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Full text of "Thrill"

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LSU School of Medicine 
in Shreveport 



LIBRARY 
I SUHSC in SPORT 






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THRILL 



First Edition 



1973 



¥ % 



TABLE OF 




CONTENTS 


Dedication 


2-3 


Acknowledgements 


4 


History 


5-7 


First Four Years 


8-35 


Parties 


36-42 


Faculty 


43-63 


Seniors 


64-79 


Juniors 


80-83 


Sophomores 


84-87 


Freshmen 


88-91 


Yearbook Staff 


92-93 


In Memoriam 


94 


Contributors 


95 


Advertisements 


96 



DEDICATION 




Edgar Hull, M.D. 
Dean 




A NOTE OF CONGRATULATION 



One of the most important phases in the development of an institution is the beginning and continuation of tradition. 
Tradition consists in large part of history, which must be written down if it is to be preserved without error for future gener- 
ations. In schools and colleges, tradition can be established only in part, and in rather small part, by faculty and adminis- 
trators; students must play the larger role in founding traditions and recording history. 

Over the years the Thrill, brought into being this year by the students of the L.S.U. School of Medicine in Shreveport, will 
record for future generations the history of our School and its students and faculty, and serve to refresh the memories of 
those who will look back, I hope fondly, upon the years they spent within its walls. 

This first issue of the Thrill initiates a tradition of excellence in the recorded history of this School as seen through the 
eyes of its students. And the students are the school. Congratulations are due to all the members of the present student 
body, who are pioneers in many respects, not the least of which is the pioneer work of beginning a recorded history of the 
students' role in the development of traditions of excellence in the School which is soon to become their Alma Mater. 



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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 



We hope that you will enjoy this first edition of the THRILL as much as we have benefited from 
working on it this year. As you already know, we had a very late start and, as it turned out, that was 
not the only problem we encountered. Our rush schedule made many compromises necessary, and 
many times even as we were preparing sections for the publisher we found large gaps in our cover- 
age. 

I feel, however, that the THRILL is one of many small steps forward which, when added together, 
will plainly demonstrate that the Louisiana State University School of Medicine in Shreveport is one of 
the most progressive schools in the nation. This is a tribute to both the faculty and the student body 
and our ability to work so closely together. One look at the long list of Endowments, Sponsors, and 
Patrons will show that we have many friends outside the school as well. For these reasons I am proud 
to have been a student here rather than anywhere else. 

I would like to thank first my little wife, Linda, who has been so patient and understanding during 
my involvement with the yearbook. Day in and day out she has walked around, over, and sometimes 
even under the plethora of pictures, layouts and letters which have infiltrated our home, trying without 
complaint to dust and vacuum whatever areas were left exposed. For her love I am especially grate- 
ful. 

Mr. Reggie Graves deserves the credit for making this first yearbook a reality. Without his tremen- 
dous assistance at the business end, the initial enthusiasm would surely have been lost in the fog of 
specifications, meetings, phone calls, bids and general "red tape" that accompanies any enterprise of 
this nature. 

Doctor George McCormick, our faculty advisor, was an invaluable asset. Consistently concerned, 
always ready to listen, and never too busy to discuss at length any problem from large to trivial, he 
was a true friend. 

David Carpenter, the assistant editor, was the only one of our staff with previous yearbook experi- 
ence, and to him we owe many short-cuts and much time saved. 

Kenny Sehon was in charge of advertising and this was certainly a difficult job. It would seem that 
company executives are even harder to catch in their offices than physicians! For all your time Kenny, 
thanks. 

Our secretaries, Debby Murray, Suzanne Sentell, and Amy Prather, worked long hours to type and 
send out the multiple array of letters involved. The THRILL would not have been possible without their. 
patient assistance. 

Photography was a particularly ominous job and our photographers deserve an award for putting 
up with the difficulties which confronted them. Thanks to Mike Freed, Mac Fitzsimmons, Tommy Carey, 
Barry Rills, Jeff Janies, Jim Richardson, Bill Haley, and Lenny Kancher for making all the great pictures 
possible. 

There were also students in each class who helped select shots of instructors, classmates, and 
events which were representative of their class during that year. Without Bill Haley, Ken Harrison, 
Russ Keasler, Brant Casford and David Carpenter the annual would surely have been without rhyme 
or reason. Danny Wood and Cliff Dopson spent a great deal of time on the history and caricatures 
and for the fantastic results we are certainly appreciative. 

Lastly, I appreciate all of the unnamed students and instructors who have expressed an interest in 
the THRILL this year. We trust that no one will be disappointed, as our guiding principle has been that 
anything less than excellence would be a misrepresentation. 



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THE HISTORY OF LSU SCHOOL OF MEDICINE IN SHREVEPORT 

by 
Danny S. Wood 



The 100th medical school to be estab- 
lished in the United States was created 
on Monday, May 31,1 965, when Repre- 
sentative J. Bennett Johnston, Jr. of 
Caddo Parish steered a bill through the 
House of Representatives in Baton Rouge 
to found a new medical school in Shreve- 
port. The bill passed, fifty-seven to forty- 
three, in the House, and by June 7 of the 
same year the Senate authorized it and 
Governor John J. McKeithen put the fin- 
ishing touch on the bill with his signature. 
So the Louisiana State University School 
of Medicine in Shreveport was formally 



created in roughly a week — but its 
beginnings go back a little farther — ten 
years, in fact, before the bill ever hit the 
State Legislature. Since 1 955, Dr. Joe E. 
Holoubek had headed a committee of 
the Shreveport Medical Society to get a 
medical school located in Shreveport. 

So in June of 1 965, after ten years of 
work, worry, but always optimism, 
dreams were changed to realities and 
work was turned into more work and 
planning. A dean was needed for the 
school, and a dean was acquired — the 
"Dean of Louisiana medicine" — Dr. 



Edgar Hull. Dr. Hull, the associate dean 
of the L.S.U. Medical Center, was named 
interim dean of the new school by Dr. 
William W. Frye, chancellor of the L.S.U. 
Medical Center. A member of the Univer- 
sity's medical faculty for nearly thirty-five 
years, Dr. Hull had been serving as asso- 
ciate dean of the L.S.U. School of Medi- 
cine in New Orleans since 1954, and 
was also professor and head of its 
Department of Medicine. Also in 1 966, 
Dr. George R. Meneely joined Dean Hull 
as coordinator for development of plans 
and programs for the school, acting 
through the position of associate dean. 

Even with this excellent leadership, the 
fledgling medical school needed money 
— $30.5 million to be exact. The pro- 
curement of these funds had its start in 
December of 1 966 when the State Legis- 
lature voted unanimously to finance part 
of the building of the school through a 
$10 million state bond issue. But there 
was still a matter of $20.5 million, which 
was sought from the federal government. 
Dean Hull stated in 1967, "We're work- 
ing against a November 1 deadline for 
getting in our application for federal 
funds. We're working day and night — I 
work all day and the staff works all 
night." Not only can Dean Hull's wit be 
sensed in this quotation, but also the suc- 
cess of his hard work — for in December 
of 1 969 it was announced that the appli- 
cation for $20.5 million in federal match- 
ing funds was approved by the federal 
government. 

Preparations were already underway 




for the school to acquire its first students. 
A contract was signed March 1 8, 1 967, 
for beginning development of the twelve- 
story medical school, the most costly 
state building ever constructed in Louisi- 
ana, to be located immediately adjacent 
to the Confederate Memorial Hospital. 
Confederate, a 1 ,000 bed charity hospi- 
tal, was planned to be used as the medi- 
cal school's instruction center for clinical 
training. Also, in June of 1967, it was 
announced that the Veterans Administra- 
tion Hospital in Shreveport and all of its 
facilities would be available to the medi- 
cal school. Most of the classes for the first 
two years were planned to be held at the 
V.A. Hospital. Research labs, as well as 
classrooms and offices, were set up at 
the hospital. Besides the full-time depart- 
ment heads and instructors beginning to 
be appointed, in February, 1968, the 
appointment of 138 part-time faculty 




members to the school was announced 
by Dean Hull. All of the part-time 
appointees would participate without 
compensation in the school's teaching 
program. Now that the facilities, staff, 
and administration were beginning to 
take a pleasing form, in September, 
1 969, thirty-two students registered as 
the first class of L.S.U. School of Medi- 
cine in Shreveport — the Class of 1 973. 

The school grew, not only in faculty 
and administrative size, but also in stu- 
dent number. In September of 1 971 , the 
third entering class of freshmen was 
hiked from thirty-two to forty students, 
and a six-year program was begun for 
students directly out of high school to get 
a B.S. degree and an M.D. degree all in 
six years. The fall of 1972 marked 
another historical event for the school — 
on September 16, at 4:00 p.m., the 
groundbreaking ceremonies marked the 



start of the L.S.U. Medical School's 
$30.5 million physical complex, com- 
posed of five buildings, on the grounds 
of Confederate Memorial Medical Cen- 
ter. More than 500 persons attended the 
groundbreaking ceremonies, to witness 
the beginning of the most expensive 
building in L.S.U. history. 

The history of this school would not be 
complete without closing with another 
word concerning Dean Edgar Hull, who 
retired from University service on June 
30, 1973. Dr. Clifford G. Grulee, Jr., 
past dean of Cincinnatti College of Medi- 
cine, replaced Dr. Hull as the school's 
new Dean. Dean Hull has been a major 
cause for the success of this school's 
growth; and with such a fine beginning, 
the school will undoubtedly continue with 
its full development. The Shreveport Jour- 
nal aptly put it, when on September 22, 
1971, it reported, "With all aspects of 
the new med school added together, the 
influence that it will exert on this area is 
incalculable, and as the years go by and 
the school is enlarged, it very well may 
be Shreveport's greatest single asset." 



The First Four Years The First Four Years 



Scrr.tftmi . 




The First Four Years The First Four Years 







Freshmen 



Congregating for the first time in September, 1972, the forty-five members of the freshman class had a vast variety of 
preparation for entrance into the medical center — for instance, Howdy Doody's double, a Brillo pad executive that wears 
his product, a cell membrane "expurt," J. W. the sheriff's red neck deputy, a professional country clubber, Mar Joe's 
understudy, and Bill Toomay's shadow. 

The time in gross anatomy was well spent arguing about pertinent information like the course of the marginal artery of 
Drummond in a retarded albino argali. 






Hey, isn't that an ectopic nipple over there? 



JO 



As the first quarter ended with all the grandeur of three anatomy courses, biochemistry started with a bolt (left-handed 
threads, too). Miraculously surviving 1 5 jack-arounds in 1 2 weeks, we embarked upon the most beautiful course known to 
mankind — physiology. We all thought that the test questions would come from our text (which cost good money), but in 
the immortal words of G. Pyle, "Surprise, surprise, surprise." All in all, there were more survivors to fill the chairs in the 
sophomore lecture room than there were on the U.S.S. Poseidon, but that's about all that can be said. 








Maybe you should see a barber. 



11 




1 m 

Then you depress the perineum. 





I thought she had it on backwards too. 



I think I'll try 151 next time. 



12 






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41 






VP- 














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As a matter of fact, I never have had acid down the front of my pants. 



13 




My girdle is killing me. 






This is the last time I'll use cheese deodorant. 



14 




What did that guy mean when he said we had Betz cell anemia? 



15 



Sophomores 



Early in September in the year of '72 

Us students were a-gathering, at dear old LSU 

Fresh from a summer of leisure and fun 

Most were already wishing the sophomore year was done. 

But we were all there at registration time 

And Reggie Graves was a-waiting to take our last dime. 

Wandering around the lab at VA Shreveport 

Trying to urinate in that cup was something of a sport. 

And then down to X-Ray, roll up on the screen 

The things so damn cold it makes you want to scream. 

Then into the line for the good doctor to examine 

With fingers up your anus, and you a "damning." 

And finally they're through, they've got all that's required 

Your money, your blood, your urine; Oh Lord, you're tired. 

But that's when they do it, they lower the boom 

Wild Bill's in the lab, and he wants us there soon. 

"Welcome back" he said, then he passes out some bread, 

Then we sat agog while he called all those names from his head. 

That first semester was composed of pathology and micro 

And then them Wednesday classes, usually held on Toledo 

Albert and his gang had us laughing till we cried 

Then the first test, and Dr. Jekell dominated Mr. Hyde, 

And that's how it was, we had fun in path class 

But when tests came around, we'd get it in the . . . 

Usually Alton (the lance) vs. Albert (the wit) 

And try as he would, Alton usually lost it. 

Big Albert had more practice, he couldn't be beat 

But it kept Alton in class, which was a pretty good feat. 

But all in all, that ain't nothing compared to micro 

Emil and his crew have a long way to go, 

Most of the lectures were nice and full of info, 

But how they pertain to the real world, I'll never know. 

We had to memorize stuff, coming and going 

And that's a big difference, memorizing and knowing. 

But we all made it through, we even came to class 

We expected a McElroy curve, but it never came to pass. 

But all in all it was an outstanding feat 

And it earned for the department an honor real sweet 

It was Emil and Dick right down to the line 

Would worms or viruses win the ROAD APPLE so fine? 

And in the end the viruses won it all 

And old Dick Jamison had to hang it on his wall. 

Long about this time we had a halloween ball 

(and if you're thinking about that wording, it's not that kind at all) 

This one had costumes and all the frillies 

And most everyone there looked pretty damn silly 

There were bananas and ghosts, clowns and witches, 

Butterflys and weirdos, and Miller with no britches! 

But over them all, the true king of the night 

Wild Bill had on leotards, my God what a sight. 

Never let it be said that Buck's not on our side 

A Dean in that costume? I was satisfied! 



16 



Suddenly micro was over, but path still drug on 
We started pharmacology and a semester was gone 

And twice a week into our class 

Juberg would march, with that pretty little lass 

While he ranted and raved about some genetic mess 

We watched Dr. Herzberg and eyed the length of her dress. 

Now old Juberg got attention too, when he spoke he could fly 

But how can you believe someone who has syphilis of the eye? 

Next rolled around a Christmas party for the whole school 

And like all the others, most people got drunk as a fool 

But Santa's the one, he was so inebriated 

He worked at the medulla level, pharmacologically de-cerebrated. 

The rest of that quarter flew by like a breeze 

Smith put it to us now and then, but we were used to C's. 

And then one day he told us, for everyone to hear 

There would be a party at Shakeys, and He would buy the beer. 

And what a party, oh how many were drunk 

Some said they liked pathology, and some said it stunk. 

But the party wasn't over when we walked from Shakey's door 

We gave Dr. Brown and pharmacology hell, till a quarter of four. 

Just to smell that classroom, of alcohol it did reek 

Some folks slept, but old Joe got up to take a leak. 

Then we started medicine, little white coats and all 

We was some cool then, walking them Confederate halls 

Scared to death at first, then it finally sunk in 

The first test wasn't for a month and a half, what'll we do till then? 

But we kept busy, with something here or there 

And little things happened, some'which I can't share* 

Next was the midterm and a party for the class, 

The midterm was a joke, we were happy just to pass. 

But the party was great, we had crawfish galore 

But most important was the beer, that's what I went for. 

It was a mild party, with a gentlemanly crew 

"disturbing the peace" said the cop, I'll lock up ail of you. 

And over the next weeks, we continued on this way 

Minding our own business, but aggravating folks anyway. 

Take for instance the games of volleyball 

We had several run ins with a fellow named Paul. 

We disturbed him he said, with our little ole game 

Then we broke out a window, oh for shame, for shame! 

So he retaliated in a grown-up mature manner 

By chucking dirt clods at our windows, I swear on the Star Spangled Banner. 

Tempers flared a little, but it didn't get any worse 

I certainly didn't want in it, to be hit with his purse. 

Let me wrap it up by saying we all got thru 

It was one hell of a year, that 1 972 

And I think we owe Mike Trant a special salute sincere 

This yearbook's his baby, without him it wouldn't be here. 

Now the fellows in New Orleans will have to scratch around 

To fill those four pages this year, something else must be found. 



*editor's suggestion 



BRANT CASFORD 



17 



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So that was the carotid artery I ligated 



Roy on a typical date. 




;fc up 



I didn't know that was where a pap smear came from. 



18 





The classic "reverse fish story" syndrome. 



You don't use Head and Shoulders do you? 




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Do you need some help getting it in? 



Gosh, I can feel the superior turbinate. 



19 




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Medical students can be tremendously observant at times 

" 1 





He's got more up there than we do put together. 



20 




fri TTZ 



am Wk 



This is just one of the 20 physiographs which each one of us were to 
have. 









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But Dr. Juberg, that would mean that my mother and my sister were the 
same person. 



21 




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It's too late to study now Andy. 





V 




Over-Exposure. 



22 




The makings of a great orthopedic surgeon. 



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Those suppositories do make you walk funny. 







23 



Juniors 



As we look over our Junior year, we will surely remember those wonderful four o'clock lectures. Who else can boast of 
being exposed to eight hundred dermatology slides in the period of just one wonderful hour? What other period would be 
better to hear about post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis and rheumatic fever for the sixth time? Where else could one 
have heard the one hour lecture on the pediatric allergy clinic history and physical form for the third time? Although we 
tried but never succeeded, maybe some glorious day pathology can use this hallowed time to present a real clinical patho- 
logical conference on Kala-Azar. If it weren't for this time, our daily "Did you knows" may have been squelched forever. 





Win some — Lose some. 




People just don't realize the stress medical students are under. 



Tell him these leeches are to be applied no more than twice a day. 



24 



We will always remember how this wonderful period supplied at least 60% of us with an extra hour's sleep every day. 
The mechanical genius of our semi-skilled slide projectionist was always fully appreciated at these sessions. It was here 
that "Beat the wall" may have last been heard as the response to "How do I get the lights turned off?" We will last but 
surely not least remember how the four o'clock lecture would be heard being described in the most colorful and frank 
terms on afternoons when no lecturer showed up. The academic virtues of our Junior year will certainly never be equaled. 
We will always be able to do a psychiatric history and physical on an alcoholic in less than three minutes. 




You guys can drink Coors if you want — but I think you're making a big mistake. 



25 




No It's not Kala-Azor. 




Did you know this dot turns red in emergen- 
cies? 





(U)( T 



What you got on your mind Mary? 



26 




^A^ba«^ - *->' 




I would rather that you didn't sit on my desk, lay down on the couch over there if you need help. 




S / 



* 




Uh . . .Is that a fact? 



27 




Yeah . . . Psychiatry's working us to death. 






I could have sworn I had those lab values. 



John — I'm not going to ask you to wake up one more time. 



28 




I don't give a *#l«* 



Polk at his best. 



29 



Seniors Become First Graduating Class 





/ 



I didn't like him calling me chuckle-chops. 




Oh Boy . . . Am I excited. 



30 



£2^. 




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Who did that? 



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i 







Booga — Booga — Booga. 



Look but don't touch. 



I'm from east Texas. 




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O Boy, comprehensive care . . . again 





You're right, it did say she was allergic to penicillin. 



32 




The final day arrives . . 





34 







35 



PARTIES 





Some students drink more fluids in one night than they give their patients in a whole week. 



Santa and Weird Elf. 










36 



Health officials would probably ban some of our parties if they saw the conditions under which the 
food was prepared. 




Steve has had so much to drink he's coming un-done. 




37 





What generation gap? 




38 





MMM . . . It's a great feeling. 



39 




It sure takes Joe a long time to loosen up enough to say something. 




40 




§ 










What would your parents say if they had seen you doing that? 



Just fill it half way. 



41 






The original Triple-X . . . Super Female. 



-j- . 






42 







0^1^ f. 




Governor Edwin Edwards 



44 




■y * ■ : ;^^ <■ :~^. r y-;^^^ . : ^-' {:;?■$'*'. v -^ .... '•'-• -.-'*:'.> ,i*V £-.-'> 

Board of Supervisors: Left to right. Chairman Carlos G. Spaht, John Sherrouse, Jr., A. L. Swanson, Murphy J. Foster, Jimmie H. Davis, William S. Peck, 
Jr., Oliver P. Stockwell, James T. Staples, Gordon E. Dore, Dr. James R. Peltier, Dr. A. Eglin McKeithen and William T. Brown. Not Shown are: Louis H. 
Padgett, Jr. and Sargent Pitcher, Jr. 








Chancellor William H. Stewart, M.D. 



45 






Edgar Hull, M.D. 
Dean 



Clifford G. Grulee, M.D. 
Dean Designate 





Charles L. Black, M.D. 
Associate Dean 



William T. McElroy, Jr., Ph.D. 
Associate Dean 



46 



:■ 



\-ii 




M 



George R. Meneely, M.D. 
Associate Dean 




Ike Muslow, M.D. 
Associate Dean 





Marion D. Hargrove, Jr., M.D. 
Assistant Dean 



Guilford G. Rudolph, Ph.D. 
Assistant Dean 



47 




ANATOMY 




i 



Robert C. Clawson 
Associate Professor 




David L. DeSha 
Assistant Professor 




A. Ronald Cowley 
Assistant Professor 



Hayes T. Williams 
Instructor 



BIOCHEMISTRY 



] 



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Robert L. Smith 
Associate Professor 



Anita C. Olson 
Associate Professor 




* 




HI 








Guilford G. Rudolph 
Head 





K \ 



Ralph J. Henderson, Jr. 
Assistant Professor 







49 



, ' v : 
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PHYSIOLOGY 




George R. Meneely 
Head 



William T. McElroy, Jr. 
Professor 




\ / 

Francis Knox 
Assistant Professor 






Patrick A. Duffy 
Instructor 



Kermit A. Gaar 
Associate Professor 



Harold D. Battarbee 
Assistant Professor 



50 




Melvin F. Johnson, Jr. 
Man and Medicine 




Louis M. Frazier, Jr. 
Medical Administration 




Ike Muslow 
Comprehensive Care (Head) 




**. 



Heinz K. Faludi 
Man and Medicine 




Dorothy E. Risinger 
Clinic 



k 



Robert E. Rushing 
Comprehensive Care 



fi 




51 




Albert G. Smith 
Head 




Warren D. Grafton 
Associate Professor 



PATHOLOGY 







George M. McCormick, II 
Associate Professor 




c 



t* 




1 



Irwan D. Sanusi 
Assistant Professor 



52 



MICROBIOLOGY 




Roman Worobec 





"*•» 




Richard M. Jamison 
Associate Professor 



Lucille Rasmussen 
Assistant Professor 



53 




< 



PHARMACOLOGY 




Charles D. Wood — Professor 



... 
Helmut M. Redetzki 
Head 





Richard Don Brown 
Associate Professnr 




Barbara R. Manno 
Assistant Professor 





Ann B. Wilkes 
Assistant Professor 



Joseph E. Manno 
Assistant Professor 



54 



GENETICS 



**»" '"•!•»* 









Victoria Herzberg 



Richard Juberg 



CLINICAL PATHOLOGY 





n 



M 



Ronald Silberman 



Kenneth E. Griswold, Jr. 




Eduardo Blum 



55 



MEDICINE 




Dept. of Medicine Faculty: Front, L to R: Drs. Leslie L. Turk, Stephen P. G.asser, Joseph Loewenste.n Edward E.chner, Manor ^^ J . ^ 
Winder James Johnson, Charles J. Paine, and Ronald B. George. Second, L to R: Drs. Raymond Cush, Paul Sweanngen Ada Kathleen SbnmjJ J*art 
Znola!!!!, Arthur Wad.ington, Ronald Radzikowski, Christopher McDonald, and Trevor From, Jr. Back, L to R : Drs. Lelan Langston, Jr., and Mallon G 
Morgan. 



56 




Edward R. Eichner 
Hematology 





Ronald B. George 
Pulmonary 




Stephen P. Glasser 
Cardiology 



James W. Johnson 
Nephrology 



57 




PEDIATRICS 



Joseph A. Little 
Head 





Juan Gershanik 
Associate Professor 




Ralph W. Baucum, Jr. 
Associate Professor 



58 



OBSTETRICS 
AND GYNECOLOGY 




/ 

j 

M " - 




Anson H. Stage 
Assistant Professor 



Edwin E. Dilworth 
Acting Head 



OPTHALMOLOGY 



ORTHOPEDICS 





Louis A. Breffeilh 
Head 



Carl G. Goodman 
Acting Head 



59 






I 




Charles C. Schober 
Head 



PSYCHIATRY 





Karr Shannon, Jr. 
Associate Professor 



•J*-. 



H 



' 




John Richie 
Assistant Professor 



60 



SURGERY 







Charles L. Black 
Professor 



Frank T. Kurzweg 
Head 




Salvatore J. Dana 
Associate Professor 




t * 



Joel W. Williamson 
Associate Professor 



V 





Paul B. Daron 
Associate Professor 




Rodric M. Yeager 
Assistant Professor 



61 




RADIOLOGY 



Erich K. Lang — Head 

John L. Greer — Associate Professor 



George R. Grimes 
Associate Professor 




Mary J. Wood 
Assistant Professor 



62 



UROLOGY 





Raymond W. Turner 
Associate Professor 



Burdette E. Trichel 
Head 



OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY 





63 



SENIORS 



FRANK P. BRINKMAN, M.D. 

Tyler, Texas 

Madigan General Hospital 
Tacoma, Washington 





THOMAS D. CAREY, M.D. 

Minden, Louisiana 

Methodist Hospital 
Dallas, Texas 




64 




DAVID COOKSEY, M.D. 

Delhi, Louisiana 

City of Memphis Hospitals 
Memphis, Tennessee 





MICHAEL D. COX, M.D. 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 

Confederate Memorial Medical Center 
Shreveport, Louisiana 



65 



OLIVER M. FLETCHER, M.D. 

Shreveport, Louisiana 

Confederate Memorial Medical Center 
Shreveport, Louisiana 





JAMES M. GEIGER, M.D. 
Alexandria, Louisiana 

Madigan General Hospital 
Tacoma, Washington 




66 




■■mJgft 




HAROLD J. GAUTHIER, M.D. 

DeRidder, Louisiana 

St. Elizabeth 
Dayton, Ohio 





MARTHA R. GAUTHIER, M.D. 

Lake Charles, Louisiana 

St. Elizabeth 
Dayton, Ohio 



67 



WILLIAM E. HALEY, M.D. 

Baton Rouge, Louisiana 

Confederate Memorial Medical Center 
Shreveport, Louisiana 







ROBERT E. HARPER, M.D. 

Ringgold, Louisiana 

Letterman General Hospital 
San Francisco, California 




68 



n 



/ 

r It.. «k. 




GEORGE K. HARRISON, M.D. 

Shreveport, Louisiana 

Tuft's New England Medical Center 
Veterans Administration Hospital 
Boston, Massachusetts 





TIMOTHY M. HART, M.D. 

Shreveport, Louisiana 

Confederate Memorial Medical Center 
Shreveport, Louisiana 



69 



GREGORY M. HEROMAN, M.D. 

Baton Rouge, Louisiana 

St. Elizabeth 
Dayton, Ohio 




JACKSON R. HOLLAND, M.D. 

Monroe, Louisiana 

Providence 
Seattle, Washington 







70 





JEFFERY L. JANIES, M.D. 

Buras, Louisiana 

Confederate Memorial Medical Center 
Shreveport, Louisiana 





STEPHEN G. JENKINSON, M.D. 

Shreveport, Louisiana 

Confederate Memorial Medical Center 
Shreveport, Louisiana 



71 



RICHARD C. KAMM, M.D. 

Earle, Arkansas 

Confederate Memorial Medical Center 
Shreveport, Louisiana 




LEONARD B. KANCHER, M.D. 

New Orleans, Louisiana 

St. Joseph's 
Houston, Texas 






72 




DAVID W. LAW, M.D. 

Florien, Louisiana 

John Peter Smith 
Fort Worth, Texas 





ROBERT W. LITTLE, M.D. 
New Orleans, Louisiana 
University of Miami Affl. 



73 



james c. Mcdonald, m.d. 

Jonesboro, Louisiana 

Confederate Memorial Medical Center 
Shreveport, Louisiana 




TANDY W. McELWEE, M.D. 

Natchitoches, Louisiana 

Confederate Memorial Medical Center 
Shreveport, Louisiana 





74 





DANIEL J. MOLLER, JR., M.D. 

Zachary, Louisiana 

Confederate Memorial Medical Center 
Shreveport, Louisiana 





Mi 





PAUL K. NABOURS, M.D. 

Lake Charles, Louisiana 

University Hospital 
Little Rock, Arkansas 



75 



JOHN M. REAUX, M.D. 

Baton Rouge, Louisiana 

Confederate Memorial Medical Center 
Shreveport, Louisiana 





CARL J. RICHARD, M.D. 

Arnaudville, Louisiana 

Confederate Memorial Medical Center 
Shreveport, Louisiana 




76 




I W?\ 




JAMES V. RICHARDSON, M.D. 

Marshall, Texas 

Confederate Memorial Medical Center 
Shreveport, Louisiana 





BARRY M. RILLS, M.D. 

Addis, Louisiana 

Confederate Memorial Medical Center 
Shreveport, Louisiana 



77 



THOMAS Y. SOILEAU, M.D. 

Ville Platte, Louisiana 

Lafayette Charity Hospital 
Lafayette, Louisiana 





WILLARD F. WASHBURNE, M.D. 

Delhi, Louisiana 

Confederate Memorial Medical Center 
Shreveport, Louisiana 




78 




MARKS. WICKS, M.D. 

Wilmette, Illinois 

Passavant Memorial 
Chicago, Illinois 




79 



JUNIORS 





£*.■"• 




Wade Allain 



David Bryan 



Zack Buckalew, III 






Wally Burge 



John Carrington 



Louis Cenac, Jr. 



;■-""■•- -'■ 





Z&.U 




Bill Collier 



Mary Eschete 



to \*l\ 

Mac Fitzsimmons 



80 









i&ii 



David Gaar 
Vice-President 



Gary Groff 



Cary Hernandez 






<¥ I II 



Durrell Hiller, III 



Walter Hingle, Jr. 



John Humphries 





£1U 




m 



James Hundley 



Russ Keasler 



Ken Mauterer, Jr. 



81 






f^l 




Jim May 



James McCue 



Mark Mitchell 





*P % G ), 




V&V. 



Keith Peevy 
President 



Aaron Polk 



Wally Reynolds 




&&.U 








£111 



Bill Russo 



William Slatten 



Dennis Smith 



82 




fkll 





IP 



Stan Smith 



Jerry Snyder 



David Walker 




Paul Watson 





^^i 



Mike Wiemann 



Mike Zambie 




SOPHOMORES 




- IP 



Ka i 



X 








Harris Blackmart 



Mike Bourgeois 



Roy Brabham, Jr. 



Don Brian 








j 

Larry Bundrick, Jr. 



J^ u. 




John Busch 



Mark Callaway 




Rn 




' 1 



JSfc 




Arthur Liles 
Pres. 





CLASS OFFICERS 



Larry Bundrick 
Treas. 



Danny Wood 
Sec. 



Dennis Venable 
Rep. 



84 




*?/" 





fM< 





Brant Casford 



Henry Dupre 



Mike Fleming 



Greg Founds 






Lynn Home 



Jim Hunter 



Eddie Johnson, I 




Charles Lace 




Arthur Liles 





Jim Loftin, Jr. 



Archie Magee 



85 






Andy Marsala 



Alton Martin 



Carl McLemore, Jr. 




\ 



Richard Miller 





I zsm mgs 





m 



m 



W 








Jimmy Moss 



Pat Pennington 



Neal Prather 



Charles Price 







Glen Saucier 



Ed Seeliger, Jr. 



Ken Sehon, Jr. 



86 




Jr* 


y 


\ fT 




\ V y 




\-/ 


$&% 


i 





Glenn Sholte, Jr. 





Posted Spurlock 






Paul Swearingen, Jr. 



Bob Taylor 





<fe£U 





, ; v.. ;. 



Joe Touchstone 



Mike Trant 



Dennis Venable 



Danny Wood 



87 



FRESHMEN 



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^■■'m^,4m^^ 




i] I 
II : 

Mm 
■I 



SCHOOL OF MEDICIN1 
SHREVEPORT 



4 ^ 




Freshman class officers: Lloyd Frye, Vice-President; Dick Williams, Secretary- 
Treasurer; John Whitaker, President. 











Kemp Amacker 
Don Bailey 



Jeff Andrulot 
Mike Briggs 



88 





Larry Broadwell 
Ron Cowley 



David Carpenter 
Russ Cummings 





Lydia Conlay 
John Danzell 




George Cowart 
Gerry DeRouen 



Dermotologist doing his thing. 




David Donald 
Pat Duffy 



Cliff Dopson 
Tripp Edwards 



89 




Scott Emerson 
Ken Harper 



Mike Freed 
Mike Harper 




«• 





V 




-*t 



\-- 4 



i 



Lloyd Frye 
Kirk Hayes 



Brad Garber 
Larry Hill 










1 



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Eddie Johnson 
Peter Kotcher 



90 



Clint Jones 
Sonny Milstead 



Johnny Jones 
Thorn Mims 



Mike Keating 
Bill Parker 





Dave Powell 
Bob Savory 



Paul Riehl 
Jon Snelling 





n% 




r <>■ 



Ramon Rosenkrans 
Bill Spires 



Jim Saterfiel 
Madge Van Ness 








-i^.. 



David Walsworth 
Dick Williams 








Chester Weimer 
Hayes Williams 







91 





I'd be glad to help, whatever you need just name it. 



Mr. Reggie Graves — Business Manager 








V 



.^ '^ * 



Money? 



j^ #. 




That fellow tried to sell me Secrelariat one time for a thousand dollars 
but I told him he was crazy. 



92 



Life would really be a drag if it weren't for pathology. 
Doctor George McCormick — Faculty Advisor 





STAFF 



C. M. Trant — Editor 




Sorry! 



f 







*" f 




David Carpenter — Assistant Editor 



Ken Sehon — Advertising Editor 



93 




We join in remembrance of two men of 
the School of Medicine community. We 
regret the loss of our friends. 



Doctor Robert D. Knapp, Jr. 




/--> 



. B 



94 






oO 



I 



- 



Sherman Matthews 



Many thanks to all of our following friends: 



Dr. and Mrs. C. Elmo Boyd 
Dr. and Mrs. W. H. Browning 



ENDOWMENTS 

Dr. and Mrs. Edgar Hull 
Dr. and Mrs. Jason C. Sanders 
Drs. Carroll, Carlisle, Marshall, and Williams 



Artex Manufacturing Co. 

Dr. and Mrs. Ralph W. Baucum, Jr. 

Drs. Bays, Herold, and Burda 

Dr. and Mrs. N. J. Bender 

Dr. and Mrs. James R. Bergeron 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles ! . Black 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard P. Bland 

Eduardo Blum, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Louis A. Breffeilh 

Don H. Burt, M.D. 

Drs. Carl and Sue Chambers 

Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth Cummings 

S.J. Danna, M.D. 

Stuart DeLee, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. John H. Dixon, Jr. 

Mr. Mayo Drake 

James H. Eddy, Jr., M.D. 

Dr. John W. Eschenbrenner 

Heinz K. Faludi, M.D. 

Mr. Murphy J. Foster 

Dr. and Mrs. William Wade Fox 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis M. Frazier 

Dr. Ronald B. George 

Dr. and Mrs. Juan J. Gershanik 

Dr. and Mrs. Carl G. Goodman 

Dr. and Mrs. Warren D. Grafton 

Reggie and Phyllis Graves 

Dr. and Mrs. Douglas W. Greve 

Dr. George R. Grimes 

Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth E. Griswold 

Dr. and Mrs. Marvin K. Hall, Jr. 

Drs. Hall, Woods, and Teagle 



SPONSORS 

Dr. and Mrs. Marion D. Hargrove, Jr. 

Drs. Haynes and Spring 

Dr. and Mrs. John A. Hendrick 

Drs. Joe and Alice Baker Holoubek 

Hugh C. Ilgenfritz, M.D. 

James W. Johnson, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Melvin F. Johnson, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Bryson D. Jones 

Joyner's Pest Control 

Dr. Emil Kotcher 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank T. Kurzweg 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert Todd Lafargue 

Harold B. Levy, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Little 

Eugene C. St. Martin, M.D. 

William A. McBride, Jr., M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. C. H. McCuller 

Dr. William T. McElroy, Jr. 

Juanita R. Meador 

Dr. and Mrs. George R. Meneely 

William M. Monsour, D.D.S. 

Anita C. Olson, Ph.D. 

Arey, Murff, and Paula O'Neal 

William S. Peck, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. J. Paul Peters 

Dr. and Mrs. E. Blaine Pittman 

Dr. and Mrs. Jack W. Pou 

Dr. and Mrs. Harold Quinn, Jr. 

Drs. Helmut and Joyce Redetzki 

Dr. and Mrs. Adrian F. Reed 

Dr. and Mrs. John N. Richie 

Edith W. Rigsby, M.D. 



Dr. and Mrs. Archie E. Robinson, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. John Paul Robinson 

Joseph Charles Schaefer, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles Schober 

Scott Pest Control Service 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert W. Sharp 

Dr. and Mrs. Ronald Silberman 

Ben B. Singletary, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. A. H. Stage 

Dr. and Mrs. David C. Swearingen, Sr. 

Dr. and Mrs. J. Paul Swearingen, Sr. 

Dr. Ulas C. Swindle, Jr. 

Donald E. Texada, M.D. 

Herbert D. Tucker, M.D. 

The Upjohn Company 

Varian Instrument Division 

Dr. and Mrs. Rufus F. Walker, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. W. Juan Watkins 

Drs. Mary and Charles Wood 



PATRONS 



Dr. and Mrs. Robert E. Braswell 

Dr. and Mrs. A. Ronald Cowley 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul B. Daron 

Michael Ellis, M.D. 

Henry Gallager, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Ralph Henderson, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. John W. Jackson 

Dr. and Mrs. R. M. Jamison 

Barron Johns, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Bernard Kalstone 



Collier A. Kinnebrew, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. James E. Knighton 

Dr. L. V. Landry 

Robert Picard, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Alphonse Podrizki 

Dr. and Mrs. Karr Shannon 

Mr. and Mrs. Carlos G. Spaht 

T. B. Tooke, Jr., M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Clarence H. Webb 



95 



ADVERTISING 



BEST WISHES 

WYCHE 
TRAVEL AGENCY 

1 846 Fairfield 

Shreveport, La. 

71161 



SHREVEPORT'S 

REMODELING 

SPECIALISTS 




THE HANDYMAN, INC. 



3211 W. 70th 

Shreveport, La. 

686-7575 



TEXAS PHARMACEUTICAL CO 

The Company That Cares for Your Skin 

P.O.Box 1659 
San Antonio, Texas 78296 



LUBRIDERM® 
LUBATH® 
SEBA-NIL® 
METED® 



MAKERS OF: 



LIQUIMAT® 
SUNDARE® 
SUNSTICK® 
ALLERCREME® 



HYPO-ALLERGENIC COSMETICS 



96 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

SCHERING CORPORATION 




c§ 




BEST WISHES 

OLIVER H. 

VAN HORN 

CO., INC. 

228 Spring St. 
Shreveport, La. 




Caddo Office Supplies 

A DIVISION OF ZETCO, INC. 

429 CROCKETT AT MARSHALL TEL. 318/422-0366 
P. O. BOX 285 SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 71162 






OFFICE FURNISHINGS AND INTERIOR DESIGNS 





97 




SCIENTIFIC BOOKS, INC 



MEDICAL AND SCIENTIFIC BOOKS 

of 

ALL PUBLISHERS 




6632 So. Main 
Houston 77025 

1 47 So. Liberty 
New Orleans 701 12 



3770 Zip Industrial 
Atlanta, Ga. 30354 

891 1 Directors Row 
Dallas, Texas 75247 



"Best Wishes" 



Standard Plumbing 

& 

Heating Co., Inc. 



ROTO-ROOTER 
SEWER SERVICE 

2001 Marshall St. 
Shreveport, La. 



HEYDEMANN 

INSTRUMENT 

CO., INC. 

72 1 6 Mimosa Lane 
Dallas, Texas 75230 

(214)363-3033 



98 



YERVS w 

Ol\kS~HUCTI0N Ca 



HOMER O. BYERS 
Gen. Contractor 

227 E. 70th St. 
Shreveport, La. 



Best Wishes 

XEROX 

DON R. COOPER, Sales Representative 

Mid-South Towers 41 8 Travis Street 

Shreveport, Louisiana 71 101 

318 424-5203 



ELECTRIFIED WATER 
CO. 

301 East Herndon 
Shreveport, La. 




99 



THANK YOU 
LSU MEDICAL SCHOOL 

FOR 
31 NEW CUSTOMERS 




P. 0. BOX 27 
2002 LINE AVENUE 
SHREVEPORT, LA. 71161 
318-424-8186 



100 



It's the real thing, 
Coke. 



Trade-mark @ 




Lawn & Garden 
Equipment 

R. W. Hodge & 
Sons, Inc. 

8 120 Mansfield Road 



CARPET, LIGHTING FIXTURES AND MIRRORS 

House 
of Carpets Inc. 

Phone 865-4281 
304 W. 70th St. — Shreveport, La. 



P 



OLIVETTI UNDERWOOD 
Represented By 

BUSINESS MACHINES & 
COMPUTERS, CORP. 

Phone 422-9255 

COMPUTERS • ACCOUNTING MCH. 

CALCULATORS • ADDERS • TYPEWRITERS 

J. M. "PETE" MESSICK 1 406 Southern Ave. 
President Shreveport, La. 



VICTORIA LUMBER CO. 

3408 Hollywood 

Shreveport, La. 

631-1811 

OPEN WEEKDAYS 7:30-9:00 
SAT. 7:30-4:30 

HARDWARE — LUMBER — ELECTRICAL 



Best Wishes 

GEO SPROULL 
CO., INC. 

Makers of 
Silver Seal Paints 

522 Common St. 
Shreveport, La. 



101 



mmf%?? 



Archives 1973 c.4 
Thrill 









LSU School of Medicine 
in Shreveport