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Full text of "Thirty-ninth Annual Report of The National Farm School 1936"




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JOSEPH KKAUSKOPF, FOUNDER 



VISION 

Now in its fortietli year, The National Farm School 
realizes the vision of the Founder, who foresaw present- 
day social conditions of the Jews at home and abroad. He 
knew they would find it increasingly arduous to surmount 
the barriers placed in their paths ; that overcrowding in 
professions and industries would make success more dif- 
ficult in urban centers. To solve this j)roblem, he urged 
Jewish youth to enter agriculture as a vocation. 

The unfortunate condition of our brethren abroad ap- 
peals to those of us privileged to live in America. Your 
School, therefore, has liberalized its entrance requirements, 
and admitted over a half -score German refugees to train 
for agricultural pursuits. We are in constant communi- 
cation with others who desire to come to America, and our 
agreement to accept them greatly facilitates the securing 
of their vises. 

Grateful thanks are acknowledged to the friends who 
helped keep the doors of the School open during the de- 
pression. Educationally, its high standard has been main- 
tained, but buildings and equipment suffered. Funds are 
now urgently needed to rehabilitate the phj'sical plant and 
replace outworn and outmoded equipment. Larger funds, 
too, would enable us to give more boj^s, now turned away, 
their opportunity. 

This work is vital — constructive. It aids deserving 
boys to become self-supporting, worth-while citizens. Won't 
you help with a contribution? 

HERBERT D. ALLMAN, 

President. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/thirtyninthannua1936farm 



THIRTY- NINTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 

OF 

The National Farm 
School 



Farm School 
Bucks County 
Pennsylvania 




1936 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 
OFFICERS AND BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Herbert D. Allman, President of the School 
Joseph H. Hagedorn, Vice-President 
Isaac H. Silverman, Treasurer 
Miss E. M. Bellefield, Secretary 



(Having 
Herbert D. Allman 
Hart Blumenthal 
David Burpee 
Adolph Eichholz 
Harry Felix 
Dr. Wm. H. Fixes briber 
Horace T. Fleisher 
Daniel Gimbel 
Jos. H. Hagedorn 
Roy a. Heymaxn 

Term Expires 1937 
Sydney K. Allman, Jr. 
Jas. M. Anderson 
Mrs. a. J. Bamberger 
Harey Burstein 
Rabbi Juliax* B. Feibel- 

man 
Al. Paul Lefton 
DoLF L. Levy 
Elias Nuseaum 
Jas. Weintraub 
Emaxuel Wirkman 



HONORARY MEMBERS 
Served for Ten Consecutive Years) 



Jos. H. Hinlein 
Louis A. Hirsch 
Harry B. Hirsh 
Maurice Jacobs 
Hexry a. James 
Alfred M. Klein 
Chas. Kline 
Dr. Bernard Kohn 
Mrs. Jos. Krauskopf 
M. R. EIrauskopf 

ELECTED MEMBERS 

Term Expires 1938 
Frank G. Binswanger 
J. Griffith Boardman 
Lester Hano 
Julian A. Hillman 
Chas. Kahn 
David H. Fleet 
;Mrs. Henry Rosenthal 
Louis Schlesinger 
Mrs. R. B. Schoxeman 
Isaac Stern 



Leon Merz 

Dr. Louis Nusbaum 

Leon Rosenbaum 

Bernard Selig 

I. H. Silverman 

Jos. N. Sxellex'burg 

Philip Sterling 

}^Irs. Arthur K. Stern 

James Work 



Term Expires 1939 
Drue N. Allman 
Isidore Baylson 
Carroll Downes, Jr. 
Dr. S. S. Greenbaum 
Stanley H. Hinlein 
Judge Theo. Rosen 
Edwin H. Silverman 
Nathan J. Sxellexburg 
Dr. Leon Solis-Cohen 
Edwin H. Weil 



WOMEN'S COMMITTEE 

r^lRS. Jos. Krauskopf, Chairzvoman 
Mrs. Theodore Netter, Treasurer ]\Irs. David 



Mrs. A. J. Bamberger 

Mrs. Henry S. Belber 

Mrs. Max Berg 

Mrs. D. T. Berlizheimer 

Miss Belle Floersheim 

Mrs. Simon Friedberger 

Mrs. Hiram Hirsch 



^Irs. M. J. Karpeles 
Mrs. A. M. Klein 
Mrs. Bernard Kohn 
Mrs. M. R. Krauskopf 
Mrs. A. Marks 
^liss M. Oppenheimer 



Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 



Frankel, Secretary 

Samuel Paley 
H. Rosenthal 
R. B. Schoneman 
Harry Snellenburg 
Arthur K. Stern 
^ilaurice E. Stern 



Miss .\. M. Abraham.'^ox, Mrs. L. Boxsall, 
Field Secretaries 



School and Farms Located at Farm School. Bucks County, Pa. 
Executive Offices : 1701 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



THE NATIONAL FAR:\I SCHOOL 



NATIONAL BOARD OF STATE DIRECTORS 



LOUIS SCHLKSINGER, Newark, N. J., Clialrman 



Edmund H. Abrahams. Savannah, Ga. 
B. Abrohams, Green Bay, Wis. 
Sam Albreclit, Vicksburg, Miss. 
Henry A. Alexander, Athuita, Ga. 
Arthur A. Aronson, Raleigh, N. C. 
Marcus Bachenheimer, Wheeling, W. Va. 
Melvin Belirends, Washington, D. C. 
Dr. Henry J. Berkowitz, Portland, Ore. 
I. W. Bernheim, Louisville, Ky. 
W. r. BlooTu, Tuscaloosa, Ala. 
R. D. Blum, Nashville, Tenn. 
S. B. Brunwasser, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
Edgar M. Cahn, New Orleans, La. 
Edward M. Chase, Manchester, N. H. 
Gabriel M. Cohen, Louisville, Ky. 
Julius L. Colien, Superior, Wis. 
Louis Cohen, Ft. Smith, Ark. 
Miss Felice Cohn, Reno, Nev. 
Herman Cone, Greensboro, N. C. 
Max De .Toug, Evansville, Ind. 
Nathan Eckstein, Seattle, Wash. 
Samuel Edelberg, Saranac Lake, N. Y. 
Rabbi A. J. Felduian, Hartford, Conn. 
Herbert TJ. Feibelman, Miami, Fla. 
Rabbi J. B. Feibelman, New Orleans, La. 
AValter Floersheim, Roy, N. M. 
Stanley Frank, San Antonio, Tex. 
A. Frankel, Sr., Ues Moines, la. 
D. B. Franz, Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Ike L. Freed, Houston, Tex. 
Maurice J. Freiberg, Cincinnati, O. 
Max Friedwald, Billings, Mont. 
Myer Friendly, Elmira, N. Y. 
Louis M. Fuslian, Pittsbui'gh, Pa. 
Julius Glaser, St. Louis, Mo. 
Judge Edward I. Gleszer, Bangor, Me. 
Milton D. Greenbaum, Baltimore, Md. 
N. Greengard, Mandan, N. D. 
S. Gugenlieini, Corpus Christi. Tex. 
Mrs. H. A. Guinzberg, New York, N. Y. 
Judge Samuel J. Harris, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Sieg. Harzfeld, Kansas City, Mo. 
Hugo Heiman, Little Rock, Ark. 
Harry Hirsch, Toledo, O. 
Wm. L. Holzman, Omaha, Neb. 
Robt. W. Isaacs, Clayton, N. M. 
Simon Jankowsky, Tulsa, Okla. 
Julius Janowitz, New York, N. Y. 
Carl H. Kahn, Chicago, 111. 
Thos. Kapner, Bellaire, O. 
Edmund I. Kaufmann, Washington, D. C. 



Howard Kayser, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Samuel E. Kohn, Denver, Col. 

Daniel E. Koshland, San Francisco, Cal. 

Rabbi Isaac Landman, New York, N. Y. 

G. Irving Latz, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Isidore Lehman, Jackson, Miss. 

Jos. G. Lehman, Dayton, O. 

Bernard Levitt, Wichita, Kan. 

Dan A. Levy, Fort Worth, Tex. 

Dr. I. H. Levy, Syracuse, N. Y. 

M. Lipinsky, Asheville, N. C. 

Alex. Lischkoff, I'ensacola, Fla. 

J. H. Loveman, Birmingham, Ala. 

A. L. Luria, Reading, Pa. 

H. A. Mackoff, Dickinson, N. D. 

Herbert Marcus, Dallas, Tex. 

Ben. H. May, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Isaac Miiy, Rome, Ga. 

Jewell Mayes, .leffersou City, Mo.. 

Sam Meyer, Meridian, Miss. 

William Meyer, Butte, Mont. 

M. G. Michael, Athens, Ga. 

L. Migel, Waco, Tex. 

Abe Miller, Chicago, 111. 

Louis Mosenlelder, Rock Island, 111. 

Herbert A. Moses, Sumter, S. C. 

N. Murov, Shreveport, La. 

Milton G. Newmau, Peoria, 111. 

Chas. Nussbaum, Pittsbui'gh, Pa. 

Louis Oettinger, Scrantou, Pa. 

Michael Panovitz, Grand Forks, N. D. 

Dr. 1. v.. Philo. Youugstown, O. 

Judge Max L. Pinansky, Portland, Me. 

Myron Porges, Pocatello, Idaho. 

James A. Pratt, Loch Raven, Md. 

Chas. S. Rauli, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Pliram S. Rivitz, Cleveland, O. 

Alex Rosen, Bismarck, N. D. 

Bernath Rosenteld, Tucson, Ariz. 

Arthur Rosenstein. Boston, Mass. 

Emil Rosentock, Sioux City, la. 

Dr. Henry Ross, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dr. Leo S. Rowe, Washington, D. C. 

Samuel Rudley, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Oliver R. Sabin. New York, K Y. 

Henry Sachs, Colorado Springs, Col. 

Judge S. B. Schein, Madison, Wis. 

Charles Schoen, Cedar Rapids, la. 

r>i-. Laurence Selling. Portland, Ore. 

Max Semel, New York, N. Y. 

Moses Shapiro, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



4 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

NATIONAL BOARD OF STATE DIRECTORS— Continued 



David Snellenburg, Wilmington, Del. 
Morris Stern, San Antonio, Tex. 
Samuel Stern, Fargo, N. D. 
David Sternberg, Memphis, Tenn. 
Bertram A. Stroock. Novi-burgli, N. Y. 
Milton Sulzberger, Providence, R. I. 
Dr. J. J. Taubenhaus, College Station, 

Tex. 
Louis Tober, Portsmouth, N. H. 
Louis Veta, Cheyenne, Wyo. 
Eugene Warner, Buflfalo, N. Y. 



Jerome A. Waterman, Tampa, Fla. 
Adolph Well, Paducah, Ky. 
Isadore Weil, Montgomery, Ala. 
Jonas Weil, Lexington, Ky. 
Lionel Weil. Goldsboro, N. C. 
Morris Weil, Lincoln, Neb. 
Leo Weinberg, Frederick, Md. 
Henry Weinberger, San Diego, Cal. 
M. J. Weiss, Alexandria, La. 
J. K. Weitzenkorn, Wllkes-Barre, Pa 
S. D. Wise, Cleveland, O. 



NEW YORK COMMITTEE 



Hon. Mitchell L. Erlanger, Chairman 



Lester J. Alexander 

Hon. William D. Baer 

Samuel Berliner 

Walter Hart Blumenthal 

H. H. Butler 

Hon. Abram I. Elkus 

Joseph Engel 

Hon. Mitchell L. Erlanger 

Manfred Goldman 

Rev. Dr. Israel Goldstein 

Frederick AVilliam Greenfield 

Dr. Louis I. Harris 

Julius Janowitz 

Dr. Herbert M. Kaufmann 

Rev. Dr. Nathan Krass 

Hon. Herbert H. Lehman 

Hon. Samuel D. Levy 

Leopold J. Lippmann 

Dr. Louis C. Lowenstein 

Jesse J. Ludwig 



Benjamin Mordecal 

Moses D. Mosessolin 

Rev. Dr. Louis I. Newman 

Hon. Algernon I. Nova 

Hugo H. Piesen 

David L. Podell 

LoTiis P. Rocker 

Sidney R. Rosenau 

Aaron Sapiro 

Otto B. Shulhof 

Dudley D. Sicher 

Sigmund Stein 

Isaac Stern 

Rev. Dr. Nathan Stern 

Hon. Aron Steuer 

Bertram A. Stroock 

Benjamin Veit 

Jerome Waller 

Rev. Dr. Stephen S. Wise 

Isidore Witmark 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 5 

THE FACULTY 

Herbert D. Allman, President 
FACULTY OF ADMINISTRATION 

Cletus L. Goodling, B.Sc, M.Sc. (Pennsylvania State College) ; Dean of 

the School. Farm Management. 
Samuel B. Samuels, B.Sc. (Massachusetts State College) ; Assistant to the 

Dean, Director of Athletics, Instructor in Rural Sociology. 
Bernard Zeigler (National Farm School) ; Social Director. 
Maud Briel Maines (Drexel Institute) ; Librarian. 
Lieutenant Joseph Frankel (Director of the Philadelphia Municipal 

Band) ; Band Master and Musical Instructor. 

AGRONOMY 

Walter J. Groman (National Farm School) ; Assistant Farm Manager, 

Instructor in Farm Mechanics. 
Russell E. Weaver, B.Sc. (Pennsylvania State College) ; Instructor in Field 

Crops. Field Foreman. 
Edwin Webster, B.Sc. (Pennsylvania State College) ; Field Foreman. 
I. F. Antonioli, B.Sc. (Pennsylvania State College) ; Instructor in Shop 

Work. 
Franz-Adolf Frank, Dipl.Agr., Dr.Agr. (University of Berlin) ; Soils and 

Fertilizers. 

HORTICULTURE 

David M. Purmell, B.Sc. (Michigan State College) ; Head of the Depart- 
ment. 

]\'Iorris Mayer (National Farm School) ; In charge of Floriculture Work. 

Herman G. Fiesser (Gartenbauschule, Geisenheim, Germany) ; In charge of 
Landscape Work. 

Aaron Lipman, B.Sc. (Rutgers University) ; Field Foreman. 

Solomon L. Soskin (National Farm School) ; In charge of Central Sales 
Department. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY AND DAIRYING 

John C. Thompson, B.Sc, M.Sc. (Ohio State University) ; Head of the 
Department. 

Wesley Massinger, D.V.S. (New York University) ; Instructor in Veteri- 
nary Science. 

Griffin L. Roberts, B.Sc. (Ohio State University) ; Instructor in Dairying. 

Floyd Cook, Herdsman. 

POULTRY 
Cecil J. Toor (National Farm School) ; Head of the Department. 
Reuben Yoselson, B.Sc. (Pennsjdvania State College) ; Instructor in 
Poultry. 

ACADEMIC 
Henry Schmieder, A.B., M.Sc. (University of Pennsylvania) ; Head of 

Chemistry, Biology, Botany, and Beekeeping ; Instructor in English. 
David I. Burstein, B.Sc. (University of Pennsylvania) ; LL.B. (Harvard 

University) ; Lecturer in Farm Law. 
B. M. Lickman (Wharton School, Universit}' of Pennsylvania) ; Lecturer 

in Farm Accounting. 

MEDICAL 
Allen H. Moore (University of North Carolina) : M.D. (Jefferson Medical 
School); Associate, American College of Physicians; Visiting Physician 
Extra-Mural Staff Jewish Hospital; A^isiting School Physician; Director 
School Infirmary ; Lecturer in Applied Hygiene. 
Bertha Zedricks, Nurse. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 
Message of the President 

HERBERT D. ALLMAN 

to the 
Thirty-ninth Annual Meeting 

of 

The National Farm School 

October 11. 1936 



At this, the anuual harvest gathering, we are met to rejoice 
and offer grateful thanks for a most bountiful har^'est. 

Today The National Farm School, founded by Joseph Kraus- 
kopf, enters its fortieth year, its history, a cogent story of pioneer- 
ing in agricultural education, its progress, definite, consistent and 
constructive. Growth Jjas not been in buildings alone. The initial 
enrollment of ten students in 1897 has increased to 185, the faculty 
of 5 to 25; the acreage from 122 to 1,200. AVith renewed vigor, we 
shall continue our efforts, just as the founders combined initiative 
to overcome their difficulties. 

Achievements are too often taken as a matter of course. Es- 
sentially, they represent the fruits of conscious design and careful 
planning. Much that has been accomplished is due to faith and 
the harmonious co-operation of trustees, faculty, staff and man- 
agement. 

In these difficult days, when government relief cannot meet all 
needs, it is a source of gratification to participate in welfare service. 
I am happy to extend greetings and appreciation to the friends 
of the School for their support. Increased prosperity, now evident, 
means that deferred obligations and responsibilities can be taken 
up anew. Additional funds Avill permit us to accept more boys 
now^ turned away discouraged. 

This • non-sectarian institution, largely supported by Jewish 
people, is a contribution to American agriculture. As a philan- 
thropy, it is in sympathy with the plight of unfortunate Jews 
forced to leave Germany, and liberalizes its requirements to admit 
those eager to seek new securitv on the land. 




JOSEPH KBAUSKOPF LIBKAIIY AND FORUM 




LiASKER HALL, 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 7 

In an effort to set foi-tli salient facts ve<>'ar(lin<>' the purposes 
and progress of the School, I shall attempt to appraise true values ; 
in substance, render a brief account of our stewardship. The major 
problems that confront us are education, student selection and 
finance. An outline of these and other subjects may prove inter- 
esting-, especially to those unable to visit the School. 

Our financial statement is published in the Year Book. The 
School is unendowed, and largely dependent upon the contributions 
of its friends and supporters throughout the country. A student 
fee, only a tithe of the cost of education, food and housing, is 
charged. While the high educational standards of the School have 
been upheld throughout the depression, the need of funds necessary 
for equipment replacement and building-upkeep is urgent. 

Two distinct methods of agricultural education are current. 
Colleges fit young men for government positions, research work, 
teaching and as veterinarians. We teach the science of farming 
with that of practice. Dr. James E. Russel, of Columbia Univer- 
sity, in referring to the lack of progressive and vocal leadership in 
agriculture, . points to our method of training, as one that can do 
much to remedy the situation. "Graduates of agricultural col- 
leges," he says, "do not usually become farmers, but in most cases 
'narrow specialists'.' Students of vocational schools obtain a cer- 
tain facility for leadership, but without farm training thej', too, 
become voices in the wilderness. ' ' 

Our curriculum, in addition to teaching academic subjects, 
stresses the practical. Students must take examinations in all 
technical and industrial subjects, described in detail in the School's 
catalog. 

We are fortunate in having a faculty whose technical ability 
to teach practical farming is augmented by interest in boy welfare. 
Much of the success of a student depends upon intellectual inti- 
macy between himself and his teachers. Ability to teach is the 
highest art, requiring the same qualities of character demanded 
by all art : sincerity and a devotion of high order. In my 1935 
message, I voiced the hope that former salaries might be restored. 
It is gratifying to say that notwithstanding shrinkage of current 
income, a large part has been reinstated, made possible by good 
crop returns. No outside labor is hired. Students perform all 
chores as part of their training. 

At commencement we graduate about fifty seniors, competent 
to assume the responsibilities of citizenship. From a large waiting 



8 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

list, seventy scholarships are awarded annually to those eager to 
fit themselves for a useful life. 

Because the School aims for maximum results, serious thought 
is given to the problem of assuring the success of graduates. This 
is approached with the primary understanding that we train boys 
raised in the city, not the sons of farmers. Through our Placement 
Bureau we attempt to prove that the School is still their friend as 
they face their practical combat with life. We adAase graduates to 
Avork on a farm, gain more experience, save earnings and start for 
themselves. Before purchasing, we encourage them to seek our 
advice and guidance. 

Tabulated records of our graduates for the past ten years 
shoW' splendid results : 46 per cent, engaged in some branch of agri- 
culture. Some till their own land ; others are employed by master 
farmers or engaged in allied activities. Sufficient graduates to 
meet the demand cannot be supplied. 

We foster a spirit of self-reliance and honest study, an atti- 
tude of critical inquiry, resulting in intellectual moderation. Few 
schools are less institutionalized. Most of our students are indi- 
vidualists; few are extremists. They learn to work out a sound 
philosophy in relation to the best way to develop their lives. Es- 
sential elements of personality may depend more upon chance cir- 
cumstances than upon formal or planned education. 

To secure balance, students are taught to adjust themselves to 
the conditions of their environment. Familiarizing themseh^es wath 
the idealistic and realistic, and equipped wdth thinking power they 
become better citizens, able to meet the stresses of a practical world. 
Since there is no saturation point in education, continued stuch^ is 
urged. 

Some of our honor students earn scholarships in eastern col- 
leges. Prof. F. Ct. Heh^ar, Dean of the College of Agriculture, 
Rutgers University, speaks highly of three of our graduates now 
there. He tells me they have proved themselves in study and prac- 
tice, rank scholastically at the top of their respective classes and 
have the stuff in them for responsible positions. He wishes they 
had more students like them. 

Those who earn scholarships at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, major in Veterinary Science. Br. George A. Dick, Dean of 
the Veterinary School, says our boys head classes because of their 
animal husbandry practice at Farm School. 




HERBEKT D. ALLMAN ADMINISTRATION AND FARM 
MECHANICS BUILDING 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 9 

Economic depressions bring a deeper i-ealization of the prob- 
lems of youth. In order to stress the dignity of labor and lessen 
dangers due to maladjustment, vocational training should be en- 
couraged. A recent survey shows that a large percentage of high 
school students hope to enter professions or executive jobs, a pro- 
portion much greater than the call for workers of that type. 

The native ability of adolescents should be studied and di- 
rected at the source. Preparatory reading, suited to the vocation 
for which they are fitted, should be encouraged. Trained experts 
should help them select a career in which, b}^ tests, the^^ show ef- 
ficiency. Forcing students to take courses for which they are not 
fitted defeats the purpose of education. Confronted with new eco- 
nomic problems they want facts — not theories. Lacking experi- 
ence, they should heed the mature advice of parents, who should 
study their talents. Unhappiness in life often comes from getting 
into the wrong occupation. 

Serious-minded young men realize that agriculture has crea- 
tive possibilities for those scientifically trained; that it offers self- 
maintenance, health and contentment to those with knowledge of 
modern methods. Helping hesitant boys to select the right career 
is just as important to them as to the School. They should not 
spend valuable time to major in a vocation unless sure of them- 
selves, nor can the School afford to train boys unless they follow 
through. Seriousness of purpose is essential to success in any 
undertaking. Achievements are the result of devotion to an ideal. 

In the course of each year we interview many applicants. 
Careful selection and eliminations are necessary. When convinced 
they are not seriously interested in agriculture, other channels are 
suggested wherein talents may be better utilized. Proper selection 
is our responsibilitj^, yet Ave are not infallible, and occasionally 
students are dismissed. 

Three-year scholarships, equal in time to four years, in college, 
are awarded to worthy boys, irrespective of creed, 17 to 21 years 
of age. They must be physically, mentally and morally fit. Though 
less than four years of high-school training meet our educational 
requirement, graduates receive preference. Undergraduates are 
urged to continue their studies to the end of their course. It gives 
them requisite credits for college entrance. Boy scouting is en- 
couraged, as it indicates training towards good citizenship. All 
students are accepted on a six months' probationar}^ period. 



10 THE NATIONAL FAKM SCHOOL 

Especially Avheii social and economic conditions in life are so 
rapidly and violently changino-, do we recognize the factual need 
for practical training. There is a natural process of education in 
which is included an opportunity to learn through experience. 
Specialized teaching, new departments and modern equipment are 
planned, whereby the economy of the learning process is advanced. 

Our former project system, by which part of each day was 
given to industrial work and part to classroom, has been changed 
to an alternating system, with excellent results. The students ro- 
tate in two groups. During a period of six weeks, one group takes 
class work only, the other industrial. Those attending classes are 
better qualified to do evening assignments. Those engaged in farm 
operations retire early, fit for the next day's strenuous work. By 
this plan students improve their ratings, and interest is maintained. 

In their senior year, students may elect a special course, or 
major in general agriculture. An inherent liking for animal or 
vegetable life may exist in the mind of a student when he enters. 
Gradually, a degree of specialization takes place, and a choice, 
based upon intelligent judgment and scholastic experience, is made. 
Some definitely select their specialization when they enter. 

At times I interview applicants whose high school records are 
low. Here, they rate higher because interest has been stimulated 
through the hand as well as the head. Students tilling the soil 
learn its chemical values in the laboratory. Milking cows in the 
stanchions, their interest is caught and held when taught the theory 
of animal husbandry. Seniors who manipulate tractors on the 
farm, and learn how to tear down and rebuild a motor, are ca- 
pable of making repairs far from the base of supplies. Taught to 
feed and harness horses, they learn how to care for them in their 
veterinary course. By the same co-ordination, as they learn to 
plow, plant and harvest, they more readily grasp the theory of 
agronomy taught in classroom. 

Those who select the rugged but normal vocation of farming 
are removed from the distractions of urban life. In close contact 
with Nature, they enjoy more comfort. The simplicity of rural 
life keeps them friendly with neighbors. Standards of living are 
less rigid. The chances for success in the country are as good as 
those in the city. Nothing essential has been lost, except the noise 
and grime forever prevalent where congestion abounds. 

There are many phases of personal development that should 
not be omitted from the equipment of students. Therefore, our 




riNE SPECIMENS 




PICKINGS ARE GOOD 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL . 11 

purpose is more than educative. We emphasize the importauce of 
moral training. Character cannot be taught from books, nor built 
from the spoken word. It must be molded by example. Discipline 
and democracy among students inculcate traits of integrity and 
manliness. Contacts with fellow-students of various creeds, repre- 
senting a cross-section of youth, leave their imprint. We endeavor 
to develop not only independent husbandmen, but forth-right 
Americans who, to preserve the spirit of individualism, should 
adapt themselves to the increasing complexities of social philoso- 
phies, accepting only those that are good. 

Manj^ of our alumni tell me the environment at Farm School 
implants in their consciousness an intangible "something" relating 
to character-building that cannot be defined. What causes that 
something? My personal opinion, based upon observation, is — 
that no effort has been spared to unify agricultural education with 
that of wholesome living. 

Occasionally, we are challenged by the query: "Why The Na- 
tional Farm School f Might not the money expended for the educa- 
tion and keep of each student defray his expenses at an agricultural 
college !" Superficially, the question appears logical. A careful 
analysis, however, will show that this School has a definite place in 
the Nation's educational program. 

Our fundamental purpose is to divert city boys, who love 
nature, from overcrowded white-collar jobs to agriculture. There 
are other reasons. Students from the city, ignorant of the first 
rudiments of farming, require intensive practice training. The 
School's rural atmosphere tends to make boys farm-minded, farm- 
conscious. We admit students not eligible for college entrance, 
most of whom could not afford the cost of higher education. 

. Dr. Clyde L. King, Professor of Economy at the Wharton 
School, University of Pennsylvania, himself a farmer says: "In- 
dependent of the character-building your School offers, it justifies 
its need because it teaches HOW TO FARM. Graduates of agri- 
cultural colleges are not taught the practical. Educational proc- 
esses function most surely when there is a purpose in learning, and 
Farm School has that purpose." 

Farmers compelled to face weather hazards, in addition to 
rapid price fluctuations, cannot be socialized. Handicaps, how- 
ever, are mitigated by co-operation with the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. Bureaus of this organization quarantine 
against foreign pests and infectious diseases of livestock. Orchards 



12 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

are saved from scale and plant diseases. Scientific research bu- 
reaus also lielp. Prevention of yellow fever, malaria and other 
endemic diseases and new discoveries in the field of biology and 
botany save both life and property. Daily crop and weather re- 
ports aid farmers to plan with foresight and profit. Free advice 
from comity agents is also available. Intelligent growers who ap- 
ply the scientific methods suggested by experiment stations benefit 
by a service which increases yields far beyond State appropriations 
made to support Land Grant Agricultural Colleges. 

Agronomists realize the need for national action regarding soil 
conservation. Destruction by drought, floods and erosion should 
be controlled. Soil has not always been here ; the erosion that gave 
it can take it away. Assuming that America's resources were 
boundless, farmers migrated westward after stripping fertility. 
Forests were mowed down for lumber and pulp. Vast pastures 
were grazed until grass roots no longer prevent dust storms. 

Farming is as much a business as trading, railroading or min- 
ing. It reacts to the same economic influences. When farmers are 
compelled to sell crops below cost, general business is adversely af- 
fected because of shrinkage in purchasing power. If national in- 
telligence can regulate agriculture to an economic equality with in- 
dustry, commerce will show a healthy betterment, for the welfare 
of agriculture and industry are tied together. The farm and the 
shop each needs what the other produces. 

The opinion held by some that farming is a laboring occupa- 
tion of secondary importance, requiring bone and muscle only, is 
erroneous. Farming offers a splendid opportunity for those fitted 
by temperament and training for that kind of life. Financial suc- 
cess depends upon the farmer's abilit}^ to apply business methods 
to his operations, to obtain the greatest returns from the expendi- 
ture of muscle, brain and capital, in competition with other farmers 
and other industries. If we substitute those who are incompetent 
for those who know how to farm, we transfer liabilities into assets. 
There are too manj' poor farmers on good land, and too many good 
farmers on poor land. It was Luther Burbank's philosophy that 
"initiative and consciousness, combined with practical knowledge 



THE XATIOXAL FAR^[ SCHOOL 13 

and horse-sense, are the motive power beliiiul all great achieve- 
ments. ' ' 

Agricultural experts and scientists claim that if modern 
methods and synthetic substitutes are used, one-fifth of the present 
farm-land can support us; that farming will prove more profitable 
because of the tendency to unify industry with agriculture. Sig- 
nificant changes in organic chemistrj^ are being rapidly developed 
in industrial laboratories from transmuted vegetation and waste 
bj^products. 

Nurserymen now raise tomatoes, strawberries and potatoes 
without soil. Planting is done on beds of moist leaves, excelsior 
or straw placed over wire- netting, where roots reach into shallow 
troughs containing plant foods dissolved in electrically heated 
M-ater. Recent experiments show that plants which normally bloom 
in the longer light hours of summer, fliower in winter bj^ supple- 
menting daylight with additional hours of electric light. Plants 
are controlled hy the number of hours of light, not b}^ its intensity. 
The National Farm School endeavors to keep step with these scien- 
tific improvements. 

The American Cyanamid Company sponsors a fellowship at 
the School. The incumbent, Franz-Adolf Frank, Ph.D., teaches 
science, and synthetic fertilization. Bulletins relating to these ex- 
periments will be distributed to agricultural colleges and others 
interested in scientific research. V^e also collaborate with Penn 
State College in fertilization experiments on our grounds, which 
prove instructive to students of both institutions and to neighbor- 
ing farmers. 

A one-year special course, financed by the State and Federal 
Rehabilitation Bureau, offers to those physically handicapped by 
illness or injury an opportunity to major in one of the lighter 
branches of agriculture. Thus faith and confidence in their ability 
to succeed in a healthy vocation is re-established. Handicaps often 
lead to achievements, as greater effort is put forth to balance de- 
ficiencies. 

Campus life centers at the Krauskopf Library, which contains 
over 17,000 volumes, under supervision of a trained librarian. 



14 THE NATIONAL FARAT SCHOOL 

Students are taught how to use books as tools and to work things 
out for themselves. Weekly religious services are conducted along 
non-sectarian lines. Discussions are presented from the point of 
view of approved social and moral standards. 

Social life at the School is featured by student dances, ath- 
letic events, weekly assemblies and a faculty-student picnic, sym- 
bolizing the termination of the harvest season. The School Band 
and Orchestra also have social A^alue. Lieutenant Frankel, Musical 
Director, compares them fa^^orably with organizations in higher 
schools of education with which he is associated. 

A modernly equipped infirmary is maintained under super- 
vision of a registered nurse. Serious cases are cared for at the 
Jewish Hospital in Philadelphia. The School Physician, Dr. Allen 
H. Moore, gives a course in Applied Hygiene. David I. Burstein, 
University of Pennsylvania and Harvard graduate, lectures on 
Farm Law. 

The Domestic Department is under the supervision of Mr. 
Samuel B. Samuels, Assistant to the Dean. Food for those who 
work and study must be heavier; a scientific knowledge of dietetics 
is required. 

The Eoadside Market, located on the main highway, provides 
selling experience. Students learn how to approach the buyer; 
post themselves on market quotations, display their products prop- 
erl}^ and dispose of them profitably. 

Agricultural Journalism is an adjunct to the teaching of Eng- 
lish. "The Gleaner," a school magazine, is published by the stu- 
dents. Farm and topics of general interest are discussed in each 
issue. 

Student misdemeanors are impartially handled. When seri- 
ous, recommendations for dismissal are brought to the Educational 
Committee or President. Minor offenses entail extra chores or 
deduction from the thirty-five days' vacation allotted to each 
student. 

Physical training has a place in our program. Students par- 
ticipate in athletic activities that develop physique and character. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 15 

We are proud of our undefeated teams. Sportsmanlike games 
when supervised by a competent coach are definite assets. 

During- the past decade a larger Alumni Association has been 
organized with Chapters at Farm School, New York, Philadelphia, 
Pittsburgh, Chicago and Atlantic Citj-. 

The School functions under the able direction of the Dean and 
Headmaster, Professor Cletus L. Goodling, formerly of Penn State 
College. 

The post office and railroad station are located on the School 
campus. The Executive Office in Philadelphia is centrallj^ located. 
It is the clearing house for all school business, solicitation of funds 
and publicity. Applicants for scholarships are here interviewed bv 
the President, and visitors who come through Philadelphia for rail- 
road connections to Farm School are received. 

The Women's Auxiliary Committee, under the Chairmanship 
of Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf, assists and advises in the management 
of domestic departments. Outstanding citizens serve as National 
Directors in every State, under the Chairmanship of Louis Schles- 
inger, of Newark, N. J. They interview prospective students apply- 
ing from their localities, and otherwise assist the School in their 
respective communities. 

Voluntary commendations from educators, a waiting list of 
desirable applicants, and an over-demand for the services of gradu- 
ates privilege me to say the School functions satisfactorily under 
the direction of an active Board of fift}^ Trustees, representatives 
of varied business and professional activities. The Board is sub- 
divided into sixteen committees, under competent chairmen. 

The President, ex-officio on all committees, serves without 
salary. He heads faculty and staff, visits the School frequently and 
is in daily attendance at the Philadelphia office, ably assisted by 
Miss E. M. Bellefield, Secretary. Experience as an officer of other 
institutions enables him to say that no board could possibly give 
its President a freer hand to work out constructive programs. They 



16 THE XATIOXAL FARM SCTinOL 

have continiioush' advised and assisted. Tlieir interest as a whole 
and individnally, their committee worlv and visits of inspection are 
commendable and appreciated. 

There are edncational, hnmanitarian and financial problems 
still to overcome. Nevertheless, we shall labor to advance the tra- 
ditions and records made during the past fort}^ 3'ears. "When we 
look back and visualize the scope and growth of the School, when 
Ave contemplate our trials and triumphs, we cannot but feel grate- 
ful that to us has been given the dut}^ of stewardship. If our work 
has been found efficient in the past, and if those wlio inherit our 
resjDonsibilties prove true to their trust, then we shall be content. 




STUDENTS ARE TAUGHT HAND-MILKIXG AS AVELL, AS MACHINE-MILKING 




POULTRY FLOCK 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 17 

THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL GRADUATION 

March 29, 1936 

Loiichheim Auditorium on tlie School's grounds afforded the 
setting for the Thirty-sixth Annual CTraduating Exercises of The 
National Farm School, held on Sunday afternoon, March 29, 1936, 
at 2:30 o'clock. Before a large and interested audience, thirty- 
one graduates received the Scliool's diploma from the hands of the 
President, Herbert D. Allman. 

The exercises opened witJi the academic procession led by 
President Allman, in company with the guest speaker, the Hon. J. 
Hansell French, Secretary of Agriculture of Pennsylvania; the 
School chaplain. Rabbi Julian B. Feibelman ; members of the Board 
of Trustees; Dean C. L. Goodling and the faculty, who escorted 
the graduates into the hall. 

After the Invocation, pronounced b}^ Rabbi Feibelman, Dean 
Goodling, acting as presiding officer, recognized Albert 0. Boehner, 
the salutatorian, who gave a scholarh^ expression on behalf of his 
class. 

President Allman then addressed the class, their parents and 
the general audience on "the value of the vocation which these 
3'oung men had had the wisdom to select. High school and college 
graduates," he said, "now realize that many professions are over- 
crowded, Avhile farming is a self-supj)orting vocation. Graduates 
go forth from this institution forthright citizens, qualified to enter 
agriculture. Their ultimate success is the hope of parents, teachers 
and those who make this School possible. ' ' 

Continuing, now viewing the national aspect of farming, as 
graduates of the School will experience it, Mr. Allman said that 
fully half the farms in this country are unimproved or run down, 
unsuited for modern agriculture, unable to compete with up-to-date 
farms owned and run by competent farm managers. Incompetent 
farmers will gradually be Aveeded out. It is they who influence 
public opinion against agriculture as a paying industrj^ 



18 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

Secretary of Aoriculture French, speaking as the representa- 
tive of his Honor, Governor George H. Earie, who sent his regrets, 
said : " It is evident that agriculture is rapidly improving, from the 
fact that a demand for trained men had resulted in every one of 
the present graduates having already been selected for positions on 
farms in various sections of the United States. 

"The opportunities in agriculture foi'eseen for the next decade 
or two are real, and young men graduating from Farm School will 
be in line to grasp them," Secretarj^ French said. "All eyes are 
turned today to the farm in a universal awakening to the fact that 
America is still fundamentally agricultural, in spite of its indus- 
trial domination of the world. Our national prosperity springs 
from normal buying power on the farm. Agriculture has discov- 
ered waj's and means of making the world pay a fair profit on 
what it eats, and with the help of the chemist the farmer is finding 
a market for his surplus crops." 

Dean Goodling, speaking with pride and feeling of his "boys" 
about to leave the shelter of the School after three happy, useful 
and successful years' work, commended the class individually and 
as a group for fine endeavor, earnestness and the ability with which 
they go forth, equipped to follow their vocation. He then an- 
nounced the honor students, unanimously voted by the combined 
faculty as worthy to receive the School's distinguishing prizes. 

The graduates were presented by the various department heads 
to President AUman, who awarded the diplomas as follows: 

DAIRY DEPARTMENT 

Irving Bruskin Media, Pa. 

Albert Irving Cohen Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Benjamin Friedman Philadelphia, Pa. 

Morris M. Fuiman Philadelphia, Pa. 

Emanuel E. Ginsburg New Orleans, La. 

Israel Klein Baltimore, Md. 

Israel Meyer New York, N. Y. 

Paul Robinson New York, N. Y. 

*Luther V. .Shafer Reading, Pa. 

FLORICULTURE DEPARTMENT 

Solomon E. Altman New York, N. Y. 

*Albert O. Boehnex Philadelphia, Pa. 

Morton A. Waldman Philadelphia, Pa. 

* Honor students graduated with an average of 85 or better. 



THE NATIONAL FARAI SCHOOL 19 

GENERAL AGRICULTURE AND FARM MACHINERY 
DEPARTMENT 

Sidney Adler Germaiitown, Pa. 

Leonard Gilberg Philadelphia, Pa. 

*\Villiam F. Henr.v Ardmore, Pa. 

*L. William Klementisz Almont, Pa. 

Martin E. Saline W'oodhaven, N. Y. 

*\\'alter R. Schuck Philadelphia, Pa. 

HORTICULTURE DEPARTMENT 

David Bloch Youngstown, Ohio 

*jMorris J. Goodman Chicago, 111. 

Benjamin Kancepolsk\' Norfolk, \'a. 

Isidore Knop Memphis, Tenn. 

*Harry F. Saxe Scranton, Pa. 

Judy S. Schwartz Struthers, Ohio 

LANDSCAPE DEPARTMENT 

*Israel H. Bendersky Princeton, N. J. 

Alvin C. Kahn Cleveland, Ohio 

Louis Joseph Mirell Cleveland, Ohio 

Carl Pearlstein New York, N. Y. 

Thomas Smedley Pottstown, Pa. 

POULTRY DEPARTMENT 

Gustave Gellens New York, N. Y. 

Lawrence Mazer Williamstown, N. J. 

* Honor students graduated with an average of 85 or better. 

Tlie traditional rite, the Presentation of the Hoe to the Presi- 
dent of the incoming Senior Class, was performed by Gustave 
Gellens. The valedictory, the worthy composition of William 
Henry, of Ardmore, was well rendered by him and appreciatively 
received. 

Music was furnished by the Student Band, under the baton of 
Lieutenant Jos. Frankel, Musical Director. 

The exercises closed with the benediction bv Eabbi Feibelman. 



THE XATIOXAL FARM SCHOOL 



A UNIQUE INSTITUTION 

"A Unique Institution — the Story of The National 
Farm School," by Herbert D. Allman, President of the In- 
stitution, is available in an attractively bound volume of 
some 225 pages, comprehensively illustrated ^vith photo- 
graphs. It graphically tells the story of the School, the 
conception and development of the idea by the Founder, 
the small beginnings in 1896, the struggles and difficulties 
gradually surmounted, the persistent and consistent prog- 
ress to present significant and successful gro^vth. 

It is written in readable and narrative style and will 
prove of interest and encouragement to the supporters of 
the institution. It should also prove hel|)ful and enlight- 
eiiing to those engaged in philanthropic and educational 
endeavors, and to those Avho are seeking to direct their sons 
or other young people in the choice of a vocation. 

The book is available at cost — $1.00 per copy, and may 
be secured by addressing The National Farm School, 1701 
Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 21 

FOUNDER'S DAY AND TREE DEDICATION 

Sunday, June 7, 1936 

Founder's Day, observed on Sunday, June 7, 1936, marked, 
as usual, a day set apart to honor the memory of Rabbi Joseph 
Krauskopf, D.D., who, forty years ago, conceived the idea of The 
National Farm School, an institution that "would otfer to worthy 
city boys a practical type of agricultural training, so that they 
might exchange congested urban living for a life in the open. 

The weather was perfect, and the entire program was held 
out of doors on the School's beautiful campus. Features of in- 
terest to young and old were scheduled throughout the day. 

The speaking program included an address by Dr. Wm. H. 
Fineshriber, of Philadelphia, in which he jiaid eloquent tribute to 
the Founder. Dr. Fineshriber also took charge of the Tree Dedi- 
cation Exercises, when more than fifty trees planted during the 
year in honor of festive occasions and in memory of departed 
friends were impressively consecrated. The names for whom trees 
were planted will be found on page 22 of this book. 

The guest speaker was the Hon. John B. Kelly, Secretary of 
Revenue of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Secretary Kelly 
paid a tribute to the vision of the Founder, and to those who are 
today carrying forward the work begun bj^ him, whereby worthy 
city boys are aided to find a place for themselves in the scheme of 
modern living, stating that while the fields for high school and 
college graduates are overcrowded, farming offers opportunities 
for health, contentment and a living for those trained in that voca- 
tion, far bej'ond the possibilities of city industries and professions. 

The President of the School, Mr. Herbert D. AUman, spoke 
reverently' and affectionately of the Founder, and stressed his many 
fine qualities of mind and heart. Referring to the work and prog- 
ress of the School, he stated that Avhile the records of its graduates 
as owners, managers or superintendents of farms, dairies, orchards 
and in other branches of agriculture, denotes the good that it has 
accomplished in fitting youths for vocations in which they have 
succeeded, there is another important accomplishment to its credit 
— ^the development of character. Continuing, President Allman 
said: "The purpose of The National Farm School is more than 
educative. It is not limited to the teaching of youth. It becomes 
their home day in and day out, during the thirtj'-six months' course, 



22 THE NATIONAL FAinf SCHOOL 

where intelleetual, physical and ethical training is stressed, to the 
end that they ^vho enter may learn and go forth to serve as com- 
petent farmers and forthright citizens. 

*'The wholesome atmosphere that prevails is evidence that this 
ideal of the Founder is also being fulfilled and, in these days, when 
youth is subjected to subversive influences, an institution that 
moulds boys into men of strong character and enables them to 
become independent, self-reliant husbandmen is philanthropj' at 
its best." 

Mr. Edwin H. Silverman, Chairman of the Founder's Day 
Committee, presided at the exercises and introduced the speakers. 
Under his chairmanship also a Avell-planned country fair idea was 
carried out, with free amusements for the children, flower and 
horticultural booths, exhibits of farm products, breeds of poultry, 
and young stock. There were cattle judging contests, in which 
prizes were awarded. Tours of inspection, under the direction of 
the heads of the departments, left from the speakers' stand at vari- 
ous intervals throughout the day, visiting the model dairies, poultry 
plants, greenhouses, fields and orchards. 

Concerts by the Student Band, under the direction of Lieut. 
Joseph Frankel, added to the festivities and enjoyment of the 
occasion. 




ot 



PRACTICE IN THE FIELDS 




H IN THE LABORATORY 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 23 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF OPERATING ACCOUNT 
YEAR ENDING APRIL 30, 1936 



MAINTENANCE RECEIPTS 

Interest on Investments (net) $12,183.69 

State of Pennsylvania 11,250.00* 

Federation of Jewish Charities of Philadelphia 7,992.66 

Dues and Donations (net) 25,456.28 

Student Fees 17,195.48 

Rehabilitation Student Fees 2,727.24 

Real Estate Rentals (net) 2,586.40 

Sundries 23.30 

$79,415.05 

MAINTENANCE DISBURSEMENTS 

Care of Students 

Beds and Bedding $93.08 

Brooms and Brushes 349.64 

Conveyance, Freight, Express, Telephones .... 3,503.88 

Dry Goods, Laundry, Kitchen Supplies 2,621.54 

Groceries 7,073.24 

Ice 103.40 

Light and Power 6,470.16 

Medical 1,239.49 

Provisions 1 1,507.39 

Wages, Household Help, etc 9,997.62 

Milk, Eggs, Poultry, Vegetables, etc.. Trans- 
ferred from Farms to Kitchen 12,560.47 

$55,519.91 

Educational 

Printing and Stationery $600.74 

Salaries of Teachers 33,091.40 

Salaries of Clerks 2,071.00 

Text Books, Laboratory Supplies, etc 1,388.96 

37,152.10 



Repairs and Replacements 

Plumbing $457.76 

Repairs to Buildings and Equipment 1,681.72 

Tool Room Supplies 396.92 

* Due from State of Pennsylvania, $3,750. 



2,536.40 



24 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT— Contiimed 



Adiiiiiiistration and Propaganda 

Legal and Auditing $240.25 

Printing, Stationer.v, Postage L27L00 

Rent of Office 1,600.00 

Salaries, Executive Office 5,460.00 

8,57L25 

Snndrics 

Insurance $3,49L37 

Interest on Loan 1,289.57 

4,780.94 



$108,560.60 

Farm Departments 

Apiary $181.75 

Barns and Dairies 12,870.97 

Floriculture 1,339.00 

General Agriculture 7,083.32 

Horticulture 2,560.19 

Landscape 405.07 

Poultry 6,726.38 

$31,166.68 

Cr. by Farm Products Sold $44,232.51 

Cr. by Farm Products Transferred to 
Kitchen 12,560.47 ■ 

56,792.98 

25,626.30 

Net Operating Expense $82,934.30 



$3,519.25 

Extraordinary Disbnrscmcnts 

Poultry Department $571.21 

Ice Plant 1,000.00 

Furniture and Fixtures 81.80 

Farm Machinery and Equipment 273.47 

Farm Buildings 1,322.42 

3,248.90 



Deficit $6,768.15 

Diu-ing tlie depre.s.sion, -with the concerted co-operation of trustees, facultv 
staff and studeut.s, expenditures have been curtailed in an effort to meet shrinliage 
in income. Educationally, a liigh standard has been maintained. Buildings and 
equipment, unfortunately, suffered, as all but the most necessary repairs had to be 
postponed. Funds are now urgently needed to restore plant efficiencv 




PREPARING THE SOIE 





ENT SOCIAL FLNCTIOXS 



THE NATIONAL FAR^I SCHOOL 



25 



FESTIVE AND MEMORIAL TREES 

Planted and inscribed during the year were dedicated at the 

Founder's Day Exercises, Sunday, June 7, 1936, in 

honor of the followino- friends of the Institution 



FESTIVE TREES 



Louis Schlesinger, Newark, N. J. 
In Honor of His 70th Birthday 

Carol Hlrsch. Philadelphia, Pa. 
In Honor of Her Confirmation 



Bernard Selig, Philadelphia, Pa. 
In Honor of His 85th Birthday 

Carrie L. Bauer, Wheeling, W. Va 
In Honor of Her 74th Birthday 



Louis Horkheimer, Wheeling, 'W. Va. 
In Honor of His 75th Birthday 



MEMORIAL TREES 



CALIFORJ^IA 

Lios Angeles 

Csesar Samuels 

DISTRICT OF 
COLUMBIA 

Washington 

Leopold Behrends 

MISSISSIPPI 

Jackson 

Mr. and Mrs. Jos. 

Ascher 

NEW JERSEY 

Cream Ridge 

William E. Cox 
Newark 

Samuel Greenberg 
Mrs. Morris Rachlin 
Hattie Schlesinger 
Dr. Marcus Seidmann 
G. Wisner Thome 

NEW YORK 

Brooklyn 

Benjamin Rosenzweig 

New Y'ork City 

Millie K. Aaron 
Felix F. Feist 
Ettie K. Frank 



Edgar K. Frank 
Alice Solomon Green- 
wald 

Rose Grossman 
Richard A. Guinz- 

burg 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Elkins Park 

W. Maurice Step- 

pacher 

Philadelphia 

Lizzie Aarons 
Jacob Adelhelm 
Carrie L. Ancker 
Henrietta Bayers- 

dorfer 

Aaron S. Belber 
Ray Hartmann 

Bendiner 

Betty Berg 
Joseph Berliner ^ 
Dora A. Burstein 
Henry Dahlman 
Amalie Falk 
Simon Falk 
Marvin N. Fellman 
Pauline Fleishman 
Ellas Frank 
Paul B. Frank 
Frieda Jordan 



Ruben H. Goldberger 
Jos. Guckenheimer 
Lottie M. Heyman 
Henrietta Hilbronner 
Louis Isaacson 
Abraham Israel 
Jacob C. Kahn 
Theresa W. Kahn 
Clara K. Kohn 
Nat Levy 
Horace Loeb 
Abraham Mansbach 
Dr. Chas. Mayor 
Lewis Mitchell 
Hyman L. Morris 
Solomon Morris 
Cfficilie Niedermann 
Sarah Reinheimer 
Sadie Rosenthal 
Chas. Sessler 
Montgomery Sessler 
Ben Wasserman 
Dr. Henry S. Wieder 

TEXAS 

Dallas 

Rose Titche Spencer 

WISCONSIN 

Milwaukee 

Morris Miller 



26 



THE XATIOXAL FARM SCHOOL 



STUDENT REGISTER 
September 30, 1936 



SENIOR CLASS 



Morton Bacli, Astoria, L. L, N. Y. 
Israel Bernstein, Philadelphia 
Seymour Blatt, Jersey City, X. J. 
Sid. Arnold Brahin, Philadelphia 
Samuel Lloyd Clauser, Reading, Pa. 
James Cohen, Philadelphia 
Benjamin Dienstman, Philadelphia 
Morris P. Eisman, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Marvin J. Eisner, Cleveland, Ohio 
Daniel Fairshter, Philadelphia 
Leon Feld, Philadelphia 
Morris Goldberg, Wilmington, Del. 
Edward Ray Goode, Wilmerding, Pa. 
Robert Gruber, New York City 
Nathan Harris, Newark, N. J. 
Wm. H. Harrison, Easton, Pa. 
Herman Hirschhorn, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Irving Jacobson, Chicago, 111. 
Alex. Dawson King, Decatur, Ga. 
John R. Knowles, Philadelphia 
Aaron Levine, Philadelphia 
Edward Lubin, Philadelphia 



W'oodrow Malloch, Philadelphia 
Hyme Mendell, St. Joseph, Mo. 
Ralph Pinkus, Philadelphia 
Israel Pitkowsky, New York City 
Edgar Rivkin, Brooklj'n, N. Y. 
David Rothbart, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Jack Rubin, New York City 
Harold S. Schantz, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
Louis Schechtman, Hamilton, Ohio 
Abraham Scheingold, Amityville, 

N. Y. 
Lionel Schiff, Knoxville, Tenn. 
Emanuel Schnall, New York City 
David Segal, Philadelphia 
William Smuckler, Philadelphia 
Daniel Spevak, Philadelphia 
Hyman Srulowitz, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Norman Stein, Philadelphia 
Joseph' Watz, Philadelphia 
Fred Weaver, Gradyville, Pa. 
Jacob Winderman, New York City 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Edward C. Angell, Towson, ^Id. 

Louis Batalsky, Philadelphia 

Irwin L. Bloomgarden, Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
Saul Blumenfeld, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Herbert J. Brambly, Newportville, 
Pa. 

Nison Bursztein, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Sam Charlesworth, Wilmerding, Pa. 
William Crane, Philadelphia 
Wm. Alex. Eason, Malvern, Pa. 
Fredk. A. Enters, Jr., Philadelphia 



Bernard Feinberg, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
George Fellheimer, Philadelphia 
Roy R. Fox, McKeesport, Pa. 
Isidore Frankel, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Jerome Frankel, Philadelphia 
John Price Freehafer, Reading, Pa. 
Bernard Gabriel, Philadelphia 
Louis Gershenson, Philadelphia 
Emanuel Gerstein, S. Fallsburg, N. Y. 
Harold Gilbert, New York City 
John W. Gleason, Philadelphia 
Howard Gluckman, Philadelphia 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



27 



JUNIOR CLASS— Continued 



Philip Gorlin, Jamaica, N. Y. 
Harold D. Haas, Easton, Pa, 
Aloysius Happ, Norwood, Pa. 
Lynn P. Hyde, Philadelphia 
Morton Kaplan, Philadelphia 
Harold Katzen, Pottstown, Pa. 
Carl Kaufman, Philadelphia 
George M. Kessler, Philadelphia 
Samuel I. Kwass, Philadelphia 
Aaron M. Lavin, Philadelphia 
Sherman Levison, Philadelphia 
Joseph MarguHs, Philadelphia 
Ernest Meyers, New York City 
Martin Moldofsky, Philadelphia 
Raymond Morris, Philadelphia 
Morris Moscovitz, Philadelphia 
Harold Nordblom, Narberth, Pa. 
David S. Oschrin, New'ark, N. J. 
Leo M. Perkes, New Haven, Conn. 
William G. Poston, Philadelphia 
Leon Rabinowitz, Philadelphia 



Paul Rader, Easton, Pa. 
Irvin J. Ravven, Chicago, 111. 
Warren Ringler, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Elmer R. Rintz, Philadelphia 
Gabriel Roseman, Philadelphia 
Joseph Rosenblatt, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Morris Rothstein, Yonkers, N. Y. 
Solomon Rubens, Philadelphia 
Isidore Rubenstein, New York City 
Dominic Sabatini, Philadelphia 
Mac Seligman, New York City 
Morris Shapiro, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Julius Simon, Philadelphia 
Maurice V. Spears, Dayton, O. 
Raymond Stoumen, Philadelphia 
Leon Tannenwald, Bronx, N. Y. 
Wm. Jas. Wilkinson, Philadelphia 
Samuel A. Wolkoff, Scranton, Pa. 
Lloyd Wyker, Quakertown, Pa. 
Edward Zartarian, Philadelphia 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Joseph Adelman, Philadelphia 
Abraham Baron, Philadelphia 
Milton Bernzweig, Cleveland, O. 
Leonard Black, Philadelphia 
Albert Blumenthal, Sellersville, Pa. 
George Cohen, Philadelphia 
Gunther Croner, Cornwall, N. Y. 
John M. Custer, Morrisville, Pa. 
Maurice Derfler, Philadelphia 
Bernard Emil, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Alex. Erganofif, New York City 
Walter Flatow, New York City 
Joseph F. Foody, Philadelphia 
Albert Gerson, Scranton, Pa. 
Paul Goldfarb, Philadelphia 
Tommy Green, Lexington, Ky. 
John H. Haas, Renovo, Pa. 



Arthur Isbit, Chicago, 111. 
Frank H. Jacobson, Philadelphia 
Carl Jacobson, Chatham, N. J. 
Bernard Jarin, Philadelphia 
William H. Jennings, Easton, Pa. 
Abrani Jolofsky, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Herbert B. Kagan, Newark, N. J. 
James F. Klotz, Easton, Pa. 
Gerd Knoblenzer, New York City 
Wm. H. Kooperman, Philadelphia 
George Kopolow, Binghamton, N. Y, 
}\Iortimer Kornfeld, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
x\lfred Koslan, Kew Gardens, N. Y. 
Morris Krantz, Bronx, N. Y. 
Edward Lannin, Philadelphia 
Arthur F. Langell, South Bend, Ind. 
Leslie T. Leonard, Morristown, N. J. 



28 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



FRESHMAN CLASS— Continued 



Joseph Lerncr, Newark, N. J. 
Winfred Levinstone, Newark, N. J. 
Lester Lewis, Bronx, N. Y. 
Sam Lupinacci. Philadelphia 
John H. Magann, Sharon Hill, Pa. 
Sol Mofsovitz, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
George Moses. New York City 
Howard Moyer, Philadelphia 
Max Needles, Philadelphia 
Myron J. Nickman, Cleveland, O. 
Russell E. Page, Madison, Wis. 
Milton S. Pearlman, Memphis, Tenn. 
James J. Persico, Philadelphia 
Stuart Pett, Yonkers, N. Y. 
Alfred Potter, Philadelphia 



Bernard Praissman, Philadelphia 
Herman Rich, Newark, N. J. 
Leonard Richman, New York City 
Aaron Saltzman, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
George J. Schimpf, Chestnut Hill, Pa. 
David Schley, Baltimore, Md. 
Herbert G. Schull, New York City 
Philip Simon, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Jerome Sperling, Chicago, 111. 
Walter Stein, Cincinnati, O. 
Alfred Sussman, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Lester R. Trach, Easton, Pa. 
Julius Trasken, Philadelphia 
Frank Van Horn, Philadelphia 
Albert Zilbertuler, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



SPECLAL CLASS OF PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED STUDENTS 



*Walter Clajton, Jeanette. Pa. 
*Martin Coyne, Racine, Pa. 

Edward Fretz, Collegeville, Pa. 

John W. Gleason, Philadelphia 
*John Kitzig, Media, Pa. 
*Peter Kopatch, Plains, Pa. 
*John J. Jeffers, Philadelphia 



*Jacob ]Moscowitz, Philadelphia 
*Ercole Oristaglio, Philadelphia 
*Walter G. Redfern, Philadelphia 
*CarI J. Schmidt, Darby, Pa. 
*Norrnan~Stewart, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
*Steve Timinski, Scranton, Pa. 
*Jackson E. Traugh, Philadelphia 



*Michael-Wnorow.ski, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



* Sponsored by the State and Federal Rehabilitation Bureaus for a special 
one year's intensive course in one of the lighter branches of farming, through 
W'hich they are rehabilitated and become self-supporting. This work, now in 
its fourth year at the School, has been considered most successful, those having 
completed the course having been placed on good jobs by the School Administra- 
tion, in co-operation with the Rehabilitation Bureau. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 29 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL MEETING AND 
HARVEST FESTIVAL 

October 11, 1936 

A nation-wide baek-to-the-soil movement, as a means of bet- 
tering conditions throughout the countrj^, was stressed by Dr. Wm. 
H. Fiueshriber at the Thirty-ninth Annual Meeting and Harvest 
Pilgrimage of The National Farm School on Sunda.v, October 
11, 1936. 

Dr. Fineshriber was the guest speaker of the occasion, which 
witnessed a large audience of members of the Board, friends of 
the School and visitors generally from Philadelphia and neigh- 
boring communities, who annually gather for this Fall Festival. 

"The business of farming," declared Dr. Fineshriber, "con- 
tributes more to American culture than anything else. Although 
some may say this seems radical, I believe The Farm School is 
more beneficial as an educational factor than any college or uni- 
versity in America. Here the average student gets much more, 
culturally speaking, than he does in college, because, fundament- 
all.y, all culture springs from the soil — from our contact with our 
mother earth." 

The new faculty dining room, a beautiful and utilitarian addi- 
tion to Lasker Hall, was dedicated on this occasion. 

The President's Message, his annual address to contributors 
of the Farm School throughout the countrj^, was presented by 
Mr. Herbert D. Allman, the School's President, and is set forth in 
its entirety in this Year Book. (See pages 6 to 16.) 

Prof. C. L. Goodling, Dean of the School, in bringing the 
speaking program to a close, spoke of the growing emphasis being 
placed upon vocational training. He stated that in his opinion it 
will not be long before every township in Pennsylvania will have 



30 THK NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

a vocational school, to be followed by the establishment of voca- 
tional colleges. 

Mr. Harry B. Hirsh occupied the chair, presiding at the meet- 
ing, which unanimously elected the following ncAv Trustees to the 
Board : Dolf L. Levy, David H. Fleet, Mrs. Henry Rosenthal, Mrs. 
Rosa B. Schoneman, Nathan J. Suellenburg and Edwin Weil. 

Elected to Honorar}^ Board Membership, after serving ten con- 
secutive years, were Dr. AVm. H. Fineshriber, Horace T. Fleisher, 
]\Iaurice Jacobs, Mrs. Jos. Krauskopf, Mrs. Arthur K. Stern and 
James Work. 

Re-elected as Trustees for three-year terms were Drue N. All- 
man, Isidore Baylson, Carroll Downes, Dr. S. S. Greenbaum, Stan- 
ley H. Hinlein, Judge Theo. Rosen, Edwin H. Silverman and 
Dr. Leon Solis-Cohen. 

Louchheim Auditorium, Avhere the exercises were held, had 
been artistically decorated by the students with the products of 
greenhouses, farms, field and orchards. The grounds, campus 
buildings and farm departments were open for the inspection of 
the visitors throughout the dav. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

EXECUTIVE OFFICES 

1701 Walnut Street, Philadelphia 



Membership of The National Farm School 

Date, - 



I, the undersigned, being in sympathy with the object of The National 
Farm School — the training of lads in the practice and science of agriculture, 
for agricultural callings — do hereby agree to subscribe as one of the maintainers 

of the institution the sum of dollars annually. 

Benefactor $100 

Friend 50 Navte - 

Patron 25 

Member 10 Address 

Supporter 5 Make checks payable to The National Farm School. 



Form of Legacy to The National Farm School 

"I give and bequeath unto The National Farm School, Bucks County, Pa., 

near Doylestozvn, the sum of dollars 

free from all taxes to be paid to the Treasurer, for the time being, for the use 
of the institution." 



Form of Devise 

ON REAL ESTATE OR GROUND RENT 

"I give and devise unto The National Farm School, Bucks County, Pa., 
near Doylestown (here describe the property or ground rent), together xvith 
the appurtenances, in fee simple, and all policies of insurance covering said 
premises, zvhether fire, title or otherzvise, free from all taxes." 



"Real Feeds Give 
Real Results" 



VV/^HEN you feed Cows — Poultry or 
other Stock — feed for health — pro- 
duction and economy with 



TRINLEY'S <^^^ FEEDS 



blended and balanced with highest-grade 
materials and unexcelled for storing vitality 
while getting the utmost in results. 

Prices Always Attractive 

Get full value for your money and insist 
that your dealer sell you 



TRINLEY'S <P>> FEEDS 



MANUFACTURED BY 

JACOB TRINLEY & SONS 

LINFIELD. PENNSYLVANIA 

Established 1873 P/ionc— LINFIELD 8 

33 



Now in our 

new daylight store 



where furs 

may be seen 

in their true beauty 



FURRIERS now 

unto the 

third generation 



T^. 3- S^^ 



FURS OF THE BETTER GRADE 



171^ NA/ZKLNUT ST. 
PHILADELPHIA 



34 



v^ompliments 
of 




CHESTNUT at THIRTEENTH 



Staman & Dickey Co< 

127 South 22ncl Street 
ThiladelphicL 



Fine Lighting Fixtures 

LAMPS — SHADES 
FIREPLACE EQUIPMENT 



35 



Compliments of . . . 

LANE BRYANT 

THE STORE FOR YoUtkful WomeU 
WHO WANT LARGER SIZES 

Chestnut corner Twelfth Philadelphia 



Compliments 
of 

R. LOEB & COMPANY, Inc. 




STREET 
UNDER & 
PROPERT 

OPTICIANS 

20th and 
Chestnut 
Streets 

Philadelphia 



^) 




Once Grown Always Grown 

Maule's Seeds 

Pedigreed by a 6 1 -year record of Super- 
Quality, tested for abundant life, guaranteed 
by a money back bond, Maule Seeds are 
outstandingly desirable. Send for Maule's 
FREE Seed Book today, and learn how 
to have a gorgeous garden at low cost. 

WM. HENRY MAULE CO. 

Maule Building Philadelphia, Pa. 



36 



^lliim(Bii^its © 




C(Q)inffijpiimy 



Compliments of 

J. HOW ARD BROW N & CO. 

Insurance 

No. 328 WALNUT STREET 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 



Compliments of 



#ak Slait^ ®0ui^r Apartments 

13th Street and 68th Avenue 
Philadelphia 



44 



ARTCRETE 



?» 



Trade Mark Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



BIRD BATHS 
BENCHES 
FOUNTAINS 
BOXES- POTS 
JARS — URNS 
PEDESTALS 
SUN-DIALS 
GAZING GLOBES 



A SUPERIOR Furniture of 
Cast Stone in White Marble 
or Grey Granite for Garden and 
Interior Decoration. 



ARTCRETE PRODUCTS COMPANY 



p. O. ADDRESS 

UPPER DARBY, PA. 



FACTORY 

GRASSLAND, DEL. CO., PA. 



Amazins New 
Development in 

SURGICAL ELASTIC 
\ HOSIERY 

Kendrick Patent No. 1887927 




Kendrick Pat- 
ented Accordion Stitch 
prevents pinching, ciiaf- 
jnff or wrinlilinK. 




Do you suffer from sprain or 
strain, varicose veinsorswol- 
len limbs? Does your busi- 
ness demand that you stand 
long hours on your feet? 

Here is Seamless Surgical 
Elastic Hosiery that fits 
smooth and even — at ALL 
points; at ALL times. 

Responds instantly and nat- 
urally to every movement. 
Meshes aslegorfootlsflexed. 
Lies perfectly flat when leg 
or foot is in normal position. 
No pinching. No chafing. No 
wrinkling. 

• • • 

Perfectly comfortable. 

Practically invisible 

Write usand we will tell you 
where this new Surgical Elas- 
tic Hosiery with Kendrick 
Patent Accordion Stitch is 
available. Address James R. 
Kendrick Co., 6139German- 
town Avenue . . Est. 1853. 



A. H. HOFFMAN, Inc. 



JACOB H. BRODSKY 



L. W. W. 



LADENSON 
METAL CORPORATION 



38 



Penn Fruit Company 



Foods Sold With Sincerity" 



Philadelphia and Vicinity 



VICTOR V. CLAD CO. 



Manufacturers of 



Food Service Equipment 

117-119-121 SOUTH 11th STREET 



PHILADELPHIA 




Gas — Electric oZlllltlll/ RANGES 



RE.C. U.& PAT. OFF. 

ATTRACT I VE— DEPENDABLE— ACCURATE 

Roberts & Mander Stove Company 

PHILADELPHIA and HATBORO 

39 



ESTABLISHED 1877 



SS^rgman SCnitttng MUIb 



"BEACH MATE" 

Bathing Suits 



"CLUB MATE" 

Sweaters 



Pastorius and Osceola Streets, ^SfLAOEL^mA 



D. F. WATERS & SONS 



INCORPORATED 



Germantown Dye Works 



Dyers of 



WOOLEN AND WORSTED 
SKEIN YARNS 



53 and 55 Wister Street 

Germantown 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



MONEY 

for Mortgages 



STRAIGHT, REDUCING 

or B. & L. with INSURED 

SHARES 

Quick Service 

Howard B.Wiison&Co. 

REALTORS 
3624 N. Broad Street 

Philadelphia 



Bell, Stevenson 1780 
Keystone, Park 3376 



Specializing in 
Rent Collections 



N. M. DIAMOND 

REAL ESTATE 

MORTGAGES : INSURANCE : NOTARY PUBLIC 

N. W. Cor. 12th and Girard Avenue 

Philadelphia 

40 



Bathing Suits of Quality and Style 

HERBERT KOHN, Inc. 

1410 Broadway Juniper and Vine Streets 

NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

West Point Knitwear Mills 

S. W. Cor. Hunting Park Ave. at I6th St. 

Philadelphia 

MORRIS RIVKIN NEW YORK OFFICE 

LESTER G. LICHTENSTEIN 93 Worth St. 

HYMAN BROS. 

Lulu Sportswear 

319-325 North 11th Street Philadelphia, Pa. 



DAVenport 5700 Established 1859 

CHARLES PEBERDY & SON 

Manufacturers of 

KNIHED OUTERWEAR 

East Penn Street Germantown, Phila., Pa. 



SUPERIOR KNITTING MILLS 

3 7 47 Ridge Avenue 



PHILADELPHIA 



MARKOVITZ BROTHERS 

Jobbers in 

Hosiery and Underwear, Overalls, Work Shirts, Notions 

Sole distributors of "Philmont" Union Suits for Men 

321-323 Market Street 



COHLMAN & CUTLER, Inc, 

Manufacturers of 

INDUSTRIAL UNIFORMS 

28th and Fletcher Streets 

41 



... Compliments... 

Pennsylvania Laundry Company 
Pennsylvania Coat and Apron Supply Company 

319 North Thirty-second Street 

Gordon Sanitary Linen Supply Company 

1612 North Eleventh Street 



HACHIK BLEACH COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 

HYPOCHLORITE OF SODA 

(JAVELLE WATER) 

50th and Wynnefield Avenue 

)^rogr^sstU0 CInat anti Apron Mannfactnrxn^ Co. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Wl}xtt ^utk Coats anh Apronsi 

Uniforms and Trousers 

N. W. COR. 10TH AND NORRIS STREETS 

ALLEGHENY IRON AND METAL CO. 

Second and Clearfield Streets 

PHILADELPHIA 

ACME METALS REFINING CORPORATION 

PRODUCERS : BUYERS : SELLERS 
All Grades 

New METALS Alloys 
Scrap and Residues 
4200 LEIPER STREET 

REGENT 6800 EAST 9026 

MONARCH METAL CO. 

METALS AND INDUSTRIAL BY-PRODUCTS 

TRENTON AVENUE AND SOMERSET STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 

42 



National Casket Company, Inc. 

The World's Largest Manufacturers of 

FUNERAL FURNISHINGS 

BRANCHES IN 30 PRINCIPAL AMERICAN CITIES 

PHILADELPHIA BRANCH AND DISPLAY ROOMS 

1519-1521 FAIR MOUNT AVENUE 
Send for a copy of "Funeral Facts Everyone Should Know" 

Morris Rosenberg's Son 

MORTICIAN 

2009 North Broad Street 

Philadelphia 

Branches: New York and Atlantic City 

ASHER & SON, Inc. 

UNDERTAKERS 
1309 North Broad Street Phliadelphia 

STEVENSON, 3700-3701 
ALFRED R. GREENSTEIN, SECY-TREAS. 

R F" I f\A r^ N nr Guaranteed to last forever 

CEMENT 

Funeral Director [3 LJ 1x1 /\ L. 

BELMONT CEMENT BURIAL CASE CO. CASES 

Boyertown Burial Casket Co. 

Bronze, Metallic, Hardwood and Cloth-Covered Casket*, Robes and Lininis 

PhilaJ^lphia, Pa. Boyertown, Pa. Sta York, N. T. 

Columbtit, Ohio Harriaburg, Pa. BrooUjm, N. Y . 

FINNEY & SON 

Parainount Memorials, Monunnents and Mausoleums 
TWELFTH AND SPRING GARDEN STREETS PHILADELPHIA 

FUNERAL DIRECTOR 

,53g7 730 PINE STREET 

BELL. LOMBARD I gg47 PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

43 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 



Compliments of 

CECIL J. TOOK 



THOS. G. WILLIAMS 



Frank Wills 



Jonathan Ring & Co. 

Hancock and Montgomery Avenue 
Philadelphia 

WM. A. NICKERT 



HOTEL DENNIS 



ATLANTIC CITY 



QHjalionte Unti^l, Atianttr mt^ 



CHARLES F. MEBUS 

Member American Society Civil Engineers 

Municipal Engineering, Sewerage, Drainage, Sewage 

Treatment, Water Supply, Town Planning, Street 

Paving and Valuation. Supervision of Construction. 

112 S. Easton Road, Glenside, Pa. 



victor 5802 



Coulter Optical Co. 

5310 Germantown Avenue 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



COLONIAL FLOWER SHOP, INC. 

iFlotucrs for All ©rcaatona 

N. W. Corner FIFTY-SECOND AND SPRUCE STREETS 
PHONE, SHERWOOD 1300 PHILADELPHIA 



Saratoga 3959 



West 2182 



John J. Stapleton 

REALTOR 

6539 Elmwood Avenue 

Philadelphia 



Biberman Brothers 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

. . Wash Dresses 

Fifteenth and Mt. Vernon Streets 
PHILADELPHIA 



44 



S. RUDOFKER^S SONS 

S. E. COR. 13th and HAMILTON STREETS 

PHILADELPHIA 



HARRY MAKRANSKY 



LEE I. ROBIiSrSON 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH LIEBMAN 



E. GUTMAN & SONS 

I NCO RPORATED 



Balder Clothes Incorporated 

TWENTY-SIXTH and REED STREETS 

Philadelphia 



^atab ^itgA Company 

pj^tladflpi^fa. Pa. 

H. DAROFF & SONS 

INCORPORATED 

Pressman-Gutman !Sllk Company 

J. K. MALIS 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis B. Orlowitz 

45 



BURPEE'S 
SEEDS 
GROW 




Write for a free copy of Burpee's Annual 
— The Leading American Seed Catalog 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO. 

BURPEE BUILDING 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Fable & Company 



Incorporated 



TIN PLATE 

SHEET STEEL 

SHEET COPPER 



510-512 North Third Street 

Philadelphia 



Independents Standard Fertilizers 

Make a good farmer a better one 

Animal Organic Base 



INDEPENDENT MANUFACTURING CO. 

Wheatsheaf Lane and Aramingo Ave. Philadelphia, Pa. 

"CRO-ALL" INSECTICIDES 

"CRO-ALL" INSECTICIDES have been used ext-ensively for many years. 
Many of the leading growers demand "GRO-ALL" products because they 
know they are dependable and their best insurance against insects and fungus 
diseases. Uniform coverage, superior suspension, thus better protection, are 
gained from using "CRO-ALL" INSECTICIDES. 

"CRO'ALL" Spray Materials arc: 

ROTENONE DUST TAROCIDE 

ARSENATE OF LEAD CALCIUM ARSENATE 

BORDO PROTEX 

DRY LIME SULPHUR, ETC. WETTABLE SULPHUR, ETC. 

Also a complete line of Fertilizers, Fertilizer Materials, Fish Meal and other 

Feeding Materials. 

Made by CENTRAL CHEMICAL COMPANY, Inc., BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

46 



CHOICE 

SUBURBAN REALTY 

RENT or SALE 
W. T. B. ROBERTS & SON 

Open Every Day GLENSIDE (at Station) 

W. C. Fleck & Bro., Inc. 

EsuBuiHEo HARDWARE 

RIGHT GOODS - RIGHT SERVICE - RIGHT PRICES 

Jenkintown, Pennsylvania 



Cheltenham ""''VL?'""'' 
& Jenkintown ue"""" 
Ice Manufacturing 
Company 



Main Office: OGONTZ 

Phone Connection 



Plants: OGONTZ AND WYNCOTE 



Tmlmphontt 



VIICHELLS SEEDS 




5I8'516MARKETS!PHILA 



47 



Bell Phone. Regent 3426 Keystone Phone, Park 2727 

R. B. DUTT CO., Inc. 

Dyers and Bleachers of 

Fine Woolen and Worsted Yarns 

MASCHER ST. AND MONTGOMERY AVE. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Compliments of 

David Weber & Co. 

3500 Richmond St., Philadelphia 

THOS. HALTON'S SONS 
Jacquard Machines 

C AND CLEARFIELD STREETS 

BELL. REGENT 4483. 4484 KEYSTONE. PARK 1483 

•s WOT V Rt "sON^N 0""-'*"'°" M. J. Whittali's Associates. Ltd. 
O. VVWl^l {X OyJl\0 -^"^ ANGLO-PERSIAN RUGS 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Window Shades '''**' Stewart Hartshorn Window Shade Products 

105 WEST BERKS STREET. PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

Frankford Trust Company 

4400 FRANKFORD AVENUE 

INTEREST PAID on Savings Accounts 

"OVER 45 YEARS OF SUCCESSFUL BANKING" 



Member of the Philadelphia Clearing House Association 
Member of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

48 



Philadelphia Wool Scouring and Carbonizing Company 

Glenwood and Castor Avenues 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Laurel Sanitary Cleaner 

An efficient cleaner for washing cows and general barn 
cleaning. 

Flygo 

An effective fly spray. Will kill flies. Will not blister 
or harm the cattle. 

Disinfectants Soaps Tree Sprays 

LAUREL SOAP MANUFACTURING CO., Inc. 

Wm. H. Bertolet's Sons 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



TELEPHONE ESTABLISHED 1917 



RAD elf 

7700 



REACHES 
ALL DEPTS. 



\ t\^' CAPACITY 

^S^ 100,000 

^ BOXES EVERY DAY 

MADE IN A BRIGHT— CLEAN— DAYLIGHT PLANT 

GEORGE H. SNYDER. Inc. 

3631-39 No. SMEDLEY ST. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 






49 



Columbia Sill^ Dyeing Company 

SPECIALTIES: ARTIFICIAL SILK 

PURE DYES— BLACK AND COLORS 

1726-30 N. HOWARD ST. - PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

PHONES 

Andrew Y. Michie & Sons, Inc. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

HYMO, HAIR CLOTH AND TAPES 

Howard and Berks Sts. Philadelphia, Pa. 

NICETOWN DYE WORKS 

Dyers of 

Yarns, Slubbing and Wool Raw Stock 

FRANKFORD .... PHILADELPHIA 

SUCCESS is huilt on confidence. Today's work makes tomorrow's 
reputation. Good work makes a good reputation. 

SCHNEIDER DYE WORKS 

Sltein 1809-1825 E. RUSSELL STREET ^•" '''"'"R.g.nt 7489 

Bleaching PHILADELPHIA, PA. Key.tone Pho"'^^^^^ 



BELL PHONE, REGent 5256 



HOFFNER SILK DYEING CO. 

Rayon Yarns 

DYERS and CONVERTERS 

HOWARD and HUNTINGDON STS. PHILADELPHIA 



M. PHILLIPS L. PHILLIPS 

NATIONAL HAIR CLOTH CO. 

Manufacturers of f^^j^ ^loth Hnd Soft-Roll Intcrlinings 

1424 N. HOWARD STREET 

N. Y. OFFICE: 215 4th Ave., N. Y. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

50 



With 5Jarr0ui iFabric €0. 

Fast T^ \ ^> C' C! For Tying 
Color 1. X^ K C4 O Vegetables 

931-937 Market St. Philadelphia 

PHONES A. WINSTON EDWARDS, Mgr. 

JOHN CAMPBELL & CO., Inc. 

Mfrs. of DYESTUFFS and SPECIALTIES 

S. E. Cor. Broad and Spring Garden Sts. Philadelphia 

E. HUBSCHMAN & SONS 

MANUFACTURERS 

FINE CALF LEATHERS 

S. W. CORNER ORIANNA AND WILLOW STREETS 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Phones— REGENT 8265; EAST 7572 

The Peerless Silk Dyeing Co. 

DYERS AND BLEACHERS 

WILLARD and JASPER STS. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

PENNSYLVANIA BOX & LUMBER CO. 

Manufacturers of 
VENEER BOXES PACKING BOXES AND SHOOKS 

WOOD KITCHEN CLOSETS WOOD SPECIALTIES 

613 Cherry Street 
PHILADELPHIA 



WM. MacINTOSH CO. 

Manufacturing 
Lithographers 

113-115 ERIE STREET • • • CAMDEN, N. J. 

51 



CHARLES HARLAN JOHN NOBLE, JR. 

President Vice-Pres. & Treas. 

CHARLES HARLAN, Jr. 
Secretary 

CONSOLIDATED DRESSED BEEF COMPANY 

Abattoir and Salesrooms 
Gray's Ferry Avenue and 36th Street, Philadelphia 

LEWIS D. GOLDSTEIN 

Fruit and Produce 

FRUIT TRADE BUILDING 

PHILADELPHIA 
PHONE, JACKSON 5384 

CROSS BROS. 

Wholesale Butchers 

ABATTOIR 

222-30 Moore Street PHILADELJ>HIA 

BELL PHONE KEYSTONE PHONE 

STANDARD PROVISION COMPANY 

Franklin and Callowhill Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 

JOSEPH BERLINER COMPANY 

METALS 

East Cumberland and Richmond Streets 
Philadelphia 

BELL PHONE 

Booth Bottling Company, Inc. 

BOOTH'S PALE DRY GINGER ALE 

Clearfield and Ruth Sts. Philadelphia 

52 



ROYAL PIONEER PAPER BOX MANUFACTURING CO., Inc. 

1147 NORTH FOURTH STREET 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

MORT COMPANY 

4th Street and Girard Avenue, and 51 South 69th Street 
Plumbing and Heating Hardware 

OSWALD LEVER CO., Inc. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Textile Machinery 

11th and Cambria Streets PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Poplar 0657 

EDWARD KOOPERMAN & SONS 

Established 1890 

Painters and Decorators 

29th and Poplar Streets :: Philadelphia 

Heating Bell Phone Roofing 

ALBERT F. KAERCHER 

Office: 2904-06 W. Fletcher Street - - Philadelphia 
Radiator Cabinets Sheet Metal Work 

JOHN R. LIVEZEY 

Corkboard iZuL^uan of COLD STORAGE ROOMS and RESIDENCES 

Boiler and Pipe Coverings 
2213 W. GLENWOOD AVENUE PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

GEORGE NASS & SON, incorporated 

LUMBER 

Building Lumber — Hardwoods — White Pine — Maple Flooring 
N. W. Cor. GLENWOOD AVE. and DAUPHIN ST. PHIUDELPHIA, PA. 

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER COMPANY 

OF AMERICA. Inc. 

McCormick-Deering Tractors and Power Farming Equipment 

2905 NORTH 16th STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

53 



MAURICE G. COHN, President SAMUEL L. COHN. S*cretary-Tr*asurer 

SPECIALTY FURNITURE COMPANY 

Wholesale FURNITURE - - - 242 CHESTNUT STREET, PHILA. 

Bell Phone, Lombard 2036 

Bennett Hall Apartments 

S. W. Cor. Camac St. and Lindley Ave. 

Mayer I. Blum 

ROBERT L. LATIMER & CO. 

Mill, Mine, Elevator, Conveyor and Power Transmission Machinery and Supplies 
24-26 NORTH FRONT STREET - PHILADELPHIA 

Sow QUAKER Brand 

CLOVER and TIMOTHY SEED 

OVER 99y^% PURE 

BERGER BROTHERS COMPANY 

229 ARCH STREET, PHfLADELPHIA 

MERCHANT'S PARCEL DELIVERY 

Established 1883 

Package* delivered to all partt of the City and over ISO Suburban Point* in 

Pennaylvania and New Jertey. Area exceeding 300 *quare mile* 

639-651 N. 17th STREET R«ce 53S9 

BILT-RITE UPHOLSTERING COMPANY 

6623 Woodland Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. 

DANZIG & BOWERS 

Office Supplies - Printing - Engraving 
1625 RANSTEAD STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Phones: Spruce 7157-8 Race 1171 

PHILADELPHIA MANUFACTURERS MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

800 COMMERCIAL TRUST BUILDING 

FIFTEENTH AND MARKET STREETS 
PHILADELPHIA 

FRUIT BASKETS A SPECIALTY BELL, POPLAR 5208-09 KEYSTONE. RACE 1314 

COSTELLA BROTHERS 
Fruits and Vegetables — Wholesale and Retail 

22nd and spring GARDEN STREETS PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

MISSISSIPPI PEARL BUTTON COMPANY 

Factory: Burlington, Iowa 

SALESROOM 

1017 Arch Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

54 



Frank Kelley 

(Incorporated) 

49 to 69 Moore St. 

Philadelphia 
Both Phones 

Friedman & Belack 

Manufacturers and Wholesalers of 

Fine Provisions 

634-36 WASHINGTON AVE. 

U. S. Government inipected 
Bell, Jackson 2825 Keystone, Main 4856 

South Phila. 
Dressed Beef Co., Inc. 

Wholesale Slaughterers 

Beef, Lamb, Veal and By-Products 

U. S. GOVERNMENT INSPECTION 

232-50 MOORE STREET 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

C S. MARGOLIS 

Authorized Dealers 

Q KOPPERS Philadelphia COKE 

Yards : 

A 815 Washington Ave. - WAL nut 2240 
3100 Germantown Ave.- RAD elf 2422 
4800 Parkside Ave. - TRI nity 4500 

L919 Diamond Street - FREinont 0220 
S. W. Car. 8th & Washineton Aye.- H W ird 2030 

Howard 2100-2101 Main 5101 

MODERN 
CLOTH SPONGING CO. 

lOth St. and Washington Ave. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



In every good delicatessen store are 

Tongues that speak f orus 

Bernard Pincus 



454 to 458 N. AMERICAN STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 

BELL. JACKSON 1675 KEYSTONE. MAIN 1039 

DAVID AVERBACH 

Manufacturer of and Wholetaie Dealer In 

BOLOGNA, SAUSAGES 
PICKLED TONGUES, BEEF, ETC. 

S. E. Cor. Moyamensing Ave. and Moore St. 
PHILADELPHIA 



f 7070 



Bell, Howard -, -jn-jt 



Louis M. Buzby 
G. Harold Buzby 



Keystone, Main 7589 

C. M. Buzby & Sons 

LUMBER and MILL WORK 
WALL BOARDS 

612-632 WASHINGTON AVE. 
Philadelphia 

Bell, Stevenson 5528 

Joseph Albert & Son 

Owned and Operated by Philip Solomon 

Scrap Metal, Scrap Iron 
Paper Stock, Rags, Etc. 

We are no further than your Phone 
1806-08 NORTH 25th STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 
P hone s 

MONUMENTAL WORKS of 
B. REIBSTEIN 

Office: 425 SOUTH SIXTH STREET 

.^ „. „ t 425 So. Sixth Street 

Two Show Rooms j pj^^. ^^y^^ Cemetery 



5796 
5797 



Telephones 



Lombard 

J. T. RILEY, Inc 

LUMBER 

618 and 626 Pine Street 



Main 7724 



55 



Lehigh Valley Supply Co, 

PLUMBING, HEATING and MILL SUPPLIES 
ELECTRICAL SPECIALTIES 



Display Rooms : 
926 HAMILTON STREET 



Store and Office : 
THIRD AND OAK STREETS 



ALLENTOWN, PA. 



BRANCH STORES 
EASTON, PA. STROUDSBURG, PA. LANSDALE, PA. 



Doylestown Steel Threshers 




McCORMICK-DEERING FARM MACHINES 
BARN EQUIPMENT BEAN SPRAYERS 
SILOS INTERNATIONAL TRUCKS 

DOYLESTOWN AGRICULTURAL COMPANY 



Established 1851 



Doylestown, Pennsylvania 



56 



Clymer's Department Store 

OUR SPECIALTIES: 

General Electric Refrigerators - Maytag Washing Machines 

Cabinet Heaters - Perfection Oil Stoves 

Radios - Hoover Electric Cleaners - Hoosier Kitchen Cabinets 

Bed Room, Dining Room and Living Room Furniture 

Bought in Carload Lots Doylcstown, Pa. 



F, D. HartzeTs Sons 
Company 

Flour, Feed, Coal, Seeds, Fertilizer, 
Lumber and Builders' Supplies 

Chalfont, Pa., and Lansdale, Pa. 
MORRIS T. WALTERS 

Wholesale Butcher 

MONTGOMERYVILLE, PA. 

BELL PHONE. 3029 LANSDALE 



Oliver Farm Equipment 
Sales Company 

1420 Mayflower St. :-: Harrisburg, Pa. 

Tractors - Threshers - Full Line Farm Equipment 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

SANDER'S PHOTO STUDIO 

Iylrt Shop and ^ 
Framing House ^ 

83 West State Street Doylestown, Pa. 

EDWARD M. HAPP 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR :: BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

DOYLESTOWN. PA. 
Phone. 1023 W 

J. R. GRUNDY 

PHONE 1056 CARGOES INSURED 

FISCHER'S TRANSFER 

LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE 

MOVING AND HAULING 
MERCER AVE. DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Interstate Hosiery Mills, Inc. 

NEW YORK CITY. N. Y. 

CHICAGO. ILL. CLEVELAND. OHIO 

Plants at 

Bloomfield. N. J. Lansdale. Pa. 

DOUGHERTY SEED GROWERS 

Growers and Wholesalers 



Northern Michigan Certified Petoskey Rural Russet Seed Potatoes 

Aroostook County, Maine, Certified Irish Cobbler Seed Potatoes 



WILLIAMSPORT, PENNA. 

I. ROD 



58 




A Better Yield in 
Every Field 



York Chemical Works 

YORK - PENNSVLVANIA 



Coolevcitoi* 

Lansdale Ice and Storage Co., Inc. 

and Associated Dealers 
Showrooms: 2nd and WALNUT STS., LANSDALE, PA. 



GEORGE WILLARD ICE CO., Doylestown, Pa. 

POOL & SON 

Pantaloon Manufacturers 

LANSDALE, PA. 



Fritzlyn Farms 



GUERNSEYS 



W. F. FRETZ 

PIPERSVILLE . - - PENNA. 

Bell Telephone 297 

LANSDALE ICE AND STORAGE CO, 

INCORPORATED 

Distributors COOLERATOR "TOP-ICER" 

Requires Ice Once Only Every 4 to 7 Days 

Plants: LANSDALE, PA., PERKASIE, PA. 

59 



SMITH'S SANITARY 
DAIRY COMPANY 

SMITH'S ICE CREAM 
Pasteurized Milk, and Cream 

SWEET CREAM BUTTER 

Bell Phone 1020 DOYLESTOWN. PA. 

C. E. Benfield, Prop. Perkasie-Dial 538 

SOUTH PERKASIE MILLS 

Manufacturers of 

White Rose High-grade FLOUR 

GOLD MEDAL 
CERESOTA FLOUR 

Perkasie, Pennsylvania 

Dr. Wesley Massinger 



Veterinarian 



CHALFONT 



PENNA. 



. . . Compliments of . . . 

George R. Beidler 

PERKASIE, PA. 

Willauer Machine Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Better Made 
Poultry Equipment 

QUAKERTOWN, PA. 



0. J. LEATHERMAN 

""'-n LIVE STOCK 

T. B. Tested Fresh Cows a Specialty 



STABLE ON PINE ST., DOYLESTOWN, PA. 
Residence, 23 West Court St. 



Phone 193 



DANCE and DINE 

WARRINGTON INN 

WARRINGTON, PA. 

FULL COURSE DINNER 
Chicken, Steak, Chops, 75c and $L00 

EXCLUSIVE ITALIAN 
and AMERICAN FOOD 



Choice of Liquors 



Blue Ribbon Beer 



Florentina Mills 

Manufacturers of 

Tapestries 

Upholstery Goods 

Textiles and Fringes 

Fifth and Line Sts., Lansdale, Pa. 



Thrift Feed Mill, inc. 

CUSTOM GRINDING AND MIXING 

DAIRY and POULTRY FEEDS 

Grain - Molasses - Fertilizer 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



ROYAL PANTS CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Fine Trousers 

WALNUT NEAR MAIN ST. 
PERKASIE. PA. 

MAURICE A. NEINKEN. Mgr. 



60 



PHONE 106 



LEATHERMAN & GODSHALL 



Choice Meats 

16 WEST STATE STREET 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

RALPH E. MYERS 



Creamery and Dairy 
Equipment and Supplies 



DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

PHONE 250 



Bell Phone 457 

NYCE PLANING 
MILL COMPANY 

Millwork and 
Building Materials 

CONCRETE PRODUCTS AND PAINTS 

239 DECATUR STREET 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 
New York Office, 345 Broadway 

Brownhill & Kramer 

Manufacturers of 
FULL-FASHIONED 

HOSIERY 



East Columbia Ave. 
Memphis and Orange Streets 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



ESTABLISHED 1875 



Walker Mfg. Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Loom Reeds, 
Heddles, Heddle Frames, etc. 

Atlantic and Ruth Streets 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



GROFF & CARWITHEN 

Coal, Lumber, Building Materials, 
Millwork and Roofing 

John Deere Farm Machinery 

Papec Machinery Caterpillar Tractor 

Electric Furnace-Man 



DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Bell Phone, 420 

SPORTING GOODS BELL PHONE 53 

ESTIMATES FURNISHED 

CHARLES H. SHIVE 

HARDWARE 

Garden and Flower Seeds 

PAINTS :: OILS :: GLASS 

Main and State Streets, DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Phone 414 - After Business Hours 585-J 



H. R. GEHMAN 

Automobile Necessities - Gasoline and Oils 

Service Station - Harness - Collars 

Blankets - Auto Robes - Radios 

House and Auto Paints 



The CENERAL Tire 



9 WEST COURT STREET 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



H. L. DETWILER 

CLOTHING 
MANUFACTURER 



TELFORD 



PENNA. 



Bell Phone, REG 0107 

Wartime Supplies for Peacetime Uses 

DREIFUS & CO., Inc. 

Army and Navy Goods 

Tents and Camp Equipment 

2200-04 EAST NORRIS STREET 

12-14 SOUTH SECOND STREET 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



61 



South Philadelphia Realty 



Race 8272 
Dewey 4663 



FRANK GIACOBBO & BRO. 

Twelfth and Wolf Streets 



Lombard 3944-3945 



Main 8133 



STAPLER'S 

Silks • Woolens 

754 South 4th Street 

408-10-14 Fitzwater Street 

B. C. Friedman & Sons 

MATZO BAKERY 

616-24 S. 7th St. Philadelphia, Pa. 

I. RABINOWITZ 

Samuel Cooperburg 

Perloff Bros. 

Coleby TaOoring Co. 

57th and Market Sts. 



Lyle Schofield 

Bundy - Olds - Selmer 
Musical Instruments 



1317 ARCH ST., PHILA., PA. 



G. A. F. Gentzsch 

Manufacturer of 

PAPER BOXES 

Jefferson and Twenty-first Streets 

M. Buten & Sons 



Meng's Sons 
Charles Regan 



Psaki Brothers 

Importers and Wholesale Grocers 
N. E. Cor. 7th and Catharine Sts. 



W. Bodek Corporation 



308 MARKET STREET 



62 



NESHAMINY TEA ROOM 

NESHAMINY, PA. 

On the Easton Road, One and One-half 
Miles North of Pitcairn Flying Field 

CHICKEN. WAFFLE, STEAK AND 
ROAST BEEF DINNERS 

COLD PLATTERS OF ALL KINDS 
BEER ON DRAUGHT 

Banquets and Private Parties at Reduced Rates 
J. P. STANTON BELL PHONE 

Proprietor Call Halboro 32-M 

Compliments of 

THE KELLER WHILLDIN 
POTTERY COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 

Standard Flower Pots 
Azalea Pots, Bulh Pans, Etc. 

NORTH WALES, PA. 

Long Distance Phone 815 

P. A. SPECHT 

• • PANTS • • 

MANUFACTURER 

BLOOMING GLEN, PENNA. 



Day and Night Phone BOILER REPAIRS 

LANSDALE 3620 PATCHING and RETUBING 

HOLTWELD 

CERTIFIED WELDERS 

COMPRESSOR SERVICE 

COMPLETE SHOP AND PORTABLE EQUIP- 
MENT FOR ELECTRIC ARC. OXY- 
ACETYLENE WELDING 

7TH and CANNON AVE., LANSDALE, PA. 



LOMbard 9954 



Main 2285 



Neiman Steel Equipment Co. 

I ncorporated 

Manufacturers of 

STEEL SHELVING 



106-108 North Third Street 
Philadelphia 



Subscribe Now— or Buy It at Newsstands 
35 CENTS A YEAR 
4 YEARS - $1.00 




Sellersville. Penna., 
"Where the Rooster Crows the Item Goes" 

QUAKERTOWN 
Clothing Mfg. Co. 

10th and Juniper Streets 
QUAKERTOWN, PENNA. 

Hobart M. Bergey 

HORSESHOEING 

General Blacksmithing 

LANSDALE, PA. 

Bell Phone: Hatboro 354 

LUDWIG FETZER 



Florist 



CUT FLOWERS and POT PLANTS 

HARTSVILLE, PA. 

Royal Apartment Hotel 

Girard Avenue and Broad Street 
Philadelphia 

A quiet, high-class apartment hotel 

Unsurpassed in refinement and environment. 
Cuisine of the highest stendard. 

CHARLES H. PELOT, Manager 



63 



John F. Mcllvaine Co. 

325 MARKET STREET 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

COMBINATION Mac LAST 

Black, Kid, Tan 
In Stock— Sizes, 3 to 9; Widths, A to E 

INSECTICIDES and FUNGICIDES 

FOR 

FRUITS and VEGETABLES 

MECHLING BROS. 

CHEMICAL CO. 

CAMDEN, N. J. 
Phila., Pa. Boston, Mass. 

R.&AJ.GILMOURJNC. 



Dyers and Finishers 

of Cotton and Woolen Goods 

2631-35 N. THIRD STREET 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Watson & McDaniel Co. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

McDaniel Steam Traps and 
Watson Pressure Regulators 

N. W. Cor. MARSHALL and NOBLE STREETS 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

SAMUEL ZEITLIN'S SONS 

M. HALPERN AND SON 

Industrial Gold Storage & 
Warehouse Go. 

JOSEPH W. LEBERMAN 

HERMAN F. VOSS 



Weimar Brothers 

Manufacturers of 

TAPES, BINDINGS 

AND 

NARROW FABRICS 

2046-48 Amber St. Philadelphia 

Philip L. Sheerr 

AND SONS 

Manufacturers 

Hairvas 

Soft Roll Interlinings 

Torresdale Ave. and Church St. 
Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa. 

For a Good 
Sweeping Compound 



PAXSON MFG. CO. 

1026 N. 3rd St. Phila. 



REGENT 2456-7 



PARK 5005 



Hyman Brodsky Co. 

INCORPORATED 

WOOL PULLERS and 
HIDE DEALERS 

N. E. Cor. 3rd St. and Lehigh Ave. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

A. WEINFELD & SON 

Saml. F. Woodhouse, Inc. 

JOS. BENDER 

SAM SCHLESSINGER 

BOOTH 

G. BLECKSCHMIDT 



64 



W. F. JONES 

Onions 

A Specialty 
150 DOCK STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 

LOMbard 8662 MAIN 1386 

DAVID GOLDMAN & BRO. 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS 
Dealers in New and Used 

FRUIT AND TRUCK PACKAGES 

222-224 S. FRONT STREET 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Compliments of 

C. G. Justice Company 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
123 Dock Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
C. H. EBERLY 

Bell, LOMbard 3395 Keystone, MAIN 3371 

Saler's Dairy Stores 

INC. 

Butter, Eggs and Cheese 

OFFICES 

39 S. FRONT ST., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

WAREHOUSE 
32-34-36-38 S. WATER STREET 



C. HYMAN 



H. LIEBERMAN 



HYMAN & LIEBERMAN 

Wholesale Commission Merchants in 

FRUITS and PRODUCE 

127 DOCK STREET 

Telephone Connections PHILA., PA. 



Cherry-Burrell Corporation 

Cherry-Bassett Division 

I'ilA MARKET STREET 
PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

MACHINERY and SUPPLIES 

FOR DAIRIES, CREAMERIES AND 
ICE CREAM PLANTS 

Spaulding and 
Metcalf Co. 

MILL, ENGINEERS' 

MINE AND SHIP 

SUPPLIES 

514 ARCH STREET PHILA. 



Bell, Market 394S 



Keystone, Main 587 1 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

The Clean Towel Supply Co. 

430 RACE STREET 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Office and Factory Towel Service 

Both Telephones 

Mahlon A. Young Ice Co. 

Manufacturers T ^"^ T^ 
and Shippers of JL ^^v' "^ 

Main Office and Plant 

1944-56 NORTH PHILIP STREET 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Depots — P. & R. Railway Co. 

American and Berks Streets 
2144-46 Glenwood Avenue 
428-30 West Thompson Street 
2143-45-47 West Redner Street 

Bell Phones— Lombard 3167; Lombard 5291 
Keystone Phone—Main 3488 

HILL'S SEA FOOD 

WHOLESALE 

Oysters, Clams, Crabs, Crab Meat 
and Snappers 

255-57 SOUTH FRONT STREET 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



65- 



QUALITY FOR OVER HALF A CENTURY 

Forrest Laundry 

1215-1225 COLUMBIA AVE. 

ilusa, Slnnkfts, ^ace Curtains, IFr^nrt? Brg Clpantng 

BOTH PHONES 



RENT A CAR MILESTONE SYSTEM drive it yourself 



1526 MARKET STREET 

SPRuce 3600 
One block west of City Hall 



1738 N. BROAD STREET 

STEvenson 2625 
Just north of Columbia Aoenue 



PETROLEUM HEAT Cr POWER COMPANY 

PETRO-NOKOL OIL BURNERS FUEL OILS 

810 N. Broad Street POPIar 0604 

WHEN YOU WISH ANY ELECTRICAL WORK INSTALLED OR REPAIRED CALL UP 

ALBERT GENTEL, Inc. 

Electrical Contractors 



1503 COLUMBIA AVENUE 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



SEAFRJED 



BROS. 




FOOT- SO- PORT 




PERFECT FOOT BALANCE 

^SUGmftRDAvE. 



Max Bailis & Sons 



DEALERS IN 



IRON and STEEL SCRAP 

Plants Dismantled 

S. E. Cor. 
Water and McKean Streets 

Quiet May Oil Burners 

are economical 

YOU can't afford to install any 
other make 

J. E. KUNKEL 

63rd and Market Streets 
ALLegheny 2800 



66 



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