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THOMAS ROBINSON 



AND HIS 



DESCENDANTS 



By 

THOMAS HASTINGS ROBINSON 



Revised Edition, 1902 



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HARRISBURG, PA.: 
HA&&I8BU&0 Publishing Compakt. 

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8 

under the reign of James I. By the protracted wars in the 
time of Elizabeth the whole kingdom had greatly suffered, but 
the northern portion of it had been reduced to the lowest state 
of misery. After the accession of James the great rebellion of 
O'Neill occurred. O'Neill and O'Donnell, two Irish lords, who 
had been created earls by the English government, the former 
the Earl of Tyrone and the latter the Earl of Tyrconnell, com- 
menced the arrangement of a plot against the government. 
Being discovered, the two chieftains made a speedy flight to 
the continent. Their extensive estates were confiscated and re- 
verted to the crown. James determined to settle these lands 
with a population who would be disposed to the arts of peace 
and industry. The Scots were therefore invited to occupy the 
province of Ulster, in the north of Ireland, and they did so in 
large numbers, bringing with them their Presbyterianism and 
rigid adherence to the Westminister standards. The province 
greatly revived, and continued for some years to advance in 
prosperity. Persecutions of a most oppressive nature at length 
arose during the reign of Charles I. Every expedient short of 
utter extirpation — oaths, fines, forfeitures, and imprisonment — 
was tried to break down the attachment of the people to the 
Presbyterian faith. Many were treacherously and ruthlessly 
butchered. The ministers were prohibited, under severe pains 
and penalties, from preaching, baptizing, and ministering in 
any way to their flocks; numbers were imprisoned and their 
churches closed. The rents on the lands which they had leased 
from the crown were so much increased that multitudes were 
reduced to poverty. These persecutions continued and in- 
creased during the reigns of Charles II and James I. Drawing 
their ideas of Christian government from the teachings of the 
Westminster Confession and the sermons of John Knox, they 
were disposed to resist tyranny. They were not taught by their 
faith to submit in patience like the Catholic Irish. They were 
not non-combatants like the followers of William Penn. Their 
patience at length became exhausted. They were too few and 
feeble to resist successfully their oppressors and to free Ireland 
from English rule. They were but a tenth of the entire popu- 
lation. But it may safely be asserted that, had all Ireland been 



like the northern part of it, there had been no need of the 
modern Fenian movement: Ireland would have been free two 
hundred years ago. It could not have been kept in subjection 
by thrice the power that oppressed it. The people became dis- 
heartened. They saw no hope of peace. They maintained their 
principles alike through the storm and the calm. They coula 
neither be bribed nor driven to abandon them. Ireland was 
endeared to them by no traditions. It was not the home of 
their ancestry. They were willing to quit it. They began to 
leave in large numbers. The American colonies opened their 
arms to welcome them, and hither they came from the exac- 
tions of the despotic and profligate monarch of England, from 
the penalties of an obsequious Parliament, from the cruelty of 
a haughty Prelacy, and from the rapacity of the landlords of 
whom they were the tenants, to seek in the wilderness of 
another continent an asylum from intolerance and a govern- 
ment of equal rights. They came over in great numbers. 

Mr. Froude says of the men from whom our early ancestry in 
this country sprung that they "were of the same metal with 
those who afterward came over in the Mayflower, Presbyter- 
ians, Independents, Puritans, in search of a wider breathing 
space than was allowed them at home.'' If they intended to 
live as freemen, speaking no lies, and professing openly the 
creed of the Eeformation, they must seek a country where the 
long arm of Prelacy was too short to reach them. In the two 
years which followed the Antrim evictions thirty thousand 
Protestants left Ulster for a land where there was no legal 
robbery, and where those who sowed the seed could reap the 
harvest. Ships could not be found to carry the crowds who 
were eager to go. The exodus was unprecedented. A minister 
in Ulster writes in 1718, "There is likely to be a great desola- 
tion in the northern parts of this Kingdom by the removal of 
several of our brethren to the American Plantations." Min- 
isters and their congregations would go in a body. 

In the year 1729, six thousand of the Scotch-Irish are re- 
ported as having come to this country, and before the middle 
of the century, or 1750, nearly twelve thousand arrived annu- 
ally for several years. Some found homes in New England, but 



10 

the greater number of them made choice of Pennsylvania for 
their new homes, although many of them afterwards removed 
to Virginia, the Carolinas, and, at a later day, to Kentucky. 
James Logan, who was the President of the Proprietary Coun- 
cil of Pennsylvania at this time, and an especial friend of the 
Quakers and unfriendly to the Scotch-Irish, says that it was a 
"common fear that if they — the Scotch-Irish — continue to 
come they will make themselves proprietors of the province. 
It looks as if Ireland is to send all her inhabitants hither/^ 
The training these men had received in Scotland and Ireland 
was admirably adapted to make them the founders of new and 
prosperous States. They respected law. They were lovers of 
liberty. They believed that the office of the civil magistrate 
was of God. They were not an atheistic or immoral people, but 
a moral, religious, and educated people. The fear of God and 
the influence of religion pervaded their communities. They 
drew their morality from that Word of God that liveth and 
abideth forever. They knew their rights and dared to main- 
tain them. 

In the original settlement of Pennsylvania the followers of 
William Penn occupied the extreme eastern part of the State — 
the counties of Philadelphia, Bucks, and Chester. The Ger- 
man immigrants, who came over in great numbers, settled the 
region immediately west and north of them, a territory from 
thirty to sixty miles wide. Yet farther to the west, and hold- 
ing the whole frontier in that direction, were the settlements 
of the Scotch-Irish. It was deemed to be best in general to 
keep these three classes of immigrants separate. The Scotch- 
Irish and Quakers had no affinities, and the Germans and they 
were disposed to quarrel. It was found also that this hardy and 
determined race were a great protection against the hostile In- 
dians, and they were therefore encouraged to take the fron- 
tiers. They were not unwilling. They and their descendants 
held the frontiers and pushed the advancing lines of civiliza- 
tion across the continent till they reached the Mississippi. 
They came hither in such numbers that it was feared they 
would make themselves the proprietors of the province. Being 
invited by the Provincial government to come, they came and 
settled on the beautiful lands along the Susquehanna, and 



11 

when some of them were challenged for their titles, they re- 
plied that it was "against the laws of God and nature that so 
much land should lie idle while so many Christians wanted it 
to labor on and to raise their bread." They were unable to 
comprehend how the heirs of William Penn had any more right 
to buy lands of the Indians than had they, or how the King of 
England could give away lands over which the original pro- 
prietors, the Indian tribes, were still chasing the deer. It must 
be said of them that, having been taught in the school of rough 
experience abroad, they were not the advocates of passive 
obedience irrespective of legal rights and authority. Where 
law was manifest they yielded a prompt obedience, even if law 
was not equity. They were men of energy, enterprise, indus- 
try, and intelligence, of steady habits, and of deeply moral and 
religious character, whose tastes were agricultural, and who 
settled their lands with a view to permanent residence. 

Cotton Mather, in speaking of the large numbers who came 
into New England in the first half of the eighteenth century, 
says, "We are confronted with great numbers of the oppressed 
brethren coming from the north of Ireland. The glorious 
providence of God in the removal of so many of a desirable 
character from the north of Ireland hath doubtless very great 
intentions in it." 

Such were our fathers of two centuries ago — strong, earnest, 
stalwart, religious men, who for generations had contended for 
their rights, an intelligent, resolute, and energetic people. 
They came to this western world with little money, but with 
strong hands and stout hearts, and deep religious convictions 
and principles, prepared to build homes, churches, educational 
institutions, and states that would stand for generations and 
be a blessing to the world. 



CHAPTER II. 



Settlement in the New World. 

These immigrants entered the country mainly at the ports of 
Boston, Philadelphia, and Charleston. Those who landed at 
Boston settled chiefly in Maine, New Hampshire, and Massa- 
chusetts. The great tide poured, however, into Pennsylvania 
through the port of Philadelphia. Some settled in the adjoin- 
ing regions of Delaware and the eastern shore of Maryland. 
Others landed at more southern ports and took up lands in 
Xorth and South Carolina and in Georgia. 

It cannot be determined with accuracy in what year our own 
immediate ancestry came to this country. Few of the Scotch- 
Irish entered Pennsylvania earlier than 1714. In that year the 
tide of immigration had passed beyond the limits of Chester 
Valley and had reached the region of the Susquehanna. The 
Church of Donegal, Lancaster county, was organized that year. 
"By the year 172? the east bank of the Susquehanna as far up 
as Kittochtinny Mountains and the fertile lands on the little 
Conewago, the Swatara, the Manada, and Paxtang Creeks were 
dotted with settlements.'' Among the settlers who took up 
land in Donegal township, Lancaster county, in 1722, were 
families by the name of Robinson. In the list of the Taxables 
and early settlers of Hanover township (now in Dauphin coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania), are to be found the names of several Robin- 
sons — ^Philip, Samuel, Thomas, two Williams, a James, and 
others. Also three McCords, with families bearing the names 
of Black, Crawford, Martin, Logan, Fisher, Moorhead, Ramsey, 
and others, with whom our ancestors and their descendants 
were connected by marriage. 

The region in which our ancestry originally settled can 
hardly be surpassed by any part of the country for its natural 
advantages and the beauty of its scenery. It was to them a wil- 
derness where they were the pioneers. They dwelt in the re- 



13 

gion immediately surrounding Harrisburg, the present capital 
of the State of Pennsylvania — then but the site of a ferry, a 
stockade, and a trading post with the Indians. The Kittoch- 
tinny mountains, an extensive range, which begins in eastern 
New York among the Catskills, and extends southward through 
Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, into the Carolinas, bearing 
different names on its way, formed for some years the western 
boundary of the settlements. These mountains were broken 
here and there by small gaps, and boldly cut asunder where the 
many-islanded Susquehanna had forced its way through. From 
the western bank of the Susquehanna extended one of the most 
enticing valleys of American scenery. This valley, now known 
as the Cumberland valley, was originally called Kittochtinny, 
from the mountains that formed its western boundary. The 
valley, like the mountains, stretches from eastern New York to 
the Carolinas, and assumes many different names. In Virginia 
it is the Shenandoah. This region possessed peculiar attrac- 
tions for hardy and adventurous settlers. It was a favorite 
hunting ground of the aborigines. These children of the forest 
gave beautiful and significant names to the mountains and val- 
leys, the rivers, brooks, and islands, the hunting and fishing 
grounds and war paths of this charming region, and as they 
retired beyond the Kittochtinny, and, looking from some bold 
prominence, beheld the curling smoke of the white man's cabin 
rising from a hundred clearings in the forest, and heard the 
crack of his rifle over the graves of their forefathers, it doubt- 
less quickened the hatred that afterward burst with such deso- 
lation upon this people. The fertility of the soil, the abund- 
ance of fresh flowing springs, the number of clear streams that 
broke from the gaps of the mountains, the luxuriance of the 
vegetation, the variety of its forest trees, the salubrity of its 
climate, and the beauty of its position, made this valley of 
rolling plains, sheltered by mountains, of springs and streams 
and noble river, a region hardly surpassed or even equaled by 
any then or now known to American scenery. With rare ex- 
ceptions the colonists who settled at first along the eastern 
bank of the Susquehanna, through the Cumberland valley, and 
along the valley of the Juniata were Protestants and English- 



14 

speaking people. Most of them were also either communicants 
in the Presbyterian church or were strongly attached to its 
doctrines and polity. Families generally united in forming set- 
tlements, fixing their residences suflSciently near each other to 
form social neighborhoods, to meet for the privileges of relig- 
ious worship, to give to each other help in farming, and to 
protect each other should dangers arise from the savages who 
lurked in the forests of the region. The homes of the settlers 
were distributed here and there, scattered over a wide space. 
They were an adventurous people and ready to risk many perils 
in fixing the location of their homes. 



CHAPTER III. 



Ancestral Life a'nd Character. 

Where our ancestors found a spring or clear running brook, 
there they erected their cabins and began to fell the surround- 
ing forest. Week by week new settlers came, new cabins rose, 
the forest was conquered farther and farther, and civilization 
carried westward. In 1750, Philip Robinson was settled at 
Manada Gap, in the line of the Kittochtinny, where Manada 
creek issues from the mountains, east of the Susquehanna. In 
1753, George Robinson, son of Philip, patented lands on Shear- 
man's (or Sherman's) creek, west of the Susquehanna, and be- 
yond the Kittochtinny. At the same time, or a little later, the 
McCords were settled on the Conococheague, toward the south- 
em line of the State. Traditions of those early times, with let- 
ters and other records still extant, furnish us with a very com- 
plete picture of the modes of living, the manners and customs 
of our forefathers. They were frontiersmen, and dependent 
almost entirely upon themselves. They were a social people, 
and by very necessity were thrown together for mutual help. 
Much of their work was done in common. They had their 
"house-raisings," their ^log-rollings," their "com-huskings," 
their "flax-scutchings," and their "harvest-bees," where every 
man was expected to do his duty faithfully. On an appointed 
day a company would gather at a designated place, where some 
settler wanted a house, bringing axes, saws, mallets, oxen, and 
sleds. A number of trees would be speedily felled, cut into 
proper lengths, and squared. From some straight-grained tree 
clapboards for the roof, four or five feet in length, were split 
out with an axe. The timbers were hauled to some clear spot 
near a spring, rolled up into their places, the interstices filled 
with chips and rough-made mortar; rude doors and windows 
were made ; wooden pins driven into holes bored in the timbers 
served to support rough shelves; ^ clapboard table made of 



16 

split loggy tfaree-l^ged stools, wooden latches, a few pewter 
dishes, plates, and spoons, wooden bowls and trenches, cala- 
bashes and cnps made of gourds and hard-shell squashes, a few 
iron pots, knives, and forks, a crane to swing in the immense 
chimney place, and the hoose was complete. Pegs in the wall 
round about served for the wardrobe, for the rifle, shot-pouch, 
and powder horn, as well as for strings of dried pumpkins, 
haunches of ham, of beef, or of venison. Such dwellings were 
often the work of but three or four days. Their houses were 
not the poor and miserable cabins which we still sometimes 
find in the very heart of civilization. Many of them were built 
of choice logs, hewed and closely jointed, two stories high, and 
with several apartments above and below. Even some stone 
dwellings were erected as early as 1740 by these enterprising 
settlers. One of these log houses, built by our fathers of more 
than a century ago, is still standing, and is occupied by a 
thrifty farmer in Sherman's valley. It bears on its exterior 
the marks of bullets fired by the savages in the Indian wars of 
1763-64. It is in a state of admirable preservation, and seems 
likely to last for a half century to come. Its well-hewn and 
well-jointed logs, its small windows, with shutters for protec- 
tion against the prowling Indian, its wainscotted walls within^ 
its projecting timbers in the ceiling, on which were hung 
articles of dress or of food, or were slung the early settler's 
rifle and powder-horn, its broad chimney and capacious fire- 
place, where half a dozen men could stand abreast, and the 
ample flag-stones of the hearth, all speak of the early days 
when, gathered around the huge fire, neighbors narrated the 
thrilling events of the day, incidents in the wars of Braddock 
and the French, the expeditions against the Indians, the mas- 
sacre of Wyoming, and the nearer ones of Great and Little 
Cove, or talked in bated breath of Indians seen in their own 
neighborhood; or when, in more peaceable times, the father 
of the household gathered his children around him, and heard 
them from the eldest to the youngest, in turn, repeat the Cate- 
chisms learned from books that had passed through the siege 
of Derry, or had been carried to the kirk in bonnie Scotland. 
The dress worn by our fathers was simple. Their clothes 



17 

were not imported, but woven on their own looms from wool 
and flax which had been carded and spun by hand. The style 
of dress was at times partly Indian and partly civilized. The 
hunting shirt was worn by the earliest settlers. In the years of 
the Indian wars some of the younger men adopted the Indian 
dress throughout. In general, linsey-woolsey shirts and jack- 
ets, buckskin breeches and deerskin cap, formed an outfit for a 
hardy frontiersman. The women dressed universally in the 
common linsey-woolsey, woven in their own looms, and when 
they were not barefoot, or provided with anything better, cov- 
ered the foot with moccasins or enveloped them in the shoe- 
packs, which would make a sorry figure beside the elegant slip- 
per or laced boot of modem days. Punch describes a French- 
man as staring with wonder at a wash-stand! The mother of 
one hundred years ago would look with greater wonder upon 
the wardrobes of their grand-daughters. The pianos of that 
day were the spinning-wheels, big and little, and their music 
was heard in every home, the accompaniment of Dimdee, Bon- 
nie Doon, and "plaintive Martjrrs, worthy of the name.^' The 
diet of the early settlers was somewhat limited in range, and, 
to a fastidious palate of the present day, hardly as tasteful as a 
supper at Delmonico^s. Com in all its forms, — ^hominy. John- 
ny-cake, mush, and pone, — potatoes and pumpkins and pork, 
were the staples, interspersed with fish from the streams and 
game from the forests. Their dinners were seldom preceded 
by soups, interrupted by entrees, or ended with desserts. 

The athletic sports of running, jumping, wrestling, and 
heaving the weight, were common to men and boys. A well- 
grown boy of twelve or thirteen years was furnished with a 
small rifle and shot-pouch. He then became a foot soldier, and 
had his port-hole assigned him for defence. Himting soon 
made him expert in the use of the gim. Among the boyish 
sports of the day were two peculiar ones, which are illustrative 
of the times. They were that of throwing the tomahawk, and 
that of imitating the notes or noise of every bird or beast of 
the forest. And these were not mere pastimes, but well-nigh a 
necessary part of their education. A tomahawk with a certain 
length of handle, when thrown, will revolve a fixed number of 
2 



18 

times in a certain distance. It could therefore be made to 
strike an object with the edge or the back, with the handle up 
or down, or in any required position, by varying the distance to 
be thrown. Some of the settlers became as expert in throwing 
this weapon as were the Indians themselves. The imitation of 
the sounds of various animals was of peculiar importance. The 
hunter, by his mimicry of the wild turkey, often brought a 
flock of these keen-eyed birds within reach of his rifle. In like 
manner, by imitating the fawn, he could bring the parent deer 
within the range of his trusty gun, or by howl could raise 
responses from a pack of wolves, so as to put himself on guard 
against them. But this imitative faculty came into special ser- 
vice during the Indian wars. It was a custom of these savage 
men, when prowling about a neighborhood, to collect together 
at day by imitating the turkey, and by night by imitating the 
owl or the wolf. Our fathers were compelled to practice the 
same art, and to fight the enemy with his own weapons. A 
whole neighborhood has often been thrown into consternation 
by a few screeches of an owl, or the howling of a wolf. 

Our fathers were an intelligent and moral people. School 
houses and churches rose in every settlement immediately after 
the cabins of the settlers. In their schools reading, writing, 
arithmetic, trigonometry, and practical geometry were the 
branches chiefly taught, as they were of the most immediate 
use. The Bible was the standard daily reader, and on every 
Saturday morning the Assembly's Shorter Catechism was re- 
cited by all the school as a regular exercise. In the family, the 
father was the patriarch, ruler, and instructor of all. Subor- 
dination to parents was the universal law, and obedience the 
settled habit of the household. Religion was the ruling prin- 
ciple in the home, the school, and the church — the religion of 
the Bible. Communities were governed more by public senti- 
ment than by the statutes of civil law. In districts remote 
from courts and lawyers, from magistrates, sheriiffs, and con- 
stables, the people became a law unto themselves and enforced 
justice by common consent. In those early times a township 
often embraced the limits of a modern county, and the only 
civil officers in it would be the justice of the peace and a 



19 

constable. Generally no more were needed, for the moral and 
religious sentiment of the community, which wa» moulded and 
largely controlled by a few of the oldest and wisest of the set- 
tlers, was the great conservator and arbiter of right. Industry 
in working and hunting, bravery in war, hospitality, neighbor- 
liness, candor, honesty, steadiness of deportment, were the 
passports to the public confidence. The punishments for lying, 
for idleness, dishonesty, and ill fame of any kind were meted 
out with exactness. If the theft was of something of value, the 
jury of the neighborhood would condemn the culprit to the 
penalty of Moses' law, forty stripes save one. A theft of a less 
valuable article was punished with fewer stripes, but the stripes 
were well laid on by able hands, and the criminal was frequently 
given so many days to leave the settlement. A man who failed 
to do military duty, to go out on a scout or a campaign when 
it was his turn, found epithets of dishonor clinging to him for 
years. In many of the substantial virtues, these departed 
spirits of the olden time cannot be surpassed or hardly be 
equaled by their sons of a more refined generation. If some of 
them were rude and unpolished, they were hospitable and 
brave, honest in their dealings, constant in their friendships, 
free from the debts which make such an uproar in civilized life, 
and were of hardy industry; while among them were many fam- 
ilies of gentle and easy manners, courtly in their address, intel- 
ligent, refined, polite, such as are to this day spoken of as "the 
gentlemen of the old school." Nor should we omit to speak of 
that quiet energy of character, that patient endurance of hard- 
ships, and submission to domestic privation that characterized 
the women of that day. Many of them were called to bear a 
prominent part in many a bloody scene and perilous adventure. 
Many a thrilling tale has come down to us of female suffering 
and female prowess, and of female presence of mind in mo- 
ments of imminent peril. Our mothers were women worthy of 
the men of their day, women who trained their children to fear 
God, to reverence the Sabbath, the Bible, and the church, to 
respect toil, to love honor and honesty, to scorn falsehood and 
meanness; who told their sons to be generous, brave, and 
manly, and their daughters to be helpful, patient, and true. 



20 

Such were our ancestry. The testimonies to their sterling 
character are numerous. ^'The mass of these immigrants were 
men of intelligence^ resolution^ energy, religious and moral 
character, having means that enabled them to supply them- 
selves with suitable selections of land on which they made per- 
manent homes for their families/' Their youth at first 'Vere 
generally educated at home and under parental instruction^ 
and were trained to obedience and subordination as the un- 
bending law of the family. The schools established later by 
Presbyterian ministers confirmed and extended the home edu- 
cation.*'* 

♦Chambers, 146, 160. 



CHAPTER IV. 



CONTEMPOBABY HiSTOBT. 

Our ancestry, the Robinsons, McCords, Blames, Moorheads, 
Blacks, &c., with their friends and neighbors from the Old 
World, occupied this beautiful region of central Pennsylvania 
for twenty or thirty years in almost uninterrupted peace. They 
went on in the even tenor of their way, extending and improv- 
ing their farms, patenting new lands, rearing and educating 
their children, planting everywhere the school house and the 
church. They penetrated farther to the westward, crossed the 
Susquehanna, scattered over the beautiful valley now known 
as the Cumberland, and at the time of which we now speak, 
1754, a few had gone over the Kittoch tinny into the valley be- 
yond, and a few had made settlement along the Juniata. At 
this date Pennsylvania was a royal province, ruled by gover- 
nors appointed by the Penn family and approved by the king. 
At that time the people of these States numbered about one 
and a half millions, and were the loyal subjects of George III, 
and our common justices of the peace signed themselves "His 
Majesty^s justices of the peace.^' At that time the people were 
familiar with "royal proclamations,'* and paid their taxes in 
royal currency, pence, shillings and pounds. The British set- 
tlement did not extend beyond the AUeghenies. Our fathers 
along the Susquehanna and the Kittochtinny hills were hold- 
ing the frontier. As their personal history is involved in the 
public events that transpired at that time, we shall refer to the 
stirring and thrilling scenes that for some ten years, from 1754 
to 1764, occupied them. They had for their neighbors on the 
west and north the Indian tribes. Since those days when by 
their bravery and by their lives they defended the more eastern 
settlements of the non-fighting Quakers from the incursions of 
the savage, it has been repeatedly charged upon these men that 
they were the cause of all the Indian wars and bloodshed, that 



22 

they were a rude and lawless people, who hated, defrauded, 
and provoked the Indian, showing no honor or magnanimity in 
their dealings with him. The facts of history dismiss all such 
calumnies. From the first settlement of this region until the 
Indians became, with their French allies, the public enemies of 
the English, our fathers lived in peace; not the life of an In- 
dian was taken, nor the blood of one shed, nor were any of 
them deprived of their property by these Scotch-Irish settlers. 
The wars that arose, and in which our fathers bore so terrible 
a part, rose by no fault of theirs. A series of frauds and unjust 
measures and encroachments on the part of the proprietors of 
the province, the successors of the Penn family, alienated the 
Indians and after a peace of seventy years produced a most 
terrible outbreak. France was at this time in possession of 
Canada, and France and England became rival claimants to the 
soil of America. Hostilities between these two powers were 
openly declared in 1754. The peaceful era of Pennsylvania was 
now at an end, and the dark clouds of savage warfare gathered 
in the west. The French were hovering around the great lakes, 
and sedulously busy in bribing the Indians to break oflf their 
allegiance to the English. They had already begim the erec- 
tion of a line of forts from Lake Erie to the Ohio, and it be- 
came manifest that it was their purpose to connect their pos- 
sessions on the lakes with those on the Mississippi, and to 
obtain control of the whole country beyond the AUeghenies. 
The tidings that French troops had crossed Lake Erie and for- 
tified themselves at Presque Isle, and were pushing forward to 
the headwaters of the Ohio, startled the whole country. A 
young man of noble presence and martial bearing, accompanied 
by a single attendant, was seen by the inhabitants along the 
Susquehanna as he passed toward the west amid the rigors of 
mid-winter. He crossed the AUeghenies, threaded the pathless 
forests, forded the streams, and finally met the French com- 
mander at Fort Le Boeuf on the head waters of the Allegheny, 
and demanded of him an instant departure from British soil. 
The answer was evasive and unsatisfactory, and the embassy 
was unsuccessful. That young man was George Washington. 
On his return he passed through the present site of Pittsburg, 



23 

and with his military eye selected that junction of the Alle- 
gheny and the Monongahela as most admirable for military 
defence. Before he could bring troops thither from the east, 
the French had pushed forward a thousand men and built Fort 
Duquesne, and by a greatly superior force compelled Colonel 
Washington and the small detachment of men under his com- 
mand to capitulate at the Great Meadows. Then began that 
memorable war which spread along the frontier of the English 
settlements from Nova Scotia to Georgia and kindled its fires 
deep in our American forests. Most of the Indian tribes were 
drawn by the French into the conflict as their allies. We often 
speak of the wars in which our fathers were engaged with the 
savages of the forest as if they were but border strifes. The con- 
flict which opened in 1753, and in which our ancestors shared 
so largely, was part and parcel of a grand struggle in which 
the Indian was but an ally. It was a war between England and 
France, and the prize was the great central valley of this con- 
tinent. These foreign powers met in the sublime arena of our 
deep wildernesses. Hostile armies from another continent tra- 
versed the endless forests of the new world, forded its rivers, 
climbed its mountains, waded its swamps, hewed a way for 
their bayonets and their artillery with the axe of the pioneer, 
and then under the shadow of the primeval woods, thousands 
of miles from their homes in the old world, and hundreds of 
miles from the abodes of civilized men, they met and fought 
for the destiny of this continent. Our ancestors little com- 
prehended the greatness of the struggle, and the tomahawk 
that gleamed along the ranges of the Alleghenies and fell with 
unsparing cruelty in the valleys, was but an accessory of a 
grander contest than the dusky warrior imagined. 

In June, 1755, the army of General Braddock, after being 
furnished largely by the inhabitants along the Susquehanna 
with horses and carriages, left the valley and civilization be- 
hind, and struck out into the deep wilderness as a squadron 
puts to sea. Five hundred axe-men were sent forward to open 
roads. It was a cheering sight; the scarlet columns of the 
British regulars, the rude but stalwart back-woodsmen, vrith 
their hunting shirts and shouldered rifles and unmartial bear- 
ing, which drew the scorn of the haughty and egotistic Briton, 



24 

the trains of artillery, the cavalcade of white-topped wagons, 
and the pack-horses. The hopes of the people beat high. 
Nothing but victory was anticipated. Men were in that army 
whose names have become historic. The brave but xmfor- 
tunate Braddock; Gage, who twenty years later, with his 
routed battalions, recoiled before the fire of the militia at 
Bunker Hill; Gates, the reputed conqueror of Burgoyne and 
the marplot of Revolutionary times, and another, destined to a 
greater fame than all these, George Washington, well-nigh a 
boy in years, but a man in calm thought and safest counsel. It 
was no easy task for an army, greatly encumbered with need- 
less baggage, to force their way through an unbroken growth 
of forest. A narrow road was made, with ceaseless toil, across 
mountains and masses of lofty rocks, over ravines and rivers. 
The army moved forward slowly, in a slender line nearly four 
miles in length. The regular troops suffered from the hard 
fare of the wilderness, and were terrified by the depth and 
gloom of the forests into which they pierced. The over-ween- 
ing confidence and presumption of the British general, who 
resented the counsel of Washington, brought the army to fatal 
disaster. On the banks of the Monongahela, when within nine 
miles of Fort Duquesne, and while pressing forward with no 
thought of danger, a murderous and terribly destructive fire 
was suddenly poured in upon them — on their front and their 
flanks — ^by an invisible enemy, who made the woods re-echo 
with their terrible war-whoop. In an instant all was confusion. 
The regular troops seemed bereft of their senses. They hud- 
dled together in the road like flocks of sheep, while every bush 
and tree around them was alive with the incessant flashes of 
their enemjr^s rifles, and every moment the men went down by 
scores. Men loaded their muskets and flred into the air, or in 
the insanity of their terror shot their own comrades. The 
regulars, having at length wasted all their ammunition, broke 
and ran. Braddock himself, yielding at the flrst onset to fear, 
recovered himself and braved every danger. The American 
troops, Washington's Virginians, adopted the Indian style of 
warfare, and displayed the most undaunted courage. Wash- 
ington himself rode through the tumult as calmly and bravely 
''as if he loved the whistling of bullets.'^ The slaughter lasted 



25 

three hours, ending in a total defeat of Braddock's army. The 
carnage was unusually great. Never before had the savage 
tribes such a harvest of scalps and spoils. Fortunately the 
enemy did not pursue those who fled from the fatal field. 
These left all, and sought only to preserve life. Reaching the 
reserve division, under General Dunbar, they infected it with 
terror. Cannons, baggage, and wagons were destroyed, and all 
fled together. The calamities of this disgraceful overthrow 
did not cease with the loss of the hundreds who fell on the 
banks of the Monongahela. Of a sudden the terrified remnants 
of the routed army, eager to escape out of the awful woods 
where their comrades had fallen by an unseen foe, came flying 
back to the settlements east of the AUeghenies. Nor did they 
pause when they reached them, but hurried on, crossed the 
Susquehanna, a disorganized, terrified mob, spreading terrible 
reports along the way, and hastened on to Philadelphia. The' 
whole frontier was left uncovered, and the unhappy people, 
unarmed and undisciplined, were compelled to seek safety in 
flight, or to defend themselves as best they might against the 
scalping knife and tomahawk. The defeat of Braddock was 
the signal for the savage tribes to snatch up their weapons and 
assail the English settlements with one accord. Tribes that 
had been neutral no longer hesitated. The miseries of an In- 
dian war began. The tomahawk was uplifted along the ranges 
of the AUeghenies. Then for the first time Pennsylvania felt 
the scourge of Indian war. The whole frontier was turned into 
a wide scene of war and desolation. The enemy, discovering 
the defenceless state of the settlements, roamed unmolested 
and fearless along the western lines of Virginia, Maryland, and 
Pennsylvania, committing the most appalling outrages and the 
most wanton cruelties. The Shawnees prowled with horrible 
ferocity along the branches of the Susquehanna. Through the 
autumn of 1755 the storm raged with devastating fury. Scarce 
three months had elapsed after the defeat of Braddock before 
the frontier settlements were in the midst of a cruel war. The 
first blow fell upon a body of hardy and industrious Scotch- 
Irish pioneers from Kittochtinny valley, who had moved up the 
Susquehanna some fifty miles above the present site of Harris- 



26 

burg and, pitching their tents in the wilderness, had com- 
menced to open little patches of groxmd. The attack was 
made on the 15th of October, 1755, and every person in the 
settlement, consisting of twenty-five, including men, women, 
and children, was either killed or carried into captivity, with 
the exception of one man, who made his escape though danger- 
ously wounded. A number of settlers, hearing of the massacre 
from the man who had escaped, came up immediately to bury 
the dead, and made the following report to Governor Morris in 
a petition for help: "We found but thirteen, who were men 
and elderly women. The children we supposed to be carried 
away prisoners. The house where we supposed they finished 
their murder we found burnt up, the man of it, Jacob King, 
a Swisser, lying just by it. He lay on his back, barbarously 
burnt, and two tomahawks sticking in his forehead. The ter- 
rors of which has driven away almost all the back inhabitants, 
except the subscribers, with a few more who are willing to stay 
and defend the land; but we are not able to defend it for 
want of guns and ammunition, and few in numbers, so that 
without assistance we must flee and leave the country to the 
mercy of the enemy.'' This massacre spread terror through all 
the settlements. On the 23d of October a party of forty-five, 
commanded by John Harris, after whom the city of Harrisburg 
is named, and who at that time was the proprietor of Harris 
Ferry, on the site of the present city, proceeded to the scene 
of the disaster, where they found and buried a number of the 
mangled bodies of the victims. They thence proceeded a few 
miles further up the river, and had a conference with some 
Indians residing in that region, and attempted to prevail on 
them to be neutral. They learned that a large scalping party 
of fifteen hundred Indians, with a body of French, were on 
their way to attack the settlements. Having secured the prom- 
ise of neutrality and made some presents to propitiate them, 
the party set out on their return. At the crossing of Penn's 
creek they were suddenly fired upon by a party of thirty 
savages, who lay concealed in a deep natural hollow. Four 
were instantly killed. Harris says: "About fifteen of our 
men and myself took to the trees, attacked the villians, killed 



27 

four of them on the spot and lost but three more." They 
retreated to the river, pursued by the Indians, and crossed with 
the loss of four or five men drowned, one of whom was shot 
from the horse on which he was riding, behind Mr. Harris. 
Harris's horse was shot, and he was obliged to abandon him 
and save himself by swimming. The survivors of the party, 
after several days of toilsome marching through the rugged 
country, reached home in safety. 



CHAPTER V. 



The Conflicts Along the Susquehanna. — ^French and 

Indian War. 

This near approach of the enemy threw all the frontier into 
consternation. The only safety of the most exposed was to 
flee and leave all to the enemy. For a long time they looked 
in vain for any effectual help from the government. The Pro- 
vincial Assembly was under the control of the Friends or 
Quakers, and they would vote neither men nor supplies for the 
defence of the frontiers. Petitions poured in praying for arms 
and ammunition. The Governor laid before the Assembly a 
full account of the massacres and continued perils of the peo- 
ple, and appealed to them for a militia law and the needed ap- 
propriations, but in vain. The dead bodies of some of the mur- 
dered and mangled were sent from the frontiers to Philadelphia 
and hauled about the streets to inflame the people against the 
Indians and also against the Quakers, to whose mildness and 
forebearance was attributed the laxity about providing means 
of defence. The mob surrounded the House of Assembly, 
placed dead bodies at its entrance, and demanded immediate 
succor. Meanwhile troubles were increasing. Houses that 
had been occupied, bams that had been filled with a rich and 
bountiful harvest, newly-sowed fields, acres of standing com, 
and many of their cattle, were abandoned by the hardy fron- 
tiersmen, expecting, as they daily did, the coming of the enemy. 
They were in constant fear and constant danger of being cut 
off. The inhabitants, dwelling often from one to three miles 
apart, fell unresistingly or fled in dismay from their homes. 
The main body of the enemy encamped on the Susquehanna, 
thirty miles above Harrises Ferry, whence they extended them- 
selves on both sides of the river. To the east they fell upon 
Onadenhutten, Mahanoy, and Tulpehocken; on the west of the 
Susquehanna they reduced to ashes the hamlets in the lovely 



29 

limestone coves of what is now Bedford county. The whole 
frontier, from the Delaware to the Potomac, was now lighted 
with the blaze of burning cottages. The peaceful Moravians 
of Bethlehem fortified their town and took up arms in self- 
defence, and welcomed to their protection hundreds of dis- 
tressed men, women, and children who had fled from the sav- 
ages. The light of burning houses and bams and ricks of 
grain and hay could be seen nearly thirty miles away, and with 
the ridge of the Blue mountains between. On the west of the 
Susquehanna, and toward the Maryland line, the destruction 
was most appalling. The records of the times are filled with 
accounts of horrible massacres, of terrible conflicts, of brave 
and daring deeds, of woman's heroism as well as man's. 

It is in terrible scenes of this nature we make acquaintance 
with our earliest known ancestry. To guard against the devas- 
tations of the Indians a chain of forts and block-houses was 
erected by the Province of Pennsylvania along the Kittochtin- 
ny hills, from the Delaware to the Maryland line, commanding 
the principal passes or gaps of the mountains, and these were 
garrisoned each by from twenty-five to one hundred of the pro- 
vincial militia. In addition to these government forts there 
were private ones erected in many of the settlements, to which 
the people fled in times of peril. Some of these will be men- 
tioned in this narrative. 

Our ancestry settled, it would appear, on their arrival in this 
country, somewhere within the bounds of the present county of 
Lancaster, Pa. One of the original townships of the county 
according to an ancient map bore the name of Bobinson. At a 
later date it was subdivided and the old name was lost. Our 
earliest knowledge of these grandsires of ours locates them in 
the township of Derry, Hanover, and Paxton, east of the Sus- 
quehanna, in what is now a part of Dauphin county. Their 
farms, for they were generally farmers, were along the banks 
of the Swatara and tributary streams. Here dwelt and inter- 
married at an early day the Robinsons, McCords, Blacks, Mar- 
tins, Crawfords, Logans, and many other families, nearly if 
not quite all of them of Scotch-Irish origin. 

Philip Bobinson, the eldest son of Thomas, resided with his 



30 

sons Samuel and Oeorge at Manada 6ap^ a pass in the Kittoch- 
tinny, some sixteen miles east of Harrisburg, whence issues 
Manada creek. Andrew, William, and Bichard, brothers of 
Philip, were located in Derry township. Samuel and Thomas 
were in Hanover. George, about 1753, crossed the Susque- 
hanna and took up lands on the west side of the Kittochtinny, 
in what was then known as Shearman's Valley, — ^which still re- 
tains the name, with a slight alteration in the spelling, making 
it Sherman's. Forts were erected on the farms of both Philip 
and his son George. We find the following mention of them in 
the records of those early times. The fort at Manada Gap is 
sometimes called Philip Robinson's, sometimes Samuel Robin- 
son's — Samuel, as the eldest son of the household, taking 
charge of the paternal estate. 

On November 11th, 1755, immediately subsequent to the In- 
dian outbreaks. Governor Morris addresses the following letter 
to Samuel Robinson, Hanover township, Lancaster county: 

"At the request of the people of Hanover township in your 
neighborhood, I have ordered one hundred pounds of gunpowder 
to be delivered to you, which you will carry to the fort at your 
house, and distribute among the inhabitants in as equal a manner 
as may be, and recommend it to them to be careful of It I have 
no arms, or I should willingly supply them that want and are 
willing to use them in defence of themselves and their country." 

In a letter from the pen of Adam Reed, Esq., dated Hanover, 
October 14th, 1756, there is a further reference to this fort. 
The letter is addressed to Edward Shippen, Esq., a prominent 
citizen and member of the provincial council. As the letter 
gives an account of those gloomy times, the whole of it will be 
interesting. It was intended for the public eye. 

"Friends and Fellow Subjects — 

I send you in a few lines the melancholy condition of the fron- 
tiers of this country. Last Thursday, the 12th inst., ten Indians 
came on Noah Frederick, while ploughing, killed and scalped him. 
and carried away three of his children that were with him — ^the 
eldest but nine years old — and plundered his house and carried 
away everything that suited their purpose, such as clothes, bread, 
butter, a saddle, and a good rifle gun, Ac.; it being but two short 



31 

miles to Captain Smith's Fort at Swatara Gap, and a little better 
than two miles from my house. 

Last Saturday evening an Indian came to the house of Philip 
Robinson, carrying a green bush before him — said Robinson's son 
being on the corner of his fort watching others that were dress- 
ing flesh by him — the Indian, perceiving that he was observed, 
fled, the watchman fired but missed him; this being but three- 
fourths of a mile from Manada Fort. And yesterday morning, 
two miles from Smith's Fort, at Swatara, in Bethel township, 
as Jacob Farnwal was going from the house of Jacob Meylin to 
his own, he was fired upon by two Indians and wounded, but 
escaped with his life; and a little after, in said township, as Fred- 
erick Henley and Peter Sample were earring away their goods in 
wagons, they were met by a parcel of Indians and all killed, lying 
dead in one place, and one man at a little distance. But what 
more has been done has not come to my ears, only that the 
Indians were continuing their murders. The frontiers are em- 
ployed in nothing but carrying off their effects, so that some 
miles are now waste. We are willing, but not able without help; 
you are able, if you are willing, that Is, including the lower parts 
of the county, to give such assistance as will enable us to recover 
our waste land. Tou may depend upon it, that without assistance, 
we in a few days will be on the wrong side of you, for I am now 
on the frontier, and I fear that by to-morrow night I will be left 
two miles. Gentlemen, consider what you will do, and don't be long 
about it, and let not the world say, that we died as fools died. 
Our hands are not tied, but let us exert ourselves and do some- 
thing for the honor of our country and the preservation of our 
fellow subjects. I hope you will communicate our grievances to 
the lower parts of our country, for surely they will send us help 
if they understood our grievances. I would have gone down my- 
self but dare not, my family is in such danger. I expect an answer 
by the bearer, if possible. I am, gentlemen. 

Your very humble servant, 

Adam Reed. 

P. S. — Before sending this away I would mention, I have just 
received information that there are seven killed and five children 
scalped alive, but have not the account of their names.' 



f> 



Other incidental references are made to this fort. George 
Bobinson had removed to the west side of the Kittochtinny 
mountain, some twenty miles from the river, and with a few 
others had begun a settlement there. A fort for the protection 
of the neighborhood was erected on his farm at Sherman's 



32 

creek. There was also a fort still farther to the south on the 
Conocoeheague which was somewhat famous in its day for the 
part it hore in the Indian wars. It was known as McCord's 
Fort, and was doubtless erected on the farm of the ancestry, of 
the McCord families. Both of these forts are referred to in a 
very graphic and interesting narrative furnished by Robert 
Robinson, who was an eye-witness to many of the transactions 
related by him, and a participator in many of the most stirring 
events of the time. He says : "Sideling Hill was the first fought 
battle after Braddock's defeat. In the year 1766, a party of 
Indians came out of Conocoeheague, to a garrison of the name 
of McCord's Fort, and killed some and took a number of pris- 
oners.^' We learn elsewhere that this was in April of 1756, and 
that twenty-seven persons were killed or captured. Among the 
captured was Ann McCord, wife of John McCord. She was re- 
taken from the Indians about five months later, at the cele- 
brated battle of Kittanning, in September, 1756. Robinson 
goes on in his narrative to tell us, that after the capture of 
McCord's Fort the Indians took their course near to Fort Lit- 
tleton, where Captain Hamilton was stationed with a company^ 
and that he hearing of their presence marched forth with his 
company of men to meet them, guided by a friendly Indian. 
"This Indian led the company and came on the tracks of the 
Indians and followed them to Sideling Hill, where they found 
them with their prisoners, and having the first fire, but without 
doing much damage. The Indians returned the fire, defeated 
our men and killed a number of them. My brother, James 
Robinson, was among the slain. The Indians had McCord's 
wife with them. They cut oflf Mr. James Blair's head and 
threw it into Mrs. McCord's lap, saying it was her husband's 
head; but she knew it to be Blair's." 

Indian outrages in Sherman's Valley began in the early part 
of the year 1756. Rev. Thomas Barton writes thus of murders 
committed by the Indians in January of that year on the 
Juniata, and on Sherman's creek: 

"Within three miles of Patterson's Fort waa found Adam Nich- 
olson and his wife, dead and scalped, his two sons and a daughter 
are carried oif; William Wllcock and his wife dead and scalped; 



33 

Hugh Mitcheltree, and a son of said Nicholson, dead and scalped, 
with many children. In all about seventeen. The same day, one 
Sheridan, a Quaker, his wife, three children and a servant, were 
killed and scalped, together with one William Hamilton and his 
wife, his daughter, and one Frenchman, within ten miles of Car- 
lisle, a little beyond Stephen's Gap. It is dismal, sir, to see the 
distresses of the people; women and children screaming and la- 
menting, men's hearts falling them for fear under all the anguish 
of despair. The inhabitants over the hills (the Kittochtinny) are 
entirely fleeing, so that in two or three days the North mountain 
will be the frontier. Industry droops and all sorts of work seem 
at an end. In short, sir, it appears as if this part of the country 
had breathed its last. We expect nothing but death and ruin every 
night." 

The people between Carlisle and the Kittochtinny left their 
houses and iied to the town or gathered into little forts. The 
people were in perpetual danger, not knowing at what moment 
the blow might fall. It is said of George Eobinson, that while 
out in his fields ploughing an alarm was given that the Indians 
were close at hand. He instantlv detached his horses from the 
plough, placed his wife on one, "with her child, an infant of 
three days, in her arms, and mounting the other they fled over 
the Kittochtinny mountains to Carlisle, a distance of nearly 
twenty miles. A few of the inhabitants of Sherman's Valley 
combined for their protection and erected a fort on the farm of 
George Bobinson. While the great majority fled to the east of 
the mountains, these determined to abide, defend themselves, 
and secure their harvests. The Indians, finding them on their 
guard and disposed to fight, passed to the east of the Kittoch- 
tinny, and began their work of slaughter there. Robert Bobin- 
son, from whose very interesting narrative quotations have al- 
ready been made, says that in 1756 "the whole of the inhabi- 
tants of Shearman's Valley was gathered to a fort at George 
Robinson's, except the Woolcomber family, who would not leave 
home. Woolcomber said it was the Irish who were killing one 
another, these peaceable people, the Indians, would not hurt 
any person. Being at home and at dinner, the Indians came in 
and the Quaker asked them to come in and eat dinner; an In- 
dian answered that he did not come to eat, but for scalps; the 
son, a boy of fourteen or fifteen years of age, when he heard the 
3 



34 

Indian say so, repaired to the back door, and as he went out he 
looked back and saw the Indian strike the tomahawk into hig 
father's head. The boy then ran over the creek which was near 
to the house, and heard the screams of his mother, sisters, and 
brothers. The boy came to our fort and gave us the alann, and 
about forty went to where the murder was done and buried the 
dead. In July, 1756, the Indians waylaid our fort in harvest 
time, and kept quiet until the reapers were gone; James Wilson 
remaining some time behind the rest, and I not being gone to 
my business, which was hunting deer for the rest of the com- 
pany, Wilson standing at the fort gate, I desired liberty to 
shoot his gun at a mark, upon which he gave me the gun and 
I shot. The Indians on the upper side of the fort thinking 
they were discovered, rushed on a daughter of Robert Miller 
and instantly killed her, and shot at John Simmeson. They 
then made the best they could and killed the wife of James Wil- 
son and the widow Gibson, and took Hugh Gibson and Betsey 
Henry prisoners. The reapers, being forty in number, returned 
to the fort, and the Indians made off." 

The people on the frontiers were at length compelled to flee. 
Many left their harvests unreaped, their houses and bams to 
the merciless destroyers, and saw them in flames as they fled. 
Others remained and went into their harvest fields in armed 
bands, and put their pickets on guard while they reaped. Many 
were surprised and massacred while thus engaged. The attacks 
were often so sudden and unexpected that our brave forefathers 
were unmanned by them, and overpowered by numbers smaller 
than they. At Manada Gap, near Philip Robinson's fort, a 
company of ten men were to cut some grain near by. They set 
guards and fell to work, but three Indians, creeping up unob- 
served to the fence, "fired upon them and killed two, wounded 
a third, and leaped over the fence in among the reapers. They 
all ran promiscuously, while the Indians were making a terrible 
halloo, and looked more like the devil than Indians." Before 
the settlers could seize their guns and rally, the savages made 
off unhurt. The distress of the settlers reached its height. 
Their sufferings, alarms, and fears cannot be depicted. Sher^ 
man's Valley was at length wholly abandoned. Numerous peti- 



35 

tions were signed by the people and sent up to the Governor, 
Council, and Assembly for help against their barbarous foe. 
Xor did they flee only frora the west of the Kittoehtinny and 
the chain of forts along its gaps, but from the whole region 
west of the Susquehanna. Governor Morris, in his message to 
the Assembly, August 16th, 1756, says: "The people west of 
the Susquehanna, distressed by the frequent incursions of the 
enemy, and weakened by their great losses, are moving into the 
interior part of the province; and I am fearful that the whole 
country will be evacuated if timely and vigorous measures are 
not taken to prevent it." In the fall of 1755 the country west 
of the Susquehanna possessed three thousand men fit to bear 
arms; in August, 1756, exclusive of the provincial forces, 
there were not one hundred, fear having driven the greater part 
from their homes into the interior. They were too widely 
scattered in their settlements to combine in large force, too 
poorly provided with arms and ammunition, and in too great 
need of the harvest they were forced to leave perishing in the 
fields, to remain near the frontiers. Not only were our ances- 
tors who had ventured west of the Susquehanna and the Kit- 
toehtinny compelled to flee and leave all to the mercy of the 
savages, but in the tax collector's list of one hundred families 
who fled from their houses in Old Hanover township, east of 
the Susquehanna, in 1756, we find the names of several of the 
McCords and Eobinsons, and of other families with whom they 
had intermarried. 

At length, by the exertions of the celebrated Benjamin 
Franklin, a militia law was passed that encouraged and pro- 
tected the people in arming for defence. Franklin himself was 
prevailed upon to take charge of the frontier, then so infested 
by the enemy. Full powers were given him to commission such 
officers as he thought proper. With but little difficulty a force 
of five hundred and sixty men was raised. The military spirit 
revived among the people. Encouraged by the government and 
supplied with ammunition, our fathers armed in their own de- 
fence and organized into companies. They were educated by 
the stirring dangers around them, and became the equal of the 
Indian in cunning. In the rough schooling of war with a 



36 

stealthy and unforgiving foe, they gained something of his 
wild and daring spirit, his iron endurance, his unfaltering 
courage, and his sagacity. They could hunt as well, deceive 
and entrap as well. They could thread the trackless depths of 
the forest as well, guiding their course by the stars and winds, 
the streams and trees. And where there was any approach to 
an equality of numbers, they could fight better than their wily 
foe. The Indians, seeing that the colonists were arming so 
generally and determinedly, began to draw off from the borders 
to the securer retreats of the wilderness; and now the white 
man took the offensive aAd pursued them. John Armstrong, 
of Cumberland county, a man famed as inheriting the valor 
and persistency of the Scottish Covenanters, at the head of 
three hundred Presbyterians, most of them, like himself, of 
Scotch-Irish origin, his own friends and neighbors, pushed out 
boldly into the forest, crossed the AUeghenies, and after a 
wearisome march of nearly a week, and at the close of their last 
day^s march of thirty miles in the forest, were guided by the 
whoop of the Indians in their war-dance to the Indian village 
of Kittanning, a few miles above the present site of Pittsburg. 
This was the headquarters of their enemy. They quietly sur- 
rounded the town, and at day-break assaulted it, captured and 
burned it to ashes, killed or put to flight the Indian warriors, 
released eleven English prisoners, among whom was one of the 
ancestors of the McCord family, destroyed a large quantity of 
powder, enough for a long war, which had been furnished to 
the Indians by their French allies, and then, guided by the 
stars and the rivulets, found their way back through the wil- 
derness undiscovered to the Susquehanna. The battle was one 
of great fierceness and carnage, and of severe loss to the assail- 
ants. Among the wounded was Robert Robinson, who had be- 
come somewhat famous among his neighbors as an Indian 
fighter. 

Pennsylvania voted honors to Armstrong and his gallant 
band, presented him with a piece of plate, ordered a medal to 
be struck in commemoration of the event, and in later years 

9 

gave the name of Armstrong to the county that includes the 
battlefield. 

The destruction of Kittanning and of the Indians who were 



37 

gathered there, was a severe blow to the savages. Such as 
escaped the carnage withdrew, and placed the French Fort 
Duquesne and the garrison there between them and the Eng- 
lish. The fury of hostility was somewhat abated. The repre- 
sentatives of ten of the Indian tribes met in council at Easton, 
in 1757, with the representatives of the colonial government, 
and a treaty of peace was signed. There was some prospect of 
quiet. Our ancestors began to return to their deserted homes 
and farms. The French and western Indians still continued to 
roam in small parties over the coimtry, committing many san- 
guinary murders and taking captive all whom they could sur- 
prise. The border settlers were kept in alarm. The war 
between France and England for the possession of the entire 
country west of the AUeghenies was still in progress, and in it 
our ancestors participated. The war was waged for five years 
with the full energy of both nations. The prize was a great 
one — the immense valley of the Mississippi. It was a period of 
great suffering and anxiety to the colonists. 

In the summer and fall of 1758 our fathers witnessed an in- 
spiriting sight. The French still held Fort Duquesne, and an 
expedition was fitted out for its capture. Brigadier General 
Joseph Forbes arrived in Pennsylvania with twelve hundred 
and fifty Highlanders from South Carolina. They were fol- 
lowed by three hundred and fifty loyal Americans, a detach- 
ment of the British army. Pennsylvania sprung anew to the 
conflict. An unusual military spirit animated the people. 
Benjamin West, afterward known as the great painter, caught 
it. Anthony Wayne, then a boy of thirteen, raised for the ex- 
pedition twenty-seven hundred men, and displayed the daring 
that rendered him in later years a terror both to Indian war- 
rior and to British regular. Colonel John Armstrong, already 
famed for his display of courage and skill at Kittanning, was 
the senior officer. Virginia sent nineteen hundred men under 
the command of their beloved Washington. This splendid 
army of nearly eight thousand men gladdened the eyes of our 
ancestors as they passed through Cumberland Valley to meet 
at the head-waters of the Ohio the combined forces of the 
French and their Indian allies, and settle by a final conflict the 



38 

destiny of that great valley which stretches from the AUe- 
ghenies to the Rocky mountains. Washington and Armstrong, 
with the hardy provincial troops, poorly fed and poorly clad, 
bearing beside their arms only a knapsack and a blanket, were 
sent in advance as pioneers. Their bold leaders so infused their 
own spirit into their followers that they thought lightly of 
hardships and dangers. When within ten miles of Fort Du- 
quesne, the frightened garrison, hearing of their approach, set 
fire to the fort in the night time, and by the light of its flames 
floated down the Ohio. Armstrong's own hand raised the Brit- 
ish flag over the ruins of the fortress, and the name of the 
place was changed to Pittsburg, in honor of William Pitt, the 
great statesman of England. The next day was observed as a 
day of public thanksgiving for success. The great world be- 
yond the mountains, the valley of the west, a vast territory, was 
secured. The English soon gained and ever after held the 
undisputed possession of the Ohio. The French were driven 
across the northern lakes into Canada. Quebec, Niagara, 
Crown Point, Montreal fell, Canada surrendered to the British 
crown, and the eventful story of French dominion in America 
came to a close. 



CHAPTER VI. 



Renewal ot Indian Wah. 

The French and English war over, our fathers hoped now 
for a long and undisturbed peace. The French were driven 
from the continent. It was thought that the Indian tribes 
were conciliated. The valleys of the Susquehanna and of the 
Juniata began again to wear the aspect of civilized life. Cabins 
were re-built, settlers pushed their way deeper into the forests, 
and opened new farms. The militia of the middle and southern 
colonies were disbanded. The frontiers seemed to need protec- 
tion no longer, but the security of our fathers was doomed to 
be speedily and terribly broken up. 

The Indians beheld their old allies the French driven out of 
the whole country, yet scarcely had they received the rich 
presents that accompanied the treaty of peace, before murmurs 
of discontent began to be audible among their tribes. A vast 
conspiracy was formed, greater, in extent, deeper and more com- 
prehensive in its design than any that before or since has been 
conceived by a North American Indian. The bloody belt of 
war was sent secretly from tribe to tribe, until everywhere, 
from the falls of Niagara and the pine-crowned crest of the 
Alleghenies to the forests of the Mississippi and the borders of 
Lakes Michigan and Superior, all the Indian nations had agreed 
to rise and attack, on the same day, the various English forts, 
which extended then nearly to the Mississippi, and having mas- 
sacred their garrisons, to turn upon the defenceless frontier 
with all their warriors, ravage and lay waste the settlements, 
until, as the Indians fondly believed, the English would be 
driven into the sea, and the whole country be restored to its 
original owners. Pontiac, the colossal chief of the North- West, 
was the mighty spirit of this formidable conspiracy. The prep- 
arations for war were kept profoundly secret. Hatred of the 



40 

English was excited to the highest pitch by stories of their 
rapacity and cruelty. 

Suddenly the terrible storm burst. An English party, sound- 
ing the entrance to Lake Huron, was seized and murdered. 
Seven Indians admitted into the fort at Sandusky as friends, 
in an unsuspecting moment murdered the entire garrison save 
its commander, whom they carried away a prisoner. The fort 
at the mouth of the St. Joseph was entered by Indians under 
the guise of friendship, and "in about two minutes all the gar- 
rison except three men were massacred.'* At Mackinaw, with 
similar deception, the fort was seized, and all were murdered 
or borne away prisoners. The forts and garrisons at Lafayette, 
Indiana, and at Presque Isle, met the same horrible fate. Fort 
Le Boeuf, on the head-waters of the Allegheny, was attacked, 
but in the night the commander and garrison escaped secretly 
into the woods, while the Indians believed them all buried in 
the flames of the burning fort. As the fugitives, on their way 
to Fort Pitt, passed Venango, they saw nothing but ruins. The 
fort at that place was consumed, and not one of its garrison 
was left alive to tell the story of its destruction. Eight hag- 
gard and half -famished soldiers, dying from fright and exhaus- 
tion, the remnant of the men who escaped from Le Boeuf, stag- 
gered to the walls of Fort Pitt, bringing news of the coming 
tide of savages. Nor was it the forts and garrisons stock- 
ades only that encountered the fury of the aroused savages. 
They roamed the wilderness massacreing all whom they met. 
More than one hundred traders were met in the woods, struck 
down, and every one of them scalped, their bodies horribly 
mutilated, and their life-blood quaffed in savage glee. They 
laid siege to Fort Pitt. Other bodies of Indians passed east- 
ward to Fort Ligonier, at the western foot of the Alleghenies, 
attacked it with great fury and pertinacity, but were beaten off 
after a hard day's fighting. 

Bumors of these disasters and of the coming foe reached the 
country east of the mountains. At first, some trader or hunter 
would come in from the forest, weak and emaciated, and relate 
how his companions had been butchered and he alone had 
escaped; next vague rumors of forts taken and garrisons 



41 

slaughtered; then reports of every frontier post captured and 
every soldier killed. On Sunday, July 3d, 1763, a soldier riding 
express from Fort Pitt galloped into Carlisle and alighted to 
water his horse at a well in the center of the place. A crowd 
of countrymen were instantly about him to hear the news. 
^Tresque Isle, Le Boeuf, and Venango are taken, and the In- 
dians will be here soon," he cried, and remounting his horse in 
haste, he rode on to make his report at the camp of Colonel 
Boquet, who was raising a force for defence. All was con- 
sternation and excitement. Messengers hastened out every- 
where with the fearful tidings. Every pathway and road 
leading into Carlisle was filled with the flying settlers flocking 
thither for refuge. Close upon these tidings came the enemy 
himself. They passed the mountains, menaced Fort Augusta, 
and killed several men in the vicinity of Fort Bedford. The 
Indian war parties at length broke out of the woods like gangs 
of hungry wolves, murdering, burning, and laying waste on 
every hand, while hundreds of terror-stricken families aban- 
doning their homes fled for refuge toward the older settle- 
ments. Outrages were perpetrated and sufferings endured 
which defy all attempts at description. Along the western 
frontiers of Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia, terror 
reigned supreme. Indian scalping parties were ranging every- 
where, laying waste the settlements, destroying the harvests, 
and butchering men, women and children with ruthless fury. 
The refugees from the most remote settlements brought tales 
of inconceivable horror. Strong parties of armed men who 
went out to reconnoitre the country found every habitation 
reduced to cinders and the half-burned bodies of the inmates 
lying among the smouldering ruins, while here and there was 
seen some miserable wretch scalped and tomahawked, but still 
alive and conscious. Those of our ancestry who had settled 
west of the Kittochtinny were compelled to flee. Others fled 
from the sight of their own blazing homes and slaughtered 
families. A party who had armed themselves and gone forth 
to warn the living and bury the dead, on reaching Sherman's 
Valley found the fields laid waste, the stacked wheat on fire, and 
the houses yet in flames, while they grew sick with horror at 
seeing a group of hogs tearing and devouring the bodies of the 



42 

dead. Columns of smoke rising among the surroimding moun- 
tains proclaimed the work of destruction. Nothing could ex- 
ceed the terror that prevailed. The roads were covered with 
women and children fleeing to Lancaster and Philadelphia. 
The fierce barbarians prowled around the cabins of the fron- 
tiersmen^ and their tomahawks struck alike the laborer in the 
field and the child in the cradle. The wretched inhabitants 
whom they surprised at night, or at their meals, or by the way- 
side, were massacred with the utmost barbarity. 

Letters written at the time and published in the Pennsylva- 
nia Oazette, give detailed accounts of these sad events. Those 
who remained at their homes to brave the dangers and gather 
their crops, bade each other farewell each night on retiring to 
rest, not knowing the moment when they might be surprised 
and massacred. A party or six men, assembled for reaping the 
harvest, were seated at dinner at the house of Robert Campbell, 
a settler on the Juniata. A company of Indians suddenly burst 
in upon them. But one of them, George Dodd, escaped to tell 
the tale of death. The same day four men and a lad were at 
the house of William White, a neighbor of Campbell's, when 
the savages rushed upon them; one only of them, breaking a 
hole through the roof, escaped, the others were slain and con- 
sumed in the burning house. The enemy entered the house of 
Alexander Logan,* in Sherman's Valley, murdered him and his 
son, and a couple of other men a short distance away, rifled the 
house, and fled. They came to the house of William Anderson, 
an old man, killed him as with the Bible in his hand he was 

^Alexander Logan was a neighbor and friend of George Robin- 
son . of Sherman's Valley, on whose farm was built the celebrated 
fort, already mentioned, known as Robinson's Fort. A year be- 
fore his death by the Indians he had, by his will, made George 
Robinson the executor of his estate and the g^uardian of his chil- 
dren. Three of the children of George Robinson married members 
of the Logan family, which seems to have been a large and promi- 
nent one. The families removed to Kentucky together, settling 
near the present site of Lexington, and became numerous and in- 
fluential in that region and in Southern Illinois. 

Rev. Samuel C. Logan, D. D., of Scranton, Pa., well known in 
the Presbyterian Church, is a descendant of Alexander Logan. 



43 

engaged in family worship, and with him his son and a girl 
that had been brought up from a child by the old people. A 
schoolmaster and ten small children were surprised in a school- 
house, scalped, and left for dead; one, a boy of ten, survived 
his injuries. Parties were formed to go forth in search of the 
savages, and the most desperate conflicts ensued. The in- 
habitants of Sherman's Valley and of the whole region beyond 
the Kittochtinny were forced to flee and leave their houses, 
their cattle, their harvest waving in the fields, and destitute of 
the necessaries of life cast themselves on public charity. 

Overwhelmed with sorrows, parts only of fanulies, widows 
mourning for their husbands, mothers mourning for sons, with- 
out shelter, without means of subsistence or of transportation, 
their tardy flight impeded by crying children, by the weary, the 
faint, and the sick, they presented a spectacle to move the hard- 
est heart. Nearly five hundred families fled from the frontiers 
of Maryland and Virginia to Winchester, and, unable to find 
so much as a hovel to shelter them, and bare of every com- 
fort, were forced to lie scattered through the woods. Carlisle 
and Shippensburg became barrier towns, and the inhabitants 
opened their hearts and homes to their afflicted brethren. 
Every stable and hovel was crowded with the miserable refu- 
gees who had suddenly been reduced from independence to 
beggary and despair, and had become the objects of charity and 
commiseration. Multitudes who were unable to find shelter in 
the towns encamped in the woods, or on the adjacent fields, 
and along both banks of the Susquehanna for miles erected 
their huts of branches and bark, and lived on such charity as 
the slender means of the people could supply. Passing among 
them one would have witnessed every form of human misery. 
In these wretched encampments were men, women, and chil- 
dren, bereft at one stroke of home, of friends, and of all earthly 
possessions. A writer of the times says, "It is most dismal to 
see the streets filled with people in whose countenances might 
be discovered a mixture of grief, madness and despair, and to 
hear now and then the sighs and groans of men, the discon- 
solate lamentations of women, and the screams of children, who 
had lost their nearest and dearest relatives.'* Some stood 



44 

aghast and bewildered at the fatal blow, others sunk down in 
the apathy of despair, others wept and moaned with irrepres- 
sible anguish. Some filled with the craven passion of fear, 
heightened by the horrors they had witnessed, were day and 
night haunted with visions of the bloody knife and reeking 
scalp, while in others all other emotions and all their faculties 
were absorbed with the burning thirst for vengeance and a 
mortal hatred of the whole Indian race. William Bobinson, 
one of three brothers who were of a party of twelve scouts, as 
he lay weltering in his blood in his last agonies, handed his 
gun to Charles Elliott, a comrade, saying, "Take my gun, and 
peace or war, wherever you see an Indian kill him for my sake 
and I shall be satisfied.'* Page after page might be written 
giving details in the horrible monotony of havoc and blood with 
which our ancestors were sadly familiar. The country was 
filled with the wildest dismay, and the people fled by thousands 
and crowded in upon the older settlements. Entire districts 
were depopulated and the progress of the country put back for 
years. The small and scattered settlements were involved in a 
general destruction. The ranging parties, who visited these 
scenes of desolation, often discovered in the depths of the 
forest the half-consumed bodies of men and women still bound 
fast to the trees, where they had perished amid fiery tortures. 
Cumberland county, which at that time formed the western 
frontier of Pennsylvania, was almost exclusively occupied by 
the descendants of that numerous and thrifty colony of Scotch 
who for many years had occupied the north of Ireland. In 
religious faith they were staunch and zealous defenders of Pres- 
byterianism. Their religious tenets made them somewhat 
stern in temper and demeanor, and their experience in border 
strifes gave them many of the peculiar traits of the American 
back- woodsmen. And now, though at first overwhelmed by the 
unparalleled fury of the war that fell upon them and laid waste 
the country for hundreds of miles with fire and steel, they 
soon rallied, formed numerous war parties, and acquitted them- 
selves with admirable spirit in their own defence. The veteran 
Colonel John Armstrong raised three hundred men, the best 
in Cumberland county, and entered boldly into the strife. The 



45 

march of Colonel Boquet and the victory of Bushy Bun, some 
twenty-five miles from Fort Pitt, dispirited the Indian war- 
riors, caused a temporary lull in the storm, and encouraged 
some of the bolder inhabitants to return to their deserted 
farms and make preparation for defence. These raised among 
themselves a small body of riflemen, who were placed under 
the command of Colonel James Smith, a man of most daring 
and resolute character and of great popularity and influence. 
He trained his men in Indian tactics and discipline, directed 
them to assume the dress of warriors and paint their faces red 
and black, so that in appearance they were hardly distin- 
guishable from the enemy. Thus equipped they scoured the 
woods in front of the settlements, had repeated skirmishes with 
the enemy, and so protected the settlers that they were not 
again driven from their homes. Nearly two thousand persons 
had been killed or carried ofiE and nearly an equal number of 
families driven from their farms. 

Eev. John Elder, minister of the Presbyterian congrega- 
tion of Paxton, was famous not only as a divine but as an able 
military leader. He was put in command of troops formed 
from his own congregation and adjacent settlements, and was 
very efficient in preserving the inhabitants from the incursions 
of the savages. From the rough pulpit of his little church,* 
which is still standing a couple of miles from the city of Har- 
risburg, he often preached to an assembly of armed men, while 
sentinels and scouts were stationed without to give warning 
of the enemy's approach. On one occasion a body of Indians 
approached the little church on Sunday and sent forward one 
of their number, whom the settlers supposed to be a friend, to 
reconnoitre. The spy reported that every man in the church, 
including the preacher, had a rifle at his side, upon which the 
enemy withdrew, after setting fire to a few houses in the neigh- 
borhood. 

The expedition of Colonel Boquet, to which reference has 
been made above, took place in 1764. In August of that year 
he set out from Carlisle with a force of five hundred regulars, 
one thousand Pennsylvanians, and a small corps of Virginia 
riflemen, determined to follow the enemy to their own country 



46 

deep in the western forests and there compel a lasting peace. 
Numerous delays occurred, so that the army reached Fort Pitt 
only by the 17th of September. The Indians had taken the 
precaution to remove all their settlements to the western side 
of the river Muskingum, trusting that the forests and numer- 
ous streams would be an effectual barrier against all invasions. 
There they left their women and children, while they sallied 
forth to fall with merciless barbarity on the English settle- 
ments. The Indians, hearing of the expedition, sent spies and 
pretended embassies to retard it until winter should make it 
impossible to proceed. Early in October the troops left Fort 
Pitt and began their westward march into a wilderness which 
no army had ever before sought to penetrate. The progress 
w^as exceedingly difficult, and rarely exceeded more than seven 
or eight miles a day. In ten days they reached the Muskingum, 
having met no interruption. The Indian cabins they passed 
on their way were deserted by their tenants. The wigwams 
of more than a hundred families of the Tuscaroras were aban- 
doned, the inhabitants having fled in terror at the approach 
of the invaders. The army had reached the heart of the ene- 
my's country. The Indian warriors saw they were in the power 
of Boquet and reluctantly sued for peace. Twelve days were 
granted them to deliver up all prisoners in their hands, with- 
out exception — Englishmen, Frenchmen, women and children, 
whom they were to furnish with clothing, provisions, and 
horses to carry them .to Fort Pitt. They hastened to fulfill the 
conditions, dispersing to their different villages to collect and 
bring in the prisoners. Band after band of captives arrived, 
until upward of two hundred were collected in the camp of 
Boquet. 

In the ranks of the Pennsylvania troops and among the Vir- 
ginia riflemen, were the fathers, brothers, and husbands of 
those whose rescue from captivity was a chief object of the 
march. Ignorant of what had befallen them, and doubtful 
whether they were yet among the living, these men had joined 
the army in the feverish hope of winning them back to home 
and civilization. There were instances in which whole families 
had been carried off. Many who had been taken captive had 
perished by the torments of the stake, or by the more merciful 



47 

hatchet. The old, the sick, or the despairing had been toma- 
hawked as useless incumbrances, while others, pitilessly forced 
asunder, had been adopted into Indian families as sons, daugh- 
ters, and wives. It was a strange and moving sight, the tender- 
est ever witnessed in that deep wilderness, as troop after troop 
of prisoners arrived in succession — the meeting of husbands 
and wives, of fathers and children, of sisters and brothers, the 
reunion of broken families, after a sorrowful captivity. Among 
those brought in for surrender were children, who, captured 
several years before, had lost every recollection of friends and 
home, and who screamed and struggled violently when they 
were consigned to the hands of their relatives. They had 
learned to love their savage friends and their customs. There 
were also young men who had been so long among the savages 
as to become enamored of the wild forest life; and young wo- 
men, who had become enamored of the wild forest life; and 
young women, who had become the partners of Indian hus- 
bands, to whom they had given a woman's love. It was with 
extreme difficulty that they were persuaded to return to civ- 
ilized society. Many of them were borne back by force. Sev- 
eral made their escape, and eagerly hastened back to their 
warrior husbands and all the toils of an Indian wigwam. 
Numerous affecting incidents of this nature are on record. 
Xo arguments, no entreaties, no tears of friends and relatives 
could persuade some to leave their Indian friends and ac- 
quaintances, and it became necessary to bind them fast to pre- 
vent their escape. Some who were brought home in a little 
time grew tired of civilized life and ran away to the Indians. 
Nor were the Indians themselves unmoved by these scenes. 
Their women ran wailing through the camp, and at night 
made the hills and woods resound with their bitter cries. The 
warriors scorned to betray any tender feelings, and neither by 
tears, words, nor looks betrayed how deeply they were affected. 
Yet, by kindness and attention to the wants of the captives, 
by offers of furs, garments, and choicest articles of food, they 
displayed their true sorrow over separation from their adopted 
children. Some asked permission to follow the army on its 
homeward march, that they might hunt for the captives and 
supply all their wants. A young Seneca warrior, who had 



48 

taken as his wife a Virginia girl, at great risk of his life fol- 
lowed the army far within the settlements, and, at every night^s 
encampment, approached as closely the quarters of the captives 
as the sentinels would permit, and there patiently watched to 
catch a glimpse of his lost mistress. When the army, on its 
homeward march, reached the town of Carlisle, people met 
them there in great numbers to inquire for the friends they 
had lost. Women frantic with hope and fear rushed hither 
and thither searching for lost children. Many were doomed to 
disappointment. Others found their children grown as wild 
and swarthy as the savages themselves. 

After the expedition of Boquet, Indian troubles nearly 
ceased. The inhabitants now returned to their desolated farms, 
applied themselves with new energy and courage, rebuilt their 
dwellings, prepared their fields for crops of grain, and raised 
anew in the valleys so fiercely ravaged by war, the school-house 
and the church. Thus after eight years and more of savage 
warfare, during which three-fourths of the inhabitants of the 
Cumberland Valley were compelled to seek shelter and safety in 
the eastern parts of Lancaster and York counties, peace re- 
turned, congregations assembled again for worship, pastors 
were again called and installed over the Presbyterian congre- 
gations of the valley. The ravages of that terrible war can 
hardly be imagined. Indian warriors estimated that in the first 
years of it they had killed fifty whites for one Indian that was 
killed, and in after years when the white inhabitants better 
understood their modes of warfare, they still killed ten whites 
for one Indian slain by the settlers. This great disparity arose 
from the slaughter by the Indians of women and children, for 
whose scalps their French allies offered liberal rewards. Many 
losing all hope of security and quiet in that part of the country 
left it permanently. Eev. Eichard Sankey, the pastor of the 
Hanover congregation, with a large part of his charge removed 
in 1764 into the valley of Virginia, below Staunton, and there 
formed a new settlement and church. Several of our own an^ 
cestors went thither. Large portions of Virginia, especially the 
beautiful valley of the Shenandoah, and parts of North and. 



49 

South Carolina, were settled by the Scotch-Irish who emigrated 
thither from central Pennsylvania. / 

After the cessation of the Indian struggles, the settlements 
along the Susquehanna progressed rapidly in population and 
improvement. The frontiers extended westward year by year, 
the Scotch-Irish in all cases being the pioneers. Events were 
transpiring of exciting interest about the close of the Indian 
war and immediately subsequent, such as the murder of the 
Conestoga Indians by the *Taxton Boys/* the lawless and riot- 
ous proceedings near Fort Loudon, in which some of the in- 
habitants of . Cumberland Valley participated; and the rescue 
by a mob, from the jail at Carlisle, of Stump and Ironcutter, 
two Germans who were there confined on the charge of mur- 
dering ten Indians — ^four men, three women, and three chil- 
dren. These events all sprung out of the fearful wars in which 
these settlers were involved for nine years. They were exas- 
perated to excess by the inhuman barbarities they suflfered 
from their treacherous enemies; and having reason to believe 
that a body of professedly friendly Indians, resident at Cone- 
stoga, were guilty of perfidy, and gave information ta the hos- 
tile Indians, a number of men from Paxton and Donegal 
attacked their little village, murdered all who were at their 
homes and burned their dwellings; and a few days later pro- 
ceeded to Lancaster, forced open the doors of the prison where 
the remainder had been placed for safe-keeping, and inhumanly 
despatched them all. The entire nimiber thus murdered in 
cold blood was twenty, six men, five women, and nine children. 
It was a savage deed, but the hearts of men whose families 
were massacred, scalped, or driven from their homes, were 
stung with a madness that would not listen to reason. It was 
a tragedy performed by a few men who were excited by the 
mangled bodies of wives and children on the frontier, and who 
believed these Conestoga Indians to be aiders and abettors of 
the general massacres. 

The proceedings at Fort Loudon were the seizure and de- 
struction of the goods of certain Indian traders, and the sub- 
sequent release by force from Fort Loudon of a number of the 
Inhabitants who had been confined there. An act of Assembly 
prohibited the selling of guns, powder, and other warlike stores 
4 



50 

to the Indians, but a company of vicious, lawless, and profli- 
gate traders, moved only by hopes of personal gain, set aside 
the law, and as the government, then largely under the control 
of Quakers, who were disposed to be friendly to the Indians and 
hostile to the Presbyterians of the frontier, did not interpose, 
the inhabitants were compelled to defend themselves, and to 
prevent by violent measures the transit of military stores to 
their enemies. They found among the goods siezed and burned 
by them blankets, lead, tomahawks, scalping knives, and gun- 
powder. They were fully justified, when they weighed the 
blood and lives and property of the inhabitants of that region 
Against the value of the property destroyed, in promptly seiz- 
ing and violently destroying it, and warning traders to cease 
the inhuman traffic. 

Of the guilt of the Germans, Stump and Ironcutter, in the 
unprovoked murder of ten peaceable Indians, there was no 
doubt. They were rescued from jail and set at liberty, not 
because public opinion justified their barbarous deed, but be- 
•cause the warrant for their removal and trial at Philadelphia 
was regarded as an encroachment on the right of a citizen 
to be tried by a jury of his countrymen in the county where 
the crime was committed. It was feared if they were allowed 
to be removed to Philadelphia it might be used as a precedent 
for the removal of innocent men for a trial in a distant juris- 
diction. A party of Stump^s friends from Sherman^s Valley 
was joined by others, until they amounted to about seventy, 
.and being well armed, they appeared at Carlisle jail at an early 
liour of the day, surprised the keeper, gained admittance, and 
:soon bore away the murderers. The rioters were pursued by 
Colonel Armstrong, the sheriff of the county, William Lyon, 
Bev. Mr. Steel, pastor of the Presbyterian church, Ephraim 
Blaine, and others, but without success. The murderers escaped 
to Virginia and no further intelligence of them was heard. 
Ephraim Blaine, of whom mention is here made, was one of the 
ancestors of the Blaine family, who became quite distinguished 
during the war of the Revolution, and to whom further refer- 
ences will be made. 



CHAPTER VII. 



Our Ancestry and the Ebvolution. 

The history and traditional memories of the Scotch-Irish 
people, and the principles of reUgious and political liberiy 
which had found a home in their breasts for generations pre- 
pared them for the great conflict of the Revolution. The 
causes were many why their patriotism should have been bo 
earnest and universal in the war with England. They had 
learned in the past to distrust the mother country and to dis- 
like her methods of government. They recalled their griev- 
ances in their homes across the sea. Many of them had fled 
from the burden of oppressive laws and religious persecution. 
The memory of old wrongs was kept alive by the continued 
arrivals of friends from abroad, who sought, as they had done, 
a home where they might enjoy and transmit to their children 
the blessings of a liberal civil government and of a church free 
from unjust restrictions. They could not hesitate when the 
strife between the colonies and the mother country arose. The 
peril to their civil rights and religious freedom made them 
ardent and steadfast patriots. History accords to them a pe- 
culiar honor in the great contest for the independence of this 
country. Mr. Adolphus in his work on The Reign of Oeorge III, 
says, *^The first effort toward a union of interest was made by 
the Presbyterians.*' Mr. Galloway, a prominent advocate of 
the government, in 1774 ascribed the revolt and revolution 
mainly to the action of the Presbyterian clergy and laity as 
early as 1764. Another writer of the same period says, *Trou 
will have discovered that I am no friend to the Presbyterians, 
and that I fix all the blame of these extraordinary proceedings 
upon them.*' Rev. Dr. Elliott, the editor of the western organ 
of the Methodist church, in answer to an assailant of the Pres- 
byterians, says : *T?he Presbyterians, of every class, were prom- 
inent, and even foremost, in achieving the liberties of the 



52 

United States, and they have been all along the leading sup- 
porters of the constitution, law, and good order/' Multiplied 
testimony of similar import could be largely quoted. Our 
Scotch-Irish ancestors ere the war broke out gathered in public 
assemblies here and there through the land and gave their 
clear and positive testimony against the demands of the Eng- 
lish government and in favor of a sturdy resistance. They 
were ripe for revolution. 

As early as the spring of 1774 meetings were held in the 
different townships along the Susquehanna. The earliest of 
those whose record is preserved was that of an assembly of the 
inhabitants of Hanover in the upper part of Lancaster county, 
now Dauphin, held on Saturday, June 4, 1774, Col. Timothy 
Green, chairman, *Ho express their sentiments on the present 
critical state of affairs.^' It was then and there '^unanimously 
resolved^' : 

1st. That the recent action of the Parliament of Great Bri- 
tain is iniquitous and oppressive. 

2d. That it is the bounden duty of the inhabitants of Amer- 
ica to oppose every measure which tends to deprive them of 
their just prerogatives. 

3d. That in a closer union of the colonies lies the safety of 
the people. 

4th. That in the event of Great Britain attempting to force 
unjust laws upon us by strength of arms, our cause we leave 
to Heaven and our rifles. 

5th. That a committee of nine be appointed who shall act 
for us and in our behalf as emergencies may require. 

Following in the footsteps of these brave men, on the Friday 
following, June 10, 1774, a similar meeting was held at Mid- 
dletown. Col. James Burd, chairman, and like stirring resolu- 
tions were passed. 

On the 15th day of June a like meeting was held in Lancaster 
borough, and on the 12th of July a meeting was held in Carlisle 
of the freeholders and freedmen of the several townships of 
Cumberland county, strong resolutions passed, and a committee 
of thirteen (among them Ephraim Blaine, a grandsire of Hon. 
James G. Blaine) was appointed to carry out the will of the 
meeting. 



53 

Their patriotism was not expended in brave resolves. As 
Governor Penn prophesied, the inhabitants were ripe for revo- 
lution, and when the drum of battle aroused the youngest ot 
the nations, the citizens of central Pennsylvania promptly re- 
sponded to the call. Within ten days after the news of the 
battle of Bunker^s Hill had reached the province of Pennsyl- 
vania, her first rifle regiment was officered and completed, 
many of the nine companies numbering one hundred men each. 
It was commanded by Col. William Thompson, of Cumberland 
county. Of these companies two were from Cumberland coun- 
ty, two from Lancaster, one from Bedford, one from Northum- 
berland, one from York, one from Northampton, and one from 
Berks. The muster rolls of these companies show that nearly 
all the men were Scotch-Irishmen. The regiment upon its or- 
ganization at once marched to the relief of Boston, where they 
arrived about the last of Julv, a march of four hundred miles. 
They were the first companies from south of the Hudson to 
arrive in Massachusetts and excited much attention. The best 
blood of the country flowed in the veins of this pioneer body of 
patriots. 

Thatcher, in his Military Journal of the Revolution, under 
date of August, 1775, thus describes this battalion, which be- 
came, in January, 1776, the *Tirst Begiment of the United 
Colonies, commanded by General George Washington.^' 'T?hey 
are remarkably stout and hardy men : many of them exceeding 
six feet in height. They are dressed in white frocks or rifle 
shirts and round hats. These men are remarkable for the ac- 
curacy of their aim: striking a mark with great certainty at two 
hundred yards distance. At a review, a company of them, 
while on a quick advance, fired their balls into objects of seven 
inches diameter at the distance of two hundred and fifty yards. 
They are now stationed in our lines, and their shots have fre- 
quently proved fatal to British officers and soldiers who expose 
themselves to view, at even more than double the distance of 
a common musket shot.'' 

The company of Captain William Smith, of Paxtang, sub- 
sequently accompanied General Arnold in his unfortunate ex- 
pedition against Quebec. The majority of them, however, were 



54 

taken prisoners at Quebec, while a large proportion of them 
died from wounds and exposure. 

Among these earliest soldiers of the Revolutionary army were 
several of our own ancestry. Sharing in the love of civil and 
religious liberty which characterized Scotch Presbyterians of 
that day, the men of central Pennsylvania were at the front in 
the great struggle for American independence. 

Captain Thomas Bobinson commanded a company under 
Col. — afterwards Gen. — Anthony Wayne at Ticonderoga in 
1776. He was wounded at the battle of Brandywine while serv- 
ing as a major, and subsequently was promoted to the rank of 
Lieutenant Colonel, and served throughout the war. 

George Bobinson, of Sherman^s Valley, served for some time 
in the army, and the gun which he carried is still preserved and 
is in the possession of the writer of these records. 

Of the ancestors of the Blaine family. Colonel Ephraim 
Blaine, of Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, stands most dis- 
tinguished for his personal ability and for his public services 
during the period of the Bevolution. Prior to the opening of 
the Bevolutionary struggle, during the Indian wars of 1765- 
1764, we meet him in the records of that day, a prominent and 
influential man in the central part of the State. He seems to 
have been a man of large property. During the larger part of 
the Bevolutionary conflict he served as a quarter-master gen- 
eral of the army, and was largely trusted by General Washing- 
ton, who made his house his head-quarters when in Carlisle. 
His letters, which may be found in the records of the State and 
of the general government, though pertaining to the commis- 
sary supplies of the American army, prove him to have been 
a man of ability and decision. 

The following sketch of him, taken from the Washington 
(Pa.) Examiner y will be interesting to all his descendants: 

"In the third volume of the New American Encyclopedia re- 
cently issued from the press of the Messrs. Appleton, we find the 
following brief sketch of an eminent Pennsylvanian of the Revo- 
lutionary era: 

'Blaine, E^phbaih, an officer in the Revolutionary war, belonging 
to the Pennsylvania line, died at Carlisle, Penn'a., 1808. He en- 



55 

tered the army as a colonel, at the commencement of the war, 
and wajs subsequently made commissary general. His seryices 
were gallant and patriotic. He was with Washington in many 
of the most trjring scenes of the Revolution, and enjoyed the 
confidence of his chief to the fullest extent. During the "dark 
winter" at Valley Forge, the preservation of the American army 
from starvation was in a great degree owing to the exertions and 
sacrifices of Colonel Blaine.' 

It would be impossible to do Justice within a single paragraph 
to the memory and services of so gallant a soldier, so valuable 
an officer and worthy a man, as Colonel Ephraim Blaine. Living 
on his princely estate of 'Middlesex/ in the county of Cumberland, 
at the time the Revolution was inaugurated, he at once offered 
his personal services and his large means to the patriot cause. He 
was forthwith commissioned by the Continental Congress as a 
colonel, was attached to the Pennsylvania line of troops, and did 
not 'ground arms' until the contest was over and the victory won. 
It happened from the outset of his service, he was thrown much 
in contact with General Washington, and the result was a warm 
friendship between the two, which manifested itself in a cordial 
correspondence through a period of more than fifteen years — 
many of Washington's letters being still in the possession of 
Colonel Blaine's descendants. 

Owing to his own marked and meritorious services, both in 
'camp and field/ and aided perhaps by the personal friendship of 
Washington, Colonel Blaine was appointed to the very important 
post of 'Commissary General of the Northern Department,' in the 
year 1778, about the time the distinguished General Wadsworth 
was appointed to a similar rank in the Southern Department. 
In this large and most responsible sphere of duty, Colonel Blaine 
won imperishable laurels. The district over which he was made 
'Greneral of Commissariat' extended from the Maryland line north- 
ward, including Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and New 
England, and it was to his great energy and oftentimes the 
means which he had the individual and personal influence to 
command, that the 'patriot army' was kept from actual want and 
starvation. The large operations for army 'supplies' which Col- 
onel Blaine negotiated may be inferred from the fact that at 
one time, January, 1780, the Supreme Executive Council of Penn- 
sylvania drew a single warrant in his favor of one million of dollars 
to reimburse him for advances which his own exertions and his 
own means had provided, and at another time a warrant for seven 
hundred and fifty thousand was credited to him by the same au- 
thority in payment of similar negotiations. During the 'dark 
winter' at Valley Forge, the most critical and trying period per- 



56 

hapB in the whole seven years' struggle, the American army was 
left, at one time, almost entirely dependent on Colonel Blaine's 
efforts, and the faithful and heroic manner in which he discharged 
his duties at that period was always spoken of in terms of the high- 
est praise by Washington. 

Oolonel Blaine was with Washington in several of the most 
critical epochs in the long struggle for our liberties, and was 
among the most tried, true and trusted,' to the last. At the close 
of the Revolution he retired to his estate at 'Middlesex,' which 
had become greatly impaired by his long absence, though they 
were still magnificent in their extent and resources. Here he 
resided for more than a quarter of a century after the war, 
in true manorial dignity and hospitality, entertaining his numer- 
ous visitors in a style and liberality suited to his social rank and 
public position, and admirably illustrating the character of the 
Pennsylvania gentleman of the 'olden time.' It was at his house 
that President Washington and suite were entertained when they 
journeyed to the Interior of the State on that eventful expedition 
called out by the Whiskey Insurrection of the western counties 
in 1794. During Washington's presidency. Colonel Blaine spent 
many of his winters in Philadelphia, forming one member of that 
'Republican Court' which surrounded and gave eclat and dignity to 
the social rule of our first and great chief magistrate. 

Colonel Blaine's son, James Blaine, went abroad in 1791 as an 
attache to one of the American embassies, and was made a few 
years after the bearer to this country of the celebrated 'Jay's 
Treaty,' which was the cause of such an angry Congressional con- 
troversy immediately after its reception, and which resulted in 
the permanent estrangement from Washington of some who had 
been previously reckoned as among his devoted political friends. 
James Blaine, at the time of his return from Europe, was con- 
sidered to be among the most accomplished and finest looking 
gentlemen in Philadelphia — ^then the centre of fashion, elegance 
and learning on this Continent. His reputation as a model gentle- 
man was honorably sustained throughout life. He died a few 
years since in Washington county, Pennsylvcmia, whither he re- 
moved after the death of his father. It may be mentioned here 
that Colonel Blaine was one of the original members of the Penn- 
sylvania Society of the 'Cincinnati.' 

The domestic and family history of Colonel Blaine was quite as 
remarkable and interesting as his public career was honorable 
and patriotic. Shortly after the war was over he lost his wife 
who was a Miss Galbraith, of a well known Scotch family. He 
passed some years as a widower, and his second marriage was 
somewhat singular and romantic, to say the least In the town 



67 

of Carlisle, near which his estate of 'Middlesex' lay, one Judge 
Duncan was among the most prominent citizens — a man of social 
rank and high spirit, and some years the Junior of Colonel Blaine. 
A personal difficulty happened between Judge Duncan and a law- 
yer of the Cumberland county bar, named Lamberton, and the 
result was that a challenge passed and was accei^ted. The second 
of Judge Duncan was James Blaine, the son of Colonel Blaine, 
already alluded to. The issue of the duel was the instant death 
of Judge Duncan, shot with a rifle ball directly in the forehead. 
And now for the singular sequel. A few years elapsed and Col- 
onel Blaine married Judge Duncan's widow — ^the widow of the 
man for whom his son had acted second in the duel which proved 
fatal to him. This lady survived Colonel Blaine a long number of 
years, and after his death resided in Philadelphia. Her residence 
was one of the elegant mansions on Walnut street, west of 
Twelfth, and here she lived in a state of true elegance and social 
distinction until she attained the ripe age of ninety. She died as 
lately as 1850, and is buried in a family lot at LAurel Hill. 

The descendants and collateral connections of Colonel Blaine, 
in Pennsylvania, and many other parts of the Union, are quite 
numerous. In this State, the family is intimately interwoven with 
the Lyons, the Russels, the Ewings, the Alexanders, the Ander- 
sons, the Reeds, the Walkers, the Oillespies, and numerous other 
branches of the old Pennsylvania stock. The son of Colonel 
Blaine's second wife. Dr. Stephen Duncan, of Natchez, Mississippi, 
is widely known as one of the wealthiest planters of the South, 
his estate being reckoned by millions, while he wajs otherwise 
known as the most high-minded, philanthropic, and Christian of 
men. Robert J. Walker, late Governor of Kansas, and so dis- 
tinguished as a Democratic statesman, belongs to the same stock, 
being a nephew, we believe, of Colonel Blaine's wife. Hon. Samuel 
Russell, late Representative in Congress from the Bedford dis- 
trict, in this State, and Hon. A. L. Russell, late Secretary of State, 
are grand-nephews of Colonel Blaine. Hon. John H. Bwlng, for- 
mer Representative in Congress from the Washington district, 
married a granddaughter of Colonel Blaine; and Robert C. Wal- 
ker, Esq., well known in our State, and now connected with the 
Agricultural Bureau in Washington, is connected by a similar tie. 

A branch of the family is to be found in South Carolina, inter- 
married with the Wheatons, of that State; another branch is set- 
tled in New Jersey; another in Missouri; another in Iowa; and 
still another in Arkansas; while one lineal descendant, a grand- 
son of Colonel Blaine, has wandered off northward to New Eng- 
land. We allude to James O. Blaine, Esq., formerly a resident of 
this place, and a successful contributor to the Whig press, but 



58 

who now resides in Maine, and edits one of tlie leading Republican 
papers of that State. The male members of the blood bearing the 
family name are scarce. At one time, since the death of Colonel 
Blaine, he had five namesakes among his relatives, but not one 
of them now survives. The name itself, therefore, belongs to com- 
paratively few, while the blood flows in the veins of a very large 
number. 

It is interesting thus to trace out the ties of consanguinity 
which bind the present generation to the worthy and good men 
of the past We have no sympathy with that miserable and sickly 
feeling which induces a man to live on the reputation of his 
ancestry, and we have Just as little with that afTected contempt 
for a 'goodly family stock' which certain persons are in the habit 
of parading. The true feeling and true ambition should be to 
cherish a worthy pride in one's honorable ancestry by emulating 
their worthy deeds. We believe, at all events, in keeping the 
patriotic deeds of our Revolutionary heroes fresh in the remem- 
brance of posterity, and we have therefore thought that nothing 
would prove more acceptable to Pennsylvania readers than this 
brief sketch of Colonel Ephraim Blaine, of Middlesex.' 



ft 



CHAPTEE VIII. 



Family Histoby After the War of the Revolution. 

We may now gather from scattered and scanty records, and 
from tradition, some of the general history of our families from 
the latter part of the last century down to the present time. 

That hardy, freedom-loving race to which our ancestors be- 
longed, the Scotch-Irish, influenced in part by their love of ad- 
venture, and in part by the strong family, social, and religious 
ties that bound them together, constituted for several genera- 
tions the advance guard of American civilization. As the In- 
dian tribes retreated, they moved forward and took possession 
of the country. At first settling mainly in central Pennsylva- 
nia, and from thence moving westward and southward, they 
were the original settlers, in the main, of central Virginia, of 
central and western Carolina, of western Pennsylvania, of 
southern Ohio, and of large portions of Kentucky and Tennes- 
see. 

In the latter part of the eighteenth century glowing accounts 
of the beauty and richness of the valleys of the west, of cen- 
tral Kentucky, and of the country along the lakes, induced a 
rapid emigration thither. The families of our ancestry began 
to scatter very widely. Some went south into Virginia and the 
Carolinas, others west to Kentucky, and a few families departed 
at the close of the century for the shores of Lake Erie on the 
north, leaving a few to linger in the region of the Susquehanna, 
where their descendants may still be found. 

The troubles of the Indian wars that succeeded the defeat 
of Gen. Braddock in 1755 caused many of the inhabitants of 
the Cumberland Valley to seek safer and more peaceful homes. 
The congregation of Hanover, in which some of the Sobinsons 
were included, was nearly broken up. Some of the people, as 
we have seen, with their pastor, the Rev. Sichard Sankey, fled 
southward and settled in Prince Edward county, Virginia, in a 



60 

fertile region on Buffalo Creek, near the subsequently fa- 
mous field of Appomattox. No record remains of the families 
that went thither beyond the names that are frequently met in 
later history of those who are probably their descendants. 

Of the daughters of Thomas RdbinsoUy the eldest known an- 
cestor, nothing is known. Of his six sons, about the families of 
three, William^ Richard and Thomas^ very little is known. The 
first is supposed to have gone south about 1750. The second 
died in 1768, and his family of four sons and a daughter are 
supposed to have followed the tide of immigration into Virginia 
and the Carolinas. The third left descendants, but their his- 
tory is unknown. Of Samuel nothing is known beyond his tak- 
ing up land in Hanover in 1743. 

Of the family history of the remaining two brothers, Philip 

and Andrew, we are enabled to give a complete account. The 

descendants of Andrew are still to be found in small numbers 

in the region of their first settlement. The line of Philip is far 

• more widely scattered, and survives in greater numbers. 

Of Philip^s sons, the eldest, Samuel^ has left a large follow- 
ing of descendants, who may chiefiy be found in Ohio, Indiana, 
and California. The family Begister, furnished in great part 
by one of the descendants, will give most of what is known of 
them. One sister married into the line of Andrew Bobinson. 
A second married Bobert Thompson, and further knowledge of 
her family fails. 

The second son, Thomas^ married, but died without issue. 

The third son, Oeorge, settled about the middle of last cen- 
tury on Shearman^s Creek (now in Perry county, Pa.). He re- 
turned there after being driven away in the Indian war of 
1756-1763, and resided on his farm until he had reached the 
ripe age of seventy years, rearing around him a large family. 
He held a commission under George III as a magistrate, and 
was a man of note in the region and an elder in the earliest 
Presbyterian church of that section. 

Mary, his eldest child, married John Black, a worthy farmer 
of Shearman's Valley, where she spent her days in the bosom 
of a large household, dying at a good old age and greatly be- 
loved. One of her sons, Hon. James Black, was for some years 



61 

an associate judge^ and served also as a member of the State 
Legislature and a member of Congress. He married^ but left 
no issue. Samuel, another son, resided on the Juniata River, 
and left several sons and daughters. 

The daughters of Mary Bobinson Black inter-married with 
the Eamsey, Meredith, Carson, Wiseman, and Mateer families, 
but of their history nothing further is known. 

As early as 1774, before the Revolutionary war had fairly 
opened, the tide of civilization, moving westward from the At- 
lantic, approached the AUeghenies, crossed the mountain bar- 
rier, and Finley, and Boone, and Harrod, and Logan, and Knox, 
and Whiteley, and Kenton, hunters of renown, introduced into 
Kentucky the rifle, the axe, the plough, and the Bible. At- 
tracted by reports of the richness and marvelous beauty of 
that famous hunting ground of the Indians, the current of 
population rolled on, wave by wave, in rapid succession. While 
the Revolutionary guns in April, 1775, were announcing at Lex- 
ington the opening of the contest for American independence, 
the pioneer axe was resounding amid the majestic forests and 
luxuriant cane-brakes of Kentucky, in the work of rearing the 
first cabins of the wilderness. The city of Lexington is but an 
echo of that battle, having been laid out the day on which these 
veterans of the frontier received the news that the war for in- 
dependence had begun. Yet less than a score of years passed 
ere Kentucky took her place beside her sister commonwealths 
in the company of States. 

In 1785, Jonathan Robinson, whose revolutionary record is 
given on pp. 90 ff., visited this new region, selected several hun- 
dred acres of this rich soil, in the heart of the justly celebrated 
^^lue Grass'' region, and returning to Sherman's Valley re- 
moved his family at once to his new home. Other members of 
the family of George Robinson followed, and about the year 
1797 he himself, with his wife, removed thither, settling beside 
his sons and daughters near the present site of Georgetown, 
Kentucky. It was through privations incredible and perils 
thick that these missionaries in the cause of civilization laid the 
foundations of society. They left behind them all the comforts 
of a settled country, and came like pilgrims into a wilderness. 



62 

The tide of emigrants swelled into a great stream. Thousands 
of men, women and children, horses, cattle and other domestic 
animals, were seen moving westward in long procession, the men 
on foot, with the trusty gun on their shoulder, driving stock and 
leading pack-horses, and the women, some walking with pails on 
their heads, others riding with children in their laps, while 
other children were swimg in baskets on horses fastened to the 
tails of those in advance; encamping at night expecting to be 
attacked by Indians before another daybreak, subsisting often 
on stinted allowances of stale bread and meat, and happy at 
last to reach a resting place in the wilderness in some unchink- 
ed cabin which scarcely sheltered their heads. 

Eight of George Eobinson^s children, with their wives, hus- 
bands, and children, sought homes in central Kentucky, near 
the aged parents — John, Margaret^ Jonathan, Agnes, Sarah, 
Esther, Martha, and Oeorge. The youngest son, Thomas, hav- 
ing married into the McCord family, removed with two of his 
brothers-in-law to the country bordering on Lake Erie, and thus 
became widely separated from the main branches of the family. 
He left a numerous body of descendants, of whom mention will 
be made hereafter. 

Hon. James F. Robinson, the youngest son of Jonathan Rob- 
inson, furnished the following particulars of those members of 
the family who removed to Kentucky: 

^Ttfy grandfather, George Robinson, died in 1814, in the 87th 
year of his age. I was but a boy at his death, but have a per- 
fect recollection of him. He was six feet high, perfect in per- 
son, remarkably athletic and strong, fine large head, light hair, 
beautiful large blue eye, large and well developed forehead, 
with a benevolent and intellectual countenance, which was no 
counterfeit. He was a good English scholar, remarkable for 
his love of reading, especially that of the higher and more diflBl- 
cult kinds, works on law, on ethics, and the philosophy of mind. 
The copies of some of his books, such as Blackstone's Commen- 
taries, Locke on Government, Hume's History of England, the 
Spectator, Stewart's Philosophy, &c., are illustrative of his 
taste. In his neighborhood and among his acquaintances he 
stood distinguished for his safe and sound judgment. He was 



63 

a general eotinselor^ a kind of oracle to all around. He liyed 
and died a prominent and worthy member of the Presbyterian 
Chnrch^ in trath and in fact a Christian gentleman. His mem- 
ory \s cherished by all who knew him, and has been handed 
down as that of one of the worthies of his day." His son 
Jonathan greatly resembled his father in physical person and 
in the traits of his character. He had the same commanding 
bodily presence, the same high standing and influence in society 
and in the church. Both father and son were for many years 
elders in the Bethel Presbyterian church, of Scott county, Ken- 
tucky; and both the father and son, having passed their four- 
score years, died in highest honor among men, and their re- 
mains were buried by the church where they so long worshiped. 
On the tombstone of George Bobinson is to be found the fol- 
lowing inscription: 

Sacbed to the Memoby of Obobge Robinson, 

who departed this life, March 6, 1814, 

in his 87th year. 

"Of softest manner, unaffected mind, 
Lover of peace and friend of human kind. 
Go live! for Heaven's eternal rest is thine. 
Go! and exalt this mortal to divine." 

John, the eldest son of George Bobinson, married Margaret 
Logan, and, together with his brother George and his sister 
Esther, who married James Logan, John Crawford, the hus- 
band of Martha B., and James Fergus, the husband of Sarah B., 
and their families, after a few years* residence near Georgetown, 
Ky., removed in 1799 to the Cumberland river and settled near 
«ach other. Subsequently John and George removed to Illi- 
nois and leased from the United States Government the "Saline 
Lick** or extensive salt works near Shawneetown. Meeting 
with pecuniary reverses in the management of the works, the 
co-partnership was dissolved and the enterprise abandoned. 

Oeorge settled for a time at Shawneetown, where about the 
years 1807-14 he served as postmaster, justice of the peace, mail 
contractor, and deputy clerk of the county. About the year 
1814 he settled in the forks of the Wabash, and later removed 
to western Tennessee and engaged in the raising of cotton. In 



64 

1824 he was residing in West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana. One 
of his sons, George, was then residing on the Brazos river in 
Texas. He died April 20, 1825, at Tipton, Tenn., at the home 
of his son Thomas. 

John Kobinson, in company with Francis Leech, a son-in-law 
of his brother George, took a second lease of the salt works and 
secured a handsome fortune. The families of John Bobinson 
and the Logans, who were brothers-in-law, increased largely, 
and by intermarriages formed quite a tribe, of which John Bob- 
inson was the patriarch and general counselor. They continued 
under his guidance until his death at a very advanced age. At 
the termination of the second lease of the salt works, the whole 
tribe removed to the Mississippi, near New Madrid. Here John 
Bobinson lost all he had in the earthquake which overwhelmed 
so much of that country in the year 1807 or 1808. Mr. Bobin- 
son, at the time of the earthquake, sought refuge on a large log 
with his whole family, where they remained throughout the 
night. They then constructed a raft and escaped, but penni- 
less. The tribe at one time was located upon a large and beau- 
tiful tract of land in Tipton county, Tennessee, covering the 
present site of the famous Fort Pillow. The families con- 
tinued to increase so largely, that finding themselves once 
again straitened for room, they sold out their farms in Tennes- 
see, purchased lands on White river, in Arkansas, and all re- 
moved thither. Here the beloved "Patriarch*' died in 1832, 
in the eighty-fourth year of his age. 

Two other of the daughters of George Bobinson, Sr., Sarah 
and Martha, married respectively James Fergus and John Craw- 
ford. They settled in Cumberland county, in the southern part 
of Kentucky. The parents have been dead for many years, and 
the children are now unknown to the other branches of the 
original family. Mr. Crawford held for some years the position 
of judge, and seems to have been a man of standing. In 1814, 
he received from the United States government the appoint- 
ment of agent for the salt works in Illinois, and going thither 
died in a few months. James Fergus followed teaching, and 
was highly esteemed, and was for several years a member of the 



65 

Legislature. Agnes Robinson married James Fisher. They 
lived and died in Fayette county, Kentucky, leaving three chil- 
dren, Margaret, Hetty, and Molly, The first married Rev. Wil- 
liam Eainey, of the Eeformed Presbyterian Church. Hetty 
married James Logan, and Molly, William Logan. Their de- 
scendants are but partially known to the other branches of the 
family. Margaret Robinson married Samuel Logan. Both 
lived and died in Scott county, Kentucky, leaving a large family 
of children, who sold the old homestead and removed to In- 
diana, where their descendants still reside. 

Jonathan, second son of George Bobinson, married Jean 
Black, a sister of John Black, the husband of his sister Mary. 
Removing to Kentucky in 1785 he bought land near George- 
town, and erected a house, which is still standing — 1891 — a fine 
relic of the olden times, with its massive chimneys, spacious 
fire-places and hearths. Here he resided until his death in 
1834. The house afterwards became the home of his son James^ 
F. Robinson, the Governor of Kentucky. The family embraced: 
twelve children, five of whom died unmarried. 

One of the daughters, Mary, married John Snoddy Robinson,, 
a son of Samuel, and grandson of Philip Robinson, of Hanover,^ 
Pennsylvania. An account of this branch of the family will be 
found elsewhere. 

Two of the sons, Thomas and Oeorge, married sisters by the 
name of McConnell. Thomas died without issue. George lived 
and died in Henderson, Kentucky. His descendants at a later 
date were residing in New Orleans, and were among the promi- 
nent families of that city. 

Of the two remaining daughters of Jonathan Robinson, Jean 
and Anne Wiley, the former married James Dougherty, leaving 
a single daughter, Sidney Jane, who married George W. Gravea 
and had issue; and the latter married Francis R. Palmer and 
died in Independence, Missouri, December 6, 1839, leaving a 
family of several sons and daughters. 

The two youngest sons of Jonathan Robinson, John Mc- 
Cracken and James Fisher, became men of large reputation, the 
former in Illinois as a lawyer. Senator of the United States, and 
5 



66 

Judge of the Supreme Court; and the latter as a distinguished 
lawyer. State Senator and Governor of Kentucky. (See the 
Genealogical Secord.) 

The descendants of Andrew Robinson, brother of Philip and 
son of Thomas, remained more largely in the region where 
their ancestry settled in Lancaster, now Dauphin county. 
Th^y were by marriage connected largely with the families of 
other settlers. The bodies of many of them lie buried in the 
burial ground of old Derry church, famous for the last century 
and a half. They were connected with that church, several of 
them being officers in it and very highly esteemed. Through 
death and removals the family name is now nearly extinct in 
jbhat region. 



CHAPTER IX. 



The Family in Nobthekn Pennsylvania. 

We may now follow more fully those members of our ancestry 
who settled in northern Pennsylvania. In the spring of 1797 
two young men, brothers-in-law, influenced by reports of the 
beauty and richness of the country on the lakes, went thither 
to prospect for a settlement. A large part of their way, especi- 
ally from Pittsburg northward, lay through an unsettled coun- 
try. The great tide of emigration from the region of the Sus- 
quehanna, whence they came, was to the west, the famous valley 
of the Ohio. Thither went most of their own immediate rela- 
tives. They found it necessary to thread the forest, and blaze 
the trees to find their way back to their families. A few set- 
tlers had preceded them, and dwelt in different parts of the 
county — ^not then organized into the present territorial limits 
and name of Erie county, but forming a part of Allegheny 
county, which then covered all the western boundary of the 
State. These young men were Joseph McCord and Thomas 
Robinson. They spent the summer of 1797 in the new country, 
and were so pleased with it that they located their claims, began 
work in the forest, erected their cabins, and prepared a place 
of reception for their families. In the fall they returned to 
their homes in Cumberland county, and in the spring of 1798 
the following small company might have been seen on their 
way to their new homes: Joseph McCord and Elizabeth his 
wife, vrith two children, Eliza, now the wife of Colonel James 
Moorhead, and William; Thomas Robinson and Mary McCord 
his wife, with two children, William A. and Hetty, afterward 
the wife of Alvah Barr; and James McMann, his wife and one 
child. Their goods were sent by boats up the Allegheny to 
French Creek, and thence to Le Boeuf, the site of the old fort 
of the same name, now Waterford, from which point they were 
transported in wagons over the wildest of roads to their desti- 



68 

nation. Our ancestors themselves came on horseback across 
the country, a distance of between three and four himdred 
miles. The children, then of the tenderest age, were borne in 
the arms of their parents. Two years later, in 1800, Alexander 
T. Blaine, his wife Kosanna McCord, and one child, Margaret, 
afterward the wife of Mr. James Mills, and John M^Cord and 
afterward the wife of Eev. James Hampson, joined the former 
settlers. It is of these four families, Joseph and John MTord, 
his wife Polly Harkness, with two children, William and Ann, 
Alexander T. Blaine, and Thomas Eobinson, and of their de- 
scendants, we now write. 

The children of the present generation hear with feelings of 
wonder the stories of the hardships and privations of the early 
settlers, and surrounded as they are with the conveniences and 
comforts of a cultivated and closely settled country, and with 
the improvements which invention and the arts have made so 
familiar, they know little and realize far less of the difficulties 
their fathers encountered. But few of the women of modern 
times have either the courage or the ability to undertake jour- 
neys such as were made by their mothers of half a century or 
more ago, or could endure the privations of a forest and fron- 
tier life. Somewhat more than fifty years ago, about the year 
1813, the wife of one of the early settlers, a woman who in 1867 
was still living at the age of eighty-six, accompanied by but a 
single attendant, her son of eleven years, traveled from her 
present home in Erie county to Lancaster county and back, on 
horseback, a distance of fully eight hundred miles. 

The mode of living in these forest homes was primitive and 
rugged. Cabins were erected in the simplest style, not divided, 
as modern and more elegant homes, into halls and parlors, and 
libraries, nurseries, dining-rooms, chambers, and kitchens. A 
single room would suffice for many purposes. The floors and 
roofs were often of bark. The ceilings were guiltless of plaster 
and stucco, the windows of curtains of damask or lace. The 
hearths of their fire-places were ample and broad, and the large- 
throated chimneys seemed to welcome the blaze of hickory and 
maple. No silver knobs graced their doors, nor engraved plate 
informed the passers by who was the lord of the primitive man- 



69 

sion. Their latch-strings hung out a welcome to all. They 
helped and were helped in turn in the spirit of genuine kind- 
ness, erecting their cabins and barns, clearing away the forests, 
reaping their fields, husking their corn, by mutual aid. Com- 
ing so far to form a settlement, our fathers could bring but lit- 
tle with them. Some bedding, a tea-kettle, a frying-pan, a 
large flat-iron from old Pinegrove furnace, with axes, hoes, 
spades, ploughs, and other implements of labor, constituted the 
principal movable property of one of these families. Pails were 
unknown at first, or were rudely constructed from blocks of 
wood. Their chairs were the primitive stool and bench. Their 
tool chest formed a dining-table, the floor a bedstead. As the 
country filled up, tradesmen and mechanics of every gradQ sup- 
plied their wants, but the first-comers were their own carpen- 
ters, cobblers, and blacksmiths, making their own axe-helves, 
and hoe-handles, and rakes, and chairs, and tables, and sleds, 
and yokes, with many other necessaries. Their windows were 
often barren of glass, and blankets sometimes supplied the place 
of doors and partitions. 

They traded with Pittsburg, sending thither for flour, tea 
and coffee, and utensils. Families would club together and or- 
der a barrel of coffee or chest of tea. Boats were also sent 
down the lake to Buffalo and Niagara Falls for flour. Grain 
was sometimes ground in coffee mills or with stones worked by 
hand, somewhat according to the scriptural custom. It is said 
that the rock may still be seen which was used as a mill by some 
of the early settlers, a hole being cut in it, into which grain was 
poured to be pounded with a pestle. Baking was frequently 
done after the Indian fashion in hot ashes. The manners of 
the people were simple, open, and hearty. When they met they 
called each other by their Christian names — ^William, and Aleck, 
and John, and Peggy, and Polly, and Betsey, with all -the warm 
familiarity of a single household. They came to weddings and 
funerals from near and far, rejoicing with those that rejoiced, 
and weeping with those that wept. The jealousies and hatreds 
that so often exist in more cultivated society were to a large 
degree unknown. It is not unlikely these ancestors of ours had 
faults, for they were men of like passions with ourselves. 



70 

Doubtless there were scenes of violence and wrong beheld then 
as now. In the absence of courts and officers of justice, their 
scattered communities were often compelled to be a law unto 
themselves. From what we can learn of these men and their 
wives, they were in every way worthy of our remembrance and 
veneration. 

Joseph and John McCord, Thomas Robinson, Alexander T. 
Blaine, and Eobert Moorhead, were men of the old school, not 
rough backwoodsmen, uncultivated and uncouth in manners, 
rude in speech, of limited knowledge and range of thought, but 
men of presence, courtly almost in their manners, men of sound 
judgment, sterling sense, refined feeling, and general informa- 
tion. They were men noted for their integrity, for their intel- 
ligence and Christian character. The two brothers, John and 
Joseph McCord, with their brother-in-law, Thomas Eobinson, 
were the original elders of the Presbyterian Church of 
North-East at the time of its organization, and filled their posi- 
tion in the church and such other places as they were called to 
with a dignity and an ability unsurpassed by any of their suc- 
cessors. Men of strictest integrity, of great honesty, of tem- 
perate habits, and of reverent piety, they were honored and 
trusted as widely as they were known. They were men of 
peace, arbitrators in the broils and quarrels that sprung up in 
society. They were religious men, who feared and loved God, 
honored his truth, respected his ordinances, and by example 
and precept set before men the highest style of life. When we 
look upon the large number of those who have succeeded them 
in the line of regular descent, and note how they have been pre- 
served from the vices common to men, from crimes and follies, 
what places of respectability and honor they have filled, how 
few of them have failed in character, and how many of them 
bear a Christian and honorable reputation, we must attribute 
much of it to the teachings and examples of these worthy sires. 
They were strict Presbyterians, and ardently devoted to that 
church. But few of their descendants have forsaken it. 

The church at North-East was organized in 1801, by Eev. 
Elisha McCurdy. Its first elders, Joseph and John McCord and 
Thomas Eobinson, were ordained to their office in a grove on 



71 

the banks of Sixteen Mile creek, near the present cemetery. 
There preaching was first had. The tan-bark house of John 
McGord and also his bam were used as preaching places. Two 
or three years later several acres of ground were purchased on 
Cemetery Hill and a log church erected, the first sermon being 
preached in it by Rev. James Patterson, in the spring of 1804. 
In this church the seats were movable, every man providing his 
own pew. No provision was made for heating it even in the 
coldest weather of winter. An addition was subsequently built 
to the church, which was used as a school-room. Here fire was 
allowed. A Sunday-school was formed as early as 1817, in 
which the books read were such as Baxter's Call, Boston's Four- 
fold State, and like works. The Bible and Fisher's Catechism 
were the text-books. The teaching was limited, consisting 
chiefly in recitations from the Bible and the Catechism 
without note or comment. There were no regular classes, the 
children and youth making their recitations to any one whom 
they chose. Among the men of that early time who were 
especially loved and venerated by the young and sought by them 
as their teacher on the Sabbath, was old Mr. Moorehead. Even 
when age and lameness had greatly disabled him, he was at the 
meetings of the church and the Simday-school. 

The main road through the township east and west, in the 
early days of the settlement, was that now known as the Lake 
Shore road, along which lie the farms and homes of the sons of 
Joseph McCord. The upper, and now the main road of travel, 
leading through the village of North-East and the other prin- 
cipal villages of the county, was of later date. 

One of the exciting events in the early period of this settle- 
ment was the war of 1812, between the United States and Great 
Britain, during the administration of President Madison* 
Through the surrender of General Hull and his army at Detroit, 
and the defeat of General Van Bensselaer at Niagara, the Brit- 
ish were left in full possession of Lake Erie. Having five armed 
vessels they soon captured the only armed vessel of the Ameri- 
cans, the AdamSy a brig of one himdred and fifty tons, and at 
any time could strike a fatal blow upon the settlements along 
the south shore of the lake. Their presence caused great fear 



72 

and excitement among the people of the country, and a con- 
stant guard was maintained at those points where a landing 
could be readily effected. General Harrison commanded the 
North-western army, but the necessity of a naval force on the 
lake to co-operate with him to destroy or disable the British 
fleet became so apparent, that in the autumn of 1812 the prep- 
aration of a fleet of ships of war was commenced at Erie, which 
when completed was confined to the command of Commodore 
0. H. Perry. During the construction of these vessels, it was 
a customary thing for the British commander to bring his fleet 
across the lake and anchor them along the southern shore, 
80 close that the names of his vessels could be read, and the 
men be seen on the decks, and the morning reveill6 be heard by 
the inhabitants on the shore. They were keeping close watch 
of the harbor at Erie and waiting for the appearance of Perry^s 
ships. It was a common thing for the people to come out on 
the high banks along the southern coast and watch the ships 
of the enemy moving up so stately and proud, their commander 
confident of the victory which he so completely lost. A con- 
centration of the enemy^s troops took place at Long Point, di- 
rectly opposite Erie, at a distance of some forty or less miles, 
and an attack upon Erie and her unfinished fleet in its harbor 
was planned. Great fears were entertained that it would be 
made and be successful before the ships could be launched and 
manned. Great consternation prevailed not only at Erie, but 
along the southern shore of the lake generally. The militia 
were called out and put under arms for defence. It was known 
that the British army was composed in part of Indian warriors. 
The early massacres at Wyoming and elsewhere had inspired a 
hearty dread of the modes of savage warfare, and once and 
again the inhabitants along the shores of the lake removed their 
families and their goods back into the country. Women and 
children were started off in flight, or to the woods for conceal- 
ment. 

The burning of Buffalo created great alarm. The alarming 
intelligence was spread through the country that a British force 
of three thousand regulars, militia, and Indians had captured 
our forces at Buffalo, burned the village and the vessels on the 



73 

lake at that point, and was advancing up along the southern 
shore, destroying everywhere as they came, and giving to their 
Indian allies full liberty to plunder as they wished. Our 
fathers and neighbors were called from the field. Alarms as to 
the progress of the enemy and of their devastations were very 
frequent during the winter of 1813, and the people were fre- 
quently astir at midnight packing goods and furniture for a 
hasty exit. Stories and traditions are still afloat concerning 
these times and the early settlers, many of which are very 
amusing. The militia paraded in begged, borrowed, or in- 
herited uniforms, and often presented an appearance more 
ludicrous than warlike. Happily the war soon ended after the 
celebrated victory of Commodore Perry, our fathers once more 
returned to their peaceful pursuits, and were not again troubled 
by rumors of war until the year 1837. 

The ^Tatriot War" is still fresh in the memory of thousands 
living along the shores of Erie. For a time it seriously threat- 
ened to embroil the country in trouble with Great Britain. It 
was a predecessor of the modern Fenian movement. The 
French inhabitants of the Canadas, always restive under the 
yoke of the British power, broke out in open insurrection in the 
fall of 1837. They raised the cry of "Liberty," a cry that al- 
ways produces sjrmpathy and enthusiasm in American breasts. 
It was but a brief time before arms, provisions, means of war, 
and troops were passing over from the American side to the aid 
of the insurgents. The roads along the southern shore of the 
lake were lined with ragged, undisciplined, and unarmed men of 
the lower classes of society, hurrying like a mob through the 
country to share in the glory of liberating Canada from the 
hands of our old enemy, Great Britain. Neutrality, law, order, 
and decency were all forgotten. Few if any of the better and 
more intelligent citizens of the country joined in the strife or 
gave any counsel or aid to the enterprise, though doubtless 
many, moved by the surviving hatred of England, wished it 
success. The popular excitement was very great, but the de- 
termined and vigorous measures of the American government 
soon effectually stayed the rush to arms on the American side 



74 

of the border. The disorganized and powerless mob departed 
to their homes, and the revolt was suppressed. 

I need not dwell on the subsequent history, which is within 
the memory of so many of the living. It would be a pleasure 
to recall personal incidents in the history of many who have 
passed away, but whose memory remains dear and honored with 
the living. The descendants of Alex. T. Blaine, of John and 
Joseph McCord, and of Thomas Sobinson, are now widely scat- 
tered over the central and western States of the Union. And 
of the descendants of the original settlers in central Pennsyl- 
vania, scarcely one of the States south and west of New York 
has failed to receive some representatives. Many of these fam- 
ilies are now wholly unknown to each other. Families once 
large and promising have by the providence of God become 
nearly extinct, while others thrive and multiply in numbers. 
They have generally been an agricultural people, quiet and or- 
derly in their lives. But few of them have sought public life, 
though they have numbered among them men of all the pro- 
fessions and most of the ordinary pursuits, members of our 
State and national legislatures, men who have risen to high 
distinction in political life, at the bar, and in the church. As a 
mass, they have been, it is believed, men of intelligence, resolu- 
tion, energy, moral and religious character, not below any class 
of citizens in their principles, virtuous habits, and public use- 
fulness. 

This history would be incomplete if I did not refer to that 
greatest event of modem times and to the part our families 
bore in it — I refer to the late rebellion. 

Our earliest fathers passed through scenes that tried their 
souls and called out the highest heroism and self-sacrifice. 
They bore their part in the terrible war with Indian savages 
from 1755 to 1764. They shared in the toils and sufferings and 
triumphs of the revolutionary struggle that secured American 
independence. Not one of them was numbered among the 
tories of that day. No one of them bears a dishonored name. 
They took part again in the war of 1812 along the shores of 
Lake Erie and in the valley of the Mississippi. 

When the late war for the severance of the American Union 



76 

broke out, of those whose history is known to ns, nearly to a 
man they ranged themselves against the rebellion and in favor 
of a perpetuated Union. Their hearts were filled with loyal 
emotions. They rejoiced in every success of their country^s 
arms over armed and powerftil treason. They grew sad over 
every defeat. They contributed influence, money, and men for 
their country's defence. Their representatives stood and fought 
and fell on the field of battle and suffered cheerfully in southern 
prisons. They were with the armies of the west and of the 
east, and met the fortunes and hardships of war in nearly every 
one of the rebellious States. Some of them were among the 
first that answered the call of their country, and among the last 
to be disbanded when the rebellion had been vanquished. We 
weep over some that fell, but it had been with bitter tears had 
they faltered and turned back. We rejoice in the well-won 
honors of all, and thank them in the name of all our families, 
and in the name of their revolutionary sires, who gave ns the 
country which they have helped to preserve, for the lustre of 
their patriotic record. 

It may not be invidious to mention among the many who dis- 
tinguished themselves by their faithful services, the names of 
the following: Scott, and John, and George Eoblnson, of Ken-: 
tucky, sons of Governor Eobinson, who, when their State was 
wavering in the balance, and the young men of Kentucky by 
thousands were joining the ranks of treason, and appeals to 
southern pride were corrupting the loyalty of many, placed the 
welfare of their whole country above every other consideration 
and cast their lives at her feet. One of them, Scott, served 
during most of the war as lieutenant of cavalry and as an aid 
on the staff of one of the Union generals. 

Lieutenant William C. Blaine, son of James Blaine, of In- 
diana, who fell on the battlefield of Triune, Tenn., on Friday, 
the eleventh day of June, 1863, also merits honorable mention. 
Lieutenant Blaine was a young man of uncommon promise, 
greatly beloved by his company, who had become very strongly 
attached to him, and ever spoke of him with pride and respect. 
He fell as he was bravely leading his company in the battle, 
offering on the altar of his country a noble and worthy sacrifice. 



76 

We may mention also, with a sad pleasure, the honored name 
of Colonel John W. McLane, who, thongh not in the line of 
family descent, was closely connected therewith by marriage. 
Colonel McLane was a native of Erie county, and early mani- 
fested that love of military affairs that prepared him for subse- 
quent distinction. As early as 1845 he organized and com- 
manded the Wayne Greys, which was known as one of the finest 
military companies of the State. He also participated in the 
Mexican war, winning honors for his bravery as a soldier and 
his wisdom as a leader. When President Lincoln issued his 
first call for 75,000 three months' men. Captain McLane was 
the first man of the county in the field. And when shortly 
after three years' men were called for, he promptly answered 
the call, raising the first Erie county regiment, the gallant 
Eighty-third, in whose command he displayed the most signal 
ability and won the honors that now invest his name. His 
regiment was noted for its discipline and soldierly bearing. 
With it he joined the army of the Potomac, and in the marches 
and battles of that army from Alexandria via Yorktown toward 
Eichmond, during the celebrated campaign of 1862, he partici- 
pated. At the battle of Gaines's Mill, on the morning of the 
27th of June, the second day of the celebrated seven day's fight, 
he fell, pierced in the head by a rifle shot. His last words be- 
fore the fatal shot were addressed to the regiment: "Boys, if 
the enemy come too close, give them the cold steel.'' 

Colonel McLane was a man of the most unselfish patriotism, 
a man who did not pause to weigh the loss of property, of home, 
or of life, against the cause of his country. As a soldier, he is 
said by those who best knew him to have had no superior for 
efficiency under all circumstances, for powers of command and 
discipline and for coolness and bravery in the midst of battle. 
He gave up official position and devoted his property to the 
good cause, paying most of the expense of recruiting and or- 
ganizing his regiment out of his own pocket, — ^though by no 
means a rich man; he dedicated th^ best energies of his body 
and mind to the prosecution of the war, and finally laid down 
his life for his country. Let his memory be perpetuated in 
the breasts of the living. 



77 

Colonel W. A. Bobinson, since the close of the war breveted 
brigadier general for gallant conduct on several fields^ an- 
swered the first call for three months^ volunteers, and then con- 
tinued in service until mustered out, several months subsequent 
to the final surrender of the rebel armies. He shared in the 
campaigns of the east, west, and southwest, campaigning in the 
several States of Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mis- 
sissippi, Louisiana, and Texas, fighting on many a bloody fields 
— Stone Eiver, Corinth, Liberty Gap, Chickamauga, at the last 
of which he was taken prisoner in a night engagement. For 
fifteen months he shared with his fellow-prisoners the tender 
mercies of Libby prison, of Macon, of Camp Sorghum at Co- 
lumbia, and of Charleston, where he was one of six hundred 
Union officers w^ho by rebel authority were placed under the fire 
of the Union guns from the ships and forts in Charleston har- 
bor. After his release from the long confinement he rejoined 
his regiment, and served in several campaigns in Tennessee, 
Louisiana, and Texas. Entering the army as a private in one of 
the companies of the celebrated Pennsylvania Reserve Corps, 
he rose through the different military grades to the command 
of a regiment that greatly distinguished itself by hard service, 
and fully earned the honor of a brevet brigadier general, which 
the Government conferred upon him. 

It is but natural that during the civil war of 1861-1865, the 
sons of our ancestry who since 1785 have been settled in Ken- 
tucky, Tennessee, Louisiana, and other Southern States of the 
Union should give their fealty and service to the Confederacy. 
They did so with heartiness. Many of them, we know not how 
many, entered the army. A number lost their lives and others 
were wounded in the service. Some fought in the ranks of the 
common soldier; others rose to positions as officers. It is a re- 
gret that we have not secured a full record of the military 
service of our Southern brethren. We can give that of Col. 
Graves, of Kentucky, only. We know their bravery and their 
loyalty to the cause they had conscientiously espoused, and are 
glad now to find one flag waves over us all. 

The names of others might be mentioned with honor, who 
served their country faithfully and merited her thanks. We 



78 

trust that the spirit of patriotism will never perish from the 
breasts of their descendants^ and that whenever and however 
the country is again assailed by the violence of disloyal men, 
they will be as ready as their ancestors of the earlier genera- 
tions to give home and country the defence that may be de- 
manded of them. 

More than a third of a century has passed since the close of 
the great war, the most memorable one for centuries in its re- 
sults for the world. The progress of the united Nation since 
that time has been beyond precedent. Well may the men and 
women who have shared in it and been, even in small degree, 
factors in it, thank Ood that they ^^came to the kingdom at 
such a time as this.^' The decendants of Thomas Bobinson 
are scattered from ocean to ocean, from northern to southern 
boundaries. It is impossible longer to keep bright the links of 
widened relationship. It is very likely there have been in the 
past and there may be now some unworthy ones, unfaithful to 
their ancestry, to themselves, and to their Ood; but it is a 
pleasure to say that marvelously few of this kihd have been 
discovered in our ranks. If the proportion in the future is as 
small, we shall contribute no little to make the race better as 
well as larger. 

It is with feelings of mingled pleasure and sadness that we 
bring to a close this brief record of fragmentary and imperfect 
history. Gathered with no little trouble from different parts 
of the country and widely scattered branches of the family, it 
still remains very incomplete. Less than one hundred and fifty 
years have passed since our earliest known ancestors came to 
this country. They are now a largely and widely scattered 
band, in nearly every State of the American Union, a large 
part of their descendants wholly unknown to each other. Sev- 
eral generations of them sleep with the dead. Oreat changes 
have altered not only the face of the country but the customs, 
manners, and habits of the people. When they came hither 
from the old world, central Pennsylvania and Virginia were 
the frontiers of the settlements of white men, and along that 
boundary raged the fiercest of Indian wars. When they came 
hither, and for nearly half a century after, the country was a 



79 

colony and dependency of the British crown. Now one may 
travel a thousand miles beyond the original home of our ances- 
tors^ through a rich and grand country of hamlets and villages 
and cities^ and still find the frontiers of civilization hundreds 
of miles away from him^ and the feeble population of one or two 
millions has swollen to scores of millions. The progress in 
material wealthy in social comforts, in educational facilities, in 
religious privileges, in invention, and in all the arts of civilized 
life, has been far more marvelous than the increase of the 
population. The Indian war-track and the pioneer^s bridle- 
path have given way to the country road, the canal, the rail- 
way, and the telegraph, as means of transit and communication. 
It is amiable to venerate the customs and the opinions of our 
forefathers. It is seemly and beautiful to do them honor, to 
remember and imitate their stern and simple virtues, and noble 
to perpetuate the purity of their blood. They deserve all this 
at our hands. They brought to this country habits of industry 
and temperance, principles of highest integrity, manners and 
consciences educated by purest religious teaching. They were 
all strict Presbyterians, of the stem Calvinistic order, brought 
up on the Catechism and Covenants and Confessions of the 
Scottish churches. They were good men, inheriting doubtle^ 
much of the rugged and blunt simplicity of those earlier times 
of persecution through which their fathers had passed. They 
had also their faults. They were himian. They were men of 
fixed, decided faith, and of strong prejudices. There have been 
many and vast changes since the earlier generations. They 
kneeled in log churches or under the forest trees, with one 
hand upon a trusty musket by their side. They lived in days 
when power-looms and telegraphs, steam engines and railroads 
were wholly unknown, and when the common school was very 
uncommon. They sat by the broad chimney-jamb of their log 
houses, and by the blazing fires of hickory and of oak read the 
Catechism, the Bible, and their few solid books. There they 
finished the education of their sons and daughters. They lived 
lives of honest industry and hardy independence, working with 
their own hands, trading on their own bone and sinew, con- 



80 

tented and happy in their lowly homes and with their simple 
fare, their plain and godly living. The growth of art and civili- 
zation has placed their sons of the fifth and sixth generations 
far in advance of them in all material comforts, in knowledge, 
in means of wealth and culture. Invention has added to our 
stores year by year. They knew but the alphabet of science. 
We possess a vast heritage. Everywhere we behold the march 
and the triumph of improvement. Where they were but pio- 
neers, clearing the rugged and resisting forest, and fighting the 
wily savage, we dwell on cultivated farms in elegant country 
homes, or in city residences, worship' in stately temples, send our 
sons and daughters to seminaries, colleges, and imiversities. 
Both their day and ours have their follies and their sins. 
Neither the virtues nor the vices of our common himian nature 
are the possession of any one generation. If the present age 
seems to run wild with excitement, if we gamble in stocks of 
imaginary railways, if the mania to be rich sets the men of this 
age to digging for gold, and copper, and coal, or boring for oil 
on every farm, our fathers had also their excitements. They 
were men of our passions. The strifes of parties were as fierce 
in the olden time as now. Elections were as stormy. Religious 
controversies were as bitter. Politics corrupted men then. 
Political men were ambitious then as now. Demagogues lived 
then, the predecessors of the larger and more shameless brood 
of to-day. If new temptations and new vices meet us in the 
lives of this age, so do we meet also new virtues, new and grand 
achievements of good in the present day. We review with ven- 
eration the record and traditions of the past, we recall with 
saddened pleasure the faces and the virtues of the sires who 
have lain down to sleep with their fathers within our own recol- 
lection, we look with respect and increasing love upon the sur- 
viving members of the oldest living generation, and trust that 
the simple, hearty manners, the honest and sterling virtues of 
our fathers, their loyalty to country, their religious faith, their 
veneration for the word of God and all sacred things, may be 
perpetuated in their sons to the latest generation. 



FAMILY OF ROBINSON. 



FIRST GENERATION. 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



II 



\ 



Thomas Robinson. 
Wife unknown. 

1. Philip m. unknown. 

2. Andrew m. Agnes 

Boal. 

3. William m. Margaret 



4. Christiana m. Thomas 

Muirhead. 

5. Richard m. Isabel 



6. Samuel m. unknown. 

7. Thomas m. unknown. 



1698 
1700 



1702 



) 



1740 (?) 

1770 
1797 



1765 
1768 



Hanover, 

Dauphin Co., 

Pa. 



Among the earliest of the Scotch-Irish settlers in PennsylTanis 
was the family of Thomas Robinson, who came to America prior 
to 1730. He was already an old man and died about 1740. The 
record concerning him is involved in obscurity. The name of his 
wife is unknown; of his children the names of six sons and one 
daughter have come dovim to us. His place of burial is unknown. 
The family it is believed came from Derry, Ireland. From the 
large number of Robinsons scattered over the country who trace 
their parentage back to Central Pennsylvania and to the region 
near the Susquehanna River where Thomas Robinson settled, we 
may believe that with him came brothers and sisters and other 
relatives of his. The traits of person and character and persist- 
ence of family names indicate nearness of origin. 

SECOND GENERATION. 



II 



III 



K 



f Philip Robinson', 
i Thomas*. 
I Wife unknown. 

1. Samuel m. Jean 

Snoddy. 

2. Thomas m. Jean . 



1698 


1770 


1728 


1807 


1726 


1780 



Hanover, 

Dauphin Co.» 

Pa. 



Hanover. 



6 



82 



Mflonag'C. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMII«T. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



Ill 

(( 

CI 

(I 
<c 



3. G e o r g e m. *A n n 

Wiley, 'Mary Mar- 
tin. 

4. Agnes m. Robert 

Robinson. 

5. Sarah n>. Robert 

Thompson. 

6. Mary m. Samuel 

Elder. 

7. Joseph. 

8. John. 



1727 


1814 


1780 
1782 


Dec. 22, 
1792. 


1784 




1786 





Philip Robinson, son of Thomas R,, bom about 1698, in the North 
of Ireland, came to the Province of Pennsylvania before 1730. 
His name appears on the first tax list of Hanover tovniship, Ijan- 
caster county (now Dauphin). His father had first settled near 
Conewago Creek farther east. He vdth his family and one or 
more of his brothers settled on Manada Creek near the Gap of the 
same name in the Kittochtinny Mountains. During the Indian 
Wars, 1755-1763, there was a fort on his farm for defence against 
the savages, and for the protection of the settlers of the region in 
times of invasion. His sons were already grown men, for in 1755 
Governor Morris addressed a letter to Samuel Robinson, sending 
vdth it one hundred pounds of powder to be used by the inhabit- 
ants of Hanover "in defence of themselves and their Country." 
Beside their farm, the Robinsons had built a mill at the mouth 
of the Gap on the Manada, and furnished supplies to the Govern- 
ment during the Indian and the Revolutionary wars. Philip R. 
died in 1770. His vnfe's death preceded his ovm. 

The fort mentioned is called Robinson's Fort in the old Colonial 
Records. At one period of the incursions of the Indians, he is re- 
ported on the Assessment list as having fied from his home. 

A copy of the Confession of Faith vdth the Larger and Shorter 
Catechisms, Directory for Worship, etc., etc., published by Ben- 
jamin Franklin in 1746, and bearing the autograph "Philip Robin- 
son, his book," and containing also on every blank page the 
names of quite a number of his descendants, is now, 1901, in the 
possession of one of his great-great-grandchildren and v^ll be 
•carefully handed down. The autographs of several generations 
are in it. It has been largely used and gives proof that the 
Robinsons of earlier days were staunch and loyal Calvinists. 
One of them was not content with simply writing his name care- 
lessly on a blank page, but in bold hand thus subscribes: "I, Sam 



83 



Bobinson, of the township of Hanover, and County of Lancaster 
and the ProTince of Pennsylvania, Do approve of and consent to 
the Chief of the Substance of this Confession, &c., &c. Appear- 
antly and not in dark sayings as it is set forth in Scripture. 1766." 
The Robinsons of Hanover were members of the Presbyterian 
Congregation of Hanover under the ministry of its first pastor, 
Rev. Richard Sankey. Another branch of the family was con- 
nected with the Presbyterian Church of Derry, under the care of 
John Elder, "the fighting Parson." The tombstones of several 
may be seen in the ivy covered church-yard of that famous con- 
gregation. 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



II 



n 



m 

It 
If 
« 



II 



II 



III 

f( 
l( 
u 

(C 



II 



III 



(Andrbw Robinson", 
i Thomas^ 

(AONEB BOAL. 

See separate record of 
this line (page 154). 

{William Robinson', 
Thomas^ 
Maboahet . 

1. Samuel. 
2l Alexander. 

3. William. 

4. John. 
No further record. 

{Chbistiana Robin- 
SON*, Thomas*. 
Thomas Muibhead. 
See separate record of 
this line (page 161). 

i Richard Robinson*, 
i Thomad'. 
( Isabel . 

1. Richard. 

2. James. 

3. John. 

4. Thomas. 

5. Eleanor. 

It is believed that this 
family went into Vir- 
ginia or Carolina. 

Samuel RoB^NSON^ 

Thomas*. - 
Wife unknown. • 

1. Alexander. 

2. William. 

No further record. 



1700 
1702 



1797 
1790 



1702 



1765 



1768 



Hanover, 

Dauphin Co., 

Pa. 



Hanover, 

Dauphin Co., 

Pa. 



Hanover^ 

Dauphin Co., 

Pa. 



Hanover, 

Dauphin Co., 

Pa. 



Hanover, 

Dauphin Co. } 

Pa. 



84 



ROBnr303r family. 



Wife unknoiwiu 
III U John. 



Duphia Co.» 



Of this famil J onljr this is Imown. In 1767 ThomaSy the father* 
deeded to his son John his plantation (called Newry) in HanoTer 
township, which had been warranted to him in 1752. No fur- 
ther record* 

THIKD GENERATION. 

Line or Philip BoBnrsosr'. 



Ill 



III 



IV 

n 
(I 
II 
(I 
II 
II 
II 

14 
II 



{S A If TJ E L BOBISrSOX*, 
Philip*, Thomas'. 
Jean Snoddt. 
See separate record of 
this line (page 141.) 



'George RosncsoN*, 
Philip*, Thomas'. 
'Awif Wiley. 

'MaBT MARTITf . 

1. Mary m. John Black. 

2. John m. Margaret 

Logan. 

3. Margaret m. Samuel 

Logan. 

4. Jonathan m. Jean 

Black. 

5. Agnes m. James 

Fisher. 

6. Sarah m. James Fer- 

gus. 

7. Esther m. James Lo- 

gan. 

8. Martha m. John 

Crawford. 

9. George m. Mary 

Thome. 

10. Thomas m. Mary 
McCord. 



1728 



1727 



1748 

1760 

June 15, 
1762. 



1766 



1771 
1778 



1807 



Mar. 6, 
1814. 



July 11, 
1834. 



1801 



Apr. 20, 
1826. 

July 12, 
1880. 



Near Lexing- 
ton, Ky. 



85 

The place of birth of George Bobinson is unknown. It was 
probably in the North of Ireland. His early boyhood and youth 
were spent at the family home in Hanover township at Manada 
Gap in the Kittochtinny Mountains, a few miles from Harrisburg, 
Pa. About 1755, some years after his marriage with Ann Wiley, 
he settled in Cumberland county, now Perry county, west of the 
mountains and the river Susquehanna, at the headwaters of Shear- 
man's Creek. With other pioneer settlers of that region he was 
soon called to bear the brunt of Indian wars, and was driven 
from his home in hurried flight across the mountains. He was 
a farmer and upon his farm was built a fort for the protection 
of the settlers of the region. It is known in Colonial history as 
George Robinson's Fort. The inhabitants of the valley frequently 
fled to it for safety. He was commissioned as a Justice of the 
Peace by the Proprietary Government under George III. He also 
served in the Army of the Revolution though then a man well 
advanced in years. The musket he carried a century and a quar- 
ter ago has been preserved and is now in the possession of his 
g^eat-grandson, Bev. Thomas H. Bobinson. 

He removed to Kentucky in 1797, whither eight of his children 
had preceded him. The fame of the new region was attracting 
many settlers from Pennsylvania. But two of his children re- 
mained near the old home. He settled in the country a few 
miles from Lexington, Ky., and remained there until his death, 
March 6th, 1814, in the 87th year of his age. Before leaving Penn- 
sylvania he was a Ruling Elder in the Centre Church, of which 
Rev. John Linn was pastor for many years, and after his removal 
to Kentucky he served as Elder in the Bethel Presbyterian Church 
of Scott county, Ky. Here his body was buried by the side of the 
church to which he gave the closing years of his life. On the 
tombstone erected to his memory was inscribed the follovdng 
record: 

Sacred to the memory of George Bobinson, who departed this 

life March 6, 1814, in his 87th year. 

Of softest manners, unaffected mind. 
Lover of peace and friend of human kind. 
Go! live, for Heaven's eternal rest is thine. 
Gol and exalt this mortal to divine. 

In the year 1899 what remained of his dust, a finely preserved 
skull of remarkable size, was removed to Lexington, Ky., and 
placed in the beautiful cemetery there, and a handsome monu- 
ment erected over it by his great-grandson T. H. B. The late 
Hon. James F. Bobinson, ex-Governor of Kentucky, and grandson 
of George B. says of him: "I was but a boy at the time of his 



86 



death, but I have a perfect recollection of him. He was six feet 
in height, perfect in person, remarkably athletic and strong, 
with a fine, large head, beautiful large blue eyes, a large and well 
developed forehead, and a benevolent and intellectual counte- 
nance that was no counterfeit. He was a good English scholar, 
remarkable for his love of reading, especially that of the higher 
and more difficult kinds, works on Law, on Ethics, and the phil- 
osophy of the mind. The list of a few of his books, such as 
Blackstone's Commentaries, Locke on Government, Hume's His- 
tory of England, Stewart's Philosophy, The Spectator, etc., etc., 
is illustrative of his taste. In his neighborhood and among his 
acquaintances he was distinguished for his safe and sound judg- 
ment. He was a general counsellor, a sort of oracle to all around. 
He lived and died a prominent member of the Presbyterian 
Church, in truth and in fact a Christian gentleman. His memory 
is cherished by all who knew him and has been handed down as 
that of one of the worthies of the day." 

A few of his letters written in his closing years show him to 
have been a man of profound religious character. They are re- 
plete with expressions of Christian triumph and joy. 

He was tvdce married, but his first wife, Ann Wiley, was the 
mother of his children. 



Mftrriage. 



b«n. 



ROBINSON FAMn«T. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



Ill 



IV 



III 



IV 



III 



IV 



AoNES Robinson', 
Philip*, Thomas\ 
Robert Robinson*, An- 
drew*, Thomas^ 
See family record of 
Andrew Robinson 
(page 155). 

r Sarah Robinson*, 
i Philip*, Thomas\ 
( Robert Thompson. 
Several children, one 
Thomas, but the rec- 
ord is too incomplete 
to furnish any knowl- 
edge for publication. 

tMary Robinson*, 
i Philip*, Thomas^ 
( Samuel Elder. 
No record secured of 
this family. 



1730 
1782 



1732 



1792 
1819 



1734 



Derry, Dau- 
phin Co., Pa. 



Derry, Dau- 
phin Co., Pa. 
Donegal, 
Lancaster 
Co., Pa. 



Pazton, Dau- 
phin Co., Pa. 



87 



FOURTH GENERATION. 



Marriftge. 



G«n. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



Jan. 5, 
1821. 



IV 



TMabt Robinson^, 
I Georgre", Philip*, 
] Thomas^. 
|^*JoHN Black. 

1. Mary m. Robert Ram- 

sey. 

2. Jane m. DaTid Mere- 

dith. 

3. Abigail m. John Gar- 

son. 

4. Hetty m. George 

Wiseman. 

5. Rebecca m. Ma- 

teer. 

6. John. 

7. Jonathan. 

8. Robinson m. Eliza 

Noble. 

9. James m. Mary 

Noble. 

10. Samuel m. Mary 
Nelson. 

11. George m. Margaret 
Morrison. 

12. William. 

13. Thomas. 



1779 



1871 



Perry Co., 
Pa. 



Mary Robinson, first bom of George Robinson, was bom in 
Hanover township, Dauphin county, about the year 1747. Brought 
into Perry county while yet young, she was exposed to the hor- 



*John Black was the son of John Black and Abigail. He came 
to PenusylTania prior to 1750. They had issue (Will, Mar. 23, 1763) : 

1. James m. Robinson. Lived and died in Raccoon Valley; 

belonged to the Cumberland Go. militia, 1777. 

2. John m. Mary Robinson. 

3. George, First Lieutenant, Oct., 1777. Commissioned July 31, 
1777. 

4. William, Cumb. Co. militia, 1777. Captain, May 10, 1780. 

5. Samuel, settled in Tennessee. 

6. Jonathan, settled in Tennessee. 

7. Rachel, m. Thomas Stephenson, settled in Kentucky; removed 
to Ohio. 

8. Abigail, m. Samuel Shaw; removed to Ohio. 

9. Rebecca, m. Robinson; removed to Ohio. 

10. Jean, m. Jonathan Robinson. 

Of the families of Ramsey, Meredith, Carson, Wiseman, and 
Mateer, who married daughters of John Black and Mary Robinson 
no record has been found. 



88 



rors of the Indian wars. The place became her home until her 
death at an advanced age. Her husband, John Black, was a thriv- 
ing farmer. Before the close of the century her aged father and 
eight of her brothers and sisters removed to Kentucky. Her 
youngest brother, Thomas, settled on the Southern Shore of Lake 
Erie. The record of her family is a very incomplete one, but is 
given as fully as possible. 



Mfttriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMII«Y. 



Birth. 



I>eftth. 



Residence. 



IV 



IV 



V 

t( 
II 
II 

CI 

II 

IC 

II 
II 



CI 



John Robinson*, 
George", Philip*, 
Thomas^ 

Mabgabet Looan. 
See special record of 

this line (page 172). 

Maboabet Robinson*, 
George", Philip*, 
Thomas^ 
Samuel Looan. 
1. John, 
a. George. 

3. James. 

4. Samuel. 

5. Hetty. 

6. Martin m. had 

daughter Catherine. 

7. Nancy. 



1748 



1760 



8. Alexander m. 

several children. 

9. Mary m. *Wm. An- 

derson, *Rev. B. L. 
Baldridge. 

10. Fsther m. Adam 
Rankin. 



June, 
1814, 



Near Lexing- 
ton, Ky. 



The families of Margaret Robinson Logan and of her sister 
Esther Robinson Logan settled on the banks of the Wabash River, 
Illinois, about 1818. The sisters died a little past middle life. 





V 


r Jonathan Robinson*, 


June 16, 


July 11, 


Lezlnffton, 






George", Philip*, 


1762. 


1884. 


Ky. 






Thomas*. 












Jean Black. 










V 


1. John, died early. 




1774 








2, Mary m. John 


Sep. 17, 


June 11, 








Snoddy Robinson. 


1774. 


1884. 





89 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON PAMII^Y. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



3. Abigail, died unmar- 

ried. 

4. George m. Martha 

McConnell. 

5. Hetty, died unmar- 

ried. 

6. Jonathan, died un- 

married. 

7. Thomas m. Mary Mc- 

Connell. no issue. 

8. Jean m. James 

Dougherty. 

9. Margaret, died un- 

married. 

10. John McCracken m. 

Mary D. B. Rat- 
cliffe. 

11. Ann Wiley m. Fran- 

cis R. Palmer. 

12. James Fisher m. 

^ S u s a n Mansell, 
•Willina S. Hern- 
don. 



1780 



Dec. 81, 
1787. 
1789 

1791 

1794 

1796 
1800 



1845 

Jan. 20, 

1855. 



Aug. 12, 
1837. 
1819 



Aug. 26, 
1848. 

Dec. 6, 
1839. 
1888 



Lexington, 
Ky. 



Jonathan Robinson was bom in Hanover township, Dauphin 
county, Pennsylvania, but in early life was taken to Perry county, 
where he grew up to manhood. He married Jean Black, a sister 
of John Black, husband of his sister Mary. During the Revolu- 
tionary War he was Captain in the Fourth Battalion of Cumber- 
land county Infantry, and was in service about six years. He re- 
ceived his commission from the Supreme Executive Council of 
Pennsylvania. In 1785, he went to Kentucky and bought a farm 
of six hundred acres in Scott county, upon which he erected cab- 
ins. In the spring of 1786, he returned to Pennsylvania and took 
his family back with him to their new home. Here he continued 
to reside as one of the wealthiest and most influential citizens of 
the State, passing away at the ripe age of eighty-six, greatly 
respected and beloved. He was a man of deeply religious charac- 
ter and convictions, and through the most of his life a beloved 
member of the Presbyterian Church. In one of his letters, still 
preserved, written in 1814, he gives a very interesting description 
of the great religious movement of that day, extending in various 
forms from 1800 onward for fifteen to twenty years. It was a 
period of profound religious impulse, resulting in extravagances 
and disorders to a marked degree, and to the founding of new 
religious bodies. For an interesting and full record of the period 



90 

see The History of the Presbyterian Church in Kentucky, by Bcv. 
Bobert Davidson, D. D. 

Jonathan Robinson was an earnest and loyal lover of his coun- 
try and entered into its service, as already stated, during the war 
of the Bevolution. The only remaining record of his connection 
with the army is his commission, as follows: 

In the name (md hy the authority of the freemen of the Commonioealih 
of PennaylvimUi: 

The Supreme Executive Council of said Commonwealth 
to Jonathan Kobinson, Esquire. 

We, reposing special trust and confidence in your patriotism, 
valor, conduct and fidelity, do by these presents constitute and 
appoint you to be a Captain of a company of foot, in the fourth 
battalion of militia, in the county of Cumberland. You are, there- 
fore, carefully and diligently to discharge the duty of captain, by 
doing and performing all manner of things thereunto belonging: 
and we do hereby charge and require all officers and soldiers un- 
der your command to be obedient to your orders as captain: and 
you are to observe and follow such orders and directions as you 
shall from time to time receive from the Supreme Ebcecutive Coun- 
cil of the Commonwealth, and from your superior officers, ac- 
cording to the rules and discipline of war, and in pursuance of 
the acts of Assembly of this State: This commission to continue 
in force until your term by the laws of this State shall of course 
expire. 

Given under my hand and the lesser seal of the Commonwealth, 
at Philadelphia,, the thirty-first day of July, 1777. 

Tho. Wharton, Jun'r. 

PresH. 

In the year 1832 the following interesting paper was filed in 
one of the justices' courts of the State of Kentucky: 

State op Kentucky, 
Scott County. 

On the 19th day of November, 1832, personally appeared in open 
court, before the justices of Scott county court, in the county of 
Scott and State of Kentucky, Jonathan Robinson, aged eighty 
years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his 
oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit 
of the act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832. 

That he entered the service of the United States during the war 
of the Revolution, first as a captain of a company of volunteers, 
in November, 1776: that he marched with his company from Cum- 
berland county, State of Pennsylvania, the place of his residence, 
through Carlisle, Lancaster and Philadelphia to Princeton, New 



91 

Jersey: that his field officers were Colonel Frederick Watts 
and Darid Mitchell: that they were stationed at Princeton, and 
employed in scouting expeditions, and as a guard against the in- 
vasions of the British army, which then lay at New Brunswick, 
upon the surrounding country: that he recollects at one time dur- 
ing this tour, he was ordered with one hundred men, under the 
command of Colonel Bohanan, to intercept the provisions of the 
British army passing on the Raritan River to New Brunswick: 
that they accordingly made the attempt, and fired upon five small 
vessels of the enemy without ejffect: that during the skirmish ope 
of his men was wounded with a grape-shot, some others injured: 
that according to his best recollection he remained in the service 
this tour until some time in May or June of 1777: that in a very 
short time after his return home he received from the Supreme 
Executive Council of the State of Pennsylvania, the commission of 
captain, of a company of foot in the fourth battalion of militia, 
in the county of Cumberland, and State aforesaid: that under 
said commission, and as captain of the same, he served and per- 
formed five tours of duty, two of said tours were six months each 
and the three were three months each: that in the first of said 
tours he was called into service some time in August, 1777, and 
marched from Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, through Car- 
lisle and Lancaster, and in September following (as he believes) 
was at the battle of Brandywine, Delaware: that in the ensuing 
winter he was ordered to the camp of General Lacy, at Shamany 
bridge, over the Shamany creek, which empties into the Dela- 
ware: that in passing to General Lacy*8 camp, he recollects that 
he passed by the camp of General Washington, which was then at 
Valley Forge: that after his arrival at General Lacy's camp he 
was ordered with his company to be stationed at Carroll's Ferry, 
on the Delaware river, to guard bullocks and provisions in cros- 
sing the river from New York, Connecticut and New Jersey, for 
the American army: that at this time the headquarters of the 
British army were in the city of Philadelphia: that he remained in 
service till March or April, 1778: that the next of said tours he 
marched from Cumberland coxmty, Pennsylvania, in the fall of 
1778, under General Frederick Watts, Colonel Samuel Lyon and 
Major James Powers, to Philadelphia, and from there was march- 
ed from point to point of the surrounding country and in Mary- 
land, in scouting parties against the British: that he entered the 
service in the fall of 1778 and served until the spring of the fol- 
lowing year, and is well satisfied that.it was a period of at least 
six months, although he cannot state the precise time of its com- 
mencement or ending: that the three remaining tours of three 
months each were in the summer and fall of the years 1779, 1780, 



92 



and 1782, as well as he now recollects: that he marched each of 
said tours from Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, from point to 
point in the State of Pennsylvania, Maryland, New Jersey and 
probably New York: that Colonel Bohanan, Colonel James Purdy 
and Major James Fisher were his field officers during the tours 
above mentioned: that during one of said tours, but which he can 
not now state, he was in the battle of Paoli, at which his lieuten- 
ant, James Arbuckle, and his ensign, Samuel Arbuckle, together 
with five of his men, were killed: that although he has a dis- 
tinct recollection of the performance of each of said last named 
tours, yet he is unable to give a detailed account of each sepa- 
rately and of his field officers: that he was born in Lancaster coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, June 15th, 1752, old style: that he has in his pos- 
session a record of his age taken from his father's family rec- 
ord: that he was raised in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, re- 
sided there when called into service, and continued to reside 
there during the war of the Revolution, and until the year 1785, 
when he removed to Scott county, Kentucky, where he has con- 
tinued to reside to this time: that he now has the commission 
spoken of in this declaration, which he files herewith: that he 
knows of no person now living and within his reach by whom he 
can fully prove his aforesaid services as above detailed, but that 
he has procured affidavits of Captain William Black and John 
Robinson, proving the same in part, which are herewith filed. He 
hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity, 
except the present, and declares that his name is not on the pen- 
sion roll of the agency of any State whatever. 

(Signed) Jothn. Robinson. 

The above declaration was accompanied by affidavits of Cap- 
tain William Black, of Alabama, and John Robinson, of Tipton 
county, Tennessee, and references for the character and stand- 
ing of the petitioner were made to Hon. Henry Clay, Hon. Wil- 
liam S. Barry, and Hon. Richard M. Johnson, of Kentucky. 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



IV 



V 



(( 



II 



f Agnes Robinson*, 
J George', PhiUp*, 

] Thomas^ 

James Fisher. 

1. Margaret m. Rev. 

William Rainey. 

2. Hetty m. James Lo- 

gan. 

3. Mary m. William Lo- 

gan. 



Kentucky. 



93 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



IV 



V 

If 



' Sabah H o b I n s o n', 
George", Philip*, 
Thomas*. 
*Jaj<es Fergus. 
1^ James. 

2. George, died in early 
life. 



1756 



1801 



Kentucky. 



No further record remains of this family. Mr. Fergus was a 
lawyer of high reputation and served in the Kentucky Legislature 
for several years. He resided near the Cumberland river. The 
time and place of his death are unknown. Mrs. Fergus died in 
middle life. Of the children no history remains. 



IV 



V 

(( 
It 

(I 



Esther Robinsow*, 
George', Philip*, 
Thomas^ 
James Logan. 

1. George. 

2. Margaret m. John 

Robinson*. 

3. Mary m. George 

Robinson*. 

4. Nancy m. Alexander 

Robinson*. 

5. Martha m. William 

Robinson*. 

6. Ann Wiley m. *Sam- 

uel Robinson*, 

.'James Robinson* 

(George*, George*. 

Philips Thomas^) 



1797 



1856 



1862 



Kentucky. 



Five daughters in this family married five brothers, their 
cousins, sons of John Robinson and Margaret Logfan. See the 
separate record of the line of John Robinson*, p. 172. 



IV 



(Martha Robinson*, 
George*, Philip*, 
ThomasS 
♦John Crawford. 
1. George. 

Four daughters, names 
unknown. No fur- 
ther record. 



Kentucky, 



♦John Crawford and James Fergus, with their families, set- 
tled at one time in Southern Kentucky, on the Cumberland river. 



94 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



'Geo ROE BoBmsoN*, 
George", PhiUp", 
Thomas^ 
Maby Thorite. 
See separate record of 
this line, furnished 
by Mr. J. V. Wayman*, 
of Santa Bosa, Cal., 
(p. 188). 



1771 



Apr. 20, 
1826. 

May 8, 
1881, 



Died at 
Tipton, Tenn. 

Tipton Co., 
Tenn. 



George Bobinson was bom in 1771 in Perry county, Pennsylva- 
nia, where he spent most of his youth. Near the close of the 
century he accompanied several of his brothers and sisters to 
Kentucky and settled in Scott county near Lexington. About 
1799 he went with his brothers-in-law Fergus and Crawford, and 
settled for a time on the Cumberland river. His life was an unset- 
tled one, and he spent but a few years in any one place. In 1805, 
he visited his brother Thomas, to whom he was greatly attached, 
at North East, on the shore of Lake Erie. In his trip he went to 
Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in search of a legacy left him by some 
relative. On his way home he stopped at Pittsburg and wrote to 
Thomas concerning their aged father, George B., who for a time 
had joined a "New Light" party in the Presbyterian church of 
that region in Kentucky. In the year 1805 he was at the Saline 
licks, Kentucky. He and his brother John rented a part of the 
property, hoping to make a fortune in the manufacturing of 
salt. The experiment was a failure; they lost heavily and 
suffered greatly from sickness, John's eldest child and only 
daughter dying there. They moved thence to Shawneetown, Hli- 
nois, in 1807. Here he was in public offices, serving as postmaster, 
justice of the peace, mail contractor, clerk of court, etc. The 
family removed in 1813 from Shawneetown to the forks of the 
Wabash. Later he returned to the Saline Licks, as assistant to 
his brother-in-law John Crawford. In 1814, he was residing on the 
Wabash about 23 miles from Shawneetown. In 1824 he was living 
near some of his children in West Feliciana, Louisiana. He had 
passed through a gfreat deal of trouble, was in poor circumstances, 
and was feeling aged. His wife was still living and five of his 
nine children. In the following year, 1825, he died at Tipton, 

For some years Mr. Crawford held the position of Judge and was 
a man of standing. In 1814, he received from the United States 
Government the appointment of agent for the salt works near the 
Ohio river, and going thither died in a few months. 



95 



Tennessee at the home of his son Thomas. His letters to his 
younger brother Thomas, of Erie county, Fennsylyania, that are 
still preserved, reveal a man of generous, loving, and deeply re- 
ligious character. He was but 53 years of age at his death. He 
had never been successful in worldly business, though very san- 
guine of coming fortune. 



Mmrrimge. Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 


nu 


IV 


'Thomas Robinson*, 


1773 


July 12, 


North East, 






George*, Philip*, 




1880. 


Erie Co., Pa. 






Thomas*. 












*Mary McCobd. 


July 28, 


Aug. 23, 


North East, 








1777. 


1848. 


Pa. 




V 


1. William Andrew m. 


July 20, 


Mar. 10, 


North East, 






Nancy Cochran. 


1796. 


1871. 


Pa. 






2. Hetty m. Alvah Barr. 


Mar. 15, 
1797. 


Feb. 24, 
1844. 








3. Nancy m. William 


April 8, 


Jan. 18, 


Springfield, 






Doty. 


1799. 


1845. 


Pa. 






4. George Washington 


June 12, 


Jan. 7, 


Glrard, Pa. 






m. Matilda Wyllis. 


1801. 


1877. 








5. John d. unmarried. 


Aug, 17, 


Aug. 25, 


North East, 








1808. 


1828. 


Pa. 






6. Mary Ann m. Ben- 


Oct. 11, 


July 81, 


North East, 


• 




jamin Boyce Tut- 
tle. 
7. Joseph McKinney 


1805. 


1889. 


Pa. 






Deo. 26, 


Dec. 18, 


Galveston, 




■ 


m. Sarah Crosby. 


1808. 


1843. 


Texas. 






8. Alexander Hamilton 


May 8, 


Aug. 5, 


Indiana. 


« 




m. Lomira Wvllis. 


1811. 


1872. 








9. Eliza McCord m. 


Aug. 18, 


Nov. 80, 


North East, 






Dyer Loomls. 


1813. 


1867. 


Pa. 






10. Samuel ' McCord m. 


Jan. 26, 


Feb. 12, 


Plymouth, O. 






Nancy Townsend. 


1816. 


1892. 





Thomas Robinson, son of George B., was bom in Shearman's 
Valley, Perry county, Pennsylvania, in 1773. His father was a 
farmer and prominent citizen of the region. He was the young- 
est of ten children and had in youth the advantages of an intelli- 
gent and pious home, and such common schools as the times af- 
forded. He was married to Mary McCord, a young bride and wife 
at seventeen, in 1794, doubtless by Bev. John Linn, the pastor of 



♦Mary McCord was the daughter of William McCord and Agnes 
McKinney, of Perry county. William was the son of John Mc- 
Cord, wife unknown, who was among the first settlers of Cen- 
tral Pennsylvania. The home of the McCords in Perry county, 
built before the Indian wars 1755-1763, was still standing a few 
years ago and bore in it the marks of bullets fired by the Indians 



96 

the family. This marriage separated him in life from the rest of 
his father's household. He continued to reside in Perry county 
until 1798, when he went to Erie county, PennsylTania, and select- 
ed four hundred acres of land for his future home in Lower 
Greenfield township, now North East. The county of Erie was 
organized in 1800. One or more of his brothers-in-law, McGords, 
accompanied him. He built a cabin upon his gfround, put in some 
seed for a crop in the next year, returned to his old home, and 
in the spring of 1799, with his family and several of the McGords^ 
Moorheads, Blaines, etc., all related by marriage, came back and 
made a permanent settlement. His farm was about a mile and a 
half from Lake Erie, and bordered on the boundary line between 
the States of Pennsylvania and New York. The others who accom- 
panied him and yet others who came from Central Pennsylvania, 
settled from four to eight miles west of the New York State line» 
in the present townships of Not>th East and Harborcreek, and in 
later years their descendants formed large communities of thrifty, 
intelligent, and religious people. They were mainly farmers, 
and with their homes they also built schoolhouses and churches. 
They were Presbyterians and were the founders of the first Pres- 
byterian church on the southern shore of Lake Erie, the church 
at North East. The first board of Ruling Elders consisted of 
Thomas Eobinson and his two brothers-in-law, John and Joseph 
McCord. Settlers both from Central Pennsylvania and from New 
England and New York were attracted to that region by glowing 
reports of its beauty and richness. 



in their incursions upon the white settlements. William McCord 
was thrice married. The children by his first wife, Agnes Mc- 
Kinney, were as follows: 

1. Joseph, m. Elizabeth McCord, b. Jan. 9, 1766; d. Feb. 7, 1813. 

2. John, m. Mary Harkness, b. Dec. 5, 1767; d. Feb. 13, 1839. 

3. William, b. Mar. 15, 1769; d. Jan. 5, 1795. 

4. Samuel, b. Oct. 16, 1770; m. Polly Blaine, Apr. 19, 1798; d. Sept. 
20, 1825. 

5. Griselda, b. Sept. 27, 1772; m. John Morrison; d. Oct. 31, 1795. 

6. Mary, b. July 28, 1777; m. Thomas Robinson; d. Aug. 23, 1843» 

7. Rosanna, b. May 23, 1779; d. Nov. 1, 1830; m. Alex. T. Blaine, b. 
1776, d. 1817. 

8. Andrew, b. July 27, 1781; d. ; m. Rosanna Bell. 

9. James, b. Mar. 2, 1783; m. Susan Davidson, 1st; Jane Sturgis,. 
2nd; d. Oct. 18, 1865. 

By his second wife, Rachel Scudder: 

10. David, b. July 22, 1786. 

11. Alexander, b. Sept. 17, 1787; m. Lucy Davidson, 1st; Margaret 
Woodbum, 2nd; d. Mar. 6, 1826. 

12. Isaac, b. Mar. 13, 1795; m. Mary Leman, 1st; Hannah Mc- 
Clennan, 2nd; d. 1849. 

The third wife was a Patterson — no issue. 



97 



Thomas Bobinson passed away at the age of fifty-seven, when 
he was but slightly beyond the prime of life. He left behind 
him memories of a noble and saintly man, who was greatly be- 
loved by his contemporaries. In physical form he was a model 
of gfrace and beauty. He was fully six feet in height, straight as 
an arrow, easy in all his movements, and excelled most of the 
men of his day in feats of athletic skill and strength. His hair 
was auburn in color, his eyes a deep blue, his face with its finely 
arched Roman nose and high forehead was a handsome one, indi- 
cating intellectual and spiritual character. He was mild in 
temperament, genial in spirit, and courteous in bearing. He 
served for many years as a justice of the peace, but was known 
generally as the peaceful arbitrator of quarrels, persuading men 
to settle without process at law. One who well knew him and 
who long survived him, said of him "He was the most complete 
gentleman I ever knew, distinguished for his courtesy towards 
his fellow-men. He possessed the qualities of a wise leader and 
ruler In the church in which he was an officer from its organi- 
zation in 1801 until his death in 1830. He was remarkably gifted 
in prayer, reverential, tender, and impressive." By descent, by 
early training, and by choice, he was a Calvinist and Presbyter- 
ian, but was also broad-minded and generous in spirit towards 
all who called themselves Christians. The narrowness of secta- 
rianism was utterly foreign to him. The traditions that have 
come down about him show that he was an uncommonly gifted 
man of noble character. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 


Jan. 5, 


V 


r Robinson Black', 


1799 


1871 


Perry Co., 


1821, 




Mary Robinson*, 
George', Philip*, 
Thomas^ 
^ Eliza Noble. 






Pa. 




V 


^Geoboe Black', 
Mary Robinson', 
George', Philip', 
ThomasS 

^Maroabet Morbison. 






Perry CJo., 
Pa. 




VI 


1. Anthony m. Sarah 
Moreland. 




May 16, 
1841. 






<( 


2. John. 




1792. 






i( 


3. Mary m. Thomas 
Hunter. 






Moved to 
Ohio, 1809. 



98 



Iffftrriftge. Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



1820 



1810 



VI 

(( 

{( 
(I 

CI 

it 
it 



(I 

(( 
ft 



VI 

<t 
(( 

(< 



4. Eleanor m. Thomas 

Clark. 

5. Jonathan m. Abigail 

Beach. 

6. George, unmarried. 

7. John, unmarried. 

8. T h o m a s m. Mar- 

garet Zimmerman. 

9. Samuel m. Mary Ann 

Okeson. 

10. Margaret m. Wil- 
liam Clark. 

11. Nancy m. Josiah 

Roddy. 

12. Susannah m. Sam- 

uel Okeson 

13. James. 

14. William, tinmarried. 

^Mabt Logan*, Mar- 
garet Robinson*, 
George", Philip*, 
ThomasS 
* William Anderson. 
'Rev. Benjamin L. 
Baldbidoe. 

1. William Anderson, 

Jr. 

2. George Anderson. 

3. Benjamin L. Bald- 

ridge, Jr. 
Two daughters. No 
further record. 



POLLT Robinson*, 
Jonathan*, 
George*, Philip", 
Thomas\ 
John Snoddt Robin- 
son*, Samuel*, 
Philil^, Thomas^ 
See record of Samuel 
Robinson line (p. 141) . 

fGEORQE Robinson*, 
Jonathan*, 
George*, PhiUp*, 
Thomas*. 
Martha McConnell 
Lexington, Ky. 
See special record of 
this line (page 184). 



Death. 



Residence. 



1793 

1795 
1797 
1800 

1802 

1804 

1806 

1809 

1811 
1818 



1880 

1868 
1886 
1881 

1876 



1870 



1888 



Ohio. 
Ohio. 



Illinois 



Juniata Co. 
Pa. 

Ohio. 

Kentucky. 



1774 



1766 



1780 



1834 



1848 



Jan. 20. 
1866.' 



Aug. 
1865. 



Henderson 
Ky. 



99 



MarrUse. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Reaidenoe. 




V 
VI 


'Jean Robinson*, Jona- 

t h a n\ George*, 

Philip", Thomas^ 

James Dougherty. 

1. Sidney Jane m. 

George W. Graves, 

of Fayette Co., Ky. 


1789 

May 8, 

1817. 


1819 

May 24, 
1868. 


Lexington, 
Ky. 



James Dougherty was a brilliant lawyer of Lexington, Ken- 
tucky, but died in his early manhood. 



Jan. 28, 


V 


r John McCracken 


Aup. 10. 


Apr. 26, 


Carmi, III. 


1829. 




Robinson*, Jona- 
< than% George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 


1794. 


1848. 








^ Mary D. B. Ratcliffe. 


Apr. 8, 
1809. 


Sep. 14, 
1864. 






VI 


1. James Shannon m. 


Mar. 12, 


Nov. 17, 








^Emma S. Ready, 


1880. 


1859. 








*Lucy Harrow. 










It 


2. Jean Black. 


Oct. 17, 
1882. 


May 20, 
1884. 






(1 


3. Margaret RatclifPe 


Apr. 8, 


Aug. 20, 


Carmi. 111. 






m. Robert F. Stew- 


1885. 


1902. 








art. 










II 


4, 5. Twin daughters. 


1887, 


1887. 






(1 


6. John. 


Aug. 2, 
1888. 


Dec. 8, 
1840. 






It 


7. Mary Jane. 


Feb. 27, 
1842. 


Sep. 29, 
1848. 





John McCracken Robinson, son of Jonathan and Jean (Black) 
Robinson, was born near Lexington, Kentucky, in 1794. He and 
his younger brother graduated as classmates from Transylvania 
University, at a time when that institution was in the height of 
its renown. They graduated with honors, though both of them 
were still young, John about nineteen and James fifteen. Each 
of them chose the profession of law. After John was admitted to 
the bar at the early age of twenty-two, he removed to Illinois, 
first landing at Shawneetown, and later going to Carmi, which be- 
came his permanent home for the remaining twenty-five years of 
his life. During that time he became widely known as the most 
prominent statesman of Southern Illinois. His high character as 
a brilliant and thorough young lawyer became known at once 
and he was appointed prosecuting attorney in 1819, and again in 
1821, and State attorney in 1827. Honors and large responsibili- 



100 



ties wer poured upon him. In January, 1832, he was elected by 
the Legislature as United States Senator to fill the unexpired 
term of John McLean, over D. J. Boker, the choice of the Gov- 
ernor. He entered on these high duties at the early age of thirty- 
seven. In 1836, he was re-elected for a full term, which expired 
in 1843. He was in the Senate about eleven years and won a 
high rank as a statesman. He was a Democrat in politics and 
had the special and personal friendship of President Van Buren, 
who presented him with a fine oil portrait of himself, and also on 
his VTithdrawal from political life appointed him as Judge of the 
United States District Court for the Northern district of Illinois. 
Two months later Mr. Robinson died at Ottawa, the seat of the 
court, after a brief illness. Testimonials to his great worth and 
high standing as a lawyer, judge, statesman, and citizen, were 
given by the Legislature, the bar and officers of the Supreme 
Court, and various other bodies. Mr. Hobinson was partial to mil- 
itary displays and rose to the grade of major general of the State 
militia, and was generally spoken of as General Hobinson. Physi- 
cally he was a man six feet and four inches in height, his eyes 
were blue, and his hair a rich auburn. In personal appearance 
he could scarcely be excelled. The large steel engraving of him 
in the possession of the ^^^-riter presents a man of splendid aspect, 
a head like an old Roman Senator, an ample forehead, large ex- 
pressive eyes, heavy eyebrows, a Roman nose, firm mouth, a mass 
of curling brown hair, and a face of handsome features. He was 
a man of dignified, courtly manners, who would draw the attention 
of all who met him. He was kindly-hearted, greatly beloved at 
home and among friends, and honored everywhere. On January 
28, 1829, Mr. Robinson married Mary D. B. Ratcliffe, daughter of 
James Ratcliffe, an eminent citizen of Southern Illinois. She 
survived her husband until 1864. 



Marriage.' Gen. 



ROniNSON FAMII^Y. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Reaidence. 



Oct. 80, 
1820. 



r Antje Wiley Robin- 
son", Jonathan*, 
George", Philip*, 
Thomas\ 
Rev. Francis R. Pal- 
mer. 

17 Jonathan Robinson, 
unmarried, lawyer. 

2. William Henry m. 

Jane F. Cowherd. 

3. Margaret Jane. 



1796 


Dec. 6, 




1889. 




Dec. 22, 




1878. 


Aup. 14, 


May, 


1821. 


1891, 


June 18, 


Apr, 5, 


1828. 


1891. 


Feb. 16. 


Nov. 6, 


1825. 


1825. 



Independ- 
ence, Mo. 



Denver. 



101 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Reaidence. 



VI 



(( 



l< 



4. Jean Black m. N. J. 

Hockensmith. 

5. Frances Anne m. 

Barton S. Grant. 

6. Charles Nathaniel m. 

^Susan A. Cook, *M. 
J. Hollingsworth. 



Sep. 10, 
1826. 

July 11. 
1829. 

Feb. 26, 
1831. 



June 28, 
1887. 

Dec. 8, 
1891. 

July 20, 
1899. 



St. Louis. 



Francis B. Palmer was a pioneer preacher of the Disciples 
Church in Missouri. He was a man of marked ability and was 
greatly beloved and widely useful. His name became a household 
word among* the people of his denomination and was honored by 
all. He resided for many years at Independence, Missouri. 



Dec. 26, 
1812. 

Nov. 21, 
1889. 



VI 



r Jaues Fisher Bobin- 
SON*, Jonathan*. 
George', Philip*, 
Thomas*. 
^SUSAN D. Mansell. 



^ 'WiLLINA S. HEBNDON. 

1. Emily Jane m. *John 

B. Burbridge, "Will- 
iam S. Downey, 
'Hamilton Busby. 

2. James Fisher m. 

Mary Wheeler. 

3. Scott Herndon. 

4. John McCracken m. 

Elizabeth Pope. 

5. George Sidney m. 

Florida Johnson. 

6. Madison Johnson. 

7. Stephen Gano. 

8. Willa Ewlng. 

9. Philip Eldon. 

10. Stephen Gano, 2d. 



1800 


1888 


July 14, 


Nov. 


1827. 


1879. 


Nov. 26, 


Feb. 6, 


1882. 


1892. 


May 30, 




1842. 




iMay 80, 




1844. 




Feb. 11, 




1846. 




Aug. 80, 




1847. 




1849 


1861 


Mar. 11, 




1851. 




Oct. 20. 




1853. 




Dec. 29, 




1859. 





Georgetown, 



James Fisher Robinson, the youngest son of Jonathan B., was 
bom in Kentucky, and spent his life there. At the early age of 
about fifteen he graduated from Transylvania University in the 
same class as his brother John McC, and like his brother stood 
high in scholarship. He also chose the profession of law and 



102 



rapidly rose to distinction at the bar of Kentucky. He repeated- 
ly refused political office and honors, being offered the seat that 
had been filled by Henry Clay, in the Congress of the United 
States. About the opening of the Civil War in 1861, he was chosen 
to the Senate of his native State, and was made its presiding offi- 
cer. Upon the resignation of Gov. Magoffin because the State re- 
fused to join in the secession movement, Mr. Robinson became 
Governor, and filled the office with great ability and patriotism 
during one of the most trying periods of the war. After his term 
as Governor, he resumed the practice of his profession and took 
rank with the first lawyers of the Commonwealth. He was bril- 
liant and eloquent in his public addresses. In person he was fully 
six feet and three inches in height, and bore in figure and courtly 
manners and in the character of his oratory, a striking resem- 
blance to Kentucky's favorite son, Henry Clay. He was a reader 
of the best literature and possessed fine conversational powers. 
He died at his beautiful residence ^'Cardome,'* near Georgetown, 
Kentucky. His body rests in the cemetery at that place. 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON PAMII<Y. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



VI 

IC 

»l 

c« 

(( 
<< 
« 
«< 
11 



'' M AROABET Fisher", 
Agnes Bobinson^ 
George*, Philip', 
Thomas^ 
Key. William Rainet. 
No record of this fam- 
ily. 



1 



Hetty Fisher*, 
Agnes Kobinson\ 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas'. 

James Logan. 

1. David m. Fra- 

zier. 

2. James M. m. Martha 

Thompson. 

3. Agnes m. * Cald- 

well, * Inskip. 

4. William m. " Cald- 

well, * Caldwell. 

5. Susan. 

6. Mary. 

7. Samuel Crothers. 

8. Charles. 

9. George. 

No further record of 
this line. 



103 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


R0BIN80N FAMILY. 


Birtli. 


Death. 


Residence- 




V 

VI 


'Molly FibhebS 
Agnes Bobiiisoii\ 
i George*, Philip*, 

Thomas*. 
^ William Logan. 

1. Mary Jean. 

2. Esther, unmarried. 

3. Abigail, m. Eli Smith. 

4. Zillah. 

5. Margaret Kainey. 

6. James. 

7. William. 

No further record of 
this family. 








July 10, 


V 


rMAHY Robinson*, 








1812. 




George*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas\ 
[ Francis Leech. 




1828 






VI 


1. George. 


1818 








•( 


2. Acsah. 










u 


3. , died early. 










1( 


4. Francis. 








Mar. 9, 


V 


r William Andrew 


July 20, 


Mar. 10, 


North East, 


1820. 




Robinson*, 
< Thomas*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas'. 


1796. 


1871. 


Pa. 






^ Nancy CocHiiAN. 


Dec. 22, 


Mar. ^, 


North East, 








1797. 


1884. 


Pa. 




VI 


1. Rosanna Blaine m. 


Aug. 14, 


Dec. 18, 


Philadelphia 






John Davidson Mc- 


1821. 


1886. 








Cord. 












2. Alexander Cochran 


Nov. 26, 


Dec. 81, 


Sewickley, 






m. Catharine Ma- 


1822. 


1875. 


Pa. 






ther Ely. 












3. John F. m. Philena 


Mar. 9, 




Sewickley, 






Alice Livingston. 


1824. 




Pa. 






4. Nancy Martin m. 


Mar. 80, 


1876 


North East, 






Alexander Cochran, 


1826. 




Pa. 






M. D. 












5. David, unmarried. 


Jan. 80, 


Jan. 7, 


Allegheny, 








1828. 


1896. 


Pa. 






6. Thomas Hastings m. 


Jan. 80, 




Pittsburg, 






Mary Wolf Buehler. 


1828. 




Pa. 






7. William Andrew m. 


June 17, 




Pittsburg, 






Alice Blaine. 


1880. 




Pa. 






8. Samuel Martin, un- 


July 9, 


May 20, 


Pittsburg, 






married. 


1883. 


1902. 


Pa. 



104 

William Andrew Bobinson, of the fifth generation from Thomas 
B., was born July 20, 1795, on a farm near the head of Shearman's 
creek, Perry county, Pennsylvania. He was taken by his parents 
to their new home in Erie county, Pennsylvania, in the township 
of North East. He was a farmer by occupation throughout his 
active life. When a young man and before his marriage he was 
a teacher during the winter in the common schools. He was a 
man of large intelligence, of practical wisdom, of great integrity 
of character, and of a thoroughly religious life. For many years 
he was a Buling Elder in the First Presbyterian church of North 
East, where his father had served before him for nearly thirty 
years. Early in life he became a decided reformer in political 
life, in temperance, and a warm advocate of the abolition of 
slavery. He was among the earliest friends of the slave in North- 
ern Pennsylvania, and stood firmly by his convictions when the 
friends of freedom were greatly in the minority and were under 
social ban. He left the old Whig party and joined the Free Soil 
movement, and was pronounced in his anti-slavery position in 
State and Church. His home was open as a refuge for the fieeing 
slave. The famous Fugitive Slave law and the Missouri Compro- 
mise bill were abominations in his sight. But he was no noisy 
fanatic. He loved the ways of peace. He lived in friendship with 
his neighbors, and during a long life had no disputes at law with 
any of his fellow men. He was universally respected and beloved 
for his pure and noble character and life. He spent a portion of 
the later years of his life in Pittsburg, with several of his chil- 
dren, but removed again to North East, where he died in 1871. He 
married, March 9, 1820, Nancy Cochran, daughter of 'Alexander 
and Nancy (Martin) Cochran, with whom he lived in happy union 
for fifty-one years. She survived him thirteen years. She was 
through life, until her death at the age of eighty-seven years, a 
woman of great force of character, keen, bright, intelligent, a 
wise and ready helper, and a director in all good things. The 
eight sons and daughters all lived to manhood and womanhood, 
and ever most thankfully acknowledged the strong and happy 
influence of their parents upon the formation of their own char- 
acters and the shaping of their lives. 

'Alexander Cochran was the son of Hugh Cochran and Nancy 
(Beatty) Cochran, and was born at Wood Grange, County Down, 
Ireland, in 1766. He was the eldest of eight children, four sons 
and four daughters. He married Nancy Martin in 1795, and in 
the year 1802 the family came to America and settled in Bipley, 
Chautauqua county, New York. He was a farmer of unusual- 
ly large means and was through life greatly respected for his 
integrity and Christian character. Their children were: 



105 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




V 


Hetty Robinson", 


Mar. 16, 


Feb. 27, 


DoorVillaire, 


Oct. 19, 




Thomas*, George', 


1797. 


1844. 


iDd. 


1819. 




Philip*, Thomas*. 












Alvah Barb. 




Mar. 10, 
1861. 


DoorVillage» 
Ind. 




VI 


1. Mary Anne m. Will- 


Dec. 8, 


Dec. 10, 


Door Village, 






iam Hilton. 


1820. 


184G. 


Ind. 




u 


2. Julia m. James M. 


Sep. 11, 


Feb. 1, 








Hubbard. 


1828. 


1846. 






<c 


3. Martha m. Wright|Sep. 25, 


Dec. 18, 








Murphy. 


1825. 


1887. 






i( 


4. Milton F. m. Catha- 


Nov. 18, 










rine Johnson. 


1829. 







1. John m. Polly Ship- 

boy; farmer. 

2. Nancy m. William A. 

Robinson. 

3. Hugh m. Rachel 

Hampson; tanner. 

4. Alexander u n m a r- 

ried; merchant. 

5. Robert m. 'Catharine 

Dinsmore, 'Julia 
Barnard; minister. 

6. William m. Laura 

Fairchild; farmer. 

7. Samuel. 

8. Margtiret m. Jede- 

diah Loomis, far- 
mer. 

9. James m. Nancy 

Johnston; farmer. 

10. Martin m. Helen 
Gates; farmer. 

11. Andrew m. Katha- 

rine Moore; minis- 
ter. 

12. DaTid. 

13. Eleanor m. Samuel 
C. Dickson, farmer. 



Mar. 7, 

1796. 
Deo. 22, 

1797. 
Jan. 29, 

1800. 
Ck5t. 7, 

1802. 
Mar. 3, 

1806. 

Aug. 29, 
1806. 

Mar. 12, 
1808. 

Dec. 28, 
1809. 

Apr. 4, 
1811. 

Jan. 24, 
1815. 

Mar. 9, 
1817. 

Mar. 19, 
1819. 

June 26, 
18.0. 



Dec. 14, 

1878. 
Mar. 22, 

1884. 
May 12, 

1872. 
Nov. 16, 

1882. 



Mar. 27, 
1888. 

Nov. 7, 
1824. 

Nov. 1, 
1881. 

May 14, 
1891. 

Jao. 28, 
1868. 



Mar. 4, 
1826. 

Mar. 29, 
1896. 



Ripley, N. Y. 

North East, 
Pa. 



Joliet, 111. 

Austinburg, 
Ohio. 



Ripley, N. Y. 
Ripley, N. Y. 

Ripley, N. Y. 
Ripley, N. Y. 
Oneida, N.Y. 

Ripley, N.Y. 
S. Dakota. 



Of the succeeding generation there were seventy-one. Robert 
C. was for many 3'ears a minister of the Congregational Church. 
Andrew was a graduate of Washington and Jefferson College, and 
of Princeton Theological Seminary, and for about thirty years 
pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Oneida Castle, New York. 



106 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




VI 


5. Edwin Thomas. 


Dec. 22, 
1882. 


May 15. 
1858. 






<( 


6. R o b i n 8 o n A. m. 


July 6, 










Nancy Slocum. 


1888. 








V 


'Nancy Robinson*, 


Apr. 8, 


Jan. 18, 


Springfield, 






Thoma8^ George*, 


1799. 


1845. 


Erie Co., Pa, 






Philip*, Thomas*. 












William Doty. 












1. Calvin Robinson m. 


Oct. 1, 


Sep. 22, 






VI 


Sarah A. Townsend. 


1821. 


1860. 








2. Cordelia Robinson m. 


Apr. 10, 


Apr. 14, 


Springfield, 




it 


John P. Annis. 


1825. 


1900. 


Mass, 




CI 


3. William. 


June 14, 
1834. 


Nov. 9, 
1884. 






V 


George Washington 


June 12, 


June 4, 


Girard, Pa. 






Robinson*, 


1801. 


1877. 








J farmer, Thomas^, 












1 George*, Philip*, 












Thomas*. 












(^Matilda Wyllis. 






Ripley, N. Y. 




VI 


1. Sarah Matilda m. 
Newton Truesdale. 


Dec. 25, 
1826. 


1868 






CI 


2. Joseph Wyllis, far- 
mer, m. ^America 
•Robert son ; ^TiAii ra 
A. Graves. 


May 25, 
1829. 




Girard, Pa. 




cc 


3. Josiah Whitney, far- 
mer, m. Nancy Jane 
Ferguson. 


May 25, 
1829. 


189^ 


Girard, Pa. 




1 1 


4. Edwin Evans m. Ro- 


Deo. 8, 


Mar. 20, 








setta J. Bailey. 


1888. 


1892. 






V 


"Mary Ann Robinson*, 


Oct. 11, 


July 31, 




April 




Thomas^, George*, 


1805. 


1889. 




1881. 




^ Philip*, Thomas*. 












^Benjamin R o y c e 




May 14, 


North East, 






^ Tuttle, builder. 




1860. 


Pa. 




VI 


1. Edwin Rush m. Mary 
Sherwood. 


1882 


Dec. 27, 

1868. 






<« 


2. Thomas, died early. 









*Benjamin R. Tuttle was of a New England family that settled 
in North East, Pennsylvania, early in the present century. He 
was of English descent, a carpenter and builder by occupation. 
Few men have been more respected and beloved by their genera- 
tion. For many years he was a Ruling Elder in the Presbyterian 
church of North East, and at the time of his sudden and unex- 



107 



Marriage. 



Gtn, 



VI 



t» 



ROBINSON PAMII^Y. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



r J O B E P H McKlNNXI 

Robinson*, mer- 
chant, Thomas^, 
George", Philip', 
Thomas^. 
Sarah L. Cbosby, of 
Albany, N. Y. 

1. Franklin Case m. 

Caroline Rutledge. 

2. Frances Mary m. 

Alexander F. Will- 
iams. 



Dec. 26, 
1808. 



July 21, 
1885. 

July 81, 
1837. 



Dec. 13, 
1848. 



Oct. 14, 

1865. 

May 9, 

1897. 



Galveston, 
Texas. 



Joseph McK. B. was a young man of unusual promise. Early 
in life he entered the mercantile profession, residing for some 
years in Albany, New York, where he was prominent among the 
Christian young men of the city. He married into a widely known 
family, the Crosbys. While still a young man he removed with 
his family to Texas as a merchant, and died at Galveston, at the 
early age of thirty-six. His widow and two children returned 
north, making their home at Davenport, Iowa. 



1888 



VI 

II 



r Alexander Hamilton 
Robinson*, 
Thomas^, George*, 
Philip', Thomas^ 
LoiiiRA Wyllis, of 
Ripley, N. Y. 

1. Mary, unmarried. 

2. Lydia, m. James L. 

Angell. 

3. WylUs. 

4. Hamilton, u n m a r- 

ried. 



Oct. 8, 
1811. 



1834 
1885 

1838 
1841 



Oct. 5, 

1872. 



1866 



1851 

Oct. 10, 

1881. 



Laporte, Ind. 



Alexander H. R. was born in Erie county, Pennsylvania, but 
shortly after his marriage removed to northern Indiana, where 
he spent his life. He was a farmer, a merchant, and a general 
business man, a man of great activity and public spirit, and filled 
several ofiices of public trust, as sheriff, member of the State 
Legislature, and an officer in the army during the Civil War of 
1861-1865. He was a man of large popularity. His wife was from 
a New England family, residing at Ripley, New York. 

pected death was a commissioner to the General Assembly of 
the Presbyterian church. United States of America, that was to 
meet that week at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 



108 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Reaidenoe. 


Apr. 28, 


V 


f Eliza McOobd Robin- 


Aug. 18, 


Nov. 80, 


North East, 


1889. 




son", Tllomas^ 
George', Philip*, 
Thomas*. 


1818. 


1867. 


Pa. 






*Dyeb Loomis, magis- 


Oct. 1, 


Dec, 2, 








L trate. 


1810. 


1901. 






VI 


1. Mary Eliza, unmar- 
ried. 


1841 


1862 


North East. 




(t 


2. Joseph Warren, m., 
no issue. 


1848 


1896 


North East. 




(C 


3. George Lamartlne. 


1847 


Aug. 26, 
1862. 


North East. 


Aug. 14, 


V 


r Samuel M c C o b d 


Jan. 26, 


Feb. 12, 


Plymouth, 


1888. 




Robinson*, 
Thomas^, George', 
Philip', Thoma8\ 
^ Nancy Townsend. 

* 


1816. 


1892. 

Dec. 18, 
1898. 


Ohio. 




VI 


Mary Louise, unmar-'Feb. 26, 


July 27, 








ried. ' 


1839. i 


1888. 





Samuel McC. R. entered upon a mercantile life at an early age 
at Springfield, Erie county^ Pennsylvania, where he married the 
daughter of his partner. The largest part of his life was spent at 
Plymouth, Ohio, from 1845 to 1892, where he was a successful com- 
mission merchant of wide reputation. He was a man of upright 
and noble character, of handsome presence, tall, dignified and 
gentlemanly in his bearing, and a universal favorite among his 
fellow men. For many years he was a director of the S. M. and 
N. R. R., originator and vice president of the First National Bank, 
and had within his reach almost any office in the hands of his 



*Mr. Loomis was of a large New England family that settled in 
Erie county in the earliest years of the century until his death, 
at a great age, in 1901, he was still an active business man. He 
had been in public office for more than half a century, and had 
been a Ruling Elder in the Presbyterian church of North East 
since Nov. 25, 1849. He was captain of Company C, 145th Regi- 
ment of Pennsylvania Volunteers in the late Civil War, 1861-1865, 
from Aug. 26, 1862, to Sept. 5, 1863. His son, Lamartine, was a 
member of his father's company, being discharged on surgeon's 
certificate. He will be long remembered for his sterling worth 
as a man, a citizen, and a Christian. 



109 



fellow citizens. It was said of him by a prominent business man 
of a neighboring city, "He is one of the grand men of the age» 
honest, just, and upright on all occasions, acting on the principle 
and spirit of the Golden Rule, a man of deep convictions, a staunch 
friend, a patriotic citizen, courteous to all, and loving in his 
household." He united with the Presbyterian Church in early life 
and died amid the consolations of the Christian faith. His body 
lies at Plymouth, Ohio. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 



Marriage, 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



VI 



VII 

(( 

II 

14 
(I 
It 
It 
<l 
ft 
it 

VI 



VII 



II 



II 



II 



il 



«< 



tl 



n 



William Logan*, 
George Logan*, 
Margaret R.*. 
George*, Philip% 
Thomas\ 

Elizabeth Baxter. 
l\ Nancy Fisher. 

2. Mary Ann. 

3. George Baxter. 

4. James Fisher. 

5. Eliza Jane. 

6. Abigail Robinson. 

7. Hettie Fisher. 

8. Zillah Frazer. 

9. Margaret. 

10. William Rainey. 



r Sidney Jane Dough- 
erty*, Jean Rob- 
inson*, Jonathan*, 
George', Philip", 
Thomas*. 
George W. Grates. 



1. John Robinson m. 

Mary E. Tarlton. 

2. Fielding Louis m. 

Leotie Way. 

3. Francis, unmarried. 

4. Henry Clay, killed by 

accident. 

5. Margaret m. George 

A. Sprake. 

6. James Dougherty m. 

Teresa C. Parker. 

7. Georgette m. John 

Thomas Hogg. 

8. Irene, died young. 



May 3, 
1817. 



Auff. 6, 
1882. 

July 19, 
1838. 



Apr. 29, 
1840. 

July 11, 
1848. 

Nov. 18, 
1845. 



May 24, 
1868. 



May, 
1895. 



Lexington^ 
Ky. 



July, 
1896. 
Sep. 
1848. 



Bannock^ 
Mont. 



CyDthiana, 

Ky. 

Washington. 

D, C. 

Cynthiana, 

Ky. 



110 



Marrimge. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Reaidence. 




VI 


r James Shannon Rob- 


Mar. 12, 


Nov. 17, 


Carmi, 111. 






INBON*, John M.% 


1880. 


1850. 








Jonathan*, 












George*, Philip', 












Thomas^ 








May 14, 




*£mma S. Ready. 


Oct. 81, 


Feb. 14, 




1851. 






1881. 


1852. 




Aug. 




"Lucy E. Habbow. 


Apr. 6. 


Mar. 26, 




1854. 






1829. 


1866. 






VII 


1. Edwin Webb. 


Feb. 7, 

1852. 


May 21, 
1852. 






(( 


2. Daughter. 


1855 


1855 






t( 


3. Lucy Harrow m. 

Hawkins. 


Mar. 11. 
1857. 


• 





James S. Robinson became a lawyer as was his father, and gave 
promise of high place and honors in his profession, but died at 
the early age of twenty-nine. 



Aug. 22, 
1872. 



VI 



Dec. 1, 
1842. 



VII 



VI 



Mar. 18, 
1884. 

Aug. 15. 
1872. 

Mar. 19, 
1878. 



VII 



Dec. 25, 
1889. 



II 



(I 



cc 



(I 



<l 



c( 



Maroabet Ratcliffe 
Robinson*, John 
McC", Jonathans 
George*, Philip' 
Thomas*. 

Robebt F. Stewart. 
Mary Robinson. 



r William Henby Pal- 
mer*, Anne W. R.*, 
Jonathan*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 
Jane Fbances Cow- 
HEBD, of Virginia. 

1. Margaret Ann, un- 

married. 

2. Lawrence Kirtly m. 

Anna F. Carter. 

3. America Virginia m. 

T. P. Bell, M. D. 

4. Sarah Elizabeth m. 

James B. Owsley. 

5. Charles Scott. 

6. William Henshaw, 

unmarried. 

7. Mary Frances. 



Apr. 8, 
1885. 



Aug. 4, 
1878. 

June 12, 
1828. 



II '8. Catharine Izora, un- 
married. 

(I 9. Jonathan Haskell m. 
Oora Davidson. 

cc 10. Lucy Harriet. 



Oct. 25, 

1824. 
Aug. 28, 

1848. 
Sep. 16, 

1847. 
June 11, 

1849. 
Dec. 24, 

1850. 
Mar. 5, 

1852. 
Feb. 15, 

1854. 
Mar. 6, 

1856 
Feb. 17, 

1858. 
Oct. 8, 

1860. 
May 24, 

1868. 



Aug. 20, 
1902. 



Apr. 5, 
1891. 



Carmi, 111. 



Denver, Col., 



Apr. 6, 
1891. 



Mar. 29, 
1891. 

Apr. 9, 
1891. 

Feb. 4, 
1878. 



Apr. 8, 
1891. 



Denver, Col. 

Jackson Co., 

Mo. 
Jackson Co., 

Mo. 
Denver, Col. 

Denver, Col. 

Georgetown, 
CoL 



Denver, Col. 



Nebraska, 
City, Mo. 



«?> 



Ill 



Col. William H. Palmer, son of Rev. Francis R. Palmer and 
Anne W. Robinson, belonged to a highly honored family in Mis- 
souri. The latter part of his life was spent largely in Colorado. 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residenoe. 



Sep. 14, 
1842. 



June 22, 
1852. 



JuDe 12, 
1856. 



Dec. 2 
1899. 



VI 



VII 



II 



VI 



VII 



li 



u 



VI 



Jean Black Palmer*, Sep. 10, 
Anne W. R.\ Jon- 1826. 
athan^ George", 
Philip". Thomas*. 

Newton J. Hocken- 

SMITH, M. D. 

1. Newton J. m. Jane A. 

Watson. 

2. Frank, killed in the 

Civil War, 1861-1865. 

3. Mary, died in her 

fourth year. 



VII 
1% 

i( 



It 
II 



'' Frances Anne Pal- 
mer", Anne W. R.", 
Jonathan\ 
George", Philip", 
Thomas^ 
Barton S. Grant. 



1. Morris D. m. Alice 

Reggs. 

2. Frank P. m. Mary 

Lewis Wisdom. 

3. Lee Wiley m. Zoe B. 

Nelson. 

r Charles Nathaniel 
Palmer, M. D.", 
Anne W. R.«, 
Jonathans 
George", Philip", 
Thomas*. 
*SusAN A. Cook. 

" M. J. H o L L I N o s- 
worth. 

1. Lutie C. 

2. Mary B. 

3. Francis A. 

4. Jonathan Robinson, 

died in infancy. 

5. Patty. 

6. Charles Nathaniel, 

Jr. 

7. Grace m. J. S. Grif 

flth. 



July 11. 
1829. 



Dec. 22, 

1819. 
Feb. 28. 

1855. 
Feb. 8, 

1867. 
Jan. 27, 

1865. 

Feb. 25, 
1881. 



Juae 28, 
1887. 



Dec. 8, 
1891. 



Sep. 12, 
1891. 



Fulton, Mo. 



July 20, 
1899. 



Oct. 11, 

1875. 



Jan. 22, 

1883. 



St. Louis, 
Mo. 



Warren? • 
burg, Mo. 



St. Joseph, 
Mo. 



112 



Dr. C. N. Palmer, son ol Rev. Francis R. Palmer and Anne W. 
Robinson, was born in Scott county, Kentucky. He was for many 
years a practicing physician in Lawson, Ray county, Missouri^ 
where his children were bom. He afterwards removed to St. 
Louis, where he resided for some years, and thence in 1897 to 
Warrensburg, Missouri, where he died July 20, 1899. Dr. Palmer 
was awarded at different institutions of learning the degrees of 
A. B., A. M., and M. D., being a graduate of the State University of 
Missouri, of St. Louis Medical College, and a post graduate of 
the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania, at 
Philadelphia. He was one of the founders of the Atlantic Month- 
ly, but withdrew from the publication at the breaking out of the 
Civil War of 1861-1865, as his sympathies were with the Southern 
cause. Dr. Palmer was a man of mark, a typical gentleman of 
the old school, polite and courteous to a fault, and a man of broad 
culture, whose views when expressed inspired thorough respect. 
His home life was ideal in the strong and true sympathy that 
bound its members in the closest ties. Death came to him sud- 
denly from heart failure and he passed away painlessly, greatly 
beloved and lamented. 



Marrias^e. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




VI 


Emily Jane Robin- 


July 14, 


Nov. 


Lexington, 






SON*, James F.*, 


1827. 


1879. 


Ky. 






J o n a t h a n\ 












George', Philip^, 












Thomas*. 












*JOHN B. BURBRIDGE. 












•William S. Downey. 






Lexington^ 






"Hamilton Busby. 






Ky. 
New York 




VII 1. John. 






City. 




<t 


2. Susan Robinson m. 
Lewis Braxton 
Grigsby. 










ii 


3. Willina Barnes m. 
James Barclay. 










CI 


4. Mary Sheves. 








June 9, 


VI 


James Fisher Robin- 


Nov. 26, 


Feb. 6, 


Lexington^ 


1859. 




son, 2d% James 
F.', J o n a t h an*, 
George*, PhiHp«, 
Thomas^ 
Mary Wheeleb. 


1832. 

April 
1887. 


1892. 


Ky. 




VII' 1. James Wheeler, died 


Oct. 11, 










early. 


1860. 








11 


2. Willie Braxton. 


Sep. 10, 
1862. 


June 25, 
1868. 





113 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON P.'^MILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



VII 



(I 



t( 



(I 



3. Abigail. 

4. Thomas Bush. 

5. Eliza Wheeler. 

6. Mary Elizabeth. 



Oct. 4, 

1864. 
July 81, 

1866. 
Auff. 14, 

1868. 
Jan. 21, 

1871. 



Aug. 15, 
1866. 

Deo. 26, 
1888. 



Gen. James F. B., as he was familiarly known, was bom in 
Georgetown, Kentucky, Nov. 25, 1832. He graduated from George- 
town College in the class of 1853, and two years later went to 
Iowa, where he was successful in land speculations. In 1859 he 
married Mary Wheeler of Winchester, Kentucky. During the 
Civil War he was for a time Quartermaster General of Kentucky, 
and was an open and out-spoken friend of the Union. During many 
years he held various offices in the municipal government of 
Lexington, Kentucky, where he spent the greater part of his life. 
He was City Collector for many years and at the time of hia 
death he was City Treasurer. Under the administration of Presi- 
dent Cleveland he was Collector of Internal Bevenues for four 
years. For nearly twenty years he was President of the Ken- 
tucky Association for the culture of thorough-bred horses. He 
was a conspicuous citizen of Lexington, and was closely identi- 
fied with its interests and those of his native State. The public 
testimonials to his worth, made at his decease, indicated the high 
and general esteem in which he was held, and his social quali- 
ties and private life gave him hosts of personal friends and the 
tender attachment of his family. 

The loss of his popular and talented son, Thomas Bush, by an 
accident, at the early age of twenty-two years, was deeply felt 
by the father and mourned by a large circle of friends, who an- 
ticipated for him a life of large success. 

The Bobinson family, that during the first half of the nine* 
teenth century was a large one in Kentucky, has at the dose 
of the century, by death and removal to other parts of the 
United States, become almost extinct. Very few who bear the 
name now survive within the State. Of those who have gone 
elsewhere and generally to the South and West, nearly all are 
now unknown to other branches of the family. During the Civil 
War of 1861-1865, the families were arrayed on both sides of the 
conflict and probably fought on the same field. The descendants 



8 



114 



of Thomas Robinson, first, are widely scattered througii the 
country, are apparently decreasing in their numbers and are be- 
coming complete strangers to one another. 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




vi' 


' RosANNA Blaine Rob- 


Aug. 14, 


Dec 18, 


Phlla., Pa. 






I N 8 N*, William 


1821. 


1886. 








A.\ Thomas*, 








Oct. 24, 




George*, Philip*, 








1846. 




Thomas^ 












*JoHN Davidson Mc- 


Dec. 4, 


July 1, 


Phila., Pa. 






1 Cord. 


1808. 


1900. 






VII 1. Charles Clifford m. 


July 28, 




BesTer, Pa. 






Sarah Smyth. 


1847. 








t( 


2. Ella. 


-ept. 24, 




Phila., Pa. 




CI 


3. Mary Robinson m. 
Joseph DeF. Junk- 
in. 


June 27, 




Phila., Pa. 



Rosanna B. R., eldest daughter of Wm. A. and Nancy 
Robinson, was bom at North East, Pa., where she spent her early 
life. For a year or more she was a student at Oberlin College, 
then for a time a private teacher at Pittsburg, Pa., until her 
marriage in 1846. Mrs. McCord won through life the esteem of 
all, and the deepest devotion and love of her family and friends 
for her peculiarly attractive character. Of her it might be said, 
'*Many daughters have done virtuously, but thou excellest them 
all.*' She was for many years an active and earnest church 
member in Pittsburg and in Philadelphia, in the latter city serv- 
ing for many years as the Treasurer of the Woman's Home Mis- 
sionary Society, 



*John Davidson McCord, the son of James and Susan (Davidson) 
McCord, was born at Newville, Cumberland Co., Pa. The family 
belonged to that large body of Scotch-Irish Presbyterians, who 
from 1720 to 1760 settled near the Susquehanna in Central Penn- 
sylvania. The McCords, Robinsons, Blaines, Moor heads, and 
other families were intermarried from an early date and shared 
in the hardships of the early times. In early life Mr. McCord be- 
came a hatter by trade. In 1833 in company with two friends he 
opened at Pittsburg a house for the hat and fur trade. The 
business in 1847 fell wholly into the hands of himself and a 
younger brother, James S. McCord, under the name of McCord Sc 
fco. The firm is still conducted (1901) under the same name. 
Mr. McCord was a very successful business man, and having se- 
cured a. competence he retired from active service in 1867, and 
spent the closing years of his life in Philadelphia, passing away 
on July 1, 1900, in his 92d year. He became closely connected 



115 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Reaidenoe. 




VI 


f AXEXANDEB COCHRAN 


Nov. 26, 


Deo. 81, 


Sewickley, 






EOBINSON*, W i 1- 


1622. 


1875. 


Pa. 






liam A.* Thoiiia8\ 








Oct. 23, 




i George', Philip", 








1868. 




1 Thomas^ 

1 Catherine Mather 

L Ely. 










VII 


1. Alexander Cochran 
m. Emma Jones. 


Oct. 19, 
1864. 








t( 


2. Selden Marvin. 


Nov. 20, 
1866. 








i( 


3. Rosalina. 


Nov. 19, 
1871. 


Mar. 12, 
1876. 






i( 


4. Philip Ely. 


Mar. 18, 
1876. 







Alexander C. B., eldest son of Wm. A. and Nancy Robin- 
son, was born at the paternal home in the township of North 
East, Erie Co., Pa., where he spent his childhood and early youth. 
At the early age of seventeen, he begtin to teach in the public 
schools. Manhood began precociously with him. He early de- 
termined to leave home and make his own fortune, and before the 
close of his 19th year he "went west*' and began fanning in the 
summer and teaching school in the winter in Laporte Co., In- 
diana. His experiences as given by himself in his letters are very 
interesting. Not meeting with the coveted success at farming 
where crops were doubtful, he went to Chicago, then in its youth, 
and engaged in mercantile life, purchasing ground that a few 
years later proved to be of very great value. Summoned to 
Pittsburg he disposed of his interests in Chicago and in the year 
1848 entered into the fur and hat trade with McCord & Co. A 
short time later, in connection vtrith his brothers, a large carpet 
house was opened and the business was carried on successfully 



both at Pittsburg and Philadelphia with public enterprises and 
benevolent institutions. For forty-five years he served as a Rul- 
ing Elder in the Presbyterian church and became prominent in 
the government of several of its benevolent, educational, and 
religious agencies. His life was one of honorable and successful 
efforts to live worthily, bless his fellowmen, and serve his God. 
Few men ever won a heartier esteem from his fellow citizens or 
a deeper love from his Christian brethren. He reached his great 
age in the quiet and happy possession of all his faculties and 
ready for his departure from earth. His body was laid to rest 
in the family lot at Pittsburg. 



116 



for seTeral years. In 1863, when the bankings hotiae of Bobinson 
Bros, was formed, he became a member of the firm and continued 
in it until his death, December 31, 1875. A. G. B. was from early 
life thoughtful beyond his years, making his profession of faith 
in Jesus Christ at the age of twelve. Through life he was a con- 
serratlTe in politics and religious views, a man of fine business 
qualities, a lover of the best literature, a man of incorruptible 
integrity, and a sincere and devout Christian. To his younger 
brothers he was greatly devoted and ready for any sacrifice that 
would promote their welfare. 

He found his wife in Bipley, N. Y. She still survives him after 
a quarter of a century, and his son A. C. B., Jr., is a member 
of the firm of Bobinson Bros. The mother is of New England 
origin and the family can be traced back through the names of 
Ely, Marvin, Mather, etc., for many generations. 



MArriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residenoe. 



Feb., 
1861. 



VI 



r John F. Bobinson*, 
William A.» Thom- 
as*, George*, Phil- 
ip*, Thomas*. 
Philena Alice Liv- 
ingston. 

No issue. 



Mar. 0, 
1824. 



Sewickley, 
Pa. 



John F. B., second son of Wm. A. and Nancy Bobinson, 
was bom in the township of North East, Erie Co., Pa., March 9, 
1824« After school and academy and farm days were over, he 
Was for a time in a general dry goods and grocery store in Bipley, 
N. Y. In the year 1848, he came to Pittsburg and was for a few 
years in the dry goods store of Murphy and Burchfield, then 
became a partner in the carpet house of Bobinson & Co., and 
about 1863 united with his brothers in forming the banking house 
of Bobinson Bros. He continued a member of the firm until 1891, 
when his failing health led him to withdraw. 

Since the year 1870 he has resided in Sewickley, a suburb of 
Pittsburg, on the banks of the Ohio. His life from his early man- 
hood has been a very busy one. For the last twenty-one years he 
has been a Buling Elder in the First Presbyterian Church of 
Sewickley^ His wife is a member of a family of New England 
origin, who came to Pittsburg in 1833. Her father was a manu- 
facturer in iron, and a Buling Elder in the Third Presbyterian 
Church of Pittsburg. 



JOHN F. Robinson. 



117 



Marriage. 


G«n. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


l>eath. 


Residence. 


Oct. 10, 


VI 


fNANOT 3iABTIN ROB- 


Mar. 80, 


1876 


North East, 


1860. 




INSON*, William 
A.\ T h o m a s\ 
i George*, Philip", 
Thomas^ 


1826. 




Pa. 






Alexander Cochran, 


Jan. 11, 


Oct. 12, 


Westfield, 






L M. D. 


1825. 


1866. 


N. Y. 




VII 


1. William Robinson m. 


Apr. 6, 




Knox^ille, 






Frances Mildred 


1864. 




Tenn. 






Parker. 









Nancy M. R., was a woman of remarkably unselfish and lorely 
character, and a most devoted Christian. More than any of the 
children of her parents, her life was g^ven to them; her married 
life being bnt Ave brief years. Dr. C. was a physician in Westfield, 
N. Y., a man of high character and great devotion to his profes- 
sion, and with a rapidly growing practice. 



VI 


David Robinson*, Wil- 


Jan. 80, 


Jan. 7, 


PitUburg, 




liam A.* Thomas^, 


1828. 


1896. 


Pa. 




George', Philip*, 










ThomasS 









David R., son of William A. and Nancy (Cochran) Robinson, was 
born at North East, Pa., on Jan. 30, 1828. His parents were both, 
of Scotch-Irish descent and of Presbyterian ancestry as far back 
as the lines of lineage have been traced. The mother was born 
near Belfast, Ireland, in 1797, and was brought to this country 
by her parents in 1802. The ancestors of his father had been in 
this country since about 1730, being residents of the Cumberland 
Valley, Pa., and among its earliest settlers. It was one of the 
choicest of Christian homes into which David Robinson was bom. 
It was no home of worldly wealth, but rather one of hardy and 
manly struggle in which all the members of the household were 
taught to share. It was a country home where amid the quietness 
of farm life were daily illustrated the beauty and power of true 
religion. It was an intelligent home, full of quickening influences. 
To parental training was added in early youth the discipline of 
the country school. This was followed by the village select 
school, four miles away, where preparation for college life viras 
begun. 

In the fall of 1845, after a few months of special study, David 



118 

BobinBon was admitted as a freihman into Oberlin College, with 
the expectation of completing the course and entering upon a 
professional life. Failing health and other canses defeated the 
purpose, and in the fall of 1848 he entered the banking house of 
William H. Williams, of Erie, Pa. Early in 1850 he was called to 
Pittsburg and became a clerk in the well-known house of N. 
Holmes & Sons, Bankers. Within a couple of years, he entered 
the banking house of Thompson Bell and became one of its 
partners. A few years later was organized the banking firm of 
Bobinson, McClain A Co., which in 18G3 was succeeded by the 
house of Bobinson Bros., five brothers eventually entering into 
the partnership, Alexander C, John F., David, William A., and 
Samuel M. He was a member of the firm at his death. For over 
forty years he was closely connected with the business interests 
of Pittsburg. He became widely known and very highly esteemed 
for his ability and integrity and was called to positions of trust. 
He was yet more closely identified with the religious interests 
of the city and of the Presbyterian Church throughout the coun- 
try. All religious movements awakened his interest, and they 
summoned him to their help not in vain. Trusteeships, Treas- 
urerships, and Directorships were thrust upon him. He became 
a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Pittsburg on July 
1st, 1855, and was soon afterwards called to serve as S. S. Super* 
intendent. Trustee, and Buling Elder. The latter office he filled 
until his death, thirty-three years. At different times he was a 
member of the higher courts of the church, Presbjrtery, Synod, 
and General Assembly, and for several years he served most 
efficiently the Western Theological Seminary in the three-fold 
capacity of Trustee, Director, and Treasurer. The benevolent 
organizations of the city turned to him for counsel. He was a 
generous and large giver to church needs and to general charities. 
The triumph of his life came in the last few years — ^years of 
physical pain but of ceaseless effort to carry out plans of general 
blessing, one of the last of which was securing an endowment of 
$70,000 for the Theological Seminary of which he was a Director. 
His religious life was calm and clear and strong. He never 
wavered as he walked amid the doubt and darkness of a world of 
unbelief and sin. He was hopeful, full of generous charity toward 
all men. His death was sudden and unanticipated. He closed his 
eyes and was gone. His body sleeps in the family lot beside his 
parents in the cemetery at North East, Pa. 



DAVJD KOHIKS 



119 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




VI 


r T H o M A 8 Hastings 


Jan. 80, 




Pittsburg, 


May 18, 
,1866. 




Robinson*, W i 1 - 


1828. 




Pa. 




liam A.% Thomas*, 
George", Philip*, 












Thomas^ 












Mary Wolf Buehler. 


May 10, 
1883. 


Oct. 20, 
1901. 






VII 


1. Henry Buehler. 


Dec. 27, 
1867. 


Dec. 80, 
1857. 








2. Anna Margaretta. 


July 21, 
1859. 


Dec. 28, 
1881. 








3. William Andrew m. 
Anna Green Mac- 
TAren. 


Sept.26, 
1861. 










4. Eliza McGormick m. 
George Richmond 
Fleming. 


Aug. 6, 
1868. 










5. Edward r t h m. 
Mary Baird Mc- 
Enight. 


May 20, 
1866. 










6. Thomas Hastings, 
j r., n^. Anna 
Jacobus Scott. 


Feb. 6. 
1871. 










7. Mary Buehler. 


Jan. 26, 












1874. 







Thomas H. R., twin brother of David R. and son of William 
Andrew Robinson and Nancy Gochran Robinson, was born in the 
township of North East, Eric Co., Pa., January 30, 1828. He re- 
ceived his early education in the common schools of the day and 
in the Ripley Academy, Ripley, N. Y. After spending a year in 
the Preparatory Department of Oberlin College, he entered the 
College as Freshman in 1846, and graduated from it in 1850. The 
vacations in his College course were spent in teaching common 
and select schools, and for over a year after his graduation he 
was engaged in teaching in a Classical and English Academy at 
Ashtabula, O., and in a Normal School at Farrlngton, O. 

Having made a public confession of Christ during his college 
course he devoted his life to the gospel ministry, and in the 
winter of 1851-1852 he entered the Western Theological Seminary, 
Allegheny, Pa., and completed its three years course in May, 1854. 
On June 15, 1854, he was received under the care of the Presbytery 
of Ohio, since divided into the Presbyteries of Pittsburg and 
Allegheny, and on the same day, after examination, was licensed 
to preach the gospel. His first sermon was delivered on June 
20, 1854, in the First Presbyterian Church of Pittsburg, of which 
he was a member. Upon the following Sabbath, June 27, 1854, 



120 

upon the first Sabbath in July, 1854, and on the Wednesday 
evening intervening, he gave by invitation five discourses to the 
congregation of the English Presbyterian Church, Harrisburg, 
Pa. (now the Market Square church), and on July 5th he was 
unanimously called to be colleague pastor of the church with the 
Bev. William B. DeWitt, D. D. The call was accepted and early 
in October, 1854, he came to Harrisburg and entered upon the 
duties of his office. 

On October 17th he was received as a licentiate into the Pres- 
bytery of Harrisburg (N. S.), and on January 21, 1855, he was 
ordained and installed as co-pastor of the church. The colleague 
relationship with Dr. DeWitt lasted thirteen years, but for most 
of the time Dr. DeWitt gave the duties of the charge to his col- 
league. Upon his death in 1867 the sole charge of the church was 
continued by the younger colleague, until the relationship was 
dissolved by the Presbytery of Carlisle to take effect on the first 
Sabbath of June, 1884. He continued to fill the pulpit until the 
last Sabbath in June, the thirtieth anniversary of his first ser- 
mon to the congregation, when he preached his farewell dis- 
course. 

In November, 1883, he was called by the Directors of the West- 
ern Theological Seminary to the Be-union Professorship of Sacred 
Bhetoric, Pastoral Theology, and Church Qovernment. He accept- 
ed the call but was unable to enter upon the duties of the 
Seminary until January, 1885. This position he held until May, 
1901, when he retired. 

Many duties outside of the pastorate and professorship have 
been laid upon him. He was for many years a Trustee and Presi- 
dent pro tem. of Wilson College for Women, Chambersburg, Pa., 
from 1875 to 1887 a Trustee of Princeton College, N. J., and has 
been for several years a Trustee of Washington and Jefferson 
College, and of the Pennsylvania College for Women, Pittsburg, 
Pa. Prom 1875 to 1884 he was a Director in the Western Theolo- 
gical Seminary. 

He was moderator of the Synod of Pennsylvania (N. S.) in 1861, 
and at the Be-union of the O. S. and N. S. Presbyterian Churches 
in 1870 he was made Stated Clerk of the Synod of Harrisburg. 
He held this office until the consolidation of the four Synods in 
Pennsylvania into one, when he was chosen Stated Clerk of the 
new Synod of Pennsylvania, resigning in 1884, when he began 
the work of his Professorship. 

During the Civil War, 1861-1865, he was a member of the United 
States Christian Commission, directing its work in Central Penn- 
sylvania and for two or three months visiting the battlefields 
of Tennessee and Virginia in 1863. 



8 Hastings Robinson, 



121 



He was a member of the General Assembly N. S. in 1858 and 1866, 
and of the re-united Assemblies of 1873, 1882, and 1892, and was a 
delegate to the Alliance of the Reformed Churches throughout 
the world at the meetings held in London, 1875 and 1889. 

On May 13, 1856, he married Mary Wolf Buehler, of Harrisburg, 
Pa., daughter of Col. Henry and Anna Margaretta (Wolf) Buehler. 
The mother was the only daughter of Hon. George Wolf, GoTemor 
of Pennsylvania, 1829-1835. The ancestry of Mrs. Bobinson on 
both her father's and mother's side were German and Moravian 
in descent. 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




VI 


William Andrew 


June 17, 




Pittsburg, 






Bobinson*, W i 1- 


1880. 




Pa. 


Oot. 20, 

1874. 




liam A.', Thomas^, 










^ George*, Philip", 










Thomas^ 












Alice Elizabeth 


1884. 










Blaine. 










Vll 


1. Alice. 


Mar. 29, 
1876. 








u 


2. Alexander Blaine. 


Apr. 7, 
1878. 








tt 


3. William Andrew. 


Aug. 22, 
1880. 







William A. B., the fifth son of William A. and Nancy 
Cochran Bobinson, was bom in the township of North East, Erie 
Co., Pa., June 17, 1830. His boyhood and early youth were spent 
amid the exi>eriences and training of home and school and farm 
life, the school life ending with the Academy and Normal School. 
Abandoning the life of the farm he came to Pittsburg in 1853 and 
was for a few years in the carpet store of Bobinson & Co. Then 
he became a partner in the firm of Livingston A Co., a foimdry 
and machine manufacturing company. 

At the opening of the Civil War in 1861, W. A. Bobinson was 
among the first to respond to the call of President Lincoln for 
seventy-five thousand soldiers of the Army of the Union. His 
war record is here given: 

He enlisted as a private in Co. A, 9th Pennsylvania Beserves, 
d8th Pennsylvania Volunteers. This company was known as *'The 
Pittsburg Bifles." The date of his enlistment was April 17, 1861. 
He was mustered in May 1, 1861. He was promoted to Corporal, 
then to Sergeant, and the company came on at once to Washing- 
ton, D. C. On November 1, 1861, he was commissioned 2d Lieuten- 
ant in the 73d Penna. Volimteers, and on November 5, 1861, was 



122 

commissioned Ist Lieutenant, Co. E, 77th Pennsylvania Volunteers. 
On February 13, 1862, he received a commission as Captain of 
Co. E, and on March 25, 1865, was made Major of the Regiment^ 
not mustered — and on May 22, 1865, he was commissioned as Lieut. 
Col. of the Begiment, 77th Pennsylvania Volunteers. Later he 
was created Brevet Colonel and Brigadier General, United States 
Volunteers, for gallant and meritorious services during the war, 
to date from March 13, 1865. 

Below is a record of services rendered. On reaching Washing- 
ton, he was assigned to the Third Brigade, McCall's Division, 
Pennsylvania Beserves. September, 1861, he was put on picket 
duty at Great Falls, Maryland. In November he was trans- 
ferred vnth his regiment to the Fourth Brigade, Gen. McCook's 
Division, Department of the Ohio, Camp on the Nolin Biver, Ten- 
nessee. In December, the 77th was transferred to the Fifth 
Brigade, Second Division, Department of the Ohio, and arrived at 
Nashville, Tenn., March 2, 1862. Operations on Decatur and Nash- 
ville R. R. Battle of Shiloh, April 6 and 7. Duty at Pittsburg Land- 
ing, April and May, 1862. Siege of Corinth, Miss., May 26-30. 
Operations along the line of the Memphis and Tennessee B. B. De- 
fence of Louisville, Ky., Sept. 25. Fern Creek, October 1. Law- 
renceburg, October 8 and 9. Transferred to Third Brigade, Second 
Division, Department of the Cumberland. Scout duty during No- 
vember. Lavergne, Tenn., Nov. 27. December at Triune, Tenn. 
Murfreesboro, or Stone River, Dec. 30, 1862, to Jan. 3, 1863. 
Wounded slightly in battle at Stone River, Dec. 30, 1862. 2d Bri- 
gade, 2d Division, 20th Corps, Army of the Cumberland, scout and 
fatigue duty near Murfreesboro, until June. Selected by Gen. 
Rosecrans* order as member of the roll of honor to form a pro- 
posed regiment for special service (regiment never organized). 
June 24, Lafayette, Tenn. June 25, Liberty Gap. Sept. 17-18, Mc- 
Lemore's Cave. Chickamauga, Ga., Sept. 1^20. Wounded on head 
and prisoner of war, Sept. 19. Taken east and confined in Libbey 
Prison, Richmond, Va.; Salisbury, N. C; Macon, Ga., and Charles- 
ton, S. C; under fire of Union g^uns from Charleston Harbor while 
at Charleston; removed to stockade, at Columbia, S. C. Exchanged 
November, 1864; returned to his command of the 77th Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, in 3d Brigade, 1st Division, 4th Corps, 
Army of the Cumberland, at Franklin, Tenn., Nov. 30, 1864. 
Nashville, Tenn., December 15-16. In pursuit of enemy to Hunts- 
ville, Ala., and on duty at Huntsville until March 13, 1865. Ex- 
pedition to Bull's Gap, East Tenn., March and April, 1865. 1st 
Brigade, 1st Division, 4th Corps, June, 1865. Ordered to Texas, re- 
moved thither via New Orleans, La. On duty on Guadalupe River, 
near Victoria, Texas. Returned north by sea. Discharged Dec. 
5, 1865, and finally mustered out vdth the regiment at Camp Cad- 



L Martin RoamsoN, 



123 

walader, near Philadelphia, Jan., 1866. W. A. Bobinson's army 
life was filled with events of great interest. Since the close of the 
war he has been an active member of the banking house of 
Bobinson Bros., in which he is now, 1902, the senior partner; 
a prominent man in the Grand Army circles, in the Society 
of the Army of the Cumberland, and in the Chickamauga 
Battlefield Association. He has also taken part in the benevo- 
lent, educational, and religious agencies of Pittsburg. He is a 
Buling Elder in the First Presbyterian Church of Pittsburg and 
a Trustee of the Western Theologfical Seminary. He married in 
1874 Alice E. Blaine, of North East, Pa., daughter of Alex. W. 
Blaine, of North East, and granddaughter of Alex. T. Blaine, one 
of the first settlers of Erie county. Pa. 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



VI 



Samuel Martin Bobin- 
son', William A,\ 
ThomasS George*, 
Philip', Thomas*. 



July 9, May 20, 



1888. 



1902. 



Pittsburg, 
Pa. 



Samuel Martin B., the youngest son of William Andrew and 
Nancy Cochran Bobineon, was born in North East township, Pa. 
His early life was spent in the paternal home. On December 15, 
1853, he joined his brothers at Pittsburg, Pa., and on December 
16th entered the banking house of Thompson Bell, leaving it in 
July, 1868, to enter the First National Bank of Pittsburg. Here 
he filled the position of teller imtil his resignation on account 
of impaired health in February, 1870. The five years that fol- 
lowed were spent mainly at North East, Pa., withdrawn from ac- 
tive business. He returned to Pittsburg in 1875, and for five years 
was President of the South Pittsburg Gas Works, controlled by 
Bobinson Bros. He then became a member of the banking house, 
from which he retired about 1896. At the time of his death, in 1902, 
he was residing in Pittsburg. 



Dec. 8, 


1 

VI 


r Mart A n n e B a b r*, 


Dec. 8, 


Dec. 10, 




1844. 




Hetty Bobinson', 
Thomas^, George*, 
Philip". Thomas*. 


1820. 


1846. 








William Hilton, car- 




Mar. 4, 


Mishawaka, 






riagemaker. 




1894. 


Ind. 




Vll 


1. Mary Ellen, unmar- 


Feb., 




Mayfield, 
Cal. 






ried. 


1846. 





124 



MATTlage. 



6«n. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



1844. 



VI 



VII 



VI 



VII 



(4 



l( 



VI 



f Julia Babb*, Hetty 
Bobinson", Thom- 
as*, George*, Phil- 
ip", Thomas*. 

^ James M. Hubbabd. 

1. Julia C. m. George 
Gordon. 

Mabtha Babb*, Hetty 
Bobinson^ Thom- 
as*, George", Phil- 
ip", Thomas^ 
L Wbight Mubphy. 

1. Bobinson Barr m. 
Lina V. Johnson. 

2. Martha Charlotte 

m. Dr. Clarence M. 
Whiting. 

3. Frances Ella m. Wil- 

liam Holyoke. 



Sept. 11, 
1828. 



Feb. 1, 
1846. 






VII 



.( 



k( 



u 



u 



VI 



VII 



(( 



(( 



t( 



f Milt ON F. Babb", 
Hetty Bobinson", 
Thomas*, George", 
Philip", ThomasS 
Cathabine Johnson. 

1. Margaret Lovina m. 

BeT. Alfred C. 
Walkup. 

2. William Milton m. 

Jane Chambers Al- 
len. 

3. Bobinson Lincoln m. 

Anna £. Edmiston. 

4. Hetty Martha m. 
Thomas P. Camp- 
bell. 

5. Oliver Edwin m. 
Dora M. Topping. 

f Bobinson A. Babb", 
Hetty B.", Thom- 
as*, George", Phil- 
ip", Thomas*. 
Nancy Slocuic. 

1. Hetty Ann. 

2. Edwin Bobinson. 

3. George Slocum. 

4. William M. 



Sept.25, 
1825. 



May 11, 
1849. 

Jan. 4, 
1861. 

Apr. 27, 
1866. 

Nov. 18, 
182g. 



Hayward, 
Cal. 



Deo. 18, 

1887. 



Apr. 3, 
1866. 

May 10, 
1867. 

Mar. 14, 
1860. 

May 8, 
1864. 

June 11, 
1866. 

July 6, 
1838. 



June 8, 

1866. 
Aug. 1, 

1868. 
Jan. 18, 

1876. 
Aug. 26, 

1878. 



Aug. 8, 
1888. 



Front Royal, 

Va. 
Cedar Bap- 
ids, Iowa. 

• 

Topeka, 
Kansas. 

Harrison, 
Idaho. 



Sanger, Cal. 

Fresno, Cal. 

Western 
Park, Kan. 

St. Maries, 
Idaho. 



Mar. 29, 
1867. 

July 28, 
1874. 

Sep. 10, 
1896. 



125 



Mftrriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




VI 


r Calvin Robinson 


Oct. 1, 


Sep. 22, 








Doty*, Nancy B.», 


182K 


1860. 








< Thomas% George*, 












Philip*, Thomas^ 












>- Sarah A. Townsend. 


1822 


Aug. 22, 
1866. 


. 




VII 


1. Kate Carol m. Elisha 


Nov. 28, 


Apr. 24, 


Springfieldt 






Burr Maynard. 


1847. 


1889. 


Mass. 




K 


2. Emma Francis. 


Oct. 20, 
1849. 


Feb. 20, 
1860. 






(( 


3. Wm. Henry Calvin 
m. Ella Frances 
Maynard. 


Aug. 27, 
1862. 








U 


4. Sarah Louisa m. Ed- 
gar L. Hills. 


June 28, 
1856. 








VI 


r Sarah Matilda Rob- 


Dec. 26, 


1868 


Conneaui* 


• 




inson*, George 
VV.*, Thomas*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas^ 
(^Newton Truesdale. 


1826. 




vills, Pa. 


• 


VII 


1, Geo. Henry, unmar- 


May 26, 


Dec. 18, 


Oonneaut- 






ried. 


1866. 


1899. 


ville. 




VI 


r JosiAH Whitney Rob- 


Mar. 26, 


Apr. 8, 


Fanner, 






inson*, George 


1829. 


1898. 


Girard, Pa» 






W.*, Thomas*, 












George*, Philip*, 












Thomas.^ 












Nancy Jane Fergu- 












^ SON. 








June 2, 


VTl 


1. Mary Matilda m. Ed- 


Jan. 80, 






1892. 




ward H. Lichten- 
walner. 


1860. 








44 


2. Jane America. 


June 16, 
1866. 


Sep. 20, 
1868. 






VI 


r Joseph Wyllis Rob- 


Mar. 26, 




Farmer, 






inson*, George 


1829. 




Girard, Pa» 






W.*, Thomas*, 












-l George*, Philii)*, 












Thomas^ 












^America Robertson 








April 4, 




^» Laura A. Graves. 








1896. 




No issue. 










VI 


'Edwin Evans Robin- 


Dec. 8, 


Mar. 20, 


Erie, Pa. 






son*, George W.*, 


1888. 


1892. 








Thomas*, George*, 












Philip^, Thomas*. 












LRosetta J. Bailey. 










VII 


1. William E. 










II 


2. Walter. 









126 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



June 15, 
1856. 



Feb. 4, 
1875. 



if 



« 



VI r Edwin Rush Tuttle*, 
Mary Ann R.», 
Thomas*, George*, 
Philip", Thomas*. 
Maby Sherwood. 



1882 



VII 1. Edith Sherwood. 

2. Annie Robinson m. 
Rev. W. H. Jeflers, 
D. D. 

3. Mary Oeorgianna. 



VI 



Feb. 19. 
1858. 



VII 



VI 



VII 



C( 



u 



14 



VI 



Fbanklin Case Rob- 
I N s o N*, Josephs 
Thomas*, George", 
Philip", Thomas.» 
Caroline Rutledoe. 
Alice Florence. 



''Frances Mary Rob- 
inson", Joseph", 
Thomas*, George", 
Philip", Thomas*. 
Alexander F. Wil- 
liams. 

1. Ella Ophelia m. John 

S. Thompson. 

2. Anna Sarah m. J. 

Price Crawford, M. 
D. 

3. Frederick Crosby. 

4. Joseph Robinson. 



Aug. 29, 
1887. 

Nov. 9, 
1858. 

Sep. 5, 
1860. 

Mar. 19, 
1868. 

July 21, 
1885. 



Dec. 27, 
1868. 



July 15, 
1874. 

June 16, 
1881. 



Jan. 1, 
1890. 

May 9, 
1897. 



Chicago. 



Sewickley, 
Pa. 



Dayenport, 
Iowa. 



July 81, 
1887. 



VII 



r Lydia Robinson", 
Alexander H.", 
Thomas*, George", 
Philip", Thomas^ 
James L. Anoell. 
1. Harriet Robinson. 



June, 
1826. 

Mar. 5, 
1859. 

Feb. 15, 
1862. 

Sep. 11, 
1870. 

Mar. 19, 
1876. 

1885 



Dec. 15, 
1887. 



Davenport, 
Iowa. 



Sep. 21, 
1894. 

Feb. 16, 
1894. 



Davenport, 
Iowa. 

Davenport, 
Iowa. 



127 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON PAMII^Y. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 


June 6, 


VII 


rJOHN EOBINSON 


Aug. 6, 




Lexington, 


1864. 




Graves', Sidney 

J. D.*, Jean Rob- 
^ inson', Jonathan^, 

George*, Philip', 

Thomas*. 
^ Mary E. Tablton. 


1882. 




Ky. 




VIIT 


1. Eugene Kobinson. 


Nov. 20, 
1866. 


Jan. 19, 
1868. 








2. Edwin Tarlton. 


Mar. 81, 
1867. 










3. Francis Sidney. 


Apr. 10, 
1860. 










4. Clarence Scott m. 
Cora Marshall. 


June 7, 
1864. 










5. George Wilbur. 


Feb. 10, 
1867. 










6. Viola Robinson. 


April 2, 
1869. 


May 27, 
1870. 








7. Robert Lee. 


June 9, 
1874. 










8. Claude Rogers. 


Mar. 2, 












1878. 







John Robinson Graves, eldest son of George W. Graves and Sid- 
ney J. Dougherty, his wife, was bom August 6, 1832, in Kentucky. 
He was educated at the Western Military Institute and the Tran- 
sylvania Law School, Lexington, Ky., from the latter of which he 
was graduated in 1854, and removed to Missouri the same year. 
At the breaking out of the Civil War he entered the Southern 
army as Colonel of the Second Missouri Infantry, and was en- 
gaged in most of the battles fought in the Trans-Mississippi 
Department. He was captured and held as a prisoner during the 
last year of the war, and when peace was restored he returned 
to Kentucky. On September 1, 1867, he was elected Principal of 
the Lexington city schools and continued to fill the position until 
September 1, 1881, when he was elected Principal of the Dudley 
High School of Lexington. This position he still fills. Col. Graves 
while in the army showed the qualities of a brave and honorable 
soldier, and his success as an educator for more than a third of 
a century has been marked by the approval and esteem of his 
fellow citizens. 



128 



MarriARe. 



Gen* 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



Feb. 18. 
1877. 


VII 




VTTT 




<i 




«i 




f( 




(( 


Oct. 10, 
1861. 


VII 




VIII 


Nov. 24, 
1891. 


(1 
«l 




(i 




(( 




44 


Nov. 9, 
1869. 


VII 




VIII 




(( 




4( 




<( 



Fielding Louis 
Gbaves^, SidneyJ. 
D.*, Jean E.', Jon- 
atliaii% George', 
Philip*, Thomas*. 

Leotie Way. 



1. Georgie. 

2. Fielding L., Jr. 

3. Edith. 

4. Harry C. 

5. Lilah. 

fMABQABETj. GBAVE8^ 

Sidney J. D.", 
• Jean R.', Jona- 
t h a n*, George", 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
,Geobge a. Spbakb. 
iT George Graves. 

2. Frank Graves m. 

Kate A. Broadwell. 

3. Elizabeth Gibson. 

4. Richard Anderson. 

5. Sidney Fielding. 

6. Dixie Lee. 



James Doughebty 
GBAVE8^ SidneyJ. 
D.*, Jean R.*, Jon- 
athan\ George*, 
Pftiilip*, Tlhomas*. 

Tebeba C. Pabkeb. 

1. Sidney M. m. Ed- 

ward G. Wright. 

2. James Clay m. Ro- 

berta M. Bryant. 

3. Jefferson Sharp. 

4. Llev^ellyn. 



July 19, 
1838. 



Nov. 29, 

1869. 
Mar. 31, 

1878. 
Mar. 8, 

1880. 
Feb. 28, 

1882. 
May 16, 

1886. 
Mar. 6, 

1890. 

Apr. 29, 
1840. 



May 11, 

1868. 
Feb. 7, 

1866. 
June 20, 

1868. 
May 6, 

1871. 
Jan. 26, 

1874. 
July 12, 

1876. 

July 11. 
1848. 



June 16, 

1861. 
Jan. 9, 

1871. 
Mar. 19, 

1872. 
Feb. 6, 

1879. 
Mar. 28, 

1881. 



Sep. 20, 
1891. 



Feb. 28, 

1877. 



Mar. 26, 
1881. 



Bannock, 
Montaaa. 



Cynthiana, 
Ky. 



Atlanta, Ga. 

Oynthiana, 

Ky. 
Denver, CoL 

Gynthiana, 

Ky. 
Oynthiana, 

Ky. 



OongresB 
Heights, 
Washington,. 
D. C. 



129 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



VIII 



({ 



June 27, 
1870. 



VII 



VIII 



(< 



Aug. 16, 
1872. 



VII 



VIII 



(I 



Mar. 19, 
1873. 



VII 



VIII 



i( 



(C 



5. Gertrude. 

6. Barak Thomas. 



Georgette GRAVES^ 
Sidney J. D.", Jean 
R.«, Jonathan^, 
Georges Philip*, 
Thomas*. 
.John Thomas Hogg. 

1. Clara Fielding m. S. 

B. Smith. 

2. Frank Thomas. 



f America Virginia 
Palmer', William 
H. P.% Anne W. 
B.', Jonathan*, 
George", Philip*, 
Thomas^ 

. T. B. Bell, M. D. 

1. Mary Willina. 

2. Charles Jasper. 



[Sarah Elizabeth 
Palmer', William 
H. P.«, Anne W. 
B.', Jonathan*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 

^ James B. Owsley. 

1. Martha Frances. 

2. Mary Catharine m. 
Boten. 

3. Bryant Palmer. 



Sep. 2, 
1883. 

Sep. 16, 
1886. 

Nov. 18, 
1845. 



Dec. 7, 
1872. 

Mar. 1, 
1882. 

June 11, 
1849. 



May 8, 
1887. 



Oct. 27, 
1881. 

June 16, 
1885. 

Dec. 24, 
1860. 



Dec. 25, 
1889. 



vn 



VIII 



'Jonathan Haskell 
Palmer', William 
H. P.«, Anne W. 
B.', Jonathan*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 

^ Cora Davidson. 

1. William Samuel. 



Aug. 9, 
1874. 

Dec. 21, 
1876. 

Dec. 20. 
1888. 

Oct. 8, 
1860. 



Mar. 29, 
1891. 



Cynthlana, 
Ky. 



Georgetown, 
Col. 



Apr. 9, 
1891. 



Denver, Col. 



Sep. 6, 
1890. 



Dec. 24, 

1884. 



Georgetown, 



•rget 
Col. 



LAke Clty» 
Col. 



130 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



VII 



Aug. 19, 
1891. 



VIU 

it 

(i 
(( 
ii 

VII 



VIII 



VII 



VIII 



(( 



{( 



f Db. Newton J. Hock- 

E N 8 M I T H, JR.^ 

Jean B. P.*, Anne 
W. R.*, Jonathan*, 
George", PhUip*, 
Thomas*. 

[ Jane A. Watson. 

1. Frank W. 

Z. Rowena M. m. E. V. 
Beach. 

3. Fanny K 

4. Watson. 

5. Newton. 

rFBANK Palmer 
Grant*, Frances 
A. P.«, Anne W. 
R.», Jonathan*, 
George", Philip", 
Thomas*. 

^Mary Lewis Wisdom. 

Barton Stone. 



fLEE Wiley GRANT^ 
Frances A. P.*, 
Anne W. R.*, Jon- 
athan*, Geopge", 
Philip", Thomas*. 

^ZoE B. Nelson. 

1. Barton Nelson. 

2. Irene Frances. 

3. Esther Robinson. 



Dec. 4, 
1899. 



Feb. 8, 
1867. 



June 19, 
1892. 

Jan. 27, 
1865. 



VII 



Nov. 25, 
1890. 

Aug. 18, 
1894. 

Apr. 4, 
1896. 



VIII 



VII 



Susan Robinson Bur- 
BRiDOE% Emily 
R.", James F.", 
Jonathan*, 
George", Philip", 
Thomas*. 

Lewis Braxton 
Grigsby. 
L Fanny. 



^WlLLINA BARNES 

Burbrii>ge\ Em- 
ily R.", James F.», 
Jonathan*, 
George", Philip-, 
Thomas*. 
James Barclay. 



June 12, 
1863. 



Fulton, Mo. 



Jefferson 
City, Mo. 



131 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON PAMII^Y. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



Mar. 19, 
1885. 



Oct. 9, 
• 1878. 



VIII 



(I 



VII 



VIII 



II 



VII 



VIII 



Oct. 2, 
1890. 



<< 



<i 



VII 



1. Emily Robinson m. 

Ferdinand Eugene 
Crassons. 

2. James. 



rCHABLES Cliffobd 
McGoBD^, Bosan- 
na B. B.% William 
A.\ Thomas*, 
George', Philip*, 
Thomas^ 
Sabah E. Skyth. 



1. Charles Clifford, Jr. 

2. George Robinson. 

rMABY Robinson Mc- 
C o B D^ Rosanna 
B. R.«, WiUiam 
A.", Thomas*, 
George", Philip*, 
Thomas*. 
Joseph DeFobest 
JuNKiN, lawyer. 
17 Joseph DeForest, Jr. 

2. Rosamund Robinson. 

3. George. 



Apr. 28, 

1872. 



July 28, 
1847. 



Aug. 11, 

1854. 

Jan.. 

1886. 
July 6, 

1888. 

June 27, 



Nov. 9, 
1879. 

Aug. 15, 
1886. 

June 25, 
1891. 



^Alexandeb COCHBANOct. 19, 
Robin80n\ Alex-I 1864. 
ander C. R.% Will- 
iam A.*, Thomas*, 
George", Philip*, 
Thomas^ 
Emma Payne Jones. 
Vlllil. Alexander Cochran. 



(I 



(i 



2« John Noel. 
3. David. 



Nov. 1, 
1891. 

Dec. 25, 
1892. 

Aug. 1, 
1894. 






Jan., 
1886. 



Beaver, Pa. 



Philadelphii 
Pa. 



Pittsburg, 
Pa. 



Alexander C. R., Jr., son of Alexander C. and Catharine Mather 
Ely Robinson, was born in Sewickley, Pa. He was graduated 
from the Western University of Pennsylvania, Pittsburg, Pa., in 
1882, and soon after entered as a clerk in the banking house of 
Robinson Bros., of which he has now been a member for several 



132 



years. On October 2, 1890, he married Emma Payne Jones, daugh- 
ter of John Bright Jones, of Sewickley. He is a ruling elder in 
the First Presbyterian church of Sewickley, Pa. 



Marriage. Geu. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 


May 27, 


VII 


r William Eobinson 


Apr. 6, 




Knox vi lie, 


1896. 




Cochran, M. D.', 
Nancy M. Robin- 
son% William A.*, 
Thomas*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas^ 
Frances Mildred 
Parker. 


1864. 

Dec. 18, 
1868. 




Tenn. 




VIII 


1. WMlliam Bobinson. 


Sep. 5, 
1897. 




• 
• 




(( 


2. Elizabeth Barber. 


Nov. 15, 
1899. 







William Robinson Cochran, son of Dr. Alexander Cochran and 
Nancy M. Robinson, his wife, was born in Westfield, New York. 
He was graduated from the Western University of Pennsylvania 
in 1882 with the degree of Ph. B., and from the University of 
Pennsylvania in 1885 with the degree of M. D. From 1885 to 1894 
he lived in Philadelphia, where he held the following official posi- 
tions: 1885-86, Resident Physician in the Children's Hospital; 1886- 
87, Resident Physician in the Presbyterian Hospital; 1887-88, Sur- 
geon, Out-Patient Dept. of the Presbyterian Hospital; 1888-91, Su- 
perintendent of the Presbyterian Hospital; 1891-94, Visiting Sur- 
geon in the Western Temporary Home. Since 1894 he has lived at 
Knoxville, Tenn., as a practicing physician. In 1898, he was Pro- 
fessor of General Pathology in the Tennessee Medical College, and 
in 1900 he was Surgeon in the Eastern Tennessee Dispensary, and 
President of the Knox County Medical Society. He is a member 
of the Tennessee State Medical Society, the American Medical 
Association, etc. 



Nov. 26, 
1888. 



VII 



VIII 



II 



''William Andrew 
R0BIN80N^ Thom- 
as H.*, William 
A.», Thomas*, 
George", Philip*, 
Thomas*. 
Anna Green Mac- 
Laren. 

1. Elizabeth MacLaren. 

2. Thomas Hastings. 



Sep. 25, 
1861. 



July 5, 
1861. 

Feb. 8, 
1890. 

Jan. 18, 
1898. 



Lawrence- 

ville, N. J. 



133 



William A. K. was born in Harrisburg, Pa.» prepared for col- 
lege at the Harrisburg Academy, and was graduated at Princeton 
College (now Princeton University) in 1881, with high hon- 
ors. He spent two years abroad, studying at Heidelberg and 
Leipzig. He had charge of the department of Greek and German 
at Marietta College, Marietta, O., in 1884, and was Professor of 
Greek at Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pa., in 1887-88. From 
1888 to 1899, he was Professor of Greek and Secretary of the 
Faculty at Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa. In 1899 he 
was called to take charge of the department of Latin in the Law- 
renceville School, Lawrenceville, N. J., which position he now 
holds. He married Anna Green MacLaren, daughter of Rev. 
Donald MacLaren, D. D., Chaplain in the U. S. Navy, and of 
beth (Green) MacLaren. 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



Oct. 9, 
1890. 



VTI 



VIII 



CI 



Oct. 29, 

1898. 



Oct. 2, 
1900. 



VII 



''Eliza McCormick Aug. 5, 

Robin80n\ Thorn- 1868. 

as H.*, William 

A.», Thomas*, 

George', Philip', 

Thomas\ 
George Richmond 

Fleming, lawyer. 
1. Anna Margaretta. 



VIII 



VII 



2. Susanna Mowry. 



^Edward Orth Robin- 

80N\ Thomas H.', 

William A.", 

Thomas*, 

George", Philip*, 

Thomas^ 
Mary Baibd Mc- 

Knight. 
1. Edward Orth, Jr. 



r T H o M A s Hastings 
Robinson, J b.^, 
Thomas H.«, Will- 
iam A.", Thomas*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 
Anna Jacobus Scott. 



VIII Anna Jacobus. 



Sep. 18, 
1860. 

July 80 
1891. ' 

Apr. 28, 
1896. 

May 20, 
1865. 



Jan. 6, 
1898. 



Harrisburg, 
Pa. 



Harrisburg, 
Pa. 



Pittsburg, 
Pa. 



Dec. 17, 
1866. 

Dec. 28, 
1900. 

Feb. 6, 
1871. 



July 4, 
1902. 



Apr. 8, 
1876. 

May 11, 
1902. 



Pittsburg, 
Pa. 



134 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 




Oct. 28, 


VII 


fBoBiNSON Babb Mub- 


May 11, 




Front Royal, 


1875. 




PHY', Martha 
Barr*, Hetty R.», 
Thomas^, George', 
PhiUp% ThomasS 
^ LiNA V. Johnson. 


1849. 




Va. 




Vill 


1. Bobinson Barr, Jr. 


Dec. 28, 
1876. 


May 28, 
1877. 






(( 


2. Martha Charlotte. 


Jan. 28. 
1878. 








(( 


3. Annie Marginia. 


Nov. 8, 
1881. 







Bobinson B. Murphy enlisted in the War of the Bebellion Aug. 
6th, 1862, at the age of thirteen years, two months, and twenty- 
four days, in the 127th Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was made 
orderly to the Colonel of the regiment. In January, 1864, he was 
made orderly to Gen. J. A. J. Lightburn, and participated in sev- 
eral hard fought battles. He received a medal of honor for lead- 
ing two regiments into battle in front of Atlanta on the 28th 
of July, 1864, at which time he had his horse shot from under him, 
being then only 15 years of age. , 

The circumstances under which young Murphy led two regi- 
ments into battle were as follows. The division which Gen. 
Lightburn commanded was that day on the extreme right of the 
army, which was being flanked by the enemy. Young Murphy 
was sent to the right by his General to find out the situation, and 
finding that the enemy had flanked the right wing and were 
driving them, he rode on his pony down the line and met Gen. 
Logan, who that day commanded the Army of the Tennessee, and 
begged him with tears in his eyes for reinforcements, telling 
him they were cutting our right all to pieces. The General re- 
plied, ''I have ordered reinforcements from the left, and here 
they come now, and if you know where they are needed, Bob, 
show them in." And that is how he came to lead the two regi- 
ments that day. 

Wab Depabtment, 
Bbcobd and Pension Division, 
Washington, D. C, May 20th, 1892. 

B. B. Murphy was enrolled August 6, 1862, at the age of thir- 
teen years, and was mustered into service with Company A, 127th 
Illinois Volunteers. He appears to have been present with his 



135 



command, or properly accounted for, from enrollment to the 
mnster out of his company, which occurred Jime 5, 1865. 

Under the proTisions of the act of Congress approved March 3, 
1863, he was, on July 15th, 1890, awarded a medal o^ honor for 
conspicuous bravery at Atlanta, Oa., July 22d and 28th, 1864. 
By authority of the Secretary of War: 

[Signed] F. P. Aucswobth, 

Major and Burgeon, V. 8. Army. 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



Sep. 27, 
1877. 



VII 



June 10. 
1877. ' 



VIII 



IC 



ft 



VII 



VIII 



u 



(I 



r Martha Charlotte 
MnRPHT\ Martha 
Barr«, Hetty B.", 
Thomas*, Geor^^', 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
Clarence M. Whit- 
ing, M. D. 

1. Clara Fannie. 

2. Hall Sanf ord. 

3. Harry Murphy. 



Jan. 4, 
1861. 



Jan. 22, 
1878. 

Apr. 26, 
1888. 

Apr. 26, 
1888. 



Frances Ella Mur- Apr. 27, 



VII 



VIII 






PHY', Martha 
Barr*, Hetty B.», 
Thomas*, George", 
Philip*, Thomas^ 
William Holtoke. 

1. Martha Adaline. 

2. Joseph Murphy. 

3. Elizabeth Murphy. 



rMARGARST LOVINA 

BARR^ Milton F.*, 
Hetty B.», Thom- 
as*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas^ 
Bbv. Alfred C. 
Walkup. 
1. John Milton. 



2. Alfred William. 

3. Eleanor M. 



1855. 



Jan. 22, 
1878. 

Oct. 21, 
1880. 

May 80, 
1887. 

Apr. 8, 
1855. 



Aug. 21, 
1888. 

Sep. 18, 
1888. 



Cedar Rspidt 
Iowa. 



Nov. 8, 
1886. 



Aug. 8, 
1888. 



Topeka» 
fan. 



Oct. 4, 
1881. 

Mar. 4, 
1884. 



Oberlin, O. 

Oberlin, O. 
Oberlin, O. 



136 



Rev. Alfred C. Walkup is a missionary of the American Board 
of Commissioners for Forei^ Missions to the Gilbert Islands, 
and Captain of the missionary ship, Hiram Bingham. He was 
ordained 1880 and commissioned the same year. 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Nov. 4, 
1890. 



VII 



VIII 



n 



If 



(( 



i( 



K 



May 19, 
1881. 



VII 



VIII 



VII 



VIII 



({ 



(( 



r William M i l to n 
Babr% Milton F.*, 
Hetty R.», Thom- 
as*, George*, 
Philips Thomas*. 
Jane Chambers 
Allen. 

1. Caroline Levenie. 

2. James Allen. 

3. Mary Robinson. 

4. Alice Jane. 

5. Milton Frank. 

6. Edwin Lewis. 



" Robinson Lincoln 
Barr', Milton F. 
BarrS Hetty R.», 
Thomas*, George", 
Philip', Thomas*. 
Anna E. Edmiston. 
1. Jessie Levenie. 



fHETTY Martha 
Barr% Milton ¥•, 
Hetty R.», Thom- 
as*, George', Phil- 
ip*, Thomas*. 
Thomas P. Camp- 
bell. 

1. Lee Milton. 



2. Kate Lavenia. 

3. Ada Francelia. 



May 10, 
1867. 



Dec. 16, 

1886. 
Sep. 6, 

1887. 
July 19, 

1890. 
Mar. 26, 

1892. 
June 22, 

1893. 
Mar. 13, 

1896. 

Mar. 14, 
1860. 



Aug. 11, 
1896. 

May 8, 
1864. 



Oct. 26, 
1882. 

Aug. 29, 
1884. 

Apr. 28, 
1886. 



Residence. 



Sanger, Cal. 



Fresno, Gal. 



Western 
Park, Kan. 



137 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




VITT 


4. Thomas Robinson. 


May 22, 

1888. 








(( 


5. Dwight. 


June 18, 
1890. 








(1 


6. Marion Barr. 


Aufir. 20, 










1892. 










June 11, 








VII 


'Oliver Edwin Barr% 
Milton F.\ Hetty 
R.% Thomas*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 

^DORA M. Topping. 


1866. 




St. Maries, 
Idaho. 




VIII 


1. Clark M. 










«4 


2. Erma May. 


Mar. 26, 
1897. 






Aug. 29, 

4 ^^te^^ 


VII 


1 

-Kate Carol Doty\ Nov. 28. 


Apr. 24, 


Springfield, 


1870. 




CalTin D.% Nancy 
R.S Thomas*, 
George', Philip*, 


1847. 


1889. 


Mass. 






Thomas*. 










Elisha Burr May-' 




Springfield, 






NARD, Judge of 




Mass. 






the Superior; 










Court. 








VIII 


1. Robert Doty m.'June 3, 
Grace M. Par- 1871. 
menter. 1 




Springfield, 
Mass. 






2. Isabelle Prances. Sep. 26, 


Sep. 27, 










1878. 


1887. 








3. Elisha Burr. 


May 27, 
1876. 


Oct. 11, 
1876. 








4. Ruth. 


Aug. 18, 
1876. 










5. Josephine. 


Mar. 28, 
1878. 


Apr. 26, 
1878. 


. 






6. Paul. 


Nov. 1, 
1879. 


Sep. 29, 
1886. 








7. William Doty. 


Mar. 18, 
1889. 






1877. 


VII 


'Sarah Louisa DoTY^ 
Calvin*, Nancy 
R.*, Thomas*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 

^ Edgar L. Hills. 


June 28, 
1866. 








vm 


1. Maud L. 


Feb. 19, 
1879. 








II 


2. Margaret. 


Dec. 24, 

1887. 







138 



Marriage. Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMII«T. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Apr. 80, 
1886. 



VII 



VIII 



K 



Oct. 26, 
1882. 



VII 



VIU 



Oct. 14, 
1884. 



if 



K 



li 



^ AimiE HOBINSON 

TuTTLB', Edwin 
Rush T*, Mary 
Ann R.*, Thomas*, 
George*, Philip", 
Thomas*. 
Rev. Wm. H. Jeffebs, 
D. D., LL. D., pro- 
fessor. 
1. John Robinson. 



2. Hamilton Moore. 



Ella Ophella. Will- 
iams^, Frances M. 
R.*, Joseph R.*, 
Thomas*, George', 
Philip", Thomas*. 

John S. Thompson. 

1. Alexander Williams. 

2. Lorentus Stephen. 

3. Eloise. 

4. Harold Frederick. 



Sep. 6, 
1860. 



Jan. 10, 
1887. 

Oct. 18, 
1898. 



Mar. 5, 
la'iO. 



Sep. 9, 

1888. 
May 19, 

1885. 
May 2, 

1889. 
Nov. 21, 

1890. 



VII fANNA Sabah Will- 
IAM8^ Frances M. 
R.*, Joseph R.», 
Thomas*, George*, 
Philip", Thomas*. 
J. Pbice Cbawfobd, 
M. D. 

Villi 1* Frances Louise. 



C( 



II 



(( 



l« 



■ 

2. Genevieve. 

3. Helen. 

4. Dorothy ] 

!- twins. 

5. Margaret j 



Feb. 16, 
1862. 



Jan. 4, 
1887. 

Oct. 4, 
1888. 

Jan. 29, 
1891. 

Sep. 1, 
1897. 



Residence. 



Allegheny, 



?t' 



CaliforDia. 



Davenport, 
Iowa. 



139 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 



MarrUge. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



May, 
1886. 



VIII 



Sep. 24, 
1891. 



IX 



K 



VIII 



May 8, 
1898. 



IX 



VIII 



IX 



VIII 



IX 



VIII 



^Clabence S. Obaves*, 
John R. G.% Sid- 
ney J. Dougher- 
ty*, Jean R.*, Jon- 
athan*, George*, 
Philip', Thomas*. 

LCORA MABSHAIiL. 

1. Leila. 



2. Mary Agnes. 



Sidney M. Gbaves*, 
James D. G.^ Sid- 
ney J. Dougher- 
ty*, Jean R.*, Jon- 
athan*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 

Edwabd G. Wright. 
1. Teresa McLear. 



f James Clay Graves*, 
James D. G.', Sid- 
ney J. Dougher- 
ty*, Jean R.*, Jon- 
athan*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
Roberta M. Bryant. 

1. Bryant Clay. 



r Clara Fielding 
Hogg*, Georgette 
Graves^, Sidney J. 
D.*, Jean R.*, Jon- 
athan*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
S. B. Smith. 

1. Shelburne Clay. 



fROWENA M. HOCKEN- 

SMiTH*, N.J.Hock- 
ensmith, Jr.', 

Jean Black Pal- 
mer*, Anne W. 
Robinson', Jona- 
than*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
E. V. Beach, Attor- 
ney-at-Law. 



June 7, 
1864. 



Dec. 10, 
1887. 

Aug. 18, 
1899. 

Jan. 9, 
1871. 



Feb. 16, 
1894. 

Mar. 19, 
1872. 



Feb. 22, 
1899. 

Dec. 7, 
1872. 



1897. 



Residence. 



Lexington, 
Ky. 



Dec. 4, 
1899. 



Helena, 
Mont. 



uo 



Marriftge. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



Apr. 28, 
1891. 



IX 



VIII 



IX 



l( 



i( 



VIII 



IX 



1. John T. 

2. Alice G. 



Emily Bobinson Bar- 
clay*, Willina B. 
Burbridge', Em- 
i 1 y R.*, J am e s 
F.», Jonathan*, 
George*, Philip", 
Thomas*. 

Ferdinand Eugene 
Crassons. 
I. Marie Jean. 



2. Ferdinand Barclay. 

3. Willina. 



BoBERT Doty May- 
NARD», Kate C. 
Boty', Calvin D.«, 
Nancy R.», Thom- 
as*, George*, 
Philips Thomas\ 

Grace M. Parmen- 

TER. 

1. Pauline. 



Apr. 28, 
1872. 



May 18, 

1866. 
Jan. 1, 

1898. 
Mar. 11, 

1894. 
July 8, 

1897. 

June 8, 
1871. 



Hackensaok, 
N. Y. 



Springfield, 
MaBB. 



141 



LINE OF SAMUEL ROBINSONS 

THIRD GENERATION. 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




Ill 


r Samuel Robinson*, 

Philip', Thomas^ 
< *Jkan Snoddy. 
*Mr8. Lktitia Mont- 
gomery. 


1728 


Nov. 16, 
1807. 
1768 






IV 


I. Polly m. Alexander 


Aug. 8, 


Aug. 15, 








Woods. 


1762. 


1828. 






K 


2. Joseph, drowned 
with his mother 
while crossing 
the James river. 


Aug. 6, 
1764. 


1768. 






(( 


3. John Snoddy m. 


Oct 12, 


Mar. 28, 








Mary Robinson. 


1766. 


1848. 






(( 


4. Matthew. 










i( 


S finmiiol TTi 










(t 


6. Thomas. 








FOURTH GENERATION. 




IV 


Polly Robinson*, 

Samuel*, Philip% 
Thomas*. 
^ Alexander Woods. 
See separate record 
of this line (p. 194). 








1796. 


IV 


John Snoddy Robin- 
son*, SamueP, 


Oct. 12, 


Mar. 28, 








1766. 


1848. 








Philip', Thomas*. 










■ Mary Robinson", 


Sep. 19, 


June 11, 








1 Jonathan*, 


1774. 1848. 








1 George', Philip', 


1 








L Thomas'. 










V 


1. Jonathan, unmar- 


Dec. 2.5, 


Dec. 14, 








ried, merchant. 


1797. 


1848. 




1825. 


li 


2. Jean Snoddy, m. M. 
W^ard. No issue. 


Nov. 9, 
1799. 


- 1890. 






(1 


3. Samuel. 


1802 


June, 
1812. 






i( 


4. James. 


1808 


Aug. 21, 
1222. 






(( 


5. Ann Wiley, m. Wil- 


Jan. 12, 


May 18, 








liam Silver. 


1806. 


1860. • 






i; 


6. Harvey. 


1808. 


Aug. 18, 










1822. 





142 



Marriajre. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMII«Y. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Reaidenoe. 



Mar. 2, 
1826. 



Nov. 22, 
1849. 



IV 



« 



l» 



7. Thomas Black m. 

Sarah Hudson. 

8. Newton m. Hannah 

Silver. 

9. Maria Louisa. 

10. Maria Louisa m. 
James V. Wayman. 

'Samuel Robinson^, 
Samuel*, Philip", 
Thomas^. 
Wife unknown. 

1. John m. No issue. 

2. Samuel Sturgeon, un- 

married. Teacher. 

3. Nancy m. Samuel 

Wallace. Issue, one 
daughter, who died 
1887, unmarried. 



Mar. 28, 


Mar. 29, 


1810. 


1862. 


May 1, 


Mar. 16, 


1812. 


1876. 


1814 


1814 


July 12, 




1816. 






1822 


Aug. 16, 


March, 


1810. 


1897. 


May 9, 




1819. 





FIFTH GENERATION. 



VI 



VI 



r Ann Wiley Robin- 
son*, John S.*, 
Samuel', Philip", 
Thomas^ 
WiLUAU Silver, 
merchant. 
il James Robinson m. 
Amanda Gregg. 

2. Icepheon Mary. 

3. Araminta Wayman 

m. George R. Diven. 

4. John Quincy. 

5. William. 

6. Louisa Ann m. Wil- 

liam H. Taylor. 

'Thomas Black Rob- 
inson", farmer 
and merchant, 
John S.*, Sam- 
uel", Philip", 
Thomas\ 
Sabah Hudson. 
1^ John Edwin, m. 
Alice M. Morton. 



Jan. 12, 
1806. 



Feb. 12, 

1827. 
Aug. 14, 

1828. 
Sep. 8, 

1830. 
Oct. 24, 

1832. 
Aug. 4. 

1887. 
Sep. 21, 

1842. 

Mar. 28, 
1810. 



Sept. 2, 
* 1851. 



May 18, 
1860. 



May 18, 
1889. 



Aug. 5, 
1837. 

Sep. 12, 
1879. 

Mar. 2-2, 

1838. 

Mar. 11, 

1838. 



Pendleton, 
Ind. 



Mar. 29, 
1852. 



Pendleton, 
Ind. 



Springboro, 
Ohio. 



143 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



May 12, 
1886. 



Mar. 28, 
1886. 



VI 



VI 



N B W T O N ROBINBON', 

John S.*, Samuel*, 
PhiUp», Thomas'. 
Hannah Silver. 



1. William. 

2. Mary m. Milton Fort. 

3. Newton m. Anna 

Bell Stewart. 

4. Twin sister, who 

died at birth. 

5. Martha m. Samuel 

McGuffin. 

6. Willard. 

7. James. 

8. Julietta. 



Maria Louisa Bob- 
IN80N», John S.*, 
Samuel', Philip', 
Thomas'. 

James Vallorbs 
Wayman, M. D. 

1. J u 1 i e t Mary m. 

Georgfe A. Johnson. 

2. W i 1 1 a r d Gross m. 

Elizabeth Ormsby. 

3. Isabella Ruth. 

4. Araminta Paulina. 

5. Maria Louisa m. 

Henry H. Whitman. 

6. James Robinson. 

7. Florence Josephine. 

8. John Vallores. Un- 

married. Mining", 
y. Elizabeth Eugenie m. 
Wm. E. Ballenger. 



May 1, 
1812. 

Dec. 8, 

1811. 
Mar. 29, 

1887. 
Feb. 14, 

1889. 
Mar. 7, 

1841. 
Mar. 7, 

1841. 
Mar. 11, 

1846. 
Aug. 18, 

1848. 
July 9, 

1860. 
Aug. 27, 

1864. 

July 12, 
1816. 



Oct. 14, 

1811. 
May 18, 

1887. 
Apr. 8, 

1889. 
Nov. 26, 

1841. 
Sep. 26, 

1848. 
Nov. 16, 

1846. 
Doc. 19, 

1852. 
Dec. 19, 

1852. 
Jan. 17, 

1866. 
Jan. 17, 

1866. 



Mar. 16, 
1876. 

Aug. 9, 
1872. 

Aug. 9, 
1848. 



Sep. 28. 

1897. 
Mar. 7, 

1841. 
Aug. I, 

1886. 
Oct. 12, 

1866. 
Sep. 28, 

1866. 
Oct. 27, 

1866. 



Mar. 26, 

1888. 
Oct. 26, 

1888. 
May 16, 

1878. 
Nov. 20, 

1861. 
June 4, 

1867.. 



Jan. 26, 
1854. 

Jan. 26, 
1864. 



Knights- 
town, Ind. 



Santa Rosa, 
California. 



144 



SIXTH GENERATION. 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



May 20, 
1851. 



Nov. 16, 
1887. 



May 12, 
1860. 



July 11, 
1867. 



VI 



VII 



It 



(( 



(< 



k( 



If 



VI 



VII 



t( 



fi 



t< 



4( 



l( 



»c 



VI 



James Bobinson Sil- 
ver*, merchant, 
Ann W.», John S.*, 
Samuel", Philip', 
Thomas*. 

Amanda Gregg. 

1. William Gregg m. 

Elizabeth Clark. 

2. Dora May. 

3. Minnie Bell. 

4. Harry Lee m. Lettie 

Taylor. 

5. Delia A 1 v o r a m. 

Charles Cockefair. 

6. Arthur Monroe, mer- 

chant, unmarried. 



Feb. 12, 
1827. 



Sep. 17, 

1858. 
Feb. 22, 

1856. 
Jan. 25, 

1858. 
Dec. 15, 

1868. 
Jan. 7, 

1866. 
Jan. 1, 

1871. 



^Araminta Wayman Sept. 8, 
S I L V E R«, Ann 1880. 
W. R.». John S.*, 
Samuel", Philip', 
Thomas^ 
George Raphield 

DiVEN. 

1. Charles Edgar m. May 29, 

^Lillian B. Branch, 1851. 
'Kate E. Mullikin. 

2. Mary Anna m. David Mar. 5, 

W. Campbell. 1853. 

3. William Silver m. Sep. 8, 

Laura M. McCon- 1855. 
nell. 

4. George Haphield. 



Sep. 5, 
1868. 

Aug. 20, 
1868. 



Sep. 12, 
1879. 



Feb. 21, 
1878. 



5. James Robinson, 

druggist, unmar- 
ried. 

6. Martha Louisa m. 

Henry T. Thomp- 
son. 

7. Alice Bell m. David 

K. Goss. 



'Louisa Ann Silver", 
Ann Wiley R.», 
John S.*, Samuel", 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
William H. Taylor, 
merchant. 



July 29, 
1858. 

Feb. 25, 
1861. 

Dec. 25, 
1864. 

Dec. 9, 
1868. 

Sep. 21, 
1842. 



July 27, 
1878. 



Aug. 27, 
1872. 



Pendleton, 
Indiana. 



Pendleton, 
Ind. 



Pendleton, 
Indiana. 
Eaton, 
Ohio. 

Pendleton, 
Indiana. 



Pendleton, 
Indiana. 

Anderson, 
Indiana. 

Anderson, 

Indiana. 

Anderson, 

Ind. 



Anderson, 
Indiana. 

Ogden, 
Utah. 

Indianapo- 
lis, Ind. 



--. .^ 



146 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON PAMII^Y. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Aug. 6, 
1874. 



vn 



VI 



Dec. 2, 
1867. 



Nov. 2, 
1866. 



VII 



1. Nellie Icepheon m. 
Walter J. Dixon. 

'John Edwin Robin- 
son', merchant, 
Thomas B.\ John 
S.*, Samuel', Phil- 
ip", Thomas^ 

[ Alice M. Morton. 

1. William Thomas. 



** 2. Charles Joseph m. 
Mabel Baird, 

3. John Earl m. Miley 
Lowery Merritt. 

4. Ralph Morton. 



it 



n 



it 



n 



I( 



<( 



(( 



VI 



Apr. 18, 
1868. 

Sep. 2, 
1851. 



VII 



(i 



{t 



K 



VI 



VII 



5. Rhoda Myrtle. 

6. Fred Clifton. 

7. Jennie Glendosa. 

8. Eva Irene. 

9. Roy Connor. 



fMASY Robinson*, 
Newton", John 
S.*, Samuel', Phil- 
ip", Thomas^ 

< Milton Fort, farmer. 

1. Perry m. Ella Bell. 

2. Pearl. 

3. Bennie L. m. Henry 
Baker. 

4. Willard. 



Newton Robinson, 
Jr.*, Newton*, 
John S.*, Sam- 
uel*, Philip", 
Thomas^ 

Anna Bell S t e w- 

ART. 

1. Minnie. 



June 2, 

1876. 
Jan. 6, 

1877. 
Dec. 19, 

1878. 
Feb. 17, 

1881. 
July 17, 

1884. 
Aug. 20, 

1886. 
Aug. 2, 

1889. 
Nov. 8, 

1891. 
Feb. 2, 

1894. 

Feb. 14, 
1889. 



Oct. 2, 

1858. 
Apr. 6, 

1861. 
May 28, 

1862. 
July 17, 

1864. 

Mar. 7, 
1841. 



Residence. 



KokomOjInd. 



Sprlngboro, 
Ohio. 



Sprlngboro, 
Ohio. 



<( 



K 



<( 



(( 



(( 



t( 



It 



it 



Knightstown 
Ind. 



Aug. 25. 
1867. 



July 6, 
1861. 

Feb. 8, 
1887. 



Sep. 28, 
1897. 



Sep. 29, 
1868. 



10 



146 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



Dec. 28, 
1876. 



Oct. 11, 
1866. 



VI 



vn 



(I 



(( 



VI 



VII 



tl 



(i 



(i 



i( 



^Martha Robinson*, 
Newton*, John S.*, 
Samuel*, PhUip*, 
Thomas^ 
Samuel H. McGuf- 
FiN, farmer. 

1. Enna Ozora. 

2. Zola Lauese. 



3. Mary Ethel. 



r Juliet Mary Way 
MAN*, Maria Lou- 
i 8 a*, John S.*, 
Samuel*, Philip*, 
Thomas^ 
Qboroe Asbur y 
Johnson, lawyer. 

1. William Preston m. 

Minnie Josephine 
CuUen. 

2. Minnie Grace m. 

William Todd. 

3. Guy Anderson, drug- 

gist, unmarried. 

4. Archibald M e r k e r 

m. Minnie C. Clover. 

5. Shirley W a y m a n 

m. Marie Bendlyn. 



Mar. 11, 
1846. 



Nov. 12, 
1877. 

July 28, 
1880. 

May 6, 
1884. 

May 18, 
1887. 



Aug. 17, 

1829. 
Oct. 6, 

1867. 

Dec. 81, 

1858. 
Jan. 8, 

1861. 
Oct. 28. 

1867. 
Oct. 7, 

1876. 



Aug. 1, 
1886. 



Knightetown 
Ind. 



Oct. 26. 
1888. 



Sep. 20, 
1894. 



Bed Bluffs, 
Cal. 

Santa Rosa, 

Cal. 
Santa Rosa, 

Cal. 
Santa Bosa^ 

Cal. 
San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 



Mr. Johnson was a graduate of Yale College, class of 1853, 
Judge of Wayne County Court, Indiana, and Attorney General of 
California 1886-1890. 



Feb. 18, 
1867. 



June 26, 
1896. 

Apr. 10, 
1902. 



VI 



vn 



II 



rWiLLARD Gross 
Wayman, M. D.*, 
Maria Louisa*, 
John S.^ Samu- 
n e 1», Philip*, 
Thomas^ 
Elizabeth Ormsby. 

1. Willard Ormsby m. 

Rose Faull. 

2. Guy Trumbo m. Es- 

telle F. Hayes. 



Apr. 8, 
1889. 



Aug. 16, 
1871. 

Feb. 16, 
1876. 



May 16, 

1878. 



San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 



San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 



II 



147 

Dr. Wayman was born at New Castle, Indiana, and died at San 
Francisco. Though he passed away in the early prime of his 
manhood, he had already attained great eminence in his pro- 
fession. Before his death he had refused the' chair of Materia 
Medic a in the Toland Medical College, now the Medical Depart- 
ment of the University of California at Berkeley. The ac- 
companying resolutions passed by the Board of Health at San 
Francisco in his memory will show the high esteem in which 
he was held, and the nobleness of his personal and professional 
character. They were adopted at a special meeting of the Board 
of Health, held in May, 1878, at the Mayor's office, to take action 
in reference to the death of Dr. Wayman, late member of the 
Board. Present — Mayor Bryant, Drs. Shorb, Simpson and Toland. 

The resolutions, offered by Dr. Shorb, and adopted, were as 
follows: 

Whebeas, It has pleased Almighty Qod in his inscrutable ProT- 
idence to summon suddenly from this world and a life of useful- 
ness, our beloved friend and lamented associate. Dr. Willard G. 
Wayman; and 

Whereas, We his late associates, members of the Board of 
Health of the city and county of San Francisco, moved not' so 
much by the authority of custom, which ordains as right and 
proper memorial resolutions under such melancholy circum- 
stances, as influenced by our deep conviction of the worth of our 
departed friend, the conspicuous and sterling qualities of his 
soul and character, worthy of the highest admiration and closest 
emulation, submit on this grievous occasion the following resolu- 
tions: 

Resolved, That the Board of Health tender their united and 
heartfelt sympathy to the heart broken widow in this cruel and 
dreadful visitation which has suddenly deprived her of a loyal 
and affectionate husband and devoted father. 

Resolved, That in the death of Willard G. Wayman this com- 
munity has lost a distinguished citizen whose practical philan- 
thropy was illustrated in every act of his modest but useful life; 
whose benevolence was perennial, and whose fidelity in the per- 
formance of all the duties of citizenship is beyond all praise. 

Resolved, That in the death of Willard G. Wayman the Board of 
Health has lost a member whose place may never be filled; whose 
conscientious discharge of all the obligations of his position was 
rigid but unassuming, simple, persistent and instructive, and 
whose devotion to the great objects of sanitary reform and the 
public health can never be too eloquently eulogised. 

Resolved, That in the death of Willard G. Wayman the profes- 



148 



Bion of medicine lost a member whose love of the scienee made 
him great; whose happiness in his ability to cure disease, relieve 
pain, and lessen the affliction of humanity made him successful; 
whose scrupulous regard for all the ethics of his high calling, 
and his loyalty to his professional brethren won for him a popu- 
larity seldom witnessed in this world. 

Rewlved, That in the death of Willard G. Wayman the State of 
California has lost from her roll-call of merit an honest man, a 
skillful physician, a devoted humanitarian, an earnest votary of 
science, a loyal friend, and a public benefactor. 

Resolved, That a copy of these memorial resolutions be printed 
in the daily papers of San Francisco, a copy also especially 
framed and sent to the widow of our late associate and lamented 
friend, and that these resolutions be finally spread upon the 
minutes of the Board of Health. 

Drs. Shorb and Simpson were delegated as pall-bearers at the 
funeral of the deceased, and the meeting adjourned. 



Marriage. 



G«n. 



ROBINSON PAMII^Y. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



Dec. 17, 
1872. 



VI 



Nov. 19, 
1885. 



VII 



<i 



(( 



(( 



VI 



-VII 



C( 



^Mabia Louisa Way- 
man*, Maria 
Louisa", John S.*, 
Samuel", Philip*, 
Thomas*. 
Henry Harrison 
Whitman. 

1. George Washington 

m. Margaret Ali- 
son Gay. 

2. Adana Ruth m. Fred- 

erick Wayne. 

3. James Vallores. 

4. Henry Harrison. 



f Elizabeth Eugenie 
Wayman*, Maria 
Louisa', John S.*, 
Samuel', Philip', 
Thomas*. 
William Elmer Bal- 
L E N o E R, mer- 
chant. 



Nov. 16, 
1846. 



L 

1. Jessica. 

2. Florine Ruth. 



Oct. 8, 
1874. 

Sep. 5, 
1876. 

May 28. 
1881. 

Aug. 21, 
1882. 

Jan. 17. 
1856. 



Concord, Cal. 



July 20, 
1887. 



Concord, Cal. 
Concord, Cal. 

Concord, Cal. 
Concord, Cal. 
Concord, Cal. 



[Sep. 8, 
1886. 

Aug. 8, 
1888. 



Sep. 18, 
1886. 

Sep. 20, 
1892. 



149 



MarrUge. 



G«ii. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



vn 



(I 



3. William Vallores. 

4. Wayman De Vilbiss. 



Jan. 28, 
1891. 

Jan. 21, 
1892. 



Feb. 2, 
1891. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 



May 18, 


VII 


' William Gregg Sil- 
ver', James R. 


Sep. 17, 




Pendleton, 


1876. 




1858. 




Ind. 






S.S Ann W. E.», 












1 John S.*, SamueP, 












Philips Thomas^ 
Elizabeth Clark. 




















VIII 


1. Donna Blanche. 


June 16, 
1877. 


i 






u 


2. Vora Delia. 


Aug. 10, 
1880. 






Apr. 26, 


VTI 


Harry Lee Silver', 


Dec. 15, 




Indianapolis, 


1888. 




merchant, James 
R. S.S Ann W. R.*, 
John S.*, Samnel*, 
Philip*, Thomas^ 
Lettie Taylor. 


1868. 




Ind. 




VIII 


1. Herbert Lee. 


Nov 7, 
1891. 




Indianapolis, 
Ind. 




it 


2. Jay Ralph. 


Jan. 1, 
1894. 




Indianapolis, 
Ind. 




VII 


f Charles Edgar Di- 


May 29, 




Anderson, 






VEN, M. D.', Ara- 


185L. 




Ind. 






minta W. Silver', 












Ann W.*,John S.*, 












SamueP, Philip", 












] Thomas*. 








Sep. 16, 




^Lillian Bell 




Jan. 4, 




lfi74. 




.' Branch. 




1881. 




July 16, 




"Catharine Evelyn 








1882. 




MULLIKIN. 










VIII 


1. George Raphield. 


Apr. 1, 
1876. 








l( 


2. Paul Bernard. 


May 28, 
1883. 








•< 


3. Mary Anna. 


Nov. 15, 
1885. 







150 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 


Apr. 15, 


VII 


r "SiABY Anna Diven^, 


Mar. 6, 




Anderson, 


1874. 




Araminta W. Sil- 

ver«, Ann W. R.% 

< John S.*, Samuel", 

Philip', Thomas*. 

David Wallace 

^ CONNELL. 


1868. 




Ind. 




VIII 


1. Bertha Estelle m. 
John Quincy By- 
ram. 


Jan. 20. 
1876. 








it 


2. Charles Diven. 


Aug. 3. 
1877. 






Deo. 18, 


VII 


' WiLLTAM Silver Di- 


Sep. 8, 




Anderson, 


1882. 




ven^, lawyer, 


1865. 




Ind. 






Araminta VV. Sil- 










ver«, Ann W. R.*, 












John S.*, Samuel', 












Philip', Thomas^ 












Laura Martka Mc- 












CONNELL. 










VTTI 


1. John Silver. 


Oct. 2, 

1888. 




Anderson, 
Ind. 






2. Edith Louise. 


Dec. 16, 

1884. 




Anderson, 
Ind. 






3. William Albert. 


Oct. 6, 
1886. 




Anderson, 
Ind. 






4. Mary Elizabeth. 


June 24, 
1890. 




Anderson, 
Ind. 






5. Robert Elmer. 


June 4, 
1894. 




Anderson, 
Ind. 






6. Laura Martha. 


May 11, 
1896. 




Anderson, 
Ind. 


Oct. 21, 


VII 


r l^iARTHA Louisa Di- 


Dec. 26, 




Ogden, Utah. 


1888. 




VEN^, Araminta 
W. Silver*, Ann 
W.S John S.*, 
Samuel», PhiUp*, 
Thomas*. 
Henry T. Thompson, 
telegraph opera- 
tor and manager. 


1864. 








VIII 


1. Frederick Diven. 


Aug. 5, 
1889. 


June 23i 
1894. 






i» 


2. Lawrence Bernard. 


Dec. 6, 'June 20, 










1891. 


1894. 






({ 


3. Helen Diven. 


July 30, 












1897. 







151 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



Deo. 26, 

1887. 



VII 



VIII 



(c 



tt 



Oct. 19, 
1892. 



VII 



VIII 



C( 



Jan. 28, 
1897. 



vn 



vni 



{( 



Aug. 11, 
1898. 



VII 



VIII 



June 8, 
1889. 



r Alice Bell Diten^, 
Araminta W. Sil- 
ver«, Ann W.*, 
John S.*, Samuel", 
Philip', Thonias\ 

^ David Kop Goss. 

1. Donald Julian. 

2. Elmer David. 

3. Walter Diren. 



'"Nellie Icepheon 
Taylor'^, Louisa 
A. Silver", Ann 
W.», John S.^ 
Samuel', Philip', 
Thomas\ 
Walter James 
Dixon, merchant. 

1. Mary Louise. 

2. Frances Emily. 



' Charles Joseph Bob- 
inson', John B.*, 
Thomas B.", John 
S.*, Samuel', Phil- 
ip*, Thomas^ 
Mabel Baird. 
1. Katharine Dorothy. 

2- Helen Alice. 



John Earl Robinson^, 
John E.*, Thomas 
B.% John S.*, Sam- 
u e 1», Philip", 
Thomas*. 

MiLEY LOWERY MeR- 
RITT. 

1. Eoland Edward. 



Dec. 9, 
1868. 



VII /-Perry Port\ Mary*, 
■' Newton', John S.*, 
Samuel', Philip', 
Thomas^ 
Ella Bell. 



Nov. 15, 
1888. 

Mar. 6, 
1891. 

Dec. 8, 
1897. 

Apr. 18, 
1868. 



May 18, 
1896. 

Dec. 24, 
1898. 

Jan. 6, 

1877. 



Feb. 11, 
1898. 

July 2, 
1900. 

Dec. 19, 
1878. 



June 7, 
1899. 

Oct. 2, 
1868. 



Indianapolifl, 
Ind. 



Mar. 12, 
1899. 



Eokomo, 
Ind. 



Sprin^boro, 
Ohio. 



Sprin^boro, 
Ohio. 



Enightstown 
Ind. 



152 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMII.Y. 


Birth. 


Death. 






vm 


1. Janette. 


Apr. 6, 
1890. 




Knightstown 
Ind. 


June 15, 


VII 


^BENNIE L. FOBT^ 


Mav 28, 


Feb. 8, 




1882. 




Mary*, Newton', 
John S.*, Samuel", 
Philip", Thomas*. 
^Heitby Bakeb. 


1862. 


1887. 






VIII 


1. Lulu. 


Apr. 11, 
1883. 






July 18, 


vn 


' William F b e s t o n 


Oct. 6, 




Red BluffB, 


1887. 




Johnson^, lawyer, 
Juliet M. Way- 
man*, Maria Lou- 
isa', John S.*, 
Samuel", Philip^ 
Thomas*. 
Minnie Josephine 

I CULLEN. 


1857. 




Gal. 




vm 


1. Willard Cullen. 


June 24, 

1888. 








ii 


2. Sidney Ryder. 


Mar. 27, 
1898. 








(f 


3. Evelyn Robinson. 








July 80, 


VII 


"Minnie Grace John- 


Dec, 81. 






1898. 




80N% Juliet M. 
Wayman*, Maria 
Louisa*, John S.*, 
Samuel", Philip", 
Thomas*. 
William Todd, 
merchant. 


1868. 




Santa Eosa, 
Cal. 




VIII 


1. Henry. 


Sep. 11, 
1894. 


Sep. 15, 
1894. 






(( 


2. Juliet Mary. 


Feb. 6, 
1897. 








(( 


3. Isabella Hugus. 


Aug. 8, 
1898. 






Feb. 7, 


VII 


Archibald Merger 


Oct. 28, 




Santa Boea, 


1892. 




Johnson^ Juliet 
M. Wayman", Ma- 
ria Louisa', John 
S.*, Samuel", Phil- 
ip", Thomas^ 
Minnie Cordelia 
t Cdoveb. 


1867. 




Cal. 



153 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMII^Y. 



Birth. 



VIII 



it 



(( 



Apr. 4, 
1901. 



VII 



July 18, 
1899. 



VIII 



VII 



Sep. 26, 
1899. 



VIII 



VII 



VIII 



1. Helen Clover. 

2. Evelyn Goldie. 

3. Juliet Wayman. 



r Shikley Wayman 
JoHNSON^ Juliet 
M. Wayman*, Ma- 
ria Louisa", John 
S.^ SamueP, Phil- 
ip', Thomas'. 
Marie Bendlyn. 

1. Shirley Bendlyn. 



George Washington 
Whitman', Maria 
Louisa Wayinan", 
Maria Louisa*, 
John S.*, Samuel*, 
Philip*, Thomas\ 

Margaret Alison 
Gay. 
1. Donald Ga3% 



rADANA Ruth Whit- 
man', Maria Lou- 
isa Wayman*, Ma- 
ria Louisa*, John 
S.*, Samuel*, Phil- 
ip*, Thomas^ 
Frederick Wayne. 

1. Frederick Wayman. 



Nov. 14, 
1892. 

Mar. 80, 
1894. 

May 1, 
1897, 

Oct, 7, 
1876. 



Apr. 22, 
1902. 

Oct. 8, 
1874, 



Dec. 3, 

1876. 

June 14, 

1902, 

Sep. 6, 
1876, 



July. 19 
1900, 



Death. 



Residence. 



Ck>ncord, Cal. 



San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 



Sep. 6, 
1900. 



VIII 



IX 



'' Bertha E s t e l l e 
Campbell*, Mary 
Anna Diven^, Ar- 
aminta W. Silver*, 
Ann W. K.*, 
John S.*, Samuel*, 
Philip*, Thomas^ 

^JOHN QUINCY BYRAM. 

1. John Quincy, Jr. 



Jan. 20, 
1876. 



Nov. 4, 
1901. 



Indianapolis, 
Ind. 



154 



LINE OF ANDREW ROBINSOW. 



SECOND GENERATION. 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON PAMII^Y. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



II 
III 



{ 

1. 
2. 



3. 
4. 

5. 



Andrew Robinson*, 
Thomas*. 

AONEB BOAL. 

Thomas m. Jean 

Hay. 
Robert m. Agnes 

Robinson. 

John m. . 

Mary m. Robert Mc- 

Cleary. 
Elizabeth m. 

Henderson. 



1700 


Feb. 16, 




1797. 


1702 


1790 


1782 


July 6, 




1819. 



Derry, Pa. 



Others unknown, who went to the Carolinas at an early period. 
Andrew R. was born in Donegal county, Ireland. The year of 
his coming to America is unknown. It was probably about 1730, 
in company with his father and brothers and other kin. He set- 
tled on the Conewago creek, Lancaster county, Penna. His wife, 
Agnes Boal, was of a prominent family of that day. They had 
a large family and spent their long lives in Londonderry township 
and their bodies were buried in Derry churchyard with a number 
of their descendants. Andrew R. was an honored Ruling Elder 
of the Derry Presbyterian church for a great many years. 



THIRD GENERATION. 



Ill 



IV 

(C 

It 
«( 

C( 

ct 



' Thomas Robinson*, 
Andrew", Thom- 
as\ 

^ Jean Hat. 

1. John. 

2. Andrew. 

3. Agnes. 

4. Mary. 

5. Sarah. 

6. Elizabeth. 

7. Julian. 

No further record of 
this family. 



1788 



155 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON PAMII«Y. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




Ill 


^ ROBEBT ROBmSON*, 

Andrew*, Thom- 


1782 


July 6, 
1819. 


Derry, Pa. 






Agnes Robinson*, 


1780 


Dec. 22, 








L Philip', Thomas*. 




1792. 






IV 


1. A n d r e w m. Jean 
Grain. 


1760 


June 8, 
1846. 








2. Mary m. John Gray. 












3. Thomas m. ^Letitia 
Moorhead, "Mary 
Clark. 












4. Elizabeth m. Charles 
Clark. 












5. Robert m. Rachel 
Skyles. 












6. Martha m. Jam eft 
Elder. 









Robert R. married his cousin Agnes. They resided in Lancas- 
ter, now Dauphin county, living to good age. Their bodies were 
laid to rest in Derry churchyard, of which church Robert was 
long an honored Ruling Elder. 



Ill 



IV 

(( 
(( 
(( 



I 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 

6. 



John Robinson", 
Andrew*, Thom- 
as^ 
Wife unknown. 

Robert m. . 

John T. 

Thomas. 

Andrew. 

Nancy m. John 

Thorn. 
Jean m. William Mc- 

Bay. 



Erie Co., P.:. 
Virginia . 



FOURTH GENERATION. 



IV 



'"Andrew Robinson*, 
Robert*, Andrew", 
Thomas\ 
Jean Chain (daugh- 
ter of Geo. Grain 
and Jean Stur- 
geon). 
1. Nancy, unmarried. 



1760 



1766 



Aug. 4, 
1791. 



June 8, 
1846. 



Dec. 16. 
1876. 



156 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



It 



i( 



(( 



(( 



IV 



V 

i( 

IV 



IV 



V 

(c 
(( 

IV 



2. George. 

3. Robert B., unmar- 

ried. 

4. Joshua m. Nancy 

Youtz. 

5. William Grain m. 

Jeannette Lytle. 

6. Mary m. John Le- 

mon. No issue. 

Maby Robinson^, Rob- 
ert*, Andrew', 
Thomas*. 

John Gray. 

1. Joseph. 

2. Nancy. 

Thomas Robinson*, 
Robert*, Andrew', 
ThomasS 

*Letitia Moorhead. 

•Mary Clare. 

By first marriage: 

1. Robert. 

2. James. 

3. Eliza. 

4. Matilda. 

By second marriage: 

5. Thomas Clark. 

6. Charles Clark. 

7. Sarah Ann. 

8. John. 

9. Agnes. 

10. Mary. 

11. Andrew. 

r Elizabeth Robinson^, 
J Robert*, Andrew*, 

' Thomas*. 

Charles Clark. 

1. Robert. 

2. John. 

3. Sarah. 

4. Andrew. 



Robert Robinson^, 
Robert*, Andrew', 
Thomas*. 

Rachel Skyles. 



Mar. 23, 

1798. 
Dec. 15, 

1794. 
Jan. 20, 

1796. 
June 29, 

1797. 
July 28, 

1799. 



Feb. 26, 
1884. 

Dec. 27, 
1874. 



Jan. 16, 
1876. 



Paxton, Pa. 



Northumber- 
land Co., Pa. 



Northumber" 
land Co., Pa* 



167 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON PA MIX. Y. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



V 
IV 



(( 



<( 



<c 



»( 



C( 



it 



(I 



IV 



(( 



(( 



1. Harriet Ann m. John 
Logan. No issue. 

'Mab t h a Bobinson^, 
Robert*, Andrew*, 
Thomas^. 
Jaices Eld£R. 
1. Bobert Eobinson m. 
*Sarah Sherer, 
'Elizabeth G. Elder. 
2« Darid m. Juliana 
Sherer. 

3. John m. Elizabeth 
McKee. 

4. Polly m. Samuel 

Eussell. 

5. Joshua m. ^Eleanor 

Sherer, "Margaret 
C. Gilmor, *Nancy 
Brown. 

6. James m. Margaret 

Barnett. 

7. Bachel m. Bev. Jesse 

Smith. 

8. Thomas m. *Eliza- 

beth Coleman, *J. 
Cook. 

' B O B E B T BOBINSOir*, 

John", Andrew", 
Thomas^ 
Wife unknown. 

1. John M. m. Jemima 

Todd. 

2. Nancy B. m. John S. 

Todd. 

3. Bobert m. Nancy 

Todd. 

No further record of 
this family. 



Oct. 8, 
1788. 

Aug. 20, 

1786. 
Oct. 2, 

1797. 
Oct. 27, 

1799. 
Jan. 18, 

1802. 



Feb. 18, 
1804. 

Dec. 18, 
1806. 

Mar. 1, 
1810. 



Paxton, Pa. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 



VI 



«( 



J O 8 H XT A BOBINfiON*, 

Andrew*, Bobert*, 
Andrew", Thom- 
as^. 
^ Nancy Youtz. 

1. William Grain m. 

^Catharine Sturts, 
"Eliza Grunden. 

2. Bachel Mary m. Bu- 

dolph Sanders. 



Jan. 20, 
1796. 



Dec. 27, 
1874. 



158 



llarriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



VI 



Ci 



»( 



{( 



VI 



(* 



i( 



(( 



If 



VI 

(1 



VI 



(i 



3. 
4. 
5. 



William Chain Bob- 
INSON*, Andrew*, 
Robert*, Andrew*, 
Thomas^ 

Jkannette Lytle. 

Martha Jane m. 
George Ross, M. D. 

William Grain, un- 
married. 

Christiana Lytle m. 
Adam Detweiler. 

Grace Lytle m. John 
B. Bomberger. 

Sanford B. m. Louisa 
Catharine Maulfair. 



'^Robert Robinson 
Elder*, Martha 
R.*, Robert*, An- 
drew*, Thomas^. 
^Sarah Sherer. 
^"Elizabeth G. Elder. 
By first marriage: 

1. James, died early. 

2. Robert, unmarried. 

3. Martha m. Samuel H. 

Wallace. 

4. Sarah m. J. Mont- 

gomery Forster. 
By second marriage: 

5. Scott. 

6. Thomas. 

C David Elder*, Mar- 
tha R.*, Robert*, 
Andrew*, Thom- 
as^ 
Juliana Sherer. 

1. James. 

2. Sarah E. 

(John Elder*, Mar- 
tha R.\ Robert*, 
Andrew*, 
Thomas*. 
Elizabeth McKee. 

1. Elizabeth. 

2. Martha J. 

3. Thomas Robinson. 



June 29, 
1797. 



Mar. 24, 

1880. 
Mar. 16, 

1832. 
Mar. 28, 

1884. 
Sep. 28, 

1886. 
Dec. 1, 

1888. 

Oct. 8, 

1788. 



Aug. 26, 
1826. 

May 2, 
1880. 



Aug. 20, 
1786. 



Oct. 2, 
1797. 



Nov, 80, 

1880. 

Nov. 29, 

1859. 



Mar. 8, 
1861. 



Lebanon 
County. 



PaxtOD, Pa. 



169 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON VAMTUY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Resideaoe. 



V 



VI 
(( 

({ 

({ 

(I 



VI 



(i 
kf 



it 



VI 



4. Caroline. 

5. J. McKee. 

Polly Eldeb*, Mar- 
tha R.*, Robert*, 
Andrew", 
Thomas*. 

Samttel Russell. 

1. William. 

2. Rachel. 

3. Dorcas. 

4. Polly. 

5. Samnel. 

''Joshua Elder*, Mar- 
tha R.*, Robert*, 
Andrew*, 
Thomas*. 

^Eleanor Shereb. 

"Margaret C. Oil- 

HOR. 

L ■Nancy Brown. 
By first marriage: 

1. Joshua Robinson. 

2. David Robinson. 
By second marriage: 

3. Elizabeth M. 

By third marriage: 

4. Margaret m. William 

K. Cowden. 

5. William Brown. 

6. Eleanor Thompson 

m. Francis W. 
Rutherford. 

7. Matilda. 

8. Mary A. 

{James Elder", Mar- 
tha R.*, Robert", 
Andrew", 
Thomas*. 
Margaret Barnett. 

1. Martha Robinson. 

2. Thomas Barnett. 



Rachel Elder", Mar- 
tha R.*, Robert", 
Andrew", 
Thomas*. 

Ret. Jesse Smith. 
1. Sybil M. 



Oct. 27, 
1799. 



Jan. 18, 
1802. 



Paxton, Pa. 



Feb. 18, 
1804. 



Dec. 18, 
1806. 



160 



llarriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON PAMH^Y. 



Birth. 



Ueath. 



VI 
n 



'Thomas Eldeb', Mar- 
tha R.*, Robert*, 
Andrew*, 
Thomas^. 
'Elizabeth Coleman. 
*J. Cook. 
By first marriage: 
1. Sarah. 
a. Robert. 

By second marriage: 
3. Margaret. 



Mar. 1, 
1810. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 



VI 



Mar. 16, 
1852. 



VII 
(I 

€1 

VI 



VII 
VI 



VII 



l( 



«k 



«t 



(I 



''William Cbain Rob- 
INSON^, Joshua*, 
Andrew*, Robert", 
Andrew*, 
Thomas\ 
HDathabine Stubts. 

""'Eliza Gbunden. 

1. Edward. 

2. John Lemon. 

3. Charles Morris. 

r Rachel Mary Rob- 
inson*, Joshua*, 
Andrew*, Robert*, 
Andrew", 
Thomas\ 
Rudolph Sanders. 

1. Aaron. 



Mabtha Jane Robin- 
son*, William C.*, 
Andrew*, Robert*, 
Andrew*, 
Thomas*. 
^ George Ross, M. D. 



1. Mary Jeannette. 

2. George Redsecker. 

3. William Robinson m. 

Valeria Rhinehart 
Smith. 

4. Robert May. 

5. Martha Elizabeth. 



May 24. 
1830. 



Nov. 2, 

1821. 
Dec 23, 

1852. 
Oct. 7, 

1854. 
July 8, 

1856. 

Dec. 6, 
1860. 

Jan. 6, 
1866. 



Nov. 80, 
1880. 



Nov. 19, 
1891. 



Oct. 4, 
1868. 

Feb. 6, 
1870. 



Lebanon, Pa. 



161 



Marriage. 



G«n. 



ROBINSON PAMII«y. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



VI 



VII 



(( 



cc 



VI 



VII 



(< 



r Grace Lytle Eobin- 
sow*, William C", 
Andrew*, Robert*, 
Andrew*, 
Thomas\ 
John B. Bombeboer. 

1. Williani Bobinson. 

2. Jeannette Bobinson. 

3. Martin Eby. 

4. Grace Bennett. 



f Sanford B. Robtn- 
I B0N«, William C.», 

I Andrew*, Robert*, 

Andrew*, 

Thomas*. 
Louisa Catharine 

Maitlfair. 
1^ Mary Jeannette. 

2. Grace Ann. 



Sep. 28, 
1886. 



Nov. 21, 

1866. 
Aug. 1, 

1868. 
Apr. 19, 

1870. 
Aug. 16, 

1874. 

Dec. 1 , 
1838. 



Aufir. 7, 
1878. 

Dec. 2, 
1876. 



Dec, 
1880. 



Sep. 2, 
1877. 



Lebanon, Pa. 






SEVENTH GENERATION. 



VII 


r W I L L I A M Robinson 


July 8, 






Boss% Martha J. 


1866. 






E.«, William C.», 








Andrew*, Bobert", 








Andrew*, 








Thomas^ 








Valeria Bhinehart 








I Smith. 






VIII 


1. William Bobinson. 


Mar. 80, 


Jan. 9, 






1884. 


1886. 



11 



162 



LINE OF CHRISTIANA ROBINSON MUIR- 

HEAiy. 

SECOND GENERATION. 



MarrUifl;e. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



1751, 
Doaegfal 
Ireland. 


II 




III 







































\ 



\ Christiana B o b i n- 
SON*, Thomas*. 
Thomas Muibhead. 



1. James m. Katharine 
Byers. 

Mc- 



2. Jane m. 

Culloug'h. 

3. Elizabeth m. 

Boal. 

4. Alexander, died 
young. 

5. Margaret m. John 
McClure. 

6. Bobert m. Margaret 
Boal. 

7. Katharine m. 

McEwan. 

8. Christiana m. Na- 

thaniel Lytle 
(killed at Battle of 
Oermantown) . 

9. Lily m. Ma- 

gfinn. 

10. Thomas. 



July 8, 

1702. 
On ship- 
board, 
1782. 



Oct. 6, 
1766. 



1740 



Aug. 16, 
1761. 



Mar. 10, 
1824. 



N. Carolina. 



N. Carolina. 



N. Carolina. 



Thomas Muirhead, with his wife Christiana, daughter of Thomas 
Bobinson, came to America in 1732. He is recorded as haying 
bought land in Lancaster county, Pa., in 1744. 

THIBD GENEBATION. 



James Moobhead*, 
Christiana B.% 
Thomas^ 

Katharine Byers. 

1. Thomas m. Jane 

Young. 

2. Letitia m. Thomas 

Bobinson. 

3. James m. Ann Wil- 

son. 

4. Ann m. Andrew Cul- 

bertson. 



1732 




Aug. 10, 


Deo. 


1769. 


1853. 


May 23, 




17—. 




Oct. 29, 




17—. 




Apr. 29, 


Nov. 19, 


1781. 


1867. 



163 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMII^Y. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residenoe. 




IV 


5. Christiana m. Will- 


Feb. 8, 


Jan. 27, 








iam Dickson. 


1788. 


1886. 






(( 


6. John m. Eleanor 


Sep. 2, 


Apr. 24, 








Longhead. 


1785. 


1868. 






(( 


7. Robert m. Jane Mc- 
Creary. 


Sep. 18, 
1787. 








li 


8. George m. Matilda 
Barnett. 


July 6. 
17—. 








a 


9. Eliza m. George 


Jan. 7, 










Moore. 


17—. 




• 




III 


' Robert Moorhe ad", 
Christiana R.*, 
Thomas*. 


1740 


Mar. 10, 
1824. 








Margaret Boal. 


1746 


May 16, 
1817. 






IV 


1. John Boal m. Ann 


Jan. 8, 


May 15, 








Snodgrass. 


1774. 


1864. 




Feb. 11, 


(i 


2. Jane m. Jeremiah 


Oct. 7. 


June, 




1800. 




Sturgeon. 


1776. • 


1864. 




Mar. 17, 


(; 


3. Thomas m. Ann 






Lancaster 


7 

1-92 


(( 


Clark. 
4. Robert,^ unmarried. 
Other children — 
names unknown. 




1 


" Co., Pa. 


FOURTH GENERATION. 




IV 


" Thomas Moorhead*, 


Aug. 10, 


Dec, 








James M.», Chris- 


1769. 


1853. 








tiana R.*, Thom- 

nci 1 












as. 
V. Jane Young. 


May 20, 
1771. 


Jan. 5, 
1862. 






V 


1. James Miller m. 
Eliza McCord. 


Aug 18, 
1798. 










2. Joseph Young m. 


Oct. 22, 


Mar. 4, 








Mary Blaine. 


1796. 


1880. 








3. Martha Matilda m. 
Joseph Neely. 


Nov. 14, 
1797. 










4. Kitty Ann. 


Dec. 28, 
1799. 










3. Thomas m. Rebecca 


Sep. 1, 


Aug. 6, 








Barnett. 


1803. 


1859. 








6. Jane m. William Mc- 
Cord. 


Aug. 10, 
1806. 










7. Caroline m. John Mc- 
Cord. 


Jau. 26, 
1810. 


1851 








8. Christian. 


Dec. 6, 


July 16, 








1812. 


1813. 





164 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON PA.MILT. 



Birth. 



Death. 



IV 



IV 



V 



IV 



(( 



(( 



IV 



fLETITIA MoOBHEAD\ 

James M.% Chris- 
tiana R.*, Thom- 
as.^ 
Thomas Robinson^, 
Robert*, Andrew*, 
Thomas^ 
See Record of Andrew 
Robinson's line (p. 
156). 



r J A H E S MOOBHEAD*, 

James M.', Chris- 
tiana R.% Thom- 
as.^ 
Ann Wilson. 

1. James. 

2. Thomas m. Jane A. 

Russell. 

3. Wilson E. m. Mary 

Ann Pollock. 

4. John. 

5. Eliza m. Robert Rob- 

inson. 

6. Mary Ann m. Charles 

Pollock. 
7 Rachel. 
8. Caroline. 



rANN Moobhead\ 
James", Chris- 
tiana R.", Thom- 
as.* 
Andbew Culbebtson. 



1. Thomas Moorhead. 

2. Andrew Jackson. 

3. William Patton m. 

*Mary McCord, 
'Helen Reed, 'Mary 
Fay, ^Charlotte 
Hall. 

{Christiana M o o r- 
HEAD*, James M.*, 
Christiana R.% 
Thomas*. 
William Dickson. 
1. John m. Elizabeth 
Alexander. 



Oct. 29, 




17—. 




Apr. 29, 


Nov. 19. 


1781. 


1867. 


Dec. 25, 


Dec. 19. 


1772. 


1847. 


June 21, 


Oct. 15, 


1810. 


1881. 


Apr. 21, 


1883 


1812. 




Dec. 8, 




1819. 




Feb. 8, 


Jan. 27, 


1788. 


1836. 



165 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 





V 


2. George Moorhead, 
unmarried. 










ti 


3. Cyrus m. Delia E. 
McConnell. 










iC 


4. David McCord m. F. 
B. Spring. 




1847 






li 


5. Eliza Ann m. Thomas 
Madill. 










(( 


6. Elizabeth m. Dean 
Bradley. 








Apr. 16, 


IV 


'John MooBHEAD^ 


Sep. 2, 


Apr. 24, 




1816. 




James*, Chris- 


1786. 


1868. 




* 




tiana R.% Thorn- 












as. 
^Eleanob Longhead. 


July 29, 
1795. 


Deo. 8, 
1870. 






V 


1. Joseph Byers m. 


JaD. 27, 


Mar. 10, 








Eliza Hampson. 


1817. 


1880. 




Mar. 1, 


l( 


2. Samuel Tate m. Mar- 


Aug. 26, 






1866. 




garet Mills Moor- 
head*. 


1827. 








(( 


3. John Dickson m. 
Mary Robinson 
Moorhead*. 


Aug. 24, 
1829. 








(( 


4. Eliza Ann, unmar- 


Mar. 2, 


Aug. 27, 








ried. 


1832. 


1896. 






(( 


5. Sarah Ellen, unmar- 


Mar. 22, 


Oct. 28, 








ried. 


1886. 


1869. 








6. Catharine. 


Apr. 2, 


May 18, 






ii 




1820. 


1826. 






IV 


" Robert Moorhead*, 


Sep. 18, 




Mt. Joy and 






James M.*, Chris- 


1787. 




Harborcreek 






tiana R.*, Thom- 






Pa. 






as. 
'^ Jane McCreary. 










V 


1. James R. m. Matilda 
Leet. 










IV 


"George Moorhead\ 
James M.*, Chris- 






Mt. Joy and 
Harborcreek 


t 




tiana R.*, Thom- 
as.* 
^Matilda Barnett. 






Pa. 




V 


1. James Byers. 


Nov. 20, 
1820. 







* Married by the Rev. Johnston Eaton, at Portland, N. Y. 
fMarried by Rev. Johnston Eaton, at Fairview, Erie Co., Pa. 



166 



Marrtagie. 


Gen. ROBINSON FAMILT. Birth. 


Death. 


Resldciice. 


May 80, 

1864. 


V 

(f 
<l 

IV 
V 


2. Barnett m. *Mary 

Backus, "Cornelia 
A. Harvey. 

3. Catharine Ann m. 

Mont g o m e r y M. 
Moore. 

4. Eliza Jane m. Joseph 

McCarter. 

r E L I Z A MOOBHF AT>*, 

James M.\ Chris- 
tiana B.", Thom- 
as.* 
^Geobge Moobje. 

1. Moma. 

2. Mordecai. 


Jan. 17, 
1822. 

Mar. 25, 
May 29, 


Nov. 23, 
1891. 


Erie, Pa. 


May 2, 
1816. 


IV 


r John Boal Moob- 
UBAD^ B o b e r t 

S M.*, Christiana 
B.", Thomas*. 

^AxN Snodgrass. 


Jan. 8, 
1774. 

1779 


May 15. 
1854. 

1848 


Buried in 
Derry grave- 
yard. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 



VI 



li 



ii 



i( 



i( 



(( 



II 



r James Milleb Moob- 
head', Thomas*, 
James", Christi- 
ana B.", Thomas*. 
Eliza McCobd. 

1. Joseph M. m. Har- 

riet Scott. 

2. Thomas m. Maria 

Dada. 

3. Kitty Ann m. Jo- 

seph McCord. 

4. Elizabeth m. Lucien 

Couse. 

5. William McCord m. 

Fanny Kendrick. 

6. James Adair m. Ju- 

lia Baldwin. 

7. Jane m. George F. 

Sherwin. 



Auor. 18. 
1793. 



167 



MarrUge. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON PAMII«Y. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



VI 



<i 



i< 



(( 



i« 



»( 



(I 



VI 

(i 
If 
i< 
(( 
(( 



VI 

(( 

it 
(( 

li 

u 



' JoBEPH Young Moor- 
head", Thomas*, 
James", Christi- 
tiana R.*, Thom- 
as.^ 
Mary Blaine. 

1. Kosanna Jane m. 

John W. McLane. 

2. Margaret Mills m. 

Samuel Tate Moor- 
head". 

3. Mary Bobinson m. 

John D. Moorhead*. 

4. Joseph Alexander. 

5. Nancy Crawford m. 

*Dr. Perkins, 'Jo- 
seph Tuttle. 

6. Matilda N e e 1 y m. 

Benjamin G. Crary. 

7. Caroline Josephine 

m. William Oxtoby. 



I 

\ 



f M A R T H a Matilda 

Moorhead", 

Thomas\ James", 
I Chri s t i a n a R.', 

Thomas^ 
[ Joseph Neely. 

1. Jane. 

2. Susanna F. 

3. Eliza Ann. 

4. Catharine. 

5. Joseph. 

6. Maria. 



1 



f Thomas Moorhead", 
Thomas\ James", 
Christiana R.", 
Thomas^. 
Rebecca Barnett. 

1. Isaac m. Caroline F. 

Haskinson. 

2. Emily m. Calrin 

Leet. 

3. Rebecca Jane. 

4. Timothy Green Al- 

len. 

5. Clarissa. 

6. William W i 1 b e r- 

f orce m. Mary 
Yale. 



Oct. 22, 
1796. 



Feb. 26, 
1825. 

June 2, 
1827. 

June 26, 
1881. 

Feb. 4, 
1884. 

Apr. 20, 
1888. 

Feb. 26, 
1841. 



Nov. 14, 
1797. 



Sep. 1, 
1808. 



Jan. 11, 
1828. 

Mar. 80, 
1830. 
1832 
1834 

1887 
1839 



Mar. 4, 
1880. 



1866 
Jan. 16, 

1898. 
Nov. 17, 

1872. 



Aug. 6, 
1869. 



1884 
1886 



168 



Mania^. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



I>eath. 



Re8ideno& 



Sep. 1, 
1840. 



VI 
<i 

If 



VI 
(( 

K 

(( 

4( 



VI 

It 

f( 
(i 
t( 
II 

«l 



VI 

II 
II 
II 
II 
If 
II 



7. A n n a m. Charles 

Derrickson. 

8. Elizabeth m 

Charles W. Stone. 

9. Effie Jane. 
10. Mary. 

fjANE Mogbhead", 
Thomas\ James", 
Christiana B.% 
Thomas^ 
William McCobd. 

1. Thomas m. Delia C. 

Durst. 

2. Catharine, unmar- 

ried. 

3. Joseph, unmarried. 

4. Alexander m. 

Backus 

5. Isaac, unmarried. 

6. Montgomery. 

''^Oabglinb Moob- 
HEAD*, Thomas*, 
James', Christi- 
ana R.*, Thomas\ 

■Catherine E. Dada. 

John McCord. 

1. Jane Y. m. W. Au- 

gustus Ensign. 

2. James M., unmar- 

ried. 

3. Luther. 

4. John Calvin. 

5. Joseph Thomas. 

6. William F. 

7. Caroline. 

Joseph Bters Moor- 
H e a D*, J o h n*, 
James', Christi- 
ana R.', Thomas*. 

Eliza Haxipson. 

1. Cassius. 

2. Helen Louise. 

3. Sarah EIIpti. 

4. George Hampson. 

5. Robert. 

6. Joseph. 

7. Margaret. 



1841 



Aug. 10, 
1806. 



1831 

1884 

1886 
1840 

1842 
1847 

Jan. 26, 
1810. 



1805 
1836 

1839 

1844 
1847 
1849 



1847 



1876 
1851 



1845 



Jan. 27, 
1817. 



Mar. 10, 
1880. 



169 



SIXTH GENERATION. 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



VI 



VII 
It 

(( 

VI 



VII 

(( 

(I 

VI 



VII 

II 
il 
II 

VI 



VII 

• I 



^Joseph M. Moor- 
head", James M/, 
Thoma8\ James", 
Christiana B.*, 
Thomas^ 

, Harriet Scott. 

1. Bobert m. 

2. Mary m. Andrew 

Backus. 

3. Isabella m. E.Dodge. 

4. Charles m. «— . 

5. Anna. 

Thomas Moorhead", 
James M.*, Thom- 
a s*, J a m e s", 
Christiana B.', 
Thomas^ 
^ Maria Dada. 

1. Frank. 

2. Elizabeth. 

3. Harriet. 

4. Edward m. . 

5. Alice. 



^ Kitty Ann M o o r- 
head", James M.S 
Thomas^, James", 
Christiana B.", 
Thomas^ 

^Joseph McCord. 

1. Frank. 

2. Elizabeth. 

3. Jane. 

4. Jessie. 

'^Elizabeth Moor- 
head", James M.*^, 
Thomas^ James", 
Christiana B.', 
Thomas^ 

, LuciEN Couse. 

1. Mary. 

2. Norman. 



170 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



VI 



VII 
(I 



VI 



VII 

(< 

l( 

Cf 

VI 



VII 
VI 



VII 



Sep. 
1868. 



(( 



u 



VI 



f William Mc C o b d 

M o o B H E A D^ 
James M.*, Thom- 
as*, James", 
Christiana K.*, 
Thomas.^ 
Fannt Eendbick. 

1. William. 

2. Edith. 

3. Ralph. 

4. James. 

^ Jambs Adaib Moob- 
HEAD*, James 'M.', 
Thomas\ James", 
Christiana K.', 
Thomas.^ 

^ Julia Baldwin. 

1. Frederick. 

2. Hose. 

3. Mary. 

4. Helen. 

5. Mabel. 



^Jane Moobhbad*, 
James M.', Thom- 
as*, James", 
Christiana R.", 
Thomas*. 

^George F. Shebwin. 
1. Josephine. 



ROSANNA J. M gob- 
head", Joseph Y.", 
Thomas*, James", 
Christiana R.", 
Thomas^ 
, John W. MoLane. 

1. Mary m. Par- 

sons. 

2. Jessie m. Bur- 

bick. 

3. Rose m. Arthur 
Fraser. 



Is A A C MOOBHEAD", 

Thomas", Thom- 
as*, James", Chris- 
tiana", Thomas^ 
Caboline F. Habkin- 

SON. 



Feb. 26, 
1825. 



Jan. 11, 
1828. 



Jan. 16, 
1898. 



171 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



VII 1. Ruth m. Frederick 
Metcalf. 
2. Maxwell Wood. 



K 



VI 



VII 
VI 



VII 



r William W i l b e b- 

FOBCE MOOB- 

head", Thomas", 
Thomas^, James', 
Chri s 1 1 a n a B.', 
Thomas^ 
Maby Yale. 
1^ Mary. 

Anna Moobhead*, 
Thomas', Thom- 
as*, James', Chris- 
tiana B.', Thom- 
as\ 

^Chables Debbickson. 
1. Thomas. 



1839 



1841 



The lines of descent given on the following pages were contrib- 
uted by Mr. John Vallores Wayman, of Santa Bosa, California, son 
of Maria Louisa Bobinson Wayman' (John S.*, Samuel', Philip', 
Thomas*). They include the descendants of John Bobinson* 
(George', Philip*, Thomas*); of Qeobge Bobinbon' (Jonathan*, 
George', Philip*, Thomas*); of George Bobinson* (George', Philip*, 
Thomas*) ; and of Majiy (Polly) Bobinson Woods (Samuel', Philip*, 
Thomas*). 



172 



LINE OF JOHN ROBINSONS 

FOURTH GENERATION. 



Marriage. 


Geu. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




IV 


r John Robinson*, "The 


1748, 


1882 


Jackson Co., 






Pat riarch," 


in Pa. 




Ark. 






< George*, Philip', 












Thomas^ 












^Mabgaret Looan. 




About 
1829. 


Tipton Co., 
Tenn. 




V 


1. George m. Mary Lo- 
gan. 




1836 


Jackson Co., 
Ark. 




It 


2. Alexander m. Nancy 


June 11, 


Aug. 8, 


Jackson Co , 






Logan. 


1787. 


1858. 


Ark. 




II 


3. John m. Margaret 
Logan. 










II 


4. William m. ^Martha 
Logan, 'Hetty Rob- 
inson, 'E m i 1 i n e 
Haggard. 




» 






II 


5. Samuel m. Anne Wi- 
ley Logan. 






- 



John Robinson went from Tipton county, Tenn., and located on 
the White river, Jackson county, Arkansas, in 1831, with his fam- 
ily and descendants. 

His wife, Margaret Logan, was sister to James Log^n, who mar- 
ried Esther Robinson, sister to John Robinson. 

Their five sons married five daughters of Jas. Logan and Esther 
Robinson. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 



VI 



« 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



George Robinson*, 
John*, George*, 
Philip', Thomas*. 

Mary Logan, daugh- 
ter of Jas. Logan 
and Esther Rob- 
inson. 

1. Minerva. 

2. Peggy Ann m. Col. 

Jas. Robinson. 

3. Nancy Jane m. Alvin 

McDonald. 

4. James. 

5. George S. 

6. Alexander. 

7. Burilla or Varilla. 

8. Narcissa. 

9. Martha m. Ballard 

Crump. 



June 9, 



1886 



1826 



June 29, 
1844. 



Jackson Co., 
Ark. 

Tipton Co., 
Tenn. 



Jackson Co., 
Ark. 



George Robinson was murdered in Arkansas in 1836 by high- 
waymen while returning from Memphis, Tenn., with supplies. 



JuiKiE John Robinso 



173 



Marriagte. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



June 2, 
1825. 

Tipton 
Co., 

Tenn. 



Death. 



Residence. 



VI 



VI 



Alexander B o b i n- 
80N», John\ 
George', Philip% 
Thomas^ 

Nancy Logan", Es- 
ther Robinson*, 
George', Philip', 
Thomas^ 

1. John A. m. Miss Shu- 

ford. 

2. William, unmarried. 

3. Mellville Logan m. 

Elizabeth A. Rob- 
son*. 

4. Mary m. *Dr. Nor- 

wood, of Georgia, 
'J. L. Stewart. 

'' "Judge" John Robin- 
SON', John*, 
George', Philip', 
Thomas*. 
Margaret Logan', 
Esther Robin- 
son*, George', 
Philip', Thomas*. 

1. James L. m. Miss 

Smith. 

2. Mary Ann m. Alvin 
McDonald. 

3. Margaret m. Jas. 
Waddell. 

4. Minerva m. Robt. 

McDonald. 

5. Elizabeth m. Mell- 

ville L. Robinson'. 

f William Robinson*, 
John*, George*, 
Philip', Thomas*. 
*Martha Logan', Es- 
ther Robinson*, 
George', Philip', 
Thomas*. 
"Hetty Robinson', 
George*, George", 
Philip', Thomas*. 

L "Emiline Hagoard. 

First marriage: 

No children. 



June 11, 
1787. 



Jan. 81, 
1797. 



\ 



1825 



Oct. 28. 
1827. 



1818 



Aug. 8, 
1863. 



May 14, 
1862. 



Death at 
70 years. 



Jackson Co., 
Ark. 



Jackson Co., 
Ark. 



Aug. 1, 

1864, in 

Texas. 

1856 



1854 



March, 
1844. 



Newport, 

Jackson Co., 

Ark. 

Portland, 

Oregon. 



Jackson Co., 
Ark. 



Jackson Co., 
Ark. 



Jacksonville, 

Fla. 

Newport, 

Ark. 

Jackson Co., 
Ark. 



174 




VI 


i( 


(( 


(( 


l( 


(( 


li 


It 


II 



Second marriage: 

1. AdeUa m. *F. P. Ful- 

cher, "L. B. Clay. 

2. Jonathan m. Sarah 

J. Girder. 

3. Mary m. Alex. H. 

Logan*. 

4. Margaret, died in in- 

fancy. 

5. John, died in infancy. 
Third marriage: 

6. £mma. 

7. Virginia. 

8. Frances. 

9. Samuel. 



Mar. 20, 




1826. 




Mar 4, 


Nov. 8, 


1828, 


1868, 


Tenn. 


Ark. 


Mar. 14. 


May, 


1831, 


1861, 


Tenn. 


Ark. 



Born at Cov- 
ington, Tenn. 



There are supposed to be descendants of the children of this third 
marriage living, but no record of them was found beyond the fact 
that in 1878 Virginia was living at St. Charles, Missouri. 



VI 



rSAMUEL Robinson*, 
John*, George', 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
Ann Wiley Logan", 
Esther Bobin- 
son*, George*, 
Philip", Thomas*. 
1. Amanda m. Theo- 
dore Phillips. 



1840 



1887 



Jackson Co., 
Ark. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 



VI 



VI 



r Peggy Ann Robin- 
son*, George*, 
John*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
James Robinson*, 
George*, George*, 
Philip', Thomas*. 
Seeunder Line of 
George Robinson* 
(p. 189). 

Nancy Jane Robin- 
son*, George*, 
John*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
Alvin McDonald. 
1. L. B. m. Davis, 



1 



June 9, 



Oct. 10, 
1800. 



1815 



June 29, 
1844. 



Dec. 1, 
1889. 



1878 



Jackson Co., 

Ark. 



Arkansas. 



176 



Maxrimge. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




VI 


" Mabtha Kobimson*, 
George', John*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 

-Baxlabd Cbump. 










VII 


1. James Ba 1 1 a r d m. 
Loudie Anthony. 






McKinney, 
Texas. 


1860 


VI 


" John A. Robinson*, 
Alexander*, John*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 

Shufort). 










VII 


1. Robert Lee m. Miss 
Jennings. 






Newport, 
Ark. 




l( 


2. John S. 










(< 


3. Alexander S. 








1858 


VI 


' Mellville L o a n 
Robinson*, Alex- 
ander*, John*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 


1826 




Newport, 




VI 


Elizabeth A. Rob« 

I N 8 O N*, J o h n*, 

1 John*, George*, 






t< 




• 


L Philip*, Thomas*. 










VII 


1. James, died at three 
years of age. 






(< 




u 


2. Charles, unmarried. 


1868 


Jan. 
1901. 


a 




(( 


3. George L., unmar* 
ried. 


1866 




l( 




4i 


4. Kate, died in infancy. 










(( 


5. Nancy A. 


1871 


1878 






VI 


" Mabt Robinson*, 


Oct. 28, 




Portland. 






Alexander*, John*, 


1827, 




Oregon. 






George*, Philip*, 


Ark. 










Thomas*. 




1849 




1846 




*Db. Nob wood, of 
Georgia. 






Portland, 


Dec. 24, 




/James L. Stewart. 






Oregon. 


1860. 














VII 


1. Alexander R. Nor- 


June 15, 




Bruce. Ben- 






wood m. Louise. 
Myers. 


1848. 




ton Co., Ore- 






No children by second 






gon. 






marriage. 









176 



MmrriMfst. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 






VI 


i^Jamf.8 L. Bobinson^, 
John*, John*, 
< George*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 
Smith. 






Newport, 
Ark. 




VII 


1. John M., unmarried. 


1864 




Newport, 
Aril. 




VI 


- Maby Ann Robinson*, 
John*, John*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 


1818 


1854 








wAlvin McDonald. 


1816 


1878 






VII 


1. John m. Donie Davis. 




1890 






14 


2. Florence m. Henry 
Scales. 


1844 




Weldon, 
Ark. 




<( 


3. Bobt. E., unmarried. 


1846 




Newport, 
Ark. 




(( 


4. Alvin m. Mary John- 
son. 


1852 




Weldon, 
Ark. 




tl 


5. Margaret Elizabeth 
m. Henry Johnson. 


1864 




Ik 




VI 


•(^lABGARET BOBINSON*, 

John*, John*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 
^ James Waddell. 










VII 


1. Burnett m. Miss Mc- 
Coy. 










II 


2. lAura J. m. George 
K. Dills. 






Newport, 
Ark. 




VI 


" MiNEBYA BOBINSON*, 

John*, John*, 
George*, Philip*. 
Thomas*. 
'^Robert McDonald, 






Jacksonville, 
Fla. 




VII 


1. Edward. 

No further record. 






(1 




V. 


^ Elizabeth*, John*, 
John*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
J Mellyxlle L o a n 

1 Robinson*, Alex- 
a n d e r*, John*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 






» 






See page 175. 









177 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




VI 


'A DEL I A KOBINSON", 

William", John*, 
George", Philip", 
Thomas*. 


Mar. 20, 
1826, 

CJoving- 
ton. 




Paris, Texas. 


Sep. 20, 




*Febdinand p. Pul- 








1842, 




CHER. 






■ 


Ark. 












Oct. 81, 




"Lu R. Clay. 






• 


1854. 




First marriage: 






, 




VII 


1. James, killed in CitII 


June 80, 


1864. 








War, Pilot Knob, 


1844. 




• 






Mo. 












2. Ferdinand P. 
Second marriage: 




Deo., 
1849. 








3. Frances m. Joseph 


Mar. 1, 




Dennison, 






Martin. 


1866. 




Texas. 






4. Joseph Bennett. 


June 11, 
1868. 


Mar. 27, 
1878. 


f 






5. John Robinson m. 


June 11, 




Terrell, 






Minnie £. Martin. 


1868. 




Texas. 






6. Hettie Ann m. M. R. 
Bruckner. 


Mar. 17, 
1861. 




Paris, Texas. 






7. Logan R. 


Apr. 19, 
1868. 


May 9, 
1891. 








8. Mary Adelia m. Per- 
cy D. Preston. 


Jan. 8, 
1866. 




Paris, Texas. 


May 8, 


VI 


'Jonathan Robinson", 


Mar. 4, 


Nov. 8, 


Jacksonport, 


1864. 




William", John*, 
< George", Philip", 
Thomas^ 

V^SaBAH J. GiBDEB. 


1828. 


1868. 


Ark. 




VII 


1. Mary Ellen. 


June 17, 
1866. 


Oct. 21, 
1860. 






». 


2. Hettie m. Col. A. 
Gate. 


May 22, 

1867. 




Paris, Texas. 




I( 


3. Mary m, T. B. VVil- 


June 17, 




Durrani, 






kins. 


1860. 




L Ter. 


May, 


VI 


f Maby Robinson", 


Mar. 14, 


May, 


\ 


1840. 




William", John*, 
George", Philip", 
Thomas*. 
•^ Ale X a n d e b H. Lo- 
gan", Geo. Logan", 
Esther Robinson*, 
George", Philip", 
Thomas*. 


1881. 


1861. 





12 



178 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




VII 
(f 


1. Mary Bobinson. 

2. Henry Payne. 


Dec., 
1861. 


May, 
1861. 
1870. 


JacksoDport, 
Ark. 



After the death of Mary Robinson Logan, Alexander H. L. mar- 
ried a second time and removed to Portland., Ore., where his de- 
scendants now reside. 



1862 


VI 


rAicANDA Robinson*, 
Samuel*, John*, 
George', Philip*, 
Thomas'. 

L Theodore Phillips. 


1840 


1887 
1887 


Jackson Co., 
Ark. 




VII 


1. Annie L. m. Dr. A. S. 


May 8, 


1896 


Newport, 






Parish. 


1868. 




Ark. 


Jan. 9, 


it 


2. Samuel Robinson m. 






K 


1901. 




Claire Neill. 










({ 


3. Josephine m. A. D. 
Bailey. 






f m 




(( 


4. Narcissa m. Chas. L. 






{ t 




C( 


Minor. 






It 




il 


5. Cornelia. 

6. Theodore. 


1882 




C( 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 



VII 



Vlll 



if 



«i 



VII 



VIII 



tt 

if 
<f 

f( 

(C 



I 



L. B. McDONALD% 

Nancy*, George*, 
John*, George*, 
Philip', Thomas^ 
Davis. 



1. William m. 

Connor. 

2. Nettie m. 

Bond. 

3. Lena. 



fjAMES Ballabd 
CRUMP^ Martha*, 
George", John*, 
George*, Philip*, 
ThomasS 
LouDiE Anthony. 

1. Mattie. 

2. Hattie. 

3. Susie. 

4. Gur. 

5. Mamie. 



6. Joseph. 



1868 
1871 
1874 
1878 
1884 
1887 



Jackson Co., 

Ark. 



If 



f < 



(( 



MoKinney, 
Texas. 



•I 
<( 

t; 
f( 



179 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON PAMII^T. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



1896 



VIII 
<« 

1866 VII 



VII 



1895 



VIII 



CI 



CI 



II 



n 



VII 



VIII 



VII 



VIII 

II 



VII 



VIII 

II 



Robert Lee Bobin- 
flON% John A.*, 
Alexander*, John*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas^ 
, Jennings. 

1. Mary. 

2. Fannie. 

AUSXANDEB B. NOR- 

w o o D^, Mary*, 
Alexander", John*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas^. 
^ liOniSE Mtebs. 

1. Burt m. Lillie Hyde. 

2. John L. 

3. Beuben U. 

4. Mary Ellen m. How- 

ard Marston Tyler. 

5. William G. 



John McDonald\ 
Mary A. R.*, John*, 
John*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
DoNiE Davis. 
1. Emma m. William 
Hooker. 

^Florence McDonald', 
Mary A. R.*, John*, 
John*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
Henry Scales. 

1. Alvin m. Ada Sco- 

field. 

2. Polk, died at four 

years. 

(Alvin McDonald, JR.^ 
Mary A. R.*, John*, 
John*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
Mart Johnson^ 

1. Sue. 

2. Robert. 



1896 
1898 

June 16, 
1848. 



1868, 

Ark. 

1873, 

Ark. 

1875, 

Texas. 

June 12, 

1878, 
Texas. 

1880, 
Oregon. 



1844 



1852 



1885 
1887 



1890 



1869 



Newport, 
Ark. 



cc 

CI 

<l 



Bruce, Ben- 
ton Co., Ore. 



Coburg, 
Lane Co., Ore 
Harrisburg» 
Linn Co., Ore 



ii 



<c 



IC 



Arkansas. 



cc 



Brinkley, 
Ark. 



Weldon,Ark. 



II 



cc 

iC 



180 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



vin 



(C 



(C 

<i 
It 
(t 

<( 



VII 



vni 

VII 



VIII 



« 



Apr. 29, 

1874, 
Paris, 
Texas. 



VII 



VIII 






Birth. 



Death. 



1890 
1892 
1896 
1897 

1864 



1877 

1879 
1885 



1895 



3. Lottie. 

4. Joseph. 

5. Ralph. 

6. Clyde. 

VII TMargabet Eliza- 

I BETH McDONALD% 

J MaryA.R.«, John", 

John*, George*, 
Philips, Thomas^ 
L Henry Johnson. 
VIII 1. Durkie, died at four 
years. 

2. Florence m. Henry 
Herring. 

3. Roy. 

4. Laura. 

5. Bertha, died at three 
years. 

6. Mary, died at twelve 
years. 

7. Mildred. 

p Burnett Waddell\ 
Margaret*, John*, 
John*, George*, 
Philip', Thomas*. 
— McCoy. 

1. James. 

"Laura J. Waddell\ 
Margaret*, John*, 
John*, George*, 
Philip'. Thomas^ 
George K. Dills. 

1. Lizzie m. S. W. Tag- 
gard. 

2. Lottie m. Joseph 
Walker. 

("Frances CLAY^Ma^. 1, 
Adelia*, William*,! 1856. 
John*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
Joseph Martin. 

1. Frank H. juiy g, 

1876 

2. Joseph Clay. juiy gi, 

3. Clarence. gep. 27, 

4. Adeha. Aug. 7, 

1886. 



Residence. 



Weldon,Ark. 



ct 

14 



Weldon, 

Jackson Co., 

Ark. 



Memphis, 

Tenn. 

Weldon, Ark. 



(C 



If 



(c 



Arkansas. 



Arkansas. 



it 



(( 



Dennison, 
Texas. 



Terrell, 
Texas. 
Hubbard 
City, Texas. 

Dennison, 
Tex. 



181 



Marriage 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMII^Y. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




VllI 


5. Logan Bandolph. 


July 4, 
1888. 




Dennison, 
Texas. 


Nov. 10, 


VII 


r John Hobinson CLAY^ 


June 11, 




Terrell. Tex 


1880, 




AdeliaS William', 


1858. 




^x/&&«^*A, Aw^k. 


Terrell, 




John*, George', 








Tex. 




Philip*, Thomas^ 
^Minnie £j. Mabtin. 










VIII 


1. Nell Adelia. 


Dec. 8. 




(( 


. 






1888. 






Oct. 11, 


VII 


'He'itie Ann Clay\ 


Mar. 17, 




Paris. Tex 


1882. 




AdeUa*, William', 
John*, George", 
Philip', Thomas*. 
^ M. B. Bbuckneb. 


1861. 

• 




A W&AO, AV^k. 




VJII 


1. Paul Clay. 


Auff. 9, 
1888. 




(( 






2. Elizabeth May. 


May 16, 
1886. 


Feb. 14, 
1887. 


U 




II 

J _ 


3. Max H. 


June 16, 
1889. 


■ 


(( 




II 


4. Mary Katherine. 


Aug. 14, 
1895. 




(f 


June 12, 


VII 


rMABY Adelia CLAY^ 


Jan. 8, 




(( 


1890. 




Adelia', William', 
-s John*, George', 

Philip*, Thomas^ 
'-Pebcy D. Pbeston. 


1866. 








VIII 


1. Percy Clay. 


Sep. 17, 
1891. 




i( 




(( 


2. James A. 


Sep. 17, 
1896. 




CI 


July 10, 


vir 


' H E T T I E BOBINSON^, 


May 22, 




(1 


1888. 




Jonathan', Will- 
i a m', John*, 
George', Philip*, 
Thomas^ 
^ Col. a. Cate. 


1857. 




i4 




VII 


1. John Girder Gibbon. 


Apr. 17, 
1889. 




li 


Dec. 7, 




r Maby B B I N 8 O N^ 


June 17, 




Durrant, 


1887, 




Jonathan', Will- 


1860. 




Ind. Ter. 


Paris, 




i a m', J o h n*, 








Tex. 




George', Philip', 
Thomas^ 

. T. B. WiLKINS. 






cc 




VIII 


1. Leslie L. 


Feb. 14. 


Mar. 14, 


if 






1889. 


1890. 





182 



Marriage. 



1884 



1888 



1895 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMII^y. 



Birth. 



VU 



Vm 2. Chester Qifford. 

3. James Girder. 

4. Hettie Gate. 



VIII 
*t 

VII 



VIII 
VII 



VIII 



Annie L. Phillips^, 
Amanda*, S a m- 
u e P, J o h n*, 
George', Philip", 
Thomas*. 
^ Db. a. S. Pabish. 

1. William T. 

2. Ida. 

Josephine PHILLIps^ 
Amanda*, Sam- 
uel", J o h n*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 
L A. D. Bailey, 
Four (4) children. 

'■ Nabcissa Phillips*, 

Amanda*, S a m- 

ueP, John*, 

George*, PhiUp*, 

Thomas*. 
, Charles L. Minob. 
1. Charles. 



Jan. 26. 

1891. 
Jan. 18, 

1898. 
June 16, 

1896. 

May 8, 
1868. 



1886 
1889 



1897 



Death. 



1896 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 



vm 



IX 

vin 



IX 



'William McDonald*, 
L. B. M c D.% 
Nancy*, George*, 
John*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 

CONNOB. 

1. Jessie. 

'Nettie McDonald*, 
L. B.^ Nancy*, 
George", John*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 

Bond. 

1. Nettie. 




Residence. 



Durrant, 

Ind. Ter. 
(( 

(I 



Newport, 
Ark. 



If 

it 



ii 



(C 



Jackson Ck)., 
Ark. 



Jackson Co., 
Ark. 



(C 



183 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



May 1, 
1897. 



VIII 



IX 



(( 



VIII 



IX 



VIII 



'' Maby Ellen Nob- June 12, 
WOOD*, Alexan- 1878, 
der R. NJ, Mary% Tex. 
Alexander*, John*, 
George*, Philip", 
Thomas^. 
HowABD Mass TON 
Tyleb. 

1. Homer Alexander. 

2. Frank Leslie. 



IX 



VIII 



IX 



June 8, 
1898. 

Aug. 14, 
1900. 



^ E M M A McDonald*, 
John McD.% Mary 
A. R.*, John», 
John*, George*, 
PhiUp*, ThomasS 
William Hookeb. 

1. Irma. 

2. Franchelle. 

'Alvin Scales*, Flor- 
ence McD.^ Mary 
A. R.*, John», 
John*, George*, 
PhUip*, Thomas*. 

^Ada Soofield. 

1. William Thomas. 



Flobence Johnson*, 
Margaret McD.^ 
Mary*, John*, 
John*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas^ 
^Henby Hebbing. 

1. Guy. 

2. Henry. 



VIII f Lizzie Dills*, Laura 
Waddeir, Marga- 
ret*, John*, John*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas\ 
S. W. Taggabd. 
IX Three sons, names not 
known. 



1888 
1891 



1899 



1877 



1897 
1899 



Residence. 



Harrisburg, 

Linn Co., 

Ore, 



tl 



« 



Brinkley* 
Ark. 






Weldon, 
Ark. 



it 



Memphis, 
Tenn. 






Ark. 



(f 



184 



Marriage. G«ii. 



ROBINSON PAMII^T. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



VIII 



IX 



'Lottie Dulls", Laura 
Waddeir, Marga- 
ret*, John*, John*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas^ 
Joseph Walker. 
1. Daughter, name not 
known. 



Ark. 



LINE OF GEORGE ROBINSON^ 

FIFTH GENERATION. 



1810 



VI 



i( 



ct 



(< 



(f 



{George Eobinson*, 
Jonathan*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 
Martha McConnell. 

1. Eliza Jane m. Thom- 

as E. Price. 

2. William, unmarried. 

3. Jonathan Black m. 
Maria A. Hewlett. 

4. Thomas Fielding m. 

Osborne Smith. 

5. George Price m. 

Leonora Jerdone. 



1780 


Jan. 20, 
1855. 


1808 


Aug. 
1855. 
1864 




Nov. 25, 

1848. 




1854 


1828 


1880 



Henderson, 
Ky. 



Lexington, 

Ky. 
New Orleans, 

La. 
Henderson, 

Ky. 



Henderson, 

Ky. 

New Orleans, 

La. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 



1826 



VI 



VII 



If 

(( 



r Eliza Jane Robin- 
son*, Gteorge*, Jon- 
athan*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
Thomas Eeene 
Price, of Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 

1. Martha Jane m. W. 

L. Baber. 

2. Edleonora Keene m. 

B. H. Moss, M. D. 

3. Eliza Hobinson. 

4. Margaretta Eliza 

Hill. 

5. Harry Hill m. Sue 

Cannon, of Colum- 
bus, Miss. 

6. Sarah Frances. 







1808 


1864 




1870 


1829 


1864 


1882 




1834 


1886 


1840 


1841 


1842 




1844 


1846 



N6w Orleans, 
La. 



<c 



Sumner Co., 

Tenn. 
New Orleans. 



({ 



New Orleans. 



185 



Marriage. 



1867 



G«n. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



VI 



VII 



VI 



VII 



(C 



VI 



VII 



r Jonathan Black 
Robinson*, 
George", Jona- 
than*, George*, 
Philip", Thomas^ 
Mabia Amanda Hew- 
lett. 

1. Thomas Price, died 
at 18 years of age. 



" Thomas Fielding 

R O B if N S O N*, 

George*, J o n a- 
than*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 

OSBOBNE ^QTH. 



1. John Smith, killed in 

the C o n f e d erate 
Army. 

2. George, married. 

Georoe Price Robin- 
B o N*, George*, 
Jonathan*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas^ 
^Leonora Jerdone. 
1. Mary or Molly m. 
Smith. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



1828 



1854 



Dec. 20, 
1846. 



1860 



1858 



Nashyille, 
Tenn. 



Henderson, 
Ky. 



(i 



Henderson, 

Ky. 
New Orleans. 



Evansyille, 
Ind. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 



1845 


VII 


r Martha Jane PRICE^ 
Eliza Jane*, 
George*, J o n a- 
than*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 

I^W. L. Barer. 


1829 


1854 


Sumner Co., 
Tenn. 




VllI 


1. Martha Alice m. Dr. 
L. G. Durr. 


1846 


1888 


Nashyille, 
Tenn. 




If 


2. EUeonora Price m. 
Robt. W. Miller. 


1847 




(f 




(i 


3. Thomas Price. 


1850 


1866 





186 



Marriage. Gen. 



ROBINSON PAMII^Y. 



1856 



VII 



1868 



vni 



(i 



VII 



VIII 



(( 

(I 

a 



r Elleonoba K e e n e 
PBICE^ Eliza 
Jane*, George", 
Jonathan*, 
Georgre«, PhiUp", 
Thomas*. 
B. H. Moss, M. D. 

1. Ben. Price, unmar- 

ried. 

2, Elleonora Erwin, un- 
married. 

Habby Hill Pbice^, 
lawyer, Eliza 
Jane*, George*, 
Jonathan% 
George*, Philip', 
ThoniAs^ 

SuBiE Cannon, of Co- 
lumbus, Miss. 

1. Eliza Jane. 

2. Manie Moss m. Bobt. 

L. Dlxey. 

3. Thomas K. 

i. £31eonora m. Earnest 

H. Garland. 
5, Alice. 
0. Carrie Walmsley. 

7. Sue Cannon. 

8. Grace Kernochan. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



1882 



July, 
1868. 

Oct., 
1860. 

1842 



1873 



1866 
1866 

1869 
1871 

1876 
1877 
1879 
1884 



1871 



New Orleans, 
La. 






It 
(< 

l( 

C( 

l( 

u 

IC 
Cf 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 



VJII 



IX 

<c 
(( 
(f 
(< 



r Mabtha Alice Ba- 


1846 


1888 


BEB*, Martha 






Jane Price', Eliza 






Jane*, George*, 






Jonathan\ 






George*, Phmp«, 






Thomas^ 






Dr. Lafayette G. 






DUBB, of New Or- 






leans. 






1. Lafayette G. 


1876 




2. Harry Price. 


1877 


1877 


3. Lucille. 


1878 




4. Benjamin King. 






6. Martha Alice. 






6. Juanette King. 


1881 





Nashville, 
Tenn. 



(( 



If 



187 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON PAMII«T. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 


1869 


VIII 


rEiJ-EONORA Price Ba- 
BEB", Martha 
Jane Price% 
Eliza Jane*, 
George*, Jona- 
than^ George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
BoBERT W. Miller, 
of Lebanon, Tenn. 


1847 




Nashville, 
Tenn. 




IX 


1. Elbridge Seawell. 


1870 


1870 


CI 




•* 


2. Lilian Seawell m. 
Bobt. U. Bransford. 


1872 




CC 




CI 


3. Ben. Moss. 


1878 


1878 


(( 


1888 


Vlll 


tManie Moss Price*, 
Harry P r i e e^, 
Eliza Jane*, 

-s George*, Jona- 
t h a n*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas'. 

'^ BOBERT L. .DiXEY. 


1866 




New Orleans. 




IX 


1. Bobert H., Jr. 


1889 








<l 


2. Harry Price. 


1890 








(( 


3. Minge. 


1891 








t( 


4. Albert Miles. 


1893 






1896 


Vlli 


r Elleonora Price*, 
Harry P r i c e^, 
Eliza Jane*, 
George*, Jona- 
t h a n^, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas'. 

^Earnest H. Garland. 


1871 




(1 




IX 


1. Sue Cannon. 


1897 




IC 



NINTH GENERATION. 



IX 



«« 



Lilian Seawell Mil- 
ler*, • Elleonora 
Baber*, Martha 
Jane Price% Eliza 
Jane B.*, George*, 
Jonathan*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas'. 

BoBERT Harper 
Bransford, 

1. Margaret. 

2. Bobert Miller. 

3. Ben. Moss. 



1872 



Nashville, 
Tenn. 



1871 

1892 
1896 
1897 



«c 



Note. — ^This line is complete to date (1900), with the exception 
of the descendants (1) of George Bobinson^ (Thomas Fielding*, 
George*, etc.), and (2) of Mary Bobinson Smith^ (George Price*, 
George*, etc.). George B. and family are living at Henderson, Ky., 
and Mary B. S. and family are supposed to be living at or near 
Evansville, Ind. J. V. W. 



188 



LINE OF GEORGE ROBINSONS 

FOURTH GENERATION. 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 


• 


IV 


fQEOBOE Robinson*, 




Apr. 20, 


Tipton Co., 
Tenn. 






George*, Philip*. 




1826. 






Thomas*. 












Majely Thobne. 




May 8, 
1881. 


Tipton Co., 
Tenn. 




V 


1. Thomas, unmarried. 




Mar. 29, 


Tipton Co., 
Tenn. 










1881. 




C( 


2. Polly m. Francis 

*.-'*ch. 










f 1 


3. George m. Lucinda 


Jan. 12, 


Feb. 20, 


Ruiers villa, 






Galloway. 


1798, 


1843. 


Texas. 




(( 


4. James ("Col.") m. 


Oct. 10, 


Dec. 1, 


Newport, 






*Peggy A. Robin- 


1800. 


1889. 


Jackson Co., 






son, 'Mrs. Anne 






Ark. 






Wiley Logan Rob- 












inson. 










c( 


5. John, killed by horse. 


1802 


1809. 


Jackson Co., 




(1 


6. Hetty m. William 
Robinson. 




Aug.. 
1886. 


Ark. 




(< 


7. Oliyer Vanlanding. 


1809 


1819 






1( 


8. Nancy, died young. 









FIFTH GENERATION. 



July 16, 
1812, 
Shaw- 
nee town 
III. 



VI 



i( 



r P o L L Y Robinson*, 
George*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 

Francis Leech. 
1. George. 

2^ ^ girl, name not 
known. 



July, 
1818. 



No further record of the Leech family. Descendants liTing in 
Arkansas. 



Feb. 1. 


V 


fGEOBGE Robinson*, 


Jan. 12, 


Feb. 20, 


Rutersrille, 


1818, 




George*, George*, 


1798. 


1843. 


Fayette Co., 


Louis- 




Philip*, Thomas*. 






Texas. 


iana. 




1 












Lucinda Galloway. 


Jan. 20, 


Feb. 8, 


Fayette Co., 






Born in Louisi- 


1804. 


1879. 


Texas. 






ana. 









189 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



VI 



CI 



If 



<( 



l( 



u 



<( 



II 



1. Oscar, unmarried. 

2. Thomas, unmarried. 

3. Oliver, unmarried. 

4. Mary Ann m. George 

W. McElyea. 

5. Eobert James, un-> 

married. 

6. George m. Susan Me- 

Gill. 

7. Vincent G. m. Mary 

C. Martin. 

8. Lewis Galloway m. 

Mary M. Terry. 



Feb. 20, 

1820. 
July 7, 

1828. 
Dec. 6, 

1826. 
Mar. 26, 

1828. 
Jan. 26, 

1881. 
Jan. 2, 

1885. 
Got. 27. 

1888. 
Mar. 17, 

1842. 



Nov. 1, 
1841. 
1864. 

Jan. 24, 

1864. 
Jan. 19, 

1888. 
Nov. 20, 

1879. 
Jan. 26, 

1900. 

Jan., 

1878. 
Nov. 11, 

1887. 



Fayette Co., 
Texas. 



II 



(I 



Luling, 
Texas. 



Fayette Co.,. 
Texas. 



George Hobinson went from Tipton county, Tenn., in 1816 or 
1817, to Louisiana, where he married. From Louisiana he went 
to Texas, near the mouth of the Brazos River, in 1820; thence to 
Fayette county, where he filled the ofl&ce of sheriff. He also 
served through the Mexican War. 





V 


r"CoL." James Robin- 


Oct. 10, 


U&G* 1 , 


Newport, 






son*, George*, 


1800, 


1899. 


Jackson Co., 






George', Philip', 


Cumb. 




Ark. 


Feb. 24, 
1882. 




Thomas^ 
*Pegqy Ann Robin- 
son*, George*, 
.j John', George', 
Philip', Thomas*. 


Co.,Ky. 
Jan. 9, 


June 29, 
1844. 


Jackson Co.,. 
Ark. 


June 2. 




'Mrs. Ann Wiley Lo- 








1845 




o A N Robinson*, 








A vsw. 




Esther Robinson*, 
George', Philip', 
Thomas\ 
First marriage: 










VI 


1. Oscar. 


Feb. 11, 


Oct. 8, 


Jackson Co., 






# 


1888. 


1868. 


Ark. 




(1 


2. Amanda Melissa. 
Second marriage: 


Mar., 
1884. 


Sep. 26, 
1886. 


II 




II 


3. Josephine m. Green 


Mar. 29, 




Newport, 






Brandenburg. 


1847. 




Ark. 



190 



Col. James Hobinson went to Jackson county, Territory of Ar- 
kansas, in 1831. He was there elected sheriff, county clerk, mem- 
ber of the lower house of the State Legislature, State senator, 
and probate judge. His second wife was the widow of Samuel 
Bobinson" (John*, George*, Philip*, Thomas^). 



Marriage. 



G«n. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



July 2, 
1825. 



r H E T T T Robinson*, 
George*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
William Robinson*, 
John*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
See Line of John Rob- 
inson (p. 171). 



Aug., 
1836. 



SIXTH GENERATION 



July 29, 


VI 


rMARY Ann Robinson*, 


Mar. 26, 


Jan. 19, 


RutersVlUe, 


1869, 




George*, George*, 


1828. 


1888. 


Tex. 


Ruters- 




■j George*, Philip*, 








ville, 




Thomas*. 








Tex. 




^George W. McElyea. 










VII 


1. Lula Jane m. Alfred 
Nash. 


Sep. 14, 
1860. 




Zephyr, 
Tex. 




t( 


2. James Lewis m. 


July 21, 




Lillard, 






Frankie L. Young. 


1863. 




Tex. 


Dec. 9, 


(1 


3. George Alice m. Pe- 


Oct. 2, 




West Point, 


1899. 




ter G. Simpson. 


1866. 




Tex. 




1 1 


4. John Henry m. Cora 


Sep. 20, 




Hockheim, 






B. Green. 


1868. 




Tex. 




VI 


r G E b G E Robinson*, 


Jan. 2. 


Jan. 25, 


Luling, Cald- 






George*, George*, 


1885. 


1900. 


well Ck)., Tex. 






-l George*, Philip*, 












Thomas*. 












L Susan McGill. 




1 






No issue. 





George Robinson* served through the war in the Confederate 
Army—Maurs Legion, First Battalion, Company D. 



Jan. 14, 
1866, 

Ruters- 
vllle, 
Tex. 



VI 



VII 



Cl 



li 



{Vincent G. Robinson*, 
George*, George*, 
George*, PhiUp*, 
Thomas*. 
Mary C. Mabtin. 

1. Robert L. m Bessie 
H. Smith. 

2. Hattie L. m. Arthur 

L. Furby. 

3. Vincent G., Jr. 



Oct. 27, 
1888. 



Oct. 81, 
1866. 

Aug. 12, 
1870. 

July 29, 
1872. 



Jan., 
1878. 



West Point, 
Tex. 



(I 



191 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



1876 


VI 




VII 




i( 




it 




n 


Apr. 26, 
1864. 


VI 


Jan. 9, 
1884. 


vu 










June 16. 
1898. 













r Lewis Galloway 
Robinson*, 
George", George*, 
George*, Philip*, 
ThoIaas^ 
Maby Maude Tebby. 



1. Ida Maude. 

2. Jennie Lee m. Bobt. 

Hall Gresham. 

3. Benjamin Terry. 

4. Louise Estelle. 



I 



Josephine Robinson*, 
"Col." James*, 
George*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas^ 

Green Brandenburg. 

1. Hettie m. Charles 

Wilmans. 

2. James. 

3. Henry Green. 

4. Amanda m. R. B. 

Hooker. 

5. Elizabeth Logan m. 

Euguene Maris. 

6. Frederick Charles. 

7. Ray Robinson. 

8. Lucy Tozier. 



Mar. 17, 
1842. 



Nov. 4, 

1872. 
Mar. 19, 

1874. 
Jan. 2, 

1876. 
Mar. 28, 

1878. 

Mar. 29, 
1847. 



Mar. 2, 

1866. 
June 10, 

1868. 
Dec. 7, 

1870. 
.Jan. 81, 

1872. 
Sep. 26, 

1876. 

Feb. 

1877, 
June 14, 

1880. 
Mar. 2, 

1888. 



Nov. 11 

1887. ' 



Jan. 29, 
1888. 



Sep. 26, 

1868. 



Fayette Co., 
Tex. 



Gronzales, 

Tex. 
San Antonio, 

Tex. 
San Antonio, 

Tex. 
Corpus Chrls- 



>rpi 



Tex. 



Newport, 

Jackson Co., 

Ark. 



Newport, 
Ark. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 



Apr. 18, 
1882. 



VII 



LuLA Jane McElyea^ 
Mary Ann*, 
George*, George*, 
George*, Philip*, 
Thomas^ 
, Alfred Nash. 



Sep. 14, 
1860. 



Zephyr, Tex. 



192 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




vin 


1. Alice. 


Jan. 9, 
1884. 




Zephyr, Tex. 






2. Mary. 


Nov. 10, 
1886. 










3. Elizabeth. 


May 10, 
1889. 










4. Eunice. 


Dec. 16, 
1890. 










5. Georgia. 


June 19, 
1898. 










6. John McElyea. 


1894 






Nov. 20, 


VII 


^James Lewis Mc- 


July 21, 




Lillard, 


1882. 


VIII 


Elyea% Mary 
Ann*, George*, 
George*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas^ 
^Frankie L. Young. 
Large family of child- 
ren. Names not 
known. 


1868. 




Hardin Co., 
Tex. 


Sep. 28, 


VII 


'John HenryMc- 


Sep. 20, 




Hockheim, 


1896. 




Elyea^, Mary 
Ann*, George*, 
George*, George*, 
Philip*, Thomas\ 
^GoRA B. Green. 


1868. 




Tex. 




VIII 


1. Lois Lanora. 


Feb. 2, 
1898. 




<i 


Feb. 27, 


VII 


^Robert L. Robinson^, 


Oct. 81, 




West Pointy 


1889, 




Vincent*, George*, 


1866. 




Tex. 


West 




George*, George*, 








Point, 




Philip*, Thomas^ 








Tex. 




I Bessie H. Smith. 










VIII 


1. Mary E. 


Dec. 24, 

1889. 








c( 


2. Ogden S. 


Dec. 8, 
1892. 








f 1 


3. Era A. 


Apr. 1, 
1894. 








(( 


4. Embrose A, 










<l 


5. Willie E. 


Aug. 20, 
1898. 






July 6, 


VII 


rHATTIE L. ROBINSON^ 


Aug. 12, 




«c 


1890, 




Vincent*, George*, 


1870. 






West 




George*, George*, 








Point, 




Philip*, Thomas^ 








Tex. 




w Arthur L. Furby. 









193 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residenoe. 




VMI 


1. Lionel H. 


Aug. 22, 
1891. 




West Point, 
Tex. 




«c 


2. Afiher B. 


May 10, 
1898. 




(1 




<l 


3. Ferol T. 


June 11, 
1896. 


May 24, 

1897. 


(( 




If 


4. Haddon F. 


May 80, 
1897. 




t( 




«4 


5. Virgn V. 


Aug. 14, 
1899. 




u 


July 19, 


VII 


r Jennie Lee Robin- 


Mar. 19, 




San Antonio, 


1891. 




flON% Lewis*, 
George*, George*, 
George*, Philip", 
Thomas^. 
Robert Hall Gresh- 

^ AM. 


1874. 




Texas. 




VIII 


1. Rupert Neely. 


Apr. 7, 
1892. 




u 




(( 


2. Maude. 


Sep. 7, 
1897. 








u 


3. Carrie Lee. 


Oct. 29 
1899. 




(b 


Jan. 28, 


VII 


["Amanda Branden* 


Jan. 31, 




Newport, 


1898. 




BX7RO% Josephine*, 


1872. 








"Col." James*, 












George*, George*, 












Philip*, Thomas*. 












^Robert B. Hooker. 










VIII 


1. Elise. 


Jan. 4, 
1896. 







13 



194 



LINE OF POLLY ROBINSON WOODS*. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 



Marriage, 



Gen. 



ROBINSON PAMII«Y. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



Jan. 2, 

1794, 
Da'phin 
CJo., Pa. 



IV 



^ Polly Robinson*, 
SamueP, PhiUp% 
lliomas*. 

Alexander Woods, 
wheelwright. 



1. John m. Sarah Ann 

Lynch. 

2. Samuel m. Abigail 

Glines. 

3. James m. Maria Rob- 

eson. 

4. Alexander m. Sarah 

K. Brice. 

5. William C. m. Juliet 

Jamieson. 

6. Jane m. Bon- 

ner, no children. 

7. Mary m. Jonathan 

Gray. 

8. Rebecca m. James 

Kennedy. 



Aug. 3, 
1762, 
Dau- 
phin Co. 

1768, 
Tyrone 
Co., Ire- 
land. 
Oct. 18, 
1794. 



Sep. 9, 
1800. 



Aug. 12, 
1806. 



1808 

Nov. 16, 
1810. 



Aug. 16, 
1828. 



1848. 



Farm near 
Springboro, 
Ohio. 



July 80, 
1866. 
1848 

Nov. 16, 
1861. 

Aug. 17, 
1868. 

Sep. 16, 
1886. 



1880 

Jan. 26, 
1866. 



Died in Ham- 
ilton, Ohio. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 



June 20. 


V 


f John Woods', lawyer, 
J Polly R.*, Samuel", 


Oct. 18, 


July 80, 


Hamilton, 


1820. 




1794. 


1866. 


Ohio. 




. 


1 Philip', Thomas*. 












Sarah Ann Lynch. 


Dec. 29, 
1801. 


Oct. 7, 
1881. 






VI 


1. Mary m. Dr. Cyrus 
Falconer. 


June 8, 
1821. 


1871 






(i 


2. Sarah. 


Jan. 18. 
1828. 


Feb. 21, 
1828. 






(( 


3. Martha m. William 


Feb. 14, 




Hamilton, 






Beckett. 


1824. 




Ohio. 




t( 


4. Sarah. 


Oct. 10, 
1827. 


July 23, 
1840, 






t( 


5. Rebecca m. William 


Feb. 17, 


May 6, 








H. Miller. 


1831. 


1894. 





John Woods' was a member of the National House of Represent- 
atives for two terms, 1825-1829, and Auditor of the State of Ohio, 
1845-1851. 



195 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




Vi;6. Rachel m. Samuel 


Apr. 6, 


Nov. 8, 


• 

Buffalo, 






K. Worthington. 


1885. 


1896. 


New York. 




(( 


7. John m. Harriet 


Jure 19, 




Ludinfifton, 






Jane Vance. 


1888. 




Michigan. 




(( 


8. Twin brother. 


June 19, 
1888. 


June 19, 
1838. 






i( 


9. Cyrus. 


Dec. 8, 
1840. 


Nov. 24, 

1844. 




Butler 


V 


r Samuel Woods, M. 




1848 


Died at Ham- 


Co.. 




D.^ Polly*, Sam- 






ilton, Ohio. 


Ohio. 




uel*, Philip", 
Thomas^ 












-Abigail Glines. 


1807 


May, 
1860. 






VI 


1. Isaac, died in in- 
fancy. 


1826 


1826 






(( 


2. James Robinson m. 


Apr. 2, 




Rose Hill, 






Elizabeth Morris. 


1828. 




Iowa. 




»( 


3. Mary Jane. 




May, 
1863. 


Died at Kirk- 
ville, Iowa, 




t( 


4. John William m. 


Sep. 24, 




Kirkville, 






Nancy Marshall. 


1888. 




Iowa. 




C( 


5. Silas Smith m. Mar- 
tha E. Harsin. 


Apr. 28, 
1886. 








(( 


6. Caroline Scott m. J. 


Dec. 4, 


Sep. 4, 


Died in Ne- 






M. Wickard. 


1888. 


1889. 


braska. 




It 


7. Ruth Eliza m *John 


Oct. 18, 




Enterprise, 






Zrll m ' 


1840. 




Oregon. 










W etherly. 










<c 


8. Samuel A. m. 'Lizzie 


May 24. 




Wilbur, 






Ross, m. 'Sarah De- 


•7 ' 

1842. 




Waehington. 






witt. 










(» 


9. Charles McDill. 




1849 




Feb. 28, 


V 


r James Woods", Polly*, 


Sep. 9, 


Nov. 16, 




1826. 




Samuel*, Philip*, 
Thomas'. 


1800. 


1851. 








Mabia ROBESOn. 


Sep. 17, 


Dec. 20, 








k 


1807. 


1852. 






VI 


1. Mary Ann m. Sylves- 


Aug. 12, 


Mar. 29. 


Died at Keo- 






ter W. Irwin. 


1827. 


1868. 


kuk, Iowa. 




(( 


2. Harriet Eliza. 


Oct. 14, 


Nov. 5, 


Died in But- 








1829. 


1886. 


ler Co., Ohio. 




IC 


3. Martha Maria m. Al- 


Sep. 9, 


Nov. 17, 


Died at Mid- 






bert M. Jewell. 


1882. 


1885. 


dletown,Ohio 




(( 


4. William Alexander 


Mar. 80, 


Oct. 4, 


Died at Pow- 






m. 'Charlotte Grove, 


1887. 


1892. 


ersville, Mo. 






m. "Mary Barnes. 









196 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




VI 5. James Newton m. 


Aug. 7, 




Crescent Hill 






^Louisa Rogers, m. 


1840. 




Ky. 






•Lydia F. Judldn. 










i< 


6. John Robeson m. 


July 24, 




Hamilton, 






Jennie M. Zener. 


1844. 




Ohio. 


May 19, 


V 


r Alexander Woods*, 




Aug. 17, 




1825. * 




Polly*, Samuel*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
Sarah K. Brics. 




1858. 

Mar. 11, 
1859. 






VI 


1. John Kersley Woods 


June 15, 




Van Wert» 






m. Rebecca Lynch. 


1828. 




Ohio. 




C( 


2. WilUam T. 


Sep. 9, 
1888. 


Oct. 25, 
1884. 






(f 


3. James Newton. 


July 24, 
1885. 


Dec. 6, 
1861. 






«v 


4. Anna Margaret. 


Apr. 9, 
1888. 


Feb. 8, 
1889. 






I( 


5. Sarah Jane m. Mar- 
tin B. Morton. 


Mar. 10, 
1840. 




Dayton, Ohio 


July 7, 


V 


r William C. Woods*, 


Aug. 12, 


Sep. 15, 


Died at Ham- 


1885, 




lawyer, Polly*, 


1806. 


1836. 


ilton, Ohio. 


New 




-{ Samuel*, Philip*, 








Paris, 




Thomas.* 








Ohio. 




^Juliet Jamiesoist. 










VI 


1. Ellen Frances m. H. 


July 11, 




Salt Lake 






D. Martin. 


1886. 




City, Utah. 



Juliet Jamieson Woods was married a second time to a Mr. 
Martin, of Bourbon county, Kentucky, where are liying children 
by this marriage. 



Dec. 20, 


V 


Mary Woods*, Polly*, 
Samuel*, Philip*, 


1808 


1880 




1825. 














"j Thomas^ 
Jonathan Qrat. 












Jan. 14. 


1870 










1794. 








VI 


1. Alexander W. 


Sep. 12, 
1826. 


June 6, 
1885. 






(( 


2. Agnes M. m. Andrew 


Feb. 10, 


Apr. 28, 








Clyde. 


1829. 


1854. 






<f 


3. William C. m. Anna 


Oct. 17, 


Oct., 


Chicago, 






K. Qarns. 


1880. 


1901. 


111. 




(I 


4. Mary Hadassa m. 


July 7, 




Wyoming, 






Andrew Ritchie. 


1885. 




Ohio. 




t( 


5. Joanna. 


June 22, 


Mar. 18, 










1887. 


1884. 





197 



Mftrriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMII,Y. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




VI 


6. Jonathan (farmer, 


Apr. 16, 




Pleasant 






unmarried). 


1842. 




Bun, Ohio. 


Sep. 27, 


V 


Rebecca Woodb^, 


Nov. 15,1 Jan. 25, 




1886. 




Polly*, Samuel," 
Philip*, Thomas^ 
James Kennedy. 


1810. 


1866. 






VI 


1. Jane m. John Wood- 


Sep. 1, 


May 13, 








side. 


1840. 


1867. 






(I 


2. Mary, unmarried. 


July 6, 
1842. 


Nov. 14, 
1861. 






(( 


3. William W. m. Mary 
S. Winters. 


May 17, 
1845. 




Byers, Ohio 

• 



SIXTH GENERATION. 



Oct. 10, 
1839. 


VI 




VII 






Oct. 9, 
1880. 




















Sep. 22, 
1846. 


VI 



Mary Woods*, John 
Woods*, Polly*, 
Samuel*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 

Cyrus Falconer, 
M. D. 

1. John Woods, Capt. 
41st U. S. C. I. 
Killed at Appomat- 
tox. 

2. Jerome, wounded at 
Stone River, Dec. 
31, 1862. 

3. William Beckett m. 
Eva Woodbridge. 

4. Louise m. Gen. Eu- 
gene PowelL 

5. Helen m. Capt. L. M. 
O'Brien, U. S. A. 

6. Cyrus, Jr., m. Martha 

Piatt. 

7. Scott. 

8. Mary Woods m.Saml, 

D. Fitton. 



rMARTHA WoODS*, 

John Woods*, 
Polly*, Samuel*, 
Philip*, Thomas^ 
William Beckett, 
paper manufac- 
turer. 



June 8, 
1821. 



Jan. 21. 

1810. 
Sep. 30, 

1840. 



March, 
1844. 



May 14, 

1847. 
Feb. 15, 

1852. 
Dec. 9, 

1858. 
Mar. 5, 

1856. 
May 12, 

1858. 
May 22, 

1868. 

Feb. 14, 
1824. 



Mar. 17, 
1821. 



1871 



Jan. 28, 

1895. 

April, 

1865. 



Aug., 
1868. 



Feb. 17, 

1887. 



1860 



Nov. 27, 
1895. 



Died at Ham- 
ilton, Ohio. 



(C 



Hamilton, 
Ohio. 

Columbus, 
Ohio. 



Chicago, 

111. 



Hamilton, 
Ohio. 



198 



Marriage 


. Gen. ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




VII 


1. Sarah m. Horace 


Oct. 21, 


Apr. 15, 


, Hamilton, 






Woodrough. 


1849. 


1898. 


Ohio. 




(( 


2. Frank, unmarried. 


Jan. 9, 
1868. 




(1 




(1 


3. Ella m. Robt. C. Mc- 
Kinney. 


Feb. 8, 
1856. 




(( 




i( 


4. John, unmarried. 


Dec. 20, 
1866. 




Texas. 




(t 


5. William D. m.^Marion 
C. Beck, »Ella Bon- 
ner. 


Jan. 28. 
1859. 




Omaha, Neb. 




(( 


6. Thomas m. Mary 


Aug. 8, 




Hamilton, 






Millikin. 


1860. 




Ohio. 




(C 


7. Cyrus F., unmarried. 


Mar. 9. 
1862. 




Omaha, Neb. 




«( 


8. May m. Dr. Mark 


Feb. 9, 




Hamilton, 






Millikin. 


1868. 




Ohio. 


Oct. 28, 


VI 


TRebecca Woods^, 


Feb. 17, 


May 6, 




1861. 




John Woods', 
Polly*, Samuel*, 
Philip*, Thomas^ 


1831. 


1894. 








William Hamilton 


July 16, 


Sep. 18, 








Miller, killed in 


1823. 


1861. 








Civil War at Gau- 












L dy Bridge, W. Va. 








Augr. 20, 


VII 


1. Edward Hamilton m. 


Aug. 21, 




Portland, 


1880. 




Francis A. Eudy. 


C7 7 

1852. 




Ore. 




(i 


2. Anna Osborne m. 


Oct. 10, 




Hamilton, 






John E. Heisor. 


1854. 




Ohio. 




(< 


3. William Ellis m. 


Jan. 6, 




Coolgardle, 






Blanch S . 


1857. 




Australia. 


1884 


(( 


4. Mary Grace m. Flor- 


Nov. 3, 




Glendale, 






ien Giauque. 


1858. 




Ohio. 




t( 


5 Katharine Woods m. 


Apr. 18, 




MinneapoliSi 






Orlando H. Peck. 


1860. 




Minn. 




(1 


6. Alice, died in in- 


Mar. 15, 










fancy. 1862. 






Sep. 18, 


VI 


"Rachel Woods', 


Apr. 6, 


Nov. 8, 




1856. 


■ 


John Woods', 
Polly*, SamueP, 
I Philip*, Thomas\ 
Samuel Kellogg 
w^orthington. 


1835. 


1896. 


Buffalo, 
N. Y. 




VII 


1. Robt. H., lawyer. 


1856 




New York 

City. 




t 
1 


Z, Arthur Woods m. E. 


1858 




Buffalo, 






Strong. ^• 






N. Y. 




1 


3. Florence m. Charles 


1859 




London, 






McAndrewB. 






England. 



199 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




VII 4. Louise. 


1861 




Buffalo, 












N. Y. 




(< 


5. Sarah Frances. 


1866 




(( 




K 


6. Fdith. 


1871 




C( 


Aug. 18, 


VI 


^JOHN Woods, D. D.% 


June 19, 




Ludington, 


1867. 




John Woods", 
Polly*, SamueP, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
1 Habbiet Jane Vance, 
daughter Judge 
A. F. Vance, Ur- 
bana, Ohio. 


1888. 

Mar. 28, 
1848. 




Mich. 


Nov. 18, 


VII 


1. Irene Frances m. 


July 28, 




(C 


1896. 


t» 


Robt. Arnott, Jr. 


1868. 








(( 


2. Arthur Vance. 


Apr. 5, 
1882. 


Sep. 19, 
1882. 


(( 




CI 


3. Helen Marie. 


Nov. 20, 
1885. 




(( 




(( 


4. Mary. 


May 28, 




u 








1890. 







John Woods* was graduated at Miami University, Oxford, O., 
1860, and ordained to the ministry in the Presbyterian Church, 
O. S., Sept. 25, 1861. He received the degree of D. D. in 1889. 



Apr. 17, 


VI 


p James Robinson 


Apr. 2, 




Rose Hill, 


1852, 




Woods*, Samuel 


1828. 




Iowa. 


College 




Woods*, Polly*, 








Corner, 




Samuel", Philip', 








Ohio. 




Thomas*. 
Elizabeth Mobbis, 
descendant o f 
Revolut i o n a r y 
family. 










VII 


1. Blanche Ereletta m. 


July 17, 


Sep. 28, 


Alto, 






John T. Pettichord. 


1858. 


1885. 


Washington. 






2. Ida Garrone. 


Nov. 27, 
1854. 


Aug. 21, 
1855. 








3. Morris Hinsey. 


Feb. 22, 
1856. 


Jan. 9, 
1857. 








4. Charles Franklin m. 


Dec. 15, 




Oskaloosa, 






Barbara Sheely. 


1858. 




Iowa. 






5. Florence m. Bryson 


Oct. 28, 




Nugent, 






F. Sheely. 


1860. 




Iowa. 






6. Rosetta. 


Apr. 8, 
1862. 


Mar. 20, 
1864. 








7. Elmer Ellsworth m. 


Dec. 14, 




Oskaloosa, 






Emma Maria Bark- 


1868. 




Iowa. 






ley. 









200 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



Sep. 1, 
1856. 



Mar. 3, 

1864, 

Edin- 

burg, 

Ind. 



Deo. 10, 

1867, 
Hamil- 
ton , 
Ohio. 



vn 



VI 



VII 



«( 



II 



VI 



VII 



(( 



(I 



41 



(( 



(i 



It 



<( 



VI 



8. William Grant m. 
Rose Harrington. 

rJoHN William 
WooD8% Samuel 
Woods*, Polly*, 
Samuel', Philip", 
Thomas^. 
Nancy Jane Mab- 

SHALL. 

1. Charles Albert m. 

Edith Grimshaw. 

2. Mary Malinda m. 

George L. Grim- 
shaw. 

3. Izetta May. 



Dec. 26, 

1868. 

Sep. 24, 
1888. 



VII 



Silas Smith Woods*, 
Samuel W o o d s', 
Polly*, Samuel*, 
PhiUp% Thomas\ 

Mabtha E. Habsin. 



1. Flora J. 

2. Selma m. Emily 

Morrow. 

3. Ira. 

4. Dora. 

5. Minnie B. 

6. Viola M. 

7. Lida L. 

8. John Orval. 



fC aroline Scott 
Woods*, Samuel 
Woods', Polly*, 
Samuel*, Philip", 
Thomas*. 
Jacob M. Wickabd. 

1. Henry B. 



June 6, 
1866. 

Nov. 15, 
1869. 

Apr. 18, 
1862. 

Apr. 23, 

1886, 
Oxford, 

Ohio. 
June 12, 

1844. 
Dec. 21, 

1864. 
June 19, 

1866. 
Jan. 24, 

1869. 
Apr. 11, 

1871. 
Sep. 22, 

1874. 
Oct. 20, 

1878. 
Dec. 19, 

1882. 
Jan. 26, 

1884. 

Deo. 4, 

1888, 
Hamil- 
ton, O. 

Jan. 26, 
1885. 

Dec. 17, 
1868. 



Sep. 7, 
1878. 



Oct. 12, 
1866. 



Apr. 14, 
1870. 

Sep. 8, 
1879. 



Sep. 4, 
1889. 



Nov. 7, 
1892. 



Bedford, 
Iowa. 

Eirkville, 
Iowa. 



Coryallis, 
Ore. 



iC 



Rose Hill, 
Iowa. 



Rose Hill, 
Iowa. 



201 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMn«T. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



Apr. 4, 

1868, 

Iowa. 



Oct. 24, 

1867. 

Apr. 17, 

1876. 



VII 



if 



<( 



(I 



(C 



(( 



u 



(I 



f ( 



(( 



VI 



VII 



«( 



(i 



VI 



VII 



(t 



l( 



2. Eugene T. m. Lea 

Whipple. 

3. Earnest L., unmar- 

ried. 

4. Morrison J. m. Han- 

nah Malm. 

5. Walter W. 

6. Charles C. 

7. Clarence. 

8. Albert E, unmar- 

ried. 

9. Caroline. 

10. Willie J. 

11. Ida M. 



(Ruth Eliza Woods*, 
Samnel W o o d s", 
P o 1 1 y^, Samuel*, 
Philips Thomas^ 
JOKN ZeLL. 

1. Launar Ballard m. 

Junia Bly. 

2. Lizzie Estella. 

3. Lloyd Elwin. 



r Bev. Samuel Alex- 
ander Woods* 
(Methodist), 
Samuel*, Polly*, 
Samuel*, Philip*. 
Thomas^ 
^Elizabeth Boss. 



V.«! 



Sarah Bewitt. 



First marriage: 

1. Emma Gertrude m. 

Wyatt S. George. 
Second marriage: 

2. Gordon. 

3. Henry. 



Dec. 29, 

1860. 
June 8, 

1862. 
Feb. 14, 

1864. 
Apr. 12, 

1866. 

Dec. 15, 

1868. 
Aug. 16, 

1870. 
Feb. 16, 

1872. 
Aug. 28, 

1874. 
Apr. 26, 

1877. 
June 16, 

1880. 

Oct. 18, 

1840, 
Butler 
Co., O. 

Feb. 14, 
1864. 

Feb. 14, 
1866. 

Aug. 81, 
1874. 

May 24, 
1842. 



Feb. 20, 
1849. 

Oct. 14, 

1868. 

Jan. 26, 
1876. 

Apr. 18, 
1878. 



.Jan. 1, 
1878. 

Jan. 15i 
1879. 

Aug. 17, 
1870. 



Dec. 20, 
1878. 

Feb. 14, 
1887. 

Mar. 21, 
1882. 



Valparaiso, 
Nebraska. 



It 



Wahoo, Ne 
braska. 



Aug. 22, 

1871. 
Nov. 14, 

1874. 



Jan. 9, 
1874. 



Egypt, Miss. 



Enterprise. 
Oregon. 



Milton, Uma- 
tilla Ck)., Ore. 



Wilbur, 
Washington. 



Rosalia, 
Washington. 

Wilbur, 
Washington. 



202 



Marriage. 


Geu. 


ROBINSON FAMILY. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




VII 


4. Samuel Eoy. 


Sep. 22, 
1879. 








(1 


5. Mary Alice. 


Jan. 18, 
1898. 






Mar. 10, 


VI 


Mary Aits Woods', 


Aug. 12, 


Mar. 29, 




1846. 




James Woods*, 
Polly*, SamueP, 
Philip", Thomas^ 
Sylvester Welch Ir- 
win. 


1827. 


1868. 






VII 


1. Anna Maria m. Dr. 
Robt. H. McKay. 


Dec. 7, 
1846. 




Girard, Kan. 




ii 


2. Charles Clayton. 


May 2, 
1849. 


Aug. 18, 
1849. 






it 


3. Mary Alice. 


Dec. 31, 
1854. 


Feb. 14, 
1857. 




Feb. 8, 


VI 


TMartha Maria 


Sep. 9, 


Nov. 17, 


Middletown, 


1854. 




Woods*, James 
J Woods', Polly*, 

SamueP, Philip', 

Thomas*. 
1 Albert M. Jewell. 

V 


1882. 

June 5. 
1827. ' 


1885. 


Ohio. 

(C 




Til 


1. Ida Mary, unmar- 
ried. 


Aug. 12, 
1859. 




(C 




i( 


2. Edgar. 1 


June 28, 


Sep. 25, 


(( 




»( 


3. Edna, k^^^' 


1867. 

June 28, 
1867. 


1877. 


tc 




(( 


4. Charles W., died in 
infancy. 










VI 


/■ William Alexander 


Mar. 80, 


Oct. 4, 


Died at Pow- 




V ^k 


Woods*, James 


1837. 


1892. 


ers villej Mo. 






Woods*, Polly*, 












Samuel*, Philip*, 












Thomas*. 








Mar. 2, 




^Charlotte Grove. 








1858. 

May 24, 

1864. 




■Mary Barnes. 

>> 






Holbrook, 
Arizona. 


VII 


1. William Barnes. 


Mar. 26, 




»« 








1866. 








l( 


2. Estella Blanche. 


May 18, 
1869. 


Oct. 21, 
1870. 




Mar. 5, 


(* 


3. John Harry m. Ten- 


Nov. 21, 




Deming, 


1895. 




nessee Manner. 


1871. 




N. M. 




t( 


4. Maggie. 


Feb. 14, 


Mar. 12, 




• 






1878. 


1878. 





203 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



Sep. 4, 
1864. 

Jan. 4, 
1888. 



May 18, 
1898. 

Dec. 10, 

1874, 
Cincin- 
nati, O. 



VII 



(( 



tC 



(( 



VI 



VII 



(( 



VI 



VII 



(( 



VI 



VII 



(( 

l< 
(< 



5. Edward Payson. 

6. Albert Alexander. 

7. Alice Irene. 

8. Mattle Maria. 



James Newton 
Woods, M. D.S 
James Woods*, 
Polly*, Samuel*, 
Philip*, Thomas\ 

'Louisa Booers. 

*Lydia Forman Jud- 

KINS. 

1. James Rogers m. Al- 
ice Hedden. 

2. Cherokee Morgan m. 
Fred. E. Lee. 



^JOHN ROBESOI7 

W o o d 8', mer- 
chant, James 
Woods*, Polly*, 
Samuel', Philip', 
Thomas\ 
Jenioe M. Zener. 



1. Pearl Zener. 

2. Lydia Marie. 



John Kebbley Woods, 
M. D.% Alexander 
Woods", Polly*, 
Samuel*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 

Rebecca Lynch. 

1. Eden T. m. Hattie 

Church. 

2. Charles L., M. D., m. 

. No issue. 



Apr. 2, 

1876. 
July 4, 

1879. 
Mar. 12, 

1881. 
Aug. 25, 

1886. 

Aug. 7, 
1840. 



3. Emma m. 

ber. 

4. Frank. 

5. Mary. 



Web- 



May 1, 

1845. 
Nov. 26, 

1847. 
Sep. 9, 

1865. 
Aug. 16, 

1873. 

July 24, 
1844. 



Sep. 11, 
1848. 

Sep. 8, 
1875. 

Dec. 26, 
1883. 

.Tune 15, 
1828. 



1878 
1875 



June 18, 
1884. 



March, 
1899. 
1894 



Holbrook, 
Arizona. 



4i 



*l 



Crescent 
Hill, Jeffer- 
son Co., Ky. 



Louisville, 

Ky. 
Lexington, 

Ky. 

Hamilton, 
Ohio. 



It 



ct 



li 



Van Wertj 
Ohio. 



K 



Pine Ridge 

Ind'n Agency 

So. Dakota. 

Greenville, 

Ohio. 

Van Wert, 
Ohio. 



204 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMII^Y. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Oct. 3, 
1859. 



Nov. 1, 

1899. 

Jan. 10, 
1899. 

Oct. 9, 

1856, 
Bourb'n 
CJo.,Ky. 



Residcnoe. 



VI 



VII 



Feb. 12, 
1888. 



cc 
f c 



VI 



vn 



(• 



Sarah Jane Woods*. 
Alexander 
Woods*, Polly*, 
SamueP, Philip^, 
Thomas*. 
^Martin B. Morton. 



1. Ida Maud m. B. M. 

Barere, M. D. 

2. Jennie G. 

3. Louis Woods m. Gol- 

da Anderson. 



rELLEN Frances 
Woods*, William 
Woods*, Polly*, 
Samuel*, Philip', 
Thomas*. 
Hezekiah D. Martin, 
M. D. 

1. John G.« unmarried. 



2. Juliet m. Ijewis Van 
Antwerp Kemp. 



Mar. 10, 
1840. 



Apr. 12, 
1840. 



Nov. 6, 
1871. 

July 11, 
1886. 



Aug. 7, 
1857. 

Nov. 4, 
1858. 



Dayton, Ohio. 



June 29, 
1895. 



June 26, 
1868. 



« 



C( 



l( 



Marion, Ind. 

Salt Lake 
City, Utah. 



«( 



Lezinjfton, 
Ky, 



Dr. Martin was captain of the 79th Illinois volunteers. He was 
wounded at Liberty Gap and died at Murfreesboro, Tenn. 



Feb. 24, 


VI 


rAoNEs M. Gray*, 


Feb. 10, 


Apr. 28, 




1862. 




Mary Woods*, 
Polly*, Samuel*, 
Philip', Thomas\ 
V. Andrew Clyde. 


1829. 


1854. 






VII 


1. William C. 


1858 


Feb. 27. 
1867. 




Dec. 2, 


VI 


r W I L L I A M C. Gray*, 


Oct. 17, 


Oct., 


Chicago, 111. 


1856. 




editor Interior, 
Mary Woods*, 
Polly*, Samuel*, 
Philip', Thomas*. 
,Anna Kate Garns. 


1880. 


1901. 






VII 


1. Frank Sherwood. 


1857 




(1 




<( 


3. Anna Coram. Charles 
A. Purcell. 






Oak Park, 
111. 


May 29, 


VI 


TMary Hadabsa 


July 7, 




Wyoming, 


1855. 




Gray*, Mary 
. Woods*, Polly*, 
] Samuel*, Philip', 

Thomas*. 


1835. 




Ohio. 


• 




Andrew Ritchie. 






«« 



205 



Marriage. 


G«B. 


ROBINSON FAMn^Y. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




vn 


1. Edwards m. Mary 


Mar. 18, 




Cincinnati, 






Brice. 


1868. 




Ohio. 


June 6, 


»i 


2. Ellsworth Gray m. 


Nov. 16, 


Sep. 12, 




1889. 




Jean Bichardson. 


1868. 


1890. 






4» 


3. Marilla J. 


Jan. 6, 
1862. 


Jan. 18, 
1862. 






<i 


4. Melville, publisher, 


Oct. 29, 




Cincinnati, 






unmarried. 


1868. 




Ohio. 




I( 


5. Ella Mary. 


Oct. 26, 

1872. 


Nov. 28, 
1878. 




Deo. 16, 


VT 


^Jaitb Kennedy*, Re- 


Sep. 1, 


May 18, 




1858. 


VII 


becca Woods*, 
Polly*, SamueP, 
Philip*, Thomas\ 

LJohn Woodside. 

1. Child died in in- 
fancy. 


1840. 


1867. 




Jan. 18, 


VI 


' WiLLLAM W. Kenne- 


May 17, 




Byers, Ohio* 


1870. 




dy*, Rebecca 
J Woods", Polly*, 
Samuel', Philip*, 
Thomas^ 
^ Mary S. Winters. 


1846. 








VII 


1. Arthur C, merchant, 
unmarried. 


Dec. 19, 
1870. 




<( 




<< 


2. Laura A. m. Wm. 


July 81, 




Chillicothe, 






Snook. 


1872. 




Ohio. 




<c 


3. William L., dentist. 


Augr. 21, 




Byers, Ohio. 






unmarried. 


1876. 







SEVENTH GENERATION. 



1878 



VII 



vin 



(( 



(( 



fLOUISE FALCONER^ 


Feb. 16, 




Columbus, 


Mary Woods*, 


.1862. 




Ohio. 


John Woods', Pol- 








i ly*, Samuel*, Phil- 








ip*, Thomas*. 








Gen. Eugene Powell. 








1. Mary Louise. 


Nov., 
1874. 




i^ 


2. Elizabeth. 


Nov,, 
1878, 




CI 


3. Frederick Falconer. 


Mar., 




f ( 




1888. 







206 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON PAMII«T. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 


Nov., 


VII 


Helen Falconer', 


Dec. 9, 


Feb. 17, 


Died at Fort 


1877. 




Mary Woods*, 
John W o o d s*, 
Polly*, Samuel*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
Capt. L. M. O'Brien. 
»- U. S. A. 


1853. 


1887. 


Yates, Dak. 




VIII 


1. Charlotte Ide. 


Oct., 

1881. 




Columbus, 
Ohio. 




<« 


2. Falconer. 


Apr., 

1884. 




(( 




(( 


3. Allen. 


Feb., 
1888. 


Feb., 
1883. 


(( 




•( 


4. Herbert Lyster. 


Feb., 
1887. 


1892 


(< 


1886 


vn 


'Cyrus Falconer, Jr.\ 


Mar. 5, 
1866. 




CHileago, 111. 






Mary Woods*, 










John Woods*, Pol- 












ly*, Samuel*, PhU- 












ip«, Thomas*. 












Martha Platt. 


A 




11 




VIII 


1. Helen. 


Aug., 
1887. 




w « 




(( 


2. Douglas Platt. 


1889 
1894 




(C 




<( 


3. Cyrus 3d. 






June 7, 


VII 


'Mary Woods Fal- 


May 22. 
1868. 




Hamilton, 


1888. 




coner^, Mary 




Ohio. 






Woods*, John 












Woods*, Polly*, 












Samuel*, Philip*, 












Thomas*. 












Samuel Dustin Fit- 












ton. 










VIII 


1. Cyrus. 


Mar. 14. 
1889. 




(( 




(( 


2. Donald Webb. 


Apr. 18, 
1890. 




« 


Mar. 17, 


VII 


("Sarah BECKETT^ 


Oct. 21, 


Apr. 15, 


i( 


1870. 




Martha Woods*, 

J John Woods*, 

Polly*, Samuel*, 


1849.. 


1898. 


















Philip*, Thomas*. 












Horace Woodrouqh. 










VIII 


1. Howard, unmarried. 


1871 




«( 




(( 


2. Joseph William, un- 


Aug. 29, 
1878. 




<( 






married. 








(1 


3. Frederic Charles, un- 


Dec. 22, 




(( 




married. 


1874. 







207 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON FAMII.Y. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 


Oct. 16. 


VII rELLA Beckett^, Mar- 


Feb. 8, 




Hamilton, O. 


1879. 




tha Woods*, John 
Woods*, Polly^, 
SamueP, Philip*, 
Thomas^ 
Robert C. McEinney, 
'^ manufacturer. 


1855. 








VIII 


1. Ruth. 


Sep. 


July 6, 
1888. 










1882. 






(( 


2. Dorothy. 


Jan. 25, 
1889. 








VII 


^ W ILLIAH D. Beck- 
ETT^, Martha 
Wood s*, John 
Woods*, Polly*, 
Samuel*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 


Jan. 28, 
1859. 




Omaha, Neb. 


May 3, 




*Martow C. Beck. 




Feb. 12, 


<( 


lS88. 








1889. 




Oct. 2, 




A*EU*A BONNEK. 








1891. 














VIII 


1. Alma. 


Feb. 24, 
1884. 




Omaha, Neb. 




({ 


2. Henry. 


Jan. 26, 
1889. 




<i 




u 


3. Margery. 


June 27, 
1892. 




(4 




»i 


4. Guy Hamilton. 


Dec. 12, 
1898. 




If 


Oct. 19, 


VII 


^Thomas Beckett^, 


Auff. 8, 




Hamilton, O. 


1894, 




manuf a c t u r e r. 


1860. 






Hamil- 




Martha Woods*, 








ton, O. 




John Woods*, 












Polly*, Samuel*, 
Philip*, Thomas'. 

*^MaBY AflLLIKIN. 






ic 




VIII 


1. Nora. 


Aug. 24, 
1895. 




l( 














<l 


2. Minor. 


Dec. 9, 
1896. 




(f 


June 29, 


VII 


rMAY Beckett^ Mar- 


Feb. 9, 




Hamilton, O. 


1898, 




tha Woods*, John 


1868. 




—^■^^^^^r-^ ^m^^^^ ^^ ^^ ^p ^^ ^^^V B ^^^r 9 


Hamil- 




Woods*, Polly*, 








ton, O. 




Samuel*, Philip*, 
Thomas*. 
^Mark Millikin, M.D. 










u 


1. Frances. 


Apr. 28, 




(( 








1894. 







208 



Mmrriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON PAMII«Y. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Residence. 




vni 


2. Madeleine. *) 


Apr. 24, 




Hamilton, O. 




• 






1897. 








(f 


3. Kathleen. 


► Twins. 


Apr. 24. 
1897. 




t( 


Mar. 80, 


VII 


f Anna Osborne Mn.- 


Oct. 10, 




(( 


1876. 




LER^ Rebecca 

VV cods*, John 
-{ Woods', Polly*, 

SamueP, PhiUp*, 

Thomas'. 
^ John E. Heisor. 


1854. 








VIII 


1. Alma Fredrika. 


Sep. 29, 
1876. 


Sep. 15, 

1877. 


(( 




(( 


2. Karl William. 


Mar. 4, 

1878. 




<< 




ft 


3. Edna Mary. 


July 1. 
1880. 




C{ 




<( 


4. Helena Katrina. 


Sep. 2, 
«82. 




i( 




C( 


5. Robert Miller. 


Nov. 29, 
1889. 


Jan. 2. 
1894. 


(< 


Nov. 14. 


VII 


^Katherine W. Mil- 


Apr. 18. 




Minneapolis^ 


1882. 




ler^, Rebecca 
Woods', John 
Woods", Polly*, 
Samnel>, Philip*. 
Thomas*. 
* Orlando H. Peck. 


1860. 




Minn. 




VIII 


1. Freda. 






(( 




tl 


2. Stanley Miller. 






K 




VII 


'Arthur Woods 
worthingt0n% 
Rachel*, J o h n% 
Polly*, Samuel*, 
Philip", Thomas'. 

,E. Strong. 


1858. 




Buffalo^ 
N. Y. 




VIII 


1. Robert S. 










(( 


2. Arthur St. Clair. 










u 


3. Eleanor S. 










(( 


4. Howard. 








«• 


VII 


i- Florence Worthino- 


1859. 




London, 




T0N% Rachel 






England. 






Woods*, John 












Woods*, Polly*, 












Samuel*, Philip", 












Thomas*. 










^Charles McAndrews. 




1 





209 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMII^Y. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



Nov. 18, 

1878, 
Mahas- 
ka Co., 
Iowa. 



VIII 



it 



(C 



VII 



VIII 



f ( 



It 



i( 



« 



1. Gerald Alexander. 

2. Mary Louise. 

3. Charles Arthur 

Worthington. 

r Blanche E<beletta 
Wood8^ James 
Woods*, Samuel 
Woods*, Polly*, 
Samuel', Philip*, 
Thomas^ 
John T. Pbttichobd. 

1. Sophronia Ann. 

2. John Smith. 

3. Harry Antone. 

4. James Morton. 

5. William Stewart. 



July 27, 

1894. 

Nov., 

1896. 

Oct. 8, 
1897. 

July 17, 
1863. 



Sep. 28, 
1886. 



Alto, Colum- 
bia Co., 
Washington. 



Oct. 10, 

1874. 

AuRT. 81, 

1876. 

Nov. 16, 
1878. 

Nov. 26, 
1880. 
Dec, 
1882. 



Nov. 18, 
1877. 



It 
It 

u 



One of these boys was with the Washington volunteers at Manila, 
1898-99. 



July 26, 
1878. 



VII 



VIII 



(I 



(( 



(i 



t< 



Charles Franklin 
Wood8^ James 
Woods*, Samuel 
Woods*, Polly*, 
Samuel*, PhiUp*, 
Thomas^ 

. Barbara Ellen 

(^ Sheely. 

1. Archibald Sylvester.* 

2. Bemetie. 

3. Orrin Edson. 

4. Elmer Marson. 

5. Milton Raymond. 



Dec. 16, 

1868. 



May 8, 

1868. 
Feb. 26, 

1880. 
Aug. 20, 

1881. 
June 7, 

1888. 
Jan. 16, 

1886. 
Aug. 21, 

1886. 



Aug. 21, 
1881. 



Aug. 12, 
1886. 



Oskaloosa, 
Iowa. 



Oskaloosa, 
Iowa. 



^Archibald Sylvester joined the 61st Arkansas for the Spanish 
War, 1898. 

14 



210 



Marriage. 


Geu. 


ROBINSON PAMII«Y. 


Birth. 


Death. 


Reaidcnoe. 




VIll 


6. Mary Henrietta. 


Jan. 26, 
1889. 








(1 


7. Herbert Glenn. 


Oct. 12, 


July 2, 








1893. 


1896. 






i( 


8. Harmon Gilbert. 


Nov. 21, 
1896. 








C( 


9. Eril Vernon. 


Feb. 19, 
1898. 






Apr. 27, 


VII 


' Florence W o o d s', 
James*, Samuel', 


Oct. 28, 




Nugent, 


1878. 




1860. 




Iowa. 






\ Polly*, Samuel*, 












Philip*, Thomas'. 












Brtson F. Sheelt. 






u 




vm 


1. Bdwin Valentine. 


June 16, 
1879. 


May 6, 
1880. 








2. William Andrew. 


May 6, 
1881. 










3. George Lafayette. 


Nov. 23, 
1888. 










4. Carey Morton. 


Mar. 11, 
1886. 










5. Harriet May. 


Oct 3, 
1888. 










6. Barney Wheeler. 


Aug. 13, 
1891. 










7. Leroy Howe. 


Nov. 28, 
1893. 










8. Frederic Roscoe. 


Oct. 17, 
1894. 










9. James Freeman. 


Jan. 21. 
1898. 






Feb. 11, 


VII 


f E LM E R BLLSWORTH 


Dec. 14, 




Odkaloosa, 


1892. 




Wooda^ Jamee*, 
Samuel*, Polly*. 
\ Samuel*, Philip*, 
Thomas^ 
Emma Maria Bark- 
is LET. 


1863. 




Iowa. 
Ik 




VIII 


1. Roy Cleo. 


Apr. 17. 
1896. 




(< 




<i 


2. Floyd Cecil. 


Mar. 16, 
1898. 




ii 



211 



Marriage. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Birth. 



Death. 



Residence. 



Nov. 16, 
1892. 



VII 



May 29, 
1879. 



VIII 



VII 



VIII 



K 



(i 



If 



May 1, 
1879. 



VII 



VIII 



it 



({ 



it 



(( 



•f 



Nov. 6, 
1890, 



VII 



^William Obant 
Woods', James*, 
Samuel", Polly*, 
Samuel', Philip", 
Thomas^ 
Rose Habbinoton. 
1. Forest i^ioyd. 



r Charles A l b e b t 

Woods', John W. 

Woods*, Samuel 
^ Woods*, Polly*, 

Samuel*, Philip", 

Thomas*. 
Edith Obimshaw. 
1^ Albert Nelson. 

2. Joshua Marshall. 

3. Walter A. 

4. Edna Izette. 



f Mabt Malinda 
Woods', John W. 
Woods*, Samuel 
Woods*, Polly*, 
Samuel*, Philip*, 
Thomas^ 

^ George L. Grikshaw. 

1. Lloyd Marshall. 

2. Etta May. . 

3. Bertha. 

4. Leonard Harrison. 

5. John Nelson. 

6. Ray. 



f Selma Woods', Silas 
t S. Woods*, Sam- 

J uel Wooded, 
Polly*, Samuel*, 
Philip*, Thomas'. 
Emilt Mobbow. 



Dec. 26, 
1868. 



Feb. 18, 
1894. 

June 6, 
1866. 



June 7, 

1880. 
June 24, 

1888. 
Sep 17, 

1888. 
Aug. 2, 

1897. 

Nov. 16, 
1869. 



Feb. 1, 

1880. 
Nov. 8, 

1882. 
Oct. 7, 

1884. 
Nov. 10, 

1888. 
Oct. 18, 

1891. 
Sep. 18, 

1894. 

June 19, 
1866. 



May 26, 
1887. 



Bedford, 
Iowa. 



if 



Corvallis, 
Ore. 



IC 

1< 

»i 
(i 



Corvallis, 
Ore. 



<c 

i( 
(i 
(< 



Corvallis, 
Ore. 



K 



Rose Hill, 
Iowa. 



(( 



212 



Marrisge. 



Gen. 



ROBINSON PAMII^Y. 



Birth. 



Mar. 80» 
1890. 



Nov. 15, 
1804, 

Omaha, 
Neb. 



June 4, 
1891. 



Dec 21, 

1887. 



VIII 



(( 



%t 



VII 



VIII 



VII 



VIII 



II 



VII 



VIII 



(I 



41 



VII 



1. Mary Rose. 

2. John Henry. 

3. Katherine. 



f Eugene T. Wickabd\ 
I Caroline Woods*, 

I Samuel Woods', 

^ Polly*, Samuel*, 

Philip', Thomas*. 
Lea Whipple. Bom 
in New York. 
1. Carlos Ouy. 



f *MoBBisoN J. Wick- 
ABD% Caroline 
Woods*, Samuel 
Woods*, Polly*, 
Samuel*, Philip*, 
Thoma8\ 

I Hannah Malm. Bom 

i^ in Sweden. 

1. Joyce C. 

2. Clark A. 



' Launab Ba l l a b d 
Z e L L', Ruth 
Eliza Woods*, 
Samuel Wooded, 
Polly*, Samuel*, 
Philip*, Thomas*. 

JUNIA BlY. 

1. Royal Ralph. 

2. Hallie. 

3. Earnest. 



Emma Gebtbude 



WOOD8\ 

Samuel*, 
Samuel*, 
Thomas* 

W Y ATT 

Oeobge. 



Samuel*, 

Polly*, 

Philip*, 

Sidney 



July 80, 
1898. 

Aug. 16. 
1896. 

Sep. 6, 
1898. 

Dec. 29, 
1860. 



Nov. 80, 
1866. 

Au^. 19, 
1894. 

Feb. 14, 
1864. 



Mar. 1, 
1869. 

Aug. 14, 
1896. 

Aug. 29, 
lb97. 

Feb. 14, 
1864. 



Jan. 17, 
1893. 

Dec. 21, 
1895. 

Aug. 15, 
1897. 

Oct. 14, 

1868. 



Death. 



Residence. 



Rose Hill, 
Iowa. 



41 



it 



Valparaiso, 
Neb. 



n 



(i 



Wahoo, Neb. 



Milton, Uma- 
tilla Co., 
Ore.. 



Rosalia, 
Wash. 



* Morrison J. Wickard, a teacher by profession, was register o{ 
deeds for Saunders county. Neb., 1894-98. 



213 



Marriage. 


Gen. 


ROBINSON PAMILV. 


Birth. 


Death. 






VIII 


1. Neal Noel. 


July 17, 
1889. 








(t 


2. Wyatt Earl. 


Dec. 16, 
1890. 








(« 


3. Dolores Caleen. 


Apr. 16, 
1894. 






June 12, 


VII 


f Anna Mabia IBWIN^ 


Dec. 7, 




Girard, Kan. 


1866, 




Mary Ann 


1846. 






Keokuk 




Woods*, James 








Iowa. 




Woods'. Polly*, 
^ Samuel*, Philip', 
Thomas^ 

ROBBBT HENDEBSON 

McKat, M. D. 








• 


VIII 


1. Ralph Irwin. 


July 16, 
1867. 


Dec. 11, 
1870. 


<c 






2. Ada Alice. 


Nov. 29, 
1871. 


Au^. 16, 

1874. 


it 






3. Mary Edna. 


Oct. 8, 

1876. 


Nov. 7, 
1882. 


(< 






4. Frank Irwin. 


Deo. 27, 

1877. 










5. Albert Jewell. 


Jan. 19, 

1880. 










6. Anna Hazel. 


Feb. 21, 
1884. 










7. Robert Donald. 


Oct. 12, 

1887. 






Apr. 6, 


VII 


' James Rooebs Woodb\ 


Sep. 9, 




Louisville, 


1891. 




James N. Woods*, 

James W o o d fl*, 

1 Polly*. Samuel*, 

Philip*, Thomas*. 


1866. 




Ky. 






Mabt Alice Hedden. 


May 7, 
1864. 




i( 




VIII 


1. James Hedden. 


July 18, 
1898. 




ii 














(( 


2. Thomas Everett. 


June 26, 
1887. 




(( 




VII 


r Eden T. Woodb\ John 
K. Woods*, Alex- 
ander Woods*, 
Polly*, Samuel*, 
Philip^, Thomas*. 

^ Hattie Ghubch. 






Van Wert. 
Ohio. 
























VIII 


1. Iris. 









214 



Marriage. 



Oen. 





VII 




VIII 


Dec. 26, 

1879. 


Vll 




VTTT 




(« 


Nov. 9, 
1892. 


VII 




vm 


Apr. 6, 
1894. 


VII 




vm 



ROBINSON FAMILY. 



Emma. WooDs^ John 
K. Woods*, Alex- 
a n d e r Wood8^ 
Polly*, Samuel*, 
Philip*. Thomas*. 

Webbeb. 



1. Mary Woods. 

' Anna Cob.^ Gbat\ 
William Gray*, 
Mary Woods*, 
Polly*, Samuel', 
Philip*, Thomas*. 
Chables a. Pubgell, 
Gen'l Mgr. Amer- 
ican Malster Co., 
Chicago. 

1. William Gray. 

2. Ralph. 



r Edwabds R I t c h I E^ 
attorney, Mary 
H. Gray*, Mary 
Woods*, Polly*, 
Samuel", Philip*, 
Thomas^ 

^Maby Bbice. 
1. Herbert Ellsworth. 



Lauba a. Kennedy^, 
William Ken- 
n e d y*, Rebecca 
Woods*, Polly*, 
Samuel*, Philip*, 
Thomas^ 

William M. Snook. 
1. Edwin Kennedy. 



Birth. 



Death. 



1888 



Residence. 



Greenville, 
Ohio. 



March, 
1899. 



Sep. 20. 

1880. 
Aug. 1, 

1887. 

Mar. 18, 
1858. 



Oct. 29, 
1894. 

July 81, 
1872. 



Fob. 3, 
1895. 



Oak Park, 
Ills. 



ti 



i( 



(( 



Cincinnati. 
Ohio. 






ChilUcothe, 
Ohio. 






REGISTER OF NAMES 



Luge ottiiiefali denote pages* SmaU mnnefali abore the line denote geacfatloiis, 

fcckoned ffom THOMAS ROBINSONS 



Alexander, Elizabeth, 164. 
Allen, Jane Chambers, 124, 136. 
Anderson, George, 98. 

Golda, 204. 

William. 88, 98. 

William*, 98. 
Angell, Harriet Robin8on^ 126. . 

James L., 107, 126. 
Annis, John F., Jr., 106. 
Anthony, Loudle, 175, 178. 
Amott, Robert, Jr., 199. 

Baber, Blleonora Price", 185, 187. 
Martha Alic^, 185f. 
Thomas Price", 185. 
W. L., 184f. 

Backus, , 168. 

Andrew, 169. 
Mary, 166. 
Bailey. A. D., 178, 182. 

Rosetta J., 106, 125. 
Baird, Mabel, 145, 151. 
Baker, Henry, 145, 152. 

Lulu", 152. 
Baldridge, Benjamin L., 88, 98. 

Benjamin L.,* 98. 
Baldwin, Julia, 166, 170. 
Ballenger, Florine Ruth^ 148. 
JeB8ica^ 148. 
Wayman De Vilbi8S^ 

149. 
William Elmer, 143, 148. 
William Vallore8\ 149. 
Barclay, Emily Robinson", 131, 140. 
James, 112, 130. 
James", 131. 
Barere, D. M., 204. 
Barkley, Emma Maria, 199, 210. 
Barnard, Julia, 105n. 
Barnes, Mary, 195, 202. 
Bamett, Margaret, 157, 159. 
Matilda, 163, 165. 
Rebecca, 163, 167. 



Barr, Alice Jane", 136. 

Alvah, 67, 95, 105. 

Caroline Levenie", 136. 

ClarK M.", 137. 

Edwin Lewis", 136. 

Edwin Roblnson^ 124. 

Edwin Thomas", 106. 

Erma May*, 137. 

George Slocum^ 124. 

Hetty Ann', 124. 

Hetty Martha', 124. 136. 

James Allen", 136. 

Jessie Levenie", 136. 

Julia", 105, 124. 

Margaret Lovina', 124. 135. 

Martha", 105, 124. 

Mary Anne*. 105, 123. 

Mary Robinson", 136. 

Milton F.", 105, 124. 

Milton F.", 136. 

Oliver Edwin', 124, 137. 

Robinson A.", 106. 124. 

Robinson Lincoln', 124, 136. 

William M.' (Milton F. B.*), 

124, 136. 
William M.' (Robinson A. 
B."), 124. 
Baxter, Elizabeth, 109. 
Beach, Abigail, 98. 

Alice G.", 140. 
E. v., 130, 139. 
John T.", 140. 
Beatty, Nancy, 104n. 
Beck, Marion C, 198, 207. 
Beckett, Alma", 207. 

Cyrus F,', 198. 
Ella', 198. 207. 
Frank', 198. 
Guy Hamilton", 207. 
Henry", 207. 
John', 198. 
Margery". 207. 
May', 198, 207. 



216 



Beckett, Minor*, 207. 
Nora", 207. 
Sa^ah^ 198, 206. 
Thomas^ 198, 207. 
William. 194, 197. 
William D.'. 198, 207. 

Bell, Charles Jasper*, 129. 
Ella. 145, 151. 
Mary Willina", 129. 
Rosanna, 96n. 
T. R., 110, 129. 

Bendlyn, Marie, 146, 153. 
Black, , 12, 21, 29. 

Abigail I.« 87n. 

Abigail II., 87n. 

Abigail*, 87. 

Anthony*, 97. 

Eleanor*, 98. 

George, 87n. 

George, 87, 97. 

George*, 98. 

Hetty*, 87. 

James, 87n. 

James*, 60, 87. 

James*, 98. 

Jane*, 87. 

Jean, 65, 84, 87, 89. 

John I., 87n. 

John II., 60, 65, 84, 87, 89. 

John*, 87. 

John* (d. 1792), 97. 

John* (b. 1797), 98. 

Jonathan, 87n. 

Jonathan*, 87. 

Jonathan*, 98. 

Margaret*. 98. 

Mary*, 87. 

Mary*, 97. 

Nancjr*, 98. 

Rachel, 87n. 

Rebecca, 87n. 

Rebecca*, 87. 

Robinson*, 87, 97. 

Samuel, 87n. 

Samuel*, 61, 87. 

Samuel*, 98. 

Susannah*, 98. 

Thomas*, 87. 

Thomas*, 98. 

William, 87n. 

William*, 87. 

William*, 98. 
Blaine, , 3, 21. 

Alexander T., 68, 70, 74, 96n, 
123. 

Alexander W., 123. 



Blaine, Alice Elizabeth, 103, 121. 
123. 
Bphraim, 50, 52, 54ir. 
James, 56, 57, 75. 
James G., 52, 57. 
Margaret, 68. 
Mary, 163, 167. 
Polly, 96n. 
William C, 75. 
Bly, Junia, 201, 212. 

Boal, , 162. 

Agnes, 81, 83, 154. 
Margaret, 162, 163. 
Bomberger, Grace Bennett^ 161. 

Jeannette Robinson^ 
161. 

John B., 158, 161. 
Martin Eby', 161. 
William RoblnsonM61. 

Bond, , 178, 182. 

Nettie*, 182. 

Bonner, , 194. 

Ella, 198, 207. 

Boten, , 129. 

Bradley, Dean, 165. 
Branch, Ldllian B., 144, 149. 
Brandenburg, Amanda^ 191, 193. 

Elizabeth Logan% 191 
Frederick Charles', 

191. 
Green, 189, 191. 
Henry Green^ 191. 
HetUe^ 191. 
James^ 191. 
Lucy Tozier^ 191. 
Ray Robinson% 191. 
Bransford, Benjamin Moss**, 187. 
Margaret**, 187. 
Robert Harper, 187. 
Robert Miller^ 187. 
Brice, Mary, 205, 214. 

Sarah K., 194, 196. 
Broadwell, Kate A., 128. 
Brown, Nancy, 157, 159. 
Bruckner, Elizabeth May*, 181. 
. M. R., 177, 181. 

Mary Katharine*, 181. 
Max R.*, 181. 
Paul Clay*, 181. 
Bryant, Roberta M., 128, 139. 
Buehler, Henry, 121. 

Mary Wolf, 103, 119, 121. 

Burbick, , 170. 

Burbnage, John^ 112. 

John B., 101, 112. 
Mary Sheves', 112. 



217 



Burbridge, Susan Robin8on^ 112, 

130. 
Willina Barnes', 112, 
130. 
Busby, Hamilton, 101, 112. 
Byers, Katharine, 162. 
Byram, John Qulncy, 150, 153. 
John Qulncy*, 153. 



-, 102. 



Caldwell, 

Campbell, Ada Francella', 136. 

Bertha Estelle", 150, 153. 
Charles Dlven*, 150. 
David Wallace, 144, 150. 
DwlghtS 137. 
Kate Lavenla", 136. 
Lee Milton*, 136. 
Marlon Barr*, 137. 
Thomas P., 124, 136. 
Thomas Robinson*, 137. 
Cannon, Sue, 184, 186. 

Carson, , 61. 

John, 87. 
Carter, Anna F., 110. 
Cate. A., 177, 181. 

John Girder Gibbon*, 181. 
Church, Hattle, 203, 213. 
Clark, Andrew*, 156. 
Ann, 163. 
Charles, 155, 156. 
Elizabeth, 144, 149. 
John*, 156. 
Mary, 155, 156. 
Robert*, 156. 
Sarah*, 156. 
Thomas, 98. 
William, 98. 
Clay, Frances% 177, 180. 

Hettie Ann^ 177. 181. 
John Robinson', 177, 181. 
Joseph Bennett', 177. 
Logan R., 174, 177. 
Logan R.', 177. 
Mary Adelia', 177, 181. 
Nell Adelia*, 181. 
Clover, Minnie C, 146, 152. 
Clyde, Andrew, 196, 204. 
William C, 204. 
Cochran, Alexander I., 104 and n. 
Alexander II., 105n. 
Alexander III., 103. 117, 

132. 
Andrew, 105n. 
David, 105n. 
Eleanor. 105n. 
Elizabeth Barber*, 132. 



Cochran. Hugh I., 104n. 
Hugh II., 105n. 
John, 105n. 
James. 105n. 
Margaret, 105n. 
Martin, 106n. 
Nancy, 95, 103, 105n., 123. 
Robert, 105n. 
Samuel, 105n. 
William, 105n. 
William Robinson', 117. 

132. 
William Robinson*, 132. 
Cockefair, Charles, 144. 
Coleman, Elizabeth. 157, 160. 

Connor, , 178, 182. 

Cook, J., 157, 160. 

Susan A., 101, 111. 
Couse, Lucien, 166, 169. 
Mary', 169. 
Norman', 169. 
Cowden. William K., 159. 
Cowherd, Jane Frances, 100, 110. 
Grain, George, 155. 

Jean, 155. 
Crary, Benjamin G.. 167. 
Crassons, Ferdinand Barclay*, 140. 
Ferdinand Eugene, 131, 

140. 
Marie Jean*, 140. 
Willina*, 140. 

Crawford, , 3, 12, 29. 

Dorothy*, 138. 
Frances Louise^, 138. 
Genevieve*. 138. 
George*, 93. 
Helen*, 138. 
John, 63f., 84, 93f. 
J. Price, 126, 138. 
Margaret*, 138. 

Crosby, Sarah L„ 95, 107. 

Crump, Ballard. 172, 175. 
Gur*, 178. 
Hattle*, 178. 

James Ballard', 175, 178. 
Joseph*, 178. 
Mamie", 178. 
Mattle*, 178. 
SusieP, 178. 

Culbertson, Andrew, 162, 164. 

Andrew Jackson*, 164. 
Thomas Moorhead*, 

164. 
William Patton*, 164. 
I CuUen, Minnie Josephine, 146, 152. 



218 



Dada, Catharine B., 168. 

Maria, 166, 169. 
DavldBon, Cora, 110, 129. 
Lucy, 96n. 
Susan, 96n., 114n. 

Davis, , 178. 

Donie, 179. 
Derrickson, Charles, 168, 171. 

Thomas', 171. 
Detweller, Adam, 158. 
Dewltt, Sarah, 195, 201. 
Dickson, Cyrus*, 165. 

David McCord*, 165. 
Eliza Ann', 165. 
Elizabeth*, 165. 
George Moor head*, 165. 
John*, 164. 
Samuel C, 105n. 
William, 163, 164. 
Dills, George K., 176, 180. 
Lizzie, 180, 183. 
LotUe*, 180, 184. 
Dinsmore, Catharine, 105n. 
Diven, Alice BelF, 144, 151. 

Charles Edgar^ 144, 149. 
Edith Louise*, 150. 
George Raphield, 142, 144. 
George Raphield^ 144. 
George Raphield*, 149. 
James Robinson', 144. 
John Silver*, 150. 
Laura Martha*, 150. 
Martha Louisa', 144, 150. 
Mary Anna', 144, 150. 
Mary Anna*, 149. 
Mary Elizabeth*, 150. 
Paul Bernard*, 149. 
Robert Elmer*, 150. 
William Albert*, 150. 
William Silver', 144, 150. 
Dixey, Albert Miles*, 187. 
Harry Price*, 187. 
Minge*, 187. 
♦Robert H., 186f. 
Robert H.*, 187. 
Dixon, Frances Emily*, 151. 
Mary Louise*, 151. 
Walter James, 145, 151. 

Dodge, E., 169. 

Doty, Calvin Robinson*, 106, 125. 

Cordelia Robinson*, 106. 

Emma Frances', 125. 

Kate Carol', 125. 137. 

Sarah Louisa', 125, 137. 



Doty, William, 95, 106. 

William*, 106. 

William Henry Calvin', 126. 
Dougherty, James, 65, 89, 99. 

Sidney Jane*, 65, 99, 
109 127. 
Downey, William's., 101, 112. 
Durr, Benjamin King*, 186. 

Harry Price*, 186. 

Juanette King*, 186. 

Lafayette G., 185f. 

Lafayette G.*, 186. 

Lucille*, 186. 

Martha Alice*, 186. 
Durst, Delia C, 168. 



Edmiston, Anna E., 124, 136. 
Elder, Caroline*, 159. 

David*, 157, 158. 

David Robinson*, 159. 

Eleanor Thompson*, 159. 

Elizabeth*, 158. 

Elizabeth G.. 157, 158. 

Elizabeth M.*, 159. 

J. McKee*, 159. 

James, 155, 157. 

James*, 157, 159. 

Jamee* (Robert R.*), 158. 

James* (David*), 158. 

John, 45. 

John*, 157, 158. 

Joshua*, 157, 159. 

Joshua Robinson*, 159. 

Margaret* (Joshua*), 159. 

Margaret* (Thomas*), 160. 

Martha*, 158. 

Martha J.*, 158. 

Martha Robinson*, 159. 

Mary A.*, 159. 

Matilda*, 159. 

Polly*, 157, 159. 

Rachel*, 157, 159. 

Robert* (Robert R.*), 158. 

Robert* (Thomas*), 160. 

Robert Robinson*, 157, 158. 

Samuel, 82. 86. 

Sarah* (Robert R.*), 158. 

Sarah* (Thomas*), 160. 

Sarah E.*, 158. 

Scott*, 158. 

Thomas*, 157, 160. 

Thomas*, 158. 

Thomas Bamett*, 159. 

Thomas Robinson*, 158. 



♦Misprinted in text Robert L. for Robert H. 



219 



Elder, William Brown«. 159. 

Ely, Catharine Mather, 103, 115, 

116. 
Ensign, W. Augustus, 168. 
Eudy, Francis A., 198. 



Fairchild, Laura, 105n. 
Falconer, Cyrus, 194, 197. 
Cyrus\ 197, 206. 
Cyrus', 206. 
Douglas Piatt*, 206. 
Helen\ 197, 206. 
Helen*, 206. 
Jerome^ 197. 
John Wood8^ 197. 
Loui8e% 197, 205. 
Mary Woods^ 197, 206. 
Scott'. 197. 

WiUiam Beckett', 197. 
Faull, Rose, 146. 
Fay, Mary, 164. 
Fergus, George*, 93. 

James, 63f., 84, 93f. 
James*, 93. 
Ferguson, Nancy Jane, 106, 125. 
Fisher, Hetty*, 65, 92, 102. 
James, 65, 84, 92. 
Margaret*, 65, 92, 102. 
Mary* (Molly), 65, 92, 103. 
Fltton, Cyrus*, z06. 

Donald Webb*, 206. 
Samuel Dustln, 197, 206. 
Fleming, Anna Margaretta*, 133. 
George Richmond, 119, 

133. 
Susanna Mowr3^, 133. 
Forster, J. Montgomery, 158. 
Fort, Bennie L.', 145, 152. 
Janette*, 152. 
Milton, 143, 145. 
Pearl', 145. 
Perry', 146, 151. 
Wiiiard', 145. 
Fraser, Arthur, 170. 

Frazier, , 102. 

Fulcher, Ferdinand P., 174, 177. 
Ferdinand P.', 177. 
James', 177. 
Furby, Arthur L., 190, 192. 
Asher B.*, 193. 
Ferol T.*. 193. 
Haddon F.*, 193. 
Lionel H.*, 193. 
Virgil V.*, 193. 



Galloway, Lucinda, 188. 
Garland, Earnest H., 186f. 
Sue Cannon*, 187. 
Gams, Anna Kate, 196, 204. 
Gates, Helen, 105n. 
Gay, Margaret Alison, 148, 153. 
George, Dolores Caleen*, 212. 
Neal Noel*, 212. 
Wyatt Earl*, 212. 
Wyatt Sidney, 201, 212. 
Giauque, Florien, 198. 
Gilmor, Margaret C, 157, 159. 
Girder, Sarah J., 174, 177. 
Glines, Abigail, 1941!. 
Gordon, George, 124. 
Goes, David Kop, 144, 151. 
Donald Julian*, 151. 
Elmer David*, 151. 
Walter Diven*, 151. 

Grant, Barton Nelson*, 130. 

Barton Stone, 101, 111. 
Barton Stone*, 130. 
Esther Robinson*, 130. 
Frank Palmer', 111, 130, 
Irene Frances*, 130. 
Lee Wiley', 111, 130. 
Morris D.'. 111. 
Graves, Barak Thomas*, 129. 

Bryant Ciay", 139. 

Clarence Scott*, 127, 139. 

Claude Rogers*, 127. 

Edith*, 128. 

Edwin Tarlton*, 127. 

Eugene Robinson', 127. 

Fielding Louis', 109, 128. 

Fielding Louis*, 128. 

Francis', 109. 

Francis Sidney*, 127. 

George W., 65, 77, 99, 109, 
127. 

George Wilbur*, 127. 

Georgette'. 109, 129. 

Georgie*, 128. 

Gertrude*, 129. 

Harry C.*, 128. 

Henry Clay', 109. 

Irene', 109. 

James Clay*, 128, 139. 

James Dougherty', 109, 
128. 

Jefferson Sharp*, 128. 

John Robinson', 109, 127. 

Laura A., 106, 125. 

Leila*, 139. 

Lilah*, 128. 



220 



Graves, Llewelljm*. 128. 

Margaret J/, 109, 128. 
Mary Agnes*, 139. 
Robert Lee», 127. 
Sidney M.", 128, 139. 
Viola Robinson', 127. 
Gray, Agnes M.«, 196, 204. 
Alexander W.\ 196. 
Anna Cora^ 204, 214. 
Frank Sherwood\ 204. 
Joanna*, 196. 
John, 155, 156. 
Jonathan, 194, 196. 
Jonathan*, 197. 
Joseph*, 156. 

Mary Hadassa*, 196, 204. 
Nancy*, 156. 
William C.*, 196, 204. 
Green, Cora B., 190, 192. 

Elizabeth, 133. 
Gregg, Amanda, 142, 144. 
Gresham, Carrie Lee*, 193. 
Maud^, 193. 
Robert Hall, 191, 193. 
Rupert Neely*, 193. 
Griffith, J. S., 111. 
Grigsby, Fanny*, 130. 

Lewis Braxton, 112, 130. 
Grimshaw, Bertha*, 211. 

Edith, 200, 211. 
Etta May*, 211. 
George L., 200, 211. 
John Nelson*, 211. 
Leonard Harrison*, 211. 
Lloyd Marshall*, 211. 
Ray*, 211. 
Grove, Charlotte, 195, 202. 
Grunden, Eliza, 157, 160. 

Haggard, Emiline, 172f. 
Hall, Charlotte, 164. 
Hampson, Eliza, 165. 

James, 68. 

Rachel, 105n. 
Hanner, Tennessee, 202. 
Harknees, Mary (Polly), 68, 96n. 
Harrington, Rose, 200, 210. 
Harrow, Lucy E., 99, 110. 
Harsin, Martha E., 195, 200. 
Harvey, Cornelia A., 166. 
Haskinson, Caroline F., 167, 170. 

Hawkins, , 110. 

Hay, Jean, 154. 
Hayes, Estelle F., 146. 
Hedden, Mary Alice, 203, 213. 



Heisor, Alma Fredrika*, 208. 
Edna Mary*, 208. 
Helena Katrina*, 208. 
John E., 198, 208. 
Karl William*, 208. 
Robert Miller*. 208. 

Henderson, , 154. 

Hemdon, WiUina S., 89, 101. 
Herring, Guy*, 183. 

Henry, 180, 183. 
Henry*, 183. 
Hewlett, Maria Amanda, 184f. 
Hills, Edgar L., 125, 137. 
Margaret*, 137. 
Maud L.*, 137. 
Hilton, Mary Ellen\ 123. 
William. 105, 123. 
Hockensmith, Fanny L.», 130. 

Franr, 111. 
Frank W.*, 130. 
Mary', 111. 
Newton*, 130. 
Newton J., 101, 111. 
Newton J.', Ill, 130. 
Rowena M.*, 130, 139. 
Watson*, 130. 
Hogg, Clara Fielding*, 129, 139. 
Frank Thomas*. 129. 
John Thomas, 109, 129. 
Hollingsworth, M. J., 101, 111. 
Holyoke, Elizabeth Murphy*, 135. 
Joseph Murphy*, 135. 
Martha Adaline*, 135. 
William, 124, 135. 
Hooker, Elise*, 193. 

Franchelle*, 183. 
Irma", 183. 
Robert B., 191, 193. 
William, 179, 183. 
Hubbard, James M., 105, 124. 

Julia C.^ 124. 
Hudson, Sarah, 142. 
Hunter, Thomas, 97. 
Hyde, Lillie, 179. 



-, 102. 



Inskip, 

Irwin, Anna Maria^ 202, 213. 

Charles Clayton^ 202. 

Mary Alice^ 202. 

Sylvester Welch, 195, 202. 

Jamieson, Juliet, 194, 196. 
Jeffers, Hamilton Moore*, 138. 

John Robinson*, 138. 

William Hamilton, 126, 138. 



221 



-, 175, 179. 



Jennings, 

Jerdone, Leonora, 184f. 
Jewell» Albert M., 195, 202. 
Charles W.% 202. 
Edgar% 202. 
Edna^ 202. 
Ida Mary'. 202. 
Johnson, Archibald Merker, 146, 
152. 
BerthaS 180. 
Catharine, 105, 124. 
Durkie*. 180. 
Evelyn Goldle^, 153. 
Evelyn Robinson*, 152. 
Florence*, 180, 183. 
Florida, 101. 

George Asbury, 143, 146. 
Guy Ander8on^ 146. 
Helen Clover", 153. 
Henry, 176, 180. 
Juliet Wayman*, 153. 
Laura*, 180. 
Una v., 124, 134. 
Mary. 179. 
Mary*, 180. 
Mildred*, 180. 
Minnie Grace', 146, 152. 
Roy*, 180. 

Shirley Bendlyn*, 153. 
Shirley Wayman', 146, 

153. 
Sidney Ryder*, 152. 
Willard CuUen', 152. 
William Preston', 146, 
152. 
Johnston, Nancy, 105n. 
Jones, Emma Payne, 115, 131. 
Judkin, Lydia F., 196, 203. 
Junkin, George*, 131. 

Joseph De Forest, 117, 131. 
Joseph De Forest*, 131. 
Rosamund Robinson*, 131. 

Kemp, Lewis Van Antwerp, 204. 
Kendrick, Fanny, 166, 170. 
Kennedy, Arthur C.\ 205. 

James, 194, 197. 

Jane*, 197, 205. 

Laura A.', 205, 214. 

Mary*, 197. 

William L.', 205. 

William W.*, 197, 205. 

Lee, Frederick E., 203. 
Leech, Acsah*, 103. 



Leech, Francis, 64, 103, 188. 
Francis*, 103. 
George*, 103, 188. 
Leet, Calvin, 167. 

Matilda, 165. 
Leman, Mary, 96n. 
Lemon, John, 156. 
Lichtenwalner, Edward H., 125. 
Livingston, Philena Alice, 103, 116. 
Logan, , 12, 29, 64. 

Abigail*, 103. 

Abigail Robinson', 109. 

Agnes*, 102. 

Alexander, 42. 

Alexander*, 88. 

Alexander H.*, 174, 177f. 

Ann Wiley*, 93, 172, 174, 
188f. 

Charles*, 102. 

David*, 102. 

Eliza Jane', 109. 

Esther*, 88. 

Esther*, 103. 

George* (Margaret R.*), 88. 

George* (Esther R.*), 93. 

George*, 102. 

George Baxter', 109. 

Henry Payne', 178. 

Hetty*, 88. 

Hetty Fisher', 109. 

James L, 63f., 84, 93, 172. 

James II., 65, 92, 102. 

James*, 88. 

James*, 103. 

James Fisher', 109. 

James M.*, 102. 

John, 157. 

John*, 88. 

Margaret, 63, 84, 88, 93, 
172. 

Margaret*, 93, 172£. 

Margaret', 109. 

Margaret Rainey*, 103. 

Martha*, 93, 172f. 

Martin*, 88. 

Mary' (Margaret Robin- 
son'), 88, 98. 

Mary* (Esther Robinson*), 
93, 172. 

Mary*, 102. 

Mary Ann', 109. 

Mary Jean*, 103. 

Mary Robinson', 178. 

Nancy* (Margaret Robin- 
son'), 88. 



222 



Logan, Nancy* (Estner Robinson^), 
93. 172f. 
Nancy Fi8he^^ 109. 
Samuel, 65 84, 88. 
Samuel*, 88. 
Samuel C, 42n. 
Samuel Crothers*, 102. 
Susan*, 102. 
William, 65, 92, 103. 
William* (Hetty Fisher*), 

102. 
William* (George*, Mar- 
garet R.*). 109. 
William* (Molly Fisher*), 

103. 
William Rainey', 109. 
Zillah*, 103. 
Zillah Frazier', 109. 
Longhead, Eleanor, 163, 165. 
Loomis, Dyer, 95, 108. 

Qeorge Lamartine*, 108. 
Jedediah, 105n. 
Joseph Warren*, 108. 
Mary Bliza*, 108. 
Lynch, Rebecca, 196, 203. 
Sarah Ann, 194. 
Lytle, Jeannette. 156, 158. 
Nathaniel, 162. 

McAndrews, Charles, 198, 208. 

Charles Arthur 

Worthington*, 209. 
Gerald Alexander*, 

209. 
Mary Louise", 209. 
McBay, William, 156. 
McC^rter, Joseph, 166. 
McCleary, Robert, 154. 
McClennan, Hannah, 96n. 
McClure, John, 162. 
McConnell, Delia E., 165. 

Laura Martha, 144, 150. 
Martha, 65, 89, 98, 184. 
Mary, 65, 89. 

McCord , 3. 12, 15, 21, 29. 

32, 35, 62. 
Alexander, 96n. 
Alexander", 168. 
Andrew, 96n. 
Ann, 32, 36. 
Ann (of John), 68. 
Caroline*, 168. 
(Catharine*, 168. 
Charles Clifford', 114, 
131. 



McCord, Charles Clifford*, 131. 

David, 96n. 

Eliza, 67, 163, 166. 

Elizabeth, 67, 96n. 

Elizabeth', 169. 

Ella', 114. 

Frank', 169. 

(George Robinson*, 131. 

Griselda, 96n. 

Isaac, 96n. 

Isaac*, 168. 

James, 96n., 114n. 

James M.*, 168. 

James S., 114n. 

Jane', 169. 

Jane T.*, 168. 

Jessie', 169. 

John I., 32, 95n. 

John II., 68, 70, 71, 74, 
96 and n. 

John III., 163, 168. 

John Calvin*, 168. 

John Davidson, 103,114. 

Joseph I., 67, 70, 71, 74, 
96 and n. 

Joseph II., 166, 169. 

Joseph*, 168. 

Joseph Thomas*, 168. 

Luther", 168. 

Mary I., 67, 84, 95, 

Mary II., 96n. 

Mary III., 164. 

Mary Robinson', 114, 
131. 

Montgomery*, 168. 

Robert, 96n. 

Rosanna, 68. 96n. 

Samuel, 96n. 

Thomas*, 168. 

William I., 95n. 

William II., 96n. 

William III., 67. 

William IV., 68. 

William v., 163, 168. 

William F.*, 168. 

McCoy, , 176, 180. 

McCreary, Jane, 163, 165. 

McCullough,. , 162. 

McDonald, Alvin, 172ff., 176. 

Alvln', 176, 179. 

Clyde", 180. 

Edward', 176. 

Emma". 179. 183. 

Florence', 176, 179. 

Jessie", 182. 



223 



McDonald, John', 176, 179. 
Joseph*, 180. 
L. B.^ 174, 178. 
Lena*, 178. 
Lottie*, 180. 
Margaret Elizabeth^ 

176, 180. 
Nettie*, 178, 182. 
Ralph*, 180. 
Robert, 173, 176. 
Robert*, 179. 
Robert E.^ 176. 
Sue*, 179. 

William*, 178, 182. 
McElyea, George Alice% 190. 
George W., 189f. 
JameA Lewi8% 190, 192. 
John Henry^ 190, 192. 
Lois Lanora*, 192. 
Lulu Jane', 190f. 

McE}wan, , 162. 

McGill, Susan, 189f. 
McGuifin, Enna Ozora', 146. 
Mary Ethel', 146. 
Samuel H., 143, 146. 
Zola Lauese', 146. 
McKay, Ada Alice*, 213. 

Albert Jewell*, 213. 
Anna Hazel*, 213. 
Frank Irwin*, 213. 
Mary Edna*, 213. 
Ralph Irwin*, 213. 
Robert Donald*, 213. 
Robert Henderson, 202, 
213. 

McKee, Elizabeth, 167, 158. 
McKinney, Agnes, 95n. 

Dorothy*, 207. 
Robert C, 198, 207. 
Ruth*, 207. 
McKnight, Mary Baird, 119, 133. 
McLane, Jessie', 170. 

John W., 76, 167, 170. 
Mary', 170. 
Rose', 170. 
MacLaren, Anna Green, 119, 132. 

Donald, 133. 
McMann, James, 67. 
Madill, Thomas, 165. 

Maginn, , 162. 

Malm, Hannah, 201, 212. 
Mansell, Susan D., 89, 101. 
Maris, Eugene, 191. 
Marshall, Cora, 127, 139. 

Nancy Jane, 195, 200. 



Martin, 



-, 12, 19. 



Adelia*, 180. 
Clarence*, 180. 
Frank H.*, 180. 
Hezekiah D., 196, 204. 
John G.', 204. 
Joseph, 177, 180. 
Joseph Clay*, 180. 
Juliet', 204. 

Logan Randolph', 181. 
Mary, 82, 84. 
Mary C, 189f. 
Minnie E., 177, 181. 
Nancy, 104. 

Mateer, , 61, 87 and n. 

Maulfair, Louisa Catharine, 158, 

161. 
Maynard, Elisha Burr, 125, 137. 
Elisha Burr", 137. 
Ella Frances, 125. 
Isabella Frances*, 137. 
Josephine^, 137. 
Paul*, 137. 
Pauline*, 140. 
Robert Doty*, 137, 140. 
Ruth*, 137. 
William Doty*, 137. 

Meredith, , 61. 

David, 87 and n. 
Merritt, Miley Lowery, 145, 151. 
Metcalf, Frederick, 171. 
Miller, Alice', 198. 

Anna Osborne', 198, 208. 
Benjamin Moss*, 187. 
Edward Hamilton', 198. 
Elbridge Seawell*, 187. 
Katharine Woods', 198, 208. 
Lilian Seawell*, 187. 
Mary Grace', 198. 
Robert W., 185, 187. 
William Ellis', 198. 
William Hamilton, 194, 198. 
Millikin, Frances*, 207. 
Kathleen*, 208. 
Madeleine*, 208. 
Mark, 198, 207. 
Mary, 198, 207. 
Mills, James, 68. 
Minor, Charles*, 182. 

Charles L., 178, 182. 
Montgomery, Mrs. Letitia, 141. 

Moore, , 12, 21. 

George, 163, 166. 
James, 67. 
Katharine, 105n. 



224 



Moore, Montgomery M., 16G. 
Mordecal*, 166. 
MoniA*, 166. 
Robert, 70, 71. 

Moorhead (Muirhead,) , 3, 12, 

21. 
Alexander*, 162. 
Alice', 169. 
Ann«, 162, 164. 
Anna*, 168, 171. 
Anna^ 169. 
Bamett*, 166. 
Caroline* (James^), 164. 
Caroline* (Thomas^), 

163, 168. 
Caroline Josephine*, 167. 
Cassius*, 168. 
Catharine*, 166. 
Catharine Ann*, 166. 
Charle8\ 169. 
Christian*, 163. 
Christiana*, 162. 
Christiana', 163, lb4. 
Clarissa*, 167. 
Edith', 170. 
Bdward', 169. 
EHAe Jane*, 168. 
Eliza*, 163, 166. 
Eliza*, 164. 
Eliza Ann*, 165. 
Eliza Jane*, 166. 
Elizabeth*, 162. 
Elizabeth* (James M.*), 

166, 169. 
Elisabeth* ( Thomas* ) , 
168 

Elizabeth', 169. 

Emily*, 167. 

Prank', 169. 

Frederick'. 170. 

Oeorge', 163, 165. 

Oeorge Hampson*, 168. 

Harriet', 169. 

Helen', 170. 

Helen Louise*, 168. 

Isaac*. 167, 170. 

Isabella'. 169. 

James, 67. 

James*. 162. 

James', 162, 164. 

James*, 164. 

James', 170. 

James Adair*, 166, 170. 

James Byers*. 165. 

James Miller*, 163. 166. 



Moorhead, James R.*, 165. 
Jane*, 162. 
Jane*, 163. 
Jane*, 163, 168. 
Jane*. 166, 170. 
John*, 163, 165. 
John*, 164. 
John Boal*, 163, 166. 
John Dickson*, 165, 167. 
Joseph*, 168. 
Joseph Alexander*, 167. 
Joseph ByereP, 165, 168. 
Joseph M.*, 166, 169. 
Joseph Toung*, 163. 167. 
Katharine*. 162. 
Kitty Ann*, 163. 
Kitty Ann*. 166, 169. 
LetiUa*, 155, 156, 162, 

164. 
Lily*, 162. 
Mabel', 170. 
Margaret*, 162. 
Margaret*, 168. 
Margaret Mills*, 165, 167. 
Martha Matilda*, 163. 

167. 

Mary*. 168. 

Mary' (Joseph M.*). 169. 
Mary' (James A.*), 170. 
Mary' (William W.*), 

171. 
Mary Ann*, 164. 
Mary Robinson*, 165, 

167. 

Matilda Neely*, 167. 
Maxwell Wood', 171. 
Nancy Crawford*, 167. 
Rachel*, 164. 
Ralph', 170. 
Rebecca Jane*, 167. 
Robert, 70. 
Robert*, 162, 163. 
Robert* (James*), 163, 

165. 
Robert* (Robert*), 163. 
Robert*, 168. 
Robert', 169. 

Rosanna Jane*, 167, 170. 
Rose', 170. 
Ruth', 171. 

Samuel Tate*, 165, 167. 
Sarah Ellen*, 165. 
Sarah Ellen*, 168. 
Thomas. 81. 83. 162. 



225 



lif oorhead, Thomas^ 162. 

Thomas^ (James*), 162, 

163. 
Thomas* (Robert"). 163. 
Thomas* ( Thomas* K 163, 

167. 
Thomas* (James*), 164. 
Thomas', 166, 169. 
Tlmotny Oreen Allen*, 

167. 
William^ 170. 
William McCord*, 166, 

170. 
William Wilberforce*, 

167, 171. 
Wilson E.*, 164. 
Moreland, Sarah, 97. 
Morris, Elizabeth, 195, 199. 
Morrison, John, 96n. 

Margaret. 87, 97. 
Morrow, Emily, 200, 211. 
Morton, Alice M., 142, 145. 
Ida Maud', 204. 
Jennie Q.\ 204. 
Louis Woods\ 204. 
Martin B., 196, 204. 
Moss, B. H., 184, 186. 
Ben. Price*, 186. 
Elleonora Erwin*, 186. 
Muirhead, see Moorhead. 
MuUikln, Catharine Evelyn, 144, 

149. 
Murphy, Annie Marginia*, 134. 
Frances Ella', 124, 135. 
Martha Charlotte', 124, 

135. 
Martha Charlotte*, 134. 
Robinson Barr', 124, 134. 
Robinson Barr", 134. 
Wright, 105, 124. 
Myers, Louise, 175, 179. 

Nash, Alfred, 190f. 

Alice*, 192. 

Elizabeth*, 192. 

Eunice*, 192. 

(Georgia*, 192. 

John McElyea*, 192. 

Mary*, 192. 
Neely, CJatharine*, 167. 

Eliza Ann*, 167. 

Jane*, 167. 

Joseph, 163, 167. 

Joseph*, 167. 

15 



Neely, Maria*, 167. 

Susanna F.*, 167. 
Neill, Claire, 178. 
Nelson, Zoe B., Ill, 130. 

Mary, 87. 
Noble, Eliza, 87, 97. 
Mary, 87. 

Norwood, Dr. , 173, 175. 

Alexander R.', 175, 179. 

Burt*, 179. 

John L.*, 179. 

Mary Ellen*, 179, 183. 

Reuben U.*, 179. 

William G.*, 179. 

O'Brien, Allen*, 206. 

Charlotte Ide*, 206. 

Falconer*, 206. 

Herbert Lyster*, 206. 

L. M., 197, 206. 
Okeson, Mary Ann, 98. 

Samuel, 98. 
Ormsby, Elizabeth, 143, 146. 
Owsley, Bryant Palmer*, 129. 

James B., 110, 129. 

Martha Frances*, 129. 

Mary CatharineP, 129. 
Oxtoby, William, 167. 

Palmer, America Virginia', 110, 129. 
Catharine Izora', 110. 
Charles Nathaniel*, 101, 

lllf. 
Charles Nathaniel', 111. 
Charles Scott', 110. 
Frances Anne*, 101, 111. 
Francis A.', 111. 
Francis R, 65, 89, lOOf. 
Grace', 111. 
Jean Black*, 101, 111. 
Jonathan Haskell', 110, 

129. 
Jonathan Robinson*, 100. 
Jonathan Robinson', 111. 
Lawrence Kirtly', 110. 
Lucy Harriet', 110. 
Lutie C, 111. 
Margaret Ann', 110. 
Margaret Jane*, 100. 
Mary Frances', 110. 
Mary B.', 111. 
Patty', 111. 

Sarah' Elizabeth', 110, 129. 
William Henry*, 100, 110. 



226 



Palmer, William Heii8haw\ 110. 

William Samuel*, 129. 
Parish, A. S., 178, 182. 
Ida», 182. 
William T.«, 182. 
Parker, Frances Mildred, 117, 132. 

Teresa C, 109, 128. 
Parmenter, Grace M., 137, 140. 

Parsons, , 170. 

Patterson, , 96n. 

Peck, Freda', 208. 

Orlando H., 198, 208. 
Stanley Miller", 208. 

Perkins, Dr. , 167. 

Pettichord, Harry Antone*, 209. 
James Morton*, 209. 
John Smith*, 209. 
John T., 199, 209. 
Sophronia Ann*, 209. 
William Stewart*, 209. 
Phillips, Annie L.^ 178, 182. 
CJomelia', 178. 
Josephine^ 178, 182. 
Narcissa', 178, 182. 
Samuel Robinson^, 178. 
Theodore, 174, 178. 
Theodore% 178. 
Piatt, Martha, 197, 206. 
Pollock, Charles, 164. 

Mary Ann, 164. 
Pope, Elizabeth, 101. 
Powell, Elizabeth", 205. 

Eugene, 197, 205. 
Frederick Falconer*, 205. 
Mary LouiseP, 205. 
Preston, James A.*, 181. 
Percy Clay*, 181. 
Percy D., 177, 181. 
Price, Alice*, 186. 

Carrie Walmsley*, 186. 
Eliza Jane*, 186. 
Eliza Robinson', 184. 
Blleonora*, 186f. 
EUeonora Keene^ 184, 186. 
Grace Kemochan", 186. 
Harry Hiir, 184f. 
Manie Moss*. 186f. 
Margaretta Eliza Hiii^ 184. 
Martha Jane', 184f. 
Sarah Frances', 184. 
Sue Cannon*, 186. 
Thomas Keene, 184. 
Thomas Keene*, 186. 



Purcell, Charles A., 204, 214. 
Ralph*, 214. 
William Gray*, 214. 

Rainey, William. 65, 92, 102. 

Ramsey, , 12, 61. 

Robert, 87 and n. 
Rankin, Adam, 88. 
Ratcliffe, Mary D. B., 89, 99. 
Ready, Emma S., 99, 110. 
Reed, Helen, 164. 
Reggs, Alice, 111. 
Richardson, Jean, 205. 
Ritchie, Andrew, 196, 204. 
Edwards', 205. 214. 
Ella Mary', 206. 
Ellsworth Gray', 205. 
Herbert Ellsworth*, 214. 
Marilla J.', 205. 
Melville', 205. 
Robeson. Maria. 194f. 
Robertson, America. 106, 125. 

Robinson, , 3, 21, 29, 36, 60, 

87n. 
Abigail*. 89. 
Abigail', 113. 
Adelia*, 174. 177. 
Agnes*. 82. 86, 154, 156. 
Agnes* (George*), 62, 65, 

84. 92. 
Agnes* (Thomas*), 154. 
Agnes*, 156. 
Alexander* ( Samuel') , 

83. 
Alexander* (William*) . 

83. 
Alexander*. 93. 172f. 
Alexander*, 172. 
Alexander Blaine', 121. 
Alexander (Cochran*, 103, 

115f.. 118. 
Alexander Cochran', 115. 

116. 131. 
Alexander Cochran*, 131. 
Alexander Hamilton*, 96. 

107. 
Alexander S.', 175. 
Alice', 121. 
Alice Florence', 126. 
Amanda*. 174, 178. 
Amanda Melissa*, 189. 
Andrew*, 30, 60, 66, 81, 
83, 154. 



227 



Robinson, Andrew^ (John"), 156. 
Andrew* (Robert*), 165. 
Andrew* (Thomas*), 154. 
Andrew^, 156. 
Ann Wiley* (John Snod- 

dy*). 141, 142. 
Ann Wiley* (Jonathan*), 

65, 89, 100. 
Anna Jacobus*, 133. 
Anna Margaretta\ 119. 
Benjamin Te^^y^ 191. 
Burilla*, 172. 
Charles', 175. 
Charles Clark*, 156. 
Charles Joseph*, 145, 151. 
Charles Morris^ 160. 
Christiana*, 81, 83, 1*62. 
Christiana Lytle*, 158. 
David*, 103, 117f., 119. 
David*, 131. 
Edward^ 160. 
Edward Orth^ 119, 133. 
Edward Orth*, 133. 
Edwin Evans*, 106, 125. 
Edwin WebV, 110. 
Eleanor*, 83. 
Eliza*, 156. 
Eliza Jane*, 184. 
Eliza McCord*, 95, 108. 
Eliza McCormick^ 119, 

133. 
Eliza Wheeler', 113. 
Elizabeth*, 154. 
i EUzabeth*(Robert*) , 156f. 

Elizabeth* (Thomas*), 

154. 
Elizabeth*, 173, 176. 
Elizabeth A.*, 173, 175. 
Elizabeth MacLaren*, 132. 
Embrose A.*, 192. 
Emily Jane*, 101, 112. 
Emma*, 174. 
Era A.*, 192. 
Esther*, 62f., 84, 88, 93, 

172. 
EiVa Irene', 145. 
FannieP, 179. 
BYances*, 174. 
Frances Mary*, 107, 126. 
Franklin Case*, 107, 126. 
Fred Clifton', 145. 
(George*, 15, 30f., 33, 42, 

54, 60ff., 82, 84f., 94. 



Robinson, George*, 62ir., 84, 94t, 

188. 
Cteorge* (Andrew*), 156. 
George* (George*), 64, 

188f. 
George* (John*), 93, 172. 
George* (Jonathan*), 66, 

89, 98, 184. 
George*, 189f. 
George', 185, 187. 
George L.', 175. 
George Price*, 184f. 
Cteorge S.* ((5eorg€P),172. 
George Sidney* (James 

Fisher*), 75, 101. 
(George Washington*, 96, 

106. 
Grace Ann', 161. 
Grace Lytle*, 158, 161. 
Hamilton*, 107. 
Harriet Ann*, 157. 
Harvey*, 141. 
Hattie L.', 190, 192. 
Helen Alice*, 151. 
Henry Buehler', 119. 
Hettie', 177, 181. 
Hetty* (GJeorge*), 172f., 

188 190. 
Hettr* (Jonathan*), 89. 
Hetty* (Thomas*), 67, 96, 

105. 
Ida Maude', 191. 
James*, 12, 32, 83. 
James* ( C^rge*) , 93, 

172, 174, 188ff. 
James' (John Snoddy*), 

141. 
James* (Thomas*), 166. 
James* (Creorge*), 172. 
James* (Newton*), 143. 
James', 175. 
James Fisher*, 62, 65, 75, 

85, 89, 99, lOlf. 
James Fisher*, 101, 112f. . 
James L.*, 173, 176. 
James Shannon*, 99, 110. 
James Wheeler', 112. 
Jane America', 125. 
Jean*, 155. 
Jean*, 65, 89, 99. 
Jean Black*, 99. 
Jean Snoddy*, 141. 



228 



RobioBon, Jennie GIendosa^ 145. 

Jennie Lee', 191f. 

John" (Andrew*). 154f. 

John* (Philip*). 82. 

John* (Richard*). 83. 

John* (ThomaB*), 84. 

John* (William*), 83. 

John* (George*), 62ff., 84, 
88, 92ff., 172. 

John* (Thomas*), 154. 

John" (GJeorge*), 188. 

John* (John*), 93, 172f. 

John' (Jonathan*), 88, 
92. 

John' (Samuel*). 142. 

John* (Thoma8*,Creorge"). 
95. 

John* (Thomas*, Rob- 
ert*), 156. 

John* (John McCrack- 
en') 99. 

John* '(William*), 174. 

John A.*, 173, 176. 

John Earr, 145, 151. 

John Edwin*, 142, 145. 

John F.*, 103. 116, 118. 

John Lemon', 160. 

John M.*, 157. 

John M.', 176. 

John McCracken*, 65, 89, 
99f., 101. 

John McCracken*, 75. 101. 

John Noel*, 131. 

John S.' (John A.*), 175. 

John Smith' (Thomas 
Fielding*). 185. 

John Snoddy*, 66, 88. 98, 
141. 

John T.*, 155. 

Jonathan*, 61ff., 65, 84. 
87n., 88ir. 

Jonathan* (John Snod- 
dy*), 141. 

Jonathan* ( Jonathan* ) . 
89. 

Jonathan*, 174, 177. 

Jonathan Black*, 184f. 

Joseph*, 82. 

Joseph*, 141. 

Joseph McKinney*, 95, 
107. 

Joseph Wyllis*, 106, 125. 

Josephine*, 189, 191. 



Robinson, Josiah Whitney*, 106, 

125. 
Joshua*, I56f. 
Julian*, 154f. 
Julietta*, 143. 
Kate', 175. 

Katharine Dorothy*. 151. 
Lewis Galloway*, 189. 

191. 
Louise Estelle', 191. 
Lucy Harrow', 110. 
Lydia*, 107. 126. 
Madison Johnson*. 101. 
Margaret*, 62, 65, 84, 88. 
Margaret*. 89. 
Margaret* (John*), 173, 

176. 
Margaret* (William*), 

174. 
Margaret Ratcliffe*. 99. 

110. 

Maria Louisa* (b. 1814), 
142. 

Maria Louisa* (b. 1816). 

142, 143. 
Martha* (CJeorge*), 62ff.. 

84, 93. 
Martha* (Robert*), 165. 

157. 
Martha* (GJeorge*), 172, 

175. 
Martha* (Newton*), 143, 

146. 
Martha Jane*, 158, 160. 
Mary* (Andrew*). 154. 
Mary* (Philip*). 82. 86. 
Mary* (George*), 60. 65, 

84, 87 and n., 89. 
Mary* (Robert*), 155f. 
Mary* (Thomas*). 154. 
Mary* (Andrew*), 156. 
Mary* ((Jeorge*), 65, 103. 
Mary* (Jonathan*), 65, 
. 88, 98, 14L 
Mary* (Thomas*), 166. 
Mary* (Alexander*), 173, 

175. 
Mary* (Alexander Ham- 
ilton*), 107. 
Mary* (Newton*), 143. 

145. 
Mary* (William*), 171, 

177. 



229 



Robinson, Mary^ (George Price'), 
185. 187. 
Mary' (Jonathan*), 177, 

181. 
Mary*, 179. 
Mary Ann', 95, 106. 
Mary Ann* (Creorge"), 

189f. 
Mary Ann* (John*), 173, 

176. 
Mary Buehler', 119. 
Mary E.*, 192. 
Mary Elizabeth', 113. 
Mary Ellen', 177. 
Mary Jane*, 99. 
Mary Jeannette', 161. 
Mary Louise*, 108. 
Mary MaUlda', 125. 
Matilda*, 156. 
Matthew*, 141. 
Mellville Logan*, 173, 175. 
Minerva* ((Jeorge*), 172. 
Minerva* (John*), 173, 

176. 
Minnie', 145. 
Nancy*, 155. 

Nancy* (Andrew*), 155. 
Nancy* (George"), 188. 
Nancy* (Samuel*), 142. 
Nancy* (Thomas*), 95, 

106. 
Nancy A.', 175. 
Nancy B.*, 157. 
Nancy Jane*, 172, 174. 
Nancy Martin*, 103, 117, 

132. 
Narcissa*, 172. 
Newton*, 142, 143. 
Newton*, 143, 145. 
Ogden S.*, 192. 
Oliver*, 189. 

Oliver Vanlanding*, 188. 
Oscar* (George"), 189. 
Oscar* (James*), 189. 
Peggy Ann*, 172, 174, 

188f. 
Philip', 12, 15, 29ff., 34, 

60, 81f. 
Philip Eldon*, 101. 
Philip Ely', 115. 
Polly*, 141, 194. 
Polly* (Jonathan*), see 

Mary*. 
Polly* (Gteorge*), 188. 



Robinson, Hachel Mary*, 157, 160. 
Ralph Morton', 145. 
Rhoda Myrtle', 145. 
Richard*, 30, 60, 81, 83. 
Richard*, 83. 
Robert, 164. 
Robert*, 321, 36, 82, 86, 

154. 155. 
Robert* (John*), 155, 157. 
Robert* (Robert*), 155f. 
Robert* (Robert*), 157. 
Robert* (Thomas*), 156. 
Robert B.*, 156. 
Robert James*, 189. 
Robert L.' (Vincent*), 

190, 192. 
Robert Lee' (John A.*), 

175, 179. 
Roland Edward*, 151. 
Rosanna Blaine*, 103, 114. 
Rosalina', 116. 
Roy Connor', 145. 
Samuel*, 12, 30, 60, 81ff. 
Samuel* (Philip'), 30, 

60, 81f., 84, 141. 
Samuel* (William*), 83. 
Samuel*, 141f. 
Samuel* (John*), 93, 172, 

174, 190. 
Samuel* (John Snoddy*), 

141. 
Samuel*, 174. 
Samuel McCord*, 95, 108f. 
Samuel Martin*, 103,118, 

123. 
Samuel Sturgeon*, 142. 
Sanford B.*, 158, 161. 
Sarah*, 82, 86. 
Sarah* ( George* ) , 62ff . , 

84, 93. 
Sarah* (Thomas*T7"l54. 
Sarah Ann*, 156. 
Sarah Matilda*, 106, 125. 
Scott Herndon*, 75, 101. 
Selden Marvin', 115. 
Stephen Gano* (b. 1849), 

101. 
Stephen Gano* (b. 1859), 

101. 
Thomas, 54. 

ThomasS 5, 12, 29, 60, 81. 
Thomas^ 30, 60, 81, 84. 
Thomas* (Andrew*), 154. 



232 



Waddell, James*, 186. 

Laura J.\ 176. 180. 
Walker, Joseph, 180, 184. 
Walkup, Alfred C, 124, 135f. 
Alfred William*. 135. 
Eleanor M.*. 135. 
John Milton', 135. 
Wallace, Samuel, 142. 

Samuel H., 158. 
Ward, M., 141. 
Watson, Jane A., Ill, 130. 
Way, Leotie, 109, 128. 
Wayman, Araminta Paulina*, 143. 
Elizabeth Eugenie*, 143, 

148. 
Florence Josephine*, 143. 
Guy Trumbo^ 146. 
Isabella Ruth*, 143. 
James Robinson*, 143. 
James Vallores, 142, 143. 
John Vallores*, 6, 94, 143, 

171. 
Juliet Mary*, 143, 146. 
Maria Louisa*, 143, 148. 
Willard Gross*, 143, 146ff. 
Willard Ormsby', 146. 
Wayne, Frederick, 148, 163. 

Frederick Wayman*, 163. 

Webber, , 203, 213. 

Mary Woods*, 213. 

Wetherly, . 195. 

Wheeler, Mary, 101, 112. 
Whipple, Lea, 201. 212. 
Whiting, Clara Fannie*, 135. 

Clarence M., 124, 135. 
Hall Sanford*, 135. 
Harry Murphy*, 135. 
Whitman, Adana Ruth^ 148, 153. 
Donald Gay*, 163. 
George Washington', 148, 

153. 
Henry Harrison, 143, 148. 
Henry Harrison', 148. 
James Vallores', 148. 
Wickard, Albert E.', 201. 
Carlos Guy*, 212. 
Caroline', 201. 
Charles C. 201. 
Clarence', 201. 
Clark A*. 212. 
Earnest L.', 201. 
Eugene T.', 201, 212. 
Henry E.', 200. 
Ida M.', 201. 
Jacob M., 195, 200. 
Joyce C.*, 212. 
Morrison J.', 201, 212. 



Wickard, Walter W.', 201. 

Willie J.', 201. 
Wiley (or Wylie). Ann. 82. 84ir. 
Wllkins. Chester Clifford*. 182. 
Hettie Gate*, 182. 
James Girder*, 182. 
Leslie L.*, 181. 
T. B., 177. 181. 
Williams, Alexander F., 107, 126. 
Anna Sarah', 126, 138. 
Ella Ophelia', 126, 138. 
Frederick Crosby', 126. 
Joseph Robinson', 126. 
Wilmans, Charles, 191. 
Wilson. Ann, 162, 164. 
Winters. Mary S., 197, 205. 
Wisdom, Mary Lewis, 111, 130. 

Wiseman, , 61. 

George, 87 and n. 
Wolf, Anna Margaretta, l;sl. 

George, 121. 
Woodbridge, Eva, 197. 
Woodburn, Margaret. 96n. 
Woodrough, Frederic Charles*, 206. 
Horace, 198, 206. 
Howard*. 206. 
Joseph William', 206. 
Woods, Albert Alexander', 203. 
Albert Nelson*, 211. 
Alexander. 141, 194. 
Alexander*, 194, 196. 
Alice Irene', 203. 
Anna Margaret*, 196. 
Archibald Sylvester*, 209. 
Arthur Vance', 199. 
Bernetie*, 209. 

Blanche Eveletta', 199, 209. 
Caroline Scott*, 195, 200. 
Charles Albert', 200, 211. 
Charles Franklin', 199, 209. 
Charles L.', 203. 
Charles McDill*, 195. 
Cherokee Morgan', 203. 
Cyrus*, 195. 
Dora', 200. 
Eden T.', 203, 213. 
Edna Izette*, 211. 
Edward Payson', 203. 
Ellen Frances*, 196, 204. • 
Elmer Ellsworth', 199, 210. 
Elmer Marson', 209. 
Emma', 203, 213. 
Emma Gertrude', 201, 212. 
Bril Vernon*, 210. 
Estella Blanche', 202. 
Flora J.', 200. 
Florence', 199. 210. 



233 



Woods, Floyd CeclP, 210. 

Forest Floyd% 210. 

F^ank^ 203. 

Gordon', 201. 

Harmon Gilbert', 210. 

Harriet Eliza*, 195. 

Helen Marie', 199. 

Henry', 201. 

Herbert Glenn', 210. 

Ida Garrone', 199. 

Ira', 200. 

Irene Frances', 199. 

Iris", 213. 

Isaac*, 195. 

Izetta May', 200. 

James*, 194f. 

James Hedden*, 213. 

James Newton* (Alexan- 
der*), 196. 

James Newton* (James*), 
196, 203. 

James Robinson*, 195, 199. 

James Rogers', .203, 213. 

Jane*, 194. 

John*, 194. 

John*, 196, 199. 

John Harry', 202. 

John Henry*, 211. 

John Kersley*, 196, 203. 

John Orval', 200. 

John Robeson*, 196, 203. 

John William*, 195, 200. 

Joshua Marshall*, 211. 

Katharine*, 211. 

Lida L.', 200. 

Lydia Marie', 203. 

Maggie', 202. 

Martha*, 194, 197. 

Martha Maria*, 195, 202. 

Mary*, 194, 196. 

Mary*, 194. 197. 

Mary' (John*), 199. 

Mary' (John Kersley*), 203. 

Mary Alice', 202. 

Mary Ann*, 195, 202. 

Mary Henrietta*, 209. 

Mary Jane*, 195. 

Mary Malinda', 200, 211. 

Mary Rose*, 211. 

Mattie Maria', 203. 

Milton Raymond*, 209. 

Minnie B.', 200. 

Morris Hinsey'. 199. 

Orrin Edson*, 209. 

Pearl Zener', 203. 

Rachel*, 195, 198. 



Rebecca*, 194, 197. 

Rebecca*, 194, 198. 

Rosetta', 199. 

Roy Cleo*, 210. 

Ruth Eliza*, 195, 200. 

Samuel*, 194f. 

Samuel Alexander*, 195, 201. 

Samuel Roy', 202. 

Sarah* (b. 1823), 194. 

Sarah* (b. 1827), 194. 

Sarah Jane*, 196, 204. 

Selma', 200. 211. 

Silas Smith*, 195, 200. 

Thomas Everett*, 213. 

Viola M.', 200. 

Walter A.*, 211. 

William Alexander*, 195, 

202. 
William Barnes', 202. 
William C.*, 194, 196. 
William Grant', 200, 210. 
William T.*, 196. 
Woodside. John, 197, 205. 
Worthlngton, Arthur St. Clair*, 208. 

Arthur Woods', 198, 
208. 

Edith', 199. 

Eleanor S.*, 208. 

Florence', 198, 208. 

Howard*, 208. 

Louise', 199. 

Robert H.', 198. 

Robert S.*, 208. 

Samuel Kellogg, 195, 
198. 

Sarah Frances', 199. 
Wright, Edward G., 128, 139. 
Teresa McLear*, 139. 
Wyllis, Lomira, 95, 107. 
Matilda, 95, 106. 

Yale, Mary, 167, 171. 
Young, Frankie L., 190, 192. 

Jane, 162, 163. 
Youtz, Nancy, 156, 157. 

Zell, Earnest*, 212. 

Hallle*, 212. 

Launar Ballard', 201, 212. 

Lizzie Estella', 201. 

Lloyd Elwin', 201. 

John, 195, 201. 

Royal Ralph*, 212. 
Zener, Jennie M., 196, 203. 
Zimmerman, Margaret, 98. 



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