drinks pink ladles 
on a date. 



Junior 

She laughs at naughty 
jokes. 

She says, "Oh, please." 



She wants to marry a 
capitalist. 

She thinks midnight 
isn't so late. 

"The Art of love" 

She won't date a boy 
who has had over one 
drink. 

She tells her diary ev- 
erything. 

She likes to smooch 
Her motto: Nothing 
ventured nothing gain- 
ed. 

She drhiks highballs 
on a date. 



Senior 

She tells naughty jokes 

She says, "Oh" 

She wants to marry a 
man. 

She thinks midnight is 
midnight. 

"Care and Feeding of 
Infants." 

She won't date a boy 
unless he drinks. 

She doesn't tell a 
damn thing. 

She likes to smooch 

Her motto: Boys will 
be boys 

She drinks anything, 
anytime, anywhere. 



Vxmceion Club 
Loses Privileges 

Tiger Inn Board Bans 
Liquor and Women 



The "Daily Prlncetonlan" re- 
cently announced that the Tiger 
Inn, one of the University's eating 
clubs, has been deprived of party, 
liquor, and women guest privileges 
for an undetermined length of 
time. 

This action was Instigated 
the Tiger's Graduate Board . 
Governors following the club .. 
"misconduct" over the recent Ju- 
nior Prom weekend. 

'Gentlemen's Acreement' 

The eating club's violation was 
contrary to a "Gentlemen's Agree- 
ment", which was signed at the 
beKlnnlng of the school year by 
the presidents of all the clubs. 
The Agreement provided that offl- , 
cers of the organization were re- ' 
sponsible for the behavior of club 
members. i 



by 
of 



The Fishing Season 
Will Soon Be Here 

on hand to help moke your 
season o success are 

Fishing Rods Sinkers 

Lines Reels 

Hooks Flies 

Fishing Boots 

PHILLIPS' 
General Store 



1 1 Water St. 



Phone 89 



Why woit until 
morning? 

When you can get the out. 
■tandlnt newt of the day „„, 
evenlni throufh the full Ui,^ 
wire AsKOcUted Pren tervlce in ' 

0>l|P (Iraiiiirrt;ii 

North Adomi, Mou. 
On tale at 5 p.m. en oil 
Williomitown Newiitmdi 



PINE PLAINS RESTAURANT 

"Nice Place to Eat" 

Home Made Pie Real Beef Homburgers 

Around corner left of traffic light going south 

Right at Traffic Light going north 

Look for Flashing Sign 

PINE PLAINS RESTAURANT 

Opposite Clock Monument 
PINE PLAINS, NEW YORK 



DID YOU KNOW 
THAT YOU HAVE A PLACE IN NEW YORK? 

It's the Williams Club at 24 E. 39th St. Its pleasant 
rooms are yours at special undergraduate rates . . 
Your date will love the Ladies Cocktail Lounge and 
Dining Room . . . and you will feel right at home in 
the bar. 

The Williams Club 

24 East 39th St. 
It's Your Club - We Hope You'll Use It. 

Undergraduates are always welcome 



BRING A DATE 

OUT AND ENJOY 

GOOD FOOD 

AND 
FINE LIQUOR 



Open till 1 




Phon* 267 



Best company 

an Easter bonnet 
ever kept . . . 





Get ready for Easter with Arrow Shirts in white, 

solid colors, and patterns, and Arrow Ties, 



ARROW 



>»» — 

MMTI • nU • spent tHWTf • UNDI*VnA« • HANDKIilCHIIFt 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1952 



Purple INine Preps \CoCaptams Brody Haskell Top 

For April Opener 



Vets Face Battle 
For All Positions 

Holdovers Puffer, Beard 
Return to Mound Duty 



by Pete Goldman '54 

Monday, March 24 — "We won't 
be world beaters, but we'll have a 
pii-lly fair ball club." This was 
Coach Bobby Coombs' appraisal 
of 1952 Williams baseball pros- 
pects as he watched his batlery- 
meii BoiiiB through their paces in 
the; cage today. 

The former major league hurler, 
now in his seventh year at the 
helm of the Eph nine, was quick 
to ({iiallfy his statement. "Pikh- 
ini; is SO't' of the college game", 
he added, "and a lot depends on 
how our stall shapes up. However, 
we liave a veteran nucleus to build 
around and a bunch of good look- 
ing, sophomores coming up." 
Puffer, Beard Return 

The returnees Coombs referred 
to include the brilliant pitching 
duo of last year's Little Three 
chumps, Mike Puller and John 
Board. Puller, a right bander, won 
five games for the Ei)hs last sea- 
.son, including a near no-hittcr 
against Harvard in the finale, 
wliile southpaw Beard notched 
four victories. 

Although Howie Babcock and 
Henry Norwood are the only other 
retuining moundsmen. Coombs has 
added nine sophomores to his stall, 
including Rog Moody. Dewey Rey- 
nold.s, and Paul Murphy. Moody 
was the number one starter for 
last year's freshman nine. 
Open Against Union 

Elsewhere on the ball club, var- 
sity veterans face battles for ev- 
See Page 4, Col. 4 



Martin Enters National 
Intercollegiates 

Dick Martin, newly elected 
co-captain of the Williams 
.swimming team, will attempt 
to continue the brilliant record 
he has maintained in the Nat- 
ional Intercollegiate Swimming 
this week-end. ■ 
events to be held at Princeton 

The lone Williams entry will 
be competing against the na- 
tion's top performers. Martin, 
ranked by his best times in the 
50, 100, and 220 yard events, 
has been placed among the top 
ten swimmers in the country 
for tliose events. 



Pttcksters Select 
Pike '53 Captain 

Bell, Harvey, Pike Speak 
At '96 House Banquet 

Wednesday. March 26 — John 
Pike '53 of Winchester, Mass. was 
elected captain of the 1952-53 Hoc- 
key Team at the annual squad 
dinner held at the 1896 House 
this evening. 

Pike, who was left wing on the 
first line this year with Captain 
Jim Harvey '52 and John Beard 
'53. is a graduate of Belmont Hill 
Academy where he played two 
years of varsity hockey. The two- 
year Eph letterman also won his 
Fi-eshman Numerals in hockey. 
Coach, Captains Speak 

Coach Frank Bell. Captain Har- 
vey and Captain-elect Pike de- 
livered speeches at the banquet 
in reviewing the past .season. 
There was discussion of fresh- 
man cllKibility for next year's 
team and of eliminating such top- 
flight teams as St. Lawrence from 
the Williams .schedule. 



Host of Track Team Candidates; 
Planskymen to Hold Six Meets 



liij Hill licilman '54 

Monday, -Maroli 24— Willi a liost of lottcrnicn rctnrninj^ from 
last year's oncc-jjcaten s(|ua(l and several fine prospects up from 
llie f9.51 l,lltlc Three freslnnaii cluunps, Tony Plansky's track 
leani will start the season witli tlirec-deep power in almost every 
event. Tile Purple spikenien have been working for two weeks on 
llie indoor and board tracks jji preparation for the concentrated 
six-meet schedule which starts April 23 at the University of Mass- 
achusetts. 

(>)-Captains jack IJrody and Tim Haskell will lead the team 
inlo action, lirody, a sprinter and broad juni])er, will be j^iven 
plenty of competition in the 100 and 220 yd. dashes by letterman 
Albie Fletcher and sophomore star 13ana Fearon. 
Slivii'^ ill Mile 

Fearon also rims the 440 alonj; with Pete Cosgriff, a junior, 
and Ted C^ypiot, another sophomore. Haskell is the leading perfor- 
mer in the middle-distance event, and has plenty of supjiort in the 
.S80 honi |ohn iMeese and Rob |ones. Haskell, liruce Banta, IJttle 
Three cross country cliampion, and Joe Rice form an especially 
stronji; trio of niilers. 

In Ihe two-im'le Banta will join forces with two veterans, Doiij^ 
Wilson :ind Frank Olmstead, to fill out the flat race jier.sonnel 
The hurdles find seniors Dick Walters and Georf^e Steinbrenner 
runniu)^ stride for stride once aj^ain. Other hurdlers are (ieorire 
Kelsey in the highs and Gus Campbell in the lows. 
See Page 4, Col. 1 



Dekes Cop Intramural Swimming 
Crown; Zeta Psi Places Second 



Wednesday, March 26 — Delta 
Kappa Epsilon gained a victory in 
the final event, the 200 yd. relay, 
to defeat second place Zeta Psi 
34-21 and capture the Interfra- 
ternity Swimming Meet. Delta Up- 
silon placed third scoring 17)5 
points, only a point and one-half 
in front of fourth scoring Kappa 
Alpha. 

A narrow victory in the 100 yard 
breaststroke by John Allan gave 
the Zetes a 21-16 edge over the 
Deke's with only the closing event 
to be run off. Forced to grab eith- 
er first or second in the relay, the 
DKE's nosed out second place 
Kappa Alpha for eight points and 



the meet. 

Murray rouble Winner 

Parker Murray, Kappa Alpha, 
was the only swimmer to place 
first in two events. Murray scored 
his 10 points in the 50 and 100 
yard dashes. The Zetes started the 
afternoon well by taking a first in 
the opening 150 yard medley re- 
Icy. Don Wyman added five points 
to the DKE score in the 200 yard 
freestyle. Murray's double victory 
surrounded Boyd Pall's win in the 
diving. 

Delta Upsilon took their only 
first place of the meet as Peterson 
copped the 100 yard backstroke a- 
head of DKE, Zete and Phi Gam. 







"'"■ «,tv ol M"""' 
University 



To ^^^^. 






Be Happy- 

fiOUKKY! 



>^\^:i"^op. •' 



^"^ "" c ThomP'°" 
Peter t- (;^Ueie 
Dart"io"<h ^ 




In a cigarette, taste 
makes the difFerence-i 
and Luckies taste better ! 

The difference between "just smoking" and 
really enjoying your smoke is the taste of a 
cigarette. You can taste the difference in the 
smootfier, mellower, more enjoyable taste of a 
Lucky . . . for two important reasons. First, 
L.S./M.F.T.— Lucky Strike means fine tobacco 
. . . fine, mild tobacco that tastes better. Second, 
Luckies are made to taste better . . . proved best- 
made of all five principal brands. So reach for a 
Lucky. Enjoy the cigarette that tastes better! 
Be Happy— Go Lucky! Buy a carton today! 

L.S/M. FT- ludcy' Strike 
Means Fine Tobacco 



>«"^/^ 



DouiS'-'f/rPo'"""'' 
ynivers^'y 



ex. I. Co. 



AMEItlCA'B LIADINO MANUFACTURER OF CIQARITTKS 




HEADLINER 



by Kay KoUisian, Jr. 



w 



ITH the lapld approach of spring to Willlamstown and en- 
virons the winter sports seasons fade into the past, and must 
be content to rest in the record books for the remainder of their 
existence. It was a winter of ups and downs, with memories both 
good and bad. 

Fresh in our minds is the amazing performance of Bob Muir's 
.swimmers. Dick Martin, one of the mosi outstanding swimmers in 
the history of the school, although severely handicapped by illness, 
came through with twin wins in the New Englands. Over the course 
of the year, however, it was a team performance which brought 
both the Little Three Title and the New England Championship 

With the return of Dick Squires (u eligibility. Coach Chaffee 
was able to guide his relatively inexprrienced squash squad to 
decisive victories over both Wesleyan and Amherst, taking his sixth 
Little Three Crown in a decade of coaching, 

Skiing — great! In his second year at Williams, Coach Ralph 
Townsend not only brought us the Class B title for the second con- 
secutive year, but also gave Williams a Class A rating for 1953. 
AN ENTHUSIASTIC, never-say-die winter track team, under 
the tutelage of Tony Plansky, went all out in its quest for 
victories. Led by Captain George Steinbrenner, the trackmen turned 
in a superb showing in both small college and "big time" competition. 

A thumping win over Amherst for the Purple wrestlers provided 
sweet consolation after an otherwise unsuccessful season. In the New 
Englands. individual crowns were captured by Callaghan, Edwards, 
and Shorb, giving Williams a surprising second place. 

Coach Al Shaw, faced with the loss of four-fifths of his great 
1950-51 basketb::ll team, had to rebuild around a nucleus of inex- 
perienced sophomores. Only with a sensational showing at the Pratt 
Gym were the Lord Jeffs able to take the "Potted Ivy League" Champ- 
ionship. 

piNALLY. we come to the bottom of the ladder — and we all 
know what's there. Yes, hockey! Tacked on to an otherwise 
good winter showing, the hockey season stands out worse than the 
Ijroverbial sore thumb. Winning but one or two games a season is not 
fun. And when the losses come by 12. 15. and 20 goal margins, just how 
long can spirit and desire to play last'.' How much longer must Wil- 
liams hockey squads face teams which obviously outclass them? 
How long will a bunch of hard-working, earnest guys who play for 
the love of the sport, be subjected to the miseries of inadequate faci- 
lities, conditions, and coaching. A cliange must be made, and made 
soon, if hockey is to remain a major sport here at Williams. A change 
must be made if tlie college continues to offer organized hockey 
as an attraction to men entering Williams. 

This problem is one which has been hashed over, and re-hashed; 
it's been run through the pages of the RECORD many times. And if 
you don't believe what we say, just ask any one active on the hockey 
squad. Eirly morning trips to Troy, poor home conditions, unorgan- 
ized practice sessions — the status quo will have to gol 

As we see it, and we would nut be alone in this matter, institu- 
ting an informal hockey jjrogram would provide the most suitable 
means to alleviate the situation until further improvements can be 
effected. 

ELL. we started out with a glimpse back at a winter season 
which in many respects is one to be proud of: but that "sore 
thumb" keeps popping up. getting sorer and sorer. 



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J. Paul Sheedy* Switched lo Wildrool Cream-Oil 
Because He Flunked The Finger-Nail Tcsl 




*'Taks your hat 'n goat and scr-r-raml" Sheedy's girl said. "I 
won't give you a date, but your hair sure gives me a billy-laugh!" 
But-but-but-" he butted. Said she,"Havcn't you herd of Wildroot 
Cream-Oil? For well-groomed hair it can't be bleat! Non- 
alcoholic. Contains Lanolin. Helps you pass the Fingcr-Nail 
Test. Relieves dryness. Removes loose dandruff." So Shecdy got 
"Wildroot Cream-Oil and now every gal wants to horn in on his 
time! Better milk 29^ out of your roommate and hoof it to the 
nearest drug or toilet goods counter. Buy Wildroot Cream-Oil, 
America's favorite hair tonic. And ask for it on your hair next 
time you goat to your favorite barber shop. Then no other goat 
will get your nanny! 

* o// 3 1 So. Harris HillRd., WilliamstiUe. .V. Y. 
Wildroot Company, Inc., Buflfalo 11, N. Y. 




THE WILLIAMS RECORD FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1952 



Lacy 



RECENT INOPPORTUNE EPIS- 
TLE TO THE YALE DAILY 
NEWS IS MOST DISHEARTEN- 
ING AND HAS DESTROYED MY 
PUERILE ILLUSIONS AS TO 
YOUR SENSE OP PROPRIETY 
UNDER THE CIRCUMSTANCES 
I FEEL COMPELLED TO WITH- 
DRAW MY RECENT ACCEPT- 
ANCE OP THE INVITATION 
'I ENDERED ME PRIVATELY BE- 
FORE TODAY'S PUBLICATION 
OF YOUR OFFER I CONSIDER 
YOUR ACTION MORALLY COR- 
RUPT INTELLECTUALLY DE- 
PRAVED AND IN SHORT BE- 
NEATH CONTEMPT OET THEE 
TO A NUNNERY. KENNETH W 
BUCKLEY JR. YALE '54 
Neo-Amazoiihin 

The "Dartmouth Daily" took a 
particularly dim view of tlie pro- 
ceedings. Preferrini,' llip boy-gets- 
gii'l tradition to Mi.s.s Blodgett's 
neo-Araazonian appiouch, they ed- 
itorialized, "It's a doKKone shame 
that you had to bother us with 
your silly letter. 

"Our leader - James Thurber - 
h s warned us in his many tracts 
on the battle of the se.xes to be 
chary of such insidious strategems 
as yours. Your letter sounds giddy 
and gay and innocent enough, but 



Track . . . 

The same sort of depth exists 
in the field events. SiJrinters Bro- 
dy and Fearon will co in the broad 
jump along with Cypiot. while 
Walters. Al Post, Kcl.sey, and pos- 
sibly Ken Perry will be pole vault- 
ing. The two versatile sophomores, 
Kelsey and Cypiot, are the lead- 
ing candidates in the high jump 
with Kelsey having cleared six feet 
and Cypiot threatening that mark. 

Last year's number one shot 
putter and discus thrower. Bob 
Howard, is back but will throw 
with his leg heavily taped due to 
a football injury. Backing him 
are George McAleenan and Chuck 
Salmon in the shot and "Cappy" 
Ad ms in tlie platter throw. 

Pete Sterling and Kelsey will 
throw the javelin with Sterling 
capable tf getting the spear out 
165 feet. Salmon, Perry, and Lou 
Haeberle will throw the hammer. 



ISRAEL 

1 952 
SUMMER INSTITUTE 

of the Jewish Agency for Polestine 

July 8 - August 25 

TRAVEL - in Israel - stop- 
over in Europe 

WORK - in agricultural set- 
tlements 

STUDY - at the Hebrew 
University 

Applicants between 18-35 

Write NOW for further informa- 
tion to: 

Israel Summer Institute 

c/o Intercollegiate Zionist 

Federation of America 

131 West 14 Street 

New York 11, N.Y. 



actually it's another inroad into 
our male prerogative. It just goes 
to show what a mistake the Nine- 
teenth Amendment has turned out 
to be." 

Amherst Hurt 

From Amherst came a hurt let- 
ter written by a representative of 
the slighted "Student" board. "On 
behalf of all Amherst men and 
the 'Amherst Student' particular- 
ly I must call to your attention 
the insult you have paid Amherst 
students and alumni." 

"We at Amherst believe we are 
the eiiual of any college men you 
could have contacted. With our 
tradition of fair play we find it 
difhcult to understand why you 
failed to contact us in your pres- 
ent difflculty. Whei'eas other men's 
colleges may .scoff at your plight 
we cannot do that. Perhaps be- 
cause we are located so near to 
two of your sister institutions we 
understand better than most what 
the college girl really is. There Is 
no need to run a contest as far as 
Amherst is concerned." 
VVirkrd Williams 

Summarizing the content of her 
letters in her lavishly furnished 
room, Lucy remai'ked that "only 
Williams men seem to possess a 
sense of humor imwarped by con- 
ceit. From their letters I charac- 
terize the average Williams man 
as a real nice guy decked in 
striped ties and gray flannels. 
Their letters however, suggest that 
they might be rather frustrated, 
and that Williamstown is quite a 
wicked place. I'd rank them sec- 
ond in sex appeal only to the 
Princetonians." 

Although "L" day was still a few 
days ofl' 'March 27 1 the Berk- 
shire County Miss 'Great Har- 
rington I had hopes for many more 
letters: preferably in the good- 
humored, gray-flanneled, sexy, 
Williams style. 



Henry IV . . . 




dialogue. What we have here is 
not the language of real life — but 
a rather specialized idiom whlcn 
bogs down in some over-length 
fii'st act utterances. 

Weems, Dewey Add Humor 

Theodore Weems' characteriza- 
tion of the grotesquely pompous 
Dr. Genoni is faithfully conceived 
and does much to lighten the bui- 
den of Pirandello's heavy-handed 
intellectuality. Similarly effective 
is Joseph Dewey as Belcredi, the 
sceptic and humorist. Together 
with Sally Long, who is most con- 
vincing as Donna Matilda, the 
thiee of them try to tear from 
Henry the mask which he has 
worn so long and bring him back 
again into their life which is void 
of "the pleasure of history." 

These three are most effective 
in tlieir scenes with Heiuy where 
they are nuide to feel the incon- 
gruity of their situation: less so 
in the moments where they appear 
alone and are forced to stand 
or fall on the expository worth 
of their dialogue. Weems' por- 
trayal of the nervous little doctor 
who is filled with so many ridi- 
culous notions of his own impor- 
tance does mucli to relieve the 
monotony of these scenes. This is 
insufficient, however, to build 
these interludes in anticipation of 
Henry's entrances, and they serve 
merely as a series of rather tedious 
expository vignettes. 

Except for the extremely awk- 
v't.rd final scene where Henry 
clumsily runs through Belcredi 
v.'ho is held like a sitting target, 
the production is technically 
jound. The costtunes and sets are 
superb while the lighting is re- 
sourceful and original. 



BRINO 
YOUR CAR 
TO US FOR 

EXPERT SERVICE 

€Ut«t 

fiENUINE FORD PARTS 



You'll lik* our 
Frompf 5erv/ct 



"It was jusl n little outcluor cafe, 
until tlicy started pulling lots of 
Angostura* in the drinks!" 

AROMATIC BITTERS 
MAKES BETTER DRINKS j 

P.S. Angostura Hitters is what you put 
in to make the jUiinr come out in Man- i 
hatlans and Old f'ashioncds. And the ' 
same goes for soups, salads, and sauces! ' 



You'll liko our 
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You'll Ilk* our 
frhndly Way of 
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HARRY SMITH 

INCORPORATED 




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Baseball . . . 

ery position as the April 16 open- 
er against Union appioaches. Be- 
1 hind the bat, last season's starter. 
Bob DePopolo, will have to tight 
olf the sophomore trio of Bill Le- 
wis, Lee Monioe and Rit Ames to 
retain his berth. 

Wall Cieer, who swung a ,450 
war club as fieshman receiver in 
1951, has been moved into con- 
tention with Bob Ouchterloney, 
Dick Whitehead and Dick HoUing- 
Lon for the thiid base slot. 

Hawkins Shifted to Short 

Jack Hawkins, a reformed third 
sacker with a .444 freshman bat- 
ting average, has been shifted to 
shortstop in the infield shakeup. 
Also in the running for the short- 
field are Jell Miller, freshman re- 
gular a year ago; Charles Harris, 
and Reed Foster. 

At first, sophomore Owen Maher 
pits his power-hitting ability a- 
gainst the fielding genius of Pete 
Callahan, wliile Dave Palmer looms 
as the dark horse for the post va- 
cated by Harry Sheehy. Captain 
Billy Callaghan returns to the 
keystone position. 

Two Vets in Outfield Muddle 

In the outfield, varsity holdovers 
Tom Dorsey and Pete Connolly 
take on sophomore Paul Zeck- 
hausen and ex-jayvee's Steve 
Klein. Bill Kinkead and Bill Mill- 
er in the wide open struggle for 
picket line positions. 

Coombs' outer cordon became 
depleted by the loss of Jolin Kul- 
sar, and graduates Shay Lynch 
and Pete Fisher. Kulsar has an- 
nounced that he will give up base- 
ball. 



Police Investigate Research Firm; 
Princeton Authorities Claim Fraud 



Kiiilav, Muieii iS-l'^rilos and Morgan, a New York Caty 
si'aicli linn, is currciitiv Ix'iiJH iiivi'sti^;atctl by New jersey Si 
I'oliee lor llic use of Iraiidiileut pollluK teelini<nics. The In 
personal (|iiestioiialres lia\'e been senl to slinleiits at sv\, 
eastern eolle>;<'S, iueliuliiif^ Williauis, llar\ai-(l ami I'riiieetou. 

'I'lie poliee probe was toiielied oil bv a report Iroiii tlie I'm, 
ton aiitliorilies that, altliou.nh tlie loriiis stale tlial tlie stud 

will remain anonymous, they con-|j- __. 

tain secret code numbers. Such a aire, 
method was justified by the firm's 
Artliur J. Morgan as "an estab- 
lished practice to speed up the 
return of forms," 

(iovernment Action 

United States Postal authorities 
have stated that, should the firm 
attempt to i.ssue second question- 
aires or to contact students tor a 
per.sonal interview, such action 
would constitute fraudulent use 
of the mails for misrepresentation, 

Reseaicli at Williams has sub- 
stantiated the Princeton report of 
code numbers. When subjected to 
ultra-violet light, the form sent 
to Jay McElroy '52 revealed the 
identification mark in the lower 
left-hand corner of the question- 



re- 
:ite 
ii's 
ral 



■111 



The foim itself requests "pc 
nent information" conceniinn 
student's family, father's pro: 
sion, and the estimated am, 
family Income, Questions al, 
the individual's social schola 
and extra-curriculHr activi 
were also included. 

The extent of the poll is rev' 
ed by the fact that over 200 I i 
vard students have reported 
ceptlon of the form. 

As yet, there has been no o 
cial release of the number of \' 
liams and Princeton students 
received the polls. One Willi: 
freshman was contacted a .sec 
time when he failed to answer 
original ifquest for informnlK 



I he 

•'S- 

'lal 
lilt 
Uc, 
: ie,s 



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PRESCRIPTION OPTICIAN 
No. Adams 1136 



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74 M.MN STREET NORTH ADAMS 



Campus Interviews on Cigarette Tests 

No. 3 6... THE OTTER 



M 




A 



usually mild-manneretl and easy-going 
lad, he really made the fur fly when he realized 
the trickiness of most of the so-culled cigarette 
mildness tests! He knew there was one 
honest test of cigarette mildness. Millions of smokers 
everywhere know, too - there's one true test! 

It's the sensible test ... the 30-Day Camel 
Mildness Test, which simply asks you to try Camels 
as your steady smoke - on a pack-after-pack, 
day-after-day basis. No snap judgments! Once 
you've tried Camels in your "T-Zone" 
(T for Throat, T for Taste), you'll see why . . . 

After all the Mildness Tests . , 

Camel kods d 




vemr 






f tr^ ttilli 



Volume XLVI, Number 16 



Purple Yawl Wins 
Chesapeake Race 
For McMillan Cup 

Maclay Pilots 'Intrepid' 

To Edge Cantab Crew 

In 10-Team Regatta 

Auimpolis, Md., April 6 — Skip- 
pti bill Maclay piloted the Wil- 
liBiiis College yawls "Intrepid" 
and "Resolute" to victory over 
nine other competing entries to- 
day ill the annual two-day Mc- 
Mill^ui Cup regatta. It marked the 
first I ime the Ephs have won since 
the llastern Intercollegiate Cham- 
pionship Bob Bavier copped the 
uoiJliy two years running in 1839 
and 1940. 

Williams placed second in each 
race to collect a winning total of 
20 points. The Harvard yawl 
"Fliil", skippered by John Bishop, 
wliicli won the first race In two 
hours 12 minutes and 10 .seconds 
dropped to a fourth place today, 
but remained second In the series 
Willi 19 14 points. 

Behind Harvard were Navy, 17 
points Cornell, 15 1/4; Pi-inceton, 
15; Trinity, 13; MIT. 9; Tufts and 
Syracuse, tied with 8, and Drexel 
with 6. 

50 mph Winds 

Fifty mile an hour .squall wind.s 
buffeted the 44 ft. craft in Sat- 
urday's sailing. Having replaced 
H blown-out mainsail Just before 
the race, the Eph sailors Jumped 
the .starting gun, but gained a po- 
.sition in the middle of the fleet 
a,s the first wmdward mark was 
rounded. Tacking westward to the 
Maryland shore the "Kesolute" 
picked up three boats on the next 
leg and trailed Harvard to the 
finish line by only four seconds. 

At 10:15 a.m. this morning the 
t<^n yiiwlo cut the starting line 
with lee rails awash as they reach- 
ed into 36 mile per hour gusts. 
The twenty mile course almost 
doubled yesterday's twelve mile 
run. Sailing with a genoa Jib, the 
"Intrepid" held the fleet in its 
wuke at the first mark. 
Cornell Wins 

Changing headsalLs cost the Eph 
entry two places, but on a ten mile 
windward leg the Williams crew 
spotted calm water and no.sed in- 
to second place behind Tufts at 
the mark. Maclay tacked upwind 
on the final leg to beat Tufts, but 
followed Cornell's "Vigilant" a- 
iross the finish line by a scant 
six seconds. The winning time tor 
the race was three hours and four 
minutes. 

Crewlng for the Purple were 
Williams Yacht Club Commodore 
I'odd Mauck, Doug Reed, John 
Clarey, Brett Boocock, Carl Aus- 
trian and Tom Pelrce. 



Eph Sailors in Chesapeake Race 




3^^^xrfjJt 



SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 1952 



PKICE 10 CEN'l S 




■^Tesiiber' of the ^\:l|ianls crew of the "Intrepid" weather a 
•: licsamake Bay Squall cm Iheir way to winninc: the McMillan Cup 
Regatta. 



Spring Street Robbers Arraigned; 
Local Youths Confess to Crimes 



By Al Ilorne 

Monday. April 7-Two boy-,, seniors at Williamstown High School, 
pleaded guilty in district court this morning to a series of nine rob- 
beries on Spring Street and elsewliere in Williamstown, in which 
cash and merchandise estimated at $1069.29 was taken. They were 
both placed under ball of $2,000 each and ordered bound over for 
the grand Jury by Special Justice Henry W. Kaliss. 

The two youths, Robert F.O . — . 

Monette and Carey R. McLaln, i 

were arrested at their homes ' NcW Yofk SymphoHy 



Jr 



Saturday afternoon after a police ; _, . oni 

investigation of several montlis. I lO Appear at Kll 

They are accu.sed of breaking into 
two stores and the Boston & 
Maine station office, and Monette 
has also been charged with four 
additional thefts. 



Mitropoulos to Conduct 
Philharmonic Orchestra 



Walsh Victimized 

The first break in the series, at 
the House of Walsh, was said to 
have occurred Augu.st 1, 1951. 
while the most recent theft, in 
wliich only Monette participated, 
took place April 3, again at 
Walsh's. During the eight months 
which intervened, the College 
Pharmacy. Hart's Drug Store, tlie 
Co-op. the railroad station and. 
on three other occasions, the 
House of Walsh, were broken 
into and items such as suits, 
shirts, a camera and a portable 
radio were seized. 

In five raids, the House of 
Walsh lost an estimated $621.50, 
while the Co-op's toll was $184.50 
in a single break. The College 
Pharmacy reported a loss of 
money and goods valued at $137.54, 
and Hart's was missing $125.75 
after Monette visited it on the 
night of March 16. The five thefts 
In which both boys participated 
netted a total of $657.79. including 
a shut-out at the railroad station. 



Saturday, April 12 — Dlmitri 
Mitropoulos will direct the New 
York Phllarmonic Symphony Or- 
cliestra at the Rennselaer Poly- 
technic Institute Field House, 
Saturday evening. April 19. 

The program will include "Pre- 
lude and Allegro" by Coupcrln- 
Milhaud, "Dances from Galanta" 
by Kodaly and "Suite from Pet- 
rouchka ' by Starvinsky. Tickets 
may be obtained from the Field 
House box office. 

Mitropoulos Debut in 1936 

Mitropoulos, the conductor of 
the Phllarmonic Symphony, made 
his American debut In 1936 with 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
After several seasons with this 
company, Mitropoulos became 
conductor of the Minneapolis 
Symphony Orchestra. In 1949 he 
became associate director of the 
New York Phllarmonic with Leo- 
pold Stowkowski. 

The N. Y. Phllarmonic was 
founded in 1842 and combined 
with the N. Y. Symphony in 1928 
to form the present group. 



ChaHeemen Down 
William and Mary 

Lose Five Matches 
During Spring Tour 

Wednesday, April 9-Coach Clar- 
ence Chaffee's tennis .squad pick- 
ed up practice, experience and one 
victory in its annual southern 
jaunt during the spring vacation. 
Playing six matches in a week, 
the squad lost to Duke. North 
Carolina twice, Virginia, the Coun- 
try Club of Virginia, and defeated 
William and Mary In the last 
match of the trip. 

After two days of practice the 
team engaged Duke at Durham, 
and came out on the short end of 
a 9 1/2 — 4 1/2 score. Dick Squires 
started his second year as the top 
player for the Purple by defeating 
Kes Deimhng in three sets 6-1, 
3-6. 10-8. Pete Pickard playing no. 
7 scored the only other win in the 
singles, downing Simpson 6-4, 6-0. 
E'romise of good doubles emerged 
from this match as both Squires 
and captain Hank Norton, and the 
team of Soapy Symington and 
John Brownell won in straight 
sets. 

N, C. Sweeps Two 

A strong University of North 
Carolina team, sporting four 
freshman trounced the team 13-2 
ill the first of two encounters. Al 
Pulkerson at no. 6 and Pickard 
were the only Chatfeemen to win, 
both in straight sets. Del Sylvia 
led the Tar Heel's victory with a 
(i-4, 3-6. 6-3 win over Squires, 
while Herb Browne, last year's in- 
terscholastic champion, playing 
no. 2 edged out Norton 3-6, 6-2. 
6-4. 

In the second meeting between 
the two teams, with every other 
position reversed, the Ephs took a 
10-5 defeat. Squires defeated 
Browne in three sell-fought f:ets 
See Page 2, Col. 4 



Paragraphs in the News 



The Freshman Class at Amherst 
College recently voted in favor of 
a total membership policy for the 
Jeff fraternities. The poll reveal- 
ed that 88':; of the freshmen vot- 
ing are in sympathy with this 
proposal. 

Reaching 75''; of the freshmen, 
the poll also disclosed that 97% 
of those questioned wanted to Join 
a fraternity this year. Of the re- 
maining three percent, half ex- 
pressed a desire to Join the Lord 
Jeff Club and the rest wanted to 
remain Independent. 

e « e e e 

With the advent of spring wea- 
ther, the Williams Gun Club un- 
der the leadership of Ted Cart 
'53 is planning a series of weekly 
shoots at Thanatopsis Valley. 
These events will begin tomorrow 
and will continue until the Sunday 
before examinations. 

All those interested, regardless 
of experience, are welcome to Join 
the sportsmen. Free instruction 
will be given weekly and rifles will 
be supplied to those attending. 
« • « • • 

A recent vote conducted by the 
student senate of Colgate Univer- 
sity revealed that a majority of 
the Undergraduates are In favor 
of a five day week for all members 



of the student body. This proposal 
was closely followed by a move to 
keep the present six day week with 
special weekends throughout the 
year. 

o o a o 

The University of Massachusetts 
has invited all foreign students of 
the New England area to an In- 
ternational Conference to be held 
April 19-20 on the Massachusetts 
campus. The conference plans to 
help these students talk over their 
problems, exchange their ideas, 
and become better acquainted 
with each other's interests. 

The cost of the weekend. Which 
includes registration fee, room ac- 
commodation and board, will be 
five dollars. Registration blanks 
have been sent to the advisors of 
foreign students on most New Eng- 
land campuses. 

a o e e e 

About two out of every three 
college students stated that they 
total more than ten hours of 
study time during a normal school 
week, according to the ACP Nat- 
ional poll of Student Opinion, The 
vast majority of the students fell 
in the ten to 30 hour category with 
a mere five percent working over 
the 30 hour limit. 

The question, as asked college 



Williams Golfers 
Lose Dixie Tilts 



Duf field, Brayer Bow 
To Norfolk Debaters 

Sunday, March 30 — The 
Norfolk Prison debaters won 
a victory over a Williams team 
for the second lime this year, 
as Richard Duffield '52 and 
William Brayer '53 went down 
to defeat, upholding the affir- 
mative of the topic. Resolved: 
That the reserve clause in ba.se- 
ball should be condemned. 

The Williams duo lost the 
decision by a unanimous vote of 
the three Judges, all connected 
with the sporting world. Ear- 
lier this year Norfolk defeated 
the Williams team of Arnold 
Levin '52 and Donald Gold- 
stein '53 on the subject of so- 
cialized medicine. ' 

On April 26-27 the Adelphlc 
Union will run their own tour- 
nament, with 14 schools par- 
ticipating. The topic to be dis- 
cu.ssed will be Resolved: That 
the United States should send 
an ambassador to the Vatican. 



Weather Hinders 
l^ractice Sessions 
for Purple Nine 

Captain Callaghan Leads 

Nucleus of Veterans; 

'51 Battery Returns 



students all over the country, 
was: "Aside from mid-term week 
and final examination week, how 
much studying time do you esti- 
mate you spend during a normal 
week?" A senior in social work 
replied, "I work 52 hours a week 
and squeeze my studies in when- 
ever I can." 



Human relations workers at 
the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology want to know what a 
Radcliffe girl would do if she had 
an illegitimate child. 

A poll containing this and many 
other problems has been given to 
the Radcliffe girls in an attempt 
to test their abilities to predict 
the reactions of other college 
girls. Those taking the test were 
given a questionaire with ten 
problems and list of possible ans- 
wers to each of the hypothetical 
situations. 



The Traditions Committee of 
tire Amherst Student Council has 
suggested changing the color of 
the freshman beanie from green 
to the college color of purple. The 
change will also include placing 
the class numerals on the tradi- 
tional frosh headgear. 



MacManus, Rand Lead 
Vacation Trip Scoring 

By Gerry Davis 

Saturday. April 12 — Hopes for 
a successful season are high in 
the minds of the Purple golfers 
who recently returned from the 
annual southern trip. Meeting 
tome of the southland's outstand- 
ing linksmen without the benefit 
of any winter practice, the Eph- 
men were unable to win any of 
their three matches, but gained 
experience on the trip which 
should prove a valuable asset a- 
gainst northern opposition during 
the regular season. 

After spending three days In 
the vicinity of Southern Pines, 
North Carolina where they played 
their first rounds of golf since 
last fall, the Williams team moved 
1,0 Durham on Thursday, April 3. 
meeting Duke University. Playing 
at the Hope Valley course, the Eph 
men fared poorly with Frank Mac- 
Manus' 71 the outstanding roimd 
m a 24-0 loss under the Nassau 
system of scoring. 

Rand Low Scorer 

Chapel Hill and a match with 
North Carolina was the next stop 
on the Purple itinerary. Morgan 
Coleman was the only man able 
to break the scoring ice as the 
Tarheels triumphed 35-1. Jim 
Tompkins, playing in the number 
three slot came through with a 
fine round, but could not match 
his opponent's sub-par 68. 

The final and most successful 
contest from the Purple viewpoint 
look place Saturday at Charlottes- 
ville against the Virginia Cavaliers. 
Scoring under the customary New 
England three points-per-four- 
some plan, the Ephmen forced the 
Cavaliers to go all out before the 
home team was able to gain a 6-3 
victoi-y. Don Rand's 76 was the 
low Williams score, with Rand, 
playing number five. Moro at 
number four and Kaufman, num- 
ber six accounting for the three 
Purple victories. 



Lacrossemen Win 
One Spring Match 

Gain Needed Experience 
On Southern Journey 

Tuesday, April 8 — Ralph Town- 
send's lacrosse eleven returned 
from their spring vacation .south- 
ern swing today with a 17-5 
tjouncing of North Carolina and a 
wealth of badly-needed game ex- 1 
perience to their credit. The ex- 
i;erience was f.cquired the hard 
way. as the Ephmen absorbed 
.'ihellackings from Army i20-l>, 
Maryland il0-2i. and Virginia 
123-31 in th* trip's other three 
outings. 

rhe Southward excursion was 
not the dismal failure which the 
iatler three debacles would seem 
to indie, te, however, for the Pur- 
ple were playing out of their class 
with practically no previous prac- 
tice, while their opponents had 
been working out for belter than 
a month. 

Van Dusen Nets Six 

Bruce Van Dusen led the April 
2 triumph over North Carolina 
with six goals and four assists. 
Ted Johnson scored four times 
for the Ephs. and Ted Mitchell 
chipped in with two more goals 
ind five assists. 

For the only time during the trip 
the offense was able to function 
.smoothly, and the defense, bolster- 
ed by the steady net-tending of 
goalie Rod Starke, was consistent- 
ly strong. 

Army Rolls Over Ephs 

Army completely overwhelmed 
the Ephmen in the trip's opener 
by tallying ten goals in the first 
period. Sophomore Al Klssack con- 
verted on a pass from Dave White- 
ford for Williams' only goal in the 
20-1 rout. 

Townsend's crew had no better 
luck in their first tussle south of 
the Mason-Dixon line against 
powerful Maryland, as the Terps 
won hf.ndily. 10-2. Van Dusen and 
Bob Utiger scored for the Ephs. 

The Virginia combine scored at 
will against the Purple, running 
the final count to 23-3. 



Wednesday, April 9— With the 
season's opener against Union one 
week off the Williams baseball 
Learn is beginning to take form. 
Coach Bobby Coombs stated, "We 
got ill tv.o days of outdoor prac- 
tice during vacation and have a 
lot of hard work behind us." 

Although the starting lineup is 
only tenlatlve and competition is 
still wide open for several posi- 
iloiis, ilie battery seems to be set 
with last year's starters. Mike Puf- 
fer and Johnny Beard, back on the 
hill and Bob DePopolo once again 
behind the plate. Puffer had a 5-3 
record last year while Beard won 
four and was not defeated. 
Junior Moundsmen 

Howie Babcock will be the third 
in a strong trio of Junior mounds- 
men With Hank Norwood. Dewey 
lieynolds. and Kog Moody behind 
hiin. Norwood is a Junior and the 
l..iu'r two are Sophomores. 

Al first base Pete Callahan and 
Owen Maher are running neck 
and neck while another close race 
exists ai shortstop between Jack 
Hawkins and Chuck Harris. Cap- 
lain Bill Callaghan is a fixture at 
ihe keystone sack witii Dick Sul- 
li\an performing well behind him. 
and Walt Creer appears to have 
the edge at third. 

Connolly Returns 

Rightfielder Pete Connolly will 
be back at his old spot, but the 
other outfield berths are being 
hotly contested by a trio of fast, 
sure fielders. Tommy Dorsey. Tom 
Adkins, a cnnvei'ted catcher along 
with Creer, and Bill Miller. 
Coombs commented that these 
three would make up a fine de- 
fensive outfield, but they lack hit- 
ting power. 

The battiiif; order has not been 
set as yet l)iil the nucleus of a 
haid-hlttin,^ ball club exists in the 
returning regulars. Callaghan hit 
.411 last year. Connolly rapped at 
a .393 clip, and DePopolo hit .333. 
They will be aided by Creer, Haw- 
kins, and Maher. the leading hit- 
ters on last season's frosh team. 

Last Year's Record 
Williams 4 U, of Mass. 6 

Williams Bowdoin 2 

Williams 8 Union 4 

'vVilliams 11 Wesleyan 3 

Williams 3 RPI 10 

Williams 2 Springfield 8 

Williams 10 Dartmouth 2 

Williams 8 St. Michaels 5 

Williams Wesleyan 2 

Williams 7 Army 10 

Williams 9 Amherst 5 

Williams 5 Amherst 2 

Williams !) Harvard 4 

Won 8 Lost 5 

Schuman Manuscript 
Ready for Publication 

Patt Article. Speeches 
Also Receive Attention 



Flying Club to Enter 
Harrington Air Meet 

Wednesday. April 9 — The 
Williams Flying Club will enter 
four men in the forthcoming 
sixth annual Intercollegiate 
Air Meet, to be held at Great 
Barrington. Mass., May 2-4. 

Clubs fiom 10 other colleges 
R. P. I.. Union, Siena, S,vracuse, 
Yale. Dartmouth, University of 
Rhode Island, M. I. T., Har- 
vard, and the University of 
I New Brunswick, are al.so sche- 
duled to compete. 

The program will open Fri- 
day. May 2. with a get-acquain- 
ted party in the evening. Con- 
tests will be held in spot land- 
ing, paper cutting, bombing, 
and cross-country flying. Air- 
craft and equipment manufac- 
turers will exhibit new models, 
and an air meet queen will be 
chosen at a Hangar Dance on 
May 3. 



Saturday. April 12 — Professor 
Frederick L. Schuman has recently 
completed the manuscript of a 
new book which will be published 
next fall by Alfred A. Knopf un- 
der the title of THE COMMON- 
WEALTH OF :MAN: An Inquiry 
Into Power I'olilirs and World 
Government, riie book will be con- 
:ei-ned with world politics of to- 
day, and the possibility of a world 
government. 

Professor Schuman has also 
iirtributed an article on "Inter- 
national Ideals and the National 
iLiterest". whicli was published in 
t'ne March, 1951 is.sue of The An- 
na's of the American Academy of 
Political and Social Science as part 
of a comprehensive tie. imcnt of 
'Ethical Standards in American 
Public Life". 

His address of last year before 
the Chicago Council on Foreign 
Relations on "Peace Without Ap- 
peasement" has been published in 
a book of adult readings on world 
affairs. 



THE WILUAMS RECORD SATURDAY. APRIL 12, 1952 



f tie Wmi|^il l^eof^ 

Uodii Ajuiiu, ;..-»i-.;.aii.,;i /Villiuiliitjwn, Mossochusal". 

■Cn'ered as second doss matter November 27, 1944, ot the post ottirf cji 
North Adams, Mcibbiichuselts, under the A. t of March 3, 1 379." Prmle.l t>\ 
Lamb and Hunler, Inc., North A<lc ns, Mossochusetts. Puhlished 
Wednesday and Saturoay during the college car. Siibscriplion price S'j.OO 
per year. Record Oflirc, Jesup Hall, Willium' own, 
RECORD Office - Phone 72 Editor - Phone 981 -JK 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

John H. Allan '53 ^'>'"°' 

Charles E. Longe '53 

Richard C. Porter '53 Managing Editors 

Woodbridge A. D'Oench '53 News Editor 

ihomos A. Belshe '53 

Kay Kolligian, Jr. '53 Sports Editors 

Frederick A. Terry, Jr. '53 Feature Editor 

Assistant Editors; Richord T. Antoun '53, Thomas H. S. Brucker '53, 
James J. Cashmore '53 



R. Wyman Sanders '54, Charles Eichel '54 
Thomas Hughes '53 



Stoff Photographers; 

Staff Cartoonist: 

Associate Editors; 1954 - Q. Abbot, W. R. Aiken, J. Brownell, E. Cowell, 

K. Donovan, G. Davis, C. Elliot, C. Fisher, C. Foster, P. Goldman, 

R. Goldstein, A. Home, J. Klein, J. Marr, C. O'Kiette, W. Warden, 
W. Weadock 

Editorial Staff; 1954 - W. Redman; 1955 - R. Carey, C. Heodley, 
£. Heppenstoll, P. Hunn, J. Kearney, D. Krehbiel, P. Max, W. McLaugh- 
lin, R. Moore, L. Nichols, T. Oviatt, N. Reeves, J. Rudd, J. Souse, 
H. Sheldon, R. Smith, E. von den Steinen, R. Wiilcox. 

BUSINESS BOARD 

John Notz, Jr. '53 Business Manager 

Dudley M. Boker '53 Assistant Business Manager 

Robert 0. Coulter '53 Assistant Business Manager 

John F. Johnston, II '54 Advertising Manager 

Horold G. Pratt, Jr. '54 Assistant Advertising Manager 

Curtis V. Titus '54 Circulation Manager 

Richard C. Schaub '54 Treasurer 

Business Staff; 1954 - J. Gushee; 1955 - H. Lindsay, H. Moser, G. Olm- 
sted, J. Innes, R. Chadwick, N. Faulkner, H. Smith 



Volume XLVI 



April 12, 1952 



Number 16 



Spring Athletic Schedule 



Varsity Baseball 



April 10 
April 19 
April li4 
April 26 
April 30 
May 1 
May 3 
May 7 
May 10 
iVi'ay 13 
May 15 
Alay 17 
l-.lay 21 
J.,nf 14 



Union 

U. of Mass. 

Bowdoin 

Trinity 

Middlebury 

St. Michael's 

Wesleyan 

R. P. I. 

Amherst 

Springfield 

Dartmouth 

Wesleyan 

Amlierst 

Harvard 



Home 
Away 
Home 
Away 
Away 
Away 
Home 
Away 
Away 
Home 
Home 
Away 
Home 
Home 



April 24 
April 26 
April 28 
April 30 
May 2 
May 6 
May 7 
May 0-11 
May 14 
May 16 
May 20 



Varsity Golf 

Bowdoin 

Holy Cross 

Brown 

Union 

U. of Mass. 

R. P. I. 

Siena 

N. Englands 
Wesleyan 
Amherst 
Springfield 



Home 
Home 
Away 
Home 
Away 
Home 
Home 
Boston 
Away 
Home 
Away 



Varsity Lai'ros.se 

April 26 Yale Away 

April 28 Duke Home 

May 7 Union Home 

May 10 Harvard Home 

May 14 Springfield Away 

May 17 Dartmouth Home 

May 21 R. P. I. Away 



Varsity Track 

April 23 U. of Mass. Away 

April 30 Middlebury Home 

May 2 Wesleyan Away 

May 9 U. of Conn. Home 

May 14 Amherst Home 

May 17 Easterns 





Varsity Tennis 




April 24 


Bowdoin 


Home 


May 2 


Harvard 


Away 


May 3 


Brown 


Away 


May 6 


N. Carolina 


Home 


May 7 


Springfield 


Home 


May 10 


Wesleyan 


Away 


May 12 


Army 


Away 


May 13 


Dartmouth 


Home 


May 14 


Colgate 


Home 


May 15 


Yale 


Away 


May 16- 


8 IntercoUegiates 


May 20 


Amherst 


Home 


May 24 


New Englands 





Freshman Baseball 

Apiil 19 U. of Mass. Away 

April 23 Hotclilciss Home 

April 26 R. P. I. Home 

May 3 Wesleyan Away 

iMay 10 Pittsfleld Home 

May 17 Amherst Home 

Freshman Golf 

April 26 Exeter Away 

May 3 Hotchkiss Home 

May 7 Nichols Jr. Away 

May 10 Dartmouth Away 

May 17 Amherst Home 

Freshman Lacrosse 

April 26 Union J. V. Home 

May 10 Harvard Home 

May 14 Mt. Hermon Away 

May 21 Deerfleld Away 

Freshman Tennis 

April 23 Hotchkiss Home 

May 3 Kent Away 

May 7 Deerfield Away 

May 10 Wesleyan Away 

May 12 Army Away 

May 17 Amherst Home 

Freshman Track 

April 23 U. of Mass. JV Away 

April 28 Nichols Jr. Home 

May 3 Little Three Away 

May 7 Deerfleld Home 



McCarthy Speaks 
At Smith on Reds 

Stirs Crowd Emotionally 
In Generalized Speech 

Northampton. April 10— Joseph 
McCarthy, Republican Senator 
from Wisconsin, addressed a 
crowd of 2300 listeners tonight at 
Jolm M Cireeiie Hall, Smitli Col- 
lege. His speecli. sponsored by the 
Smith Young Republican's Club, 
was entitled "Reds in the Govern- 
ment." 

The senator stated that he has 
often been accused of taking ad- 
vantage of his congressional im- 
munity. He declared, however, that 
now he was outside of the senator- 
ial chamber and would definitely 
nante Communists m our govern- 
ment. 

McCarlliy declared that Owen 
Lattimore and Lawrence "liad a 
great affinity for Communist pol- 
icy." and that "Phillip Jessup was 
the second most dangerous man 
in our government." second only 
to Dean Acheson. 

Emotional Presentation 

Although these charges implied 
subversive activities, McCarthy 
never openly said that any of 
Uiese men. some of whom he had 
accused in the Senate, were Com- 
munists. 

McCarthy delivered his speech 
in an emotional manner, pound 
ing on the podium at times and 
continucUy interspersed his talk 
iv.ui renmrKs about his war record 

ni one point, in response to a 
n.ss iruiii ine audience, McCarthy 
commented drily. "Hiss — that word 
oounds familiar." 

jjuiiiig me course of the speccli 
about a liaif dozen people walked 
out oi the aiidilorium. Their exit 
was accompanied by scattered au 
uiCnce approval. 

i-ouowing the speech, questions 
were screened and presented to 
iUcCarihy. Queried whether college 
le.xhers should be required to take 
loyalty oaths, the senator replied, 
■oenalors have to take them and 
I worked hard to take mine. I see 
no reason why American mothers 
and fathers should hire Comma 
nists to teach their sons and 
diUighters treason." 

ADA to Discuss 
Coming Elections 

MacManus, Rand Lead 
Vacation Trip Scoring 

Saturday. April 12— The Nor 
thern Berkshire Chapter of A 
mericans for Democratic Action 
will present a panel discussion on 
the topic "Men and Issues in the 
Present Presidential Campaign' 
in 3 Griffin Hall at 8:00 p.m. 
Monday evening. 

Four speakers will lead the ADA 
.sponsored discussion. James M. 
Burns '39, Associate Professor of 
Political Science and Chairman 
of the Williamstown Democratic 
Committee, and Robert DebevoLse, 
Williamstown Republican Chair- 
man are to conduct the panel. Ri- 
chard Duffield '52 and Arnold 
Levin '52 have also been chosen 
to take part. 

The meeting will be open to all 
students, faculty members, and 
townspeople who wish to attend. 



Tennis . . . 

o-j. 0-3, 0-4. Pickaid continued 
ii.s wiimmg ways with u 6-3, 1-6. 
u-j victoiy over Green. Playing al 
lio. a Al Casson defeated John 
Beeker U-2. 3-6. 6-4. and Jim Zlel- 
gier added a final singles point by 
aowning Thompson 6-4, 6-3. 
dquires and Norton won the only 
uouuies match foi' the Purple, 
ao.iuuig urowne and Payne 6-8, 
U-... 9-'/. 

i,osc Two in Virginia 
Journeying to CharloitesviUe, 
uie universiiy oi Virginia irounc- 
eu the Cnaiieemen 13-2. No. 3 
.iiaii ouapy Symington gathered 
uie oniy siiigies win tor the team, 
ou.eaiuig rtoisley 6-3, 6-1. Squires 
and Norton were leading li-l m the 
iiiird set against Long and Hors- 
ley, but could not win llie final 
game aiiu finally lost 10-8. The 
team of Oordie Canning and Al 
Casson added the final point with 
a 7-a. 5-7. 6-4 win. 

Saturday at the Country Club 
of Virginia, playing under adverse 
weather conditions, the Purple net 
men lost their fifth match 7-4. 
The squad scored three wins in the 
singles as Squires defeated Shel- 
don Horsley 6-3. 6-8. 6-4. Brownell 
ralhed to defeat Miller 2-6. 6-0, 
6-4. and Al Fulkerson downed 
Blair 6-4, 6-1. The second doubles 
team of Brownell and Symington 
easily won over Dickinson and 
Miller 6-0. 6-1. for the other Pur- 
ple point. 

Kesel Wins 
The team showed the results 
of the week's practice by scoring 
a 5-4 win over William and Mary. 
Playing without Squires who was 
bothered by a knee mjury. the 
Chaffeemen took four singles 
matches as Brownell. George Kes- 
el, Tom Brucker and P^ilkerson 
all won handily. A close 6-2, 7-5 
win by the second doubles team of 
Norton and Kesel clinched the 
matcli for tlie Pui"ple, as the team 
closed out its trip. 



Student Group Seeks Liberal Candidate, 
Boosts Douglas for Democratic Nomination 



Saturday. April 12 — A group of 
students, believing that "a liberal 
candidate for president is need- 
ed by the Democratic Paity in this 
time of world crisis." has formed 
a "William O. Douglas for Presi- 
dent Club." 

The organization is hr;ided by 
Peter Oaks '52. while the other 
officers are Arnold Levin ',^2, vice- 
president. Matthew Markotic '52. 
secretary, Robert Goldstein '54. 
treasurer, and Peter Goldman '54. 
recording secretary. 

Take Russia Seriously 

William Douglas, an associate 
justice on the Supreme Court, has 
declared that the only way to ac- 
hieve pe.,ce in these crucial times 
Is to take Russian offers for peace 
seriously. In the UN at present 
both the United States and the 
Soviet Union continually call each 
others' proposals for disarmament 
farcical. 

Douglas believes that coopera- 
tion Is the only .solution to the 
present pioblem. and that "arma- 
ment for peace" can never be a 
reality. The justice, however, does 



not feel that NATO should be a- 
bandoned. but that while we are 
preparing ourselves for an em(!r- 
gency. we should also attempt to 
solve the dilemma of the cold war. 
The Club feels that Douglass 
pioposal must be endorsed. 
For Civil Rights 

It was Justice Douglas that gave 
the minority decision on the Fein- 
berg law. stating that it was a vio- 
lation of civil rights to force the 
teachers of New York State to 
declare that they had never been 
members of "a subversive oi'gan- 
ization", especially when these or- 
ganizations have never been list- 
ed or defined. 

Douglas has also opposed ilie 
Smith and McCarran Acts for roa- 
.sons similar to those mentioned 
above. The justice has consistanl- 
ly been the most liberal member 
of the Court, while at the same 
time has been, the members of the 
"Douglas for F>residcnt Club" feel. 
the most lealistic man in the gov- 
ernment in the formulation of 
ioreign policy. 



I L.G.Balfour Co. 

I FRATERNITY lEWELRY 

Stationery Progromi 

Badges Ringi Steim 

Jewelry Gifti Favon 

Club Pini Keyi 

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Write or Call 
CARL SORENSEN 

30 Murroy Ave. Woterford, N V 
TelephoneTroy — Adorns 82563 



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Your date will love the Ladies Cocktail Lounge and 
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It's Your Club - We Hope You'll Use It. 

Undergraduates are always welcome 



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fb^ Willi 



Volume XLVJ, Number 17 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE 




3^^f(rfj^ 



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 1952 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Adams Memorial Theatre to Stage 
Clifford Odets' "Awake and Sing"; 
Stone, Matus Cast in Lead Roles 



Nine Williams Vacationers About Prosidciltial GrOUUls 

To Depart for Tropical Bermuda 



WcdiK'Silay, April 16-C;lilt()nl Odds' inodcni drama "Awake 
■ui,l Siller' ijpi'i's lor a three-day run May 1 on the sta^e of the 
Adams Nh'Uiorial Theatre. Tlie Cap and Hells sponsored |)lay, a 
leature ol SpriuK llouseparty weekend is the final presentafionOf 
the current AMT season. 

I'uking leads In Odets's drama Q 

of family life In the Bronx, during 



llie depression years of the Ihlr- 
ue.s, are John Stone '52 as Axlrod, 
Kdwin Mutus '54 us Ralph Berger, 
Marmot Harlman taking the role 
ijl Hennie, and Eve Child as Bessie 
lli'rger. 

Previous Roles 

Stone starred earlier in the sea- 
Mai in the AMT production of 
■ I'ygmalion". while Matus took an 
anpoitant role In last year's 
•iiUiello". Margot Hartman has 
dune dramatic work at Benning- 
um. where she is a student, while 
I'ive Child was seen this year in 
I'yiimalion". 

Also cast in "Awake and Sing " 
an' Gilbert Holtzman '53 as 
■lai'.ob, Allen Good '53 as Myron 
BiMuer, Seth Shapiro '53 as Uncle 
.Monty. Edward Rice '53 as Sam 
Ft'inschreiber. and Philip Meeder 
S4 as Schlosser. Holtzman ap- 



pt^ared in this sea.son's "Henry IV" 
while both Good and Shapiro took 
leads in "Pygmalion". 

Acts and Setting 

The Odels production is set in 
the parlor and dining room of 
the Berger family, Bronx, New 
York. 'Ihe play, divided into three 
acts and tour scenes, is under the 
direction of David C. Bryant, Jr. 
Victor Meyers '53 has designed the 
.set for the play. 

The production manager is 
Prank Weeks '53, William Schneid- 
er being tlic stage manager. In 
charge of crews for the play are 
Reed Coleman '55. scenery: 
Charles Telly '54, props; John 
Larson '53, box oince; James Mar- 
tin '53, sound: David Hudson '53, 
lighting: Timothy Beard '53, cos- 
tumes; and Charles Hamilton '52, 
makeup. 



Staff Hails New "Cow^^ as Success; 
Readers Call Revival "Best Eve/^ 



May Copy to Contain 
Feature by Watters 

by Bill Warden '54 

Wednesday, April 16 — The flr.st 
issue of the new "Purple Cow", 
wliich went on sale on March 26, 
lias been ajudged a complete suc- 
rcss by the "Cow" staff. Feeling 
they have successfully passed this 
first critical test in the rebirth 
■■>! college humor, the staff is or- 
ganizing a second issue to appear 
in May. 

Approximately one third of tlii 
student body bought the maga- 
zine cither on the newsstand or 
llirough .subscriptions. It is esti- 
mated that at least 90 per cent 
of the students have read it. 
Favorable Letters Received 

The staff of the "Cow", pleased 
with the excellent reception their 



work received among students and 
faculty, were further lauded by 
many letters from parents and 
alumni. Several mentioned the 
issue as the "best 'Cow' they had 
yet seen." 

The rebirth of the "Purple Cow" 
under new management indicates 
a significant trend in many east- 
em colleges. The dirtii of college 
humor in the past few years is 
being remedied by the return of 
a number of Hi!frnor magazines. 
As in the "Purple Cow", most of 
these periodicals include both tlie 
humorous and the .serious aspects 
of campus life. 

May Issue 

The general organization of the 
May issue will be much the same 
as the last. Special features will 
include a humorous story on tlie 
life of a coach by Len Watters. 
and a surpri.se feature. 



Annual Ball Held 
By Town Firemen 



Dancing, Concert, Raffle 
Highlight Gala Evening 

Monday, April 14— The Fifty- 
fifth Annual Fireman's Ball was 
lield in the Williamstown High 
.School Gymnasium last Monday 
evening under the auspices of the 
Gale Hose Company. The proceeds 
of the ball, which featured Glenn 
Miller's Orchestra iPittsfield), 
were used entirely to supplement 
the Fireman's Benevolence Fund. 

The festivities commenced with 
a band concert given by the or- 
chestra between 8:30 and 9:00. At 
!l:00 the dance officially began as 
cioidon Noble. Foreman of the 
Oale Hose Company, led the 
Chand March. Following that, 
tlicre was dancing in the main 
liallroom and also square dancing 
ill the school cafeteria, led by call- 
er Marty Lamphalr. Music for this 
was provided by the Bennington 
Hot Shots. 

Prizes Given 

The high point of this evening 
of entertainment came when win- 
ners of the raffle, proceeds of 
which also went to the Fireman's 
Benevolent Fund, were announc- 
ed. The Grand Prize was a $100 
Savings Bond. Seventy-five sub- 
sidiary prizes, all donated by mer- 
chants of North Adams and Wil- 
llamstown, were also awarded. 

Several hundred residents of 
WlUlamstown and the surrounding 
communities were on hand includ- 
ing fire chiefs from Pownal, North 
Adams. Adams. Clark.sburg, and 
North Pownal. 



ADA Holds Panel 
On '52 Campaign 

Party Chairmen, Students 
Discuss Men, Issues 



Monday. April 14 — The Ameri- 
cans for Democratic Action held 
a forum this evening in Griffin 
Hall, dl.scusslng the potential can- 
didates and policies of both the 
Democratic and Republican Par- 
ties. 

Representing the Republican 
point of view were Mr. Robert 
Debevolse, chairman of the Wil- 
liamstown Republican Committee, 
and Richard Duffleld '52. Asso- 
ciate Professor James Burns, 
chairman of Williamstown's Dem- 
ocratic Committee, and N. Arnold 
Levin '52 presented the Democra- 
tic opinions. 

Campaign of Individuals 

Debevolse and Duffleld stres.sed 
the point that the election would 
be decided on the basis of Indi- 
vidual candidates, rather than 
the party. Professor Bums and 
Levin later expressed themselves 
for a campaign based on policies. 

While the Republican Chair- 
man criticized the incumbnnt 
Democrats as "too partisan and 
political minded". Duffleld, said 
that "new blood and new faces 
are needed in Washington". He 
suggested that General Eisenhow- 
er would piovlde a change, but not 
a reaction. 

Professor Bums stated that the 
last two decades had .seen two 
political trends, one toward gov- 
ernment action for the people, 
and the other away from Isolatlon- 
l.sm. 




Courtesy of Pan Amertcon World Airwoys 



Freshman Warnings IWCA Alters Cabinet, 



Lead Other Classes 



Underclassmen Surpass 
Previous Percentages 



Wednesday, April 16 — A total of 
617 warnings have been given to 
384 Williams students as a result 
of below C work done during the 
first half of the second semester. 
The freshman class leads, as us- 
ual, in the numl».. of warnings 
received with 286. They are fol- 
lowed by tlie sophomores with 154. 
the juniors with 124. and the sen- 
.ors with 53. 

This year's freshman class has 
done slightly worse this semester 
than last year's freshman cla.ss 
did during the same period. 
Whereas only 52 ',i of the Class of 
1954 was warned last year, 55','i 
of this year's freshmen have re- 
ceived warnings. 15'; of the max- 
imum number of warnings that 
could be issued to last year's class 
were D warnings and 2''.', were E 
warnings, while this year's class 
received a comparable 16'r of D 
warnings and the same percentage 
of E warnings. 



Museum Displays 
German Pictures 



Expands Membership 

New Members Include 
Social Unit Delegates 



Wednesday. April 16 — The Wil- 
liams Christian Association has 
completed a revision and enlarge- 
ment of its Cabinet. It is hoped 
thai the move will bring about 
more campus cooperation and 
greater interest in the .^s.socla- 
tion's activities. 

Directed by College Chaplain. 
Claude V. Roebuck, Howard Bab- 
cock '53 and Bruce Van Dusen '53, 
the ieorE;..nization was begun be- 
fore spring recess and was conclu- 
ded at the WCA's Monday night 
meeting. 

Executive Committee 

New members of the cabinet in- 
clude delegates from each frater- 
nity and from each religious con- 
Ki'Cf-'atlon. No decision regarding 
non-affiliate membership has yet 
bet'n reached. 

An executive committee has also 
been formed. This body will con- 
tain the President. Secretary. 
Treasurer, the Co-Directors of 
the Boy.s' Club, the heads of the 
Deputations, the Chapel Commit- 
tee, the Chest Fund, and the Pub- 
r.city Committee. 



Iiileiisiiy Campaigns 



Record's Circulation 
Averages Near 1000 

Wednesday. April 16 — In a 
lecent survey the Record cir- 
culation department deter- 
mined that, on the average, 
close to 1000 readers subscribe 
to each issue of the Record. 

Holding the lead in tlie 
breakdown of the sub.scrlption 
list are the parents of Williams 
sLddents and the alumni with 
680. Student subscriptions 
siand at 191, while the faculty 
loUow with 40. Between 40 and 
50 issues are sold on the news- 
stands every publication day. 



Boys Cluh Plan 
Rummage Benefit 

Designates Proceeds 
To Improve Camp 



Wednesday, April 16 — All stu- 
dents contemplating a general 
spring cleaning of dormitory 
I'uoms this week are urged to do- 
nate unwanted articles to the 
Williamstown Boys' Club. Student 
membert, of the organization will 
tour the campus during the week 
collecting old books, clothes, ties, 
furniture, ashtrays, or what have 
you. for the rummage sale on 
Saturday at 9 a.m. 

The rummage sale, to be held at 
the Bovs' Club building on Cole 
Avenue is an annual event staged 
for the benefit of the Boys' Club 
summer camp on Northwest Hill, 
just outside of Williamstown. The 
money collected from the sale 
cf the donated articles will be 
used to make improvements in the 
summer camp's electrical and 
plumbing facihties. 

Bill St. Amant '54 and George 
Kelsey '54. co-heads of the Boys' 
Club, aie organizing this year's 
sale. 



Monthly Magazine Picks 
Faison as Art Critic 

Wednesday. April 16 — A collec- 
tion of paintings, lithographs, 
etchings and woodcuts by German 
artists is on exhibit at the Law- 
rence Art museum and will re- 
main on display through April 
28. 

On loan from the New York 
City Museum of Modern Art. the 
exhibit includes works by pre- 
World War I German expression- 
ists Ernst Kirchner. Erich Heckel. 
Karl Schmidt-Rottluff. Emit 
Nolde, Otho Mueller and Max 
Pechstein. 

AKso on exhibit are woodcuts 
by Nolde and Schmidt-Rottluff 
which were recently added to the 
permanent collection of the Law- 
rence Art Museum. 

Faison Appointed 

In addition. The Nation maga- 
zine has announced the appoint- 
ment of Professor S. Lane Faison, 
Chairman of the Williams Art De- 
partment, as a full-time art cri- 
tic on their staff. 

As critic. Professor Faison will 
contribute a monthly column re- 
viewing painting and sculpture 
exhibits. For the past three years, 
he has .submitted book reviews and 
some pieces on art to The Nation. 



SAC to Determine 
1952 ■ 53 Tax 



Aid Request Deadline 
Set for oril 28 



Monday, April 14 — At a brief 
meeting today the Student Activi- 
ties Council discussed the ur- 
gency of all campus organizations 
in need of grants or loans for the 
next school year to turn in their 
estimated budget by April 28. 

It was pointed out that the pro- 
cedure for granting financial aid 
necessitates a long period of time 
because each request must be in- 
vestigated by the executive com- 
mitte of the SAC and then be vo- 
ted upon by the entire organiza- 
tion. 

Attempt to Cut Tax 

The expen.ses of non-profit cam- 
pus organizations are supported by 
a tax placed on the student body 
through tire social units at the be- 
ginning of cacli school year. Last 
fall the tax was $1.50. and Bob 
French '53. president of the SAC. 
said that he hopes the new tax 
will not be as high. 

Other business that appeared 
before the meeting dlscIo.sed that 
the Purple KniRhts. college dance 
orchestra, had withdrawn $48 
from It's sinking fund. 



UC Votes to Lift 
VpperclassQttotas 

Committee Books Change 
In Off-Weekend Curfew 



Eisenhower Body 
Proves Strongest 

Taft Backers Pessimistic 
On Eve of Primaries 



Monday. April 14— The UC vo- 
ted tonight to accept the recom- 
mendations of the 1951-52 Under- 
graduate Council to II lift all 
quotas before the coming post 
season rushing period, and 2) 
eliminate the rule that no juniors 
or .seniors may be rushed. 

Tliese recommendations, accept- 
ed recently by the Tippy Com- 
mittee, will be put into effect if 
approved by President Baxter. A 
third recommendation, that each 
house's quota for the freshman 
rushing next fall be one-fourteen- 
th of the class, was tabled by the 
Tippy Committee until the April 
28 meeting with the UC in New 
York. 

Barks Curfew Extension 

The Committee supported un- 
animously a proposal to request 
an extension of the off-weekend 
curfew hours. It was decided that 
2 a.m. would be the best hours for 
both Friday and Saturday nights 
of non-party weelcends. 

Believing that a vote this spring 
would do more harm than good, 
the UC rejected the suggestion 
of the League of Total Member- 
ship that a vote be taken on an- 
other complete rushing plan. The 
Committee felt that the student 
body would be apathetic toward 
such a vote right now and that it 
should be postponed until next 
fall. 

The UC decided that the setup 
of the Bowdoln Plan should re- 
main e.s.sentlally unchanged and 
that the quota should again be 
.set at six. 



By John Brownell '54 

Wednesday, April 16— With the 
Massachusetts primaries to be held 
on April 29. the various political 
factions of the Williams student 
body, working in conjunction 
with townspeople and faculty have 
intensified their work of cam- 
paigning for their particular can- 
didates. Student interest has been 
directed mostlj toward the can- 
didacies of Eisenhower, Kefauver, 
and Taft. 

Headlining the ELsenhower drive 
is a meeting tomorrow night at 
7:30 at the Williamstown High 
School in which John Heselton one 
of the presidential delegates from 
this district, will speak. Another 
event of major importance to Ei- 
senhower's backers is President 
Baxter's talk, which he will deliver 
tonight in Pittsfield. 

Ike Receives 80% 

Besides making arrangements 
for Mr. Heselton's speech. Eisen- 
ho'A?r headquarters, situated on 
Main Street, below Currier Hall, 
has been conducting a telephone 
campaign, and is making arrange- 
ments for transportation to the 
polls for those people who can get 
iliere in no other way. 
Thus far things seem to be fairly 
easy for Ike supporters, since, ac- 
cording to a recent poll taken by 
the Political Science Department, 
807r of Williamstown has shown a 
preference for the general. 
Kefauver Group Active 

On the Democratic side, a group 
of Williams students, headed by 
Franklin D. Rudolph '52 and Ri- 
chard Antoun '53 have come out 
as the first organized force in this 
r.rea for Estes Kefauver. 

Antoun, who is actjpg as group 
chairman, says that the purpose 
of the organization is to instigate 
a write-in campaign among the 
residents of Williamstown, North 
Adams, and Pittsfield, 

Work Through Press 

Due to a lack of money, most of 
their work^has been done through 
press releases to the nearby pa- 
pers. Any Berkshire residents who 
are willing to help in any way 
have been urged to get in touch 
with Frank Rudolph here at the 
college. 

In contrast with the Elsenhower 
and Kefauver backers, the group 
representing Senator Taft have 
been doing their campaigning on 
a much more informal basis. Judg- 
ing from the data of polls that 
have been taken, Taft men feel 
that due to insufficient interest in 
western Massachusetts, an all- 
ojt campaign would not be worth- 
while. 



WMS to Broadcast 
Inter-Fraternity Sing 

Kap, Psi U Octets Meet 
In First Round Tonight 

Sunday, April 13— The Interfra- 
ternity Sing, sponsored by WMS. 
got under way Monday night with 
Sigma Phi meeting Phi Gam To- 
night the Psi U octet tskes on 
Kappa Alpha in another first 
round contest. 

The contest won last year by the 
Garfield Club, has 13 entrants 
in its fourth year of existence. 
The winning group will have the 
name of Its social unit engraved 
on a plaque. 

Art Muir '53. IFS chairman, an- 
nounced that the matches will be 
held on Monday and Wednesday 
evenings at 9:30. The semi-final 
and final contests will be record- 
ed and broadcast over station 
WMNB in North Adams. 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1<U952_ 



^^£ ttill^g 3^£a^;^|| Letters to the Editor 



Norrh A.l.ims, Moss«j' nus^tti A/i|linm«town, Mnssochusatts 

'Ln'ared as secoml clii^s motter Novr'inl«.'i 27, i 'J -l t, at ilie oosi office al 
North Adams, Mossothusetts, under the A. I of March 3, 1879." Print«d by 
t.arr\b and Hunler. Inc., North Ado nb, Mo»achusetts. Published 

V\'edne5day ond Satuiaay during the college ear. Subscription price $5.00 
per veor. Record Office, Jesup Hah, Williunv own 
RECORD Office - Phone 72 



Editor - Pfione 981 -,IK 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

John H. Allan '53 , Editor 

Charles E. Longe '53 

Richard C. Porter '53 Managing Editors 

Jameb J. Cashmoro '53 Newb Editor 

ihomas A. Belshe '53 

Kay Kolligian, Jr. '53 Sports Editors 

Frederick A. Terry, Jr. '53 Feature Editor 

Assistant Editors: Richard T. Antcun '53, Thomas H. S. Brucker '53 



Staff Photographers: 
Staff Cartoonist: 



R. Wyman Sanders '54, Charles Eichel '54 
Thomas Hughes '53 



Associate Editors: 1954 - Q. Abbot, W. R. Aiken, J. Brownell, E. Cowell, 
K. Donovan, G Davis, C. Elliot, C. Fisher, P. Goldman, R. Goldstein, 
A, Home, J. Kli'in, J. Man, C. O'Kieffe, W. Redman,W. Warden, 
E. Weodock. 

Editorial Staff: 1955 - R. Corey, C. Heodley, E. Heppenstoll, P. Hunn, 
J. Kearney, D. Krehbiel, P. Max, W. McLaughlin, R. Moore, L. Nichols, 
T. Oviatt, N. Reeves, J. Rudd, J. Souse, H. Slieldon, R. Smith, E. von 
den Steinen, R. Willcox. 



Business Manager 

bistont Business Managers 



BUSINESS BOARD 

John Notz, Jr. '53 

Dudley M. Baker '53 

Robert O. Coulter '53 

John F. Johnston, II '54 

Horold G, Pratt, Jr. '54 Advertising Managers 

Curtis y. Titus '54 Circulation Manager 

Richard C. Schoub '54 Treasurer 

Business Staff: 1954 - J. Gushee; 1955 - H. Lindsay, H. Moser, G. Olm- 
sted, R. Chadwick, N. Faulkner, H. Smilh, R. Wallace. 



Vtjlume XLVI 



April Ifi, 19,52 



Number 17 



The Williiiiiis lUCCOBD takes plciisiiic in iiimoimcinp, ihc pro- 
inolion.s of James ./. Ctishinorv '.S'S jroni lirookhjn, iVcif York lo flic 
IHi.-iitidii of \'cii!< Editor, of Harold C. PratI, .jr. Tyl of Concord, 
Mass. lo the position of CoAdvcrtisinii^ M(inii<ii'r, of \\'ilH(ini H. 
Redman '^4 of Piltafield, Mass. to the positiini of Associnle i'.ilitor. 
and of Hielnird \\ W'aUaee '.i.j of liochester. \en- York lo Ike 
yJK.v/iK'.v.v Staff. 



EDITORIAL 

\ iilllr ii\(r :i iHoiitl) atjo Mil' Excctitiw Odininiltcc ol the So- 
I'ictv (il .Miiiiiiii (illcri'd the Aliiiniii Mou.sl' on .Spring Sirci't to 
(lie uii(lcrt;ni(liiat(' IxkIv lor its use as a teiiiporarN' stiidciit iiiiioii 
next fall. IF (his nciu'ioiis {rt'stiirc on (lit' par( of aliimiii is t;oiiit; 
lo im'aii aiix'thimr, the UiKk'r<j;railnatc (.'oihrII aiul the adnilnis- 
tratioii should choose a couihiiied laeultx' and student board ol 
L;()\eniois innnediateb' and bej^iu planiiiiii; the use that the 
buildliiy will reeeiM' in (he interim period before the coiupletioii 
of the collei^e's permanent student union in the fall of 19.53. 

If the .'Muiniii House is not s^iven extensixe use because ol ade- 
ipiate planniiitr and control, a had precedent will he set which 
iua\' liaiii|)er the chances of the permanent structure which the 
administration is now plaiininj^ to build Ix'twceii President Bax- 
ter's home and Saj^e 11. ill. If the .Muiaui Ilonse-studeut union 
control board does not be'^in to plan now for union activities, the 
buiklinn will not he<rin to function at the bei^inning of the fall 
terni with much sdident apprmal and use. Unless die buildint; is 
opened with some acti\"ilies that will act as a drawinjr card for a 
larye ninnher of mider<j;ra(luates, die house will not receive enouf^h 
use to make it worth die alumni's Siviiii; up the buildiui; h)r stu- 
dent use next year. 

Therefore, we urf^e the VC, to set ii|) in the five weeks of classes 
that remain a committee to sdidv the aeti\ ities (hat will take place 
in the Alumni IIou.se next vear. 



BATTLE WITH BLOOD AND IRON 

loiheKilittirof tlieHEC:OHD: 

Never haviiiK taken invself very seriously, I was (|iiite siu 
prised to see 'l.oel) He\ isited " in the betters to the Kditor Column 
111 \dur .March J5 issue. 

Voiir editorial note also inierested iiie. 

l'erlia|)s you would like to see what oeeasioiied the Messrs. 
-Msops rather less than charitable remarks. Knelosed herewith is 
the Iroiit pai^e of our newspaper for March 8 with an editorial, 
whicli minlit interest you heeaiise it has broader implications 
than just tlic .Msop Brothers. 

Jii reference to this .\lsop eoliiinn one of our employees writes 
as follows: '1 read with interest your editorial about profit sharing 
in answer to .Msop. Von mij^lit lui\e trutbfully inentioni'd at the 
time (lia( no other conipany in -Manchester takes care ol its sick 
people the way the Union Leader does. During uiy stay in the hos- 
pital in January and last month, 1 came in contact with a lot ol 
patients, none of whom fared as well as 1 ditl. " 

Insteail of iii(|uiriii)j; as to whether 1 was fair and just in my 
relations with those who work for the Union Lcatler, the Alsops 
pri'fi'rred to answer ad himiiiieiii with the smearing remarks which 
you (|note. 

I'or \ery good and sufficient reasons, 1 certaiiil)' DO carry 
a loaded rexolver under all legal circiimstaiices. 1 most assuredly 
DID publish my birth certilicate, signed by the Presitlcnt ol tlie 
United States, I'heodore Roosevelt, on the front page of my jjapt'r. 
1 did so for a reason which Mr. Alsop \ery coiivcnicntly lorgets. 

Senator Tobey had won a narrow, 1100- vote \ictory in ti 
primary o\cr a W'orkl War II .\ir Force gunner whom the Union 
Leader had supported. One ol the methods the Tobey loUowers 
used to win oxer Powell was (o say that Powell was "the candidate 
of that tiauined Jew from Aew York," referring to myself. The 
birth certificate was published merely to indicate that if Mr. 
i'obi'ys followers could be so factually wrong about me, they 
coiilcl also probably be wrong in their slanders against members 
of tlie |ewish faith. 

The Alsop boys are not only careless with the truth, but thoy 
art' soiiiewliat iiai\e in no( uiKlerstanding that the word "libend ' 
guarantees no halo of saKation around the heads of (hose who 
so name (lieiiisehcs, jiis( as (he adjective "conservatixe" tloes not 
damn its o\\ tier to eternal hell fire. Mr. Alsop's catalogue of iiulix i- 
uuals IS cntirel)' too simple (o euiilorm either to the rules of com- 
mon .sense or reality. 

Knowing hoxv xve edited THE RECORD in my day, 1 thought 
\dii uoiiiil be interested in ALL the facts. 

William Loeb '27 

Ktlitor's note: .Mr. Loeb countered the Alsop attack with a front 
page editorial on .March S I'lititled "Does Alsop Know His Right 
Lrom His Left':'" This defense cited the generous profit sharing 
policx' ol the Manchester Union Leader as an example ol its 
bnexoleiit inauagement. It also explained the nexxspaper's cam- 
paign h)r Taft, asserting that it is the plain people xvlio arc sup- 
porting Taft". Conversely the "confused mind clings almost 
hysterically to Ceneral Liscuhower's coattails". 



Letters to the Editor 



RECORD CONFIDENTIAL 

To die Editor of the RECORD; 

Mr. William Loeb of the Manchester Union Leader sent iiie 
a clip))ing of (he editorial entitled ".Another Sedition Act" in the 
Williams' Record of March 12. 

|ack Lait and 1 ai5])reeiate voiir ]iositioii in behalf of freedom 
of the |)ress. The verv acl of attempted illegal suppression by offi- 
cials named in the book is prool of our contention that iiiaiiv 
bureaucrats have become dictators. 

Sincerely yours, 
Lee Mortimer 



CHIVALRY IN THE BERKSHIRES 

To the Editor of the RECORD: 

Mv thanks go in return for Williams' endiusiastic support of 
mv scheme, and for the pnblieitv xvithont xvhich "L-Day' xvoiild 
haxc been a iiiiserahle failure instead of the oxcrxvhelming siiecess 
it (iinied ou( (o be. .\lso iii\- sincere gratitude h)r ])resenting an 
imslanted x iexx' ol (he tat K, Distortion jiy other nexvspapers caused 
me much difficulty, hul eiiluineed niv appreciation of the 
HECOKD's fair attitude. 

Mav I point out thai mv (lolicv in this affair was strictlv im- 
partial, and I did not intend to he used bv one college agaius( 
another. Williams, hoxxcxer. for the reasons aboxe, has my xvliole- 
hearled support and eoniinrndation. 

Sincerely, 
Lucy G. RIodgct 



DON'T RUSH ME! 

To die Editor of die liECOHD: 

In the Satindav. April 12 i.ssiie of (he RECOHD there ap- 
peared ail article on a Douglas For President Club. In the first 
place, no such club has xct been formed. .Sexeral people irere 
discussing potential Democratic candidates. This conversation 
prompted vour reporter to make an inaccurate statement. Not 
only have no officers been elected, as reported in the RECOHD, 
but the views of [nstice Douglas xvere also misrepresented. 

We siiicerelv hope (ha( (he Demoeradc Party will nominate 
and the people of (he United Sta(es elect a liberal candidate such 
as Instiee William (). Douglas or Governor Adlai Stexenson xvho 
will carry on the great tradition of Jefferson, Jackson, Wilson, and 
Hoosevelt. 

Peter Oaks '.52 



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HEAVY BASE GLASSES 

Williams Seal 
High Balls and Old Fashions 
— Special at $2.50 a doz. — 

For a limited time 

Let us Pack and Mail these for Gifts 

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66-68 Spring Street 



Williamstown 



Tel. 29 R 




NEW — Tourist Round Trip Air 

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Choice of over 100 
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Travel Study Tours * JT J 
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Remington Fccny's ninncv went to his fat 
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liis shoes so lie conld iiKvays keep it witli iiii". 
By the time he was 48, lie was nine feet tall. 

Money can he used to grow on, but not ncccs- 
s.irilv hv Mr, I'tenv's iiietliod. For instance, 
more than 1,I()(),0()() pe()])le have shown their 
faith in the future of the Bell Tclcijlionc System 
hy investing their moncv in it. About one-liflli 
of them are Bell em|5lovecs who bought stntl; 
through a payroll savings plan. 

It takes both moncv and ])eoplc to keep the 
Bell System growing and iniprtning to mctt 
our country's telephone needs. That's wbv col 
lege men with the right ciiialifications can find 
iiilercsting opportunities with u,s — in engineer- 
ing, research, operating and administration. 

Vonr cam|)us placement office will be glad 
lo gi\c yon more information. 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 




HEADLINER 



THE WILLIAMS RECORD WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 1952 



by Tom BeUbe 



Ycstt'iduy, the major league 
buseball season opened, umld llie 
usual fanfare and publicity. To- 
day, however, represents an even 
more Important opening day to 
Williams adherents, us Bobby 
Cciimibs' 1952 baseball team opens 
its .schedule against Union on 
Wcslon Field. Not to be out-done 
Ijy the so-called prediction experts, 
who have crystal-balled the ma- 
joi.'i tor weeks, here we go In an 
atlempt to foresee the 1952 Little 
Tliree race. 

I'otentially, this year's Eph 
bii-i'ball team is loaded with pow- 
er, mid the outlook for the future 
would .seem unlimited. Potentially, 
tliiit is! For pitching, Coacli 
Coombs Clin cull on either Mike 
Puffer or John Beard, both tested 
vricians who probably would rank 
witli most duos in recent Williams 
history. Completing the battery is 
Bob Depopolo, undoubtedly one of 
till' best defensive catchers in all 
liini' Purple annals, and a Kood 
loiiK ball hitter to boot. 

At second. Coombs has a two 
year veteran, Captain Billy Cal- 
lutlian a .411 hitler last year, 
while Pete Connolly in riijht field 
im lit a .393 clip during the '51 
cioiipalgn. On paper, this is the 
nucleus of a first-rate ball-club, 
but there are many "ifs" to qualify 
thi' potential success of the Purple 
ti'iiin. 

For one thing, Coombs must 
come up with a third pitcher to 
back up Beard and Puffer, for 
Hare are .several spots in the sche- 
dule when three games are slated 



In five oi six days. As of right now, 
junior Howie Babcock is leading 
the crew of pitchers, and although 
he possesses a world ot stuff, he 
has little game experience to give 
liim tliat poise that Is so necessary 
U) a pitcher. Another big question 
mark lo face this year's team, is 
the three sophomores who have 
won starting positions, Walt Creer 
at third, Jack Hawkins at short, 
and Owen Mahar in left field. All 
three hit well as freshmen, 

Still another big worry, is the 
condition of Pete Connolly, who 
is fast becoming known as a sec- 
ond Jim Puchs. Fragile Pete is at 
piesent side-lined with a pulled 
hip muscle, and there is no telling 
how long he will be bothered by 
the affliction. The last big pro- 
blem facing the Ephs, concerns 
cenlei- field, where four worthies 
are battling for recognition. Right 
now. Tommy Dorsey is leading the 
paiade but he has yet to prove 
thai he can hit college pitching, 
and the same might be said for 
the other hopefuls. 

1 realize that 1 sound unduly 
pessimistic in lookinB over the 
season. As a matter of fact, I have 
so much confidence that the soph- 
omores, and Babcock. and Dorsey 
will all come through with flying 
colors, that I'm going out on a 
limb and picking the Ephs to win 
10 out of their 14 games, and also 
to top the Little Three again. 
Here's hoping they can better this. 

. . . And. in case anyone's inter- 
ested, I pick the Indians to beat 
the Phllies in the World Series. 



Lacrosse Team Stresses Offense, 
Defense, in Pre-Season Practice 



Saturday, April 12— After re- 
turning from the southern trip, 
Halph Townsend's varsity lacrosse 
team has settled down to perfect 
both their offense and defense. 
The players gained a chance to 
VMl organized down .south and are 
preparing for Ihe opening game 
with Yale on April 26 at New Ha- 
ven. 

Eleven of last year's lettermen 
are back plus a number of pro- 
mising sophomores up from last 
year's freshman squad. As it 
stands now, Bruce Van Dusen and 
Ted Mitchell have pretty well sew- 
ed up two of the attack posts, 
while Larry Donoho, Dave Han-i- 
■son. and Steve Whlttier are fight- 
ing foi- the third. 

At this pomt Ted Johnson, Ed 



Shudt, and "Duke" Curtis com- 
prise the first mldfield, while Pete 
IngersoU, recently switched from 
defense, Dave Burgher, Hugh 
Murphy and Bob Utlger are a- 
mong those vying for positions on 
the .second. Curtis, who was injur- 
ed for most of last season has 
looked exceptionally well in prac- 
tice. 

Captain Page L'Hommedleu 
heads the defense, while Don Ba- 
yer, Dick Cave, Walt Palmer, 
George Stege, and Tony Stolz arc 
all In the running for the other 
two positions. Sophomore Rod 
Starke appears to have the edge 
over John Sylvester at the goalie 
position. 

For the first real scrimmage 
See Page 4, Col. 1 



Yachtmen Schedule Seven Meets; 
Freshmen Enter Three Regattas 



Sunday, April 13 — The Williams 
Yacht Club, recent winners of the 
Eastern Intercollegiate Champ- 
ionship in the Annapolis McMil- 
lin Cup competition, today an- 
nounced a full dingy racing sche- 
dule for the spring term. 

Commodore Ted Mauck, with a 
crew including Doug Reed, Tom 
Pierce and Mark Cluett, entered 
the Tufts Regatta this weekend 
for the first of seven races in 
which the Ephs will be repre- 
sented. 

Among the more Important 



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competitions this spring are the 
New England Championship, E- 
limination C, at the Coast Guard 
Academy on April 20 and the Ow- 
en Trophy regatta at MIT on 
April 26 and 27. 

The Sailors will also enter eith- 
er the New England Champion- 
ships at the Coast Guard Academy 
or the Spring Invitational at 
Dartmouth on May 10 and 11. 
Freshmen Meets Scheduled 

Thi'ee Freshmen meets have 
been scheduled this year; two 
Fieshman Regattas at Dartmouth 
on April 20 and May 18. and the 
Fi-e.shman Singles Championship 
at Brown on April 27. 

Commodore Mauck also an- 
nounced that three ten-foot "pen- 
guin" dingys will be available 
throughout the spring for the in- 
formal sailing of club members. 



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Afine Oi^ens Xgdxnst \]vL\on Today 
With Puffer or Beard on Mound 




Center-field Slot 
Bothers Coombs 



Varsity Baseball Coach, Bobby 
Coumbs during pre-season warm- 
up. 



Lettermen, Sophs 
Head Golf Team 



Vacation Trip Warmup 
Should Prove Asset 



Wednesday, April 16— With the 
season's opening match against 
Bowdoln only a week and a day 
away, Coach Dick Baxter is hope- 
ful th<»t the 1952 varsity golf team 
Will maintain the unbeaten record 
of last year's New England Cham- 
pion team. 

Heading the team lineup are 
Captain Prank MacManus, Ted 
Taylor, and Don Rand, all re- 
turning lettermen, playing m the 
numbers one through three spots 
respectively. Sophomore Ed Mau- 
ro, star of last season's freshmen 
will hold down the number four 
post while Jim Tompkins, another 
veleran letterman will play num- 
ber five. The sixth position is still 
undecided. 

Commenting on the spring trip 
wliich saw his linksmen lose 
ihiee matches Coach Baxter said 
'The main point of the Southern 
nip is to give the men a chance 
10 loosen up after a winter long 
lay-off. The experience we gained 
in competing against some of the 
south's outstanding golfers will 
give us a big jump against Nor- 
thern competition which did not 
have the same opportunity.' 



By Fete Goldman '54 

Wednesday, April 16— When the 
Williams baseball squad squares 
oil against Union in the season's 
opener at 4 p. m. today, Coach 
Bobby Coombs will send either 
Mike Puffer or southpaw John 
Beard to the mound for the start- 
ing assignment. These veterans 
were credited with all of the nine 
Eph victories in last year's play. 

Coombs has been particularly 
pleased with the performances of 
the two hurlers in pre-season 
practice . Puffer worked five no- 
hit innings in an intra-squad 
game Saturday, while Beard was 
almost as impressive, despite a 
brief siieak of wlldne.ss that co.st 
him two runs. 

Lead Oft a Question Mark 

The center field post and the 
lead-off slot in the batting order 
remained the only question marks 
in the Eph starting lineup for to- 
day's game. As the team ran 
through a fhial workout yesterday. 
Coombs had not yet decided 
among Tommy Dorsey. Tom Ad- 
kins. Paul Zeckhausen and Steve 
Klein for the starting job in the 
middle garden. 

Billy Callaghan. team captain 
and a leading Purple hitter last 
season, returns to the keystone 
and will bat second. The third 
slot will be filled by long-ball hit- 
ting Owen Maher. who has been 
shifted to left field from the first 
b.ise position he held as a fresh- 
man. 

Creer. Hawkins Start 

Veleran catcher Bob DePopolo 
has been designated as the clean- 
up hitter, followed by right fleldei' 
Pete Connolly, returning to action 
today after a week's layoff with a 
pulled hip mu.scle. 

Walt Creer. who led last year's 
freshmen in batting, will open at 
third base and bat sixth. Below 
Creer in the batting list are .sopho- 
more shortstop Jack Hawkins and 
first baseman Pete Callahan. 
Ephs Sharp Defensively 

Although hitting during pre- 
season drills was unimpressive, the 
starting lineup has been excep- 
tionally tight defensively and the 
See Page 4, Col. 1 



Chaffee Predicts Successful Year 
Despite Tennis Trip Record of 1-5 



Par from downhearted despite 
his team's five losses in six starts 
on their spring-vacation southern 
trip. Conch Clarence Chaffee, now 
in his eleventh season at the Eph 
tennis helm, is instead very pleas- 
ed and rosily predicts another suc- 
cessful year. 

Chaffee's optimism stems chief- 
ly from the apparently conclusive 
evidence afforded during the 
southern matches that number 
one man Dick Squires is complete- 
ly recovered. The veteran Eph ace 
had been plagued by injuries to 
both knees, and it was feared that 
he might never regain top form 
this season. 

IMiddlcbury Practice Saturday 

The good news about Squires 



more than offsets the series of 
reversals suffered at the hands of 
Duke i9'/2-4V2i. North Carolina 
113-2 and 10-5i. Virginia (13-21, 
and the Country Club of Virginia 
(7-4). In the trip's final meet- 
ing, the Ephmen finally hit the 
victory column, downing William 
and Maix 5-4. 

A practice till at Middlebury 
Saturday will afford the racquet- 
men their last warmup before em- 
barking upon an ambitious 11- 
match schedule April 24 against 
Bowdoln here. 

Following the Polar Bear tussle 

is a revenge match on tap for 

May 2 with Harvard, who last 

spring topped the Purple in the 

See Page 4. Col. 1 



Dioni/,ri'iis Calo prescribed: 



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Make that pleasure an ice-cold 
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lOTTlED UNOEK *UTHORITr Of THE COC4COIA COMMNY «y 

BERKSHIRE COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY 

© 1952, THE COCA.COIA COMPAMV 



THE wiu-uMS RECORD \\■l!;l:)^l■:slx\^, ai'iui. lo, iy.52 



Baseball . . 



puchiiiB .suill has shown well. 
(Jjombs attribiili's tlif luck of fire- 
works lit but to the fact that the 
hmlers had been woikiiiB indoors 
for a month, and the hitters had 
not yet caimlit iii) to them. 

Coombs iianu'd varsity holdover 
Howie Babi'oek as his number one 
r.'lieli'r. followed by Dewey Rey- 
nolds and Rot! Moody, both sopho- 
mores. Dick Sullivan, regular 
fre.sliman second baseman a year 
aKo, will ,see .servue in a utility 
iiiHeld role. 

L.LSt season's edition of the Eph 
nine blasted Union 8-4, behind 
tlie pitching of Beai'.l The Dutch- 
men present a well-balanced, vet- 
eran aBBrcBation, uilh returning 
regulars at every position except 
the mound, wlieic graduation 
lo.sses were heavy. 



Tennis . . . 



(ip.'iuT. But far oiii v.cighing the 
Harvard encounter :ii importance 
is the May 20 mei'iiiig with lea- 
.Mde-rival Amherst, «ho surprised 
ihe Ephrnen in tin- finale a year 
ago, adding insult lo injury by 
snapping an eight-match Williams 
Wiiuiing streak besides taking the 
Little Three Crown. 

I'en men made the southern 
swing, but the lineup varied .some- 
wiial from day to day. Rouglily, 
the order was Stiuiies, Capt. Hank 
iNorlon, "Soapy" Symington, John 
i3i-ownell, Tom Bnicker, Al Pulker- 
son, Pete Pickard, Al Casson, Jim 
Ziegler. and Gordon Canning. 
I'leshman George Kesel also play- 
rd. but will be ineligible for ree- 
uia,- varsity competition. Brownell, 
I'Vilkerson, and Zicgler are new- 
comers up from last year's yearl- 
ing squad. 



Lac 



rosse . . . 

Since reluniiiig from Dixie, Town- 
.".end divided the squad up into 
;,wy teams. The 'Blues' led by Do 
noho. Johnson, and Mitchell each 
of whom scored two goals beat tlie 
■Orange,' 9-3, Inger.soll, Van Du- 
sen, and Dave Whiteford scored 
the other Blue goals; Curtis i2i 
and Harrison scored for the losers. 
Townsend was especially pleas- 
ed with the .stick handling in the 
scrimmage, and said that tlie team 
has improved much over the last 
two weeks. 




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Vacalioii I'loasiires 
5 SPECIAL CRUISES to 




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Volunteer Firemen Extinguish Grass Fire; 
Buildings on IS. Hoosic Road Ihreatened 



'ilunsday, April lu -Three 
pumpers, Vi men of the Williams- 
town Voliuiteer Fire Department, 
and three college students early 
this afternoon extinguished a 
glass fire which threatened a barn 
owned by Lawrence Lenlej', a ua- 
rage containing an auto owned by 
Mrs. Pearl Fuller, and twelve 
other buildmgs in the vicinity of 
the corner of North Street and 
North Hoosic Road. 

The blaze, which was iliought 
to have spread from a fire al the 
rear of a house on North Hoosic 
Road, progressed rapidly over an 
area of about one acre, and was 
only 50 feet from the Lenley barn 
when firemen brought it under 
control. Firemen also prevented 

Four Students Get 
"Comment" Posts 
For Coming Year 

Abrams Becomes Editor; 

Next Issue to Appear 

Sometime in May 



the fire from spreading lo a pine 
woods located at the north end 
of the field. 

The firemen were exlingulshiny: 
a minor grass fire in tlie field 
north of the college infirmary 
when the alarm for the Nortli 
Hoosic Road fire went in at '2:10. 
1' ire Chief K, H. McGowan sighted 
the blaze from the infirmary, and. 
afu'r putting out the infirmary 
fire, led his crew of 15 men and 
one pumper lo join the other two 
pumpers at the scene of the grass 
fire. 

Fire Warden Arthur L. Warden 
said at the grass fire that res- 
trictions on burning off fields 
will be tightened during the windy 
spring weather. 



Wednesday, April 16 — Election 
results for tlie new officers of 
"Comment", the college literary 
ma.gazine, have been announced. 
Richard Abrams '53 rccei\'e(i the 
pcsition of Editor in Chief. In ad- 
dition to his work on "Comment", 
Abrams, a member of Zeta Psi, 
is president of the International 
Relations Club and has been con- 
nected with Cap and Bells. 

Chosen to head the revised 
board is Peter Christman '53. a 
member of Phi Sigma Kapjia. He 
has also worked with the Outing 
Ciub and Cap and Bells, and has 
played freshman and varsity base- 
oall. Because of the lack of pub- 
licity altendng the publcaton of 
.he last issue of the magazine, the 
duties of the business board liave 
bci-n drastically changed. 

The position of Circulation 



Impromptu Speakers 
Register for Contest 

Wednesday, April 16— All 
Jiniiors and Seniors interested 
in the Van Vechten Impromp- 
tu Speaking Contest must reg- 
ister with Mr, Connelly before 
tomorrow night. No prepara- 
tion is necessary for this con- 
test scheduled for Monday 
night at 8 p.m. in Griffin Hall. 

Each contestant must choose 
one topic from a list of three 
handed to him on entering the 
room; he will speak for three 
minutes on this subject. The 
best speaker will receive a prize 
of $30. 



'Ian, ger went to John Troller '54, 
also a member of Phi Sigma Kap- 
pa. The new Art Editor is Robert 
Seaman '54, a member of Delta 
Psi, who holds the same position 
on the recently-reactivated "Pui- 
ple Cow." 

It was also annoimced that a 
drive for new subscriptions will be 
lainiched among the students, fa- 
culty, and parents .sometime in 
the near future. Meanwhile, plans 
are being made for another issue 
to be published in May, possibly 
house party weekend. 



Student Poll Picks 
Kefauver Over Taft 

45 Prefer Democrat 
38' Favor Ohioan 



Wednesday, April 16— Este.s Ke- 
fauver has a shglit edge over Ro- 
oeit Tait as presidential choice 
among the country's college stu- 
ueuis. 'rius tact was revealed by 
„iie results of the latest A.ssociated 
Collegiate Press Nalioiiul Poll uf 
otudent Opinion, 

llie pull indicates that Kefau- 
,er has iiis best support from stu- 
dents in die Soudi, and that he 
ami i'afl are abou