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Full text of "Thompson's Island beacon"

Vol. 57 No. t Printed at The Farm and Trades School, Boston, Mass. May, 1953 

Entered Naveittber 3, 1903 at Boston. Mass., as Second Class matter, under Act of Congress, of Jrhfi. U74 



The Annual Band Concert 

An enthusiastic audience of several 
hundred fathered in Faneuil Hall> on 
Sunday afternoon, April 26, for the 
annual spring concert of the Band. It was 
an amazingly good turnout, for the day 
was dark and dismal, with li#)t rain 
falling almost continuously. Although 
most of those present were parents and 
friends of the boys, there were also many 
graduates and friends of the school, 
toiiether with several prominent musicians 
who were interested in what our boys 
were doin^ with instrumental music. 

Our Bandmaster, Frank L. Warren, 
was at his genial best and kept the program 
moving smoothly. The concert began 
promptly at two o'clock with the playing 
of the perennial favorite, "Show Roy 
March." Various types of selections 
followed one another for almost two 
hours, and all were well received. 

Six of our boys were featured as 
soloists and all did a marvelous job. The 
band accompaniments, too, helped much 
to set off these individual solos. The 
selections played by quartets, one of 
cornets and another of trombones, were 
very well received. 

Howard B. Ellis, '98, our former 
bandmaster, was present and directed the 
boys in the playing of a spirited march. 
He used the baton which was formerly 
used by John R. Morse, founder of the 



band. One of the band's ardent boosters, 
Mr, Ellis has been present at each of our 
concerts at Faneuil Hall, and it is a 
pleasure indeed, and a privilege, to have 
him with us. 

John Corley, director of music at M. 
I. T. and Brookline High School, was 
also present and after complimenting the 
band he led the boys in a march called 
"Little Champ." Mr. Corley is very 
active in the New England School Music 
Festival Association, and we were pleased 
that he could be with us at this occasion. 

Sousa's "King Cotton" was led by 
W. Marshall Hall, '27, and this National 
Guard bandmaster had the boys on the 
alert as he brought forth the snap, pep and 
vitality which this famous composition 
demands. 

C. Robbins Emery, '12, "Big Brother" 
of radio and television, was on hand and 
spoke briefly. This was a real treat, and 
to some a sentimental one, for in the 
audience were some former members of 
the Big Brother Club. Mr. Emery spoke 
of plans he is formulating for producing 
films of activities at our school for television 
shows. He is a pioneer in radio and 
television, having been in these fields for 
more than three decades. 

Space does not permit the naming of 
many others present. School music di- 
rectors, professional musicians and lovers 
of band music were in the audience. Their 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



interest is indeed very much appreciated. 

Although most of the music played 
was of standard band works, there were 
lighter compositions interpolated in the 
program so as to give a nice balance. The 
"Hunting Scene" of Bucallosi and the 
"Farm and Trades School Has a Band," 
the boys' own novelty, were both very 
well liked by the audience. 

The concert was a tribute to the boys 
who have worked hard during the winter 
months in preparing the music for this 
occasion. After the concert they were 
heartily congratulated for their very fine 
performance. The generous praise and 
hearty applause is just the tonic the boys 
need to spur them onward. 

The program played, and the roster 
of the band follows: 

PROGRAM 

March— Show Boy Huff 

Overture— Trapelo Fulton 

Clarinet Solo— Delecta RolUnson 

Robert Fabello 
Trombone Solo— Wanderer Harlow 

Bruce A. Graham 
Selection— Victor Herbert Favorites 

Trumpet Solo— A Trumpeter's Lullaby 
Donald E. Richardson 

Euphonium Solo— Steve's Delight 

William F. Sonier 
Cornet Quartette— Finlandia Theme 
Teyet Ramar, II Frederick E. Harding 

Loren E. Cain David E. LeVeille 
Trombone Quartette— 

I Love You Truly Bond 

Richard A. Ostrander Edward J. White 

David A. Pulsifer William H. Dillon 

Patrol— Something About a Soldier 

Drum solos by David W. Howard 

Tuba Solo— My Tuba Solo Southwell 

Thomas Angelos 



Selection -Manage aux Lantemes 

Descriptive— Hunting Scene Bucallosi 

Overture— Day of Youth Fulton 

Polka— Pizzicato Straus 

Novelty— 

Farm and Trades School Has a Band 

March — Salutation Seitz 

Star Spangled Banner 

Roster of the Band 

Mr. Frank L. Warren, Director 
Mr. Clifton E, Albee, Assistant 



Clar^et§ 

Robert O. Cain 
Daniel W, Dockham 
Robert Fabello 
Barry R, Fuller 
Larry E. Garside 
Frederick L, Krueger 
Arnold M. Sutterlin 
Alan C. Waldron 

Cornets 

Loren E. Cain 
Albert K, Ellis 
Frederick E. Harding 
David E, LeVeille 
Teyet Ramar II 
Donald E. Richardson 
Carroll E. Young 

Basses 

Thomas Angelos 
William F, James 



Alto Horns 

S. NeWGomb Graham 
Robert A, Kidder 
Norman W, Sellevaag 
Carleton G. Skinner, Jr. 

Drums 

Gerald L. Briggs 
David W, Howard 
Alexander D. Marinakis 
Arthur A. Sprague 

Baritones 
Paul E. Parker 
William F. Sonier 

Trombones 
William H. Dillon 
Bruce A. Graham 
Richard A, Ostrander 
David A. Pulsifer 
Edward J. White 



Planning the Class Banquet 

A class meeting is the first step taken 
by the sophomore class on preparations 
for the annual class banquet. At this 
meeting the class decides on the tentative 
date, menu, hour and who should be 
waiters. The seating arrangement is also 
planned, for the upper two classes and 
the instructors attend. With the help of 
Mr. Meacham and Mr. Jakeman these 
matters are settled. 

The class has two ways of raising 
money to pay for the banquet. One is 
by class dues, and the other is the 



THOMPSONS ISLAND BEACON 



proceeds of an auction, held especially 
for that purpose. 

Invitations are prepared in the school 
printing office, and the sophomores send 
these to each invited guest. Small table 
place cards are also printed. 

The banquet is held in the school 
dining room in Bowditch House. The 
tables are arranged in a horseshoe shape, 
banquet fashion. An important part of 
the banquet are the speeches, which are 
given by several instructors and students. 

Year after year the class banquet is a 
big feature. The class does all it can, but 
the success of the banquet depends much 
upon the help it gets from the instructors. 
The office staff orders the food, the 
kitchen instructors prepare it and the 
dining room people cooperate. In fact, 
it is everyone's cooperation that makes 
the annual banquet so enjoyable. 

William F. Sonier 

A Band Trip 

The music festival trips are all-day 
oufiniJs and the procedure is much the 
same for each trip. We get dressed in 
our uniforms before breakfast, and after 
the meal we assemble at the Old Elm. 
When all are present we head for the 
boat. Here we are given advice which is 
always the same, namely watch our instru- 
ments and not get soaked by the salt water. 
We dock at the Public Landing and in 
no time at all have our instruments stored 
away and are comfortably seated. If we 
were successful in the rush we are seated 
next to a window. 

Upon arriving at our festival desti- 
nation we take our instruments and head 
for the audition hall. We set up on the 
stage and make sure everything is all right. 
When the judges are ready we are brought 
to attention and watch for the downbeat 
from Major Warren. 



In the afternoon, around two o'clock, 
it is time for the parade to start. Each 
band is in line waiting for the first band 
to step off. The parade covers the princi- 
pal streets of the town and ends in the 
hi^h school stadium, where a concert of 
all the bands in massed formation is held. 
While waiting for the bands to get in line 
one makes many friends with members of 
the other bands. This massed band 
concert is led by several conductors, each 
one leading one of the pieces. 

The massed band concert ends the 
festival program, unless there is marching 
drill, in which case we take part. After 
this we find our bus, pack away our 
instruments and are ready for the return 
trip. We are spending our time talking 
with those in other bands, for the streets 
are crowded with school musicians. 

After the bus gets on the main highway 
we sing a few songs, and settle back for a 
pleasant ride back to school where we end 
a perfect day. 

Donald E. Richardson 

First Guernsey Cattle in America 
The first Guernsey cattle imported to 
this country were one bull and two heifers 
which arrived at Boston in 1831 and were 
taken to the farm of General Moody 
Adams Pillsbury on Guernsey Island at 
Lake Winnepesaukee, New Hampshire. 
The original Pillsbury Mill has been 
renewed and serves as a museum for the 
American Guernsey Cattle Club. 

The Magna Carta 

The Magna Carta— a guarantee of 
civil rights and liberties to all people — was 
signed with great reluctance by England's 
King John on June 15, 1215. The Magna 
Carta is one of the most important docu- 
ments in world history, and to it we owe 
the basis of the privileges and benefits of 
free men. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Cl)oinp$oii'$ Island Beacon 

Published Monthly by 

THE FARM AND TRADES SCHOOL 

Thompson's Island, Boston Harbor 

A PRIVATE SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF EXCELLENT 

CHARACTER SUPPORTED BY ENDOWMENTS. 

TUITION FEES AND SUBSCRIPTIONS. 



Vol. 57 No. 2 



May 1953 



Subscription Price 



One Dollar Per Year 



BOARD OF TRUS TEES 

Calvin Page Bartlett, President 

James H. Lowell, Vice-President 

Alfred C. Malm, Treasurer 

Merton P. Ellis, Secretary 

Howland S. Warren, Assistant Secretary 

Term Expires 1954 
George P. Denny, M. D. 
Ralph B. Williams 

Thomas Temple Pond 
Mason Sears 

Joseph L. Pendergast 
Lawrence Terry 
John Q. Adams 

Term Expires 1955 
Gorham Brooks 
Charles E. Mason 

Donald S. MacPherson 
Philip H. Theopold 

Augustus P. Loring, III 
Robert H. Gardiner 
A. Conrad Ericsson 

Term Expires 1956 
Leverett Saltonstall » 

Moses Williams 
William M. Meacham 
George S. Mumford, Jr. 
Frederic Winthrop 
John Lowell 

Edward V. Osberg 

Advisory Commiitee 
N. Penrose Hallowell 
Edwin H. Place, M. D. 

The greatest need of the world to-day 
is the rebuilding of the Christian spirit of 
service, the basic development plan at our 
home school. Why not help a fine, worthy 
boy achieve his goal by making a financial 
contribution to America's best investment? 



Editorial 

"I can never fully express my ap- 
preciation and gratitude for all you and 
the School have done for both my sons. 
They have learned how to live with 
others in such a way that when the time 
comes for them to break away from home 
and go out to face the world they can do 
so confidently. 

"You would have to be proud of 
them, as I was, last Friday. I took them 
to the High School to pick up their sister 
and while waiting for her the Principal 
came over to us. The boys were so 
mannerly and displayed such poise that 
my heart nearly burst with pride. It 
would have made you proud, too, to 
hear them answering the Principal's ques- 
tions about The Farm and Trades School. 
You could tell that they loved and were 
proud of their school. All I can say is 
'God Bless you all and please make it 
possible for other boys to receive the 
benefits which my sons have had.' " 

This excerpt from a recent letter of 
the mother of two of our boys speaks 
volumes. These brothers have the quali- 
ties and the character of outstanding 
citizens. The School has helped them to 
develop their talents and round out their 
personalities. As adults they will be 
leaders in their community. 

Every one of our boys has these 
potential qualities. They need to be fully 
developed and expanded. Every lad 
who graduates from the School can be 
counted on to do his part in our American 
way of life. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Topics in Brief 

The freshman class presented a very 
unusual and entertaining program on April 
20, the day on which we observed the 
Patriot's Day holiday. In their show, the 
class members combined reading, singing, 
and pantomime to produce a clever bur- 
lesque of an old-time melodrama. The 
costumes, songs and settings were good. 
It was good holiday entertainment. 

The principal event of the month 
was the Annual Spring Concert, given by 
the Band in Faneuil Hall on April 26. 
The concert was fine in every way, and 
the 1953 Band may well be proud of an 
outstanding achievement. Truly the boys 
maintained the high standard of musical 
excellence which has stamped our bands 
annually over a period of many years. 
This was the seventeenth annual concert 
played in town, and all of them from the 
stage of historic Faneuil Hall. 

It has been a rather cold, wet spring, 
and the boys have been impatient to get 
down to the business of baseball, softball, 
tennis and other spring sports. Before 
this issue reaches our readers league 
schedules and tournaments in these sports 
will be well underway. Games will be 
played as often as possible, so as to make 
up for time lost because of unfavorable 
weather. 

The first visiting day of the year took 
place on May 15. It was far from an ideal 
day, jet a large number was present. The 
next visiting day will be on June 4, when 
the annual graduation exercises will be 
held. 

The spring week of vacation began 
on April 6. Fourteen of the boys, who 
had the highest rating in effort and con- 
duct, were home for this period. The 
new term commenced on April 13. 



On April 10 fifteen of the boys acted 
as waiters for the Annual Sugar Party of 
The Vermont Association of Boston. The 
boys did a fine job and afterwards enjoyed 
the superb treat of maple syrup on snow, 
doughnuts, sandwiches, pickles and the 
other treats of the traditional sugar party 
menu. 

The boys arrived in town early, so 
took time to visit the news room of station 
WCOP and were interested in watching 
the teletypers. Then they were shown the 
turntables which were at the time playing 
transcriptions of the popular "Hayloft 
Jamboree" program with Nelson Bragg. 

On Friday, April 10, half of the boys 
were in town with their parents, and on 
the following day the rest of the boys 
enjoyed a similar holiday. The first 
visiting day of this spring at the school 
will be May 15. 

Fishing has been a popular sport 
during the early days of spring. There 
have been some good catches of flounder 
taken, one of the boys having a string of 
seven. A few eels have been taken. We 
understand that mackerel are being caught, 
in our vicinity, but as yet our boys have 
not caught any. 

Our cornet quartette appeared on 
WBZ-TV on Saturday, May 2, the boys 
having been invited to take part by "Big 
Brother" Bob Emery. It was quite an 
experience for the boys and they enjoyed 
it very much. They did a fine job playing 
the theme from Sibelius' "Finlandia." 
Mr. Emery has stated that he will make 
it possible for others from our student body 
to take part on one of his popular television 
programs. 

The annual banquet of the graduating 
class was held April 30 in Bo<vditch House. 
A steak dinner was enjoyed. Several 
members of the faculty, and some students 
spoke at the gala class function. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



A Stunt Flight 

Today we are going to witness the 
premier flight of the first stunt plane to 
appear on Thompson's Island. To begin 
we'll need a few items to start the motor. 
They are: a battery, a can of fuel, an eye- 
dropper, and a fuel pump. We'll need 
flying lines also. These are hitched to 
the leadouts on the plane. 

Now we'll start the engine. First we 
pump the balloon tank with fuel and then 
attach it to the engine. Then we open 
the needle valve and connect the battery 
to the glow plug. Next we prime the 
engine by putting one or two drops of 
fuel into the exhaust port. A whirl and 
the engine starts. Pow! Now we adjust 
the needle valve. Man, we've got that 
Wasp roaring now. 

We hand the plane to the launcher 
and dash to the center of the circle. (The 
plane travels a circular path and is con- 
trolled by two thin wires. The area within 
its path is called the circle.) We take up 
the control handle and test. Ah! Perfect! 
We give the launcher the signal. 

We fly a few level laps to gain con- 
fidence. Well, now, let's try a wingover. 
Gulp! Phew! We were lucky that time. 
Let's push our luck and do a loon. Say! 
This is all riiht! Now a fiendish thought! 
Let's buzz the spectactors. Wow! Laid 
'em flat. 

Oops, out of fuel, the engine cut. 
Well, We'll try to land. 1 he plane is too 
high. Wait a minute! It is noscheavy. 
Don't bring it in so sharply! 

"Hey Sam! I just looped! Look!" 

The old sorehead! Sam just stomped 
in and picked up the pieces. Hmph! 
Peeved, just beca' se it was his engine and 
his last prop. 

Robert A. Kidder 

(Ed. Note: Sam Griswold woefully 
watched this crackup; he has s'nce brought 



his equipment to top shape and efficiency. 
We note, though, that at the exhibitions 
we've seen, that Sam alone handles the 
controls. 'Tis the best way to retain full 
control of plane and temper.) 



Strawberry Culture 

Care of a strawberry patch begins 
with the preparing of the soil, which 
should be plowed, harrowed and fertilized 
during the last two weeks of August or the 
first two weeks of September. Strawberries 
do well on soil that is not too rocky, but 
a bit on the sandy side. A level stretch 
makes it easy to mark off the rows and 
care for the plants. The depth to plant 
should be six inches, so that the roots 
will be able to spread in a fan shape. 

The best way to cultivate is by hand, 
taking out the weeds and loosening the 
soil around the plants. A faster way is to 
use a tractor. This loosens the soil all 
right, but doesn't clean the weeds so well. 
The strawberry bed should be mulched 
after cultivation with three to four inches 
of sawdust. This mulch can be left on for 
the following season, for it will help 
retain moisture and keep down weeds, 
and is a help to the harvester. 

During the first two weeks of July the 
fruit chansies from a green to red color, 
and this is the time to pick. Strawberries 
don't keep very long in hot weather, so 
they are preserved by freezing. Although 
this is done in many ways, here we hull 
and clean the fruit and pack in small 
cardboard tubs which are put in the deep 
freezer. 

The results of the work on the straw- 
berry patch are enjoyed all year long. 
Luscious berries are served with cereal for 
breakfast, on shortcake for dinner, and in 
pie for supper. Icecream specialties made 
with strawberries are served often. 

Robert O. Cain 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



The Day New Boys Gome 

The day after Labor Day is the day 
the new boys arrive annually at The Farm 
and Trades School. They are met at the 
wharf by other boys who help with the 



Additional Alumni Notes 
LiNwooD L. Meacham, '41. of 9 
Talbot Road, Hingham, has been intro- 
duced to folks in th:it community by a 



luggage, 'and take them to the recreation ^plendidly written article which appeared 

in a recent issue of the local paper. We 
take the liberty of quoting several para- 
graphs of this newspaper account, which 
was written by Wm. Eugene Hays, Gen- 
eral Agent. Boston, of the New England 
Mutual Life Insurance Company. 

"Lin started his career with us right 
after getting his degree from Middlebury 
College in 1950. He already numbers 
among his clients prominent business 
men considerably his senior. How come? 
Well, he'll study a profiram until nine 
times out of ten, he's found a way to 
improve it. He's made a specialty of 
reducing tax commitments and protecting 
business interests through life insurance. 

"You see, Lin Meacham has realized 
early the opportunities in providing a 
truly professional service approach to life 
underwriting. He has completed both 
Career and Advanced Underwriting 
courses, and is now working toward his 
C. L. U. (Chartered Life Underwriter) 
degree. 

"Lin also has musical interests which 
have associated him with various social 
activities. Playing, as the occasion war- 
ranted, either the bass viol, clarinet or 
drums, he was a member of his college 
orchestra and band, and led 'The Black 
Panthers', a 14 piece dance band, in 
professional engagements all over New 
England. In addition, he was Director 
of Middlebury 's famed 'Mid-Time Var- 
ieties' and President of his college flying 
club. Yes, you'll find Lin Meacham has 
a lot to ofTer, and he's looking forward 
eagerly to taking an active part in his new 



room in A House. Here ihey have a short 
interview with Mr. Albee and are soon 
on their way to their assigned dormitory 
rooms. 

At approximately one o'clock they go 
on their first beach walk, along with 
many of the older boys. On this beach 
walk they are told a brief history of the 
islands around us. For example, the 
story of Moon Head and the new bridge 
to Long Island. Also how Spectacle 
Island has been filled in so that it no 
longer looks like a pair of spectacles. They 
are also told about the engineering job 
that removed Governor's Island, and 
about Fort Independence on Castle Island. 
They will also hear of Indian graves found 
on our Island, and go for a swim at the 
north end beach. 

This beach walk will take up most of 
the afternoon. At night there is usually a 
movie show, or assembly, and at nine 
o'clock the new boys are tired and ready 
for bed. 

Another article could be written on 
pranks played on the new boys, but these 
don't take place the first day. New boys 
can expect, after a few days, to be sent 
for a pail of steam, or the key to the 
sunshine box, or a cows false tooth, or 
any number of things including a hundred 
yards of shore line. 

It takes only a few days for the new 
boys to become fast friends with one an- 
other, and with the older boys in school. 
Time passes quickly, and they will be 
ready to greet the incoming new boys 
when "the day the new boys come" once 
more arrives. 

Bruce A. Graham 



community. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Che Jllumni Association of Che farm and Crades School 



John Patterson '43 Vice-President 
W. Medford, Mass. 



Alton B. Butler, '26, President 

Newton, Mass. 
Donald S.MacPherson '17, Treasurer 

WoUaston, Mass. 

The Alumni Meeting 

The annual meeting of the Alumni 
Association was held at a Boston restaur- 
ant on Wednesday, May 13. The Field 
Day, one of the big events held by the 
Association, was the main subject, and 
the Committee was given much construc- 
tive help by the members which will aid 
in planning for this day which will be held 
on June 13. 

This season of the year is filled with 
importvint activities for the School Band, 
and the director, Major Frank L. Warren, 
was called upon to tell of the band's recent 
participation in several concerts andschool 
music festivals. All were glad to hear of 
the fine record made by the 1953 Band. 

Other speakers helped make the 
evening pleasant. It was informally noted 
that the turnout of our younger members 
at Association afifairs could be increased. 
If you are a member of the past two or 
three classes please be sure that you are 
most welcome to join in all Alumni events. 
Come to all our events and bring a class- 
mate! 1 r>- ij 

Notice of the coming Annual Field 
Day will be mailed to all members soon. 
Please be sure to return the attendance 
card and thus help your secretary. 

Lawrence J. MacManus writes from 
the Samson Air Force Base, at Geneva, 
New York. He has been in the air force 
since March 17 and has high hopes of 
studying to be an aerial photographer and 
aerial radio operator. He writes rather 
humorously of many of his experiences. 
We expect that shortly he will have a 
different service address and will print it 
on this page at that time. 



William C. Burns. '37, Secretarj 

No. Wiiralngton, Mass. 
Q, George Larsson, "17, Historiao 
Hyde Park. Mass. 



A rather interesting note appeared in 
the local press recently relative to Corn- 
elius Conway Felton, Headmaster of our 
School in 1839. A historical sign which 
pointed out the birthplace of Mr. Felton 
in West Newbury disappeared more than 
20 years ago and on April 22 of this year 
it mysteriously reappeared. Our graduates 
who live in that area might like to look 
up this sign. 

Mr. Felton was president of Harvard 
College from 1860 to 1862. He received 
his early education in a one room school- 
house. He achieved international fame 
and distinction during his later years as a 
foremost authority on classical Greek 
grammar, and that country's art and 
literature. 

John R. Mason, '51, writes from 
Cannes, France and tells of a rather rough 
passage from Algeria to France when 15 
days were spent at sea. He has been in 
many major European ports during his 
Navy tenure and has a fine collection of 
photos and curios which he has gathered. 
His address is: John Mason QMSN, USS 
Cascade AD16, care of Fleet P. O., New 
York, N. Y. 

Thomas C. Kenvin, '38, visited our 
band as the boys took part in a school 
music festival in Maiden. He will be re- 
membered as a star drum major, here, in 
high school and then with a top-notch 
army band with which he saw service 
during World War II in this country, in 
the far East, and in Australia. He has re- 
cently been an agricultural school teacher, 
but is not engaged in this work at present. 
He now makes his home in Swampscott. 




Vol.57 No.JLPrinted at The Farm and Trades School, Boston, Mass. June, 1953 

Entered November 3, 1903 at Boston, Mass., as Second Class matter, under Act of Congress, of July 6, lJ-74 



The Music Festivals 

A common question at this time of 
year askei by all graduates is "How were 
the music festivals? What did the Band 
do?" The band attended three festivals, 
and in brief summary, here is an account 
of the happenings. 

The first festival we attended was at 
Maiden, when schools from northeastern 
Massachusetts gathered for a gala musical 
event. Unfortunately, weather interfered 
with all outdoor parts of the festival, and 
they were cancelled. Our boys played in 
an auditorium in Maiden High School 
and the judge's report was very favorable, 
one of his comments being "An amaz- 
ingly fine band." 

One week later we participated in the 
southeastern Massachusetts school music 
festival, held on May 9. Fine weather 
made the day a complete success. In the 
morning our boys played in the Norwood 
Theatre, and it seemed to those in the 
audience who heard the band previously, 
that it was here that our group did its best 
work. Again the judge for this event 
gave our boys a most commendable report, 
adding praise to our conductor's efforts in 
good fundamental instrumental music 
teaching. 

At this festival, in the afternoon, there 
was a parade through the principal streets 
of the city. For the first time in the long 
history of the festivals our boys were 



chosen to lead the parade, and they did 
tliemselves proud. At the Norwood 
athletic field a concert was given by the 
bands en masse, and several marches 
were played, all to the great satisfaction 
of hundreds who had gathered to hear 
the concert. 

On May 23 our Band went to Storrs, 
Conn,, the campus town of the University 
of Connecticut, to take part in the New 
England School Music Festival. Here 
outstanding groups from New England 
schools were on hand in a day-long 
schedule of audition and marching dem- 
onstrations. Our boys this time played 
before a committee of three judges, each 
one distinguished in the field of school 
music. The report from each judge was 
indeed favorable to our boys, the chair- 
man of the group adding the note that 
our performance was even an improvement 
over last year. In the afternoon we entered 
the drilling and marching exhibition and 
our band stepped off in fine shape, doing 
a precision drill with scarcely a discernible 
error on anyone's part. The judges in 
this event concurred in the evaluation of 
our efforts in grading the band as Division 
I, comparable to a mark of 95-100 on a 
basis of 100. 

The overall grade for concert per- 
formance by all the judges at all of the 
festivals was a Division II rating, equal to 
a mark of from 90-95, on a basis of 100. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



The boys certainly did a fine job, and all 
of us are proud of the result achieved by 
Major Warren, the director, and each 
member of the Band. 

The purpose of the festivals, of course, 
is to continually raise the standards of 
school music, and the judges critically 
note all factors in the results achieved by 
each participating group. The judges all 
agreed that we would do well to add to 
our instrumentation, suggesting more clar- 
inets, an oboe, bassoon, and flute. We 
shall certainly aim towards the goal of 
more perfect instrumentation. 

Up in the Air 
Man's first ascent by balloon was made 
in 1783 by two Frenchmen. Pilatre de 
Rozier and the Marquis d'Orlandes. From 
that time on, until the age of the airplane, 
many ascents were made, and all of them 
were very thrilling. Sadly enough, in 
making some, lives were lost. In this 
country Francois Blanchard made the first 
ascent, in New York City, in 1896. We 
have come a long way from these balloon 
ascensions to jet propelled aircraft. Who 
can tell what will come next? 

Howard E. Murphy 11 

Basketball 

I like basketball very much, and now 
that we have an outdoor court it is a sport 
we play the year around. Last winter I 
played on the Sears league and had a lot 
of fun playing with boys my own size, and 
some who were bigger than me. I hope 
next winter I can be on the winning team. 
We haven't had any games this summer 
yet on our outdoor court, but the boys 
have been practicing shooting. Right now 
almost everyone wants to play baseball, 
or Softball, and already we have had 
many good games in these sports. 

Daniel W. Dockham 



Paint Shop Work 

I have been working in the paintshop 
for quite a while now, and I like the work 
very much. I never did much in this line 
before, and already I know I have learned 
a great deal. In fact, I have helped to 
paint two apartments, and several dormi- 
tory rooms. Every so often I help on the 
boat, which I like to do. Also, I have 
learned to set glass and to make minor 
repairs which are expected of a painter. 

Norman W. Sellevaag 

Movies 

We all look forward to the movies 
every Saturday night. The show starts at 
seven-thirty and lasts about two hours. 
Usually the first picture is a short one 
with an orchestra, or perhaps a cartoon. 
The main picture always has good actors 
and a good story. We have had sports, 
comedy, westerns and war films this 
year so far and enjoyed them all. 

Our last movie was "Jim Thorpe All- 
American." 

David W. Howard 

Making a Maze 

One of my friends has a game named 
"Tilt" which he and I like to play very 
much. The object of the game is to 
control a steel ball and make it follow a 
confusing system of networks and paths 
until the goal is reached. After awhile 
we got tired of the board we were using 
and we decided to make a new one, using 
our own original design, which was quite 
different from the original one. 

We went to the sloyd room and asked 
Mr. Kihlstrom about it. He suggested 
using beaver board, and gave us the ma- 
terials we needed. First the board was 
sawed to the correct size, and then several 
small strips were cut for the bunkers and 
sides. The path the ball was to follow was 
was sketched, figured, and drawn on the 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



board, and then we drilled holes for pit- 
falls along this path. The sides were glued 
on, and the bunkers glued about the drilled 
holes. After much patient work our new 
board was made. 

Now the game is like a new one, and 
later on we are going to design and build 
more original maze boards. 

Arnold M. Sutterlin 

Taking Pictures 
Yesterday I went to the barn with a 
friend to get some pictures. We took 
some of the barns and then tried to coax 
a steer to pose for us. He kept doing 
everything he could to prevent us from 
getting the picture, so we gave up and 
went to the poultry house. Here we got 
a real good picture of the hens, who were 
not as stubborn as the steer. We got some 
good pictures for our albums. 

Alexander D. Marinakis 

Memorial Sunday Service 

The annual Memorial Sunday services 
were held at our little cemetery at the 
south end of the Island on May 24. The 
exercises were simple and sacred, most 
fitting for the occasion. The weather was 
ideal, and the service held in the beauti- 
ful outdoor setting was most impressive. 

William Sonier, president of the 
graduating class, was in charge and 
announced the program. The meaning 
of this Memorial service, from its origin 
after the Civil War up to the present, was 
related by Mr. Meacham. Sometimes the 
true significance of the day becomes 
obscured, especially among younger 
people, or is not known, and it is well 
that the special import of this religous 
service is known. 

Music for the service was furnished 
by a brass quintet, and the boys played 
the accompaniments for the singing, as well 
as special numbers. The quintet played 



excellently, and added much to the 
observance. 

Beautiful bouquets of flowers were 
prepared earlier in the morning, and 
these, with American flags, were used for 
the decoration of each grave. 

The program was as follows: 

PROGRAM 
Hymn — America 

School 

Invocation 

Mr. Bartram 

Poem— In Flanders Fields 

Bruce A. Graham 
Pledge of Allegiance 
William F. Sonier, Frederick E. Harding 

Reading — The Meaning of Memorial Day 
Teyet Ramar II 

Hymn— America the Beautiful 
School 

Poem — I Have a Rendezvous with Death 
Edward J. Darr 

Hymn — God of Our Fathers 
School 



Remarks 



Mr. Meacham 



Rolling of Drums 

David W. Howard 



Taps 



Teyet Ramar II 

Loren E. Cain 

Donald E. Richardson 



History of the Graves 

William F. Sonier 

Hymn — Nearer My God to Thee 
School 



Benediction 



Mr. Bartram 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Cbompson's island Beacon 

Published Monthly by 

THE FARM AND TRADES SCHOOL 

Thompson's Island, Boston Harbor 

A PRIVATE SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF EXCELLENT 

CHARACTER SUPPORTED BY ENDOWMENTS. 

TUITION FEES AND SUBSCRIPTIONS. 



Vol. 57 No. 3 



June 1953 



Subscription Price 



One Dollar Per Year 



BOARD OF TRUS TEES 

Calvin Page Bartlett, President 

James H. Lowell, Vice-President 

Alfred C. Malm. Treasurer 

Merton P. Ellis, Secretary 

Howland S. Warren, Assistant Secretary 

Term Expires 1954 
George P. Denny, M. D. 
Ralph B. Williams 

Thomas Temple Pond 
Mason Sears 

Joseph L. Pendergast 
Lawrence Terry 
John Q. Adams 

Terra Expires 1955 
Gorham Brooks 
Charles E. Mason 

Donald S. MacPherson 
Philip H. Theopold 

Augustus P. Loring, III 
Robert H. Gardiner 
A. Conrad Ericsson 

Term Expires 1956 
Leverett Saltonstall 
Moses Williams 

William M. Meachem 
George S. Mumford, Jr. 
Frederic Winthrop 
John Lowell 

Edward V. Osberg 

Advisory Committee 
N. Penrose Hallowell 
Edwin H. Place, M. D. 

The greatest need of the world to-day 
is the rebuilding of the Christian spirit of 
service, the basic development plan at our 
home school. Why not help a fine, worthy 
boy achieve his goal by making a financial 
contribution to America's best investment? 



Our band is making six public ap- 
pearances and giving shorter concerts at 
the School during this early summer 
period and we are reminded of the great 
values in this part of the training and 
experience of our boys. To the casual 
observer it might appear to be simply a 
matter of a boy picking up a horn and 
tooting for the want of something more 
interesting to do. 

America's first boys' band was organ- 
ized here at our school in 1857 and in 
another four years we will be celebrating 
100 years of continuous Band activity. 
At that time we should remind the Nation 
that our tiny community in historic Boston 
Harbor quietly pioneered this important 
activity which has now developed into 
recognition throughout the Conntry. 

We are often asked where we get all 
of our boy musicians. People cannot 
understand how such superb bands can be 
developed here year after year, winning 
first prizes, 99% ratings, and in compe- 
tition with large city high school bands so 
often come out in top place and they hear 
about our graduates who have become 
Band Leaders, Boston Symphony mem- 
bers, almost a score of bands where our 
graduates predominate and many indi- 
viduals who achieve success and fame in 
the field of music, and our friends say, 
"How do you do it?" 

Space does not permit detailed ex- 
planations of all the factors. It is not that 
simple. In the first place, we definitely 
do not seek nor select boys for admission 
to the School with any regard to their 
musical abilities. Almost never does a boy 
entering the School have previous musical 
experience or training. Practically every 
normal boy (and girl) has the basic latent 
talents which can be developed and almost 
every boy at our school elects to learn to 
play one or more musical instruments and 
learns to read music. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



To be a member of the Band a boy 
must have the initiative to select an instru- 
ment and start toward the goal which he 
determines to reach. He must have the 
"drive" which constantly spurs him on to 
achieve his ambition by dint of daily 
practice and study. He must have the 
courage to devote time which might other- 
wise be used to fly model airplanes, pitch 
horse shoes, go fishing or watch television, 
and so organize his time that he can do 
those things also in his spare time. He 
must develop the power of concentration. 
He must have the strength of character to 
not be diverted by wasted time efforts of 
little consequence. A boy must be responsi- 
ble for his own success and he must learn 
to work with others in the team, his Band. 
His success in the band depends upon his 
diligence in these qualities and, of course, 
he must be friendly to his associates, courte- 
ous to his leaders, punctual to his practice 
periods, particular in his appearance, and 
precise in every note coming forth from 
his musical instrument. There are in fact 
few, if any ideal qualities of basic success 
in life not found in the development of a 
boy band member, especially as conducted 
here where excellence in results is the 
pride and satisfaction of every boy. 

Other important factors include equip- 
m e n t , planning, tradition, financing, 
support and encouragement of friends, 
and, of course, the leadership and di- 
rection of such a combination as we have 
in Boston's Dean of Band Masters, Major 
Frank L. Warren, thirty years our Band 
Director, and his capable assistant, who 
can play every instrument and composes 
some of the numbers, Mr. Clifton E. Albee, 
in his twenty-seventh year here. 

Topics in Brief 

The boys in Dormitory C are very 
happy with their new television set, the 



purchase of which was made possible by 
the boys' parents, with the cooperation of 
our supervisor, Mr. Thomas. The new 
television sets are a great improvement 
over models only a year or two old, and 
the sound and picture of this new set is 
remarkably fine. 

The recreation of the boys has been 
centered pretty much on softball and 
baseball during the month. Shuffleboard 
and tennis have their devotees also, and, 
of course, there are many who like nothing 
better than fishing from our wharf. After 
experiencing a winter and spring, when 
outdoor sports were almost negligible, the 
many summertime activities are even more 
desirable and pleasant. 

Due to adverse weather, the parade 
and other outdoor events at the North- 
eastern Massachusetts school music festival 
on May 2 were cancelled. This left our 
Band with nothing scheduled for the 
afternoon and with the fine cooperation 
of Clyde W. Albee, '33, of the Boston 
Museum of Science stafT, a trip to Science 
Park was immediately arranged. The 
staff at Science Park was particularly kind 
in making this visit worth while in every 
respect and our boys enjoyed the many 
wonderful and thrilling exhibits, and 
special science shows. Boston and New 
England may well be proud of their new 
Museum of Science. 

A sport quiz of a different type was 
given by Division B of the eighth grade 
on May 4. A panel of instructors was 
chosen which competed with a panel of 
the boys, as the members of the class 
pantomined the action in a great number 
of sports and athletic events. The final 
tally showed the instructors the winners 
but by a very close margin. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Through the courtesy of Col. Nelse 
M. Duncan of the Sunset Club of Boston, 
which is sponsored by the Volunteers of 
America, our Band took part in the 
Annual Day of Remembrance of the Club 
at the Hotel Bradford on Sunday, May 
10. The boys played several compositions 
and received high praise. Speaker of the 
eveningwastheHon.SumnerG. Whittier, 
Lieut. Governor of the Commonwealth, 
who delivered a stirring and inspired 
address. 

The Quincy Patriot Ledger, in its e- 
dition of May 5, carried a fine article 
about our school, illustrated with three 
fine pictures. We are grateful indeed for 
the publication of this account, which is 
extremely well written by Richard T. 
LeBrecque. The publisher. G, Prescott 
Low, kindly loaned us the stereotyped 
plate of the editorial page upon which this 
article appeared, and we have reprinted 
2100 copies in our school printing office 
for distribution to our friends. 

We enjoyed a fine entertainment 
given by the seventh graders on May 11. 
The program was made up of three one 
act plays, which the boys performed most 
creditably. The stage settings were es- 
pecially fine. All of the boys in the class 
took part. 

A Fire 
One of the exciting events which we 
will not forget soon was that of a fire in 
the harbor. One weekday, while we 
were at dinner, one of the boys saw a 
large barge afire near our north end. We 
went to watch and soon saw two coast 
guard boats racing to the scene, to give 
assistance to the tug which was towing the 
burning barge. In a few minutes a police 
boat and fire boat were at the scene. The 
fire boat soon had the fire under control. 



and it looked as though all the hoses were 
in use. After awhile the fire died down 
and the barge was towed to Spectacle 
Island where the fire was put out com- 
pletely. We learned later that the barge 
was so thoroughly burned that it was taken 
to sea and sunk. 

Teyet Ramar II 

Our Assembly Program 

I think the assembly program our 
class had was about the best ever. We 
were all in costume as the wives of cabinet 
members. As we were introduced we 
told of all the things our "husbands" did 
and the audience, as well as we, learned 
much about the leaders of our government. 
Every member of the class had a part in 
the program and our teacher, MissBaird, 
worked very hard in preparing costumes 
and making the stage setting for us. After- 
wards she took pictures of us in costume. 

Ronald G. Hermann 

Spring 

Winter has gone and we are enjoying 
the beautiful days ofthe spring season. No 
matter in what direction one looks he can 
see the wonderful rich green of the lawns 
and trees. The sky is clear and blue and 
the buildings at Squantum Naval Base 
stand out clearly. To the west, the skyline 
of Boston, with the many tall buildings is 
an inspiring sight. The many garden beds 
have tulips of many hues in full bloom, 
and the lilac bushes add much to the spring 
season. No matter where one looks, he 
can be sure of seeing Mother Nature at 
her best. There is no place as beautiful 
as Thompson's Island in the springtime. 

Stanton H. Pearson 

Looking Ahead 

Soon Alumni Day will be with us, 
and this is a big day for the Alumni, as 
well as for the boys in school. Tables, 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



chairs and benches, and the public address 
system, are set up on the lawn. The 
alumni first assemble here and are greeted 
by Mr. Meacham. Then the schedule of 
events for the day begins. This includes 
ball games, picnic races and lunch served 
out-of-doors. The boys at the school take 
part in all the events and enjoy the day. 
All of the graduates take time to roam 
about the grounds and think about the 
years they spent at the school. It is a 
happy day. 

Edward J. Darr 

Additional Alumni Notes 
William G. Beadle, '12, has long 
been much interested in our band. This 
year, just before the concert at Faneuil 
Hall, he made a gift to the Band of 
selected reeds for the clarinet players. He 
has been employed by the Cundy-Bettoney 
instrument manufacturing company for 
many years. His home address is 219 
Grove Street. Randolph, Mass. 

Daniel E. Smith, '20, has made a 
fine start in the woodworking business, he 
having opened his own shop a year ago. 
He has spent many years in this business 
and we know that further success will 
meet his every effort. He lives in 
Arlington, at 11 Park Street. 

Rev. Clifford H. Taylor, '15, 
recently had the opportunity to do a 
service for Mark C. Baird, our head farm 
instructor. Mr. and Mrs. Baird were 
touring in Maine and sought road di- 
rections. Talking with a resident of 
Corinth, Maine, they not only secured 
the information they desired, but also 
learned that their informant was an F. T. 
S. graduate, now doing a fine work as 
pastor of a church in East Corinth, Maine. 
A pleasant conversation resulted, and new 
friendships formed. 



Honor Roll — Spring Term 

The highest academic avcrafies in each clasi tfroup 
Junior Class 

Frederick E. Harding 

Sophomore Class 

Robert A. Kidder 
Alan C. Waldron 

Freshman Class 
William H. Dillon 
David E. LeVeille 

Eighth Grade Division A 

Albert K. Ellis 
Harold L. Spurling 

Eighth Grade Division B 

William F. James 
Thomas Angelos 

Seventh Grade 

Arnold M. Sutterlin 
Alexander D. Marinakis 

Best Citizenship 

"A" Rank general conduct and effort 
in each class ^roup 

Sophomore Class 

Roberto. Cain 
Samuel M. Griswold 

Ralph F. Hopkins 

Donald E. Richardson 

William F. Sonier 

Alan C. Waldron 

Freshman Class 

Edward A. Atton 
Walter R. Hermann 
David E. LeVeille 

Eighth Grade Division A 

Loren E. Cain 

Albert K. Ellis 

John E. Lennon 

Howard E. Murphy, II 

Carleton G. Skinner 

Eighth Grade Division B 

Ralph Schofield 

Seventh Grade 

Alexander D. Marinakis 
Arnold M. Sutterlin 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Cbe JRlumni }!$$ociatiott of Che farm and trades School 



Alton B. Butler, '26, President John Patterson '43 Vice-President 

Newton, Mass. W- Medford, Mass. 

Donald S. MacPherson '17, Treasurer 
Wollaston, Mass. 



William C. Burns. '37, Secretarj 
No. Wilmington, Mass. 
G. George Larsson, '17, Historian 
Hyde Park. Mass. 



George H. Bruce, '45, has written 
recently, telling us of his interesting work 
in the Intelligence Branch of the armed 
forces. His address is now Pfc George H. 
Bruce, RA21631670, Cas. Det. 8617 AAU., 
Arlington Hall Station, Arlington 12, Va. 
We are sure that he would enjoy corres- 
ponding with his many FTS friends. 

IVERS R. Allen, '16, writes that he 
will be at 728 Union Avenue, Lakeport, 
New Hampshire, until Labor Day. We 
strive to keep our alumni address list cor- 
rect, and thank him for his note. All alumni 
are urged to notify us of address changes. 
for it is important, and is a big help to 
your secretary. 

Walter Ostrander, '50, was a 
recent visitor. Early in June he expects 
to leave for duty in Europe. A member 
of the armed forces, he has recently grad- 
uated from a special service school where 
he trained as a communications receiver 
repairman. We will publish his new ser- 
vice address as soon as it is made available 
to us. 

Kenneth W. Clayton, '52, is at- 
tending Brainlree high school, and at a 
recent music festival held in Norwood, he 
visited with our band. He plays cornet 
in the Braintree band, enjoys his school 
life, and is doing well in his various school 
activities. His address is 1237 Washington 
Street, South Braintree, Mass. 

James L. Angelos, '49, is employed 
as a salesman in the upholstery de- 
partment of the Jordan Marsh store in 
Boston. He has served with the U. S. 
Army as a bandsman. He has continued 



to keep up his interest in the Order of the 
DeMolay. and is at present Master of his 
Lodge. He lives at 35 Logan Way, South 
Boston, Mass. 

Ramsey C. Allen, '30, has recently 
opened a downtown showroon and is 
very busy in the marine trade. Interest 
in amateur boating of all kinds is in- 
creasing and he is prepared to demonstrate 
all of the popular boat models and 
accessories. He is always happy and 
pleased to meet former F. T. S. friends. 
His new store is conveniently located on 
Federal Street in Boston. 

Congratulations are in order to Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward Capaul, who have only 
recently completed a honeymoon trip. 
The couple was at the Faneuil Hali 
concert, and it was a pleasure indeed to 
welcome Mrs. Capaul into the great 
family of F. T. S. alumni folk. Mr. 
Capaul has for many years operated the 
Swiss Family Laundry, in Roxbury. He 
is in frequent attendance at all Alumni 
gatherings. The address of the Capauls 
is 3 Glenwood Terrace, Roxbury, Mass. 
He graduated with the class of 1905. 

John P. Richardson, '52, is com- 
pleting the junior year at Hingham high 
school. He visited us recently and spoke 
of his many school activities. He is 
particularly active in dramatics. He lives 
at 13 Hersey Street, Hingham. 

The annual Field Day will be held on 
Saturday, June 13. The boat will leave 
the Public Landing at 10:45. Members 
of the Association, with their guests, are 
invited. Send reservation promptly to 
your secretary. 




Vo\.57No.3 Printed at The Farm and Trades School, Boston, Mass. July, 1953 

Entered November 3, 1903 at Boston, Mass., as Second Class matter, under Act of Congress, of July 6, If- 74 



Graduation 

Graduation exercises for the Class of 
1953 were held Thursday, June 4. Almost 
at the last moment rain threatened to mar 
the observance, if held outdoors, and it 
was decided to hold the ceremonies in 
Bowditch House. Thirteen boys were 
graduated. 

The class had the privilege and good 
fortune to be addressed by the Honorable 
John V. Spalding, Justice of the Supreme 
Judicial Court of the Commonwealth. 
Justice Spalding had a practical, clear-cut 
message for the class and every point in 
his address could well be given immediate 
application. He urged the young gradu- 
ates to build on the solid foundation they 
have developed here, and to remember 
that "Every day is a miracle." As to 
the disheartening situation of present-day 
world and national conditions he cited 
numerous instances in the history of our 
nation when itseemed that insurmountable 
difficulties were bound to defeat us. He 
stressed the fact that there are bound to 
be disappointments and hard times, yet 
we must always face the future with a 
wholesome type of courage and refuse to 
adopt a cynical attitude. We are indebted 
greatly to Justice Spalding for coming to 
us with a timely and valuable message. 
Justice Spalding was introduced by the 
President of the Board of Trustees of the 
School, Calvin Page Bartlett. 



The Rev. Morris A. Inch, a friend of 
long standing, gave the Invocation. Mr. 
Inch has a personal interest in our boys 
and not many years ago was our minister 
for a period of two years. On the Sunday 
preceding graduation day he conducted 
the Baccalaureate service for the class at 
the South Baptist Church, of which church 
he is pastor. 

The address of the valedictorian, 
Robert A. Kidder, was very good. One 
other class member had a speaking part 
in the exercises, the Salutatorian, Alan C. 
Waldron, who welcomed the more than 
two hundred parents and friends of the 
boys. The band played several selections 
under the baton of our bandmaster, Frank 
L. Warren, among them being a trumpet 
solo played by Donald E. Richardson. 
David W. Howard of the Class of 1954 
was marshall for the graduates. 

Headmaster William M. Meacham 
presented diplomas to the thirteen gradu- 
ates. As each received the coveted honor 
he was warmly applauded. Each of the 
young graduates through the years has 
earned the admiration and friendship of 
not only us at the School, but also of a 
large number of others, including many 
of the parents and friends of our student 
body members, who were delighted to be 
present as this significant goal in the edu- 
cational career of each young graduate 
was reached. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Many prizes and awards were made. 
Mr. Meacham presented sloyd diplomas 
to three, and a junior year certificate to 
one post graduate. 

The greatest individual honor to be 
bestowed annually is the P'rancis Shaw 
Scholarship Award, which was received 
this year by William F. Sonier. 

Mr. Meacham also presented many 
other awards and prizes. The Charles 
Hayden Scholarship Certificates were 
awarded and certificates for Band pro- 
ficiency given. Other prize awards made 
included the Shaw Conduct Prizes, and 
the Sears basketball awards. The names 
of the prize winners will be found on an- 
other page in this issue. 

After the exercises the members of the 
class received congratulations and then 
farewells were in order. The graduates 
left on the PILGRIM, taking with them the 
best wishes of a host of friends. Although 
they will experience other graduations 
from advanced schools, we feel sure that 
the ceremonies here will remain firmly in 
memory as f/j^ graduation. We are indeed 
very proud of our thirteen new alumni. 

The program, and names of those re- 
ceiving diplomas, follows: 

PROGRAM 

Class Processional— Youth Victorious 
David W. Howard, '54, Marshall 

Invocation 

The Reverend Morris A. Inch 
Pastor, South Baptist Church 

Overture — Day of Youth 

Salutatory 

Alan C. Waldron 

Trumpet Solo — Trumpeter's Lullaby 
Donald E. Richardson 

Valedictory 



Robert A. Kidder 



Introduction of Speaker 

President Calvin Page Bartlett 

Address 

The Honorable John V. Spalding 
Justice, Supreme Judicial Court, 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Presentation of Diplomas and Prizes 
Headmaster William M. Meacham 

Finale — Salutation March 

DIPLOMAS AWARDED 

GRADUATION 
Robert Otis Cain 

Edward James Darr 

Donald Robert Dockham 
Bruce Alexander Graham 
Samuel Morse Griswold 
Wayne William Henry 
Ralph Frederick Hopkins 
Robert Arthur Kidder 
David Alan Pulsifer 
Teyet Ramar II 

Donald Earle Richardson 
William Francis Sonier 
Alan Coates Waldron 

SLOYD 

Donald Robert Dockham 
David Edmond LeVeille 

Donald Earle Richardson 

JUNIOR YEAR CERTIFICATE 
Frederick Edward Harding 

Class Officers 
William F. Sonier, President 
Donald E. Richardson, Vice President 
Wayne W. Henry, Secretary 
Class Motto 
"Strive and Succeed" 



THOMPSONS ISLAND BEACON 



Basketball Awards 
Alihough a comparatively new game, 
basket ball has reached tremendous world- 
wide popularity, and here at F. T. S. the 
game is played almost the year 'round, 
although, of course, it is during the winter 
months that the most intensive play is 
reached. Athletic certificates and insignia 
are awarded to those excelling in the 
game, and this year the presentation of 
these prizes was made on Graduation Day. 
Fifteen bovs were included on the list who 
won basketball awards. They were: 

Varsity Awards 

Bruce A. Graham, Captain 

Edward J. Darr 

David E. Leveille 

Norman W. Sellevaag 

William H. Dillon 

Robert Fabello 

Intramural Awards 

Ralph F. Hopkins 
David W. Howard 
S. Newcomb Graham 
John E. Lenrion 
Robert W. Wright 
Kenneth C. Alexander 

Foul Shooting Awards 

Norman W. Sellevaag (Senior) 

Carroll E. Young (Junior) 

Frederick L. Krueger (Cubs) 

Activities on Graduation Day 

Every school, I imagine, has gradu- 
ation, but nowhere is there the kind of 
activity we have here. To begin, just to 
be sure that everyone is wide awake so as 
to enjoy the dciy in full, the graduating 
class band serenades everyone atS:30 A.M. 
Seldom is the graduation morning band 
noted for sweetness, but the racket it pro- 
duces makes further sleep impossible. 
When this reveille is finished the boys put 
away their instruments, and in late years 
have been invited to a special breakfast, 



this year graciously provided for by Mr. 
and Mrs. Steinhoff. It was surely a real 
sumptious breakfast. 

Well, anyway, it isn't all fun and 
pleasure. There's work to be done! During 
the morning we "setup" for the exercises. 
The chapel settees and lawn benches are 
brought to the bandstand on the front 
lawn. The platform is arranged, and this 
takes care, because one mistake might be 
very embarrassing later. After dinner the 
dining room chairs are also taken to the 
lawn, so we have seats for several hundred 
people. 

Meanwhile, as we have time, those 
having parts get in last minute rehearsals. 
This year we had even less time for this 
because the weather was fickle and at noon 
everything was moved inside. Graduation 
was held in Bowditch House. 

The guests arrived shortly after one- 
thirty, and at two-thirty we began the cer- 
emonies. The Band played the process- 
ional and the class marched solemnly to 
the stage. The great moment had arrived. 

The formal exercises did not take 
very long. Afterwards the class had a 
busy time checking on suitcases, chests, 
packages and other things they took with 
them. The boat boys were dressed in their 
whites and saw that the class had a happy 
landing at City Point. 

Still the activity is not yet over. Al- 
though the graduates have left there is a 
job to do at the School. The settees, 
chairs and many other things used for the 
exercises must be returned to their accus- 
tomed places. Finally graduation day 
draws to a close. The weather is usually 
warm and the final event is fun — a swim. 

Alan C. Waldron 

"Reputation is what men and women 
think of us; character is what God and 
the angels know of us." 

Thomas Paine 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Chompson's Island Beacon 

Published Monthly bv 

THE FARM AND TRADES SCHOOL 

Thompson's Island, Boston Harbor 

A PRIVATE SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF EXCELLENT 

CHARACTER SUPPORTED BY ENDOWMENTS. 

TUITION FEES AND SUBSCRIPTIONS 



Vol.57 No. 4 July 1953 



Subscription Price 



One Dollar Per Yeai 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Calvin Page Bartlett, President 

James H. Lowell, Vice-President 

Alfred C. Malm, Treasurer 

Merton P. Ellis, Secretary 

Howland S. Warren, Assistant Secretary 

Term Expire! 1954 
George P. Denny, M. D. 
Ralph B. Williams 

Thomas Temple Pond 
Mason Sears 

Joseph L. Pendergast 
Lawrence Terry 
John Q. Adams 

Term Expires 1955 
Gorham Brooks 
Charles E. Mason 

Donald S. MacPherson 
Philip H. Theopold 

Augustus P. Loring, III 
Robert H. Gardiner 
A. Conrad Ericsson 

Term Expires 1956 

Leverett Saltonstall 
Moses Williams 

William M. Meaoham 
George S. Mumford, Jr. 
Frederic Winthrop 
John Lowell 

Edward V. Osberg 

Advitory Committee 
N. Penrose Hallowell 
Edwin H. Place, M. D. 



The greatest need of the world to-day 
is the rebuilding of the Christian spirit of 
service, the basic development plan at our 
home school. Why not help a fine, worthy 
boy achieve his goal by making a financial 
contribution to America's best investment? 



Dear Sir: 

I finally have time to write to you to 
let you know how I'm doing, and what 
my work is. I hope everything is fine 
with you and the family, and everybody 
else at the school is fine and of the best of 
health. 

I'm now stationed at Webb Air Field 
Base, Big Springs, Texas. The people 
down here are the nicest people you could 
meet anywhere, and most of them are 
Christians. I'm now a member of one of 
the churches in town. For a population 
of 21,000 people they have 42 churches. 
It may sound unbelievable, Mr. Meacham, 
but it is true, and all of them are well 
attended. I'm very grateful I had a chance 
to come to Texas, because it gives me an 
altogether dififerentchange of environment 
from what I've known, and also weather. 
Well, I don't think too highly of the Texas 
weather in this vicinity. When the wind 
begins to blow it picks up all the dirt and 
blows all around. Sometimes it blows so 
hard you can hardly see in front of you. 
Last night we were scheduled to play at a 
baseball game at Big Springs. We arrived 
at the ball park at about seven o'clock. 
Just as I got out of the car a large gust of 
wind hit me in the face, and with dust. 
You know what a thunder storm looks 
like before it hits your vicinity, well we 
had the same type of clouds. The dust 
blew very hard for about an hour, and to 
top it all off it started to down pour, and 
we had a mixture of dust and rain, and 
this is the result. It rained mud, and as 
we were riding back to the base we could 
see the murky water as it splashed against 
the car's window. 

I'm looking forward to seeing every- 
body back at the school again. The school 
will always be my home, because of all the 
wonderful things we had. I wish more 
fellows could have had the opportunities 
I had when I was there. I believe Mr. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Thomas, and all the other instructors who 
said I'd wish I was back. Well, I do wish 
I was back. The reason why I wish I was 
back is because I realize how much the 
people out there had done for me in big 
ways and little, and how much fun we had 
out there, and all the wonderful times we 
all used lo have. The school isn't a school 
to me anymore Mr. Meacham, because 
when I think about the wonderful training 
I was given it is the same training any boy 
of an average family would get. To me 
the school is a home. I sometimes think 
about how I reacted my first year there. 
I sometimes laugh, and at times I blush 
when I think of what I did. Remember 
when I was accepted by the Board of 
Trustees and we got back to school, and I 
came up to your office that afternoon and 
told you I didn't want to be accepted by 
the Board of Trustees. If I could relive 
the past and be back at the school, I'd do 
it. It isn't only the things and the won- 
derful times I had while I was there but it 
was the Island itself, and the farm, par- 
ticularly in the springtime when everything 
is growing and the farm boys, and instruc- 
tors do the spring plowing and planting. 
There are so many things I'll hold dearly 
in my heart and memory. I hope some- 
day to be able to come down and visit 
and spend some pleasant hours down at 
the school. Well, Mr. Meacham, give 
my regards to everybody at the school, 
and I wish there were more people and 
men like you Sir, who realize the needs 
of fellows like me. I'm pretty sure if 
people thought and worked together as 
you and the instructors and the fellows 
have gotten along this would be a better 
world to live in. I feel through knowing 
you, Sir, and being under your guidance 
that it is the people like you who make 
this world a better place to live in. 

Sir, I have my leave starting the 1st 
of June, and I feel and know if nothing 



goes wrong I'll be down for graduation. 
Could you send me a card telling the 
date of graduation? I would appreciate 
it very much. I hope you can read my 
writing, if you can't read it too well be- 
cause of my writing let me know Sir, and 
I'll write plainer and slower. 

I guess this is all for now. I'm ever 
grateful for what you and the others have 
done for me. 

Yours truly, 

William L. Glennon, '52 

P. S. I forgot to tell you I'm doing 
fine in my band work and I hope to make 
corporal or rather Airman 2nd class. 

Topics in Brief 

Graduation exercises for the Class of 
1953 were held on June 4. Because of 
inclement weather the program was held 
in Bowditch House. The boys were ad- 
dressed by the Hon. John V. Spalding, 
Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of 
the Commonwealth. Thirteen received 
graduation diplomas, one a junior year 
certificate, and three boys received sloyd 
diplomas. Four of the class members will 
be with us another year, taking the post- 
graduate course. The other members of 
the class left for their homes after the 
exercises. 

On Sunday May 31 the Rev. Morris A. 
Inch delivered the Baccalaureate address 
to the graduating class at the South Baptist 
Church. Mr. Inch had an inspiring 
message for our group. A brass quartet, 
made up of members of the class, assisted 
the church choir in presenting special 
musical selections. 

The graduating class enjoyed an ex- 
cursion to Canobie Lake, N. H., on June 1, 
through the courtesy and kindness of 
Mrs. Arthur Adams, who for many years 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



has annually provided funds for the class 
outing. Ideal weather, and the beautiful 
setting of the Canobie Lake recreational 
area made the day a memorable one, com- 
pletely enjoyed. 

On graduation eve the members of 
the Class of 1953 were the guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Meacham at Adams House for 
a class supper. The meal was served bufifet 
style on the lawn, and, needless to say, 
the class had a grand time on this, the last 
get-to-gether, before the formal ceremonies 
of the next day. 

We regret to report the passing on 
June 16 of Malcolm H. Holmes, one of 
New England's foremost musicians. Mr. 
Holmes for years was keenly interested 
in our school band, and only last fall was 
host to our group at Harvard for the game 
with Springfield. He both played and 
conducted in our Chapel Hall with the 
Harvard Pierean Sodality Orchestra in 
years past. Wellesley, Radcliffe, the Pops, 
Esplanade, Tanglewood, the Conserva- 
tory and, of course, Harvard, mourn his 
passing. We have all lost a good friend, 
and particularly so. great numbers of young 
people with whom he was associated. 

We have always had many boys in- 
terested in flower gardening and much 
stress is placed upon this activity, which, 
in numerous instances, has led to a most 
worth while life hobby. Each of the boys 
is encouraged to care for his own garden 
plot and expert supervision and instruction 
are given. Prizes are awarded annually 
to those who excel in flo-ver gardening, 
and this sensonal activity is carried on with 
much enthusiasm by a large number of 
our boys. Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby provides 
these cash prizes. 

The sophomore class held its annual 
class night exercises on May 25, at which 



time a rather complete summary of the 
activities of the class members was given. 
A biographical sketch of each of the boys 
was a highlight. The class will, prophecy, 
and naming of class leaders in various 
fields were all interesting as well as hu- 
morous in many instances. William F. 
Sonier was in charge of the program, and 
each member of the class participated. 

This was the final assembly program 
of the school year, as well as the last per- 
formance by the Class of 1953. 

Memorial Day was observed by the 
staging of our annual track meet. The 
boys were grouped according to age and 
athletic ability and competed in the more 
popular field and track events. The track 
meet, a traditional annual event, is one 
of our major spring recreational highlights 
and of course very popular with our boys. 

The holiday was made complete by 
a picnic on the beach in the evening, at 
which time prizes for the winners of the 
day's track events were awarded. 

The freshman class entertained the 
sophomore class at a farewell party on 
the evening of May 29. Our good friend. 
Miss Helen M. Gresty, was with us for the 
occasion and brought with her a group of 
girls from her church groups in Lynn. 
Dancing and informal games were enjoyed 
under Miss Gresty's direction, and every- 
one surely had a most pleasant and happy 
evening. 

Our church services this summer are 
being conducted by Mr. John Beauregard, 
a graduate of Gordon College. He will 
be assisted by two of the boys at each 
service. We are confident that a fine, very 
successful series of religious services will 
result from the excellent leadership of 
Mr. Beauregard and the lively interest of 
the boys. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



A pleasant time was enjoyed here on 
June 20, when Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
were hosts to a group with whom they 
vacation annually at Sandy Island Camp, 
Lake Winnipesaukee, N, H. Highlight 
of the outing was a ball game between the 
visitors jind our boys. It was a pleasure 
to have these visitors with us — they had 
heard repeatedly of Thompson's Island — 
and we were pleased to have them per- 
sonally see our island school and witness 
first-hand our excellent facilities, as well as 
to meet some of our students and staff 
members. 

Occasionally, during the summer 
months, we enjoy a meal served out-of- 
doors. On June 28 a lawn supper was a 
happy event. Perfect weather and a 
perfect menu were the ingredients for this 
pleasant occasion. 

Most of the boys are sporting an 
athletic shirt, white with blue lettering, 
reading "The Farm and Trades School, 
Thompson's Island." These are practical, 
summertime shirts made available to the 
boys by our athletic department. 

Charles Hayden Scholarships 

The noted financier, Charles Hayden, 
had definite thoughts relating to the value 
of the right and proper upbringing of our 
Nation's children. He was firmly con- 
vinced that the future of the entire world 
depended upon the right training of boys 
and young men in education, mental 
recreation, wholesome educational enter- 
tainment, together with co-ordinated 
physical training. He was particularly 
anxious that youngsters be brought up in 
wholesome environments where they 
would be fostered and trained so that their 
characters would be developed to their 
greatest possibilities for ultimate gain to 
mankind the world over. 

To the end that his beliefs could be 



realized, he directed that his personal 
fortune be used for the benefit of youth, 
and that the Charles Hayden Foundation 
be organized to supervise the trust. The 
welfare of young people has been furthered 
considerably by vast sums granted by the 
Foundation to many schools, colleges and 
youth organizations. For several years 
scholarships have been granted to a gr( up 
of our boys. With each scholarship the 
recipient is awarded a certificate from the 
Foundation. Tiie names of those receiving 
the Charles Hayden Scht-larships for this 
year are: 

Robert O. Cain 
Edward J. Darr 

William H. Dillon 

Donald R. Dockham 

Robert Fabello 

Bruce A. Graham 
Samuel M. Griswold 
Frederick E. Harding 

Wayne W. Henry 

Ralph F. Hopkins 

Robert A. Kidder 

David A. Pulsifer 

Teyet Ramar, II 
Donald E. Richardson 

Alan C. Waldron 

Waiting on Table 

All of us take turns waiting on table. 
The waiters report a half hour earlier and 
have an early meal. After they have eaten 
they get on their waiters' uniforms and 
get ready to do their job. When the 
meal starts they help the bus boys bring 
in the hot food. From then on it is up 
to the waiters to see that coffee and tea 
are served the instructors and see that 
extra food is brought as needed. Later 
the serving dishes are taken from the tables 
and the dessert brought in. After the meal 
our work is finished and we are dismissed. 

Robert W. Wright 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Che fliumni Jlssociation of Che farm and Crades School 



Alton B. Butler, '26, President John Patterson '43 Vice-President 

Newton, Mass. W. Medford, Mass. 

Donald S. MacPherson '17, Treasurer 
Wollaston, Mass. 



William C. Burns. '37, Secretary 
No. Wilmington, Mass. 
G. George Larsson, '17, Historian 
Hyde Park, Mass. 



The Annual Field Day 

The annual field day of the Alumni 
Association was held at the School on 
Saturday, June 13. Approximately 150 
graduates and guests attended, they arriv- 
ing at the School by chartered boat at 
ten o'clock. Alton B. Butler, '26, Asso- 
ciation president, was host to the group 
and acted as master of ceremonies, ably 
assisted by the treasurer of theAssociation, 
Donald S. MacPherson, '17. Both saw 
to it that the day's program got off to a 
good start. 

The group assembled on the north 
lawn and was greeted by Headmaster 
William M. Meacham, who expressed 
his gratification at seeing so many present. 
Plans for the day were then announced 
by President Butler and the informal 
meeting terminated. 

Our Secretary, William C. Burns, '37, 
was busy throughout the day, and his help 
was very much appreciated by those in 
charge. It was a big job to circulate news 
of the event to our entire membership 
and to prepare identification badges for 
those in attendance, as well as to accom- 
plish much necessary Association business 
on this annual field day. 

The big event to the younger men 
was no doubt the baseball game. A picked 
alumni team played the School nine. For 
a few innings it was a close contest, but as 
the saying goes, "Youth Conquers," and 
the graduates began to show the effects of 
lack of practice, among other things. The 
less said about the final score the better 
perhaps, but if fun and recreation were 
the purpose of the game it may be safely 
said that both teams won. The spectators 
certainly had a good time too. 



The graduates like nothing better than 
to roam about the campus, visiting places 
which arouse nostalgic memories of happy 
boyhood days. On this day some brought 
guests and it was a delight and pleasure to 
escort these guests about the school 
grounds. Many a quiet moment, too, was 
spent in Chapel Hall, where significant 
reminiscences of innumerable schoolday 
happy events came to mind. 

A buffet lunch was served at mid-day, 
with Mr. and Mrs. Meacham acting as 
hosts, assisted by several members of the 
school staff. The meal featured F. T. S. 
baked beans, "best in the world." Golden 
Guernsey milk, direct from our dairy was 
a decided treat. The menu was prepared 
with much thoughtfulness for this outing, 
and the Association is very appreciative 
for this tasty lunch, for it did involve con- 
siderable planning and work. 

The afternoon was given over to all 
kinds of sports. The final two hours were 
devoted to a program of races, stunts and 
games in which the undergraduates took 
part, as well as a number of youngsters 
here for the outing. All of the favorite 
picnic games were enjoyed, and prizes of 
one kind or another were won by every 
participant. Some entertained, utilizing 
our public address system. But it was 
mainly the sack race, the crab race, the 
chariot race and numerous other picnic 
standbys which entertained both those 
taking part, and the grownups looking on. 

All too soon, it seemed, the time came 
for departure and at half past four the first 
trip was made to City Point. Soon after, 
the rest of the guests took their leave. The 
sentiment of all was that it was a very 
successful and happy field day and reunion. 




Vol 57 No.7^ Printed at The Farm and Trades School, Boston, Mass. August, 1953 

Entered November 3, 1903 at Boston, Mass., as Second Class matter, under Act of Congress, of July 6, 1S74 



A Trip to Fenway Park 

On July 28 we were happily surprised 
to hear that twenty-five of us were going 
to the Red Sox-Chicago game on the 
following day. The trip was made possible 
by the efforts of one of the graduates, 
Donald S. MacPherson, '17. We were 
naturally very pleased and could hardly 
wait for the boat trip at 12:45. We went 
to City Point with Mr. MacPherson 
and four friends, each of whom had his 
car. It didn't take long to drive to Fen- 
way Park. Soon we were seated in the 
grandstand on the first base side. We 
had a chance to see some of the batting 
and fielding practice drills. The park was 
in beautiful condition. We liked the big 
crowd and the excitement. 

We were lucky to see a very unusual 
game. The starting pitchers were Pierce 
for Chicago and MacDermottfor Boston. 
Inning after inning, as the game progressed, 
MacDermott set the Chicago batters down 
with only one hit in eight innings. The 
Red Sox meanwhile had scored one run 
and we all had hopes that the team would 
end a losing streak. 

In the ninth inning though the Red 
Sox ran into much hard luck. The White 
Sox began hitting, and the Red Sox 
changed pitchers. The Boston star center 
fielder, Tom Umphlett, attempted to catch 
a drive which Minoso hit. Umphlett 
crashed into the center field bull pen wall 



and was so badly hurt that he was carried 
from the field on a stretcher. It was a 
week before he could play again. The 
hit was a home run, and before the Red 
Sox got the side out eight runs were in. 
It was a wild ninth inning for Chicago 
but not much for us to cheer about. 

The Red Sox didn't give up. In the 
last of the ninth some timely hitting re- 
sulted in two more runs, and the final 
score was 8-3 in favor of the Chicago 
White Sox. 

It was a good game and we enjoyed 
it. We arrived back at Cily Point at 5:30 
and thanked Mr. MacPherson and his 
friends for giving us such a good time. 
William H. Dillon 

My Vacation 

I have just returned from a wonderful 
vacation. It began on July 18. Two 
days later my mother, father and I started 
for New Hampshire. We first visited my 
sister who is at a girls' camp in West 
Ossipee. Then we continued on our trip 
to North Conway, where we saw many 
interesting things such as the aerial tram- 
way and an old covered bridge. We went 
through the White Mountains to Gorham, 
N. H., where we stayed overnight. In 
this town we saw the movie, "A Queen is 
Crowned." in technicolor. Early the 
next morning we drove through Berlin on 
our way to Stratton, Maine. In Berlin we 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



saw many of the big pulp mils. There were 
h'l^e piles of p ilp wood alon"! the river's 
ed^e for miles it seemed. In Stratton we 
visited a wood turning mill \^here we 
watch-d the workmen turn out screwdriver 
handles, mallets, pill boxes and many 
other articles. 

From Stratton we began a trip over 
a six mile dirt road in a Chevrolet truck. 
We moved at about twenty miles an hour 
maximum. Our destination was Tim 
Pond, which is about ten miles from the 
Canadian border. Tim Pond is a native 
trout pond and Hy fishing only is allowed. 
We fished without much luck but had a 
good time. We stayed here three days 
and then left for Boothbay Harbor, Maine. 
We visited friends there and I had the 
pleasure of going on two trips on a 38-foot 
Chris Craft cruiser. The boat belonged 
to friends and was a beauty. 

After a wonderful stay at Boothbay 
Harbor we left for home and I spent the 
rest of my vacation there. It was the best 
vacation I have ever had. 

David W. Howard 



The Shav*^ and Temple Prizes 

At Graduation the Shaw and Temple 
prizes for excellence in conduct were a- 
warded by Mr. Meacham to the 20 boys 
who had earned the highest conduct rank. 
This marked the 129th six-month period 
that the Shaw prizes have been given. 
Mr. Francis Shaw, a former member of 
the Board of Trustees, gave these prizes 
during his lifetime, and assured their per- 
petuity by a provision in his will. It was 
Mr. Shaw's earnest conviction that good 
conduct should be suitably rewarded and 
he believed strongly that every effort 
should be expended in the development 
of good citizenship. 

Mr. Thomas F. Temple, also a former 
trustee, realized that some almost made 



the Shaw list, and in or-'er to further en- 
courage these boys he supplied funds for 
an additional five prizes to be known as 
the Temple Consolation Piizes. He gave 
these for many years, and upon his death 
Mr. N. Penrose Hallowell, a trustee, gave 
them in memory of Mr. Temple. Mr. 
Hallowell continues to give these valued 
awards. 

Those who received the Shaw Prizes 
for the past six month period were: 

Shaw Prizes 
Samuel M. Griswold 
Walter R. Hermann 
Carleton G. Skinner, Jr. 
Alan C. Waldron 
Robert O. Cain 
Donald E. Richardson 
Albert K. Ellis 
John E. Lennon 
William F. Sonier 
Alexander D. Marinakis 

The five who received Temple Con- 
solation Prizes were: 

Temple Consolation Prizes 

Loren E. Cain 
Howard E. Murphy 
Ralph F. Hopkins 
William H. Dillon 
David E. Leveille 

Five also received honorable mention. 
They were: 

Honorable Mention 
Frederick E. Harding 
David W. Howard 
William F. James 
Edward A. Atton 
Gerald L. Briggs 

In the Air 

I remember in school last year we 
had some interesting geography lessons. 
One had to do with the protection of our 
natural resources. Government agencies 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



send planes to destroy insects, and many 
farmers do so at their own expense to 
protect their crops. Not long ago, in the 
west, the farmers were bothered with wild 
ducks eating the grain in the planted fields. 
Scarecrows were put up, but the ducks 
thought they were there to keep them 
company. So the wildHfe service was 
called. This government agency planted 
grain in a wildlife refuge and then sent 
planes to chase the ducks to the refuge. 
Planes are also used to get information 
for weather reports. Sometimes pilots 
follow hurricanes and report the course 
of the storm to the weather bureau. 

Larry E. Garside 

Early Days in the West 
As our country kept growing westward 
in the early days there was need of mail 
and transportation service beyond that of 
the covered wagon trains. So a "Pony 
Express" from Missouri to California was 
begun. Men on horseback covered the 
distance of 2,000 miles in nine days. Forty 
riders were used in each direction and the 
horses were changed frequently. It cost 
five dollars to send a letter by pony 
express. 

Besides the pony express there was a 
freight and passenger service by wagon 
and stagecoach. Mark Twain made a stage- 
coach journey in 1861. He paid $150 for 
his ticket and found the trip very long and 
weary. He travelled from Missouri to 
Nevada. Eight years later two railroads 
were in operation and he made the same 
trip. Although he had to change trains 
many times he most surely found the 
journey much quicker and less tiring. 
These railroads were the Union Pacificand 
the Central Pacific. 

The government gave the railroads 
public money to help lay the tracks and 
also gave the.Ti more than 24,000,000 acres 
of public lanJ. This helped the railroads 



to speed up their work and made the 
settlement of the far west easier. Most of 
the settlers made their homes in Oregon 
or California. 

The plain states were inhabited mostly 
by the large Indian tribes. They could see 
that the white men were destroying their 
food supply by shooting the wild buffalo, 
and indeed they were. From time to time 
the Indians went on the warpath against 
the few white settlers in the prairie country. 
Now and then the Indians would win a 
battle against the soldiers who were sent 
to protect the settlers. In the end though, 
the general result of the fighting was to 
drive the Indians into places where the 
federal government wanted them to go. 

The early days of the West were filled 
with many heroic deeds, and the setders 
underwent many great hardships. 

Richard B. Pulsifer 

Vacation Thoughts 
Last year I was in the eighth grade 
and had for my subjects sloyd, arithmetic, 
English, geography and history. English 
covered a lot of ground, such as spelling, 
reading, composition and grammar. I 
kept wondering if I would get good marks 
in all my subjects and am glad to say that 
I did. Now that school is over and va- 
cation is here I am thinking ahead to fall 
when I will be a freshman. 

Harold L. Spurting 

Afternoon Kitchen 
Lately I have helped the kitchen in- 
structors after dinner and before supper. 
It takes about a half hour after dinner 
each day to tidy up the kitchen. Before 
supper I am pretty busy helping get the 
meal ready. Quite often we bake rolls 
and I like this best. I pour the milk and 
make myself generally useful, 

James P. LaGrassa 



THOMPSON'S rSLAND BEACON 



Cbomp$on'$ Island Beacon 

Publiihed Monthly hr 

THE FARM AND TRADES SCHOOL 

Tbonipson't leland, Boston Harbor 

A PRIVATE SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF EXCELLENT 

CHARACTER SU5>PORTED BY ENDOWMENTS. 

TUITION FEES AND SUBSCRIPTIONS. 



Vol.57 No. 5 



August 1953 



Subscription Price 



One Dollar Per Year 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Calvin Page Bartlett, President 

James H. Lowell, Vice-President 

\lfred C. Malm, Treasurer 

Merton P. Ellis, Secretary 

Howland S. Warren, Assistant Secretary 

Term Expires 1954 
George P. Denny, M. D. 
Ralph B. Williams 

Thomas Temple Pond 
Mason Sears 

Joseph L. Pendergast 
Lawrence Terry 
John Q. Adams 

Term Expires 1955 
Gorham Brooks 
Giprles E. Mason 

Donald S. MacPherson 
Philip H. Theopold 
Augustus P. Loring, III 
Robert H. Gardiner 
A. Conrad Ericsson 

Term Expires 1956 

Leverett Saltonstall 
Moses Williams 

William M. Meachem 
George S. Mumford, Jr. 
Frederic Winthrop 
John Lowell 

Edward V. Osberg 

Advisory Committee 

N. Penrose Hallowell 
Edwin H. Place, M. D. 

The greatest need of the world to-day 
is the rebuilding of the Christian spirit of 
service, the basic development plan at our 
home school. Why not help a fine, worthy 
boy achieve his goal by making a financial 
contribution to America's best investment? 



"Mr. Meacham please accept this two- 
dollar check for the Beacon which expired 
in February. I am at Cohasset and sorry 
to have overlooked the matter. I am very 
much interested in the School which turns 
out boys of first quality and am so grateful 
to have my son Hans graduate from 
there." 

This paragraph from the mother of 
one of our boys who graduated two years 
ago is typical of the sincere appreciation 
of hundreds of parents whose sons have 
had the many opportunities provided by 
our broad program of living and total 
development. 

Hans Christensen made the most of 
every phase of activity while here and 
is carrying on in the several lines of 
interests experienced in his nearly five 
years here. "Chris" is a credit to our 
School and his family. 

It is not easy to judge the exact 
importance of the various features of 
our School. "Chris" was most inter- 
ested and proficient in Farming, Sports, 
and Band. "Bob" Cain, a graduate of 
this year, had all of these as his special 
interests and also won an award for Re- 
ligious Interests. Others won flower 
garden prizes. The graduating class of 
1953 voted English as their most liked 
academic study. This was especially vital- 
ized by the library development which 
placed our old library on a modern basis. 
Many other features also rank hijih in 
importance. 

Our home atmosphere, with a staff 
of men, women, and their children, un- 
doubtedly provides the real spark of vital, 
interesting, living soundness to this unique 
school. These are our boys. This is our 
home and our community. We are all 
working toward the same goal, "Right and 
happy living." We all love it and we are 
wlioleheartedly devoted to our important 
life-work. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Topics in Brief 

Donald S. MacPherson, '17, arranged 
for 25 boys to attend the Red Sox-Chicago 
baseball game at Fenway Park on July 29. 
Mr. MacPherson arranged for he and his 
friends to drive the boys to the ball park. 
The Chicago team won the game, much 
to the disappointment of our boys who 
are staunch Red Sox rooters. Attending 
the game was a rare treat, especially to 
those who never before had seen a major 
league baseball game. 

Edward Rowe Snow, Boston's famous 
author, historian and radio lecturer, visited 
us on July 26, bringing with him a large 
group of visitors, all intent with learning 
something of the early history of our 
Island location, as well as the present day 
story of The Farm and Trades School. 
Annually Mr, Snow conducts a lecture 
tour here, and has made many new friends 
for our School. 

We have made some improvements 
on our permanent outdoor fireplace, lo- 
cated on the beach near the wharf. These 
include a sheet metal grill, heavier grate, 
and a chimney — all adding to make the 
fireplace much more efficient, and a real 
pleasure to work with. A picnic table, 
with seats for eight, has also been built 
and adds much to the picnic area. 

Swimming has been the most popular 
sport this summer and the boys are now 
in the process of completing the American 
Red Cross swimming, life saving and 
water safety courses. This work is under 
the capable supervision of our supervisor, 
Raymond Thomas, who is an accredited 
Red Cross aquatic and first aid instructor. 

Our shuffleboard court has been a 
valuable adjunct to our recreational pro- 
gram, and the game is played almost 



continually. The court was constructed 
recently, the work being done mainly by 
the boys. Several tournaments have been 
played this summer and some of the boys 
have developed clever skills in the sport. 
Although comparatively new in this area, 
the game has long been extremely popular 
in the South, especially in Florida. 

Our farm has produced satisfactory 
quantities of fresh vegetables in spite of a 
sustained and severe drought. Summer 
squash, string beans, beets, spinach, lettuce, 
and peas have been harvested. The haying 
is almost completed, and the quality and 
quantity of this year's crop has been very 
good. 

The parents and friends of our boys 
were here on the afternoon of July 10. 
As usual, the group was transported to and 
from City Point on the boat "723." 

The floors in our chapel, classrooms, 
and gymnnsinm have been refinished this 
month by the boys in our maintenance 
department. This is but a short, simple 
statement of fact. In truth the boys did a 
big job, marvelously well. 

We are justly proud of the official 
fine achievements of our Band in the 
school musie festivals held in May, and, 
of course, the excellence of the annual 
concert at Faneuil Hall. We have received 
a newspaper clipping naming our Band 
as one of two outstanding New England 
units, and a friend in New Hampshire 
writes that the high ratings earned by our 
boys were given proper commendation 
on a television program received in that 
area. 

A group of summer students attending 
the Eastern Nazarene College at Wollas- 
ton held a clam bake and picnic on our 
south end beach on July 11. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



On July 12 we enjoyed a lawn supper, 
served buflfet style, on the Bowditch House 
lawn. It was a beautiful evening and we 
all had a very pleasmt time— especially 
the boys who like watermelon — for there 
was a plentiful supply of this summertime 
favorite fruit. 

Two of our boys had the opportunity 
of attending Camp Pineridge foroneweek 
this month through the kind efforts of our 
minister last year, Mr. John Bartram. Our 
boys report that they had a wonderful 
time. Th'S popular Christian camp for 
boys is but one unit of many in the large 
conference grounds operated by The New 
England Fellowship of Evangelicals for 
groups of all ages. 

The paint shop crews have been 
painting the exterior window casings and 
sashes of Dormitory A, and this w-ork is 
rapidly nearing completion. We have 
added some new equipment to our paint- 
ing department to facilitate this important 
work. 

Band Awards 

Annually the members of the Band 
who are in the graduating class receive 
band certificates as mementos of their 
membership in the band. Because of the 
many fond memories of band trips, drills 
and rehearsals and the fact that the certifi- 
cate shows that the holder was a member 
of America's first school band, organized 
in 1857, makes thecertificates highly prized. 
Those who received Band Certificates this 
year are: 

Robert O. Cain 

Bruce A. Giaham 

Robert A. Kidder 

David A. Pulsifer 

Teyet Ramar II 

Donald E. Richardson 

Alan C. Waldron 



Beacon Articles 

Every month we are asked to write 
a short article for the school paper, the 
Beacon. As you see, most of the short 
stories you read in this paper are written 
by us boys. Once in a while we are asked 
to write on a given subject, but usually we 
choose our own topics. So the BEACON 
will have articles about almost any subject. 
Some boys like to write and get articles in 
often, while others are slow about writing. 
We all like to read our paper, especially 
if our story is printed. 

Loren E. Cain 

Poultry Work 

This spring and early summer I worked 
at the poultry houses until I hurt my leg. 
We were busy all of the time getting the 
range ready for the young chicks. The 
coops we use on the range were repaired, 
the fencing fixed, and everything set to 
take care of the young chicks. The best 
time to work on poultry is in the summer 
when the range is in use, and there are 
always boys volunteering for poultry jobs. 

Joseph S. Lombardo 

A Control Tower 

Every large airport has a control 
tower, operated by a man who is like a 
traffic patrolman at a busy street inter- 
section. He sits in a glass enclosed room 
high above the landing field and can see 
in every direction. He knows the position 
and altitude of every plane near the field 
and signals pilots when to take off and 
when to land. 

Sometimes, at a big airport, a dozen 
or so big planes await their turn to land. 
The tower chief "stacks" these planes, each 
one being a thousand feet above the one 
below. The planes continually circle the 
field and await instructions to land. They 
mu^t keep to their sky lane. A pilot may 
not change his ahitude, nor even his 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



cruiiriii speed, without first getting per- 
m'ssion from the control tower. The 
planes, of course, keep in CTnstant touch 
by radio. 

Barry R. Fuller 

The Francis Shaw Scholarship 

Annually it gives us real satisfaction 
to announce the name of the' pupil, who, 
by his effort and sincere application to 
duty, has earned the Francis Shaw Schol- 
arship for the year. 

Francis Shaw was a member of our 
Board of Trustees for 34 years, from 1889 
until 1923. He had one wish uppermost 
in his heart, that of instilling in youth the 
right principles of wholesome living. The 
steadfast, stalwart and upriglit character 
of every Farm and Trades School boy 
was his principal concern. In his 34 years 
on the Board his services were of incalcul- 
able value to the School, and although his 
interests touched every phase of our school 
lite, it was to the farm that he devoted his 
greater attention. 

In 1936, in memory of her father. 
Miss Miriam Shaw established the Francis 
Shaw scholarship. It is usually awarded 
to a member of an upper class, and pro- 
vides for a considerable part of the ex- 
penses for the year. If one could study 
a biographical sketch of the past winners 
of this scholarship his heart would be 
warmed. Certainly this Memorial to 
Mr. Shaw has paid rich dividends in the 
development of American youth. 

William F. Sonier, Class ot 1953, has 
the honor ot being named the Francis 
Shaw Scholarship winner for this year. 
We congratulate him for his achievement 
which he richly deserves. 

The Gutenberg Bible 

Johann Gutenberg combined genius, 
patience, skill and effort in hislifework of 



inventing a means of printing from mov- 
able type. About 1450 he printed the 
Holy Bible, and by bringing God's Word 
to iill he opened the door to the great 
freedoms of democracy — freed(^m of re- 
ligion, thought, knowledge, the press and 
educaation. 

Before his invention of printing the 
Scriptures were recorded on parchment 
by monks, who worked for years copying 
by hand with a quill pen, in order to 
complete but a single volume. Up to the 
time of Gutenberg there were very few 
copies of the complete Bible and those 
few were available almost exclusively to 
churchmen only. 

When Gutenberg commenced his 
historic work there was but one translation 
of the complete Bible. This was the one 
by St. Jerome, known as the Vulgate 
Latin translation. Jerome finished this 
momentus work at the close of the fourth 
century. Thus a thousand years elapsed 
before any large segment of the public had 
access to St. Jerome's translation. 

There being no special need for the 
ability to read up to Gutenberg's time, few 
outside of churchmen and high state offi- 
cials ever learned how. Actually there was 
litde or nothing to read. All this changed 
with Gutenberg's invention. It may well 
be said that he opened the door of edu- 
cation for all. 

Gutenberg printed 225 copies of the 
Bible. Two volumes were required, each 
having 641 pages. Every page was hand- 
ornamented with color and the finished 
work was truly a masterpiece. A facsimile 
of this 42-line Bible is on display in our 
printing office and is a source of much 
interest to all. 

Millions of God-fearing people are 
comforted daily by the Book, and it is 
well for us to know something of the his- 
tory of the first printing of our Holy Bible 
by Johann Gutenberg. 



THCMPS3N'S ISLAND BEACON 



Che B\mn\ Association of Che farm and Cradcs School 



Alton B. Butler, -26, President John Patterson '43 Vice-President 

Newton, Mass. W. Medford. Mass. 

Donald S. MacPherson '17, Treasurer 
Wollaston, Mass. 



William C. Burns. '37. Secretar> 
No. Wilmington, Mass. 
G. George Larsson, '17, His 
Hyde Paris. Mas 



Charles Alvin Blatchford, '04, 
died on June 18, after a protracted illness. 
At the time of his death he was a patient 
at the Crile Veterans Hospital. He was 
69 years old. 

Mr. Blatchford graduated from our 
School almost a half century ago, and 
throughout the yeurs maintained a con- 
tinuing interest in all activities on Thomp- 
son's Island, as well as being an active 
member of the Alumni Association, even 
though distance made it necessary for him 
to be a "corresponding participant" in 
School and Alumni affairs. 

He was a retired employee of the 
River Terminal Railroad. For more than 
a quarter century he was operator of the 
company's Cuyahoga river bridge. He 
has been retired since 1948. 

Mr. Blatchford was born in Gloucester 
and lived for some years in Cambridge, 
Ohio. He was a member of the Masonic 
order and of the Detroit Avenue Metho- 
dist Church in his home town. Lakewood, 
Ohio. He was a veteran of World War I. 
We of the Alumni Association will 
miss him greatly, for there was never a 
project which we sponsored which did 
not receive his whole-hearted support. We 
have lost a good and loyal friend. 

Our sympathy is expressed to his wife, 
Mrs. Helen H. Blatchford. We are ap- 
preciative of the newspaper account she 
sent us from the family home at 1520 
Cohasset Ave,, Lakewood, Ohio, and 
from which this article is in part taken. 

Malcolm C. Wiley, '50, has written 
a very interesting letter from "Somewhere 
in Korea" where he is the Statistical 
specialist and Security Clerk for his 



squadron. He is quartered in a quonset 
hut. in a restricted area, and tells of the 
strict security measures taken. He has been 
in Korea three months and writes that he 
doesn't mind his tour of duty much— the 
days pass by without too much boredom 
and he has only nine months before his 
Korean service period ends. The airfield 
where he is based is in a mountainous area, 
well protected. Bombers take off and 
land almost every minute, and many 
wounded personal are cared for temporari- 
ly at the field. 

He asks about everyday happenings 
at the School, especially the band, straw- 
berrv yield this year, baseball, swimming 
and other sports. As for milk — how he'd 
like a pitcher of Guernsey milk from our 
dairy. He writes that he hasn't had a glass 
of fresh milk in a long time. 

Of course he would like to hear from 

his schoolmates and other F.T.S. friends. 

His address is: Malcolm C. Wiley AF 

11253740, 1873d AACS, Mob. Comm. 

Sq., APO 970. care of Postmaster, San 

Francisco, California. 

We appreciate receiving his fine letter, 

which of course has already been answered. 

All of our servicemen receive the Beacon 

and we correspond regularly with them. 

George H. Tangen, '51, is in the 
service, attached to a radar squadron at 
Phoenix, Arizona. He writes that life 
goes along pleasantly enough, and that 
he expects a furlough this fall in which case 
he will see a football game here. In his 
group are several Free Chinese and a few 
French soldiers studying our methods of 
warfare. His address is George H. Tangen, 
2347 W. Tanat St., Phoenix, Arizona. 




Vol. 57 No. 5 PrintedatTheFarmandTradesSchool, Boston, Mass. Sept., 1953 

Entered November 3, 1903 at Boston, Mass., as Second Class matter, under Act of Congress, of July 6, lf-7^ 



Painting the Silo 

During early August the farm Instruc- 
tors decided that it would be necessary to 
make repairs on the silo and paint it. Mr. 
Baird, our head farmer, turned this job 
over to Mr. Dockham, who knew exactly 
how to do it. Mr. Dockham and a few 
farm boys got lumber from various sources 
and first made a staging. This staging was 
thirty feet high and completely en- 
compassed the silo. There were platforms 
to work on built at six-foot intervals. 
One can imagine that it was quite a job to 
build this staging. 

Next we inspected the silo, replacing 
loose nails and securing some patches 
which had become loosened. Scraping 
removed old^jjaint and we were ready to 
apply the first, or priming, coat of white 
paint. The priming coat made the silo 
look much better and to finish the job we 
applied a second coat. This coat was put 
on smoothly and carefully. 

After the painting was finished came 
the job of taking down the staging. Then 
we had our first good look at our job and 
were proud of our work. The silo 
certainly looked beautiful as it glistened 
in the sun. 

William H. Dillon 

Dairy Barn Work 

Every morning I get up at five and 
go to the dairy barn. I first sweep out the 



mangers and feed the cows grain. I give 
each cow an amount listed on a chart. 
Each animal has a ration and the grain is 
weighed carefully. After the cows are fed 
I feed the calves skim milk. Nursing 
buckets are used and the milk is heated to 
the temperature of a cow's body. Next 
I milk one of our cows by hand. The 
other cows are milked by machine, and 
we have two of them so this doesn't take 
too long. After the milking is done I 
feed hay to all the cows and calves. My 
job is finished when the milking machines 
and buckets have been properly washed 
and sterilized. 

Loren E. Cain 

Water Fun 
This summer we enjoyed swimming 
very much. We went two or three times 
every day, and the new swimming raft 
and diving board which were built two 
years ago got their longest season's steady 
use, from May until the present, and the 
season is still on. Playing water tag is a 
popular sport and the boys invent many 
variations for the game. Almost everyone 
likes divingand thissummer many became 
very good at doing the popular dives and 
body flips from the board. Crab hunting, 
which we do when the tide is low, is fun. 
We use a glass-faced mask to keep the water 
out of our eyes, and rubber fins on our 
feet so we can move about easily. The 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



crabs are captured with a spear, and with 
good luck a fair-size batch can be caught 
in this way. 

Almost every Saturday and Sunday 
we went water skiing and aquaplaning. 
Lin Meacham owns the equipment and 
uses his speedboat. Some of us thought 
we were pretty good at this sport so we 
tried to do it one hand, or no hands, but 
as far as I know all that happened was a 
successful spill into the ocean. 

As you can see, we all enjoyed swim- 
ming and water fun this summer. 

Albert K. Ellis 

Printing Office Work 
On September 8 I began working each 
afternoon in the printing office. Our big 
job is always this paper, the BEACON, and 
most months it is printed by the tenth. 
All of the type is hand-set with type kown 
as Caslon series. We do all the school 
office printing such as request slips, station- 
ery, boat reports and many other forms. 
This is very interesting work and 1 like it 

very much. 

David W. Howard 

My First Impression 

When I came here five years ago I 
already knew that the School was just the 
place for me because my brother had 
already been at F. T. S. for six months and 
I wasn't a stranger to the island. I came 
with a group of new boys and the first 
things I noticed were the cows in the 
pasture and big fields of corn. It wasn't 
long before we were assigned to rooms 
and had our bags unpacked. Until dinner 
we played horseshoes, and after dinner 
tennis for awhile until Mr, Albee took us 
on a beach walk. He told us some 
history of our island and named the nearby 
islands and pointed out the shipping lanes. 
We went for a swim at the north end 
beach. My brother and I stayed close 



together that first day and I remember 
everything very clearly. You can see that 
my first impression was a good one. 

Richard A. Ostrander 

Room Changes 
Just before Labor Day we had a room 
change. This is so that the number of 
boys in each of the three dormitories 
will be about equal, and leave most of 
Dormitory A for the new boys. I was a 
new boy last year and lived in room 6 in 
Dormitory A. I have been changed to 
room 7 in Dormitory C. We have a nice 
new television set in our dormitory sitting 
room, and this is a big feature with those 
in our dormitory. 

John E. Lennon 

My Vacation 
On my vacation I went to New York 
with my family. We saw the Statue of 
Liberty and at the same time saw the 
Queen Mary leaving the harbor. We 
went to the top of the Empire State 
Building which is 102 stories high. We 
saw "The Band Wagon" at the Radio 
City Music Hall. We inspected the radio 
and television studios and saw five shows 
broadcast. I enjoyed it very much. 

James P. LaGrassa 

My Work 

Each afternoon at 1:15 I report to the 
supervisor for work. He is in charge of 
keeping the grounds cleaned, flowerbeds 
attractive, lawns mowed, and seeing that 
the chapel, gymnasium, locker rooms and 
many other places are always in neat 
condition. In fact he has much to do and 
several boys help him each day. It is a 
big job. I like this work because it is 
varied and I learn something new with 
every job I tackle. 

In the summer the flower beds, lawns 
and hedges take much time. To mow 
the Softball field and the baseball field we 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



have a gang mower which is tractor pulled 
and does a fast, smooth job. On the large 
lawns around the dormitories we use a 
gasoline powered mower and on the small 
areas we use hand mowers. We have 
many hedges and they are trimmed with 
powerful electric clippers. 

We are now getting ready for football 
and it is a busy time. Our supervisor is 
also our head coach and has charge of all 
the athletic equipment. The goal posts 
have been put up and almost any day now 
we will be lining the football field, which 
is an all day job. 

The work I do is interesting, and one 
can learn a lot if he enjoys it. 

Teyet Ramar II 

Kitchen Work 

I work in the kitchen -and have 
learned to do many things. I wash pots 
and pans, sweep and wash the floor and 
help keep everything neat and clean. I 
have helped bake and cook and some of 
the things I've made lately are cake, 
cookies and pie. 

Joseph S. Lombardo 

Good Conduct 

It is best to have good conduct in 
school for the teachers will like you better 
and you will learn more. The more you 
cooperate with the teachers, the more 
you'll learn. Although the teachers would 
like you to get all A's, it is all right with 
them as long as you try hard and pass the 
work. 

Richard Seaver 

Red Cross Water Safety Awards 
For many years our supervisor, Ray- 
mond Thomas, has taught the swimming, 
life saving and water safety courses as set 
up by the aquatic division of the American 
Red Cross, Mr, Thomas is an accredited 
Red Cross instructor in these subjects. 



The following received certificates and 
badges for completion of the designated 
courses this summer. 

Beginner Swimmer 

Richard B. Pulsifer 

Intermediate Swimmer 

Gerald L, Brings 
James P. LaGrassa 

John L. Peterson 

Richard Seaver 
Harold L, Spurling 

Swimmer 

Bruce Alexander 

Daniel W. Dockham 

Albert K. Ellis 

Barry R. Fuller 

Willian F. James 

John E. Lennon 

Alexander D. Marinakis 

Norman W. Sellevaag 

Junior Life Saving 

Bruce Alexander 

Loren E. Cain 

Daniel W. Dockham 

Albert K. Ellis 

Robert Fabello 

Barry R. Fuller 

John E, Lennon 

Norman W. Sellevaag 

Football Outlook 

Football is a wonderful sport and all 
the boys play on one team or another. 
The varsity team began practicing when 
school started. There are 23 boys out 
for the team and the average weight will 
be about as last year. We have some of 
the boys from last years' first team playing, 
and several from the second team. 

We will have a seven game schedule, 
with five at the school and two away. 
This year we are going to try to have an 
unbeaten-untied season like we had last 
year. 

The intra-mural teams have not been 
chosen yet, but will be very soon. 

William F. James 



THOMPSONS ISLAND BEACON 



Cbompson's Island Beacon 

Published Monthly br 

THE FARM AND TRADES SCHOOL 

Thompson's Island. Boston Harbor 

A PRIVATE SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF EXCELLENT 

CHARACTER SUPPORTED BY ENDOWMENTS. 

TUITION FEES AND SUBSCRIPTIONS. 



Vol.57 No. 5 



September 1953 



Subscription Price 



One Dollar Per Year 



BOARD OF TRUS TEES 

Calvin Page Bartlett, President 

James H. Lowell, Vice-President 

Alfred C. Malm, Treasurer 

Merton P. Ellis, Secretary 

Howland S. Warren, Assistant Secretary 

Term Expires 1954 
George P. Denny, M. D. 
Ralph B. Williams 

Thomas Temple Pond 
Mason Sears 

Joseph L. Pendergast 
Lawrence Terry 
John Q. Adams 

Term Expires 1955 
Gorham Brooks 
C urles E. Mason 

Donald S. MacPherson 
Philip H. Theopold 

Augustus P. Loring, III 
Robert H. Gardiner 
A. Conrad Ericsson 

Term Expires 19E6 
Leverett Saltonstall 
Moses Wil iams 

Wiliam M. Meacham 
George S. Mumford, Jr. 
Frederic Winthrop 
John Lowell 

Edward V. Osberg 

Advisory Committee 
N, Penrose Hallowell 
Edwin H. Place, M. D. 

The greatest need of the world to-day 
is the rebuilding of the Christian spirit of 
service, the basic development plan at our 
home school. Why not help a fine, worthy 
boy achieve his goal by making a financial 
contribution to America's best investment? 



Thompson's Island Beacon, Vol. 

1, No. 1, was published and printed at 
the School May, 1897. The name of this 
monthly paper was credited to the Presi- 
dent of the Alumni Association, who, ac- 
cording to our records, was John Philips 
Ackers of the Class of 1890. 

John Ackers married Adeline W. 
Morse of Cambridge in 1899. In 1900 he 
"went into business for himself, Newspaper 
Advertising Agent, Globe Building." Mr. 
Ackers died of typhoid fever Nov. 24. 1902. 

The current issue of the Beacon is 
the 677th consecutive issue and if ever a 
diary or LOG of happenings was recorded 
this is it. Not only do we find here a 
carefully recorded history of events but 
we can trace the wonderful development 
of virtually every boy who builds his life 
from pre-adolescence to young manhood 
by aid of the great facilities, broad program 
of interests, and able leadership of men 
and women at the School selected essen- 
tially for their wholesome desire to take 
part in the responsibilities of "building 
men." 

The first issue of the BeacON had an 
article on "Our New Band" by Thomas 
J. Fairbairn, Leader. This lad concisely 
and enthusiastically described the object 
and the plan of the "New Band" which 
consisted of beginners to later replace 
graduating members of the Regular Band. 
Other articles by boys indicated their 
diverse activities. All through these past 
56 years the Beacon policy has been to 
feature boys' articles of 200 to 400 words. 

It occurs to us that our readers would 
be interested in similar stories by our 
alumni, so, former boys of the School, 
send in a two to four hundred word article 
of your present interest and we will see 
again your name in print in the BEACON. 
You are in almost every profession, busi- 
ness and industry. Most of you five years 
or more out of school have married and 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



have your own happy families. Many of 
you have built your own homes. All of 
you are civic minded and some have 
political interests. Your travel and your 
hobbies are extensive. You alumni have 
seen great strides of progress at your Alma 
Mater and miraculous scientific advance- 
ment all about you. The BEACON asks 
you to send in an article because you 
certainly have plenty to write about. 

P. S. A Shaw prize for this cannot 
be awarded but for the first twelve articles 
received and printed in the BEACON the 
writers will be given a year's free sub- 
scription. 

Topics in Brief 

Our Sunday evening church services 
for the summer term have come to a close. 
Mr. John Beauregard was in charge of 
our religious work for the period and ac- 
complished a real service as he worked 
week after week with our boys. 

The boys have had many pleasant 
hours working on their flower gardens. 
To many this is a major hobby, and cer- 
tainly worth while in every respect. Tiie 
area comprising the individual gardens 
is always a popular place, and the boys 
are always proud to show their friends the 
results of their gardening work. For 65 
years prizes have been given annually 
to t'lose who excelled in flower gardening, 
the awards being instituted by Mr. Henry 
S. Grew, a member of the Board of 
Trustees, and upon his death continued 
in Mr. Grew's memory by his daughter, 
Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby. 

A major job was accomplished by 
Mr. Dockham and the farm boys recently 
when our silo was given necessary repairs 
and then painted. The silo is approxi- 
mately 32by 6 feet, and a complete staging 
was erected for the painting job. The 



silo was built in 1924 and the first cut 
fodder was put into it on September 4 of 
that year. 

Two boy scout troops from Revere, 
together with several leaders, held an all- 
day outing at the School on August 29. 
Much scouting activity, together with a 
ball game and swim, gave the visitors a 
full day of pleasure. 

With the beginning of the fall term 
our summer sports program gradually 
gave way to football and other fall sports. 
The summer recreation program has been 
fine in every way, ample opportunity 
being given for participation in Softball, 
baseball, tennis, swimming and life saving, 
and such games as shuffleboard and horse- 
shoe pitching. The two weeks previous 
to Lgbor Day were unseasonably warm 
and the bovs made the most of our ideal 
swimming facilities. The boys are all good 
swimmers, and this year most of them 
advanced in their Red Cross swimming 
courses, many earning the Junior Life 
Saving certificates. 

Edward Rowe Snow has earned for 
himself a high place in the field of Boston 
Harbor history and has in the past few 
years broadened his scope to include a 
major share of the United States eastern 
coast history. Since beginning this life 
work a quarter of a century ago Mr. Snow 
has been a constant visitor at our School, 
seeking historical data and introducing to 
countless hundreds some of the thrills he 
receives from searching out all but for- 
gotten historical data. 

Some years ago he was the prime 
force behind the organization of a club 
named the "Harbor Ramblers." This 
club holds weekly trips to a different 
Boston Harbor landmark and there are 
so many of these points of interest that 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



it isn't necessary to duplicate a harbor 
"hike" during the course of a year. 

Our dietitian, Mrs. Helen L. Warner, 
is a member of the Harbor Ramblers and 
through her eflforts the Club held a birth- 
day party for Mr. Snow on our west beach 
on August 23. Guests of the Ramblers at 
this party included fifty members of the 
Appalachian Mountain Club, and our 
entire school membership. Mr. Snow 
received a huge birthday cake and there 
were small individual cakes, decorated 
by our boys, all of whom had a happy 
time getting ready for the party and of 
course, taking part. 

Later in the evening Mr. Snow showed 
several reels of motion pictures which he 
had taken on his trips of exploration. 
These were very much enjoyed, especially 
so because of the interpretations and de- 
scriptions given by Mr. Snow. 

We have had several beach suppers 
and lawn picnics during the summer 
months, all of which have been very 
pleasant, and very much enjoyed. Weather 
conditions for all of these events have 
been ideal and it ts hard to imagine 
lovelier outdoor settings for such picnics 
than our Tnompson's Island campus. 

More and more people apparently 
are becoming interested in amateur boat- 
ing, for on weekends an endless stream 
of pleasure craft passes by our wharf. We 
have derived much pleasure from watching 
these craft, and especially so the sailboat 
races which are held almost weekly. Oc- 
casionally we are of help, our facilities 
serving as a haven when engine or other 
mechanical failure makes it necessary for 
the boatmen to seek assistance. 

The first football game of the season 
will be at the School on October 3, with 
Milton Sophomores as the opponents. 
Football game days are Friends' Days. 



Mailboy 

I am the F. T. S. mailboy. I like 
this job because while working on it I meet 
many people and learn to be businesslike. 
I am in town each day from one until five 
except on Saturday when I go in the 
morning. First I deliver any packages I 
may have and then go to the main post 
oflfice. I have a bag of mail to get on its 
way and then I pick up the incoming mail 
from the worker where our post office box 
is located. I have many errands to do 
and am on my way to do them, after 
which I telephone the school office to see 
if there are other things to be done. 
When I have everything as completed as I 
can I return to the boat. 

Ralph F. Hopkins 

Honor Roll — Spring Term 
Best Citizenship 

"A" Rank general conduct and efiott 
in each class group 

Junior Class 

Ralph A. Hopkins 
David A. Pulsifer 
Teyet Ramar II 

Sophomore Class 

Edward A. Atton 

Robert Fabello 

William H. Dillon 

David W. Howard 

David E. LeVeille 

Richard A. Ostrander 

Freshman Class 

Thomas Angelos 

Gerald L. Briggs 

Loren E. Cain 

Albert K. Ellis 

John E. Lennon 

Howard E. Murphy, II 

Paul E. Parker 

Ralph Schofield 

Carleton G. Skinner 

Arthur A. Sprague 

Harold L. Spurling 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



1953 Football Schedule 

October 3 

Milton Sophomores at F. T. S. 

October 10 

Hingham J. V. at F. T. S. 

October 17 

Quincy Sophomores at F. T. S. 

October 24 

Milton Academy 2nds at Milton 

October 31 

Braintree Frosh at F. T. S. 

November 7 
Weymouth Frosh at F. T. S. 
November 14 
Maiden Vocational at Maiden 

My First Day in the Laundry 

Yesterday was my first day working 
in the laundry. I learned how to iron 
shirts and other articles. I haven't learned 
how to run the machines yet, but I will 
soon. We have two washing machines, 
an extractor, flatwork ironer and a dryer. 
The laundry is a busy place. 

S. Newcomb Graham 

Additonal Alumni News 
David E. Long, '22, has sent us an 
unusual notice of a change of address. 
It is in the form of an attractively printed 
post card with a photo of the new Long 
family home at 85-59 Hollis Court Boule- 
vard, Queens Village. New York. Mr. 
Long formerly taught in the public schools 
of New York City and is now in business 
for himself. We hope to see him this fall 
at one of the football games here, and at 
our annual alumni banquet. 

Cecil A. Morse, '28, writes from 
his home at 409 E. Defee Ave., Baytcwn, 
Texas, telling us that he enjoys reading 
the Beacon, and especially so the recent 
Graduation (July) issue. Mrs. Morse, 
he writes, has been in Europe this summer 
studying with the University of Houston 



international study group. Three weeks 
were spent at the University of Paris and 
the work included visits to twelve Euro- 
pean countries and the British Isles. 

Mr. Morse has kept up his athletic 
interests and is a member of the Southwest 
Football Officials Association as well as 
statistician for the local high school athletic 
teams. He has umpired numerous baseball 
and Softball games this summer. 

Alan P. Stewart, '42, served as 
Maintenance Supervisor at Sandy Island 
Camp, in Lake Winnipesaukee, New 
Hampshire, this summer. 

In February, 1951, he married a class- 
mate at Fitchburg State Teachers College, 
where both were members of the gradu- 
ating class. They have one child, a 
daughter, Bonny Louise, age nine months. 

The Stewarts will soon make their 
home in Trumbull, Conn., where Mr. 
Stewart has been engaged to teach Manual 
Training. 

Bruce A. Graham, '53, served as one 
of Mr. Stewart's helpers at Sandy Island 
Camp during the summer months. This 
camp is operated by the Boston Y.M.C.A. 
and many of our graduates have served 
on the camp staff during the past fifteen 
years. 

Theodore L. Jones. '50, visited us 
on August 27. He is in his sophomore 
year in the School of Engineering of 
Northeastern University. As part of the 
University training he is now at work in 
the drafting department of the Lewis 
Shephard Co., of Watertown, and two 
nights and Saturdays each week he is em- 
ployed as a meat cutter in a Belmontsuper 
market, a part-time job he has held since 
leaving F. T. S. He enjoys his college ac- 
tivities, especially the gym periods and 
band experiences. He lives with his grand- 
parents at 128 Hillside Road, Watertown, 
Massachusetts. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Che J\\mn\ Jlssociation of Cbe farm and trades School 



Alton B. Butler, ^e, President John Patterson '43 Vice-President 

Newton, Mass. W. Medford, Mass. 

Donald S. MacPherson '17, Treasurer 
WoUaston, Mass. 



William C. Burns. *37, Secretary 
No. Wilmington, Mass. 
G. George Larsson, '17, Historian 
Hyde Park, Mass. 



Alumni President's Message 
When I was informed that each grad- 
uate was to receive this issue of the BEACON 
1 was glad to be invited to add my per- 
sonal greetings to our Alumni membership 
of nearly 500. 

It is a pleasure to read the BEACON 
each month and note with satisfaction 
news of everything from the activities of 
"New Johnnies" to the hopes and aspira- 
tions of those in each succeeding graduating 
class. 

Occasional visits to the School bring 
happy memories, and as time goes on 
each of us realizes more and more the 
wonderful advantages we enjoyed as 
youngsters on Thompson's Island. Our 
love for our Alma Mater grows richer 
with each passing year. 

I hope to see you all at the coming 
meetings and activities of our Alumni 
Association. 

Alton B. Butler, '26 
President, Alumni Ass'n. 

Your Secretary's Note 
I have long wished that more of our 
graduates received the BEACON regularly^ 
for in it is a wealth of news of our alumni. 
In fact a full page in each issue is devoted 
entirely to news of our graduates and the 
Alumni Association. Those who receive 
the paper have first-hand information as 
to all of the business and social events of 
the Alumni Association, and it is a fine 
way to automatically keep in touch with 
both life at the School and Alumni hap- 
penings. 

I hope all graduates will plan to see 
at least one football game at the School 
this fall, and when plans are completed 



for our annual Alumni banquet that all 
will save that evening for a tip-top dinner 
and get-to-gether. 

William C. Burns, '37 
Secretary, Alumni Ass'n. 

It is with deep sorrow that we announce 
the passing of Mrs. George W. Russell. 
She was the life-long inspiration and coun- 
selor of our grand old graduate of the 
Class of '85, Rev. George W. Russell. 
Our sincere sympathy is expressed to Mr. 
Russell, whom we regret to say, is ill at 
the family home at Fairfax, Vermont. 
Mr. Russell is the retired pastor of the 
Baptist church in Fairfax. 

Wayne D. Suitor, '50, is an en- 
listed man in the Air Corps and recently 
sent greetings from the Far East. Although 
he doesn't say, we believe that he is in 
Korea, for he notes in his letter that "It 
has been very quiet since the truce was 
signed." He asks for news of the football 
team, and hopes that the boys have a good 
year, adding that he wishes he were still 
in school and playing for F. T. S. He'd 
surely like to hear from his schoolmates 
and his address is: A-3c Wayne D. Suitor, 
AF11253658, 607th AC &W Sqdn.. APO 
970, Postmaster, San Francisco, California. 

A clever announcement has been 
received telling of the arrival of Donna 
Lee Beckon July 22, 1953, The happy 
parents, Mrs. and Raymond L. Beck, '36. 
state that Donna Lee tipped the scales at 
5 lbs, 1 ounce. The Becks live at 637 
Dudley Street, Dorchester, Mass., and 
Donna Lee is their firstchild. Our sincere 
congratulations! 




Vol. 57 No. 6 Printed at The Farm and Trades School, Boston, Mass. Oct., 1953 

Entered November 3, 1903 at Boston, Mass., as Second Class inatter, under Act of Congress, of July 6, 1S74 



An Entertainment 

Recently an announcement was made 
by Mr. Meacham that we were to have a 
treat on September 21. We looked forward 
with pleasure, for we were told that on 
that night we would have a very special 
entertainment. We were not disappointed, 
for the show was one of the best whiph 
we have seen. 

First on the program was a barber shop 
quartet, composed of Quincy businessmen. 
This group had entertained us before, ard 
we knew we would enjoy hearing them 
again. They sang without accompaniment, 
the leader sounding the pitch on a pitch- 
pipe. First some humorous songs were 
sung, and these were followed by ballads. 
We enjoyed all their songs, but the ones 
with the solo parts were best, for they got 
the most applause. 

Next on the program was Hugh Mc- 
Ginnis, a former professional entertainer, 
and now a restaurant proprietor. He is a 
comedian and tells stories and jokes, and 
sings, while all of the time playing a piano 
accompaniment. The song we liked best 
was sung in Irish dialect. Mr. McGuinnis 
entertained longer than he had planned, 
because we enjoyed him so. He finally 
said he would sing no more, for he wanted 
to see the magic show which was to follow. 

Malcolm E. Cameron, '19, was next 
on the program. We knew that he was 
a very skilled magician, but even so we 



were very much surprised and amazed 
by the wonderful tricks he did. He had 
everything from rabbits to handkerchiefs 
appear and disappear before our eyes, 
and we are still wondering how he fooled 
us. Some of the boys volunteered to go 
on the stage, and they became involved 
in many feats of magic, much fun being 
had by both them and the audience. The 
funniest trick was one in which a perfectly 
good handkerchief kept changing its size, 
shape and condition. Mr. Cameron was 
ably assisted by Mrs. Cameron, and their 
fast moving series of tricks, jokes and 
stunts, made up a wonderful magic show. 

Our alumnus-trustee, Donald S. Mac- 
Pherson, '17, came with the entertainers 
and introduced them at the show. We 
thank him for playing a major part in 
bringing this entertainment to us. We all 
enjoyed the show very much. 

Monitor Duties 
When I returned from my vacation 
I was glad to learn that I had been chosen 
to be a monitor. There are two monitors 
on each floor of the dormitories. Ralph 
Hopkins is monitor with me. Our duties 
principally are to see that the boys are 
awakened on time, that they are not late 
for meals, school or work. We see that 
the boys are in bed at nine. We keep 
order in the dormitory and help the sup- 
ervisor all we can. 

David A. PuUifer 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



My Summer Vacation 

My vacation began on August 1. My 
father met me and we went to our family 
physician for a checkup. The doctor 
told me that I was in perfect health, due 
to living in the fine surroundings of 
F. T. S. From there we took a three 
hour drive to Pittsfield, N. H. where I was 
to stay for two weeks at Camp Graylag. 
This camp is operated by Bob Cousy.star 
of the Boston Celtics. I was met by the 
councilor of the cabin where I was to stay, 
who explained the camp program and 
regulations. I had a Httle time to roam 
over the camp grounds with my father. 
At iive-thirty I went to supper with the 
rest of the boys, and we enjoyed a succu- 
lent and delicious meal. 

After supper I went to the basketball 
court where I met Dick Eid. the star 
freshman member of the University of 
Massachusetts basketball team, who was 
being given some pointers by his college 
coach. Bob Curren. At the same time I 
met Togo Palazzi, the six foot four Holy 
Cross star. Ed Conlin and Bob Cousy 
were also on the court. Ed is the country's 
second highest rebounder from Fordham 
University. 

During the two weeks I was at camp 
I was given basketball instruction by the 
greatest players in the game. We concen- 
trated on basketball, for itwas the purpose 
of the camp to teach this game. In ad- 
dition we played Softball, baseball, tennis, 
badminton and had wrestling, boxing, 
riding and swimming. 

I met many famous sports celebrities, 
including Red Auerbach, coach of the 
Celtics, Joe Sherry, top tennis pro and 
John Bach, the Fordham coach. These, 
and others, conducted clinics, which were 
important and helpful. 

It was a wonderful vacation and I will 
never forget those thrill-packed two weeks. 

David E. LeVeille 



A Visit to F. T. S. 

My mother and I visited Thompson's 
Isbnd to see the school. We roamed over 
the grounds and visited the dormitories, 
sloyd room, dining room, band ball and 
other places. Then we went to the office 
and my mother talked with Mr. Meacham. 
Finally I was asked my age, school grade, 
what my hobbies were, and a few other 
questions. Mr. Meacham said that I could 
enter the School on that day, July 13. 

I must admit that I had a few mishaps 
during my first days here, but I am getting 
along all right now. 

Richard T. Castonguay 

A Pleasant Day 

One day last summer my brother and 
I visited our relatives. There was a lake 
nearby and we went fishing. Together 
we caught eleven fish, which were a mixed 
reddish white color. We used garden 
worms for bait. While we were fishing a 
large cat came along and watched us. We 
gave the cat a small fish which he ate in a 
jifTy. We had a fish supper that night, 
and, although it was very good, there 
were too many bones in it to suit me. 

Walter F. Grignon 

Being Office Boy 

My work is that of office boy. I begin 
after breakfast, when we have medicine 
line. At this time the boys who are sick, 
or have hurt themselves, report to the 
office for medical attention. My job is to 
help in any way I can, and to put away 
equipment used. 

I see that the office is always neat. I 
empty the waste baskets, sweep and dust. 
I deliver messages to the instructors and 
also the many packages which come to 
the office. Very often I go to the store- 
rooms to get supplies for the departments. 
You may see that most of the time I am 
very busy being office boy. 

Frederick E. Krueger 



THOMPSONS ISLAND BEACON 



My First Day 

The first day I came here I thought 
that the School was a very nice place and 
I still do. When I stepped from the boat 
I asked if there were any horses here and 
was told that there were two. I thought 
that there would be at least eight, but I 
found out that the tractors and truck had 
replaced most of the horses. I like to work 
with animals and was glad to learn of the 
cows, heifers, bulls and pigs. 

I went up the avenue with my brother, 
who came to school with me. We first 
got our suitcases from the truck and went 
to our rooms. Then we went to the beach 
where we cooked our supper. It was Labor 
Day and the outdoor supper was part of 
the holiday activities. We had frankforts, 
bacon, rolls, ice cream and other good 
things to eat. After supper 1 played a 
game of horseshoes. 

Thomas C. Cronin 

New York Adventure 
This summer I had a vacation in 
Bethlehem, which is near Albany, New 
York. I helped work on a farm and one 
day I was given permission to ride a horse. 
While going across a field we came to a 
gully and the horse stopped short, while I 
flew over his head into the gully. Then 
I started riding again and we came to a 
river where I fell from the horse. On the 
next day my ankle began to swell and soon 
I couldn't walk. It was a whole week 
before my ankle lost iis soreness. 

Joel C. Robbins 

My Impressions 

When I was told that I was to become 
a student at The Farm and Trades School 
I had a few definite impressions which I 
thought about. The first impression which 
came to me was that I would be with boys 
riiy own age and size. I was surprised to 
find that the boys were my age, but much 



larger and stronger. I thought I wouldn't 
have a chance to be on an athletic team, 
but to my satisfaction I learned that there 
are teams for smaller boys. 

Another impression I had was that I 
would learn one certain thing. But that 
was wrong, for here we learn how to do 
many things, all of them practical and 
valuable to know. 

More or less, though, school life here 
is about as I thought it would be, and I 
hope that I may accomplish many things. 
Steven R. Wellington 

1953 Football Schedule and Scores 

October 3 

Milton Sophomores at F. T. S. 

Score: F. T. S. 54 Milton Sophs 20 

October 10 
Hingham J. V. at F. T. S. 

Score: F. T. S. 27 Hingham JV 

October 17 
Quincy Sophomores at F. T. S. 

October 24 

Milton Academy 2nds at Milton 

October 31 

Braintree Frosh at F. T. S. 

November 7 
Weymouth Frosh at F. T. S. 
November 14 
Maiden Vocational at Maiden 

Fishing 
Before I came to F. T. S. I lived in 
Englewood, a suburb of Denver, Colo. 
On my aunt's estate there is a beautiful 
lake, about a mile in circumference. 
There is good fishing there, and most of 
the fish are large mouthed bass and 
croppies. My father and I fished from a 
row boat and caught five bass and two 
croppies. My father caught a really big 
bass. On the next day I caught twenty 
croppies. 

George McPeek 



THOMPSONS rSLAND BEACON 



Cbompson's Island Beacon 

Published Monthly by 

THE FARM AND TRADES SCHOOL 

Thompson's Island, Boston Harbor 

A PRIVATE SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF EXCELLENT 

CHARACTER SUPPORTED BY ENCOV^MENTS. 

TUITION FEES AND SUBSCRIPTIONS 



Vol. 57 No. 6 



October 1953 



Subicription Price 



One Dollar Per Year 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Calvin Page Bartlett, President 

James H. Lowell, Vice-President 

Alfred C. Malm, Treasurer 

Merton P. Ellis, Secretary 

Howland S. Warren, Assistant Secretary 

Term Expires 1954 
George P. Denny, M. D. 
Ralph B, Williams 

Thomas Temple Pond 
Mason Sears 

Joseph L. Pendergast 
Lawrence Terry 
John Q. Adams 

Term Expires 1955 
Gorham Brooks 
Cfinrles E. Mason 

Donald S. MacPherson 
Philip H. Theopold 
Augustus P. Loring, 10 
Robert H. Gardiner 
A. Conrad Ericsson 

Term Expires 1956 
Leverett SaltonstaU 
Moses Williams 

William M. Meacham 
George S. Mumford, Jr. 
Frederic Winthrop 
John Lowell 

Edward V. Osberg 

Adviaory Committee 
N. Penrose Hallowell 
Edwin H. Place, M. D. 

The greatest need of the world to-day 
i3 the rebuilding of the Christian spirit of 
service, the basic development plan at our 
home school. Why not help a fine, worthy 
boy achieve his goal by making a financial 
contribution to America's best investment? 



Two young alumni of the Connecticut 
Junior Republic recently visited us. We 
enjoyed the opportunity of exchanging 
information pertaining to our two home 
schools for boys. Several days later we 
received a fine letter of appreciation, part 
of which follows: 

Dear Mr. Meacham: 

First of all, let me thank you on behalf of Gor- 
don Currier and myself, for permitting us to 
visit your School, and taking time out to show 
us around. I was particularly impressed by the 
well kept grounds, and especially by the attitude 
of the boys themselves. Honest friendliness is 
the only way I can think of to describe it. 

These two alert young men, ages 
about eighteen, especially noted the well 
kept grounds, the attitude of our boys, the 
honest friendliness of all. These are basic 
elements of true happiness and successful 
living of all mankind the world over. 

Disorderly homes and surroundings 
are the prime breeding spots of delinquen- 
cy and crime, and even communism and 
wars. The attitude of others toward us 
and our attitude toward others completely 
determines, of course, the way of life for 
each of us. Honest friendliness is indis- 
pensable to human life in this tiny spot of 
the universe called The World. 

Children's problems of childhood 
and youth are intensified by attitudes and 
behaviour of adults. 

We constantly hear the term "Juve- 
nile Delinquency" and the newspapers 
are ever reminding us of this terrible 
problem. A recent Boston Herald edi- 
torial lauded the proposal of a new "Boys 
Town" in this area to care for 3,000 boys 
annually. Removal of the youngsters 
from their unfortunate surroundings and 
providing adequate, well orjianized life 
programs would be a start in the right 
direction. To wait until they are in 
trouble or on the verge of trouble is a 
questionable procedure. The concen- 
tration of 3,000 in one area, as proposed, 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



would be a tragic attempt to cure delin- 
quency. The problem can largely be 
solved, which reminds us of the statement 
of an eminent jurist who had severed the 
knot of wedlock of over 1,600 couples in 
his court and was asked what advice he 
would give to prevent divorce. He said, 
"None, they wouldn't take it if I did." 

In the meantime let's continue to justi- 
fy the observations of the two enthusiastic 
young men, with pride in our "well kept 
grounds," glory in "the attitude of the 
boys," and always be grateful for the 
"honest friendliness" of our little com- 
munity. 

Our home school has had upward of 
4,000 boys enrolled since the year 1814 
when its doors were first opened at the 
corner of Cambridge and Lynde Streets 
in Boston. The count is 3,317 since Thomp- 
s )n's Island became its home in 1833. 
More than 60 other schools have been 
founded either using ours as a model or 
following along closely similar lines. Band 
music, printing, wood working and agri- 
cultural experiences have all made great 
strides throughout America since being 
pioneered by our school. 

We are not content to rest on whatever 
good the past or present has brought forih. 
We expect our school will provide a 
happy, well adjusted home life and broad 
development program to thousands more 
in the years ahead. 

Topics in Brief 
Labor Day was observed as a full 
holiday, of course, but there were unusual 
aspects. In the first place we were pre- 
pared for a major hurricane, for we had 
been warned several times that such was on 
the way. Fortunately the storm veered 
out to sea and we were spared any dififi- 
culty whatever. Secondly, our new students, 
who were to come in mid-morning, had 
been notified to report at the Public 



Landing at five o'clock, when all danger 
of the storm would have been passed. This 
they did, in time to have a holiday meal 
on the beach, as a part of the observance 
of the day. This new group, numbering 
15, may aptly be called the "Hurricaners." 

Classes for the new academic year be- 
gan on Septembers. Kenneth J. Rose will 
serve as principal, and will teach the 
mathematics courses, as he did last year. 
Arthur H. Clark will again head the 
science department and will also teach 
some history courses. Miss Jean F. Baird 
will continue her good work as teacher of 
the sixth and seventh grades. A new 
member of the staff, John Burckes, will 
teach English and History. 

The annual outing of the Rotary Club 
of Boston was held at the School on 
September 12. More than 200 members 
of the Club, and their guests, were present. 
The program for the day was carefully 
planned by the Committees. Activities for 
everyone, young and old, took place with 
the timing such that every event was held 
as scheduled. The weather cooperated so 
that the entire program was held out of 
doors in the lovely setting of our school 
campus. Mr. Meacham is a past president 
of the Club and acted as host for the day. 

With the beginning of the new school 
year our band has begun its series of weekly 
rehearsals under the direction of our 
bandmaster. Major Frank L. Warren. 
Year after year our group has achieved 
high ratings at the school music festivals, 
and we have every hope that the high 
records and acclaim which our group has 
received will be equalled, and possibly 
bettered, by the 1953-54 F. T. S. Band. 
Enthusiasm and interest is at a high pitch 
and nearly every boy is enrolled either in 
the band or in a beginners' class. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



On Monday evening, September 21, 
we were treated to an excellent enter- 
tainment. First on the program were 
selections by a barber shop quartet from 
Quincy. The personnel included George 
Schools, tenor; Robert Cooper, lead; 
William Childs, baritone, and Alfred 
Cornell, basso. The concert given by the 
quartet included many old favorites, all of 
which we enjoyed tremendously. Follow- 
ing the quartet was a pianist-vocalist, Hugh 
McGuinnis, who sang comedy songs and 
entertained with jokes and stories. These 
men came to us through the efforts of 
Donald S. MacPherson, '17. 

The entertainment was completed by 
a great magic and humor show staged by 
Malcolm E. Cameron. '19, assisted by 
Mrs. Cameron. "Mai" Cameron has 
earned an enviable reputation as an out- 
standing entertainer and certainly he gave 
us a real treat as he performed his numerous 
magic feats, one after another with re- 
markable polish. His main wish, it seems 
to us, is to entertain, rather than mystify, 
and he certainly does both with the skill 
ihatonly years of professional appearances 
can develop. 

We thank these entertainers for 
coming to us with a show \\hich we will 
long remember. 

Charles S. Marvin, editor of the Island 
Echoes, a publication issutd by the Long 
Island Hospital, and Samuel Correnti, of 
the Hospital's Department of Physical 
Medicine visited us en September 15. 
Both were very much impressed with the 
facilities we have for the education and 
training of our boys and had a pleasant 
time visiting and talking with many of the 
boys and instructors. 

In the October issue of Island Echoes 
there is an excellent article by Mr. 
Marvin telling of the visit. He writes 



that our campus reminds one of a minia- 
ture Harvard Yard, while the baseball 
and football fields, encircled by a cinder 
track, are superior to many of those of 
much larger schools. 

We were glad to meet neighbors 
Marvin and Correnti and appreciated 
their accounts of life on Long Island, 
where is located a modern hospital which 
has attracted the attention of the medical 
field for the fine work it is doing. 

The football season got away to a 
good start on October 3, when our boys 
won over the Milton sophomores 54-20. 
Parents and friends of the boys, as well 
as many graduates, were on hand to cheer 
the team to victory. Even though the 
score wjis perhaps a bit one-sided, the boys 
from Milton put up a good game, and 
enjoyed their visit to Thompson's Island, 

The Quincy radio station, WJDA. 
carries a running summary of our football 
games each Saturday afternoon, and our 
friends can keep tabs on how the games 
here progress by tuning the station, 1300 
on the dial. 

Alaska 
On March 30, 1867, our country made 
a treaty with Russia and we secured Alaska. 
Andrew Jackson was president and many 
people thouj:ht he was not wise in buying 
such a barren, far off country. The United 
States paid $7,200,000 in gold for Alaska. 
It was used then by the Russians, whose 
chief business was trapping animals for furs. 
The total acreage is vast, 586,400 square 
miles, an * it cost us two cents an acre. 
Russia had been trying to sell us the land 
for several years and was secretly happy 
that we bought it at what they thought 
was a bargain for them. 

Not much attention was paid to 
Alaska until gold was discovered in 1896. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



It is still being mined profitably. The 
whole area is rich in natural resources. 
There are vast forests and timber is a 
major product. Fishing is another major 
industry, and there are large canneries. 
Alaskan salmon is famous the world over. 

Tin, platinum, antimony, tungsten, 
copper and gold are mined in Alaska. 
Hard and soft coal mines are good 
producers, and there is a growing interest 
in the oil buiiness. Prospects for the 
petroleum industry in certain parts of 
Alaska are bright. 

Juneau is the capital and has a popu- 
lation of about 130,000. The land has 
been a territory since August 24, 1912. 
It it governed by senators and representa- 
tives headed by a governor, appointed by 
our president. Although it is not a state 
yet, most people think that it will be 
before too long. 

Alaska has become an interesting land, 
and many tourists visit there every year. 

Henry T. Murphy 

The First Football Practice 
On September 1 those who wanted 
to try out for the football team had the 
first practice. The locker room was filled 
with familiar husde, bustle and noises. 
The boys were busy hunting for T shirts, 
pads, and getting into their uniforms. 

Soon we were on the field. The 
laughing and shouting stopped and we got 
down to work. We had a short calis- 
thenics drill and then we worked on the 
blocking machine. We were all glad to 
get at this machine until the first time we 
hit it, for it seemed to hit us right back. 
After this we practiced on the dummies, 
which was better, because there was no 
resistance from them. We next learned 
two plays. This finished practice for the 
first day of 1953 football. Later we went 
swimming, for it was a hot day. 

Robert Fabello 



Learning Football 
Last September when I came here I 
didn't know much about football, because 
I didn't have a chance to play. I was 
chosen on one of the club teams and 
gradually I learned some of the rules of 
the game and how to play it. This year 
I am trying out for the varsity and hope I 
get in to play some of the games. All of 
us like football, and it is an exciting, rough 
game. 

Bruce Alexander 

Additional Alumni News 
Edward Capaul, '05, was a recent 
visitor. He is the proprietor of the Swiss 
Family Laundry at 3-4 Glenwood Place, 
Roxhury. It has been nearly fifty years 
since Mr. Capaul graduated, and through- 
out this period he has kept an active in- 
tert^st in the alumni association, and may 
always be counted upon to be among 
those present at all functions. 

William G. Beadle, '12, was a 
visitor October 3. He came as the guest 
of our bandmaster, Mr. Warren, to attend 
the band rehearsal and see the football 
game. Although he did both, much of 
his time was spent in checking our clarinets 
and making repairs as needed. Mr. 
Beadle has for many years been an instru- 
ment repairman with the Cundy-Bettoney 
company. It was fine of him to come to 
us and assist with our instrument problem. 

Mr. Beadle has always been interested 
in all phases of school life and activities, 
and particularly so the band. He lives in 
Randolph, at 219 Grove Street. 

Donald S. Duquet, '51, graduated 
from Braintree high school last June, then 
moved to New Jersey where he worked 
for a time in a department store. He 
lately enlisted in the air force and is doing 
his basic training at Sampson Air Force 
Base, Geneva, N. Y. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



ZU J\\mm Association of Che farm and trades School 



Alton B. Butler, '26. President John Patterson '43 Vice-President 

Newton, Mass. W. Medford, Mass. 

Donald S. MacPherson '17, Treasurer 
Wollaston, Mass. 



William C. Burns. '37, Secretary 
No. Wilmington, Mass. 
G. George Larsson, '17, Historiao 
Hyde Paris. Mass. 



John E. Bete, '96, we report with 
sorrow, passed away on September 1. 
We extend our deepest sympathies to 
Mrs. Bete, who has written us from the 
family home at 11 Grant St., Greenfield, 

Mass. 

Mr. Bete spent a lifetime in machine 
shop work, and was the inventor of a 
special shoe tree which was promoted by 
the A. O. Miller Machine Co., of 
Brockton. He was devoted to his Alma 
Mater, and always glad to hear news of 
the School and Alumni Association. 

Our sincere sympathies are extended 
to Mr. and Mrs. Clyde W. Albee, '33, 
upon the death of their only child, a son 
George, aged 10, at the Childrens Hospi- 
tal in Boston on September 9. Funeral 
services were held in Revere on September 
12. Floral tributes were many and beauti- 
ful, and included lovely wreaths from Farm 
and Trades School friends and from the 
staff of the Museum of Science where 
Mr. Albee has been employed for many 
years. 

William F. Anderson, '25 has for 
many years been employed in the 
woodworking trade. This year he has 
been specializing in the construction of 
kitchen cabinets, a field in which work 
opportunity is almost unlimited at the 
present time. He lives at 3 St. John St., 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. He may always be 
counted among those present at all alumni 
activities, and is an occasional visitor to 
the school during the football seasons. 

Berton E. Cadorath, '47, is a 
member of a U. S. Marine Corps Band, 



and his address is 3rd Marine Division 
Band, Hdq. Co., Hdq. Bn., care of Fleet 
Post Offii.e, S.in Francisco, California. 
He had his boot training at Parris Island, 
and then became a member of the Post 
Band at Quantico, Va. In July of this 
year he was transferred toCamp Pendleton, 
California, to join the 3rd Marine Division 
Band and after one week of duty there the 
band was ordered to Camp Gifu, in Japan, 
where he is now stationed. 

We have received a fine letter from 
his mother, Mrs. Weita M. Cadorath, who 
tells us that Bert has written since his arrival 
in Japan, is fine and getting all the edu- 
cation he can from his travels. We thank 
Mrs. Cadorath for her good letter. It is 
always a pleasure to hear from old friends. 

IVERS E. WiNMILL, '25 is a member 
of the Longfellow Tambourine Trouba- 
dors. This group was featured on the 
fifth anniversary program of the "Toast 
of the Town" television hour recently, 
with Ed Sullivan as master of ceremonies. 
Fabulous entertainers presented a tremen- 
dous show, and the Tambourine Trouba- 
dors, strictly an amateur group, more than 
held their own with the professionals, 
causing the audience to break out with 
emphatic applause at the astonishing 
precision shown. 

W^e are looking forward to a pleasant 
evening on October 24, when the Annual 
Banquet of the Alumni Association will 
be held. As our members are aware, the 
event will take place at the Eliot Lounge 
in Boston at 6:30 P. M. We want a 
banner attendance, and indications are 
that such will be the case. Come and 
enjoy a happy reunion with fellow alumni. 




Vol 57 No. 7 Printed at The Farm and Trades School, Boston, Mass. Nov., 1953 

"Entered November 3, 1903 at Boston, Mass., as Second Class matter, under Act of Congress, of July 6, 1S74 



Hallowe'en 

One evening in the 5'ear which is re- 
served strictly for fun and pleasure is that 
time when Hallowe'en is observed. This 
year was no exception, and we enjoyed 
one of the best parties held in years. 
Many of the instructors acted as leaders, 
and all the boys took part. 

The hall was attractively decorated 
with corn, pumpkins, lanterns and other 
accessories so that party atmosphere was 
immediately created. The decorating 
committee did a fine job in setting the 
stage, as it were, for the gala party. 

The party began with a buflfet supper, 
prepared and served by our kitchen and 
dining room staff. Sandwiches, doughnuts, 
pumpkin pie, cider and other good 
Hallowe'en foods were enjoyed. 

An "amateur hour" entertainment 
followed. This included many stories, 
poems, skits and stunts. Nearly all of the 
boys in the school were called to the stage 
and all had a great time taking part and 
enjoying the humor of the show. Some 
of the instructors helped out in leading 
songs and stunts, all of which helped to 
make this part of the party one of pleasure. 

Following the entertainment there 
was a series of contests, games and 
Hallowe'en stunts. The games were 
enthusiastically played, and all were 
planned purely for fun and laughs. The 
stunts included many of the old favorites 



such as bean bag toss, darts, pinning the 
tail on the donkey and others. In the 
opinion of most, this part of the party 
was the big feature. There were plenty 
of peanuts, apples and candy bars so that 
the winners of each contest were suitably 
rewarded. 

The party lasted for more than three 
hours and j^ave all much fun and pleasure. 
The happy cooperation of the boys, and 
the leadership of the instructors, combined 
to give all of us reason to tuck in our 
memories another event for pleasant 
recollections in years to come. 

Thompson's Island 

Thompson's Island is located in 
Dorchester Bay, Boston Harbor. In area 
it is 157 acres, and its circumference is 
three miles. It has been the home of the 
Farm and Trades School since 1832, when 
the school moved to the island from its 
Boston location. The entire island is 
owned and used by the school. There is 
a big farm, and the first buildings seen on 
arriving are the white barns. There are 
many buildings, including dormitories and 
shop buildings grouped in the center of 
the island. It is a beautiful island, with 
lovely lawns and gardens. But who can 
tell about Thompson's Island in just a 
short article like this? 

Paul Parker 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Harnessing the Horses 
We have a team of horses. Blackie 
and Tom. Althousih they spend most of 
their time in the pasture taking life easy. 
once in a while they are called upon to 
work. We used to have six or more 
horses, and have the stalls for that number 
now, but the tractors do the work quicker 
and better. 

In harnessing a horse the neck pad 
and collar are first put on. Then the 
harness itself is placed on the horse's back. 
The harness is fastened around the collar. 
The rear part of the harness is adjusted so 
that the horse's tail lies over the rum pstoop. 
The bridle is next put on. The second 
horse in the team is harnessed in the same 
way. The horses are then lined up in the 
way they are going to pull and the reins 
clipped to the bridle ring, each outside 
rein going to its outside ring. The two 
inside reins are crossed and are clipped 
on the inside bridle rings. 

The team is driven to the farm im- 
plement being used and backed up, one 
on each side of the pole. The neck yoke 
is fastened and the tugs hitched to the 
whiffletrees. If the horses have been 
properly harnessed and hitched they are 
ready to go to work. 

Ralph F. Hopkins 

A Fire 

One night after supper Bill James and 
I were looking out a window watching 
quite a severe electrical and wind storm. 
Suddenly we saw what looked like a big 
ball of fire come out of the sky and land 
in the north end grove. It looked for a 
moment Hke a big torch, and then went 
out so that we thought the tire was out for 
good. We went in the sitting room to 
watch television. Soon Mr. Thomas 
came in and recruited us to go to north 
end with buckets. We soon had the fire 
out, which was in a tree. 

Robert W. Wright 



Farm vs. Laundry 

I have been working in the laundry 
and have been changed to the farm. I 
certainly like working on the farm better. 

Each morning I help clean the cow 
barn, or feed the pigs or bring the vege- 
tables to the kitchen. These are all jobs 
I like to do, I especially like working 
with the animals. 

In the laundry I had to watch the 
clock to see that the clothes were in the 
machines just so many minutes, that they 
were rinsed just so long. Then everything 
had to be folded just so, and when we 
had ironing to do by hand we had to see 
that the iron was set for the right tempera- 
ture and didn't burn the clothes. 

The farm is the job for me. 

Kenneth C. Alexander 

Why Not? 
I like to play football, and so do 
thousands of other boys across the nation. 
I think all boys should play the game. 
They wouldn't all be stars, but they would 
get action, fun and competition from the 
sport. Every so often some boys say they 
can't play the game, but that isn't really 
so. They are just doubtful of their ability, 
or they are timid or too lazy to play. 
Anyone can learn football if he wants to. 
Just try. 

Ralph R. Schofield 

The Cow 
The cow is a common dairy animal 
and its principal purpose is to produce 
milk. It has to be kept clean and comfor- 
table at all times. We have about forty 
registered Guernseys in our herd, and they 
are milked by machine. A record is kept 
of each milking, so that we always know 
how much milk each cow produces. 
Visitors always enjoy stopping at our cow 
barn and seeing the animals, especially the 
young stock. 

Douglas Boyd 



THOMPSONS ISLAND BEACON 



My First Day 
It was 10:30 A. M. on Monday, Sep- 
tember 7, Labor Day, that my family 
brought me to the Public Landing to meet 
the Thompson's Island boat. The boat 
didn't come, and my mother phoned and 
found out that hurricane warnings were 
up, and the PiLGRIM wouldn't come until 
4:30 P. M. We returned at this time, and 
I came to the School. At first I didn't 
think I would like going to school here, 
but after being here a few weeks I think 
Thompson's Island is a wonderful place. 

James E. Anderson 

Propeller Trouble 

One Sunday night when we were 
going to leave City Point for the Island 
the propeller on the Pilgrim became 
disabled. We were towed to our wharf 
and soon had the boat on the beach. 
When the tide went out we took the 
propeller shaft out and took it to a 
machine shop in Boston. In a few hours 
it was repaired, and soon the boat was 
back in service. 

Gerald L. Briggs 

Intra-Mural Football 

After the varsity squad was picked 
we chose teams for the intramural league. 
Barry Fuller and Dan Dockham were 
elected captains, and they chose their teams 
naming them Notre Dame and Navy. 
The teams play one game a week, and 
the season lasts until Thanksgiving. Last 
year I was on the winning team, and I 
hope I will be this year also. 

Harold L. Spurting 

Football Thoughts 

The football season is more than half 
over and we have had a good time. We 
started in really hot weather and the days 
have grown gradually cooler, which is 
good because we can play better. Our 
first game away was with the Milton 



Academy second team, which we won 39 
to 13. We were treated royally by the 
academy boys. We are as yet undefeated . 
We learn new plays for each game, first 
from a blackboard drill, and then on the 
field. We have a crowd of loyal rooters 
who come to every game, and so far have 
cheered the team to successive wins. 

Arthur A. Sprague 

A Hike 

Last summer at camp we decided to 
go on a hike. We went to a reservoir 
and saw some tracks, but no one could 
identify them. We hiked along the edge 
of the reservoir and saw more tracks, and 
then noticed a kingfisher across the water. 
We came to a forest ranger's house and 
from there we could see almost the entire 
reservoir. We continued our hike and a 
red fox jumped almost in front of us. 
Later we saw a chipmunk. On a side 
road we noticed skins which a snake had 
shed and a big turtle. It was a good hike. 

John W. Cronin 

Poultry 

I have been helping out in the poultry 
department lately. We have two large 
houses, a brooder house and a laying 
house. The range is about three acres in 
size and the young birds are kept there 
during the summer. We have a number 
of small coops on the range, and wafer 
is piped to a convenient location. The 
range is changed each year to a new 
location. This year it is at the northeastern 
end of the orchard. 

Our birds are Rhode Island Reds and 
we are now getting one thousand eggs a 
week from them. During a full year the 
egg production is close to one hundred 
thousand. 

I am interested in poultry farming 
and like to learn the best ways to keep 
the pens clean, feeding systems, and how 
to care for the birds at all times. 

Thomas Angelos 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Cbompson's Island Beacon 

Publitbed Monthly by 

THE FARM AND TRADES SCHOOL 

Thompioa'i leland, Boston Harbor 

A PRIVATE SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF EXCELLENT 

CHARACTER SUPPORTED BY ENDOWMENTS. 

TUITION FEES AND SUBSCRIPTIONS 



Vol. 57 No. 7 



November 1953 



Subicription Price 



One Dollar Per Year 



BOARD OF TRUS TEES 

Calvin Page Bartlett, President 

James H. Lowell, Vice-President 

Alfred C. Malna. Treasurer 

Merton P. Ellis, Secretary 

Howland S. Warren, Assistant Secretary 

Term Expire! 1954 
George P. Denny, M. D. 
Ralph B. Williams 

Thomas Temple Pond 
Mason Sears 
Joseph L. Pendergast 
Lawrence Terry 
John Q. Adams 

Term Expire* 1955 
Gorham Brooks 
Chnrles E. Mason 

Donald S. MacPherson 
Philip H. Theopold 

Augustus P. Loring, III 
Robert H. Gardiner 
A. Conrad Ericsson 

Term Expires 1956 
Leverett Saltonstall 
Moses WilliamB 

William M. Meacham 
George S. Mumford, Jr. 
Frederic Winthrop 
John Lowell 

Edward V. Osberg 

Advitory Committee 
N. Penrose Hallowell 
Edwin H. Place, M. D. 

The greatest need of the world to-day 
is the rebuilding of the Christian spirit of 
service, the basic development plan at our 
home school. Why not help a fine, worthy 
boy achieve his goal by making a financial 
contribution to America's best investment? 



We propose to write a series of nine 
articles pertaining to the major features of 
progress of our school, which we hope 
will be of interest to the readers of this 
column and add to the record for future 
reference. These articles will constitute a 
sort of word picture or brief enumeration 
of some of the salient points in our forward 
march of service to boys and the broad 
objective of helping make America a better 
and even happier area of living. 

These items will be briefly considered 
under the headings: The Present-Where 
Are We? The Past-Where Have We 
Been? The Future-Where Are We Going? 

The Present-Where Are We? It may 
seem strange to the reader that we start off 
with a word about "Football." "Surely," 
you will say, "This cannot be so impor- 
tant." But let us consider for a moment. 
Football and other seasonal ball sports 
constitute one of the chief interests of most 
boys and a large majority of men. Those 
who participate in these sports are rarely 
found in anti-social troubles. Good sports- 
manship is a prime requisite to fair and 
honorable dealings with others. Give every 
boy a few years of well coached participa- 
tion in organized athletics and there will 
be no organized gangs of boys or men 
terrorizing the neighborhood. Recently 
the President of one of Boston's great in- 
surance companies said, "I remember, 
vividly, playing football against the team 
at Thompson's Island. The harbor boat 
ride was a novel experience and I will 
never forget the good sportsmans-hip we 
encountered there. I remember one big 
fellow especially " 

Our Varsity team is still winning, not 
only games for the team, but renown for 
good sportsmanship at F. T. S. And the 
intramural games, with every boy taking 
part, are even greater assets to the broad 
program of living at The Farm and Trades 
School. The other day we received a 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



letter from one of our lads in Korea in 
which he said, "The most important day 
in my life was that day when I went into 
my first club (intramural) football game. 
My parents were amazed and so happy 
to see me in there. It was really the turning 
point in my life." This lad might well 
have become another juvenile delinquent 
except for the program of living he found 
here. 

The Band ranks very high in this 
total scheme of living for boys. It has 
been said, and with great truth, "Teach 
a boy to blow a horn and he will not later 
blow a safe." Every boy at our school 
aspires to join the Band. If there is any 
more important part in the daily life of a 
boy I have yet to find it! America's First 
Boys' Band tradition continues to spread 
its fame by State and New England awards 
and our Band Alumni are found every- 
where in the field of good music, and even 
more important, as outstanding citizens 
all over America. (Note: virtually every 
living graduate of F. T. S. has played in 
the Band.) 

Topics in Brief 

The room in the Main Building, known 
to the older graduates as the Dining Room, 
is being redecorated. A modern compo- 
sition ceiling is being installed, and later 
the walls will be painted an attractive buff. 
For more than a century the room served 
as a dining room, until time brought us 
the beautiful accommodations we now 
enjoy in Bowditch House. 



Our electric light and power supply 
comes to us from Quincy by way of a 
submarine cable. Twice this month the 
power failed, once during the supper 
period, when we had the novelty of 
having the meal by candelight. Another 
time we had no lights just before the 
evening meal. Fortunately the trouble 
was remedied after only relatively brief 
delays, and was caused by falling trees in 
North Quincy. Except for the incon- 
venience caused we incurred no great 
difficulty. 

We are rebuilding the cement walk 
leading to the wharf, and hope soon to 
have the job completed. This is a major 
job being done by our farm boys, who 
will learn considerable in doing the work. 

Football is the reigning sport during 
the fall months. The school team has 
met and vanquished four foes and there is 
one remaining game on the schedule. 
The intra-mural teams are headed towards 
the end of their weekly games also, with 
Yale, captained by Barry Fuller having 
the edge over Notre Dame, led by Daniel 
Dockham. 

William Lane, a student at Gordon 
Seminary, spoke at our two Sunday 
services on October 18, at the invitation of 
our minister, John Bartram, also a student 
at Gordon. Mr. Lane gave a fine message 
to our group and we thank him for coming 
to us. 



Our farm has enjoyed an excellent 
season, both as to quality and quantity of 
produce harvested. The potato crop was 
especially good. We experimented this 
year by planting Kennebec seed potatoes 
and were well pleased with the resultant 
satisfactory yield of potatoes of uniform 
size and texture. 



The combined sophomore and 
junior classes entertained us at our weekly 
Monday assembly October 19 with a 
musical play based upon some of the 
scenes from "Pinafore." The boys did a 
fine job and we enjoyed their performance 
very much. The songs, some of them 
parodies, were especially good. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



The freshman class presented a one 
act play, using Thanksgiving as a theme 
on October 26. Considerable humor 
and clever costumes helped to make the 
play a success. The entire class had a 
part in the entertainment. 

The month ended with our annual 
Hallowe'en party, held as usual in the 
gymnasium. The boys had a great time 
enjoying thetraditional Hallowe'en games, 
stunts and refreshments. 

1953 Football Schedule and Scores 

October 3 

Milton Sophomores at F. T. S. 

Score: F. T. S. 54 Milton Sophs 20 

October 10 
Hingham J. V. at F. T. S. 

Score: F. T. S. 27 Hingham JV 

October 24 
Milton Academy 2nds at Milton 

Score: F. T. S. 39 Milton Academy 2nds 13 

October 31 
Braintree Frosh at F. T. S. 

Score: F. T. S. 35 Braintree Frosh 

November 14 
Maiden Vocational at Maiden 

My Vacation 

I had a good time on my vacation. 
I went to Ocean Park, Maine, where my 
family rented the "Sunny Brook" Cottage. 
This WHS small, but we had enough room. 
Ocean Park is about a mile from Old 
Orchard Beach, and we went there for an 
outing. There are all kinds of amusements 
at the beach, as "Dodger" and "Coaster" 
rides. W« lived near enough to the ocean 
so we could go in swimming any time we 
wished. 

Richard B. Fulsifer 

Football 

Football here is the most important 
of all sports, and liked better than the 
others by more boys. It is a lot of fun. 



and also a lot of work. I like playing 
very much, in fact much more than last 
year. This is becaus e 1 have the experience 
and know why I am asked to do some 
things which I used to think unimportant. 
We have a good schedule, and have won 
our first two games. We all hope to end 
the season with a good record. 

Norman W. Sellevaag 

Football Practice 

This is my first year playing varsity 
football and our coach is teaching me to 
center. We begin our practice by a 
calisthenics drill and then have tackling 
and blocking practice. After this is over the 
first and second teams run through a set 
of plays. 

We practice every day, and if it should 
rain, we have blackboard drill. 

Alexander D. Marinakis 

Camp Dorchester 
Last summer I worked at Camp 
Dorchester as a kitchen boy. There were 
180 boys in camp. My work was mostly 
setting tables for meals. After work I 
went fishing most of the time. Once in a 
while I went with the nature counselor 
hunting for snakes, foxes and rabbits. I 
had a £Ood time at Camp Dorchester. 

Edward M. Walker 

Our Alma Mater 

Every article and item in the Sep- 
tember Beacon was very interesting, 
dealing as they did in our kind of human 
relationship. 

In addition to making life-long 
friendships while studying, working and 
playing at the School every boy is gaining 
some of the polish he will require all 
through life in dealing in human relation- 
ships. Perhaps a large part of the 
advantage that college graduates have over 
nongraduates is their ability to get along 
well with others. To learn now how to get 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



alon^ well with instructors, boys, and all 
others, is the chance of every F. T.S.boy 
for happy and successful living now and in 
later life. The BEACON speaks to us all 
of this kind of development. 

Good conversation is the finestsport in 
life. Every well planned recitation is 
important practice in the good conversa- 
tion of human relations; practice that 
leave its mark of tact and pleasant co- 
operation. Every task well done will 
leave its mark of practice in successful 
living especially on one trying to "play 
the man." Every sport well played marks 
the player as a sportsman. Good conver- 
sation is partly short story telling and 
writing, and our BEACON speaks well to 
us of our School. 

William F. Anderson '25 

Additional Alumni News 

Eugene Proctor, '38, is a master 
sergeant in the Air Force, and is now in 
his seventh year of service in Japan as a 
Radio Operations Supervisor. Happily 
Mrs. Proctor is with him, which makes 
life at least endurable, but both are looking 
forward to their return home within six 
months. Sergeant Proctor has requested 
assignment here in the Northeast, and he 
feels that he will be relocated by early 
summer. 

Some facts included in a recent letter 
are of interest. The greatest concern has 
been in helping the Japanese recover from 
terrific disasters caused by floods and ty- 
phoons, which made thousands homeless. 
Drowning, starving, disease and freezing 
caused almost unbelievable suffering. 
Travel is difficult by automobile, and it 
takes about an hour to cover 15 miles on 
an average trip. In his locality for every 
two pleasant days there are five days of 
rain. These, and many other statements 
made his letter of unusual interest. 

The Proctors would be glad to hear 



from F. T. S. friends. Their address is: 
M-Sgt. Eugene Proctor, AF20115596. 
1809th AACS GP, APO 710, c-o Post- 
master, San Francisco, California. 

Stephen J. Zevitas, '47, has written 
from Korea, where he is a member of an 
army band. He is having what he terms 
a "wonderful experience" and is enjoying 
his band work. While crossing the Pacific 
he spotted a schoolmate, JOHN S. HlG- 
GINS, '48, and both had many get-togethers 
aboard ship. Upon arrival in Japan he 
lost track of Higgins, for there were 3,000 
men making the trip. Zevitas was soon 
sent to Korea, where he spent many weeks 
before his turn came for a few days leave, 
which he spent in Yokohama, Japan. 
While there he was snapping photos of a 
Communist parade when he was grasped 
by the arm. He turned to stare into the 
face of Edward H. Strom, '50, who is 
an army meat inspector in Yokohama. 
It was not long before both were having a 
tremendous reunion. They drank a toast 
to Jimmy Thomas and were photographed, 
the photo now being a prize possession of 
Jimmy's parents. 

Why not write a note to Sergeant 
Zevitas, and the other grads in the armed 
forces. Addresses are listed monthly on 
this page and the boys would be pleased 
beyond words to hear from you. Zevitas 
can be reached at 40th Inf. Div, Band, 
APO 6, care of Postmaster, San Francisco, 
California. 

We note in a recent issue of the Boston 
Herald a photograph of Ramsey C. Allen, 
Class of 1930. He was one of the sponsors 
of a testimonial dinner to Thomas Parker, 
a leader in Boston boating circles for many 
years. Mr. Allen heads the R. C. Allen 
Co. The main showroom of the concern 
is in Boston, at the corner of Federal and 
Purchase Streets. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



ZU Jllttmiti Jlssociation of Che farm and trades School 



Alton B. Butler, '26, President John Patterson '43 Vice-Presider 

Newton, Mass. W. Medford, Mass. 

Donald S. MacPherson '17, Treasurer 
Wollaston, Mass. 



William C. Burns. '37, Secretary 
No. Wilmington, Mass. 
G. George Larsson, '17, Historian 
Hyde Park, Mass. 



Joyce Easter Meacham, '46, the only 
living woman eligible to be rated as an 
alumna of The Farm and Trades School, 
had several distinctive honors during her 
enrollment here. She entered the sixth 
grade at The Farm and Trades School 
with a group of boys all of whom were a 
year and a half older. In her first year in 
this boys' class Jo ranked highest in effort. 
Her academic average and mark in English 
ranked second to Carl Irving, being in 
the high B's. Two other high ranking 
classmates that year were Robert Smith 
and Stephen Zevitas. 

In her second year three other high 
ranking lads entered the class, and, al- 
though Jo's average and effort continued 
high, Lawrence Cable rated first place in 
academic honors, closely followed by 
Bruce Haeger. Donald DeWolf was a 
close fourth. During that year Jo rated 
second in the Printing Office trade course, 
became a regular member of the Band 
and was active in tennis, swimming and 
dramatics. 

After two years of enrollment at The 
Farm and Trades School Jo transferred to 
Dana Hall to complete her preparation for 
college. Her work at F. T. S. proved 
valuable at her new school where she con- 
tinued to be one of the youngest but 
sufficiently high academically to rate ad- 
mission to Middlebury College in the fall 
of 1949. At Dana Jo was especially pop- 
ular among the girls and faculty. She was 
active in many extra-curricular affairs and 
was awarded a special prize for being 
the most friendly and most helpful girl in 
the Senior Class. 

At college Jo continued in her special 
interests, majoring in English, playing 



tennis, skiing a bit, active in her Sorority, 
Variety Show, and in her senior year 
Managing Editor of the Kaleidoscope. Jo 
graduated from Middlebury in June, 1953. 
Jo's special interest is in the field of 
writing and believes that an advertising 
organization or department is a logical 
approach to that goal. After considering 
several offers from book companies, 
publishers and other business concerns in 
New York and Boston she decided to go 
with Boston's Jordan-Marsh Co. She is 
in their Executive Training Course and 
at the present time is Assisiant Editor of 
the store publication. 

This article is rather long but we 
thought our readers might be interested to 
know what is happening in the life of the 
only living girl Alumna of F. T. S. and the 
only girl ever to have played in America's 
First Boys' Band, the F. T. S. Band. 

Among the many graduates who have 
visited us during the football season is 
James Patterson, '43. He is a sales- 
man for a leading maker of cellophane 
tape products. His home is at 78 Semin- 
ole Street, Mattapan, Mass. 

Weston O. Page, '38 is a teacher 
coach at Stevens High School, Claremont, 
N. H. He and Mrs. Page live a busy life, 
being associated with the many functions 
of community life in which a teacher is 
called to serve, and caring for their three 
fine sons. Jeffrey arrived two months ago, 
while Jimmy is headed toward his second 
birthday and Bobby his fourth. The Pages 
live at 37 Grove Street, Claremont. New 
Hampshire. 




Vol 57 No. 8 Printed at The Farm and Trades School, Boston, Mass. Dec, 1953 

Entered November 3, 1903 at Boston, Mass., as Second Class matter, under Act of Congress, of July 6, 1874 



Thanksgiving Day 

Thursday, November 26, dawned 
fair and clear, after a period of very heavy 
rain. The big event of the day, the 
Harvard-Yale football game, had to be 
cancelled because of the rain-soaked 
gridiron. However, the Army-Navy 
game between the younger boys was played 
because this was a six-man game and 
could be played on a small area. One of 
the lawns near the dormitories was utilized 
for the game. Tom Cronin captained 
the winning team. Navy, while Harold 
Spurling led the losers. Army. 

At noon came the Thanksgiving feast. 
This was truly a wonderful meal, and 
preceding it Mr. Meacham gave a few 
brief remarks relating to the serious 
purpose of the holiday. On the Sunday 
before Thanksgiving our church services 
were devoted to the Thanksgiving theme, 
so that the religious significance of the 
season was brought home to our boys. 
The feast, which has become the symbol 
of our national Thanksgiving, was of 
course centered about huge turkeys, roasted 
to a golden brown. 

The afternoon was pleasant, and most 
of the boys used the time to further their 
interest in hobbies, or hiking around the 
beach. A top-notch football game was 
being televised from Utah which claimed 
the attention of many. 



In the evening we had a fine movie 
show, featuring the most important 
baseball world series games which were 
attended by our presidents. Woodrow 
Wilson, Warren Harding, Calvin 
Coolidge, Herbert Hoover, Franklin 
Roosevelt and Harry Truman were 
pictured throwing out the baseball to begin 
each classic and then the outstanding plays 
of each series were shown. The boys 
were much interested in this film, which 
taught history in a clever fashion. 

The holiday was very much enjoyed, 
and each of us had full reason to pause 
and reflect on the wonderment of God's 
goodness to us. 

Museum of Science 

Saturday, the 14th of November, the 
sixth grade went to the Museum of Science. 
Our teacher, Miss Baird, got permission 
from Mr. Meacham for the trip and our 
kitchen instructors packed a nice lunch for 
us. 

As we were changing cars in the 
subway we saw the basement store of 
Jordan Marsh. We bought some apples 
at a subway stand that were big and juicy. 
We each ate ours as we walked from North 
Station to Science Park. 

For some time we went through the 
museum working most of the exhibits 
ourselves. Later we went to see Mercury 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



cross the sun. The telescope was set up by 
the bank of the Charles River. About an 
hour later we returned to see it again. 
The lecturer said that it had traveled 
across the sun about half a million miles. 
We did not look through the telescope, 
but watched the reflection on a large square 
of white board. 

We had a very interesting visit to 
Science Park and thank Miss Baird for 
taking us. We certainly enjoyed the day 
very much. 

Walter E. Grignon 

Thank God 

Thank God for America, 

Our land so dear, 
Where people may worship 

Without any fear. 

Thank God for our Flag, 

A symbol so grand; 
We'll always be proud of it. 

As it floats o'er the land. 

Robert H. Grignon 

Stunts 

At our Hallowe'en party most of us 
were in the show. I was a ventriloquist's 
dummy, while Richard Pulsifer was the 
ventriloquist. Afterwards there were some 
stunts for us to do, They were: 

1. Pin the Cat's Tail 

2. Nail Driving Contest 

3. Ring Toss 

4. Dart Throw 

5. Ball Can Game 

We all enjoyed the stunts, and left the 
party with our pockets filled with candy 
bars, apples, and peanuts. 

Malcolm E. Cameron, Jr. 

Varsity Football 

The 1953 football team had a good 
season, winning four out of five games. 
Many of the boys were mentioned now 
and then in the sport sections of the 
Boston newspapers for their excellent 



playing. In another column will be found 
the schedule and scores. The team was 
captained by William H. Dillion. 

First Team Roster 

Teyet Ramar, re, Waltham 

Paul E. Parker, rt, Franklin 

Robert Fabello, rg, Marlboro 

S. Newcomb Graham, c, Quincy 

Loren E. Cain, Ig, Brockton 

Norman W. Sellevaag, It, Stanton, Mich. 

David E. LeVeille, le, Franklin, N. H. 

Capt. William H. Dillon, qb, Cambridge 

Ralph R. Schofield, rhb, Burlington 

Robert W. Wright, Ihb, Burlington 

William F. James, fb, Chelsea 

Second Team Roster 

Larry E. Garside, re, Boston 
Kenneth C. Alexander, rt, Woburn 
Bruce Alexander, rg, Cambridge 
Edward M. Walker, c, Boston 
Stanton H. Pearson, Ig, Dorchester 
Alexander D. Marinakis, It, Boston 
John E. Lennon, le, Boston 
Ralph F. Hopkins qb. Maiden 
Donald W. Sheehan, rhb, Dorchester 
Arthur A. Sprague, Ihb, Walpole 
Richard A. Ostrander, fb, Dorchester 

Football Summary 

Practice began just before Labor Day, 
and it was hard for the team, because the 
days were very hot. But the weather 
cooled ofT and we were ready for the first 
game with Milton Sophomores which we 
won. We took each game in stride, and 
won all but the last with Maiden 
Vocational. I think our best game was 
with the Milton Academy second team. 
The academy had a good heavy team. 
I remember one of their players was six 
foot six. 

For the squad I want to thank our 
coach, Mr. Thomas, who worked hard 
with us day after day and week after week. 
Also the assistant coaches, Mr. Rose and 

Mr. Burckes. William H. Dillon, Gap't. 



THOMPSONS ISLAND BEACON 



A Pleasant Afternoon 
My brother and I are twins, and we 
came here in September. On a football 
game day my grandmother and my aunt 
came to see us. We received some nice 
presents, including some puzzles and 
spyglasses. We watched the football 
game for a while, and then we went to 
the dormitory. While my grandmother 
rested, we went to the barn and saw the 
cows. Afterwards my brother and I played 
some pieces on our clarinets. 

Donald J. Oke 

Visiting Day 

I came here in September, and before 
long we had our first football game, which 
was also the first visiting day since I was 
here. I was at the wharf when the boat 
arrived, but my parents weren't on the 
boat. I looked towards City Point and 
saw another boat coming. My friends 
were on this boat. I was glad to see them. 

We first went to the dormitory where 
I showed them my room. Then we went 
to the football game and had some re- 
freshments. My brother wanted to see the 
cows and my flower garden so we went on 
a hike. After visiting some of the other 
places we returned to my room where we 
stayed until it was time for the boat to 
take the friends back to City Point. 

Donald E. Robicheau 

Honor Roll — Fall Term 

The hitfheit academic averages in each class <roup 
Junior Class 

Ralph A. Hopkins 
Teyet Ramar II 

Sophomore Class 

William H. Dillon 
Richard A. Ostrander 

Freshman Class 

Richard T. Castonguay 
Steven R. Wellington 



Eighth Grade Division A 

Larry E. Garside 
Stanton H. Pearson 

Eighth Grade Division B 

Howard E. Murphy, II 

Kenneth Alexander 

Seventh Grade 

Robert H. Grignon 
Malcolm E. Cameron, Jr. 

Sixth Grade 

Walter E. Grignon, Jr. 
George D. McPeek 



"A 



Best Citizenship 



Rank general conduct and effort 
in each class group 
Junior Class 

Ralph F. Hopkins 

Sophomore Class 

Edward A. Atton 
William H. Dillon 

Robert Fabello 

David W. Howard 

David E. LeVeille 

Richard A. Ostrander 

Norman W. Sellevaag 

Freshman Class 

Gerald L. Briggs 

Loren E. Cain 

Albert K. Ellis 

John E. Lennon 

Paul E. Parker 

Carleton G. Skinner 

Arthur A. Sprague 

Steven R. Wellington 

Eighth Grade Division A 

Thomas C. Cronin 

Roy W. Ganong 

Alexander D. Marinakis 

Edward M. Walker 

Eighth Grade Division B 

Howard E. Murphy, II 
Ralph R. Schofield 

Seventh Grade 

Robert H. Grignon 

Donald E. Robicheau 

Donald J. Oke 

Sixth Grade 

George D. McPeek 



THOMPSONS ISLAND BEACON 



Cbomp$oit'$ Island Beacon 

Pubiiibed Monthly by 

THE FARM AND TRADES SCHOOL 

Thompson't laiand, Boitoa Harbor 

A PRIVATE SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF EXCELLENT 

CHARACTER SUPPORTED BY ENDOWMENTS. 

TUITION FEES AND SUBSCRIPTIONS. 



Vol. 57 No. 8 



December 1953 



Subscription Price 



One Dollar Per Year 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Calvin Page Bartlett, President 

James H. Lowell, Vice- President 

Alfred C. Malm. Treasurer 

Merton P. Ellis, Secretary 

Howland S. Warren, Assistant Secretary 

Term Expire* 1954 
George P. Denny, M. D. 
Ralph B. Williams 

Thomas Temple Pond 
Mason Sears 
Joseph L. Pendergast 
Lawrence Terry 
John Q. Adams 

Term Expire* 1955 
Gorham Brooks 
Charles E. Mason 

Donald S. MacPherson 
Philip H. Theopold 

Augustus P. Loring, III 
Robert H. Gardiner 
A. Conrad Eriosson 

Term Expire* 1956 
Leverett Saltonstall 
Moses Williams 

William M. Meacham 
George S. Mumford, Jr. 
Frederic Winthrop 
John Lowell 

Edward V. Osberg 

Advisory Committee 
N. Penrose Hallowell 
Edwin H. Place, M. D. 

The greatest need of the world to-day 
is the rebuilding of the Christian spirit of 
service, the basic development plan at our 
home school. Why not help a fine, worthy 
boy achieve his goal by making a financial 
contribution to America's best investment? 



The second in a series of articles about 
the progress of the School attempts to 
outline briefly some of the current doings 
of this 139-year-old home school for boys, 
under the heading The Present— Where 
Are We? 

The basic program of most schools is 
considered to be the courses of study from 
books, the academic, theoretical, studies 
pertaining to social knowledge, but has 
little or no practical experiences in the 
best ways to do things. Class room studies 
are highly important to our American 
way of life and we emphasize these studies 
here in order that every boy may acquire 
under expert guidance and leadership the 
maximum of his capacity in the vast store 
of available knowledge from the sixth 
grade through three years of high school. 
Through our staff of trained and ex- 
perienced teachers every boy has available 
to him a broad and diversified program 
of studies in the social and physical sciences 
and mathematics. Never in the history 
of this school has there been a more 
complete and well rounded academic 
program preparing for college or general 
study, nor a more competent staff of 
teachers. 

Acquiring practical knowledge of 
nature, methods and uses of living plants 
and animals from seed to harvest and 
through the multiple processes to food on 
the table is indispensable but all too often 
neglected in the great maze of urban life. 
The "know-how" of the many every-day 
trades cannot possibly be encountered by 
youngsters in most traditional schools. 
The responsibilities of production in the 
many phases of home and community 
living are denied to most boys, but here 
taking responsibility is the key-note of our 
success. Did you ever notice (or perhaps 
you remember your own youthful experi- 
ences) how proud a child is of his own 
ability to set a table, bake a cake, iron a 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



shirt, trim a hed^e, paint a wail, seed a 
lawn, milk a cow, drive a tractor or go to 
tile store and do tiie family shopping? 
These and literally thousands of other re- 
sponsibilities requiring expert training are 
taken every day by our ten-to-seventeen- 
year-old-lads. Is it any wonder that our 
alumni are such outstanding citizens? 

Recently our staff and boys laid a 
thousand feet of six-inch water main. 
Among the many maintenance jobs we 
are currently doing are wharf repairs 
involving about a thousand feet of sup- 
porting timbers and surface lumber and 
rather extensive cement work on the 
same, installing a new ceiling in a room 35 
by 48 feet, re-glazing and painting the 
exterior trim of our main building. The 
list is far too long to enumerate in this 
article. Will these boys ever forget these 
vital experiences? Maybe the ripple of 
this great work will not spread far across 
our own bit of the Atlantic Ocean but 
America and the World will be that much 
better because of our efforts. 

Topics in Brief 

The Beacon wishes its readers a 
Merry Christmass and a Happy New Year. 
May 1954 bring to all a bountiful supply 
of God's blessings. 

Thanksgiving is always a joyful season 
here, and our boys are led, without 
formality, to a keen realization as to the 
full meaning of the day. Our Thanks- 
giving sermon was preached by Mr. 
William Lane on the Sunday preceding 
the holiday. Mr. Lane explained the 
Christian view of Thanksgiving Day, and 
how grateful we should be for God's 
marvelous gifts. We are confident that the 
real significance of the holiday is fully 
understood by even our youngest boys. 



More about the wonderful feast and other 
holiday activities will be found in another 
column. 

The sixth and seventh graders 
combined to present a program at our 
November 16 assembly. It was rather a 
pretentious enertainment for the smaller 
boys, and extremely well done. Several 
of the boys gave a short play, and there 
was a magic exhibition followed by several 
musical selections. 

Our Sunday church services are being 
conducted again this year by Mr. John 
Bartram. Sunday school is held in the 
morning, and a formal service in the 
evening. Mr. Bartram has many of the 
boys assist him with the services. A 
Sunday afternoon Bible club is held, and 
this group also meets during the week 
under the leadership and encouragement 
of our staff members, Mr. and Mrs. 
Dockham. 

Our band has been making steady 
progress this month, and we look forward 
to another fine year for the group. Our 
bandmaster, Mr. Warren, has been con- 
ducting weekly rehearsals and several 
rather difficult selections have been 
mastered. Most of the boys are studying 
instrumental music, and we hope th^t in 
another month or two some of the 
beginners may be proficient enough to 
join the group. Our Band has always 
been an important part of our school life, 
and year after year the boys earn high 
honors for their musical ability. 

Our boat crew has completed the 
construction of a 12-foot tender for the 
Pilgrim III. The boat is made from 
marine plywood, and is painted a glisten- 
ing white. It will replace the old tender, 
which has been in use for many years. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



The boys in the sixth grade, accompa- 
nied by their teacher, Miss Jean F. Baird, 
visited the Museum of Science on Nov- 
ember 14. As might be expected, the trip 
was most worth while and the boys enjoyed 
it very much. Our alumnus, Clyde W. 
Albee, '33, chief carpenter at Science Park, 
met the group and did much to make the 
trip a success. 

The eighth graders gave an entertain- 
ment at our weekly assembly on November 
9, in the form of a play burlesquing a day 
at school. There were many comical lines 
and jokes, and humorous costuming added 
to the fun. Ten of the class members took 
part. 

The boys are enjoying the series of 
weekly moving picture shows which take 
place on Saturdays. The pictures have 
all been good, and some excellent. Our 
films are for the most part the product of 
20th Century Fox, selected for recreational 
use in schools. Travelogues, sports or 
cartoons are usually shown, along with a 
major feature film, so that the boys get a 
well balanced program. Occasionally 
pictures are shown strictly for their edu- 
cational value, and there are many such 
fine films available for our use. 

David A. Pulsifer, one of our juniors, 
played two baritone horn solos on the 
Christian Endeavor program broadcast 
over WHDH on November 22. Later he 
did more solo work at his church, the 
Green Street Baptist Church, in Melrose. 
His sister, played the pipe organ accom- 
paniments. A chancel light was dedicated 
in memory of Alan Pulsifer, father of the 
young musicians, at the church service. 

The pens in the laying house at our 
poultry plant have been given the-r 
customary annual vigorous cleaning and 
the Rhode Island Red birds have been 



moved indoors from the outdoor range 
where they have been during the summer 
months. Many of the boys helped with 
this work, and they have learned the 
necessity of absolute cleanliness in the 
poultry houses. The precautions taken in 
this regard have helped us maintain a 
healthy, well laying, vigorous poultry 
flock over the years. 

The Fall term ended on November 
25, and was preceded by a week of ex- 
aminations. The Thanksgiving recess 
extended until November 30. 

The football season for the school 
team ended on November 14, when our 
boys lost to Maiden Vocational 12-6, at 
Maiden. This was a close game to the 
very end, and our boys lost several oppor- 
tunities. The season resulted in four wins 
and one loss for our team, and all of the 
games had a predominant factor, — good 
sportsmanship. 

1953 Football Schedule and Scores 

October 3 

Milton Sophomores at F. T. S. 

Score: F. T. S. 54 Milton Sophs 20 

October 10 
Hingham J. V. at F. T. S. 

Score: F. T. S. 27 Hingham JV 

October 24 
Milton Academy 2nds at Milton 

Score: F. T. S. 39 Milton Academy 2nds 13 

October 31 
Braintree Frosh at F. T. S. 

Score: F. T. S. 35 Braintree Frosh 

November 14 
Maiden Vocational at Maiden 

Score: F. T. S. 6 Maiden Voc. 12 

Grew Garden Prizes 

In order to encourage the boys in 

flower gardening, prizes for excellence in 

this work were instituted sixty-four years 

ago by Mr. Henry S. Grew, a trustee, and 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



have been Jiiven annually. Since the 
death of Mr. Grew his daughter, Mrs. S. 
V. R. Crosby, has given the prizes. 

Those who were awarded the prizes 
this year were: 

1. Harold L. Spurling 

2. Alexander D. Marinakis 

3. Edward A. Atton 

4. Albert E. Ellis 

5. Carleton G. Skinner 

6. John L. Peterson 

7. David E. LeVeille 

8. Stanton H. Pearson 

Vacation 
Last summer I spent my vacation at a 
camp. I was there for six weeks and 
enjoyed it very much. Once we went on 
a mystery hike and I told a wierd story. 
We acquired some pets at camp such as a 
pigeon, some snakes and two rabbits. I 
liked archery and nature study best of all 
the activities. 

Roy W. Ganong 

Hallowe'en 
On the evening of October 31, which 
was Hallowe'en, we had quite a time. It 
began at six o'clock when we had supper 
in the gymnasium. There were three 
kinds of sandwiches, cider and pie. After 
supper we had a show in which almost all 
the boys had a part. Lin Meacham had 
a skit which we acted with him. It was 
called "The Lion Hunt." After this there 
were games and contests and the winners 
got prizes of peanuts and candy bars. We 
all had a good time. 

Robert H. Grignon 

Additional Alumni News 

George J. Zevitas, '42, visited us 
recently. He is a baker, and plans to 
open his own business when time is op- 
portune. He lives in Roxbury, at 2 
Hewes Street. 



Malcolm C. Wiley, '50. writes 
from Pusan, Korea, to say that through 
the last issue of the BEACON Wayne D. 
Suitor, '50, has contacted him and they 
hope to soon have a real get-together. 
Other mail has been received through the 
Beacon article, and we hope that our 
readers who csn, will continue to write 
our men in the service, particularly those 
on overseas duty. He writes that the 
weather is footballish in Korea, and he is 
thus reminded of the great days he had 
on the Thompson's Island gridiron. He 
wishes the team well. His address is 
Malcolm C. Wiley, AF 11253740, 1873d 
AACS, Mob. Comm. Sq., APO 970, 
care of the Postmaster, San Francisco, 
California. 

Lawrence J. McManus writes that 
he is a radar operator and is stationed at 
a small island north of Japan. He adds 
that he will be in the far East, as far as he 
knows, for 24 months. He writes that his 
training here has helped him a great deal 
in his service career, and that he misses 
the band rehearsals at the School very 
much. His address is: A-3c Lawrence 
J. McManus, AF12432256. 511th AC&W 
GP, Det. 7, APO 309-1. care of Postmaster 
S. F. C2 LiF. 

A recent item in the Boston Post 
tells of a gift from Fay S. Blood, a 
former pupil, of an autograph book con- 
taining the signatures of the greats and 
near greats of the 101st Infantry down 
through the years. The book was received 
with appreciation by the Yankee Division 
Memorial Club. 

Mr. Blood will be remembered as an 
entertainer in his younger days and 
performed under the stage name of the 
"Wyoming Yodeler." He now lives at 
35 Daisy Avenue, Long Beach, California. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Che fllumni Jissociation of Che farm and trades School 



Alton B. Butler, '26, President John Patterson '43 Vice-President 

Newton, Mass. W. Medford, Mass. 

Donald S. MacPherson '17, Treasurer 
Wollaston, Mass. 



William C. Burns. '37, Secretary 
No. Wilmington, Mass. 
G. George Larsson, '17, Historian 
Hyde Park. Mass. 



IVERS E. WiNMiLL, '23, we note in a 
recent issue of the Boston press, wa^ one of 
seven Boston policemen promoted to ser- 
geants. For many years Sergeant Winmill 
was traffic officer at the Houghton Dutton 
corner in Boston, and in recent years has 
been attached to station 8, being at the 
desk atthe Boston Harbor station. We are 
happy that recognition given Mr. Winmill 
for his many years of outstanding service 
has resulted in this promotion on Nov- 
ember 26, and we extend congratulations. 

A. Wallace FitT, '47, has been in 
the U. S. Army since March 1952. He is 
now in Korea and expects to be stationed 
there for another year. He was married 
in June, 1952, and now has a infant son, 
William Arthur Fitt, of whom he is very 
proud. 

He took his basic training at Fort Dix 
and was sent by boat to Japan from New 
York. The trip through the Panama 
Canal, and the stopover at Hawaii were 
wonderful experiences. Once in Japan 
the men were given special courses so that 
they would be familiar with the Korean 
people and customs. Upon completion 
of these courses Wally was sent to the 
Island of Kajou. Here he hires about 35 
men per day to work as laborers for the 
Army. 

Needless to say he would rather be 
home with his wife and baby son, but is 
taking full advantage of the opportunity to 
see the Orient. He would very much 
like to hear from his schoolmates and his 
address is: Pvt. Arthur Wallace Fitt, Jr. , 
I. S. 21311551. Hq. & Hq. Co. 226th O. 
B. D. APO 59, care of Postmaster, San 
Francisco, California. 



W. Marshall Hall, '27, has earned 
a fine reputation as a musician, and is 
currently a member of some of Boston's 
top musical groups. He plays both baritone 
and trombone, and directs a National 
Guard band. He is married, has one son, 
Kenneth, a pupil at Medford High School. 
The Halls live at 72 Webster St., Medford, 
Mass. 

Theodore L. Vitty, '29 attended 
Wakefield High School and Bangor 
Theological Seminary. Later he entered 
the insurance business. He has main- 
tained a deep interest in his Alma Mater 
through the years, and we were happy to 
meet him at the recent Alumni dinner. 
He is District Manager of the Universal 
C. I. T. Credit Corporation with offices at 
14 Central Avenue, Lynn, Mass. 

Alan C. Waldron, '53, writes of 
his summer vacation experience in Ohio, 
and New Brunswick. He is doing well in 
high school, in Dexter, Michigan, and is 
a junior. Dexter is a small town, and the 
high school has pupils from surrounding 
towns so that the total school enrollment 
is large enough to permit music, athletic 
and recreational clubs. He is enjoying his 
new school life. His address is 3321 E St., 
Dexter, Michgan. 

Kenneth E.Kearns, '24, and Mrs. 
Kearns have recently returned from a 
vacation trip to Europe and the British 
Isles. Mr. Kearns is in the advertising 
business, and one of his major projects is 
the directing of the annual Chevrolet soap 
box derbies. The Kearns home is at 54" 
Maple Street, Manchester, N. H. 




Vol. 57 No. 9 Printed at The Farm and Trades School, Boston, Mass. Jan., 1954 

Entered November 3, 1903 at Boston, Mass., as Second Class matter, under Act of Cotigress, of July 6, 1874 



The Christmas Concert 

The annual Christmas Concert given 
on December 20 was centered about the 
play "It Was Written in the Star," by 
Esther Phelps-Jones. The cast was 
composed of five of the older boys, who 
gave a sincere and dramatic characteriza- 
tion of this timely, beautiful religious play. 
Essentially, the theme of the drama was 
based upon the concerted beliefs of the 
three kings of the Nativity scene, that of 
the promise of hope for life everlasting. 
The stage setting and costuming was done 
beautifully, and the entire presentation a 
tribute to the cast and their teacher, Mr. 
Rose. 

Music for the concert was provided 
by a choir of thirteen of the younger boys, 
who gave a superior and lovely rendition 
of two Christmas anthems. Congrega- 
tional singing of beloved Christmas hymns 
was an important part of the concert. 

Our minister, Mr. Bartram, gave the 
invocation and prayer, and read the 
Biblical text upon which the Christmas 
play was based. 

All of those taking part in the service 
did an outstanding piece of work and 
richly deserved the congratulations they 
received. 

The program was as follows: 

PROGRAM 

Hymn 407-O Come All Ye Faithful 
Congregation 



Invocation and Lord's Prayer 
Mr. Bartram 

Hymn 409— The First Noel 

Congregation 
Scripture Reading 

Mr. Bartram 

Selection— We Three Kings 
Choir 

Christmas Play- 
It Was Written In The Star 

Selection — Away In A Manger 
Choir 

Hymn 217-Joy To The World 
Congregation 

Benediction 

Mr. Bartram 

"It Was Written in the Star" 
A Christmas Play by Esther Phelps-Jones 

Time— An evening almost two thousand years ago 
Place— The housetop of Balthasar's Palace 

The Cast 
Balthasar Norman W. Sellevaag 

Melchoir Robert Fabello 

Gaspard David E. LeVeille 

Sofiamor William H. Dillon 

Sikrut Ralph F. Hopkins 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Choir Members 

Malcolm E. Cameron, Jr. George D. McPeek 

John W. Cronin Donald J. Oke 

Thomas C. Cronin Ronald A. Oke 

John A. Fritz Donald E. Robicheau 

Robert H. Grignon Richard Seaver 

Walter E. Grignon, Jr. Harold L. Spurling 
Steven R. Wellington 

Lunch at Science Park 

Last Saturday, November 14, our 
grade went to the Boston Museum of 
Science. We brought our lunch with us, 
and at noontime we gathered near the 
Museum's Charles River dock. Here 
there were comfortable benches and we 
ate the nice sandwiches which had been 
made for us by our kitchen instructors. 
It was such fun! When we heard three 
honks of a horn we knew it was Mr. Clyde 
Albee, for he had arranged to drive us to 
City Point so we could get the one o'clock 

boat. 

We had a very interesting time at 

Science Park. 

Joel C. Robbins 

Our Savior 

The night was clear 

The stars were bright; 
Our Savior dear 

Was born that night. 

Born that night 

A King was he; 
The shepherds came 

On bended knee. 

They heard the angels 

Sing their song; 
They know that night 

The Savior was born. 

In a manger 

Born a King; 
Still the blessed 

Angels sing. 

Walter E. Grignon, Jr. 



Christmas Day Events 

At ten o'clock the boys went to 
Chapel to meet Santa. We were surprised 
to discover that he was Fred Harding. 
Over 500 presents were given out in about 
an hour. Jimmy Thomas spent his second 
Christmas in Chapel with the boys and 
he had an exciting time. 

At twelve o'clock we went to dinner 
and were pleased to see that the tables 
were decorated with tall white candles 
and holly around each candlestick. We 
had a fine roast pork dinner. 

In the evening we had a movie, 
"Robin Hood" in technicolor. It was 
very exciting. The color was brilliant, 
and the acting very good. The movie 
ended a very happy day. 

George D. McPeek 

Carol Singing 

On Dec. 23 twenty-two of the boys 
went carolinij. Those who sang were choir 
bo^8, and those who had parts in the 
Christmas play. We began at 7:30 by 
singing for the instructors in the Main 
Building. Then we went to Bowditch 
House and sang there. The next stop was 
the flagpole where we sang another group 
of songs. We finished at Dormitory A. 
Then we sang over the public address 
system, and we had the songs recorded 
so that on the next day we could hear how 
we sounded. 

After we finished singing we went to 
Bowditch House, where Mrs. Warner had 
delicious refreshments of cocoa, sand- 
wiches and pop corn for us. 

Malcolm E. Cameron, Jr. 

Our Assembly Program 
Our class gave the assembly program 
recently. We had all parts of it well 
rehearsed and there wasn't a slip anywhere 
in the show. Joel Robbins was the 
announcer. Most of us were in costume. 



THOMPSONS ISLAND BEACON 



First on the program was the reading of 
twenty proverbs incompletely and asking 
the audience to finish them. Then four 
of the boys gave a short play ba^ed on 
proverbs. The Oke boys next played a 
clarinet duet. Malcolm Cameron then 
did some magic tricks, and did them very 
well, too. After this there was a clarinet 
sextet which played the Star Lullaby. 

The final piece on the program was 
a drum and trumpet piece played by 
Robert Grignon, Malcolm- Cameron and 
myself. 

Donald E. Robicheau 

My Stamp Collection 

I first began collecting stamps in 1948, 
and I now have 600 dififerent stamps, and 
many duplcates. I am very proud of my 
album. I like collecting stamps because I 
learn the names and locations of many 
countries. I think I have stamps from 
every country in the world except nine. 
I have quite a few foreign stamps which 
are not cancelled. 

Donald J. Oke 

Kitchen Work 

I am in the morning kitchen crew. We 
take turns helping in the kitchen, vegetable 
room and bakery. I like the bakery work 
best of all. I make ice cream twice a week, 
and help bake cakes and pies. Sometimes, 
especially on holidays, we make extra- 
special decorated cakes. 

Henry T. Murphy 

The Bible Club 

Some of the boys decided to have a 
Bible Club and after school began in 
September plans were made. On October 
21, 1953. under the sponsorship of Mr. 
and Mrs. Dockham, our club could be 
said to be organized. Since then regular 
meetings have been held every week, with 
an average attendance of 20 boys. We 
pray and study the Bible at each mid-week 



meeting and have a pleasant social time. 
We are now studying the first three 
epistles of John in the New Testament. 

David E. LeVeille is president of the 
Club, and Thomas Angelos is vice 
president. The secretary is Carleton G. 
Skinner. 

We often have extra features at our 
meetings. Movies of our school have 
been shown. At Christmas time we had a 
wonderful party, and we realized then 
that we have plenty for which to be 
thankful. 

All boys are invited to join the 
Bible Club. If you are not a member 
why don't you come to the next meeting? 
You'll be glad you came. 

Carleton G. Skinner 

New Year's Party 

On New Year's Eve the boys in each 
dormitory had a party. In Dormitory A 
we set up the basement rooms with card 
tables and had many different kinds of 
games, such as chess, checkers, cribbage 
and Monopoly. We played games for a 
couple of hours and then had refreshments 
of candy, cookies and punch. After this 
we went to the sitting room and watched 
television. We saw the big crowds in 
Times Square celebrate the arrival of the 
New Year. 

I'm sure that everyone will agree that 
we had a real good time at the party, 
thanks to those who planned it for us. 

Ronald A. Oke 

Tobogganing 

Last Saturday Larry Garside, John 
Fritz and I went tobogganing. We had 
a lot of fun, even if we hit a tree once. 
We went down the slide together, and by 
twos, and we went alone at least once. 
We had the best ride when we went 
altogether. When we got tired we went 
to Dormitory A and watched television. 

George D. McPeek 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



CDompson's Island Beacon 

Published Monthly by 

THE FARM AND TRADES SCHOOL 

Thompson's Island, Boston Harbor 

A PRIVATE SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF EXCELLENT 

CHARACTER SUPPORTED BY ENDOWMENTS. 

TUITION FEES AND SUBSCRIPTIONS. 



Vol. 57 No. 9 



January 1954 



Subscription Price 



One Dollar Per Year 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Calvin Page Bartlett, President 

James H. Lowell, Vice-President 

Alfred C. Malm, Treasurer 

Merton P. Ellis, Secretary 

Howland S. Warren, Assistant Secretary 

Terra Expires 1954 
George P. Denny, M, D. 
Ralph B. Williams 

ThomasTemple Pond 
Mason Sears 

Joseph L. Pendergast 
Lawrence Terry 
John Q. Adams 

Terra Expires 1955 
Gorham Brooks 
Charles E. Mason 

Donald S. MacPherson 
Philip H. Theopold 

Augustus P. Loring, III 
Robert H. Gardiner 
A. Conrad Ericsson 

Term Expires 1956 
Leverett Saltonstall 
Moses Williams 

William M. Meachsm 
George S. Mumford, Jr. 
Frederic Winthrop 
John Lowell 

Edward V. Osberg 

Advisory Corarailtee 
N. Penrose Hallowell 
Edwin H. Place, M. D. 

The greatest need of the world to-day 
is the rebuilding of the Christian spirit of 
service, the basic development plan at our 
home school. Why not help a fine, worthy 
boy achieve his goal by making a financial 
contribution to America's best investment? 



The Christmas season was so bounti- 
fully good to us that we pause in our train 
of thought pertaining to the progress of 
the School to give thanks to our many, 
many friends for all the thoughtful and 
generous remembrances at this time. 

Christmas is always the busiest time 
and the happiest time on Thompson's 
Island. Preparations start two months 
ahead of the great day, planning for the 
Christmas religious play enacted by a cast 
of boys, exchange of name slips to give to 
each other, and boys slips to Santa Claus 
for the School to remember each one with 
a gift. 

The entire Christmas week is filled 
with events and much carol singing. 
Then Christmas morning Santa (actually 
a young graduate in disguise) comes from 
across the bay, is escorted by the boys 
operating a vehicle for his comfort (?), 
to the main building. Here in Chapel, 
with two huge Christmas trees all decorated 
and lighted and Christmas gifts heaped 
all about, Santa proceeds to distribute the 
parcels. 

We counted 477 items on the tree 
this Christmas. This does not include the 
m.any gifts at various parties during the 
week. 

Over 200 cards were received from 
alumni and other friends of the School. 
This does not include the individual cards 
received by each one. 

Cash and various packages were re- 
ceived from friends of the School for gifts 
to individual boys and for enjoyment of 
all, amounting in value to well over 
$100.00. 

The instructors were extremely gener- 
ous in gifts to all the boys and to the 
Headmaster and his family. 

For all of these generous contributions 
to our happiness and in memory of Him 
whom we honor at this great birthday 
anniversary we extend most grateful thanks. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



It was, indeed, a season of real joy, such as 
every alumnus of the School counts as the 
happiest period of life, and which every- 
one who has spent the Christmas season at 
Thompson's Island agrees is a never- 
forgotten experience. 

Topics in Brief 

Christmas was a glorious season atthe 
School. All of the traditional events 
were held, including the many parties 
and observances. Fred Harding, '53, 
acted as Santa Claus and arrived on the 
Pilgrim III early Christmas morning to 
distribute huge piles of gifts. The Christmas 
concert, carol singing, days in town for 
shopping, dormitory and club parties and 
many other activities combined to make 
it a season rich in life-long memories. 

Five of the older boys, assisted by a 
choir of thirteen younger boys, combined 
to present a religious concert on Christmas 
Sunday, December 20. The play "It Was 
Written in the Star" was enacted superbly, 
and the singing of the soprano boys' choir 
was excellent. It did seem as though 
those taking part were inspired with the 
wonderful message of the Christmas 
season. 

The boys were in town either on 
December 11 or 12, meeting their parents 
at City Point and taking the time to do 
their Christmas shopping. Many were 
much impressed with the really wonderful 
Christmas scenes set up in the show 
windows of the big department stores. 

Edward Rowe Snow and a delegation 
of members of the Harbor Ramblers 
visited the School on December 13. Mr. 
Snow brought gifts for all and told his 
plans for visiting the lighthouses on both 
the East and West coasts as the "Flying 
Santa Claus." Mr. Snow is an authority 



on the history of Boston Harbor and 
much of the eastern coast and is the 
author of several historical books. He 
is widely known as a lecturer and story 
teller, and for many years has been a 
radio favorite with his weekly programs. 

An annual gift which is always very 
much enjoyed is the Christmas entertain- 
ment provided for by Mrs. Arthur Adams. 
This year the technicolor movie "Robin 
Hood" was shown, much to the delight 
of the boys. This is a very fine picture, 
ideally suited for school use. 

Fred Smith, a singer of gospel hymns 
in the Western style, was with us on 
Sunday, December 5. and assisted with 
both our religious services. Mr. Smith 
is a classmate at Gordon Seminary of our 
minister, Mr. Bartram, and came at his 
invitation. An excellent singer of songs 
with a message, and an able speaker to 
young people, he added much to our 
services and we thank him for coming. 

The winter vacation extended from 
December 24 until January 4, and many 
of the boys spent some of this time at 
home. Vacation ended with gala New 
Year's parties in each of the dormitories 
and holiday activities of sports and movies 
over the New Year's weekend. 

On Thursday evening, December 3, 
a surprise testimonial dinner was given to 
Robert R. Kitching, who has completed 25 
years of service with us as our poultry 
instructor. Mr. Meacham spoke of the 
service to our boys which Mr. Kitching 
has given and then presented him, on 
behalf of the School, a wrist watch suitably 
engraved. The honor bestowed upon 
Mr. Kitching is indeed richly deserved, 
and friends of the School over the past 
quarter century will be happy to hear of 
the event. 



6 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Recreation during the winter months 
is centered pretty much about basketball 
as an indoor sport, and coasting, skating 
and hockey as outdoor sports, as weather 
conditions allow. The school team will 
play a nine-aame schedule, and the two 
intra-mural leagues have already begun 
the annual competition. 

Our Band played aconcert on Boston 
Common on December 6, as a unit 
participating in the City of Boston 
Christmas Festival. The boys played 
several standard works for band inter- 
spersed with Christmas carols Later the 
Band repeated the concert for the Sunshine 
Club of the Volunteers of America. Late 
in the afternoon the boys were the guests 
of Mrs. Katherine Ostrander at her home, 
where they were serveci a delicious lunch. 
Mrs. Ostrander is the mother of Walter, 
'5L now with the armed forces in Europe, 
and Richard '54. The boys certainly are 
grateful to her for her kindness, for they 
had a grand time at her home. 

Our paint shop crews have been busy 
decorating some of the instructors' 
rooms in the main building, as well as 
reiinishing the main halls and stairways. 
Some paint work has also been done in 
the oiSces. 

One of the happy joys of Christmas- 
tide is receiving greeting cards. Graduates, 
former instructors and other friends of the 
school this year sent a total of several 
hundred cards, many of which were origi- 
nal creations. We were, of course, very 
happy to be so remembered. It does 
seem as though the Christmas cards grow 
more lovely annually. Some are truly 
works of art. To those who sent cards 
we say, "Thank You." 

A list of those who sent cards was read 
in Chapel on Christmas morning. 



Shaw and Temple Prizes Awarded 

Early in December the Shaw and 
Temple prizes for excellence in conduct 
were awarded for the six month period 
ending December L This was the 130th 
successive time that the Shaw cash prizes 
have been given to the ten highest boys 
in conduct rating. The Temple prizes are 
books, and w^ere first given by Mr. Thomas 
F. Temple to encourage those who almost 
made the Shaw list. These prizes are now 
given in memory of Mr. Temple by Mr. 
N. Penrose Hallowell. The remaining 
five boys on the list received honorable 
mention. 

Those who received the Shaw prizes 
were: 

Shaw Prizes 

Carleton G. Skinner, Jr. 
Edward A. Alton 
Gerald L. Briggs 
John E. Lennon 
William H. Ddlon 
Larry E. Garside 
Albert K. Ellis 
Arthur A. Sprague 
Ralph R. Schof^eld 
David E. LeVeille 
The Temple Consolation prizes were 
awarded to: 

Temple Consolation Prizes 

Alexander D. Marinakis 
Howard E. Murphy 
Richard A. Ostrander 
Robert Fabello 
Thomas Angelos 

Honorable Mention was earned by 
the following: 

Honorable Mention 

Loren E. Cain 
David W. Howard 
Paul E. Parker 
Norman W. Sellevaag 
Ralph F. Hopkins 

Congratulations to the prize winners 
for the fine record they attained. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Christmas Shopping 
One day before Christmas we went 
in town to buy presents. The boat left 
around ten o'clock. When we got to the 
Public Landing there weren't many people 
there, but they began to come soon after. 
In the afternoon we went out to 
dinner, and after this I brought presents 
for my roommates and other friends. I 
went visiting after I got the presents. 

The time went by quickly and we 
left for City Poiut. We got there a few 
minutes before the boat came. Soon we 
were headed back to the School. I had 
quite a time getting up the avenue with 
all my gifts. 

Joel C. Robbins 

Looking Ahead 

Summer time is coming and I will 
be glad because I will be able to work on 
the farm. Last summer I spent a lot of 
my spare time there. I worked in the 
garden, helped get in hay, and at times 
worked in the cowbarn. I have always 
liked farm work. I am looking ahead to 
the summer time because during vacation 
we can do so many things we can't do 
when we are going to school every day. 

Larry E. Garside 

Visiting Day 

Last fall I worked in the afternoon 
dining room on visiting days. It was quite 
a job to get the dishes done and be ready 
to meet the boat, but we always managed 
to. We watched the boat dock, and if 
our parents weren't on it we'd wait for the 
second trip. During the afternoon we 
went to the ball field to see the football 
games. The games were very exciting, 
especially when our team was ahead. 
When it was time to leave, the tower bell 
would ring, and another Friends Day 
would be almost over. 

Robert H. Grignon 



Additional Alumni News 

At the annual meeting and dinner of 
the Engineers Blue Room Club of Boston, 
a Masonic group, our Alumni were repre- 
sented as follows: 

Mr. and Mrs. Merton P. Ellis, '97 

Howard B. Ellis, '98 and Miss Helen 
I. Ellis 

Mr. and Mrs. Willard H. Perry, '10 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Pendergast, 
'16 

Calvin O. Holmes, '15, and Luke W. 
B. Halfyard, '21 are also members of the 
Club, but were not present at the annual 
dinner. 

Annually, in March, our Band plays 
for the Blue Room Club, and the concert 
is a red letter occasion for our band boys. 

Franklyn S. Harris, '40 received 
his Master's degree in Nutrition last year 
and in March, 1953, was married. After a 
honeymoon trip to Florida he did further 
graduate work at the University of Tenn- 
essee and in September accepted a position 
as Nutritionist with the Hermitage Feed 
Mills of Nashville, Tennessee, His work 
consists of formulating old feeds and 
creating new ones, such as dog rations, 
catde supplements and broiler mashes. 
Although Mrs. Harris enjoys now being 
just a housewife, she has had a grand 
career as Educational Director of Wash- 
ington Pike Church and is a graduate of 
Scarritt College. Mr. and Mrs. Harris 
have put their church membership in the 
West End Methodist, and are active 
members in many of the church functions. 
They live at221 Lauderdale Rd., Nashville, 
Tenn. 

Several of our graduates have com- 
pleted their preparatory school training at 
Mount Hermon School in years past, and 
this year SamUEL F. GriSWOLD, '53, is a 
student there. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



ZU jllumni ilssociation of Che farm and trades School 



Alton B. Butler, '26, President John Patterson '43 Vice-President 

Newton, Mass. W. Medford, Mass. 

Donald S. MacPherson '17, Treasurer 
Wollaston, Mass. 



William C. Burns. '37, Secretai 
No. Wilmington, Mass. 
G. George Larsson, '17, Hi 
Hyde Park, Mass. 



V. Herbert Gordon. '15, had the 
honor of bein^ elected president of the 
North Adams Savings Bank at the annual 
meeting of the corporation held recently. 

Mr. Gordon, who lives at 476 E. Main 
St., No. Adams, is a partner in the con- 
tracting tirm of Gordon & Sutton and is a 
former Commissioner of Pubic Works in 
North Adams. He has been a corporator 
of the bank since 1931, a trustee since 1932, 
a memberof the board of investment since 
1941 and a vice president since 1945. A 
veteran of World War I he served in 
France with the 26th Army Division. 

Harold F. Bent, '35, graduated 
from Parsonfield Seminary and the State 
Normal School in Gorham, Maine, where 
he received his collegiate degree in 1941. 
He taught for one year at Rumford and 
then worked for a time for the New 
England Shipbuilding Corporation at 
Portland. During the same period he 
began asmall printing business at Gorham. 
Later he added a sheet metal shop and 
air conditioning sales unit. 

He was married in 1941 to Helene 
K. Libby. They have two children, 
Jeannine Louise, six years old, and 
Kathleen Susan, now nearing her second 
birthday. 

Mr. Bent has expanded his business 
gradually and only recently installed a 
linotype and complete bindery in his 
printing plant. He has signed a long term 
sub contract for heating installations with 
the largest prime heating contractor in the 
Portland area. For the past six years he 
has operated rental income property, at 
present having seventeen units. His sheet 
metal and air conditioning businesses have 
grown with the times. 



Mr. Bent leads a busy life, and 
whatever success he has achieved is due to 
the understanding and encouragement of 
Mrs. Bent, a wonderful wife and mother. 
He adds in a note to us that nearly every 
day in his work he discovers something 
helpful which can be traced directly to the 
training he received here. 

He is a member of the Harmony 
Lodge, Number 38 A. F. & M., the 
Kiwanis Club, and the Methodist Church 
in Gorham, where he serves on the 
Official Board, and as a Trustee and 
Finance Officer. 

The Bents own their home at 32 
Main Street, in Gorham, Maine. This is 
a spacious twelve room colonial residence, 
and the Bents have remodelled the house 
to permit gracious New England living. 

Friends of FRANK J. Dow, '30, will 
be saddened to hear of his death on Dec. 
4. After his graduation from F. T. S. 
he attended Vermont Academy and later 
served in the armed forces during World 
War II. He was a chef and had followed 
the trade for many years. 

Congratulations are in order for our 
alumnus-trustee, MerTON P. Ellis, '97, 
upon his recent election to the chairman- 
ship of the Board of Appeal of the City 
of Boston. He formerly served as a member 
of the Board. 

William F. Sonier, '52, and Joseph 
C. Turner are both employed by Boston 
printing firms. Having Saturdays free, 
they have opened the "Bill and Joe's 
Housecleaning Service" on that day. We 
suspect they will do well in this business 
venture, and wish them good luck. 




Vol. 57 No. 10 Printed at The Farm and Trades School, Boston, Mass. Feb., 1954 

Entered November 3, 1903 at BostoD, Mass., as Second Class matter, under Act of Congress, of July 6, 1874 



The Boston Farm School Offering 
A copy of "The Boston Farm School 
Offering," Vol. I, No. 2, published May, 
1859, has just turned up, found among old 
papers in an attic of a friend of the School 
following his decease. Mr. Alfred C. 
Malm '00, Treasurer of the School, 
presented this rare copy for our archives. 
We are especially grateful to Mr. Malm 
for this very rare and valuable original 
publication of nearly 100 years ago. 

Another alumnus, George O. Poole 
'27, has been urging the Beacon to resume 
reprinting the column "90 Years Ago." 
This old copy of "The Boston Farm 
School Offering" is ideal for that purpose. 
We propose, therefore, in. each Beacon 
issue during the next twenty months to 
run one of those items or articles which 
was first printed in 1859. 

We have searched the files at the 
School and we have found no copies of 
that series of publications nor any record 
of same. Can any reader of the BEACON 
find a copy of the first issue, date of 
December, 1858? Your own attic or one 
of the Public Libraries in Boston or 
vicinity, Dublin, N. H., the home town 
of the School's Superintendent of that era, 
Mr. William A. Morse, may be holding a 
copy. A find like this is priceless and a 
very real contribution. 



Our Minstrel Show 

Each class prepares an entertainment 
for our weekly assemblies. Our teacher, 
Mr. Rose, told our class that it would be 
our turn before we knew it, and we had 
better get ready. He asked for suggestions. 
A few were given, but were not very well 
received by the class. Then a minstrel 
show was proposed. This seemed to be a 
good project for us. Mr. Rose got several 
minstrel show books for us to look over. 
We picked one we thought we could do 
best. Not long after this rehearsals began. 

The show opened with the entire cast 
singing a rousing song to the tune of 
"California Here I Come." The four end 
men followed with a tambourine routine 
which everyone enjoyed very much. The 
melody used was "Show Me The Way to 
Go Home," and the four end men had 
their parts learned perfectly. "Camptown 
Races" was next sung, and this was fol- 
lowed by a baritone solo by Dave Pulsifer, 
"The Darktown Strutter's Ball." Between 
numbers the interlocutor and end men 
kept up a stream of conversation and told 
many jokes. At one time there was a 
series of conundrums by the interlocutor 
and end men which was very funny. 

The show continued with Norman 
Sellevaag singing "Buffalo Gals." After 
a comic speech by one of the endmen, 
Teyet Ramar played for a cornet solo the 
always popular Stephen Foster song, "Old 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Black Joe." The end men did another 
tambourine routine which brought the 
show to the finale, which was a c'ever 
arrangement of the song "Good Night 
Ladies." 

Everyone enjoyed the show and we 
had plenty of fun getting it ready. The 
cast was as follows: 

The Cast 
Interlocutor William H. Dillon 

Mr. Fantail David B. Pulsifer 

Mr. Avalanche David W. Howard 

Mr. Firefly S. Newcomb Graham 

Mr. Agony Richard A. Ostrander 

Mr. Cotton Hull Norman S. Sellevaag 

Chorus 
David E. LeVeille Edward A. Atton 

Teyet Ramar II Ralph F. Hopkins 

Robert Fabello 

A Happy Surprise 

It was Thanksgiving morning, and 
the Holden family were gathering at the 
family homestead for the holiday feast. 
It was a big family, Ma and Pa and nine 
children, six girls and three boys. Three 
of the children were married, and the 
grandchildren helped swell the total at the 
big table to fourteen. But there was one 
empty chair. 

Everyone would be present, every- 
one, that is, except Eddie. He was in 
the Navy, and would not be home for 
Thanksgiving. 

'Tt isn't right, keeping our boy away 
on Thanksgiving," said Pa, with a snap 
in his voice. 

"Oh, let's not argue again," replied 
Ma. "It would be silly to go to the Sec- 
retary of the Navy. He doesn't know 
Eddie. Besides, Washington is 700 miles 
away." 

The morning passed, and it had been 
a busy period. As time for the Dinner 
approached the family wondered who 
would fill the vacant seat. The Holdens 



had asked a nearby naval base to send a 
sailor who wouldn't be home for the hol- 
iday. Eddie was in California and 
couldn't possibly get there. 

The doorbell rang, and to the surprise 
of all, in walked Eddie. After five min. 
utes of hugs, kisses, and handshaking 
Eddie explained how he managed to be 
present. He had replaced a man in a 
great emergency in a plane crew and the 
plane had landed at the naval base in 
their town. Fle was handed an address 
to report to for Thanksgiving, and to his 
great joy it was his own home. 

"Eddie, see, it just goes to prove that 
the Golden Rule works. How happy we 
all are," said Ma, with a little tear in her 
eye. 

You can be sure that no family any- 
where had a happier Thanksgiving, even 
though Eddie's plane took oflf late that 
evening for another leg in its long flight. 

Richard A. Ostrander 

Our Lost Gat 
On Friday I helped with the early 
milking, going to the cowbarn at five 
o'clock. I fed the calves while two other 
boys stripped after the milking machine. 
We decided that something was missing, 
and we were right, because our pet cat 
had not made an appearance. We went 
looking for him and finally found him 
contentedly sleeping in the hay. What 
does this prove? That cats don't get up 
at five in the morning, even to get a dish 
of warm Guernsey milk. 

Larry E. Garside 

Range Work 

After the chickens had been taken 
from the range and put in the laying 
house we began getting ready for next 
year. The range fences were taken down, 
and the wire rolled and placed with the 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



posts. Then the seed boxes and egg 
laying boxes were collected and put away. 
The water pipe was disconnected to 
prevent damage. The range location is 
changed every year and it won't be long 
before we'll have the job of making the 
place ready for the new chicks. 

Stanton H. Pearson 

Customs 

Some of the customs people have in 
other lands seem strange to us, yet they 
are rather nice, I think. For instance, 
on Christmas Eve in the Netherlands the 
children put their shoes before the fire- 
place, while here we hang stockings. In 
many European lands our Santa Glaus is 
known as St, Nicholas. Our homes are 
decorated for Christmas with a tree la- 
dened with bright tinsel and gold and 
silver bells. In Europe homes are also 
decorated. The one custom which we 
all have is that we learn how much 
pleasure we get out of giving presents, as 
well as receiving them. 

John W. Cronin 

Captain Kidd vs. Blackbeard 

In the days of pirates Captain Kidd 
and Blackbeard were the most feared. 
They were bitter enemies and one day 
Captain Kidd saw a Spanish ship off his 
bow. He began to pursue it when another 
ship appeared, that of his hated rival, 
Blackbeard. The Spanish ship was for- 
gotten and the pirates began a terrific 
battle. The Spanish fleet appeared and 
the pirates sailed for safety and got away. 
Both the pirates had vast treasures hidden, 
and each wanted them. Blackbeard tracked 
Captain Kidd to Haiti but misfortune 
struck both, for they were captured, and 
sentenced to be hanged. The pirates' 
crews, however, stormed the prison and 
rescued their leaders. This didn't do 



Blackbeard much good though, because 
Captain Kidd ran a sword through him. 
Upon findingout, Captain Kidd got Black- 
beard's treasure and then he had a great 
fortune, which he hid so that no one could 
find it. He never could use it though, 
because he was captured, tried, sentenced 
and hung. Thus ended his adventurous 
life, 

I think that someday someone may 
find this treasure, for many hunt for it. 
It is the most valuable of pirate treasures, 
and I think the only one not to be 
discovered. If you find it you will be very 
rich. 

Roy W. Ganong 

Sloyd 

Sloyd is very popular with most of 
the boys. The course begins in the eighth 
grade, and the first lessons deal with 
mechanical drawing, because a drawing is 
made of each model before the work can 
be started. 

The first model is a pencil pointer, 
which teaches the use of the knife. This is 
the only tool used for the model. Each 
succeeding model employs different tools 
so that when the course is completed all 
of the principal woodworking tools have 
been studied. 

As the boys develop skill they make 
extra models for their own use, such as 
chests, tables, lamps and other pieces of 
furniture. These are often given as gifts 
at Christmas and at other times. A good 
workman can finish the course in two 
years, although many take longer. We 
have one period a day and many of us 
work our playtime so as to keep ahead of 
the class. 

The last model is a tool chest, and 
we are certainly proud of our work when 
this chest is finished. 

Loren E. Cain 



THOMPSONS ISLAND BEACON 



CI)omp$on'$ Tsland Beacon 

Published Monthly br 

THE FARM AND TRADES SCHOOL 

Thompgon's Island, Boston Harbor 

A PRIVATE SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF EXCELLENT 

CHARACTER SUPPORTED BY ENCOWMENTS. 

TUITION FEES AND SUBSCRIPTIONS 



Vol.57 No. 10 



February 1954 



Subicription Price 



One Doiiar Per Year 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Calvin Page Bartlett, President 
Alfred C. Malm, Vice-President 
Howland S. Warren, Treasurer 
Merton P. Ellis, Secretary 
Bartlett Harwood, Jr., Assistant Secretary 

Term Expires 1955 
Gorham Brooks 
Charles E. Mason 

Donald S. MacPherson 
Philip H. Theopold 
Augustus P. Loring, III 
Robert H. Gardiner 
A. Conrad Ericsson 

Term Expires 1956 
Leverett Saltonstall 
Moses WiLiams 
William M. Meachem 
George S. Mumford, Jr. 
Frederic Winthrop 
John Lowell 

Edward V. Osberg 

Term Expires 1957 
George P. Denny, M. D. 
Ralph B. Williams 

Thomas Temple Pond 
Mason Sears 

Lawrence Terry 
John Q. Adams 
Alton B. Butler 

Advisory Committee 
N. Penrose Hallowell 
Edwin H. Place, M. D. 
James H. Lowell 

The greatest need of the world to-day 
is the rebuilding of the Christian spirit of 
service, the basic development plan at our 
home school. Why not help a fine, worthy 
boy achieve his goal by making a financial 
contribution to America's best investment? 



Editorial 

We shall again interrupt our proposed 
editorials on the progress of the School 
because -ve would like to use the space to 
tell our readers about several exceptionally 
fine tributes which have come to the 
School. 

A series of historical articles entitled 
"Early Dorchester" by the late Lawrence 
F. Berry was published by The Dorchester 
Beacon with six weekly issues from July 
31, 1953 through September 4, 1953 
headed, 'Thompson's Island." 

The Dorchester Beacon headline says, 
"Serving the Community for Over Eighty- 
five Years. More Than 250,000 Live 
Here. Most of Them Read This News- 
paper." 

These writings are well documented, 
interesting and accurate, and show the 
essential and fascinating activity here all 
the way from 1621 when the Island was 
first named "The Island ofTrevore" by 
a member of Captain Myles Standish's 
crew by the name of Trevore when they 
first explored Boston Harbor. 

It is interesting to note, as stated by 
Mr. Berry, that, "Dorchester Town Rec- 
ords furnish the following historic entry to 
substantiate her claim as founder of the 
'First Free Public School Supported by a 
General Tax on the residents (or Free- 
men) of a town.' It is ordered the 20th 
May 1639, that there shall be a rent of 20 
pounds yeerely foreu'r imposed vpon 
Tomson's Hand to bee pay'd b' eu'ry 
p'son that hath p'prtie in the said Hand 
according to the p'portion that any such 
p'son shall fro' tyme to tyme injoy and 
possesse there, and this towards the mayn- 
tenance of a school in Dorchester." 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Topics in Brief 

We have made improvements on 
our basketball court from time to time 
and this month some carpentry work has 
been done under the baskets at each end 
of the court. The backboards and baskets 
have also been strengthened. Our gym 
gives more pleasure and fun than any 
room at the School, and is always available 
for the use of the boys. 

Our sympathies are expressed to Mrs. 
Marion Nichols Walker upon the death of 
her husband, Kirk W. Walker, on Jan. 

24. Mrs. Walker served as kitchen instruc- 
tor here for more than a quarter century. 
Her hosts of Farm and Trades School 
friends will be saddened to hear of her 
great loss. 

The juniors and sophomores joined 
together to give us an excellent entertain- 
ment at our weekly assembly on January 

25. The program, in the form of an old- 
time minstrel show, included vocal and 
instrumental musical selections, stories, 
jokes and tambourine specialties. The 
costumes and makeup added much to the 
show. 

Mr. Williams, of the Wirthmore 
Feeds Company, was here this summer 
to gather information and take pictures of 
the activities of the school. This material 
was incorporated into a feature article in 
"Spatters," the monthly publication of the 
company, and was printed in the Novem- 
ber issue. The article is very well written, 
and is illustrated with twelve excellent 
photographs of everyday life here. The 
closing paragraph of the article reads: "All 
in all, The Farm and Trades School 
provides more than scholastic and voca- 
tional training — it supplies a well-rounded, 
complete, and happy living experience 
for all its boys." 



Our Scout troop held an impressive 
investiture ceremony on the evening of 
January 28, at which time fourteen 
received the rank of Tenderfoot. The 
older scouts did a fine job in staging the 
ceremony, and welcomed the new boys 
into the troop in a fitting manner. A social 
period followed the investiture ceremony. 

This month our Band has made much 
progress under the direction of Major 
Frank L. Warren, our band instructor 
since 1923. There are several appearances 
in town scheduled for the boys and we 
are confident that the 1954 Band will up- 
hold the high honors earned by our Band 
throughout its illustrious life of nearly a 
century. 

Basketball has been the principal 
sport this month. The varsity teams are 
well along on the schedule, and are 
pointing towards the small school tourna- 
ment in March. The Sears League is 
having an exciting season, and it is diffi- 
cult to name the championship team as 
yet. The Nut League, made up of the 
younger, less-experienced players, has 
played several games on its schedule, all 
of which have been well contested. 

Our paint shop crew did a good job 
in painting the band hall this month. The 
hall is used almost daily by more than 
forty of the boys, and it is well to have it 
redecorated in the colorful two-tone plan 
which our painters have used. 

Forestry Associates, Inc. is a new 
company organized to provide efficient 
and technically sound forestry service. 
We have an interest in this project, for 
Stephen L. Jacobs, son of the late Alfred 
W. Jacobs, '10, is one of the two partners 
operating the business. We wish the new 
Gorham, Maine, company the best of 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Abraham Lincoln 

Our wonderful president, Abraham 
Lincoln, was the 16th president of our 
country. He was born in a log cabin in 
Kentucky. He got his first big chnnce as a 
young lawyer in Springfield, Illinois. He 
became a representative in 1847 and later 
became well known through his debates 
with Stephen Douglas. Although an abo- 
litionist, he thought slavery unlawful. The 
Emancipation Proclamation and the 
Gettysburg Address expressed his inspired 
beliefs. He was assassinated by John 
Wilkes Booth in 1865 at a Washington 
theatre. His death caused nation-wide 
mourning, for he was a symbol of freedom 
for all. Probably the best loved phrase 
he said was, "With malice towards none; 
with charity for all." 

John A. Fritz 

Varsity Basketball 
Basketball is my favorite sport and I 
play on the varsity. The team has im- 
proved very much and we are looking 
ahead to the small school tournament, 
which begins March 5. In our games so 
far we have won three games and lost 
four. We had some good games with 
Christian High, New Prep, Braintree 
Freshman and other teams. 

Norman W. Sellevaag 

The Bears 

I play basketball in the Sears League. 
There are four teams and we play a game 
every week. Our team, the Bears, is the 
best team and John Lennon is the captain. 
We are in first place and have a good 
chance of staying on top. Our captain is 
our best player, and R;)lph Schofield is 
second best. In the last game he scored 
22 points. Other good players on our 
team are Stan Pearson, Dan Dockham, 
and Edward Walker. 

Joseph S. Lombardo 



Dressing a Pig 

Not long ago I had a "first" experi- 
ence. This was to get a pig ready for the 
table. Albert Ellis, Robert Wright and I 
held the animal while Mr. Baird did the 
butchering. As soon as the animal was 
dead we scraped the hair from the hide, 
washed the carcass and hung it. Then 
we cleaned out the innards and buried 
them. Later the pig was taken to the 
meat room where it was carved in sections 
for storage in the deep freezer. Soon we 
will be enjoying tasty roast pork and pork 
chops. 

Carlton G. Skinner, Jr. 

Bible Club 

A project we have started in our Bible 
Club is writing to Christian missionaries. 
Mrs. Dockham has the names of those 
with whom we may correspond. Already 
some of us have written letters, and almost 
any day we may get answers to our letters. 
It will be fun to get mail from foreign 
lands. 

Malcolm E. Cameron, Jr. 

My First Visit 

I visited this school on January 20, to 
see if 1 would like to be here. First the 
"ofSces were visited, and then we were 
shown through some of the shops and 
dormitories. I went to the gym and played 
basketball for a little while. We saw the 
dining room and right away I thought 
how nice it was. A few days later! came 
to the School and am a pupil in the sixth 
grade. 

Richard Ayers 

Snow Owls 

Have you ever seen a snow owl? We 
have two at the school, which have been 
here most of the winter. One is about a 
foot tall, with a wing span of approxim- 
ately four feet, and is a light grey. The 
other stands two and a half feet tall, and 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



has a wing span of five or six feet. It is a 
clear white. 

Snow owls eat field mice, pheasants 
and chickens, if they can get them. What 
do you say? Are they doing more harm 
than good? They might reduce the number 
of field mice, but the snoA^ owl would 
multiply. More snow owls would eat the 
pheasants, spoiling the sport of hunting. 
The snow owls next would begin raiding 
chicken farms, causing much trouble. 

Should we do away with snow owls? 
Someday we may have to answer this 
question, but now they are not too com- 
mon here, and are interesting to study. 

Richard T. Castonguay 

Boat Trips 

I work on the boat each afternoon. 
Our first trip is at one o'clock when the 
mail boy goes over. Sometimes we have 
freight to bring back to the school. Often 
visitors come on the one o'clock trip and 
we make another trip in mid-afternoon 
to bring them back. Our last trip is al- 
most always at five o'clock. This is when 
most of the freight comes. I make a re- 
port of each trip, time of departure, names 
of passengers and crew, and a list of the 
freight handled. Between tripslwork on 
maintenance jobs. 

William H. Dillon 

Additional Alumni News 

Carl H. KuphAL, '25, is Community 
Service OfBcer of the State Prison Colony 
at Norfolk, Mass. This is a position of 
considerable importance, and one which 
Mr. Kuphal has held for many years. He 
is much interested in Alumni happenings, 
and is one of the "Regulars" at the annual 
field day outing of the Alumni Association, 
held in June of each year. 

James L. Keith, '47, now works in 
an accounting office in Indianapolis. He 



hopes and expects soon to be called to 
work in the General Motors plant there. 
He lives at 3415 Oliver Avenue, Indian- 
apolis. He writes that his brother, Paul 
D. Keith, '47, is going to an army school 
at Fort Ord, California, and that he is in 
his final year of enlistment. 

We hope to have Paul's address soon, 
and will print it in the alumni news. 

William L. Glennon '52 writes 
that he is looking forward to a visit here, 
probably at Graduation in June. He is a 
member of an Air Force Band, and after 
his service "hitch" is up he hopes to begin 
his study for the ministry at Moody Bible 
Institute. His address is: William L. 
Glennon, A-3c, AFI12353323, 509th Air 
Force Band. Webb Air Force Base, Big 
Springs, Texas. 

Henry C. Lowell, '20. is married, 
has three children and lives at 2018 Main 
St., Athol, Mass. He is employed at the 
Western Auto Stores, in Athol. At a 
recent dinner and entertainment of the 
Rotary Club in that town he and 
Malcolm E. Cameron, '19, who 
provided the entertainment, had a pleasant 
visit talking over old times at F. T. S. 

Cecil A. Morse, '28, was given 
special mention in a recent sports column 
in the Houston, Texas, "Chronicle." 
Morris Frank, the columnist, states that 
Mr. Morse is an avid sport fan. coaches, 
officiates and upon occasion fills in as sports 
reporter for the newspaper. Herb Gray, 
the Texas tackle, is certain to reach All- 
American rating at least twice in his college 
career, and was coached by Mr. Morse. 

Mr. Morse does his athletic coaching 
as a sideline. Daily he is busy in a 
petroleum distillery plant. His home 
address is 409 E. Defee Avenue, Baytown^ 
Texas. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



ZU J\\mm }l$$oc1ation of Che farm and trades School 



Alton B. Butler, '26, President John Patterson '43 Vice-President 

Newton, Mass. W. Medford, Mass. 

Donald S. MacPherson '17, Treasurer 
WoUaston, Mass. 



William C. Burns. '37, Secretai 
No. Wilrainiton, Mass. 
G. George Larsson, '17, Historia 
Hyde Park. Mass. 



Alfred C. Malm, '00, resigned as 
Treasurer of the School at the 1954 
annual meeting of the Corporation, Mr. 
Malm expressed his reluctance at retiring 
from the responsible position but decided 
that after 37 years of handling the accounts 
of the School it was time that another 
should carry on. No persuasion would 
change his mind. Mr. Malm is the only 
alumnus who has ever been Treasurer of 
the School and after finding that he would 
not yield in his decision to retire as 
Treasurer he was promptly promoted to 
the position of Vice President of the 
Board of Trustees. This is another first 
for our devoted alumnus. No alumnus 
has ever been Vice President of the Board. 
Mr. Malm has often acted as President in 
the absence of our Chief and now there 
will doubtless be many occasions through 
the coming years when he will be filling 
the post and be required to perform the 
duties of President. 

Alfred C. Malm (affectionately called 
"Carl" by many of his large circle of 
friends) came to the School as a little boy 
60 years ago, January 31st. During all 
those years he has been closely attached 
to the School. Upon finishing his course 
here he became employed in the ofifice of 
the then President of the Board and con- 
tinued in that office in Financial Trust 
work until he went to the First National 
Bank of Boston as Trust Officer in 1926. 
Later when the Old Colony Trust Com- 
pany affiliated with the First National 
Bank he was appointed Trust Officer of 
Old Colony, a position he held until he 
recently retired and promptly assumed 
management of the physical plant and 
financial affairs of Trinity Church. 



After graduating from The Farm and 
Trades School Carl continued his edu- 
cation at night school, graduated from 
Northeastern Law School in 1911 and was 
promptly admitted to The Bar. 

Alfred Carl Malm and Susan Williams 
married and bought a home in Melrose, 
where their three children were born and 
raised. All three graduated from Melrose 
High School and all went on to college. 
Mr. and Mrs. Malm have continuously 
taken very active part in the affairs of their 
community. Carl has served as Alderman, 
President of the Y. M. C. A. and Deacon 
of the Methodist Church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Malm have two daugh- 
ters, Elizabeth and Susan, and a grand- 
daughter, Dorothy Elizabeth Malm. Their 
son. John, an alumnus of Middlebury 
College and an aviation officer in World 
War II, was lost in action. 

Rev. Theodore B. Hadley, '21. 
graduated from Bangor Theological Sem- 
inary and from Middlebury College, where 
he also did graduate work for his Master's 
degree, which he received in 1934. He 
was married in 1932, and he and Mrs. 
Hadley have devoted their lives to doing 
God's work in parishes in Vermont and 
New Hampshire. Mr. Hadley is accom- 
plished in many fields, one of them being 
poetry, and we look forward each year to 
receiving his distinctive Christmas greeting 
in the form of an original poem. 

Mr. Hadley, and Mrs. Hadley also, 
are very much interested in every phase 
of school life at F. T. S. 

The Hadleys are always at home to 
their F. T. S. friends at the parsonage in 
Hamstead, N. H. 




Vol. 57 No. 11 Printed at The Farm and Trades School, Boston, Mass. March, 1954 

Entered November 3, 1903 at Boston, Mass., as Second Class matter, under Act of Congress, of July 6, 1874 



The Boston Farm School Offering 

First in a series of articles reprinted from paper 
titled as above, Vol. 1, No. 2, May 1859. 

Editorial 

The Farm School Offering was es- 
tablished, and its first number issued, in 
December, 1858. Its publication presented 
a new feature in the operations of this 
School; and met with such favor, that we 
are now encouraged to issue another 
number. 

It is designed as a cordial Offering 
to our patrons and friends at large; a 
pleasant mode of shaking hands, and 
exchanging congratulations and sympa- 
thies, after being long denied the privilege 
of personal interviews; and to acquaint 
them in a slight degree with our trans- 
actions here. 

Being separated from the mainland 
by strong natural barriers, we are left 
much to ourselves, especially during the 
cold season. We form a litde community 
of our own; and, though our kind and 
interested Managers contribute in every 
possible way to our comfort and happiness, 
we must necessarily depend principally 
upon local means for profitable entertain- 
ment and amusement. 

Do not think, dear reader, that our 
isolated position produces unhappiness or 
discontent? Far otherwise. Our heads 
and hands are too much occupied, and 



our hearts too deeply interested in our 
charge, to admit of any such feelings. It 
we are isolated from society, we are also 
isolated from many of its vices and temp- 
tations. 

During the past winter, our School 
has consisted of one hundred and two 
boys, who have been instructed by kind 
and faithful teachers in branches suited to 
their various capacities. Much attention 
has been given to writing, and vocal and in- 
strumental music. We have now a band — 
of brass and stringed instruments — com- 
posed of boys from the School. All are 
much interested in it, and its effect is 
plainly visible upon the whole school. 

We have a well-organized Band of 
Hope, the officers of which are chosen 
once in four weeks from among the boys. 
The meetings are held weekly. The 
exercises consist of the discussion of some 
appropriate question, declamation, read- 
ing of composition, and singing. The 
meetings are interesting, and do much 
good. 

We have also a post-office with weekly 
mail arrangements; giving boys an oppor- 
tunity to write to one another, and to their 
friends on and off the island. The revenue 
from this office may not assist in paying 
government debts; but it will certainly 
assist in forming correct habits and fixed 
principles. It will assist in forming men. 

We also admit boys into our family, 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



and contrive various means for their 
amusement. 

Winter out-of-door sports consist of 
coasting, skating, sleighing, &c. In sum- 
mer, they are of a greater variety. 

Contentment is a ruling feature of 

this School. 

Our heavenly Father, who has in 
limes past so signally blessed us, has 
vouchsafed to us his richest blessing— health 
—during the past season. We have had 
no sickness worthy of the name. We 
sincerely hope that the future may prove 
as pleasant and prosperous to us as the 
past has been. 

Kind readers, we present you with 
our little sheet, and hope you will receive 
no unfavorable impressions of our insti- 
tution by its perusal. We make no 
pretensions as journalists, being young and 
inexperienced in the business. W^e there- 
fore hardly dare propose an exchange 
with any of the popular journals of the 
times; but will throw ourselves entirely 
upon their clemency, assuring them that 
any encouragement oflfered to us in our 
work of reform and improvement will be 
like seed sown in good ground, and its 
increase will be an hundred-fold. 

William A. Morse 

Pets 

Here on Thompson's Island we have 
many pets. The ones seen most are the 
dogs, five of them. They are all owned 
by instructors, but they are everyone's pets. 
Besides the dogs there must be around 
twenty cats. Seems as though we are 
always finding homes for kittens. Would 
you like one? 

Larry Garside has a rabbit named 
Pebbles. Although the rabbit has a good 
cage, he always finds a way to get out. 
Then a dog finds him and a merry chase 
is on. After Pebbles is cornered he simply 



leaps over the dog and the chase is on 
again, 

Down atthebarn thereisa litde yellow 
kitten named Squirt. This kitten likes 
the boys and often follows them to the 
dormitories. Squirt has a habit of going 
to sleep anywhere, sometimes so that we 
can't get by. All the pets are liked very 
much. 

Albert K. Ellis 

A Wish 

I wish I could go for a plane ride. I 
haven't yet had such a chance. Planes fly 
overhead all the time, and there are many 
kinds. I keep wondering what flying is 
like. The planes make quite a sight at 
night when they head towards the airport 
with their very bright searchlights picking 
up the runways. One of these days I hope 
my wish to fly will come true. 

Richard L. Sawyer 

Sloyd 

I have only been here a short time 
and have just began to take sloyd. I am 
sure I will like this. I want to learn how 
to make trays, mirrors, chests, and other 
articles which the boys make. I can use 
them for gifts to send home. Then, 
learning about tools and woodworking is 
preparation for either a lifetime trade or 
hobby. 

Gary D. Schoonmaker 

My Hobby 
I am very much interested in wood- 
working, and I am lucky, too, because I 
work in the afternoon dining room and 
have spare time every day to work on my 
hobby. 1 am now making a mirror frame, 
with gumwood decorations and an inlay. 
I take sloyd and often work on the sloyd 
models in my playtime. Our instructor is 
always patient with us and helps us on the 
kinds of work we find hard. 

Edward M. Walker 



THOMPSONS ISLAND BEACON 



Hamsters 

Hamsters are small rodents, and 
burrow like rats. They come from Asia 
and Europe and have been imported to 
this country for pets. They got their odd 
name from the paunches on the sides of 
their cheeks. They must be kept in cages 
at all times, because they will burrow and 
make holes in almost anything. They are 
interesting and fascinating to watch, and 
make very nice pets. They like to be 
petted. Unlike some pets, hamsters are 
extremely clean. If you are not acquainted 
with hamsters you should get some as pets. 

Richard A. Ostrander 

A Heavy Fog 

This morning James Anderson and I 
got permission to go to the beach. It was 
the foggiest morning I could remember. 
We could see nothing out on the water, 
although we knew there were ships going 
by because we heard the whistles. Even 
though it was very foggy there were no 
accidents in the harbor. 

Joel C. Robbins 

Relievo 

Last Sunday the weather was so good 
that we decided to have a game of relievo 
at Bowditch Grove. Mr. Beauregard was 
with us. Each team had twelve players. 
In case you don't know, Relievo is a 
game where the players run, chase, hide, 
are captured, freed and in general have 
few rules or handicaps. 

John E. Lennon 

Painting 

We have been very busy in the paint 
shop this winter. The major jobs which 
we have done were to paint the old dining 
room in the main building, the corridors 
and stairways in that building, the band 
hall, and the printing office and laundry. 
We have just begun to paint B Building, 



and we expect to paint the complete in- 
terior of the building. This will take us 
some time. 

Every so often we stop the big job we 
are doing to make minor repairs on win- 
dows, such as replacing worn sash cords, 
broken lights of glass, and so forth. 

Edward A. Atton 

School Work 

In school we are studying about the 
Panama Canal. By treaty in 1903 our 
country secured the rights to build a canal 
across the Isthmus of Panama. A strip of 
land five miles deep on each side of the 
canal, known as the Canal Zone, is also 
United States Territory. 

Building the canal was a very difficult 
piece of engineering. After ten years of 
hard work the canal was open for traffic, 
but it was not until 1920 that our govern- 
ment announced the official opening. The 
canal is a little less than 51 statute miles in 
length. 

Donald J. Oke 

Show Boat 
I had a monitor's week end recently 
and went to see the movie "Show Boat." 
This is a good picture for anyone to see, 
for it is full of fun and good music. The 
color is wonderful. There are so many 
people in the picture I couldn't list them 
all, but they do a wonderful job of enter- 
taining. See the picture if you can. 

Ralph R. Schofield 

Kitchen Work 

Two weeks ago I had my work 
changed to the kitchen, which I like very 
much. We alternate our jobs each week 
from vegetable room to kitchen to bakery. 
The instructors have let me do quite a little 
cooking. I have also made ice cream, 
baked, and did other work which I liked. 

Steven R. Wellington 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Cbompson's Tsland BeacoH 

Pobliibed Monthly by 

THE FARM AND TRADES SCHOOL 

Thompion'i Island, Boitoa Harbor 

A PRIVATE SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF EXCELLENT 

CHARACTER SUPPORTED BY ENDOWMENTS. 

TUITION FEES AND SUBSCRIPTIONS 



Vol. 57 No. 11 



March 1954 



Subicription Price 



One Dollar Per Year 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Calvin Page Bartlett, President 
Alfred C. Malm. Vice-President 
Howland S. Warren, Treasurer 
Merton P. Ellis, Secretary 
Bartlett Harwood, Jr., Assistant Secretary 
Term Expires 1955 

Gorham Brooks 
Charles E. Mason 

Donald S. MacPherson 
Philip H. Theopold 
Augustus P. Loring, III 
Robert H. Gardiner 
A. Conrad Ericsson 

Term Expires 1956 
Leverett Saltonstall 
Moses Williams 

William M. Meacham 
George S. Mumford, Jr. 
Frederic Winthrop 
John Lowell 

Edward V. Osberg 

Term Expires 1957 
George P. Denny, M. D. 
Ralph B. Williams 

Thomas Temple Pond 
Mason Sears 

Lawrence Terry 
John Q. Adams 
Alton B. Butler 

Advisory Committee 
N. Penrose Hallowell 
Edwin H. Place, M. D. 
James H. Lowell 



The greatest need of the world to-day 
is the rebuilding of the Christian spirit of 
service, the basic development plan at our 
home school. Why not help a fine, worthy 
boy achieve his goal by making a financial 
contribution to America's best investment? 



This is the third of a series of nine 
editorials pertaining to the major features 
of progress of our school. The first two 
appeared in the November and December 
issues of the BEACON. Those two and 
this one have to do with The Present- 
Where Are We? 

In our first article we emphasized the 
importance of a well organized extra- 
curricular program and indicated the great 
strides of progress of our school, even as 
a pioneer in music and intramural sports 
for every boy. The second article outlined 
our very broad program of the academic 
and practical experience, with the empha- 
sis on taking responsibility. 

There are many, many important 
factors in achievement such as this school 
is noted for, and they all boil down to 
one word. People, the founders, the 
supporters, the Trustees, Alumni, boys, 
and the Staff. 

Fifty per cent of the present staff 
members have an average length of service 
of 16 years, 8 months. Length of service 
does not in itself prove quality, but when 
longservice is linked with ability, integrity 
and the other essentials of leadership of 
boys you have a total organizational 
structure hard to beat, and which, inci- 
dentally, takes years of continuously 
persistent effort to assemble. 

The other part of the team, and a 
vitally important part, consists of the Boys, 
the enrolled boys living at this home 
school and the graduates. The Public 
knows any school or college principally 
by its product, and ours is no exception. 

The Farm and Trades School is well 
known, but not widely known, for the 
solid citizenship of its boys and alumni. 
One of the many indications of outstand- 
ing quality was shown in World War II, 
where 62 per cent of our lads in service be- 
came officers, as against 45 per cent for the 
entire American Armed Services. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Many tributes come to the School, 
your school and our school. You would 
be even more proud of her if you could 
hear them all. One recent tribute picked 
at random, because of its brevity, is written 
by Dr. Ray Johns, General Secretary of 
the Boston Y. M. C. A.: "The School is 
doing a very fundamental work. The 
quality of its work and the high regard in 
which it is held is a fine tribute to you." 

Topics in Brief 

Our school basketball team entered 
the small schools tournament and played 
Chatham high school on March 5. The 
game was played at Falmouth and our 
boys were defeated 89-52. Even though 
defeated, the boys had a grand trip of 
80 miles, going by private bus and being 
accompanied by many of their parents. 
This game ended the varsity schedule for 
this year, the boys winning three and 
losing five games. 

The annual King Philip's War took 
place on February 22. There was no snow, 
which took away some of the fun, yet the 
armies managed to stage quite a battle. 
The Indians, led by Teyet "King Philip" 
Ramar, defeated the Settlers, led by Robert 
Fabello. After the battle refreshments 
were served to both armies in the gym- 
nasium. A 6ne biographical movie was 
enjoyed in the evening. 

Basketball has been the main rec- 
reational feature of the month, nine teams 
having played at least one regularly 
scheduled game each week, and numerous 
informal games also being staged. The 
varsity. Sears League and Nut League 
make it possible for every boy to take part 
in the game. The interest has remained 
at a high pitch throughout the season. 



Our bandmaster, Frank L. Warren, 
has returned from a month's vacation in 
Florida, where he became associated with 
musical groups. He was guest conductor 
of the St. Petersburg Concert Band, and 
played with and directed other bands. 
He is now hard at work drilling our boys 
for several appearances this spring and 
early summer, a very important one being 
the annual spring concert at Faneuil Hall 
on May 2. 

The sixth and seventh graders com- 
bined to present an instructive and enter- 
taining program atthe weekly assembly on 
February 15. A review of the year 1953 
was given, with each pupil presenting an 
article on the historical significance of an 
outstanding event. Musical selections by 
class members rounded out an excellent 
program. 

Everyone at the school is very grateful 
to the Alumni Association for the gift of a 
pound of delicious chocolates on George 
Washington's Birthday. Funds for the 
chocolates came from the Richard Bell 
Fund, of which Merton P. Ellis, '97, is 
an honorary committee member. Mr. 
Ellis saw to it that the chocolates were 
purchased and delivered to our boat in 
time for the holiday. 

The paint shop crew has painted 
both the printing office and laundry this 
month, and is well underway with the 
work of painting the interior of Dormitory 
B. Many minor repair jobs have been 
done day by day by the painters. 

The freshman class entertained atthe 
weekly assembly on February 1, by giving 
an amateur "Talent Scout" program. 
The program was built on the idea of 
pure fun, and both the contestants and the 
audience had many laughs as the boys 
went through their routines. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



We had a gala party on the evening 
of March 2, the occasion being the birth- 
day of Mr. Meacham. A buflfet supper 
was served in the gym, and was concluded 
with the cutting and serving of a huge 
birthday cake. Later, in the assembly 
hall, many of the boys and instructors 
combined to present a program of enter- 
tainment, which was thoroughly enjoyed. 

It is an appropriate time to note that 
birthdays and notable anniversaries are 
given recognition throughout the year. 
Once each month those who have 
birthdays during that month are guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Meacham for a "Birthday 
Supper," and this happy custom has grown 
to be a tradition. 

A Change 
Mr. John Bartram, who has been our 
minister for the past year and a half de- 
cided to leave us to work for a church in 
Portsmouth. N.H. In his place Mr. John 
Beauregard has come. Mr. Beauregard was 
here for several Sundays last summer, and 
most of the boys know him. We all know 
we will like Mr. Beauregard, even though 
we were sorry to see Mr. Bartram go. 

John W. Cronin 

Bats 

A baby bat is approximately the size 
of a honeybee. It clings to its mother as 
she hangs her head downward. Bats are 
born in dark corners of attics, barns and 
caves. At dusk the mother bat creeps to 
an opening, then flies to a tree. She 
settles on a high branch, hangs her baby 
from a twig and wraps a leaf about him. 
While the baby bat sleeps, its mother 
hunts insects for food. 

Henry T. Murphy 

Office Boy 
When I first came here I wanted to 
be office boy. But 1 did not get the chance 



right away. I first worked in Dormitory B. 
Then I was given dining room work. 
Finally I was changed to the office. Here 
I do quite a variety of things, and I have 
found that it is a very responsible job. I 
like the work very much, and am glad I 
was assigned the duty. 

Welter E. Grignon 

Printing Lessons 

Each afternoon the seventh graders 
go to the printing office. We learn how 
to set up type, lock the type forms in the 
chases and run the presses. This week we 
have been setting articles for the BEACON. 
The name of the type we use is Recut 
Caslon for the body of the'article and New 
Caslon for the title and author's name. 
Each line is sixteen picas in width. 

Donald E. Robicheau 

My Work 
Until a few weeks ago I worked in 
the dining room. Then I was changed to 
the sewing roon. Here we have the job 
of looking over all the boys' laundry and 
mending it. We also have charge of all 
the linen. Baskets of clothing come to 
us from the laundry. After mending we 
fold and pack the laundry, and deliver 
the baskets to the dormitories. The sewing 
room is a busy place. 

Thomas C. Cronin 

King Philip's War 
On Washington's Birthday we played 
a game called "King Philip'sWar." This 
is usually played with snow forts, and it 
is better that way, but this year the ground 
was bare and muddy, so we made changes 
in the rules. The battleground was the 
field west of the play ground. Two fort 
areas were marked out. The purpose of 
the game was to capture small sacks and 
hold them in the fort until the end of 
each of the three periods. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



There were two teams, the Indians 
and the Settlers. The Indians were the 
first to attack, the Settlers fighting to keep 
the bags they had. In the next period 
the Indians had the sacks and were at- 
tacked by the Settlers. In the third and 
deciding period the sacks were placed 
midway between the forts and the armies 
charged to capture, secure and deliver the 
sacks to their forts. 

After the final whistle the points were 
counted and the Indians were the winners. 
Teyet Ramar was King Philip, and 
Robert Fabello General of the Settlers. 
Each army cheered the other, and then 
everyone went to the gymnasium for 
refreshments of cocoa and doughnuts. 

The leaders of the Indians, who won, 
were: 

King Philip Teyet Ramar 

Big Chief Robert W. Wright 

Little Chief Albert E. Merrill 

First Warrior Alexander D. Marinakis 
Second Warrior Bruce Alexander 

Third Warrior Larry E. Garside 

Medicine Man Kenneth C. Alexander 

The officers of the Setder's army were: 
General of the Army Robert Fabello 

Captain William H. Dillon 

First Lieutenant Stanton H. Pearson 

Second Lieutenant Loren E. Cain 



First Sergeant 
Second Sergeant 
Color Bearer 



Edward M. Walker 
Gerald Brig^s 
Douglas Boyd 

Richard B. Pulsifer 



Honor Roll — Winter Term 

The highest academic averages in each class group 
Junior Class 

Ralph A. Hopkins 
David A. Pulsifer 

Sophomore Class 

William H. Dillon 
Richard A. Ostrander 

Freshman Class 

William F. James 
Richard T. Castonguay 



Eighth Grade Division A 

Larry E. Garside 

Barry R. Fuller 

Eighth Grade Division B 

Howard E. Murphy, II 
Bruce Alexander 

Seventh Grade 

Robert H. Grignon 
Malcolm E. Cameron, Jr. 

Sixth Grade 

Walter E. Grignon, Jr. 
George D. McPeek 

Best Citizenship 

"A" Rank general conduct and effort 
in each class group 

Sophomore Class 

Edward A. Atton 
William H. Dillon 

Robert Fabello 

S. Newcomb Graham 

David W. Howard 

David E. LeVeille 

Richard A. Ostrander 

Norman W, Sellevaag 

Freshman Class 

Thomas Angelos 

Gerald L. Briggs 

Loren E. Cain 

Albert K. Ellis 

William F. James 

Albert E. Merrill 

Paul E. Parker 

Carleton G. Skinner 

Steven R. Wellington 

Eighth Grade Division A 

Larry E. Garside 
Alexander D. Marinakis 

Eighth Grade Division B 

Howard E. Murphy, II 
Ralph R. Schofield 

Seventh Grade 

Robert H. Grignon 

Donald E. Robicheau 

Donald J. Oke 

Sixth Grade 

George D. McPeek 
Richard L. Sawyer 



THOMPSON'S ISLAiND BEACON 



ZU Alumni Jfssociation of the farm and trades School 



Alton B. Butler, '26, Preiident 

Newton, Mass. 
Donald S. MacPhbrson '17, Treasurer 
Wollaston, Mass. 



John Patterson '43 Vice-President 
W. Medford, Mast. 



William C. Burns. '37, Secretaiy 
No. Wilrainjton, Mass. 
G. George LarsSON, '17, Historian 
Hyde Park, Mass. 



Darwin C. Baird, '45, grew from 
babyhood to young manhood on Thomp- 
son's Island. During this span of nearly 
two decades he gained the friendship of 
a large percentage of our Alumni mem- 
bership, all of whom will be gratified to 
learn of his notable accomplishments. 

The son of Mr. and Mrs. Mark C. 
Baird, instructors here since 1928, he be- 
came a member of our sixth grade in 1940, 
and graduated in 1945. He participated 
in all of the school activities, being espec- 
ially prominent in the band, dramatics, 
and athletics. In the fall of 1945 he con- 
tinued his preparatory school work at 
Mount Hermon School, graduating in 
1948. At Mount Hermon he excelled in 
athletics, as well as taking an active in- 
terest in the many and varied Hermon 
functions. 

In September, 1948, he enrolled at 
Park College, Parkville, Missouri, major- 
ing in Social Sciences and Economics. 
His college career was one of continual 
activity, for he was an enthusiastic member 
of the college athletic teams, and drama 
and music clubs. He received his degree 
in 1952. Among many honors he won 
were membership in the Beta Chapter of 
Mu Sigma, the national music fraternity, 
and being listed as outstanding in the 
American College Student Leaders Hand- 
book. 

He gave considerable thought to the 
immediate future and decided that his 
best interests lay with the United States 
Air Force. He enrolled at Northwestern 
University for a short intensive course in 
specialized mathematics. Completing this 
work, he enlisted in the air force program 
for college graduates and was assigned to 



Ellington Air Force Base in Texas. He 
soon discovered that there was little time 
for anything but work, hard work, and 
plenty of it. Eventually his first goal was 
achieved, that of his commission in the 
air corps as a lieutenant. Soon after he 
was awarded his wings. 

On last December 12 he was married 
to Miss Patricia Louise Cole, of Dallas, 
Texas, a classmate at Park. The young 
couple had known each other for years, 
and the bride has visited us here, so that 
we at the School had a very personal in- 
terest in the marriage. Darwin's parents 
flew to Dallas for the ceremony, which 
was performed by Dr. William Elliot, Jr. 
Lieut, and Mrs, Baird left after the re- 
ception for a honeymoon trip to the West 
Coast. They are now at home at 1550 
Orange Avenue, Apartment E, East Del 
Pasa Heights, California. Lieut. Baird is 
on duty at a Sacramento air force base. 

Our heartiest wishes for continued 
success is extended to our young gradu- 
ate. To Darwin and Pat, as they are known 
to their Thompson's Island friends, we 
extend sincere congratulations. Perhaps 
circumstances may permit them to visit 
here in the not too distant future. We 
hope so! 

John B. Mason, '51, was married 
on February 14 to Miss Concetta Natale 
Morganti. Our best wishes are extended 
the happy couple, who are at home at 
299 Cross St., Maiden, Mass. John joined 
the Navy in 1951. His brother, Joseph 
B. Mason, is also in the Navy. He has 
kept up his study of the euphonium, and 
enjoys his musical connections. His home 
address is 276 Cambridge St., Boston. 




Vol. 57 No. 12 Printed at The Farm and Trades School, Boston, Mass. April, 1954 

Entered November 3, 1903 at Boiton, Mmss., at Second Class matter, under Act of Congress, of July 6, 1874 



The Boston Farm School Offering 

Second in a series of articles reprinted from paper 
titled as above, Vol. 1, No. 2, May 1859. 

Lines to My Mother 

Mother dear! if you should die, 

And leave me all alone, 
How bitterly would I then cry! — 
For then all would be gone. 

And mother, mother, ever dear, 

Who loves me more than you? — 

Who always wished to have me near, 
Some kindly act to do. 

Yes Mother dear, I, too, love you, 
And long your voice to hear: 

I'll ne'er forget you; if I do, 

'Twill break your heart, I fear. 

Mother, so kind and always true. 
When I become a man, 

1 then will take all care of you. 

And do the best I can. 

And, when we've lived in peace and love 

And happiness together, 
Our God will take us high above, 

To dwell with Him for ever. 

H. D. Forest Gurney 
Farm School, April 10, 1859. Age 12. 

Faneuil Hall Band Concert Notice 

The Annual Spring Concert of our 

school Band will be given at Faneuil Hall, 

in Boston, on May 2, at two o'clock. A 

most cordial invitation is extended to all 



our friends to attend this concert, and we 
do hope that you will come. This will be 
the eighteenth successive year that the boys 
have given their spring concert in historic 
Faneuil Hall. 

Those who have attended the Faneuil 
Hall concerts have enjoyed them very 
much, and we know that this year the 
music will be equal, or even surpass, that 
of all of the concerts in this series. A 
varied, interesting program is assured 
which we are sure will please all those in 
attendance. 

The boys have rehearsed painstaking- 
ly and diligently throughout the winter 
months, and they welcome this oppor- 
tunity to show their friends what has been 
accomplished. We feel sure that you will 
agree that their music study has been 
fruitful. 

In May the Band will participate in 
the regional and New England school 
music festivals. These events are attended 
by thousands of school musicians, and 
are a great inspiration to the young school 
musicians. It is a wonderful experience 
to be a participant in these school music 
festivals. 

The expenses for the Festivals, as well 
as the Faneuil Hall concert, are met by 
contributions. If you feel disposed towards 
helping meet these expenses, a small gift 
sent to the Band Fund at the School will 
be gratefully received and acknowledged. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Please do not make any contributions at 
Faneuil Hall. 

The success of our Band depends in 
a large measure upon the always faithful 
interest of the hosts of friends who have 
been interested in the boys over a period 
of many years. Indeed, our friends are 
a vital factor in promoting interest and 
enthusiasm. We do hope that you will 
attend the Faneuil Hall concert, and 
bring friends if you wish. No further in- 
vitation than this is necessary. May we 
see you at Faneuil Hall on May 2? 

A Real Pal 

A dog is a real pal and an ideal 
companion, bringing joy and happiness to 
the master's heart. Although human 
friendships can be hurt by unkind words 
or deeds, the loyalty of a dog to his 
master is always true. Therefore whoever 
owns a dog should try and make it happy, 
his good for children to own dogs. Dogs 
will play with them, and watch out for 
them. Sometimes it seems as though dogs 
like children more than they do grown 
ups. I like dogs, and have one, who is 
now getting quite old. She is an ideal 
companion. 

Norman W. Sellevaag 

Sunday Afternoon Activities 
Last Sunday afternoon some of the 
boys went on a beach walk. When we 
got to Bowditch Grove we stopped and 
chose sides to play relievo. We played 
for a long time. Then we continued on 
our beach walk. After supper we watched 
television. Then we had our Sunday night 
church service. Mr. Beauregard is our 
minister. 

George D. McPeek 

Sophomore Assembly 

This week, on March 22, the sopho- 
mores had the privilege of giving the 
entertainment at the weekly assembly. 



Ourprincipal, Mr. Rose, was in charge of 
the rehearsals and it took two weeks to 
prepare the show. 

The assembly opened by the school 
singing a favorite song, then the cla^^s 
program began. It opened with a group 
of songs by the class quartette, called the 
Monotones. One of the songs was 
written especially for the quartette and 
was called, "Across the Bay." Those in 
the quartette were David LeVeille, 
William Dillon, David Pulsifer and Teyet 
Ramar. 

Second on the program was a mono- 
logue by Norman Sellevaag. His stage 
name was Dusty Brake Beans. There 
were plenty of laughs as he gave "I Am 
Whom?" Following this there was a 
blackface monologue by David Howard. 
As Romeo Howard he gave "Me and 
My Gal." The third monologue was by 
Robert Fabello. As Harry the Hobo he 
gave "The Knight of the Ties." 

The third and closing part of the en- 
tertainment was another group of songs by 
the Monotones. 

The school band followed the class 
program with a group of selections in- 
cluding the Determination Overture and 
Gate City March. 

Mr. Meacham then made the inter- 
esting and important announcement of 
scholastic honors of the graduating class. 
The valedictorian for the class of 1954 is 
William H. Dillon and the salutatorian is 
David E. LeVeille. They were warmly 
applauded. 

The singing of another song by the 
school completed the assembly. 

David W. Howard 

Our Major Sport 
In the minds of many of the boys 
here football is the major sport. Of course 
baseball, basketball and other games have 
their place but we all long for the fall 
season and the first football drill. We 



THOMPSONS ISLAND BEACON 



begin in the early part of September aud 
drill daily. After a few days our coach 
has determined who will be on the varsity 
squad. He keeps twenty-two boys, and 
a first and second team is organized. 
After a month of practice the squad is 
ready for the first of a seven game season. 
Each boy gives his all for his team and 
thus for his school. Truly, football is our 
major sport, and from it we learn loyalty, 
sportsmanship and courage. 

Teyet Ramar II 

The Library 

Our library room is opened several 
times every day so that we can read 
magazines and exchange books. Mr. 
Rose is the librarian and he has assistants 
from the boys. Most of the popular 
magazines are on the library table and 
back issues are kept on file. There is a 
wide variety of fiction, as well as a good 
selection of books on biography, history 
and travel. Many reference books are on 
hand to help us with our school work. 

The library is used for school work, 
for we get the books we need for required 
reading there. Also most of us like to 
read for pleasure, and the library has 
many steady borrowers. New books are 
being added almost every week. 

Larry E. Garside 

Pleasant Weather 
We don't seem to have the cold, 
snowy weather that used to be the New 
England winter. For the past months the 
days have been mild and pleasant. On 
Saturdays and Sundays the weather has 
been perfect for hiking around the beach 
and playing games in the north end grove. 
On some days the ocean has been as calm 
as a lake. Of course winter is not over 
yet and we may still get an old-fashioned 
winter snowstorm. 

Robert H. Grignon 



Astronomy 

Astronomy is the scientific study of 
the stars and other heavenly bodies. It 
originated when the need of designated 
time intervals came into being. The 
Greeks were the first people to make a 
serious study of astronomy. Among 
the great students of the science were 
Pythagoras, Ptolemy, Capernicus, and 
Galileo, among others. To them we 
owe much of our present knowledge of 
the stars. In the years to come, as we 
learn more and more about astronomy, 
we may be able to explore other planets 
in our solar system. 

John A. Fritz 

A New^ Boy's Opinion 
I came to this School abouttwo months 
ago, and must admit I didn't think I 
would like it. Before long I found out I 
was certainly wrong, for F. T. S. is a very 
good place. The boys are all friendly, 
and it didn't take me long to get to know 
everyone. Someone asked me if I was 
homesick at first. No, I wasn't. This is 
all I am going to write for now. 

Joseph F. McDonough 

A Driving Lesson 
Last week I took my first driving 
lesson. It lasted about 30 minutes. When 
we started I was shown how the controls 
of the car were operated, and given in- 
struction on some rules of the road. We 
drove through town and out into the 
country. Then I took the wheel. I first 
learned how to start and stop smoothly. 
Then I learned how to back up. We 
stayed on a side road for twenty minutes 
practicing. When the lesson was over I 
had a test, that of driving the car to my 
home, which I did without any trouble. I 
might say that I was a little proud of my- 
self^. 

Robert Fabello 



THOMPSONS ISLAND BEACON 



Cbompson's Tsland Beacon 

Publiibed Monthly bT 

THE FARM AND TRADES SCHOOL 

Thompsofl't Uland. Boiton Harbor 

A PRIVATE SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF EXCELLENT 

CHARACTER SUPPORTED BY ENDOWMENTS. 

TUITION FEES AND SUBSCRIPTIONS 



Vol.57 No. 12 



April 1954 



Subicription Price 



One Dollar Per Year 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Calvin Page Bartlett, President 
Alfred C. Malm. Vice-President 
Howland S. Warren, Treasurer 
Merton P. Ellis, Secretary 
Bartlett Harwood, Jr., Assistant Secretary 

Term Expires 1955 
Gorham Brooks 
Charles E. Mason 

Donald S. MacPherson 
Philip H. Theopold 

Augustus P. Loring, III 
Robert H. Gardiner 
A. Conrad Ericsson 

Term Expires 1956 
Leverett Saltonstall 
Moses Williams 

William M. Meacham 
George S. Mumford, Jr, 
Frederic Winthrop 
John Lowell 

Edward V. Osberg 

Term Expires 1957 

George P. Denny, M. D. 
Ralph B. Williams 

Thomas Temple Pond 
Mason Sears 

Lawrence Terry 
John O. Adams 
Alton B. Butler 

Adviiory Commitlee 
N. Penrose Hallowell 
Edwin H. Place, M. D. 
James H. Lowell 

The greatest need of the world to-day 
is the rebuilding of the Christian spirit of 
service, the basic development plan at our 
home school. Why not help a fine, worthy 
boy achieve his goal by making a financial 
contribution to America's best investment? 



The Past — Where have we been? To 
condense more than a century of glorious 
history into onecolumn isimpossible but a 
few significant milestones can be spotted. 

From the time in 1814 when the first 
of three schools was organized, and all 
since been joined as one, the aim and 
objectives has been to provide an edu- 
cation, vocational and academic, and the 
other essentials of normal, happy living 
for the development of good boys who 
by unfortunate circumstances or inadequate 
facilities would otherwise be deprived of 
the advantages which every American 
boy ought to have. 

In spite of measre finances for this 
worthy project the men of Boston who 
had this vision were tenacious in their 
determination to establish and maintain a 
real haven for boys. The purchase of 
Thompson's Island, almost barren, 
treeless, unimproved, a 157-acre sheep 
pasture, in 1832, marked the most cou- 
rageous and important step in the real 
birth of our present school. 

It is safe to say that there was never a 
time when the school was not confronted 
with problems. The record indicates 
many discouragements along the way, 
but with the objective of smoothing the 
road of life and bridging turbulent waters 
of stress for future youth to follow, the 
School continued ever toward higher 
goals for its young charges. 

Her accomplishments are not unlike 
the satisfactions of middle aged parents 
who have successfully reared and provided 
for a large family of outstanding young- 
sters and seen them take their places as 
leaders in our great American way of life, 
multiplied a thousand-fold. 

As in every household, there are 
problems. Our greatest problem of the 
momentconsists of our inability to render 
maximum service because of lowered 



THOMPSONS ISLAND BEACON 



enrollment brought about by "Govern- 
ment Aid" and the reluctance of the 
School to wage a vigorous, continuous 
campaign of publicity and field work, 
which, indeed, was not until recent years 
necessary. 

The association of islands of Boston 
Harbor as places of penal institutions, in 
the minds of many uninformed people, 
has led to much inaccurate and unfavorable 
opinion. This has been dispelled to a 
considerable degree in the last twenty-five 
years by our Band's annual appearances 
throughout New England and our athletic 
teams playing in eastern Massachusetts, 
talks given at many civic clubs and 
churches, generous free publicity in the 
Press and over the Radio, and by a 
considerable number of book and 
magazine articles. Not the least of these 
items of publicity was the colorful blotter 
of the First National Bank of Boston given 
very wide distribution, portraying Ameri- 
ca's First Boys' Band established at The 
Farm and Trades School in 1857. 

Topics in Brief 

Our school band entertained the 
members of the Blue Room Club, a Mas- 
onic organization, on March 13. Howard 
B. Ellis, '98, was host to the boys and 
saw that they were well taken care of. The 
boys had an excellent dinner and then 
played their concert in the George Brown 
auditorium of the New England Conserva- 
tory of Music. Several hundred members 
of the Club made up an enthusiastic audi- 
ence. Following the hour-long concert 
there was an entertainment by professional 
talent. 

A special meeting of a representative 
group of alumni was held at the Parker 
House on April 5. at the suggestion of the 
school's Board of Trustees. The purpose 



of the meeting was to suggest a program 
of advancement for our school to cover a 
period of the next ten years, or longer. 
An enthusiastic group was present, and 
many valuable suggestions received. The 
meeting was adjourned until April 20, at 
the Parker House. 

The boys in the sixth grade are en- 
gaged in the fascinating hobby of corres- 
ponding with youngsters in foreign lands, 
through association with the International 
Friendship League. Many times in the 
past our school has had pleasant contacts 
with the League, and our Band has furn- 
ished music upon occasion for the short 
wave broadcasts sponsored by the League. 

Our library has been enriched through 
the gift of a set of Encyclopedia Brittanica, 
which we appreciate highly. These vol- 
umes, and others, were received from 
Miss C. Ina Carrigan. Our library, which 
was completely reorganized last year, is a 
source of considerable interest to most of 
our boys, and several have served as 
assistant librarians. 

The recreational interests of the boys 
have been centered upon the beginning 
of the baseball season. The work of getting 
both the Softball and baseball fields in 
good condition is almost finished, and we 
expect games in these sports to be played 
by mid-April. The basketball season, 
which has just ended, was completed by 
the annual foul shooting competition, in 
which most of the boys took part. 

The sophomore class entertained on 
March 22 at the regular weekly assembly. 
The boys gave very clever monologues, 
in costume, and a class quartet sang four 
numbers. One of the songs was written 
especially for the occasion. The program 
was very much enjoyed. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



Our paint shop crew is rapidly 
nearing the completion of completely 
redecorating Dormitory B, and the boys 
are very proud of their fine job. Some 
linoleum in the basement corridors of the 
dormitories is being replaced. These, 
with routine maintenance jobs, keep the 
painters busy. 

The freshman class prepared a cos- 
tumed entertainment on March 29, which 
featured instrumental and vocal popular 
selections. Most of the class members 
took part. Harold Spurling acted as the 
master of ceremony for his class. 

Some of the boys had the opportunity 
of seeing the popular, colorful musical 
"Oklahoma," at the Boston Opera House 
on April 3. They enjoyed the musical 
very much, and were thrilled by the stage 
settings. 

Our maintenance crew has built a 
rugged cart to be tractor pulled. This will 
be utilized in many ways, and will prove 
to be a valuable piece of equipment. 

The farm boys have done a good job 
in making carpentry repairs to the storage 
barn. The east end of the barn was 
completely shingled. 

My Thoughts 
1 like school on Thompson's Island. 
Here we have the chance to learn how to 
do so many things that if I listed them it 
would take a whole column. It is a lot 
different than going to public school 
where all I had was class work. Here we 
have farming, slovd, music, printing and 
athletics which I like especially and many 
other interests which the other boys like. 

Barry R. Fuller 

An Unusual Hobby 

One of my friends has an interesting 
hobby. He catches field mice and puts 
them through an intelligence test. He 



puts a mouse in a box with a hole in it to 
see how long it will take the mouse to find 
the hole. Next he puts the mouse in a 
box which has a maze of mirrors and sees 
how long it takes the mouse to find an ex- 
cape hole. The last test is the most 
exciting. The mouse is put on a little 
island, with a rope ladder leading to a 
block of cheese. A smart mouse will 
climb the ladder, while another will swim, 
hunting for an exit. 

This is what I call a very unusual 
hobby. 

Loren E. Cain 

Spring on Thompson's Island 
The spring season at the School is 
very interesting. There are so many things 
to be done that we wonder whether we 
are going to have time to do them. The 
lawns, shrubbery, walks, baseball and * 
Softball fields all need to be put in shape. 
The flower gardens are planted. On the 
farm the land has to be made ready for 
the seed, and the farm crews work hard, 
because the spring season is short and time 
is precious. The island is certainly beauti- 
ful in May. The boys pitch in so that 
everything will be in top shape by the time 
early summer arrives. Yes, in the spring- 
time there is a lot to be done, and we do 
it. Then all through the summer we 
enjoy the results of our spring work. 

David E. LeVeille 

City Life 

Although it must be said that there 
are advantages when one lives in the city, 
it must also be admitted that there are 
many disadvantages. In a crowded section 
of a city especially, one will wake up to 
the noise of trucks and cars, and often 
to odors from factories or mills. The sun- 
light which comes through the windows 
isn't much, and the view is the side of the 
next house. When going to work one is 
pushed and jostled in a bus or subway car. 



THOMPSON'S ISLAND BEACON 



There are many disadvantages to life in 
a city. 

In the country one wakes to the 
sounds of birds. The houses have big 
yards. Shrubbery and flower gardens are 
common. One walks to work along a 
pretty road, or drives on a quiet highway. 
There isn't the haste, noise or crowds, and 
life seems much more peaceful. 

William H. Dillon 

Printing Ofl&ce Painted 
You will be glad to see our printing 
office, for it has just been painted. The 
new color is a light green with brown 
trimmings. The paint shop crew did a 
very excellent and speedy job. On your 
next trip to the school be sure to visit the 
printing office. 

David W. Howard 

' , Competition 

Open competition is the life of trade. 
In the manufacturing of any item the 
management tries to produce a better 
article, to be sold at less cost, than that of 
his competitors. The competition in 
business must be met, and when it is the 
company prospers. Some big companies 
spend much money experimenting to 
discover new products and better, cheaper 
ways of manufacturing old ones. 

S. Newcomb Graham 

Additional Alumni Notes 

Among visitors to the School during 
the month were two of our younger grad- 
uates, Wayne D. Suitor, '50 and Malcolm 
C. Wiley, '49. Both are Korean war 
veterans, having joined the service after 
their graduation from Waltham and 
Weymouth high schools respectively. 
They have been assigned duty in this 
country to finish out their enlistment. 

Frederick E. Munich, '20, is very 
much interested in the activities of his 



Alma Mater, and plans at least one visit 
to an alumni gathering annually. He has 
been for many years associated with the 
Western Union Telegraph Company, and 
is listed in "Who's Who in Engineering." 
He was recently awarded the Pratt 
Institute Engineers Alumni Association 
Key for 1953 for "outstanding services for 
the alumni association." He lives in 
Glen Rock, N. J., at 474 South Maple 
Avenue. 

Robert W. Sanborn, '50, is a 
sophomore at Rutgers University. His 
principal subjects include English, Latin, 
Psychology and Sociology. He is active 
in many college activities, including the 
R. O. T. C, the French Club. Political 
Science Club and the fencing team. Bob 
is to be congratulated on his fine work, 
for he has earned most of his high school 
and college expenses by excellent scho- 
lastic attainments and initiative. He was 
awarded scholarships which completely 
cover his tuition, and works part time in 
the college book store and cafeteria to 
pay for his living expenses. He has won 
numerous prizes for his public speaking 
ability. 

The above article pertaining to Bob 
Sanborn gives us the opportunity to reflect 
on the fine records our alumni achieve in 
advanced schools. The lessons which they 
learned here have developed their respon- 
sibility, initiative, enterprise, and, above 
all, gives them a character which makes 
them "stand out." It gives us tremendous 
satisfaction to have these boys do so well, 
and to have them look back on their 
Thompson's Island days as the firm found- 
ation upon which they have been able to 
build their educational careers. Good 
luck to our young graduates now making 
a name for themselves in high school and 
college! 



THOMPSON'S ISLAWD BEACON 



Che Jflumni JI$$ociatio« of Cbe farm and trades School 



Alton B. Butlkr, '26. Preiident John Patterson '43 Vice-Pretident 

Newton, M«»». W. Medford, Mim. 

Donald S. MacPherson "17, Treaiurer 
Wollaiton, Mail. 



William C. Burns. '37, Sccretaiy 
No. Wilmintton, Mass. 
G. George Larsson, '17, Historiao 
Hyde Park. Mass. 



We are saddened to report the death 
of Norman F. Morse, '85, at his home 
on Bridge Street, Chatham, on March 17. 
He was 77 at the time of his death 
and had enjoyed reasonably good health. 

Mr. Morse was born on Thompson's 
Island, in the farm house at the southern 
part of the island. He was the son of 
John Ripley and Sarah J. Morse. His 
father was active as a member of the 
school staff for many years, and organized 
and directed the school band for half a 
century. 

One of our older alumni, Mr. Morse 
retained a deep interest in the School 
throughout his lifetime, and served as an 
alumni representative on the Board of 
Trustees. He was a frequent visitor here, 
especially on Alumni Field Days. His 
hobby was photography, and he had 
many excellent collections of photographs 
of the school and its work taken through 
the years, which he was always happy to 
show at alumni gatherings. 

He retired three years ago, after 
having served for many years as office 
manager of the Master Builders, a Boston 
concern. 

He was a fifty year member of the 
Old Colony Lodge, A. F. & A. M., past 
high priest of Wompatuck Royal Arch 
Chapter and past president of the High 
Street Cemetery Association, all in 
Hingham, in which town he made his 
home until a year ago when he moved to 
Chatham. 

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. 
Bessie Wilder Morse; a daughter, Mrs. 
Eunice Shuebruk of Darien, Conn.; and 
a granddaughter. Miss Serena Shuebruk, 
a senior at the University of Connecticut. 



Masonic services were held at the 
Downing Cottage Chjipel, Pond Street, 
Hingham on March 19. On the following 
day funeral services were conducted at 
the Old Ship Church under the direction 
of the Rev. Richard W. F. Seebode. 
Representatives of the School and Alumni 
Association were present. 

We have lost a good friend and loyal 
alumnus, one whose ever present interest 
and warm friendliness will be gready 
missed. The BEACON expresses its sympa- 
thy to the family. 

Donald J. DeWolf, a former ^upil^ 
here, according to a Boston Herald^ -^ 
account on March 28, is engaged to be 
married to Miss Davena Rogers. Miss 
Rogers is the daughter of Vincent D. 
RoSers, principal of Brewster Acedemy, 
in Wolfeboro, N. H. Mr. DeWolf will 
resume his studies in the fall at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts. He has com- 
pleted three years of service with the U. 
S. Marine Corps, and is a Korean War 
Veteran. 

Robert W. Duquet, '43, received 
his law degree from Suffolk Law School in 
June, and recently was admitted to the 
Massachusetts Bar. He served in the 
armed forces in World War II. We 
were glad to see him at a recent alumni 
gathering, and to wish him well on his 
law career. 

Robert O. Cain, '53, is a third 
year student at Brockton Trade School. 
He earns a good share of his living ex- 
penses by part time work. He lives at 
51 Rosetter Street, Brockton, Mass.