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Vol. XII 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., SEPTEMBER 17, 1909 



Number 1 



FLAG RUSH 

THIS AFTERNOON 



FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORES 
WILL CLASH AT FOUR. 



Commission Committee Posts Rules. 

Scrap in Front of Cutler as 

Usual — Some New 

Provisions. 

Shirts a-flyin' and blood a-squirtin' 
and Freshies a-scratchin' and Sophs 
a-clawin' and all a-howlin' and kodaks 
a-clickin', and all for fifteen minutes. 
Some 1 eople wouldn't mix with that 
for fifteen dollars. But the Freshies 
and Sophs will do it for every bit of 
the fifteen minutes. The scrap com- 
mittee has so decreed and it will be 
on hand at 4 o'clock this afternoon 
to watch the lower classmen malt'eat 
each other. So will everybody else 
be there. "But why must this out- 
rage be?" protests the new one. Out 
of the goodness of his heart the re- 
porter answers: 

The Associated Students Commis- 
sion assembled in Hagerman parlor 
last Saturday afternoon and discussed 

Continued on Page 5. 

a, ® 

tb This is the first issue of ^ 

O Volume XII of The Tiger, ^ 

tl) the weekly newepaper of Colo- ^ 

Hi rado College. It is distjibuted m 



e free. Next Monday after ^ 

$ chapel, subscription blanks will ^ 

^ be passed. For $1.25 you can ^ 

O secure the rest of the file which ^ 

a^ will appear every Friday even- © 



4» 

db 
9D 



ing throughout the school year. 



J. J. HAGERMAN DEAD 



GENEROUS TRUSTEE OF COL- 
LEGE SUCCUMBS TO HEM- 
ORRHAGE IN ITALY. 



President Slocum Pays Tribute to 

Personal Friend for Whom 

Hagerman Hall Was 

Named. 



The campus flag hung at half mast 
last week, out of respect to J., J. 
Hagerman, trustee of Colorado Col- 
lege and western empire builder, who 
died at Milan, Italy, last Monday 
night. Hagerman Hall was named 
for Mr. Hagerman in iSSg, five years 
after lie came to Colorado Springs 
for his health. Ever since his coming 
to this city in 1884 he has been a 
staunch friend and benefactor of the 
College. President Slocum, in mak- 
ing a statement to the newspapers, 
said: 

"I have known Mr. Hagerman ever 
since he came to Colorado, twenty- 
five years ago. It is to me the loss 
of a very warm personal friend who 
has been one of Colorado College's 
best benefactors. He gave generous- 
ly to the institution. The first build- 
ing to be erected on the campus after 
iny coming here was named by the 
board of trustees Hagerman Hall. 

"Mr. Hagerman was a man of very 
unusual personal force and, when one • 
came to know him closely, he found 
one of the richest and finest hearts 
and. minds. His love of books and 
good pictures was very rare in this 
active man of affairs. He had with- 
out doubt the largest and most com- 
plete private library that has ever 
been in Colorado Springs, andi he 
was a constant reader of the best 
books. 

Continued on Page 4. 



STATE ATHLETIC 

SITUATION 

FACULTY CONTROL IN MOST 

INSTITUTIONS THIS FALL. 

Boulder and Denver at Outs — Our 

Freshmen Promising — Old Men 

Back Strong — Siddons 

Prognosticates. 



Although far from uniformity in 
regard to athletics, the various insti- 
tutions around the State are begin- 
ning to realize the vahie of a stand- 
ard set of relations, and by the end 
of this year the goal will probably 
be reached. 

Interest in athletics last spring was 
greatly handicapped by the split due 
to an a-gument ovejr "faculty con- 
trol." Denver University and the 
School of Mines refused to consider 
"faculty control" and their baseball 
teams fought it out auKing them- 
selves. The University of Colorado, 
the Aggies and C. C. met and agreed 
on a set of rules. Among these were 
the faculty control rule and the one 
semester rule. The faculty control 
rule provides that the faculty shall 
have a majority on the athletic board 
of control. The oi.c semester rule 
prohibits Freshmen participating in 
college athletics the first semester. 
This, of course, allows all Freshmen 
entering school in the fall to engage 
in sp.ing athletics. 

The situation at preesnt is the same 
as it was last spring with the possible 
exception of the School of Mines. 
The board of arbitevs at that institu- 
tion has given the athletic board the 
privile.ge of faculty control, and the 
question will be voted on by the stu- 
dent body in the near future. 

Our first big game this fall will be 
fought out on Washburn Field, Oct. 

Continued on Page 8. 



THE TIGER 



HOW THEY SCATTERED 



BRIEF PARAGRAPHS ABOUT 
OUR FACULTY MEMBERS. 



With the exceptions of Prof. Pat- 
tison of the English depanment, Prof. 
C. W. D. Parsons. of the Physics de- 
partment, and Prof, Armstrong of the 
Engineering school, the members of 
the faculty have all returned. They 
spent the summer in various places 
and m various ways, but seem to 
have come back universally anxious 
to get to work again. 

Dean Parsons taught a class in the 
Y. W. C. A. ci>nference at Cascade. 
He was in the Springs till the mid- 
dle of August, when he made a hur- 
ried trip East, spending ten days in 
the Adirondack woods and the rest 
of the time in New England. 

Prof. Howe spent the sumemr at 
Ft. Adams, Newport, R. I., with his 
father. Col. Howe of the U. S. Army 
The weather was cool, and the water 
Vi'as fine. 

Prof. Gile was at Rye Beach, New 
Hampshire, He says that he spent 
the time lazily doing nothing, but no 
one who knows him will believe that. 

Prof. Clark divided his time be- 
tween rehitives at Lake Alinnetonka, 
Minnesota, and work on his Doctor's 
degree at the University of Wiscon- 
sin. 

Prof. Schneider visited relatives in 
Iowa and spent some time at his old 
college at Tabor. 

Miss Reinhardt was in the Springs 
and Denver all summer. 

Prof. Smith preached in Colorado 
City. He claims the record of good 
behavior. 

Prof. Noyes visited his old home in 
South Pyfield, Mass., during the early 
part of the summer and spent the 
rest of the time in Estes Park and 
at his home here. 

I'.of. Griswold was doing expert 
mining work f(jr the government for- 
estry service in Wyoming. 

Prof. Woodbridge camped in the 
mountains near here, when not at 
home in the city. 

Prof. Strieby lived in his summer 
camp at Crystola. Mrs. Strieby was 
in California. 

Prof, Albright was in cha-ge of the 
registrai's ofhce at the College. He 
reports a very busy time. 

.\fter finishing his work at Har- 
vard, Prof. Rrehaut spent the time 
with friends in Maine. 



Miss Sahm spent the summer here 
and traveling in the State. 

Prof. Hills sailed for Europe early 
in the spiing, and landed at Gibral- 
tar. Ej-om there he went to Morocco, 
spending some time around Tangiers. 
Returning to Spain, he spent a month 
tra\'eling there. He then returned to 
Gibraltar and took a steamer to Na- 
ples. From Naples he traveled north 
through Switzerland, going thence to 
Pa; is. He bought books for the Col- 
lege in iNIadrid, JMilan, and Paris. He 
sailed for home on the George Wash- 
in.gton from Cherbourg. 

Mrs. Goodale and Miss Sater occu- 
] ied Mrs. Bemis' residence in the 
city. 

Prof. ]\Ioore spent his summer 
camping around the Peak and cruis- 
ing on the Great Lakes. 

Dean Cajori lef.t soon after com- 
mencement for California. While 
there he climbed Mt. Wilson, visited 
the Carnegie observatory, and distin- 
guished himself by saving a woman 
from drowning at La Jolla. During 
the summer he wrote a paper for Sec- 



NEW INSTRUCTORS. 



College Opens With Strong 
Added to Its Faculty. 



Men 



ticn 



)f the British Association. 



Miss Canon made up for her 
montli's absence from duty by putting 
the Library in better shape than it 
h.as e^ er been before. 

Miss Brown spent most of the 
time in Indiana. 

Mr. Ormes was in the Springs and 
at Crystola with his family. 

Miss Gilbert was in the Springs. 

Miss Loomis was at Lakewood, 
New Jersey, for a ' hort time and in 
the White Mountains, New Hamp- 
shire, during the rest of the summer. 

Prof. Collais superintended the 
building of the new hotel at Manitou 
Park till the middle of the summer 
and then took a t.ip East. 

Prof. Lyon did civil engineering 
work in the State. 

Prof. Ruger did work in Columbia 
University. 



COLLEGE SERVICE. 

P.esident Slocum will preach at 
the First Congregational Church Sun- 
day morning at eleven o'clock to the 
students of the College and Academy. 
This is the opening Sunday of the 
new college year and it will be a fine 
thing if every student will for this 
Sunday be at this college service. 
Dean Parsons will assist and everjj^ 
thing will be done to make it a col- 
lege day and to have every student 
feel at home. 



The faculty is doing its part to 
swell the enthusiasm that exists 
everywhere for the year that has just 
begun. 

Ihe new members are: 

P/ofessor John Mills, professor of 
physics and electrical engineering. 

Prof. Walter J. Morrill, of the 
School of Forestry. 

Assistant. Prof. Roger H. Motten 
of the Department of English. 

Fred Mortimer Green, instructor in 
electrical engineering. 

Professor Mills is a graduate of 
Chicago University, where he held a 
fellowship in Physics during i90i-'02. 
The following year he was a fellow 
at the University of Nebraska, where 
he took his A. M. degree. He was 
elected to the scholarship fraternity 
of Phi Beta Kappa while at Chicago 
University and to Sigma XI at the 
University o"^ Nebraska. After four 
years as instructor in the University 
of Cleveland, he entered the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology to 
complete his engineering studies. 
Here, besides devoting his time to 
enginee/ing studies, he was instructor 
in Mechanical Drawing and Descrip- 
tive Geometry. He wrote in connec- 
tion W'ith a colleague a text-book, 
"Electricity, Light and Sound," for 
college sophomores, which is publish- 
ed by Ginn & Co. In the past he has 
also made minor contributions to the 
American Physics Review. 

Professor Morrill, of the School of 
Forestry, did his undergi-aduate work 
in the University of Maine and stud- 
ied forestry in the Yale School of 
Forestry, of wdiich he is a graduate. 
Seven years ago he commenced work 
with the Bureau of Forestry as 
Cruiser, in Maine. The following 
year he cruised in the Appalachian 
mountains and the year after that in 
western Kentucky. For the past four 
years he has worked in the Forest 
Service in Colorado, leaving the 
supervisorship of the Rio Grande 
National Forest to accept t'le profes- 
sorship of Forest y in the Colorado 
College. 

During the present year he will be 
acting dean of the. College of Fores- 
try. The appointmeni of an assistant 
professor will be made in a few days. 

Professor Motten is a graduate of 
Alleghany College, where he special- 
ized in English and in the Classics. 



THE TIGER 



He has also completed the greater 
part of the work called for the Ph. 
D. deg ee. He has had years of ex- 
perience as a teacher and was asso- 
ciated f f r two ye;irs with Westmin- 
ster University. Professor Motten 
has written several ijlays which have 
been presented in different parts of 
the country. 

Mr. Gi-een, instructor in electrical 
enginee'ing, comes from the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, of 
which he is a graduate. 



ENGINEERING SCHOOL AT MANITOU PARK 



"HAG" PROSPERS. 



All Floors Full and Applicants 
Turned Away. 



Under the management of the Y. 
M. C. A., the boys' dormitory has 
been undergoing a process of repairing 
for the last month. About $500 has 
been expended on repairs and im- 
provements. Not the least of these 
is the remodeling of the office, a 
work which is due to the thoughtful- 
ness and generosity of the Woman's 
Educational Society. This will be 
greatly appreciated by the boys of 
Hagerman Hall. 

Improvements on the building is 
not all that indicates prosperity. The 
number of applications for rooms has 
greatly increased, a fact which, shows 
that "Hag" is becoming more and 
more desirable as a residence hall. 
This year every room was engaged 
and thirty applicants turned away 
ten days before the opening, some- 
thing which has never been before. 
Hagerman Hall now has sixty room- 
ers, where fifty is the most that it has 
had heretofore. 

This is persuasive evidence that a 
new men's building, Y. M. C. A. dor- 
mitory, is not only desired but is ab- 
solutely necessary. 



FIRST SUMMER COURST LARGELY ATTENDED. 



Thorough Courses — Competent Instructors — Ideal Camp — Practical Work 

and Satisfied Students. 



Summer Courses at Manitou Park. 

Distinct Success. Aims 

Accomplished. 

The Colorado College School of 
F.ngineering is to be highly com- 
inendcd for securing and permanent- 
ly establishing a summer school of 
surveying. 

The v^hie of such an adjunct to the 
Civil Engineering Department is in- 
estimable. While the duration of a 
year's work is lengthened four weeks, 
the thoroughness of the work for 
the entire year is g'eatly enhanced. 

In the past, when field practice 
had to be crowded into a heavy 
schedule, two afternoons a week did 
nor admit of ample time to carry on 
the practical application of the prin- 
ciples of surveying in as thorough a 
manner as was thought necessary. 

rh:e prescribed course in engineer- 
ing is a heavy one and most men, 
especially the new students, have 
mo.e wcrk than they can find time 
for. 

As was the case of a good many 
who pursued the study of Civil En- 
gineering, some of the men would 
feel that tlie time spent in the field 
was wasted, and that they could use 
that tin'ic to better advantage on 
tiieir other studies. Consequently, 
dissatisfaction and a lack of interest 
vv(nild lower their scholarship. In 
view of these facts the Colorado Col- 
lege Summer School of Surveying 
was instituted. 



It was demonstrated at Manitou 
Park that a greater amount of work 
and more efficient work could be done 
in the same number of hours than 
had been done under the old condi- 
tions. 

The cutting out of- a bulk of labor- 
atory work in one or more courses 
during the last semester and crowd- 
ing u all into a period of four weeks 
made it possible to devote more time 
t(T othe ■ courses in the curriculum. 
The thoroughness of a course, where 
the undix'ided attention can be turned 
into one channel, even though it be 
but for a short period, no one can 
rjuestion. 

Colorado College was exceptional- 
ly fortunate in the choice of able 
directors. The work of last year's 
summe- school was conducted by 
Professor T. B. Sears of the depart- 
ment of Civil Engineering at the Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, Professor H. A. 
Winkenv.-erder of the Colorado 
School of Forestry, and Mr. H. H. 
Davis, a most able assistant. It 
would have been hard to find better 
men for the work, all being able 
teachers and popular with the stu- 
dents. 

Courses. 

There were three courses given 
during the summer session. 

First — Field practice in Plain Sur- 
veying. 

Second — Railroad Field Work. 

Continued on Page 8. 




ENGINEERS AND FORESTERS AT MANITOU PARK SUMMER SCHOOL 



THE TIGER 



THE HANDBOOK. 

Kittleman's Fourth Yearbook a 
Splendid Publication. 

The Christian associations have 
just issued to the student body one 
of the neatest and most complete lit- 
tle handbooks ever published at Colo- 
rado College. It contains informa- 
tion as to student organizations, the 
year's calendar, athletic statistics, im- 
portant dates, pages for memoranda, 
a directory of college advertisers, and 
everything else a student would need 
to start the year right. One of the 
new features of the book is the dia 
gram of the three floors of Palmer 
Hall. Another is the pocket in- 
side the front cover to be used for 
the season ticket to all student con- 
tests, athletic and otherwise. S. W. 
Kittleman was editor and L. E. Gris- 
wold was manager. Vesta Tucker 
and Louise Kampf of the Y. W. C. 
A. assisted the editor. This is the 
fou.th year that Kittleman has edited 
the handbook. 



CUTLER ACADEMY. 

College Prep. School Opens With 

Large Attendance and Bright 

Prospects. 



EMPLOYMENT BUREAU IS 
ACTIVE. 

Twice as Many Students Working as 
Fbrmerly. 



TEACHERS' EXTENSION 
COURSES. 

The College has offered the follow- 
ing teachers' extension courses, re- 
serving the right to withdraw any 
courses not elected by at least six 
candidates; 

English J — Shakespeare, three 
plays will be carefully studied, with 
special attention to the language. 
Outside reading- will be assigned, one 
hour. Professor Woodbridge. Col- 
lege credit, three. 

English V — Literary study of the 
plays of Aeschylus and Sophocles in 
poetic translation; lectures on the 
Grek theater and on Greek art (illus- 
trated), one hour. Professor Noyes. 
College credit, three. 

Mathematigs Ai — College Algebra, 
one hour. Professor Albright. Col- 
lege credit, three. 

Mathematics A2 — Solid Geometry, 
one hour. Professor Albright. Col- 
lege credit, two. 

Mathematics A2 — Trigonometry, 
one hour. Professor Albright. Col- 
lege credit, three. 

Astronomy A — General. Professor 
Albright. One hour. College credit, 
three. 

For more detailed information, ap- 
ply to Dean Parsons. 



A good deal of money has been 
spent this summer in putting Cutler 
in shape. Several new hardwood 
floors have been laid, the wall and 
ceilings freshly painted, the wood- 
work stained, new plumbing installed, 
the building rewired, much handsome 
fu niture has been added, and slate 
blackboards have been put in some 
ro'.ims. 

Cutler is to have a separate study 
hall and chapel this year. The large 
room on the second floor, formerly 
used by the draughting department, 
will be utilized for this purpose. 

The schedule of studies has been 
somewhat revised. The periods have 
been shortened from an hour to for- 
ty-five minutes. Recitations will be- 
gin at 8:,w and last until 12:30, and in 
the afternoon will be from 2 o'clock 
to 3:,?o. Practically all classes will 
recite five times a week. 

Professor Gile becomes associated 
with Mr. Park in the principalship of 
the Academy, and will teach classes 
in beginning Latin and Cicero. The 
other teachers will be the same as 
last year, with the exception of Miss 
Brown, who retires because of her 
duties as acting Dean of Women. A 
new teacher has been secured to take 
her place. 

The enrollment of Cutler is large 
and the year promises to be a most 
successful one. The outlook for win- 
ning baseball and football teams is 
particularly bright. 

SUMMER IMPROVEMENTS AT 
BEMIS. 



During the summer the completion 
of Remis Hall has been under way. 
The third and fourth floors have been 
finished, but only the fourth is fur- 
nished. The furniture is on the mis- 
sion style, and the rooms are very at- 
tractive. Nearly all of them are oc- 
cupied now. 

Not much, has been done in the 
baseemnt as yet. The laundry has 
been finished and equipped, and it is 
hoped that before long the room un- 
de • the dining hall will be finished up 
for the Dramatic Club. 

The shrubs aiound the Hall have 
grown wonderfully well during the 
summer and add greatly to the at- 
tractive appearance from the outside. 



The College will have the largest 
class in its history tliis fall, and in 
order'to meet the needs of new stu- 
dents who will need work, the Y. M. 
C. A. Employmem iSureau began 
work the middle of August. One 
hundred and fifteen appTications for 
work from new students have been 
received up to date. This is four 
times as many as have been made in 
auj' pre^'ious year. But Mr. A. J. 
Hesler, chairman of the Bureau, has 
delivered the goods and every man 
who has applied for work has been 
supplied. This is indeed a record to 
be proud of. He has secured over 200 
jobs. Too much praise cannot be 
given both j\lr. Hesler and Mr. 
Heald for the efficient way in which 
the Bureau has been handled and the 
needs of the students provided for. 
To provide work for so large a num- 
ber as are working is no small task. 



HAGERMAN DEAD 

Contfnucd from Page 1. 

"His service to Colorado Spriiigs 
in the building of the Colorado Mid- 
land railroad and the development of 
its larger business interests was a 
most valuable contribution. 

"Mr. Hagerman has always been a 
generous man and has been deeply 
and warmly interested in the college. 
As a member of the board of trustees 
he has given time and constant 
thought to its affairs. The value oi 
such men as he and General Palmer 
to new communities cannot be over- 
estimated." 

Mr. Hagerman's death was caused 
by hemorrhage of the lungs. Al- 
though he had gone to Milan for -his 
health, his condition was not consid- 
ered serious, and news of his death 
came as a shock. 

Mr. Hagerman came to Colorado 
Springs for his health in 1884, and 
was soon the prime mover in a num- 
ber of large enterprises. He became 
interested in Leadville mining, and 
his holdings there were largely re- 
sponsible for the construction of the 
Midland railroad. Pie was the prin- 
cipal owner of the road in those days, 
and served as president until 1889, 
when numerous other businesses 
caused him to sell the road to the 
Santa Fe. 

The Mollie Gibson mine at Aspen, 



THE TIGER 



which he owned, and which suddenly 
sprang into the rank of the foremost 
producers of the west, added to his 
already large fortune, and in the early 
'go's he was ranked as one of the 
richest men in the state. Mr. Hager- 
man was also later interested in Crip- 
ple Creek mining. 

He was formerly president of the 
First National Bank of Colorado 
Springs, and built the handsome of- 
fice and business block in this city 
which bears his name, as well as the 
magnificent residence on North Cas- 
cade avenue. 

Mr. f-i'agerman sutisequently be- 
came impressed by the resources of 
the Pecos valley, in New Mexico, and 
mvestcd largely in an irrigation sys- 
tem which greatly developed that dis- 
trict. He built the Pecos Valley and 
Northeastern railroad, and so thor- 
oughly developed the resources of the 
valley that it was soon the home of 
thousands of prosperous farmers. It 
is still the most prosperous portion 
of the great and growing state of 
New Mexico. Mr. Hagerman owned 
the South Spring rancn and a mag- 
nificent villa near Roswell, N. M. He 
was often called the apple king. 

Leaving New iMexico a few months 
ago, Mr. and Mrs. Hagerman went 
to Europe in an effort to recuperate 
his health. Mr. Hagerman's condi- 
ti(.)n was considered by no means se- 
rious, and he had planned to sail for 
the United States September 25. 

He was born in Ontario, but was 
reared near St. Clair, Alichigan. He 
was graduated from the University 
of Michigan in 1839, ^i»d early en- 
tered the iron and steel industry, be- 
coming manager of the Milwaukee 
Iron company when it was organized 
by E. B. Ward in 1866. He later be- 
came president of the company, but 
resigned in 1873, 'ind with a company 
of Milwaukee men, opened up the 
Menominee iron district in the north- 
ern part of Michigan. He became 
the principal owner of the Chapin 
mine, which was one of the richest 
in the country. He sold his interest 
in this property in 1883, after which 
he spent a year in Europe, in the 
hope of regaining his lieaUh, before 
coming to Colorado Springs. 

Mr. Hagerman leaves two sons, 
former Governor H. J. Hagerman of 
New Mexico and Percy I-^agerman of 
Colorado Springs. H. J. Hagerman 
will be remembered by the older stu- 
dents as the principal speaker at the 
commencement exercises of the Class 
of IQ08. 



FLAG RUSH THIS AFTERNOON 

Continued from Page 1. 

the fall scraps between the Fresh- 
men and Sophomores. At the close 
of Ihe meeting President McOuat ap- 
pointed a committee to revise the 
rules for the regular dag rush and 
draw up rules for a ^vater contest and 
for one other scrap. This commit- 
tee, which consists of H. W. Coil, 
C. P. Morgan and S. W. Dean, posted 
the following rules over their sig- 
natures on Wednesday: 



RULES GOVERNING THE SOPH- 
OMORE - FRESHMAN 
FLAG RUSH. 



Class of 19:2 versus Class of 1913. 

(1) The ANNUAL FLAG RUSH 
between the Sophomore and Fresh- 
man classes shall occur on the first 
Friday' after the regular day for regis- 
tration. In 1909 it shall occur Friday, 
September 17, at 4 p. m. 

(2) The Sophomore class shall 
provide a flag made according to the 
followin-,; specifications: It shall be 
twenty-lour inches wide and thirty- 
si <; luclies long; made in the colors 
of the Sophomore class and bearing 
their numerals, made of eight-ounce 
duck (.1- n-iaterial e'jually as heavy 
;iiid strtiiig. 

(j) The flag shall be hung on the 
flag pole rbout seventy-five feet due 
east of C'-.itler Academy. 

(4) The flag shall be placed on the 
pole by tlie upperclass committee in 
cl'.a.'-ge of tlie rush. 

(5) The lower edge of the flag 
where it is attached to the pole shall 
be not m<)re than fifteen feet from 
the ground. 

(6) The flag shall be attached to 
the pole by not mof-e than two tacks 
not larger than eight-ounce tacks. 

(7) There shall be no person sta- 
tioned on the pole when the rush 
commences nor shall there be placed 
on the pole any obstacle or substance 
to make climbing difficult or dis- 
agreeable, 

(8) There sh;i.ll be no climbers, 
spikes, or sharp metallic instruments 
of any kind used by any one con- 
cerned in the Rush, 

(9) The Sophomore class shall 
defend the flag and the Freshman 
class shall rush at 4 p, m. and the 
rush shall cease at the end of fifteen 
m'nutes, 

(10) If the flag is on the pole or 
in the possession of the Sophomore 
class at the end of fifteen minutes 
from the beginning of the Rush, then 



the Sophomore class shall be de- 
clared victors and shall be entitled to 
the possession of the flag. If the 
flag is down and in possession of 
the Freshman class at the end of 
fifteen minutes from the beginning of 
Ihe Rush, then the Freshman class 
shall be declared victors and shall be 
entitled to the possession of the flag. 
If the possession of tlie flag is ques- 
tionable, then the class having the 
greatest number of hands on the flag 
sliall be declared victors and shall be 
eni,;tle"d to the possession of the flag. 
i.\i, The Upper Class Committee 
of liiL- Student Council shall decide 
the question of pos/session of the 
flag and all other questions arising 
under these rules. 

By Order of the 
STUDENT COUNCIL, 



THE PRESIDENT'S SUMMER. 

President Slocum, shortly after the 
close of college, accepted an invita- 
tion from Mr. Philip B. Stewart to 
make a riding and camping trip 
through the Yosemite Valley in Cali- 
fornia, They had a pack-train and 
guides and ri;ide the trails of this won- 
de;ful region, sleeping nights under 
the great trees. After leaving the 
Yosemite, they followed up the Mer- 
ced river into the higher Sierra moun- 
tains, riding often long days through 
these great, primitive forests and 
camping where the day's ride left 
them at night, 

Dr, Slocum returned to the College 
in July and devoted the remainder of 
that month to college matters. Early 
in August Mrs. Slocuni and he went 
east to Millbrook, New York, where 
he had an engagement. They had a 
restful month there with friends and 
returned to Colorado early in Sep- 
tember. 



PERKINS REWIRED. 



And Other Buildings Improved Dur- 
ing Vacation. 



Approved conduits and metal cab- 
inets were installed throughout the 
whole of Perkins Hall this summer 
at a cost of a thousand dollars, thus 
bringing its electrical equipment up 
to the modern standard. In Mont- 
gomery, new plumbing was put in and 
the interior woodwork repainted. 

Changes have also been made in 
the piping of the plant to provide for 
the new machinery of the engineer- 
ing department. 



THE TIGER 



The Weekly Newspaper of Colorado College 



GLENN W. SHAW Editor-in-Chief 

HARRY W. McOUAT Business Manajjer 

S. W. Dean Assistant Editor 

C. DONELAN Assistant Editor 

H. H. HAIGHT Assistant Editor 

L. E. GriSWOLD Engineering Editor 

B. P. SIDDONJ Athletic Editor 

H. F. Rice Forestry Editor 

Julia Ingersoll Alumni Editor 

Helen Canon Exchange Editor 

Jenet Kampf Local Editor 

W. L. WARNOCK Local Editor 

A. E. BrySON Assistant Manager 

E. W. HiLLE .-- Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

Janet Kamf, Elsie Green, Pcrsis Kidder, Kent O. Mitchell, 
Ernest Fowler, Allison French 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to TheTiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 
College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
Springs, Colo., as second-class matter. 

Subicriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 

EDITORIAL 



CONCERNING US. 



We hunted up an artist this sum- 
mer and asked him to draw us a 
genial-looking tiger to ride our first 
page through the year. He drew us 
a citt, and we said it would never do. 
Then he retired and drew another. 
For six days he wore out drawing 
pencils to please the editorial we. At 
the expiration of that time he went 
home one night with a strong mental 
picture in his head and brought us a 
copy of. it in the morning. This is 
the best explanation we can offer of 
the beast rampant on our front. We 
shall not ti'y to deserve it. We won't 
have to, according to the artist. 



WELCOME AND. 



And now that you know how really 
mean and hard to satisfy we are 
going to be^ we can extend our paw 
without hypocrisy and growl "Wel- 
come." As we smile, we are hopeful 
that you will remember your manners 
and press one and twenty-five into 
our paw. For that amount we will 
hunt you up and gossip with you 
every Friday evening throughout the 
year. Our long suit is the dissemina- 
tion of information extracted from 
ether people's business. If you are 
human, we can interest you. 



MORE CONCERNING US. 

We are almost human ourselves. 
We have had to hustle to get this 
issue out two days and a half after 
the opening of College. We intend 
to keep on hustling throughout the 
year. If we e\er stop for breath, 
write us a note and we will publish 
it, even if we have to take time out 
to expurgate it. But never believe 
for a minute that you have to find a 
knock before you can contribute to 
The Tiger. Our predecessors pro- 
vided a tin box for the use of stu- 
dents and faculty who might be in- 
terested in helping them publish the 
best college paper possible. That 
same box is on the lower shelf of the 
first alcove to the right in Coburn 
l.i)jrary, waiting for you,' write-ups. 
All information deposited therein by 
Wednesday noon will be fed to the 
hungry public on the LTiday e\-ening 
following. 



THE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS. 



AND OUR ADVERTISERS. 



We are enabled to make this 'prom- 
ise because there are business men 
in Colorado Springs who are backing 
us with their advertisements. We 
realize that many of the old students 
saw something familiar about the 
caption above and are skipping this 
paragraph. But that cannot prevent 
our talking to the loyal among the 
old students and to those of the new 
who want to be loyal. We are not 
penning a bluff, for the perusal of 
business men. We are talking to you 
students. You will place your patron- 
age with the advertisers in your Col- 
lege publications, or they will forget 
you when making out their allow- 
ances for advertising. There are men 
and women in Colorado College who 
never fail to mention the fact that 
they use our papers for shopping di- 
rectories. If we dared let the man- 
ager in these columns right now, he 
would gladly deliver his decided opin- 
ion of the rest of you. 



THAT FRESHMAN CLASS. 

At the office they say the class of 
1913 will number 250. That will be 
hard on the Sophomores, but it will 
be fine for the College. The Tiger 
likes the looks of the new ones. They 
are about to help us make the year 
igog-'io the best in the history of the 
College. The optimism of these col- 
umns will not have to be strained 
this year. 



Had we not grudged the five pages; 
this issue would have contained the 
complete const\,tution of the nev\'ly 
organized associated students of Col- 
orado College. The commission 
should consider the immediate pub- 
lication of the document in pamphlet 
form. At this time it might be well 
to remind the student body that the 
new organization is beginning to be 
tested. No hitches have occurred yet 
and it is safe to say no serious hitches 
will occur if we all keep the same ob- 
ject in view, the general good of the 
College. Up to closing hour Wed- 
nesday, but fi\'e students out of a 
large registration had refused to pay 
the seven-dollar fee. The College 
catalogue gives the athletic fee as $5. 
The new organization was perfected 
after the publication of the catalogue. 
Whereas the old five-dollar fee was 
purely and simply a donation for the 
suppo t of athletics, the new seven- 
dollar fee buys a non-transferable 
season ticket to all athletic and other 
contests held in Colorado Springs un- 
der the management of the student 
organization. The students in gen- 
eral are taking to the new arrange- 
ment naturally enough. 



FOOTBALL. 



It is too early to say anything more 
definite about football than that our 
chances are good for a winning team 
this .year. 'Tf our Freshmen could 
only play" has been heard a good deal 
the last few days. The answer is: 
"But they can." If there is one thing 
with which a coach can do wonders 
to build a team, it is the battering 
ram he sends into it every night. If 
a Freshman schedule is arranged, our 
Freshmen can win; if not, they can 
make the first team win. At present 
we \\\\\ risk saying there is no reason 
why they cannot do both. 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 



In next week's Tiger the dates of 
tlie open meetings of the men's lit- 
erary societies will be announced. 
Not that all programs throughout the 
\ear are not open, but at the opening 
of College every fall each society se- 
lects a night on which it offers a spe- 
cial program, a good time and re- 
freshments to the new men. 

The girls' societies will not pledge 
new members from the beginning 



THE TIGER 



class this .year. Last spring they 
adopted a set of rules restricting 
niembe ship to the three upper class- 
es. They will require a prospective 
member to have been in College one 
semeste , to be a supporter of Student 
Government (which term must re- 
niTiin ambiguous to the Freshman at 
present) and to have attained a rea- 
sonable rank of scholarship. During 
her college course a young woman 
n.ay reecive only one invitation. 



AN ASSIGNMENT COVERED. 



DRAUGHTING ROOM 
TO PALMER. 



MOVED 



OPENING V/EEK. 

Pa't of the week has flown. The 
re-t \vill fly as follows: At a flag 
lush in front of Cutler building at 4 
o'clock this afternoon, at the big joint 
reception in Bemis parlors this even- 
ing and at the stag in the gymnasium 
tomorrow evening. By Sunday we 
will all know so many new faces and 
so many new names and so many 
new things that we will be glad to 
rest and let them soak in. 



SPECIAL COLLEGE SERVICE. 



The new week will begin with a 
special College service Sunday morn- 
ing at the First Congregational 
church, corner of St. Vrain and Tejon 
st.eets. President Slocum will 

preach. He is very desirous that all 
students of the College and Acadeijiy 
be present. 



TO OUR EXCHANGES. 



Happy new year! We're all at it 
again, outlining policies and reform- 
ing eve ytliing, as usual witli our kind. 
Cur kind is the limit, but don't let 
the gang know it. The Tiger wishes 
you all success, and hoijes for the 
continuance of past favors. Please 
mail all exchanges for The Tiger to 
I- 8 North Weber Street, Colorado 
Springs. 



A few good co-respondents will be 
appointed before the issuance of the 
next Tiger. If you want a job, apply 
to the Tiger box. 



Talk about your wild and woolly 
lav\'n mowers! .\proijos, one Soph 
v\as h.ca"d to remark that there were 
,^G0 Freshrnen, counting the sheep. 



By Webb Foote. 



The editor of this journal gave me 
a hunch. That was last Wednesday 
evening. I put the hunch in my pock- 
et and went out and sat under an arc 
light to await developments. 1 
awaited thus until i a. m. The moths 
flitted and the night watchmen drop- 
ped in on me now and then. They 
are an inquisitive lot, those star-bear- 
ers. But pothing happened as per 
hunch. 

When my rheumatism had protest- 
ed about long enough, I heeded it 
and retired. As I slipped between, 
the sheets, I felt no love for said 
editor. He doesn't pay me much of 
anything anyway. 

Thursday morning 1 did mj' best to 
hurry the cook, but I had not yet 
eaten at 10 o'clock. A fellow can't 
boss a cook much when he's asleep. 

At eleven I was strolling across the 
campus, and met a Freshman, who 
offered himself as an interviewee. 

"There's been fightin?." 

"No?" I said. 

"\'es. We scratched 'em all up." 

"That's about like you." 

I was disgusted. A nice way of 
fighting, that. 

''Why in blazes didn't you hit 'em?" 

"1 mean the posters. We did roll 
around with 'em." 

So there had been posters. I 
loo'sed on the flag pole. The/e was 
a dirty blotch, and at the upper end 
of it, I managed to rend "Mutton 
heads." Thanking my lucky stars 
that I was spared the pain cf reading 
the -.efined billingsgate which musl 
have followed -such words earlier in 
the morning, I sneaked to the ditch 
box, where I 'had hid the editor's 
lumch and sulked off down town with 
It. I'll use it tonight and tomorrow 
night and all next week. 

But I never have any luck. And t;) 
think that Sayre had his head c ushcd 
all over tlie v;alk. Why that's awful 
— to miss a thing- like that. 



Ye Fat Bear Inn has opened. Mut- 
ton has not beea openly promised. 



SYLVESTER PRESIDENT OF 
PEARSONS. 

Pearsons Literary Society met after 
chapel Wednesday and elected John 
Sylvester president, to fill the vacancy 
left by A. T. French, who gees to 
Denver this year. Sylvester is a 
l^rominent Sigma Chi. 



During the summer a new draught- 
ing loom has been fitted up in the 
atlic of Palmer Hall. The old room 
in Cutler Building is being used by 
Academy students for a study hall 
a.nd chapel. The new draughting" 
roum has a floor space of 75 square 
feet. Several new desks have been 
added to the equipment, and 75 men 
can be nicely accommodated without 
C-Owding. The room is better light- 
ed than the one formerly used, all the 
light being admitted by four large 
skylights. 



MUSIC OUT. 



Hillle and French have just received 
several hundred copies of their three 
songs, "For Colorado," "The Black 
and Gold" and "Bruin Inn." The 
tl:ree pieces a.e under one cover. A 
quartet .-irrangement of the chorus of 
"Bruin Inii" is also included in the 
folde.\ The design on the cover was 
done by Eugene Preston last year 
while a Junior here. The three pieces 
will sell for 40 cents. 



NOVEL AQUATIC FIGHT. 

The committee appointed from the 
student commission to oversee the 
class sc-'aps this fall has hinted that 
it is working on a novel aqu;itic fight 
t.) f .How sorMi after the flag rush. 
There was talk of having, the two 
ciasses ull a tug-o'-war across one of 
th.e lakes in Monument \''alley Park, 
b U the idea x- as abandoned because 
cf lac'c of . 00m near the lakes. Boats 
r>r rafts will be used in the fight now 
being arranged, the rules for which 
w ill appear shortly. 



FRESHk EN MEET AND ELECT 
TEMPORARY OFFICERS. 



Prcfessor Hills called a meeting of 
the Fieshman class after chapel Wed- 
nesday and ordered the election of 
temporary oflicers. The following 
were elected to hold office for one 
month: Budelier, of Grand Junction, 
President; Howard, of Delta, \'ice- 
President. 

McOuat, as head of the student 
body, spoke briefly and outlined th.e 
rules to be observed in the flag rush 
today. 



THE TIGER 



STATE ATHLETIC SITUATION 

Continued from Page 1. 

i6, and the Miners are to be the vic- 
tims. 

The most serious breach along the 
line is between Boulder and D. U., 
those two institutions having severed 
all athletic relations. While this 




GARY 



does not materially affect us, it does 
affect the chance of having athletics 
of the state on a uniform basis. 

To a casual observer our Freshman 
class this year seems to contain the 
cream of the State as far as athletics 
are concerned, especially football. 
Every man one meets is larger than 
the last, but we must not be too san- 
guine, because in the new game size 
is not nearl}' 'as important as some 
other elements. But it certainly does 
help. 

While the chance of getting much 
honor on the gridii-on this fall is 
slim, the Freshmen must come out. 
If anything is of benefit to a team it 
is to have a good scrimmage. The 
benefits derived vary directly with 
the efficiency of the scrubs. Come 
out and get on the second team. 

There is considerable rumor around 



now concerning a Fresh-man football 
schedule, which could easily be ar- 
ranged, and with good management 
could be made a profitable proposi- 
tion for the athletic board. 

"Embryonics" are Howard, Ran- 
dolph, Benjamin, Withrow, Budelieu, 
Long and a score of others. 

The one semester rule could not 
have happened at a better time than 
this fallj as far as we are concerned. 
The old men evidently have been 
somewhat bothered by the recollec- 
tion of a couple of gEimes last year. 
They are back to get even and this is 
the year to do it. 

V';mdemoer, Sinton, Whittaker, 
Sherry, Steele, Gary, Mu/phy, iMor- 
rison, Wilson, Reichmuth, LeClere 
and Thompson are all back, looking 
bigger and better than ever. With 
Richards at the helm and everyone 
else in College pushing, we have the 
chance of our lives to clean up the 
State. 

Suits were given out last night at 
the gym and work will begin in ear- 
nest next week. 

Frank Newh-ouse is back, too. He 
can be seen anywhere any time and 
is particularly conspicuous by the 







'i^^ 



NEWHOUSE 



g in he acquired this summer. On 
the square, Frank is almost good 
looking since his acquisition. It 
might be stated, incidentally, that a 
wife is the cause of it all. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 

Continued from Page 3. 

Third — Field Practice in Hydro- 
graphic Surveying. 

The first course was given for 
Freshmen, the other two for Juniors. 

The ground covered in each of these 
courses is as follows: 

The Freshmen course included* 
practice with the use and adjustment 
of all- plain surveying instruments of 
standard makes, pacing, use of chain, 
compass, level and transit, contouring 
and hand leveling, profile and topo- 
graphic mappmg, stadia methods, and 
the use of plane table and traverse 
table. The running of simple rail- 
road and municipal courves, cross- 
section work, calculation of cut an^ 
fill, land surveying, rc-running old 
township surveys, location of oblit- 
erated corners. Also practice in run- 
ning azimuth traverse, p -actice in 
making a translation survey, estab- 
lishin.g a base-line by meridional ob- 
servation, on polaris and the sun; es- 
tablishing triangulation stations, and 
measurement of angles by repetition. 
This triangulation woriv is very sel- 
dom given to Freshmen, as it in- 
volves the use of some very fine in- 
st uments. In last summer's wo.k a 
"Buff & Buft"' transit was used, read 
ing to ten seconds of arc. 

The course in Railroad Surveying 
was excellent. Preliminary and lo- 
cafion sur\-eys of two miles of rail- 
road through a mountainous country 
were made; just as in actual practice, 
grade line was established, cut and 
fill calculated, slopp stopes set and 
curves, simple and compound, uin in. 

The course in Hycl.ographic Sur- 
veying is one peculiarly adapted to 
the local condition existing in the 
Park. The waters of Trout Creek 
were measured and gauged by weirs. 
Lake Torrington afforded excellent 
facilities for hydrographic mapping 
and the calculation of reservoir con- 
tents. Irrigation ditches were sur- 
veyed, drainage areas mapped and a 
dam site located. 

Manitou Park. 

The lay of the land is such that it 
presents problems that would vex the 
most competent engineer. Many 
fields for summer work in surveying 
are adapted to one course in partic- 
ular, but this cannot be said of our 
own field at Manitou Park, for there 
Vvc have ideal conditions for any kind 
of surveying. Both civil and mine 
surveying can be done there. Min- 



THE TIGER 



9 



eral claims, both abandoned and in 
active operation, present a field for 
the mining engineer. 

The "Metcalf cottages" were used 
last summer by the summer school 
of Forestry and by the engineers. 
Better accommodations could not 
have been wished for. These cot- 
tages were transformed into commis- 
sary, lecture, draughting and dining 
rooms. Besides these, eight "bunk 
tents" and the cottages offered room- 
ing facilities for eighty men. 

The evenings spent in comfortable 
camp furniture seated by an open fire 
in a large fireplace, will linger in 
the memories of those who attended 
the first summer school of Surveying. 

As a monument to the work done 
by the Foresters and Engineers, mile 
posts dot the road from Woodland 
Park to Manitou Park, and each post 
bears the elevation. 

Challenge. 

Be it known to the engineers who 
attend the summer school of survey- 
ing in the year 191 1 t'lat a challenge 
is made by the class attending the 
summer school in the year of 1910, to 
have our elevation of Manitou Park 
checked, the final decision of the ocr- 
rect ele\ation to be made by those 
students attending the summer school 
of surveying in the year of 1912. 



FORESTRY PROSPECTUS 



NOTICES. 



The dates of the first literary so- 
ciety meetings have not been an- 
nounced. 



The Glee Club will meet upstairs 
in Perkins at 4 o'clock on Monday 
afternoon. 



The regular annual flag rush of the 
Freshman and Sophomore classes will 
take place on the west half of the 
campus at 4 o'clock this afternoon. 



The joint Y. W.-Y. M. C. A. recep- 
tion to all students will be held at 
Bemis hall this evening. 



The opening stag will be pulled off 
at the gymnasium tomorrow, Satur- 
day evening. 



The first meeting of the Y. 'N[. C. 
A. will be a Bible study rally in 
Hagerman lounging room, one week 
from tonight. 



No. 40 of the General Series of the 
Colorado College Publication De- 
voted to the Interests of the 
Forestry School. 



The last Colorado- College publica- 
tion is a prospectus of the Colorado 
School of Forestry. This school was 
organized in 1905 as a result of what 
was felt to be an increasing demand 
for practical instruction in forestry. 
The few years that have passed since 
its organization have more than prov- 
en true the convictions of the organ- 
izers. 

The first part of the bulletin is a 
general statement of the purposes 
and history of the School. The sec- 
ond part takes up the courses of the 
School in detail. In the last part are 
several interesting pictures taken on 
the forest reserve at Manitou Park. 

The school is located at Colorado 
Springs, and the field laboratory of 
13,000 acres is just back of the Ram- 
part Range some thirty miles north- 
west of Colorado Springs. The 
school is within easy reach of, and 
has access to, two large United 
States national forests. The students 
of the Forestry School have all the 
advantages accorded the students of 
Colorado College. These include 
scholarshir s, the College library, the 
large and well equipped laboratories 
of the departments of Biology, Geol- 
ogy^ Physics and Chemistry; the 
School of Engineering, the Museum, 
the literary societies, the College lec- 
ture course, and use of the dormi- 
tories and boarding clubs. 

At Manitou Park, with its many 
natural advantages, the students are 
given the opportunity to take part 
under competent instructors in all the 
phases of practical treatment and 
management of a large forest. After 
the theoretical work in the College 
proper, this gives a much needed 
touch of the practical side of For- 
estry. Logging and lumbering are 
carried on atcively in the reserve. 

A nursery is maintained on the 
banks of Monument creek within ten 
minutes' walk of the College proper. 

In 1908 the course was changed 
from three years to four years and 
now leads to the degree of Forest 
Engineer. A graduate course is of- 
fered leading to the deg-ee of Master 
of Forestry. In addition to this a 
short course is offered lasting" twelve 
weeks. This is planned to meet the 



needs of forest rangers and guards, 
timber cruisers, logging superintend- 
ents, woodland owners and others 
who wish to acquire a general knowl- 
edge of the principles of forestry, and 
the methods of handling timber lands. 
This course is offered in cooperation 
with the United States Forestry 
Service, which aids in the mainte- 
nance of the School. 

The bulletin is a good prospectus 
of the School and one well worth the 
attention of anyone in any way in- 
terested in either what Colorado Col- 
lege is doing cr in the work being 
done to preserve and maintain our 
frirests. 



NEW BOOKS IN ROMANCE 
LANGUAGES. 



Professor Hills Adds Some 200 

French, Spanish and Italian 

Books to Coburn Library. 

While abroad this summer. Profes- 
sor Hills gathered some 200 volumes 
in French, Spanish and Italian, which 
he has placed in Coburn Library. He 
now has for the use of his depart- 
ment an alcove and a half of well 
selected books. When Professor 
Hills first came to Colorado College 
in igo2 there were in Coburn but 
three tiers of books of this descrip- 
tion. He takes a great interest in his 
br.oks. Professor Sturgis recently 
ga^•e him ten Spanish books printed 
in the -Vrgentine Republic, of which 
he is verv proud. 



ATHLETIC FEES. 



Article IX of Constitution Given in 
Full. 



At the beginning of the year the 
most impo tant article of the new 
constitution of the Associated Stu- 
dents seems to be Article IX, which 
deals with fees. It is given in full 
for the benefit of the Freshmen and 
those who wish to refresh their mem- 
ories: 

ARTICLE IX. 
Fees. 

Section i. 
Season Ticke s and Amount of Fee. 

Each member of the Associatecif 
Students shall pay a fee of seven dol- 
lars ($7.00) for each college year, at 
the office of the College Treasurer, 
and shall receive therefor fjrom the 
Athletic Board a non-transferable 



10 



THE a' I G E ii 



ticket of admission to all athletic 
contests of the Colorado College, 
teams on the home grounds. All de- 
bating or oratorical contests shall 
also be open to all students of the 
Colorado College upon presentation 
of tickets authorized by the Commis- 
sion. Members of the Faculty of the 
Colorado College and alumni may 
avail themselves of the privilege of 
season tickets as above set forth, 
such privilege being confined, how- 
ever, to the attendance of all the 
events specified and in no way allow- 
ing them voice or vote in the meet- 
ings of the Associated Students. _ 

Section 2. 
Division of General Fee. 

Of the aggregate sum of money 
composed of the fees of the several 
students the;e shall be set aside for 
the use of the Athletic Board 85 per 
cent, and of the remainder 60 per 
cent, shall be a general fund and 40 
j-er cent, a fund for Oratory and De- 
bating. The correct division and 
proper expenditure of the funds so 



raised shall be supervised by an audit- 
ing board composed of th.ee mem- 
bers of the Commission, appointed 
by the President, except that the 
funds provided for the Athletic Board 
shall be audited by the Board as pro- 
vided. (Reference to the constitution 
of the Athletic Association incorpo- 
rated in the larger constitution.) 

Section 3. 
Expenditure of Funds. 

The expenditure of any and all 
moneys from the general or special 
funds above enumerated shall be in 
the power of the Commission. A 
complete leport shall be made to the 
Associated Students at a regularly 
called meeting, both by the Treasurer 
of the Athletic Board and by the 
Treasurer of the Associated Students, 
and the report so made shall be cer- 
tified by the auditing boards of the 
respective organizations. 

Section 4. 
Special Taxes. 

A special tax of money shall not 
be laid upon the members of the As- 



sociated Students except as hereby 
provided, i. e., at a regularly called 
meeting of the Associated Students, 
the Commission may recommend a 
specific per capita tax of money for 
a specific purpose; if such recom- 
mendation shall be approved by a 
three-fourths vote of tl>e members of 
the Associated Students, by virtue of 
such action, this recommendation 
shall become an enactment of the 
Commission. 



PHI GAMMA DELTA STARTS 

THE SOCIAL SEASON 

WITH A DANCE. 



On Monday evening, Sept. 13, the 
Phi Gamma Delta fraternity opened 
the college social season with a 
dance, preceded by a dinner, at the 
Acacia hotel. Fiji banners and Col- 
lege pennants decorated the hall. The 
guests cf the fraternity were Presi- 
dent and Airs. Slocum, Mr. and Mrs. 
Willis, Mr. and Mrs. Henderson, the 




Three of the Beautiful Halls Belonging to Colorado College. 



THE TIGER 



11 




Extends a hearty welcome "home" to the old men, and 
a most cordial invitation to those of you who are here 
for the first time. Our Specialty is catering to the 
tastes of College Men 



Cigar Store 13 ^""^ Harry C. Hughes Tej«nst. 13 



m 



U»Bi& 



IS MADE WITH 

J\ word to the wise is sv^ficient ' 

^ite^^i -CLARK 
GaC^'^ engraving CO. 

ILLU5TRATOR& PUEBLO, 



DESIGNERS 



COLO. 



ENGRAVERS 










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Misses Tucker, the Misses Perkins, 
the Misses Reinhardt, and Misses 
McCoy, .'itevenson, Watson, Whit- 
taker, Henienvvay, Randolph, Frantz, 
Blackrnan, Stark, Harris, Hale, 
Hughes, Hood, Weeks, Ferrell, Bar- 
c;aj% Cheeley, Sells, Rice, Prof, and 
?\Irs. Armstrong, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Willis Armstrong. The music at din- 
ne was by Mrs. Briscoe and at tlie' 
dance by the Alamo trio. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Ivan C. Hall '08 was married on 
July 5th to Miss Elizabeth Hall of 
\'ictor. They spent nielr Tioneymoon 
at the N. E. A. in Denver. Their 
home will be in Everett, Washington, 
where Mr. Hall has a position in the 
schools. 

On July 29th occurred a wedding of 
great interest to college people, when 
^liss Mabel Emery '08 became the 
wife of the Rev. Asa Zabel Hall, M. 
D. The happy couple will reside at 
Saguache, w^here Dr. Hall has a 
church. 



iMiss Hazel Wagner, ex-p8, was 
married in July to Mr. Joseph Cole, 
a rising 3'oung banker of Pasadena, 
Calif. After leaving college Miss 
Wagner took a course in music in 
Boston, after which she attended the 
Greeley Normal, where the romance 
began which is now so happily cul- 
minated. 



Miss, Mae Rantschler '06 was mar- 
ried in August to Mr. Ralph Bly, at 
Plainfield, Indiana. 



Miss Faith Skinner '09 is teaching 
in the High School at Eaton, Colo. 



Miss Mabel Carlson '09 is taking 
post graduate work at Denver Uni- 
versity. 



Patronize TIGER 
Advertisers 



A College Ball or Reception isn't 
complete without decorations . . 
of course we mean the kind that 
are made by 



The Out West 

Tent and Awning Co. 

No. 113 '2 North Tejon Street 
Quality and Workmanship Guaranteed 

Engineering Supplies at 
the College Book Store 

This is the Official Book 
and Supply Store for Colo- 
rado College and Cutler 



Academy 



Our set of Drawing Instruments and all 
Supplies are purchased only on the requi- 
sition from the College, and the prices 
are lower this year than ever before 



Remember we are the only 
authorized store for Engi- 
neering Supplies 

Ask your Instructor for Complete List of 
Instruments and Supplies 



Whitney and Grimwood 

No. 20 North Tejon Street 



12 



THE TIGER 



0. E. Hemenway 



Groceries and 



Meats 








115 South Tejon Street 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



YOU don't entertain your 
guests to save money — 
if you did, the simplest 
way would be to forego en- 
tertaining them. 
•IMueth's may cost more, 
but — 

CUMueth^ 

CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 



5 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



The Colorado Springs Floral Co. 

Wish to Have Your Business at Right 
Prices 



Telephone Main 599 



104 N. Tejon St 



Latest out College Posters lowest Prices 

Picture Framing 

Hedrick Wall Paper and Paint Company 



Take a look in the window as you go by 



214 North Tejon Street 



The Greeley C. C. Alumni and pres- 
ent students were very active during 
the summer. A club was organized 
which met every week for a social 
time, and every effort was made to 
reach prospective students. A suc- 
cessful party was given fi}r that pur- 
pose early in August. 

Miss Nina Eldridge ex-'o8 spent the 
summer in Colorado visiting her 
many college friends. Since leaving 
Cdllege, Miss Eldridge has been en- 
gaged in making hydrographic charts 
of the New England coast. 



Died — In June, Mr. Richard Knowl- 
ton '05. i\[r. Knowiton will be re- 
membered as an old football man dur- 
ing the two years he spent here. 
Since his graduation he had been 
connected with the Colorado Springs 
schools. 



^liss Mary Tucker ex-'og graduated 
at Wellesley College with honors in 
June. Miss Tucker spent her Fresh- 
man and Junior years at Colorado 
College, and was president of her 
class here in 1907-08. 



^'ictor E. -Keyer '05, deputy dis- 
trict attorney of Weld County, was 
married on July S to Miss Dora Todd 
of Denver. 



Born — To Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. 
Ewing, in June, a daughter. Mrs. 
Ewing will be remembered as Louise 
Currier '03. 

On June ,30th Miss Jessie Smith. '05 
was married to Mr. James Leslie 
Wcodrow of St. Louis, Mo. 



Miss Ruth Ragan.'o7 is teaching in 
the High School at Castle Rock, 



JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, CI aning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Stree 



FOR THE 

Most Exclusive Millinery 

CALL ON 

Mme. M. D. Hillmer 

6 East Pike* s Peak Avenue 

Finest of Material and 
Best of Workmanship 



Phone Black 395 



Colorado Sorinam 



Fraternities, Clubs, Individuals 
desiring Milk or Cream 
in any quantities 
should remem- 
ber :: :: 

The Sinton- Rustic Home 

No. 419 South El Paso St. 
Phone Main 442 



Dairy 



The College Photo Studio 

The Highest Class of 

Photographs 




Bingham 

18 S. Tejon St. Phone M-678 



DOUGLAS & 
HETHERINGTON 



Telephone 536 



Architects 

Rooms 15 and 16 Out West Bulldinii. 
COLORADO SPRIGS. COLO. 



THE T I (; v: R 



13 



College Memory 

Scrap Books || Local Department 



Bound in Colors — 
Black and Orange 
Just what you want 



Only $1.25 each 



The Out West 

Printing & Stationery Co. 
9-11 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 



Furniture ^l,^:'"'" 

Special' Terms to Students 

McCracken & Hubbard 

120 and 122 South Tejon Street 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

15 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

Are Always Well Pleased When They 
Get Their Hair Cut at 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



12 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springs 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



'as cade Laundry 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 

20 per cent, discount 

To All Students of College and Academy 



7 E. Bijou 



Phone 820 



Ruth Beaty has returned to Nation- 
al Park seminary, where she will fin- 
ish, this year. 

A neat place, good goods and 
courteous treatment await you at No- 
ble's confectionery sto-e and foun- 
tain. Opposite North Park. 

Miss Loomis will not be back until 
the second semester, on account of 
cuntinued ill health. 



John Burgess injured his right foot 
(juite badly with an axe about a week 
ago. Awful careless. 

Several C. C. people enjoyed a de- 
lightful camping trip near Creede 
during the first two weeks in August. 



"Walter" Kachelski for years 
"campus man" and a well known 
figure around C. C., is here again. 



L.ouise Kampf and Hazel Musser 
will not enter college this year. 



Howard, from Delta and Budelier 
from Grand Junction are new Fresh- 
man football material. 



Miss Holden is at Hosmer Hall, 
St. Louis, Mo. 



Miss Ruth. McCoy is a visitor 
around the campus. She expects to 
take a trip to California about Christ- 
mas. 

J. P. Hanna, Jr., ex-'oQ is now in 
charge of the Arab Amusement As- 
sociation, an exclusive pool and bil- 
liard club at 13 N. Tejon. 



Mildred H. Humphrey '07, after 
graduate work in English, and mathe- 
matics at Radclifte, is teaching in the 
new Boston N. H. High School. 



M. D. Hersey '07 is assistant in- 
structor of physics at the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology. 



The Tennis Association has had 
men busy repairing the courts since 
^londay. 



Hunt Up 

BisselFs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
Flour, Feed, Cirain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 

C. F. Arcularius & 
Company 

A Large Assortment of 

BELT PINS 

All the. Latest Styles 



9 South Tejon Street 
COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 



P 



RINTING, Engraving 

Paper. Gowdy-Simmons 
Printing Co., 21 N. Tejon St. 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Out West Building 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Picnic Supplies 

For picnics and all kinds of outings, 
we are ready to supply everything in 
the way of eatables. We also have 
baskets so that we can pack your out- 
fit complete. Just say what you 
want, and when you want it, and 
you will have nothing else to do but 
think of the good time you are going 
to have. : : :: :: :: 



W. N. Burgess 



112-114 North 
Tejon Street 



14 



THE TIGER 



This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 

Company 




Headquarters for 

College Footwear 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

FOUNDERS AND MACHINISTS 



College 
Inn 



y. Short 
// Orders 



Commutation Tickets — 
$3.30 for $3.00 

THE 

Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vcrmijo Ave. 

We Pay Special Attention to 
the QUALITY of our 

Lignite 
Furnace Coal 

The Colorado Springs Fuel Co., 
112 Pike's Peak Avenue. Two 
Phones Main 230 

Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 

^ A. S. BLAKE 

Is the Man to See 

107 North Tejon Phone 465 

Nickie Ware Cutlery 



!\Iinerva held a closed meeting this 
afcenvjcn at the home of Miss 
Kampf, after which refreshments 
were served and a general good time 
indulged in. 



Misses Dorothea Holden and Irene 
Wate s held a delightful dance Mon- 
day night at the San Luis School. 
Fink's orchestra furnished the music 
and a delicious supper was served. 
There was dancing from nine until 
one. Cotillion favors and confetti 
added greatly to tKc merriment of 
the^ occasion. About twenty couples, 
mostly college people, attended. 



Floy Estill ex-"io has registered at 
C. C. this year, after spending last 
winter at .Simmons College in Bos- 
ton. 

Edith Forrest will return to Ne- 
braska University to take her degree. 
She was a student of Nebraska U. 
for two years previous to coming to 
C. C. 

Chester Whittaker, Herbert Vande- 
moer, Herbert Sinton, and Jay Knox 
are back in school this year. 



Eugene Preston, Allison French 
and Gertrude Amsbury are attending 
D. U. this year. French is member- 
ship secretary of the Y. M. C. A. in 
Denver, and Preston is taking law. 



Harry Larson will probably finish 
his senior year in Dartmouth. 

Freshmen! New students! One of 
the first things to learn is that No- 
ble's is the place for candies, ice 
cream, ices and drinks. 



Alice Hutchinson is going to at- 
tend the State Normal School, where 
;be will make a specialty of art. 



May Wallace has gone to Wells 
College for her Junior year. 



Dorothy Haynes, Mabel Wilson 
and Grace Wilson entertained the 
Misses Hedgecock, Fames, Ferrill 
and Yerkes, at her home in Greeley 
with a house pa'"ty during August. 



Ruth and Helen Laughlin are in 
Europe, where they intend to remain 
during tl'c winter. 



Lucilc Piirsons has re-entered col- 
lege afier a term's t.l.i.sence in the 
South. .She will register as a Junior. 



Get Started Right! 
By Trading With 

The Murray 

Drug Company 

(Just Opposite the Campus) 

fffffffi 

To all old students this admonition 
unnecessary, but we are desirous of 
securing the patronage of the new 
students as well. 

Everything to be found in an up-to- 
date drug store, including Kodaks, 
Stationery, etc. 

An exceptionally good line of 
C C PENNANTS at right prices 

Meet at Murray's 

William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 



MEMBERS 



\ New York Stock Exchange 

' Colorado Springs Mining Stock Exchange 



High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



THE 



Official Printers 

To the Student 
Body of C. C. 



The Waterman Press 

112 E. Cucharras St. 
Phone 1154 



We Print THE TIGER 



THE TIGER 



15 



Faith Gilmore e.\-'i2 and Gertrude 
Amysbury e.\-'t2 have enteerd Dcm-e ■ 
Universitj'. 

Murphy, star guard and place 
kicker of the College team, expects 
to enter College. 



Herbert Sint'n. star end en the '07 
football team, is in College. 

Jay Reid has left town for Ari- 
zona, where he will spend the winter 



Nell Warnock ex-'T2 has re-entered 
school, after two years' ;ibsence. 



Cary, Wilson, Steele, Vandemoer, 
Sinton, Whitake -, Heald and Murphy 
will all be seen on the gridiron this 
year. 

Drop in at Noble's, corner Bijou 
and Tejon, and refresh yourself wdien 
down town. 



GIDDINGS BROS. 

Colorado Springs 

THE SPECIALTY STORE 

A Hearty Welcome Constantly Awaits All Visitors 

College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 

106' 2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone Main 700 



Why not have the BEST WORK ? 

20 per cent, discount 

To all Students of College and Academy 



J. J. WILSON, College Agent 

W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



•11 Those College-Going Fellows 



m Will find here Special Styles for them . . 
Til Distinctive Smart Fashions — The College 
Brand, and Adler Rochester-Made Suits and 
Overcoats, $40 to $18. 



119 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 



Gorton's 



Correct Dress for Men 



113 E. Pike's Psak 
Avenue 



Joe Withrow and Willes, two of 
Longmont's star football team, have 
entered College. 



Ray Woodmanse ex-'i2 has entered 
' Highland Park College at Des 
jMoines. 



Herbert X'andemoer, star end on 
last year's team, has entered College 
again. 



Among those who did good work 
for the College this summer is 
James Flanigan, of Cutler Academy. 
He returned from Holj'oke, Mass., 
bringing with him seven men, two of 
whom will enter College. 



Hughes and Caple, from Spearfish, 
South Dakota, have entered the 
Sophomore class in College. 

' Lem" Putnam has accepted a po- 
sition as secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 
at Columbus, Ohio. 



"Merle" Sebring will leave for Chi- 
cago in a few days. He will enter 
the university there. 



Oliver Cook will not enter College 
this fall. He expects to be with us 
again next year. 



Miss Margaret Stevenson ex-'i2 
will enter Columbia College of Ex- 
pression. 



Miss Hedgcock is taking music in 
Denver for the winter. 



Terrill ex-'ii has taken up a claim 
in the western part of the State and 
will not return to school. 



K, Lee Hyder, for three years one 
of C. C.'s best all round men and star 
athletes, will not be back this year. 
He intends to leave shortly f(5r Penn- 
sylvania University, where he will 
take a course in architecture. 



The student commission has ar- 
ranged a series of novel stunts, to be 
pulled ofif between the Fresrnnen and 
Sophomores in the near future. 



Several Sigma Chi couples attended 
the Monday night dance at Stratton 
Park pavilion. 

Elsie Connell is unable to enter this 
lerm on account of ill health. 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-203 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence, 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 956 

The College 

Photo Studio 



Hi^h Class Photographs 
Kodaks and Supplies 




TTh^OJ 



Corner Cascade and Kiowa 



16 



tup: tiger 



Perkins-Shearer Co. «^ f^vfT." S^^ ^"^""^ 

ft 

THE Young men getting their outfits together will find us ready with the New 

YOUNG Fall Styles. We have the Greatest Collection of Exclusive Styles and 

MEN'S SHOP Patterns especially suitable for Young Men that we have ever seen 



Fall Suits $15 to $35 



Fall Overcoats, $12 to $40 




d. Shoe Styles for Students 

Featured among our new styles for Fall wear, are all 
those new models that have snap and go, that are 
especially designed for the good dressers among our 
College Students 



Popularly Priced 



\f5>^«Vft5 



SHOES THAY SATISFY 



$3.50, $4 and $5 



ti S.TCJON ST- 




When Trading, Remember TIGER Advertisers 




COLORADO 
COLLEGE 



Founded 

at 

Colorado Springs 

io 1874 



Departments 



r College of Arts and Science 

E. S. PARSONS, Dean 
School of Engineering 
J F. CAJORI, Dean 

School of Forestry 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 
School of Music 

E. D. HALE, Dean 



The thirty-fifth year will begin in September, 1908. WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



Cutler Academy 



Cutler Academy is the Associated Preparatory School of Colorado College, in which students are 
prepared for any American college. Address 

J. W. PARK, Head Master 




■IB 




COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., SEPTEMBER 24, 1909 



Vol. XII 



Number 2 



SOPH STRATEGY 
VS. FRESH BEEF 



NEW PRESIDENTS 



EXCITING FLAG RUSH WON BY 

SECOND-YEAR CLASS AFTER 

NIGHT OF PRELIMINARY 

SKIRMISHING. 



Well Regula:ed Fight Lasts Fifteen 
Minutes — Witnessed by Large 
Crowd — An Accident Sup- 
plies Scandal for 
Newspapers. 



The first class scrap, the flag rush, is 
over, and 1912 is owner of her own pen- 
non. At 4 o'clock precisely, on Friday 
afternoon, Sept. 17, the upper-class com- 
mittee, Coil, Morgan and Dean, informed 
the Freshman mob assembled at Hag that 
the yellow-and-white flag of the Sophs 
had been nailed to the pole in front of 
Cutler in acocrdance with minutest 
instructions, and their time had come. 
The Freshmen, who had been painting 
each other's faces with grotesque lamp- 
black figures for the last half hour, shiv- 
ered individually and sallied forth with a 
bold front collectively. After turning the 
corner by Cutler, they broke into a run 
and dashed for the Soph defenders with 
a sound like the musical hum of stam- 
peding cattle. The hum stopped with a 
whoop, as about fifteen Sophs dove under 
the onsurging wave and piled it five- 
men high some fifteen yards from the 
pole. As its component parts unpiled, 
the wave filtered into the Soph cluster 
about the pole and delivered and suffered 
sundry bodily inconveniences for fifteen 
minutes. Then the committee declared 
the Sophs victors and "Morley Morrison, 
last year's flag-gettter, shinned the pole 
^nd slid down with the saved pennant, 
"amid the cheers of his classmates. 

Hostilities really began at about nine 

Continued on Page 4. 



SYLVESTER, MISS TUCKER AND 

GRAHAM HONORED BY 

THEIR CLASSES. 



The three upper classes met after 
chapel Wednesday and elected their 
leaders for the year. J. J. Sylvester, 
who was elected president of Pear- 
sons Society last week, had another 
honor added to his name when he 
was chosen to head 1910 in her year 
of graduation. The Juniors chose Miss 
Vesta Tucker, associate editor of the 
Annual and a prominent worker in 
association and literary society work, 
to steer them into seniorhood. G. C. 
Graham took the Sophomore plum. 

The fall list of class officers fol- 
lows: 

Seniors: 

President, J. J. Sylvester. 

\''Jce-Prepi''len*^, Genevia McCaw. 

Secretary, Marguerite Seifried. 

Treasu.-er, J. F. Nelson. 

Double Sergeant-at-Arms, C. R. 
Blackman and T. M. Pettigrew. 
Juniors : 

President, Vesta Tucker. 

Vice-President, L. M. Van Stone. 

Secretary, Edith Sommers. 

Treasurer, Arthur Bryson. 

Sergeant-at-Arms, H. H. Haight. 

Sophomores: 

President, G. C. Graham. 

Vice-President, Marion Yerkes. 

Secretary, Lucy Ferril. 

Finance Committee, W. W. John- 
ston and Eleanor Thomas. 

Sergeant-at-Arms, R. H. Sayre. 

Barbecue Manager, "Bob" Hamil- 
ton. 

Last week the Freshmen chose Bu- 
delier for temporary president and 
Howard for temporary vice-president. 
The election of permanent officers will 
follow one month after the first elec- 
tion. 



STATE PIGSKIN 

CHASERS BUSY 

INTERESTING COMPARISONS 

OF STRENGTH MADE BY 

THE DOPIST. 



Miners Talking — Boulder Busy — Ag- 
gies Lying Low — Ministers 
Weakened — Tigers Im- 
proving Slowly. 



Now that the various football 
squads have been out for several days, 
it is possible for the dopist to sharpen 
his pencil and (almost) decide the 
state championship. Of course it is 
impc^sible to get any line at all on 
the new men in the various lineups, 
but to the true dojjist, new men cut 
no ice whatever. 

At the School of Mines there is the 
usual bluster, accompanied by the 
same old newspaper dope. Two new 
coaches find ve y few of the old squad 
back. Those absent are Brooks, 
Blatherwick, Burns, Tommy Skinner 
and Baker. Skinner was captain- 
elect for this year. Unless the Min- 
ers open a large package of pepper 
this fall, it looks like a repetition of 
that dizzy string of defeats which 
were such a surprise last fall. Ortner, 
a husky Denver boy, will occupy the 
pivot position. Curtis, an old Michi- 
gan man, will coach, and Hines, who 
played a stnr tackle for three years 
with the Mines, will assist him. 

Boulder, with Folsom coaching, 
will make a formidable bid for the 
rag this fall. Both ends, Paddock and 
Mills, both halves, Keim and McFad- 
den, Quarterback Sterritt, Center 
Newton, and O'Brien, a line man, 
are all back; this makes a fine neu- 
clciis about which to build a strong 
team. It is said, however, that, out- 
Continued on Page 8. 



THE TIGER 



THE PLACE OF SELF-RESPECT 
IN RELIGION. 



President Slocum Opens the College 

Year With a Sermon at the 

Congregational Church. 



Last Sunday morning marked the 
opening of the new college year. 
President Slocum preached before 
the faculty and the students of the 
College at the First Congregational 
Church, Dean Parsons assisting in the 
service. The church was crowcPed 
with students and their friends, and 
it is hoped that this will be an an- 
nual occurrence. 

The text was taken from Ezekiel 
2:1 — "Son of man, stand upon thy 
feet and T will speak unto thee." 

The subject was, The Place of Self- 
Respect in Religion. A brave and 
noble man is about to receive his 
commission and instructions from his 
king for an important mission. In 
place of assuming an abject position, 
he is told to stand on his feet and the 
message will be gi^•en to him. This 
so\-ereign is the King of Kings. It is 
God who is speaking to him. This 
teaches the true attitude in which one 
hears God speak to him. 

First there should be the attitude of 
self-respect. God wants no man to 
grovel before him. He wishes us to 
stand at our very best and then He 
gives His truth to us. 

There is a great difference between 
self-respect and conc'eit. The con- 
ceited man is satisfied with himself. 
The man who has a true regard for 
himself always feels that there is so 
much still to be attained, he has no 
time to be satisfied with himself. He 
is always pressing on toward the mark 
of the high call of God. The man 
who truly respects himself cannot do 
a mean thing. 

This indicates the true philosophy 
of the religious life. Truth comes to 
a person in accordance with his own 
character. A mean person will have 
mean conceptions of duty. A narrow 
minded man will gain narrow ideas 
of God and truth. The earnest per- 
son is ever gathering new and larger 
notions of earnestness. God gives 
us truth just as we are fitted to re- 
ceive it. One must be at his best to 
gain the highest conception of the 
character of God. 

Then there must be an attitude of 
expectancy. We are warranted in 
anticipating the very largest things 
from God. Seek for the largest con- 
ceptions of truth and service. We do 



not begin to know what great things 
God has in store for us, nor do we 
begin to know what great things we 
can do for God until we give Him our 
best. Then there must be an attitude 
of obedience. The Christian concep- 
tion of obedience is positive. A neg- 
ative life is not adequate for the op- 
portunities which Christ offers. It is 
our business to bring things to pass 
in the world: to do something that is 
worth while. There is work for 
everyone, and we shall know what 
God thinks about our tasks only as 
we set ourselves at them. 

Then we should remember the 
meaning of the words, "All things 
are yours." Every nation has some- 
thing to give; we gather truth every- 
where. God is ready to speak to us 
in a great variety of ways. Nature, 
history, e.Kperience, all tell us of God. 
Christ comes to unify all life, to show 
as its real meaning and nature. There 
are a thousand ways in which God 
seeks to speak to us. 

^\'e are, then, to live so that we can 
respect om'selves, to hold ourselves 
icady for obedience to any call to 
duty, to keep ourselves in the very 
best possible moral and intellectual 
condition in order that we may be 
able to understand the instructions 
which God has for us. 

There is a commission tendered 
each one of us, and it is in the hand 
of the Great King. Are we ready to 
receive it, or will it forever remain 
unused, unrecognized, while we live 
useless, empty lives? 



CONSTITUTION AND CONFER- 
ENCE RULES 



FIRST SING. 



Students Meet on Palmer Hall Steps 
for First Sing of the Year. 



At chapel Thursday, notice was 
given that there would be a sing on 
Palmer Hall steps that evening. The 
Freshmen evidently were afraid that 
the old students might forget it, for 
amidst considerable confusion and 
more noise they assembled and 
marched with lo"ck-step to the scene 
of the song-fest. 

Soon after the rest of the students 
began to arri^•e and it was not long 
until the largest crowd ever present 
at a sing was gathered on the steps. 

Songs were sung and yells were 
yelled. Gary spoke on Football, 
Prexy spoke more generally, more 
songs were sung, and with another 
good C. C. we all went home. 



Of the Colorado Faculty Athletic 
Conference, Organized Janu- 
ary 30, igog. 



Name. 

The name of this organization 
shall be the Colorado Faculty Ath- 
letic Conference. 

Membership. 

(i) Membership in the Conference 
shall be based upon the principle of 
active faculty control of athletics 
within the institutions represented. 

(2) New members may be admit- 
ted by vote of all but one of the in- 
stitutions represented. 

(3) The representative of each in- 
stitution in the Conference shall be a 
member of the faculty, chosen by the 
faculty vote of that institution and 
entrusted with power to act. 

Officers. 

(i) The officers of the Conference 
shall be two, a Chairman and a Sec- 
retary-Treasurer. 

(2) The office of Chairman shall 
be held in rotation by the representa- 
tives of the institutions included in 
the Conference. The order of rota- 
tion shall be determined by lot. The 
term of office shall be one year. The 
Secretary shall also hold office for 
one year, but may be re-elected. 
Meetings. 

(i) Regular meetings of the Con- 
ference shall be held on the second 
Saturdaj^ of eacli month, except the 
months of June, July and August. 

(2) Special meetings may be called 
by the chairman at the suggestion of 
any two members. 

(3) The Alay meeting shall be for 
the election of officers. 

(4) A meeting of the Conference 
shall be held during the Christmas 
holidays, with the coaches and man- 
agers of the athletic teams of the 
Conference institutions, to arrange 
schedules of games for spring and 
fall athletics. 

Voting and Quorum. 

(i) Each institution represented in 
the Conference shall have one vote. 

(2) The vote of all but one insti- 
tution of those represented in the 
Conference shall be necessary to make 
any action binding. 

(3) No binding action can be taken 
except at a regularly called meeting 
in whicii all the Conference institu- 
tions are represented. 



THE TIGER 



Assessments. 
All needed funds shall be raised by 
pro rata assessment of the institu- 
tions represented. 

Amendment. 
This constitution may be amended 
at any regularly called meeting by the 
vote of all but one of the Conference 
institutions. 

Conference Rules. 

1. Bona fide Students — A student, 
to be eligible to participate in any 
intercollegiate contest, must 

(i) Have completed the full num- 
ber of preparatory credits demanded 
for unconditioned entrance by the in- 
stitution in which he is enrolled; 

(2) Fie must have been registered 
and regularly at work within two 
weeks of the beginning of the sem- 
ester in which he is to participate; 

(3) He must be earning passing 
grades in at least two-thirds of what 
is considered as full work in his in- 
stitution. 

Any student participating in any in- 
tercollegiate game, who shall leave 
his institution before the end of the 
semester or term, unless for illness 
or equally good reason, or who shall 
not have passed his work to the satis- 
faction of the faculty, shall not be 
eligible to compete in any branch of 
intercollegiate athletics until he shall 
have again been in residence a full 
semester or term. 

2. Migrant Students — (i) A stu- 
dent entering a Conference institu- 
tion directly from another institution 
in which he was engaged in intercol- 
legiate athletics shall not be eligible to 
participate in any intercollegiate con- 
test until he has been in residence 
one year. This rule shall apply to all 
students who have played on college 
teams as preparatory, special or reg- 
ular students. During his residence 
year he must have fulfilled the condi- 
tions of Rule I (3). 

(2) In case a student enters a 
Conference institution after a year 
has elapsed since he took part in in- 
tercollegiate sports in another insti- 
tution, his case shall be treated ac- 
cording to the half-year rule (Rule 
3). 

3. New Students — New students, to 
be eligible to participate in intercol- 
legiate athletics, must have been in 
residence and fulfilling the conditions 
of Rule I (3) for at least one-half of 
a college year. 

4. Compensation — No student shall 
be eligible for any intercollegiate con- 
test who receives, or has received. 



any remuneration in the form of mon- On what high school, academy, or 

ey, beard, tuition, or other substantial college teams have you played before 

return for his athletic services except entering this institution? 

as provided for in Rule 8. State in detail in what sports you 

5. Limit of Participation— No stu- have represented any institution be- 
dent shall participate in intercol- fore entering here and during what 

legiate athletics for more than four tune? 

years in the aggregate, and any mem- I" what games have you represent- 

ber of a college team who plays dur- ed this institution and in what years? 

ing any part of any intercollegiate 

contest shall be considered as partici- Have you ever, as a member of any 

patmg thereby m athletics for the ,,;,,,, .school, academy, cr college 

y^^"^- teams, before you ente.ed this insti- 

6. Assumed Name - No student ^^tion, or as a member of any team 
shall be allowed to compete in inter- 3,-,^^^ y^^, entered it, received any 
collegiate athletics who has played compensation, directly or indirectly 
under an assumed name. f^r playing, whether in the form cf 

7. Athletes' Statement — Athletic money, board, room, tuition, or other 
committees shall require each candi- substantial return? If so, when and 

date for a team that is to represent under what conditions? 

the institution in intercollegiate con- g Summer Base Ball— Until fu -- 

tests to subscribe to a statement that ^her action so-called Summer Base 

he is eligible under the letter and gall will be allowed under the re- 

spir.t of the rules adopted. striction (i) that no student shall be 

8. Certificates — (i) At least two permitted to play in any form of in- 
weeks before the opening intercol- tercollegiate athletics who has played 
legiate game in any college sport the under the National Commission or in 
chairman of each board of control any outlaw organization recognized 
shall send to the chairmen of the by such commission, and (2) that no 
boards of control in other institutions, student shall be allowed to play dur- 
with which members of the Confer- ing the college year (i. e. between the 
ence have relations, an official state- opening day in September and com- 
ment regarding each candidate for the mcncement day) on any other teams 
team. This statement shall embody than that of his own institution. 

the following points: ^ Freshman Contests - No inter- 
la) A statement that so far as the collegiate contests between Freshman 
board of control have been able to teams shall be permitted, 
ascertain, the candidate is eligible un- ^^_ Relations With Non-Conference 
der the Conference rules; Institutions-( i ) The institutions re- 
lb) A statement of his athletic presented in this Conference agree not 
history before and after entering the to enter into athletic relations, except 
institution. This shall be gathered _as permitted by vote of the Confer- 
from the candidate's own account and ence, with other collegiate institutions 
from any other information which which do not have faculty control of 
may be available to the Board. athletics and an equally high standard 

(c) A statement of his scholastic of eligibility rules, 
record, showing when and with what (2) The question whether an insti 
credits he entered and from what tution is eligible to take part in in- 
high school, academy or college, and tercollegiate athletics with the Con- 
showing further the number of credits ference institutions shall be decided 
he has earned since he entered the in- by the Conference itself. 

stitution. This shall be obtained from r ^ r . ■ 

, ^ ^ .. r 4.1 T-, x .1 "• Inter-Conference Relations — If 

a signed statement of the Dean of the ... 

^ ,, . 1 • 1 ^1 . 1 ^ • • '"^"y suspicion IS raised m one institu- 
Colleae m which the student is regis- 

," tion against any athlete of another 
tered 

™, : ., ^ .11, i 1 1 Conference institution, it shall be re- 

Ihis statement shall not preclude , , , , 

, ^ ^ ,. , ^ garded as the duty of the board of 

supplementary reports on candidates , . , ^ 

, , ^ • r ■ .1 i. control of the former institution to 
who may appear later, providing that 

, ^ . J , , ^ communicate the same to the board 

such reports are issued at least one r 1 1 ... 

, , . , ,• , , . ot the latter institution, 
week before such candidate appears m 

a regularly scheduled game. 

(Suggested form of card to be At Yale University it has been de- 
signed by the student, to provide in- cided to establish a school in con- 
formation for the individual boards nection with the theological school, 
of control) — for the training of missionaries. 



THE TIGER 



SOPH STRATEGY 

Continued from Page 1. 

o'clock Thursday evening. At the sing 
on Pahner steps the new ones stuck close 
together all through the agonizing and 
the speech making. As the last discord 
was sneaking away in the stilly night, 
they clustered about their presidential 
tower and vocjferously delivered their 
rhymed version of the identity of the 
parties providentially delegated to run 
the universe. Exception was taken gen- 
erally by individuals, but no group 
formed to correct the error. Without 
dispute, the Freshmen formed a long line 
and marched in lock step and with many 
windings to the light spot directly under 
the arc light at the library corner. Here 
a brief conference was adjourned to the 
lounging room in Hag. Little Fatty 
Head, who eats at Tucker's and sells 
Saturday Evening Posts about the cam- 
pus by authority of a special license bear- 
ing the signature of Prexy Hammond in 
someone's else handwriting, broke up this 
meeting by ordering it to buy out his 
stock. It withdrew to aforementioned 
light spot instead, and there decided that 
those who wished might safely go to bed 
in Hag. while the nervous ones guarded 
them. Ten minutes later the parlor floor 
in that reputable gentlemen's dormitory 
was covered with sleeping forms, beds 
enough up-stairs were full and Budelier, 
badly handicapped by corporeal and other 
prominence, kept the door with a trio of 
assistants. Upper classmen, who always 
make it their duty to have themselves 
considered a necessary nuisance about 
the camps of the belligerents during the 
first few nights of school, scouted about 
for hours without being greatly amused. 

Everything was still at Hag. Then 
suddenly the big guard felt forms step- 
ping by him through the parlor door. 
Fingering one warily, he whispered 
hoarsely : 

"Who is it? Who is it? For heaven's 
sake, somebody scratch a match!" 

Somebody did. Another somebody 
punched a companion in the ribs. An- 
other emitted noise. The garrison 
jumped to its feet and found the room 
full of upper classmen, and McOuat hav- 
ing his coat lapels caressed at the portal. 

"Where are the Sophs?" they all 
yelled. "Hunt up some Sophs and bring 
them around, can't you?" 

Thus beseeched, the visitors said 
that they didn't know, but thought they 
could, and withdrew. While lounging 
around the Library some minutes later, 
tlicy saw a dark form wending its way 
along a path, and took after it for luck. 
They yelled just like Sophs. The form 



threw in the high gear and everybody 
progressed about two hundred yards at a 
break-neck speed. Then suddenly the 
yelling increased, a horde streamed 
across the grass from Palmer and the 
form was brought to earth. The first 
upper classman reached the spot in time 
to hear several members of the horde 
rebuking their quarry thus : 

"Why didn't you stop? We gave you 
the. whistle. Why didn't you answer? 
Flow could we tell?" 

They had caught their own man, who 
was just returning from a spying ex- 
pedition to Hag. He reported that he 
had slipped in unknown, had rested with, 
the enemy in the parlor and had heard 
all their talk. Flis report was informally 
;iccepted by the moving toward Hag 
of the whole mob. 

The first engagement of the contend- 
ing forces took place in front of Hag at 
midnight or thereabouts. A squad of 
Sophs walked straight into the Fresh- 
man stronghold and dragged its struggl- 
ing leader into the open. His vassals 
surged out after him, but they fared 
poorly. They lay down upon the grass 
or the gravel walk and, the Sophs doing 
likewise, they all rolled over and over, 
grunting and calling for aid. Mean- 
while five or six Sophs had managed to 
carry Budelier along Cache la Poudre as 
far as the library, and were trying to 
gather his straggling members in with a 
rope. A group of Freshmen getting 
wind of it, they quit rolling for a min- 
ute, and ran in the direction of their 
president; but meeting with several 
Sophs of a social sort, they all stopped 
and fell to rolling again. 

While they rolled, Budelier was car- 
ried down an alley yelling "Trail me. 
Freshmen; trail me. Fm Budelier." 
Three of his charges did trail him and 
were soon assisted by the Sophs. Once 
the big man got his ropes loose and 
caused his captors considerable trouble. 
For a long time they rolled about in the 
weeds, everybody yelling commands 
and nobody obeying anybody else. In 
spite of the confusion, he was finally 
hound hand and foot. Harding sat 
upon Budelier's haunches and re- 
marked absent-mindedly: 

"Golly, 'es a beeg buck!" 

Everybody laughed but Budelier, and 
tlie cortege moved on. When it had pro- 
gressed several blocks, a closed hack 
drove up and a sufficient guard got in 
with Budelier. While the other captives 
were being put away in barns and cellars, 
the hack bounced over the road to Chey- 
enn.e canon, where the Freshman presi- 
dent was tied to a tree in a little dell 
just above the pavilion. Here he was 



fed and watered for thirteen hours. 
From two to five Sophs were always 
with him to see that he didn't get lone- 
some and go off in search of company. 
A cheerful fire was kept burning and 
"all present report a very enjoyable 
time." At 2 :30 in the afternoon the 
hosts left their guest, after tightening his 
knots, and departed for the city. One 
returned at six and helped a park police- 
man loose his bonds. That was after 
the Soph flag had been successfully de- 
fended for fifteen long minutes. 

While Budelier was being entertained 
in the suburbs, his henchmen were suf- 
fering he knew not what. After he was 
escorted from Hag, young men continued 
to play at roly-poly for half an hour or 
more. Afterwards things became still. 
Then a detachment of late Freshmen 
came to the Hall and started a search 
for compatriots. The finding of but one 
has been reported. He was discovered 
cuddled in the middle of his bed with 
many blankets over him. When exposed, 
he blinked horrified eyes and managed 
to enquire after the matter. 

"Are you a Freshman ?" he was asked. 

"No, n-no," he stammered. "I just 
got here from Boulder, and haven't reg- 
istered yet. Maybe Fll be a Junior." 

"Maybe he will, some day. You never 
can tell," said a commentator. 

Shortly afterwards, Swanson, who had 
kept out of the scuffling, claiming that 
he had played the goat for two years 
and should be excused in spite of his 
Sophomore registration, was caught by 
some Freshman maurauders and prof- 
fered his usual excuse. They were too 
new to fully comprehend the intricacies 
of the registration bureau and asked 
Swanson to accompany them to Monu- 
ment Valley Park, where a lake low 
lieth. Solemn discussion preceded the 
ducking. Would it be better to tie a 
man and leave a guard with him or to 
throw a man in a lake, thus causing en- 
forced absence for several hours while 
he changed his raiment and they caught 
several of his fellows? , There was a 
decision and Swanson was ordered to 
face the pond and forward march. He 
begged leave to deposit his coat and 
shoes on shore. They begged leave to 
inform him that said coat and shoes 
would aviate to the middle of the lake if 
he didn't wet himself all over. All con- 
ditions having been accepted, and all pre- 
liminaries completed. Swanson marched 
and ducked and marched back again. 
He was in the fight that afternoon. 
Thus did the Freshies give the Sophs a 
man. 

All Friday morning the contending 
forces were looking for fragments of 



THE TIGER 



each other. Several men on either side 
were taken captive. The most exciting 
incident before the fight occurred in an 
alley between Wahsatch and Weber 
streets when a bunch of Freshmen sud- 
denly jumped from cover and rescued 
two of their classmates from three Sophs 
who were leading their captives south 
toward St. Vrain, and two of whom 
were themselves captured. Climbing in- 
to a barn nearby, the Freshies found one 
of their number sitting lonesome without 
his trousers. Immediately they removed 
a Soph's leg casings and slipped them on 
their own man. Then tying two coats 
about their victim's loins, they marched 
him and his companion to a cave near 
Shook's run and left them tied to reflect 
on their evil ways. 

When the flag rush was called at 4 
o'clock, not more than ten men were out 
of the fight as captives. They were all 
Freshmen. Swanson and Gardner, the 
cave dwellers, managed to get back just 
in time. So did two Freshmen, Bendt 
and Allen, who jumped from a barn loft 
and ran to join their scuffling friends at 
the pole. Budelier being unavoidably 
detained, Howard, vice-president of his 
class, led the Freshmen into the Sophs. 

The fight was hard-fought, clean and 
fair. No dirty work was attempted on 
either side. The Freshmen outnumbered 
the Sophs two to one perhaps, but the 
latter used their heads to advantage. In 
the first place they met the Freshmen 
half way and broke up their wedge. 
Then they kept close to the pole and 
grabbed at everything that tried to go 
over them. On the outskirts of the fray 
they had posted picked men who imme- 
diately jumped for every Freshman who 
bobbed up above the surging mass of 
heads andjiands. As usual twenty or 
more men lay on the grass, throughout 
the whole fight, because they each hap- 
pened to meet another man in the first 
rush who suffered under the delusion 
that he was a steel trap and couldn't let 
go. 

The Freshmen had picked the ban- 
tams Randolph and Sisco to do the 
monkey-on-a-stick trick. At the very 
first Randolph was thrown at the pole 
and stuck to it head and shoulders above 
the crowd for several seconds. His blue 
shirt beat him down by about a length. 
Then Sells made a good try, and Sisco 
and Smith and Shaw and many others 
whose painted faces and generally dilap- 
idated condition forbade identification. 
Even the heavy beef of Long got above 
the crowd once, but it came down like 
everything else. 

Harding was noticed standing at the 



edge of the crowd grabbing Freshmen 
liy the back of the neck and slapping 
them over every time one emerged from 
the mass. Harding is a little near 
sighted, and his performance was very 
reminiscent of the old cat that sits in 
everybody's barn and indifferently peers 
ahead until a mouse enters the field of 
vision and then quickly slaps it over on 
its back. Vandemoer threw himself on 
the heads of the mob, and grabbing a 
big man near the pole, was pulled back 
by the legs, dragging fully half a dozen 
fighters with him. Bowers of the Fresh- 
man class put in his fifteen minutes run- 
ning about tackling Sophs and Freshies 
indifferently. 

All this happened to no avail. The 
Freshmen had but two minutes more in 
which to drag the Sophomore colors 
down. They seemed to be doing less 
good than ever. Then suddenly Ran- 
dolph, already shirtless, flew over the 
heads of the crowd and clung to the pole 
with his whole body from the knees up 
clear of the mass. A mighty cheer went 
up. So did many hands and the climb- 
er's clothes began to come away in hand- 
fuls. Then a hand fastened in his belt 
and pulled. The belt broke ; Randolph 
clung where he was for a few seconds ; 
then, yielding to the force of artificial 
gravity, he dropped after his clothes, and 
the newspapers went to press. In no 
time he had occupied with the laws of 
propriety and was back in the fight again 
with all his might. But the fight was 
lost. Nothing more was accomplished. 
The upper classmen called time, and the 
Freshmen went to wash up, while Mor- 
ley shinned up and got the 1912 pennant 
to the music of his cheering classmates. 

Thus ended one of the best regulated 
class scraps ever fought at Colorado 
College, and the most widely advertised. 
Fully a thousand people must have wit- 
nessed the fun, and they did not come 
in a spirit of criticism either. Such is 
the disagreeableness of false reports and 
sensational misrepresentation that the 
flag rush may have to be relegated to the 
athletic field in the future and admission 
refused to all not directly concerned. 
This will happen only over the protest 
of the student body in general. 



LIST OF COLLEGE COURSES 
INCREASED. 

F. J. Bruno to Lecture on Philan- 
thropy. 



GLEN REED IMPROVING. 



Glen Reed, who was taken from 
Hagerman Hall a week before the 
opening of College and operated upon 
for appendicitis at the Deaconess 
Hospital, is improving rapidly. He is 
allowed to see visitors now. > 



The list of courses at Colordo Col- 
lege is to be increased this year by a 
course on constructive and preventa- 
ti\e philanthropy, given by Rev. F. 
J. Bruno of this city. It will be open 
to students cf the College who have 
taken the required work in Economics 
and to others on application to Dean 
Parsons. The following brief outline 
shows the nature of the course: 

I. Heredity and Social Improve- 
ment, covering physiological, social 
and vicious heredity. 

_'. Causes of Poverty, covering 
both pe sonal poverty with the habits 
and characteristics which bring it 
about, and social poverty in its many 
ramifications, as well as its' many 
causes, which lie in faulty education, 
unjust or unfortunate industrial con- 
ditions, the unhygienic conditions of 
the laboring classes, economic con- 
ditions and lack of good laws or the 
existence of bad laws. 

,'. Classification of Dependents. 
The unemployed, persons of defective 
character or personality, deserted 
wives, widows, orphaned children, 
etc. 

4. Relief of Dependents. Indoor 
relief, such as almshouses, etc., out- 
door relief, private relief, organized 
charities. 

5. Preventative Agencies. The 
playground movement, anti-tuberculo- 
sis mo\ement, tenement house re- 
form, industrial education, etc. 

6. The Insane and Feeble Minded., 
The many phases of this branch of 
charity work. 

7. The Criminal. History of pun- 
ishment, mode n methods, probation. 

8. Additional Subjects. Standard 
C'f living, accident insurance, tramps, 
child labor, babies in great cities, the 
social evil, temperance, occupational 
diseases, lack of employment, pauper- 
ization, methods common to social 
investigations. 

Mr. Bruno is exceptionally well fit- 
ted for this work, for he devoted him- 
self especially to the study of these 
questions while in Williams College 
and later in Yale. The summer of 
1908 he spent in New York' City and 
took courses covering all phases of 
charity work. 



THE TIGER 



The Weekly Newspaper of Colorado College 



GLENN W. SHAW Editor-in-Chief 

HARRY W. McOUAT Business Manager 

S. W. Dean Assistant Editor 

C. DovELAN Assistant Editor 

H. H. HAIGHT Assistant Editor 

L. E.Griswold Engineering Editor 

B. P. SIDDONS Athletic Editor 

H. F. Rice Forestry Editor 

Julia Ingersoll Alumni Editor 

Helen Canon Exchante Editor 

Janet Kampf...., Local Editor 

W. L. Warnock Local Editor 

A. E. Bryson Assistant Manager 

E. W. HILLE Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

Geneva McCaw, T. M. Pcttigrew, Edith Sommers, F. B 

Copeland, Margaret VVaison, E S Statten, 

Katharine True, D. L Sisco 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles anditemsto TheTiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 
College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

_;:2^Sp2^o Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
t,j«^g^pjL)s Springs^ Colo., as second-class matter. 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



A REPORTER SCORES. 

Last week a reporter was sent to 
our campus to get a story. He got 
it, and the State has had it since. Not 
only the Strite, but the United States, 
has read it; for stuff like that re- 
porter wrote travels far and fast. 

It is the reporter's business to 
make news. A foundation to build 
on is a good thing; if the reporter 
can find no foundation and must hand 
in copy, he does not scruple \o "fake" 
news. The public wants it and the 
city editor wants what the public 
wants. But what the public wants is 
very often hard on the individual, 
whether the story be a "pipe" or an 
exaggeration. Someone has his feel- 
ings hurt, and perhaps his business 
and reputation, by almost every 
newspaper that comes off the press. 
This is simple truth. The human love 
of scandal is the cause, but that's 
none of our immediate business. 

The tiling that interests us is that 
we were the "goat" last week. We 
had to be called brutes and other 
things, because the usual ambitious 
reporter figured that he could easily 
make a third page article do for the 
front. He succeeded, and we were 
pretty well worked up in the morn- 
ing, :is the victim always is. The 
victim was somebody else the day 
before. Perhaps he suffered worse 
than we did. At any rate, the inci- 



dent is closed now; charges- have 
been made and denied, parents have 
asked for information and been cor- 
rectly advised, and now small frag- 
ments of the row are filling odd cor- 
ners in eastern papers. It is our hope 
to show you in our next issue how 
the original story looked when it got 
to Chicago and Boston and New 
York. 

As to our actual loss by that story, 
we cannot give figures. It will do 
harm in some quarters. At the same 
time, there is considerable truth in 
the statement of an enthusiast who 
dubbed it an advertisement and de- 
clared, "That lie will bring us all the 
red-bloods in the State next year." 
Most people who read the story 
must have realized that it was an ex- 
aggeration. The practiced newspaper 
reader learns to allow for warping in 
jirticles of that nature. The facts are 
given in detail elsewhere in this issue. 
They show animal spirits, and that is 
all. 

The paper in which the exaggerated 
story of brutal hazing and debauch- 
ing misconduct first appeared, the 
Colorado Springs Gazette, did not wil- 
fully injure the College. It has been 
our friend for 3'ears. Its reporter 
played up his story too heavy and 
swore that he had the facts. His story 
was printed. It was not a "pipe," but 
it was mostly superstructure. It is 
bound to blow over. Meanwhile you 
might write a letter home. 

THE KINNIKINNIK. 

The Kinnikinnik is the monthly 
magazine of Colorado College. It 
prints stories, essays and poems writ- 
ten by cur students and faculty mem- 
bers. Last year was its first year, 
and it cut its teeth largely on 
worked-over themes from the English 
classes. But it maintained a very 
high standard of literary and artistic 
excellence. 

Shortly the first issue of Volume 
II will appear and be distributed free, 
as was the first issue of The Tiger. 
The manager should meet with no 
trouble in getting a large subscrip- 
tion list. The greatest difficulty ex- 
perienced by those who issue the 
magazine is in interesting those who 
write to the point where they will sit 
down and expend their ability on 
work for the Kinnikinnik only. Class 
room work makes as good reading for 
those who have not heard it, and the 
majority of the subscribers ha^■e not 
heard it, since most of it comes from 
the class in advanced composition; 



but it would add zest to the work of 
both editors and contributors if every- 
thing printed in The Kinnikinnik 
made its initial appearance the:e. 
ft 
COLORADO COLLEGE SONGS. 

We are not paid for trying to sell 
Kinnikinniks or College Song folders; 
neither managers nor publishers have 
tried to approach these columns. 
Nor are we trying to fill them. We 
feel that the one thing that can build 
college loyalty is interest in college 
institutions. The Kinnikinnik is one 
of our new ones. It deserves every- 
body's support and everybody in C. 
C. deserves the good they will get 
out of supporting it. If you write for 
it, you will be interested in seeing it 
get out on time and in good shape, 
that you may see your work in print 
and others may see it. If you sub- 
scribe for it, you will be interested 
in seeing it get out on time that you 
may note if a friend has something in 
it. As you read it month after month, 
you begm to feel that your school 
mates are getting out a magazine as 
interesting as some you have seen put 
out by "real publishers and real 
writers." Then you meet a friend 
who has just written a "hit." He 
doesn't look like so much. Why 
shouldn't you try your hand? Thus 
your interest grows, and the Kinni- 
kinnik grows, and everything grows. 
Colorado College grows as the stu- 
dents become more interested in all 
phases of student activity. The Kin- 
nikinnik represents an important 
phase. 

So do Hille's and French's songs, 
which can hardly be called College 
institutions. They were composed 
and written, not as money-makers, 
but to supply C. C. with music dis- 
tincti\'ely her own. The sooner we all 
get copies and learn to sing them and 
come to enjoy singing them together, 
the better for the publishers and us. 
They cost 40 cents, three of them. By 
an argument hinted at in the para- 
graph above, we feel sure we could 
prove every folder bought and put to 
use worth to the College twenty 
times its cost. The publishers have 
not realized a cent yet and they are 
not likely to make much if they sell 
out their whole stock. We hope a 
hint will prove effective enough with 
a hundred or more of you; if it does 
not, we will probably find time next 
week to develop the whole argument. 
Of course, we shall know it useless 
by then, but pencils are cheap. 



THE TIGER 



THE FIRST ETHICAL. 



President Slocum Begins His Regu- 
lar Chapel Addresses. 



The 
chapel 



President began his regular 
addresses last Friday. His 
advice was good for starting a new- 
school year. It was, in part, as fol- 
lows : 

"You are here for a great moral 
purpose. The building of character 
is the great purpose of this college. 
If this year finds you at its close 
with less nobility than you now have, 
if it finds you more selfish than you 
now are, your year has been a failure.' 

"You camiot gain nobility of char- 
acter if ymi neglect your intellectual 
life. I want the students to feel that 
every day is a precious day, that 
every hour is a precious hour, not to 
be wasted. 

"If you want to make your life a 
failure, you can. If you want it to 
be a success, it will be a success. It 
will be just what you want it to be. 

"We must start right to make the 
most of this year. We must make 
the most of the first day, of the first 
week, of the first month, if we would 
have this year a success. 

"The best is not gotten, if you live 
just for yourself or for a certain 
group of friends. You can make your 
life just as great as the object you 
work for and no greater. One can 
not get the best out of society unless 
one works for the best in society. 
"You will grow nobler as you help 
your college to grow nobler and 
greater. This same principle applies 
to your relation to the community, to 
the state and to your country. If 
your class group is first, your life will 
be no greater than that group or 
class. 

"I speak so much of making the Col- 
lege great because I want you stu- 
dents to be great. That greatness 
will come just so far as we try to 
make the College life greater 
Whether in dormitories, at the table, 
in boarding halls, or wherever we 
are, we can make the life of our Col- 
lege better for our being here.'' 



C. C. CHEM. CLUB. 



The C. C. C. C. was organized in 
1904 shortly after the Engineering 
School came into existence. The ob- 
ject of the club was to promote in- 
dividual research and enable the mem- 
bers of the club to keep in touch with 



up-to<late practice in all matters per- 
taining to chemistry and electro-chem- 
istry. Only upper classmen taking 
the higher courses in chemistry and 
pliysics were elegible. 

During the initial year tlie-c were 
but seven members, but last year the 
membership had grown to twenty- 
three. With the increase in the num- 
l~.er of members, the nature of the 
work broadened out, until la^t yea; 
it was of more of an engineering na- 
ture than chemical. Realizing this 
tendency and also the need cf a pure- 
ly engineer's club, it was decided to 
amend the constitution of the Chem. 
Club so as to make all upper class 
engineers eligible and embrace in its 
field of work all engineering science. 

In this way it is hoped to make the 
club a benefit to all the upper class 
engineers and hence of the Engineer- 
ing School as a whole. 



PROFESSOR WINKENWERDER 
LEAVES. 



OUR PART IN THE PRESIDEN- 
TIAL VISIT. 



"Because of the visit of President 
Taft to Colorado Springs on Wednes- 
day, Sept. 22nd, there will be no ex- 
ercises at Colorado College on the 
afternoon of that day. 

"EDWARD S. PARSONS." 

And we all smiled. Soine of us 
hea-d "Bill" talk; the rest of us saw 
him beam. After which we left North 
Park and ran to the campus, intend- 
ing to howl "Rah, Rah, Rexy" as the 
procession passed. But the line of 
march got twisted and classes are 
running as usual today. 



FORESTRY SCHOOL SECURES 
NEW PROFESSOR. 



The P'orestr}' School is very for- 
tunate in securing the services of 
Prof. Coolidge, who will fill the posi- 
tion left vacant by Prof. Winken- 
werder, now connected with the For- 
estry School at the University of 
Washington. Prof. Coolidge is a 
graduate of both the Yale and Har- 
vard Forestry Schools and comes 
here highly recommended. He has 
had a great deal of experience both 
in teaching and government work and 
understands western conditions thor- 
oughly. He is highly esteemed by the 
Forest Service and the College is to 
be congratulted upon securing so val- 
uable a man. 

Prof. Morril will be acting dean in 
the place of Prof. Sturgis, who has 
gone to Europe for the year. 



Accepts Position With University of 
Washington. 

Prof. H. A. Winkenwerder, wdio has 
had charge of the Forestry School 
for the past two years, has accepted 
a positi(]n with the Forestry School 
at the University of Washington. He 
will be head of the department of 
products. 

The College is unfortunate in losing 
the services of a man who has been 
largely instrumental in bringing the 
Forestry School up to its presfent 
standard of efficiency. We wish Prof. 
Winkenwerder the best of success in 
his new position and congratulate the 
University of Washington upon se- 
curing a inan of his ability and en- 
ergy. 



POLYTECHNIC LIBRARY EN- 
LARGED. 



The polytechnic library, wdiich oc- 
cupies a portion of the basement of 
Coburn Library, has been enlarged 
during the past summer. The room 
has been widened, six new book 
stacks installed, and the room re- 
wired. The room has heretofore 
been used exclusively by the mem- 
bers of the Pike's Peak Polytechnic 
Society and the students in the School 
of Engineering. 

But now the room will be used for 
the libraries of the Polytechnic So- 
ciety, and the El Paso Medical So- 
ciety. 

The library of the latter organiza- 
tion has been shifted from its old 
undesirable position oit the second 
floor in Coburn Library to the new 
shelves m the basement, and has be- 
come an asset to the Biological de- 
partment of the College. By the kind 
consent oi the El Paso oCunty Med- 
ical Society this complete medical li- 
brary of five thousand volumes is 
available for reference to students 
taking beginning courses in Medicine. 

Not only has the enlarging of the 
old polytechnic library room given 
more space to the growth of both li- 
braries, but the handy auditorium 
which has been fitted up will be used 
as a meeting place for the Engineer- 
ing, Forestry and Medical Clubs. 

In the near future an assistant li- 
brarian will iiave charge of the li- 
braries, periodicals and magazines of 
the societies. 



THE TIGER 



STATE PIGSKIN CHASERS 

Continued from Page 1. 

side of these men, there is not very 
much good material available. Let 
us hope not. 

Aggieville has not said a word 
about their team, but when we con- 
sider the showing they made last 
year, coupled with the fact that none 
of their freshmen can participate this 
fall, the most optimistic view that can 
be taken will not give them a look- 
in. Griener, the star quarter, is not 
in school this fall. It is too bad that 
a man of Rothgeb's reputation has to 
attempt to build a team from a bunch 
of material which is strictly of high 
school caliber. 

Out at Denver University things 
have been progressing favorably for 
three weeks. Koehler demonstrated 
last fall that he is a coach of no mean 
ability, provided, of course, he has the 
material . As our contract with D. U. 
this fall contains a "one semeste." 
clause, whereby no new men can play, 
and as several of their last fall's stel- 
lars are out, we have a fine chance 
this fall to get even with the Meth- 
c (lists. 

"Duke" Shrader, erstwhile "Gravy 
Train," turned up this fall forty 
pounds shy, due to an attack of ap- 
pendicitis. Hutzell, the best end they 
ever had, could not get a contract to 
suit him and was drafted to Sacred 
Heart. Wingeader, all Colorado cen- 
ter, has played his four years, and it 
is doubtful if Lieber will be back. 
This quartet of huskies subtracted 
from the D. U. squad will make much 
difference on Thanksgiving day. 

Koehler will use Volk in fullback 
and switch Archie Brusse to the end 
left vacant by Hutzell. This will 
necessitate the development of a new 
quarter. 

C. C.'s outlook at present, is not the 
rosiest in the state, and the most op- 
timistic rooter cannot but hold his 
breath when the first team scrim- 
mages the scrubs. Of course Murphy 
and Sherry will make the bunch look 
more like a football team, but there 
is an awful lot of hard work ahead. 
Little can be said of individual work 
this early in the season, but by to- 
morrow night we shall have a rough 
idea of who's who and why. 

First Game Tomorrow. 

Tomorrow afternoon the Tigers 
and Terrors line up for the first game 
ol the season. Of course this will not 
be a big game, but it will be a foot- 
ball game with umpire's whistles 



blowing, high school kids rooting., and 
Newhouse on the side lines. 

Come out, everyone (Freshmen, 
too), and pay two bits just to show 
the bunch we are with them stronger 
tlian ever. 



TENNIS. 



Association Officers Missing — Prof. 
Smith Busy. 



By an unfortunate chain of cir- 
cumstances the tennis club is in a 
somewhat destitute condition this fall. 
Their p esident, French, is not back, 
and Dietrich, who was secretary and 
treasurer, is also among the missing. 

The unusually heavy 'rainfall this 
summer left the courts in a weedy 
condition. Prof. Smith, who is quite 
an enthusiast, has attended to having 
the courts improved, and by the time 
the fall tournament is under way, the 
courts will be in good condition. 

Tennis is not recognized as a reg- 
ular branch of College athletics, but 
it is a good game. 

The interest shown at the regular 
state tournament in Denver last' 
month proves its merits as a branch 
of athletics. While the Athletic As- 
sociation is unable to assume man- 
ageemnt of tennis, a tennis associa- 
tion has shown ability to take care of 
itself. 

The city Y. M. C. A. has planned a 
city tournament to be played in the 
near future. It will be open to all 
College men. Here is a chance to 
start something. 



THE JOINT RECEPTION. 



Bemis Hall the Scene of Over 1,000 

Introductions in Less Than 

Two Hours. 



One of the things looked forward 
to at the beginning of each year by 
all old students is the joint Y. I\L 
and Y. W. C. A. reception. Recep- 
tions, as a rule, are not haled with 
joy by the average college student, 
but this cannot be said of the joint 
reception. 

After beiiig duly tagged, we pre- 
sented ourselves to the receiving line. 
Its personnel changes but little from 
year to year. Shaw, president of the 
Y. M. C. A., greeted us with his every 
day smile and we immediately felt at 
home. Following the cue of the fel- 
low in front we went on down the 



line and were greeted in turn by Miss 
Strang, president of the Y. W. C. A., 
President and Mrs. Slocum, Miss 
Brown, Miss Scott of the class of 
'05, and GenerjJ Secretary Heald. 

After that we were pretty badly 
mixed with some 400 other Colorado 
College students for a considerable 
time — and we thoroughly enjoyed the 
experience. The receiving line was 
but the beginning, for Ed T. Heald 
had- no sooner let go our hand when 
some one else grabbed it. And so it 
was all through the evening. We 
shook hands with everybody and 
everybody shook hands with every- 
body else. 

Refreshments were served " by the 
Sophomore gi:ls. When every one • 
had met everyone else college songs 
were sung and then we hunted our 
hat and went home. And next day we 
spoke to everyone that looked our 
way. 



STAG RECEPTION. 



Y. M. C. A. Gives Its Annual Recep- 
tion to Men in the Gym. 



If you have been reading the Colorado 
Springs Gazette, you may have had the 
impression that the underclassmen of 
Colorado College were all lying bound 
and gagged and slowly dying from starv- 
ation. If you have been reading the 
Denver papers, you may have conceived 
the campus of Colorado College as being 
the scene of violent and outrageous war- 
fare between the two lower classes. Per- 
haps you pictured to yourself the dead 
and dying strewn everywhere over our 
beautiful campus. But if you were pres- 
ent at the stag reception given by the 
social department of the Y. M. C. A. in 
the Gym last Saturday night, you thought 
that either your eyes were deceiving you 
or the aforementioned papers were try- 
ing to. Why even Budelier, the man 
who, according to certain papers, was 
a physical wreck less than twenty-four 
hours before, was present and was so 
regardless of his critical condition as to 
engage in a pie-eating contest and a hog- 
tying contest! 

Each year the Y. M. C. A. gives such 
a reception and each year it becomes 
more popular. "Pat," of the D. & R. G., 
was one of the first to present his card 
at the door, and Prexy occupied a seat 
on the bleachers even before the Fresh- 
men had all assembled. It certainly is 
those who have been longest here who 
are most afraid of missing some of the 
fun on this occasion. 



THE TIGER 



9 



Shaw began the show by introducing 
everything in general and McOuat in 
particular, who then gave a good clear 
talk on the Student Commission. Dean 
Cajori told a few stories, ending char- 
acteristically with, "Work hard, play 
hard, look up, stand on your feet, and 
be optimistic." President Slocum then 
disclosed one of his dreams that is about 
to be fulfilled. It was all about that new 
gymnasium. By way of introduction, he 
told of how our old gym was built with 
money raised almost entirely by the stu- 
dent body and the work done largely by 
the students themselves. In his dream, 
Prexy saw the new gym as a $100,000 
stone building. In the main building- 
were shower baths, a large pool, lockers, 
a common room large enough for men's 
meeting, reading rooms, offices, and 
everything else that would be needed to 
make a gym one of the best in the 
United States. 

To the south of the main build- 
ing was a large open air space in which 
was all the modern gymnastic apparatus, 
and an indoor track. Large iron pillars 
supported the roof, while it was suffi- 
ciently enclosed on the sides by a wire 
netting. Superintending all this was a 
permanent physical instructor. Some of 
us have seen too many of Prexy's dreams 
come true to doubt for a minute this 
new one. 

The Sophs and Freshies were then 
turned loose and for two hours hilarity 
and good-natured rivalry reigned. 

The first athletic event was a spud 
race. Each class had three entries. The 
Sophs showed the more agility in coral- 
ling the starchy tubers and were de- 
clared the victors. This stirred the de- 
termination of the Freshmen to even 
greater depths and in the next test of 
supremacy, a dressing contest, Sisco '13 
won over Gregg '12 by a shoe. 

Made desperate by the sting of a de- 
feat, 1912 sent Center, their contestant 
in the sawing contest, in to beat With- 
erow of 1913 or die. He didn't die. 

Thompson, Sinton, and Heald for the 
Sophs were then given ropes and told to 
tie up Budelier, Bowers and Benjamin 
of the Freshmen, who were similarly 
armed. The Sophs obeyed instructions. 
Not disheartened by losing three of the 
five contests, the Freshmen, repre- 
sented by Cort, Budelier and Shaw, 
won over Harding, Hedblom, and 
Love, in a pie-eating, ginger cham- 
pagne drin'<ing, watermelon consum- 
ing contest by a safe margin. The 
Sophomores were, however, the win- 
ners of the evening. 

Boxing exhibitions were then given by 



Jardine and Putnam ; Copeland and 
Ramsey, and Putnam and Newhouse. 

The usual apple-peanut bill-of-fare 
was se.ved and then everyone joined 
in serenading the girls' halls, and 
those girls who happened to be 
awake. 



BIG PLANS FOR BIBLE STUDY. 

Faculty Men Instead of Students to 

Conduct Bible Courses 

This Year. 



The year promises to be a banner year 
for Bible study. Some of the strongest 
men on the Faculty have promised to 
take classes in the Y. M. C. A. Hereto- 
fore the students have been leaders of 
these classes. The courses offered are : 

For upcpr classmen — 

Organized Studies in Social Christian- 
ity Prof. Clarke 

Relation of Science and Religion 

Dr. E. C. Schneider 

Social Significance of the Teachings 

of Jesus Prof. Smith 

For Seniors — 

Life of Christ. Prof. Hastings 

Open to All Classes — 
Life of Christ Dean Parsons 

Dean Parsons will conduct this course 
in connection with the Normal Training 
class. 

Cheley and Kirkpatrick are busy or- 
ganizing Bible classes for High School 
students in the Y. M. C. A. and in the 
Sunday Schools, over which picked men 
from the College are to be placed. 

C. C. is the pioneer in this novel 
scheme, and many colleges throughout 
the country, together with the Interna- 
tional Committee of the Y. M. C. A., 
are watching its outcome with consid- 
erable interest. 

Dean Parsons will speak tonight on 
Bible Study. Hear him. In the loung- 
ing room of "Flag." 



LETTER FROM E'WING. 



The following letter has been received 
from Harry Ewing, C. C. '08, who is to 
be supported by Colorado College in 
the South American mission field : 

September the 11th. 

Dear Heald : — I have had a talk with 
Mr. Mott. It is definitely settled now 
that I am to go to Buenos Ayres for my 
language study and be associated with 
the secretaries there in the student work. 
You may know I am happy. Both Mr. 
Mott and Anderson said I'd be sent to 
Colorado earlv this fall. The dates have 



yet to be adjusted with Colton and Tur- 
ner. This will be done^as quickly as 
possible. Colton is coming westward 
soon, and I think we'll be there together. 
Let us unite in praying that all this 
work may be adjusted wisely and with 
vision for future years. The plan to 
boost Colorado's work in South America 
through the best administrative mission- 
ary agency, the International Committee, 
ought to yield big returns. Oh ! I am 
eager to get started and into the work. 
I hope I can have at least a week in the 
Springs. 

With best wishes and prayers, I am, 
Sincerely, 

HARRY. 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 



Dean Hale has spent the summer in 
New York and Boston in study and in 
plans for tlie benefit of the School. 
Among other things he has established 
a connection between it and the Institute 
of Musical Art of the City of New York, 
and the Conservatory in Boston, by 
which work there or here counts equally 
in the courses of the connected institu- 
tion. Students that propose to get a di- 
ploma in New York or Boston may do 
all but the Senior year of their course 
here 

Incidentally the new arrangement defi- 
nitely places our school on a level, edu- 
cation;iliy, with these institutions, just as 
CV)!orado College stands in the same 
clas<; with Wellesley and Yale. 



PROFESSOR COLLAIS 

PURCHASIN-G AGENT. 



Prof. C. G. Collais, supe/intendent 
of the mechanical laboratories, has 
lately been appointed purchasing 
and financial agent for Colorado Col- 
lege. He is to have cha -ge of tlie 
purchasing of the general supplies for 
the College. The office created re- 
quires a practical and competent busi- 
ness man. A better choice of a man 
to fill so important a position would 
be hard to make. An assistant is 
soon to be appointed to aid Prof. 
Collais in the laboratories, that he 
may devote more time to his new du- 
ties. His office is in Palmer Hall, 
the room adjoining the treasurer's 
cflice on the south. 



Ruel ^Morgan, former football star, 
is in the hospital at \''ictor with an 
attack of typhoid fever. His condi- 
tion is not dangerous. 



10 



THE TIGER 



PRESIDENT SLOCUM DENIES 
REPORTS. 



In Letter to Denver Republican, 

Prexy Deplores Literal Accounts 

of Faked Occurrences. 

On Monday morning last the Den- 
ver Republican gave prominence to 
a letter from President Slcscum, in 
which he denied the damaging re- 
ports recently circulated to the detri- 
ment of the College. The headlines, 
which were played up large in the 
Denver paper, are he/e given in black 
faced type. 

FACULTY FIND HAZING 

TALES PARTLY FALSE 



Other Stories Overdravi^n in Recitai 
by Outside Parties. 



PRESIDENT OF COLORADO 
COLLEGE MAKES STATE- 
. MENT TO THE PUBLIC. ■ 



Does Not Believe in Hazing Nor in 
Wild Reports of Harmless Acts. 

Colorado Springs, Sept. 19. — (To 
the Editor of The Republican.) — Dear 
Sn- — It seems due to the public that 
has read the damaging published 
accounts of the occurrences at Colo- 
rado College on Friday last that a 
brief statement of facts should be 
made. 

The faculty and representatives of 
the student body have made a careful 
investigation of the case, with the 
conclusion that many of these ac- 
counts are absolutely false and en- 
tirely without foundation, while oth- 
ers have so slight a foundation in 
truth and are so greatly perverted 
and exaggerated that the recital of 
them bears small relation to the orig- 
inal facts. 

I make no defense of hazing or of 
any reprehensible conduct on the part 
of any student. The faculty and up- 
per classmen have for a long time 
been making strenuous efforts to 
eliminate everything but good na- 
tured and justifiable sport between 
the sophomore and freshman classes, 
and they have practically accom- 
plished their purpose. 

The discouraging effects of such re- 
ports as have been circulated in the 
city and state during the last two 
days upon those who are earnestly 
working for the best class rel;.';ions 
may be inferred. 

But the great and inestimable harm 



done is to the mass of people who 
read the detailed and literal accounts 
of things that did not occur and who 
naturally infer that, instead of an in- 
stitution that is honestly trying to 
train young people for citizenship, 
there exists here one that allows and 
fosters conduct unwc/irthy in a civil- 
ized community'. 

Very sincerely y(.)urs, 
WILLIAM F. SLOCUM. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



PROFESSOR GILE HONORED. 

Last Monday Prof. M. C. Gile was 
elected by the city council to serve 
on a civil service commission for a 
period of six years, as provided for 
in the new city charter of Colorado 
Springs. It will be remembered that 
Mr. Gile was also a member of the 
recent charter convention. 

Professor Gile is head of the De- 
partment of Greek and Latin at the 
College, and because of his pressing 
duties as a teacher, he feels that he 
cannot serve on this commission. 



NEW MACHINERY. 



After an interview with Chief En- 
gineer Baylis, we are glad to report 
that Prexy's experiment has proved 
a success. The automatic lawn 
m.tiv/er which has been operating on 
the campus du.ing the past summer 
in the guise of a herd of sheep, has 
demonstrated its efficiecy beyond 
the wildest expectations. So suc- 
cessfully has the invention worked 
that a patent has been applied for 
and next year a much larger machine 
of approximately 250 sheep power 
will be in.stalled. The new mower has 
a great many advantages over the 
old, a few of which are enumerated 
below: In the first place, it runs and 
operates itself, thus doing away with 
the services of a laborer; secondly, 
it is different from most mechanical 
devices in that it improves with usage 
instead of deteriorating. It utilizes 
the grass mowed for motive power 
and the strengthening of its intricate 
mechanism. 



NOTICES. 



All those who are interested are 
cordially invited to attend the lit- 
erary meetings of the girls' literary 
societies. 



Miss Edith Hall 08 has a fifth 
grade position in the Colorado 
Springs schools. 



Miss Ada Freeman '08 is teaching 
at Pikeview this year. 



On Sept. sth a daughter was born 
to Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Brent of Mani- 
tou. j\Irs. Brent was Miss Irma 
Cockrell ex-'io. 



Warren Currier ex-'o8, who gradu- 
ated from Dartmouth last year, is at 
present engaged in the clothing busi- 
ness in California. 



Miss Ruth Frothingham 08 is teach- 
ing at Elsinore, Calif. 



Miss Florence Fezer '05 entered the 
Medical College at Denver University 
this fall. 



DC 



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THE TIGER 



11 




IIT'Ih'Y ¥ ^^XA/"^? The next time you are near 13, be sure to notice 

the goodly array of pipes and smoker's articles on dis- 
play in the window. Something is sure to strike your eye, and about our pipes — 
well just come down and look them over. Shape, Size, Quality and Price 
just right for your pocket. 



Cigar Store 13 ^°'*'' Harry C. Hughes Tejonst. 13 




P^Blfi 



IS MADE WITH 

_ [f(L[L[ll3Tni?^W[D iJffi^. 

fi word to the wise cs sufficient " 

^F~ir. CLARK 

GA^P'^ engraving C&. 

ILLUSTRATORS PUEBLO 



DESIGNERS 



COLO. 



ENGRAVERS 



Gel Your Picnic Supplies 

=^ AT 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Favorite Resort of the Col- 
lege Students, Renowned in 
Story and Song 

BRUIN INN 

Up North Cheyenne Canon 



Patronize TIGER 



Advertisers 



UNION ICE AND COAL CO. 

W. M. BANNING, Proprietor 

Artificial Ice and Cold Storage 

Dealers in All Kinds of Coal and Piaion Wood 
Yard Office, 105 W. Vermii. City Offic., 5 N. Tejon 



Miss Laura Stiles '05 has resigned 
her position in the Greeley High 
School to accept a similar one in 
North Denver. 



Miss Mary McCreery '08 is attend- 
ing the Y. W. C. A. training school 
at Los Angeles, Calif., this year. 

IMiss Helen Sloane '08 has a High 
School position at Silverton. 

Miss Ruie Aitken '08 has been pro- 
moted from Pikeview to Colorado 
Springs. 



Clarence W. Lieb '08 will attend 
Johns Hopkins University this year. 



Miss Edith McCreery ex-'og, after 
a successful year at Wilson College, 
Penn., will spend a year at home. 



On July 19th a son was born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Roberts of 
Heyburn, Idaho. Mrs. Roberts was 
Miss Tthelwyn Fezer '02. 



Harold D. Roberts and Donald Mc- 
Creery, both '08 have been visitors 
about the campus this week, stopping 
oi¥ on their way back to Harvard. 



Miss Mabel Sweeney and Miss 
Louise Belser, both ex-'io, are spend- 
ing their Senior year at Boulder. 



Mrs. C. J. Marshall (Elizabeth Por- 
ter '03), and her little daughter, were 
in town for several days this week. 



INDEPENDENT HEATER. 

All of the buildings on the campus 
are now supplied with hot water from 
an independent heater. The old sys- 
tem of separate heaters for each 
building has been eliminated by this 
new installation. A greater abun- 
dance of hot water is now provided 
for, without the need of a fire in any 
building. 



Maier's Lunch & Dining Room 

Lunches of All Kinds 



Regular Meals 20c and 25c 

216' 2 N. Tejon St. Opposite North Park 

"Attention Collegians" 

Let us make your Dances, Receptions, 
and Fraternity Socials this term, affairs 
never to be forgotten, by decorating 
your hall or parlors in an artistic man- 
ner with the college banners, pennants, 
festoons and bunting. Then have 
erected our sidewalk canopy to keep off 
the inclement weather. We also have 
floor coverings to protect the carpets. 
All this will cost but very little and 
add much to these affairs. 

Tht Out West Tent and 

A,„_* „ r^_ Telephone Main 1261 
Wning L^O. 113L, N, Tejon Street 

Engineering Supplies at 
the College Book Store 

This is the Official Book 
and Supply Store for Colo- 
rado College and Cutler 



Academy 



Our set of Drawing Instruments and all 
Supplies are purchased only on the requi- 
sition from the College, and the prices 
are lower this year than ever before 



Remember we are the only 
authorized store for Engi- 
neering Supplies 

Ask your Instructor for Complete List of 
Instruments and Supplies 



Whitney and Grimwood 

No. 20 North Tejon Street 



12 



0. E. Hemenway 

Groceries and 



Meab 



.*f.*M 







115 South Tejon Street 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



YOU don't entertain your 
guests to save money — 
if you did, the simplest 
way would be to forego en- 
tertaining them. 
€f|MuETH's may cost more, 
but — 

ClMueth^s 

CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 



5 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 
The Colorado Springs Floral Co. 

Wish to Have Your Business at Right 
Prices 



Telephone Main 599 



104 N. 



THE TIGEK 
Latest out CoUe^e Posters lowest Prices 



Picture Framing 



Hedrick Wall Paper 

Take a look in the window as you go by 



and Paint Company 

212 North Tejon Street 



II Local Department || 



Mrs. McLean is expected to visit 
the College Friday. 



Mrs. Skelton invited the presidents 
of the women's organizations to tea 
on Sunday to meet Miss Sarah Wool- 
verton '04. 



Harry Black ex-'ii and his brother 
Claude ex-' 12 are working in the 
mines at Victor. They will both be 
back to continue their work at Colo- 
rado College. 



In a short time the literary socie- 
ties, classes and fraternities will be 
giving parties and receptions. Those 
in charge never forget Noble in or- 
dering the refreshments. 

Mrs. Henderson entertained Hy- 
patia and her town alumnae on Fri- 
day. 



Mr. Greene visited his daughter on 
Sunday. 



Miss Morehouse has been fortunate 
in having her mother with her the 
past week. 



Eight Sigma Chi couples went to 
Bruin Inn Tuesday night. 



Several Kappa Sigmas and friends 
explored Huccacode cave Tuesday 
evening. 



Miss Jennie Pinckney, who has 



DOUGLAS 4 
HETHERINGTON 



JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

I Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Slrec 

FOR THE 

Most Exclusive Millinery 

CALL ON 

Mme, M. D. Hillmer 

6 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

Finest of Material and 
Best of Workmanship 



Phone Black 395 



Colorado Sorinss 



Fraternities, Clubs, Individuals 
desiring Milk or Cream 
in any quantities 
should remem- 
ber :: :: 

The Sinton-Rustic Home 

No. 419 South El Paso St. 
Phone Main 442 



Dairy 



The College Photo Studio 

The Highest Class of 

Photographs 




Bingham 

18 S. Tejon St. Phone M-678 



Architects 



Telenhone 336 Rooms 1 5 and 16 Out West Buildinii. 

leiepnone ooo COLORADO SPRI^GS. COLO. 



THE T 1 (J P] R 



13 



College Memory 
Scrap Books 

Bound in Colors— 



Black and Orange 
Just what you want 



Only $1.23 each 



The Out West 

Printing & Stationery Co. 
9-11 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 



been spending the summer in Chicago, 
has returned and will probably enter 
College as a special. 



Minerva, Contemporavy and Hypa- 
tia have a joint picnic tonight at 
Bruin Inn. 



Mrs. Yerkes, who was here visiting 
her daughter over Sunday, has gone 
home. 

""J'lie Cultivation of Good Habits" 
would make a good subject for an 
ethical. The Noble habit is a good 
habit for those who like confection- 
ery. 

Dr. Slocum took supper at Bemis 
Hall Tuesday evening. 



Furniture ^L^;''"" 

Special Terms to Students 

McCracken & Hubbard 

120 and 122 South Tejon Street 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

IS S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

Are Always Well Pleased When They 
Get Their Hair Cut at 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



12 S. T«jon St. 



Colorado Spring* 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

'as cade Laundry 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 

20 per cent, discount 

To All Students of College and Academy 



7 E. Bijou 



Phone 820 



The first gymnasium classes met 
Thursday afternoon. 



English U, which has been changed 
to a two-hour course; continuing 
throughout the entire year, promises 
to be one of the most popular given 
this year. 

Dr. and Mrs. Slocum entertained 
the members of the Faculty with a 
reception, Friday night. 



The date set for the first Sigma Chi 
dance is October 2. 



Genevra IMcCaw, Sharley Pike, and 
Mary Randolph were among the late 
arrivals at College. 



The Y. M. C. A. is looking forward 
to sending delegates to the conven- 
tion to be held in the Christmas holi- 
days, at Rochester, N. Y. In 1904, 
C. C. sent a delegation to Nashville, 
Tcnn. 



Nearly all of the College students 
took advantage of the half holiday 
and went down to North Park to 
hear President Taft's address. 



Reed '12 and Sells 'i.^ are new Phi 
Gamma Delta pledges. 

The Sophomore class won the an- 
nual flag rush. They won the rush 
last year. 



Alpha Tau Delta held a very pleas- 
ant smoker Monday night. 

Leon Clough ex-'ii, G. W. Smith 
'08, Cramer ex-'ii, Pritchet ex-'og, 
Johns ex-'io and Walsh '09 were vis- 



Hunt Up 

BisselFs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



C. F. Arcularius & 
Company 

A Large Assortment of 

BELT PINS 

All the Latest Styles 



9 South Tejon Street 
COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 



P 



RINTING, Engraving 

Paper. Gowdy-Simmons 
Printing Co., 21 N. Tejon St. 



Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgage? 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Picnic Supplies 

For picnics and all kinds of outings, 
we are ready to supply everything in 
the way of eatables. We also have 
baskets so that we can pack your out- 
fit complete. Just say what you 
want, and when you want it, and 
you will have nothing else to do but 
think of the good time you are going 
to have. :: : : :: :: 

W\T n 112-114 North 

. N. DUrgeSS Tejon Street 



14 



THE TIGER 



This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 

Company 



xiih 




Headquarters for 

College Footwear 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

FOUNDERS AND MACHINISTS 



College 
Inn 



*^ Short 
// Orders 



Commutation Tickets 
$3.30 for $3.00 



THE 

Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 



Phone 101 



117-123 W. Vermiio Ave. 



We Pay Special Attention to 
the QUALITY of our 

Lignite 
Furnace Coal 

The Colorado Springs Fuel Co., 
112 Pike's Peak Avenue. Two 
Phones Main 230 

Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 
A. S. BLAKE 



itors at the Kappa Sigma house the 
past week. 



Heizer ex-'io has entered College 
again. 





Is the 


Man 


to 


See 






107 North Tejon 






Phone 


465 


N 


ckle Ware 








Cutlery 



Jay Randolph is a new Sigma Chi 
pledge. 



Morse, who last year attended Col- 
lege at Southern California Univer- 
sity, has entered the College. 



Sinton '12, Center '12 and Gregg 
'12, are new pledges to Alpha Tau 
Delta. 



IMcMillin has entered College. He 
attended Baker University in Kansas 
last, year. 



Simga Chi gave a smoker for new 
men last Thursday evening. 



Parkinson '13 and Winchell '13 are 
pledged to Kappa Sigma. 



Lina Bruner ex-'og is principal of 
the Monument school. 



Earle Alden '09 is taking his mas- 
ter's degree in College this year. 



C. M. Rose '09 was a visitor at the 
Alpha Tau Delta house last week. He 
left for Chicago University, where he 
will study law. 

Miss Shepard has returned to Col- 
lege after an extended visit to Que- 
bec. 



Last week a serious mistake was 
made in the Tiger. The address of 
The Hedrick Wall Paper Co., who 
have such a fine display of College 
posters, should be 212 N. Tejon in- 
stead of 214, as printed. 



Shelton ex-'i2 and Hughes '12 are 
pledged to Phi Delta Theta. 



Mrs. Bogue, who is on her way to 
Salt Lake City, visited her daughter 
liere Monday. 



About ten Freshmen who did not 
care to enter the class scrap stayed in 
barns and other secluded spots. 



Two teams and over are out on the 
football field every night. There are 
more good men who should be out. 



A marked growth is noticed in the 
increased attendance of the upper 



Get Started Right! 
By Trading With 

ft 

The Murray 

Drug Company 

(Just Opposite the Campus) 

To all old students this admonition 
unnecessary, but we are desirous of 
securing the patronage of the new 
students as well. 

Everything to be found in an up-to- 
date drug store, including Kodaks, 
Stationery, etc. 

An exceptionally good line of 
C C PENNANTS at right prices 

Meet at Murray's 

William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 



MEMRPDS ' New York Stock Exchange 

mtlYlBtKS I Colorado Springs Mining Stock Exchange 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



THE 



Official Printers 

To the Student 
Body of C. C. 



The Waterman Press 

112 E. Cucharras St. 
Phone 1154 



We Print THE TIGER 



THE TIGER 



15 



classes of the engineering school, as 
well as in the under classes. The 
class in Qualitative Chemistry is al- 
most twice as large fls in any pre- 
vious year. 



The Seniors are arranging for a 
party. 

Phi Gamma Delta gave a smoker 
last week. 

Contemporary held a closed meet- 
ing Friday afternoon. 



Sam Kittleman is teaching a class 
in Resistance of Materials two hours 
each week for Prof. Lyon. 

THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 

PETERSEN 

121 E.Kiowa 

Sewed Soles 7S cents 

Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 

GIDDINGS BROS. 

Colorado Springs 

THE SPECIALTY STORE 

A Hearty Welcoma Constantly Awaits All Visitors 

College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barb«r 
work and baths 



106H E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



Why not have the BEST WORK ? 
20 per cent, discount 

To all Students of College and Academy 



J. J. WILSON, College Agent 

W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



119 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



Sweater Coats 
Large Assortment 
$6.00 to $2.00 
GORTON'S 



NO CLEVERER 
BIT OF 



Tailoring and Designing has ever been seen in a 
$25 Suit or Overcoat than you'll find in the splen- 
did series of new Fall Styles we are now introduc- 
ing at this price, $25, College Brand and Adler 
Rochester made. 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 



Gorton^ s 



Correct Dress for Men 



113 E. Pike's Peak 
Avenue 



■Hypatia Program for October i. 



Brief Sketch of the History of Ger- 
many Louise Auld 

Geographical Survey.. Edna Woodard 
Music Eleanor Thomas 



Pearsons Literary Society holds an 
open meeting at the club house to- 
night. All new men are cordially in- 
vited to be present. 



The first meeting of the Y. M. C. A. 
will be held in Hagerman lounging 
room at 7 o'clock this evening. Dean 
Parsons will speak on Bible Study. 



The Dramatics Club will give a 
farce entitled, "Sweethearts," in the 
Jungle, Saturday afternoon at 4 
o'clock. All new girls are invited to 
attend. 



MINING E. 



The . course in mine plant design 
known as Mining E, which was for- 
merly given during the second sem- 
ester of the senior year, has been 
enlarged, made more practical, and is 
now given during the first semester. 
It includes the design of head- 
frames, ore bins, aerial, tramways, 
skip cages, over balance hoisting de- 
vices, and the staking out of founda- 
tions to accompany drawings. 



DRINK 

DERN'S 

Freshly Roasted Tea and Coffee 

29 South Tejon Str.et 

The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies and 
Fixtures 



208 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 812 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-203 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence, 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 956 

The College 

Photo Studio 

Hi^h Class Photographs 
Kodaks and Supplies 




<\S<\^77l€^Xl / 



Corner Cascade and Kiowa 



16 



THE TIGER 



Perkins-Shearer Co. «^ f^f^ Sn%^:f ^"'""^ 

THE YOUNG MEN'S STORE . ' 

We want vou to wear Perkins-Shearer Clothes while you are in Colorado College. Ours 
are made up especially for college young men, of fabrics and patterns that are exclusive. 
Every Suit, Every Overcoat, Every Raincoat is made on lines and firm materials that 
will give satisfaction. 



Come In and Try On the New Models 



Suits $15 to $35 




d. Shoe Styles for Students 

Featured among our new styles for Fall wear, are all 
those new models that have snap and go, that are 
especially designed for the good dressers among our 
College Students 



Popularly Priced 



\^>^<VR< 



SHOES T»»*7^SATlS|tY 



$3.50, $4 and $5 



Za. S.TEJON ST- 




When Trading, Remember TIGER Advertisers 





RADO 
COLLEGE 



Founded 

at 

Colorado Springs 

in 1874 



Departments 



College of Arts and Science 

E. S. PARSONS, Dean 
School of Engineering 

F. CAJORI, Dean 

School of Forestry 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 

School of Music 

E. D. HALE, Dean 



The thirty-fifth year will begin in September, 1908. WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



Cutler Academy 



Cutler Academy is the Associated Preparatory School of Colorado College, in which students are 
prepared for any American college. Address 

J. W. PARK, Head Master 



z-in: 



I 








COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., OCTOBER 1, 1909 



Vol. XII 



Number 3 



GIRLS' 

ATHLETICS 



NEW PLANS OUTLINED FOR 
THE YEAR'S WORK. 



Miss Picken to Conduct Regular 
Work — Girls' Athletic Associa- 
tion to Have Track Meets. 
A Share of Athletic 
Money Wanted. 



This year considerable change will 
be made in women's athletics. Here- 
tofore gym work has been as a duty, 
often considered a disagreeable one, 
and something to be avoided if pos- 
sible. It was a thing to be gotten 
through with with as little work and 
thought a's possible. A change has 
been planned, for it is realized that 
it is necessary tliat each girl take a 
live interest in her physical Cie\e!op- 
ment, if it is to be of the most good 
to her. She must see its value in 
the matters of standing, walking, car- 
riage, etc. She must see that gym 
work is not merely a matter of so 
much exercise, but that it is a way t^ 
mo e perfect health and a better en- 
joyment of life. 

This year instead of making gym 
work compulsory as heretofore, each 
girl will be allowed to choose be- 
tween gym work, tennis and basket 
ball. That this plan will be popular 
is evidenced by the number of girls 
who are registering fur the latter 
two. One hour of tennis counts for 
one-half hour of gym work. This 
f eedom of choice is bound to bring 
more interest and better results. 

Miss Picken has been secured ti 
take Miss Woodsmall's place as 
Girls' Physical Director and . prom- 
ises to be an extremely good person 
for the place. She is a graduate of 
the Kansas State Normal Schocl at 



Emporia, Kansas, of the class of 1908. 

Since her graduation she has 
spent a year teaching. SliC is thor- 
oughly inte e.sted in the work and is 
\ ery enthusiastic over the prospects 
here. She considers the equipment 
very good. Chance for so much out 
of donr work gives possibilities which 
have not yet been anywhere nearly 
;ea!ized. Basket ball will be made a 
stron.g feature. Already a series of 
inter-class games have been arranged. 
Inte -class tennis matches may also 
be played. 

Another part of the girls' athletics 
is track work. Over this the Girls' 
Athletic Association, of which Miss 
Laird Anderson is president, has 
clij'.rge. The girls believe that they 
should be gi^■en some part of the ath- 
letic fees. They pay the fee the same 
as do the men and yet do not get the 
advantage c^f its use as do the men. 
In the past it has been necessary to 
depend upon charity for the money 
with which to buy trophies for the 
meets. A small sum would enable 
tl'.em to offer something more ap- 
propriate in the way of prizes. , 



PRIVILEGES AND 
RESPONSIBILITIES 



PRESIDENT SLOCUM URGES 
STUDENTS TO MAKE THE 
MOST OF OPPOR- 
TUNITIES. 



.'\t chapel, last Friday, President 
Slocum spoke on the p ivileges and 
responsibilities of our college life. 

"In regard to these talks that are 
gi\er. every Friday, I want them to 
be helpful to the College as a whole. 
In these addresses we are laying 
down a few fundamental principles. 

Continued on Page 3. 



TERRORS 

DEVOURED 

TIGERS WIN FIRST VICTORY 
IN RAGGED GAME. 



The Game — The Week on Washburn. 
Old Men Back — Freshmen Ready. 
Varsity Schedule — New Cap- 
tain at Mines. 



In a somewhat ragged, but neverthe- 
less interesting contest, the Tigers won 
the opening game from the Terrors last 
-Saturday by a score of 14-0. The score 
in this opening contest is usually small- 
er, and the unusually large score this 
_\-ear was not due so much to Tiger 
strength as to Terror weakness. The 
High School hoys are as full of fight and 
grit as ever, but they do not show the 
speed and class which has marked their 
playing the last few years. This is due 
to loss of (Ad mate'ial. 

The showing made by the Tigers was 
far from what it should be b\- this time 
of the season. The new material, how- 
ever, showed up beyond expectation. 
Putnam at quarter, Copeland at end, 
and Roe at tackle, all made good. Put- 
nam is a featherweight of the Orie Lee 
type, the kind which fights all the time. 
His forward passing will need i(n^" of 
coaching. 

Most of the substantial gains were 
made on cross tackle bucks and end runs 
by Heald and Vandemoer. Orie Lee at 
full was always good for two or three 
yards on a line pUmge, 

For the Terrors, Cheese, Morris, 
Brusse and Moore showed up best. 
Cheese's handling of punts being a fea- 
ture. 

In the first half the only scoring done 
was on a drop kick by Vandemoer from 
the 3n-yard line, which would have been 
goo 1 had it been kicked from the 45- 

Continucd on Page 4. 



THE T I G K R 



EUPHRATES COLLEGE 



SCHOOL LIFE AT HARPOOT, 
TURKEY. 



Arthur E. Harper '07 Writes Inter- 
estingly of His Work Across 
the Seas. 



The past year has undoubtedly 
been the most remarkable that Tur- 
key lias seen in a long time. Politi- 
cally, these reforms offer many 
things to Turks, Armenians and other 
races. Educationally, they promise 
enlightenment for this country, a 
la ger pkice for schools and colleges 
and a better opportunity for educated 
men and women. Religiously, we be- 
lie^'e it if God's work as He is open- 
ing this ancient land for the new 
forces to pr.ssess it for Jesus Christ 
This has been a most inte esting time 
to live in this pat of the world. I 
have always desired to be where there 
is something going on all the time, 
and 1 can assure you that I ha\ e not 
missed the pulsation of real vital life 
during my stay here. 

Not only these new movements, but 
the people themselves, those who are 
the purpose, for whom these move- 
ments have sprung up, have shown me 
many new things. The \'ery evident 
fact that they were greatly in need 
.-if a new and better condition in edu- 
cation, social progress, indust ial de- 
veloyment, etc., is very keen to one 
coming here straight from America. 
I have enjoyed becoming accjuainted 
v^ith these historic races, gaining 
knowledge of their ancient national 
life, the bonds that hold the individ- 
uals of each race together still, and 
the remains of their ancient civiliza- 
tion found in their traditions, old cus- 
toins, and ruins of castles. 

Naturally this has centered about 
the unit that I have had the most to 
do with — the college students of Eu- 
phates Colle.ge.- Possibly you will 
be most interested in my mentioning 
seme of the difTerent phases of the 
student life here, to which I gave my 
time. 

In teaching I had the following 
classes each week, throughout the en- 
tire year. With the Second Varzhar- 
an class 2 hours, 5 hours with the 
First Varzharan (highest class in col- 
lege preparatory), 6 hours with the 
Freshmen, as their class was separat- 
ed into two divisions, ,^ hours with the 
Sophomores, with the Juniors I had 
one hour for a composition and de- 
bating course, and one hour for a 



c >urse in declamation. Thus I had 21 
lii'urs a week of legular teaching, and 
in all these classes my work was 
teaching English. 

I f:.und most of the boys very 
briglit and anxious to learn. This 
lias agreeably su. prised me, for 1 did 
not expect to find it so universal 
among the students. They seem natural- 
ly to have a good memory, and so re- 
member new words with considerable 
ease. 1 heir eagerness to learn was 
shown in an incident which occurred in 
one of my classes. I remarked one day 
that to gain the vernacular of the English 
language, one should read American 
magazines and newspapers. A few days 
later some of the boys came to me and 
spoke of certain articles they had read, 
but one boy came to me and said, "I tried 
to read an article but found so many 
new words in it, that I could hardly un- 
derstand any of the article." He had 
been reading the Scientific American and 
made a list of all the words he did not 
recognize, and among the list was a lot 
of words he would not use twice in a 
life-time. I was careful after that to 
explain what kind of articles they should 
read, that virtue might be rewarded. 
They are aware of the opportunities that 
these new conditions in the government 
should open to them, and they want to 
be ready when the time comes. 

Having had considerable experience in 
working a part of my way through col- 
lege, I have a great deal of sympathy 
for the number of boys who are "work- 
ing their way" through here. It is re- 
markable that Euphrates College can give 
an education so cheaply as is done. The 
expenses, as you are probably aware, for 
a whole year including board, room, tui- 
tion, books, etc., are only about Lt 11 
(Turkish) or about $48.50 for a student 
in the college for one year. That sum, 
however, is a large one for a poor boy 
here. When a boy can only earn Ic to 
3c per hour working, you can easily see 
how hard it is to raise $50.00. As an ex- 
ample of a number of boys, I want to 
tell of one Freshman who interested me. 
He had no money, but he succeeded in 
borrowing Lt 4 at his village before com- 
ing here. He was a good student in all 
his courses. During his spare time from 
school work he put in his time at the Col- 
lege Cabinet Shop, where work is fur- 
nished to such boys. In the winter 
months he took care of the fires in the 
rooms of the college building. When 
college closed and all his accounts were 
settled, it was found that he had earned 
less than Lt 4, and that after paying in 
the Lt 4 he had borrowed, he was still 
indebted to the college for about Lt 3. 



That means that he cannot come to col- 
lege next year, but must work for a cou- 
ple of years until he pays all his debts 
and saves enough to start in again. I 
saw him just before he left for his vil- 
lage and said, "Harotune, do you think 
education pays? Are you glad you came 
to college this past year?" 

"Yes sir, I am glad I could go to col- 
lege for a year ; I like this college very 
much, and I am coming again if I can 
get the money to do so." 

One factor that helped our English 
work this past year was a society 
formed of students in the college. It 
was called, "The English Speaking So- 
ciety." Its members pledged themselves 
always to speak English to one another 
during school hours, and to attend the 
weekly meetings of the society, where we 
had a literary program in English. The 
membership was altogether voluntary, 
but many became quite enthusiastic about 
it, and worked to become more proficient 
in the use of English. They had little 
pins made to distinguish the members by. 
We hope to renew this organization this 
coming year and accomplish still more 
with it. 

Much of my time is occupied in cor- 
recting composition papers, but that te- 
dious work is often enlivened by striking 
sentences that an occasional student 
writes as he attempts to learn the mys- 
teries of the English language : 

"The donkeys have a disgracious voice, 
which we call the brays of donkeys." 

"He was an English knite." 

"Socrates was very bad by face and 
fantastical by walking." 

"My cat's dorsal is soft." 

"Shakespeare, the largest man of the 
world has many tragedies." 

This one from a description of the Bat- 
tle of Bannockburn, "King Edward es- 
caped with a fishing boat. Fourteen 
years later, this was acknowledged by an 
English parliament." 

The athletics opened up an opportunity 
for me among the boys. Although I had 
done very little along this line at college, 
yet I soon saw that we needed athletics 
here. I wish all the students would take 
a part in them. We had the regular 
spring athletics with field day in Com- 
mencement Week. At that day we had 
about the regular number of contestants. 
We introduced a new event, and broke a 
couple of previous records in old events. 
There were some men who came out for 
practice who did not come out for the 
final contest. These men at least had the 
advantage of the daily exercise, and that 
is what such work is for. The interest 
in this event was increased by some prize 
money offered by President Riggs. 



THE TIGER 



If we only had a good campus we 
could do very much more. The boys 
need more exercise to strengthen their 
bodies, learn what is manly sport, and 
work off some of their surplus energy. 
There is no place nearer than Mezrah 
for such games as football, baseball, etc., 
and we cannot go two miles away after 
school to play such games. These 
games, as football, etc., are played at 
the other colleges in this land, but 
Euphrates College up on the hill, has 
no place for playing such games. I 
believe that if we had a good place 
where the students cculd take 
part in vigorous games, Euphrates 
College would produce a better type 
of men. 

There are several lines of religious 
work which interest me and to which I 
have given considerable time in the past 
3'ear. I had a Sabbath school class 
made up of Juniors and Seniors from 
the college. This has brought me in con- 
tact with another side of the boys. The 
work of the Y. M. C. A. appeals very 
strongly to me. Certainly the college 
was established here for a religious pur- 
pose, and we cannot turn out men of 
true character unless they are religious 
men. The college Y. M. C. A.'s occupy 
a large place in the life of the students 
in most of the higher educational institu- 
tions in America. I hope that during 
the coming year we may be able to make 
this part of our student life a more vital 
and practical part of the life here for 
our men. We will miss Baron Donabed 
Lulejian this year very much, for he was 
a leader in this line in the past year, 
and otherwise had a strong influence 
with the boys. Baron Donabed has left 
for America, where he will do post- 
graduate work, preparing himself as Bio- 
logical professor of Euphrates College. 

Of course, one does not need to leave 
all his preaching and moralizing for his 
Sabbath School class or Y. M. C. A. 
meetings. I find my great opportunity 
for helping the boys in my work in the 
class room, and my personal life with the 
boys. The tendency among some of the 
boys to cheat in lessons, to be careless 
about immorality, and unfair in contests, 
must be emphasized in their environ- 
ment, and not left for an appropriate 
sermon later on. 

The most interesting and appreciated 
part of the work for myself, is the 
friendship cultivated with many of the 
boys. Usually several evenings out of 
the week, some of the boys call upon me 
in my room, and then we have pleasant 
chats about different things of interest 
to us both. The various pictures and 
books I brought from America, and have 



collected since comig here, help to give 
us a common subject of conversation. 
Mr. Earnest Riggs suggested that to me 
before I left America, and I have found 
it a very useful factor. I wish I had 
more of this sort. Many of the boys 
visit to have practice in speaking English, 
and so that helps in our friendship. As 
I have told some of the boys, "If it were 
not for the friendly way in which the 
boys have treated me, my work .would 
appeal to me very much less strongly." 
To find friends among so many of them 
has made it almost seem that I am still 
in America attending college with my 
friends and not really 'way off in Turkey, 
as an instructor. My room is in the col- 
lege dormitory, and I try to have it look- 
ing cheerful ,and to let all the boys know 
that I am at home to them whenever 
they can come in to see me. 

One element that interferes with our 
work is the number of men constantly 
leaving the college to go to America be- 
fore graduation, some to make money, 
others because their parents are going, 
others because they think their life is 
unsafe in Turkey. I suppose, however, 
that in the larger light, this is not such a 
discouraging feature after all, for if the 
man goes to America, the same influences 
which would have helped him here are 
constructive for his life in America as 
well, and he is certain to influence fel- 
low Armenians whether he resides in 
Turkev or America. 



PRIVILEGES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 

Continued from Page 1. 

"Our life here is a little community. 
Each student brings something to it. 
Even though you think that you do 
not have much influence, you bring 
something that either lifts up or 
something that pulls down. The life 
here is a complicated one. There is 
not one of you who is not of great 
value to it. If you make no contri- 
butions to the community or to the 
state, then your life grows smaller 
and meaner. This thought was laid 
down by the Greatest Thinner of all 
life. 

"The unfortunate experience that we 
had on the campus last week, the 
Class Scrap so-called, is an illustra- 
tion. Yesterday, I got three letters 
from one place, full of concern about 
the reports appearing in certain news- 
papers. This is only evidence that no 
man liveth unto himself. I am an- 
xious that the upper classmen should 
arrange for these affairs to be less 
public — down on Washburn field, say, 
where we as a family can have our 



own affairs in our own front yard 
and in this way avoid the unjust criti- 
cism of those who are trying to hurt 
the College. I hope that mcjre and 
more a good, wholesome sport shall 
exist. I am anxious for this to come. 
I want to go down and see that foot- 
luill game betwecii the Freshmen and 
Sophomores. 

"Now as to your individual life — 
.Self culti\ati( 11 is a duty whicli we 
owe to ourselves. Our dress, man- 
ners, and general bearing effect our 
personality. I hope that as you go 
over the State you will be known as 
ladies and gentlemen. The little 
things that seem almost trivial play 
a great part in all your social inter- 
cou."se, whether in the fraternities, or 
in the societies. They are the things 
that are for the making of gentle- 
men and ladies. 

"You are here that you may be fit- 
ted for life. If you lose out of your 
Freshman, or your Sophomore or 
your Junior or your Senior years, 
things that are for you, you have lost 
them forever. You are having these 
opportunities just once in your life. 
Here a.e the lectures, the library at 
your elbuw, here are companionships 
all c-f which you should make use of. 
Then, too, there are the Christian 
Associations, the churches, certain 
class meetings and the chapel exe.-- 
cises, all of which staitd for religi<Tn. 
Get out of them the things that are 
for 3'ou. 

"In conclusion, so far as you as in- 
dividuals are concerned, everything 
depends on your spirit, on your atti- 
tude to the life about you. If you will 
you can say, "I am not here to pull 
down, but to be a constructive part 
in the life of the College." The man 
who is here as a 'chronic kicker' is 
destructive. He is pulling down. If 
things are not going to suit him let 
him go like a man to headquarters 
and say so. 

"Let me say as we go into this col- 
lege year, that I believe in you stu- 
dents. You have a tremendous 
power for the making of this col- 
lege." 



The old cobbler across the way 
will soon realize that there is a de- 
crease in the number of short orders 
for soles and heels, food which gravel 
walks always relish. 



Mr. George Ross, a graduate of 
Michigan University, visited at the 
Alpha Tan Delta house this week. 



THE ^r 1 G 1'] R 



TERRORS DEVOURED 

Continued from Page 1. 

yard line. Scoring from a drop or place 
kick this year founts but three. 

In the second half Heald and Vande- 
moer divided honors and scored a touch- 
down ap'ece. Va^idemoer failed to kick 
one goal, the bail h.itting the cross bar. 
Final score, 14-0. 



1 


|. 




1 


H^^^V ^''ib r<y " v^^^^ 




1 


IbiiwM ^IntVi' 






mtm^ 


BMe- 




...s 



Who Is Playing His Old End Position 



But say, ha\'e you been down on the 
field the past week? Did you notice a 
difference? There certainly is a differ- 
ence. 'J here are "Al" Sherry and 
"Chet" Whittaker handling punts, "Big" 
Dick Morrison filling the stall known as 
left tackle, and "Old Murph" with his 
Quaker Oats smile. It is truly an inspir- 
ing sight to see these old warriors back 
on Washburn. 

With Murphy, Vandemoer, Wilson. 
Whittaker and Heald for backs. Sherry 
and Putnam quarters, Lee, Sinton and 
Copeland on ends, Morrison and Cary 
tackle, Reichmuth and Thompson guards 
and "Shorty" Steele at center, the Tigers 
ought to ha\'e a fast ball team this 
fall. 

The past week has been spent in a 



gruelling attack on the tackling dummy 
and light practice in the way of getting 
down on punts and learning new plays. 
Each evening's performance winds up 
with scrimmage. If you don't believe it 
is scrimmage come down and look it 
over. The scouts, the majority of whom 
are Freshmen (I do not understand why 
they are called scrubs. They do not play 
like scrubs; neither do they look the 
part), are a wild bunch and can make 
the first division believe they ha\c been 
to a regular football game. 

1 hey are developing a fine spirit and 
nnibt be doing something in the wa_\' of 
studying, as the faculty members on the 
athletic board have said that the facult\- 
is favorable toward allowing the Fresh- 
men tea n to participate in class games 
ihrougbdut the State. The team has 
elected Ja\' Randolph captain and all the\- 
need is a live manager who will start 
something and fix up a schedule. 

'I he regular schedule has at last been 
completed. The open date, which was 




AL SHERRY 

Speedy Quarterback Who Has Returned to 

Washburn Field 



Oct. 30, has been filled by the University 
of Wyoming game to be played at Lara- 
mie. 



The schedule is as follows : 

Oct. 16 — School of Mines, at Colorado 
Springs. 

Oct. 30 — University of Wyoming, at 
Laramie. 

Nov. 6 — Aggies at Colorado Springs. 

Nov. 13 — U. of C. at Colorado Springs. 

Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 25 — D. U. at 
Denver. 




ORVIL LEE 
Who Is Making Good at End 



Spring, a Junior who played halfback 
at the School of Mines last year, was 
chosen to captain the team this fall. The 
position was made vacant by the non- 
appearance of Tommy Skinner. 



* * 

* A special meeting of the stu- * 

* dent body is called for after ♦ 

* chapel Monday, Oct. ii, to * 
•i* elect a Junior member of the •?• 

* Athletic Board. * 

* Nominations must be by pe- * 

* tition signed by fifty (50) * 

* students and handed to the * 
4» Secretary five days previous * 

* to the election. * 

* * 



THE TIGER 



MATHEMATICS FOR ENGINEERS 



THE ENGINEERING EDITOR 

REVIE\A/S SOME RECENT 

OPINIONS. 



The value of "so much math" has 
often 'been questioned by students tak- 
ing the curriculum courses in engineer- 
ing. It was recently remarked, "It looks 
like a waste of time to bother with so 
much math. You do not use it in prac- 
tical work. When you do need it, you 
can get books with the necessary formula 
all 'doped out.' " What is the reason, the 
underlying motive, for this remark of a 
Freshman? A hatred of the study of 
mathematics in general and a poor ele- 
mentary course in high school, is the 
reason in some cases. Many who take 
courses in mathematics in college find 
that there is a great breach between 
where their elementary mathematical 
training leaves off and their college work 
begins. Almost any deficiancy can di- 
rectly be accounted for either in the in- 
dividual, the instructor, or both. 

At the last of the special joint meet- 
ings of the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science and the 
American Mathematical Society, which, 
were held in December, 1908, papers 
were presented and "The Teaching of 
Mathematics for Engineering Students" 
was discussed at considerable length. A 
great deal of emphasis was laid on the 
methods of teaching, the impracticability 
of teachers and the reasons for their 
being so. The following are a few of 
the extracts taken from the papers and 
the disbussions : 

Prof. R. S. Woodward, President of 
the Carnegie Institution, says, "In many 
cases men of inferior accomplishments 
and without any practical knowledge or 
experience outside of the class room are 
employed to teach mathematics to the 
students. Quoting Professor F. S. 
Woods of the Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology: "The low 
."salaries paid to mathematical in- 
structors and the relation of this to the 
competence of the men and the results of 
their work" corroborates the above state- 
ment. 

Professor Alexander Trivet, of the 
University of Michigan, ofifers the reason 
for this fact that "Mathematics is given 
a higher position in foreign universities 
than in this country." In this country 
the skilled mathematician is not yet ap- 
preciated at his real value. 

In another paper it was stated that 
"The defects of teaching are readilv 



pointed out, but remedies are rarely sug- 
gested." After the mathematical teacher 
has done his work, the professor of en- 
gineering should so teach that the stu- 
dent will be obliged to use the knowledge 
imparted to him by the former. Mathe- 
amtics should be a familiar working tool 
of the engineer. Mr. C. F. Scott, a con- 
sulting engineer for the Westinghouse 
Electric & Mfg. Co., quotes a prominent 
engineer as saying that the ordinary en- 
gineer does not use higher mathematics 
in his work because he does not know 
how. He adds further that a teacher 
who is simply a mathematician will teach 
his subject in such a way that it shows 
the student no practical use or applica- 
tion of what he is taught. "What is 
needed is a combination of mathematics 
and common sense, so that, when a prob- 
lem is presented, the student will have 
the ability to grasp it and to realize all 
tl;c' elements that enter into it." 

"Only a small percentage of the gradu- 
ates of so-called engineering schools are 
employed in positions that require the 
use of mathematics, but as a matter of 
fact, few of these graduates are properly 
educated in the subject," says Prof. 
Gardener S. Williams, of the University 
of Michigan. His idea of teachers of 
mathematics is that they should practice 
engineering. As a matter of fact there 
are very few engineers who are com- 
petent to teach higher mathematics. It 
is not so much a problem of what to 
teach as how to teach. He advocates the 
overhauling of the branches of mathe- 
matics, as taught in the grammar school, 
which, according to him, is the vital 
point of prescribed mathematical study. 

The ability to use the higher branches 
of mathematics depends upon the thor- 
oughness of the elementary courses given 
in the grannnar and high schools. 

-The concensus of opinion at this meet- 
ing was that geometry is of great im- 
portance and should be given more prom- 
inence and greater attention. The de- 
sirability of ascertaining whether a stu- 
dent really understands and has an- 
alyzed a problem or whether he has sim- 
ply memorized some rules or formulas 
is evident. 

Prof. E. T. Townsend of the Univer- 
sity of Illinois, highly advocates an in- 
crease in the requirement in mathemat- 
ical wore fo:- entrance to college, es- 
pecially along the lines of geometry as a 
practical study. There is a growing de- 
mand for a better correlation of mathe- 
matics with general education. It is 
claimed that the studv of mathematics is 



not to develop mental faculties but to 
mathematics should be continuous and 
give men power to do things. For this 
reason, if no other, the teaching of 
consecutive from school to college and 
should be a compulsory subject. 

Prof. Townsend further states that he 
would not teach any mathematical prin- 
ciples empirically or allow students to 
disregard the necessity for demonstra- 
tions. In revising the scheme of educa- 
tion the general student should have 
more mathematics rather than the en- 
gineering student have less. 

Mathematics should be taught by' 
mathematicians and engineering by en- 
gineers. If the mathematician wants to 
teach engineering he should be famil- 
iar with it and the engineering in- 
-structor should review and levise his 
knowledge <if nrithematics from time 
to time. 

There is nothing that is more discour- 
aging t(j the Freshman engineers than 
the trying to take college mathematics 
with a deficient elementary preparation, 
'1 he time and energy spent in trying to 
get a lesson is wasted, if points are over- 
looked which need reviewing; not only 
is the time wasted but succeeding courses 
are made all the harder, and less prac- 
ticable. If you can not use your mathe- 
matics readily, j-ou are not an engineer. 

This latter plan of re\'ising and 
reviewing is undoubtedly the best means 
toward overcoming deficiencies which go 
to make up the breach between high 
school and college courses in mathe- 
matics. 



PROPOSED AMENDMENT FOR 
DRAMATIC CLUB. 



At a meeting of the Young Women's 
Dramatic Club, Monday noon, the fol- 
lowing amendments to the constitution 
of the club were proposed : 

1. No member shall be eligible for 
office unless she has taken part in at least 
one farce during her college course. 

2. The offices of this society shall be 
divided equally between hall and town 
young women — a President and Vice- 
President shall not both be hall or both 
town young women. 

By-Laws — 

1. There shall be some form of dra- 
matic entertainment every six weeks. 

2. The accounts of the society shall 
be audited every two months by a com- 
mittee composed of the secretary and 
custodian. 



THE TIGER 




The Weekly Newspape: of Colorado College 

GLENN W. SHAW Editor-in-Chief 

HARRY W. IWcOUAT Business Manager 

S. VV. Dean Assistant Editor 

C. DOVELAN Assistant Editor 

H. H. HAiGHr Assistant Editor 

L. E.GriswOLD Engineering Editor 

B. P. SiDDONS Atlilctic Editor 

H. F. Rice Forestry Editor 

Julia Ingersoll Alumni Editor 

Helen Canon Exchange Editor 

Janet Kampf Local Editor 

W. L. Warnock Local Editor 

A. E. BrySON Assistant Manager 

E. W. HiLLE A sistani Manager 

Correspondents 

Geneva McCaw, T. M. I'ltligrew, Edith Sommers, F. B. 

Copeland, Margaret \Varson, E S Statten. 

Kathaiine True, U L sisco 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles anditems to The] IGER. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all comn:unications to THE TIGER, Colorado 
College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

.^gg ^g^^ Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 

*^^^^^^ Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $L25. Single Copies 5c 



ATHLETIC OPTIMISM. 

The Tiger, containing an editorial 
under the caption "Conference 
Rules." was on the press this morning 
when the mail man p.esented Dean 
Parsons with the following letter: 

Sept. 30, '09. 
Dr. Edward S. Parspns, 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Dear Dr. Parsons: 

I beg to announce that this day the 
Faculty of the Colorado School of 
Mines, has been placed in control of 
athletics at this institution. 

As soon as possible the faculty will 
convene to consider the conference 
invitation. 

Very cordial yours, 

HERMAN FLECK. 

This letter simplifies athletic com- 
plications in the State. Denver L^ni- 
versity is the only institution which 
still holds out against the Conference 
rules adopted by the faculty repre- 
sentatives of Colorado College, the 
State University and the Agricultural 
College at a meeting in Denver last 
January and printed in the Tiger last 
week. A lack of enthusiasm for ath- 
letic relations with the Boulder insti- 
tution, rather than any objection to 
the conference rules, seems to explain 
Denver's attitude. Both Denver and 
the Mines have scheduled games to 
be played with us under the cnnfe '- 
ence rules; that is, without Fresh- 



men in the line-up. The gaine with 
the .Mines was pending satisfactory 
adjustment, but Professor Fleck's 
letter makes it a certainty. The 
game with the Minsters will be played 
in Denver on Thanksgiving day ac- 
cording to agreement. 

The action of the Schoil cf Mines 
makes it seem certain that the near 
future will see the intercollegiate ath- 
letics of Colorado on a sound and 
well-orde.ed basis. For years the 
teams of the State have been plug- 
ging away at each other without re- 
gard for eligibilit}' rules or any rules 
except the one scrupulously observed 
by savage warring tribes, which, po- 
litely stated, is, "Anything to win." If 
one institution had a protest to make 
against another, it made complaint to 
<i liard-liearted world though the col- 
umns of a newspape.- sporting page 
and severed athletic relations with its 
o'lender. Of course there were sev- 
crings galrire under a system which 
rewa:'cled the most unscrupulous 
fighter. One crook can never abide 
the more finished work of another. 

Rule 10 of the Conference rules, 
which will put an end to the old 
scjuabbling, is entitled "Relations 
With Non-Conference Institutions'' 
and reads as follows under two sec- 
tions: 

"(i) The institutions represented 
in this Conference agree not to enter 
into athletic relations, except as per- 
mitted by vote of the Confe.-ence, 
with other collegiate institutions 
which do not have faculty control of 
athletics and an equally high standard 
of eligibility rules. 

"(2) The ciuestion whether an in- 
stitution is eligible to take part in in- 
tercollegiate athletics with the Con- 
ference institutions shall be decided 
by the Conference itself." 

This will not prevent a dissatisfied 
institution's withdrawing from the 
Conference, but it will bind the Con- 
ference institutions to stand for right 
principles and boycott the team which 
refuses to abide by them. 

The Conference rule which is caus- 
ing the most discussion now is the 
half-year rule, which bars the Fresh- 
men from intercollegiate contests. 
Rule 9 provides that "no intercol- 
legiate contests between Freshman 
teams shall be permitted." This 
makes the half-year rule go down 
hard with many. The Athletic Board 
of Colorado College has petitioned 
the Conference to abolish Rule 9 and 
allow Freshman contests. We can- 



not p/ophesy what action will be 
taken, but whatever the action. Rule 
3, which provides fo.' a half-year 
residence with passing grades, must 
be enforced* While the action of the 
Mines was yet doubtful,- the question 
was heard: "If they refuse our condi- 
tions, can we not play them on Oct. 
16 and let the Freshmen play in just 
that one game?" The answer to such 
a cjuestion of everyone who thinks 
and realizes what Colorado College 
has been working for for the last two 
years, must be emphatically "No!" 
Now is the c.itical time. Colorado 
College has a Freshman team which 
is making the regulars hustle, but she 
can afford to wait. So can every in- 
stitution in the State. Clean athletics 
depends upon whether we all wait 
with strength. The Freshman is an- 
other case of "He also serves who 
only stands and waits." 

ON MAKING MUSIC. 

We sing a good deal at Colorado 
College, but we do not make much 
music. Those who attended our 
first campus sing realize that spirit 
does not always make harmony. Of 
cou.se the Sophomores were absent, 
and the Freshmen were nervous and 
did not know the songs anyway. But 
neither do a lot of the upper class- 
men know the songs. We need to 
learn more songs, learn them better 
;;nd smg them oftener. The individ- 
ual is the man to get busy. He is 
worthless on the steps of Palmer 
Hall unless he has taken an interest 
before he came to the sing. 

Speaking of things musical. Dean 
Hale of the School of Music is an- 
.xious to arouse interest in a choral 
societ}' of mixed voices. Such a so- 
ciety could add ten fold to the plea- 
sure of our chapel services and could 
make a new thing of our May Fes- 
tival. When the Dean issues his call 
for candidates for such an organiza- 
tion, he should meet with a hearty re- 
sponse. 

TO OUR ALUMNI. 

Arthur E. Harper '07, who has 
been teaching English in Euphrates 
College, Harpoot, Turkey, since his 
.graduation from Colorado College, 
has just written an interesting letter 
to Dean Parsons. We have printed 
the letter in this issue. Our alumni 
could supply the students with some 
very attracti\'e reading matter if they 
would. This paragraph is intended 
for an invitation. 



THE TIGER 




"^ik. 




CAMPUSTRY 



By Webb Foote 



Two upper classmen were lying at 
the northeast corner of Perkins Hall 
idly discussing the great American 
fly, and the ugly harmlessness of 
our campus sheep. The automatic 
lawn mower stood browsing about 
ten feet away. Just as one of the 
loafers was observing that the mouth 
of a mutton loc-kcd like an oyster, a 
playful bitvof a dog nipped at the hind 
stilts of one of the innocents at the 
other end of the mower. The flock 
stampeded, and like a phalanx, offered 
a solid front to the reclining philoso- 
phers. "OfTered" is hardly right; 
they delivered it. The two rapidlj' 
perforated the lawn with their noses 
and t ied to crawl through. They 
only succeeded in making attractive 
hurdles of themselves and the sheep 
vaulted over like the flock crossing a 
stile in an ordinary nightmare. When 
a man's d^nvn, even harmless sheep 
will pick on him. Moral, if any: 
Keep up. 



The rumor that the committee re- 
cently appointed to arrange a big 
aquatic contest for the lower class- 
men was drowned to the death while 
in\ estigating the wetness of a neigh- 
boring lake, is entirely false, accord- 
ing to latest reports from the bedside. 



If the editor doesn't catch this 
in the proof, on Friday the Tiger will 
advocate a big triumphal procession 
around the campus the day our en-i 
closing sidewalk is completed. 



Jerking tags at the candy raffle at 
Murray's would be gambling, if it 
were net for the nature of the prizes, 
which makes it a rummage sale. 



DYING ECHOES. 

A Chicago paper condensed our 
recent scandal mto a three-inch dec- 
laration that Budelier had been abus- 
ed and Mrs. Goddard was after our 
scalp. We were in hopes that eastern 
papers would report some amusing 
versions wliich we could display for 



There is an artesian hole-in-the- 
grcund in front of Perkins, which is 
afifording considerable amusement 
these days. It is situate just at the 
edge of the walk and is well hidden 
by fond and clinging grass of con- 
siderable length. It is about calf-deep 
and always, brim full of water. 

Whetlicr it is truly a:tesian or 
whether some happy cut-up fills it 
each night, we will not attempt to 
say. We don't care: such a trick 
would be worthy of the lords of the 
administration building. Were we 
said lords., we boldly confess we 
would set some 300 cf those juicy 
traps along the borders of all our 
walks. Some people's feet would 
soon toughen enough so they could 
stand gravel. If not, they would 
lun'e patches put on their soles. 



Some people think Freshmen 
shouldn't be fooling with beer cases. 
Not so the law enforcement folk. 



Why is it that spending a dime 
makes a man feel richer than finding 
one? 



The liniityper says some students 
write a hand like some professors. 



The hills are beautiful these days. 
Text books seem tu be lacking in some 
essential tpialities, but they have a 
drag witli the authorities that prom- 
ises to keep theni from ever becom- 
ing outcasts. 



"Ye shall know the truth and the 
truth shall make you free." Christ- 
mas is coming. 



our readers this week, but they all 
printed the same article. It is not 
worth a rep int. The most interest- 
ing form in which we have seen it 
was as foreign news in a German pa- 
per published in New York. If it 
readies Europe, our special corres- 
pondent will wi;'e us. 



A COMMUNICATION. 
"Speckled Tater" Says "uec B^sy. 

"Oh, I haven't got time." If there is 
a phrase that echoes about the campus 
more than another it is "I haven't got 
time." Then the speaker starts in to 
enumerate the multitudinous duties that 
are his, as if no one else had anything to 
do but listen to them and reply, "You 
poor mortal, I wish 1 could help you." 
But, strange ' to say, no one takes time 
even to say this much. 

Perhaps it is because no one cares. 

Yes, this is a busy life, and college life 
is the busiest life of all, so we students 
think. 

But say, have you ever tried to quit 
thinking so iBuch about what you had to 
do and do a little more ? Some one asked 
Beecher how it was that he accomplished 
so much work. Hsi reply was, "When 
I have anything to do, I do it just once." 

This is another way of saying that he 
did not do his work over and over again 
in his mind before he got to it. He did 
one thing at a time. 

If you have a lesson to get, sit down 
and get it, — not tonight, not in the morn- 
ing, but now. If there is a theme to 
write, write it now instead of wondering 
what you are going to write about and 
conclude your wondering by going into 
your neighbor's room or over to Mur- 
ray's or perhaps down to the Majestic. 
Get your lessons first, get them now. 
That is what you are here for, primarily. 
Then, get out and mix a little. Get out 
of pleasure all that there is in it. If 
your time is rightly managed, you can 
do this. 

In conclusion, if the Y. M. C. A. sec- 
retary, or your class president, or the 
president of your society asks you to do 
something don't say, "I haven't got time." 
He won't believe you and, if he does, 
he will think that you don't amount to 
much if you can't do a little more. 

This is not an attempt to run in oppo- 
sition to President Slocum's weekly eth- 
icals, but a little bit taken from real ex- 
perience. 

SPECKLED TATOR. 



DAIS OFFICERS. 

The Ancient Order of the Dais has 
elected the following officers: 
Headmaster, Mary LeClere. 
Summoner, Lenore Pollen. 
Clerk, Ruth Wight. 
Franklin, Nannie Gibbs. 
Almoner, Bertha Miller. 
Baillie, Irene Huse. 
Jeste', Reba Hood. 
Page, ]\Iargarite Seifried. 



THE TIGER 



RACQUETS OUT. 



Tennis Association Elects Officers 
and Discusses Plans. 



Tile Ter.nis Association met after 
chape! Wednesday noon to elect offi- 
cers lor tlie year and discuss many 
plans. 

In the absence of last year's presi- 
dent, Professor Smith has gone 
ahead and seen to having the courts 
put in shape. He reported to the as- 
sociation that three courts would be 
entirely equipped and ready for hard 
use by the beginning of next week. 
He has ordered three new nets and 
tape. The association indorsed the 
work of Professor Smith and thanked 
I'lim for assuming responsibility. 

A mntion to have clay put on the 
two lower courts was carried enthusi- 
astically in spite of the lone five-dol- 
lar bill which grinned from the treas- 
u.y. The association is allowed $30 
a semester from athletic association 
funds for maintenance. Marion Die- 
trich and Earnest Fowler were ap- 
pointed to get clay on the courts, 
money or no money. 

This year outsiders, to the number 
of not more than ten, will be allowed 
to use tlie courts under the same con- 
ditions as association members after 
the payment of a fee of $2. There is 
no fee for college people. An as- 
sessment is levied for balls and tro- 
phies for tournaments. 

The rules for reserving the courts 
may be found in the front of the re- 
servation book hanging at the foot 
of the steps in Coburn Library. They 
provide that two persons cannot sign 
for any court for more than i hour in 
24. Reservations cannot be made 
more than 24 hours in advance of the 
time a court is to be used. The.e 
will be no signing for early morning 
hours; before breakfast "first come, 
first served" will hold. The rules for 
reserving courts are in force immedi- 
ately. The two south courts are num- 
bered from east to west i and 2; the 
upper court is number 3. 

Officers for the year were elected 
as follows: 

President. John Nelson. 

Vice-President, Mary Publow, 

Secretary-Treasurer, Marion Die- 
trich. 



REPORT AND PROSPECTUS. 



1908-1909 and a prospectus of the 
work planned for 1909-1910. In the 
front is a pen-sketch of Hagerman 
Hall done by K. Lee Hyder for last 
year's Annual. The booklet will be 
mailed to alumni and friends of the 
Association, who will be shown what 
became of their contributions last 
year and where moneys will be spent 
during the coming year. The Y. M. 
C. A. is out after a budget of $1300 
this 1,'ear. 



TO BEGIN HOWLING. 



Glee Club Issues Call for New Voices 

and a Manager — Dean Hale 

Talks of Choir and 

Singing Club. 



Boola! Boola! The Glee Club will 
be at it again next week. Dean Hale 
will be in his office in Perkins Hall 
to try the voices of all men who may 
wish to make the club this year im- 
mediately after chapel on Monday 
and Tuesda}'. He will be kept busy. 
The incoming class is full of good 
voices, and the old men are enthusi- 
astic. 

Practice will begin immediately and 
the club will be ready for a week's 
trip early m the holidays. Whoever 
aspires to be manager is hereby re- 
quested to leave his name at Dean 
Hale's office not later than Monday. 

When talking of the Glee Club, 
Dean Hale spoke of big plans he is 
working on for a chapel choir and 
singing club that could be used at 
the May Festival. Such a club will 
probably be organized in the near fu- 
ture. Both men and women will 
make up its membership. 



GOVERNMENT ESTABLISHES 
EXPERIMENT STATIONS. 



The V. M. C. A. has just issued a 
20-page booklet containing a report 
of the work done during the year 



The two experiment stations which 
are to be established on the slopes of 
the Peak by the Forest Service should 
be of inestimable value to the For- 
estry School. Experimental work of 
different kinds will be undertaken on 
a large scale, and if the Forestry 
School would work in conjunction 
with the government men, a la ge 
amount of valuable knowledge could 
be acquired. 

It is very probable that the upper 
classmen will make several visits to 
the station during the coming year on 
trips of inspection. 



FORESTERS' CLUB 



Outlook This Year Brighter Than 
Ever Before. 



The outlook for the Foresters' 
Club this year is brighter than ever 
before in its history. Heretofore the 
one drawback to greater success has 
been lack of members, but this year 
the Forestry School is larger, which 
insures an ample membership for the 
club. Practically two-thirds of the 
states in the Union are represented 
in the Forestry School's enrollment. 
.A great manj' <if the men have had 
previous experience in forestry work 
in the dififerent regions and will be 
able to impart to the other men a 
large amount of valuable information 
in regard to different working meth- 
ods, market conditions, etc., in other 
portions of the country. 

A committee is now at work mak- 
ing arrangements with different prom- 
inent speakers and government ex- 
perts, who will be heard from time to 
time during the year. Printed pro- 
grams, for this year's work will be is- 
sued in a short time, and it is hoped 
by the officers of the club that the 
new men will take an interest in the 
work and hand in their names for 
membership to Pres. "Pinchot" Mor- 
gan as soon as possible. 

The regular meetings will be held 
every two weeks. The time will be 
decided later and committees will be 
appointed to look up market condi- 
tions, progress in Forestry, current 
events and various other topics of in- 
terest. These committees will report 
at each meeting; in this way the 
members will be kept in touch with 
everything that is going on. Too 
much stress cannot be laid upon a 
foresters keeping well informed; for 
forestry is an advancing profession, 
and methods which are now in use 
will in a very few years be obsolete. 
Unless a man keeps well abreast of 
the times, he cannot hope to make a 
success of his calling. The older men 
in the School realize this to a much 
greater extent than the new men, who 
will soon realize its importance if 
they will take an interest in the club 
and come out to the meetings. All 
meetings are open to students of the 
other departments as well as Forest- 
ers. 



The present Senior class, in the de- 
partment of Civil engineers is the largest 
in the history of the College. 



THE TIGER 



BIG PLANS. 



Y. W. C. A. Busy Under Direction of 
General Secretary. 



The Young Women's Christian As- 
sociation has this year entered upon 
a new era. Feeling that the Associa- 
tion needed a closed organization 
and some one to look; after its inter- 
ests better than has heretofore been 
possible, Miss Mayme Scott, a Colo- 
lado College graduate, has been se- 
cured to act as General Secretary. 

Miss Scott was one of the most 
popular young women of lier class 
while m College. She can be de- 
pended upon to develop the Y, W. 
C. A. to a much greater degree of 
usefulness. 

One of the things proposed for this 
year is to make Bible study more in- 
teresting. The old group system has 
been abolished, and this year it is 
planned to have the girls meet in one 
large class each Tuesday evening at 
the regular time for prayers. Dean 
Parsons will lead this class and the 
Parables will be studied. AJready 
nearly all of the girls in College have 
registered for the course. 

In the Missionary department the 
old group system has also been abol- 
ished. Missionaries of practical ex- 
perience will be secured to address 
the meetings. It is thought that the 
student will get a much more profit- 
able and interesting knowledge of the 
work. Already Miss Mary Noble has 
been secured to give a series of talks 
similar to those which she gave last 
year and which were so well attended. 

The social side is not to be neglect- 
ed, for it is realized that it is possible 
for the Association to do an import- 
ant work in drawing the girls closer 
together socially. The adoption 
of the new society rules will be a 
help here, for it will allow the older 
girls to be attentive to new girls 
without drawing suspicion of "rush- 
ing." A party will be given to the 
new girls some time before Xmas. 

But perhaps the largest field that 
lies before the Association wo/kers is 
that of the Extension work. Under 
the leadership of Miss Lenore Pollen 
great things are planned and already 
a good beginning has been made. It 
is hoped through this field to bring 
the girls into active contact with 
some phases of charity work. While 
great care will be exercised to avoid 
the girls coming in contact wi"th in- 
fectious diseases, lists of the sick and 
helpless will be kept and to them will 



be taken something of cheer, as nni- 
sic, flowers, reading, etc. Wherever 
needed, sewing and other work will 
be done. Visits will be made at the 
hospitals of the city. At Thanksgiv- 
ing time a number of dinners are 
given away by the girls. At Xmas 
time- a box is sent to the Day Nur- 
sery in this city and to an Orphans' 
Home in New Mexico. 

These arc a few of the ways by 
which it is hoped to put more life 
into the Association and thus make it 
more vital and practical to every one 
of its members. 



WHY STUDY THE BIBLE? 



"SWEETHEARTS" IN JUNGLE. 



Dramatic Club Gives Opening Farce 
for New Girls. 



The College dramatic season opened 
Saturday afternoon, with a delightful 
playlet, entitled "Sweethearts," by W. S. 
Gilbert, given in the Jungle, compliment- 
ary to the new girls. 

The farce, representing two dainty love 
scenes in English country life, was un- 
usually well done and the charming na- 
tural setting added greatly to the gen- 
eral effect. 

Helen Canon, as the serious young- 
lover in the first act, and the gruff, but 
romantic, old veteran in the second, was 
especially good. Julia Ingersoll as Jen- 
nie, bashful but saucy in the first act, 
and gentle and appealing in the second, 
was quaint and charming. Both Laird 
Anderson as the gardener, and Marion 
Yerkes as the maid took their parts well. 

The caste was as follows : 

Mr. Spreadbrow Helen Canon 

Jennie Julia Ingersoll 

Willrox Laird Anderson 

Maid Marion Yerkes 

The audience was not very large, but 
very appreciative, the efforts of the comb 
orchestra adding greatly to its enthusi- 
asm. 



INTERSOCIETY PICNIC. 



On Friday evening, the members of 
the girls' literary societies went to 
Bruin Inn for supper and a jolly time 
together. The walk up the canyon 
in the early moonlight made even 
more acceptable the appetizing sup- 
per served at the inn, and dancing and 
music afterward made the time pass 
all too Cjuickly. About forty-five 
girls were present and the affair was 
sc) successful and so much enjoyed 
that it will probably be made an an- 
nual occurrence. 



Dean Parsons Gives Four Strong 

Reasons in Talk at First 

Y. M. C. A. Meeting. 



The first meeting of the Y. M. C. 
A. last h'riday night took the form 
of a Bible Study rally. Dean Par- 
sons addressed the ineeting on "The 
Study of the Bible." He gave four 
reasons wliy every educated man 
should study the Bible. First, it is 
good English. Second, it corrects 
lower standards, by teaching good 
moral principles. The progress of 
the human race has been and is to be 
along the lines of the principles of 
the Bible. Third, it brings us in 
contact with the greatest personality 
in history. This we must grant what- 
e\-er our view of him may be. The 
Bible is good biography and it al- 
ways pays to come in contact with 
any great man. 

Fourth, it gives Christ a chance at 
us. 

"And so f(jr your lower self and 
for you ■ higher self, study the Bible." 

Following Dean Parsons, Prof. 
Clarke, Professor Schneider, and Prof. 
Hastings briefl}' outlined their 
courses. Cards were passed and 
nearly every man signed up. The 
Bible study department of the Asso- 
ciation is under strong leadership this 
year and gives great promise. 



PAPETOWN PICNIC. 



\ picnic was given at Palmer 
Park, Saturday, to seventy of the 
Papetown children, under the auspices 
of the Extension Department of the 
College Y. M. C. A. Some of the 
College boys went out and helped 
conduct a track meet in which all the 
youngsters entered. 

I\Ir. Nelson, tiie chairman of the 
Extension wo:k, is doing some ener- 
getic planning for the year. Three 
College boys and three College girls 
go out to Papetown Sunday mornings 
to teach the children of the miners in 
the Sunday School. Plans are being 
laid for the College students to carry 
on services at several other villages in 
the vicinity. 



Dr. J, C. Shedd, former head of the 
Physics Department at Colorado Col- 
le.ge, and now instructor in Physics at 
Olivet C'-.llege, iMichigan, is the father 
of a healthy little daughter, born 
Sept. 20. 



10 



T H E ^J^ I G 10 R 



IN TROUBLOUS SOUTHERN 
EUROPE. 

Prof. Hills in Morocco Just Before 
War. 

Prof. E. C. Hills, who spent last 
spring and snnimer in sonthern Eu- 
rope, cluetli' in Spain and Italy, and 
who also made a trip into Alorocco a 
short while before hostilities began 
between the Moors and Spain, gave 
;in interesting interview relative to 
the Spanish situation, to the Denver 
papers. Dr. Hills said: 

"The Moors and Spaniards have 
been enemies for 1,200 years or ever 
since the Moors irnaded Spain in 
711, The present war seems to have 
started over a Spanish mining claim. 
It is hard to tell what the outcome 
will be. The Spaniards are now fight- 
ing energetically. Alany volunteer 
regiments are being formed. Some of 
these are composed i>f wealthy men 
who furnish their equipment and pay 
all their expenses. But it is almost 
certain that the Spaniards will not be 
able to penet -ate far into Africa. The 
Spaniards have the men to do so and 
their soldiers are brave and hardy, 
but Spain has not the money to carry 
on a long, expensive war. 

"The people of Barcelona were op- 
posed to the war, partly because they 
knew that it meant increased taxation, 
a large part of which they would have 
to pay, and partly because they have 
ever disliked the dominant Castilians. 
The province of Catalonia, of which 
Ba/celona is the capital, is wealthy 
and prosperous. A large part of the 
manufacturing interests of Spain are 
situated in or near Barcelona, and 
naturally this wealthy province pays 
a large part of the taxes of the coun- 
try. 

"The Catalans speak a language of 
their own, which differs from Spanish 
as nnich as does Italian. Those who 
have followed the course of events in 
Spain during the past months must 
have noticed that when the recent 
an'.i-war ri(_jts began in Barcelona, the 
government troops seemed powerless 
at first t?. cpiell the disturbances, but 
later they put an end to them with 
the gre:itest severity. The reason 
was this: 

"The troops that faced the rioters 
at first were Catalans, and they re- 
fused to fi c iin the people; but. when 
the Castilians arrived they immediate- 
ly suppressed the revolt with a hand 
of iron. The Castilians arc the dum- 
inant people nf Spain and they in- 



tend to remain so. Every few years 
the Catalans revolt, or at least seek 
to do so; and each time the Castil- 
ians rush in and crush the Catalans." 
In Italy. Dr. Hills observed with 
inteest the growing antagonism be- 
tween the Italians and the Austrians. 
"Austria holds much Indian territory 
yet. chieHA' the country about Triests 
and parts of Italian Tyrol. Tiie Ital- 
ians of Austria complain that they 
are oppressed, that the Italian lan- 
guage is discriminated against, and 
that Italian schools and universities 
are not permitted to exist. These 
complaiiits, doubtless much exag- 
gerated, have reached the Italian peo- 
ple and have stirred them deeply. The 
Italian papers speak openly of a war 
with Austria." 



ALUMNI NOTES 



PRESIDENT SLOCUM ENTij:R- 
TAINS. 

Last Friday evening, Dr. Slocum gave 
an informal reception to the Faculty and 
some close friends of the College. The 
evening was most enjoyably spent in a 
general social way, and in getting ac- 
quainted with the new members of the 
Faculty. 

Mrs. P. B. Stewart and Mrs. Strieby 
assisted in serving the refreshments. 



PROFESSOR RUGER RETURNS. 

Prof. Ruger has just returned from 
Columbia, where he has been doing re- 
search work in Philosophy and Psychol- 
ogy. He will resume his chair as as- 
sistant in this department at the College. 



PEARSONS LITERARY SOCIETY 
ENTERTAINS NEW MEN. 

The first open meeting of the lit- 
erary societies was given by the Pear- 
sons men last Friday night in their 
clubhouse. About twenty new men 
were present and listened to an in- 
teresting pi'ogram. Pes. Sylvester 
opened with a speech of welcome and 
Rice followed with a cello solo. Har- 
man talked next on "Birds of North 
Dakota." Blackmail told of the pine- 
apple industry in the Philippines. 
Pollock recited "The Blacksmith's 
Story, Shaw talked on some abstract 
subject too vague t■^ mention, and 
the program ended witli music by the 
quartette. Refreshments in the form 
of apples and doughnuts W'ere next 
thrown around. The society then ad- 
jou ncd to serenade the halls. 



Miss Bessie Gordcn 'c6 was mar- 
ried in Tune* to Mr. Bernstein and is 
living in Manzanola. 

Aliss Lottie Bigier '08 is attending 
the Pennsylvania Women's Medical 
College in Philadelphia. 



G. W. Smith '08 was around the 
campus on Sunday. 



Wni. S. Jackson ex-'io has gone 
back to Flarvard after a few weeks' 
stay in Colorado Springs. 



Miss Edith Forrest ex-'io was in 
tovvn Friday on her way to the Uni- 
versity of Nebraska. 



-Miss Edith ^IcCully ex-'i2 is at- 
tending Cornell University. 



Miss Marian Emmons ex-'og is 

"Our Colorado'' 

"Bruin Inn" 
"BlackandGold'' 



The Three Songs of Colorado 

College — in Sheet Form 

for 40c. Buy Them of 

E. W. HILLE 



Clever Clothes 

FOR 

College Chaps 

AT 

ROBBINS 

==ON THE CORNER =^ 



THE 1M G E R 



11 



I r^ SMOKE JUNIO 

H ^ ^P - : (DOMESTIC) 

^^^^" ^^^^^^^ C i: /^ X D-M.M. xl "TL r _ ^^ x_-. 



Four-for-a- Quarter 



Better than any Three- for -a- Quarter 



r>» n. -1 r> l *^ of ... . "l *3 course -^ <3 -^ ^3 

Llgar Otore 1 t3 1 O where 1 ^ else 1 o 1 o 



Wm 



IS MADE WITH 

7\ word to the wise is siifficienT ' 

{jX0^^ engraving ca 

ILLU5TRAT0RS PUEBLO. 



DESIGNERS 



COLO. 



ENGRAVERS 



Get Your Picnic Supplies 

AT ^= 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Favorite Resort of the Col- 
lege Students, Renowned in 
Story and Song 

BRUIN INN 

Up North Cheyenne Canon 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER, Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 



Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Patronize TIGEFT 
Advertisers 

UNION ICE AND COAL CO. 

W. M. BANNING, Proprietor 

Artificial Ice and Cold Storage 

Dealers in All Kinds of Coal and Pinion Wood 
Yard Office, 105 W. Vermii. City Office, 5 N. Tejon 



teaching at the Colorado Woman's 
College in Moiitclair. near Denver. 



Miss Clara Cowing '05 lir.s been a 
■\isitcr at Bemis this week. 

Miss Clare McCoy '03 is attending 
the University of California. 

Bo n — On Sept. 2j, to M;. and Mrs. 

Max Giesecke, tf Denver, a son. Mrs. 

Giesecke will be remembered as Miss 
Agnes Smedley '05. 



Miss Jean Pattison ex-'ii is attend- 
ing Vassar College. 



Miss Ernestine Parsons '08 left 
Saturday for North Dakota, where she 
will spend the winter with friends. 

Paul Eaton ex-'i2 is spending the 
year at home in Eaton, Colo. 

?\Iiss Ruth Londoner '09 stopped in 
town Tuesday on her way to Denver, 
where she will spend the winte.". 



Miss Glenn Stiles ex-'og was a vis- 
itor on the campus on Sunday. Miss 
Stiles is teaching at Colorado City 
this year. 

D. G. Rice ex-'oj was around the 
campus last week. 



Miss Mayme Scott '07 is the new 
Student Secretary of the Young- 
Women's Christian Association. 



SOPHOMORE PARTY. 



Yes, it was a jolly affair, that Sopho- 
more party on Tuesday night. "Ten 
o'clock came all too soon." Games and 
stunts were played till late. Dainty re- 
freshments were then served. Handsome 
emblems in the form of pennants, bear- 
ing the class numeral in colors, mounted 
on a toothpick stafif adorned the lapel of 
each coat. 



Maier's Lunch & Dining Room 

Lunches of All Kinds 
Regular Meals 20c and 25c 



216' 2 N. Tejon St. 



Opposite North Park 



"Attention Collegians" 

Let us make your Dances, Receptions, 
and Fraternity Socials this term, affairs 
never to be forgotten, by decorating 
your hall or parlors in an artistic man- 
ner with the college banners, pennants, 
festoons and bunting. Then have 
erected our sidewalk canopy to keep off 
the inclement weather. We also have 
floor coverings to protect the carpets. 
All this will cost but very little and 
add much to these affairs. 

The Out West Tent and 

Telephone Main 1261 
lis', N, Tejon Street 



Awning Co. 



College 
Stationery 

We are CLOSING OUT 
Box Stationery, em- 
bossed in Colors, with 
Pennant and Colorado 

Regular Price . 50c 
Sale Price . . 23c 




Whitney and Grimwood 

No. 20 North Tejon Street 



12 



THE T I G E H 



0. E. Hemenway 

Groceries and 



Meats 







115 South Tejon Street 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



YOU don't entertain your 
guests to save money — 
if you did, the simplest 
way would be to forego en- 
tertaining them. 
CfjMuETH's may cost more, 



but- 



©.Mueth's 



CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 

5 Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 
The Colorado Springs Floral Co. 

Wish to Have Your Business at Right 
Prices 



Telephone Main 599 



104 N. Tejon St. 



Latest out College Posters lowest Prices 

Picture Framing 

Hedrick Wall Paper and Paint Company 



Take a look in the window as you go by 



212 North Tejon Street 



Local Department || 



Miss Addle Hemenway has been 
elected treasurer of the Dramatic Clui), 
to fill the vacancy left by Miss Forrest. 



Edward Morse is a new Kappa Sigma 
pledge. 



Minerva holds her opening dance for 
new girls in the gym tonight. 

Misses Clara Cowing and Ruth Lon- 
doner visited College the early part of 
the week. 



Lloyd Shaw is a new Sigma Chi 
pledge. 



JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Stree 



FOR THE 

Most Exclusive Millinery 

CALL ON 

Mme. M. D. Hillmer 

6 East Pike' s Peak Avenue 

Finest of Material and 
Best of Workmanship 



Phone Black 395 



Colorado Sorines 



Dick Morrison, Murphy and Whittaker 
appeared Tuesday afternoon on Wash- 
burn Field in suits. 



Mrs. Ultey and her sister. Miss Anna 
Bispham, delightfully entertained Miner- 
va last Thursrlay afternoon with an in- 
formal tea. 

Helen Stricby spent Friday and Satur- 
day at Crystola gathering botanical speci- 
mens. 

French F and Bible I held their first 
meetings Wednesda\'. 



Fraternities, Clubs, Individuals 
desiring Milk or Cream 
in any quantities 
should remem- 
ber :: :: 



Edith Forrest, ex-'lO, stopped off last 
l'"rida>- on her way to Nebraska LTniver- 

sity. 

Sylvester left Wednesday for Monte 
Vista, where he will remain until Mon- 
day. 



The Sinton-Rustic Home 

r\ • P No. 419 South El Paso St. 

1/airy a) Phone Main 442 

The College Photo Studio 

The Highest Class of 

Photographs 




Bingham 

18 S. Tejon St. Phone M-678 



DOUGLAS &. 
HETHERINGTON 



Architects 



Telephone S36 Rooms 1 5 and 16 Out West Buildinii. 

COLORADO SPRINGS. COLO. 



-^"TIIE TKJKl^ 



13 



Memory 
Books 

Bound in colors, black and 
and orange, and lettered on 
side. The only really Colo- 
rado College Scrap Book 
made. Lar^e enough to con- 
tain your four years' items. 

Price, $1.25 each 



The Out West 

Printing Sk Stationery Co. 
9-11 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 



Furniture 



At Moderate 
Prices 

Special Terms to Students 

McCracken & Hubbard 

120 and 122 South Tejon Street 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

IS S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

Are Always Well Pleased When They 
Get Their Hair Cut at 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



12 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springs 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

'as cade Laundry 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 

20 per cent, discount 

To All Students of College and Academy 



Larson is back, and has registcrcHi will) 
tlif Seniors. 

Saturday e\ening the members of the 
Dais had a feast to celebrate the birth- 
days of Miss Brown, Miss Smith and 
Miss Seifried. 

To renew old spirit and begin the year 
right the Sophomores gave a class party 
1 uesda\' e\ening in upper Perkins. 



Alpha Tau Delta entertained Saturda\ 
night with a tramp to Roe's cabin. The 
guests of the fraternity were: Misses 
Young, Saimders, Weir, Randolph, Mc- 
Caw, Haynes, Ferril, Watson, Fezer, 
frames, Pnillips, Weaver, Shepard, Whit- 
taker, Warnock and Roe. 

Miss Mattie Lendrum spent Saturday 
and Sunday at her home. 

Last Friday night, the F"reshmen girls 
of Ticknor Hall, were entertained with 
a fudge party. 

Saturday night, the Freshmen girls in 
Bemis had a "Sing" all their own, in 
the common room, and then adjournsd 
to Miss Burger's room, for a banana 
feast. 



Miss Hinkley gave a tea for a number 
of the new girls. 

Miss Lucilc Dilts entertained last 
Sunday with a tea. 

Miss Ruth Packard, of Denver, and 
Miss Katherine Gear, of Massachusetts, 
have entered the Freshman class. 

The Misses Vesta Roberts and 
Edith Douglas gave a spread in Tick- 
nor Hall last week. 



7 E. Bijou 



Phone 820 



Among guests visiting the College were 
Mrs. Cook, Miss Wilkes, Mr. H. A. 
True and Miss True. 



Mr. and Mrs. Thomas motored down 
from Denver Saturday to visit their 
daughter, Miss Jennie Thomas. 



"You can fool all the people some of 
the time," etc., may be true, but our 
motto is "Fool none of the people none 
of the time." Try us for ice cream, ices, 
candies, etc. Noble, Phone M. 920. 

Miss Vesta Tucker entertained the An- 
nual board Thursday evening. 



The prayer meeting committee of the 
Junior class has been appointed : Clara 



, Hunt Up 

Bissell's Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Re'ail Dealers in 
Flour, Fe(>d, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 

C. F. Arcularius & 
Company 

A Large Assortment of 

BELT PINS 

All the Latest Styles 



9 South Tejon Street 
COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 



P 



RI NTING, Engraving 
Paper. Gowdy-Simmons 
Printing Co., 21 N. Tejon St. 



Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Picnic Supplies 

For picnics and all kinds of outings, 
we are ready to supply everything in 
the way of eatables. We also have 
baskets so that we can pack your out- 
fit complete. Just say what you 
want, and when you want it, and 
you will have nothing else to do but 
think of the good time you are going 
to have. : : : : :: : : 

W\T n 112-114 North 

. IN. DUrgeSS Tejon Street 



14 



THE TIGER 



This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 

Company 




Headquarters for 

College Footwear 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

FOUNDERS AND MACHINISTS 



College 
Inn 



*^ Short 
II Ord 



ers 



Commutation Tickets — 
$3.30 for $3.00 

THE 

Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 



Phone 101 



117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 



We Pay Special Attention to 
the QUALITY of our 

Lignite 
Furnace Coal 

The Colorado Springs Fuel Co., 
112 Pike's Peak Avenue. Two 
Phones Main 230 

Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 

A. S. BLAKE 



Is the Man to See 



107 North Tejon 

Nickle Ware 



Phone 465 

Cutlery 



Wight, chairman; Lillian Pricken, Mr. 
Dean, Mr. Shapcott and Mr. Van Dyke. 

Miss Roberts and Miss Auld gave a 
tea Wednesday afternoon, for the hon- 
orary and active members of Hypatia. 

Miss Drew entertained McGregor 
Juniors at tea, Sunday. 



Eleven College men climbed Pike's 
Peak last Friday night, reaching the sum- 
mit in time to see the run rise. My, but 
it was cold ! 



Mrs. McCIain was at the College Wed- 
nesday looking after the interests of the 
Y. W. C. A. She returned to Denver 
the same day. 

Bancroft '13 and Boynton '13 are 
pledged to Phi Gamma Delta. 

Harry Ewing will visit around the Col- 
lege from October 24 till the 31. 



A nice cool drink is relished these 
davs. Get it at Noble's. 



Wynne Ross '13 is pledged to Alpha 
Tau Delta. 



Phi Gamma Delta entertained their 
lady friends at Bruin Inn Saturday 
night. 



Arthur Brown '11 entered College 
Monday of this week. 



The joint Literary societies held a 
party at Bruin Inn Friday night. Every- 
one reports a fine time. 



Kappa Sigma gave a smoker Saturday 
night. 



Paul Moffit returned to school Tuesday 
afternoon. He has been working at Tel- 
luride. 



Bruin Inn, the popular little rustic 
hostelry, in North Cheyenne canon, 
changed hands recently and is now man- 
aged by Swanson and Riley, two ener- 
getic and obliging young men of this 
city. They promise the same treatment 
accorded to College students by their 
predecessor, Mr. Laveley. 



C. C. Hurst, a Sigma Chi from De 
Pauw, visited the chapter here. 



Moberg '13 is a Delta Phi Theta 
pledge. 



f At Last I 

• They're Here • 

We mean those Post Cards that 
we ordered from our German friends 
last spring. These cards are colored 
by hand, and include every huildmg 
connected Toiih the College. 



Sets of 12 cards, 25c, or 2 
for 5c, as wanted 



To be had only at 

Murray's 

(Just Opposite the Campus) 

William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

MEMBERS \ ^*'* York Stock Exchange 

1 Colorado Springs Mining Stock Exchange 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House. London, E. C. 



THE 



Official Printers 



To the Student 
Body of C. C. 



The Waterman Press 

112 E. Cucharras St. 
Phone 1154 



We Print THE TIGER 



THE TIGER 



15 



NOTICES 



The girls' literary societies are open to 
all who care to attend. All College girls 
are very cordially invited. 



Minerva program for October 1 : 
Lectvn-e Professor Gile 



Contemporary program for Oct. 1 : 
General Condition of Drama 

Louise Strang 

Renaissance of Tragic and Poetic Drama 
Dorothy Frantz 

THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 

PETERSEN 

121 E.Kiowa 

Sewed Soles 75 cents 

Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 

GIDDINGS BROS. 

Colorado Springs 

THE SPECIALTY STORE 

A Hearty Welcome Constantly Awaits All Visitors 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barber 
wrork and baths 



106'/2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



^fe 



aundry 



Why not have the BEST WORK ? 



20 per cent, discount 

To all Students of College and Academy 



J. J. WILSON, College Agent 

W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



119 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



/^ 



Sweater Coats 
Large Assortment 
$6.00 to $2.50 

GORTON'S 



For the 
College Fellows 



who are fussy about just the high style and snap in 
clothes, here's a rich lot of good ones. The most 
stylish exclusive clothes made ; the athletic- looking, 
smart styles, which look like something, $40 to $25. 



=^ 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 



Gorton' 



Correct Dress for Men 



113 E. Pike's Peak 
Avenue 



%, 



J 



Literary Quality of Recent Dramatists 

Frances Eames 
Music Lucy Ferril 



Hypatia program for Oct. 8 : 

Early Barbarians Ruth Bateman 

Stories from Ancient Sagas 

Flora Crowley 

Music Elizabeth Gerould 



The Apollonian Club extends a special 
invitation to all new men to visit them 
:it their club house tonight. 



APOLLONIAN PROGRAM FOR 
OCTOBER I. 

Music Hesler 

Welcome The President 

Things Worth While Dr. Slocum 

Music Hille 

The Apollonian Club Bryson 

Refreshments. 



PEARSONS PROGRAM FOR 
OCTOBER I. 



Football Prospects Kittleman 

Debate — Resolved, That the present 
tariff fulfills the Republican plat- 
form of the last election. 

Aff., Clifford and C. Copeland. 
Neg., Seldomridge and Woodard. 

Music Williams 

Speech Alden 



DRINK 

DERN'S 

Freshly Roasted Tea and Coffee 

29 South Tejon Strvet 

The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies and 
Fixtures 



208 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 812 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-203 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone IMain 1701. Resi- 
dence, 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 9'^6 

The College 

Photo Studio 



Hi^h Class Photographs 
Kodaks and Supplies 




<yS<\^7Tl€/n4 



Corner Cascade and Kio'wa 



16 



THE TIGER 



Four Coats in One... "EUREKA"— STAN-LAY (?uS 13 ^aiV"" ^ 

Cravanette, Raincoat and Overcoat in all weights a garment of class 

THE YOUNG The "Eureka"— -Stan-lay Coat solves the pioblem. It is a perfect combina'ion of the lay down 

MEN'S STORE lapel and the stock collar. A big boxy coat with plenty of snap. 



0^.>.LJ««^ Ch^^^^^ r^^ ^^^ 2S East Pike's Peak Avenue 

rerkinS'onearer Co. ^sf^ 



8 North Tejon Street 




CL Shoe Styles for Students 

Featured among our new styles for Fall wear, are all 
those new models that have snap and go, that are 
especially designed for the good dressers among our 
College Students 

Popularly Priced 



\f5>^«va.< 



SHOES THAT SATISFY 



$3.50, $4 and $5 



22 S.TEJON ST- 




When Trading, Remember TIGER Advertisers 




Colorado College 

Founded in Colorado Springs in 18 7 4 



WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



College of Arts and Science 

E. S. PARSONS, Dean 
School of Engineering 

F. CAJORI, Dean 
School of Forestry 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 
School of Music 

E. D. HALE, Dean 




Cutler Academy p 



The Associated 
rreparatory 
School, in which 
students are prepared for any American College 



\: 



Electrical Laboratory 





gMKMRMK) CXm^€^ 



Vol. XII COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., OCTOBER 8, 1909 



Number 4 



STILL AFTER 

THE GYM 



STUDENT COMMITTEE IS AP- 
POINTED TO COOPERATE 
WITH PRESIDENT. 



Same Plans for Finest Building in 
Colorado Uppermost in Pres- 
ident's Thoughts. 



The movement for a new gymnas- 
ium for Colorado College is not dead. 
President Slocum is giving more 
thought to this project at present 
than to all the other plans on foot 
hereabouts. At the opening stag, he 
devoted his talk to the outlining of 
those same plans for a fine stone 
building with indoor and outdoor 
gyms and reading and locker rooms. 
That it will come is certain. "How 
soon?" is the prevalent question. 

To hasten its arrival the Student 
Commission recently empowered the 
president of the Associated Students 
to appoint a committee to cooperate 
with President Slocum in raising the 
necessary funds. President McOuat 
has announced the following commit- 
tee: Carl R, Blackman, chairman; J. 
J. Sylvester, T. M. Pettigrew, R. G. 
Argo and Ray Sayre. 

The committee will go to work im- 
mediately. Its chairman has a head 
full of plans, and "How soon?" can 
safely be answered "Not long." 



JUDGE BEN LINDSEY WILL AD- 
DRESS Y. M. C. A. BANQUET. 



Judge Ben Lindsey has accepted an 
invitation to address the banquet 
which will be given by the College 
Young Men's Chistian Association at 
Bemis Hall Tuesday evening, Decem- 
ber 14th. The judge is in the public 
eye at present owing to the series of 



exposure articles running in Every- 
body's Magazine, and also to his call 
to Sari Francisco to take part in the 
prosecution of graft there. The Y. 
M. C. A. is fortunate in securing him. 



SIDDONS 

CANDIDATE 



JUNIOR MEMBER OF ATHLETIC 

BOARD TO BE ELECTED 

MONDAY. 



Some Constitutional Provisions Re- 
viewed. 



The election of a Junior member 
of the Athletic Board will take place 
after chapel on Monday, October 11. 
Iv. Lee Hyder, who was chosen to fill 
this position at the regular election 
last Ma3', did not return to college 
this year. Section 5 of Article VII 
of the Constitution of the Associated 
Students provides that, "Nominations 
to fill any vacancy shall be by peti- 
tion as provided in Article "\^II., Sec- 
tion I, except that nominations shall 
be clf-sed and posted five (5) days be- 
fore election; and provided, more- 
over, that election shall be by ballot 
at a special meeting of the Associated 
Students." The article on nomina- 
tions referred to above requires the 
signatures of 50 students to the peti- 
tion of a candidate for Junior repre- 
sentative on the Athletic Board. 

The petition of B. P. Siddons has 
been filed with Secretary Van Stone 
according to the constitutional provi- 
sions. He will be the only candidate 
before the electors Monday. 

Those qualified to vote are defined 
as follows in Section 3 of Article 
VII.: "Every registered student who 
has paid his fees to the Associated 

Continued on Page 5. 



MINES GAME 
CALLED OFF 



GOLDEN REFUSES TO PLAY 

WITHOUT FRESHMEN ON 

OCTOBER i6. 



No Open Dates Later in Tiger Sched- 
ule — Longmont Will Not Play 
Here Tomorrow. 



The Colorado Springs Gazette of 
Thursday says: 

"That the Mines and Tigers will 
not meet this year is now almost a 
certainty. Last night, after a confer- 
ence at Golden, Manager P. H. Car- 
penter of the Mines eleven announced 
that, acting on the advice of Coach 
Curtis, the Mines had decided not to 
play the Colorado College Tigers in 
Colorado Springs October lO. Mana- 
ger Carpenter said that an effort 
would be made to arrange a game lat- 
e ■ in the season. 

"Manager S. W. Kittleman of the 
Tigers, after being notified that the 
Mines would not play here, said that 
the Tigers had no dates left, and that 
unless the Mines were permitted to 
play freshmen, the game could not be 
pulled off. 

"The gene;-al feeling here is that 
the Miners are making a mistake by 

Continued on Page 5. 



MEETING OF FACULTY 

ATHLETIC CONFERENCE 



The Faculty Athletic Conference 
holds its regular monthly meeting 
next Saturday in Denver at the Uni- 
versity Club. The question whether 
the Freshmen of the different institu- 
tions represented in this Conference 
are to have intercollegiate contests is 
(o be decided at this meeting. 



THE TIGER 



FUTURE FLAG RUSHES. 

Upper Class Committee Confers With 
Faculty Representa ives. 



At the last meeting of the Student 
. Commission, President McOuat ap- 
pointed a committee consisting of 
himself, Phillips, Shaw, Dean and 
Haight to meet with a committee ap- 
pointed by President Slocum, and dis- 
cuss the whole question of future flag 
rushes at Colorado College. The stu- 
dent committee met with President 
Slocum, Dean Parsons, Dean Cajori 
and Professor Gile in the trustees' 
room last Monday afternoon and ap- 
pointed a sub-committee to draw up 
recommendations to be submitted to 
the student commission. 

At the conference the fact that re- 
cent scandal has not blown over as its 
slight foundation warranted^ was 
made plain by President Slocum. He 
receives many letters daily from 
friends of the college and parents of 
students here, who have read distort- 
ed reports in papers all over the coun- 
try. Cue Springfield paper recently 
reported the dying condition of two 
unfortunates who have been confined 
to the hospital since suffering barbar- 
ous outrages. Equally absurd reports 
will probably continue to hann Colo- 
rado College for weeks. 

Whereas the members of the con- 
ference v\ere unanimous in their ap- 
proval of t!:e class scrap as a regular 
fall event, they belie\e it advisable to 
place it under rules which will restrict 
the 'attendance and exclude persons 
who may wish to detract from the 
g-.od name of the College. It may be 
he'd at the athletic field, witnessed 
only by men of the College. Steps 
may be taken toward the prevention 
of all tying-up previous to the con- 
test. The sub-committee will report 
to the conference in the near future. 



DONELAN ELECTED TO 
NUAL BOARD. 



AN- 



The 19TI Annual Board has lost two 
of its members — Mr. Black and Mr: 
Stanchfield, not in college this year. 
At their last meeting the board con- 
sidered the available material with the 
result that it was decided to recom- 
mend to the class that Mr. Chas. 
Donelan be elected to the board. Mr. 
-Donelan has lately been elected to 
The Kinnikinnik Board, is one of 
the assistant editors of The Tiger, and 
has marked literary ability. He will 
be a distinct addition to the board. 



TROPHIES PLACED 

IN LIBRARY 

TWO LARGE CUPS WON LAST 

SPRING NOW ADORN A 

SHELF IN COBURN 



OFFERS SPECIAL COURSES. 



Colorrdo College Will Give Series of 
S udles for Teachers. 



Two large, handsome loving cups 
are now standing staunchly on the 
mantel just back tf the east reading 
table in Coburn Library. Like two 
gij.nt eagles perched on a lofty ledge 
just after devouring their prey, they 
seem to say, "It's all mine." At least 
these cups in their poseful attitude 
are symbols of similar feelings which 
fill each student as he admiringly 
gazes at them. 

On the face of one, beautifully en- 
graved, are the words: 

"A. A. U. Meet 

First Place 

Colorado College 

1909." 

On the face of the other are the no 

less proud symbols of thought and 

feeling: 

"First Place Relay Race 
A. A. U. Meet 
Colorado College 
T909." 
The men who won these emblems 
of glory both for themselves and for 
il'.e College are: 
Jardine, Captain. 
Gary. 
Jamison. 
Putnam. 
Fowler. 
Terrill. 
Johnston. 
Black. 



MINERVA DANCE. 

According to custom, Minerva held 
the first dance for new girls, last F i- 
day night, in McGregor Gym. "Pret- 
tier than ever," was the general com- 
ment, when the girls entered the room 
and found it a fluttering swarm of 
thousands of blue paper butterflies 
sus-ended from the ceiling, dangling 
from the walls, and hovering over the 
pilla s. 

The butterfly efifect was carried out 
in the programs, which were distrib- 
uted by girls in white with butterflies 
in their hair. 

Miss Brown and Mrs. Cajori stood 
in the receiving line, with the presi- 
dent; and Mrs. Rice, Mrs. Goodale, 
Miss Johnson and Miss Hall served 
ice and punch. About 125 we-e pres- 
ent. 



Special courses for teache s will be 
offered by Colorado College, in re-' 
spouse to many requests. The fac- 
ulty will reserve the right to with- 
d,aw any course if less than six elect 
it. Following are the courses: 

English J — Shakespeare. Three 
plays will be carefully studied with 
special attention to the language. 
Outside reading will be assigned. 
Three hours credit. Professor Wood- 
bridge. 

English N — Tennyson and Brown- 
ing. The purpose of the course is to 
give a general knowledge of the 
poems of Tennyson and Browning, 
and to make a careful study of the 
more important ones. About 50 
poems of each poet are read and stud- 
ied in class, and an equal number as- 
signed for outside reading. Three 
hours credit. Professor Motton. 

English y — Greek drama for Eng- 
lish leaders. Literary study of Aes- 
chylus and Sophocles in poetic trans- 
lation; lectures on the Greek theater 
and on Greek art (illustrated). Three 
hours credit. Professor Noyes. 

Psychology B — Genetic Psychology, 
Two hours credit. Professor Ruger. 

Persons completing these courses 
will be given credit on the same for 
the A. B. degree. For further infor- 
mation teachers should apply to Dean 
Parsons of the college faculty. 



REV. FRANKLIN GIVES INSPIR- 
ING TALK TO Y. M. C. A. 

Before an interested group of men 
in Hagerman Hall last Friday night. 
Rev. J. H.' Franklin of the First Bap- 
tist Church of this city gave a heart- 
t;-heart talk on "Learning by Doing." 

He said that "Christ did not ask 
for the opinion that the disciples had 
of Him until they had been with Him 
and kiu^wn Him. If He had asked 
them whether they believed in the 
Atonement or in His Divinity, no 
doubt they would have said "No." He 
v.anted an answer that came from ex- 
perience. His religion is one that 
will stand the test of experiment. It 
is a laboratory religion. 

"You will not know Him by any 
mathematical proof. But take Him 
as an ideal. We become like that 
which is set before us. This is what 
Christ meant when He said, 'Seek ye 
my face'." 



THE TIGER 



FIRST YELL PRACTICE A 
FARCE. 



KINNIKINNIK OUT IN A NEW 
COVER. 



ASSISTANT LIBRARIAN 
APPOINTED. 



Corporal's Guard Responds to Mc- 
Ouat's Call. 

When President McOuat annonnced 
yell practice for Wednesday night, he 
did not make a long talk on the ad- 
vantages of yelling in general and 
yelling college yells in particular. He 
didn't tell how the men on the squad 
are down on the field for two hours 
every night, whereas he was asking 
for only a half hour of each individ- 
ual's time. He didn't tell us how 
'much the men on the field appre- 
ciate the yelling. He didn't tell us 
how badly we yell as a body or how 
much we need the practice. He 
didn't tell the Freshrtien what a great 
chance it would be to learn the yells 
so that they might begin to be of 
some use by Thanksgiving. He 
didn't take the tinie to deliver an ora- 
tion on the fo egoing topics, because 
-he- didn't consider it needful. 

Every one except the Freshmen are 
supposed to know all these things an:l 
act accordingly. And the Freshmen, 
more cr less, stand around and do 
what they see some one else doing 
anjdiow. Therefore it's up to the up 
per classmen and the Sophomo.es to 
see to it the, t the new men get the 
yell practice habit. - And it's up to 
the Freshmen to sit up and take no- 
lice of what's going on around them 
and try to take an interest. After 
things get stated ofif perhaps it will 
not be so necessary for the upper 
classmen to be on hand. It's un- 
d".ubtedly true that they do have their 
hrnds full, but they should at least 
make an effort to be present at the 
fir.'t few yells. Of course the Fresh- 
men think they a e busy, ton, and 
perhaps they are — in their way — but 
the be'"t way they can busy them- 
selves about five-thirty p. m. of even- 
ings when 3'ell-p;actice is being held 
is to wander down to Washburn 
field and be ready when that fi st 
C-O is calied for. And besides, it's 
one of the best ways of making peo- 
ple think you arc -i real live Fresh- 
man. 



Tennis has recently been placed on 
the same, footing as track in Stanford 
University. All members of the team 
y/ho win their games are to be grant- 
ed a Varsity "S," while those who are 
defeated may wear the German "S." 



The Septembe.- number of the Kin- 
nikinnik was distributed gratis after 
chapel Monday. It came out arrayed 
in an artistic new cover and full of 
breezy reading matter — stories, es- 
says and poems. Herbert Roe is ed- 
itor of the magazine this year and 
Clare Phillips is manager. On Tues- 
day they called for the support of 
the students with subscriptions and 
literary contributions. The October 
number will be out the end of the 
month. 

An interesting announcement was 
that of the election of Charles Don- 
elan 'ii to the assistant editorship 
left \-acant by -A.. T. French ex-'io, 
who is in Denver this year. 



Miss Elizabeth Martin has lately 
been appointed to tlie position of as- 
sistant librarian. She is to .have 
charge of the polytechnic library, 
which includes both the libraries of 
the Engineering Society and the El 
Paso Medical Club. Miss Ma-tin 
comes to her new position from the 
Colorado Springs Public Library, 
where she has been assistant librarian 
for the past year. The rapid growth 
of the polytechnic library has necessi- 
tated that some one be in:charge of 
the room during the day. The Col- 
lege is extremely fortunate in being 
able to Secure so experienced a person 
for this position. 




DEAN. EDWARD S. PARSONS 

President of the Colorado Faculty Athletic Conference, whose firm stand for clean athletics 

in this state is beginning to bear fruit. He is enthusia tic over the new Conference 

rules and is eager for their strict enforcement in this their first year of trial. 

He declares that the slightest violation of the half year rule will destroy 

all that which already has been accomplished toward an orderly 

athletic settlement in Colorado 



THE TIGER 



SIDDONS' FOOTBALL DOPE 

Practice Games Ministers Make Poor Showing Against Longmont- Mines Runs Up Big Score on North Denver— Folson 
Picks Champions — Agell Practice — The Team Picked — High School Victory 



The results of last Saturday's prac- 
tice games have the significance of 
putting an entirely new face on the 
football situation in this State. The 
D. U. team, which has been scouted 
as the "best in the Rocky Mountain 
region," was outplayed and nearly 
outclassed by the plucky Longmont 
boys. While one should not take too 
much for granted and make predic- 
tions on the strength of that game, it 
is pardonable at least to say that D. 
U. will have to go somewhat ha der 
this year than she did last to continue 
to enjoy her mighty territorial title. 
The Methodists' friendly newspaper 
expressed itself as perfectly satisfied 
with the showing of their favorites, 
.-aying that everything is as it should 
be at this early date; that if D. U. 
had been working together like a well 
oiled piece of machinery at this time 
of the year it would be hard to pre- 
dict another championship. As they 
are fuiribling, falling down, and mix- 
ing up things in general, it is very 
easy for the gentleman to predict an- 
other bfilliant year. 

The Methodists meet the University 
of Wyoming tomorrow in Denver and 
it is prrnbable that most of our squad 
will be present to see the contest. 
Captain Crowley was hurt last Satu.-- 
day and will probably be kept out of 
tomorrow's battle. 

While- the Longmonters were giv- 
ing Koehler's squad a workout Sat- 
urda}- afternoon the School of Mines 
was running up a few points on North 
Denver High. We do not as yet know 
inuch about the strength of the North 
.Side aggregation, but a team which 
can run up 58 points -in two twenty- 
minute ^halves on any team demon- 
strates ihat it has been working and 
working hard. 

Added to this comes a report f;om 
one of the wise football heads of the 
State. Folsom, coach at Boulder, 
picks the Miners to make a clean 
sweep this year. This may or may not 
be Folsom's real opinion; if it is, we 
do not attempt to say whether or no 
it is based entirely upon the game 
last Saturday! But we will say that 
he evidently overlooked a factor in the 
situation — namely the Tigers. 

Speaking of the Miners, reminds us 
it is just a week from tomorrow that 
the first real football dispute of the 



season v>-ill be grid-ironed, and we 
who are not out working on the field 
every night, have, nevertheless, a duty 
to perform at that affair. It may 
seem unreasonable, but an athletic 
team of any kind takes as much pride 
in the renters who back them as do 
the rooters themselves in the team. 
This is especiallj' true in football, and 
when an eleven is out on the field 
scrapping for their college, what can 
be mo e inspiring than a yell from the 
organized student body? 

Rooting practice began last Wed- 
nesday night and will continue all 
next week. "Fuzzy" McOuat is a yell 
leader and if you come out once you 
will come again. He makes you like 
it. 



Richards has been driving the team 
hard ail week. Hard work and scrim- 
maging will gradually be tapered off 
next week. Thus far we are very 




JIMMIE WILSON 
Wholls Making a Hard Try for a Back Position 



lucky in not having an injured man 
on the squad. The fierce scrimmages 
which have been gone through night 
after night, a e a ceaseless sou'ce of 
worry to the nervous ones, but New- 
house has the bunch in good shape 
and that lessens chances of injury. 

The team has practically been pick- 
ed. By that it is not meant that eleven 
m-en have been chosen to fill eleven 
places, but that about fifteen will fill 
those eleven places this year. 

"Shorty" Steele will play center. 
"Shorty" has learned all the football 
he knows under Richards' coaching, 
and got his start two years ago on 
the scrubs. 

Reichmuth and Thompson, while 
not heavy men, are holding down the 
guard posts to the satisfaction of the 
coaches. They are both new men on 
the team, but not new to football. 

We need only mention that Cary 
and Morrison will play the tackles to 
guarantee that these positions are 
well filled. 

Sinton and Lee will probably be 
the choice for ends. Sinton is bigger 
and stronger than when he made his 
"C" two years ago and is showing up 
finely this fall. Orrie Lee is not so 
big, but no one ever worries about his 
end of the line. Copeland and "Mor- 
ley" Morrison are also being tried 
out for end and will succeed if they 
stick to it. 

Al Sherry is running the team this 
fall with more judgment than ever be- 
fore. His passing and forward pass- 
ing are accurate and he has the com- 
plete confidence of the team. When 
it comes to running back punts he is 
about the "biggest little man" in the 
State. 

In Whittaker, Heald, Vandemoer 
and Wilson we have four backs from 
whom it is hard to pick three superi- 
n.rs; all of them hit the line hard, are 
fast in getting away, and are fighters. 
Whittaker handles punts well and is 
playing a smashing game on the of- 
fensive. Heald's work at defensive 
full back and Wilson's skill in hand- 
ling forward passes cannot be over- 
looked. Vandemoer is making per- 
haps the most consistent gains: he is 
also doing the kicking. Hedblom is 
substitute for a line position and Put- 
nam is Sherry's substitute. Botb are 



THE TIGER 



good material and will be in a cham- 
pionship game if they stick to it. 



High School took the Dummies to 
a cleaning last Saturday morning. 
Five touchdowns were made by the 
Terrors, but only three allowed. Mor- 
ris kicked three perfect goals. Score 
18-0. 



MINES GAME CALLED OFE 

Continued from Page 1. 

refusing to play the Tigers. They de- 
cline to play them on the plea that, 
with the six-months rule in effect, 
they can not get together a team, and 
this in spite of the fact that there are 
300 students at Golden. 

"Golden's decision to break the date 
with the Tigers will cause great dis- 
appointment to local fans. For the 
last five years the Mines and Tigers 
have not met in Colorado Springs, 
their games having been played in 
Golden and Denver. 

"The faculty of Longmont High 
School refused to permit the inter- 
scholastics to come here for a prac- 
tice game with the Tigers Saturday. 
They claimed that two games with 
college elevens in two weeks was too 
much for a high school team. This 
leaves the Tigers without a game for 
Satu day." 



SIDDONS YELL LEADER. 



Bert -am P. Siddons 'n has been 
appointed yell leader for the 1909 foot- 
ball season. He called the first yell 
practice last Wednesday evening and 
met with a response that did not make 
furthe; practices seem unnecessary. 
His next call for practice will be more 
like' a bull. Siddons has promised to 
teach the bunch some snappy new 
ones at the next session. 



SENIOR PARTY. 



The Dignified Ones Loosen Up and 
Act Like Kindergarteners. 

I-ast night the members of the 
Senior class threw aside their wonted 
dignity and gathered at the home of 
Janet Kampf, 1516 North Tejon St., 
for the purpose of experimentally re- 
calling their happy days in the distant 
kindergarten. They smiled and ac- 
complished their purpose admirably. 

The games of the evening were of 
the informal sort. Charades preceded 



sundry children's games, square danc- 
ing and singing. The refreshments 
were as dainty as usual. 



A DRAMATIC CLUB IN COLO- 
RADO COLLEGE. 

The Students are Asking "Why Not?" 



For some time there has been an 
undercurrent of sentiment in favor of 
a dramatic club among the students 
of Colorado College. No formal steps 
have been taken to organize a club, 
but a sufficient number are interested 
to assure its success should it be 
formed at any time in the near future. 

A dramatic club has come to be 
recognized as one of the leading stu- 
dent activities of the foremost col- 
leges of the country. The writer was 
interested to note that, in a series of 
articles on American universities by 
Edwin E. Slosson appearing in the 
"Independent," the dramatic clubs of 
the different universities were gener- 
ally mentioned and commented upon. 

The great forward strides made by 
the drama in Europe during the last 
decade together with the low tone of 
the plays foxed upon the American 
public by those in charge of the Am- 
erican stage at present, have caused 
many devoted admirers of the drama 
to look with longing eyes to the col- 
leges of the country for a revival of 
interest in plays worth while. Nor 
have they been disappointed. Last 
year, Henry Van Dyke's "The House 
of Rimini" was presented at the Uni- 
versity of California, while Percy 




DR. EDWARD C. SCHNEIDER 
Head of the Biological Department 

Whose class in the Reiationof Science to 
Religion promises to be very popular this 
winter. The class will meet at the First 
Congregational Church every Sunday morn- 
ing at 10 o'clock. 



Mackaye's delightful, if rather book- 
ish, version of "The Canterbury Pil- 
grims" was acted at a score of col- 
leges. 

In this movement we cannot afford 
to be behind other colleges. In an ef- 
fort to raise the quality of plays on 
the American stage, by cultivating, 
among ourselves, a lively sensibility 
to the best in dramatic literature, we 
can be sure to count on the hearty 
co-operation of the faculty. C. D. 



SIDDONS CANDIDATE 

Continued from Page 1. 

Students shall have the right to vote." 
The fee is $7; those who have paid 
the $,3.50 covering the first half are 
eligible to cast a ballot. 

The vote will probably not be large, 
since Siddons is the only candidate. 



It is with much pleasure that we 
announce that Professor Griswold^ 
Jr. has two new teeth. 



ON THE JOB. 



The employment bureau of the Y. 
M. C. A. has prepared a report of its 
work for the first month. It has 
placed 120 men on permanent jobs to 
date this fall, as compared with no 
all last year. The cash value of this 
work will amount to $12,200 if the 
men hold their jobs. The value of 
their work last year was $9,000. 



The football coach at the Univer- 
sity of Minnesota has devised a clever 
method of teaching the fast back-field 
the art of successful dodging. Up- 
right posts are scattered thickly 
throughout the field and the playe s 
are compelled to run among them at 
full speed without touching any of 
them. 



The University of Colorado hasi 
succeeded in having its constitution 
for the government of the Associated 
Students accepted. It was necessary 
for it to pass the Faculty and the Re- 
gents before it could become effective. 

The fee of four dollars entitles a 
student to a membership card which 
admits him to all athletic events, all 
debates, the annual Glee Clug con- 
cert, an annual band concert, and 
gives him a year's subscription to the 
Silver and Gold. Unless nine hun- 
dred students join and pay this fee 
the constitution must fail. 



THE TIGER 



€^^<^ 



The Weekly Newspaper of Colorado College 

GLENN W. SHAW Editor-in-Chief 

HARRY W. McOUAT Business Manager 

S. W, Dean -- Assistant Editor 

C. DON'ELAN Assistant Editor 

H. H. Haight Assistant Editor 

L. E.GriswOLD Engineering Editor 

B. P. SlDDONS Athletic Editor 

H. F. Rice Forestry Editor 

Julia Ingersoll Alumni Editor 

Helen Canon Exchange Editor 

Janet Kampf Local Editor 

W. L. Warnock Local Editor 

K. E. Bryson Assistant Manager 

E. W, HiLLE Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

Geneva McCaw, T. M. Pettigrcw, Edith Sommers, F. B. 

Copeland, Margaret VVarson, E S Statten, 

Katharine True, D. L Sisco 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

■ rticles anditemsto The'Iiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 
College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

_j^^^^^j,o Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
~--<BQ^nB>^ Springs, Colo., as second-class matter. 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c. 



THE EWING FUND. 

Last year the student body voted to 
raise a fund to support Harry E. 
Ewing '08 in the foreign field and sub- 
scribed and paid into the fund some 
$800. Ewing will start for South 
America this winter under the con- 
trol of the International Committee 
of the Y. M. C. A. 

Most of the money subscribed has 
been collected; a small amount is 
being collected now. The collection 
of the Ewing Fund at the rate of ten 
cents f.om each subscriber every 
week, became very irksome last win- 
ter to both subscribers and collectors. 
It caused considerable complaint and 
not a little c.iticism of the whole plan 
of supporting a missionary. 

But the missionary committees of 
the two Christian associations met re- 
cently and decided that the student 
body as a whole is not opposed to 
the keeping up of the fund. The mat- 
ter will be placed before the student 
commission immediacely. Those most 
deeply interested are strongly in 
favor of making subscriptions definite 
sums to be paid on one definite date. 
Inconvenience caused by a crude sys- 
tem of collection is not likely to 
make Colorado College back water 
in a movement which has been her- 
alded over the country as a big step 
toward the position of larger institu 
tions in the East. 



WHAT WILL THE MINES DO? 

Nobody knows what the Mines will 
do about the Tiger game. Last week 
repo ts had it that the Golden 
school had virtually joined th£ Colo- 
rado P'aculty Conference and would 
be bound by its rules. Immediately 
the Den\er papers began to cry out 
that there were not enough men out 
of the 300 enrolled at Golden to make 
up a respectable football team, unless 
their freshmen played. It is undoubt- 
edly true that the teams of the State 
would all lose good material by the 
observance of the half-year rule. But 
three out of five of these teams are 
willing to make a heavy sacrifice this 
year and a lesser one in all years to 
come for the ultimate good of Colo- 
rado intercollegiate athletics. Not so, 
thr-se 300 mining engineers, if the 
Denver papers know whereof they 
speak. While football enthusiasts 
were wondering at the scarcity of 
good men confessed to by our neigh- 
bors, the final report came. Coach 
Curtis has advised the Golden mana- 
ger to cancel the game scheduled with 
us under the Conference rules for Oc- 
tober 16, and the manager has acted 
upon the advice of the coach. Still, it 
is said, there is one chance for a sat- 
isfactory settlement. Faculty repre- 
sentatives from the Mines will meet 
with the Faculty Conference at Den- 
ver tomorrow, and "hopeful" is the 
word with us. 

MURPHY'S CASE. 

The newspapers have just discov- 
ered that Murphy can not play on 
the regular football team this year, 
and seem to believe that the faculty 
has but recently denied him this priv- 
ilege. The truth is that Murphy en- 
tered College this fall with a distinct 
understanding that he was to be 
barred from intercollegiate football. 
He has been out working hard with 
the scrubs every night: the impossi- 
bility of his playing with the regular 
team this year makes his the lion's 
share of the credit due the loyal sec- 
ond team men. 

Colorado College has taken a firm 
stand for the conduct of state athlet- 
ics along lines which will make them 
of the greatest good to the individ- 
uals participating, the institutions of 
learning represented and the common- 
wealth at large. In Rule i adopted by 
the Colorado Faculty Athletic Con- 
ference, of which one of our deans is 
president, it is distinctly stated that, 
"Any student participating in any in- 
te collegiate game, who shall leave 



his institution before the end of the 
semester or term, unless for illness 
or equally good reason, or who shall 
not have passed his work to the sat- 
isfaction of the faculty, shall not be 
eligible to compete in any branch of 
intercollegiate athletics until he shall 
ha\e again been in residence a full 
semester or term." 

That is definite. It applies to Mur- 
phy's case exactly, and Colorado Col- 
lege is firmly enforcing all Conference 
rules. 

GENUINE HELPFULNESS. 

When a man wants a job, he wants 
it bad. Few inen stoke furnaces be- 
cause they prefer firing to playing 
tennis. Colorado College has in her 
enrollment a large nuinber of men 
who are earning their education by 
tending furnaces and yards, washing 
dishes, waiting table, and so on. 
When these men came to Colorado 
Springs, the city was before them, the 
city full of jobs. But it is a hard task 
to go out and tramp over a strange 
town for odd jobs. The Y. M. C. A. 
has made this unnecessary. When a 
Freshman comes to Colorado Col- 
lege, he solicits for odd jobs at Room 
I, Hagerman Hall. He is given a 
note to his new employer, who has 
been secured for him by the Associ- 
Etion employment bureau. He goes 
to work, that's all. 

The employment bureau this year 
has been in the hands of A. J. Hes- 
ler, who has superintended the most 
thorough canvas of Colorado Springs 
ever made for this purpose. The lat- 
est report of his department gives 
the number of men placed in perma- 
net employment at 120. Here is gen- 
uine helpfulness. The men who hold 
jobs secured for them by this depart- 
ment should remember that they owe 
something to the bureau and to the 
men who will want work next year, 
and should conduct themselves ac- 

TOO MANY CAPITALS. 

We a"e "sore" at our predecessors. ■ 
So is our linotyper. Why they even 
took to capitalizing "Freshman" and 
"Sophomore" and "Junior" and even 
"Senior," we do not pretend to know. 
Why we followed their example is 
easy to say. We did it for the same 
reason thai onr forebears learned to 
spell "quire" "choir" and "rime" 
"rhyme." Somebody is always start- 
ing something and eve-ybody else is 
always following. However much 
we hste to be iconoclasts, even mild 

Continued on Page 7. 



THE TIGER 



A SONG EACH WEEK 




ifcUi-'PiKK* 'tiwil 







CAMPUSTR Y By Webb Foote 



Several nights ago the night watch- 
man who protects apple orchards in 
this neighborhood, found a big ripe 
•watermelon on the east steps of 
Palmer Hall. A tag spiked into it 
with an 8-penny nail declared that the 
gift was for Hagerman Hall. Here 
is a deep mystery and a good story 
for some enterprising reporter. We 
supply sample headlines free: 

DASTARDLY HAZING AT 

COLORADO COLLEGE 

Poisoned Watermelon Meant for 

Freshmen Intercepted 

by Police. 

Humane Society, Orphans' Home 

and Day Nursery Will Take 

Steps to Close Hotbed 

of Crime. 



He was a keen observer, that 
Freshman who wanted to know if the 
east bulletin board was for girls only; 
but his conclusion was entirely 
wrong. The girls are always looking 
for cuts, that's all. 



"It is commonly talked around that 
the School of Mines boys a 'e a gang 



TOO MANY CAPITALS 

Continued from Page 6. 

ones, the editorial pencil is getting 
too short to waste lead on big F's for 
freshmen, and we hereby give notice 
that The Tiger will no longer squan- 
der capitals in its columns. When 
"state" means "Colorado/' we will 
spread ourselves on a big "S," and 
when "college" means "Colorado 
College" you can have a big "C"; but 
beyond this we refuse to go. If we 
give the freshmen a big "F," the fac- 
ulty will be wanting one; and if the 
seniors have a monstrous "S," what 
is to prevent the sheep making rep- 
resentations? At one time Dickens 
might have honored all applicants 
with a big initial, but we find proof 
reading too tedious a job without the 
worry of avoiding discrimination for 



of tuffs and thugs, but when '09 had 
their ducking bee, they did not chase 
naked men through the streets, nor in 
all our class rushes has anyone been 
stripped of his clothes." 

Poor, abused, virtuous Miners! 
Why, we fry 'em in cottolene down 
here and serve 'em up hot for the 
patrons of our opium dens. If you 
want some good, tough, well-cured 
man-hide laces for your boots, don't 
hesitate to believe we have them. 



There is no good reason why a 
Coco-Cola with tar in it should be 
called a Minerva. There would be 
some excuse in the color scheme for 
calling a wild-cherry phosphate a 
Contemporary and a mint phosphate 
a Hypatia. While he's at it, the 
fountain man might try selling a glass 
of water for a nickel by calling it a 
Y. W. C. A. At any rate, they say 
the sale of Minervas is increasing and 
many eds and coeds can take them 
now without wincing. 



The trees are all aflame these days, 
but they don't seem to have sug- 
gested anything to the Sophomores 
yet. 



or against ambitious words. Next 
week we begin our capital-smashing. 



The Tiger has secured the services 
of a competent critic, who will fur- 
nish our readers with a detailed re- 
view of the Kinnikinnik each month. 
His c itique of the September num- 
ber will appear in next week's Tiger. 



Miss Canon has been supplied with 
a number of Tigers of the first three 
issues, which may be secured at the 
library by subscribe "s who, because 
of lateness in supplying addresses, or 
for any other reason, have not secured 
copies to date. 



LEARN IT. 



Our Colorado. 



(Words by A. T. French. Music by 
E. W. Hille.) 



Where the Monument is flowing and 
the Jungle lies serene. 
Where the silv'ry moon is watching 
o'er the night, 
Where the sun is ever shining and the 
trees are e\'er green, 
Where the silent stars are shedding 
mellow light, 
There the men and maidens wander 
in the Colorado air, 
There they gather for the good old 
campus song. 
There our Alma Mater nestles, there 
no foes may ever dare, 
There no defeats but ever victories 
belong. 

Chorus — 

For Colorado! Our Colorado! 
Where the sun shines eevry day 
throughout the year. 
Where all good fellows are met to- 
gether. 
Where fair maidens ever hold tradi- 
tions dear. 
For Colorado! Our Colorado! 
Where the Peak, our mighty mascot, 
towers above! 
For Colorado! Our Colorado! 
Hee's to thee, our Alma Mater, thee 
we love. 

Here's to all who love the College 
and to all who hold her dear. 
Here's to all who've shown their 
f iendship good and true; 
Here's to all who've graduated: here's 
to one we all revere. 
Whom we'll always love and ever 
honor, too! 
For his name is on our campus and 
it's on our every tongue. 
While it's blazoned on the face of 
Palmer Hall! 
When we sing our college melodies, 
there ever shall be sung. 
The name and praises of our dear 
old General: 

Chorus. 



If you have not yet written the The University of California has 

home folks a thorough description of forty-three freshmen eligible for the 

that unfortunate flag rush, you have freshman intercollegiate game with 

a duty to perform tonight. Stanford. 



THE TIGER 



LIBRARIES and 
REFERENCES 



THE ENGINEERING EDITOR 
DISCOURSES WITH A PUR- 
POSE IN VIEW. 



Some one said that we, as college 
men and women, do not do near the 
amount of reading that we should. 
It is sad, but true. But why should it 
be so? Some say, well, we don't 
have time for outside reading. Per- 
haps not, but we are all busy, and, as 
the old saying goes, the busier a man 
is, the more he can do. To be sure, 
you drop into the library occasionally 
to read the newspapers, and look at 
the pictures in the magazines, or do 
some assigned reading. Such reading 
is well enough in its place, and you 
may keep more or less posted on the 
current events. But that is not suffi- 
cient. Make acquaintance with books 
of different authors. They are your 
best friends, some one has said. 

It is a pat of your education to be 
able to use a library. It ought to be 
as easy for you to find any book, 
manuscript or document in the library 
as it is to turn to a certain word in 
the dictionary. It is surprising how 
few people are familiar enough with 
the libra. y to be able to look up all 
the material on any one topic. 

It comes av\kward to use Pool's In- 
dex at fi/st, to get references, and 
then it's a task to find the reference 
books on the shelves. If you are not 
familiar with the library, spend a lit- 
tle time each day in finding out the 
various schemes of indexing, group- 
ing, and cataloguing. The librarian 
will kindly lend you any assistance, 
for the asking. There is no harm in 
making inquiries. 

A certain amount of reference work 
is requi/ed of all upper class en- 
gineers. Everyone, be he engineer 
or liberal arts student, ought to know 
how to use the library to good advan- 
tage, whether reference work is in 
his prescribed course of study or not. 



It will be the purpose of the en- 
gineering depa tment of The Tiger 
this year to be as helpful to the mem- 
bers of the faculty and students of 
the Engineering School as possible. 
In the first place, our aim will be to 
publish all the news of the different 
departments in such form that it will 
be of interest to all. However, to be 
of value to the engineering depart- 
ments particularly, any technical arti- 



cles worthy of mention will be gladly 
received by the engineering editor. 
It has been proposed that a space be 
given over each week to a list of ref- 
erences to current topics and articles 
occurring in the technical papers and 
magazines, that either bear directly 
upon certain studies or are of interest 
to engineers in general. All contribu- 
tions of this nature may be deposited 
in The Tiger box in Coburn Library. 
They must be in by Tuesday noon of 
the same week the issue appears. 

References. 

The following references were re- 
ceived, recommended for those taking 
the course in Masonry, Civil M. : 

"An Inferno of the Day" — a treatise 
on Rosendale Cement. — Harper's 
Weekly, September i8, 1909, page 11. 

"Freezing Apparatus for the Tun- 
nel under the Seine, Paris." — Harper's 
Weekly, September 18, 1909, page 17. 

"I'he Lucin Cut Off." — Century 
Magazine, January, 1906. 



PROFESSOR GILE GIVES HELP- 
FUL TALK TO JUNIORS 
AND FRESHMEN. 



At a joint prayer meeting of Juniors 
and PVeshmen, held last Sunday even- 
ing. Professor Gile gave an interest- 
ing and helpful talk. 

He spoke from the wo-ds uttered 
by Christ to Peter, "Lovest thou 
Me?" He went on to say that of all 
the questions Christ might have asked 
Peter this was the all-essential one: 
Ij Christ knew that Peter loved Him, 
He v.as willing to leave all the other 
questions unanswered. 

It makes no difference how un- 
promising a person may be, if unself- 
ish love dominates his life, that per- 
son will be successful in all the rest. 
The graces that are lacking now will 
come in due time. This is the funda- 
mental question in all family rela- 
tions, in relations between man and 
man, between class and class. If love 
e\er prevails, the problem of the mill, 
of the factory and of the farm will be 
solved. 



POST SEASON GAME. 



It is rumored that the committee 
on underclass contests will make the 
Freshman-Sophomore game a post- 
season engagement this year. It is 
also. said that the idea of further con- 
tests before the regular games, 
football, baseball and track, has been 
dropped. 



SLOCUM AND DIETRICH 

PAPERS ARE PUBLISHED 

"Athletics — Athletic Cornpetition in 
College and Preparatory Schools, or 
Competition Preparatory to Entering 
College" is- the subject of an inter- 
esting article by President W. F. Slo- 
cum, which appears in the current 
number of the Hygiene and Physical 
Education Magazine. The same 
magazine also contains an article by 
Superintendent John Dietrich of the 
public schools of this city on "How 
Should the Athletics of Both the 
Men's and Boys' Departments of the 
Y. M. C. A. Supplement That of the 
Public Schools?" 

Both of these articles were read as 
papers at the meeting of the National 
Educational Association in Denver 
last July. 



ENROLLMENT. 



Two Boys to Every Girl in Freshman 
Class. 



Now that the figures of the Regis- 
trar a;e complete, we are able to 
know how many entered the College 
in the F eshman class. They number 
205 altogether. There are 139 boys 
and 66 girls, a fact which seems quite 
unpromising for a "girls' seminary." 
Besides this number there are many 
new students who have registered in 
the other classes and as specials. 



PROF. ALBRIGHT IMPROVING. 



Prof. Albright is reported to be 
doing as well ' as can be expected. 
Although his attack of typhoid fever 
is slight, yet it is a disease from 
which recovery in any case is slow. 
Last Sunday he was able to sit up in 
bed for a time and he hopes to be 
able to take up his school work 
again soon. Meanwhile, those who 
have Math. Cons, would do well to 
get busy. 



HEWETT LECTURES AT 
PERKINS. 



Dr. Edgar L. Hewett, director of 
the School of American Archaeology 
and of the works of excavation in this 
country, gave a stereopticon lecture 
at Perkins Hall last night, his sub- 
ject being, "Three Excavations at 
Puye." Dr. Hewett is the leading au- 
thority on the work of attempting to 
recover the history of ancient man on 
this continent.. 



THE TIGER 



DR. RANNEY SPEAKS 

IN CHAPEL. 



Last Friday the students had the 
pleasure of hearing Dr. Ranney, prob- 
able pastor of the First Congrega- 
tional Church of this city. Dr. Ran- 
ney has been called to fill the vacancy 
made by Dr. Gregg and it is antici- 
pated that he will be as popular with 
the students here as he is with those 
at Williams College. 

Among the things he said in his 
brief address were; 

"We do not believe that the world 
is an endless cycle. We believe that 
we are making a new world better 
than the old world." 

"It is not a pleasant thought that 
we must be shaken out of our old rou- 
tine. It would be much easier not to 
have any new problems. As we 
change from the old to the new, it is 
nor pleasant. Some of us have chang- 
ed schools, and have lea.ned the in- 
conveniences. -As we -change class 
rooms or change instructors, we are 
not happy." 

"The use of opportunities for what 
is profitable or what is unprofitable 
come to students at the same time. 
We must make our choice." 

"Welcome the new. He who wel- 
comes the new has enthusiasm for 
work. Those who never grow old are 
looking for new truths, new power 
which God has offe-ed. Let every 
one think of his task not as routine but 
as a new opportunity that coines 
with every new day." 

"There spoke a Man not on our 
level, but One who had deep insight 
into the things of this world. He 
said, 'Behold, make all things new.' 
He saw that if we are to go forth, 
we are to be children of a Father 
who IS anxious- for us to grow.'' 



CERCLE FRANCAIS. 

President Jameson Issues Notice and 
Call for Members. 



The first open meeting of the club 
was held the evening of Thursday, 
September 30th, in Ticknor Study. 

The following program was given: 

Musigue Mile. Cold 

Discours M. Jameson 

Lecture Mile. Madeline Thelier 

Musique ....Miles. Anderson et Cold 
Anecdotes de Voyage M. Hills 

The visitors and members then 
scattered for conve.'sation and re- 
freshments, and the evening closed 
with songs. 



The regular meetings will be held 
every other Thursday at 7:45 p. m. in 
Ticknor Study, beginning October 
T4th. The club hopes this year to 
vary the programs with dialogues and 
dramatic representations, to secure 
the services of various French people 
for talks and readings, and during the 
second semester, to give a somewhat 
more elaborate play than heretofore. 
Those who are interested in the work 
and thmking of joining will please see 
Mr. Jam^eson or Miss Pollen, 



RHODES SCHOLARSHIP EXAM- 
INATIONS. 



FRESHMEN PRAYER MEETING. 

Last Sunday night the Freshmen 
met with the Juniors in a joint prayer 
meeting. There was a good turn-out 
of both classes. While the Juniors 
are always glad to ha^ e the Freshmen 
present at any time, yet they believe 
that the Freshmen would feel better 
if they could have their prayer meet- 
ings by themselves. It would foster 
class spirit and sociability. Every 
class he etofore has had a prayer 
meeting cf its own, and it is believed 
t'.iat the class of 1913 is not going to 
break the custom. Any one of the 
i.tlier classes would be willing and 
glad to give them suggestions for get- 
ting such an organization started. 

Perkins Hall will be available from 
now on, as the Juniors are going to 
meet in Ticknor Study. 



NOTICES 

All notices for this column must 
be in the Tiger Box by Tuesday 
of each week 



The Student Commission will meet 
in the trustees' room at 4 o'clock on 
JMonday, October 11, to clean up the 
slate and set a time for regular meet- 
ings. 



The Associated Students of Colo- 
rado College will meet after chapel 
on Monday, October 11, for the elec- 
tion of a Junior member of the Ath- 
letic Board. 



Professor Gile will talk to men in 
the lounging room at Hagerman 
Hall tonight at 7 o'clock. 



The Young Women's Christian As- 
sociation meets Friday night in Bemis 
Hall. It is to be a recognition serv- 
ice for the new gfrls, so everyone is 
urged to be present. 



The next examination for the Rhodes 
scholarship will be held in the rooms of 
the State Superintendent of Public In- 
struction, at the Capitol, Denver, Oct. 
19 and 20. The winner of this scholar- 
ship is entitled to reside at the Univer- 
sity of Oxford for three years with an 
annual income of fifteen hundred dollars 
($1,500). Full information concerning 
the requirements will be furnished at the 
Dean's ofSce. 

7'he applicant must have completed 
his Sophomore year. He must be un- 
married and not younger than nine- 
teen, or older than twenty-five. He 
will be judged under the heads of 
scholarship, athletic ability, powers of 
leadership, and character. 

The examination in Denver will be 
just a qualifying examination, and the 
appointment will be made from those 
who pass. 

Formerly, the applicant had to pass 
an examination in Greek. Now, he is 
allow ed to 1 ut off the examination in 
this branch and need only take, it in 
case lie is appointed. 

One man from each state is ap- 
. o.nted each year. If any college or 
university has more than one who 
passes, that institution must deter- 
mine which one shall have the ap- 
printment. 



DR. SLOCUM'S BROTHER PAYS 
HIM A VISIT. 



Winfield S. Slocum, a brother of 
President Slocum, has been visiting 
the College where his "Prexy" brother 
has lots of room. It has been twenty 
years since he was here before, and 
he says that things about the campus 
have changed a little since that time. 

He is an attorney in Boston and 
also city solicitor for the City of 
Newton. 



IMPROVEMENTS IN THE 
DRAWING ROOM. 



Prof. iVloore has had men at work 
tills week making some improvements 
in the new drawing rooms. Drop 
liglits have been put in, so that the 
students no longer need to depend 
upon daylight. While the room is al- 
most ideal, yet on very cloudy days 
or late in the afternoons the new 
lights will be very handy. Black- 
boards will be placed on the walls 
and one of the smaller rooms will 
be fitted up for an office. 



10; 



THE TIGER 



LIT. PROGRAMS 



(All programs to be inserted in this 
coluiiin must be in' The Tiger box not 
later than Tuesday of each week.) 



APOLLONIAN, OCTOBER 8. 

Extemporaneous Speech. 

Latest Aeroplane Developments, 

G. C. Graham 
Discovery of the Pole. .. .Thompson 

Music Hille 

Debate: Al'firmative, F. J. Hill and 

Clark. Negative, Hunt and Weir- 

ick. 
Critic. 

Visitors welcome. 



PEARSONS, OCTOBER 8. 

President Taft's Trip Hamilton 

Debate: Resolved, That the "Fresh- 
man Rule" is for the best interests of 
intercollegiate athletics in Colo- 
rado. Affirmative, Fuller and 
Haight. Negative, Phillips and 
Warnock. 

Music Roe 

Essay Donelan 

Visitors welcome. . 

CICERONIAN, OCTOBER 8. 

Vi61in Solo Taylor 

Welcome Dietrich 

Talk Dean Parsons 

V^ocal Solo Finkbiner 

Pape;: "The North Pole". .. Greenlee 

Recitation Finkbiner 

Music Taylor 

Visitors welcome. 



MINERVA, OCTOBER 15. 

Aristophanes and Menander, 

Miss Hall 

Plautus and Terence Miss Stark 

Visitors welcome. 



CONTEMPORARY, OCTOBER 15. 

Idealistic Harriet Spencer 

Rostand and the Drama..Cla;a Herr 

Music Marion Yerkes 

Visitors welcome. 



HYPATIA, OCTOBER 15. 

The Early Barbarians.. Ruth Bateman 
Stories from the Ancient Sagas, 

Flora Crowley 
The Minisingers .... Eleanor Thomas 

Music Jennie Thomas 

Visitors Avelcome. 



The dramatic year at Stanford op- 
ened with Shakespeare's "Twelfth 
Night." 



LOWELL INSTALLED AS PRES- 
IDENT OF HARVARD. 

Former President Eliot Retires from 
Active Life. 



On Wednesday, October 6, the 
presidency of Harvard was formally 
given over to Abbot Lawrence Low- 
ell, previously a professor in the uni- 
versity, by former President Emeritus 
Eliot. The occasion was decidedly 
striking when the two great leaders, 
the old and the new, marched side by 
side at the head of the inaugural pro- 
cession. 

In outlining his policies, President 
Lowell declared himself in favor of ev- 
ery nian learning something well, but 
alsci of every man learning something 
of everything. He took occasion to 
place himself on the side of intercol- 
legiate sports. He also stated his be- 
lief in the segregtaion of Freshmen 
and in the drawing together closer of 
the ties between upper-classmen. It 
was an occasion that will last long in 
tl:c annals of Harvard. 



EXCHANGES 



The English Club of the University 
of California is planning to publish a 
story book this- spring, collecting the 
best short stories of the more famous 
of their graduates. One story by 
some student attendant at the Univer 
sity at the present time will be in- 
cluded. 



To avoid delay in registeiing, at 
the Uni^'ersity of Utah a fine of two 
dollars was imposed this year on 
those who did not register du ing the 
week set apart for that purpose. 



The University of Ut; h this year is 
trying a five-dollar fee for the promo- 
tion of University activities. 

Students of Brown University a e 
arranging for the presentation of 
Lessing's "Minna von Barnhelm" on 
February 21. 



The English Club at Cornell is to 
present "Twelfth Night" this spring. 

The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co. 



A. 6. SPALDING a BROS. 



The * 

SPALDING 
Trade -Mark 




is known throughout 
the world as a 

Guarantee of 
Quality 



are the Largest 
Manuf acturerg 
in the World o^ 

Official 

Equip ment 

For All 
Athletic 
Sports and 
Pastimes 

If You are inter 
11 1 OU ggjgj jjj 

Athletic Sport you 
should have a copy 
of the Spalding 
Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyclo- 
pedia of what's new 
in Sport and is sent 
free on request. 



A. G. Spalding & Bros. 

1616 Arapohoe St., Denver, Colo. 

"Our Colorado" 

"Bruin Inn" 
"BlackandGold" 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 



The Three Songs of Colorado 

College — in Sheet Form 

for 40c. Buy Them of 

E. W. HILLE 



Clever Clothes 

FOR 

College Chaps 

AT 

ROBBINS 

ON THE CORNER = 



THE TIGER 



11 




Just Received ship^tr of CAKE BOX 

Smoking Tobacco. Also the Finest Line of CALABASH PIPES 
Ever Shown in This City. - - - - - - - - 



r>» n. •% 4"^ "% <3 of ... . •% #3 course -^ #^ -^ f^ 

Cigar otOre 1 t3 l O where l O else 1 t3 1 O 




GACB^'^'ErSGRAVII 

ILLU5TRATORS PUEBLO 
/^ DESIGNERS CUL.O. 
ENGRAVERS ^ 



Gel Your Picnic Supplies 

' AT ^= 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Favorite Resort of the Col- 
lege Students, Renowned in 
Story and Song 

BRUIN INN 

Up North Cheyenne Canon 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER. Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Patronize TIGER 
Advertisers 

UNION ICE AND COAL CO. 

W. M. BANNING. Proprietor 

Artificial Ice and Cold Storage 

Dealers in All Kinds of Coal and Piaion Wood 
Yard Office, 105 W. Vermiio City Office, 5 N. Tejon 



SIGMA CHI DANCE. 



The Sigma Chi fraternity held its 
tlrst dance at the San Luis school, 
.Saturd;'y, October 2. Professor and 
Mrs. MbLs acted as chaperones. The 
guests cf the f aternity were: Misses 
Iceinhardt, Rice, Evelyn Lennox, Mc- 
I'aw, T.ue, Stott, Huse, Janet and 
Cora Kampf, Kidder, Hinckley, Petti- 
grew, Campbell, Frantz, Whitaker, 
Pollen, McCoombs, Forhan, Wilson; 
Messrs. Root, Holland and Sisco. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Miss Helen Sloane 'o8 is teaching at 
Wolfe Hall in Denver. 



Miss Dorothea Beach ex-'o5 has 
charge of one of the cottages at the 
Baldwin School at Bryn Mawr this 
winter. 



Miss Ethel Hall ex-'ii is spending 
the year abroad with Dr. and Mrs. 
Sturgis. She expects to study in 
Lausanne this winter. 

W. G. Johnston 'oO, the adve tising 
manaiTer of the Gazette, is off on a 
deer hunting trip. 



Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Willett of 
Woodbine, Iowa, are the parents of 
a son, born about two weeks ago. 
Mrs. Willett was Miss Bell Sinton 
ex-'io. 



Mr. and Mrs. Kraker of Colorado 
Sp'ings are the parents of a son. Mrs. 
Kraker was Miss May Rafield, a for- 
mer C. C. student. 



Miss Carolyn Marsh ex-'ii is teach- 
ing m a kindergarten in Pueblo. 



Miss Lina Brunner ex-'og was in 
town last week. She is principal of 
the Monument school this year. 



Maier's Lunch & Dining Room 

Lunches of All Kinds 
Regular Meals 20c and 25c 

216' 2 N. Tejon St. Opposite North Park 

"Attention Collegians" 

Let us make your Dances, Receptions, 
and Fraternity Socials this term, affairs 
never to be forgotten, by decorating 
your hall or parlors in an artistic man- 
ner with the college banners, pennants, 
festoons and bunting. Then have 
erected our sidewalk canopy to keep off 
the inclement weather. We also have 
floor coverings to protect the carpets. 
All this will cost but very, little and 
add much to these affairs. 

The Out West Tent and 

Telephone Main 1261 
113>2 N, Tejon Street 



Awning Co. 



College 
Stationery 

We are CLOSING OUT 
Box Stationery, em- 
bossed in Colors, with 
Pennant and Colorado 



Regular Price 
Sale Price 



. 30c 
. 23c 




Whitney and Grimwood 

No. 20 North Tejon Street 



12 



THE TIGER 



0. E. Hemenway 



Groceries and 



Meats 



.♦.•••• 







115 South Tejon Street 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



YOU don't entertain your 
guests to save money — 
if you did, the simplest 
way would be to forego en- 
tertaining them. 
^IfMuETH's may cost more, 



but- 



CLMueth's 

CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 



5 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 
The Colorado Springs Floral Co. 

Wish to Have Your Business at Right 
Prices 



Telephone Main 599 



104 N. Tejon St. 



Latest out Colle^e Posters lowest Prices 

Picture Framiil^ 

Hedrick Wall Paper and Paint Company 

Take a look in the window as you go by 212 North Tejon Street 



Miss Sarah Wolverton '04 has re- 
ceived a scholarship at Radcliffe Col- 
lege, and has gone east to begin her 
work there. 



Miss Anne Wheeler ex-'oj is teach- 
ing in Lafayette, Colo. 



Miss Maude Stoddard '05 was mar- 
ried in September to Mr. Walter Bar- 
rett. Mr. and Mrs. Barrett will live 
in Ft. Morgan. 



■■Prexy" Hammond '09 is teaching 
in Mills Institute in Honolulu. 



Ha ley Sill '08 is prospecting in 
fexico, to be gene two years. 



Miss May Cathcart '00 was married 
,;t her home near Garden City, Kan- 
sas, on Se tember 16, to Mr. Richard 
J. Hopkins, speaker pro tem for the 
K.'insas house of representatives, and 
a director of the Knapp State Refo.m 
School. 



Orrin Randolph '06 is chief en- 
gineer on the new San Luis and 
Southern Railroad, with headquarters 
at Blanca. 



Neil Vandemoer '09 is surveying 
near Creede. 



Mrs. J. J. Vandemoer (Miss Sarah 
Wallace) was in town last week on 
her way to Grand Junction. 



Miss Reinhardt — "What's the mat- 
ter with you, Mr. Picken?" 

Picken — "I w ote these sentences in 
one suit of clothes and wore another 
suit to calss." 

Miss Reinhardt — "Hereafter, Mr. 
Picken, I'd advise you to write them 
on paper." 



JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Stree 

FOR THE 

Most Exclusive Millinery 

CALL ON 

Mme. M. D. Hillmer 

6 East Pikers Peak Avenue 

Finest of Material and 
Best of Workmanship 



!*hone Black 39S 



Colorado Sorina* 



Fraternities, Clubs, Individuals 
desiring Milk or Cream 
in any quantities 
should remem- 
ber :: :: 



The Sinton-Rustic Home 

rv • §!, ^°- ^^^ South El Paso St. 

Uairy a) Phone Main 442 



The College Photo Studio 

The Highest Class of 

Photographs 
Bingham 

18 5. Tejon St. Phone M.678 




DOUGLAS 6 
HETHERINGTON 



Architects 



Teleohone 536 Rooms I S and 16 Ou« West Buildini{. 

" COLORADO SPRINGS. COLO. 



THE 1M G E R 



13 



Memory 
Books 

Bound in colors, black and 
and orange, and lettered on 
side. The only really Colo- 
rado College Scrap Book 
made. Lar^e enough to con- 
tain your four years' items. 

Price, $1.25 each 



The Out West 

Printing Si Stationery Co. 
9-11 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 



Furniture f,,!^'"'" 

Special Terms to Students 

McCracken & Hubbard 

120 and 122 South Tejon Street 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

15 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

Are Always Well Pleased When They 
Get Their Hair Cut at 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



12 S. T*jon St. 



Colorado Sprinsrs 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



'as cade Laundry 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 

20 per cent, discount 

To All Students of College and Academy 



INGERSOLL CONTRIBUTES TO 
ENGLISH MAGAZINE. 



Dr. L. R. Griswold '02 contributes 
an important article on Magnetic Ro- 
tation to the Philosopliical Magazine, 
published in England. Dr. Ingersoll 
is Assistant Professor of Physics at 
the University of Wisconsin. He 
s' ent his last summer vacation on Mt 
Wilson, in California, whe/e he 
worked on a problem of solar phys- 
ics, under the auspices of the Smith- 
sonian Institution. He has published 
a considerable number of papers and 
is becoming well known among 
physicists through his resea ches. 



II Local Department || 



Miss Mary Randolph has been ab- 
sent several days on account of ill- 
ness. 



Quite a nvimber of Senior girls are 
taking the course in practice teach- 
ing, and are cadeting in iht different 

city .schools. 

-Addie ^1'nenv.ay is a pledge to 
Minerva. 



Kappa Sigma gives its first dance 
Saturday, October ^. at the San Luis 
bcliool. !. 



Gryce Wilson is a pledge to Con- 
temporary. 



Mr. Copeland was a visitor at the 
Kappa Sigma house Thursday. 



7 E. Bijou 



Phone 820 



Several college couples attended the 
dance at Stratton Park last Friday 
night. 

A number of students assisted in 
taking the religious census of the 
city last Saturday. 



Pres. Slocum's brother is visiting 
him. 



The Senior table gave a spread Sat- 
urday evening in honor of Miss Ruth 
Wight's birthday. 



The M'sses Mary and Vesta Tucker 
were the guests of Miss Barclay for 
Sunday dinner. 



Hunt Up 



Bissell's Pharmacy 



When You Want 



Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 



Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 



Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Re'ail Dealers in 
Fiour, Fe(>d, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



C. F. Arcularius & 
Company 

A Large Assortment of 

BELT PINS 

All the Latest Styles 

9 South Tejon Street 
COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 



P 



RINTING, Engraving 

Paper. Gowdy-Simmons 
Printing Co., 21 N. Tejon St. 



Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Picnic Supplies 

For picnics and all kinds of outings, 
we are ready to supply everything in 
the way of eatables. We also have 
baskets so that we can pack your out- 
fit complete. Just say what you 
want, and when you want it, and 
you will have nothing else to do but 
think of the good time you are going 
to have. :: :: :: :: 



W. N. Burgess 



112-114 North 
Tejop. Street 



:i4 



THE TIGEE 



This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 
1 Company 



11 



C^T,sC 




Headquarters for 

College Footwear 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

FOUNDERS AND MACHINISTS 



Collei^e 
Inn 



^^ Short 
// Orders 



Commutation Tickets — 
$3.30 for $3.00 

THE 

Crissey& Fowler Lumber 
Company 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 

We Pay Special Attention to 
the QUALITY of our 

Lignite 
Furnace Coal 

The Colorado Springs Fuel Co., 
112 Pike's Peak Avenue. Two 
Phones Main 230 



Chafing Dishes 



Tinv 



For a Square Deal 

A. S. BLAKE 



Is the Man to See 



107 North Tejon 

Nickle Ware 



Phone 465 

Cutlery 



Miss Helen Sloan was the guest of 
Miss Reba Hood, Sunday. 



A few of the Seniors rose early 
Tuesday morning and breakfasted in 
the Garden of the Gods. They re- 
turned in time for 8:15 classes. 

"You can fool all the people some of 
the time," etc., may be true, but our 
motto is "Fool none of the people none 
of the time." Try us for ice cream, ices, 
candies, etc. Noble, Phone M. 920. 



A few upper class mernbers visited 
Bruin Inn, Saturday. 



Seve al college people saw "Polly 
of the Circus," Tuesday evening. 



Miss Blanche Whitaker entertained, 
Thursday evening of last week for 
Aliss Brady, who has left for Califor- 
nia. 



Fov/ler led the Junior prayer meet- 
ing on last Sunday. Professor Gile 
c.ave a \e v interesting, talk. 



Blackman, Benjamin, McOuat and 
Withrovv v.cnt to Denver, Satu/day 
to see the fojtball game between D. 
U. and Longmont High School. 



Mr. and Mrs. Green of Denver vis- 
ited llieir (laughter over Sunday. 



Miss Brady '12 left Sunday for 
Holywood, Califij-rnia, where she will 
.spend the winter. 



Friend, Randolph, Ross, Crow, Al- 
lan, Bennett, Smith and Heizer are 
new Apollonian men. 



Bruin Inn, the popular little rustic 
hostelry, in North Cheyenne canon, 
changed hands recently and is now man- 
aged by Swanson and Riley, two ener- 
getic and obliging young men of this 
city. They promise the same treatment 
accorded to College students by their 
predecessor, Mr. Laveley. 

Randolph was elected captain and 
Ross was elected manager of the 
Freshman football team. No games 
can be arranged with other college 
freshman teams till after the meeting 
uf the Conference, Saturday. 



R. K. Harris from Illinois visited 
his sister at the college, last week. 



Glee Club tryouts were given Mon- 
day and Tuesday of this week. There 



I At Last I 

• They're Here • 

We mean those Post Cards that 
we ordered from our German friends 
last spring. These cards are colored 
by hand, and include every building 
connected with the College. 



Sets of 12 cards, 25c, or 2 
for 5c, as wanted 



To be had only at 

Murray's 

(Just Opposite the Campus) 

William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

MFMBFRS ■ ^** York Stock Exchange 

I Colorado Springs Mining Stock Exchange 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 Georgre St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



THE 



Official Printers 

To the Student 
Body of C. C. 



The Waterman Press 

112 E. Cucharras St. 
Phone 1154 



We Print THE TIGER 



J 



THE TIGER 



15 



is fine material for a good club. A 
trip will be ta'<en through the state 
du ing the holidays. 



Diet ich and Fowler are busy get 
ting tlie tennis courts in shape. 

Pettigrevv spoke at Lamar last Sun- 
day. 

Hughes has taken some good pic- 
tures of the football squad. 



Vandemoer is captain and Donavan 
is manager of the Sophomore foot- 
ball team. The date of the interclass 
game has not been decided as yet. 



Professor Smith addressed the city 
THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 

PETERSEN 

1:21 E. Kiowa 

Sewed Soles 7S cents 

Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 

GIDDINGS BROS. 

Colorado Springs 

THE SPECIALTY STORE 

A Hearty Welcome Constantly Awaits All Visitors 

College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barber 
wrork and baths 

IO6I/2 E- Pike's Peak Ave. Phone Main 700 



^b' 



aundf?y 



Why not have the BEST WORK ? 
20 per cent, discount 

To all Students of College and Academy 

J. J. WILSON, College Agent 

W.I.LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



119N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



f^n 



ats All Styles 
New Arrivals 
$3.00 

GORTON'S 



A Store 

for Young Men 



^^ 



In these days there are young men's special styles; too often 
the quality is sacrifised to the style; but not here. We 
have the broad shouldered, dip front coats, the extreme peg 
trousers, the very snappy college models, which are dear to 
the hearts of the young fellows. The College Brand and 
Adlers of Rochester $25.00. 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 



Gort 



on's 



113 E. Pike's Peak 
Avenue 



K 



Correct Dress for Men 



J 



Y. W. C. A. at its vesper service last 
Sunday afternoon on "The Value of 
Bible Study." 

Invitations for Hypatia's autumn 
spread, for October 8, have been is- 
sued. 

Invitations are out for the costume 
ball to be given by Contemporary, 
Friday, October 15. 



Delta Phi Theta gave an informal 
dinner for the Colorado Springs 
alumni of Beta Theta Pi last Wed- 
nesday evening. 



Sisco, Bowers, Shaw, Mott, Moody 
and Kirkpatrick are new Pearsons 
men. 

Roy Rose ex-'io visited at the 
Alpha Tau Delta house Monday. He 
will return to college next year. 



Miss Lota Merris ex-'io is teach- 
ing music at Victor, Colo. She ex- 
pects to study again in New York 
later. 



A nice cool drink is relished these 
days. Get it at Noble's. 

Apollonian Club held its open night 
last Friday evening. Several new 
stunts v.-ere sprung. 



The French Club met last Thursday 
evening. A Aery good program was 
rendered. Professor Hills gave an 
interesting talk. 



DRINK 

DERN'S 

Freshly Roasted Tea and Coffee 

29 South Tejon Str«et 

The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies and 
Fixtures 



208 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 812 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office. Rooms 201-203 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence, 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 9£ 6 

The College 

Photo Studio 



Hi^h Class Photographs 
Kodaks and Supplies 




^^<\S77Umf 



Corner Cascade and Kiowa 



16 



T TT E T T G E R 

THE YOUNG MEN'S STORE 



College Men who wear our clothes are considered the best dressed men in the bunch. 
The style, the all wool fabrics, the tailoring, the individuality are the reaso/is. Let 
us show you the new creations tor this fall. We have dozens of your size handing in 
our cabinets. Suits $lS.OO to $3S.OO 



Perkins-Shearer Co. «^ '' ^" ' ""''' '"" ^-^ 



8 North Tejon Street 




CL Shoe Styles for Students 

Featured among our new styles for Fall wear, are all 
those new models that have snap and go, that are 
especially designed for the good dressers among our 
College Students 



Popularly Priced 



\f5>^^ 



SHOES '^hatSATISFV^ 



$3.50, $4 and $5 



Za, S.TCJON ST 




When Trading, Remember TIGER Advertisers 



^ 




Colorado College 

Founded in Colorado Springs in 18 7 4 



WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



College of Arts and Science 

E. S. PARSONS, Dean 
School of Engineering 
Depart- J F. CAJORI, Dean 

ments School of Forestry 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 
School of Music 

E. D. HALE, Dean 



^ 



Cutler Academy 



The Associated 
Preparatory 
■ School, in which 
students are prepared for any American College 



Electrical Laboratory 




Vol. XII 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., OCTOBER 15, 1909 



Number 5 



STUDENT 

COMMISSION 

SIECIAL SEIEION CLEANS THE 

SI ATE AND SETS TIWiE FOR 

REG'j: AR i EETINGS. 

Hlvirj Fird ? I^e R.ised — Treasur- 
er's Rep It Prese.-ted — Juniors 
to Give Stunt— Bills Allowed. 
Meetings Open. 

The Student Commission met in 
the trustees' room in Palmer Hall at 
4 o'clock last Monday afternoon and 
fixed a regular time for meetings 
throughout the year. Beginning next 
week, they will meet every alternate 
Wednesday at s o'clock. 

The commission listened to Profes- 
sor Gile and W. G. Harman, who 
presented plans for the raising of the 
Ewing fund this year. The body 
voted to stand behind the raising of 
the money^ and at its next meeting 
will adopt detailed plans for present- 
ing the matter to the student body. 

Manager Donovan of the sophomore 
football team came before the meet- 
ing to ask if the Y. M. C. A. got his 
proceeds this year and whether he 
could schedule outside games. A Y. 
M. C. A. representati^-e assured him 
that the association has washed its 
hands of all such unclean lucre, and 
the commission said it felt no call to 
interfere with the scheduling of out- 
side games by a class teain. 

A committee from the junior class 
asked the cooperation of the commis- 
sion in a "stunt" which they plan to 
pull off in the near future, -and went 
away with the assurance that it was 
behind them. 

The report of the treasurer of the 
Athletic Association was read, to- 
gether with the auditor's certificate. 



GLEE CLUB PICKED 

STRONG COMPETITION FOR 
POSITIONS. 



HANDS IN 

RESIGNATION 



Holiday Tour Will Go South— Week- 
End Trips May Be Taken. 



The Glee Club has been picked and 
will start rehearsing at once. Out of 
some forty applicants for positions, 
the following won out; 

First Tenors: Hesler, Morrison, 
and Shaw. 

Second Tenors: Hayward, Roe, and 
Welle:-. 

First Basses: Blackman, Kirkpat- 
nck, Thompson, and Thornell. 

Second Basses: Belsey, Friend, 
Warnock, and Winchell. 

A first tenor and a second tenor 
are yet to be picked. 

Two rehearsals will be held next week 
on Tuesday and Wednesday evenings. 
At the meeting Tuesday evening, the 
manage- will be selected. The trip 
this year will probably be taken dur- 
ing the holidays and will be through 
tie cities of the southern part of the 
state. Requests for concerts have 
been received from all parts of the 
state. Some week-end trips may be 
taken. 



EWING COMING. 



Former General Secretary to Make 

Farewell Visit Before Leaving 

for South America. 



Harry Ewing 'o8 pays a farewell 
visit to Colorado College this month. 
He will arrive in Denver this week_^ 
and from there will go to Ft. Collins. 
Froi-n the 17th to the 20th he will be 
at Boulder and from the 20th to the 
23rd at D. U., and the Mines. He 



HILDRETH FROST ASKS TO BE 

RELIEVED OF DUTIES ON 

ATHLETIC BOARD. 



Gives Reasons in Let'ier — Favors 
Six-Months Rule, But Says Con- 
ference Has Assumed Too 
Much Authority. 



Last Tuesday, Hildreth Frost '01, 
who ha--, been an assistant football 
coach on the Tiger team for years, 
eenr in his resignation as president of 
the Athletic Association. He is not 
in sympathy with the stand that the 
Colorado Faculty Athletic Conference 
has taken with regard to intercollegi- 
ate athletics. 

His resi.gnation will be acted on by 
the faculty of the college at its regu- 
lar meeting this afternoon. It will 
probably be accepted and his succes- 
sor will be named at that time. 

In a letter to the editor of The 
Tiger, Mr. Frost expressed himself 
as follows: 

On accoimt of the article appearing 
in the Colorado Springs Gazette of 
this date, I deem it necessary to pub- 
lish briefly my reasons for resigning 
from the athletic board of Colorado 
College. 

For the last five years I have 
sought to secure the adoption of the 
elegibility rules, one to eight, adopted 
b}' the faculty conference. I am en- 
tirely in sympath}' with these rules, 
particularly with the so-called "six 
months rule," and believe the adop- 
tion of such a system of rules is nec- 
essary for clean athletics. These 
rules were formulated at the request 
and with the full knowledge of .the 
athletic board. 



Continued on Page 5. 



Continued on Page 5. 



Continued on Page 5. 



THE TIGER 



COLORADO ATHLETICS. 

Dean Parsons Reviews Work of the 
Faculty Conference. 

Feeling that the student body is en- 
titled to the facts concerning the pres- 
ent athletic situation in Colorado, 
Dean Parsons, President of the Fac- 
ulty Athletic Conferehce, revie'we'id 
the story of Colorado athletics during 
the last year at a meeting of the stu- 
dent body after chapel Monday. 
Much comuient has resulted from the 
last meeting of the conference and 
from its action in regard to the 
Mines-C. C. game in particular. The 
Dean has been "on the job" as far as 
athletics ai e concerned pretty con- 
stantly for seme time and is a thor- 
oughly competent authority. 

I-^is talk was in substance as fol- 
lows: 

I'hings were in a bad condition last 
fall, charges and counter charges 
we e being made, every one was sus- 
picious of every one else, and ath- 
letics were in a general state of 
chacs. At that time it seemed to 
many that it would be better to abol- 
ish intercollegiate athletics entirely 
than to ha-^e them continued as dur- 
ing the past few years. Accordingly, 
Dean Parsons was authorized by the 
faculty here to call a meeting of fac- 
ulty representatives of the various 
colleges and universities to consider 
the sitttation. The sense of this meet- 
ing was that some change was neces- 
sary and that in order to get the best 
results it would be advisable to take 
the control of athletics out of student 
hands, because student control was so 
constantly changing. 

So another conference meeting was 
called in February of this year at 
which were present faculty represent- 
atives from Ft. Collins, Boulder, and 
Colorado College. The Miners could 
not say they had faculty control, so 
were not in the conference, but were 
present as guests, thus showing that 
they were in sympathy with the 
movement. 

Since that time meetings have been 
held cnntiiuiously, sometimes as often 
as every two wrecks, and much time, 
energy, and nervous worry have been 
spent by those interested. At times 
it has seemed almost hopeless of ac- 
complishing the desired result, but 
the conference kept up its work, and 
by commencement time, distinct pro- 
gress had been made, and at the first 
meeting this fall the conference rules 
as published in The Tiger were 



adopted. They are not perfect and 
no one realizes this better than those 
who drew them up, but with the 
adopted rules as a basis, progress 
must be in the right direction. The 
proposition has been considered as a 
whole and not from the standpoint of 
any one college. Thus the problems 
were perhaps more difficult than may 
appear to any one student body. 

One of the rules as adopted is to 
the effect that no conference institu- 
tion may play any other institution 
not having conference rules except by 
permission of the conference. And 
there were several cases in which 
these exceptions were made. For in- 
stance, we play Wyoming and the U. 
of C. plays the University of New 
Mexico, neither of which schools have 
confe ence rules. In these instances 
it was thought best to make excep- 
tions, because the colleges played 
were so weak that the contests could 
be nothing more than practice games. 
We are to play Denver University, 
not in the conference, but in this case 
the contract was made before the 
adoption of the conference rules ^lid 
we are to play them under confer- 
ence rules. If they do not come into 
the conference, they will no longer be 
played by the other colleges in the 
state. But D. U. has shown a de- 
cided interest and will su 'ely come in. 

The six months rule has also been 
adopted. Everyone knows how diffi- 
cult it is for the freshmen to get 
started working. And this is espe- 
cially hard for the athlete, who must 
spend so much time in practice. This 
is felt to be the reason for so many 
athletes dropping out in the middle of 
their first year. The six months rule 
was the.efore adopted. It was felt to 
be needed scholastically, and further, 
because it was believed that it would 
keep athletes in college for four 
years instead of six months, as so 
often the case previously. It has been 
asked why the six months rule was 
adopted instead of the one year rule. 
The reason is this. At , Golden the 
Seniors have each year a long spring 
trip, taken at such a time as to pre- 
vent any fourth-year man from en- 
gaging in sp."ing athletics. And if the 
one year rule were enforced, students 
there could engage in only two years 
of baseball and track. 

Colorado College presented a peti- 
tion for the allowing of the schedul- 
ing of freshman games. This was 
discussed carefully and finally re 
jected. It was felt that it would tend 
to defeat the purpose of the freshman 



rule. In the East it has been found 
that when freshman games are per- 
mitted, an athletic system is built up 
within an athletic system, and this- 
is not desired here. 

Dean Parsons said that he realized 
how hard it is for the students here 
to submit to the new rules, but that 
the same conditions exist throughout 
the state. For instance, Boulder has 
had to refuse to play Utah, a very de- 
sirable game. At Ft. Collins the team 
was at one time practically disbanded. 
At the Mines there has been a bitter 
struggle, but faculty control has final- 
ly won out. It was found, however, 
that their existing contracts would 
prevent them from living up to the 
conference rules this yea-, and it was 
therefore voted to admit them on Dec. 
I. 

It seems to the conference mem- 
bers that much has been accom- 
plished. The ringer has been elim- ■ 
inated and there are few possibilities 
of bitterness. If a college has any 
suspicion of any player on its teams, 
it will be its duty to report said sus- 
picion to the conference, that there 
may be a free discussion. 

Dean Parsons concluded by saying 
that it had been a source of keen 
satisfaction to feel, as he had, that in 
all his efiforts he had had the support 
of the student body. Students, man- 
agers, captains, and athletes general- 
ly have, he said, co-operated with 
him heartily. 

"We have begun a new era, an era 
when our athletics will be our pride 
and not a by-word among the states 
around us." 



THE TIGERS MAY MEET ARMY 
ELEVEN HERE, OCT. 23. 



Colorado College may meet the 
strong army football team of Fort 
Russell, Wyoming, on Washburn 
Field, Saturday, October 23. 

Negotiations have been in progress 
several days, and the athletic board 
last night voted to bring the Fort 
Russell team here, The Tigers are 
expecting a hard contest if the two 
teams clash. The army has for its 
stars a number of West Point artists. 
The game here should be one of the 
best of the season. 

The Tigers are keeping up their 
daily practice and the results are ap- 
parent. The squad work is improv- 
ing each week. 



THE TIGER 



SING COLLEGE SONGS. 



AN OPPORTUNITY. 



Men to Warble at Hag Every Friday 
Evening. 



At a quarter to seven last Friday 
night se\'eral men gathered around 
the piano in Hagerman Hall. It was 
net long before the greater number of 
tliem were huddling about the lights 
with their hand-books open before 
them, as they more or less sviccess- 
fully followed the songs that were 
being played on the piano. 

When some of the older men have 
to get out hand-books in order to 
join in on a song, it seems that we 
had better get together and learn 
seme of these college songs. Every 
fellow in school ought to be able to 
help swell the volume of our cam- 
pus melodies on any and every occa- 
sion. If he can't, he will feel out of 
place at every game, every time the 
women's halls are serenaded, or even 
when two or three start up a familiar 
song, and he must remain silent or 
mutter a word now and then. 

Some may think that these "sings" 
are "cappers' " games, just to get fel- 
lows into the Y. M. C. A. meetings, 
which begin at seven. This is not 
the case. The Y. M. C .A. does not 
want to play any tricks in order to 
get fellows to the meetings. No one 
is obliged to stay, if he does not feel 
inclined. At the same time, the Y. 
M. C. A. extends a cordial invitation 
to every man. 

At any rate, come out to these 
sings Friday night at a quarter to 
seven, and learn the songs of your 
College. There are some new ones 
that are going to make a "hit." 

SPECKLED TATER. 



NEW EQUIPMENT. 



The Monument Valley Coal Com- 
pany lias recently presented the Min- 
ing Engineermg Depaitment of Colo- 
rado College with a complete set of 
working drawings of their new coal 
tipple, recently erected at the old 
Keystone mine, four miles north of 
the city. These drawings are of' 
great interest, for they deal with con- 
ditions peculiarly local. This mine 
and its achie\ ements was treated at 
considerable length, under the head 
of the "Keystone Mine Project" in 
the • thesis prepared by Neil Vande- 
moer, who graduated in 1909. 



Pike's Peak Polytechnic Socie.y to 

Start Meetings Scon — Excellent 

Speakers to Be Secured. 



During each college- year a number 
c^f men prominent in engineering 
professions are secured to address 
the meetings of the Pike's Peak Poly- 
technic Society. These meetings are 
Oj,en to all engineering students and 
not exclusively for members of the 
society, as a good many have thought. 
.All engineering students cf the Col- 
lege are not only mvited, but urged to 
attend these meetings. Some very 
able addresses have been given, per- 
taining to engineering features cur- 
ren.t in the technical world and of in- 
tense interest to all engineers. In 
this comparatively new and rapidly 
growing science, new developments 
arc constantly arising. New methods 
are constantly displacing old ones. 
To keep abreast of these vast strides 
that are being made in the science of 
engineering, .. is next to impossible- 
An opportunity is given to come in 
contact with men who are in the 
midst of big undertakings. A chance 
may be had to obtain some knowl- 
edge that cannot be found in your 
textbooks. It is a part of one's edu- 
cation to get in touch with practical 
men in the different professions. This 
is tlie pri^'ilege offered by these meet- 
ings, which have been held every 
two weeks on Saturday evenings here- 
tofore. 

This year special effort will be made 
to have the meetings at a time which 
will be tnore convenient for the en- 
gineering students. The regularity of 
these fortnightly meetings is not- cer- 
tain or fi.xed. Much depends on 
speakers being available and the time 
when they may be secured. 

Men come from all over the state 
to have the privilege of attending 
these meetings. The meeting place is 
in the basement of Coburn Library. 

Notices of all meetings announcing 
the speakers are posted from week to 
week on 'Palmer Hall and Coburn Li- 
b ary bulletin boards, and they also 
appear in the columns of The Tiger. 
Watch for these notices and adapt 
your schedule to them. They can be 
of great value to you. 



COURSE IN GRAZING. 

Forestry School to Inaugurate Ne-w 
Study. 



If the plans of Professor Morril do 
not miscarry, a course in grazing 
will be added to the schedule of the 
Forestry School at the beginning of 
the second semester. The idea is 
origmal with Professor Morril, who, 
from lung service with the govern- 
ment, recognizes what an important 
part grazing plays on some of the re- 
se ves. In the past, foresters have 
been educated in lumbering, planting, 
etc., only to find when they get on a 
reserve that most of their work is 
along grazing lines and they are hope- 
lessly at sea. 

It is strange that such a course has 
not been established in some of the 
eastern schools long before this, but 
such is not the case. Colorado Col- 
lege will be the first and only college 
in the world to have grazing taught 
in its forest department, and this cer- 
tainly speaks well for the energy and 
progressive spirit of the men in 
charge. 

It is highly probable that ]\Ir. Clos 
or some other expert on grazing will 
come out from Washington to take 
charge of the work. The outline of 
the ground to be covered is now being 
made, but it is not yet known just 
how much the course will include. 

The Forestry School will be bene- 
fited in more ways than one by the 
introduction of this study. It will add 
to the efficiency of the men turned 
out, it will bring the School into 
favor with the forest service and give 
it a higher ranking among forest 
schools the world over. 



PRESIDENT SLOCUM AND 

DEAN PARSONS ASSIST 

In Starting Y. M. C: A. Building 
Campaign. 



The University of Nebraska has 
been admitted to membership in the 
American Association of Universities. 



Last Sunday, President Slocum and 
Dean Parsons went to Pueblo to as- 
sist in launching a campaign to raise 
$100,000 for a Y. M. C. A. building in 
that city. Dr. Slocum spoke at the 
First Presbyterian and First Method- 
ist churches. Dean Parsons made his 
appeals in the First Congregational 
and First Baptist churches, besides 
making an address before a women's 
m_eeting in St. Paul's Methodist 
church. 



THE TIGER 



SIDDONS' FOOTBALL DOPE 

Mines Game Off — Team in Fine Shape — Scrubs Doing Good Work- High School Wins — Denver University Shows Up 

Better — Fort Russel Here? — New Grandstand t 



There was much glocm around the 
campus early this week when it was 
learned that we cannot meet the 
Mines this year. 

Dean Parsons attended the Confer- 
ence at Denver hist Saturday and did 
all he could to arrange to play the 
Mine s, but to no avail. His attempts 
to arran'a;e an inte collegiate fresh- 
man schedule were also voted down. 
This, hov.CA-er, will n t i revent the 
freshman team from arranging games 
with high school or athletic club 
teams, and it is very probable that 
we shall see our freshmen in action 
before long. 

In spite of the disappointment at 
not be'ng allowed tr-. play the ^liners, 
the team has been out working ha d 
every night, -and is in shape to play 
a. championship game today. The 
sc.ubs also seem to be in the spirit 
of the thing and are out every night. 
We owe the present condition of our 
first team to the loyalty of the scrubs. 

The scrubs have a bunch of mate- 
rial which will be a large factor on 
our team next year. Withrow, who 
plaj's center, was on the champion- 
ship Longmont team last year. Fie is 
a husky man, ha-d to put off his feet, 
and will easily make the first team 
next year; Hedblom and Johnson are 
at guard. Hedblom is also subbing 
on the first team, and although some- 
what awkward, is a comer and stands 
good to make his "C" this fall. John- 
son is rather light for a guard, but 
makes up for his lack in weight by 
the energy and go he puts into his 
playing. Le Clere at left tackle is 
making a name for himself by his 
srnashing style of play; his work 
shews that he has played bef"r,\ 
Long, who has been switched from 
the backfield to right tackle, is show- 
ing up much bette ■ in his new posi- 
tion. Bowers, all-Colorado . high 
school end for last yea-, is a star; 
he is a sure tackier and runs around 
his end gain little. J. Sinton is play- 
ing the other end. In the backfield 
the scrubs are especially strong: 
Putnam at quarter is improving every 
day, Murphy at full causes much wor- 
ry on the sidelines; his fierce line 
plunging seems unable to be stopped 
without hurting someone. In Acker 
and Howard the second team has a 
pair of halves that would look good 



on any college team in the state. 
Acker's work on the offensive has 
been a feature this week; he holds 
his feet and dies hard. Howard 
shows up best on the defensive; he 
is at the bottom of every play stopped 
and it seems impossible to hurt him. 
He runs interference well and is a 
fair punter. 

Howard was elected captiin of the 
freshman team last Tuesday night to 
take the place of Jay Randolph, who 
has quit coming out. 

"Rusty"' Conklin has been out all 
week. He i)layed football on the 
Delta High School, where he made 
good; he is built for a back and if 
he stays Oiit, ought to make good. 

"Tommy" Thompson has been laid 
up this week with a badly bruised hip. 
Rce and Hedblom have Jilled his po- 
sition since he has been hurt. 



ues to run punts back through the 
whole scrub team and Whittaker's 
work on the offensive is something 
.that will make the critics take notice 
before the season is over. 



The first team has rounded into 
perfect shape this week and is begin- 
ning to show real class. Heald at de- 
fensive full reminds us of "Tub" Mor- 
ris' playing at that position. He hits 
a play low and hard. Sherry contin- 




In one of the most exciting games 
e\"er seen on Washburn Field, the 
Ter ors took Manual Training High 
.Sc'ini. 1 into camp by the narrow mar- 
gin of 12 to II, last Saturday. 

That the Brown and White have a 
fi.ghting bunch this year was satisfac- 
torily demonstrated; outweighed ten 
pounds to a man, with their captain 
out of the game, they fought an up- 
hill battle and finished one point 
ahead. 

Honors were about even the first 
half. Each team sco.ed a touchdown 
and kicked goal, making the score 6-6. 
In the second half Manual made' a 
touchdown on a spectacular 50-yard 
run by Aldrich, but failed to kick 
goal. 

It was right here that the Terrors 
get busy. Cheese steamed around 
end a few times for gains averaging 
30 yards, an onside kick and one more 
run by Cheese put the ball over and 
tied the score. Ady then relieved 
matters by kicking a perfect goal. 

After this Manual seemed to lose 
heart and couldn't get the ball out of 
their territory. 

D. U. showed a partial reversal of 
form last Saturday, when they waded 
through Wyoming for nine touch- 
downs. It was not D. U.'s strength 
as much as Wyoming's weakness that 
figured in the results, the wo.k of the 
Ministers being very ragged. Tomor- 
row they meet Washburn; this game 
will probably be an exciting one, as 
the Kansans are said to have a strong 
bunch this year. 



Other state scores: 
University of Colorado 3, Alumni o. 
• East Denver 6, D. U. Freshmen 0. 

U. of C. Freshmen 10, West Den- 
ver o. 

Delta II, Montrose o. 



CARL A. HEDBLOM, '07 
Former Captain of the Tigers 

Word has just come from Boston that 
Mr. Hedblom is the recipient of another 
scholarship at Harvard Medical School. 



Manager Kittleman has been nego- 
tiating with Ft. Russell for a game to 
be played here October 23. The game 
will probably be played, though final 
arrangements are not complete. 



THE TIGER 



Little or nothing is known of this 
team, but six of the plaj'ers are grad- 
uates of West Point, so they proba- 
blj^ will give our Tigers a good stiff 
game. Let us hope so. Practice, of 
course, helps some, but our bunch 
needs hard games, and needs them 
badly. 



Money was allowed at the meeting 
of the Athletic Board Tuesday night 
to build a new grandstand on Wash- 
burn Field. The interest in football 
in the state has increased so largely 
the last few years that another stand 
is needed. It will be similar to the 
stjiud on the east side of the field and 
will be placed directly north of the 
east stand. 



HANDS IN RESIGNATION 

Continued from Page 1. 

My reasons for resigning are, in 
b ief, as follows: 

1. The faculty conference entirely 
exceeded its authorized power in 
adopting rule 9, barring intercollegi- 
ate freshmen contests, and rule 10, 
ba ring relations with other colleges 
except such as may be permitted by 
the conference. 

2. The rule barring inte collegiate 
contests between freshmen teams ap- 
pear:: to have been ad ipted by the 
conference about January, 1909; no 
notice of this action was brought be- 
fore the board, or to my notice, until 
about September 15, 1909. In the 
meantime, the boa d was requested 
to, and did approve, the actions of 
the conference committee, without 
the disclosure to it of this important 
rule, and membe/s of the board, in- 
cluding mj'self, were allowed to rep- 
resent to incoming freshmen that in- 
tercollegiate contests would be al- 
lowed. 

,<■. The exercise by the conference 
of the powers claimed by them re- 
duces the athletic board to a mere 
dummy board, with no final power or 
authority except as regards auditing 
bills and electing managers. I have 
no time to give in se.ving upon a 
dummy board. 

4. The members of the board are 
undoubtedly responsible for its obli- 
gations; to make athletics pay ex- 
penses, the board must be able to 
contract freely, and must have a free 
hand in making its schedule, subject 
only to the approval of our own fac- 
ulty. To require the approval of the 
confe.'ence of our relations with out- 
side colleges is ridiculous. 

5. The action of the conference in 



debarring freshman contests, and in 
limiting the number of possible 
games, as has been done, will make 
a successfrd athletic season very im- 
probable. 

If the faculty conference sticks to 
its legitimate business of adopting 
and enforcing a uniform code of eli- 
gibility rules, it will succeed. Its 
present actions will not receive the 
support of the students of the confer- 
ence institutions, and will succeed 
only in further embroiling and embit- 
tering athletic relations in the state. 

The members of the conference are 
neither in touch with nor in sympa- 
thy with the general athletic situation 
and, aside from the adoption of gen- 
eral eligibility rules, their interfer- 
ence in other matters will most cer- 
tainly be inimical to the best interests 
of athletics. On account of the geo- 
graphical position of our school, their 
actions will work with particular 
ha"dships on us. 

The faculty conference, in inter- 
meddling, as they ha^•e dene, ha\e en- 
tirely exceded their authority. By the 
failure to gi' e n tice of debarring in- 
terccllegiate freshman c-ntests, - nd by 
knowingly allowing me to mike rep- 
resent'! ti ns tliat such contests would 
he held, 1 feel thrt I ?m place 1 in such 
a rsition tiat I wculd ni 1 n-jer be 
willing to serve upon the athletic 
borrd as the alumni represent" ti^e ap- 
pointed by the faculty. 
Respectfully, 

HILDRETH FROST 09. 



EWING COMING 

Continued from Page 1. 



will arrive here Saturday eveni'ng, 
October 23. Sunday at 6:30 p. m., he 
will add.ess a union prayer meeting 
at Bemis Hall. Monday noon he will 
speak at chapel. At 6:30 on Tuesday 
evening he will speak at a short 
meeting of the men in Hagerman 
Hall. Wednesday at 5 p. m., he will 
preside over an open meeting of the 
Volunteer Band in Montgomery 
Hall. At 7:30 the same evening he 
will be present at the first meeting 
of the South Y\merican mission class 
in Ticknor Study. All who wish in- 
terviews with him should ma'<e ar- 
rangements with Heald, as his time 
will be well taken up. He will sail 
in the spring for South America and 
this will likely be his last visit to the 
College for seven years. He leaves 
Wednesday night or Thu sday morn- 
ing for Canon City, where he will 
St eak before the Y. M. C. A. 



STUDENT COMMISSION 

Continued from Page 1. 

ft is (in file at the treasurer's office in 
Palmer Hall and may be seen by any- 
one wdio- is interested. 

Simdry small bills were allowed. 

All meetings of the Students' Com- 
mission are open and the student 
body should feel free to attend. 



INSPECTION TOUR. 

Last Thursday morning the class in 
Railroad Economics, Civil Eng. R., 
visited the junction of Pike's Peak 
Avenue and the Santa Fe Railroad to 
inspect the wo, king of the railroad 
company's steam pile driver, which 
has been in operation for the past 
week. The railroad is to viaduct the 
wagon road. Excavation work is 
being done on both sides of the t.ack. 
While this is being done and to in- 
sure a safe roadbed for continual 
traflic, a system of temporary bents 
are being put in. Piles are driven 
some twenty feet into the road-bed, 
and sawed off flush with the g ound. 
Then tie piling is cut off three feet 
below the trac!;s and headers are 
tlirown in and CLinnected by span 
timbers. As the earth is remo\ ed an 
-'t e sids cf t!.e tracks, eac'.i track 
'. left 'ngh t.ntl dry abjve the wagon 
rotd. 

The fou -and-a-half-ton steam-ham- 
mer was recorded to have made six- 
ty-eight "love taps' per minute, six 
to ten minutes being requi.ed to sink 
a piling to the required depth. 



A society for the study of equal 
suft'rage has recently been organized 
by the women of the University of 
California. Such organizations have 
been established throughout the 
United States, the one at Bryn Mawr 
having become widely known. These 
societies do not necessarily support 
the theories of the women's rights 
faction, but are formed merely for the 
study of this question of such vast 
impo.tance today. 

The Colorado School of Mines 
boasts of having a new club, the only 
one of its kind west of the Missis- 
sippi. It is called the Integral Club, 
and the membership consists of the 
trustees, the faculty, the alumni, 
the undergraduates during their at- 
tendance at the school, and the sub- 
scribe s to the gymnasium fund. The 
club Is controlled and managed by the 
student body. A house warming 
was recently held in the^club rooms. 



THE TIGER 



The Weekly Newspaper of Colorado College 



GLENN W. SHAW Editor-in-Chief 

HARRY W. McOUAT Business Manager 

S. W. Dean Assistant Editor 

C. DONELAN .__ Assistant Editor 

H. H. Haight ......Assistant Editor 

L. E. GriSWOLD Engineering Editor 

B. P. SiDDONS Athletic Editor 

H. F. Rice Forestry Editor 

Julia Ingersoli Alumni Editor 

Helen Canon Exchanse Editor 

Janet Kampf Local Editor 

W. L. Warnock Local Editor 

A. E. Bryson Assistant Manager 

E. W. Hille A sistanl Manager 

Correspondents 

Geneva McCaw, T. M. I'ettigrcw, Edith Sommers, F. B. 

Copeland, Margaret VV'arson, E S Statten, 

Kathaiine True, D. L iiisco 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to The Tiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 
College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

<T^^^t^ ^ ^^L> g Entered at the postofiicc at Colorado 
^^«t!c^BS6*^ Springs, Colo,, as second-class matter. 

Subicriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 

FROST'S RESIGNATION. 

Hiklreth Frost has resigned from 
the Athletic Board. He says the Col- 
orado Faculty Athletic Conference by 
forbidding intercollegiate freshman 
games and making itself the 
last court of appeals in the mat- 
ter of tlie relations between confer- 
ence and non-conference institutions, 
has made the local* board a dummy 
aggregation, over which he does not 
care to preside. He expresses him- 
self as lieartily in favor of the six- 
months rule, but accuses the confer- 
ence of taking unto itself too much 
authority. 

If Mr. Frost feels that his useful- 
ness to the Athletic Board is ended, 
all ivell and good. We can easily be- 
lieve that its responsibilities and wor- 
ries are lessened by the authority of 
the conference, and a man should not 
be expected to spend his time audit- 
ing accounts and electing managers, 
if his own business offers more im- 
portant work to do. But such a res- 
ignation should not be taken as argu- 
ment against the conference rules and 
the authority of the conference. Both 
rules and authority are blessings, for 
the very reason that they do simplify 
the work of athletic boards. The 
work of athletic boards has been ve y 
complex and trying in the past. 

Mr. Frost may be personally op- 
posed to rules 9 and lO, but his is but 
one opinion against hundreds. Rule 



10 is all that makes valuable the six- 
months rule, and rule g will save our 
freshmen for future victories and 
themselves. 

INFORMATION. 

To what dees your season ticket 
entitle you? The advisability of an 
answer to this question was made 
plain by the attempt of a freshman to 
ente.- the gate at the High School- 
Manual game Saturday by showing a 
piece of card with McOuat's signature 
on it. If holders of tickets will read 
what the officers thought should be 
printed on the reverse, they will find 
that they are entitled to admittance 
to games played on Washburn Field, 
only when the college team partici- 
p.ates in such games. Their tickets 
will also secure them entrance to de- 
bating ccntests in Perkins Hall, pro- 
vided, of course. Colorado College is 
a contestant. Should Perkins Hall be 
rented to managers for a Peary-Cook 
squabble, the holder of a ticket is- 
sued by the Associated Students' 
Commission in receipt of a $7 fee, 
would have to put up good money 
at the door. The coming freshman- 
sophomore football game on Wash- 
burn Field will cost y5u just what 
the managers say, unless the commit- 
tee on underclass contests decides to 
make it a free show. Your season 
ticket will gain you admission to no 
contest in whicth Colorado College 
is not a contestant. It is good only 
in Colorado Springs. 

TO SMOKERS. 

This is not a sermon on the "filthy 
habit" of consuming the "pernicious 
weed" in smoke. We should never 
succeed at n-riting tracts; we are too 
well satisfied that some things should 
be none of our business. But there is 
a tradition at Colorado College that 
no man shall smoke on the campus. 
So far as we know, the faculty has 
never announced a hard and fast rule 
forbidding tobacco the grounds. In 
ethicals, President Slocum has as'.'ced 
the men to extinguish lights upon 
stepping on the campus, and a gen- 
eral precedent has always been fol- 
lo\>ed. Of late too many pipes have 
been smoking up to Palmer Hall. The 
smokers of Colorado College have al- 
waj-s respected the sentiments of the 
faculty and the greater part' of the 
students of the institution. We have 

net a wi^.men's seminary here but we 
I 

have a coeducational college, you un- 
derstand. Purdue found it necessary 
to abolish smoking on the campus by 
faculty ruling; we' find it necessary to 
write an editorial. 



ASSISTANTS. 

The Tiger Board of Control will be 
glad to consider all applications of 
those who may aspire to be assistant 
editor of this paper. If the right man 
can be found, he will be elected at 
the next meeting. Put your applica- 
tions in The Tiger box. 



SIDDONS ELECTED. 



Last Monday a meeting of the As- 
sociated Students was called by Pres- 
ident McOuat for the pu pose of 
electing the junior member of the 
Athletic Board. Siddons, whose peti- 
tir.n had been signed by the required 
numbe;- of students and filed with the 
secretary in accordance with the con- 
stitution of tlie Associated Students, 
was elected. 



REFERENCE BOOKS. 



Because of the small number of 
books available in certain courses, all 
refe.ence books must be back in the 
library by 8:15 instead of 9:15. This 
rule goes into effect Monday, October 



NOTICE OF REMOVAL. 



Of late the automatic lawn mower 
has been conspicuous by its absence. 
Maify have asked, what has become 
of the sheep? It was remarked that 
a wolf or a "Fat Bair" broke into the 
fold and carried off the entire herd. 
But the evidence is lacking to corrob- 
orate this statement. However, they 
ha^-e disappeared. Either the high 
taxes, that must be paid when li^■e 
stock is pastured in the city, the 
prc'ximity of Thanksgiving or the 
approaching barbecue contributed 
to their sad fate. 

The entire herd was taken to the 
Smith Packing Company and each 
and every bleater was ruthlessly dis- 
patched unto the happy feeding 
ground, where premonitory moisten- 
ing no longer stands on their nether 
lips for the luscious campus flower. 
L, E. G. of Mutton. 



A tug-of-war .icross the lake will 
take the place of the flag rush at the 
UniA'ersity of Colorado this year. 



At Purdue University it has been 
ruled that there be no smoking on the 
cinipus. 



THE TIGER 




fcitTJ^o* .-ui«r 




CAMPUSTR Y By Webb Foote 



I got on a street car yesterday and 
let it carry me to tlie campus. I had 
no more than selected a seat and ap- 
propriated it, when the conductor 
dropped down beside me. 

"Go to college?" he asked. 

"Yep. How'd yen guess it?" 

"Didn't. Saw your necktie." 

His joke was pointless. I took time 
out to tell myself so. He interrupted 
me. 

"Was you ever a conductor?" 

"No, but I've taken tickets at 
games." 

"There, that's just what I wanted 
to ask you about," he said, reaching 
into his pocket. "Did you ever see 
one of these?" 

"Yes," I said, "one. That's an As- 
sociated Students' ticket." 

"What's it good for?" 

"To go to games with." 

"Sort of a girl?" 

"Not much; sort of a season pass." 

"Good enough. When's your next 
game?" 

"Nobody knows. But you can't use 
that ticket." 

"Why not?" 

"Non-transferable." 

"Oh, that's just a blufif. Our trans- 
fers say that, too." 

"But your transfers aren't season 
tickets. I tell you, that pasteboard 
won't buy you anything." 

Deep disappointment crept over his 
face. 

"You're sure of that?" he asked, 
slowly. 

"Very sure." 

"Then I'm stung. That blamed kid 



POLYTECHNIC AND MEDICAL 
LIBRARY IN ORDER. 



Hereafter books taken out of either 
the inedical or polytechnic library in 
the basement of Coburn will be re- 
corded as in the main library above. 
The books have all been accessioned 
and catalogued separately and will be 
much easier obtained than before. 
Miss Martin, lately at the public li- 
brary, is in charge. 



looked so innocent when he offered it 
to me that I just took it and pulled 
the bell cord as if I'd got a nickle. 
Of course I had to pay a good coin 
out of my own pocket. And I gave 
the little scoundrel a transfer to 
Manitou, too. He worked me right." 

"But he didn't. That ticket cost 
him th ee dollars and a half. You're 
t'lree-forty-five to the good." 

"You go to -college, all right. Say," 
he called, as I got off, "give him this 
if you see him." 

"But I don't know him." 

"Oh, that won't matter. You 
wouldn't give it to him if you did. I 
hope you have a good drink on that 
nickle you forgot to give me.'' 

"Thanks." 

And I hurried away. It wasn't 
my fault that conductor talked so 
much he forgot to collect my fare; I 
had a nickle in my pocket for him. 
It was the fault of that freshman who 
thinks a season ticket to college foot- 
ball games and debates is legal tender 
everywhere. It hurt my pride to have 
the conductor remind me of an over- 
sight in earshot of a car full of pas- 
sengers. I burnt that season ticket. 



Our sheep lia\e gone on a tour of 
the k cal boarding houses. Today 
they are mutton with green trim- 
mings; tomorrow, after a night's 
boiling, they will be lamb; and Sun- 
day morning they will be hash and a 
byword. Students, be modest and 
chew the grass short; your reward is 
in the ne.xt block. 



PROF. AND MRS. BREHAUT EN- 
TERTAIN. 



Professor Brehaut invited his His- 
tory A class to a lawn party at his 
home in Broadmoor last Saturday 
afternoon. Amusement in plenty was 
provided by a soap-bubble-blowing 
contest, and it proved a mighty good 
wajj- to get every one to "inix" with 
every one else. Mr. and Mrs. Bhe- 
haut proved themselves the most 
charming of hosts. 



A SONG EACH WEEK 

LEARN IT. 
Bruin Inn. 



(Words by A. T. French, Music by E. 
W. Hille.) 

College days are filled with mem'ries 
Of the campus, lab. and dorm, 
Of fraternities and of co-eds. 
Of cold classrooms and warm; 
We'll lemcmber Deans and Prexy, 
All the places where we've been 
And we'll e'er recall with rapture, 
Days at dear old Bruin Inn, 
Where the little pianola 
Gave us many a moonlight tune, 
Ah! h(jw dear the farewell visit. 
When wc came away in June. 

Chorus — 
When our college days are over 
Still we'll see them as a dream. 
We'll look back again in fancy 
And how good they all* will seem! 
We shall see again old Bruin 
And the little waterfall, 
The old fireplace a-making 
Shadow pictures on the wall; 
And we can't forget the lunches 
Eaten there in the days gone by, 
The aroma of the coffee, • 
Tender steaks, and apple pie; 
When we've thought the whole thing 

over. 
All anew we shall begin, 
For we ne'er can stop a dreaming 
Of our dear old Bruin Inn. 

We'll recall the water's ripple, 
Silv'ry stream in North Cheyenne, 
Where we used to do our fussing. 
With the gril we went with then: 
And tlie many :ustic bridges 
Where we used to sit and s; oon 
Or more often when we couldn't. 
Ten o'clock came all too soon! 
And we'll ask again the question. 
Is it really such a sin. 
If we're just a little tardy 
Getting home from Bruin Inn? 



OPEN HOUSE. 



The Phi Gamma Delta fraternity 
has issued over looo invitations to 
visit them at their house, 817 N. Cas- 
cade Avenue, on Wednesday, Octo- 
ber 20, afternoon and evening. Some 
of tlie invitations may Iiave miscar- 
ried and the Fijis want it generally 
understood that all students, faculty 
members and friends of Colorado Col- 
lege are invited. 



THE TIGER 



THE ASSOCIATED CHARITIES 
HOLDS ANNUAL MEETING. 



Some Interesting Facts in Annual 
Report. 



The Associated Charities held its 
annual meeting in Perkins Hall last 
Tuesday afternoon. While the stu- 
dent body is not directly connected 
with this work, yet there is much 
about it that should be of interest to 
us. 

Mr, Bruno, who has charge of the 
work, has had applications from 1047 
persons during the last year. Of this 
number, 305 had been in the city less 
than six months. 

While it is imjossible to assign a 
cause for poverty, it perhaps is safe 
to say that sickness is the reason in 
most cases. The applicants who are 
sick are nearly all suffering either 
from some chronic malady f."om which 
there is no relief or their sickness is 
very temporany. It is a singular fact 
that but a small percentage of appli- 
ti. ns c'lme from persrns who have 
h mes. t'lrt is, fr m pe pie actively 
c imect d rvith a family. This is 
found to be true in all 1. arts of the 
Unite 1 St'i.tes, The significance of 
this f ct is thr.t poverty does not 
breav up the home, but that it comes 
after the home has been broken up. 

The total income of the society for 
the year was $10,292.04. This is raised 
in two ways. One is by gene al sub- 
scri]: tion for the general support of 
the association, and the other is by 
subscription for the support of special 
cases. 



C. C. C. C. BROADENS INTO 

GENERAL ENGINEERING 

SOCIETY. 



At the last meeting of the Chemical 
Club of Colorado College, Wednes- 
day night, the organization took a 
very important step toward bringing 
about tiiat which has been so much 
needed m the life of the engineering 
department of the college — the es- 
tablishing of an engineering society. 
Membership in the club heretofore 
has been restricted to those students 
who have taken or were taking quan- 
titative chemistry or an equivalent 
course in advanced physics. To ful- 
fil this requirement, limited the mem- 
bership to a few A. B. students, min- 
ing and electrical engineers. It was 
thought that the civil and irrigation 
engin'eers ought to share in the ben- 
efits that a society of this kind could 



give. So the iiualifications which men to be their guests at a joy-mak- 

have held heretofore will apply only ing billed for Bemis Hall, Saturday 

to A. B. students. All upperclass en- evening, October 23. 

gineers shall now be eligible to mem- 

bership. The name of the club will CO-OPERAtION AND COMPETI- 
;emain the same for the present. TION. 



QUIT WASTING TIME. 



College Calendar to Be Out Before 
Thanksgiving. 



Christmas is coming, and many 
young women are doubtless wasting 
spare moments on the construction 
of dainty holiday gifts for their 
friends. Good word has just come 
that such work will not be necessary 
this year. The College Calendar will 
be out before Thanksgiving. 

Mrs. Smith, who made such a suc- 
cess of the Calendar last year, has 
collected a large number of excellent 
new pictures and has let the contract 
for a 12-page calendar, which will be 
the equal of last year's in every re- 
spect. It will be printed in rich 
brovrn tones on hea'v'y calendar 
stock. The calendar will sell for 60 
cents, as it did last year. Similar cal- 
endars sell for $1 and $1.50 at easte.n' 
institutions. 



LOWER CORRIDOR OF BEMIS 
COMPLETED. 

Last Saturday evening, the hall 
girls celebrated the completion of the 
lower corridor in Bemis Hall by danc- 
mg. Miss Brown made the occasion 
more enjoyable by serving punch. 
The girls are delighted to have such 
a good floor for dancing and so much 
room. 

This p -actically marks the comple- 
liori of Bemis, with the exception of 
the room for the Dramatic Society. 



HYPATIA AUTUMN SPREAD. 

McGregor gym made one think of 
Hallowe'en, when Hypatia enter- 
tained the new girls at her annual 
autumn spread. Jack-o-lanterns peep- 
ing out through the corn stalks, and 
bright foliage, gave their smiling ap- 
proval. 

The programs for the old-fashioned 
dances and games \vere in the shape 
of leaves. During intermission, ap- 
propriate refreshments were served. 



JUNIORS WILL ENTERTAIN 
FRESHMEN. 



President Slccum Shows that Both 
Go Hand in Hand. 



The juniors have invited the fresh- 



Chapel, Oct. 8, 1909. "I want to 
say a few things on competition and 
co-operation, not co-operation versus 
competition. The two words go to- 
gether. Some think that competition 
means to fight and by that there must 
needs be destruction of someone else. 

"In a football game every one wants 
a record. Every one ought to do his 
best, but the best kind of competi- 
tion is where every one co-ope ates. 
In the early part of the Civil war, 
when defeat was at every hand, each 
general was trying to make a record. 
In the latter part of the war, when 
victory followed victory, each general 
was making rec:-.rds, but they were all 
wo king tcgether. Each cne c op 
crated with e-eryc ne ehe. Get at t.e 
secret of hun.an life and you will see 
that the man wdio attempts to win 
out at the expense of othe " ]"ecple is 
pl:iying a losing gair.e. When Stan- 
ford Uni\ersity was starting, every- 
body said that the University of Cali- 
fornia would suffer. Instead ,the idea 
cf education went through the state 
as never before. 

"Now, I want to apply this to col- 
lege life. There is not one among 
> ou students who can not make a re- 
crrd. It is a good ambition to desire 
to be the best student in college. We 
want our class to be the best class in 
ccillege; we want our society to be 
tlie best society in college. Now, how 
are we .going to make it? By saying 
mean things of the others? Far from 
it. It can be done by entering into 
the class cr the society to give it the 
best intellectual and moral life. Let 
every one go in to make his the best 
in college, not by pulling down some 
other society. 

"See the result. Here we have 
three men's and three women's so- 
cieties, all working for the best. 
When one is on a high level, it pulls 
up the rest. That is why it seems 
th.at all competition should be for the 
best. 

"There is no real antagonism be- 
tween competition and co-operation. 
I say this not because you are at 
Colorado College. I say it that it 
may go out in all your lives." 



THE TIGER 



POFESSOR PATTISON REMEM- 
BERS COLLEGE. 

The following notice has been 
posted on the bulletin board: 

"Professor Pattison's examination 
papers have arrived and the condition 
examinations in his'^ourses will be 
given on Saturday morning, October 
i6th." 

The abo\e needs no comment. 



REVIEW OF THE SEPTEMBER 
KINNIKINNIK. 



The Kinnikinnik, in its handsome 
new cover, make's a creditable appear- 
ance. The cover design is a striking 
one, well balanced, and fitting for the 
magazine it encloses. A comparison 
of the external appearance of this and 
the inagazines of other c jlleges would 
n t esult unfavorably to the "Kin." 
The magazine giA es an imp.ession 
fuil of dignity. No one could mistake 
it for a patent medicine pam^dilet nor 
for a mining c .n.pany's prospectus. 

ihe premise given by the co^er is 
fulfilled within. The number has a 
variety of contributions this month — 
something pleasing to every taste. 
1 lie arrangement is good, though in 
one or two cases the page has been 
crowded, obviously, to make the 
story fit the page. Little can be said 
for the proof-reader. 

The verse in this number is above 
the average college verse. Miss 
Louise Strang's "Autumn Love Song" 
has a delicacy about it that is most 
delightful. The second stanza shows 
much artistic restraint. Miss Scott 
shows marked power of phrase and 
an ease in rhyming that should lead 
to good work. Some of her lines are 
of fine finish, and full of haunting 
cadence. 

Of the shorte.- articles, Miss Par- 
sons' "Sam's Chance" is a good piece 
of work. There is hardly a false 
touch in it, and every line breathes of 
the South. Miss Huse is at her best 
in work such as "A Monologue." 
This and "Jonesville's Deadly Peril" 
are well done. There is a "first hand" 
quality about them that is a distinc- 
tion in itself, and is most convincing. 

'Mr. Donelan has an interesting 
comparison between "Poe and Mau- 
passant." His style is decidely read- 
able, and what he has to say is orig- 
inal. Perliap''s the "Dean of American 
Letters'' is handled rather too rough- 
ly. Mr. Donelan evidently admires 
Pee without reserve. "On the Lizza," 
by Wylie M. Jameson, is skillfully 



written. The description is well ar- 
ranged and imaginative. 

Mr. Shaw is clever in his sketch, 
"Occasioned by Automobiles." His 
hurnor is individual. 

"A Treasury of Thouglit," although 
commonplace enough in substance, is 
ca efully written. It is not interest- 
ing, however, which, in an essay writ- 
ten for a magazine, is one of the Sev- 
en Deadly Sins. 

Mrj Sinton is not successful in his 
sketch. The pC)int is too obvious. 
His style shows some crudities as 
yet, but he knows what is material 
for a story. 

"The Storj' of an Assignment" by 
Mr. Argo, is a forceful bit of work. 
The style is admirably suited to the 
story, and the selection of detail gi-es 
a \i\ id picture. 

In "My Expe ience .;it Enjle v > vl," 
Kauil Qu .3'!e h''s a fair pl.t. It .s 
not new, but p.^rhaps it is di Terent. 
His' stjle is a little matter-of-fact and 
di^es not conimend the story to his 
readers. A little more attenti n to 
cliaracter would save the stcry frim 
the paper back class. As it is, it 
promises to rank somewhere betweeh 
"The Duchess" and Anna Katherine 
Green. 

The editors are to be cong atulated 
upon securing contributions of such 
\ariety and uniformly good quality 
as the September number contains. 
"DENNIS." 



LITERARY PROGRAMS 

(Material for this column must be 
in The Tiger box by Tuesday of each 
v\ cek.) 



BARBECUE ENTHUSIASM. 

There is no need for more enthusi- 
asm. "The air is supersaturated with 
it now," said a sophomore the other 
da}'. .\ meeting was called last Wed- 
nesday after chapel in O'der to give 
some a chance to show their enthusi- 
asm. President McOuat. after telling 
how .the barbecue used to be run, 
called on an old enthusiast, Dr. Ca- 
jori, who introduced two things to 
think about until the eventful eve of 
October 31. They are, "How to' find 
the cosine of Noah's Ark" and 
"Dantes' Paradise." 

Shaw was the next "faculty mem- 
ber'' to air his views on the subject. 
He said that he was in for this barbe- 
cue because they were not going to 
have any wienies. 

Business Manage" Hamilton closed 
the meeting by making a ve y busi- 
nesslike plea for the support of the 
student body. 



APCLLCNIAN, OCTOBER 15. 

Extemporaneous Speech. 

Governor Johnson Rice 

What Ruose'.eT and Taft are Doing, 

Shapcott 

]\Iusic Wei ick 

Debate: Resolved, 1 hat the tarifl 

should be le\ied for re\enue only. 

Affirmati\e: Hesier, Childs. Nega- 

ti\e:^G. C. Graham, Rhone. 
Critic. 

\ isit rs \, cicrime. 

iZARECNS, OCTOBER 15. 

Dj-el. ment .. f Flying Macliines, 

Burgess 
;■.. ijate. (Fi^t.-n minutes:) 
\v h^ ..L,s .ii.c e,ed t..e north p.de? 

Cook Hedblom 

Pe;irj' F. Copeland 

P;.'per Neison 

Aliisie WarUijck 

, iS.t r; . :.z ... e. 

CICERONIAN, OCTOBER 15. 

Mu>ic Fiuivbiner and Dietrich 

Cur ent E\ ents Gilmore 

Debate: Resolved, That a system of 
compulsory voting should be adopt- 
ed in the United States. Affirma- 
tive: Ellingwcod, Ormes. Nega- 
ative: Harrison, Manley. 

Pai liamentary Drill Love 

\'isito s welcome. 



MINERVA, OCTOBER 22. 

Lectin'e Professor Woodbridge 

\'isitors welcome. 

CONTEMPORARY, OCTOBER 22. 

Tour Great Successes ....Irene Huse 

Clyde Fitch Dorothe Haynes 

v isitos welcome. 

I-IYPATIA, OCTOBER 22. 

Mediaeval Towns — Nuremberg, 

Augsberg, Rothenberg, 

Gertrude Ashley 
German Reformers: 

Luther- Lucile Dilts 

Melanethon Laura McClain 

iMusic Edna Woodard 

Visitors welcome. 



KAPPA SIGMA DANCE. 



Professor Coolidge made a busi- 
ness trip to Manitou Park this week. 



The Kap])a Sigma frate.nity held 
its opening dance at the San Luis 
School, Saturday. October 9. Pen- 
nants were used in decorating, and 



10 



THE ^r I G E R 




328 North Tejon Street 



Phone Main 715 



A. G. SPALDING a BROS. 



The 

SPALDING 
Trade- Mark 




is known throughout 
the world as a 

Guarantee of 
Quality 



are the Largest 
Manufacturers 
in the World of 

Official 

Equipment 

For All 
Athletic 
Sports and 
Pastimes 

If You a"^ inter 
** * "" ested in 
Athletic Sport you 
should have a copy 
of the Spalding 
Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyclo- 
pedia of what's new 
in Sport and is sent 
free on request. 

A. G. Spalding & Bros. 

1616 Arapohoe St., Denver, Colo. 

Patronize 
TIGER 

Advertisers 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co. 



Phone Main 48 



313 N. Tejon St. 



Fink's orchestra furnished the music. 
Mr. and Mrs. Morril chaperoned. 
The guests were: Misses Parsons, 
Kilbourne, Nell and Floy Estill, Mc- 
Cavv, Frost, Glasser, Pinckney, Camp- 
bell. Ilerr, Hinckley, Connell, Hedge- 
c ick, Frasei-, Smith, Walsh, Phillips, 
Janet and Cora Kampf, Bogue, Pier- 
son, Davis.. Mrs. Edmunds. Messrs. 
Estill .and Welle. r 



NOTICES 



(All notices for this column must 
be in The Tiger box by Tuesday of 
each week.) 



Dr. Bayley will speak at the Y. W. 
C. A. meeting in the Cominon Room 
at Bemis this evening at .~ o'clock. 



,V meeling of the freshman class 
\'>i!j be h.el'd after chapel, Monday, 
Octr.ber i8, for the electiiin of per- 
manent olhccrs. 



L)ift'crent members of the Young 
'^^'()men s Christian Association are to 
gne fudge parties for all the hall girls 
S.it'.rua.v evening, in order that they 
may bect.me better acquainted. 

The freshman- junior reception will 
take place on October 23. 



Condition exams 



English, at 



Palmer Hail, Saturday moning, Oc- 
tober 16. 



The Glee Club will rehearse in Per- 
kins at 8 o'clocv Tuesday evenin;i; 
and at 6:45 o'clock Wednesday even- 
ing. 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 

"Our Colorado" 

"Bruin Inn" 
"BlackandGold" 



The Three Songs of Colorado 

College — in Sheet Form 

for 40c. Buy Them of 



E. W. HILLE 



Clever Clothes 

FOR 

College Chaps 

AT 

ROBBINS 



ON THE CORNER 



J 



THE TIGER 



11 




Cigar Store 



Say! Know? "13" Is Doing? 

No! Well Listen 

There are six $5.00 gold pieces arranged in a frame dated from 1901 to 1906 and 
the nearest correct guess as to the arrangement, wins the $30.00. A guess given 
with every dollars worth of purchase tickets. 

Harry 1 C3 Hughes 



'J»BJ 



IS MADE WITH 

_[f[L[LaF3Tni?^W[DiJ[BS, 

IK word to the wise is sufficient ' 

GaCBp'^ engraving cq. 

ILLU5TRATORS PUEBLO 
DESIGNERS COLO. 
ENGRAVERS , 



Gel Your Picnic Supplies 

AT 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Favorite Resort of the Col- 
lege Students, Renowned in 
Story and Song 

BRUIN INN 

Up North Cheyenne Canon 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER, Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 



Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Patronize TIGER 
Advertisers 

UNION ICE AND COAL CO. 

W. M. BANNING, Proprietor 

Artificial Ice and Cold Storage 

Dealers in All Kinds of Coal and Piaion Wood 
Yard Office, 105 W. Vermiio City Offic, 5 N. Tejon 



FORESTERS' CLUB. 

The sec;nd meeting of the Forest- 
ers' Chib was held last Thursday 
night in the Polytechnic Library, The 
following program was rendered: 
The Future of the Eucalyptus 

Morgan 

The Pike Forest Prof. Morril 

The \ale Forest Club. Prof. Coolidge 

After a shfu't recess and business 
meeting, the club listened to general 
discussion. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



G. VV. Smith 'o8 was in town for 
the Kappa Sigma dance on Saturday 
night. 



Miss Be.-,s Traeder and Miss Betty 
Car enter, b^^th ex-'og, are teaching 
in rueblo. 

Chas. Bishop is engaged in busi- 
ness in J\fonte Vista. 



h'ranklin Moore 'o8 is teaching in 
the Munte Vista High School. 



Miss Helen West ex-'og was mar- 
ied on September 29th to Mr. Drew, 
general passenge:- agent of the Mid- 
land. After an extended trip in the 
east, Mr. and Mrs. Drew will settle 
in this city. 



Miss Carrie Davis '09 is studying 
German in Berlin, where she is 
spending the winter. 



Miss Faye Taylor ex-'io is assistant 
instructor in history in National Park 
Seminary, Washington, D. C. 



Miss Kate Ashley '09 is teacliing in 
Le;:d, South Dakota. 



Maier's Lunch & Dining Room 

Lunches of All Kinds 
Regular Meals 20c and 25c 

216! 2 N. Tejon St. Opposite North Park 



"Attention Collegians" 

Let us make your Dances, Receptions, 
and Fraternity Socials tiiis term, affairs 
never to be forgotten, by decorating 
your hall or parlors in an artistic man- 
ner with the college banners, pennants, 
festoons and bunting. Then have 
erected our sidewalk canopy to keep off 
the inclement weather. VVe also have 
floor coverings to protect the carpets. 
All this will cost but very little and 
add much to these affairs. 

Thfc Out West Tent and 

elephone Main 1261 
3'.> N, Tejon Street 



Awning Co. n 



R03' Shants '01, forme- instructor 
of biology here, and now in the Bu- 



College 
Stationery 

We are CLOSING OUT 
Box Stationery, em- 
bossed in Colors, with 
Pennant and Colorado 



Regular Price 
Sale Price 



30c 
23c 




Whitney and Grimwood 

No. 20 North Tejon Street 



12 



THE T I G K H 



O.E.Hemenway 



Groceries and 



Meats 



.«.*.*« 







115 South Tejon Street 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



YOU don't entertain your 
guests to save moneys 
if you did, the simplest 
way would be to forego en- 
tertaining them. 
ijfMuETH's may cost more, 
but — 

ClMueth^s 

CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 



5 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



The Colorado Springs Floral Co. 

Wish to Have Your Business at Right 
Prices 



Telephone Main 599 



104 N. Tejon St. 



Latest out Colle^e Posters lowest Prices 

Picture Framing 

Hedrick Wall Paper and Paint Company 



Take a look in the window as you go by 



212 North Tejon Street 



reau of Plant Industry at Washing- 
ton, has been visiting around the 
campus. 



Miss Irene Hunter '09 is doing 
post-graduate work at Leland Stan- 
ford University. 



Miss Winifred Pease ex-'og has 
been appointed assistant commission- 
er of the poor in El Paso County. 



Mrs. R. T. Ward (Miss Hannah 
Johnston 07) has returned to her 
home in Honolulu after spending the 
sun'.mer in Denver. 



}di8S Grace Wolcutt ex-'og was a 
vi^it .r ;:t 1 emis tn Sun.'ay. 

Benjamin Rastall '02 has been m 
the city this week. 



Air. Walrich is manager of a lum- 
_■• } ard in Alamosa. 



JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Stree 



FOR THE 

Most Exclusive Millinery 

CALL ON 

Mme, M. D. Hillmer 

6 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

Finest of Material and 
Best of Workmanship 



Phone Back 395 



Colorado Sorinef 



Miss Jennie Tyler '09 is teaching at 
Whitewater, near Grand Junction. 

Neil Vandemoer '09 was in the city 
last week. 



i\'Iiss Evelyn Shuler ex-'o7, from 
Raton, N. Mex., is visiting in the city. 

Mrs. Goldtho pe (Miss Natalie 
Soper, special '01), is now very se.i- 
ously ill in Denver. 

Miss Louise Steele '01 is in the city 
for a time, staying at Mrs. Fox' 
boarding house, 409 N. Tejon street. 

Professors Morril and Coolidge 
and some of the Senior foresters at- 
tended the National Conservation 
meeting in Denver last week. 



Fraternities, Clubsjndividuals 
i desiring Milk or Cream 
in any quantities 
should remem- 
ber :: :: 

The Sinton-Rustic Home 

No. 419 South El Paso St. 
Phone Maun 442 



Dairy 



The College Photo Studio 

The Highest Class of 

Photographs 




Bingham 

18 5. Tejon St. Phone M-S 78 



DOUGLAS & 
HETHERINGTON 



Telephone 556 



Architects 

Rooms 15 and 16 Out West Building. 
COLORADO SPRINGS. COLO. 



THE TKlKR 



13 



Memory 
Books 

Bound in colors, black and 
and orange, arid lettered on 
side. The only really Colo- 
rado College Scrap Book 
made. Lar^e enough to con- 
tain your four years' items. 

Price, $1.23 each 



The Out West 

Printing & Stationery Co. 
9-11 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 



At Moderate 
Prices 



Furniture 



Special Terms to Students 

McCracken & Hubbard 

120 and 122 South Tejon Street 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

15 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

Are Always Well Pleased When They 
Get Their Hair Cut at 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



I2S. Tajon St. 



Colorado Spring* 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main S36 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

Cascade Laundry 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 

20 per cent, discount 

To All Students of College and Academy 



DR. AND MRS. SLOCUM TO GO 
TO BOSTON. 

The Boston Alumni Association ol 
Colorado College has tendered an in- 
vitation to Dr. and Mrs, Slocum to a 
dinner, Thursday evening, Nov. ii. 
Dr. Slocum will make an address, 

Tliis association now numbers 37 
alumni from C. C. 



PEARSONS ROUND TABLE. 



Pearsons Round Table had its first 
dinne' of the year in the Dutch room 
: t the .^c•!cia last night. The even- 
ing was most enjoyably spent chat- 
ting over the courses and listening 
to the after-dinner speeches, with 
their usual wit and wisdom. 



II Local Department 



Warnock has gone home for a 
week. 



G, VV. Smith, M. R. Smith, Piatt 
and French were down for the Kappa 
Sigma dance. 



Elizabeth Kilbourne has entered 
college, after an extensive trip in Or- 
egon and Washington, 



Elsie Council and Gwendolyn 
Hedgecock were down from Denver 
for the Kappa Sigma dance. 



Invitations are out for the Contem- 
porary fancy dress ball tonight. 



7 E. Bijou 



Phone 820 



A committee has been appointed tt) 
see about the seniors' caps and 
gowns, which are to appear first on 
Insignia day, November 10, 



Herbert Vandemoer and ' Chester 
Whittaker spent Saturday in Denve". 

New Pearsons men are Golden, 
Knight, King and Weller. 

Professor Albright expects to meet 
at least part of his classes next week. 

Robert Lloyd is pledged to Delta 
Phi Theta. 

Misses Randj Morehouse, Moore 
and Picken, and Messrs. Golden, 



Hunt Up 

BisselFs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Re'ail Deali rs in 
Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 

C. F. Arcularius & 
Company 

A Large Assortment of 

BELT PINS 

All the Latest Styles 



9 South Tejon Street 
COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 

We have Embossing Dies for Stationery of all the 
College Societies aad Fraternities, also the Great 
Seal of the College. We carry in stock a large 
line of papers upon which to emboss these Dies — 
Hurd's, Crane's and others. 

Gowdy-Simmons Ptg Co. \Zur!^ 



Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Picnic Supplies 

For picnics and all kinds of outings, 
we are ready to supply everything in 
the way of eatables. We also have 
baskets so that we can pack your out- 
fit complete. Just say what you 
want, and when you want it, and 
you will have nothing else to do but 
think of the good time you are going 
to have. :: : : " :: 



W. N. Burgess % 



112-1 14 North 
on Street 



14 



THE TIGER 



This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 

Company 




Headquarters for 

College Footwear 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

FOUNDERS AND MACHINISTS 



College 
Inn 



^^ Short 
// Orders 



Cominutation Tickets — 
$3.30 for $3.00 

THE 

Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 

Our Special Extra- Clean 

Lignite 
Furnace Lump 

The Colorado Springs Fuel Co., 
112 Pike's Peak Avenue. Two 
Phones Main 230 

Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 

A. S. BLAKE 



Is the Man to See 



107 Nonh Tejon 

Nickle Ware 



Phone 465 

Cutlery 



r;ick;;rd and Deffke a"e doing splen- 
did work as teachers in the Siniday 
school at Papeton. 



Budelier spoke at the services ^at 
Papetown Sunday night. 

\'esta Tucker served tea to a few 
of the college girls, Saturday. 



Myrtle Hill, who has been ill, is 
able to be back in college again. 



Mabel Sweeney is a Delta Gamma 
];ledge at Boulder. 



A party of Sigma Chi's and guests, 
twenty-two in all, went up to Bruin 
Inn Saturday evening. 

"You can fool all the people some of 
the time," etc., may be true, but our 
motto is "Fool none of the people none 
of the time." Try us for ice cream, ices, 
candies, etc. Noble, Phone M. 920. 



Margaret Sells and Marguerite 
Glas?er we e in Denver Friday and 
Saturday. 

The first seminars, on evolution, 
were read in senior philosophy last 
Friday by Fitch, Norris, and Scott. 

Several college people went to 
Den\er to see the D. U.-Wyoming 
game, Saturday. 



May Wier ex-'o2 has_ reentered col- 
lege and is registered with the junior 
class. 



The seniors all indulged in sand- 
wiches last Friday after philosophy, 
to get over the effects of the semi- 
nars. 



Pettigrew is lecturing this week in 
South Dakota. 

Gilmore spent Saturday and Sunday 
at Palmer Lake. 



Bruin Inn, the popular little rustic 
hostelry, in North Cheyenne canon, 
changed hands recently and is now man- 
aged by Swanson and Riley, t^o ener- 
getic and obliging young men of this 
city. They promise the same treatment 
accorded to College students by their 
predecessor, Mr. Laveley. 

DeJta Phi Theta and friends took 
supper at Bruin Inn last Saturday. 
The guests of the fraternity were 
Misses Zellhoefer, Crandall, Miller, 



In these days of expensive leelhei 

it pays to care for your shoes. 

We have a complete 

Hne of 

Bixby's 

Shoe Dressings 

In all colors, suitable for every 
grade of leather . . . from dainty 
kids to heavy boots 

While they last, we will ^ive 
a 35c shoe brush and a box 
of Bixola for 23c 



Murray's 

(Just Opposite the Campus) 

William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 



MEMBERS \ ^'^ York Stock Exchange 

I Colorado Springs Mining Stock Exchange 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Spring^s, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



THE 



Official Printers 



To the Student 
Body of C. C. 



The Waterman Press 

112 £. Cucharras St. 
Phone 1154 



We Print THE TIGER 



THE T T G E R 



15 



Ge-ould, Pettigrew, Tyler, Crowley, 
Smith, Work, Humphreys and Wood- 
ring. Professors Gile, Clark and 
Smith chaperoned. 



Elsie Green went to Denver Sun- 
day. 

Francis Eames spent the week-end 
at her home in Denver. 



Mr. and Mrs. Hasty motored up 
from Lrmar to spend Sunday with 
tliere daughter, Veda. 



• The weekly informal recital of stu- 
dents of the School of Music was giv- 
en Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock 
in Perkins Hall. 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 

PETERSEN 

1 2 1 E. Kiowa 

Sewed Soles 75 cents 

Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 

GIDDINGS BROS. 

Colorado Spring* 

THE SPECIALTY STORE 

A Hearty Welcome Constantly Awaits All Visitors 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barbsr 
work and baths 

106H E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone Main 700 



^fe' 



aundry 



Why not have the BEST WORK ? 



20 per cent, discount 

To all Students of College and Academy 



J. J. WILSON, College Agent 

W.I.LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



/^, 



Sweater Coats 
$6 to $2.50 

GORTON'S 



You'll Find Here 
the Greatest 



=^ 



gathering of really fine clothes in the country; and an important 
fact about it is you'll find no other kind. Whatever your price, 
it's better to select from an assortment of all-good things than from 
all kinds of quality. We specialize College Brand and Adler clothes. 

Suits and Overcoats $40 to $15 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 



%: 





Correct Dress for Men. \ 



13 E. Pike's Peak 
Avenue 



J 



Clara Wright entert-'iined last Mon- 
day with a tea. 



Mr. and ]Mrs. F. G. Sylvester visit- 
ed here last Saturday and Sunday. 



Prof. Gile gave a very helpful talk 
to young men at the regular Y. M. 
C. A. meeting in Hagerman Hall last 
Friday evening. 



Neil Vandemoer '09 spent several 
days around college on his way 
home' to Denver, after a summer's 
business trip. 



119 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



W. H. Acher, a brother of the all 
American half-back of St Louis Un- 
iversity, is making a good showing 
in football. 



G. W. Belsey has been absent from 
recitations for several days on accou- 
nt of illness. 



DRINK 

DERN'S 

Freshly Roasted Tea and Coffee 

29 South Tejon Straet 

The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies and 
Fixtures 



208 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 812 



Manager Ross of the freshman 
team is trying to arrange a game 
with.C. S. H. S. for the near future. 



Winchell '13 was absent for a few 
days on account of illness. 



C. ]\f. Rose '09 visited the Alpha 
Tau Delta house this week. He is 
taking up work this year in the D. U. 
law school. 

Dave Smiley '12 is pledged to Alpha 
Tau Delta. 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-203 DeGraff Building, 118 
NortK Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence, 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 956 

The College 

Photo Studio 



Hi^h Class Photographs 
Kodaks and Supplies 




rruM 



Corner Cascade and Kiowa 



16 



THE TIGER 

THE YOUNG MEN'S STORE 



College Men who wear our clothes are considered the best dressed men in the bunch. 
The style, the all wool fabrics, the tailoring, the individuality are the reasans. Let 
us show you the new creations tor this fall. We have dozens of your size hanging in 
our cabinets. SuitS $lS.OO to $35.00 



Perkins-Shearer Co, «^ '' '"'' '""'' '"" ^"^ 



8 North Tejon Street 




CL, Shoe Styles for Students 

Featured among our new styles for Fall wear, are all 
those new models that have snap and go, that are 
especially designed for the good dressers among our 
Cc liege Students 



'^'^P'lfr'y Priced 




ik S TE.JON ST 




$3.!^0, $4 ard $5 




When Trading, Remember TIGER Advertisers 



^ 



Electrical Laboratory 




Colorado College 

Founded in Colorado Springs in 18 7 4 



WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



> 





'' College of Arts and Science 

E. S. PARSONS, Dean 


Depart- 


School of Engineering 

F. CAJORI, Dean 


ments 


School of Forestry 

W. C. StURGIS, Dean 


« 


School of Music 
I E. D. HALE, Dean 



Cutler Academy 

students are prepared for any American College 



The Associated 

Preparatory 

• School, in which 





m 



gXLCHtMK) 




Vol. XII 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., OCTOBER 22, 1909 



Number 6 



TABLET 

UNVEILED 



FIFTEENTH PENNSYLVANIA 

CAVALRY PRESENTS PALMER 

MEMORIAL BRONZE. 

Placed in Palmer Hall — Student Body 
Attends Ceremonies — Major Henry 
McAllister Makes Speech of Pre- 
sentation — President Slocum Re- 
sponds — 473 Names Below Tablet. 



Last Wednesday at the hour of the 
usual chapel service, the faculty, the stu- 
dent body and friends of the college as- 
sembled in the main corridor at Pahner 
hall and took part in the ceremonies at- 
tendant upon the unveiling of the Palmer 
memorial tahlet recently presented to 
Colorado College by the survivors of 
the F'ifteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, Gen- 
eral Palmer's old regiment. The bronze 
tablet, which is fastened to the wall at 
the west end of the corridor between the 
entrance to the president's office and the 
treasurer's office, hears these words : 
In Loving Remembrance of 
General William J. Palmer 
Fifteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry 

By the Sur\-ivors of the Regiment 

1909. 
Beneath it are framed the names of 

Continued on Page 7. 



DONALD S. TUCKER ELECTED. 

At a meeting of the faculty last 
Friday afternoon Donald S. Tucker 
'06 was ai pointed to succeed Hil- 
dreth Frost 'or, whose resignation as 
president of the Athletic Board was 
accepted at the same meeting. Mr. 
Tucker has taken a deep inte 'est in 
all (lie affairs of his alma inater since 
grfidualion and is a valuable addition 
tc the Athletic Board. 



* * 

* FOOTBALL TOMORROW. * 

* * 

* U. S. Army (Fort D. A. Rus- * 

* sell) vs. Colorado College. * 

* * 

* Washburn Field. * 

* * 

* Your ticket is good. * 



SOPHOMORE 

BARBECUE 



To Be Brilliant Occasion, With Real 
Barbecued Meat. 



Manager Hamilron of ihc sophomore 
barbecue is full of plans for the "best 
ever." He says that Washburn field 
will be lirilliantly lighted on Hallowe'en 
an.d genuine barbecued meat will l:e 
served. A decoration committee is 
working on things ornate that will make 
the old grandstand look more attractive 
than anv local theatre. Stdl speaking m 
superlatives, the sophomores intend to 
present the college with a program that 
will make whole states of New England 
woodland aslnamed of themselves. 
Chestnut .gatherers will be allowed to 
carr\ away but one bagful of spoils per 
man. .A homely tone will be restored to 
the festivities by the banging of good 
old-fashioned tin cups. As to the late 
prank of an unknown incendiary, the 
manager says one match can do $20 
worth of damage, but it can't stop the 
sophomore class. They will build a bon- 
fire that will warrant their boasting and 
shouting claimo along with the upper 
classmen. If you want to contribute 50 
cents toward the fun, the manager will 
be glad to give you a valuable receipt iri 
return. 



PLANS ARE 

ADOPTED 



STUDENT COMMISSION MEETS 
AND PROVIDES FOR RAIS- 
ING THE EWING FUND. 



Other Business — Soliciting of Ads 
Restricted — Auditing Committee to 
Watch Barbecue Accounts — Report 
of Committee on Associated Stu- 
dent Fees. 



According to the vote of the Stu- 
dent Commission at its regular bi- 
weekly meeting Wednesday' after- 
ncjon, a special chapel meeting will be 
held (.)n Thursday, November 4, for 
the purpose of raising the Ewing sub- 
scription for 1909-1910. It will be 
necessary to raise but $500 this year, 
which, it is said, is the amount always 
raised by the college for foreign mis- 
sions pre^■i(nls to undertaking the sup- 
port of a missionary of our own. A 
large committee of forty has been ap- 
pointed by the commission to solicit 
subscriptions and, smalle.' collection 
and auditing committees are ready to 
go to work. The complete plans for 
the campaign, as submitted by W. 
Gray Harnmn of the missionar}- com- 

Continucd on Page 5. 



SOPH WOODPILE BURNED. 

The 1912 wocidpile was burned to 
the ground last Tuesday night or ear- 
ly Wednesday morning. Only a few 
boxes and barrels were saved. The 
sophomores went to work immedi- 
ately to repair their loss, and Hal- 
lowe'en will not be without its mon- 
strous biinfire. The man wlio de- 
serves the ducking has not been 
caught. 



THE TIGER 



LIBERTY AND SENSE OF RE- 
SPONSIBILITY. 



President Slocum Continues Series of 
Chapel Talks. 



Chapel, Oct. 15. This is the sec- 
ond of a series of talks which Presi- 
dent Slocum is giving in chapel every 
Friday. On Oct. 8, he spoke on 
"Competition and Co-operation." 
Last week his subject was "Liberty 
and Responsibility." 

"j.iberty is a word that has been 
I'std for many years. A great deal 
of history clusters about it. Liberty 
is the right to do what is right. There 
is u ditle.'ence between liberty and 
license. People say that they have the 
right to do anything. They have not. 
Hang this up on the walls of your 
conscience, I know of those who are 
wronging themselves, wronging the 
comnnmity, and wronging those about 
them. You have no right to wrong 
anyone. 

"Having this as a fundamental 
principle, we can go on to see some- 
thing of responsibility. I want to 
help you interpret that word. (])ne 
sees our campus and admires it. An- 
other cares nothing for it, and walks 
across it. One has a sense of respon- 
sibility, the other has no such feeling. 
One says, T am responsible for the 
life of the college.' Another says, T 
don't care about the life of the col- 
lege. I am going in for "math." ' 
People will say, 'He lives for himself. 
He doesn't count in his community. 
He doesn't count for good.' One 
makes the nation better, the other has 
to be carried along, 

"When I come to discu.^s this with 
yon I have to ask which is your 
choice? .'Vre you going to be a citi- 
zen in God's world? 

"One man is willing to give himself 
for his nation to make his country 
better. If you define your liberty in 
this way. you take a noble attitude, 
but if you are trying to get out of 
your country all that you can just for 
yourself, you are mean and narrow. 

"Apply this to college life. You say 
'How can I define my service for the 
college?' In the first place, consider 
the college as a whole . Get into the 
life where you may make mistake's, 
but don't make them. There is little 
excuse for mistakes. Consider your 
personal habits as_ you go about the 
campus. Ask yourself if you are 
doing your best for the college as a 
whole. 

"You can do this and have your 



good limes. I want to see you have 
your liberty. It is the best thing that 
can come to you in all the world, but 
don't misuse it." 



THE POLYTECHNIC SOCIETY 
MEETS. 



GLEE CLUB. 



Rehearsals Fixed — Haywrard Vice- 
President — Siddons and Hille 
Managers. 



At the rehearsal Tuesday evening 
the Glee Club set the regular practice 
hours, 8:30 Monday night, 8 o'clock 
Tuesday night, and 6:45 Thursday 
evening. Baker, an academy student, 
(jualified for the first tenor position 
that was open: 6 applicants are still 
being ctjnsidered for the remaining 
berth with the second tenors. Hay- 
ward '11 was elected vice-p."esident to 
fill the position left vacant by Stanch- 
field. Siddons and Hille will manage 
the club. 



FANCY DRESS BALL. 

Last Friday night Contemporary 
gave their annual fancy dress ball for 
new girls in McGregor Gym. The 
decorations were in red and white. 
Tlie programs were also in the colors 
of the club. During intermission 
Contemporary ice was served. 



JUNIOR OPERETTA. 



191 1 Selects Comic Light Opera for 
Presentation This Year. 



The junior class has decided to pre- 
sent "Princess Bonnie" sometime during 
the present semester. A committee con- 
sisting of Miss Shuler, chairman ; Miss 
Frantz, Miss Drew, Miss Pike, Hill, 
Fowler, Copeland, VVoodard and Van 
Dyke, has been considering the matter, 
and after their report at a class meeting 
Wednesday noon, the operetta was de- 
cided upon. The music is catchy, but 
not difficult. There are twelve principal 
parts — eight for men and four for wo- 
men — besides several minor parts and a 
chorus. 

Miss Evl3n Shuler, who has taken part 
in the presentation of "Princess Bonnie." 
has been secured to do the coaching. 
The class is very fortunate in getting her 
assistance. 

Announcement of the cast will be made 
in the next issue of The Tiger. The 
date for the operetta has not been de- 
cided upon as yet, but it will be some 
time before the Xmas holidays. The 
place will be Perkins Hall. 

Miss Brown and the Faculty heartily 
endorse the plans of the class. 



Last Saturday evening the Pike's 
Peak Polytechnic Society met for the 
first time this year. The meeting 
was informal and no regular program 
was rendered. The policy of the so- 
ciety for the ensuing year was briefly 
outlined. Speakers will, be secu;e,l 
to deliver addresses on the following 
topics: 

.Aerial Navigation, Glass Manufac- 
ture, Irrigation and Dry Farming, 
.Automobile Industry, The Gunnison 
Tunnel, The Weather Bureau, Treat- 
ment of Low Grade Ores, Electrical 
Short Transmission Lines, The Prog 
less of Hydro Electric Development 
in Colorado. 

Besides the above named topics 
se\'eral others will be added to the 
lists at a later date. 

After the announcements, dainty 
refreshments Vi'ere served and every- 
body thoroughly enjoyed himself. 
Those who failed to be present miss- 
ed a rare t eat, which is always the 
case at every meeting. 

A special invitation was given to 
the engineering students of the col- 
lege who by virtue of their classifi- 
cation a:e associate members of the 
society. 

Notices of each meeting will be 
posted on the bulletin boards in 
Palmer Hall and Coburn Library and 
also in the columns of The Tiger. 
Watch for these notices and plan to 
be at everv ineeting. 



THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF 

MINING ENGINEERS MEETS 

IN PUEBLO. 



Last Monday the American Insti- 
tute of Mining Engineers en route to 
Chicago from Spokane, Washington, 
stopped over in Denver and took a 
trip to Pueblo, where a meeting of 
the institute was held. 

Prof. C. T. Griswold of the depart- 
ment of mining and metallurgy, at- 
tended the meeting of this society, of 
wdiich he is a member. The meeting 
was short and was given over mostly 
to general business. While there the 
society visited the Minnequa Iron 
Works, the U. S. Zinc Plant, and the 
smelters of the American Smelting 
and Refining Company. 

The engineers left at seven o'clock 
Monday evening in their special train 
for Chicago. 



THE TIGER 



FORESTERS' TRIP. 



Seniors Leave Monday for Arapahoe 
National Forest. 



MIDVALE STEEL CO. REPRE- 
SENTATIVE VISITS 
COLLEGE. 



NEW EQUIPMENT. 



The senior class, in cha"ge of Pro- 
fessor Coolidge, leaves Monday over 
the Mofifat Road for the Arapahoe 
Natural Forest. Extensive lumbering 
operations are being conducted on 
this reserve, and fcestry is being 
practiced on a hirger scale than in any 
cither part of the state. The seniors 
will spend a week or ten days in the 
study of logging operations, sawmill- 
ing and methods employed by the 
forest service in silviculture and con- 
servative lumbering. 

A very complete report illustrated 
by photographs will be prepared by 
each man. This report will be type- 
written, bound and p esented to the 
Forest School as part of the reference 
library. As there reports accumulate 
they will make valuable references 
for future courses in lumbering. The 
reports will describe the fo."est types 
in which lumbering is being conduct- 
ed; they will give the cost of every 
detail in logging operations, construc- 
tion of camps, character of commis- 
sary, etc. They will describe meth- 
ods of logging, road building and will 
record all data pertaining to a large 
logging outfit. 

Trips of this sort will be made an- 
nually from now on by the senior 
class. The reports take the place of 
a thesis and form a valuable addition 
to the library besides. 



RECITAL AT BEMIS HALL. 

The Colorado Springs Musical 
club has issued invitations for a re- 
cital and reception this evening at 
Bemis hall. The program will be 
presented by ]\fr. Wilhelm Heinrich, 
of Boston. 



PERMANENT OFFICERS. 

The freshman class met after chapel 
Monday and elected the following 
officers for the year: 

President, Lloyd Shaw, of Colorado 
Springs. 

Vice-President, Arthur Moody, of 
Ontario, Oregon. 

Secretary, Ma-tha Phillips, of T^a 
Junta. 

Treasurer, Dwight Sisco, of Colo 
rado Springs. 

The class broke a precedent by 
electing a man vice-president. 



Last week we were fortunate in 
having Mr. F. S. Reinhold, a repre- 
sentative of the Midvale Steel Co. of 
Philadelphia visit the college. Mr. 
Reinhnld is the steel company's rep- 
resentative in Colorado, and has his 
office in the McPhee 'auilding in Den- 
ver. He was well impressed with our 
situation, our equipment and the ex- 
cellent facilities that we have for test- 
ing all kinds tif construction mate- 
rials. As the result of his visit he has 
promised to send us samples of the 
Midvale Steel Company's products, 
with literatu e describing the same. 

TRIP OF INSPECTION. 



Professors Morril and Coolidge and 
a party of the foresters made a trip 
of inspection Saturday to the new ex- 
perimental station established by the 
forest service above the Half-Way 
House. The men derive much bene- 
fit from these excursions, and it is 
hoped that they can be made a reg- 
ular weekly occurrence. 

Both Professors Morril and Cool- 
idge are former Government men and 
are well acquainted with the Pike 
Forest and the vegetation of the 
Pikes' Peak region. If the new men 
want to learn tree identification in a 
pleasant and practical way, they 
should ta'<e advantage of all these 
trips and make the most of the op- 
portunity. All the men who do take 
these tramps and become acquainted 
with the Hora of this region will find 
their dendrology work in the sopho- 
more year much easier to handle. 



DR. BAYLEY SPEAKS. 



In Dr. Bayley's address befo e the 
Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion last Friday evening, he compared 
our lives to planets. He pointed out 
the folly of anyone thinking that she 
is the solar planet about which all 
other planets revolve. An early life 
with self as first thought, he said, 
would lead to an inevitably sad old 
age. 



NEAD APPOINTED. 



Walter Nead '05 has been appointed 
alumni member of the Tiger Board of 
Control. Nead is an instructor in the 
local high school. He fills the place left 
vacant by Donald Tucker, resigned. 



Prof. Collais Adding More Machin- 
ery to His Department. 



There has reecntlj- Ijcen installed 
in the mechanical laboratories (jf the 
engineering school a new metal 
planing machine. It was made by 
G. A. Gray & Co., of Cincinnati, 
Ohio. It's dimensions are 24 inches 
by 24 inches by 6 feet, which means 
that it will plane a piece of metal 
that large or of any dimensions small- 
er than that. The machine is fitted 
with uni\'ersal clnic< for holding 
small materials, dmible cutting beads 
on the cross rail, automatic feed, is 
self-oiling, and will wurk cither single 
or gang tool. 

Another handy little convenience 
that has been added to the equipment 
in the mechanical department is a 
one-fourth horse-power electric emery 
wheel. The operator merely throws 
in a little switch and. 'electricity does 
the rest. It is particularly useful 
because it can be attached to any of 
the larger machines, the electric con- 
nection being made by means of the 
light socket. In this way it may be 
used to do the fine finishing grinding 
on large pieces of work which could 
n(.t otherwise be done nearly so ac- 
curately. 



CANDY PARTIES. 

In order that the girls might realize 
that the Christian Associatirm has a 
social side, candy parties were given 
last Saturday evening, in which all 
hall girls we e invited to participate. 
During the process of making and 
eating the candJ^ an opportunity was 
given to become better acquainted. 
Afterwards, the girls in McGregor 
collected in the parlor and sang col- 
lege songs until ten o'clock, when 
everyone departed with a kindly feel- 
ing toward everyone else and espe- 
cially toward the association. 



FRESHMAN COLORS. 



"Cjre-Mi and gold. I guess that's good." 
.So said the first man ouc. The freshmen 
have solved their first weighty problem. 
At an after-chapel meeting Thursday 
thev discussed every color ever discussed 
by a class and adopted the ones usually 
turned down. At the same meeting they 
anthorir^eil the appointment of a com- 
mittee to arrange for Sunday evening 
prayer meetings. 



THE TIGER 



BERT SAYS 



Tomorrow's Game Will Ee a Hummer — Boulder's Methods are Not Nice — Last Saturday's Games Were a Sur- 
prise — Interest Centers in Four Big Ones Tomorrow — What's Left of a Crippled Squad is Hard as Nails. 



Since arrangements have been com- 
pleted for the Tiger-Ft. Rvissell game, 
we have gradually come to a realiza- 
tion (if the fact that instead of being 
an ordinary practice game, the battle 
tomorrow will probably be as fie ce 
as any of the season. 

Th.e army team averages i8o pounds 
and is composed largely of old east- 
ern football stars, and while lacking 
in the finished polish of team work, 
will easily make up for the deficiency 
in weight and individu^d playing. 

The army team has not lined up 
against any other team so far this 
year, so no relative comparisons can 
be drawn; \\c a"e, nevertheless, lrio'<- 
ing for a game that none can afford 
to miss. 

We certainly do mo^t heartih' dis- 
approve of some of the methods used 
at Boulder ai:parently to take their 
spite out on Denx'cr University. It is 
authentically reported that some of 
the officials in athletics at Colorado 
U^niversity ha^'e been communicating 
with officials and the faculty at Wash- 
burn College, also with, Nebraska, en- 
deavoring to get these institutions to 
call off thei- games with D. U., on 
the grounds that the Methodists are 
a buncli of rank i-ingers, etc.. etc. 

While wc do not believe that the 
team representing Denver University 
is above reproach, we cannot endorse 
such methods of eliminating the evil. 

No end of expense and sacrifice 
ha\e been marie this year for the pur- 
]")o3e of getting athletics under a uni- 
form conference. Such tactics as 
th.ese cetainly will not hasten that 
end. 

Last Saturday's games in the state 
were a cause for considerable surprise 
to the close followers of football. 

The Aggies with a \ ery light team 
and three weeks' practice, went out 
on Durkee Field and ran up a score 
against Laramie that compares very 
favorably with D. U.'s showing 
against the same team two weeks 
ago. 

The Methodists too's Washburn 
into camp by a surp-isingly uneven 
score and the unbelieving public (out- 
side of Denver) were forced to admit 
that the Ministers have a lovely 
chance to repeat their performances 
of last year. 



Tomorrow Colorado will be the 
scene of four big football games, the 
results of which are watched for with 
eager inte est. 

The one of most interest to us is 
the Aggie-Colorado U. game. We 
meet both of these teams in the ve.y 
near future and it will be quite a re- 
lief to get some tangible dope on 
these people; while all concede that 
Boulder will win, we cannot say for 
sure. Rothgeb's bunch are not to be 
despised and with luck breaking their 
waj% they may blast the hopes of 
Folsom's pets. 

The University of LUah meets the 
School of Mines in Denver in a game 
which, according to dope, will be won 
by Utah. This is the only time Colo- 
rado will see the Maddox tribe in ac- 
tion; it is also the first appearance 
of tl.e -Miners . under their new coach, 
Curtis. 

While the Miners and Alonnons 
battle at Union Park, the Ministers 
will he "up against it" at University 
Park. South Dakota has an unusually 
strong team this year, having suc- 
ceeded in holding King Cole's Corn 
Huskers to a o-o score two weeks 
ago. The results of this game will • 
therefore give ns a fairly good com- 
parison of Colorado football with 
that of the Middle West. 

The squad has met with several ac- 
cidents this wee-: and will be in a 
somewhat c ippled condition when 
they line up against Ft. Russell to- 
morrow. 

Sherry has a badly bruised shoulder 
that will keep him out of practice foi 
several nights. Thompson reinjured 
his hip last week and it is very doubt 
ful whether he will play tomorrow. 
"Shorty" Steele has a very badly 
wrenched back. 

Richards has not let up a minute 
on the rough work ; in spite of sev- 
eral men being laid up, there is scrim- 
mage every night, and if the Tigers 
show lack of speed and wind tomor- 
row, it is not his fault. 

Putnam has been running the team 
all week and will start tomorrow's 
game, while Roe or Hedblom will be 
at Thompson's guard position in case 
"Tommy" cannot go in. 

Whittaker is back on the squad, 



pleasing the coaches with his dashing 
playing. 



PLANS ADOPTED 

Coniinued from Pa£e 1. 

mittee of the Y. M. C. A. and adopted 
by the commission follow: 

Art. I. — Meihods of Solicitation of 
Subscriptions. 

Section i. On one day the chapel 
hour shall be given over to the pres- 
entation of the Ewing budget and a 
call for subscriptions. 

Sec. 2. At the chapel presentation 
;i representative of the Student Com- 
mission shall recommend the support 
of Ewing to the student body. 

Sec. 3. The commission shall ap- 
point a committee of forty to make 
a personal canvass for subscriptions. 

a. This committee shall make a pre- 
liminary canvass for subscriptions 
during the week preceding the chapel 
meeting at which the money is raised. 

b. It shall be the work of this com- 
mittee to provide for the passing of 
subscription cards at the chapel, and 
to complete the canvass for subscrip- 
tions after chapel and see that they 
a e turned over to the collection com- 
mittee. 

c. This committee shall meet Sun- 
day afternoon, October 31, at Ticknor 
Study at three o'clock. 

Art. 2. — Methods of Advertising. 

Section i. The two missionary com- 
mittees shall be authorized to provide 
wb.alever advertising is deemed nec- 
essar}^ ■ 

Sec. 2. The expense of this adver- 
tising shall be paid from the Ewing 
fund. 

Art. 3. — Methods of CollecUon and 
Keeping of Accounts. 

Section i. The system of weekly 
collections shall be discontinued. 

Sec. 2. A system of subscription 
cards and collection methods similar 
to thc>se employed by the Young 
Men's Christian .Association, is rec- 
ommended. 

Sec. 3. The commission shall ap- 
point a treasurer of the funds who 
shall recei\e moneys collected and 
l.i~ep accounts of same. 

Sec. 4. A committee of eleven 
members shall be appointed to make 
collections. This committee shall 
consist of five men students, five wo- 



THE TIGER 



5 



men students and one facilty mem- 
ber. 

Art. 4. — Arrangements for Keeping 
and Disposition of Funds. 

Section i. Tlte commission shall 
appoint a finance committee of five 
members, to have control of arrange- 
ments for the keeping and disposition 
of the funds. This committee shall 
consist of the treasurer of the Ewing 
funds, one faculty member and three 
students. 

Art. 5. — Program. 

Section i. The chapel program at 
which the budget is presented shall 1;e 
as follows: 

Presentation by a representative of 
the commission. 

Presentation bj^ Dr. E. C. Schneid- 
er. 

Presentation by Dean Cajori. 

Art. 6. — Date of Chapel Presentation. 

Section i. The Ewing budget shall 
be presented at chapel, Thursday, No- 
vember 4th. 

Art. 7. — Amount to Be Raised. 

Section i. In view of the fact that 
Ewing will sail half a year later than 
originally planned, it is recommended 
that the amount to be raised this year 
be $500. 

(The above amount will stand it 
ratified by the various interests in- 
volved. No change will be consid- 
ered without the approval of the 
commission.) 

The commission authorized President 
McOuat to appoint the committees pro- 
vided for, and he has them under advise- 
ment. 



Managers and Advertisers. 



For the protection of both managers 
and advertisers the commission rided that 
no ads should be solicited in Colorado 
Springs by students except for the four 
standard student publications, The Tiger, 
Tiie Kinnikinnik, The Nugget and the 
handbook. This ruling was passed to 
prevent the bothering of business men 
with calls for advertising in score cards, 
etc. This, of course, has nothing to do 
with a student's beeing connected with a 
publication outside the college. 



Barbecue Auditing Committee. 



The commission provided for the ap- 
pointment of a committee of three, whose 
duty it shall be to audit the accounts of 
the manager of the barbecue and see 
that a just sum is spent for the delecta- 
tion of the college. In another year it 



is likely that tlie connnission will rule 
against the tendency which has grown 
in past years of making the barbecue a 
money-making show by means of which 
the general public is urged to contribute 
to the treasury of a class. 1 he senti- 
ment of the commission is that the bar- 
becue should get back to a more strictly 
collegt-and-its-friends affair. 



Season Ticke.s. 



The connuittee recently appointed to go 
over the accounts of the Associated 
Students in the treasurer's office, re- 
ported to the commission as follows : 

Tour hundred and two tickets have 
been sold, but 15 of these were bought 
l<y academy students, and their money 
will be refunded. '1 his leaves 387 sold 
to college students, the moneys from 
which amount to $1,354.54. Eighty-five 
])er cent, of this, $1,151.32, belongs to the 
Athletic Association ; of the remaining 
15 per cent., 60 per cent., amounting to 
$121.91, goes into a general fund at the 
disposal of the commission and 40 per 
cent., amounting to $81.27, goes to the 
oratorical fund. These amounts are for 
the first semester. It is thought that 
they will be raised considerably within 
the next month by the efforts of the 
committee, which will endeavor to ascer- 
tain why everyone in college does not 
join the Associated Students. The fees 
will amount to practically the same in 
the second semester. 

NEW DRAMATIC FARCE. 

"The Bow of O ange Ribbon" is 
the next farce to be presented by the 
Dramatic club. The farce was drama- 
tized by the Misses Barkley from the 
novel of the same name by Amelia 
Barr. The cast is as follows: 

Kath.erine Lucy Ferrill 

Hyde Janet Kampf 

Goris Grace Cunningham 

Nell Lillian Duer 

Semple Leona Thacher 

Lysbeth Florence Humph ;eys 



THE EUCALYPTUS. 



Professor Gulliver Talks Before For- 
esters' Club. 



At the last meeting of the Forest- 
ers' Club a very interesting and in- 
structive talk was given by Profes- 
sor Gullive.- of St. Marks, f)n the 
Eucalyptus. Prof. Gulliver is doing 
lesearch work for the government 
and has just finished an exhaustive 



study cjf the eucalyptus in, California. 
The future of the eucalyptus in this 
country is very bright and the tree 
promises to be a great aid to the for- 
ester in the reforesting of cut-over 
lands in the south. It is a rapiu 
growing tree and the wood is very 
hard and durable. It is especially 
suited for marine w<jrk and interior 
finishing. 



DR. CAJORI PUBLISHES PAPER. 
Slide Rules with Runners. 

Since the going to press of D:. 
Florian Cajon's new book, "The His- 
tory of the Logarithmic Slide Rule 
and Allied Instruments," a paper has 
been published under the heading 
"Slide Rules witii Runners." 

The paper points out that the first 
suggestion of the use of the runner 
was made in the seventeenth century, 
according to English writers, instead 
of the eighteenth century, as de- 
scribed by German writers. To Sir 
Isaac Newton is given the honor of 
having st)lved numerical equations by 
a slide rule of special desTgn, which 
embodied the use of a runner, as is 
shown in a letter of Oldenberg to Lei- 
buitz dated June 24, 1675. 

The device did not meet with pop- 
ular approval until along in the first 
half of the nineteenth century, and on 
this account it came to be forgotten 
in England. 

It is undoubtedly true that Mann- 
heim was the first designer of the 
slide rule with a runner attachment, 
and his instrument has become widely 
used in both Europe and America, 
but it is also to be noted that he was 
anticipated in the invention of the 
rr.nner by the English. 



A NEW GRAND STAND. 



At last we see signs that the football 
season is not going to pass over us with- 
out our having a chance to gather on 
Washburn field under floating banners 
and amid songs, yells and various vocal 
products bursting from scores of mega- 
phones. We are going to see a game 
and some of us are going to sit in a new 
grand stand. 

This grand stand is built just north 
of the one on the east side of the field. 
It will seat 440 people very comfortably. 
1 he management of athletics expects to 
see big crowds fill all these grand 
stands soon. 



THE TIGER 



The Weekly Newspaper of Colorado College 



GLENN W. SHAW Editor-in-Chief 

HARKY W. McOUAT Business Manager 

S. W. Dean Assistant Edilor 

C. DON'ELAN Assistant Editor 

H. H. Haight Assistant Editor 

L. E. Griswold Engineering Editor 

B. P. SIDDONS Athletic Editor 

H. F. Rice Forestry Editor 

Julia Ingersoll Alumni Editor 

Helen Canon Exchange Editor 

Janet Kampf Local Edilor 

W, L. VVarnOCK Local Editor 

A. E. Bryson Assistant Manager 

E. W.HiLLE Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

Geneva McCaw, T. M. Cetligrcw, Edith Sommers, F. B. 

Copeland, Margaret Watson, E S Statten, 

Katharine True, D. L Sisco 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to THE TIGER. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 
College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

i-ii^^^Smx^i H Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
'"'^^S*^' Springs, Colo., as second-class matter. 

Subicriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



MANAGERIAL JOY. 

Four managers at least are happy, 
riiat is a good many, when you come to 
think about it. The manager of a col- 
lege publication has a pretty hard job 
at best, and at worst, when business 
men are being forever pestered by ad 
getters for score cards and other odds 
and ends, he begins to wish that he were 
an editor, which, by the way, is an ex- 
treme wish. But the student commission 
has considered the complaints of our 
managers and has earned their undying 
gratitude by forbidding the soliciting of 
ads for any student publication other 
than The Tiger, The Kinnikinnik, The 
Nugget and the handbook. When some 
one of us impecunious ones starts out 
to find a few odd bits of specie to take 
us to a banquet, we will remember that 
football programs used to make as much 
as live or six dollars in good seasons, 
and we will probably grunt a little selfish 
grunt, of course strictly to ourselves. We 
will not howl to the winds about it, be- 
cause we will know that the best inter- 
ests of the college are being served. But 
no one will dare deny us the privilege of 
talking to ourselves mutely in our own 
rooms, and we mean to do it. 

WOODPILE REFLECTIONS. 

Somebody burned the sophomore 
woodpile last week and somebc'dy 
probably is not ashamed of himself 
as he should be. Whoever he is, the 
incendiary probably feels that he did 



something very clever and bold. In 
reality he played a trick very asinine 
and cowardly. He probably ran so 
fast and so far after he had touched 
the pile off that he had no opportun- 
ity to play Nero over his fire. The 
only excuse we can think of for him 
is his age. Surely he was a small boy 
with .Ml inordinate desire to do some- 
thing as brave and manly as Jimmy 
in the next block ever did. We can- 
not believe it was a freshman. If 
we could believe a freshman guilty, 
we should splatter this pot of reviling 
ink all over the page, and then hasten 
out to join the ducking bee. In our 
present belief, the best we can do is 
to end with the only p actical sug- 
gestion that comes to mind. Barbe- 
cue managers used to consider it a 
saving of time to handle their wood 
twice; they would store the batting 
cage full during October, and the 
night before the barbecue, the whole 
force would get out and build ana 
live on Washburn until the legitimate 
lighting of an intact bonfire. 

ADVICE TO DELINQUENTS. 

Are you a member of the Associ- 
ated Students of Colorado College? 
If not, have you a good excuse for 
your eccentricity? The books of the 
t easurer arc being pored over care- 
fully by a committee whose 'next work 
it will be to hunt up delinquents and 
put to them the above questions. 
Good excuses are good anywhere; 
poor excuses will not heap abuses on 
their giver's heads, but they will bring 
down a flood of argument such as 
said late ones never heard. Every 
committeeman is loaded, and we 
would advise those who never intend 
paying tlieir fees to get to work on 
their excuses tonight. 

A BUSY WEEK. 

Next week will be a busy week 
at Colorado College. Harry Ewing 
will arrive in Colorado Springs to- 
morrow afternoon and will put in one 
solid week talking. On Sunday at 
6:30 he will lead a union prayer meet- 
ing of all the classes in Bemis Com- 
mon; on Monday he will speak at 
chapel; on Wednesday he will address 
an open meeting of the Student Vol- 
unteer Band in Montgomery parlor 
at 5, and at 7:30 he will organize the 
South American Study group at 
Bemis; on Friday he will speak at 
the regular Y. M. C. A. meeting. 

Hereafter Cutler Academy will be 
gi\en a column in each week's Tige". 



A SONG EACH WEEK 

LEARN IT. 

The* Black and the Gold. 

(Words by A. T. French. Music by 
E. W. Hille.) 

The whistle blows; the Tiger knows 

at last the game is on! 
How cool he is with all of his two 

hundred pounds of brawn! 
The kick-off's done, the game's begun. 

Go, Tigers to the fray — 
To you must be the victo-y! There 

is no other way: 
The chance is small, the line they call 

so strong can ever hold, 
h'or college men a e Tigers when they 

wear the Black and Gold. 

Chorus — 

The Black and the Gold! The 

Black and the Gold! 
Defenders of the colors that we 

wear — 
Beneath them to fight, boys, from 

morning till night, boys, 
They're floating on high in the 

air! — 
If foes e'er assail j'ou, you never 

shall fail to 
Defend them like warriors of old, 
And we're right behind you, 

wherever we find you 
Under the Black and the Gold. 

The pitclier winds, and thus he finds 

the curves he hopes to throw 
Across the plate. He learns too late 

some things he didn't know! 
For Tigers hit right through his mit, 

down to the Monument! 
Home plate you've crossed; the ball 

is lost, but you know where it 

went: 
For Tigers play their winning way 

with all of them enrolled 
Upon the sheet where no defeat 

comes to the Black and Gold. 
Chorus. 

The pistol cra.cks, the cinder tracks 

stretch out before you now. 
Go, Tigers, true; it's up to you to 

show the others Iiow! 
The discus throw to us must go. 

Don't let them get a thing. 
Get ev'rj' place: in ev'ry race a Tiger 

breasts tlie string: 
You've got the "schpeed"; that's 

what you need; the half was 

never told 
Of what you've gained or h<")vv you've 

trained to wear the Black and 

Gold! 



THE TIGER 



EDWARD R. WARREN AP- 
POINTED DIRECTOR OF 
MUSEUM. 



Mr. Edward R. Warren has been 
appointed di/ector of the museum of 
Colorado College and will enter im- 
mediatel)' upon the dunes of his new 
position. 

He is a son of the late Dr. R. S. 
Warren, a leading physician of Mas- 
sachusetts, and has been a resident 
of Colorado Springs for many years. 

Mr. Warren was a student at Colo- 
rado College in its early history, and 
at another time attended the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology. 

He has already iende;ed valuable 
service in the museum. His article in 
the "Colorado College Publication" 
upon "The Mammals of Colorado" 
has attracted much attention, and he 
has a book in press upon the same 
subject. 



HERBARIUM PRESENTED TO 
THE COLLEGE. 



Mrs. A. E. Touzalin has recently 
presented to the department of biol- 
ogy an herbarium of about 600 speci- 
mens of California flowering plants. 
The specimens are preserved unusu- 
ally well. This gift will fill some im- 
portant gaps in the college herbarium, 
which now numbers about 23,000 spe- 
cies and varieties. The larger part of 
the present collection is the Edward 
Tatnall herbarium, presented to the 
college by Miss W. H. Tatnall, of El- 
mira, N. Y. The plant life of 24 
states will now be well represented in 
the herbarium. 



SENIOR PRAYER MEETINGS. 



The seniors have decided neither 
for nor against prayer meetings. In 
the history of the class, unsuccessful 
eflorts at holding Sunday meetings 
have turned many members against 
them. They say a thing worth doing 
is worth doing well., and what has 
npver been done well is probably not 
worth doing. An artificial inte/est is 
of no value. While no definite vote 
has been taken against class prayer 
meetings, it is likely that 1910 will 
not attempt to hold them this year. 



AN OPPORTUNITY. 

Course in Psychology Open to Any- 
one. 

Commenting on the unsettled condi- 
tion of religious thought, one of the local 
papers spoke as though it was due to a 
lack of undestanding the laws of psy- 
chology. If people understood better the 
phenomena in this science, much of the 
superstitious mysticism in religion would 
he eliminated. 

.\ course in genetic psychology is 
being offered in Colorado College for 
teachers, meeting on Tuesday and Thurs- 
day afternoons, and one in general psy- 
chology for the public on Saturdays. The 
latter course is for beginners and is es- 
pecially \alual)le to those who have no 
training in this line and who would for- 
tify themselves against the errors which 
have crept into modern thought. 



BIBLE STUDY HAS BEGUN. 

Dean Parsons is holding a Bible 
study class in the "Parables of 
Jesus" every Tuesday evening at 7 
o'clock m the Common room at 
Bemis. He is combining his lecture 
with general discussion. The attend- 
ance so far has been good and it is 
hoped that many girls will continue 
to come. 



PROFESSOR LYON ATTENDS 
CONFERENCE. 

Professor Lyon of th.e Civil Engin- 
eering Department attended a confer- 
ence of the American Street and In- 
teruiban Railway Association which 
met recently in Denver. While there 
he was promised a numbei" of framed 
photographs that show several new 
and interesting features in municipal 
railwav construction. 



The Phi Gamma Delta fraternity 
kept open house for its friends Wed- 
nesday afternoon and evening. Mu- 
sic, ice cream and joy filled hundreds. 



TABLET UNVEILED 

Continued from Page 1. 

the 473 survivors of the ca\-alry ho(l_\- 
Ijresenting the tablet. 

The college hymn, "Oh, God, our help 
in ages past," and America were sung 
by the whole audience. Major Henry 
McAllister delivered the speech of pre- 
sentation, President William F. Slocum 
accepted the memorial for the college 
and Dean Parsons pronounced the bene- 
diction. 

Major McAllister's words follow : 
I am sure that upon none save the im- 
mediate members of his family, did the 
death of General Wm. J. Palmer fall 



with a greater weight of sorrow than 
upon his old comrades in arms of the 
Fifteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry. 

Each one of its surviving members 
felt that he had sustained a severe per- 
sonal bereavement. Each of them felt 
that the strongest link in the great chain 
of eternal order that connected him with 
a memorable and glorious past had been 
broken ; each was brought anew face to 
face with a realizing sense of the sterr 
certainty that in a few, a very few. 
years all those who took an active part 
in the work of those tremendous days 
of 1881-65 when a man could Hve a life 
time every twenty-four hours, will see 
the last of earth. 

1 he memijcrs of General Palmer's reg- 
mient never looked upon the General m 
the liglit in which he was viewed by 
those whose acquaintance with him orig- 
inated after the war. They did not 
think of him as the capitalist, the great 
man of business, the philanthropist, do 
them he was still tiieir dashing and 
gallant colonel. Ihey pictured him in 
their minds during the past forty odd 
years as they saw him during the war 
at the head of their regiment, rushing 
along with unexampled celerity over the 
mountains, across the rivers, and through 
the corn and cotton fields of ten great 
states. 

Owing to Gen. Palmer's prominence 
as a young man m Pennsylvania, when 
the war broke out, his high standing as 
an attache of the Pennsylvania railroad, 
and the private secretary of its president, 
he attracted to his comamnd a body of 
young men who more nearly resembled 
the Cavaliers who were led by Prince 
Rupert than the praying, psalm-singing 
roundheads who followed Cromwell. 
1 hey were as a rule very young men. 
They came largely from mercantile es- 
tablishments, some were the sons of 
farmers, whilst a large number left the 
schools, colleges and universities of 
Pennsylvania to join the regiment. 

These young men had probably felt 
fewer of the restraints of civil life than 
most young men of that period. They 
were spoiled boys, as it were. 

To rit them to the Procrustean bed of 
a military life was therefore no easy 
task. They naturally at first resented 
strict camp regulations and the disci- 
pline imposed upon them as unnecessary. 
They had joined the army to fight, and 
not unceasingly to drill and parade and 
to perform guard and fatigue duty. To 
meet such a condition no man was e\'er 
better equipped than General Palmer. 
.V natural dignity of character and man- 
ner ; unyielding firmness without a trace 
of truculence ; the exaction of implicit 



8 



THE TIGER 



obedience to every order; justice ad- 
ministered with unusual judgment, with 
absolute disregard of rank in the regi- 
ment or previous station in civil lite ; 
blindness to such youthful and harmless 
peccadillos as did not impinge upon mili- 
tary efhciency, soon brought about the 
most perfect order and discipline m 
camp, in the held nothing was needed 
but a leader, and they had in General 
Palmer such a leader as few cavalry 
regiments ever had. 

A soldier fears timid and. incompetent 
leadership, a costly and stupid blunder 
such as directed the charge of the six 
hundred at Balaklava. 

General Palmer's conduct as a soldier 
was marked by a prudent temerity. He 
believed and always acted upon the be- 
lief that a vigorous, unhesitating attack 
was conducive to the safety of his com- 
mand. Many times his prisoners were 
surprised and mortified to find that they 
had been captured and their forces scat- 
tered by a body of men perhaps a third 
of theirs in number. 

General Palmer once parried a ques- 
tion touching the strength of his com- 
mand put to him by a prominent con- 
federate general who had been captured 
together with nearly the whole of his 
command, giving as a reason that his 
prisoner's feelings might be hurt at 
learning that his captor's numbers were 
insignihcant as compared with his and 
that it might discredit him in southern 
military circles. 

Despite General Palmer's splendid 
record as a soldier in the Civil war he 
was essentially a man of peace. He be- 
lieved that war was a fragment of sav- 
agery inherited from remote ages. He 
told me in Philadelphia in 1862, and re- 
peated the remark to me at Glen Eyrie 
a year before his death, that he strongly 
favored the purchase by the government 
of every slave in the South at twice or 
thrice their market value, if necessary, 
in order to avert war. 

When he became convinced that noth- 
ing but a dissolution of the Unidii and 
the formation of a new nation with 
slavery as its cornerstone would satisfy 
southern statesmen, he despaired of 
avoiding war, and joined the army. 

It was owing to his radical views in 
favor of peace that he was nominated as 
a candidate for the presidency of the 
United States in 1900 by a party whose 
views coincided with liis. 

A short time prior to his death a num- 
ber of General Palmer's military friends 
in Colorado urged him to become a 
member of the Military Order of the 
Lo\al Legion of the United States, an 
orgnni/ation composed of commissioned 



officers who served with credit in the 
war for the preservation of the Union. 
1 he General expressed his entire wil- 
lingness to join the organization, and all 
the preliminary papers were prepared. 
In order that he might fully understand 
the objects and aims of the organization, 
1 sent with the papers a copy of the 
constitution of the order. He returned 
the latter next day with the statement 
that one clause sounded a little too war- 
like to be supported by a member of the 
Peace Society and asked if the objec- 
tionable paragraph could be suspended 
as to him. Immediately after this he 
started on his last trip to England, and 
l!ie matter was finally dropped. 

Friends, 1 have already trespassed 
too much upon your time, and have per- 
haps departed too far from the business 
that has called us together. But for my 
proli.xity 1 take refuge behind the words 
of Burke: "Pardon the garrulity of age, 
which loves to diffuse itself in dis- 
course of tile departed great." At my 
years we live in retrospect alone. Un- 
litted for vigorous life we enjoy the best 
balm to all wounds, the consolation of 
friendship in those only whom we have 
lost forever. 

After General Palmer's death the sur- 
vivors of his regiment whose names are 
attached to this memorial tablet, after 
some thought as to what should best be 
done to give physical expression to their 
love and reverence for their dead 
Colonel concluded to prepare a tablet to 
his memory. There could be no con- 
troversy over the location. Where could 
there be a more suitable place than in 
Palmer Hall — this fine building that 
bears his name — of Colorado College, for 
the foundation of which he cast the first 
spadeful of earth, and which has been 
the recipient of his many munificent gifts 
for its support and future growth, the 
practical evidence of his love and partial 
care ; in the City of Colorado Springs 
which he founded and adorned ; within 
sight and sound of the railroad con- 
structed by his genius ; within the shad- 
ow of the mountains whose resources 
discovered and developed by him, have 
enriched a continent. 

1 have just received the following mes- 
sage from the regimental organization in 
Philadelphia, which 1 take pleasui^ in. 
reading : 

Philadelphia. Pa., Oct. 20th, 1909. 
Major Henry McAllister, 

Dear Comrade : — It seems fitting as 
you gather together that some word 
should be spoken for those who are far 
away, but who are interested in your 
proceedings this day. 

I'^irtv years after the great conflict 



which called us together as an organiza- 
tion, Wm. J. Palmer paid his greatest 
tribute to the men of his old command 
in the concluding paragraph of his "In- 
troductory"' to the published History of 
the 15th Penna. Cavalry, "That I am 
praud to have commantied and to have 
-ince retained the respect and confidence 
of such a body of men goes without say- 
ing." 

The pent-up feeling of that old regi- 
ment goes out today in the inscription 
upon the tablet you dedicate. 

"In loving remebrance of General 
Wm. J. Palmer." 

We cannot be with you on this occa- 
sion — very many things prevent a sec- 
ond march by the old Regiment upon 
Colorado Springs, but as you conclude 
_\oiir ceremonies, you may look around 
and in your fancy see the old command 
assembled and mark their nods of ap- 
proval to this last tribute to our beloved 
Comamnder. 

Our ranks have thinned since those 
memorable days. Very many of the boys 
who rode with us at "Antietam," "Stone 
River," "Tullahoma," "Chickamauga," 
"Sequatchie," in our first Tennessee 
Campaign at "Dandridge," "Mossy 
Creek," "Serierville," "The Atlanta Cam- 
paign," "The Capture of Hood's Pontoon 
Train," "The Second East Tennessee 
Campaign," the pursuit of Jefferson 
Davis, — have passed on to the other side 
and joined the great majority, and yet 
in all these years, remembering the les- 
sons we learned in those early days, we 
have the most splendid and complete or- 
ganization of any veteran regiment of 
the great war ; a marked monument to 
our old Commander and the genius of 
his faithful Lieutent Colonel Betts. 

In those early days we had not learned 
to fully appreciate the character of our 
Colonel, but as time went by, and as the 
Regiment developed under his careful 
training, his military genius, Tiis wonder- 
ful knowledge and memory of men and 
things, and the perfect confidence the 
men had in his leadership and his great 
bravery, all showed to us that Wm. J. 
Palmer was no ordinary man. 

As time goes on and the remnants of 
that Grand Old Army melt away, very 
much of that great struggle will have 
lieen forgotten. The deeds and heroism 
of particular regiments and men will 
have passed out of mind and only the 
great and momentous events of that 
war will stand out before the coming 
generations. 

But until the last man of the old "An- 
derson Cavalry" shall have been "mus- 
tered out" and shall have answered to 
the Reveille above, the memory of Wil- 



THE TIGER 



9 



Ham J. Palmer, his valor, his patriotism, 
his unflinching devotion to duty, his care 
for the men of his command, and above 
all his great services to his country, will 
ever be kept alive and then this tablet 
will stand 

"fn loving remembrance of General 
\Vm. J. Palmer." 

I he services of General Palmer as a 
citizen, particularly to his adopted state 
and city, can be better told by others 
than by his old comrades, but Palmer 
as a soldier and as a man cannot be bet- 
ter understood than by the perusal of 
those letters written to his uncle during 
his connection with the Regiment and 
one particular letter dated Februar>- 12th, 
1865, should be printed in letters of gold 
and placed in the archives of Colorad(j 
College, where you are now unveiling 
the tablet to his memory. 

The ofiicers of our association in sub- 
mitting this tribute to the memory of 
General Palmer, feel that they are giving 
expression to the sentiments of every 
survivor of our Regiment, and that no 
words could be written that would place 
too high an estimate on the service he 
rendered his country in the great war 
of 1861 to 65 ; as a cavalry commander 
of great ability and unswerving deter- 
mination to do his best for the suppres- 
sion of the Rebellion and the preserva- 
tion of the Union, — the cause for which 
we all fought. 

SMITH D, COZEN.S, 

Vice-President. 

JOHN F. CONAWAY, 

Secretary. 

THEOP. H. SMITH, 

Treasurer. 

CHAS. H. KIRK, 

Asst. Secy. 

REV. W. H. GRAFF, 

Chaplain. 

We extend our greetings and heartfelt 
best wishes to all assemliled at this un- 
veiling. 

Yours fraternally, 
JOHN F. CONAWAY, 
Secretarw 

Mr. President, members of the faculty 
and students of Colorado College : — As 
the mouthpiece and in the name of the 
few members of General Palmer's regi- 
ment who are present; in the name of 
the greater number who are not here, 
but whose thoughts flowing in from 
thirty states are about us at this moment. 
T present to Colorado College a tablet in 
memory of General Wm. J. Palmer, with 
a Mst of all the surviving members of 
hi ; regiment. We are not ignorant of 
the fact that the best monument to his 



inenuiry are the splendid and (hu'ablc 
buildings which stand upon and adorn 
this cr.mpus ; tlie city of which they are 
so impnrtant a part, and the hundreds of 
millions of wealth the product of the 
peace he loved so well flowing out of 
every pass and canon in the wondrous 
mountains o\'er the lines of railroad pro- 
jected and built by him; but if a glance 
at this tablet should bring to the minds 
of the present and future students of 
Colorado College the name i)f him who 
'so unselfishly aided them, through their 
.■\lma l\later, and arouse in them an am- 
1 ition to take the greatest possiljile ad- 
vantage of the opportunities he has 
placed ! efore them to become good, in- 
telli'.;ent ami useful men and women, 
then this tablet will nut ha\'e been placed 
here in vain. 

.Vfter fl. W. McOuat, Genevra McCaw 
and Janet Kampf of the senior class. 
li.'irl drawn the flag from the face of the 
tal.'let. President Slocum responded in 
th.e loilowing words : 

In behalf of the Board of Trustees, 
the faculty and students of Colorado 
College, I thank the members of the Fif- 
teenth Pennsylvania Cavalry for entrust- 
ing this institution with this memorial 
tablet. It is both sacred and pleasant to 
have placed on the walls of this building, 
which bears the name of "Palmer Hall," 
this bronze which will ever remain here 
to remind those who pass this way of 
him whom we love and honor. It will 
remind the thousands who look upon it 
of those who followed him in the service 
of tneir countt^v. 

In the years to come thousands of 
young men and women will read these 
words: "In loving remembrance of Gen- 
eral William J. Palmer," and think of 
our great and true friend who has gone 
and of you who have placed this in- 
scription on these walls. It will help to 
remind them of the country which they 
too are to serve and will make them 
nol)ler, liraver and more generous in 
word and deed. 

This flag, which during the last few 
days has veiled your tablet, is the one 
he gave when the regiment occupied the 
college residences, and during your stay 
here as his guests it floated over the col- 
lege campus. It seems most fitting that 
it should greet us here, making us tliink 
once m.ore of his loyalty to the highest 
interests of his country and his unfail- 
ing fidelity to those whom he loved. 

In the name of Colorado College we 
accept this trust and we hope that in 
all time to come this institution which 
he founded, will cherish his memory m 
loving remembrance. 



LITERARY PROGRAMS 

(Programs for this column must be 
in The Tiger box by Tuesday of each 
vi^eek.) 

APOLLONIAN, OCTOBER 22. 

E. H. Harriman Shelton 

Child Labor Crow 

Violin Solo Griswold 

Debate: Resolved, That the Unitted 
States should subsidize its mer- 
chant marine. Affirmative, Bennett 
and Ross; negative. Friend and Al- 
len. 
Critic. 
Visitors welcome. 



PEARSONS, OCTOBER 22. 

Closed meeting. 
Initiation. 

CICERONIAN, OCTOBER 22. 

Music Taylor 

Paper, The Ferrer 'Affair Gilmore 

Debate: Resolved, That permanent 
copyright should be granted by 
the United States government. Af- 
firmative, Jamison and Ormes; 
negative, Scott and Manley. 

Extemporaneous Speech Putnam 

Visitors welcome. 



MINERVA, OCTOBER 29. 

Lope de Rucda and Lope de Vega, 

Miss Ingersoll 

Calderon Miss Canon 

Visitors welcome. 



CONTEMPORARY, OCTOBER 29. 

Problem of the Problem Play, 

Marian Yerkes 

Ibsen Meliceiit Campbell 

Music. 

Visitors welcome. 



HYPATIA, OCTOBER 29. 

Artists and Poets <>i Reti irmatii m 
Perio:d 

Albrecht Durer Lillian Duer 

Hans Sachs Elizabeth Gerald 

Music Louise Auld 

^'^isitors welcome. 



Minnesota has sent out an inter- 
fraternity council to visit some of the 
large universities in order to make a 
study of fraternity conditions. 



The University of Chicago will 
erect in the near future an $800,000 
library as a memorial to the late 
President William Rainey Harper, 



10 



THE ^r [ G ¥] R 




The BIG ANNUAL 

BARBECUE 




Advance Sale of Tickets 
50c. Tickets at Gate 75c 



October 30th, 1909. CLGiven by the 
Class of 1912, on WASHBURN 
FIELD. BigFire! BigFeed! Big Joy! 



NOTICES 

All notices for this column must 
be in the Tiger Box by Tuesday 
of each week 

P. of. Hills will entertain the Tiger 
Board and correspondents at hi-> 
home, 120 Tyler place, next Thursday 
evening. 

The date of Insignia Day has been 
changed to December, owing to the 
intended absence of Dr. Slocum on 
November lo. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



L. W. Howell 'o8 is at present in 
business in Reedley, Calif. 



Miss Louise H'olcomb '06 is a mem- 
ber of the faculty of Mi. Holyoke 
College. 



The engagement of Miss Ruth 
McCoy ex-'i2 is announced, tn Air. 
Earnest Stump, of Canon City. 



Dr; Bayley will speak at the Y. M. 
C. A. meeting tonight. 

■flu- Glee Club will . chearse up- 
stairs in Perkins Hall at 8:30 Mon- 
days, at 8 Tuesdays, and at 6:45 
Thursdays. 



Stephen L. Goodale '99 is p.ofessor 
of metallurgy at the University • of 
Pittsburgh. 



Miss Jeanette Scholz '03 and Miss 

Cora Wilcox '04 have returned from 

Europe, where they spent the sum- 
mer, visiting Italy especially. 



iMiss Plixie Rider '09 is teacliing at 
Fountain. 



The Colgate Manufacturing Com- 
pany has presented the civil engineer- 
ing department with a handsomely 
framed photograph of their plant. 

Snappy, Swa^^y 
Clothes 

AT 

THE MAY CO. 

Clever 
Haberdashers 



Miss Ida Johnson '09 has a high 
school position at Julesburg. 



Silmon Smith '09 stopped in town 
over Sunday on his way back from 
Seattle, Wash. He will enter the 
Denver University Law School this 
winter. 

Miss Mary Colt ex-'i2 is a f.-esh- 
man at Wellesley, with seven hours 
credit from C. C. 



Miss Beulah Wittle '09 is sui)stitut- 
ing in the Den\-er scliools. 



Miss Edna Jacques '00 is teaching 
in the Colorado Springs High Schnol. 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co. 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 



"Our Colorado" 
"Bruin Inn" 

"BlackandGold" 



The Three Songs of Colorado 

College — in Sheet Form 

for 40c. Buy Them of 

E. W. HILLE 



Clever Clothes 

FOR 

College Chaps 

AT 

ROBBINS 

==ON THE CORNER = 



THE TIGEE 



11 




Cigar Store 



Say! Know? "13" Is Doing? 

No! Well Listen 

There are six $5.00 gold pieces arranged in a frame dated from 1901 to 1906 and 
the nearest correct guess as to the arrangement, wins the $30.00. A guess given 
with every dollars worth of purchase tickets. 

Harry 1 C3 Hughes 



W9m 



IS MADE WITH 

_ [|[L[L[03irK?i3i7[!:© ^\m. 

'J\ word to the wise is swrfficient ' 

%e ^, .CLARK 
GAC^"^ ENORAVINGCa 

ILLU5TRAT0R& PUEBLO. 



DESIGNERS 



COLO. 



ENGRAVERS 



Gel Your Picnic Supplies 

^=1^=^ AT ^= 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Favorite Resort of the Col- 
lege Students, Renowned in 
Story and Song 

BRUIN INN 

Up North Cheyenne Canon 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER, Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Patronize TIGER 
Advertisers 

UNION ICE AND COAL CO. 

W. M. BANNING, Proprietor 

Artificial Ice and Cold Storage 

Dealers in All Kinds of Coal and Pinion Wood 
Yard Office, 105 W. Vermiio City Office, 5 N. Tejon 



Maier's Lunch & Dining Room 

local Department Jl '""*"'''"' "' ^" '^"*'' 



Regular Meals 20c and 25c 



Ab(-)ut twenty Sigma Chis ami 
guests went to the canons last Sat- 
urday. ( 1! an all-day tramp. 



Prof. H. F. Smith spoke befo e the 
ministerial association at the Y. AI. 
C. A. last Monday morning. 

"The test of the pudding is the eat- 
ing." We are willing that our goods 
should stand the same test. We, 
meaning Noble, of course. 

Elsie Connell came down from 
Denver to serve at the Phi Gamma 
Delta reception. 



Many of the college people attend- 
ed Sousa's concerts last Saturday. 

Marguerite Glasser intends to 
move to Denver in the near future. 



Mason E. Hyde ex-'i2 is teaching 
school in Franklin, Nebraska. He is 
also director f)f athletics at Franklin 
HigJT School. 



Sherry was at his home in Denver 
the latter part of the week. 



Miss Morehouse, Miss Cook, Pro- 
fessor Collais and Nelson had charge 
of the opening services at Hastings 
Chapel Sunday evening. 

Harry McRae has discontinued col- 
lege work for this term. 

Miss Faith Gilmore ex-'i2, who is 
attending Denver University this year, 
is pledged to Pi Beta Phi. 



Miss Seifried was in Denver Sat- 
urday and Sunday. 



216' 2 N. Tejon St. 



Opposite North Park 



"Attention Collegians" 

Let us make your Dances, Receptions, 
and Fraternity Socials this term, affairs 
never to be forgotten, by decorating 
your hall or parlors in an artistic man- 
ner with the college banners, pennants, 
festoons and bunting. Then have 
erected our sidewalk canopy to keep off 
the inclement weather. We also have 
floor coverings to protect the carpets. 
All this will cost but very little and 
add much to these affairs. 

Thfc Out West Tent and 

Telephone Main 1261 
13'.. N, Tejon Street 



Awning Co. i 



College 

Pennants 

New line of Pennants just received 
--they are very attractive, and the 
prices about a third lower than 
ever before. 

Our Celebrated College Posters are 
now only 25 or 50 cents 
each, mounted 




Whitney and Grimwood 

No. 20 North Tejon Street 



12 



THE 'JM G E R 



0. E. Hemenway 

Groceries and 
Meats :: :: :: 



.«.•-•» 







115 South Tejon Street 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



YOU don't entertain your 
guests to save money — 
if you did, the simplest 
way would be to forego en- 
tertaining them. 
<f[MuETH's may cost more, 
but — 

C LMuet h^s 

CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 



5 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



The Colorado Springs Floral Co. 

Wish to Have Your Business at Right 
Prices 



Mr. ar,d Alr^. O. W. Sylvester .-iirl 
danghte." Ruth spent tlie latter part of 
the week \isitina; friends here. 



Several box parties cf college peo- 
ple witnessed Henrietta Crosman in 
"Sham" ]a>t .Monday evening. 

Professor .Albright is again able to 
take cha.ge of his classes. 



Howard, Weller, and Lynch are 
new pledges to Phi Gamma Delta. 



Landers '13 has left college. 

Isn't satisfaction what you pay for 
after all? Then the next time you 
want to be perfectly' at ease about an 
ice cream or catering order, send it to 
Noble. Phone Main 920. 



Wright and Pac'<ard are pledged to 
Delta Phi Theta. 



Dean Hale and Hedblom went out 
to Papeton Sunday evening. 

Cary and Vandemoer spent Satu - 
day and Sunday in Denver. They in- 
cidentally took in the D. U. -Wash- 
burn game. 

Professor Finlay is still compelled 
to use crutches on account nf his 
badly sprained ankle. 



Ihe Misses Walsh, Smith and Phil- 
lips and Mr. and Mrs. Edmunds were 
guests at the Kappa Sigma house Sat- 
u day evening for dinner. 



Several college people "tramped" to 
Crystal Park Saturday. 



D.-. Bayley spoke at Y. W. C. A. 
Friday ex'ening. 

The Y. W. girls entertained at 
fudge parties Saturday evening. 

Mr, True \isited his sister, Sunday! 



Last Wednesday the Phi Gamma 
Musical Society entertained with a 
very fine program. 



Telephone Main 599 



104 N. Tejon St. 



Miss Florence Smith, Miss Martha 
Phillips and :\liss Mary Walsh in- 
vited their l^rothers to dine at Hemis 
last Sunday. 



A. G. SPALDING a BROS. 



The 

SPALDING 
Trade -Mark 




•V.6.PAT. 

is known throughout 
the world as a 

Guarantee of 
Quality 



are the Largest 
Manufacturers 
in the World of 

Official 

Equipment 

For All 
Athletic 
Sports and 
Pastimes 

If You ar'^'"ter 
" * "" ested in 
Athletic Sport you 
should have a copy 
of the Spalding 
Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyclo- 
pedia of what's new 
in Sport and is sent 
free on request. 

A. G. Spalding & Bros. 

1616 Arapohoe St., Denver, Colo. 

JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

I Oo the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Stree 

Fraternities, Clubs, Individuals 
desiring Milk or Cream 
in any quantities 
should remem- 
ber :: :: 



The Sinton-Rustic Home 

rv • B No. 419 South El Paso St. 

"airy S Phone Main 442 

The College Photo Studio 

The Highest Class of 

Photographs 




Bingham 

18 S. Tejon St. Phone M-678 



DOUGLAS & 
HETHERINGTON 



Architects 



Telephone 556 Rooms 15 and 16 Out West Bulldlnii. 

COLORADO SPRINGS. COLO. 



T 11 E '1" I (i !•: R 



13 



Memory 
Books 

Bound in colors, black and 
and orange, and lettered on 
side. The only really Colo- 
rado College Scrap Book 
made. Lar^e enough to con- 
tain your four years' items. 

Price, $1.23 each 



The Out West 

Printing & Stationery Co. 
9-11 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

Furniture ph";'"'" 

Special Terms to Students 

McCracken & Hubbard 

120 and 122 South Tejon Street 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

15 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

Are Always Well Pleased When They 
Get Their Hair Cut at 

Campbell's Barber Shop 

12 S. Tejon St. Colorado Spring* 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main S3S 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

'as cade Laundry 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 

20 per cent, discount 

To All Students of College and Academy 



Miss Ccira ii.oman x'isitcd Mi^ 
Kditli Mall Saturday anil Sunday. 



Mrs. Campbell of Denver was a 
guest at tlie College ]\I(inday. 



Miss Ida Wolcott was absent I'mm 
class tor a few days on account of ill- 
ness. 



Mr. and Mrs. H. A. True were 
week-end guests at the college. 



Miss Bertha Price '13 entertained 
a guest f'om Cripple Creek last Sun- 
day. 



The big Does she like confec- 
tionery? Well, that de;H-nds. If it's 
Noble's — ves. 



]\liss June Musser and .Miss Katli- 
erine Gear, freshmen, ga\e a delicious 
spread Tuesday night, in honor of 
their own brilliancy in mathematics. 



The freshmen girls in Bemis enjoy- 
ed a heart-rending serenade Tuesday 
evening. 



Warnock has returned, after a 
week's \'isit to his home at Loveland. 



Professor James A. Blaisdell of the 
Biblical department of Beloit, was a 
caller at the college on Wednesday 
of last week, the guest of Professor 
Smith. 



The .Alpha Tan Deltas and guests 
took su| per at Bruin Inn last Satur- 
day. 



7 E. Bijou 



Phone 820 



Gym classes were suspended last 
Thursday on account of the ^IcGreg- 
or open-house. 

Bruin Inn, the popular little rustic 
hostelry, in North Cheyenne canon, 
changed hands recently and is now man- 
aged by Swanson and Riley, two ener- 
getic and obliging young men of this 
city. They promise the same treatment 
accorded to College students by their 
predecessor, Mr. Laveley. 

Ruth Packard spent Sunday at her 
home in Denver. 



Lilian Duer spent Saturday and 
Sunday at her home in Denve'. 

Esther Warner ex-'i2 is attending 
Radcliffe college this year. 



Hunt Up 

BisselFs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

Seldomridde Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
Flour, Fe(>d, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 

C. F. Arcularius & 
Company 

A Large Assortment of 

BELT PINS 

All the Latest Styles 



9 South Tejon Street 
COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 

We have Embossing Dies for Stationery of all the 
College Societies and Fraternities, also the Great 
Seal of the College. We carry in stock a large 
line of papers upon which to emboss these Dies — 
Hurd's, Crane's and others. 



Gowdy-Simmons Ptg Co. \Z^^, 



OD St. 

one 187 



Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Picnic Supplies 

For picnics and all kinds of outings, 
we are ready to supply everything in 
the way of eatables. We also have 
baskets so that we can pack your out- 
fit complete. Just say what you 
want, and when you want it, and 
you will have nothing else to do but 
think of the good time you are going 
to have. :: :: :: :: 

W. N. Burgess 'ilUZZ^ 



14 



T H b: t I g in k 



This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 

Company 



xiih 




Headquarters for 

College Footwear 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

FOUNDERS AND MACHINISTS 



College 
Inn 



*^ Short 
// Orders 



Commutation Tickets — 
$3.30 for $3.00 

THE 

Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 



Phone 101 



117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 



Our Special Extra- Clean 

Lignite 
Furnace Lump 

The Colorado Springs Fuel Co., 
112 Pike's Peak Avenue. Two 
Phones Main 230 



Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 

A. S. BLAKE 



Is the Man to See 



107 North Tejon 

Nickle Ware 



Phone 465 

Cutlery 



Margaret Ste^shenson ex-'i2 is at- 
tending Columbia School of Expres- 
sion in Chicago. 



. Dr. Slocum was in Denver, M()h- 
dav. 



Miss Jones, one of Minerva's hon- 
orary members, entertained the 
Minerva alumnae and the present of- 
ficers of the active society, Tuesday 
afternoon, at her home. Miss Jean- 
ette Scholz talked upon he.- recent 
trip to Europe. 



Miss Edith Forrest ex-'io is a Chi 
Omega pledge at the University of 
Nebraska. 



Miss Faith Gilmore and Miss Ger- 
trude Amsba y, both ex-'i2, are Pi 
Phi pledges at Denver University. 



REFERENCES FOR ENGINEERS. 



The following references a-e rec- 
ommended for those taking Graphics 
A: 

Direction Marks for Maps. — Eng. 
News, Oct. 7, p. 380. 

Bridge Construction. — Eng. News, 
Oct. 7, p. 382. 



ACADEMY 



Amy L. Busch, Correspondent. 



The senior class held a meeting Oct. 
8, and elected the following officers : 
President, Roland Jackson. 
Vice-President, Raymond Lewis. 
Secretary-Treasurer, F. Cajori. 



There are 104 pupils enrolled in Cutler 
Academy this year, of whom about one- 
half are new students. 



New hymnals, for use in the Academy 
chapel, were received last week. 



The first year class have elected the 
following officers : 

President, Clyde Scoggin. 
Vice-President, Josie VanDiest. 
Secretary, Lucy Lloyd. 
Treasurer, Walcott Stewart. 

Henry Hutchinson, an old Academy 
student, is helping coach Cutler's foot- 
ball team this year. 



In these days of expensive leather 

it pays to care for your shoes. 

We have a complete 

line of 

Bixby's 

Shoe Dressings 

In all colors, suitable for every 
grade of leather . . . from dainty 
kids to heavy boots 

While they last, we will ^ive 
a 33c shoe brush and a box 
of Bixola foi- 23c 



Murray's 

(Just Opposite the Campus) 

Wiiliam P. Bonbright & Co. 
Investments 



MEMBERS * ^^^ York Stock Exchaoge 

) Colorado Springs Mining Stock Exchange 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



THE 



Official Printers 

To the Student 
Body of C. C. 



The Waterman Press 

112 E. Cucharras St. 
Phone 1154 



We Print THE TIGER 



THE TIGEK 



15 



Evcret Jackson was a Denver visitor 
last Saturday, attending a meeting of the 
Int-.-rscholastic footI)all league. 



Frank Lynch and Irving Schneider 
were absent several days last week, 
owing to injuries received in football. 



Following is a list of some of last 
year's Academy pupils who are not with 
us this year, and where they are attend- 
ing school : 

Colorado College — Luella Huff, Lucilc 
Ariiistrong, Lucy Jones, .Marion Haynes 
Leon Havens, Fred Hoover : Andover — 
Flarold Gile, Clement Gile, Merrill Ber- 
nard, Van Dyne Howbert, Raymond Lit- 



IHE MODERN SHOE SHOP 

PETERSEN 

121 E.Kiowa 

Sewed Soles 7S cents 

Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



GIDDINGS BROS. 



Colorado Springs 



THE SPECIALTY STORE 



A Hearty Welcoma Constantly Awaits All Visitors 



College Boys Remeinber 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 



106H E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



^li' 



aundi?y 



Why not have the BEST WORK ? 



20 per cent, discount 

To all Students of College and Academy 



J. J. WILSON, College Agent 



W. I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



119 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



/Tc 



CAPS -- Imported 
and Domestic .'. 
Bath Robes and 
House Coats, at 

GORTON'S 



Such Clothes as 
These 



=^ 



Fine goods we show from Adler, Rochester and College 
Brand. Last better and look better while they last 
than most of the goods you see. The all-wool fabrics 
and the fine tailoring do it, $40 to $20. 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 




\ Correct Dress for Men. \ 



113 E. Pike's Peak 
Avenue 



%-. 



J 



tlePeld, Henry Hob'^on ; University of 
Colorado — Leonard Curtis, Gretc'ien 
Fowler: Boulder Preparatory School — 
Robert Champion ; Portland Academy, 
Portland, Ore. — Preston Staley : High 
School. Hot Springs, S. Dakota — Rex 
Putnam ; McKenzie School, Doble's 
Ferry, N. Y. — Washington Pastorius ; 
Mount Hol3'oke College — Esther Par- 
sons; St. Timothy School, Maryland — 
Eleanor Hobson ; Racine College, Ra- 
cine, Wis. — Dudley McClurg; Amherst, 
Charles Parsons; Yale — Arthur Little- 
field. 



Charles Parsons '09 is playing tht 
cello in the Amherst musical club. 



Philo Literary society program, Mont- 
gomery hall, Oct. 22 : 

Edgar Allen Poc. 
Life of Edgar Allen Poe...Miss Woods 
Recitation, "Anabel Lee"... Miss Parley 
Story of "The Gold Bug". .Miss Jackson 
Reading, "The Bells" Miss Lennox 

Roll call answered by quotations from 
Poe. 



Hesperian Literary society program, 
Friday, Oct. 22: 

Reading Lewis 

Debate : Resolved, That national party 

lines should be ignored in municipal 

elections — 

Affirmative — Littlefield and Strieby : 

Negative — Stark and Cajori. 
Extemporaneous Speeches. 
Critic's Report. 
Speech Prof. Brehaut 



DRINK 

DERN'S 

Freshly Roasted Tea and Coffee 

29 South Tejon Straet 



The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies and 
Fixtures 



208 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 812 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-203 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence, 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 956 



The College 

Photo Studio 

Hi^h Class Photographs 
Kodaks and Supplies 




<\3<\B7TU^H / 



Corner Cascade and Kiowa 



16 



THE TIGER 



The Young Men's 
Store 



Style and Distinction t&^ 

Is what makes the young man proud of his clothes. These are the distinguishing features 
of the PERKINS-SHEARER CLOTHES. "CLOTHES BEAUTIFUL"— they have 
ad individuah'ty which appeals to the College fellows of good taste and good judgment. 
They cost no more than the ordinary. Let us show you the new creations for this fall aftd 
winter 

Perkins-Shearer Co. «^ f ^f^ Sn^ ^"'""' 




All the New Features 

in young men's fall styles in footwear. Among them 
is the new high arch last with military heels- -wing tips 
and fancy perforations, in Tan Russia, Patent Colt and 
Dull Calf, our showing is es- 
pecially complete at this 
time. 



^^S'^issi^ 



SHOES THAY SATISFY 



21 S.TCJON ST- 



When Trading, Remember TIGER Advertisers 




Colorado College 

Founded in Colorado Springs in 18 7 4 



WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



College of Arts and Science 

E. S. PARSONS, Dean 

School of Engineering 
Depart- j F. CAJORI, Dean 

ments School of Forestry 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 

School of Music 
I E. D. HALE, Dean 



^^ a 1 A 1 The Associated 

Cutler Academy preparatory 
^^^^mmm^^^^^^^^^mt^^^^^-^^^^^^^ School, in which 
students are prepared for any American College 



Electrical Laboratory 




Vol. XII 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., OCTOBER 29, 1909 



Number 7 



ARMY 



DEFEATED 



TIGERS SCORE FIFTY-FIVE 

POINTS AGAINST SOLDIERS 



Vandemoer and Sinton Star — Army 

Fond of Old-Style Football 

and Slow. 



In a one-sided bnt interesting con- 
test the Tigers took the Army mule 
into camp last Saturday to the happy 
tune of 55-0. 

A large and enthusiastic crowd wit- 
nessed the game, which was somewhat 
of a disappointment to many in that 
the score was so uneven. The game 
as a whole cannot be taken as a cri- 
terion of- the strength of the Tigers, 
as Ft. Russell would have a hard time 
beating the Terrors. Only four times 
during the whole game did the Army 
make first down; twice in the first 
half on straight line bucks and twice 
in the second half on forwa'rd passes. 
They were very weak on the defen- 

Continucd on Page 4. 



DR. SLOCUM TO GO EAST. 

Will Be Banqueted by Harvard 
Alumni. 



President Slncum will go .to New 
York ne.vt week to be present at the 
meeting of the board of directors of 
the Carnegei fund. During his trip 
President Slocum will preach at 
Smith, ]\It. Holyoke and at the Tomb 
school. In Boston he will join Mrs. 
Slocum, who left for the east Sunday 
morning. On the evening of Novem- 
ber II, they will be the guests of the 
Colorado College Alumni Association 
of Harvard at a banquet. The C. -C. 
alumni of Boston number thirty- 
seven. 



DEBATERS BUSY 

Pearsons Has Chosen Affirmative of 
Question Submitted by ApoUo- 
nians. 



From February to June last year, 
the Apollonian Club was busy decid- 
ing on a question to submit to Pear- 
sons Society for the annual inter-so- 
ciety debate this year. Since that 
time. Pearsons has been busy decid- 
ing which side of the question they 
wanted. I.ast i-^riday night the deci- 
sion was reached. 

The question submitted by the Ap- 
ollonians is; "Resolved, That Con- 
gress should adopt the Cummins plan 
of federal income tax, rather than the 
Bailey plan," it being understood 
that the action of c^^.ngress should 
not be used as argument. Pearsons 
will uphold the affirmative and Apol- 
lo's representati\es v\ill argue for the 
negative. 

Already both societies show signs 
of fe vent spirit, and by the time that 
the two teams clash in Perkins Hall 
there will have been much hard work 
on both sides, and no less conjecture 
as to which way the judges will vote. 



FALL TOURNAMENT. 



Tennis Association Has Committee 
at Work. 



.A. meeting of the Tennis Association 
was held Tuesday after chapel. The 
idea of a tournament this fall was dis- 
cussed, and a committee appointed to 
make arrangements. This cljmmittee 
consists of Dietrich, Miss Bogue, and 
Braden. It is hoped that maches m 
ladies' and gentlemen's singles and dou- 
liles, and also in mixed doubles, may he 
pulled off. .e schedule for singles was 
posted on the bulletin board today and 
everyone is urged to play off their 
matches as soon as possible. 



NO MORE 

BETTING 



GAMBLERS TO BE PLACED UN- 
DER COLLEGE DISCIPLINE. 



Faculty Decrees in Furtherance of 
Action of Trustees. 



1 he trustees of Colorado College voted 
at the June meeting of the board, that 
1:etting should not be allowed in the 
liuildings or on the grounds of the col- 
lege. In line with this action, the fac- 
ulty, early this fall,. decreed that any stu- 
dent found guilty of laying a wager 
should be under college discipline. 

If you have a five-dollar bill that 
burns 3'our fingers, go and spend it 
for neckties or text books or any- 
thing like that. The faculty is in 
earnest and will deal summarily with 
the first would-be booky they catch 
hereabouts. Now that our football 
season has fairly started, they are 
hawk-eyed. 



WOMEN PRESENT PETITION. 



Ask Athletic Board for Fifty Dollars. 



At the last meeting of the Athletic 
Board, the young women presented a re- 
quest for $50 to be devoted to women's 
r:thletics, claiming that they had a right 
to a share of the proceeds of associated 
student tickets. The Athletic Board took 
no definite action, but referred the peti- 
tion to the Student Commission. 

At a special meeting Wednesday, 
President McQuat was instructed to ap- 
point i committee of three to make a 
study of the women's claims and present 
a report at the next regular meeting on 
Wednesday, Nov. 3. 



THE TIGER 



THE FOREIGN MISSION FIELD. 



Mr. E. C. Colton, International Sec- 
retary of the Y. M. C. A., Deliv- 
ers Eloquent Address. 

One of the most interesting chapel 
talks delivered this year was that of 
Mr. E. T. Colton, international secretary 
of the Y. M. C. A., who spoke on the 
foreign mission field last Wednesday. 

Mr. Colton began by telling of the in- 
troduction of modern civilization into 
the orient and with it all the vices of 
every nation. He urged his hearers to 
see to it that Christianity should be 
preached to these people in order to 
offset the evil influences attendant on 
commercial conquest. "We have under- 
mined their faith in their old religion," 
he said, "and it is for us to give them 
something to replace it." 

Mr. Colton then spoke of the South 
American mission field. He quoted 
John Barrett on the importance of 
America's trade with her southern neigh- 
bors. Mr. Colton thought that South 
America presented as great an opportu- 
nity to the missionary as to the mer- 
chant. 

The speaker took occasion to compli- 
ment Colorado College on the manner in 
which it was assisting foreign missions 
by sending Mr. Ewing to South Amer- 
ica. 



EWING SPEAKS IN CHAPEL. 



To some of the older students it 
did not seem quite natural to have 
"Harry" occupying a chair on the 
rostrum last Monday in chapel, for 
thej' remember him as just one of the 
fellows. He succeedetr, liowever, i:: 
possessing the dignity of an orator 
as he spoke about the great opportu- 
nity of the Student Volunteer conven- 
tion which is to be held in Rochester 
next December. He said that this is 
the one time when a young inan 
should be glad he was alive to see 
and take part in the great missionary 
movement. 



DR. 



BAILEY ADDRESSES Y. M. 
C. A. 



Last Friday evening the Y. M. C. 
A. had the pleasure of listening to 
Dr. Bailey of Denver. He spoke in- 
formally, but very effectively, on the 
opportunities that college men have 
in this day and generation. He show- 
ed that after all the aim should not 
be only to bulid great houses and 



place transcontinental railways, but 
that the greatest aim should be to 
save this geneatinn. He said that 
he was in for athletics and high 
scholarship, but that he hoped the 
association would see that the great 
question was the rnoral question, that 
the making of character and living a 
life v\iis the great aim of all true 
men. 



NEW BIOLOGICAL EQUIPMENT 



ADDITIONS TO COBURN 
LIBRARY. 



Over $300 Worth of New Books 
Added to Reference Department.. 



There have lately been added to the 
reference department of Coburn Li- 
brary four sets of books of consider- 
able value. 

l\vo of these were given by the 
Jewish jjeople of this city. One is 
"The Babylonian Talmud" of ten 
volumes. The other "The 'Jewish En- 
cyclopaedia" in twelve volumes. 

Colorado Springs Council, No. 582, 
of the Kinghts of Columbus, a Cath- 
olic men's organization, has given to 
the library "The Catholic Encyclo- 
pedia." But four ^'olumes of this set 
have been received, the others being 
still in the hands of the publishers. 

The most important set is, "A New 
English Dictionary," by James A. H. 
Murray, LL.D This set is also as 
yet incomplete. Six volumes have 
been received, two are in the hands of 
the publishers, and two are still un- 
finished. It was a dictionary founded 
mainly on the materials collected by 
the Philological Society of London. 
Its aim is to furnish an adequate ac- 
coimt of the meaning, origin, and his- 
tory of words. It is recognized as 
the most scholarly dictionary ever 
published. 



GERMAN CLUB ELECTS OFFI- 
CERS. 



There were some offtcers in the 
German Club left vacant this year 
since the students who were elected 
to them last spring did not return to 
college. ' Last Thursday evening in 
Ticku'tr study these offices were filled 
as follows: 

President, Miss Lotta Hull; vice- 
president, Miss Wilhelmina Miller; 
secretary. Miss Hilda Anderson; 
member of executive committee, i\Iiss 
Hayden. Mr. Guy Clark was elected 
treasurer last year. 



Dr. Schneider Adds a Number 
New Instruments to His 
Department. 



of 



Dr. Schneider is putting into his 
department this fall several new 
pieces of apparatus for work in plant 
psychology. The biological depart- 
ment already had some -first class 
equipment, but more was needed for 
supplementary work. 

Perhaps one of the most interest- 
ing of these is a circummutationo- 
meter for the study, graphically, of 
the movements of the growing ends 
of plants, as the morning glory, etc. 

Another instrument is a water cli- 
mostat with which to study the influ- 
ence of gra\ity nn growing structures. 

A third instrument is an auxano- 
meter which records automatically 
the rate of growth of plants. 

A set of helictropic chambers will 
be used for the study of the influence 
of light on growing plants. 

Two new microtomes are being put 
in for the use of the histology stu- 
dents. One is a freezing microtoiue 
for rapid work in preparing micro- 
scopic sections and the other is a 
sliding microtome for parafin work. 

Other minor instruments are being 
put in, and the biological department 
is now prepared to do, not only all 
the necessary experimental work, but 
much else in the way of supplement- 
ary experimental research for the stu- 
dent. 



RALLY! RALLY! 



"Going to the rally tonight?" was 
the question that greeted everyone's 
ears as he went about the campus 
last Friday afternoon. Sure enough, 
everybody went. It was the first 
chance to show any of our football 
enthusiasm which has been bottled 
up for all these weeks. 

Captain Cary spoke on the splendid 
spirit and on the hard, consistent 
work of the team even though it had 
not had a chance yet to show what 
things it was saving up for the ene- 

.After "Beaut}'" Nevvhouse added 
his remarks sandwiched in with broad 
grins, McOuat and Siddons gave the 
students a cliance to sing and fill 
old Perkins Hall with vociferous 
veils for the team and college. 



The football team at Illinois prac 
tices nightK' by electric light. 



THE TIGER 



AIR COMPRESSOR INSTALLED. 

High Speed Steel Treated— Colorado 
College First to Install Treat- 
ment in School Work. 

The new ai.' eompl•es^^)r which has 
been recently installed in the mechan- 
ical laboratories has been the means 
of simplifying- and enlarging the com- 
pass of the shop work. Sundry minor 
appliances involving the use of sepa- 
rate d3aiamos to operate the fans in 
the forge department have been done 
away with. The comp/essor consumes 
two hundred cubic feet of air per min- 
ute from the atmospheric pressure, 
compresses it to one hundred pounds 
and delivers it to a large receiving 
tank, from which it is "distributed to 
all the laboratories in one-inch mains, 

With this new installment it is pos- 
sible to do many kinds of practical 
work that could not be done in so sat- 
isfactory a manner heretofore. It has 
opened up the way and enlarged the 
course in forge wor'<, until now the 
department is especially equipped to 
handle t'lc treatment of high grade 
steels. This treatment is of a high 
practical importance and Colorado 
College is the first to install this 
treatment in school work.. 

This work is carried on in pot and 
muffle fu naces, which are adapted 
to alloy crucible work, tempering, 
sharpening of high speed steels, and 
brazing work. These furnaces and 
their appliances have been made in 
every detail by the students them- 
selves in their various courses in foun- 
dry work and bench and on the. lathe. 



UNION PRAYER MEETING. 



show tlicir loyalty to Colorado Col- 
lege by so doing. 



LOOKING FOR AN ASSISTANT. 

It was announced in The Tiger 
some time ago that Prof. Collais was 
to have an assistant this year. But 
that was only a part of the story. 
Just now it begins to look like he will 
have to continue doing two men's 
work. Since the middle of last sum- 
mer both he and President Slocum 
have been looking for a man for the 
place but so far have been unsuc- 
cessful. They find plenty of men 
who are willing to accept the posi- 
tion, but upon looking up the stand- 
ards of the schools with which the 
applicants have been connected, they 
have invariably found the work done 
at Colorado College so far superior 
as to admit of no comparison. There- 
fore they are still locking for the 
right man, all of which goes to show 
that Professor Collais is "doing 
thirigs" in his department. 



Instead of the regular class prayer 
meetings last Sunday evening, all 
classes met in the common room of 
Bemis and listened to a talk by Harry 
Ewing. Before the address Mrs. Sel- 
domridge sang. 

Ewing took up the history of the 
student missionary movement from 
the notable "haystack" meeting down 
to the present time, sketching briefly 
the work of a few of the more noted 
student missionaries. He showed 
that although there is a constant in- 
crease in the growth of teh move- 
ment it will take scores of years to 
bring the people of the world into 
even nominal Christianity. 



CAST OF "PRINCESS BONNIE," 



The cast for Princess Bonnie, the 
jimior farce, has been picked and re- 
hearsals are progressing regularly 

The cast follows : 

Roy Sterling R. Kirkpatrick 

Capt. Tarpaulin B. Weirick 

Count Falsetti R. H. Rice 

Shrhnps E. W. HiUe 

Salvador W. Dean 

Lieut. Fuze L. Van Stone 

Capt. Surf E. B. Fowler 

Admiral Pomposo Mr. Larson 

Auntie Crab Elsie Greene 

Dono Pomposo Gertrude Ashley 

Kitty Clover Winifred Shuler 

Princess Bonnie Vesta Tucker 



NEW 



HERBARIUM FOR 
ESTRY SCHOOL. 



FOR- 



Professor Morril is making plans 
for a herbarium of the trees of North 
America . When finished it will be 
the largest and most complete collec- 
tion of its kind in the United States. 
Letters have been written to univer- 
sities and colleges in all parts of the 
country asking for specimens from all 
the trees growing in their vicinity. 
Each school responding with a col- 
lection will be sent in return a com- 
plete herbarium of the trees of the 
Pike's Peak region. In this way it is 
hoped that a very complete collection 
of North American trees can be got- 
ten together. A herbarium of this 
kind is greatly needed by the Forest- 
ry School for the teaching of dendrol- 
ogy and other botany courses. Prof. 
Morril is spending a great deal of 
time and energy upon the securing of 
this collection, and any of the stu- 
dents who can help in any way will 



HEINRICH'S RECITAL. 

Air. Wilhelm Heinrich, the blind 
tenor of Boston, gave a very instruc- 
tive invitation recital at Bemis Hall 
last Friday night, under the auspices 
of the Colorado .Springs Musical 
Club. Many college people were 
p. esent. 

The program was composed of four 
parts. Two parts were made up of 
English songs, one of French, and 
one of German. Mr. Fleinrich played 
his own accompaniments and prefaced 
each number with a historical sketch. 



TWO NEW PHOTOGRAPHS RE- 
CEIVED. 



The Civil Engineering department 
has received two framed photographs 
du;-ing the past week. One is a hand- 
some tri-color showing the location 
of the Mofi^at line crossing the Conti- 
nental Divide. The other is a six- 
foot panorama of Sann Pedro Harbor, 
Los Angeles, California, which show3 
the water terminal docks of the trans- 
continental railroad, the Pacific coast 
terminal of the San Pedro, Los An- 
geles and Salt Lake railroad. Both 
photographs are examples of fine rail- 
road engineering and are of use in the 
courses in railroad engineering. 



MISSIONARY LUNCHEON. 

A convention of the Laymen's 
Missiona.y Ajovement will be held in 
Colorado Springs from March 2 to 4. 
To consider plans for the organiza- 
tion here, the following men took 
lunch with Prof. M. C. Gile last Wed- 
nesday noon: E. T. Colton,, H. E. 
Ewing, P. L. Gillett, E. B. Simmons, 
E. S. Parsons, C. B. Hall, A. F. 
Smith, C. P. Dodge. D. W. Moore, A. 
Alexander Smith, Dr. W. F. Slocum, 
Dr. W. W. Flora and E. T. Heald. 



NEW BOOKS. 



Ihe reference library of the Forest 
School is to be enlarged in the near 
future by the addition of several val- 
uable books on the white, long leaf, 
short leaf, loblolly and Cuban pines. 
A complete collection of the govern- 
ment publications on forestry is be- 
ing made and the new ones are being 
bound as fast as printed. These pub- 
lications are written in the most prac- 
tical way and form a valuable addi- 
tion to any library. 



THE ^J^ I G E R 



SIDDONS REVIEWS THE FOOTBALL WEEK 



'1 he team left this morning for Lara- 
mie, VVyo., where they play the Univer- 
sity of Wyoming tomorrow afternoon. 
We do not consider that this will be a 
very hard game as Wyoming is no heav- 
ier than a high school team and thus far 
have shown themselvees to be a very 
weak bunch. 

1 he team will probably line up as fol- 
lows : 

Sinton, re. 

Gary, rt. 

Roe, rg. 

Hedblom, c. 

Reichmuth, Ig. 

Morrison, It. 

Thompson, le. 

Putnam, q. 
• Vandemoer, rh. . 

Heald, fb. 

VVhitaker, Ih. 

Owing to injuries, Sherry and Steele 
were left at home, as the trip is a tire- 
some one. Coach Richards did not ac- 
company the team, but stayed here to 
be with his Terrors tomorrow when they 
meet Cutler Academ\-. 



1 here was considerable comment 
among the down-town, followers of foot- 
ball early this week, when it was learned 
that a number of men were not out for 
practice Monday night. 

A number of our town backers are 
graduates of eastern schools, and some 
have participated in athletics at these in- 
stitutions. Such a condition, namely 
men not appearing for practice, is en- 
tirely unknown to these people, and a,s 
they have the good of the team at heart, 
they were perfectly justifiable in their 
complaints. The game last Saturday 
was b.arder on the men than a game with 
a closer and smaller score. Many of the 
men were bruised up and sore, but in 
spite of this, they should have been out 
in uniform. 



As a curtain raiser to the big event 
last Saturday, Manager Kittleman 
staged a contest between the C. C. 
freshmen and Cutler Academy eleven. 

The final score, which could have 
been much larger had the f"eshies 
cared to make it so, was 21-0. It 
seemed, however, that they took pity 
on the prep school boys, as they did 
not look like the team which goes 
against the Tigers every night. 

For the freshmen, Howard, Bowers, 



Benjamin, Judd, Long ;;nd Withrovv 
were the stars. Howard scared two 
touclidowns. Bowers one and Benja- 
min (;>ne. Only ane goal was kicked. 
On the wiiole the game was rather 
slow, and the f.eshmen did not begin 
ttt show the enthusiasm manifested by 
their followe s in the stands. 

By decisively defeating South Da- 
kota last Saturday, Denver University 
makes evident the fact that football 
in Colorado is up to or even above 
the standard of the teams of the Mid- 
dle West. Three weeks ago last Sat- 
urday, South Dakota played Nebras- 
ka to a standstill, and last Saturday 
Nebraska .played a tie game with 
Iowa. 

.'\s these teams are among the best 
in the Mississippi region, we feel that 
this comparison can be made. 



Boulder's showing against the Aggies 
last Saturday opened many eyes to the 
fact that Boulder will make a strong bid 
for championship honors this year. , Re- 
ports of the game give Folsom much 
credit in the way his team works to- 
gether. It is the opinion of many that 
our game with Boulder will be a much 
harder contest than any other game we 
play this year. 



There are practically no important 
games in the state to;norrow. The Ag- 
gies have brok-en their contract with D. 
U. for tomorrow's game. They got per- 
mission to do as they pleased in the mat- 
ter at the conference in Denver last Fri- 
day. Their grounds for breaking ofT the 
game are the same as those of the Uni- 
versity : they say D. U.'s athletics are 
not clean. 

There was some attempt made to get 
C. C. to call ofif the D. U.-C. C. game 
Thanksgiving, but this game will be 
played under conference rules. 



Tomorrow the Terrors meet Cutler in 
what promises to be a very interesting 
contest.' The winner of this game will 
probabl>- be cliampion of this division, 
although Pueblo Centennial has a stronp 
team. 

Both teams have been working hard, 
perfecting their plays and getting into 
sh.ipe : and there will not be a harder 
fought battle on Washburn this vear, as 



thf-re is considerable feeling between the 
teams. 

College student tickets are of no value 
for this game, but it will easily be worth 
the price of admission. 

W'e do not attempt to pick the winner. 



'1 he game at Golden last Saturday sur- 
prised everyone. The Miners were very 
much outweighed and all practically a 
new team. 

Fighting against these odds they went 
in and won, and the student body is wild. 
There was no school Monday, the day 
being given over to celebrating. 

'I he Mines pla>'s D. U. one week from 
tomorrow. 

The score at the end of the first half 
of the C. C. -Wyoming game will be an- 
nounced at the High School-Cutler game 
tomorrow. 



ARMY DEFEATED 

Continued from Page 1. 

sive; time after time Vandemoer and 
Wbitttiker circled their ends for long 
gains, and a forward pass was almost 
always good for a number of yards, 
due to the old style single line of de- 
fense employed by the visitors. 

Putnam plaj'ed quarter the whole 
game and ran the team well; he 
showed especial ability in making for- 
ward passes, while his receiving kick- 
outs from X^andemoer was a feature. 

Whittaker and Vandemoer on the 
offensive, worked finely in the 
backfield, both in running interference 
and in carrying the ball. Vandemoer's 
kicking kept Nolan, who played in the 
backfield for the Army, guessing, and 
his sprinting ability enabled him to 
get away for some long runs. 

Heald's work at full was especially 
noticeable on the defensive; he has 
overcome that dangerous habit of 
waiting for a plaj' to come to him and 
liits it low and hard.' While Heald 
made no long runs, he showed him- 
self to be a consistent ground gainer. 

Hedblom, Roe and Reichmuth as a 
center trio more than held their own 
against their hca\'ier opponents. Only 
once did the Army make any substan- 
tial gains through them; this was 
early in the first half when first down 
was made twice in succession. After 



THE TIGER 



5 



this tliere was lUjtliinjj- more doing 
there. 

The playing of Cary and Morrison 
at tackles was a feature. They al- 
ways beat the ends, down on punts, 
and were a tower of strength on the 
offensive. "Big Dick" showed great 
form in every department; pushing 
and pulling the man carrying the ball. 
On every line buck he seemed to be 
unable to lose track of the ball. On 
the defense he was at the bottom of 
every play and seemed to have pep- 
per to burn. Sinton easily showed 
himself the class of the ends. He 
made four of the ten touchdowns on 
fo:ward passes and is a reliable man 
on defense. 

"Morley" Morrison and Copeland, 
who are fighting it out for the other 
end, both showed up well. They 
are both new to the game, this being 
their first year. Copeland showed 
himself to be the more versatile 
player of the two, both on ofifense 
and defense. 

"Jimmy" Wilson, who took Whit- 
taker's place at half and later re- 
placed Heald at full, is as good a 
substitute for the backfield as could 
be asked for. He has the knack of 
recovering forward passes and fum- 



bles, and when he learns to hit the 
line low, will be hard to stop. 

LeClere, an old veteran of the 
scrubs, played left half (^le latter part 
of the game. His work showed him 
to be a reliable, consistent player. 
His only weakness lies in an inability 
to handle the forward pass. "Shorty" 
Steele took Roe's place at guard dur- 
ing the last few minutes of play. He 
has been laid up with a badly strained 
back for the past few weeks, which 
was a handicap to him last Saturday. 
However, the fact was not noticeable. 

The scoring started early in the 
game; Vandemoer kicked ofT to Bond, 
who returned the ball 8 yards. Army 
was compelled to kick, and after a 
forward pass failed, Vandemoer punt- 
ed past Nolan, who recovered the ball 
but was forced over his line by Cary 
and Morrison, who Vi^ere down on the 
punt. There was some question as 
to \\'hetlier the play should count two 
points, but the referee decided it a 
touchback. 

A few minutes later Vandemcer got 
loose on an end run for 45 yards, 
which put the ball on the Army's 9- 
ya"d line, and Whittaker plunged 
through for the first touchdown. 



Vandy failed to kick goal. Tigers 5, 
Army o. 

Copeland returned the kickoff .^o 
yards, and the ball was put over for 
a touchdown in three plays, Sinton 
getting away for a 40-yard run on a 
perfect pass from Putnam. Vandy 
again failed to kick goal. The score 
stood Tigers 10, Army o. 

Vandemoer kicked off over the line 
and Army chose to scrimmage on the 
25 -yard line. They were forced to 
kick; Whittaker returned the punt 15 
yards, and two line bucks, a forward 
pass to Putnam, and another to Sin- 
ton, put the ball across for the third 
touchdown. Vandemoer kicked out 
to Putnam, who heeled the kick on 
the 30-yard line; Cary kicked an easy 
goal. Tigers 16, Army o. ' 

Army kicked to Putnam, who re- 
turned the ball 30 yards, but the 
Tigers were penalized 15 yards a few 
minutes later on a failure to make a 
forward pass. Vandemoer punted and 
Heyl kicked out of bounds. Another 
forward pass failed; at this point Wil- 
son took Whittaker's place at left 
half. Heald went thrr)ugh left tackle 
on a split buck for a touchdown, Alor- 

Continucd on Page 9. 




THE TIGER 






of the strongest speeches delivered in 
our chapel for years. Ewing's fire 
and sincerity have won the old men 
The Weekly Newspaper o£ Colorado College anew and have added to his host of 

friends the newcomers since his time. 

Now that our missionary has been 
he.e and we have all seen him and 
heard him talk, there can be no doubt 
of an easy raising of the $500 to be 
asked of the students next Thursday. 

The subject on which Ewing has 
done most of his talking, is not the 
South American field, however, but 
the sixth international convention of 
the Student Volunteer movement to 
be held in Rochester, N. Y., from De- 
cember 29 to January 2. Colorado 
College is entitled t<T 7 delegates, one 
faculty member, the two general sec- 
retaries and 4 students. We are a 
long way from Rochester and'we have 
no Westons with us, but the commit- 
tee appointed by the Christian asso- 
ciations is confident that we will send 
our full representation. At a meeting 
(if the Advisory Boa:d of the Y. M. 
C. A. last evening, the members, who 
are business and professional men of 
sound judgment, expressed by vote 
their desire to stand behind the com- 
mittee in raising the necessary funds 
to send a m.aximum delegation. These 
conventions are held once each stu- 
dent generation, once every four 
years, and bring together missionaries 
and editors of religious journals froin 
all quarters of the earth. Strong men 
speak to thousands of students, who 
go back to their fellows with broad- 
ened views and worldwide concep- 
tions. This is an enlightened age, a 
time when great movements are being 
pushed with the zeal tliat inspires. 
In, the forefront of these is the mis- 
sionary movement. Colorado College, 
by supporting a missionary of her 
own, has stepped to the fo e. Will 
our interest continue? Will we keep 
ourselves informed? Will we send 
men east, who can come back with 
the assurance that we have done right 
and can satisfy what doubts may ex- 
ist? Will we have seven delegates at 
Rochester? Think it over. Make 
your answer definite. 



GLENN W. SHAW Editor-in-Chief 

HARRY W. McOUAT Business Manager 

S. W. Dean Assistant Editor 

C. Do^•ELAN ..Assistant Editor 

H. H. Haight Assistant Editor 

L. E. GriswoLD Engineering Editor 

B. P. SiDDONS Athletic Editor 

H. F. Rice Forestry Editor 

Julia Ingersoll Alumni Editor 

Helen Canon Exchanae Editor 

Janet Kampf Local Editor 

W. L. WarnoCK...- Local Editor 

A. E. BrySON - - Assistant Manager 

E. W. HiLLE A'sistani Manager 

Correspondents 

Geneva McCaw, T. M. I'ettigrcw, Edith Sommers, F. B. 

Copeland, Margaret Watson, E S Statten, 

Katharine True, D. L Sisco 

Students, Professors and Alumni arc invited to contribute 

articles anditemsto TheTiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 
College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

\^iS^ S S^g^,^ a Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
^"^^^^^jsfi*^"" Springs, Colo., as second-class matter. 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c. 

AT LAST, THE FOOTBALL 
SEASON. 

East Saturday the team showed us 
that its wind was good for 55 points 
against slow opponents. And we 
showed the team thai our lungs could 
also stand a good long siege. The 
season has started and has started 
well. It is a matter of regret that the 
Fort Russell team was so antiquated 
in personnel and style of play, but in 
spite of the one-sidedness of the 
game, it showed us t!iat we were 
right in our surmises.. The Tigers are 
a strong, fighting bunch this year. A 
few additions from the freshman 
squad would stren.gthen them, but 
they are just such a team of hard 
working, qualified students as to keep 
our pride and our enthusiasm red hot. 
They will have to fight for what they 
get in our two hard games with the 
State Unive.'sity and with Denver. 
They realize this, and their realization 
of it is just what will win us a cham- 
pionship. As a student body, let. us 
keep our spirit commensurate with the 
team's. That will keep us humping, 
but a spontaneous hump is an easy 
hump to maintain. 

OUR MISSIONARY INTERESTS. 

We have heard a great deal about 
missionaries and foreign stations tliis 
Week, and we could easily listen to 
mo.-e talk of the same quality. Mr. 
Coltcn's address Wednesday was one 



WE TAKE THE LIBERTY. 

A prank is a fine thing. We had 
rather be full of aevils, playfully 
speaking, than full of Latin. It feels 
better to be so loaded. Moreover, it 
is well to have all the fun you can 
before old Rheumatism and his fel- 
lows initiate you into . a sedentary 
brotherhood of waiters. But joy seek- 
ers should cultivate a sense of humor. 



If it would not be taking someone 
too seriously, we should like to sug-_ 
gest that he quit daubing that new 
ticket booth at Washburn. The old 
Schneider, Hall joke is as dead as the 
innocent men that crossed the street. 
Speakers learn that if tliey want to 
make people laugh, they must leave 
old stories and tell new ones. The 
practical joker should be equally ob- 
servant. Will somebody please play a 
good trick tonight ana try to keep in 
mind the fact that he is as loyal to 
Colorado College and as proud of her 
as his fellow with book-chained eyes? 

SPECIFICALLY GENERAL. 

Did you eve.- criticise the faculty? 
Good: you're one of us. But do you 
always take the trou'oTe :o find out 
what you are talking about? If not, 
get the habit. Never believe the first 
story you hear. And if you must re- 
peat it as mankind must, tell 
your auditor that you and oth- 
ers have been mistaken once or 
twice in the past, a- mankind has. 
Above all, do not foigct triat the fac- 
culty is a pretty good picture of you 
ten, twenty or thirty years from now. 
They used to criticise and they still 
criticise, but they investigate as well. 
If you want to start a little practical 
investigation, look into our grades 
and draw j^our own conclusions as to 
why we write in this strain. We will 
consider you within your rights, since 
we have said our say, but do not try 
it on the next man you meet. He 
may have higher motives than we. 

THE BIG NIGHT FALLS. 

Tomorrow at dark, falls the big- 
night of the fall. We give 1912 the 
credit for the "best yet" before their 
barbecue e\er happens. So far in our 
history no class has ever failed to 
beat the Hallowe'en show of every 
predecessor, and the history of barbe- 
cues at Colorado College is long- 
enough to justify our expectations. 
There will be some people tossed, too. 
A good deal depends upon how a man 
takes his tossing. Outline a policy, if 
you are nervous, and see to it that 
i'ou are not asked to bob for stars 
again next vear. 



A new depa ture in college sport., 
rifle shoctij-ig, is becoming very pop 
ular. Among the institutions now. 
having rifle clubs are: Yale, Harvard, 
Cornell, California, Columbia, Idaho. 
Pennsylvania, Iowa, Nevada, Alassa- 
chusetts Institute of Technologj-. 



THE TIGER 



SHOULD ATHLETIC FEE 
MADE COMPULSORY? 



BE 



WHY THE WOMEN WANT 
FIFTY DOLLARS. 



A MUSICAL CLUB. 



This question has been discussed be- 
fore and the paying of the fee has re- 
mained a matter of option with the in- 
dividual. With the adoption of the 
new system of issuing admission tickets 
to those who pay the fee the question 
comes up again. 

Two objections are made against a 
compulsory fee. The first is that if an 
athletic fee is included on all the tuition 
bills of the college, objection will be 
made by those who pay the bills, on the 
ground that the money is used for foot- 
ball and other things of which they do 
not approve. The other objection is that 
our tuition already appears to be higher 
than the other colleges with which we 
compete. 

While the first objection may have 
been good at one time, it seems to the 
writer extremely doubtful that it is a 
^3od argument now. While there was a 
time when football in particular was ob- 
jected to by some people, that time it 
seems has passed and there are few who 
do not recognize the game as being bene- 
ficial when the proper restrictions are 
imposed upon it. Furthermore, if there 
are still a few people who would make 
this objection, do they outnumber those 
who object to paying a fee which is es- 
caped by others? Would it be as great 
an injustice to make the fee compulsory 
as it is to accept it from the majority of 
students and allow a few to evade it? 

And as to the second objection, a 
comparison of the actual fees collected 
by the colleges of the state will not show 
a great difiference. What we collect un- 
der the name of tuition other colleges 
get as laboratory fees, etc. And finally 
a compulsory fee would make no in- 
''■rease in the expenses of ani'one but 
those few who at present are not pay- 
in.g the fee, but who should do so, as 
everyone will grant. 

1 he student sentiment is bound to be 
such as to make ever}' one except a very 
few pay the lee and should they be al- 
lowed to escape it? 

ALO. 



HAG HALL OPEN HOUSE. 



According to custom, the inmates of 
Hagerman Hall will hold open house 
again this year. 

The date will be Saturday evening, 
November 2"]. This occasion is the 
one opp'^rtunity of the year for the 
women of the college to see how the 
model college man lives. 



(By Mary Ande/son, President of the 
Women's Athletic Association.) 

There has been a great deal of dis- 
cussion concerning the right of the 
Women's Athletic Association to a 
certain portion of the athletic fees, 
and in order that the students may 
understand the situation, we make the 
following explanation: 

Gymnasium work for the women in 
Colorado College is compulsory, ana 
in view of this fact, it is rather im- 
portant that it be made attractive. 
One way of domg this is to have cut- 
door exercises, such as basketball, 
field work, etc. This fall this phase 
of the wor< has been much delayed 
because of the condition of the field, 
cinder track and apparatus. When 
asked to put the grounds in order, the 
JNIen's Athletic Association promised 
to attend to it, but did nothing: this 
week President Slocum took the mat- 
ter up, having the necessary work 
done at his own expense. 

Another way to keep up enthuisi- 
asm for the work is by having field 
meets and something for which to 
contest. In the past Miss Woodsmall 
has solicited trophies from her 
freinds; but this year the Athletic As- 
sociation takes this work in charge. 
As an association we have no friends 
upon whom we may depend for suit- 
able trophies. 

When the representatives of the 
high schools are here on high-school 
day the women have their part in en- 
tertaining the guests and in provid- 
ing an opportunity for them to meet 
the college students at an evening re- 
ception. As this is under the aus- 
pices of the Athletic Association the 
board feels that the bills should be 
paid out of the athletic fees. (I 
might add that last year's bills for 
this affair have not yet been paid. 
We had occasion last year to give a 
few other social affairs of this sort, 
and we know that the girls, after pay- 
ing their fees, positively refuse to 
pay any more to the Athletic Associ- 
ation. 

After careful consideration, the 
board has asked for fifty dollars, a 
sum which we consider very reason- 
able. 



The Students' Lecture Association 
at Michigan has engaged Dr. Freder- 
ick A. Cook, the famous North Pole 
discoverer, to deliver a lecture in 
their course at a cost of $3,000. 



The faculty of the School of Music 
has been lamenting the lack of interest 
taken in musical matters by the stu- 
dents, it seems to many that this is 
due, not to a lack of interest, but to a 
lack of organization. Unlike other 
schools we have never given time to the 
production of operettas or oratorios, yet 
it must be admitted that such work does 
much for those taking part and is a de- 
sirable feature of college life throughout 
the country. In every school of music, 
there must be some common work to 
hold the students together, and this can 
only be accomplished by organized ef- 
fort. Therefore, the demand for a mu- 
sical club. 

Our chapel services, from a musical 
standpoint, are a failure, both on account 
of the arrangement of the voices and the 
lack of a director. Such an organiza- 
tion could reform our service m a very 
material way, and turn a mere babble of 
sound into a chant, with some regard for 
harmony. 

The members of the junior class have 
Ijegun work on an opera, and it is to be 
hoped that they will show the real ad- 
vantages of such work as a part of our 
school life and that a permanent and 
more general organization will result. 



A GOOD SCHEME. 



Professor Griswold of the Mining 
Enginee:-ing department has a neat 
way of getting the maximum amount 
of work out of his classes, and a mod- 
el way of keeping the students in his 
classes posted as to how they stand 
in any course at any time. He keeps 
his class record accessible to any stu- 
dent at all times so that he may see 
daily whether his work is satisfactory 
or not. It is a little scheme that 
brings r.esults. 



McGregor entertains. 



Last Thursday afternoon McGreg- 
or was at home to the other hall girls 
from four to six. Tea and cakes were 
served. The juniors presided at the 
tea tables, the sophomores served, 
and the freshmen made themselves 
generally useful. 



ADVISORY BOARD MEETS. 

The Y. M. C. A. advisory board niet 
Thursday evening at the home of the 
chairman, Dean Parsons. 1 hi' meeting 
was devoted to routine business and con- 
sultation with ]\'Ir, Ewing. 



THE TIGER 



E. 



T. COLTON SPEAKS AT 
BEMIS. 



Describes Ewings Field and Work. 



Mr. E. T. Colton, International Sec- 
retarj' of the Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation, addressed the students at 
Bemis Jrlall Wednesday evening on the 
South American Opportunity. Jde 
showed that the worli that liwing will 
have at Buenos Ayres is different from 
tlie old conception of a missionary's 
work. Instead of going out to the wilds 
to hold a Bible in his hand before a 
crowd of poorly-dressed savages with 
greedy appetities, he goes to a country 
tnat lias transcontinental raih^oads, re- 
sources to supply tue world, and a popu- 
lation of 5U,UUU,U00. He goes to the city 
of Buenos Ayres, wnich has a population 
of 1,250,U00, street cars, paved streets, 
electricity, and is the most beautitul city 
on the western hemisphere. 

In his work he will be associated with 
the City Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation of Buenos Ayres, and with the 
CStudent Association of the University of 
Buenos Ayres. T. he university has 4,000 
students and four departments, Law, 
Medicine, Literary and Engineering. The 
medical department has a seven-year 
course. In this work ne will be asso- 
ciated with the educated classes, and with 
many who will go out to take the most 
important government positions. The 
city association has a modern $100,000 
building, where the American fleet was 
entertained on its trip around the world. 

Mr. Colton took up some of the prob- 
lems that had to be met in South Amer- 
ica. "Among the vices drink' is not a 
S'-iious problem. Gambling, however, is 
v.. i\ersal. Instead of discouraging this 
e\il. the biisint-ss houses encouiage it by 
closing their places on the days of races 
to "give their men a chance to attend. 
The worst evil, however, is social im- 
purity. One .of the bad customs that en- 
courage this is the high wedding fees that 
are charged by the clergy. 

.\ncther important problem is the state 
of the Catholic church. Conditions are 
such that they are not defended by 
Catholics themselves in other parts of 
the world. Only about one man out of 
live is loyal to the church, but most of 
the women are loyal. There is a gen- 
eral ignorance about the Bible, and when 
the first Bibles were taken to the coun- 
try, even the priests bought them out of 
curiosity to see what they contained. 

The Young Men's Christian .Asso- 
ciation is able to render important 
practical services in several ways. 
One of its important services is the 



development of athletics. It is also 
encouraging the laymen to take part 
in carrying on religion instead of 
leaving it all to the women. More- 
over, it is helping to purify the 
Church. 

Evving's permanent location will 
not be known for another year. He 
will be associated with the work at 
Buenos Ayres until he has learned 
the language. Mastery of the native 
language is an important part of the 
missionary's equipment, as the Latin 
Americans are a proud race and proud 
of their language. 

i\Ir. Colton said that the college 
was to be congratulated to have a 
part in extending christianizing influ- 
ences in this Land of Opportunity, 
and also on. the representation that it 
will have in its graduate, Harry Ew- 
insj. 



FIRST MEETING OF C. C. C. C. 
LARGE ATTENDANCE. 

Last Tuesday evening, the Colorado 
College Chemical Club held its first 
meeting of the year. The broadened 
views, the breadth of purpose with 
which the club launched forth this 
year ma'ks a new era in its life. The 
club has undergone a complete trans- 
formation in all respects save the 
name, which for the time being will 
remain the same. 

The club was founded originally 
with the object of promoting individ- 
ual research in the fields of chemistry 
and physics. A prize of ten dollars 
was given annually to the member 
presenting a treatise on some original 
work of the highest merit. The mem- 
bership was then limited to those stu- 
dents who had taken qualitative or 
some equivalent advanced course in 
physics. 

Now the membe.ship is to include 
all upperclass engineers. Professor 
Strieby spoke upon the value of such 
a society to the engineering students 
as individuals. The club, he said, is 
of value to a fellow who is studying, 
as it gives him a chance to bump 
against the ideas of other men. A 
man cannot look up every subject of 
special inte est, or read all the mate- 
rial on any one subject. When a pa- 
per is given the gist of a subject may 
be obtained, which in itself represents 
a vast amount of work that would 
undoubtedly not be done if each one 
was to look up the subject individu- 
ally. And light is often thrown upon 
material for stud)', for you may hear 



of a book or a process; and then, too, 
you are enabled to get a great deal of 
knowledge on the practical side of 
things. Besides getting helpful hints, 
you becoine broadened out and do 
work that you would not do in the 
class room. You learn how and 
know where to find information. En- 
gineering all dovetails together; the 
civil engineer should be posted in a 
general way on topics relating partic- 
ularly to the mining and electrical en- 
gineer, and so all engineers should be 
in touch with the work of other en- 
gineers, whether they be indirectly 
or immediately concerned with that 
particular phase of enginee.-ing, or 
not. To keep one posted on all phases 
of engineering is the object of a gen- 
eral engineering society. 

A very interesting paper was pre- 
sented by E. V. Deshays, the presi- 
dent of the club, on the "Ores of 
Iron," in which he went into the 
geology of several kinds of iron ores, 
their origin and the methods of min- 
ing. He dealt mainly with the large 
deposits in the Lake Superior re- 
gion, illustrating how the deposits 
were formed and the three standard 
methods used in mining, i. e., the 
steam shovel, the glory hole and the 
stoping systems. After the presenta- 
tion of this paper, a "Dutch lunch" 
was served and thoroughly enjoyed 
by all. These meetings are open to 
all students who may be interested in 
programs more or less technical. 



REFERENCES FOR ENGINEERS. 



"Prospecting by Plants," Transac- 
tions of Amer. Inst, of Mining Eng're, 
Vol. 15, p. 647. 

This article treats of ore locations 
by means of characteristic flora. 

"Iron O.^e Mining,'' Engineering 
and Alining Journal, September 22, 
190S. This article shows one of the 
most immense resources of the C. F. 
and I. Co., in Wyoming. 

"Steam Shovel iMining," "Mines 
and Methods," Vol. i. No. i, Septem- 
ber, 1909. The "Mines and Methods" 
is a new periodical published in Salt 
Lake City, and is largely devoted to 
the exploitation and development of 
the L^tah and Nevada mines, and con- 
tains reading of general engineering- 
interest. 

.A. new volume of Costigan's Mining 
Law has been added to the polytech- 
nic librarj' this week. 



THE TIGER 



9 



KINDNESS AND SELF- 
SACRIFICE. 



Dr. Slpcum Gives Third Ethical in 
Series. 



FORESTERS' CLUB MEETS. 



In chapel, Friday, October 22, Dr. 
Slocum dealt only with the first part 
of his subject. He will continue his 
talk next Friday. 

\\\ speaking of kindness, he said: 

"I know there is a tendency to sen- 
tinientalism in being kind. It is very 
important to be known as a kind per- 
son. It is also very easy to be 
known as a kind pe.son and at the 
same time not be kind. Anything 
that leaves one in a worse condition 
is not kindness. The flatterer is not 
kind. The surgeon who is called on 
to perform a necessary operation but 
refuses to do so because it will hurt, 
is not kind. With the beggar, a stern 
refusal is more kind tlian to give him 
what he asks. Kindness is the thing 
that makes you: friend better than 
when he came to you, 

"Now, what is forgetting a wrong? 
The grace to forgive is a noble thing. 
On the other hand, a request for for- 
giveness is often to be let down easy. 
Forgiveness, in that case, is unkind- 
ness. To ask for forgiveness is to be 
anxious to right all the wrong as far 
as it lies in the power of the offender. 
It is to say, 'I'll never be caught do- 
ing the mean thing again.' To give 
out a lot of sentimentalism is soft- 
ness. Our business in the world is to 
get ourselves and others on our feet. 

"Some one said, 'What shall be 
done with the "snobbish" rich?' The 
answer was 'Social ostracism.' The 
way to do with wrong-dcers is to os- 
tracise them, to cut them until they 
want to Ao what is right, then put 
out our hand to help them. That is 
what the Great Master taught. The 
world needs kindness. It does not 
need your soft, slushy sentimentalism. 
It needs the great strong kindliness 
of strong manhood and womanhood. 
Don't truckle! d:.n't play humility. 
The one who crawls does no good. 
Crawling and hypoc isy go together. 

"If you stand out for what is kind. 
good and t.ue, people at some time 
or other will say you are unkind. 
Sometimes you will have to stand 
alone and continue to hear the mean 
things, but don't waver. Stand out 
for what is right. Stand and make 
people feel that they can not lie and 
be respected. 



The Foresters' Club met in 
Pearsons house at 7:30 last night and 
listened to the following program: 
Possibilities of Black Locust, 

Fred P. McKown 
The Everglades of Florida, 

Mr. Ballard 
Mr. Ballard proved a most interest- 
ing -speaker. 



LE CERCLE FRANCAIS. 



Le Cercle Francais met last night. 
The program follows: 
Musique. • 
La France Aujourd'hui, 

Mile. Madeleine Thelier 
Lecture de Theophile Goutie.-, 

Mile. Hull 
Musique. 
Recitation Mile. Finley 

Jcux et Chansons. 



PRCGRAMM DES DEUTSCHE 
VEREINS. 



The Dutch Club met in Ticknor 
Study, Thursday evening. October 21, 
and the following program was ren- 
dered: 

Begruessung Herr Howe 

.'Xusprache Fi 1. Sahm 

Deutsche Kultur in Amerika Musik, 

Fran Howe 

Volksheder. 



JUNIOR PARTY. 



Th.e junior class entertained the 
freshn.en last Saturday evening. The 
office s of the class were in the re- 
ceiving line. Postal cards were 
matched for partners. The Pearsons 
quartette furnished music. 



ARMY DEFEATED 

Continued from Page 5. 

rison pulling him over the line. Gary 
kicked goal. Tigers 22, Army o. 

V'aiulemoer kicked and Nolan re- 
turned the oval 4 yards. Army lost 
the b;ill here on downs, and line bucks 
by Wilson, Heald and Vandemoer 
put it over for five more points. Gary 
kicked goal. Tigers 28, Army o. 

B)' this time the rooters were 
coi'iiting the score by fives. 

Army kicked to R. Morrison, who 
made a return of 20 yards; a forward 
pass to Sinton netted 20 more; line 
bucl-:s by Wilson and Heald put the 
ball on the Ft. Russell lO-vard line. 



and Vandemoer put it over. Gary 
kicked goal. Tigers 34, Army o. 

This was the final score of the first 
half, but with another minute to play 
the Tige.s would have scored another 
touchdown, as they had the ball on 
the Army five-yard line when the 
whistle blew. 

In the second half the Army used 
a shift formation almost entirely on 
the offensive, with which they accom- 
plished little. Wilson was shifted to 
full and LeClere took left half. 

Army kicked to Putnam, who pass- 
ed the ball to Vajidemoer, and the 
kick. was returned. College took pos- 
session of the ball on a fumble. Van- 
demoer made first down on three line 
bucks and kicked. Vandemoer recov- 
ered on onside kick. LeClere made 8, 
.Wilsc'ii 5, \''andemoer and Wilson 5 
each and Vandemoer put it over. 
Gary failed to kick goal. Tigers 39, 
Army 0. 

Vandemoer kicked to Rathburn and 
on the return kick made a brilliant 
run of 60 yards, and Sinton closed 
up the rest of the distance on a for- 
ward pass. Gary kicked goal. Tigers 
45, Army o. 

Steele took Roe's place at left 
guard. Vandemoer made his thi;-d 
touchdown.^ a few minutes later oh a 
cross-tackle buck for 15 yards. Gary 
failed to kick goal. Score, Tigers 50, 
Army o. 

The last touchdown was made on a 
funded punt. Dick Morrison was 
down as usual, and grabbing the ball, 
carried it over for an easy touch- 
down. Gary failed to kick a goal. 
Tigers 55, Army o. 

Time was called a few minutes later 
with the ball out of bounds. 

The line-up: 

Tigers. Army. 

Copeland, ^lorrison, 1. e., Johnson, 

Dufound. 

R. Morrison 1. t Wilder 

Reichmuth I. g Anderson 

Hedblom c Kelley 

Roe, Steel r. g Westervelt 

Gary ( Capt.) . . . .r. t Ghegas 

Sinton r. e. Knight, Hemaica 

Whittaker. Wilson, LeClere, 1. h., 

Rathburn. 

Heald, Wilson . . f . b Heyl 

Vandemoer r. h Bond 

Putnam q. b Nolan 

Touchdowns: Vandemoer, 3; Sin- 
ton, 4; R. Morrison, Heald, Whitta- 
ker. Goals, Gary, 5. 

Oflicials: Referee, Shute; Umpire, 
Nead. Head linesman, Rosenfelt. 
Time <eL'pers, Watson and Powell. 

Time of halves, 35 and 25. 



10 



THE T I G 10 R 




^ -k.ar***' 



The BIG ANNUAL 

BARBECUE 




Advance Sale of Tickets 
50c. Tickets at Gate 75c 



October 30th, 1909, CLGiven by the 
Class of 1912, on WASHBURN 
FIELD. BigFire! BigFeed! Big Joy! 



LITERARY PROGRAMS 



APOLLONIAN, NOVEMBER 5. 

Fight vs. Tube.culosis Johnston 

Piano Duet Hesler and Hille 

New York Election Sayre 

Debate: Resolved, That a central 
national bank similar to the Bank 
of England would be for the best 
niterests of our country. Affirma- 
tive, Moffit and Gregg. Negative, 
Lloyd and Newman. 
Visitors welcome. 



PEARSONS, OCTOBER 29. 

Current Events Haight 

Reading Dean 

Music Fowler 

Parliamentary Drill. (Society please 

study up Roberts' Rules of Order.) 

Visitors welcome. 

CICERONIAN, OCTOBER 29. 

Piano Solo EUingwood 

Lecture Experiences Pettigrew 

Snappy, Swa^^y 
Clothes 

AT 

THE MAY CO. 

Clever 
Haberdashers 



Current Events Harding- 
Debate: Resolved, That arbitration 
between capital and labor should 
be compulsory. Affirmative, Van 
Dyke and Heckman. Negative, 
Dietrich and Finkbiner. 

Parliamc ntary Drill Scott 

Visitors welcome. 



MINERVA, NOVEMBER 5. 



G.eene, Lyly, and Kyd...Miss Kampf 
Afarlowe and Shakespeare, 

Miss Tucker 
N'isitors welcome. 



CONTEMPORARY, NOVTMBER 5 

Bernard Sh;i\\ and the Social De- 
mocracy Afarguerite Seifried 

Stephen .Phillips .. .Winnif red Schuler 

Oscar Wilde Anna I^ewis 

X'isitors welcome. 

HYPATIA, NOVEMBER 5. 

Great Cathedrals of Germany, 

Altha Crowley 
The Rhine and Its Castles, 

Jennie Thomas 

Music Eleanor Thomas 

Visitors welcome. 



To Discuss College Policies. 

President Slocum has invited the fac- 
ulty to his home tonight for a discus- 
sion of general college policies. 



Y. W. C. A.. 



Tea will be served in the Montgom- 
ery rest room, Saturday, October 30, 
to all the college girls, from half-past 
three till half-past five. 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co. 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 

"Our Colorado" 
"Bruin Inn" 

"BlackandGold" 



The Three Songs of Colorado 

College — in Sheet Form 

for 40c. Buy Them of 

E.W. HILLE 



Clever Clothes 

FOR 

College Chaps 

AT 

ROBBINS 

=^ON THE CORNER == 



THE TIGER 



11 




Cigar Store 



Say! Know? What "13" Is Doing? 

No! Well Listen 

There are six $5.00 gold pieces arranged in a frame dated from 1901 to 1906 and 
the nearest correct guess as to the arrangement, wins the $30.00. A guess given 
with every dollars worth of purchase tickets. 

Harry 1C3 Hughes 



M 



IS MADE WITH 

_[f[L[L[ll3W?^W[DiJ[i^. 

J\ wo rd to the wi5e is sufficient ' 

GaC^'^ engraving CO. 

ILLUSTRATORS PUEBLO 
DESIGNERS «'«L,"- 
ENGRAVERS ^ 



Gel Your Picnic Supplies 

AT =1 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Favorite Resort of the Col- 
lege Students, Renowned in 
Story and Song 

BRUIN INN 

Up North Cheyenne Canon 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER, Mgr. 



Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Tatronize TIGER 
Advertisers 

UNION ICE AND COAL CO. 

W. M. BANNING, Proprietor 

Artificial !ce and Cold Storage 

Dealers in All Kinds of Coal and Piaion Wood 
Yard Office, 105 W. Vermiio City Office, 5 N. Tejon 



ALUMNI NOTES 

Miss Iriiia Rudd '05 has a position in 
tlie ueiA cr postoffice. 



Mr. and Mrs. Geo. D. Meston. ol 
i^uel)lo, a.rc rejoicing in the birth of a 
daughter, born Oct. 22. Mrs. Meston 
\v!;i lie reni..m>,ered as i\'iiss [rene White- 
hurst '07. 



Miss ]-'.thel Harrington '04 is the sec- 
retary of the West Denver High School. 



'! heodore '\iggs '08 was arourid the 
carnp'is last weei<. He is attending the 
. vr.\er University Law School this win- 
ter. 



Phidelah Rice '04, AUibrand ex-'09, 
and liarbert ex-'ll attended the army 
game last Saturday. 



Miss Mary Taylor ex-'09 is assistant 
vocal instructor at Wolfe Hall, in Den- 
ver. 



On Oct. 16, a son was born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Arthur Case';ier of Pasadena, Calif. 
Mrs. Casehier was Miss Flosse Churchill 
•05. 



Bert Stiles '08 is starting on a survey- 
ing trip to Blanca in the San Luis Val- 
1 y. Gvv'llim ex-'ll will also be in the 
party. 

Miss Alma Hubert, ex-'ll is attend- 
ing Denver ITniversity. 



Miss Minta PMwards ex-'lO was m,-ir- 
led on Oct. 20 to Mr. Roswell C. Kel- 
h'v of Leadville, Colo. Mr. and Mrs. 
'■''elley will live at Roswell, Colo. 

Ed Hoover ex-H was in town Mon- 
I'ay, stopping off on his way to Mexico. 
Since leaving C. C, he has been attend- 
ing Denver LTniversity. 

Mi'-s Emma Riggs '09 is engaged in 



Maier's Lunch & Dining Room 

Lunches of All Kinds 
Regular Meals 20c and 25c 

216' 2 N. Tejon St. Opposite North Park 



"Attention Collegians" 

Let us make your Dances, Receptions, 
and Fraternity Socials this term, affairs 
never to be forgotten, by decorating 
your hall or parlors in an artistic man- 
ner with the college banners, pennants, 
festoons and bunting. Then have 
erected our sidewalk canopy to keep off 
the inclement weather. We also liave 
floor coverings to protect the carpets. 
All this will cost but very little and 
add much to these affairs. 

Tht Out West Tent and 

A,._„* „ /^_ Telephone Main 1261 
Wning L.O. 113' J N, Tejon Street 

College 

Pennants 

New line of Pennants just received 
--they are very attractive, and the 
prices about a third lower than 
ever before. 

Our Celebrated College Posters are 
now only 25 or 50 cents 
each, mounted 




Whitney and Grimwood 

No. 20 North Tejon Street 



12 



THE TIGER 



0. E. Hemenway 



Groceries and 



Meats 



-♦••.•• 







115 South Tejon Street 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



YOU don't entertain your 
guests to save money — 
if you did, the simplest 
way would be to forego en- 
tertaining them. 
CfjMuETH's may cost more, 
but — 

ClMueth^s 

CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 



5 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



The Colorado Springs Floral Co. 

Wish to Have Your Business at Right 
Prices 



Telephone Main 599 



104 N. Tejon St. 



Young Women's Christian Association 
work in Bellinghani, Wash. 



A. G. SPALDIi a BROS, 



McHendrie '01 and Griffith '00 are ex- 
pected down to attend the Boulder 
game. 



l\Jiss i>iary vVeaver ex-'Q8 is teaching 
in Pueldo. 



Glenn Spencer ex-'12 has a position in 
the Auto Supply Co. in ]^ueLlo. 




The- 

SPALDING 
Trade -Mark 



Local Department || 



A. Lee Golden, Robert Lloyd and 
Defke '13, are new pledges to Phi Delta 
Theta. 



At a meeting of the freshman class, 
held Thursday, Oct. 21, the following 
committee was appointed to arrange for 
the class prayer meetings : the Misses 
Phillips, True and Stott and Messrs. 
Box'es and Golden. 



Miss True has been absent several 
days on account of illness. 



Prof. Coolidge, O. W. Lee and F. H. 
Rice were at Manitou Park Saturday 
marking timber for the sawmill. 

The senior foresters' lumbering trip 
has l)een postponed to a later date. 

Mr. Grant, a student at the University 
of Wisconsin, visited the Alpha Tau 
Delta over Sunday. 

Mrs. Skelton had a few college girls 
at her house for tea Sunday afternoon. 

Minerva had a breakfast above the 
falls in Williams canon Saturday morn- 
ing. 



Isn't satisfaction what you pay for 
after all? Then the next time you 
wa.nt to be irerfectlj^ at ease about an 
ice cream or catering order, send it to 
Noble, Phone Main 920. 

The juniors entertained the freshmen 
in a very pleasant manner last Saturday 
in Bemis hall. 



is known throughout 
the world as a 

Guarantee of 
Quality 



are the Largest 
Manufacturers 
in the World of 

Official 

Equipment 

For All 
Athletic 
Sports and 
Pastimes 

If You areinter- 
** * "" ested in 
Athletic Sport you 
should have a copy 
of the Spalding 
Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyclo- 
pedia of what's' new 
in Sport and is sent 
free on request. 

A. G. Spalding & Bros. 

1616 Arapohoe St., Denver, Colo. 

JOHN MOFFA T 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Stree 

Fraternities, Clubs, Individuals 
desiring Milk or Cream 
in any quantities 
should remem- 
ber :: :: 



The Sinton- Rustic Home 

rV • No. 419 South El Paso St. 

Uairy §) Phone Main 442 



The College Photo Studio 

The Highest Class of 

Photographs 




Bingham 

18 S. Tejon St. Phone M-678 



DOUGLAS & 
HETHERINGTON 



Telephone 336 



Architects 

Rooms 15 and 16 Out West Buiidlnii. 
COLORADO SPRINGS. COLO. 



THE 'I'UlKK 



13 



Memory 
Books 

Bound in colors, black and 
and orange, and lettered on 
side. The only really Colo- 
rado College Scrap Book 
made. Lar^e enough to con- 
tain your four years' items. 

Price, $1.23 each 



The Out West 

Printing & Stationery Co. 
9-11 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 



Furniture pL";'"'" 

Special Terms to Students 

McCracken & Hubbard 

120 and 122 South Tejon Street 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

IS S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

Are Alvrays Well Pleased When They 
Get Their Hair Cut at 

Campbell's Barber Shop 

12 S. T«jon St. Colorado Springs 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

'as cade Laundry 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 

20 per cent, discount 

To All Students of College and Academy 



7 E. Bijou 



Phone 820 



Elsie Greene spent the week end at 
her home, in Denver. 

Mrs. Clark of Oklahoma visited her 
niece, Gertrude Ashley, Saturday. 



Mr. Wodbridge has been made an 
h.onorarv member of Pearsons. 



George A. Bettes, of Missouri Univer- 
sity, spent the week visiting at the Sigma 
Chi house. 

Bruin Inn, the popular little rustic 
hostelry, in North Cheyenne canon, 
changed hands recently and is now man- 
aged by Swanson and Riley, two ener- 
getic and obliging young men of this 
city. They promise the same treatment 
accorded to College students by their 
predecessor, Mr. Laveley. 

Irene Huse has been absent from 
classes all week on account of sickness. 



.K party of Sigma Chi's and guests at- 
tended "P'aust," Tuesday evening. 

Frank Harshbarger received a few in- 
juries by a fall from his wheel. . 

Glenn Reid ex-'ll has left the city. 
He expects to enter the Normal School 
at Greeley. 



Miss Hinkley and Miss Weeks visited 
friends in Denver the latter part of the 



Roy 
Alpha 



Kirkpatrick 
'I'au Delta. 



'11 is pledged to 



Thornell '12 is pledged to Kappa Sig- 
ma. 



Pearsons initiated Friday night. Four- 
teen men got the goat : Williams, Sel- 
domridge, Donelan, Bowers, Sisco, 
Shaw, Mott, Moody, Kirkpatrick, 
Knight, Esmay, King, Golden and Wel- 
ler. 



A large number of college people at- 
tended Lucia de Lammermoor and 
Faust, Mondav and Tuesdav nights. 



'"The test of the pudding is the eat- 
ing." We are willing that our goods 
should stand the same test. We, 
meaning Noble, of course. 



Miss Marjorie Northcutt ex-'12 is ex- 
pected this week for a visit with friends. 

The Kappa Sigma sophomores enter- 
tained at dinner last Saturday evening. 
Mr. and Mrs. Morril chaperoned. The 
guests were : Misses Estill, Glasser, Pier- 



Hunt Up 

BisselFs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



C. F. Arcularius & 
Company 

A Large Assortment of 

BELT PINS 

All the Latest Styles 



9 South Tejon Street 
COLORADO SPRINGS. COLO. 



We have Embossing Dies for Stationery of all the 
College Societies and Fraternities, also the Great 
Seal of the College. We carry in stock a large 
line of papers upon which to emboss these Dies — 
Hurd's, Crane's and others. 

Gowdy-Simmons Ptg Co. \\^:^^^ 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Picnic Supplies 

For picnics and all kinds of outings, 
we are ready to supply everything in 
the way of eatables. We also have 
baskets so that we can pack your out- 
fit complete. Just say what you 
want, and when you want it, and 
you will have nothing else to do but 
think of the good time you are going 
to have. :: :: :: :: 

W. N. Burgess '^^ii::^ 



14 



THE T I G E K 



This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 

Company 




Headquarters for 

College Footwear 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

FOUNDERS AND MACHINISTS 



College 
Inn 



** Short 
// Orders 



Coimnutation Tickets — 
$3.30 for $3,00 

THE 

Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 

Our Special Extra-Clean 

Lignite 
Furnace Lump 

The Colorado Springs Fuel Co., 
112 Pike's Peak Avenue. Two 
Phones Main 230 

Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 

A. S. BLAKE 



Is the 


Man 


to 


See 




107 North Tejon 






Phone 


465 


ickle Ware 








Cutlery 



son. True, Ferril, Kilbourne, Bogue, 
Phillips. 

. The Dramatic Society presents "A 
Bow of Orange 'Ribbon" Friday even- 
in.g. 



Edith J\'JcCreery ex '09^ and Mabel 
Woolf e.N;-T2, are down from Greeley 
for the barbecue. 



Theodore Riggs was around the cam- 
pus the early part of the week. 

Ed Hoover was here the early part of 
the week on his way to Arizona, where 
he will join Cliff Kairne. 

Clara Jacobs spent the week-end in 
Denver. 

The exam bug has entered C. C. The 
infection has spread rapidly among the 
profs., without serious results, but the 
mortality among the students is great. 

Lenore Pollen has been at her home in 
Manitou all week on acocunt of illness. 



Messrs. Blackman, Griswold and Shaw 
purchased a large crop of fine pumpkins, 
Tuesday, which they charitably presented 
to Miss Brown. 



Sylvester has returned after a week's 
visit in Denver, during which time he 
took the thirty-second Masonic degree. 



Oh! You Football 
Enthusiasts 

The big games arc yet to come. 
Have you seen the very latest novelty? 

The Football Muff 

A protection a; ainst the chill of 
autumn weather, equipping you at 
the same time for the display of un- 
bounded enthusiasm. A most unique 
trophy for your room after the foot- 
ball season. See them at 

The Murray Drug Co. 



A hint to the fellows — If you 

can't make a hit with one of these, 
"It 'aint no use." 

William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 



MEMBERS 



\ New York Stock Exchange 

I Colorado Springs Mining Stock Exchange 



Dean Parsons and Prof. Smith filled 
the pulpit in the morning and evening 
services at the First Congregational 
church last Sunday because of the ill- 
ness of Mr. Bruno. 



High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



ACADEMY 



(Amy L. Busch, Correspondent.) 

Mi.ss D'Estelle Tremaine of luka, 
Kas., is a new student at Cutler. 

Professor Flaherty is enjoying a 
visit from his mother. 

The officers for the class of 1913 
are: 

President Edith Jackson 

\''ice-President D. Crowley 

Secretary and Treasurer. . H. Lennox 

The officers of the juniors are: 
President G. I^ittlefield 



THE 



Official Printers 

To the Student 
Body of C. C. 



The Waterman Press 

112 E. Cucharras St. 
Phone 1154 



We Print THE TIGER 



THE TIGER 



15 



Vice-President H. Crampton 

Secretary and Treasnrcr . . 1,. Wright 
Athletic Representa.tive, 

W. Hemenvvay 

Ha ry Ewing addressed the Cutler 
students at chapel, Tuesday. 



Albert AlcFarlane ex-'og of Victor, 
Cclo., is again, enrolled. 



Miss Edith Baker ex-'ii visited 
Miss Elizabeth Fowler last week. 



FOOTBALL NOTES. 

Cutler's football team began its 
season this year by tying the Deaf 
and Dumb Institute by a score of 6 

THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 

PETERSEN 

121 E. Kiowa 

Sev\red Soles 75 cents 

Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 

GIDDINGS BROS. 

Colorado Springs 

THE SPECIALTY STORE 

A Hearty Welcome Constantly Awaits All Visitors 

College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 



106! 2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



^h 



aundry 



Why not have the BEST WORK ? 



20 per cent, discount 

To all Students of College and Academy 



J. J. WILSON, College Agent 

W.I.LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



119 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



/f 



HATS 

the latest shapes 
and colors, $3.00. 
Try one at 

GORTON'S 



Young Men's 
College Styles 



=^ 



Sui s and Overcoats. It has been a great thing for the 
young fellows to find here just what they want; snappy 
models broad shoulders, dip-front coats, with long broad 
lapels; very peg trousers. We have special models from 
the College Brand at $25.00. 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 



%r. 





Correct Dress for Men. \ 



113 E. Pike's Peak 
Avenue 



J 



to 6. A little later it played them 
aga.in, beating them 5 to o. This 
game showed a great imp.-ovement 
over the first one, but the line is still 
very slow at defense. The team last 
Saturday played the college freshman 
eleven and was defeated by a score 
of 21 to 0. 

With only these three scrimmages 
Cutler must face the local High 
School tomorrow. It will be the big 
game of the season, and Cutler means 
to win if possible. Now, to do this, 
the team must be supported. At the 
practice games there were only a few 
rooters out and there was hardly any 
cheering. At this game every one 
in Cutler must come out and cheer, 
if he hopes to see his team put up a 
hard fight. 



Schneider, who has been out of the 
game with a cracked lib, is back 
again on the team. 



Stark has had to leave the team on 
account of outside work. 



HESPERIAN NOTES. 

■ The program for Friday, October 
29, is as follows: 

Speech H. Brunner 

Recitation R. Jackson 

First Chapter, Continued Story, 

E. Jackson 

Speech C. Miller 

Paper M. Strieby 

Critic's Report. .. Professor Flaherty 



DRINK 

DERN'S 

Freshly Roasted Tea and Coffee 

29 South Tejon Straet 

The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies and 
Fixtures 



208 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 812 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-203 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence, 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 9£6 

The College 

Photo Studio 

Hi^h Class Photographs 
Kodaks and Supplies 




TTUMf 



Corner Cascade and Kiowa 



16 



THE TIGER 
THE YOUNG MEN'S STORE 



Our Shoe Man Suggested the Other Day 

that we call the attention of the College Men tj our Regal Shoe styles for this fall. 
The smartest looking, longest wearing and best made shoe in the world at anywhere 
near its price. $3.SO and $4.00. The Regal "College Blucher" is designed 
especially for the young men who are looking for something snappy. 



Perkins-Shearer Co, •»% 



28 East Pike's Peak Avenue 
8 North Tejon Street 




All the New Features 

in young men's fall styles in footwear. Among them 
is the new high arch last with military heels- -wing tips 
and fancy perforations, in Tan Russia, Patent Colt and 
Dull Calf, our showing is es- 
pecially complete at this 
time. 



\f5>^«v5y 



SHOES THAr SATISFY 



&a S-TCJON ST- 



When Trading, Remember TIGER Advertisers 

Colorado College 

Founded in Colorado Springs in 18 7 4 
WM. F. SLOCUM, President 




Depart- 
ments 



College of Arts and Science 

E. S. PARSONS, Dean 
School of Engineering 

F. CAJORI, Dean 
School of Forestry 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 
School of Music 

E. D. HALE, Dean 



Cutler Academy p' 



The Associated 
'r ep ar a tory 
■ School, in which 
students are prepared for any American College 



Electrical Laboratory 




Vol. XII 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., NOVEMBER 5, 1909 



Number 8 



EWING 



LARGE SUBSCRIPTION AT 
CHAPEL MEETING. 



JI3 Promised — $500 to Be Raised — 

McCuat, Schneider and Cajori 

Speak — What Other Colleges 

Are Doing. 



Yesterda.v Iresident McOuat called a 
meeting of the student body to put be- 
fore them the action of the missionary 
committees and of the Student Commis- 
sion. After reviewing briefly what had 
i:een done last year and wliat it was up 
to the students to do this year, he called 
on Dr. Schneider. 

Dr. Schneider said that it was im- 
poriant to lia\f an experience in a world 
wide movement. Jrle further stated thai 
in college the tendency to become self- 
centered was too manifest, that even ui 
the local work of the associations evor_-- 
one was always ready to shift the re- 
sponsibility on some one else. 

He added that the best way to get a 
real interest was by giving money and 
by knowing some one who is actively in 
this work just as we know Ewing. 

Next, Dr. Cajori cited instances of 
men who had in a large way cut down 
on their living expenses that they might 
l~,e able to give more to the development 
of young men and women in this coun- 
try. Among these men were Dr. Pear- 
sons of Chicago, Andrew Carnegie, and 
corning closer home, there were General 
Palmer, Mr. Hagerman, the Bemises and 
others. He said that we were the recipi- 
ents of the gifts made by these and that 
we could give in a small' way something 
of what had been done for us. 

He further emphasized that we eitner 
ought to take this up as a college mo\-e- 
meiit or not go into it at all. 

In closing, he added, "As to Ewing, 
you know h'm. He sat here among you 
for three years. He is a good, clean boy 



and has a'lility alony" the Hue he has 
chosen for his life work. 

"Let it be kn.own that the students can 
carr\- on tins undertaking successfuil_\-." 

As a result of the preliminary can- 
^•ass thus far the men have promised 
$113, the women $224, the faculty $69 
and friends $7.00, making a total of 
$4!3. Tins smn will be raised to the 
$500-mark when all the cards are in. 

Some time ago the missionary coni- 

Continued on Page 7. 



GALA NIGHT 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL BARBE- 
CUE A GREAT SUCCESS. 

Brilliant Lights^ — Novel Decorations. 
Barbecued Meat, and Cider — Ac- 
tive Blanket — Large Crowd 
to Enjoy It All. 

Last Saturda\- night was gala night on 
Washburn Field, when the sophomores 
cr^tertained at the annual barbecue. 
.Artistic programs promised as follows: 

Welcome President Graham 

The Value of the Barbecue to Colo- 
rado College President Slocum 

Selection Quartette 

A Tagless I'ale Dean Cajori 

Selection . Quartette 

The Value of Colorado College to the 

Barbecue G. W. Shaw 

Wright Brothers Competitors. 

But things did not work out right in 
tins department. President Slocum and 
Dean Cajori talked with a snap, but 
there was no musical relief One mem- 
ber of the quartette never showed up. 
To make matters worse, Shaw got up 
and gave a successful demonstration of 
the sins of non-preparation and bluffing, 
.After the program, the sophomores 
pulled off their part of the show, which 
was successful in every respect. 

Continued on Page 9. 



44 TO 5 

THE TIGERS TROUNCE WYOM- 
ING AT LARAMIE. 



Vandemoer, Whitaker and Putnam 

Star — V/yoming's Center Scores 

on Long Run After Fumble. 

Tigers Entertained Royally. 



'1 he game last Saturday with the Uni- 
versity of Wyoming in Laramie proved 
to be another practice game, the score 
being 44 to 5. The Wyoming team, 
though light and inexperienced, showed 
a knowledge of the game and pluck un- 
usual in a JDsing team. The men were 
in the game until the very finish, the 
whole student body back of them all the 
time. '] he run which gave them their 
score, was received with an enthusiasm 
worthy of a victory and the man who 
made it was a real hero. 

The Tigers did not play a brilliant 
game by anj^ means. Forward passes 
were repeatedly blocked and the light 
liacks of Wyoming again and again tore 
holes in the line. In the second half 
four successive plays of this sort were 
each good for from five to ten yards. 
Vandemoer and Whitaker were often 
good for- long gains, Vandemoer going 
around the end twice for fifty yards. 
Putnam secured the ball on a punt and 
ran thirty-five yards for a touchdown. 

The first touchdown was made after 
three and one-half minutes of play and 
the second followed quickly after a long 
gain through the line by Whitaker. 
Vandemoer kicked a field goal for the 
third score. The first half closed after 
two more touchdowns with the score 27 
to 0. In the second half Wheeler, Wyo- 
ming's center, secured the ball on a fum- 
l)le and ran fifty yards for a touchdown, 
being downed on the line liy Vandemoer. 
This meant almost as much as victory to 

Continued on Page 9. 



THE T I G P] R 



JUNIORS WORKING HARD ON 
"PRINCESS BONNIE." 



Operetta to Be Given in Perkins Hall 
November 23 — The Plot. 



The date <>f the presentation of the 
junior operetta. "Princess Bonnie." 
will be Tuesday night, November 2^. 
It will be given in Perkins Hall. 

Manager Co, ehmd is making ar- 
rangements for the decorations, scen- 
ery, etc., and on November 23 will 
present a finished production. 

The juniors have made a new de- 
partu.e, and f.om the way in which 
the class is working, the operetta will 
undoubtedly be a decided success. The 
music is extraor-dinarily catchy, and 
the cast already has it well in hand. 
While the chorus necessarily is not 
making headway as. fast as are the 
princi;:als, yet it is doing well, and 
will be a strong feature of the play. 

Followmg is a synojisis: 

Act II. 

Bonnie, the adopted daughter of Capt. 
Tarpaulin, who has been rescued by him, 
has just attained her 19th birthday, on 
which occasion all the villagers and the 
canoeists are gathered. The captain 
presents Bonnie with a miniature of her 
mother which was around her neck when 
she was taken from the boat where she 
was d ifting alone. While Bonnie is 
looking at the picture, Roy Stirling, a 
lisherman, comes along on his way to a 
nearby ship and falls in love with Bon- 
rie at first sight. His affection is re- 
turned by the }-oung lad\-. 

It seems that in Spain Bonnie is heir 
to a large fortune and has been be- 
tr.jthed in infancy to Count Falsetti. 
'1 lie Count and Admiral Pomposo now 
appear on the scene and claim her. She 
is compelled to go with them, taking 
Kitty, but leaving Roy and Shrimps 
b.eartbroken. but the latter by their ac- 
tions sliow that they intend to follow to 
Spain. 

Act IJ. 
The act opens with Bonnie in her un- 
cle's home in Spain, but much disturbed 
by the attentions of the Count. Pom- 
poso has just purchased some wax fig- 
ures and is having them put in place in 
his garden. Tn the meantime Roy, 
Shrimps, and the Captain have arrived 
in Spain and have succeeded in having 
themselves substituted for the wax fig- 
ures. In this way they appear and are 
recognized by Kitty and Bonnie. The 
whole party are just preparing to leave 
the castle when Count Falsetti appears 
and orders them to stop. A duel be- 



tween Shrimps and the Count ensues, 
wherein, just as the Count is about to 
he overcome, he summons a company of 
Spanish soldiers. Roy and Shrimps 
oNcrcOiUe the soldiers and escape, but 
they are recaptured and brought before 
Pomposo. He condemns them to the 
dungeon, but as they are to be carried 
off, Bonnie appears and begs for their 
lives. Salvador enters and hands Pom- 
poso a paper which tells him that the 
Count is a traitor. Pomposo has the 
Count put in chains and bestows Bon- 
nie's hand upon Roy. 



VICTORIOUS IN FIERCE BAT- 
TLE WITH FLAMES. 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 

.Vt the conference on Tuesday, Dean 
Hale gave the first of a series of lectures 
on '1 echriique. I''or clearness' sake two 
senses of the term were discriminated. 
There is the abstract technique of the 
art, as, of painting, and there is the con- 
crete accomplishment of the artist. This 
accomplishment is essentially mental and 
neurotic, it is only incidentally muscular. 
'1 he acquirement of it is, contrary to the 
connnon notion, an intellectual process 
possessed of peculiar disciplinary value — 
a highly idealized manual training. ^Nlr. 
Hale showed photographs of the hands 
of Busoni (an X-ray), and of Rubinstem. 
These will be discussed further next 
Tuesd.ay. All interested in music study 
are invited to be present. 



MUSICAL CLUB RECITAL. 

The first recital of the Colorado 
.Springs Musical Club for the season of 
19,39-1910 will be given in Perkins Hall, 
Monday afternoon, Nov. 8, at 3 :30 
o'clock. The recital will he open to the 
pulilic and all interested are cordiall\- 
invited to be present. 

The program will be devoted to organ 
music, and Mrs. Burt Davis will give a 
paper on "The Development of the 
Organ." 

ENTERPEAU SOCIETY. 



The Euterpian Society held a recital 
at Perkins Hall last night. An excellent 
program was rendered by local people. 



TEAS. 



The tea given by the Young Wo- 
men's Christian Association in the 
rest room in Montgomery Hall was 
very successful. These teas will be 
given frequently. Women should 
watch the bulletin board and the Tig- 
er for notices of them. 



Short Liire Rushes Special Train to 
Scene. 

At about 2 o'clock Monday afternoon 
the foresters were called upon to extin- 
guish a forest fire which had been raging 
unchecked for two days in the mountains 
ab-out six miles south of town and along 
the Short Line railroad. Considerai le 
damage had already been done and the 
lire was getting up into the more valu- 
aljle timber and threatening the. Pike 
forest. So urgent was the appeal for 
help that a special train was gotten 
ready and the foresters, plentifully sup- 
plied with food and tools, were soon on 
their way to the scene of the conflagra- 
tion. 

Upon arri\-ing they iinmediatel\- set to 
work trenching around the fire under 
the direction of Professors Coolidge and 
Alorril. After about two hours' hard 
work, during" which time several of the 
men were more or less burned, they suc- 
ceeded in 1 ringing the fire under con- 
trol and in about two hours more had it 
completely extinguished. 

1 he place selected for the stand was in 
a dense grove of chaparral, which, al- 
though thick, is not very high. In 
growth like this a fire burns along the 
surface and is more easily fought than 
when burning through the crowns of 
the larger trees. 

Experiences of this sort are a \alu- 
able thing for a forester, and while there 
is a great deal of hard work connected 
with it, the training more than pays for 
any physical exertion expended. 



MRS. GOODALE GOING TO 
PENNSYLVANIA. 

Mrs. Priscilla Goodale, who has 
been associated with Colorado 
College so long, coming here in igo8, 
is preparing to leave us. i\lost of the 
students know her in her capacitx- as 
an assistant in the treasurer's office, 
but those who know her personally will 
see her go with great regret. She was 
graduated from the college in 1902, and 
has always shown the most sympathetic 
interest and loyalty for all its life and 
activities. She' is going to join her hus- 
1 and, who is teaching in the School of 
Mines of the University of Pittsburg. 
Pa. 

Miss Harriet Sater, who has been as- 
sisting Mrs. Goodale. during the present 
year, is to continue as assistant in the 
treasurer's office. 



THE TIGER 



KINDNESS AND SELF-REGARD. 

Dr. Slocum Gives Fourth Ethical in 
Series. 
I 

Last Friday Dr. Slocum continued 
his ethicals on "Kindness," this time 
considering it witli '"Self-Regard." 

By way of introduction, he said: 

"There is nothing really kind, that 
we cati do for a person, which doesn't 
help him to be his best morally and 
intellectually. If we give a man liq- 
uor or tobacco, we arc not really kind 
to him. If we flatter a man, we are 
not really kind to him. We are not 
kind to anyone whom we cause, by 
word or deed, to lower his standards 
of life." 

In speaking of "Self-Regard." the 
President said: 

"We all know some people who 
seem to be making an apology for 
their existence — who have no regard 
for their personal appearance — who 
always by their actions show that they 
consider themselves inferior. This at- 
titude is unfortimate. None will re- 
sfect you unless you respect yourself. 
Respect and honor your moral nature. 
If yon respect yourself morally and 
spiritually you will get the best out of 
life. 

"Don't shirk work. If you do, you 
a e not honoring yourself. If you get 
the best out of everything, you will 
do everything well. 

"Make others honor you by refrain- 
ing from low words or actions in your 
presence. A man who indulges in low 
words or actions in your presence is 
insulting you. He thinks that is what 
you like. And we get in this world 
about what we deserve. If we are 
earnest and noble we get earnest and 
noble companions. If we are low we 
get low companious. We get what 
we deserve. 

"There are two ways to ward ofif 
things that are low: i. Don't listen to 
gossip. In the first place, most of it 
is untrue, and, even if it is true, there 
are too manj^ good things in life to 
talk about, instead of exchanging pet- 
ty personalities. 2. Don't be too fam- 
iliar with anyone. Don't let people 
joke you about the sacred things of 
life — things that siiould always be 
spoken of with reverence. Don't let 
them be so familiar as to put you on 
a lower plane. Be dignified — dignity 
of charatcer gets the respect of other 
people. 

"This world needs men and women 
who stand on their dignity so splen- 
didly that they make meanness seem 



mean, lowness low. Stand up at your Matches must be played at once. The 

best. Honor yourself, and God will association is an.xious to know who is 

regard you, and t!ie world will regard going to represent the college in the in- 

you. tercoUegiate tournament, so get busy.- 



DRAMATIC AMENDMENTS" 
ACCEPTED. 

.^t a meeting of the Dramatic So- 
ciety last Friday night the following 
amendements to the constitution were 
;iccepted : 

I. The oflices of the society shall be 
di\'ided equally between town and hall 
young women. 

a. The offices of president and vice- 
president shall not both be held by 
liall. or both bj' town young women, 
in the saine year. 

By-Laws:. 

1. There shall be some form of dra- 
n:atic entertainment every six weeks. 

2. The accounts of the society shall 
be audited every two months b}^ a 
committee consisting of the secretary 
and custodian. 

.3. A member may not take part in 
more than two entertainments during 
a semester. 



PRESIDENT SLOCU¥i'S TRIP. 



Will Visit Many Points in the East. 



President Slocum will go east shortly, 
mainly to attend a meeting of the Board 
of Trustees of the Carrnegie F'oundation 
for the Advancement of Teaching. Presi- 
dent Slocum is a trustee of this found. 
While away he will visit Washington, D. 
C. and Port Deposit, Maryland. He will 
deliver an address at the Tome School 
for Boys. From there he will go to Bos- 
ton, speaking at two colleges in the vi- 
cinity—Mount Holyoke and Smith, 
From there he will proceed to New York 
to attend the meeting of the Carnegie 
F'oundation, and thence to Millbrook 
N. Y. 



TENNIS TOURNAMENT. 



Th tournament is on. Singles have 
been scheduled and the doubles will be 
posted soon Matches are being played 
now and from all indications things ;ire 
going to be lively. 

It is understood that tourna;;ient 
matches take precedence o\'er other 
games, whether they are signed for or 
not. 

The entry fee of 25 cents must be paid 
to the treasurer of the Tennis Associa- 
tion before the matches are played. 



CONCERNING $50.00. 



A Review of the Two Sides of the 
Controversy. 



That the women had petitioned the 
athletic i)oard for $50 was noted in last 
week's Tiger. 

'1 here seem to be two strong sides to 
this question, and as nearly as" we can 
('.iscover, this is the situation. The wo- 
men sa_\ that they need money to main- 
tain their athletics. Their expenses are 
not high, but in any case, they must be 
luet. Basket balls are needed, the track 
and other equipment must be kept up. On 
High School Day the women's athletic 
association incurs expenses in entertain- 
ing the high school students. Here- 
tofore the little money which the women 
Irave had for these purposes has been 
ra.ised by subscription, as they have had 
no other way of obtaining it — and even 
then the amount secured has not been 
sufficient. The girls claim that they pay 
their athletic fee as do the men, but the 
money is spent, not upon athletics in 
general, as they feel it should be, but 
upon the men's sparts,. Therefore the 
women do not get the same benefit from 
it as do the men. 

The stand which the Athletic Board 
takes is this : According to the consti- 
tution of the association the athletic fee 
is to be spent upon intercollegiate ath- 
letics, and since the girls do not engage 
in intercollegiate athletics, the board 
does not feel that it is in its power to 
grant this request. They think that it is 
a matter which should be decided by 
the student commission and the money 
taken, if at all, from the general fund 
and not from the athletic fee. As to the 
argument concerning the women's ex- 
penses on High School Day, the board 
says it has absolutely nothing to do with 
that day and could not in any case ap- 
propriate money for this use. High 
School Da>' is a college affair and not a 
matter with which the athletic associa- 
tion is connected in any wa}'. 

So the matter stands — and the women 
are still after the fifty dollars. 



Everj' organization in college will give 
over its meeting to the big rally one week 
from tonight, if the boosters have their 
wav about it. 



THE TIGER 



A THLETIC NOTES 



'I'oiiiorrovv Coach Rothge'j will be liere 
with his Aggie team. Although Boulder 
and D. U. have waded through this team 
for large scores, we are well enough ac- 
quainted with Rothgeb to know that his 
bunch will put up a hard, plucky light 
tomorrow. 

Richards realizes that the crucial game 
of the \'ear is not far off and has been 
rushing the team harder than ever. The 
cripples are all coming around in good 
shape, and barring any future accident, 
he will be able to put any man on the 
squad in our big games. 

The Tigers will line up as follows to- 
morrow : 

Sinton, r. e. ; Gary, r. t. ; Steele, r. g. ; 
Hedblom, c. ; Reichmuth, 1. g. ; Morri- 
son, 1. t. ; Thompson, 1. e. ; Sherry, q. b. ; 
Heald, f, b. ; Vandemoer, r. h. ; Whit- 
aker, 1. h. ^ 

Game is called at three o'clock. 



Tonight at 7 :30 o'clock there will be a 
mass meeting, and we want everyone 
out; Fuzzy has one or two new yells to 
present and we shall hear from Goach 
Richards and others. 



Gonsiderable annoyance has been ex- 
perienced of late by students who wait 
mitil the game to get their tickets 
punched. The men at the gate are busy 
enough without this extra work, which 
can easily be avoided by securing your 
tickets earlier in the week. 



Last Saturday our freshman team 
slipped down to Pueblo and handed a 
small package to the Gentennial High 
School team. The game was played in a 
Minding dust storm and the freshmen 
say the score should have been much 
larger, but 15-0 isn't so bad. 

The feature of the game was a 4S-yard 
run to a touchdown by Judd. who sifted 
through the whole Pueblo team, having 
received the ball on a punt. Cort was 
the most consistent ground gainer for 
the freshmen. Howard made several at- 
tempts for a drop kick, but the wind was 
so bad he only succeeded in putting one 
between the posts. "Shorty" Long made 
the other touchdown. 

The freshmen are getting lots of fine 
experience this fall, which will be put to 
good use next fall and which will also 
stand them in good stead when they meet 



the sophomores in their annual post- 
season battle. 

'I heir line-up : 

Bowers, 1. e. ; LeGlere, 1. t. ; Hall, 1. 
g. ; Withrow, c. ; Root, r. g. ; Howard, 
r. t. ; Sinton, r. e. : Judd, q. b. ; Acker 
and Long, 1. h. ; Gort, f. b. ; Benjamin, 
r. h. 

1 he drawings for the singles in the 
temiis tournament have been made ; 
doubles will be scheduled later. 
Ladies' Singles. 

Miss Hall vs. Miss Shalleberger. 

Miss Miller vs. Miss Jones. 

Miss Publo vs. Miss Bartlett. 

Miss Shapcott vs. Miss Bogue. 
Men's Singles. 

Ellingwood vs. Seldomridge. 

Greenlee vs. Ramsay. 

Braden vs. Ormes. 

Dietrich vs. Krueger. 

Morgan vs. Nelson. 

Hunt vs. Smith. 

Fowler vs. Clifford. 

Bailey vs. Heald. 

Matches must be played off at once. 
Tournament matches take preference to 
all other games whether the courts are 
signed for or not. The entry fee of 25c 
must 1-e paid to Dietrich before matches 
are played. 



Those who witnessed the game be- 
tween Gutler and the Terrors saw one 
of the best high school games ever played 
on Washburn Field. Cutler's inexperience 
in some departments of the game prob- 
ably cost her the game. Their handling 
of punts was very ragged. Twice in the 
second half High School recovered punts 
and carried the ball to a touchdown. For 
Gutler Brice was a particularly brillia":t 
star, his two long runs to the goal being 
spectacular plays. 

Cutler played a strong game on the de- 
fense and fair on the offense, but they 
were not present in a pinch ; the Terrors 
plainly showed that they knew more foot- 
ball than their old enemies and deserved 
to win. 

There were practically no games played 
last Saturday in Colorado. Tomorrow 
there will be one game which is very im- 
portant in that it will practically elim- 
inate one team from the championship. 
This is the game between Mines and 
Denver University. The Miners are 
light, fast and full of fight this vear, and 



if they can stop the line-plunging of Volk 
will give Denver the battle of her life. 
Denver, on the other hand, with the cjn- 
hdence inspired by a long string of vic- 
tories and the advantage of weight and 
experience, will probably repeat their 
\-ictory of last year. 



New Mexico journeys up to Boulder 
tomorrow to battle U. of C., but they are 
too light to give the Silver and Gold 
aggregation a good work-out. 

The following article, occasioned by 
the death of Captain Byrne of West 
Point, who died as the result of injuries 
in the game between West Point and 
Harvard last Saturday, is taken from the 
Denver News of last week and gives a 
good idea of what a hold the game of 
football has on the American public : 

While deploring the sad accident at 
West Point Saturday, which resulted in 
the death of Cadet Byrne of the Army 
team, presidents of the various Colorado 
colleges defend the game and declare 
that they cannot see any reason to take 
action against the playing of the great 
college game. They unite in saying they 
cannot see any great danger for the con- 
testants engaged in the present open style 
of play, and look upon the accident as an 
incident liable to happen in any sport or 
pastime. 

'I he sentiment seems to be general 
that football as it is now played is no 
more dangerous to life and limb than 
several other sports which are engaged 
in by strong, healthy and high-spirited 
young men enthused through carrying 
the colors of whatever institution they 
attend. 

Goach Koehler of the Denver Univer- 
sity team says that while the accident is 
to be deplored, he cannot see why it 
should have the slightest effect on foot- 
ball at any institution other than 
West Point. He points to his own 
career and experiences in ten years' 
connection with the game, either as a 
player or coach, as an evidence that 
the game, while strenuous, is not a 
dangerous one when the number of 
men engaged in it is taken into con- 
sideration. He has never received a 
serious accident in football. 

A'l embers of the Denver University 
team say the accident at West Point 
does not scare them any more than 
they would be scared of riding on a 



THE TIGER 



train after reading of a wreck some- 
where. Captain Crowley exp/esses 
the opinion that for everyone injured 
in football ten are benefited by engag- 
ing in the sport. 

Following are some of the expressions 
made by presidents of the various insti- 
tutions of learning : 

Will Make No Change. 

Golden, Colo., Nov. 4. — "While, of 
course, we all deplore the death of the 
young West Pointer from the result of 
injuries received on the football field, I 
cannot see that it will make any change 
in the future of the game, generally 
speaking," said Dr. V. C. Alderson, pres- 
ident of the School of Mines, today. 

"Because a man was struck by light- 
ning while attending a church last sum- 
mer, people of the world did not make a 
solemn vow to never again go to church. 
Several persons were killed or injured in 
an electric car accident last week in Den- 
ver, yet there is no decrease in the num- 
ber who patronize the cars. 

"Aside from the disbanding of the 
West Point team, I "do not anticipate the 
death of young Byrne will have the 
slightest effect on the football situation 
elsewhere, either this season or later." 
Same as Other Sports. 

After boarding the Rock Island train 
for New York, where he goes to inau- 
gurate the campaign for subscriptions to 
the Palmer memorial statue, President 
W. F. Slocum made the following state- 
ment regarding the future of football at 
Colorado College : 

"While the recent casualties are deeply 
to be regretted, it is nevertheless true 
that football is not more dangerous to- 
day than are several sports which no one 
would think of discontinuing, such as 
horseback riding, swimming and auto- 
mobiling. The game is certainly much 
less dangerous today than it was ten 
years ago. What its future is to be no 
one can prophesy. It pro!,ably will be 
still further modified. But in my judg- 
ment it has too firm a hold on popular 
favor to be given up." 

Dean Edward S. Parsons of the Col 
lege, who was at the station to see Presi- 
dent Slocum off, and who is chairman of 
the athletic board at Colorado College, 
concurred in President Slocum's state- 
ment. 

Bring More Open Style. 

Fort Collins, Colo., Nov. 4. — The un- 
usual number of fatalities in last Satur- 
day's football contests will have the ef- 
fect of producing a more open style of 
play in the opinion of Dr. Charles A. 
Lory, president of Colorado Agricultural 
College, who sa\'s : 



"1 his is a coincidence of fatalities thai 
can not be explained. I see no specific 
cause for them, but the effect undoubted- 
ly will be to produce a more open style 
of play. It will tend to loosen up the 
game, and cause some needed modifica- 
tions in the rules to further lessen the 
chances of acicdent. 

"Football is not a particularly danger- 
ous sport. When one considers the num- 
ber of men engaged in play, it will be 
found that the average of casualties is 
low. There is no real basis for opposi- 
tion against the sport, which does not 
apply to any other sport as well. 

"The great danger in football comes 
from undertrained teams playing strong 
and well trained elevens. This sort of 
criminal negligence should be stopped. 
As far as accidents are concerned, they 
can not all be presented, but undoubted- 
ly the endeavor will be to minimize them 
as much as possible. I have no fear that 
these accidents will cause any serious ef- 
fort to abolish football in the leading in- 
stitutions of the country." 



CCUR^ES IN ART TO BE GIVEN 
By MR. C. W. LOVE. 



EWING'S FAREWELL. 



Fast Friday night, before the Christian 
associations of the college, Ewing bad': 
farewell. He spoke informally and 
quietly on how he felt the increasmg 
power with which to go into this new 
world of activity. His expression was 
permeated not with a spirit of sacrifice 
or self-denial, but with the greatest op- 
timism that he had the privilege of going 
into this "Continent of Opportunity." 

Last week Ewing filled to the brim 
with personal interviews, -^ommrttee 
meetings, chapel t.alks, and various ochtr 
meetings in the halls and ,vith tlie Ad- 
visory Board., not only g'-ving something 
of the vision that he saw in the new 
field he is about to enter, but also stir- 
ring up int.-rest in the Rochester con- 
vention and in Christian Association 
work in general. 



PROFESSOR RUGER RECEIVES 

APPOINTMENT AT 

COLUMBIA. 



Professor Ruger has recently received 
notice of his appointment to teacb in the 
summer school of Columbia University 
during the coming summer. He will be a 
member of the facluty in the psycholog- 
ical department. Prof. Ruger spent the 
past summer at Columbia, doing ad- 
\-anced work and also having charge of 
a part of the original research work. 



Mr. C. W. Love announces the follow- 
ing art classes to be held in Perkins 
hall : 

A portrait class will meet in the morn- 
ing four times each week. There will be 
three divisions of this class : one for be- 
ginners, one for those who have some 
knowledge of the work, and one for ad- 
vanced work. The general aim of this 
class will be to teach portrait painting. 

Another class will meet at night. This 
will be an illustration course. Mr. Love 
intends this as an aid to anyone who 
may consider making illustrations for 
magazines or doing other illustrating or 
sketching work. 

The third class will meet on Saturday 
motnings and is intended especially for 
school teachers, students, or others who 
may be unable to attend the other 
classes. 

Later in the year work will be done in 
landscape painting when the weather 
permits. Lectures will be given on com- 
position, color, anatomy, and perspective. 

Mr. Love is a graduate of the Jersey 
City Technical School in New Jerse}^ 
Since his graduation he has been doing 
private work in Denver and New York. 



EXCHANGES. 



Two of the women's societies at Ob- 
erlin are now offering fellowships for 
study abroad. 

One of the frate.nity houses at the 
University of California has been of- 
fered to the football men for their 
use in order that they may become 
more perfectly organized before one 
of the big games. 



The University of Pennsylvania was 
awarded the grand prize and a gold 
medal for the best educational exhibit 
at the Seatttlc Exposition. 



At Da tmouth no text books are to 
be used in the economics courses this 
year, but the students are required to 
subscribe for the New York Post and 
be able to discus« economic questions 
in class. 



A course in aeronautics is being 
planned at the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of fechnology. 



Inter-class and inter-fraternity ten- 
nis tournaments are held each fall at 
-Amherst. 



THE TIGER 



The Weekly Newspaper of Colorado College 



GLENN W. SHAW Editor-in-Chief 

HARRY W. McOLAT Business Manager 

S. W. Dean Assistant Editor 

C. DovELAN Assistant Editor 

H. H. Haight Assistant Editor 

L. E. GriSWOLD Engineering Editor 

B. P. SiDDONS Athletic Editor 

H. F, Rice Forestry Editor 

Julia Ingebsoll Alumni Editor 

Helen Canon Exchange Editor 

Janet Kampf Local Editor 

W. L. Warnock Local Editor 

A. E. Bryson Assistant Manager 

E. W. HiLLE Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

Geneva McCaw, T. M. Pettigrcw, Edith Sommers, F. B. 

Copeland, Margaret Watson, E S Statten, 

Katharine True, D. L Sisco 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to The Tiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 
College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

jTBi^^^icl vjR Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
^^s^^ffls^^ Springs, Colo., as second-class matter. 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c. 



A DOSE OF FALL TONIC. 



If what i^eenis to be the general having a large number of out-of-door 
sentiment of the student body, to put sports into which p.-actically every 



Tomorrow the Tigers play the Ag- 
gies on Washburn Field. The Tiger 
does not urge every student to be in 
the rooters' section proving his loy- 
alty and spirit; it expects every one 
to be there. j\Iost of you hold tickets 
that would make you believe you were 
losing money if you were not there, 
and this season's games are nut so 
plentiful that we need call attention 
to seldom-knocking opportunity. But 
we must confess uneasiness about the 
attendance at the series of evening 
yell practices scheduled for Wash- 
burn Field on every afternoon next 
week at 5 o'clock. We remember the 
past and the ways of students. To- 
morrow's game should not be too 
hard, but the University \V\\\ arrive 
here one week later with a brand of 
football that will test- us, both play- 
e s and rooters, most thoroughly. 
That game will be hard, and we are 
glad cf it. There is more glory in 
winning one hard game that fourteen 
easy rolly-polly bouts. We should^ 
begin to win next week's game now. 
Coach Richards will have the Tigers 
in shape; we can depend on them. 
We must be in shape to do our part. 
Siddons and McQuat will be on 
Washburn Feild every afternoon this 
week. Will you? 



our HoUowe'en carnival back a few 
years in' one important respect, to 
again make it a "home-folks affair," is 
to result in any good the reform must 
be made now, before next year's man- 
ager gets his advertisements out and 
can claim a grievance if his plans are 
interfered with. 



The women will probably not be 
granted a regular allowance of $50 
from the athletic association moneys. 
Their position has been compared 
with that of the man who does not 
participate in athletics, but pays his 
fee along with everybody else. The 
Athletic Association is undergoing an 
experiment this year, too, and cannot 
indulge in generosity. 



D. U. has completed the member- 
ship of Colorado colleges and univer- 
sities in the Faculty Conference. She 
\\\\\ come in with the Mines after the 
football seastjn. 



PRESIDENT SLOCUM WRITES 
ON ATHLETICS. 



The September number of "Hygiene 
and Physical Education" contains an 
article by President Slocum, entitled 
"Athletic Competition in College and 
Preparatory School." This is based 
upon the paper read by him at the 
"National Education Association" 
last summer, which caused a large 
amount of comment throughout the 
press of the country. Dr. Slocum 
takes the position in this article that 
the ultimate end of physical training 
is the development of self-control 
and normality. He does not think 
that athletic competition should be 
the dominating principle in physical' 
training, but maintains that every stu- 
dent should receive adequate physical 
culture and emphasfzes the import- 
ance of good, wholesome sport for its 
own sake. While football does train 
men. in self-control, it is not so much 
sport as it is the training of men to 
win a victory over some one else. It 
is most largely a contest in which the 
dominating element is the defeat of 
an eneni}' in battle. It is not played 
for its own sake, because when the 
opposing teams have been defeated or 
h;i\e won, the game is given up for 
the season and no one thinks of con- 
tinuing it until a new year comes 
roud. 

Then he advocates very stronglj' 



one will enter. 

President Slocum's article takes 
high groun*d in regard to athletics 
and is sure to attract considerable 
discussion. 



UNIVERSITY DAY. 



One week from tomorrow, November 
13, Colorado Springs will contain 400 
students from the University of Colo- 
rado, here for the purpose of winning a 
football game. About this time a year 
ago some 250 C. C. students went to 
Boulder for the same purpose and the 
university provided a few means, besides 
eleven men and a thousand voices to 
prevent the same. That was university 
spirit. WE have the eleven men and 
half a thousand rooters, but we are going 
to make them suiificient, and, incidental- 
ly, we are going to show college spirit. 

We have a beautiful city, a beautiful 
campus and a beautiful opportunity to 
show 400 visiting students the feeling of 
good will that exists here. There is no 
question but that every student will be 
at the game, working and hoping and 
3'elling for victory; and there is no rea- 
son why that victory should not come. 
But let us turn the day to another pur- 
pose than that of winning, namely, the 
welcome and pleasure of the visitors. 

The special arrives in this city at 11 :3u 
a. m. at the Colorado and Southern sta- 
tion and will be met by the C. C. rooters. 
The University of Colorado will bring 
with it a band of thirty-two pieces and 
this 1 and will lead a procession of both 
roote!-s up Pike's Peak avenue to Tejon 
street and north on Tejon street to the 
Acacia hotel. From here the C. C. root- 
ers will march on up to the college. 

The game begins at 2:30, but the root- 
ers will assemble in the old east stand at 
2 o'clock sharp. At the close of the 
game the buildings on the campus will 
be open for visitors. The special will 
probably leave the city, at 6 :30 and will 
afford a splendid opportunity for the 
gathering together for the big celebra- 
tion. S. W. KITTLEMAN. 



NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS. 



The management desires to announce 
that November 15th has been set as the 
final date, when the rate of $1.25 for un- 
paid subscriptions will expire. Subscrip- 
tions paid after that date will be $1.5C 
Money will be received by McQuat, Br.\- 
son or Hille. 



THE TIGER 



EXTENSION WORK. 

A Big Work Being Done in the Ex- 
tension Department of tlie 
Y. M. C. A. 



i 



Extensive work is being done this 
year in the extension department of 
the Y. M. C. A. Extension work is 
not merely conducting religious serv- 
, ices, but takes a broader field by try- 
ing to do a general educational work. 

So far this year the work done has 
been principally at Papetown. Some 
work is being done at Hastings, and 
, there are other .opportunities, but so 
far the association has hardly been 
able to meet the needs at Papetown. 
From 15 to 18 college people go 
there every week. Seven are in Sun- 
day school work, five are organizing 
and conducting a glee club, and three 
are teaching in the night school. 
There have usually been college peo- 
ple teaching in the Sunday School 
and this year they are practically in 
entire charge. 

There is a surprising amount of 
musical talent in this little place. The 
plans to organize a glee club are the 
first steps toward getting the young- 
people interested in further educa- 
tional work. The night classes are 
P-incipally for foreigners and their 
aim is to give an opportunity to those 
who must work during the day, o^ 
learnnig to write and read the Eng- 
lish language. It has been discovered 
from the religious census that the en- 
tire English education of a large part 
of the population consists in the abil- 
ity to write their own name. Few 
can read. Professor CTark has 
charge of the night school and Dean 
Hale will direct the work of the glee 
club. John Nelson is chairman of 
the extension department in the Y. 
M. C. A., and Miss Lenore Pollen has 
charge of the same work in the Y. W. 
C. A. 

The stereopticon lectures which 
were begun last year will be contin- 
ued this year. One series of these 
will treat of coal and its formation. 
L. E. Griswold is making a lantern 
which will be especially adapted to 
the place, there being no electrical 
connections to allow the use of a 
regular lantern. 

The mxOnthly men's meetings con- 
ducted by Mr. W. C. Johnson, have 
been a big drawing card, and have 
doubled the attendance at the Sunday 
services. Another important feature 
of the work is the socials which are 
given about once a month. 



Conditions are extremely favorable 
to the work. The poeple live in an 
isolated community where saloons 
and the usual other laboring man's 
attractions are absent. 

Any one who cares to enlist in the 
work should see either Nelson or 
Heald of the Y. M. C. A., or Miss 
Pollen of the Y. W. C. A. 



COMMISSION MEETING. 

The Student Commission met at 5 
o'clock Wednesday evening and com- 
pleted plans for the student body 
meeting of Thursday. The commis- 
sion advised the athletic board not to 
grant the request of the Women's 
Athletic Association for a regular 
$50 allowance from its funds. The 
other business was the appointment 
of an entliusiasfn committee for the 
U. of C. game here a week from 
Saturday. The committee is: Shaw, 
chairman; Blackman and Davis. 



TIGER BOARD ENTERTAINED. 

On Thursday evening, October 28. 
Professor and Mrs. E. C. Hills en- 
tertained the board of control and the 
editorial and managerial sta'ffs or The 
Tiger at their home, 120 Tyler Place. 
iNlusic and speaking made the evening 
enjoyable and refreshments were 
served lavishly. 

Those present were; Pro'fessor 
and Mrs. H. E. Woodbridge; Pro- 
fessor and ^Irs. W. H. Nead, blisses 
Ingersoll, Canon, Kampf and Som- 
mers, and the Messrs. Ha mon, Hes- 
ler, ]McOuat, Shaw, Dean. Donelan, 
Height, Siddons, Rice, Warnock. 
Bryson, Hille and Statten. 



EXCHANGES. 



The senior class at Oberlin will 
give "The Merchant of Venice'' this 
year. 



The t-ack men at Illinois who .have 
won the varsity letter two years in 
succession are awarded a blanket 
with the block "I" upon it. 



Columbia is to have a new $400,000 
building donated to the School of 
Domestic Economy. 

Pennsylvania's nev/ veterinary build- 
ings are nearing completion. They 
are said by experts to possess the 
best feature of veterinary hospitals in 
Europe. 



EWING 

Continued from Page 1. 

mittees of the Young Men's and Young 
Women's Christian Associations drew up 
some plans for raising the funds neces- 
sary to send Harry E. Ewing '08 to 
South America. These plans were sub- 
mitted to the Student Commission for its 
consideration and approval. The com- 
mission endorsed the movement and 
promised to give what support it could 
ill carrying out the undertaking. 1 he 
plans as they were submitted were pub- 
lished in I'he Tiger a couple of weeks 
ago. 

It was \'oted that President McOuat 
appoint committees which should co- 
operate with the two missionary com- 
mittees. T hese have been appointed, 
i here is a committee of forty to canvass 
the student body. This committee met 
in Bemis Hall last Sunday afternoon to 
discuss plans for conducting this work. 
■ in addition to this committee there has 
Ijeen one appointed consisting of eleven 
members, which is to look after the col- 
lecting, and a board of finance, of which 
Professor Smith is chairman. This board 
is to have charge of all the money the 
fund received and shall keep account of 
it as it is paid out. 

Little booklets have been published 
and circulated to give an idea of what 
has been and what is going to be done. 
Last year the student body raised $682.85. 
the faculty $78.50 and friends $62.00, 
making a total of $823.35. Since Ewing's 
sailing has been postponed a half year, it 
is necessar\- to raise only $500.00 ihis 
year. He will be one of the International 
Secretaries for South America and will 
be associated with the City Young Men's 
Christian Association at Buenos Ayres. 
and with the student association of the 
LIniversity of Buenos Ayres. Colorado 
College IS the first institution to send a 
man to South America. Dther colleges 
and uni\^ersitics have sent representatives 
into the Orient. Yale is establishing a 
school for educational missionary enter- 
prise in China. Pennsylvania has started 
a medical school at the University of 
Canton. Northwestern University is 
helping to establish the Anglo-Saxon 
College of Singapore. Harvard is now 
planting a Medical College in Pekin in 
which one of C. C.'s alumni is to have 
a chair. Colorado College is keeping 
pace with other leading colleges in the 
countrw 



Question — Does a senior wear a cap 
and gown because he is conceited or 
because he worships precedent? 

Answer — He doesn't. 



THE TIGER 



"BOW OF ORANGE RIBBON. 



Dramatic Club Gives Second Success- 
ful Play. 



Last Friday night, the Dramatic 
Club presented "The Bow of Orange 
Ribbon" as dramatized by Miss Jessie 
Barclay from the story of that name 
by Amelia Barr. 

Lucy I'"erril, as Katherine, inter- 
preted the part well and made a most 
attractive heroine. 

Janet Kampf, as the dashing young 
Hyde, called forth much praise. 

Leona Thacher made the most of 
her part as Semple, and added great- 
ly to the interest of the play. 

Others in the ca;t were Grace Cun- 
ningham as Goris, Lillian Due.- as 
Neil, and Florence Humphreys as 
Lysbeth. 

This was the second play of the 
year, and^there promises to be much 
enthusiasm shown in the club. Mem- 
bers must hereafter present their 
tickets for admission. 



EXCHANGES. 



The University of Chicago is to 
have a new score board which will 
show the line-up of each team 
throughout the game. Names will be 
changed as fast as new men are put 
in. The letters will be ten inches 
high and the board placed so that 
they can be read from all over the 
field. 



Stanford has organized a cricket 
club for next semester. 

Washburn students of Greek and 
Latin are planning to present "Trin- 
ummus" by Plautus. 



The University of Pennsylvania 
will soon have a wireless station and 
communication will be opened with 
C olumbia, Cornell and Princeton. 



New York University 'has started a 
school of journalism with several ex- 
perienced newspaper men. 



Swimmmg is a compulsory course 
at Syracuse University. 



At Oregon four sophomores were 
.suspended for one year as a result of 
hazing. 



The University of Illinois is the 
largest state university in America, 
having 5,000 students. 



ENGINEERING 



A GOOD SUGGESTION. 



it has been suggested that a list of the 
leading articles in the engineering peri- 
odicals and magazines be published each 
week. Such a list would be of extreme 
value to those students who are trying 
to- keep up on the current progress in 
the engineering world. Few students 
have time enough outside of their reg- 
ular work to "browse"' about a huge 
stack of periodicals in search of some- 
thing 1.0 read. 'I hose who do have che 
time often waste it, in feeding promis- 
cuously about with nothing definite i ■ 
view, whereas if a number of important 
articles were cited, some one might ap- 
peal to an individual interest. Such a 
list can be of ser\'ice in aiding you to 
make those few moments spent in the 
library profitalile. But few students 
realise how important a supplement, re- 
ference work is to textbook work. 
Leading Topics for Reference. 

The Rice Two-Cycle Double-Acting 
Gas Engine. Something new for auto- 
mobiles and motor boats. A gas engine 
that can he started and reversed as easily 
as a steam engine. Occurs in The Amer- 
ican Machinist, Oct. 2S, 1909.. 

Recent improvements m the Hamburg 
Blankenese Oh'sdorf High-Tension Sin- 
gle Phase Railway. Occurs in the Elec- 
trical Railway Journal, Oct. 23, 1909. 

Hydro-electric Development of the 
Uncas Power company, at Scotland, 
Conn. Occurs in the Electrical World, 
Oct. 28, 1909. 

Twelve Months' Progress in the Use 
of Metal Filament Lamps for Street 
Lighting. Occurs in "The Electrician," 
Cict. 15, 1909. 

The Sociological Side of the Mining 
Industry; Progress in Europe and the 
Ignited States. Occurs in the Engineer- 
ing and Mining Journal, Oct. 30, 1909. 

The Madeira-Marnore Railway. Rail- 
roading in the Tropics. Occurs in the 
Engineering News, Oct. 28, 1909. 

1 he Tumwater Power Plant of the 
Great Northern Railway. Occurs in the 
Engineering Record, Oct. 30, 1909. 

Devi^lopment of the Oil Lamp. Oc- 
curs in the Illuminating Engineer, Oct, 
1909. 

Chapt'T,- in the Early Histor\- of 'Ma- 
chine Tools, Occurs in "IMachines,"" 
Sept., 1909. 

Belled Electric Elevators. Occurs in 
Power and the Engineer, Aug. 17, 1909. 



Notes on the Bolsas River Country, 
.Mexico. Gold Beds of Mexico. Occurs 
ill the Mining VVorld of October 30, 
1909. 



A HANDSOME LITHOGRAPH 
PRESENTED. 



Mr. Oliver T. Boyd, general passen- 
ger agent for the Pennsylvania railroad, 
sends a lithographic reproduction of the 
Hudson River terminal on Manhattan. 
1 he nicture shows t!ie handsome olhce 
buildings which are twenty-two stories 
in height. In the basement of these 
great office buildings,, of which there are 
two, is t];e lerminal station of the Hud- 
son River T--,nnel system which connects 
with the Pennsylvania, the Erie and the 
Lackaw.uuia railroads and with the 'rol- 
ley lilies terminating on the New Jersey 
water front Underneath the street level 
is the track floor, where all trains enter 
and depart. On the ■ level below th 
tracks is located all the machinery which 
operates the jombined terminal oifice 
buildings and tunnels. The entire sta- 
tion is below tide, and is surrounded by 
a solid reinforced concrete wall eight 
feet thick, ninety feet deep and one hun- 
dred and seventy-five feet wide by four 
hundred feet long. On this grand con- 
course are located shops of all descrip- 
tions, fully equipped to supply the de- 
mands of the vast army of passengers 
v.'lio pass through daily. Over eight 
thousand people find employment in the 
ofi^lces. and over forty thousand people 
go in and out of the office section of this 
building every worlcing day. ri-,e lloor 
space covers twenty-seven acres, thirty- 
nine elevators are used in constant serv- 
ice. It has been said that these buildings 
and the terniinal station art one of the 
world"s gre-itest wonders Drop into the 
Ci\'il En,s:inper'ng drpartmiiU and see 
this picture. 



UPPER-CLASS ENGINEERING 
WORK. 



To the useful engineer moot of the 
work done during his first two years 
seems to be nothing but drudgery. 
When, however, he enters his junior 
year, he begins to get more of the 
practical side of his chosen profes- 
sion. Fie begins to handle tools and 
to work with the raw materials. Just 
now the engineers in the mechanical 



THE TIGER 



laboratories are making U, S. stand- 
ard test specimens. From the me- 
chanical department these specimens 
go to the physical department, where 
they are nsed in making tensile and 
compression tests. This work will be 
followed by other practical work, and 
so it will go clear on through the 
year. Professor Collais is giving not 
only more thorough, work, but more 
advanced work, than is given in most 
other schools. 



GALA NIGHT 

Continued from Page 1. 

The big college event of the first 
semester is the barbecue. It is looked 
forward to by both students and alumni 
— looked forward to because it is one of 
these occasions when the whole college 
gets together in a social wa}'. And be- 
sides giving us the opportunity of meet- 
ing everyone else in college when they 
arc in their best spirits and their every 
day clothes, it is a mighty pleasant way 
to spend an evening. 

Kach year the sophomore class has 
charge of the barbecue and each year 
the demonstration of the previous year 
is eclipsed. It's progress is easily seen 
in the yearly increase of the attendance. 
It has become so popular that there 
has grown up a strong feeling that 
hereafter admission should be re- 
stricted to the people of the college 
and their immediate friends. 

The sophomores this year began 
early and we;e dete mined to out- 
build anything heretofore seen on 
Washburn Field in the way of a bar- 
becue bontlre. The burning of almost 
half of -their wood ten days previous 
to the time for the official conflagra- 
tion did not discourage them. They 
kept at it and succeeded in building 
such a boniire as to give them a right 
along with all their predecessors, to de- 
fend themselves in the annual "which — 
really — was — the — biggest ?" debate. 

There was a great plenty of the 
ustial barbecue bill-of-fare, and if any 
one went away hungry, it was not the 
fault of the refreshment committee. 
Good barbecued meat was served. Small 
tin pails painted in the class colors, were 
provided for the cider. 

The decorations were novel and ap- 
propriate. Black witches, cats, owls, 
snakes, tlves, and various other be- 
ings, ran all over strips of yellow 
bunting, helping immensely in the 
Hallowe'en effect. 

A fireworks piece, made up in the 
class numerals, was set off during an 
intermission in the program. The 



feature of the barbecue of the class 
of igi^ was the illumination. A feed- 
er had been run to the field from the 
power hf.usc and the whole fieUl was 
brilliantly lighted. Strings of incan- 
descent lamps were strung about the 
field, se^•eral arc lights were placed 
near the immediate scene of festivi- 
ties, and two electric searchlights 
were continually played over the 
field. 

The much sought after Raffles was 
present but was not caught, in spite 
of the persistent efforts of Professor 
Motten and others. 

A list of offenders, a-s selected by a 
junior committee, was read by Pres- 
ident Graham. Their crimes ranged 
from too much fussing, to freshness. 
It is not an honor to be tossed, but 
it may be one of the luckiest things 
that ever happens to a man. It all 
depends on how he takes it. 

Altogether the barbecue of 1909 
was a decided credit, not only to 
Manager Flamilton and the class of 
1912, but to the whole college. 



EXCHANGES 



Minnesota is putting in a course in 
Journalism this year for the first 
time. 



The University of Minnesota is 
planning a ca.niival in the form of a 
circus, with numerous novel attrac- 
tions. 



On account of stiffer entrance re- 
quirements and the lengthening of 
the course one year, the registration 
of freshmen in the college of engin- 
eering of the University of Minne- 
sota has been reduced this year from 
seventy-five to twelve. 



The University of California has a 
series of fall baseball games for the 
fraternity championship. 



The Columbia Spectator owns its 
ov.n printing plant. 



Yale has opened its 200th year with 
a total registration of 3,500. 



In order to identify its members, 
there is a campaign on at Chicago to 
get every student to v\-ear the nflicial 
"C" of the university. 



44 TO 5 

Continued (rom Page 1. 

Wvoming and tlie\ received it accord- 
ingly. 

1 he trip was a success financially, and 
inasmuch as it provided a good practice 
ga.ne for the team, may be considered 
worth while. The treatment accorded 
the visitors b}' Wyoming was very cor- 
dial. A dance was held in the University 
g\"m. in the evening and a most royal 
welcome given to the guests. 

The line-up : 

Colorado College. Wyoming. 

Hedblom c Wheeler 

Roe r. g Price, H. 

Gary r. t Pitts 

Sinton r. e Jones 

Reichmuth 1. g Story 

Morrison, R 1. t Price, W. 

Thompson, 

Copeland 1. e McGrath 

Putnam q. b Roberts 

Vandemoer r. h Cliinn 

Whitaker 1. h Corthell 

Oviatt 
Heald, Wilson. . . .f. b Langheld 

Officials — Referee, Lieut. Shute ; Um- 
pire, Lockridge; Head Linesman, fapt. 
Eskridge. 

S. W. KITTLEMAN. 



Locals on Wyoming Trip. 



President Merica of the University of 
Wyoming led the rooting and was on to 
his job. 



Copeland and "Morly" were invited to 
dine at the Women's Hall and accepted. 



Williston (ex-'lO) saw the game. 



Wyoming tried the steam siren stunt. 



The game closed just as a typical 
prairie blizzard arrived. 

Wyoming plays the Mines and the 
Boulder Freshmen yet this season. 

They have a gym. on the campus that 
would not look out of place b\- Wash- 
])urn held. Only 200 students to use it, 
too. 



Stanford has raised $17,000 for a 
club house to be known as the Stan- 
ford Union. 



Roe got the ball on a fumble and tried 
to make a touchdown for Wyoming. 

\\ ilsfiu cnuld not remember the score. 

W hen 1 see these seniors starting out 
with their teachers' manuals and birches, 
it makes me wish I was a school kid 
again. 



10 



THE TiG K H 



Football # Washburn Field 



Tomorrow 
Next Week . 



Aggies 
Univ. of Colo, 



Your Ticket will be good at both games, and at 
the yell practices every evening next week at 5 o*c 



LITERARY PROGRAMS 

APOLLONIAN NOVEMBER 5-, 

Closed meeting. Initiation. 

PEARSONS, NOVEMBER 5. 

Music Kirkpatrick 

Boomerang Debate L. Shaw 

A Freshman's Impressions of Colorado 

College King 

Reading Bowers 

Visitors welcome. 

CICERONIAN, NOVEMBER 5. 

Closed meeting. Initiation. 

CONTEMPORARY NOVEMBER 12 



The club will entertain its honorary 
members and alumnae with the annual 
musical. Closed meeting. 



Snappy, Swa^^y 
Clothes 



AT 



THE MAY CO. 

Clever 
Haberdashers 



HYPATIA, NOVEMBER 12 

1 he Renaissance in Germany — 

Painters Edith Douglas 

Composers Flora Crowley 

Music Lucile Dilt^ 

Visitors welcome. 

CEECLE FRANCAIS. 

Progiamme. 11 Novembre. 
iViusique. 

Courrier de la Semaine. . .Mile. Bateman 
Conference sur Maeterlinck. ... M. Hills 
Musique. 
Dialogue de Pelleas et Melisande. 

Mile. E. Norton. 

M. Ellingwood. 
Jeux et Chansons. 

1 icknor Study, huil heures le soir. 

NOTICES 

All notices for this column must 
be in the Tiger Box by Tuesday 
of each week 

Invitations are out for the Alpha Tau 
Delta open house, Wednesday. Novem- 
ber 10. 

Men who atimded the Cascade Con- 
ference last spring will address the reg- 
ular Y. M. C \. meeting tonight. 

Rally — Perl- ins — Tonight. 

i he Young \\'onien's Ciiristian asso- 
ciation has its regular meeting b'riday 
evening, in Bemis hall. Subject, "1 he 
Power of a I'urpose.e" Leader, Mar- 
juerile Seifried. 



Fairyland Theatre 

High-class Vaudeville and Latest Moving 

Pictures, Entire Change of Program 

Mondays and Thursdays 

DAN TRACY, Manager 

Patronize 
TIGER Advertisers 

THE CENTRAL FUEL CO. 

R. M. AITKEN, Manager 

All Best Grades of Fuel. Patterson Lump the 

Best Furnace Fuel 

"Rvery Lump a Lump of Heat" 

Prompt Delivery 

Two Phones 1101 128 N. Tejon Street 

The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co. 



Phone Main 48 



313 N. Tejon St. 



"Our Colorado" 

"Bruin Inn" 
"BlackandGold" 



The Three Songs of Colorado 

College — in Sheet Form 

for 40c. Buy Them of 

E. W. HILLE 



Clever Clothes 

FOR 

College Chaps 

AT 

ROBBINS 

= ON THE CORNER ^= 



THE TIGER 



11 




Cigar Store 



Largest Line of High-Grade Smoking Tobacco 

is a pretty broad statement but as a proof of it just look into our window the next 
time you pass. Walk out of your way to see it. 

Harry 1 C3 Hughes 



IS MADE WITH 

_[|[L[L(ll3'ini?^W[Di![0S, 

Pi word to the wise is sufficient ' 

GABBtl^ ENGRAVING Ce. 

ILLU5TRATORS PUEBLO 
/cS\ DESIGNERS '-OLO. 



ENGRAVERS 



Gel Your Picnic Supplies 

AT ^ZZ 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Favorite Resort of the Col- 
lege Students, Renowned in 
Story and Song 

BRUIN INN 

Up North Cheyenne Canon 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

H^. O. BRINKER, Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Patronize TIGER 
Advertisers 

UNION ICE AND COAL CO. 

W. M. BANNING, Proprietor 

Artificial !ce and Cold Storage 

Dealers in AH Kinds of Coal and Piaion Wood 
Yard Office, 105 W. Vermiio City Office, 5 N. Tejon 



ALUMNI NOTES 



INGER&OLL GETS GRANT. 

"The Rumford coniniittee of the 
American Academy of Arts and Sciences 
has made an additional grant of $3JU to 
Professor L. R. Ingersoll, of the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, for the continua- 
tion of his research on the optical con- 
btants of metals." — Science, Oct. 29. 

Ur. Ingersoll graduated from C. C. 
with the class of '02. 



Miss Rose Burhank '08 is tutoring and 
substituting in the Longmnnt schools. 



Merriell ex-'lO has a good position on 
the Grand Valley Interurban road, near 
Grand Junction. 



Miss Lilian Douglas ex-'ll is a Sopho- 
more at Park college. 

Miss Helen Clarke '08 is visiting in 
Den\er. 



Miss Demetrius Van Landingham '09 
is substituting in the Denver schools. 

Among the alumni present at the bar- 
becue were. Miss Brush '05, Montgom- 
ery Smith '07, Miss Morence Fezer '05, 
and Silmon Smith 'OS, 



McLean Work ex-'ll is the assistant 
editor of the "Monmouth Oracle" at 
Monmouth College. 

Miss Irene Hunter '09 has returned to 
college to take her_ master's degree, and 
is expecting to take her doctor's degree 
at the L^niversitv of Paris. 



Miss Jane Skinner ex-'12 passed 
through town Tuesday on her way to 
southern Texas, where she will spend the 
winter, near San Antonio. 



Maier's Lunch & Dining Room 

Lunches of All Kinds 



Regular Meals 20c and 2Sc 

2161 2 N. Tejon St. Opposite North Park 



"Attention Collegians"^ 

Let us make your Dances, Receptions, 
and Fraternity Socials this term, affairs 
never to be forgotten, by decorating 
your hail or parlors in an arti.-tic man- 
ner with the college banners, pennants, 
festoons and bunting. I'hen have 
erected our sidewalk canopy to keep off 
the inclement weather. We also have 
ffoor coverings to protect the carpets. 
All this will cost but very little and 
add much to these affairs. 

Tht Out West Tent and 

Telephone Main 1261 
113! 2 N, Tejon Street 



Awning Co. 



Miss Helen Jackson ex-'U has been 



College 

Pennants 

New line of Pennants just received 
--they are very attractive, and the 
prices about a third lower than 
ever before. 

Our Celebrated College Posters are 
now only 25 or 50 cents 
each, mounted 




Whitney and Grimwood 

No. 20 North Tejon Street 



12 



THE- TIGER 



0. E. Hemenway 



Groceries and 



Meats 



.♦x»» 







115 South Tejon Street 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



YOU don't entertain your 
guests to save money — 
if you did, the simplest 
way would be to forego en- 
tertaining them. 
iffMuETH's may cost more, 
but — 

Ct^Mueth's 

CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 



5 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



The Colorado Springs Floral Co. 

Wish to Have Your Business at Right 
Prices 



Telephone Main 599 



104 N. Tejon St. 



elected as the one sophomore representa- 
ti\'e on the Vassar student council, which 
corresponds to the Student Commission 
at C. C. 

iVJiss Mabel Woolf ex-'12 is a senior at 
the Greeley Normal School. 

Mr. and Mrs. Willis Armstrong, of 
this city, are rejoicing in the birth of a 
daughter, born October 23rd. Mrs. Arm- 
strong will be remembered as Miss Dell 
Heizer '99. 



A. G. SPALDING a BROS. 



The * 

SPALDING 
Trade -Mark 



Raymond C. Davison ex-'ll is attend- 
ing Cornell University. 

Miss Lulu Draper '08 is teaching at 
Concido, near Pasadena, California. 

Miss Faye Anderson ex-'08 and Miss 
Mildred Baker '07 are visiting in lUi- 




is known throughout 
the world as a 

Guarantee of 
Quality 



are the Largest 
Manufacturers 
in the World of 

Official 

Equipment 

For All 
Athletic 
Sports and 
Pastimes 

If You are inter 
** * "" ested in 
Athletic Sport you 
should have a copy 
of the Spalding 
Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyclo- 
pedia of what's new 
in Sport and is sent 
free on request. 



A. G. Spalding & Bros. 

1616 Arapohoe St., Denver, Colo. 

II Local Department || JOHN MOFFA T 



Dean Parsons spoke at a parents' 
meeting at tlie Lowell school at 3 o'clock 
this afternoon. 



Professor Motten delivered a lecture 
before the Woman's Club Wednesday 
afternoon. 

Emma Wheeler ex-'ll came down 
from Denver to visit her friends over 
Snndav. 



Martha Phillips has enjoyed a visit 
from Miss Sherman of La Junta. 



"Kitty Clever" will begin her course i.i 
"Adx'ice to Young Men," November 23. 
Registration for this elective will soon 
begin. Fall in line, fellows ! 



FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Stree 

Fraternities, Clubs, Individuals 
desiring Milk or Cream 
in any quantities 
should remem- 
ber :: :: 



The Sinton-Rustic Home 

. 419 South El Paso St. 
one Main 442 



Dairy S ?: 



Lillian Duer and Jennie Thomas gave 
a tea in honor of Fmma Wheeler. 

Miss Dorothy Hinkley has been visit- 
ing her sister. 



Some of tlie juniors' took a tramp up 
Queen's canon, Saturday. 



Miss Angove of the normal, spert the 
I'eek-end with Nelle Warnoc'<. 



The College Photo Studio 

The Highest Class of 

Photographs 




Bingham 

18 S. Tejon St. Phone M-678 



DOUGLAS S. 
ETHERINGTON 



Architects 



Telephone SS6 Rooms 1 S and 16 Qui West Building. 

COLORADO SPRINGS. COLO. 



THE tkjkr 



13 



Memory 
Books 

Bound in colors, black and 
and orange, and lettered on 
side. The only really Colo- 
rado College -Scrap Book 
made. Lar^e enough to con- 
tain your four years* items. 

Price, $1.23 each 



The Out West 

Printing 61 Stationery Co. 
9-11 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 



Furniture pL""'"'' 

Special Terms to Students 

McCracken & Hubbard 

120 and 122 South Tejon Street 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

IS S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

Are Always Well Pleased When They 
Get Their Hair Cut at 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



12 s. T*jon St. 



Colorado Spring* 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 336 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



'as cade Laundry 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 

20 per cent, discount 

To All Students of College and Academy 



Marion llaiiics entertained several 
quests at dinner Wednesda_\- nigiit. 

l\)iner\a i^axe a dance in Tic!<n(.)r studi 
lM-ida\' niglit in lionor of Addie Henien- 
way. 

AJargaret Watson was called home for 
a few days the latter part of the week", 
iwing to the. death of her grand,iiother, 

Melicent Caniphell entertained' a few 
seniors at tea Monday night. 

Irene Hunter has entertained college 
to take her master's degree. 



7 E. Bijou 



Phone 820 



Bruin Inn, the popular little rustic 
hostelry, in North Cheyenne canon, 
changed hands recently and is now man- 
aged by Swanson and Riley, two ener- 
getic and obliging young men of this 
city. They promise the same treatment 
accorded to College students by their 
predecessor, Mr. Laveley. 

A few of the seniors entertained at a 
fudge party Wednesday evening. 



Faith Plaines had several of the hall 
^irls for supper Wednesday evening. 

Janet Kampf entertained a few girls at 
tea Saturday afternoon in honor of 
Edith McCreary. 

A number of college people saw "The 
Royal Chef Monday night, also "A 
Knight for a Day," Wednesday night. 

McOuat spent Saturday in Denver on 
business. 

Middlesworth and Ruell Morgan vis- 
ited at the Phi Gamma Delta house last 
week. 

Pay your Tiger subscription now. 

Edith Vaughn entertained Minerva de- 
lightfully last Friday at her home on X. 
Nevada. After the regular weekly pro- 
gram, a delicious supper was served. 

Cary was in Denver over Sunday. 

Glenn K. Spencer visited friends at the 
college over Sunday. 



Wesley Acker '13 is pledged to Alpha 
Tau Delta. 

The sophomores held a VQry helpful 
prayer meeting Sunday evening. Mr 
Gregg was leader. ' 



Hunt Up 

BisselPs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 

C. F. Arcularius & 
Company 

A Large Assortment of 

BELT PINS 

All the Latest Styles 



9 South Tejon Street 
COLORADO SPRINGS. COLO. 

We have Embossing Dies for Stationery »f all the 
College Societies and Fraternities, also the Great 
Seal of the College. We carry in stock a large 
line of papers upon which to emboss these Dies - 
Hurd's, Crane's and others. 

Gowdy-Simmons Ptg Co. \ZZTm 



Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Picnic Supplies 

For picnics and all kinds of outings, 
we are ready to supply everything in 
the way of eatables. We also have 
baskets so that we can pack your out- 
fit complete. Just say what you 
want, and when you want it, and 
you will have nothing else to do but 
think of the good time you are going 
to have. :: :: :: :: 

W. N. Burgess Tfjon^S^r°ee? 



14 



THE T I G E K 



This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 

Company 




Headquarters for 

College Footwear 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

FOONDERS AND MACHINISTS 



College 
Inn 



y. Short 
// Orders 



Commutation Tickets 
$3.30 for $3.00 



THE 

Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 

Our Special Extra-Clean 

Lignite 
Furnace Lump 

The Colorado Springs Fuel Co., 
112 Pike's Peak Avenue. Two 
Phones Main 230 

Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 

A. S. BLAKE 



Is the Man to See 



107 North Tcjon 

Nickie Ware 



Phone 465 

Cutlery 



The ladies of Wyoming University i 
ga\e a daiice in honor of the Tigers last 
Saturday nigb.t. 

F. L. Moorhead, graduate manager of 
-the University athletics, was here Tues- 
day, completing arrangements with Kit- 
tleman for the game. 



McGregor hall was the scene of many 
teas and spreads Saturday. 



Miss Mabel Woolf e.x-T2 came down 
for the barbecue. 



A part\ of Kappa Sigmas gave an auto 
p.irty iii lion(.)r of Miss Northcut, Tues- 
day evening:. 



"Monte'' Smith and Piatt visited ai 
t]ip Kappa Sigma house over Sunday. 



.Among guests at the barbecue Satu 
day were, Misses Brunner, Estill, Mc 
Creery, Mary Tucker, Wheeler, North- 
cott and Woolf; Messrs. G. W. Smith, 
M. R. Smith, S. L. Smith, Tucker, 
Staunchfield, Platte and Lake. 



Candies that are fresh, pure and tempt- 
ing, at Noble's. 



Mr. Hastings took charge of the Phil- 
osophy C class in the absence of Dr. Slo- 
cum. 



Angle Hayden is visiting Janet Kampf 
for a few days on her way to Durango, 
where she intends to spend the winter. 



Fourteen foresters and "Pinchot" Mor- 
gan helped to put out the fire on the 
.Short Line Mondav of this week. 



"Mr. Shrimps" has reached town and 
v.'ill make his formal debut into college 
society, November 23, in Perkins Hall. 



Get down on the field once in a while 
and encourage the Tigers and the scrubs. 



\ number of out of town people ex- 
pect to see the Aggie game and attend 
the Sigma Chi dance in the evening. 



It wasn't the sophomores' fault that 
both the program and the blanket fell 
through. The blanket was rotten, and 
the program . 



LTenry Hdfifman ex-'io and his 
brother Arthur ex-'ii are engaged in 
mining at Lake City. 



Oh! You Football 
Eothusiasts 

The big games are yet to come. 
Have you seen the very latest novelty? 

The Football Muff 

A protection a ainst the chill of 
autumn weather, equipping you at 
the same time for the display of un- 
bounded enthusiasm. A most unique 
trophy for your room after the foot- 
ball season. See them at 

The Murray Drug Co. 



A hint to the fellows — If you 

can't make a hit with one of these, 
"It 'aint no use." 

William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

MEMBERS ' ^^^ ^otV Stock Exchange 

i Colorado Springs Mining Stock Exchange 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St.. New York ' 

16 George St., Mansion House. London. E. C. 



THE 



Official Printers 

To the Student 
Body of C. C. 



The Waterman Press 

112 E. Cucharras St. 
Phone 1154 



We Print THE TIGER 



THE TIGER 



15 



ACADEMY 



(Amy L. Busch, Correspondent.) 



Cutler last Saturday played the local 
High School, and although the team was 
defeated 22 to 12, the game was the 
hardest fought battle of the season. 
Cutler started to play from the start and 
made the first touchdown. High School 
in the last few minutes of the half ! 
pushed over a touchdown and kicked the 
goal. Cutler's second score was made by 
a 7S-vard run bv Brice. High School 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 

PETERSEN 

1 2 1 E. Kiowa 

Sewed Soles 7S cents 

Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



GIDDINGS BROS. 



Colorado Springs 



THE SPECIALTY STORE 

A Hearty Welcome Constantly Awaits All Visitors 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barber 
vrork and baths 



106H E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



#^fe 



aundi?y 



Why not have the BEST WORK ? 



20 per cent, discount 

To all Students of College and Academy 



J. J. WILSON, College Agent 

W.I.LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



Shirts Plaited and 
Pl^in, the Latest 
are here 

GORTON'S 



Exclusive Suit and Over- 
coat Showing $25 



^^ 



Nowhere else can you see Adler-Rochester-Clothes, that 
celebrated line we are showing, for we are exclusive 
agents for them. We would be glad to have call in and 
examine the different selections we have to offer from 
$40.00 to $18.00. 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 





Correct Dress for Men. \ 



'13 E. Pike's Peak 
Avenue 



%: 



J 



119 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



made three other touchdowns, but failed 
twice to kick the goals. 

The whole Cutler team played their 
best. Brice was the star of the game, 
making both Cutler's touchdowns and 
kicking one of the goals. Taylor held 
the ceriter of the line well and led the 
team in tackling. Schneider and Wilson 
pla_,ed fine football until they were taken 
out of the game on account of injuries. 
Stanton and Flanagan l)oth played 
strongly. 

Tomorrow the team will play Centen- 
nial High School at Pueblo. Centennial 
tied Colorado Springs High School, to 
0, so Cutler will have another hard game 
on hand. 

Clifford Snyder of Denver, a former 
Cutler student, was in Colorado Spruigs 
last week, to attend the football game. 

The Cutler students held a very en- 
thusiastic football rally last Friday morn- 
ing. Speeches were made by tlie differ- 
ent members of the team, and also by 
Prof. Park and Prof. Flaherty. Cutler 
j-ells were practised, and a great deal of 
school spirit was shown, which has not 
been dampened by the loss of Saturday's 
game. 



'Merle Wilson had his shoulder dis- 
located in the game last Saturday, but 
played for ten minutes before leaving the 
game. 



Otis Mclntyre '05 has been elected 
president of the senior class of the Shef- 
hehl Scientific School of Yale Universitv. 



DRINK 

DERN'S 

Freshly Roasted Tea and Coffee 

29 South Tejon Street 

The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies and 
Fixtures 



208 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 812 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-203 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence, 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 9E6 

The College 

Photo Studio 

Hi^h Class Photographs 
Kodaks and Supplies 




TTUmi 



Corner Cascade and Kiowa 



16 



THE TIGER 



THE YOUNG MEN'S STORE 



STYLE, INDIVIDUALITY AND FIT 

are what make a young man proud of his clothes. These are the distinguishing features of the 

PERKINS-SHEARER CLOTHES 

for the young man this fall. They'll cost you no more than the ordinary overcoats and suits de- 
signed especially for the college man 

Perkins-Shearer Co, ^ f ^fr S^J^r ^""""^ 



~\ 



iV \ 







Footw^ear of Quality 

When we say footwear of quality we do not necessarily mean high- 
priced footwear. All our women's shoes are made for our trade by 
expert makers, using only choice materials in the various grades, are 
unusually large and stylish, showing 
is offered you at $2.50, $3.00, 
$3.50, $4.00, $4.50, $5.00 



\f5>^< 



a^ 



SHOES '^HAY SATISFY- 



ZZ S.TeJON ST. 



When Trading, Remember TIGER Advertisers 

Colorado College 

Founded in Colorado Springs in 18 7 4 
WM. F. SLOCUM, President 




Depart- 
ments 



College of Arts and Science 

E. S. PARSONS, Dean 
School of Engineering 

F. CAJORI, Dean 
' School of Forestry 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 
School of Music 

E. D. HALE, Dean 



Cutler Academy p'^p^'a 

•^ School 

students are prepared for any American College 



The Associated 
ar a tor y 
, in which 



\= 



Electrical Laboratory 




Vol. XII 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., NOVEMBER 12, 1909 



Number 9 



TIGERS BEAT 

AGGIES 



ONE-SIDED GAME RESULTS IN 
31-0 VICTORY. 

Whitaker and Sherry Show Up 

Strongly — Forward Passes by 

Aggies a Feature. 

By a score of 31-0 the Tigers took 
Aggieville to their second defeat last 
Saturday. The one-sided score, how- 
ever, is not an indication of how fiercely 
the game was fought, nor is it an indi- 
cation of how interesting the contest 
was from the spectator's point of view. 
The Aggies were full of determination 
and spirit. They also showed good 
coaching and ran off some of the neat- 
est plays seen on Washburn this year. 

The Tigers, on the other hand, while 
handicapped by a practically new line- 
up, showed a better knowledge of the 
game in every department, except the 
forward pass ; they also had a slight 
advantage over their opponents in 
weight. The style of play was almost 
straight football throughout, while the 
Aggies opened up everything they had. 

For the Aggies McCarren handled 
punts remarkably well and recovered 
most of our onside kicks. Captain 
Schaeffer at full was the life of the Ag- 
gie team. He could always make a few 
yards through the Tiger line and ran off 
the complicated forward passes in a 
eool, deliberate manner. Their ends 
showed the effects of good coaching and 
were strong both on defense and offense. 

For the Tigers, Whitaker and Sherry 
were most conspicuous by their brilliant 
playing; Sherry had all kinds of pep- 
per and steam. He was usually the first 
man down on punts and always got his 
man. His touchdown from a punt 
brought the stands to their feet. Whit- 
aker, besides being the most consistent 



ground gainer in the Tiger backfield, 
starred in other departments ; he ef- 
fectively broke up most of the forward 
passes on his side of the field and showed 
himself to be a valuable asset to the 
team as a kicker ; out of four chances, 
he kicked four easy goals, besides mak- 
ing a 27-yard place kick at a very diffi- 
cult angle. 

Vandemoer punted well, made some 
good gains on end runs and recovered 

Continued on Page 9. 



MORRISON 

DROPPED 



COLORADO COLLEGE ALUM- 
NUS DOES RESEARCH 
WORK. 



Mayo D. Hersey, C. C. '07, Performs 
Valuable Investigations at Bos- 
ton Tech. 

(From the Daily Tech, Boston, Mass., 
November i.) 



Investigations completed in the Me- 
chanicril Engineering Laboratories 
during tlie spring and summer by 
Mayo D. Hersey, '09, were the out- 
growth of meeting the usual problems 
of journal friction on an occasion of 
machine construction some time be- 
fore, and of considering them theoret- 
ically 'in 1908. Mathematical analysis 
made possible an electrical method of 
measuring the actual thickness of the 
oil film at the point of nearest ap- 
proach of brass to journal. 

The question of journal friction is 
one of the most fundamental, and at 
ihe same time the most complex and 
baffling, with which engineers have 
had to deal. Logically, the/e should 
be two methods of attack: first, to in- 
vestigate the conditions of minimum 
friction in bearings already built; sec- 
ond, by investigations of the seizing 
point, to determine better rules for de- 
sign. Curiously, past experiments 

Continued on Page 9. 



CONFERENCE RULES ARE EN- 
FORCED AGAINST STAR 
TACKLE. 



Faculty Action Endorsed by Student 

Commission — Dean Parsons Makes 

Detailed Statement to Student 

Body. 

Because of a rule, the full import of 
which neither Dean Parsons nor Dr. 
Norlin of Boulder understood, Dick 
Morrison, the mainstay of the Tiger 
line, will not be in the game tomorrow. 

It was a gloomy crowd of students 
that faced Dean Parsons Wednesday 
noon, when he rose to explain the ruling 
of the Conference in Morrison's case. 
He said : 

"I am going to take a good deal of 
your time this morning. This may seem 
to you a very long-winded proceeding, 
but the student commission wanted all 
the facts presented to you exactly as I 
presented them to it. 

"At the beginning of the year there 
were formulated rules which have been 
passed and which were out in printed 
form aljout October 1. They were pub- 
lished in The Tiger. 

"One rule in regard to the quitting of 
school for a good excuse was so inter- 
preted by the Conference as to allow 
Whitaker and Vandemoer to play. 

"This rule, which reads, 'Any stu- 
dent participating in any intercollegiate 
game, who shall leave his institution be- 
fore the end of the semester or term, un- 
less for illness- or equally good reason, 
or who shall not have passed his work to 
the satisfaction of the faculty, shall not 
be eligible to compete in any branch of 
intercollegiate athletics until he shall 
have again been in residence a full sem- 

Continued on Page 7. 



SMITH DEFEATS DIETRICH. 

Pueblo Midget Wins Men's Singles in 
Fall Tournament. 

Last Wednesday afternoon one of the 
most interesting tennis matches ever seen 
on the college courts was played, when 
Smith defeated Dietrich in the finals of 
the men's singles. The fact that the en- 
tire five sets had to be played shows how 
evenly matched were the two men. It 
was almost a "toss-up" between them. 
Not until the last point was won could 
anyone be sure of the result. 

The struggle lay between Smith's care- 
ful placing and splendid lobbing, and 
Dietrich's swift and low returns, the for- 
mer winning out. Both men showed 
good form and won their points, on the 
whole, by consistent playing. Time and 
again sensational plays were made, win- 
ning applause from those watching the 
match. 

Nelson and Morgan refereed. The 
final score by games was 7-5, 6-8, 6-2, 3-6 
and 7-5. 

The tournament is a splendid success, 
considering that "the honor of the thing" 
, is the only reward. It is hoped that it 
will be possible to give some award to 
the winners of the spring tournament 
which is being planned. 

The ladies' singles are being played, 
and, although not so many are entered, 
much interest is being shown. The 
finals will be played before the end of 
the week. 

The doubles will be played at once. In 
this, too, some close matches are antici- 
pated. 

We have an excellent opportunity here 
to play tennis, and all racquet wielders 
should try to keep in trim for the tourna- 
ment next spring. An intercollegiate 
tournament is almost certain, and with 
Smith, Dietrich, Fowler, and others who 
are not so slow, Colorado College should 
carry off the honors here in the state. 



WEIRICK ELECTED TO igii 
ANNUAL BOARD. 



There has been a vacancy in the edi- 
torial staff of the 1911 Annual Board 
since the opening of school this fall. The 
board has considered several people with 
the object of filling this' position and at 
their last meeting decided to nominate 
Bruce Weirick. At a class meeting after 
chapel Tuesday, Mr. Weirick was elected 
associate editor. Weirick will be a good 
man for the position. He has considera- 
ble ability and is a conscientious worker. 



THE TIGER 

CHRISTMAS MYSTERY PLAY. 
Cast for "Eager-Heart" Chosen. 



FORESTERS' CLUB. 



The officers of the Dramatic Society 
have announced the cast of their next 
production, "Eager-Heart," an old 
mystery play portraying a Christmas 
story, which will be staged at Bemis 
on December 3. The title role, Eager- 
Heart, will be played by Vesta Mc- 
Roberts of the freshman class. The 
cast follows: 

Eager-Heart Vesta McRoberts 

Eager-Sense Julia Ingersoll 

Eager-Fame Janet Kampf 

Alan Louisa Malcolm 

Old Man Wilhelmina Miller 

Young Man Mary Bogue 

First King Dorothy Cook 

Second Kmg Louise Strang 

Third King ' Helen Rand 

b'i St Shepherd. .Katherine Morehouse 
Second Shepjierd Jt ssie Smith 



WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB ORGAN- 
IZED. 



Colorado College will again have a 
women's glee club. Early last week 
a call was issued for candidates, and 
about fifty voices responded. The 
first rehearsal was held Wednesday 
afternoon with 30 present. When 
selected the club will consist of 28 
voices. Mrs. Taliaferro is training 
the women and expects to arrange a 
public cantata soon. The women's 
and men's glee clubs will form the 
chapel chorus. 



MEN OF 1911 TO HAVE ANNUAL 
STAG. 



Last year the men of the class of 1911 
met one evening for a smoker. They 
had a few short speeches, athletic stunts 
and the usual smoker refreshments. This 
\ear the junior men will again have 
something in the nature of a stag. Just 
what it will be has not yet been decided, 
l)ut a committee, appointed by vice-- 
president, Van Stone, is at present work- 
ing it up. 

The affair last year was voted an un- 
qualified success by every man present 



Nine undergraduates of the University 
of Maine have been suspended on ac- 
count of violating the new hazing rules. 
.\s a result, the entire student body is on 
a strike. 



W. I. Hutchinson Lectures on "For- 
estry in the Philippines." 

The Foresters' Club listened to a very 
interesting and instructive talk Tuesday 
evening on "Forestry in the Philippines," 
by Mr. W. I. Hutchinson of the U. S. 
Forest service. 

Mr. Hutchinson has just returned from 
a .three years' stay in Mindanao, where 
he was in charge of about 125,000 square 
miles of territory. He gave a very in- 
teresting account of the life and customs 
of the Filipinos and of the forestry work 
which is being carried on in that coun- 
try. 

There are about three thousand differ- 
ent varieties of trees in the Islands ; 
most of them are unnamed and a great 
many more are unknown to the scientific 
world. Mr. Hutchinson himself is the 
discoverer of about twenty hitherto un- 
known species, which now bear his name. 
The work of estimating is very difficult 
in that country, owing to the great num- 
ber of different varieties to be found on 
an acre and the dense undergrowth which 
it is almost impossible to penetrate. 

Some of the finest timber in the world 
is found in the Philippines, and the yield 
per acre is often enormous. 

There are a great many kinds of valu- 
able cabinet woods and construction 
woods galore. The natives have in the 
past done a great damage by making 
clearings for agriculture and then in 
two or three years moving on and mak- 
ing another. These clearings sometimes 
cover an area of thirty square miles 
and occur at very frequent intervals. 
When an opening is once made and 
abandoned, it grows up to grass, rattan, 
bamboo and other worthless timber and 
prevents forever the return of the more 
valuable species. 

The people of Mindanao are Malays 
and were never thoroughly conquered by 
the Spaniards. They consequently have 
given the Americans much trouble. 
There is still a great deal of danger, 
and Mr. Hutchinson himself has had 
several narrow escapes. On one occa- 
sion hi§ roommate was killed while lying 
beside him in bed, and on another occa- 
sion Mr. Hutchinson was the only one 
of a party of six who escaped. 

The moral standard in the archipell- 
ago is very low and hundreds of young 
men are going to the bad annually 
through liquor and fast living. Any 
white man who marries a Filipino wo- 
man is an outcast, but nevertheless many 
of them do and in the course of a few 
years are absolutely worthless. Liquor 



THE TIGER 



3 



is always on tap, and it is safe to sa\' 
that there is more drinking per capita 
than in the worst portion of the United 
States. Ihere are no churches and ab- 
solutely no restraining influences to hold 
a young man in check, and it is no won- 
der tliat so many of them go to the bad. 
There is an excellent missionary field in 
Mindanao and the surrounding islands 
for any one who cares to take it up. 



TECHNIQUE AS HABIT. 



Dean Hale Gives Second Conference 
Lecture. 



Dean Hale's second conference lecture 
was upon Technique as a Habit. The 
capacity of the nerve to register and re- 
tain impressions is one of the conditions 
of all educational development. The art- 
ist must keep tight rein on the aut(jmat- 
ism. There is a sense in which the best 
habit is no habit. The habit of repose 
and the habit of instantaneous action are 
the fundamental conditions of a compe- 
tent technique, — open secrets discovered 
by a small, acute minority The "ade- 
quate technical habit is gaiivd iiy bring- 
ing to bear upon each detail of action the 
whole weight, nothing less, of (lie atten- 
tion. 



STUDENT COMMISSION. 

At a meeting of the Student Com- 
mission Tuesday e\-ening, the commis- 
sioners voted the money necessary for 
a new tossing blanket to be used at 
barbecues and on similar occasions. 
The old blanket ripped and let a man 
th;ough on Hallowe'en. 

Twenty-five dollars was allowed 
from the funds of the Associated Stu- 
dents toward the hiring of the Mid- 
land band for tomorrow's game. 

Action was also taken relative to the 
holding of a college picnic in the Gar- 
den of the Gods on Washington's 
birthday, as was planned last year. 
In the near future the matter will be 
placed before the student body. 



SET OF TRANSACTIONS 
COMPLETE. 



The set of Transactions of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers 
has recently been completed by the 
purchase of those volumes that the 
library has formerly lacked. 



THE ROCHESTER CONVEN- 
TION. 

Colorado College and Cutler Academy 
Entitled to Nine Delegates. 

Word has just been received that Cut- 
ler Academy has been selected as one of 
the few preparatory schools in the coun- 
try to be entitled to a delegate to the 
Rochester Convention, in addition to a 
faculty delegate. The college is entitled 
to four students, the secretaries and one 
faculty member, thus making a total del- 
egation from the academy and the col- 
lege of nine. 

Attendance at this convention will be 
a greater privilege than at any quadren- 
nial convention that has been held in the 
past. The way other lands are opening 
up to western ideas, as in China, Korea, 
Turkey, South America, makes the mis- 
sionary situation of unusual interest just 
now. The rapid growth of the Laymen's 
Missionary Movement and of the Church 
Brotherhood, which were launched at the 
last quadrennial convention, add interest 
to the convention. The delegates are 
limited, and those who will be selected 
to represent the college and academy can 
well look upon their choice as a high 
honor. 

There is a mistaken conception on the 
part of some that the purpose of the con- 
vention is to make student volunteers. 
While it is true that many delegates have 
volunteered at these conventions, the aim 
is not to make volunteers but to promote 
intelligent interest and co-operation in 
the missionary movements of the world ; 
to get the world view before the stu- 
dents. It is often true that a delegate 
who does not volunteer can do more to 
promote real vital interest in misions 
than one who does volunteer. Aside 
from the missionary benefits which the 
delegates will get, such a convention has 
an important educational valite that will 
be of advantage to any institution that 
sends a representative delegation. 



REPORT OF CASCADE CON- 
FERENCE. 



'1 he final registration figures at Har- 
vard University report an increase of 125 
over last year. 



The meeting of the Young Men's 
Christian Association last Friday, was 
given over to a report of the Cascade 
Conference. Among those who attended 
the Conference and gave reports were 
E. E. Hedblom, J. F. Nelson, Paul Clif- 
ford, W. G. Harman, A. J. Gregg and E. 
. T. Heald. 

The Conference will probably be held 
at Cascade again next June, though 
there is a possibility that Estes Park will 



be ready. Colorado College was repre- 
sented by about twenty delegates last 
June for most of the Conference. Kan- 
sas had the largest delegation of. any 
state, over 100 of the 300 delegates pres- 
ent. Other states represented were Ne- 
liraska, South Dakota, Wyoming, Utah 
and New Mexico. 



ROSSINI QUARTETTE COMING. 

Will Give Concert Under Auspices 
of C. C. Glee Club. 



On Nov. 20 the Rossini Quartette of 
Denver will give a concert in Perkins 
Hall under the auspices of the Colorado 
College Glee Club. 

This quartette presents a high-class 
musical entertainment and is very prom- 
inent in Denver musical circles. The in- 
dividual members are soloists of recog- 
nized merit, while their ensemble work 
meets with marked approval. 

Mrs. Mabel Acheson, soprano, sang 
for several seasons under the direction 
of the Redpath Lyceum Bureau. Miss 
Maude Norman, contralto, is one of the 
younger western singers. She has ap- 
peared at numerous concerts and re- 
citals in D.enver, meeting with unquali- 
fied success. Mr. Walter Loreman 
achieved great success in England in 
oratorio. He has sung second tenor in 
the famous choir of St. Bartholomew's 
Episcopal church, New York City. Mr. 
Louis Reilly, the baritone, has appeared 
as soloist in Denver, Pueblo and Colo- 
rado Springs. He was the soloist of the 
Denver . Symphony Orchestra. Miss 
Markman is the accompanist. The quar- 
tette presents a programme made up of 
concert classics and selections from the 
most popular grand operas and lighter 
operatic works. 



NEW DRAWINGS AND BLUE 
PRINTS. 



The mining engineering department 
has recently received several drawings 
and blue-prints that will be of consid- 
erable service in the courses. Draw- 
ings and specifications for cyanide 
plants have been received from the 
Moore Filter Company. 

Blue-prints of a new Ring Roll Mill 
have been received from the Sturte- 
vant Ring Roll Mill Machinery Com- 
pany. The prints are of new machines 
used in ore crushing. While the ma- 
chine is of a new type, it is claimed to 
be a rapid pulverizer and yields a uni- 
form product. 



THE TIGER 



A THLETICS 



By defeating Centennial High last 
Saturday Cutler gave the championship 
of this division to the Colorado Springs 
Terrors, and incidentally showed them- 
selves to be a bunch of true sports. The 
Cutler and High School boys have al- 
ways been the bitterest of enemies on 
the athletic field. Had Cutler allowed 
themselves to be beaten Saturday, it 
would have compelled the Terrors to 
play off the deciding game with Centen- 
nial, but they went down and won in a 
thrilling game. 

Little Brice continued his brilliant 
work and made two long runs to touch- 
downs, one of which is probably a record 
for this state. He recovered a fumble 
on the two-yard line and ran 109 yards ; 
his other run was 65 yards. 

D. U. still continues her long string of 
victories. Last Saturday she won from 
the Mines for the second time in the his- 
tory of the institution. The victory was 
celebrated by a holiday on Monday. 
Here's hoping D. U. will be compelled 
to attend classes Friday, Nov. 26. 



Tomorrow afternoon Washburn Field 
will be the scene of an athletic event 
second to none in the college 3'ear, name- 
ly "the Boulder game." For some mys- 
terious psychological reason we would 
rather win this game than any other two 
games in any of our schedules. 

This year we are going to have a hard 
time winning that game. All tangible 
"dope" is against us and one of our best 
men has been barred, but we can win. 
H every student of this institution can 
go down there tomorrow feeling like we 
are going to win and if he can show that 
team just how he feels about it, we will 
win. 

Don't forget the rally tonight— come 
out and go crazy. 



Before the Brown game, the student 
council at Harvard passed an ordinance 
against cutting classes to attend the 
game. 



The parade of Minnesota students at 
the first annual carnival extended over 
two miles. 



The University of Pennsylvania will 
have twenty-eight dormitories when the 
two houses now in course of construction 
are completed.. 



A REVIEW OF "THE KINNIKIN- 
NIK" FOR OCTOBER. 

J he October number of the "Kin" was 
distinctly disappointing, through no fault 
of the editors, but through your own 
fault, "gentle reader." The adage con- 
cerning silk purses would apply to the 
situation of the editors : "You can't make 
a Kinnikinnik article out of an English 
B theme." Now, can you ? 

1 he concluding chapter in "My Ex- 
pf'ience at Englewood" hardly came up 
to our hopes. Anna Katherine Green, it 
certainly was not. It is sometimes hard- 
ly clear, and the end is poorly managed. 
The chief difiliculty with the story is, it 
seems, that the characters are mere pup- 
pets. 

"The .Tew and the Gentile" is too ama- 
teurish to deserve much criticism. There 
is material in it for a successful story, 
but the author has much to learn of 
structure. 

"Something Always Happens," a con- 
\entional sort of story by Mr. Sylvester, 
moves easily and holds the reader's in- 
terest. The climax is not unskillful. 

i^. VV. P.," whose "Under the Pecan 
Tree" occupied first place in ;he maga- 
zine, received an undeserved distinction. 
The infant prodigy who is "mos' seven" 
speaks as never child spake before. The 
dialect is good. There is no plot, and as 
a sketch, this article has hardly enough 
charm to sustain interest. "Atmosphere" 
is not lacking, but at times there is too 
much of it. Too bad the child is im- 
possible, for in many respects she is fas- 
cinatingly natural. 

Miss Huse and Mr. Argo do what 
they a^ttempt in an interesting way. 
Neither sketch was ambitious. Mr. 
Weirick's sketch seems a trifle over- 
drawn. 

What shall we say of "To You"? We 
shall have to be a bit harsh with the 
editors here. This ought never to have 
"got in." It is even more than crude. 

.\ 'Summer Memoir" is not quite in 
the same class, yet it is clearly out of 
place in the magazine. When "A Sum- 
mer Mann" writes this sort of thing he 
should tear it up before he is tempted. 

"Honor and Other Things" has much 
.that is fresh and interesting. It has that 
so-necessary quality of an informal essay 
— charm. Phrases are sometimes well 
turned and epigrammatic. Of course it 
is not serious, and, seriously, it is some- 
times a little coarse. 

Louise Luqueer Strang's "From the 
Other Point of View" is imaginative 
and clever, or, perhaps, clever and imag- 
inative would be more accurate. Tt is 
not quite convincing. "DENNIS." 



ENGINEERING 



Leading Topics and References. 



Modern Architectural Development. 
Occu/s in The Builder, October i6, 
1909. 

A Combined Water Supply, Irriga- 
tion and Power Project. Occurs ■ in 
the Engineering Magazine, November 
I, 1909. 

The World's Record in Tunnel 
Driving. Occurs in "Mining and Sci- 
entific Press," October 30, 1909. 

Some Life Ideals. By V. Karape- 
toff, Professor of Electrical Engin- 
eering at Cornell University. Occurs 
in The Sibley Journal of Engineering 
of Cornell University, October, 1909. 

Wire Rope Tramway Engineering. 
Occurs in the Mining and ^letallurgi- 
cal Journal, November 5, 1909. 

Dry Chlorination in Metallurgy. 
Occurs in Mining Science, November 
9, 1909. 

High Explosives as Used in Manu- 
facturing Arts. Occurs in The Tech- 
nical World Magazine, November, 
1909. 

Underground Pneumatic Postal 
Tubes. Occurs in the American Ma- 
chinist, November 4, 1909. 

Locomotives for Pennsylvania Tun- 
nel. Occurs in The Electrical World, 
November 4, 1909. 

The Assapos Viaduct, Greece. Oc- 
curs in the Engineering News, No- 
vember 4, 1909. 

Widening of the American Canal at 
Sault Ste. Marie. Occurs in the En- 
gineering Record, September 11, 1909. 

Electrolytic Treatment of Galena. 
Occurs in the School of Mines Quar- 
terly of Columbia University, Novem- 
ber, 1909. 

College Men in Maintenance of 
Way. Occurs in the Railway and En- 
gineering Review, November 6, 1909. 



IN THE HALL OF FAME. 



Several plates made by the students 
who have taken the course in machine 
design, have been framed recently and 
placed upon the walls of the new 
draughting room. 

The plates are samples of the work 
done by the present sophomores and the 
upper class engineers. They are very 
useful for demonstration purposes. As 
examples to turn to for reference, they 
are the best. Only the best drawings of 



THE TIGER 



each kind and of each class are placed on 
the wall. 

The following plates have been added 
to the collection of framed trophies ; 

"Guide Block and Piston Rod End of 
Steam Engine," by E. R. Thornburg 
■10. 

"Post Connection of Cache la Poudre 
Street Bridge," by L. E. Griswold '10. 

"Detail and Assembly Drawings of 
Polishing Laths," E. W. Steele '11. 

"Eccentric for Steam Engine," C. E. 
Hayward '11. 

"Section, Detail and Assembly Draw- 
ing of Globe Value," G. C. Graham '12. 

"ruiieys and Journal Bearmgs," K. 
M. Copeland '12. 

Practically all of these designs are 
original work rather than reproductions 
to a different scale. In fact as far as it 
is practicable the course in machine de- 
sign is different for each individual. 

These and other drawings constitute a 
part of the permanent exhibit of the 
work done in this department. All serve 
as a strong incentive for new students to 
strive to have some of their work placed 
beside other masterpieces in the hail of 
fame. 



ECONOMIC PRIZES. 

Conditions of Contest and Suggested 
Subjects. 



BEMIS PORCH LAMPS. 



A new set of handsome porch lamps 
for Bemis Hall are being made in the 
mechanical laboratories, according to 
the design and plans submitted by M. 
T. Briscoe, who drew up the plans of 
Bemis Hall. 

The design is in metal and calls for 
a considerable amount of scroll work. 

The bending and roughing out work 
is being done by the sophomore class 
in the fo.ging department. The finish- 
ing touches and the putting together 
will be done by the juniors in the ma- 
chine shop. The work is of a high 
quality and requires no small amount 
of skill to execute it well. Much 
credit is reflected upon the students 
who can do the advanced work called 
for by skilled workmen, Too much 
praise cannot be given to Professor 
Collais, under whose most able in- 
struction the work is being done. 



The University of Pennsylvania has 
opened a course for physicians, who will, 
by virtue of their positions, be expected 
to deal with matters affecting the public 
health. 



The "treating system" has been abol- 
ished by the fraternity men of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 



The opportunity to compete for the 
Economic prizes offered by Hart, Schaft- 
ner & Marx has been brought to the at- 
tention of students of the college by 
Professor J. Laurence Laughliii of the 
University of Chicago, who is chairman 
of the committee in. charge of the con- 
test. . 

Papers for the prizes are to be sub- 
mitted before June 1, 1910. There are 
live prizes, totaling $2,000. The contest- 
ants are divided into three classes, fuller 
details of which may be had from the 
head of the department of political 
economy. The prizes are divided as' 
follows: 

Class "A," first prize $600; second 
prize $400. ' . 

Class "B," first prize $300; second 
prize, $200. 

Class "C," one prize, $500. 

Classes "A" and "B" refer particularly 
to college graduates and undergraduates, 
and the following subjects have been 
suggested by Professor Laughlin's com- 
mittee : 

1. The effect of labor unions on in- 
. ternational trade. 

2. The best means of raising the 
wages of the unskilled. 

3. A comparison betwen the theory 
and the actual practice of protectionism 
in the LInited States. 

4. A scheme for an ideal monetary 
system for the United States. 

5. The true relation of the central 
government to trusts. 

6. How much of J. S. Mills' economic 
system survives? 

7. A central bank as a factor in a 
financial crisis. 

'file members of the committee, aside 
from Professor Laughlin, are : 

Professor J. B. Clark, Columbia Llni- 
versity ; Professor Henry C. Adams, 
ITniversity of Michigan ; Horace White, 
Esq., New York City, and Edwin F. 
Gay. Harvard University. 



DANCE AT SAN LUIS SCHOOL. 

A jolly party of town people gave a 
subscription dance at the San Luis school 
last Thursday evening. Mr. and Mrs. 
Morrill chaperoned. Those present 
were: Misses Reinhardt, Yna Reinhardt, 
Frost, Nell Estill, Floy Estill, McCreery, 
Rice, Pinckney, Morris, Kampf, Louise 
Kampf, Lennox, Agnes Lennox, Camp- 
bell, Whittaker, Love, Randolph. Glasser, 



Sells, Stark, Hamilton, Cora Kampf, 
ilelen Lennox, McCoombs, Cheely; 
Messrs. Argo, Arters, Whipple, Tucker, 
Nafe, Sylvester, Kittleman, Angell, Phil- 
lips, Hesler, Hazen, Kampf, Vandemoer, 
Reed, Steele, Morrison, R. Morrison, 
Puffer, Siddons, Whittaker, Thompson, 
Sisco, Sells, Holden, Cary, Scibird, 
Cheely. 



COLORADO COLLEGE CALEN- 
DAR. 



Cuts Ivlade and Stock Ordered. 



The Colorado College Calendar for 
1910 is rapidly assuming material form. 
The cuts are made and the stock is or- 
dered, which means that the finished pro- 
duct will very soon be on sale. Be fore- 
sighted this year, everybody, and begin 
now to lay aside your sixty-cent pieces. 
Last year many applications for calen- 
dars were made when it was too lat>^ 
Don't make this mistake again. Make 
\our plans now, and as soon as the cal- 
endars are out speak for as many as you 
will be able to dispose of, so that those 
who have the matter in charge will know 
in time whether a second order will be 
necessary to supply the demand. 

'1 he calendar will contain twelve pages, 
one for each month of the year, with two 
new and attractive cuts for each page. 
1 1 will be in rich chocolate-brown tones, 
the double-sepia half-tones being mount- 
ed on a tipping of dark brown against a 
backing of lighter shade. The cover de- 
sign, drawn by Miss Louise Strang, is a 
conventionalized oak border which will 
lie very effective in the black and gold. 
Watch for the Calendar ! 



SIGMA CHI DANCE. 



1 he Sigma Chi fraternity gave a de- 
lightful dance at the San Luis school 
Saturday, November 6. Mr. and Mrs. 
Whitney, Mrs. Kittleman and Mrs. Kirk- 
wood chaperoned. Fink's orchestra ren- 
dered music for the occasion. Those 
present were : Misses Rice, McCreery, 
Hayden, Randolph, McCaw, Campbell; 
Huse, Whittaker, Kampf, Pollen, Stott, 
Hood, Knight, Pinckney, Franz, Kidder, 
Brown : Messrs. Whipple, Baker, Vree- 
land. Goldsmith, Betton, Holland. 



There is to be no more smoking on the 
campus at the University of Illinois. 

Prof. Coolidge, Barryhill and Ran- 
dolph were at Manitou Park Saturday 
marking timber. 



a 



THE TIGER 



<;^<^ 



The Weekly Newspaper of Colorado College 

GLENN W. SHAW Editor-in-Chief 

HARKY W. McOUAT Business Manager 

S. W. Dean Assistant Editor 

C. DOVELAN Assistant Editor 

H. H. Haight Assistant Editor 

L. E. Griswold Engineering Editor 

B. P. SiDDONI Athletic Editor 

H. F. Rice Forestry Editor 

Julia Ingersoll Alumni Editor 

Helen Canon Exchante Editor 

Janet Kampf Local Editor 

W. L. Warnock..-- Local Editor 

A. E. BrysON Assistant Manager 

E. W. HiLLE Assistant Manager 



Correspondents 

Geneva McCaw, T. M. Pettigrcw, Edith Sommers, F. B. 

Copeland, Margaret Watson, E S Statten, 

Katharine True, D. L Sisco 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to THE TIGER. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 
College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

t^^^^^^o Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
'^-Jaai^SiBs*-' Springs, Colo., as second-class matter. 

Subicriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



TOMORROW 

Colorado College is going to Wash- 
burn Field to win a football game. 
We will go into the game with de- 
pleted forces but with plenty of red 
blood coursing where it ought to 
course. Morrison's case is closed and 
the letter of the law has been lived 
up to. A inistake, by whoever made, 
is a mistake and rankles naturally, 
but making the most of everything is 
the pride of the true sport. The 'Boul- 
der game is no more lost than you 
are. it has not been played yet. 

The team is strong and full of fight. 
Richards has been coaching eleven 
men and substitutes, not one man. He 
has built up a machine that will make 
you proud when you see it work to- 
morrow. And you may depend upon 
it, it will 'ivork. If it would not be 
insulting you, we would here urge you 
to bring- your lungs, and megaphones, 
and spirit and help a classy team de- 
feat Boulder again and set our alumni 
to dancing. Instead we say. here's 
hoping and fighting. Colorado Col- 
lege is out after Boulder tomorrow. 

NAMES AND NICKNAMES. 

A few weeks ago the Daily Califo.- 
nian of Berkeley mentioned in its ex- 
change column some trifling events 
which had just occurred at Colorado 
College and said that they happened 
at Colorado. To anyone conversant 



with the colleges and universities of 
the state of Colorado tna: would mean 
that the fudge party, or whatever it 
was, was successfully conducted at 
Boulder. Now we choose this occaT 
sion to remark pleasantly on the 
names of our sister in^tift.itions be- 
cause fudge parties realty '■'cannot be 
taken as legitimate excuses for heated 
editorial rejoinders, although, of 
course, — but let that go. Our pu.- 
pose is rather to defend Boulder in 
their lamentation over an unfortunate 
confusion of names than to quarrel 
with them over the nothings which 
make biased students so zealous in 
their praise of stinging editorial vo- 
cabularies. 

Boulder is the State University and 
is therefore Colorado, speaking col- 
lectively, just as the State University 
of Pennsylvania is Pennsy and the 
Berkeley institution is California. We 
are not Colorado and do not care to 
he; we were christened Colorado 
College when we were the lonely lit- 
tle first-born hereabouts, and Colo- 
rado .College we are. When we are 
addressed officially, we are respectful- 
ly called Colorado College; when we 
are mentioned casually, the slang for 
us, Colorado Springs or whatever it 
may be, does not ruffle us. Nor can 
we imagine "Terrible Teddy'' arous- 
ing unseemly ire in the admirable 
Theodore Roosevelt, nor "St. 
James' " setting the government of 
Great Britain on its ear. Some things 
are beneath some people, which is a 
polite way of saying we do not see 
the sense of a row over indifferent 
names, especially where they carry 
no hint of belittlement or insult. We 
shall continue to use Unive.-sity of 
Colorado, State University, Boulder 
and U. cif C. indifferently in our ev- 
evryday talk an'd shall smile at cavil- 
ing .as always. 

We have been led into this disser- 
tation on names and nicknames, not 
because of any recent rebuke for dis- 
respect, but because the Agricultural 
College is adopting a new name this 
fall and we see more confusion ahead 
for our distant contemporaries who 
may wish to mention our activities. 
The Farmers have recently decided to 
call themselves the State College. We 
do not object; we simply consider it 
interesting that Colorado will be hold- 
. iiig more and more fudge, and othe.' 
parties throughout the undergraduate 
lournals of the country as state insti- 
tutions change their names to sound 
more end more lil^e those of their sis- 
ters. But we need not grow confused 



here at home, since we know each 
other and have definite nicknames 
for each other. Let Colorado Col- 
lege, Colorado arul the State College 
of Colorado go ahead with their fudge 
parties unconfined and thank fortune 
that Denver and the Mines are satis- 
fied with themselves and their names. 



This space reserved for 
those who.may wish to write 
their own comtnent on things 
in general. 



CHAPEL SINGING. 

Something should be done to improve 
our chapel singing. That singing which 
should be the most enjoyable and bene- 
-^icial part of our chapel services, is so 
poor that it falls far short of its pur- 
pose. Here is a suggestion for the bet- 
terment of our chapel singing that could 
be put into eiTect next semester. Why 
not follow the custom of most eastern 
colleges and have a chapel choir. A 
suitable choir of mixed voices could eas- 
ily be obtained from the members of the 
two glee clubs. Such a choir would 
make a tremendous improvement in our 
singing. In addition to the improvement 
that the united singing of a choir would 
make, a choir would also act as a stim- 
ulus to the remainder of the student 
body. It would give them that lead 
which they lack so very badly now. The 
choir could have their places on the plat- 
form back of the pulpit or could sit in 
the two front rows of chapel seats. A 
roll of the choir members could he taken 
with tlie rest of the students. 

A CONTRIBUTOR. 



THE TIGER 



,^.f,jjSi>i»--- 



■m^ 




CAMPUSTR Y By Webb Foote 



Are you in any of those matrimony 
courses ? While I was raking leaves in 
the library the other day a worried man 
leaned over me and told me all about 
them. He said : 

"Say, now, listen here old man. My 
folks are sending me to college. They 
are spending money and wrinkled brows 
on me. They wanted me to learn to 
amount to something in this world. They 
weren't worried about my getting mar- 
ried. They knew that education and am- 
bition were the only things that could 
keep me from immediate coupling. 1 
was engaged down home, and they sent 
me here to get some sense before doing 
what no man needs be taught to do. 
And now see what is being handed me ! 

"This morning I went to English O 
and put in one solid hour listening to 
endless guesses as to whether Dean 
Swift really loved Stella. We turned 
love over and over a dozen times and 
nobody got any wiser by the turning. 
Dean Swift is dead and so is Stella, but 
love isn't. Tomorrow we shall consider 
■ the pranks it played on Clarissa Har- 
lowe, and while the men protest the im 
possibility of the villain in the case, the 
women will as vehemently declare him 
a common type and the fainting Clarissa 
the figment of a dead man's mind. 

"But English O isn't the only matri- 
mony course. I went from it to English 
N and found Tennyson supplying food 
for busy tongues. Geraint was no sort 
of a husband, Enid was too easy, Lyn- 
ette treated Gareth detestably and, ac- 
cording to some, as they always treat 
them, according to others, emphatically 
"No," and according to still others, with- 
ering frowns. All of which goes to say 
that nobody knows, but everybody knows 
he does know, because his last mix-up 
prejudiced him. For the same reason 
you don't accept that statement." 

"Never mind," I said, "steam up a 
little. Troubles of my own are crowd- 
ing." 

"Well," he said, "I'll try to talk faster. 
The limit was reached when I dropped 
into a cold-blooded economics class and 
found them discussing the influence- of 
socialism on the marriage st^te. I'm 
cutting math right now because I've 
learned enough of what I know these 



profs don't know any more than anybody 
else does, and I've revolted. Maybe you 
don't see how they could work math into 
matrimony, but — And say, there's an- 
other course ; English K has run into 
the same subject. We're fighting eacn 
other over Milton's views on divorce and 
the reasons for them. We're, — _ 

"Sitting here wasting time," I put in 
shortly. I'm sorry I spoke shortly now, 
for that man went away with the most 
pained expression 1 ever saw on a hu- 
man face. He may leave college, just 
for that. But seriously, I don't believe 
it will be my fault. If what he told me, 
and was about to tell me, is true, the 
Student Connnission should take some 
action. A man doesn't have to pay tui- 
tion to gossip in this world. It is cheaper 
to pay court, I believe, but I don't really 
pretend to know. In any case the above 
conversation was strictly confidential and 
I hope 3'ou will see to it that it goes no 
farther. 



I conversed with a small friend the 
other day. We took turns about as fol- 
lows : 

"Hello, Mickey." 

"Hello, Webb." 

"How's school?" 

"Fine. Got another teacher now." 

"Is that right? What's she like?" 

"Like you." 

"Great, She must be there." 

"She is — 'bout twice a week." 

"Like me?" 

"No, not that way. But she's just a 
kid, too." 

"Oh, I see. What does she teach ?" 

"Lis and music. Oh, everything." 

"Is she any good?'' 

"Well, now, I'll tell you, Webb, hon- 
estly, she'd be all right, but she's new. 
She's just learnin' how to teach us and 
we're teachin' her. Yesterday I asked 
her when Teller county was discovered 
an' she said 1849, just as if she knew. 
Dad told me to do it. I don't know the 
joke exactly, but when I laughed, she 
redded all up. I s'pose there ain't no 
Teller county. She'll be all right, though, 
an' she's awful easy. You see, she just 
helps Miss Ruler. Wish she'd beat the 
old crank out of her job. Maybe she 



will. Jinnny says there's one of 'em 
down to his school, too." 

"(Jne of what?" 

"Cadets, 1 think they call 'em. But 
they ain't no soldiers. They're more like 
Sunday school teachers. So long. Got 
to chop some wood." 

"So long, Mickey. See if there isn't 
a vacant seat in your room, will you ?" 

"Yep," he called, and smiled, but I 
don't believe he will see the joke until 
he gets into college. 



Blows always come in flocks. The 
mantle fell on us Thursdav night. 



"1 hen the telephone rang." 



MORRISON DROPPED 

Continued from Page 1. 

ester or term,' was overlooked by both 
Dr. Norlin and myself and I am willing 
to take all the blame for overlooking 
that rule. Not realizing that that was 
in the rules, I made the statement to 
Aiorrison that if he were up in his work 
at this time, and appeared to be acting 
in good faith toward his school work 
(l.'Oth of which he has done), he 
could play, and that there was no rule to 
stop him. I made that statement to Mor- 
rison, to the coach, Mr. Richards, to 
different students, and to many people 
in the city. On Oct. 9, at a meeting of 
the Conference in Denver, Mr. McDon- 
ald of C. A. C, as we sat talking in- 
formally after dinner, said to me that 
he wanted to talk over the cases of three 
of our men with me. He said that in a 
purely friendly way he wished to inquire 
into the eligibility of Whitaker, Vande- 
moer and Morrison. I proceeded to give 
him our reasons why we thought that 
those men should be permitted to play. 

"The eligibility certificates were diffi- 
cult to fill out. and a lot of information 
had to be gotten, and all the institutions 
were late in sending them out. The LI. 
of C. blanks got to us two weeks ago, 
and ours got to them the Monday be- 
fore the C. A. C. game here. That week 
Mr. McDonald (C. A. C.) called up and 
said that the credits of three of' our men 
were not sufficient, and, in a friendly 
manner, said that he felt that the men 
should be protested and their names 
brought up before a meeting of the Con- 
ference. At great personal inconveni- 
ence, I attended a meeting of the Con- 
preceding the C. A. C. game. We put in 
ference in Denver on the Wednesday 
three and a quarter hours on the sub- ' 
ject, considering this rule which both Dr. 
Norlin and myself had overlooked. It 
was found that Boulder had played a 



THE TIGER 



man in the C. A. C. game who was in- 
ehgible. They discussed the case of 
Vandemoer and decided that he could 
play. Whitaker, even though he lacked 
credits, was considered eligible, because 
of his perfectly good reason for quitting 
school last year. Morrison, they said, 
should have his case referred to the C. C 
faculty. I came back from Denver 
Thursday night, feeling pretty blue. 
After thinking over the matter I called 
up Dr. Norlin and said that in view 
of the fact that both he and myself had 
misunderstood the rule, and that there 
was a great desire to keep the matter 
out of the papers and avoid publicity "of 
all kinds, would he agree to make an ex- 
ception in Morrison's case, and let him 
play in the last two games and not in 
the C. A. C. game? He said that he 
would bring the matter before the Ath- 
letic Board of U. of C. and telephone me 
later. This was Thursday night before 
the C. A. C. game. Friday night 1 re- 
ceived no message from Boulder and so 
Saturday morning I called up Dr. Nor- 
lin, who said he had failed to phone 
Friday night because the meeting of the 
Athletic Board hadn't closed until one 
o'clock in the morning. He said that the 
action of the board had been that they 
did not want to go behind the action oi 
the Conference in the matter, and that 
they preferred to leave it with the fac- 
ulty of Colorado College as to whether 
Morrison should play or not. 

"I told Dr. Norlin that I was very 
sorry that they were taking such ac- 
tion, as it was certain to' stir up that 
feeling of fierce animosity in Colo- 
rado College against Boulder which 
was now dying out. Norlin agreed 
with me and said that he would 
call up Fort Collins and would have 
another meeting of the Boulder 
Board. With that I had to be satis- 
fied, as I had agreed to pull Morrison 
out of the C. A. C. game already. 
On Saturday (the same day) I saw 
President Lowry of C.A.C. here, who 
expressed his regret at the trouble 
and said he had no intention of hav- 
ing Morrison withdrawn for the whole 
season, but, as they had already made 
so many sacrifices for the Conference 
and were so weak, they didn't feel 
that Morrison should play against 
them, but that he might play in the 
other two games. 

"On Tuesday I got a letter from 
Dr. Norlin of Boulder as follows: 

"Our Board of control stated that 
they had no intention of protesting 
Morrison, but did not feel li'<e going 
behind the Conference rules in the 
matter. We think that C. A. C. has 



made more sacrifices for the Confer- 
ence than any other institution, and 
that the faculty of Colorado College 
would best serve the Conference by 
respecting the protest, and that, while 
C. A. C. would make no objection if 
-vlorrison was played, still we think it 
would be very unwise if he is allowed 
to play. C. A. C. has stated that 
they regard it as a test of faith on the 
part of Colorado College, as to wheth- 
er it would respect the Conference 
rules or not.'' 

"I at once called up C. A. C. and 
read the letter to them. Mr, McDon- 
ald said that that was not the senti- 
ment of their Board at all, and that 
he would send us a letter the next 
morning giving us their position. I 
requested that he call me up and read 
the letter before sending it. The next 
noon I got a phone message from C. 
A. C. and they said: "If your faculty 
finds Mr. Morrison eligible, we accept 
it without question." 

"I then talked to Mr, Richards, and 
he agreed that the faculty couldn't 
say that under the present rules Mor- 
rison is eligible. 

"I then called up Fort Collins and 
suggested to them that they should ' 
change the letter to read Tf, un- 
der the circumstances, your faculty 
thinks Morrison should play, etc' C. 
A. C. then asked again for our reas- 
ons for wanting to play Morrison, 
which I gave them, and C. A. C. 
agreed to send the letter to Boulder. 
"Then we had a faculty meeting at 
which .it was decided not to play Mor- 
rison. The question was then con- 
sidered by the Student Commission 
and they indorsed the action of the 
faculty." 

Dean Parsons' explanation was 
followed by a short talk by Mr. Rich- 
ards, who, though he indorsed the ac- 
tion of the faculty, was plainly not 
feeling very cordially toward "our 
sinsters in charity — and in confer- 
ence." "We are not licked yet," he 
said ,in closing, and the fervent 
"Amens" that came from every part 
of chapel showed that the Tiger 
fighting spirit had been aroused at 
last. 



CONTEMPORARY TO 
CELEBRATE. 



Big Rally Tonight 
at Perkins 



Tenth Anniversary to Be Observed 

With Banquet and Picnicking. 

Annual Musicale. 



Contemporary Club will celebrate the 
tenth anniversary of its organization 
Friday night by a banquet at the Acacia. 
Many of the alumnae will be present and 
will respond to the toast, "The Contem- 
porary Girl" in her different activities. 
After the banquet a dance will be held in 
the ball room. 

Saturday morning the town alumnae 
will entertain Contemporary at a picnic 
breakfast in North Cheyenne canon. 

A box party at the Boulder game will 
conclude the celebration. 

Friday afternoon, the honorary mem- 
bers, the alumnae who arrived in time, 
and some of the new girls, were enter- 
tained at the annual musicale at Pear- 
sons House. The program was given 
by Mrs. Taliaferro, Mrs. Briscoe and 
Mrs. Chase. 



WEEK OF PRAYER. 



Dr. Bayley of Denver to Conduct 

Evening Meetings — Phil. Gillette 

to Speak Friday. 

In agreement with the action of other 
colleges and universities throughout the 
country, Colorado College will observe 
the Week of Prayer, Nov. 14th to 21st. 
Dr. Bayley of Denver has accepted an in- 
vitation to speak at vesper service Sun- 
day afternoon at 4:30, at Perkins Hall. 
He will remain at the college until 
Thursday, and his time will be at the 
service of the students. Half-hour prayer 
meetings have been arranged for the 
men, at Hagerman Hall, Monday and 
Tuesday evenings at 7 o'clock. He will 
speak to the women Monday evening. 
On Wednesday evening there will be a 
union prayer meeting of men and women 
at Bemis Hall, which will also be ad- 
dressed by Dr. Bayley. 

Dr. Bayley is well known for his re- 
freshing personality and the attractive 
view of Christianity which'he holds, and 
his visit will give the students an op- 
portunity to get acquainted with him 
which they will profit by taking advan- 
ta,ge of. 

On Friday, Nov. 19, Phil. Gillett will 
conclude the meetings by speaking to the 
men at Hagerman Hall, 



THE TIGER 



TIGERS BEAT AGGIES 

Continued from Page 1. 

several Aggie forward passes when it 
seemed inevitable that a man in green 
should get the ball. Hedblom at center 
took care of his position well. Gary 
was charging through hard and blocked 
two kicks which resulted in safeties 
Copeland showed up better Saturday 
than at any previous time this year, as 
did Morrison, who took Sinton's place 
at right end the second half. Putnam, 
who played most of the second half, 
was full of snap and ran the plays well. 

V^andemoer kicked to Schaeffer, a for- 
ward pass failed, and after receiving the 
kick the Tigers ran the ball to the Ag- 
gies' 10-yard line, where they fumbled. 
Aggies followed suit by fumbling, and 
Heald went over for a touchdown after 
three minutes of play. Whitaker kicked 
goal. 

The next score was made a few 
minutes later when the Tigers, by a 
series of line bucks, ran the ball down 
to the Aggies' lo-yard line. Here the 
Aggies took a brace, and the next two 
line plunges were held for no gain. 
The next play was a forward pass to 
Sinton, who made an easy touchdown, 
and Whitaker kicked goal. Score: 
Tigers 12, Aggies o. 

With a lead of twelve points, the 
Tigers began kicking on first down; 
Vandemoer outpunted Schaeffer and 
the penalty on the non-execution of a 
forward pass left the ball in the pos- 
session of the Aggies on their 3-yard 
line. Schaeffer punted out 40 yards, 
and Al Sherry, who received the ball, 
carried it through the whole Aggie 
team to a touchdown. It was a bril- 
liant piece of work and reminded us 
of that happy day two years ago when 
Boulder was given a similar trick. 
Whitaker kicked another perfect goal. 
Tigers 18; Aggies o. 

At this point the Ag.gies began to 
open up some of their shift plays and 
complicated forward passes, and for 
a while matters stood about even, but 
the Tigers gradually worked the ball 
down into Aggie territory until Mr. 
Schaeffer again found himself in that 
precarious position of punting from 
behind his own goal line. This time 
Gary broke through and blocked the 
kick, and after some discussion, the 
officials allowed two points for a safe- 
ty. Tigers 30; Aggies o. 

This ended the scoring of the first 
half and time was called a few min- 
utes later. 

During the second half Richards 
practically tore the regular line-up to 
pieces by sending in five new men. 



Wilson took Heald's place at full, 
Morrison was sent in to relieve Sin- 
ton. LeClere was given a chance in 
the backfield. Putnam replaced Sher- 
ry, who had a bruised leg, and Roe 
went in to right guard, relieving 
Thompson. 

The first score of the second half 
came when Vandemoer went across 
tackle for 10 yards, after the ball had 
been carried down the field on a series 
of straight tactics. Whitaker kicked 
another easy goal. Tigers 26, Aggies 0. 

Not Jong after this Gary again 
blocked one of Schaeffer's south paw 
punts and another safety was allowed. 
Tigers 28, Aggies o. 

Whitaker wound up the scoring by 
a beautiful place kick from the ex- 
treme west side of the field and 27 
yards back. 

Aggies kicked off to Gollege. Put- 
nam uncorked a few plays in the way 
of forward passes and onside kicks, 
which were working finely when time 
was called just before Morley slid 
over the line for a touchdown, which 
was not allowed. 

The line-up : 

Gopeland 1. e Proctor, Horn 

Steele 1. t Morse 

Reichmuth 1. g Johnson 

Hedblom c Wachter 

Thompson, Roe. . ..r. g Mann 

Gary r. t Bohmeyer 

F. Morrison, Sinton. r. e Ghase, Coate 

Putnam, Sherry. . .q. b McGadden 

Vandemoer, LeGlere r. h Cram 

Wilson, Heald . . . . f . b Schaeffer 

Whitaker .1. h Bloomfield 

Summary ; 

Officials — Referee, Dubach ; Umpire, 
Van Stone ; Head Linesman, Rosenfelt ; 
Timekeepers, Rothgeb, Jardine. 

Touchdowns — Heald, Sinton, Vande- 
moer, Sherry. 

Goals — Whitaker, 4. 

Place Kick — Whitaker. 

Safeties — Tigers, 2. 

Time of Halves^25 minutes. 



ALPHA TAU DELTA HOUSE 
WARMING. 



G. G. no doubt will expect to run a 
higher score than U. of G., sh ! but G. G. 
will ever remember the horrible night- 
mare' she had two years ago when the 
wise ones said. Ho ! the score will stand 
30 or more to in our favor, however, 
we left the Tigers' territory that even- 
ing with 4 points to the good not forget- 
ting at the same time to present them a 
goose egg. Beware sages lest history 
repeat herself. — Rocky Mountain Gol- 
legian. Ft. Gollins, Nov. 6. 



Ali)ha Tau Delta Fraternity gave a 
liouse-warming Wednesday afternoon 
and evening. More than five hundred 
friends of the fraternity attended. 
The house was tastefully decorated 
with red and white roses, the fratern- 
ity colors. An orchestra porvided mu- 
sic during the evening. Those who 
seived and assisted were: Miss Brown, 
Mrs. Argo, Mrs. Schneider, Miss Bar- 
clay, Mrs. Cajori, Mrs. Hills, Miss 
Weir, Miss Glara Gheley, Mrs. Howe, 
Mrs. Woodbridge and the Misses 
McGaw, Hood, Hunter, Kampf, Pol- 
len, Strang, Miller, Huse, Auld, Par- 
soris, Wilson, Randolph, Gibbs, Kid- 
der, Frantz, Whittaker, Watson, Shep- 
ard, Vesta' Tucker, Maud Miller, Roe,- 
Eva Wilson, Warnock, Yerkes, Fames, 
Fay Templeton, Forhan, Vaughn, 
Haines, Ferril, Thomas, Flora Grow- 
ley, Diltz. 



CO¥IMITTEE TO CHOOSE 

SENIOR CLASS PLAY. 



President Sylvester of the senior 
class has appointed a committee to 
choose a drama and select a coach for 
the al fresco play to be given in the 
Jungle next spring. The committee, 
G. W. Shaw, chairman; Louise Strang, 
Julia Inge.'soll, Marguerite Anderson, 
and W. M. Jameson, met last Monday 
night and outlined a reading course 
which should bring results within a 
month.. 



COLORADO COLLEGE ALUMNUS 

Continued from Page 1. 

liave been confined to the first method, 
altliough the second would seem the 
more fruitful. For, while it is the 
problem of the operating engineer to 
select the best lubricant, the designer 
has to decide the more vital question 
of how many pounds load to allow per 
square inch. And if, by good judg- 
ment, the former may reduce the fric- 
tion a few per cent., the latter by his 
dimensioning of the bearing, can mul- 
tiply or divide the friction by hund eds 
of per cent. 

Hersey believed that, without pro- 
ducing actual "hot-boxes," investiga- 
tions of load-carrying power might be 
made which would yield information 
designers are waiting for. The de- 
signer must strike a compromise be- 
tween long beariiigs, with excessive 
friction, and short bearings, with con- 
centrated load. Usually the allowable 



10 



THE ^1 I G E R 



football tomorrow 

Colorado college versus 
university of Colorado 

no season tickets punched at the gate 



I ! Fairyland Theatre 



J 



pressure, or carrying power, has been 
limited by heating, and assumed to 
vary inversely with speed, resulting in 
low efficiency at high speeds. But ex- 
1. eriments in Germany have recently 
shown how to escape the heating dif- 
ficulty, so there is now demanded a 
new c.iterion for design. 

This research shows that such a cri- 
terion may be -found in the compressi- 
bility of the oil film. By precise meas- 
urements of all thicknesses of film 
from two-thousandths of an inch down 
to one-millionth, the laws of varia- 
tion of carrying power with speed, 
load, and state of lubricaticn were de- 
termined, verifying theoretical expect- 
ations and indicating the possibility of 
better efficiency in certain types of 
high speed machinery. 

The efTect upon tlie co-efficient of 
friction, and upon lost work, and upon 
the rate of heating, of variations in 
speed, load, rate of feed, method of 
lubrication, temperature, and viscosity 
of lubricant were also studied over a 
wide range, five hundred tests being 
run, all told. 



Snappy, Swa^^y 
Clothes 

AT 

THE MAY CO. 

Clever 
Haberdashers 



ALUMNI NOTES 



l-Iowbert '07 was at the game Satur- 
day. He is the manager of the Aiichoria- 
Leland mine at Cripple Creek. 



Miss Helen Clarke '08 passed through 
town Monday on her way to Canon City 
frorii Denver, where she has been visit- 
ing. 



Mrs. Cleveland (Miss Agnes Thomas 
ex-TO) is visiting her home in Colorado 
Springs. 



Scibird '07 was at the football game 
on Saturdav. 



Miss Harkey '09 is studying dom'estic 
science at Columlia this vear. 



Miss Dora Miller '06 is teaching in 
Cheyenne. 

On Thursday night, Nov. 4, the mem- 
bers of the class of "08 in Denver held 
a reunion at the home of Miss Irene 
Fowler. G. W. Smith, Lester Bonham, 
A. T. French, Miss Helen Sloane, Miss 
Flelen Clarke and Theodore Riggs were 
present. 



On November 6th, Miss Ida M. Gil- 
land '08 was maried, at her home in 
Cheyenne, to Dr. Galen A. Fox. Dr. and 
R'Irs. Fox will live in Cheyenne. 



The Sigma Chi fraternity had a num- 
ber of guests at dinner Sunday. Those 
present were the Misses Angie Hayden, 
Janet Kampf, Mable Towhill, Marjorie 
Statton and Mr. and Mrs. Statton. 



High-class Vaudeville and Latest Moving 

Pictures, Entire Change of Program 

Mondays and Thursdays 

DAN TRACY, Manager 



Patronize 
TIGER Advertisers 



THE CENTRAL FUEL CO. 

R. M. AITKEN, Manager 
All Best Grades of Fuel. Patterson Lump the 
Best Furnace Fuel 
"Rvery Lump a Lump of Heat" 
Prompt Delivery- 
Two Phones 1 101 128 N. Tejon Street 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co. 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 

"Our Colorado^' 
"Bruin Inn'' 

"BlackandGold'' 



The Three Songs of Colorado 

College — in Sheet Form 

for 40c. Buy Them of 

E. W. HILLE 



Clever Clothes 

FOR 

College Chaps 

AT 

ROBBINS 

^=ON THE CORNER = 



THE TIGER 



11 




Cigar Store 



Largest Line of High-Grade Smoking Tobacco 

is a pretty broad statement but as a proof of it just look into our window the next 
time you pass. Walk out of your way to see it. 

Harry 1 C3 Hughes 



W9\Si 



MADE WITH 

ihe wise 15 sufficient ' 

CivARK 
ENGRAVING Ca 

ILLUSTRATORS PUEBLO 
/@\ DESIGNERS COLO. 

V®/ ENGRAVERS , 



'^' 



GAeaei-* 



Gel Your Picnic Supplies 

^^ AT ^^ 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Favorite Resort of the Col- 
lege Students, Renowned in 
Story and Song 

BRUIN INN 

Up North Cheyenne Canon 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER, Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 



Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Patronize TIGER 
Advertisers 



UNION ICE AND COAL CO. 

W. M. BANNING, ProprieUr 

Artificial Ice and Cold Storage 

Dealers in All Kinds of Coal and Pinion Wood 
Yard Office, lOS W.Vermiio City Office, 5 N. Tejon 



LITERARY PROGRAMS 

'I here will be no meetings of the 
men's literary societies or of the Y. M. 
C. A. tonight, on accovmt of the athletic 
rally at Perkins Hall. 

CONTEMPORARY, NOV. 19. 

1 riumph of the Literary Play 

Reba Hood 
The Poetic Dramatists. .:... Luc\- b'erril 
Stevenson as a Dramatist. . . .Lois Smith 
Visitors welcome. 

HYPATIA, NOVEMBER 19. 

Universities of Germany — 

In Mediaeval Time's. . .Edith Summers 
In Modern Times Ruth Bateman 

Music Elizabeth Gerould 

Visitors welcome. 

CHEMI&TRY CLUB, NOV. 16. 

Static Electricity J. T. C'oves 

Iron <ind Steel Manufacture, 

R. G. Conklin 
Mineral Resources of Siberia, 

F. D. Harding 
Visitors welcome. 



Local Department 




Hall and Lankes have opened up a 
pantatorium in Hagerman. 

Judd '13 has left school. 



The sophomores of Alpha Tau Delta 
entertained at dinner Thursday evening. 
Guests of the fraternity were the Misses 
Hedgwick ex-'12, T'errill, Watson, Whit- 
aker. Roe, Fezer. Miss Barkley and 
Professor Motten chaperoned. 



Maier's Lunch & Dining Room 

Lunches of All Kinds 
Regular Meals 20c and 25c 

216' , N. Tejon St. T Opposite North Park 

"Attention Collegians". 

Let us make your Dances, Receptions, 
and Fraternity Socials this term, affairs 
never to be forgotten, by decorating 
your hall or parlors in an artistic man- 
ner with the college banners, pennants, 
festoons and bunting. Then have 
erected our sidewalk canopy to keep off 
the inclement weather. We also have 
floor coverings to protect the carpets. 
All this will cost but very little and 
add much to these affairs. 

Thfc Out West Tent and 

A,.,„* ^ C^ Telephone Main 1261 
/VWnmg L^O. 113' > N, Tejon Street 

College 

Pennants 

New line of Pennants just received 
— they are very attractive, and the 
prices about a third lower than 
ever before. 

Our Celebrated College Posters are 
now only 25 or 50 cents 
each, mounted 




Whitney and Grimwood 

No. 20 North Tejon Street 



12 



THE ^JM G E R 



0. E. Hemenway 



Groceries and 



Meats 



jkf.t*. 







115 South Tejon Street 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



YOU don't entertain your 
guests to save money — 
if you did, the simplest 
way would be to forego en- 
tertaining them. 
tjjMuETH's may cost more, 
but — 

ClMueth^s 

CHAS. p. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 



5 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



The Colorado Springs Floral Co. 

Wish to Have Your Business at Right 
Prices 



Miss Ferrill was at her home in Den- 
ver over Sunda}'. 

A large crowd of alumni are expected 
for the Boulder game. 



Miss Warnock spent the latter pait ot 
the wsek at her home in Loveland. 



Miss Herr went to Denver to meet her 
parents the last of the week. 



Miss Hedgcock is down for the Boul- 
der game. 



Miss HinklcN' spent Sunday at her 
home in Denver. 



Paul Clifford was in Denver and at- 
tended the D. U. -Mines game last week. 



Don L. King is pladged to Delta Phi 
Theta. 



A party consisting of Miss Greene and 
Miss Douglass, Nelson and Dietrich, 
went out to North Cheyenne canon last 
Saturday for a "weenie" roast. 

Pettigrew and Dean were in Denver 
over Saturday and Sunday. 

Professor Griswold of the mining 
engineering department spent the 
week-end examining and sampling 
mining property m the Cheyenne Na- 
tional Forest Reserve. 



Miss June Ashley of Michigan visited 
Gertrude Ashley over Saturday. 

Hypatia was very pleasantly enter- 
tained h_y the Misses Crowley Saturday 
evening. 



Miss True's brother visited her last 
Tuesday. 



Miss Walsh spent the week end at her 
home in Denver. 

A freshman rally was held in Miss 
Wolcott's room Saturday night. 



.Miss Bertha Price entertained at a 
fudge party in Ticknor hall, Tuesday 
evening. 



Telephone Main 599 



104 N. Tejon St. 



Miss Marion Haines entertained Miss 
June Messer. and Miss Anna Huse at 
dinner last Wednesdav. 



A. G. SPALDING a BROS. 



The 

SPALDING 
Trade -Mark 




'•V.s.pat. 



is known throughout 
the world as a 

Guarantee of 
Quality 



are the Largest 
Manufacturers 
in the World of 

Official 

Equipment 

For All 
Athletic 
Sports and 
Pastimes 

If You areinter- 
** * "" ested in 
Athletic Sport you 
should have a copy 
of the Spalding 
Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyclo- 
pedia of what's new 
in Sport and is sent 
free on request. 

A. G. Spalding & Bros. 

1616 Arapohoe St., Denver, Colo. 

JOHN MOFFA T 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Stree 

Fraternities, Clubs, Individuals 
desiring Milk or Cream 
in any quantities 
should remem- 
ber :: :: 



The Sinton-Rustic Home 

D* o No. 419 South El Paso St. 

airy S) Phone Main 442 

The College Photo Studio 

The Highest Class of 

Photographs 




Bingham 

18 S. Tejon St. Phone M.678 



DOUGLAS & 
HETHERINGTON 



Architects 



Telephone S56 Rooms 1 5 and 16 Qui West Buildinii. 

COLORADO SPRINGS. COLO. 



THE T1(}ER 



13 



Memory 
Books 

Bound in colors, black and 
and orange, and lettered on 
side. The only really Colo- 
rado College Scrap Book 
made. Lar^e enough to con- 
tain your four years' items. 

Price, $1.23 each 



The Out West 

Printing & Stationery Co. 
9-11 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 



Furniture 



At Moderate 
Prices 

Special Terms to Students 

McCracken & Hubbard 

120 and 122 South Tejon Street 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, >Ve 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

IS S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

Are Alvrays Well Pleased When They 
Get Their Hair Cut at 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



12S. Tajon St. 



Colorado Springs 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

^ascade Laundry 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 

20 per cent, discount 

To All Students of College and Academy 



Miss Miller entertained the freshmen 
in Bemis at a fudge party Friday night. 



The freshman class is to give a picnic 
breakfast next Saturday morning. All 
freshmen come ! A good time is an- 
ticipated. 



7 E. Bijou 



Phone 820 



Mrs. Price visited her daughter last 
Sunday. 

There has been splendid attendance 
at the freshman prayer meetings, and 
they are proving a great success. Miss 
Stott is to lead next Sunday, with the 
subject, "What Christ Should Mean to 
the College .Student." 



Bruin Inn, the popular little rustic 
hostelry, in North Cheyenne canon, 
changed hands recently and is now man- 
aged by Swanson and Riley, two ener- 
getic and obliging young men of this 
city. They promise the same treatment 
accorded to College students by their 
predecessor, Mr. Laveley. 



Miss Anna Huse entertained at a 
fudge party on Thursday last. 



Miss Helen Clark visited college 
friends Tuesday morning. 



Miss Ethel Rice entertained at din- 
ner Sunday for Miss Edith McCreery. 

A Kappa Sigma party took dinner at 
Rainbow falls Saturdav. 



A crowd of girls breakfasted in the 
Canon last Saturdav. 



Edith McCreery left Monday for her 
home in Greeley. 



Philosophy C. took a cut last Friday. 

Mary Bell Conklin, sister of Ross 
Conklin, visited here last week. 



Marian Hoffman visited Elsie Coniiell 
in Denver last week. 



Janet Kampf entertained informally 
for Angie Hayden Tuesday evening. 



Miss Picken was in Denver for the 
week end. 

A party of Sigma Chi's and guests 
spent Saturday morning in the hills. 



Helen Hinckley and Clara Herr were 
in Denver Saturday. 



Hunt Up 

Bissell's Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

Seldomridde Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Fec>d, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



C. F. Arcularius & 
Company 

A Large Assortment of 

BELT PINS 

All the Latest Styles 



9 South Tejon Street 
COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 

We have Embossing Dies for Stationery of all the 
College Societies aid Fraternities, also the Great 
Seal of the College. We carry in stock a large 
line of papers upon which to emboss these Dies — 
Hurd's, Crane's and others. 

Gowdy-Simmons Ptg Co. \\^:rf^ 



Wills; Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



A jolly party of college people spent 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

Burgess Candy 

There's nothing too good for the 
College girls — that's why we sell 
them candy. But we've noticed the 
girls themselves dont always do the 
buying. When a box of candy bears 
the Burgess stamp, you knOw it is 
never stale orshelf worn, but packed 
to your order from the freshest, pur- 
est, richest goods that our expert 
candy-makers can produce from day 
to day. 

W. N. Burgess 'i^ii^^ 



14 



THE T I G E K 



This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 

Company 




Headquarters for 

College Footwear 



The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

FOUNDERS AND MACHINISTS 



College 
Inn 



4^«k Short 
// Orders 



"Come in, the Cider's 
Fine" 

THE 

Crissey Si Fowler 
Lumber Co. 



Phone 101 



117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 



Our Special Extra-Clean 

Lignite 
Furnace Lump 

The Colorado Springs Fuel Co., 
112 Pike's Peak Avenue. Two 
Phones Main 230 

Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 

A. S. BLAKE 



Is the Man to See 



107 North Tejon 

Nickle Ware 



Phone 465 

Cutlery 



the week end camping at Pinecrest. Dr. 
and Mrs. Baker of Pinecrest chaperoned. 

Lenore Pollen was in Denver friday 
and Saturday. 

Phi Gamma Delta entertained Satur- 
day evening with a Bruin Inn party. The 
guests of the fraternity were, Mrs. Hale, 
Misses Roly, Glasser, Stark, Cora 
Kampf, Weeks, Watson, Hamilton, Mer- 
win, Wright, Pierson, Lewis, Harris, 
Knight, Tucker, Blacki-nan, Sells, Yerkes, 
Fezer, Perkins and Messrs. Sisco and 
Smith. 



Lucy Ferril spent Saturday and Sun- 
day at her home in Denver. 



Dorlie Crandall entertained last Sun- 
day with a tea. 

Marian Hoffman spent Saturday and 
Sunday in Denver. 



Mary Colt ex-T2 is president of the 
freshman class at Wellesley. 



Elizabeth Gerould spent Saturday and 
Sunday at her home in Pueblo. 



E. W. Hille played at the recital given 
by the Musical club last Monday after- 
noon. 



ACADEMY 



(Amy L. Busch, Correspondent.) 



Cutler defeated Centennial High school 
of Pueblo 18 to 11, last Saturday. after- 
noon at Pueblo. Neither team played as 
good a game as they are capable of play- 
ing, owing to the intense heat. During 
the larger part of the game the ball was 
in Cutler's territory, but Centennial was 
unable to take full advantage of their 
opportunities to score, and both teams 
fumbled badly. 

Brice made one of the most sensation- 
al plays ever seen on a Colorado grid- 
iron. Centennial had carried the ball to 
within two feet of Cutler's goal, where 
they lost it on a fumble. Brice snatched 
the ball from a mass of struggling play- 
ers and ran 109 yards for a touchdown. 
Keating got away with Brice and 
blocked ofif the only man who had a 
chance of stopping the runner. 

Cutler's additional touchdowns were 
made by the recovery of onside kicks, 
Keating getting the ball in both instances 



Oh! You Football 
Enthusiasts 

ft 

The big games are yet to come. 
Have you seen the very latest novelty? 

The Football Muff 

A protection against the chill of 
autumn weather, equipping you at 
the same time for the display of un- 
bounded enthusiasin. A most unique 
trophy for your room after the foot- 
ball season. See them at 

The Murray Drug Co. 



A hint to the fellows — If you 

can't make a hit with one of these, 
"It 'aint no use." 

William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

MCMDCDC ^ ^'w York Stock Exchange 

mtMbtKS I Colorado Springs Mining Stock Exchange 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St.. New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



n 


n 


he Waterman Press 


L 


at 112 E. Cucharras 


U^ 


Ik 




ji 


1 


are Specialists in Fine 


Printing, and solicit 



the patronage of the most ex- 
acting for anything that can 
be done in a d ecent print shop 
No matter how particular you 
are, we are here to make good 



We Print THE TIGER 



THE TIGER 



15 



and beating it for 35 and 65 yards for 
touchdowns. 

Brice, Stratton, Flanagan, Keating and 
McFarlan played the best game for Cut- 
ler. Taylor was painfully hurt in the 
first five minutes of play but refused to 
leave the game. 

Centennial kicked off to Cutler. Brice 
fumbled on the first play and Pueblo got 
the ball and carried it to within two feet 
of the goal line. On the next play Cen- 
tennial fumbled and Brice got away for 
his sensational run. Centennial again 
kicked off and on the first play Cutler 
lost the ball on a fumble. In three tries 
Centennial carried the ball over the line. 
The -first half ended 6 to 6. 

Shortly after the kick-off of the sec- 
ond half, Brice got ofif an onside kick 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 

GIDDINGS BROS. 

Colorado Springs 

THE SPECIALTY STORE 

A Hearty Welcom« Constantly Awaits All Visito s 

College Boys Remeinber 

HYATT'S 

Is the pUcc to go to get your barber 
work and baths 

106H E. Pike's P«ak Ave. Phone Main 700 



^\s 



AUNDF?y 



Why not have the BEST WORK ? 



20 per cent, discount 

To all Students of College and Academy 



J. J. WILSON, College Agent 

W.I.LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



119 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



/^, 



Shirts Plaited and 
Plain, the Latest 
are here 

GORTON'S 



Exclusive Suit and Over- 
coat Showing $25 



==^ 



Nowhere else can you see Adler-Rochester-Clothes, that 
celebrated line we are showing, for we are exclusive 
agents for them. We would be glad to have call in and 
examine the different selections we have to offer from 
$40.00 to $18.00. 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 




\ Correct Dress for Men. \ 



113 E. Pike's Peak 
Avenue 



^: 



J 



which Keating recovered. He ran 65 
yards for a touchdown. Centennial re- 
taliated b}' carrj'ing the ball half the 
length of the field and scoring by short 
line plunges. Try for goal was missed 
three times in this half. Centennial car- 
ried the ball to within ten yards of the 
goal line but lost it on downs or by fum- 
bles. With less than a minute to play 
Brice got off another kick and Keating 
got away for 35 yards for the last score 
of the game. Brice kicked all three goals 
after touchdowns. 



The Y. M. C. A. will give a stag re- 
ception for the young men of Cutler at 
7 :30 this evening, in the reading room at 
Hagerman Hall. 



Dr. Cajori addressed Cutler Academy 
chapel last Friday in the interests of the 
Ewing fund. Clara Perley, Everett 
Jackson and John Taylor have been ap- 
pointed to look after Cutler's interest 
in this fund. 



In order to celebrate the victory of 
last Saturday's game, Cutler was given a 
half holiday Monday. 



Willabel and Helen Lennox and 
Roland Jackson attended the Cutler-Cen- 
tennial game at Pueblo last Saturday. 



Miss Amy Tompson of Los Angeles, 
Calif., is a new student at Cutler. 



Next Tuesday afternoon the Centen- 
nial High School football team will meet 
the Colorado Springs High School on 
Washburn field. 



DRINK 

DERN'S 

Freshly Roasted Tea and Coffee 

29 South Tejon Street 

The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies and 
Fixtures 



208 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 812 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-203 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence, 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 956 



The College 

Photo Studio 

Hidh Class Photographs 
Kodaks and Supplies 




<S3<\^77l€^a / 



Corner Cascade and Kiowa 



16 THETIGER 

We Have the Storm Boot for You 

Whether it rains or snorvs, hails or sleets, y^our feet mil be dry and comfortable in our $5.00 Semi-High- 
Cut Storm Boot. Don't think, you can't afford to get a pair Just for stormy weather. You know you not 
only insure your health, but also practice economy by doing so 

J^ocrnl ^hrk^Q contain the best leather made, and are acknowledged to be the best shoe value in the world. 
MXC^Ul KJIiUCii jjj.^p .^ ^^j i^^^ ^^^^ ;^g i^i^^^ p^^^^i ^f^i^^ for fall. $3.50 and $4.00. 

Perkins-Shearer Co. «*^ I\l2 Sn^ ^"'""' 




Footwear of Quality 

When we say footwear of quality we do not necessarily mean high- 
priced footwear. All our women's shoes are made for our trade by 
expert makers, using only choice materials in the various grades, are 
unusually large and stylish, showing 
is ofifered you at $2.50, $3.00, 
$3.50, $4.00, $4.50, $5.00 



\f5>^<VR5 



SHOES THAT SATISFY 



la, S.TCJON ST- 



When Trading, Remember TIGER Advertisers 




Colorado College 

Founded in Colorado Springs in 18 7 4 



WM. F. SLOCUM, President 





^ College of Arts and Science 

E. S. PARSONS, Dean 


t- 


School of Engineering 

F. CAJORI, Dean 




School of Forestry 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 




School of Music 
L E. D. HALE, Dean 



g"^ - 1 A 1 The Associated 

tutler Academy pepaatory 

^^_.^^^___^^__i_^^^^^^^a_ School, in which 
students are prepared for any American College 



Electrical Laborofory 





^HXMBMK) COUgC^ 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., NOVEMBER 19, 1909 



Vol. XII 



Number 10 



JUNIOR 

OPERA 



PRECEDENT TO BE SET FOR 
COMING JUNIOR CLASSES. 

"Princess Bonnie" Ready for Presen- 
tation Tuesday Night — Vesta 
Tucker to Sing Leading Role. 

"Princess Bonnie," the comic opera 
that is to be given by the junior class on 
Tuesday evening, Nov. 23, will be one 
of the 'most interesting things presented 
on the college campus this year. 

It is a Spanish opera written by Wil- 
lard Spenser. There are two acts, the 
first is located on the coast of Maine 
near Bar Harbor and the second one is 
in the courtyard of Admiral Pomposo's 
palace in Spain. The part of Bonnie is 
taken by Miss Vesta Tucker, who has a 
lyrical .soft voice and who makes a 
charming Princess. The part of the 
leading man, "Roy," is sung by Mr. 
Kirkpatrick, and he will win everybody's 
applause. Earl Hille as "Shrimps," the 
champion canoeist and village jack of all 
trades, is excellent. Miss Winifred 
Shuler makes a most attractive "Kitty 
Clover." Harry Larson as Admiral 
Pomposo, Bonnie's Uncle, is fine, and 
Miss Gertrude Ashley as Donna Pom- 
posa is a most dignified little lady. Miss 
Elsie Greene as Auntie Crab and Bruce 
Weirick as Captain Tarpaulin, leave 
nothing unfinished in the management of 
their parts. R. H. Rice plays well the 
villain's part in the character of "Fal- 
sette." Dean in the character of "Sal- 
vador" is Admiral and Donna Pomposo's 
colored servant. 

The music is bright and catchy. The 
whole campus will be humming "Never 
Never Fall in Love" and "I Told You 
So" the day after the performance. 
There are some pretty dances and tab- 



leaux. You will like the Spanish dance 
by six dark-eyed maidens. 

The opera will be staged and costumed 
in the best possible manner. There will 
also l;e an orchestra. 



FIERCE 



A. J. HESLER, TREASURER OF 
EWING FUND. 



Collection and Fniance Committees. 
Sources of Fund. 



At the last meeting of the Student 
Commission, A. J. Hesler was ap- 
pointed treasurer of the Ewing fund. 
The payments will be made mostly in 
lump sums this year, and plans are be- 
ing completed to make the notifica- 
tions and collections in a businesslike 
way. 

Professor Noyes has been appoint- 
ed chairman of the collection commit- 
tee. The following finance committee 
was appointed: Prof. H. F. Smith, 
chairman; Miss Summers, Miss L. 
Anderson, J. F. Nelson, A. J. Hesler. 
Ewing Fund, 1909-1910. 

Men: 
Liberal Arts — 

Seniors $38.00 

Juniors 22.00 

Continued on Page 8. 



* * 

* DENVER FOOTBALL * 

* SPECIAL. * 

* ♦ 

* THANKSGIVING * 

* * 

* There and back for $2.00 * 

* * 

* Train leaves D. & R. G. sta- * 

* tion at 8:30 a. m., sharp. * 

* Special stops at Cache la * 

* Poudre cros|jng on return trip, "i" 

* but not going. * 

* * 



GAME 



TIGERS DEFEATED 9 TO o BY 
STATE UNIVERSITY TEAM. 



Spirited Bleacherites Watch Exciting 
Battle— Stirrett Scores All of Boul- 
der's Points With His Boot. 



Tn the fiercest game evr played on 
■Washburn Field, the Tigers went down 
to defeat before the Silver and Gold of 
Boulder last Saturday by a score of 9-0. 
1 he score is no evidence, whatever, of 
the way the game was fought. 

The Tiger line-up was entirely new; 
they ha'l never even scrimmaged before 
lined up as they did Saturday. In spite 
of all handicaps, barring of Morrison and 
Murphy and a new line-up, the Orange 
and Black played the game of their lives 
There is not a member of the student 
body \.ho is not as proud of every man 
on that team as if we had won that 
game; somehow or other after the 
game was over none felt as if we had 
lost, it was almost as good as win- 
ning to see that team play the way 
they did, even if they did lose. 

Of course, some mistakes were 
made, but no one is complaining. 
When we consider the strain under 
which the team had been the previ- 
ous week, losing Morrison, hoping 
for Murphy, they certainly played 
wonderful ball. 

The spirit in the stands was the 
greatest exhibition of spirit ever seen 
in Colorado. It was the kind which 
sticks win or lose and was one of the 
causes of the fierce playing of the 
Tigers. 

When we consider that Boulder 
used a new set of ends and three new 
backs while we only made one change 
in our line-up, it's a cinch that we 

Continued on Page 8. 



THE TIGER 



MURPHY'S CASE 



Being a Detailed Report of Dean 

Parsons' Statement Before the 

Student Body, November 15. 

1 feel that there are some things which 
T have a right and a duty to say this 
morning in order to put the whole situ- 
ation of the last few days in the correct 
light before the student body. 

The rumor has come to me that Dr. 
Schneider and 1 lost that game on Satur- 
day, and 1 war.t to correct that rumor a 
litt'e, and say that it was I who lost the 
game on Saturday, because I feel and 
believe that if we had had Mr. l\Turphy 
in ■^lie game on Saturday, we would have 
won. Not that Dr. Schneider wants to 
hliirk the duty in the matter, for we 
came to the same agreement in Denver, 
and in that way he is responsible, but he 
had no vote, while I, of, course, did, so 
til It tliose students who were circulating 
the i3etition here for my overthrow were 
right in blaming me for the action. I 
wai." you to know all the facts as to the 
posit on we took, and I am not in the 
least afraid of what your judgment will 
be. The Conference met in Denver Fn- 
da ' evening, and Mr. McOuat put allthe 
facts of Mr. Murphy's case before the 
Conference in a very able manner. It 
seemd best to us in the conference, that 
we should first go over all the old 
ground. We said to the Conference that 
we felt that the faculty of Colorado Col- 
lege had been forced into a wrong posi- 
tion by the Conference in regard to Mor- 
rison's case, as we had been acting in 
good faith throughout the whole year, 
and had only made the same mistake 
that the U. of C. had made in regard to 
one of their own men, and that we 
should not have been forced into the po- 
sition which we were forced into. And 
let me say again as I think over that 
case, I feel more and more strongly that 
we did the only thing that we could do 
under the circumstances, and I think the 
Conference saw our position, and I am 
very sure that both members of the Con- 
ference regret having taken the position 
that forced us into doing what they made 
us do. That thing was said with very 
great emphasis before the Conference. 

We then took up the case of Mr. Mur- 
phy. After we had discussed his case 
sufficiently, Dr. Norlin of U. of C, 
moved that Mr. Murphy should be al- 
lowed to play for the remainder of this 
season. I was in the chair, and of course 
had no vote. Then Mr. MacDonald of 
C. A. C. said with the utmost fairness 
and friendliness and with the greatest 



cordiality, that he could not conscien- 
ciously second the motion, since he felt 
that the only way to get out of the ath- 
letic situation we have been in previous- 
ly, is by living up strictly to the rules 
we ha\'e laid down. He said. "We have 
gone through some bitter o.\V'c!riences at 

C. A. C, and we have won out, and un- 
der the circumstances 1 do not feel that 
I can second that motion." 

The thing then was at a dead-lock. 
Now what we thought of then has been 
suggested by some of our students since : 
i. e., that I call Mr. MacDonald to the 
chair, and second the motion myself, and 
that was suggested at the Conference. 1 
said 1 was not willing to do it. 1 said 
this: "I have never believed Mr. Murphy 
eligible to play," and when the students 
came to see me the other day, I said to 
myself, you are simply forcing us to take 
a position in this matter which we can- 
not consistently maintain. I think Dr. 
Schneider will bear me out that I pre- 
sented the case as strongly as I could 
present it, and yet when I presented it, 
I saw the weakness of it, and when it 
came to voting for it, I could not do it, 
and so I refused to allow him to take the 
chair, not even to win your favor, against 
my own convictions. It has been asked 
why there was no action taken by the 
Conference in regard to Murphy, and I 
will say to that, that since neither Mr. 
MacDonald nor myself were willing to 
second Dr. Norlin's motion, there could 
of necessity be no action That was the 
whole case, and I am willing to accept 
your judgment of my action. 

Some have asked why Murphy was 
thrown out and Keim was allowed to 
play. I 'phoned Principal Brown of N. 

D. H. S., where Keim was once a stu- 
dent, and he said to me that while it had 
been some time since he had looked up 
Keim's credits, he distinctly remembered 
that he had, when he left N. D. H. S., 
within 1-2 a credit of enough for college 
entrance. In the other cases of suspect 
it was clearly shown that the suspected 
men were all right with the exception of 
one man against whom there was no 
proof. Dr. Norlin said he would go to 
Boulder Saturday morning and look into 
that case, and if he could by any means 
find the truth of the suspicions he would 
bar the man from athletics, and I have 
seen enough of Dr. Norlin to know that 
he is perfectly sincere, and would act 
absolutely as he thought fair and right. 
Now I want to say that -I was glad when 
the affair was settled as it was, for it 
took a great load off of my conscience. 
I told Dr. Norlin that the ideal thing 
would be to play Murphy, and have you 
beat us, but if I shotild do it and we 



should beat you, I should never get over 
the humiliation of the affair. 

Kindly let me say that I appreciate the 
spirit of Colorado College in cleaning oft 
the field for the game, and in treating 
the U. of C. with the same courtesy 
which we would have shown if this had 
not occurred. There was not one act to 
mar the game and the spirit, and it is a 
thing of which we are justly proud. 

Then about the team. There was a 
rumor out Saturday morning that the 
team would refuse to play without Mur- 
phy. One of the Denver papers phoned 
me about noon, and said they were just 
going to press, and had heard that ru- 
mor, and wanted to know if there were 
any truth in it. I told them that 1 had 
heard nothing of the rumor, but that I 
knew it was absolutely false and that 
Colorado College couldn't do such a 
thing, and that the Tigers are not quit- 
ters, and could not be, and that they 
would play the game of their lives, which 
1 am proud to say they did. 

I 'eel that in our action in these mat- 
ters we have gained more than we can 
possiblly estimate. Dr. Norlin told me 
that there was a U. of C. man talking to 
him after thev had referred Alorrison's 
case to our faculty for action, who said 
things of C. C. which he was ashamed to 
hear a U. of C. man say, and that this 
man had said our faculty would certainly 
play Morrison, whether it was right or 
not and he could depend on it. The 
next morning he came around to Dr. 
Norlin and said he wished to apologize 
for his previous statements, and that if 
there was anything they could do to get 
Alorrison in that game they must by all 
means do it. 

I had a long talk on Saturday with a 
lousiness man of this city who is a friend 
of the boys here, who said that while he 
felt pretty strongly about Morrison's 
case, still he felt that we did the right 
thing with regard to Murphy. 

On my return from Denver I was met 
by the owner of the Gazette and he said, 
"Mr. Parsons, I want something said in 
the Gazette on this position which you 
have taken, and which I believe so ear- 
nestly in. We fought the same thing out 
at Yale, and a bitter fight it was, too, but 
we won." He said, "I wish you would 
talk to the editor so that he may say 
clearly what you have done. I 'phoned 
to him, and he said he had turned it 
over to another editor, one of the chief 
editors, and he asked me to put the state- 
ment in, the paper, and then of his own 
free will and without any suggestion 
from me, he put the editorial in the 
paper which came out in the Gazette this 



THE TIGER 



Mnorning, and which I believe will set the 
whole thing right in Colorado Springs. 
1 Mow I am going to say something 
•about you students which is pretty- 
Stroiig. I beliex'c that on one side of the 
line will I e found the people who think 
it is right to do an illegitimate thing to 
win a game, and on the other side of the 
line the people who do not think, it is 
right to do an illegitimate thing to win a 
game. Am I wrong? It seems to me 
not. I, for one, want to be on the side of 
the 'ine of those who wouldn't do that 
thing to win one game, nor one dozen 
game's, nor one dozen championships, and 
I feel that this- student body would not 
have done ' anything except what Dr. 
Schneider and I did do under the cir- 
cumstances. 



GAZETTE EDITORIAL. 



SPIRITED SHOVELERS. 



PAST OF THE TIGER. 



Colorado College Praised by Local 
Paper. 

An editorial in the Colorado Springs 
Gazette for Monday, Nov. 15, contained 
the following . statement : 

"The Colorado College Tigers won 
and lost — won because they represented 
the cause of clean, athletics and played 
with a spirit seldom seen in the- face of 
such discouraging conditions; lost be- 
cause they were fairly beaten by a little 
better team. It is no disgrace, not even 
a discredit, to lose under such circum- 
stances; on the other hand, it is a credit 
and a rare thing, too, for, a, team to work 
as hard as did the Tigers with almost 
nothing to expect but the worst. There- 
fore defeat was accompanied by a vic- 
tory that will reflect to the credit of the 
Tigers and Colorado College." 

The above is only a small part of the 
editorial, but it shows it's general cha'-- 
acter. 

Nearly every daily paper in the state 
has coinmented favorably' upon the action 
of Colorado College in the recent athletic 
controversy. Of course there are a few 
who are inclined to object to the barring 
of Murphy and Morrison, but in the eyes 
of the newspapers at least we seem' to 
have done the right thing 



SOUTH AMERICA GROUP. 

The next lecture in the South Am- 
erica course will be at Bemis Hall. 
Monday evening, November 22nd. at 
seven o'clock. Phil Gillett, C. C. '97, 
who is Y. M. C. A. secretary at Seoul, 
Korea, will speak. 



College Men Clean Washburn Field 
For Boulder Game. 

Last Friday, the weather had a 
"grouch on." He, too, was entering pro- 
tests, only it seemed as if his protest was 
going to keep 22 men out of the game on 
Saturday instead of one. There was 
about six inches of snow on Washburn 
Field. This was Friday, the next day 
I was Saturday and the State University 
was going to battle with the Tigers on 
this very spot. Things looked bad. 
Manager Kittleman suggested that the 
men turn out -to shovel off the snow on 
the football field. At half past one they 
began to show up, and before the after- 
noon was half gone the field was alive 
with enthusiastic snow shovelers. When 
dusk came, there was still quite a stretch 
of snow to remove. After the rally the 
fellows again made, for the field where, 
in the glare of two big reflectors con- 
nected with the electric light plant, the_\ 
worked until 1 o'clock in the morning. 

After a couple of hours' work Satur- 
da}' morning the snow was off and the 
arena was ready. Who sa^s that there 
is no spirit in C. C. ? 



CONTEMPORARY CELEBRATES 
TENTH ANNIVERSARY WITH 
BANQUET AND DANC- 
ING. 

Contemporary celebrated the tenth an- 
niversary of its organization Friday 
evening at the Acacia. The banquet 
was served in the Dutch room, which 
was decorated in red and white ; crim- 
son carnations, the club flower, were 
used on the table. Informal toasts were 
given by the Contemporary alumnae, 
lilla Warner told of the organization of 
the club, Mayme Scott gave the point of 
view of an "old maid." Mrs. Chase re- 
sponded to the toast, "The Brides," and 
Mrs. Davis, the alumnae president, spoke 
for the married members who were no 
longer brides. Other alumnae told of 
some of their experiences. Contempo- 
rary songs were sung and the club ad- 
journed to the ball room, where the rest 
of the evening was spent • in dancing. 
The alumnae present were : Grace 
. Trowbridge, Helen Sloane, Mrs. Davis, 
Ada Freeman, Mrs. Chase, Mrs. Drew, 
Evelyn Shuler, Harriet Piatt, Mabel 
Carlson, Zella Warnock, Gwendolyn 
Hedgecock, Ella Warner, Mayme Scott 

The club and alumnae attended the 
Boulder game Saturday in boxes. 



Perhaps it would be interesting to 
Tiger readers to hear something of the 
past of the student publications in Colo- 
rado College. Mr. Ormes has just com- 
pleted, excepting numbers 6 and 9 of 
Vol. 1 of Ihe Tiger, a file of all the 
College papers. Former President Ten- 
ney is sending a complete list of the col- 
lege notes as they appeared in the daily 
papers previous to the publication of a 
newspaper by the college students. 

The first college paper was the "Oc- 
cident." It appeared first in February, 
1880, and ran for four issues. It was 
discontinued for financial reasons. In 
November of 1881 the "Ocicdental Mir- 
ror" appeared and ran for three years. 
1 he Occidental Mirror was published 
by the Occidental Club, one of the lit- 
erary societies at that time. There was 
great rivalry between this club and the 
Irving Institute and the Occidental Mir- 
ror was the result of the competition of 
the two societies. Mr. H. H. Seldom- 
ridge was prominently connected with 
the paper at this time. In the issue of 
October, 1882, there appears the follow- 
ing item : 

"For the first time since the college 
was organized, the students from out of 
town are in the majority." 

The "Pike's Peak Echo" was the next 
venture. This lived a year, 1885-1886 
From 1886 to 1890 there was no college 
paper, but in October of 1890 the first 
issue of the "Collegian" made its ap- 
pearance. This lived until 1898. For 
some reason there grew up a dissatis- 
faction with the paper and as a result on 
April 11, 1899 The Tiger appeared as its 
rival. The Tiger and the Collegian ex- 
isted side by side until commencement 
of that year, when the two were consoli- 
dated under the name of "The Tiger." 

Some interesting reading is found in 
the old issues of the college paper. One 
number of the "Occident" devotes con- 
siderable space to lamentations caused 
by a habit of the Academy boys of 
stealing rides on the 'bus, a conveyance 
run by the college in the prehistoric days 
of street cars. In another mention is 
made of a couple of rabbits, the fruits 
of a rabbit hunt conducted upon the 
campus. 

If you want to read some history that 
is really interesting, look up some of 
those old papers ; they are in the library. 



You saw the Tigers fight on Saturday, 
Ne.xt Thursday will be your last op- 
portunity to get happy over their gam- 
bols. 



THE 'J' I G E R 



THE WEEK OF PRAYER 

Talks by Dr. Bayley and Rev. Ranney 



DR. 



BAYLEY SPEAKS AT 
VESPERS. 



Last Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock, 
Dr. Bayley gave a most helpful address 
in Perkins Hall. 

.\mong the things that he said were, 
that everything is changing in ■ science, 
hooks, agricultural implements and 
means of transportation, and that in 
view i.f all this we have a right to ask, 
"Is the Gospel going to change?" In 
reply to this. Dr. Bayley suggested that 
we turn to the words, "Heaven and 
earth shall pass away, but my word shall 
not pass away." 

He further added that the love of the 
human heart is unchangeable. Nothing 
can make us happy but the unchanging 
love of an unchanging God. 



"THE WEB OF LIFE." 



To seize every opportunity to do good 
— to rise above any physical weakness — 
to overcome evil environment — this was 
the message Dr. Bayley had for the stu- 
dents who heard him in chapel Tuesday. 
He conpared man's life to a piece of 
goods being weaved. "The warp," he 
said, "does not determine the web. It 
is for us to, say with what colors our life 
shall be dyed — the colors of majesty — 
of nobility — of character. Dr. Bayley 
urged the students to devote their life to 
fruitful works of high endeavor so that 
when the end shall have come — when the 
web is finished — it may be said of them, 
"Well done, thou good and faithful 
servant." 



DR. BAYLEY SPEAKS AT HAG- 
ERMAN HALL. 



Dr. Bayley spoke to the men at 
Hagerman Hall Tuesday evening to 
the following effect: 

"There are two main things that are 
essential to the beginning of the 
Christian life. First, it is an act of 
the will. It may or may not be ac- 
companied by an emotional experi- 
ence. The mistake that many people 
make is to think that their feelings 
must be greatly worked up and their 
emotions stirred- before they 
are qualified to enter upon the Chris- 
tian life. You need simply by an act 
of the will ask God to come into your 
life. 



The second essential is praye.'. 
rins does not mean a mere exercise, 
but a real vital transaction with the 
living God. It need only take a mo- 
ment at the beginning of the day; a 
1 etition to God to keep me from lazi- 
ness or to give me courage to face 
temptation, is ? real transaction. God 
will help you if you ask hiin. Then 
why not ma',<e use of this assistance 
He wdl give you? Prayer is neces- 
sary to maintain the personal relation- 
ship with God. If one neglects pray- 
er this relationship is weakened just 
as any f.eindship on earth weakens 
unless commimication is kept up." 



DR. BAYLEY'S SECOND CHAPEL 
TALK. 



In his chapel talk last Wednesday, Dr. 
Hayley called our attention to the fact 
that in using natural forces such as the 
winds and electricity, men instinctively, 
and without hesitation, work in conjunc- 
tion with God, for certainly He is the 
Author of all these forces. Then he 
asked the question, "Do you suppose that 
God helps man only in material things, 
and not in the higher or spiritual ?" 
This question he answered by stating 
emphatically that in the spiritual realm 
most of all, God helps man. "From the 
heart." he said, "come all the actions of 
the outer life," therefore it is most es- 
sential that the heart or mind be con- 
trolled. "Tngersoll said that man is not 
responsible for his thoughts, because he 
cannot control them. Why then is a 
man responsible for his actions, since 
these spring directly from his thoughts?" 
Then he showed how God comes into 
the life of anyone and enables that one 
to govern his thoughts. Before a man 
can do right he must will to do right, for 
we must recognize the will as the dom- 
inant factor in both the inner and outer 
life. The closing words were a strong 
appeal for all to work with God in the 
inner as well as the outer things of life, 
by allowing Him who stands knocking 
at the door of the heart, to enter. 

Some of the strong, terse sentences of 
Dr. Bayley in this address, are : 

"No man accomplishes much in this 
world who does not recognize God." 

"No man can think impure thoughts 
and live a pure life." 

"In the secret chamber of the soul, the 
imagination, the character is formed." 



"God comes in to give us the victory 
under the law of substitution." 

"A man cannot begin on the outside 
to reform himself." 

"God's part is regeneration. Man's 
part is conversion. It is not a process, 
but a crisis. It is an act of the will, not 
a feeling." 

"God respects our freedom of choice." 

"You gear up with God's omnipotence 
in the material life, why do you keep 
Him out of vour inner life?" 



REV. W. W. RANNEY SPEAKS 
AT BEMIS HALL. 



Rev. W. W. Ranney, who has recent- 
ly taken up the pulpit at the First 
Congregational church, spoke to the 
students at a union prayer meeting at 
Bemis Hall Wednesday night. "I shall 
not talk much about religion tonight, 
but about life. I have been to some 
prayer meetings that made me feel sad 
and unhappy, and there was something 
wrong with them. I sometimes think 
there is more real religion in a snow 
ball fight such as occurred in front of 
chapel today, when some degree of 
courage, daring, good humor, is called 
out, than in some prayer meetings. 

"I congratulate you upon your op- 
portunities of this life in college and 
the opportunity of life that will be 
yours after these college, days. And 
you can make your opportunity great- 
er by taking God into partnership with 
you. What a wonderful thing our life 
is, mcilded as it has been by all the 
people v/e have ever met, and by all 
who have ever lived. And what a 
boundless future, for you can do any- 
thing with your young lives that you 
will. And God can link you up with 
the Infinite. 

"After all, religion is life with God 
in it?" 



WEEK OF PRAYER AT BEMIS 
HALL. 

Last Monday evening Dr. Bayley 
addressed the young women. His talk 
was beautiful and helpful. With the 
arch as a theme, he showed that as the 
circumference of the circle is made 
perfect by its relation to the center, 
so lives are made richer and more per- 
fect when they revolve about God as 
the center. Dr. Bailey's keen sympa- 



I 



THE TIGER 



thy with the student makes his splen- 
did thoughts touch deep and give the 
needed help. 

Tuesday night, Dean Parsons' regu- 
lar Bible class was held for the contin- 
ued study of "The Parables of Jesus." 
Then Dr. Ranney spoke to the student 
body Wednesday evening, .and every- 
one who heard him was deeply im- 
pressed. His hopeful words as to our 
part in the future were encouraging 
and made it seem worth while to be 
just a student with a big future open 
before one. Dr. Ranney is going to be 
a great help and inspiration to every 
college student, and his sermons will 
affoid an opportuntiy none should fail 
to grasp. 



C-C-C-C. 



Conklin, Harding and Groves Read 
Interesting Papers. 



FROM HAG HALL. 



A Sort of Invitation. 



Hagerman Hall men announce that, 
having removed their watches and other 
valuables to the bank, and having se- 
creted or glued down everything take- 
able in their rooms, they will be charmed 
to let the college gambol through their 
apartments from 8 to 10 o'clock Satur- 
day evening, Nov. 27, 1909. 

Tantalizing toasted tricklets have been 
prepared for the freshman girls — the 
others can bring their sewing and darn 
socks. It is hoped that the girls will take 
this opportunity of seeing "how the other 
half lives," and wil Itry and avoid making 
any overt remarks that will damage the 
inmates' feelings, such as, we regret to 
say, were heard last year, as : 

"These curtains look nice cut in two, 
don't they ?" 

"There is father's cast-off horse blan- 
ket on the bed," or 

"There, I told father Willard was 
smoking again." 

Such things, to say the least, are rather 
harrowing, especially when one is doing 
the honors to someone, and one's affable 
sister is at the same time doing the dis- 
honors, and he can scarcely be blamed 
for wishing that there were an edict for- 
bidding the run of the house to sisters 
with the tongue rampant. We speak 
feelingly on this question, and will say 
in conclusion that the management has 
been seriously considering a reform 
movement but has kindly decided to issue 
this note of warning, hoping that it will 
be respected, and that the pain of drastic 
treatment of our fellow sisters will be 
avoided. 

Sincerely, 

HAG. HALL. 



'J'he Colorado College Chemical 
Club held its first regular meeting last 
Tuesday evening. The following pa- 
ters were presented: 

The Metallurgy of Iron and Steele, 
by Ross Conklin. 

Resources of Siberia, by H. F. 
Harding. 

Static Electricity and Its Use in 
Medicine, by J. F. Groves. 

In the first paper, the author gave a 
very interesting treatise on the mod- 
ern practice of iron smelting and re- 
fining. He dealt mainly with, (i) the 
types of furnaces used, mentioning 
two kinds, the crucible type and the 
hot blast; 2) the metods of moulding 
in sand and in mechanical moulds; 
(3) the refining of pigs by the open 
grate process. The frequent use of 
blackboard diagrams made his expla- 
nations very vivid. 

Mr. Harding's paper on the resourc- 
es of Siberia was especially inte.-est- 
ing, due to the fact that Mr, Harding 
is of Russian extraction, and being 
well versed on the conditions in Rus- 
sia, both political and commercial, he 
was able to give us some idea of the 
immense rich, undeveloped resources 
of Siberia. At the beginning of his talk 
he pointed out in a rather general way 
the geographical position of Siberia, 
and the positions of all the chief min- 
eral deposits. These deposits are in a 
more or less undeveloped stage and 
situated in the Ural and Alti Ranges. 
The Ural range is especially rich in 
gold, silver, platinum, mercury, and 
copper; also many precious stones are 
found, of which the amethyst is the 
most abundant. The methods of min- 
ing used by the peasants are of the 
very crudest. Practically all peasant 
inining is for gold, and placer meth- 
ods are employed. As a great deal of 
mercury is obtained in the free state, 
it is used in the crude evaporation 
processes of gold refining in a very 
wasteful manner. 

The best developed mines are op- 
erated by the Russian government or 
by foreign companies who have re- 
ceived concessions from the govern- 
ment. The mines operated by the gov- 
ernment in which prisoners are em- 
ployed, are not only salt mines but 
gold, silver and coal mines. The sil 
ver mines in particular are worked by 
prisoners, and the richest ores are sit- 
uated in the Alti Mountains. Immense 



deposits of iron ore and zinc blend ex- 
ist in the south central portion .of Si- 
beria. 

As yet, owing to much civil strife, 
a large portion of the eastern part of 
Siberia remains unexplored. Only 
within the last five years has the gov- 
ernment sent exploration parties into 
this region. From official reports this 
country appears to be a second Alas- 
ka, but the confirmation of such state- 
ments awaits the prospector and min- 
ing experts. 

The paper on Static Electricity by 
Mr. Groves was' intensely interesting, 
from the fact that it contained so 
much valuable material on the latest 
perfections of instruments used in 
medical X-ray methods. Mr. Groves 
enjoys the privilege of having been an 
assistant at one time to Dr. J. M. G. 
Beard, practicing physician of Fruita, 
Colorado, and a charter member of the 
Roentgen Ray Society. Dr. Beard has 
rendered a great service to the medi- 
cal profession in perfecting the fluora- 
scopic screen coating used in X-ray 
work. He is a designer of a twenty- 
four plate static electrical machine of 
which he has manufactured quite a 
number . In Mr. Groves' paper he 
dealt mainly with the methods used in 
X-ray photography, illustrating the 
working principles of the Crooks and 
Geissler tubes. 

The papers given were well supple- 
mented with experimental equipment 
and blackboard diagrams; as this is a 
very satisfactory method of handling 
subjects on technical matters, special 
emphasis is placed upon this side of 
the program rendition. 

All students are invited to attend 
these meetings. The regular programs 
are rendered fortnightly on Tuesday 
evenings. Notices of these meetings 
and the programs for each will be run 
in The Tiger in the Friday issue just 
previous to the meeting. 



MORE NEW BOOKS. 



Mrs. Franklin Bartlett of New York 
city has donated to the college a num- 
ber of Greek, Latin, French and German 
texts. They will strengthen the depart- 
ment of languages. 

W. B. Clark of this city has given a set 
of International Studio, an art magazine, 
and twenty volumes of Percey's Anec ■ 
dotes. 

Some modern dramas written by the 
best known modern writers have also 
been added to the library. Several sets 
of government publications have recently 
been completed. 



THE TIGER 



The Weekly Newspaper of Colorado C«lle^e 



GLENN W. SHAW Editor-in-Chief 

HARRY^W. McOUAT Business Manager 

S. W. Dean ; Assistant Editor 

C.jDOVELAN Assistant Editor 

H. H. Haight Assistant Editor 

L. E.Griswold Engineering Editor 

B. P. SiDDONi Atliletic Editor 

H. F. RiCl Forestry Editor 

Julia Ingersoll Alumni Editor 

Helen Canon Exclianse Editor 

Janet Kampf Local Editor 

W. L. WarnoCK Local Editor 

A. E. BrysON Assistant Manager 

E. W. HiLLE Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

Geneva McCaw, T. M. Pettigrcw, Edith Sommets, F. B. 

Copeland, Margaret Watson, E S Statten, 

Katharine True, D. L Sisco 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to The Tiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorad* 
College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
Springs, Colo., a> second-class matter. 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



CLOSING THE DOOR ON AN 
EPISODE. 

On another page is a full report of 
the last session of the Colorado Fac- 
ulty Athletic Conference as given to 
the student body by Dean Parsons at 
chapel, Monday. The only objection 
we can find to the statement is that it 
ever had to be made at all. But men 
ever have formed hasty opinions and 
ever will. 

The case stood thus: Both Murphy 
and Morrison were plainly ineligible 
according to the conference rules. 
Murphy was so informed from the be- 
ginning, and The Tiger cited and ex- 
plained the rule which the Dean's of- 
fice had found applicable to the case. 
Morrison was told that he might play 
if he kept his work up. He kept it up 
and naturally expected to be in the 
big games. Why the rule was not ap- 
plied to Morrison in the first place as 
it was to Murphy, no one can say. 
Dean Parsons accepts the full blame; 
it is his, and there is an end of that. 

Then the Conference made its mis- 
take. Under the circumstances fair- 
ness to the individual required that a 
misinterpretation of the rules, in 
which, Mr. Norlin of the State Univer- 
sity shared with Dean Parsons, should 
lead to an application of the spirit 
rather than the letter of the law. But 
the Conference voted against Morri- 
son, an act for which all the individual 



members have since expressed regret, 
and Colorado College stood the blow. 

Dissatisfaction there was, but it was 
not very noisy, when Murphy passed 
an old entrance history exam just be- 
fore the Boulder game, and hope 
sprang up in doubting breasts. Now 
we would make up for the loss of 
Morrison, but the letter of the law was 
still against us. All the passing of that 
exam altered was the opinion of stu- 
dent leaders, and through them, of 
Dean Parsons' opinion, that Murphy 
could not by any means play this year. 
The man's splendid efforts and efficient 
work this semester made generosity 
on the part of the Conference worth 
hoping for. Dean Parsons says that 
he went to Denver satisfied that his 
case was weak, but he considered it 
worth trying on behalf of an agitated 
student body. The case was strongly 
presented. McQuat saw to that. But 
it was weak in itself, and was as hon- 
estly presented as it was strongly. 
Alisrepresentation was no part of the 
efifort of Colorado College to have 
Murphy declared eligible. The whole 
trial was a plea for leniency in rule 
enforcement. The Conference did not 
see fit to practice leniency. An oppor- 
tunity of evading what one member 
sincerely considered the right was of- 
fered by him when he suggested that 
Dean Parsons call him to the chair. 
Dean Parsons did no such thing; he 
he was in Denver purely and simply 
asking a favor. He need not have 
gone there had he wished to play Mur- 
phy without permission. Murphy had 
never been protested, and the Confer- 
ence simply refused to consider him. 
A declaration of eligibility from this 
end was never made. Murphy was in- 
eligible and the Conference refused to 
be generous. That was their business. 

As for the knocking, it always dies. 
That unfortunate petition was never 
presented. And you do not hear state 
papers or alumni knocking. The great- 
est fear now is that all the praise we 
are receiving will make us feel too 
virtuous for any use. We are human 
and the Dean is, right. 

HOME IT COMES. 

President Slocum has received the 
following letter from the superintend- 
ent of schools, of Pueblo: 

Dear Dr. Slocurn: 

Mr. N. W. Shetter, the. man who has 
charge of our high school football 
team,, states that the majority of the 
college freshman team smoked cigar- 
ettes upon the football grounds and 
about the high school grounds. He 



suggested that I should take some ac- 
tion on the premises, but I do not 
know what else to do than to write 
directly .to the President. I am sure 
that you will receive this letter in the 
same spirit in which it is written, be- 
lieving that if my own boys were to 
break training in that manner at your 
school you would be kind enough to 
tell me. I make bold to write you in 
this regard because I know your ideals 
for manhood, especially in the athletic 
field, are in accord with my own. 
Very truly yours, 

M. C. Potter. 
That is a straightforward letter and 
calls for the respectful attention of 
every man in Colorado College. Out- 
siders judge the college by the conduct 
of its individual membe s, as they see 
them going about this city or in other 
cities where they may be with athletic 
teams or the glee club or some other 
organization. Your smoking may be 
no one's business; and again it may be : 
school authorities are certainly justi- 
fied in objecting to the bad example 
set by a college football team which 
went upon the field of play smoking. 
E\en though it was a freshman team, 
they are. From freshman to senior it 
is the college man's duty to respect 
the rights of others. The college al- 
ways hears from its absentees; make 
the reports welcome. 

STUDENTS' FRIENDS. 

This week has been the week of 
prayer for college Christian associa- 
tions all o\-er the country. At Colo- 
rado Coileeg short' services have been 
held almost every evening beginning 
with the vesper services on Sunday. 
At most of these meetings Dr. Bayley 
of Denver has been the speaker. He 
is a man who understands and loves 
students, and he never fails to make 
his words fit his hearers. Colorado 
College is greatly privileged in having 
such a friend, who is willing to stay 
with us the larger part of a week and 
talk to us and counsel with us. Also, 
we have a new and helpful friend in 
Dr. Ranney, who has recently been 
called to the pastorate of the First 
Congregational Church, and who 
spoke at the joint prayer meeting 
Wednesday evening. These men. are 
as good as faculty members and their 
services are greatly appreciated. 

KEEP IT UP. 

Spirit that keeps a stand full of 
rooters in their places yelling like vic- 
tors until the whole field is cleared, 
and then sends a serpentine parade to 



THE TIGER 



the gym to cheer every player as he 
emerges from the dressing room, and 
after that leads a happy mob to the 
vaudeville for a good time together, is 
spirit such as no defeat can break. 
Can time break it? Is college loyalty 
dependent on the excitement of the 
football season? Not if it is real loy- 
alty, real spirit; let's fight until June 
and make this year memorable. Every 
day we're setting an example. 

Two dollars to Denver and return, 
Thursday. It will take a trainload to 
lick D. U. in her own back yard. 



BOSTON ALUMNI BANQUET. 

President and Mrs. Slocum Meet 
Enthusiastic Reception. 



PROUD OF THEIR ALMA 
MATER. 



To the Editor of The Tiger ; 

Will you pardon a few words from one 
of the great body of alumni who have 
been watching the recent conduct of 
Colorado College in athletic affairs with 
the deepest interest. 

We have watched with justifiable 
pride the active and prominent part Col- 
orado College has taken in the radical re- 
form in college athletics now going on in 
this state. The only policy which can lift 
college athletics to a position where they 
can command the respect and support of 
thinking people is the policy which ab- 
solutely eliminates professionalism of 
every form from college athletic teams. 
It is unnecessary here to go into the 
"whys" and "wherefores" of this fact. 
Neither does it mattter that in this in- 
stance the rules may have operated .■^c as 
to bar from our team a bona fide stu- 
dent. The rules adopted by the confer- 
ence, after extended deliberations were 
thought to be best calculated to accom- 
plish the desired result. 

The faculty and student body of Colo- 
rado College cannot be too highly com- 
nn;iri(d for their rigid adherence to the 
high standards set largely through their 
own efforts. 

If the recc-nt application of these rules 
i^ost us a victory over Boulder, that de- 
fei^t is of very slight importance when 
compared to the vast significance of the 
m-^ral victory won on the side of -purr 
co'lege sports and far-sighted college pol- 
1 -y^ Our defeat at the hands of Boulde,- 
will soon be forgotten and buried under 
a huge pile of the victories to come, but 
the stand taken by the college in the loy- 
al support of the conference rules will 
long be remembered as an epoch-making 
victory in the struggle for pure college 
athletics in Colorado. 

We are proud of the action of Colo- 
rado College in this matter. 

THEODORE D. RIGGS, '08. 



The second annual banquet of the 
New England Association of the C. C. 
Alumni was held Thursday evening, 
Nov. Uth, at the Hotel Brunswick, Bos- 
ton. President and Mrs. Slocum were 
the guests of the association. There 
were twenty-five alumni and former stu- 
dents, a number of whom came from 
some distance, present. The party first 
gathered in the hotel parlors to renew 
acquaintances and to welcome "Prexy" 
and Mrs. Slocum. 

The banquet hall was decorated with 
College colors and the long table with 
chrysanthemums and ferns. After the 
feasting, W. A. Leighton, '04, president 
of the association and toastmaster, wel- 
comed those present. "Bill" Lennox, '09, 
responded to the toast, "Twenty-five 
Hundred Miles from Home." He said 
that distance only drew the bonds of af- 
fection for our real alma mater the 
tighter. Miriam Carpenter '04 gave her 
own unique version of "A Woman's 
Work." Carl Hedblom '07 then read a 
number of letters from absent members, 
who expressed regret at being unable to 
attend and sent greetings to those pres- 
ent. He also read an article from The 
Tiger concerning the Boulder game. It 
was unanimously voted to send a tele- 
gram to the Tiger team telling them that 
we expected them to win. 

When President Slocum rose to speak 
he was greeted with the. old-time "Rah, 
rab, Rexie, bully for Prexy." He gave 
a splendid address on "Colorado Col- 
lege, Today and Tomorrow." When he 
had concluded, we felt prouder than ever 
of our alma mater and more confident of 
its future with Prexy at the helm. The 
student generations may come and go, 
but he still stands, like old Pike's Peak, 
sturdy and unchanging, the bulwark of 
the College. After a rousing "C-o-l-o" 
the company returned to the reception 
room, where they spent another pleasant 
soiial hour Those present were : 

President and Mrs. Slocum. 

Mrs. Mary G. Ahlers. 

Louise H. Root '03. 

Florence Root ex-'03. 

William A. Leighton '04. 

Sarah Wolverton '04. 

Miriam Carpenter '04. 

Leo Bortree '06. 

Violet Holcomb '06. 

Mayo D. Hersey '07. 

Carl A. Hedblom '07. 

Wilson Smillie '08. 

Donald McCreerv '08. 



Clarence Lieb '08. 

Harold Roberts '08. 

John Maguire '08. 
William Lennox '09. 

Frances Wiggin. 

Alice Clement ex-'09. 

Carroll Dunbar. 

Horence Curry ex-'09. 
Mary E. Colt ex-'12. 

Ethel Warner. 

Alfred Stickney. 

William Jackson ex-'lO. 

Letters were read among others from ■ 

Dr. James B. Gregg. 

Robert D. Andrews. 

Dr. Willis E., Hartshorn '98. 

Alfred F. Isham '00. 

Maritz Wormser '00. 

Judson Cross '01. 

Eric Lake '03. 

Grace Barker '07. 

James Muffley '07. 

Priscilla Fletcher '07. 

Marion Park. 

C. A. Hedblom, Sec'v. 



OUR ALUMNI AT HARVARD. 



There were twenty scholarships 
awarded to men of the three upper 
classes at Harvard Medical school this 
year. All three of the C. C. g/aduates 
in these classes were in this list of 
men. These men are Bortree 'o6, 
Smillie 'o8, and Hedblom '07. The 
scholarship of the last named is the 
highest given by the school. As men 
attend this school from all the best 
colleges and universities in the coun- 
try, this achievement by the Colorado 
College men is no small one. It speaks 
especially well for the grade of work 
done by Dr. Schneider and the biology 
department. 

The three C. C. graduates in the law 
school a;-e also doing well. Roberts, 
McCreerv, and Magui e. all '08, are in 
the second year, Maguire is the only 
one who applied for a scholarship, but 
he had no difficulty in getting one. 



Among the aknnni at the game Satur- 
day were, Pettibone '04, Wasley '05, 
Work '03, G. W. Smith '08, Howbert 
'08, T. Hunter '06, F, Stillwell ,Moore 
'08, Miss Ella Warner '04, Miss Ruth 
Londoner '09, Miss Zella Warnock '09, 
Miss Mabel Carlson '09. 



For the first time "in years" the sopho- 
mores of the University of Colorado 
have managed to clear themselves in the 
barbecue. 



THE TIGER 



EXCURSION TO GO OVER D. & 
R. G. 

At the meeting of the Student Com- 
mission held Wednesday afternoon it 
was decided to run the excursion to 
the Tiger-D. U. game over the 
Denver and Rio Grande railroad. This 
decision was a matter of form rather 
than a necessity, for it would be hard 
to keep the student body from travel- 
ing over "Pat's" road. The Colorado 
& Southern and the Denver & Rio 
Grande made the same rate, but the 
C. & S. offered to run the train on 
out to the D. U. field after dinner. 
This at first seemed to be quite an in- 
ducement, but since the cost in car- 
fare would be the same in any case, 
everybody wishing to go up town, the 
running of the special from the Union 
depot to D. U. park would be of no 
advantage. The C. & S. got the ex- 
cursions to Te.xas and Boulder last 
year. 



dent body, and Newhouse and Cary for 
the team. 

Between yells, songs and speeches, a 
collection was taken to insure the hiring 
of a band for the game, and the hats 



THE GERMAN CLUB. 

The second regular meeting of the 
German club was held Thursday even- 
ing, Nov. 18, and the following program 
was given : 

Die Alten Germaneu Fre. W. Miller 

Gedichte Fre. Burgess 

Musik Fre. Alexander 

Deutsche Volkslieder and Spiele. 

The club is studying phases of Ger- 
man culture this year, and will hold its 
regular meetings every other Thursday 
evening, beginning with Nov. 18 in Tick- 
nor Study at 8 o'clock. It is planned to 
cive a German play sometime during the 
second semester, and perhaps a declama- 
tion contest also. Everyone interested in 
German is invited to be present at any 
regular meeting. 



ENTHUSIASTIC RALLY. 



Last Friday night, while Dean Par- 
sons, Dr. Schneider and McOuat were 
sitting with the Faculty Conference 
in Denver, the rest of Colorado Col- 
lege was yelling the roof off of Per- 
kins Hall. The Y. M. C. A. meeting. 
all literarjf society meetings and a 
freshm.an party had been called off 
that everyone might be present to swell 
the spirit. Enthusiasm was at a high 
pitch for two solid hours. 

Shaw presided and speeches were 
made by Dean Cajori, Prof. Park, W. 
H. Nead, Pettibone, Wasley and Work, 
of the alumni, Sylvester, Morgan, Sid- 
dons, Pettigrew and Dean, of the stu- 



HESLER TREASURER 

Continued from Page 1. 

Sophomores 22.00 

Freshmen 32.00 

Total $114.00 

Engineering — 

Seniors $13.00 

Juniors 3-5o 

Sophomores 4-00 

Freshmen i3-00 

Total $33-50 

Forestry — 

Freshmen $6.50 

Total $6.50 

Total, Men: 

Seniors $51.00 

Juniors 25.50 

Sophomores 26.00 

Freshmen Si-So 

Total, men $IS400 

Women : 

Seniors $49-50 

Juniors 49.60 

Sophomores 48.3S 

Freshmen 89.50 

Special i.oo 

Total, women $2;iJ.7S 

Men and Women: 

Seniors $100.30 

Juniors 75- 10 

Sophomores 74-35 

Freshmen 141.00 

Special 2.00 

Total, College students. .$391.75 

College Faculty 69.00 

College friends 46.00 

Raised by College $506.75 

Academy 36. 50 



Total, November 17... $543. 25 



FIERCE GAME 



Continued from Page 1. 

won something more than a "moral 
victory," Saturday. 

Boulde.- owes her victory to Cap- 
tain Stirrctt, whose kicking was great. 
Out of four attempts at field goals 
three were perfection itself, while the 
fourth was very close. Besides this he 
was the life of the Colorado team and 
seemed to be equal to any occasion 
t'l.at might come up. Boulder cannot 
give too much credit to this plucky 



little quarterback, because without 
him they never would have beaten on 
Saturday. 

Other men on the Silver and Gold 
eleven wlio showed up well are Stock- 
er, ]\IcFadden and O'Brien. Stocker is 
a comparatively light man for full- 
back but his line plunging was fierce 
and as long as he was in the game he 
was a hard man to stop. McFadden 
seem.ed to be the best ground gainer 
in the whole backfield, but he was not 
in long enough to show his real worth. 
O'Brien is one of the best guards in 
the state and showed it Saturday, es- 
pecially on the defensive. It was im- 
possible to gain through him; his 
work in making holes in our line was 
also very noticeable. 

When it comes to sizing up our 
team individually, there is not a man 
on the team who is not worthy of spe- 
cial mention. Saturday's game brought 
out the fact that Jimmy Wilson is an 
end and if his work Saturday is any 
criterion he is one of the best in the 
state. Not a gain was made around 
his end and several times he threw 
the Boulder backs for losses. His 
tackling was cleancut and hard. 

"Shorty" Steele was another man in 
a new position. He put up one awful 
fight here, and between him and Jim- 
my Wilson, Sam Bowler, the 200-lb. 
tackle, had a sorry time of it. "Tom- 
my" Thompson was up against a bad 
man in O'Brien but he went to it 
every minute, and after the battle was 
over it was hard to see where O'Brien 
had it on Tommy. 

At center, "Bud'' Hedblom more 
than made good. Newton, the Boul- 
der center, is a big 200-pounder, but 
he didn't make himself very trouble- 
some. Time after time Hedblom 
would sift through and spoil a play 
behind the line. He bore the brunt of 
Boulder's fierce line plunging and 
was playing a stronger game at the 
finish than at the start. 

Reichmuth played the same kind of 
a game as Hedblom and was there 
every minute, especially on the de- 
fense. Car}!- at tackle was a cyclone. 
Gil realized this was his last chance at 
Boulder and he took it with a vim. 
Down on punts, tackling hard, smash- 
ing interference and fighting every 
minute, he put up the best game he 
ever played on Washburn Feld. Herb 
Sinton at right end showed that a few 
boils mo:-e or less do not have much 
effect on a man's playing ability. His 
work had the snap and fight shown 
by the rest of the team and few gains 
we e made around his end. 



THE TIGER 



Boulder was afraid of Sherry and 
took every chance they had to pile on 
to the plucky little quarter. He game- 
ly stuck it out one half and played a 
good game. Sherry had no chance at 
all to open up the trick plays and for- 
ward passes, as Richards said to play 
straight football the first half. By 
putting Sherry out of the game, Boul- 
der did themselves little good. Put- 
nam who took his place was a whirl- 
wind and played a wonderful game. 
He was the first man to Stirrett on 
every punt, ran the team like a vet- 
eran, recovered a forward pass and 
was simply "there" in general. Heald 
played his old reliable game at full- 
back. He was always good for a few 
yards through the line and the way he 
backed up the line was responsible 
for the number of new men sent into 
the Boulder backfield. 

Vandemoer got a shoulder "jam- 
med" early in the game, but it could 
never be told from his playing. His 
punting was great considering some of 
the holes from which he had to punt 
and he was the best ground gainer on 
the team. "Chet" Whitaker at the 
other half played. a hard, fast game 
throughout; he broke up Boulder's 
only attempt at a forward pass and 
made some fierce line plunging and 
ran some good interference. 

Stirrett won the toss and chose to 
defend the south goal. Vandemoer 
kicked off, and the ball rolled over the 
goal line. University chose to scrim- 
mage on the 25-yard line and made 
first down three times on straight line 
bucking. Wilson stopped the parade 
by throwing Keim for a 6-yard loss 
and on the next down it was Tiger's 
ball. After two downs which netted 
S yards, Vandemoer kicked to Stirrett 
who was downed in his tracks. Stir- 
rett tried an on-side kick in the first 
play, Vandy recovered the ball with 
no return. 

The Tigers now ran the ball down 
to the University's 5-yard line, where 
they were held on downs and the best 
chance of the day to score was lost. 
On the next play Stirrett kicked out 
from behind his goal line to Vande- 
moer, who fumbled and recovered the 
ball on Boulder's 50-yard line. In this 
play McFadden was laid out and 
Heatbn took his place. 

Vandy made 8 yards through left 
tackle and Sherry 2 around left end. 
Vandemoer punted and the punt was 
blocked by Newton, but the ball was 
Recovered. An on-side kick to Sherry 
netted 18 yards; after two more downs 
Vandemoer punted to Stocker. Boul- 



der again made first down on straight 
line bucking, but forced Stirrett to 
punt after two downs in which no 
gain was made. Sherry returned the 
punt 8 yards; Vandemoer made 12, 
Heald 3, and Vandemoer punted to 
Stirrett. A bad pass to Stirrett lost 
ID yards for U. of C. He punted to 
Vandemoer who returned the ball to 
the middle of the field. Tigers made 
first down on an end run by Vande- 
moer and a play through center by 
Heald. Whitaker made an on-side 
which was recovered by Stirrett, who 
immediately punted 65 yards. The 
ball was on the Tiger 15-yard line, so 
Vandemoer punted out of danger to 
Stirrett. After two downs which 
gained 6 yards, Stirrett punted to 
Whitaker, who made a slashing return 
of 20 yards but fumbled when tackled 
and it was Boulder's ball on the 
Tigers' 25-yard line. After two at- 
tempts to gain, Stirrett dropped back 
to the 3S-yard line for a place kick. 
His line gave him plenty of time and 
the ball sailed between the uprights 
for the first score of the game after 
2;^ minutes of play. Boulder 3, Tigers 
o. 

Stirrett kicked off to Steele, who re- 
turned the ball 12 yards. Two line- 
bucks by Whitaker and Heald failed 
to gain and Vandemoer punted to Stir- 
rett who fumbled but made a brilliant 
recovery. Both teams now put up an 
elegant defensive game, neither team 
being able to rriake first downs; the 
game became a kicking contest be- 
tween Vandemoer and Stirrett. A 
pass intended for Vandemoer bounced 
off Sherry's head and was recovered 
by Boulder. This gave Colorado the 
ball on our 35-yard line. Stocker 
made 15 yards through center, but the 
line settled down and compelled Stir- 
rett to try for another place kick. 
The trial was made from the 25-yard 
line and missed by a scant- foot; The 
ball was brought out to 25'-yard line 
and A'andemoer punted to Sti/rett, 
who punted in return. Sherry made 
the first attempt of the game at a for- 
ward pass and failed. A'andemoer 
punted to Heald. An exchange of 
punts ended the half with the ball in 
possession of Boulder on the College 
4G-yard line. 

Second Half. 

Putnam gees in at quarter. Stir- 
rett's low kick bounced over the goal 
line and Chet put the Tigers in a bad 
hole by attempting to return it He 
was downed on the College 2-yard line 
and Van was forced to go back into a 
snowbank and kick. "Stirrett healed 



the punt and after a series of ilne 
plunges which netted little called fo.' 
another try at a place kick, which 
dropped between the poles as if per 
schedule. Boulder 6, Tigers o.; 3 min- 
utes of play. 

\'andemoer kicked off to Slocum. 
After making two first downs, Stirrett 
punted to Putnam who- fumbled and 
the ball was recovered by Vandemoer 
on the College 3-yard line. He punted 
out to Stirrett^ who made a fair catch. 
The University now ran the ball down 
to the Tigers' three-yard line. Here 
the Tigers got in action and held. It 
was very close, the ball being just 
two inches from, the goal line. Van- 
demoer kicked out and Jimmy Wilson 
squirmed into possession of the ball. 
Vandemoer punted again and Stirrett 
responded with a punt. Vandemoer 
punted again and Stirrett returned the 
punt 22 yards. The Tigers were put- 
ting up an awful defensive game and 
N^andemoer vv^as outpunting Stirrett. 
Gilligan, Heaton and Stocker were re- 
placed with fresh men and still they 
couldn't gain. Putnam uncorked about 
e^-erything he had and got away with 
some good forward passes but as the 
ball was in Tiger territory most of the 
time it was dangerous business. Boul- 
der also opened up but couldn't make 
good on any trick plays. 



CULLED. 



The students of Colorado College are 
publishing a literary magazine. The Kin- 
nikinnik, which is worthy of the highest 
commendation. It is presented in a most 
attractive form, and its contents, consist- 
ing of stories, poems and articles, pos- 
sess much literary merit. — The Univer- 
sity Clarion, Denver. 



1 'ii. faculty of Colorado College has 
foitin' it necessary to take active mea- 
sures to prohibit betting on the college 
campus. — T!ie Washburn Review. 



^ There is nothing that makes a 
^ more acceptable Christmas eift 
J ' than a piece of ^00 d Jewelry. 
That k.ina is to be had of The 



JOHNSON JEWELRY 
CO., 26 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 





Expert Repairing 




10 



THE TIGER 



Full Dress and Tuxedo Suits Made by 
Alfred Benjamin & Co., and 
Society Brand 

Odd taste demands that when roe mingle in the society of well-bred 
people, we must he correctly and becomingly garbed. There is no 
place these da^s for the careless fellow who neglects his formal 
attire, and discerning men and women are slow to bestow their favor 
upon him. 

Tuxedo Suits at $35 and up — A If red Benjamin & Co. make. 
Full Dress Suits, $35 and up. 



THMHUB 



Fairyland Theatre 

High-class Vaudeville and Latest Moving 

Pictures, Entire Change of Program 

Mondays and Thursdays 

DAN TRACY, Manager 

THE CENTRAL FUEL CO. 

R. M. AITKEN Manager 

All Best Grades of Fuel. Patterson Lump the 

Best Furnace Fuel 

**Rvery Lump a Lump of Heat" 

Prompt Delivery 

Two Phones 1101 128 N. Tejon Street 

The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co. 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 

Patronize 
TIGER Advertisers 

Snappy, Swa^^y 
Clothes 

AT 

THE MAY CO. 

Clever 
Haberdashers 



LITERARY PROGRAMS 

APOLLONIAN, NOVEMBER 19. 

Mght vs. Tuberculosis Johnston 

Piano Duet Hesler and Hille 

New York Election Sayre 

Debate: Resolved, That a central 
national bank similar to the Bank 
of England would be for the best 
interests cf our country. Affirma- 
tive. J. Randolph and Gregg; neg- 
ative, Lloyd and Newman. 
Visitors welcome. 



PEARSONS, NOVEMBER 19. 

I..adies' night. 



CICERONIANS, NOVEMBER 19. 

Violin Solo Nordine 

First Edition: Ciceronian Record- 
Herald Scott 

South Dakota Hughs 

Debate: Resolved, That the deepen- 
ing of the Mississippi channel is an 
immediate necessity. Affirmative: 
Greenlee and Budelier. Negative: 
Harrison and Copeland. 

'"^ration Jameson 

Farliamentary Drill Ormes 

MINERVA. NOVEMBER 26. . . 

Congreve and Otway ..Miss McCaw 
Goldsmith and Sheridan, 

Miss Hemenway 
^'isitors welcome. 



NOTICES 

All notices for this column must 
be in the Tiger Box by Tuesday 
of each week 



!\fr. E. T. Crockett, Pueblo business 
man, will address the regular Y meeting 
in Hagerman Lounging Room tonight at 
7 o'clock. 

Rossini Quartette tomorrow night at 
Perkins, under auspices of the Glee Cub. 
Student tickets, 35 cents. 

Princess Bonnie will be given by th. 
junior class in Perkins Hall next Tues- 
day evening. 



Denver special, Thursday, ?2. 



So? 

C. C. was only able to beat the Aggies 
31 to 0, their first team playing the whole 
of the game ; Colorado won by the score 
of 57 to 0, playing all the scrubs in the 
second half. — Silver and Gold. 



"Our Colorado'^ 
"Bruin Inn'' 

"BlackandGold'' 



The Three Songs of Colorado 

College — in Sheet Form 

for 40c. Buy Them of 

E. W. HILLE 



Clever Clothes 

FOR 

College Chaps 

AT 

ROBBINS 

ON THE CORNER 



THE TIGER 



U 




Nothing is "Niftier" 



Cigar Store 



than a good Briar Pipe with two "C's" inlaid in silver. We 
have the good briar pipes with the two "C's" inlaid in every 
conceivable style. Come in and talk football and look at 
pipes 

Harry 1 C3 Hughes 



mmm 



IS MADE WITH 

_ [r[L[LaF3rni?i3W© ^[ds. 

Pi word to the wise is sufficient 

/>>^^,. CLARK 

GA^^*^ engraving ca 

ILLU5TRATORS PUEBLO 
DESIGNERS COLO. 
ENGRAVERS , 



Gel Your Picixic Supplies 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Favorite Resort of the Col- 
lege Students, Renowned in 
Story and Song 

BRUIN INN 

Up North Cheyenne Canon 



The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER, Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch. Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Patronize TIGER 
Advertisers 

UNION ICE AND COAL CO. 

W. M. BANNING, Proprieter 

Artificial Ice and Cold Storage 

Dealers in All Kinds of Coal and Piaion Wood 
Yard Office, 105 W.Veriniio City Office, 5 N. Tejon 



AL UMNI NO TES i Maier's Lunch & Dining Room 



Crane '09 is teaching in the Chamber- 
!aiu-Hunt Academy, Port Gibson, Miss. 



Miss Ethel Bear '09 is spending the 
vvi.iter at home in Delta. 

Newton C. Morris '09 and wife, have 
settled in Rockj^ Ford, where Mr. Morris 
has gone into the grocery business. 



Miss Bessie Chapman ex-'09 is a senior 
at Tarkio College, Missouri. 



1 . Hunter '06 is studying law at Den- 
ver University. 

Miss Ruth Londoner '09 was a guest at 
Bemis over Sunday. 

Miss Lala Bartleson '09 is principal of 
a school at Cokeville, Wyoming. 

Miss Alice Hutchinson and Miss Wil- 
iiia Spicer, be th ex-'ll are sorority 
pledges at Greeley Normal School. 

Born, Nov. 3, to Dr. and Mrs. 1,. R. 
Ingersoll, of Madison, Wis., a daughter. 
Dr. Ingersoll graduated from C. C. in 
'02 and Mrs. Ingersoll was Mis? Ethel 
Smeigh '03. 

Frank Pettibone '04 is practising law 
in Denver. 



Bert Wasley '05 is cashier of the Al- 
bert Secrist Electrical and Gas Manufac- 
turing Co., in Denver. 

Lee Hyder ex-' 10 has recently been 
elected to the staff of the architectural 
maga/^ine at the L'niversity of Pennsyl- 
vania. He also won first place in the 
broad jump in the class contests there. 

Two years of college work will be re- 
quired for admission to the Yale law 
and medical schools hereafter. 



Lunches of All Kinds 
Regular Meals 20c and 25c 

216> 2 N. Tejon St. Opposite North Park 

"Attention Collegians'* 

Let ijs make your Dances, Receptions, 
and Fraternity Socials this term, affairs 
never to be forgotten, by decorating 
your hall or parlors in an artistic man- f 
ner with the college banners, pennants, ; 
festoons and bunting. Then have ' 
erected our sidewalk canopy to keep off i 
the inclement weather. We also have 
floor coverings to protect the carpets. 
All this will cost but very little and 
add much to these affairs. 

Thfc Out West Tent and 

A ,.,„•_ C- Telephone Main 1261 
/\Wning 1-.0. II3I/2 N. Tejon Street 



College 

Pennants 

New line of Pennants just received 
--they are very attractive, and the 
prices ahout a third lower than 
ever before. 

Our Celebrated College Posters are 
now only 25 or 50 cents 
each, mounted 




Whitney and Grimwood 

No. 20 North Tejon Street 



12 



THE TIGER 



0. E. Hemenway 



Groceries and 



Meats 



.«.•.»• 







115 South Tejon Street 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



YOU don't entertain your 
guests to save money — 
if you did, the simplest 
way would be to forego en- 
tertaining them. 
CfjMuETH's may cost more, 
but — 

ClMueth^s 

CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 



5 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



The Colorado Springs Floral Co. 

Wish to Have Your Business at Right 
Prices 



Telephone Main 599 



104 N. Tejon St. 



II Local Department 



Mrs. Helen Fauntius ex-'lO visited 
Faith Cox Sunday and Monday. 

Elsie Connell was down from Denver 
for the game, Saturday. 



Gwendolyn Hedgecock was down for 
Contemporary's anniversary, Friday and 
Saturday. 



Katherine James, formerly of Boulder, 
was a guest of Lenore Pollen, Saturday. 



Several Kappa Sigmas and guests at- 
tended the "Yankee Prince," Monday 
night. 



Floy Estill entertained informally at 
tea, Sunday afternoon. 

On account of the bad weather, the 
vesper service, Sunday afternoon, was 
not as well attended as the excellent pro- 
gram warranted. 

Don't forget Princess Bonnie, Novem- 
lier 22), in Perkins Hall. 

Faith Cox gave a tea for Mrs. Faun- 
tius Sunday afternoon. 

Several Sigma Chis and friends had 
dinner at the Alamo and afterwards at- 
tended the theatre, Monday night. 

You will be treated right and your 
order for ice cream or catering will 
be appreciated by Noble, phone Main 
920. 



Se\-eral college people went up to the 
Peak, Sunday, on the Cog road, and rode 
down on the engine. 



The gym classes last Thursday were 
adjourned on account of yell practice. 



Mabel Carlson and her friend Miss 
McCampbell, were visitors at the college 
Saturday and Sunday. 



Rehearsals of Eager Heart, a miracle 
play to be given December 3 in Perkins 
Hall, have bearun. 



A. G. SPALDING a BROS. 



The • 

SPALDING 
Trade-Mark 




is known throughout 
the world as a 

Guarantee of 
Quality 



are the Largest 
Manufacturers 
in the World of 

Official 

Equipment 

For All 
Athletic 
Sports and 
Pastimes 

If You areinter- 

" *""ested in 
Athletic Sport you 
should have a copy 
of the Spalding 
Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyclo- 
pedia of what's new 
in Sport and is sent 
free on request. 

A. G. Spalding & Bros. 

1616 Arapohoe St., Denver, Colo. 

JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Stree 

Fraternities, Clubs, Individuals 
desiring Milk or Cream 
in any quantities 
should remem- 
ber :: :: 



The Sinton- Rustic Home 

r\ • o No. 419 South El Paso St. 

"airy §) phone Main 442 



The College Photo Studio 

The Highest Class of 

Photographs 




Bingham 

18 S. Tejon St. Phone M-678 



DOUGLAS & 
HETHERINGTON 



Telephone S36 



Architects 

Rooms 15 and 16 Oul West Buildinii. 
COLORADO SPRINGS. COLO. 



i 



T M E 'I' I ( i K R 



13 



Memory 
Books 

Bound in colors, black and 
and orange, and lettered on 
side. The only really Colo- 
rado College Scrap Book 
made. Lar^e enough to con- 
tain your four years* items. 

Price, $1.25 each 



The Out West 

Printing fii Stationery Co. 
9-11 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 



Furniture pL";'""" 

Special Terms to Students 

McCracken & Hubbard 

120 and 122 South Tejon Street 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

IS S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

Are Always Well Pleased When They 
Get Their Hair Cut at 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



12 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springs 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main S36 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

'as cade Laundry 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 

20 per cent, discount 

To All Students of College and Academy 



.Miss Brown and Miss Bunce were the 
guests of Miss Vesta Sharp last week. 



7 E. Bijou 



Phone 820 



Charline Cover ex-'12 is visiting col- 
lege friends this week. She expects to 
enter college again the second semester. 

Several Phi Gamma Delta's and guests 
attended the theatre Monday night. 

l\lr. Ornies went to Denver Thursday 
on library 1 usiness. 

Miss Kennedy of Cripple Creek was a 
guest at the college Saturday and Sun- 
day. 

Bruin Iiui, the popular little rustic 
hostelry, in North Cheyenne canon, 
changed hands recently and is now man- 
aged by Swanson and Riley, two ener- 
getic and obliging young men of this 
city. They promise the same treatment 
accorded to College students by their 
predecessor, Mr. Laveley. 



Last Friday night the freshmen in 
Bemis gathered in Miss True's room for 
a fudge party, waiting the tolling of Cut- 
ler bell. 

Laura Moncrief of Denver was the 
guest of Mary Bogue this last week- 
end. Miss Packard gave a spread in 
her honor. 



Doroth}- Stott entertained a guest 
from Boulder last Saturday. 



Kathleen \Vheeler, of the LIniversity, 
spent Saturday with friends in the halls. 



Mrs. Smith gave a farewell tea last 
Sunday for Dorothe Haynes. 



You must hear Auntie Crab's "advice 
)out love," November 23. 



Eleanor Thomas entertained a few 
college friends very elaljorately at din- 
ner Monday evening. 



Tuesday evening, Delta Phi Theta 
gave an informal hop at their house. 



Mrs. Weeks entertained Hypatia Fri- 
dav afternoon. 



Ab. Middlesworth and his brother 
were down for the game Saturday. 

Dwight Sisco is a Sigma Chi pledge. 



The Sigma Chis entertained some of 
their friends by a jolly bob-sled party 
Tuesdav afternoon. 



Hunt Up 

BisselFs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Fec>d, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 

C. F. Arcularius & 
Company 

A Large Assortment of 

BELT PINS 

All the Latest Styles 



9 South Tejon Street 
COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 

We have Embossing Dies for Stationery •£ all the 
College Societies and Fraternities, also the Great 
Seal of the College. We carry in stack a large 
line of papers upon which to emboss these Dies — 
Hurd's, Crane's and others. 

Gowdy-Simmons Ptg Co. W^^Tm 



Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

Burgess Candy 

There's nothing too good for the 
College girls — that's why we sell 
them candy. But we've noticed the 
girls themselves dont always do the 
buying. When a box of candy bears 
the Burgess stamp, you know it is 
never stale or shelf v\orn, but packed 
to your order from the freshest, pur- 
est, richest goods that our expert 
candy-makers can produce from day 
to day. 

W. N. Burgess 'iSi'^s^::? 



14 



THE T I G E K 



This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 

Company 




Headquarters for 

College Footwear 



The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

FOUNDERS AND MACHINISTS 



College 
Inn 



^* Short 
// Orders 



"Come in, the Cider's 
Fine" 

THE 

Crissey 6i Fowler 
Lumber Co. 

Phone 101 117-123 W- Vermijo Ave. 

Our Special Extra-Clean 

Lignite 
Furnace Lump 

The Colorado Springs Fuel Co., 
112 Pike's Peak Avenue. Two 
Phones Main 230 

Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 

A. S. BLAKE 



Is the Man to See 



Helen Hinckley was in the infirmary i 
for several days last week. 

Addie Hemenway was in Denver 
Thursday and Friday of last week. 

Notliing succeeds like success and 
nothing hnngs success like enterprise, 
which in other words is to say that 
successful Harry Hughes, the tobacco- 
nist, has spread a little wider and now 
has a cigar and.candj^ stand in the 
lobby of the new Exchange Bank 
Building. The building is a "cracker- 
jack" and Hughes' stand is in full ac- 
cord with the building. 



Harriet Spencer spent Sunady at her 
home in Pueblo. Zella and Nell War- 
nock accompanied her. 



Several of the senior girls entertained 
some of the Boulder girls at tea after 
the game Saturday. 



The Misses Crowley entertained for 
Chrirline Cover, Wednesday evening. 

The seniors had a spread Monday in 
honor of Nannie Gibbs' birthday. 



Dorothe Haynes has discontinued 
school. 



Pearsons Literary Society gives its 
first ladies' night tonight. 

Minerva held a closed meeting this 
afternoon, the meeting being held at 
Miss Schole's residence. 

The second Kappa Sigma dance occurs 
tomorrow night, November 20. 



The freshman class has postponed its 
picnic breakfast until Saturday, Novem- 
ber 20, when it will be held if the fates 
and the weather permit. 



107 North Tejon 

Nickle Ware 



Phone 465 

Cutlery 



Alpha Tau Delta entertained the Boul- 
der chapter of Beta Theta Pi Saturday 
after the game. 

Dr. Bayley was a guest at the Delta 
Phi Theta house Tuesday noon. 

The Ciceronian Symposium held 
their regular monthly banquet at the 
Acacia Wednesday night. , 

Delta Phi Theta gave a party at 
their fraternity house Saturdaj' even- 
ing. Guests of the fraternity were: 
Misses Thacher, McCaw, Seigfried, 
Tucker, Pickin, Tyler, Gerould. Rita 
Miller, Gleason, Work, Green, Yerkes, 
Douglass, Smith, McRoberts, Burgess, 



_£L 


L 




ii iL n 



N order to dispose 
of our :: :: :: 

Foot Ball 



iim Muffs 






before the end of the season 
we are offering them at actual 
cost, viz. 




MURRAY'S 



William P. Bonbright & Co. 

' Investments 

MEMncDC 1 New York Stock Exchange 

MtMBtK!) -, c„|„„j„ Springs Mining Stock Exchange 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



he Waterman Press 

at 112 E. Cucharras 
are Specialists in Fine 
Printing, and solicit 
the patronage of the most ex- 
acting for anything that can 
he done in a d ecent print shop 
No matter how particular you 
are, we are here to make good 



We Print THE TIGER 




THE TIGER 



15 



Pettigre.v. Crandall, Morehouse, 
Roane, Mozelle Anderson, Stott, Ful- 
ler, and Perkins. Professor and Mrs, 
Smith chaperoned. 



ACADEMY 



(Amy L. Busch, Correspondent.) 



Y. M. C. A. STAG. 

Last Friday evening, the Cutler de- 
partment of the Y. M. C. A. held its 
second stag reception. At this meet- 
ing the project of separating irnm the 

THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 

GIDDINGS BROS. 

CmloraJo Springs 

THE SPECIALTY STORE 

A Hearty Welcom* Constantly Awaits All Visito s 

College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

Is the plac* to go to get your barber 
-work and baths 



106^2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



^fe' 



aundry 



Why not have the BEST WORK ? 



20 per cent, discount 

To all Students of College and Academy 



J. J. WILSON, College Agent 

W.I.LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



119N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



/^ 



For Christinas 

House Coats, Bath 
Robes, Mufflers and 
Leathar Goods 

GORTON'S 



Nifty Clothes for the 
College Going Men 



=^ 



Adler-Rochester and College Brand Clothes. Here is the gather- 
ing place for the snappy young fellows who are looking for the 
smart, ultra-fashioned clothes, which the college man and those 
like him crave, and require. They're quality clothes, full of style, 
handsomely tailored, for $25 and $20. 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 



\: 




Correct Dress for Men. \ 



nS E. Pike's Peak 
Avenue 



J 



College Association was discussed 
and was then left to be decided by a 
committee. Cajori represented the 
seniors on the committee, Stark the 
juniors, Beale the sophomores, and 
Scogin the freshmen. Then various 
contests were held between the classes 
in Cutler. An indoor football game 
was wm by the freshmen and jimiors; 
but the sophomores and seniors won 
tlie baseball game and tug of war, thus 
getting the majority of the honors of 
the reception. Refreshments were 
served and the company left, after get- 
ting very well acquainted. 



The following program will be given 
at the Philo Literary meeting, Friday, 
November igth, at Study Hall, Cutler. 
Life of James Whitcomb Riley, 

Miss Perley 
Short Story from Riley, 

Miss Ormes 

Recitation, "Sweegekums'' Riley 

Miss Lennox. 
First half. Original Story, 

Miss Metz 
Roll Call, answered by quotations 
from Riley. 



Following is a list of new pledges 
to the Philo Literary Society: Ruth 
Gile, Charlotte Kissel, Agnes Donald- 
son, Jo van Diest, Margaret Wilson, 
I^ois Milone, and Miriam Bispham. 



Attention is called to the advertise- 
ment of The Hub, who are now set- 
tled in their new quarters in the Ex- 
chang'e Bank Building. 



DRINK 

DERN'S 

Freshly Roasted Tea and Coffee 

29 South Tejon Street 

The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies and 
Fixtures 



208 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 812 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-203 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence, 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 956 



The College 

Photo Studio 

Hi^h Class Photographs 
Kodaks and Supplies 




<^Sr<\Brrum 4 



Corner Cascade and Kiowa 



16 



THE TIGER 



We Have the Sto rm Boot for You 

Whether it rains or snows, hails or sleets, ^our feet will be dry and comfortable in our $5.00 Semi-High- 
Cut Storm Boot. Don't think, ^ou can't afford to get a pair Just for stormy weather. You know you not 
only insure your health, but also practice economy by doing so 

l^ocrrtl QAo^C 'contain the best leather made, and are acknowledged to be the best shoe value in the world. 
MVfigUl ^llUti;^ Q^^^ f^ ^^j i^^i^ ^^^^ ti^^ i^f^^f p^^g^i ^^^/g^ for fall. $3.50 and $4.00. 

Perkins-Shearer Co, «^ f,l2 S.\r ^"^""^ 




Footwear of Quality 



When we say footwear of quality we do not necessarily mean high- 
priced footwear. AH our women's shoes are made for our trade by 
expert makers, using only choice materials in the various grades, are 
unusually large and stylish, showing 
is offered you at $2.50, $3.00, 
$3.50, $4.00, $4.50, $5.00 



\^>^«vst^ 



SHOES T"** SATISFY 



&a S.TCJON ST- 



When Trading, Remember TIGER Advertisers 

_ 




Colorado College 

Founded in Colorado Springs in 18 7 4 



WM. F. SLOCUM, President 





^ College of Arts and Science 

E. S. PARSONS, Dean 


Depart- 
ments 


School of Engineering 

F. CAJORI, Dean 
School of Forestry 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 




School of Music 
I E. D. HALE, Dean 



f^ ,1 4 1 The Associated 

tUtier Academy preparatory 
^^^_.^_^_^^^^_»a_i^^^^^^^_i School, in which 
students are' prepared for any American College 



Electrical Laboratory 




Vol. XII 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., NOVEMBER 26, 1909 



Number 11 



GREAT 

SUCCESS 



JUNIOR CLASS GIVES "PRIN- 
CESS BONNIE" TO THE 
DELIGHT OF A LARGE 
AUDIENCE. 



I 



A Critique of the Opera, With the 
Usual Question, Why Not Co- 
Educational Dramatics? 

As the enthusiastic crowd slowly 
filed out of Perkins Hall Tuesday 
evening, everyone was asking, "Why 
haven't we done something like this 
before?" To say that the perform- 
ance of "Princess Bonnie" by the 
class of 191 1 was a success would be 
to put it very mildly; for, from the 
minute that Haight broke the ice 
with a hearty sneeze in the first cho- 
rus until the transparent curtain clos- 
ed on the finale the play was one 
continuous round of applause. 

In a strictly "all-star" cast it would 
not be correct to pick out anyone for 
special praise; and yet a critique that 
failed to mention the excellent work 
of Earl Hille as "Shrimps" would be 
no critique at all. Hille was the life 
of the play. Shrimps' local hits evok- 
ed great applause from the audience. 
His acting was finished to a degree 
tha twould have done credit to any 
professional comedienne. 

Winifred Shuler played — and look- 
ed, the part of Kitty Clover, the vil- 
lage belie^ to perfection. Her grace 
and charm won the audience the min- 
ute she appeared on the stage. 

Bruce Weirick as Captain Tarpau- 
lin and Harry Larson as Admiral 
Pomposo acted their parts so as to 
leave little to be desired. Ralph Rice 
as an Italian nobleman was good. It 
was worth the price of admission to 
see the -dignified Dean do that cake 



walk. VanStone as Lieutenant Fuzee 
and Fowler as Capt. Surf, did the small 
parts assigned them in a creditable 
manner. 

Kirkpatrick as Roy Stirling acted 
excellently and he sang even better 
than he acted. He rendered a rather 
difficult musical score in a manner 

Continued on Page 7. 



CAPS AND 

GOWNS 



SENIORS WILL OBSERVE 
SIGNIA DAY DECEMBER i 



IN- 



Chapel Exercises — Seniors Entertain 

Juniors at Bemis — Juniors Will 

Be Funny. 



Wednesday, December i, is Insig- 
nia Day. The regular date for this 
occasion is the second Wednesday in 
November, but owing to the fact that 
President Slocum could not be here, 
the date was postponed until Decem- 
ber I. 

On this day the seniors wear their 
caps and gowns for the first time, 
and tlie juniors always make an effort 
to originate some "stunt" co show 
their respect to the class that has 
just recently become dignified. After 
Insignia Day the fashion of dress for 
every senior on Friday at chapel will 
be a cap and gown. 

The exercises take place at chapel. 

There is alwaj's a procession from 
the Library headed by the faculty 
members who have donned their caps 
and gowns in accordance with the 
degrees they hold and the schools in 
which they received them. After the 
facult}', the seniors following, assum- 
ing as much the same dignity as pos- 
sible. 

The juniors act as ushers of the 

Continued on Page 8. 



TIGERS 

BEATEN 



DENVER UNIVERSITY WINS 

COLORADO CHAMPIONSHIP 

IN SPECTACULAR GAME. 



Score 6 to 6 in First Half— Ministers 

Add 23 Points in Second Half. 

Tigers Fight Hard. 



Before a large crowd of frenzied 
football fans our Tigers met and lost 
to the husky bunch representing Den- 
ver University, by a score of 29 to 6. 
In the first half no one could tell just 
how the game was coming out; the 
Tigers were fighting every minute and 
the Preachers didn't look exactly like 
a bunch of world beaters; Heald could 
tear off good gains through center and 
D. U.'s cross tackle bucks and end runs 
were being stopped with joyful regu- 
larity. 

In the second half weight began to 
tell. Schroeder and Crowley battered 
the center of our line and made first 
down whenever they felt like it. This 
drew in the defensive halves and ena- 
bled D. U. to pull off their trick plays 
with practicall}' no interference. 

1 he Tigers fought every inch and gave 
an exhibition of gameness seldon seen 
on a gridiron ; every man gave all he 
liad. Sherry, Vandemoer, Whitaker, 
Gary, and Heald all starred; Sherry han- 
dled punts remarkably well, Whitaker 
broke up several forward passes and 
handled forward passes perfectly. Van- 
demoer's punting was a feature and his 
speed let him away for some good gains ; 
Gary played his last game and played 
it right, down on punts and good, hard 
consistent playing throughout. Heald 
with a little more weight would be a 
second "Tub" Morris. His work Thurs- 
day was great and reminded us of 

Continued on Page 3. 



THE TIGER 



A Review of Dean Cajori^s New Book, "The History of the Logarith- 
mic SHde Rule," with a List of the Author's Previous Mathematical Works 



"The History of the Logarithmic 
Slide Rule," a book of 150 pages by 
Dean Floriaii Cajori has just come 
from the press of the Engineering 
News. In this work the author has 
aimed to settle the question to whom 
the honor of the invention of the 
slide rule is due, to show that the 
possibility of utilizing the slide rule 
in the solution of numerical equations 
by the inverting of the logarithmic 
line is of much earjier date than has 
been supposed by some writers, and 
to trace the development and growth 
of the logarithmic slide rule from the 
earliest date of the invention, to the 
present date. 

Soon after the invention of logar- 
ithms by John Napier {1530-1617) we 
find the first steps toward the second 
labor saving invention, the slide rule. 
This step, which was a necessary pre- 
lude to the invention of the slide rule, 
was taken by Gunter (i 581 -1626) in 
1620, who designed the so-called log- 
arithmic "line of numbers." Distances 
along a straight line were taken pro- 
i;ortionately to the logarithms of the 
numbers, from one to ten, and ar- 
ranged upon the line from one end to 
the other. 

This line when mounted upon a 
rule with another representing the 
logarithms of trigonometric functions 
constituted an instrument known as 
"Gunter's Scale" and problems were 
solved by means of a piir of com- 
passes. 

Dr. Cajori devotes several pages to 
the disentanglement of the main facts 
pertaining to the often confounding 
of "Gunte 's Scale" with the slide 
lule, also to the conflicting statements 
on the invention of the slide rule, 
which he summarzies as follows: 

"Edmund Gunter invented a loga- 
rithmic line called 'Gunter's line,' but 
not the slide rule. Tb.e straight edge 
slide rule was first invented by Ed- 
mund Wingate and explained by him 
in several publications, the earliest 
of which appeared in 1630. Such a 
slide rule was also given to the world 
in 1632 by William Oughtred in a 
wur'< pepared for the press by Wil- 
liam P'orster. Oughtred was the first 
to design a circular slide rule." 

The greater portion of the book is 
devoted to the development of the 



slide rule in England, Germany, 
France and the United States. 

In England during the eighteenth 
century the development of the slide 
rule was greater than in any other 
country. Outside of France and Ger- 
many no evidence has been secured 
that the instrument was even known 
to exist. The wider use of the slide 
rule in England was facilitated by the 
great attention given in elementary 
instruction to the subject of decimal 
fractions. During the eighteenth cen- 
tury I'^rance and Germany produced 
nothing in connection with the slide 
rule which had not been worked out 
earlier in England. The early records 
are very unauthentic. The gross in- 
accuracies which occur in standard 
publications are due to the neglect of 
this early history of the slide rule. 



The English books of the eighteenth 
century fail to mention Wingate and 
Oughtred in connection with the slide 
rule. Their instruments as originally 
planned weer not used extensively, 
and wdien supplanted by new designs, 
bore the names of the designers, and 
tlie names of Wingate and Oughtred 
were naturally forgotten. 

A decline in the use of the slide 
rule in England was evident in the 
second quarter of the nineteenth 
century, due in part to the alteration 
in the system of weights and mea- 
sures, which rende.ed obsolete old 
rules gauged in the old units of mea- 
sure. However, the chief difficulty 
lay, not in the design and manufac- 
ture of new rules, but rather in get- 
ting people to learn how to use 
them. Little was done during the 




DEAN FLORIAN CAJORI 



THE TIGER 



nineteenth century in Germany, 
though Lambert and Segner made 
some effort to popularize it. France 
became the center of activity in the 
design and manufactu/e of rules. 
During the French revolution intel- 
lectual activity was intense and 
mathematical studies received much 
attention. Immediately after the 
French revolution and the adoption 
of the metric system, did the great- 
est ascendency of the slide rule take 
place, both types, the circular and the 
rectilinear, were highly developed, the 
rectilinear gradually taking precedent 
over the circular.^ 

In the United States while no great 
use of the slide rule was known, in- 
stances of their being used are cited. 
]Mr. F. R. Krassle-, the first superin- 
tendent of the United States Geodetic 
Survey, possessed a slide rule. 

The development during recent 
times has been the greatest, and to 
the French army oiificer Amedee 
i\'Iaunheim is credited the Resign of 
the slide rule best adapted to the or- 
dinary every-day uses. His rule be- 
came popular and he succeeded in 
popularizing the use of the runner. 
Today the types used are numerous, 
but the Mannheim in various im- 
proved forms are used wherever in- 
struments of this class are employed. 
It is not certain that the Mannheim 
type will continue long in its undis- 
puted supremacy as the best portable 
rule for popular use in ordinary com- 
putations, for many signs of divided 
allegiance exist. 

Greater stress has been laid in gen- 
eral upon the rule in engineering- 
schools of the United States. 

The slide rules designed and used 
since 1800 have been listed and ar- 
ranged in chronological order. This 
list comprises some two hund ed 
and fifty styles that have been made 
and which have met with more or 
less approval. Then following this 
list is a very complete bibliography 
of the slide rule dating from 1620- 
1909. 

The appearance of Dean Cajori's 
new book on the slide rule brings to 
mind his other books. 

The first of these was a govern- 
ment publication entitled "The 
Teaching and History of Mathemat- 
ics in the United States." Professor 
Cajori made the contract with the 
U. S. Bureau of Education for this 
work soon after he came to Colorado 
in 1890 and it was completed the fol- 
lowing year. In regard to this book 
former Presdient Fiske of Columbia 



said m an address before the Ameri- 
can Mathematical society," the most 
valuable source from which the gen- 
eral reader may secure information 
in regard' to the first period (of 
Mathematical History in the U. S.) 
is a work by Prof. Florian Cajori." 

Professor Cajori's second book 
was "A History of Mathematics," 
published in 1894, and was followed 
two years later by "A History of Ele- 
mentary Mathematics," In "A Study 
of Mathematical Education," by 
Benchara Branford of Oxford the fol- 
lowing appears: 

■'A list of works is appended de- 
signed to interest mathematical teach- 
ers in mathematical Jiistory and its 
application to education. The list is 
short — about twenty of the best works 
have been selected." Professor Ca- 
jori's "Flistory of Mathematics" and 
"History of Elementary Mathematics'' 
both appear in this list. 

In 1899 "A History of Physics" was 
published and in 1902 a book on "The- 
ory of Equations." All these books 
were published by the Macmillan Co. 
of New York, which of itself is a 
guarantee of their good standing. 

Professor Cajori considers that his 
greatest work is his part in the fourth 
and last valume of a History of Math- 
ematics written by nine of the most 
prominent mathematicians of the 
world. Professor Cajori was the only 
American among its authors. 

Besides these books Professor Ca- 
jori has written numerous pamphlets 
and papers. He has had a total of 
something like 70 articles published 
in various scientific magazines. Prac- 
tically all of this work has been done 
since he came to Colorado. 

While in a few instances Professor 
Cajori has been rewarded materially 
for his wfirk, he has done by far the 
greater part of it with the single pur- 
pose of addmg his sha e to the build- 
ing up of the science to which he has 
given his life. 



TIGERS BEATEN 



Continued from Page 1. 

"Tub." The rest of the men were 
handicapped by weight, but fought it 
out to the finish. 

The first half was almost even ; D. 
U.made the first touchdown and Brusse 
kicked goal after a series of split bucks 
and line plunging. 

The Tigers, not a bit disheartened 
went in, and by similar methods ran 
the ball down to the D. U. 10-yard 
line. A penalty, a forward pass and 



Heald ran it over and Whitaker kicked 
goal. This ended the scoring for the 
first half. 

In the second half D. U. started in, 
and by fierce line bucking, ran the hall 
over for a touchdown. In this way 
they sinipl}' wore onr line down and 
scored four touchdowns. They also un- 
corked all the trick plays, some of 
which worked and some of which did 
not. 

The most spectacular play of this 
half was a fake from tandem formation ; 
a touchdown resulting after a run of 
,35 yards. Another brilliant play was 
a tackle by Vandemoer. A D. U. man 
had gotten away on a forward pass 
and Vandy, by a magnificent burst of 
speed, caught him on the 5-yard line. 
Line -Up. 

D. U. C. C. 

Green c Hedblom 

Fike rg Thompson, Roe 

Curtis rt Gary 

Meyers re Sinton, Copeland 

Prater Ig Reichsmuth 

Darden It Steele 

Rnss le Wilson, Morrison 

Brusse, Large qb Sherry, Putnam 

Schroeder fb Heald, Wilson 

Crowley rh Vandemoer 

Volk Ih Whitaker 

Time of halves — 30 minutes 



STRING QUARTET ORGANIZED. 

To Accompany Glee Club on Christ- 
mas Tour. 

For some time there has been talk 
of organizing a string quartet to be 
known as the C. C. String Quartet. 
This has finally been accomplished 
and the quartet was fo mally recog- 
nized last We'dnesday when the Glee 
Club, after hearing it play, decided to 
have the quartet accompany them on 
the trip which they will make this 
winter. The following are the mem- 
bers of the quartet; 

Rice 'ii, first violin; G iswold 'lo, 
second violin; Lahrman '13, viola; 
Hensel '13, 'cello. 

Such a quartet should help greatly 
in stimulating- interest in music among 
the college students, and deserves our 
hearty suppo.t. 

The United States Fortlanid Ce- 
ment Company of Concrete, Colo., 
has recently donated eight hundred 
pounds of conc-ete cement to be used 
by one of the seniors in making in- 
vestigations of the relative strength of 
concrete mixtures in thesis work. 



THE TIGER 



RANGERS . FROM NATIONAL 

FORESTS TO BE DETAILED. 

TO ATTEND FORESTRY 

SCHOOL. 

During the coming winter sixty 
Rangers and Deputy Supervisois are 
to be detailed from the National 
Forests in District Two (Colorado 
Wyoming and Smith Dakota) for a 
special course, known as the Ran- 
ger course, in the Colorado School 
of Forestry at Colorado Springs. 
Beginning January ii, 1910, the course 
lasts ten weeks, the first fifteen 
days at Colo.'ado Springs and the 
remainder on the Forestry School 
timber tract at Mnnitou Park in the 
heart of the Pike National Forest. 
Since the men will be on full pay 
and since their transportation to and 
from Colorado Springs will be paid 
by the National Forest Service, 
they will be burdened bj^ little 
more expense while receiving in- 
struction than they would be on 
their districts or at their headqua t- 
ers on the National Forests. 

The Ranger Course is planned to 
meet the needs of forest rangers and 
guards, timber cruisers, logging sup- 
erintendents, woodland owners and 
others who wish to acquire a gen- 
eral knowledge of the principles of 
I'^orestry, and of the methods of 
handling timber lands. The Forest 
Service co-operates in the work of 
School of Forestry. The tuition is 
free to all. 

Hy means of this Ranger Course 
tne men who are stationed on the 
National Fp:ests will be prepared to 
assist in larger portion of the tech- 
nical work in Forestry. The increas- 
ing possibilities of practising inten- 
si\e methods of Forestry on the 
National Forests have created a need 
for such training in the local For- 
est Ser\'ice officers. The Ranger 
Course also will enable Forest offi- 
cers who have shown special apti- 
tude for administrati\-e work but 
who lia\e not had the opportunity 
to take regular courses at Forestry 
schools, to gain considerable knowl- 
erlge of technical forestry .and so to 
be able to cooperate more fully with 
the regularly trained technical forest- 
e s on the National Forests 

A somewhat similar course for For- 
est Rangers was conducted this, fall 
fo- the first time on the Coconino Na- 
tional Forest, the headquarters of 
which are at Flagstaff, Arizona. The 
course at the Colorado School of 
[•"orestry was conducted last winter 



for the first time although at that time 
the Range s were not detailed on pay. 
The Ranger Course at the Colorado 
School of Forestry includes instruc- 
ti. n in matters pertaining to the use 
of the National Forest for Grazing, 
Law pertaining to Forest Administra- 
tion, Forest Plantmg and Sowing, Sil- 
vicultu.-e, Lumbering, Diseases of 
Trees, and Surveying by members of 
the Forest Service, and in Botany, 
Dendrology, Forest Mensuration, Me- 
teorology, Geology and Mining, His- 
tory of Forestry, and the Practice of 
Forestry by the F"aculty of the For- 
estry School. Furthermore, the 
Course is supplemented by practical 
instruction in .First Aid to the In- 
jured, Packing, Horse-shoeing, and 
similar subjects. 

The Faculty of the Colorado School 
of Forestry was increased this fall by 
the addition of two Professors in 
Forestry, who have had several 
years in administrative work in the 
Forest Service on the National For- 
ests in Colorado. The Faculty of the 
Colorado School of Forestry has 
therefore for the instruction of F"ores- 
try and Lumbering both the advan- 
tages of complete technical training 
and of long experience in the actual 
practice of Forestry. In addition to 
the two Professors who teach For- 
estry and Lumbering the Faculty in- 
cludes members of the Faculty of 
Colorado College, of which institution 
the Colorado School of Forestry is a 
department. The Faculty of Colorado 
College gives instruction in the For- 
estry School in Botany, Zoology, 
Geology, Surveying, Engineering, 
English, Modern Languages, Eco- 
nomics, Mathematics, Chemistry, 
Physics, Law, and Meteorology. The 
regular course of the Colorado School 
of Forestry covers four years and 
leads to the degree of Forest En- 
gineer. 

The chief aim of the School is to 
give a thorough training to students 
who intend to adopt Forestry as a 
profession and to fit them for posi- 
tions in the Government Forest Serv- 
ice, for positions as State Foresters, 
or for private employment as expert 
Foresters. 

The school was founded in 1905 by 
gifts from Dr. William A. Bell and 
from the late General William J. 
Palmer. It is particularly fortunate 
in possessing a tract of 13,000 acres of 
forest land at Manitou Park, about 
twenty-five miles west of Colorado 
Springs near the line of the Colorado 
Midland road. The forest on the 



School land consists mainly of West- 
ern Yellow Pine and also of a small 
amount of Douglas Fir. On account 
of the "good market for forest prod- 
ucts in the vicinity of Manitou Park 
it is possible to practice very inten- 
sive methods of Forestry. A sawmill 
is located on the School land at the 
present time to cut the overmature 
and defective trees. 

The fi -St year of the regular course 
of the Colorado School of Forestry 
is ■ occupied principally with such of 
the studies named above as are funda- 
mental for a sound scientific educa- 
tion. The second and third years in- 
clude more advanced work in Engin- 
eering and Biology and in the ele- 
mentary subjects of Forestry among 
them Forest Mensuration, Silvicult- 
ure, Dendrology, and Timber Phys- 
ics. The last year is devoted entirely 
to Forestry. The courses in Forest 
.Management, Forest Law, Lumber- 
ing, and Forest Geography (descrip- 
tion and methods of applied Forestry 
for the several forest regions and 
types of the Lhiited States) are em- 
phasized. Trips are made to inspect 
local lumber operations and after the 
Civil Service Examination in April 
the Senior Class spends the remaining 
two months m actual field work in 
mapping, estimating and preparation 
of working plans for large bodies of 
timber. 

Although an undergraduate course 
does not give the student opportunity 
to make as complete study of the 
more academic courses, the curricu- 
lum at the Colorado School of For- 
estry includes all the subjects in For- 
estry and allied sciences necessary for 
thorough training of technical Forest- 
ers, and in this respect equals any 
Forestry School in the United States. 
The Colorado School has the unique 
advantage of being located within 
easy reach of several National For- 
ests, and its students have therefore 
ample opportunity to inspect the 
most extensive work in practical 
Forestry which can be found in the 
Untied States. Colorado Springs is 
located only three miles from the 
boundary of the Pi'<e National For- 
est. In addition to this great advan- 
tage, the location of the School in the 
West not only gives prospective for- 
esters from the East who contemplate 
positions on the National Forests op- 
portunity during their college years 
to become familiar with Western con- 
ditions of life but also gives Western 
young men opportunity to study For- 



THE TIGER 



5 



estry without undergoing the expense 
of .a long journey to the West. 

The tot£il enrollment of the Colo- 
rado School of Forestry this fall was 
thirty. Of the seventeen members of 
the entering class, several are from 
Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and oth- 
other Eastern States. The class of 
1910, which will be the first to grad- 
uate has four members. 



PROFESSOR STEWART SPEAKS 

Gives Interesting Talk on Photog- 
raphy. 



The Foresters' Club listened to a 
very pleasing and instructive talk on 
photography, by Professor Stewart, 
Tuesday evening. Professor Stewart 
is an authority on the subject and 
much benefit was derived by those 
who had the pleasu/e of being pres- 
ent, to hear him. 

Neeps, Daguerre and Porter were 
among the men who first became in- 
terested in photography and who did 
the most for its advancement. Da- 



guerre was tlie most successful and 
was the first to make the outlines of 
the image plain. 

Photography has made great strides 
since the time of these, men and is 
now almost an e.Kact science. In Da- 
guerre's time it took several minutes 
to make an exposure and the image 
had a strained, unnatural look. Now 
an exposure can be made in one two- 
thousandth of a second and the small- 
est changeof expression noted. 

.A.t the present time there are three 
kinds of cameras: the plate, roll film 
and the film pack. Each one has its 
advantages and disadvantages, but on 
the whole the film pack is the most 
convenient. The plate camera can be 
focused directly on the object, and the 
glass plates are much cheaper and 
easier to handle in developing. They 
are much heavier than the other 
kinds, howe-\'er, and the number of 
exposures is limited. A dark room 
must be used in loading, so that this 
class of camera is scarcely available 
for field work. 

The roll film camera is easilj' port- 
able, is small and can be loaded in 



broad daylight. The films are not so 
easily broken as the glass plates. 
This camera is good for all around 
work in spite of the fact that it costs 
and is more easy to operate than the 
plate camera. 

The film pack has most of the ad- 
vantages of both the other two and 
the same disadvantages as the roll 
film. One great advantage possessed 
by it is that individual films can be 
removed and developed before the 
whole pack is used. 

There are five steps in photogra- 
phy: focusing, exposing, developing, 
fixing and printing. Exposure seems 
to be the hardest for amateurs and 
causes more difficulty than all the rest 
combined. The chief cause of this is 
inaccurate judgment in regard to dis- 
tance and light conditions. Snap 
shots are safe only in bright light and 
should have from one-fiftieth to one- 
hundredth of a second exposure. 
Time exposures should be given from 
one-half to one-quarter of a second, 
and not ten or twelve seconds, as is 
popularly supposed. 




couwnunps' fMiil 



LIZZIE LftRMW pomroso 



THE TIGER 



The Weekly Newspaperof Colorado College 



GLENN W. SHAW Editor-in-Chief 

HARRY W. McOUAT Business Manager 

S. W. Dean Assistant Editor 

C. DON'ELAN Assistant Editor 

H. H. Haight Assistant Editor 

L. E. Griswold Engineering Editor 

B. P. S1DDON8 Athletic Editor 

H. F. Rice Forestry Editor 

Julia Ingersoll Alumni Editor 

Helen Canon Exchanse Editor 

Janet Kampf Local Editor 

W. L. Warnock Local Editor 

A. E. BrysON Assistant Manager 

E. W. Hille Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

Geneva McCaw, T. M. i^etligrcw, Edith Sommers, F. B. 

Copeland, Margaret Watson, E S Statten, 

Katharine True, U. L Sisco 

Students, Profc&SiTrs and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to TheTiGER. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 
College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

(T.'JiS^ S.oLts Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
^^^^^^^^ Springs, Colo., as second-class matter. 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



HURRAH FOR THE JUNIORS. 

When a precedent is started it be- 
hooves The Tiger to take notice and 
thank the originators. Last Tuesday 
evening the class of 1911 gave a very 
successful starter in a long line of 
junior operas which will amuse Colo- 
rado College in the years to come. 
Not only will they amuse Colorado 
College; they will add to college loy- 
alty and spirit and draw the students 
closer togethe ■. Every event which 
brings the student body together to 
see each other doing things or to do 
things in concert, adds to that abid- 
ing love of college of which rooting 
at football games is only one mani- 
festation. An original college opera, 
libretto and music done by students 
here, would be a very welcome loy- 
alty generator at this time. Some one 
get busy, or busier. But whether we 
get a college opera or not, we shall 
remain in the juniors' debt. 

ALL-COLLEGE PICNIC. 

It is time some action be taken by 
the student body toward an all-col- 
lege picnic on Washington's birthday. 
Last year plans were all completed 
for a big gala day in the Garden of 
•the Gods, plahs including a hare and 
hound race over the Mesa, a pennant 
hunt on the gateway rocks, a senior- 
faculty baseball game, speechmaking, 
etc. That would have been a joyful 



occasion if snow had not come and 
made us sell our ready provisions to 
the boarding houses. Snow may come 
at any time, but a committee should 
be appointed immediately to make 
representations to the weather man. 
The same committee should arrange 
to accommodate at least 400 students 
with food and amusement in the Gar- 
den of the Gods oil next Washing- 
ton's birthday. 

HOLIER THAN THOU. 

"Holier than thou" is the hack- 
neyed phrase which guilty consciences 
too often like to throw in the teeth 
of disagreeing rivals. Fellow stu- 
dents, our teeth have been assaulted. 
"Llolier than thou, holier than thou," 
cries the Silver and Gold, meaning 
that Coloradii College has set herself 
on a false pinacle and is frowning 
down on her sister institutions from 
the hole in a doughnut halo. Having 
other more important business, we 
will not enter deeply into the athletic 
liistory of the institution represented 
by the indignant Silver and Gold, but 
will and do hereby present to the uni- 
versity which is foreveir severing re- 
lations with those whom she cannot 
bully, this pastry halo of ours. We 
did not realize that we were wearing 
the thing; we do not deserve it. It 
is yours, Colorado; you alone of all 
us pennant hunters know how to 
grow righteously indignant and with- 
draw unto yourself whenever you find 
it conveniently virtuous to do so. 
And speaking of baby conduct, as 
your journal did, we can only see fit 
to say that when such a whining edi- 
torial on small-fry inconveniences 
appears in The Tiger, you have your 
cue to lie back in an easy chair and 
laugh immoderately. Whoever com- 
mits them, some such things can be 
justified always and some cannot, but 
they happen everywhere. Even Boul- 
der has not been entirely free of dis- 
courtesies committed by individuals 
and groups of considerable size. We 
refuse to enumerate because we de- 
spise the baby imputation. One of 
the first thing a small boy learns is to 
yell, "You did this and you did that 
and you think you're smart just be- 
cause your papa is so-and-so and 
you're teacher's pet." The sad thing 
is that similar driveling is the last 
thing some people can forget. We 
close and smile expectantly. 



whole creditably Out after the rest of 
it , studies and all! Lay on, Alac- 
Bluff! 



To stipport a game team is exhila- 
rating. We were happy enough 
Thanksgiving to make our return 
from Denver to Colorado Springs one 
long joy ride. 



The evening papers seem to have 
beat Lennox to an announcement. 
Congratulations, Bill, and the same to 
you, ^liss Buchtel. 



A glee club that has to be begged to 
have a finished concert ready on time, 
is not an ideal glee club. That's as 
easy as we can say it. 



What is there against holding a big 
meeting once each month that might 
be called "College Night?" Talent 
and ideas would come out with the 
crowd. 



Who mentioned that gymnasium 
last? The fioor is open to somebody 
again. 



If you have ever seen a bird dart 
after a butterfly in midair, you can 
imagine Heald's tackles in Thurs- 
day's game. 



Again those bids have got 'em 
guessing. "Drink Minerva, 5c," says 
the sign, but the bets are running 
higher than that. 



SIi mips were on everybody's 
tongue Wednesday. It's martyrdom 
to pass up such a chance for a pun 
as that name offers, but we do it. 



Seniors have been having all the fun 
they could this week. Apace steals 
on the sable stole. 



Because the staff was too busy be- 
ing thankful, this week's Tiger is out 
a dav late. 



Before the next issue of The Tiger 
is out the new calendars will be here. 
Of curose theer had to be a few 
hitches which have delayed delivery, 
but that is all to make us appreciate 
them the more when they get here. 
They will be here in a very few days. 



The football season has closed: the 
first semester is little more than half 
over. We have finished a part of the 



The freshmen and sophomores at 
Washburn had a rope scrap this year. 
1 he sophomores won by tying up the 
greater uuniher of men. 



THE TIGER 



A SAMPLE LETTER. 



.DELEGATES .CHOSEN. 



"PERSONALITY." 



Dean Parsons is in receipt of many 
letters like the following: 

Steamboat Springs, Colo., 

Nov. 21, 1909. 
Dear Air. Parsons: 

Through the "Tig r" and by reading 
various newspapers, I think I am fair- 
ly conversant with the p:'esent ath- 
letic situation in Colorado College. I 
am writing this letter to say to you 
personally that I was never more 
proud of my college and those who 
direct it than I have been in watching 
the stand she has taken during the 
trying times of. the past few weeks. 
Certainly no one athletic victory or 
season of victories could have made 
up for any different kind of action in 
the Athletic Council. 
I am sincerely, 

Your friend, 

Kent O. Mitchell. 



Colorado College to be Represented 
at Rochester Convention. 



ALPHA TAUS PLAN A HOME IN 
THE HILLS. 



The Alpha Tau Delta Fraternity has 
completed plans for its club house on 
Cheyenne Mountain, and expects to 
finish the worK soon after the 'first of 
the year. The building will be in the 
nature of a bungalow. The main room 
will be large with a floor suitable for 
dancing; the whole structure will be 
rustic in character, with a wide ver- 
anda running entirely around it, and 
will be equipped with fireplaces, rustic 
seats, etc. 

The location is one of the most 
beautiful about Colorado Springs, be- 
ing near Dr. McKay's cabin and only 
a mile and a half from the Casino car 
line. 



FRENCH CLUB DOING WORK 
IN DIALOGUE. 

The French Club is this year begin- 
ning early to prepare for its annual play. 
The programs have heretofore been of a 
general nature, but this year the club is 
taking up work in the dialogue. Short 
scenes, in which the different characters 
are taken by members of the club, are 
presented at each meeting. In this way 
valuable e.xperience will be gained which 
will be a great help in presenting the an- 
nual play in the spring. 



Oxford University, England, which 
has been an institution for men alone for 
a thousanrl years, will admit women 
hereafter. 



The Rochester convention com- 
mittee has sent in registration fees 
for the following delegates; Miss 
Anna Strang, Miss Elsie Greene, G. 
W. Shaw, E. T. Heald, C. R. Black- 
man, Professor Gile, and Calvin Brice 
of the Academy. 

This convention promises to be one 
of the .greatest events in the exten- 
sion of Christianity that has occurred 
in modern history. The last such con- 
vention at Nashville four years ago 
started the Lajmien's Missionary 
Movement, the Church Federation 
Movement, the new impetus to the 
Young People's Missionary Move- 
ment. All these new movements will 
contribute t<i this year's convention. 
But most important is the awakening 
i)f foreign lands to western civiliza- 
tion and Christian ideals. There ne^-- 
er was such an opportunity before the 
missionary movement; 3,500 college 
students will be brought together to 
learn the facts from men who have 
been at the front and take these facts 
and what they mean back to their in- 
stitutions. 

Other colleges in this state are pre- 
paring to send their full delegations. 
Boulder will send ten, the Agricultnr- 
. al College, four, and the School of 
Mines and Denver University will be 
represented. Plans are being made to 
run a special car from Denver through 
to Rochester if enough of the dele- 
gates can start at that time, right aft- 
er Christmas. 

Applications have been sent in for 
extra delegates from Colorado Col- 
lege, and these will be voted on De- 
cember rst. .Some of the delegates 
are paying their own way. For the 
others about half of the money nec- 
essarj' has been raised. No gencal 
canvass of the student body will be 
made owing to the previous demands 
that have been made for various ob- 
jects, but any parties who wish to 
have a sha.e in sending the delegates 
can see Secretary Heald about it. 

The convention will not only be of 
great value to the college but also to 
the city of Colorado Springs. One 
delegate will make a specialty of get- 
ting material for the benefit of the 
churches and the Christian Endeavor 
societies, and plans are being made 
for a union mass meeting of all young 
peoples' societies after the con\-en- 
tion, at which the delegates will make 
reports. 



Phil. Gillett Delivers Forceful Chapel 
Talk. 

It is very gratifying to listen to a 
speaker who has borne out in his own 
actions the ideas which he wishes to 
commend to you. This was our pleasure 
last Friday when Philip Gillette, C. C. 
alumnus now in the Y. M. C. A. work 
in Korea, addressed the students at 
chapel 

In substance Mr. Gillette said that 
hero-worship is a predominating influ- 
ence in the lives of all men, because it 
is one of the great factors in the forma- 
tion or acquisition of a personality. 
This acquiring of a personality, he 
said, is the object for which men and 
women come to college. To gain 
this object there must be some ideal, 
especially loyalty to the right; action, 
which follows out the ideals of the 
mind; a riddance of any habits or 
practices which are det:-iniental to the 
formation of a personality; freedom 
from superstitution, which crowds 
down the development of manhood 
and consequently of personality; 
strong motives in life; and lastly, but 
greatest of all, sacrifice. He illustra- 
ted these various essentials with ex- 
amples from his own work among the 
Ko:-eans, telling of the inaction and 
aversion to work or exercise which ex- 
ists in that far Eastern land, and of 
what the Y. M. C. A. work is doing 
for the people by changing their 
ideas in regard to physical exercise. 
"We must live at the top notch of 
physical ability to think the best 
thoughts and do the best things." 
said he, and it is along this line large- 
ly that the Y. M. C. A. is working to 
help the young men of Korea. But 
the physical is only one side of the 
matter, and a man must come to the 
highest conception, fo:- in Jesus, the 
Man and the Eternal Son of God, all 
of the qualities which go to make up 
this conception are found. 



GREAT SUCCESS 

Continued from Page 1. 

that won him much praise from the 
lovers of good music present. 

Elsie Green as ".\unty Crab" made 
quite a hit with the audience, while 
no one failed to admire Gertrude .A.sh- 
ley as Donna Pomposo. 

Ve.sta Tucker as "Bonnie" was eas- 
ily the star of the evening. Her act- 
ing was charmingly natural and he- 
rendition of her several songs was 
excellent. 

The work of the cho us was ex- 



THE TIGER 



tremely good. When we consider the 
short time in which the play was 
staged and the few practices the cho- 
rus has had, their work Tuesday night 
was a great credit to them. 

Taken all in all the play was a great 
success, financially, artistically and 
socially. It set a precedent — and a 
good one — and hereafter we can look 
forward to a junior "stunt" every 
year. 

Of course this play is only a starter. 
After seeing the excellent acting in 
"Princess Bonnie," it is interesting to 
speculate what Colorado College 
might do in the way of co-educational 
dramatics. 

The junior class is greatly indebted 
to Miss Shuler, who coached the pro- 
duction, and to Miss Rheinhardt and 
Mr. Motten who assisted. 

The cast and musical numbers fol- 
low: 

Cast of Characters. 
Shrimps, champion canoeist and the 
A'illage "Jack of all Trades," in 

love with Kitty Earl Hille 

Captain Tarpaulin, of the fishing 
smack "Nancy," and keeper of 
the Light-House ...Bruce Weirick 
Roy Stirling, a follower of Izaak 
Walton, in love with Bonnie, 

Thomas Kirkpatrick 
Admiral Pomposo, a Spanish 
Grandee with a hobby for 
collecting rare antiquities, 

Harry Larson 
Count Castinetti Marionetti Flage- 
oletti, an Italian nobleman, be- 
throtbed to Bonnie in infancy, 

Ralph Rice 
Salvador, body guard to Admiral 

Pomposo Wilkie Dean 

Lieutenant Fusee, a Spanish officer, 

Leonard Van Stone 
Surf, Shrimps' best friend, 

Ernest Fowler 
Kitty Clover, captain of the Canoe 
Club, and the belle of the village, 

Winifred Shuler 
Susan Crabbe Tarpaulin, Tarpau- 
lin's sister, commonly called 
"Auntie Crab," assistant keeper 

of the light Elsie Green 

Donna Pomposo, wife of Admiral 

Pomposo Gertrude Ashley 

Bonnie, the Princess Bonnabellavita, 
daughter of Captain Tarpaulin, 
and niece of Admiral Pomposo, 

\'csta Tucker 
Spanish Dancers: Persis Kidder, Dor- 
othy Frantz, Matt Draper, Louise 
Malcolm, Clara Wight, Bella Glau, 
Spanish Students: Alfred Hesle:', 
Leonard Van Stone, Earl Bryson, 
Ernest Fowler. 



Chorus of Canoeists, Spanish Peas- 
ants, Soldiers: Misses Bay, Alex- 
ander, Bartlett, Canon, Draper, 
Douglas, Frantz, Duer, Harris, Has- 
sell, Kidder, Glau, Kramer, Mal- 
colm, McMorris, McLain, Pike, 
Parsons, Summers, Wilson, Wight 
and Woodard; Messers. Bryson, 
Fuller, Flesler, Haight, Hill, Hay- 
ward, Marsh, Schneider, F. H. Rice, 
Shapcott, Steele, Greenlee, Argo, 
Greenlee, and Van Dyke. 
Act I. 
Overture. 

1 Opening Chorus, "Fair-Weather 

Sailors Are We." 

2 "Listen Well.'' Auntie Crab, Kit- 

ty and Chorus. 

3 "Once Upon a Time." Kitty, 

Bonnie, Auntie Crab, Captain 
Tarpaulin and Chorus. 

4 "Slumber So Gently." Bonnie and 

Chorus. 

5 Duet. "Love is Like a Dainty 

Flower." Bonnie and Chorus. 

6 "My Bark Canoe." Shrimps, Kit- 

ty and Chorus. 

7 "I Told You So." Shrimps, Cap- 

tain Tarpaulin and Kitty. 

8 "Never, Never, Fall in Love." 

Auntie Crab and Chorus. 

9 "Did You Hear What She Was 

Saying?" Bonnie and Chorus. 

10 "Dreaming of Love." Bonnie and 

Chorus. 

11 "Now, Did You Konw? Have You 

Heard?" Auntie Crab, Captain 
Tarpaulin and Chorus. 

12 "Bonnie, My Queen." Roy. 

13 "You Never Lose a Little Fish." 

Ro3s Shrimps and Men's Cho- 
rus. 

14 "Ah! My Heart With Fear is 

Rending." 

15 "Merry, Merry, Maids of Spain." 

16 "Those Happy Days." 

17 March. Chorus. 

18 Finale. "Fortunes Ove.'whelri 

Me;" "America, I Love Thee." 
Chorus. 

Act II. 

1 "Merry, Merry Maids of Spain." 

Chorus and Dance. 

2 "I am the Great Pomposo." Ad- 
» miral Pomposo, Donna and 

Chorus. 

3 Duet, "Lovely Bonnabellavita.'' 

Bonnie and Count Falsetti. 

4 "Whisper Words of Love." Kitty 

and Spanish Students. 

5 Barn Dance. 

6 "I'm Just a Little Indian, Nothing 

More." 

7 "Come, Hurry Up!" "Ha! Ha! 

You Are Too Late." 

8 Duet, ".A. Summer Givl's Love." 



Kitty and Shrimps. 
9 "He Came Right Up." Chorus. 
10 Finiale, "Thrice Happy the Woo- 
ing." Ensemble. 



CAPS AND GOWNS 

Continued from Page 1. 

procession by marching into chapel 
first and standing on either side of 
the center aisle, there to await the 
i;assing of the faculty and the seniors. 
The faculty take places on tthe ros- 
trum and the seniors occupy the reg- 
ular section assigned to them. As 
soon as the procession enters the aud- 
itorium the student body rises and re- 
mains standing until the faculty and 
seniors are seated. The exercises are 
short and effective. President Slo- 
cum makes an address, usually em- 
phasizing the right of honor to whom 
honor is due. 

This is one of the traditions in C. 
C. that was started several years ago. 
The purpose was to give some formal 
recognition of honor to those who 
have by sacrifice and diligent study 
reached a certain mark. Our sister 
institutions in the east put more em- 
phasis on class distinction than we do 
in the west, where the spirit of de- 
mocracy is cultivated almost to a 
fault. 

Those who originated Insignia Day 
intended to make it a kind of incent- 
ive for those in lowe;- classes to strive 
on to a place worthy of recognition, 
and also to show to outsiders that ed- 
ucation brings with it the quality of 
justifiable honor. 

In the evening the senior class en- 
tertains the juniors. At this Insignia 
party the juniors present each mem- 
ber of the senior class with a picture 
of President Slocum. This is also a 
time when old class feuds cease and 
the hatchet is buried. 

Carl Blackman, Miss M. Caw, Miss 
Thacher, Miss Seigfried, Miss Huse, 
T.' M. Pettigrew and L. Pollock are 
the committee arranging for the In- 
signia party in Bemis Hall, Decembe ■ 
I. The junior class are getting their 
heads together to show 'their origi- 
nality in the part they have to do. 



The University' of Pennsylvania 
has a larger number of foreigners en- 
rolled than any other American uni- 
versity. 



The student council of the Unix-er- 
sity of Michigan has decreed that all 
freshmen must wear the official cap. 



THE TIGER 



DEAN PARSONS NOMINATED. 

Will Probably Be President of Win- 
ter Nights Club. 

Dean Parsons' name has been plac- 
ed in nomination for the presidency 
of the Winter Nights Club by a nom- 
inating committee of that organiza- 
tion. The club is composed of 225 of 
the leading men of the town. Its 
popularity is shown by the large num- 
ber of names always upon the wait- 
ing list. It holds a dinner once each 
month during the winter. The club 
was founded by Professor Urdahl, 
formerly an instructor in the college. 



EX-STUDENT RETURNS. 



HAGERMAN HALL 



OPEN HOUSE 



GET RICH. 



The following article has appeared 
on the bulletin board: 
Gotta 
FUNNY STREAK 
in you? 
Wanta convert it into a 
? PAY STREAK? ? 

The Annual Board wants jokes, 
humorous write-ups of events, humor- 
ous poems, humorous short stories, 
humorous d.awings, in fact, 

ANYTHING FUNNY. 
Material should bear directly on 
college life, preferably on our own 
college life. Short productions pre- 
ferred. 

PRIZES 
For the most humorous contribu- 
tion along any of these lines; the fol- 
lowing prizes are offered: 

First $5.00 

Second $3.00 

Third An Annual 

Hand contributions to any of the 
following: 

Miss Frantz, Miss Tucker, Miss 
Kidder, or to Argo, Donelan, Weirick 
or Bryson. 



COLLEGE THANKSGIVING 
SERVICE. 

A Thanksgiving service for college 
people was held in Bemis common 
room on Thursday morning. Dean 
Parsons conducted the meeting. 



MULTIGRAPH PURCHASED BY 
COLLEGE. 

The college has recently purchased 
a Gainmeter Multigraph with which to 
print examination questions or simi- 
lar papers whe e many copies are de- 
sired. Its cost was about $300. 



A. L. Barnlay in Town With Show. 

Mr. Arthur L. Barnlay, manager of 
the show, '"Fifty Miles from Boston," 
which appeared at the Opera House 
Monday night, was one time a stu- 
dent of tlie college. He was here 
when Cutler Academy and Colorado 
College were the same institution and 
when military uniforms were worn by 
all the men and bovs. 



RECEPTION TO MR. RANNEY. 

A reception for Mr. Ranney, the 
new pastor of the First Congrega- 
rional Church, will be held on Tues- 
day evening, November 30, in the 
rooms of the church. Alan}' college 
people will be present. 



TO TENNIS PLAYERS. 

The Tennis association has posted 
Ihe following notice: 

"You cannot sign for courts before 
breakfast or between 5 and 6." 

"When your time is up, be polite 
enough to give up the court to those 
who have signed for it. Don't wait 
for them to ask." 

The last part of this notice should 
be unnecessary. 



"THE DESIRE OF THE HEART." 



E. T. Crockett, Pueblo business man, 
spoke at the regular Friday evening 
meeting of the Y. M. C. A. last night. 

Fie said : "We may expect a multi- 
tude of desires, all influencing our lives 
more or less, and warring with each oth- 
er, but as in logic there must alwa3s be 
the major promise, so in life's weavings 
with its minor plots there must ever be 
the major pattern. And if one's desires 
are to so subtly shape our destiny, it be- 
hooves that early endeavor be made to 
clearly classify them." 

In closing, he said: "Should we have 
desires? Yes. Desires of joy? Yes, 
for God's nature ever sings with joy. 
Desires of success? Yes, for he sh.all be 
like a tree planted by the river of waters, 
his leaf shall not wither, and whatsoever 
he doeth shall prosper. Desires of help- 
fulness? Yes, in honor preferring one 
another. Desires in all things that ever 
1)ring deeper, wider visions of soul" 

(Overheard in one of the Halls.) 
"Have you seen the pictures for the 
new calendar? Say, but they're all 
right!" 



Hagerman ' Flail will hold "open 
house" Saturday night, November 27, 
from eight to ten o'clock. Last year 
the Hall observed this form of enter- 
tainment for the first time in its his- 
tory, and as a result of interest shown 
in it, the event will be made an an- 
nual aft'air. The time is not the most 
favorable this year, coming as it does 
when many of the students will be at 
home for the Thanksgiving holiday, 
but all who are in the city then are 
cordially invited to come over and 
get acquainted and enjoy refresh- 
ments. 



Those who have been permitted a 
glimpse of the cover proof and sam- 
ple pages for the new calendar are 
anxious to see mcire, and we're all 
getting curious. 



"COMMENCEMENT DAYS." 



"Commencement Days," with a cast 
both icng and strong, a production 
declared to be remarkably handsome, 
comes to the Opera House next Mon- 
day under the management of John 
Cort. 'Commenceemnt Days" is writ- 
ten around the types oud trials of a 
woman's crllege of today. The char- 
acters are described as of striking 
fidelity to the originals and the story 
unfolded is one of constant interest. 
The play, already widely popular, 
comes to this city under very favora- 
ble circumstances, and local concern 
in the engagement is naturally keen. 
The cast, numbering more than fifty 
people, will include Frederick W. 
Bowers, Grace Hopkins, Willa.d 
Louis, FI. A. Mo ey. Amy Dale, Leila 
Smith. Catl.erine Carter, Elizabeth 
\'ari Siell, "Tip" Smith and E. F. 
O'Connor. There are thirty girls in 
the company. 




'^ e^^^m^A 



There is nothing that makes a |^ 

more acceptable Christmas pift :- ^ 

■ — ^ — - M 

than a piece of good Jewelry. ^S 

^ — 'i^ 

That kirtd 's to be had of The Sp 

JOH NSON J EWELRY M 

CO. , 26 E. Pike 's Peak A ve. g 
Expert Repairing 





10 



THE TIGER 



Full Dress and Tuxedo Suits Made by 
Alfred Benjamin & Co., and 
Society Brand 

Odd taste demands that when roe mingle in the society of Well-bred 
people, we must be correctly and becomingly garbed. There is no 
place these da\)s for the careless fellow who neglects his formal 
attire, and discerning men and women are slow to bestow their favor 
upon him. 

Tuxedo Suits at $35 and up — A If red Benjamin & Co. maJ^e. 
Full Dress Suits, $35 and up. 



^^ 



THBWUB 



Fairyland Theatre 

High-class Vaudeville and Latest Moving 

Pictures, Entire Change of Program 

Mondays and Thursdays 



DAN TRACY. Manager 



THE CENTRAL FUEL CO. 

R. M. AITKEN Manager 

All Best Grades of Fuel. Patterson Lump the 

Best Furnace Fuel 

"Rvery Lump a Lump of Heat" 

Prompt Delivery 

Two Phones 1101 128 N. Tejon Street 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co. 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 

Patronize 
TIGER Advertisers 

Snappy, Swa^gy 
Clothes 

AT 

THE MAY CO. 

Clever 
Haberdashers 



ENGINEERING REFERENCES 

Building of a Ball-bearing Type- 
writer. — American Machinist, Novem- 
ber II, 1909. 

The Influence of Speed on the Cut- 
ting Action when Turning. — Ibid. 

The First Cross-island Electric Line 
on Long Island. — Electrical Railway 
Journal, November 13, 1909. 

Electrical Notes from Great Brit- 
ain. — Electrician, Novembe/ 13, 1909. 

An Oil Engine Central Station. — 
Electrical World, November 11, 1909. 

Annual Report of the El Ore Min- 
ing Company. — Enginee.ing and Min- 
ing Journal, November 6, 1909. 

The Stanley Lake Dam Near Den- 
ver. — Engineering Record, November 
13, 1909. 

Making Smokeless Fuel from West- 
ern Coal. — Mining World, November 
13, 1909. 

River Protection Work on the Kan- 
sas City Southern Ry., Near Braden, 
Okla. — Railroad and Engineering Re- 
view, November 13^ 1909. 

The Oxyhydric Process of Cutting 
and Welding Metals. — The Iron Age, 
November 11, 1909. 

Nature's 1500-ton Plant for Crushing 
Dredge Tailings. — Mining and Scien- 
tific Press, November 6, 1909. 

Copper Mining at Ely, Nevada. — 
Mining Science, November 11, 1909. 

Signalling to Mars. — Technical 
Wo: Id, December, 1909. 

Notes on Coming System in North- 
ern Iron Mines. — The Engineering and 
Mining Journal, November 13, 1909 



EXCHANGES. 

New York University upperclassmen 
recently gave the freshmen their annual 
ducking in the»"Fountain of Knowledge," 
as the little pond near the college has 
been termed. The "freshies" were co."- 
ralled early in the evening and made to 
get into their pajamas and in the center 
of a large throng of upperclassmen were 
escorted to the "fount." Each freshman 
was given a "stunt"' to perform and if 
he refused or .was unable to satisfy the 
judges, he was plunged into the icy 
water. 1 he scene was witnessed by a 
large number of people from an amphi- 
theatre which had been built around the 
pool. 



Self-government for the men has 
been instituted at Pomona College. 



Beloit is agitating an inter-collegi- 
ate v/resiling tournament. 



The Wesleyan University has insti- 
tuted a Cosmopolitan club. 



"Our Colorado" 
"Bruin Inn" 

"BlackandGold" 



The Three Songs of Colorado 

College — in Sheet Form 

for 40c. Buy Them of 

E. W. HILLE 



Clever Clothes 

FOR 

College Chaps 

AT 

ROBBINS 

ON THE CORNER 



THE TIGER 



11 




Nothing is "Niftier" 



Cigar Store 



than a good Briar Pipe with two "C's" inlaid in silver. We 
have the good briar pipes with the two "C's" inlaid in every 
conceivable style. Come in and talk football and look at 
pipes 

Harry 1 C3 Hughes 



IS MADE WITH 

_ [r[L[L[037U?^mELD /SE©. 

JK word to the wise is si^ficient ' 

,^^-77. CLARK 

GaCBp"^ engraving CO. 

ILLU5TRATORS PUEBLO. 



DESIGNERS 



COLO. 



ENGRAVERS 



Gel Your Picnic Supplies 

AT ^= 

SOMMERS' MARKET 



113 S. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 114 



The Favorite Resort of the Col- 
lege Students, Renowned in 
Story and Song 

BRUIN INN 

Up North Cheyenne Canon 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRISKER, Mgr. 



Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Patronize TIGER 
Advertisers 

UNION ICE AND COAL CO. 

W. M. BANNING, Proprietor 

Artificial Ice and Cold Storage 

Dealers in All Kinds of Coal and Pinion Wood 
Yard Office, 105 W.Vermiio City Office, 5 N. Tejon 



In the- game with Lamar last Sat- 
urday, the Terrors again proved that 
they are the scrappiest and hardest 
players in this section of the state. 
Although outweighed 25 pounds to a 
man and playing on a muddy field 
where weight means an advantage, 
they steamed up and played their 
best game this season. 

Every man on the team was a star. 
Kenipf at quarter ran the team like a 
veteran and made some b'illiant re- 
turns of punts; Cheese, Morris, Bresse, 
Moore. St. John, and Ady made them- 
selves conspicuous by their hard play- 
ing. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Miss Helen Clarke died in Pueblo, 
last Thursday, from the effects of an 
operation for appendicitis. Her death 
came as a great shock to her college 
freinds, as she visited here onlj^ two 
weeks ago and seemed in perfect 
health. Miss Clarke was a member of 
the class of 1908, a member of the 
Minerva Society and the permanent 
vice-president of her class, and was 
interested in many college activities 
during her course. 



H. Harootunian '09 is instructor in 
Mathematicsi at the University of 
Colorado. 



Miss Emily Palmer '06 is teaching 
mathematics in the High School at 
Salem, Ore. 



In the October number of the "Am- 
erican Journal of the Medical Sci- 
ences," Carl A. Hedblom '07 and Wal- 
ter B. Cannon of Harvard, have pub- 
lished a paper on "Some Conditions 
Affecting the Discharge of Food from 
the Stomach." This article is the re- 
sult of Mr. Hedblom's research work 



Maier's Lunch & Dining Room 

Lunches of All Kinds 



Regular Meals 20c and 25c 

216' 2 N. Tejon St. Opposite North Park 



Patronize 

TIGER 

Advertisers 



College 

Pennants 

New line of Pennants just received 
—they are very attractive, and the 
prices about a third lower than 
ever before. 

Our Celebrated College Posters are 
now only 25 or 50 cents 
each, mounted 




Whitney and Grimwood 

No. 20 North Tejon Street 



12 



THE T 1 G E K 



0. E. Hemenway 



Groceries and 



Meats 






-^^ 




115 South Tejon Street 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



YOU don't entertain your 
guests to save money — 
if you did, the simplest 
way would be to forego en- 
tertaining them. 
tffMuETH's may cost more, 
but — 

<lE.Mueth^s 

CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 



5 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



The Colorado Springs Floral Co. 

Wish to Have Your Business at Right 
Prices 



Telephone Main 599 



104 N. Tejon St. 



for the last two years, much of which 
which was done by means of the X- 
rays and it has been very favorably 
commented upon. 



Eugene Preston ex-'io is recover- 
ing from an attack of diphtheria in a 
hospital in Denver. 



G. W. Smith 'o8 has a position in 
the Bending and Security Coinpany 
of Denver. 



Miss Eleanor Pease '07 is principal 
of the Georgetown High School. 



James McCltintock '07 visited here 
Wednesday. 



II Local Department || 



Adeline Weeks spent Thanksgiving 
with Elsie Connell in Denver. 



The I\Iisses Greene, Duer, and 
Thomas spent Thanksgiving at home. 

Emma Wheeler came down from 
Denver for "Princess Bonnie." 

I\Iiss Freeman was the guest of 
Miss Hall at dinner Sunday. 

The Young Women's Christian As- 
sociation is to have a candy pull on 
Thursday afternoon, for the girls who 
remain in the halls over Thanksgiv- 
ing. 

Tlie in\-itations for Minerva's func- 
tion December 9, have been issued. 

J\Iiss Dorothy Hnkley, accompa- 
nied by her sister, furnished enjoyable 
music on the violin at coffee, Sunday. 

You will be treated right and your 
order for ice cream or catering will 
be appreciated by Noble, phone i\Iain 
920. 

A large number of hall girls went 
to Denver over Thanksgiving. 

The Philosophical Review, publish- 
ed daily by Philosophy C, has receiv- 



A. G. SPALDING a BROS. 



The . 

SPALDING 
Trade -Mark 




•'is. PAT. 



is known throughout 
the world as a 

Guarantee of 
Quality 



are the Largest 
Manufacturers 
in the World of 

Official 

Equipment 

For All 
Athletic 
Sports and 
Pastimes 

If You =»'^'^'"f" 
** * "" ested in 

Athletic Sport you 
should have a copy 
of the Spalding 
Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyclo- 
pedia of what's new 
in Sport and is sent 
free on request. 

A. G. Spalding & Bros. 

1616 Arapohoe St., Denver, Colo. 

JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

I Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Waiting's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Stree 

Fraternities, Clubs, Individuals 
desiring Milk or Cream 
in any quantities 
should remem- 
ber :: :: 



The Sinton- Rustic Home 

No. 419 South EI Paso St. 
Phone Main 442 



Dairy 



The College Photo Studio 

The Highest Class of 

Photographs 




Bingham 

18 S. Tejon St. Phone M-678 



DOUGLAS & 
HETHERINGTON 



Architects 



Telephone 5S6 Rooms 1 S and 16 Out West Buildinii. 

COLORADO SPRINGS. COLO. 



T tl E T 1(.- K R 



13 



Memory 
Books 

Bound in colors, black and 
and orange, and lettered on 
side. The only really Colo- 
rado College Scrap Book 
made. Lar^e enough to con- 
tain your four years' items. 

Price, $1.23 each 



The Out West 

Printing & Stationery Co. 
9-11 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 



At Moderate 
Prices 



Furniture 



Special Terms to Students 

McCracken & Hubbard 

120 and 122 South Tejon Street 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

15 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

Are Always Well Pleased When They 
Get Their Hair Cut at 

Campbell's Barber Shop 

12 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 

High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



'as cade Laundry 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 

20 per cent, discount 

To All Students of College and Academy 



ed volume -;5. 
snappy news. 



].(ii.)k here for brieht. 



\'irginia Parker, Mozelle Anderson, 
Griffith, Reba Hood, Melicent Camp- 
bell ;Mid Shaw g•a^•e seminars in Phi- 
losLiphy C, Wednesday. 



7 E. Bijou 



Phone 820 



Anne Strang is taking an anabases 
class in Cutler Academy until Christ- 
mas. 

The German Club meets in Tick- 
nor Study next Thursday evening. 

Elsie Greene's mother came down 
from Denver for "Princess Bonnie." 

.Mr. Gillett spoke on oriental edu- 
cation Wednesday afternon in Palmer 
Hall. 

Mrs. McClain made a sho t visit at 
the college last week. 

Miss Brown entertained Mrs. Mc- 
Clain and the Y. W. C. A. cabinet at 
tea, Saturday. 

.A. few of the senior girls had a 
fudge party Monday evening. 

Harriet Spencer entertained at a 
"coffee" for Miss Zella Warnock one 
dav this week. 



Ma le Forhan left Wednesday for 
Denver, where she spent Thanksgiv- 
ing with her friend, Miss Nola Grass. 

Bert Siddons left Wednesday for 
Denver. From there he goes to ar- 
range the Glee Club trip, 

Mr. Sylvester spent Thanksgiving 
at his home in Monte Vista. 



Aliss Dorothy Hinckley visited her 
sister Helen this last week. 



Professor Cajori was a guest at the 
Sigma Chi fraternity Tuesday noon. 

McOuat and Fowler were in Den- 
ver last Saturday. 

Warnock is sepnding the week-end 
at his home in Loveland. 



Oh! you lucky "Morley," 



Coach John R. Richards was at the 
D. U. -Nebraska game Saturday. 

Professor Parks and McOuat were 
in Denver Tuesday and Wednesday. 



Hunt Up 

Bissell's Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
Flour, Fepd, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



C. F. Arcularius & 
Company 

A Large Assortment of 

BELT PINS 

All the Latest Styles 

9 South Tejon Street 
COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 



We have Embossing Dies for Stationery •£ all the 
College Societies and Fraternities, also the Great 
Seal of the College. We carry in stock a large 
line of papers upon which to emboss these Dies — 
Hurd's, Crane's and others. 



Gowdy-Simmons Ptg Co. W^T 



St. 
187 



Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Burgess Candy 

There's nothing too good for the 
College girls — that's why we sell 
them candy. But we've noticed the 
girls themselves dont always do the 
buying. When a box of candy bears 
the Burgess stamp, you knOw it is 
never stale or shelf worn, but packed 
to your order from the freshest, pur- 
est, richest goods that our expert 
candy-makers can produce from day 
to day. 

W. N. Burgess ■^5o."srr." 



u 



THE T I G E K 



This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 

Company 




Headquarters for 

College Footwear 



The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

FOUNDERS AND MACHINISTS 



College 
Inn 



y^ Short 
// Orders 



**Coine in, the Cider's 
Fine" 

THE 

Crissey & Fowler 
Lumber Co. 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 

Our Special Extra-Clean 

Lignite 
Furnace Lump 

The Colorado Springs Fuel Co., 
112 Pike's Peak Avenue. Two 
Phones Main 230 

Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 
A. S. BLAKE 



Is 


the 


Man 


to 


See 




107 North Te 


jon 






Phone 


465 


Nickle Ware 










Cutlery 



Mr. George Cunningham, a gradu- 
ate of jMonmouth College 'o8 visited 
friends on the campus this week. 



Acker is spending the week-end at 
Canon City. 



Miss Eames and Miss Yerkes went 
to their homes in Denver Wednesday. 



Alpha Tau Delta seniors entertain- 
ed at dinner Saturday evening. 



Miss Lewis visited with her sister 
over Thanksgiving. 



Mr. Harry Black ex-'ii was a visit- 
or on the campus last week. 

James Hopkins ex-'i2 is visiting at 
the Alpha Tau Delta house. He ex- 
pects to enter school next semeste/. 

Miss Dorothy Hinkley visited her 
sistei- this week. 

Elmer Huleatt '13 left Wednesday 
for his home in Loveland, Colo. He 
will return the first of the week. 



Beth Hamilton entertained some of 
the freshman girls at supper Sunday 
evening. 



Larry Smith ex-'i2 was up for the 
Kappa Sigma dance and remained in 
town until Thanksgiving. 



Charleen Cover left Sunday night 
for her home in Rocky Ford. 

Whipple, Winchell. Phillips and 
Martha Phillips went home for 
Thanksgiving. 



Agnes Lennox entertained inform- 
ally Friday evening. 

Insignia Day will be on December 
I, next Wednesday. 



The subject of the sophomore pray- 
er meting for next Sunday is "The 
duty of cheerfulness." Mr. Shelton 
will lead. 



ACADEMY 



(Amy L. Busch, Correspondent.) 



JUNIOR CLASS PARTY. 

A junior class party v\'as held at the 
home of Miss Dorothy Woods, 1806 



I 



1^ l lTI rn 



n ii li 

\afe7 



N order to dispose 
of our :: :: :: 

Foot Ball 



lllM Muffs 






before the end of the season 
we are offering them at actual 
cost, viz. 




MURRAY'S 



William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 



MEMBERS 



S New York Stock Exchange 

f Colorado Springs Mining Stock Exchange 



High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 




he Waterman Press 

at 112 E. Cucharras 
are Specialists in Fine 
Printing, and solicit 



the patronage of the most ex- 
acting for anything that can 
be done in a decent print shop 
No matter how particular you 
are, we are here to make good 



We Print THE TIGER 



THE TIGER 



15 



N. Cascade avenue, last Saturday 
night. About twenty' membe.s of the 
class were p esent. The evening was 
spent in having a geenral good time 
and the most exciting feature was the 
chasing of the ice cream robbers. 

Calvin Brice has been elected as 
Cutler's representative to the Student 
^^olnnteer convention which is to be 
held at Rochester, N. Y., December 
29 to January 2, 1910. 



The football team was shot (with a 
camca) last Monday. 

Emmet Varvel will syend Thanks- 
giving holiday at his heme in G■eele3^ 
Colo. 

THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 

GIDDINGS BROS. 

Colorado Springs 

THE SPECIALTY STORE 

A Hearty Welcome Constantly Awaits All Visito s 

College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barber 
wrork and baths 



106(2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 




AUNDf?Y 



Why not have the BEST WORK ? 



20 per cent, discount 

To afl Students of College and Academy 



J. J. WILSON, College Agent 

W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



119 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



/^. 



Sweater Coats, Muff- 
lers, Leather Goods, 
Fur GUves, House 
Coats, Bath Robes 

GORTON'S 



Visit Our Young 
Men^s Store 



^=^ 



The special models we show are selected for young men 
exclusively; fabrics chosen for young men; fashions that please 
young men. Coals with long lapels, form-fitted backs, broad 
shoulders, peg top trousers. 

Young men's overcoats in the latest models and colors* 

Suits and overcoats, $25 to $15. 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 




%= 



\ Correct Dress for Men. \ 



nS E. Pike's Peak 
Avenue 



J 



The Y. M. C. A. committee which 
was appointed last week, held a meet- 
ing Monday and drew up a constitu- 
tion subject to the approval of the 
other members. 



The Philo Literary Society will in- 
itiate its new pledges next week. No 
meeting will be held by the society 
this week. 



Miss Katrina Brewster, daughter of 
Bishop Brewster, formerly pastor of 
Grace Episcopal Church, is a new stu- 
dent at Cutler. 



The Philo girls have commenced to 
practice for their annual play. 



The Hesperian Literary Society in- 
itiated the following new members 
last Friday night: Beale, Pollock. 
Miller, Strieby, Taylor, and Lewis. 



I and IV Enolish classes did not 
recite Tuesday owing to the absence 
of Professor Park. 



Miss J. Auld taught Cutler's Cicero 
this week. 

Miss L. Strang will teach Cutler's 
Greek class until after Christmas. 

Two former Cutler students, Miss 
Bethany Perry, and Mr. Charles W. 
Kurie, were married at the Methodist 
parsonage in Victor, Colo., last Wed- 
nesday evening. 



DRINK 

DERN'S 

Freshly Roasted Tea and Coffee 

29 South Tejon Street 

The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies and 
Fixtures 



208 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 812 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-203 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence, 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 956 

Christmas 
Photos 

Up-to-Date in Style 
and Finish. Set for 
them now 




77Una 4 



Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 



16 THETIGER 

We Have the Sto rm Boot for You 

Whelher it rains or snows, hails or sleets, ^our feet mill be dry and comfortable in our $5.00 Semi-High- 
Cut Storm Boot. Don't think, Jpou can't afford to get a pair Just for stormy weather. You know y)ou not 
only insure your health, but also practice economy by doing so 



contain the best leather made, and are acknotvledged to he the best shoe value in the world. 
Drop in and look over the latest Regal stales for fall. $3.50 and $4.00. 



Regal Shoes 

Perkins-Shearer Co. «^ f^fr Sn%C::f ^"""^ 




Footwear of Quality 

When we say footwear of quality we do not necessarily mean high- 
priced footwear. All our women's shoes are made for our trade by 
expert makers, using only choice materials in the various grades, are 
unusually large and stylish, showing 
is ofifered you at $2.50, $3.00, 
$3.50, $4.00, $4.50, $5.00 



\f5>^«VW 



SHOES THAY SATISFY 



a.Z S.TEJON ST- 



When Trading, Remember TIGER Advertisers 




Colorado College 

Founded in Colorado Springs in 18 7 4 



WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



Electrical Laboratory 



Depart- 
ments 



College of Arts and Science 

E. S. PARSONS, Dean 
School of Engineering 

F. CAJORI, Dean 
School of Forestry 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 
School of Music 

E. D. HALE, Dean 



Cutler Academy p 



The Associated 
rep ara tor y 
School, in >vhich 
students are prepared for any American College 




Vol. XII 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., DECEMBER 3, 1909 



Number 12 



INSIGNIA 

CEREMONIES 



SENIORS APPEAR FOR FIRST 
TIME IN CAP AND GOWN. 



Juniors Have Usual Frolic and Burn 
Senior in Effigy. 



The seniors appeared in caps and 
gowns for t'ne first time at chapel 
Wednesday. Ushered by the juniors, 
they marched sedately into chapel, 
followed by the faculty, also wearing 
the insignia of their various degrees, 
and took their places as the official 
seniors of Colorado College for the 
remainder of the year. The faculty 
wee seated on the platform where 
Dean Parsons presided, and President 
Slocum gave the annual Insignia Day 
address. 

The juniors with malice afore- 
thcught, had procured costumes fo; 
the men, while the women were 
dressed as Puritan maidens. Before 
the procession entered the chapel the 
band of Indians marched down the 
side aisles a la war dance, filling the 
room with war whoops and other 
noise. Thej^ lined up along the cen- 
ter aisle and each brave captured a 
Puritan maiden as they came in. 
They stood thus in two lines, wdiile 
the seniors and faculty marched down 
and then filed into their usual section. 
After the regular chapel e.xercises. 
President Slocum gave the following 
address: 

Insignia Day Address. 

Insignia Day has become an im- 
portant e\-ent in Colorado College, 
and the leading question we are ask- 
ing this morning is; 

For what does it stand in the life' 
of the institution? 

In accordance with time honored 



custom, the members of the senior 
class have put on cap and gown and 
we have come together wearing these 
historic emblems of academic life. 
Either this means little, or worse 
than nothing, or it indicates that at 
Colorado College we are doing that 
which is worthy of what the cap and 
gown have stood for in years gone 

Continued on Page 8, 



PREXY RETUNS. 



President and Mrs. Slocum Visited 

Many Colleges and Universities 

in the East. 



President and Mrs. Slocum retu n- 
ed from their trip to the east on Sat- 
urday morning. The special business 
that called President Slocum east was 
the annual meeting of the board of 
tlv,.- Carnegie fund. 

While there President Slocum made 
addresses at Smith and Mt. Holyoke 
Colleges, also at Hampton Institute. 
While in Virginia he was present at 
ihe educational conference at which 
were President Taft and President 
Eliot, Andrew Carnegie and other 
prominent men. 

Dr. and !\Irs. Slocum were also 
present at a meeting of the New Eng- 
land Association of C. C. Alumni, 
W'ho tendered a banquet to them on 
the 14th at Brunswick hotel in Bos- 
ton. All his spare time was given to 
the interests of the college and many 
1 eople were seen in regard to that 
new gymnasium. President Slocum 
was much impressed by the construc- 
tive work being done in the colleges 
and universities of the east, a number 
of which he visited. 

While at Harvard, President Slo- 
cum was told by a member of the fac- 
ulty that C. C. students were earning 
more scholarships and fellowships in 
that university than any other college 
of anything like its size. 



SENIORS 

ENTERTAIN 



FORMER SPIRIT OF RIVALRY 
ABANDONED. 



Two Upper Classes Spend Evening of 
Insignia Day in Merrymaking. 



Early in the week the junior class 
received the following invitation: 

"The senior class requests the honor 
of your presence on Wednesday even- 
ing at 7:30 o'clock, Bemis Hall." 

It was unanimously voted that the 
invitation be accepted and accordingly 
7:30 o'clock or thereabouts on Wed- 
nesday evening found the two classes 
assembled in Bemis Common Room. 
Because Of the burning of a senior in 
etfigy at the Insignia exercises the 
juniors were expecting things and 
they we:e not disappointed. 

Upon entering the dining room the 
first thing that attracted attention was 
a pair of somewhat singular looking 
curtains, particularly noticeable on ac- 
count of their inability, because of 
transparency and lack of size, to per- 
form their usual function of conceal- 
ing the stage from view. They 
brought uncomfortable suggestions of 
the gauze effects used as cu tains by 
the juniors in their presentation of 
"Princess Bonnie," and a premonition 
that something was going to be 
sprung. 

President Sylvester of the senior 
class announced that we would first 
listen to tlie remainder of 1912's bar- 
becue program. The missing member 
of the quartet having arrived, that 
body delivered their performance 
which should have been given at the 
barbecue. The audience felt a little 
selfish but enjoyed it just the same. 

Just as the quartet finished, Todd 

Continued on Page 9. 



THE TIGER 



THE TIGER'S ALL-COLORADO ELLINGWOOD MAY GET THE HOV/ TO PREVENT TUBERCU- 
TEAM. RHODES SCHOLARSHIP. LOSIS. 



D. U. Given Five Places, Miners, 
Boulder and C. C. Each Two. 

Now that the smoke of battle has 
rolled away, The Tiger can give its 
choice for an all-Colorado team. It 
differs somewhat from most of the 
all-Colorado teams he:"etofore chosen, 
but our dopist thin<s it the strongest 
that can be selected. His team would 
line up as follows: 
1 e, Russ, D. U, 
1 t, Leadbetter, Mines. 
1 g, C)'Brien, Colorado, 
c, Ortner, Jvlines. 
r g, Pruter, D. U. 
r t, Cary, C. C. 
r e. Meyers, D. U. 
q b and captain, Ster.itt, Colorado. 
r h, Vandemoer, C. C. 
f b, Schroeder, D. U. 
1 h, Crowley, D. U. 

Other men worthy of mention arc; 
Wilson, C. C, left end; Bowler, U. 
of C, right tackle; Volk, D. U., right 
half, and McFadden, U. of C, right 
half, 

Wilson made his "rep" in the Boul- 
der-C. C. game, and had he played as 
well in the Thanksgiving game, would 
have been given one of the coveted 
positions. 

Bowler, the husky right tackle of 
U. of C, was picked by some as all- 
Colorado material for a tackle, but 
his work in the C. C.-U. of C. game 
did not show enough class to put him 
on the team. McFadden and Volk 
a: e likely candidates for halves, but 
Vandy's all-around work, especially 
in the punting line, give him the place 
without a question. 

Stirrett's masterly generalship in 
running a team places him in a class 
by himself as all-Colorado captain. 

Had Dick Morrison and Murphy 
been able to play, they both would 
have surely made positions on this 
team. The battle between Murphy 
and Schroeder alone would have been 
worth the price of admission Thanks- 
giving. 



JUNIOR STAG POSTPONED. 



Because of a conflict in date with 
the Minerva function, the junior stag, 
which had been planned for Decem- 
ber 9, has been postponed until after 
Christmas. 



Choice Lies Between Colorado Col- 
lege Senior and Anderson of 
U. of C. 



A Chapel Talk by Dr. G. E. Kepford. 



A. E. EUingwood of the senior 
class has passed the qualifying ex- 
amination for the Rhodes scholarship 
from the state of Colorado. The oth- 
er successful candidate is F: ed An- 
derson of the University of Colorado 

The final decision as to which of 
these two men shall receive the schol- 
arship will be made in a few days, the 
points to be considered being scholar- 
ship, athletic ability, character and 
powers of leadership. 



BULLETIN NO. 44. 



Colorado College Publication Issued 
in Tribute to William J. Palmer. 



Colorado College publication No. 
4.4. has just come from the press. It 
was edited by Mary G. Slocum and is 
a tribute to the late William J. 
Palmer. The feeling of the trustees 
of the college was that a record of the 
witness borne by the fellow citizens 
of the general should be published by 
some one, and that since he founded 
our college, no one could more prop- 
erly undertake the work. 

Opposite the first page is a three- 
fourths length portrait. This is fol- 
lowed by a brief historical sketch of 
the occur.ences which caused the gen- 
eral's death and of the funeral cere- 
monies. 

The remainder of the pamphlet con- 
tains the addresses of President Slo- 
cum, ;\Ir. Irving Howbert, and Rev. 
James B. Gregg, which were made at 
the devotional service held in Perkins 
Hal!; the resolutions passed by the 
faculty of Colorado College, and the 
address made by Major McAlliste.-, 
together with President Slocum's re- 
sponse, at the unveiling of the me- 
morial tablet presented to the college 
by tlie survivors of the 15th Pennsyl- 
^•ania cavalry. 

Though something more substan- 
tial is desired as a memorial to the 
founder of Colorado College, it is a 
satisfaction to have these tributes 
placed in permanent form. 



In a two days' campaign the Y. M. 
C. A. of Nebraska University recently 
raised $1,267. 



You would hardly expect a doctor, 
speaking on such an important sub- 
ject as the prevention of tuberculosis, 
to be humorous. But certain it is that 
no speaker at chapel this year has 
produced more smiles and laughs than 
did Dr. Kepford last Monday. His 
speech, however, was full of helpful 
suggestions and facts which set one 
to thinking. 

"The hope of the future lies with 
the students of today so far as the 
ultimate eradication of tuberculosis is 
concerned," said Dr. Kepford. "This 
generation will gather equipment to 
fight the scourge, the next will see the 
disease disappear. We can fight the 
disease readily because we know that 
It is aKvays caused by the tubercle 
bacillus, and that this bacillus is al- 
ways present in tuberculosis, whethe.- 
it be of the ,'kin, lungs, or other or- 
gans. Moreover, the disease cannot 
be handed down by heredity, though 
the tendency to contract it may. It 
is supposed that the tubercle bacillus 
was originally one that aided in the 
deorganization of dead animal matter, 
and from this in some way came to 
be a facultative parasite. 

"There are three avenues of ap- 
proach open to this ge;m: by inocu- 
lation; by eating or drinking infected 
food stufifs; and by inhalation. Were 
it not for the fact that the body has 
several means of guarding against the 
disease, we should find many more 
people suffering from it. The body's 
chief nieaus of resistance is the white 
blood cor])uscles. When a tubercle 
bacillus finds lodgment in the lung, 
these immediately form around the 
,genn and imprison it safel}-, unless 
some other agency 'frees it again. 
Ve-y often pus germs, which are al- 
ways present in the mouth, find their 
waj' into the lung, break down the tis- 
sue, and so release the bacillus. Then 
the two may join forces in carrying 
on the disease. 

"A patient suffering with tuberculo- 
sis usually has a fever in the after- 
noon, poor appetite, general lassitude, 
and loss of weight. Usually there is 
present in tuberculosis of the lungs a 
cough, and in a more advanced stage 
hemorrhages. Upon an early diagno- 
sis of tuberculosis depends its cure." 

Some of the safeguards which we 
should use against the spread of the 
disease were also mentioned. Spit- 



THE TIGER 



ting, according to Dr. Flick, is one cf 
the commonest ways in which tuber- 
culosis is spread. Kissing is another 
prolific source of the disease, especial- 
ly in the case of babies. "I liave 
known many cases," said Dr. Kepfortl, 
"v.iic e babies died as a result of the 
kisses . of their own mothe/s." The 
common drinking-cup should not be 
tolerated. All dairy cows should be 
carefully tested with tuberculin, as 
this method is safe when properly 
used. Poor ventilation of sleeping 
rooms is another source of great in- 
jury and is often the cause of one's 
contracting the disease. An adult 
needs thirty-five hundred cubic feet of 
fresh air per hour, and the only way 
to get this is to let it in Ihc room 
where we study and sleep. 

"Finally," said Dr. Kepford, "in- 
form yourselves in reference to the 
social aspects of tuberculosis. When 
we have solved this problem, we shall 
have advanced a step in civilization. 
We shall then see the fulfilment of 
the mission of Him who went about 



PHIL GILLETT TALKS OF 
KOREA. 



BASKETBALL. 



The only objection to a basketball 
team at Colorado College seems to be 
that it has not been self-supporting. 
In the past this has been a fact, but 
it would be ha.d to prove that a good 
manager couldn't make it pay this 
year. Basketball expenses are not 
high, w-e have most of the suits that 
would be needed, the city Y. M. C. A. 
will ma'xe satisfactory arrangements 
f o - the use cf their gym, and with a 
team such as we could turn out this 
year, the student support alone should 
pay expenses. Of the old men. Jar- 
dine, Siddons, Sinton, and Wilson are 
tlie best. Other players are Thomp- 
son, Reed, Dickson, Boyes, Belsey, 
and others. Why not arrange a sched- 
ule and go after it? 



PALMER MEMORIAL. 

Money Being Raised for . Equestrian 
Statue. 



While in the east. President Slo- 
cum met the eastern members of the 
Palmer Memorial committee and steps 
are now being taken to raise the nec- 
essary fifty or sixty thousand dollars. 
The memorial will be a bronze eques- 
trian statue of heroic size. 



The men who staid in town over 
Thanksgiving and attended the Y. M. 
C. A. meeting at Hagerman Hall, Fri- 
day night had a treat. Phil Gillett 
told ot the Y. M. C. A. work at Se- 
ou', Korea, wlie.e he is secretary. 

'"The great movements of today 
have an economic basis," he said. 
"The present awakening in Korea 
and other oriental countries, and their 
adoption of western civilization, are 
results of the pressure of the bread 
and butter question. 

"The first three years that I spent 
in Korea I devoted to a study of the 
language, customs and life of the peo- 
ple. .'\.s a result of this study, we 
knew how to adapt our work to the 
needs of the people and to get in line 
wtih their national developfent. In 
this way we were able to secure the 
cooperation of the leading statesmen 
and officials of the kindgdom. Prince 
Ito, who was recently assassinated by 
a misguided Korean, was one of our 
most loyal supporters. 

"With the cooperation of these men 
the Association has assumed a leading 
part in the moulding of the policies 
iif the nation through this transition 
stage. It is probably true that the 
Y. M. C. A. has had a greater influ- 
ence on the life of Korea during the 
past five years than any other factor. 

"Through the Association and mis- 
sionaries, western ideas have been in- 
troduced and an American trade has 
been developed. The missionaries, 
when they established homes, fitted 
them up with clocks, stoves, watches, 
oil lamps and other western neces- 
saries which were new to the Kor- 
eans. The people soon adopted the 
same articles and there are today a 
million watches in Korea, most of 
them American. The Koreans had a 
prejudice against using cow's milk, 
and the mortality of children was 
great. Condensed milk was intro- 
duced from America and now dairies 
are becoming established, and the 
mortality' among children has de- 
creased. 

"The Association has done impor- 
tant educational work through lec- 
tures. Lectures on such subjects as 
sanitation, a matter in which the 
Koreans are deficient, on any topics 
of economic, social or industrial in- 
terest, draw a full house. There are 
no government schools, and for the 
present the government entrusts ed- 
ucational work to the Association. 



The curriculum offered by the Y. M. 
C. A. is on a par with that of many 
of the institutions of higher learning 
in America. Teachers are being train- 
ed who will develop the educational 
system of Korea in the next genera- 
tion. 

"The government recognizes the 
value of the work of the Association 
to such an extent that it contributes 
$5, coo a year out of the national 
treasury." 



UTAH DEBATE. 

Question to be Selected Within Two 
Weeks. 

The second debate with the Univer- 
sity of Utah will take place some 
time during the second semester, and 
the question for debate will have to 
be selected and forwarded to Utah 
within two weeks of this date. All 
men who are interested in this debate 
or are likely to participate should 
confer at once with the manager of 
debating relative to the selection of 
a question. 

The debate will be held in Colorado 
Springs, the one last year, in which 
Utah was victorious, having been 
held in Salt Lake City. Utah is sure 
to send good men to represent her, 
and C. C. should make every effort to 
win this year's debate. 



BILL'S 



BROTHER 
TOO! 



IS THERE, 



"Bill was there" all right, and inci- 
deritally The Tiger was "scooped"' by 
the daily papers in announcing his en- 
gagement. This was careless on the 
l^art of The Tiger and thoughtless on 
the part of Bill, and just to square 
ourselves we are going tri let another 
cat out of the bag. 

The engagement of Miss Lucy 
Moore to Bill's brother, Loring C. 
Lennox, has leaked out. 

Miss IMoore is a gratluate of Den- 
ver University and is now an instruct- 
rr in that institution. She is a mem- 
ber of tl'.e Gamma Phi Beta sorority. 
.Mr. Lennox graduated from Colorado 
College with the class of 1906. 



President Benjamin Ide Wheeler of 
the UniAcrsity of California is deliv- 
ering two addresses each week at the 
University of Berlin on "Public Opin- 
ion as the Governing Force in Amer- 
ica." 



THE TIGER 



A CRITICISM OF THE NOVEM- 
BER KINNIKINNIK. 



The verse in the No-\-ember numbe/ 
of The Kinnikinnik is charming 
and, for college verse, really good, 
though none of it is very ambitious. 
There seems to be a prejudice against 
sustained effort among all the cellege 
students! 

Miss Strang's title, "The World," 
seems to embrace a good deal at first 
blush, and perhaps she doesn't do the 
subject full justice. One follows and 
enjoys the first three stanzas, and 
then forgets what they were about in 
trying to fathom the meaning of the 
fourth. What the last line of it means 
we cannot conceive. The author 
shows some knowledge of technique, 
and many of her lines are musical and 
imaginative. 

"F. j\l. H." is successful in a con- 
ventional but pleasing bit — "My' 
Theme." In some of his lines his art 
is rather evident. Better punctuation 
would make the meaning clearer. 

The rondeau by "I. L. H." has a 
whimsical charm. It is not entirely 
free from device at times. The form 
is, of course, highly artificial and dif- 
ficult, and the author shows consider- 
able skill. 

"Little Cayuse" and "A Wet Day in 
Camp" have a naturalness that is de- 
lihtful. Some of the figures of speech 
in the former are inaccurate, and the 
diction is not always happy. Mr. 
Argo succeeds in giving a striking 
realism to the description in his stan- 
zas. 

Mr. Roe is at his best in stories of 
the type of "The Cook for the Canni- 
bal Chief" — not a good title, by the 
way. He is easy, nonchalant and droll> 
humorous. The situations might be 
more exciting than they are. A more 
carefully worked out plot would have 
added much. His phrasal power is in 
evidence and is responsible for much 
of the interest which the story cer- 
tainly has. On the whole, the story 
is anti-climactic. The setting strong- 
ly suggests that of many curent mag- 
azine stories. The South Sea is much 
in vogue with story writers. 

"Ralph the Rover," a rollicking bur- 
lesque by Charles Donelan, carries 
one away on the tide of its swagger 
and bombast. The diction and "at- 
mosphere" are notable. 

Mr. Shaw has achieved another 
mild triumph in his original tale — 
"Cats of Unsavory Reputation." 
One's interest is held till the very 
end. 



Miss Hood's story is extremely 
conventional in plot. The opening 
paragraph is skillfully done, but the 
latter part seems to drag a little. 

Miss Huse does the very small girl 
very well indeed. Her digressions are 
very diverting. 

"A Sacrifice Hit'' is amateurish and 
stiff in style. It is, however, carefully 
written and decidedly readable. 

Miss Aikin's essay says nothing 
that is very new, but it seems to be 
carefully thought out, and her style 
is clear and easy. 

This number is distinctly an im- 
provement over the last. It is inter- 
esting, and has a variety of material, 
that should appeal to many tastes. 

"Dennis.'' 



PARSONS ELECTED. 



Winter Nights Club Honors College 
Dean. 

Dean Parsons was elected president 
of the Winter Nights Club at its first 
regular meeting held at the Antlers 
hotel last Monday evening. A ban- 
quet and an address by Mr. Johnston 
of the First Presbyterian church pre- 
ceded the business meeting. 

Other officers elected were: First 
vice-president, H. H. Seldomridge; 
second vice-president, W- K. Argo; 
third vice-president, the Rev. J. H. 
Franklin, and secretary and treasurer, 
W. W. Pohtlethwaite. 

Almost the entire college faculty 
are members of the club. 



EX-FOOTBALL STAR INJURED. 



E. E. Cooley Breaks Ankle at Trini- 
dad. 



Earl E. Cooley, for four years a 
star member of the Tiger football 
team, now a prominent attorney and 
manager of the West theater at Trin- 
idad, Colorado, was severely injured 
last Sunday. As he stepped from a 
street car his foot went into a small 
hole and his ankle was badly broken. 

Besides being for four years a 
member of the Colorado College 
championship football team , Mr. 
Cooley was very prominent in other 
college activities. 



Phil Gillett addressed an open 
meeting of the Volunteer Band in 
Ticknor Study this afternoon. He 
spoke on the life work of a mission- 
ary in Korea. 



COMMITTEES APPOINTED. 
Duties Assigned to Faculty Members 

The •following committees of the 
faculty have been appointed for the 
year 1909-1910: 
Accredtied Schools. 

Mr. Ruger. 

Mr. Gile. 

Mr. Park. 
Athletics: 

Mr. Griswold. 

Mr. Clark. 

Mr. Moore. 

Mr. Schneider. 
College Lecture Course; 

Mr. Woodbridge. 

Mr. Finlay. 

Mr. Noyes. 
Forestry: 

Mr. Morrill. 

Mr. Coolidge. 
Course of Study of Individual Stu- 
dents: 

Mr. Parsons. 

Mr. Noyes. 

Miss Brown. 

Miss Loomis. 
Discipline: 

Mr. Slocum. 

Mr. Cajori. 

Mr. Gile. 

Mr. Parsons. 

Mr. Schneider. 

Miss Loomis. 
Fraternities: 

Mr. Parsons. 
Engineering: 

Mr. Cajori. 

Mr. Collais. 

Mr. Green. 

Mr. Griswold. 

Mr. Lyon. 

Mr. Mills. 

Mr. Stewart. 
Hagerman Hall: 

Mr. Gile. 

Mr. Motten. 

Mr. Heald. 

Mrs. Cajori. 

Airs. Parsons. 

Mrs. Slocum. 
Library : 

Mr. Ormes. 

Mr. Slocum. 

Miss Canon. 
Miss Reinhardt. 
Miss Sahm. 
Master's Degree: 
Mr. Hills. 
Mr. Cajori. 
Mr. Parsons. 
Mr. Schneider. 
Music : 
Mr. Hale. 
Miss Sahm. 



THE TIGER 



Publications: 

Mr. Slocum, Editor-in-Chief. 

Mr. Cajori, Managing Editor. 

Mr. Howe, Secretary. 

Mr. Hills. 

Mr. Schneider. 
Bulletin: 

Mr. Noyes. 

Mr. Clark. 

Mr. Moore. 

Mr. Motten. 
Publicity: 

Mr. Howe. 

Mr. Hills. 

Mr. Noyes. 

Mr. Smith. 

Mr. Woodbridge. 
Schedule: 

Mr. Albright. 

Mr. Cajori. 

Mr. Mills. 

Mr. Noyes. 
Scholarship: 

Mr. Slocum. 

Mr. Cajori. 

Mr. Parsons. 

Miss Brown. 

Miss Loomis. 
Student Govecrnment: 

Mr. Slocum. 

Mr. Parsons. 

Miss Brown. 

Miss Loomis. 

EXCHANGES. 

.-V new magazine, The American 
College, is being published by the 
Higher Educational Association of 
New York. It is devoted entirely to 
the different phases and activities of 
college life. 

The fifteenth anniversa-y of the 
University of California, May, iQio, 
will be marked by the erection of a 
$100,000 Alumni Hall with a large as- 
sembly room and offices for college 
publications. 



A cross-country contract for five 
years has been signed by Tech. and 
Harvard. 



Cornell is striving to lead the col- 
lege world in cheering. Nine cheer 
leaders have been elected. 



The campus of Wisconsin Univer- 
sity has been planned for the next 50 
years, with accommodations for 15,000 
students. 



A Japanese student recently made 
a protest against the lack of cleanli- 
ness of the gymnasium at Illinois. 



GROWTH IN THE SHOP 
COURSES. 

During the past summer, Professor 
CoUais made several inspection tours 
over the state and collected much val- 
uable material for his shop courses. 

He is building up all the various 
branches of shop work and adapting 
the general courses to better suit the 
needs in each department of engineer- 
ing. 

Consider the course in Shop A, the 
elementary course involving bench 
work in truss and model making, pat- 
tern making and foundry work in cast- 
ing and moulding. It is a course es- 
sentially general, covering in common 
a number of fundamental principles. 
All engineers are required to take this 
course. The first few weeks are de- 
voted to acquiring skill in handling the 
tools; simple structural joints and 
truss models are turned out. As soon 
as each individual has acquired a suf- 
ficient amount of skill in the use of 
the tools, he is placed upon some piece 
of work bearing directly upon the pro- 
fesion he has chosen. The mining en- 
gineers are placed upon seme piece of 
timber construction work, such as the 
making of head frames, the design of 
cyanide plants or some other compli- 
cated piece of work. The civil engin- 
eering studrMits work upon models of 
all kinds of bridge construction and 
trestle work, several excellent models 
of trestles bearing simple and com- 
pound curves have been made by civil 
engineering students, and are among 
the many models in the display collec- 
tion. The electrical engineers turn 
out models of various designs in pow- 
er plant construction and the accom- 
panying designs of t 'ansmission line 
towers ,etc. 

This course is a supplement to a 
manual training course, and progress 
there is measured by individual apti- 
tude. However, those students who 
have not enjoyed the good fortune of 
becoming acquainted with the use of 
tools through natural handiness or a 
course in manual training are more or 
less handicapped. And it is for thfs 
purpose that the first few weeks of 
this course are devoted to the making 
of simple models, that these students 
who have not had such privileges may 
have time to attain some degree of 
skill in the use and manipulation of 
tools. 

During the past year, as a result of 
these inspection tours various designs 
and models of the latest contrivances 
used in engineering p -actices have 



been received and are being used in all 
of the shop courses. 

Mr. Collais in his tour last summer 
visited several points of interest in 
the mining industry, namely Lead- 
ville, Aspen, Georgetown, Silver 
Plume, Idaho Springs, Central City, 
and Black Hawk, and came in contact 
with many men of widely different 
professions, all of whom gladly helped 
him to secure the information he was 
in search of. In every way the atti- 
tude of superintendents and mine 
presidents toward engineering stu- 
dents was the most kindly. All were 
impressed with the scheme which Mr. 
Collais is putting in practice in his 
laboratory courses, and said that the 
handling of mine timber construction 
work was the one thing that should 
have greater emphasis placed upon it. 

Several drawings of the latest tun- 
neling devices have been received, 
from the Retallack and Redfield Tun- 
neling and Mining Company, and work 
in the construction of several of these 
will begin shortly. 



FACULTY MEMBERS DO NOT 

OBJECT TO A MIXED 

DRAMATIC CLUB. 



Several times this question has 
been asked in The Tiger: "Why not 
a dramatic club?" While no definite 
answer to this has ever been given, 
there has been a feeling that the fac- 
ulty in general and the Dean of Wo- 
men in particular were opposed to a 
co-eductional club. 

The writer took the trouble to in- 
terview several members of the fac- 
ulty on the subject, including the 
Dean of Women and in no case was 
an}' objection expressed. Miss Brown, 
on the other hand, expressed herself 
as heartily in favor of such a club, 
provided it was organized for work 
and not for its social side. It seems 
to be up to the students. What are 
we going to do about it? 



WORKING ON CATALOGUE. 



Under the chairmanship of Profes- 
sor Noyes, the committee in charge 
is at work upon the annual catalogue. 
It will appear some time early in Feb- 
ruary. 



For the purpose of furnishing of- 
ficial news to the daily papers, an of- 
ficial press bureau has been estab- 
lished at the University of Chicago. 



THE T I G E E 



The Weekly Newspaper of Colorado College 



GLENN W. SHAW Editor-in-Chief 

HARRY W. McOtAT Business Manager 

S. W. Dean Assistant Editor 

C. Don-elan Assistant Editor 

H. H. Haight Assistant Editor 

L. E. Griswold Engineering Editor 

B. P. SlDDONS Athletic Editor 

H. F. Rice Forestry Editor 

Julia Ingersoll Alumni Editor 

Helen Canon Exclianae Editor 

Janet Kampf Local Editor 

W. L. WARNOCK Local Editor 

A. E. Bryson Assistant Manager 

E. W. HiLLE A'sistani Manager 

Correspondents 

Geneva McCaw, T. M. Pettigrew, Edith Sommers, F. B 

Copeiand, Margaret \v arson, E S Statten, 

Katharine True, U. L Sjisco 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

aitictes and items to iHEilGER. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all comnmnieations to THE TIGER, Colorado 
College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
Springs, Colo., as second-class matter. 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



in&i(.;nia da^ tendencies. 

Insignia Day is held at Colorado Col- 
lege in formal recognition of the right 
of the seniors to wear the emblem of 
scholarship, the cap and gown. For the 
first time they don their sober insignia 
and march to chapel to hear a serious 
talk on the privileges and responsibili- 
ties of the senior. After chapel they file 
out and fall to capering like what they 
used to be — and are yet, but for the 
clothes, and ever will be, but for con- 
ventions. There is something pleasing 
in the traditions of Insignia Day, some- 
thing attractive ' in the formality of the 
ceremonies and the mild self-ridicule 
afterwards. 

Not the least enjoyable of the day's 
charms has always been the conduct of 
the junior ushers. In early days when 
the third-year class was first asked to 
escort their elders who were assuming 
dignity, they saw something a little in- 
congruous in the ceremony, and con- 
ceived it agreeable to fit themselves out 
in mock grandeur. They used to march 
to chapel in Prince Alberts and high silk 
hats, carrying beribboned canes. Some- 
times the men wore plain black and der- 
bies, with the women in white. Some- 
times it was one thing and sometimes 
another, but there has always been good- 
natured banter. Of course class rivalry 
leads every junior class to strive for a 
burlesque more elaborate than that of its 
predecessor, and of late years each has 
been successful in its efforts. Two years 
ago the class of 1909 had prepared gowns 
and mortarboards of red and white, their 
class colors, but objection on the part of 



1908 prevented them wearing them. Last 
year the class of 1910 paraded in full 
dress, wearing a variety of ludicrous 
headgear and carrying gay canes. The 
women costumed daintily as usual in 
class colors. And this brings us to 1911*5 
performance of Wednesday. 

As usual the juniors made appearance 
in surpassing array. Rather than pre- 
tending to bedeck themselves more 
sumptuously and parade as the seniors' 
betters or equals, they dressed as Indian 
braves and Puritan maidens. This was 
wandering from the original purpose of 
junior costuming, but still expressed 
playful disrespect and was showy and 
amusing, as was right. They conducted 
themselves but little more boisterously 
than precedent warrants inside the 
chapel and acted strictly within their 
rights. So did they outside, so far as 
that goes. In fact, we have heard noth- 
ing but favorable comment on all that 
war dancing and effigy burning, and it is 
this prevalent uncritical spirit which 
makes the editorial we, vvho is of neces- 
sity a senior, feel free to comment on 
Insignia Day tendencies. 

There was no harm in the juniors' 
pow-wow. The great criticism is that it 
was decidedly meaningless. Had there 
ever been between 1910 and 1911 any- 
thing nearly approaching animosity, it 
would have meant something, probably a 
fight. Had 1909 burnt in effigy 1908 "on 
the latter's coming-out day, women 
would have held gowns and mortar 
boards while the men of the two upper 
classes rolled in the dirt and showed the 
sophomores and freshmen what a hollow 
pretense was dignity and the judgment 
supposed to come with college years. 
The fault would have been with the 
juniors ; the feeling between those two 
classes was such that the seniors must 
take the burning of their efifigy as a di- 
rect and personal insult. This year it 
was mere foolery, was taken as such, 
and the crowd enjoyed it. However, the 
crowd's judgment must be bad if they 
cannot see in Wednesday's performance 
a wrong tendency. We hope that next 
year's juniors will not attempt to follow 
a bad example, but will content them- 
selves with a less rowdy rebuke of the 
seniorial diginity. It is foolish to go be- 
yond the limit; 1912 can do the future 
a good turn. 

MAGNA PANPAN. 

Last week's Tiger said, "What is 
there against holding a big meeting once 
each month that might be called 'Col- 
lege Night'?" To date no, one has sub- 
mitted his objection. On the other 
hand. President Slocum has declared 
himself heartily in favor of such a night. 
The only criticism of the original sug- 
gestion that occurs to us is in respect to 
the name : "College Night" is much 
tamer than "Magna Panpan." But the 
name niav be considered of the least con- 



sequence; the spirit is the thing. Call 
it the Monthly Nonclave, if you like. 

At the next meeting of the Student 
Commission, plans will be submitted 
about as follows : That the Commission 
appoini: and have published immediately 
one committee of three for each month 
during the remainder of the school year, 
these committees to be in charge of the 
meetings occurring in their respective 
months. The programs at these meet- 
ings will consist of speeches by alumni, 
brought to Colorado Springs for the pur- 
pose, by faculty members and by leading 
students. Musical and other relief will 
round out programs that should be of 
the greatest interest to every man and 
woman in Colorado College. 

You have all been to football rallies. 
Sometimes intensely interesting things 
may be accomplished on the spur of the 
moment ; at other times the whole per- 
formance is plainly a laudable dissembl- 
ing. The success or failure of the rally 
depends largely on the moment's tense- 
ness or flaccidity in athletics. Football 
hubbub is merely one expression of that 
abiding college loyalty which is forced 
by circumstances to lie dormant during 
too great a part of the year. The Great 
Panpan is intended to draw the college 
together to consider questions of vital 
import and to amuse and instruct itself. 
It will be a sort of universal literary so- 
ciety, with monthly meetings, planned 
weeks and months ahead. It will cause 
us to pull together for Colorado College 
entire and will depend on no minor vic- 
tory hoped for or won, or no defeat 
neither. 

BIG HOLIDAY NUMBER. 

The last number of The Tiger be- 
fore Christmas vacation will be a 
thirty-two page holiday number, and 
will be issued one day early, on 
Thursday, December i6. It will con- 
tain, besides the regular weekly nev^^s 
section, a review of the football sea- 
son and a summary of the fall's work 
in all OLir activities at Colorado Col- 
leLre. Ir WjU be fully illustrated. 

Tlie IliiJiday Number of The Tiger 
will be just the thing with which to 
supplement your persuasive conversa- 
tions with senior friends in the high 
schools. A large number of extra 
copies will be printed, and you should 
line your suit case with them before 
departing. 

COLORADO COLLEGE CALEN- 
DAR. 

This year's College Calendar is a 
beautiful]}- artistic production. Every_ 
month is gi\'cn two pictu es, a large 
ciii- ;it the top of the page and a small 
one below at the side of the days. 
The pictures are well chosen and rep- 



THE TIGER 



resell tativc, and the mechanical work 
is excellent, J\Irs. Smith deserves 
much credit for this her second suc- 
cess in calendar making. She also de- 
serves your support. "Do your 
Christmas shopping early," say all 
advisers. You will have to,- if you 
want a calendar. Sixty cents a friend 
is pretty cheap, and kills two birds 
with one stone. 

NEW ASSISTANT EDITOR. 

The Tiger is pleased to announce 
that its staff has been strengthened by 
the election of Roy L. Kirkpatrick to 
the position of assistant editor. Mr. 
Kirkpatrick came to Colorado College 
from Wes:minster University of Den- 
ver; he took his preparatory degree 
ai the Colorado Springs High school. 
He is a member of Pearsons Literary 
Society and a pledge to the Alpha 
Tau Delta fraternity. 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 



Dean Hale will lecture on Tech- 
nique at the conference on Tuesday, 
at 5 o'clock. All students interested 
in music study are invited. The last 
three lectures have been occupied 
with discussions of the better known 
"methods." These are properly con- 
cerned with the elementary problems 
and touch onlj' in a general way the 
real task of building a technique. In 
that work the guidance of the com- 
petent teacher is necessary. And the 
competent teacher is that one only 
that can and does actually play, artis- 
tically, consummately, the literature 
he teaches. He must possess intimate 
knowledge and vital experience. 



DR. WEBB TO LECTURE. 

Some time after the first of the year 
Dr. Webb is to give several talks on 
tube culosis at our chapel exercises. 
It is needless to say that these ad- 
dresses will be interesting and in- 
structive. 

Dr. Webb has made an extended 
study of this disease and has had a 
large experience as a physician in the 
treatment of it. 



The faculty of the Unive.sity of 
Kansas has threatened to take drastic 
measures against the fraternity men 
unless thei;- scholarship is improved. 
They are put on probation until Feb- 
ruary. 



FREHMEN TO SEND REPRE- 
SENTATIVE TO ROCHESTER 
CONVENTION. 

The freshman class has stepped 
somewhat into the limelight by vot- 
ing to send a representative to the 
Rochester cenn'ention to be held dur- 
ing the Christmas holidays. The ex- 
pense will be very nearly one hun- 
dred dollars, and this they intend t(j 
raise by a class assessment. It is not 
too big a proposition for a class the 
size of 1913, if they go at it in the 
right spirit. It is up to the freshmen 
to make good on their bluff. A. Lee 
Golden is the man chosen as fresh- 
man class delegate. 

The action of the freshmen has been 
commended by President Slocum and 
Dean Parsons as follows: 

I appreciate highly the effort of the 
freshman class to send a delegate to the 
Rochester convention. It will be a dis- 
tinct value to both the one who goes 
and also to the class itself, and in this 
way to the whole college. 

WILLIAM F. SLOCUM. 



gold, which ga\e a \e y pleasing ef- 
fect. 



The action of the freshman class in 
deciding to send one of their representa- 
tives to the Rochester convention will 
have a great influence upon the life of 
the College during the next four years. 
The convention will be an eye-opener to 
anyone who attends it and the represent- 
ative of the class cannot fail to get for 
himself and bring back to the class and 
to the College an outlook and an impulse 
which will mean much to the higher in- 
terests of the College life. 

EDWARD S. PARSONS. 



"HAG" HALL ENTERTAINS. 

From every quarter of the campus 
people came through a snowstorm 
last Saturday night to see that the 
men in Hagerman know how to enter- 
tain. After shaking hands with Dr. 
and Mrs. Slocum, Dr. and Mrs. Par- 
sons, Heald and Weirick, in the re- 
ceiving line, the guests were shown 
through the rooms, which were tidy 
for once and all decorated with pen- 
nants and pictures arranged accord- 
ing to men's tastes. 

The refreshments were served in 
the lower reception room by Mrs. 
Hale, Mrs. Smith, Mrs. Cajori and 
Miss Brown. Those who assisted 
were: Miss Pettigrew, Miss Watson, 
the Misses Crowley, Miss Burgess, 
Miss Douglass, Miss Vesta Tucker, 
and Miss Sharp. 

The room in which refreshments 
were served was draped in black and 



NOTICES 

Y. M. C. A. BANQUET. 

Alamo Hotel, 

Tuesday, December 14. 



Finals begin just three weeks after 
Christmas recess. 



Take calendars home with you at 
Christmas time, and the big Holiday 
Tiger. 



Pearsons Literary Society will give 
a show early in the second half. 



Mr. Bruno will speak on a sociolog- 
ical subject at the regular Y. M. C. A. 
meeting next Friday night. 



Christmas vespers at Bemis, De- 
cember S and December 12. Talk by 
Dr. .Slocum. Special music. 



The senior men will dine at Bemis 
as guests of the Ancient Order of the 
Dais next Wednesday evening. 



Pearsons Round Table will meet 
ruesday evening. 



SPECIAL SERVICES. 



President Slocum to Speak on Christ- 
mas Themes at Bemis Hall. 

At the request of many of the stu- 
dents. President Slocum is arranging 
for two Sunday services to be held in 
Bemis before Christmas. They will 
be similar to those held last spring, 
which drew together so many of the 
students. The first will '^e held next 
Sunday. The music will be a feature 
and will consist of Christmas carols 
and hymns. Next Sunday Mrs. Howe, 
Mrs. Taliaferro, and Miss Sahm will 
have charge of the special music. 
President Slocum will take for his 
theme, "The Good Will of Christmas 
Tide." 

The second service is to be held the 
following Sunday and will have for its 
subject, "The Incarnation." The spe- 
cial music at that time will be fur- 
nished by the glee clubs. 

These serAnces are open not only to 
all of the students and members of 
the faculty but also to the friends of 
the college throughout the city. 



THE TIGER 



INSIGNIA CEREMONIES 

Continued Irom Page 1. 

by in many of the historic institutions 
of the world. Simply to ape outward 
expression of the customs of these 
older schools is to make ourselves 
ridiculous. If, on the other hand, we 
are trying to follow in the footsteps 
of those who have achieved intellec- 
tual distinction and are letting our 
academic dress symbolize that this is 
a centre of true student life and we 
have achieved what is characterized 
as "academic standing," then it is 
right and appropriate that we wear it 
on an occasion like this. 

Only a few years ago when aca- 
demic dress was first suggested at 
Colorado College, there were those 
who honestly questioned its appro- 
p. lateness. As, however, the institu- 
tiiin grew in numbers and, above all, 
m character, and as it established 
standards of scholarship, all quest- 
tioning as to its appropriateness grad- 
ually disappeared. Still the question 
comes back to us: Have we set our 
standards high enough to warrant us 
in wearing this dress at Colorado 
College? 

It is a costume which has been 
worn for many years by great schol- 
ars. Upon academic occasions at 
colleges and universities, scudents and 
teachers have appeared in it and it 
has symbolized to the world the 
intellectual achievements of men of 
letters, and also the high ideals of 
students who have been connected 
with these educational establishments. 
Just as the garb of the priest in the 
church stands for that which has 
made the church sacred, so in the life 
of the scholar the cap and gown 
stands for those things that have 
made the life of the student noble and 
worthy. If in Colorado College we 
are content with mediocre scholar- 
ship, with poor ideals of academic 
achievement, then we ought not to 
wear this cap and gown. It becomes 
simply an outward appearance and we 
are worse than making ourselves 
fooli.-ih. Then it becomes a mere 
pretense of something that does not 
really exist. The college and uni- 
versity in the life of the civilized 
world stand for culture, for scholar- 
ship, for refinement, for moral and 
intellectual achievements. These in- 
stitutions are supposed to be centers 
of learning, of high standards of life, 
of an aristocracy of letters. 

Here we have erected, as the years 
have gone on, our buildings and creat- 



ed a library, laboratories, and equip- 
ments rif various sorts. Many of the 
things of the incidental to college life 
have been produced here. Books have 
gone forth, articles and periodicals 
have been published, a catalog is sent 
out year by year, by which we are 
saying to the wnrld: We stand for 
the same things which have made the 
older colleges and uni\-ersities what 
they are. But there still remains the 
question: Are we really doing the 
Avo:k, are we really establishing the 
standards, that make it just that we 
should assume this which has been 
the garb of the scholar and the sym- 
bol of intellectual achievement? One 
test of our right to assume this grows 
out of the answer to the question: 
Dn our intellectual life and moral 
standards compare with those of the 
older colleges that have won the 
right to use this uniform of the 
scholar? It seems only fair to answer 
tbi^ in tlu' aflirmati\"e, in view of the 
recognition that the college has 
alreadj' received from the older insti- 
tutions of the country. But there is a 
test which lies behind this one. Are 
we really living up to our standards 
and to the reputation we have in 
some degree earned? This test can 
be applied not simply by enumerating 
the books we have read and the sub- 
jects we have studied, but by the 
wdiole atmosphere of our life here 
which ought to be that of the scholar. 
If the dominating feature of the col- 
lege is found in a superficial life 
growing merely out of social rela- 
tionships and social contact, then it 
is not worthy of us to appear on the 
platform and on this floor with this 
decoration. If, however, in our spirit, 
in our conversation, in our life on the 
campus, in the lecture room, in the 
laboratory, there is being created an 
atmosphere of high purpose, of intel- 
lectual achiexement, and the e are 
here the industrious habits of the 
scholars, then we can enter the ranks 
of those who have worn these sym- 
bols. Few things are more demoral- 
izing than to be willing to accept a 
mediocre intellectual or moral life, 
to adopt the c inclusion that we never 
caii have the higher intellectual 
achievement; that -we must live only 
on the ordinary grade, that our stand- 
ards of refinement, of cultivation, of 
intellectual worth, can be those only 
')f the mediocre college. To accept 
the position of continuous defeat in 
any condition of human life is most 
unwholesome. Not only must there 
be the determination to win x'ictory. 



but also the results of victory in our 
lives, if we are to have the bearing 
and the charatcer of true men and 
women. There are those who place 
themselves and those with whom they 
are associated in the ranks of those 
who are forever defeated. There is 
always some serious defect in the 
plan, in the ideals, in the achieve- 
ments, of those who win no great vic- 
tories and who do not achieve high 
ideals. 

It must be ever kept in mind, too, 
that an occasion such as this should 
be prophetic of the still larger life 
and nobler achievements of the future. 
What has been accoinplished here is 
only the stepping stone to something 
better. Wc wear these symbols of 
intellectual life as a promise that we 
will be true to what they have stood 
for in the past, that we will give our- 
sehes to the life of true culture, that 
we will make the world see what it is 
that the student stands for in the na- 
tion and in the community. We are 
saying to ourseKes, as we gather here 
today as teachers and as students, 
that we will make this college stand 
for those things that make an aris- 
tocracy of scholarship, that during 
this year and all the years to come, 
the college shall have reason to be 
proud of the victories which we are 
winning as students, as men and wo- 
men of cultu e and intellectual force. 
B}' this dress we are asserting and 
we are promising that we will be true 
to the life of the scholar. If we are 
helping to create here a center of the 
higher learning and to make it one of 
the institutions which stand in the 
ranks of tlu)sc that have been the 
home of the true student and which 
are sending out their benign influence 
into the life of all the world, — then it 
is fitting that we appear from time to 
time in cap and gown. 

After coming out of chapel the 
seniors gathered for the customary 
games of '-'drop the handkerchief," 
"tag," "London bridge is falling 
down," etc., while the juniors pro- 
ceeded with their merry making. A 
senior was burned in effigy, while the 
Indians danced about the fire, and a 
pale face papoose was oflfered to the 
flames. 

Meanwhile, the seniors had become 
dignified. F.om this time on they 
will always wear their caps and 
gowns to chapel on Fridays. If any 
senior breaks the rule laid down by 
his class, he will contribute 25 cents 
to the treat fund to be spent at Mur- 
ray's. 



THE TIGER 



SENIORS ENTERTAIN 

Continued from Page 1. 

Maro Pettigrew Jr., a graduate of 
the class of 1910, now an actor of 
note, strolled across the stage and 
happened to meet John Nelson, who 
was also in college in those days of 
long ago. While they were talking of 
old times, McOuat entered and the 
three told of what had happened to 
some of the people they had known 
while in college, especially those of 
1911. iMcOuat had invented a tele- 
scope through which the trio looked 
at the past. The stereopticon slides 
used were all local hits and from the 
laughte,- they provoked were appreci- 
ated. 

The grand finale was a burlesque on 
"Princess Bonnie," entitled "Princess 
Weinie. ' In general it seemed to 
make almost as great a hit as did the 
original. 

While ref.eshments were being 
served each cf the senio/s were pre- 
sented with a picture of President 
Slocum. 

V\'ith a short speech by Pre.xy and 
a few : emarks by Sylvester, the pro- 
gram of the evening was terminated. 
ScAcral things had been sprung, but 
they had been enjoyed alike by both 
the "springers'' and the victims. 



C-C-C-C. 



Y. M. C. A. BANQUET DEC. 14. 

The annual Y. M. C. A. banquet 
occurs Tuesday evening, December 
14. It will be strictly an informal af- 
fair and no flowers will be tolerated. 
The place at this writing has not been 
decided upon, but it will be at one of 
the down town hotels. 

The speech of the evening will be 
delivered by Judge Ben Lindsey of 
Denver. Shaw will act as toastmas- 
ter. 

if yon haven't a date, you had bet- 
te; be getting one, for the/e is usu- 
ally all kinds of competition, and even 
the fellows with regulars are in dan- 
ger. 



Wisconsin has 175 candidates for 
the freshman crew, who will be kept 
hard at work all winter. 



At the University of California the 
senior women have meetings for the 
discussion of any questions of interest 
to the seniors and college world, and 
fo- the strengthening of friendship. 
They are planning through their own 
efforts to build a hall for senior wo- 
men. 



Last Tuesday the following program 
was given before the Chemistry Club : 

Portland Cement L. E. Griswuld 

Equiping an Electric Garage 

R. Hamilton 
Iron and Steel W. D. Scholield 

In the paper on Portland Cemnet the 
author confined himself to the methods 
in vogue and the apparatus used by the 
Portland Cement company at Portland, 
Colorado. 

After giving a brief history of the 
manufacture of cement, Mr. Griswold 
took up in their order the separate steps 
involved in cement making from the 
quarrying of the limestone and shale to 
the sacking of the finished product. 

The paper on the equiping of an Elec- 
tric Garage was given to the club 
through the courtesy of Mr. Hamilton. 
Mr. Hamilton showed the plans of the 
Blake Garage situated here in the "city 
of Colorado Springs, in which he pointed 
out the unique features which have at- 
tracted the attention of many garage 
owners. 

The most unique feature of the whole 
plant is the simplicity with which inex- 
perienced men may handle the charging 
of machines. The charging boxes are ot 
a special design and the charging of 
several machines can be done at one 
time. After taking up in detail the con- 
struction of the charging boxes, he gave 
a very vivid explanation of a novel 
switchboard which, though very intri- 
cate in its construction, is capable of 
telling at the time of charging of several 
machines simultaneously, just how long 
each has been charging. 

The paper on Iron and Steel, delivered 
by Mr. Schofield, was a continuation of 
a series of papers given before the club 
upon the same topic. He dealt with the 
treatment of steels by mechanical pres- 
sures, especially by methods of rolling, 
and confined himself after a brief ex- 
planation of a rolling plant, to the making 
of pipe, both lapped, welded edge, and 
drawn pipe. He outlined the method of 
wire making, and pointed out the com- 
mon practice in copeing with the difficult 
process of annealing. 

He also mentioned the numerous uses 
for malleable cast iron and the large 
field that is open to its use in the iron 
and steel industry. 



"SOPHS" ELECT FOOTBALL 
CAPTAIN. 

Last Thursday Hedblom was elected 
captain of the sophomore football team. 
Some weeks ago Donovan was elected 
manager. Things are now moving rap- 
idly in the way of preparations for the 
football game between the two lower 
classes. 



FOOTBALL WARS. 

Now that foreign wars over pigskin 
territory are ended, civil strifes are 
creeping in. The sophomore warriors 
are watching the maneuvers of the 
freshmen forces and at the same time 
are making plans to attack them in the 
weakest places. Over in the freshmen 
camp, things are stirring and signs of 
war are evident. They too are exercis- 
ing their powers of war stratagem in 
making plots against the older settlers. 

Football is one of the three contests in 
athletics between the freshmen and 
sophomores. The class winnig two of 
the contests will be declared the victor 
and will receive a pennant. The kind 
of pennant will be decided by the com- 
mittee on lower class contests. 

The Chinese Students' Alliance of 
America has recently held its fifth 
confe ence, at Hamilton Ccllege, New 
York. Besides discussing the prob- 
lems of the awakening Chinese nation 
the members of the conference form.- 
cd ui)o ntlieir own initiatiA'e a Chinese 
Students' Christian Association, and 
expressed their intention to make the 
Chinese Church united. , 



At the University of Minnesota, the 
Norwegian Club this year will pre- 
sent Ibsen's play, "Pillars of Society" 
in Norwegian. 



Tlie Ha-dinge Conical Pebble Mill 
Co. has presented to the Mining En- 
gineerin.g Department a glass model 
of a conical pebble mill used far- 
grinding or .granulating ores and ce-- 
nient. 3.1r. Hardinge is the invent(^r 
and througli liis kindness is the de-. 
partment indebted to the compin.y. 



There is nothing that makes a 



1^ more acceptable Christmas pift |;j.f 
than a piece of ^ood Jewelry. 
That kina is to be had of The 



JOHNSON JEWELRY % 
li CO., 26 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Expert Repairing 






10 



THE T I G K R 



Full Dress and Tuxedo Suits Made by 
Alfred Benjamin & Co., and 
Society Brand 

Odd taste demands that when we mingle in the society of well-bred 
people, we must be correctly and becomingly garbed. There is no 
place these da^s for the careless fellow who neglects his formal 
attire, and discerning men and women are slow to bestow their favor 
upon him. 

Tuxedo Suits at $35 and up — A If red Benjamin & Co. make. 
Full Dress Suits, $35 and up. 



.<^^ 




Fairyland Theatre ' LITERARY PROGRAMS 



High-class Vaudeville and Latest Moving 

Pictures, Entire Change of Program 

Mondays and Thursdays 

DAN TRACY, Manager 

THE CENTRAL FUEL CO. 

R. M. AITKEN Manager 
All Best Grades of Fuel. Patterson Lump the 
Best Furnace Fuel 
"Rvery Lump a Lump of Heat" 
Prompt Delivery- 
Two Phones 1 101 128 N. Tejon Street 

The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co. 



APOLLONIAN. DEC. lo. 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 

Patronize 
TIGER Advertisers 

Snappy, Swa^^y 
Clothes 

AT 

THE MAY CO. 

Clever 
Haberdashers 



.Speech, The Growtli of Labor Un- 
ir)iis Bryson 

Speech, Strikes and Lockouts, 

Moffitt 

Debate: Resolved, That the sentence 

ol imprisonment on the three labor 
leaders on account of the Buck 
Stove Company case is just. .Affirm- 
ative, Rhone and Shelton. Nega- 
tive, Wei rick and Thomison. 
^''isitors v/elcjme. 



PEARSONS, DEC. 3. 

Music Esmay 

Pai, er Golden 

The Nicaraguan Trouble Moody 

The Income Tax in England. .. Mott 

Essay Weller 

Poem Argo 

Visitors welcome. 

CICERONIAN, DEC. 3. 

Music Finkbiner 

Oration Heckman 

Reading Norris 

Second Edition Ciceronian Record- 
Herald Putnam 

Debate: Resolved^ That Congress 
should pass an income tax law. 
Affi:-mati\-e, Ellingvvood and Caple. 
Negati\e, Pettigrew and Love. 

Parliamentary Drill Wilkinson 

\'isitors welcome. 



iV INERVA, DEC. 10. 

Closed meeting at the home of Miss 
Scholz. 



CONTEMPORARY, DEC. 10. 



Reading fri,;m Maeterlinck. 

Music Marian Yerkes 



CERCLE FRANCAIS, 9 DECEM- 
BRE. 



Conference sar Edmond Rostand, 

Mile. Louise Strang 
E.xtrait de lyrano de Bergerac, 
Mile. Campbell, M. Clififord. AI. 
Jameson. 
Musique. 
Jeux et Chansons. 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



"Our Colorado'' 
"Bruin Inn" 

"BlackandGold'' 



The Three Songs of Colorado 

College — in Sheet Form 

for 40c. Buy Them of 

E. W. HILLE 



Clever Clothes 

FOR 

College Chaps 

AT 

ROBBINS 

ON THE CORNER 



THE TIGER 



11 




Hughes Grew; Did Hughes? 
Hughes Is Growing; Is Hughes? 
"QUALITY DID IT" 



Cigar Store 



Store A 
North 13 Tejon 



HUGHES 

TOBACCONIST 

Store C ? 



Store B 

Lobby Ex. Bank Bldg 




W9iC, 




S MADE WITH 

[r[L[Lai2)Tnj?^W©iJ[DS. 

the wise IS sufficient ' 

.CLARK 
ENGRAVING CO, 

LLU5TRATOR& P^^BLO 
(^ DESIGNERS COLO. 

CS/ ENGRAVERS . 



GaSbBI^* 



Gel Your Picnic Supplies 

AT , Z= 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 



The Favorite Resort of the Col- 
lege Students, Renowned in 
Story and Song 

BRUIN INN 

Up North Cheyenne Canon 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER, Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 



Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Patronize TIGER 
Advertisers 



UNION ICE AND COAL CO. 

W. M. BANNING, Proprietor 

Artificial Ice and Cold Storage 

Dealers in All Kinds of Coal and Pinion Wood 
Yard Office, 105 W.Vermiio City Office, 5 N. Tejon 



I GOT IT, TOO! 



(By Webb iMiote.) 

l-.ast week I got into a meeting of 
The Kinnikinnik board by mistake. 
By saying "you all" and other little 
things, I made them think I was Arg i 
and got to stay. They ail had thci 
eyes glued to manuscripts, anyway. 
Of course it wasn't Ic ng before some- 
body had to raise his head to : emark, 
"Fine, fine atmosphere. Sympathetic 
treatment. Diction suited to theme." 
Then I left. Not that I disagreed 
v.it'i the comment, but I had to go 
then. 

Little did I think that the literary 
bug had infected me in those few 
ethereal moments cf contemplation, 
in the atmosphere of art. Little did I 
thin'v that I could write poetry. But 
before T had gone a block I was call- 
ed of my soul, and resting on a snowy 
doorstep, I wrote as follows on the 
back of a bill from my clothier; 

Softly bieathcs the south wind sigh- 
ing, 
Sadly moans the oak tree dying, 
Wei dly wails the night bird crying, 
h^or you, just you, dear, you! 

Loudly boom the breakers dashmg 
Awf'ly throb the thunders crashing, 
Quick, your order, here, Fm hashing, 
I^or \-(iu, just you, dear, you! 

Had I been capable of sustained ef- 
fort, my poesy should not have ended 
thus. I started with true poetic fer- 
vor, not intending to produce this 
apostrophe to money by a self-sup- 
porting student; but a p;.et must 
write what his sublimated brain dic- 
tates. I shall submit this musical bit 
to The Kinnikinnik, and you may 
confidently await its appearence in 
the December number. 




Are the most popular tilings in 
college. 365 of the former and 
over 20 of the latter may be 
had after chapel any day next 
week for Sixty Cents. 15UP 3 

College Calendar 



Maier's Lunch & Dining Room 

Lunches of All Kinds 
Regular Meals 20c and 25c 

216' , N. Tejon St. Opposite North Park 

THE CHRIST wTrE 

We are headquarters for 
attractive things for Christ- 
mas presents, with some- 
thing to suit all purses. :: 

Whitney and Grimwood 

No. 20 North Tejon Street 



12 



THE T I (J K R 



0. E. Hemenway 



Groceries and 



Meats 



.*f.u 






'W^ 




115 South Tejon Street 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



YOU don't entertain your 
guests to save money — 
if you did, the simplest 
way would be to forego en- 
tertaining them. 
<|fMUETH's may cost more, 



but^ 



CLMueth's 



CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 

5 Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



The Colorado Springs Floral Co. 

Wish to Have Your Business at Right 
Prices 



Telephone Main 599 



104 N. Tejon St. 



REFERENCES FOR ENGINEERS. 

A iVlachine Shop without Cutting 
Tools. The Machines and Fixtures 
used in Building Burglar-Proof Safes 
out of Manganese Steel, Which Can 
Only be Machined by Grinding. Amer- 
ican Machinist, Nov. 25, 1909. 

Reconstruction and Standardizing of 
Chicago Railway Company Cars. Elec- 
tric Railway Journal, Nov. 27, 1909. 

Transmission Interior Wiring. De- 
velopment of Electrical Undertakings. 
Electrical Review and Western Electri- 
cian, Nov. 27, 1909. 

Court Definition of Annual Horse 
Power. Electrical World, Nov. 11, 1909. 

Details of Practical Mining Engineer- 
ing Journal, Nov. 27, 1909. 

Extracts from the Annual Report of 
the Isthmian Canal Commission. En- 
gineering News, Nov. 25, 1909. 

Through the courtesy of Dr. Schnei- 
der, professor of the Biology department, 
several topics worthy of notice to en- 
gineering students have been incor- 
porated among the references in this 
issue. While these topics are not found 
in the periodical literature, they are none 
the less valuable, and can be of service 
to the engineer in whose hands often the 
welfare of a community rests. 

The following are a few topics dealing 
chiefly with some phase of Sanitary Sci- 
ence : 

Water supply. 

Collection and Disposal of Waste. 
(Sewage and Garbage). 

Ventilation systems. 

Heating systems. 

Plumbing systems. 

The above topics are to be foimd 
treated at considerable length in any of 
the following texts : 

Bashore's "Outlines of Practical San- 
itation." 

Gerhard's "Sanitation of Public Build- 
ings." 

Price's "Handbook on Sanitation." 

Savage's "Water Supplies." 

Harrington's "Practical Hygiene." 

Bergey's "Principles of Hygiene." 



"BILL" TELEGRAPHS HOME. 

The following telegram has reach- 
ed the Lennox residence in this city: 
"Send my teeth to Chicago. Left in 
the toolbox of the auto. 

"Bill." 



A. G. SPALDING a BROS. 



The • 

SPALDING 
Trade -Mark 




are the Largest 
Manufacturers 
in the World of 

Official 

Equipment 

For All 
Athletic 
Sports and 
Pastimes 

If Yftil areinter- 
" * 0" ested in 
Athletic Sport you 
should have a copy 
of the Spalding 
Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyclo- 
pedia of what's new 
in Sport and is sent 
free on request. 

A. G. Spalding & Bros. 

1616 Arapohoe St., Denver, Colo. 

JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Strcc 



is known throughout 
the world as a 

Guarantee of 
Quality 



Fraternities, Clubs, Individuals 
desiring Milk or Cream 
in any quantities 
should remem- 
ber :: :: 



The Sinton- Rustic Home 

rw • o No. 419 South El Paso St. 

Uairy §) Phone Main 442 



The College Photo Studio 

The Highest Class of 

Photographs 




Bingham 

18 S. Tejon St. Phone M.678 



DOUGLAS &. 
HETHERINGTON 



Telephone 556 



Architects 

Rooms IS and 16 Out West Bulldin|{. 
COLORADO SPRINGS. COLO. 



TllK 'I'M.-KR 



13 



Memory 
Books 

Bound in colors, black and 
and orange, and lettered on 
side. The only really Colo- 
rado College Scrap Book 
made. Lar^e enough to con- 
tain your four years' items. 

Price, $1.25 each 



The Out West 

Printing & Stationery Co. 
9-11 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 



At Moderate 
Prices 



Furniture 



Special Terms to Students 

McCracken & Hubbard 

120 and 122 South Tejon Street 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, V/e 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

IS S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

Are Always Well Pleased When They 
Get Their Hair Cut at 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



12 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springs 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 
^ascade Laundry 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 

20 per cent, discount 

To All Students of College and Academy 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Miss Grace Barker '07 is teaching in 
the Baldwin School for Girls, Bryn 
JMawr, Penna. 

Miss Mary Porter 'OS is teaching in 
the East Denver High School. 



The engagement has recently been an- 
nounced of William Lennox '09, to Miss 
Emma Buchtel of Denver. 

Miss Nelle Scott '03 is teaching in 
the Grand Junction High School. 

Miss Ruth Brush, a former student of 
Colorado College, has recently been mar- 
ried to Mr. Bliss of Greeley. 



II Local Department || 



Ralston and Davis put in the best 
part of Thanksgiving week taking 
civil ser-^'ice examinations in Denver. 



The Glee Club and String Quartet 
sat together for a picture at Emery's 
3-esterday. 



Withrow '13 and Benjamin '13 were at 
their homes in Longmont last week. 



Esmay '13 is pledged to Alpha Tau 
Delta. 



Miss Frantz spent the last of the week 
at her home in Pueblo. 



7 E. Bijou 



Phone 820 



Heizer and Leadham were in Las 
Animas for Thanksgiving. 

Tom Chapman was home last week. 



Miss Kidder spent the week end at 
her home in Denver. 



Miss Evelyn Schuler has returned to 
her home in Raton, New Mexico. 



Miss Yerkes entertained at her home 
in Denver, Friday night. Those present 
from Colorado College were, the Misses 
Eames, Ferril, Mable Wilson, Grace 
Wilson, Hedcock ex-'12 and Gilmore 
ex-'12, and Messrs. Graham, Ela, Gil- 
more, Dorlin and the Station brothers. 



Hunt Up 

BisselFs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 



Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
Flour, Fe«>d, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



C. F. Arcularius & 
Company 

A Large Assortment of 

BELT PINS 

All the Latest Styles 

9 South Tejon Street 
COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 

We have Embossing Dies for Stationery ef all the 
College Societies and Fraternities, also the Great 
Seal of the College. We carry in stock a large 
line of papers upon which to emboss these Dies — 
Hurd's, Crane's and others. 

Gowdy-Simmons Ptg Co. 'jZZTx'^i 



Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Burgess Candy 

There's nothing too good for the 
College girls — that's why we sell 
them candy. But we've noticed the 
girls themselves dont always do the 
buying. When a box of candy bears 
the Burgess stamp, you knOw it is 
never stale or shelf v\orn, but packed 
to your order from the freshest, pur- 
est, richest goods that our expert 
candy-makers can produce from day 
to day. 

W. N. Burgess '^Ji'^sS:-.:^ 



14 



THE T I G E K 



This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 

Company 




Headquarters for 

College Footwear 



The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

FOUNDERS AND MACHINISTS 



College 
Inn 



**j Short 
// Orders 



"Come in, the Cider's 
Fine" 

THE 

Crissey & Fowler 
Lumber Co. 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 

Our Special Extra-Clean 

Lignite 
Furnace Lump 

The Colorado Springs Fuel Co., 
112 Pike's Peak Avenue. Two 
Phones Main 230 



Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 

A.S.BLAKE 





Is the 


Man 


to 


See 






107 No 


rth Tejon 






Phone 


465 




ickle Ware 








Cu 


tlery 



Miss Winifred Schuler spent the week 
end in Denver. 



Delta Phi Theta entertained at dinner 
Monday evening. Mrs. Smith chap- 
eroned. The guests were, Misses Har- 
ris, Pettigrew, Shepard, Miller, and the 
Misses Knight. 



Delta Phi Theta took supper in Wil- 
liams canon Friday night. 

Messrs. Strohl and Watson and Cap- 
tain Ball, U. S. A., of the Mines chapter 
of Beta Theta Pi spent the latter half 
of the week investigating the mills in 
Colorado City, and visited at the Delta 
Phi Theta house. 



Addie Hemenway entertained a few 
of the junior girls with a tea, Satur- 
day afternoon. 



Beth Hamilton entertained some of 
the freslman girls at supper Sunday 
evening. 

Marion Yerkes entertained some of 
the college people F. iday night at her 
home in Denver. 



Clara Wight entertained. Monday 
afternoon with a tea. 

Many freshmen spent Thanksgiving 
at their homes. 



Miss Kennedy is spending a few 
days with Miss Price. 

Last Saturday night a candy pull 
was given in Ticknor Study for the 
girls who remained at the halls on 
Thanksgiving day. 



Miss Wolcott entertained with a 
spread last Saturday night. 



Miss Crandall gave a tea last Sun- 
day. 

Miss Rita Miller's mother spent 
Thanksgiving day at the college. 



Many spreads have been held in 
the halls by girls who received boxes 
from home. 



The freshman class has elected 
Mr. A. L. Golden as its delegate to 
the Rochester convention. 



You Will Find Many 
Articles at 

The Murray 
Drug Qo.9&^ 

Suitable for 

Christmas Gifts 

Of Particular Interest to 
College People We Mention 
Pennants, C. C. Pillow Tops, 
College Calendars, Kodaks, 
Waterman Pens, Lowney's 
Chocolates in Beautiful Hol- 
iday Packages from ^ 2 to 5 
Pounds, Safety Razors, Toil- 
et Articles, Etc., Etc., Etc. 



William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

MCMDCDG ^ New York Stock Exchange 

MtMBtKS , c„|o„j„ Springs Mining Stock Exchange 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House. London, E. C. 




he Waterman Press 

at 112 E. Cucharras 



are Specialists in Fine 



Printing, and solicit 



the patronage of the most ex- 
acting for anything that can 
be done in a decent print shop 
No matter how particular you 
are, we are here to make good 



We Print THE TIGER 



THE TIGER 



15 



TO ATTEND QUARTERLY 

MEETING. 



President Slocuni nnd Dean Par- 
sons are to attend the quarterly meet- 
ing of the state Y. M. C. A. commit- 
tee in Denver tonight. 



ACADEMY 



(Amy L. Biisch, Correspondent.) 



At a ineeting of the Cntle- boys 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 

GIDDINGS BROS. 

Colorado Springs 

THE SPECIALTY STORE 



A Hearty Welcome Constantly Awaits All Visito • 



College Boys Rennember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barber 
wrork and baths 



106H E- Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



^^ 



aundi?y 



Why not have the BEST WORK ? 



20 per cent, discount 

To all Students of College and Academy 



J. J. WILSON, College Agent 

W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



119 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



/T 



A Few Suggestions for the Early 
Christmas Shoppers 



==^ 



Bath Robes, All Colors 

House Coats, Handsomely Tailored 

Pajamas, Exquisite Patterns 

Hose Supporters, Individual Boxes 

Suspenders, Silk, Sterling Silver Buckles 

Mufflers, All Colors in Silk - 

Neckwear, Imported Silks 

Gloves, Fur, Kid, Fur or Silked Lined 

Handkerchief, Fancy, Silk or Linen 

Leather Goods, Collar Bags, Pocket Book 

Card Cases, Toilet Sets, Military Brushes, 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 




%. 



\ Correct Dress for Men. \ 



$13.50 to $4 

$15 to $5 

$5 to $1.25 

50c to 25c 

- $3 to 75c 

$7.50 to $1 

$2.50 to 25c 

$10 to $1.25 

$1.50 to 25c 

s, Bill Books, 

Cigar Cases. 



113 E. Pike's Peak 
Avenue 



J 



last Tuesday, it was decided to have 
a class football game in the near fu- 
tu.c. Stratton was elected captain of 
the junior-freshman team, and Lewis 
of the sophomore-senior team. 



The death of a former Cutler stu- 
dent, Mrs. Abbot, nee Miss Florence 
Cary, occurred in Denver last Friday. 
Mrs. Abbott was a member of the 
class of 1910 for two years. 



The Academy subscription to the 
Ewing fund amounted to $38, instead 
of the sum mentioned in a recent is- 
sue of The Tiger. 



A number of Cutler girls assisted at 
ihe San Luis Charity Fair which was 
held last week. 



DRINK 

DERN'S 

Freshly Roasted Tea and Coffee 

29 South Tejon Street 



The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies and 
Fixtures 



The Philo Literary Society will hold 
a musical meeting at the home of 
Miss Crowley, 1314 North Tejon St., 
December 10. The following pro- 
gram will be given: 

Piano Solo Miss Perley 

Life of Mendelssohn, Miss Van Diest 

Violin Solo Miss Parsons 

Piano Solo Miss McReynolds 

Vocal Solo Miss Lennox 

Roll call to be answered by "Roasts 
on the Management." 



208 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 812 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-203 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence, 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 956 

Christmas 
Photos 

Up-to-Date in Style 
and Finish. Sit for 
them now 




m^ 



Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 



16 THETIGER 

We Have the Sto rm Boot for You 

Whether it rains or snoivs, hails or sleets, ^our feet will he dry and comfortahle in our $5.00 Semi-High- 
Cut Storm Boot. Don't thinly \}ou can't afford to get a pair Just for stormy weather. You l^nou) y^ou not 
only insure your health, but also practice economy by doing so 



contain the best leather made, and are acknowledged to be the best shoe value in the world. 
Drop in and look over the latest Regal stales for fall. $3.50 and $4.00. 



Regal Shoes 

Perkins-Shearer Co. «^ f ^vfr ^n^ ^'""'" 




Young Men's Dress Footwear 



The Approaching Holiday Season and Its Social 
Functions Will Demand Dress Footwear. Our 
Showing Is Superb. 



Dress Shoes, 
Button, Lace 
or Blucher at 
$4. 00, $5.00 
and $6.00 



\f5>^«vft.^ 



SHOES ■^»*'*T SATISFY 



&a S.TEJON ST- 



Dress Pumps 
in Patent, Gun 
Metal, and 
Black Suede 
at $5.00 




When Trading, Remember TIGER Advertisers 




Colorado College 

Founded in Colorado Springs in 18 7 4 



WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



Depart- 
ments 



College of Arts and Science 

E. S. PARSONS, Dean 
School of Engineering 

F. CAJORI, Dean 
^ School of Forestry 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 
School of Music 

E. D. HALE, Dean 



Cutler Academy 



The Associated 
Preparatory 
■ School, in which 
students are prepared for any American College 




Vol. XII 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., DECEMBER 10, 1909 



Number 1.'-^ 



MAGNA 

PANPAN 



THE STUDENT COMMISSION 

ADOPTS PLAN OUTLINED 

IN LAST WEEK'S TIGER. 



Committees to Be Appointed — Regu- 
lations Made for Freshman-Soph- 
omore Game — No Admission 
Charge. 



Five committees of three each, one 
for each month from January to May 
inclusive, will be appointed by the 
Student Commission to have charge 
(jf the Aiagna Panpan for the rest of 
the yea.'. So voted the commission 
at its regular bi-weekly session early 
in the week. 

At the same meeting the commis- 
sioners decided that the freshman- 
sophomore football game should b" 
held without charge on Washburn 
h'ield. Friday, December lo, and that 
the two teams should be made up, the 
freshman, strictly of first-year men, 
and the sophoniore, strictly of second- 
year men. The sophomore member 
st 'ongly advocated a nominal admis- 
sion fee, but the upperclassmen all op- 
posed him, with the exception of Van 
Stone, who seconded the lost motion 
for a charge. 



EXAMINATION. 



Final for Rhodes Scholarship, Decem- 
ber i8. 

The final examination for the 
Rhodes scholarship will be held in 
the office of the state superintendent 
of instruction in Denver a week from 
Saturday. At that time final decision 
will be made between Ande;son of 
Boulder and Ellingwood of C. C. 



UNION MEETING IN BEMIS. 

Dr. Slocum Will Speak — Special 
Music. 

fn Bemis Hall next Sunday night at 
6:.",o, President Slocum will give the 
second of a series of talks preparatory 
to the Christmas season. He will 
speak on The Incarnation. 

Those who were at the last service 
know that they cannot afTord to miss 
the meeting next Sunday night. The 
two glee clubs will sing, and the 
string (|uartetle will render special 
music. 



"EAGER HEART" 



DRAMATIC SOCIETY STAGES 

BEAUTIFUL CHRISTMAS 

PLAY. 



Miss McRoberts Does Splendid Work 

in Title Role — Similar Play to 

Be Given Each Year. 



On Friday evening the Dramatics 
Society presented in Perkins a medi- 
eval mystery play — "Eager Heart." 
This was by far the most ambitious 
attempt yet made by the society and 
they are to be congratulated upon the 
remarkable success of the undertaking. 
The unusual nature of the stage set- 
ting, costumes and lighting made the 
task of presenting this play difficult, 
but so well had these been arranged 
that the atmosphere of the production 
was harmonious from beginning to 
end. No small credit is due Miss An- 
derson as stage manager and ?\Iiss 
Barclay as trainer. 

The cast was composed largely of 
young women making their first ap- 

Continucd on Page S. 



MUDDY 

SCRAMBLE 



SOPHOMORES AND FREHMEN 

WALLOW ON SOGGY LAWN 

FOR THIRTY MINUTES. 



One Flag Captured by Sophomores- 

Another Tattered by Wallowers, 

And a Third Confiscated by 

Student Commission. 



Pantatcjriums have been working 
overtime since the freshiuen and 
sophomores crawled down near to na- 
ture yesterday after chapel. Arrayed 
in their next-to-best the underclass- 
men scrambled and rolled about on a 
soggy lawn for thirty feverish minutes. 
They fell to it when Gregg '12 shinned 
up the rain pipe by the chapel door 
and tossed a green and yellow flag 
inio th-c crowd leaving the services, 
and they ke,;t at it until the upper- 
classmen decided it was time to count 
hands on the two remaining pieces of 
the torn rag. The referees declared 
that the freshmen held 26 handfuls to 
the sophomores' 24. The sophomores 
declared that they had pockets full of 
green and yellow bits, and spectators 
and gladiators went home to dinners 
and bathtubs, respectively. 

The freshmen were initiatos of the 

Continued on Page 9. 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB. 



Twenty-Eight Members Working 
Hard, Concert in February. 

The Girls' Glee Club was organized 
November 24, although two reeharsals 
had been held previous to that time. 
The following officers were elected: 

President, Eleanor G. Thomas. 

Vice-President, Miss May Weir. 

Continued on Page 9. 



THE TIGER 



COLLEGE PEOPLE DOING 
PRACTICE TEACHING. 



State Legislature Will Grant State 

Certificates to Those Who Fulfil 

the Special Requirements. 



At the last meeting of the state leg- 
islatue a bill was passed whereby 
graduates of colleges within the state 
may secure state certificates for teach- 
ing in the public schools without tak- 
ing the teachers' examinations. Cer- 
tain conditions as lo professional 
training were prescribed and a state 
board of examiners created to carry 
out the provisions of the bill. 

Two kinds of certificates a- e provid- 
ed for; one is for life and the other is 
for five years, temporary and non-re- 
newable. College graudates who have 
fulfilled the requirements are given the 
temporary certificate. 

The conditions as to professional 
training a e that a total of 20 semes- 
ter hours of work be done in at least 
three of a group of six specified sub- 
jects. These are: 

r. General and educational psychol- 
ogy- 

2. History of Education. 

3. Science and Principles of Educa- 
tion. 

Practice Teaching and Special 
Methods. 

5. O ganization and Management of 
Schools. 

6. Philosophy, Sociology, and An- 
thropology. 

Credit for practice teaching to 
the extent of at least 4 hours must be 
presented by each candidate. As a 
part of that 4 hours' credit, it is fur- 
ther specified that the student must 
te::ch at least sixty recitation periods 
of net less than thirty minutes each 
or not fewer than fifty diff'erent days. 
This teaching is to be supervised. 

A given student — to make the case 
concrete — might present 6 semester 
hours of Psychology, 8 in Philosophy, 
4 in Practice Teaching, and 2 in Prin- 
ciples of Education, making a total 
of 20 semester hours — the minimum 
requirement. 

Through the courtesy of the Board 
of Education of Colorado Springs and 
the hearty cooperation of the princi- 
pal of the High School and of the 
High School Annex, principals of the 
various grade schools and of the 
teachers, opportunity is offered for the 
fulfillme'nt of the requirement as to 
practice teaching by students of Colo- 
rado College. 

The work of the students includes 



not merely the practice teaching pre- 
scribed by law but also various kinds 
of assistance which they can tender 
to the regular teachers, such as the 
correction of written work, prepara- 
tion of materials and reports, and in- 
dividual instruction. This work counts 
toward the 4 hours' credit, which must 
include also the 60 periods of practice 
teaching. The students act as assist- 
ant teachers — not in any sense sup- 
planting the regular teachers, but 
working under their directions. 

The student teachers attend the 
regular teachers' meetings and are un- 
der the supervision of the teachers and 
principal of the school in which they 
teach. Conferences concerning the 
work done are held with the college 
ofticer in charge. A college commit- 
tee composed of Dean Parsons, Dr. 
Howe and Professor Ruger has gen- 
eral oversight of the arrangements. 

Seventeen members of the senior 
class are at present engaged in assist- 
ing regular teachers. There are five 
at the Garfield school, 4 each at the 
Lowell and Steele schools, and 2 each 
at the Columbia school and the High 
school. 



RHODES SCHOLARSHIP. 

Dr . Parkin in Colorado Conferring 
with State Committee. 

Dr. Geo. Parkin, of London, secre- 
tary of the Rhodes scholarship trust, 
made a hurried trip to Colorado to 
talk with the Colorado committee. 
The committee met him on Monday 
evening, Dec. 6. He is making a tour 
of all the states to secure by a per- 
sonal conference with the committees 
a better understanding of the way in 
which appointments are secured and 
to suggest improvements. Dean Par- 
sons went to Denver to attend the 
meeting. 



THE PALMER MEMORIAL. 

The campaign to secure $60,000 for 
an equestrian statue of General Wm. 
J. Palmer will begin immediately. 
This decision was reached at a meet- 
ing of the finance committee of the 
Memorial Association, Monday after- 
noon. The campaign will be carried 
on simultaneously in Colorado 
Springs, throughout the state, and in 
the east. 

Locally the committee decided to 
start the campaign by sending out a 
circular letter to every citizen of Colo- 



rado Springs. So generous a response 
is expected that a personal solicitation 
will hardly be necessary in the opinion 
of those in charge. 

The memorial will probably be 
placed on the campus of Colorado 
College. 



MINERVA FUNCTION. 

Minerva Literary Society gave its 
annual function Thursday, December 
9, at the Acacia hotel, in commemora- 
tion of its seventeenth birthday anni- 
versary. The banquet was held in the 
dining room, which was decorated 
with blue flowers pendant from the 
ceiling. The table decortaions were in 
wnite narcissus, pink carnations and 
blue-shaded candles. An eight-course 
banquet was served, the gentlemen 
progressing between courses. Fink's 
orchestra played throughout the even- 
ing. 

Those present were: Dr. and Ms. 
Slocum, Dr. and Mrs. Parsons, Dr. and 
Mrs. Cajori Misses Kampf, Canon, 
Parsons, Weeks, Watson, IngersoU. 
Anna Strang, Hemenway, Wier, Stark, 
Tucker, McCaw, Hoffman, Miller, 
Vaughn, Randolph, Hall, Barclay, 
Safer, Estill, Nell Estill, Scholz, Ait- 
kin, Connell, Gile, Frost, Cheley, Mc- 
Creery, Rice, Louise Kampf, Bispham, 
Gregg; Messrs. Motten, Clark, Phil- 
lips, Argo, Steele, Angell, Lake, Haz- 
en, Hesler, Whipple, Merreill, Sylves- 
ter, Avery, Nye, Kittleman, Hamilton, 
Rice, Randolph, Sayre, Johnston, 
Gregg, Conklin, Thompson, Bryson, 
Dean, Griswold, Shaw, Coolidge, Col- 
lins, Shapcott, Roe, Heald. 



CONFERENCE TO MEET SAT- 
URDAY. 



The Colorado Faculty Athletic Con- 
ference will hold its regular December 
meeting on Saturday, Dec. 11, at the 
University Club in Denver. Dean 
Parsons will represent Colorado Col- 
lege. 



PEARSONS ROUND TABLE. 



The members of Pearsons Round 
Table met Tuesday night in the Dutch 
room of the Acacia for the regular 
monthly festivities. 



HOLIDAY TIGER next week! 



No dress suits and no flowers; lots 
of food, lots of fun and lots of sense; 
that's the Y. M. C. A. banquet at the 
.Mamo, Tuesday night. 



THE TIGER 



FORESTRY SCHOOL SENIORS 
RETURN FROM LUMBER- 
ING TRIP. 



■ The senior class of the Colorado 
School of Forestry at Colorado Springs 
has returned from its ten day trip with 
Professor Coolidge among the logging 
camps and sawmills of the Fraser or 
Arrowhead district. Fraser, which is 
eighty-five miles from Denver on the 
Moffat Road is the center of a large 
lumber industry. The class left Denver 
immediately after Thanksgiving and 
made its headquarters at Fraser. Ins- 
pection of logging camps, chopping, 
skiding, docking, and sledding of logs 
and sawmilling kept the class busy dur- 
ing their stay in the woods. Fraser is 
the headquarters of the Arapaho Na- 
tional Forest and the class was fortunate 
in having a place of this kind to inspect, 
as the difference in the methods of cut- 
ting timber on the private land and on 
the National Forest served as an object 
lesson as to what can be done in pract- 
ical forestry. 

The class was exceedingly fortunate in 
the assistance rendered by Deputy Sup- 
ervisor Cooper of the Arapahoe National 
Forest with whom they visited the 
timber sale areas of which he has chai'ge. 
Messrs. Aitcheson and Stevens of the 
Colorado Lumber Company also very 
kindly consented to show the class over 
the company's railroad and sawmill. 
Some of the class, who are well known 
football stars, seemed to derive nearly as 
mush enjoyment from assisting the 
lumber jacks in buffeting the logs into 
place on sleds or cars as they had shown 
in buffeting the pigskin. 

The men returned feeling that they 
had profited from their contact with the 
practical woodsmen and their oppor- 
tunity to see the woods work. 

This is the first lumbering trip made 
by the Colorado School of Forestry, 
The trip is to be made a regular yearly 
institution for the Seniors, and is one 
of numerous means by which the actual 
instruction in Forestry and Lumbering 
will be carried on in the lumber woods 
as it should be. 

The class consists of W. S. Lee, F. P. 
McKown, C. P. Morgan, and A. E. 
Sherry. 



DINNER, PRAYERS AND GAMES. 

The Ancient Order of the Dais Enter- 
tains at Bemis. 



Last Wednesday evening, JMiss 
Brown and the Ancient Order of the 
Dais entertained the town girls and 
the men of the senior class at dinner. 
Dr. and Mrs. Slocum, Dean and Mrs. 



Parsons, Dean and Mrs. Cajori, Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. Smith were also pres- 
ent. 

Pointed limericks smiled from the 
backs of the acorn-decorated place 
caxls. Juniors, sophomores and fresh- 
men bm'led from the back of the din- 
ing hall. The seniors were seated at 
tables on and near the dais. .'\fter 
dinne ■, t!ie men were allowed to watch 
the regular order of everiing services 
at Bemis. A short dance in the lower 
corridor is always followed by pray- 
ers in the common room. Wednesday 
being an exceptional night, additional 
sports, such as the X'irginia reel and 
Ruth and Jacob, were allowed after 
praye.s. 



PHIL GILLETT SPEAKS 
STUDENT VOLUNTEER 
OPEN MEETING. 



AT 



BIG FEAST. 



ApoUonians Give Second Annual Stag 
Banquet. 



On last Tuesday night the membe s 
of ilic .^polloriian Club gave their sec- 
ond annual stag banquet, at the Alta 
^''ista hotel. After the good things 
had been disposed of, the time was en- 
joyably s.;ent in listening to the speak- 
ers of the evening, and in singing. 
The president of the club, Harry W. 
Coil, acted as toastmaster. The com- 
plete list of toasts is as follows: 
Confessions of a Bachelor, 

xMr. J. M. Clark 

Mile Stones E. B. Hunt 

Debates Hildreth Frost 

.\pollonian Spirit L. E. Griswold 

Our Ladies Robert Childs 

Fumes B. H. Stewart 

Gregg and Thompson composed the 
committee of arrangements responsi- 
ble for the success of the occasion. 
Tvventj'-eight members were in attend- 
ance. 



PHI GAMMA DELTA BANQUETS. 



The Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity 
held its annual stag-banquet at the 
chapter house last Saturday night. 
Prominent members of the fraternity 
and alumni from all parts of the state 
were present to aid in the merriment 
and partake of the festivities. 

After a sumptuous feast, in which 
roast pig played a prominent part, 
toasts were responded to by several 
of the alumni and active men. The 
remaineder of the evening passed in 
renewing old friendships and singing 
songs that never grow old. 



'"If we leave out the fact of allegi- 
ance to Christ, the missionary enter- 
prise is .more than worth while con- 
sidering only ihe infiuerice of Chris- 
tianity on the iiome life and pe.-sonal 
life of those who are reached by it." 
This is one of the things which Phil 
Gillett said to those who were at the 
Student Volunteer meeting last Sun- 
day. In the Korean language there is 
no word for "home," so we see how 
much they need the work that is be- 
ing done among them by our mission- 
aries. The Korean appreciates this, 
too, for in addressing the mission- 
aries they always use the highest 
form of language. The middle form 
is used for equals, and the lower 
form for those whom one considers 
inferior. It is significant to note also, 
that in addressing the Buddhist 
priests this lowest form is used. A 
man uses the same word for his wife 
that he uses to designate his house, 
and whenever he can afford it, he has 
tv.'o or three wives. We can see from 
this the great field, for advancement 
under Christian leadership there is in 
Korea. The foremost educational in- 
stitutions now in that land are the 
Christian schools. 



PROFESSOR MOTTEN 

LECTURES BEFORE 

WOMAN'S CLUB 



Prot. R, H. Motten last week deliv- 
ered his third lecture before the Wo- 
man's Club of Colorado Springs. His 
subject was the mystical poem "Para- 
celsis." which he handled in a way 
that showed his own deep insight into 
the meaning and beauty of the poem. 

The remainder of the series of lec- 
tures wliicli arc to be delivered on the 
first Wednesday of each month during 
the winter take up the following 
themes: 

"Christmas Eve and Easter Day," 
"God and the World," "The Future 
Life,'' "The Incarnation." 



NOTICE. 



The management has decided to dis- 
continue sending Tigers to unpaid 
subscribers after the Christmas holi- 
days. If you desire to keep your name 
on the mailing list, pay up at once. 
The management needs the money 
and you want the paper. 



THE 1 I G E R 



CHANGES NEEDED IN ENGINEER- 
ING COURSES 



Instructors in Colleges are Out of 
Touch with the Workaday World. 

GRADUATES FULL OF THEORY. 



Lack of Practical Training in Our 
Technical Schools Plunges Grad- 
uates Into a Strange World. 

In a paper read before the Society 
for the Promotion of Enghieering 
Education at a meeting in Pratt In- 
stitute. Brooklyn, Mr. Charles B. Go- 
ing, editor of the Engineering Maga- 
zine, attacked the plan on which en- 
gineering education is now being con- 
ducted. He urges that so far no uni- 
versity has succeeded in giving its stu- 
dents a foretaste of the conditions un- 
der which they will have to work after 
they graduate, and that the professors 
and instructors are quite out of touch 
with the workaday world. 

Air. Going is himself on the staff of 
Columbia and had much to do with 
the introduction there and the man- 
agement of a course in mechanical en- 
ginee.ing which is designed to show 
the students what will be expected of 
them in the economical management 
of shop work, so as to produce the 
utmost efficiency at the minimum of 
cost. He declared, however, that the 
prevalent opinion among practical 
men is that the graduate of an engin- 
eering school is "too full of theory" 
and that he must have a considerable 
supplementary training in minor prac- 
tical positions before he can be trust- 
ed to work out results which will be 
economically valuable. 

One reason for the lack of practical 
teaching in the schools, Mr. Going 
thought, is the way in which the old 
university spirit lingers. A German 
trained incumbent of a teaching chair, 
he said, had bewailed in his presence 
the necessity of having any students 
at all at the university, as they inter- 
fered with his opportunities for re- 
search and meditation. 

There is still too little disposition 
among teaches to recognize economic 
limitation as being as important as 
scientific standards of perfection. 

The universities, too, have deliber- 
ately discouraged their professors 
from combining outside practice with 
college work. They are consequently 
unable to keep closely in touch with the 
advance of modern practice. On the 
other hand their assistants are paid 



such small salaries that it is impossi- 
ble to obtain men of real experience, 
and the result is that they are by ne- 
cessity drawn from a class scarcely a 
step in advance of that of the under- 
graduates themselves. Mr. Going's 
remedy for this is a proper use of the 
professor's Sabbatical year. It is a 
recognized custom in American uni- 
versities for professors to receive 
leave of absence once in so many 
years at full pay, so that they may 
devote their leisure to travel and the 
familiarizing of themselves with the 
work done in their subjects elsewhere. 

At the present time engineering 
professors, like their colleagues in oth- 
er faculties, have construed this as 
meaning visits to other universities. 
Mr. Going would see the Sabatical 
periods in the technical faculties come 
around every three years, and the re- 
quirement imposed that the professor 
should occupy this time not in re- 
search or seeing how his subject is 
taught, but in active work, as an of- 
ficial or attache in a railway organiza- 
tion, a bridge or construction com- 
pany, or a manufacturing plant, seeing 
how the things he teaches are actu- 
ally practiced. He believes that there 
would be no difficulty in inducing the 
managers of large concerns to take in 
university professors in their years of 
leisure, as the scientific knowledge 
that the professor would bring with 
him would be of advantage to the men 
with whom he was associated. At the 
same time he would return to his 
classes with an assured grasp of the 
latest ideas and methods, a fresh 
viewpoint and larger experience. 

He would then be much better fitted 
to tell his students what is the life 
actually before them and what will be 
expected of them. 

Mr. Going illustrated this by com- 
paring the sort of training which a 
student gets at Annapolis or West 
Point with the course at an ordinary 
university. 

"The boy entering Annapolis or 
West Point," he said, "steps at once 
into the life of navy or the army and 
becomes a part of it. His graduation 
is merely a step forward in the same 
direction. The boy entering one of 
our engineering schools usually steps 
into something totally unlike an en- 
gineering corps, a manufacturing shop 
or the motive department of a railway. 
His graduation is a plunge into a 
strange and bewildering stream mov- 
ing in a new direction in which he 
must find a new foothold and new ori- 
entation. 



To sum up the proposed changes 
he as'<ed for a fundamental change in 
the engineering schools of the coun- 
try, by j.vhich the teachers will live 
nearer to the practicing engineers and 
the obstacles now put in the way of 
professors doing outside work for 
themselves would be entirely swept 
away. 

Then there may be a real desire on 
the part of employers to obtain young 
graduates instead of, as is often the 
case at the present, looking askance 
at them till they have rubbed off the 
gloss of their college course by two or 
three years in practical jobs. — The 
New York Times. 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 



Dean Hale discussed "Velocity" at 
conference on Tuesday. Your regula- 
tion music pupil will jeopardize any- 
thing to play fast. And so he invites 
shipwreck, and quite infallibly gets it. 
If he had the penetration to under- 
stand that velocity, wisely employed, 
would plainly and promptly test the 
quality of his practice, he might ma- 
terially mend that and get his playing 
fast, too. However, it is true that he 
needs here the admonition and guid- 
ance of the competent teacher. 



CITIES OF THE EAST. 



Howard Agnew Johnston to Give 
Four Chapel Talks— Other Cler- 
gymen to Speak Later. 



Arrangements have been made with 
various clergymen in the city to con- 
duct prayers at Colorado College at 
various times during the year. Next 
week the Rev. Dr. Howard Agnew 
Johnston, of the First Presbyterian 
Church will have charge on Monday, 
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. 
In place of the regular exercises he 
will give four addresses on Ancient 
Historic Cities: Damascus, the City of 
Merchants; Athens, the City of Schol- 
ars; Rome, the City of Politicians; 
Jerusalem, the City of Religionists. 
The second week in January, the Rev. 
W. W. Ranney, of the First Congre- 
gational Church will have charge and 
will also give a series of four short 
addresses. Following him other cler- 
gymen will have charge from time to 
time. The purpose is to bring the 
students more closely in touch with 
the churches and the clergymen of the 
city. 



THE TIGER 



HAMPTON INSTITUTE. 



President Slocum Tells in Chapel of 
Recent Visit. 

Instead of the regular chapel ad- 
dress last Friday, President Slocum 
told of his visit, during his eastern 
trip, to the Hampton Institute in Vir- 
ginia. In general, his talk follows: 

The most serious problem the na- 
tion has ever had came with the close 
of the civil war. The people were in 
the poorest condition, they had no 
money and few implements of indus- 
try; in the North the Indians were 
a serious problem, while in the South 
the great mass of freed salves threat- 
ened to absorb the enti.e civilization. 
It was this problem of the negro in 
the South and the Indian in the North 
that led to the founding of the 
Hampton Institute under the leader- 
ship of General Armstrong. This in- 
stitute was established with the sole 
purpose of helping these people by 
means of an industrial education. 

In the Hampton Institute from 800 
to 900 negro and Indian boys and 
girls are being trained for industrial 
life. Their teache.s are for the most 
part of their own race. Everywhere 
a marvelous spirit of loyalty and earn- 
estness is present, and everywhere 
the idea of training this crowd of 
children to become useful and self- 
supporting members of society dom- 
inates. All the buildings of the 
school were built by the stu- 
dents and student hands do all the 
work in turn. They even make arti- 
cles such as boots and shoes, wagons, 
etc. for the New York markets. All 
this work is done with the idea of 
getting the student to take hold of 
every problem which is likely to con- 
front him in later life. In all their 
recitations this idea is kept before 
them. 

On Saturday morning, President 
Taft arrived, and for the next th ee 
days many important confe.ences 
were held. Andrew Carnegie, Presi- 
dent Eliot of Harvard, John D. Rock- 
efeller, Jr., and about twenty other 
representative men were present. On 
Sunday a general meeting was held 
with all the students present. They 
were an encouraging sight as they 
stood on the platform, each wearing 
the school uniform, and sang the old 
plantation melodies. The first part 
of the meeting was made up of ad- 
dresses by graduates of the school. 
They told of the transformation that 
had been made in their lives by this 



industrial educatii)n, the changes it is 
making in the fai-m life of the south- 
ern negro, of what it means in the 
way of better education, better 
clothes, better living conditions, bet- 
ter everything. 

A record has been kept of every 
graduate of the school and it can be 
shown that almost without exception 
the industrial education received at the 
Hampton Institute has resulted in a 
wonderful improvement in the indi- 
vidual. After these alumni speeches 
came addresses bj' the governor of 
Virginia, Andrew Carnegie, President 
Taft, President Slocum and others. 

The whole occasion was cu.iously 
democratic, and its very democracy 
was prophetic of better things — bet- 
ter things for the whole nation by a 
solution of the problem of the Amer- 
ican Indian and the American negro. 



POLYTECHNIC SOCIETY 



Holds First Regular Meeting. 

Last Wednesday evening the Pike's 
Peak Polytechnic Society enjoyed 
hearing a very instructive paper on 
"The Great Tunnels of the World," 
by Charles W. Comstock, State En- 
gineer of Colorado. 

In his paper he endeavored to point 
out the salient engineering features 
of great tunnel projects. Men do not 
build long timnels to avoid trifling 
rises or to reach small depths. The 
large expenditures necessary for the 
construction of a great railroad tun- 
nel are only warranted by the avoid- 
ance of heavy grades and long climbs 
and the corresponding decrease in op- 
erating expense. The chief difficulties 
experienced in the construction of 
long tunnels are due to temperature 
and pressure. 

Some idea may be had of the high 
temperatures which are encountered 
at great depths, although the rate of 
increase in temperature is extremely 
va iab!e. It is generally greater in 
sedimentary than in crystaline rocks. 
A mean of 12,000 observations in the 
mines of Saxony showed that 42 met- 
ers correspond to an increase of 10 c 
in rock temperature. Besides, the 
high temperature of the rocks, the 
abnormal rises due to the presence of 
thermal springs, the vital heat of men 
and horses, the combination of large 
quantities of powder and the flames 
of innumerable oil lamps, make work- 
ing conditions the severest possible. 



In the Yellow-Jacket, men worked in 
relays of ten to fifteen minutes, and 
each worked a total of two hours per 
day. 

The item of pressure is probably 
the worst to contend with. "Great 
moimtain masses left to themselves 
find a position of equilibrium in which 
the difference between the principal 
stresses in any part is insufiicient to 
cause rupture or flow. Disturb the 
equilibrium by the creation of so large 
an opening as a double track railroad 
tunnel and a readjustment begins, but 
is well nigh irresistible. 

There are no rules to guide the tun- 
nel engineer. "Each instance is a 
problem in itself, and only the most 
resourceful men can hope to solve 
each one as it presents itself." 

After mentioning the difficulties 
met with and overcome in such works, 
Mr. Comstock outlined briefly the 
main features of some of the largest 
tunnels, the Mount Cenis, the Hoosac, 
the Sunplan and the St. Goddard. 

The best progress has been made in 
drilling, with the Brandt drill. This 
type of machine was used almost ex- 
clusively in the construction of the 
Sunplan tunnel. Greater progress has 
been made in Europe in tunneling 
than in America. This is probably 
due to the difiference in the method of 
attack. 

"The American system of attack is 
almost universally by deep holes, 8 
to 10 feet, and the European is by 
large shallow holes, 3 to 5 feet in 
depth. The explosive in the European 
system is more compressed and much 
more effective than when it is spread 
over a long length of hole. Long 
corners, which often occur in the 
American system, are never left. 
They have to be cleared out by hand 
or subsequent attack, by short holes. 
"But the largest handicap of the Am- 
erican engineer is that of labor. The 
amount of work to be performed in 
a day's labor is often predetermined 
by the workmen. 

Follovi'ing the reading of this pa- 
per, a discussion of tunneling ma- 
chines took place, which culminated 
in the belief that tunneling machines 
which cut or bore the entire heading 
have not proven practicable as yet. 

Both methods of tunneling have re- 
spective merits and drawbacks, and 
the universal practice of tunnel con- 
struction is still open to greater per- 
fection. 



Meet me at the Alamo, Tuesday. 



THE TIGER 



The Weekly Newspapei of Colorado ColleiJe 



GLENN W. SHAW Editor-In-Chlet 

HARRYIW. McOLAT Business Manager 

S. W. Dean Assistant Editor 

C. Do^■ELAN Assistant Editor 

H. H. HAIGHT Assistant Editor 

L. E. Griswold Engineering Editor 

B. P. SIDDONS Atliletic Editor 

H. F. Rice Forestry Editor 

Julia Ingersoll Alumni Editor 

Helen Canon .- Excliante Editor 

Janet Kampf... Local Editor 

W. L. Warnock Local Editor 

A. E. Bbyson J Assistant Manager 

E. W. HiLLE -, Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

Geneva McCaw, T. M. I'eiiigrcw, Edith Sommers, F. B. 

Copeland, Margaret Watson, E S Statten, 

Katharine True, D. L Sisco 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles anditemsto TheTiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 
College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
* Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c. 



ADDRESS OF PRESIDENT SLO- 
CUM AT CHRISTMAS VES- 
PER SERVICE. 



In Bemis Hall, Sunday Evening, De- 
cember 5th. 



SUITABLE RECOGNITION. 

Hereafter Tiger editors and mana- 
gers, who perform faithfully their du- 
ties throughout the year, will have 
their work lecognized and suitably re- 
warded by the Tiger Board of Con- 
trol. At its last' meeting the board 
appointed a committee to choose the 
material and design of a pin, which is 
to be made the official emblem of 
members of the Tiger staff who have 
finished their fourth year creditably, 
or in the case of assistant editors 
who fail of gaining the editorship, 
their junior year. The board will de- 
cide who has earned a pin each spring. 
Nearly all of last year's staff have been 
awarded the- emblem. In after years, 
when its meaning becomes established 
in the; minds of college men and wo- 
men, this little pin will be greatly 
coveted. 

COEDUCATIONAL DRAMATICS. 

Now is the time to organize a coed- 
ucational dramatic club. .\ carefully 
prepared constitution, duly submitted 
to the faculty by the Student Commis- 
sion, would not li.<ely meet with a re- 
buff. Such a constitution should call 
for a limtied membership in the three 
u pe • classes, and conscientious work 
on plays worthy of the best efforts of 
er'rnest students of the drama. Now! 



The subject was: "The Christian 
Message of Peace and Good Will," 
and the text, "On earth peace, good 
will toward men " St. Luke 2:14. 

Christmas is coming once more and 
again we are thinking of the cradle in 
the little town in Judea, of the mys- 
terious, royal messengers and their 
gifts, of the heavenly chorus with its 
song of gladness and good-will. Again 
we see the simple-minded shepherds 
hurrying from their hills to Bethlehem 
to find that which has come to pass, 
kneeling before the Christ-child with 
v.'cnder and worshipfulness in their 
minds and hearts. 

This evening we are asking; What 
is there in the birth of Jesus that 
brings a message of peace and good 
will for us. All over this world will 
be heard, with expressions of great joy 
and feelings of happiness, men and 
women and children wishing each oth- 
er a "Merry Christmas." Hatred, bit- 
terness, and ill-will will be forgotten 
and everywhere people will smile upon 
one another as if some great and 
good news had come, making life 
more beautiful for eve.yone. We seem 
to hear again and again Tiny Tim say- 
ing to every Old Scrooge and all 
whom he sees, "A Merry Christmas, 
and God bless us, everyone!" 

Life seems larger and richer as 
Christmas tide comes back once more 
and the heart beats faster and the 
pulse stronger. It is more difficult to 
think little thoughts or do mean 
things and God seems nearer, friends 
more precious, and life more worth 
living because of the Christmas mes- 
sage. 

One reason for this must be that it 
makes God seem very near. To these 
lowly men watching their flocks by 
night comes the consciousness that unto 
them is born a Saviour which is Christ 
the Lord. No greater truth can come to 
anyone than that God is so near that he 
sees and knows us and will speak to us, 
that no life is so burdened, no station so 
humble, no work so simple, no night so 
dark that the infinite Father is not near 
with His blessed message. He is saying: 
"Let peace and joy and courage be yours, 
for T am nearer than you know." It is 
the great truth of the eternal presence 
that keeps one calm and strong, that lets 
one lay himself down with gratitude and 
peace in his heart as the evening comes 



and the night draws nigh. Again and 
again we hear, "Unto you is born a 
Saviour which is Christ the Lord." He 
abides and all else will pass on to its 
own place* With our mistakes and our 
failures He is gentle and kind if we are 
doing our duty. 

The blessing of good will comes with 
the life of service for others. No ill will 
can abide toward another when, in love 
and kindness, we are seeking to make 
him noble and helping him to bear his 
burdens. 

Jesus came to serve humanity and 
therefore he could not hate anyone. We 
hate those whom we have wronged, and 
we love most the cause to which we give 
most. There is no happiness comparable 
with that which comes with service for 
others. The selfish person never really 
has peace in his soul. 

The coming of Jesus marked a new 
era in the history of the world. Never 
has there been a period more hopeless 
than that when Christ was born in Beth- 
lehem. Hebrewism had lost its glory 
and its religious life had become empty, 
formal, hypocritical. The Greeks had 
failed to make much of the ideals of their 
great thought-life ; Rome was passing 
on to its decay ; and into all this dark- 
ness the new light shone with its words 
of hope and courage. The narrowness 
of the older life with its cruelty and its 
bitterness finds its cure in the great, uni- 
versal life of Jesus with its message of 
peace toward all men and nations. This 
is the truth that has come down to us 
and is finding its nobler expression in 
the hearts of those who are doing the 
world's work. The real joy and gladness 
of life will be found among those who 
are giving themselves, with larger and 
deeper conceptions of the possibilities of 
human life, to those movements that are 
making for its enrichment. It is true 
that great and serious problems confront 
our national life; but they are only op- 
portunities for service when we probe 
them deeply. The emigrant coming to 
our shores ; the black man in the South ; 
the toiler struggling up toward a higher 
and better life for himself and his chil- 
dren, are at heart opportunities for the 
noblest service. Our country vvill find its 
true life and blessing as it gives itself to 
these problems, recognizing that the life, 
the teachings and the ideals of Jesus 
possess the spiritual forces and method 
for their solution. 

Our land is crowded with men and 
women chasing pleasure, when close at 
hand, within the reach of everyone, is 
the real peace and joy of life. The 
world needs kindness and gentleness and 
love. Only that will make you great ; so 
only will come peace and good-will for 
yourselves and those whom you can 
touch and serve. 



Coming up: 
TIGER. 



THE BIG HOLIDAY 



Genuine Swedish Gymnasium Oxfords, all sizes. Wulff Shoe Store, 118 S Tejon Street 



THE TIGER 

CHAPEL CHORUS ASSURED. THE BLACK LOCUST BORER. 



Dean Hale Gives Out Announcement. 



Dean Hale announced to the two 
glee clubs last Wednesday that the re- 
port of the special committee on 
chapel music had been accepted by the 
faculty of the college. This practically 
assures a chorus of mixed voices for 
the chapel exercises, a thing which 
many have felt for some time to be a 
pressing need. One semester hour's 
credit will be given to each one in the 
chorus, a feature which will undoubt- 
edly appeal to many. The chorus will 
be selected by Dean Hale, who will 
have charge of the .work done by 
them. All applicants must pass a 
qualifying examination in the primary 
essentials of music, such as reading, 
time, and so forth. All who wish to 
join this chorus should hand in their 
application to Dean Hale as soon as 
possible, as the number in the chorus 
is limited, and the glee clubs are taking 
up the idea with much enthusiasm. 

The organization of such a chorus 
to lead the chapel singing should 
work a revolution in our chapel serv- 
ices, and will undoubtedly inc.ease the 
interest in this service, which is so 
distinctive a part of our college life. 
"Here's to the chapel chorus: May it 
li^e long and prosper." 



MINERVA ENTERTAINS NE'W 
GIRLS. 



Minerva entertained about twenty- 
six new girls last Fiiday in the club- 
house. A unique feature of the pro- 
gram was a scene from Sheridan's 
"Rivals," acted by six of the girls. 
After the program, refreshments were 
served. The prog.-am was as follows: 

Music Mrs. Howe 

Sketch of Sheridan, and "The Rivals" 

Miss Hemenway 
Scene from The Rivals. 
Music Miss Brunner 



DER DEUTSCHE VEREIN. 



The fifth regular meeting of the Ger- 
man Club was held Thursday evening, 
December 2, and the following program 
was given : 
Geschaftliches. 

Die Kreuze ziige Fraulein J. Smith 

Gedichte Fraulein A. Strang 

Volkslieder und deutsche Spiele. 

On December 16, Rev. Wm. Kahse, 
pastor of the English Lutheran church, 
will give us a talk on Christmas in Ger- 
many. Every one interested in German 
is invited to be present. 



Fred McKown Reads Interesting Pa- 
per at Foresters' Club. 



Tuesday evening a very inte.'esting 
meeting of the Foresters' Club was 
held, at which the following paper 
was given by Mr. Fred McKown: 

The black locust borer is a whitish, 
elongated, round-headed grub or larva 
which hatches from an egg deposited 
by a black or brown, yellow striped 
beetle found on the trees and the 
flowers of golden rod from August to 
October, and the young borers hatch- 
ing therefrom, excavate cells in the 
outer layers of the living bark where 
they pass the winter, and in the spring 
bore through the bark into the sap- 
wood and heartwood. In July and 
August of thr following year they 
change to pu;:ae and emerge from the 
trees in August and September in the 
form of beetles. 

The injury to the trees consists of 
wounds in the bark and sapwood 
which in the majority of cases causes 
the death of the tree or makes the 
lumber of no commercial value. 

The presence of the insects in a 
tree is indicated by the slight flow of 
sap and brownish borings where the 
young larvae are at work in the bark 
and the sickly appearance of the twigs. 

The locust bore has damaged the 
locust trees of this country to such an 
extent that it is not only considered 
unprofitable to grow trees for shade 
and lumber but even the natural 
sprouts are considered a pest. 

The most favorable conditions for 
the destructive work of the borer ap- 
pear to consist in the presence of iso- 
lated trees and groves where the gold- 
en rod is abundant or where less re- 
sistant varieties of the tree prevail. 

The unfavorable conditions for the 
borer are found in large areas of pure 
or mixed stands where the black lo- 
cust predominates, also in plantations 
where there is no golden rod and 
whe:'e resistant varieties are culti- 
vated. 

In order to destroy the young larvae, 
infected trees should be cut from the 
first of October to the first of April, 
the trees barbed and the bark burnt. 
All this should be done before the 
buds begin to swell in the spring. 



EXCHANGES. 

The Harvard glee club is planning 
to make a Christmas trip to Denver. 

Indiana offers a course in the con- 
struction of storage batteries. 



Tlie /Mumni Association of the 
School of Mines provided a loan fund 
for students whom lack of funds 
might have prevented their attending 
the Mines-Denver game. 



President Taft will receive one of 
the small gold footballs which are 
awarded to the Yale men who beat 
Harvard in their annual game. He 
recently received his Yale "Y." 

The "Educational Laboratory" of 
the School of Education of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago is engaged in an 
investigation of the educational pos- 
sibilities involved in the various forms 
of social, athletic, and lite.ary student 
activities. Ordinarily dancing, ath- 
letic, debating, and similar diver- 
sions are regarded as rivals of, rather 
than adjuncts to, the regular school 
work, Dean Franklin W. Johnson, of 
the University High School (an in- 
tegral part of the "laboratory" of the 
School of Education), in an article in 
the School Review for December, de- 
scribes the successful organization of 
high-school clubs for athletics, social, 
scientific, and literary purposes, etc., 
which have taken the place of secret 
fraternities. The plan includes evep 
dancing parties, as a part of the gen- 
eral scheme of social education, all of 
which is being studied for its educa- 
tional effect on the youth, and is re- 
ceiving the co-operation and approv- 
al of the Parents' Association organ- 
ized in connection with it. 



The Deutscher Verein at the Uni- 
versity of California recently p e- 
sented three of the famous Shrove- 
tide plays of Hans Sachs. 



INTEREST IN FORESTRY IS IN- 
CREASING. 

It is interesting to note the wide- 
spread inte/est that is being taken in 
forestry all over the country. Some 
idea of this interest may be gained by 
an inspection of the states represented 
in the Colorado School of Forestry. 
The states represented are Louisiana, 
Massachusetts, Colorado, California 
Kansas, South Dakota, Pennsylvania, 
Texas. Iowa, New MexicD, ]\Iaine, 
West '\''irginia, Indiana, and Minne- 
sota. It will be seen that practically 
every portion of the country is repre- 
sented both from the extreme east and 
west to the extreme north and ^outh. 



For Evening Dress or Street Shoes, College Folk Will Find Economy at Wulff Shoe Store 



8 



THE T [ G E R 



"EAGER HEART" 

Continued from Pa£c 1. 

pearance in college dramatics, but 
their work was excellent throughout. 
Miss McRoberts as "Eager Heart" 
deserves much praise for bringing out 
so clearly the sweet simplicity and 
strength of the character she repre- 
sented. "Eager Sense'' and "Eager 
Fame'' were well executed by Miss In- 
gersoU and Miss Stott, while Miss 
Strang, Miss Rand and Miss Cook as 
the three kings representing the Wise 
Men could not have been surpassed. 
The shepherd group around the fire- 
light in the second scene was most 
realistic, and all carried their parts 
well. 

In the closing scene, the tableau at 
the home of "Eager Heart" was beau- 
tiful, and as the curtain fell, the audi- 
ence felt that it had indeed been given 
a glimpse of the true spirit of Christ- 
mas. The beauty and dignity of this 
play place it far above anything pre- 
viously given by the society and it is 
hoped that something of the kind may 
be given each year as the Christmas 
tide draws near. 

"Eager Heart" is an imitation of a 
medieval mystery play. There are 
three scenes. The time is Xmas eve. 
Following is a synopsis: 
Scene I — Dwelling of "Eager Heart." 

"Eager Heart" (tj'pical of good- 
ness, simplicity, etc.) has prepared for 




There is nothing thai makes a 
more acceptable Christmas sift 
than a piece of good Jewelry. 
That k.ina is to be had of The 



JOHNSON JEWELRY 

CO., 26 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 




Expert Repairing 



The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

FOUNDERS AND MACHINISTS 



l^p^ IVe have a most complete line of 
Christmas Novelties. One visit to our 
store will convince you. 

Pike's Peak Book & Stationery 
Co.,27 S. Tejon Black 354 



the coming of the king. Her sisters, 
Eager Sense and Eager Fame (typi- 
cal of worldly ambition and pride) 
urge her to come to the palaces and 
gay places to find him. She refuses 
and stays at home. The Holy Family 
enter disguised as a family of poor 
people. She shelters them and then 
departs to meet the king. 

Scene III (Starlit Plain). 

Shepherds are warming themselves 
at a small fire and grumbling about 
the king who does not come to visit 
poor folks like themselves. Eager 
Heart enters and bids them listen to 
the far ofT gloria and then come with 
her to find the king. Exit all but Old 
Shepherd, who has already caught the 
heavenly vision and lies dead upon 
the ground. Enter three kings (typ- 
ical of the three wise men) who are 
also seeking the king, and a soliloquy 
over the dead shepherd ensues. 

Scene III (Old Familiar Street). 

Enter Eager Heart and shepherds 
still seeking the Lord. Enter Kings 
who enquire whose dwelling they have 
reached. She confesses that it is hers. 
Then the doors are opened, disclosing 
the Holy Family sealed within. Eager 
Heart kneels on the steps while the 
choir sings. She then enters the 
house, the doors are closed, and Eager 
Sense and Eager Fame arrive too late, 
finding that their worldliness has ex- 
cluded them. They are duly humbled 
and all exit happily while the gloria 
is sung. 



CONTRACT FOR THE ANNUAL 
PLACED. 



Board Getting Down to Real Business 



After a thorough consideration of 
all the bids and propositions received 
from every section of the country, 
the board has placed the contract in 
Denver. Last Saturday provisions in 
both the contract for the printing and 
binding and the contract for the mak- 
ing of the cuts were drawn up. 

The Great Western Publishing Co. 
will do the p inting and Williamson 
and Haffner will do the work on the 
cuts. It will be remembered: that 
these two firms did the work on the 
annual that came out in 1907. 

Now that the ship has been 
launched, so to speak, Captain Bryson 
and crew are looking forward to the 
time when their cargo of books will 
be unloaded at Perkins Hall next — 
May? June? — or July perhaps. 

The pens of the editors, are in full 
swing, the brushes i.f the a tists are 



wet with ink, and the cameras of the 
photographers are clicking, while the 
business managers are in hot pursuit 
of the filthy lucre with which to pay 
for the best book that has ever been 
put out. 



CLASS GAME DOPE. 

Before The Tiger is ready for the 
mailing room, a great football game 
will have been played on Washburn 
Field this afternoon. Just because 
the public will see the game before 
it sees this article is no reason why 
the "sporting editor" can't get busy 
and make up a dope sheet for the 
event of this afternoon. 

It will be a great game, almost of 
the intercollegiate caliber. The soph- 
omores have a little the best of it 
from all appearances, since they will 
have eight inen who played on the 
\'arsity team. On the other hand, the 
freshmen have men who would have 
beaten some of the sophomore players 
out for places on the first team had it 
not been for the conference rules. 
The local fans are not saying which 
team will win, but are just waiting to 
see a good game played in the at- 
mosphere of good class spirit. 

The line-up follows: 

Freshmen. Sophomores. 

Bowers le . . . H. Sinton 

Budelier It. .W. Johnston, 

C. Copeland 

Leclere Ig Wilkinson 

Withrow c Hedblom 

Floyd rg Hazen 

Howard rt Thompson 

J. Sinton re. .Morrison, Scott 

Moody q Putnam, Reed 

Acker Ih Whipple 

Cort f ' Murphy 

Benjamin rh Vandemoer 



This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 

Company 




Headquarters for 

College Footwear 



THE T-I G E R 



25 "nt off OP College Clothes 

We have placed on sale our entire stock of Suits, Over- 
coats and Raincoats made by the well-known Alfred 
Benjamin & Co., and Society Brand at 25 per cent, off 
their regular prices 

An ideal collection of garments that are hand-tailored to 
perfection .... every little detail has been given the most 
scrupulous attention by the tailors of Alfred Benjamin & 
Co., and Society Brand 



$40. 00 Suits, Overcoats and Raincoats, for 

$35.00 

$30.00 

$27.50 

$25.00 

$22.50 



$30.00 
$26.23 
$22.25 
$20.65 
$18.75 
$16.85 



THQWUB 



Fairyland Theatre 

High-class Vaudeville and Latest Moving 

Pictures, Entire Change of Program 

Mondays and Thursdays 



DAN TRACY, Manager 



THE CENTRAL FUEL CO. 

R. M. AITKEN Manager 

All Best Grades of Fuel. Patterson Lump the 

Best Furnace Fuel 

"Rvery Lump a L ump of Heat" 

Prompt Delivery 

Two Phones 1101 128 N. Tejon Street 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co. 



Phone Main 48 



313 N. Tejon St. 



Patronize 
TIGER Advertisers 

Snappy, Swa^gy 
Clothes 

AT 

THE MAY CO. 

Clever 
Haberdashers 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

Continued from Page 1. 

Secretary, Miss Lucy Ferrill. 

Treasure.-, Miss Mary Publow. 

Librarian, Miss Morehouse. 

Accompanist, Miss Pettigrew. 

There is a membe ship of twenty- 
eight, consisting of: 

First Sopranos — Misses Ashley, 
Ferrill, Phillips, Randolph, More- 
house, Strang, Graves. 

Second Sopranos — Misses Frantz, 
Butler, Sharj.e, Wight, Ma;sh, Hassel, 
Bay. 

First Altos — Misses Weir, Gowdy, 
E. Thomas, Anderson, Madd^ck, Pub- 
low, Miller. 

Second Altos — Misses F. Smith, 
Tyler, G een, J. Smith, McLeod, Cold, 
McRoberts. 

Under the very eftlcient leadership 
of Mrs. De Lana W. Taliferro, the 
club has been workiiig up several 
miscellaneous numbers and befo.e 
long will begin a cantata. They e.x- 
pect to give a concert sometime in 
February. .A. committee consisting of 
Misses Anderson, Ashley and Ran- 
dolph is at work on a constitution, 
and is trying to find a bette ■ name 
for the club than merely "Girls' Glee 
Club." 

The voices harmonize very nicely 
and that fact added to a great deal of 
enthusiasm on the part of all the 
members, seems to promise a splen- 
did season of work this winte •. 



MUDDY SCRAMBLE 

Continued from Page 1. 

trouble. Sometime during the last 
darkness they had fastened to the top 
of the flagpole in the center of the 
campus a taunting penant, which con- 
tinued to wave there saucily until 
about 11:30, when Morley, the prac- 
ticed flag-getter, climbed to it and 
tossed it to his comrades below. An 
imitation tussle ended in a parade of 
joyfully yelling sophomores, who used 
the flag as a Walter Raleigh coat. 
Then followed an hour's quiet, while 
the college went to chapel and a con- 
pie of ambitious freshmen fixed a new 
banner to the rain pipe outside. After 
which, the ente taining wallnw! 

While Putnam was throwing antag- 



You Will Find Many 
Articles at 

The Murray 
Drug Co. 9&^ 

Suitable for 

Christmas Gifts 

Of Particular Interest to 
College People We Mention 
Pennants, C. C. Pillow Tops, 
College Calendars, Kodaks, 
Waterman Pens, Lowney's 
Chocolates in Beautiful Hol- 
iday Packages from H to 5 
Pounds, Safety Razors, Toil- 
et Articles, Etc., Etc., Etc. 



The football budget of Indiana 
shows a shortage of $i,ooo. 



Clever Clothes 

FOR 

College Chaps 

AT 

ROBBINS 

ON THE CORNER 



10 



THE T l(i !•: li' 



€[[We have just received the finest line of 
X-mas Cigars ever shown in this city. From 
50c per box up to as high as you wish to go 



Store A 
North 13 Tejon 



HUGHES 

TOBACCONIST 

store C ? 



Store B 

Lobby Ex. Bank Bldg 



^aie 



IS MADE WITH 

Pi. word to the wise is stifficient ' 

,TO-rr. CLARK 

GACBP"^ engraving CO- 
ILLUSTRATORS PUEBLO 



DESIGNERS 



COLO. 



ENGRAVERS 



Gel Your Picnic Supplies 

AT = 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Favorite Resort of the Col- 
lege Students, Renowned in 
Story and Song 

BRUIN INN 

Up North Cheyenne Canon 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER, Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 



Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Patronize TIGER 
Advertisers 

UNION ICE AND COAL CO. 

W. M. BANNING, ProprieUr 

Artificial Ice and Cold Storage 

Dealers in All Kinds of Coal and Pioion Wood 
Yard Office, 105 W.Vermiio City Office, 5 N. Tejon 



onists about profusely, and Budelier 
was holding up tans of writhing meat, 
and young Tommy was growing crazy, 
and everybody else was besmea:ing 
and bleeding one another unmerciful- 
ly, some wily sophomore hied him to 
the center of the campus and nailed a 
yellow and white decoration to the 
mainmast. 

Meanwhile President Slocum had 
stopped a part of the tight long 
enough to o der the replacing of Old 
Glory at he- accustomed stand, and 
McOuat had promised that the Stu- 
dent Commission would take the nec- 
essary repairs in hand. Immediately 
after the cessation of hostilities, the 
Commission met bj' telephone and de- 
cided that at 2:30 sharp the f.cshmen 
should put new halyards on the cen- 
tral flagpole, and the sophomore flag 
should be placed in the hands of the 
commission. Shortly before the tim; 
set, Budelier borrowed a pair of climb- 
ers and attempted an ascent, but re- 
tu ned and hired a lineman of the 
electric company to go up in his steacl. 
When, after 2:30, the flag dropped, the 
assembled freshmen made considera- 
ble objection to the order of the com- 
mission, but McOuat finally walked 
away with the trophy, having first in- 
vited the presidents of the two lower 
classes to meet with the commission 
at fi\ e o'clock. 

So ended the last act of a very en 
tertaining and profitless mud wallow. 
Not profitless, either, for any number 
of potential dandelion roots were un- 
doubtedly grubbed from their scggy 
beds. 



Professor Wallace of the Univer- 
sity of Nebraska, has recently dis- 
co\ered that Shakespeare was a part 
owner of the Globe theatre, and has 
definitely determined the site of th.is 
structure. 



Judge Ben I^indsey of Denver will 
speak at the Y. M. C. A. banquet en 
Tuesday night. 




Are the most popular things in 
college. 365 of the former and 
over 20 of the latter may be 
had after chapel any day next 
week for Sixty Cents. IBUP 9 

College Calendar 



Maier's Pool and Billiard 

Room a4^^ 216 N. Tejon St. 

IVUUlll ffSfT 3^ Opposite North Park 

Tobacco, Cigars, Pipes, Etc. 

t¥1rIS™S STOfiE 

We are headquarters for 
attractive things for Christ- 
mas presents, vv'ith some- 
thing to suit all purses. :: 

Whitney and Grimwood 

No. 20 North Tejon Street 



THE TIGER 



11 



0. E. Hemenway n^^r ^^ 

Local Uepartment || 



Gr 



ocenes a 



nd 



Meats 



-'X»» 










115 South Tejon Street 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



.\ large mnnber of college people 
Mttended the matinee of "Top o' the 
World." Satu.day. 



]\liss Scholz entertained Alinerva 
this afternoon at h.er home on North 
Nevada avenue. The regular pro- 
g/am was given, after which refresh- 
ments were served. 



Etlith .McCreery and Elsie Connell 
were down for the Minerva function. 



YOU don't entertain your 
guests to save money — 
if you did, the simplest 
way would be to forego en- 
tertaining them. 
€[jMuETH's may cost more, 



Attention is called to the advertise- 
ment of the Perkins Crockery Co. on 
the back cove\ They are selling out 
at COST. Surely a good hint for 
Christmas, when you can select from 
such a fine, large line. 

Alarie Roberts entertained the alum- 
nae and active members of Hypatia at 
her home, Tuesday evening, Novem- 
ber 30. 



but- 



aMueth's 



CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 



Sharley Five has been called home 
by her father's illness. 

Vida Pitts ex-'io will be in the city 
the latter part of the week. 

.Melicent Camiibell delightfully en- 
tetained a few friends after the dancs 
Saturdav e\-ening. 



5 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Helen Hinckley is spending a few 
dc-'ys in Denver. 



l^hi Gamma Delta is giving a large 
house party at the Star raiTch, F iday 
and Saturday. 



The Colorado Springs Floral Co. 

Wish to Have Your Business at Right 
Prices 



The senior girls entertained the 
senior men at dinner Wednesday 
evening. Great excitement was shown 
Tuesday after chapel, when partners 
were drawn by lot. 



What shall I buy for Christmas? A 
box of candy — Noble's. No — two of 
them. 



Telephone Main 599 



104 N. Tejon St. 



Flavia Churchill of Denve ■ came 
down for the Sigma Chi dance, and 



A. G. SPALDING a BROS. 



The 

SPALDING 
Trade- Mark 




is known throughout 
the world as a 

Guarantee of 
Quality 



are the Largest 
Manufacturers 
in the World of 

Official 

Equipment 

For All 
Athletic 
Sports and 
Pastimes 

If You are inter 
" *"" ested in 
Athletic Spoit you 
should have a copy 
of the Spalding 
Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyclo- 
pedia of what's new 
in Sport and is sent 
free on request. 

A. G. Spalding & Bros. 

1616 Arapohoe St., Denver, Colo. 

JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Clf-aning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

I Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Stree 

Fraternities, Clubs, Individuals 
desiring Milk or Cream 
in any quantities 
should remem- 
ber :: :: 



The Sinton- Rustic Home 

No. 419 South El Paso St. 
Phone Main 442 



Dairy 



The College Photo Studio 

The Highest Class of 

Photographs 




Bingham 

18 S. Tejon St. Phone M-678 



DOUGLAS & 
HETHERINGTON 



Telephone 536 



Architects 

Rooms 13 and 16 Ou( West Building 
COLORADO SPRINGS. COLO. 



12 



THE 'I I G E K 



Memory 
Books 

Bound in colors, black and 
and orange, and lettered on 
side. The only really Colo- 
rado College Scrap Book 
made. Lar^e enough to con- 
tain your four years' items. 

Price, $1.23 each 



The Out West 

Printing £i Stationery Co. 
9-11 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 



At Moderate 
Prices 



Furniture 



Special Terms to Students 

McCracken & Hubbard 

120 and 122 South Tejon Street 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Tiiem 

JEWELER 

IS S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

Are Always Well Pleased When They 
Get Their Hair Cut at 

Campbell's Barber Shop 

12 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main S36 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

'ascade Laundry 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 

20 per cent, discount 

To All Students of College and Academy 



was the guest of friends the first of 
the week. 

Marie Forhan is in college again 
after a brief illness. 



The girls of Montgomery entertain- 
ed a few of their friends Saturday 
evening. 



A number of the tables have had 
spreads this week. 



The Christmas vesper service in 
Bemis, Sunday evening, was very de- 
lightful and helpful. There was a 
large attendance. 

Ave y, of Cancjn City, was up for 
the Minerva function. 



Some of the sophomore class forest- 
ers expect to go to Manitou Park dur^ 
ing the vacation. 



Ficrt Siddons is in the southern part 
of the state in the interests of the 
Glee Club. 

With an entirely new line of goods 
and in swell quarters, the Hub is mak- 
mg a strong bid for the college trade. 
A sale now on gives you 25 per cent, 
discount on all clothing in the house. 

Pearsons will hold their debate t y- 
out Friday night. 



R. H. B aden, of Pittsburg, will stay 
here with his son during the holidavs. 



7 E. Bijou 



Phone 820 



Apollonian will hold their try-out 
Frida}' night for tlie Pearsons-Apollo- 
nian debate. 

A large number of the college pe.i- 
ple are enjoying the skating. 

The most democratic banquet of the 
year — Tuesday, at the Alamo. 



At Chicago the members of the var- 
sitj' debating teams will receive schol- 
arships worth the tuition of two quar- 
ters of the school year. 



The latest thing in college f.aterni- 
ties has taken root in Golden, namely 
Kappa Beta Phi. A charter of this 
unique fraternity has recently been 
granted to the petitioners at Mines. 
The nearest chapter to the infant is 
at Chicago. — Mines Retort. 



Take a bunch of Holiday Tigers 
home with you. 



Hunt Up 

Bissell « Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
Flour, Fec>d, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 

JetDdrp ^ 

C. F. Arcularius & 
Co. ^^^ Jewelers 

9 South Tejon Street 



We have Embossing Dies for Stationery of all the 
College Societies and Fraternities, also the Great 
Seal of the College. We carry in stock a large 
line of papers upon which to emboss these Dies — 
Hurd's, Crane's and others. 

Gowdy-Simmons Ptg Co. 'jZJ^fui 



Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

Burgess Candy 

There's nothing too good for the 
College girls— that's why we sell 
them candy. But we've noticed the 
girls themselves dont always do the 
buying. When a box of candy bears 
the Burgess stamp, you knOw it is 
never stale orshelf worn, but packed 
to your order from the freshest, pur- 
est, richest goods that our expert 
candy-makers can produce from day 
to day. 

W. N. Burgess 'ililJ.Mv:!' 



T II K T I (1 K R 



13 



BLEND 



FATl M A '^"^^^^^^ 

20 for 15 c+s. O 





Glee Club — sweet music. 
Pretty girls, plenty of fun 
— with time m between 
for a comforting smoke of 
Fatimas. 

Fine Turkish tobacco, skilfully 
blended, aged and mellowed for 
two years. 

In a neat but inexpensive foil 
package, that means ten extra 
cigarettes to you. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO CO. 



14 



THE T I G E K 



A Suit or 
Overcoat 



per 
cent, off 




How Would a Reduction 
of 25 per cent, on All 
Our Suits and Overcoats 
Look to You ? ? ? ? 

You can have this reduction on any suit or 
overcoat in our store, but more than that, our clothes 
are far different from the ordinary clothing. 

We have a size for every man, from the 
largest to the smallest, and a wide variety to choose 
from. Come and examine our line before you buy. 



Greenberg 



M. 

New York Tailor and Clothier 108 E. Pike's Peak 



William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 



MCMDCDG ^ l^^w York Stock Exchange 

MtMBfcKS ^ Colorado Springs Mining Stock Exchange 



High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



DR. ROBINSON TALKS TO THE 
Y. M. C. A. 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



THE 

Crissey ^ Fowler 
Lumber Co. 



Dr. Robinson of this city spoke to 
the men at Y. ]\I. C. A. meeting Fri- 
day night. He told of the progress 
that lias been made during the last 
half century and of the many oppor- 
tunities for the }'oung man of today. 
More and m.ore, he. said, it is becom- 
ing necessary for a young man to 
choose =ome definite stand, not only 
in rega.'d to his place in the world of 
science but also in regard to his atti- 
tude toward things moral and reli- 
gious. 



THE UTAH SITUATION. 



Phone 101 



117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 



Our Special Extra-Clean 

Lignite 
Furnace Lump 

The Colorado Springs Fuel Co., 
112 Pike's Peak Avenue. Two 
Phones Main 230 

Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 

A. S. BLAKE 





Is the 


Man 


to 


See 






107 North Tejon 






Phone 


465 


N 


ickle Ware 








Cutlery 



Last year the schools in Colorado 
with the possible exception of the 
School of Mines, agreed on the one- 
year rule; consequently we were un- 
able to arrange any games with those 
institutions this season because we 
allowed freshmen to represent us on 
our 'varsity team. In view of these 
circumstances it is perfectly obvious 
that if we wish to secure a schedule 
next year that will be worth while, it 
will be necessary for us to adopt the 
one-year rule that is in vogue in all 
the larger eastern institutions and in 
our sister Colorado colleges. The 
only thing against Utah's adopting 
such a rule is that she is not large 
enough as yet to put forth a strong 
team without allowing freshmen to 
play. — Utah Chronicle. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Miss Edith Sawyer, ex-'lO, is teaching 
at Eaton. 



Miss Elizabeth Frazer and Miss 
Bertha Webb, both C. C, ex-'lO, will 
represent Denver University at the 
Rochester Convention during the holi- 
days. '■ 



INIiss Ruth Londoner is taking post- 
graduate work at Denver University-. 



I^ester Bale 'o6 is chemist for the 
Standard Oil Company at Cleveland', 
Ohio. ; 



William Jackson ex-'io will go to 
the Rochester con^•ention from Har- 
\ard. 



Coach Warner of the Carlisle In; 
dians has inaugurated a correspond- 
ence school for fooball coaches in 
minor institutions. 



North Dakota Agriculture College 
is making a strong efifort to have the 
statue of Theodore Roosevelt, which 
is to be erected in that state, upon its 
campus. 



College 
Inn 



*^ Short 
// Orders 



"Come in, the Cider's 
Fine" 




he Waterman Press 

at 112 E. Cucharras 



are Specialists in Fine 



Printing, and solicit 



the patronage of the most ex- 
acting for anything that can 
be done in a decent print shop 
No matter how particular you 
are, we are here to make good 



We Print THE TIGER 



THE TIGER 



15 



SIGMA CHI DANCE. 



The Sigma Chi fraternity gave their 
regular mrnthly dance in the San Luis 
school rooms last Saturday evening. 
The decorations were in Xmas colors, 
and Fink's orchestra furnished the 
music. Professor and M s. Smith 
chaperoned. The ether guests of the 
fraternity were the ?ilisses Whitaker, 
Pollen, Forhan, Frantz, Kampf, 
Bogue, Pierson, Kidder, McCaw, 
Huse, Pettig-ew, Eva Knight, Camp- 
bell, True, Stott, Strang, Churchill. 
Herr, McCoombs, Wilson, Rice., and 
Messrs. Pettis, Powell, Capen, Gold- 
smith, Pe'Ty of Alpha Tau Delta fra- 
ternitv, and Dean of Delta Phi Theta. 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 

GIDDINGS BROS. 

Colorado Springs 

THE SPECIALTY STORE 



A Hearty Welcom« Constantly Awaits All Visiters 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

I* the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 



106H E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



-h^h 



aundry 



Why not have the BEST WORK ? 



20 per cent, discount 

To all Students of College and Academy 



J. J. WILSON, College Agent 

W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



119 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



/f= 



A Few Suggestions for the Early 
Christmas Shoppers 



''^ 



Bath Robes, All Colors 

House Coats, Handsomely Tailored 

Pajamas, Exquisite Patterns 

Hose Supporters, Individual Boxes 

Suspenders, Silk, Sterling Silver Buckles 

Mufflers, All Colors in Silk - , - 

Neckwear, Imported Silks 

Gloves, Fur, Kid, Fur or Silked Lined 

Handkerchief, Fancy, Silk or Linen 

Leather Goods, Collar Bags, Pocket Book 

Card Cases, Toilet Sets, Military Brushes, 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 



%: 




Correct Dress for Men. \ 



$13.50 to $4 

$15 to $5 

$5 to $1 25 

50c to 25c 

- $3 to 75c 

$7.50 to $1 

$2.50 to 25c 

$10 to $1.25 

$1.50 to 25c 

s. Bill Books, 

Cigar Cases. 



113 E. Pike's Peak 
Avenue 



-J 



ACADEMY 

Bruce Robinson, a Cutler student in 
T907, is again enrolled in the Acad- 
emy. 



A number of the Cutler boys were 
guests at the Thanksgiving dinner giv- 
en by Mr. W. C. Johnston, December 
2nd, at his home on North Nevada av- 
enue, for his Sunday school class. 



A very enjoyable afternoon was 
si:ent by the Philo Literary Society at 
the home of Miss Blackman, 1806 
Wood avenue. The event was the in- 
itiation of the new Philo pledges, who 
were Ruth Gile, Margaret Wilson, Jo 
van Diest, Charlotte Kissel, Lois Mi- 
lone, iMiriam Bispham, and Agnes 
Donaldson. 



Misses Elizabeth Fowler and Helen 
Davis wall attend the social function 
to be given by the Chi Omega Soror- 
ity, of the University of Colorado, 
next Friday and Saturday. 



Miss Elizabeth Fowler entertained 
a number of her friends at her home 
on North Nevada avenue, last Friday 
night. 



HESPERIAN PROGRAM, DEC. 10. 



Last chapter, continued story, 

Littlefield 
Parliamentary Drill. 

Paper Pollock 

Critic's Report Professor Flaherty 



DRINK 

DERN'S 

Freshly Roasted Tea and Coffee 

29 South Tejon Street 

The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies and 
Fixtures 



208 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 812 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-203 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence, 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 9t 6 



Christmas 
Photos 



Up-to-Date in Style 
and Finish. Sit for 
them now 




<\S<i^77l€^Zl/ 



Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 

Phone Main 679 



16 



THE TIGER 



Not 'Cheap' Gifts, hut Worthy Gifts Cheap 



You'll Appreciate the Difference 



Just Two Lines to Remember 



The Perkins Crockery Co. Selling out at COST 

120 North Tejon Street Colorado Springs 




Young Men's Dress Footwear 



The Approaching Holiday Season and Its Social 
Functions Will Demand Dress Footwear. Our 
Showing Is Superb. 



Dress Shoes, 
Button, Lace 
or Blucher at 
$4.00, $5.00 
and $6.00 



^f5>^<Vft5 



SHOES THAr SATISFY 



&a A.TEJON ST- 



Dress Pumps 
in Patent, Gun 
Metal, and 
Black Suede 
at $5.00 




When Trading, Remember TIGER Advertisers 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 



WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



Departments — College of Arts and Science, E. S. PARSONS, Dean. School of Engineering, 
F. CAJORI, Dean. School of Forestry, W. C. STURGIS, Dean. School of Music, E. D. 
HALE, Dean 




Manitou Parl^ — Field Laboratory 
of the School of Forestry 






i' 



'■! ii ' . ' j i ""MH i . i )j 



ffF^^T— TWTWTT'>TirWT!TffT!Tr»TWWW^WI^^"gW H 1 1 W ■ ! um i'i MH 







m 








.••'! 



I 




HOLIDAY 
NUMBER 



A RETROSPECTIVE VIEW 

OF COLORADO COLLEGE 




To call this article anything but a 
sketch is a misnomer. It is to be re- 
gretted that such a subject could not 
have been treated more fully and 
more interestingly by some one capa- 
ble of the undertaking. To w/ite a his- 
tory of Colorado College is a big work, 
a work of months, and not of days; a 
work of volumes, and not of pages. 
It is to be hoped that some day this 
task may be performed by someone 
who can do credit to himself and to 
his subject. 

In this article but little time has 
been spent upon the last twenty years. 
For this there are two reasons — one is 
a lack of time and space, and the oth- 
er is that the events of the last two 
decades are niit yet far enough re- 
moved to be appreciated. 

The first trace we have of Colorado 
College is found in the proposition 
made in 1868, to the Ministerial Con- 
gregational Association of the Terri- 
tory of Colorado College, by Rev. 
Edward P. Tenney, pastor of the 
Congregational Church of Central 
City, Colorado, He proposed to the 
association that steps be taken at 
once to establish in Colorado a Chris- 
tian college under Congregational 
auspices. The proposition was favor- 
ably received but no action was taken 
and with the return of Mr. Tenney to 
New England soon afterward it ap- 
peared that the matter had been drop- 
ped and fo gotten. Soon, however, 
influence was brought to bear from 
another direction. 

In 1&73, Professor Thomas VVils'm 
Haskell, M. A. (Yale), came to Den- 
ver in the health interest of his dru-ji- 
ter, Florence Edwards Haskell. S le 
l^ ed but a fe' v m )nths, and in her 
mcmecry her f;;ther sourijht to f.auid a 
college. Accordingly he took up the 
work with great ea.nestness and sue- 



SOME INTERESTING 
EARLY HISTORY 

ceeded in getting the Congregational 
Association actively committed to the 
college enterprise, and a committee 
was appointed to consider the location 
of this Colorado College. 

Before this time the Colorado 
Springs Colony Cnmpany, under the 
leadership of General William J. 
Palmer, had set aside a tract of land 
for the purposes of higher education 
and had made it known that they 
would deal liberally with any denomi- 
nation that would establish and main- 
tain a college at Colorado Springs. 
In 1872, the Catholics seriously con- 
sidered this proposition but finally 
decided on Denver as the location for 
their school. 

The committee of the Congrega- 
tional Association next appeared and 
after careful consideration decided to 
accept the ofifer of the Colorado 
Springs Company. The meeting 
which brought Colorado College to 
Colorado Springs was held in the 
parlor of the house of Frank L. 
Rouse, at the northwest corner of 
Cascade avenue and Costilla street. 
The report of this meeting was duly 
accepted and rooms were secured in 



First 

Home of 

Colorado 

College 



the second sto.y of the Wanle.ss build- 
ing on the northwest cm-ner of Tejon 
-treet and Pike's Peak avenue, where 
the First National bank now stands. 
Windows marked i and 2 in the cut 
opened into these rooms. This was 
the first location of Colorado College. 

Thomas Nelson Haskell, the practi- 
cal founder of Colorado College, was 
appointed financial agent, and the 
Rev. Jonatlian Edwards the first pro- 
fessor and principal of the college, 
Mr. Edwards refusing the title of 
president. The following announce- 
ment appeared that year ( 1874) '■ 
"COLORADO COLLEGE. 

"The first term of the Preparatory 
Department of Colorado College will 
open at Colorado Springs, Wednes- 
da3% May 6, 1874, ;ind continue ten 
weeks. 

"ihe object of this department is to 
give students, of both sexes, a thor- 
ough drill in the rudiments of Eng- 
lish and Classical Education, and thus 
fit them for either college or business. 

"Classes suited to the age and ad- 
vancement of all who may apply, will 
be f(jrmed. (Instruction will be given 
to undergraduates, in College studies, 
if desired.) 

"Rev. Jonathan Edwards, of Mass., 
who has been eelcted by the Board of 
Trustees as Principal of this Depart- 
ment, is highly recommended as a 




THE IM G E R 




9^» 



'•Sui!^ 



4. — First 

Building 

Built 

by 

the 

College 

5. Ptesby- 
terian 
Church 

6. Bijou 
Street 



lJi';ictical, efficient ediictaor. He will 
b^> assisted ])y competent and experi- 
enced teacliers. 

"Rcioms well adapted to the piirpi )se 
ha\e been secured, and will be fitted 
up in the best and mo,st approved 
mannc ". 

"Arrangements ha\e been made by 
which boarding- can be secured in pri- 
vate famdies ;ind (jtherwise, at rea- 
sonable rates. 

"Tuition, $io.oo to $20.00 per term, 
according to the studies pursued. 

"h'or further particulars, address, 
until May ist. Rev. F. M. Sturtevant, 
or J. E. Ayers, of Denver, Colo., and 
after May ist, 

"REV JONATHAN EDWARDS, 
"Colorado Springs." 

In the Colorado Springs Gazette of 
Maj' 9, 1874, we find the following no- 
tice: 

"The Preparatory Department of 
Colorado College was opened Wed- 
nesday last and 20 students have been 
enrolled." 

In the fall of 1874, the college was 
moved into its first school building, a 
two-room frajTie structure standing 
on the west side of Tejon st eet, op- 
posite North Park, near what is now 
the Park bakery. It is marked 4 in 
the cut. This building was later ad- 
ded upon ;md is now a part of the 
liouse between the Lennox building 
c nd Couture's cleaning establishment, 
opposite North Park. A sig'n readin.g 
as follows stands in the front yard: 

FOR SALE. 
This house with steam heat and bath. 
Land will be improved with stores. 

CHAS. P. BENNETT. 
The Gazette of December 14, 1874, 



mentions the forming of the first lit- 
erary society, R. S. Owens, p:'esident; 
H. jMacHurd, secretary. By this time 
the little two-story building erected at 
a cost of $1200, had been mortgaged 
fcjr $i.S00. 

At the end of the winter term, Prin- 
cipal Edwards and all but one of the 
instructors resigned. Rev. James G. 
Dougherty, M. A. (Brown), of Wy- 
andotte, Kansas, was elected the first 
p esident of Colorado College. By 
this time the panic of 1873 and the 
grasshoppers of 1874 had so complete- 
ly paralyzed the country that thou- 
sands had left the Territory in search 
of other homes; and the cry of those 
who remained was not money for 
colleges, but money for bread. 

In Au.gust, 1875, ^Ir. James H. Kerr 
was elected to the faculty. During 
this winter the enginee.-ing school 
was founded by him in a bnildin.g near 
where the Empire Theater now 
stands. He organized afternoon and 
night classes in assaying, chemistry, 
metallurgy, geology, and mining. 
These were continued by Mr. Kerr 
until the coming of Professor Strieby 



Colorado 

College 

in 

1881 



in 1880, -.when he took charge of a 
part of the work. 

December,', 1908, marked the close 
of a third rff "a century of connection 
with the college by Mr. Kerr. 

President Dougherty had resigned 
in 1875. and in 1876, the man who had 
first conceived the idea of a Colorado 
Cc liege. Air. Edward P. Tenney, was 
elected to the presidency. His coming 
gave teh college new life and new 
hope. For the purpose of furnishing 
a large endowment fund without hav- 
ing to ■ beg it, he got possession of 
o\-er 5,000 acres of land surrounding 
our p esent campus. At that time it 
was valued at $100 an acre, but now it 
IS selling at the rate of from $10,000 
to $20,000 an acre. Had Mr. Tenney's 
scheme been carried out as outlined, 
Colorado Colle,ge would today be one 
of the richest colleges in America 
And the reason why his scheme failed 
was the inability to raise $20,000 at a 
time when it was needed. 

While keeping a close watch of the 
financial conditions of the college, 
President Tenney established as feed- 
ers to the college preparatory schools 
in Salt Lake City, Trinidad, Las Ve- 
gas, Albuf|uerque, and Santa Fe. It 
is in connection with these schools 
that we first hear of Professor Strie- 
I)y in the educational field. 

In 1877, President Tenney secured 
the services in the mathematics de- 
partment of Mr. Frank H. Loud. 
Doctor Loud in his early days was an 
extremely diffident man. The follow- 
ing story is told of him: It is said 
that at certain hours of the day he 
always went around the college 
square for fear of meeting a member 
of the fair sex. As a result one of the 
psychological problems often socially 
discussed in pioneer days was, how 
Professor Loud proposed to Miss 
Vk/'iley. At a gathering of village la- 
dies, someone seriously remarked: 
"Well, only Professor Loud, Mrs. 
Loud and the Lord know." To which 




THE TIGER 



3 



another replied: "And perhaps they 
don't." 

In 1877, the catalogue shows tlie to- 
tal registration in the cdlege to have 
been three: one sophomore and two 
freshmen. 

In 1880 Professor Strieby became head 
Professor of Chemistry and the present 
chemical department is the result of his 
faithful work. 

In 1881 Mr. George N. Marden linked 
his fortunes with Colorado College. 
First we find him as professor of political 
economy and history, next as financial 
agent, and afterwards as treasurer. The 
greatest part of his work, however, was 
the securing of Dr. William F. Slocum 
as president for the college. 

In 1878 work was begun on the pres- 
ent Cutler academy and in 1880 the wings 
were added. The removal of the col- 
lege from its two-room frame building 
down town to this then palatial stone 
structure marks the end of the first era 
in the life of the college and the begin- 
ning of a second. The first might be 
called the struggle for the right to live 
and the second the struggle to maintain 
that right. 

In 1885 President Tenny left and the 
three following years were dark ones. 
It was during this period that Mr. Mar- 
den performed his greatest service. Un- 
der his leadership a vigorous campaign 
had been undertaken in New England 
and the money raised to pay ofif some of 
the most pressing debts. 

And then in 1888 Rev. Wm. F. Slocum 
came and we have the mark of another 
era. The new epoch was to be one of 



steady growth and development. Colo- 
rado College had found itself. When 
the President came, there were seven in- 
structors and about twenty-five students, 
not one a regular college student. The 
college possessions consisted of a cam- 
pus of fifty-one acres and one stone 
building, now Cutler academy, then 
Palmer hall. What changes have been 
wrought since that time ! What progress 
has been made ! What order has been 
brought out of the former chaos ! Y\.nd 
all this has been due to the efforts of 
one man and that man is President Wil- 
liam F. Slocum. 

In 1888 the President's residence was 
purchased. It had been built in Presi- 
dent Tenney's time, but had later been 
sold. Hagerman Hall was completed in 
1889, Montgomery Hall in 1891, and the 
same year the gymnasium was built by 
student contributions. Coburn Library 
and the Wolcott Observatory followed 
in 1894. 

One by one the buildings were placed 
upon our campus until on March 3rd, 
1902, was laid the corner stone of Palmer 
Hall. As far as material improvements 
are concerned this was the grand climax 
in the life of Colorado College. Since 
that time Bemis Hall has been built and 
we are hot on the trail of a first-class, 
up-to-date gymnasium. And we are 
going to get it, too. 

Meanwhile other things have been hap- 
pening, the faculty has been continually 
increased and the endowment has been 
annually growing larger. The Colorado 
Collegian, a monthly paper, was started 
in 1890 and was succeeded bv the 



"Tiger/ 'a weekly, in the spring of 1899. 
Intercollegiate athletic life began in 
1895. If success in athletics is to be 
measured by the number of games won, 
it can hardly be said that much was 
achieved on the football field during 
those first few years, but in baseball the 
Tigers won the state championship in 
'96, '98, '99 and 1900. In '99 and 190U, 
however, the football championship was 
brought to Colorado College. This is 
the occasion of which it is said that 
Prexy broke his telephone yelling "Pike's 
Peak or Bust." In 1891 was the first 
barbecue, a non co-educational affair. 
The girls, however, attended the follow- 
ing year. In '92 and '93 Colorado Col- 
lege won the State Oratorical contest. 
For the '93 and '94 contests over 100 
rooters accompanied the teams to Den- 
ver and Boulder. 

From a little two-room frame building 
on a twenty-five-foot lot, Colorado Col- 
lege has become an institution of over 
a dozen capacious buildings, with a large 
and beautiful campus. 

Instead of property worth $1,200 and 
mortgaged for $1,500, the endowment 
fund is fast approaching the million- 
dollar mark, and the campus alone is 
worth upwards of that amount. From 
what was scarcely more than a prepara- 
tory school it has risen to the level of 
the best colleges of the land. Its credits 
are accepted by every .college m the 
United States. 

Thus Colorado College grew — and 
continues to grow. The dreams of its 
founders have been realized. 




PALMER HALL 



THE TIGER 




HAGERMAN HALL 



FIRST DORMITORY 



Results of Pres. Slocum's Early Efforts 



Back m the days of '89 there was 
not any dwelling place whatever for 
the students. In order to get stu- 
dents from out of town it was neces- 
sary that such a building be erected 
as soon as possible. The first thing 
that Dr. Slocum did wlien he came to 
this college as its president in 1888 
was to raise money ior the edifice 
now known as Hagerman Hall. 

General Palmer, W. S. Jackson and 
Mr. Hagerman were the principal 
donors. The building of Hagerman 
was started in the sp"ing of '89 and 
the hall was sufticiestly built for use 
in the fall of the same year. The up- 
per story was not completed until 
some time later. The material used 
in this building is red sandstone. The 
rooms at first were furnished by old 
friends of Dr. and Mrs. Slocum in the 
east. 

The firsit college ,life' outsi 'e of 
^tudy and recitrtiens began at this 
iiall. When the doors fif Ha-jernian 
\vc e first opened to students, n t 
more than a (\o/^vn bny-, entered them. 
The purpose "f this buildiu'; w. s ti.' 
make a luime fur the young men. 



There were n(jt any girls' dormitories. 
The few girls in college then whose 
homes were out of the city, roomed 
aroimfl town and went 'to Hagerman, 
where there was a girls' table, to 
board. The first and second stories 
were soon filled up. The third story 
was then completed, and a little later 
the wing on the west side was built. 

Soon the movement for boys to 
earn their own support was started. 
Consequently, thee never was the de- 
mand for men's dormitories that 
there has been for dwelling places for 
the women. 

Until the last few years, Hagerman 
was the social center for the men of 
the college. The majority of those 
who worked for their rooms came to 
"Hag" for their meals. Even the men 
in fraternities boarded at the "Phila- 
delphia Club," as it was called. 

Hagerman for a long time was un- 
der the control and management of 
some members cf the facult}'. Space 
does n(it allow the writer to '.elate 
some ( f the episodes that ha\'e taken 
pl'ice in this building, cr some of the 
pranks played on the unwary "prof" 
wild, in night apparel ventured to find 
his way up to the third stor\- in the 
d;ii"< in urder to sec who had cut off 
the lights, onlv to be .greeted bv a 



bucket of water or to find his feet 
pasted to a mass of "tanglefoot" fly- 
paper. Now the hall is under the 
supervision of the Y. AI. C. A. The 
fraternity men board at their own 
houses and the rest of the men board 
at f-he stadents' club, or at the regi:- 
lar boarding houses near the campus. 
The large dining room has been con- 
verted uitf) a lounging room whcrj 
men gather to play games, box, sing 
or V. hat not? Here, too, the regular 
)i-.cetm.c;s < f the Y. M. C. A. are held 
every v-eck. 

C''uld Uie walls ot th^s old building 
sjv.ik 'hey nc doubt would tell us of 
many ;n escapade that has taken 
place untiei cover of night, of "rough 
houses" and "rough houses," of the 
merry times that students in olden 
ciay.3 have had, along with their hou' ; 
of hard study when the midnight can- 
dle was burning low. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE LI- 
BRARIAN, M. D. ORMES 

( Condensed.) 

The library in p -ogress and develop- 
ment, has kept the pace set by other 
departments of the college. The total 
additions for the year have been 4,449, 
3,849 of which have been numbered . 



THE TIGER 



and nearly 4,000 pamphlets. Within this 
statistical statement there is concealed a 
widespread interest in the library. A 
great deal of devoted thought and most 
generous action. 

In the absence of endowment and with 
the needs, so many and so great, of a 
rapidly growing body of students, the 
thoughtful and generous gifts of friends, 
gifts of books and gifts of money, have 
enabled us to meet these needs in many 
particulars. The time spent in soliciting 
funds, is most profitably spent; not so 
much for the money and the books se- 
cured, as for the friends made for the 
library and the college. The donors to 
an institution become advocates of it. 
ambassadors for it. Gifts have been 
made by people who believe we are serv 
ing the cause of humanity ; by peopk 
who once were students here, and who 
hasten to show their gratitude for what 
they secured here, and their joy at the 
abounding success of the institution. A 
college is built up by multiplying its 
friends. It would be a great blessing, 
too, if people should send their books to 
the library, which they will not use 
again ; good books which they are tak- 
ing care of and to which they are g"i\i 
shelf room and perhaps moving over the 
country. A book of recent date which 
has served its purpose with you, may be 
passed on the greater number who 
use a college library. Such thought- 
fulness for others is certainly a 
Christian act. 

The last book accessioned in Novem- 
ber of the current 3'ear was given the 
number 43,200. When the present li- 
brarian took charge five years ago, the 
first book accessioned received the num- 
ber 20,666. Not considering the un- 
numbered government books in the li- 

ConMnued on Page 10 



COBURN LIBRARY. 



Where Silence Is Goddess 



THE STUDENT COMMISSION. 



(By H. W. McOuat, President of the 
Associated Students.) 



It's the building whose architecture 
is the best on the campus; and it's 
the place wliere knowledge is packed 
away so tight that the students often 
become discouraged in their efforts to 
dig it out. Sometimes you'll find 
them gazing at the backs of those 
thousands of volumes with an awe 
that is truly wonderful. 

Such an austere place can have lit- 
tle charm for the timid freshmen. 
After trying to work the coml)ination 
on the swing doors they decide to use 
the home library. The sophomores 
feel that they must show the fresh- 
men their familiarity with everything 
pertaining to the college, so they 
walk boldly in. The juniors find that 
it is the only place where they are 
sure of seeing everybody, and they be- 
gin to appreciate it as a social center. 
The seniors with their intricate knowl- 
edge of every alcove, make yoii real- 
ize that Coburn Library is the mother 
of all learning. 

"Silence" is the motto of this as 
well as of all well-regulated libraries. 
Now and then there is a suppressed 
giggle at the wit of some old scibe, 
but at a glance from the librarian or 
his assistant the offender realizes that 
he must look for only the most seri- 
ous things in his reading 

The Winged \'ictory is the god- 
dess of the library. She has been 
there night and day for yea s, and 
could she but speak many are the tales 
we might hear about the generations 
which have passed out of the doors, 
but "silence" is her motto also. 



Previous to this year the president 
of the senior class was the acting- 
head of the student body, not by any 
power delegated to him in the form of 
a constitution, but me.ely ex-officio, 
by precedent. We can see readily that 
this was unsatisfactory, as it gave 
one man czar-like authority if he 
chose to use it, and left no one re- 
sponsible in case he refused to act. 
Fortuntaely nothing of the kind ever 
took place so far as I have been able 
to learn — the senior president usually 
deciding the minor things and submit- 
ting the more important ones to the 
student Ijody in mass meeting. This 
also was undesirable, for a large body 
of hung.-y students called for a chap- 
el-meeting did not give the various 
problems due consideration. In the 
case of any expenditure involving the 
whole student body a special assess- 
ment and several chapel meetings, to 
say nothing of tiresome collections, 
vvas necessary. To put it simply, we 
did not have an. organized student 
body. To efTect this organization the 
present constitution was drawn up 
and adopted. In it vvas inserted num- 
erous other details, including the sea- 
son ticket proposition. 

In attaining the end for which it 
was created the commission has been 
mildlj' successful. Organization has 
been effected. The athletic board 
has been working nicely in conjunc- 
tion with it, and all other student ac- 
tivities are well represented in its 
membership. The class scraps have 
come under its supervision. Its great- 




PALMER, COBURN LIBRARY and PERKINS 



6 



THE TIGER 



est usefulness probably lies in its abil- 
ity to give the equivalent of the con- 
certed action of all the students to 
any cause for the advancement of the 
college, quickly and easily. It acts 
as a mediator between the faculty 
ancl the student body and between 
the student body and other interests, 
such as the athletic conference. In it 
ideas and plans arc originated and, if 
worthy and feasible, put intc.i execu- 
tion. 

Tu ning to the faults of the con- 
stitution we find that there are some, 
there undoubtedly always will be. 
The commission is fully aware of 
these faults and intends to recom- 
mend changes at the annual election 
in the spring. An attempt to name 
them over here would be both tedious 
and iiic implete. An important change 
is the raising of the fee. As condi- 
tions now e.xist this seems imperative. 
Something must also be done to force 
the payment of the fee. But these in 
their time. 

The real success of the experiment 
is going to depend upon the attitude 
of the students at large towa.d theii' 
governing or rather directing body. 
The commission is their creature and 
their property, if they give it loyal 
support it will succeed, if they desert 
Or are indifferent, it exists in name 
only. 



TICKNOR HALL SPEAKS 

I am not so very old, if you count 
my age by years, but if age is deter- 
mined by experience — well, i ve had 
quite a bit of that. When I was first 
given to College and became the 
second girls' dormitory on the 
campus, I was proud of my newness, 
and was the popular spot on the 
college grounds for a long tiime. Aly 
good friends built me in a beautiful 
location, where I could look out over 
the creek and see our great mascot 
towering above us to the West, 
covered with a white mantle of snow, 
or rising brown and ba e from the 
pine-clad mountains in front of it. 
i'hen, too, I could lootc out across the 
c:ni us and see all the events which 
took i)lace about the College. Those 
were hapi)y days indeed for me. 

In my study down-stairs many 
hours have been spent by the stud- 
ents, seeking to drown the memory 
of lessons unprepared, and "flunks'', 
and "cuts", in the pleasure of"co-ed" 
parties. How many times have my 
walls rung wiith the College songs 
and cheers they gave. I remember 
one time — but I mustn't tell, for you 
know that one must respect the 
wishes of one's friends, and they 
were all my friends. 

Continued on Page 12. 



FORESTRY SCHOOL SHOWS 
STEADY GROWTH 



The Forest School was founded in the 
fall of 1906 following the giving of Mani- 
tou Park to the college by General 
Palmer and Doctor Bell. 

The school was founded for the pur- 
pose of preparing technical men both for 
private and public service, although since 
the beginning special emphasis has been 
laid upon the training of men for public 
service. This has been done for the rea- 
son that forestry in this country is still 
in its infancy and by far the greatest 
demand for trained men is being made 
by the governments, both state and na- 
tional. The demand for private experts 
is increasing rapidly, however, and in 
the near future as much stress will be 
placed upon this phase of forestry by 
the school as upon the other. That this 
time is not far distant is shown by the 
fact that already there is much talk of 
establishing a special course in Eucalyp- 
tus growing in addition to the regular 
course now given. This will be done 
just as soon as the growth of eucalyptus 
in this country assumes commercial pro- 
portions. At the rate which eucalyptus 
is now being planted and the bids which 
the engaged companies are making for 
trained foresters it will not be over two 
years at the very outside. 




TICKNOR HALL 



THE IM G E R 



Although practiced but a few years in 
this country forestry is making mar- 
velous strides. This can readily be seen 
when one stops to think that ideas and 
methods which were in vogue a couple 
of years ago are now completely obso- 
lete. 

In order to keep up with this rapid 
march of events any forest school which 
wouid consider itself thoroughly modern 
must be continually discarding old 
courses and adding those which will 
give the latest discoveries and ideas. 

Although the newest forest school in 
the country and with a reputation which 
has in a large measure yet to be estab- 
lished, the Colorado School of P'orestry 
stands pre-eminent as an exponent of 
progress in the science of forestry. A 
great many changes have already been 
made in the forest school curriculum and 
beginning with next year several other 
revisions will be made. English T and 
Law F will be stricken out of the sched- 
ule and courses on grazing and forest 
administration will be substituted. 

The course in grazing will be the lirst 
of its kind to be established in any 
forest school in the world, and is orig- 
inal with Professor Morril. About two- 
thirds of a forest supervisor's work on 
some of the national forests has to do 
with cattle and a man who is well in- 
formed on grazing will have a much bet- 
ter chance for advancement than one 
who goes onto a reserve knowing noth- 
ing about the subject. 

The course on forest administration 
will deal with the routine business of a 
national forest and will be very valuable 
to a man going into the government 
service. This is also a new course ne\er 
before taught at any school and onlv 
goes to show the progressive spirit 
which is dominant in both the forest 
school and the men in charge. 

Spanish will also be added to the 
schedule because it has been found thai 
in the southwestern part of the countrv 
a knowledge of this language is abso- 
lutely essential in dealing with the Span- 
iards and Mexicans who do most of the 
cattle business on the reserves in that' 
region. 

Engineering will also play a more im- 
portant part in the course so that a man 
who for any reason does not find for- 
estry congenial or satisfactory will have 
a second profession to fall back on and 
any man who successfully completes the 
amount of engineering work as pre- 
scribed in the new schedule will, with 
very little preliminary preparation, be 
able to qualify as a civil or irrigation 
engineer. 

Continued on Page 12. 




'PREXY" SLOCUM 



THE COLORADO FACULTY 

ATHLETIC CONFERENCE 

( By Dean Edu'ard S. Parsons.) 
The history of the formation and de- 
velopment of the Colorado Faculty Con- 
ference has so often been told that there 
is no need of repeating it. But it may 
be of value to re-state some of the prin- 
ciples and purposes which underlie it 
and to tell a few things it has accohi- 
plished and hopes to accomplish. 

The conference believes, in the lir,-,! 
place, that athletics are sport and not 
business. They are valuable as an a'!- 
junct to college life, but are a bane '' 
exalted to the position of being the main 
interest of a student or of an institution. 
If they are advanced to the first place, 
they naturally cease to be sport and 1)e- 



come business, and naturally the desire 
to win liecomes their animating prin- 
ciple. Vnd the desire to win easily de- 
generates into the desire to win at any 
cost. So naturally methods creep into 
their administration which are entirely 
unworthy, and men are recruited to 
make the winning possible and certain. 
Recruiting" in one institution means re- 
cruiting in all institutions where the de- 
sire to win is in control, and S3 the 
athletic field is monopolized by riiigers 
wlio bring low motives and often low 
riiorals to leaven the college community. 
E.\eryone acquainted with intercollegiat: 
athletics will recognize that this down- 
ward movement in athletics has char- 
acterized the life of almost all institu- 
tions during the early stages of their 
development. .\nd no one who has a 



THE TIGER 




BEMIS HALL 



McGregor 



real interest in the highest welfare of 
our college young people can stand by 
and see such a state of things without a 
desire to do what he can to bring al)out 
a better condition. 

It was this desire to help out a bad 
situation in Colorado which organized 
the Colorado Conference. To realize its 
ideal that athletics are sport and not 
business it proceeded to formulate rules 
to insure the limitations of athletics to 
bona fide students and the elimination 
of professionalism. Such rules could 
not be enforced without a central body 
of influence enough to make them stand. 
Only one group in our colleges has the 
college situation sufficiently in hand to 
control it at all times, and that group is 
not the student body, nor the alumni, 
nor even the board of trustees. It is the 
faculty. So the conference made as its 
basal principle the control of athletics 
by the faculty within its own institu- 
tion and the centralizing of this control 
for athletics at large in the conference, 
riie authority of the conference in ex- 
acting the rules it has made has had 
r.ovAe severe tests during the last two 
athletic seasons, but it has stood the 
strain. The conference has proved that 
it can not only make rules but that its 
relation with college faculties has given 
it strength enough to enforce them. 

But this authority would be an un- 
reality were it not for something which 
is the real power behind the rules and 
the organization. It has associated 
representatives of the different colleges 
together in sympathetic relations. It 
has shown that like ideals exist in them 



all. It has created confidence where 
there was doubt and suspicion. And 
with confidence has come frank speak- 
ing, so that what before was left to 
ferment in the dark, has been brought 
to the light, in most cases to die of too 
much sunshine. It has proved that more 
than half our athletic difficulties have 
grown out of misunderstandings. It 
has thus become a clearing house for 
rumors of every kind. It is a rule of 
the conference that it is the duty of 
athletic boards to communicate to the 
college involved any suspicions against 
athletics which may have arisen in their 
minds or been brought to them. The 
conference members are thus pledged to 
investigate all charges, and to the best 
of their ability to do their utmost to fur- 
nish full information. In case any man 
is for any reason proved to be ineligible 
to participate in intercollegiate athletics 
he has been debarred. 

So much has been accomplished, as 
has been said, not so much by formal 
organization as by meeting together fre- 

Continued on Page 9. 



BEMIS HALL~"Social Center" 

Bemis Hall, though still in its baby- 
hood, is justly proud, for in it is that 
most important factor of the college life, 
the "social center." The big Common 
room has been the setting of many a 
pretty scene: anxious juniors at the In- 
signia party, wondering what their 
senior friends have prepared for them ; 
frightened freshmen being entertained by 



these same juniors, now all smiles and 
bows ; fair maidens in quaint big cos- 
tumes tripping through the minuet at the 
Colonial ball ; a big fraternity reception ; 
President and Mrs. Slocum entertaining 
their friends at a musicale ; and Presi- 
dent Slocum's Sunday evening services 
in Lent and before Christmas. 

The dining room, which ordinarily 
provides for 150 girls, could tell tales 
of banquets, supper parties, and spreads 
galore, among which the girls' student 
government association banquet, the 
Pearsons Literary Society banquet, and 
the supper given each year by the senior 
girls for the senior men, stand out espe- 
cially. The senior girls, proud member 
of the Ancient and Honorable Order of 
the Dais, with the Dean of Women, 
overlook the dining room from their 
elevation at the south end and face the 
little balcony, from which perhaps some 
day sweet music will pour forth. 

Bemis has countless other advantages. 
The porches at east and west ends of 
the front are ideal for serenades and 
often used for this most praiseworthy 
purpose, and the parlor is almost as 
much of a social center as is the Com- 
mon room. The rooms on second and 
third floors (always in perfect order and 
waiting for inspection by curious vis- 
itors), are the homes of studious seniors 
and frivolous freshmen. In the base- 
ment there is a long, light corridor, 
where after supper, many a care is 
danced away, and a big empty room, 
sometime to be a little theatre, the future 
home of the Girls' Dramatic Club. Such 
is Bemis, the "new hall." 



THE TIGER 



ATHLETIC CONFERENCE 

Continued from Page S. 

quently, looking into the faces of the 
men of the other institutions, and 
strengthening one another's hands in the 
world which is so vital to us all. 

The conference attitude has helpfully 
influenced the athletic life of the state 
since its organization. The ringer has 
been banished. He no longer finds a 
comfortable bent in the colleges. He 
gets no money and no honor, and a long 
apprenticeship is before him if he wishes 
to enter any sport, an apprenticeship of 
a kind which is peculiarly distasteful to 
him. The football games of the last 
fall, also, have been the cleanest the 
state has ever seen. There has been no 
bad blood and no "dirty work" — to drop 
into football parlance. Professionalism 
always means illegitimate practices on 
the field itself. These external results 
have produced one still more worth 
while. The athletic morale of the insti- 
tutions has been raised. Practices which 
a very few years ago would have been 
winked at, not only by coaches and man- 
agers, but by students, and sometimes, 
alas, by faculty men themselves, are no 
longer possible. We could never in 
Colorado drop back to the depths out 
of which we have risen. 

The work of the conference thus far 
has been a signal instance of the power 
there is in the steady insistence upon 
principle. The faculties and the men 
who have represented them have stood 
unflinchingly to the position which they 
took at the outset. In spite of the sac- 



rifices they have been called upon to 
make, they have not faltered. And be- 
cause they have faced the situation with 
insistent courage, they have .overcome 
an opposition which seemed at the outset 
almost invincible. As one looks back 
over the period of only one year since 
the conference was first talked about, it 
seems hardly possible that all the insti- 
tutions in the state which have athletic 
teams in the field are now working in 
one organization, the principle of which 
is co-operation for the best interest of 
all. The problems are by no means all 
solved, but no one need despair now of 
their solution. The colleges of the state 
have today a consciousness of their abil- 
ity to cope with the difficulties in their 
path. A year ago some of them were 
ready to throw overboard intercollegiate 
athletics altogether. Now they see that 
it is in their power to control them, and 
to make them an honor and not a dis- 
grace to the state and to education. 

There is much for the conference to 
do in improving its machinery, in cor- 
recting defects in its rules, in broaden- 
ing the scope of its work. But those 
who have been closest to its work have 
the firm assurance that the spirit of sym- 
pathy which controls it, the desire to 
meet common problems in the spirit of 
helnfulness, will be equal to every emer- 
gency. Now that men of a common 
aiiii have come to understand one an- 
othi r the future is assured. 

It must be understood — and this is 
the closing word — that these results 
could be wrought only by the heartiest 



co-operation of all concerned. The same 
burden has rested upon all the institu- 
tions and the problem has been attacked 
with the same earnestness and self-sac- 
rificing spirit by all. The result is a 
tribute to the work of all, and all should 
have equal honor. 



THE MINING DEPARTMENT 

Offers Comprehensive 

Courses 

It n\ay seem to the casual observer 
that the couse in mining at Colorado 
College is a sort of a rival of tin- 
State School of Alines at Golden. 
This was not the intention with 
which the ct)urse was instituted. It 
■ is belie^'ed at Colorado College that 
the inining engineer needs a broader 
preliminary training than almost any 
other engineer, the course is so ar- 
ranged that the student is thoroughly 
drilled in English, modern languages, 
chemistry, mathematics, physics, geol- 
ogy, drawing and shop work before 
he takes the mining and metallurgical 
subjects. In these subjects no attempt 
is made to turn out specialists in any 
particular line of work. A student is 
better able to select a particular line 
or work upon which he wishes to spe- 
cialize,, after he has a knowledge of 
the possibilities and requirements of 
several branches of the work which 
falls to a mining engineer. In each 
subject the students arc taught the 
underlj'ing principles and their appli- 
cations as represented in current 



I 




McGregor hall 



10 



THE ^J I G E R 



practice. Particular stress is laid 
u; on developing in the student the 
power tif digging out for himself in- 
fo niation from technical journals, 
catalogues and hand books. The aim 
of the department is to turn out grad- 
uates who understand the theo.y and 
are competent to do the tasks that 
fall to the lot of a young enginee.-. 

The mining course has been improv- 
ed during the past year by giving 
practical underground instruction in 
mine surveying both in coal and metal 
mines. The miners have been given 
some experience in rock drilling, as 
the department now has an air com- 
pressor and a complete equipment of 
rock drills. The sampling of dumps 
and blocks of ground that are for 
lease in the Cripple Creek district 
will be given again this year. Some 
new features are to be added in the 
senior courses. The students are to 
be given some practice in the making 
of mine models from survey maps. 
Tests will also be made by the seniors 
with the recently acquired safety 
lamps, or) explosive mixtures such as 
are found in gaseous coal mines. This 
will be for the purpose of familiariz- 
ing the students with the appearance 
of the flame of the lamp when in a 
dangerous atmosphere. The water 
gauges and anemonmeters will be 
used on all the ventilating systems of 
the nearby coal mines whose opera- 
tors are very cordial in extending ev- 
ery courtesy to the department. 



Annual Report 

Continued from Page 5. 

brary, estimated at 8,000, during this 
five year period the number of books 
has more than doubled. It has increased 
by 23,534 volumes — a large library in 
itself — an average of 4,707 per year. The 
library now numbers 51,200 volumes. If 
the present rate of growth continues, and 
it should increase, within seven years 
all available space in the present build- 
ing will be occupied, and the main cen- 
tral building of the library must be 
erected. 

The following are the principal 
sources from which books have been 
received this year : 

Coburn Library Book Club 251 

U. S. Government 481 

The Library of Congress on ex- 
change account. 226 

Bound Magazines 930 

On Exchange account with the Uni- 
versity of Utah, and Chicago 

University 175 

Donations 2,000 




MINING ENGINEER IN THE MAKING 



The balance of the 4,449 volumes by 
purchase, exchange, etc. 

The proportion of books of permanent 
value purchased by the Book club has 
never been so great. The club is per- 
forming a great service to the college in 
depositing with us a very useful list of 
books which we would not otherwise se- 
cure. 

The large number from the Library of 
Congress is explained by the fact that, 
in over 100 years this library had accu- 
mulated an enormous stock of duplicates ; 
and to make room for J;he present-day in- 
crease the librarians were willing to 
send them out to the depository libraries 
of the cotmtry — on "exchange account," 
as they preferred to put it. From this 
source we received books long out of 
print, and now unobtainable elsewhere. 
From them we received all volumes lack- 
ing from our set of "Niles Register,'' 
many books on the early history of the 
country west and south as well as east, 
and a long line of Almanacs of the early 
and later Colonial periods. 

Tn the bound magazine and "Poole 
set" section there is a great shrinkage. 
For three years over 2,000 volumes a 
year were put on the shelves. In the 
year 1908 the number dropped to 1,377, 
and this year to 930. This is due to the 
fact that for a library of the size of this 
one, the collection is relatively a good 
one. We have more sets than the Den- 
ver public library has, though less than 
half the number of books announced by 
them ; more than the State University, 
though they have more than double our 
income ; as many as the State LIniversity 
of Missouri has, though they spend 



$5,000 a year on their periodical list 
alone. Our supply of "Poole sets" is 
probably not exceeded in the west. 

Among the more notable donations 
may be mentioned the following : 

Friends of Professor Ahlers have 
nearly finished raising $1,000 for Mrs. 
Ahlers ; and in return, his books will be 
turned over to the college library. The 
lot comprises 1,100 well chosen books. 
It is especially rich in the history of 
early German literature. Three hundred 
twenty books have been added to the al- 
coves of the Romance languages. Some 
of them came by gift, some by purchase, 
but many of them were bought of funds 
raised by Prof. E. C. Hills. The Jewish 
community of Colorado Springs has 
given the money for two great sets of 
Jewish books,— the New Jewish Encyclo- 
pedia, of twelve volumes, and a new edi- 
tion of the Talmud, ten volumes, the two 
listed at $159. 

Colorado Springs council 582, Knights 
of Columbus, have purchased for us a 
set of the New Catholic Encyclopedia, 
six volumes of which have already been 
issued, — published at $90. These two 
groups of citizens' have greatly honored 
the college and themselves by their gen- 
erosity. 

Mrs. Irving Howbert has turned over 
to the college 292 books of the library of 
the late Miss Crowell. These books are 
deposited in Bemis hall for the exclusive 
use of the young women of the college. 
They are numbered in the library acces- 
sion books. We hope to have them cata- 
logued soon and the cards included in 
our main catalogue. 
Wm. B. Clark has presented to the li- 



THE TIGEK 



11 



brary many single volumes, and also two 
sets of books : Percy's Anecdotes, 20 
volumes, and a set of the Studio of Lon- 
don. Dr. James B. Gregg is credited 
with the gift of 66 books which have 
been numbered, and as many more not 
yet numbered. Mrs. Franklin Bartlett 
of New York City, sent a box of books 
containing 152 volumes. Mr. Rush G. 
Kimball, a student of the college in its 
early days, gave 200 books ; Mrs. Geo. 
N. Marden, 140 volumes; Miss Virginia 
Beauchamp, 20 volumes ; Mrs. Horace 
E. Pastorius, 24 volumes ; Prof. W. L 
Sclater, 25 volumes. Thirty-eight other 
people have given from one to fifteen 
volumes each. Henceforth we shall miss 
Gen. Wm. J. Palmer's princely co-opera- 
tion. He made his last gift last March, 
just before his death, and it seems most 
fitting that this should be a copy in 
morocco (2 volumes) written by himself 
and Dr. Bell, "New Travels in North 
America," issued in 1869, two years be- 
fore this town was started. 

During the last two years, in addition 
to bound files of the local papers, the 
"Boston Daily Transcript," and the "New 
York Daily Times" have been bound and 
are now available for the use of students 
in their debates, essay work, etc. 

Other sets have been added by ex- 
change or purchase as follows : Nearly 
a complete set of the Annual Proceed- 
ings of the National Conference of Char- 
ities and Correction, 35 volumes. 

Ffty-seven volumes came from the 
Library of Congress, nearly completing 
our set of the "London Societv of Civil 



Engineers." From the same source 
"The Friends (Quakers) Library," of 14 
volumes ; a complete file of the "Amer- 
ican Quarterly Register," and the first 
fourteen volumes of the "American 
Journal of Education." A run of Z2 
volumes was added to our stock of the 
Edinboro Review, completing the set, 
and 38 volumes to the file of the West- 
minster Review, ten volumes to the set 
of the Contemporary Review. A com- 
plete file of the London Magazine of 
Art, 28 volumes, was secured. Perhaps 
the most important single item added to 
the library in the period under reviev/ 
was a set of the "New English Diction- 
ary," edited by Dr. James A. H. Mur- 
ray, and published at Oxford. It is the 
most extended and monumental dic- 
tionary ever undertaken. Six volumes 
are already published and the seventh is 
in press. Ten volumes altogether will 
be issued. This work was begun in 1857 
at the suggestion of Archbishop French. 
The purpose was "to make a dictionary 
which, by the completeness of its vocab- 
ulary and by the application of the hxs- 
fnrical method to the life and use of 
words, might be worthy of the English 
language and English scholarship." The 
emphasis is put upon the origin and his- 
tory of the word illustrated by quota- 
tions. During the year, the Engineering 
library room in the basement was en- 
larged, the Medical library moved into 
it from the west gallery of the main li- 
l^rary and a new assistant. Miss Eliza- 
beth P. Martin engaged to care for these 
two departments of the library. This, 
together with the helpful co-operation of 



the students, has greatly improved the 
library situation in the college during 
the year just closed. 

M. D. ORMES, 

Librarian. 



MCGREGOR'S YOUNGER DAYS. 

Early in the history of the college, 
the policy was adopted which requir- 
ed all young women to room on the 
camps, except those whose homes 
were in the city or wlm had relatives 
iir friends with whom the)' might live. 
Montgomery and Ticknor were filled 
to overflowing and it became neces- 
sary to provide for further accommo- 
dations. There came a number of 
special gifts from friends in the east 
as well as in the west with which Mc- 
Gregor Hall was erected. 

The building was named in honor 
of Miss McGregor Noyes, who was 
the president's assistant at that time, 
and who is a sister of Professor 
Noyes now on the faculty. "McGreg- 
or" was the inaiden name of Miss 
Noyes' mother. 

The parlor was furnished by Miss 
Noyes. The girls' gymnasium in the 
basement was a gift of one of the 
daughters of General Palmer. The 
furnishings of the rooms are the gifts 
of many friends. 

With the erection of McGregor 
Hall, the plan for the quad .angle of 
women's halls assumed shape, which 
the erection of Bemis has completed. 
This part of the campus, which at 




A CAMPUS VIEW 



Cutler and Montgomery 



12 



THE 1 i G E K 



first seemed useless, was graded, thus 
giving the grounds for tennis courts 
and the quiet location for the homes 
of the young women. 

McGregor Jlall has always been a 
favorite with the women. Every 
room has always been occupied, a 
fact which is due to its quietness and 
its exceptional location for beautiful 
views of the mountains. 



Ticknor Hall Speak 

Continued from Page 6. 

If you come into the little parlor 
on the north of the hall down-stairs, 
you will see all the cups there on a 
little table. Many a time have the 
girls gathered here to drink tea, and 
to talk over the latest happenings, 
how that young Freshman girls had 
been going too much with an Upper- 
class girl's beau, the new stjde in 
hats, the latest way of doing up one's 
hair, and a great many such trifles. 
Still those were pleasant gatherings, 
and one ne\er wanted to miss even 
one, for there was always something 
new to talk rbout. You'd be sur- 
prised to hear the girls talk over t'le 
chances for winning the next game 
of football — they always knew just 
hriw things were going to come out, 
provided the boys did also. 

I have tried to decide which of my 
two parlors has been the most 
popular, but I haven't quite decided. 
There is some advantage, you know, 
in a small parlo'/, for there won't be 
so many others there. But some- 
times the larger is the best, especially 
when one is bashful for then, when 
you call, you can sta\'