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Full text of "Three cities and their industrial interests, with an historical and descriptive sketch of the national armory and arsenal, the location, manufacturing facilities, and business advantages of Davenport, Iowa, and Rock Island, Moline, and Milan, Illinois--their commerce, population, schools, churches, and present condition"

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i 





LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. 

Shelf •^3'''T>5^>^ 



UNITED STATES OF A31EilH A. 




DAVENPORT, 
Rock Island, 

and moline: 

THEIR 

INTERESTS, 

INDUSTRIES. 

INSTITUTIONS. 




Citizens • National • Bank, 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



CAPITAL, - - $100,000.00. SURPLUS, - - $100,000.00. 
UNDIVIDED PROFITS, - $30,000.00. 



OFFICERS. — 

F. H. GRli.i.h, iicsuient. E. S. CARL, Cashier. 

ROBT. KRAUSE, Vice-President. AUOLPH PRIESTER, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS. — 

T. W. McCLELI-AND. NICHOLAS KUHNEN. F. H. GRIGGS. 

ROBERT KRAUSE. P. T. KOCH. DANIEL GOULD. 

OTTO ALBRECHT. D. N. kU'HARDSON. H. H. ANDRESEN. 

JENS LORENZEN. \V. C. WADSWORTH. 



A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED. 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE SOLD AT THE LOWEST RATES. 

We Issue Drafts «m all tlie I'rinoipal Cities of Kurope. 

QeRMAN ^ 5^V'N^S ^ ^PiHK 

DAVENPORT. IOWA. 

Capital, S300,000.00. £-a.rpl-a.s, SSO,000 OO. 

->>> OFFICERS. -V^- 

H. LISCHER, President. L. WAHLE, Vice-President. 

H. H. ANDRESEN, Caslilcr. JAS. F. BREDUW, Asst. Cashier. 

--V DIRECTORS. ^r-— 

O rrO ALBRECHT. NICHOLAS KUHNEN. F. H. GRIGGS. 

H. H. ANDRESEN. H. LISCHER. H. TECHENTIN. 

D. GOULD. JENS LORENZEN. L. WAHLE. 



Five Per Cent Interest Paid on Deposits. Money Loaned on Real 
Estate and Personal Security. 

Otilce open from O < ni. i<> :{ p. iii., aii<l on Saturdays l<> K p. in. 



BANKS. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 



DjPs.\7E:]SrFOK.T, IO\x7jPl. 



-The First National Bank in Operation in the United States 



Capital, - $100,000.00. Surplus, - $50,000.00. 

Undivided Profits, • $70,000.00. 

JAS. THOMPSON, J. E. STEVENSON, JOHN B. FIDLAR, GEO. HOEHN, 

President. Vice-President. Cashier. Asst. Cashier. 

DIRECTORS: 

John P. Van Patten. James Thompson. S. F. Oilman. 

Henry W. Kerker. A. Burdick. Aug. Steffen. 

Christ. Mueller. J. E. Stevenson. Nathaniel French. 

George W. Cahle. Geo. M. Schmidt. 



Davenport • Savings • Bank 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

Office in First National Bank Building. 









T 






Cash Ca 
Deposits 


pital, 
, over 


. 


$ 
I 


120,000.00. 
,000,000.00. 








■ — iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii ' 


— 






OFFICERS : 




BURDICK, 
President. 






LOUIS HALLER, 
Vice-President. 

DIRECTORS : 




J. B. MEYER, 

Cashier 


J. F. DOW. 
H. KOHRS. 
WM. O. SCHMIDT. 




L. HALLER. 
A. STEFFEN. 
F. T. BLUNK. 




A. HURDICK. 
JAMES THOMPSON. 
F. H. HANCOCK. 



FIVE PER CENT INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 

Money Loaned on Real Estate and Personal Security. 

Office open from 9 :oo a. m. to 3 :oo p. m., and on Saturdays to 8:00 p. m. 



ay 



BANKS. 



Davenport National Bank 



Capital, $200,000. 

DAVENPORT, lOV/A. 

* * * .*•*. * * *• 



e. S. BALLORD, 

PRESIOCNT. 



OFFICERS: 
S. F. SMITH, 

VICE-PRESIDENT. 



S D. BAWDEN, 

CASHIER. 



DIRECTORS: 



(/. B. PHELPS, of Lindsay & Phelps, Lumber. 
Wm. Renwick. President Dauenport Woolen Mills. 
I. H. Sears, of Sears & Sons, Pres't Scott County 

Sauings Ban It. 
Uriah RORABACK, of U. N. Roberts & Co. 



Geo. H. French, Pres't Eagle Manufacturing Co. 

S. F. SMITH, Retired Lawyer. 

R. SiCHELS, of Sicliels, Preston & Co. 

D. T. Robinson, Lumber, Rocl< Island. 

E. S. BALLORD, of Ballord & Co., Druggists. 



SCOTT COUNTY SAVINGS BANK 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

Southeast Corner of Third and Brady Streets. 



Oasli. Oa<pita,l, 


OFFICERS: 


sso,ooo.oo. 


I. H. SEARS, President. 


HENRY F. 
J. H. HASS, Cashier. 

DIRECTORS: 


PETERSEN, Vice-President. 


I. H. Sears. 


H. F. Petersen. 


C. A. Ficke. 


T.J. O'Meara. 


A. P. Doe. 


J. B. Phelps. 


G. M. Schmidt. 


Otto Klug. 


J. H. Hass. 



FIVE PER CENT INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 

Money Loaned on Real Estate and Personal Security. 

Office open from 9 : oo a. m. to 3 : 00 p. m., and on Saturday to 8 : 00 p. m. 



BANKS. 3 

J. M. Gould, President. I. T. Browning, Vice-Prest. John S. Gillmore, Cashier. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

MOLINE, ILLINOIS. 

Organized, December, 1S63. Charter E.vtended, February 24, 1883. 

Capital, - $150,000.00. Surplus, - $30,000.00 

Collections given prompt and careful attention, and remitted for at lowest rates on day of payment. 

Directors. — ^J. M. Gould, S. H. Velie, James Sliaw, Jonathan Huntoon,J. T. Browning, Charles 
H. Deere, Samuel Bowles, H. A. Barnard, A. F. Vinton, Morris Rosenfield, John S. Gillmore. 

Correspondents. — Northwestern National Bank, Chicago; Importers and Traders National 
Bank, New York. 

MOLINE NATIONAL BANK 

MOLINE, ILLINOIS. 

Capital, - $100,000.00. Surplus, - $20,000.00. 



S. VV. WHEELOCK, President. PORTER SKINNER, Vice-President. 

C. F. HEMENWAY, Cashier. 

Directors. — S. W. Wheelock, Porter Skinner, H. A. Barnard, J. Silas Leas, Hiram Darling, 
A. S. Wright, L. E. Hemenway, C. Vitzthum, J. S. Keator, C. F. Hemenway, J. H. Williamson. 

DOES A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS. 
T. J. Robinson, President. J. H. Wilson, Vice-President. J. F- Robinson, Cashier. 

Rock Island Natioinal Bank 

Rock island, Illinois. 



Capital Stock, - $100,000.00. Surplus Fund, - $50,000.00. 

Undivided Profits, - $54,000 00. 



New York Correspondent — National Park Bank. Chicago Correspondents — Commercial Na- 
tional Bank, and Merchants Loan and Trust Company. 



Established 1856. 



Mitchell & Lynde, 

-^•^ Bankers^- 



p. L. MITCHELL. 

coRNSLRs lynde. ROCK ISLAND, ILLINOIS. 

PHIL. MITCHELL. 



INSURANCE. 



S. K. OILMAN, President. 
E. J. BABCOCK. Secretary- 



G. P. McClelland, Vice-Prest. 
M. L. MARKS, Treasurer. 



^«.cuR/^^ 



FIRE INS. 



COMP'Y, 



Capital, _ _ - $100,000.00. 

Insures Mercantile Risks, Buildings, Dwellings, Farm Property, and all the 

Better Classes of Risks Against Loss by Fire, Lightning, 

Tornado, Wind-Storm, and Cyclone. 



DIRECTORS: 

S. F. Oilman, President, of Crescent Flouring Mills. G. P. McClelland, Vice-President, of 
T. VV. McClelland & Co., Sash, Doors, and Blinds. M. L. Marks, Treasurer, of Van Patten & 
Marks, Wholesale Grocers. F. H. Griggs, President Citizens National Bank. J. S. Wvlie, Whole- 
sale Coal Merchant Robert Sickels, of Sickels, Preston & Co., Wholesale Hardware. Jens 
LoRENZEN, Wholesale Crockery. Walter Chambers, of Egbert, Fidlar, & Chambers, Publishers; 
J. B. Phelps, of Lindsay & Phelps, Lumber Manufacturers. W. H. Fernald, of Reimers <fe Fer- 
nald. Wholesale Confectioners. E.J. Babcock, Secretary. 

The FEDERAL LIFE Association 




SURETY 

Fund 
Feature 



HENRY EGBERT, President. 
E. H. WHITCOMB, Secretary. 



Affords the Safest and Most Perfect System of Insurance Ever Presented for Popular Acceptance 
Home Office: DAVENPORT, IOWA. 
Organized March 15, 1882. 

DEATH Losses paid, over $50,000.00. 

A SURETY FUND LIMITED TO $500,000.00. created exuressly to secure the payment of death losses. 
Securities for Inveslmenls made deposited with the Auditor of State. 

It FURNISHES not only PROTECTION to the FAMILY, but a SUPPORT in OLD AGE. 

Plans Operated; ORDINARY LIFE, and LIFE AND SAVINGS FUND. 
Directors.— E. B. Hayward, Henry Egbert, E. A. Benson, G. E. Maxwell, Geo. W. Cable, E 
H. Whitcomb. Wm. Thompson. W. W. Grant. Medical Director. Write for Prospectus. 



INSURANCE. 5 
ORGAN IZED 1858. PURE LY M UTUAL. 
THE 

Northwestern Mutual • • 
• • Life Insurance Company 

OF MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN. 



Dividends to Policy-Holders are land have been during each ot the past 
fourteen years) larger than those of any other company on similar policies. 

Its Interest Receipts largely exceed its death losses. 

It does not solicit business in the Gulf States or in Foreign Countries. 

No Loans are made on Stocks or any kind of fluctuating securities. 

No restrictions on residence, travel, or occupation after three years. 

If you contemplate insuring, IT WILL PAY YOU TO INVESTIGATE. 

A copy of the Northwestern's " Challenge to all other Companies," and any 
desired information, cheerfully furnished on application. 

GEO. E. COPELAND, generalagent 

Ryan Block. DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

T. J.' ROBINSON, President. O. B. BLACKBURN, Secy, and Gen. Manager. 

W. W. STAFFORD. Ass't Secretary. 



SUN 



ACCIDENT ASSOCIATION 

Home: Office, Masonic Temple, Rock Island, III. 

ISSUES CERTIFICATES TO PAY 

$1,000 in case of accidental death.. 

$1,000 in case of loss of two tiands, two feet, two eyes, or any two 

of these members 
$ 500 in case of loss of one hand, one toot, or one eye. 
IN ADDITION to a Weekly Indemnity ranging from $7.50 to $25.00 

per -week, for a period up to one year. 

RELIABLE AGENTS WANTED. 

JL. J", lei^ch: &c bi^o. 

FURNACES, STOVES, 

House - put^nishing Goods, 



Tin, Copper, and Sheet -Iron Ware, 
) Street, 

Adjoining Masonic Temple, 



WEST THIRD STREET. DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



6 WHOLESALE HOUSES. 

J. W. STEWART. J. M. MONTGOMERY. 

STEWART & MONTGOMERY, 

JOBBERS OF 

HARDWARE, IRON, NAILS, 

Glass, Cutlery, Cordage, Belting, Mechanics' Tools, 
"Wagon Stock, Fence "Wire, etc. 

FLOc:£fC isLjPLnsrrD, - - illiistois. 

ROBERT SICKELS. J. R. PRESTON. J. R. NUTTING. 

SicMs, Preston & Co. 

EXCLUSIVELY WHOLESALE 

HARDWARE 

121 and 123 West Third Street, 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

S. M. REYNOLDS. IRA L. GIFFORD. 

REYNOLDS & GIFFORD, 



DEALERS IN 



Hardware, Paints, and Oils 

223 Brady Street, 



WHOLESALE HOUSES. 



E. G. FKAZER, 

Hock Island, |ll., and Davenport, |ouia. 



W. p. HALLI6AN & CO 

COAL 



Hard, ^^^ ^"^ A W Lackawanna, 

Anthracite, MM ■ I\ I Pardee- 

Soft, % ^ 1 f /-A I Wilkesbarre, 

Blossburg, ^^^ V.*^ M M. 1 ^ Lehigh, 

AND 



Yards, Corner Fifth and Harrison Sts., 

Telephone No. 171. DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

Elstablishisci ISQS. 



COAli 



J. S. WTLIE, 

SHIPPER OF 

3ijPs-E.rD ANTD SOFT COAL. 



RATES OBTAINED FOR DELIVERY IN CAR LOTS 
TO ALL POINTS IN THE NORTHWEST. 

HARD COAL ALL RAIL FROM THE MINES. 

Masonic Temple, Third Street, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

All Rail Shipping Yards: JOLIET, ILLINOIS. 



WHOLESALE HOUSES. 



W. C. WADSWORTH & CO. 

loe. 111, and. lis eijPlst seicodscd stk.e:h;t, 
DAVENPORT, IOWA, 

Importers and Jobbers of 

DRY Goods, Hosiery, 

Notions, Dnderwear, Etc. 

Our Stock is New and Inviting, and Complete in Every Department. 
We Guarantee Prices as LO W as any qnotatlons offered in Chicago or New York. 
We carry the CHOICEST STOCK OF PRINTS and the BEST BRANDS OF DOMES- 
TICS to be found in the West. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ORDERS. 

DRY GOODS 

J. H- c. 

»'^." ,„ PETERSEN ,.. "T" 

SONS. ""?" 

flOTiOfls, mmLiiflEHV, cliotHiNg, 

GflF^PETS 

ETC. 

BHAHCH HOUSH, - GE^IESHO, IbUIf^OIS. 



WHOLESALE HOUSES. 



A. MoRiTz s Bros. • • • • 

Whdlesai.f. and Rktail Dealkrs in 

—CLOTHING-- 

HATS AND CAPS, 

GENTS' Furnishing Goods. 

121 ^ 123 West Second St., DAVENPORT, lOWA. 



Steffen « 




2Ze, 223, and 230 
Corner Harrison, 



IDK.Y GOODS 

AND 

i<roTio:N:s. 



Telephone 381. IDa.\7-e:jn.poi:t, loTJcra.. 

JARYIS WHITE & CO. 

( SUCCESSORS TO HASTINGS, WHITE & FISHER,] 

• PHOTOGRAPHERS • 

Manufacturers of Picture Frames, and Dealers in Steel Engravings, Etchings, etc. 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS A SPECIALTY. 

320 Brady St., DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



10 WHOLESALE HOUSES. 

I. H. SEARS & SONS, 

DEALERS IN 

Leather, Saddlery-Hardware, Findings, Etc. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



HORSE-COLLARS ^ SADDLES. 

Cor. Perry and Second Sts.. DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

J. RosENFiELD. Established 1856. m. rosenfield. 



J. & M. ROSENFIELD, 

Manufacturers of Collars and Saddles, 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

SADDLERY-HARDWARE, LEATHER, SHOE FINDINGS, 
HIDES, AND WOOL. 

K.OCI^ ISLjPlDNTD, - - ILLIlsTOIS. 

SETH P. BRYANT. EstabHshed 1864-. s. w. pierce. 



SETH P. BRYAHT & CO. 



WHOLESALE Davonport, Iowa. 

BOOTS. SHOES. .^^ RUBBERS. ~^ 

SMITH & HUGHES, 

BAG MANUFACTURERS, 

119 Brady Street, 

DAVENPORT, - IO^VA. 



WHOL ESA L K HO USES. 
Established 1857. 



11 



JEKTS LOE.z:nsr^z:N, 



IMPORTER 0|- AND DEALER IN 



CHINA, CRflCKERf, and CUSSWARE, 



223 West Third St., 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



WflSHBURN-HfllUGJlN COFFEE CO. 

ROASTERS OF COFFEES, 



AND MANUFACTURERS OK 



Spices, Baking Powders, Flavorings Extracts, etc. 

216 and 218 East Third St., - DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

Geo. a. Fleming & Co. 

Cfll IFORNIA ™«TED : V 

< AND DRIED FRUITS. 

Rock Island, Illinois. 



Manufacturers of the Celebrated 

"BLACK DIAMOND" 

Brand of Dried Fruits, 

AND 

Fleming's Raisin -Cured Prunes. 



Factory : 



SAN JOSE, CAL. 



Packing House and 

Distributing Depot: 



ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 



12 WHOLESALE HOUSES. 

Henry Dart's Sons, 

Wholesale • Grocers, 

Rock Island, Illinois. 

Established 1857. Correspondence Solicited. 

Van Patten & Marks, 

Wholesale Grocers 

119, 121, and 123 East Second St., 

Davenport, Iowa. 



"^-^ 



ERDIX T. SMITH. D. K. SMITH. C. C. SMITH. 

Erdix T. Smith & Bros. 

Wholesale Grocers, 
Fruits, and Commission, 

219 and 221 Perry Street, 
Established in 1876. DaVGnpOrt, lOWa. 

CHAs. BEiDERBKCKE. Established 1856. f. h. miller. 

Beiderbecke & Miller, 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 

Davenport, Iowa. 



WHOLESALE HOUSES. 13 



ONE OF THE BEST 




KNOWN O 1' THE 



INDUSTRIES 



5e- miillR 



Known in every part 
of our line. 



And the motto adopted 
'-'X^-^-.'^Uy/^^mr^-^^^ Nv ^^^,,^^_^^ by the proprietor, 

"S(sld.onn EIqij.a-ll&d., N:e\T<sr E^ccellsd./' 

Holds just as good to-day as it did ten years ago, with this brand. 

NICHOLAS KUHNEN, Proprietor. 

Established 1854. DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

Established 1854. 

OTTO ALBRECHT & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

R8ER8YPR0M808a GIGMRS 

find Sealeps in ^©baGSSS. 



306 West Second St., 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



ARGILLO WORKS 



CARBON CLIFF, ILLINOIS. 



The Largest FIRE-BRICK and TILE WORKS in the West. 

PRICES ALWAYS THE LOWEST. 

a®"" Telephone Connection with Moline, Rock Island, and Davenport. 



14 



J[. I XUFA CTl 7i' IXG HO USES. 




Standard Scale 

Manufactured by 



VICTOR 

Moline S(]j\^]jJ] Company 



For Prices and Circulars, address the Company, at 



MOLINE, ILL. 



Davenport Canning Company, 

PACKERS OF archer's FAMOUS BRANDS OF 

Sugar-Corn, Red-Coat Tomatoes, Peas, Raspberries, Pumpkins, 
and other Vegetables and Fruits. 

THE LARGEST INDUSTRY OF THE KIND IN THE V7"EST. 
Factory, Warehouse, and Office, - - DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



H. H. ANDRESEN, Prest. ROBT. KRAUSE, Secy. 



L. P. BEST, Supt. 



Davenport Glucose Mfg. Co. 



SUPERIOR DOUBLE-REP'INED 




Grape Sugar, Glucose a^rf Table Syrups 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



3rA N I 'FA ( '77 7.' I.\< 1 1 10 1 N/.'.S'. 1 1 

n. F. McLARTV, Prest. VV. B. !• KKCU'SON, Vice-Prest. W. M. TRENTICE, Secy. 

J. I". ROBINSON, Ticas. L. A. NR-KEKSON, Supl. 



Rock Island Knife and Shear Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 




KNIVES, SHEARS, AND SCISSORS, 

Tailors' Shears, Tiriners' Sqips, Razors, Table and Pocket Cutlery, 
Every Knife and Shear Fully Warranted. ROCK ISLAND ILL. 



HUGH WARNOCK. 



Elstablistieci 1SS3. 



ROBT. RALSTON. 



JAS. D. WARNOCK 



WARNOCK I RALSTON, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



LAaiindry • and • Toilet 

+ SOAPS + 



CORNER 

Fifth Ave. and Second St. 



* * * * 



Rock Island, III. 



16 MISCELLANEOUS. 

T. w. McClelland & co. 



MANUFACTURERS Ol- 



Sash, Doors, and Blinds 

AND DEALERS IN 

i^P2.E:nsrc5i jPs.3srrD jPs.ixiE:i?.ic-!Ps.asr o-ljOlss, 
304-312 Main Street, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

Lumber Yard, corner Fourth and Harrison Streets. 

CHARLES 6. HIPWELL, 

PRACTICAL SLATE ROOFER 




AND 



„ 4f ■ M S ' i' Bl'i' DEALER IN SLATE. 

'S^alljit-^^nF^^ OFFICE: 

^m^^^^^^^^^^*^-^ 430 Brady St., DAVENPORT, IOWA. 
All Work Warranted. Gravel Roofing done by Experienced Workmen. 

E. D. ROBESON & SONS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Fresh f^^ Smoked Meats, 

GAME AND POULTRY, 
426 Brady Street, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

Tei 'sphone 204. 

H. F. BRAMMER & CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Washing Machines, Boxing and Shipping Cases, 

and Fence -Sign Boards, 
317 to 327 Warren Street, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

J. VOLK. I. WEISS. G. WEISS. 

J. "VOLIC & CO. 

PROPRIETORS OF PLANING MILLS 

And Manufacturers of Sash, Doors, Blinds, Mouldings, etc. 
319 AND 321 Eighteenth St., ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 



STAIR BUILDING - PLUMIUSU, GAS-FITTIXG. ETC. 



17 




1712 First Ave., Rock Island. 



Davis Block, iVIoline, Illinois. 



DAVIS & CO. 

Plumbers, Gas and Steam Fitters. 



HEATIXG AND VENTILATING ENGINEERS. 



"We have in stock a full line of Plumbers' and Sieanm Fitters' 

Goods, and are as w°ll prepared as either Chicago or St. Louis to do 

all work in our line. 



w 



-^^^r 



^^ 



£;^-Contiactors for erecting Water- Works and Klectric Light Plants, and laying 
Gas, Water, and Sewer I'ipe. 
2 



18 



ARCHITECTS— PLUMBING, GAS-FITTING, ETC. 






--H AR C H I TECT »^- 

-^ J. ^'W. ^ R.OSS ^- 




ARCHITECT 



AND 




SXJP=H:K.I]>TTE:]NrDH;iSCT * OF- * BXJir.DIISCCS-S, 

Corner Third and Perry Streets — Eldridge Block, 

Davenport, Iowa. 

E,IDTx7jPi.K.nD S. HjPs-]V[]V[jPi.XT, 

WORK FOR REFERENCE. 

Augustana College, Eock Island. 
County Clerk's Office, Rock Island. 
.Tewish Synagogue, Davenport. 
Kemper Hall. Davenport. 
Saint Katharine's Hall, Davenport. 
Roddewig Building, Davenport. 
Residence of Prof. Sheldon, Davenport. 
Residence of T. M. Ackley, Davenport. 
Residence of E. H. Sleight. Moline. 
Residence of J. L. Wells, Moline. 
Residence of J. D. Taylor, Rock Island. 




KEMPRK HALL. 



Office: Corner Third and Brady Streets. 



J. B. Li]N:DSjPLiir, 

Plumbing, Gas ^ Steam Fitting, 

128 EAST THIRD STREET, 



LA WYERS— HA TTERS — DENTISTRY— B UTTER — INSURANCE. 19 

("Office, No. 307. ( Davenport National Bank. 

Telephones -< Fred Heinz, No 327. Reier to< Citizens National Bank. 

(a. J. Hirschl, No. i66. (Hon. John F. Dillon, 195 Broadway, N. Y. 

heinz^sThirschl, 

LAWYERS, 

N.W. COR. THIRD AND MAIN. DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

Collections attended to. Stocks, niort^Hges. ;ind real estate Ixjii.irht and sold. Invest 
money.s on first mortgage on improved Iowa farm-'. 

ADAIR PLEASANTS. ELMORE W. HURST. 

"PLEIlSflNTS I HURSir 

Attorneys i Counsellors at Law, 

Office, Rooms 3 ^4 Masonic Temple, ROCK ISLAN DJ LL. 

References, any Bank in Rock Island. 



ElSTjOs-IBLISBiElXD IBTO. 



W. S. CAMERON & SON, 

Hatters * and * Mens' * Furnistiing * Goods, 

No. 127 East 1 hird Street, near Posf-Office. 

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Twenty years successful practice. Ryaq Block, Cor. Second and Brady. 

C. S. STREEPER, 

^^ MANIFACTUKER OK ^^ 

Fine •:•:• Creamery •:•:• Butter. 

•— ^I'— AND ALSO COMMISSION. -"'-^ Office and Refrigerator, 217 Perry St. 

3Z)jPLA7"E:isrp='o:R.T, xc:>\m>^. 

TORNADOES. CYCLONES. WIMD-bTORMS, FiRE AND LIGHTNING. 
INSURE AGAINST THEM WITH 

SlNTIDEII^ « 5. * IxriLKS, 

112 West Second St. Newcomb House Block), DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



20 LIVERY STABLES— HORSE EXCHANGE. 

JOSEPH GIMBEL, 

Livery ^"^ Boarding Stable, 

All orders promptly attended to. All Turn-outs as good 
as can be found in tlie city. 

7 AND 119 WEST FOURTH ST. DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

.:i;Kimball^ House 4^ Stables:?:- 

Proprietor. 

LiVei^ij, ^ale, and Feed ^teble^, 

117, 119, AND ll9i EAST FOURTH ST. 
TELEPHONE 220. D A.VENPOR.T, l.Q'SN' A. 

R. BENTON. C. H. IlENTON. 

lu'eri sale, and feed stables, 

R. BENTON & SON, 

Cor. Third and Rock Island Sts. DAVENPORT, lOV/A. 

HORSES BOUGHT, SOLD, ANO EXCHANGED. 

C. LORTON. S. LORTON. 

LORTON & BROTHER, 

Davenport - Horse * Exchange, 

305, 307, 309, pt* 311 
East 3d street, 

DA.VENPOR.T, TQ^tJA.. 



Horses purcliased and .sold bv retail and car-load lots. Buggies, harness, and 
road-wagons — all styles — for srile. Guarantee everything as represented. 




LI] EHY— .JERSEY CATTLE— QROCERIES— TURKISH BATHS. 21 

CHARLES E. BURRALL, 

Livery ^ Feed Stable 



ORDERS FOR CARRIAGES, WITH OR WITHOUT DRIVERS 
PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



Telephone 278. 



Commercial Alley, Rear of III Third Street, Davenport. 



RICHARDSON BROS. 

THOROUGHBRED 

JERSEY ^CATTLE 

Largest Herd in the West. Send for Catalogue. 

DAVENPORT. IOWA. 

J. M. GLASPELL, 

Grocer®FruitDealer 

Apples and Cider a Specialty. 

213 and 215 East Third St. DA VENPORT, IOWA. 

'—-'■'-- THE — ^I'-— 

Finest « West • of » C hicago. 

Those who are tired of drugs, and those -who are not, give us a call. 

We rarely fail to cure any disease, no matter 

how long standing. 

DR. J. H. THATCHER, 

ne West Third St., bet. Brady and Main. ID A.^i;7'E3S^I=OI^T, lOTTT" J^. 



22 FURNITURE— UPHOLSTERY— BOOKS. 

A. J. SMITH & SON, 

MANUFACIURERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

Furniture,* Carpets, 



-W!^ 



Drapery,<^> Shades. 

<«« >— -H »»> 



Linoleum,* Oil-Clotli, 



-^^m ->— — « »>» 



Foldi ng Beds, Etc., Etc. 

HAVE JUST REMOVED TO THEIR IMMENSE 
NEW STORE, 

Opposite Masonic Temple, 125 and 127 "West Third St. 

FRANCIS MCCULLOUGH, 

DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 

Furniture, * Upholstery, 



MATTRESSES, ETC. 



510 

BRADY Street, 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



•5fJ-^*4»- Tub Leading Booh and stationery House. > > ■ ■ • ; }<• 

THOMAS THOMPSON. 

BOOKS 



MISCELLANEOUS 1^1 1 1 ll/C V^ BLANK BOOKS and 
and SCHOOL I'll II I Y\ ii STATIONERY. 



Finest line of Engravings, Pictioxes, Mouldings, and Frames in the city. 

Paper Hangings and Decorations, from the Cheapest 

to the Finest Grades. 

Corner Brady and Third Streets, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



CRACKERS AND BISCUITS— GROCERIES. 23 

J. Ixl. CMR.ISTY, 

r — ■^'^-♦■MANUIACTL'RKR OK-»-j-^- — > 

Crackers ^^ Biscuits, 

ROCK ISLAND, ILL. t^^' DES MOINES, IOWA. 



SPECIALTIES: 



The CHRISTY OYSTER-^— — «And CHRISTY WAFERS. 

^Roddewig-Schmidt 

^Cracker • Company, 

-^iDavenportj-lowa. 

Branch House, Des JVIoines, Iowa. 

SvC, CHAMBERS, 



-DEALER IN- 



Staple X and x Fancy x GroceriGS 



FINE FRUITS A SPECIALTY. 



S. W. Corner of Fourth and Brady Streets, 



24 



LAND, LOAN, AND REAL ESTATE AGENTS. 



J. M. ELDRIDGE, 

Land and Loan Agent, 

NO. 208 BRADY ST.. DAVENPORT. IOWA. 



Farms and Houses to Rent. Thirty-three Years in Business. 

MEDILL & WHITEHEAD, 

REAL + ESTATE + AND + FINANCIAL + AGENTS. 




Six and Seven per cent Net on ILLINOIS FARM MORTGAGES. 

"^ We conduct a careful investing business in Real Estate Mortgage Securities, and offer to 

investors First Mortgages on Improved Farms in the best Agriailtural localities in the State of 

Illinois. 

ft We look closely after all securities until loan is finally paid. Principal and interest collected 

and remitted without cost. Loans also made on good business property in the substantial cities 

of Illinois. 

We have for sale paying investments in city property, improved or unimproved. Choice 
acres adjoining the cities of Rock Island and Moline, suitable for immediate platting if so desired, 
proving a sure and lucrative investment. 

-5K- OUR LAND DEPARTMENT. -5K- 



A long experience in buying and selline: Iowa, Kansas, and Nebraska lands gives us unex- 
celled opportunities to supply purchasers. First-class unimproved farm lands in Iowa at from I9 
to $11 per acre. One to two dollars per acre down, balance on long time. In Southwestern 
Kansas we have cne of the finest body of lands in the State at from J3 to $5 per acre, one-fifth 
down, balance on time. 

4®* Special attention given to the business of correspondents. 



REAL ESTATE— LOAN AGENCY. 25 

* JiNO. J. DAHMS. -5^ 

Central Real Estate Agency, 

CITY PROPERTY BOUGHT, SOLD, AND EXCHANGED. 

ALSO 

Wild and Inaproved Lands in all "Western States and Territories. 
Property taken care of for non-residents : taxes paid ; loans negotiated. 

* A. C. FULTON. ^ 



Experience tells me that it is to the interest of 
and the duty of every man to secure himself and 
family a home. I have many well located build- 
ing lots, in healthy and improving locations, for 
sale cheap and on long credit. 

A. C. FULTON. 

^ A. J. MONTAGUE, ^ 

REAL ESTATE INSURANCE, 

AND LOAN AGENCY, 
304 Brady St„ First Floor, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



A full line of Fire Insurance Companies. Mortgages and other Securities 
Bought and Sold. Loans Negotiated on First-Class City and Country Real 
Estate. Taxes Paid City Property of every kind, Farms, and Western Lands 
for Sale or Exchange. Special attention given to locating of Manufacturing 
and Wholesale establishments. Parties desirous of relocating or putting in 
new Plants will please correspond, giving particulars. 

SOME CHOICE MANUFACTURING PROPERTY FOR SALE. 



26 



EEAL ESTATE AND LOAN OFFICE. 



Real Estate ^ Loan Office, 

310 Fifteenth Street, 

iiynoLinsTE, irji_.iisrois. 



Money 



Received for in- 
vestment on good 
Real Estate secu- 
rity. 



Money to Loan 

In amounts from 
|2oo to |[o,ooo on 
good Real Estate 
security. 



Fire Insurance' 

Written in the best 
American and Eng- 
lish Companies at 
lowest Board rate. 



GUSTAF SWENSSON, 

LEADING 

REAL ESTATE 

Money Brote, 

NOTARY PUBLIC, 



Justice ol the Peace, 

310 Fifteenth St. 

(MOLINE NATIONAL BANK BUILDING.) 

Moline, Illinois. 



Sixteen years experience in the 
Real Estate business in Moline has 
given me'the advantage of know- 
ing the value of every foot of land 
in the city and vicinity. 



Foreign Excliange 

Sold at the lowest 
rate. 



Collections 

In United States 
and Europe will be 
attended to with 
promptness. Cor- 
respondents in all 
principal cities in 
the world. 



Ticltets 

To and from Eu- 
rope for sale at 
lowest rate. All 
Ocean Steamship 
lines represented. 



ILLUSTRATIONS AND MAPS. 



Map of Rock Island Arsenal 28 

Bird's-Eye View of the City of Davenport 32 

Davenport Water Works — Pumping (Station No. 1 36 

Davenport AVater Works — Pumping Station No. 2 37 

Cable Lumber Mill 38 

Eagle Manufacturing Company's Shops 39 

Kuhnen's Cigar Manufactory 39 

Red Jacket Pump Works 40 

U. N. Roberts & Company's Block 41 

Davenport Canning Works 43 

Scott County Court House 45 

Turner Hall and German Theatre 46 

Masonic Temple 46 

A. J. Smith & Son's block 47 

Roddewig Block 47 

Ryan Block 52 

Mercy Hospital -^3 

Overlooking the City of Moline 56 

Sylvan Water Opposite Moline 57 

Moline Bridge to National Arsenal 58 

Moline Water-Power Tail-Race 60 

Moline Water-Power Pool 61 

Arsenal Water-Power Machinery 62 

Deere & Company's Plow Works 65 

Moline Plow Company's Shops 66 

Moline Wagon Company's Works 67 

Deere & Mansur Company's Corn Planter Works 68 

Barnard & Leas Manufacturing Company's Works 69 

The Moline Iron Works '70 

Moline Paper Mill 71 

Moline Pump Company's Works 72 

Moline Postoffice I'.uilding 73 

Davis & Company's Office Building 75 

The City of Rock Island 80 

Rock Island Entrance to Arsenal 83 

Rock Island and Davenport Ferry 85 

Rock Island Lumber and Manufacturing Company's Mills and Yards 87 

Rock Island Plow Works 88 

New Rock Island High School 90 

Augustana College ^'1 

Residence of Hon. Bailey Davenport 93 

Harper House 96 

Map of the Hennepin Canal 98 

Black Hawk's Watch Tower — Looking East 99 

Black Hawk's Watch Tower — Front View 100 

Black Hawk 101 

Col. Oeorge Davenport 102 

Col. Davenport's Home 103 

Grant School Building, Moline 104 

Rock Island Arsenal Gun Yard • 106 

Gen. Rodman's Tomb 107 

The Commandant's Residence 108 

Partial View of Armory Shops 109 

Soldiers' Barracks HO 

Railroad Map I^ast Cover 



Three Cities: 

DA^'ENPORT. 

ROCK ISLAND. 

AND MOLINE, 

Their Location, Industrial Enterprises, Whole- 
sale Trade, Transportation Facilities, 
Business Opportunities, Banks, 
Schools, Churches, and 



ALSO A DESCRIPTIVE SKETCH OF ROCK ISLAND ARMORY AND ARSENAL, 






^ X WITH ILLUSTRATIONS ^ MAPS. 



^ _i ■ / 

BY ^ F'SCTILLINGHAST. 

i\ 
Tlie Valley of the Mississippi is, upon the whole, the most magnificent dwelling-place prepared 
bv God for Man's abode. — DeTocoueville's Democracy in America. 



<:opvii<ilit, 1887, by B. F. Tillinghast. ',, ^^ 

.MauPQ 188 V, 



DAVENPORT, IOWA : 

ECHKKT, FIDLAR, & CHAMBERS, PRINTERS AKD HI^'DEKS. 
1888. 



:jo business summary 






BUSINESS FACTS. 



THE THREE CITIES AS A MANUFACTURING AND. COMMERCIAL CENTER. 

Davenport, Rock Island, and Moline form the most populons, most important, 
and most prosperous manufacturing and commercial center between Lake Michigan 
on the east, the Missouri river on the vrest, the head of Mississippi river navigation 
on the north, and the mouth of the Illinois river on the south. The municipal 
limits of the three cities fall vrithin a circle whose radius is about four miles, and the 
central geographical point of which is in longitude 13° and 37^ west of Washington, 
and in latitude 41° and 30' north. With reference to well-known places the point 
already tixed is: By rail, 181 miles west of Chicago and 318 miles east of Omaha; 
by river it is 332 miles north of St. Louis and 397 miles south of St. Paul. The 
population of these cities is very close to 70,000, about equally distributed on either 
bank of the Father of Waters for a distance of eight miles. Nature intended this 
as a locality upon which she could bestow her richest gifts. She placed the most 
beautiful of the many islands which divide the waters of the great river here. 
Around this Island of Rock Island is the cluster of cities described in this book, and 
upon it is the National Armory and Arsenal of the Mississippi Valley, designed to 
be the largest on the continent. While affording the nation protection in time of 
danger, it furnishes the trio of cities and their visitors a park without an equal in 
the west. 

RICH IN MATERIAL RESOURCES 

The location is not only picturesque and attractive for its natural beauty and as 
a place of residence, but it is wonderfully rich in material resources, which as yet 
have been but imperfectly developed. Here is an unlimited water-power which the 
government partially utilizes in its wheels of nearly 4,000-horse-power, and which 
has made the city of Moline known as the Lowell of the West. In the diversity of 
resources may be found an abundance of cheap coal, and transportation facilities by 
river and rail which afford means for reaching iron-mines, north and south, and pine- 
forests in Wisconsin and Arkansas. 

A year's manufactures. 
But specific facts and figures are more stubborn things, and also more satisfactory 
than general statements, however well they may be vouched for. Let us deal with 
realities — with the business of Davenport, Rock Island, and Moline for the year just 
closed. Over 100 factories, of all kinds, have been in operation. They have invested 
as capital $16,804,000.00; gave employment to 9,343 hands, who received in wages 
$4,361,500.00. The actual business transacted, as shown by the volume of sales, 
was $21,997,600.00. 

THE WHOLESALE TRADE. 

While the industrial interests take precedence in the extent of business done, 
the wholesale trades are a factor of immense importance. They number more than 
Ibrty. The capital invested is $3,6.50,000.00. The wholesale houses employed 817 
hands, and did a business of $11,226,000.00. These fiictories and wholesale houses 
keep an army of 350 commercial travelers on the road. The retail business and 
general trade are in keeping with the manufacturing and wholesaling. 

SOME LEADING INDUSTRIES. 

To be more definite. The one industry of largest proportions is that of lumber- 
making. The eight saw-mills, during the last season, cut 191,500,000 feet of lumber; 



B U8INESS S UMMA RY. 31 

40,500,000 lath, aud :{."), '2oO, 000 shingles. Upon their pay-rolls are the names of 
1,756 men, and their salesbooks show 11,575,000.00 as the business of twelve months. 
The second most important industry is plow-making. The five factories employ 
1,550 men; their sales reach $3,000,000.00, and in the twelve months of 1887 they 
made more than 400,000 implements. The various cigar factories have given em- 
ployment to over 700 hands, and made more than 16,000,000 cigars. Flour-making, 
pork-packing, the manufacture of wagons, glucose, pumps, paints, crackers, candy, 
stoves, glass, beer, soap, saws, scales, paper, malleable iron, organs, steam boilers and 
engines, furniture, clothing, vinegar, threshing-machines, brick, and pottery, are some 
of the other industries which help to make the totals given. 

THE MEASURE OF BUSINESS. 
The banks measure business accurately. Their figures are accessible. The eight 
national banks and one private banking-house sold exchange during the year 1887 
amounting to $45,610,000.00. Their paid up capital is $950,000.00. Their resources 
at the time of their December statements were $4,519,820.80. The savings banks 
show the thrift and condition of the working classes. There are four of these institu- 
tions, with an aggregate capital of $490,000.00, and undivided profits of $239,197.00. 
They have deposits of $4,780,933.00, and the number of their depositors is 10,753 — 
an individual average of $444.61. What western city can make a proportionate 
showing ■? 

PO.ST-OFFICE GAINS. 

The statistics of the post-offices in the three cities for the year 1887 show an in- 
crease of twenty-five per cent in the gross receipts over 1886. These amount to $80,- 
726.50. The number of money-orders issued is over 14,000, representing $129,501,60; 
the number of postal-notes issued was more than 9,000, amounting to $16,025.84. 
The number of money-orders paid is 26,000, and the amount $381,189.30; the num- 
ber of postal-notes paid was more than 14,600, aggregating $32,316.64. 

A year's INCREASE. 
Carefully compiled statistics of 1887 show an increase in the business of the 
various trades and industries of from fifteen to twenty-five per cent over any 
former year. And this is confirmed by bank figures, proving the last twelve months 
to have been the most prosperous equal period ever known. In the way of building 
improvements and new factories established, the increase has been far greater. New 
business blocks, public buildings, and private residences represent a cost of fully 
$2,000,000.00. The ten brick-yards have burned 12,000,000 brick, and this home 
product has been supplemented by purchases elsewhere to meet the demand. The 
transportation companies — railroads and steamboats — have been paid in excess of 
$3,000,000.00 for freight moved to and from Davenport, Rock Island, and Moline 
during the year. While this sum is enormous, the shippers of this locality have 
advantages in rates, in competitive lines, and in nearness to markets unexcelled by 
any other commercial center. 

A FAVORED LOCALITY. 

It is the design of the author and the artist in the succeeding pages to describe 
and picture in detail the causes and institutions which contribute to the aggregates 
above given; to state facts which will bear examination. The success of the manu- 
facturing and commercial houses here; the thrift of the general public; the steady 
growth of the three cities; the enduring foundations which have been laid; the 
opportunities for business and investment; the central location, and the diversified 
advantages, all unite to make the three cities a locality which capitalists, manufac- 
turers, builders, and those seeking homes cannot aftbrd to overlook. 



['"Hull 



' 111 'ii; 



II' 



I. , 



Vi 
!jl!J' 

i '" li 



n, I' 

llllll, i 



r'l 










■J / ji 



iiiilliiiiliii 




Daa/emfoirt, 



GENERAL FEATURES. 




A RECORD OF FACTS. 

HIS BOOK is not a romance. It is not intended for a work of the 
imagination of any kind. It is simply a plain statement of facts 
that ask for a careful examination at the hands of men of business 
who are willing to make investigation. This locality claims to have 
advantages second to those oflered by no western city, and to have 
profited by them to a marked and flattering degree, though as yet the 
resources have been developed but to a comparatively small extent. 
In their further development it is confidently believed that by helping new indus- 
tries and commercial houses to establish themselves here, those already established 
will be helping themselves. Unlike some western cities which have had a remarkable 
paper growth, and are now suffering from bigh-jiressure inflation which must sooner 
or later end in a disastrous collapse, Davenport has not been made delirious by the 
boom fever. It has discouraged rather than aided any movement in that direction. 
It has, however, enjoyed a steady, stable, and satisfactory growth. During the year 
1887 its trade was, on the average, twenty-five per cent larger than during any 
former year, and its building improvements more than one hundred per cent greater 
and more diversified than for any twelve months since the War of the Rebellion. 
It is the object of this work to show where and how the advance has been made, 
and to prove that the prosperity of the year just closed is only the beginning of a 
new era of wonderful expansion. 

A WORD FOR THE PAST. 
The picture to be presented is one of the present, and yet Davenport, as it is, 
cannot be understood correctly without some acquaintance with its half-century of 
historj-. At the close of the Black Hawk War, in 1832, there were no settlements on 
the Iowa side of the Mississippi River. The purchase from the Indians of the terri- 
tory where Davenport now stands, in common with all the river counties, was made 
September 15th, 1832, the treaty having been signed on the one side by General 
Scott. In 1833 there were one or two claims made upon the lands now occupied by 
the lower part of the city. Davenport was laid out in 1S35 by Colonel George 
Davenport and Antoine Le Claire, and some fifty lots were sold at that time for from 
$300.00 to $600.00 each. These two enterprising pioneers built the first public house 
in 1836, and in honor of the new town, named it the Davenport Hotel. The building 
is still to be seen at the northwest corner of Front and Ripley streets. During this 
year Antoine Le Claire was appointed the first postmaster, but in a short time the 
3 



34 DA VENPORT: 

duties became burdensome, and he turned the business over to D. C. Eldridge, who, 
after using his hut for the purpose for two years, built a brick post-office, 10 by 12 
feet in size, where the Masonic Temple now stands. James Mackintosh opened the 
first store, in October. The following year, 1887, was an eventful one. It witnessed 
the first religious service; the opening of the first law office; the birth of the first 
boy, L. S. Cotton, and the first girl, Sarah Eldridge; the first flat-boat ferry; the first 
ball; the first duel, and the first marriage. It was twenty-one years earlier that the 
first troops arrived — May 10th, 181G — on the Island of Eock Island, and began the 
construction of Fort Armstrong. In 1838 the tide of emigration began to flow into 
the new territory from the older states, and each succeeding year it has continued to 
grow larger without interruption. 

ADVANTAGES OF LOCATION. 

Davenport was selected as the site of a great city by the pioneer prospectors, 
because it exceeded in natural beauty and picturesque surroundings any other 
locality on the Mississippi river. Approaching the city by rail from the east, or 
from the north or south by boat, the observer has his attention fixed upon the waving 
bluffs which follow the river east and west. Between the line of these and the river 
is a triangular-shaped plateau, narrowing at the eastern limits of the city, and 
large enough to accommodate a population of 150,000. Handsome homes dot the 
blufis, while much of the residence part of the city lies beyond, or to the north. 
River views, as building sites, have been largely occupied, the scope of country 
brought within the range of the eye furnishing variety of scenery unequalled. 
The drainage is naturally good, street rising above street like terraces. 

AS A PLACE OF KESIDENCE. 

No city in the Mississippi Valley, or in that of the IVIissouri, offers more or better 
inducements as a place of residence. Its sanitary conditions are unsurpassed, the 
statistics of the Board of Health showing that Davenport ranks high, not only among 
the cities of the United States, but of the world. Epidemic diseases have rarely 
made their appearance, and the light forms have been shown by the remarkably low 
death rate. The cost of living, as shown by the average prices of commodities, is 
less than most western cities, for the reason that many of the staples are home 
grown. The supply of pure water is never-failing, as shown in a separate chapter. 
The educational system comprehends public schools, seminaries, and colleges; and 
the various religious denominations are represented by large churches and noble 
cathedrals. The judicious management of municipal affiiirs places the city's credit 
high in financial centers. 

REAL ESTATE. 

The opportunities for safe investment by men of means, and bj' those who wish 
to build for their own accommodation, are pre-eminently good. Desirable building 
sites may be selected in some of the best parts of the city, and they may be secured 
at prices that will guarantee the holder a large interest and certain profit. The 
advance in values during the year 1887 has been steady, and the volume of real 
estate transactions has been larger than during any former equal period. The 
unusual extent of building operations during the last twelve months, and the con- 
tracts already placed for 1888, have had their natural effect in stimulating prices. 
Good property is not waiting for purchasers, because the advance of realty prices is 
based on legitimate cau.ses. Within the eight months ended December 31st, inside 
city property has increased in value in some districts more than fifty per cent over 
one year ago. This gain has been brought about largely by residents, who have thus 
.shown their confidence in the future of their city. Several additions have been 
made to tlje city. One of them affords a striking illustration of the force of the 
statements already made. Park Lawn Addition, in the west end, was laid out 
September 1st, and a public sale was held thirty-lour days later. Of the 206 lots, 
160 were .sold for §35,000.00, cash being paid for more than three-fourths of the 
property. 



nS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 35 

XKW KAII.KOAI) AND HKIDGE FRANCHISES. 

A special tax of !?12."),00().0O has been voted in aid of the Davenport, Iowa, & 
Dakota Railroad. The tonditions have been complied with, and during the three 
last months of 1887 ten miles of road was graded, bridged, and tied. During the 
present year the track will be laid to Anamosa, a distance of about forty miles. 
Beyond that point the road is graded to Independence, some seventy miles. This 
new road, which is shown on the railroad map on the last page of the cover, will 
open a new territory for trade, and add valuable railroad connections. The franchise 
includes three blocks on the levee for depot, side-tracks, and other purposes. The 
forty-ninth congress granted the Davenport & Rock Island Bridge Company a 
franchise for a second bridge across the Mississippi river between Davenport and 
Rock Island. There are good reasons for believing that the completion of this pro- 
posed bridge is a certainty of the near future. The same congress granted the 
Davenport & Rock Island Horse-car Company the right to use the government 
bridges between the two cities for street-car purposes, thus connecting the systems 
in the three cities. 

STAGES OF WATER. 

The Mississippi river is one of changes, these depending upon the rainfall, and 
particularly upon the snowfall in Wisconsin and Minnesota. The highest mark 
reached was on June 26th, 1880, when the gauge used, on the draw-pier of the 
government bridge, recorded 18.4 feet above low- water mark; and the lowest — zero 
mark — December 14th and loth, 1878. The average stage of high water for thirty 
years has been 13.17 feet; in no instance has it proved destructive to any large 
amount of property, owing to the fortunate location of the city. During the season 
of navigation the river rarely falls to a stage so low as to seriously interfere with the 
running of steamboats and rafts. 

With the general facts already given in mind, the reader is invited to a more 
careful stud.y of the material interests and the more prominent institutions of 
Davenport, the commercial metropolis of Iowa. 



THE WATER-WORKS. 

THE SYSTEM DESCRIBED. 

Without any exception Davenport has the most complete system of water-works, 
both for tire protection and sanitary purposes, of any city in the west. It is not 
secondary to the manufacturing interests, for without it they would not feel the 
security which experience has proved admits of no doubt. The system comjjrehends 
a magnihcent plant, in which nearly $1,000,000.00 has been invested, and the best 
known engineering skill used. No one point carries greater weight to the nianufac- 
turer or business man seeking a new location than this of fire protection, while those 
who enjoy it estimate the advantage as practically bej^ond value. The Davenport 
Water Company is a private corporation, which was organized through the etlbrts of 
the late ex-Mayor Michael Donahue and his brother, the late Colonel Peter Donahue, 
of San Francisco. The works comprise two pumping-stations and a reservoir; about 
twenty-eight miles of water mains from 4 to 16 inches in diameter. There are 256 
public and nine private fire hydrants, and about 1,400 water consumers. 

The pumping capacity of Station No. 1 is 11,000,000 gallons in twenty-four 
hours. This station compi-ises the original works, and is situated on the Mississippi 
river, about a mile above the government bridge. The pump-house is a large two- 
story building, 68 by 9'o feet, including the boiler-room. There are two sets of 
pumping-engines in this station. Pumping-engine No. 1 is a condensing set of 
duplex engines of 5,000,000 gallons capacity per twenty-four hours, built by the Clapp 
& Jones Manufacturing Company. Pumping-engine No. 2, which has been completed 
within the last few months, is a high-duty Worthington compound condensing du- 



36 



DA VENPORT: 



plex engine of the very latest design, and capable of delivering (),()()(), (100 gallons 
of water in twenty-four hours against a head of 345 feet. There has also been 
placed in this station within the last year a new triple set of steel boilers of the most 
improved pattern. At this station the smoke stack is 133 feet high, and one of the 
largest in the west. There is also one of the largest steam-gongs ever built. 

The pumping capacity of Station No. 2 is 5,000,000 gallons in twenty-four 
hours. The bluff or high service, or all that portion lying above Sixth street, is 
supplied by reservoir water delivered by the pumps at this station, which are located 
at the reservoir. These engines are vertical — of the duplex compound condensing 
type. In precisely thirty seconds the pumps of Station No. 2, which are continually 
running for the high-service, can be changed so as to pump into the gravity-service, 
and pump down hill in case the reservoir pressure is not sutlScient for fire purposes. 
Then, too, there is another resource in case of fire; and that is Pumping-Station No. 1, 
which can be set in motion and give all the additional pressure necessary. This means 
that the piping system is so designed that the pumps at Station No. 1 and Station 
No. 2 can pump at the same time, at their respective ends of the distribution mains, 
thereby insuring increased pressure — an almost unlimited supply of water and 
pressure in time of fire. 




l-lMl'lNi; STATION NO. 1. 

The reservoir, shown in the next illustration, has a capacity of 5,000,000 gallons. 
The gravity supply is used to furnish that part of the city below Sixth street during 
the night and when the pumps at the station are not in operation. This reservoir 
was built in 1888, and cost $100,000.00. The reservoir has an elevation of 115 feet, 
antl gives a natural pressure of sixty pounds to the square inch. The purity of the 
water furnished for domestic and sanitary uses is quite as important as its almost 
limitless supply for fire purposes. The water taken from the river has been re- 
peatedly analyzed, and has been proven to be purer, by a great weight of evidence, 
than water drawn from any well or cistern in the vicinity. The purity is assured, 
not only from the fact that no town of any size is drained within forty miles, biit 
also from the manner in which the water is taken from the river. The company 
tunnelled under the bed of the river until the channel was reached, where the water 
runs over solid rock for several miles, with a current never less than six miles an 
hour. The pure, cool water is delivered through this long tunnel into a large well 



ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTlilKS. 37 

15 feet in diameter and ;>0 feet deep, and the water is, to a certain extent, filtered in 
this well before it supplies Purapin-:; Station No. 1. The rates to consumers are 
exceedingly reasonable — much ))elow those cliarged lor poorer service in other cities. 




PUMPING-STATION NO. 2. 



The water-works are managed by the following officers: Nicholas Kuhnen, 
President; James P. Donahue, Vice-President and Secretary-; Thomas N. Hooper, 
Chief Engineer and Inspector. These officers, with Colonel James M. Donahue, of 
San Francisco, Hon. J. H. Murphy and F. H. Griggs, of Davenport, constitute the 
Board of Directors. 



INDUSTRIAL INTERESTS. 



MANUFACTURING ADVANTAGES. 

It does not require argument to prove that Davenport offers great inducements 
to all kinds of industrial interests. More than fifty flourishing factories and shops 
furnish the positive and indisputable evidence. There is a vast market in this region 
and further west for manufactured goods. Most of the materials required for manu- 
facturers are within easy reach. The facilities for trans])ortation include the four 
leading trunk lines of the west, with their many divisions and connections, as shown 
by the map on the cover of this book. They also include the Mississippi river with 
its competing lines of steamboats and barges. The year 1888 finds Davenport in the 
enjoyment of better railroad rates than ever before, and more and better means of 
distributing its products. New territory in the southwest and northwest has been 
opened, and the 200 traveling representatives have occupied it in the interest of 
their houses. The region for a thousand miles west of the Mississippi river is 
perhaps a country of richer soil than is to be found elsewhere in the world. Illinois 
ranks third and Iowa fourth of the coal-producing states. Within a radius of fifteen 
miles of Davenport the annual coal product is over 500,00(t tons, and the price is 
therefore correspondingly cheap. The iron of Lake Superior and Missouri, together 
with that of Tennessee and Pennsylvania, furnishes the raw material at a cost for 



38 



DA V EN PORT: 



transportation comparatively small. The pineries of the north furnish an abundance 
of soft wood. Of this the river floats to and by this locality each summer more 
than one thousand million feet. The great hard-wood forests of the southern states 
supply all the material net^essary to enter into the consti-uction of farm machinery. 



FACTS IN FIGURES. 



A carefully-taken census of the manufacturing interest of Davenport for 1887 
shows that the capital invested is $4, SCIiJ, 000.00; the number of hands employed 
3,575; the amount paid for wages $1,502,500.00, and the aggregate business Si), 877,- 
600.00. Some of the industries which make up these figures will now be noticed. 



THE LUMBER WORKS. 



The leading industry is lumber sawing. 




riiK ( AiJi^i-: 3111. 1j. 



of lumber; 15,000,000 lath, and 15,000,000 shingles. 



During the past season there were in 
^ operation four saw- 

mills, thoseof Lind- 
say & Phelps, the 
Ca]>le Lumber Com- 
pany, Christ. Muel- 
ler, and the Daven- 
port Lumber Com- 
pany. These mills 
gave employment to 

^ --^^j^^xjm, 501 hands, who re- 
ceived in wages over 
.S21 0,000. 00; they 
have a capital in- 
vested of $()25,- 
000.00; and the total 
business was !j)l,325,- 
000.00. These mills 
cut 76,0000,000 feet 



FUOUR MILLS. 

There are three large flouring mills — the Phienix, Crescent, and Farmers. 
Their business lor the year reaches l?2,000,0()0.()0, and about 100 men are engaged. 
They have a capacity for making 1,100 barrels of flour daily. 

GLUCOSE MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 

This is the largest establishment of its kind in the west, and in many respects 
it is uneciualled in the country. It regularly employs 100 hands, and its business 
amounts to three-quarters of a million dollars annually. It manufactures glucose 
and many kinds of syrups, whose purity has been demonstrated by repeated tests. 
These articles are of world-wide use, and the limits of the United States mark the 
territory from which orders come and to which goods are forwarded by this house. 
Estimated by weight, the product of these works is represented by .35,000,000 
pounds. This enterprise was the flrst of the kind projected in the west, but the 
wisdom of the undertaking has never been questioned. It has vastly benefited 
Davenport and the tributary country, as it furnishes a market for nearly 3,500 
bushels of corn daily, or more than a million bushels yearly. Farmers, after dis- 
posing of their corn, find in the starch-feed a ver}' desirable article for their stock. 
It is not unusual for two hundred teams to be loaded in a day with this feed. 
During the year just closed improvements have been added to the amount of $40,- 
000.00, including an elevator, boiler-house, and general extensions of the plant. 

AfJRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

There are four important factories devoted to agricultural machinery and im- 
plements. The leader of these is the Eagle Manufacturing Company, which gives 
employment to 125 hands regularly, and who.se business looks down on $300,000.00. 
While having its specialties in the Golden Eagle Cultivators, it manufactures a full 
line of plows, listers, cultivators, sulky rakes, stalk-cutters, harrows, cotton-planters, 



ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 



39 



and other iinplenients. The Globe Plow Works is a younger institution, but one 
whose business is boinid to grow. The threshing-machine works of John S. Davis' 





^ 






EAGLE MANUFACTURING COMPANY'S SHOPS. 

Sous is one of the hirgest manufacturing houses of its kind in the west, and in 
addition to the " Davenport Oscillator," makes traction and portable engines. Fifty 
men are employed. 

CKACKERS. 

There are two cracker factories, the Roddewig-Schmidt Cracker Company and 
the Eagle Steam Bakerj'^; the former being the more important and the older. Their 
line of goods is complete. They give employment to sixty hands, and do a yearly 
business of over $r200,000.00. 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Davenport has sixteen cigar and tobacco factories. The leader of these, and the 
most extensive iu Iowa, is that of Nicholas Kuhnen. His army of .300 employes 

does not fairly represent 
the work done, for the rea- 
son that lately-invented 
machinery is called into 
play on a large scale. Mr. 
Kuhnen's business is on 
the rising side of a quarter 
of a million dollars, and 
his famous brands of cigars 
are known from the Mis- 
sissippi river to the Pacific 
and far eastward. Otto 
Albrecht & Co. hold sec- 
ond position, working 
thirty-six hands, and doing 
abusmessof$60,000. Some 
of the other factories are 
:aciiuLAs KUHNEN. cxtensive. The number of 

cigars made in this city in 1887 is 14.104,048, and employment has been given to 
nearly 600 persons. 




40 



DA VENPORT: 



WOOLEN MILLS. 

There is no better illustration of what new industries may do than what has 
been accomplished by the Davenport Woolen Mill. It employs 100 hands, and does 
an annual business of over $125,000.00, finding a western market for its goods. 

VINEGAR WORKS. 

The Amazon Vinegar Works have a pay-roll of more than forty names, and do a 
business of more than $150,000.00; manufacturing over 15,000 barrels of vinegar 
annually. 

UOXES, CHURNS, BARRELS, ETC. 

Under this heading there are five important enterprises: The Davenport Cigar- 
Box Company, which turns out 500,000 boxes a year; the Moeller & Aschermann Man- 
ufacturing Company, which makes and handles all kinds of cigar manufacturers' 
supplies; H. F. Brammer & Co., who add churns, boxes, and shipping cases to washing 
machines; Henry Bremer & Son, who turn out 50,000 barrels annually; and the 
Coopers' Union, which does even a larger business. These industries have a capital 
invested of $250,000.00; employ more than 200 hands; pay out $80,000.00 in wages, 
and do a business of $350,000.00 a year. 

FURNITURE, STAIRS, ETC. 

Under this head are Knostman, Peterson & Co., who manufacture all kinds of 
household furniture; M. Bunker, who makes a specialty of stair-building supplies, 
decorative wood-work, grates, etc. ; A. J. Smith & Son, Knostman & Son, and 
Charles Hill, who have specialties. They furnish employment to upwards of 130 
hands, and do a business of more than $300,000.00. 

BRICK-MAKING. 

The owners of brick-yards enjoyed their busiest season in 1887. They began 
with nearly 2,000,000 brick on hand from the previous year. These were quickly 
used, and something of a brick-famine followed, owing to the unprecedented extent 
of building operations. The five yards of John Ruch, B. Ruch, Joseph Otten, B. H. 
Pohlman, and G. H. Delfs manufactured over 6,000,000, leaving the surrounding 
towns of Rock Island, Muscatine, and other places to meet the wants of builders. 



PUMPS, LADDERS. 




The Red Jacket Pump 
Company is a vigorous 
manufacturing house, 
pushing to the front its 
special make of adj ust- 
able force pumps and 
general line of wood 
pumps. The Daven- 
port Ladder Company 
is the only exclusive 
ladder house in the 
west, and it manufac- 
tures all kinds of fire- 
men's, farmers', trestle, 
step, and extension lad- 
ders. 



RKI) .lACKET I'UMP COMPANY. 



PORK-PAOKING 



There are four extensive packing-houses — those of John L. Zoeckler, Henry 
Kohrs, John Ruch, and Ranzow & Haller. During the past packing season they 
slaughtered 26,280 hogs; gave work to 100 hands, and did a business of more than 
$350,000.00. 



JTS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 



41 



MALT-HOUSKS. 



Four houses represent the nialt-makiufi husiness — W. II. Decker, John George, 
John Noth, and Henry Frahm. They do a business of $200,000.00 a year. 



HOTTHNU WORKS. 

Two bottlini:; estalilishments — H. J. AVitt and Collins & Baker — do a business 
of nearly $100,000.00, and employ thirty-two hands. 

CANDY FACTORIES. 

The three manufactnring confectioners are Reimers & Fernald, H. A. Pearne, 
and B. F. Taylor. Thev give employment to fifty hands, and do a business of 
$175,000.00. 

CARRIAGES AND WACiONS. 

There are twelve carriage and wagon shops and factories, the largest of which 
are those of J. L. Mason, Young & Harford, and A. C. Duve & Co. This industry 
employs over 200 hands; and does a business of about $300,000.00. 

THE TANK LINE. 

The Consolidated Tank Line Company has an investment in its Davenport plant 
of §25,000.00, and this being a principal distributing point, over 60,000 barrels of 
oil are handled. The aggregate of the year's business will reach $450,000.00. The 
company has made in its own shops 20,000 barrels, besides being a large purchaser. 

PAINTS. 

The Dettloff & Stearns Paint Works, having a branch house at St. Paul, employ 
thirty-five hands, and do a business reaching up to $175,000.00. 

CLOTHING. 

Robert Krau,se is an extensive manufacturer of pantaloons, overalls, and.shirts, 
employing about fifty hands in this department of his establishment. 

PLANING MILLS, ETC. 

T. W. McClelland & Co., J. H. Whitaker, and U. N. Roberts & Co. represent the 
planing, sash, blind, door, and glass interest, with a force of over 150 men, and an 
annual business of about $400,000.00. 




U. N. ROBERTS <t CO. .S BLOCK. 



42 DAVENPORT: 

GENERAL MAXUFACTUKIXC;. 

The design is not to give wearisome details of Davenport's manufacturing 
houses, but to show their number and variety; and these include, beyond what has 
already been noted, some of the industries being extensive ones, the following: The 
paper-bag works of Smith & Hughes; the machine shops of Ebi & Neuman, P. D. 
Quirk, and Eiufeldt & Barnholt; the Novelty Manufacturing Company, forty hands; 
J. W. Wirtel, trunk-maker; Charles G. Hipwell, roofing; the Davenport Pottery 
Company; M. G. Lee & Son's broom-works; the American Fire Hose Manufacturing 
Company; the blank-book and printing-house of Egbert, Fidlar, & Chambers; the 
boiler shop of Grupe & Murray; G. H. Young, awnings and tents; the Northwest 
Davenport ISIachine Shop; the horse-collar works of I. H. Sears tS: Sons; the soap 
works of Matthes Bros.; the Arc-Scale Company; E. W. Brady, window shades; 
Hadsell & Co., paper boxes; William Sternberg, iron castings; C. Cruys, .shirts; 
Boudinot & Sous and Charles Stoltz, rope-walk; the Davenport Shoe Works; A. 
Schreiber, files; C. L. Burleigh, hair goods; Mossmau & Yollmer, rubber stamps, and 
niTmerous small factories, which swell the aggregate of Davenport's manufacturing 
to the fiyrures given. 



NEW INDUSTRIES AND ENTERPRISES. 

NOTABLE ADDITIONS. 

In the preceding chapter on "Industrial Interests" notice has not been taken of 
the very important enterprises which have been built or begun ])usiness during the 
year, nor is this chapter intended to cover the business blocks, public structures, and 
hundreds of private residences, the building of which has made the past year a cease- 
les.sly busy one. 

C, R. I. & p. R. R. SHOPS. 

The Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Company expressed the purpose of 
erecting new and capacious .shops for the building of cars and general work. The 
principal cities along its line were quick to make liberal propo.sitions in the hope of 
securing the location; but the business men of Davenport made cash subscriptions to 
the amount of §12,000.(10, bought a desirable site of several acres, and presented a 
deed to the company. Operations were at once begun by the company, and the largest 
railroad shops in Iowa at once resulted. The dimensions are as follows, all the 
buildings being of brick, and of the most substantial character: The car .shop proper 
is 162 by 104 feet; a part of it, 53 by 104, being two-story, with slate roof, the one- 
story portion having a tin roof The engine-house is 42 by 50 feet, with a smoke- 
stack 75 feet high, the base being 9 by 9 feet, resting on bed-rock, concrete, and 
railroaa iron. The machine .shop is 181 by 100 feet, of which 50 feet in width is 
devoted to a blacksmith shop (50 by 100 feet). The machine shop proper is 130 by 
100 feet; it has a slate roof on iron supports. The paint .shop is 130 by 175 feet. 
The boiler-house is of brick and stone, 32 by 22 feet. These shops are supplied 
throughout with boilers, shafting, machinery, tools, and every necessity for turning 
out ten cars daily. The cost of this improvement is $130,000.00. 

DAVENPORT CANNING COMPANY. 

This is the largest canning factory in Iowa, if not in the west: and its location 
here was secured, like the car shops, by the public spirit of the citizens over compet- 
ing points. The dimensions of the works shown in the accompanying illustration 
are as follows: The main building is three stories, 48 by 120 feet, with basement. 
It has two two-story wings, each 32 by 150 feet. The boiling or process room is 50 
by 50 feet, one story and basement. The boiler-house is one story, 44 by 50 feet. All 



ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 



43 



the buildings are of brick 



The l)niUlin<i.s and tlieir equijiments cost $;]5,()00.00, and 

"" ■ During the busy season — June, 

iploynieut was given to :J00 hands, 



V1.V- ^.^..^..ug,o ...c w. .,.i^rw. xue Duiuungs ana tlieir equiiinients cost 
the capital invested in the business is $60,000.00. During the busy 
July. August, September, and part of October— employment was give 




\ 









DAVENPORT CANNING WORKS. 

and business transacted amounting to §100,000.00. The season was but a partial 
one, and yet the pack was (J00,000 cans of tomatoes and 600,000 of corn. With an 
abundant yield, the pack of 1888 will be more than 1,000,000 cans of the vegetables 
named, beside the fruits of the locality. 

DAVENPORT FOUNDRY AND :\rACHINE COMPANY. 

This new conqiany completed its buildings and was ready for business in Decem- 
ber. The capital stock is §50,000.00, and the beginning was made with thirty 
hands. Automatic steam-engines will be made a specialty, while all kinds of foundry 
and machine work will be attended to. The machine shop is 140 by 42 feet; the 
foundry is 80 by 42; tlie pattern shop, 42 by 35, and the blacksmith shop 42 by 35. 
A tifty-horse-power automatic engine of the company's own make drives the ma- 
chinery. These buildings cost §20,000.00. 

BETTENDORF METAL WHEEL COMPANY. 

This enterprise, which begins 1888 with remarkably fine prospects, has a future 
of certain development. The capital invented in the plant is §50,000.00, and fifty 
hands will find employment. New buildings, specially adapted to the purposes of 
the company, have been erected. The main shop is 200 by 52 feet, with two wings 
75 by 40 feet each. The cost of this improvement is §25,000.00. The Bettendorf 
metal wheel is an invention which has proved a boon for makers of agricultural 
implements, baby carriages, wheel-barrows, etc. 

WASHBURN-HALLIGAN COFFEE COMPANY. 

This industry is devoted to the preparation of coffee and pure spices for the 
wholesale trade. Though started but a few months, its business has become e.stab- 
lished. Over §20,000.00 has been invested in the business, and ten hands are 
employed. 

OTHER NEW ENTEKPKISES. 

Among these are the Novelty Bustle Factory, the Quilt Factory, and the Astron- 
omical Clock Works. 



44 DA VENPORT: 

THE WHOLESALE TRADE. 

WHAT THE FIGURES SAA'. 

The advantages of Davenport as a wholesale and jobbing center are shown by 
the fact that there are twenty-two houses of this kind, with a capital invested of 
over $4,000,000.00, and whose sales for the last twelve months have been consideral)ly 
over $10,000,000.00. The trade territory is reached not only by the Mississippi river 
and its tributaries, which act as regulators of the railroad tariffs, but by a system of 
railroads which penetrate nearly every county of Iowa and Illinois, and the more 
thickly settled parts of Missouri, Kansas, Minnesota, and Nebraska. The amount 
of business done is one important element of success, and demonstrates that Chicago, 
St. Louis, St. Paul, and Kansas City find competition here which they cannot over- 
come. A new advantage is found in the pro rata taritfs from the cities of the sea- 
board to the Mississippi river which the trunk lines have made during the last few 
months, and which have materially settled in its favor the claims put forth by this 
commercial center. Embraced within the territory reached hj the jobbing trade is 
a country of matchless fertility, and one whose population must multiply several 
times in the near future. It is the granary of the world. 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

There are four exclusively wholesale grocery houses — Beiderbecke & IMiller, 
Van Patten & Marks, Erdix T. Smith & Bro., and Martin, Woods & Co. — whose 
annual business reaches $2,500,000.00. Besides these there are several large grocery 
stores which do a wholesale business in specialties. 

DRY GOODS. 

The three leading wholesale dry goods firms are W. C. Wadsworth & Co. , J. H. 
C. Petersen & Sons, and A. Steffen. Their business aggregates upwards of $2,000,- 
000.00 yearly, and covers a wide territory. 

HARDAVARE, IRON, ETC. 

The wholesalers of hardware, iron, wagon stock, and paints are Sickels, Preston 
& Co., R. Sieg & Co., and Peter Lamp & Co., while two smaller houses do a con- 
siderable shipping business, the whole annual trade amounts to upwards of $1,000,000. 
The house of Sickels, Preston & Co. is the largest of its kind in Davenport, and the 
only exclusively hardware house in Iowa. It has built up a business which is wide- 
spread in the territory covered, and which, in the sale of barb-wire, white lead, and 
paints, is unequalled between the Mississippi and Missouri rivers. 

CLOTHING. 

R. Krause and A. INIoritz & Bros, are the leading representatives of the whole- 
sale clothing trade. They do a business of about $500,000.00. 

CHINA AND CROCKERY. 
The largest hou.se of its kind — china, crockery, and glassware — in Iowa is 
that of Jens Lorenzen. 

OTHER WHOLESALE HOUSES. 

S. P. Bryant & Co. are an extensive firm in the way of boots, shoes, and rubber 
goods. E. B. Hayw-ard tt Son do a large business in staves, headings, shingles, and 
cedar posts. Egbert, Fidlar, & Chambers manufiicture and wholesale blank-l)ooks, 
stationery, and supplies. J. S. Wylie ships coal in car-load lots throughout the 
northwest. I. H. Sears & Son are manufacturers and wholesalers of horse-collars, 
saddlery-hardware, etc. James Mclntyre, representing the Cincinnati factory of the 
Emerson & Fisher Co., deals extensively in buggies, carriages, pha-tons, etc. Barr 
& Co. deal in oysters and fish. H. W. Kerker is wholesale agent for the Charles A. 
Pillsbury flouring mills. D. H. McDaneld &; Co. deal in hides, pelts, and tallow. 
There are four wholesale liquor houses. 

CITY ELEVATOR. 

J. F. Dow & Co. are proprietors of the City Elevator, and handle annually from 
750,000 to 1,000,000 bushels of grain. All kinds of grain cleaned and corn shelled 
in transit. 



ITS IXTERESTS AND INDISTRIES. 



45 



LINKS DAVKNI'OUT NEKDS. 

"While several houses mannfacture and jol) their own <j;oods, as eifiars and tobacco, 
flour, crackers, paints, ai^ricultural iniiilcnients, lumber, syrups, canned goods, scales, 
vine<;ar, etc., Davenport has need of more wholesale houses, and oilers an inviting 
fleld for them which must soon be filled. The special lines of goods which could 
be profitably handled are drugs and medicines, hats and caps, jewelry, rubber goods, 
and paints and oils. 



NEW BUILDINGS. 



A PROSPEROUS YEAR. 

The chapter on "New Industries and Enterprises" notes the building of fac- 
tories involving an outlay of more than §200,000.00, and yet this is only a beginning 
of the season's work, which swells to over §1,100,000.00, as detailed a little further 
on. ilore factories, business blocks, and residences are planned for 1888 than have 
been comjileted during the past year. 

THE COURT HOUSE. 

The amount voted for this temple of justice was §150,000.00, but the co.st, in- 
cluding heating, furnishing, and frescoing, 
will reach upwards of §175,000.00. The 
style of architecture is known as the 
Italian-Renaissance. The ground dimen- 
sions have a frontage of l-'')2 feet on Fourth 
street, with a depth of 100 feet. The build- 
ing is of stone, brick, and iron fire-proof. 
Its front is characterized by a massive 
portico, from which a wide corridor leads 
to the rotunda. This is connected with 
the various offices. The third floor fur- 
nishes the court rooms on either side the 
rotunda, the east room being 45 by 60 feet, 
and the west 54 by 46 feet. The first story 
is 12 feet, the second 16 feet, the third 16 
feet, with each court-room 26 feet, and the 
mezzanine 14 feet in height. From the 
center of the building rises a circular- 
tower, capped by a dome surmounted by a 
lantern, the top of which is 206 feet from 
the ground, and upholds a flag-staff. The 
massive structure presents an imposing 
view, and is the most conspicuous build- 
ing in the city. 

TURNER HALL. 

The Turner Society of Davenport owns, beyond per adventure, the best building 
devoted to gymnastic and theatrical purposes of any society of the kind in the 
United States. The cost of the unfurnished structure is over §85,000.00. It was 
designed and its building superintended by F. G. Clausen. It faces north on Third 
street, and has a front of 151 feet by a depth on Scott of 140 feet. Its architectural 
proportions are fairly shown in the cut. The ea.stern side of the block, 70 by 140 
feet, is devoted to general purjx)ses, the first floor containing ball, billiard, sample 
rooms, and ofiices; the second has the dining-hall. sleeping, card, smoking-rooms, 
and wardrobe; the third is assigned to meeting-rooms, reading-rooms, library, etc. 
The gymnasium occupies the first floor of the west side, or Turner Hall proper. It 
is 72 by 114 feet, with a gallery, the room being 22 feet from floor to ceiling. Above 
this is the main hall and theater, which is entered from two main stairways 10 feet 
wide: also from the sides. The stage is 35 feet deep by 71 wide, and the width of 
the proscenium is .'54 feet. The gallery, 20 feet in width, runs around three sides. 




SCOTT COUNTY COURT HOUSE. 



46 



DA VENPORT: 




TURNER HALL AND OPERA HOUSE. 



The seating capacity is 1,300. The building is of brick, trimmed with stone, and is 
complete in every department and detail. Over the main entrance to the office, at 
the corner of Third and Scott streets, a circular tower rises 100 feet high. 



THE MASONIC TEMPLE. 

No exception can be taken to the 
statement that the New Masonic 
Temple is the noblest building in 
Iowa devoted to the uses of the Craft, 
and one of the largest in the great 
west. Its cost, exclusive of furniture, 
is $75,000.00. It is located on the 
northeast corner of Third and Main 
streets; has a front of 65 feet, and a 
depth of 150 feet. The Temple has 
four floors and basement which is 
devoted to offices. A corridor 12 
feet wide, entered through an arched 
vestibule, runs the length of the 
building. The first floor is entered 
through an archway 16 feet in width 
and 19 feet high. This floor is de- 
voted to spacious offices. The second 
floor is similar in its arrangement. 
On the third floor the rooms an 
practically the same as those be- 
neath, except there is an assembly- 
room at the north end 50 by 60 feet 




MASONIC TEMPLE. 



77'^' INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 



47 




A I >5Mi rn t. -^ON S> HI OC K 



in size. The Masonic floor is in the 
fourth story. The Bine Lodge hall 
is on the front, ")() by :58 feet, and 26 
feet high. The Asyiuni and Chapter 
are located in the northwest section. 
This apartment is 30 by 40 feet. On 
the east of it is the Red Cross 
room, 20 by 34 feet. There is also 
a banquet-hall, 30 by 41 feet. 
There are parlors, preparation, and 
other rooms. In the attic-story are 
the kitchen, cook-room, pantry, 
store-rooms, etc. The exterior is in 
the Romanesc|ue style of architect- 
ure. The tower rises at the south- 
west corner to a height of 114 feet. 
The windows in the raised base- 
ment story and the first and second 
stories are square, with transoms. 
In the third they are arched, and in 
the fourth square again. The ap- 
pearance of the Temple is majestic. 
J. W. Ross is the architect. 

BUSINESS BLOCKS. 

Among the business blocks there 
are some deserving of particular 
mention: One of these is the tine 
block erected by A. J. Smith & Son, 
on Third street, almost exactly op- 
posite the Masonic Temple. It is a 
four-story brick structure, half a 
block in depth. On Harrison street, 
between Fourth and Fifth, Ferd. 



Roddewig's Sons have erected a business block which 
is of unusually fine architectural proportions. E. S. 
Hammet is the architect. Another large four-story 
building is that completed late in the season by 
J. H. Whitaker on Third street, west of Brady. 
These by no means exhaust the list, but there is a 
limit to the space at command. In the way ot 
private residences great gains have been made, the 
most attractive along the western bluffs being the 
elegant home of M. I). Petersen, and the most 
picturesque in the central part of the city being 
that of J. S. Wylie. But of far more significance 
than any ten residences costing $15,000.00 each, or 
$150,000.00 in all, is the great number of modern 
cottages which are to be found in the outskirts of 
the city. A careful canvass shows that not less than 
150 of these have been built during the past twelve 
months. They are all owned by their occupants. 
The workiugman finds that in Davenport he shares 
the property of the manufacturer. Following is 
given a list of the more important buildings of the 
past year : 




48 



DA VENPORT: 



Public Buildings. 

Court House, Fourth street ?175,000 

Turner Hall, Third street '.10,000 

Masonic Temple, Third street 80,000 

Soldiers' Orphans' Home 5,000 

Chxirches, Schools, and Colleges. 

St. Anthony's Church, annex, Fourth St., 7,000 

St. Amhrose College, Locust street 5,000 

School House No. «, Fourth street 3,500 

Presbyterian Church, Brady street 2,500 

New S/iops, Factories, Etc. 

C, R. I. &. P. Shops, Fifth and Case Sts., 130,000 
Davenport Canning Works, Division St., 35,000 
Bettendorf Wheel Works, Fourth and 

Farnum streets 25,000 

Davenport Foundry and Machine Shops, 

Fourth street 20,000 

Noveltv Bustle Works, Second street S,00n 

A. Zoller & Bro. Malt House, Third St.... 4,500 

Children's Carriage Factory, Third St... 6.000 

Quilt Works 4.000 

Sternberg's Machine Shops, West Locust, 3,000 

Second Street Railroad Barns 3,000 

Additions to Sho})S, Factories, Etc. 
Davenport Glucose Works, Rockingham 

road 40,000 

Davenport Water- Works, Front street ... 30,0lK) 
Moeller & Aschermann Manufacturing 

Company, Fifth street 10,000 

M. Frahm, Harrison street 8,000 

Young & Harford, Carriages, Front St... 5,000 
H. F. Brammer & Co., Churns, Warren 

street 3,000 

Amazon Vinegar Works 3,000 

Dettloff & Stearns, Paint Works 3,000 

Business Blocks. 

A. J. Smith & Son, Third street 15,000 

Ferd. Roddewig's Sons, Harrison street. 15,000 

J. H. Whitaker, Third street 15,000 

J. Hageboeck, Third street 10,000 

D. B. Home, Third street 6,000 

H. F. Petersen, Third street 6,000 

A. Meisner, Third street 4,000 

M. Greeley, Third street 4,000 

D. Bush, Eddv street 3,000 

Tierney & Stapleton, Perry street 2,500 

Fred. Genzlinger, Front street 2,500 

Davis & Camp, Third street 2,000 

Lorton Bros., Third street 2,000 

Additions to Business Blocks. 

St. James Hotel, Main street 10,000 

Ryan Block, Second street 10,000 

R. Sieg, Warehouse, Fifth street 7,000 

Democrat-Gazette Block, Main street 5,000 

W. S. Holbrook, Second street 4,000 

Joseph Ochs' Sons, Main street 3,000 

Emerson & Fisher Co., Fourth street.... 3,000 

F. Stroh, West Second street 3,000 

Residences. 

M. D. Petersen, Sturdevant street 18,000 

J. S. Wvlie, Brady street '. 10,000 

T. O. Swinev, Perry street 8,(00 

J. W. Ross, Fourteenth .street 5,000 

H. Haller, Main street 5,000 

M. D. Snyder, row of buildings 8,000 

J. L. Tillotson 5,000 

R. R. Baldwin 4,000 

J. R. Clemens 4,000 

.Tosei>h Plambeck, Franklin street 4,000 

Theo. Hartz, West Eighth street 4,000 

M. T. Brown, Grand Avenue 4,000 

Mrs. Dieser, West Eighth street 3,.500 



W. A. Spaulding, Tremont Avenue S 3,000 

Trinity Church, rectory, Bradv -street 3,000 

Henry Stoltenberg, West Twelfth street, 3,000 

John Turner, West Third street 3,000 

.John Turner, West Third street, addi- 
tional buildings 3,000 

P. T. Walsh, Marquette street 3,000 

T. Peterson, West Eighth street 3,(XX) 

Charles Whitaker, Walnut street 3,000 

Gust. Haa.se, Sixth street 3,000 

Peter Kloppenhvirg, West Locust street.. 3,000 

William Haase, West Eighth street 3,000 

P. Jones 3,000 

J. M. Ackley, Locust street 3,000 

Theodore Peterson 3,000 

F. Belter, West Locust street 2.500 

H. M. Mandeville, Brady street 2,-500 

0. P. Samp.son, East Fourteenth street... 2,.500 
William Renter, Eighth street 2,500 

A. Meisner, Third street 2,500 

D. Bush, Eddy street 2,500 

W. Camp, East Third street 2,000 

P. Conway, Case street 2,000 

J. H. Whitaker, Iowa street 2,000 

J. Walters, Sixth street 2,000 

Hans Osbar, Third street 2,000 

Dr. J. P. Crawford, East Sixteenth St 2,200 

George Henricksen, Third street 2,000 

C. Ruschmann, West Locust street 2,000 

J. A. Place, East Fifteenth street 2,000 

E. H. Whiteomb, Grand Avenue 2,000 

R. Channon, Arlington Avenue 1,800 

G. W. Learner, East Fourteenth street.... 1,800 

William Armil, West Locust street 1,600 

R. Hinscher, Brown street 1,600 

Peter Otten, Marquette .street 1,600 

F. Genzlinger, East Front street 1,500 

W. Brown, Le Page street 1,500 

C. W. Clemens, West Fourteenth street.. 1,500 

C. W. Clemens, Grand Avenue 1,500 

August Blunck, Second .street 1,500 

1. Hanschild, West Eighth street 2,000 

Mrs. Dueser 2,000 

John Helmick, Locust street 2,000 

Frank Fearing, Locust street 2,000 

Thomas Shields, Seventh street 1,800 

H. Lawer, Fourteenth street 1,800 

Fred Ruhe, Marquette street 1,800 

Robert Burchill, Fourteenth street... 1,700 

Robert Burchill, Thirteenth street 1,600 

N. C. Morrison, Iowa street 1,600 

J. C. Channon, Tremont Avenue l,i5(X) 

Joseph Ha.ssler, Bowdich street 1,5(XI 

John Hallaback, East Ninth street l,.50O 

Bvron AVhitaker, Third Avenue 1,500 

W. D. Nichols, Eighth street l,4tX) 

Will. Evers, Rock Island street 1,300 

John Lucey, Fifteenth street 1,200 

Mrs. Andrews, Fifteenth street 1,200 

William Gordon, Sixteenth street 1,200 

William Oakes, East Eighth street 1,200 

P'ritz Priess, Third street 1,200 

T. Mulane, Harrison street 1,200 

B. Baldwin, Bridge Avenue 1,200 

John O. Teegen, Bowdich street 1,200 

Joachim Roopman, Bowdich street 1,200 

J. Bockelmaiui, Gaines street 1,200 

M. Dellahane, Gaines street 1,200 

J. Moeller. Gaines street 1,200 

H. Kirk, Warren .street 1,200 

H. Schoeller, Mitchell street 1,200 

M. Welzcnbaeh, Sturdevant street 1,200 

J. Trainer, Ilarri-son street 1,200 

Andrew Fullerton, Le Page street 1,200 

E. S. Tilford, Tremont Avenue 1,200 

William Frazer, Fifteenth street . 1,200 

One hundred and forty-tive cottages, 

from $500 to 81,000 each, averaging 

$800 116,000 



Affording a grand total, at the lowest estimate, of about $1,200,000.00, for the building opera- 
tions of Davenport in 1887. 



/7W JA'TEHESTS AND INDUSTRIES. -Ui 

BANKS AND BANKING. 

TIIK MKASURK dl" liUSINKSS. 

The fiuaiuial operations of a city, as shown by the transactions of its l)anks, 
mirror its importance as a commercial center, and reflect the i)rosperity of the 
country tril)utary to its business. The banking capital and deposits of the financial 
institutions of Davenport are greater than those of any other city in Iowa. The 
amount of business done with country banks, in the way of having their accounts 
kept here, give unexcelled facilities for making collections. More than one hundred 
of these banks are represented, and they often save a day's business, as compared 
with calling on Chicago or St. Louis for their currency. There are three national 
and three savings banks. 

THE NATIONAL BANKS. 

The First National. — This bank was the first in operation in the United States 
under the national banking law. It has a capital of $100,000.00 ; a surplus of $50,- 
000.00, and undivided profits of $50,000.00. The officers are: James Thompson, 
President; J. E. Stevenson, Vice-President; John B. Fidlar, Cashier. 

Citizens National. — This institution has a capital of $100,000.00, and a surplus 
of $100,000.00. It is a United States depository. The officers are: F. H. Griggs, 
President; Robert Krause, Vice-President; E. S. Carl, Cashier; Adolph Priester, 
Assistant Cashier. 

Davenport National. — This bank has a capital of $200,000.00, and a surplus of 
$45,000.00. Its officers are: E. S. Ballord, President; S. F. Smith, Vice-President; 
S. D. Bawden, Cashier. 

THE SAVINGS BANKS. 

The three savings banks have an aggregate capital of $490,000.00; undivided 
profits of $239,197.00. They have 9,553 depositors, and the aggregate of the deposits 
is $4,500,933.00, or more than half the entire amount of all the savings banks of 
Iowa. The uniform rate of interest is five per cent. 

German Savings. — This bank has a paid up capital of §300,000.00, and a surplus 
of $1)0,000.01). It has accounts with 5,643 depositors, the aggregate of whose deposits 
is $2, (535,000. 00. The officers are: H. Liseher, President; L. Wahle, Vice-President; 
H. H. Andresen, Cashier ; J. F. Bredow, Assistant Cashier. 

llie Davenport Savings. — It has a cash capital of $120,000.00; undivided profits 
of $60,000.00. Its depositors number 2,450, and their deposits amount to $1,183,- 
761.00. The officers are: A. Burdick, President; Louis Haller, Vice-President; J. 
B. Meyer, Cashier; O. L. Ladenberger, Teller. 

Scott County Savings. — This is the youngest of the savings institutions of the 
city. It began business December 1st, 18S3. It has a capital of $70,000.00; $682,- 
172.00 in deposits, and 1,460 depositors Its officers are: I. H. Sears, President; 
H. F. Petersen, Vice-President; J. H. Hass, Cashier. 



THE POST-OFFICE-. 

A year's business. 

The Davenport post-office transacted its heaviest business in 1887. In the free- 
delivery department there was an increase in everj' particular except registered 
letters delivered. The nine carriers delivered 602,969 more pieces of mail, and 
collected 390,108 more pieces than in 1886, a total excess of 993,077 — an increa.se 
of twenty-five per cent. The gross receipts were S40,3(i.).75 — an increase of more 
than $2,000.00. More than $10,0(10 00 of this sum was transmitted to the United 
States treasury, and a like amount paid to the clerks of the railway mail service. In 
the money-order department the remittances from other offices were $633,689.25. Seven 

4 



50 DA V EN PORT: 

thousand money orders were issued, amounting to $64,750.80; 4,500 postal-notes, in 
the sum of $8,012.92 — a total of $706,452.97. Money-orders numbering over 13,- 
000 and aggregating $190,594.00 were paid; 7,300 postal-notes, amounting to $16,- 
158.32; and nearly $500,000.00 was deposited with the postmaster at Chicago. It 
will thus be seen that the money-order business aggregated nearly $1,500,000.00 — a 
gain over 1886 of nearly $250,000.00. J. M. DeArmond is postmaster. 



BUSINESS ORGx\NIZATlONS. 

DAVENPORT BUSINESS MENS' ASSOCIATION. 

This is a newly organized, vigorous, and representative body of about 150 mem- 
bers, whose object it is to protect the rights and advance the mercantile, manufacturing, 
and other interests of the community. The further aims of the association are to 
promote the public welfare by furnishiug reliable, information regarding the city; to 
assist in securing the location of new and desirable industries in our midst; to obtain 
just and equitable rates of transportation; to facilitate the entry of additional lines 
of railroad; to entertain strangers, and to cultivate the social and business acquaint- 
ance of the representatives of the trades, industries, and professions of the city of 
Davenport. There are standing committees on by-laws, membership, statistics, 
finance, transportation, manufactures, local trade, advertising, and entertainment. 
The association has comfortably-furnished rooms in the Masonic Temple, to which 
all visitors to the city are invited. Its officers are: J. S. Wylie, President; J. A. 
Freeman, Vice-President; H. T. Dsnison, Secretary; J. H. Hass, Treasurer. 

THE ADVANCE CLUB. 

This organization has a membership of nearly 400. Its affairs are managed by 
the President, F. H. Hancock, and an Executive Committee of twelve members. It 
has been at work for two years, and the resulting benefits are seen in the securing of 
a new railroad and business enterprises. 

BOARD OF TRADE. 

Of this body J. M. Eldridge is President and L. M. Parker Secretary. The Board 
has done effective work in advertising the city in many directions, and in inducing 
the investment of capital here. 

TEI-CITY shippers' ASSOCIATION. 

This organization has nearly 200 members, representing the leading business 
houses of Davenport, Rock Island, and Moline. The object is to secure equitable 
rates, efiBcient service, and the best transportation facilities. The interests of 
shippers are looked after by Fred Wild, the general agent, who is one of the best- 
posted railroad experts in the west. 

the PRODUCE EXCHANGE. 

The membership of the exchange is composed of grain-buyers, pork -packers, and 
others directly interested in obtaining the latest quotations from the market centers 
of the world. It has rooms in the St. James block, and its own telegraph service. 
The officers are: F. H. Hancock, President; K. II. Hayward, Vice-President; J. F. 
Dow, Secretary and Treasurer. 

LOAN, BUILDING, AND SAVINGS ASSOCIATION. 

This very successful association is in its eleventh year. Its assets, at the time of 
its last statement, were $117,351.00. It had 1,792 shares of stock of the ten series 
issued. The objects are entirely mutual in their character. It has helped hundreds 
of persons of small means to secure homes of their own easily and safely, under a 
system of monthly payments. 



ITS INTEEES7S AND INDUSTRIES. 51 

LINDSAY LAND AND LUMBER COMPANY. 

This is a corporation composed of some of the leading men of money in Daven- 
port, Rock Island, and Moliiie, organized for the purpose of manufacturing and 
dealing in Arkansas lumber and timber lands. The principal office is in this city. 
The company has a paid up capital of .?150,()n0.00, the limit being placed at $1,000,- 
000.00. It owns 125,000 acres of the best timber lands in the state of Arkansas — 
land that is known will average 10,000 feet of lumber to the acre, or 1,250,000,000 
feet. The members of the corporation are: Fred Weyerhaeuser, Charles H. Deere, 
J. T. Browning, J. E. Lindsay, William Eenwick, D. N. Richardson, S. H. Velie, 
C. R. Ainsworth, J. M. Gould, George S. Shaw, J. B. Phelps, Fred Wyman, Christ. 
Mueller, and others. 

EAGLE LUMBER COMPANY. 

This Davenport institution is located at Eagle Mills, Ouchitau county, Arkansas, 
on the cotton-belt line. The shipments reach from Texas to Chicago, Minneapolis, 
Omaha, and circumscribed territory. The mill has a capacity of over 60,000 feet a 
day, having recently made the largest cut of any mill in the state in a single day. 
The company own 0,000 acres of valuable timber land. The capital stock is $50,- 
000.00. The principal stockholders and officers are: H. M. Gilchrist, Viola, 111., 
President; E. S. Crossett, Vice-President; E. B. Hayward, Secretary and Treasurer; 
S. W. Pierce and George W. Cable, all of Davenport. 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 

THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

The first school-house was built in Davenport in 1838, and the graded school system wa.s 
organized in 1858. It has always kept abreast of the best in course of study and methods of 
instruction. There are ten school buildings, all well adapted and well equipped in every way 
for school purposes. The largest is the high school, which was erected in 1874, at a cost, including 
grounds, of $65,000.00. The enrollment of pupils in it in 1887 was 309. The staff of instructors is 
composed of Superintendent J. B. Young, ten principals, and eighty-nine teachers, ten of whom 
teach the German language, one vocal music, and one gymnastics. Tlie two last named subjects 
are as regularly and systematically taught as any other subjects in the course. Drawing and pen- 
manship are successfully taught without the help of special teachers. The last census gave a 
school population of 9,313. Last year the total enrollment was 4,446, and the average membership 
3,.547. The annual cost of the schools is 176,000.00. The management rests in a Board of Directors 
consisting of six members, two of whom are electofl each year. A free evening school is main- 
tained for four months each winter, which afibrds excellent instruction in reading, writing, 
arithmetic, the elements of bookkeeping and of physios. It has a large patronage, and is a popu- 
lar feature of the public school .system. As a department additional to the regular high school 
course there is maintained a most excellent normal and practice-school, in which most of the 
teachers in the schools are trained and tried before entering upon their work. To the services of 
this school is due largely the high standing of the Davenport public schools. 

SAINT KATHARINE'S HALL. 

This is a boarding and day school for girls, without a superior in the United States. The 
noble building, which is devoted exclusively to the school, crowns one of the highest and 
most commanding bluffs on the Missis.sippi river. The views eastward, southward, and west- 
ward are unobstructed, overlooking the National Armory and Arsenal, the cities of Daven- 
port, Rock Island, and Moline, and a beautiful stretch of river' miles in extent. The .school 
is now in its fourth year, its prosperity being unexampled. Founded for the education of Cln-istian 
women, it has been true to its high mission. Its roll of patrons numbers 150, and they are 
the representative business men of the west. Twice enlarged. Saint Katharine's capacity is again 
crowded. Its course includes three departments — preparatory, intermediate, and academic — 
and covers seven years. It is complete in the primary and in the advanced studies. While the 
Bishop of Iowa i.sthe head of the school, the direct control is entrusted entirely to the Principal, 
Miss Emma Adelia Rice, whose personal care and attention is devoted to every pupil. Miss Rice 
is a rarely-gifted woman, of fine executive ability and experience, whose success as a teacher has 
placed her name at the head of western educators. She is supported by a well-chosen staff of 
twelve instructors. Nowhere in the west are educational advantages for girls and young ladies 
offered superior to those of Saint Katharine's, and in very few cities of the country are equal 
facilities to be found. 



52 



DA VENPORT: 



GRISWOLD COLLEGE. 

This Institution was founded in 1859, and offers special advantnscs to students from the 
western states. It is conducted under tlie auspices of the Epi.^copal Church, and lias three 
courses of instruction — a four-year classical course, a three-year scientific course, and a one-year 
commercial course. The teaching is thorough. 

KEMPER HALL, 

The preparatory department of Griswold College, occupies a separate huikling, hoautifully 
located and handsomely furnished — a model of all that a school-building sliould he. Each pui)il 
has a separate room, and sleeps in a single bed. The Rev. P. C. 'WolcoU is lieadniaster, with 
competent assistants. It is pre-eminently a home school, and one wlucli regards the moral and 
physical, as well as the mental, training of youth. The military drill has been introduced into 
the school with remarkable success. 

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION ACADEMY. 

This institution, conducted by the Sisters of the Blessed Virgin Mary, is pleasantly situated 
on one of the crowning eminences that overlook the city. The buildings are elegant and com- 
modious. Young ladies of every religious denomination are admitted, and every facility is 
afforded for mental and moral training. The institution is in its twenty-ninth year. 

ST. AMBROSE SEMINARY. 

This collegiate scliool occupies a new and commodious building, beautifully located. It was 
established through the efforts of Rt. Kev. Henry Cosgrove, Bishop of the Roman Catholic See of 
Davenport. It has three departments — preparatory, commercial, and cla-ssical — each complete, 
and confers academic honors upon its graduates. Rev. J. A. Schulte is President. 



IOWA COMMERCIAL COLLEGE. 

The history of western business institutions shows no more surprising success than is found 
in the Iowa Commercial College. From a small beginning in May, 1884, it has grown into one of 
the largest and most prosperous institutions in the country. The school occupies the upper floors 

_ of Ryan Block, one of the 

.-.,., -~ ■----. largest and most central busi- 

ness buildings in Davenport. 
,...,._. Si.xteen states and three terri- 

tories were represented by 378 
students in the catalogue is- 
sueil in 1886, since which time 
the applications for admission 
have been more numerous 
than before. In the new tield 
of short-hand the proprietors, 
Wood & Van Patten, have 
e(iuil)ped a large imniber of 
young ladies and gentlemen 
for practical business life. The 
best proof that this college en- 
joys the en<lorsement and sup- 
port of the business men of 
Daveni>ort, Rock Lsland, and 
ISIoline, is found in the fact 
that a large number of its 
students is engaged here, and 
that they are giving perfect 
satisfaction and connnanding 
good salaries. The college 
has in a great measure revo- 
utionized business methods 
during the last four years by 
^^ introducing the type-writer, 
whose merits the college has 
advocated, and whose utility 
it has taught. The use of 
.short-hand and type-writing 
save one-half the time, or 
make it possible to do twice 
the business at a .slight increase of expense. The Iowa Commercial College is a member of the 
National Union of Business Colleges, of which D. R. Lillibridge is President. The Western Pen- 
man's Association will hold its third annual meeting in the rooms of the Iowa Commercial Col- 
lege, December 26-.30, 1888. This as.sociation is comi>osed of a body of business educators now 
numbering ninety-six members. Prof. B. C. Wood, of Wood & Van Patten, was one of the cor- 
responding secretaries for the i)ast year, and is chairman of the Executive Committee for the 
l)rcsent year. 

'other schools. 

There are nine private schools, of which two are kindergardens, one a free German school, 
and the other six parochial schools. 




KYAN BLOCK. 



ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 



53 



HOMES AND HOSPITALS. 

cook's home for the friendless. 

This clinrity wns made possible hy the iniinilic(ii<>e of Mrs. Clarissa C. Cook, deceased. Her 
will (k'.siKiiatiHl the smii of Siilt.ddO.do fm- the puipose of providing a home for "destitute and 
indigent females." To this sum S('>5,<l(l(l.(K) has been added. 

SOLDIEKS' orphans' HOME. 
The Iowa Soldiers' Orphans' Home and Hoine for Indigent Children is a state eharital)le 
institntion. It was organized December, 1SG3, and oitened ,Iuly, 1864. S. W. Fierce was elected 
Superintendent, Mrs. S. W. Pierce, Matron, and Dr. \V. F. Peck, Physician, November, 1867, and 
they are tlie present incumbents. The home was strictly for soldiers' orphans till July. 1876, when 
it became a home for all indigent children. There were at the close of the year 313 children at the 
home, of whom fifty-six were soldiers' orphans. There are thoroughly graded schools and an 
industrial department for lioth boys and girls. Altogether about 2,000 children have been cared 
for and educated. Suitable buildings on the cottage plan, sixteen in number, have been provided. 

MERCY HOSPITAL. 
The illu.stration gives a partial view of Mercy Hospital and grounds. The upper building on 
the right represents, though imperfectly, St. .Tohn's Asylum, which is .set apart for the accom- 
modation and comfort of the male insane patients. It is a monument of the zeal and charity of 
the lamented Rt. Kev. John McMuUen, the lirst Catholic Bishop of Davenport. St. John's Asylum 
is in reality a four-story brick building, completed in 1884 at a cost of 3^25,000.00. The architecture 
conforms to the hospital proper, with accompaniments which enhance its stately appearance. It 
has a frontage of 45 feet, with a depth of 91 feet, anil east and west wings, each 12 by 20 feet. In 
1886 Rt. Rev. Bishop Co.'grove, on visiting the female department, recommended for the better 
accommodation of patients the erection of a thir<l building. This has been done, the structure 
having a frontage of 60 feet by a depth of 90 feet. It has three stories and an attic with all modem 
(improvements, and is elegantly equipped for its intendeil use. 




MERCY HOSPITAL AND ST. JOHN S ASYIAM. 

Mercy Hospital, in all of its departments, is one of the first institutions of the kind in the 
country —one with which there is no other in Iowa for favorable comparison. The main building 
is a mas.sive brick, four stories high, and 1.50 by ()0 feel. The present grounds cover thirty acres, 
being located just outside the city limits on tlie north, and distant IVoni the posl-olliee about two 
miles. The iiistitution was oi)cncd in December, 1868, but from its humble beginning it has grown 
to magnilieent proportions. As to the management of Mercy Hospital, it is >iuite sullicicnt to .say 
that the entire control and disinpline are in the hands of the Sisters of Mercy. It is subject to con- 
stant visitation by county ollicials, who point to it with a feeling of just pride. Tlie institution has 
not only the entire' confidence of tiu- oflicial board and of the city physicians an<l surgeons who 
regularly visit it, but, when occasion requires, it has the patronage of the best citizens. Its 
wonderful success is the best evidence that it fulfills the grand mission for which it was organized. 



54 DA VENPORT: 



MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Davenport is divided into six wards, each of which is represented in the city council by two 
Aldermen, elected to serve two years. The Mayor. City Clerk Treasurer, and Assessor are elected 
annually ; the Police Magistrate biennially. The Engineer, Fire Chief, Attorney, Chief of Police, 
and Collector are appointed. The city is incorporated under a special charter, and has full legisla- 
tive power under it. 

THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

In connection with the perfect system of water service which has been described, Davenport 
has a fire department equalled in its efficiency by but few^ cities in the country, and surpassed by 
no otlier place of corresponding size. The paid department is oonii)osed of three liose companies, 
one hook and ladder company, and a chemiciil-engine, all well housed, and in the hands of trained 
firemen. The force is always on duty, and is supplied with the best of horses, abundance of hose, 
and all essentials to a complete outfit. The value of the service is vastly increased by an electric 
fire-alarm telegraph with alarm-boxes, or stations, distributed throughout the city. By means of 
gongs at the water-works and hose-houses, and bells struck by electricity, the location of a fire is 
made known instantly. The average time occupied from the first sound of an alarm until the 
firemen are in their places, with the horses on a wild run toward the .scene of the fire, is from fifteen 
to seventeen seconds. In case of a conflagation — from which the city has not suffered since the 
paid department was equipped — there are volunteer fire organizations covering tlie outlying 
districts which can be summoned. The protection is. such that Davenport is practically a fire- 
proof city. 

THE POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

This consists of a Chief, Night-Captain, and thirteen patrolmen. The number of arrests 
average less than two per cent of the population. In no city is life safer, property more secure, or 
better order maintained. The last few years have been notably free from the work of criminals. 

PARKS AND STREETS. 

Davenport has three public parks — Central, Washington, and Lafayette. Tlie first is the 
largest, embracing tliirty-five acres, and was bought by the city for S13,00O.OO in 1885. An artesian 
well is now being sunk there, and the grounds are to be handsomely laid out and ornamented. 
Lafayette Square was laid out by Antoine Le Claire in the original plat of the city. 

STREETS AND SEWERS. 

The entire city is divided into blocks — most of them 320 feet square ^ by 126 streets, 60 to 80 
feet wide, which, if placed continuously, would extend a distance of eighty miles. Over S1,000,- 
000.00 has been expended in macadamizing the streets, wJiich are in good condition for both 
hauling and driving purposes. The city is well sewered, the drainage being natural from the 
bluffs to the river. 

REVENUE AND DEBT. 

Tlie revenue of the city amounts annually to about $150,000.00, of which one-fifth is derived 
from licenses, and the rest is secured from an assessed valuation of over S" ,000,01)0.00. 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

The sanitary condition of the city is watched by a Board of Health, which is clothed by state 
law and municipal ordinance with all necessary power. 

MEANS OF LIGHTING. 

The city is lighted by electricity, the plant containing ninety-four lights of 2,000 candle-power 
each, of which forty are placed on eight towers 125 feet high, fifty-two upon mast-arms 30 feet 
high, and two upon poles 50 feet high. The wires have a length of over 26 miles, and the light is 
perfect. There are 26 miles of gas mains. 

STREET-CAR LINES. 

Davenport has three lines of street-cars — the Third street, the Brady street, and the Second 
street lines — in all twelve miles. The Second street line was built during the fall of 1887, at an 
expense of 120,000.00, and the city council has granted the franchise for an extension of eight miles 
of line in 1888. All parts of the city can be reached easily and quickly. 



CHURCHES, LIBRARIES, ETC. 

ACADEMY OF SCIENCES. 

The Davenport Academy of Natural Sciences is an institution known throughout the scientific 
world. The collection of mound relics is incomparable. The academy building was erected for 
the purpose which it serves upon a sightly lot, the gift of Mrs. P. V. Newcomb. The academy 
has 120 regular, 78 life, and .300 corresponding members. Tlie library is a most valuable collection, 
containing man.v thousands of books and pamphlets. The number of yearly visitors is about 
6,000, of whom from 1,500 to 2,000 are non-residents. Four volumes of proceedings — works of 
acknowledged scientific value — have been published, and the fifth volume is in preparation. 



ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 



THE PUHLIC IJHUARY. 



A fine building, dedicated to public library uses, is centrally located. Its cost was §13,000.00. 
The shelves contain about 12,000 volumes of standard books, and the reading-tables are supplied 
with the leading magazines and ncwspapere. 

CHURCHES. 
Davenport is a see city, being the .seat of the Protestant Episcopal Church of the Diocese of 
Iowa, Kt. Rev. William Stevens Perry, Bishop. Grace Outhcflral, a grand Gothic cdilice. cost more 
lliau s;S0,>KK).00, and, with its handsome grounds, upon which is tlie Bishop's vine-covere<l residence, 
occupies 11 block. Trinity Episcopal Church bus a chime of bells costing S6,Of)0.(K), and their peals 
may be heard for miles. This city is al.so the place of residence of the Bishop of the Koman 
Catholic Diocese of Davenport, embracing the southern half of the state of Iowa. Davenport has 
four Baptist, four Catholic, one Christian, two Congregational, four Epi.scopal, one Hebrew, three 
Lutheran, four Methodist, four Presbyterian, and one tfnitarian churches. 



IN GENERAL. 



THE PRESS. 

Davenport hag five daily newspapers — The Morning Democrat- Gazette, independent; the 
Evening Democrat-Gazette, democratic; Der Demokrat (German), democratic; the Evening 
Times, a labor paper, and the Morning Tribune, republican. All publish weekly editions, and 
Der Demokrat, a semi-weekly. There are also the Northwestern News, Iowa Messenger, Iowa 
Reform (German), published weekly; the Dania, semi-monthly, ami the Iowa Churchman and 
Familien Journal, luonthly. The Democrat-Gazette is the only paper in Iowa issuing both morn- 
ing and evening editions. 

HOTELS. 

The Kimball House is the leading hotel of Iowa in all that pertains to a strictly first-class 
house. It is always kept up to the highest rank in appointments and service. During the last two 
years §10,000.00 has been expended in interior improvements and furnishings. The Kimball is five 
stories in height, with a frontage of 300 feet on Fourth by 150 on Perry street. It is supplied with 
telegraph, telephone, elevator, and all modern conveniences. The proprietor is Howard Burtis. 

The St. James is located on the corner of Main and Front streets, commanding a delightful 
view of the river, and within a few steps of the ferry and steamboat landings. It has become 
known as " the commercial man's friend," and as such it is a favorite. The proprietor is Gough B. 
Grant, whose personal attention is always given to guests, and they are made to feel really at 
home. The house is capacious, elegantly furnished, and the table is" excellent. During the past 
season a §10,000.00 addition has been made to the St. James. 

There are numerous other smaller, though well-kept, houses in Davenport, which may be 
commended to strangers. 

THEATRES. 

The Bi^rtis Opera House is connected with the Kimball House. It has a seating capacity of 
1,700. It is supplied with upholstered opera-chairs, large stage, and beautiful scenery, ample for 
the setting of any play. 

The German Theatre is described elsewhere in connection witli the new Turner Hall. 

YOUNG men's CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

This society is in its twenty-first year. It has quarters in the central part of the city, which 
are well suppled with gymnastic apparatus, bath-rooms, library, reception-rooms, etc. 

SOCIETIES, ETC. 

The leading Turner society of the state is here. There is a strong military organzation in 
Company B, I. N. G.; a ball club; a boat and a canoe club; and nearly all of the various fraterni- 
ties, orders, societies, and brotherhoods are represented. 

SECURITY FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

This home company is endorsed without qualification by every bank and banker in the city. 
It afibrds absolute .security to all holding its piolicies. It ofl'ers protection against loss by lire, light- 
ning, and cyclone, the last by no means an improbable disiister. The Security has a capital of 
SlOO,000.00. " It has received in premiums since its organization about S175,fKK).lK). It has paid los.ses 
aggregating §13,000.00, and numbering 201, the average size of the lo.ss being not quite §213.00. Its 
stockholders are the most responsible capitalists and business men of Davenport, and its otficers are 
men of successful experience in business. 

THE FEDERAL LIFE ASSOCIATION. 

This is a Davenport company whose sterling character is vouched for by bankers and busi- 
ness men of this city, who are familiar with its workings and mHnagcment. The Federal afibrds 
the safest and most perfect system of insurance. It provides for life insurance only, at the lowest 
cost consistent with security on terms of entire equity. Its special features commend the Federal 
JUS giving tlie most insurance for the least money possible. 



]><Ioline:. 



GENERAL FEATITRES. 

OBJECTS OF THIS WOKK. 

ERE THIS a work of ancient history, it would dwell on the degree 
of civilization attained by the mound-bnilders and the character of 
the implements and nteusils they nsed, showing the vast difference 
between their times and ours. Were it a book of modern history, it 
would linger on the explorations of L>e Soto, who discovered the 
Mississippi river in 1541, of Marciuette and Joliet, who descended 
it almost to its mouth in 167:5, and of La Salle, who in 1«82 passed 
through it to the Gulf of Mexico and took possession of the country 
in the name of the King of France. Were it an account of Indian 
wars, it would recount the war-dances of the Algonkins, the Da- 
kotas, and the Sioux. But it is intended for those now on earth, 
doing business and on the lookout for more advantageous localities, 
although there are those now living here who knew Keokuk and Black Hawk per- 
sonally (the latter died October 3, 1838) before Moline attracted much attention. 
Manufacturing here dates back to 1840, when a rude dam thrown across Sylvan water 
at the foot of Rodman avenue supplied openings for seven wheels. 

THE city's LOCATION. 

Moline, whose name signifies City of Mills, is distinguished for its healthful and 
beautiful location, as well as for the amount and excellence of its manufactures, which 
in one form or another find their way to almost every farm and into ahnost every 





VIEW OF SYLVAN WATER, OPrOSITE MOI.TXK. 



home from New York to Oregon, and from the great lakes to the Gulf of Mexico. 
The city is located on the south (the Mississippi running westerly for a few miles) 
bank of the river near the foot of the upper rapids, nearly midway between the 
5 



58 



MOLINE: 



cities of St. Paul on the north and St. Louis on the south. Moline lies south of the 
eastern half of the Island of Rock Island, which has a length of three miles, reaching 
westward to the limits of the city of Rock Island, and southward almost to Rock 
river, three miles distant, and whose confluence with the Mississippi is some six miles 
below. The site of the city is attractive and beautiful. The lower or plateau part 
is largely filled with factories, which occupy the water-power and river bank for nearly 
two miles. Moline is rightfully designated as the ' ' Lowell of the West, ' ' for it is 
one of the busiest, most thrifty cities in the Mississippi Valley, famed the world 
over for the variety and extent of its industrial interests as well as for the quality 
of their products. The city's bluffs and the plain stretching beyond them furnish 
the most desirable building opportunities. 

SPLENDID BOWING WATER. 

The accompanying illustration shows a part of Sylvan water, between the water- 
power wall and the Island. It is over a mile in length, by nearly 1,000 feet in width, 
affording the best sheet of rowing water, protected as it is on all sides, in the entire 
west. This course has been four times selected during the last ten years by the 
Mississippi Valley Ameteur Rowing Association for its annual regattas. It is the 
only place on the great river where slack water in sufficient quantity can be found. 
Moline has its Sylvan Boat Club of 100 members, an organization which takes 
advantage of its fine opportunities for pleasure and practice. 




MOLINE UUIUGi: TO NATIONAL AKSENAL. 

MUNICIPAL GOVEKNMENT. 



Moline has a population of over 11,000. The corporation limits are divided into 
seven wards, each of which has two representatives in the city council, one Alder- 
man being elected for two years each alternate year. The rate of taxation, for all 
purposes, is 6:| cents on each $100.00 equalized valuation. For 1887 the assessed 
valuation was |1, 720, 555. 00. The assessed valuation is on a basis of from one-sixth 



ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 59 

to one-fourth of the actual value. The bonded debt is $73,500.00. The City Marshal 
acts as health officer under the state law. The sanitary condition of Moline, as 
shown by its mortuary record, is remarkably high. The death rate during 1887 was 
less than two to each 100 of the population. 

THE WATER-WORKS. 

Moline has its complete system of water-works, ample for fire protection, house- 
hold, and general purposes. The works were built in 1883 by Davis & Co., who 
operated them as a private enterprise till July 1, 1886, when they were bouf!;ht by 
the city. They are located at the foot of Seventeenth street, and represent a j udicious 
outlay of $100,000.00. There are eleven miles of mains and distributing pipes, and 
138 fire-hydrants, covering every point within the city limits. The pumping-station 
is 60 by 45 feet, of brick. Three Deane engines are used — one of 1,500,000 gallons 
capacity, and two each of 500,000 gallons pumping capacity every twenty-four hours. 
There is an inlet pipe furnishing the water which is over half a mile in length, and 
extends from the cistern, which is also a settling-basin, out into the channel of the 
Mississippi river, where the water is uncontaminated. A recent test has proved that 
ten good fire streams can be thrown a distance of 200 feet. In case of need, the 
engines of three of the largest factories in the city can be utilized to supplement the 
water-works, thus assuring fire protection. During 1887 the works pumped over 
220,000,000 gallons of water. Fred Alsterlund is chief engineer. 

The fire department is a complete, efficient volunteer organization of five com- 
panies, one for each fire district, which has proved its trustworthiness repeatedly. 
Each of the larger factories has its own fire department fully equipped. 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The public schools of Moline, of which W. S. Mack has been Superintendent for 
ten years, are the pride of the city, as much so as the manufacturing industries. No 
city east or west furnishes its youth better educational facilities. The schools are 
organized under what is known as the general school law of Illinois. Under the 
provisions of this act the management of the schools is entrusted to a Board of six 
members, two of whom and a President are elected each year, the first Saturday in 
April. The President holds his office one year, and each member of the Board three 
years. The Board elects its Secretary and its committees. The President presides 
at the meetings of the Board, votes in case of a tie, and signs orders. " He does not 
count to make a quorum, nor does he perform any other duties unless so directed by 
the Board." The school district is a political unit entirely distinct from the munici- 
pal unit, although the boundaries of the two are co-extensive. This takes the school 
elections out of the field of party politics, the people being called upon in electing 
members of the School Board to consider only matters of school policy. 

GROWTH. 

Since the organization of the schools under the general school law, in April, 
1873, there has been a steady growth commensurate with the development of the 
industrial interests of the city. From a population of some over 4,000 in 1873, the 
district had grown in 1887 to 10,514. The school population increased in the mean- 
time from 1,533 to 3,111; the average monthly enrollment from 624 to 1,626; the 
number of teachers from 16 to 40, and the salary account from $8,014.00 to $21,092.00. 
The tuition per pupil, on average monthly enrollment, was, in 1873, $12.84; in 1887, 
$12.97. 

PRESENT CONDITION. 

The district now owns six school buildings — four brick and two frame buildings 
— containing forty-two school-rooms, besides the high school, with ample accommoda- 
tions for 1,900 pupils, and so distributed as to be easily accessible to the school 



60 



MO LINE: 



population. Nothing so quickly attracts the attention and calls forth the admiration 
of the stranger, and is at the same time the source of so much pride to Moline's 
citizens, as its attractive and well-kept school buildings and sites. Few, if any, 
cities of its size can boast of more valuable school property. The course of study 
covers eight year.s below the high school, and a four-year English and a three-year 
Latin course in the high school. "Without going into the details of the course of 
study, two lines of policy to which the schools as a whole seem to be committed may 
be mentioned: First. The substitution of independent thought and investigation 
for the mere study and committing of texts, and as a result of and a means to this 
end, the establishment of school libraries and collections of specimens in the different 
buildings. Second. The systematic teaching of drawing, as another means of acquiring 
information, accompanied by the realization in different kinds of materials of the 
forms drawn, thereby providing thorough manual training for the development of a 
side of the child's nature heretofore neglected. Much more could be said concerning 
the school privileges which the people of this manufacturing city have provided for 
their children, and which should commend Moline to any who may be seeking 
investment for their capital and desirable homes for their families. 



MOLINE WATER-POWER. 



WHAT IT HAS ACCOMPLISHED. 



The water-power of Moline has always occupied a prominent place in the history 
of the city, deciding its location, and for many years causing its growth. The 
enterprising pioneers of forty or more years ago were quick to see that a power easy 




MOLINE WATER POWKR TAIL-RACE. 



of development and vast in extent (from the peculiar character of the river) as this 
evidently was would attract a large industrial population, and prove a continuous 
source of growth and prosperity. 



ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTEIES. 



61 



THE EARLY IMPBOVEMENTS. 

The first improvemeuts of the power were crude, yet they attracted a few mills 
and manutactories, and from a beginning so small Moline has grown to be a manu- 
focturing city whose reputation is national, and whose industrial products are known 
to almost every civilized country of the world. The water-power was hampered at 
the start by lack of capital — a not uncommon experience in those early times — and 
after parsing through the hands of several parties, who in vain strove to supply the 
requisite capital, it came at length into the hands of the present company about 
twenty years ago. 

THE PRESENT WATER-POWER COMPANY. 

Soon after the passage of the water-power into the hands of the present company, 
the long-dreamed-of plan of a national armory and arsenal in the Mississippi Valley 
began to assume a definite form, and the Island of Rock Island wiis fixed upon as a 
siiftable site. The Island had been reserved by the government for the purpose, and 
successfully held both against the settlers and land rings, which repeatedly endeavored 




moi.inp: water-power pool. 

to obtain possession. Fort Armstrong, a military post in the early Indian wars, was 
located at the lower end of the Island, and here numbers of young officers did service, 
many of them afterward becoming famous in the Mexican and Civil wars, notably 
Winfield Scott and Jefl:erson Davis. 

THE GOVERNMENT AND THE COMPANY. 
Col. Davenport, whose name our sister city bears, had obtained a part of the 
Island, and made it his home, and several other small cessions had been made. 
D. B. Sears had secured a small piece of territory on the upper end of the Island, 
with the right to abut dams for water-power purpo.ses, and in pursuance of this 
right, had built a dam from the west side of the Island to the little island in the 
main channel, and had erected a saw and a flouring mill. Mr. Sears' rights, together 
with those of the Davenport estate, were taken by the government and paid for under 
appraisement. It was proposed in addition to remove the dam and obliterate the 



62 



MOLINE: 



power, paying the Water-Power Company by a similar appraisement. But most 
strenuous protests were made against such a proceeding — although a sale would have 
been advantageous to the company — inasmuch as it involved the blotting out of the 
town, and meant virtual ruin to the industries built up by the water-power and 
dependent upon it, as well as surrendering the finest power site on the Mississippi 
river, with all its great posibilities of future advantage. 

CONDITIONS OF THE AGREEMENT. 

A final agreement, however, was made, by which the power |was saved to the 
town, by the Water-Power Company surrendering the entire power to the govern- 
ment without consideration, save an agreement on the part of the government to 
enter at once upon plans for its complete development, and to maintain the same, 
and give the company one-fourth of the entire developed power^^free of charge for 
rent. As to what degree the power was capable of development, both the government 




AR&ENAI. \\ ATER-PO^V ER .MACHINERY. 



and the company agreed that a twelve-foot head was practicably obtainable, there 
being a fall of twenty feet over the rapids to this point. At this transfer to the gov- 
ernment, appropriations were made and improvements begun on plans having such 
ultimate development in view. 

CHANGES IN THE PLANS. 

Subsequent changes in the plans were made, however, to enable the government 
to bring the power down to a point opposite the shops in the middle of the island. 
This extension of the power entirely changed the plans for the dam, and largely 
increasedj'the, amount of the work and the consequent expense, and took precedence 
over the general improvements on which the Water-Power Company were dependent 
for power, and also left a contracted tail-race for the escape of the water. These 
changes in plan rendered the water-power practically worthless to the company, 
as far as general utility was concerned, since the completion of the dam. But now 
work has been done in enlarging the capacity of the tail-race, and in improving the 
inlet to the pool, which has in a mejisure restored the water-power to usefulness. 

POWER FOR NEW INDUSTRIES. 

The result has been that many of our manufacturers during the past year have 
resumed the use of the power, which they had previously abandoned, and has 
enabled the company to put in new wheels, aggregating a large amount of power to 



ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 63 

rent to new industries. Now that the Arsenal shops are completed, and can be 
equipped with machinery for their immediate use, the importance of completing the 
water-power for operating them on short notice has presented itself to the attention 
of the war department, and this work has been decided upon as the next step in the 
equipment of the Arsenal. This insures a power of uniform head at all stages of the 
water and during all seasons of the year the best on the Mississippi river, full of 
promise for the realization of the advantages expected from it l)y its enterprising 
founders and promoters. 



MOIvINE MANUFACTORIES. 

THEIR PROSPERITY. 

"What is the strongest inducement Moline offers new manufacturing enterprises 
to locate here ? ' ' 

This question was asked by the writer of Hon. John M. Gould, one of the first 
business men, in point of time, to establish himself here. As President of the First 
National Bank for many years, as a prominent member of the Moline Water-power 
Company, as one of the great lumber firm of Dimock, Gould & Co., and as one who 
has been, and is, identified with the city's interests in many ways, he was thought 
to be thoroughly competent to meet the query. The answer was brief and signifi- 
cant — as full of meaning as if it had been amplified in the form of a book. It came 
in these seven words: 

' ' The success of the factories already here. ' ' 

Within a few years some of the largest industries of their kind in the country 
have been built up here. In every instance the start was made in a small way, and 
enlargements came as they were demanded by the growth of business. The steps 
taken have always been in one direction, and that upward and forward. What has 
been done here can and will be done again many times over. It is as certain as any 
future can be — as sure as the recurrence of the seasons — that within ten years the 
number of factories here will be more than doubled, while those established will go 
on expanding at a rate surpassing the national census. In most of the widely and 
wildly-boomed western towns the promises are all for the future; there are no redeemed 
pledges to exhibit for the past. Moline points to what has been achieved as the best 
evidence of the new advances which are to be made. The success of the factories 
already here afford the strongest inducement Moline can offer new manufacturing 
enterprises about to start, and those already established which desire to take advan- 
tage of better opportunities. 

THE VALUE OF A GOOD NAME. 

It is a modest statement that affirms that millions of dollars have been expended 
in carrying the name of Moline and its products all the way around the world. 
Through newspapers and magazines of every class and in every civilized country; 
b}^ means of trade-circulars in many languages; by exhibits at state, national, and 
international expositions ; by traveling salesmen and agents; by the work of agricul- 
tural implements in field-tests everywhere, and by innumerai)le plows, planters, culti- 
vators, and machines in daily use in America, Mexico, Brazil, England and English 
provinces, France, Spain, Germany, Egypt, Japan, and even China, the name 
"Moline" has been made a familiar one. It has a value which represents a heavy 
outlay through several years, and yet its use is offered to all who care to avail them- 
selves of it. The word "Moline" carries with it a kind of good-will and endorse- 
ment which for business purposes is invaluable. 

THE WORLD FOR A MARKET. 

The world being the territory from which ISIoline draws its trade, it follows that 
reverses or unfavorable years never come. A certain section of the country may 
have had a famine in 1886, or a flood in 1887, or it may be a scourge will come in 1888; 
but owing to the wide distribution of the products of Moline factories, nothing less 
than universal disaster can ever affect them. 



64 MOLINE: 

PROSPERITY L)ISTHI1U;TED. 

With the success of capital comes the prosperity of labor. This is forcibly 
illustrated in Moline. Hundreds and hundreds of mechanics who have followed 
their trades have reached conditions of comfort, own their homes, and have a savings- 
bank account to meet the proverbial rainy day, or means with which to pass their 
vacations in travel, or give their children advantages which are unknown where 
idleness is common or starvation-wages paid. The working men of Moline do not 
need to be told that they have cast their lots in a fortunate place. 

AN INVITATION. 

With the foregoing introduction the reader is invited to make a tour through 
some of the larger factories, and satisfy himself of their extent and variety, first 
glancing at " A Year's Business," by way of preparing for the interesting round. 



A YEAR'S BUSINESS. 

MONEY WELL INVESTED. 

Capital well placed at seven per cent interest is considered a fortunate invest- 
ment. Government bonds yield only about half this interest; railroad stocks fall 
below it, and general business for a series of years is considered satisfactory if the 
profits equal it. But in the great majority of commercial ventures success is not 
the rule; it is the few and not the many who prosper. Looking over the statistics 
of Moline manufacturing since the close of the Civil war, it is found that the ma- 
jority of enterprises started here have succeeded well; that business has increased 
and profits multiplied at a ratio largely exceeding the legal rate of money. Moline 
has been a notable exception to the rule in manufacturing centers in the east as well 
as in the west. 

WHAT STATISTICS SHOW. 

A personal canvass of every industry in Moline furnishes the figures used here- 
with. They are not exaggerations. The capital invested in manufacturing enter- 
prises at the close of 1887 was |7,935,000.00. The number of employes on the pay-rolls 
for the year was 8,768. The amount paid for wages, $1,859,000.00. And the aggre- 
gate of business transacted was $7,120,000.00 — the largest in the history of the city. 
The number of men indicated, it is only fair to note, have not been employed con- 
tinuously, for the reason that here, as elsewhere, the " busy season " occurs, and it 
is made the most of. The saw-mills, too, usually cannot run more than from seven 
to eight months, on account of snow and ice. But on the whole, the average mechanic 
and employe, the worker in wood and iron, is certain of regular employment twelve 
months in the year. 

DEERE & COMPANY. 

Forty years ago, when Moline was but a small village, with no special commercial 
advantages, when railroads were unknown, and steamboats were the only freight 
lines, a far-seeing mechanic — John Deere — who recognized in the immense water- 
power which might be utilized the key to a successful business future, chose the spot 
as a base of operations and set up his little plow-shop on the banks of the Sylvan water. 
It was not much of an establishment. A small two-story and basement frame 
building, with a one-story L, in which were two or three forges, a large grindstone, 
and some machinery of rather primitive stj'le run by water-power, in addition to 
the ordinary tools of the blacksmith's trade, a wood-worker's bench or two, and a 
small paint-shop. That was about all. Here was continued the manufacture of 
steel plows which had been commenced at Grand Detour, 111., a short time before. 
The first year's output would hardly stock the warehouse of an ordinary implement- 
dealer of to-day, and yet it was a successful year's business. Who could have 
prophecied that the immense establishment represented in the accompanying cut 



ITS INTE BESTS AND IXDUSTlilES. 



(if) 



would be in so sliort a time as forty years the outgrowth of this small beginuing. 
The secret of tlie graiul siiecess that has so universally attended the business started 
in so small a way nearly half a eentury ago, and which still attends it, has been the 
determination carried out through all these years to make the best goods i)08sible 
by conscientious painstaking, the employment of the most skilful mechanics and 
the most approved machinery, and thi^. use of only the best material^the market 




^ .1 Ml!" 



11 I'l" 






h?.^ 



1' 







DEBRE Jk company's WOKIx-. 

affords. This course of action is what has made the ''John Deei'e Plows" known 
the world over; and wherever known, most popular. This institution has done much 
for the communit}' in which it is located, and is a credit to the city as being the 
largest establishment of its class in the world. 



MOLINE PLOW COMPANV. 

The next illustration does injustice to the immense shops of the Moline Plow 
Company, and yet it furnishes some idea of the facilities at command for manufactur- 
ing fixr more than a thousind plows weekly, to say nothing of other agricultural 
implements. The works cover more than two acres of ground — which means more 
than eight acres of lloor space — and every square yard of it is crowded with men, 
machinery, and material for the conversion of train-loads of coal, iron, steel, and 
lumber into the finished implements, which are carried by rail, river, and ocean- 
steamer to the four (quarters of the earth. The Moline Plow Company is an institu- 
tion of no less rapid growth than of enduring character. It was organized twenty- 
one years ago, with a capital stock of only nominal proportions, but by men of more 
than ordinary resources in the way of energy and enterprise; bj'^ men who had faith 
in Moline as well as in the development of the great west and the means which must 
be largely used to accomplish it — by implements which, to use the expression of one 
of the lirst of statesmen, himself a fiirraer, " when they tickled the soil caused it to 
laugh with a harvest." On reaching the age designated as that of legal manhood, this 

6 



66 



MOLINE: 



company fiuds itself possessed of a vast estate in the way of territory; of a manu- 
facturing plant which few of the largest cities can equal; of an established and 
growing business, and of an army of skilled employes and agents. The twenty-five 
employes of the first year have grown to be twenty times as many. The small shop has 
divided itself into departments, and these have become a great factory, with branch 
establishments in Kansas City, Omaha, Des Moines, and Minneapolis, and extensive 
agencies and supply-houses in Cincinnati, Columbus, Peoria, Toledo, St. Louis, San 
Francisco, Sacramento, and Portland. Each year of the life of this company has wit- 




MOLINE PLOW company's WOEKS, 



nessed enlargements, and 1887 is no exception. Two large brick structures, one 54 
by 78 feet, three stories, and the other 30 by 50 feet, three stories, have been added, 
with the view of enlarging the manufacturing facilities. The President of the Moline 
Plow Company for many years has been Hon. S. W. Wheelock, a prominent factor 
in Moline's history. Associated with him as Secretary is A. L. Carson, and a large 
and efficient executive force. 



MOLINE WAGON COMPANY. 

Moline is a magical word. There is an enchantment about it which is wonder- 
ful. Yet the city in which mills and factories have been founded, and which have 
flourished niarvelously, is subject to no power of sorcery. The agencies have been 
the same in all — a combination of lavorable circumstances and the application of 
the strict rules of business to them. What true merit in the product combined with 
executive ability and business sagacity can accomplish in such a location as this has 
a striking illustration in the upbuilding of the Moline Wagon Company, a fine view 
of whose extensive works is given on the next page. If the plow is the fittest 
emblem of agriculture, the wagon certainly holds the place of the farmer's best 
friend. It is his independent line of transportation, which can never be subjected to 
government control through inter-state laws. The maker of a good wagon is the 
helper of the agriculturalist. The company which is the subject of this sketch is 



ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 



67 



one of the largest nianufacturers of farm and spring wagons in the world. Its most 
gratifying growth has been within the hust fifteen years, dnring whieh the eapaiMty 
has been more than (juadnipled. The two-story sho]), (iO by H() feet, has been trans- 
formed into four-story brick struetures, covering, with the warehouses and luml)er- 
sheds, about six acres of ground. The thirty employes who began with the organiza- 
tion of the company have multiplied more than fifteen times, while the addition of 
machinery has been supplied in an equal ratio. Add to the skilled workmen the 
toughest and best-se;isoned lumber and every mechanical device, and to this fifteen 
years practical experience and the most watchful supervision over every detail, and 




MOLINE W A(.ON (OMTANV S WORKS. 

the secret of success becomes known. Nothing has been left to chance. Every step 
of progress has been made in the face of fierce competition. Despite all obstacles, 
and by sheer force of time-tried worth, the Moline wagon has taken its place by the 
side of the Moline plow as having a superior nowhere. In different parts of the 
country the company has distributing houses, including Minneapolis, Winnipeg, Des 
Moines, Kansas City, St. Louis, Indianapolis, Fort Worth, and Salt Lake City. The 
President is Morris Rosenfield, whose genius has directed the affairs of the company 
from the first. 

LUMBEE AND WOODEN-WARE. 

Next in importance to the manufacture of agricultural implements comes the 
lumber interest, which if not more extensive than that of any other city on the 
Mississippi river, is certainly far more varied. It gives employment to nearly 500 
hands, who receive in the way of wages more than $200,000.00, while the business of 
a twelve-month runs up to about $1,000,000.00. 

The firm of Dimock, Gould & Co. is the oldest in continuous business in Moline. 
The senior member of the firm, J. M. Gould, with D. C. Dimock, recently deceased, 
began the manufacture of tubs and pails in 1852, in a frame building on what is now 
the Island of Rock Island — the site of the National Arsenal and Armory. During 
the last year the company had a force of 275 men, the most of them the year through. 
Although they cut 20,00(1,000 feet of lumber and 3,000,000 lath, this was by no means 
the extent of their business. In another department of their works they made 600,- 
000 wooden pails, 120,000 tubs, and 120,000 washljoards. Nor is this all. A third 
department is devoted to the manufacture of paper-pails, and of these 135,000 were 
made. 



68 



31 LINE: 



The Keator Lumber Company, like that of Dimock, Gould & Co., has been 
tried by fire as well as by time. Each has proved its strength, while their prosperity 
was never more marked than it is to-day. Mr. J. S. Keator is a pioneer in the felling 
of pine trees, the rafting of logs and their conversion into marketable lumber and 
building material. He has not only seen great changes in the business, but he has 
been at the front in making them. The Keator mill is now one of the most perfect 
in the northwest. During the past season it cut 22,500,000 feet of logs, 4,000,000 
lath, and 3,000,000 shingles. In 1874 B. C. Keator became a partner, and since that 
time three other sons have become stockholders — S. J. Keator, F. W. Keator, and 
E. B. Keator. The paid up capital stock is $200,000.00. In 1862, in 1870, and in 1883 
the mill was burned, but after each fire, and before the smoke had blown away, a 
larger and better mill was begun. The present main building is 64 by 185 feet, 
corner posts 30 feet high. The cost was $75,000.00. A band-saw just added makes 
the capacity of the Keator mill 30,000,000 feet annually. A planing-mill has lately 
been completed, at a cost of $10,000.00. About twenty acres of ground are occupied 
by mills and yards. The employes number 175, and the last year's business amounts 
to $500,000.00. 

DEERE & MANSUE COMPANY. 

Eleven years ago the corn-planter works of the Deere & Mansur Company were 
organized, and in the interval of little more than a decade they have taken their 
place by the side of the largest in the country. Employment is given to more than 
150 men. The main building occupied is a sightly brick structure, four-stories, 180 
by 60 feet, and supplied with the best machinery the ingenuity of man has devised. 
The corn-planter, while it is the implement to which attention is largely turned — no 




DEERE A: MANSCB COMPANY'S CORN-PLANTER WORKS. 



less than six kinds being made — is by no means the only implement manufactured by 
the company. Four lines of check-rowers, three of stalk-cutters, three of seeders, four 
of sulky-rakes, with garden-cultivators and seeders, harrows, and drills, give an idea of 
the variety of demands which this house is able to supply. The history of western 
industries does not afford an instance showing where a new enterprise has found 
business at its command, from the day its implements were placed upon the market, 
comparable with this. The name " Moline " was worth a fortune to the corn-planter 
works from the beginning. It has equal value awaiting factories yet to locate here. 
The name means superiority of workmanship and design; it signifies merit, and is 
accepted as such everywhere. 



ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 



69 



BARNARD & LEAS MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 

From an insignificant beginning in 1860, in a amall two-story frame building, the 
Barnard & Leas Manufacturing Company has developed into the largest manufac- 
turing house of its kind in the country. They have followed enlargements with 
additions until the shops now cover nearly a block and a half, and furnish about two 
acres of lioor-room. On visiting these shops the stranger is suddenly convinced that 
he is inside a vast bee-hive of industry. Machine departments, foundries, paint- 
shops, and wood-working floors all unite to tell the story of well-directed energy. 
Two hundred employes, mostly skilled mechanics, have tbeir places. At the start, 
only one machine was made — a smutter and separator. To-day the Barnard & Leas 
Manufacturing Company are prepared to furnish throughout the largest llouring-mill 




THE BARNARD i LEA.S MANUFACTURING COMPANY'S SHOPS. 

with their famous separators, smutt^rs, scourers, corn-shellers, cleaners, packers, 
purifiers, reels, and rollers. Mr. Barnard is the inventor of several of these machines 
— the bestof their kind — and they are made exclusively by his firm. As one item of 
the past year's business, it may be said that this house has built and equipped over 
one hundred flouring mills and elevators. Their agents in London, England, Rio 
Janeiro, South America, and other foreign countries annually call for carloads of 
their machines. The business of 1887 amounted to nearly half a million dollars. 



MOLINE PIPE-ORGAN COMPANY. 

The observing reader has by this time noted that Moline's industries are not 
confined to one line. The Moline Pipe-Organ Company, of which Lancashire & 
Turner are the proprietors, was started in 1871, incorporated in 1^79, and during 
that time the instruments which they make have received the endorsement of the 
best-known organists. Instruments ranging in price from !?o00.00 to !?"i(),()(tO.OU have 
been built; among many others, for the following churches and societies: Sinai 
Synagogue, St. Andrew's, St. Paul's, Armour's Mission, Swedenborgian Temple, 
Western Ave. M. E. Church, Chicago; St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Evansville, Ind.; 
Grand Ave. and Dundee M. E. Churches, Kansas City; First Congregational Church, 
St. Louis; Swedish College, Lindsborg, Kas. ; the Congregational Church, Des Moines, 
Iowa; the M. E. Church, Muskegon, Mich.; Congregational Church, Michigan City, 
Ind.; Presbyterian Church, South Bend, Ind.; the M. E. Church, C4reenville, Penn.; 
Congregational Church, Fergus Falls, Minn. ; Catholic Cathedral, St. Cloud, Minn. ; 
Presbyterian Church, Burlington, Iowa; Swedish liUtheran College, St. Peters, Minn. 



70 



MO LINE: 



THE MOI.IXE IRON WORKS. 

Alfred Williams founded what is now the great iron works of Williams, White 
& Company, in 1854, and he has been a witness of the steady growth of what was 
one of Moline's earliest enterprises until now it is one of the largest. The large 
buildings, shown by the illustration, are arranged for the special work of the com- 
pany, and are supplied with the most complete machinery. The officers and principal 
owners are: Alfred Williams, President; M. H. White, Vice-President, and H. A. 
Ainsworth, Secretary and Treasurer. About two and one-half acres of ground are 
occupied hy the shops. The foundry is 114 by 60 feet; pattern-shop, 120 by 40 feet, 
three stories; the machine and other departments are of similar proportions. One 




THE MOLINE IBON WORKS. 

hundred mechanics and moulders find constant work. A specialty is made — though 
all kinds ot work is done — of power-hammers, drop-presses, and the "bulldozer," a 
machine for forging by pressure. The "bulldozer " has been made to order for such 
establishments as the Pullman Car-Shops, at Pullman, near Chicago; the Illinois 
Central; Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, and other railroads; the Cooke Locomotive 
Works; for shipbuilders, and other heavy workers in iron and steel. 

MOLINE SCALE COMPANY. 

Moline scales weigh the grain and the live stock of the northwest. The Victor 
Scale Works continued business here from 1868 to 1877, when Major Josiah Grout 
bought the plant, enlarged the business, and changed the title- word to "Moline." 
From that time the growing capacity of the shops has nearly always been behind 
orders. Railroad track scales, all kinds of wagon scales, stock and hay scales, and a 
variety of portable and dormant scales are manufactured. 

MALLEABLE IRON WORKS. 

There are two of these establishments, both very extensive — among the largest 
of their kind in the west. The Union Malleable Iron Company and the Moline Mal- 
leable Iron Works together have a capital invested of |200, 000.00. They give em- 
ployment to 325 hands, and pay yearly in wages $160,000.00. The aggregate of sales 
for 1887 reaches $400,000.00. Over 6,000 tons of malleable iron castings have been 
made in the past twelve months, and it is used all over the northwest, though the 
Moline manufacturers consume the greater portion of the product. This business 
has grown to its present proportions since 1870. 

ROILER WORKS. 

There are two important boiler shops in Moline, those of Thomas Trumble and 
M. Schillinger. Moline boilers, as well as Moline engines, are favorably known at 
home and abroad. 



ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 



71 



MOLINE PAPER COJIPANY. 

Moline paper finds its way not only into every state and territory of the union, 
but into the home of nearly every family composing the more than 60,000,0(10 people. 
For its paper-mill, as 

for other of its most ' -, , 

successful enterprises, _ 

Moline is indebted to 
S. W. Wheelock, a man 
of large and varied 
business experience 
and tact; one who has 
had from the first firm 
confidence in the city's 
future, and one who 
has spent his best 
power and money in 
developing its manu- 
facturing interests and 
resources. Mr. Whee- 
lock came to Moline in 
May, 1851, and bought 
the present site of the 
paper-mill. A one- 
story frame building, 
30 by 75 feet, answered 
for the inception. Two 
forces of men are employed, and the nature of the process requires the mills to be run 
the year around. Such newspapers as the Chicago Tribune, Inter-Oceau, Staats Zei- 
tung, the St. Louis dailies, and scores of journals in cities of the second class, like 
Peoria, Quincy, Dubuque, Des Moines, and Burlington, get their supplies of paper 
here. During 1887 over 2,000 tons of print and wrapping-paper were manufactured. 
The capital invested is nearly $100,000.00. Sixty employes are engaged. 




"-"ffiii.t, t^ 



MOLINE P\PER company's UILIiS. 



3I0LINE BTIGGY C03IPANY. 

This enterprise is one of the comparatively new industries, yet it is one that has 
made a high mark. It occupies buildings adapted to its objects, and during 1887 
kept fifty mechanics busy. All kinds of buggies, spring wagons, phictons, road- 
carts, and buck -boards are manufactured, the number for the past season being over 
1,500. 

PRINTING-HOUSES. 

The Porter Printing Company is unexcelled in the east or west in its reputation 
for fine printing. Moline products may be correctly judged by the character of their 
advertising, which is always all that art and skill can produce, backed by uncramped 
facilities. J. H. Porter is the head of this house. 

The Plowman Publishing Company of Warr & Kuhn does a very large busi- 
ness in the way of class-papers and publications. 

UNION MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 

This is a new company, or rather an old one which has been drawn to Moline 
from Iowa City, Iowa, by the superior business inducements ofl'ered here. It manu- 
factures the "New Method " combined hot water and air furnace. 



OTHER ENTERPRISES. 

This book does not profess to notice in detail all the industrial enterprises of 
Moline, but it aims to present those which show the variety and the extent of the 
business. Among the remaining industries are the following: The Moline Elevator 
Works; several wagon shops; a brass foundry; four large brick-yards; four cigar 
manufactories; two furniture fiictories; the INIoline Cabinet-Organ Company; L. H. 
Barker's pump works; the Moline Screw Company; the Moline Stove Company. 



72 



MOLINE: 



jrOLINE PUMPS. 



Plows, planters, and pails by the ten thouFand, paper by the thousand tons, so 
there are pumps almost -without number. The Moline Pump Company, whose exten- 
sive works are shown by the ilhi.stration, has made for itself and its goods a wide 
and enviable reputation. It has been expanding since 1866, when the senior member 
of the company began manufacturing pumps on the island. The first year's work 




MOLINE PDMP COMPAN'V s FACTOE\ 

amounted to 1,100 pumps; the second, 2,000; the fourth, 5,000; the seventh, 15,000, 
and the increase has been in that ratio ever since. In 1887 the company gave em- 
ployment to seventy-five hands. 

The Moline Pump Works, of the Huntoon Brothers, is a growing institution, and 
demonstrates that Moline is becoming a pump as well as a plow center. It is a much 
younger institution. 



BANKS, POST-OFFICE, ETC. 

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS. 

First National Bank. — This institution was organized November Kith, 1863, and 
began business on the following 22d day of December. Its officers are: J. M. Gould, 
President; J. T. Browning, Vice-President; J. S. Gillmore, Cashier. It has a capital 
of $150,000.00, and a surplus of |30,000.00. At the time of its last statement its 
resources were $638,129.09. 

Sloline National Bank. — This bank began business April 1st, 1872, as the suc- 
cessor of the Manufacturers Bank. Its officers are: S. W. Wheelock, President; 
Porter Skinner, Vice-President ; Charles F. Hemenway, Cashier. It has a capital of 
$100,000.00, and a surplus of $20,000.00. At the time of its last statement its 
resources were $255,463.48. 

Moline Savings Bank. — This is the only chartered savings bank in Rock Island 
county. Its officers are: H. W. Wheelock, President; Porter Skinner, Vice-President; 
Charles F. Hemenway, Cashier. It has over 1,200 depositors, and more than $280,- 
000.00 in deposits. That this number of workingmen should have savings-bank 
accounts is good evidence of their frugality and thrift. 



ITS JNTEEESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 



7:i 



THK roST-OKFICE. 

The accompanying cut shows that the Moline post-office occupies for its home one 
of the handsomest buildings of any post-office in the United States. The block was 
built with the special view of meeting the wants of the postal-service. It is a three- 
story stone structure, in the very center of the city. The income from this office 
during the year 1887 was over $17,000.00. The domestic money-order business increase 




MOLINE POST-OFFICE BUILDING. 

during the year was a little over twentj'-five per cent, and during the same time the 
international money-order business increased a little over thirty-three and one-third 
per cent. Moline, like all first-class cities, has the free-delivery service, which, with 
the general service, is very efficient. D. W. Gould is Postmaster. 

BUILDING, SAVINGS, AND LOAN ASSOCIATIOX. 

Another evidence of the prosperity ot the laboring classes of this city is found 
in the number of patrons of the Moline Building, Savings, and Loan Association. 
The current series of stock is the thirtieth, and the total number of $100.00 shares 
issued is 1,802. The gain on the first series has been $22. 17, equal to an interest of 
thirteen per cent ])er year from the date of the organization, in June, 1880. The 
rate of gain in 1887 was considerably above the average — seventeen and one-half per 
cent, against ten and one-half per cent in 1886. The assets amount to A7(),388.23, of 
which )?64, 977.00 is in real estate loans, and the rest in cash, notes, and interest. 
The fact that the iissociation has not had a single foreclosure since it was organized 
is evidence of the good judgment that has marked the business management. The 
officers for 1888 are: P. C. Simmon, President; E. E. Wheelock, Vice-President; 
J. W. Warr, Secretary; W. W. Bearby, Treasurer; W. J. Entrikin, Attorney. Audit- 
ing Committee: L. B. Kuhn, W. S. Mack, C. E. Kneberg. The Secretary in his 
last report says: " I feel proud of the association's healthy growth, and of the fact 
that no questionable methods of business have stained its record. I am glad that 
the policy of the Board of Directors luis been to make it the friend of deserving men, 
rather than as a means of showing great gains at the expense of those who are 
struggling to make better men of themselves and better citizens of the community, 
by becoming owners of homes. ' ' 



74 MOLINE: 

THE BUILDING RECORD. 

A SPLENDID SHOWING. 

The building season has not been "boomed," yet a quarter of a million dollars 
has been expended on new factories, additions to old ones, and in more than a hundred 
neat homes for workingmen. Moline, always progressive, has never gone forward 
with such a rush that backward steps had to be taken. 

THE GRANT SCHOOL. 

This is one of the handsomest, and at the same time one of the best-arranged, 
school structures in Illinois. It was built during the year 1887 at a cost of lfi25,000.00. 
In the basement are a boys' and a girls' room, and two corresponding rooms for other 
purposes around the ample corridor. The first floor has four class-rooms, each 'ifi by 
26 feet, with two cloak-rooms out of each. The second floor has the Superintendent's 
office in addition. Important changes have been made in the interior of the high 
school building during the past season. (See illustration of Grant school building on 
page 104). 

B. c. keator's residence. 

This occupies one of the most commanding sites on the central blufis, and over- 
looks not only all of Moline and part of Rock Island, but aflbrds a grand stretch of 
up-river view and the city of Davenport, across the Mississippi river. Its cost is 
$12,000.00. 

NEW PLANIN6-MILL. 

As mentioned in the notice of the Keator^Lumber Company, this firm has added 
a brick planing-mill, 60 by 130 feet in size, at an expense of $10,000.00. 

factory extensions. 

The Moline Plow Company has erected a three-story brick, 30 by 48 feet, and a 
second addition, also three-stories, 64 by 87 feet. 

electric light plant. 

The Merchants Electric Light Company, spoken of more in detail elsewhere, 
have put up a building which, with general plant, cost $20,000.00. 

business blocks. 

Several new business blocks have helped to supply the demand for more room. 
Among them are the Chase block on Fifteenth street, and the fine three-story stone 
building on Sixteenth street by Swensson & Bortner. 

other buildings. 

The Baptist Church Society has just erected one of the handsomest temples of 
worship in the state. J. E. Poole is building a $3,000.00 residence on Fifth Avenue. 
And in the way of dwellings, not less than one hundred, costing from $2,000.00 down- 
ward, have been erected. 



MOLINE BUSINESS ASSOCIATION. 

the objects and officers. 

Organized action is well-directed, harmonious action. The various interests of 
Moline unite^in working together to promote the common good through the Business 
Association. It has a large and representative membership, and permanent quarters 
at 305 Sixteenth street. The officers are: Charles H. Deere, President; "William C. 
Bennett, First Vice-President; Eugene Lewis, Second Vice-President; L. E. Fish, 



ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 



75 



Secretary; J. W. Atkinson, Corresponding Secretary; G. H. Sohrbeck, Treasurer. 
The Board of Directors is composed of C. H. Deere, J. S. Gillmore, J. W. Atkinson, 
C. F. Grantz, William C. Bennett, R. A. Smith, Eugene Lewis, G. H. Sohrbeck, and 
Gustaf Swensson. The association is at all times, and in all ways, ready to help any 
project the object of which is to advance Moline's material and general interests. 
New manufacturing enterprises about to engage in business, and those already estab- 
lished desirous of changing their locations, will be enlightened, and perhaps bene- 
fitted, by opening correspondence with the Moline Business As.sociation. Plans for 
river improvement, questions of transportation, and all others affecting the city's 
business, are given careful consideration. Any desired information about the city, 
its advantages, factories, schools, and prospects, will be furnished. 



LIGHT AND HEAT. 



AX IMPORTANT IMPROVEMENT. 



The Peoples Light and Fuel Manufacturing Company is a corporation of which 
Moline, as a city, and its patrons have no right to grumble. Its proprietors are 
energetic citizens, who have exhibited their faith in the city by their works many 
times. Davis & Company, who form the controlling spirit, are a firm of which a 




davis'a company's-.ofpice building. 

larger place might well be proud. It was they who, in 1883, built, as a private 
enterprise, the complete water-works which the city now owns, and operated the 
same nearly three years, proving completely the capacity of the works for actual 
service, and at the same time their ability.as engineers. The Peoples Light and 
Fuel Company own the lighting facilities of the city, and since the gas plant was 
placed in their hands they have largely improved the output of gas. The price 
ranges from twenty to forty per cent cheaper than in other cities of Moline's size. The 



76 MOLINE: 

progressive spirit of these gentlemen caused the erection, during the past season, ot the 
plant of the Merchants Electric Light Company in the western part of the city — a loca- 
tion specially favorable, for two reasons: It enables the company to avail themselves 
of the excellent water-power, and to occupy a central position from which they can 
furnish electric light to the cities of Rock Island and Moline, the heart of either not 
being two miles distant in a direct line. This it is proposed to do: To utilize the 
great water-power of the Mississippi river by applying it to the generation ot elec- 
tricity for the complete lighting of the three cities. The main building to serve this 
purpose is 40 by 76 feet. It has a boiler and pump-room 37 by 52 feet. The company 
have the exclusive use of the water-power for this purpose, using six wheels, which 
will furnish 600 horse-power of water. This power, in case of accident, is reinforced 
by two steam engines and a battery of four boilers, capable of generating an additional 
400 horse-power when wanted. The plant is thoroughly equipped with electrical 
appliances — dynamos. The company is prepared not only to supply light and heat, 
but it is ready to negotiate for electric motors in all parts of Davenport, Rock Island, 
and Moline, for all uses. Moline's sources of light, in addition to the gas works, con- 
sist of 100 arc and 200 incandescent lights. The improvements described approxi- 
mate an outlay of $20,000.00. 



OTHER INSTITUTIONS. 

THE MOLINE PRESS. 

Moline has two daily papers and two weeklies. The Evening Dispatch, now in 
its tenth year, represents the daily Chimes, which it absorbed a year ago, and in its 
weekly issue the Review, with which it was consolidated some seven years since. 
The Moline Evening Dispatch is a seven-column folio sheet which is a credit to the 
city and loyal to its every interest. P. S. McGlynn is Editor, and J. K. Groom 
Business Manager. The Dispatch is republican in politics. 

The Moline Republican issues evening, Sunday morning, and weekly editions. 
The paper is now in its sixth year. It is a seven-column, vigorous, well-edited 
journal that is jealous of Moline's good name, and its earnest advocate. It is pub- 
lished by the Republican Company. Ezra Eastman is Manager. 

The Western Plowman, which has lately lengthened its name and enlarged its 
usefulness by joining the South and West to its force, is a monthly agricultural 
journal of thirty-two pages. That it is the best of its class is proved by its large 
circiTlation ^ — now more than 30,000 and rapidly growing — among the most progres- 
sive farmers of the west. It is meritorious and original on every page: thoroughly 
practical, and what is not common among agricultural papers, it is always readable 
and suggestive. It has an intelligent and appreciative constituency. J. W. Warr is 
Editor, and L. B. Kuhn Business Manager. From the Plowman office several educa- 
tional publications are issued. 

FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

The Moline public library was started in 1872 by a public subscription of $5,- 
576.00, and opened June 0th, 1873. It occupies permanent and commodious rooms 
in a tine brick ])uilding donated forever for library uses by Hon. S. W. Wheelock 
and wife. It contains nearly 8,000 volumes of the best books, besides most of the 
current newspapers and periodicals. It is a growing monument attesting the intelli- 
gence of the people of the City of Mills. The annual revenue for the maintenance 
of the library is derived from municipial tax, rents, and subscriptions. The institu- 
tion is freely patronized, the yearly circulation of books being about 20,000, and the 
average monthly attendance over 2,000. 

CHURCHES. 

Moline has ten church buildings, some of them being costly structures. The 
denominations are represented by two Ba])tist houses, one Congregational, one Catholic, 
two Lutheran, three Methodist, and one Unitarian. 



ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 



SOCIKTIES, ETC". 



The Youn>; Men's Christian Association is a live organization, which is doing 
much good. During the ])ast winter an excellent course of lectures has been given 
under its auspices. The Associated Charities is another moral agency which has 
contributed largely to the help of the distressed. The various orders and fraternities, 
as the Masons, Ancient Order United Workmen, Modern Woodmen, Crood Tenii)lars, 
Druids, Odd Fellows, the Grand Army of the Republic, and the Illinois National 
Guard, are all strongly represented. 

STREET-CARS. 

There are three street-car lines, two of which run the length of the city east 
and west, and one from the river to and over the bluffs. The street-car system is 
complete, not only for Moline, but in connection with the Rock Island and Milan 
lines. 

THE KEATOR HOUSE. 

The leading hotel of Moline is the Keator House. It is a four-story brick 100 by 
125 feet, in the center of the city, having accommodations for 150 guests. The 
service is first-class, and the appointments and table altogether creditable. Col. J. B. 
Snyder, the landlord, is now in his third year of increasing business. 

OPERA HOUSE. 

Wagner's opera house was opened in 1882. It is a complete theatre, seating 900 
persons; it has opera-chairs, and is well supplied with scenery. The best dramatic, 
musical, and literary attractions regularly visit Moline. 



THE LATERAL CANAL. 

THE ROCK ISLAND RAPIOS. 

The series of rapids of the Mississippi river, extending from a point near the 
foot of the Island of Rock Island just above the government bridge to Davenport, 
to Le Claire, Iowa, and Rapids City, 111., a distance of over fourteen miles are 
called the Rock Island rapids. This stretch of river — since the completion of the 
lateral canal, about nine miles in length, at Keokuk, by which the Des Moines 
rapids are avoided during low stages of water — remains the most troublesome 
between St. Paul and St. Louis. 

A PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT. 

To overcome the difficulties of the upper or Rock Island rapids, the engineers 
adopted a different plan. Here the river falls 20 2:59-1,000 feet in about fourteen 
miles. These rapids at low water consisted of a succession of pools of various de])ths, 
encased in a hard limestone rock, connected by narrow, crooked channels worn down 
into the rocky bed, with a depth, in most cases, of several feet, while the bed of the 
main river at low water was almost uncovered. The plan of connecting these pools 
by widening and straightening the tortuous channels was decided upon, and .some 
$1,300,000.00 has been expended within the past twenty years for this purpose, with 
the result to give a continuous channel, having a width of 200 feet in its narrowest 
parts, and a depth of nearly or quite four feet at low water. Of necessity this 
channel is far from straight, and the current remains in places swift and dangerous. 
This renders their passage at low water very difficult, and also expensive, as addi- 
tional insurance is demanded on account of the hazard to loaded steamers, beside 
special pilotage. 

A LATER PLAN. 

A full and interesting statement of what it is sought to accomplish for the river 
interest by the proposed lateral canal has been made by Eugene Lewis, Esq., of 
Moline, who has given the subject much care and study. It is as follows: 



78 MO LINE: 

"The engineer corps in charge of the river improvements have for some time past heen 
striving for a continuous channel at low water, six feet in depth, from St. Paul to St. Louis, and 
have, as it is understood, substantially accomplished this from St. Paul to the mouth of the St. 
Croix, at Prescott, Wis., and will doubtless be able, within the next few years, to obtain a con- 
tinuous channel, with from five to six feet, from St. Paul to St. Louis, except the stretch of fourteen 
and a half miles across the Rock Island rapids, if their efforts are seconded with the necessary 
appropriations. If a continuous channel can be secured, then better lines of steamers can be put 
on (the present steamers are fully as good as the business justifies), greater speed can be attained, 
regular time-tables adopted, and delays avoided. With such a channel, a better day will dawn for 
upper Mississippi navigation. The south is rapidly recovering from the impoverishing effects of 
the war. The great development which the south has had during the last decade has already 
brought wealth into the possession of many of her people, and more and more every succeeding 
year will they be found seeking summer homes in the north. The next twenty years will witness 
a wonderful transformation. From northern Iowa to St. Paul those beautiful hills will be crowned 
with villas and summer cottages. Around Lake Pepin will be clustered a large summer popula- 
tion, and the now silent shores of the upper river, scarcely showing more traces of civilization 
for many a long stretch of shore than when the red man was the sole occupant of this great valley, 
will swarm with a population fleeing from the fierce tropical summer of the lower river, thus 
calling for lines of swift steamers, stopping only at principal points, and lines of packets, stopping 
^vherever they can pick up a passenger or a little freight. This passenger travel, with the business 
developed between the Crescent City and the great cities of the north and all the intermediate 
points by regular and prompt transmission and delivery of freight, will call for an enormously-in- 
crea.sed river tonnage. Antedeluvian methods of handling freight and transacting bu.siness will 
be entirely discarded. As you descend the river from St. Paul to St. Louis you are confronted by 
one, and but one, serious obstacle to this deeper channel. At Le Claire, Iowa, you find the Rock 
Island rapids, abounding in rocky reefs, and an occasional interesting relic of the glacial age in the 
shape of a huge boulder, which, though lying outside of the narrow, swift channel, is liable at 
any time, by the action of high water or ice, to be rolled into it, and to result in the wreck of the 
ill-fated craft that first discovers it — by stranding upon it. Here, at low water, you find scarcely 
four feet of water, barely equivalent to three feet to a boat ascending the stream. To-day you find 
a steamer requiring a five-foot channel may be able, at some risk, to cross this fourteen-mile 
stretch. A few days later, by a fall in the river, .she may find herself imprisoned above for months, 
perhaps, compelled to shift her passengers by some light craft fourteen miles below, to take there 
such a boat as they can find, and to transfer her freight in the same way. But why not cut a wider, 
straighter, and deeper channel, so as to give a depth of six feet the whole distance ? 

"An approximate estimate of the cost of doing this work, made by Maj. Mackenzie, of the 
United States Engineer Corps, stationed at Rock Island, 111., and having charge of the improve- 
ment'of the upper river, in response to a resolution of congress, fixed the cost at §3, 491,000.00. It 
is not understood that this estimate was made from actual surveys made for the purpose, but that 
it ^vas based upon the best obtainable data in the office at that time, and may be very far inside the 
actual cost. 

" Nor is it to be presumed that any engineer will say that you can get six feet of water across 
t^he rapids for the whole fourteen and a half miles, with a channel 400 feet wide, by an expenditure 
of 81,000,000.00. Besides, a straight, smooth channel 400 feet wide, and with a depth of six feet at 
shallowest points, fourteen miles long, having a fall of over twenty feet in the fourteen miles, 
would seem much better fitted for a mill-race than a steamboat channel. And yet will not all 
cutting hereafter be in the direction of a .straighter, smoother channel than the present, with greater 
velocity of current? And where your quantity of water is limited, great velocity means shallower 
water. In fact, so many undetermined elements enter into the computation that we can well believe 
that no engineer who has a reputation would be willing to risk it by predicting, with any claim of 
precision, the effect upon the depth of the channel over the Rock Island rapids that would follow 
the expenditure of a given number of millions in widening, deepening, and straightening the 
present channel. Why not attempt a canal as at Keokuk? 

"The engineer corps made an examination with that view twenty years ago, but found that 
to eut a canal, or construct one by building into the river so as to be able to obtain six feet of water 
at low water, would entail such an enormous expense that they abandoned the idea as imprac- 
ticable. Thus the matter rested until the Hennepin Canal surveys and levels of 1885 were made. 

" An examination of the surveys and levels of what is termed the Watertown route of the 
Hennepin Canal, via Penny's slough, disclosed the fact that the level of the proposed canal at 
Watertown, four miles above Moline, 111., was nearly twenty feet above the low-water level of 
the Mississippi at the foot of Campbell's island, just below Watertown. This fact suggested a com- 



ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 79 

parison of tlie level of the canal with the surface of the Mississippi at the Iiead of the Uouk lulaiid 
rapids opposite Le Claire, and between Rapids City and Port Byron, 111., from which it was found 
that this level of the canal was nearly twelve feet higher. This fact suggested the feeding of 
a lateral canal from Rock Island by building a canal like the proposed Hennepin Canal from Rock 
river below Penny's slougli to the lateral canal at Watcrtown. It was found ui)on examination of 
the estimates of the Hennepin canal that the costof such a feeder would be, in round numbers, S4C8,- 
000 00. By the use of this feeder it was believed that a lateral canal could be built largely on the 
surface, thus avoiding the enormous expense of rock-cutting required to sink the canal 11 8-10 feet 
for almost the entire distance of ten and a half miles, from Ra|)ids City to the government water- 
power pool at Moline. The matter was brought before the Moline Business Association, and 
after careful consideration, believing that the importance of the matter would justify them in 
undertaking to have a preliminary survey made of the line from Rapids City to Moline, they em- 
ployed Mr. G. A. Marr, a civil engineer, who has for a long time been employed by Maj. Macken- 
zie, of the Engineer Corps, U. S. A., on the improvement of the upi)er Mississippi, and was 
employed in the fall of 1886 by the Board of Engineers of the United States of America to ex- 
amine the Portage Lake and Lake Superior ship canal, with a view of determining whether the 
United States should purchase the canal, to take charge of the work, with H. G. Paddock, a civil 
engineer of experience, and other assistants. The survey was begun the last of September, 1887, 
and the estimates and maps are now completed, at an expense to the association of about $900.00. 
The estimates have been made for a canal seven feet in depth, and of an average width of about 
200 feet, and with locks of sufHcient capacity for the largest steamboats running on the upper river, 
viz.: 350 feet long, 80 feet wide, and 7 feet above the mitre sills. The line from Rapids City to 
Moline, ten and a half miles, was found an unusually favorable one, both for the construction and 
maintenance of a canal. 

" There are three locks in the main line of the canal, one at Rapids City, the head of the 
rapids, which is both a guard and lift-lock. When the river is over 11 8-10 feet above extreme 
lo'w water, the canal would be fed entirely from the Mississippi ; when below 4 8-10 feet, it must 
be fed entirely from Rock river. 

" The second lock is at the entrance of the canal into the Mississippi at Moline ; thence the 
line is down the government water-po\ver pool, which supplies water power for the great Rock 
Island Arsenal, and thence about 2,500 yards along the south shore of Rock Island to the lower or 
west end thereof, where it descends into the deep water of the Mississippi, between the cities of 
Rock Island, 111., and Davenport, Iowa, by the third lock. The estimates are as follows : 

For three locks ^1,335,000 00 

Constructing canal from Rapids City to Moline, ten and a half miles, 671,701 10 

Constructing canal from Moline to Rock Island, three miles 364,475 50 

Feeder, twelve miles, Rock river to Watertown 426,395 27 

Total $2,797,571 87 

To this add ten per cent for contingencies 279,757 19 

Total 83,077,329 06 

" This would give a perfectly secure method of passing the rapids by night or day, with 
between six and seven feet of slack water — sufficient for the largest craft that ever passes Cairo, 
m. A trfling sum compared with amounts already expended on the improvement of this great 
natural water-way, which with its main channel alone almost bisects our national domain. Can 
the residents of this great valley allow the navigation of this, one of the great inland water-ways 
of the world, to be so greatly impeded by this break of fourteen miles, cutting in twain the naviga- 
tion of the upper Mississippi ? Is there a town or hamlet upon the line of this great river or its 
navigable tributaries that will not favor this enterprise ? Is there one that can afford to sit by and 
not'.lend its aid in securing this great and much-needed improvement ? " 



R.oci^ Island. 




THE CITY'S NAME. 

KNOWN EVERYWHERE. 

t^r\l' VH Vr-^ ' '^ ^^•'^ ^^^^^^ ' The name is known every where. No city in Illinois, 
%i»^^(?i^^ ^^^c^^o alone excepted, is so well advertised. It has become 
famed for its beautiful location, for its business, and for its 
diversified attractions. It is not a city which has been builded in a 
day to die in a night. It has existed long enough to prove that 
its foundations do not rest upon sand. And yet it is not old 
enough to retire from the race of competing cities up and down 
the Mississippi Valley, and between the lakes and the western 
mountains. Rock Island is in the early prime of a vigorous life, as life is measured 
in the new, now developing, central west. It is not located in one corner of the 
continent, but in the center, and what always must be the center of population. 
The blizzard of the north does not paralyze its energies in the winter, nor the heat 
of the south enervate its activities in the summer. It knows nothing of the arid 
drouth that parches the western plains and spreads famine over^'the adventurous 
settler, nor is it subject to the industrial troubles and the linancial panics of the 
over-crowded east. Resting on the banks of the greatest of rivers, and in the richest 
region of what a famous traveler has called " the most magnificent dwelling-place pre- 
pared by God for man's abode," it has advantages beyond rival cities, and is destined, 
by virtue of these superiorities, to be a prosperous commercial and manufacturing 
center when the mushroom-towns now boasting of their spongy importance have 
passed into inevitable decay. 

"Rock Island ! " The name designates the fairest island in the greatest river in 
America. More strangers are drawn to it during any given year than to any other 
single attraction in the state. Here the government has located not only its largest 
manufacturing arsenal, but what is designed to be the most comprehensive and 
valuable plant of the kind in the world. In time of war this arsenal will afford 
work to 20,000 men, and arm and equip 750,000 soldiers. 

'* Rock Island ! " The name is used to distinguish one of the longest and oldest 
of western railroads. The Rock Island Route connects the cities of Chicago, St. Paul, 
Omaha, Kansas City, Wichita, and will soon furnish a continuous rail from Lake 
Michigan to the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific Ocean. It is also borne by other 
railroads, which carry it far and wide. 

" Rock Island ! " The name marks a county which has an annual coal-produc- 
ing capacity of more than half a million tons — which is a veritable coal-bed 
throughout its length and breadth. Rock Island county is one of the most populous 
in the entire west, and one of the richest. 

" Rock Island ! " It is a trade-mark which is stamped upon plows and agricultural 
implements; upon glass and stoves; upon lumber and its manufactured products; 
upon soaps and scissors; upon saws and steamboats, and a hundred other articles of 
trade, and gives them a commercial value of the highest importance. 

It is to this vridely-known city that attention is invited, while some of its more 
salient resources and advantages are presented for the careful investigation of in- 
vestors, manufacturers, and business men generally. It is a solid city, without the 
glare and glitter of newer towns puffed up by a little brief notoriety. It will bear 
examination, and the most rigid inquiry. 

7 



82 ROCK ISLAND: 

GENERAL FEATURES. 

LOCATION. 

A glance at any map will settle the question of geography. Beginning at St. 
Louis, and following the Mississippi river northward for 729 miles, there is no equal 
to the circle, whose diameter is six miles, and which has Eock Island for its center. 
At this point the river is divided by two of the largest islands to be found in its 
entire length. One of these is opposite the upper or eastern part of the city, and 
takes the name of the city itself. The other is just below the western or lower 
limits of the city, and is known as Offerman's or Credit Island. It is the picnic- 
grounds of hundreds of excursionists, and one of the several pleasure resorts which 
the resident has to choose from. The distance by river to St. Louis is 332 miles; to 
St. Paul 397 miles. By the shortest railroad line the distance to Chicago is 168 
miles; but by the line most frequently traveled, 181 miles. Milwaukee is 197 milea 
away; Kansas City 339 miles; Omaha 316 miles. Three miles below Rock Island, 
after turning the wheels of flour and paper-mills, and affording a valuable, though 
as yet but partially developed, water-power, the winding and beautiful Rock river 
loses itself in the Mississippi. South of the level plain upon which the city rests 
the scene is broken by wooded bluffs, affording many a sloping lawn. Southwesterly, 
and following the line of bluffs, are many sightly residences, and building opportuni- 
ties for more, which for eligibility and scenery are beyond duplication along the 
river. 

A traveler's views. 

Captain Willard Glazier, the author of seven books of travel; one who has 
visited every American city of any note; who has made a horseback-ride from the 
Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific, and who five years ago paddled his canoe from the 
source of the Mississippi river to the sea, stopping at every point of interest, is a compe- 
tent judge and a disinterested witness. He writes, pages 265-268, " Down the Great 
River: " 

" The city of Rock Island is situated on the main-land at the extremity of Rock 
Island Arsenal, on the Illinois or left bank of the river. On its southern side are 
some very picturesque bluff's, stretching away to the sheltered valley of the Rock river, 
and including scenery of unrivalled beauty. Comfortable residences dot the sides of 
these hills, amid clumps of trees and miniature forests that afford shelter and shade 
to the well-to-do residents. Rock Island is about midway between St. Louis and St. 
Paul, and immediately opposite the city of Davenport, Iowa. It is connected with 
the latter city by an elegant and substantial iron bridge, owned by the government, 
and open to the public free of toll. The famous water-power produced by the upper 
rapids has contributed largely to the marvelous growth of this city as well as of 
Moline, the city of factories, within an easy walk or horse-car ride of Rock Island 
city. Here is to be the terminus of the projected Hennepin canal, by which it is 
proposed to solve the problem of cheap transportation between the Atlantic Ocean 
and the Mississippi, through the intervening great lakes. Recently a deep interest 
has been manifested in the construction of this canal, the accomplishment of which 
will doubtless be of vast benefit to the people of the northwest, as well as to the 
public generally. 

"In Rock Island city we found numerous flourishing establishments for the 
manufacture of plows, cultivators, and other agricultural appliances; of wagons 
and carriages, together with foundries and machine-shops. At night the streets are 
brilliant with the Brush electric lights; the sidewalks are well paved and clean. 
Rock Island has a well organized police force; a fire department, water- works, street- 
cars, and a flourishing public library, a free-postal delivery, churches, public schools, 
and a commerce and trade second to no city of its size in the union. In the interest 
of the growth of a city the transportation problem is perhaps the most important 
question for the consideration of the citizens, and Rock Island is very favorably 
situated in this respect, owing to her position as the center of a SJ^stem of railroads. 
Several lines pass through here, and give the city a busy aspect at all times. It is 
on the line of the great transcontinental highway. The Chicago, Rock Island & 
Pacific railroad passing through Rock Island connects the eastern trunk lines with 
the Union Pacific at Omaha; and here also are depots of the Chicago, Milwaukee & 



ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 



83 



St. Paul; the Chica^to, Bnrlinf^ton it Quincy; the Rock Island Si. Peoria, and the Rock 
Island & Mercer County railroads. The population of this enterprisinfji; city is at 
present about 1(5,000. The private residences have a neat and thrifty appearance, 
while many aflford evidence of the wealth and taste of their owners. The shrubbery 




ROCK ISLAM) ENTRANi li TO Ai;>KNAI,. 

and flowers which cluster about the doorways of even the humblest residences are 
indications of the comfort and thriving condition of the tenants." ♦ 

A CONVENTION CITY. 

The facilities of travel by both river and rail, combined with the hospitality of 
the citizens, the natural attractions, and the many objects of interest, make Rock 
Island a popular place for holding conventions of all kinds. The annual reunk)n of 
the Army of the Tennessee, lately held here, evidenced the fact that Detroit, St. 
Louis, Cincinnati, and Chicago, older and larger cities, lose in favor when comparisons 
are made. For state meetings Rock Island is the favorite from one end of Illinois 
to the other. Travelers across the continent and tourists up and down the river 
are certain to make a halt here, and to be well rewarded for their pains. 



MANUFACTURING ADVANTAGES. 



THE CENTRAL LOCATION. 

For several years to come Rock Island must be very near the heart of the nation. 
It must remain the center of a great producing region and of a consuming people. 
Describing a circle with this locality as a center, with a radius of o30 miles, what 
territory does it embrace, and what is its wealth? The circle will cut eight states; 
pass through Cairo, at the mouth of the Ohio river, embrace St. Louis, Indianapolis, 
Milwaukee, St. Paul, Minneapolis, Omaha, Kansas City, Chicago, and scores of 



84 ROCK ISLAND: 

smaller but still very important cities. It has a population of more than 12,000,- 
000, or one-fifth the population of the United States and territories. In soils it is 
the richest in the world. In farm products it offers almost every variety of the 
temperate zone. In timber lands it is marvellously rich. In minerals inexhaustible 
quantities of coal, iron, copper, lead, and zinc exist. What a field for the manu- 
facturer ! All this vast population must be clothed and supplied with the implements 
of industry. What harvests of wealth will be realized in supplying this great and 
growing want, augmented as it will be by the progress of civilization and the 
demands of luxury. The farms of Illinois and Iowa cannot be transferred to New 
England or to the south, but the cotton-mills of the one section, and the cotton of 
the other, may and must be brought to this region, where the manufacturer will be 
better paid, the cost of living diminished, and the fabricated goods cheapened. 

AN ARGUMENT ILLUSTRATED. 

To illustrate the tendencies of manufacturers, and of what has been said, let us take 
the case of manufactured cotton goods, and see if we may not even be sanguine enough 
to hope to have this great King Cotton among us some day. Starting at Memphis, 
one of the largest cotton-markets, cotton is now taken by river to New Orleans, 
thence by vessel to New York, then to Boston, then to Lowell. At New Orleans it 
passes through the hands of two or three middle-men, and the same in New York. 
Besides the commissions of these middle-men, the wastage from sampling (it might 
sometimes be dignified with the name of stealing) is considerable. We then haul 
bread and meat from Illinois and Iowa to Lowell to feed the operatives. They manu- 
facture the cotton into goods, and again it starts on its perilous journey amongst the 
middle-men through Boston, New York, Chicago, to Rock Island. The average 
number of middle-men who have taken toll from the much-picked cotton between 
Memphis and Chicago is no less than seventeen. When we add the percentages and 
profits of all these gentlemen to the cost of this long, tortuous journey, and freight on 
the bread and meat, it foots up quite a respectable bill of extras. Now, in comparison 
with this, let us estimate the saving of bringing this cotton direct from Memphis to 
this point, without middle-men, and selling it direct from the boat into the ware- 
house of a mill, where it finds a water-power and cheap food for the operatives who 
are to spin it. When made up, it need go no further than Chicago to be sold; and 
though sold in Chicago, it can remain in the mill warehouse till shipped westward. 
With all these advantages, in these times of sharp competition, is it unreasonable or 
audacious to expect that cotton and many other manufactories, if once started, might 
come here and demand a water-power ? If they get it, they will succeed, as others 
here have already done. 

A DEMONSTRATION. 

There is nothing visionary about the foregoing. Rock Island Arsenal is to-day 
manufacturing many articles used by the different wings of the army at a smaller 
cost than they can be fabricated at eastern arsenals, and as a result, the manufacture 
of more and more of these articles is being transferred to this point each year by the 
war department. The diversified establishments which have been prospering here 
for years prove conclusively the necessity of keeping the consumer and the producer 
together. 



TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES. 

A NATURAL HIGHWAY. 

To complete the manufacturing advantages there must be adequate distributing 
facilities. These Rock Island enjoys immeasurably beyond places like Indianapolis, 
Kansas City, Wichita, and other interior cities. The Mississippi river is open from 
March to December — eight months. During this two-thirds of the year more than 
one hundred steamboats are engaged in towing rafts of lumber and logs to and below 
this point; in transporting the pine from Arkansas; in carrying the iron and coal 



ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 



85 



and sugar from the mines and plantations to this manufacturing market, and in dis- 
tributing the agricultural implements and other manufactured articles from St. Paul 
to New Orleans. The river not only affords a natural and unobstructed means of 
communication, travel, and trade, Init it furnishes a competition and reduces railroad 
rates. Were it not for the river this locality would be deprived of nearly one-third 
of its business. By means of this great natural water-way rafts of logs and lumber 
from the pineries are floated to Rock Island which equal i)0,000 loaded cars annually. 
The river gives Rock Island each year, putting the fact in another form, about 
twenty times the raw material for manufacturing purposes that the railroads do. In 




EOCK ISLAND FERRY. 



this statement Rock Island does not include the neighboring cities of Moline and 
Davenport, which also present enormous figures of indebtedness to the river. And 
it should be borne in mind here that the value of the Mississippi river is not confined 
to the matter of transportation. For sanitary and fire purposes, for its water-power, 
and for its other uses it is invaluable. 



THE KAILROAD SYSTEM. 

Seventy-two passenger trains depart from and arrive at Rock Island every twenty- 
four hours. A passenger train goes or comes every twenty minutes, night and day. 

Thirty-six passenger trains leave Rock Island every twenty-four hours — one every 
forty minutes — north, south, east, or west. Every one of the thirty-six arriving 
trains brings persons who come to trade. 

Three hundred loaded freight cars daily carry the goods of the jobbing and man- 
ufacturing houses of Rock Island far and near in all directions during each of the 
313 working days of the year. Fifteen freight trains of twenty cars each are required 
every day to distribute the wares made and sold in Rock Island. 

The territory covered, and the iron arteries which reach it, are correctly shown 
by the railroad map on the outside cover-page of this book. The evidence is there 
presented of the far-reaching railroad system of this business center. 

CHICAGO, EOCK ISLAND & PACIFIC. 

This line was the pioneer of western railroads in reaching the Mississippi river, 
the date of its coming being February 22d, 1854. It has practically four divisions, 
from as many directions, meeting here. The main double-track line runs to Chicago 
eastward, and to the Missouri river westward; the Albert Lea line reaches Minneapolis 
and St. Paul, and the Southwestern division, Leavenworth, Topeka, Kansas City, Atchi- 
son, St. Joseph, Witchita, and points beyond. This systen' , during the past two years, 



86 ROCK ISLAND: 

has been pushing its extensions through southwestern Kansas to the cattle-fields of 
the Indian territory, to the very gateway of the republic of Mexico. Its northwestern 
line runs through the northwestern part of the state of Kansas into and through the 
central and western parts of Nebraska. The avowed purpose of the Rock Island is 
evidently to push its southwestern system to the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific 
coast. 

CHICAGO, MILWAUKEE & ST. PAUL. 

This railroad has a mileage of its own of 5, 500 miles — the largest of any single 
corporation in the world. It covers with its network of roads northern Illinois, 
much of Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and extends into Nebraska and Dakota. It is 
a strong competitor for business, and a car loaded in this locality will reach its desti- 
nation over this road at not hundreds but thousands of points. 

CHICAGO, BURLINGTON & QUINCY. 

This is another of the great trunk lines, known all over the world, and one that 
makes Rock Island the headquarters of two of its important divisions — the Rock 
Island and St. Louis and the Rock Island and St. Paul lines. It opens a vast terri- 
tory not reached by any other road, and competes with all of them for business to 
common points. 

ROCK ISLAND & PEORIA. 

This is a short, direct line connecting the western systems with those of the 
southeast and east. It is a strong link in a chain of roads which connect Rock 
Island with Springfield, Indianapolis, and Cincinnati. 

OTHER RAILROADS. 

The Coal Valley Mining Company's line, and that of the Rock Island & Mercer 
County reach valuable and exhaustless beds of coal within forty miles, much of it 
within less than half that distance, which have been developed to a great extent. 

All these railroads have large switching and side-track facilities in Rock Island. 
They also connect with every railroad, great and small, throughout the west. 



ROCK ISLAND INDUSTRIES. 

FIGURES OF BUSINESS. 

It has been conclusively shown in the last two chapters that Rock Island has 
" manufacturing advantages " and "transportation facilities." It will now be proved 
that they are appreciated and turned to profitable account. The city has twenty-five 
important manufactories, beside several smaller ones, with an invested capital of over 
$4,000,000.00. During the year 1887 employment was given by these industries to more 
than 2,000 hands, who received in wages nearly 1 1,000, 000. 00, and whose aggregate 
business was more than $5,000,000.00. Some of these interests will be noted: 

THE LUMBER INTEREST. 

The saw and planing-mills of the Rock Island Lumber and Manufacturing Com- 
pany and Weyerhaeuser & Denkmann are among the very largest of their kind in the 
lumber-making region of the northwest. They represent an invested capital of 
$1,000,000.00; give emploj^ment to 805 persons, whose yearly wages amount to $300,- 
000.00, and their transactions for the year 1887 reached $2,000,000.00. They sawed 
73,000,000 feet of logs; made 18,500,000 lath, 14,250,000 shingles, and 350,000 pickets. 
They manufactured 100,000 doors, 125,000 windows, .50,000 pairs of blinds, and 
3,500,000 feet of moulding. Their shipments by rail amounted to 85,000 carloads. 
The planing-mill of John Volk & Co. adds materially to these figures. 



77TSr INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 




88 



ROCK ISLAND. 



The Rock Island Glass Company employs ninety persons, and does a business ol 
$100,000.00. Its plant is both extensive and complete. The company's prosperity 
demonstrates that window-glass can be manufactured as advantageously at Eock 
Island as at Pittsburg. 

STOVES. 

The business for 1887 of the Rock Island Stove Company was the best it has ever 
known. It manufactures all kinds of cook-stoves and ranges, as well as a general 
variety of heating stoves. The company aflfords employment to eighty persons. 

SOAPS. 
The house of Warnock & Ralston makes a line of toilet and laundry soaps 
which are demanded by a large western trade. Its established business, extending 
through several years, shows the advantages of Rock Island for different kinds of 
manufacturing. 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 
The Rock Island Plow Company is one of the large agricultural implement 
houses of the country. The illustration conveys to the reader a good idea of the 

extent and character of this 
leading manufacturing enter- 
prise. This locality is known 
all over the world for the 
excellence of its agricultural 
implements, and not a small 
part of this fame is due to 
this factory. Its plows, har- 
rows, cultivators, stalk-cut- 
ters, cotton-planters, wheeled 
walking-plows, listers, and 
i' drills vie with the sunshine, 
the rain, and the fertility of 
the. soil in the growth of the 
rich crops of the agricultural 
states of the union, and even 
beyond it. During 1887 this 
company gave employment 
to 250 hands, and its sales 
will reach $500,000.00. 
BREWING AND BOTTLING. 
There are five houses in Rock Island for the brewing and bottling of beer, ale, 
and mineral water. They have invested in the business $450,000.00; employ ninety 
hands, to whom they paid for the last year's work $46,000.00 in wages; they did a 
business of $352,000.00. These firms are: George Wagner, I. Huber, Raible & 
Stengel, Carse & Ohlweiler, and J. Junge. The first three are breweries, and during 
the year they made 47,000 barrels of beer. George Wagner's establishment combines 
both brewing and bottling. It contains a thirty-five-ton ice-machine, which keeps 
at an even temperature 22,000 cubic feet of air, doing the work of 8,000^tons of ice. 

CRACKERS. 
The cracker and biscuit factory of J. M. Christy has a capacity of 125 barrels 
daily, and employs twenty-five hands. Mr. Christy has a branch factory at Des 
Moines of equal capacity, the outgrowth of his Rock Island business. 




BOCK ISIiAND^PLOW.WOEKS. 



The saw factory of D. Donaldson is a flourishing industry, with a large home 
market and increasing general trade. 

HOESE-COLLARS AND SADDLERY. 
J. & M. Rosenfield and J. C. McConnell & Son do a manufacturing business in 
horse-collars and saddles running up to nearly $100,000.00. 



ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 89 

BUGGIES, CAEiaAGES, AND WAGONS. 

The Rock Island Children's Carii;ige Company employ fifty hands most of the 
year, and do a larjjie as well as a prosperous business. Wall tt 111 manufacture a 
line of buggies, carriages, and phajtons. There are four smaller shops in the wagon- 
making line. 

BOAT-WAYS. 

Kahlke Bros. , proprietors of the Rock Island boat-ways, build and repair steam- 
boats, having the only boat-ways between Le Claire and Quincy. Employment is 
given to forty men. 

OTHER FACTOKIES. 

Among the other industries worthy of note are: Noftsker & Havenhill, cornices; 
"William Farrell, bone-factory, the only one of its proportions between the lakes and 
the Missouri river; Crampton & Co., blank-books; William Gray, boxes ; John Mager, 
brass-foundry; Atkinson A OlofF, J. W. Graham, William Lyon, and B. H. Redecker, 
brick-yards; and the Rock Island Iron Works and Foundry of George Downing, Jr. 



NEW INDUSTRIES. 

ROCK island's advantages. 

The superior shipping facilities possessed by Rock Island, together with other 
evident advantages, have drawn to this city within a few months two manufactories, 
which add to the variety of work done here. 

the knife and shear COMPANY. 

This flourishing business was recently transferred from Rockford, III., to Rock 
Island, where its opportunities and facilities have been greatly enlarged. The com- 
pany manufacture knives, shears, and scissors, tailors' shears, tinners' snips, razors, 
and table and pocket cutlery. This city is the furtherest-west point having such a 
factory. lu the points of material, finish, and cutting qualities, these goods are 
superior to any now in the market, as nothing is used but the very best of Wardlow's 
English steel. Skilled and high-priced labor is employed, and a warranty accom- 
panies every piece. The company offers to the western trade the advantage of acces- 
sibility, the quick-filling of orders, and dealing with first hands. The officers are: 
D. F. McLarty, President; W. B. Ferguson, Vice-President; W. M. Prentice, Secretary. 

PLATING WORKS. 

The Rock Island Plating Works is a new addition to the industries of this city, 
coming from Galesburg, 111. It is fast developing into one of the important institu- 
tions. 



THE WHOLESALE TRADE. 

ITS EXTENT AND VARIETY. 

While second in extent to the manufacturing business, the jobbing trade oi 
Rock Island is of heavy proportions. The volume of business for 1887 is in excess 
of $3,000,000.00. 

LINES OF GOODS SOLD. 

The wholesale grocery and provision house of Henry Dart's Sons is one of the 
largest in Illinois outside of Chicago, doing a business of over $1,000,000.00 yearly. 
The steady increase of sales by this firm is evidence of the desirable location. 

The establishment of George A. Fleming & Co., dealers in California evaporated 
dried fruits, covers the entire country in its business. It receives, on the average, 
one full carload of California dried fruits daily throughout the year. This keeps a 



90 



ROCK ISLAND: 



force of forty hands busy packing and preparing for shipment. There is nothing of 
the kind, on even a smaller scale, between Denver and Chicago. The business is in 
its third year, and rapidly expanding. 

Hartz & Bahnsen do a large trade in drugs and medicines. 

Stewart & Montgomery represent the wholesale hardware branch of business. 
This house is one of the city's solid institutions, and it is favorably known over a 
wide territory. 

Mention has been made of the manufacturing department of J. & M. Rosenfield 
and of J. C. McConnell & Son. Both of these houses do a jobbing business in leather 
and findings. 

J. S. Gilmore does a heavy pork -packing and salt-meat business. During the 
season just closed he slaughtered 10,000 hogs. 

There are three wholesale liquor houses and rectifying establishments — Peter 
Fries & Co., Kohn & Adler, and C. Tegeler & Co. 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 




THB NEW ROCK ISLAND HIGH SCHOOt.. 



Eight large school-houses testify to the appreciation in which the Rock Island 
public school system is held. The Superintendent, S. S. Kemble, has been identified 
with the cause of education here for fourteen years. Forty-five regular teachers are 
engaged, and one special teacher of vocal music. The school census gives the num- 



ITS INTEEESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 



91 



ber of children between the ages of six and twenty -one years as 3,825. The most 
convenient, and what is chiimed as one of the most elegant, high school buildings in 
the state has jnst been completed, at a cost of $'28,000.00. It was dedicated Novem- 
ber 1st. The cost of tuition for each pupil enrolled is $11.12, and few cities .show as 
good return for the money expended. The annual cost of the public schools is 
about $50,000.00. 

THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Owing to the free and truly public character of the city library it must be 
regarded as one of the educational institutions, and one which exercises a grand 
influence. It was founded and is supported by the city, whose people appreciate it 
and its reading-rooms at their full worth. There are upon the shelves about 10,000 
volumes. The number of books drawn during the last twelve months was 22,362, 
and the total attendance was 41,562 during the same period. 

AUGUSTANA COLLEGE. 

This is the largest and oldest college of the Swedish-American Synod of the 
Evangelical Lutheran Church. It was founded in 1860, and removed from Paxton 
to Rock Island in 1876. The site occupied is one of the most sightly on the upper 
Mississippi river. It overlooks not only Kock Island and Moline, being located 




AUGUSTANA COLLEGE — NEW BUILDING. 



almost midway between the two cities, but Davenport, the National Arsenal and 
Armory, and a picturesque sweep of the river. The institution embraces the follow- 
ing departments: (')The college, with its classical and, scientific courses, 'each of 
four years; (^) the preparatory school, with its three years' course; (^) the conserva- 
tory of music, three years; (*) theological seminary, two years. More than $150,- 
000.00 have been expended on the buildings and grounds. The library consists of 
8,000 bound volumes and 5,000 pamphlets. There are thirteen professors, three 
instructors, and over 200 students. The accompanying^'engraving shows the new 
college building, now nearly completed. It is 168 feet long, the central part 76 feet 
wide, and the wings 64 feet, four stories high, including the basement. The cost of 
this building is $75,000.00. Architecturally it is an imposing structure, to which its 
lofty location materially adds. The architect was E. S. Hammatt. 



92 ROCK ISLAND: 

BANKS, POST-OFFICE, ETC. 

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS. 

There are fourjbanking-houses in Rock Island, three of which are national insti- 
tutions, and one, that of Mitchell & Lynde, a private bank. The amount of exchange 
sold during the last year was over $10,000,000.00. The resources of the three national 
banks, as shown by the last statement for 1887, were $1,208,638.25. These institutions 
are officered as follows : 

Rock Island National. — T. J. Robinson, President; J. H. Wilson, Vice-President; 
J. F. Robinson, Cashier. j^^The capital is $100,000.00 ;''surplus $50,000.00, and un- 
divided profits $46,500.00. 

Peoples National. — Bailey Davenport, President; Joseph Rosenfield, Vice-Presi- 
dent; John Peetz, Cashier. ^The capital is $100,000.00; surplus $35,000.00. 

First National. — P. L. Mitchell, President; G. H. Loosley, Cashier. The capital 
is $100,000.00; surplus $50,000.00. 

THE POST-OFFICE. 

Rock Island has the carrier-service and mail facilities of the best kind. During 
the year j ust ended the total receipts of the office, except the money-order business, 
were $18,765.78, divided as follows: Sale of stamps, $12,510.10; envelopes, $4,737.04; 
newspaper postage, $594.16; box rents, $924.48. 

BUILDING, LOAN, AND SAVINGS ASSOCIATION. 

The Rock Island Mutual Building, Loan, and Savings Association is in its eighth 
year. At its last report the assets were $144,556.00. It has issued twenty series of 
shares, representing an investment of nearly $100,000.00. The association has proved 
itself a friend of the homeless, enabling many of limited means to own the comfort- 
able homes which they occupy. 



REAL ESTATE AND BUILDING. 

STEADY GROWTH. 

Rock Island is not a city blanketed with mortgages. There has been no " boom," 
as the word is commonly understood; which means wild speculation, inflated prices, 
and real estate transfers on paper. Therefore no day of reckoning, with its blight 
and ruin, is to come. But there has been a steady advance in values, an apprecia- 
tion of property of all kinds. Nearly 500 building lots have found purchasers, and 
several new additions have been laid out to accommodate the natural demand. 
Mechanics and working men have been busy the year around and prosperous. They 
have invested their earnings in homes, and in lots upon which to build homes. 
The population is surely gaining. All this shows growth of the substantial and 
enduring kind. It must continue. Money placed in Rock Island real estate^will 
prove a certain investment, and one returning regular dividends, 

BUILDING OPERATIONS. 

More than a [quarter of a million dollars has been put into homes, business 
blocks, 'schools and colleges, and manufactories during the last twelve months. 
This can be seen by looking at Augustana College, the new high school, the new 
Swedish Lutheran Church, the_,three-story brick warehouse of the Rock Island 
Lumber and Manufacturing Company, P. L. Mitchell's brick block, O. J. Dimick's 
row of store-rooms, the Bortner and Hull blocks. Porter Skinner's block, John Volk 
& Co. 's warehouse, at Wagner's brewery, the Rock Island Glass Works, and in more 
than 100 residences and cottages, ranging in cost from $3,000.00 to $500.00. 



ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 



93 



MEANS OF COMMUNICATION. 

HINTS TO STRANGERS. 

The thousands of strangers who visit this locality in quest of pleasure or in search 
of business opportunities have at their command several means of transit and com- 
munication between places of interest. The railroads supply a quick way of reach- 
ing Moline, Davenport, and Milan, and are nearly always available. For a more 
leisurely means of enjoyment a carriage and driver may be called. A week can be 
profitably passed in visiting the Arsenal Island, Black Hawk's Watch-Tower, and in 
the great number of favorite drives which a guide is able to point out, to say nothing 
of the immense factories. 

THE STREET-CAR SYSTEM. 

A cheap and satisfactory way of making a tour of observation is by use of the 
street- cars. The Moline & Eock Island line, of five miles, extends from lower Rock 




RESIDBNCE OF HON. BAILEY DAVBNPORT. 

Island to upper Moline, running through the business parts of both cities. The 
Union or Motor line climbs the bluffs, and is also five miles long. It connects vdth 
the north and south or bluff line in Moline. The Rock Island & Milan Motor line 
runs from the river five miles south, reaching Milan and Black Hawk's Watch-Tower. 
There are fifteen-minute oars on all these lines. One of the handsomest ferry-boats 
on the river, an illustration of which is given elsewhere, plies the river constantly 
between Rock Island and Davenport. 



THE TELEPHONE EXCHANGE. 

A complete telephone system, with perfect service at all hours of the day and 
night, brings all parts — business and residence — of Rock Island, Davenport, and 
Moline within easy speaking distance of each other. The exchange has a central oflSce 
in each city, at which connections may not only be made with more than a thousand 
offices and residences, hotels, depots, steamboat-landings, and newspapers, but also 
with more than 300 surrounding cities and towns within a range of 200 miles. A 



94 BOCK ISLAND: 

partial alphabetical list in Iowa includes Ackley, Albion, Alpha, Allison, Amber, 
Anamosa, Andrew, Atalissa. Auburn, Baldwin, Bassett, Belle Plaine, Bellevue. Ben- 
nett, Bernard, Blairstowu, Brandon, Bristow, Brooklyn, Brush Creek, Buffalo, Butler 
Center, Calamus, Calmar, Camanche, Cascade, Castalia, Cedar Bluff, Cedar Falls, 
Cedar Rapids, Center Junction, Center Point, Charles City, Chester, Chickasaw, 
Clarence, Clarksville, Clayton, Clear Lake, Clermont, Clinton, Cold Spring, Coles- 
burg, Conover, Conroy, Coralville, Cottonville, Decorah, Delaware, Delhi, Delmar, 
Denver, De Witt, Dixon, Downey, Dubuque, Durant, Dyersville, Earlville, Edge- 
wood, Eldora, Eldorado, Elgin, Elkader, Elvira, Eli, Elwood, Epworth, Farley, 
Fayette, Fillmore, Fredericksburg, Frestina, Froleich, Fort Atkinson, Fulton, 
Gamavillo, Garrison, Garryowen, Gilman, Grand Mound, Greeley, Greene, Grin- 
nell, Guttenberg, Hawkeye, Homestead, Hopkinton, Hurst, Independence, Ionia, 
Iowa City, Iowa Falls, Janesville, Jesup, Kellogg, Ke.ystone, Ladora, La Motte, 
Langworthy, La Porte, Le Claire, La Grand, Lynn Junction, Lisbon, Liscombe, Long 
Grove, Lost Nation, Lowden, Low Moor, Luxemburg. Luzerne, Lyons, Malcom, 
Malvern, Manchester, Maquoketa, Marble Rock, Marengo, Marion, Marshalltown, 
Mason City, Masonville, Maxtield, Maynard, McGregor, Mechanicsville, Miles, 
Millersburg, Monona, Montezuma, Monlicello, Morse, Moscow, Mt. Auburn. Mt. 
Vernon, Muscatine, Nashua, National, Nelson, Newberg, New Hampton, Newton, 
New Vienna, Nora Springs, North English, North Washington, Olewein, Onslow, 
Osborn, Ossian, Otter Creek, Oxford, Oxford Junction, Paris, Parkersburg, Parnell, 
Petersburg, Pleasaut Prairie, Postville, Prairieburg, Prairie City, Prestou, Princeton, 
Quasqueton, Reasnor, Rochester, Rockford, Rowley, Sabula, Shell Rock, Shellsburg, 
Sherrill's Mound, Solon, South Amana, Spillville, Springdale, Spriugville, Stanwood, 
State Center, Steamboat Rock, Sterling, St. Lucas, Stockton, Stone City, Strawberry 
Point, Sumner, Sweetland Center, Tiffin, Tipton, Tripoli, Union, Urbana, Valaria, 
Van Horn, Victor, Vinton, Walcott, Walker, Washburn, Waterloo, Waubeck, Wau- 
coma, Waucon, Waverly, Welton, West Branch, West Liberty, West Uniou, Wheat- 
land, Williamsburg, Williamstown, Wilton, Windsor, Winthrop, Worthiugton, 
Wyoming, Zwingle. In Wisconsin, Prairie du Chien. And in Illinois, Albany, 
Brookvilie, Cambridge, Coal Valley, Coleta, Cordova, Dame, Dixon, Dutchtown, 
Elizabeth, Erie, Fenton Center, Fulton, Fremont, Galena, Gault, Hampton, Hanover, 
Lanark, Lyndon, Milledgeville, Morrison, Mt. Carroll, Port Byron, Prairie Center, 
Prophetstown, Rapids City, Rock Falls, Rock Island Junction, Round Grove, Savanna, 
Shannon, Sterling, Toledo. 



BUSINESS ASSOCIATION. 

ROCK ISLAND BUSINESS MEN. 

This association is composed of representative, enterprising merchants, manu- 
facturers, and professional men, the men who make cities grow. Its objects are to 
collect and record such local and general statistical information relating to commerce 
and manufacturing as may promote and advance the welfare of the city of Rock 
Island and its interests. The officers are: W. B. Ferguson, President; L. S. McCabe, 
Vice-President; J. F. Robinson, Secretary; John Peetz, Treasurer. The Finance 
Committee is composed of A. C. Dart, Henry Carse, H. C. McCounell, J. T. Noftsker. 
All information concerning the city, its advantages, and the inducements offered new 
business enterprises will be supplied correspondents. 

SUN ACCIDENT ASSOCIATION, 

This has shown itself to be an important business gain to Rock Island. Its 
officers attest its trustworthiness, and vouch for its correct and successful management. 
They are as follows: T. J. Robinson, President; Fred Weyerhaeuser and J. M. Gould, 
Vice-Presidents; J. F. Robinson, Treasurer; William Jackson, Counselor; W. C. 
Bennett, Auditor; 0. B. Blackburn, Secretary and General Manager; W. W. Stafford, 
Assistant Secretary. Any man between the ages of eighteen and sixty-five years, of 



ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 95 

sound mind and body, iiud of temperate habits, is eligible to membership. The 
members are I'hvssified in divisions, according to the hazard of occupation. The 
association offers the advantage of not only carrying the insurance and indemnity 
together, but either one alone, according to the rate of assessment paid. Indemnity 
is allowed for a period of Hfty-two weeks, while the ordinary limit in other com- 
panies is twenty-six weeks. More advantages are offered by this company than any 
other in the United States. 

sear's park. 

A company has been incorporated, with a capital of $20,000.00, for the purpose of 
establishing a lirst-class pleasure resort. The site .selected is a beautiful one, on the 
Kock river heights, directly west of Black Hawk's Watch-Tower. It is easy of access, 
contains thirty acres, and will be supplied for early use with hotel, cottages, an 
electric light plant run by water-power, and various amusements. The view, near 
and distant, is grand, taking in the city of Davenport, across the Mississippi river, 
six miles away, Muscatine, twenty-five miles, Buffalo, and other towns. 



MUNICIPAL AND GENERAL. 

ROCK ISLAND WATER-WORKS. 

The original Holly system of water-works was first used in 1871, but the follow- 
ing decade showed that the works, to keep pace with the city's growth, must be 
enlarged. In 1881 the present works were built, and to their construction and re- 
location Hon. P. L. Cable contributed $25,000.00. A twenty-four-inch inlet-pipe, 
2,200 feet in length, takes the water in its purity from the channel of the Mississippi 
river, and conveys it, for sanitary uses, to a settling-basin, from which it is pumped. 
In case of fire the water is pumped directly from the river. • The works have two 
Holly pumps, with a capacity of 3,000,000 gallons every twenty-four hours. There 
are seventeen miles of water-mains, and over 1,000 consumers. 

THE FIRE PROTECTION. 

The water-works has over 100 hydrants distributed throughout the city. It is 
believed that the fire protection thus furnished with a never-failing supply of water, 
and a pressure adequate to any emergency, is all that could be desired. There are 
seven fire companies of twenty men each — one for each of the seven wards. 

COUNCIL AND FINANCES. 

The municipal affairs are administered by a council of fourteen alderman and 
the Mayor, each being elected for two years. The financial condition of Kock Island 
is healthy, a low rate of taxation and the ordinary licenses affording the necessary 
revenue. 

THE PRESS. 

Rock Island is well represented by its daily press, the Union, published by the 
Union Printing Company, being the leading republican morning paper, and the 
Argus, of which J. W. Potter is editor and proprietor, the evening democratic journal. 
Both issue weekly editions. There are also the Rock Islander, weekly, and the 
Volks-Zeitung, semi-weekly. 

HOTELS AND OPERA HOUSE. 

The hotel accommodations of any city afford a trustworthy means of measuring 
its enterprise and public spirit. It is to the hotel that the stranger goes on his arrival, 
and his impressions of the place are formed very quickly without his ever seeing the 
business blocks, the manufacturing enterprises, or before he knows anything of the 
general advantages offered. The thousands of visitors who have stopped at the 
Harper House annually for the last fifteen years, have been convinced that Rock 
Island is not lacking in first-class hotel facilities. Hon. Ben. Harper, to whom the city 



96 ROCK ISLAND: 

is indebted for much of its prosperity, builded wisely in this great monument of his 
liberality, to which he gave his personal supervision until his death — about one year 
ago. The Harper House enjoys the reputation of being the best hotel, in all respects, 
in Illinois, outside of Chicago. Its proprietor is Mr. Homer J. Lowrey, whose per- 




HABPBR HOUSE. 

sonal attention is given to the management of the house. Its business is large, its 
cuisine first-class, and its farnishings elegant. There is no hotel in the world that is 
safer against fire. Every room has a mercury alarm, which at 110° of heat notifies 
the office; and all other means known to science are employed to insure the safety of 
guests. 

The Rock Island, Taylor, and Commercial Houses will prove satisfactory to 
visitors content with comfort at less expense. 

Harper's Theatre is the parlor opera house of the stat«. It seats 1,200, and has 
complete and splendid scenery and commodious dressing-rooms. It is supplied with 
upholstered opera-chairs, and is attractively furnished. 

engineer's office. 

The United States Engineer's office, under the charge of Captain A. Mackenzie, 
is located in Rock Island. The office has the direction of the Mississippi river im- 
provements from St. Paul to the mouth of the Illinois river. The annual appropria- 
tion for this work for several years past has reached $1,000,000.00. 

IN GENERAL. 

Rock Island is not without its fine church buildings, one of which is the Broad- 
way Presbyterian, representing a cost of $35,000.00. There are three Baptist, two 
Catholic, one Christian, one Episcopal, two Lutheran, three Methodist, and four 
Presbyterian churches. 

The city is well lighted by both gas and electric light plants. 

It has a full representation of all the military, benevolent, and civic societies, 
such as the Masons, Odd Fellows, Grand Army of the Republic, Ancient Order oi 
United Workmen, Young Men's Christian Association, etc. 



ITS INTEHESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 97 



THE HENNEPIN CANAL. 

cp:rtain to he built. 

This favorably-known link of water communication between the Mississippi 
river and Lake Michigan, thereby affording an ail-water-route to the seaboard, is 
an improvement of national importaTice, and it has been so recognized by several 
congresses. JJoth the house and senate of the ibrty-ninth congress passed the river 
and harbor bill containing a large appropriation for this work. The building of this 
canal will prove the solution, in a large measure, of the cheap transportation problem. 

By the action of the general assembly, sanctioned by the popular vote of Illinois, 
the Illinois and Michigan Canal, extending from Chicago to Hennepin, has been 
ceded to the United States. This has been done with the understanding that the 
general government will accept the grant and complete the canal (for which the 
surveys have been made) to a point on the river at or near Rock Island. The length 
of the unbuilt link is only sixty-five miles. With this water-route open to boats, 
the farmers and merchants, mechanics and manufocturers, of the whole northwest 
will be the gainers. This locality will not only share the common good fortune, but 
it will reap, inevitably, local benefits of no mean proportions. 

The map on the next page conveys the whole subject to the eye at a glance. 
By an act of congress, passed August I'ith, 1882, an appropriation of $30,000.00 was 
made for surveys of three practical routes for the canal between Hennepin and the 
Mississippi river. This work was completed by Major W. H. H. Benyaurd, and esti- 
mates furnished. It is stated that the cost of construction of the Kock Island route, 
the most desirable, including feeders and the right of way, will be $6,(j7;2,800.00. 
This amount covers the estimated cost of the canal and feeder from Rock river to the 
summit line of the canal, each eighty feet in width at the water-line and seven feet 
deep, including locks 170 feet in length and thirty feet in width, with a capacity for 
vessels of at least 280 tons burden. 

The practicability of the canal construction here contemplated has been thor- 
oughly investigated, and that by the best of engineering talent. At the instance of 
citizens of Illinois and Iowa, Colonel J. O. Hudnutt, a civil engineer of eminence, who 
is quoted in- the "Report of the Select Committee on Transportation Routes to the 
Seaboard," presented to the senate of the United States on April 24th, 1874, made 
the first survey of the Hennepin Canal route. In his report of that survey, rendered 
with estimates in 1866, Colonel Hudnutt so unequivocally endorsed the project as one 
of easy accomplishment, that he asserted that " </tJS would be the cheapest canal con- 
structed in the United States." His estimates, however, were for a canal of only 60 
feet in width and 6 feet deep, with locks of 150 by 21 feet, to cost $4,500,000.00. 
The first survey by the United States was that of Gorham P. Low, in 1870. It was 
made for a "ship-canal," and placed his cost at $12,479,693.00. But a "ship-canal " 
has never been desired by the intelligent advocates of the Hennepin Canal, since a 
canal for commercial purposes is alone what is required. In 1874 the United States 
engineers made estimates for a commercial canal based on the survey of Mr. Low, 
which placed the cost at $4,541,000.00. It was objected in the senate of the forty- 
seventh congress, however, that the Low survey did not actually locate the route, and 
that the estimates made did not include cost of right of way and fencing. Therefore 
that congress appropriated $30,000.00 for a new survey and complete estimates, both 
as to the Hennepin Canal and the enlargement of the Illinois and Michigan Canal. 
The report of Major Benyaurd is the result, as heretofore quoted. 

The Hennepin Canal is the grandest national work ever undertaken in the 
interest of cheap transportation. The seven northwestern states whose commerce it 
will cheapen produced, in 1879 (according to the United States census), in round 
numbers, 1,300,000,000 bushels, or 70,000,000 tons, of grain alone. The saving of 
two cents a bushel on one-half this amount would net $13,000,000.00 in one year, or 
enough to build two such canals. 



98 



ROCK ISLAND: 



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ITS INTERESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 



99 



MILAN AND VICINITY. 

THE ROCK EIVEK VVATKK-POWKR. 
The incorporated town of Milan, an important factor from every point of view 
in the quartette of cities, is located three miles south of the city of liock Island, on 
Eock river, near the confluence with the Mississippi. The chief feature of the place 
is its great water-power, which in volume is some three times that of the Merrimac 
river at Lowell. It includes all the water of Rock river. The fall is twelve feet, and 
may be increased to fourteen feet. The bed and shores of the river are, as the name 
suggests, of solid rock. The river frontage, suitable for mill-sites and the use of 
water, is one and one-half miles, and may be extended to almost any desired extent. 
It is so planned as to accommodate mills and factories with side-tracks. Extensive 
coal-mines are worked along the river banks, and south and also west of the town at 
different points, from one to twenty miles. Combined with an unlimited water- 
power, the plac'e offers the inducements of cheap coal and both railway and river 
transportation facilities. The north side of Rock river is designated as Sears, in 
honor of one of the most enterprising citizens of the state. 

THE tourists' PARADISE. 

One of the chief attractions to visitors is Black Hawk's Watch-Tower, illustrated 
and described in the following chapter. In addition there are several beautiful 
islands in the vicinity, offering every inducement of camp-life — fishing, boating, etc. 

Milan is on the line of three railroads — the Rock Island & Peoria, the Rock 
Island & Mercer County, and the Coal Valley Mining Company — and within easy 
reach of the trunk lines centering at or passing through Rock Island. The Rock 
Island & Milan Street-Rail way affords prompt means of communication with the 
tri-cities at all times. 



BLACK HAWK'S WATCH-TOWER. 



A FAMOUS LOOKOUT. 







BLACK hawk's WATCH-TOWER, LOOKING EAST. 

This historic spot, the subject of two illustrations, was the resort of the Indian 
chief Black Hawk. It is situated three miles south of the city of Rock Island, on 
the highest bank of Rock river, and was selected by the great Sac's father as a look- 
out at the first building of the tribe's village. From its commanding summit an 
unobstructed view is had up and down the valley of the winding river for many 



100 



BOCK ISLAND: 



miles, and across the low-lands to the south. For the last half a century the tower 
has been the admiration of thousands, and now that the street-car carries the visitor 
to the very peak, it is the popular resort of resident and tourist. The owner, Hon. 
Bailey Davenport, has erected a summer-house at the most charming point of view, 
which is open to all. 

Black Hawk, in his autobiography, which was dictated to Antoine Le Claire in 
1833, and which has recently been published by Colonel J. B. Patterson, says of this 
interesting place: "This tower, to which my name has been applied, was a favorite 
resort, and was frequently visited by me alone, where I could sit and smoke my pipe, 
and look with wonder and pleasure at the grand scenes that were presented by the 
sun's rays, even across the mighty water [the Mississippi]. On one occasion, a 
Frenchman who had been making his home in our village brought his violin with 
him to the tower, to play and dance for the amusement of our people, who had 
assembled there, and, while dancing with his back to the cliff, accidentally fell over 
it and was killed by the fall. The Indians say that always, at the same time of the 
year, soft strains of the violin can be heard near that spot." 




BLACK HAWK S WATCH-TOWER — FRONT VIEW. 

Another legend is related by Black Hawk. In 1827, a young Sioux Indian who 
was lost in a snow-storm found his way into a camp of the Sacs. While there he 
fell in love with a beautiful maiden, and, upon leaving for his own country, promised 
to return during the approaching summer and claim his bride. He did so, secreting 
himself in the woods until he met the object of his love. A heavy thunder-storm 
was coming on at the time. The lovers hastened to and took shelter under a cliff of 
rocks on the south side of the tower. Soon after they had done so, a loud peal of 
thunder was heard, the cliif of rocks was shattered into a thousand pieces, and the 
lovers buried beneath them. "This," writes Black Hawk, "their unexpected tomb, 
still remains undisturbed." 




ITS INTEEESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 101 

BLACK HAWK. 

THE CHIEF OF THE SACS AND FOXES. 

The following account, from "Patterson's Life of Black Hawk," will answer 
many inquiries: 

"The great chieftain, after whom this noted promontory was named, was more 
than an ordinary man and warrior. He was born in 1767, in the village of the Hac 
Indians, at the foot of the bluffs on the north side of Kock river, about one mile 
from its junction with the Mississippi. In 1786 his father 
was killed in a battle with the Cherokees near the Merrimac, 
and at the age of nineteen years Black Hawk succeeded to be 
chief of the Sac and Fox Indians — the Fox tribe having, at 
Green Bay, some years previously, given up their separate 
organization, and joined the Sacs. These united tribes were 
very war-like and numerous. The Sac village on Kock river 
contained over 10,000 inhabitants, and the Fox village, situ- 
ated from about Twentieth street, Kock Island, to near Wag- 
ner's brewery on Moline avenue, and between the bluffs and 
the river, had a population of over 5,000. The whole face of 
the country from the Mississippi to some distance back from 
the crest of the blutl's, except that occupied by the lodges, 
BLACK HAWK. was one vast corn-field. All the higher points back of the 

hills, where the forest was permitted to grow, were ' lookouts,' 
or points where a sentry was posted to prevent a surprise. The point known as 
' Black Hawk's Watch-Tower ' was covered with stately trees, from the tops of which 
the whole country for miles around was visible. From this ' lookout ' a sentry was 
constantly on the watch, guarding the village on the low-land near its base. 

" It was under these stately trees that Black Hawk would assemble his advisers 
and hold council. The hill-top just west of this 'tower' or 'lookout' was made 
sacred and dear by the ashes of his loved dead for many years. On the western slope 
of the tower itself Black Hawk had tenderly and affectionately laid to their last rest 
the remains of his father, a noble brave. When at last he himself was compelled to 
leave this loved home of his youth for the reservation on the Des Moines river, after 
the disastrous battle at Bad Axe, Wis., in August, 1832, he asked of the pale-faces 
one favor, and only one, and that was that the graves of his ancestors and his tribe 
be spared from desecration; that the tiller's plow should leave untouched the heaving 
turf above his sleeping dead. No nobler, braver, or truer man than this old chieftain 
ever trod our native soil; and when we look upon the lovely hills, the fertile valleys, 
the splendid water-courses, and consider the abundance of all kinds of game and 
fish then available, we do not wonder at his love for his favored home. After his 
defeat in 1832 he was held a prisoner, with his two sons, at Fortress IMonroe for 
nearly a year, after which he went to his tribe on the Skunk river, west of Ft. 
Madison, Iowa. He died in Davis county, Iowa, a county on the Missouri line, 
about 100 miles west of Burlington, October 3d, 1838, and was buried there. He 
was sick only fourteen days. The only mound over the grave was some puncheons, 
split out and set over his grave and sodded over with blue-grass, making a ridge 
about four feet high. A flag-statf, some twenty feet high, was planted at the head, 
on which was a silk flag, which hung there until the wind wore it out. He was 
buried right where he sat the year before when in council with the Iowa Indians, 
and was buried in a suit of military clothes, made to order and given to him at 
Washington city, by General Jackson, with hat, sword, gold epaulets, tassels, etc. 
His body laid on a boird, his feet about fifteen inches below the surface of the ground, 
and his head raised about three feet above the ground. A strong picket-fence, 
twelve feet high, enclosed the ground. His body remained there until 1839, when it 
was carried off by a certain Dr. Turner, then living at Lexington, Van Buren county, 
Iowa. The bones were afterward taken to Alton, III., and mounted with wire. 
Afterwards they were carried to Warsaw, 111., but Black Hawk's sons, when they 
heard of the desecration of their father's grave, complained to Governor Lucas, of 
Iowa Territory, and he caused the bones to be brought back to Burlington, in the 
fall of 1839 or spring of 1840. The bones were subsequently placed in the collection 
of the Burlington Geological and Historical Society, and perished in the fire which 
destroyed the building and all the society's collections, in 1855." 



102 



ROCK ISLAND. 



COLONEL GEORGE DAVENPORT. 



SKETCH OF A USEFUL LIFE. 

Colonel George Davenport was the first white man to make a permanent settle- 
ment in what is now Rock Island county, arriving here in the spring of 1816. He 
was a native of England, born in Lincolnshire, in 1783. At the age of seventeen he 
enlisted as a sailor on a merchant-vessel, and for the next three years he visited 
France, Spain, and Portugal. After a remarkable experience on the high-seas, 
Davenport enlisted in the regular (American) army in 1805. In the spring of the 
next year he went with his regiment to New Orleans. For ten years he served his 
adopted country as a soldier, principally against the Indians. 

ARRIVAL AT EOCK ISLAND. 

On receiving his discharge in 1815, he was employed by Colonel William Morrison, 
of Kentucky, government contractor, to supply the troops with provisions. Going to 
St. Louis, he took charge of several keel-boats loaded with provisions. A large 
drove of cattle were also purchased and driven through the country. They started up 
the river, and arrived at the mouth of the Des Moines river late in the fall, and 
concluded to stop there for the winter. In the spring of 1816, in company with 

Colonel Lawrence, in command of the 
Eighth Regiment, United States infantry, 
they again embarked on boats, and pro- 
ceeded up the river. Arriving at the 
mouth of Eock river, they examined the 
country for a site for a foil, resulting in 
the selection of the lowtr end of Rock 
Island as the most suitable point. They 
landed on Rock Island, May 10th, 1816, 
and here Mr. Davenport made his home 
until his death. His residence, a double 
log-cabin, was near the foot of the island, 
where he subsequently erected a large 
two-story frame house, a fine sketch of 
which is shown in this work. 

AS AN INDIAN- TRADER. 

The Indians at that time were not 
very friendly to the Americans, but soon 
took a fancy to Mr. Davenport, giving 
him the name of Saga-nosh, meaning 
"an Englishman." During the second 
year, with what little money he had 
saved, he purchased a stock of goods, and 
began trading with the Indians. As an Indian-trader he was remarkably success- 
ful, securing and retaining their good-will and confidence, although for a time he 
had more or less trouble with the Winnebagoes, at one time narrowly escaping being 
ma.ssacred. In 1823 the first steamboat — the Virginia — arrived at the island, 
loaded with provisions for Prairie du Chien, and Mr. Davenport was called upon to 
pilot her over the rapids. In 1825 a post-oflQce was established upon the island, with 
Mr. Davenport as postmaster. He held the office until its removal to the main-land, 
on the organization of the county. In 1827 he visited his native land, after an 
absence of twenty-three years, returning in 1828. 

HIS INFLUENCE WITH THE INDIANS. 

During this year the first settlements were made in this vicinity. As they were 
poor, Mr. Davenport furnished many of them with provisions and groceries until 
they could raise a crop. When the Indians returned in the spring of 1829, Mr. 
Davenport used all his influence to. induce them to remove to the west side of the 
Mississippi river, and partially succeeded. Waupello removed his village to Muscatine 
slough, and Keokuk, with part of the Sacs, to the Iowa river; but Black Hawk and 




COLONEL GEOBGE DAVENPORT. 



ITS INTEBESTS AND INDUSTRIES. 



103 



the remainder of the Sacs refused to go, claiming that they had never sold their 
laud. During the Black Hawk war that followed Mr. Davenport was appointed 
Quartermaster-General, with the rank of Colonel. 

AS A TREATY-MAKER. 

On the organization of the county. Colonel Davenport was elected one of the 
first county commissioners, and served some two or three years. In the fall of 1835, 
in company with several others, he purchased a claim of Antoine Le Claire, across 
the river, in Iowa, and proceeded to lay out a town. To this town was given the 
name of " Davenport," in his honor. In the fall of ]8;>7 he visited Washington city, 
in company with a number of chiefs of the Sac and Fo.x nations, and aided the gov- 
ernment in the purchase of a large portion of Iowa. In 1842 Governor Chambers 
made another treaty with the Sacs and Foxes. He told the chiefs to select any 
of their white friends they might choose to assist them in making a treaty. They 
selected Colonel Davenport as one of four. By this treaty the Indians sold all of 
their lands within the state of Iowa. Shortly after this Colonel Davenport withdrew 
from the Indian trade, and devoted the remainder of his life to the improvement of 
his property in Davenport and Kock Island. 

HIS PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS. 

" Colonel Davenport," said a well-known writer, "was of a very free and generous 
disposition — very jovial and fond of company. After retiring from the Indian trade 
he spent the winters generally in St. Louis or Washington. Whether traveling on a 
steamboat or stopping at a hotel, he would always have a crowd around him listening 
to his stories and anecdotes. He never sued any one in his life, and could not bear 
to see any one in distress without trying to relieve him. He enjoyed excellent health 
and spirits, and had the prospect of living many years to enjoy the comfort for which 
he had toiled so hard, but was struck down by one of a band of robbers, in his own 
house, on the 4th of July, 1845. He died aged sixty-two." 




COI.ONEL DAVENPORT'S HOUSE IN 1860. 

The life of Colonel Davenport was a long and active one. " Although of trans- 
Atlantic extraction," says the writer already quoted from, "he was a true type of 
the American, possessing indomitable resolution, a restless desire to progress, with an 
invincible determination to overcome obstacles and achieve success. Much as his 
courage, perseverance, enterprise, and ability demand admiration, there is still some- 
thing more than these commanding our respect and honor; something which is more 
lustrous than wealth, better than position or title; it was his humanity." 



The -2PLi^sz;]NriPs.L. 




THE ISLAND OF ROCK ISLAND. 

A MAGNIFICENT PARK. 

' HE MOST beautiful of the many islands which divide the waters of 
the Mississippi river, from its source to it« mouth, is Rock Island. 
It is the object of attention and praise from the thousands of tourists 
who go up and down the river from May to October. Viewed from 
the deck of a steamboat, it is a picture of grandeur which dwells 
upon the vision, while many a traveler by rail stops here for a day 
to enjoy its shady drives and broad avenues. It is a magnificent 
national park — one which the public is always free to enjoy. Its 
location is fortunate — almost midway between the head of naviga- 
tion and the largest river city. It derives its name from the nature of its formation. 
The Island rests upon a bed of rock, consifiting mainly of gray magnesian limestone, 
which in places crops out on the surface, but is generally covered with from one to 
eight feet of earth, principally loam and clay, though sometimes sand or gravel. 
The limestone is hard, strong, and durable, though it is never found in strata suitable 
for quarrying purposes. 

AREA OF THE ISLAND. 

The length of the Island is nearly two and three-fourths miles, and its width 
varies from one-fourth to three-fourths of a mile. It contains, above low-water mark, 
970 acres. The course of the Mississippi, for some six miles, is nearly with the sun, 
and lengthwise the Island lies east and west. The surface of the Island is waving, 
yet not to any marked extent, and it is covered generally with sparse timber. On 
much of it the first growth of timber has been removed, and is replaced by a second 
growth, mixed with some large old trees that remain. The native trees are principally 
oak, elm, ash, bass-wood, hickory, and walnut. The highest part of the Island is 
that occupied by the shops, all of it being from 17 to 23 feet above the highest stage 
of water. The other high grounds are generally from 14 to 20 feet above high water. 

THE BLACK HAWK WAR. 

The United States acquired its title to Rock Island through a treaty which was 
made by William Henry Harrison, Governor and Superintendent of Indian Affairs 
for the Indian Territory and District of Louisiana, with certain chiefs of the Sac and 
Fox tribes of Indians, at St. Louis, Mo., in November, 1804. Black Hawk, the 
famous Indian hero of the Black Hawk war, was the principal chief of the Sacs, and 
did not sign the treaty, but held, during the war of 1812 and the Black Hawk war, 
that the treaty was not binding. Various other treaties were signed by other chiefs 
and warriors, but it is doubted if Black Hawk wrote his name to any of these, 
though the records conflict. 

The Island of Rock Island was not occupied by white men, and appears to have 
had no history, until the breaking out of the war with Great Britain, in 1812. The 
Indians occupied it unmolested, and it was their favorite hunting and fishing-ground, 
and its beautiful scenery and rich woods made it a favorite resort for feasts and for 
the performance of religious and other ceremonies. 
9 



106 



ROCK ISLAND ARSENAL. 



FORT AEMSTEONG. 

In September, 1815, the Eighth United States Infantry was sent from St. Louis 
to establish a fort upon the Island. Owing to the difficulties of travel, the troops 
first landed on the Island May 10th, 1816. Soon after was commenced the construc- 
tion of the fort, named Fort Armstrong, in honor of the Secretary of War. Its 
location was the extreme northwest corner of the Island. The fort had an interior of 
400 feet square. The lower half of the walls was of stone, and the upper half of 
hewn timber. The fort was completed in 1817, and from that time to the breaking 
out of the Black Hawk war, in 1831, no imusual e^'ent is connected with it. 

After the close of the war there were no further hostilities with Indians. A garrison 
was maintained at Fort Armstrong till May 4th, 1836, when the fort was evacuated. 
General Street, Indian Agent, had charge of the Island until 1838, wheTi Colonel 
George Davenport succeeded him, remaining in charge two years. In 1840 an ord- 
nance depot was established at the fort, of which Captain Shoemal.er had charge 
until 1845, when the stores were removed to St. Louis Arsenal. Froi^i 1845 till the 
act for establishing the Rock Island Arsenal was passed, in 1862, the Island was in 
charge of a civil agent or custodian employed by the war department, out of the con- 
trol of which it never passed. 



THE COMMANDANTS. 

GENERAL THOMAS J. RODMAN. 

The act of congress locating the National Arsenal on Rock Island was approved 
July 11th, 1862, and it appropriated for the purpose $100,000.00. This was the first 
action of congress looking definitely to the construction of the Arsenal. Ground for 
the first building — that now seen at the extreme west end of the Island — was 




THE ARSENAL GLN-VARD ON MAIN ANliMK. 

broken September 1st, 1863. The corner-stone was laid April 20th, 1864. The tower 
of this building is supplied with one of the best clocks in the United States. It has 
a dial twelve feet in diameter on each of the four sides of the tower, and a striking 
bell weighing 3,300 pounds. The dials can be easily read from the cities of Daven- 
port and Rock Island. General Thomas J. Rodman, the inventor of the famous gun 
bearing his name, was assigned to the command of the Arsenal in June, 1865, succeed- 



BOCK ISLAND ARSENAL. 



107 



ing Major Kingsbury, wlio was the first ordnance officer in command. General 
Rodman assumed his duties August 3d, 1865, and his command continued until his 
death, June 7th, 1871. 

It was on February 7th, 1866, that General Rodman submitted plans to the Chief 
of Ordnance, comprehending ten great shops, in two rows of five shops each, those 
on the north being designed for the Armory, and those on the south for the Arsenal. 
These plans were approved, and General Rodman began the execution of his mighty 
work. 

An act of congress approved March 3d, 1869, appropriated |.500,000.00 for the 
construction of the bridge across the Mississippi. Upon this work of engineering 
General Rodman bestowed a great deal of time, labor, and trouble; and to him 
belongs the honor of completing the plans. He lived to see his plans for the Arsenal 
materialized in the construction of two of the great shops and the quarters for the 
commanding officer. 




GKNEKAL RODMAN'S TOMB. 



General Rodman died at his quarters at the Arsenal, June 7th, 1871. At the 
request of the Chief of Ordnance, he was buried upon the Island, in a lot of ground 
set apart for that purpose, near the national cemetery, at the east end of the Island. 
There a modest shaft, bearing the honored name of "RoDJlAX," marks the last 
resting-place of the illustrious soldier and noble citizen. 

COLONEL D. W. FLAGLER. 

Colonel D. W. Flagler was placed in command of the Arsenal by an order issued 
from the Adjutant-General's office, June 15th, 1871. He at once comprehended the 
importance of the great work placed in his charge, and to it, for fifteen years, he 
gave his time, careful attention, and profound study. The plans, as he received 
them, were imperfect in the details, compared with the elaborate work that developed 
from them, with the numerous changes and improvements that have been made. 
The progress of construction was supplemented by the manufacture of stores for the 
army to the extent of $150,000.00 annually for several years. In this way Colonel 
Flagler proved that ordnance stores can be manufactured here and distributed to the 



108 



ROCK ISLAND ARSENAL. 



army cheaper than they can be fabricated in the east and brought west. He super- 
intended the building of the great shops, the water-power machinery, the oflScers' 
quarters, the soldiers' barracks, a complete system of sewers, the Moline bridge, the 
roads, streets, and avenues about the Island, the system for transmitting power, the 
grading and ornamentation of grounds. Colonel Flagler was transferred to Frank- 
ford Arsenal, Philadelphia, in the summer of 1886. 




THE commandant's RESIDENCE. 

COLONEL THOMAS G. BAYLOR, 

The present commandant, graduated from West Point with the class of 1857. 
He served as Second Lieutenant at Fortress Monroe from July, 1858, to July, 1861. 
Later he was commandant at Fort Monroe Arsenal, serving in that capacity from 
August 15th, 1861, to October 20th, 1863, when, having been promoted to the rank- 
of Captain, he was appointed Chief of Ordnance for the Army of the Cumberland. 
His war record was gallant, and his responsibilities many. In June, 1865, he was 
reappointed commandant of Fort Monroe Arsenal, and remained there till 1876, 
when he was transferred to the command of the New York Arsenal. After ten years' 
service at that Arsenal, he was transferred to Kock Island in 1886, having been pro- 
moted to the full rank of Colonel. 



ARSENAL AND ARMORY SHOPS. 



THEIR EXTENT AND CHARACTER. 



The row of five shops south of the main avenue are for the Arsenal, and the five 
north of the same avenue are for the Armory. The center shop in the row is the 
forging-shop and foundry of the Arsenal, and the other four are designed for finishing 
— wood, leather, and metal-working shops of all kinds for the manufacture of all the 
material of war. The center shop of the north row is the rolling-mill and forging 



ROCK ISLAND ARSENAL. 



109 



shop for the Armory, and the two on either side of it are finishing and wood-working, 
or "stocking," shops for the manufacture of all kinds of small arms. The center 
shop in each row is only one-story high, and the other four have a hasement and 
three stories. The ground-plans of all the ten shops are alike. Each building con- 
sists of two parallel wings, 60 by 300 feet, 90 feet apart. This leaves an interior 

court 90 by 238 feet. 
The porticoes at the 
sides project twelve 
feet, and are 60 feet 
wide; and those in 
front project two feet, 
and are also 60 feet 
wide. The total area 
of each shop, includ- 
ing thickness of walls, 
is 44,280 square feet 
— a little more than 
one acre. 

The walls of all 
these buildings are 
entirely of stone. The 
exterior or face-stones 
are heavy ashlar, laid 
in courses, jointed, 
and having a square- 
ly-])roken face, with- 
out tool-marks. The 
backing is rubble, 
laid also in courses, 
and has its face, which 
forms the interior of 
the wall, well pointed. 
The average thick- 
ness of the walls is 
as f o 1 1 o w s : First 
story, three feet four 

inches; second story, two feet ten inches; third story, two feet four inches. The 
amount of material entering into the construction of one of these buildings is enor- 
mous. In shop A, the first built, for instance, there are 30.115,800 pounds of rock; 
26,000 of copper; 362,500 of slate; 1,331,500 of lumber; 2,199,646 of iron; 3,132,800 
of brick; 200,000 of plaster. 




PARTIAL V^E^V OF ARMORY SHOPS 



ARSENAL NOTES. 



A BRIDGE TO EACH OF THE THREE CITIES. 

The Island is connected with the Iowa side of the river by one bridge, and with 
the Illinois side by three bridges. The main bridge is at the extreme northwest 
corner of the Island. This spans the main channel of the Mississippi river. The 
total length of the bridge is 1,550 feet 6 inches, divided into five spans and one draw 
— the latter having a total length of 368 feet. The north shore span is 197 feet in 
length, and the one on the .south or Island end is 100 feet 8 inches, making the total 
length, including shore spans, 1,848 feet 2 inches. The draw is double, rests on a 
center pier, and gives, when open, clear water-ways between the draw-pier and the 
adjacent north pier 162 feet, and the same on the south sid(\ The bridge is double- 
decked, the wagon -road being on the lower, and the railroad on the upper deck. 
The cost of this bridge was $1,000,000.00. The wagon bridge leading to Rock Island 



110 



ROCK ISLAND ARSENAL. 



is 600 feet in length, of four equal spans; there is an iron railroad bridge also leading 
to Rock Island. At the upper end of the Island there is a bridge thrown across 
Sylvan water connecting with Moline. This bridge is 711 feet long, of five equal 
spans. 

THE DESIGN. 

The design of the Arsenal is evident — the ordnance department supplies the 
army vnth every article used by the soldier for offensive and defensive purposes. It 
is proposed by the government to make this Arsenal the Arsenal for the whole Mis- 
sissippi Valley. When completed, if crowded to its" full capacity in time of war, it 
will be sufficient to arm, equip, and supply an'army'of 750,000jmen. 




soldibrb' babbicks. 



THE ISLAND DUKING THE WAK. 

During the Civil war. Rock Island was transformed into a military prison. 
From 1863 until the close of the war there were upwards of twelve thousand Con- 
federate soldiers confined as prisoners there. During that period the number of 
deaths was 1,961, all the interments being made on the Island. The city of the dead 
so populated is uo longer pointed out by the small mound or leaning head-stone. 
These have all been leveled, and suggestions of the prison days are undisclosed. 

THE NATIONAL CEMETERY. 

In the national cemetery, at the upper end of the Island, lie the remains of about 
400 Union soldiers. The grounds are scrupulously cared for, and with each recurring 
30th of May the graves are strewn with wreaths of flowers. 

THE ARSENAL WATER-POWER. 

On the south side of the Island, almost midway between the cities of Rock Island 
and Moline, the United States has constructed a water-power of nearly 4,000-horse- 
power. This is, however, small in comparison with the water-power yet to be utilized. 
But it suffices to do the work of the Arsenal shops at the present time. 



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112 



HOTELS. 



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113 



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ROCK ISLAND 

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MERCHANT TAILORS 



And Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Cloths, 
Cassimeres, and Vestings, 

118 East Third Street, 

Established 1857. DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

G. M. SCHMIDT, 

DEALER IN 

Ladies' i Gents' Fine Shoes 

CORNER SECOND AND HARRISON STREETS, 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 




DEALERS IN AND TRANSPORTERS OF 

Illuminating, Lubricating, Lard, and Linseed 



OILS, 



Axle Grease, El Dorado Engine Oil, 

Turpentine, Naphtha, 

and Cans, 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



PORK-PACKING, GRAIN, ETC. 115 

JOHN L. ZOECKLER, 

PORK-PACKER, 

Office: No. 1337 WEST SECOND STREET, 
DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

HENRY KOHRS, 

PORK -PACKER, 

1343 West Second Street, 

DAVENPORT, - IOWA. 



JOSIAH DOW. 



J. F. DOW & CO. 

General • Grain ■ Dealers 



CITY ELEVATOR, 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



STORAGE, FORWARDING AND COMMISSION. CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. 

All kinds of Grain Cleaned, and Corq Shielled in Transit. 

WM. FARRELL, 

MANUFACTURER OF FERTILIZER 

AND PURE GROUND BONE MEAL, 
Grease, Tallow, Neatsfoot Oil, and Dealer in Hoofs and Horns, 

POSTOFFICE BOX 153, 
Highest Price Pai.l for Dry Bones. ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 



llfi 



FOUNDERS AND MACHINISTS. 



G. K. NEIIMAN. 



EBI & NEUMAN, 

FOUHDERS AHD MACHINISTS 



Manufacturers and Dealers in 

FARM MACHINERY, 

Cor. Front and Gaines Sts., 



Telephone No. 165. 



Davenport, Iowa. 



HV' imtl-c a Specialti/ of Enghies, Boiler.'^. Sti-fnn Pinups, llnnsc ('(ilminif:. Inni Stairs, PuUnjs, 
irrnigfis, Sli'iftiiigs, Fire-Fronts, Grdtc-Burs; und crerii ntrict;/ of Cast 
Iron and Mill Work (lo)ic on short notice 



GEORGE DOWNING, JR. 

Rock Island |pon Works. 

Sole Manufacturer of 

BURKHOLDER'S PATENT IRON FENCE, 

The Best and Cheapest Fence made in the United 
States. 

CRESTING A SPECIALTY. 

General Johhimj Work, House-Fronts, 
Cnlumns, Boor-Steps, Lintels, etc. 

All Uinds of SiTiall Castings niade to order, 

Orders by mail are solicited, and prices furnished on request. 
Cor. Ninth St. and Seventh Ave., ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 



P. D. QUIRK, 

GENERAL 

MACHINIST 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

New and Secoqd - Haqd Portable 
aqd Statioqary 

ENGINES "^BOILERS 

And General MachiiqerL). 

Repairs of Steam Pumps. Kugines, 
and <ieneral Ilepairs. 

Foot of Brady St., 

DA VENPO R T, 10 WA. 





Agent for tb.e Blake Steam Pump. 



IRON WORKERS — PAPER MILL. 117 

Williams, White s Company, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



FORMING AND FORGING MACHINES, 

PUNCH AND SHEARS, 

^ Spring-Power Hammers, 

SPECIA L MA CHIN Ell Y . 
EYE- BOLT MACHINES, 

The ••BULL-DOZER" Forming. Forging, and Machinists and Founders. 

Bending Machine. 




H. A. AINSWORTH, President. 
M. H. WHITE, Vice-President. 
J. J. WILLIAMS, Secretary. 



MoLiNE, Illinois. 



MoLiNE '- Paper -• Company 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



lE^rintirag a.nd- "Wra-ppiraf 



PAPER 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiii 1^^ f 1 1^^ 1^ tw^ ' > 'i""ii" ' """ *"" ' 



S. W. WHEELOCK, President. TvT/'-^. 1 i 1^ «C> Til 

E. E. WHEELOCK, Secretary and Treasurer. _LA_L LJ _L -L X ± <S- -j XX_L. 



CjPs-SI^ r=jPs.IID IT'OPi P2..SS.CS-S ■ 



118 WAGONS, CARRIAGES, ETC. 

YOUNG- St H:jPs.E.FOE.D, 



WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS OF 

SPRING WAGONS, BUGGIES, 
ROAD 

CARTS, 




218 and 220 East Front St., DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

MASON'S CARRIAGE WORKS, 

MANUFACTURERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

CARRIAGES, HARNESS, ROAD-CARTS, AND SLEIGHS. 

I^argest and Best Assorted Sto<'k in the Tri-Cities. 




PATENTEF. AND MANUFACTURER OF 



Mason's Patent Runner Attachments 

FOR WHEELED VEHICLES. 

Factory: 119 and 121 EAST FOURTH STREET, 
Repository: UNDER KIMBALL HOUSE, 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



WAGONS, CARRIAGES, ETC. 



119 



MOLINE WAGON COIVIPANY, 



MOLINE 



ILLINOIS. 



CD 

t— 




'■^^ 



Manufacture the Light - Running Moline Farm and Spring Wagons. 



Illustrated ,Af'-t3"'-Vi 
Catalogues v<^i' 'd^, 



TOP BUGGIES, 

CARRIAGES. CARTS. 



PHAETONS, 

AND 

SPRING WAGONS. 

ALSO, AGENT FOR THE 

Columtins Bttggy Co.'s Goods. 



Wholesale Western 
Agent for the 

EMERSON 



FISHER 
CO.'S 




Fourth and Le Claire Sts. DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



1:20 



PUMPS— THRESHERS. 



MOLINE PUMP GO"™^ 



^# 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



WOODEN AND IRON PUMPS, 

Chain Pumps* Pump Tubing, Aqueduct Pipe, Etc. 

DEALERS IN 

PLAIN AND GALVANIZED IRON PIPE, FITTINGS, 
AND RUBBER HOSE. 



^^ 



IXEoline:, 



Illirrois. 



John S. Davis' Sons 



fnanufaetureps of 



Xl^i^eshing 







-^Si 



^^^^^'—' V.'^'lx 






"DRVIS" IROfl POUlEf?. 



•' OSCIliLlATOR " SEPAF?ATOr{. 

DavenpoPt, louua. 



Tf^flCTIOj^ EflGII^ES. 



rUMPS, TUBING, ETC. 




RED JACKET 

ADJUSTABLE 

FORCE PUMPS 

AND 

Lafferty Patent Screw-Cylinder 

WOOD PUMPS 




MANUFACTURED BY 



RED JACKET PUMP CO. 



DAVENPORT, IO\VA. 



Descr'qittve Price List funrislied on iijijiJiciitian. 



Ixlolirxe; 'E^xjLTn^ Tx/orl^is. 



11 



\u 1 



m 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

- WELL ^^^ CISTERN - 



PoPeelain-Iiined-'Cylindep Pumps, Tubing, 
Chain Pumps, Pipe, Chain, Hubber Buttons, etc. 

moiiiHE, mil. 



Send foi» Catalogue and Price Liist. 

Our Style (if Curb Pumps being ori(jinal und entirely diffrrrnt in construc- 
tion from others, is superior to anything on the viarkct. 



122 



FLOURING MILLS. 



Barnard & Leas Mfg. Co. 

MILL BUILDERS ^ MILL FURKISHERS, 




Send for Catalogue. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

SCALPERS, 

Centrifugal Reels, 

PURIFIERS, 

WHEAT CLEANERS, 

BRAN SCOURERS. 

Shafting, Pulleys, etc., 

Moline, Illinois. 



Charles A. Pillsbury & Co. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

manufacturers of 

The best FLOUR 

IN THE WORLD. 

No Brand of Flour was ever so muchi 

Imitated aqd Couqterfeited 

as tl^is. 




Hundreds of Mills arc endeavoring to sell their Flotir on the reputation of this CELE- 
BRATED BRAND. 

Thousands of Grocers are aiding and abettinq this by palming off on their customers other 
Flours, claiming them to he equal to PILLSBU'RY'S )3EST because they can BUT THEM 
CHEAPER, and thus increase THEIR PROFITS at the expense of YOUR BREAD. 



BE NOT IMPOSED UPON. 



None genuine unless the package con- 
tains our circular with directions. 



If your (/rucer cannot, or will not, furnish you with the genuine PILLSBURY^S BEST, 
go to'onc that will. We guarantee every barrel of this Flo^ir to give satisfaction. 

THE KERKER FLOUR CO., Wholesale Agents, Davenport, Iowa. 



FLOUR — INSURANCE. 



123 



PHOENIX MILL CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



SPRING .-» WINTER WHEAT 



I^B-t^nt s-r-id I^S-noy 



FAMILY 



FLOUR 



Davenport, Iowa. 



This Mill is Furnished with the Latest 

and Most Improved Roller 

System. 



F. H. aRIGGS, President. 

F. T. BLUNCK, Sec. and Treas. 

H. POHL, Superintendent. 




L.. K. FISM, 



tJtxstice; of ttie; P^e;a.e(S, 



IXloline;, IliijTLois. 



Life, Aggident, and Fire Insurange 



COLLECTIONS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



REAL ESTATE RENTS pj^^ GENERAL BUSINESS LOOKED AFTER. 



Office, 305 Sixteenth St., Moline Business Association Rooms. 



124 

Established 1852. 



LUMBER, ETC. 



J. M. GOULD, C. R. AINSWORTH, C. M. HILL, 

President. Vice-President. Secretary. 



Dimock, Gould & Co 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



LUMBER, WOODENWARE, LATH, AND SHINGLES, Moline, HL 



ALSO, THE 

Improved Eureka 
Paper Pail, 

Made from Manila stock, \ery strong and durable, 

and will stand Warm Water and Sun 

Heat without injury. 

This Pall is WOUND, therefore SEAMLESS, 
and Very Light. 

Warranted not to Leak or Water - Soak. 

ARE TASTELESS, and will stand any fair 
ordinary usai^e. 

The strong Iron Hoops, top and bottom, protect the 
inside as well as the outside edges of the fail. 

Packed in substantial wooden crates, half-dozen 
in each. 

NOT EXCELLED FOR DAIRY PURPOSES. 

Leading: Paper Pail in the market. 




Patented M"V 16 1882. 



LINDSAY & PHELPS, 



MANUFACTURERS OF AND DEALF.RS IN 



GANG-SAWED LUMBER 

Office, Third St., opposite Gas \A(^orks, 

And at Gang Mill, East Davenport, 



J. E. LINDSAY. 
J. B. PHELPS. 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



CHRISTIAN MUELLER, 

BAND Saw and Planing Mills 

A (jood assortment of Timber generally on hand, and Extra Sizes 
Sawed on Short Notice. 



Mills and Yard 



Cor. Front and Scott Sts. DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



LUMBER, ETC. 125 

F. C. A. UENKMANN, J. I'. WEVERH.iaiSER, JOHN J. kICIMlCRS, 

President. Vice-l'resl. and MaiiaKcr. Sec. and Treas. 

Rock Island Lumber and Mff • C^* 

MANUFACTURERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

Lumber, Lath, Shingles, 

Sash, Doors, Blinds, 

Mouldings, etc. 

ROCK ISLAND, - - ILLINOIS. 

GEORGE W. CABLE, President. J. A. FREEMAN, Secretary. 

Cable Lumber Co. 

STEAM GANG 8AW-M1LL8 



BRIDGE TIMBER A SPECIALTY. 



Davenport, Iowa. 



126 LUMBER, ETC. 

J. S. KEATOR, President. S. J. KEATOR, Vice-Prest. B. C. KEATOR, Sec. and Treas. 

Established 1856. Incorporated April 15, 1881. 



J. S. Keator Lumber Company, 



MANUFACTURERS OF AND DEALERS IN 



GANG-SAWED LUMBER, 

LATH r SHINGLES. 



DIMENSION TIMBER OF ANY SIZE SAWED TO ORDER. 

ESTIMATES FURNISHED ON APPLICATION. 



Office, Comer First Ave. and Eighteenth St., MOLI N E, ILL. 

Mississippi V^H^y M^i^^I^cturers Mutual Insurance Qo. 

ROCK ISLAND, ILLINOIS, 

J. S. KEATOR, President. \VM. B. FERGUSON, Secretary. J. M. GOULD, Treasurer. 



:BO-!PLP2.r3 OF* XDirS.ElO'X'OI^S : 

J. S. KEATOR, J. S. Heator Lumber Co., Moline, III. JOHN M. GOULD, Dimook, Gould & Co., Moline, III. 

BEN. HERSHEY, Hershey Lumber Co., Muscatine, Iowa. J. J. REIMERS, R. I, Lumber & Mfg. Co., Rock Island, III. 

JOHN B. Phelps, Lindsay & Phelps, Dauenport, Iowa. R. MCMlLLEN, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. 

S. H. VELIE. Deere & Co., Mcline, III. H. A. AiNSWORTH, Williams, White & Co, Moline, III. 

W. E. Smith, W. E. Smith & Co., Chicago, III. E, H. ANAWALT, R. I. Lumber & Mfg. Co., Rock Island, III. 

F. C. DENKMANN, Weyerhceuser & Denkmann, Rock Island, III. C. M. AVERY, Avery Planter Company, Peoria, III. 

WM. C. Bennett, Bumard & Leas Mfg. Co., Moline, III. P. M. MUSSER, Musser Lumber Co., Muscatine, louia. 

WM. B. Ferguson, secretary of the Company. 

MANUFACTURER OF 

BUTCHERS' TOOLS, » ^ A ^A/ S Ai^^''*^' ^'^^- 

All kinds of Saw Repairing, Re-grinding, etc. 

Cor. Fourth Ave. and Sixteenth St. ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 

Established 1857. Correspondence Solicited. 



PLOWS, CULTIVATORS, ETC. 

V/alker on Wheels. 



127 



The FLYING DUTCHMAN 



Ulheel Ulalking plow 



Its Superiority Covers the following Points 
of Excellence : 

It is Perfe<'tly Balanced on the AVlieels, 

affording perfect support to the plow, and avoids 
dragging at the corners. 

It can be I>evelecl Instantly, while team is 
in motion, preventing landside and bottom fric- 
tion, and insuring light draft. 

It will Turn a Square Corner, when in or 
out of the ground, on account of the wheels being 
maintained in a natural position. 

The I>an(l Axle lias Sprinjr Connecting it 
with leveling power, which prevents plow from 
being too rigid, and insures an even depth of fur- 
row when passing over dead furrows, corn rows, 
or uneven ground. 

For prices, terms, and agency, address the 








On .Account of the Perfect "IJalance" 

of the plow on the wheels, a toy that can drive 
can handle the plow with ease'. 

It can be Carried Conveniently on the 
wheels for transportation from field to field or on 
the road. 

The Team is Hi»<hed and plow landed in 
the ordinary way. 

It is so Constructed that it can be instantly 
forced into the ground, and has sufficient suction 
to hold it down to its work in the hardest ground. 

These qualities make it a great favorite for all 
plowing, 
manufacturers. 



MOLINE PLOW COMPANY, Moline, Illinois. 






[iberty •< Enlightening the |||orld 

IN REGARD TO THE UNEQUALED MERITS OF 

Tiie FLYING DUTCHMAN Jr. 

The Original and Famous Three-Wheeled Plow, which for 
Lightness of Draft and Working Qualities is the Con- 
ceded Champion of the Whole Plowed World. 

POINTS OF SUPERIORITY. 

It runs lighter than any other plow made, because by 
means of the perfect support afforded by three wheels the 
plow is carried, not dragged. 

It is easy on the team, because there is absolutely 
no weight on the horses' ne<-ks. 

It turns square corners, turning furrows either in- 
ward or outward, as may be desired. 

The rear furrow wheel is locked when plowing 
straight ahead, but unlocked by foot-trip when necessary 
to turn. After the corner is turned it locks itself auto- 
matically. 

The caster wheels running in furrow effectually pre- 
vent any strain on the frame of the plow, or on the horses 
when turning. The plow is turned on the same 
principle as a cart. 

^^,~'_r' The front furrcjw wheel is at point of 

^^ i)low, insuring a uniform depth when crossing 
dead furrows or ditches. 
The land a.xle has a spring that keeps the 
^ plow from being too rigid, and causes it to cut 
level when crossing corn furrows or ridges. 

Tlu' team is hitclied the same as to a walk- 
ing |)low, and the horses draw easily and naturally. 
The plow is in front of the driver, where 
its work is constantly under his eye. 

These, and many other points, fully explained, 
illustrated, and proved in our descriptive circu- 
lars, sent free to any address. 

MOLIIME PLOW COMPANY, Moline, Illinois. 




128 



FLOWS, CULTIVATORS, ETC. 



'J' 



AGLE Manufacturing Company 



MAKERS OF 



with Reversible Teeth, both Wood and Steel Frames. Two 
Sections, 48 teeth ; Three Sections, 72 ; Four Sections, 96. 

with Metal Wheels ; 8, 10, and 12 feet Heads, with 
either Shafts or Pole. 



Golden Eagle Walking Cultivators, 
Golden Eagle Combined Cultivators, 

WITH ATTACHMENTS TO SAME, CONSISTING OF 

Broad-cast Seeders, Fifth Shovels, Cotton and Corn Planters, Mold- 
board Shovels, Cotton Sweeps, and Scrapers, and Attachments 
for Cultivating Listed Corn. 

Tongueless Cultivators. 

Harrows, 

Eagle Rakes, 

Famous Rakes, with Metal Wheels ; Shafts or Pole, 
jt3.11( lUtterS, Single and Double Row. 

Combined Listers. Rotary Drop Planters. 

1 lU VV u» Full Line of Old Ground, Breaker, Brush, and Grub Plows. 

Ptows for Southern Trade. Black-land and Sandy-land Plows, 
Combined Cotton and Corn Planters with Forced Feed, Cotton 
Root Cutters, Grub Plows, Georgia Stocks, Double Shovels, etc. 

We are making a great variety of 

WHEELS 

For agricultural machiinery n^ostlLj. We are 
furqishing our Wheels to rriany of tf\e prin- 
cipal manufacturers of sucl^ niacf\iqery from 
the Atlantic to the Pacific coast. 

All Wheels made by us are nqade under 
our owq patents, We priqt a cut shiowing 
how our spokes are perfectly secured in 
the hub. 

Corresponderfje solicited from all wf\o 
want wheels \r\ quaqtity 

Bettendorf Metal Wheel Co. 

DAVENPORT. IOWA. 




FLOWS, CULTIVATORS, ETC. 



129 



Rock Island Plow Co 



p 

L 
O 

w 

s 



ROCK ISLAND, ILLINOIS, 

Manufacturers of 




7--W 






^\^' 



p 

L 
O 

w 

s 



NEW MODEL PLOWS, 

Wheel -Landside Sulky Plows, Gang Plows, 

"Wheel -Walking Gang Plov\^s, Harrows, 

Stalk -Cutters, Land -Rollers, and 

Check - Rowers . 




SUPERIOR SPRING CULTIVATOR. 

Send for Catalogue. Correspondence Solicited. 

11 



130 BOTTLING WORKS— BREWERY. 

CARSE & OHLWEILER, 

ROCK ISLiND BOTTLING WORKS. 




BLACK HAWK, 8()DA, AND MINEEAL WATERS, 

Imported and Domestic ALES, PORTER, and GINGER ALE, LAGER BEER, and CIDER. 
Cor. Fifth Ave. and Eleventh St., ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 



The following is an analysis of the celebrated Black Hawk Water, by Professor Speidel, of the 
Illinois Industrial University, given in fractions of a single grain : 



Soda and Potash 3,329 

Lime 1.6,769 

Magnesia 8,869 

Chlorine 4.357 



Sulphuric acid i,545 

Silica 0,991 

Iron oxide and alumina 0,258 

Volatile matter 3,855 



Orders shipped to all parts of tlie country. 



Atlantic Brewery 



• • • 



AND MflLT House, 



GEOR-OE Tx^jPLGrKTER., 



PROPRIETOR. 



MOLINE AVENUE, 



Rock Island, Illinois. 



railhoads. 131 



TjPlpce: te^e: 



ROCK ISLAND & PEORIA RAILWAY 



AND ALL POINTS 



EjPlST, SOXJTM:, an.d. SOXJXMIEjPlST. 



OFAST TRAILS DAILY 



CLOSE CONNECTIONS IN UNION DEPOT, PEOEIA, 

WITH ALL RCjADS DIVERGING. 



FAST TIME, CLOSE CONNECTIONS, ELEGANT DAY COACHES 



RECLINING-CHAIR-CARS. 



For Time Tables and all information, call on Local Agent, or 

R. STOCKHOUSE, 

General Ticket Agent. 
H. B. SUDLOW, 

Superintendent. 

ROCK ISLAND, ILLINOIS. 



132 RAILROADS. 

CHICAGO, ROCK ISLAND & PACIFIC RAILWAY. 

This universally popular railway was the first to construct a through line to Rock Island, 
and the fiest to connect the "three cities" — by the erection of a magnificent bridge across the 
Mississippi river at that point. It has been the chief instrumentality in the encouragement and 
expansion of those cities to metropolitan greatness, and the industries they repre-ent to mammoth 
proportions. For many years after the completion of its line to Council Bluff'.-, to a close identi- 
fication with what was for a long time the main transcontinental thoroughfare to the Pacific, it 
w^as satisfied to restrict its business operations to a field which it had conquered for its own 
legitimate traffic, and over which it held an almost undisputed sway. When its vast and growing 
business, and the rapid development of Kansas made an outlet via Atchison and Kansas City 
necessary, it built its Southwestern Division, making those two cities and Leavenworth its terminal 
points. Subsequently it obtained control of the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern and Minn. 
& St. Louis lines and extensions in Iowa, Minnesota, and Dakota, establishing the Famous Albert 
Lea Route, which, from the day of its opening to the public as a through line for traffic and 
trade, has commanded tlie lion's sliare of business between Kansas City and Chicago (and inter- 
mediate points) and Minneapolis and St. Paul. Within the past year — driven to this course by 
the fierce competition of rival and hcstile lines which were attacking its business at Missouri river 
points and depleting its sources of revenue — it determined on a bolder and more aggressive policy 
than that hitherto pursued. After carefully formulating its plans, and raising all the capital 
necessary to accomplish its purposes, it suddenly and boldly struck out into " pastures new ; " and 
the indomitable energy displayed in the construction of its numerous extensions west and south- 
■west of St. Joseph and Kansas City into southern Nebraska and Kansas, has been unexampled in 
the history of railroad building. The network of lines now constituting the Chicago, Kansas & 
Nebraska Railmay (so far as completed) furnish ample testimony to the intelligent direction 
and indomitable executive force which have accomplished, in a time so short, results so amazing. 
Starting at St. Joseph, Mo., it will be seen (by reference to the map of route in this issue) that 
the Chicago, Kansas & Nebraska Railway divides into five distinct mainlines — one west, 
through southern Nebraska, one through northern Kansas, one .southwest and nearly south to the 
Indian Territory, one to the southwest corner of Kansas on the direct line to El Paso, and another 
extending through the interior heart of Kan.sas to an ultimate western terminus. By the conditions 
of a lease made with tlie Union Pacific, this company also has the use of its track between 
Kansas City and Topeka, thus securing the best practicable route for through travel in a south- 
west direction between Chicago and the Pacific coast. The mileage of the different lines con- 
structed thus far during the past year are as follows : 

Miles. 

St. Joseph, Mo., southwest to Wellsford, Kas. (El Paso Line) 340 

Herington, Kas., southwest to Caldwell, Kas. (Gulf Line) 123 

Hortoii, Kas., nortliwest to Nelson. Neb. (Yellowstone Nat. Park Line). ..166 

Fairbury, Neb., southwest and west to Mankato, Kas. (Denver Line) 70 

McFarland to Grant, Kas. (Clay Center Line) 35 

Herington to Enterprise, Kas. (Salina Line) 14 

Kansas City to Topeka (lea.sed line) 68 

Total mileage 816 

Tlie foregoing mileage, all of which has been built within the past year, and nearly all of which 
is now in practical operation, is a record that shows a wonderful enterprise and energy. Many 
more miles will, it is believed, be added to the above aggregate before the close of the year, for 
grading an<l track-laying is still going on as fast as the ground can be put in shape and the rails 
laid. It should be borne in mind that the mileage above given by no means represents all that 
has been accomplished or the capital that has been expended. A vast system of machine and 
work shops have been established at favorable locations ; numerous convenient and commodious 
stations erected, including the splendid official headquarters, hotel, and depot at Topeka; ma- 
chinery plant purcha.'-ed and put in place ; locomotive engines finished and harnessed to trains ; 
while the entire system has been splendidly equipped throughout — coaches of all kinds suited to 
modern travel and witli the latest improvements — by the celebrated Pullman Palace Car Com- 
pany, which fact is alone a sufficient guarantee of its superiority. 

The Rock Island has i.iken a bound into the arena of comtietition which has already given 
it a prominent place among the few great railway systems of the world. The lines now composing 
it are substantially as follows : 

Miles. 

Cliicago, Rock Island & Pacific 1,384 

Burlington, Cedar Rapids tt Morthern 1,039 

Minneapolis «.fc St. Loins 580 

Chicago, Kansas & Nebraska 816 

Total mileage constructeJ anl in operation 3,819 



RAILROADS. 



13:{ 



m mM$.- 



who is uiiacquiiiiited with the Kcography of the country ^ve8t 
northwest, and southwest of Cliicago — that viist, hiKhly-culti- 
vated, thiekly-populatod, and i)rosperous section of the con- 
tinent known as the " Middle- West "—will derive much Important and useful information from 
a study of the following map of the 




CHICAGO, ROCK ISLAND & PACIFIC RAILWAY. 

It is a noticeable fact that the flourishing and opulent cities of Rock Island, Davenport, and 
Moline are the keys to the situation — the very centers of the system to which that railway offers 
the best possible facilities to all points (and in every conceivable direction) reached by its main 
lines, branches, and extensions. Going to Chicago, Peoria, St. Joseph, Atchison, Leavenworth, 
Kansas City, Des Moines, Council Bluffs, Omaha, Sioux Falls, Watertown, Minneapolis, and St. 
Paul, the "(;reat Rock Island," with — 

THE FAMOUS ALBERT LEA ROUTE, 

Constitutes the best, most direct, and universally popular line, or system of lines. Between all 
those points Daily F'ast Kxpross Trains run in either direction, consisting of fine Day Coaches, 
elegant Dininjf-Cars (serving delicious hot meals at 75 cents each), magnificent rullnian I'alaee 
Sleeping-Cars, and (to and from St Joseph, Atchison, and Kansas City) restful Koclining-Chair- 
Cars, seats Free to holders of first-class tickets. The K<><'k Island is admirably and carefully 
managed, operating a double steel-track between the "Three Cities" and Chicago. It aims to 
give satisfaction to the traveling public, assuring its patrons safety, certainty, comfort, and luxury. 

Fast Umited Express Trains daily each way, saving five hours time between Chicago 
and Council Bluffs and between Chicago and St. Joseph, Atchison, Leavenworth, and Kansas City. 
Connections with corresponding fast trains at these terminal points, going through to Los Angeles, 
Portland (Ore.), San Francisco, and all Pacific coast points. California excursions daily at lowest 
round-trip rates. 

For tickets, maps, folders, copies of the "Western Trail," or any information in regard to 
rates, routes, or connections, call on William Rickey, Passenger Agent at Davenport, or address — 

E. ST. JOHN, E. A. HOI, BROOK, 

General Manajjer. Gen. Ti<-kot and Pass. Agt. 

<'III<'A<iO, ILL. 



134 RAILROADS. 

The: loTXj^a. E-outte:. 



Burlington, Cedar Rapids, k Norttiern 

THE SHORT AND POPULAR LINE 



FOR ALL POINTS IN 



IOWA, MINNESOTA, DAKOJA, AND JHE NEW NORTHWEST. 

The only line making close connections with all important lines leading 

NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, or WEST. 

'VT/^'pnpLT for Minneapolis, St. Paul, and all points in Minnesota, Dakota, Manitoba, Mon- 
i\ vylV L n tana, Wyoming, and Oregon. 

Q/^TT'T'^TT for St. Louis, and Points in Illinois, Missouri, Arkansas, Texas, and all points 
Ovv'U i O. South and Southeast; New Orleans and all Florida points. 

H^^A^^ I for Chicago and all points in the Middle, Southeastern, and Eastern States. 

'\"XTT7Q'T^ for Council Bluffs, Kansas City, and all points in Nebraska, Kansas, Colorado, New 
VV XZ/vJ L Mexico, Utah, Nevada, and California. 

Solid Trains with Pullman Sleepers 

ARE RUN BETWEEN 

CHICAGO, MINNEAPOLIS, and ST. PAUL, 

VIA THE 
AND BETWEEN 

ST. LOUIS, MINNEAPOLIS, and ST. PAUL, 

VIA THE OLD-ESTABLISHED AND POPULAR 

St. Louis, Minneapolis, and St. Paul Short Line 

DINING-CARS ON ALL ALBKKT LKA KOl'TK TRAINS. 

The through trains leave Chicago via the Chicago, Rock Island <fe Pacific Railway ; St. Louis 
via the St. Louis, Keokuk & Northwestern Railway, and Minneapolis and St. Paul via the Minne- 
apolis & St. Louis Railway. 

This line operates over i,ooo miles of road, consisting of the Main Line, Burlington, Iowa, to 
Albert Lea, Minnesota ; Muscatine Division, Muscatine, Iowa, to What Cheer and Montezuma, 
Iowa; Clinton Division, Clinton to Elniira, Iowa; Iowa City Division, Elmira to Riverside, Iowa; 
Belmond Division, Dows to Belmond, Iowa ; Decorah, Division, Cedar Rapids to Postville and 
Decorah, Iowa; Iowa Falls Division, Cedar Rapids to Worthington, Minnesota, and Watertown, and 
Sioux Falls, Dakota; Waverly Short Line, Waverly Junction to Waverly, Iowa. 

LAND-SEEKERS' ROUND-TRIP TICKETS 

On sale at all prominent points to its Iowa, Minnesota, and Dakota Land Points. 

Maps, Time Tables, Through Rates, and all information furnished on application to Agents. 
Tickets over this route on sale at all prominent points in the Union, and by its Agents to all parts of 
the United States and Canada. 

C. J. IVES, J. E. HANNEGAN, 

President and General Supt. General Ticket and Passenger Agent. 

CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA. 



RAILROADS. 135 




Railway Companies as Publisliers. 



[S DISSEMINATORS of practical information the Railway Com- 
panies of the United States appear to be doing- quite as much in 
the way of educating the adult portion of our population as is 
done by the public schools in "teaching the young idea how to 
shoot." 

In addition to the matter of fact time schedules, dealing only with 
figures showing the arrivals and departures of trains at all stations, the 
Railway Companies find it necessary to attract the public eye, and call 
attention to the particular special facilities offered, by printing more or 
less expensive posters and hand-bills, and by publishing guide-books, 
pamphlets, circulars, calendars, almanacs, etc., which, while serving to 
advertise the various roads, also convey to the intelligent mind consider- 
able information of a character calculated to instruct the reader thereof. 
The Western roads, particularly, have found it profitable to indulge in 
literature of this kind, and the Chicago, Milwaukee, & St. Paul Railway 
Company takes foremost rank in its publications. 

The sending of a two-cent postage stamp to A. V. H. Carpenter, 
General Passenger Agent, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, will suffice to bring by 
return mail any one of the following named publications which may be 
designated by the applicant : 

Gems of the Northiuest. 
A Tale of Ten Cities. 
Guide to Summer Homes. 
The Overland Journey. 
The Northwest and Far West. 
Plain Facts About Dakota. 
Whist., and How to Play It. 
A Treatise on Hunting and Fishing. 
The Reason Why., etc. 
New Rules for Calculating Interest. 
Latest Postal Regulations. 

Three Decisive Battles — Shiloh^ Gettysburg., and 
Chattanooga. 

All of these publications are finely illustrated, and contain valuable 
information which can be obtained in no other way. 



136 



CYCLOPAEDIA — OEGAKS. 



Johnson's Cyclopedia, 

UNIFORMLY PRONOUNCED THE BEST 

BY ALL WHO HAVE INVESTIGATED THE MATTER. 



Note what is said and who says it: 

"Johnson's Cyclopcedia is a work which is found, in tlie library of Congress, to answer more 
questions satisfactorily than any other work of reference." — A. R. Spofford, LL.D , Librarian of 
Congress. 

Washington, D. C, Aug. 29, 1887. 
Messrs. A. J. Johnson & Co. — Gentlemen: I do not know that I can say more in commendation 
of your CyclopcBdia than to state the fact that, when in my study, I always keep it within reach of 
mv hand for constant reference. 

Yours respectfully, JOS. P. BRADLEY, 

Justice U. S. Supreme Court. 
Davenport, Iowa, December 8, 1887. 
Air. M. T. Brown — Dear Sir : The Democrat-Gazette library contains four Encycloptedias, 
viz. ; The Britannica, Appletons' (American), Johnson's, and Chambers'. Johnson's is used more 
than the three others combined. B. F. TILLINGHAST, 

Associate Editor and Author of " The Three Cities." 

The careful reading and preservation of this notice may save you from 
$60 to $120 in the purchase of a Cyclopaedia. We can furnish any of the 
older and second-class works at half price. 

Encyclopedia Britannica (9th Ed.), .... I2.50 a Volume. 

Appletons' (The American), 2.50 a Volume. 

Sold only by subscription. Correspondence solicited. Address: 

(Western Office.) Davenport, Iowa. 

MoLiNE Pipe Organ Company, 

:]ycoi_.ia^E], ii_,i_,inyrois. 




-manufactirers ok- 



CMrcli and Chapel Orps. 



The iVIost Complete Establishment In the Country. 

Otir instruments are noted for their fine voicing, 
)eauty of tone, and superiority of workmanship 
throughout. 

Testimonials furnished on application from noted 
organists and from churches whose people are using 
our organs. 

*«• ■«<■ 

Illustrated catalogue furnished on application, as 
ipgF ^also estimates for any size instruments, repairs, or 
^^S^g^ tuninj;. 



INDEX OF CONTENTS. 



i3jPs."\7"E:nsrF'OP5.T. 



PAGE. 

Academy of Sciences 54 

Academy of the Immaculate Concep- 
tion 52 

Advance C'Inh 50 

Association, Y. M. C. A 55 

Banks 49 

Business Men's Association .... 50 

Car Shops, C, R. I. & P 42 

Colleges 52 

Churches 55 

Court House 45 

Educational Institutions . . . .51, 52 

Fire Department 54 

Hotels 55 

Home, Soldiers' Orphans' 53 

Home For Friendless 5o 

Hall, Kemper 52 

Hall, St. Katherine's 51 

Historical 3:^ 

Hospital, Mercy 53 

Jobbing Trade' 44 

Library, Public 55 

Lindsay Land and Lumber Co. ... 51 



PACE. 

Loan, Savings and Building Associa- 
tion 50 

Location 30 

Lumber 38 

Manufacturing .\d vantages .... 37 
Manufacturing Industries .... 38-42 

ISIasonic Temple 46 

Municipal Affairs 54 

New Industries 42 

New Buildings 45-48 

Parks 54 

Postoffice 49 

Press 55 

Produce Exchange 50 

Real Estate . 34 

Schools, Public 51 

Seminary, St. Ambrose 52 

Shippers' Association 50 

Statistics, Three Cities 30 

Street Cars 54 

Theatres 55 

Water Works 35-37 



ixion-iKTE:. 



Association, Y. M. C. A 77 

Banks 72 

Barnard & Leas Manufacturing Co. . (>!) 

Boiler Works 70 

Buggy Company 71 

Business Association 74 

Building, Loan and Savings Associa- 
tion 73 

Canal, Lateral 77-* 9 

Corn Planter Works 'i*^ 

Churches 7(> 

Deere & Company t»4 

Deere & Mansur Co 68 

Dimock, Gould & Co ')7 

Hotel 77 

Keator Lumber Co fj8 

Library, Public 7(j 

Light and Fuel Co 75 

Location 57 

Lumber Industries 67 

Malleable Iron Works 70 

Mill Machinery (>9 

Manufacturinti Statistics 64 



PAGE. 

Municipal Affairs 58 

Moline Iron Works 70 

Moline Plow Company 65 

Moline Pipe Organ Co 69 

Moline Wagon Co 66 

New Buildings 74 

Organs 69 

Paper Mill 71 

Plow Factories 64, 65 

Postoffice 73 

Press 76 

Printing Houses 71 

Pump.s 72 

Schools, Public 59 

Scale Company 70 

Statistical Summary 30 

Sylvan \\'ater 58 

Theatre 77 

Wagon Company 66, 67 

Water Power 60-62 

Water Works 59 

Williams, White iS: Co 70 

Woodenware 67 



138 PRINTING AND BINDING. 
■ < i K« ►-. ESTflBlilSHED 1854. 






^(^ 



Printing ^^ Binding 



^ BLiflfiK 'i^ BOOKS * 



4 



317 and 319 Brady Street, 



HENRV EGBERT. 

Ul. F. FIDUHR. -V-, 

CUHUTER CHHrtlBERS. 1) 



k^ DRVEFlPOt^T. 



-V,>. /,s 



INDEX OF CONTENTS, CONTINUED. 



139 



p^ock: isx-jPi.3srrD. 



Banks U-2 

Black Hawk, Sketch of 101 

Black Hawk's Watch Tower .... !)!) 

Building Association iJ2 

Building Operations 92 

Business Association 94 

Canal, Hennepin 97 

Churches 96 

College, August ana 91 

Davenport, Col. George 102 

Engineer's Ofttce, United States . . 9(5 

Hotels 9.") 

Library, Public 91 

Location 82 

Lumber Interest 8fi 

Manufacturing Advantages . . . h:5, 81 
Manufacturing Houses 88 



Milan 99 

Municipal Affairs 95 

New Industries 89 

Park, Sears' 95 

Postoffice 92 

I'ress 95 

Kailroads 85 

Real ]':state 92 

Schools, Public 90 

Statistics, Business 86 

Street-Cars 93 

Sun Accident Association 94 

Telephone Exchange 93 

Trade, Jobbing . 89 

Transportation Facilities .... 85, 86 

Water Power 99 

Water Works 95 



iiJSi.Txoisi.ei.1^ jOLP^KCoPi^jr jp^isttd jPs.p?.SE:isrjPLL. 



Area 105 

Armstrong, Fort 106 

Baylor, Col. Thomas G 108 

Bridges 109 

Capacity 110 

Cemetery, National 110 

Flagler, Col. D. W 107 



Historical 105 

Kingsbury, Major 107 

Prison, Military 110 

Rodman, Gen. T. J 106 

Shops, Character of 109 

Water Power . . , 110 



BRADNER SMITH & CO. 

Paper Makers, 



Headquarters for 




ol every Description 



Writing, Printing, ^ "Wrapping Paper, Envelopes, 

Card Board, Twines, Bags, Tags, Merchandise 

Tags, Gummed Labels, Pin Tickets, 

Notarial Seals, Etc. 



SEND FOR WTE-^V CA.TA.LOGXJE. 



140 



COOPERS ' SUPPLIES - PAINTS— LADDERS. 



EB.HAYWARD&SON, 

■ Manufacturers of and Dealers in^ — ■ 

Staves, ^^ Headings, ^^ Hoops, 

SHINGLES, AND POSTS. 

Waj-ehouses at Chicago, III., and Davenport, lozua. 



PRINCIPAL OFFICE : 

218 East third St. 



DAVENPORT. IOWA. 



Dettiioff Sl Steri^hs, 



-MANUFACTURERS OF- 



Dry Colors, White and Colored Leads, 

READY-MIXED PAINTS ^ PUTTY, 

122 AND 124. FRONT Street, 172 and 174 East 5th Street, 

DAVENPORT, IOWA ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA 



H. H. FELCH. 



NORMAN JORDAN. 



The Only Exclusive Ladder House in the West. 

Davenport * Ladder * Company, 




Firemen's, Farmers', Trestle, Step, and 
Extension Ladders. . 

Office, Third and Farnam Sts. DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



B@" Our Spruce Ladders are much superior to Norway pine ladders, they 
being Hghter, tougher, and not cross-grained. 



INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



PAGB. 

18 
18 
18 
19 
19 
10 



Architects — E. S. Hammatt . 
F. G. Clausen .... 

J. W. Koss 

Attorneys — Heinz & Hirschl 

Pleasants & Hurst 
IJags — Smith & Hughes . . . 
Banks — Citizens National, Dav 

port 2d cover 

German Savings, Davenport 

2d cover 

First National, Davenport . 1 
Davenport Savings .... 1 
Davenport National .... 2 
Scott County Savings ... 2 
First National, Moline . . 3 

Moline National 3 

Rock Island National ... 3 

Mitchell & liynde, R. Island 3 

Bath House — Dr. J. H. Thatcher . 21 

Books — Thomas Thompson .... 22 

Boots and Shoes — Wholesale — S. P. 

Bryant & Co 10 

Retail — George M. Schmidt . . 114 
Bottling Works — Car.se & Ohlweiler 130 

George Wagner 130 

Builders — T. W. McClelland & Co. 16 

John Volk & Co 16 

Business Men's Association, Daven- 
port 3d cover 

Canning Factory, Davenport .... 14 
Carriages, Buggies, Etc. — Young & 

Harford 118 

J. L. Mason 118 

James Mclntyre 119 

Cattle, Thoroughbred jerseys .... 21 
China and Crockery — Jens Lorenzen 11 

Cigars — N. Kuhnen 13 

Otto Albrecht 13 

Clothing — A. Moritz & Bros. ... 9 

Coal— E. G. Frazer 7 

W. P. Halligan & Co. . . . 7 

J. S. Wylie 7 

Coflfee Mills— Washburn Halligan Co. 11 

College, Iowa Commercial Ill 

Commission House — C. S. Streeper . 19 

Martin, Woods & Co. ... 142 

Cooperage — E. B. Hayward & Co. . 140 

Corn Planters — Deere & Mansur Co. 142 

Crackers — J. M. Christy 23 

Roddewig-Schmidt Co. . . 23 

Cyclopa?dia — M. T. Brown . . . .136 

Dentist— Dr. J. B. Morgan .... 19 

Dry Goods — W. C. Wadsworth& Co. 8 

J. H. C. Petersen & Sons . 8 

August StefFen 9 

Elevator, Grain — J. F. Dow & Co. . 115 



PAGE. 

Engraving and Electrotyping — A. 

Zeese &Co 143 

Fertilizer — Wm. Farrell 115 

Flour — Chas. A. Pillsl)ury & Co. . . 122 

Phcenix Mill Co 123 

Foundries — Ebi & Neuman . . . .118 

George Downing 116 

Fruits — Geo. A. Fleming & Co. . . 11 
Furniture— A. J. Smith & Son . . 22 

Frank McCullough .... 22 

Glucose Manufacturing Co 14 

Groceries — Wholesale — Henry Dart's 

Sons 12 

Van Patten & Marks ... 12 

E. T. Smith & Bros. ... 12 
Beiderbecke & Miller ... 12 

Retail — J. M. Glaspell .... 21 
R. C. Chambers 23 

Hardware — Wholesale — Stewart & 

Montgomery 6 

Sickels, Preston & Co. . . . 6 
Retail — Reynolds & Gifford . . 6 

Hats, Caps, Etc. — Cameron & Sou . 19 

Hotels — Kimball House, Davenport 112 
Keator House, Moline . . . 112 
St. James, Davenport . . .113 
Harper House, Rock Island 113 

House Furnishing — A. J. Lerch & 

Bro 5 

Insurance — Security Fire 4 

Federal Life 4 

Northwestern Mutual Life . 5 

Sun Accident 5 

Snider <k Miles 19 

L. E. Fish 123 

Mississippi Valley Manufac- 
turers Mutual .... 126 

Iron Works — George Downing . . . 116 
Williams, White & Co. . . 117 
Donahue, for sale 144 

Knife and Shear Co., Rock Island 15 

Ladders — Davenport Ladder Co. . . 140 

Leather and Saddlery — I. H. Sears 

& Sons 10 

J. & M. Rosenlield .... 10 

Livery — Joseph Gimbel 20 

F. H. Maass 20 

R. Benton & Son 20 

Lorton Bros 20 

Charles E. Burrall 21 

Lumber — Dimock, Gould & Co. . .124 

Christian Mueller 124 

Lindsay & Phelps 124 

R. I. Lumber and Mfg. Co. . 125 

Cable Lumber Co 125 

Keator Lumber Co 126 



142 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS— C0M3IISSI0N. 

Deere & Mansur Company, 



JVCOLHsTE, ILXjinsrOIS, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 




AS A HOE 

GARDEN CULTIVATORS AND SEEDERS. 



O 

W 

o 



n 



9 o 

CO '-^ 

c+ I — I 

o w 
U 



hd 



CD" hj 
•^ c 

w p. 
- <! 


N 

CQ 



■C. D. MARTIN. - 



■O. C. WOODS.- 



■GEO. W. NOTH. 



MARTIN, WOODS & CO. 

Wholesale Fr'uit? and Commission 



PACKERS AND PROPRIETORS OF 



HAWKEYEllMOYSTERS. 



IIV Elast Second street, ID.A.'VE ISTIPOI^Tj IOAA7".A.- 



INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS, CONTINUED. 



143 



PAOB. 

Machinists — Kbi & Neuman . . . .116 

P. D. (^nirk IKi 

Williams, White & Co. . .117 
Meats — E. D. Koheson i^ Sous ... 1(5 
Mill lUiilders — Barnard t'v: Leas Mfg. 

Co 1-22 

Oils — Consolidated Tank Line Co. . 114 
Organs — Moline Pipe Organ Co. . . l;56 

Paper — Moline Paper Co 117 

Bradner Smith & Co. . . .139 
Paints — Dettloft" t^ Stearns . . . . 140 
Photographs — Jarvis White & Co. . 9 
Plows and Cultivators — Moline Plow 

Co 127 

Eagle Manufacturing Co. . 128 
Kock Island Plow Co. . . . 129 

Plumbers — Davis & Co 17 

J. B. Lindsay 18 

Pork Packers — Henry Kohrs . . . llo 

Joliu L. Zoeckler 115 

Printing — Egbert, Fidlar, ct Cham- 
bers 138 

Pumps — Moline Pump Co 120 

Red Jacket Pump Co. . . . 121 

Huntoon Bros 121 

Railroads — Rock Island & Peoria . 131 
Chicago, Rock Island & 
Pacific 132, 133 



PAGE. 

Railroads — Burlington, Cedar Rapids 

iV' Northern 134 

Chicago. Milwaukee & St. 

Paul 135 

Real Estate — J. M. Eldridge ... 24 
Medill & Whitehead ... 24 

John J. Dahms 25 

A. C. Fulton 25 

A. J. Montague 25 

Gustaf Swensson 26 

Roofing — C. G. Hipwell 16 

Sash, Doors, and Blinds— T. W. Mc- 
Clelland & Co 16 

John Volk & Co 16 

U. N. Roberts & Co. . 3d cover 

Saws-;-D. Donaldson 126 

Scales — Victor Scale Co 14 

Soaps — Warnock & Ralston .... 15 

Stair Builder — M. Bunker 17 

Tailors — Thompson & Bahls . . . .114 
Threshing Machines — John S Davis' 

Sons 12(t 

Tile Works, Argillo 13 

Type Writers — Wyckotf, Seamons & 

Benedict Ill 

Wagons — Moline Wagon Co ... . 119 
Washing Machines, Etc. — H. F. 

Brammer & Co ... . 16 
Wheels — Bettendorf Metal Wheel Co. 128 



pf^oto-Zipe 



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GhilCJ^GO. 



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Mining Charts, Plats, Geological Views, 

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Specimens sent on application. 



144 



THE M. DONAHUE IRON WORKS. 



Works are centrally located, corner of Front and 
Scott Streets. 




The plant covers 216x150 feet, and includes Foundry, Mactiine Shops, 
Cajpenter Shops, Etc. Buildings of Brick, with Slate and Metal roofs. 



ESTABLISHED 1865,- 



U. N. ROBERTS & CO. 



WHOLESALE 



Sash, Doors, Blinds, 

Mouldings, Etc. 

BEST OF GOODS AT LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES. 



If you are buyers in this line, we are in position 
to meet your wants. 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

This OOOK contains several fair and candid facts worthy 
of careful consideration, about 

Davenport's Advantages, 

and the prosperity of the many industries located here. 
But if you want to learn more about the city and the oppor- 
tunities for engaging in the particular business in which you 
are interested, you can easily do so by corresponding with 
the Secretary of the 

Davenport Business Men's Association. 

This organization is composed of two hundred representa- 
tive business men of Davenport, who believe they can help 
themselves by helping others, and that there is room enough 
for all. If you desire still further information, visit Daven- 
port in person, and make a full examination. The Busi- 
ness Men's Association will be glad to furnish guides at any 
time, and invite you to make yourself at home in their per- 
manent and comfortably-furnished quarters in the new Ma- 
sonic Temple block, corner Main and Third streets. 




Copyright, 1887, by B. F. TiLniNOHAsx. 
Map showing tlii' K.iiliim'l System of Davenport, Rock I.sland, and Moliiie; the Mississippi, Miasouri, and 
Ohio rivers; the rehilive location to Uliicago, .St. Paul, Omaha, and Kansas City; and the Imme- 
diate Trade Territory of tliis Mauiifactiiriiii^, Mercantile, and Uesidenoc Center. 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



016 092 266 7