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Full text of "The Tiger (student newspaper), Sept. 1910-June 1911"

Colorado College Library 

Library JYo....^.3...?'...h.f 
From 

Received AUG. IS. t9tl 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/tigerstudentnews13unse 



^ 



THE TIGER 



or in ruonih outside the campus. Then 
Colorado Springs always has a large 
riuniber of its young people in the Col- 
lege. This has been especially true since 
the institution has taken such a high 
stand among the best colleges of the 
count;"y and its scholarship has been rec- 
ognized by the eastern universities. 

The members of the faculty will be 
at their posts for the opening. President 
Slocum, who, with Mrs. Slocum, has 
been in Germany during the sunmier, 
will reach the city in time to take charge 
of affairs early in the week. Dean Par- 
sons, who spent the summer with his 
family in Michigan, and Miss Brown, 
the registrar, have been registering new 
studeute all last week. Dean Cajori has 
been in the city looking after the affairs 
of the engineering school for the last 
two weeks, and Dean Sturgis of the 
school of forestry reurns after a year's 
leave of absence in Europe, and will re- 
sume coimections with the school, though 
Acting Dean Coolidge will have charge 
of the opening of the school of forestry, 
and the registration of students, which 
will be much heavier this fall than usual, 
the number of students coming from the 
eastern states showing a large increase. 
Dean Loomis, who has been on leave of 
absence for the last year, will again be 
in charge of the women of the college, 
and will be in her rooms at Bemis Hall. 

Professor M. C. Gile returned to Colo- 
ra:'.o Springs yesterday, and he and 
Principal Park will look after the stu- 
dents of Cutle:- academy, which also 
promises to have an exceptionally large 
registration this year. Dean Hale has 
been spending the latter part of the sum- 
mer at Crystohi., biU lias already returned 
tj the city and will be in his offices in 
Perkins Hall each day this week to care 
for the students in the school of music. 

To the men who have done so much 
for many years to make Colorado College 
what it is, and who have stood by it so 
loyally and faithfully, will be added a 
number of new men of exceptionally 
marked abiliy. Dr. F. Bushee, who 
comes to he department of economics 
from Clark college and university in 
Worcester, Mass., brings the ability and 
effectiveness of a successful and able 
teacher and writer. Dr. Bushee re- 
ceived the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
from Dartmouth college in 1894, studied 
later at Harvard uni\-ersity, the univer- 
sity of Berlin and the College Liber des 
Sciences Sociales of the College de 
Frances, and received the degree of 
Master of Arts and Doctor of Philoso- 
phy from Harvard university. He has 
spent two years in one of the best labor- 
atories of practical economics in the 



country, the South End House of Bos- 
ton.. 

A second addition to the teaching 
force is that of Dr. J. V. Breitwieser, 
who comes fro the department of 
psychology in Columbia university to a 
similar position in Colorado College. 
Dr. Breitwieser is a wesern man, a 
graduate of the Central Normal school 
and of 'the State Universit}^ of Indiana. 
He received the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy from Columbia university. 
He has had several years' experience in 
teaching in both High schools and col- 
leges, has contributed frequent articles 
to technical journals in his chosen sub- 
ject, and has had some little experience 
in the preparation of apparatus for 
studies in experimental psychology. 

A further addition to the teaching 
force of the college is that of a grad- 
uate of the college, Earle S. Alden, who 
is to be associated with, the department 
of English. 

A new office was created last June by 




DR. BREITWIESER 

the appointment of Donald S. Tucker 
as secretary of he college. Mr. Tucker 
is a graduate of the class of 1906, and 
h;;s been for t'le last three years a mem- 
lier of the High school faculty of Colo- 
rado Springs. He will have the re- 
sponsibility of many business details 
that have become exceedingly burden- 
some to the president with the \ery un- 
usual growth of the college, and will de- 



vote himself especially to the creation 
of a larger giving constituency to meet 
trie ver\' pressing financial demands of 
the institution wlijch has made a place 
for itself among the colleges of the 
country. The expenses of Colorado 
College have increased with its growth 
to more than fifteen times what they 
were when Dr. Slocum took charge of 
affairs twenty-two years ago and the 
growth each year makes a large increase 
in the endowment funds of the institu- 
tion an absolute necessity. Mr. Tuck- 
er will devote himself to this work 
under the direction of President Slocum. 
The new year at Colorado College thus 
begins with enlarged opportunities in 
every department of its life and work. 



PROFESSOR AND MRS. SMITH 
LEAVING. 



l^rofessor Harry F. Smith, who for 
the last few years has been assistant 
professor in Biblical Literature and 
Public Speaking, has resigned his po- 
■\ition in tlie College and will resume 
his vvork in the ministry. He has 
been called to Beverley, Mass., where, 
he will take up his work at once. 
Mrs. Sni'th will lea^■e to join her hus- 
band in about two weeks. 

Both ^Ir. an-{ Mir-. ifmUTi have a 
large number of fr'ends among the 
students and thei- going will be a 
d'stinct less to the College. Both 
iiave always joined into all the activ- 
ities of the students. Mrs. Smith has 
been the head of Mont:^cmery Hall 
during her stay he'/e. 



PROFESSOR LYON GOES TO 
UNION COLLEGE. 



ProF. George J. L\'on, who has becii 
in charge of the Engineering Depart- 
ment for se-<-eral years, has accepted a 
similar position in Union College in 
Schenectady. N. Y. Professor Lyon's 
\, ork in the College was thorough and 
i-fflcient and leaves no doubt iT his 
"Success in his new position. 



SHAW VISITS EUROPE. 



Glen Shaw 'lO, last year's editor of 
The Tiger, made an unusual trip to 
Europe this summer. In company 
with Professor Gile's son, he worked 
his way across in a cattle boat and did 
England and Paris all on the sum of 
about $60 and Shaw , declares that they 
la\'ished money right and left, too. 
.•\fter paj'ing his compliments to King 



THE TIGER 



Edward and telling the Fiench a few 
things about their language that they 
never realized before, he returned to 
his own country more convinced than 
e\er that it is the most civilized coun- 
try on the globe. 



HANDBOOK OUT. 



The new Handbook for the years 
igio-'n is out, fresh from the press 
of the Out West Printing company. 
The Handbook is without doubt the 
neatest and best gotten-up book of 
its kind that the College has ever had. 
The form has been considerably 
changed, the advertisements have 
almost all been cut out. more space is 
given for the keeping of memoranda, 
the 'informtaion has been made more 
compact and all superfluous informa- 
tion left out. The size has been 
changed to more nearly that of one's 
pocket and the binding is of better 
leather than ever before. Throughout 
the books are placed short epigram- 
matic pieces of advice to new and old 
students. Secretary Kirkpatrick is to 
be congratulated on the make-up of 
the booklet. 



Y. M. C. A. CABINET DINES. . 



On last Saturday evening the Y. M. 
C. A. were treated to a splendid din- 
ner by Secretary Kirkpatrick. The 
dinner was held in the Dutch room of 
the Acacia Hotel and practically every 
member of the Cabinet was present. 
After the dinner, talks were made by 
the officers and chairmen of commit- 
tees in which plans for th coming 
year were outlined and discussed. 

Those present were: Mr. Nipps, 
the newly appointed State Student 
Secretary; Mr. Fidler, Dean Parsons, 
Professor Motten, Professor Gile, and 
Kirkpatrick, Bryson, Fowler, Boyes, 
Gregg, Haight, Hesler, Dean, Hed- 
blom, Crowe. 



PRESIDENT'S TRIP. 



President and Mrs. Slocum returned 
from their summer in Europe on Tues- 
day morning. They left immediately 
after Commencement and landed at Rot- 
terdam and went directly, to Oberam- 
mergau for the purpose of seeing the 
Passion Play, which they enjoyed very 
much. President Slocum says that he 
has brought back a good many photo- 
graphs which will be made into stereop- 
tican views, for the purpose of giving 



to the students and their friends of the 
College some idea of the play. From 
Bavaria they made a rip through the 
Austrian Tyrol and the Bavarian Alps to 
Baden-Baden, where they spent most of 
the summer quietly. This famous Ger- 
man resort is on the edge of the Black 
Forest and they enjoyed many of the 
walks which are so attractive in that vi- 
cinity. After a week in Paris they met 
Graham of the sophomore class, and 
Dean and Mrs. Sturgis visited them at 
Baden. 

The summer has given the president 
and his wife the rest which was mo.st 
welcome after the strenuous work of last 
year. The one thought has been to re- 
turn in good condition to help make the 
new year one of the most successful that 
the College has ever experienced. The 
president expresses himself as greatly 
pleased with the prospects of the new 
year at the College and the number and 
character of the new students that are 
entering. 



PHI GAMMA DELTA DANCE. 



The Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity 
started the social season with an en- 
joyable dance at the Acacia Hotel last 
Monday night. The fraternity had 
about sixty guests. The Alamo Trio 
furnished the music, and favors in t'le 
form of a mixed bouquet of fllowers, 
tied with the fraternity colors, we e 
given to the lady guests. Among the 
guests were; .Mrs. Julia Hale, Mr. 
and Mrs .J. Roy Armstrong, Misses 
Pierson, Bogue, Yerkes, Watson, 
Mabel Wilson, Summers, Ashley, 
Florence Smith, Faye Anderson, Mar- 
garet Stephenson, Edith Douglass, 
Ida Blackman, Meservey, Turner, 
Mary and Vesta Tucker, Hemenway, 
Cora Kampf, Stark, Hall, Eversole, 
Worthing, McKinney, Randolf, Par- 
sons, Ada and Bessie Johnson, Ethel 
Rice, Edith McCreery, Merwin, Frost, 
Crandall, McGee. 



TERRILL DISCOVERS 

DINOSOUR TRACKS. 



Colorado College Student Uncovers 
Valuable Find. 



E. A. Terrill, who has reentered 
college after an absence of a year, 
made a discovery during the summer 
that has given him no little notoriety 
and may prove of considerable finan- 
cial benefit to him. Terrill did not 
discover a gold mine nor even a new 
patent medicine but something that 



is even rarer and more unusual than 
either of these two bonanzas — in 
short, he has uncovered the footprints 
of no less a monster than a dinosour. 
The tracks are estimtaed to be some 
sweet sixteen million years of age, 
and occur at regular intervals of four 
and one-half feet. They occur in an 
old stream-bed in lime-stone forma- 
tion near Grand Junction, Colo,, and 
are themselves about fifteen inches in 
width. Terrill has given one to Pro- 
fessor Finlay and one for the College 
museum is due to arrive in a few days. 
It is necessary to enclose them in 
cement in order to slnip them. These 
tracks arc very ra e, especially in 
Colorado, Some were discovered in 
Montana several years ago. Terrill 
does not know how many of the 
tracks there are, but as far as he has 
"prospected," he has found them oc- 
curring at the regular intervals. The 
Dinosouria are gigantic reptiles with 
a structure approaching nearer to the 
mammalian type than that of any 
other class. Their bodies were sup- 
ported at a considerable height on 
four strong limbs, though tlicy walked 
largely on the hind limbs. 

Terrill oq.iccts to dispose of some 
of the tracks to the museums and uni- 
versities of the east. 



EROADBENT BENEDICT. 



Miss Bettic R. Le.- ight, of Hun- 
mett, Ida., and Harry M. Broadbent 
of Ordway, Colo., were married Wed- 
nesday morning, September 7th, at 
8:30 o'cloc'<, at the First Methodist 
Episcopal parsonage, by Rev. Merle 
N. Smith, pastor of that church. 

Broadbent will be remembered as a 
member of the class of igii. He dis- 
continued his work at the end of his 
sophomore year, intending to remain 
out a year and return to finish later. 
During the year out of college he 
taught school in Ordway, Colo., 
where he met Miss Leeright. They 
expect to live in Ordway. 



Dr. Shantz Visits City.— Dr. H. L. 

Shantz, C. C. '01, visited friends in 
Colorado Springs recently. Dr. Shantz 
holds the position of plant physiolo- 
gist at the Bureau of Plant Industry 
in Washington. During the past year 
he had the ofTer of professorships at 
three universities in the west, but he 
preferred to remain in his present po- 
sition which givs him exceptional fa- 
cilities for research work. 



THE TIGER 



FORESTRY SCHOOL 



McKOWN MADE CITY FOR- 
ESTER OF COLORADO 
SPRINGS. 

igio Graduate of Forestry School Gets 
Good Position. 



Fred P. McKown, one of the two 
men of the first graduating class of 
the School of Forestry has been 
made city forester of Colorado 
Springs. The position is a newly 
created one and McKown's work will 
begin the first of the year. His work 
will consist largely of the care of all 
trees and shrubbery in the city; he 
will supervise all trimming to see that 
It is properly done and prescribe for 
anj' infectious growths such as the 
white scale, which has been such a 
pest in the city during the past few 
years. 

This movement is in line with the 
action of many of the larger cities of 
the country and promises to be one 
of the most profitable fields for men 
who have had training in forestry 
lines. The other fields for the em- 
ployment of graduates of this line of 
work are government positions and 
positions with private lumber compa- 
nies. 

The employment of McKown in the 
service of the city makes the Colo- 
rado College delegation at the city hall 
quite an influential one. G. C. Lake, 
of the class of 1905, is the city chem- 
ist and Dr. Omar Gillette, of the class 
of iSqo, is city physician. 

C. P. Morgan, the other of the two 
graduates of last year, is at present in 
the employ of a large company in 
California which makes a specialty of 
tree surgery. His headquarters are in 
.San Mateo, California. 



Summer School. 



The freshman and sophomore class- 
es in forestry spent the month of June 
at the summer school at Manitou 
Park, the field laboratory of the 
.School of Forestry. 

The freslinicn took the course in 
civil engineering with the freshmen 
engineers and gained an engineer's 
knowledge of the subject, which is 
considerable more than is given for- 
esters in many other institutions. 

The sophomore foresters took the 
course in Forest Mensuration under 



Professor Coolidge. Although he was 
unable to supervise the work person- 
ally all the time, the course was nev- 
ertheless very successful. More work 
of a real value to both school and 
students was done than in previous 
years. Not ofily were the systems of 
mensuration taught and practiced but 
considerable timber marking was done 
also. Sudies were also made complet- 
ing the work of the seniors in the 
spring by which the proper Manitou 
Park can be determined. A diameter 
growth table was also prepared show- 
ing the diameter of an average yellow 
pine for every year up to 210. A large 
number of stumps were studied — over 
.200 — and the resulting table proved 
very good. A copy was sent to Den- 
ver for the use of the United States 
Forest Service. A new departure in 
the course was the teaching of timber 
estimating and land mapping as is 
practiced by the United States For- 
est Service in its reconnaissance sur- 
veys. 

The outlook for next year is very 
bright, for Professor Coolidge will be 
able to devote more time to the im- 
mediate supervision of tlie work and 
probably the course will be consider- 
ably more improved than this year in 
'■onsetjuence. 



Reconnaissance Work. 



This summ.er most of the men in 
the School of Forestry worked for the 
United States Forest Service doing- 
reconnaissance work on various na- 
tional forests. They were distributed 
as follows: Donavan. Thompson, 
Rice, on the San Juan national forest; 
Stewart, on the Big Horn national 
forest; Berryhill, Pierce, on the San 
Isabel national forest; Floyd, Lake, 
Raker, on the Pike national forest. 

The work consisted of the estimation 
of the timber on each quarter section 
separately by means of small samples 
and in mapping the countrj'. One 
man would do from one to one and 
one-half square miles per day. The 
w :irk was of great benefit as ex- 
perience and will also be a great aid 
in passing the portion of the Civil 
.Service examination relating to train- 
ing and experience. In this relation. 
Prof. Coolidge received a communica- 
tion from the Civil Service Commis- 
sion in part as folios:: "In order 



to receive a rating of 70 or more on 
training and experience a competitor 
must have had extended practical ex- 
perience, or undergraduate work sup- 
plemented by post graduate work of 
considerable practical experience. No 
competitor in this examination re- 
ceives a rating of 70 on training and 
experience who has had only under- 
.graduate work and the experience in- 
cidental to such wprk." 

Those who have been working this 
summer may congratulate themselves 
that they will add a few percent at 
least to their Civil Service examina- 
tion marks when they take them. 



Baseball Team Leaves for Japan. 



Twelve students, constituting the 
baseball team of the University of 
Chicago, left on September 2 for 
Japan by way of Seattle, to play a 
series of games with the teams of 
Keio and Waseda universities. The 
series to be played is the result of a 
challenge issued by Waseda Univer- 
sity, and this, it is predicted, will re- 
sult in a counter challenge which will 
bring the Japanese team to Marshall 
Field at the University of Chicago 
next year. The present series will 
be watched with interest by those 
concerned in the game from the col- 
lege standpoint, since the Japanese 
team at Waseda University is coached 
by Albert W. Place, a former Univer- 
sity of Chicago batter who won much 
fame for himself about ten years ago. 
The Chicago team is being managed 
by H. O. ("Pat") Page, as captain 
and pitcher, who is widely known as 
captain and quarter-back of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago football team of 
tgog. The trip involves a journey of 
approximately 19.000 miles, and to 
earn the privilege, members of the 
team have worked strenuously through 
the summer quarter to make up the 
necessary credits to permit of their 
absence till Christmas. They will be 
in official charge of Dr. Gilbert A. 
P)liss, .\ssociate Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 



Fourth Floor Finished. — During the 

summer the fourth floor of Bemis 
Hall has been completed and more 
room made for the ever-increasing 
enrollment of students. 



THE TIGER 



ENGINEERING SCHOOL 



NEW FACULTY MEMBERS IN 
ENGINEERING SCHOOL. 



SUMMER ENGINEERING 
SCHOOL. 



The Civil Engineering Department is 
now in charge of Prof. G. E. Martin, 
who comes from the engineering fac- 
ulty of the University of Illinois. As a 




PROF. G. E. MARTIN 

practical man he brings the very highest 
recommendations. Two years' experi- 
ence, part with the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road, part with the Lake Erie and West- 
ern R. R., some general engineering 
work at Fort Wayne and drainage, road, 
and city work in Allen County, Indiana, 
indicate the scope of his field work. 

Professor Martin is a graduate of 
Purdue and when Dean Goss went from 
Purdue to the University of Illinois he 
took Mr. Martin with him. We have, 
then, as good reason to find him valuable 
as a theoretical man as we have as a 
practical one. 

As Professor of Civil Engineering at 
Colorado College, Professor Marin suc- 
ceeds Professor Lyon, who has left Colo- 
rado College to become Professor of 
Civil Engineering at LT„ion College, at 
Schnectady, N. Y. 



An Ideal Camp and a Practical Field 
Experience. 



The Colorado College School of En- 
gineering has successfully maintained its 
summer school during a second year. 
When the field school of engineering 
was established it was received with de- 
light by the engineering students, as it 
eliminated the heavy course of field prac- 
tice that was forced into an already 
crowded schedule. Now, the field work 
is done in four weeks, which are free 
from the struggles in other classes, and, 
which are spent in a pine-covered moun- 
tain park. Laboratory work in the Col- 
lege is greatly beneficial under this ar- 
rangement. 

The "Metcalf cottages" housed the en- 
gineers and the foresters. The drafting 
rooms were improved, pipe lines were 
laid, the stables were put in good repair. 
Students report that the camp was com- 
fortable and jolly and Professor Lyon's 
arrangements for their ravenous hunger 
were highly satisfactory. During the 
session there were twenty-five engineers 
and foresters at Manitou Park. 

Courses. 

Professor Lyon and his assistant, Mr. 
Brown, offered courses in Plane Survey- 
ing for freshmen and sophomores, in 
Civil, Irrigating, Mining Engineers and 
Foresters. They gave other courses to 
advanced students, juniors and seniors 
in Engineering, in Railroad Field Work 
and Hydrographic Surveying. 

Challenge. 

Be it known that the Summer School 
Engineers of 1910 have determined and 
recorded the elevation of Manitou Park, 
and challenge the class of 1911 to check 
it. The final decision of the correct ele- 
vation to be made by the students of the 
school of surveying in 1912. 

New Men. 

The Electrical Engineering Depart- 
ment has added to its faculty' this sum- 
mer. The new member is Mr. G. B 
Thomas, a graduate of Ohio State LTni- 
versity, in Electrical Engineering. From 
there he went to the Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology and was an assist- 
ant and instructor in the standardizing 
laboratory and dynamic laboratory, 
handling notes that were, in fact, indi- 



vidual laboratory manuals arranged by 
the students. For two years Mr. Thom- 
as taught night school, giving practical 
Electrical Engineering to practical men. 
During the installation and testing of 
the electrical equipment of the Ohio 
Steel plant, Mr. Thomas was doing this 
work. For two summers he was with 
the Westinghouse Company, one in the 
construction department and one on the 
testing floor. 



OUR NEW COACH 

Continucti from Page 1. 




COACH ROTHGEB 

made an enviable reputation at the Ag- 
gie town. With a small amount of ma- 
terial and with light men he developed 
a fast team and the Aggies have been 
noticed for their heady and fast work. 
Rothgeb is a married man, and lives 
with his family at 16 East Espanola. 

He studied in the University of Illi- 
nois, where he was one of the foremost 
men in baseball, football and track 
athletics. Mr. Rothgeb will have en- 
tire charge of all athletics in the college, 
which from now on will feel the influ- 
ence of a permanent and able director 
who will give his full time and thought 
to this important phase of college life. 

The creation of this directorship for 
the development of all physical culture 
in the college makes possible for the first 

Continued on Page 12. 



THE TIGER 



The Weekly Newspaper of Colorado College 

A. E BRYSOIN Editor-in-Chief 

S. WILKIE DEAN Business Manager 

Sam J.Shelton Assistant Editor 

Herbert G. Sintom Assistant Editor 

Richard L. Hughes Assistant Editor 

ROBERT M. COPELAND Engineering Editor 

Fred S. Baker Forestry Editor 

Helen Canon Alumni Editor 

Mamie C. Detmoyer Exchange Editor 

Edith L. Summers Local Editor 

J. A. Root Local Editor 

Ray H. Saver Assistant Manager 

E. E. Hedblom Assistant Manager 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to TheTiger. Contributions 

must be accompani- d by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 
College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

.a3^ ga»^ Entered at ihe postoffice «t Colorado 

^'^^^^^ Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



YOU AND 
THE TIGER. 



Just a few things that are said at 
thi'^. time ever\' year, and which arc 
true this year as they were ten years 
ago and as they will be ten years 
iieiice:— The Tiger is your paper, 
gotten out by your representatives for 
you. These things being true, it is 
worthy of your support. Now as to 
how you can support it: — You can 
assist the manager materially by sub- 
scribing for the paper and by patroniz- 
ing the men who make the paper pos- 
sible at the price you pay for it; you 
can assist the editors by a spirit of 
cooperation in getting it out. The 
Tiger columns are always open to 
students and faculty for the consider- 
ation of matters of interest to all, and 
by submitting such articles you are 
not only making the Tiger mare truly 
the mouthpiece of the student body, 
but you are assisting the editors as 
well. 



BOQUETS. 

Attention is called to the editorials 
from the Colorado Springs Gazette 
and the Denver Post which appear 
elsewhere in this issue. These edi- 
lorials are expressions f)f the position 
which is held by Colorado College 
among the institutions of the West, 
and its contribution to the life of the 
city and state. Of course, we all 
knew these things before but it is a 
pleasure to hear them said by repre- 
sentative n.cwspapers. 



FRESHMAN 
CUSTOMS. 

At this season of the year, the 
freshman is decidedly the most talked 
of and thought of individual on the 
campus. His deeds are the source 
of much consideration and his needs 
caused the editor to write this editorial. 
Colorado College is somewhat lacking 
in regulations concerning the conduct 
of freshmen — he may wear corduroy 
trousers or sit in the Holy of Holies 
if it is his desire and little or nothing 
is said about it. The line between 
under classmen and upper classmen has 
been gradually grownig more appar- 
ent, yet there are times when it grows 
quite faint. Upper classmen are de- 
serving of respect and to gain this re- 
spect certain distinctions between the 
privileges of upper and under class- 
men are necessary. It is not too 
late to start these rules for the com 
ing year and it is to be hoped that 
the Student Council will give the 
matter their early consideration. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

Uontinued from Page 1 

P'rom the Demer Post, Friday, June 
17th, 1910. by George Creel. 

Not until one sees it and feels it 
can the real importance and true 
standing of Colorado College be com- 
pletly understood. In twenty-two 
years, many of them lean. President 
Slocum has won comparative wealth 
and splendid prosperity for his insti- 
tution, and established standards of 
scholarship that have gained the re- 
spect and consideration of all the 
great educators and bodies that have 
to do with things educational. 

But it is not in statistics, impres- 
sive though the figures are, nor in the 
praise and recognition of eastern uni- 
versities and endowment fund trus- 
tees, that appreciation of Colorado 
College finds its best expression and 
its true importance fullest proof. 
The chief characteristic of the school 
— the thing that has driven it through, 
obstacles to success, as a bullet pierces 
butter is its freedom. Its atmosphere 
is one of courage and honesty, and the 
education that it gives is a real thing, 
intimate in its relation to life, There 
is alertness then, not aloofness — open 
minds and open eyes, and instead of 
the cloister effect that tradition de- 
crees, the wind of the world blows 
through the College. From end to 
end there isn't a trace of dry rot, or 
sign of traditional stupidities that 
make a prejudice master of accept- 



ance and rejection. Not in faculty 
or in student body are there those 
that go pussy-foot. The tread is 
firm and foi»ward and the advance is 
in honor, courage and freedom. 

Few institutions so splendidly 
epitomize the spirit of the West, and 
that is why the student body is so 
finely representative of western man- 
hood, and will continue to be increas- 
ingly. 



THE COLLEGE AND THE CITY. 



(From Colorado Springs Gazette, 
September 13.) 



The opening of each new academic 
year at Colorado College becomes a mat- 
ter of increasing significance to this com- 
munity. When, twenty-two years ago. 
President Slocum came to the apparent- 
ly hopeless task of saving the institution 
for the larger work into which it has en- 
tered so successfully, the college played 
a very small part in the life of the city, 
and was not commonly regarded as a 
very serious factor in the life of Colo- 
rado Springs. The coming into the city 
for a continuous residence of nearly a 
thousand people, counting members of 
the faculty and their families, the ever- 
increasing student body, and the large 
number of employees, is a matter of 
greater significance than most people 
realize. 

It is not, however, simply the business 
interests which are receiving the ad- 
vantage of this increasingly strong force 
which works so silently for the upbuild- 
ing of the community. All social and 
moral influences of the city are distinctly 
accentuated by the existence of an insti- 
tution, which, by its very naure, makes 
for earnestness and for consecrated man- 
hood and womanhood, and any commun- 
ity is fortunate in having expressed with- 
in it the highest ideals of life and work 
as they are expressed in the life and 
work of Colorado College. If from the 
churches of the communiy, for example, 
were to be taken all that has been 
brought to them by the growth of Colo- 
rado College, they would feel it as a 
most serious loss to their moral power. 
The self-sacrificing struggles which have 
made the college have made much be- 
sides in he community. Do the people 
of Colorado Springs recognize the great- 
ness of the debt that they owe to those 
who have given themselves so earnestlv 
to the making of Colorado College? 

As the years go on, the relations of tiie 
college to the city are more and more 
clearly defined, it will be seen that the 
greatest value of this institution is the 



THE TIGER 



development of its own inner life of in- 
tellectual and moral forces. It must 
grow from within outward into the life 
of the community. It should develop 
its own organization and its own move- 
ments, and its policy must ever point to- 
wards those high ideals for which the in- 
stitution was founded and towards which 
it has unceasingly moved during the last 
two decades. Its largest service to the 
state, and to the city especially, will be, 
and must be, the fulfillment on its part 
of that which has made other institu- 
tiohs in America what they are in the life 
of the nation. 

The college is creating at the moral 
center of the community a mighty force 
for righteousness. Those who are con- 
nected with it do most for the city by 
doing what so many have done under the 
present administration, giving themselves 
heart and soul to the unbuilding of the 
college itself. This has been the secret, 
during the past twenty years, of the evo- 
lution which has made the college a great 
power for good in the community. 
Large-minded men have come to recog- 
nize this controlling principle in the di- 
rection of its affairs, and are grateful for 
the large-mindedness and the statesman- 
ship that have directed its administra- 
tion. Its larger future will be the out- 
growth of this conception. 

It is this which has held men of very 
unusual ability and character on the fac- 
ulty, and it is this idea which must be 
recognized and supported by all who are 
really interesed in its future, and in what 
it can do for the young people who with- 
in it are being trained into the true ideas 
of citizenship which lie at he heart of the 
very life of the nation. The college 
must live its own life, fulfill its own high 
purposes. So only can it be the most to 
the city and state. Whatever is best for 
Colorado College is best for Colorado 
Springs. 



HAGERMAN HALL. 



Hagerm;m Hall this year is fortu- 
nate in having a larger number of up- 
per classmen than usual in the build- 
ing. At this time most of the rooms 
are rented. There are several changes 
in the administration this year. The 
or'< of the hall is now in the charge 
of a janitor and housekeeper who live 
in the hall. Heretofore the manager 
has been the only resident officer of 
the Hall and the work of the Hall has 
been handled by a housekeeper with 
several part-time assistants. 

The residents m the Hall on Tues- 
day were: 



Uasemcnt — C. D. He.bcrt, janitor. 

First floor — D. S. Tucker, manager; 
[van Wild. •Wesley Desley, Walster 
Wakefield, George Dawson, William 
Wong, C. A. Carson, E. W. Lind- 

strom, Har-den, L. C. Swanson, 

Herbert Fay, Barnes brothers. 

Second floor— C. A. Mantz, W. B. 
Hcvvland, W.- FI. Taplen, E. Z. Kkihr, 
C. A. Flarter, B. L. Haskett, F. T. 
Hurlbiirt, R. E. Miller, h". C. Wray, 
E. K. Huleat, A. L. Rowbotham, C. 
K, Seeley, R. S. Buchanan, T. A. 
Fisher, B. Weirick, E. S. Alden. 

Third floor — Lin Guy, John Shee- 
han, A. G. Stark, R. H. Basler, E. 
Jacobs, O. Cook, N. Wright, H. Le- 

Clere, Le Clere, A, F". Isensee, 

Chapin, H. Newman, C. Angell, 

Lake. 

The most interesting thing this year 
is the proposed fitting up cf the two 
big rooms in the basement. The big 
room which was last year used as a 
reading room will probably be turned 
into a "recreation room" with a col- 
lection of gymnastic apparatus. Then 
it is planned to cut a door through 
the partition into the room which 
used to be the kitchen and fit that up 
as a "reading room." It is hoped 
that the work can be started before 
this first issue of The Tiger appears. 



RULES GOVERNING MEMBER- 
SHIP IN FRATERNITIES. 



STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

BUREAU BUSY. 



$12,000 Worth of Work Secured. 



The Student Employment Bureau 
of Colorado College has been at work 
since the middle of August. A can- 
vass of the northern part of the city 
has been finished. The bureau is much 
indebted to the energetic men of the 
College, whose aid made it possible 
for the Employment Bureau to ac- 
complish the good results that it has. 

Special attention will be paid to odd 
jobs this winter, with a view of de- 
veloping them to a greater extent 
next year. This field is a new one 
and in the course of a few years will 
be the main source of wealth for the 
!iew men who come each year. 

A rough valuation of the work so 
far obtained is $12,000. The bureau 
will continue its worx' throughout the 
year and hopes to raise the value of 
the jobs from the $12,000 of last year 
to between $15,000 and $20,000; with 
the help of the men who are working 
their way through college this result 
can be attained but if the men do not 
do their work well the Employment 
Bureau will be helpless and useless. 



1. A proposed initiate of the Liberal 
Arts department to be eligible for in- 
itiation into any fraternity, repre- 
sented in this Council, must have re- 
cei^■ed credit on the College records 
for at least twelve (12) semester hours' 
work completed in Colorado College, 
and must not be marked deficient 
(conditioned or failed) in more than 
one of the courses constituting the 
work of the semester immediately 
preceding his proposed initiation. 

A proposed initiate of the Engineer- 
ing or Forestry departments to be el- 
igible for initiation into any fraternity 
represented in this Council must have 
received credit on. the College records 
for at least twelve (12) semester reci- 
tation hours' work completed in Col- 
orado College and must not be 
marked deficient- (conditioned or 
failed) in more than one of the reci- 
tation courses included in the work 
of the semester immediately preced- 
ing his proposed initiation. He must 
also have passed and received credit 
on the College records for his labor- 
atory work in the said semester, ex- 
cept in one course in which he may 
be marked incomplete or conditioned 
without his being excluded from init- 
iation. 

2. Two weeks before any man may 
be initiated into any fraternity repre- 
sented in this Council his name shall 
be handed to the faculty members of 
the Council who shall determine his 
eligibility for initiation. 

Any man initiated in violation of 
the rules of this Council shall be 
dropped from the College and the 
chapter conce'-ned shall be publicly 
reprimanded as directed by the Coun- 
cil. 



RULES GOVERNING MEMBER- 
SHIP IN WOMEN'S LITE- 
RARY SOCIETIES. 



Only young women of the three 
upper classes shall be eligible for 
membership aftc having been in Col- 
lege at least one semester. 

No young woman shall be eligible 
for membership who has failed in 
more than six semester hours or more 
than two courses. 

No young woman shall be eligible 
tor membership who does not support 
Student Government. 

During her college course a young 
woman may receive only one invita- 
tion. 



THE TIGEB 



ATHLETICS 



FOOTBALL PROSPECTS GOOD 



RULE CHANGES WILL MAKE 
GAME DIFFERENT. 



Good Games Here. 



NINE VETERANS RETURN. 



Plenty of Promising Freshmen. 



Coach Rothgeb got busy with his 
Tigers and the embryonics Monday 
afternoon, and the opening of the 1910 
football season was an auspicious event, 
sixteen husky men being out ready for 
the fray and prospects good for many 
more. Steele, Hedblom, LeClere, Van- 
demoer, Copeland, Thompson, Cook, Put- 
nam, Heald, Hand, Bowers, Weller and 
Terrill of he old men, ; J. Sinton, W. Le- 
Clere, Witherow, Acker, Reed, and 
hloyd of he eligible new men who were 
here last year. 

Cary, Jacobs, Ady and a number of 
promising freshman material have been 
out working and show that there will be 
something for Tiger elevens in the fu- 
ture. 

The Tiger aggregation is going 
through light work now but the schedule 
is so strenuous that the men will have 
to be whipped into shape in a short time. 
Many of the old men expect to be back 
in the harness in a few days. 

From now on daily practice will be 
the order at Washburn field. The time 
is short before the opening game next 
month, and Coach Rothgeb realizes the 
importance of an early understanding of 
the new game. Captain Vandemoer, who 
expected to remain on the western slope 
two weeks longer, has been urged to re- 
port at once, and his arrival is looked 
for daily. 



The passing of the flying tackle to the 
story books, the quarter back's dismissal 
from his former activities, and changes in 
he forward pass rule are among the 
prominent rule changes which the Na- 
tional Commission passed during the 
summer. A great deal has been and 
can be written on the changes, which are 
severely censured by some and recom- 
mended by others. The fast heady 
player takes the place of the beef and 
the whole team under the new rules has 
to play with their heads. The offense 
play is greatly benefitted by the changes 
and the defense will be the matter of 
worry to more than one coach. 

Claude J. Rothgeb, the recently ap- 
pointed director of athletics at Colorado 
College, has been studying the new rules 
during the last few weeks, and, like many 
other coaches, is undecided whether he 
likes them or not. 

"Every time I look them over," he re- 
marked yesterday, "I find something new, 
and it will require close study by players 
and coaches alike before they thoroughly 
understand the new order of things. 

"While we may read the rules over 
and over, and gain a general idea of what 
the 'new' game will be like, we cannot 
arrive at anything definite until we get 
the men on the field. That is why it is 
important the football candidates should 
bo ready for early practice. If we are 
to accomplish results in football this 
vear we must get to work at once. 



With but three intercollegiate games 
on Washburn Pield and four on foreign 
territory, loyal supporters of the black 
and gold will have a chance to see their 
padded warriors in real action. The 
most important game from every stand- 
point outside of the championship con- 
test will be the game with the Kansas 
Agricultural college of Manhattan, Kan., 
on November 5. Last season the Kan- 
sas cornhuskers played a strong game, 
defeating Washburn, one of the Kansas 
strong teams by a score of 40 to and 
were defeated by Kansas U. by a score 
of 10 to 0. The Mines play here on 
October 29 and Wyoming Ocober 15. 
October 8, the Terrors of the High 
school will play the Tigers in the regu- 
lar practice game. 

The schedule in full is as follows and 
the students are advised to paste it in 
their hats. 

October IS — University og Wyoming 
at Colorado Springs. 

October 22 — University of Utah at 
Salt Lake City. 

October 29 — School of Mines at Colo- 
rado Springs. 

November 5 — Kansas Agricultural 
college at Colorado Springs. 

November 12 — University of Colorado 
at Boulder. 

November 19 — Colorado Agricultural 
at Fort Collins. 

November 24 — Denver university at 
Denver. 



Elmer Terrill has re-entered col- 
lege after being out for a vear. 



More Noise. — Professor Noyes is 
the proud father of a baby girl which 
arrived during the summer. 




STEELE 



HEDBLOM THOMPSON VANDERMOER (C) COPELAND PUTMAN 



HEALD SINTON 



THE TIGER 



THE COLLEGE OUTFIT 

Clothes, Hats and Furnishings Designed Especially for College Men of Rehne- 
ment. Styles that appeal to virule young fellows. Values unusually good. 
Our buyers keep in close touch with the makers who create the fashions for 
students of the great universities. Suits and OvercoatS $15.00 to $50.00. 



GANO-DO$^5HS» 




Deichmann & Douglas 
Floral Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER. Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 
Students' Trade Solicited 



111 N. TejonSt. 



Telephone 1593 



To College 
Men and Women 
We Are Known as 
"The Satisfactory 
Jeweler". To 
New Ones We 
Soon Will Be. 



Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

"Satisfactory Jewelry 

Store" 



WE LOAN MONEY 

ON ALL VALUABLES 

Big line of new and unredeemed 
Drawing Instruments .'. Diamonds 
Watches and Jewelry ot all descrip- 
tions. Firearms and Fishing Tackle, 
Musical Instruments and hundreds 
of other articles 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



Condition examinations will be held 
in Palmer Hall Saturday, September 
17. 



Joint Y. M.— Y. W. C. A. reception 
in Bemis Friday night. 



Meeting of the Pan-Hellenic Coun- 
cil in Trustee's room. Palmer Hall, 
at 5 o'clock Tuesday afternoon. 

Stag reception in the gym Saturday 
evening at 7:30. Not a dress suit 
affair. 



Handbook is on sale at Y. M. C. A. 
or Y. W. C. A. office. Free to fresh- 
men ten cents to upper classmen. 



President Slocum will adidress a 
mass meeting of all the men of the 
college in the lower hall of Perkins 
Sunday afternoon at four o'clock. 
His. subject will be, "Traditions and 
Temptations of College Life." Special 
music. No man can afford to miss it. 



BRIEFS 



Thompson Leaving. — E. C. Thomp- 
son, better known around the campus 
as "Tommy," will not reenter college 
this year. Thompson leaves shortly 
for Yazoo City, Miss., where he ex- 
pects to show the natives how to 
grow cotton scientifically. 



Cutler Late. — Cutler Academy, to- 
gether with the High school and the 
grade schools of the city will not re- 
open until September 26. 



Antlers 

Turkish Baths 

(Opposite Elks Club) 
Open Day and Night 

BATHS OF ALL KINDS. Also Chiro- 
pady and Swedish Massage. Treat- 
ment at Residence by Appointment. 

CARL J. WENBERG, Prop. 

Graduate Swedish Masseur 

Phone Red 33 14 E. Bijou Street 



Snappy, Swag^y 
Clothes 



AT 



THE MAY CO. 

College Men 10 Per Cent 

Clever 
Haberdashers 



This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 

Company 




Musical Scholarship. — A scholar- 



Headquarters for 

College Footwear 



10 



THE IM G E R 



For Young Men Who Want 
Snap and Dash In 

their clothes yet refined, tasteful and beboming styles, we offer 
American standard of fashion. 

SOCIETY BRAND CLOTHES 



These garments embody the highest type of tailoring and 
fabrics. Your every wish can be gratified at from $22.50 to |40 



Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton-Rustic Home 

No. 419 South El Paso St. 
Phone Main 442 



Dairy 



Photography 

In All Its Branches 



Clark 



112 South Tejon St. 
Special Discount to A II Students 

Shoe Repairing. Clothes Cleaned and Pressed. 
Second-Hand Shoes a d Clothing 

J. H. PERKINS 



lyi S. Cascade 



Colorado Springs 



PRATT, The Barber 

s At he Alta Vista Hotel 

He Solicits the Patronage of the 
College Boys 



ship fnr a course of training in piano 
music will be awarded by the School 
of Music of Colorado College in an 
open contest, the date of which will 
be announced later. The conditions 
for entry are, that the applicant be 
in need of the assistance and have 
real musical abilit}'. 



President's Trip. — President and 
Mrs. Slocum returned Monday from 
an extended trip through Europe dur- 
ing the summer. A large part of their 
time was spent in the Black Forest 
in Germany and both returned great- 
ly rested and ready for a strenuous 
}'ear of work. 



Back from Europe. — Carl R. Black- 
man, who has been touring Europe 
during the summer with George Gra- 
ham, returned last iNIondaj'. Graham 
will return in about two weeks. Dur- 
ing the summer they visited Engl'and, 
France, Switzedand and Germany, 
and took in the Passion Play at Ober- 
amergau. 



Big Doin's. — The stag reception to 
be held in the gymnasium, Saturday 
night, promises to be an enjoyable 
and exciting event. Fowler is in 
charge of affairs and a large time is 
promised. The underclassmen are 
already choosing their representatives 
lor the athletic contests. 



A tends Conference. — Sec etary 
Kirkpatrick attended the Fake Forest 
Conference for the student Y. M. C. 
A. secretaries. Kirkpatrick was in 



WINDOW SLEEPING TENTS 



THE OUT 


WEST 


TENT AND AWNING CO: 


1131 NORTH TEJON STREET 





Phone 917 



GEO. R. BERGEN, D. D. 

IMANF'G OPTICIAN 
Eyes Tested 611-12 Exch. Nat. Bank BIdg. 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented 
and Repaired 

Supplies of AH Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing Typewriter. The 
Ne V No. 10 Model Has All Latest 
Improvements 

Zimmerman Supply 

Company 



22 E. Kiowa St. 
Phone Main 374 



Established 1890 



Furniture, Furnishings 

For College Use 

The Fred S. Tucker 

Furniture Company 

106-108 North Tejon Street 

The Hassell Iron Worlds 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 



THE TIGER 




Extends a hearty welcome "home" to the old mc n, £.^ d 
a most cordial invitation to those of you who arc hcrre 
for the first time. Our specialty is catering lo the 
tastes of College Men. 



Cigar Store 1 3 Nonh Harry C. Hughes Tej«n s, J 3 



Get Your Picnic Supplies 

— AT =:= 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER, Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Notary Public 

A. J. LAWTON 

Real Estate, Loans and Insurance 
10J4 E. Pike's Peak Ave. , Colorado Springs 

The MURRAY 
Drug Company 

(Opposite Campus) 



The handiest place to buy 
your Note Books, Tablets, 
Fountain Pens, Pennants, 
Kodaks and Supplies, as well 
as Everything Usually Kept 
in a Well Stocked Drug Store 



''Meet at Murray's" 



attendance for a week and learned 
many things that will be of value to 
him in his work. 



Fraternity Convention Delegates. — 

During the summer, Ed Morse at- 
tended the Kappa Sigma convention 
in New York City. A. E. Bryson at- 
tended the Phi Gamma Delta con\en- 
tion in Niagara Falls, Canada. 



Dr. Cajori Reads Paper. — At the 

summer meeting of the American 
.Mathematical Society, recently held 
in New York City, Prof. Florian Ca- 
jori contributed a paper, "Fourier's 
improvement of the Newton-Raphson 
method of approximation anticipated 
by Moin-raillc." The paper will be 
published in a Eiu'opean journal of 
mathematics. 



Graduate Honored. — i\Iiss Maria 
Leonard, who tiiok the degree of 
Master of Arts in mathematics at 
C. C. last June, has been appointed 
to the important position of dean of 
women and professor of mathematics 
in the State Normal school at Albion, 
Idaho. 



Loud Paint. — lioth the Pearsons 
and the Apollonian Club houses have 
been painted during the siminier. 
Roth needed the paint badly and the 
appearance of their end of the campus 
has been materially improved by the 
vivid hues which were so lavishly 
spread on. 



Miss Loomis Returns. — Miss Ruth, 
Loomis, Dean of Domen, who has 
been on a leave of absence for the 
past two years, has resumed her du- 
ties. 



"Josie" Hughes, who will be re- 
membered as a member of the cham- 
pionship baseball team of 1908-q is 
in college. 



F0% THE 

Most Exclusive Millinery 

CALL ON 

Mme, M. D, Hillmer 

6 East Pike's Peak A-venue 

Finest of Material and 
'Sest of IForkmanship 



Phone Black 395 



Colorado Springs 



You Will Find our Store a Good Place to 
Visit When Looking for College Supplies. 
In Loose Leaf Note Books, Drawing Mater- 
ials, Fountain Pens, We Excell. 

The Pike's Peak Book & Stationary Co. 



27-27! 2 South Tejon Street 



Peone Black 354 




Watch the caps you meet. 

You •won't need an intro- 
duction to the HEIDCAP. It 
is not a mere head covering. 
It has character. It gives 
character to its wearer. It 
is made of exclusive English 
cap cloths. It is a thorough- 
bred. 

Try on a HEIDCAP. 



12 



THE TIGER 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co 
Groceries and 



Meats 



.«£•« 







115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



MUETH'S 

The Place Where the Stand- 
ard Is Never Lowered. High 
Class Goods at Reasonable 
Prices. Ice Cream, Hot 
and Cold Drinks. 

Ask Any Old Student 
CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 

S Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

THE 

Colorado Springs Floral 
Company 



Tel ephone Main 599 



104 N. Tejon St 



The D. Y. Butcher Drug Co. 

DRUGS, KODAKS, SUPPLIES 

Free and Prompt Delivery 
Cor. Opposite P. 0. Phones 90 and 750 



OUR NEW COACH 

Continued from Page 5. 

time a compulsory athletic fee from the 
students. This has been done by direc- 
tion of the board of trustees on request 
of the students of the college, with the 
understinding that part of the funds 
realized will be devoted to athletics and 
outdoor sports for young women, as well 
as for the young men. This will tell 
not only in football, baseball, and track 
athletics, but also in the maintenance of 
tennis and other games so desirable 
especially in Colorado. 



This summer, the Faculty lost the 
superintendent of shops, Mr. Collais. 
He has gone to Honolulu to be dean of 
the Technical Department of the Cami- 
maha College. Mr. C. M. Angell has 
been chosen as temporary superintendent 
of the shops. Mr. Angell is a former 
student of Colorado College and one 
year served as assistant in the electrical 
engineering department. 



II Local Department || 



George Belsey '13, who left school last 
January, has returned and will continue 
his work here. 



Phone 687 



Manicuring for Gentlemen 



Herb. Sinton will not be able to play 
football this fall. 



Miss Glen Stiles ex '09, has again en- 
tered school. 



Richard Tanner, from Pennsylvania, 
and Byron Winans, Norh Denver, are 
pledged to Alpha Lau Delta. 



Wilds, formerly of D. U., has entered 
Colorado College. 



Thireen men turned out for foot-ball 
practice Monday night. 



Ramona Brady ex '12, will again regis- 
ter here. 



Kruger, a Delta Phi Theta and mem- 
lier of last years' sophomore class, will 
not return to College. 



Dean Cajori spent the summer at 
Chicago Beach. Much of his time was 
spent in bathing and his excellent knowl- 
edge of swimming is only another proof 
of his relation to the shark family. 



Miss N.' E. Johnson 

Toilet Parlors 

Facial and Scalp Treatment with VIBRA- 
TOR, a Specialty 

Complete Line of Hair Goods 
324 N. Te on Street Colorado Springs 

JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 

Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Waiting's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Stree 

The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

Pays i% Interest on Deposits and Gives 
Special Attention to Accounts of Students 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, Preiident Ira Harris. V-President 

M. C. Gilc Wm. F. Richards 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M. 

Mrs. Anna Bethman 

Hair Dressing Parlors 

Moles and Superfluous Hair Removed 

with Electricity. Hair Goods Made 

To Order a Specialty 

Phone Red 394 27 East Kiowa Street 

The College 

Book Store 

We supply all text books 
and supplies for Colorado 
College. Also drawing in- 
struments, etc., for the 
engineering Department. 

Large stock of Fountain 
Pens, including Waterman's 
Ideal and Conklin Self-Fill- 
ing Pens. 

WHITNEY and 
GRIMWOOD 

20 North Tejon Street 



THE TIGER 



13 



This Space Re- 
served for 

The Out West 

Printing Si Stationery Co. 
9-11 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



1 2 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springs 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



Phone Main 2055 



Art Needle Work 



THE HUNT & VAN NICE 
Art Specialty Store 

Stamping, Designing, Perforating, Linens, 
Lawns, Best Hand-Painted China 



8 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs, Colo 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co. 



One or two freshmen seem to feel 
slighted because their trunks arrived safe 
and sound with no placards, pictures or 
paint upon them. 



Miss Beth Hamilton '13, is to continue 
her college work at Berkeley. 



Miss Ruth Packard is going to Wells- 
ley this year. 



Miss Martha McLeod '13, will not be 
back for school this year. 



Joe Gardener ex '12 has returned to 
Colorado College this fall. 



Miss Anna Huse '13 will not return to 
college. 



Miss June Musser '13 had not ex- 
pected to return this fall but has found 
it posible to do so. 



Miss Anna Baker, formerly of D. U. 
has entered College as a sophomore. 



Miss May Wallace ex '11, who has 
been in atendance at Wells, and her sis- 
ter Ruth have entered Colorado College. 



George Satton will not be in school 
this vear. 



G. G. Reed has returned to College. 



Several college men, under Sam Kit- 
tleman, went out as a surveying party 
around Green River, Utah, this summer. 



Bent, a Phi Gamma Delta from Bos- 
ton Tech., was in the Springs Monday 
to attend the dance given by the local 
chapter of that fraternity at the Acacia 
on Monday evening. 



Two series of Colorado College ser- 
vices are already announced, one just be- 
fore he Christmas holidays and another 
during Lent. The President will an- 
nounce later the subjects of the address- 
es which are to be given. 



The first Chapel exercise will be at 9 :15 
Friday morning, when the president will 
speak upon matters bearing upon the 
new College year. 



Freshmen, fresh from home, will find 
fresh home made candies at Noble's, cor- 
ner Bijou and Tejon. 



Thos. Lynch. '13, has been detained 
at his home in Greensburg, Pa., by 
the absence of his parents abroad and 
will enter college in about two weeks. 



Hunt Up 

BisselFs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and iSeeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



A "Burgess Spread" 

Perhaps you Freshies don't know 
what that is; but to us old C. C. 
men it means much — very much. 
The finest delicatessen department, 
a superb bakery, a candy shop that 
possesses the essentials of purity and 
the added virtues of thorough work- 
manship and artistic individuality. 
You'll be present this semester at more 
than one strictly "Burgess" function 

W. N. Burgess— Grocer 

1 12-1 14 N. Tejon Street Phone 83 

FREE 

Shoe Repairing Absolutely Free 
of Charge for Entire Term of 
1910-1911 to the College Stu- 
dent Submitting the Best Ad for 

PETE'S 
Shoe Shop 

230 East Dale Street 

Men's Sewed Soles 75c; Ladies, 6Sc 
Rubber Heels, 35c 



14 



THE T I G h] K 



$1.00 



$1.00 



Young Men 

For $1.00 per month, we sponge, press and do minor repairing on one 
suit, or one overcoat, or two pairs of trousers, each week; calling for 
and deliverieg same in our wardrobe, dustproof wagons. We claim 
to do the best work in the city. A trial from you will allow us to 
prove our claim. 

Special Prices Given to the Young Women of 
the College. Get Our Price List. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



Agents: Bert Siddons 
Glenn Bowers 




and Cleaners. 



T. E. AIKEN 

Taxidermist, Furrier 

Dealer in Souvenirs and Novelties 
12 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

For Best and Quick Delivery 

SEE 

The Monument Coal Co. 

28 East Kiowa Street 

William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

MEMBERS 
New York Stock Exchange 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



THE 

Crissey 6k Fowler 
Lumber Co. 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 

Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 

A. S. BLAKE 

Is the Man to See 



107 North Tejon 
Nickle Ware 



Phone 465 

Cutlery 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Don L. King, ex '13, expects to at- 
tend Dartmouth during the coming 
vear. 



OHver Cook, who has been out of 
college for the past year, is back to 
resume his work. 



Rev. Frank H. Touret, treasurer of 
the college during the year 1908-9. 
has been called to this city to fill the 
pulpit of the Grace Episcopal church. 



Jos. Hughes, '13, of Denver and 
Oliver B. Cook, '13 of Delta, are Phi 
Gamma Delta pledges. 



The following men are wearing the 
Kappa Sigma spike: John Hcrron 
and Edward Koch of Aspen, John 
Robertson of Glenvvood Springs, Mar- 
vin Smith and Maurice Reynols of 
Canon ,Cit}', and Chester Gotten of 
this city. 



^liss Faye Anderson ' came down 
from Denver to attend the Phi Gam- 
ma Delta dance. 



Miss Margaret Stephenson ex-'i2 
is the guest of Miss Addie Hemen- 
way for a few days. 



When down town these warm fall days 
and you feel kind 'er tired, just drop in at 
Noble's for something good to eat or drink, 
corder Bijou and Tejon. 



R. H. Rice, ex 'it, will enter the 
Uni\ersity of Virginia this year. 



W. H. Graham cx-'i2 expects to 
attend the University of Illinois dur- 
ing the coming year. 



Broken Lenses 



Phone Black 233 



Duplicated Colorado Souvenirs 

C. B. LAUTERMAN 

Jeweler and Manufac- 
turing Optician 

121 N. TEJON STREET Colorado Springs 

10c STORE AND MORE! 

THE EMPORIUIVI 

1 10 S. TEJON STREET 



College Inn 

Freshmen!! 

Tuis Is the Place for 

GOOD THINGJ) EAT 



Fine Watch Work 



Diamond Setting a SpeciaItT 



H. E. Kapelke 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 



130 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 



Grand Union Tea Co. 

Importers of Fine Teas and 
Coffees 

Phone Main 2678 220 N. Tejon St. 



On hand as usual 
but just a little better 
equipped for serving your 
needs — 



The 

WATERMAN 

PRESS 

PRINTERS and 
BINDERS 



THE TIGER 



15 



Elmer Hand and Arthur Brown 
have resumed their work in college. 



Charles Copcland will remain out 
of college during the coming year. 



E. J. Campbell, formerly of Woos- 
ter University, is a new junior. 



Buchanan of Cooper College has 
ente-ed the senior class. 

THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Br^s. 

"The College Favorite ' 



The Favorite Shopping 

Place for the College 

Woman 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 

106' 2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone Main 700 






Star 
Laundry 



will give you 20% discount, but does 
not take it out of the work. You 
get the best finished laundry in the 
State and costs no more than the 
poorest. Our agent will see you 

W.I.LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



119 N. Tejon 



Pbone Main 900 



/f 



For Classy 

Shirts 

See 

GORTON'S 



Begin This 
Season 



HATS 

of Qualty 

Only at 

GORTON'S 



==^ 



to wear the best clothes. Best clothes 
doesn't necessarily mean a greater outlay. 
It simply means discrimination on your 
part. You'll pay no more for Gorton's 
special hand tailored Adler Rochester 
suits than you would for clothes just 
.,rdinary good. Suits $35, 30, 25, 20, 15 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 




E. Pike's Peak 
113 



^: 



\ Correct Dress for Men. ^ 



J^ 



A PAGE OF INFORMATION. 



The following rules regarding eli- 
gibility for athletics, offices, fraterni- 
ties and women's societies will be ot 
interest to the new students. Read 
the rules and plan you;- year accord- 
ingly: 

The following is the classification 
used in ranking the College offices. 
No student is permitted to have more 
than tliirteen points: 

Class A — 8 points. 

President cf Student Body. Editor 
of Tige;: manager of Tiger, manager 
of Football; Editor of Nugget, second 
semester; Manager of Nugget, second 
semester. 

Class B — 6 points. 

Editor of Kinnikinnick; Editor of 
Nugget, first semestc;-; Manager of 
Nugget, first semester; other 

members of Nugget beard, second 
semester: Assistant editor of Tiger; 
Manager cf barbecue d-iring season; 
Manager of Glee Club; Manager of 
Baseball; Manager of Track. 



When Trading, 
Be Sure to 

Patronize Tiger 
Advertisers 



Dern's Freshly Roasted Coffee 

will make 10 more cups to the lb. 
than Eastern roasted coffee 

29 S. Tejon Street Phone 575 

Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 



Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence. 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 956 



The College 
Photo Studio 



i^'^ 7ru/3i/ 





Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 

THE 

Gowdy-Simmons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS, ENGRAVERS 

21 N Tejon Street 



16 



THE TIOER 



Clothes Styles were never truer Rogers-Peet, and Sampeck at$15 and up. 

,. r ^ ■ ^'^^ newest rail ideas in bort and Stiff 

surer more alive for the energetic young Hats for the young man b-y Knox, Stetson, 

man of now. At this modern, all new col- ^nd Crofut-Knapp here at 3, 4 and $5. 
lege man s store. The Fall Regal Shoes in H sizes at ^3.50, 

The accepted styles in Fall and Winter 4, 4.50 and 5. Caps, cravats, shirts, socks, 

weight Suits andOvercoats from Stein-Block, collars, the clever creations for Fall are here. 



8 N. Tejon Street 



(Pa4vimShea!Pev 6 



28 E. Pike's Peak 




CL Shoe Styles for Students 

Featured among our new styles for Fall wear, are all 
those new models that have snap and go, that are 
especially designed for the good dressers among our 
College Students 

Popular Priced 



AfS^^JVJW 



SHOES THAr SATISFY 



tfL S.TCJON ST- 



$3.50, $4 and $5 




^ 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



\ 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 

Departments —College of Arts and 
Science, E. S. PARSONS, Dean. 

School of Engineering, F. CAJORI, Dean 
Scliool of Forestry, W. C. STURGIS, Dean 
School of Music, E. D. HALE, Dean 



Manitou Park — Field Laboratory 
of the School of Forestry 






Headquarters for 

GATTERER 

216 N. Tejon Street 




Latest Designs in Imported 
and Domestic Browns and 
Coronation Colors :: :: 

lOf^ Discount to Students 




A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., SEPTEMBER 22, 1910 



Vol. XIII 



Number 2 



EXCITING 

CLASS SCRAP 



SUCCESSFUL STAG 

RECEPTION 



COLORADO 

FOOTBALL 



SOPHS AND FRESHMEN CLASH SPEECHES, CONTESTS, EATS BEAR STORIES BEGINNING TO 
IN FLAG RUSH. AND SINGING. CIRCULATE. 



Early Morning Contest Removes Ob- 
jectionable Features. 



Fourteen's moving van squad had 
just returned from a joy ride and the 
breakfast fires scarcely had been lighted 
when the men of the sophomore class 
g'athered around the pole in front of 
Cutler and pledged themselves to de- 
fend to the end their flag of purple and 
white. The flag which these men were 
to defend so successfully was hanging 
listlessly from the pole fifteen feet above 
the ground. 

"Freshmen! forward!" Kirkpatrick 
gave the order at 6:30, and with a wild 
yell, the collected remnants of proud 
Fourteen charged furiously on the de- 
fenders of the sophomore colors. In 
such numbers that no one tried to count 
them, the green labeled attackers rushed 
across the campus, gathering speed and 
momentum as they ran, until when they 
struck the breastwork of men around 
the pole, it was all but brushed aside. 
There remained, however, a few strong 
guards clinging to the pole, and these 
successfully kept the freshmen from the 
flag until th« main body of sophomores 
recovered, and regained their positions. 
Scarcely had they done so when the 
freshmen reserves joined in the fight. 
The plans of attack and defense now 
became plain. The freshmen order 
was to "get a man." If this order 
could have been carreid out the result 
of the contest would have been an easy 
victory for the freshmen because of 
their greater numbers. The sophomore 
defense, however, was well planned. 
While most of the men of both classes 
were struggling around the pole, several 
of the largest and strongest freshmen 



Sophs Victorious — Exciting Rope-tie- 

ing Contest — Ends in Lock-step 

Parade. 

Last Saturday evening the annual 
stag reception was held in the old gym- 
nasium under the auspices of the Y. M. 
C. A. The program began with a 
"good snappy C-0" led by Bryson, who 
then made a few remarks on the true 
aspect of the Y. M. C. A. and concluded 
by urging each man to take an active 
part in so important a college body. The 
proposal of a "Rah-Rah Rexy" was 
met with a hearty response, and then 
President Slocum spoke in favor of 
self-reliance and aggressiveness on the 
part of the college man. He was fol- 
lowed by Kirkpatrick who outlined 
briefly the work to be undertaken this 
year, and promised us, among other 
things, an interesting course of lectures 
to be given the first part of the semes- 
ter. Nine 'rahs were then given for 
Rothgeb, our new coach, who urged all 
possilale football men to be on Wash- 
burn for practice Monday evening. He 
made an appeal for the students to turn 
out and show some enthusiasm. "Win 

Continued on Page 6. 



(D) 

m 
m 

on 



Do You Know? 

That the "Kin" is great! 

That we need your sup- 
port! 

That the business men 
appreciate us ! Why 
can't you? 



(St) 

m 



dD 

m 
m 



State Situation Reviewed — Tiger 
Stock Looks Good. 



.^.s cverbody expected, the same 
old CDck-and-bull stories about the 
Unix'ersity of Colorado team are now 
being published. Reports from the 
Aggie camp seem to have some foun- 
dation and the Miners seem to be do- 
ing good training -work, but Denver 
University is sending out tales like 
the Silver and Gold bunch. Boulder 
reports ,^5 men out for work and that 
the coaches are dovv-ncast over the 
outlook. Denver saj's that they have 
a small squad but with several old 
men in harness expect to again land 
the coveted bunting. 

At the University, Sterritt, McFad- 
den, Keim, Newton and two or three 
other valuable men will not be in 
the line-up. and thf coaches. Castle- 
man and Folsom, claim that their line 
will be weak. 

The Miners give promise of a 
stronger team than usual. Captain 
Douglas, a half back, has had his men 
hard at work and although light, ex- 
perts state that they look better than 
usual. Slattery at half back, Wolfif 
at quarter, Young and Eaton for full, 
Cadvt, Mertes, Davis, Leadbetter, 
Rockwood, Marshall, .'\rthur and sev- 
eral other men for the lines, give the 
Miners a fair promise for some real 
football. 

At Aggieville, things are about the 
same. A small amount of eligible 
material and all light, does not prom- 
ise much, but the Aggies have always 
fought their best and play plucky, foot- 
ball under great odds. Reports from 



Continued on Page < 



Continued on Page 5. 



THE TIGER 



FORMAL CHAPEL OPENING 



PRESIDENT DELIVERS 
ADDRESS. 



Dignified and Impressive Services. 

The formal opening of the College 
chapel exercises for the new year was 
marked by a dignified and an inspiring 
service. Everyone was in his perman- 
ent seat, and "Perkins Hall was filled 
with students and members of the corps 
of instruction. The faculty appeared 
in academic costume, filling the large 
platform. Dean Parsons assisted in 
the service and the procession as it en- 
tered the hall was impressive, and the 
whole service orderly and uplifting. 

The President's address explained the 
religious motive which led to the foun- 
dation of the institution and emphasized 
strongly the sacredness of the trust 
which has been imposed by its founders 
upon those who follow them in all the 
years to come. He indicated clearly 
that a positive religious ideal was in the 
minds of those who established the Col- 
lege ; but it was definitely stated and 
agreed that it should never be under 
sectarian control or suffer from polit- 
ical interference. 

The address of Dr. Slocum was as 
follows : 

"Something over thirty-six years ago 
a group of earnest and far-sighted men, 
under the leadership of a commanding 
personality, founded Colorado College. 
The authorized announcement issued at 
the time contains the following state- 
ment, — Tt is the purpose of the Trus- 
tees to build a college in which liberal 
studies may be pursued under positive 
Christian influences. The College is 
under no ecclesiastical or political con- 
trol. The character which is most de- 
sired for this College is that of thorough 
scholarship and fervent piety, each as- 
sisting the other, and neither ever of- 
fered as a compensation for the de- 
fects of the other.' 

"Many things enter into the creation 
of a foundation of the higher learning. 
There must be generous gifts of far- 
sighted men and women ; the erection 
and equipment of appropriate buildings ; 
the collection of a library ; the choice of 
an able and scholarly corps of teachers 
and the gathering of a student body 
which seeks to avail itself of the oppor- 
tunities which such a foundation has 
to offer. 

"Each college has its own distinguish- 
ing features and usually there is some 
predominating idea which serves as a 




principle of unity and shapes develop- 
ment. The founders of Colorado Col- 
lege intended that it be a place where 
scholarship should be emphasized. 
They expected that men of scientific 
training and literary ability would 
gather here for the purposes of instruc- 
tion and intellectual activity. They 
had a right to ask that its financial af- 
fairs should be managed with integrity 
and that there should be intelligent bus- 
iness administration with honest and 
careful conservation, of all its resources. 

"There was, however, a commanding 
obligation which they laid upon those 
who should be called to its board of 
trustees and its faculties. This is con- 
tained in the announcement from which 
I have read and especially in those 
words ; "A college in which liberal 
studies shall be pursued under positive 
Christian influences." 

"This then is the trust which has been 
placed in the keeping of every one of 
us. Trustees, Faculty and Students. 
Entrance -into the life and services of 
the College carries this trust with it. 
This does not lay upon the College any 
denominational or sectarian control 
whatsoever. There can never be here 
anything other than the largest aca- 
demic freedom. No one is asked to 
subscribe to any creed or affirm any 
theological tenet in order that he may 
enter the service of Colorado College. 
He is not asked to be a member of any 
special church ; but he can not honor- 
ably in word or deed, be recreant to the 
principle that this college was founded 
with a distinct religious ideal as its 
corner-stone. It recognizes and ever 
seeks to promote the truth that no edu- 
cation is complete without recognition 
of the relation which every human 
being should sustain to God, his Crea- 
tor. The College acknowledges that 
the central factor of the Universe is 
God and that everyone should recognize 
Him and come to know Him as the 



Supreme Ruler and Spiritual Father. 
It holds also that Christianity is an ex- 
pression of this relation. Under these 
ideas there i? the largest liberty of 
tliought and action. 

"Acknowledging the sacredness of this 
trust, each morning throughout the year 
that the College is in session, there is 
held on the campus a religious service 
by means of which the faculty, students, 
and friends of this College may recog- 
nize the purpose for which it was 
founded. It is most appropriate then 
that at the opening of each college year 
we should all gather here and make ac- 
knowledgement, by means of this simple 
service, of that far-reaching and benefi- 
cent purpose which led to the creation 
of the College and the establishment of 
endowments for its permanent main- 
tenance. 

"It is not, however, by this service 
alone that we can make acknowledge- 
of this idea which was in the minds of 
the founders of the College. There 
are many ways by which we can main- 
tain the purpose to create this 'char- 
acter for the College' which is to ex- 
press itself in 'fervent piety and thor- 
ough scholarship.' The lives of stud- 
ents and teachers at all times ought to 
recognize this truth. 

"It is our privilege to labor together 
to make real by means of the College 
through its life and its spirit, the truth 
that God and His Christ are the central 
factors in those mighty purposes which 
are expressing themselves in human 
history. 

"This is why we gather here this 
morning to worship, and to pray that 
we may be kept true and humble in 
doing our part for the fulfilment of 
God's will in the Universe. 



DAIS ELECTION. 



The first meeting of the Dais was 
held Friday evening in Bemis. The 
principal business was the election 
of officers and the making of plans 
for further festivities. The follow- 
ing were elected for the first semes- 
ter: 

High Mogul Ida McMorris 

Summoner Lillian Duer 

Clerk Grace Wilson 

Franklin Grace Cunningham 

Almoner Edith. Douglass 

Baillie Persis Kidder 

Jester Sharley Pike 

Page Dorothv Frantz 



THE TIGER 



STATE UNIVERSITY UNABLE 
TO CARE FOR ITS FRESH- 
MEN. 



Plenty of Work at Colorado College. 

t.ixty Applications for Work at 

Boulder Untilled. 



1 he fuUuwing piece of news which 
appeared as a front page article in the 
lirst number of Silver and Gold will be 
of interest to Colorado College students : 



"Unable to obtain work to help pay 
their way through the school, about 
seventy-hve prospecti\e students, some 
of 'them prominent football men, have 
been besieging the employment bureau 
of the Y. M. C. A. both by letter and in 
person, for the last two weeks. Ap- 
pioximately one-third of these, it is ex- 
pected, will not attend the University 
unless they can work their way through. 

If positions are not found soon, some 
of those already here will be compelled 
to return home, it is feared. 

The office of the Y. M. C. A. in the 
basement of the main building has been 
filled with a constant stream of appli- 
cants and already fifty men have been 
placed, at least half of them securing 
permanent positions. The most of the 
available positions, however, were filled 
some time ago. There are now more 
than sixty written applications which 
have not been filled, on file in the em- 
ployment office. Work is as plentiful 
as ever, but there have never been so 
many applicants, and never so many 
turned away. 

President Clarence DeVoss and Dean 
Worcester of the Y. M. C. A., and Cap- 
tain John O'Brien, of the football team, 
have been making an exhaustive can 
vass of the town in the hope of reliev- 
ing the situation. They have asked 
the business men to join them in finding 
positions. 

Some of the men who are as yet with- 
out work have made enviable records 
on the gridiron in high school and are 
looked upon as promising football ma- 
terial. Several star football men have 
already been secured work." 



The situation at Colorado College is 
in marked contrast to this. The stud- 
ent employment bureau was engaged in 
an active canvass for about two weeks 
before the opening of college and suc- 
ceeded in lining up approximately $12,- 
000.00 worth of work. The result was 
that when the new men arrived in 
larger numbers than ever, they were 
at once taken care of and placed in good 



positions. Not only were all the new 
men provided for but a good many de- 
sirable jobs zi'ere actually left over. 
The cause of such a contrast is, of 
course, apparent, a smaller institution 
and a much larger and wealthier town 
to call upon for work. 



FIRST MEN'S MASS MEETING. 



CLASS ELECTIONS. 



At meetings held Wednesday, the 
juniors and sophomores selected the 
following officers: 

Juniors. 

President Miss Marion Ycrkcs 

N'icc-President W. W. Johnston 

Secretary Miss Mary Randolf 

Treasurer Al. Knight 

Seargeant-at-arms 

Miss Altha Crowley 

Sophomores. 

President Harold Parkinson 

Vice-President ....Miss Mary Bogue 

Secretary Miss Marion Haines 

Treasurer Joe Witherow 

P)arbecue Manager ..Thos. Lynch, Jr 



APOLEONIAN OPENING NIGHT. 



The Apoleonian Club will hold its 
annual opening night at the Club 
house Friday evening, September 23, 
at eight o'clock. The following pro- 
gram, together with refreshments and 
a general good time will be given: 

Remarks President Slocum 

Reading Friend 

Apollo Hesler 

Piano Solo Flille 

The new men are cordially invited 
to attend. 



Sinton Resigns. 

Herbert G. Sinton has found it nec- 
essary to withdraw from all student 
activities on account of heavy work 
outside of his college duties. Sinton 
held a number of positions and has 
always been one of the most promi- 
nent men in his class. He was assist- 
ant editor of The Tiger and assistant 
editor of The Nugget. His resigna- 
tion from the two student publica- 
tions will be a distinct loss to each 
of them. 



T. M. Petigrew '10 was in this city 
the early part of the week acting as 
an insurgent Republican delegate.. 
Pettigrew is in the real estate business 
in Denver. 



Forcible Address by President 
Slocum. 



At the first mass meeting of the 
Young Men's Christian Association 
held in Perkins Hall Sunday afternoon. 
President Slocum gave a splendid ad- 
dress on 'College Traditions and Temp- 
tations." He spoke of business admin- 
istration and high standards of scholar- 
ship as great purposes of the college; 
but the greatest end of the college, he 
said, and that most difficult of attaining 
because of the many temptations of col- 
lege life, is the building of noble charac- 
ter. 

The President's address follows : 

'There is a sense of privilege in the 
opportunity to speak to the men of the 
College at the opening of a new year. 
It is the men who ought to give direc- 
tion to the best life of the College. To 
them, in peculiar ways, is given leader- 
ship for good or ill. 

"The new year is begun. What is to 
be made of it? As it draws to its close 
next June, will it find each one of you 
nobler than he is today. The fact that 
you are here indicates that there is high 
aspiration in you, that you want to 
make something of yourself that is 
worth while. 

"The great Apostle turning to his 
students, — they were students of a great 
movement for righteousness, — said to 
them : "Be zealous for the best gifts." 
He used very effective words. A zealot 
is almost a fanatic. He wanted those 
people to be intensely eager for the best 
things. They were not to be eager 
for ordinary moral qualities. Only the 
best character ought to satisfy. It is 
not enough to be simply better morally 
than some one else ; you are to be the 
very noblest possible. No other type 
of achievement can satisfy the best pos- 
sibilities of your soul. 

"There are many things which enter 
into the creation of a college. The 
financial problem is ever perplexing and 
of great importance. Its many affairs 
must be administered with care, and 
with the highest sense of trust imposed. 
The intellectual standard must be main- 
tained so that students are fitted for 
the grave responsibilities which come to 
them. The highest moral life never 
exists where the intellectual life is on 
a low plane. But neither of these 
things expresses by itself the large pur- 
pose of a true college. Great wealth 
and even high standards of scholarship 
will not make of themselves men who 
are adequately prepared for the work 



THE TIGER 



of life. The college must pay its bills; 
it must have able scholars, and teachers ; 
but its one great business is to produce 
men of character ; people who are hon- 
est, pure and unselfish. 

You must be good students and work 
conscientiously if you desire to have the 
noblest characters; but there must be 
at the centre of all your thinking, a 
great commanding purpose which forces 
you to be above all else men of the 
highest type of character. This is 
what will test your success in Colorado 
College. It ought to be said of you ; 
"That man is honest ; he is pure ; he 
shows it in his thoughts and in his 
words and in the very expression of his 
face. No man can make him do what 
is a mean and selfish 'act.' This is the 
victory which you are to win for your- 
selves this college year in the largest 
measure. 

"No one can do this for you. Every 
man here must stand on his own feet 
and win it for himself. 

"Your life to accomplish this must be 
positive, and not negative. The devils 
always enter the empty soul. Fill your 
heart and mind with constructive con- 
ceptions of righteousness. Be and do. 
Bring things to pass in religious and 
moral life of the College and so will 
you grow noble and pure yourselves. 



ELLINGWOOD LEAVES FOR 
OXFORD. 



PAN-HELLENIC DELEGATES 
CHOSEN. 



Fraternities Choose Men to Repre- 
sent Them on the Interfraternity 
Council During the Coming 
Year. 



The five fraternities of the College 
have elected their junior representa- 
tives on the Pan-Hellenic Council for 
the year igio-'ii. These delegates are 
chosen for a period of two years, thus 
leaving half of the council made up 
of experienced men each year. Those 
chosen were: Alpha Tau Delta, W. 
L. Warnock; Sigma Chi, E. Statton; 
Phi Gamma Delta, W. W. Johnston; 
Delta Phi Theta, Sam Shelton; Kappa 
Sigma, Ed. Morse. 



There are still several hats and coats 
left at the Sigma Chi house by the 
freshmen who were in the scrap Thurs- 
day night. The owners of the gar- 
ments better claim their own at once. 



Reception Tendered Colorado College 

Man Who Won Rhodes 

Scholarship. 

The faculty and students of Colo- 
rado College met last evening to pay 
their parting respects to Ellingwood, 
the Rhodes scholar from Colorado. 
The reception was given in the art 
room on the upper floor of Perkins 
Hall, under the auspices of the Cicer- 
onian Club, of which body he has 




wood had passed. Their names then 
went before the committee in charge 
and the decision was in favor of El- 
lingwood because of his exceptionally 
fine scholastic record. The contest 
was otherwise very close, and even in 
scholarship there was but a small 
margin. 

The Rhodes scholarship amounts to 
$1500 a year for three years and is 
supposed to include all expenses at 
Oxford and three months travel each 
summer in addition. 

Ellingwood left for England last 
Tuesday morning, taking with him 
the best wishes of his host of friends 
in Colorado Springs. 



Minerva enjoyed an informal dance 
in Ticknor study, Saturday evening. 



been a member for two years. The 
evening was spent in visiting with 
the guest of honor and members of 
the club. Light refreshments consist- 
ing of ice cream and cake were 
served. 

Ellingwood entered Colorado Col- 
lege from the high school of this city, 
four years ago, and at all times has 
been recognized as a scholar of ex- 
ceptional ability, being awarded high 
honors each year, and a Phi Beta 
Kappa key at the end of his course. 
He has always ranked well in a liter- 
ary way, being president of Cicero- 
nian Club the first semester of his 
senior year, and a member of the 
winning debating team put out by 
that society the year before. He 
also took some part in athletics, and 
was exceptionally skillful in tennis. 

Elhngwood took the Rhodes schol- 
arship exam, a year ago, in company 
with Anderson of Boulder and a rep- 
resentative from D. U. Word was 
returned that Anderson and Elling- 



JOINT RECEPTION 



After the excitement of the class 
scrap, and the hurry and worry of regis- 
tration, the faculty and students of the 
college met Friday evening in Bemis 
Hall for a social time and the making 
of better acquaintances. As the stud- 
ent entered the door he was tagged with 
a card bearing his name, the name of 
his native state, and the numerals of his 
class. Then he fell into the line which 
filed past the reception committee which 
consisted of President and Mrs. Slocum, 
Miss Loomis, Dean and Mrs. Parsons, 
and the Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. presi- 
dents. Then came the mixing with 
the crowd, introductions, renewing of 
old acquaintances and a general good 
time. The guests then adjourned to 
the dining room where refreshments, 
consisting of sherbet and cakes were 
served by the ladies of the Y. W. C. A. 
After a half hour more of visiting, the 
party disbanded and old and new ac- 
quaintances went home together, feeling 
more than ever full of enthusiasm for 
the year's work and of loyalty for old 
C. C. 



FINK'S ORCHESTRA GIVES CONCERT 



.A. good sized and appreciative audi- 
ence of men listened to the concert by 
1-^ink's orchestra in Perkins Hall, Sun- 
day afternoon, preceding President 
Slocum's address. The following pro- 
gram was rendered: 
Overture, "Nabucodonoz.or" ..Verdi 

"The Gentle Dove" Bendix 

"Forget-Me-Not" Macbeth 

(Trio — Violin, 'Cello and Piano.) 

"I^ove's Greeting"' Elgar 

March, from the Opera "Aida", Verdi 



THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 



FORMER TIGER MAKING GOOD 



CARY TO ACT AS ASSISTANT COACH 



"Heine" Schmid Playing Baseball with 
Wichita Western League. 



"Heine" Schmid, captain of the 1909 
baseball team and a "C" man in base- 
ball for four years is rounding out a 
successful season as shortstop on the 
Wichita Western^ League team. 
Heine's fielding has been very good 
during the season but he has not been 
so fortunate with th.e batting end of 
the game, yet, considering that this 
is his first year in such company, his 
record is a good one. 

Schmid was one of the main-stays 
of the Tiger squad during his four 
years of college ball and few and far 
between were the liners that passed 



■-^ 





"HEINE" SCHMID 

him at his old position, the third 
sack. His batting too, was often the 
deciding factor in many Tiger vic- 
tories. Heine has the good wishes 
of his many friends in the College for 
big things in the baseball world. 



Herb. Sinton to Play.— Herbert G. 
Sinton, end 1909, who for a time 
thought he would be unable to play 
football this fall, has announced that 
he will be able to play. Herb is a 
classy end. his height and speed giv- 
ing special advantages. He has had 
two years' experience. 



"Gil" Gary, last year's captain of the 
Tigers, a "C man in football for four 
years, and holder of the state record 
for throwing the discus, will again 
don his dootball togs this fall, not as 




a member of the Tiger squad, but as 
an assistant to Coach Rothgeb. Gary 
is a veteran at the game and should 
be able to help Rothgeb very much 
during the season. This together with 
the return of Vandemoer and Putnam 
makes the outlook for Tiger meat 
better than ever. Heald, the whirl- 
wind half-back is expected back any 
(lav. 



BOULDER-KANSAS GAME CAN- 
CELLED. 



The game scheduled for October 
15, between the University of Colo- 
rado and Kansas, has been called off 
on accoimt of the members of the 
Jayhawker aggregation not desiring to 
play under conference rules. No oth- 
er game has been secured for that 
date. 



COLORADO FOOTBALL 

Continued from Page 1. 

the.e claim that a better team than 
usual is being developed. 

Denver University has an abund- 
arce of material which^ is said to be 
eligible. Volk, captain this year, has 
been working his men hard and states 
that he hopes to ha\-e something do- 
n-'g befo e the season closes. 

All the camps are surrounded with 
a sort of air of mystery', the new rules 
being of so peculia.r a nature that the 
cradles say little and do much. 

With the return of Captain Herbe t 
\'andem(_)er to take charge rf the men 
on Washburn field, and the addition 
of several men. Tiger stock has taken 
a sudden boom during the week and 
f'om a conservative estimate, "things 
lodk good." 

Jardine, vvlio has never played on 
the lime-marked field, will be a strong 
bidder for a place on the te.ani, his 
speed and head work proving valuable 
to him. Bowe-.'s and Herb. Sinton 
ar; showing up well im ends. Hed- 
bl( m and Steele are being counted 
upon for guards, while Witherow is 
showing up good for the center posi- 
tion. Joe Sinton, Reed, Dickson and 
Acker have had chances at the quar- 
ter's place and all look good. Noth- 
ing definite on tlie back field has been 
placed whatc\-er, although Coach 
Rotligeb is thinking seriously of the 
matter. The men have shown some 
excellent spirit durin'g the week ^and 
when tlic whistle blows for the first 
game ,a Tiger team which v,'ill rank 
with the topnotchers in speed, knowl- 
edge of the game and hard-hitting 
qualities is expected to be (Uit in 
force. Some of the men who have 
been on the field this week are: Ack- 
er, Hedblom, Steele, Whipple, Jar- 
dine, Vandemoer, Witherow, Reed, 
Tcrrill LeGle:-e, W. LeClere, Joe 
Sinton, Dicksfju, Hatch. Cook, J. 
Gary, Weller and a mnnber of promis- 
ing freshmen. 

Coach Rothgeb has laid down some 
stringent training rules and these will 
ha\-e to be lived up to. It is expected 
that in ;i week the more likely candi- 
dates for tjie team v ill be given a 
chance in the positions where they 
will most probably perform. 



THE TIGER 



Th« Waekly Newspaper of Colorado College 

A. E BRYSON Editor-in-Chief 

S. VVILKIE DEAN Business Manager 

Sam J. Shelton Assistant Editor 

Richard L. Hughes Assistant Editor 

T. Wynne Ross Atliletic Editor 

Robert m. Copeland Engineering Editor 

Fred S. Baker Forestry Editor 

Helen Canon Alumni Editor 

Mamie C. Detmoyer Exchange Editor 

Edith I.. Summers Local Editor 

J. A. Root Local Editor 

Ray H. Sayre Assistant Manager 

E, E. Hedblom Assistant Manager 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to The Tiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo 

Phones: Editor, Main 1975. Manager. Main 2073 

^^g^^^^^ r. Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
"-*b3S"^^ Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subicriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



Employment Bureau. 

The work of the student employment 
bureaus of the institutions of the state 
has come to be an important item in 
securing new students in the institu- 
tions. Every year sees an increase in 
the number of men who attend college 
and every year sees an increase in the 
number who desire to help themselves 
through college, consequently the col- 
lege offering the most favorable advan- 
tages for self-help has a valuable asset. 
It is not the policy of the college to urge 
men to attend the institution when they 
find it necessary to support themselves 
entirely, especially in the engineering 
and forestry schools where the time of 
the men is so largely taken up, but it 
is a truth that' is always emphasized 
that if a man must work his way, the 
advantages offered in Colorado Springs 
are exceptional. With a town of 30,- 
000 people to draw from, and a class of 
people who are both able and willing to 
help deserving students, the student em- 
ployment bureau finds it a comparative- 
ly easy matter to care for all applicants 
for work. While other institutions are 
complaining of their inability to care 
for the men who have found it neces- 
sary to help themselves, the student 
employment bureau of Colorado Col- 
lege has already provided about $12,000 
worth of work for its students, and has 
a mimher of positions left over. 



especially in -hearing his own voice rais- 
ed to the winds in harmony or even in 
discord. College students have un- 
doubtedly inherited this trait to a very 
marked degree — there are few things 
more enjoyable to the average college 
student than a good song, not necessar- 
ily good in every detail but good in 
spirit and enthusiasm. All this being 
true, it would seem that with the un- 
usual advantages which we possess at 
Colorado College, there would be more 
singing. These splendid evenings are 
ideal for campus sings, there are dozen 
of men and women in the college who 
possess good voices, and those who are 
not so fortunate, possess good inten- 
tions and can at least make a joyful 
noise. The college has some good 
songs, and undoubtedly when singing 
becomes more prevalent, more songs 
will appear. Let's have more singing, 
and when we get more singing, let's 
have better singing — both will result in 
more and better songs. 



YOU FRESHMEN! 



(By Regin-ald Wright Kauffman, in 
the August "Cosmopolitan.") 



THE PURPOSE OF THE 
COLLEGE. 



I'he opening chapel service on Mon- 
day was helpful and uplifting. The 
pi'esident made clear to everyone the 
purposes in the minds of the found- 
ers, which led to the creation of the 
College. 

It was established as a Christian in- 
stitution and it is the business of 
those in charge of its affairs to see 
that the trust imposed upon them is 
sacredly maintained. No part of the 
College can be exempt from the con 
ditions of this foundation. To enter 
the College is of itself a recognition 
of this fact and what it ought to 
mean. Especially is this true for the 
faculty. It is also true for every stu- 
dent. 

There is nothing narrow in the 
spirit and the ideas which were in 
the minds of the founders of the Col- 
lege and the present administ -ation 
has always recognized this trust im- 
posed upon it, and in a peculiarly 
broad-minded way interpreted and 
executed it. Tliis is certainly felt 
through all the College. 



Singing. 

From time inuncmorial, man has al- 
ways found a peculiar delight in music. 



Hagerman Improvements.-Tbe work 
of coinerting the basement of Hager- 
man iiitt-) a recreation room and read- 
ing room is pmgrcssing nicely and 
will probably be cnmpleted about Sat- 
urday. 



This is the time when the young man 
that left college in June is going to 
work, and when the young man that 
left school in June is going to college. 
The latter has something to learn from 
the former. You remember the two 
youths that were the biggest figures in 
college last commencement day. One 
had stuck to his books, learned all that 
was in them, and graduated with hon- 
ors. The other had captained his foot- 
ball team, stroked his crew, and — he 
just graduated. If you are the sort of 
boy that the typical parent wants his 
son to be you will imitate the first of 
these. If you are the typical boys' 
boy you will imitate the second. Suc- 
ceed in being either, and you will be a 
failure. 

For your honor-man, if he is like 
most honor-men, will have paid for his 
learning with his strength. The lad 
that has glued his eyes to what the old 
educators called "Humanities" will be 
too near sighted to see humanity. The 
student that has sacrificed all his ener- 
gy to master theory will be ground to 
dust in the mill of practice. He will 
have had his day, and that in the class- 
room which no longer recalls his name. 

The athlete's life is generally short. 
That casual injury on the gridiron has 
developed a chronic weakness ; that 
strain of the four-mile row has maimed 
his heart ; that constant and sudden 
variation from training has sapped his 
virility. The man has oft'ered up his 
constitution to his muscles. If he has 
escaped, in what stead will stand him 
that athletic education acquired at the 
cost of his brain? His football cap- 
taincy will have qualified him for coach- 
ing other young animals ; his rowing- 
arm will enable him to boss underpaid 
toilers for an illiberal wage. But his 
day was before a grandstand that for 
gets. 

"A sound mind in a sound body"? 
Excellent. But not the mind developed 
to the point of physical enervation ; not 
the body developed to the point of men- 
tal sterility. The successful education 
fits you not for topping your fortune 
with one cent more than you earn, nor 
yet for making books or muscles an end 
rather than a means ; the only educa- 
tion is that which makes you of some 
use to your fellow men and forbids 
you to forget that your fellow men are 
all mankind. 



THE TIGER 



Y.M.C.A.PlANS BIG YEAR 



MANY CHANGES IN POLICY. 



The cabinet of the college Y. M. C. 
A. met at a dinner last Saturday night 
and took up the policy for the year. 
Although only a half-time secretary is 
to be employed, the policy is more 
comprehensive than ever before. 

The general feeling as strong that 
the religious meetings of the associ- 
ation should be made such that they 
fill a vital need of the college men. 
The two-fold purpose of the meetings 
was defined as, first, to lead men to 
Jesus Christ and His work, and sec- 
ondly, to furnish an inspiration for 
the religious life and work of the col- 
lege Association. The plans for the 
year include a mass meeting for the 
men of the college every two weeks, 
on Sunday afternoon at four. Spe- 
cial music will be furnished for each 
meeting. 

Plans for the Bible study of the as- 
sociation were also discussed fully. 
The group system will be used, the 
natural social groups of the college 
body being used as nuclei for the Bi- 
ble study groups. The classes will be 
discussional and will deal with live 
topics for college men, following an 
outline prepared by the committee 
and based upon Speer's "Principles of 
Jesus." The three-fold purpose of 
this work was taken to be, first, to 
stimulate the observance of the quiet 
hour among the men, second, to win 
men for Christ, and third, to win men 
for the work of Christ. Among other 
plans, it is hoped to have a group of 
men studying Wright's "The will of 
God and a Man's Life Work" prepar- 
atory to teaching classes in this next 
year. It is also planned to have the 
groups of men at work on special 
courses for fraternity men and engin- 
eers. 

The policy of the missionary com- 
mittee this year is concerned with 
arousing greater missionary intelli- 
gence and enthusiasm. This will be 
done through three agencies: the mis- 
sion classes, missionary talks before 
students, and missionary information 
in the college papers. There will be 
four classes this year. The course for 
upperclassmen will be on comparative 
religions; that for sophomores will 
be on the industrial or economic view 
of missions as related to the college 
man; the courses for freshmen will be 
on Mohammedan countries and Japan. 
It is planned also to begin these 



classes about the middle of October 
instead of after Christmas as has been 
done heretofore. 

In extension work it is planned to 
hold all the points occupied so far 
and to extend the work as opportu- 
nity offers. The committee expects 
to make a study of conditions in 
Papeton with a view of establishing a 
settlement work there. For the first 
time in the history of the association 
plans are being made to send out at 
least one Gospel team during the hol- 
iday season and perhaps during spring 
vacation. 

The employment committee is mak- 
ing special plans for handling the odd 
jobs. The committee has secured 
about $12,000 worth of work so far, 
and expects to increase this very 
largely by the end of the year. 

It is very strongly urged that every 
man join the association this year, 
and the committee is making plans to 
ha\e every man in college a member 
of the association before the end of 
the first semester. Membership in 
the college association is necessary 
for those who expect to take advan-. 
tage of the city association's student 
membership rates. 

The social committee emphasized 
the fact that our work must be social 
to a great extent, eSi_ecially during 
the first few weeks of the fall term. 
The committee expects to make a 
study of the college field to discover 
just what are the social needs which 
the Y. M. C. A. should satisfy. 

An active campaign will also be be- 
gun with the alumni of the college in 
order to keep in touch with them for 
mutual service. The association feels 
that there is a great need for closer 
relations between the alumni of the 
college and the students who are now 
in school. To fill this need the asso- 
ciation is planning to send out a 
news-letter to all the alumni about 
once every six weeks, to use them in 
the work of the association whenever 
possible, and to keep in touch with 
them through personal letters from 
the secretary and cabinet members. 
This campaign vvill not be confined to 
the alumni alone but will include the 
parents of students, high school prin- 
cipals, and others interested in the 
college. 



SUCCESSFUL STAG RECEPTION 

Continued from Page 1 

or lose," said he, "every man on the 
team should feel that the college he 
represents is behind him." 

At this point "Friday" F"owler took 
charge of the entertainment and began 
the contests between the sophs and 
f reshies by a peanut race which was won 
by Tear for the freshmen over Clark who, 
although he moved faster, did not dis- 
play the dexterity of his opponent in 
scooping up the evasive peanuts. -Daw- 
son and Bowers then faced each other 
on the gymnasium horse, and pounded 
each other with cloth rolls until Daw- 
son pulled leather and forfeited. Then 
the freshmen won an unique race in 
which Cowdery and Winans were tied 
back to back and ran against Sells and 
Bowers who were tied in a similar 
manner. Shaw then tied the score by 
wimiing the dressing contest from Long 
by the margin of two shoes, a coat and 
a necktie. This made the hog-tying 
the decisive contest of the evening. 
The sophs were represented by Cook, 
Acker and Benjamin who opposed Som- 
ers, Jacobs an4 Sloyd. Somers and 
Sloyd managed to tie Cook in a hurry 
but on turning to their other opponents 
found that they had succeeded in tying 
Jacobs and that the result was as much 
in doubt as ever. Somers opposed 
Acker who played a defensive game 
and managed to save himself from 
being tied till the arrival of Benjamin 
who had had a hard time disposing of 
his active little antagonist. The two 
sophs then spent at least ten minutes 
tying Somers who put up a splendid 
scrap and won the admiration of the 
crowd by his gameness and endurance. 
This gave the sophs the contest and the 
evening by the score of 3-2. 

While the men stood in line waiting 
to be fed, they listened to a "ginger- 
talk" by McOuat who hasn't learned 
yet to love Boulder or forgotten how to 
stir up enthusiasm. "Fuzz" said that 
they have the gridiron full of promising- 
material at the University, but he still 
feels sure that the Tigers will win if 
properly supported. After an exciting 
"door-rush," the girls' halls and Presi- 
dent Slocum were serenaded aixl the 
evening's fun was concluded by a lock- 
step parade down town and back to 
Hagerman which point was reaced 
aliout one o'clock in the morning. 



Ed. Jacobs of Delta, Amnions of West 
Denver and Charles Johnston of Canon 
Cit}' are pledged to Phi Gamma Delta. 
Delta. 



Knower Mills and Roland Lothrop, 
seniors in the ITarvard graduate school 
of forestr}-, visited Donovan for a few 
da\s last week. 



8 THE TIGER 

Whistler Could 

spread two dollars worth of piint over a piece of canvas as big as milady's ^i, 

handkerchief and get a thousand dollars for it. There's a lot in the way ^\ '|g\ 
the paint is put on the canvas, and there's a lot too, in the way clothes are 
put on your manly form. The clothes we select for you are designed by 
the Whistlers of Tailordom — by master tailors. Suits $15.00 to 50.00 



o 




UP-TO-DATE APPARATUS. 



Chemistry Department Adds Valuable 
Calorimeter to Its Equipment. 

There is now a new and. beautiful 
little machine for the determination 
of heating values in Professor Strie- 
by's office. This calorimeter, an At- 
water Bomb Calorimeter, is as far 
superior to the aluminum cup in a 
vessel of water, which most of us have 
used in the Physics Laboratory, as a 
Pullman coach for t/aveling is to an 
oxcart. 

Essentially, the.e is a very strong 
steel cup, lined with gold and provid- 
ed with an equally strong and tight 
cover. Into this cup a small dish is 
lowered on platinum wires and the 
steel cover is screwed on. Oxygen is 
pumped into the enclosed space until 
there is a pressure of about seven at- 
mospheres, or one hundred pounds to 
the square inch. By means of the 
elect ic current, the combustible ma- 
terial in the small dish may be ignited 
at the proper time. As soon as it is 
ignited it burns, more or less furious- 
ly and h.eats the gold-lined "bomb." 
The importance of the machine lies 
in the accuracy with which this gen- 
erated heat can be measured. 

Before the small dish and its in- 
flammable contents are allowed to 
unite with the oxygen, the bomb is 
lowered into a nickel pail containing 
a measured amount of water. This 
nickel pail sits on very small legs in 
a papier mache pail and this in turn 
is held in a second one of papier 
mache. The whole series of pails has 
a cover to keep down radiation, and 
through this cover there are three 
small holes, two f(u- the motor-(lri\'en 
mixer and one fur the delicate ther- 
mometer. As so;)n as the water and 
bomb and nickel jiail are at ;i uniform 
tempe-ature, th;it temperature is 



measured to the one-hundredth part 
of a degree centigrade. The mixture 
in the bomb is lighted by the electri- 
cal fusing of a small iron wire and the 
mixer is set to work. 

Owing to the atmosphere of oxy- 
gen the combustion is very complete. 
When it is entirely ended and the wa- 
ter jacket is of a uniform temperature 
due to the stirrer's action this tem- 
perature is read as carefully as was 
the first. The difference in tempera- 
ture multiplied by the known amount 
of water and the number of calories 
necessary to raise one unit of water 
through one degree gi^■es the number 
of calories generated. When the 
chemist knows the relative heating 
power of the different coals, oils and 
various combustible materials he can 
make valuable recommendations to 
fuel consumers for efficiency and econ- 
omy. This is not the only use of the 
calorimeter, however. 

The calorimeter owned by the Col- 
lege is a very valuable one. The 
bomb alone is worth $275 and the 
whole machine, including containers, 
stirre.- and sample press cost $450. 
Tlie fine thermometer, reading to hun- 
dredths of centigrade degrees, is worth 
$20. At present the department has 
no pumps for the oxygen charge but 
obtains its supply from Denver in 
steel tubes that are refilled when nec- 
essary. 

Other e(|uipment for the labortories' 
use during the year is now coming in 
and will ha\-e arrived in about ten 
days. 



GOLF. 

Those who are interested in the 
game which is described as the lazy 
man's game, the game in which a man 
hits a little rubber ball as hard as he 
can with a big stick and then walks 
a mile trying to find the ball, may be 



interested to learn that there is a nat- 
ural golf course only a short distance 
from the campus. The rolling top of 
the mesa seems made purposely for 
the playing of golf, and here Profes- 
sor Albright during the summer sank 
tin cans in the ground and so started 
nine-hole golf links. Of course, there 
are many hazards and Colonel Bogey 
will probably always win, but still the 
sport is good even over such rougli 
greens. The tees and putting "greens" 
can be made suitable with a little 
work if many take to playing golf. 

If anyone wishes to become better 
acquainted with the mesa course. 
Professor Albright will be glad to 
shovv the way. 



EXCITING CLASS SCRAP 

Continued from Page 1 

remained on the outside, prepared to 
ascend the pole by climbing over the 
heads of the contenders. During the 
last five minutes of the contest the up- 
per classmen in charge refused to allow 
anyone to be held down. All were 
given an opportunity to get in the thick 
of the fight. The excitement of those 
last few minutes was intense. Old 
Fourteeu, perspiring and bleeding, and 
bruised and torn was making a last 
desperate effort to reach the despised 
flag of the foe. But the attempt was 
futile, and when the fifteen minutes 
were up the small square of cloth re- 
mained untouched by freshmen hands. 

The fight was conducted under the 
rules of last year, except for the change 
of time for beginning it. This change 
proved very wise. At 6 :30 in the 
morning the usual crowd of spectators 
was not on hand. A noticable feature 
was the absence of the college girls. 

This flag rush was a most satisfactory 
one from the college point of view, in- 
asmuch as there were no unfortunate 
results either by way of accidents or 
exaggerated newspaper reports. 



THE TIGER 



Fall Footwear for Young Ladies 

$2.50 $3.00 $3.SO $4.00 

Deal's styles at these prices will surely be a delight to every young lady looking for 
something different, something new in Fall footwear, button or blucher patterns, 
cloth or neat kid tops in patent colt, suede, gunmetal calf and glazed kid, on the 

new extreme short vamp lasts, high arch, 
Cuban heels. We are shoe fitters. Let us 
fit you. 





Deichmann & Douglas 
Floral Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER. Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 
Students' Trade Solicited 



1 1 1 N. Tejon St. 



Telephone 1593 



To College 
Men and Women 
We Are Known as 
"The Satisfactory 
Je eler". To 
New Ones We 
Soon Will Be. 



Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

"Satisfactory Jewelry 

Store" 



WE LOAN MONEY 

ON ALL VALUABLES 

Big line of new and unredeemed 
Drawing Instruments .'. Diamonds 
Watches and Jewelry of all descrip- 
tions. Firearms and Fishing Tackle, 
Musical Instruments and hundreds 
of other articles 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 




Mrs. Howe Joins Music School 
Faculty. — Dean Hale of the school of 
music announces that Mrs. George M. 
Howe will take charge of the violin 
department in the school of music 
this year. Mrs. Howe is very well 
and favorablj' known in musical cir- 
cles of the city, and is a prominent 
member of the Colorado Springs Mu- 
sical club. She has studied under 
Tirindelli of the Cincinnati Conserva- 
tory of Music, and under Hollaender 
and Witenberg, in Berlin. Mrs. Howe 
had several years experience as teach- 
er of violin before coming to Colo- 
rado Springs. 

Rastall Visis Here. — Ben Rastall, 
a graduate of the college who is now 
on the faculty of the Unive/sity of 
Wisconsin, is spending a few days 
in this city. Rastall has been lectur- 
ing this summer at the University of 
Chicago. 



Sunrise Breakfast. — The fifth an- 
nual sunrise breakfast for the fresh- 
men under the auspices of the sophs 
was one of the most enjoyable of the 
early social gatherings of the year. 
The sophs are ahead considerably in 
a financial way and the freshmen in 
experience. 



Sayre Resigns. — Ray H. Sayre has 
found it necessary to resign his posi- 
tion on the Y. M. C. A. cabinet as 
chairman of the finance committee. 
His successor will be appointed soon. 



Chapel Monitors.— G. W. Clark, S. 
W. Dean and A. E. Bryson have been 
appointed chapel monitors for the 
coming year. 



Antlers 

Turkish Baths 

(Opposite Elks Club) 
Open Day and Night 

BATHS OF ALL KINDS. Also Chiro- 
pady and Swedish Massage. Treat- 
ment at Residence by Appointment. 

CARL J. WENBERG, Prop. 

Graduate Swedish Masseur 

Phone Red 33 14 E. Bijou Street 



Snappy, Swa^^y 
Clothes 

AT 

THE MAY CO. 

Collede Men 10 Per Cent 

Clever 
Haberdashers 

This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 

Company 




Headquarters for 

College Footwear 



10 



THE TIGER 




WINDOW SLEEPING TENTS 



For Young Men Who Want Snap and 
Dash In Their Clothes 

yet refined, tasteful and becoming styles, we offer American 
standard of fashion. 

SOCIETY BRAND CLOTHES 

These garments embody the highest type of tailoring and fabrics. 
Your every wish can be gratified at from $22.50 to $40.00 



Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton-Rustic Home 

D« o No. 419 South El Paso St. 

airy a) Phone Main 442 

Photography 

In All Its Branches 



Clark 



112 South Tejon St. 
Special Discount to j4 II Students 

Shoe Repairing. Clothes Cleaned and Pressed. 
Second-Hand Shoes a d Clothing 

J. H. PERKINS 



7K S. Cascade 



Colorado Springs 



PRATT, The Barber 

s At the Aha Vista Hotel 

He Solicits the Patronage of the 
College Boys 



Smokers. — Sigma Chi, Alplia Tau 
Delta and Phi Gamma Delta enter- 
tained last week with several enjoya- 
ble smokers for the new men. Kappa 
Sigma will entertain this evening. 

Student Commission Meets. — The 

Student Commission met Wednesday 
afternoon and discussed several mat- 
ters of importance. A full account 
of the proceedings will be given in 
the next issue of The Tiger. 



Registration Heavy. — The registra- 
tion of freshmen is larger at this time 
than at a similar time last year. A 
noticeable feature of the registration 
is the large number of upperclassmen 
who have come from other institu- 
tions. There are about thirty of 
these. 



Prize Offered. — The Lake Mohonk 
Conference on International Arbitra- 
tion offers a prize of $ioo for the best 
essay on "International Arbitration'' 
by an undergraduate student of any 
American college or university. 
Donor of Prize. Chester Dewitt Pugs- 
ley of Peekskill. N. Y. Judges, Hon. 
E. E. Brown, Hon. Joseph B. Moore. 
Geo. W. Scott, D. D. For additional 
information, address the secretary of 
the conference. 



Book Exchange.— The Y. U. C. A. 
has started a book exchange which 
has been under the supervision of D. 
L. r.oyes. The exchange is located in 
Perkins Hail and is open after chape! 
and at noon. 



THE OUT WEST 


TENT AND AWNING CO. 


113'. NORTH TEJON STREET 





Phone 917 



GEO. R. BERGEN, D. D. 

MANF'G OPTICIAN 
Eyes Tested 611-12 Exch. Nat. Bank BIdg. 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought^ Sold, Rented 
and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing Typewriter. The 
New No. 10 Model Has All Latest 
Improvements 

Zimmerman Supply 

Company 



22 E. Kiowa St. 
Phone Main 374 



Established 189 



Furniture, Furnishings 

For College Use 

The Fred S. Tucker 

Furniture Company 

106-108 North Tejon Street 

The Hassell IronWorl s 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 



THE TIGER 



U 




Extends a hearty welcome "home" to the old men, and 
a most cordial invitation to those of you who are here 
for the first time. Our specialty is catering to the 
tastes of College Men. 



B == 



Cigar Store 13 Nonh Harry C. Hughes Tej<.nst, 13 



Get Your Picnic Supplies 

^= AT = 

SOMMERS' MARKET 



113 S. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 114 



The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER, Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Notary Public 

A. J. LAWTON 

Real Estate, Loans and Insurance 
10/4 E. Pike's Peak Ave., Colorado Springs 

The MURRAY 
Drug Company 

(Opposite Campus) 



The handiest place to buy 
your Note Books, Tablets, 
Fountain Pens, Pennants, 
Kodaks and Supplies, as well 
as Everything Usually Kept 
in a[ Well Stocked Drug Store 



''Meet at Murray's" 



New Bible Class. — Dean Parsons 
announces that he will conduct a new 
Bible study class for the men and 
women of the college, to be held in 
Bemis Hall on Tuesday evenings at 7 
o'clock. The course will be on the 
"Social Message of Jesus,'' to con- 
sist of lectures and outside readings 
College credit will be given for the 
work done in the course. 



Hagerman Smoker. — The men of 
Hagerman Hall are planning for a 
smoker for their friends and them- 
selves on Saturda}^ evening in the 
new recreation rooms of the hall. 



Kinnikinnik Out, Friday. — The first 
issue of Tlie Kinnikinnik, the liter- 
ary monthly of Colorado College, 
win probably be out tomorrow. The 
.hrst number will be distributed at 
chapel free of charge. 



Kitely Back. — "Ripsaw" Kitely, the 
man with the fog-horn voice, has re- 
turned to cnllege. I-Iis voice will be 
a material addition to the rooters' 
club. 



3.[rs. Stephen L. Goodale will rc- 
tu n to Pittsburgh within a few days. 
Air. Goodale is professor of metal- 
lurgy and ore dressing in the School 
of Mmes, University of Pittsburgh. 
Both professor and Mrs. Goodale are 
graduates of Colorado College. 



The following dialogue took place 
since Shaw's return from Europe: 

I^ady — So you Ikh-c been abroad, 
j\Ir. Shaw. Did 3'ou go on a scholar- 
ship? 

Shaw — No, I went on a cattle-ship. 



Any person wishing to receive their 
Tiger free by acting as correspondent, 
will please hand his or her name to 
either of the local editors. 



F0% THE 

Most Exclusive Millinery 

CALL ON 

Mme, M, D, Hillmer 

6 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

Finest of Material and 
^est of Workmanship 



Phone Black 395 



Colorado Springs 



You Will Find our Store a Good Place to 
Visit When Looking for College Supplies. 
In Loose Leaf Note Books, Drawing Mater- 
ials, Fountain Pens, We Excell. 

The Pike's Peak Book & Stationary Co. 

ZI-2V/2 South Tejon Street Peone Black 354 




Watch the caps you meet. 

You won't need an intro- 
duction to the HEIDCAP. It 
is not a mere head covering. 
It has character. It gives 
character to its wearefo It 
is made of exclusive English 
cap cloths. It is a thorough- 
bred . 

Try on a HEIDCAP. 



12 



THE TIGER 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co. 
Groceries and 

Meats :: :: :: 



.♦.•,»» 







115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



MUETH'S 

The Place Where the Stand- 
ard Is Never Lowered. High 
Class Goods at Reasonable 
Prices. Ice Cream, Hot 

and Cold Drinks. 

Ask Any Old Student 
CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 

5 Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

THE 

Colorado Springs Floral 
Company 



Telephone Main 599 



104 N. Tejon St 



The D. Y. Butcher ? rug Co. 
DRUGS, KODAKS, SUPPLIES 

Free and Prompt Delivery 
Cor. Opposite P. 0. Phones 90 and 750 



II Local Department || 



Edith McCreery visited her sister 
who is in the freshman class this past 
week. ffl 



Marguerite Mack had a dinner for 
several alunmae at her home Saturday 
of last week. 



Appel, who is here from California, 
and Lewis are pledged to Sigma Chi. 

Anna Baker'13 is ill in the infirmary. 



Miss McKenzie "14 entertained a 
friend from Canon City the later part 
of last week. 



Lucile Dilts '12 entertained at tea 
Saturday night. 



Pyke Johnson, the sporting editor of 
the Denver Republican, came to the 
Springs Tuesday to get the pictures of 
the football squad. 



Winifred Shuler ex '11 spent Sunday 
visiting with friends, on her way to 
Wellesley, where she expects to enter 
the junior class. 



Miss Hall '08 is acting as house mis 
tress of Ticknor. 

G. Rice ex '06 has been in the Springs 
the past week. 



Clara Wright ex '11 passed through 
here last Friday. She expects to con- 
tinue her work in the University of 
Chicago. 

Mrs. Tanner of Pennsylvania arrived 
last week to take her position of house 
mistress at Montgomery. 



Phone 687 



Manicuring for Gantif men 



The Misses Bruner entertained Tues- 
day and Wednesday afternoon. Many 
College friends enjoyed their hospital- 
ity. 



Miss Lomis has gone to Manitou 
Park for a few days. 



Louise Strang '10 is visiting ;it the 
Colleg'e. 



Letitia Lamb, who spent the sum- 
mer in Europe, returned to College, 
Thursday. 



Miss N. E. Johnson 

Toilet Parlors 

Facial and Scalp Treatment with VIBRA- 
TOR, a Specialty 

Complete Line of Hair Goods 
324 N. Te on Street Colorado Springs 

JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling'-s Book Store 16 S. Tcj*n Strce 

The Assurance Savings and Loan 
AssociaUon 

Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Gives 
Special Attention to Accounts of Students 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, Preiident Ira Harris, V-President 

M. C. Gile Wm. F. Richards 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M. 

Mrs. Anna Bethman 

Hair Dressing Parlors 

Moles and Superfluous Hair Removed 

with Electricity. Hair Goods Made 

TovOrd«r a Specialty 

Phone Red 39 27 East Kiowa Street 

The College 

Book Store 

See our College Pen- 
nants, largest stock and 
latest designs. 

Be patriotic and deco- 
rate your rooms. 

WHITNEY and 
GRIMWOOD 

20 North Tejon St eet 



THE 1 I G K R 



13 



PENNANTS 

Out West pennants 'are the 

talk of the town. 

Have you seen our window 

displays? 

Do so before you buy a 

pennant. 

Headquarters for College 

Supplies of all kinds. 

THE OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationary Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



I2S. Tajon St. 



Colorado Springs 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main S36 



Phone Main 2055 



Art Needle Work 



THE HUNT & VAN NICE 
Art Specialty Store 

Stamping, Designing, Perforating, Linens, 
Lawns, Best Hand-Pstinted China 

8 Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs, Colo 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcuiarius & Co. 



Sharley Pike arrived the last of this 
week. 



H. Justin Dowhng, of Brooklyn, 
Charles Mantz, of Denver, George Bel- 
sey, of Saint Louis, and Walstin Wake- 
field of Loveland are pledged to Alpha 
Tau Delta. 



Cora Kampf '13 gave a tea Tuesday 
afternoon at her home for several soph- 
omore girls. 



Several Sigma Chis and ladies took 
dinner at Bruin Inn Tuesday evening. 



Dorothy Stots father visited her 
Tuesday. 



Dean Cajori's shed burned Tuesday 
morning. Rumor has it that his bicy- 
cle suffered some in the conflagration. 



Mr. Stroller, a Sigma Chi from Case 
School, Ohio, visited the local chapter 
Tuesday. 



Hubert Somers and Harry Ray '14, 
are pledged to Delta Phi Theta. 



Florence Smith ex '13 visited Miss 
Ruth Augenbaugh this week. 



Delta Phi Theta entertained about 
tifteen men at an informal smoker last 
Tuesday evening. 

Freshmen, fresh from iiome, will find 
fresh home made candies at Noble's, cor- 
ner Bijou and Tejon. 



Defifke ex '13 spent the early part of 
the week at the Delta Phi Theta House. 



Charles Wright, Canon City, Oliver 
Hall, Denver, Kent Thornell, Sidney, 
Iowa, are Kappa Sigma pledges. 

Miss Elsie Connell ex '12, is attend- 
ing Denver University this year. 



Mike Donelan and Harry Greenlee 
were among the late arrivals. 



Miss Lucy Shepard ex '12, leaves 
soon for Vassar where she will continue 
her work during the coming year. 



"Tubby" Coulter of Nebraska U., was 
a visitor at the Phi Gamma Delta 
House last week. 



Hunt Up 

Bissell's Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Re'ail Dealers in 
Flour, Fei»d, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



A "Burgess Spread" 

Perhaps you Fresliies don't know 
what that is; but to us old C. C. 
men it means much- very much. 
The finest delicatessen department, 
a superb bakery, a candy shop that 
possesses the essentials of purity and 
the added virtues of thorough work- 
manship and artistic individuality. 
You'll be present this semester at more 
than one strictly "Burgess" function 

W. N, Burgess— Grocer 

1 12-114 N. Tejon Street Phone 83 

FREE 

Shoe Repairing Absolutely Free 
of Charge for Entire Term of 
1910-1911 to the College Stu- 
dent Submitting the Best Ad for 

PETE'S 
Shoe Shop 

230 East Dale Street 

Men's Sewed Soles 75c; Ladies, 65c 
Rubber Heels, 35c 



14 



THE TIGEK 



$1.00 



$1.00 



Young Men 

For $1.00 per month, we sponge, press and do minor repairing on one 
suit, or one overcoat, or two pairs of trousers, each week; calling for 
and deliverieg same in our wardrobe, dustproof wagons. We claim 
to do the best work in the city. A trial from you will allow us to 
prove our claim. 

Special Prices Given to the Young Women of 
the College. Get Our Price List. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



Agents: Bert Siddons 
Glenn Bowers 




, 'trench ^yers 
and Cleaners. 



T. E. AIKEN 

Taxidermist, Furrier 

Dealer in Souvenirs and Novelties 
12 E. Pike's Peak Ave, Colorado Springs 

For Best and Quick Delivery 

SEE 

The Monument Coal Co. 

28 East Kiowa Street 



William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

MEMBERS 
New York Stock Exchange 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



THE 

Crissey 6i Fowler 
Lumber Co. 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 

Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 

A. S. BLAKE 

Is the Man to See 

107 North Tejon Phone 465 

Nickle Ware Cutlery 

Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Dorothy Cook gave a spread in Mont- 
gomery Hall for the freshmen girls. 



There was a water melon spread hela 
in the Jungle Monday afternoon 
which the Misses Musser, Price, Walsh, 
Galpin and Burger were present. 



Katheriiie True gave a trout fry in 
her room last Friday night. 



Putnam came back Monday and is 
once more hard at work on the grid- 
iron. 



Gil. Carey and his cousin. Jack Carey, 
were in Denver over Saturday and Sun- 
day. 



When down town these warm fall days 
and you feel kind 'er tired, just drop in at 
Noble's for something good to eat or drink, 
corder Bijou and Tejon. 



Miss Bogue, who is a senior at Wells- 
ley, visited her sister, Mary Bogue, 
Friday and Saturday. 



Eugene Steele went to Denver Friday 
afternoon, returning Simday. 



Whipple, Moberg, Jardine, Vaia Stone 
and Jameson have donned the mole 
skins and are making a good showing. 



The freshmen have been a little slow 
in showing up for football but several, 
among whom are Sloy, Jacobs, Park 
and Carey, have come out every night. 



Broken Lenses 
Duplicated 



Phone Black 233 
Colorado Souvenirs 



C. B. LAUTERMAN 

Jeweler and Manufac- 
turing Optician 



121 N. TEJON STREET Colorado S 



pnngs 



10c STORE AND MORE! 

THE EMPORIUM 

1 10 S. TEJON STREET 



College Inn 

Freshmen!! 

Tiiis Is the Place fur 

GOOD THINGS OEAT 



Fine Watch Work 



Diamond Setting a Specialtj 



H. E. Kapelke 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 
130 E. Pike*s Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

Grand Union Tea Co. 

Importers of Fine Teas and 
Coffees 

Phone Main 2678 220 N. Tejon St. 



On hand as usual 
but just a little better 
equipped for serving your 
needs — 



The 

WATERMAN 

PRESS 

PRINTERS and 
BINDERS 



THE TIGER 



1& 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



Mr. Geo. Creel, editorial writer of 
the Denver Post, will address a mass 
meeting of the College Sunday after- 
noon, Oct. 2. Special music will be 
provided. 



The first regular meeting of the 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



II ii'\ 



Giddings Br^^s. 

The College Favorite' 



The Favorite Shopping 

Place for the College 

Woman 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

I« the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 



106'/2 E. Pike'» Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



W Star 
-^^^ Laundry 

The College Laundry 

We give you 20% discount. You get the 
best finished laundry in the state and costs 
no more than the poorest. It does not tear 
the collars oi shirts. 

B. J. DICKSON, Agent 

W. I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



119 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



/^' 



HATS 
The Classy 

Kind 
GORTON'S 



For the 
College Man 



S IRTS 

Exclusive Patterns 

$2, $1.50, $1 

GORTON'S 



=^ 



College Brand Clothes are made especially; 
young fellows have learned that this store is 
headquarters for the styles they seek. ^Ve'll 
show you the liveliest lot of swagger things 
you ever saw; new colors and patterns $35, 
30, 25, 20, 18. A Hearty Welcome is extended to 
all College Studen's at this store. 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 




E. Pike's Peak 
113 



V 



\ Correct Dress for Men. ^ 



J 



Pearsons Literary Society will be 
held at the Club House Friday even- 
ing. A short program will be ren- 
dered and new men are invited to be 
present. 



The opening meeting of the Apo- 
Iconian Club for the new men will 
ixcur I'riday evening. All new men 
are in\'ited to be present. Program, 
refreshments and a good time. 



Chem. Club Meeting — The Colorado 
College Chemistry Club holds its first 
regular busines.s meeting at 7:30 p. m., 
Friday, September 2j, in the Poly- 
technic Library. All members please 
arrange to attend on time, so all busi- 
ness can be attended to before the 
time for other society meetings. 



When Trading, 
Be Sure to 

Patronize Tiger 
Advertisers 



Dern's Freshly Roasted Coffee 

will make 10 more cups to the lb. 
than Eastern roasted coffee 

29 S. Tejon Street Phone 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 



Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence. 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 9£6 



The College 
Photo Studio 




TTUmj 




Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 

THE 

Gowdy-Simmons Printing Co. 

PRINTERS, ENGRAVERS 

21 N Tejon Street 



16 



THE 



You young men who are to 

the fore in your College life, should in every 
way he to the fore in your dress. 

Here at this modern clothes shop with its 
all new stock you will find the clothes that 
will place you at the front in your dress. 



Here are the kind of clothes that are 
pictured and described in the National Maga- 
zines; the advertised kirfd of clothes. 

Priced at $15, $20, $25 and up. 

There are certain advantages in early 
choosing. 



8 N. Tejon Street 



(Pbi4uii4-Sfeecii«er 6 



28 E. Pike's Peak 




Ct, S hoe Styles for Students 

Featured among our new styles for Fall wear, are all 
those new models that have snap and go, that are 
especially designed for the good dressers among our 
College Students 



Popular Priced 



\f5>^!fVSM 



SHOES •■■HAr SATISFY 



$3.50, $4 and $5 



It. s.reJON ST. 




^ 



jiiaistas?Mt=Ms^sasi3 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




1 '^~S»-. 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 

Departments —CoWege of Arts and 
Science, E. S. PARSONS, Dean. 

School of Engineering, F. CAJORI, Dean 
School of Forestry, W. C. STURGIS, Dean 
School of Music, E. D. HALE, Dean 



Manitou ParJ^ — Field Laboratory 
of the School of Forestry 



Headquarters for 

GATTERER 

216 N. Tejon Street 




1 1. Latest Designs in Imported 

_ « and Domestic Browns and 

^-^Jm^mK^ Coronation Colors 

ashion \ 

107^ Discount to Students 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF 

COLORADO COLLEGE 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., SEPTEMBER 29, 1910 



Vol. XIII 



Number 3 



STUDENT 

COMMISSION 

MEETING 



FACULTY 

ADVISORS 
APPOINTED 



ATHLETIC 

CONFERENCE 
CONTROVERSY 



MATTERS OF INTEREST DIS- ONE PROFESSOR TO EVERY DECIDES THAT D. U. CANNOT 
CUSSED. TEN FRESHMEN. MEET MARQUETTE. 



Freshman Rules Adopted. — Commis- 
sion Has No Money. — Commit- 
tee Appointed to Supervise 
Fresh-Soph Football 
Game. 

At the first meeting of the Student 
Commission, although there was onl}' a 
small attendance, several matters of im- 
portance were discussed and acted upon. 
One of the most important pieces of 
business was the matter of the adoption 
of rules regulating the conduct of fresh- 
men. A committee was appointed to 
draw up rules for this regulation. Tliis 
committee met later in the week, and the 
following rules were adopted : 

1. Freshmen are not allowed to wear 
any high school insignia, such as pins, 
athletic letters, etc. 

2. Smoking is not allowed on the 
campus. 

3. Freshmen arc not allowed to wear 
College colors e.xcept at intercollegiate 
contests. 

4. Freshmen are not allowed to go 
bareheaded on the campus. 

. 5. All freshmen shall wear the fresh- 
man cap adopted by the Commission. 
Engineers shall__be distinguished by a 
green Initton, liberal arts by a red but- 
ton and foresters by a purple button. 

The Commission hereby authorizes the 
sophomore class to enforce these rules. 

It was the thought of the committee 
that too much should not be done at the 
beginning, but that only such rules 
should be made as could be easily en- 
forced, consequently only a few rules 

Continued on Page 5. 



Each Adviser to Give Reception for 
His Group. — Scheme Success- 
ful Elsewrhere. 

The scheme for faculty advisers to 
the men of the freshman class, which 
was proposed last year, has been per- 
fected bj' Professor Hills and adopted 
by the class of ninetccn-fourtecn. The 
plan provides for the division of the 
class into groups of about ten men, 
with a faculty member as advisor to 
each group. The men are privileged 
and expected to consult their adviser 
in all cases in which they need help 
in their studies, or whenever they feel 
the need of advice in matters pertain- 
ing to their lives as college students. 
The advisers' have been named and 
each one expects soon to give a recep- 
tion to his group. They also extend 
an invitation to the men under them 
to visit them in their homes whenever 
possible. The advisers in every case 
are giving their services willingly, and 
it is hoped that the freshmen will ap- 

Conlinued on Page 3. 



Don't Buy a Season t 

Ticket ® 

UNLESS - I 

You want a successful % 

football season % 

m 

AND UNLESS you want to Z 

save a dollar ^ 



Question of Eligibility of Contested 

Players to Come Up at Next 

Meeting. 



The first meeting of the Rocky Moun- 
tain Athletic Conference was held in 
Den\'er last Saturday'. Dean Parsons 
and Prof. Griswold represented Colorado 
College. Practically a half day was 
given over to the consideration of the 
proposed game between Denver Univer- 
sity and AL'irquette University which is 
scheduled to take place in Denver on 
October 15. 

* Rule VI of the Conference 
€» Constitution provides that: 
"i^ (i) The institutions repre- 
'Z» sented in this Conference agree 
nut to ent-'r inti> athletic rela- 
tions, except as permitted by 
vote of the Conference, with 
other collegiate institutions 
which do not have faculty con- 
trol of athletics and an equally 
high standard of eligibility 
rules. ■ . 

(2) The question whether an 
institution is eligible to take 
])art in intercollegiate athletics 
with the Conference institu- 
tions sh:il! be decided by the 
Conference itself. 
Denver University, however, sched- 
uled the game with Marquette, a non- 
conference institution, in open violation 
of this rule. Dean Parsons and Dr. 
Niirlin of Boulder, feeling that the case 
was one of direct violation to a plainly 
stated rule, \-oted that Denver Univer- 

Continued on Page .'^ 



THE TIGER 



STEELE, SENIOR PRESIDENT. 



■'Shorty" Steele was honored with 
the senior presidency at a meeting of 
the class held last Thursday. Steele 
came to Colorado College from INIan- 
ual Training High School and has dis- 
tinguished himself on the gridiron 
during his three years in the college. 
He was also art editor of last year's 
Nugget. 

The other officers chosen were: 

\^ice-President Lillian Ducr 

Secretary Grace Cunningham 

Treasurer B. H. Van Dyke 

Sergeant-at-Arms A. E. Bryson 



CHARLES FRIEND WINS 
DENVER TIMES 

SCHOLARSHIP. 



NUGGET VACANCIES FILLED. 



The junior class met Wednesday of 
last week to fill the vacancies of the 
Nugget board caused by the resignation 
of Manager Hamilton and assistant edi- 
tor Sinton and by the absence from 
school of assistant manager Graham and 
associate editors George Stratton and 
Miss Kilbourne. Upon the recommen- 
dation of the board, Edward P. Morse 
was elected business manager with E. 
S. Station as assistant manager. R. 
L. Hughes was chosen assistant editor 
and I\'[iss Francis Fames associate edi- 
tor. 

The resignation of two ,-t:ch capable 
men as Hamilton and Sinton is a decided 
loss felt keenly by the class, as is the 
case with those members who did not 
return to college. The reorganized 
board is already at work and feeling op- 
timistic, for the new members are well 
qualified to fill their positions and will- 
ing to boost for the best Nugget ever 
published. 



SAN RAFAEL OR COLLEGE 
STREET? 

A petition headed by D. C. Rice and 
36 signers to change San Rafael street 
to College street has been heard by the 
city council of the city. It is probable 
that the change will be made, although 
several residents thereon still desire the 
picturesque name of San Rafael. Ad- 
joining College Place at Cascade avenue 
the street would justly and appropriate- 
!v bear the name. 



Freshman-soph football game takes 
place Satiu'day mrjrning on Washburn 
field. Show your class spirit. 



Charles Friend '13, it is announced, 
has won the prize ofifered by the Denver 
Times in their scholarship contest in 
the territory outside of Denver. 

The prize consists of $1,000.00 to be 
distributed over a period of four years, 
$250.00 each year. Friend was twenty 
votes ahead of his nearest competitor. 

Friend is a member of the Apollonian 
Club and was on their winnnig debating 
team last year. He is also a star base- 
ball man and covered second base and 
ranked second in the batting column 
a.mong the championship Tigers of last 
year's Ijasel^all team. His friends re- 
joice with him in his success, as Friend's 
pluck and perseverence have won him 
the admiration of all who know him. 



First College Sing. 

On Wednesday evening of last 
week. Palmer steps were once more 
the scene of a large student gathering 
where singing and yelling were in- 
dulged in until much old-time enthusi- 
asm was aroused. Both old and new 
students attended this first sing in 
such numbers as to settle forever the 
question of "spirit" in Cohirado Col- 
lege, Kirkpatrick and McIMillan led 
the singing- and the yelling, and the 
entire repertoire of C. C. was ren- 
dered. McOuat was called for, and 
led a rousing C-O." "Fuz" made an 
appeal lor some new yells and songs. 

This first college sing was a decided 
success, and more of them will do the 
student body good. 



I.e Clere 'i,^ and Spangler 'r4 are 
pledged to Delta Phi Tlieta. 



Apollonian Open-Night. 

Last Friday night, the Apollonian 
Club held its annual opening at the 
club house. The club house has been 
]nit in fine shape during the summer, 
the outside having been painted, the 
w-alls calcimined, and the floor put in 
better condition, so that on last Fri- 
day evening it presented a splendid 
appearance. About seventy-fi\-c fel- 
lows were present and enjoyed the 
program and hospitality of the club. 

After the program, several athletic 
contests were arranged between the 
freshmen and sophomores and proved 
very interesting and exciting to the 
spectators as well as to the contest- 
ants. After the "eats" the crowd 
gathered around the piano, and with 
Hille playing, a vast amount of music 
was liberated to the faiu winds. 



NO BARBECUE FIRE? 

Sophs in Difficulty. — Looks Like a 
Firelefes Barbecue. 



These are troublous times for the 
sophomore class and for Barbecue 
JManager Lynch especially. Is the big- 
gest bonfire ever' to become a thing 
of the past? Are the wood-stealing 
expeditions to become a mere mem- 
ory? Alas and alack! it would ap- 
pear even so. No more will the heav- 
ens be lighted up with burning baby 
cradles, dog-houses, and front-yard 
gates; no more will the tireless soph 
scout the surrounding country in 
search of stray bits of combustible 
matter — no more, — but maybe it's not 
so bad as all that, maybe we'll have 
that fire yet. 

The facts of the matter are these: 
the insurance companies wdio carry 
the risks on the college buildings are 
lacking in an appreciation of things 
that appeal to the youthful mind and 
have come to President Slocum say- 
ing that it is neither fitting nor proper 
that the college buildings should be 
subjected to such dangers when they 
must foot the bills if anything un- 
seemly should happen. Next, Mana- 
ger Lynch appears before President 
Slocum and use all the persuasion 
of his nimble Celtic tongue to show 
the President the error of his ways, 
but to no avail. One of two things 
must be: either there shall be no bar- 
becue bonfire, or else it must occur 
in the middle of Washburn Field 
where all danger will be removed. 

The only possibility of securing the 
middle of Washburn is to store the 
materials at one side until the day of 
the festivities and then by all night 
and all day work to get it in shape for 
the match. This will probably be the 
solution of the matter providing the 
Athletic Association can be brought 
to view matters in the light that the 
sophomores desire. Meanwhile, pub- 
lic sentiment says that wdiile a fircless 
cooker may be a boon to humanity, 
a fireless barbecue is boon to profan- 
ity. 



DAIS INITIATION. 



Grace Starbird and May Wallace were 
initiated into the Ancient Order of Dais 
last Friday evening. The High Mogul, 
Ida McMorris. presided over the formal 
initiation in the Common Room. After- 
wards, a sumptuous repa.st was served 
in the dining room. 



THE TIGER 



PRESIDENT'S FIRST ETHICAL. 

The Prcsick'Ht's I'^riday cluipel ad- 
dress was upon tlie subject, "What 
Sliall We Do with the New College 
Year?" 

He congratulated every student 
upon the opportunities which a new 
college year offers. There are very 
few things in the wm'Id like a year in 
college and each will pass away never 
to return. First, you are all here for 
work: honest, earnest work. To fail 
in one's intellectual life is to make a 
faijiire of everything. No one is 
"dropped from the college''; he puts 
himself out by his own conduct. Such 
people often blame everyone except 
the person who is really at fault. 

Begin the new year well. I.et each 
task as it comes cnnmand the best 
that IS in you. One who falls behind 
at the beginning will find it exceed- 
ingly hard to overcome such failure. 

There are many temptations which 
come in the tirst days. Endless things 
tend to interfere with study; but the 
test of one's ability to make good is 
the wo: k done in the first weeks. 

Then the:e ought to be faith in 
one's self to win in the largest way. 
Believe in your own capacity for hon- 
est intellectual work. Cultivate con- 
fidence in your power to master every 
task by persistent, conscientious in- 
dustry. 

I^et every association of the new 
college year be helpful. Give and 
take the best. As you give the best 
out of your own character you will get 
the best from others. The man who 
has nothing to give has little or no 
capacity for receiving. The selfish 
person does not know how to gain 
from others. His very selfishness 
shuts the real wealth out of his own 
soul. What have you to give to the 
college that is worth giving? Proba- 
bly much more than you yourself real- 
ize. Learn how to give and receive 
the best, and the best only. 



THE KINNIKINNIK 

Enters Upon Its Third Year With a 
Good Number. 



Cutler Opens. — Cutler Academy op- 
ened for the year last Monday morn- 
ing. The registration is large and the 
outlook good for a prosperous year. 



Seniors Entertained. — President and 
Mrs. Slocum were at home to the 
senior class last Tuesday evening. 
There was a large crowd present and 
an enjoyable evening was passed. 



Shields '14 and Bosler '13 arc 
pledged to Delta Phi Theta. 



If the first number of The Kinni- 
kinnik can be taken as a criterion for 
the year, we would better all sub- 
scribe, for it will be too gc3od to 
miss. To quote, "The Kinnikinnik 
was founded two years ago. It has 
for a purpose the stimulation of an 
unrestricted, healthy taste for writing. 
It also serves as a permanent record 
of such literary articles as are judged 
worthy to represent the best efforts 
of the students of Colorado College." 
The success rif The Kinnikinnik is 
exactly in proportion to the degree in 
which it can be made a real literary 
monthly. This depends entirely on 
your willingness to help us make the 
magazine one which will contain ar- 
ticles typical of the best work of the 
students of Colorado College." The 
Kinnikinnik is living up to its part 
and we must live up to oiu's. 

We welcome the new board of ed- 
itors and wish them all success. We 
are glad to see the old names and are 
pleased with the new. Your work 
will not always be pleasant and the 
critic may not always be favorable, 
but your cause is good and one which 
deserves the support of every one on 
the campus. 

The first poem by Miss Strang is a 
charming bit of verse which answers 
some of those questions of life in a 
most delightful way. The last five 
words have so much in them, "Ah! 
Life Itself, 'Tis You!" 

"The Stuff That Dreams Are Made 
Of" is a realistic sketch and has 
much that does not appear on first 
reading. It is well told and the char- 
acters are skillfully drawn. There is 
just enou.gh said to fire our imagina- 
tion and that is the success of a short 
story. It is life-like and the ending 
is as it should be. This is much bet- 
ter than Miss Aikin's other piece in 
the same issue. 

In "The Keystone" Mr. Hughes has 
given us a story with those peculiar 
characteristics not often found in a 
college magazine. One might almost 
think in reading that the story were 
in "igio''. The setting is entirely in 
keeping with the thought and you are 
made to feel the reality of it. The 
ending is particularly good. 

Miss Huse has given us a delightful 
bit of New England life and those 
who enjoy Myrtle Reed will find 
pleasure and enjoyment in this sketch. 



The piece by Air. Ornies is rather 
far fetched, but consistently carried 
out. It has a certain amount of 
humor and the suspense is sustained 
to the last. 

In "Brave Deeds Done in the Past," 
Mr. Argo neglected to tell us that the 
story is true but the scene is so vivid 
to some of us that it can never be 
forgotten. Again we have demon- 
strated that "Truth is stranger than 
fiction." The sketch is life, carefully 
portrayed, and all our emotions are 
played upon. There is a good deal 
of suggestive detail which adds much 
to the story. 

The home sketch, by W. Blount, is 
good, if we could just forget the 
brown-stone front. We confess frank- 
ly that we cannot appreciate the selec- 
tion, Plebian as it must sound. New 
York has no charms for us, and the 
brown-stone fronts do not appeal to 
us as homes. We prefer the West, 
with its free air and open country. 

Glad to have you back, Mr. Shaw, 
and we hope to ha^■c more of your 
experiences in print. Sufficient to say 
of your work that it is "Shawesque," 
the college understands, and we all 
appreciate. 

The choice bit of the magazine was 
saved for the last and it is by far the 
best thing Miss Humphreys has ever 
given us. Every student should com- 
mit it and call it to mind always when 
the "sad gray clouds" gather round. 

On the whole, "The Kin" is a very- 
creditable number and we trust that 
as the months go by it may prosper 
and improve so that it may stand sec- 
ond to none. 



FACULTY ADVISORS APPOINTED 

Continued from Page 1 

preciate this fact, and remember that 
men as busy as are these college pro- 
fessors would not give their time to 
the plan if they did not expect it to 
do some good. 

Although similar S3'stems have been 
in operati(Tn in eastern colleges for 
several years, no plan was suggested 
for adoption here until last year, when 
a committee of the freshman class 
was appointed to confer with Profes- 
sor Hills, the class officer. The out- 
ciime of the several conferences hekl 
by these men is the present plan. 

The men of the College of Liberal 
Arts have been divided alphabetically 
into five groups and those of the tech- 
nical schools into four groups, accord- 
ing to subjects, the foresters consti- 
tuting a single group. 



THE TIGER 



A DOUBLE PAGE OF 



BREEZY BITS ABOUT THOSE TIGERS 

Coach, Claude Rothgeb, considered 
Colorado's greatest. 

Herbert Vandemoer, captain of the 
1 igers, booter, 10 second man, ATH- 
LETE. 

Kenneth Heald, full of pep, a candi- 
date for anything. 

Hedblom, heavy and gingerlike, a 
player. 

Thompson, all to the good. 

Steele, will make somebody hustle for 
th.c line. 

II. Sinton, fast and furious, O. K. for 
the Tiger team. 

LcClere brothers, strong and goodl)' 
candidates to look upon. 

Witherow, member of U. S. champ H. 
S. team. Looks good for center or 
guard. 

Van Stone, pitcher, and "some" booter. 

Dickson, a fast senior, who looks good 
for a position behind the line. 
Jardine, "Say, what can't Jardine do?' 

Reed, Reed we are certainl_v glad you 
are back. Maybe quarterback. 

Joe Sinton, Nerve, speed and ability. 
Joe, keep it up. 

Cook, all muscle, and plenty of it. 
How would the line suit you, Oliver? 

Bowers, "What a crackerjack of an 
end you will make." 

Hatch, determined, heavy and a comer. 

Eloyd, "M}' face scratched as it is 
makes me hn.ve more ginger." A 
"peach." 

Acker, of a footliall family, Acker hits 
the line, "honestly." 

Benjamin, from Longtown where they 
play real football. 

Clark, experience is lacking but the 
spirit is willing. 

Whipple, built like a football player. 
Play? Certainly. 

Haight, dancing H. H., but a deter- 
mined lad. 

Terril, a classy stepper. 

Freshmen, many good ones and some 
eligible upper classmen who are inter- 
mittantlv on the field. 



NEWS FROM THE STATE CAMPS 



Doings at Boulder. 

Quarterback and former captain Stcr 
ritt, quarterback Randolph, halfback 
Kcim, tackle Rowler, guard Prince, cen- 
ter Newton, tackle Slushcr, tackle 
Workeley, half back Poley, end Prince 
and guard Cooper, all stars for the Sil- 
ver and Gold, will not be in Boulder 



uniforms this year. The only old men 
back are: O'Brien, Gilligan, Van Gundy, 
Stocker, Kemp, Mils, Stocker and Lines. 
Folsom is planning to do away with a 
quarterback entirely, but the season is 
early yet for plans. 

At D. U. 

Schroeder, Crowley, Volk, Baily, 
Greene and kike are the old men which 
will form the nucleus of the Denver 
University team this fall. It is rumored 
that Schroeder will play quarterback and 
that Coach Koehler is full of trick plays. 
i hanksgi\ing will decide. 

Aggies. 

Coach Cassid}' at the Aggie camp has 
been working hard with some raw ma- 
terial, l)ut things look a little better there 
as the season advances. About 30 men 
are out for the team. 



Mines. 

The lack of practice games before the 
LTniversity of LTtah game with the Mines 
i', playing hard with the Golden lads. 
The game comes October 15 and the 
management reports a failure to get 
games for practice. However, Stuart, 
the coach, is hard at work with his 
squad, which appears promising. 

Rule-sick Coaches — Yes, No? 

"Rocky Mountain coaches at Sea o\er 
new rules." reads a headline in the re- 
cent issue of a Denver new'spaper. No 
doubt that the coaches all over the coun- 
try liave not figured out all the chances 
of play under the new rules but coaches 
in. this state are not as much at sea as a 
freshman in the math class, as it is sup- 
posed. Rothgeb, a thorough football 
expert, has studied the rules and inter- 
prets them in a clearer manner and he 
is now working his hardest to secure 
trick plays that will do the business. It 
is probable that when the trick plays are 
being rehearsed on Washburn field kill 
things will l)e of the secret cu"der, 
especially before any contest. 



Those Season Tickets. 

It behooves the athletic department to 
say a little to the students about the 
season tickets for the college games. As 
a business proposition it should appeal 
to e\'ery student, but as a college' boost- 
ing proposition it should do more than 
appeal — it should cause action. There 



is spirit on the campus this year. That 
is the right stuff and every loyal student 
of C. C. should have a season ticket and 
should use it at every game. BOOST 
BUY AND ATTEND. 



Bov/ers to Lead Sophs. 

The sophomores organized their foot- 
ball team Friday with Glen Bowers as 
captain and laid plans for the annihila- 
tion of the freshmen. The date for the 
game has not been set by the commis- 
sion 1 ut will probably come in the near 
future. 

Noted Cfficials zt Game. 

Walter Ekersall. the great Chicago 
quarterback, and considered the greatest 
football player in the world, Jake Stahl, 
a great U. of Illinois graduate player 
and Coach Quigley will be the important 
officials now scheduled for the positions 
of umpire, referee and head linesman re- 
spectively for the Denver University- 
Marquette game on October 15 in Den- 
\-er. It was said that D. U. is jeopar- 
dizing its chance for retaining member- 
ship in the state conference by playing 
with a team which does not abide by the 
rules. 



Coach Koehler of D. U. is planning to 
insert an evening course of study of 
the game of football for his athletes soon, 
probably to keep his men in the study 
habit. 



State Captains. 

Boulder — "Jawn" O'Brien. 
Denver University — Mark Volk. 
School of Mines — Douglas. 
Aggies — Williams. 
Colorado College — Vandemoer. 



A WORD TO THE WISE 



"Look out for the Tigers this year — 
things look good in Rothgeb's camp." 
— Pike Johnson, sporting editor of the 
Republican, the most conservative of 
all Denver sporting writers. 

Think over the above phrase — reader 
and loyal student — and think conserva- 
ti\ely. what will happen this season. It 
can readily be said that not for several 
years has such a spirit of confidence, 
not of the superficial Icind, but the died- 
in-the-wool stuff", held the campus in its 
gri]). With enougli eligible material 
for two teams and enough other mater- 



THE TIGER 



LIVE SPORTING NEWS 



ia! for another, the Tigers are certainly 
showing- up well. Hitting the bucking 
machine and scrapping "with the tackling 
dunnny are the features of the evening's 
practice now on the held. The first 
game comes A 'Week from Saturday with 
tile Terrors, who are showing up well 
under Coach Coflin, formerly of Long- 
mont. 



cfHitest is a good chance fur the un- 
de.classnien to dexehjp their class 
spirit and is always of great interest 
to the upper classmen as well. 



halll)acl< Aicl'adden nf the University of 
C(ilf)ra.l(,. 



More Bear Tales. 

Denver mii\crsity supporters are 
afraid that the "jt)nah" has struck their 
team. This time there seems a little 
ground for the report. John Fike, the 
husky left guard is ill with pneumonia 
and I'^rank Greene, center, had a narrow 
escape from death by the poison route 
when he took several ounces of corrosive 
subliiuate inwardly for an infected sore 
on his arm. Greene was so enthusias- 
tic over the chances of the D'enverites 
to win the pennant that he got mixed 
on the trainers suggestions for treat- 
ment. Fike is not seriously ill and 
Greene is "able to be out." 



S;ate Coaches. 

Den\-er Uni\ersity — John P. Koehler. 

University of Colorado — Castleman, 
Rich and Folsom. 

School of Mines — Ted Stuart. 

Agricultural College — H. W. Cassidy. 

Colorado College — Claude J. Rothgeb. 
Carv. 



"BEAUTY" STILL ON DECK. 



Word from Denver announces that 
"Beauty" Newhouse, formerly trainer 
of the Tiger football team has re- 
turned to that city after a successful 
season as umpi'/e in the Central 
League. Newhouse, it is said, may be 
given a tryout in the American 
League next season. 



FIRST GAME OF THE SEASON. 

Freshmen and Sophs to Have It Out 
on Washburn, Saturday Morning. 

The committee in charge of the un- 
derclass contests has fixed the time 
for the next cla^s clash for Saturday 
■ mornings when the husky warriors of 
191,^ will mix with their eld friends of 
1914. The sophomores .= eem to have 
the best outlook, though the freshmen 
have some promising material. This 



ASSISTANTS APPOINTED. 

I''()0tl)a]l .Manager h'owler has chos- 
en the men who are to assist him dur- 
ing the football season. The assist- 
ants are: A. J. Gregg, Ernest Station, 
and G. Seldomridge. The manager 
■f.)r next year will pr^ibably be chosen 
from among these three men.- 



ATHLETIC CONFERENCE CONTROVERSY 

Continued from Pa^^e 1. 

sity be n()t allowed to play the proposed 
game ; this was sufficient to keep Denver 
from playing the game. Denver Uni- 
versity mairitaius that Marquette has 
agreed to pla\' under tlie Rocky Moun- 
tain Conference rules and that it is an 
ii^justice to them to cancel the game at 
t'.u> late date. Dr. Norlin of Boulder, 
however, investigated the standing of 
Marquette among the institutions of its 
section and found that it was an outlaw 
and recognized no conference rulings 
with the result that but few of the col- 
leges of its own section would meet it. 
In sp'.te of Denver's objections, how- 
ever, the representatives of both Boul- 
der and the College feel that Denver 
overstepped its bounds in contracting 
for the game when the ruling covering- 
such a ease is so clearly stated in the con- 
stitution. Colorado College, when ar- 
ranging for its out-of-state game with 
the Kansas Agricultural college, took 
the matter before the Conference and 
was granted permission to have the 
game. No doubt if Denver had pur- 
sued the same course its game would 
have been allowed and the present con- 
troversy avoided. Just what will be 
the result of the action taken is uncer- 
tain. There is some talk of D. U.'s 
withdrawal fron-i the Conference, but 
such a mine is quite iniprobable as they 
h;[ve much more to lose by the cancel- 
lation of their games with the other Con- 
ference institutions than by the cancel- 
lation of the Marquette game. 

1 he matter (if the protested plavers 
was laid on the talile until the next 
n-!eeting which occurs October 8. Those 
who arc under protest are fullback 
Schroeder and halfback Walker of Den- 
ver- University, and fullback Stocker and 



STUDENT COMMISSION MEETING 

Continued from Page 1 

were adopted and more n-iay be expected 
at a later date. It was also the sense 
of the Cf)nuuittee that headgear for the 
three upper classes should be adopted 
but that their selection should l)e left to 
llie classes themselves. 

'J he financial question is an embarass- 
ing one this year as the Commission has 
no income'since the $7.50 athletic fee has 
been aliolished. Some n-ione_\' is neces- 
sary in order to conduct the affairs of 
The C'innnission, so a c>innnitlee was aj)- 
pointed to wait on President Slocum to 
see what arrangements can be made for 
raising the necessary funds. A possible 
source of revei-iue was suggested by 
usi:ig the gate receipts of the freshman- 
sophomore game. Past experience, 
however, goes to show that these receipts 
are not fabulous in quantity, and that 
e\en if this source is used, the Commis- 
sion will not roll in wealth. 

A connuittee was appointed to have 
eliarge of the coming freshman-sopho- 
more football game. It is quite prol?- 
able that the rules of last year will again 
hold for this _\ear antl that the contest 
will take place some time in Octoljer, 
probably October fifteenth. Last year's 
experience in waiting until the season is 
over shows the iiKuh-isability of this move 
as the game was put ofi from time to 
time with the result that the game was 
nc\'er played. Another argument in 
favor of the pre-season game is that it 
eliminates the "C" men entirely as none 
of the snphoniores will have made their 
letter liy that time. .\ pre-season game 
would bring out a large nuiulier of 
freshmen for practice in time to lie of 
some good to the College team. 

It is planned to continue the Pan-pans 
again this year, though not as frequently 
as last. The Commission will meet 
e\ery two weeks, probabl\- at fn-e o'clock 
in Palmer Hall. 



Prof. G. E. Martin went to Pueblo, 
Tu.esday. to attend the National Irri- 
gation Congress. R. M, Copeland 
also went. 



Dr. Schneider will continue his talk 

to the men of the college on next 

:\lr'n(Iay morning at the tisnrd chaiie! 
hour. 



THE TIGER 



The Weekly Newspaperof Colorado Collei^e 

A. E BRYSON Editor-in-Chief 

S. WILKIE DEAN Business Manager 

Sam J. Shelton Assistant Editor 

Richard L. Hughes Assistant Editor 

T. Wynne Ross.- Athletic Editor 

Robert m. Copeland Engineering Editor 

Fred S, Baker Forestry Editor 

Helen Canon Alumni Editor 

Mamie C. Detmoyer Exchange Editor 

Edith I.. Summers Local Editor 

J. A. Root Local Editor 

Ray H. Sayre Assistant Manager 

E. E. Hedblom Assistant Manager 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to THE Tiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phones: Editor, Main 1975. Manager. Main 2073 

^sg^ggB-- - Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
^^Ss^^^^' Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



Wanted: Assistant Editors. 

There are at present two ^'acancies 
on The Tiger staff, which are to be 
filled as soon as desirable men are 
found til fill them. The vacancies are 
among the assistant editors and the 
qualifications for the position arc: 
willingness to work; alertness, and a 
knowledge of English "as she is writ." 
Applications for the position should 
be made in writing to E. W. Hille, 
president of the Advisory Board. 

Freshman Football. 

The lack of interest on the part of 
the freshmen in football has been 
((uite noticeable this year. While 
there have been two or more teams on 
the field every evening among the up- 
per classes, until recently there has 
ntjt been an entire team of freshmen 
out at any time. Perhaps the fresh- 
men are not to be blamed entirely for 
this seeming lack of interest, as no 
games have Ijeen arranged for them 
with the neighboring high schools. 
Since the freshmen are debarred from 
all ciillege games under the Confer- 
ence rules, it is only fair tliat some 
opportunity should be given them to 
meet a few opposing teams. There 
v.'ould be but little trouble encount- 
ered in arranging a few games with 
the near-by high schools, and as it 
!•: only by developing our material 
thi^ year that we can hope tn ha\e a 
good te.ani for ne.Kt yea:-, it would 
seem advisable that a greater interest 
should be aroused anmng the fresh- 
men by offering them a little more in- 
centive to get out and i)ractice. 



D. U. and the Conference 

-Present indications would seem to 
indicate that the turmoil and unpleas- 
antness of last year are to be repeated 
in the matter of the attitude of some 
of the institutions of the state toward 
the Athletic Conference. Denver Uni- 
\ersity in direct and knowing viola- 
tion to the constitution of the Con- 
ference scheduled a game with a non- 
conference institution without the 
sanction of the ofticers i.if the Confer- 
ence. The officers thereupon very 
justly asked Denver to cancel their 
game. Talk is now rife that the Uni- 
versity contemplates playing their 
game and withdrawing from the Con- 
ference. 

Colorado College has swallowed its 
bitter pill of Conference medicine and 
did it without howling or threatening 
to do an}' of the unwise things D. U. 
plans on doing. If a Conference is 
worth anything, and if a ruling is to 
have any force, the Conference must 
enforce its laws. The action of the 
University is to be deplored, coming 
at this time when the outlook was so 
good for a peaceful and clean year of 
athletics. 

College and the Outside World. 

A tendency that has been already 
mentioned several times this year, but 
which will bear repetition for empha- 
sis, is that of so binding one's self up 
in the affairs of college life as to for- 
get that there is an outside world. 
College life can become a very narrow 
and selfish life if one allows it to be- 
come so, — one can forget that he has 
certain obligations towards the state, 
the city, and to those who make it 
possible for him to be in college: he 
can become so absorbed in matters 
pertaining to the College as to neglect 
to read the newspapers and other 
periodicals, thus he forgets that there 
are elections taking place which may 
affect the public welfare and his own 
as well, he overlooks the fact that 
there are great ideas, and thoughts be- 
ing given utterance to every day. that 
.great inventions are being produced, 
that a hundred and one things are 
happening in the outside world which 
affect his own welfare and the lives of 
people generally.. To many students, 
the outcome of a diilicult mathemati- 
cal problem is of more consecpience 
than the outcome of the race for the 
governorship — such students are fall- 
ing into a habit of narrowness that is 
to be regretted. As one of the minis- 
ters of the city said recently, the 
townspeople need the influence of the 



college student just as much as the 
college student needs that of the 
townspeople; college students should 
never consider themselves as a class 
apart, but should .so mi.x up in the af- 
fairs and the life of the community as 
to take an active and influential part 
m these matters which affect the lives 
<jf everj'one. 

Anoth er Tiger Wins Laurels. 

Another Colorado College graduate, a 
football and baseball hero of days gone 
by, is now in line for one of the most 
important posts in the state. Ben Grif- 
fith, class of 1900, football and baseball 
captain in his last year and whose name 
was on every collegeman's tongue in the 
state, was nominated for attorney gen- 
eral of the state of Colorado Wednesday 
afternoon at the Republican state con- 
vention held in this cit.v. Grilifith is 
now living in Grand Junction where he 
has a flourishing legal practice and is 
considered a political power. He was 
one of the strongest advocates of the 
charter form of government which is 
now in force in that citv. 



DIRECTOR OF MUSEUM 

WRITES VALUABLE BOOK 



One of the most interesting and val- 
uable works ever produced by a Colo- 
rado writer has come from the press of 
G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, in 
"The Manniials of Colorado," by Ed- 
ward Royal Warren, S. B., director of 
the museum of Colorado College. Years 
of patient study are involved in the vol- 
ume, which is an account of the several 
species of mammal found within the 
boundaries of the state, together with a 
record of their habits and their distribu- 
tion. 

Three maps, and a full series of illus- 
trations reproduced from nature pho- 
tographs are contained in the book. 
These photographs are particularly note- 
worthy, as Professor Warren secured 
them from life. Many native Colo- 
radoans will be surprised to learn 
through Profesor Warren's work the 
numerous kinds of little hill and plain 
dwellers to be found in this state. 

Professor Warren displays a thorough 
knowledge of his subject and the volume 
will be of particular value to colleges, 
schools and libraries. Every .small ani- 
mal which makes its home in Colorado 
is described in detail, from the mountain 
lion to the hat. 



THE TIGER 



LARGEST CLASS YET 

IN SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 



The entering class in the School of 
Forestry is the largest there has been 
yet — a very gratifying fact, as it shows 
not only that it is a good place to 
gain a forestry education but also that 
all the agitation on conservation and 
forestry is bearing very material fruit, 
and is by no means merely talk and 
froth. It is hoped that fate will smile 
on this class and that more will be 
able to stay here than was the case 
with last year's class. 

Professor Coolidge has not yet been 
able to secure an assistant in his work. 
Such a person is a necessity, however, 
owing to the large number of separate 
courses that are taught. Although as- 
sistants of fair ability may be found, 
a man of the calibre needed for an in- 
stitution with such a reputation for 
scholarship as Colorado College, is 
difficult to find. Forestry is too new 
a science to have many experienced 
men in this country. 

Dean Sturgis to Resume a Part of 
His Work. 

Dr. Wm. C. Sturgis, Dean of the 
School of Forestry, who has been 
traveling in Europe for the last year, 
will be in Colorado Springs this win- 
ter. Just at present he is in the east 
attending a convention. He will prob- 
ably not take a very great amount of 
the work of the school personally but 
will doubtless do some of the instruc- 
tion in the subject of tree diseases. 
In this subject he is one of the fore- 
most authorities in this country. 
While he was abroad he sent to the 
School of Forestry a collection of 
fungi on bark and leaves as well as 
the woody parts of trees. These are 
of considerable aid in teaching the sub- 
ject, as in this dry region the number 
of species of fungi to be noticed are 
considerably fewer than in Europe or 
the moister parts of our own country. 



Field Work in Silviculture. 

In accordance with the general prac- 
tical nature of the work in the ScIktoI 
of Forestry, the class in silviculture 
is to go to Manitou Park, the field 
laboratory, on Tuesday, September 27, 
for a stay of a few days. The chief 
work to be done is the marking of the 
timber to be cut on the park this win- 
ter. Last spring the seniors made 
studies and determined the general, 
location and time of the cuttings and 
the silviculture class will make the 



actual clioice of the individual trees 
to ]jc cut on the stated tract. Proles- 
sor Coolidge will take charge iif the 
work. At present, the fir^t aim in 
timber marking is to get rid of rotten 
and diseased trees and those which 
are dying because of the crowding of 
their more vigorous neighbors. Some 
good sound trees judiciously selected 
have to be cut also, largely as a con- 
cession to the saw-mill owner, who 
would not find his work a paying 
proposition otherwise. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SHOPS 
APPOINTED. 

Mr. J. H. Arbuckle, a former student 
of the College, has been selected Super- 
intendent of the Mechanical Laborator- 
ies, to fill the vacancy caused by the 
resignation of Superintendent Collais. 
Mr. Arbuckle has for a long time been 
interested in mechanical work, taking all 
the manual training possilile in high 
school. He has also had a great deal 
of practical training with different steel 
and iron companies. IN-Ir. Arbuckle is 
certainly well qualified for his new po- 
sition, for in addition to his practical 
experience, he has had under Professor 
Collais two years special tr.iining bear- 
ing directly upon his new work, which 
has familiarized him with the methods 
ST successfully employed 1)\' the former 
superintendent. j\Ir. Arbuckle is very 
}oung to undertake so important a po- 
sition, but his training and industry 
insure his success. 



TREAT FOR COLLEGE PEOPLE. 

One of the most interesting discov- 
eries of late years has been that of 
coliir pliotography. It is now possi- 
ble to take photographs of flowers, 
landscapes, and in fact, of any object 
or scene, in the colors as they appear 
in nature. As yet the;e are few who 
have used the process to any great 
extent. One of these few who have 
been successful is Mr. McGinnis, of 
Denver. He has been engaged for 
some months in showing on the Or- 
pheum circuit scenes which he has 
taken in_ various parts of the United 
States. Those who have seen these 
slides say that thej' are the most re- 
markable pictures that they have ever 
seen, and that the colors are perfect. 
Paul de Longpre, the famous a tist 
of Hollywood, California, says that 
the copies of his paintings are perfect. 

The lecture has received enthusias- 



tic praise wherever it has been given, 
and the students of Colurado College 
slundd not miss seeing these views. 
A special rate has been made for stu- 
dents of the college. The general ad- 
mission is fifty cents, the student rate 
thirty-five. The lecture begins at 8 
o'clock, this evening, Perkins Hall. 



ALUMNUS TO ADDRESS MEN. 



It is seldom that college students 
ha\'e the pleasure and opportunity of 
hearing one of the alumni of their 
own Alma Mater tell of hi-> work in 
a mission land, and it is for this rea- 
son that we should Ijc dmdjly glad of 
the privilege of having W. M. N'ories, 
C. C. '04, in our city to adJre>-s the 
ma^s meeting of the College men on 
next Sunday afternoon, in Perkins 
Hall. Not only is Mr. ^^ories an 
alumnus of our college, but he is an 
alumnus who has "made good." The 
Y. M. C. A. work of Japan would not 
be today such a power were it not 
for the work that \'cries has been in- 
strumental in building up. 

Vories went out as a teacher in a 
government school in the province of 
Hachiman but. soon had organized a 
Bible class which before many months 
had grown into a real Y. M. C. A. or- 
ganization. Then it was that Vories 
was forced to give up the government 
position because of the opposition of 
the Buddhist priests. P.ut the associ- 
ation which he had started was kept 
ali^•c through his efforts, and has now- 
grown into a most flourishing work. 

Vories will tell on next Sunday 
afternnon of the five years he has 
spent in the island kingdom. Those 
who liave heard the story of these 
years of his life declare that it is one 
of the stories which though true 
are stranger thari fictiou and have a 
lasting influence on tl:e li\es rif those 
who jiear tiiem. 

It is hoped that all the men of the 
ciillege will be present at this meeting 
and help to make it one of the best 
of the series. The organ recital by 
Mr. Hille will start promptly at 3:30. 
This recital will be a treat to those 
wdio love good music. 



President and Mrs. Slocum gave a 
reception to the members of the fac- 
ulty of Colorado College and their 
families on Friday e\-ening. This was 
tende ed to ofi'er an opportunity for 
the older members of the staff to meet 
the new men, and it was very much 
enjoyetl by everyone. 



THE TIGER 

When man plucked his clothes from the branch of a fig tree 
he, no doubt, plucked the finest leaves on the branch. 
No two leaves are just alike. No two garments are just alike. 
Every clothier offers suits at $25, but every clothier has his 
own notion about values, some want more profit than others. 

Thousands of men are looking to us for the best they can afford, the best at their prices 
—the best at $15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 50 




ALUMNI NOTES 



Among those who are in attend- 
ance at the Denver University law 
school are T. D. Riggs '08, Fred Wil- 
lett '06, and S. L. Smith '09. 



Jimmjr F'sk '08 is city engineer of 
Grand Junction, Colo., and Sam Red- 
ding 08 is city engineer of Montrose, 
Colo. 



Carl R. Blackman '10 lias entered 
the freshman class of the medical 
at Boulder. He expects to take a four- 
year course. 



Charles Lorton Cox, a graduate of 
the Engineering School in mining en- 
gineering in 1906, was married recent- 
ly to Miss Rebecca R. Boswell, for- 
merly an instructor at the State Agri- 
cultural College. IMr. Cox was an in- 
structor at the Ag.icultural College 
also in 1908 and 1909, and it was here 
that their acquaintance began. 



Faith Skinner 'U9 resumes her posi- 
tion as teacher of German and English 
in the Eaton High school. 



Jane Skinner ex-'i2 is first grade as- 
sistant in Brownsville, Texas. 



Dorothe Haynes ex '12 will study 
nuisic this winter in New York City. 



Louise Strang '10 will substitute in 
the Denver schools this year. 



Maynie Scott '07 is attending the Y. 
W. C. A. Training school in Los Angeles. 



George Giblis '10 is doing depart- 
mental work in English in Canon City. 



Anna Lewis '10 was married on 
August tenth to James J. Cunningham. 
They will reside in Lovcland. 



Emma VVhiton '09 is teaching histor_\ in 
Centennial High school, Pueblo. 



Ada Brush 'U5 will spend the winter 
in California. 



Clara Jacolis ex '13 will be in Denver 
until Januarx- when she expects to lea\e 
for South America. 



Irene Fowler '08 spent the sunnner on 
the coast of Maine. 



Marguerite Seifried '10 will be in 
Georgetown this winter. 



Faith Cox '10 is assistant principal of 
the Georgetown High school. 



Reba Hood '10 is teaching in Empire. 



Irene Huse '10 is teaching in Bridgton, 
Maine. 



Mabel Sweeney ex '10 will travel 
abroad this year. 



Helen Laughlin ex '12 will attend 
Smith College. 



T. Ernest Nowels of the class of 1901 
is the father of a son, born last Wednes- 
day. Mr. and Mrs. Nowels live at 11 
North Eleventh street. Mr. Nowels is 
city editor on the Herald-Telegraph. 



Ethel Baer '09 is teaching in the Delta 
High school. 



Lina Brunner ex '09 will have a posi 
tion in the Colorado Springs schools. 



Mr. and Mrs. Roy M. McClintock 
have moved to Pueblo where Mr. Mc- 
Clintock '00 is connected with the Star- 
Journal. 



Mary McCreer\- '08 has gone to New 
York to attend the Y. W. C. A. Train- 
ing school. 



trip abroad and will resume her teaching, 
in the Grand Junction High school. 



Ethel Hall ex '11 has returned from a 
\ear abroad. 



Hazel Ela, ex '07 is teaching Latin in 
the Grand Junction High school. 



Ruth Bateman '10 is teaching in the 
Ordwav High school. 



Grace Trowbridge '08 attended the 
summer school at the LTniversitv of Wis- 



Learn Wireless and Railroad 

TelenrdnhV ' Shouage of fuHy 10,000 Oper- 

W "r^'J • ators on account of 8-hour law 
and extensive "wireless" development. We operate 
under direct supervision of Telegrapli OfBcials and 
positively place aM students when qualified . Write for 
catalogue NATIONAL TELEGRAPH INST., Cinci nati, 
Philadelphia, Memphis, Davenport, la., Columbia, S. C, 
Portia d, Ore. 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heatifg Co. 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 

DEXTER & HUDSON 

EXCHANGE BARBER 
SHOP 

Room 307, Third Floor 
Exchange Bank Building 



Nellie Scoot '03 has returned from a 



The Dentan 

Printing Company 

No. 9 So. Cascade Auenue 

FIRST-CLASS PRINTING 
at REASONABLE RATES 

Telepnone Main No. 602 



THE TIGER 




Young Men's Shoes 

That's our long suit. We make a specialty of having 
just what the young men like, those nobby effects, 
patterns that please. Be sure and see our Square Deal 
Shoe'^3.50 and $4.00. 



''Good Shoes, That's All" 

$3.50, $4.00, $5.00 



nX FOR EVERY FOOJ 




THE 

EAI 

HO EC 




AT DEAL S 



107 South Tejon Street. 



Deichmann & Douglas 
Floral Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER. Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 
Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 

To College 
Men and Women 
We Are Known as 
"The Satisfactory 
Jeweler". To 
New Ones We 
Soon Will Be. 

Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

"Satisfactory Jewelry 

Store" 



WE LOAN MONEY 

ON ALL VALUABLES 

Big line of new and unredeemed 
Drawing Instruments .'. Diamonds 
Watches and Jewelry ot all descrip- 
tions. Firearms and Fishing Tackle, 
Musical Instruments and hundreds 
of other articles 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 



CDHsin and is now teaching history in the 
Victor High school. 



Miss Berrynian ex '10 graduated from 
the State Normal last year and is teach- 
ing eighth grade in Cripple Creek. 



Earl Howbert '08 married Miss Sadie 
Pitman of Denver this summer. 



Ethel Gray '10 is teaching in the 
grades in Pueblo. 



Lloyd Reeks '08 is attending a school 
of osteopathy in Los Angeles. 



William Jackson ex '10, who graduated 
from Harvard last }-ear, has been around 
the campus. 



Stilwell Moore '08 will teach English 
in the Colorado Springs High school 
this vear. 



Ida Johnson '09 has a position in the 
Colorado Springs High school. 



Elizabeth Eraser ex '10 will graduate 
at Denver University this year, and is 
teaching English in The Preparatory 
School. 



Ethel Murray ex '10 has a grade posi- 
tion in the Denver schools. 

Julia Ingersoll '10 is teaching the fifth 
grade in the Myrtle Hill school in Den- 
ver. 



Harriet Spencer '10 and Effie Miller 
'10 have grade positions in Pueblo. 



Anna Strang '10 is teaching Latin and 
English in Centennial High school, 
Pueblo. 



Virginia Parker '10 and Mac Elrick 
'10 are teaching in the High school at 
Lafavette. 



Antlers 

Turkish Baths 

(Opposite Elks Club) 
Open Day and Night 

BATHS OF ALL KINDS. Also Chiro- 
pady and Swedish Massage. Treat- 
ment at Residence by Appointment. 

CARL J. WENBERG, Prop. 

Graduate Swedish Masseur 

Phone Red 33 (4 E. Bijou Street 



We Cater to the Par- 
ticular Men 

Those Who Appreciate 
Style and Quality 

A Trial Will Convince You 

10% Discount to Students 

THE MAY CO. 

23 North Tejon Street 

This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 

Company 




Headquarters for 

College Footwear 



10 



THE TIGER 



For Men Who Feel Young 

They're styled for yoiing men, built for young 
men, worn by young men 

SOCIETY BRAND CLOTHES 

are worthy of our highest praise and yours. See 
them, try them on and you'll be as enthusiastic as 
we are. Suits and overcoats $20 to |40. 



THE^IUB 



Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton-Rustk Home 

r\ • o No. 419 South El Paso St. 

Llairy a) Phone Main 442 



Photography 

In All Its Bj'a riches 

Clark 



112 South Tejon St. 
Special Discount to yj/l Students 

Shoe Repairing. Clothes Cleaned and Pressed. 
Seconii-Haitd Shoes a d Clothing 

J. H. PERKINS 



7 'AS. Cascade 



Colorado Springs 



PRATT, The Barber 

Is At 1 he Alta Vista Hotel 

He Solicits th«i Patronage of the 
College Boys 



BRIEFS 



Handbooks Still on Sale. — Secretary 
KirkiKitrick still has on hand a good 
many copies of the Hand-book. The 
Hand-book has in it a great deal of 
valuable information and is unusually 
well gotten up. Those who have not 
yet secured copies should do so at 
once. 



Faculty Reception. — President and 
Airs. Slocuni were at home to the fac- 
ultj' last Friday evening, at the pres- 
ident's home, 24 College place. 



Track Man Back. — Harry Black, a 
former student of the College, has en- 
tered the junior class. Black was a 
member of the Tiger track squad in 
1900 and will make a valuable addition 
to next year's already promising team. 



Separate Chapel Meetings. — Dr. 

Sclmeider addressed the men of the 
College at a meeting held in Perkins 
Hall last Monday morning. President 
Slocuni talked to the women at the 
same time in Cogswell theater. 



Smoker Postponed. — The smoker 
which the Hagermanhallites had 
planned for last Saturday night was 
postponed on account of the inability 
of the carpenters to finish the im- 
])r()venu-nts in the basement of the 
ilall. The smoker will take place Sat- 
urday night of this week. 



WINDOW SLEEPING TENTS 



THEOUT 


WEST 


TENT AND AWNING CO. 


1 13-2 NORTH TEJON STREET 





Phone 917 



GEO. R. BERGEN, 0. D. 

MANF'G OPTICIAN 
Eyes Tested 611-12 Exch. Nat. Bank BIdg. 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold; Rented 
and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing a Typewriter. The 
New No. 10 Model Has All Latest 
Improvements 

Zimmerman Supply 

Company 



22 E. Kiowa St. 
Phone Main 374 



Established 189 



Furniture, Furnishings 

For College Use 

The Fred S. Tucker 

Furniture Company 

106-108 North Tejon Street 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 



THE TIGER 



11 



Do You Know That Hughes Is Still at the Old Stand with a Finer 

Line of Cigars, Cigarettes, Pipes and Smokers ' Sundries Than 

Ever Before? If Not, Get Busy. You We Missing Something 

13 North Tejon Street 



Gel Your Picnic Supplies 

- = 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER. Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Notary Public 

A. J. LAWTON 

Real Estate, Loans and Insurance 
10>f E.Pike's Peak Ave. .Colorado Springs 

The Murray Drug Co. 

(Opposite Campus) 

K 




Films, Paper, Chemicals and Supplies. Develop- 
ing and Finishing for Amateurs 
'•Meet At Murray's" 



Y. M. C. A. on the Move.— The Col- 

• 

lege Y. 'W. C. A. will move shortly 
from its old location to larger and 
more commodious ([uavters at the 
north end of Hagerman Hall. The 
association will then have two rooms 
at its disposal and plans to use one of 
these as the secretary's office as be- 
fore and the other as a committee 
room. 



VanDyke Elected.— B. Hall Van- 
Dyke was elected to the Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet to fill the position of Ray 
Sayre, resigned, as chairman of the 
membership committee. 



Squabble Discussed. — Several mem- 
bers of the football team and upper 
classmen had a meeting with Dean 
Parsons last Monday night, when the 
D. U. matter was discussed. Student 
sentiment seems to be divided on the 
question of the right and wrong of the 
attitude taken by the College's repre- 
sentatives at the Conference. 



Change in Requisite. — By vote of 
the faculty, candidates for the -degree 
of A. B. are permitted to take either 
Econunncs i or Political Science 2 in 
fulfilment of the re(|uisite designated 
by the catalogue on page 28 as Eco- 
nomics I. 



Seniors to Have Distinctive Sky- 
pieces. — At a recent meeting of the 
seniors, a committee was appointed to 
recommend a hat which will serve as 
a means of distinguishing the digni- 
fied ones from the wise-looking fresh- 
men. 



Climb Mascot. — Eleven college 
men ascended Pike's Peak Saturday 
night and, with about thirty-five tour- 
ists, observed a fine sunrise. Kiteley 
reports having passed about thirty 
people while climbing the mascot. 



Harry Black '12 is a Kappa Sigma 
pledge. 



F0% THE 

Most Exclusive Millinery 



CALL ON 



Mme, M, D. Hillmer 

6 East Pike's Peak A-vettue 

Finest of Material and 
'Sest of IVorktnauship 



Phone Black 395 



Colorado Springs 



You Will Find our Store a Good Place to 
Visit When Looking; for College Supplies. 
In Loose Leaf Note Books, Drawing Mater- 
ials, Fountain Pens, We Excell. 

The Pike's Peak Book & Stationary Co. 

27-271 2 South Tejon Street Peone Black 35 4 




Watch the caps you meet. 

You won't need an intro- 
duction to the HEIDC AP. It 
is not a mere head covering. 
It has character. It gives 
character to its AVearer. It 
is made of exclusive English 
cap cloths. It is a thorough- 
bred. 

Try on a HEIDC AP. 



12 



THE TIG ]•] \i 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co. 
Groceries and 



Phone 687 



Manicuring for Gentlemen 



Meats 



e o e • • • 







115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



MUETH'S 

The Place Where the Stand- 
ard Is Never Lowered. High 
Class Goods at Reasonable 
Prices. Ice Cream, Hot 
and Cold Drinks. 

Lunches and Afternoon Teas 
Ask Any Old Student 

CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 

5 Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

THE 

Colorado Springs Floral 
Company 



Telephone Main 599 



104 N. Tejon St 



The D. Y. Butcher rug Co. 
DRUGS, KODAKS, SUPPLIES 

Free and Prompt Delivery 
Cor. Opposite P. 0. Phones 90 and 750 



Local Department || 




Tlios. Lynch and Arthur Sherry re- 
sumed their ci'llege work hist week. 

G. Ross Conklin and Charles Park- 
er, both of Delta and former students 
here, were visitors at the Phi Gamma 
Delta house last week. 



Loo'.<; out for the Kansas-Aggie 
game. It's to be the biggest thing of 
the season. 



Encourage the team by going down 
to see scrimmage practice in the even- 
nigs. Pl shows good spirit. 



Miss Loudoner '09 of Denver visited 
at th.e College for a few days. 



Invitations are out for Minerva's An- 
r.ual dance for the new girls, Saturday 
tx'ening. 



The Misses Crowley entertained at 
tea Wednesda\- afternoon. 



Miss Plall gave the first of her Wed- 
nesdav teas last week. 



Lillian Duer was elected treasurer of 
the Y. \V. C. A. to fill the vacancy made 
b}- the absence of Clara Wight. Alta 
Harris was made chairman of the affil- 
iated membership committee, and May 
Weir chairman of the missionary com- 
mittee. 



Margaret Watson spent the week end 
in Greelev. 



The Colorado Springs Alumnae of 
Hypatia entertained the active members 
at dinner Saturday evening at the home 
of Mrs. Henderson. After dinnev, 
dancing was enjoyed. 



Tht Misses Williams spent Sunday 
at their home in Pueblo. 



President Slocum and Mr. Busive took 
supper at P>eniis I'rida\' evening. 



Miss Loomis returned to College Mon- 
da,' morning. 



Laird .Anderson '10 is teaching in tlv 
San Luis school. 

Miss Inez: Piarclav and Miss Withcrell 



Miss R. E. Johnson 

Toilet Parlors 

Facial and Scalp Treatment with VIBRA- 
TOR, a Specialty 

Complete Line of Hair Goods 
324 N. Te on Street Colorado Springs 



JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 

Rates to College Students 

I Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Strce 



The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

Pays^ 4% Interest on Deposits and Gives 
Special Attention to Accounts of Students 

OFFtCERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, President Ira Harris, J'-PreuJtnt 

M. C. Gile VVm. F. Richards 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M. 



Mrs. Anna Bethman 

Hair Dressing Parlors 

Moles and Superfluous Hair Removed 

with Electricity. Hair Goods Made 

To Order a Specialty 

Phone Red 394 27 East Kiowa Street 

The College 

Book Store 

See our College Pen- 
nants, largest stock and 
latest designs. 

Be patriotic and deco- 
rate your rooms. 

WHITNEY and 
GRIMWOOD 

20 North Tejon St eet 



T TT E TIGER 



16 



PENNANTS 



Out West pennants are tlie 

talk of the town. 

Have you seen our window 

displays? 

Do so before you buy a 

pennant. 

Headquarters for College 

Supplies of all kinds. 



THE OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationary Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



12 S. Tejon .St. 



Colorado Springs 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



24 E. Kiowa St, 



Phone Main 536 



Phone Main 2055 



Art Needle Work 



THE HUNT & VAN NICE 
Art Specialty Store 

Stamping, Designing, Perforating, Linens, 
Lawns, Best Hand-Painted China 

8 Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs, Colo 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co. 



b.a\f returned to take up their wurk iii 
t-.e San Luis scliool. 



lisihcr Warner ex-'lO is a Kappa 
Kappa Ganriia pledge at Boulder. 



Ida Wolcott's niotiier spent Sunday 
with her. 



Mr. Brehant returned to College Mon- 
day, 



1 he young women living in the halls 
were entertained by tl;e Y. W. C. A. at 
three eourse spreads last Fridaj' evening. 



Jaek Carey '13 has been elected man- 
ager of the freshman football team and 
is busy scheduling games with the High 
sc!".ools of the state. 



Kenneth Heald returned Thursday 
and is once more hard at work on the 
foitliall field. 



Louis Decsz e.x; '11 visited the College 
Fridav. 



Allen True visited his sister, Kather- 
ne, Fridav. 



Eddie iMills, who attended Colorado 
College several years ago. but who after- 
wards went to Boulder, has been visiting 
here for the last week. He has spent 
considerable of his time coaching the 
second team. 



The Y. W. C. A. held a progressive 
spread F"riday night. 



Bert Siddors was in Denver over 
Fridav and Saturda\'. 



Eddie Hoover ex '10 visited the Kappa 
Sigma hocse Saturda\-. 



Several College people saw "The 
Spendthrift" at the opera house Satur- 
da.v night. 



"Shorty" Steele's father visited him 
Sundav. 



Fowley Hill is 1 ack in College and is 
registered in the Forestry school. 



Spanish 7 has been changed from one 
to two o'clock Fridays. 



Frank Pettibone '04 was a delegate to 
the Republican State Convention held 
here last week. 



b^arl Howbert married Raie Pitm;ui 
of Denver last August. 



Hunt Up 

BisselFs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Refail Dealers in 
Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



A ''Burgess Spread" 

Perhaps you Freshies don't know 
what that is; but to us old C. C. 
men it means much — very much. 
The finest delicatessen department, 
a superb bakery, a candy shop that 
possesses the essentials of purity and 
the added virtues of thorough work- 
mansiiip and artistic individuality. 
You'll be present this semester at more 
than one strictly "Burgess" function 

W. M Burgess— Grocer 

112-114 N. Tejon Street Phone 83 



FREE 



Shoe Repairing Absolutely Free 
of Charge for Entire Term of 
1910-1911 to the College Stu- 
dent Submitting the Best Ad for 

PETE'S 

Shoe Shop 

230 East Dale Street 

Men's Sewed Soles 75c; Ladies, 65c 
Rubber Heels, 35c 



14 



THE TIGEK 



$1.00 



$1.00 



Young Men 

For $1.00 per month, we sponge, press and do minor repairing on one 
suit, or one overcoat, or two pairs of trousers, each week; calling for 
and deliverieg same in our wardrobe, dustproof wagons. We claim 
to do the best work in the city. A trial from you will allow us to 
prove our claim. 

Special Prices Given to the Young Women of 
the College. Get Our Price List. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



Agents: Bert Siddons 
Glenn Bowers 




T. E. AIKEN 

Taxidermist, Furrier 

Dealer in Souvenirs and Novelties 
12 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

For Best and Quick Delivery 

SEE 

The Monument Coal Co. 

28 East Kiowa Street 



William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



THE 

Crissey ^ Fowler 
Lumber Co. 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Veimijo Ave. 



Chafinn; Dishes 



Tinware 



For a Square Deal 

A. S. BLAKE 

Is the Man to See 

107 Norlh Tcjon Phone 465 

Nickle Ware Cutlery 

Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



i*i'ench ^yers 
and Cleaners. 



Prof. Breaheaut has returned after his 
absence in the East where he has been 
engaoed in historical research work. 



Miss Gill3ert's sister 
lege Tuesday. 



.-isited the Cc 



Prof. Breitweiser is the proud father 
of a new baby. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



The opening night of the Pearsons 
literary Society will be held at the 
club house tomorrow evening at eight 
o'clock. All new men are invited. 



Tonight, Stanley McGinnis, of Den- 
ver, will deliver a lecture in Perkins 
Hall on the subject "Color Photog- 
raphy." The lecture will be illus- 
trated with numerous beautiful views 
of Mr. McGinnis' own selection. 

Mr. Vories, a graduate of Colorado 
College, who has been in Japan for 
several years, will address the men's 
mass meeting Sunday afternoon. A 
half-hour organ recital by Earl Hille 
will precede the address. 



Mr. Kirkpatrick would like to see any 
of the men of the College who are inter- 
ested in the prohibition movement. Mr. 
Warner of the Intercollegiate Prohibi- 
tion movement is to be at the College 
next week and it is hoped that confer- 
ences of those interested in the cause of 
prohibition may be arranged with Mi'. 
Warner. Please see Mr. Kirkpatrick as 
soon as possible. 

Special meetings of the Missionary 
committee of the Y. M. C. A. are to be 



Broken Lenses 



Phone Black 233 



Duplicated Colorado Souvenirs 

C. B. Lauterman 

Jeweler and Manufac- 
turing Optician 

121 N. TEJON STREET Colorado Springs 



10c STORE AND MORE! 

THE EMPORIUIVI 

1 10 S. TEJON STREET 



College Inn 

Freshmen!! 

Tiiis Is the Place for 

GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



Fine Watch Work 



Diamond Setting a Specialty 



H. E. Kapelke 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 
130 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

Grand Union Tea Co. 

Importers of Fine Teas and 
Coffees 

Phone Main 2678 220 N. Tejon St. 



On hand as usual 
but just a little better 
equipped for serving your 
needs — 



The 

WATERMAN 

PRESS 

PRINTERS and 
BINDERS 



THE TIGER 



15 



held the last part of the week or the 
first of next. The student volunteers 
of the College are also asked to meet on 
next Sunday afternoon after the Mass 
Meeting. The purpose of these meet- 
ings is to arrange for the program of 
the Third Annual Student Volunteer 
Conference of Colorado which is to be 
held in this city in November. Several 
prominent speakers" will be present at 
this time and it is. hoped that a number 

THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings 

'The College 


Bros. 

Favorite ' 


The Favorite Shopping 

Place for the College 

Woman 



/^- 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

U the plac* to go to get your barbar 
work and baths 



106^2 E. Pik«'» Peak Avo. 



Phone Main 700 



K^ Star 
^^[^ Laundry 

The College Laundry 

We give you 20% discount. You get the 
best finished laundry in the state and costs 
no more than the poorest. It does not tear 
the collars oi shirts. 

B. J. DICKSON, Agent 

W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



f SWEATER COATS 
of Quality 
$7.50 to $2.50 
GORTON'S 



THE SHOP 
MAKER 



UNDERWEAR 

Quality Only 

$5 to $1 the Suit 

GORTON'S 



=^ 



The new model for young men or any man who 
want a good figure, designed by Gorton's hand 
tailored, in exclusive patterns, is the best thing ever 
made. Many smart styles for young men. These 
suits and overcoats are hanging in our cabinets ready 
for your inspection. $35, $30, $25, $20, $18 

Specialists In Good Clothes 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 



^: 





E. Pike's Peak 
113 



Correct Dress for Men. ^ 



==^ 



of College students may take tbis oppor- 
tunity to learn of the actual working 
of the great missionary movements of 
the day. 'Those interested should watch 
the Tiger for further announcements. 



A LITERARY FEAST. 



119 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



Professor Motten Discourses on the 

Literary Viands of Colorado 

College. 

At a meeting of the student budy 
last Tuesday morning, when all were 
given a chance to subscribe for The 
Kinnikinnik, Professor Motten waxed 
eloquent on the literary feast that is 
served up piping hot to the students 
of Colorado College every year. Pro- 
fessor Motten made a strong plea for 
the student support of student publi- 
cations. He said_ in part that a sump- 
tuous banquet of literary viand's was 
offered to the student body, the "'feast' 
lasting the tlie entire year. First cornes 
the appetizer — the Handbook, small 
but essential; next the heavy course. 
The Tiger, absolutely essential to the 
welfare of the student body; the sea- 
son athletic tickets, though not"m~the 
same line, form a necessary adjunct, 
acing as pepper and salt for all that is 
being served. Next comes The Kin- 
nikinnik; this is not hash, but a tasty 
salad that is both palatable and neces- 
sary for the banciuet Finally, in 
May, the juniors bring forth the des- 
sert — The Nugget. 

To gain the best- results from such 
a repast, every course is necessary — 
from the 'appetizing- Ha'ndbook to the 
leave-a-good-taste-in-your-mouth Nug- 
get. Every student in the college is 
expected to partake freely. 



Dern's Freshly Roasted Coffee 

will make 10 more cups to the lb. 
than Eastern roasted coffee 



29 S. Tejon Street 



Phone 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 



Registered Medical Practitioneers 



Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence. 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 9E6 



The College 
Photo Studio 




<\s<i97nfw 




Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 

THE 

Gowdy-Simmons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS, ENGRAVERS 

21 N Tejon Street 



16 



THE TIGEK 



This is Suit Week at This ^^^ overcoat situation has been balanced 

New Store. A smashing strong showing to a nicety here, your size, your ideas as to 

now — all new patterns — 1910 models — every weight, pattern and style, and your purse are 

possible size. all considered in this showing. 

Beautiful, desirable garments every one 
there nationally advertised by the makers. $15.00 to $60.00 



8 N. Tejon Street 



(iWlum-Sfeecirer 6 



28 E. Pike's Peak 




Styles That Are 
Right 



Correct Styles for Young Ladies 

If the young lady comes here for Shoes she will find 
just the right style and fit, with quality and price 
right too. 



\f5>^WM 



SHOES THAT SATISFY 



Z% S.TeJON ST- 




Xpert Shoe 
Service 



^ 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



% 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 

Departments — College of Arts and 
Science, E. S. PARSONS, Dean. 

School of Engineering, F. CAJORI, Dean 
School of Forestry, W. C. STURGIS, Dean 
School of Music, E. D. HALE, Dean 



Maniiou Parl^ — Field Laboratory 
of the School of Forestry 



Headquarters for 

GATTERER 

216 N. Tejon Street 




Latest Designs in Imported 
and Domestic Browns and 
Coronation Colors :: :: 



107^ Discount to Students 



I 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF 

COLORADO COLLEGE 



Vol. XIII COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., OCTOBER 7, 1910 Number 4 



FAST 



CLASS 

GAME 



SOPHS WIN ANNUAL GAME 
BUT HAVE TO "PLAY BALL. 



Close and Exciting Game — Several 

Stars — Gives Idea of What New 

Game is Like. 



raced across the line with it. The 
forward pass attempts by the sopho- 
mores, the majority of which proved 
to be absolute failures, caused the 
1913 aggregation to become a little 
groggy in certain plays and had 
straight football been resorted to en- 
tirel}-, the score might have been dif- 
ferent. The freshmen played a good 

Continued on Page 5 



BARBECUE 
WITHOUT 
BONFIRE 



NEW FEATURES PROMISED TO 
TAKE PLACE OF FIRE. 



Freshmen 3, sophomores 9. This 
tells the score of the freshman-sopho- 
more game on Washburn Field last 
Saturday, but it gives but a little in- 
formation regarding the fierceness of 
the battle, the classy game which the 
freshmen put up and the new rule ef- 
fects of the grand old game. The 
freshmen played better football than 
the sophomores during the first two 
quarters but their score was tlie re- 
sult of a fluke, a misplaced forward 
pass, gobbled up by Jacobs, who 



COBURN GROWING 

MANY BOOKS ADDED TO THE 
LIBRARY. 



Insurance Companies Complain — End 
of Old Tradition— Up to Sophs to 
Provide a Substitute. 



Coburn Library this summer re- 
ceived a valuable gift in the shape of 
a total of five hundred eighty-eight 
assorted volumes. It was made in 
the name of the late Judge Nash nf 
Leadville, a brother of Miss Nash, the 
matron of Ticknor Hall, and father of 
Harold" Nash class of '04, and of Per- 

Continued on Page S. 



This year's barbecue will be lacking 
in one of the features that has made 
the Ijarbecues of the past so enjoy- 
able — the bonfire. This decision was 
reached at a meeting of the sopho- 
more class last Tuesday when the 
matter was presented to the class by 
i\Ianager I^ynch and the tradition of 
long standing was voted to be discon- 
tinued. 

Each year the fire has been bigger 
than ever before and the success of 

Continued on Page 3. 







^<5n"-^V- 



GIRL SOCIETIES PLEDGE DAY. 

Saturday an Exciting Time — First 
Pledges Under the New System. 

Excitement was in the air last Satin- 
day wlitn the bids came out for the 
girls' societies, excitement and ex- 
lectancy, not r.lone to see who would 
Ije the chosen few but also to see what 
\\ould be the outcome of the new rul- 
ings concerning membersliip in the 
girls' societies. 

Under the new rules membership is 
conhrjed to the three upper classes, a 
recpiired amnunt nf wor'-; mu^t be 
passed, and girls' student government 
supported, also a young woman can 
recei\ e only one invitation to become 
.'I mL'mbcr during her college course. 
.\n intersociety council meets at 
pletlge time and the different societies 
make their choices in rotation, one 
society getting first choice one year 
and another the second year. The 
pledges are as follows: 
Minerva. 

Cora Kampf, June .Musser, Marion 
Haines, Martha Phillips, Octavia Hall, 
and Mary Walsh. 

Contemporary, 

jMarian Fezer, Katheriue More- 
house, Florence Pierson, Dorothy 
Stott, Katherine True and Charlotte 
Eversole. 

Hypatia. 

Lillian Bateman, Letitia Lamb, Car- 
rie Burger, iMattie Lendrum. 



PAN-HELLENIC MEETING. 



Officers Elected— Many Plans Dis- 
cussed. 

At the first regular meeting of the 
Pan-Flellenic Council, the interfra- 
ternity organization of Colorado Col- 
lege, officers were elected for the en- 
suing year and several plans discussed 
bearing on the fraternity life of the 
College. The oificers elected were: 

President — Dr. Plorian Cajori. 

Vice-president — A. E. Bryson. 

Secretary-treasurer — E. B. Fowler. 

Among other things it is probable 
tliat an exchange of members of the 
different fraternities for one meal 
every two weeks will be effected. In 
this manner, each fraternity will send 
Dut two or three men to each other 
fraternity, thus leaving about half the 
chapter to act as hosts to the visiting 
Greeks. The plan, if adopted, will 
result in ,i much closer interfraternity 
feeling and cannot help but assist in 
unifying the men of the College. 



THE TIGER 



GEOLOGISTS PLAN TRIPS. 



^Members of the class in Geology I 
under Dr. Finlay, took an enjoyable 
tramp through Williams Canon last 
Saturday morning. The rock forma- 
tions of the canon were studied and 
an elementary knowdedge gained of 
instruments and methods used in geo- 
logic work. 

The class plans many such field ex- 
peditions during the course of the 
year and on October the fifteenth will 
explore the Cave of the Winds, 
through the generosity of its manager. 
Later, Pike's Peak will be scaled and 
its geologic attractions studied. 

Colorado College is particularly for- 
tunate in its location for study along 
geologic lines, the actual results can 
be studied at close range and the prac- 
tical field work substituted for the 
more or less unsatisfactory text-book 
work. 



FRESHMAN CAPS. 



\'au Stone, president of the Student 
Body, says that the freshman caps 
will be here in a few daj'S, and that 
iminediately upon their arrival, the 
new rules will go into effect. It be- 
hooves every freshman to show his 
spirit and provide himself with this 
distinctive piece of headgear. 



JUNIORS ENTERTAINED 



Last Tuesday evening President 
and Mrs. Slocum were at home to the 
junior class. Nearly all the members 
of the class were present, and a very 
enjoyable evening was spent. Pro- 
fessor Breitweiser, the new class offi- 
cer, was present and seemed well sat- 
isfied with his charges. Mrs. Bushee 
and Mrs. Howe assisted in serving re- 
freshments. 

COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY. 



Large Crowd Hears of Recent Dis- 
covery. 



Last Thursday night, Mr. Stanley 
McGinnis of Denver delivered an in- 
teresting lecture on the new photo- 
grapliic science, color photography, 
.'^fter a clear and interesting exposi- 
tion of the history of the art, for it is 
an art, he showed a large number of 
beautiful films of his selection. Tlie 
films included views in the Yellow- 
stone • National Park, California, The 
Grand Canon and many taken in Col- 
orado, Mr. McGinnis is a Colorado 



man and showed his loyalty to the 
state throughout his lecture. His 
field is new but a very promising one 
and full of possibilities. A large 
crowd was present to show their in- 
terest and appreciation. 



1 



SEMINAR SUBJECTS. 



Senior Philosophy Subjects Given 
" Out. 

Dr. Slocum recently gave out the 
seminar subjects for his phisosophy 
class. The seniors are given thei;- 
choice of the list and a few of the 
seminars are to be given every Fri- 
day. Following are the subjects: 
Idealism. Materialism. Evolution, 
Pessimism, Agnosticism, Heathenism, 
Mysticism, Freedom of the Will, 
Reign of I^aw, Pantheism, Positivism, 
Skepticism, Pragmatism, LTtilitarian- 
ism, Rationalism, ITnity nf the Scien- 
ces, Philosophic Basis for Faith in 
God, Dualism, Origin of Ideas, 
Causality, Certainty versus Relativ- 
ity, Innate Ideas, Force and iMotion 
as an explanaticn for the Origin < f 
Things, God as the First Great Cause, 

GLEE CLUB STARTS WORK. 



Tryouts have been held for the var- 
ious positions on the men's glee club, 
but so far no selections have been 
made. There is an abundance of 
freshman material and the prospects 
are that we will have a good club this 
year. More tryouts will be held this 
week, and the personnel of the club 
will be known next weeek. 

The plans of the club have not been 
given out yet, but it is expected that 
an extensive state trip will be taken 
either during the Christmas holidays 
or during spring vacation. 



A COURSE IN MAGAZINE 
WRITING. 

An evening course in magazine 
writing will be one of the subjects 
offered this year by the University of 
Chicago through University College. 
The course is devised to meet the 
needs of those who desire to enter 
upon v^'riting for magazines or journ- 
als as a profession, and will embrace 
drill in the writing of reviews, edi- 
torials and special articles, but will 
not cover instruction in "short-stor}'" 
writing. The course will include two 
meetings a week of two hours each, 
throughout the Autumn Quarter. 



THE TIGER 



WORD FROM EWING, 



Word has just been received from 
Harry Ewing that the work in the 
Un-ivcrsity Association over which he 
lias cha,rge is progressing finely. At 
the time of writing the card, prepara- 
tions were being made for the visit of 
Mr. E. T. Colton. It is wonderful, 
s;i\'s Ewing, how the young men are 
getting luider the work. 

Mr. Colton will be at Colorado Col- 
lege some time soon, just after his 
return from our sister continent. He 
will bring up a great deal of informa- 
tion about Dur work in the Univer- 
sity of Buenos Aires and about our 
representative there. Mr. Evvald, 
who was the p.'edecessor of Ewing, 
is also to be present at the State 
Student \''olunteer Conference which 
meets here November 4-6. 

The report of the treasurer of the 
PZwing fund, Mr. Hesler, shows that 
of the pledges last year all but $50 
have been paid, making a total to date 
of $470 received from students and 
friends. As will be remembered the 
amount raised last year was only $500, 
due to the fact that Ewing went to 
the field in the middle of the year. 



GOOD OUTLOOK IN MUSIC 
SCHOOL. 



Dean Hale reports that the music 

. school is in better condition than ever 

before. It already has the largest 

attendance in its history and students 

are still coming in. 

A special feature of the work this 
year will be the use of Dean Hale's 
own text-book in techni^que and com- 
position, and the reference work in 
other standard texts. 

The regular weekly student's re- 
hearsals to be be held at five o'clock 
each Thursday begin today, and re- 
citals will follow as material is de- 
veloped. 



ORGAN RECITAL BY HILLE. 



Good music is never lacking at the 
Men's Sunday afternoon mass meet- 
ings. It is to be regretted, however, 
that more of the young men of the 
College do not take advantage of the 
opportunity to enjoy these splendid 
programs. Last Sunday afternoon, 
immediately preceeding the address 
by ?\[r. Vories, Mr. Hille gave an 
organ recital, rendering the following 
program: 



1. Catilene Dubois 

2. Pilgrim's Chorus (from Tann- 
hauser) Wagner 

3. (a) Melody in D flat St. Clair 

(b) Meditation St. Clair 

4. (a) Gavotte(from Mignon) .... 

Thomas 

(b) Serenade Vanderpool 

5. Tocatta Dubois 



CUTLER OPENS. 



MR. VAN DEN AREND LEC- 
TURES. 



Tells How Beautiful Cities Look and 
Where They are Found. 



The subject of City Planning was 
put in new light before the people of 
Colorado Springs im Monilay night 
at Perkins. There, Mr. Van Den 
Arend showed many examples of the 
street effects that are accepted as the 
best of Europe and there were few 
other sides shown and approved ex- 
cept our own Pike's Peak looking 
west. 

In general, he classified street ar- 
rangement as rectangular or radial. 
The advantages of the first form were 
tori few to notice and the chief dis- 
advantage appeared to be that short 
cuts are at a minimum, that a street 
stretched on and on indefinitely and 
monotonously, and, that "street vis- 
tas" were a rarity. 

It was evident from the pictures 
that the "street vista" was desirable 
and that streets were more interest- 
ing when a walk of a few blocks was 
enough to bring a new view. Mr. 
Van Den Arend conceded that the 
tendency of fast traffic in business 
district was toward the straight street, 
but he urged that the private citizen 
should make it his business to see that 
streets, whether long or short, were 
made beautiful by trees and flowers 
and by buildings of residence or civic 
importance of a type of architecture 
and a quality of materials that would 
be a source of satisfaction, not only 
to the present occupant, but also to 
their successors. 

It is evident that such people as 
students, who are more or less famil- 
iar with pictures and arrangements of 
beautiful cities should take some 
thought of their own opportunities to 
influence public opinion on parks and 
playgrounds or on paved streets and 
underground wires. Here is a field 
that is too open to cause any fear of 
wasted effort. 



Cutler Academy opened Monday, 
.September 26, with an enrollment of 
ab(jut roo, which is larger than usual. 
-All of last year's instructors are back 
and the work is progressing favorably. 

This summer, the building was 
thoroughly overhiiuled and many re- 
pairs made. The chemical laborator- 
ies were improved and put in excellent 
condition. The building is now in 
the best condition that it ever has 
been. 

The .Academy will not have a foot- 
ball team this year on account of the 
late opening of school. There is 
plenty of baseball material, however, 
and next spring Cutler will keep up 
her reputation oi ha\ing a winning 
baseball team. 



BARBECUE WITHOUT BONFIRE 

Continued from Page 1. 

the barbecue has been, in a large de- 
gree, measured by the size of the pile. 
The 'fire has necessitated an immense 
amount of work on the part of the 
sophs and weeks were spent in prep- 
aration of the big pile — chicken coops, 
doll houses, gates and everything else 
loose and combustible went to build 
up the biggest fire ever. But all this 
is over and a new feature must be 
provided by this year's class to take 
the place of the old. 

The discontinuance of the fire is 
not a voluntary move on the part of 
the sophs, but a course made neces- 
sary by the companies which carry 
the insurance on the College build- 
ings. The bonfire has always been 
held on Washburn Field and since the 
completion of Bemis H'all, th'e danger 
of fire has been greatly increased ow- 
ing to its closeness to the field. The 
alternative was offered the sophs of 
using the middle of Washburn, thus 
taking the fire further away from the 
buildings. However, this was prac- 
tically impossible as the field would 
be in constant use and no preparation 
could be made until the day of the 
barbecue. This would be too short 
a time to prepare a pile of any size. 

The sophs promise to divert their 
labors from this feature to other and 
new ones so that this year's barbecue 
will undoubtedly be up to the former 
standards and many new features in- 
troduced. Meanwhile the old timers 
are lamenting the passing of a tradi- 
tion of many years' standing. 



THE TIGER 




REASONS WHY THE TIGERS 
SHOULD BE WINNERS. 



Washburn Field is the scene of real 
enthusiasm, coupled with an interest. 

Twenty-seven eligible men, all sub- 
stantial material ready for pisitions. 

COACH ROTHGEB. 

Experienced men in the line and 
l:)eliind it. 

Two sets of ends and probably 
halves. 

Work and more of it is being ac- 
complished. 

The men are keeping in training. 

Van Stone can punt and drop kick 
better than any man in Colorado to- 
day. 

Captain Vandemoer speedy and a 
sure handler oi the elusive forward 
pass. 

Old men lor the line — Sinton, Hed- 
blom, Thompson, Cook; Old men for 
backs — Vandi', Heald, Putnam. 

New men for line — Briwers, With- 
erow, Whipple, Haight, Terrill, J. 
Sinton, Black; New men for back 
field — Dickson, Acker, Reed, Van 
Stone, Jardine. 



Loyalty. 

Again those season tickets. 

Buy one (two if possible or neces- 
sary) and become a material as well 
as sentimental booster. It's neces- 
sary. 



Tennis. 

The whang of the ball against the 
racket and the ejaculations of the 
players are resounding through the 
courts of the tennis association. 
Members are needed. Join and go 
in . for the tournament. Tennis is 
more popular in College now than 
ever before. The committee will 
create a permanent organization soon 
and plans for the tourney will be 
completed. The committee is com- 
posed of F'owlcr, Clifford, Miss True, 
E. Jackson. 



Mines are Defeated by Freshmen. 

The miners from Golden, Ho. went 
di wn in defeat before the freshmen of 
that school Saturday by a score of 6 
I" S i'l a hard fought gc\mc. Si,gns 
were shown that promise but small 
things from the Miners this year. The 



line was weak, the offense poor and 
the forward pass almost a failure. 



The freshmen from the University 
of Colorado defeated North Denver 
High by a score of 2j, to o Saturday. 
Things look good for those freshmen 
at the university. They are arrang- 
ing' a regular schedule and may play 
the Terrors here in a few weeks. 



Will Marquette Sue? 

Information of a shady source says 
that the Marquette team will sue the 
Denver team and the Colorado Con- 
ference because the game with that 
team had been called off regardless 
of a contract which would mean a 
financial loss of $ioo as well as some 
pride as to the conduct of athletics 
in that school. Denver has an- 

nounced that the game will be can- 
celled as called for by the conference. 
It probably will. The decision will 
be recei\'ed in a few days. 



U. of C. Plays Poor Game with Preps. 

Although the Prep team was de- 
feated by the 'varsity by a score of 
20 to at Boulder last Saturday, Fol- 
som stated that his Silver and Gold- 
ites play about as poor a game of 
football as he ever saw in Colorado, 
and allowed the weaker Prep aggre- 
gation to go through the line time and 
again. JMcFadden, who will probab- 
ly be barred from conference games, 
was the chief Boulder luminary. U. 
of C. is not overly joyous over the 
way things are going and the mater- 
i'al wdiich is showing up for the team 
dees not look promising. 



Basketball. 

.\lthough a little early, there is 
some good news in the air for basket- 
ball enthusiasts of the College and 
this consists of the great probability 
of a College basketball team during 
the season from December i to 
March I. .A.thletic Director Roth- 
,geb has sjjoken very favorably regard- 
ing the matter and is anxious to put 
a team in the field. Efforts will be 
"re;ill}' made" this year to secure 
'quarters for practice and the games, 
.^.n inter-fraternity league last winter 



started enthusiasm in the sport and 
there are about twenty experienced 
and excellent players in the College 
who wish to play. 



Many Injuries in East. 

A surprising number of early season 
injuries in eastern college teams have 
been reported during the last week. 
Whether the new rules with the open 
play and fierce attack is the cause or 
not the coaches will not decide, but 
the way things look the new regula- 
tions do not lessen the danger in the 
playing. Colorado teams have dem- 
onstrated that fact. 



The annual contest between the 
Tigers and the C. S. High school will 
occur Saturday afternoon on Wash- 
burn Field. The Terrors have been 
easy marks in the practice settos but 
Coffin's stars look better than for 
some time. The game will show up 
all the players of the College and will 
be watched eagerly for a good inter- 
pretation of the new regulations of 
the game. 



D. U.— MARQUETTE GAME. 

Denver Willing to Cancel Game- 
Marquette Objects. 



The D. U. -Marquette matter still 
remains somewhat unsettled and 
whether or not the game will be 
played and a Conference fight started 
still remains to be seen. D. U. has 
taken a commendable stand in show- 
ing its willingness and desire to can-- 
eel the game, but not so with Mar- 
quette. Marquette expects to meet 
other teams on its western trip and 
claims that the cancellation of the 
D. U. game will cause the financial 
failure of the trip. They also resent 
the charges brought against them, 
and have even threatened to sue the 
conference officials for libel. How^ever. 
there has been the usual newspaper 
sensationalism about the matter which, 
probably will be quietly- and peacefully 
settled by calling off the game. 



"Shorty" Steele, who was injured in 
football practice, is able to be about 
the Campus again. 



THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 



HOSPITAL LIST GROWS. 
Here. 

Gene Steele, the popular guard and 
sure candidate for tackle, was in the 
Glockner hospital for two days with 
a crushed jaw bone, which has slight- 
ly affected his eyesight by the pres- 
sure on the nerves. The accident 
was received last Wednesday in prac- 
tice and certainly bars Shorty for 
the remainder of the season and liis 




"SHORTY STEELE" 

College term. Steele has the sympa- 
thies of the entire College, and the 
gym was not any too cheerful when 
the word was received as to the ex- 
tent of the injuries. Acker was out 
for three days with a badly wrenched 
knee, Putnam is recovering from sev- 
eral injuries and Sinton has a painful 
bone bruise on his left shoulder which 
may hinder his work considerably. 



At Denver U. 

Captain \'olk out of game for sea- 
son with badly wrenched knee. Can- 
not play this season whatever. 
Schroeder not in college for football. 
Will not play. Only twelve eligible 
men out for practice. Koehler is 
certainly having hard luck. Green, 
center, elected captain for season. 



Mines. 

Coach Steward disappointed at 
showing made by 'varsity. Captain 
Douglas, and Newman, halfback, out 
with minor injuries. Will not play 
for a week. Capt. Spring of igog 
helping Stewart, who hints that he 
will change things a great deal. 
Charges Miners with indifference. 



Aggies. 

Harry Shipman, freshman, frac- 
tured a vertebra -near his neck. Dan- 
gerous condition and will never play 
game again. Coach Cassidy has a 
large amount of material, but only 
fifteen eligible men. Light team bu! 
a chance for speed. 



Boulder. 

Stockner injured with wrenched 
neck. May be out of first few 

games. McFadden's eligibility 

shady. Probably jiot able to play. 
No linemen except Capt. O'Brien. 
Folsom evidently worried, and reports 
from real sources state t'.iat things 
look poor at the Silver and Gold camp 
now. Wightman and lioroman, 

good men, are injured. 



FAST CLASS GAME 

Continued from Page 1 

forward pass game and the igi4 team 
for a time looked like winners, but 
experience and weight proved too 
much. 

The sophs first scored in the third 
quarter on a pretty kick from place- 
ment on the 25 yard line by Joe Sin- 
ton, but the latter missed two more 
such kicks later in the game. The 
next score was made by pushing the 
ball up the field by line plunges, Ben- 
jamin being the stellar pe.former ir. 
this game. Bowers scored the touch- 
down (in a fake line plunge, going 
around right end. Sinton kicked 

goal. 

The feature of the game was the 
work of five players. Flerron, Jac- 
obs and Howland for the fresh and 
Benjamin and LeClere for the sophs. 
The little quarter of the freshmen, 
Herron, was in eve;-y play and his 
accurate handling of punts. and 
smashing tackles brought forth much 
admiration from the witnesses of the 
game. Jacobs, the husky full back, 
played a grand game, being in eve -y 
play and using headwork which looks 
good for the '\arsity. Howland, the 
South Denver end. smashed up more 
soi)h plays than any other player on 
the fresh team. He showed a lar,ge 
quantity of nerve and ability. Ben- 
jamin, the soph star, was their chief 
ground gainer and his work was a 
little too much for the new ones. His 
method of plunging and end runs has 



a tingle of real football. LeClere, 
the soph tackle, was in several plays 
and played consistent football 
throughout. 

The game showed cinisiderable of 
what will happen under the new rules 
and the four (juarter proposition was 
received by both spectators and 
players with enthusiasm. The open 
play, especially regarding the tack- 
ling of men after punts and the new 
rules regarding forward passes proved 
to be efticient and will undoubtedly 
prevent n:ucli of the injury of last 
year. No plan's of especial brilliancy 
were executed. 

The teams lined up as follows: 
Sophs. Fresh. 

Bowers, qb H err( n, qb 

Floyd, fb Jacobs, fb 

Ben-jamin. rh Gettes, rh 

Welkr, Ih Slocy, Ih 

Withcruw, c ...Sanderson, Ogilbee, c 

Aloberg, rg Summers, rg 

Shaw, Ig Harder, Ig 

LeClere, It Koch, It 

Cook, rt , Winans, Cameron, rt 

Sinton, re Carjf, Flowland, re 

Root, le Jackson, le 

Cary acted as referee, and Van 
Stone as umpire. Coach Rothgeb 
kept time and tab. 



EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITY 
FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS. 



Colorado Springs Musical Club to 

Bring Noted Musical Talent to 

This City. 



In line with the policy adopted at the 
annual meeting several months ago, the 
Colorado Springs Musical Club will 
bring some of the best artists in the 
musical world to this city during the 
coming season. 

Kocian, a Bohemian violinist, who has 
but recently come to the notice of the 
world as an artist, will be one of the 
early attractions. Others will lie; Ger- 
ville-Reache, principal contralto in the 
Metropolitan opera house. New York, 
and Gogorza, the Spanish baritone, who 
will give a joint recital and Josef Flof- 
man, known the world over for his ex- 
quisite execution on piano. 

Tt is probable that special arrange- 
ments will be made wherein- the College 
students can attend these concerts at a 
special rate as has been done in the 
past. 



THE TIGER 



Tha Waekly Newspaperof Colorado College 

A. E BRYSON Edttor-ln-Chlef 

S. WILKIE DEAN Business Manaifer 

Sam J. Shelton Assistant Editor 

Richard L. Hughes Assistant Editor 

T. Wynne Ross Athletic Editor 

Robert m. Copeland Engineering Editor 

F« D S. Baker Forestry Editor 

He, en Canon Alumni Editor 

Mamie C. Detmoyer Exchange Editor 

Edith L. Summers Local Editor 

J. A. Root Local Editor 

Ray H. Savbe Assistant Manager 

E. E. Hedblom Assistant Manager 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

trticlci and items to TheTiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address ill communications to THE TIGER, Colorad* 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phones; Editor, Main 1975. Manager, Main 2073 

it.'^Sr'^T'M kJ '^ Entered at tht postoflice it Colorado 
' "^Jiaiy" Springs, Colo., as second-clais matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



Support Griffith. 

Colorado College alumni, former 
stutJents, and students in the College 
have an opportunity to demonstrate 
their loyalty in a somewhat different 
way from the ordinary loj'alty shown 
on the football field and support of 
other representative of the College, 
but m no less tangible or effective 
way — namely the support of an alum- 
nus who has made good, and in re- 
flecting credit on his Alma Mater — 
Ben Griffith. Griffith is the nominee 
on the Republican ticket for the posi- 
tion of Attorney General of the state. 
Those who know him, know that he 
is a man who will do his work as it 
should be done, that he has no alle- 
giance to a man "higher up," and 
that his work will be conscientiously 
and hoiiestly done if he is elected to 
the position. The present week is 
registration week, and every student 
should avail himself of the opportun- 
ity s(i that when election day comes, 
he will be able to cast a /vote for 
clean politics and incidentally boost 
the College by boosting an alumnus. 

Season Tickets. 

Manager Fowler reports that the 
sale of season tickets has been very 
light. It would hardly seem neces- 
sary to urge every student to ex- 
change two dollars for three, yet this 
seems to be the situation regarding 
the season tickets. 

It goes without saying that every 
-ludent . in the College will attend 



every home game — and some away 
from home, too, it is hoped. This 
v\ill cost three dollars unless the 
season ticket is bought, and Mana- 
ger Fowler says that no concession 
will be made to those wdio have not 
bought the season ticket, but that 
they will have to pay the regular gate 
charges. Help the Athletic Associa- 
tion by helping yourself. 

"A Stitch in Time." 

On Saturday of this week, the 
Tigers begin their football season 
when they meet the local High school 
Terrors. One week later the Uni- 
ve^'sity of Wyoming will invade our 
territorj' and every week follow- 
ing up to Thanksgiving, the merits of 
the Tigers are to be tested against 
teams that are hungering for Tiger 
meat. The time has passed when an 
appeal for loyalty or student support 
is necessary through these columns 
or any other medium — the spirit is 
here and simply needs awakening and 
developing. All this preparatory 

to the statement that it is necessary 
for every student to begin to learn — 
if he has not already done so — the 
songs and yells of the College. 
There will, no doubt, be yell prac- 
tices held soon and every student 
should go to these prepared to take an 
active part in them. Better yet, he 
should write a few new and better 
ones if he has ability along those 
lines. 

During the past two years, Colo- 
rado College has developed an envi- 
able reputation for spirit and support 
of teams. The beginnings of this 
year show clearly that another year 
of the same kind of loyalty is start- 
ing, but it must be even better than 
those that have gone before. Inci- 
dentally, after you have bought your 
season ticket, it might be well to 
start saving your loose change so as 
to attend that Tiger-Boulder game in 
Boulder on November twelfth. 

Literary Socities. 

Colorado College has three literary 
societies. They have been doing a 
good work in the past and indications 
seem to point to another successful 
year. A noticeable and unfortunate 
tendency, however, is the withdrawal 
of the interest and participation of 
the fraternity men in these organiza- 
tions. It was prophesied that this 
would be the case — it is not true yet, 
but the tendencj' is apparent. It is 



to be In jjed that the tendency will be 
overcome and that the fraternity men 
will continue to support these organ- 
izations that form so impnrtant a part 
in the life of the College. The week- 
ly meetings fnrm one of the best com- 
mon meeting places that we have — 
here men of different fraternities, f.-a- 
ternity and non-fraternity men mix 
and work together for a common pur- 
pose. The loyalty to the literary 
societies has been one of their dis- 
tinctive features and wheii men who 
ordinarily do not see much of one 
another, get together and boost for 
a common purpose, it is certain to 
bring them closer together. The 
literary societies, aside from their 
primary purpose — that of development 
along literary and debating lines — are 
too good a "melting-pot" and too 
good a common meeting ground to 
allow them to lose the support of all 
the men of the College. ■ 



VORIES TELLS OF HIS WORK. 



C. C. Alumnus Doing Splendid Work 
in Japan. 



In 1904, Mr. William M. Vories grad- 
uated from Colorado College, and the 
next year he went to the interior of 
Japan with the intention of making his 
way by teaching, and doing pioneer 
missionary work. In Hachiman, a 
town with a population of about 6,000 
and where Christianity was practically 
unknown, there was a place waiting for 
him in one of the leading academies. 
Here, under the discouraging prediction 
of the missionary leaders in Japan that 
he would see no results within two 
years, Mr. Vories began his work. 

Speaking to the men of his Alma 
Mater in Perkins Hall Sunday after- 
noon, Vories told how he came to go to 
Japan and discussed in a very interest- 
ing manner the results of his work in 
those foreign islands. 

When Mr. Vories reached the scene 
of his labors, he found himself on a se- 
cluded island inhabited by thousands of 
people heretofore untouched by Chris- 
tian iuHuences. He knew no Japanese 
and the people were not in sympathy 
with him; he was the only American 
within a radius of thirty miles. He 
found the students of the academy al- 
ready studying English, and, as they 
were very desirous of learning to 
speak it conversationally, he had a 
splendid opportunity to become in- 
timately acquainted with main- of 
them. lie began to invite them to 



THE TIGER 



his home and to entertain them by 
teaching them American games and 
showing tlicm post card views of 
America. This gave him an oppor- 
tunity to study them and select the 
leaders. He was soon able to inter- 
est them in Bible study, and by the 
end of the first year he had four class- 
es with a total membership of over 
300. In a short time Vories had organ- 
ized a Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation and erected a building which 
served both as a meeting place and 
a boarding heme for non-resident 
boys. The outlook was very promis- 
ing until the Buddhist priests became 
alarmed at the rapid growth of the 
new religion and took measures to 
check it. The result was that the 
government ordered the appropriation 
for the support of the school stopped 
unless the Christian teaching should 
be discontinued. Vories refused to 
give up his Christian work and was 
immediately dismissed, but instead of 
leaving the province, as the priests 
liad expected him to do, he settled 
down to devote himself to the Y. M. 
C. A., although he had no means of 
support. He now began to put to 
practical use his knowledge of archi- 
tecture gained by previous study, and 
his income from this source, together 
with the $300 a year from an unknown 
friend, was quite enough to make him 
independent. In this manner he has 
been able to keep up his association 
work, which has continued to grow 
until now Mr. Vories has several na- 
ive leaders working under him. 

What Vories, relying entirely upon 
his own resources, has been able to 
accomplish under discouraging crmdi- 
tions, should be an inspiration to all 
young men who feel called to the for- 
eign field. 



FORESTERS' TRIP TO MANI- 
TOU PARK. 



The Silviculture class which went to 
Manitou Park last week on a field 
trip, spent most of the two days there 
in marking trees to be cut. Timber 
marking is one of the important 
branches of forestry, and a man has 
to know a great deal about trees to 
be a successful marker. In Manitou 
Park it is the policy to mark mature 
trees to be cut, those which are spike 
topped, cat-faced, {that is with the 
bark partly torn off, or the trunk in- 
jured) or showing signs of incipient 
rot. Very rotten trees are left, and 
also trees on steep bare gravelly 



slopes. In Manitou Park false 

mistletoe is also very plentiful, and 
trees which ;ire se\'ercly affected by 
this are cut. Also, trees with poor 
crowns showing a likeliness of early 
death are marked for the axe. 

The trees are marked by blazing 
them on the stump and about breast- 
high on the trunk. These blazes are 
then stamped with the initials nf the 
School of Forestry. 

Air. Law, who operates the saw-mill 
which cuts Manitou Park timber, has 
a gang of men at work in the woods 
and at the mill. Last year the mill 
cut about 50 M feet B. M. a month 
and if he cuts at the same rate this 
year the amount marked should last 
about two months. Besides marking 
timljcr fi.r cutting, the class scaled the 
logs that Air. Law had ready on the 
skidways and gained considerable 
experience in allowing for crook and 
rot. 

Such trips as these give , a practical 
experience which is of more help than 
weeks of theory. 



ORE DRESSING LAB TO MOVE. 



Prof. Griswold Arranges to Work 
Without Making Distracting Noises. 



The Ore Dressing Laboratory with 
its rock crushers, screens, jigs and 
various machines will be moved from 
its present location in the lower part 
of Palmer Hall into a portion of the 
old gym. The object of this change 
is to allow the work of this laboratory 
to be carried on without turning loose 
in Palmer Hall the conseciuent and 
unavoidable noise an v. jar made by the 
machinery when in motion. 

This machinery and other apparatus 
to be moved will make in its new lo- 
cation a complete Alining Laboratory. 



JUNIOR CIVILS WORKING. 



The engineering program is ire- 
quently held uo as one example of 
hard work, and, in order to simplify 
matters Prof. Alartin has opened the 
Testing Alaterials Laboratory, Civil 
8.'. Ordinarily this work is done in 
the second semester and causes some 
mental anguish then, but, under the 
present system it will be possible to 
take a heavy half year course without 
a sensation of grinding. 

The cement Testing Laboratory is 
to add to its' equipment the Vicat 
Cement Testing Apparatus and when 



this is installed the laboratory will be 
in a very good condition. It will be 
possible to make all the customary 
commercial tests on cement as well 
as the strength tests. 



FACULTY REVISES FRESHMAM GROUPS 



The f(.)llowing are the se\eral divi- 
sions, with the name and home ad- 
dress of each adviser. 

College of Liberal Arts. 

Group I — .\d\-iser, E. S. Alden, 
llagerman Hall; G. L. Ammon, F. A. 
Cajori, C. A. Carson, Rex Al. Atwater, 

E. W. Barnes, A. F. Cameron, A. A. 
Carson, J. Cary. 

Group II— Adviser, Prof. J. V. Breit- 
wieser, 309 East San Aliguel; O. C. 
Clark, H. T. Davis, G. AI. Dawson, R. 
Dickson, H. J. Dowling, S. Fukuya. 
W. Geddes, F. AI. Gerlach, H. W. 
Gregg, J. L. Herron. 

Group III — Adviser, Prof. G. M. 
Howe, 181 1 N. Nevada: E. B. Jack- 
son, AI. Jackson, R. T. Jackson, E. Z. 
Klahr, F. II. Koch, i^. Lewis, R. T. 
AlcLaughlin, G. T. Maltby, , C. A. 
Alantz, D. W. Ogilbee. 

Group IV — Advise-. Prof. R. H. 
Alotten, 18 E. San Aliguel; C. Perry, 
D. L. Reynolds, J. Al. Roberson, AL 
H. Robinson, R. Rudolph, E. B. 
Sheilds, AI. C. Smith, F. P. Storke, C. 

A. Street, AI. E. Strieby. 

Group V — Adviser, Prof. E. C. 
Hills, 120 Tyler place; T. R. Templin. 
K. H. Thnrnell, J. P. Van Eaton. F. 

B. Williamson, C. W. Wright, and all 
freshmen who register after Septem- 
ber ji. 

Engineering School. 

Group A'' I — Adviser, Prof. C. T. 
Griswold; G. W. Dennis. C. A. Har- 
ter, B. L. Haskett, W. B. Howland, A. 

F. Isensee, E. B. Jacobs, C. AI. Johns- 
ton, 1. Kerstine, J. S. Long, W. C. 
AlcCoy, F. AlcSherry. 

Group VII — Adviser, G. B. Thom- 
as, 215 E. LTintah; H. H. Brunner, C. 
'W. Coltrim, C. Gotten, J. A. Court- 
right, F. C. Dickey, H. h'lagg, J. C. 
Fleming, O. W. Hall, H. C. Hampton. 

Group VIII — Adviser, Prof. G. H. 
Albright, i.s23 N. Tej..n; N. K. Alyers, 
J. AI. Reynnlds, A. F. Rose, R. M. 
Rose, H. Spangier, H. G. Summers, 
W. N. Wakefield, T. R. Warner, B. 
VkMnans. H. C. Wray. 

School of Forestry. 

Group IX — Ad\iser, Prof. P. T. 

Continued on Page 10 



THE TIGER 




Give a thousand cooks the same ingredients and no two will 
produce pudding exactly alike — they say. 

It's so with clothes. No two makers can take the same 
materials and make suits alike. But no other tailor can buy 
many of the woolens we show. No other maker can produce the modeling, tailoring and 
fabrics of the exclusive suits we price at |15.0() to $50.00. Hart, Schaffner & Marx and 
Gadoco Clothes. 

'M GANO-DC»0HS» 



COBURN GROWING 

Continued from Page 1. 

cival Nash, class i.)f 'oi, who made the 
presentation. The gift included the 
complete works of Kipling, Balzac, 
Thackeray, Washington Irving, j\Iac- 
donald, Holland and Barrie in addi- 
tion to Grote's History of Greece. 
Knight's History of England, Addi- 
son's Spectator, Tarbell's Life of I^in- 
coln, Hume's History of England, a 
number of valuable Greek and Roman 
te.xts and a great number of miscellan- 
eous works of fiction. 

Professor Ruger on leaving, made 
the library a present of fifty-five as- 
sorted volumes. Harmon 'lo gave 
fifteen books of general literature and 
Jamison, of the same class, gave ten. 

The Congressional library gave the 
following valuable Poole sets: Dub- 
lin University JNIagazine (i/ vol.); 
Frazer's Magazine (51 vol.); Modern 
Review (5 vol.); Retrospective Re- 
view (11 vol.); Republican (7 vol.); 
De Boni's Review (18 vol.); Nile's 
Natural Register, Revue des Deux (8 
vol.); Chambers Edinborough Journal, 
Scott's Magazine, The Lisndon Spec- 
tator and the Athenaeum. 

The government gave about two 
hundred seventy-five volumes con- 
sisting largely of the Congressional 
Records and reports of the depart- 
ments. 

Rev. W. W. Ranney is the donor of 
some assorted volumes of English lit- 
erature. 

In additii)!! to the above lists, there 
was acquired by purchase, a thirty 
volume set of Lafuene's History of 
Spain, in Spanish, and twenty odd 
volumes for reference work in Sociol- 
og}', th.e whole swelling the total 
number of volumes in the library to 
appro.ximately fifty-three thousand 
and the number of pamphlets to over 
fiftv-thousand. 



I'liss Moore ex-'ll h;is lieen ahnut 
ti '\\n thiN last week. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



.\iabcl Carlson 'og will be in Den- 
ver until January when she will leave 
fur South America. 



Clara Jacobs ex-'i3 is attending the 
State Normal this year. 



Jessie Smith '10 is teaching in an 
academy in Salt Lake City. 

Emily Mills '10 is teaching at Cal- 
han. 

Walter Sloane '07 is in the real es- 
tate and abstract business in Saguache. 



Winifred Shuler ex-'ii has entered 
the junior class at Wellesley. 



Irene Fowler '08 is teaching Biology 
and English in the Canon City High 
school. 

Nannie Gibbs '10 is teaching in the 
grades in Canon City. 



Invitations have been received for 
the wedding of Jean A^aughn e.x-'ii 
and Paul Sears West ex-'o8. The 
wedding will take place at the bride's 
home in Clearfield, Iowa, on October 
twelfth. They will make their home 
in Portland, Oregon. 



Clare Phillips '10 is in the employ 
of the Dunn agencv in Denver. 



Miss Edith C. Sloane and William H. 
Warner are instructors in the high 
school at San Jose, California. 



E. B. Hunt '10 is attending the law 
school of the Uni\-ersitv of Oklahoma. 



Jay Vandemoer ex-'07, who has been 
representing Baca county at the Irriga- 
tion Congress held at Pueblo, visited 
his brother here Friday. 



The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies, Fixtures 

208 N. Tejon Street Phones Main 812, 830 

Lowell-Meservey Hdw. Co. 

Dealers in Paints, Oil, Glass, Every- 
thing in Hardware 



106 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springs 



Learn Wireless and Railroad 

TelearanhV ' Shouage of tuHy 10,000 Oper- 
'*sl' *'r"J ' ators on account of S-I)our law 
and extensive 'wireless" development. V\"e operate 
under direct supervision of Telegraph Officials and 
positively place aM students when qualified . Write for 
catalogue NATIONAL TELEGRAPH ,INST., Cinci nati, 
Philadelphia, Memphis, Davenport, la., Columbia, S. C, 
Portia- d. Ore. 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heatirg Co. 



Phone Main 48 



313 N. Tejon St. 



DEXTER & HUDSON 

EXCHANGE BARBER 
SHOP 



Room 307, Third Floor 
Exchange Bank Building 



The Dentan 

Printing Company 

No. 9 So. Cascade Auenue 

FIRST-CLASS PRINTING 
at REASONABLE RATES 

Telepnone Main No. 602 




Fall 1910 Last and Pattern 



THE TIGER » 

Gentlemen and Ladies of Colorado College 

We rise to announce the young men's and young ladies' line 
Fall 1910 footwear. We have striven to make the new offer- 
ings even better than the strong showings of past seasons. 
We cordially bespeak your 
kind consideration when in 
need of nobby footwear, at 
$2.50, 3.00, 3.50, 4.00 to 5.00 




FTTFOR EVERY FOO' 



THE 

EAI 

HO EG 



107 South Tejon Street 




Deichmann & Douglas 
Floral Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER. Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 
Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 



To College 
Men and Women 
We Are Known as 
"The Satisfactory 
Jeweler". To 
New Ones We 
Soon Will Be. 

Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

"Satisfactory Jewelry 

Store" 



WE LOAN MONEY 

ON ALL VALUABLES 

Big line of new and unredeemed 
Drawing Instruments .'. Diamonds 
Watches and Jewelry ot all descrip- 
tions. Firearms and Fishing Tackle, 
Musical Instruments and hundreds 
of other articles 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 



BRIEFS 



Forestry Club — The first meeting of 
the 3ear was held in the Polytechnic 
library last Tuesday e\ening. 



Correspondents Chosen — The local 
editors of the Tiger ha\e chosen their 
assistants for the coming year. Those 
selected among the women are: 

Alisses E. Greene, Lillian Duer, 
Grace Wilson, Dorothy Cook and Dor- 
othy Stott. 

Among the men: 
A. W. Donovan, C. E. Howard, Joe 
Sinton, Bruce Weirvvick, William 
Sloey. 

Hagerman , Full — Manager Tucker 
of Hagerman Hall reports that every 
room in the Hall except one is rented. 
The appearance of the Hall is notice- 
ably good this year, and it is more 
a home than ever before. 



Y. M. C. A. Located— The College 
Y. M. C. A. is now located in its new 
quarters at the north end of the first 
floor in Hagerman. The association 
now has more room and a quieter lo- 
cation than before. 

Minerva Dance — On Saturday even- 
ing Minerva gave her annual dance 
for the new girls in College. The 
decorations were in blue and white. 
Fourteen dances were enjoyed, and 
punch and cakes were served through- 
dut the evening. About one hundred 
and sixty were present. 



Dinosour Tracks Here — The tracks 
iif the prehistoric dinosoin- which 
were discovered bj- E. A. Terrill and 
which were shipped here for the Col- 
lege Museum ha\"e arrived and will 
soon be placed on exhibition. 



Antlers 

Turkish Baths 

(Opposite Elks Club) 
Open Day and Night 

BATHS OF ALL KINDS. Also Chiro- 
pady and Swedish Massage. Treat- 
ment at Residence by Appointment. 

CARL J. WENBERG, Prop. 

Graduate Swedish Masseur 

Phone Red 33 14 E. Bijou Street 



We Cater to the Par- 
ticular Men 

Those Who Appreciate 
Style and Quality 

A Trial Will Convince You 

10% Discount to Students 

THE MAY CO. 

23 North Tejon Street 

This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 

Company 




Headquarters for 

College Footwear 



10 



THE TIGER 



For Men Who Feel Young 

They're styled for young men, built for young 
men, worn by young men 

SOCIETY BRAND CLOTHES 

are worthy of our highest praise and yours. See 
them, try them on and you'll he as enthusiastic as 
we are. Suits and overcoats |20 to $40. 



THQHIUB 



Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton-Rustic Home 

PI • o No. 419 South El Paso St. 

Uttliy a) Phone Main 442 

Photography 

In All Its Branches 

Clark 

112 South Tejon St. 
Special Discount to All Students 

Shoe Repairing. Clothes Cleaned and Pressed. 
Second-Hand Shoes a d Clothing 

J.H.PERKINS 



Dr. Blackman Addresses Women — 

Dr. A. A, Ulacknian gave a talk to the 
women of tlie College in Cogswell 
Theatre Tuesday morning. Dr. 

Schneider concluded his address to 
the men at the same hour in Perkins 
Hall. 



Dr. Bushee an Apollonian — At the 

last meeting of the Apolonian Club. 
Dr. Bushee was made the faculty 
member of the Club to take the place 
(if Prof. Clark, who is now assistant 
professor in Amherst. 



Entertain at Dinner — The upper 
classmen of Phi Gamma Delta enter- 
tained their lady friends at dinner last 
Tuesday evening at the Chapter house. 
The guests were: Mrs. Julia Hale. 
Misses Barkley, V. Tucker, Littell. 
Wakefield, Yerkes, Eversole, Wallace, 
Crandall, McKenzie, Weeks, McKin- 
nie, Aughenbauer. 



lYi S. Cascade 



Colorado Springs 



PRATT, The Barber 

Is At the Alta Vista Hotel 

He Solicits the Patronage of the 
[College Boys 



FACULTY REVISES FRESHMAN GROUPS 

Continued from Page 7. 

Coolidge, 7 Pelham place; R. G. Ap- 
pel, G. H. Copeland, G. S. Covvdery, 
Jr., W, F. Harder, S. Lake, E. W. 
Lindstrom, R. A. Moye, N. R. Par'<, 
J. L. Parker, W. W. Sanderson, D. R. 
Smilev, R. Tanne-, A. E. Tear. 



WINDOW SLEEPING TENTS 



THE OUT 


WEST 


TENT AND AWNING CO. 


113'2 NORTH TEJON STREET 





Phone 917 



GEO. R. BERGEN, 0. D. 

MANF'G OPTICIAN 
Eyes Tested 611-12 Exch. Nat. Bank BIdg. 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented 
and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing a Typewriter. The 
New No. 10 Model Has All Latest 
Improvements 

Zimmerman Supply 

Company 



22 E. Kiowa St. 
Phone Main 374 



Established 189 



11. W. Coil '10 is assisting in the 
laboratory of Dr. Gerald C. Webb of 
this citv. 



Furniture, Furnishings 

For College Use 

The Fred S. Tucker 

Furniture Company 

106-108 North Tejon Street 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 



THE TIGER 



11 



Just Received a Shipment of EL COLMA Cigars. A West Indies 
Cigar for 5c, Equal to Any 10c Havana 



HUGHES 

North I *J Tejon 



Get Your Picnic Supplies 

^^ AT ^^ 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER. Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Notary Public 

A. J. LAWTON 

Real Estate, Loans and Insurance 
\0% E. Pike's Peak Ave. , Colorado Springs 

The Murray Drug Co. 

(Opposite Campus) 




Films, Paper, Chemicals and Supplies. Develop- 
ing and Finishing for Amateurs 
'•Meet At Murray's" 



II Local Department || 




The Phi Gamma Delta fraternity en- 
tertained the neighborhood Friday night 
with a brass Ijand concert. 

Several Sigma Chis and ladies went 
'up the Mount Manitou Incline Saturday. 



Vandemoer and Fowler were in Den- 
\er over Sunday. 



"Beaut" Newhouse has bought a home 
in Denver. 



Van Stone was in Denver over Sun- 
dav. 



Montgomery has a mascot which 
answers to the name of Pete. 

Miss Rassbach visited her sister this 
week. 



Remember, when planning your social 
stunts, that it is a mark of "The Nobility" 
to go to Noble's for your refreshments. 
Corner Tejon and Bijou. 

Elen Grdpin's aunt visited her Sunday. 



Mrs. Cunning visited her daughter, 
Ruth, Fridav. 



Elizabeth Burgess '12 visited at her 
home in Canon City last week. 



Geddis and Carey, both of Denver, 
are pledged to Sigma Chi. 



Bonnell and Morris, U. of C. men, 
visited Alpha Tau Delta fraternity Sat- 
urday. 



Dickson's father visited him Monda\'. 



Phillips are expecting to attend Greeley 
Normal next semester in order to study 
domestic science. 



Dr. and Mrs. E. C. Hills entertained 
the fifth group of freshmen at their 
home, 1 20 Tyler Place, Wednesday 
evening. Refreshments were served 
and a very pleasant evening was 
spent. 



Kingman Packard's parents visited 
him early in the week. 



Kathcr^ne Morehouse and Martha 



Mr. J. W. Nipps.the new State 
FOTC THE 

Most Exclusive Millinery 

CALL ON 

Mme, M. D, Hillmer 

6 East Pike's Peak Auenue 

Finest of Material and 
'Best of Workmanship 



Phone Black 395 



Colorado Springs 



You Will Find our Store a Good Place to 
Visit When Looking for College Supplies, 
In Loose Leaf Note Books, Drawing Mater- 
ials, Fountain Pens, We Excell. 

The Pike's Peak Book & Stationery Co 

27-27! 2 South Tejon Street Peone Black 354 

Watch the Caps You Meet 

You won't need an intro- 
duction to the HEIDCAP. 
It is not a mere head cover- 
ing. It has character. It 
gives character to the wear- 
er. It is made of exclusive 
English cap cloths. It is a 
thoroughbred. Trv on a 
HEIDCAP. 



1!2 



THE TIGER 



THE 



Hemenway Grocery Co. 
Groceries and 

Meats :: :: :: 



.«y.». 







115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



MUETH'S 

The Place Where the Stand- 
ard Is Never Lowered. High 
Class Goods at Reasonable 
Prices. Ice Cream, Hot 
and Cold Drinks. 

Lunches and Afternoon Teas 
Ask Any Old Student 

CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 

5 Eike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

THE 

Colorado Springs Floral 
Company 



Telephone Main 599 



104 . Tejon St 



The D. Y. Butcher Drug Co. 
DRUGS, KODAKS, SUPPLIES 

Free and Prompt Delivery 
or. Opposite P. 0. Phones 90 and 750 



Student Secretary of the Y. AI. C. A.. 
was visiting tlie College the early 
part of tlie week in the interests of 
the local work in the College. Mr. 
R. S. Fidler, assistant secretary of the 
Denver City Association, acci mipanied 
him. 



The new Apollonians are Gregg, 
Appel, Davis and Starke. 



Clare Phillips '10 was a visitor at the 
Kappa Sigma house earh- in the week. 

Mark Robinson, a Phi Delta Theta 
of Tulane University, has affiliated with 
the Alpha Tau Delpha fraternity. 



Get down to Washburn once in a 
while to see "what's doing." 



George Satton e,\-'ij \-isitcd the Col- 
lege Wednesday on his way to Cali- 
fornia. 



'1 he freshmen girls at'Frances Games' 
talile gave a spread last Wednesday. 

Cowdery "14 was visited by his 
father Sunday. 



Perry '14 has been pledged to zMpha 
Tau Delta. 



Helen Graham enjoyed a visit from 
her parents the last of the week. 



Elsie Connell of Denver visited 
friends in the College over Sunday. 



Adeline Weeks ex-'i2 spent sever- 
al days here on her way home from 
Europe. 



Mr. Vories and his mother took 
dinner at Bemis Hall Sunday. 



Plypatia enjoyed a supper in the 
Canon Fridaj^ evening. 



Buy your sea.?on ticket and help 
things out a little. 



Dawson, the freshman president 
pro tern, has ju:^t undergone an oper- 
ation for appendicitis. 



The Jeffries-Johnson fight pictures 
were in town last week. Johnson 
won again, just as Prexy ]5redicted. 

Judsiui cx-'it was a visit'r at the 
Delt.i Phi Theta house the early part 
nf tlie week. 



Phone 687 



Manicuring for Gentlemen 



Delta Phi Thela held it> First An- 



Miss N. E. Johnson 

Toilet Parlors 

Facial and Scalp Treatment with VIBRA- 
TOR, a Specialty 

Complete Line of Hair Goods 
324 N. Te on Street Colorado Springs 

JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Strce 

The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

Pays 4%) Interest on Deposits and Gives 
Special Attention to Accounts of Students 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, PresiJeiit Ira Harris. I'-President 

M.C.'Gile VVm. F. Richards 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Trenmrer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M.. 

Mrs. Anna Bethman 

Hair Dressing Parlors 

Moles and Superfluous Hair Removed 

with Electricity. Hair Goods Made 

To Order a Specialty 

Phone Red 394 27 East Kiowa Street 



The College 

Book Store 

See our College Pen- 
nants, largest stock and 
latest designs. 

Be patriotic and deco- 
rate your rooms. 

WHITNEY and 
GRIMWOOD 

20 North Tejon Street 



THE TIGER 



IS 



Memory Books 

Freshmen should get 
one of these fine books 
at once. The only right 
way to preserve the 
programs, souvenirs and 
write-ups of College life. 
Only $1.25 each. 

THE OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

CampbeU's Barber Shop 

12 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



Phone Main 205S 



Art Needle Work 



THE HUNT & VAN NICE 
Art Specialty Store 

Stamping, Designing, Perforating, Linens, 
Lawns, Best Hand-Painted China 

8 Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs, Colo 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co. 



ntial Crystal I'ark Trip last Saturday, 
chartering for the purpose two f)f the 
large autos, and starting immediately- 
after the class football game. Lunch 
was served en route'. Prof, and Mrs. 
Hills chaperoned one car and Prof., 
and Mrs. Howe the other. The guests 
of the fraternity were the Misses 
Canon, Harris, Shelton, Fuller, Work, 
Fezer, Stukey, Wasley, Wakefield, 
i\fcKenzie, Albright, Flamilton, Mc- 
Roberts, j\Iorehouse, Crutcher, King, 
Henderson and Cunningham. 



Don't start making cow paths on 
the campus; there are walks pro- 
vided. 



Elsie Greene's father and mother 
spent Sunday with her. 

Francis Fames, Letitia I^amb and 
Ivuth Wallace spent the week end at 
their homes in Denver. 



Miss Pirown enjoyed a \'isit from 
her cousin and his wife. 



Persis Kiciucr gave a tea for Con- 
tempo-.-arj' last week. 

Invitations have been issued for the 
annual .\utunni Spread by Hypatia. 

Carl P>lackman 'lo spent the week 
end at his home in this citj^ 



Miss Nevin, a graduate of Western 
College, is taking a post-graduate 
course in the College. 



A nmnber of fudge parties \vere 
i'wcn P'riday evening for the new 

nrls. • 



Miss Ividder ente tained Contem- 
porary at tea, in honor of the pledges. 



Contemporary will give a German, 
in honor of her pledges, Saturday 
night, October 8. 



Miss Elsie Council ex-'i2 is a Pi 
Phi pledge at Denver University. 



Prof. iMotten and A. J. Hesler will 
attend a boys' conference which is ti> 
be held in Brush, Colo., Saturday and 
Sunday of this week. 



George Belscy is confined at Clock- 
ner Sanitarium with a case of typhoid 
fever. 



Hunt Up 

BisselFs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

Seldomridde Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



A "Burgess Spread 



» 



Perhaps you Freshies don't know 
what that is; but to us old C. C. 
' men it means much — very much. 
Tlie finest delicatessen departnjenr, 
a superb bakery, a candy shop that 
possesses the essentials of purity and 
tlie added virtues of thorough work- 
manship and artistic individuality. 
You'll be present this semester at more 
than one strictly "BLirgess" function 

W. N, Burgess— Grocer 



112-114 N. Tejon Street 



Phone 83 



FREE 

Shoe Repairing Absolutely Free 
of Charge for Entire Term of 
1910-1911 to the College Stu- 
dent Submitting the Best Ad for 

PETE'S 

Shoe Shog 

230 East Dale Street 

Men's S&wed Soles 75c; Ladles^, 65|^ 
Rubber Heels, 35c 



14 



THE T I G K B 



$1.00 



$1.00 



Young Men 

For $1.00 per month, we sponge, press and do minor repairing on one 
suit, or one overcoat, or two pairs of trousers, each week; calling for 
and deliverieg same in our wardrobe, dustproof wagons. We claim 
to do the best work in the city. A trial from you will allow us to 
prove our claim. 

Special Prices Given to the Young Women of 
the College. Get Our Price List. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



Agents: Bert Siddons 
Glenn Bowers 




T. E. AIKEN 

Taxidermist, Furrier 

Dealer in Souvenirs and Novelties 
12 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

For Best and Quick Delivery 

SEE 

The Monument Coal Co. 

28 East Kiowa Street 

William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



THE 

Crissey Si Fowler 
Lumber Co. 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 

Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 
A. S. BLAKE 

Is the Man to See 

107 North Tejon Phone 465 

Nickle Ware Cutlery 

Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



and Cleaners. 



A FIRE, MAYBE. 

The possibility of a bonfireless bar- 
becue has stirred the College to its 
inmost recesses. What, a tradition 
of almost twenty years to be dropped 
rather, too reasoning insurance 
agents? What again, are the sophs to 
be denied the privilege of swiping 
hen-coops and dog-houses? What 
once more, is the College to be de- 
prived of tosing obnoxious freshmen 
by the light of the flickering bon-fire? 
The answer, say the sophs, is "No, 
never;" the answer, says the Presi- 
dent is "Maybe;'' the answer, says the 
College in general is "We hope not." 

"Why, a barbecue without a fire 
would be worse than a barbecue with 
fried weinies,"said Mr. Shaw, former 
editor of the Tiger when interviewed 
recently. "It cannot was," said Mr. 
Leon Lester, when urged to give his 
opinion. 



City Planning — Mr. Van den Arend 
last Monday night gave an interesting 
lecture in Perkins Hall on the sub- 
ject "City Planning." The lecture 
was under the auspices of the Civic 
Club. It was well illustrated with 
stereoptican views of the improve- 
ments that are being made in nthcr 
cities. 



What, Again? — The Hagerman 
smoker, the oft-postponed, will posi- 
tively occur — unless again postponed 
— in the near future. This an- 

nouncement is final and comes from 
head([uartcrs. 



Broken Lenses 



Phone Black 233 



Duplicated Colorado Souvenirs 

c. B. Lauterman 

Jeweler and Manufac- 
turing Optician 

121 N. TEJON STREET Colorado Springs 



10c STORE AND MORE ! 

THE ElVIPOmUM 

1 10 S. TEJON STREET 



College Inn 

Freshmen!! 

Tiiis Is the Place for 

GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



Fine Watch Work 



Diamond Setting a Specialty 



H. E. Kapelke 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 
130 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

Grand Union Tea Co. 

Importers of Fine Teas and 
Coffees 

Phone Main 2678 220 N. Tejon St. 



On hand as usual 
but just a little better 
equipped for serving your 
needs — 



The 

WATERMAN 

PRESS 

PRINTERS and 
BINDERS 



THE TIGER 



15 



TERRORS 

versus 

TIGERS 

Washburn, Saturday 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

"The College Favorite ' 



The Favorite Shopping 

Place for the College 

Woman 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 



lOeh E- Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



• 



Star 
Laundry 



The College Laundry 

The ONLY Laundry which advertises in 
The Tiger. We give 207" discount to you. 
The best work in the state for as low a 
price as any. 

B. J. DICKSON, Agent Phone Main 342 



W.I.LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



119 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



r 



HATS 
The Real Man- 
Making Kind 
$4 and $3 



FOR YOUNG 

MEN 





SHIRTS 


The 


Comfortable 




Kind 


$2 


$1.50, $1 



'^ 



the new 'Varsity and the Shape-maker; the best model 
for young men ever designed. All styles here for the 
lively young fellows. Gorton's special hand tailored 
garments. Suits and overcoats of quality $35, $30, 
$25, $20 and $15. 

Specialists in Good Clothes and Nothing Else 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 




E. Pike's Peak 
113 



^: 



\ Correct Dress for Men. ^ 



J^ 



MINERVA PROGRAM, OCT. 7. 



Madame Dc Stael Alibs Estill 

Jean D' Arc Miss Draper 

Music Miss Bispham 



CONTEMPORARY. 

The Contemporary program for 
October 7th: 
The character studies of Sargent . . 

Ramona Brady 

Abbey Grace Wilson 

Music Mabel Wasley 

HYPATIA PROGRAM, OCT. 7. 

Magna Graecia and the Temples of 
Paestum Edith Summers 

Naples and Its Environs 

Lillian E. Duer 

Music Alice England 

APOLLONIAN PROGRAM, OCT. 7. 

Speech — "The Indictment of the 
Beef Trust Ofticials on September 
12" Sayre 

.Music Weirick 

Speech — "The Newfoundland Fish- 
eries Case as Settled by the Inter- 
national Court of Arbitration ..Ela 
Debate — Resolved, That water pow- 
er sites should be under national rath- 
er than state control. 
Atfirmative. Negati\e. 

l^ennctt. L. Clark. 

Johnston. Newman. 



Dern's Freshly Roasted Coffee 

will make 10 more cups to the lb. 
than Eastern roasted coffee 



29 S. Tejon Street 



Phone 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 



Registered Medical Practitioneers 



Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Buiiaing, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence, 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 9E6 



The College 
Photo Studio 




m^ 




Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 

THE 

Gowdy-Simmons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS, ENGRAVERS 

21 N Tejon Street 



16 



THE TIJER 



One step to the front in °^ winter Overcoats — snappy, individual, ex- 
dress, must be the rule, if you will be a ruling elusive garments— will sn^oothly pave the way. 
figure in the business or professional life of Complete satisfaction here, in pattern, 
today; of tomorrow. fabric, fit, tailoring, style and price. 



An early selection from this great showing 
8 N. Tejon Street 



(Pei4umS6ecirer (s 



$15, $18, $20, $25 and Up 

28 E. Pike's Peak 




Smart Shoes for the Young College Man 



We're showing the swell things — Shoes with all the new Fall style kinks worked to 
the limit. The new high toes and heels, short vamps, etc., in button, lace and 
blucher, and in tan Russia, patent colt, or gun 
metal calf. Choice leather and artistic shoe- 
making. 



$3.S0, $4.00, $5.00, $6.00 



\f©>^!^a.< 



sHOFST»*^SAr!SFYi 



2a S.TEJON ST. 



/■ 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 

Departments — College of Arts and 
Science, E. S. PARSONS, Dean. 

Scliool of Engineering, F. CAJORI, Dean 
School of Forestry, W. C. STURGIS, Dean 
School of Music, E. D. HALE, Dean 



Manitou ParJ^ — Field Laboratory 
of the School of Forestry 



It Takes a Rich Conversation to Sell Poor Clothes. Gatterer^s 
Clothes Sell Themselves. Don 't Overlook the Browns for Fall 

GEO. J. GATTERER 



216 North Tejon Street 



Telephone Main 1247 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF 

COLORADO COLLEGE 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., OCTOBER 14, 1910 



Vol. XIII 



Number 5 



TIGERS 

WALLOP 
TERRORS 



A BEN GRIFFITH CLUB? 



TIGER LINE NONE 

TOO STRONG. 



Rothgeb Says Team Will Have To 
Do Better. 



New football was on tap at Wash- 
burn field last Saturday, when the 
Tigers walloped the Terrors to the 
tune of 2J^ to o, in the annual prac- 
tice game. The feature of the game 
was the forward pass work of the 
College and a real feature it was, al- 
though the Tiger backfield on several 
occasions did certainly show a spirit 
which looks good for a champion ag- 
gregation. Several facts were 
brought out clearly: that the Tiger 
line is not any too strong and must 
be bolstered; that in \'an Stone the 
Tigers ha^'C a real (|uarterback; and 
that Herb. Sinton liandles the for- 
ward passes in classy style. 

The day was too warm for a game 
of football and both teams were a lit- 
tle sluggish for a time. The High 
school vv'as of course nutweighed and 
outgeneraled, but they should have 
played a better game. Nervousness 
was somewhat apparent. 

Voach Rothgeb tried to give every 
man who shows signs of varsity foot- 
ball a chance in the game. After the 
game the coach was heard to say 
"You fellows will have to do better 
tha nthis." This is all he said for 
publication. 

The scores were made by quarters 
as follows: 6-o, 9-0, 15-0, 2.^0. 

Of course Captain A^andemoer 
played the star game — his work on 
skirting the ends for gains, his punt- 

Continued on Page 4 



Suggestion Receives Approval — Would 

Assist Griffith and Benefit 

Students. 



The suggestion that Colorado Col- 
lege men should form a Ben Griffith 
Club is receiving very favorable com- 
ment from all who ha\e heard the 
l)lan discussed. It is pointed out 
that Griffith should ha\e the unani- 
mous support of all voters in the Col- 
le.ge and that some attempt ^himld be 
made to interest the townspeople as 
well. Griffith has many friends in 
the College and those who do not 
know him personally do know him by 
reputation and all are heartily in favor 
of such a move. 

The formation of such a club would 
not only assist a deserving alumnus 
but would give the College men an 
excellent opportunity to get a line on 
the political situation in the state as 
not only Griffith could be secured to 
make an address before the proposed 
club, but several other prominent men 
in political circles would be glad to 
address such an organization on time- 
ly topics. The movement is in line 
with that adopted in practically all the 
larger institutions where young men's 
political clubs are the common things. 

The movement is only in the sug- 
gested stage so far but if the proper 
interest is displayed it can soon be 
made a reality and both Griffith and 
the students of the College will be 
benefitted thereb^^ 



Only Two More Weeks 

in which to get 

THE TIGER 

at the reduced rate 
Save a Quarter 



REFORM 

IN THE 

AIR 

BUSY COMMISSION MEETING. 

Chapel Order, Honor System, Yell 

Leader and Pans-pans up for 

Discussion. 



The second meeting of the Student 
Commission kept up the record of the 
first for doing things and from the 
tenor of these two meetings, it is evi- 
dent that much may be expected of 
this organization during the year. 

Professor J\fotten appeared before 
the Commission to ask for the co- 
operation of the students in improv- 
ing the chapel order. He pointed out 
how other organizations had at- 
tempted to solve the problem but 
failed. He stated that classes were be- 
ing delayed from five to ten minutes 
because of the lateness of starting the 
exercises, and on coming out the stu- 
dents block up the south door so as to 
cause more delay. The north door 
which is supposed to be used by the 
juniors and sophomores is not being 
used at all. It is probable a bell will 
be installed in Perkins to give warn- 
ing of the chapel time and that the 
upperclassmen will be asked to help 
solve the problem of conduct during 
the chapel exercises as well as the 
time of beginning. 

The next matter of importance to 
come up was the discussion of the 
Honor System. Profs. Hills and 

Woodbridge were present and stated 
the merits of the sj'Stem as they had 
found them in their own colleges. 
They made it plain that if the stu- 
dents desired the Honor System, the 
faculty would sanction it. 

During the course of the discussion 

Continued on Page 7. 



THE TIGER 



A COSMOPOLITAN COLLEGE. 



NEW DIRECTOR OF WOMEN'S 
ATHLETICS. 



BARBECUE COMMITTEES AP- 
POINTED. 



Interesting Statistics on Where Colo- 
rado College Students Come From. 

The field of Colorado College is 
])rimarily Colorado, but its field is 
far from being confined to this state 
alone. If you are curious to know 
what a variety of states are repre- 
sented in the student body, incjuire of 
the first dozen yovi meet, what is their 
native state and the probabilities are 
that you will receive a dozen different 
replies. Perhaps the forestry school 
has the most widely divergent enroll- 
ment of any department in the College 
when its size is considered. The re- 
marks of Wm. J\I. Vories, who told of 
the high standing of Colorado College 
among the many eastern institutions 
which he visited, is well borne out 
by the cosninpoiitan character of 
our student body. 

For the benefit of those who are in- 
terested in statistics, the following 
table showing the geographical distri- 
bution of Colorado College students 
will furnish food for thought: 

Colorado 380, Iowa 11, Illinois, 10, 
Nebraska 9, Massachusetts 9, South 
Dakota 8, Ohio 8, Kansas 5, California 
5, New Mexico 5, Wyoming 4, Indiana 
4, New York 4, Minnesota 3, Missouri 
3, New Jersey 2, Utah 2, Kentucky 2, 
Montana 2, Texas i, Louisiana i, Flor- 
ida I, North Carolina i, Canada i, 
District of Columbia i, Pennsylvania 
I, China 3, South India i, Japan 3, 
Hawaii 2. 



PIKE'S PEAK OR BUST! 
Geologists Plan to Ascend Mascot. 



Geology is getting a large number 
of treats these days. Two weeks ago 
Williams Canon was explored, last 
week the class was shown the won- 
ders of the Cave of the Winds, and 
now it is announced that the trip up 
the Peak will be accomplished on Sat- 
urday, October 22. A special car will 
be provided for those who take the 
trip and a rate of $2.50 will probably 
be made for the round trip. A num- 
ber of stops will be ma.de on the way 
up and down, so as to allow time for 
the inspection of the geologic attrac- 
tions along the way. The trip will be 
imder the supervision of Dr. Finlay 
and all students have the privilege of 
making the trip whether a member of 
tiie class or not. 



Miss Auten Assumes Position — Has 
Had Much Experience. 



Miss Auten, the new director of 
women's athletics, has arrived and 
taken charge of her work here as suc- 
cessor to Miss Picken. Regular gym- 
nasium work will begin next week. 
While the work will be conducted 
along the same general lines as here- 
tofore. Miss Auten will introduce sev- 
eral new features which will add to 
the pleasure and interest of the routine 
work of the year as well as the special 
gymnastic exercises. The girls are 
fortunate in having Miss Auten as 
their instructor this year for she has 
already announced her intention of 
showing them a good time. 

Miss Auten comes to us highly rec- 
ommended. She has had much ex- 
perience in woman's athletics, for- 
merly in Kansas City and later in 
South Africa. 



PROF. HILLS GETS OUT NEW 
BOOK. 



Prof. E. C. Hills of the College, and 
Mrs. Louise Reinhardt, of the local 
high school, have collaborated in the 
publication of a new text book for 
High School upe. The title of the 
book is, "Short Spanish Stories," and 
is published by D. C. Heath and Co., 
of Boston. 

Prof. Hills is a recognized author- 
ity in modern languages and has writ- 
ten several text books. His Spanish 
grammar, written in collaboration 
with Prof. Ford of Harvard, is recog- 
nized as the standard text book in its 
subject and is used in nearly all the 
colleges and high schools of the coun- 
try. 



The Chinese students of University 
of Pennsylvania recently gave a play 
written and acted by themselves. The 
play was entitled, "When East and 
West Meet." 



A hospital fund is to be started at 
the State Agriculture School this year. 
The purpose of this is to give free 
accommodations to needy students in 
the city hospital. The movement is in 
charge of the Y. M. C. A., and is sup- 
ported by all students. 



Hallowe'en 'Festivities to be Confined 
to Students — A College Affair. 



The following managers and com- 
mitteemen have been chosen from the 
sophomore class to have charge of 
the barbecue arrangements for Octo- 
ben 31 : 

Manager — Thos. Lynch. 

Assistant Manager — K. F. Weller. 

Stunt Committee — Shaw, Root, Hall, 
Miss Bogue. 

Program Committee — Golden, Le 
Clere, Winched, ]\Iiss Scott, Miss 
Phillips. 

Refreshment Committee — Ross, Bel- 
sey, Boj^es. 

The committees are hard at work 
and promise that everything from 
Dean Cajori's jokes to the blanketing 
of the last freshman will be entirely 
new, up-to-date, revarnished and 
adorned with new trimmings. 

An important change in the year's 
barbecue is the limitation to College 
students. In the past the occasion 
has lost much of its value as a College 
afifair because of its popularity with 
the townspeople who came to the 
event in hundreds. This year only , 
College students and faculty, together 
with a few immediate friends of the 
College will be admitted. This lim- 
itation, however, is with the under- 
standing that the affair shall receive 
the support of every student in the 
College for otherwise it will not be 
possible. Manager Lynch has been 
instructed by the class to make it a 
College affair if he receives the prop- 
er financial support, otherwise it will 
be thrown open to the public as in for- 
mer years. 

The sophs are keeping their plans 
very secret but rumor has it that 
among other attractions. President 
Roosevelt will deliver the address of 
the evening and several aerial contests 
will be pulled off in addition to a five 
round go between President Slocum 
and Jack Johnson. 



The trustees of the Rhodes scholar- 
ships have issued a statement show- 
ing that 179 men were recipients of 
Rhodes honors last year, of this num- 
ber 90 were from the United States, 
78 from the British colonies, and ii 
from Germany. 



The semester system has been in- 
stalled at Monmouth. 



THE TIGER 



RHODES SCHOLARSHIP EXAMI- 
NATION. 

Qualifications Necessary for the Com- 
petition — Chance to Make Some 
Easy Money. 



The qualifying" examinations for the 
1911 Rhodes scholarship for the state of 
Colorado will begin at 9 a. m. Tuesday 
morning, October 25, in the state capitol 
building in Denver, and will be conclud- 
ed the following day. Any unmarried 
student, born a citizen of the United 
States who on the first of this month 
was between the ages of nineteen and 
twenty-five years, is eligible to take these 
examinations, provided he has com- 
pleted his sophomore year at some "rec- 
ognized degree-granting university or 
college of the United States." 

The examination papers are corrected 
in England and a list of the names of 
those who have qualified will be for- 
warded to the chairman of the commit- 
tee of selection of this state. This com- 
mittee will choose the scholar, consider- 
ing him with regard to (1) "his literary 
and scholastic attainments," (2) "his 
fondness for and success in manly out- 
door spots." (3) "his qualities of man- 
hood, good fellowship, etc.," (4) "his 
exhibtion during school days of moral 
force of character, power of leadership, 
etc.," 

The successful candidate is entitled 
to the scholarship, consisting of three 
hundred pounds a year for three years, 
and is expected to reside in college for 
at least two years and to take any de- 
gree for which he may have qualified. 
Marriage vacates a scholarship. 

The qualifying examinations are in 
Greek, Latin and mathematics, but a 
student ma)' fail in the Greek examina- 
tion and yet be eligible for the scholar- 
ship. However, if such a student be 
awarded the scholarship, he must pass 
tlie regular Oxford Greek Responsions, 
as the entrance examinations are termed. 
This exception is made with the hope 
that students who otherwise would not 
attempt the examinations because of a 
lack of knowledge of Greek, upon pass- 
ing the other required subjects and be- 
ing assured of the scholarship, would 
master enough of that language to sat- 
isfy the entrance requirements of the 
university. Students passing all three 
branches of the qualifying examinations 
are exempt from the Responsions. 



THE FIELD OF THE REPRE- 
SENTATIVE OF COLORADO 
COLLEGE IN SOUTH 
AMERICA. 



JUNIORS MAKING ANNUAL 
FIGHT. 



A Ycvy interesting magazine has 
just been received from Harry Ewing. 
It is one of the publications gotten 
out in Buenos Aires and gives a great 
many views of the recent Pan-Ameri- 
can congress held in that city. The 
\-ievvs of the city illumination in hon- 
or of the event rival thrise of our own 
great expositions, and those who think 
of Argentina as a semi-civilized coun- 
try should look at a few of the views 
in this magazine and be convinced 
that our sister continent is in more 
ways than geographically a real sister 
continent. 

One of the most interesting views to 
C. C. people is that of the banquet of 
the Y. M. C. A. The picture shows 
J\Ir. E. T. Colton, who will soon be in 
Colorado to visit us, addressing the 
conference of prominent business 
men of that city. 

This magazine may be seen in the 
library on the magazine table. 



JUDGE VAN CISE OF DENVER 

TO ADDRESS MEN'S 

MASS MEETING. 



Judge Van Cise will be the speaker 
at the next mass meeting- for the men 
of the college. This will be held in 
Cogswell Theatre on next Sunday af- 
ternoon. The Association is very for- 
tunate in securing Judge Van Cise for 
this meeting, as he is known through- 
nut the state as one of the ablest 
speakers of Denver. The subject up- 
on which the Judge will speak is "The 
Responsibilities of Leadership." 

His years of legal experience 
have given to the speaker a store 
of information upon this subject 
such as few men have. The talk 
will be one that no thinking college 
man should miss. 

The meeting starts at 3:30 sharp and 
will last one hour. Every man in the 
College is urged to be present. 



Cliicago University proposes build- 
ing a new $600,000 library as a mem- 
orial to their late President Harper. 



An undergraduate council which 
Tufts college abolishes co-education. will govern student affairs lias been 
A woman's college is to be organized formed at the University of Arkan- 
in connection with Tufts. sas. 



A "Prom" or an Operecia Their Slo- 
gan — May Get Neither. 



The usual junior-faculty scrap for a 
junior stunt is now being waged. For 
several years past an attempt to get 
permission to give a junior prom has 
met with positive and unyielding- 
negatives. Last year the class re- 
alized the futility of wasting energy 
and time in seeking for this junior 
ambition, and satisfied themselves 
with presenting an operetta. The pres- 
ent junior class state they, too, will be 
satisfied with an operetta, but those 
higher up maintain that such a produc- 
lion necessitates much time in prepara- 
tion and that the social life of the Col- 
lege is already too strenuous, ergo, the 
outlook for either a "prom" or an oper- 
etta is both dark and threatening. 

The juniors believe in persistence, 
however, and so are pushing their side 
of the case with all vigor and may be 
al)le to persuade those who have the de- 
cision in hand that it is not only fitting 
and proper but that it is their moral 
duty to allow, aid and abet some junior 
festivity, preferably a prom, and next 
in preference an operetta. 



FIRST SOCIAL STUNT 

FOR FRESHMEN. 



No Serious Accidents Reported — One 

Man Swallowed His Spoon, But 

Will Recover. 



Freshman social life received con- 
siderable stimulus last Saturday even- 
ing when President and Mrs. Slocum 
ei-itertained the class at Bemis Hall. 
After a short period of hand shaking 
and becoming better acquainted in the 
common room, the doors of Cogswell 
theater were thrown open, and the en- 
tire class assembled in that beautiful 
little hall to listen to Mrs. Slocum's 
entertaining story of the Passion Play 
which she and President Slocum had 
the good fortune to see while abroad 
this summer. jMany actual photo- 
graphs of the characters of the play 
were shown to the class. 

The last touch of good cheer was 
added in the dining room where re- 
freshments were served. 



Student governn-ient is making its 
initial bow before the University of 
Utah. 



THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 



THE COWBOYS FROM WYOM- 
ING HERE FOR A LITTLE 
FOOTBALL SATURDAY. 



Although defeated by a score of 17 
to 3 by Denver University, the Wy- 
iiniing aggregation, which meets Cohi- 
r.ido College on Washburn Field Sat- 
urday afternoon are said to play bet- 
ter football than was expected\ of 
them — in fact they play better than 
last year tn a great extent and the in- 
.tercollegiate season for the ligers will 
open under auspicious circumstances. 
The football scouts are watching the 
game for the foretelling of future 
strength and the Tigers expect to play 
"some football." 

The Tigers will probably line up as 
follows: Witherow, center; Van 
St^iue. quarter; Vandemoer, captain, 
left half back; Dickson, Heald, right 
half back; Ac'<er, Heald, fullback; H. 
Sinton, Black, Thompson and J. 
Sinton, ends; Cook, Bowers, Black, 
LcClere, tackles; Haight, Floyd, 
guards. 

The Wyoming U. line up will be; 
Fuller, 1. e.: W. Prue, 1. t.; Hill, 1. g.; 
Jones, c; Covert, r.g. ; Pitz.r.t.; Whit- 
man, r. e.; Burgess, q.b.; C. Jones, 1. 
h. b.; 0^iat, r. h. b.; Grant, f. b. 



TIGERS WALLOP TERRORS 

Continued from Page 1 

ing and forward pass work shows 
that for the third successive time 
He;b ^'andemoer will be an all 
state player. Heald also showed up 
in great shape on his lijTe smashes, 
and Acker gained considerable ground 
by his smashing line plunges. Fow- 
ler for the Terrors played their star 
game. 

The line-up and summary: 
Tigers. Terrors. 

Bowers . 1. t Kippe 

Hedblom 1. g Moore 

Witherow c Martin 

Haight r. g. . . . Holmes, Ahl 

Cook . . ,■ r. t Carn 

H. Sinton, 

J. Sinton r. e Webber 

Van Stone cj. b.. I'owler, Kampf 

Heald, Dickson . . 1. h Emery 

Vandemoer r. h Cheese 

Acker f. .b. . . Kam])f, Bruce 

Tiinclidow ns — ]f. Sinton, Tlmmpson, 
A'andemoer, Goals from touchdowns 
—Van Stone, j,. Goals from field — 



Van Stone. Referee — Nead. Umpire 
— Dick Morrison. Field judge — Parks. 
Head linesman — Joe ]\Iorrison. Lines- 
men — Wilson and Gregg. Time of 
quarters — 15, 10, 10 and 10. 



SPORT NEWS. 



D. U. Defeats Wyoming. 

Although thej' defeated the same 
team by a score of 56 to o a year ago, 
D. U. had a hard time winning from 
the cowboys by a score of 17 to 3 
last Saturday and played a poor game. 
Former captain of the Tigers, Gil 
Cary, who has seen the ^Ministers play 
ffir several years, states that they 
played poor football and the new 
game was not in evidence to any ex- 
tent. Old football resulted in the 
scoring. Crowley, who is one of the 
best football players in Colorado, was 
the chief ground gainer and the star 
of the contest, while Burgess for the 
Wyoming team was a star in his par- 
ticular sky. 



TIGERS 



VS. 



COWBOYS 

Washburn • Saturday 

YouVe Expected 



K. Aggies Husky Lineup. 

The Kansas Aggie lineup which will 
probably face the Tigers in the game 
here has been announced and received 
here. The team average is about 160. 
The lineup is as follows: 

George Elliott, re, i yr., 165 pounds. 

R. T. Towler, le, 2 yrs., 155 pounds. 

Harvey Roots, rt, 2 yrs, 185 pounds. 

A. W. Seng, Ig, i yr., 200 pounds. 

Anderson, rg, (last season sub.). 

Holmes. It, (last season sub.), 

Charles Zoller, c, 2 yrs., 175 pounds. 

Harry Bates, qb, 2 yrs., 147 pounds. 

Captain G. S. Croyle, Ihb, ,3 yrs., 
175 pounds. 

Whit G. Speer, rhb. 2 yrs., T65 
pounds. 

Sims, fb, I _\r., 175 |)Ounds. 

The K, .X.g.gie game, which occurs 
No^■embcr 5, is the bi,g local event. 



Denver University, the Mines and 
the University of Colorado have 
started secret practice — so it is said. 
All are working hard and the coaches 
have hopes. Eve:-ybody has them. 



Baylor University of Waco, Texas, 
wants a game with Denver Univer- 
sit)-. They may get it? 



H. S. Cooper, 'a U. of C. star on the 
line, whose attendance was not ex- 
pected at the school, has returned and 
is out for the team. He will play 
tackle. 



The Mines students are showing 
some great spirit this year — cheering 
the team and singing songs every 
night around the fence at the secret 
practice. 



Don't forget to show your College 
loyalty as well as business foresight 
by purchasing a season ticket. 



Get down and watch the fellows 
work for the team. It will instill a 
little additional College spirit. 



Because H. McMiller, a giant Wis- 
consin guard misspelled six words too 
many in an elementary spelling exam, 
he will probably be barred from play- 
ing with the Badgers this year. Il- 
literacy sometimes strikes those big 
teams in hard places. 



Slattery, a Mines player of abilitj', 
whose return to the game was in 
doubt for a while, is again with the 
Blue and White team and shows 
promise of being a star half back. 
However, his eligibility' is questioned. 



Scores of last week in the east with 
the big teams: 

At Chicago — Chicago o; Indiana 6. 

At Princeton, N. J., — Princeton 12; 
New York University o. 

At Providence, R. I., — Brown o; Col- 
gate o. 

.\t Boston, — Harvard 21; Williams 
o. 

.\t .Annapolis, Aid., — Final sx;ore: 
Navv o; Rutgers o. 



THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 



Mines-Utah Saturday. 

The School of Mines eleven will 
clash with the Utah team at Salt 
Lake Saturday and the outcome of 
the game will probably show up the 
way the two aggregation will stand 
for a chance for the pennant. Re- 
ports from the Morman camp are 
anything but encouraging and the 
Mines are in the same boat. The 
alumni defeated them Saturday by a 
score of 12 to o. 



Boulder Beats Alumni. 

The University of Colorado defeat- 
ed the alumni team last Saturday 
by a score of 12 to 0. The game 
showed none of the new rule forma- 
tions and was a poor exhibition. 
Ciiach Folsom did not dare uncork 
any of his tricks and old-style foot- 
ball was the order of the day. 



D. U. Peevish About??? 

Denver University is now out with 
a story that Brusse, a good quarter- 
back who has played four years foot- 
ball but is in school, will be in their 
lineup against Boulder if McFadden 
and Stocker remain in the lineup. 
Several protests have been made con- 
cerning these men and the trouble in 
the Conference is not over yet. 



Drop Kickers Wanted. 

And badly — all through the East. 
The Tigers are fortunate in having 
the best drop kicker in the state — Van 
Stone and if predictions are of some 
weight, scores will be made by this 
route in a time of need. 

Training Table for Team. 

Manager Fnwler started his training- 
table for the members of the squad 
last week. Supper is the only meal 
served to the men at this time. Coach 
Rothgeb is with the fellows and foot- 
ball talk fairly makes the room buzz 
during the evening repast. Repartee 
and common sense relative to football 
is present at the meetings. The table 
is situated at the Student's Boarding 
club on West Cache la Poudre street. 



D. U. -Marquette Game to be Played. 

Because of the fact that the Mar- 
quette management refused to cancel 
the game scheduled with Denver U. 



lor Saturday, October 15, and that D. 
U. authorities had done all in their 
power to cancel the contest, the Colo- 
rado Faculty Athletic Conference 
voted to permit the game at last Sat- 
urday's meeting. Marquette main- 
tains tthat its athletics are clean and 
the game will be played. (By the 
way it defeated Monmouth, 32-0, poor 
D. U.) 

The conference also took up the 
matter of the eligibility of men, but 
decided on none but Marvin, a 125 
pound Boulder player, whu was de- 
clared scholastically ineligible. They 
will meet again in two weeks for final 
eligibility settlement. The players 
who are protested are: 

Denver University — Mate Walker. 

Colorado University — iMcFadden, 
Stocker and Smith. 

Miners — Slattery, Zisch and Lead- 
better. 

Colorado College — Reed. 



Still a Chance 

To Save Money By 
Buying a 

SEASON TICKET 

Three Remaining Games $2.00 



More Fence — Manager Fowler has 
had placed on the south and east 
sides of Washburn a board fence, both 
solid and high, to prevent impecunious 
spectators from watching the games 
at niibody's expense. 



TENNIS ELECTION. 



The election of permanent officers 
of the Tennis Association took place 
yesterday. The nominations for the 
positions were: 

President— Weller, Clifford. 

Vice President — Miss Bogue, Miss 
Hall. 

Sec :etary-Trea surer — Ormes. Root. 

There is a big interest in tennis this 
year and prospects look good for 
some interesting matches. 



INTERSCHOLASTIC LEAGUE 
MEETING. 

Decides on Eligibility Rules. 

At a meeting of the representatives 
of the state interscholastic league, 
held in this city last week, a new eli- 
gibility rule was inserted into the con- 
stitution of that body which provides 
that any student desiring to compete 
in interscholastic contests must have 
lieen in the institution which he repre- 
sents at least one semester. 

As before, the league will be divided 
into two sections, the northern and 
southern. Each section is in turn 
divided into two divisions, A and B. 
Class A. in the northern division will 
comprise North Denver and the 
P>i)uldcr Preps.; class B, Longmont, 
Greeley, I^oveland and Fort Collins. 

Southern division: Class A, Colo- 
rado Springs, Centennial and Central 
of Pueblo; class B, Las Animas, La 
Junta, Lamar, and Rocky Ford. The 
winners of the different sections will 
meet to decide the championship on 
Thanksgiving. 

The following officers were elected: 
President, Principal Casey of Long- 
mont; vice president. Principal R. C. 
Hill of Colorado Springs High school; 
secretary-treasurer, R. V. Foster of 
Boulder. 

The Denver High schools last year 
decided not to take part in the inter- 
scholastic league and will not meet 
any of the teams in the. League but 
will settle the championship of the 
capital city among themselves. 



The freshman foot-ball team ex- 
pects to play the Springs High schoiil 
team ne.xt Saturday, as a curtain 
raiser to the C. C. -Wyoming game. 
An interesting contest is assured. 



Work on the Hagerman Hall Gym- 
nasium is progressing rapidly, and the 
management reports that they hope 
to have the reading room and gym. 
ready for occupancy within the next 
ten days. The oft-postponed will 
then occur. 



Stanford University is considering 
the formation of a Pacific Coast De- 
bating League with the Universities 
of Washington and Oregon. 



THE TIGER 



The Waekly Newspaper of Colorado College 

A. E BRYSON Editor-in-Chief 

S. WILKIE DEAN Business Manager 

Sam J. Shelton Assistant Editor 

Richard L, Hughes Assistant Editor 

T. Wynne Ross Athletic Editor 

Robert m. Copeland Engineering Editor 

Fr d S. Baker Forestry Editor 

He, EN Canon Alumni Editor 

Mamie C. Detmoyer Exchange Editor 

Edith I,. Summers Local Editor 

J. A. Root Local Editor 

Ray H. Sayre Assistant Manager 

E. E. Hedblom Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

A. W, Donovan, C. E. Howard. Bruce Weirick, William 

Sloey, Joe Sinton, Elsie Green, Lillian Duer, Grace 

Wilson, Dorothy Cook, Dorothy Stott 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to The Tiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phones; Editor. Main 1975. Manager, Main 2073 

'^p ^'^-^ - Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
~^SsiiJgJS>*'' Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



The Student Commission. 

The Student C>)mmission, the gov- 
erning board of the Associated Stu- 
dents, is entering on its second year 
of existence. The creation of this 
body has solved one of the perplexing 
problems that Colorado College has 
had to deal with — that of having some 
board which is the recognized author- 
ity of the students and which has the 
power to do things. That the Commis- 
sion has been successful is putting it 
mildly. It has instituted already 

several plans which would probably 
never have been instituted otherwise 
and which ha\'e done much to better 
conditions in the College. In keep- 
ing with the record of last year, the 
Commission is discussing new plans; 
it has already decreed that freshmen 
shall wear the regulation cap — a thing 
that has been discussed for some 
years, but which has been lacking 'u 
some authoritati\e body to back it up. 
It has taken up the Honor System 
and prospects look good for its adop- 
tion. Colorado College is indeed, 
fortunate in ha\ing such bodies as the 
Student Commission, the Student Self 
Government Board and the Pan-Hel- 
lenic Council, all made up entirely of 
students and working for the welfare 
of the College by working for the stu- 
dents themsel\-es. 

Chapel Order. 

In history, some in(li\-idual has ob- 



served, very often the same thing 
happens twice; so too with Tiger 
editors— they are very prone to make 
about the same observations from 
year to year and very often the causes 
of these observations go on as before. 
For several years past, the matter of 
Chapel conduct has called forth re- 
marks and various and sundry ex- 
[tlicatives on the part of the faculty 
and others who are trying to reform 
things in general. This year, even 
after numerous pleas for better Chapel 
conduct, it continues to be as bad as 
ever. So it becomes our duty to call 
attention to the deficiencies and to 
scold with the hopes of improving 
matters. Chapel is called for 9:16 a. 
m., but it usually starts several 
minutes later, as the temptation to 
loiter outside is 'too great. Such de- 
lay necessarily cuts down the period 
which -follows and causes no little 
inconvenience to the professors who 
are unfortunate enough to have classes 
at that hour. Worse than this, how- 
ever, is the continuous buzz that starts 
immediately and lasts, in some cases, 
until the Chapel exercises are finished. 
Chapel stands for certain distinct 
principles. Renewing old acquaint- 
ances, and the discussion of current 
events are not among those principles. 
The improvement of these exercises 
lies largely with the upper-classmen. 
If the present conditions continue the 
freshmen are not to be blamed if they 
continue, but if the upper-classmen 
will take the matter in hand, the new 
students will soon learn what is ex- 
pected of them during Chapel exer- 
cises. 

The Honor System. 

In political life, there are certain 
principles which all admit to be good, 
and which continue to bob up from 
time to time even after having been 
voted down or lost from loss of inter- 
est or demand for them. The same is 
true in college life and the Honor 
System is one of these principles 
which will always be discussed until 
finally adopted. The Honor System 
is not new to Colorado College an^d 
little that is new can be said for or 
against it. Though it is not gener- 
ally in \ogue in the College, there are 
some professors who use it; it has 
never been voted down by the stu- 
dents of the College, largely because 
the e has been no organization to 
present it and push it. The Student 
Commission thinks the time is ripe 
for Colorado College to institute the 



system here and the faculty have prac- 
tically agreed that if there is a de- 
mand for it, and a sentiment that will 
support it, they are willing that it 
should be started. 

There is remarkably little dishon- 
esty in the College and what little 
there is, is largely among the new stu- 
dents who come from the high schools 
where student sentiment does not dis- 
countenance cheating but rather 
laughs at it and encourages it. 

The arguments for the system-- are 
too well known to be repeated. The 
principal argument against it has al- 
wa\'s been the unwillingness to act 
the part of tale-bearer in reporting 
dishonest students. While there are 
few of us who would willingly report 
such a person, thee are few who 
would object to telling the individual 
personally that he is doing something 
which is not in line with the traditions 
of the College. If the student per- 
sisted in cheating, he would deserve 
to be reported. 

Colorado College has always been 
ready and willing, and in many cases 
has taken the lead, in adopting any 
advancement which is admittedly 
good and which will improve the stu- 
dent life. Here is an opportunity 
for the students to again demonstrate 
their good judgment by adopting and 
enforcing the Honor System. 

The Men's Mass Meeting. 

The College Y. M. C. A. this year 
inaugurated the plan of having bi- 
monthly mass meetings for the men 
of the college. These meetings are 
being addressed by prominent men 
and no expense or trouble is being 
saved to make them unusually worth 
while. In spite of the inducements 
that have been offered, however, the 
attndance has not been very encour- 
ageing. It is an imposition to ask such 
men here as the Y. M. C. A. have been 
bringing and expect to bring in 
the future, when the interest shown is 
so small. It is urged that every man 
in college show his support of the 
Association and the speakers by giv- 
ing an hour every other week to hear- 
ing- these speakers who have a real 
message for college men. 



F"riends of Miss Angle Al. Haydcn, 
ex-io, last week recei\'ed invitations 
to her wedding. The groom is a Mr. 
Odes Laird of Glen Arm, 111. 



THE TIGER 



FORESTRY CLUB OPENS 

On Tuesday of last week, the For- 
estry Club held their first meeting of 
the year in the Polytechnic Library. 
The meeting ■ was opened with a 
speech of welcome to the freshmen, 
who were the special guests of the 
club, by Pres. F. H. Rice. 

Following this, the principal talk of 
the evening was given by Prof. Cool- 
idge, on the St. Paul convention, 
which he attended this summer. It 
was this convention which Pres. Taft 
addressed on the subject of conserva- 
tion and in which he advocated t'"t 
large irrigation and drainage projects 
be done by the states rather than by 
the National government, which 
Roosevelt has opposed in his late 
New Nationalism speeches. 

After Prof. Cooledge's interesting 
talk a business meeting was held. The 
officers of last year were held over to 
this semester, so the only elections 
were to fill vacancies. Stewart was 
elected Secretary to take the place of 
E. E. Walker, who graduated last 
year. A program committee consist- 
ing of Prof. Coolidge, Moye, and 
Gardener was also chosen. 

After this business meeting refresh- 
ments, consisting of "wienies'' and 
soda pop were served and a general 
social time was indulged in. 

The meeting wa^ not attended as 
well as it should have been, either by 
Freshmen or the other men. This 
club should be heartily supported by 
every Forester, as it is the only or- 
ganization of the School of Forestry, 
and is an aid to those attending the 
meetings- in their class-room work. 
At these meetings topics of vital in- 
terest to foresters are discussed, and 
a good time is had as well. It may 
interest those thinking of joining to 
know that the dues will be one dollar 
if paid before November ist, after 
which $1.25 will be charged. 

.At present the plans for the next 
meeting are to have an oyster 
feed at the College Inn. followed by 
short speeches in the Polytechnic Li- 
b-'ary. Every Forester is urged to be 
present at that time. 



ENGINEERS SHOW COLORS. 



Brotherhood Appears in Distinctive 
Hats. 



erhood of Engineers in a small brown 
felt hat with a green band and the 
class numerals in green felt. All up- 
per class engineers are members of 
the organization that is decorated with 
the new hat. 

The B. E. was founded last year 
and up to the present time has only 
lived up to its expressed intention of 
relieving the boredom in student af- 
fairs on a couple of occasions, notably 
a presentation of the rooters' hat of 
last year to Dean Cajori of the En- 
gineering School. The present action 
is a sign of the readiness of the 
"grinds" to engage in a concerted ef- 
fort for the growth of permanent in- 
signia. 

As the Student Commission provid- 
ed a green button for the caps of the 
Freshmen in engineering these caps 
are in harmony with the Brotherhood 
hat. All Freshmen in the Engineer- 
ing School are apprentices in the 
Brotherhood as soon as they register 
for the second semester. 

Although the wearers of the brown 
and green were comparatively few at 
chapel their head covering was suffi- 
ciently striking to cause favorable 
comment. 



GREEN HONORED. 



Fred M. Green, last year associate 
professor of electrical engineering in 
Colorado College, has won a signal 
honor in his appointment as second 
lieutenant, in the United States Coast 
artillery as a result of competitive ex- 
aminations taken by more than 200 
applicants. Of the 68 applicants who 
passed the examination, the twelve 
men who received the highest marks 
were immediately appointed as second 
lieutenants by the war department. 
Prof. Green, who is a graduate of the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technolo- 
gy, received the second highest mark 
ever given by the department in an 
examination of this class. 



P. G. Notice — Saturday, October 
IS is the last day for registering for 
post-graduate work. 



THE RIVALS. 



Dramatic Club Starts Its Work. 



Sir Lucius O'Grigger ..Carrie Burger 

Fag Lulu Kramer 

Mrs. Malaprop Alta Harris 

Lydia Persis Kidder 

Julia May Wallace 

Lucy Matt Draper 

David Alyrtle King 

Thomas Grace Starbird 

The above is the cast of characters 
for "The Rivals," the farcical com- 
edy with which the Dramatic Club in- 
tends to open its _ run for this season 
at Cogswell Theater. 

The Dramatic Club has taken up 
its work with unusual zeal this year 
and the cast for "The Rivals" is 
working hard to make the best pos- 
sible showing at the first production, 
which will take place October 21. 



The chapel exercise of Tuesday 
marked the appearance of the Broth- 



Sir Anthony Absolute. . Marion Fezer 

Captain Absolute Marian Haines 

Frankland Helen Rand 

Acres Frances Hall 



REFORM IN THE AIR 

Continued from Page 1 

it was made clear that the system had 
been successful in Amherst, Williams, 
Princeton and many other colleges and 
that it failed in Cornell largely be- 
cause of the poor caliber of the men 
who were enforcing it. At Will- 
iams, the system is cherished as one 
of the most sacred traditions and vio- 
lations are exceedingly rare. 

The system has been tried in but 
few coeducational colleges and if in- 
stituted in Colorado College, it will 
be something of a new departure. In 
addition to the stock arguments in 
favor of the system, it was pointed 
out that its adoption would give the 
College something of a distinction as 
no other institution in the state and 
few in the West have adopted it. 

A committee was appointed to draw 
up the main features of the system to 
submit them to a joint meeting of the 
upperclassmen for discussion, a fin- 
ished statement to be drawn up and 
inserted in the constitution of the As- 
sociated Students if adopted by that 
body. 

This committee met later in the 
week and drew up the following sug- 
gestions: 

1. In all tests and examinations, 
professors shall remain in the room 
only long enough to answer questions 
relative to the examination. Students 
shall then be free to converse or move 
about at will but at the end of the ex- 
amination shall be required to sign 
the following statement: "I hereby 
certify that I have neither given nor 
received help in the examination." 

2. If students are detected at 
cheating, it shall be the duty of those 

Continued on Page 9. 



8 THE TIGER 

Twill Rain Sometime ^ ---" « J>-; -^ ^ ^ry m- 

surance, rashionable overcoat- 
ing, in exclusive patterns, made water-proof without affecting the finish of 
the cloths, cut and tailored to the smart military, auto, tourist and long 
overcoat models. Hart Schafifner & Marx and Gadoco Raincoats |15 to 
35. Overcoats |15 to 60. 

'M GANO-DCR^?NS» 




FIRST STUDENTS' SUMMER 
CONFERENCE IN KOREA. 



Phil Gillette, Colorado College Grad- 
uate, Chairman of Pioneer 
Movement. 



Phil Gillette 'yg. General Secretary 
of the Y. M. C. A. in Seoul, Korea, 
one of the most successful Christian 
Associations in the Far East, writes 
e^f the work of the first Students' 
Summer Conference in Korea. Gil- 
lette was chairman of the committee 
in charge and repr^rts that the new 
movement was highly successful. 

He writes as follows: 

"Pook. Han is a rugged mountain, 
rising 2,300 feet above the walls of 
Seoul, the capital of old Korea. Its 
far side is cut by a numlier of canons 
and in one of these is a delightful 
grove, surrounding a royal tomb. A 
considerable stream of water flows 
through the canon and affords some 
b.ithing facilities. The Buddhists 
have located one of their largest 
monasteries in tins secluded spot and 
for a consideration agreed to rent it 
for a week to tiie Christian Student 
Movement of Korea. The complete 
control of four temple buildings, not- 
withstanding the fact that the idols 
remained therein was thus secured for 
the services. While the fullest re- 
spect and consideration was paid tc 
these shrines and their inmates, it was 



Two airy front rooms, splendidly fur- 
nished, all modern conveniences, as- 
sessible to carline and good table board. 
No boarding house proposition, but a 
private family where you can have the 
comforts and associations of a home. 

1629 North Tejon Street 
Phone 1570 



a >triking thing to see prayer groups 
of Christians gathered before the 
rows of Buddhas. Heads were indeed 
bowed before idols but the earnest 
words of confession, heart-longing 
and consecration to Christ were in 
striking contrast to the customary 
wailings and poundings on drums and 
cymbals that occurs in the presence 
of these images. The athletic games 
and bathing sports were also a bit off 
the ordinary routine of a Buddhist 
monastery. 

After it v\as all over the Head 
Priest remarked that it was "The 
st.angest thing that had ever occurred 
in my temple.'' When he first agreed 
to rent the place and was told that a 
crowd of Korean students were to 
come and stay with him for a week 
he took it for granted, he said, that 
they would bring the customary danc- 
ing girls and strijng drink, whereas 
to his amazement there had not bee» 
a single quarrel. 

Sixty-two delegates .including . the 
speakers, were present from ten dif- 
ferent schools. It being tlie first con- 
ference of the kind in Korea the lead- 
ers were desirous of restricting the 
attendance to thirty-five or forty and 
thus makfe it possible to so direct the 
details of the daily life and program 
as to establish customs that should 
prevail in future conferences. Al- 
though the attendance was larger than 
was desired, from this above men- 
tioned standpoint, from the spirit- 
ual point of view the session was a 
success. The sight of 3'oung men 
studying their Bibles or engaged in 
pri\'ate prayer in distant parts of the 
grove or on tb.e mountain, the general 
adoption of the Morning Watch, and 
the quiet announcements of twenty- 
two men on the last evening that they 
had decided to consecrate their lives 
to Christian service, constituted the 
strongest kind of visible proof that 
the aim of the gathering was being 
secured. Six of these twenty-two 



The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies, Fixtures 

208 N. Tejon Street Phones Main 812, 830 

Lowell-Meservey Hdw. Co. 

Dealers in Paints, Oil, Glass, Every- 
thing in Hardware 



106 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springs 



Learn Wireless and Railroad 

TelfidranllV ' Shoitage of fully 10.000 Oper- 
^"'Sl' **r|'7 ■ ators on account of S-hour law 
and extensive "wireless" development. We operate 
under direct supervision of Telegraph Officials and 
positively place ail students wlien qualified. Write for 
catalogue. NATIONAL TELEGRAPH INST., Cinci nati, 
Philadelphia, Memphis, Davenport, la., Columbia, S. C, 
Portia d. Ore. 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co. 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 

DEXTER & HUDSON 

EXCHANGE BARBER 
SHOP 

Room 307, Third Floor 
Exchange Bank Building 



The Dentan 

Printing Company 

No. 9 So. Cascade Auenue 

FIRST-CLASS PRINTING 
at REASONABLE RATES 

Telepnone Main No. 602 




Fall 1910 Last and Pattern 



THE TIGER 9 

Gentlemen and Ladies of Colorado College 

We rise to announce the young men's and young ladies' tine 
Fall 1910 footwear. We have striven to make the new offer- 
ings even better than the strong showings of past seasons. 
We cordially bespeak your 
kind consideration when in 
need of nobby footwear, at 
$2.50, 3.00, 3.50, 4. 00 to 5.00 




FTT FOR EVERY FOOT^:^-- — 



THE 

EAI 

HdEC 



107 South Tejon Street 




Deichmann & Douglas 
Floral Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER. Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 
Students' Trade Solicited 



1 1 1 N. Tejon St. 



Telephone 1593 



To College 
Men and Women 
We Are Known as 
"The Satisfactory 
Jeweler". To 
New Ones We 
Soon Will Be. 



Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak Ave.. 

' 'Satisfactory Jewelry 

Store" 



WE LOAN MONEY 

ON ALL VALUABLES 

Big line of new and unredeemed 
Drawing Instruments .'. Diamonds 
Watches and Jewelry ot all descrip- 
tions. Firearms and Fishing Tackle, 
Musical Instruments and hundreds 
of other articles 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 



men definitely determined to become 
pastors, one a doctor ad one a 
teacher. 

Since returning from the monntain 
we have heard of a number of the del- 
egates who have made a beginning 
and are preaching the Gospel in ac- 
cordance with the consecration they 
made at this time., 

P. L. GILLETTE, 
Chairman of the Conference. 



REFORM IN THE AIR 

Continued from Page 7. 

present to warn him. If the student 
pe.'sists or repeats the cheating, he 
shall be reported to the Board. 

3. There shall be two boards for 
the hearing of any cases that may 
arise. One for the men, made up of 
men of the Student Commission. One 
for the women, made up of a joint 
board of the women of the Student 
Commission and the Women's Stu- 
dent Go^'^r^ment Board. 

4. These boards shall have power 
to punish. 

If proven guilty, a student who 
has been in the College one year or 
more shall be e.xpelled from the in- 
stitution. First year students shall 
be suspended if proven guilty. 

It was decided that only two Pan- 
pans are to be held before the first of 
the year, one on November ro and 
another on December 15. 

The question of yell leadership was 
discussed but no action was taken. 
The matter of head-dress was again 
taken up and it was decided that the 
new rules go into effect immediately 
upon arrival of the freshmen caps. 



Walter A, Nead was recently elected 
president of the Colorado Springs Es- 
peranto society. 



Rert Stiles "09 is an instructor in 
the Salem, Ore., high school. 



Antlers 

Turkish Baths 

(Opposite Elks Club) 
Open Day and Night 

BATHS OF ALL KINDS. Also Chiro- 
pady and Swedish Massage. Treat- 
ment at Residence by Appointment. 

CARL J. WENBERG, Prop. 

Graduate Swedish Masseur 

Phone Red 33 14 E. Bijou Street 



You will find here a vast as- 
sortment of classy styles, 
in suits and overcoats, such 
as careful dressers wear. 



lO'/o Discount to Students 

THE MAY CO. 

23 North Tejon Street 

This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 

Company 




Headquarters for 

College Footwear 



10 



THE TIGER 



MANHATTAN 
SHIRTS 



THE*IUB 



FOWNS 
GLOVES 



We have never been in better readiness to 
please young men of varied tastes. It's an 
easy matter to settle the overcoat or suit 
question here. Handsome grays, tans, 
brow^ns, greenish casts as well as the more 
sombre effects in dark mixtures, plain blues 
and blacks. Suits and overcoats made by 
Society Brand ^20.00 to $40.00. 



Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton-Rustic Home 

r\ • ^ No. 419 South El Paso St. 

UBlYy a) Phone Main 442 

Photography 

In All Its Branches 

Clark 

112 South Tejon St. 
Special Discount to y^ II Students 

Shoe Repairing. Clothes Cleaned and Pressed. 
Second-Hand Shoes a d Clothing 

J. H. PERKINS 



TAS. Cascade 



Colorado Springs 



PRATT, The Barber 

Is At the Alta Vista Hotel 

He Solicits the Patronage of the 
College Boys 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Mabel Wolff ex-'io is teaching in 
the Glenwood Manual Training school 
which is just outside Chicago. 



Kate Ashlev '09 is in quarantine in 
Cripple Creek with a light case of 
scarlet fever. 



Ruth Jameyson ex-'io was married 
in September to Ralph Bergen. They 
will reside in Millers, Nevada, where 
Mr. Bergen is connected with the re- 
duction mills. 



Ethel Harrington '04 and Louis 
Stillman '04 were married in August. 
They have left for Alanila where they 
will make their home. 



Lucy Ferril cx-'i2 is teaching in 
K;inorado. 



Mrs. Alabel Barbee Lee '05 is doing 
settlement work in connection with 
the Y. W. C, A. in Los Angeles. 

The marriage of Ethel McLain ex- 
'10 to Arthur Biggs ex-' 11 will take 
place on the twenty-sixth of the 
month. 

Carl l>lackman '10 is pledged to 
Omicron Upsilon Phi, a medical fra- 
ternity in Boulder. 



WINDOW SLEEPING TENTS 



THE OUT 


WEST 


TEIMT AND AWNING CO. 


1132 NORTH TEJON STREET 





Phone 917 



Genevra McCaw '10 is teaching at 
Geneva, Missouri. 



GEO. R. BERGEN, 0. D. 

MANF'G OPTICIAN 
Eyes Tested 611-12 Exch. Nat. Bank BIdg. 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented 
and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing a Typewriter. The 
New No. 10 Model Has All Latest 
Improvements 

Zimmerman Supply 

Company 



22 E. Kiowa St. 
Phone Main 374 



Established 189 



Furniture, Furnishings 

For College Use 

The Fred S. Tucker 

Furniture Company 

106-108 North Tejon Street 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 



THE TIGER 



11 



A LITTLE BIT BETTER THAN OTHERS 

BENSON & HEDGES CIGARETTES 

Turkish and Russian, Gold Tips, Cork Tips, Plain and Mouth Piece. 

Perfumed and Not Perfumed 



HUGHES 

North 1 *J Tejon 



Gel Your Picnic Supplies 

^= AT = 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER. Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Notary Public 

A. J. LAWTON 

Real Estate, Loans and Insurance 
lOYz E.Pike's Peak Ave., Colorado Springs 

Just Received 

A Large Stock of 
C. C. PENNANTS 

Our Prices are Low but in Order 
to Move This Stock Quickly We 
Will Give a Japanese Lacquered 
Cane Free with Each Pennant 

The Murray Drug Co. 

(Opposite Campus) 



LE CERCLE FRANCAIS. 

Program, Jeudi, 13 Oct. 1910. 

Aliisique Mile. Butler 

Courrier de la Semaine. 
La Situation en Portugal 

Mile. Hemenway 
Lecture Mile. Reinhardt 

Ticknor Study, a huit Inter. 

CICERONIAN CLUB. 

Program, Oct. 14. 

Current Events Rowbotham 

Debate- 
Affirmative — Harrison, Scott. 
Negative — Harootunian, Guy. 

The Revolution in Portugal. .Copeland 

Extempore Speeches. 

Critic's Report Critic 



HYPATIA PROGRAM, OCT. 14. 

Mrs. Slocum will talk on the Pas- 
sion PlaJ^ 



CONTEMPORARY PROGRAM 
FOR OCT. 14. 

Current events 

Sharley Pike, Darliska Crandel 



APOLLONIAN PROGRAM. 

October 14, 1910. 

Speech — The present relations be- 
tween Japan and Korea Allen 

Speech — Why business has been de- 
pressed Crow 

Music Griswold 

Debate — Resolved, That Colorado 
should adopt the principles of the Ini- 
tiative and and Rofeendum. 
Aftirmative. Negative. 

Friend. Hill, 

Black. . Appell. 

Meetings are open and new men 
are cordially in^■ite(I to attend. 



James Wilson e-v-'io is employed in 
a bank in Clarinda, Ljwa. 



Barbecue Program Committee — The 

barbecue program committee upon 
which falls the responsibility of find- 
ing new and novel stunts to entertain 
the multitude consists of the follow- 
ing sophomores: A. Lee Golden, 
chairman; W. B. Winchell, Walter 
LeClere, Miss Phillips and Miss 
Stott. The committee has had sev- 
eral meetings, but has not given out 
any definite plans. 



FOTi THE 

Most Exclusive Millinery 

CALL ON 

Mme, M. D. Hillmer 

6 East Pike's Peak A-venue 

Finest of Material and 
litest of IV rk m ansh ip 



Phone Black 395 



Colorado Springs 



BOOKS 

Stationery, Pictures and 

Novelties at 

The Pike's Peak Book & Stationery Co 



27-271 2 South Tejon Street 



Peone Black 354 



Watch theCapsYouMeet 

You won't need an intro- 
duction to the HEIDCAP. 
It is not a mere head cover- 
ing. It has character. It 
gives character to the wear- 
er. It is made of exclusive 
Engh'sh cap cloths. It is a 
thoroughbred. Try on a 
HEIDCAP. 



12 



THE TIGER 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co 
Groceries and 



Meats 



Jtf.*M 







115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



MUETH'S 

The Place Where the Stand- 
ard Is Never Lowered. High 
Class Goods at Reasonable 
Prices. Ice Cream, Hot 
and Cold Drinks. 

Lunches and Afternoon Teas 
Ask Any Old Student 

CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 



5 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 



Mention THE TIGER when 
Patronizing Our Advertiserr 

The D. Y. Butcher Drug Co. 

DRUGS, KODAKS, SUPPLIES 

Free and Prompt Delivery 
Cor. Opposite P. 0. Phones 90 and 750 




Girls' Glee Club Officers — The Girls' 
Glee Club had election of officer^ 
Moncla}'. Those elected were: Presi- 
dent, Alary Randolph, first vice presi-' 
dent, Alice Alarsh; second vice presi- 
dent, Alarfha Phillips, secretary-treas- 
urer, Flora Crowley. 



Sophs Have Their Turn — President 
and Mrs. Slocum. were at home last 
Tuesday evening. The usual good 
time was had and all went away with a 
warmer spot in their hearts for "Mr. 
and Mrs. Prexy" and a better ac- 
quaintance among themselves. 



Contemporary German — Con tempor- 
ary entertained her pledges with a 
German, in Ticknor Study, Saturday 
night. Mrs. Cajori assisted and a 
very delightful time was spent. The 
refreshments of Contemporary cakes 
and ice were served. 



Autumn Spread — About one hun- 
dred and fifty guests attended the 
.\utinnn Spread, given by Hypatia, 
Friday evening in McGregor Gym. 
The gym was decorated with corn 
stalks, pumpkins and autumn leaves. 
Aliss Loomis and Miss Ackley led the 
grand march. In the middle of the 
evening, supper was served. 



New ApoUonians — The following 
men were elected to membership in 
the Apollonian Club at the regular 
meeting of the Club held last Friday 
night: H. P.runner, E. Jackson, Mc- 
Coy, Beatty, Rudolf, Barnes. 



Open House — Invitations have been 
issued by the Phi Gamma Delta fra- 
te 'nity for its annual open house on 
Wednesday, October 19. The afifair 
is for all the College students, faculty 
and friends, and the Fraternity asks 
that anv wlm. through oversight, were 
not given in\itations consider this no- 
tice a? an invitation. 



Big Geology Class — The class in 
Geology inspected the Ca\-e of the 
Winds last Saturday. Geolngj- be- 
came very popular suddenly and the 
cla>^ which urdina ily hasabout thirty 
members incre:ised to fifty. 



No More Wrinkles 

I have a rerrftdy that will speedily eradicate 
any case of wrinkles — no matter how bad or 
what the cause. It makes old faces look 
young, removes all lines and wrinkles, 
corrects flabby or withered skin, makes thin 
faces plump, fills out hollow cheeks, will 
develop any part of the body round and full 
without any massaging. Call at my parlors 
and I will explain fully and convince you. 

Miss N. E. Johnson 



Phone 687 



324 N. Tejon Street 



JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 

Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tej«n Strec 

The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Gives 
Special Attention to Accounts of Students 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, Prfsident Ira Harr ,V-President 

M. C. Gile Wm. F. Richards 

Donald D. Wilfiey, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M. 

Mrs. Anna Bethman 

Hair Dressing Parlors 

Moles and Superfluous Hair Removed 

with Electricity. Hair Goods Made 

To Order a Specialty 

Phone Red 394 27 East Kiowa Street 



Colorado 
College 
Students 



Remember We Do Framing 
as It Ought To Be Done and 
at Right Prices 



WHITNEY and 
GRIMWOOD 

20 North Tejon St eet 
Opera House Block 



THE TIGER 



15 



Memory Books 

Freshmen should get 
one of these fine books 
at once. The only right 
way to preserve the 
programs, souvenirs and 
write-ups of College life. 
Only $1.25 each. 

THE OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 

12 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 

High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



Phone Main 2055 



Art Needle Work 



THE HUNT & VAN NICE 
Art Specialty Store 

Stamping, Designing, Perforating, Linens, 
Lawns, Best Hand-Painted China 



8 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs, Co/ 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co. 



II Local Department || 




Spaiigler has been notified that his 
essay on "Total Abstinence — Its \'ahu' 
to a Life," which hist spring was 
awarded the first prize in the local 
W. C. T. U. contest, was also success- 
ful in the Interstate contest. 



Stubby Dean was laid up for several 
days last week by a sprained back. 

Frank Newhouse visited the Springs 
last Thursday. 



■'Sil" Bernard, wdio was captain of 
the base ball team four years ago, vis- 
ited the College this past week. 



Miss Barclay chaperoned six Alpha 
Tau Deltas and their friends to Bruin 
Inn Wednesday evening. 



Geddes and Jack Carey spent Satur 
day and Sunday in Denver. 



Fred Harbert ex-'u \isited the Col- 
lege last week. 



Alta Harris spent the week end 
with Elsie Greene at her home in 
Denver. 

Lillian Duer went tn DeuA-er Satur- 
day morning. 

Marian HofTman \isited her cousin 
in Denver over Sunday. 

The Ancient Order of the Dais ad- 
journed tri the Plaza Monday after- 
noon to register. 



Dick Morrison is back in town. 

Earl Hille's father visited him Sun- 
day. 



Sayrc, Esmay and Winnan were in 
Den\er o^•er Sunday. 



IMrs. Steele, Shorty's mother, has 
been in the cit}' for several days. 



Coach and Mrs. Rothgeb, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Patterson took dinner at 
the Alpha Tau Delta house Sunday. 



Violet Hopper entertained her 
mother at the College during the 
week end. 



Hunt Up 

Bissell's Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

Seldomridde Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Refall Dealers io 
Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



A "Burgess Spread" 

Perhaps you Freshies don't know 
what that is; but to us old C. C. 
men it means much — very much. 
The finest delicatessen department, 
a superb bakery, a candy shop that 
possesses the essentials of purity and 
the added virtues of thorough work- 
manship and artistic individuality. 
You'll be present this semester at more 
than one strictly "Burgess" function 

W. N. Burgess— Grocer 



112-114 N. Tejon Street 



Phone 83 



FREE 

Shoe Repairing Absolutely Free 
of Charge for Entire Term of 
1910-1911 to the College Stu- 
dent Submitting the Best Ad for 

PETE'S 

Shoe Shop 

230 East Dale Street 

Men's Sewed Soles 75c; Ladies, 65c 
Rubber Heels, 35c 



14 



THE 'I' I G K B 



$1.00 $1.00 

Young Men 

For $1.00 per month, we sponge, press and do minor repairing on one 
suit, or one overcoat, or two pairs of trousers, each week; calling for 
and deliverieg same in our wardrobe, dustproof wagons. We claim 
to do the best work in the city. A trial from you will allow us to 
prove our claim. 

Special Prices Given to the Young Women of 
the College. Get Our Price List. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



Agents: Bert Siddons 
Glenn Bowers 




T. E. AIKEN 

Taxidermist, Furrier 

Dealer in Souvenirs and Novelties 
12 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

For Best and Quick Delivery 

SEE 

The Monument Coal Co. 

28 East Kiowa Street 



William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



THE 

Crissey & Fowler 
Lumber Co. 



Phone 101 



117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 



Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 

A. S. BLAKE 

Is the Man to See 

107 North Tejon Phone 465 



Nickle Ware 



Cutlery 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



and Cleaners. 



Emily Mills 'lo spent Sunday with 
friends at the College. 



Miss Brown and Mrs. Hall took a 
trip Friday to Calhan to visit Emily 
Mills. 



Mr. Morton went to Denver Friday. 



Gil Carey and Van Stone spent tht 
week end in Denver. 



Broken Lenses 
Duplicated 



Phone Black 233 
Colorado Souvenirs 



C. B. LAUTERMAN 

Jeweler and Manufac- 
turing Optician 

121 N. TEJON STREET Colorado Springs 



10c STORE Km KORE! 

THE EIMPORIUIVI 

1 10 S. TEJON STREET 



College Inn 

Freshmen!! 

Tiiis Is the Place for 

GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



Wakefield spent Saturday and Sun- 
day at his home in Loveland. 



Miss Louise Wallace visited over 
Sunday with Miss Charlotte Eversole. 

Remember, when planning your social 
stunts, that it is a mark of "The Nobility" 
to go to Noble's for your refreshments. 
Corner Tejon and Bijou. 



Eloise Shellabarger is ill in the in- 
firmary. 



Maude Griffith has been in the in- 
firmary witli a badly sprained ankle. 



May and Ruth Wallace entertained 
their cousin, Miss Louise Wallace Sat- 
urday and Sunday. 



Katherine True, Anne Baker and 
June Musser entertained some friends 
at a shriinp supper Wednesday even- 
ing. 



Bertha Price entertained a few 
friends at a chafing-dish party Thurs- 
dav evening. 



H. D. Judson ex-'ii and his wife vis- 
itcrl the College last week. 



Fine Watch Work 



Diamond Setting a Specialty 



H. E. Kapelke 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 



130 E, Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 



Grand Union Tea Co. 

Importers of Fine Teas and 
Coffees 

Phone Main 2678 220 N. Tejon St. 



On hand as usual 
but just a little better 
equipped for serving your 
needs — 



The 

WATERMAN 

PRESS 

PRINTERS and 
BINDERS 



THE TIGER 



15 



Miss Relic Slieltfiii left for her home 
Tuesday after visiting her brother the 
past two weeks. 



Better come down on the field these 
evenings and watch the team practice. 

Gwendolyn Hedgcock spent Satur- 
day and Sunday in Denver. 

Marian Haines entertained several 
THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

'The College Favorite ' 



The Favorite Shopping 

Place for the College 

Woman 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 



106"2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



• 



Star 
Laundry 



The College Laundry 

The ONLY Laundry which advertises in 
The Tiger. We give 20% discount to you 
The best work in the state for as low a 
price as any. 

B. J. DICKSON, Agent Phone Main 342 

W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



119 N. Tejon 



Pbone Main 900 



/^- 



SHIRTS 

of 

Quality 

$2, $1.50, $1 



ADLER 
ROCHESTER 



HATS 

See the Latest 

for $3 

GORTON'S 



'^ 



fine suits and overcoats are sold at "Gorton's" the 
house of good clothes and nothing else. Slip into an 
Adler suit or overcoat and see the totally different 
kind. Clothes that are guaranteed for life, a new 
suit or the money back. Suits and overcoats $35.00, 
$30.00, $25.00 and $20.00. 

Specialists in Good Clothes and Nothing Else 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 



^ 




E. Pike's Peak 
113 



Correct Dress for Men. ^ 



■J 



sophomores at supper Sunday even- 
in. g. 



Several sophomore girls took break- 
fast at Bruin Inn Saturday. 



Allen is spending this week in tlie 
northern part of the state. 

David R. Smiley, who for the last 
year has been doing the cartoon work 
on the Tiger, has accepted an offer 
from the Colorado Springs Gazette to 
do cartooning for that paper. Smiley 
was oiifered a good position on an 
Omaha newspaper this fall, but his de- 
sire to return to college kept him from 
accepting. IMr. Smiley will continue 
his work in college while working for 
the local paper. 



Harry Esmay was forced to stay 
out of school a few days this week 
because of a seriously sprained foot. 



Prohibition Representative — Mr. W. 

C. Warner, the travelling secretary of 
the Intercollegiate Prohibition League, 
spoke at chapel Monday. 



Mrs. Tone Wallace who will be re- 
membered as Anne Stocks ex-'i2, has 
returned vvith her daughter to Geor- 
gia, after a visit in this city. 

Wallen, formerly of Carlton College 
in Minnesota and a football man, has 
registered as a junior forester. He 
is iiledged to Phi Gamma Delta. 



Cowdery of West Denver is pledge( 
to Phi Gamma Delta. 



Miss Brown took a day ofif to visit the 
county fair at Calhan, Colo. 



Dern's Freshly Roasted Coffee 

will make 10 more cups to the lb. 
than Eastern roasted coffee 



29 S. Tejon Street 



Phone 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 



Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence. 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 956 



The College 
Photo Studio 




Aj^ygTW^ay 




Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 

THE 

Gowdy-Simmons Printing Co. 

PRINTERS, ENGRAVERS 

21 N Tejon Street 



jLy^ 



16 



THE TIOER 



Here are the kind of Good 

Clothes you see advertised nationally. 

Stein-Bloch Michaels-Stern 

Rogers-Peet Sampeck 
They are Good Clothes for energetic, 
live-wire men everywhere. 



They are good enough for you — none 
better made anywhere or we would include 
them in this showing at $15, $20, $25. 

Then, too, your new Fall Hat is here at 

s?3.00, $4.00, $5.00. 



8 N. Tejon Street 



(Fei«lumSfeecirer G 



28 E. Pike's Peak 




Style and Quality at the Right Price 

For styles in young men's shoes that are "different," that have class and character, look 
this way. We are making a specialty of snappy styles that appeal to young men, our 
showing is especially strong in gun metal, tan and 
patent leathers in blucher and button patterns, 
splendid values for 



$3.50, $4.0C, $4,50 and $S.OO 




SHOIS THAT SATISFY 



22 S TEJON ST. 



# 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



% 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 

Departments — College of Arts and 
Science, E. S. PARSONS, Dean. 

School of Engineering, F. CAJORI, Dean 
School of Forestry, W. C. STURGIS, Dean 
School of Music, E. D. HALE, Dean 



Manitou Park — Field Laboratory 
of the School of Forestry 



^ 



It Takes a Rich Conversation to Sell Poor Clothes. Gatterer*s 
Clothes Sell Themselves. Don 't Overlook the Browns for Fall 

GEO. J. GA TTERER 

216 North Tejon Street ^ ^Telephone Main 1247 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF 

COLORADO COLLEGE 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., OCTOBER 21, 1910 



Vol. XIII 



Number 6 



OPERETTA 
TO BE 

GIVEN 



JUNIOR STUNT TO OCCUR ON 
NOVEMBER 22nd 



The Little Tycoon Selec ed — Camp- 
bell, Manager— ?,.r. Richer ds Will 
Coach. 






The ccmn.iltL-e in charge of 
the Juni r Operetta, acting 
upon the acK'ice of Dr. Rich- 
ards, who has been chosen 
trainer, hi'.s decided upon "The 
Little T\'C:;on" as the play to 
be given. 

There vvil be a junior operetta this 
3-ear. Miss Loomis, when interviewed 
by the committee, said "yes," and then 
she enumerated conditions. But con- 
ditions included, the operetta will be 
given and the date is November 22. 
Mark that on ynur calendar. The jun- 
ior class met last week, and upon hear- 
ing the favorable report of the com- 
mittee, procee;'cd imme-hately to elect a 
manager and a committee to select the 
operetta to b; given. Mr. C. S. Camp- 
bell, who is a r.ew man here, having 
spent his first tw ) },'ears at Wooster Uni- 
versit}', Ohio, .was elected to manage the 
production. The operetta committee 
is composed of the following members: 
Miss Eleanor Thomas, chairman ; Miss 
Rita Miller, Miss Randolph, Seldom- 
ridge, Gregg, and Sayre. The com- 
mittee met Monday of this week and de- 
cided that they would first engage a 
trainer, who should lie consulted in the 
selection of the operetta. It is prob- 
able that Mr. Richards, who is training 
the Glee Club, will be chosen for this 
position. 

The first operetta was given by the 

Continued on Page 10 



TIGERS 

GREAT 
SEND OFF 

ENTHUSIASTIC FAREWELL TO 
TEAM 

STUDENT BODY FIVE HUN- 
DRED STRONG TAKES 
TEAM TO DEPOT. 



"Tige" Leads the Procession — Team 
In Tally-ho Drawn by Students. 



Tiger spirit was uncorked in large 
quantities this morning when the 
team was escoried to the depot for 
their leave-taking for Salt Lake City, 
where they meet the Morman team 
Saturday. Practically every student 
in College did his share to give 
such a demonstration as was never 
before seen in Colorado Springs. 

Led by Tige, the mascot, the team 
in a tally-ho decorated with the Col- 
lege colors, was drawn through the 
streets of the city to the depot. 
The women did their share, too, by 
walking at the sides of the procession 
until the streets were so filled with 
happy, yelling students that traffic al- 
most stopped. 

The men who made the trip are 
Coach Rothgeb, Manager Fowler, 
Vandemoer, Haight, Thompson, 
Reed, Cook, Floyd, Bowers, Heald, 
Acker, Witherow, Hedblom, Putnam, 
Le Clere, Sinton, Black, Dickson. 



WYOMING 
THE FIRST 

VICTIM 



COLORADO COLLEGE 23, 

WYOMING o. 

Van Stone Injured, Will Be Out of 
the Game Balance of Season — For- 
ward Pass Used to Good Ad- 
vantage — Second Team 
Used in Last Quarter. 



, Displaying form which looks good for 
championship material and the develop- 
ing of a tighter line, a harder hitting 
set of backs and a classier forward pass, 
the Tigers walloped the Wyoming Uni- 
\'ersity team last Saturday by a score of 
2^1 to o. A larger score could have 
been made Ijut Coach Rothgeb was sat- 
isfied and allowed his second team, with 
the exception of the center, to play dur- 
ing the fourth quarter. The cowboys 
only hinted at scoring once, when Bur- 
gess, their snappy quarter, made an at- 
tempt to kick from placement and hit 
the cross bar. 

The first play of the game resulted in 
Van Stone's injury, a fracture of the 
small bone in his right leg above the 
ankle. Heald was injured during the 
game but was not in a serious condition. 
Acker received a badly bruised shoulder. 

Iota Reed, quarterback, certainly 
showed some "pep" and ran the Tig- 
ers wn'th the get-up-and-get-to-it spirit 
that looks good. Reed puts the team 
on the run, calls the signals while the 
men are getting ready and has the 
plaj' off before the opponents can 
wake up. With Reed and Putnam in 
the quarter place, the Tigers have lit- 
tle to fear on that proposition. 

One the kick-ofif. Van Stone was in- 

Continued on Page 5 



THE TIGER 



DEBATORS GATHERING AMMU- 
NITION. 



NEW ASSISTANT EDITOR. 



COLLEGIATE ALUMNAE OF 
AMERICAN COLLEGES. 



Work Starting on Annual Inter-So- 
ciety Event — Disarmament 
Question up for Discus- 
cussion. 



Already members of the Pearson's Lit- 
lrar\- Society and of the Apollonian Club 
are perusing volume after volume of 
l)i)und magazines and Congressional rec- 
ords ; they are pouring over works of 
sociology and political science; they are 
delving into the most remote nooks of 
tlie liljrary in search ot new matter, and 
it all is about that intersociety debate 
v.hich takes place about the middle of 
the school year. Pearson's has sub- 
mitted the following Cjuestion to the 
Apollonian Club : 

■'Rcsohed. That the United States 
sl.ov.lii institute a policy of gradual dis- 
anuaiiuut of its army and navy." 

riie Apollonians have not chosen sides 
yet, Ijut it is expected that they will do 
so within a few days, and then work will 
begin in earnest. 

Doubtless every freshman has heard of 
this contest which arouses as much spirit 
as a football' game with Boulder — even 
the women take sides — liut proliably few 
of them know that it has been an annual 
event since 1899. This debate is of 
utmost value to the College, since it has 
kept alive and encouraged the debating 
spirit, thus materially helping to develop 
men' to represent us in intercollegiate 
debates. All freshman members of the 
two societies are urged to go into the 
preliminaries, for although they may not 
be selected to represent their club, they 
can assist greatly in developing a win- 
ning team. 



LAW COURSES OFFERED. 



Three law courses are to be given 
this year — a course in elementary law, 
one in torts and one in real property. 
Mr. H. C. Birchby will conduct the 
classes in elementary law and real prop- 
erty and Mr. H. R. Arnold will conduct 
the class in torts. 

To quote from tne catalogue "These 
courses in law have been arranged with 
a view to meeting the wants of students, 
wdio, not intending to practice law, 
nevertheless desire a thorough founda- 
tion in the general principles on which 
Anglo-Saxon jurisprudence is based, 
as well as of those who intend to com- 
plete their studies and practice the pro- 
fession. The principal law schools of 
the country grant credit for work done 
in these courses." 



At a recent meeting of the Tiger 
Adz'isory board, Harry Black '12 was 
elected to the position of assistant edi- 
tor of the Tiger. Black has had con- 
siderable newspaper experience and was 
on the editorial board of the paper of 
the Victor High school. He was 
elected to the 191 1 Annual Board but 
was out of College last year and unable 
to serve. His election will strengthen 
the Tiger stafif considerably. 



FALL STYLES IN HATS. 

Fashion Editor Discourses on the 
Correct Thing in Headgear. 

Have you noticed the latest designs 
in fall millinery for men? For hard- 
working grinds like the engineers, 
brown hats with green numerals are 
very becoming, while for solemn, re- 
sponsibility bearing seniors, nothing but 
expensive Stetsons with black leather 
bands are to be tolerated. The kinder- 
gartener's are to be marked by the black 
cap with red, green or purple buttons, 
accordingly as the wearer is Liberal 
Arts, engineer or forester. Sophomores 
and juniors are maintaining silence in 
regard to their choice, but a rumor 
from the fashions department is to the 
effect that the two classes will unite in 
wearing large straw hats, decorated 
Chanticleer fashion, the feathers to be 
in College colors. While the sophomore 
president persists in denying this report, 
the junior president when interviewed, 
only smiled and declined to answer. 
The rumor has created great excitement 
about the campus. 

At a recent meeting of the class of 
191 1, the committee in charge of the se- 
lection of the senior hat gave a's their 
choice, a small semi-sombrero with a 
rim about two and a half inches wide 
and a crown of about four inches. The 
hats have been ordered and are ex- 
pected in about two weeks. 

The selection of this type of hat makes 
it imperative that underclassmen wear- 
ing hats similar to the ones chosen, dis- 
pose of them, or at least, discontinue 
to wear them as soon as the senior hats 
arrive. 



"Dramatics" are being tried this 
year at the University of Utah. It is a 
student body activity and every mem- 
ber of the student body is given an 
e(|ual chance in the competition for 
places on the cast. 



Important Meeting to Be Held in 
Colorado Springs. 



On Saturday of this week there 
will be held at Colorado College a 
session of the annual meeting of the 
National Association of the Collegiate 
Alumnae of American Colleges. 
About one hundred and fifty delegates 
from all sections of the country will 
be present. The conference will be 
opened with an address of welcome 
by President W. F. Slocum. Among 
the distinguished women present will 
be the Deans of Women of Cornell, 
Chicago, Minnesota and Wisconsin 
universities, Dr. INIary Whiton Calkins, 
of Wellesley College, Miss Grace Ab- 
bot of Hull House, Mrs. P'annie Fern 
Andrews, of the American School 
Peace League, and many others of 
national reputation. 

Dr. and Mrs. Slocum will give a re- 
ception to the entire association on 
Saturday afternoon at their residence, 
24 College Place, and r\fiss Ruth 
Loomis, the Dean of Women of Colo- 
rado College, will give a luncheon at 
Bemis Hall to the visiting deans. On 
Monday, October 24, there will be a 
conference of deans lasting all day. 

The sessions of the association will 
be held at Bemis Hall. The confer- 
ence will be one of the most important 
ever held in the city, and is another of 
the valuable congresses which Colo- 
rado College has brought to Colorado 
Springs. 



DENVER ALUMNI ELECT 
OFFICERS. 



The Alumni Association of Colo- 
rado College in Denver held its an- 
nual meeting last Thursday evening, 
October 13th, at the home of Miss 
Mabel Carlson '09. A most enjoyable 
social evening was spent by the thirty 
members present. Delicious Carlson 
ice cream and cake were served for 
refreshments. At the business meet- 
ing held during the evening the fol- 
lowing officers were elected: 

President, Mr. Montgomery Smith 
'06; vice-president, Miss Carrie Davis 
'09; treasurer, Mr. Silmon Smith '09; 

It was voted to extend a cordial in- 
vitat'on ti^ all the students and faculty 
of Colorado College to attend the an- 
nual ban(|uet of the association to be 
held this year at Thanksgiving time. 
The exact date and place of the ban- 
(juet will be announced later. 



THE TIGER 



GLEE CLUB MEMBERS CHOSEN. JUDGE VAN CISE ADDRESSES 



Mr. Richards to Train Club.— Exten- 
sive Trips Prepared — Reader to 
• Accompany Club. 



Tlie final tryouts for the Glee Club 
were held last Monday afternoon. All 
the positions were filled except two 
second tenors. The following men 
were selected: 

First tenors: Hesler, Baker, C. 
Wright. 

Second tenors: Weller. Thornell 
(two remainin.g to be selected). 

First bass: Kirkpatric'<. F. Thomp- 
son, Dcwding, Mantz. 

Second bass: Belscy, Winchell, 
Warnock, Campbell. 

Mr. Richards, who has been helping 
in the selection of the club, will sing 
with the fir^t tenors. It is planned 
this year to have a reader accompany 
the clul), and any men who wish to 
try fur this position shmdd report to 
the president. 

Although the schedule is not yet 
complete, ^Manager Siddons expects to 
give a concert in Colorado City and 
to take the club on a week-end trip to 
Victor and Cripple Creek before the 
holidays. The Christmas trip has not 
been decided upon. It is proposed to 
make it a two-weeks' trip, and to go 
either to the northern part of the state 
or to the western part. The northern 
Iri]) would include Boulder, Greeley, 
h'ort Collins. Longmont, and Love- 
land. The ti'ip to the west would prob- 
ably be more extensive. It would in- 
clude ;\lontrose. Delta, Grand Junc- 
tiin and other western slope towns. 
If both trips could be taken, as has 
been suggested the College would re- 
ceive much more valuable advertising. 

Mandolin Club. 

Alc.Millan has been agitating the for- 
mation of a mandolin club and, al- 
though there is scarcely enough ma- 
terial for a full mandolin club, it is 
probable that a string quartet com- 
posed of Seldomridge, Hall, ]^IcMillan 
and Cook will be organized to accom- 
pany the Glee Club. 



Columbia has catalogues printed in 
the Celestial tongue and sent to China 
for the information of prospective stu- 
dents. 



Prominent Denverite Delivers Force- 
ful Address. 

Judge Van Cise, of Denver, deliv- 
ered an inspiring address to a fair-sized 
audience of young men last Sunday 
afternof)n in Cogswell Theater, on 
"The Responsibilities of Leadership." 
He dealt chiefly with the opportuni- 
ties of college men, and their responsi- 
bilities in preparing themselves for 
their life work. 

."The de\'elopment of character in 
college," the speaker said, "is of more 
importance than the knowdedge to be 
derived from books." Enlarging upon 
this idea he warned the students to 
guard against foolish and unwise hab- 
its, especially the losing of one's 
highest ideals in selfish struggles. He 
emphasized particularly the need of 
moral convictions and the courage to 
stand by one's convictions. "There 
is .no place," he said, "where this is 
more necessary than in college." 



Secretary Miss Wakefield 

Treasurer Dowling 

Historian Miss Brown 



BARBECUE GINGER MEETING. 



The student body held a short meet- 
ing after chapel last Monday for the pur- 
pose of announcing the barbecue to be 
held on Washburn field Hallowe'en 
evening. Hesler introduced Lynch, the 
manager, who told of two important 
changes to be made this year. In the 
first place, he said, there is to be no bon- 
fire, but instead he promised us an im- 
provement that "will put the bonfire 
clear off the map." The other change 
is the restricting of the celebration to 
College students instead of allowing a 
promiscuous attendance as heretofore. 
He explained that the term "College stu- 
dents" includes friends and relatives of 
the students and faculty. 

Lynch was followed by Dean Cajori, 
who in his entertaining way, showed the 
anology between the centipede and the 
old style barbecue and traced out the 
gradual evolution of the Hallowe'en cel- 
ebration in the College. He concluded 
by stating that he was going to "be 
there," and urged that all students be 
with him. 



FRESHMEN ELECT PERMAN- 
ENT OFFICERS. 



The engineering school in Utah 
University provides for the sprinkling 
of the athletic field and for the entire 
campus. 



The freshman class held a meeting last 
Monday and elected the following offi- 
cers ; 

President Gotten 

Vice President Lewis 



Y. M. C. A. Bringing Noted Settle- 
ment Worker Here. 

Dr. .Stewart Coit, one of the best 
known writers and thinkers on philo- 
sophical sub.jects, a graduate of Am- 
herst College, and now a social settle- 
ment worker in luigland, will speak 
at Perkins Hall under the auspices of 
the College Y. M. C. A., October 27, 
on the subject, "Bernard .Shaw as a 
Social Symptom." Dr. Coit is a per- 
sonal friend of Dean Parsons, the two 
having been associated while in Ar- 
herst. 

Dr. Coit is calle the first settle- 
ment worker in the United States. He 
started his work in New York City, 
and this grew to the University settle- 
ment work, and from this new social 
settlement work. For the last fifteen 
years he has been living in England, 
where he was recently a candidate 
from Wakefield for Parliament. His 
recent book, "National Idealism and a 
State Church," created a sensation in 
England. 



The Griffith Club. 

Sentiment around the campus ap- 
pears to be heartily in favor of the 
suggested College political organiza- 
tion, a Ben Griffith Club. No active 
plans have been made for effecting 
the organization necessary for such a 
body, but if the proper student sup- 
port is offered, the plans can be made 
realities. It is probable that the mat- 
ter will come up at the next Commis- 
sion meeting. 

The following letters indicate what 
some of the students and alumni think 
of the plan: 

Editor of Tiger: 

I saw in the Tiger of last week 
that there was some talk of organiz- 
mg a Ben Griffith club. That is a 
great idea. Griffith is the finest and 
cleanest man on the Republican state 
ticket. He has taken a very coura- 
geous stand on the Western Slope. 
The indications are that he will run 
considerably ahead of his ticket in 
Denver. The machine candidates are 
going to be very seriously crippled as 
the Progressive organization is very 
strong. 

Personally I am going to do all I 
can to swing our people to Griffith, 
not as a matter of college loyalty, 
but because he is the kind of a man 



THE TIGER 




THE TIGER-UTAH GAME. 



Mormons Beat Miners — Gary Attends 

Game, Says Tigers Will Have to 

Work Hard to Defeat Utah. 



The University of Utah, which ag- 
gregation the Tigers will play Satur- 
day afternoon in Salt Lake, played the 
School of Mines oft" their feet last Sat- 
urday, defeating them Ijy a score of 6 
to o, and the game with the Mormon 
warriors looks like a snappy contest, 
with the odds Tigerward. The touch- 
down last Saturday was made in the 
last five minutes of play but was made 
on the new football, forward pass, etc. 
Ex-captain Gil Gary, who was in attend- 
ance at the game, sa>-s that the Mor- 
mans played the new open game in good 
style and that the Tigers will have to 
play some new football to defeat them 
as badly as they should. The Mines 
team is not playing the ball which it 
played in seasons past and there should 
be little trouble in our mixup with them 
October 29. 

Utah lines up as follows : 
Peterson, 1. e. 
Holmes, (captain) 1. t. 
Young, 1. g. 
Nielson, c. 
Christenson, r. g. 
Oleson, r. t. 
Riser, Garmichael, r. e. 
Grant, ci. b. 
Romney, 1. h. 
Bennion, r. h. 
Richardson, f. b. 

The Mines team is using the follow- 
ing line up in its regular practice: 
Rockwood, 1. e. 
Leadbetter, 1. t. 
Cadot, 1. g. 
Mertes, c. 
Calvert, r. g. 
Young, r. t. 
McGuire, r. e. 
Wolf, q. h. 
Slattery, 1. h. 
Douglas, (captain) r. h. 
Newton, f. I1. 

The Marquette team spent Sunday in 
this city looking over the points of in- 
terest. A feature of their visit was 
their josh-practice on the top of Pike's 
Peak. Several C. C. fellows met the 
team members and pronounced them a 
good sort. 



. Colorado College lost a crack quarter- 
back by accident, Lenny Van Stone, 
who will not be able to be with us again 
on account of a fracture of a bone in 
his right leg. Van Stone, in his first 
year of football, showed signs of an all- 
Colorado quarterback and a sure point 
winner for the Tigers. 



Vandemoer's pretty run through the 
cowboy team and the fact that the touch- 
down did not count. Also the width 
of the boundar\- line. 



Acker's smashing of the line — a pre- 
diction of real plunging for gains. He 
only failed to make at least five yards 
one time, when W. U. had a double line. 



"Iota Reed's brilliant work at quarter. 



Sinton and Thompson on forward 
passes. 



The tightening of the C. C. line. 



The score by quarters: 0-0 ; 17-0; 
6-0 ; 0-0 ; total 23-0. 



What a Surprise! 

Marquette was unable to score 
against D. U. last Saturday, although 
tliey had the ball in the Methodists' 
territory all the time. D. U. never 
had a chance to score, but played 
some excellent defensive football. 
They were out-experienced and out- 
classed, but they fought hard. How- 
ever, a spectator states that !\Iar- 
quette was so penalized as to take 
awa}' all cliance of a touchdown by 
them, and that D. U. with Crowley, 
looks pretty st:"ong. Crowley was the 
star of the game and his long end- 
runs were the features. The Denver 
team is weaker than last year, but 
John P. Koehler is putting up a bra^•e 
front witl: the following men: 

Age. Weight 

Large, 1. e 25 158 

Tajdor, J. t 23 162 

Dardcn, 1. g 20 161 

Green, c 24 180 

Pike, r. g. 21 190 

Curtis, r. t 22 182 

Bailey, r, e 21 160 

Walker, q. b 20 176 

Crowley, r. h. b 24 170 

Herbert, ]. h. b 2T 154 

Koonsnian, f. b 20 178 



Freshmen 0, Terrors 8. 

The Terrors defeated the freshman 
team last Saturday afternoon in the 
eye-opener of the big afternoon by a 
score of 8 to o, but the '14 team 
played better ball than the score 
vvould indicate. The organization and 
coaching of the High School lads 
proved itself valuable to them, and 
tric'< work resulted in their gains. 
Harder, the husky fresh tackle, and 
Herron, were the stars, although Ja- 
cobs, Howland and Koch played good 
football. The fresh play Centennial 
High School in Pueblo, Friday. 

Good-Bye and Good Luck, Tigers! 

The Tigers, about 16 strong, with 
Coach Rothgcb and Pat Patterson, of 
the D. & R. G. on board, left for Sah 
Lake this (Thursday) morning, with 
the best wishes of a loyal student 
body behind them. Here's wishing 
all kinds of good luck. 



BIG -PE-RADE." 



'J'he well known C. C. spirit was much 
in evidence throughout the city last Sat- 
urday evening, when the general en- 
thusiasm over the splendid showing- 
made by the team manifested itself in 
a good old-fashioned night shirt parade. 
Attired in gowns and pajamas of every 
shape and color, the happ_\' ones started 
from the gym at seven-thirt}', first 
marching through tlie girls' halls, and 
then visiting the president's house, 
where they listened to a few words from 
President and Mrs. Slocum. Then, 
four abreast, they danced the snake 
dance down Tejon street and lining up 
in front of the "Busy Corner," gave Col- 
orado College yells till time for the sec- 
ond performance at the Majestic. Here 
they secured front seats and "saw the 
whole show through," their appearance 
adding much to the interest of the spec- 
tators (?). 

The end of the show marked the con- 
clusion of the parade also, and the fel- 
lows went home full of the determina- 
tion to give a like demonstration in the 
streets of Boulder on the evening of the 
twelfth of November. 



Rothgeb, We're Glad You "Have 
Came." 

"Claude G. Rothgeb— athletic di- 
rector of Colorado College — has cer- 
tainly made good. He keeps busy 



THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 



and saws wood, and hi^ wix id-pile is 
getting bigger." 

Prospects for a winning team are 
getting brighter with every night's 
practice, every scrimmage and every 
game. The team is becoming familiar 
with the new rules, and plays the new 
game right. The most prominent fea- 
ture of the effect of Rothgeb's coach- 
ing is the development of the forward 
pass, which is as near perfectly exe- 
cuted by the Tigers as ever seen on 
Washburn field. Rothgeb has the con- 
fidence of every man on the team and 
they are working for him just about 
right. 



Tennis Election. 

The Tennis Association met last 
Friday and elected the following offi- 
cers : 

Paul Clifford '12, president; ]\Iiss 
Mary Bogne '13, vice-president, and 
R. Lewis '14, secretary. 

The club is planning to fix up the 
courts with a mixture of clay and 
gravel. Plans for a tournament will 
be formulated in a week. Interest in 
tennis, especially among the freshmen 
is greater than has been seen on the 
campus for several years. 



Freshman Team Gets Games. 

The freshman team, under the 
coaching of Cary and the captaincy 
of Heron, is developing into a strong 
aggregtaion, and games are being se- 
cured for the season. Pueblo Centen- 
nial will be met at Pueblo, Saturday, 
and a game is being arranged for, a 
week from Saturday, with Denver. 



Secret Practice. 

Coach l^othgeb is teaching his Tig- 
ers a few football ins and outs in 
secret practice these days and nights 
during the training table, and after- 
wards for half an hour the team is 
given a few of "Rothgeb's Easy Les- 
sons in the Game." 



Don't Forget. 

A few dates you should remember. 
Also let it sink into your mind that 
after November 5 the Tigers will not 
play on Washburn again during the 
1910 season, and that you should see 



e\ery game before and including that 
date. The dates: 

October 22. University of Utah at 
Salt Lake City. 

October 29. Colorado School of 
Mines, at Colorado Springs. 

November S- Kansas Agricultural 
College, a Colorado Springs. 

November 12. University of Colo- 
rado, at Boulder. 

November 19. Colorado Agricul- 
tural College, at Fort Colins. 

No^•ember 24. Denver University, 
at Denver. 



WYOMING THE FIRST VICTIM 

Continued from Page 1 

jured, but on the next play A'ande- 
moer got away for his sensational 60- 
yard run, but stepped on the sideline 
and his touchdown was not allowed. 
Neither team tried hard to score in 
this period and the ciuarter ended with 
the ball in the mid-field, 

Vandemoer made five yards in the 
next play but was set back for off-side, 
A punt followed and was recovered, 
and then Acker, Vandy and Heald 
plunged and plunged for a tuuchdown, 
the former having the honor. Goal 
was missed. Wyoming was too 
strong in the toe work and the ball 
was put in scrimmage on the 25-yard 
line, but with no gains. Vandemoer 
punted, and Burgess got a fair catch 
and attempted a place kick from the 
middle of the field. He missed it; 
Heald got the ball lor a 15-yard gain. 
Reed, 10; Vandemoer, 4; Acker, 3, 
and then Van again for 8, allowed 
Sinton to get near the goal on a pret- 
ty forward pass, and then by back 
plunges the ball was put on the 3- 
yard line, and Vandy scored — and 
kicked goal: ii-o. 

They exchanged punts, and Burgess 
tried a field goal without success. 
Bowers made 10 yards through tackle, 
and gains by Sinton, Heald. Acker and 
\'andemoer allowed the last men- 
tioned to score another touchdown. 

In the next quarter. \^'indcmoer 
made 20 on the kick-oft", and in a pret- 
ty double-pass trick play Thompson 
made 20 yards, but was injured, and 
Joe Sinton took his place. H. Sinton 
then made a 20-yard fo;-ward pass 
play, but after a few line plunges a 
fumble lost the ball and then Wyom- 



ing made their largest gain — y yards. 
After a few plunges the ball came 
back to the Black and Gold and then 
Heald scored the last touchdown. 
Score 2ji to o. In the last quarter, the 
second team was put in fur a little 
practice and the half ended with the 
ball in our territory. 
The line-up was: 

C. C. 
Thompson, J. Sinton, 1. e. 
Bowers, Moberg, 1. g. 
Hedblom, Le Clere, 1. g. 
Witherow, c. 
Black, r. g. 
Cook, I'doyd, r. t. 
H. Sintiin, r. e. 
Reed, Putnam, q. b. 
Heald-Jardinc, 1. h. b. 
Dicksen, r. h. b. 
Acke;-, Scott, f. b. 

Wyoming. 
I'uUer, 1. e. 
W. Prue, 1. g. 
Hill, 1. g. 
Jones, c. 
Covert, r. g. 
Pitz, r. t. 

lii^h. Whitman, r. e. 
Burgess, q. b. 
C. Jones, 1. h. b. 
Ovitt, r. h. b. 
Grant, f. b. 

Touchdowns: Heald 2, Vandemoer, 
Acker. Goals for touchdowns: Van- 
demoer 3. Referee: Ilenry Smith 
Brown. Officials: umpire, Coffin, Fligh 
School. Field judge: Nead, Pligh 
School. Time of quarte.'s: first two, 
15 minutes, last two. 10 minutes. 



Contemporary entertained the fresh- 
men girls at the annual fancy dress 
ball, Friday night, October 14. The 
gymnasium was decorated in red and 
white. Airs. Slocum and Miss Kidder 
led the grand march. Durding the in- 
termission. Contemporary ice was 
served. 



.-Vt Washburn, they held an old-fash- 
ioned singing school in chapel, in or- 
der that the students might learn how 
t ) sing the hymns correctly. The fac- 
u.lty were seated on the platform and 
alsri partook in. the lesson. After the 
hymns, the Washburn field song was 
u'emorized and sung. 



THE TIGER 



Tha VVaekly Newspaperof Colorado Collei^e 

A. E BRYSON Editor-in-Chief 

S. WILHIE DEAN Business Mana|{er 

Sam J. Shelton Assistant Editor 

Richard L. Hughes Assistant Editor 

T. Wynne Ross Athletic Editor 

Robert m. Copeland Engineering Editor 

F« D S. Baker Forestry Editor 

HEjEN Canon Alumni Editor 

Mamie C. Detmoyer Exchange Editor 

Edith I,. Summers Local Editor 

J. A. Root .. Local Editor 

Ray H. Sayue Assistant Manager 

E. E. Hedblom Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

A. W. Donovan, C. E. Howard. Bruce Weirick, William 

Sloey, Joe Sinton, Elsie Greene, Lillian Duer, Grace 

Wilson, Dorothy Cook, Dorothy Stott 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to TheTiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colerad* 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phones: Editor, Main 1975. Manager, Main 2073 

-tjg^ggfc^ Entered at th« postofficc at Colorado 

^^S^BS^ Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



College and Politics. 

The tendency toward narrovvnes.s in 
college life has already been men- 
tioned in these columns this year, yet 
an idea that strikes twice in the same 
place is often more effective than a 
single presentation — hence ithis edi- 
torial. There is no subject in which 
this narrowness is more apparent and 
may be more unfortunate than in the 
student's consideration of the politi- 
cal (|uestiiins that arise at election 
time. It may be safely asserted that 
not half the men in College know 
what the issues are in the approach- 
ing election and it would be wholly 
unsafe to assert what proportion of 
the women know even who are candi- 
dates for the state offices. 

These conditions are not true of 
Colorado College alone but rae true 
of a majority of institutions of higher 
learning. The reason is apparent — 
simply the complexity and strenuosity 
of life in college and the great number 
of demands within the college circle 
that almost entirely exclude the hap- 
penings of the outside life. 

The formation of a ijolitical club 
such as the suggested Ben Griffith 
club would not only assist a deserving 
alumnus but would help solve this 
problem of ignorance and indifference 
on one of the first duties of .'\merican 
citizenship — that of casting an intelli- 
gent \-ole at the polls. 



Concerning Debating. 

Acti\-c wiu-k has been started on 
the annual intersociety debate be- 
tween the Apollonian Club and the 
Pearsons I.itcrary Society. This de- 
bate is a si)lendid thing and creates 
a rivalry and enthusiasm that means 
much to the organizations participat- 
ing. There is, however, an unfortu- 
nate feature of this debate that could 
and should be remedied. It is ad- 
mittedly true that the best debaters 
in the College belong to these two 
clubs and the Ciceronian Club. The 
debate is of such long standing and 
the rivalry so keen, that a large num- 
ber of men try out for the debate and 
no work or trouble is spared to win 
the e^■ent. About the time the work 
on the intersociety debate is at its 
height, an effort is made to arouse suffi- 
cient enthusiasm for the intercollegiate 
debates. Result — the men who should 
be representing the College are too tied 
up with their intersociety debate to par- 
ticipate, or at least, they have given so 
much time to the event that it is practi- 
cally imposible for them to participate in 
the more important contest. 

The intersociet}' debate is a good thing 
and should ]>}• all means be continued, 
yet it is far more important that the Col- 
lege should be properly represented than 
that one or the other of the rival clubs 
should win The situation could be solved 
quite easily by choosing the same ques- 
tion for the intersociety debate as is 
used in the intercollegiate contest, or 
vice-versa, if the College has the choice 
of the question. In this wa_\-, there 
would not only he no conflict, but the 
training recei\-ed in the smaller event 
would give an immense amount of help 
and training for the contests in which 
the College is a part. 

More About 

The Honor System. 

I'hc Tiger this week prints the con- 
stitution gox-erning the Amherst Honor 
System. It is at Amherst, among 
many other places, that the Honor 
System has been so successful. The 
constitution there contains almost all the 
features that Colorado College would 
want if the i)lan should he instituted 
here. 

Student sentiment, especially among 
the upper clasmen, appears to be strong- 
ly in favor of the movement for the 
adoption of the system. Some urge 
that it cannot he thrust on the students 
on short notice, but that a sentiment 
that will support such a change must 
be developed by the evolutionary pro- 



cess. Such a process has been going 
on for the past three years ; the plan 
was urged and advocated by The Tiger 
in 1907-0S and 1908-09, and even at an 
earlier date tlian this, the matter was 
submitted to \-ote, and though voted 
down, there were a large number who 
favored the plan. 

The time is here for a decision. Shall 
Colorado College take the lead among 
Western institutions in a movement that 
must come sooner or later? 

C,)r shall we l.)e satisfied with the pres- 
ent inadequate system and adopt the 
plan after several others have tested its 
merits and found them good? 



THE HONOR SYST.EM AT AM- 
HERST. 



The following is the constitution of 
the "honor system" as published in 
The Amherst Student, that has been 
in successful operation at Amherst 
for the past six years: 

ARTICLE J. 

Section i. The honor system in 
examinations is defined as that sys- 
tem under which, after the examina- 
tion is set by the faculty, no faculty 
surveillance is exercised, and under 
which the student body, through a 
committee, control investigations con- 
cerning dishonesty in examinations. 

Sec. 2. The instructor may be 
present for a few moments at the 
opening of the examination to answe;- 
any question that may arise. 

Sec. 3. During examination each 
student shall have perfect freedom 
of action and conversation, provided 
he does not interfere with the work 
of others. 

ARTICLE II. 

Section i. Plach student must, in 
order to make his examination valid, 
sign the following declaration: "I 
pledge my honor that I have neither 
given nor received aid in this exami- 
nation.'" A similar statement may be 
required in case of a written exami- 
nation, essay, oration, but in case of 
no other work. 

Sec. 2. \'iolations of the honor 
system shall consist in an}- attempt to 
receiye assistance from written or 
printed aids, or from any person or 
his paper; or any attempt to give as- 
sistance, whether the one so doing 
has completed his paper or not. This 
rule shall hold within and without the 
examination room during the entire 
time in wdiich the examination is in 

Continued on Page 10 



THE TIGER 



ENGINEERING AND FORESTRY NEWS 



CHEMISTRY CLUB REORGANIZ- 
ING. 



Plans Made to Increase Membership 
and Enlarge Field of Work. 



The meetings of the Club are to be 
held on Friday night every week in- 
stead of on Saturday nights of alter- 
nate weeks as they were last year. The 
new arrangement is a much needed im- 
provement and opens a way for growth. 
Before this change was suggested, it 
frequently happened that a program 
would be prepared and scarcely a hand- 
ful of men came to the Polytechnic to 
hear it, because so many other events 
had been announced Ijefore. The Cluli 
intends to do the same kind of work 
that is done in the literary societies, but 
with especial emphasis on technical mat- 
ters. 

Object is Knowledge of Engineering 
Problems. 

The Chemistry Club was formed in 
1903 and since that time has been com- 
posed of faculty members and students 
of advanced standing in chemistry and 
other technical subjects. Research 

work and papers by Club members and 
authorities outside the College were the 
chief topics. As the engineering school 
keeps growing, it is more and more evi- 
dent that a club for engineers is needed. 
.A.11 that the old club could do in its semi- 
monthly meetings will be done in the 
new organization. Papers, discussions 
and illustrated lectures will be the ma- 
terials for programs and the banquet 
•rich year will add to the social feeling 
ndtivated in the "spread" every fourth 
week. 

Eligible List Increased. 

All members of the Brotherhood of 
Engineers' are invited to attend the reg- 
ular meeting at seven o'clock in the 
Polytechnic library on Friday evening. 
At the present time all engineers 
who have sophomore standing are eli- 
gible and also all students taking tech- 
nical subjects that were accepted by 
the Chemistry Club. Under this rule, 
the members of the B. E. are 
able to enter actively into .the work at 
-the beginning of the first semester of 
their sophomore year instead of the 
second. The meeting of .Friday is 
chiefly for discusing the constitution, the 
plans, and the opportunities and no in- 
terested man should miss it. 

A good program is now being ar- 



ranged for the twenty-eighth and the 
Club proposes to start now and make 
the meetings better for the engineers 
than the literary meetings are. For 
seven years the work of the Club has 
gone on without being widely approved 
or criticised and it is now ready to en- 
ter upon wider and lietter fields for 
a group of the men of the College who 
need it and can make it a success. 



A CITY FORESTER OF COLO- 
RADO SPRINGS. 



A PROPOSED BILL TO LICENSE 
ENGINEERS. 



All Engineers Except the Military to 
Be Affected. 



In the current news supplement of 
the Engineering Record of October i, 
1910, there appears a preliminary draft 
of a bill requiring a license of all prac- 
ticing engineers. As given, the bill 
represents an effort to provide suitable 
enactment for use in all states so that 
both effectiveness and uniformity can be 
maintained. In the same issue there 
is an editorial comment, favoring the 
proposed measure. 



Planting on Pike's Peak. 



Last Saturday work was begun on re- 
foresting a tract of about 300 acres on 
the east side of Pike's Peak. The tract 
contains- practically no coniferous trees 
at present, but is covered with grass and 
dead aspens for a large part. The seed 
has been poisoned to prevent its whole- 
sale destruction by squirrels and chip- 
munks. It has been found impossible 
to get results otherwise in planting in 
other parts of Colorado. The planting 
is in charge of Forest Agent Reinsch, 
who has a gang of about thirty men un- 
der him at present. A smaller plot is 
to be planted with seedlings of all the-in- 
diginous species as an experiment, to 
find which grow best on the tract. The 
results from this will guide the future 
plantings on the Peak. 

If anyone is curious to see how the 
government does its seed sowing, he 
would be well repaid by a visit to this 
plantation. It may be reached by going 
to the Half-way House and then follow- 
ing up the cog road to the small reser- 
voir on the left. Just beyond and on 
the other side is the trail to the Bottom- 
less Pit. The camp is out on this trail 
a short distance. 



The position of City Forester here in 
Colorado Springs is a new one and the 
chances are that the nature and duties 
of the office are not as yet popularly 
known. 

The ordinance creating the office was 
passed only last August, and is a very 
well devised law. The applicant for 
the position nuist pass the Civil Service 
e-x;aminati(jns to hold the office and must 
furthermore be a graduate of some rep- 
utable school of forestry. This last 
clause insures the city forever a well 
educated man besides the technical ex- 
pert for this position. No definite term 
of years is named dtiring which he shall 
serve, but it is indefinite, insuring the oc- 
cupant a steady position as long as he 
serves the city well. 

The whole care of the street trees of 
the city belongs to him and removal and 
proper trimming is to be done under his 
supervision. The protection of the trees 
against insect pests comes into his prov- 
ince and the war against the white scale 
which infests the silver maples bids fair 
to become an important phase of the 
work. Allied with this is the examina- 
tion of nursery stock imported into the 
cit_\'. It is largely due to lack of this 
precaution that has accounted for the 
tremendous spread of the San Jose scale 
and other dangerous insects. 

The Colorado Springs water shed is 
managed I?y the water board and the 
City Forester acts merely in an advisory 
c;!pacit>- if called on to do so by the 
mayor. 

The present forester, McKown, C. C. 
'10, aims to make Colorado Springs more 
beautiful than e\er on account of its 
trees, so that it will seem like the Gar- 
den of Eden to tra\'ellers coming across 
the treeless pl;iins from the East. 

The fact that there is this office and 
th.at it is bound to be so beneficial is 
largely due to the Commission form of 
government by liusiness men instead 
of politicians. To show the fact of this 
mereh' compare the office here and in 
other cities. In one city governed in 
the old way, the city forester had the 
magnificent preparatory training of de- 
livering ice! Civil service exams, and 
a business government will always pre- 
^'ent such a calamitv here. 



x^ 



8 T H E T [ G E K 

Eighty million Americans, one Roosevelt, thousands of tailors, 
mighty few clever ones. We maintain an office in New York 
just to keep us in touch with the leaders of fashion. Look to 
us for the right thing in clothes. Hart Schaffner & Marx 
and Gadoco good suits and overcoats at $15.00 to $50.00. 







Colorado Springs, ION. Tejon St. Denver, Sixteenth at Stout 

New York, 24 East 21st Street 



SIGMA CHI DANCE. 



PHI GAMMA DELTA "AT HOME" 



_ The Sigma Chi fraternity gave its 
lirst dance, for this j'car, in the San 
Luis school, Saturday, the 15th. The 
hall was decpretad with pine branches 
and autumn leaves. The guests of the 
fraternity were the Misses Frantz, 
Kidder, Kampf, Stctt, True, Musser, 
Pierson, Whitaker.^Brady, Hedgecock, 
Breckenridge, Estill, May and Louise 
Wallace, Baker, Merwin, Williams, 
Parsons, Watson, Allen, and Messrs. 
Jackson, Capin, Wilfred Van Stone, 
and Campbell. AL-. and Mrs. Rothgeb 
chaperoned. 



FRESHMAN GROUP ENTER- 
TAINED. 

Professor and Mrs. Albright enter- 
tained Mr. Albright's division of the 
freshman men at their home last Friday 
evening. Nearly all the men were there 
and they must have enjoyed the evening 
immensely, for according to reports, Pro- 
fessor Albright successfully banished all 
thoughts of Math. I by his jollity and 
b}' a volumnous and appetizing appeal to 
the gastronomic nature of college youths. 

This is the second social affair to take 
place as a result of the freshman advis- 
ory system, a full account of which 'was 
given in a recent issue of The Tiger. 
The system promises a great deal, since 
it affords the men of the freshman class 
an opportunity to get together in small 
groups and get better acquainted. The 
class is divided into nine divisions of 
from ten to twelve men each. 



Two airy front rooms, splendidly fur- 
nished, all modern conveniences, ac- 
cessible to carline and good table board. 
No boarding house proposition, but a 
private family where you can have the 
comforts and associations of a home. 

1629 North Tejon Street 
Phone 1570 



The annual "at home" of the i'hi 
G;imnia Delta fraternity was heUl at 
the fraternity house, 1 122 North Cas- 
cade, yesterday afternoon. The un- 
derclassmen were received during the 
afternoon and the faculty, f.'iends and 
upperclassmen in the evening. The 
following assisted in serving: 

Airs. Goddard, Mrs. Willis, Mrs. 
Armstrong, Mrs. Henderson, Mrs. 
Harrington, Mrs. J. R. Armst.'ong, 
Airs. Slocum, Airs. Bancroft, Mrs. 
Hale, Miss Brown, Airs. Hoagland, 
Airs. Alatrin, Airs. Blackman, Miss 
Lriomis, Aliss Dorsey, Airs. Cajori, 
Airs. Parsons, Aliss Yerkes, Aliss Con- 
nell, Aliss Wakefield, Aliss Eversoll, 
Aliss Crandall, Miss Douglas, Aliss 
AlcKinnie, Aliss Worthing, Miss Phil- 
lips, Aliss B. Knight, Aliss Anderson, 
Miss Stiles, Aliss AIcGee, Aliss L. 
Wallace, Aliss Randolph, Aliss C. 
Kampf, Aliss Hall, Aliss Aughen- 
baugh. Miss Stark, Miss Watson, Miss 
Bogue, Aliss Pierson, Aliss Ashley, 
Aliss Sells, Aliss Summers, Miss Tuck- 
er, Aliss Wolcott, Miss Breckenbridge. 
Miss McKenzie, Aliss Pike, Aliss R. 
Wallace, Aliss Gerould, Aliss Temple- 
ton, Aliss Fezer, Aliss Merwin, Aliss 
A'lorehouse. Miss Dilts, Aliss Black- 
man, Aliss AI. Walsh, Aliss Parsons, 
Miss Turner. Aliss Haines, Aliss Can- 
non, Aliss L. Kampf, Aliss A^aughn, 
Miss Wilson, Aliss Alusser, Aliss 
Green, Aliss Cunningham, Aliss Davis. 



John Burgess '10 is a visitor at the 
Delta Phi Theta house. At present he 
is working on a survey in the employ of 
Air. Van Diest of this dtw 



S. L. Smith '08, who is attending D. 
U. Law Scho:)l, spent Saturday and Suii- 

(l;i_\- in the Springs. 



The Siher antl Gold has decided 
to remain a weakly instead of a tri- 
weekly, as was proposed. 



The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies, Fixtures 

208 N. Tejon Street Phones Main 812, 830 

Lowell-Meservey Hdw. Co. 

Dealers in Paints, Oil, Glass, Every- 
thing in Hardware 



106 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springs 



Learn Wireless and Railroad 

TplPnKanhu ? Shouage of fully 10,000 Oper- 
leieyi apilj • gto,, „„ account of 8-hour law 
and extensive "wireless" development. We operate 
under direct supervision of Telegraph Officials and 
positively place a I students when qualified. Write fnr 
catalogue. NATIONAL TELEGRAPH INST., Cinci nati, 
Philadelphia, Memphis, Davenport, la., Columbia, S. C, 
Porlla d, Ore. 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heatii g Co. 



Phone Main 48 



313 N. Tejon St. 



DEXTER & HUDSON 

EXCHANGE BARBER 
SHOP 

Room 307, Third Floor 
Exchange Bank Building 



The Dentan 

Printing Company 

No. 9 So. Cascade Auenue 

FIRST-CLASS PRINTING 
at REASONABLE RATES 

Telepnone Main No. 602 



THE TIGER 




Square Deal Shoes $3.50 and $t 

Our Square Deal shoes for young men and young ladies hold the lead in 
quality and beauty of design. We have the tidiest, nattiest, most wearable 
line of shoes to be found. Anybody can please themselves in shoes here. 
Ease, elegance and perfection of fit are strong points in our favor. Shapely 
shoes, stunning styles for the young 
folks. All the new leathers, all the 
new new styles $3.50 and $4.00. 
Every Taste and Every Purse Finds 
Satisfaction Here. 




Deichmann & Douglas 
Floral Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER, Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 
Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 



To College 
Men and Women 
We Are Known as 
"The Satisfactory 
Jeweler". To 
New Ones We 
Soon Will Be. 

Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

"Satisfactory Jewelry 

Store" 



WE LOAN MONEY 

ON ALL VALUABLES 

Big line of new and unredeemed 
Drawing Instruments .'. Diamonds 
Watches and Jewelry ot all descrip- 
tions. Firearms and Fishing Tackle, 
Musical Instruments and hundreds 
of other articles 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 



THE GRIFFITH CLUB 

Continued from Page 3. 

of which Colorado College can be 
proud. 

The fellows down there could help 

(lUt a lot by backing Griffith. 

T. M. PETTIGREW, 'lo. 



After the suggestion in last week's 
Tiger, an undercurrent of enthusiasm 
has taken possession of the older 
men of Colorado College and steps 
are being taken to complete the or- 
ganization of a Ben Griffith Club. 
This enthusiasm should not be felt 
by the men alone; every w(jman in 
the College surely has the welfare of 
her Alma Mater as well as that of the 
State of Colorado at heart. 

Ben Griffith is not only a man of 
unquestioned honesty but he has un- 
usual abilit}'. As captain of the 
Tigers in igoo and 1901 when we held 
the State Championship, he is re- 
membered by the Alumni. It is said 
th;it his football prowess was some- 
what instruinental in Griffith's nom- 
ination. 

Every sttident in C. C, regardless 
of party affiliation, should make it a 
point to either vote or line up friends 
for Griftith. We need Griffith's as- 
sistance in the steady growth of Col- 
orado College and let us help our- 
selves by helping him. 

To the men and women of the 
Western Slope an appeal is es;;ecially 
made, for that is his home. We 
must go "down the line" for Ben a? 
he did for us in 1900 and 1901. Let 
us do it now. A meeting will prob- 
ably be announced in the near future 
and CA'cry man and woman in the 
College IS as'<ed to be present and 
pledge his or her support for Ben 
Griffith in liis race for the Attorney- 
Generalship of Colorado. 

BOOSTER, C. C. '12. 



Antlers 

Turkish Baths 

(Opposite Elks Club) 
Open Day and Night 

BATHS OF ALL KINDS. Also Chiro- 
pady and Swedish Massage. Treat- 
ment at Residence by Appointment. 

CARL J. WENBERG, Prop. 

Graduate Swedish Masseur 
Phone Red 33 14 E. Bijou Street 



You will find here a vast as- 
sortment of classy styles, 
in suits and overcoats, such 
as careful dressers wear. 



109^0 Discount to Students 

THE MAY CO. 

23 North Tejon Street 

This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 

Company 




Headquarters for 

College Footwear 



10 



THE TIGER 



MANHATTAN 
SHIRTS 



.^^^ 




FOWNS 
GLOVES 



WINDOW SLEEPING TENTS 



We have never been in better readiness to 
please young men of varied tastes. It's an 
easy matter to settle the overcoat or suit 
question here. Handsome grays, tans, 
brovv^ns, greenish casts as well as the more 
sombre effects in dark mixtures, plain blues 
and blacks. Suits and overcoats made by 
Society Brand ^20.00 to $40.00. 



Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton-Rustic Home 

PI • o No. 419 South El Paso St. 

1/airy a) Phone Main 442 

Photography 

In All Its Branches 

Clark 

112 South Tejon St. 
Special Discount to ^11 Students 

Shoe Repairing. Clothes Cleaned and Pressed. 
Second-Hand Shoes a d Clothing 

J. H. PERKINS 



7>^ S. Cascade 



Colorado Springs 



PRATT, The Barber 

Is At the Alta Vista Hotel 

He Solicits the Patronage of the 
College Boys 



THE HONOR SYSTEM AT AMHERST 

Continued from Page 6. 

progress, that is, until the time speci 
tied has expired. 

ARTICLE III. 

Section i. There shall be a com- 
mittee consisting of six members who 
shall represent the student body and 
deal with all cases involving viola- 
tions of the honor system. 

Sec. 2. The members r)f this com- 
mittee shall be the presidents of the 
four classes and two others, one a 
member of the senior class and one a 
member of the junior class. 

Sec. 3. The president of the senior 
class shall be' chairman of the com- 
mittee, and the president of the junior 
class shall be clerk. 

ARTICLE IV. 
Section i. In case of apparent 
fraud in examination, the detector 
shall first speak to the offending 
party. Should the offender show 
there is a mistake, the matter drops 
at once. Otherwise it is carried to 
the committee, who shall conduct a 
formal investigation and should the 
offender be found guilty he has the 
privilege of appeal to the faculty. In 
case of conviction the committee shall 
determine the puni.-^hment under the 
following regulations: 

1. In case of violation of the honor 
system by a member of the senior, 
junior or sophomore class, the penal- 
ty shall be a recommendation to the 
faculty of his separation from college. 

2, In case of violation of the said 
system by a member of the freshman 



THE OUT 


WEST 


TENT AND AWNING CO. 


113'2 NORTH TEJON STREET 





Phone 917 



GEO. R. BERGEN, 0. D. 

IVIANF'G OPTICIAN 
Eyes Tested 611-12 Exch. Nat. Bank BIdg. 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented 
and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing ^ Typewriter. The 
New No. 10 Model Has All Latest 
Improvements 

Zimmerman Supply 

Company 



22 E. Kiowa St. 
Phone Main 374 



Established 1890 



WILIIAMJDN 
HArrNDRO) 

ENORAVBRy-PRINTER? 
f 





d:e>nvi/K. coi/Q 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 



THE TIGER 



11 



A LITTLE BIT BETTER THAN OTHERS 

BENSON & HEDGES CIGARETTES 

Turkish and Russian, Gold Tips, Cork Tips, Plain and Mouth Piece. 

Perfumed and Not Perfumed 



HUGHES 



North 13 Teji 



on 



Gel Your Picnic Supplies 

^= AT ^ZZ 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

1 13 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER, Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Notary Public 

A. J. LAWTON 

Real Estate, Loans and Insurance 
10>2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. , Colorado Springs 

Just Received 

A Large Stock of 
C. C. PENNANTS 



Our Prices are Low but in Order 
to Move This Stock Quickly We 
Will Give a Japanese Lacquered 
Cane Free with Each Pennant 

The Murray Drug Co. 

(Opposite Campus) 



class, the penalty shall be recommen- 
dation of suspension for a term de- 
termined by the committee. 

3. Four out of six votes shall in 
all cases be necessary for conviction. 

4. All men who have been in the 
college one (i) year or more shall 
be judged by the same rule as seniors, 
juniors and sophomores. Those who 
have been in college for less than 
one ( I ) year shall be judged by the 
rule which applies to freshmen. 

ARTICLE V. 

Section i. Every student in the 
college shall be expected to lend his 
aid in maintaining this constitution. 
ARTICLE VI. 

Section i. This constitution may 
be amended by a three-fourths v<ite 
of those present at a mass meeting, 
notice having been given at least one 
week previous. 

ARTICLE VII. 

Section i. The committee shall 
make provision for interpreting the 
honor system to the members of the 
freshman class within three weeks 
after the opening of the first term of 
each year. 

Sec. 2. This constitution shall be 
posted in the lecture rooms, on col- 
lege bulletin boards, and in the li- 
brary. 

Sec. 3. This constitution shall be 
published in The Tiger three times 
each year, the first number of the 
first semester, the last number before 
the final examinations of the firsit 
semester, and the last number before 
the final examinations of the second 
semester. 



OPERETTA TO BE GIVEN 

Continued from Page 1. 

juniors .last year as a more or less sat- 
isfactory substitute for the much agi- 
tated and repeatedly farliidden prom. The 
class of 1912 recognizing the value of a 
distinctive class fimction which could be 
enjoyed by the whole College and real- 
izing the uselessness of asking for a 



prom, has decided wisely to follow the 
precedent of last year and establish the 
operetta as the traditional "stunt" of the 
junior class, just as the barbecue is the 
event in the lives of the sophomores. 

The future of the operetta depends 
upon its success this year. Miss Loom- 
is has said that those who participate 
must be up in their work and that they 
must have the permission of the dean of. 
their department. The operetta must 
be approved by the dean of women, and 
must not be allowed to interfere in any 
way with College work.. The junior 
class is espcciall\- desirous of making, 
good in order that the operetta may be 
retained as a feature of College life. 



FOn THE 

Most Exclusive Millinery 

CALL ON 

Mme, M, D, Hillmer 

6 East Pike's Peak A'venue 

Finest of Material and 
'Best of JVorkmanship 

Phone Black 395 Colorado Springs 

BOOKS 

Stationery, Pictures and 

Novelties at 

The Pike's Peak Book & Stationery Co 

27-271/2 South Tejon Street Peone Black 354 

Watch theCapsYouMeet 

You won't need an intro- 
duction to the HEIDCAP. 
It is not a mere head cover- 
ing. It has character. It 
gives character to the wear- 
er. It is made of exclusive 
Engh'sh cap cloths. It is a 
thoroughbred. Try on a 
HEIDCAP. 



12 



THE TIGER 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co 
Groceries and 



Meats 



ii 




115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



MUETH'S 

The Place Where the Stand- 
ard Is Never Lowered. High 
Class Goods at Reasonable 
Prices. Ice Cream, Hot 
and Cold Drinks. 

Lunches and Afternoon Teas 
Ask Any Old Student 

CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 



5 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 




Cox Sons & Vining 

262 Fou th Ave., New '^'ork 

Gowns and Caps 

Silk Faculty Gowns and 
Hoods. Lowest Prices 
Best Workmanship. 



The D. Y. Butcher Drug Co. 
DRUGS, KODAKS, SUPPLIES 

Free and Prompt Delivery 
Cor. Opposite P. 0. Phones 90 and 750 




Y. W. C. A. — .Mrs. Slocum ad- 
(lres.sed the Young Women's Chris- 
tian Association last Friday, on "Pa- 
tience — with one's self and with oth- 
e.'s." The special music was a solo 
by Miss Gowdy. 



Girls' Glee Club. — The meeting- 
time of the Girlb' Glee Club has been 
changed from Wednesday to Tuesday 
at four o'clock. The membership of 
the club is large this year, about 30 
lieing enrolled. 



A New Shelf or Two— In the little 
room above the office in the library there 
are some new rows of shelves. The 
room and improvements are to be used 
for storing books. Thus simply do we 
account for the mysterious disappearance 
of the pile of boards that were pushed 
into the library window last week. 



Observatory Open to Public — Be- 
ginning Thursday of this week the tele- 
scope in the College Observatory will 
be used to show interesting stars and 
phenomena of the sky to visitors. From 
time to time articles will appear in the 
local papers and these will contain a 
Ijrief notice of special features. At a 
quarter to eight Thursday the building 
will be opened. 



Breakfast — A breakfast in honor of 
P. S. West ex-'o8 and his wife, former- 
ly Miss Jean Vaugn ex-'i2, who were 
recently married, and E. C. Thompson, 
who left Sunday for his home in Miss- 
issippi, was given by the Phi Gamma 
Delta fraternity at the Chapter house 
'■\:t Saturday morning. Those present 
were: Mrs. Julia Hale, Mr. and Mrs. 
West, E. C. Thompson. Misses McKin- 
nie, Rule Aitken, Frost, Liva Brenner, 
Vesta Tucker, Janet Kampf, Randolf, 
Stark and Messrs. Lake, Fawcett, Angell 
Blackman, McOuat, S. L. Smith, Bo}-n- 
ton, Bryson, Donovan, Terrill. 
Mrs. Slocum Talks on Passion Play. 

Mrs. Slocum gave an interesting ad- 
.dress before the city Y. W. C. A. last 
Sunday afternoon. The address was 
from Mrs. Slocum's own observations 
of the play as she and the president 
saw it during their summer vacation. 



Got the Fever. 

Senior girls arc discussing the 
wearing of hobble gowns as a dis- 
tincti\'c senior dress. 



Lallie's Improved Ball Bearing 
Clipper Reel for Long Tapes 
Best Tape and Reel Made in Americr 

Lallie's Surveying Instru- 
ment and Supply Co. 



1622 Arapahoe St. 



Denver, Colo. 




No More Wrinkles 

I have a remedy that will speedily eradicate 
any case of wrinkles— no matter how bad or 
what the cause. It makes old faces look 
young, removes all lines and wrinkles, 
corrects flabby or withered skin, makes thin 
faces plump, fills out hollow cheeks, will 
develop any part of the body round and full 
without any massaging. Call at my parlors 
and I will explain fully and convince you. 

Miss N. E. JoJinson 



Phone 687 



324 N. Tejon Street 



JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Bock Store 16 S. Tejon Sttee 

The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Gives 
Special Attention to Accounts of Students 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, Prtiiilent Ira Har I'-Presidcnt 

M. C. Gile Wm. F. Richards 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M. 



Colorado 
College 
Students 



Remember We Do Framing 
as It Ought To Be Done and 
at Right Prices 



WHITNEY and 
GRIMWOOD 

20 North Tejon Street 
Opera House Block 



THE TIGEK 



15 



?rat Fellows 

will find here just the 
aid they need when getting 
up their many affairs 
We are "right there" 
when it comes to ideas for 
your dance programs, 
invitations, interior 
decorations, etc. 

THE OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



12 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springs 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main S36 



Phone Main 2055 



Art Needle Work 



THE HUNT & VAN NICE 
Art Specialty Store 

Stamping, Designing, Perforating, Linens, 
Lawns, Best Hand-Painted China 

8 Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs, Co" 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co. 



II Local Department || 




• Stul)by" Dean spent the week end 
in Denver. 



Sels and Lynch climbed the Peak 
Sunday. 



Lenny Van Stone's two Ijrothers vis- 
ited the College Friday and Saturday. 



lu-nest Statton autoed to Denver 
Sunday. 



Unknown vandals hid the hats be- 
longing to the sophomore men during 
the reception given by President Slocum 
to the whole class. 



The Sigma Chi pledges went on a 
tramp in the hills last Wednesday. 



A part of the Montgomery girls spent 
Saturday morning in the mountains. 



Herb. Vandemoer's grandmother and 
aunt visited the Springs this last week 



The. whole Apollonian Club adjourned 
early last Friday night in honor of the 
Contemporary Fancy Dress Ball. 



Dennett Ela was in Denver on Friday 
and Saturday. He attended the foot- 
liall game between Denver LTiiversity 
and Marquette. 



James Hopkins ex-T2' leaves this 
week for Des Moines, Iowa, where he 
has accepted a position as travelling 
salesman for a large railroad supply 
house. 



Willard Warnock spent the week end 
at his home in Loveland in order that 
he might see the footliall game between 
the Loveland and P'ort Collins High 
schools. 



Mark Robinson has been kept out of 
school a few days this week because of 
an attack of tonsilitis. 



E. C. Thompson has left for Yazoo 
City, Mississippi, where he will remain 
the rest of the winter. 

Ben Griffith, Republican nominee for 
.'Vttorney General, visited at Phi Gam 
House last Saturday. 



Hunt Up 

BisselFs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



Fike, Steele and Bowen of Denver 



A "Burgess Spread" 

Perhaps you"-Freshies don't know 
what that is; but to us old C. C. 
men it means much — very much. 
The finest delicatessenj department, 
a superb bakery, a candy shop that 
possesses the essentials of purity and 
the added virtues of thorough work- 
manship and artistic individuality. 
You'll be present this semester at more 
than one strictly "Burgess" function 

W. N. Burgess— Grocer 

112-114 N. Tejon Street Phone 83 

FREE 

Shoe Repairing Absolutely Free 
of Ciiarge for Entire Term of 
1910-1911 to tiie College Stu- 
dent Submitting the Best Ad for 

PETE'S 

Shoe Shop 

230 East Dale Street 

Men's Sewed Soles 75c; Ladies, 65c 
Rubber Heels, 35c 



14 



THE T I G t} K 



$1.00 $1.00 

Young Men 

For $1.00 per month, we sponge, press and do minor repairing on one 
suit, or one overcoat, or two pairs of trousers, each week; calling for 
and deliverieg same in our wardrobe, dustproof wagons. We claim 
to do the best work in the city. A trial from you will allow us to 
prove our claim. 

Special Prices Given to the Young Women of 
the College. Get Our Price List. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



Agents: Bert Siddons 
Glenn Bowers 




and Cleaners. 



T. E. AIKEN 

Taxidermist, Furrier 

Dealer in Souvenirs and Novelties 
12 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 



For Best and Quick Delivery 



SEE 



The Monument Coal Co. 

28 East Kiowa Street 



William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



THE 

Crissey & Fowler 
Lumber Co. 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 

Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 

A. S. BLAKE 

Is the Man to See 

107 North Tcjon . , Phone 465 

Nickle Ware Cutlery 

Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Uni\-ersit\-. visited at the Phi Gam House 
Saturday and Sunday. 



Violet Hopper's father visited in the 
city Saturday and Sunday. 



Ruth Edwards and, Florence Hum- 
phreys went to Denver to spend the 
week end. 



Miss Case\- and Miss Crowley visited 
Olive Case\- last Saturdav and Sunday. 



Olive Casey and Ruth Copeland en- 
tertained the freshmen of Ticknor at a 
spread Saturday- night. 



Don't forget to pay your Tiger subscription 
before November 1st., if you want to save a 
quarter. 



Miss Holland \'isite(l Ruth Copeland 
last week end. 



Neta Powell visited Frances Town- 
send at her home in Golden last week. 

Ruby Patterson has returned from the 
East and will take up her College work 
here immediately. 

Miss Gladys Wallace and Miss Louise 
Wallace visited May and Ruth Wallace 
Saturdaw 



Helen Williams entertained at a 
spread Saturday evening. 

Howes '14, of Topcka, Kansas, is 
pledged to Phi Gamma Delta. 

Katherine True and Etta Clark have- 
been quite ill. 



Dnrlie Crandall spent the week end 
n Alt. Manitou, visiting Mrs. Haves. 



Broken Lenses 
Duplicated 



Phone Black 233 
Colorado Souvenirs 



C. B. LAUTERMAN 

Jeweler and Manufac- 
turing Optician 

121 N. TEJON STREET Colorado Springs 



10c STORE AND MORE! 

THE EIMPORIUM 

1 10 S. TEJON STREET 



College Inn 

Freshmen!! 

This Is the Place for 

GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



Fine Watch Work 



Diamond Setting a Specialty 



H. E. Kapelke 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 
130 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

Grand Union Tea Co. 

Importers of Fine Teas and 
Coffees 

Phone Main 2678 220 N. Tejon St. 



On hand as usual 
but just a little better 
equipped for serving your 
needs — 



The 

WATERMAN 

PRESS 

PRINTERS and 
BINDERS 



THE TIGER 



16 



Alkie Anderson and Frances Town- 
send spent Saturcku' and Sunday at their 
homes in Golden 

Letitia Lamb has l)cen ill. 



Marion Verkes went to Den\-er Sat- 
urday. 



Etta Moore entertained a few friends 
Thursday night at a Spanish omelette 

THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

**The College Favorite ' 



The Favorite Shopping 

Place for the College 

Woman 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 



1061 2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



• 



Star 
Laundry 



The College Laundry 

The ONLY Laundry which advertises in 
The Tiger. We give 20% discount to you . 
The best work in the state for as low a 
price as any. 

B. J. DICKSON, Agent Phone Main 342 

W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 

# 

119 N. Tejon Phone Main 900 



/^= 



SWEATER COATS 

All Colors 
$6, 5, 4, 3, 2.50 



Gorton's jGood 
Clothes 



CAPS 

All Weaves 

$2.50, 2, 1.50, 1, 

75c 



^ 



We're sorry you can't tell from reading about Gorton's 
good clothes just what they are, but you can't. You 
have to feel them on your back. You have to see the 
graceful sweep of the back, the snugness of the collar, the 
grace of the lapel. You have to let your eye wander over 
every feature to appreciate these clever clothes; suits and 
overcoats $30, $25, $20 

Specialists in Good Clothes and Nothing Else 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 



^ 




E. Pike's Peak 
113 



Correct Dress for Men. \ 



J 



spread in honor of Alta Harris' birth- 
day. 

Thursday afternoon, Edith Summers 
i;a\e a Kensington. 



Florence Youngman visited relatives 
near Pueblo the end of last week. 

Gertrude Ashley entertained a few se- 
lect friends at tea. 



Miss McCutcheon, former Dean of 
Women at Westminster, spent the week 
end with June Steck. 



Netta Powell was in Denver with her 
mother over Sundav. 



May Weir has recovered from an at- 
tack of tonsilitis. 



Misses Roe and Wilson invited Hy- 
patia to a supper in Roe's cabin last Sat- 
urday evening. 



Ann Baker's mother visited her on 
Monday. 



C. S. Campljcll went to Denver Fri- 
dav. 



R. M. Copeland and his sister spent 
the week end at Lake Moraifte. 



Oliver Hall went to Denver for the 
Electric Show. 



Several young women of the senior 
class are doing practice teaching in the 
grade schools of the city. 



Katherine Gear is out after a week's 
illness. 



Dern^s Freshly Roasted Coffee 

will make 10 more cups to the lb. 
than Eastern roasted coffee 



29 S. Tejon Street 



Phone 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 



Registered Medical Practitioneers 



Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence. 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 956 



The College 
Photo Studio 




Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 

THE 

Gowdy-Simmons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS, ENGRAVERS 

21 N Tejon Street 



16 



THE 1' I a E K 



Overcoats Now; according ^^^^^^ ^"^ ^^^^ values in our experience. 

to the weather man. Put it up to us and we Three-quarters length, full length, medium 

will put you into the best thing in the over- or heavy weights. 

coat line in your experience. ' r\ . Gficnn. ci\ nf\ 

^ ^ Overcoats |15.00 to 60.00. 

Here are the nobbiest patterns, richest 



8 N. Tejon Street 



(Pei«luii4-Sfeearer 6 



28 E. Pike's Peak 




Style and Quality at the Right Price 

For styles in young men's shoes that are "different," that have class and character, look 
this way. We are making a specialty of snappy styles that appeal to young men, our 
showing is especially strong in gun metal, tan and 
patent leathers in blucher and button patterns 
splendid values for 



$3.50, $4.00, $4.50 and $5.00 




iHOES THAT SATISFY 



22 S. TEJON ST. 



# 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



\ 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 

Departments - College of Arts and 
Science, E. S. PARSONS, Dean. 

School of Engineering, F. CAJORI, Dean 
School of Forestry, W. C. STURGIS, Dean 
School of Music, E. D. HALE, Dean 



Manilou ParJ^ — Field Laboratory 
of the School of Forestry 



=0 



It Takes a Rich Conversation to Sell Poor Clothes. Gatterer's 
Clothes Sell Themselves. Don 't Overlook the Browns for Fall 

GEO. J. GA TTERER 



216 North Tejon Street 



Telephone Main 1247 



e. 'L 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF 

COLORADO COLLEGE 



Vol. XIII COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., OCTOBER 28, 1910 Number 7 



MORMON'S 
SCALP 
ANNEXED 

ANYBODY'S GAME UNTIL THE 
LAST— SCORE i5-6 AT END OF 
SECOND PERIOD IN FAVOR 
OF TIGERS. 

Lots of Wrangling — Utah Had Heav- 
ier Team — Tigers Win Game in 
Last Few Minutes of Play — Final 
Score 21-17. 



WORK ON OPERETTA STARTS. 



Stars Chosen — Lesser Parts Later. 



The fighting Tiger spirit, unexcelled 
coaching, fine physical condition and 
new football, played right, enabled 
Colorado College to defeat the Uni- 
versity of Utah last Saturday at Salt 
Lake City by a score of 21 to 17, the 
first victory on the Mormon's home 
grounds in five years. The game was 
filled with sensations, mainly forward 
pass sensations, and the Tigers 
played the football that the rooters, 
who gave them the send-off last 
Thursday, expected of them. Big Joe 
Witherow, the Tiger center, was a 
large factor in the victory. A feature 
was his scoring a touchdown on a 
fumbled forward pass, by a 40-yard 
run. 

The Tigers Average 162 Pounds. 

Consistency won the game for the 
Tigers, while the opposite "virtue" 
proved the why and wherefore of the 

Continued on Page 5 



SATURDAY 

TIGERS CLASH 

WITH MINERS 

Be There to Answer the 
Roll- Call 



The following persons ha\'e been 
selected to take the leading parts in 
"The Little Tycoon," the operetta to 
be given by the junior class: Eleanor 
Thomas, Mary Randolph, Louise 
Kampf, J. B. Thornell, W. L. War- 
nock and G. B. Seldomridge. 

The books have arrived, and al- 
though there remain many minor 
cliaracters to be selected, rehearsals 
will begin at once under the direction 
of Dr. Richards. 



BARBECUE MONDAY 



ALL IN READINESS FOR BIG EVENT 



Have you your tickets for the bar- 
becue yet? Better hurry, they are 
going fast and only three days remain 
antil the biggest College event of the 
year takes place. 

Everybody knows the barbecue, its 
traditions, its eats, its tossing, its 
other features — all of which have 
made the barbecue of Colorado Col- 
lege the most unique affair of its kind 
in the state. If, however, some of 
the unsophisticated ones do not know 
the barbecue and all it stands for, 
just ask one of the upperclass men 
who in past years paid as high as 
two dollars for their tickets, and learn 
how thoroughly worth the money it 
was even at that price. 

The sophomore class this year, by 
a great sacrifice on their part, (this 
from the manager), offers tickets to 
the student body at seventy-five cents 
each. This ticket will entitle the 
holder to every feature of the barbe- 
cue. The ",grub committee" assures 
the hungry ones that it will be by far 

Continued on Page 9 



FRATERNITIES 
SHOW 

SPIRIT 



TO GIVE UP THEIR TABLES TO 
TEAM — TRAINING TABLE TO 
BE LOCATED AT FRATERNITY 
HOUSES— EACH FRATERNITY 
TO PROVIDE FOR TIGERS 
FOR A WEEK. 

Money Raised to Improve Table Will 
Probably Go Toward Securmg a 
Band. 

The splendid spirit of loyalty that 
has been so prevalent throughout 
e\'e;"y nook and corner of the College 
during the present year was again well 
demonstrated by the action of the five 
fraternities in voting to accommodate 
the men who are eating at the train- 
ing table at their houses during the 
remaining five weeks of the football 
season. 

Up to the present, the team has 
been getting only one meal at the 
training table, the remaining two 
meals being taken elsewhere and little 
or no attempt being made toward 
confining the men to the proper food 
at these two meals. Owing to the de- 
pleted funds of the Athletic Associa- 
tion, one meal was all that could be 
allowed for the important item of 
training expense and so little money 

Continued on Page 11 



HALLOWEEN 

BARBECUE 

NEXT MONDAY NIGHT 

You Can't Afford to Miss It 



THE TIGER 



COLLEGIATE ALUMNAE 
SION. 



SES- 



NOTED SETTLEMENT WORKER 
TO SPEAK. 



Y. M. C. A. HAS SOCIAL TIME. 



Delegates Welcomed by Pres. Slocum. 
Mrs. Martin Delivers Interesting 
Address — Miss Loomis Enter- 
tains at Luncheon. 

The Association of Collegiate Alum- 
nae of America, which has been hold- 
ing its annual meeting in Denver 
since October i8, continued its ses- 
sions at Colorado Springs Saturday. 
The final meeting of the twenty-ninth 
annual convention was held in Cogs- 
well Theater of Colorado College, 
Saturday afternoon. 

President William F. Slocum wel- 
comed the association members to 
Colorado College in a brief speech in 
which he assured the visitors that the 
College was more than glad to have a 
small part in a conference which was 
bound to result in a new stinrulus to 
education and a new grasp upon edu- 
cational movements. 

jNIiss Mary R. Potter, M. A., dean 
of women at Northwestern University 
arid second vice-president of the asso- 
ciation, responded to Dr. Slocum. 
She was followed by Mrs. Gertrude 
Shorb Martin, dean of women at Cor- 
nell University, whose address on the 
subject ''The Office of Dean of Wo- 
men: What It Means," was listened 
to with much interest by the gather- 
ing made up not only of many deans 
of women from all over the country, 
but also of a number of educators of 
national prominence. Mrs. jNIartin's 
paper was followed by a lively discus- 
sion of the special question, "Shall 
Deans Teach?" During this discus- 
sion, the general opinion was ex- 
pressed that anything which will en- 
able the deanship of women to mean 
more to the women students, and to 
the institution of which it is a part, 
was to be desired. 

Monday morning, the deans of wo- 
men who were in attendance at the 
convention held a session at Bemis 
Hall, after which they were en- 
tertained at luncheon by Miss Ruth 
Loomis, dean of women of Colorado 
College. The session was participated 
in by deans from many of the import- 
ant colleges and universities through- 
out the United States. 



A university Republican club was 
organized last week at Boulder. They 
endorses the policy of the regular 
Republican party and allied them- 
selves with it. 



Dr. Coit, of London, to Give Address 
Tonight in Perkins. 

A lecture on "Bernard Shaw as a 
Social Symptom" will be given in 
Perkins Hall this evening at 8 o'clock 
by Dr. Coit of the West London Eth- 
ical Society, In this lecture Dr. Coit 
will treat the social problems of the 
present day in the masterly way of 
one who is a recognized authority of 
the world on sociology, as evidenced 
b}r the fact that his works are pub- 
lished regularly in three languages. 

Dr. Coit is just returning from a 
lecture tour on the western coast of 
the United States, where he appeared 
before the universities and education- 
al societies in many cities, receiving 
universally favorable newspaper com- 
ment. 

Dr. Coit, who was a classmate of 
Dean Parsons at Amherst, comes here 
bj' the special request of the faculty 
and under the auspices of the college 
Y. M. C. A. 



GLEE CLUB NEWS. 



Personnel Completed — Dean Hale to 
Be Faculty Supervisor. 



The personnel of the Glee Club has 
been completed by the selection- of 
Park as first tenor and Guy and Tan- 
ner as second tenors. It is probable 
that another first bass and another 
second tenor will have to be chosen, 
as two of the men previously selected 
may be unable to go on the proposed 
trips. 

The work of the club is progress- 
ing rapidly under the coaching of 
Mr. Richards. Dean Hale of the Mu- 
sic School, who was unable to train 
the club this year on account of duties 
in the school, has consented to as- 
sume the role of faculty supervisor, 
and by obtaining frequent reports of 
the scholastic standing of the singers 
he will be in a position to advise the 
men so that none of them will be 
barred because of low grades. 



A Woman's Student Affairs com- 
mittee has been approved by the pres- 
ident of Berkeley. This committee 
will ha\ e the power to judge all cases 
requiring investigation which may 
arise among the women. 



City Y. M. C. A. Throws Its Doors 

Open for Swimming Party and 

Oyster Feed. 



The splendid entertainment pro- 
vided for the men of the College Y. 
M. C. A. at the City Y. M. C. A. 
building Wednesday night was one of 
the most enjoyable features of college 
life this year. A swimming party, be- 
ginning at 7 o'clock, was followed by 
an oyster supper in the dining room, 
at Avhich many, matters of interest to 
the men were discussed. 

At the last session of the Cabinet it 
was decided to niake these meetings, 
combining business and social plea- 
sure, a monthly event of which Wed- 
nesday night's entertainment was the 
first. Every man who has paid the 
annual membership fee of one dollar 
is allowed to participate in these good 
times without any additional expense. 



"THE RIVALS." 



The Dramatic Club is to present 
"The Rivals," by Sheridan, Friday 
evening, in Cogswell Theater, at 7:30. 
This opening performance is given 
especially for all the new girls in col- 
lege. NO MEMBER of the club will 
be admitted who has not paid her 
dues. 

"The Rivals" is a story laid in colo- 
nial times. Sir Anthony Absolute, a 
blustering father, has planned a suit- 
able marriage for his son. Naturally, 
the son resents until he finds that he 
has fallen in love, under an assumed 
name, with the lady of his father's 
choice. The attempts of Bob Acres, a 
rival of Captain Absolute, to keep up 
his valor and reputation as a fighter 
are very humorous. Mrs. Malaprop, 
the aunt of the chosen lady, furnishes 
amusement bj' her "oracular tongue." 



A QUILL CLUB. 



There is in process of organization 
a new club to 1 e known as the Quill 
Club of Colorado College, and having 
for its two-fold object the stimulation 
of interest in writing and the enlight- 
enment of the public concerning the 
student activities of the College. The 
membership of the Club will be lim- 
ited to those students who have been 
in attendance at least one semester 
and who are recommended by their 
instructor in English composition. 



THE TIGER 



GRADUATE HONORED. 



Dr. Noble One of Speakers of Mis- 
sionary Jubilee. 



and co-operation among lives, and ap- 
plied the lesson in a striking way to 
college life. 



THE UTAH JAMBOREE. 



Dr. Mary R. Noble '96 of the North 
India School of Medicine for Chris- 
tian Women, Ludhiana, Panjab, is 
now in America upon a well-earned 
furlough, and is one of the speakers 
in the Woman's National Foreign 
Missionary jubilee, to be held in about 
30 cities to be visited before the 
spring of 1911. Mrs. W. A. Mont- 
gomery, Dr. Noble and other repre- 
scntati\e women will present the 
cause of woman's work in foreign 
missions. The students of Colorado 
College are particularly interested in 
Dr. Noble, as she is a graduate of the 
College. She is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles E. Noble of this 
city, and many have followed her 
career with deep interest. 

The school in which Dr. Noble is 
one of the chief instructors was 
founded in 1894 by Dr. Edith Brown, 
in conjunction with a committee com- 
posed of medical and educational mis- 
sionaries and others who realized the 
need of providing medical training, 
combined with the influences of a 
Christian home for the Christian wo- 
men of India. Its primary object is 
to teach such women as desire to en- 
gage in Zenana medical missions and 
to fit them to be medical missionaries 
to their countrywomRn. 

The work of the school is interde- 
nominational. The women engaged 
in this work are highly educated phy- 
sicians, both from England and Amer- 
ica, and the various missions aided 
by the school and hospital represent 
England, Canada and the United 
States. The church of England, Eng- 
lish Baptists, American Presbyterians 
and various other religious bodies co- 
operate heartily in the labor. 



NORTHWESTERN'S DEAN 
WOMEN SPEAKS AT 
CHAPEL. 



OF 



Last Monday the student body had 
the pleasure of listening to a short 
address by Miss Potter, Dean of Wo- 
men at Northwestern, who was in 
this city as a delegate to the annual 
convention of the National Associa- 
tion of the Collegiate Alumnae of 
American Colleges. Dr.awing her text 
from the raising from the dead of the 
daughter of Jairns, she spoke briefly 
on the absolute necessity of harmony 



Miss Calkins Speaks. 

Miss Mary W. Calkins, Psychology 
professor at Wellesley, spoke to the 
young women Saturday night on "The 
Place of Study in the College." She 
cpioted from a president of an eastern 
college who believes that the Ameri 
can uni\'ersities and colleges do not 
lay as much emphasis on study and 
intellectual de^'elopment as European 
institutions do, and that with us, study 
is more of a side issue. Intellectual 
development. Miss Calkins said, is not 
the highest aim in life; the end in 
life is the de^'e]opment of -the person- 
ality and of the social traits. But in 
order that these may reach their 
highest degree of usefulness, the in- 
tellect, too, must be trained. There 
is just one period in our lives when 
our time can be wholly given to train- 
ing of the mind, — and that time is 
during our school and college course. 
During the four years of college, then, 
ought not study to be made our pri- 
mary object, instead of one of the 
side issues? For unless we use the 
time while we have it for intellectual 
development, we cannot gain the 
greatest efficiency in the main end of 
life — the gaining of personality and 
powerful influence as social beings — 
to which the intellect is the natural 
complement. 



ALDRICH NEXT SPEAKER AT 
MEN'S MEETING. 



Next Sunday afternoon at ,3:30 in 
Cogswell Theater the men of the col- 
lege will have the splendid opportun- 
ity of listening to an address by Guy 
V. Aldrich. Mr. Aldrich will also 
speak at a joint prayer meeting in 
Bemis commcm room Sunday evening 
at 6:30. There will be special music 
at both meetings. 

Within the last year, Mr. Aldrich 
has visited all the principal colleges 
in the East and South, and he comes 
to us with a great deal of valuable in- 
formation on the live problems of the 
day for college students. 

Conferences are being arranged for 
IMr. Aldrich with the Y. M. C. A. cab- 
inet and the Student Volunteer Band. 

Mr. Aldrich, who was formerly as- 
sistant Y. M. C. A. secretary at the 
University of Pennsylvania, is now 
travelling secretary of the Student 
Volunteer Movement. 



Chapel Ginger Meeting — Tally-ho, 
Drawn by Students, for Team — En- 
thusiastic Send-Off — Saturday Night 
"Pajamarino" — Team Welcomed 
Home at Station. 



A week ago today the enthusiasm 
and loyalty of C. C. students over- 
flowed in one of the greatest "pep 
meetings'' in the history of the col- 
lege. After the usual "rousing C-0" 
for a starter, talks were made on the 
coming game by coach, members of 
the team and others. Then the whole 
team was called to the platform to 
be saluted by the Tiger and to be 
cheered to the echo by the students. 
Hille took up the trend of spirit by 
playing "Our Colorado," which five 
hundred voices joined in singing as 
all passed out. At the door stood a 
tally-ho decorated with College col- 
ors. Into this the Tigers were placed; 
willing hands seized the long rope at- 
tached to the front and the triumph- 
al march began, the men pulling the 
tally-ho down the centre of the street 
and the women keeping pace on the 
sidewalks. When the procession 
reached the depot the Tigers were 
carried from their seats to the plat- 
form and given cheer after cheer, 
while waiting for their special car. As 
their train pulled out, the last glimpse 
the Tigers had of the city showed the 
yards packed with rooters, who, cov- 
ering the platforms, filling the tracks, 
and standing on box cars, were wav- 
ing colors and yelling at the top of 
their lungs for the return of the team 
with LTtah's scalp. "After this we sim- 
pl}' can't lose," one Tiger was heard 
to remark. "We simply have to win." 

And win they did. In spite of the 
superior weight of their opponents 
and in spite of the hostility of three 
thousand rooters, the Tigers played 
straight, consistent football and beat 
the Mormons on their home grounds. 
— a feat performed only once before 
in the history of Utah University. 

Meanwhile the C. C. students were 
waiting impatiently for news of the 
game. When it was announced that 
the score at the end of the first half 
was sixteen to six in favor of the 
Tigers, the general feeling of satis- 
faction and confidence was demon- 
strated by enthusiastic rooting. A 
few minutes later came the dismaying 
news, "Utah in the lead — 17-16 — and 
ten minutes more to play." Then no 
more news till just at .dark, when the 

Continued on Patre 10 



THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 



PROPER TRAINING FOR last Saturday's game, which they tried 

TIGERS. so hard to win by either hook ov 

crook, on the grounds of the ineligi- 

No Society for Tigers Henceforth, bility of Herb Sinton and "Yota" 

No "Fussing" at Games. Reed. The eligibility of these men 

has been firmly established already 

Coach Rothgeb is making every ef- by the Conference so that the wails 

fort to put the team in the best possi- of the vanquished ones will probably 

ble trim and in his talk Tuesday he meet deaf ears at the Conference ses- 

urged the co-operation of the men of sion. It goes hard with those Mor- 

the College in keeping the team in mons tc) hjse their scalps on their 

training and asked the assistance of home grounds. 

the women as well. He urged the . 

women as a demonstration of their „j . ■ „ . ,. 

We Will Beat the Mmes. — Ihe lig- 
college loyalty to turn down anv' of i ..i -vr- i c ^ i ..i 

°,. , . -^ . ers plav the Almes here Saturdav, the 

the Tigers who might ask for their , ,' ■ i • ^ u 'i j 

"^ ^ only championship game to be played 

companj' at a dance or other social -sxr i i c i i ^u- 

^ ^ on Washburn held this year, 

engagement. \r ■ ^ j ^ ^i- 

° . . 1 ou re expected at this game. 

This request, together with the man- t,, t,- .,, , ,, ,. 

ihe iigers will have the same line- 
date that there shall be no "co-edu- 11^ 1 

up as used last week, 
cation at football games may go a -r- -,r- -i, ,• r n 

^ ^ ine Miners will line up as follows: 

little hard with the women, but it is y,- , -7 , 

ivissock, Zwetow r. e 
imperatne and means much toward t lu 4./. 

.' . Leadbetter, r. t. 

bringing the coveted pennant to Tiger t- ^ 
„ Eaton, r. g. 

Town. ,, 

Mertes, c. 

Davis, 1. g. 

UTAH TO PROTEST GAME? Calvert, i. t. 

McGuire, Marshall, 1. e. 

Mormons Take Their Defeat Hard. Douglas, q. b. 

Slattery, r. h. b. 

Latest advices from the Mormon Zisch, 1. h. b. 

camp say that Salt Lakers will protest Meyers, f. b. 

COACH ROTHGEB COMPILES TIGER STATISTICS 

The following figures compiled by average four pounds lighter than the 

Coach Rothgeb on ages, weights, and Miners and an inch and a half more in 

heights of the squad, will prove inter- , • , ^ t-i jt 

, ^ ,1 T- c T-i ^- height. The hgures: 

estmg to all liger fans. The Tigers 

Colorado College. Weight. Height. Age. 

Thompson, left end 160 5 ft. 10 in. 21 

Bowers, left tackle 155 5 ft. g in. 20 

Hedblom, left guard 175 5 ft. g in. 22 

Witherow, center 170 6 ft. 2 in. 21 

Black, right guard 155 5 ft. 1 1 in. 21 

Cook, ri,ght tackle 165 5 ft. 1 1 in. 23 

Sinton, right end 165 6 ft. 21 

Reed, quarterback 130 5 ft. 6 in. 22 

Heald, left halfback 160 5 ft. 10 in. 22 

Acker, fullback , 160 5 ft. 8 in. 20 

Vandemoer ■ 165 6 ft. 21 

Substitutes. 

LeClere 150 5 ft. 10 in. 20 

Dickson, halfback 150 5 ft. 10 in. 20 

Putnam, quarterback 130 5 ft. g]/, in. 22 

Floyd, fullback 160 5 ft. 10 in. 20 

Haight, guard 160 5 ft. S in. 28 

Squad totals 2591 93 ft. 7 m. 344 

Squad average 161 5 ft. lojX in. 21 14 

Total weight of line in first team, 1. 145 pounds; average, 163 4-7. 

Total weight of bacK^.eld, first te m, 615; average, I53-14. 



WHAT THEY THINK 



The following interviews with 
prominent members of the athletic 
association were printed in a Colo- 
rado Springs paper Monday night. 
They explain the situation seen from 
their point of view: 

"I am more than pleased with the 
showing of the Tigers against LItah. 
The way the boys got into the game 
was surprising, and I must confess 
that they played a quality of football 
that was satisfactory. We had a hard 
game, but next Saturday's with the 
Mines will be still harder. Every 
man, except for a few bruises and 
strains, is in fine condition, and I ex- 
pect to have the whole squad out this 
afternoon." — Coach Rothgeb. 

"We did the work. For the second 
time since the University of Utah be- 
gan playing football they were whip- 
ped on their own grounds. I feel 
pretty well satisfied with the showing 
of the team. We are going to put in 
some hard hours tliis week getting 
ready for the Mines, for they are to 
be our next ^■ictims." — Captain Van- 
demoer. 

"Considering the unfairness of the 
officials, our victory Saturday was 
nothing short of marvelous. Accord- 
ing to every rule of football the score 
should have been 2j^ to 11 in our 
favor. Before the \-ery eyes of the 
officials one of the Utah men crawled 
3/-2 yards to make his down after the 
ball had been declared down. That 
gave them their last touchdown. On 
one of Vandemoer's punts the Utah 
quarter touched the ball and a Mor- 
mon was tackled behind his own goal 
line, making a safety and adding two 
points to our score, but the officials 
refused to allow it." — Manager Fowl- 
er. 
Denver Gets Theirs. 

LTniversity of Nebraska 27, Denver 
U. o, Denver had no show in the 
game with Nebraska last Saturday. 
Simply could not score. Denver's 
only redeeming feature was the classy 
running by Crowley, D. U.'s great 
half back. Nebraska critics say that 
the Denver bunch had no life. 



Freshmen- Beaten by Pueblo. 



The freshmen met the Centennial 
High School team at Pueblo last Sat- 



THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 



urday for a defeat to the tune of 6 to 
0. The better and longer coaching of 
the Pueblo team showed up and their 
forward pass and trick plays were the 
reasons for the defeat of the '14 lads. 
However, Jacobs at full and Herron 
at quarterback, played good football, 
while the entire fresh team played a 
good game. The line-up was as fol- 
lows: 

Sanderson, Ogilbee, center. 

Summers, Harter, guards. 

Koch, Cameron, Long, tackles. 

Rowland, Gary, Jackson, ends. 

I-Ieron, quarter (captain). 

Geddes, Lewis, halves. 

Jacobs, fullback. 



U. C. Makes Poor Showing. 

After Colorado College has defeat- 
ed Wyoming by a score of 2X, to o 
and did not half try to make the score 
larger, the Boulder aggregation had a 
hard time in putting over a score of 
14 to 3 last Saturday, at Laramie 
McFadden, who it is said has a bad 
knee and may not last for many more 
"■ames, was the Silver and Gold's par- 
ticular star; the rest of the team 
played lukewarm football. W. U. 
played about the same game as they 
played here. The University showed 
poor form on forward passes and the 
new style game. Wait until Novem- 
ber 12, Boulder. 



FOOTBALL SCORES SATURDAY. 



Colorado College 21, Utah 17. 

C. S. High School 23, East Den- 
ver 3- 

Denver U. o, Nebraska 27. 

Boulder 14, Wyoming 3. 

Mines 10, Aggies 6. 

Centennial 6, C. C. Freshmen 0. 

Canon City 12, Cripple Creek 5. 

Yale 0, Vanderbilt o. 

Harvard 12, Brown o. 

Princeton 6, Indians o. 

Penn 10^ State College o. 

Chicago ID, Northwestern o. 

West Point 28, Lehigh o. 

Cornell 15, Vermont 5. 

Michigan 3, Ohio State 3. 

Nevada 0, Stanford 8. 

Philips Andover 5, Harvard Fresh- 
men 0. 

Swarthmore 27, Delaware College o. 

University of Pittsburg 17, George- 
town 0. 



Bucknell 9, West Virginia U. o. 
Notre Dame 51, Buchnel o. 
Virginia 28, Virginia M. L o. 
Syracuse 12, Hobart 5. 
Phillips Exeter o, Yale Freshmen o. 
Amherst o, Bowdoin 3. 
Iowa Aggies 6, Missouri State 5. 
Kansas 6, Drake o. 
St. Louis U. o, Wabash 10. 
Georgia 35, Tennessee 5. 
Texas 48, Transylvania 0. 
Georgia Technical 24, Alabama o. 
Dartmouth 39, Williams 0. 
Kansas State Normal 14, Was'h- 
burn 12. 



MORMON'S SCALP ANNEXED 

Continued from Page 1 

L'tah poor showing on open plays. 
The game was won in the last five 
minutes of play, when Vandemoer 
took the ball, after Reed had returned 
a punt some distance, and ran 30 yards 
for a touchdown. 

A feature of the contest was the 
spirit shown by the "double U," back- 
ers. Three thousand of them lined 
the field, and according to some of the 
local players, showed fine spirit. 
However, when the Tigers were in 
the lead they failed to cheer, which 
fact leads one to remark that anyone 
can cheer when they are winning. 
The Game in small detail. 

The Tigers received the kickoiT and 
Vandemoer returned the ball 15 yards 
and then made 25 yards on a fake 
punt around right end. After Thomp- 
son made eight yards on a forward 
pass, Vandy kicked out of bounds and 
in an attempt to punt, Richardson 
failed to get the ball out of Black's 
reach and Cook fell on it for the first 
touchdown. Van failed to kick goal. 
Acker took the next kick-off up the 
field for 45 yards and after an ex- 
change of punts and passes, the ball 
went into Utah's hands, but they 
failed tci materialize as adwincers in 
this quarter. Next Sinton missed a 
forward pass, Ivichardson got the ball 
and punted, but Utah recovered it. 
On a forward pass in the next play 
the ball bounced out of the recipient's 
hands, Witherow picked it up and ran 
40 yards for anotlie.- touchdown. 
Vandy kicked goal. Score 11 to o. 

Forward passes to Sintcm and 
Thompson and to Thompson again 
netted the next touchdown. Goal was 
missed. Here Utah took its first 



brace and on a good punt formation 
Romey scored a touchdown. Goal 
was kicked. The Tigers held the ball 
the remainder of the quarter. 

Floyd took Acker's place as the 
key.stone back because of a bad kick 
on Acker's head, and here Utah 
showed some real football, scoring 
two touchdowns, one on a fake place 
kick and forward pass to Home, and 
another by Riser on a 60-yard forward 
pass run. Score 17 to 16. 

In the last quarter, C. C. end runs 
and punting showed up well. The 
ball was soon placed on the Mormon 
i-yard line, but Utah held when they 
got the ball and punted. 

Reed made a fine return of the punt 
and Vandy then took the ball on a 
fake punt and ended the scoring with 
a touchdown. Failed to kick goal. 
Final score: Tigers 21, Mormons 17. 

The line-up: 

Thompson, 1. e Carmichael, 1. e. 

Bowers, 1. t Oleson, 1. t. 

Hedblom, 1. g Young, 1. g. 

Witherow, c Nielson, c. 

Black, r. g Christenson, r. g. 

Cook, r. t Home (Capt.), r. t. 

Sinton, r. e Dean, Riser, r. e. 

Reed, q. b... Grant, O. Romney, q. b. 
Vandemoer (capt.), r. h. 

Bennion, r. h. 

Heald, 1. h Romney, 1. h. 

Acker, Floyd, f. b.. .. Richardson, f. b. 

Officials — Referee, Baum; umpire, 
Bassett; field judge, Tobin; head 
linesman, Mack. 



Notes. 



"Paf Patterson after the game said 
"It was the best game of football I 
ever saw the Tigers plaj'." 

H. Sinton stopped ofT in Salt Lake 
to \\s\\. friends, for a day. Sinton used 
used to be physical director of the Y. 
M. C. A. there and is a popular man 
in the city. 

Le Cle.'e visited at Grand Junction 
for a few hours on his waj' home. 

According to Salt Lake papers, ev- 
ery member of the Tiger team was a 

lo-second man. Speed was all that 
the Mormons gave the Tigers credit 
for before the game. 



Touchdowns — Cook, 
Thompson, Vandemoer. 

Goals — A'andemoer, i. 



Witherow, 



THE TIGER 



-^^ '^!llii^ -* 

The Weekly Newspaper of Colorado College 

A. E BRYSON Editor-in-Chief 

S. WILKIE DEAN Business Manager 

Sam J. Shelton Assistant Editor 

Richard L. Hughes Assistant Editor 

Habrv Black Assistant Editor 

T. Wynne Ross Athletic Editor 

Robert m. Copeland Engineering Editor 

FRED S. Baker Forestry Editor 

Helen Canon Alumni Editor 

Mamie C. Detmoyer Exchange Editor 

Edith I.. Sltmmers Local Editor 

J. A. Root Local Editor 

Ray H. Sayre Assistant Manager 

E. E. Hedblom Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

A. W. Donovan, C.E. Hayward. Bruce Weirick, William 

Sloey, Joe Sinton, Elsie Greene, Lillian Duer, Grace 

Wilson, Dorothy Cook, Dorothy Stott 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles anditems to TheTiger. Contributions . 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo 

Phones: Editor, Main 1975. Manager, Main 2073 

-laj^jast-. Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 

(T;^ M i ^ ^^ >h Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



Miners Next. 

Saturday, the Tigers clasli with the 
Miners. If there are any who think 
that the game is a certain victory for 
the Tigers and that student support 
will be unnecessary, it would be well 
for them to get under the shower and 
turn on the cold water. The Miners 
are fighters; with them the game is 
never lost until the end. The rivalry 
between the two institutions has al- 
ways been intense. Three years ago 
the Mines team swamped our Tigers 
15-0; two years ago, the Tigers came 
back strong and retrieved themselves 
by a score of 22-4. Last year the two 
institutions did not meet, since the 
Miners had not yet joined the Con- 
ference. By process of rotation, Sat- 
urday's game should go to the Gold- 
enites, but by process of reasoning it 
may be safely asserted that the game 
will go to the Tigers, if, — the Tigers 
play up to their usual form and the 
followers of the Black and Gold show 
the same splendid spirit that has char- 
acterized the former games. 

Permanency 
in Customs. 

While the juniors and sophs are 
delving into the perplexing problem 
of choosing an appropriate ])iece of 
headgear for themselves, a word as 
to what kind of a hat should be 



chosen may not be amiss. It is un- 
doubtedly the desire of these two 
classes to choose such a hat as will 
be accepted bj- uther classes which 
follow, hence the hat must be of a 
standard style and make up and, on 
the whole such a hat as future gen- 
erations will think as much of as the 
present classes. 

The necessity of getting down to 
permanent standards in our customs 
and traditions is becoming more and 
more apparent. For instance, the 
Nugget cover. Since the Nugget 
made its first appearance, there have 
been no two covers alike, every class 
trying to outdo its predecessor in 
choice of material, general make-up, 
etc. Some of the attempts have been 
disastrous. The Nugget should have 
a standard cover used from year to 
year, something at once durable, dig- 
nified and attractive. So tuo with the 
hats and many of our other customs — • 
let's get down to something perma- 
nent. 

The Passing of 
the Bonfire. 

The passing of the Barbecue bon- 
fire marks the passage of an eventful 
tradition in the lives of the men of 
Colorado College. D'uring the fresh- 
man year, the get-together spirit is 
stimulated somewhat by the class 
scrap, but not until two men have 
"swiped'' dog-houses together for a 
barbecue bonfire do they know the 
pleasures of college friendship. There 
is something about these nightly 
raids that brings men together; there 
is something about cutting classes to 
add your quota of combustible ma- 
terial that makes class spirit; there 
is something about the building of the 
"biggest bonfire ever" that creates 
college loyalty, and now it's all a 
memory, buried in the eventful past. 
What a chance for the pessimist to 
say that "times aint like they used 
to wuz." 

Speaking of 
"Pep." 

During the past few weeks, the 
reading public has been considerably 
amused and the mollycoddle public 
considerably chagrined at the super- 
abundance of college enthusiasm that 
has been in evidence around the State. 
It has been boiling over at the edges, 
shooting up in the middle, cracking 
and popping from unexpected places; 
it has been oozing out at the cracks, 
bursting out at the seams, and spill- 
ing all o\er the innocent public. 



First came Denver with a wild and 
woolly escapade that would have made 
Diamond Dick quake with terror; 
next our own papers came out with 
the glaring headlines, "College Boys 
Break Up Democratic RallJ^" The 
Aggies, to keep pace with the splen- 
did examples set before them, roused 
themselves from lethargy and satis- 
fied themselves by putting the city 
firemen through a milling that left all 
the city horses feeling like scrambled 
eggs. The infection spread next to 
Boulder town, where certain peppery 
individuals, so say the never-to-be- 
relied-on-papers, conceived the admir- 
able and strategic plan of kidnaping a 
D. U. football artist. Result — gen- 
eral mixup, Boulder kidnapers ducked, 
general public aroused, D. U. incensed. 
Then back to our own bounds the 
mi3vement spread — students efferves- 
cent with "pep" run into a tactless 
policeman who attempts to show his 
divine right of authority; policeman 
gently shoved over an obnoxious 
fence, which settled to the earth 
'neath the preponderance of civic 
avoirdupois. What are we coming to? 
Are anarchists not more to be desired 
than college students? So say those 
who are lacking in warm blood. The 
answer is, — calm yourselves. To be 
sure, such conduct can be pushed too 
far and perhaps has been already, but 
the spirit of the act should be taken 
into account in forming a judgment. 
Such spirit as has been in evidence 
around our own campus during the 
present year must have some outlet,^ 
however, let's save the remainder for 
that Boulder game, we may need it. 

Meanwhile, it might be in order to 
ask if the Mines is the only dignified 
institution in the State. 



SOPHS GETTING THE FEVER. 



Vote to Present Student Body With 
a Mascot. 



The good luck brought to the Tiger 
squad by the impromiitu mascot, 
"Tige," has suggested to the Sophs 
that it might be well to have this fiery 
little beast as a permanent asset. Ac- 
cordingly last Tuesday at a class 
meeting, the class of 191,3 voted to 
present the student body with a hand- 
somer and more durable "Tige" than 
the one which led the procession 
which inspired the spirit that beat 
Utah, — in short, this is the Tige that 
will lead the van that will inspire the 
spirit that w'ill wallop the Miners. 
Look for "Tige" Saturday. 



THE TIGER 



NEW SOCIETY FORMED. 



Organization of "The Engineers' 
Club" Now Completed. 

Thirty-five engineers met last Fri- 
day night at the Polytechnic room in 
the library to consider a constitution 
for a club to succeed the Colorado 
College Chemical Club. The change 
is due to the growth of the Engineer- 
ing School and to the inability of the 
Chemical Club to gi\-e the needed 
training to the greater number of the 
eligible students. The chief business 
of the earlier society was research 
work, and, somewhat later technical 
papers were considered. For the pur- 
poses of the Engineering School a 
giadual broadening had been taking 
place and now the club has entered 
into direct competition with the lit- 
erary societies in an eHort to make 
Colorado College engineers and tech- 
nical students all that they should be 
in speaking and writing for an audi- 
ence. 

First Meeting Enthusiastic. 

Several of the present members are 
also members of the various literary 
societies and for their convenience the 
meeting began at seven o'clock. The 
program which follows was given: 

Introduction C. E. Hay ward 

History of the Chemical Club 

R. W. Copeland 
Limitations of the Chemical Club 

W. Lloyd 
Discussion of the Constitution 

L. Griswold 

At the close of the formal program, 
cider, apples and doughnuts were 
served. Several boxing matches, 
games and wrestling bouts were held 
before the meeting adjourned. The 
first regular program will be held Fri- 
day, Oct. 28. Freshmen engineers and 
all interested persons are invited. 

College Standing for Admission. 

The members of the club may be 
from any class more advanced than 
freshmen, in the School of Engineer- 
ing, and also students of the Liberal 
Arts department who have had Quali- 
tative Chemistry or the equivalent 
Physics. The essential requirement 
will be found in the following ex- 
tracts from the Constitution: 

The object of this club shall be to 
obtain that profit and pleasure which 
results from active participation in 
technical and literary work 

Art. L The name of this organiza- 
tion shall be "The Engineers' Club of 
Colorado College." 



Art. II, Sec. 2. Any male student 
of Colorado College taking (or cred- 
ited with) qualitative chemistry or 
sophomoie physics is eligible to mem- 
bership in this club. 

Dues. — The dues of the club shall 
be four dollars per college year; two 
dollars to be paid at the first of each 
semester. A discount of 25 per cent, 
will be made if the ones are paid be- 
fore Nov. I, the first semester and 
March i the second semester. 

The work of the club is materially 
lighter than is usual, owing to its pre- 
A'ious existence as the Chemical Club. 
It is easy to prophesy that with the 
present spirit and the number of men 
now interested, the club will serve 
the purpose for which it is now work- 
ing. 



NEW LABORATORY WORK. 



Electrical Engineering Department 

Able to Experiment on 

Series Motors. 



Ihe first tests on the new Holzer- 
Cabot motor were made Monday af- 
ternoon. The motor is one horse 
power series connected machine of 
up-to-date pattern. It is a type of 
motor that is used where a high 
torque is necessary at starting as in 
the motors of street cars and ele- 
vators. In adding this kind of a mo- 
tor to the electrical equipment the 
department not only filled up space 
with a compact and quite pretty ma- 
chine but also provided for tests and 
experiments on a kind of motor that 
is in wide commercial use. Before 
this ti'nie any serious laboratory treat- 
ment of the subject of series motors 
was impossible. 



SCHOOL OF FORESTRY STA- 
TISTICS. 

A few weeks ago there appeared in 
the Tiger a set of statistics showmg 
the wide scope of Colorado College. 
This is shown most particularly in 
the case of the School of Forestry — 
especially when one considers its 
smallness in numbers. In the Col- 
lege, exclusive of the School of For- 
estry, but 20 per cent, come from out- 
side this State, while in the School 
of Forestry 59 per cent, come from 
outside of Colorado. From the regis- 
tration it appears that the homes of 
the men of the School of Forestry are 
distirbuted as follows: 

Colorado 14, Massachusetts 4, Illi- 



nois 3, California 3, Ohio 2, Minnesota 
2, Iowa I, Kansas i, Wyoming i, Mis- 
souri I, Pennsylvania i, Hawaii i. 
Perhaps the most striking thing in 
this list is that next after Colorado 
comes Massachusetts. 



DR. STURGIS RETURNS. 



Dr. Sturgis, who was Dean of the 
School of Forestry two years ago, has 
returned from a year's trip spent in 
Europe. This trip was taken princi- 
pally for other reasons than the study 
of Forestry abroad, yet he observed 
widely the forest policies of Germany 
during a three weeks' visit to the 
Black Forest. "There," said Dr. Stur- 
gis, "one can observe all the processes 
of lumbering, planting, and thinning 
merely by driving through the roads 
in the forest. The appearance is much 
difi'erent than in ours, as the forest 
floor is clear of brush and under- 
growth and even the dead limbs drop- 
ping off are picked up and used for 
fire wood. The young forests betray 
their artificial nature by the rows in 
which they were set out, but after 
they grow old and numerous thin- 
nings have taken place they appear 
like virgin forests and no traces of 
their artificial origin are to be seen." 

Dr. Sturgis has a strong faith in 
the school and believes it has very 
many advantages over the best schools 
of the East. Its position here in the 
West near the National Forests and 
the possession of such a magnificent 
tract of land as Manitou Park for a 
field laboratory are not the least of 
these advantages. 



FORESTERS GO TO THE PARK. 



Last Tuesday noon. Professor Cool- 
idge went to Manitou Park, taking 
with him Rice, Pierce and Boynton, 
to stay until Saturday. The men are 
up there to study various species in 
their natural habitat. The species 
studied will be western yellow pine, 
Douglas fir, limber pine and possibly 
blue spruce also. They will observe 
their manner of growth, seeding ca- 
pacity, and their relations to light, 
moisture, and soil, in short, everything 
that concerns a tree. Such practical 
field trips as these do more good than 
weeks of theory. 



The. Law Association, at Berkeley, 
has decided to issue a review. The 
book will be modeled after the Har- 
vard Law Review. 



THE TIGER 



Values that have built up the greatest business in the state. Do you realize that 
we sell more apparel for men than any other concern selling men's wear exclu- 
sively, in the state. We price our goods for the season to meet competitive 
bargain sales? Several thousand customers have come to trust us to look to their 
interests, to see that they get good honest values every day and always. Com- 
pare our regular $15, $18, $20, $25 suits and overcoats with the best competitive bargain offerings 




Colorado Springs, ION. Tejon St. Denver, Sixteenth at Stout 



THE WHEREABOUTS OF igio. 

Widely Sea lered — Many Pedagoges 
Several Taking Advanced Work. 



The Class of 1910 has scattered to 
the four winds, but the places to 
which its members have scattered are 
no greater in number than the variety 
of work that they are doing. A glance 
over the list of occupations seems to 
show that the class took more kindly 
to pedagogical work than any other. 
Several of last year's graduates are 
taking work of advanced standing in 
Colorado College and other institu- 
tions and a few are taking work here 
in departments different from the 
ones in which they were graduated. 

Margaret Anderson is teaching- 
French in the San Luis School in this 
city. 

Ruth Bateman is teaching in the 
O.'dway High School. 

Carl Blackman is attending the 
medical school at Boulder. 

Harry Coil is tutoring in town. 

Faith Cox is assistant principal of 
the Georgetown High School. 

Marion Dietrich is principal of the 
Delta High School and football coach. 

Albert Ellingwood is at Oxford. 

George Gibbs is teaching in the 
Canon City tligh School. 

Nannie Gibbs is teaching in the 
grades in Canon City. 

Clare Phillips is with an employ- 
ment bureau in Denver. 



Two airy front rooms, splendidly fur- 
nished, all modern conveniences, ac- 
cessible to carJine and good table board. 
No boarding house proposition, but a 
private family where you can have the 
comforts and associations of a home. 

1629 North Tejon Street 
Phone 1570 



Hugh Gilmnre/is attending the law 
school at Denver University. 

Ethel Gray is teaching in Pueblo. 

Lester Griswold is a junior engin- 
eer. 

Henry Harrison is in the engin- 
eering school. 

Reba Hood is teaching in Empire. 

Lotta Hull is studying for an M. A. 

Elton Hunt is taking law in the 
University of Oklahoma. 

Irene Huse is teaching in Bridgton, 
Maine. 

Julia Ingersoll is teaching in the 
Byant school in Denver. 

Wylie Jameson is travelling abroad. 

Janet Kampf is teaching in the 
Garfield school in this city. 

Sam Kittleman is doing civil en- 
gineering work in town. 

IMary Le Clere is at home this win- 
ter in Grand Junction. 

Genevra McCaw is teaching in 
Geneva, Nebraska. 

Fred JMcKown is city forester here. 

Harry McOuat is surveying near 
town. 

Claude Morgan is in the forestry 
service at San Mateo, Calif. 

Effie Miller is teaching in the grades 
in Pueblo. 

Emily Mills is teaching at Calhan, 
Colorado. 

H. W. Perry is engaged in ci\ il en- 
gineering in town. 

Todd Pettigrew is secretary of the 
Progressive Republican party in Den- 
ver. 

Lenore Pollen is registered for one 
of Dr. Schneider's courses, 

Leland Pollock is in the Harvard 
Law School. 

Margaret Seifried is at home in 
Georgetown. 

Glenn Shaw has accepted a posi- 
tiijn in the Honolulu schools. 

Jessie Smith is teaching in Salt 
I,akc. 

Harriet Spencer is teaching in 
Pueblo. 



The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies, Fixtures 

208 N. Tejon Street Phones Main 812, 830 

Lowell-Meservey Hdw. Co. 

Dealers in Paints, Oil, Glass, Every- 
thing in Hardware 



106 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springs 



Learn Wireless and Railroad 

TelfiOrdnhV ' Shoitage of fully 10,000 Oper- 
H' **r'" ' ators on account of 8-hour law 
and extensive "wireless" development. We operate 
under direct supervision of Telegraph Officials and 
positively place a!l students when qualified. Write for 

catalogue. NATIONAL TELEGRAPH INST., CInci nati, 
Philadelphia, Memphis, Davenport, la., Columbia, S. C, 
Portia d. Ore. 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heatirg Co. 



Phone Main 48 



313 N. Tejon St. 



DEXTER & HUDSON 

EXCHANGE BARBER 
SHOP 

Room 307, Third Floor 
Exchange Bank Building 



The Dentan 

Printing Company 

No. 9 So. Cascade Auenue 

FIRST-CLASS PRINTING 
at REASONABLE RATES 

Telepnone Main No. 602 



THE TIGER 




Square Deal Shoes $3.50 and $4.00 

Our Square Deal shoes for young men and young ladies hold the lead in 
quality and beauty of design. We have the tidiest, nattiest, most wearable 
line of shoes to be found. Anybody can please themselves in shoes here. 
Ease, elegance and perfection of fit are strong points in our favor. Shapely 
shoes, stunning styles for the young 
folks. All the new leathers, all the 
new new styles $3.50 and $4.00. 
Every Taste and Every Purse Finds 
Satisfaction Here. 




no7 South Tejow StuettT' 



Deichmann & Douglas 
Floral Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER. Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 
Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 



To College 
Men and Women 
We Are Known as 
"The Satisfactory 
Jeweler". To 
New Ones We 
Soon Will Be. 

Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

' 'Satisfactory Jewelry 

Store" 



WE LOAN MONEY 

ON ALL VALUABLES 

Big line of new and unredeemed 
Drawing Instruments .". Diamonds 
Watches and Jewelry ot all descrip- 
tions. Firearms and Fishing Tackle, 
Musical Instruments and hundreds 
of other articles 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 



Ben Stewart has a photograph shop 
in Manitou. 

Anna Strang has a position in the 
Pueblo High School. 

Louise Strang is substituting in the 
Denver schools. 

John Sylvester is at Monte Vista, 
farming. 

Ruth Wight is teaching in the 
grades in Trinidad. 

Melicent Campbell is at home in 
Durango. 

Robert Childs is chief electrician 
for the company which is building a 
dam across the river at Helena, Mont. 

Harry Larson is attending the Co- 
lumbia Medical School. 

John Burgess is surveying in the 
employ of ;\Ir. Van Diest of this 
city. 

Mae F.lrick is principal of the La- 
fayette High School. 

Sidney Lamb is surveying in Den- 
ver. 

Lois McLeod has been substituting 
in" the Littleton schools. 

Bertha Miller is in Albuquerque in 
city Y. W. C. A. work. 

Wilhelmina ^filler is at home in 
Cheyenne. 

John Nelson is assistant chemist -in 
the Loveland sugar factory. 

Mildred Stulman is principal of the 
High School at Meridian, Idaho. 

I.,eona Thacher is teaching in Kan- 
sas. 

j\tay Tyler is teaching in Monu- 
ment. 

Gray Harman is studying agricul- 
ture at the Colorado Agricultural 
College. 

E. G. Reichmuth, until recentlj\ 
has been employed in mining engin- 
eering work at Georgetown, Colo. 



BARBECUE MONDAY 

Continued from Page 1 

the best barbecue in the line of "eats" 
that has ever been given. 

If you want another cup of cide.', 
ask for it and you will get it. There 



Antlers 

Turkish Baths 

(Opposite Elks Club) 
Open Day and Night 

BATHS OF ALL KINDS. Also Chiro- 
pady and Swedish Massage. Treat- 
ment at Residence by Appointment. 

CARL J. WENBERG, Prop. 

Graduate Swedish Masseur 

Phone Red 33 14 E. Bijou Street 



You will find here a vast as- 
sortment of classy styles, 
in suits and overcoats, such 
as careful dressers wear. 



109^ Discount to Students 

THE MAY CO. 

23 North Tejon Street 

This Space is for The 

Whitaker Shoe 

Company 




Headquarters for 

College Footwear 



10 



THE TIGER 



When You're Ready to Buy an Overcoat 

You'll see here the smartest, most distinguished 
lot of overcoats ever displayed in this town; the 
very highest type of fine clothing made to-day 

Alfred Benjamin & Co. and Society Brand Overcoats 



MANHATTAN 
SHIRTS 




r^ .' 



>^^. 




FOWNS 
GLOVES 



Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton-Rustic Home 

No. 419 South El Paso St. 
Phone Main 442 



Dairy 



Photography 

In All Its Branches 

Clark 



112 South Tejon St. 
Special Discount to All Students 

Shoe Repairing. Clothes Cleaned and Pressed. 
Second-Hand Shoes a d Clothing 

J. H. PERKINS 



IVii. Cascade 



Colorado Springs 



PRATT, The Barber 

Is At the Aita Vista Hotel 

He Solicits the Patronage of the 
College Boys 



will be no extra charge for pails, 
buckets or anything else inside the 
show grounds. Seventy-five cents 
to get in and out. 

The ticket entitles you to all. In 
addition, each and every person will 
be presented a souvenir of the occa- 
sion with the compliments of the 
sophomore class. 

The sophomores have promised Pres- 
ident Slocum that if their profits jus- 
tify the act, they will pass a dividend 
out of the earnings, payable to ticket 
buyers. The class takes this occa- 
sion to re-affirm its position. Think 
of that. Imagine spending seventy- 
five cents for an evening of real fun 
and enjoyment and then after it was 
all over have some of your money re- 
funded. It is up to you, Mr. Part-of 
the-Student-Body, to make this pos- 
sible. The barbecue is for your en- 
joyment, it is yours for the taking. 
You will make or mar its success. 

Next Monday, October .^ist is the 
date. 



THE UTAH JAMBOREE 

Continued from Page 3. 

final returns came, "Tigers win — 21- 
17." Pandemonium broke loose.' 
Cutler bell was started and not al- 
lowed to rest till time for the starting 
of the parade. A bonfire in front' of 
Hag Hall was the rallying place; at 
the appointed hour the march through 
the halls was begun. The "pe-raders" 
separated into four groups, each one 
of which was posted in a different 
place at a distance of two blocks from 
the "Busy Corner," to which all 



WINDOW SLEEPING TENTS 



THE OUT WEST 


TENT AND AWNING CO. 


1 13-. NORTH TEJON STREET 





Phone 917 



GEO. R. BERGEN, 0. D. 

MANF'G OPTICIAN 
Eyes Tested 611-12 Exch. Nat. Bank BIdg. 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented 
and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing a Typewriter. The 
New No. 10 Model Has All Latest 
Improvements 

Zimmerman Supply 

Company 



22 E. Kiowa St. 
Phone Main 374 



Established 1890 



WILI/IAMION 
HArrNDRCD 

ENOFAVBRJ-PRINTBRJ 




^MH^ 



IXE>IWI>K. COI/Q 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 



THE TIGER 



11 



We have now a complete line of the famous FLOR DE CUBA 
Havana Cigars. The finest cigar that can be made 



HUGHES 

North M. *J Tejon 



Gel Your Picnic Supplies 

:^=^=:^=i^ AT = 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER, Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Notary Public 

A. J. LAWTON 

Real Estate, Loans and Insurance 
10 J4 E. Pike's Peak Ave. , Colorado Springs 

Just Received 

A Large Stock of 
C.C. PENNANTS 




Our Prices are Low but in Order 
to Move This Stock Quickly We 
Will Give a Japanese Lacquered 
Cane Free with Each Pennant 

The Murray Drug Co. 

(Opposite Campus) 



rushed with all speed and noise pos- 
sible upon the lighting of the signal 
flare. 

After giving several hearty yells 
and parading the principal streets, the 
rooters took in the "vaud" and later 
had refreshments at Mueth's. Here 
"Fuzz" appeared to g?ve details of 
the game and to lead yells for all the 
players. The gathering broke up after 
the annoitncement that the Tigers 
would be in Sunday evening and that 
all men were expected to meet them. 



FRATERNITIES SHOW SPIRIT 

Continued from Page 1. 

allowed for the one meal that even it 
has not been all that it should be. 

Under the new plan, each fraternity 
will turn over its table to the team 
for all three meals and the men who 
are put out by the plan will be taken 
care of by the other fraternities. 
Thus each fraternity will be out of a 
tabic for a week and will be enter- 
taining guests from other fraternities 
for four more weeks. The results of 
such a scheme will be helpful in a 
two-fold way: the teams will be get- 
ting training table food for three 
meals a day and the interchange of 
fraternity members is certain to result 
in a closer acquaintanceship among 
the men of different fraternities and 
thus an even stronger college spirit 
v/ill be built up. 

Several members of the football 
team are working for their board and 
this innovation will make it necessary 
for them to provide substitutes during 
the remainder of the football season. 
Any men who can do this work should 
make it known at once to the foot- 
ball men. 

The funds that have been collected 
for the improvement of the training 
table will be unnecessary since the 
fraternities have so generously come 
to the rescue, so that it is probable 
that this money will be used toward 
getting a band at one of the home 
games. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 



W. S. Lee ex-'ii is forest assistant 
in the San Juan forest. 



Miss Mary Doublecheck ex-'ii was 
married in June to Mr. Thomas 
Beechinor, of Leadville. They are at 
present in Seattle. 



The marriage of Miss Mabel Turner 
and Mr. W. F. Redding '09 took 
place in Grand Junction on October 
19. The bride is a graduate of the 
music school of Colorado College. 
Mr. Redding is deputy county sur- 
veyor at Grand Junction. 



FOli THE 

Most Exclusive Millinery 

CALL ON 

Mme, M, D, Hillmer 

6 East Pike's Peak Airrtue 

Finest of Material and 
'Sest of Workmanship 

Phone Black 395 Colorado Springs 

BOOKS 

Stationery, Pictures and 

Novelties at 

The Pike's Peak Book & Stationery Co 

27-27^2 South Tejon Street Peone Black 354 

Watch the Caps You Meet 

You won't need an intro- 
duction to the HEIDCAP. 
It is not a mere head cover- 
ing. It has character. It 
gives character to the wear- 
er. It is made of exclusive 
English cap cloths. It is a 
thoroughbred. Try on a 
HEIDCAP. 



12 



THE IM G E R 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co 
Groceries and 



Meats 



•£*• 







115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



MUETH'S 

The Place Where the Stand- 
ard Is Never Lowered. High 
Class Goods at Reasonable 
Prices. Ice Cream, Hot 
and Cold Drinks. 

Lunches and Afternoon Teas 
Ask Any Old Student 

CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 



5 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 




Cox Sons & Vining 

262 Fou th Ave., New York 

Gowns and Caps 

Silk Faculty Gowns and 
Hoods. Lowest Prices 
Best Workmanship. 



The D. Y. Butcher Drug Co. 
DRUGS, KODAKS, SUPPLIES 

Free and Prompt Delivery 
Cor. Opposite P. 0. Phones 90 and 75 



BRIEFS 



Win This Money! — Prof. Thomas 
has offered a prize of five dollars to 
the person who will write the best 
college song. 



Soph Hat. — The sophomore class 
has reconsidered the hat question and 
has chosen a light colored soft felt 
with a narrow purple band for the 
class headgear. 

Dean Parsons Entertains. — Dean 
and Mrs. Parsons entertained the 
members of the faculty and their 
wives at dinner last Friday evening 
at their home on Wood avenue. There 
v\ere present nearly one hundred, in- 
cluding the faculty of Cutler Acad- 
emy. 

Trip Postponed. — The geology trip 
up Pike's Peak, which was planned 
for last Saturday, has been postponed 
imtil next spring. The class will take 
in the attractions of Bear Creek canon 
Srturday morning. 



Newly Elected ApoUonians. — The 

following men were recently elected 
to membership in the Apollonian club; 
Storke, Oglebee, Davis, Hall, Park, 
Klahr, Gregg, Perry. 



New Pearsons Men. — The new 

Pearson? men are: Buchanan 'ii, Joe 
Sinton '13, Cook '13, Tanner '14, Dow- 
ling '14. Smith '14, Lewis '14, Flem- 
ing '14, R. Jackson '14. 



Omission. — In the account of the 
election of officers of the Denver 
Alumni Association, the name of Mrs. 
Emma Riggs Barnard as Secretary 
was inadvertently omitted. 



Alpha Tau Dance. — The dance given 
by the Alpha Tau Delta fraternity last 
Saturday night at the Sanguis school 
was a most enjoyable affair. About 
tv, enty coujoles were present. 



Improvements. — The small room 
above the librarian's office in Coburn 
is being fitted witli seve.-al additional 
shelves. This room is not open to 
t'i@ general public, being ; eserved for 
files of college publications and for 
m;:tter bearing rn the history of the 
college. 




Lallie's Improved Ball Bearing 
Clipper Reel for Long Tapes 
Best Tape and Reel Made in America 

l^allie Surveying Instru- 
ment and Supply Co. 



1622 Arapahoe St. 



Denver, Colo. 



No More Wrinkles 

I have a remedy that will speedily eradicate 
any case of wrinkles— no matter how bad or 
what the cause. It makes old faces look 
young, removes all lines and wrinkles, 
corrects flabby or withered skin, makes thin 
faces plump, fills out hollow cheeks, will 
develop any part of tlie body round and full 
without any massaging. Call at my parlors 
and I will explain fully and convince you. 

Miss N. E. Joiinson 

Phone 687 324 N. Tejon Street 

JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 

Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejen Stree 

The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

Pays i% Interest on Deposits and Gives 
Special Attention to Accounts of Students 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, Preiident Ira Har - I'-President 

M. C. Gile Wm. F. Richards 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Trtasurer 

Hours; 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M. 



Colorado 
College 
Students 



Remember We Do Framing 
as It Ought To Be Done and 
at Right Prices 



WHITNEY and 

GRIMWOOD 

20 North Tejon St eet 
Opera House Block 



THE TIGER 



16 



Frat Fellows 

will find here just the 
aid they need when getting 
up their many affairs. 
We are "right there" 
when it comes to ideas for 
your dance programs, 
invitations, interior 
decorations, etc. 

THE OUT WEST 

Printing and Staiionery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 

12 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 

High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



Phone Main 2055 



Art Needle Work 



THE HUNT & VAN NICE 
Art Specialty Store 

Stamping, Designing, Perforating, Linens, 
Lawns, Best Hand-Painted China 



8 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

Everything inJeweliy 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co. 



II Local Department || 



Louise Auld entertained Hypatia 
at a sewing party last Thursday af- 
ternoon. 

Mable Sharpe went to Fountain 
Friday. 



Maud Stanfield and Ruth Cunning- 
ham entertained the girls of the first 
floor of McGregor in honor of Fucile 
Wakefield. 



Helen Williams and A^eda Hasty 
went to Denver Saturday to attend 
the Aggies-Mines football game. 



T. AI. Pettigrew visited the college 
a few hours Saturday aftenoon on his 
way to the "Creek." 



Eloise Shellabarger's sister ^■isited 
here Saturday and Sunday. 



Mabel Wilson's father spent Sun- 
day with her at the college. 



Ida Wolcott and \^esta Sharpe en- 
tertained at a large spread Saturday 
evening. 

A number of freslimen took break- 
fast in the Ga-den of the Gods, Sat- 
urday. 

Miss Louise Wallace visited the 
college Wednesday. 



]\Iiss Duer spent the week end at 
lier home in Denver. 

Alice Hamilton went to Denver 
Saturday to meet her mother and 
father. 



I-^etitia Lamb went home for over 
Sunday. 



The Girls' Glee Club spent a very 
pleasant afternoon with Mrs. Talia- 
ferro at her home last Saturday. 

Dorothy Madden went to Pueblo 
last week end. 

Miss Flora and Miss Altha Crow- 
ley entertained several friends at din- 
ner at their home on East Espanola 
St eet last Saturday evening. Place 
cards decorated with the college seal 



Hunt Up 

Bissell's Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springis 

Seldomridde Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Re'ail DeaUrs in 
Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



A "Burgess Spread" 

Perhaps you Freshies don't know 
what that is; but to us okl C. C. 
men it means much — very much. 
The finest delicatessen department, 
a superb bakery, a candy shop that 
possesses the essentials of purity and 
the added virtues of thorough work- 
manslup and artistic individuality. 
You'll be present this semester at more 
than one strictly "Burgess" function 

W. N, Burgess—Grocer 

112-114 N. Tejon Street Phone 83 

FREE 

Shoe Repairing Absolutely Free 
of Charge for Entire Term of 
1910-1911 to the College Stu- 
dent Submitting the Best Ad for 

PETE'S 

Shoe Shop 

230 East Dale Street 

Men's Sewed Soles 75c; Ladies, 65c 
Rubber Heels, 35c 



14 



THE TIGEK 



$1.00 $1.00 

Young Men 

For $1.00 per month, we sponge, press and do minor repairing on one 
suit, or one overcoat, or two pairs of trousers, each week; calling for 
and deliverieg same in our wardrobe, dustproof wagons. We claim 
to do the best work in the city. A trial from you will allow us to 
prove our claim. 

Special Prices Given to the Young Women of 
the College. Get Our Price List. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



Agents: Bert Siddons 
Glenn Bowers 




and Cleaners, 



T.E. AIKEN 

Taxidermist, Furrier 

Dealer in Souvenirs and Novelties 
12 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

For Best and Quick Delivery 

SEE 

The Monument Coal Co. 

28 East Kiowa Street 



William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



were used. Those present were: 
Misses Wakefield, Nichols, Thomas, 
and Messrs. Barnes, Crow and Rhone. 



Olive Casey and Alke Alderson 
spent Saturday and Sunday in Den- 
ver. 

Gertrude Haupert received a box 
from home last week and feasted her 
friends Sunday morning at breakfast. 

01i\e Casey gave a spread Sunday 
night. 

Miss Stukey visited her cousin, 
Leona Stukey for a few days last 
week. 



Broken Lenses Phone Black 233 

Duplicated Colorado Souvenirs 

C. B. LAUTERMAN 

Jeweler and Manufac- 
turing Optician 

121 N. TEJON STREET Colorado Springs 



10c STORE AND MORE ! 

THE EMPORIUM 

1 10 S. TEJON STREET 



College Inn 

Freshmen!! 

Tiiis Is the Place for 

GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



Fine Watch Work 



Diamond Setting a Specialty 



Don't forget to pay your Tiger subscriptioB 
before November 1st., if you want to save a 
quarter. 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



THE 

Crissey 6i Fowler 
Lumber Co. 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 

Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 

A. S. BLAKE 

Is the Man to See 

107 North Tejon Phone 465 

Nickle Ware Cutlery 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



The freshmen of Montgomery gave 
a spread last Friday. 

Mary Adams' father has been visit- 
ing in the city. 

Glenn Stiles gave a spread in Tick- 
nor on Saturday night. 

Miss Ruth Aughinbaugh entertained 
a ievf friends with a chafing-dish sup- 
per last Friday evening. 



H. E. Kapelke 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 
130 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

Grand Union Tea Co. 

Importers of Fine Teas and 
Coffees 

Phone Main 2678 220 N. Tejon St. 



On hand as usual 
but just a little better 
equipped for serving your 
needs — 



Theodore Riggs '08 visited over 
Sunday at the Phi Gam house. 



Weller enjoyed a visit from his 
mother last Thursday and Friday. 



Anions, Waalen, Johnston and 
Howes walked up the Peak Saturday 



The 

WATERMAN 

PRESS 

PRINTERS and 
BINDERS 



THE TIGER 



to get a glimpse of the game over in 
Utah. 



Frank Merril ^•isited the college this 
week. 



George Belsey, who has been sick 
for several weeks, is now able to be 
around. 

THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

'The College Favorite ' 



The Favorite Shopping 

Place for the College 

Woman 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barber 
wrork and baths 



106' 2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



• 



Star 
Laundry 



The College Laundry 

The ONLY Laundry which advertises in 
TheTiger. We give 20% discount to you. 
The best work in the state for as low a 
price as any. 

B. J. DICKSON, Agent Phone Main 342 



W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



119 N. Tejon 



Pbone Main 900 



/^' 



UNDERWEAR 
Union and 2 Piece 
$4, 3, 2, 1 the suit 



Adler-Rochester 
Clothes 



SHIRTS 

Beautiful Patterns 

$2, 1.50, 1 



15 



for the particular young men will be found in 
exclusive patterns at Gorton's. Priced $35, 

$30, $25, $20. Sweater Coats, all the new 
colors for this Fall's wear $6.50 down to $3. 

Specialists in Good Clothes and Nothing Else 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 



^= 





E. Pike's Peak 
113 



Correct Dress for Men. ^ 



:J 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



Yell practice, Washburn field, Fri- 
day evening at 5 o'clock 



Guy V. Aldrich, of New York, will 
address the men of the College in 
Cogswell Theatre, Sunday afternoon 
at 3:30 o'clock. Special music. 



Dr. Coit speaks on "Bernard Shaw 
as a Social Symptom,'' in Perkins 
tonight. Students' tickets 35c. 



Meeting of Engineers' Club and 
men's literary societies Friday night 
at 8 o'clock. 



Y^. M. C. A. meeting in the offices 
of the Association, Hagerman Hall, at 
7:15, Friday night. Meeting closes 
promptly at 7:45. 



Field trip of Geology i, Saturday 
morning, Bear Creek canon. 



Republican Rally at Opera House 
tonight. Ben Griffith will be present. 
Reservations made for College stu- 
dents. 



All Tiger subscriptions not paid be- 
fore November ist will be $1.50. 



Joint prayer meeting in Bemis Hall, 
Sunday evening at 6:30 o'clock. Meet- 
ing to be addressed by Guy V. Al- 
drich. 



Annual Hallowe'en Barbecue,. Mon- 
day night, Washburn field. Admission 
75c. Big time — eats, program, aerial 
flights, new features. 



Dern^s Freshly Roasted Coffee 

will make 10 more cups to the lb. 
than Eastern roasted coffee 



29 S. Tejon Street 



Phone 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 



Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence. 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 956 



The College 
Photo Studio 




^SS/ 




Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 

THE 

Gowdy-Simmons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS, ENGRAVERS 

21 N Tejon Street 




•^ 



16 



THE TIGER 






"^^^ ^^Uh^^ 



Overcoat buying was never ^^ the street, in the different sh*s, at 

f 1 1 . your gatherings, you'll not find anywhfcre, so 

saier, surer, than at this store now. •;, . %,.. ^ • , -r- i 

o > 1 • n fitting Winter Overcoats as these. 1 ry them 

hnappy, smart young men s styles in all , ° , . 

, 1-11 1 Ti on beiore our long mirrors, 
the desirable, durable weaves. 



A selection of Overcoat patterns you'll like 
on sight. 



8 N. Tejon Street 



(Pei«feim-Sfee€ii«er G 



$15y $20, $23, up to $60 

28 E. Pike's Peak 



Shoes vsrith a Record for Goodness 

For over twenty years this store has followed a well defined policy of selling nothing 
but good shoes. This policy has made this store thousands of loyal friends, and as a 
"satisfied customer is our best advertisement" we are always making strenuous efforts to 
retain our old friends and to make new ones, espec- 
ially catering to the younger trade with snappy 
styles at 

$3.00, $3.50, $4.00, $4.50 and $5.00 





SHOES THAT SATISFY 



22 S. TEJON ST. 



# 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 

Departments —College of Arts and 
Science, E. S. PARSONS, Dean. 

School of Engineering, F. CAJORI, Dean 
School of Forestry, W. C. STURGIS, Dean 
School of Music, E. D. HALE, Dean 



Manilou Park — Field Laboratory 
of the School of Forestry 



^ 



Keep in Touch with the Styles. You Can Get Them at 

GEO. J. GA TTERER 

10 Per Cent Discount to Students 
216 North Tejon Street Telephone Main 1247 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF 

COLORADO COLLEGE 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., NOVEMBER 3, 1910 



Vol. XIII 



Number 8 



GOLDEN 

GATHERS 
GOOSE EGG 

MINERS GO HOME WITH THE 

SMALL END OF AN 

8-0 SCORE. 

Lighter, Faster Team Plays Rings 

Around Their Heavier Opponents 

— No Substitutions in Tiger 

Line-up — Vandemoer 

the Star. 



Colorado College took another defi- 
nite step toward the championship of 
Colorado and the Rocky Mountain 
region last Saturday when they out- 
played the Colorado School of Mines 
from the very beginning of the game 
and won by a score of 8 to o, the 
score, however, poorly representing 
the strength of the two teams. The 
Mines were forced to kick nearly every 
time they got the ball, never executed 
a fiirward pass, a trick play or an end 
run of any consequence, and never 
gained their distance. On the other 
hand, the Tigers had the ball nearly 
all the time and Coach Rothgeb's 
football machine played the open foot- 
ball, with a repertoire of fancy plays 
that nearly threw the Miners off their 
feet, and told them, better than words 
can tell, how speed and endurance, 
coupled with Rothgeb's "Lessons in 
Football," can overcome great odds 
and defeat a weightier team. 

However, did the Miners play with 
the horseshoe of good luck in their 
hand and prevent the Tigers from 
scoring on several occasions when 
they were vfithin easy striking ' dis- 
tance of the goal? Fumbled for- 
ward passes, blocked line plunges 
and the long reach of Eaton, a short- 
Continued on Page 5 



* SENIORS ENDORSE HON- * 

* OR SYSTEM. * 

* * 

* At a meeting of the senior 4" 

* class held yesterday, the class 4" 
*■ voted to endorse the movement 4* 
"I* for the adoption of the honor * 
•i* system in Colorado College. * 
•i" A meeting of the junior class * 
•fr will be called soon and if they * 

* too, favor the adoption of the* 

* system, steps will be taken at 4* 
4* once to draw up a constitution "i* 

* which will be submitted to the 4" 

* student body for their consider- 4* 

* ation. * 

* * 

^ ^ *$* *$* *$* ^ "I* *i* "S" ^ *^ *{* *{* *{* *$* ^ 

IMPORTANT 

MISSIONARY 

CONFERENCE 

SEVERAL PROMINENT SPEAK- 
ERS—RECEPTION FOR VIS- 
ITING DELEGATES— 
PRES. SLOCUM AND 
SEC. KIRKPAT- 
RICK ON PRO- 
GRAM. 

One of the most important state 
missionary conferences of the year 
will open Friday evening at Colorado 
College with a reception to the dele- 
gates by the Christian associations 
of the College. The closing session 
will be held in Perkins Hall on Sun- 
day evening. 

Several prominent speakers are to 
be present during the conference. 
Among these are Arthur Rugh of 
China, and Charles Ewald of South 
America. Mr. Rugh is associated 
with Mr. Fletcher Brockman in Young 

Continued on Page 9 



SUCCESSFUL 
FIRELESS 

BARBECUE 



OLD FEATURES COMBINED 
WITH NEW MAKE SUC- 
CESSFUL OCCASION. 

Occasion Patterned After Old Eng- 
lish Hunting Feast — Good 
Program, Good Avia- 
tion Meet — Great 
Feast. 



We have been shown. There was 
held on Washburn field last Monday 
night a barbecue, and this barbecue 
was without a bonfire. In general, it 
was very much as barbecues have been 
for the last twenty years — the pro- 
gram, the tossing and the feast fol- 
lowed in regular order. In some par- 
ticulars, the "new barbecue" — so called 
by its enterprising manager — was dif- 
ferent: its attendance was limited, it 
lacked the cheer of a roaring fire, the 
"grub" was better, and the effect was 
unique, being that of the old English 
hunting feast. 

The lighting of the field by search- 
lights and torches and the flaring class 
numerals of fire out on the mesa were 
features deserving of especial praise. 

The program was given in the cov- 
ered grandstand which was appropri- 
ately lighted and decorated. The mer- 
ry crowd which began to gather long 
before the pKOgram commenced was 
entertained the while by the rooters, 
who, as the "fussers" arrived, persisted 
in calling attention to them in such a 
way as to make them notably conspic- 
uous — and numerous. 

Everybody Likes an Old Joke. 

The speeches and the music were 
highly enjoyed by all those present. 

Continued on Page 11 



THE TIGER 



COMMISSION TRANSACTS 
ROUTINE BUSINESS 



SEVERAL MATTERS OF IM- 
PORTANCE DISCUSSED. 

Time of Meeting Set — Honor System 
Discussed — Debating Con- 
tracts — Ewing Fund — 
Assistant Yell Lead- 
ers Considered. 



The thircl meeting of the Student 
Commission was held Wednesday of 
hist week. Only routine l)usiness 
was transaeted and no matters (if 
great importance were acted upon 
although several important questions 
were considered. 

The Commission settled down to a 
year of hard work by setting a regu- 
lar time of meeting. Hereafter, it 
will meet in the Forestry room at 5:00 
p. m. every other Monday evening, 
commencing next Monday. .Any 
student may feel free to come to the 
meetings to present any matters 
which he deems ' worthy of the con- 
sideration of this body. 

The honor sj'Stem came in for its 
share of the discussion. The Com- 
mission is strongly in favor of its 
•adoption here and to hasten the de- 
cision of the student body, it was de- 
cided to submit the matter to the up- 
per classes for their consideration, ft 
was the feeling of the Commission 
that with the backing of these classes, 
the plan could be successfully worked 
out. 

i\Ianager of Debating, Kirkpatnck. 
reported that he had been in commun- 
ication with both Utah and D. U. in 
regard to the renewal of debating 
contracts. The D. U. contract will 
be renewed, but an attempt will be 
made to arrange for a debate with 
Boulder, rather than Utah, as the ex- 
penses of such a debate would be 
lighter and the debate would arouse a 
much greater spirit. 

The matter of a Ben Griffith Club 
came up and met with the hearty ap- 
proval of the Commission. 

The Ewing fund took the attention 
of the Commissioners for a large part 
of the remaining time. $800.00 must 
be raised for the support of Harry 
Ewing '08, C. C.'s representative in 
the foreign field. It was pointed 
out in the discussion that Colorado 
Colle.gc is driing more than any insti- 
tution of its size in the country in 
this respect and is lieing watche'fl 
closely by many people to see whether 



or not the College can carry to a suc- 
cessful end what it has attempted. 
-\. J. 1-iesler was elected chairman of 
the fund and a committee appointed 
to draw up plans for a campaign for 
the necessary money. 

President Yi\n Stone reported that 
the freshmen caps W'^re long over- 
due and that their arrival is expected 
any day . McMillan was officially 
appointed yell leader and Hesler and 
Hille chosen to assist him, 



REPORT OF THE COLLEGE Y. 

M. C. A. EMPLOYMENT 

BUREAU. 



The employment bureau has been 
the means of supplying over one 
liundred men of the College and 
-Academy with work. More room 
jobs were obtained than could be 
tilled. The board jobs, although 
more numerous than last year, were 
not sufficient to supply all who de- 
sired them. Especial attention has 
been given to odd jobs which have 
amounted to about two thousand dol- 
lars. Following is an itemized ac- 
count of the work obtained to date; 
Room and board jobs, at $200 each 

(9) $1800 

Board jobs, at $150 each (39),.. 5850 
Room jobs, at $50 each (55) ... 2750 

Furnaces, $50, (45) 2250 

Odd jobs i860 

Total $14,510 

THE RIVALS. 



The presentation of "The Rivals" 
last Friday evening met with un- 
bounded success. Each part was well 
placed and exceptionally well acted. 
Captain Absolute, ^Marian Haines, 
with his gallant manner, won all the 
ladies' hearts, even his fair Lydia. 
Marion Fezer, as Sir Anthony Abso- 
lute, ga^ e a very good interpretation 
of an irate father. Faukland, Helen 
Rand, with his melancholy disposition 
provoked the audience to peals of 
laughter. Bob Cures', Frances Hall, 
time was monopolized in trying to 
keep his valor from "oozing" out his 
finger tips. Alta Harris, as Mrs. Mal- 
aprop, threw herself into the part ad- 
mirably, and produced the "hydro- 
status" to a very great degree. Car 
rie Burger, Sir Lucius O'Lugger, 
showed command of the Irish brogue. 

The work of the Club has begun 
with a ^■im and much enthusiasm, 
..Man}- new girls are expected to join. 
The rest of the characters were: 



Eydia Persis Kidder 

Julia Alay Wallace 

Lucy , Matt Draper 

Fag Lulu Kramer 

Thomas Grace Starbird 

David Myrth King 

RHODES SCHOLARSHIP EXAM 
HELD. 

W. C. Barnes '12 one of the Aspir- 
ants for Honors. 

The preliminary Rhodes scholar- 
ship examinations for the state of 
Colorado were held in Denver Tues- 
day and Wednesday of last week. 
Only three men took the examina- 
tions, two Denver University men 
and W. C. Barnes of Colorado Col- 
lege. Anderson of the State Uni- 
versity, who was an applicant last 
year and who ran very close to El- 
lingwood, did not take this examma- 
tion, but he will be eligible in the 
finals if he wishes to enter. 



NOW FOR THE GRIND. 



Sides Chosen for the Intersociety 
Debate. 



At the last meeting of the Apollon- 
ian Club, its members decided to take 
the negative side of the cjuestion sub- 
mitted by the Pearsons Literary So- 
ciety. The question is: "Resolved, 
That the L'. S. should adopt a policy 
of gradual disarmament of its army 
and navy." With the choosing of 
sides, actual work begins and will 
never end until the last speaker 
has made his appeal in Perkins Hall 
some time in February. 

The question is a live one, and one 
on which a great deal has been written. 
It is not an involved subject and will 
prove of in.terest, both to the debators 
and the hearers. 

The Apollonians will hold their pre- 
liminaries on the night of November 
18, at which time their representatives 
will be chosen. 



ANNUAL BANQUET.. 

The annual banquet of the Alumni 
Association of Colorado College in 
Denver, will be held at the Shirley 
Hotel, Wednesday evening, Novem- 
ber 2.3, at 6:30 o'clock. 

Present students as well as alumni 
are cordially invited to attend. 
Plates $1.25. All who expect to be 
present please notify T. D. Riggs, 
Chairman Bancpict Committee. 2108 
Boulevard F, Denver, Colorado. 



THE TIGER 



REVIEW OF THE KINNIKINNIK. 

Again we have to congratulate the 
Board of Editors and this time be- 
cause the Kinnikinnik comes out on 
time. We have known this magazine 
to come out a few weeks late but this 
year it is following in the foot-steps 
of every well-regulated periodical and 
coming out a few days before hand. 
And while we are saying good things 
we might speak of the improvement 
.n proof reading and express our ap- 
preciation. 

This number of the Kinnikinnik is 
very good, in fact, the best number 
we have seen. The stories are all 
well told and hold the interest of the 
reader. The poetry of our magazine 
is the weak part. 

The first verse "Oblivion" comes 
near being a sonnet but misses it. 
The movement of the poem is good 
and the choice of vowels and conso- 
nants is excellent. The alliteration 
is especially telling and there are the 
or two particularly fine lines. The 
thought is rather hopeless, but, then, 
it's oblivion. It is one of the best 
pieces of verse we have had in The 
Kin. 

"A Modern Instance" is well-named, 
'"Jingle." What place has it in our 
literary magazine? 

"An- Epigram" is a little doubtful 
in its meaning and, therefore, the 
force of it is lost. 

In "How Willie Stout Arrived" we 
have an atmosphere that is certainly 
appreciated at this time. Sometimes 
we wonder if some of the instances 
are not overdrawn, but finally decide 
after close observation of entering 
classes that they are possible. The 
innocence of Willie and the playful 
attitude of the sophomores is easily 
understood. The choice of sugges- 
tive words adds much to the effect of 
the story. 

Near the end of the story we ques- 
tion one of the statements. We have 
always been told that time could not 
be called while a play was on and 
although this scheme has been re- 
sorted to for interest, it is more apt 
to detract than add. The paragraph 
following is well done and we do 
not have to stretch our imaginations 
to picture the scene. 

The story is well developed from 
the character standpoint; the plot is 
lacking and the setting is just 
sketched in. 

"How to pack a trunk for college" 
has no particular merit except that it 
is well told. We believe that the 



writer could have given us something 
really worth while had she chosen 
another subject. 

"The Samura's Son" is good. The 
story does not drag at any time, the 
interest is sustained right to the last 
Again the element of character has 
been chosen for development and the 
plot and setting are subordinated. 

"As You Might Expect" is not what 
you might expect at all. Up to the 
last you expect Jack to be refused, 
you have not thought of another girl 
in the case. The story is cleverly 
done with all the attention given to 
the plot, and the characters and back- 
ground not elaborated. 

"The Fairy Queen" has a good set- 
ting, characters natural and dialogue 
real. There is enough suggestiveness 
to liold the interest. 

"The Pay Streak is splendidly done 
and is a fitting clima.x to an especially 
good number. Clayton Hamilton 
has said: "The aim of the short-story 
is to produce a single narrative effect 
with the greatest economy or means 
that is consistent with the utmost em- 
phasis." This has been accomplished 
in this last story. 

The editor has evidently remem- 
bered the law of emphasis for he has 
arranged his magazine so as to have 
the best stories first and last. Your 
interest is aroused at the first and 
you close the book with a feeling of 
satisfaction. 

A very creditable number! 



PRESIDENT SLOCUM WRITES 
SCHOLARLY ARTICLE. 



Last Number of C. C. Publication 

Given Over to "Constitutional 

Guarantee of Personal 

Liberty." 



There has just been issued from the 
Out West press the last number of 
the Colorado College Publication con- 
taining an article by President Slo- 
cum, which occupies the whole num- 
ber, entitled "Constitutional Guaran- 
tee of Personal Liberty." It jia 
largely the address given at Leland 
Stanford, Jr., University last Com- 
mencement. It is the result of a 
comparative examination of the Con- 
stitution of the United States and 
those of Germany, France and Eng- 
land, and maintains that nowhere in 
the world are there such constitution- 
al guarantee of personal freedom as 
in this country. In view of this Dr. 
Slocum indicates the great impor- 
tance of conserving the constitution 



in every possible way and holding to 
its principles in the present develop- 
ment of American affairs. He throws 
the great moral stress of the address 
upon the place of the college and uni- 
\ersity graduates in guiding the na- 
tion into larger conceptions of the 
mission of the United States under 
the Constitution. He indicates the 
danger both of plutocracy and! of 
socialism and shows how the govern- 
ment is based upon the sovereignty 
of the people and that from this has 
come the "constitutional state" which 
is based upon "natural rights" which 
belong to every individual because he 
is a human being. 

The address attracted much dis- 
cussion in the press of California and 
is the outcome of special study of 
the .\merican Constitution on his 
part, which has extended over a num- 
ber of years. 



ENTHUSIASM STILL OVER- 
FLOWING. 



Rally, Parade with Band, Yells With- 
out end, "Vaud," Refreshments. 



The evening before the Mines game 
the entire student body held a mass 
meeting in Perkins Hall. Coach 
Rothgeb spoke of the condition of the 
team and the prospects for the com- 
ing game. Fowler and Siddons told 
of the Utah game, each emphasizing 
the fact that it was the enthusiastic 
send-off accorded the team by the stu- 
dents that made them win. Dean 
Cajori made one of his inimitable 
talks and was followed by Prof. Mot- 
ten who, assisted by Mr. Longfellow, 
had written an inspiring football 
poem. Then Hille played "Our Col- 
orado" and other songs which were 
well rendered by the student body. 
The girls had to leave early for dra- 
matics, but the men stayed to prac- 
tice yells and make plans for the 
morrow's rooting. 

Next day, accompanied by the band, 
and the Tiger, the College men pa- 
raded the streets before the game. 
After the victory, as joon as it was 
dark, occurred the greatest night- 
shirt parade that has been seen here 
for many years. First, the halls 
were visited, then the students rallied 
at the Busy Corner, where their en- 
thusiasm attracted such crowds as to 
block the streets. Then they visited 
the Majestic, where the people were 
amused to see the Tiger drive the 
]\liners ofif the stagfe. 



THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 



BOULDER GAME 

CANCELLED 



ONE OF BOULDER'S PLAYERS 
HAS SMALL-POX— POSSIBIL- 
ITY OF POST-SEASON GAME 
DECEMBER 3— BOULDER CAN- 
CELS ALL GAMES EXCEPT 
MINES GAME ON THANKS- 
GIVING. 



Manager I'"ii\vler yesterday received 
word from the Boulder football au- 
thorities that it would be necessary 
for them to cancel the Tiger-Boulder 
game which was scheduled to be 
played in Boulder on November 
twelfth. This action is made neces- 
sary by the infection of one of the 
State University's players, Clark, 
with small-pox. Clark was out for 
practice Tuesday night and was taken 
down with the disease yesterday. 
The entire squad was exposed to the 
infection, and, it is said, will have to 
remain in quarantine for at least 
three weeks. This makes necessarj' 
the cancellation of the C. C. game 
and the Aggie game, which was to 
ha\e been played Saturday. It is 
pr(jbable that the Boulder-j\Iines 
game which is scheduled for Thanks- 
giving will be played. 

The news has been received with 
great regret about the Campus, as 
the entire College was looking for- 
ward to the contest with the Boulder- 
ites, and indications were that the stu- 
dents were going to attend the game 
in a body. When interviewed last 
night. Manager Fowler stated that 
there is a possibility that a post-sea- 
son game can be arranged to be 
played in Denver on December 3. 
Consequently, there is a chance that 
the followers of the Black and Gold 
will yet have an opportunity to see 
the merits of the Tigers tried out 
against the warriors of Boulderburg. 

No game will be arranged to take 
the place of the postponed game as 
Coach Rothgeb does not want the 
date filled. In case the post-season 
game can not be arranged, the Min- 
isters and the Tigers are the only 
claimants remaining for the Confer- 
ence Championship. This would 
make the D. U. -Tiger game in Den- 
ver on Thanksgiving the deciding 
game of the season. 






•I' 

* 



« bI« ^ ^ ^ cS* A t^ w^ 9^ A A A A A 

* 

CORN HUSKERS ARRIVE ♦ 

TOMORROW. * 

* 

The Kansas Aggies, fifteen * 

strong, arrive tomorrow morn- ^ 

ing (Friday), at 11:40 o'clock. ■!• 

It is planned to have a parade * 

to meet them at the station. * 

Officials for the game will be * 

Zrandenberg, of Denver, head * 

linesman; Witham, of Dart- * 

mouth, umpire; Smith, referee. * 

It is probable that Force, of * 

California, will be field judge. * 

Considering that the game is * 

to be the last on the local grid- * 

iron this year and that the con- * 

test is attracting attention all ^^ 

over the middle west and Mis- * 

souri valley, the attendance * 

should be a record breaker. 4* 









JUST THINK— TWENTY YEARS 
AGO. 



The Gym Fund Started— Why not 

Utilize the Spirit Found Around 

the Campus to Push This 

Proposition. 



Twenty years ago today, when 
Colorado College was considerably 
smaller than it is today, a movement 
was started for a new gymnasiuin. 
Now gentle reader, do not laugh. It 
is true. President Slocum, on that 
date, according to the files of a local 
newspaper, started a campaign for the 
fimds to build a gymnasium on the 
Campus. However, after perusal of 
the files for some time after that, 
nothing was learned of the proposi- 
tion and we still have it with us. 

With the great display of real Tiger 
spirit which is being noticed on every 
hand, the merchants of the city are 
beginning to realize what a deserv- 
ing proposition the gymnasium is and 
several have asked why the move- 
ment is not pushed after football sea- 
son. The committee in charge is 
planning to do this and when the ball 
starts to rolling, with the same spirit 
with which it has rolled with the foot- 
ball team, the corner stone will be 
laid — almost. Maybe. 






HOW WE STAND SO FAR. 

C. C. -Terrors 23-0 

C. C. -Wyoming 23-0 

C. C.-Utah . .21- 17 

C. C.-Mines 8-0 

Totals 75-17 



* 
* 
* 
* 






A WORD ABOUT THE STATE 
SITUATION. 

Boulder and D. U. Look Dangerous — 
Aggies and Miners Out of 
the Race for the Cham- 
pionship. 



The championship of Colorado and 
the Rocky Mountain region now lies 
between the University of Colorado, 
Denver U. and Colorado College, the 
other contenders being out of the 
running. Without a doubt the 

Tigers have the other two beaten on 
the modern football and the coach — 
but no expression of how things will 
end can be gained from any of the 
experts. "Its going to be the hard- 
est fought championship race in the 
history of the game in the state" is 
the way it is put b}' several of the ex- 
perts. 

Boulder took a game from Utah 
last Saturday by a score of 11 to o, 
winning because of a series after ser- 
ies of costly fumbles by the Mormans. 
McFadden, Hartman and Rich were 
their stars and all are said to be dan- 
gerous men. Rich is doing consider- 
able booting for good gains. How- 
ever, some experts think the big 
game will be with Denver U. 

However, without any of the new 
football which the up-to-date teams 
play, Denver U. cleaned up the Ag- 
gies by a score of 23 to o in Aggie- 
ville. The farming contingent at- 
tempted the new game but their line 
was not strong enough to stop any 
of the plunges of the visitors. Four 
Aggie players were out of the game, 
which accounts, in a small way, for a 
part of the poor showing. For D. 
U.. Crowley was the star — his return- 
ing of punts is remarkable and he is 
considered a verj' dangerous man 
man when he gets away with a punt. 



THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 



^ 4* 

* THE WAY THE TEAMS * 

* STAND. * 
^ * 

* W L Pet. * 

* Colo. C 3 i.ooo * 

* Denver U . . . 2 o i,ooo * 

* Colorado U .. 2 o i.ooo * 

* Mines i 2 .333 * 

* Utah I 2 333 * 

* Aggies o 2 * 

* Wyoming .... o 3 * 

^ * 



LAST HOME GAME SATURDAY. 



Aggies Have Great Team — Merchants 

May Close Their Places of 

Business Saturday P. M. 



Come on, you Kansas Aggies! The 
best game of the season is scheduled 
for Saturday afternoon. Place — 
Washburn Field, time — 3 o'clock, 
when the Tigers will do battle royal 
with the husky visitors from Man- 
hattan, Kansas, the Aggies. The 
Aggies are considered very strong 
and outweigh the locals by about ten 
pounds. They have had little trou- 
ble in cleaning up everything from 
the Haskell Indians to Creighton 
University. However, it is said that 
the Tigers should give them a good 
contest, the speed and open playing 
being a big factor. 

A movement is being agitated 
among the merchants for a holiday 
in the business section during the 
hours of the game. This will prob- 
ably go through and a large crowd 
is expected at what is to be the last 
game in which the Tigers will play 
on Washburn Field in the season of 
1910. Everybody is expected to be 
there. 



GOLDEN GATHERS GOOSE EGG 

Continued from Page 1 

winded star of the blue and white 
squad, prevented at least two touch- 
downs when the supporters of the 
black and gold were frantic with the 
ball on the five or ten yeard line. 
Sinton had a forward pass in the last 
quarter and an open field but a tum- 
ble gave the leather to the opponents. 
\^andemoer at one time attempted an 



* * 

* K S A C 57, William Jewell o. * 

* K S A C 39, Haskell o. * 

* K S A C 22, State Normal o. * 

* K S A C 5, Ark. U. o. * 

* K S A C 75, Drury 5. * 

* K S A C 75, Drury 0. * 

* K S A C 23, Rolla, Mo School * 

* of Mines 3. * 

* K S A C 6, Creighton 2. * 

* Total K S A C 227. * 
•!• Total, opponents 10. * 
.J. ^ 

end run but when within a yard of 
the goal line he slipped and the ball 
was knocked out of his arms. Reed 
fumbled a long punt, the only one he 
missed, and the Mines thought they 
might get away for a run but were 
forced to kick on the next down. 

A glance at the lineup of the two 
teams will tell a secret of the victory. 
The entire Tiger team played clear 
through the game and with only the 
regular routine of minor injuries for 
"time out." The Miners substi- 
tuted five men, who were badly in 
need of a rest, while the Tigers fin- 
ished the game with no injuries, ex- 
cepting a slightly wrenched neck on 
that crack half back, Heald. Train- 
ing, and only the right kind of train- 
ing, has been the sum-total cause of 
the excellent way the Tigers with- 
stood the onslaughts of the beefy 
visitors. The training table is now 
a permanent institution and results 
show what it means to a team to be 
properly trained. 

A-^andemoer, the Tiger leader, was 
the star of the game from start to 
finish. His work on running back 
punts, kicking the same, bothering 
the Mines by his end rims and his 
field generalship showed that Cap. 
Vandy has cinched his place on the 
All-Colorado football team for 1910, 
Vandy outpunted Douglas by at least 
fifteen yards. 

Next to Vandemoer, Wolfif, the 
quarterback of the visitors, was the 
star of the game. Time and again 
on the returning of A'^andy's long 
punts he would shake off two or 
three Tigers and gain from twenty to 
forty yards. Wolfif was a redeeming 
feature of the Goldenites and his 
work puts him in a class by himself 



as a returner of punts. Yota Reed, 
who knows when a play will succeed 
and how to put "pep" into a bunch, 
played a good game, although not as 
fast or as hardy as in the Utah con- 
test. Flis knowledge of the use 
of the trick plays was amazing and 
he had the iMiners bewildered by 
the whirl of trick after trick. Heald 
and Acker on line plunges played bet- 
ter football than ever before and both 
hint of taking a place with the big 
ones. Acker's line smashes through 
the beefy Miners showed that a com- 
paratively small man is efficient 
Thompson's and Sinton's work at 
end, their covering of the punts and 
forward passes, were of the stellar 
class, but Sinton fumbled a couple in 
costly places. 

Bowers at tackle certainly played 
heady football and withstood the on- 
slaughts of his beefy opponent in 
good shape. His tackle through 
tackle play was a sure ground gainer. 
The whole team played good football, 
but according to Rothgeb, they did not 
play the game that they are capable 
of playing or that he hopes to have 
them play. 

The crowd of 1,800 people, one of 
the largest football crowds ever at- 
tending a contest in the city, was 
kej'ed up to the highest pitch of en- 
thusiasm and the rooting was never 
excelled. The Mines yelled togeth- 
er as hard as they could, .but were 
not able to out-yell the Tiger sup- 
porters, and under the leadership of 
McMillan, assisted by Hille and 
Hesler, the C. C. bunch yelled as 
thejr never did before. The yells 
were not as united as could be 
wished, owing largely, no doubt, to 
the eagerness of the crowd of root- 
ers. 

Several times during the game. 
Mines plaj'ers were noticed throwing 
dust in the eyes of the Tiger players 
and they were none too gentle in 
their tackling. 

The intermission of the game will 
ne\cr be forgotten in the history of 
Colorado College. The serpentine 
dance, the centiped Tiger, the girafife 
Tiger, and the hippoty-hop, four 
abreast stunt, all were as exciting as 
spectacular, and showed the Mines 
that the C. C. spirit was here strong. 



THE TIGER 



"»- >* — ^ii^ — > 

Tha VVaekly Newspaperof Colorado Celleiie 

A. E BRYSON EdItor-in-Chlef 

S. WILKIE DEAN Business Manaiier 

Sam J. Shelton Assistant Editor 

Richard L. Hughes Assistant Editor 

Hapry Black Assistant Editor 

T. Wynne Ross.- Athletic Editor 

Robert m. Copeland Engineering Editor 

FRED S. Baker Forestry Editor 

Helen Canon Alumni Editor 

Mamie C. Detmoyer Exchange Editor 

Edith I.. Summers Local Editor 

J. A. Root Local Editor 

Ray H. Sayre Assistant Manager 

E. E. Hedblom Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

A. W. Donovan, C.E. Hayward. Bruce VVeirick, William 

Sloey, Joe Sinton, Elsie Greene, Lillian Duer, Grace 

Wilson, Dorothy Cook, Dorothy Stott 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to The Tiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Addteii all communications to THE TIGER, Colorad* 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phones; Editor, Main 1975. Manager, Main 2073 

tTij^^Sfe.,! S Entered at the postoffice it Colorado 
^-*SiS3p^ Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



Business Men's 
Support. 

Colorado College is indeed fortu- 
nate in being so loyally supported 
by the busines men of the city. The 
numerous demands that are made on 
the down town merchants have al- 
ways met with a most generous re- 
sponse, but never was this more true 
than during the present year. To be 
sure, it is to the interests of the mer- 
chants to treat the College students 
with all cmirtesy, but it is too often 
the case in College towns that the 
students have so over-ridden their 
privileges as students as to prejudice 
the townspeople, including the busi- 
ness men against them. Fortunately, 
this is not true in Colorado Springs. 

The support of student publications 
is one of the ways in which the mer- 
chants show their interest in the Col- 
lege people; the splendid spirit which 
prompted the donation of the band 
at last Saturday's game was another, 
jDut better than either of these is the 
personal interest that many of these 
busy men show in giving their time 
to come out to the games and by 
supporting the team and the College 
in dozens of ways. There is some 
talk among the merchants of closing 
their bu'^inoss houses Saturday after- 
noon to take in Ihe game with the 
Kansas Aggies, only another indica- 



tion of their deep interest in the 
welfare of the College. 

No doubt, the great spirit of loyal- 
ty that has been demonstrated time 
and again this year by the students 
has done much to interest the busi- 
ness men , A live student body, one 
which does things, is a decided asset 
to any town; the business men are 
not slow to realize this. Thus the 
enthusiasm that has been hovering 
about the Campus is proving fruitful 
in more ways than one. 

The Kansas 
Aggie Game. 

Saturday the students of the Col- 
lege will have a chance to demon- 
strate the true worth of their support 
of the team. Up to this game, the 
Tigers have had reason to believe 
that they would come out of their 
games with the long end of the score. 
In meeting the husky sons of the 
Kansas soil, the Tigers go up against 
one of the strongest teams in the 
Middle West. While perhaps there 
is no reason to anticipate defeat, there 
is every reason to expect a battle 
royal and one that will require the 
combined team work of every Tiger 
and the capacity lung power of every 
man in the College. The question 
naurally arises, if defeat should come, 
would it have any efifect on the stu- 
dent support. It has been remarked 
^o often as to become a truism, that 
it does not take any spirit to support 
a winning team — the real test comes 
when the score is against you. Last 
year, after being defeated by Boulder, 
the men of the College gave the teani 
the greatest demonstration of the 
vear — that is the true spirit and the 
kind that must be in evideaice in 
Saturday's game, if the score should 
be against us. This is in no sense a 
forecast, but simply a warning to be 
prepared for whatever may happen. 

Election Day. 

Next Tuesday is election day 
Every registered student in the Col- 
lege should feel it his pleasant duty 
to vote, and vote intelligently. Ne;;I 
less to say, he should vote for our 
own representative, Ben Griffith. 
There were a good many students 
who failed to register. Of tliose 
who did register, there should not 
be any who fail to vote. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE 
HONOR SYSTEM OF 

WILLIAMS COLLEGE 



De Pauw fraternities clash now 
mcl then in regular debates. 



ARTICLE I. 

Section i. — Each student must, in 
order to make his examination or any 
other written work done on paper in 
the class-room valid, sign the follow- 
ing statement: "I have neither given 
nor received aid in this examination 
(or exercise)". 

Sec. 2. — F^raud in examination shall 
consist in any attempt to receive as- 
sistance from written or printed aids, 
or from any person or his paper; or 
any attempt to gain assistance, wheth- 
er the one so doing has completed his 
paper or not. This rule shall hold 
within and without the examination 
room during the entire time in which 
the examination is in progress, that 
is, until the time speciiied has expired, 

ARTICLE 11. 

Section i. — The presence of proctoi's 
in examinations is hereby discontin- 
ued. 

Sec. 2. — The instructor may be pres- 
ent in the examination room at his 
option. 

Sec. 3. — The instructor shall an- 
nounce beforehand the time that will 
be allowed to complete an examina- 
tion, said time in no case to be more 
than three hours for final examina- 
tions and one hour for each of the 
other examinations. The nature of 
the paper is to be adjusted to these 
requirements. 

Sec. 4. — During the examination 
each student shall have pe;fect free- 
dom of action and conve'sation. pro 
vided he does not annoy or interfere 
with the work of the others. 

ARTICLE III. 

Section i. — There shall be a com 
niittee consisting of ten members, who 
shall represent the student body and 
deal with all cases involving violation 
of the honor system. 

Sec. 2. — The members of this com- 
mittee are to be elected at a special 
class election to be held during the 
week beginning with the second 
Thursday of the first term of each 
3'ear, with the exception of the repre- 
sentative of the Freshman class, who 
is to be elected near the close of the 
second term. The committee shall or- 
ganize for the year during the week 
beginning with the third Thursday of 
the first term of each year. 

Sec. 3. — The members of this com- 
mittee shall ciinsist of four Seniors, 



THE TIGER 



THE FINEST APPOINTED CAFE IN THE STATE 

THE M. & L CAFE 

College Boys Are Invited To Meet That Man Holt from Harveys 

A Place of Cosy, Semi-private Dining Rooms. Cliarges Reasonable, Superb Service and Ex- 
cellent Cuisine. College Banquets Receive Our Particular Attention 

H. MASTERSON, General Manager, from Arizona E. R. HOLT, Manager, from Iowa 

OFFICIAL HEADQUARTERS: 1he White Rats Association, The Chln-Chln Club 



three Juniors, two Sophomores and 
one Freshman. 

Sec. 4. — The chairman of this com- 
mittee shall be chosen by the commit- 
tee from its Senior representatives, 
and its secretary from its Sophomore 
representatives. 

ARTICLE IV. 
Section i. — In case of reported 
frauds in examinations, the commit- 
tee shall summon the accused person 
or persons, ?,nd witnesses, who shall 
be from the student body only, (ex- 
cept that a member of the Faculty 
may present evidence of fraud in any 
paper handed in to him), and shall 
conduct a formal investigation, pub- 
licly or secretly, at the option of the 

Continued on Paee 8 

What^s All Right? 
^ 'Extra Clean" Lignite ! 
Itls-Itls-Itis AllRight! 
What? 
Extra Clean" Lignite ! 



i( 



The Colorado Springs 

17iia1 Cf\ 112 Pike's Peak A venur 

1 UCI VO. Two Phones, Main 230 



A,G. 



& 



The Spalding 
Trade-Mark 




Is Known Throughout 
the World as a 

GUARANTEE OF 
QUALITY 



are the Largest Manu- 
facturers in the World of 

OFFICIAL EQUIPMENT 

for All Athletic Sports and 
Pastimes 

It Y#*|| are interested in 
11 lUU Athletic Sport you 
should have a copy of the 
Spalding Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyolopedia of 

What's New iu Sport 

and is sent free on request. 



A. G. SPALD NG & BROS. 

1616 Arapahoe Street, Denver, Colorado 



ENGINEERS ELECT OFFICERS. 
New Club Begins Work in Earnest. 

After a frantic search for keys tn 
gain admittance to Perkins last Fri- 
day night, the early members of the 
Engineers' Club succeeded in finding 
them and gave admission and lights to 
the rally and lent spirit and bass 
voices to the cheering.. Though 
their first regular meeting had been 
announced for seven o'clock, it was 
put olif and finally given at eight as 
follows: 
The Application of Gyroscopes to 

Aeroplanes N. R. Love 

Wellman's Atempted Flight 

C. E. Nordeen 

Licensing Engineers ... .A. W. Brown 
Extemporaneous Talks: 
(i) Why It Snows.. L. E. Griswold 
(2) Electro-Chemistry 

Dutch Schneider 

(,5) Why It Snows E. Steele 

Critics report. 

The first election was held in the 
business meeting which came after 
the program, and the first semester 
ot^cials were voted in: 

C. E. Hayward, Pres. 

N. R. Love, Vice-Pres. 

Le Clere, Secy. 

Hatch, Treas. 

E. Steele, Sergeant-at-arms. 

In one week the meeting will be 
open and the program will be of live 
topics. All engineers and other in- 
terested persons are invited to attend. 



FORESTERS FIGHT FIRE. 



College Men Called Out to Combat 
Fire. 



Last Monday afternoon two auto 
loads of College men, mostly forest- 
ers, went out to fight the fire near the 
Star Ranch with Prof. P. T. Coolidge. 
The fiVe was not a particularly large 
or dangerous one as forest fires go, 



but was rapidly becoming larger and 
working tow^ard the heavy timber on 
Cheyenne Alountain. When the 

fellows were there it was working its 
way fiercely through the scrub oak 
brush, in which it is ^•ery hard to get 
at the fire eiTectively. The fellows 
from the College did good work how- 
ever in checking the progress of the 
fire, extinguishing a mile and a half 
or two miles of flames by throwing 
dirt on them. The greater part of 
the men returned in the evening, but 
a number of them unfortunately ar- 
rived too late to participate, in the 
Barbecue aviation meet. The fire 
was by no means extinguished how- 
ever, and could be seen clearly after 
dark. At this writing, Tuesday 

noon, it is still burning and Prof. 
Coolidge has not returned. 



The underclassmen of Phi Gamma 
Delta entertained their lady friends 
at dinner last Tuesday night at the 
Chapter house. 'Sir. ;ind ^Irs. A. W. 
Henderstin chaperoned. The guests 
were Misses Peirson, Bogue, Hall, 
C. Kampf, Stark, Davis, Watson. Bak- 
er and Patterson. 



WE LOAN MONEY 

ON ALL VALUABLES 

Big line of new and unredeemed 
Drawing Instruments .'. Diamonds 
Watches and Jewelrj' ot all descrip- 
tions. Firearms and Fishing Tackle, 
Musical Instruments and hundreds 
of other articles 



.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 



THE 1 [ G E R 




New York's Men of fashion approve our evening apparel. The designer of 
our evening clothes is a member of the leading clubs of New York. He 
knows the men of unerring taste — the men whose approval of a style means 
that it will prove acceptable to men of culture everywhese. He has back of 
him the world's greatest tailoring establishment. He can't afford to err — hs 
must be absolutely correct in his styles. Many young men in this city are 
wearing evening clothes selected from our wardrobes. Why not you? 

'M GAND-IXmHS'W 

Colorado Springs, ION. Tejon St. Denver, Sixteenth at Stout 



DEXTER & HUDSON 

EXCHANGE BARBER 
SHOP 

Room 307, Third Floor 
Exchange Bank Building 



The Dentan 

Printing Company 

No. 9 So. Cascade Auenue 

FIRST-CLASS PRINTING 
at REASONABLE RATES 

Telepnone Main No. 602 



Two airy front rooms, splendidly fur- 
nished, all modern conveniences, ac- 
cessible to carline and good table board. 
No boarding house proposition, but a 
private family where you can have the 
comforts and associations of a home. 

1629 North Tejon Street 
Phone 1570 



CONSTITUTION OF HONOR SYSTEM 

Continued from Page 7. 

accused. In case of conviction the 
committee shall determine the punish- 
ment imder the following regulations- 

First: In case of fraud by a mem- 
ber of the Senior, Junior, or Sopho- 
more class, the penalty shall be a 
recommendation to the Faculty nf his 
separation from college. 

Second: In case of fraud by a mem 
bcr of the Freshman class, the penalty 
shall be a recommendation of suspen- 
sion for a time to be determined by 
ihc committee. 

Sec. 2. — A vote of four-fifths of the 
committee present shall in all cases 
be necessary for conviction. 

ARTICLE V. 
Section i. — Every student of the 
college shall be expected to lend his 
aid in maintaining this constitution 
and report to the committee of ten 
uny fraud observed by him in an exer 
cise conducted under the honor sys 
tem. 

ARTICLE VI. 
Section I. — The Faculty shall mak( 
provision for pr-i;!.'ng and distributing 
this constitution to the members of 
the Freshman c!;'.ss on or before the 
fonrtli Thursday '. f the first term ot 
eac. year, and sivall publish a general 



The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies, Fixtures 

208 N. Tejon Street Phones Main 812, 830 

Lowell-Meservey Hdw. Co. 

Dealers in Paints, Oil, Glass, Every- 
thing in Hardware 



106 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springs 



Telegraphy ! 



Learn Wireless and Railroad 

Shoitage of fully 10,000 Oper- 
ators on account of S-hour law 
and extensive "wireless" development. We operate 
under direct supervision of Telegraph Officials and 
positively place al students when qualified . Write for 
catalogue NATIONAL TELEGRAPH INST., CincI nati, 
Philadelphia, Memphis, Davenport, la., Columbia, S. C, 
Portlai d, Ore. 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co. 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Special To Students 

THE TIGERS are going to win and 
every student should have one of our 
souvenirs show^ing THE TIGERS IN 
ACTION. We will give one of these 
remarkable Panorams of Washburn 
Field with every pair of shoes bought 
here this month. Come in and see them. 

Men's Shoes $3.50 to $6 the pair. 



^M ^ 




Size of Poster 12x38 inches 



THE WHITAKER-KES 



THE TIGER 



SQUARE DEAL 

$3.50 and $4.00 



Shoes that are right in price and up-to-the-minute in style. New Ideas, New Lasts, New 
Patterns. Let us show you some shoes that you will know are good shoes 



Popular Prices 
Rule Throughout 



FIT FOft £VERY FOOT" 



IT PAYS TO D l^Kall L-. *'^ deal's 

Tb7 South Tejow StweetT-^ ^...^ 



Luxury In Dress 
Without Luxury Prices 



Deichmann & Douglas 
Floral Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER, Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 
Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 



To College 
Men and Women 
We Are Known as 
"The Satisfactory 
Jeweler". To 
New Ones We 
Soon Will Be. 

Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

"Satisfactory Jewelry 

Store" 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



statement of the system in the college 
ca'ajogue. 

Sec. 2. — The student committee shall 
make provision for interpreting the 
honor S3'stem to the members of the 
Freshman class on or before the 
fourth Thursday of the first term of 
each year. 



IMPORTANT MISSIONARY CONFERENCE 

Continued from Page 1 

Men's Christian Association work 
and is generally acknowledged to be 
one of the three most important As- 
sociation men in the foreign work. 
He is a very powerful speaker and 
was one of those .who addressed the 
International Convention of Student 
Volunteers at Rochester last spring 
The students of the College and the 
people of Colorado Springs are to be 
congratulated on having Mr. Rugh as 
one of the speakers. 

Mr. Ewald is in charge of the stu 
dent work in South America and will 
return the early part of next year to 
take up the work of organizing stu 
dent associations in all the leading 
schools of that continent. He was 
the one who organized the student as- 
sociation at the University of Buenos 
Aires, of which Harry Ewing, C. C 
'08, is in charge. 



Antlers 

Turkish Baths 

(Opposite Elks Club) 
Open Day and Night 

BATHS OF ALL KINDS. Also Chiro- 
pady and Swedish Massage. Treat- 
ment at Residence by Appointment. 

CARL J. WENBERG, Prop. 

Graduate Swedish Masseur 

Phone Red 33 14 E. Bijou Street 



You will find here a vast as- 
sortment of classy styles, 
in suits and overcoats, such 
as careful dressers wear. 



10% Discount to Students 



THE MAY CO 

23 North Tejon Street 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 




i 



Material and Experience 

We have picked ELEVEN of our best 
styles to WIN your approval. If any of 
these fail we have a good reliable bunch 
of "SUBS" to fill their places. 

With good MATERIAL and EXPERI- 
ENCE in fitting, you will find perfect 
sa.tisfaction in a pair of our shoes. 

Ladies' Shoes from $3 to $6 the pair. 



SHOE CO. 



132 North 
Tejon St. 



10 



THE TIGER 



When You're Ready to Buy an Overcoat 

You'll see here the smartest, most distinguished 
lot of overcoats ever displayed in this town; the 
very highest type of fine clothing made to-day 

Alfred Benjamin & Co. and Society Brand Overcoats 



MANHATTAN 
SHIRTS 



THE^IUB 



FOWNS 
GLOVES 



Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton-Rustic Home 



Dairy 



No. 419 South El Paso St. 
Phone Main 442 



Photography 

In All Its Branches 

Clark 

112 South Tejon St. 
Special Discount to All Students 

Shoe Repairing. Clothes Cleaned and Presseif. 
Second-Hand Shoes a d Clothing 

J. H. PERKINS 



11/2%. Cascade 



Colorado Springs 



PRATT, The Barber 

Is At >he Alta Vista Hotel 

He Solicits the Patronage of the 
College Boys 



The complete program is as fol- 
lows; 

Friday evening, Bemis Hall. 

8:00 p. m. Reception by the Chris- 
tian associations of Colorado College. 

8:45 p. m. Address of Welcome, 
President W. F. Slocum. 

0:00 p. m. Address by Mr. Arthur 
Rugh. 

Saturday morning, Perkins Hall; 

8;45 - ii;oo a. m. — Conference in 
charge of Mr. Guy V. Aldrich, travel- 
ing secretary of the Student Volun- 
teer movement. 

"Relations of the Band to the Chris- 
tian Associations in the College." 

Earl Warner. President, Y. M. 

C. A. at Denver University. 
"Alission Study in the Association." 

John Nipps, State Student Secre 

tary for Colorado. 
"Missionary Meetings of the Associa- 
tion." J. B. Watson, Secretary of 

Y. M. C. A., State School of Mines. 
"Missionary Fiteraturc " Guy \ 

Aldrich, Traveling Secretary. 

11:00 - I2;oo a. m. Address. Charlc = 
Ewald. 
Saturday afternoon, Perkins Hall. 

r ;,30 - 2;43. Business session in 
charge of T. F. Kir'<patrick, Presi- 
dent, Colorado Student ^^^Rlntec■,■ 
L^nion. 

.^;oo - 6:00. Football game, C. C. vs. 
Kansas Agricultural College. 
Saturday evening, Perkins Hall.. 

7:30 - 7:4.3. Opening session, D. C, 
Bascom. Sec ctary of Y. M. C. .'\., 
Colorad(j :\gricultural College. 

7:45 - 8:15. Address. "The Student 
\'olunteer .Mox-ement," Guy \'. Al- 
drich. 



WINDOW SLEEPING TENTS 



THE OUT 


WEST 


TENT AND AWNING CO. 


1 13>2 NORTH TEJON STREET 





Phone 917 



GEO. R. BERGEN, 0. D. 

MANF'G OPTICIAN 
Eyes Tested 611-12 Exch. Nat. Bank BIdg. 



TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented 
and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing Typewriter. The 
New No. 10 Model Has All Latest 
Improvements 

Zimmerman Supply 



Company 



22 E. Kiowa St. 
Phone Main 374 



Established 1890 



WILlIAMvOS 
HAFFNI/RCD 

ENGRAVBRJ-rRINTBRJ 




IXE>NVXK. COI/Q 



The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 



THE TIGER 



11 



We have now a complete line of the famous FLOR DE CUBA 
Havana Cigars. The finest cigar that can be made 



HUGHES 

North I *J Tejon 



Get Your Picnic Supplies 

AT ^= 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRISKER, Mar. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Notary Public 

A. J. LAWTON 

Real Estate, Loans and Insurance 
IQ'/i E.Pike's Peak Ave., Colorado Springs 

Just Received 

A Large Stock of 
C. C. PENNANTS 

Our Prices are Low but in Order 
to Move This Stock Quickly We 
Will Give a Japanese Lacquered 
Cane Free with Each Pennant 

The Murray Drug Co. 

(Opposite Campus) 



8:15 - 8:45. Address, "A Survey of 
the Field," Chas. J. Ewald. 

Sunday Morning, Perkins Hall. 

9:30 - 10:45 'I- ni. Echoes from the 
Front. 

11:00 - 12:00 a. m. Address, "Com- 
parative Religions and the Value of 
Christianity." President Slocum. 

Sunday afte.rnoon, Perkins Hall. 

2:30 - 3:4s p. m. General Confer- 
ence led by Guy V. Aldrich. 

4:00 - 5:00 p. m. Conference for 
Volunteers only. 

Sunday evening. Perkins Hall. 

7:4s - 8:15. Address. "A Call to 
Service," Guy V. Aldrich. 

8:15 - 9:00. Farewell service. 



SUCCESSFUL FIRELESS BARBECUE 

Continued from Page I. 

Parkinson establishetl a reputation. 
President Slocum and Dean Cajori 
justified reputations of long ago, and 
Shaw came into his own. Concerning 
the quartette, it can only be said that 
for a time it was thought by some 
that the members were contemplating 
giving up music in favor of aviation. 
The Feast. 

"It was the aim of the management 
this year," said Manager Lynch to a 
Tiger representative just after the bar- 
becue, "to give the greatest value fof 
the money ever given at a Colorado 
College barbecue." He had reference 
to the feast and the new departure in 
th way of serving. It was indeed a 
pleasure to sit beneath the great trees 
and the starry s'<y at a rude pine table, 
garlanded with green, ,-ind to have 
placed before you by "buxom lasses" 
all those delicacies of our forefathers: 
apples, broiled meat, hot buns, baked 
sweet potatoes, doughnuts, and cider 
in mugs! — and then to be teased and 
entertained by the mirth-making jest- 
ers and Shakespearean fools. 

The little glass mugs, tied with the 
colors of the class, and the attractive 
programs were given to the guests as 
souvenirs. The program follows: 



Ye Programme. 

Ye Welcomynge Speeche: 

Ye Sophomore President, 

Harold A. Parkison 
Ye Okie Barbecue and Ye Newe: 
Ye Colorado College President. 

William V. Slocum 
Musicke: Ye Sophomoie Quartette 
The Significance of Barbecue Aviation: 
Ye Dean nf Engineering, 

I-'hirian C*jori 
Ye Fireless Barbecue: 

Lloyd L. Shaw 
Musicke: Ye Sophomore Quartette 
Ye Blankette Liste 
Ye Barbecue Feaste 



FOTi THE 

Most Exclusive Millinery 

CALL ON 

Mme, M. D, Hillmer 

6 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

Finest of Material and 
T^est of Workmanship 

Phone Black 395 Colorado Springs 

BOOKS 

Stat'onery, Pictures and 

Novelties at 

The Pike's Peak Book & Stationery Co 

27-27^2 South Tejon Street Peone Black 354 



Watch the Caps You Meet 

You won't need an intro- 
duction to the HEIDCAP. 
It is not a mere head cover- 
ing. It has character. It 
gives character to the wear- 
er. It is made of exclusive 
English cap cloths. It is a 
thoroughbred. Try on a 
HEIDCAP. 



12 



THE TIGER 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co 
Groceries and 



Meats 










115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



MUETH'S 

The Place Where the Stand- 
ard Is Never Lowered. High 
Class Goods at Reasonable 
Prices. Ice Cream, Hot 
and Cold Drinks. 

Lunches and Afternoon Teas 
Ask Any Old Student 



CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 



5 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 




Cox Sons & Vining 

262 Fou th Ave-, New York 

Gowns and Caps 

silk Faculty Gowns and 
Hoods. Lowest Prices 
Best V\'or';manship. 



The D. Y. Butcher Drug Co. 
DRUGS, KODAKS, SUPPLIES 

Free and Prompt Delivery 
Cor. Opposite P. 0. Phones 90 and 750 




Hypatia Initiates — On Saturday 
evening, Hypatia held its initiation. 
Lillian Bateman, . Carrie Burgess, 
Letitia Lamb, and Mattie Lendrum 
were initiated. After initiation, din- 
ner was served in the Dutch Room of 
the Acacia. 



Operetta News — The date of the 
junior operetta has been changed to 
December i, just one week after 
Thanksgiving. Miss Crandall, Gregg 
and Johnston have been added to the 
cast, but their parts have not yet 
been assigned. 



Training Table — If sixteen men can 
eat twenty-four loaves of bread each 
day, how long would it take them to 
put the bakeries of the town out of 
business? This is the question that 
has been troubling the Sigma Chi 
steward where the Tigers have been 
eating during the past week. They 
have now passed on to the Alpha 
Tau Delta where the steward has al- 
ready applied for bankrupcy papers, 
according to rumors. 



Tiger Staff Entertained— Prof, and 

Mrs. E. C. Hills entertained the 
Tiger staff last Wednesday night at 
their home in Tyler Place. Mr. 
Wilder, editor of .the Gazette, gave 
an interesting talk and the whole 
evening was one of enjoyment. 



Aldrich Speaks — Guy V. Aldrich of 
New York Cit^-, gave an interesting 
address to a fair sized audience of 
men of the College in Cogswell Thea- 
tre last Sunday afternoon. He also 
addressed a joint prayer meeting in 
Bemis Sunday evening and spoke at 
Chapel ^Monday morning. He chose 
as his subjects the opportunities of 
college life and our responsibilities 
toward those in non-Christian coun- 
tries who do not have these opportun- 
ities. 

Exchange Your Tickets — Manager 
Fowler wishes it clearly understocd 
that all holders of season tickets must 
present their tickets at the ticket of- 
fice in Perkins to have them punched 
to get a reserved seat. Failure to do 
this will mean that season ticket hold- 
ers will not be admitted to the root- 
e r' section. 




Lallie's Improved Ball Bearing 
Clipper Reel for Long Tapes 
Best Tape and Reel Made in America 

Lallie Surveying Instru- 
ment and Supply Co. 

1622 Arapahoe St. Denver, Colo. 



No More Wrinkles 

I have a remedy that will speedily eradicate 
any case of wrinkles — no matter how bad or 
what the cause. It makes old faces look 
young, removes all lines and wrinkles, 
corrects flabby or withered skin, makes thin 
faces plump, fills out hollow cheeks, will 
develop any part of the body round and full 
without any massaging. Call at my parlors 
and I will explain fully and convince you. 

Miss N. E. Joiinson 



Phone 687 



324 N. Tejon Street 



JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

I Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Stree 

The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Gives 
Special Attention to Accounts of Students 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, Preiident Ira Har I'-Prcsident 

M. C. Gile Wm. F. Richards 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M. 



Hunt Up 

Bissell's Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Spring* 

Colorado College Students 

Remember We Do Framing as It Ought 
To Bs Done and at Right Prices 

Whitney & Grimwood 

20 North Tejon Street 
Opera House Block 



THE TIGER 



13 



Looseleaf Students' 

Note Books are the best 

note books for the 

College Students. 

Made in cloth and leather 

covers at prices as low 

;is 30 cents. 



OUT WEST " 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 

12 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 

High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



Phone Main 2055 



Art Needle Work 



THE HUNT & VAN NICE 
Art Specialty Store 

Stamping, Designing, Perforating, Linens, 

Lawns, Best Hand-Painted China 
8 Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Seldomridde Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Fe(>d, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co. 



EiMlil 



Guitars, Violins 
Mandolins, Banjos 

The World's Standard. Tone clear, mellow and 

very powerful. Absolutely perfect in scale. 

Finest workmanship. Prices from $15 upward. 

Send for illustrated Catalog to the makers. 

For sale by all leading music dealers. 

Desk D802 

Lyon & Healy, Chicago 

{^S^i}^ Violins 

Mcundolins. 



(95) 



Quitexr^ 



bexnjos S 



II Local Department || 



Altha and Flora Crowley enter- 
tained several Hypatia girls at supper 
Sunday. 

Hugh Gilmore and Tod Pettigrew 
came up to see the Mines attempt to 
twist the Tiger's tail and to attend 
the Barbecue. 

Golden was in Denver last Satur- 



Contemporary attended the Mines 
game in a body, occupying boxes. 



Airs. H. T. Smith delightfully en- 
tertained Contempnra-y Saturday 
night, October 29th. 



Alice Kidder Pennington '06 vis- 
ited her sister, Persis Kidder, over 
Sunday. 



I.ucretia Whitehead '06 visited the 
halls over Sunday. 



Lola Knight '04, Ruth Lewis '04. 
and Ella Warner '04 were guests at 
the halls Saturday and Sunday. 



Florence Humphreys entertained n 
lew friends at a spread Friday night 
after , "The Rivals." 



Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Out West Building 

A "Burgess Spread" 

Perhaps you Freshies don't know 
what that is; but to us old C. C. 
men it means much — very much. 
The finest delicatessen department, 
a superb bakery, a candy shop that 
possesses the essentials of purity and 
the added virtues of thorough work- 
manship and artistic individuality. 
You'll be present this semester at more 
than one strictly "Burgess" function 

W. N, Burgess— Grocer 

112-114 N. Tejon Street Phone 83 

FREE 

Shoe Repairing Absolutely Free 
of Charge for Entire Term of 
1910-1911 to the College Stu- 
dent Submitting the Best Ad for 

PETE'S 

Shoe Shop 

230 East Dale Street 

Men's Sewed Soles 75c; Ladies, 65c 
Rubber Heels, 35c 



14 



THE '1' I G I'J K 



$1.00 $1.00 

Young Men 

For $1.00 per month, we sponge, press and do minor repairing on one 
suit, or one overcoat, or two pairs of trousers, each week; calling for 
and deliverieg same in our wardrobe, dustproof wagons. We claim 
to do the best work in the city. A trial from you will allow us to 
prove our claim. 

Special Prices Given to the Young Women of 
the College. Get Our Price List. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



Agents: Bert Siddons 
Glenn Bowers 




and Cleaners. 



I Broken Lenses 
Duplicated 



T. E. AIKEN 

Taxidermist, Furrier 

Dealer in Souvenirs and Novelties 
12 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

For Best and Quick Delivery 

SEE 

The Monument Coal Co. 

28 East Kiowa Street 

William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



THE 

Crissey 6i Fowler 
Lumber Co. 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 

Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 

A. S. BLAKE 

Is the Man to See 

107 Not(h Tejon Phone 465 

Nickle Ware Cutlery 

Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Margaret Sells ex-'i2, who has been 
making an extended trip, through the 
East, returned to her home in Den- 
xer la-t Wednesday. 



.Minerva's twenty-third regular ini- 
tiation occurred Friday, October 28. 

Helen Graham's sister, Marjorie, 
has been visiting her for a few days. 



Eaton ex-'i2 visited at the Phi 
Gam House -Saturday and Sunday 
and attended the football game. 

iMiss R. Aughinbaugh spent the 
week end in Denver visiting Florence 
Smith. 

Tom Chapman e.x-'i2 and "StufTy" 
Chapman '06 came up for the Mines- 
C, C. game. 

R. .'\. Alackie, from University of 
Washington at Seattle, was a visitor 
ove.- Saturday and Sunday at the Phi 
Gam House. 



Mi.-is Zella Breckenridge visited her 
sister, Mary Breckenridge, Saturday 
and Sunday. 

Frances Fames spent the week end 
at her home in Denver. 



Jennie Thomas cx-'i2 has been vis- 
iting friends in the College. . 



Frances Fames, Ruth Wallace and 
Helen Cassidy spent the week end at 
their homes in Denver. 

President .Mderson and wife were 
the guests of President and Mrs. 
Slocuni over the week end. 



Phone Black 233 
Colorado Souvenirs 



C. B. LAUTERMAN 

Jeweler and Manufac- 
turing Optician 

121 N. TEJON STREET Colorado Springs 



10c STORE AND MORE! 

THE EiVIPORIUiM 

1 10 S. TEJON STREET 



College Inn 

Freshmen!! 

Tiiis Is the Place for 

GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



Fine Watch Work 



Diamond Setting a Specialty 



H. E. Kapelke 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 
130 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

Grand Union Tea Co. 

Importers of Fine Teas and 
Coffees 

Phone Main 2678 220 N. Tejon St. 



On hand as usual 
but just a little better 
equipped for serving your 
needs — 



The 

WATERMAN 

PRESS 

PRINTERS and 
BINDERS 



THE TIGER 



15 



Miss Louise Wallace of Denver 
ime down for the Barbecue. 

Eloise Shellabarger has been forced 
) discontinue her College work ow 
IP- to ill health. 



Mrs. H. F. Smith gave a popco: n 
arty for a number of College gir' • 
Wednesday evening. 

THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




uick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

"The College Favorite ' 



The Favorite Shopping 
Place for the College 
Woman 



!!IoIlege Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

> the place to go to get your barber 
vtrork and baths 



B6H E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



• 



Star 
Laundry 



rhe College Laundry 

"he ONLY Laundry which advertises in 
"he Tiger. We give 20% discount to you. 
"he best work in the state for as low a 
rice as any. 

. J. DICKSON, Agent Phone Maiil 342 



W^.LLUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



19 N. Tejon 



Pbone Main 900 



/f 



SWEATER COATS 

Quality Kind 

$6, $5, $4, $3 



GORTON'S 
SPECIAL 



CAPS 

Nifty Styles 

$3, $2, $L50, $1 



'^ 



Adler Rochester Overcoats and Suits in the 
latest weaves, patterns, serges, jungle tweeds, 
Huddersfield stripe. We show the latest in 
exclusive patterns, one and two suits of a pat- 
terns, pressed ready to put on. Overcoats and 
Suitsat^30, $25, ^20 

Specialists in Good Clothes and Nothing Else 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 




E. Pike's Peak 
113 



^ 



\ Correct Dress for Men. ^ 



J 



Alice England entertained a few 
friends at dinner Tuesday evening. 

Helen Crutcher'.s brother from the 
Mines visited her over Sunday. 

President and Mrs, Alderson and 
.President and Mrs. Slocnm were the 
guests of Miss Loomis at dinner on 
Sunday. 



Frances Townsend's brother came 
down from Golden for the game. 

May Weir gave a tea last Thurs- 
day. 

Helen Williams enjoyed a visit 
from her mother this last week. 

i'rank Mcrril was here for the 
Mines game. 

Mr. R. H. Ross of Loveland vis- 
it<-d Bill Warnock this week. 

The sophomore girls spent most of 
last week in the shop working on 
"Tige." 

George Graham ex-' 12 visited the 
College Saturday and Sunday. 



Neal Vandemoer was down for 
Saturday's game. 



The Sigma Chis, who are on the 
Utah football squad, took dinner with 
the Chapter here Sunday. 

Hille and Steele went to Den\'ev 
Tuesday. 



The first quad, exams are over. 



Dern's Freshly Roasted Coffee 

will make 10 more cups to the lb. 
than Eastern roasted coffee 



29 S. Tejon Street 



Phone 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 



Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence. 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 9E6 



The College 
Photo Studio 



77U^ 





Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 

THE 

Gowdy-Simmons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS, ENGRAVERS 

21 N Tejon Street 




u ^j xH /^ 




16 



THE TIGER 



Weekly on these pages, daily 

in our windows and at the store we match our 
showing of good Suits and Overcoats against 
the best offered you elsewhere and invariably 
win. There must be a reason. 



It's the perfect fitting of these hand-tailor- 
ed, all wool garments, coupled with the long 
established reputation of this store for making 
good. 

Winter Suits, $15.00 to $53.50 
Winter Overcoats $15.00 to $60.00 



8 N. Tejon Street 




bi«liimSfeecii«er (s 



28 E. Pike's Peak 



Shoes virith a Record for Goodness 

For over twenty years this store has followed a well defined policy of selling nothing 
but good shoes. This policy has made this store thousands of loyal friends, and as a 
"satisfied customer is our best advertisement" we are always making strenuous efforts to 
retain our old friends and to make new ones, espec- 
ially catering to the younger trade with snappy 
styles at 





$3.00, $3.50, $4.00, $4.50 and $5.00 



Shoes -THAI- SATISFY 



22 S. TEJON ST. 



# 



^ 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 

Departments - College of Arts and 
Science, E. S. PARSONS, Dean. 

School of Engineering, F. CAJORI, Dean 
School of Forestry, W. C. STURGIS, Dean 
School of Music, E. D. HALE, Dean 



Manilou Parl^ -- Field Laboratory 
of the School of Forestry 



10 



Keep in Touch with the Styles. You Can Get Them at 

GEO. J. GATTERER 

10 Per Cent Discount to Students 
216 North Tejon Street Telephone Main 1247 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



Vol. XIII 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., NOVEMBER 10, 1910 



Number 9 



KANSAS AGGIES MEET THEIR 

WATERLOO ON WASHBURN 



SENSATIONAL GAME V^ON BY TIGERS 



15-8 SCORE INDICATES RELATIVE STRENGTH OF THE TWO TEAMS 
AGGIES MUCH HEAVIER 

Vandermoer Again Stars, Makes 65-Yard Fun for Touchdown — Magnificent Spirit 
on Part of Rooters — Score Stood 5-3 at End of Second Period, Kansas' Favor 



Tlie niuch-lieraldcd Kansas State 
Aggies, who had not been defeated 
throughout the entire 1910 season, 
went down in defeat last Saturday on 
Washburn field by r score cf 15 to 8 
in cnc cf the hardest gridiron battles 
ever tcmght m Colorado. Outweigh- 
ing t';e !o':;ils by 18 pounds, more ex- 
perience 1 ;,nd confident, they ploughed 
through tlic Tiger line for a touch- 
down in th(.> fi St for.r minutes of play 
in seven downs. It was here that the 
Tigers found themselves and com- 
menced a game of football that for 
brilliance, .gritty playing, and reil 
courage has never been equalled in 
the city. 

What was responsible for the vic- 
tory? A dash of youth, ner\e, grit, a 
knowledge of the new football game 
and Coach Rcthgeb, but greatest of 
these is Rothgeb, whose coaching 
Vv^as apparent at every point of the 
game. 

The Colorado College line held like 
iron — after the first touchdown. It 
took nerve to withstand the bullish 
rushes of those massive lines — men 
of the Purple and White, but the nerve 
was there. The back field of the 
Tigers played an offensive game that 
will always be remembered, and a de- 
fensi\-e game that will neve" be for- 
gotten. A^andemoer, was the same 
Vandy, playing most brilliantly and 
again proving himself Colorado's 
greatest football player. His 6s-yard 
run through the entire field for a 



touchdown, spectacular and dashing, 
again brought out where C. C. can 
win tlie championship if by no cthvr 
route. Thompson at end played a 
ma.gnificent game, his end-around-end 
play, which scored for the Tigers, was 
in a class by itself. Sinton's long- 
reach on the forward passes which 
brought the ball to within 10 yards of 
the goal line, came in rather handy. 
Black and Bowers' defensive wo-k was 
excellent, both men never faltering 
and charging their opponents off their 
feet. Reed ran the team with his usual 
display of headwork and snap. 

The K. A. C. aggregation in the 
early part of the game showed a snap 
and vitality that looked ' dangerous. 
They even had the Tigers beat for the 
speed in which their plays were pulled 
ofiF. But things changed. 

After the game >.Iike O'Hearn, the 
Teutonic coach of the -^dsitors, sent 
his congratulations to Rothgeb, saying 
"You have a great football team, one 
that we never believed could be pro- 
duced out here. The game was a tri- 
umph for the new game and your team 
deserved the victory. The altitude 
never seriously afifected my men, al- 
though they were a little out of wind 
at the end of the game, because of the 
fierce game that the Tigers made th.em 
play.'' Coach Rothgeb only said "You 
fellows played good football — fine 
football, but you will have to .do bet 
ter."' 

Continued on Page 5 



BEN GRIFFITH ELECTED? * 
* 



Both Si:3es Claim Victory Mr. * 

Griffith Ran Far Ahead of * 

His Ticket. * 

* 



Election returns are cnming ^ 

in SD slovvly because of the * 

large .'imount of scratching that * 

was done that nothing definite * 

can be stated about Ben Grif- * 

fith's race for the position of •i' 

attorney general. However, the *!• 

Republicans claim that he is * 

one of the few Republicans to * 

be so honored. Both sides * 

cl; im the victory, but it is cer- 4" 

tain that Griffith made a spleji- * 

did campaign and ran far ahead * 

of his ticket. * 

*•* T T* ^* *V T* T* T* T* *** T "5* V V V 



PRESIDENT GOES EAST. 

To Attend Many Meetings — To Make 

Addresses at Several Colleges 

— New England Alumni to 

Give Banquet. 

Dr. and Mrs. Slocum left Sunday 
night for the East, to be awaj' three 
weeks. The President goes for the 
annual meeting cf the "Carnegie 
Foundation for the Advancement of 
Teaching," which is to be held in 
New York on the sixteenth. He is 
to preach at Mt. Holyoke College on 
the thirteenth and at Vassar College 
en the twentieth. He will also make 
an address at Amherst College on the 
eleventh and on the twenty-fifth JMrs. 
Shrcum and he ;ire to be the guests 
of the New England Coloratlo College 
Alumni .Association at the Brunswick 
hotel in Boston. On the twenty- 
ninth he is to asist in the dedication 
of the new buildings of the Union 
Theological Seminarj' in New York. 



THE TIGER 



DR. E. L. HEWETT LECTURES 

On "The Holy City of the Itsas" in 
Perkins Hall. 

Dr. Edgar L. Hewett, director of 
the School nf American A:-chaelogy, 
ga\"e ah ilhistrated lecture on "The 
Holy City of the Itsas" to an appre- 
ciative audience assembled in Perkins 
I-'ine Alts Hal! on Tuesday evening. 
The doors were open to the students 
and friends cf the College. A synop- 
sis of the lecture follows: 

Chichen Itsa is the grandest and 
most extensise cf all ruined cities in 
Central America. It was the mecca 
of the ancient peoples of Yucatan. 
The lecture gave a brief sketch of the 
history and civilization of the Maya 
people. Seve'al cities were described 
in detail, Chichen Itsa receiving spec- 
ial attention. 

Dr. Hewett sketched the rise and 
fall cf this city, the wanderings of 
the Itsas, the rebuilding of Chichen, 
its golden age and final downfall. 
Most of this information was gleaned 
from inscriptions and a few old books. 

Dr. Hewett has personally con- 
ducted expeditions among the ruins 
and has brought back many excellent 
pictures. In igo6 he also explored 
.the j\Iexican tableland and was soon 
put at the head of the wlmle work in 
the American field. He has begun a 
survey' of the Ri<T G/ande. San Juan, 
and Colorado basins, including work 
in archaeology, history, ethnology 
and linguistics. In iiis field. Dr. 
Hewett has traveled in Greece, Egypt 
and Syria, as well as in this hemi- 
sphere. Furthermore, he has the 
ability to present his knowledge in an 
interesting and forcible manner. 



THE NATION" PAYS HIGH 

TRIBUTE TO MR. WARREN'S 

RECENT BOOK. 



NEW ENGLANDERS 
CLUB. 



FORM 



Spend Tuesday in the Hills. 



The students from that section of 
the United States known as New 
England have banded together and 
expect scon to form a permanent or- 
ganization under the name of the 
"New England Club" with duly 
elected officers. Last Tuesday being 
a legal holiday, they hied away to the 
solitude of the hills and spent the day 
in intellechial feasting. 



"The Mammals of Colorado, 

(An account of the several species 
found within the boundaries of the 
state, together with a record of their 
habits and of their distribution. By 
Edward Royal Warren, S. B. Director 
of the Museum of Colorado College. 
With three maps and a full series of 
illustrations, rep"oduced from pho- 
tographs taken from nature. New 
York: G. P. Putnam's Sons.) 



"The scope of this handsome vol- 
ume is indicated by the title and the 
sub-title. In comjiact and well-or- 
dered form, it supplies a large amount 
of information both interesting and 
useful, both popular and technical, and 
its publication should encourage the 
production of similar works for other 
states and localities. With few excep- 
tions the eighty-one illustrations are 
based on excellent photographs; the 
coyote taken in the trap (figure 78), 
has an appropriately despondent ex- 
pression; the frontispiece might well 
have represented a more impressive 
form with a less formidable Latin 
name. Of the statements as to habits, 
many are credited to other observers, 
but the author's contributions are 
among the most important and reada- 
ble; for example, the account on page 
230 of the persistent efforts of a she- 
bear to provide sleeping accommoda- 
tions for herself and her cubs at the 
expense of some travelers. Other 
noteworthy passages refer to the hab- 
its of the prairie dog and badger. The 
slaughter of the latter the author dep- 
recates, but, on the other hand, he 
condemns without qualification the 
coyote, and states that in Kansas, 
during the year 190,3-4. bounties were 
paid upon 19,514 of these animals. The 
Rocky Mountain sheep is commonly 
believed to fall upon its enormous 
horns, wdien leaping from a height, 
but one was seen to leap from a cliff 
at least twenty feet high, and to ali.ght 
upon its feet." — The Nation, Octobar 
1,3, T910. 



Princeton's upperclassmen are de- 
hating among themselves the discon- 
tinuance of any foi-m of hazing. 



The hmior system is being used at 
Berkeley. At the last meeting of the 
Undergraduate Student Affairs com- 
mittee two students were placed on 
probation and a third was warned on 
accoimt of cheating. 



BEST STUDENT CONFERENCE. 

Large Attendance — Noted Speakers 
— Ne^^ Officers Elected. 

The largest attended conference in 
the history of the Student Volunteer 
movement in Colorado closed last 
Sunday night with services in Per- 
kins Hall. There were in attendance 
fifty-one delegates distributed as fol- 
lows: Denver University, fifteen; 
Colorado Agricultural College, nine; 
School of Mines, six; University of 
Colorado, four; Denver City Union, 
five; and Colorado College, fourteen. 

The conference was very fortunate 
this year in having with it two of the 
men who spoke before the' Interna- 
tional Convention of Student Volun- 
leers at Rochester last winter, Dr. 
Arthur Rugh of China, and Dr. W. A. 
Moore of Korea, Other speake:-s 
were Dr. Inglis of China; Guy V. Al- 
drich, traveling secretary of the Stu- 
dent A'olunteer Movement in Ame:-- 
ica; Mrs. McClean, State Secretary 
of the Y. W. C. A.; John Nipps, State 
Student Secretary, and President Slo- 
cum. 

Friday night the Conference sent a 
telegram of best wishes to Wm. Vor- 
ies, wdio was just returning to his' 
work in Korea, sailing from Tacoma 
last Saturday morning. 

The following officers were elected 
for the next year: President, Henry 
Gruenwald of Denver University; 
\'ice-President, George Smith, Colo- 
rado Agricultural College; Corre- 
sponding Secretary, ]\Iiss Edna Tur- 
ner. University of Colorado; Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, D. L. Boyes, Colorado 
Colle.ge. 



MANY NEW HATS ON CAMPUS. 



The seniors and freshmen had the 
distinction of being the first classes 
to wear their class hats this season. 
The senior hat has a distinctly West- 
ern colle.ge tone, and what is more, it 
is (|uite becoming to most of the men. 
The black leather band showing 
"Colorado College igti" is a very 
neat ornament. The freshmen caps 
are black with colored buttons. The 
button shows the course the young 
hopeful is taking. These hats are 
worn at the special request of the 
sophs, but it is a great advantage to 
the freshmen to be able to recognize 
their own classmates at first sight. 



THE 1' 1 G E R 



3 



PRIZES FOR ECONOMIC ES- 
SAYS. 

Notice has been given lliat Colo- 
rado College students who wish to 
compete for the Hart, Schaffner & 
Marx p'izes should forward their es- 
says to Profesor J. Laurence Laugh- 
lin of the University of Chicago by 
June I, iQii. 

The prizes are offered for the best 
papers on economic subjects. They 
amount to $2,000 and this is the sev- 
enth year of their existence. 

Herewith are some of the subjects 
suggestetl by the committee: 

The effect of labor unions on inter- 
national trade. 

The best means or raising the 
wages of the unskilled. 

A comparison between the theory 
and tiie actual practice of protection 
ism in the United States. 

.A. scheme for an ideal moneta-y 
system for the United States. 

The true relation of the central 
go\'crnment to trusts. 

How much of J. S. Mills' economic 
system survives? 

A central bank as a factnr in a 
financial crisis. 

If a C':intestant wishes to choose a 
special 'subject, he should communi- 
cate with Professor Laughlin who 
\\i!l provide a list of available sub- 
jects. 

RELIGIOUS CENSUS 

Statistics from the registrar's office 
in regard to the religious census 
which was taken some time ago, show 
a g" eater number of creeds represent- 
ed here than ever before. It is also 
interesting to note that of five hundred 
and fifteen students enrolled here only 
twelve are recorded as members of no 
church. The creeds represented and 
the number of students who represent 
them are as follows: 

Christian 28 

Christian Science 16 

Episcopal 56 

Baptist 32 

Congregational loi 

.Methodist Episcopal 73 

Presbyterian 118 

Jews 4 

Lutheran 5 

Catholic 16 

'Unitarian ». 3 

Miscellaneous 4 

No church 12 

Not reporterl '. 6 

Total 515 



Y. M. C. A TO OBSERVE WEEK 
OF PRAYER. 

The College V. :\I. C. A. is plan- 
ning upon the observance of the week 
of prayer which coines during the 
week of Nov. 13-20, and asks that 
every one of its members unite in ear- 
nest prayers for the ends asked by the 
International Committee. 

The week will open with a mass 
meeting for the men of the college in 
upper Perkins Hall, next Sunday at 5 
o'clock. Dr. Frank T, Bayley, of Den- 
ver, will be the speaker at this time. 
Those who know Dr. Bayley know 
that in securing him for this meeting, 
the Association has one of the best 
fitted men in the State for such a pur- 
pose. His subject will be one that 
every man will find most helpful in 
his life. It is hoped tliat every man 
in the college \vill be present. 

Dr. Bayley will also address the 
chapel services on Monday, Tuesday 
and Wednesday mornings. For the 
Thursday and Friday morning meet- 
ings other speakers will be present. 
On Tuesday evening it is planned to 
ha\ e a meeting of the faculty .men. 
the cabinet, and the committee men. 

The closing meeting of the week 
will occur on the afternoon of No- 
vember 20. It is hoped that Dean 
Peck, of Denver, may be secured for 
this meeting. The City Association 
and the College Association will prob- 
ably join in this meeting and in this 
case Perkins Hall will be used. The 
Association cpiartette will furnish the 
music for this service, which will be 
one of the . biggest meetings of the 
year. 

The Association asks the co-opera- 
tion of every Christian man in the 
college in making this week of prayer 
the most helpful week of the year. 



Crary, Miss iiender, .Miss Phillips, 
Miss True, Aliss Baker, Mr. Jardine, 
Mr. I'rank .Merrill and Mr. Cyrus 
Estill. 



KAPPA SIGMA DANCE. 

The Kappa Sigma fraternity gave a 
dance in the San Luis building last 
Saturday night chaperoned by Mrs. 
Florian Cajori. Yellow and black, 
the College colors were used in dec- 
orating. Fink's orchestra furnished 
the music. The guests of the frater- 
nity were: Miss Louise Kampf, 
Miss Hazel Allen, Miss Persis Kid- 
der, Miss Nellie Estill, Miss Tammen, 
Miss Addie Hemenway, Miss Gasson, 
Miss Davis, Miss Dorothy Frantz, 
Miss Walsh, Miss Hedgcock, Miss 
Parsons, Miss Cora Kampf, Miss 
Wright, Miss Floy Estill, Miss Mc- 



WEEKLY PARADE A LARGE 
OCCASION. 

Usual Saturday Night Jollification 

Made Jollier by Presence 

of a Band. 

The paraders were delayed down 
town last Saturday, and did not arri\'e 
on Washburn till the xA-ggiesy had, 
made their touchilown. Once on the 
field, howe\er .they showed the triic 
C. C. spirit and with cast-iron lung- 
power urged the team on to victory. 
With their arrival the Tigers started 
to score and the enthusiasm of the 
rooters blew the lid ofif. At the end 
of the game they seized the players 
and, headed by the band, carried them 
up to the gym. Here, the ancient 
structure trembled with the uncorked 
yells. The band played "Our Colo- 
rado," while all present sang until all 
the sing was sung out of their sys- 
tems. Mrs. Prexy said that C. C. 
would have the new gym as the result 
of such games; Prexy confirmed her 
statements, and Dean Cajori was un- 
able to respond to the demand for a 
speech for, as he said in a hoarse 
whisper, he had made his speech on 
Washburn during the game. Such 
enthusiasm could have but one outlet, 
a night shirt parade. Soon after sup- 
per, the largest crowd of men in the 
history of C. C. was assembled be- 
fore Cutlei. Headed by a coffin 
which was labelled Kansas and draped 
in black, the motley procession 
passed thrcjugh the girls' halls with 
the band playing a funeral march. 
Then the tune was changed to "Glory. 
Glory to the Tigers," and so the par- 
ade w^ent down Tejon till a halt was 
called at the ]jusy Corner. Here a 
huge placard bearing the score of the 
game was displayed and the students 
passed in weeping line to view the 
remains of Kansas in the coffin. Next 
the procession passed through the 
.\ntlers singing "What Have We 
Done?" and then went to the ]\Iajes- 
tic, where the coffin was solemnly 
placed behind the footlights. In re- 
sponse to the demand for a speech 
Coach Rothgeb expressed his satisfac- 
tion in the game and his confidence 
in the future. After the show the stu- 
dents had refreshments at ^lueth's. 



THE TIGER 




THE DOPE COLUMN 



Do we want to play Bnulder? 
Somewliat, 



D. U. has been playing in hard luck 
lately. Darden and Baile}- are both 
under the weatlie; as a result of last 
Sarurady's game and may be unable 
to play against Litah Saturday. 



Three big games are to be played 
Saturday in the Rocky Mountain re-- 
gion: Miners against U. of Wyoming: 
Den^•er U. against U. of Utah, and 
Colorado College versus State Agri- 
cultural College. 



Dean Parsons has received word 
from the Utah authorities that the agi- 
tation started about protesting Sinton 
was mere newspaper froth and that 
they did not question his eligibility. 



The Herald-Telegraph of last Tues- 
day juggled the football dope around 
until they became convinced of the 
following conclusion. "That, this is a 
roundabout way of doping but it 
leads to the belief that Vandermoer's 
eleven is the superior of not only D. 
U., but of Kansas, Missouri and Ne- 
braska." Sounds good. 



Meet me in Denver, Thanksgiving". 

The D. U.-U. U. game Saturday 
will give an excellent idea of the rela- 
tive strength of the Ministers and the 
Tigers. Thanksgiving will give the 
best idea, however. 



The Tigers march through the sea- 
son, annexing victory after victory, 
has been a remarkable one. The team 
is lighter than any otner team in Col- 
orado, but it plays football better than 
any other team. The members of the 
squad nave trained and trained hard- 
foregone pleasures and worked every 
day from 4 until 6 o'clock. They 
have worked for their victories and 
won them. 



TIGERS PLAY AGGIES NOVEM- 
BER 12. 

More Aggies — ! 

JManager Fowler has arranged tn 
have the Tigers meet the Colorado 



Aggies in Fort Collins November 12 
instead of November 19 as originally 
scheduled. This gives the Aggies an 
opportunity to play Boulder Novem- 
ber ig. The arrangement is especial- 
ly fortunate for the College, since the 
Tigers will have nearly two weeks to 
recover from the effects of the game 
before playing the Ministers in Den 
yer on Thanksgi\'ing day. 

The football enthusiasts of the 
state are very desirous of seeing C. 
C. meet Boulder on December 3, and 
it is probable that this game will be 
arranged. 



CONSERVATION VERSUS CON- 
VERSATION. 



Throughout the entire football sea- 
son. Coach Claude G. Rothgeb, the 
premier athletic director of Colorado, 
has had a conservative policy regard- 
ing the outcome of football games. He 
always states that his team will play 
a good game and do their best to win 
but will not definitely state anything 
else. Before the K. Aggie game, 
Rothy had an almost pessimistic 
view of things, but the classy victory 
over one of the strongest teams of the 
middle west, one that has not lost a 
.game this season until Saturday and 
which scored 233 points to its oppo- 
nents' 28, showed that conservation 
beats conversation all hollow. 

If ever anybody made good, Roth- 
geb has. 



D. U. WALLOPS MINERS. 

Playing but little new football and 
reljnng on line smashes and end runs 
in which Captain Clem Crowley ex- 
cels, Denver University defeated the 
School of Mines last Saturday in Den- 
\'er by a score of 17 to o, the score in 
this case showing the relative strength 
of the two teams. Like the Tigers, 
D. U. linesmen excelled their oppo- 
nents and battered to pieces the under- 
trained I\.[ines players. Koonsman, 
the big Denver fullback, showed up 
especially strong. The Mines did not 
work a successful forward pass. 
Walker, who booted for the Ministers, 
had hard work to excel Slattery of the 
.Mine.-, and ditl it but a few times. 
The .Mines never th.reatened to score. 



The Denver line-up is as follows: 
Large, right end. 
I'aylor, right tackle. 
Sterling, right guard. 
Darden, center. 
Fike, left guard. 
Curtis, left tackle. 
Herbert, left end. 
Walker, quarterback. 
Crowley, right halfback. 
Bailey, left halfback 
Koonsman, fullback. 



FOOTBALL SCORES. 



Colorado College, 15; Kansas, 8. 

Denver, 17; iMines, 0. 

Harvard, 27; Cornell, 5. 

Princeton, 12; Holy Cross, o. 

Brown, 21; Yale, o. 

Penn., 18; Lafayette, o. 
' Carlisle, 22; ^^irginla, 5. 

Dartmouth, 15; Amherst, 3. 

Williams, o; Wesleyan, o. 

Chicago, 14; Purdue, 5. 

Illinois, 3; Indiana, o. 

Alichigan A., 3; Marquette, 2. 

St. Louis U., 3; Mo. State U., o. 

Case, 14; Ohio State, 10. 

Nebraska, 6; Kansas, 0. 

Iowa, 2: .^mes, 0. 

Vanderbilt, 22; Louisiana, o. 

Ark. U., 50; Washington U., o. 

Washburn, ;ii3; Mo. Wesleyan, o. 

Syracuse, 3; Vermont, o. 

Annapolis, 30; Lehigli, o. 

Phillips-Andover, 21; Phillips Ex 
eter, o. 

University of Texas, 1 ; Baylor, o. 
(Forfeited). 



Every sporting writer in Colorado 
is giving the College credit for the# 
best team in the State. Even in Den- 
ver, conservative writers arc predict- 
ing that Colorado College will get a 
strangle hold on the pennant. Colo- 
rado College will have a large number 
of men on the all state team, in fact 
lar.ger than anj' other college. 



The Colorado State Agricultural 
college and Denver university are all 
that stand in the way of the annex- 
ing of the champion^iip pennant for 
the Tigers. The former will take on 
the Tigers for a light fou;--(|uarter go 
at .Aggieville, next Saturday, and 
Denver University will get theirs No- 
vember 24 — the day we give thanks. 



THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 



KANSAS AGGIES GAME 

Continued from Page 1 

The K. Aggies have a good team — 
the best team that has faced the Tigers 
this j'ear. Roots, Croyle and Bates, 
of the visitors, played brilliant foot- 
ball, and the chain-like interference 
without weak links, surpassed any of 
its kind ever seen here. This inter- 
ference was what gave them their 
large gains. They also excel in the re- 
turn of punts. 

Things started thusly: 

Sinton booted to Kansas, who we/e 
held for two downs and Bates was 
forced to punt to Reed, who gave the 
ball to Vandy on the first line-up of 
the game for the Tigers. Vandy made 
9 yards, but "Yota" fumbled the next 
play and the husky Agriculturalist 
got the leather and then began their 
march down the field. Four minutes 
was all it took, Roots being the stel- 
lar performer, making the touchdown. 
Croyle could not kick goal. The rush 
was just what the Tigers needed to 
arouse their fighting spirit. 

Rothgeb's Kittens kicked off to the 
A-ggies, who again started their old 
style rushes — but after 15 j/|ards of 
this play, they were stopped and B ites 
was forced to attempt a drop kick, 
which Black blocked and the Tigers 
got on their 10-yard line. Vandy 
punted a strong one for 50 yards and 
here it will suffice to say that Vandy 
has certainly improved in his punt- 
ing. He places them right and they 
go strong. Kansas here lost the ball 
on downs. Vandemoer tried the left 
end for 10 3'ards, but the Tigers were 
forced to punt on the next down. 
Here Reed stopped Simms with a hard 
tackle, forcing him to leave the con- 
test just as the first quarter ended. 
Score: K. A. C, 5; C. C, o. 

In the second period the Sunflowe: 
recruits started their line plunges 
without avail. Two penalties for hold- 
ing were imposed on the visitors that 
reminded them that there is a rule 
against that thing this year. An ex- 
change of punts, with odds "Vander- 
moerward," gave the Aggies the ball 
on the so-ya/d line. Sinton, he cf the 
long reach, pulled a fcrwa'd pass out 
of the sky and ran a few yards with 
it. The Tigers here started a system 
of gaining, Bowers around left end 
for 10 yards. Cook, the other way for 
15 yards, Reed, 2; a forward pass to 



Ileald, 2,^; here \'an(ly scoied the 
first placement kick nf the season for 
the Tigers. Score, 5 to 3. After this 
the ball was here and there until 
Vandy fell on it on the so-yard' line. 
Acker stopped the only pass of the 
visitors at this place. 

The Tigers kicked off, Sinton's boot 
doing the work. The y\ggies could 
Udt gain and Bates punted. Here a 
delayed pass to Vandy netted 17 yards, 
Acker and Heald providing good in- 
terference. The Tigers punted, and 
Croyle, in the first play, made 16 
yards, but received a slight jar when 
Heald tackled him and he lost the pig- 
skin. Vandy get the ball and here 
things started that always will be re- 
membered as feats of strength in Ti- 
gerdom. A touchdown was the re- 
ward of the work, I-Ieald, Acker, Reed, 
Sinton and Thompson, figuring prom- 
inently, "Tommy" doing the necessary 
work for the five points. The pass, 
of the triplet variety, was accurate 
and well chosen, and proved the thing 
needed. The ball was downed near 
the boundary and ^''andy had to kick 
out to Reed. "Hedbloss'' kicked a 
good goal. Score, Tigers 9, K. A. 5. 

Kansas lost much of its fire here and 
the Tigers played circles around them. 
When the teams lined up \^andy 
punted to Bates, who was downed in 
his tracks by Bov^'ers. That former 
K^ansan, Bowers, again broke into the 
limelight, breaking through the line 
and throwing Croyle back for a loss. 
Vandy caught the next punt and with 
the assistance of Reed, who does make 
some classy interference, dodged, 
swerved, and plunged up the field for 
the prettiest and fastest run ever seen 
on Washburn field. He scored, and 
Herlblom kicked goal. Reed got rid 
of three men in his interference and 
Vandy got rid of the rest of the Farm- 
ing aggregation. Kansas came back, 
stung, and after advancing the ball 
sonie yards, punted. Croyle looVed 
dangerous shortly after this with a 
long run, but he was downed by four 
or five Tige -s on the lo-yard line. The 
ball w.'as advanced tii the 3-yard line, 
where the \-isitors lost it en downs. 
Vandy had to kick from behind his 
own goal posts, but bocted the leather 
for 60 ya"ds. Bates returned it 2^ 
yards. Here Bates starred with the 
last scor^ of the game, a pretty goal 
from the 30-yard line. The Fa mers 



were just to attempt a trick play when 
the whistle blew and the Tigers were 
still undefeated for igio. Score, C. C. 
ts, K. A. C. 8. 

The line-up: 

Tigers. Positions. Aggies. 

Thompson 1. e Elliott 

Bowers 1. t Holmes 

Hedblom 1. g Seng 

Witherow c Zoller 

Black r. g Idammond 

Cook r. t Roots 

Sinton r. e Towler 

Reed q. b. Bates 

Heald 1. h Croyle 

Vandemoer r. h Christian 

Acker f, b Simms 

Touchdowns — \^andemocr, Thomp- 
son, Roots. Goals from touchdow^ns — 
Hedblom 2. Goals from field — Vande- 
moer and Bates. Substitutions — Rad- 
cliffe for Simms, Simms for Radcliffe. 
Referee — Smith, Brown. Umpire — 
Witham, Dartmouth, Field judge — 
Capen, Illinois. Head linesman — Bran- 
denbburg. DeuA'er. Time of qua.rters, 
15 minutes. 



PROGRESS OF PLANTING ON 
PIKE'S PEAK. 



The work of planting that is being 
dene on the Peak has been progress- 
ing very favorably owing to the gen- 
eral good weathe,- of the past few 
weeks.. The only setback was in 
the first few days when 2;^, men were 
laid off out of a gang of 32 on ac- 
count of the cold weather which froze 
the ground for a few days in northern 
exposures. The work is almost 

wholly seed planting in a tract of 
land covered with kinnikinnick. A 
pa.rt of the men were furnished with 
heavy iron rakes with teeth about 
three inches long. These men are 
lined up five feet apart and each one 
works straight before him scratching 
up patches of ground e^■e y five feet. 
Behind these follow men carrying 
poisoned pine seed which they scatter 
in the prepared spots and cover light- 
ly with earth about one-half inch 
deep, and then press clown firmly 
with their feet. After the}' have 
gone a ce 'tain distance, they move 
o\er to the adjoining untreated 
grountl and work back.. In this way 
large a:'eas can be jdanted in a sur- 
prisingly short time. 



THE 1^ I G E R 



-^ — "^ — ^ " 

The Weekly Newspaper of Colorado College 

A. E BRYSON Editor-in-Chief 

S. WILKIE DEAN... Business Manager 

Sam J. Shelton Assistant Editor 

Richard L. Hughes Assistant Editor 

Habrv Black Assistant Editor 

T. Wynne Ross Athletic Editor 

Robert m. Copeland Engineering Editor 

FRED S. Baker Forestry Editor 

Helen Canon Alumni Editor 

Mamie C. Detmoyer Exchanee Editor 

Edith I,. Summers Local Editor 

J. A. Root Local Editor 

Ray H. Sayre ...Assistant Manager 

E, E. Hedblom Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

A. W. Donovan, C.E. Hayward. Bruce Weirick, William 

Lloyd, Joe Sinton, Elsie Greene, Lillian Duer, Grace 

Wilson, Dorothy Cook, Dorothy Stott 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to TheTiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo 

Phones; Editor, Main 1975. Manager, Main 2073 

<T ^MT^^^^"^^^ r Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
^-^SsIS^ Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



A SIGNIFICANT 
VICTORY. 

Last Saturday's victory over the 
Kansas State Agricultural College 
brings a third state outside our own 
under the mastery of the Tiger team, 
Wyoming and Utah having been pre- 
viously vanquished. The conquest of 
the Kansas Aggies, an institution of 
some two thousand or more students, 
brings to mind the status of athletics 
in Colorado College more emphatically 
than ever before. During the past 
ten years the College has never won 
a championship in football, but each 
year it has turned out a team that was 
always a contender for state honors 
and pushed the winners to the limit. 
Two years ago, the University of 
Texas, another institution of about 
two thousand students, also fell a vic- 
tim to the Tiger onslaughts. That the 
College, and institution of only about 
three hundred men. can turn nut the 
teams that it h;is, not alone in football 
but in every other athletic activity, 
during the past twelve years, is noth- 
ing short of remarkable. Without a 
gymnasium, and often without the 
p'oper coaching, the Tigers neverthe- 
less turned out teams of which the 
institutirn has e\'cry reason tri be 
proud. 

Dopcsters have figured it out to the 
fifth decimal place, by comparative 



scores and considering the other 
teams that the Kansas Aggies have 
met, that the Tiger team could hold 
its own with the strongest of the 
middle western teams. We are not 
so bold as to make tliese statements, 
though, of course, we all believe them. 
Colorado College now has the 
coach, the gymnasium is certainly 
coming soon; the material we always 
have; and if we have accoinplished 
what we have in the past in the face 
of such difficulties as appeared, who 
can say what will happen when the 
gi'm comes. 



FACULTY-STUDENT 
RELATIONS. 

One of the arguments most com- 
monly used to urge the advantage of 
small colleges over the large universi- 
ties is the "personal contact" argu- 
ment — that students get a chance to 
become acquainted with their instruc- 
tors in a way that is entirely un- 
thought-of in the larger institutions. 

Theoretically, the argument is valid 
but in practice it does not always 
work out, certainly it has not worked 
out as it should in Colorado College. 
Where the fault lies, it would be hard . 
to say, but probably the faculty and 
the student body are each to blame. 
Certain it is, that a professor at some 
of the student affairs is quite a rarity 
and on the other hand, the advances 
of some of the faculty toward becom- 
ing better acquainted with the stu- 
dents by means of social times at the 
homes of the professors giving them, 
have been rather coldly received. The 
faculty adviser system to the fresh- 
men will no doubt help somewhat in 
bringing about a better acquaintance- 
ship. 

There are innumerable reasons why 
this casual acquaintanceship should 
not be. chief among these however, 
is the real need that members of the 
faculty have for friendships among 
the students and of the students for 
the faculty. To be a successful in- 
structor, one must be in sympathy 
with his students, this can be attained 
only by a knowledge of student affairs 
and intimate friendships with the stu- 
dents. On the students" part, a closer 
acquaintance is desirable for the rea- 
son that any such acquaintance is ^•al- 
uable. ?\[uch of the thoughtless criti 
cism of faculty members that is so 
often apparent among the students is 
the result of vague gene -alizations 
made by those who do not know and 
understand their instructors. 



No solution suggests itself t' im- 
prove conditions, except tlie indi\id- 
ual woi;k of both faculty and students. 
If some of the members of t!ie faculty 
would make it more of a point to at- 
tend and show an interest in student 
activities and if the college people 
would show a desire for closer ac- 
quaintanceship with the faculty, much 
good could be done for both parties. 

THE BOULDER GAME. 

Did you ever when you were a 
youngster fall heir to a five-cent piece 
which you immediately took into a 
tightly ckised fist and after a parting 
word from the giver about being care- 
ful not to lose the coin, you started 
down the street at double quick tD 
get your money back into circulation 
and mcidentally help the candy trust 
and the doctor's fees? And did you 
ever arrive at your destination, your 
eyes wide with expectancy and you: 
mouth watering with anticipation, and 
there pick out the longest licorice 
sticks, the most brilliantly colored 
"all day suckers," and the hardest 
"jaw breakers." And finally, when the 
clerk was ready to wait on j^ou, — 
when all the world was at its rosiest, 
did you eve: find that you had lost 
your money? If so, the sensation no 
doubt corresponded to your feeling 
when you first heard the news that 
there would be no Tiger-Boulder 
game. It was just the same sensation 
that you had when you plugged up all 
night fcr an examination, only to find 
it had been called off. It was like 
annexing i ne of your neighbor's mel- 
ons only to find it to be green or 
i^erhaps like any other experience that 
involved considerable surprise and di.f- 
appointment. 

■ The meeting of these two teams is 
always one of the greatest games of 
the year and is the game ab;ive all 
others that both teams set their hearts 
on winning. During the past several 
3'ears, the honors have been divided 
about equalh', but the last two years 
liave resulted in Boulder victories, 
hence it is that the entire student 
body and Rothgeb's proteges especial- 
\y are desirous o^ having the two 
teams clash. 

In spite of the additional week of 
training which it would entail, Man- 
ager Fowlc- has offered to lia\-e the 
Tigers appear against the Boulderites 
"n Dec. ,^ in Denver. Boulder main- 
tains that this game was their only 
scheduled home game and decs not 
desire to play in Dcn\-er. It is the 



THE TIGER 



THE FINEST APPOINTED CAFE IN THE STATE 

THE M. & L CAFE 

College Boys Are Invited To Meet That Man Holt from Harveys 

A Place of Cosy, Semi-private Dining Rooms. Cliarges Reasonable, Superb Service and Ex- 
cellent Cuisine. College Banquets Receive Our Particular Attention 

H. MASTERSON, General Manager, from Arizona E. R. HOLT, Manager, from Iowa 

OFFICIAL HEADQUARTERS: 1 he White Rats Association, The Chin-Chln Club 



wish of both institutions and of the 
■people generally, that some deal agree- 
able to both siues can be evolved and 
that the game be played. 
Here's hoping that it may. 



APCLLONIANS TO CELEBRATE 



Club to Commemorate Twentieth 
Birthday. 



The Apollonian. Club will celebrate 
its twentieth anniversary Monday 
evening, November 14th. It is plan- 
ned to hold a banquet at one of the 
down town hotels and to have a la; ge 
number of alumni both from in and 
out of town present at the occasion. 

The Apollonian Club is the oldest 

What's All Right? 
"Extra Clean" Lignite! 
Itls--ltls-ltls AllRight! 
What? 
Extra Clean" Lignite! 



li 



The Colorado Springs 
Fuel Co. 



112 Pike's Peak Avenur 
Two Phones, Main 230 



A. G. SPALDING a BROS. 



The Spalding 
Trade-Mark 




Is Known Throughout 
the Woild as a 

GUARANTEE OF 
QUALITY 



are the Largest Manu- 
facturers in the World of 

OFFICIAL EQUIPMENT 

for All Athletic Sports and 
Pastimes 

1£ Yrtii •"'6 interested in 

11 lUU Athletic Sport you 
should have a copy of the 
Spaldini; Catalogue. It's a 
cotnplete encyclopedia of 

What's New iu Sport 

and is sent free on request. 



college literary and debating society 
in Colorado College, in fact in the 
state of Colorado.. During its many 
years of existence, it has emphasized 
its purpose, and many of the most 
prominent alumni of the College have 
belonged to this organization. 

Prominent among the alumni are 
Ben Griffith, candidate for attorney 
general of Colorado, Wm. Weiser, 
representative from Mesa county, A. 
W. McHindrie, district attorney of 
Trinidad, Colorado, David F. Mat- 
chett, law3'er, Chicago, S. S. Packard. 
lawyer, Pueblo, Phillip Gillette, Seoul, 
Korea, Y. M. C. A., Harry Ewmg, 
Buenos Ayres University, Y. j\I. C. A. 

The comiTiittee in charge of the 
celebration expects to secure several 
out of town alumni to give the prin- 
cipal addresses of the evening and a 
special effort will be made to get as 
many as possible of the "old-timers" 
back. 



A. G. SPALD NG & BROS. 

1616 Arapahoe Street, Denver, Colorado 



THE ORIENT, THE LAND OF 
POSSIBILITIES. 



. Last Fridajr morning, Arthur Rugh 
of China, who was in this city repre- 
senting the Student Volunteer Move- 
ment, delivered before the student 
body in chapel an address in which 
he commented upon the excessive 
local pride manifested throughout this 
country. In spite of the sarcasm of 
his remarks, his allusions to "Colo- 
rado College, the hub of its universe," 
and to the "confidence of the students 
that their football team could defeat 
any other team in the country." d.'ew 
bu.rsts of applause • frpm the amused 
;uidience. He further complained of 
the manifestation of this self-centrali- 
zation in the lack of interest taken in 
foreign countrieg, particularly in 
China by the a\crage citizen of this 
country. He quoted the Right Hon- 
orable James Bryce as the authority 
for the statement that the attention 



of the civilized world is now being 
drawn to the Orient. He concluded 
with the statement that China and 
India now presented the largest field 
for any profession one might chose, 
and with the assertion that the person 
who does not at least consider the 
possibilities afiforded by these coun- 
tries is doing both himself and his 
country an injustice. 



Y. M. C. A. STARTS MISSION STUDY CLASSES 

The following courses are to be of- 
fered : 

"Comparative Religions," for juniors 
and seniors only. Leader, Prof. J. V. 
Breitwieser. 

Th.is course we believe will be one of 
the best ever offered in Missionary 
c'assts in Colorado College. It will 
cover ten of the leading, working re- 
ligions of today, with a thorough study 
of each. It -will supplement the work 
given in the senior class in Philosophy. 

"Mission Fields — Commercially and 
Economically" for sophomores only. 
Leader, Rev. George Stewart. 

This is a deviation from the usual 



WE LOAN MONEY 

ON ALL VALUABLES 

Big line of new and unredeemed 
Drawing Instruments .'. Diamonds 
Watches and Jewelry ot all descrip- 
tions. Firearms and Fishing Tackle, 
Musical Instruments and hundreds 
of other articles 



.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 



T \] E TIGER 




If it were not for dudes and tramps, the humorists and vaudeville folks 
would have a sorry time. 

To ignore style, or to dress in the extreme s'tyle is to invite ridicule 
and criticism. Style is a quality of clothes. Out-of-date styles have little 
or no market value. 

A great many men look to us for correct styles — the fashions approved 
by men of good taste, because we not only confine our buying to the clothes of reputable makers, but our buyers 
make it their business to study the styles worn by the best dressed men in New York. Cut the correct style costs 
you no more than ordinary clothes. See for yourself. Compare the suits we sell at $15, $20, $25, $30, $35, $40, 
and $50 with the common sort at the same prices. 



Colorado Springs, ION. Tejon St. 



Denver, Sixteenth at Stout 



]\Jissio:iarj' courses, and will give one a 
better understanding of the fields, from 
a Ir.'siness viewpoint. 

"Japan of Toda\ " for freshmen only 
Leader, iNIr. T. L. Kirkpatrick. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick has made a special 
stu(l\' of this course this summer and 
will be able to give those entering the 
c:<urse a working knowledge of all mis- 



DEXTER & HUDSON 

EXCHANGE BARBER 
SHOP 

Room 107, Third Floor 
Exchange Bank Building 



The Dentan 

Printing Company 



No. 9 So. Cascade Auenue 

FIRST-CLASS PRINTING 
at REASONABLE RATES 

Telepnone Main No. 602 



sionary and Y. M. C. A. activities in the 
Island Kingdom. 

"Mohammedanism — Past. Present, 
and iHiture" for freshmen onl>-. Leader, 
l\[r. Harrootunian. 

Mohammedanism has pla3ed a great 
part in the history of the world. Mr. 
Harrootunian has li\'ed in the Moham- 
medan countries and is well posted on 
their religion: Any student, whether 
interested in entering missions or not, 
will profit b)' entering this course. 

FORESTERS BECOME FIRE 
FIGHTERS. 

Kept Busy Lrst Week Fighting Stub- 
born Forest Fire — Men Com- 
plimented by Officisls for . . 
Their Work — Good 
Experience. 

Last week the topic of chief interest 
was the fire which occured on the 
lower slopes of Cheyenne mountain. 
Early Monday afternoon a couple nf 
auto loads of College men, mostly 
foresters, went out to fight the fire, 
and ] ut out a large part of it, return- 
ing Mc.nlaj' evening. Alonday even- 
ing, Patterson of the Fo est Ser\-ice, 
took charge of the work of fire fight- 



The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies, Fixtures 

208 N. Tejon Street Phones Main 812, 830 

Lowell-Meservey Hdw. Co. 

Dealers in Paints, Oil, Glass, Every- 
thing in Hardware 



106 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springs 



Telegraphy ! 



Learn Wireless and Railroad 

Shoitage of fully 10,000 Oper- 
ators on account of 8-hour law 
and extensive '"wireless" development- We operate 
under cfirect supervision of Telegraph Officials and 
positively place a 1 students when qualified. Write for 
catalogue. NATIONAL TELEGRAPH IN&T., Cinci nati, 
Philadelphia, Memphis, Davenport, la., Columbia, S. C, 
Portia d, Ore. 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co. 



Phone Main 48 



313 N. Tejon St. 



Patronize TIuER Advertisers 



THE WHITAKER-K 



Special To Students 

THE TIGERS are going to win and 
every student should have one of our 
souvenirs showing THE TIGERS IN 
ACTION. We will give one of these 
remarkable Panorarrs cf Washburn 
Field with every pair cf shoes bought 
here this month. Come in and see them. 

Men's Shoes $3.50 to $6 the pair. 




Size of Poster 12x38 inches 



THE 1M (i E R 



SQUARE DEAL SHOES 

$3.50 and $4.00 

Shoes that are right in price and up-to-the-minute in style. New Ideas, New Lasts, New 
Patterns. Let us show you some shoes that you will know are good shoes 



FIT FOft EVERY FOOT^ 



Popular Prices 
Rule Throughout 




IT PAYS TO D jlfl^Sll *T DEAL'S 

107 South Tuon StweetT" 



Luxury In Dress 
Without Luxury Prices 



Deichmann & Douglas 
Floral Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER. Mer. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 
Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 



To College 
Men and Women 
We Are Known as 
"The Satisfactory 
Jeweler". To 
New Ones We 
Soon Will Be. 

Johnson Jewelry ( o. 

26 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

"Satisfactory Jewelry 

Store" 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



ing. Tuesday night and Wednesday 
it appeared to be going out rapidly 
and Thursday was so near out that 
many left, thinking it was wholly ex- 
tinguished. Thursday afternoon a 
strong wind started and fanned the 
smouldering litter into life. Early 
in the evening about a dozen College 
foresters went out and fought fire all 
night and succeeded in getting it un- 
der control once more. Friday 
morning another lot of foresters and 
arts men went out and helped put the 
finishing touches on. Since then it 
has merely smouldered but is being 
rigidly patroled to prevent outbreaks. 
All danger will not be passed until 
a heavy snow falls. 

The fire was mostly surface fire 
burning the oak trees and other litter. 
In some places the dead oak leaves 
were burned that still clung to the 
twigs, but in other places it did not 
go even that high. Some of the sap- 
ling pines were wholly destroyed but 
as a rule they received only se\-ere 
scorchings which will be fatal how- 
ever in a majority of cases. The 
fire in many cases, especially in pine 
needles, exhibited a tendency to be- 
come a shallow ground fire. It is es- 
timated that ,",000-4000 acres were 
burned over in this way. 

The immediate loss in such a fire 



Antlers 

Turkish Baths 

(Opposite Elks Club) 
Open Day and Night 

BATHS OF ALL KINDS. Also Chiro- 
pady and Swedish Massage. Treat- 
ment at Residence by Appointment. 

CARL J. WENBERG, Prop. 

Graduate Swedish Masseur 

Phone Red 33 14 E. Bijou Street 



MACO HATS 

In AH Styles and Colors are 
Now on Display 

Snappy Styles for the College 
Fellows 

lOfo Discount to Students 

THE MAY CO. 

23 North Tejon Street 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



R SHOE CO. 



132 North 
Tejon St. 




Material and Experience 

We have picked ELEVEN of our best 
styles to WIN your approval. If any of 
these fail we have a good reliable bunch 
of "SUBS" to fill their places. 

With good MATERIAL and EXPERI- 
ENCE in fitting, you will find perfect 
latisfaction in a pair of our shoes. 

Ladies' Shoes from $3 to $6 the pair. 



10 



THE TIGER 



When YouVe Ready to Buy an Overcoat 

You'll see here the smartest, most distinguished 
lot of overcoats ever displayed in this town; the 
very highest type of fine clothing made to-day 

Alfred Benjamin & Co. and Society Brand Overcoats 



MANHATTAN 
SHIRTS 




v^S^J 



FOWNS 
GLOVES 



Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton-Rustic Home 



Dairy 



No. 419 South El Paso St. 
Phone Main 442 



Photography 

In All Its B7'anches 

Clark 



112 South Tejon St. 
Special Discount to All Students 

Shoe Repairing. Clothes Cleaned and Pressed. 
Second-Hand Shoes a d Clothing 

J. H. PERKINS 



IVz S. Cascade 



Colorado Springs 



PRATT, The Barber 

Is At the Alta Vista Hotel 

Me Solicits the Patronage of the 
College Boys 



appears insignificant but' there are a 
great many evils acompanying it 
which arc there, although invisible. 
The chief evil of such a fire is that it 
kills off the saplings and seed about 
to germinate. If fires could be kept 
out of the scrub oak, that whole area, 
except perhaps the very margin, 
would be covered with a yellow pine 
stand which would doubtless even 
tually kill out those worthless tangles 
of scrub oak. 

It may be interesting to compare 
fire conditions here and in Germany, 
for fires will occur even in that well 
regulated land. A fire the size of 
this one would be a national calam- 
ity there. 

Near Nurnberg in Bavaria, two 
"large" forest fires occurred in May; 
one set by sparks from a locomotive 
destroyed 225 acres, and ten days 
later another fire, probably occasioned 
by the carelessness of a smoker, 130 
acres, although it was almost imme- 
diately noticed by a fire guard, and 
some 400 soldiers in addition to other 
fire fighters were put in requisition. 
The articles goes on to saj' that these 
were the worst fires in that pa:t of 
Germany that had occurred in the last 
fifty years. 

The Forest Ser\-ice ofiicials were 
much pleased by the hard work put 
in by the College men who made 
quite a reputation for themscK'es I))' 
their good work. 



WINDOW SLEEPING TENTS 



Columbia Uni\ersity is thinking of 
reestablishing fontljall and other 
sjinrt'; which were abolished two 3'ears 

.l.li'O. 



THEOUT 


WEST 


TENT AND AWNING CO. 


1 13'2 NORTH TEJON STREET 





Phone 917 



GEO. R. BERGEN, 0. D. 

MANF'G OPTICIAN 
Eyes Tested 611-12 Exch. Nat. Bank BIdg. 



TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented 
and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing Typewriter. The 
New No. 10 Model Has AH Latest 
Improvements 

Zimmerman Supply 



Company 



22 E. Kiowa St. 
Phone Main 374 



Established 1890 



WII/IIM^WON 

HAFFMRCD 
wfmmm-vmmms 




i>:e>nve/R. coix) 



The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 



THE T I (i P: K 



11 



We have now a complete line of the famous FLOR DE CUBA 
Havana Cigars. The finest cigar that can be made 



HUGHES 

North -i *J Tejon 



Gel Your Picnic Supplies 

ZZ= AT = 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

1 13 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 



The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRISKER, Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Notary Public 

A. J. LAWTON 

Real Estate, Loans and Insurance 
IQYz E. Pike's Peak Ave. , Colorado Springs 

Do You Kodak? 

Give Us Your 
Developing and Printing 



Your Work Will Be Promptly 
Executed by a Professional 
Photographer. If You Prefer 
To Do Your Own, We Have 
All the Necessary Supplies 



COLLEGE OBSERVATORY 
OPEN. 

A splendid opportunity to see the 
moon and Saturn is available Thurs- 
day' evenings rif the next two weeks. 
The telescope in the observatory near 
the entrance to Washburn tield is 
given over to the use of the public at 
half past seven o'clock each week and 
every effort is being made to show 
these two interesting bodies in par- 
ticular. 

Owing to the clear air and good 
weather ai this country, it is possible 
to see more details with less effort 
than is needed in observatories in 
lower altitudes. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Born — On October ,^o, a son, to Dr. 
and Mrs. Asa Hall. Mrs. Hall will 
be remembered as Afabel Emery 'o8. 



Marian Emmons ex-'og is teaching 
History and English in the Colorado 
Woman's College in Denver. 



William Bartlett '07 is taking a 
pcst-gradurte course in college. 



Mabel Carlson 'og and Carolyn 
Davi:, 'og we:e present iit the Studeni 
Volunteer conference. 

Willis Benjamin has been obliged 
to discontinue his college wrirk be- 
cause of his mother's illness. 



The Murray Drug Co. 

(Opposite Campus) 



Foresters' Club — The meeting of 
the Foresters' Club was poorly at- 
tended last week owing to the forest 
fire to which most of the members 
vent. Cj'.ving to this, the nieeting 
broke up after a few minutes talk by 
Prof. Coolidge. 



Why ni^t have an inter-collegiate 
basket-ball team? 



LOCAL NEWS 

Eleven Sigma Chi's and friends ate 
supper at Bruin Inn Sunday. 

Ern Stattoi'i'.s father visited him 
l;\ er Sundaj-. ■ 

Herbert Roe '10 was here for the 
game last Saturday. 



Miss Marie Forhan, who has 'been 
teaching school this winter, visited the 
college this past week. 

Vandeinoer, Thompson and Hille gave 
a box party at the Kansas Aggie game 
Saturday. The guests weK^ the Misses 
Wilkins, Cheeley, Starret, Forhan, Whit- 
aker and Martin. 



Pearsons will have a ladies' night on 
tlie iKtIi of this month. 



Ihe senior hats and the freshman caps 
ha\e come at last. 

Johnnie Burgess and his sister came 
to the Springs to see the football game 
Saturday. 



BOOKS 

Stat'onery, Pictures and 
Novelties at 

The Pike's Peak Book & Stationery Co 



27-271 , Soutb Tejon Street 



Peone Black 354 



Watch theCaps You Meet 

You won't need an intro- 
duction to the HEIDCAP. 
It is not a mere head cover- 
ing. It has character. It 
gives character to the wear- 
er. It is made of exclusive 
English cap cloths. It is a 
thoroughbred. Try on a 
HEIDCAP. 



12 



THE T I G E K 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co 
Groceries and 



Meats 



.«.*.•« 



m 




115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



MUETH'S 

The Place Where the Stand- 
ard Is Never Lowered. High 
Class Goods at Reasonable 
Prices. Ice Cream, Hot 
and Cold Drinks. 

Lunches and Afternoon Teas 
Ask Any Old Student 

CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 



5 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 




Cox Sons & Vining 

262 Fou th Ave., New York 

Gowns and Caps 

^ilk Faculty Gowns and 
Hoods. Lowest Prices 
Best Workmanship. 



The D. Y. Butcher rug Co. 

DRUGS, KODAKS, SUPPLIES 

Free and Prcmpt Delivery 
Cor. Opposite P. 0. Phones 90 and 750 



BRIEFS 



Play Committee — Seniors are al- 
ready beginning to plan for their 
Commencement exercises. A commit- 
tee of five has been appointed to 
have charge of the selection of a play. 
Mrs. Barber will probably coach the 
players again this year and will assist 
in the choice of the play, which will 
probably be one of Shakespeare's. 



Discussion Class. — The class which 
Dr. Ranney is conducting among the 
non-fraternity men held its first meet- 
ing last Monday night in Hagerman 
Hall. Thirty-five men have enrolled. 
It is planned to make the class a dis- 
cussion and Bible study class. 

Barbecue Aftermath. — The l)lanket 
has been working overtime during the 
past week, caring for those who were 
unavoidably overlooked during the 
rush at the Barbecue. A marked im- 
provement in freshman conduct is the 
noticeable result. 

Women's Dramatics. — Try-outs 
were held yesterday,- afternoon for "Ea- 
gerheart," the play which the Dramatic 
Club expects to present shortly be- 
fore Christmas vacation. The play 
was presented last year and was so 
successful tha^^ the club decided to re- 
peat it. 



Election Returns, — Returns from 
the polls at the Plaza Hotel, the vot- 
ing place of most of the college peo- 
ple, showed a strong Republican ten- 
dency. Out of a total vi)tc of 2yS. 
Griffith was given 233. 



CUTLER NOTES. 

Of last year's graduating class the 
following ten are attending Colorado 
College: Miss Hazel Davis and the 
Messrs. Cajori, E. Jackson, R. Jack- 
son, R. Lewis, Lake, J. M. Reynolds, 
Strieby, Brunner and McLaughlin. 
Miss Juanita Davis is a freshman at 
Raker L^ni\'ersity. Cu tis is attend- 
ing the Sheffield Scientific School at 
New Haven. 

Of the members of former classes 
C. E. Parsons 'eg is chairman of the 
sophomore hop conimittee at Am- 
herst. He is also a member of the 
Amherst Musical Club. 

Gile 'og and Hobson '09 are fresh- 
men at Yale. 



Lallie Surveying Instrument and 
Supply Company 

C. L. Berger & Sons, Buff & Buff, W. & 
L. E. Gurley Instruments 

Field and Office Supplies 

1622 Arapahoe St. Denver, Colorado 

No More Wrinkles 

I have a remedy that will speedily eradicate 
any case of wrinkles— no matter how bad or 
what the cause. It makes old faces look 
young, removes all lines and wrinkles, 
corrects flabby or withered skin, makes thin 
faces plump, fills out hollow cheeks, will 
develop any part of the body round and full 
without any massaging. Call at my parlors 
and I will e,xplain fully and convince you. 

Miss N. E. Joiinson 



Phone 687 



324 N. Tejon Street 



JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Stree 

The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Gives 
Special Attention to Accounts of Students 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, PrtsiJint Ira Har I'-PresUenl 

M. C. Gile Wm. F. Richards 

Donald D. Wijfiey, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M. 



Hunt Up 



Bissell's Pharmacy 



When You Want 



Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 



Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 



Colorado Cc liege Students 

Remeir.berWe Do Framing as It Ought 
To Be Done and at Right Prices 

Whitney & Grimwood 

20 North Tejon Street 
Opera House Block 



Looseleaf Students' 

Note Books are the best 

note books for the 

College Students. 

Made in cloth and leather 

covers at prices as low 

as 30 cents. 



OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



12 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springrs 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa Si. 



Phone Main 536 



Phone Main 2055 



Art Needle Work 



THE HUNT & VAN NICE 
Art Specialty Store 

Stamping, Designing, Perforating, Linens, 

Lawns, Best Hand-Painted China 
8 Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealprs in 

Flour, Fei>d, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 

Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co. 



THE TIGER 

APOLLONIAN PROGRAM. 

Nov. II. 

"Electiuii Returns and Tlu'ir Sig- 
nificance" Strieby 

"\^aluc <-!nd Danger of IH^ero-Wor- 
ship" Shelton 

Debate— Resolved, That Trade Un- 
ions are Justified in Restricting 
the Number of Persons Alluvvcd 
to Learn a Trade. 

Affirmative Park, Klahr 

Negative Hall, Robertson 

FORESTERS' CLUB. 

Nov. 10. 

Dr. Sturgis will speak on "Forests 
and I'orestry in Germany." 
Refreshments. 

PEARSONS. 

Nov. II. 

Paper Kirkpatrick 

Music Esmay 

Current Events Copeland 

Five-^Iinute Speeches — Dean, Wood- 
ward. Warnock. 

iNIusic Smit'.i 

Critic's Report. 

ENGINEERING CLUB. 

Radio-Activity R. J. Ayer 

Conservation R. M. Copeland 

Extemporaneous Debate. 

CICERONIAN CLUB. 

Music Ormes 

Cicernnian Rccord-PIerald — Greenlee, 
Love. 

Debate — Resolved, That Members 
cf a Legislature Shnuld Vote Ac- 
cording to the Wishes cf Their 
Constituents Rather than Accord- 
ing to Their Own Opinions. 

Affirmative Rowbotham 

Negative Guy 

Reading Van Dyke 

Extempore Speeches. 

Critic's Report. 

LE CERCLE FRANCAIS. 

Nov. 10. 

Conference Dr. Dupuis 

Musique Mile. Marsh 

Conference sur Moliere . . Mile. Sutton 
Resume de la Comedie "L'Avare" 

Mile. Clark 
Courric:' de la Semaine. 

I^es visiteurs sout toujours invites. 



Remember We Handle Nothing but the 
BEST GRADES OF FUEL 

"EVERY LUMP A LUMP OF HEAT" 

The Central Fuel Co 



1 28 N. Tejon Street 



Phone 1101 



The Shackleford-Henley 
Leather Goods Co. 

18 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 
Makers of 

Trunks and Leather Goods 

We Carry the Most Complete Line of 
Traveling Goods, Ladies' Hand Bags, 
Pocket Books and All Sorts of Leather 
Goods in Colorado. 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Out West Building 



A Box of 

BURGESS CANDY 

Is a Bundle 
of PURE JOY 

"N'ou'll Like the Burgess Store" 



112-114 North Tejon St. 



FREE 

Shoe Repairing Absolutely Free 
of Charge for Entire Term of 
1910-1911 to the College Stu- 
dent Submitting the Best Ad for 

PETE'S 

Shoe Shop 

230 East Dale Street 

Men's S wed Soles 75c; Ladies, 65c 
Rubber Heels, 35c 



14 



THE TIG K K 



$1.00 $1.00 

Young Men 

For $1.00 per month, we sponge, press and do minor repairing on one 
suit, or one overcoat, or two pairs of trousers, each week; calhng for 
and deh'verieg same in our wardrobe, dustproof wagons. We claim 
to do the best work in the cit\'. A trial from you will allow us to- 
prove our claim. 

Special Prices Given to the Young Women of 
the College. Get Our Price List. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



Agents: Bert Siddons 
Glenn Bowers 




and Cleaners. 



T. E. AIKEN 

Taxidermist, Furrier 

Dealer in Souvenirs and Novelties 
12 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

For Best and Quick Delivery 

SEE 

The Monument Coal Co. 

28 East Kiowa Street 



II Local Department || 



Fran'-: Middlesvvcrth '06 dropped 
into t )\\n frorn Moab, Utah, last week 
to ^ee how the team looked. 



William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class ElecLrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs. Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion -House, I.ondon, E. C. 



THE 

Crissey ^ Fowler 
Lumber Co. 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 

Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 

A. S. BLAKE 

Is the Man to See ' 

107 North Tcjon Phone 463 

Nickle Ware Cutlery 

Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



F.eni. Grifhth '02 stopped over Sat 
iirday and Sunday at the Phi Gam 
house. 



Margaret Sells cx-'r2 stayed in town 
for fi:/ur or five days the fist of the 
week. 



Gee. Gibbs 'oq was in town a few 
days this week. He is teaching in 
the Canon City schools. 

Elizabeth Burgess enjoyed a visit 
frcni her sister, }\liss Anna Burgess, 
last week-end. 



Pay that little "bet" you lost by going 
to Noble's, Cor. Bijou and Fejon. 



, Marian Fezer, Mabel Wilson, Mabel 
V/asley and Mary Breckenridge spent 
the week end at their homes. 

Mrs. Smith leaves for the east .Mon- 
day. 

The father of Mcnto Thomas '13 died 
at Ir's home in Monte Vista, on Friday 
tl.e .jth. 



.Se\eral Sigma Chi's took a tramp up 
ChcNcniie mountain, Tuesday. The 
MissL's Slott, Wallace, Pearson and 
Rheinhardt were the guests of note. 



Broken Lenses 
Duplicated 



Phone Black 233 
Colorado Souvenirs 



C. B. LAUTERMAN 

Jeweler and Manufac- 
turing Optician 

121 N. TEJON STREET Colorado Springs 



10c STORE AND MORE! 

THE EMPORIUIM 

1 10 S. TEJON STREET 



College Inn 

Freshmen!! 

Tiiis Is the Place for 

GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



Fine Watch Work 



Diamond Setting a Specialty 



//. E. Kapelke 

Watchmaker ana Jeweler 
130 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

Grand Union Tea Co. 

Importers of Fine Teas and 
Coffees 

Phone Main 2678 220 N. Tejon St- 



On hand as usual 
but just a little better 
equipped for serving your 
needs — 



The 

WATERMAN 

PRESS 

PRINTERS and 
BINDERS 



THE TIGER 



15 



Vera Stewart is ill in the infirmarN-. 



■\Iartb.a Phillips' father visited her at 
ih.e college, Monday. 

IMarian Yerkes' table gave a spread 
Thursday evening. 

Miss Ne\'in entertained the first floor 
McGregor girls S.aturday evening. 

THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Eros. 

"The College Favorite ' 

II The Favorite Shopping 
Place for the College 
Woman 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 



106' 2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



• 



Star 
Laundry 



The College Laundry 

The ONLY Laundry which advertises in 
The Tiger. We give 20% discount toyou- 
The best work in the state for as low a 
price as any. 

B. J. DICKSON, Agent Phone Main 342 



W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



119 N. Tejon 



Pbone Main 900 



(T 



SWEATER COATS 

$6, $5, $4, $3 

$2.50 



Young Men's 
Distinctive Styles 



MUFFLERS 

.Ml Kiids 

$5 down to 50c 



==^ 



The special styles we show for young men are created 
particularly for the demands of young me- . We 
don't go in for freakish ideas; young men who come 
here don't want such styles. But we do provide for 
their special requirements in a way that's not common 
and the young men of this city know it. 

Overcoats and Suits $30, $25, $20, $15 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 




E. Pike's Peak 
113 



^= 



\ Correct Dress for Men. ^ 



Marian Hoffman went home to vote 
last Friday, and did not return till this 
week Thursday. 

Katherine Constant entertained at tea 
Sunday afternoon for some of the visit- 



Carrie Davis has heen visiting the 
college this week. 



Mahel Carlson was back at college 
last week to attend the Volunteer con- 
vention and to make her farewell visit 
to her friends in the Springs. 

May Wallace entertained a few friends 
at tea Sunday afternoon in honor of 
Mabel Carlson. 



Helen Williams gave a tea -after the 
game Saturday in honor of Miss Lewes, 
who has been visiting Lucile Wakefield. 

Celebrate, show your spirit, be loyal, 
cheer and sing until your throat is sore then 
go to Noble's, Cor. Bijou and Tejon. 

Marian Emmens was visiting Mamie 
Detmoyer for a few days last week. 

A number of hall girls had a splendid 
time at a party given by Marie Bartlett 
last Saturday night. 



Ida McMorris went to Pueblo to vote. 



Some Mines men were entertained at 
Hemis for dinner Sunday. 

Bertha Price enjoyed a visit from her 
mother, Saturday. 

Anne Baker has moved from Mont- 
gomery to McGregor halL 



Dern's Freshly Roasted Coffee 

will make 10 more cups to the lb. 
than Eastern roasted coffee 



29 S. Tejon Street 



Phone 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 



Office, Rooms 201 -3-4 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence. 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 956 



The College 
Photo Studio 




mil lllwAlib^^ 







Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 

THE 

Gowdy-Simmons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS, ENGRAVERS 

21 N Tejon Street 



^riA L 



(■V>Vv/-u(_^ 



16 



T HE 'J 1 G E J{ 






y 







/ti 



Visit this store this week. Ask to see these Good Winter Suits for men and young men.' 
Smart, snappy styles. Hand tailored for service and appearance. The fit, the service 
and the clothes will please you here, when you buy ind after one or'more seasons of hard 
service at home or abroad. The kind of Good Clothes that stay good at $15^ 20, 25 and up. 



8 N. Tejon Street 



(Pei4ti«4-S6earer G 



28 E. Pike's Peak 




Vorhes Regent Shoes for Men 



are high class shoes at a moderate price, designed and manu- 
^ factured with a view to giving you all the styles, all the fit and 
all the wear you would get in a ^5.00 or $6.00 shoe, not quite so 
light and fine, but they represent the best values in 
America for the money. Thirty|difTerent styles, all leathers 



$3.50 and $4.00 




SHOES THAT SATISFY 



22 S TEJON ST. 



# 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



% 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 



^ 




^yja^^^„.J*c ^. 




.^^ -^^^^^H 




1 


1 


\ 




pi 


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- 


.»«r 


-* 


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Jbai' 















WM. F. SLOCUM, President 

Departments - College of Arts and 
Science, E. S. PARSONS, Dean. 

School of Engineering, F. CAJORI, Dean 
School of Forestry, W. C. STURGIS, Dean 
School of Music, E. D. HALE, Dean 



Manilou Park — Field Laboratory 
of the School of Forestry 



\ 


^ 


Keep in Touch with the Styles. You Can Get Them at 


GEO. J. GA TTERER 


10 Per Cent Discount to Students 


216 North Tejon Street Telephone Main 1247 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



Vol. XIII 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., NOVEMBER 17. 1910 



Number 10 



CONQUESTS 

CONTINUE 



AGGIE-TIGER GAME RESULTS 
IN TIGER VICTORY, 

24 - o. 



Loosely Played Game — Tigers Did 
Not Exert Themselves — Farm- 
ers Take a Brace in Second 
and Third Periods — 
Same Tiger Line- 
Up Used. 



The Tigers kept their record clean 
for victories last Saturday by easily 
defeating the Colorado State Agri- 
cultural college by a score of 24 to 
0. four touchdowns and four goals. 
From all reports of the game the 
Tigers did not play as they are capa- 
ble of doing, did not let themselves 
out, and conservative estimates ,of 
the contest are that the score should 
have been at least 40 to o had the 
Tige's worked harder. The Tigers 
scored 12 points in the first 10 min- 
utes of play and it was 30 minutes 
before they scored again — which 
shows that, with the dash and pep 
which the Tigers are capable of, 
something was not working. The 
Tigers did not play the way they can,' 
but they are little to be blamed. An 
injury on a score would probably 
cause trouble later in the season. 

The Tigers won on their clock- 
work-like, open playing and forward 
passes, although line plunges with 
Reed, Acker and Heald in the carry- 
ing parts, netted good gains at every 
attempt. Sinton, he of the long reach 
and forward pass ability, was a partic- 
ular star of the .game, while Vande- 
moer played, his customary brilliant 
football. Sinton made two of the 
touchdowns on forward passes and 
made many good gains. Bowers was 
another star and, by the way. Bowers 
looks good for an all-state position, 



from the way he has played in the 
1 St three games. 

Schaffer, tackle and captam of the 
Farmers, was the star of their game, 
and played a gritty game against 
great odds. It can be said that Coach 
Cassidy has a better team for the ma 
lerial which he has on hand than was 
expected. 

In the first cpiarter, the Tigers 
scored, when after an end run by 
A'andy and a forward pass to Sinton, 
Bowers blocked a kick of the Farm- 
ers and fell on it behind the goal. 
Hedblom kicked the goal. Heald 
made the next touchdown on straight 
line-bucks and made it in short order. 

Continued on Page 5 



DENVER 



SPECIAL 



EWING CAMPAIGN 

TO START 



CAN COLORADO COLLEGE FIN- 
ISH WHAT IT HAS 
STARTED. 

Support of This Undertaking a Mat- 
ter of College Loyalty — Ewing Do- 
ing Good Work — Large Committee 
To Have Charge of Campaign. 

Monday is the day set for the com- 
mencement of the Ewing fund cam- 
paign. Colorado College will start 
on the campaign for the support of 
the mission she has taken, at chapel 
on next Monday. This will be fol- 
lowed by a three days campaign to 
raise the eight hundred dollars which 
is the amount which the College 
pledged herself to raise each year 
when she sent Mr. Harry Ewing to 
.South America to represent her in the 
field. The progress of the campaign 
will be noted each hour on a large 
dial placed in Palmer Hall. The en- 
tire amount is expected to be raised 

Continued on Page 6 



400 ROOTERS SHOULD ACCOMPANY 
THE TEAM 



Train Leaves Thursday Morning — Re- 
turns at Midnight— Rooters to Attend 
Show at Night 



Only one team now stands between 
the Tigers and the Rocky Mountain 
championship, yet that team will oflfer 
the hardest fight of the season. Al- 
though defeated by Utah last Satur- 
day, if the !\[inisters could beat the 
Tigers they would be placed even 
with C. C. in the race, and would re- 
tain last year's title Their team 
will be in better form than it was at 
Salt Lake for several men who were 
temporarily laid up will be back in 
their places, and each man will fight 
his hardest to redeem last Saturday's 
defeat. 

We feel that the Tigers can win if 
properly supported. D. U. students 
will be m\t in full force to encourage 
tlieir team, and it is only right that 
our men should have the satiie sup- 
port. To * make this possible a 
special train has been chartered for 
the exclusive use of C. C. rooters, and 
the round, trip rate of two dollars has 
been secured. The student may go 
up in the morning on the special and 
return on an\' train that leaves Den- 
ver before midnight. This will give 
opportunity to go in a body to the 
theatre in the evening. 

It is needless to say that the old 
students \\ill take advantage of this 
offer. They all appreciate the im- 
portance of backing their team. 
This plea is only made for the benefit 
of freshmen who may not yet under- 
stand the C. C. spirit that has always 
taken the entire student body to the 
Thanksgiving .game. Even this plea 

Continued on Page 11 



THE TIGER 



CAST OF "THE LITTLE TY- 
COON." 



Junior Production Coming on Nice- 
ly — Big Chorus — Lots of 
Girls — Spirited Music. 



COMING SOME DAY. 2nd Shepherd Lorena Woltzen 

^lan Grace Cunningham 

Hagerman Gym Apparatus On the Young Man Leona Stukey 

Way — Smoker Will Occur Old Man Mamie Detmoyer 

on Its Arrival. Prologue Florence Humphrey 



Violet Knickerbocker (The Little 

Tycoon) Mary Randolph 

Alvin Barry, (Her Lover) 

J. B. Thornell 

Rufiis (Alvin's chum 

Gerald Seldomridge 

Dolly (Violet's chum) 

. Louise Kampf 

General Knic'^erbocker, (^^iolet's 

father) C. S. Campbell 

Miss Hurricane (chaperone) 

Eleanor Thomas 

Lord Dolphin W. W. Johnston 

Teddy (His Valet) ' 

Mary Ann (pledged to Pi Alpha 

Sorority ;. 

The Marchioness ....Frances Fames 
Pickles Marian Yerkes 

The chorus is composed of the rest 
of the junior class. 

The above is the cast for "The 
Little Tycoon," which is to be given 
in Perkins Hall Thursday evening. 
December i, by the junior class. 

"The Little Tycoon" is a very 
pretty and lively comic opera, the 
scene of the first act being on board 
ship returning from Europe, and of 
the second the drawing room in Gen 
Knickerbocker's villa at Newport, 

The plot is light. Violet's father, 
Gen. Knickerbocker, opposes her mar- 
riage to her college lover, Alvin 
Barry, from whose influence he at- 
tempts to remove her by taking her 
for a trip abroad. As they return 
from Europe, Alvin and his chum, 
Rufus, happen to get on the same 
boat, on which is also Lord Dolphin, 
whom General Knickerbocker wishes 
Violet to marry. Many amusing 
situations are the result. 

There are talking parts enough that 
none of the threads of the plot are 
lost, but the play gains its chief at- 
traction from its many gay and 
swinging songs. 

The present junior class is noted 
for Ihe unbounded success which has 
attended all its efforts since it came 
to College, and all the students and 
their friends may look forward to 
this operetta as the feature of Col- 
lege life this year which they cannot 
afford not to attend. 



The apparatus for the Hagerman 
Hall recreation room which was or- 
dered early in October has not yet 
arrived. Lucas offers the explana- 
tion that when the order was sent 
it was thought that all the goods, ex- 
cept the tumbling mat were held in 
stock, and consequently only the or- 
der for the mat was sent to the fac- 
tory. It was found later that sever- 
al articles were out of stock — hence 
the delay. At present the news is 
that all except the horizontal ladder 
have been shipped and may be ex- 
pected any day. 

When the floor has been waxed and 
the complete outfit, consisting of the 
mat, ladder, parallel bars, rowing ma- 
chine, horse, weights, boxing gloves 
and striking bag ha\'e been installed, 
the inhabitants of the hall, will give 
the long delaved smoker. 



NEW ENGLANDERS COMPLETE 
CLUB ORGANIZATION. 



The New England Club, a newly 
formed organization, went on a "hike' 
uo Cutler ATountain on election day. 
A meeting was held there and the 
following officers were elected: 
President, Baker. Beverley, Mass.; 
Vice President, Miss Allbright, Bos- 
ton, Mass.; Secretary-Treasurer, Miss 
Sherman, Norton, Mass.; and Sar- 
geant-at-arms, Sanderson, Greenfield, 
Mass. Among the refreshments 

ser\-ed was real Vermont maple sug- 
ar. The club is planning for many 
good times this winter. 



"EAGER-HEART." 



The University or California is re- 
joicing over the completion of a $20,- 
000 track. 



The Christmas IMiracle play, "Eager- 
Heart," is to be the next production 
of the dramatic club. It is expected 
that this play will be the annual 
Christmas play of the Clnb. The play 
will be presented the evening of the 
ninth of December. The cast has 
been chosen and work has started on 
the parts. 

Eager-Heart Helen Graham 

Eager-Fame Dorothy Frantz 

Fager-Sense Letitia Lamb 

Kins I Dorothy Cook 

King II Marie Bartlett 

King IV Emily Landon 

Tst .Shepherd ...Katheryn Morehous'" 



APOLLO GETTING AGED. 



Club Commemmorates Twentieth An- 
niversary With an Elaborate 
Stag Banquet — Splendid Pro- 
gram of Toasts Given. 



Last Monday night the Apollonian 
Club celebrated the twentieth anni- 
versary of its existence with a stag 
banquet at the Acacia Hotel, which 
was attended by nearly all the active 
members and many alumni. 

The following toasts were re- 
sponded to with ]\Ir, Bryson as toast- 
master: 
Catchin.g Outside of College .... 

Sperry S. Packard, '04 
Hot Air or Gasoline 

Harry W. Coil, 10 

Ladies, the Psychological Moment 

Mr. Bushee 

Work vs. Dramatics 

L. E. Griswold. '10 

Best Operation for Pearsonitis . . . 

Dr. Gillett 

Sermons in Stones Dr. Finlay 

In General Dr. Bayley 

In addition to the regular program, 
i\Ir. Carrington, a member of the 
Club back in the early go's, who was 
called upon to speak, told of the 
struggles which often faced the little 
band in those days when the College 
was not nearly so strong as it is 
now. 

It was November 14, 1890 that sev- 
en men met in the library room of old 
Palmer Hall, now Cutler Hall, and 
organized a club, having for its ob- 
ject, the promotion of debating in 
the College and development along 
literary lines. Throughout the 

Club's existence, this object has ever 
been uppermost, although social af- 
fairs have had their place. 

The .Apollonian Club is the oldest 
society of its kind, not only in Colo- 
rado College, but even in the state- 



GRIFFITH'S SUCCESS STILL IN 
DOUBT. 



Ben Griffith's race for the .Attor- 
ney-Generalship has been so close 
that the result is still in doubt and 
will not be known for several days. 

An officia' count will be necessary 
before any reliable decision can be 



THE U' I G K R 



reached. It appears that whoever 
wins will do so only by a few hun- 
dred votes. There is some talk 
among the Democrats of challenging 
some of the College student votes. 



HELPFUL SERVICES. 

Dr. Bayley Gives Several Splendid 
Addresses. 

The College has been particularly 
fortunate during the present week in 
having Dr. Baylej' of Denver on the 
Campus. Sunday afternoon, he ad- 
dressed a joint meeting of the men 
and women, using as his subject 
"Ptolemaic, or Copernican," and liken- 
ing our own- lives to these two sys- 
tems. At Monday, Tuesday and 
Wednesday chapels, he held the atten- 
tion of his audience with clear ex- 
positions of student problems. Mon- 
day he compared the student's life 
with that of Seigfried and the many 
mysteries that confronted him; Tues- 
day he urged that we be "painters of 
sunsets, not paintefs of barn roofs"; 
and Wednesday he pleaded for the de- 
velopment of the aesthetic nature, 
that we do not become mere special- 
ifts, hut that cur horizon of activities 
be full-orbed. 



EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM OF 
FRANCE. 



Dr. Dupuis, a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Paris and a resident of 
Colorado Springs, gaie an instructive 
talk on the educational system of 
France to the Cercle Francais last 
Thursday evening in Ticknar study. 
Dealing with the subject in a general 
way. Dr. Dupuis described the sys- 
tem of competitive examination in 
vogue in France. As a result of these 
examinations, students pass from one 
grade to another, from the elemen- 
tary schools to the universities. A 
student who shows signs of unusual 
brilliancy in any subject is made the 
object of particular attention on the 
part of his instructors. By means of 
scholarships, awarded either by the 
state or by his town, he is given am- 
ple opportunity to increase his knowl- 
edge of his subject. After leaving 
the university, a student may com- 
pete in examinations which are 
constantly being held for appoint- 
ments in public office^ and in all 
branches of professional and com- 
mercial activities. As a result of this 
system, in almost every city in France 



one may notice many works of art or 
handsome buildings which have been 
given by students who have been ben- 
efitted by municipal scholarships. 

Another phase of the subject pre- 
sented by the speaker was the abso- 
lute uniformity of instruction. In 
the elementary schools, at any certain 
hour, the same subject is being taught 
all over the country. This enables 
the authorities to make a perfect com- 
parison between schools in different 
departments. 

Dr. Dupuis is a physician whose 
reputation has extended outside his 
own country, and his talk, which was 
given in French, was listened to with 
great interest by all present. 

BIG MEETING FOR MEN. 

On next Sunday at four a big mass 
meeting for men wjll be held in Per- 
kins Hall. Dean A. C. Peck will 
address the meeting. His subject 
will be "God's Way." Special music 
will be a feature of the meeting. Mr. 
Moore, C. C. '08, organist at the First 
M. E. church, will give a short re- 
cital immediately before the meeting 
proper begins. The Association quar- 
tet will render several numbers. The 
singing will be led by Mr. l\Tartin, of 
the city Y. M. C. A. 

This meeting is being held by both 
the City and College Associations as 
a joint service for men. It marks 
the close of the week of prayer for 
young men, which has been observed 
by both the Asociations with special 
services. It will also be the last 
men's meeting for the College before 
the holidays. It is expected that the 
chapel will be filled as the speaker is 
one of the best in the state. 

INTr. Peck was formerly Dean of the 
College of .\rts and Sciences at Den- 
ver University and is now pastor of 
an institutional church in Denver. He 
is known as one of the most forceful 
s'^eakers of this state and the men of 
the College and city are fortunate in 
having him here for this meeting. 

The Association quartet is composed 
of Dr. Richards, Mr. Ralph Young, 
Mr. Martin and Mr. Slaughter. 

All men of the College are invited 
to attend this meeting. It begins 
promptly at four o'clock. 



CALENDARS FORTHCOMING. 



Those who remem.ber the handsome 
calendars gotten out by Prof, and 
^.Trs. Smith a year aa'O, will be pleased 
to know that this form of souvenir 
will be issued again this winter. 



Mrs. Bushee and Donald Tucker are 
now at work and expect to have the 
calendar ready by December fifth. 
The cover design has not yet been 
selected, hut the stock will be the 
same as last year's, with however, 
an entirely different set of views. 
The calendars will probably sell for 
sixty cents apiece, and will make 
most acceptable Christmas remem- 
brances. 



NUGGET COHORTS WORKING. 



"Best Book Ever," Say Editor and 
Manager. 



The editor of the Nugget saw the 
Tiger repo;ter approaching with the 
determined look of one in dire straits 
for news. That's the reason that 
the reporter had only to say, "How's 

the ,'' when the editor answered- 

quickly, "It's all right — just fine. I 
am really getting enthusiastic about 
it. You may tell them," here he 
paused meditatively, and then spoke 
slowly as if weighing his words, "'Tell 
them that whenever I approach the 
manager with a new scheme for the 
embellishment of the book in any of 
its departments, he merely says, 'go 
ahead. It's going to be the best 
Nugget ever published.' " 

Several attempts have been made 
to get some idea of the nature of the 
new features, but upon this subject 
all the members of the staff were 
verbally silent, although their looks 
spoke much. The Tiger, in its at- 
tempt to ser\'e the students as a 
newspaper, will make every effort to 
gain the facts relative to the appear- 
ance or contents of the next Nugget 
and will keep its readers informed. 
Watch the Tiger. 



The Agricultural college of North 
Dakota is making strenuous prepara- 
tions for the initiation of their own 
water supply system. One of the 
best and deepest of artesian wells is 
to be sunk and a gasoline engine is 
to furnish the power for its trans- 
mission. 



President Baker of Colorado Uni- 
versity, in a recent address, advanced 
the statement that the college term 
should be shortened to two years, 
He said the American college has be- 
come an anamoly and recommends 
that all university colleges reorganize 
at once. 



THE TIGER' 



ATHLETICS 



THE DOPE COLUMN 



According to the standing in the 
percentage column, the Champion- 
of the Rocky Mountain region is the 
property of Colorado College. Den- 
ver has lost one game and stands 675 
while we have a total of 1000. If D. 
U. should happen to win turkey day, 
and there is always a bare possibility 
of such a thing, the R'linisters and 
the Tiger would be tied for the pen- 
nant. Then we would beat Boulder. 
But, the dope figures out thusly: 
Denver defeated the Aggies 22 to o 
at Denver, and the Tigers won from 
the Aggies at Collinstown by a score 
of 24 to 0. Denver used nothing 
but old time football and the Tigers 
used the new game almost entirely. 
Denver lost to Utah in Salt Lake by 
a score of 20 to o and we defeated 
the Mormans by a score of 21 to 17, 
also in Salt Lake. Denver had sev- 
eral crippled men but made a poor 
showing and advices from Salt Lake 
papers state that the Tigers have but 
little to fear from the Denver univer- 
sity aggregation. 



Denver excursion — $2 — See the 
Tigers romp home with the cham- 
pionship. 



Our "Family of Boys." — The news- 
papers have been making play on the 
fact that a student of the College dis- 
covers the real success of the Tiger 
team this year in that "the team is 
a family of big boys." Some truth 
to that. Never before has there 
been such a feeling of unity, co-op- 
eration and the true Colorado College 
spirit as that which the moleskin war- 
riors of the Black and Gold have been 
showing. No factional trouble, no 
petty jealousies, just good spirit. The 
fellows work hard. Coach Rothgeb 
works hard Cap. A^andemoer, Mana- 
ger Fowler and "Rothy" always worry 
a little how things will "pan out." 
That's why the pennant may be ours. 



The Tigers Are Winners. 

The writer picks the winner of the 
1910 Rocky Mountain Conference 
football championship as the Colo- 
rado College Tigers. Pyke Johnson, 
the Republican's si^orting man, and 
the best in Denver, has changed his 



views regarding the D. U.'s champ 
aspirations since he saw them play 
at Utah. He says Colorado College 
looks the one best bet for the pen- 
nant. He also said so early in the 
season. All the sporting writers in 
the state are being won over by the 
magnificent spirit and work of the 
Tigers. 

The Tigers should win because: 

There is no other team in the con- 
ference that can beat them. 

No other team has beaten them. 

The Tigers defeated the K. Aggies, 
who are considered one of the strong- 
est teams of the Missouri Valley con- 
ference. "We showed them." 

We won from Utah, D. U. lost to 
them by a decisive score 20 to o. 

Coach Rothgeb has clearly showed 
his superiority as a coach of the new 
game. 

The team is always in condition. 

The College is behind the eleven. 



D. U. Loses to Utah. 

Utah turned the tables and won 
from D. U. last Saturday in Salt 
Lake by a clear score of 20 to o. D, 
U. was outplayed from the start, and 
in spite of all that has been said had 
but one man out of the game — Bailey. 
Utah came back strong in all parts of 
the game and won handily. Coach 
Koehler admits that his team was 
outclassed. Crowley was injured, 
but will not be kept out of the Big 
Turkey Day game. Crowley and 
Koonsman are said to be particular 
stars at the D. U. 



Denver excursion — $2 — See the 
Tigers romp home with the cham- 
pionship. 



Basketball Again. 

With football at its heig'ht, and 
excellent chances for baseball and 
track championships next spring, it 
has been asked, "Why not use the 
basketball material which we have and 
annex another championship — making 
four for one year?" 

Without a doubt we have the ma- 
terial for one of the fastest and 
strongest basketball teams in Colo- 
rado. All the players have had ex- 
perience, and there are enough men to 
form two strong teams. But — where 



***************** 


* 






* 


* 


A GOOD DIFFERENCE. 


* 


* 
* 






* 


Comparative Scores. 


* 


* 






* 


* 


Colorado College — 


* 


* 


C. C. 


23 — Wyoming 0. 


* 


* 


c. c. 


21— Utah 17. 


* 


* 


c. c. 


8 — Alines 0. 


* 


* 


c. c. 


IS-— K. Aggies 8. 


* 


* 


c. c. 


24 — Aggies 0. 


* 


* 




— 


* 


* 


Totals 


Q9 — Others 25. 


* 


* 






* 


* 


Denver 


University — 




* 


D. U. 


21 — Wyoming 3. 


* 


* 


D. U. 


0— Utah 20. 


* 


* 


D. U. 


17 — Mines 0. 


* 


* 


D. U. 


— Marquette 0. 


* 


* 


D. U. 


— Nebraska 28. 


* 


* 


D. U. 


22 — Aggies 0. 


* 


* 




— 


* 


* 


Totals 


60 — Others 51. 


* 


* 






* 


* 


It certainly looks good. 


* 


* 






* 


***************** 



is there a place to practice and play 
the games? 

Basketball, reader, is. no game for 
invalids. It is scientific, fast, thrill- 
ing and can be clean or dirty. Colo- 
rado College has material to turn out 
a team and this material should be 
used. Coach Rothgeb is in favor of 
a basketball team; strongly in favor 
of it. The fellows are strong for it 
and the College should be. It keeps 
the men in training from December 
I to March i, when baseball and track 
will start. Boost for basketball and 
arouse the sentiment and maybe, 
somewhere, somehow, some???, we 
can get a hall to practice in. 



BOULDER TANGLE TO BE UN- 
RAVELLED TODAY. 



A conference of representatives of 
Boulder and Colorado College will be 
held today to attempt to arrive at an 
amicable solution of the post-season 
game dispute. It is understood that 
the representatives of the College will 
hold fast for the game being played 
in Denver on December 3 with the 
understanding that next year's game 
shall be played in Boulder. 



THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 



* ♦ 

* HOW THINGS STAND. * 

* * 

* W L Pet. * 

* Colorado College . . 4 o i.ooo * 

* Boulder 3 o 1,000 * 

* Denver 3 i .775 * 

* Alines 2 2 .500 * 

* Utah 2 3 .400 * 

* Wyoming o 5 .000 * 

* * 

* Does not include Kansas * 

* Aggie, Marquette, or Nebraska * 

* games. * 
4. 4* 



COLORADO FOOTBALL SCORES 

Colorado College, 24; Aggies, o. 
Utah, 20; Denver, o. 
Mines, 9; Wyoming, 8. 
High School, 28; Pueblo, 2. 
Longmont, 18; Fort Collins, 6. 
North Denver, 12; East Denver, 6. 
Manual, 35; West Denver, 8. 
Fort Morgan, 14; Greeley, 5. 
Montrose, 0; Grand Junction, o. 



THAT DENVER TRIP. 



Everybody Goes. 

It's the only chance for an excur- 
sion. 

Loosen up, and show your college 
loyalty. 

Fare — Two bones — round trip, $2. 

On the Denver & Rio Grande rail- 
road. 

Leaves here about 8 o'clock. 

Leaves Denver after the show, 
where everybody will want to be. 

Nicey larranged, isn't it? 

Now go! 

Four Hundred should be there, at 
least. 

More About It. 

To help the Tigers to victory and 
to have a good time, the entire col- 
lege should turn out for the Denver 
e-cursion, Turkey Day, November 24 
1910, The train will be especially 
built for Colorado College; the fare 
will be $2, and the train has a sched- 
ule m;.de just for the likes of the stu- 
dents. This is the big game of the 
year — the championship one. The 
team needs your support, everybody's 
support. Denver U. will have out a 
large delegation and we should make 



jood our claims of real college spirit. 
The trip is cheap, dirt cheap, and is 
I chance of a life time. 



TIGERS WHO HAVE MADE C'S. 



Captain Vandemoer, Witherow, 
Black, Hedbloom, Cook, Bowers, Sin- 
ton, Thompson, Reed, Acker and 
Heald. Floyd has made 3-4 of a C. 
This is the sum total. Not more than 
12 men with C's for the season. It 
looks good from several pqints of 
view. The team has not played with 
such good luck as could be supposed. 
It has been the result of training and 
football knowledge. It does look 
good to see the Tiger line-up remain 
the same through a game and the 
other teams, heavier and with more 
experience, filling in places of winded 
men. The training table is a suc- 
cess and should teach the College an 
object lesson in real college spirit. 

Again. Remember the sub, the 
scrub, who does not get a C. We 
will not say he does not earn one for 
he certainly earns his C. by his hard 
and conscientious work. He has the 
real college spirit. Here's to the 
sub, the scrub. Gets no glory but 
earns it 



CONQUESTS CONTINUE 

Continued from Page 1. 

Hedbloom again kicked the goal. 
Score 12 to o. All in the first quarter 
The Tigers fumbled and played a 
loose game, a complete reversal of 
the form shown in the first quarter. 
The Aggies had the ball on their 15- 
yard line in this period. In the third 
quarter, Steuber of the Aggies, 
missed an easy goal, the only chance 
the visitors had to score. In the last 
period Sinton made a couple of bril- 
liant runs on forward passes and 
scored. Hedblom could not miss 
the goal. Score 18 to o. In the last 
cf the last Sinton again made a touch- 
down on brilliant forward pass work 
and the game ended 24 to o. The 
Aggies were never dangerous, and the 
Tigers perhaps played a poorer game 
than if they had had opponents worthy 
of their metal. 

The Line-Up. 

Colorado College. Aggies. 
Thompson 1. e Brill 



Bowers 1. t.... Janes, Epstein 

Hedblom 1. g Blair 

Witherow c Bahmier 

Black r. g. . . . Grant, Mayer 

Cook r. t Schaefi'er 

Sinton r. e Chase 

Heald 1. h Gates 

Acker f. b Cowgill 

Vandemoer r. h...Gooch, Paxton 

Reed q. b Stuver 

Officials — Referee, Stewart; umpire, 
Force; field judge, Hicox; head lines- 
man, Farnsworth. 



A PROTEST 



A few weeks ago we began to hear 
of "the best barbecue ever given" in 
Colorado College. At the same time 
some difficulties arose as a result of 
which the bonfire, the distinctive fea- 
ture of the previous barbecues, had to 
be eliminated. In spite of this the 
sophs announced that their barbecue 
was to be exclusively a College affair, 
and that this exclusiveness made nec- 
essary a charge of seventy-five cents. 
In response to the howl with which 
this information was greeted. Mana- 
ger Lynch came forward with the as- 
surance that the sophs were wholly 
unselfish in the matter and as proof 
of this assertion he promised that as 
soon as the accounts we.e balanced, 
the class would either declare a divi- 
dend or turn the surplus into the 
Athletic Treasury, "if circumstances 
warranted." Evidently circumstan- 
ces do not warrant. When inter- 
\iewed the manager declined the hon- 
or of having the accounts published 
in the Tiger. This need not neces- 
sarily be construed into a manifesta- 
tion of shame for losses involved in 
the enterprise — certain sophs have ad- 
mitted that the class did not lose 
money, and an unofficial statement is 
to the effect that the profits were a 
few cents over one hundred thirty dol- 
lars. The sophs are probably at- 
tempting to tease us by delays; the 
money is undoubtedly forthcoming; 
perhaps Manager Fowler will get it 
in time to help defray some of the 
expenses of the Thanksgiving game. 



Darmouth offers a prize of twenty 
dollars to the member of the graduat- 
ing class who is the best all-around 
athlete. 



THE TIGER 



The Waekly Newspaperof Colorado ColUiie 

A. E BRYSON Editor-ln-Chlef 

S. WILHIE DEAN Business Manager 

Sam J. SheltoN-- Assistant Editor 

Richard L. Hughes Assistant Editor 

Harry Black Assistant Editor 

T. Wynne Ross Atliletic Editor 

Robert m. Copeland Engineering Editor 

FRED S. Baker Forestry Editor 

Helen Canon Alumni Editor 

Mamie C. Detmoyer Exclianse Editor 

Edith I.. Summers Local Editor 

J. A. Root Local Editor 

Ray H. Sayre Assistant Manager 

E. E. Hedblom Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

A. W. Donovan, C.E. Hayward. Bruce Weirick, William 

Lloyd, Joe Sinton, Elsie Greene, Lillian Duer, Grace 

Wilson, Dorothy Cook, Dorothy Sloll 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles inditcmsto TheTiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phones: Editor, Main 1975. Manager, Main 2073 

-j^^^^^^o Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
'-•■SbS'^ Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 



Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



On to Denver! 

This editorial is not for the pur- 
pose of trying to convert any loyal 
Colorado College student to go to 
Denver on November 24, for all such 
are already converted and Thanks- 
giving day will see Colorado College 
assembled in Denver. That day will 
see the culmination of a year of loy- 
alty, spirit, optomistic boosting that 
has not been equalled in Colorado. 
Every student knows what he can do 
to bring the championship pennant to 
Colorado College; every student 
knows what backing means to the 
team. However, just for fear that 
there might be one or more in the 
institution who Inne not yet made 
up their minds that their presence is 
both necessary and desirable in this, 
the biggest game of the year in the 
Rocky Mountain region, it might be 
titling to remar'< that such students 
are going to make a mistake, that 
they are lacking in what is known 
physiologically as "pep," that they 
will have an extremely lonesome day 
in Colorado Springs and that they 
will miss one of the events that will 
be a prominent page in the history of 
Rocky Alountain football. 

In view of circumstances, therefore, 
we do not ask, "Are you going " but 
rather, "Have you ytiur ticket yet?" 



A Co-op. Store. 

The heighth of the football season 
is perhaps an unfavorable time to 
launch a plan that will require as 
much work and thought as the es- 
tablishment of a co-operative book 
store in Colorado College will neces- 
sitate. Yet, believing that there is 
no time like the present for the es- 
tablishment of any plan that will ad- 
vance the welfare and progress of the 
institution, this notice is written. 

There are absolutely no valid argu- 
ments against a Co-op. in Colorado 
College. It has been tried in a ma- 
jority of other colleges and as a con- 
venience and a financial aid to stu- 
dents, its merits have been tried and 
proved. 

Like any other progressive measure, 
it can be instituted here, if there is 
sufficient demand for it and sufficient 
support given to boost it. Necessar- 
ily such a store wo.uld have to have a 
modest start and grow as it became 
more and more useful. 

The plan was tried here at one time 
but owing to unbusinesslike methods, 
it failed. This attempt is not a fair 
criterion as to whether or not a Co- 
op, could be successfully worked in 
the College. Such a store should be 
truly a co-operative store, financed by 
all the students and its profits shared 
by all the students rather than being 
a private enterprise and a means of 
private gain. 

Boost for a Co-op. 

The Nugget. 

The Nugget, like every other stu- 
denn publication, is deserving of stu- 
dent support, not merely in a finan- 
cial way but in a constructive way. 
This publication is one of the great- 
est advertising mediums that the Col- 
lege has, its success in this line de- 
pending largel}' upon its success as a 
reproduction of the life and events of 
the year, the history of which it re- 
cords. 

It is too often the case that the en- 
tire work of this publication is shoul- 
dered onto the board in charge. It 
is proper that they should bear the 
greatest part of the burden, but some 
student support should be given. If 
you are humorously inclined, write a 
few side-splitting episodes of our col- 
lege life; if you are a photographer 
hand o\er your best efforts; if ynu 
are an artist, lend a hand; and if you 
are just an ordinary individual, hav- 
ing no particular genius, do your share 
when the time comes to see that your 



photograph and the photograph of any 
organization of which you are a mem- 
ber is handed in promptly on the 
time set bv the board. 

Once More. 

The fate of the Honor System in 
Colorado College is largely in the 
hands of the junior class. The sen- 
iors have endorsed it, and the under- 
classmen will undoubtedly accept the 
verdict of the uppe;-classmen. Pro- 
longed delay may result in an atti- 
tude of indifference, so it is hoped 
that some definite action may be 
taken before the next Commission 
meeting which occurs next }\Ionday. 



EWING CAMPAIGN 

Continued from Page 1 

by Wednesday evening when the cam- 
jiaign closes. 

It is a matter of College loyalty to 
support this undertaking. We are 
the first college to send a representa- 
tive to the great continent of South 
America, and our position there is a 
strategic one. Ewing is secretary of 
the Y. M. C. A. of the University of 
Buenos Aires. This is the largest 
University of the continent, with an 
enrollment of over 5,000. The stu- 
dents are the leaders of the countries 
of that continent, going out to fill the 
important government posts, the large 
business enterprises and the profes- 
sional places. In no other way could 
the influence of our College be felt so 
strongly as in this touch on the pulse 
of the greatest university on our sis- 
ter continent. 

Ewing is a man well fitted for the 
1 lace. Reports show that he is doing 
splendid work already, having taken 
entire charge of the University Asso- 
ciation since in the early spring, 
shortly after he arrived. He was, 
as most will remember, secretary of 
the College Y. M. C. A. for three 
years, president of the Apollonian 
Club, Inter-society debater, and a pop- 
ular man on the campus. 

Colorado College is doing more 
than any college her size in the coun- 
try in thus undertaking the support 
of a man on the field. The eyes of 
other colleges are upon her in this 
and many are predicting that she will 
fail to carry out what she has planned. 
It is a matter of College loyalty now 
to go ahc.'.d with the work. 

The committee which is to have 
charge < f the campaign this year is 

Continued on Paee S 



THE TIGER 



THE FINEST APPOINTED CAFE IN THE STATE 

THE M. & L CAFE 

College Boys Are Invited To Meet That Man Holt from Harveys 

A Place of Cosy, Semi-private Dining Rooms. Ciiarges Reasonable, Superb Service and Ex- 
cellent Cuisine. College Banquets ,^Receive Our Particular Attention 

H. MASTERSON, General Manager, from Arizona E. R. HOLT, Manager, from Iowa 

OFFICIAL HEADQUARTERS: Ihe White Rats Association, The Chln-Chin Club 



ENGINEERING 



PROF. CAJORI CONTRIBUTES ATRICLE 



Professor Cajori contributed to the 
October number of the American 
ilathematical Monthly, a twenty page 
rticle, entitled, "Attempts made dur- 
ng the eighteenth and nineteenth 
enturies to reform the teaching of 
;eometry." The article traces the 
listory of geometrical teaching in 
^rance, Germany, Italy and England 
luring the last two hundred years, 
t is a part of the report of the Na- 
ional Committee of Fifteen on a 



What's All Right? 

"Extra Clean'' Lignite ! 

Itls-Itls-ItlsAllRight! 

What? 

"Extra Clean" Lignite ! 



rhe Colorado Springs 

[7»iv1 Prv ^*2 Pike's Peak Avenur 

rUcl VO. Two Phones, Main 230 

{ G. SPALDING a BROS. 



rhe Spalding 
Trade-Mark 




s Known Throughout 
the World as a 

iUARANTEE OF 
QUAUTY 



are the Largest Manu- 
facturers in the World of 

OFFICIAL EQUIPMENT 

for All Athletic Sports and 
Pastimes 

1C Vfifi are interested in 
II lUU Athletic Sport you 
should have a copy of the 
Spalding Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyclopedia of 

What's New iu Sport 

and is sent free on request. 



A. G. SPALDiNG & BROS. 

616 Arapahoe Street, Denver, Colorado 



Geometry Syllalnis. The Committee 
has been at work for nearly two years 
under the joint auspices of the Na- 
tional Educational Association and 
the American Federation of Teachers 
of the Mathematical and Natural 
Sciences. The Committee has not 
yet made its report but feels that this 
historical setting prepared by Profes- 
sor Cajori should be in the hands of 
mathematical teachers at once. Eigh- 
teen years ago Professor Cajori was a 
member of the conference of Ten 
which met at Cambridge and prepared 
a report recommending certain 
changes in the teaching of mathe- 
matics in secondary schools. He is 
the only member of the old committee 
who is a member of the present na- 
tional committee. 



ENGINEERS ROUGH IT. 

Last Saturday evening the fresh- 
man engineers under the leadership 
of Professor Albright boarded the 
south-bound car at Murray's and rode 
as far as the canon on their way to 
Cheyenne Mountain. Each man 

carried bedding, some "grub," and a 
canteen. They spent the night in 
camp near the summit of Cheyenne, 
returning the next morning. 

Professor Albright expects to lead 
each of the other engineering classes 
into the hills for an* overnight trip 
in the near future. 



Mr. Thomas spent several days of 
last week in Denver, arranging for 
the inspection trip of the Electrical 
Engineers. The spirit with which he 
was met made his first visit to the 
City of Lights a very successful one. 
Mr. Thomas had the good fortune 
to be ui)on the new Gas and Electric 
building when the great display of 
lights which ornament that building 
flashed into the upturned faces of 
several thousand people. 



A new motor has been placed in 
the electrical laboratory. It is one of 
the induction type; five horsepower, 
twenty-five cycles, made by the Gen- 
eral Electric company. Its squat 
black beauty makes it a welcome ad- 
dition to the power plant. 



SOPHOMORE CIVILS BUSY. 

Have you seen those lanterns glim- 
mering over the weed-covered corner 
at San Rafael and Cascade? Tuesday 
night, and Thursday night you can 
find Mr. Albright peering thoughtfully 
at the sky and wondering whether 



The Shacklef ord-Henley 
Leather Goods Co. 

18 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 
Makers of 

Trunks and Leather Goods 

We Carry the Most Complete Line of 
Traveling Goods, Ladies' Hand Bags, 
Pocket Books and All Sorts of Leather 
Goods in Colorado. 

WE LOAN MONEY 

ON ALL VALUABLES 

Big line of new and unredeemed 
Drawing Instruments .". Diamonds 
Watches and Jewelry ot all descrip- 
tions. Firearms and Fishing Tackle, 
Musical Instruments and hundreds 
of other articles 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 



THE TIGER 




A mid-season selection of Hart Schaffner & Marx good clothes. 
Our buyers, now in the Eastern markets, have sent us a big 
shipment of the very latest winter productions. Suits in the 
newest patterns, hand-tailored to the approved winter styles. 



Priced $20.00 to $35 OO 

'M G2\^D-DCRC^^lSm- 



Colorado Springs, ION. Tejon St. 



Denver, Sixteenth at Stout 



that particular cloud will uncover that 
particular star or not. He is the look- 
out for the class of sur\eyors taking 
Field Astronomy, Civil 2, and if he 
can see the star, seven instruments 
will be set up and pointed at it and 
seven Tien with ice cold fingers will 
each balance an oil dripoing lantern 
in a frantic effort to read the infinites- 
imal graduations on the silver circles. 
La.;t Thursday they were there and 

DEXTER & HUDSON 

EXCHANGE BARBER 
SHOP 

Room 307, Third Floor 
Exchange Bank Building 



The Dentan 

Printing Company 



No. 9 So. Cascade Auenue 

FIRST-CLASS PRINTING 
at REASONABLE RATES 

Telepnone Main No. 602 



as it was beautifully clea", also beau- 
tifully cold, the various members 
nf the class were so swathed in sweat- 
ers and overcoats that they looked 
like barrels set up on two bricks. 

Saturday mornings and in the early 
afternoon before the football games 
the class comes out to work on the 
run. This is as far removed f.-om 
the comfortable normal temperature 
as the night work, but it is possible 
to watch the passerby for amuse- 
ment. The quality and speed of 
the wor'v of these surveyors is ex- 
cellent and improves rapidly under 
Mr. Albright's direction. The accur- 
acy of their work can only be known 
by comparison of independent obser- 
vations by different men and these 
comparisons are very favorable, 



EWING CAMPAIGN 

Continued from Page 6. 

as follows: Mr. A. J. Hesler, chair- 
man and treasurer: Miss Gertrude 
Ashley, chairman for the girls; Mr. 
S. W. Dean, chairman for the men; 
?iliss Persis Kidder and Miss Mamie 
Detmoyer, Mr. A. J. Greeg and Mr. E. 
E. Hedblom, captains; the Misses Ida 
Wolcott, :\lary Walsh, Bertha Price, 
Letitia Lamb, Marian Haines, Char- 
lotte Eversole, Dorothy Cook, Alice 



The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies, Fixtures 

208 N. Tejon Street Phones Main 812, 830 

Lowell-Meservey Hdw. Co. 

Dealers in Paints, Oil, Glass, Every- 
thing in Hardware 



106 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springs 



Telegraphy ! 



Learn Wireless and Railroad 

Shoitage of fully 10,000 Oper- 
ators on account of S-hour law 
and extensive "wireless" development. We operate 
under direct supervision of Telegraph Officials and 
positively place ail students when qualified. V\'rite for 
catalogue. NATIONAL TELEGRAPH INST., CInci nati, 
Philadelphia, Memphis, Davenport, la., Columbia, S. C, 
Portia d. Ore. 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heatirg Co. 



Phone Main 48 



313 N. Tejon St. 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



THE WHITAKER-I^ 



Special To Students 

THE TIGERS are going to win and 
every student should have one of our 
souvenirs showing THE TIGERS IN 
ACTION. We will give one of these 
remarkable Panorams of Washburn 
Field with every pair of shoes bought 
here this month. Come in and see them. 

Men's Shoes $3.50 to $6 the pair. 




Size of Poster 12x38 inches 



THE TIGER 



SQUARE DEAL SHOES 

$3.SO and $4.00 

Shoes that are right in price and up-to-the-minute in style. New Ideas, New Lasts, New 
Patterns. Let us show you some shoes that you will know are good shoes 



FIT FOft ^VERY FOOt ^ 



Popular Prices 
Rule Throughout 



XOEC 



rr PAYS TO |[^ 

107 South Tijow ^tumt 




Luxury In Dress 
Without Luxury Prices 



Deichmann & Douglas 
Floral Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER. Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 
Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 



To College 
Men and Women 
We Are Known as 
"The Satisfactory 
Jeweler". To 
New Ones We 
Soon Will Be. 

Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

' 'Satisfactory Jewelry 

Store" 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Hamilton, Hester Crutcher, Helen 
Graham, Leona Stukey, Dorothy 
Stott, Helen Rand, Etta Moore, Lina 
Merwin, Carrie Burger, Mary Bogue, 
Elizabeth Sutton, Katherine True, 
Katherine Constant, and Messrs. E. 
W. Barnes, H. H. Haight, R. B. Wei- 
rick, Kent Thornell, H. J. Dowling, 

A. Lee Golden, Karle Weller, Harold 
Parkison, D. L. Boyes, F. J. Hill, D. 
H. Buchanan, Ray Sayre, E. S. Strat- 
ton, A. E. Bryson, K. H. Packard, C. 
S. Campbell, E. J. Schneider, and A. 

B. Crowe, committeemen. This en- 
tire committee is asked to meet for a 
moment on Friday at 12:20, in room 
29, Palmer Hall. 



Antlers 

Turkish Baths 

(Opposite Elks Club) 

Open Day and Night 

BATHS OF ALL KINDS. Also Chiro- 
pady and Swedish Massage. Treat- 
ment at Residence by Appointment. 

CARL J. WENBERG, Prop. 

Graduate Swedish Masseur 



Phone Red 33 



14 E. Bijou Street 



FORESTRY 



DR. STURGIS SPEAKS TO FOR- 
ESTERS. 

Tells of Forest Conditions in Ger- 
many. 



Last Thursday, November 10, the 
Foresters' Club held a very interest- 
ing and instructive meeting at which 
Dr. Sturgis, former Dean of the 
School of Forestry, gave a talk on 



For the Denver Game, Get 
Your Pennants, College Ties, 
College Handkerchiefs, Col- 
lege Muffs at 

THE MAY CO. 

23 North Tejon Street 

10% Discount to Students 

Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



I SHOE CO. 



132 North 
Tejon St. 




Material and Experience 

We have picked ELEVEN of our best 
styles to WIN your approval. If any of 
these fail we have a good reliable bunch 
of "SUBS" to fill their places. 

With good MATERIAL and EXPERI- 
ENCE in fitting, you will find perfect 
satisfaction in a pair of our shoes. 

Ladies' Shoes from $3 to $6 the pair. 



10 



THE TIGER 



THHKIUB 

Young Men's Suits and Overcoats at 
$20.00 and $25.00 

Represent more value than you think possible; when 
you see them you'll think they're more; $20.00 and 
$25.00. The Hub special hand-tailored suits made 
for us by Alfred Benjamin & Co., and Society Brand, 
who know how. We'll be glad to show you the 
finer ones up to $60.00, the best made clothes. 



FOWNS GLOVES 



MANHATTAN SHIRTS 



Milk 

Cream 
. Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton-Rustic Home 

T\ ' o No. 419 South El Paso St. 

Uairy S) Phone Main 442 

Photography 

In All Its Branches 



Clark 



112 South Tejon St. 
Special Discount to ^11 Students 

Shoe Repairing. Clotlies'Cleaned and Pressed. 
Second-Hand Shoes and Clothing 

J. H. PERKINS 



TyiS. Cascade 



Colorado Springs 



PRATT, The Barber 

Is At the Alta Vista Hotel 

Me Solicits the Patronage of the 
College Boys 



"The Forests and Forestry of Ger- 
many." Dr. Sturgis has been in 
Europe the last year and all his infor- 
mation on the subject was strictly 
first hand. He said in part: 

"While I was in Germany I spent 
several weeks in Fryeburg in the 
midst of the Black i<"orest and saw- 
much of that wonderful forest while 
taking drives over the macadam 
roads through the forest everywhere. 
This forest in the neighborhood of 
Fryeburg has been cultivated for the 
last 500 years though nobody would 
ever think so to see it. It looks 
like a virgin' forest, but as you travel 
through there are other conditions 
to be seen also. Possibly you may 
drive a mile or so through land with 
simply stumps and tiny s'eedlings, 
then perhaps saplings and so on. In 
ten miles you often see every stage 
from seedlings to timber being felled. 
The felling goes on with excessive 
ca.'e not to disturb or injure young 
growth, and all fire danger is ob- 
viated since the peasants gather the 
brush and chips and carry them off 
for fagots a few days after the trees 
are felled. The forests belonging to 
the State of Prussia supply the bulk 
of the State's income. 

"Among the towns and cities buried 
in this forest is the celebrated water- 
ing-place, Baden-Baden. Here I 
had the good fortune to meet Dr. 
Slocum and his wife. It is a very 
beautiful city with winding streets, 
fine buildings and large forest-like 
parks, The outskirts of the city 
merge into the forest, in which arc 
many finely kept roads and trails, 



WINDOW SLEEPING TENTS 



THE.OUT 


WEST 


TENT AND AWNING CO. 


1 13'2 NORTH TEJON STREET 





Phone 917 



GEO. R. BERGEN, 0. D. 

IVIANF'G OPTICIAN 
Eyes Tested 611-12 Exch. Nat. Bank BIdg. 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented 
and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing a Typewriter. The 
New No. 10 Model Has All Latest 
Improvements 

Zimmerman Supply 

Company 



22 E. Kiowa St. 
Phone Main 374 



Established 1890 



WILI/IAMvOS 

Ill 





P:E>TWI>R. COIyQ 



The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 



THE TIGER 



11 



We have now a complete line of the famous FLOR DE CUBA 
Havana Cigars, The finest cigar that can he made 



HUGHES 

North 1*J Tejon 



Get Your Picnic Supplies 

— AT ^=: 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER, Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Notary Public 

A. J. LAWTON 

Real Estate, Loans and Insurance 
10>^ E. Pike's Peak Ave. , Colorado Springs 

We Are Ashamed 

to mention the price we 
are making on those nifty 

FOOTBALL MUFi^S 

to clean them up by Thanks- 
giving. The ribbons alone 
are worth the money. See 
them at 



MURRAY'S 



(Opposite Campus) 



and scattered all through are the most 
charming little lakes filled with fish 
and swans and other water fowl. It 
is one of the beauty spots of the 
world." 

He then told a number of interest- 
ing experiences he had gone through 
in Germany. After this interesting 
talk, a general social time was in- 
dulged in. 



FORESTERS LEAVE ON TRIP. 

The senior foresters left last 
Thursday on the annual lumbering 
trip to inspect and study some large 
logging and lumbering operations. 
They are going to be in the neigh- 
borhood of Pagosa Springs, Colo., 
and will not return for a couple of 
weeks or so. 



THE COLLEGE FORESTRY 
SCHOOL. 

(Fri.m the Colo. Springs Gazette.) 
The increasing interest taken 
throughout tlie Rocky Mountain re- 
gion in the matter of forestry has 
been of great importance to the whole 
country. Whatever the controversies 
which exist between the central and 
state governments or whatever the 
c. inclusions in regard to conservation, 
everyone agrees that the preservation 
and development of the forests of the 
mountain slopes is of the most far- 
reaching importance in every interest 
that afifects the future of this section 
of the country. 

Colorado College in its establish- 
ment of a Department of Forestry has 
laid hold on one of the most practical 
matters ever called to the attention 
of the people of Colorado. The 
school is another illustration of the 
far-sightedness of General Palmei, 
who had so profoundly at heart the 
development of this new great West. 
The gift of the forests at Manitou 
Park has created for the school the 



largest practical laboratory of any 
such institution in the country. What 
the school now needs for its further 
development and progress is an en- 
dowment commensurate with that of 
the School of Forestry at Yale. The 
entering class is approximately as 
large as the one at the older institu- 
tion, and the importance of the work 
resting on the Colorado School is 
of even greater significance, and 
even more worthy of support thai, 
that of the one in the East. 



DENVER SPECIAL 



Continued from Page 1. 

is almost unnecessary. The fresh- 
men this year have showed as fine a 
spirit as the most ardent enthusiast 
could desire. All that is needed is 
the announcement that the College, is 
going to Denver a week from today 
to help the Tigers win the pennant. 
and the College, freshmen, faculty anc 
all, will be there. 



Inter-collegiate contests for girls 
have been abolished at Washburn 
this winter. 



BOOKS 

Stattonery, Pictures and 

Novelties at 

The Pike's Peak Book & Stationery Co 



27-27i-i South Tejon Street 



Peone Black 354 



Watch theCapsYouMeet 

You won't need an intro- 
duction to the HEIDCAP. 
It is not a mere head cover- 
ing. It has character. It 
gives character to the wear- 
er. It is made of exclusive 
English cap cloths. It' is a 
thoroughbred. Try on a 
HEIDCAP. 



12 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co. 
Groceries and 



Meats 



if 




115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



MUETH'S 

The Place Where the Stand- 
ard Is Never Lowered. High 
Class Goods at Reasonable 
Prices. Ice Cream, Hot 
and Cold Drinks. 
Lunches and Afternoon Teas 
Ask Any Old Student 



CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 



5 Pike's Peak Ave. 




THE TIGER 

COMMISSION MEETING. 



A meeting of the student commis- 
sion was held Wednesday of last week. 
Only a few matters of discussion were 
brought up. It was decided to run a 
special train to Denver on Thanks- 
giving day over the D. & R. G., a fare 
of two dollars having been secured. 

The first Pan-Pan of the year and 
the only one to be held this semester 
will occur on Thursday night, De- 
cember 15. This is immediately be- 
fore the holidays and it is the pur- 
pose of the committee in charge to so 
fill up the students with Colorado 
College enthusiasm that they will do 
nothing but boost for the College-by- 
the-Peak during their vacation days. 

The matter of the establishment of 
a Co-op- book store came up for its 
first discussion. The Commission 
was heartily in favor of the plan and, 
a committee was appointed to look 
into the best means of making the plan 
a reality. 



Colorado Springs 

Cox Sons & Vining 

262Fou'th Ave., New York 

Gowns and Caps 

silk Faculty Gowns and 
Hoods. Lowest Prices 
Best Workmanship. 



The D. Y. Butcher Drug Co. 

DRUGS, KODAKS, SUPPLIES 

Free and Prompt Delivery 
Cor. Opposite P. 0. Phones 90 and 750 



ALUMNI NOTES. 



W. G. Harmon '10 is not attending 
the Agricultural College as was an- 
nounced in a former issue, but is 
spending the winter in Arizona. 

Miriam Carpenter '05 is secretary to 
the president of Rockford College at 
Rockford, Illinois. 

Nelle Scott '03 is planning to visit 
around College Thanksgiving week. 



Mrs. Sperry Packard '02 passed 
through the city last week. 



EXCHANGES. 



Baseball players at Minnesota and 
Dakota colleges are allowed to play 
professional ball during the summer 
without losing their athletic stand- 
ing. 



Lallie Surveying Instrument and 
Supply Company 

C. L. Berger & Sons, Buff & Buff, W. & 
L. E.'Gurley Instruments 

Field and Office Supplies 

1622 Arapahoe St. Denver, Colorado 

No More Wrinkles 

I have a remedy that will speedily eradicate 
any case of wrinkles — no matter how bad or 
what the cause. It makes old faces look 
young, removes ail lines and wrinkles, 
corrects flabby or withered skin, makes thin 
faces plump, fills out hollow cheeks, will 
develop any part of the body round and full 
without any massaging. Call at my parlors 
and I will explain fully and convince you. 

Miss N. E. Jolinson 



The engineering students of the 
University of Minnesota are con- 
st 'ucting an elevated railroad three 
miles long, to be used for experi- 
mental purposes. 



Women will hereafter be admitted 
lo ihe Sigma Xi, the honorary scien- 
tific fraternity at the University of 
Pennsylvania. This is the first ad- 
mission of women to any of the hon- 
orary societies in the university. 



Phone 687 



324 N. Tejon Street 



JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

I Do the Work of the Colleg* Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tej»n Stree 

The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Gives 
Special Attention to Accounts of Students 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, President Ira Hat F-President 

M. C. Gile Wm. F. Richards 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M. 



Hunt Up 



Bisseirs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 



Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 



Colorado College Students 

Remember We Do Framing as It Ought 
To Be Done and at Right Prices 

Whitney & Grimwood 

20 North Tejon St eet 
Opera House Block 



THE TIGER 



13 



Looseleaf Students' 
Note Books are the best 
note books for the 
College Students. 
Made in cloth and leather 
covers at prices as low 
as 30 cents. 

OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



12 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springs 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St, 



Phone Main 536 



Phone Main 2055 



Art Needle Work 



THE HUNT & VAN NICE 
Art Specialty Store 

Stamping, Designing, Perforating, Linens, 

Lawns, Best Hand-Painted China 
8 Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Relail Dealers in 

Flour, Fepd, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co. 



nmm 



Xyioli/lS , The \A/'orld's Standard. Tone 
\^^)iif/y-rjrfnii-ri Q clear, mellow and very pow- 
\^/J <jU.I LU.UCU lO erful. Absolutely perfect in 
CjUZTOLfZi* scale. Finest workmanship. 

^/JTjfna^^^^^ Prices from $15 upward. 
"1^^^^^ Send for illustrated Cata- 
log to the makers. 

For sale by all leading music dealers. 



(95) 



Desk D802 

LYON&HEALY^ 

CHICAGO 



% 



II Local Department || 



Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Out West Building 



Departure — Airs. H. F. Smith left 
last Monday to join her husband 
who has charge of a CongregationaJ 
church in Beverley, Mass. For sev- 
eral years, Mr. Smith was an instruc- 
tor in Bible in the College. Mrs. 
Smith, at one time, held a position 
in the Fnglish department. During 
the past two years, Mrs. Smith has 
acted as house mistress of Montgom- 
ery Hall. Both :Mr. and Mrs. Smith 
will be missed by many. 

Reform — The sophomore girls 
showed many freshmen the error of 
their ways last Friday evening in 
Montgomery Hall. Although the 
occasion v^'as very enjoj'able, yet it 
is hoped the idea of the affair will 
not be fnrgotten and that a speedy 
reform will take I'lace. 

Fan-Hellenic Meeting — A meeting 
of the Pan-Hellenic Council was held 
last Monday afternoon at 5 o'clock 
in the faculty room of Palmer Hall. 
There was a small attendance and 
only routine business was transacted. 

Friday Tiger — The Tiger next week 
will ap;:ear on Friday so as to include 
; nd account of the D. U. -Tiger game. 



A Box of 

BURGESS CANDY 

Is a Bundle 
of PURE JOY 

"You'll Like the Burgess Store" 



112-114 North Tejon St. 



FREE 

Shoe Repairing Absoiutely Free 
of Cliarge for Entire Term of 
1910-1911 to the Coiiege Stu- 
dent Submitting the Best Ad for 

PETE'S 

Shoe Shop 

230 East Daie Street 

Men's S&wed Soles 75c; Ladies, 65c 
Rubber Heels, 35c 



14 



THE TIGEK 



$1.00 



$1.00 



Young Men 

For $1.00 per month, we sponge, press and do minor repairing on one 
suit, or one overcoat, or two pairs of trousers, each week; calling for 
and deliverieg same in our wardrobe, dustproof wagons. We claim 
to do the best work in the city. A trial from you will allow us to 
prove our claim. 

Special Prices Given to the Young Women of 
the College. Get Our Price List. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



Agents: Bert Siddons 
Glenn Bowers 




and Cleaners, 



For Best and Quick Delivery 

SEE 

The Monument Coal Co. 

28 East Kiowa Street 

William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 
( 24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C 



■ THE 

Crissey 6i Fowler 
Lumber Co. 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 

Chafjn-g Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 
A. S. BLAKE 

Is the Man to See 

107 North Tejon Phone 465 

Nickle Ware Cutlery 

Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

Remember We Handle Nothing but the 
BEST GRADES OF FUEL 

"EVERY LUMP A LUMP OF HEAT" 

The Central Fuel Co 

1 28 N. Tejon Street Phone 1101 



Contemp. rary Initiation — Contem- 
porary licld their annual initiation, 
Saturday, November i2, in the Ckib 
House. Afterwards they adjourned 
to Ticknor for their banquet. 



Soph Hats — Tile sophomore hats 
have made their appearance on the 
Campus. They a e of soft white 
felt and \m\\c a narrow purple band. 

Pay that little "bet" you lost by going 
to Noble's, Cor. Bijou and Tejon. 



Prof. Brehaut has been made an 
honorary member of the Apollonian 
Club. 



Pearsons will give a ladies night to- 
morrow evening at the club house. 



Carl Blackmail and Tim Lynch 
gave an auto party hist Saturday even- 
ing to the Misses Wilson, Watson, 
Stark, Bogue, Bess Knight and Au- 
ghenbaugh. Miss Bess Johnson 
chaperoned the party. , They took 
supper at Bruin Inn. 



Harry Howes '14 has been com- 
pelled to leave school for this semes- 
ter and has left for his home in To- 
p.= ka, Kansas. 



A number of foresters were the re- 
cipients of a tidy little sum last Mon- 
day for fi.ghting the fire in the inter- 
ests of Uncle Sam. 



Eleanor Thomas gave a delightful 
supper ['arty for Plypatia Thursday 
evening. 

The so;dioinorcs of Montgomery 



Broken Lenses 
Duplicated • 



Phone Black 233 
Colorado Souvenirs 



C. B. LAUTERMAN 

Jeweler and Manufac- 
turing Optician 



121 N. TEJON STREET Colorado Spri 



prings 



10c STORE AND MORE! 

THE ElVIPORIUIVI 

1 10 S. TEJON STREET 



College Inn 

Freshmen ! ! 

This Is the Place for 

GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



Fine Watch Work 



Diamond Setting a Specialty 



H. E. Kapelke 

Watchmaker ana Jeweler 



130 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 



Grand Union Tea Co. 

Importers of Fine Teas and 
Coffees 

Phone Main 2678 220 N. Tejon St. 



On hand as usual 
but just a little better 
equipped for serving your 
needs — 



The 

WATERMAN 

PRESS 

PRINTERS and 
BINDERS 



THE TIGER 



15 



Hall extend a vote of thanks to the 
sophomores of Hagerman Hall for the 
delicious confections which were duly 
received and highly appreciated. 



Letitia Lamb spent the week end in 
Denver. 



A few of the young women of the 
senior class are going to attend The 

THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

"The College Favorite ' 



The Favorite Shopping 

Place for the College 

Woman 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

I* the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 



lOeH E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



* 



Star 
Laundry 



The College Laundry 

The ONLY Laundry which advertises in 
The Tiger. We give 20% discount to you. 
The best work in the state for as low a 
price as any. 

B. J. DICKSON, Agent Phone Main 342 



W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



119 N. Tejon 



Pbone Main 900 



e 



Mufflers 

Sweater Coats 

House Coats and 

Robes 

Fur Gloves 



GORTON'S 
Good Clothes 



Tie Rings 

Collar Boxes 

Military Brushes 

Handkerchief Sets 

Coat Chains 



=^ 



are necessary for the up-to-date college fellow. Price for 
price with other clothes, this percentage endures through- 
out the entire Gorton's special Adler-Rochester line of 
overcoats and suits. Priced $30, $25, $20. When you 
think clothes, think Gorton's. 

Specialists in Good Clothes; and Nothing Else 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 



^: 




E. Pike's Peak 
113 



CorrectDress for Men. \ 



:=^ 



Te: chers' Association in Denver dur- 
ing Thanksgiving week. 



Dr. Bayley spoke to the young 
women on Monday evening in Bemis 

Hall. 

Ed Jacobs is in Glockner Sanitar- 
ium suffering from typhoid fever. 



The Apollonian Club held its ini- 
tiation last Friday evening. 

Dr. Hasting is giving lectures on 
philosophy during the absence of Pres- 
ident Slocum. 



Carrie Burger, Ruth Wallace, Ruth 
Cunningham, Leona Stukey and Ellen 
Galpin entertained at a delightful sup- 
per party last Saturday evening. 



Lillian Catran enjoyed a visit from 
z-v cousin Saturday and Sunday. 



Katherine True's mother visited at 
the College during the week end. 



Bertha Price spent the week end at 
her home in Cripple Creek. 



Celebrate, show your spirit, be loyal, 
cheer and sing until your throat is sore then 
go to Noble's, Cor. Bijou and Tejon. 



I^illian and Lorraine Williams en- 
tertained their brother and sister from 
Pueblo. 



Vandemoer's father was in the 
Springs Friday. 



Mrs. Rothgeb and Mr. and Mrs. 
Patterson went to Fort Collins with 
the team. 



Dern's Freshly Roasted Coffee 

will make 10 more cups to the Ib.^ 
than Eastern roasted coffee 



29 S. Tejon Street 



Phone 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 



Registered Medical Practitioneers 



Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence. 1211 N. Weber Street. Phsne Main 956 



The College 
Photo Studio 




22222^ 




Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 

THE 

Gowdy-Simmons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS, ENGRAVERS 

21 N Tejon Street 



t 






"Z- ^^ 'i l l " <in ^ 



16 



THE T 1 a E R 




For Fraternity, for dance, for Perkins-Shearer Evening Clothes and see how 

,, T7 1. D .• Ml J 1 beautitully they are matle and j&nished and 

the Faculty Reception, you 11 need to have a ^ow really good they are, you'll not hesitate 

rull Dress Suit or a Tuxedo. long. 

They sound like luxuries, but when you Then too, the pricing is so reasonable, 

examine, with a shrewd eye for values, these that it's interesting. 



8 N. Tejon Street 



(Pei«ltimS6ecii«er (s 



28 E. Pike's Peak 




Vorhes Regent Shoes for Men 



are high class shoes at a moderate price, designed and manu- 
factured with a view to giving you all the styles, all the fit and 
all the wear you would get in a S5.00 or $6.00 shoe, not quite so 

light and fine, but they represent the best values in 

America for the money. Thirtyjdifferent styles, all leathers 

$3.50 and $4.00 



SHOES THAT SATISFY 



22 S. TEJON ST. 




< 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



^ 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 



WM. F. SLOCUM, President 

Departments —College of Arts and 
Science, E. S. PARSONS, Dean. 

School of Engineering, F. CAJORI, Dean 
School of Forestry, W. C. STURGIS, Dean 
School of Music, E. D. HALE, Dean 





THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



Vol. XIII 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., NOVEMBER 24, 1910 



Number 11 



TIGERS CONF ERENC E CHAMPIONS 

Enormous Crowd Sees Black and Gold Triumph Over D. U. 

Score 6-5 



Rocky Mountain champions and the 
only undefeated team of eleven play- 
ers in the West!!! This is the record 
which the Tigers climaxed yesterday 
afternoon on Broadway field by de- 
feating Denver university, holder of 
that title for two years, by a score of 
6 to 5. We barely won from Denver 
but we defeated them in a telling 
manner, the playing of the two teams 
probably meriting a score of about 
18 to 6. Horseshoes, and the element 
of luck was the most important fac- 
tor as f?.r as the actual figures are 
concerned. Hammil missed his goal, 
Hedblom missed his goal but D. U. 
was off side and he had another 
chance which he made good use of. 
Hammil was 20 yards from the goal 
and was in good form for a drop 
kick and three points but the ball 
was poorly passed and we got through 
the line and blocked it. We lost a 
touchdown on a stolen forward pass 
on the five yard line. They dropped 
several punts which gave us a chance 
to get the ball close to the posts. Al- 
though some of this was poor foot- 
ball, it did not happen every time. 
..The game was tense with excite- 
ment, the players claiming that they 
never played a harder football game 
and the rooters proving that they had 
never attended a more exciting one. 
With so much at stake, everybody 
was keyed to the highest pitch and 
the rapid change from defeat to vic- 
tory within eight minutes was "some- 
thin" awful. 

The Tigers clearly outplayed D. U. 
except in end runs, where Crowley, 
the star, excels. Without Crowley, 



D. U. would have been in a bad way. 
The new game, fast and bewildering, 
was too much for D. U. which had 
apparently been taught little of it by 
John P. Koehler. Vandemoer was in 
his old classy form but D. U. had ap- 
parently been ordered to box him in 
and he was not able to get away for 
any of his spectacular long runs. But 
Vandy booted the leather and showed 
the generalship of the great football 
artist he is. . . The Tigers were not 
quite up to form on forward passes, 
in fact they were not playing up to 
form in any branch, but they played 
football that defeated D. U., and that 
has to be pretty good football at that. 
Denver U. has a strong offensive 
team, but poorly trained in the new 
game... They outweighed the Tigers 
at least eight pounds, and are fast. 
A team of starry individuals cannot 
accomplish what a team of trained- 
to-the-minute players can. A marked 
feature of the game was the fact that 
not ?. man was substituted. 

After a few attempts at line plunges 
both teams saw that, using the slang 
phrase, "There was nothing doing 
there." This forced D. U. to use 
Crowley around the ends, punt or for- 
ward pass, and they did all three, 
being more successful in the first than 
in the others. The first Tiger forward 
pass was intercepted by Hammil, who 
took it out of Sinton's hands. 

It took a little time for the Tigers 
to find themselves. The first quarter 
which ended o to o was not especially 
exciting until the Tiger goal was ap- 
proached to within striking distance, 
at the time of the long end run of 



Crowley, who was caught by Reed. 
Few realized that in this place Reed 
was the only man between the fleet 
Minister and the goal, and that in ad- 
dition to getting the man with the 
ball, he smashed the interference in 
good shape. . . A penalty put the ball 
on our five yard line and Vandy 
punted out of danger and Bowers 
fell on the ball. . . In the second per- 
iod, D. U. was held for downs three 
times, while the Tigers played bril- 
liant football. Again, the ball was 
on the 8 yard line, but in our possees- 
sion hut some "ball-up" in something 
caused us to lose the ball on downs 
when there was a good charice to 
score... Here is one place where the 
Tigers have not been strong this year. 
At least half a dozen touchdowms 
have been lost in some unaccountable 
manner. Of course the opponents 
take a brace at this period but a small 
distance has many times won and lost. 
With the score in the second half o to 
o, the majority of the spectators ex- 
pected a no score game. Not so the 
contingent of Tiger rooters. We 
knew how strong the bunch came 
back in the Kansas game. 

The third quarter where all the 
scoring was done was probably the 
most exciting in the history of foot- 
ball in Colorado. To win, to lose 
again, then to win, everything un- 
settled. After an exchange of punts 
and a long run by Vandy, a forward 
pass to Sinton was pulled down by 
Koonsman who made the first touch- 
down before the team had really got 
awake. Vandy was but a short dis- 

nucd on Page 5 



THE TIGER 



OPERETTA NEXT 

BIG EVENT 



JUNIORS PROMISE A NOTABLE 

OCCASION ON NIGHT 

OF DECEMBER i. 



Admissions, Two for One Dollar — 

Local Color to Have Its Place. 

Big Crowd Expected. 

Perkins, the Hall of Fine Arts, has 
been studiously avoided of late by all 
except the members of the junior 
class, but it is safe to predict that on 
the evening of December i, the sensi- 
tive ones will right about face and 
eagerly seek admission at the price 
of one dollar a couple, until there 
will be confined within the walls of 
the chapel all the inhabitants of the 
campus and many more. 

"The Little Tycoon" undoubtedly 
will be a success. Rehearsals have 
been going on regularly for the last 
two or three weeks. That is what 
you hear every afternoon and night 
when you approach Perkins. But 
don't let that dis-courage you. An 
operetta in the making may not be 
altogether an agreeable thing, but 
every assurance is given that the fin- 
ished product to be exhibited next 
Thursday night will be all that the 
most fastidious can demand. Profes- 
sor Richards, who is training the cast, 
will see to it that the last statement 
is justified. He is working very hard 
and putting into the various parts the 
most exact interpretations. He over- 
looks nothing and pays special atten- 
tion to the effect of details. Profes- 
sor Richards is a new man in the mu- 
sical and dramatic circles of Colorado 
Springs, and it looks as if he were 
going to make good. 

In last week's issue of The Tiger 
appeared the cast of characters and a 
brief synopsis of the operetta. Given 
a play with a typical college back- 
ground, such as this one, and plenty 
of opportunity for local allusions, and 
what may not be expected? It was 
officially decreed some time ago that 
"hits" would not be allowed, but on 
the other hand there are frequent ru- 
mors that local color will not be so 
entirely lacking as to make the play 
dull. 

Coming as it does immediately after 
Thanksgiving, the operetta affords the 
men of the college a splendid oppor- 
tunity to break "training" imposed up- 
on them by the football season. AH 



Fall they have gone to the games INSIGNIA DAY PREPARATIONS. 

alone, and the players have been de- 

nied the society of the fair sex almost On December 7 Caps and Gowns 
entirely, but for this event there will First Appear — Juniors Planning 

be absolutely no limitations placed up- Stunt — Senior- Junior Party 

on "fussing." in Evening. 



ARE YOU AN ELECTION 
CROOK? 



Democrats Claim that College Voters 
Were Not All Eligible. 

According to newspaper reports, the 
Democratic State Committee working 
in the interests of one Mr. Barrett, 
Ben Griflith's opponent for the attor- 
ney generalship of Colorado, is con- . 
sidering somewhat seriously challeng- 
ing some of the votes cast by the Col- 
lege students. Appearances make it 
evident that this same Mr. Barrett is 
likely to need all the spare votes that 
he can muster together, hence this 
wild dream of the Democrats. 

As a matter of fact, instead of the 
500 votes which some have asserted 
were cast by the students, less than 
half this number were cast. A large 
numbei- were prohibited from register- 
ing by the election laws and all those 
who did vote had to convince the reg- 
istration board of their eligibility. 

The Democrats will gain nothing 
but experience by their proposed 
move. 



FRATERNITIES FAVOR HONOR 
SYSTEM. 



Practically all the fraternities of th.e 
College have discussed the Honor Sys- 
tem among themselves and at votes 
taken at the regular meetings last 
Monday night placed themselves on 
record as favoring its adoption. 

The attitude of the junior class ap- 
pears to be one of some indifiference, 
and at a recent meeting a small ma- 
jority favored the plan. 

It is recommended that the Student 
Government consider the relative mer- 
its and demerits of the system and 
place themselves on record for or 
against it. 

It is probable that a Constitution 
governing the system in Colorado Col- 
lege will be drawn up and submitted 
to the vote of the Associated Stu- 
dents as an amendment to the Con- 
stitution of that body. 



Insignia Day this year will be Wed- 
nesday December 7. Then the seniors 
don for the first time the cap and gown, 
that distinctive mark of scholarship by 
which they are to dignify each Friday's 
chapel service for the rest of the year. 

The juniors are already making elab- 
orate prepartaions for a cere'mony on 
that day which will do full honor to 
their worthy superiors. An invitation 
has been received from the seniors and 
accepted by the juniors for a reception 
to be giyen at Bemis Hall on the even- 
ing of Insignia day. 



COLLEGE PEOPLE HEAR 
KOCIAN. 



Musical Club Offers Splendid Num- 
bers — Two More Treats in Store 
for Music Lovers. 

The first number of the Colorado 
Springs Musical Club artists' course 
was a concert given by Kocian, the 
celebrated Bohemian violinist, at the 
opera house last Friday night. Many 
faculty members and students of the 
college attended this concert, which 
they say was very enjoyable. 

The Musical Club this year is bring- 
ing some of the most noted artists of 
the world to Colorado Springs. The 
two remaining numbers of the course 
are concerts to be given, one by Mme. 
Gerville Reache and Emilio de Go- 
gorza, and the other by Josef Hoff- 
man. 



Apollonian Indies' night conies on 
December 2. 



CONFERENCES ON STUDY 

IN COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 

With a view to doing away as far 
as possible with the conflict that ex- 
ists between courses of study in the 
high schools and colleges and univer- 
sities in this state, representatives of 
these institutions will hold a confer- 
ence Friday and Saturday of this 
week at the State University at Boul- 
der. A feature of the conference will 
be the submitting by general and spe- 
cial committees of reports embodying 
recommendations as to changes in col- 
lege entrance examinations, training 
of high school teachers, courses of 
study and co-operation between high 
schools and the institutions of higher 
learning. 



THE TIGER 



PROF. STEINER TALKS 
ON IMMIGRATION PROBLEMS 

Grinnell Professor Gives Interesting 
Address. 



Professor Steiner, of Grinnell College, 
delivered a highly interesting address to 
the students last Friday morning, in 
chapel. He spoke of the immense influ- 
ence America is having upon many coun- 
tries of the old world today. Telling of 
his own experience when in Austria 
studying immigration, he cited the 
case of the old Jew who kept the crock- 
cry store in a squalid, dirty little town 
of the t\pe comn'ion in that part of the 
world tcxlay. Levi kept the same store 
that his father and grandfather had kept 
before him. Moses, his son, who was 
of a less religious but more practical 
turn of mind wished to sell modern 
ware, and brought on a quarrel with his 
father. Leaving the country, he came to 
America where he secured a position in 
a New York department store, and 
learned many new ideas. Later on, be- 
coming reconciled with his father, he 
went back to his home town, and taking 
charge of the store, put it on a modern 
basis. The stock of goods was enlarged 
and put in show windows facing the 
street, instead of being left back of the 
living rooms as is common in that coun- 
try. Gas lights were installed, a cement 
sidewalk built — in short. Moses Amer- 
icanski became the only successful mer- 
chant and the most prominent citizen of 
the town. His friends were not slow to 
learn the lesson, and to adopt American 
methods. 

Professor Steiner said that this was 
but one instance out of thousands, but 
that it served to illustrate the manner 
in which those peoples look to America 
for their instruction in modern affairs. 
He concluded with a plea for Americans 
to p-et the snirit of fellowship with the 
immio-ratio'i c1-i=sps to tench them the 
best of our c^^'ili7ation. 



DEAN PECK ADDRESSES MEN. 



Former D. U. Dean Gives Forcible 

Exposition of "God's Way" 

in Our Lives. 



At a joint meetins: of the city and 
college Younsr Men's Christian asso- 
ciations last Sunday afternoon, Dean 
A. C. Peck, of Denver, delivered an 
address on the subiect "Cod's Way." 
Dean Peck emphasized the fact that 
onlv Cod can make the be<:t of us. We 
are never satisfied with ourselves and 
are always reaching higher, but we 



will never attain the highest happi- 
ness and usefulness unless we key our 
lives to the same note with God's. We 
are able to utilize Nature for commer- 
cial power only as we conform to 
God's law, so God's Way is the only 
way by which we may secure perfect 
happiness. 

A special solo was rendered by Mr. 
Ralph Moore. The singing of the 
fair-sized audience was spirited and 
very enjf)3'able. 



CREEL TO TALK SUNDAY. 



Rare Opportunity to Hear Prominent 
Newspaper Man. 



EWING CAMPAIGN. 



Good Sum Raised as a Starter — Over 
Half Remains to Be Sub- 
scribed. 



As a result of a meeting held at 
chapel last Monday morning at which 
Dean Parsons and Prof. Gile made 
strong pleas for the support of such 
an undertaking as the maintenance of 
Harry Ewing as the representative of 
Colorado College in South America, 
about $300 was raised. The total 
amount to be raised is $800 and a large 
committee has been working to secure 
the remaining sum. 

The larger part of the amount 
raised came from the upper classmen 
and an especial appeal is made to th.e 
under classmen to support this under- 
taking which means so much to the 
college. 

The excitement prevailing over our 
game has made it difficult to push 
through the campaign by Wednesday 
night, but in the next few days it is ex- 
pected that the $800 shall have been 
raised. 

A word as to Colorado College and 
her relations to missions. Colorado Col- 
lege has always taken a stand in the 
front rank of colleges when it comes to 
missions. Many of her most prominent 
graduates are on the foreign mission 
field, some of them in most responsible 
positions, all of them doing a great work 
at the front. The college in taking up 
the Ewing enterprise has stepped into 
the front rank of colleges which are en- 
gaged in foreign mission work. Few 
colleges the size of ours are giving so 
much for this work as we. The students 
of the college should feel proud of the 
record made in the past and it sh'^uld 
be a matter of college loyalty to keep up 
the standard set by those whoe have 
been here before us. 



OhicT Wesleyan has received the 
money for the installation of a pipe 
organ in Sanborn Hall. 



All college men should hear George 
Creel on next Sunday afternoon. He is 
a writer well known to most Colorado 
people, and his recent experience with 
the Denver Post has shown what sort of 
man he is. He is a very pleasing speak- 
er as well as versatile writer. This will 
be the last chance to hear him before he 
goes to New York where he will do spe- 
cial work for the American Magazine 
this winter. He will be engaged in the 
same work as Lincoln Steffens, and Col- 
orado College people will watch with in- 
terest for his articles. 

The college men are fortunate in hav- 
ing this opportunity to hear Mr. Creel 
at this time. His address will be a very 
practical one for men and will give the 
speaker a chance to show his view of 
Christianity. Those who have read his 
"Quatrains on Christ" and his "Cruci- 
fixion as Seen by a Roman Soldier" will 
he .glad to hear Creel on a religious sub- 
ject. 

The meeting will start promptly at 5 
o'clock, in Perkins Hall. As this will 
he the last of the fall series of mass 
meetings, it is sincerely hoped that all 
men who are in town will be present. 
Special music will also be provided. 



THANKSGIVING ADDRESS. 

The Thanksgiving address this year 
was delivered in chapel Wednesday 
morning by Rev. F. H. Touret, rector of 
the Grace Episcopal Church of this city, 
and formerly treasurer of the college. 

Although the address was necessarily 
brief, Mr. Touret was able in his short 
allotment of time to say many things of 
a very helpful nature to students at this 
time of year. Men find it too easy to be 
thankful, he said. After one has made 
some great sacrifice still to be able to 
give thanks to God is the real test of the 
spirit. Students, when they think of 
their homes, should offer up a sacrifice 
of thanksgiving. Parents are perhaps 
sacrificing for them : why not sacrifice 
something for the parents? Colorado 
College, too, is something for which 
every one of its students should be 
thankful. Since severing his connection 
with the college. Mr. Touret has been 
able to get a perspective view of it and 
he is more than ever convinced that it is 
the best in the West. He closed the ad- 
dresss by exhorting the students to make 
the sacrifice of denying their curiosity to 
konw the evils of the world. 



THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 



THE DOPE COLUMN 



STANDINGS IF WE WIN OR LOSE. 



HERE'S TO YOU. PYKE. 

Colorado College is strong for Pyke 
Johnson, the able sporting editor of 
the Denver Republican. Johnson has 
always given the Tigers a square deal 
and tells the truth if it hurts, which 
is somewhat different from some other 
Denver papers. The Denver Republi- 
can is the authority on football in 
Colorado this year and we plan to 
stick by Johnson's ruling on the all 
state and all conference teams. All 
we want is a square deal. 



BASEBALL LOOMS UP BIG 
AND JUICY. 

The Tigers have only lost three 
baseball stars from their two-year 
championship team — namely, Siddons, 
catcher, who will manage the team 
next spring; Sherry, shortstop, and 
Wilson, centerfielder. The other mem- 
bers of last year's team, which will 
be led by Van Stone, the premier state 
twirler, are: Sinton, ib; Friend, 2b; 
Bancroft, 3b; Thornell, rf; Moberg, 
If; Dickson, pitcher; Vandemocr, If. 
New men who will undoubtedly make 
good are, Reed, catcher; Lewis, in- 
fielder; Tanner, infielder, and several 
others. 



SINTON DECLARED ELIGIBLE. 

At a meeting of the Rocky Moun- 
tain Conference held in Denver last 
Monday, Herb. Sinton, the Tigers' 
speedy end was declared eligible for 
the intercollegiate contests. 

The protest had its beginning at the 
State School of Mines, who main- 
tained that Sinton's work in the Salt 
Lake Y. M. C. A. made him ineligible. 



CAMPUS BASKETBALL AGAIN 
WITH US SOON. 

The knights of the basket are al- 
ready planning things for a campus 
basket ball league of the college, 
which: would include the fraternities 
and Hagerman hall. Last year the 
fraternity league was a success and a 
number of stars we.'e discovered in 
the games. Alpha Tau Delta won the 
championship and received a banner 
from Lucas, the sporting goods man. 
Hagerman hall, and all the fraternities 
have good material this year, and Hag 



* 
* 

* 



WIN. 

W L PC 

COLO. COLL. ... 40 1000 

Denver U 2 2 500 

Mines i 3 225 

Aggies o 4 000 

Oh, yes, Boulder has won two 
games. 

CHAMPS. 



* 



LOSE. 



* 

* 
* 



PC 

775 
775 



W L 
COLO. COLL. ..'. 3 I 

Den\'er U 3 i 

Same (we guess). 
Same (we guess). 
Same (only Boulder has won 
three). 

TIED. 



* 

* 

* 






hall has its gym to practice in. The 
matter will be taken up after football 
season is over. This will give Coach 
Rothgeb a chance to see how things 
look for a college basketball team. 



ELEVEN "C" MEN. 

The men who have gone through the 
1910 season without a defeat and who 
have secured their "C's" are : Captain 
Flerhert Vandemoer, undoubtedly the 
greatest athlete "ever" in the Rocky 
Mountain region ; Herbert Sinton, Fay- 
ette Thompson, Oliver Cook, Glenn Bow- 
ers, Plarry Black, Edward E. Hedblom, 
Joe S. Witherow, Glen G. Reed, Kenneth 
Heald and Wesley Acker. These men 
have been in every game this year. Joe 
Floyd, although technically not entitled 
to a letter has earned one, having been 
in three quarters. Other college loyals, 
and lovals in every sense of the word, 
are : Dickson, LeClere, Putnam, Haight, 
Jardine, Moberg H. LeClere, and the 
freshmen who have worked hard with 
the second scrimmage team. 



Big Crowds — Good Enthusiasm. 

Fully 8,000 people saw the Tiger- 
D. U. game. 5CX) of these were col- 
lege students, i.ooo more were C. C. 
backers, 1,000 were D. U. students 
and backers and the remainder the 
usual Thanksgiving holiday crowd. 
The cheering of both bunches was 
good, D. LT. having a larger delega- 
tion of rooters could make a little 
more noise when they were in the 
lead but their sni'-it died when they 
were losing. Not so the Tigers. 
They arc always in the game. It is 



expected that the game was a good 
business proposition, no joke either. 



Boulder Resumes Relations 
With D. U. 

The Rocky Mountain Conference 
was strengthened last Wednesday 
when Boulder resumed her relations 
with D. U. and sent out her challenge 
for the winner of the D. U.-C. C. 
game. From the opinion of the 
coacli and players — our game with the 
University crowd will not be played 
— for the reasons which have been 
stated. 



Boulder 19; Mines o. 

Boulder had little trouble in de- 
feating the Mines 19 to o yesterday 
afternoon at Union Park to a crowd 
of 2,000 fans. 



Springs High lost the state inter- 
scholastic championship by suffering 
defeat at the hands of Longmont yes- 
terday at the latter place by a score 
of 9 to o. 



Vandemoer punted 10 times, for a total 
of 445 yards, averaging 44 yards, while 
Walker in 13 tries made 525 yards, an 
average of 40 yards. 

The Tigers were penalized, largely for 
holding, four times, 70 yards being the 
total. D. U. o.nly lost 45 yards in this 
manner. 

Out of four attempted forward passes 
by the Tigers, two were successful ; out 
of seven by the Ministers, only one had 
any merit. 

Sinton averaged 56 yards on his three 
kick-ofTs and Walker's one boot went 45 
vards. 



THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 



TIGERS CONFERENCE CHAMPIONS 

Continued from Page 1. 

tance behind him when the last whi.e 
line was passed. Hammil failed at an 
easy goal. Then things changed. 
Vandy punted to Crowley who fum- 
bled and Acker fell on the ball. A 
line plunge and then Heald went over 
and tied the score. Then Hedblom 
missed the goal. But luckily, how 
luckily, the D. U. Eagerheart had 
been off side and Bloss had another 
shot at the post3 and he did it, win- 
ning the championship. 

Score— Tigers 6; D. U. 5. .. 



The last quarter, D. U. did its best, 
but failed and the game resolved it- 
self into a pun ing duel. Thus the 
Tigers kept the ball out of danger. 
. . The game was marred by fumbling, 
especidlly of punts, but who cares. 

First Period. 

Sinton kicked off fifty yards to Crow- 
ley who returned twenty-five yards. 
There was a fumble on the first play at 
the 33-yard line which was recovered 
by Denver. The next play failed and 
Walker punted to Vaiidemoer at the 
center of the field. Vandemoer returned 
ten yards. In an exchange of penalties 
Denver got the ball at their 40-} ard line. 
Crowley made eight yards over the 
tackles. Walker failed at the line. 

On the next play the Tigers got the 
ball at the middle of the field and gained 
IS yards on two end plays. A line plunge 
by Acker failed. The Tigers tried a 
forward pass which was intercepted by 
Denver at the 25-yard line. Two line 
plays by D. U. netted 8 yards. C. C. 
held on the next play and the ball was 
theirs on downs. 

C. C. gained 8 yards on two end runs 
and Vandemoer fumbled the ball on the 
third play, giving D. U. the ball. Walk- 
er punted 45 yards to Heald who fum- 
bled but recovered. It was the Tigers', 
ball on their 50-yard line. 

A forward pass netted C. C. 5 yards. 
The next play failed and Vandemoer 
punted over D. U.'s goal line. On the 
second play Crowley made an end rim 
for 50 yards. The next play at the line 
failed and Walker kicked to Heald at 
the 20-yard line. He fumbled and re- 
covered. C. C. was penalized 15 yards 
for holding, punting the ball on the 5- 
yard line. Vandemoer punted and after 
the ball was fumbled bv three or four 



men, Bowers recovered at D. U.'s 50- 
yard line. 

Second Period. 

Acker open up with a three-yard gain 
on the line. The next play failed, but a 
double pass "did the trick.' Vandemoer 
failed on an end run and an attempted 
forward pass was broken up behind C. 
C.'s line Ijy D. U. Crowley tore off 
eight yards over the tackle. A line play 
made it a first down. Both teams were 
off side on the next play. Koonsman 
went through for six yards, but on the 
third down C. C. held for downs. A 
freak formation and forward pass netted 
10 yards. 

On the next play C. C. made two 
yards and was penalized ten. Vande- 
moer pnnted out of bounds at the 15- 
yard line. Two line plays gained but 
four yards and Walker punted to Heald 
who siarnaled for a fair catch at Den- 
ver's 5S-yard line. D. U. held for downs 
on the next tliree plays. Koonsman and 
Crowlev made six yard-gains over the 
line but C. C. held on their 5S-yard line. 
The Tigers' first play failed. Vande- 
moer made three yards; a forward pass 
made it the first down. Vandemoer 
made IS yards on an end run but was 
penalized for holding by his team. The 
peerless Tiger leader made five yards 
on an end run from kicking formation. 
A forward pass failed and Vandy punted, 
the 1 all hit the ground on the 8-yard 
line and was recovered b\- Sinton of 

C, c. 

Acker failed in a line plunge. A dou- 
ble pass netted C. C. two yards, a for- 
ward pass was intercepted by C. C. but 
it was illegally made and D. U. got the 
l.iall on downs at the 3-yard line. W^alk- 
er punted to his 50-yard line to Heald. 
Two line plays netted eight yards and 
Vandemoer made forward pass from a 
punting position and Crowley intercept- 
ed the ball at his 30-yard line. Koons- 
man and Walker made good gains 
through the line bringing the ball to 
the center of the field when the time 
was called for the second period. Score 
end of second period, Denver 0, Tig- 
ers 0. 

Third Period. 

Sinton kicked off for C. C. at 3 :31 
o'clock to Hamill. On the first play 
Walker punted to Vandemoer at the C. 
C. 35-yard line. Vandemoer punted out 
of bounds at D. U.'s 55-yard line. On 
the first play D. U. was penalized 15 
>-ards for holding. Walker punted to 



Vandemoer, who returned it to the mid- 
dle of the field by a brilliant run through 
a broken field. A trick forward pass 
netted five yards. Taylor got Acker 
without a gain on the ne.xt play. C. C. 
attempted a forward pass at the middle 
of the field, which was intercepted by 
Koonsman, who made a great run for 
55 yards and a touchdown. Hamill 
missed the goal. Score : D. U. 5, C. C. 0. 

Sinton kicked off pver the goal line, 
the ball was put in play at the 2S-yard 
line. On the first play D. U. was penal- 
ized five yards for off side. Crowley 
failed and Walker punted tn the center 
of the field. When Heald fumbled. 
Large recovered the ball. Koonsman 
plunged through the line for six yards 
and Walker made first down. Heald at- 
tempted aforward pass and which was 
recovered by C .C. at the 25-yard line. 
Vandemoer made 5 yards around the end. 
A line play netted five more. Vande- 
moer brought the I all to the center of 
tl^e field on the next play, A line buck 
bv Reed was good for three. Heald got 
four through tackle. Vandemoer punted 
out of bounds at the 10-yard line. Walk- 
er punted to Vandemoer at the center 
of the field. He gained ten yards. Sin- 
ton failed on an end run. Vandemoer 
punted and Crowley fumliled the ball on 
the 10-yard line. Acker recovered it. 
Vandemoer failed on the first play. A 
forward pass carried the ball to the two- 
yard line. Heald carried tbe l>all across 
for a touchdown and the Ti.ger rooters 
went wild with joy. Hedblom kicked 
goal. Score : Tigers 6, Denver 5. 

Walker kicked off for D. U., the ball 
going to Vandemoer on the 5-yard line. 
He came back 10 yards. Vandemoer 
made 12 yards on the first play, but an 
end run held by Heald resulted in an 
equal loss. The Tiger captain punted to 
Crowley near the center of the field who 
returned 10 yards after he was tackled. 
D. U. was penalized 15 yards for hold- 
ing. Crowley made a gain then just as 
the period closed. Score end of third 
period — Denver 5, Ti.gers 6. 

Fourth Period. 

D. U. opened the period with the ball 
at the middle of the field. Walker punt- 
ed 30 yards to Reed, who came back 10. 
Tbe College was penalized ten yards. D. 
IT. still retained possession .of the ball. 
C. C. smashed through the line and got 
Crowlev on the next play. 

Walker pnssed to Crowlev for 35 
yards gain, the only good D. U. pass. C. 

Continued on Paee 7 



THE TIGER 



The Weekly INewspaperof Colorado College 

A. E BRYSOIS Editor-in-Chief 

S. WILKIE DEAN Business Manager 

Sam J. Shelton Assistant Editor 

Richard L. Hughes Assistant Editor 

Hahry Black Assistant Editor 

T. Wynne Ross Athletic Editor 

Robert m. Copeland Engineering Editor 

FRED S. Baker Forestry Editor 

Helen Canon Alumni Editor 

Mamie C. Detmoyer Exchange Editor 

Edith I.. Summers Local Editor 

J. A. Root Local Editor 

Ray H. Sayre Assistant Manager 

E. E. Hedblom ' Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

A. W. Donovan, C.E. Hayward. Bruce Weirick, William 

Lloyd, Joe Sinton, Elsie Greene, Lillian Ducr, Grace 

Wilson, Dorothy Cook, Dorothy Stott 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

• rticlet tnditemsto TheTiger. Contribution! 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

AdiresB all communications to THE TIGER, Colorade 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phones: Editor, Main 1975. Manager. Main 2073 

-<asCT B8>^ Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 

i T.«giggy^ h Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



HOME AGAIN. 

With the finish of the football sea- 
son the fraternity men who have so 
generously given up their tables to 
the football team again return to their 
own with a justifiable feeling that they 
had an important part in the success- 
ful season of the Tiger squad and not 
alone with this feeling, but with a 
deeper feeling of inter-fraternity 
friendsliip, a better knowledge of one 
another's" methods, and a clearer con- 
ception that all are working for the 
same end — the advancement of the in- 
terests of the college and the better 
development of their own members. 

It is very easy to fall into an atti- 
tude of selfishness in any organization 
if too much interest is given to the 
organization itself, and the fact that 
the organization is possible only as it 
is a small part of the greater whole — 
the College, and if the fact is forgotten 
that there are other similar and equal- 
ly deserving organizations besides 
one's own. 

These feelings have unquestionably 
been much offset by the interchange 
of members among the fraternities 
while the training table was occupying 
the house of one. While originally 
this result was thought of only as an 
incidental to the greater good, that of 
properly caring for the team, its re- 
sults along the lines above mentioned 
makes it a question whether as much 



good was not accomplished through 
the incidental as through the primary 
purpose, though, of course, in a very 
different way. 

This plan appears to be original to 
Colorado College and its success this 
year assures that it has come to. stay 
and will each year be followed so as 
to build up the team and at the same 
time build up the bonds of friendship 
and sympathy that are the basis of all 
true college loyalty. 

THE JUNIOR OPERETTA. 

That the coming event of the junior 
class will be successful both financially 
and otherwise seems assured. The 
hard work of the members of the cast 
ff the operetta and the careful train- 
ing by the coach assures its success 
as a musical production and the sub- 
stantial interest of the college and 
townspeople in last year's production 
makes it almost certain that the pro- 
duction will be a success financially. 

Until the time comes when a Junior 
Prom meets with the approval of 
those who have the authority, the op- 
eretta bids fair to hold its place as a 
college custom of the Junior class and 
as such it is deserving of the loyal 
support of every student. 

The operetta is different from any 
of our other affairs, it comes at a 
time that is convenient and favorable, 
its price is nominal and its success, 
if we are to judge by the first, excep- 
tional. 

You can't afford to miss it. 

THE EWING FUND. 

The maintenance of Harry Ewing '08, 
as the representative of Colorado Col- 
lege in South America, is both a respon- 
sibility and an opportunity for every stu- 
dent and alumnus of Colorado College 
who has the interests of the college at 
heart and whose vision is not con- 
fined to our own interests and wel- 
fare alone, but extends to the splendid 
work that is being accomplished by the 
representatives of this and other colleges 
in foreign fields. The responsibility lies 
in whether or not the college will li^■e 
up to an obligation which it has placed 
on its own slunilders and the oppor- 
tunity is in being able to have a small 
l)art in so worthy a work. 

In sending a representative to South 
America, Colorado College is following 
in the footsteps of the most advanced of 
the eastern institutions. Yale, Prince- 
ton, Oberlin and Pennsylvania have es- 
tablished the educational missionary cen- 
ters in different parts of the world. Col- 
orado College has taken the lead among 
western institutions in this matter, as it 



has in many others ; the undertaking 
was comemndable, the support so far 
has been most encouraging, the question 
now is, can we finish what we have 
started? 



BOYS' CONFERENCE HERE. 



It should be of interest to college stu- 
dents to know of the third annual con- 
ference of the Boys' Departments of the 
Y. M. C. A.'s of Colorado, which is 
meeting in this city the latter part of 
this week. It opens tonight with a sup- 
per at Bemis Hall, given by the college, 
and closes Sunday evening. 

Older high school boys will be present 
from all over the state, and it is sin- 
cerely hoped that as many college men 
as possible will take time to get ac- 
quainted with these delegates. It will 
mean a strong influence for Colorado 
College when these fellows plan to go on 
to college in the next year or two. 

College men are invited by the state 
committee to attend '.^i many of the ses- 
sions as possible. The complete program 
can be found in the daily papers. All 
sessions will be held in the city Y. M. C. 
A. building. 

TO ARRANGE FOR DEBATES. 



Manager of Debating Working Hard 
to Arrange for Two Good Inter- 
collegiate Contests 



During the past several years, Colo- 
rado College has participated in at least 
two inter-collegiate debating contests. 
For the past two years, these have been 
with Denver University and the Univer- 
sity of Utah. In all probability, the D, 
U.-C. C. debate will be arranged again 
this year, but Manager of Debating 
Kirkpatrick is trying to find another op- 
ponent instead of Utah, as neither insti- 
tution has shown any great desire for a 
continuance of the former contract. 

The University of Colorado for some 
unknown reason has made it a part of 
their policy not to meet any other Colo- 
rado institution in debate, consequently 
no contest can be scheduled with them 
Kirkpatrick has been in communication 
with Nebraska and Kansas state univer- 
sities attempting to arrange for a debate. 
Ill case no agreement can be arrived at 
with these, it is possible that an attempt 
will be made to meet one of the Iowa 
colleaes. 

Colorado College will meet Denver in 
Colorado Springs this year and will have 
the privile.ee of submitting the question. 
It is probable that the auestion for the 
intcr-sncietv debate will be submitted for 
this contest also. 



THE TIGER 




The day for the great American bird is near at hand. You like to think of 
Thanksgiving Day as a winter day. 

Are you ready for winter days? Have you bought your winter suit? Your 
winter overcoat? You'll find it easy now to get winter clothes to please you, if 
fou choose from our selections of the very latest productions. This new pur- 
chase enables us to make the best showing of the season, a showing of the new- 
est, exclusive fabrics, some cut to this season's models approved by men of taste 
in dress; others cut to the models designed for the Spring of 1911. At $15.00 to $50.00, whatever your price for 
a suit may be, you should see the suits we of?er at your price. 



Colorado Springs, ION. Tejon St. 



Denver, Sixteenth at Stout 



Antlers 

Turkish Baths 

(Opposite Elks Club) 
Open Day and Night 

BATHS OF ALL KINDS. Also Chiro- 
pady and Swedish Massage. Treat- 
ment at Residence by Appointment. 

CARL J. WENBERG, Prop. 

Graduate Swedish Masseur 

Phone Red 33 14 E. Bijou Street 



DEXTER & HUDSON 

EXCHANGE BARBER 
SHOP 

Room 307, Third Floor 
Exchange Bank Building 

What's All Right? 

"Extra Clean" Lignite ! 

It Is-It Is-It Is All Right ! 

What? 

"Extra Clean" Lignite ! 

The Colorado Springs 

17.<a1 P^ 112 Pike's Peak Avenur 

r Ucl 1^0. Two Phones, Main 230 

A. G. SPALDIi a BROS. 



The Spalding 
Trade-Mark 




Is Known Throughout 
the World as a 

GUARANTEE OF 
QUALITY 



are the Largest Manu- 
facturers in the World of 

OFFICIAL EQUIPMENT 

for All Athletic Sports and 
Pastimes 

If Ymi 3re interested in 
11 lUU Athletic Sport you 
should have a copy of the 
Spalding Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyolopedia of 

What's New iu Sport 

and is sent free on request. 



A. G. SPALD.NG & BROS. 

1616 Arapahoe Street, Denver, Colorado 



TIGERS CONFERENCE CHAMPIONS 

Continued from Page 1 

C. held on the next two plays and liam- 
ill tried a drop kick. It was blocked, but 
1). U. recovered the ball at the iS-yard 
line. C. C. intercepted a forward pass 
at the lO-yard line. Vandemoer punted 
and Crowley recovered at the center of 
the field. Some easier breathing here. 

Time had to be taken out for Crowle^'. 
A double pass at the line failed. Walk- 
er attempted a long forward pass but it 
touched the ground. Walker punted to 
Vandemoer. On a fumble D. U. got the 
ball on C. C.'s 40-yard line. 

Another forward pass failed and it 
was C. C.'s ball at the center of the field. 
Vandemoer punted 40 yards to Crowley, 
wdio came back ten. Another forward 
pass missed and on D. U.Ss 35-yard line. 
Vandemoer made ten. 

C. C. fumbled and it was D. U.'s ball. 
Walker punted to the -center of the field. 
Vandy punted over the goal and the ball 
was put in play at the 35-yard line by D. 
U. 

Final score — Tigers 6, D. U. 5. 

The line-up : 
DENVER. TIGERS. 

Herbert, 1. e Sinton, 1. e. 

Curtis. 1. t Cook, r. t. 

Fike, 1. g Black, r. g. 

Harden, c Witberow, c. 

Sterling, r. g Hedblom, 1. g. 

Taylor, r. t Bowers, 1. .t 

T-aree, r. e Thompson, 1. e. 

Walker, q. b Reed, q. b. 

Hamill. 1. h. b. . .Vandemoer fcapt), r.h.b. 

Koonsman. f. b ETeald, 1. h. b 

C—^wlev fcapt"). r. h. b Acker, f. b 

Officials: 'C. Tfenry Smith, referee: 
Steele, lunpire : Kester, field judge ; C. 
A. Brandenburg, head linesman. Time 
of periods. 15 minutes. 



PHI GAMMA DELTA DANCE. 

The Phi Gamma Delta fraternit}' gave 
an enjoyable dance at the San Luis 
school last Saturday evening. Among 
those invited were : Misses Frost. Cran- 



The Shackleford-Henley 
Leather Goods Co. 

18 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 
Makers of 

Trunks and Leather Goods 

We Carry the Most Complete Line of 
Traveling Goods, Ladies' Hand Bags, 
Pocket Books and All Sorts of Leather 
Goods in Colorado. 

WE LOAN MONEY 

ON ALL VALUABLES 

Big line of new and unredeemed 
Drawing Instruments .'. Diamonds 
Watches and Jewelry ot all descrip- 
tions. Firearms and Fishing Tackle, 
Musical Instruments and hundreds 
of other articles 



M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 



The Dentan 

Printing Company 

No. 9 So. Cascade Auenue 

FIRST-CLASS PRINTING 
at REASONABLE RATES 

Telepnone Main No. 602 



THE T I G E K 

The 1910 Tiger Squad— The Unc 




From left to right: Captain Vandemoer, rhb; Sinton, re; Reed, qb; Cook, rt; Bl 



Special To Students 

THE TIGERS are going to win and 
every student should have one of our 
souvenirs showing THE TIGERS IN 
ACTION. We will give one of these 
remarkable Panorams of Washburn 
Field with every pair of shoes bought 
here this month. Come in and see them. 

Men's Shoes $3.50 to $6 the pair. 



THE WHITAKER-KE 




Size of Poster 12x38 inches 



TIGEll 



THE TIGER 

Canted Rocky Mountain Champions 




Witherou , c; Hedblom, Ig; Bowers, It; Acker, fb; Thompson, le; Heakl, Ihb. 



Courlcsy Herald-Te.egraph 



liR SHOE CO., ' 



32 North 
Tejon St. 




kCflON 



Material and Experience 

We have picked ELEVEN of our best 
styles to WIN your approval. If any of 
these fail we have a good reliable bunch 
of "SUBS" to fill their places. 

With good MATERIAL and EXPERI- 
ENCE in fitting, you will find perfect 
satisfaction in a pair of our shoes. 

Ladies' Shoes from $3 to $6 the pair. 



10 



THE TIGER 



THBKIUB 

Young Men's Suits and Overcoats at 
$20.00 and $25.00 

Represent more value than you think possible; when 
you see them you'll think they're more; $20.00 and 
$25.00. The Hub special hand-tailored suits made 
for us by Alfred Benjamin & Co., and Society Brand, 
who know how. We'll be glad to show you the 
finer ones up to |60.00. the best made clothes. 



MANH ^TTAN SHIRTS 



FOWNS GLOVES 



Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton-Rustic Home 

f\ • No. 419 South El Paso St. 

Uairy a) phone Main 442 

Photography 

In All Its Branches 

Clark 

112 South Tejon St. 
Special Discount to A II Students 

Shoe Repairing. Clothes'Cleaned and Pressed. 
Second-Hand Shoes and Clothing 

J. H. PERKINS 



lYzZ. Cascade 



Colorado Springs 



PRATT, The Barber 

Is At the Alta Vista Hotel 

Me Solicits the Patronage of the 
College Boys 



dall, Eversole, Aughinbagh, V. Tucker, 
McKenzie, Ruth Wallace, Stark, Mc- 
Kinnie, Cora Kampf, Yerkes, Octavia 
Hall, Grace Conklin of Denver, Miss 
[""ranees Baker of Denver, Bogue, Ran- 
dolph, Watson, McCreery, Musser, 
Hedgecock, Morehouse, Ashley, Pierson, 
and Nevin ; Messrs. Statton, Parkinson, 
Dean and Warnock. Mr. and Mrs. 
Shelden acted as chaperones. 



PEARSONS LADIES' NIGHT 

Pearsons Society held its first ladies' 
night of the college year in the club 
house last Friday evening. The fol- 
lowing program was rendered, after 
which light refreshments were served, 
and all enjoyed a social time. 

Vocal Solo Kirkpatrick 

Address of Welcome Pres. Dean 

Original Story Argo 

Play (in two acts) Lloyd Shaw 

The guests of the' society were the 
Misses' Kidder, Weir, Fowler, Graves, 
Whittaker, Greene, Woodard, Pollen, 
Brady, Hedgecock, Harris, Flora and 
Altha Crowley, Crandall, Wallace, 
Grace Wilson, Baker, Dilts, Augen- 
baugh, Henderson, Maxwell, Stott, 
Phillips, Fezer, Spicer, Sheldon, 
Fames, True, Woon, Crane, Stanfield, 
Kirtman, Willenberger, Wasley, Chcl- 
ey, St. John, and the Messrs. Eby. 
Ray Shaw and Bortree. 



Breltwieser Talks — Prof. Brcitwieser 
addressed the Ministerial .Association 
Monday morning at the Y. W. C. A., 
using as his subject, "The Psycholog- 
ical Study of Religious Phenomena." 



WINDOW SLEEPING TENTS 



THE.OUT 


WEST 


TENT AND AWNING CO. 


1 13'2 NORTH TEJON STREET 





Phone 917 



GEO. R. BERGEN, 0. D. 

IVIANF'G OPTICIAN 
Eyes Tested 611-12 Exch. Kat. Bank BIdg. 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought; Sold; Rented 
and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing =» Typewriter. The 
New No. 10 Model Has All Latest 
Improvements 

Zimmerman Supply 

Company 



22 E. Kiowa St. 
Phone Main 374 



Established 1890 



WILIIAMJDN 
HAFrNDRCD 

SllUllP^ 

I llLV 





IXE>NVI>R COI/Q 



The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 



THE TIGER 



11 



A Full Line of Benson & Hedges Cigarettes 

HUGHES 

North I*J Tejon 



Gel Your Picnic Supplies 

AT 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

1 13 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRISKER. Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Notary Public 

A. J. LAWTON 

Real Estate, Loans and Insurance 
lOj^ E. Pike's Peak Ave., Colorado Springs 

We Are Ashamed 

to mention the price we 
are making on those nifty 

FOOTBALL MUF;=S 

to clean them up by Thanks- 
giving. The ribbons alone 
are worth the money. See 
them at 

MURRAY'S 

(Opposite Campus) 



II Local Department || 




New Arrangement. — Monday, Dean 
Parsons gladdened the hearts of his 
hearers when he announced that Fri- 
day following Thanksgiving would be 
given as a holiday. In former years, 
exercises have been held on this day 
and an extra day added to the Christ- 
mas vacation. 

Auditing Committee. — At the last 
Commission meeting, a committee 
consisting of Kirkpatrick, Johnston 
and Warnock, was appointed to audit 
the Barbecue accounts. 



Boys' Conference. — A conference of 
boys, many of them high school boys. 
will occur in Colorado Springs Friday, 
Saturday and Sunday of this week. A 
feature of the program will be a din- 
ner in Bemis Hall on Friday evening, 
at which Dean Parsons will preside. 

Joy Rallies. — In preparation for the 
Thursday game, rallies were held in 
Perkins last Monday and Tuesday 
evenings. The usual joy was present 
in quart measures. A new song was 
introduced at the Monday rally. 



Attend Teachers' Meeting. — Several 
members of the faculty have been in 
attendance at the annual teachers' 
meeting which is being held in Den- 
ver. Dean Parsons, Dean Cajori and 
Professors Motten and Brehaut were 
among those who attended. 



Rumor. — There is a rumor to the 
effect that at a meeting of the sopho- 
mores held last Tuesday, it was voted 
to give five thousand dollars of the 
barbecue profits to the gymnasium 
fund. 

Later — This report has been denied. 



For the Denver Game, Get 
Your Pennants, College Ties^ 
College Handkerchiefs, Col- 
lege Muffs at 

THE MAY CO. 

23 North Tejon Street 

lOfo Discount to Students 

Deichmann & Douglas 
Floral Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER. Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 
Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 



BOOKS 

Stationery, Pictures and 

Novelties at 

The Pike's Peak Book & Stationery Co. 



27-271/2 South Tejon Street 



Peone Black 354 



Watch theCapsYouMeet 

You won't need an intro- 
duction to the HEIDCAP. 
It is not a mere head cover- 
ing. It has character. It 
gives character to the wear- 
er. It is made of exclusive 
English cap cloths. It is a 
thoroughbred. Try on a 
HEIDCAP. 



12 



THE TIGER 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co 
Groceries and 



Meats 



.«.••« 







115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



MUETH'S 

The Place Where the Stand- 
ard Is Never Lowered. High 
Class Goods at Reasonable 
Prices. Ice Cream, Hot 
and Cold Drinks. 

Lunches and Afternoon Teas 
Ask Any Old Student 



CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 



5 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 




Cox Sons & Vining 

262 Foil th Ave., New York 

Gowns and Caps 

silk Faculty Gowns and 
Hoods. Lowest Prices 
Best Workmanship. 



The D. Y. Butcher Crug Co. 

DRUGS, KODAKS, SUPPLIES 

Free and Prompt Delivery 
Cor. Opposite P. 0. Phones 90 and 750 



Denver Alumni. — The annual ban- 
quet of the Denver Alumni Asociation 
was held last Wednesday night. 



Prexy Back Soon. — President and 
Mrs. Slocum will return from their 
trip to the East the latter part of 
next week. 

Doll Show. 

Eeccm^er 15 is tlie date of the doll 
show, the exhibition of all the dolls that 
h'dve b^en dress ;d for tlic cliildren of 
Papetown. Be sure to have money for 
a small admittance fee, so that you may 
be entitled to vote for the most beautiful. 
Your vote will help some worthy one 
get a pri'/e. The adnittance fees will be 
given tT Hastirgs or Papetown. 



Bartlett went recently with the Col- 
orado Branch of the American Society 
of Civil Engineers to look over the 
Beaver Land and Irrigation company's 
works near Canon City. While the -e 
he was taken to the Royal Gorge and 
over the Sky I_.ine drive and also to 
visit the up-to-date zinc reduction 
plant there. 

"Eagerheart" rehearsals are progress- 
ing splendidly. 



iMinerva's annual function is an- 
nounced to occur on December 13. Un- 
lucky date. 

Miss Melicent Campbell was a visitor 
at chapel, Tuesday morning. 

Contemporary gave a china shower in 
honor of Blanche Whitaker, at the home 
of Ramona Brady, Saturday, November 
19. 

The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies, Fixtures 

208 N. Tejoo Street Phones Main 812, 830 

To College 
Men and Women 
We Are Known as 
"The Satisfactory 
Jeweler". To 
New Ones We 
Soon Will Be. 

Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

"Satisfactory Jewelry 

Store" 



Lallie Surveying Instrument & Supply Co. 




^alli 
1622 



Standard Tran- 
sits, compasses, 
levels, barome- 
ters, field and 
itfice supplies. 
Solar ephemeris 
nailed free up- 
on request. 
Single Reflecting Solar att'm't 
Arapahoe Street, Denver, Colo. 



No More Wrinkles 



I have a remedy that will speedily eradicate 
any case of wrinkles— no matter how bad or 
what the cause. It makes old faces look 
young, removes all lines and wrinkles, 
corrects flabby or withered skin, makes thin 
faces plump, fills out hollow cheeks, will 
develop any part of the body round and full 
without any massaging. Call at my parlors 
and I will explain fully and convince you. 



Miss N. E. Jolinson 



Phone 687 



324 N. Tejon Street 



JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Stree 

The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Associaiion 

Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Gives 
Special Attention to Accounts of Students 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, Preiident Ira Har I'-President 

M. C. Gile Wm. F. Richards 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M. 



Hunt Up 

BisselFs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

Colorado College Students 

Remember We Do Framing as It Ought 
To Be Done and at Right Prices 

Whitney & Grimwood 

20 North Tejon Street 
Opera House Block 



THE TIGER 



15 



GOOD SHOE GAME 



There's a Good-Shoe game going on here all 
the time, and you're taking part in it. You 
can make a good score or not, as you choose; ai^d you're the umpire. The shoes for 
winners are SQUARE DEAL SHOES. Shoes that are always dependable in quality, 
style and price. GET IN THE GAME. 

Young Men's Shoes ?^feg*^ j Bjggt^ . ..^i^H Young Ladies' Shoes 

IT PAYS TO [^iSBK^I AT deal's 

$3.50, $4.00 to $5.00 1^**^ sE^ffia ''^■'^ $3.00, $3.50 to $5.00 



'TO7~S0UT»rTEJ0N~STiwiT 



Looseleaf Students' 

Note Books are the best 

note books for the 

College Students. 

Made in cloth and leather 

covers at prices as low 

as 30 cents. 

OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



12 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springs 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



Phone Main 2055 



Art Needle Work 



THE HUNT & VAN NICE 
Art Specialty Store 

Stamping, Designing, Perforating, Linens, 

Lawns, Best Hand-Painted China 
8 Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Fepd, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 

Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co. 



Edith Summers, j\Jay Wallace, ami 
i\'Jamie DetmL'3er went to Den\'er for tlie 
week to attend the teachers' institute. 



■ Dr. Bayle_v addressed the Young Wo- 
nien'.s Christian Association Friday 
Tiiglit, on "The College Girl's Attitude 
toward Doubt.' 



Miss Loomis entertained the senior 
girls at a doll-dressing l:>ee one evening 
last week. 

Marian Floffman was in Denver for a 
few davs last week. 



Lillian Bateman entertained her 
friends \-ery delightfully last Friday 
evening. 



Ruth Augenbaugh gave an informal 
supper Sunday evening. 

The juniors report a very pleasant 
operetta practice on Wednesday. 



If you who are on the Social Committee' 
want to go to a place where you will get 
the best satisfaction whether for your Fra- 
ternity or for your Society antl at the same 
time get it reasonable, try Noble's, corner 
Bijou and Tejon. 



Gil Cary was an interested spectator 
at the Boulder-Aggie game in Fort Col- 
lins, last Saturday. 



Contemporary program, December 2d ; 
Sir Frederick Leighton. . . . Sharley Pike 
Music Gwendolin Hedgecock 



Miss Axis Jones is a newly-elected 
h.cnorary member of Minerva. 

The freshmen are worrying over the 
next ]\Iath. test which comes after 
Thanksgiving. 



Martha McLeod ex-T3 visited at the 
cTllege, Sundav. 



Martha Phillips, Mary Walsh and 
Katherine True entertained at a chafing 
dish party Saturday evening. 



Lowell-Meservey Hdw. Co. 

Dealers in Paints, Oil, Glass, Every- 
thing in Hardware 



106 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springs 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Out West Building 



A Box of 

BURGESS CANDY 

Is a Bundle 
of PURE JOY 

'You'll Like the Burgess Store' 



112-114 North Tejon St. 



SATAN 

arose and said unto himself, 
"hiades is getting lonesome 
since the people are getting such 
good soles from 

PETE'S 

230 East Dale 



14 



THE T I G E K 



Our Prices for the Very Best of Work 



Gentlemen's 

Pants, sponged and pressed , $ .25 
Suit, sponged and pressed . . .50 
Pants, thoroughly cleaned & pressed .50 
Suit, thoroughly cleaned and pressed 1.00 
Hats, cleaned aud blocked . . .50 

Dyeing of ladies' and gents' garments 
to perfection. 



Ladies' 

Skirts, sponged and pressed . $ .50 

Skirts, thoroughlysponged&pressed .75 

Jackets, sponged and pressed . .50 

" thoroughlysponged&pressed .75 

Kid Gloves, cleaned, all lengths . .10 

Ladies' evening and party gowns cleaned 
by us like new. 



We Clean or Dye Anything from a Necktie to a Carpet 



Phone 
Main 1288 




218 North 



ff'ench^yers Tejon Street 
and Cleaners. 



For Best and Quick Delivery 

SEE 

The Monument Coal Co. 

28 East Kiowa Street 

William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 Georgre St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



THE 

Crissey 6i Fowler 
Lumber Co. 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 

Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 
A. S. BLAKE 

Is the Man to See 

107 North Tejon Phone 465 

Nickle Ware Cutlery 

Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Remember We Handle Nothing but the 

BEST GRADES OF FUEL 
"EVERY LUMP A LUMP OF HEAT" 

The Central Fuel Co 

1 28 N. Tejon Street Phone 1101 



Bertha Price spent the week-end in 
Denver. 



Miss Grace Conklin visited June Mus- 
ser, Sunday. 



Anne Baker entertained Miss Frances 
Baker from Denver, Saturday. 



Ruth Cunningham gave a spread, Fri- 
dav evening. 



Pay that little "bet" you lost by going 
to Noble's, Cor. Bijou and Tejon. 



Martha Phillips entertained at a peach 
spread, Monday evening. 



Dr. Cajori has been elected first vice- 
president of the Winter Night Club. 

Pearsons Literary Society initiated, 
Wednesday night of last week. 

December 15 is the date for the first 
Magna Panpan — keep it in mind. 



The German Club is going to give a 
play sometime after Thanksgiving. 

Many people are spending Thanksgiv- 
ing and the following holidays at their 
homes. 

It's not top late to subscribe to the 
Ewing fund. Loosen up, if you 
haven't already. 

The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heatirg Co. 



Broken Lenses 
Duplicated 



Phone Biack 233 
Colorado Souvenirs 



C. B. LAUTERMAN 

Jeweler and Manufac- 
turing Optician 

121 N. TEJON STREET Colorado Springs 



10c STORE AND MORE ! 

THE ElVIPORIUM 

1 10 S. TEJON STREET 



College Inn 

Freshmen!! 

This Is the Place for 

GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



Fine Watch Work 



Diamond Setting a Specialty 



H. E. Kapelke 

Watchmaker ana Jeweler 



130 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 



Grand Union Tea Co. 

Importers of Fine Teas and 
Coffees 

Phone Main 2678 220 N. Tejon St. 



On hand as usual 
but just a little better 
equipped for serving your 
needs — 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 



The 

WATERMAN 

PRESS 

PRINTERS and 
BINDERS 



THE TIGER 



15 



The first big Pan-pan of t'.ie year 
occurs in Beniis Hall, December 15, 
Save the date. 

Learn Wireless and Railroad 

TeleOranhV ' Shoitage of fully 10,000 Oper- 

' ^"^y ^H # ■ anrs on account of 8-hour law 
and exlensive "wireless" development- We operate 
under direct supervision of Telegraph Officials and 
positively place a'l students when qualified. Write for 
catalogue NATIONAL TELEGRAPH INST., Cinci nati, 
Philadelphia, Memphis, Davenport, la., Columbia, S. C, 
Portia d. Ore. 

THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

''The College Favorite ' 



The Favorite Shopping 

Place for the College 

Woman 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 



1061 2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



• 



Star 
Laundry 



The College Laundry 

The ONLY Laundry which advertises in 
The Tiger. We give 20% discount to you. 
The best work in the state for as low a 
price as any. 

B. J. DICKSON, Agent Phone Main 342 



W.I.LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



119 N. Tejon 



Pbone Main 900 



/f' 



SWEATER COATS 

$6, $5, $4, $3 

HOUSECOATS 
$10, $7, $5 



For the Fellow 
That Likes Distinction 



MUFFLERS 

TIE RINGS 

LEATHER GOODS 



===^ 



"class", smartness in every suit and overcoat; the tJressy 
look which you notice about some of the men you see on 
the street. You can just as well have it. Your suit may 
as well be that kind. We've got'em here. Gorton's 
special Adler Rochester suits or overcoats for $30, $25, 
$20, $15. When you think clothes, think Gorton's 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 




E. Pike's Peak 
113 



Correct Dress for Men. ^ 



■J 



ll'.e Girls' Gk-c Club is at work under 
t/.e new director: Miss Paulson. 

The senior part}' was postponed in- 
defuiitel_\ . 

The Xew England Club went to the 
Garden of the Gods, Saturday. 

Several seniors are attending the 
teachers' institute being lield in Denver. 

Harder '14 is pledged t i Delta Phi 
Theta. 

IMiss Grace Conklin of Delta, a soph- 
omore at D. U., came down for the Fiji 
dance and remained as the house guest 
of Miss Plester Frost. 

Geo. Creel, former editorial writer 
of the Denver Post, will address a 
meeting of the college men Sunday af- 
ternoon in Perkins Hall. 

The Junior operetta on Dec. i, Per- 
kins Hall, 8 o'clock, 50 cents. 



ASSAY FURNACE INSTALLED. 

Long-Expected Quick Heater in As- 
say Lab. 

A small muffle heated by a gasoline 
torch has been placed on its own brick 
pier in the assay laboratory. The gas- 
oline supply and air pressure tanks 
are located just outside the basement 
walls of Palmer, thus affording easy 
access and the accepted protection of 
an earth cover. The furnace is partic- 
ularly useful in that it is readily light- 
ed and heated up and as easily shut 
down. This ease of manipulation 
makes it much more suitable for stu- 
dents than the larger coal fired muf- 
fles. 



Dern's Freshly Roasted Coffee 

will make 10 more cups to the lb. 
than Eastern roasted coffee 



29 S. Tejon Street 



Phone 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 



Registered Medical Practitioneers 



Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence. 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 9E6 



The College 
Photo Studio 




Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 



FOR CHRISTMAS 

There is nothing finer, more appropriate 
or of more lasting value than Engraved 
Visiting Cards or Monogram Paper. 
We make these. 

The Gowdy-Simmons Printing Co. 



Phone 87 



21 N. Tejon Street 






16 



THE IIGER 




Winning or losing you'll 

find a Perkins-Shearer Suit or Overcoat a 
winning combination. 



The snap, the vigor of clean clever styles 
are emphasized in thes,e Young Men's models 
for winte. 

Dandy, durable weaves, skillfullv tailored, 



Attired in these good clothes you'll win trimmed and lined— to your special order 
in any gathering of well dressed men. you'll believe. $18y $20, $22, $25, $30. 



8 N. Tejon Street 



GWfom-Sfeeorer G 



28 E. Pike's Peak 




# 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



% 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 

Departments —College of Arts and 
Science, E. S. PARSONS, Dean. 

School of Engineering, F. CAJORI, Dean 
School of Forestry, W. C. STURGIS, Dean 
School of Music, E. D. HALE, Dean 



Manilou Park. — Field Laboratory 
of the School of Forestry 



^ 



Get Your 


Full Dress an 


d Tuxedo from Gatterer. 


$45 and upwards 




GEO. 


J, 


GA TTERER 






10 Per Cent Discount to Students 






216 North 


Tejon Street 






Telephone Main 1247 




Vol. XIII 



THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., DECEMBER 1, 1910 



Number 12 



SQUAD TO BE 

GIVEN BANQUET 

BUSINESS MEN TO SHOW AP- 
PRECIATION OF TIGERS' 
GREAT SHOWING. 



Unknown Friend to Give a Second 

Banquet Next Wednesday — 

Dutch Lunch After That. 



These are the days when it pays to 
have been a member of the Tiger 
squad. Banquets are coming thick 
and fast and plenty of opportunity 
will be given the Rocky Mountain 
champions and all the squad to eat 
enough of good things to make up 
for those long weeks of training 
table grub. 

The gist of the matter is this: 

Colorado Springs, as represented 
by her leading business and profes- 
sional men, will pay tribute to the 
football warriors of Colorado College 
and the High School at an elaborate 
banquet in the Antlers hotel next 
Friday evening at 7 o'clock. The 
football squads, managers and coach- 
es, will be the honor guests. Tickets 
admitting the public to the banquet, 
can be secured for $1.25 each at the 
Denver & Rio Grande city ticket 
office and the Murray Drug company, 
Cache la Poudre and Tejon streets. 

In addition to the rootball players, 
members of the faculty of the two in- 
stitutions as well as enthusiastic stu- 
dents and other residents of the 
city, will attend the banquet. It is 
expected that the banqueters will 
number in the neighborhood of 200. 

Details of the program have not 
been completed, but it is known that 
Coach Rothgeb and Captain Vande- 
moer of the Tigers and Coach Coffin 
and Captain Cheese of the Terrors, 
will be among the speakers. Music 



will be furnished throughout the din- 
ner by an orchestra. 

Everywhere the business men who 
are arranging the banquet are meet 
ing with the most unusual support. 
Practically every man who has been 
approached m regard to the banquet 
has signified liis willingness to take 
part. 

Both the Tigers and Terrors have 
played a wonderful game. The 
Tigers have won every game and 
every one of their opponents out- 

Continucd on Page 8 



GRIFFITH ELECTED ATTOR- 
NEY GENERAL. 



Complete Official Returns Show Plu- 
rality for Former Tiger. 



Ben Griffith, ex-Colorado College 
football captain, was elected attorney 
general of Colorado. Griffith was 
the Republican candidate for the 
office, and he defeated Barnett, the 
present incumbent, who ran on the 
Democratic ticket, by 2,209 votes, ac- 
cording to the official returns from 
the 60 counties of thhe state. 

Griffith carried 35 counties out of 
the 60. He lost Denver county by 
4,791 votes. Shafroth the success- 
ful gubernatorial candidate on the 
Democratic ticket, carried Denver by 
more than 13,000 plurality. Barnett 
was cut all over the state, even his 
own county of Ouray giving him less 
than 300 plurality. 

Ben Griffith is a Colorado College 
graduate and a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Denver law school. Colo- 
rado College men all over the state 
worked for him and worked hard. 
They worked for his nomination and 
commenced to campaign for him as 
soon as the Republicans named him 
in the convention in this city. 

El Paso county, where he is so well 

Continued on Pace 9 



BOULDER CLAIMS 
CHAMPIONSHIP 



BASE CONTENTION FOR TITLE 
ON COMPARATIVE SCORES. 



No Logic or Consistency to their 

Claims — Tigers are the Real 

Champions. 



Tigers 23; C. S. H. S. o, October 8. 

Tigers 23; Wyoming 0, October 15. 

Tigers 21; Utah 17, October 22. 

Tigers 8; Mines o, October 29. 

Tigers 15; K. Aggies 8, November 
S- 

Tigers 24; C. Aggies o, November 
12. 

Tigers 6; D. U. 5, November 24. 

Tigers 120; opponents 30. 

Although they have not played 
Colorado College and Denver Uni- 
versity, the two strongest teams of 
the Rocky Mountain region, and in 
spite of the fact that they have not 
won from D. U. for three years, and 
that the ''\Tinisters have held the 
championship of the Rocky Mountain 
region for the last two years, the 
Universit}' of Colorado is claiming 
the championship of Colorado, of the 
Conference and of the Rocky Moun- 
tain region. When Colorado Col- 
lege, after Boulder's cancellation of 
the U. C.-C.C. game, doing them a 
favor, offered them terms for a game 
on December 3, several weeks ago, 
the Boulder bunch hunched and re- 
fused, but as an after thought, chal- 
lenged the winner of the D. U. -Tiger 
game. However, they "stepped oflf"' 
when they offered to play Denver in 
Denver and refused to play us there. 
They claim that their students and 
the townspeople demanded a home 
game but offered to play D. U. at 
Denver. Football authorities who 
are not so partial to the University 

Continued on Page 10 



THE TIGER 



APOLLONIANS CHOOSE TEAM. 



ELLINGWOOD GRANTED SEN- 
IOR STANDING AT OXFORD. 



SIDDONS TO ARRANGE GLEE 
CLUB'S TRIP. 



Debaters Selected for Inter-Society 

Event — Pearsons Will Choose 

Their Team December 9. 



The Apollonians who will debate 
against Pearsons this year are Bryson, 
Friend and Crow. In the preliminaries 
held on December ig, these men were 
chosen to make up the first team, and 
W. C. Barnes, Hill, and Appel were 
selected as a second team to debate 
against the first team. Nine men en- 
tered the preliminaries and all the first 
team places were closely contested. 
Friend is the only debater of last year 
who is on the team this year, the oth- 
er two members of last year's team — ■ 
Coil and Hunt — having graduated. 
Crow was on the second team last 
year and did good work. Both Crow 
and Friend are sophomores; Bryson 
is a senior. 

Pearsons will hold their preliminar- 
ies on December 9, and from now on 
a great deal of interest will center 
upon this inter-society event. For the 
last eleven years this event has served 
as the mid-winter safety valve for the 
spirit which accumulates between the 
close of the football season and the 
beginning of track and baseball. 



BIG NIGHT TONIGHT. 



Second Operetta to Keep up the 

Standard of the First— Big 

Crowd Expected. 



Tonight in Perkins Hall the second 
annual operetta will be given by the 
junior class. Rehearsals have been 
held regularly for several weeks and 
trainer Richards promises that the 
rendition of "The Little Tycoon" this 
evening will be all that can be de- 
sired. Manager Campbell has spared 
no expense in securing suitable stage 
scenery and costumes. N. R. Love 
as stage manager has charge of the 
lighting which promises to be the 
best ever secured in Perkins Hall. 

The operetta as an annual function, 
was instituted by the present senior 
class last year, when the comic opera, 
"Princess Bonnie," was given in Per- 
kins Hall before the largest gathering 
of the year. This first attempt was 
pronounced a success, and in giving 
"The Little Tycoon" this year, the 
junior class is merely yielding to the 
popular demand for the continuance 
of the custom. 



One of Few to be so Honored — Rec- 
ognizes Work of C. C. as Equiv- 
alent to that of Harvard 
and Princeton. 



Dean Parsons this week received 
the following letter from Albert El- 
Hngwood '10, the successful C. C. can- 
didate for the Rhodes scholarship: 

November 16, rgio. 
Dear Friend: 

I have delayed in writing my ap- 
preciation of Oxford and my delight 
in its beauties, so that I might have 
good news to communicate. I know 
3'ou will be glad to hear I have been 
granted that much coveted and very 
elusive privilege known as Senior 
Standing. 

The amount of red tape necessary 
to the conferring of standin.g was re- 
sponsible for the long delay. 

Earl}' in November, Convocation 
met and by special decree voted sen- 
ior standing to two and junior stand- 
ing to fourteen of the twenty-seven 
who came over on the Haverford. 
Whereupon T paid into the Univer- 
stiy Chest three pounds Sterlin,g and 
ceased to think about preliminary 
examinations. I don't save any 

money on this proposition as it costs 
the same amount to get exemption as 
they charge for giving them, but I 
get certain valuable privileges and 
am saved considerable time. 

When I saw Mr. W. afterwards, he 
said I must have had a very unusual 
record, etc. But T think it speaks a 
great deal for the standing of my 
Alma Mater in the collegiate world. 
It recognizes her work, in this in- 
stance, at least, as equivalent to the 
work of Harvard, Princeton and the 
other accredited schools. 

I'll tell you how I am almost en- 
chanted with the beauties of this 
city "of spires and groves" later when 
I have a little more time. The first 
term is a busy one. 

Evet sincerely, 
ALBERT R. ELLINGWOOD. 



A graduate manager is elected an- 
nually at Berkeley to supervise the 
finances of the Associated Students. 



Ten Day Schedule on Western Slope 

Planned — Mandolin Quartet to 

Accompany Club. 

Manager Siddons, of the Glee Club, 
will leave Sunday evening on a hurried 
trip through the San Luis Valley to ar- 
range a schedule for the club's annual 
trip. Bookings probably will be secured 
at Delta, Telluride, Grand Junction and 
other western slope towns. 

President Warnock reports the club in 
fine shape, and it is probable that the 
trip will begin the Thursday before 
Christmas vacation and last for a week 
or ten days. . 

The club will be accompanied by a 
mandolin quartet and it was hoped to 
have a reader also accompany the songs- 
sters, but no answers were received to 
the call that was issued some weeks ago. 



DEAN PARSONS' CHAPEL 
TALK. 



Too Many College Idols, He Says- 
Studies the Important Thing. 



Dean Parsons delivered a very 
timely talk at chapel Monday morn- 
ing. After a few congratulatory re- 
marks upon the football season which 
has just closed, the dean recalled to 
mind the paramount importance of 
regular class work. A championship 
football team is- a great thin.g for the 
College; the college spirit which has 
been shown during the past season 
is of immense value but both are 
secondary to the scholastic standing 
we set as colle.ge students. He 
pointed out that nnlv a short time 
now remains until mid-year examina- 
tions and durine the lull in college 
activities it will be necessary for all 
to put their best work to bring the 
scholnrship up to the best possibble 
standard. 



THE GERMAN PLAY. 



References for debates is now cata- 
logued separately at the North Dakota 
Agricultural College library. 



The German Club is making prep- 
arations to give a play about the be- 
ginning of the next semester. For 
the past two weeks various olavs have 
been considered and a tentative se- 
lection has been made in the short 
German comedy. "Finer Alnss Heir- 
aten." The members of the club are 
very enthusiastic and e^'pect to make 
an evceptionallv good showing in 
their first play. Miss Sahm has 
charge of the work. 



THE TIGER 



PROFITABLE BARBECUE. 

Auditing Committee's Report Shows 
Neat Balance in Sophs' Coffers. 

What you have been looking for has 
at last come. The report of the barbe- 
cue manager shows that this year's bar- 
becue was the most successful one ever 
held, from the manager's point of view. 
The total profit to the class was $128.74. 

The itemized report follows: 

Receipts — 

41 1 Tickets $308.25 

Donations 10.30 

$318.55 

.Expenditures — 

Provisions $69.13 

Souvenirs 19.91 

Printing 10.90 

Costumes 39.81 

Decorating 13.26 

Canvas fence 6.00 

Lumber 14.25 

Fusees 10.00 

Oil for torches .... .55 

Incidental 6.00 

$189.81 

Total profit $128.74 

(Signed) 

T. L. Kirkpatrick, 
Chairman of Auditing Committee. 
W. W. Johnston, 
W. L. Warnock. 
The class deserves much credit for the 
way in which they overcame the handi- 
cap with which they started out, and 
everyone will be pleased to know that 
after giving us such a barbecue the soph- 
omores are still ahead financially. 

Much credit for the excellent business 
management is undoubtedly due to Mr. 
Lynch, who looked after the business 
end of the barbecue. 



DIGNITY AND SPORT GALORE. 



Next Wednesday is Insignia day. 
Then it is that the seniors, with all 
possible dignity, will make their first 
public appearance in cap and gown; 
then the juniors, with mock serious- 
ness amuse .-md entertain the under- 
classmen. 

In the evening the seniors will en- 
tertain the juniors at P>emis Hall. 
The nature of the entertainment is 
not yet known. A committee with 
Hille as chairman, is working to 
make it an enjoyable occasion. 

"\^ery little is known concerning the 
"stunt" which the juniors are plan- 
ning for Wednesday's chape! service. 



but it is whispered there will be noth- 
ing "tame" about it. Homer Mc- 
Millan is chairman of the "stunt" 
committee. 



CREEL'S TALK. 



McMillan benefit. 



As a result of McMillan's "broke 
talk'' Wednesday morning, there was 
great excitement in the halls in the 
evening. The senior girls organized 
two football teams, referee, umpire, 
coach, trainer and yell leader and 
there was a hard fought game be- 
tween D. U. and C. C, resulting in a 
score of 25 to o in favor of the Tigers. 
Between halves the rooters, led by 
two "Tiges" paraded the gym. . Two 
of D. U.'s men were knocked out at 
the end of the third quarter. After 
the game the heros were carried off 
on the shoulders of the rooters amid 
wild cheering. The night-shirt 

parade, led by the band, visited all 
the halls. The gate receipts were 
two dollars and a half, which will be 
turned over to the band fund. The 
Dais Athletic Conference made the 
arrangements at supper and the kick- 
off was at eia:h;t o'clock. 



THE STATE TEACHERS' ASSO- 
CIATION. 



The meetings of the State Teach- 
ers' Association held in Denver last 
week were well attended by Colorado 
College people. Some of the alumni 
present were Irene Fowler, Julia In- 
gersoll, Lois McLeod, Nannie Gibbs, 
Emma Whiton, Anna Strang, Louise 
Strang, Nelle Scott, Effie Miller, 
Faith Cox, Ethel, Gray, Marjory Pit- 
man, Carrie Davis, Eleanor Pease. 
Jean Ingersoll, Phillip Fitch, Myrtle 
Hill, May Tyler, Ethel Norton, Hixie 
Rider, Edna Prevost, Elizabeth Mc- 
Dowell, Harriet Spencer, Bess Trae- 
der, Betty Carpenter, George Gibbs, 
Earl Morand, Ruth Ragan. Among 
the active students were Mamie Det- 
moyer, Edna Woodard, May Wallace 
and Edith Summers. Professors 
Cajori, Hills, Brehaut, Motten, Breit- 
wieser. Parsons and Schneider rep- 
resented the faculty. 



A scholarship has recently been es- 
tablished in Chicago University in 
Political Science.' It is awarded to 
the undergraduate who writes the 
best esay on "Civil Government in 
the United States.' 



Denver Newspaper Writer Gives Op- 
tomistic Address. 



George Creel, former editorial 
writer of the Denver Fost, addressed 
the largest men's mass meeting of 
the year in upper Perkins last Sun- 
day afternoon. 

Mr. Creel dealt with present day 
problems, such as corporation con 
trol by unjust means and the inequal- 
ities of opportunity. It was his op- 
tomistic opinion that the day is com- 
ing when both of these injustices 
will be overcome in the course of 
time. 

The speaker was introduced by 
Prof. Motten, a personal friend of 
Mr. Creel's. Mr. Creel leaves short- 
ly for the Ea^t where he will write 
for the American Magazine. 



ALUMNI BANQUET ENTHUSI- 
ASTIC. 



The annual banquet of the Alumni 
Association of Colorado College in 
Den\er, held Wednesday evening, 
November 23rd, was the occasion of 
much enthusiasm over the college in 
general and the football team in par- 
ticular. The success of the banquet 
was a good omen of victory for the 
team the next day. 

About sevent}' members gathered 
at the Shirley Hotel for a good din- 
ner and a renewal of the old-time 
"College spirit." Dean Edward S. 
Parsons was the principal speaker of 
the evening. The other speakers 
were Donald S. Tucker '06, Miss Nelle 
ScoJ:t '03, Silmon L. Smith 'og, Miss 
Irma Rudd '05, and Prof. Motten. 
]\Ir. Montgomery Smith '07, president 
of the Denver Association, presided 
as toastniaster. College songs and 
College yells, led by "Fuzzy" McQuat, 
were the most enjoyable feature of 
the evening. The long tables were 
tastefully decorated with chrysanthe- 
mums, ferns and College colors, and 
the programs were ornamentally 
printed in Gold and Black. By vote 
of the company assembled, greetings 
were sent by telegraph to the Boston 
Alumni who were to have their din- 
ner the next eveening. 



Minnesota University believes in 
the "strenuous life," evidently, for 
between the quarters of the football 
games, they have relay races and 
other track events. 



THE TIGEK 



ATHLETICS 



Coach Koehler Leaves D. U. 

Coach John P. Koehler, football 
mentor for the Ministers for the last 
four years, left Friday for Milwaukee 
where he will complete his course in 
medicine at Marquette university and 
will not return to Denver again. 
Koehler has had a championship team 
for two years, previous to the season 
just completed and has pro\en his 
worth as a coach. 



Did Football Do It? 

Clem Crowley, the star halfback of 
the D. U. team and one of the best 
players ever wearing football togs, 
appropriately ended his gridinon 
career Thursday afternoon after his 
team had lost the championship to 
Colorado College by "taking unto 
himself a wife." He was married 
two hours after the final whistle of 
the game to Miss Flavia Churchill, a 
prominent society girl of Denver. 



Witherow Never Lost a Game. 

Joe S. Witherow, the all-state, all 
conference-center, and a real Tiger, 
has never lost a football game. Dur- 
ing his two years at Longmont his 
team never lost a game and his col- 
lege record has been kept just as 
clean. Here's hoping that Witherow 
can keep the record through college. 



Rothgeb — Yea Verily. 

We cannot pay our respects* to 
Coach Claude G. Rothgeb as we 
should. His record with compara- 
tively weak material at the first of 
the year, through the season and the 
annexation of the championship of 
the state, speaks for the premier 
athletic director of the Rocky Moun- 
tain region. Without a doubt Rothy 
taught the Rocky Mountain region 
what the new game of football held 
for the players; his trick plays were 
the cleverest; his forward passes the 
best placed, and his entire new rule 
game was clean cut. His defensive 
team was a surprise for its strength 
— in fact, it had no equal. Are we 
not glad that Rothgeb is coaching 
athletics in Colorado College? Base- 
ball and track are sure to follow and 
here's hoping that basketball can be 
boosted. 



All State Teams— C. C. Leads. 

Denver Post; 

Sinton, C. C, end. 
Douglas, Mines, end. 
Curtis, D. U., tackle. 
Schaffer, C. A. C, tackle. 
Hedblom, C. C, guard. 
O'Brien, Boulder, guard. 
Witherow, C. C, center. 
Vandemoer, C. C, half back. 
Crowley, D. U., half back. 
Carmichael, Boulder, full back. 
Walker, D. U., quarter. 

Denver Times : 

Sinton, C. C. 
Vandemoer, C. C. 
Curtis, C. C. 
Schaffer, C. A. C. 
Hedblom, C. C. 
O'Brien, Boulder. 
Witherow, C. C. 
McFadden, Boulder. 
Crowley, D. U. 
Rich, Boulder. 
Walker, D. U. 

Denver Republican : 
Douglas, Mines. 
Vandemoer, C. C. 
Curtis, D. U. 
Bowers, C. C. 
Black, C. C. 
O'Brien, Boulder. 
Witherow, C. C. 
McFadden, Boulder. 
Crowley, D. U. 
Koonsman, D. U. 
Walker, D. U. 



SCORES. 

Sinton, C. C, two, end. 

Douglas, Mines, two, end. 

Vandemoer. C. C two. end; one, half 
back. 

Curtis. D. TT.. tackle, three. 

SchafiFer, C. A. C, two .tackle. 

■nowers. C. C one, tackle. 

T^^riViinm. C. C. <mard, two. 

"f'-l^'-k. C. C. o-iiard, one. 

O'Bripn. BouMpr. "uard. tl.ree. 

"lA/'.'t^prow C C center, three. 

rrn„.v,- D, TT . hnlf back, three. 

lvTpT7.,^H.„ TT. of r. two. half back. 

t?;m., TT C- C-irmichael. U. C: 
T,'r,.^,^qi-inn T~) XT., pnrh one. full back. 

^^T^v-pr, n. TT.. rinnrfpr back, three. 
Poiorndo Collo"p, =;ix men, total 
.-r.^,-0 TJ. T~)'^'-i\-f^r TT fnur men. total 
~^^.-„ in. p,.^,,'i,i^r- fon,- nipn. total score. 
~. T\T:.,„t, ^.,„ m-,,T f-ot-il score, two; C. 
\ /- „.,„ ..n-,--, tot.nl score, two. 



Faculty Puts Ban on 
Post-Season Game. 

At a meeting of the faculty athlet- 
ic committee Friday afternoon, re- 
fusal to sanction the Boulder post- 
season game was given for the fol- 
lowing reasons: 

"First — The interference with col- 
lege work ine\'itable as the result of 
a prolonged athletic season. 

"Second — The unwillingness to es- 
tablish a precedent for post-season 
games." 

The meeting was attended by the 
entire athlet'c committee of the fac- 
ulty, -which is composed of Clyde T. 
Griswold, J. W. Park, Howard 
Moore, G. B. Thomas and O. W. 
Stewart. Dean Edward S. Parsons 
was ijresent as the representative of 
the Rocky Mountain Faculty Athlet- 
ic conference. 

Neither Coach Roi.hgeb, Manager 
Fowler, nor members of the team 
were piesent. 



NELSON GIVES BACK 
"JEWELS"— WE GET ONE 
MORE POINT. 

Jack Nelson, the former Aggie track 
star, who cleaned up everything in 
Colorado in his years at Fort Collins, 
and who nosed out Vandemoer at the 
conference meet at Champaign, 111., 
last spring, in the lOO-yard dash, has 
been declared a professional and has 
given back his prizes. The schools 
next in order in the two events, loo 
and 220 yard dashes, will receive the 
points Nelson won. Nelson is well 
known here and is a great runner, 
never having been defeated in his dis- 
tances. Vandemoer, who got fourth 
in the lOO-yard race, will get third 
and one more point, which makes 4 
for C. C. 



Soccer football, so popular on the 
Pacific coast, has been sta,rted in Col- 
orado, the Sacred Heart college and 
State Industrial school having good 
teams. The game is destined to be- 
come more popular. 



The Kansas football team has 
adopted the honor system in regard 
to training rules. 



THE TIGER 



ENGINEERING AND FORESTRY NEWS 



FRESHMAN FLUNKER SHOULD 
BE REMOVED FROM ENGIN- 
EERING DEPARTMENT. 



Prof. Mills Writes Interesting Notes 

As to the Training of an 

Engineer. 



Except in those branches of en- 
gineering where the basis is chemical 
knowledge, whether organic and phy- 
siological as in sanitary engineering, 
or inorganic as in mining engineering, 
the basis of the work of an engineer 
is general physics, especially those 
portions generally known under the 
titles of niechanics, thermodynamics, 
and electricit}'. And for physics the 
basis is mathematics. 

But it is to be noted that the ability 
to demonstrate theorems of mathe- 
matics, or to solve mathematical prob- 
lems does not imply an ability to ab- 
sorb physical facts and to think in 
physical terms. While the mathemat- 
ical processes of arithmetic, geometry, 
algebra, calculus, trigonometry of cir- 
cular and hyperbolic functions and 
both plane and solid geometry, to- 
gether with the more advanced theory 
of quaternions and differential equa- 
tions enter daily into the work of a 
student of physics, the ability to han- 
dle these processes counts for nothing 
without that subtle addition known as 
physical imagination or the more fre- 
quent characteristic which might be 
called physical sense. 

In the same way, although physics 
is in its breadth the basis of all en- 
gineering that is not distinctly chem- 
ical and of much that is through the 
border of physical chemistry, there is 
one important mental characteristic 
without which an ability in physical 
lines is of no real avail to the student 
of engineering. This might justly be 
termed the engineering sense. It is 
primarily, of course, a sense of pro- 
portions, and is a sense of financial or 
economic proportions. The primary 
question with the engineer is one of 
whether a certain physical arrange- 
ment is worth while financially; what 
does it cost and what will it pay are 
the present questions of engineering. 
Engineering judgment cannot of 
course be taught, but without it the 
engineer is bound to fail or at the 
most is condemned to essentially rou- 
tine and manual positions. 



For this reason it seems to the 
writer that an engineering school owes 
a duty to its students of encouraging 
them to find their real bent. This may 
be done in a positive way, but must 
also be done in a purely negative man- 
ner by indicating to a student his in- 
ability in any one of the three lines 
mentioned above. Thus the writer be- 
lieves that in the first year of engin- 
eering school work there should be 
sorted out and removed all those stu- 
dents who cannot handle the mathe- 
matics requisite to the future physics; 
and in the same way there should be 
removed in the sophomore year in 
physics all those students who lack 
ability for physical conceptions and 
analysis; and in the third year as far 
as is possible with, the student's pres- 
ent knowledge of engineering he 
should be tested on practical sense and 
judgment and if evidently deficient, 
discouraged from continuing. The 
word discouraged is used advisedly be- 
cause it is felt that on this question 
of ability judgment is hard to pass 
correctly at the early age of the aver- 
age student. On the other hand the 
student who cannot handle the mathe- 
matics or the physics of a rigorous 
college course should be effectively 
discouraged by removal from an en- 
gineering* department. 

This apparently harsh dictum is be- 
lieved to be justified on two grounds, 
both related directly to the good of 
the student body. First,, there is the 
greater effectiveness of work in 
classes not impeded by a large per- 
centage either of uninterested or in- 
competent students. This, by raising 
the standard, makes for a better gen- 
eral reputation on the part of the 
course and hence for a better market 
value for the engineering ability of 
the graduates. Second, there is the 
question of the future welfare of those 
who do not survive the tests imposed 
above. Is it efiicient economically or 
of immense value for a man that very 
evidently cannot succeed in engineer- 
ing to struggle along and be passed 
by his instructors only to fail in en- 
gineering in later life? Is it not prob- 
able that the general drill of a college 
course or an early start in business 
would be of more value to hiin later 
in his life than the ineffectual follow- 
ing of the detailed and highly special- 

Continucd on Page 10 



SCOPE OF HYDRAULIC LABOR- 
ATORY INCREASED. 

The work under Professor Martin 
in the Hydraulic Laboratory now in- 
cludes a discussion of important hy- 
draulic enterprises and assigned arti- 
cles in the leading technical papers. 
The articles cover recent installations 
and reports on hydraulic topics. This 
addition to the course promises to 
make it of interest 'and value. 



SENIOR FORESTERS RETURN 
FROM EXTENDED TRIP. 



Forest Conditions in the San Juan 

Country Studied — Reports to be 

Embodied in Theses. 



The seniors of the School of For- 
estry, who went on a trip to study 
lun'.bering, returned last week in time 
for the Thanksgiving game at Den- 
ver. They left Colorado Springs on 
Friday, November ii, and arri^'ed in 
Pagosa Springs the next day. Dur- 
ing the stay there, they studied lum- 
bering operations in the surrounding 
country. Prof. Coolidge joined them 
on Thursday of the next week. Pa- 
gosa Springs is in a part of Colorado 
where very good forest conditions are 
the rule and there are several large 
mills. The largest one is the Sollen- 
berger mill with, a capacity of 100,000 
feet per day. The felling and haul- 
ing in connection with this mill is 
very much up to date and it was here 
that most of the studies were made. 
This mill cuts yellow pine chiefly and 
has an area of about 400 square miles 
to draw from. Saturday, the 19th, 
the party left this place and pro- 
ceeded to Alamosa and from there to 
Salida. In this region they studied 
the operations of a number of small 
sawmills and at Marshall Pass they 
made a more detailed study of lodge- 
pole pine lumbering. The party ar- 
rived in town Wednesday afternoon. 

The information gathered on the 
trip will be incorporated in a de- 
tailed report which amounts practically 
to a thesis on lumbering. ^Moreover 
the reports embody facts of sound 
value that cannot be found in any 
books on lumbering and are an aid 
to following classes studying the sub- 
Continued on Page 9 



THE TIGER 



The VVaekly INewspaperof Colorado College 

A. E BRYSON Editor-in-Chief 

S. WILKIE DEAN... Business Manager 

Sam J. Shelton Assistant Editor 

Richard L. Hughes Assistant Editor 

Harry Black Assistant Editor 

T. Wynne Ross Athletic Editor 

Robert m. Copeland Engineering Editor 

FRED S. Baker Forestry Editor 

Helen Canon Alumni Editor 

Mamie C. Detmoyer Exchantc Editor 

Edith I,. Summers Local Editor 

J. A. Root Local Editor 

Ray H, Sayre Assistant Manager 

E. E. Hedblom Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

A. W. Donovan, C.E. Hayward. Bruce Weirick, William 

Lloyd, Joe Sinton, Elsie Greene, Lillian Duer, Grace 

Wilson, Dorothy Cook, Dorothy Stott 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to T'heTiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorad* 

CoUege, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phones: Editor, Main 1975. Manager, Main 2073 

vt^^^^^mu.* K Entered at the postofHce at Colorado 
^■^SaSP*^ Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



College Customs. 

There appears elsewhere in this is- 
sue a communication from a sopho- 
more in regard to the observance of 
campus rules by the freshmen. His 
position is that the observance on the 
non-observance of these rules is a 
matter of college loyalty and makes 
no difference to the sophs except as 
they are entrusted with the enforce- 
ment of the rules. 

The position is well taken. Fresh- 
men in Colorado College are handled 
very mildly as compared with their 
treatment in some other institutions. 
What few rules we have should be 
rigidly adhered to and enforced. In- 
cidentally, certain of these rules, such 
as smoking on the Campus, apply to 
sophs and upperclassmen as well as 
freshmen. If these classes do not 
observe the rules, it will be difficult 
to hold the freshmen to them. 

Concerning Championships. 

Colorado College is justly entitled 
to claim the football championship of 
the Rocky Mountain region. It is 
not the purpose of this editorial to 
go into a deep consideration of the 
matter^ but as the complexities and 
intricacies of the dispute are set forth 
elsewhere. If Boulder does claim 
the championship, there will be two 



rival claimants for the honors and 
both will be happier for the belief 
that each has the championship team. 
Colorado College can substantiate 
her claim with logical reasoning and 
results attained; Boulder must base 
her contention on the exploded theory 
of comparative scores. The wishy- 
washy reasoning of certain corre- 
spondence school writers on the Den- 
\er papers is scarcely worth the men- 
tal worry that it takes to follow the 
long-winded, far-reached calculations 
that they employ in backing up Boul- 
der's claims. 

According to the theory of com- 
parative scores, Colorado College de- 
feated D. U., D." U. tied Marquette, 
Alarquette tied Notre Dame, last 
year Notre Dame tied Michigan, this 
year I\Iichigan tied Pennsylvania and 
beat Minnesota. Pennsylvania is 

picked as one of the strongest East- 
ern teams, ergo, the Tigers are equal 
to the strongest Eastern teams. 
Would Boulder agree to that? 

Alumni Support. 

Last week there was held at wide- 
ly divergent cities, two enthusiastic 
meetnigs of Colorado College alumni, 
one in Denver and another in Boston. 
No factor, beside the student body 
itself, can mean as much to the wel- 
fare of the institution as the work 
and interest of our alumni. That 
the spirit of loyalty has been deeply 
imbedded in these "grads" is evident 
from the enthusiasm of these last 
two meetings. From reports, no 
rally of freshmen enthusiasts was ever 
more deeply enthusiastic than these 
alumni banquets. 

There are numerous other places 
where a sufficient number of alumni 
are congregated to form an alumni 
association. There is no better 
means of keeping alive the C. C. 
spirit and boosting the institution 
than such an organization. 



TOLSTOY AND STEINER. 



An article which appeared in the 
last number of the "Intercollegian" 
will be of interest to students of 
Cilorado College since it was our 
pleasure only a short time ago to 
hear Dr. Steiner, of Grinell College. 
It is a story of his visit to the home 
of the great Russian who died re- 
cently. Count Leo Tolstoy. The 
story follows: 



On Setting the World on Fire. 

"There, is a house in Russia known 
as Yasnaya Polyana. In the picture 
it looks severe and forbidding; the 
ground is covered with snow and the 
dull shadows of the leafless trees fall 
gray and harsh upon the blank white. 
It shelters an old man and his family. 
He was once a wild and reveling 
young aristocrat who tasted the worst 
of student life in Russia — a worst 
that makes our smart college sins in 
America seem like the half-conscious 
misdeeds of a child. And he came 
through the years to see the folly, 
and the shame, and the crime of it 
all; and he changed his mode of life. 
Fle is one of the most-worshipped, 
most-riduculed, most-hated men alive 
to-day; that is, whatever we may 
think of him, he is far too great to 
be ignored. One night he sat there 
with another man. The other man 
was then a young student lost in a 
maze that as yet few men in North 
America are ever called upon to tread. 
Since that time he has become largely 
and dearly known in America as a 
powerful friend of men. There were 
the two of them: Leo Tolstoy and his 
guest, Edward A. Steiner. The pic- 
tures of the old Ciunt would tell us 
that there grew a deep line between 
his heavj' brows and his gray eyes 
became terribly bright as he said: 
"Young man, you sweat too much 
blood for the world; sweat some for 
yourself first." 

There is a welter of exposures of 
crime in high [rlaces — in the palace, in 
the halls of government, in the courts, 
in tlie churches; we are called upon 
monthly — with the arrival of a fresh 
batch of magazines — to break out 
anew into lamentings over the short- 
comings of the rich and piwerful. 
We are challenged, not always by 
fri\o!ous voices, to "crush the ma- 
chine" and "bust the corporations" 
and "slay the beast." So it is our 
good pleasure always to sweat blood 
for the world. 

Has this quiet, loved, hated, wor- 
shiped, despised man in Russia not a 
momentous message for the student 
in college? Reform is in the air: it 
is popular, demanded by a crowd and 
lauded in the press. We see where 
much can be made better and long to 
be out in the fight. We are prepar- 
ing ourselves to set this old world 
afire with the ringing battle-cry of 
"Purity, Equality, Justice.'' There 
are manj- perhaps who are counting 



THE TIGER 



Colorado College 

Calendar 

New Cover New Cuts 

Better Paper 



On Sale At All Book Stores 



Seventy-five Cents Each 



Special to Students : at Coburn Library or in Office of 
President's Secretary . . Sixty Cents Each 



pon the individual help of a great 
lany of us. 

There is a world beyond partly 
ood, partly evil; but it is no lifeless 
Dccimen waiting for us to dissect 
nd comment upon; it is a bewilder- 
ig, wild, live thing, and we shall 
ich become part and parcel of its 
fe. What then? After all, the 
ords of this remarkable seer need 
comment: "Young man you 
.veat too much blood for the world; 
veat some for yourself first. " 



The upperclassnien look to the 
sophomores to enforce these rules 
and the sophomores have met with 
no little opposition which the fresh- 
men seem to take as a cute little 
class scrap. This is not the case. 
The freshmen are supposed to wear 
"these little caps" as a college cus- 
tom and they are not hurting the 
sophomores when they do not wear 
them. 

The rules are to be enforced to the 
letter. 



college, would go far towards secur- 
ing the gymnasium, and if the field 
could be extended to include every 
town that sends students to this insti- 
tution, there could be no doubt of ulti- 
mate success. Why not organize a 
boosters' club? BOOSTER, '12. 



A BAND— WHY NOT? 



CONTRIBUTED 



A SUGGESTION. 



YE FRESHMEN HATS. 



Written by a Sophomore. 

On recommendation of several up- 
erclassmen who are anxious to see 
le rules regarding the freshmen caps 
nforced, the sophomores have au- 
lorized the following: 

"That the freshmen do not realize 
lat the caps are to be worn on th.e 
ampus at all times, day and night, 
rid other times, fussing, studying, or 
t any social function on the campus. 



We have heard much in the last 
week about the Ewing fund campaign, 
and we have seen that C. C. students 
are not slow to respond to such an 
appeal. Now we ask, "Why not a 
gymnasium fund campaign?" By this 
we mean a campaign by the students. 
We know that Prexy is trying very 
hard to raise this money, and we feel 
that his efforts would be more suc- 
cessful if every student would take a 
personal interest in the matter, and 
never neglect an opportunity to boost 
this important enterprise. A lively 
campaign in this city, where the peo- 
ple take such a hearty interest in the 



When students were undertaking to 
raise money enough to enable us to 
have a band at the Thanksgiving 
game, this was the principal query 
that they had to answer: 

"Why don't you fellows get up a 
College band? Every other institu- 
tion of the standing of C. C. has a 
good band of its own." 

This argument is sound. There 
are few colleges of our rank that do 
not have a first class band. There 
is no reason why there should not be 
a Colorado College band. There is 
plenty of musical talent here and the 
proposition would be good financially, 
both for the members who could play 
at functions in the city and neighbor- 
ing country, and for the Students' 
Association which _ could profitably 
use in other ways the money ordi- 
narily spent for a band at the games. 



THE TIGER 

Your face counts for 10 per cent — your apparel 90 per cent. 
Hat, collar, cravat, shirt, coat, vest, trousers, gloves, shoes and 
your face — that's all of you the public sees. 

If apparel is 90 per cent of your appearance, do you wonder 

people size you up by the clothes you wear? If clothing counts 90 per cent in making an 

impression, be sure that your apparel is all to the good — all from 




GAND-JXy^mS"^ 



Colorado Springs, ION. Tejon St. 



Denver, Sixteenth at Stout 



TheShackleford-Henley 
Leather Goods Co. 

18 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 
Makers of 

Trunks and Leather Goods 

We Carry the Most Complete Line of 
Traveling Goods, Ladies' Hand Bags, 
Pocket Books and All Sorts of Leather 
Goods in Colorado. 



DEXTER & HUDSON 

EXCHANGE BARBER 
SHOP 

Room 307, Third Floor 
Exchange Bank Building 



The Dentan 

Printing Company 

No. 9 So. Cascade Auenue 

FIRST-CLASS PRINTING 
at REASONABLE RATES 

Telepnone Main No. 602 



SQUAD TO BE GIVEN BANQUET 

Continued from Page 1. 

classed the C. C. men in weight and 
size. 

The dining room will be decorated 
in the colors of the two institutions. 
Tables for the Tigers will be beauti- 
ful with Gold and Black while the 
Brown and White will predominate 
on the tables reserved for the Ter- 
rors. The idea of making the ban- 
quet a testimonial for both teams has 
met with general approval. The 
Colorado College men were delighted 
with the idea and the High School 
boys were not slow in expressing 
their appreciation of the movement 
to give recognition to their efforts. 

And this is not all — on ne.xt Wed- 
nesday night the victorious ones are 
to hold forth at another elaborate 
banquet, the donor of which is a 
deep, dark secret. After the feast, 
ihey will attend the show at the 
Opera House, "The Beauty Spot." 

Lastly but not leastly, Coach Roth- 
geb, it is reported, will give a Dutch 
lunch sometime in the near future 
for the squad. 

Um, don't you wish you were a 
Tiger? 



The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies, Fixtures 

208 N. Tejon Street Phones Main 812, 830 

Lowell-Meservey Hdw. Co. 

Dealers in Paints, Oil, Glass, Every- 
thing in Hardware 



106 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springs 



Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Out West Building 

The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co. 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



THINKING OF NEW SHOES? 



THE WHITAKER-K 




of this season's 
that by making 



It is our good fortune to be able 
to offer to our men customers the 
hest $4.00 boot that has ever 
been sold in the city. Box Calf, 
Vici Kid and Russia Calf in 
Blucher and regular patterns. 
Medium and extra heavy soles. 
Every pair genuine Goodyear 
welts and in a variety of shapes 
and lasts, including the "Ped and 
Rialto" — two of the most perfect 
new lasts. These goods are so good 
a sale we make you our friend. 



Get one of these posters with a pair of 
shoes. 




Size of Poster 12x38 inches 



I 



THE TIGER 



The New Bull Pup Shoe 



in Patent Colt and Tan Russia Calf. The 

new Bull Pup last is made with a full round 
high toe, high heel and arcn and with extreme short forepart. Strictly a young ladies' shoe. 
There's nothing more indicative of true refinement than neatly-fitted footwear, and there's 
no better place to buy it than right here. Step in and let us fit you with a pair of our new 
Bull Pup shoes at $4.00 the pair. 



We Combine Both 
QUALITY AND PRICE 



^<1A FIT FOR EVERY FOO-O-- 




rr i»AY8 TO [^ 


THE 

EA 

no EC 


1 . AT DEAL'S 
1 -"■'■■^ 


EXPERT 
SHOE FIITING 


^,--^107 SouTM TuoN StittirT^-^-..^ 





Deichmann & Douglas 
Floral Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER. Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 
Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 

To College 
Men and Women 
We Are Known as 
"The Satisfactory 
Jeweler". To 
New Ones We 
Soon Will Be. 

Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

' 'Satisfactory Jewelry 

Store" 

Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



GRIFFITH ELECTED 

Continued from Page 1 

and favorablj' known, gave him 2,210 
plurality. Mesa county, of which he 
is county attorney at present, gave 
him 1,100 plurality. Fremont coun- 
ty gave him 300 plurality. He used 
to live there. Las Animas county 
and other counties in the southern 
part of the state showed the effects 
of the campaigning of Cooley, Mc- 
Hendrie, Floyd and other college 
men of Griffith's day. 

But there was no sectionalism to 
Griffith's election. Counties in the 
northern part of the state, counties 
in the eastern part, counties on the 
western slope, middle counties and 
southern counties alike scratched 
Barnett for Griffith. 



SENIOR FORESTERS RETURN 

Continued from Page 5 

ject. Trips of this nature are thor- 
oughly useful and every good school 
of forestry has them. There is noth- 
ing equal to seeing a thing personally 
to teach a person all the details of 
lumbering so thoroughly in a short 
time. 



Antlers 

Turkish Baths 

(Opposite Elks Club) 
Open Day and Night 

BATHS OF ALL KINDS. Also Chiro- 
pady and Swedish Massage. Treat- 
ment at Residence by Appointment. 

CARL J. WENBERG, Prop. 

Graduate Swedish Masseur 

Phone Red 33 14 E. Bijou Street 

FOR 

Christmas Shopping 

GO TO 

THE MAY CO. 

23 North Tejon Street 

10% Discount to Students 

Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



i SHOE CO., 



132 North 
Tejon St. 




TWO IMPORTANT FACTORS 

A Corset and a Shoe are the two 
greatest factors toward a woman's 
attractive appearance. The same 
points must be considered in the 
choice of each. A corset must 
give graceful lines to the waist 
and hips without confining them 
injuriously or uncomfortalily. A 
shoe must impart graceful lines 
and a snug fit, without cramping 
or binding; there must be no wax, 
tacks or seams on the inside, and 
the arch must be well supported. 
Both must be in style. All these 
points are to be found in WHITAKER-KESTER 
SHOES. Nothing that can add to the comfort, 
health and attractiveness of the wearer has been over- 
looked in the making. You can well afford to in- 
vestigate when you want good footwear. 




10 



THE TIGER 





'/?^^. 



In Selecting a Full Dress or a Tuxedo Suit 
a Man Must Exert the 

keenest judgment, because he is about to make an investment of 
no small amount of money and he expects the suit to last him a 
considerable length of timer "Benjamin" Full Dress clothes are 
not extremely high-priced, but they are as correctly styled and as 
painstakingly made as any custom tailor's. Full Dress Suits $40 
to $55. Tuxedo Suits $35 to $50. 

Liberal Discounts to Students 



MANHATTAN SHIRTS 
STETSON HATS 



FOWNES GLOVES 
PERRINE GLOVES 



Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton-Rustic Home 

T\ * o No. 419 South El Paso St. 

Uairy §) Phone Main 442 

Photography 

In All Its Branches 

Clark 

112 South Tejon St. 
Special Discount to All Students 

Shoe Repairing. Clothes Cleaned and Pressed. 
Second-Hand Shoes a .d Clothing 

J.H.PERKINS 



7>4 S. Cascade 



Colorado Springs 



PRATT, The Barber 

Is At the Alta Vista Hotel 

Me Solicits the Patronage of the 
College Boys 



BOULDER CLAIMS CHAMPIONSHIP 

Continued from Page I. 

and can see the matter as it is, know 
that Boulder's claims have no founda- 
tion. 

It is a known fact that Boulder de- 
feated every team they played after 
they were down and out, "hasbeens," 
out of the running, and had no life 
whatever, while it is certain that the 
Mines, Utah, and the Aggies were 
not down and out when we played 
them and fought their best. This is 
a thing to keep in mind. 

However, Colorado College has de- 
feated Denver U., the holders of the 
championship, won the largest num- 
ber of games and is the real Rocky 
Mountain Conference champion. 
Comparative scores cannot be counted 
in the championship and Boulder 
knows that. 



FRESHMAN FLUNKER 

Continued from Page 5 

ized training of an engineering pro- 
fession? 

The suggestions of the above rigor- 
ous tests are also believed to be borne 
out by the answers to questions re- 
lating to the aim and efficiency of an 
engineering school. Any professional 
school, whether theological, legal, 
medical, or technical, owes a duty to 
the public not to put its seal on any 
possible incompetent. The more al- 
truistic its aims the more this seems 
to be true. The more it must striye 
to make its reputation the more this 
is believed to be true. The more effi- 
cient its teaching is to be, the more 



WINDOW SLEEPING TENTS 



THE OUT WEST 


TENT AND AWNING CO. 


113'2 NORTH TEJON STREET 





Phone 917 



GEO. R. BERGEN, 0. D. 

lUANF'G OPTICIAN 
Eyes Tested 611-12 Exch. Nat. Bank BIdg. 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented 
and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing a Typewriter. The 
New No. 10 Model Has All Latest 
Improvements 

Zimmerman Supply 

Company 



22 E. Kiowa St. 
Phone Main 374 



Established 1890 



WILIIAMJON 
HAFrNDRO) 

ENGRAVDRS-rRINTmJ 




^mM 




IXE>T'JVE>K. COl/Q 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 



THE TIGER 



11 



A Full Line of Benson & Hedges Cigarettes 

HUGHES 

North I *J Tejon 



Gel Your Picnic Supplies 

^= AT = 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER. Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Notary Public 

A. J. LAWTON 

Real Estate, Loans and Insurance 
10>< E.Pilce's Peak Ave., Colorado Springs 

Suggestions for Xmas 

A Kodak 

A Waterman Pen 

A C. C Pennant 

A C. C. Pillow Top 

A College Calendar 

A Box of Whitman's Famous 

"Fussy Chocolates" 

A Box of Fine Cigars 

A Box of Stationery 

A Manicure Case 

Perfumes, Toilet Articles, 

Atomizers, etc. 

MURRAY^S 

(Opposite Campus) 



must those incapable of receiving it 
be removed early lest the mass aver- 
age be below the ideal. 



EWING TREASURER MAKES 
STATEMENT. 



The Ewing Fund campaign has 
taken a decided slump in comparison 
with former years. Two years ago 
$8oo.oo was raised. Last year $543.00. 

This year, excepting Cutler Acad- 
emy and friends, only $352.00 has 
been raised. This is the last week 
of the campaign and we urge every 
student on that committee to get 
busy. The captains are working hard 
and we feel that by Saturday night 
our obligation will be met. The 
slump is largely due to the lack of 
support of the freshmen class. So 
far only about 25 per cent have sub- 
scribed. Last year 80 per cent, of 
the class responded. We appeal to 
the freshmen to consider this obli- 
gation seriously and sign to pay later 
in the year. We would also like to 
appeal to the faculty for better sup- 
port. Last year $150 was raised 
from this soin-ce. We were disap- 
pointed to find that so far only $60.00 
has been turned in. Of course this 
is just an oversight on their part, but 
we ask all to remember that it is only 
the co-operation of faculty, students 
and friends that will enable us to keep 
Ewing in South America. — A. J. H., 
Treas. 



PEARSONS' PROGRAM DECEM- 
BER 2. 



Music Warnock 

Current Events H. Sinton 

Debate — Resolved, That there is no 

need for restricted suffrage in the 

South. 
Affirmative. Negative. 

Joe Sinton Shields 



A.G. 



8 



The Spalding 
Trade-Mark 




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the World as a 

GUARANTEE OF 
QUALITY 



are the Largest Manu- 
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for All Athletic Sports and 
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If Ymi ^'^ interested in 
H iUU Athletic Sport you 
should have a copy of the 
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complete encyolopedia of 

What's New iu Sport 

and is sent free on request. 



A. G. SPALD.NG & BROS. 

1616 Arapahoe Street, Denver, Colorado 

We can sell you solid gold rings, set 
with nice genuine diamond $5.50. 
We have one small lot of 1-ik. solid 
gold gents' and ladies' rings, differant 
designs, set with nice white diamonds. 
Other jewelers get $20 to $25 for 
the same thing. Our price $12.50 
and $14, and we have a big selection 
diamond scarf pins from $3,50 up, 
diamond studs from $8.50 up. Big- 
gest selection of gents' ami ladies' 
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M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 

27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 

Money Adnanced on All ValuabUs 

Watch the Caps You Meet 

You won't need an intro- 
duction to the HEIDCAP. 
It is not a mere head cover- 
ing. It has character. It 
gives character to the wear- 
er. It is made of exclusive 
English cap cloths. It is a 
thoroughbred. Try on a 
HEIDCAP. 



12 



THE TIGER 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co. 
Groceries and 



Meats 



ff.»M 



m 




115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



MUETH'S 

The Place Where the Stand- 
ard Is Never Lowered. High 
Class Goods at Reasonable 
Prices. Ice Cream, Hot 
and Cold Drinks. 

Lunches and Afternoon Teas 
Ask Any Old Student 

CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and I n su.ran cc 

5 Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 



Cox Sons & Vining' 

262Fou'th Ave., New York 
Gowns and Caps 

silk Faculty Gowns and 
Hoods. Lowest Prices 
Best Workmanship. 



The D. Y. Butcher Drug Co. 

DRUGS, KODAKS, SUPPLIES 

Free and Prompt Delivery 
Cor. Opposite P. 0. Phones 90 and 750 




CICERONIAN CLUB PROGRAM 
—DECEMBER 2. 



Music Ormes 

Current Events Scott 

Debate — Resolved, That the best in- 
terests of the laboring classes will be 

advanced by the organization of a 

separate Labor party. 
Affirmative. Negative. 

Greenlee. Harrison. 

Taplin. Kleir. 

E.xteniporaneous Speeches. 



ENGINEERS' CLUB PROGRAM- 
DECEMBER 2. 



Report on Beaver Land Company. 

Bartlett 
Mine Disasters in Southern Colorado. 

H. N. Fay 

Current Events L. E. Griswold 

Extemporaneous Speeches. 

Debate — Resolved, That engi-neers 

should be licensed. 
Affirmative. Negative. 

L. C. Swanson. M. Reynolds. 

W. A. Wa-ng. T. H. Hatch. 



EWING WRITES ABOUT C. C.'S FIELD IN 
SOUTH AMERICA 



Dear Friends: 

In connection with the work of the 
University Association, I beg to make 
reference to some of the facts indi- 
cating the present status and tenden- 
cies. From experience, it is clear 
that the men coming to the rooms are 
open for frank, friendly conversations 
about the deeper and more serious 
things of life; that they are certainly 
eager for real friendship; that their 
interest in the Association and belief 
in its mission in the university is best 
evidenced by their willingness to 
work for it and' by inviting their 
friends to visit the rooms with a 
view of getting them to apply for 
membership. These men are willing 
to give their time in propagating the 
Association idea, but in order to work 
effectively, they must first be trained 
and equipped. 

The members of the directing com- 
mittee, representing as "they do the 
four departments of the university, 
by their worK for new members and 
the giving of time to planning activi- 
ties of a practical nature, are growing 
constantly in the spirit of the move- 
ment. The President of the Asso- 
ciation recently came to the office and 
spent three hours going over import- 
ant questions relative to the program 
and policy of the same. He has now 



Lallie Surveying Instrument & Supply Co. 




alii. 
1622 



Standard Tran- 
sits, compasses, 
levels, barome- 
ters, field and 
>ffice supplies. 
Solar ephemeris 
mailed free up- 
on request, 
e's Single Reflecting Solar att'm't 
Arapahoe Street, Denver, Celo. 



No More Wrinkles 



I have a remedy that will speedily eradicate 
any case of wrinkles— no matter how bad or 
what the cause. It makes old faces look 
young, removes all lines and wrinkles, 
corrects flabby or withered skin, makes thin 
faces plump, fills out hollow cheeks, will 
develop any part of the body round and full 
without any massaging. Call at my parlors 
and I will explain fully and convince you. 



Miss N. E. Joiinson 



Phone 687 



324 R. Tejon Street 



JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejen Stree 

The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Gives 
Special Attention to Accounts of Students 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, PresiJem Ira Har V-Preiident 

M. C. Gilc Wm. F. Richards 

Donald D. Wilfley, Sccretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M. 

Hunt Up 

BisselFs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

COLLEGE SEALS 

We have just had made for us 
a handsome College Seal Sticker 
that is just the thing for your 
stationery, etc. Put up 24 in a 
package for only lOc. Just the 
thing for your Xmas packages. 

Whitney & Grimwood 



THE TIGER 



15 



GIFTS 

Are you wondering what to 
get your friend that will 
be appreciated? Our store 
should be visited at once. 
Our line of leather goods, 
pennants, fine stationery 
will give you just what you 
want at pleasing prices. 

OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 

12 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 

High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



Phone Main 2055 



Art Needle Work 



THE HUNT & VAN NICE 
Art Specialty Store 

Stamping, Designing, Perforating, Linens, 

Lawns, Best Hand-Painted China 
8 Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Fe(>d, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co. 



M JT Violins,Mandolins,. 
Guitars c-^Baiyos, 



The World's Stand- 
ard. Tone clear, 
mellow and very 
powerful. 
Absolutelyperfectin scale. 
Finest workmanship. 
Prices from $15 upward. 

Send for illustrated 
Catalogtothe makers 
For sale by a!l leading 
music dealers. 

Desk D8:2 

Lyon Cz. Healy 

Chicago 



V^ 



arranged to be at the rooms regularly 
each day, in order to get acquainted 
with the members and secretary. 
The example of the president is likely 
to be followed by other members of 
the committee. Regular committees 
for receptions, meetings, lectures, 
finances and classes have recently 
been appointed, and the president and 
secretary will give much time to 
meeting these groups with a view of 
getting them to study the real situa- 


ZEHNER'S 

UN. Tejon St. 

Jewelers and Opticians 

See Our Window Display of 
Holiday Goods 

Your Choice, $2.00 


tion and later make definite proposals 




to the Commission Directiva or Cab- 








inet. 

The last week in July a reception 
was given at the rooms in honor of 
Prof. Ernesto Nelson of the Univer- 
sity of La Plata, who has studied for 
several years in the United States, 
and Mr. P. A. Conard, General Sec- 
retary of the Association in Monte- 
video, Uruguay. A group of students 
were present from the various de- 
partments of the university. Mr. Nel- 


A. Box of 

BURGESS CANDY 

Is a Bundle 
of PURE JOY 

"You'll Like the Burgess Store" 


112-114 North Tejon St. 


son gave a most interesting lecture 




on "The Social Life of the North 
American Students," and Mr. Conard 
exhibited a number of views giving 
an idea of student life In all parts of 
the world, with the World's Christian 
Student Federation as the connecting 
link. This lecture and exhibit has 
been helpful in aiding the men to real- 
ize their present condition and in cre- 
ating a desire for unity and real so- 
ciability among the students of the 
university. University or college 
spirit is entirely foreign to these men. 
A few students belong to athletic 




a 
(( 

s 

g 


SATAN 

rose and said unto himself, 
Hades is getting lonesome 
nee the people are getting such 
Dod soles from 

PETE'S 

)0 East Dale 



14 



THE TIGEK 



Our Prices for the Very Best of Work 



Gentlemen's 

Pants, sponged and pressed , ^ .25 
Suit, sponged and pressed . . .50 
Pants, thoroughly cleaned & pressed .50 
Suit, thoroughly cleaned and pressed 1.00 
Hats, cleaned aud blocked . . .50 

Dyeing of ladies' and gents' garments 
to perfection. 



Ladies' 

Skirts, sponged and pressed . $ .50 

Skirts, thoroughlysponged&pressed .75 

Jackets, sponged and pressed . .50 

" thoroughlysponged&pressed .75 

Kid Gloves, cleaned, all lengths . .10 

Ladies' evening and party gowns cleaned 
by us like new. 



We Clean or Dye Anything from a Necktie to a Carpet 



Phone 
Main 1288 




218 North 



french^yers ^ejon Street 
and Cleaners. 



For Best and Quick Delivery 

SEE 

The Monument Coal Co. 

28 East Kiowa Street 

William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House. London, E. C. 



THE 

Crissey & Fowler 
Lumber Co. 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 



Chafins Dishes 



Tinware 



For a Square Deal 

A. S. BLAKE 

Is the Man to See 

107 Norlh Tcjon Phone 465 

Nickie Ware Cutlery 

Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



Remember We Handle Nothing but the 
BEST GRADES OF FUEL 

"EVERY LUMP A LUMP OF HEAT" 

The Central Fuel Co 

1 28 N. Tejon Street Phone 1101 



clubs in the city, but there are no dis- 
tincti\e university athletic teams or 
events. 

A three-hour conversation recently 
with a keen engineering student, who 
has spent two years reading and 
studying the Hindu philosophies, who 
readily admits that he knows nothing 
of the Bible, saying also that he is 
willing to make an honest investiga- 
tion of the claims of Christ, reveals 
the condition of hundreds of these 
men and is a mighty inspiration both 
for extensive and intensive work. 
This man with several others is now 
com'ng regularly for conversations 
about the truths of Christianity. As 
I live with these promising young- 
men, who just now are like ships 
without anchors at sea in a great 
storm, and come to understand the 
multitude of terrific, destructive influ- 
ences at work about their lives, the 
necessity of holding back because of 
language limitations, realizes itself in- 
to no small burden, I can assure you. 
.A. prominent law student who is study- 
ing the life of Christ, said to me, "We 
are without a guide and that is the 
cause of so much individual unrest 
and waste in life energy." The fur- 
therance of the work will necessitate 
not only the giving of life energy but 
also the investment of much money 
on the part of Christian men who 
want to mkae a contribution which 
will influence profoundly the charac- 
ter of the nation. Very respectfully, 
HARRY E. EWING. 

BOOKS 

Stationery, Pictures and 

Novelties at 

The Pike's Peak Book & Stationery Co. 



Broken Lenses 
Duplicated 



Phone Black 233 
Colorado Souvenirs 



27-27' 2 South Tejon Street 



Peone Black 354 



C. B. LAUTERMAN 

Jeweler and Manufac- 
turing Optician 

121 N. TEJON STREET Colorado Springs 



10c STORE AND MORE ! 

THE EiVIPORIUlM 

1 10 S. TEJON STREET 



College Inn 

Freshmen!! 

Tliis Is the Place for 

GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



Fine Watch Work 



Diamond Setting a Specialty 



H. E. Kapelke 

Watchmaker ana Jeweler 



130 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 



Grand Union Tea Co. 

Importers of Fine Teas and 
Coffees 

Phone Main 2678 220 N. Tejon St. 



On hand as usual 
but just a little better 
equipped for serving your 
needs — 



The 

WATERMAN 

PRESS 

PRINTERS and 
BINDERS 



THE TIGER 



15 



What's All Right? 

"Extra Clean" Lignite ! 

It Is--lt Is-It Is All Right ! 

What? 

"Extra Clean" Lignite ! 

The Colorado Springs 

112 Pike's Peak Avenur 
Two Phones, Main 230 



Fuel Co. 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

"The College Favorite ' 



The Favorite Shopping 

Place for the College 

Woman 



College Boys Reitiember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 



IO6I2 E. Pike'i Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



• 



Star 
Laundry 



The College Laundry 

The ONLY Laundry which advertises in 
The Tiger. We give 20% discount to you. 
The best woric in the state for as low a 
price as any. 

B. J. DICKSON, Agent Phone Main 342 

W.L LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



(f^- 



Christmas Suggestions 

for men, displayed by Gorton's only 

House Coats $12.00 down to $5.00 

Bath Robes $12.00 down to $4.00 

Leather Goods of All Kinds 

Mufflers $7.50 down to 50 cents 

Fur Gloves $10.00 down to $1.50 

200 dozen neckties, boxed, $2.50 down to 50 cents 

Tie Rings, Tie Holders, Cuff Button Sets, Stick Pins 

Specialists in Good Clothes and Nothing Else 



'■% 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 



^: 





E. Pike's Peak 
113 



Correct Dress for Men. A 



Jf 



119 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



II Local Department || 



T. Hunter '06 has been visiting 
friends in this city during the past 
week. 



True, a former D. U. student, vis- 
ited his sister last Monday. 



Gwendolyn Hedgecock gave a party 
for several of her friends in Denver 
last Saturday night. 



Eight Sigma Chi couples attended 
the Sin Lazare dance in Denver Sat- 
urday. 



Lenore Pollen deliglitfully enter- 
tained Contemporary Wednesday 
evening, November 30, at her home 
in Rfanitou. The occasion was in 
honor of Melicent Campbell, who is 
visiting here. 



Invitations for the annual function 
of the Minerva Literary Society are 
out. It is to be held at the Acacia 
Hotel on the night of December 
thirteenth. 



The Sigma Chi fraternity will give 
a dance at San Luis school Saturday 
night. 



The Glee Club had its picture taken 
last Tuesday noon. 



Women's doll show, the proceeds of 
which go for charitable purposes, will 
occur on December 15. 



Bern's Freshly Roasted Coff e^ 

will make 10 more cups to the lb. 
than Eastern roasted coffee 



29 S. Tejon Street 



Phone 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 



Registered Medical Practitioneers 



Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence. 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 956 



The College 
Photo Studio 




22222^ 




Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 



FOR CHRISTMAS 

There is nothing finer, more appropriate 
or of more lasting value than Engraved 
Visiting Cards or Monogram Paper. 
We make these. 

The Gowdy-Simmons Printing Co. 

Phone 87 21 N. T«jon Street 



'=^. 



16 



THE 



TIGER 



^-y. 



You can't go ''clothes wrong" ^^^^.^ y°" ^^^ ^^^"^ ^"^ ^^^^^ ^ season's han 

service 
at this store. Not only that the clothes them- We "are showing son^e mighty attractiv 
selves are right in every detail of construction, things now in Suits and Overcoats, tailored i] 
style, fabric and fit, but we take a very per- mid-season ; styles with the ring of Spring, 
sonal interest in seeing that you're satisfied— $15^ ^jg^ $20, $22 and $25 



8 N. Tejon Street 



(Pei4iimS&ecirer % 



28 E. Pike's Peal 




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COLORADO COLLEGE 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 

Departments — College of Arts and 
Science, E. S. PARSONS, Dea«. 

School of Engineering, F. CAJORI, Dean 
School of Forestry, W. C. STURGIS, Deal 
School of Music, E. D. HALE, Dean 



Manitou Parl^ — Field Laboratory 
of the School of Forestry 



The Football Season Is Over, but the Season for Browns Is Just at Hand. The 

Biggest Selection in the City 

GEO. J. GA TTERER 

10 Per Cent Discount to Students 
216 North Tejon Street Telephone Main 1247 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



Vol. XIII 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., DECEMBER 8, 1910 



Number 13 



BANQUET 

A JOYOUS 

OCCASION 



HONOR SYSTEM 

CONSTITUTION 



TWO HUNDRED BOOSTERS 

MAKE IT A MEMORABLE 

OCCASION. 



Speeches by the Yard — Good Feeling 

Galore — Rothgeb Presented 

With $100. 



Loyal business men of Colorado 
Springs climaxed the football season of 
1910 last Friday night when they ban- 
queted the members of the Tiger and 
Terror football squads at one of the 
most elaborate affairs ever given at the 
Antlers hotel. The affair was one of 
the most enthusiastic in the history of 
the College and the 200 people who were 
in attendance made as congenial a crowd 
ay was ever gathered in the banquet 
room. Business men dropped their 
cares and became boys again with col- 
lege songs and yells, College men took 
on a new college spirit and the High 
school students expressed an anticipa- 
tion to become Tigers that was most 
noticable. 

From the presentation of $100 in gold 
to Coach Rothgeb, through the ovation 
given himself, Captain Vandemoer, 
Coach Cofifin and Captain Cheese of the 
Terrors, the affair was one of "boost," 
"I gave you the best I had," said Coach 
Rothgeb, referring to the coaching of 
the team, "and Vandemoer is the best 
captain in the West," he added. 

"The demonstration given the team 
when it left for Utah helped the team in 
its victorious season more than any 
other one thing," said "Rothy." "The 
team knew there was spirit behind them 
as was never before shown in the Col- 
lege. The team was well trained and 
were always in good shape." Rothgeb 
payed a tribute to the fraternity training 

Continued on Page 5 



MUCH AGITATED PLAN TO BE 
DECIDED. 



Committee Draws Up Rules of Pro- 
posed System to Be Submitted to 
Student Bodies — Embodies Best 
Features of Other Constitutions. 



The committee appointed by the 
Student Commission to draw up a 
constitution for the Honor System, as 
proposed in Colorado College to be 
acted on by the Associated Students, 
after careful considertaion of the con- 
stitutions of those institutions which 
already have the system, have sub- 
mitted the following constitution for 
the consideration and action of the 
student body: 

The constitution will be submitted 
to the student body in the near future 
and will have to be acted upon as an 
amendment to the constitution of the 
Associated Students and will require 
a two-thirds affirmative vote for its 
incorporation into the Associated Stu- 
dents constitution. 

The committee, consisting of A. E. 
Bryson, H. G. Sinton and Prof. E. C. 
Hills, has sought to embody in the 
proposed constitution the best feat- 
ures of the constitutions of other in- 
stitutions. Special attention is called 
to Article III, which does away with 
the necessity of creating new admin- 
istrative bodies, also Article IV, which 
obviates some of the objectionable 
features of the individual informing 
en a cheater. 

Constitution of the Honor System in 
Colorado College. 
ARTICLE L 
Section i. The honor system in 
examinations is defined as that sys- 
tem under which after the examina- 
tion is set by the faculty, no faculty 

Continued on Page 6 



"TYCOON" WINS 
TYPHOON 0? 

APPLAUSE 



SECOND JUNIOR OPERETTA 

CONTINUES STANDARD SET 

BY FIRST. 



Large Audience Shows Its Apprecia- 
tion of the Junior's Efforts — Splen- 
did Stage Settings a Feature. 



The second annual Junior operetta 
after several weeks of preparation under 
Dr. Vere S. Richards last Thursday 
night successfully staged "The Little Ty- 
coon," and operetta in two acts by 
Willard Spencer. 

The class was quite fortunate in its 
selection of a play with the college ele- 
ment playing such an important part. 
Though the plot was light and fanciful, 
it was interesting and its outcome was 
something of a problem until the play 
was finished. 

There were but few leading parts but 
these were well handled. The stars of 
the performance were easily Miss Ran- 
dolf, J. B. Thornell and G. B. Seldom- 
ridge. with Miss Thomas and C. S. 
Campbell bidding strong for secondary 
honors. Miss Randolf as Violet sang 
her part remarkably well, enunciated 
her words distinctly and all in all made 
such a "Little Tycoon" as the author had 
in mind when he wrote the piece. 

Thornell as Alvin Barry shared the 
singing honors with Miss Randolf. His 
duets with Miss Randolf were particular- 
ly enjoyable. Seldomridge as Rufus 
Readdy was the comedy producer and 
one of the big hits of the play. His 
humor was spontaneous and unaffected, 
his stage manner free and easy. 

Miss Thomas carried the part of the 
spinster in hunt of a whale with the 
disrnity necessary to such a part. Her 
singing was unusually good. 

Continued on Page S 



THE TIGER 



INSIGNIA DAY. 



Usual Pomp and Ceremony — Also 

Usual Amount of Fun and 

Frivolity. 

The regular Insignia Day exercises 
were held in chapel yesterday morn- 
ing. Dressed for the first time in 
caps and gowns, the seniors marched 
sedately from Coburn to Perkins 
with the faculty, attired in their offi- 
cial robes, bringing up the rear. At 
the head of the procession went the 
juniors in double file wearing white 
Greek robes lined with gild, the boys 
carrying lanterns in emulation of 
Diogenes. In the center aisle of the 
chapel, they halted and between their 
lines passed the seniors to their regu- 
lar chapel seats, anQ tlie faculty who 
took seats on the platform. After 
the regular chapel services, President 
Slocum gave an inspiring address on 
the significance of Insignia Day and 
the true meaning of the cap and 
gown. After the exercises the jun- 
iors entertained the spectattors by a 
series of Greek games. Burros had 
been procured and the event of the 
morning was a chariot race between 
Menelaus and Ajax, the former win- 
ning by a narrow margin. The free 
for all burro race was won by Damon 
and Pythias, mounted on Pegasus. 
Contests in wrestling, foot-racing and 
boxing followed, then a girls' Mara- 
thon, and last of all a football game, 
in which Diogenes, who had given up 
in despair his search for an "honor 
man" among the seniors, proved to 
be the star. 

At the end of the contests, the jun- 
iors changed their robes for picnic 
clothes, secured a special car and 
went off to the mountains for the 
rest of the day. They returned at 
supper time, tired and sunburned, 
with the account of a great days' fun, 
and a splendid picnic dinner. 



FIRST MAGNA PAN PAN. 



Save the Date— Big Time Promised— 
Be There! 

Five hundred pounds of pep, a good 
rousing C-0; inspiring speeches; soul- 
ful music; and a million yards of talk; 
such is but a faint description of the 
associations connected with the word 
Magna Pan Pan. Football victories 
have been won. Glee Clubs have "dared" 
for their first laurels, athletes have be- 
come orators, and professors have grown 



young and sprightly; all under the influ- 
ence and magic of Magna Pan Pan. 

There is always a great bustling 
down to the theatre to hear the sages 
speak and the gifted sing; a great 
bustling back from the theater to 
watch each other eat, and at the same 
time carry on five dififerent conversa- 
tions at once; a great rushing around 
from dining hall to parlor, and from 
parlor back to dining room again; a 
constant straining of necks to see 
who A, B. C. is talking to across the 
room; an increasing straining of necks 
to see who X. Y. Z. is talking to be- 
fore crossing the room; a general 
and rampant wonder at the storage 
capacity of the freshmen; a huge 
and indignant worry by the committee 
for fear the refreshments will fail; a 
constant watching of the clock by the 
"powers that be" for fear that en- 
croachments may be made on beauty 
sleep; an unfailing appeal to the 
pianist to play "Home, Sweet Home"; 
and a skeptical astonishment on the 
part of all as to the correctness of 
the clnck in Bemis, as they indulge 
in the last "Good Night, Ladies" and 
go to seek diligently for their hats — 
those ever elusive hats. 

And if this is not enticing enough, 
did you ever realize that there are a 
lot of people in College you don't 
know, Oh, Mr. College Wise Man, 
and that there's no place for finding 
friends like Magna Pan Pan? Did 
you ever stop to consider that an 
educated man, a really wise one, is 
one who can keep a miscellaneous 
crov/d of unfamiliar people interested, 
and that there's no laboratory for 
testing your powers quite so good as 
Magna Pan Pan? Have you ever 
considered what Rothgeb has up his 
sleeve, and do you think you can 
afford to miss hearing how we are 
going to ? 

If you think this is all "bosh," and 
that you can afford to stay in your 
den — remember, the other fellow will 
have all the more to eat. 

Thursday, December 15, 1910 — The 
Date. 

Seven forty-five o'clock — The Time. 

Bemis Common Room — The Place. 

We leave the girl to you. 



MUSIC SCHOOL. 



below, was given last week. The next 
recital will be held on Tuesday, Decem- 
ber 13th. .. , 

t'ROGRAM. 

Guilmant Organ Sonata, C Minor 

Bazzini Elegie for Violin 

Battiste Offertoire in E flat 

Lemaigre .Capriccio in F 

Dubois ".-. Tocata in G 

INTERMISSION. 
Silver Offering for the Music Fund. 

Reinecke Scherzino in E flat 

Bizet ■ . . Intermezzo in E flat 

Dubois Fanfare in B flat 

Mendelssohn Aria, "O God, Have 

Mercy" (From Elijah") 

Costa Triumphal March in E flat 



Owing to the conflict of dates be- 
tween seniors' reception to the 
juniors, which was planned for Wed- 
nesday night, with the football ban- 
quet which was arranged for the same 
nieht, it was necessary to postpone 
the class event until a later date, and 
January sixth has now been set for 
the affair. Until that time, Insignia 
Day ceremonies can not be said. to be 
complete. 



PRESIDENT RETURNS. 



The music school which has at pres- 
ent an enrollment of nearly one hundred, 
is giving regular students rehearsals 
every Thursday evening at five o'clock. 
A recital, the program of which appears 



Attended Carnegie Foundation Meet- 
ing — Delivered Several Addresses. 
Rejoiced Over Football 
Showing. 

The President returned this week 
from his annual November trip to the 
East. He went to New York for the 
meeting of the Carnegie Foundation for 
the Advancement of Teaching. This is 
the Board which has charge of the ad- 
ministration of the fifteen million dollar 
fund, the income of which is used for re- 
tiring allowances for the members of 
faculties of a limited number of colleges 
of high standards, which are not under 
denominational control. Colorado Col- 
lege is the only institution in the Rocky 
Mountain region which is on the ac- 
ct edited list of those institutions whose 
teachers are assured of the benefits of 
this fund. 

On his way to New York he spent a 
day to give an address before the stu- 
dents of the University of Pittsburg and 
was the guest of Professor and Mrs. 
Lincoln S. Goodale, both graduates of 
Colorado College. 

During his trip he preached before 
Mt. Holyoke and Vassar Colleges, and 
spoke at Amherst upon "The Mainten- 
ance of Intellectual Standards in Col- 
leges." Mrs. Slocum and he attended 
at Boston the annual dinner of the New 



THE TIGER 



England Colorado College Alumni As- 
sociation. This was largely attended 
and was an enthusiastic meeting of old 
. students, most of whom are taking grad- 
uate work at Harvard and other 
Eastern institutions. Dean Briggs of 
Harvard University was one of the 
speakers of the evening. 

A large amount of President Slocum's 
time was given to the interest of the 
College, and the securing of funds to 
meet the annual deficit which has come 
with the growth of the College. The 
difficulty in doing this increases each 
year, with the increasing demands that 
are coming to Eastern institutions, and 
the feeling that Colorado should sup- 
port its own institutions. 

Dr. Slocum found everywhere a cor- 
dial feeling towards Colorado College 
and its work, and especially at Harvard 
university where ou'" g-aduates are ren- 
dering an exceptionally fine acount of 
themselves and are winning an unusual 
number of scholarships and fellowships. 
The President expressed great satis- 
faction in the victories of the football 
team, and especially in the reputation 
which the men made as gentlemen and 
for playing fair ball and also in the 
recognition which was given the team by 
the business men of the city. 



DR. SCHNEIDER TO STUDY IN 
EAST. 



To Visit Leadine: Eastern Colle^es- 

To Be Guest of Yale During His 

Stay There — Returns Next 

September. 



Dr. Schneider will leave shortly after 
college closes for the Christmas holidays 
for the East, where he expects to spend 
several months studying the biological 
laboratory methods and equipment of the 
best colleges and universities. A great 
. deal of his time will be spent at Yale, 
where he will do research work in physi- 
oloey as the guest of the university. 

Dr. Schneider, with his family, expects 
to leave here in time to spend Christmas 
with his parents in Towa. They will then 
go to the home of Mrs. Schneider's par- 
ents, who also live in Tnwa, where Mrs. 
Schneider will spend the winter. After 
New Years. Dr. Schneider will go di- 
rectlv to Chicago University, where he 
will spend several davs investigating the 
laboratorv equipment and familiarizing 
himself with the methods used. He will 
spend a short time doino- the same kind 
of work in the Universitv of Wisconsin 
at Madison, and then will so to Yale, 
where he will do most of his phvsiolog- 
ical research work. He will also take 



U-cture work along general biological 
lines. 

It was at Yale that Dr. Schneider took 
his graduate work, and he is well 
known there. He goes back as the guest 
of the university, and will have a private 
room in the library with privileges and 
advantages which insure his doing some 
very valuable work. 

From Yale he goes to Harvard, where 
most of his studies will be in the de- 
partment of botany. It is also probable 
that he will for a few days at a time 
visit other of the leading eastern col- 
leges with the purpose of getting an in- 
sight into their laboratory methods. Dr. 
Schneider expects to go to Washington 
for a short time to make some special 
studies of the work of the Department 
of Agriculture under the direction of 
Hall, C. C. '05, who is a leading worker 
in the Bureau of Animal Industry. 

It has been positively stated by Dr. 
Schneider that he will return to Colo- 
rado Colleee next Seotember. He wish- 
es the students to entertain no fears of 
his not comine back. He has had before 
this onoortunit'es to leave Colorado Col- 
lesre. but the fact that he remains here 
shows that he is p-reatly interested in 
the work of t^e CoHeo-e. -ind his ab- 
sence f.<^r the remainder of the ve-'r is 
me-elv for the nnrnose of better Pttino- 
himself to imoroi-e his denartment. 



CHRISTMAS NTTMRFR OF THE 
KINNIKINNIK. 



"The melancholy days have come 
The saddest of the year." 

This was the quotation that came to 
mind after reading the recent number of 
our literary magazine. At a time when 
all is supposed to be Joyful why, oh 
whv. did the board ffive us such a mor- 
bid issue? The "Kin" beo-ins this month 
A^'-'th death and ends with death. Fur- 
thprniore. it is not un to the standard 
s'^t bv the present editors. However, 
w'lpn wp consider some other publica- 
tions nf thi<; state which mask as "lit- 
pi-nr-s'" we have rea'^on to reioice, but 
fl-iq is rnt un to C. C. standard. 

AAfp fin wish that those who contribute 
t-r, the maorazine would siori their names, 
TP iron arp ashamed of vour work, don't 
Vi-inrl it ii — it would be better if some 
of von did not. 

K. M. S. seems to be a verv versatile 
writer, but it is hard to conceive thnt 
one person can do such hetero'rpnpnus 
work. The first poem bv this author has 
no sense on account of tvpoo-ranhical 
errors and thprefore cannot well be crit- 
icized. We have nothing to say about 



the second poem by this writer. The 
Inst story by K. M. S., "The Lonely 
Gnome," is an old theme poorly worked 
out. We have the same objection to the 
tl'eme in the second story, "Over the 
1 rail," but the construction is somewhat 
better. 

"The Price to Get Married," is not 
i npossible, but highly improbable, and 
not up to Mr, Black's story of last 
month. We realize too soon how the 
story is going to end and, therefore, our 
interest lags. 

"The Miracle" is good and the theme 
is well worked out. There is only one 
cr'ticism to offer — our attention is drawn 
from the girl to the soldiers, when our 
interest is really with the girl. 

"Gratification" is delightful and has 
much that is worth while. There is 
pricked into it some good sound philoso- 
phy and the more one reads this poem 
the more one enjoys it. 

"Pals" sounds a new note in our lit- 
erary work and brings us a touch of the 
real. Tt is life, with all the lesson. 

Mr. Argo has given us one of his 
characteristic sketches with a little more 
humor this time than usual. The theme 
is handled well and we do not anticipate 
the end. 

We cannot see any justification for 
choosing one of Hawthorne's subjects 
for the story by Miss Akin. The com- 
parison is not well made and the force 
of the sketch is lost. 

The article by Jay Jay is wholesome 
and has much of local color. Most of 
us can appreciate this sketch to the full- 
est extent. 

"An Episode in the Life of Jimmie" 
has really no place in our literary maga^ 
zine. but belongs rather to some news- 
paper joke column. 

"Dream Ships" is hazy and intangible. 
in keeping with the theme. 

Mr. Donovan has .given us a clever 
sketch with characteristic dialect and 
setting. Though morbid it is a good 
ending for a rather mediocre number of 
The Kinnikinnik. 

'^Ve understand that there are some 
r^i ens for this edi'-'or 'iF our literary 
magazine being below par. We are will- 
ing to accept excuses, but we feel th^t 
the student body is to blame and not 
the Board of Editors. If we are to keep 
our maeazine up to the hieh standard 
that has been set for it. it will be neces- 
sary for all to feel a personal interest in 
this phase of our student activitv. We 
excel in athletics, let us also excel in the 
literarv work. 



Thirty-two pages, lots of cuts, attrac- 
tive cover — the Holiday Tiger. 



THE TIGER 



SINTON CAPTAIN FOR 1911 



'WE WANT BASKETBALL," 

SAYS COMMISSION. 



SINTON TO CAPTAIN 
1911 ELEVEN. 



BANQUET NUMBER TWO. 
NEXT! 



Petition to Be Presented to Faculty 

for Official Sanction of the 

Winter Game. 



Active steps toward securing the per- 
mission of the faculty for a basketball 
team were taken by members of the 
commission when the following petition, 
signed by all the men on the Student 
Commission, was presented to the facul- 
ty: 

"We, the undersigned, members of the 
Student Commission, de hereby petition 
the faculty of Colorado College to sanc- 
tion basketball as an inter-collegiate 
sport in the College foi the coming sea- 
son. 

"The subject has been carefully can- 
vassed among the students, and it is 
practically the unanimous opinion that 
this petition should be granted for the 
following reasons: 

1. Every other institution in Colo- 
rado of our standing is represented by 
a basketball team. 

2. The Athletic Association can easily 
support it. 

3. There is a wealth of material in 
the College and many requests have 
been made for a basketball team, both 
from students and outside sources. 

4. We have an athletic director who 
will not be in touch with any of .our 
athletic activities for three months. His 
salary is partially paid by the student 
body. 

5. Athletic exercises for as many as 
care to indulge will be furnished by this 
winter sport. Our spring athletes also 
can thereby be kept in training. 

In spite of the fact that this branch 
of sport is not under the direct control 
of the Conference, we thoroughly believe 
that scholastic standing among the play- 
ers should be required by the faculty." 

The petition will come before the fac- 
ulty at their meeting tomorrow after 
noon. Objections raised in the past 
have been our lack of a gymnasium, 
with the resulting necessity of using 
the city Y. M. C. A. gym; the fact that 
practically the same men participate in 
this spnrt that indulge in the fall and 
spring activities; and the desire on the 
part of the faculty for a few months of 
comparative quiet when more attention 
may be paid to studies and less to side- 
issues. 



Herbert G. Sinton, all-state end, was 
unanimously elected captain of the 
Tigers for 1911 at a meeting Tuesday 
noon. Sinton is undoubtedly one of 
the best qualified men in the College to 
lead the Tigers to another championship 




next year. He has won three C's in 
football, two in track, and one in base- 
ball. With Vandemoer, the retiring 
captain, Sinton made three C's last year, 
in football, baseball and track and has 
an excellent chance for the same this 
year, with possibly the addition of bas- 
ketball. Sinton is one of the best all- 
around athletes in the Rocky Mountain 
region and in addition to out-door sports 
has won many gymnasium laurels. 

Sinton is a member of the class of 
1912, the Pearsons society, Alpha Tau 
Delta fraternity and the Q. Q. Club. 



Dr. A. A. Blackman Entertains Squad 
Royally With Banquet — After- 
wards go to "The Beauty 
Spot." 



Forty men, about thirty of them 
members of the ipio Tiger squad, 
partook of the hospitality of Dr. A. 
A. Blackman last night when they sat 
down to a sumptous banquet at the 
Antlers Hotel. Joy and happiness 
reigned supreme and viands and del- 
icacies were dispensed with in great 
quantities, also with much apprecia- 
tion. After the feast, the fellows 
were Dr. Blackman's guests at "The 
Beauty Spot" at the Opera House 
and it was no less enjoyable, though 
in a different way, than the banquet. 

The fellows were profuse in their 
expressions of gratitude to Dr. Black- 
man, who has always been one of 
the most loyal and gene-ous boosters 
that the College is fortunate enough 
to have. 



MEN GET THEIR C'S, C. C'S 
AND NUMERALS. 

The Athletic board met Wednesday 
and granted the well earned insignia 
sweaters to the following men. C's: 
Captain Vandemoer, Witherow, Bow- 
ers, Black, Sinton, Acker, Hedblom. 
Cook, Thompson, Heald, Reed and 
Manager Fowler. C. C's to Jardine, 
Jamison, Dickson, Haight, Putnam, 
Scott, W. LeClere, H. LeClere, Floyd, 
Root, Moberg. Freshman numerals 
to Ogilbee, Cameron, Harder and 
Summers. The sweaters will be or- 
dered this week and the football 
heroes will soon be seen wearing 
their hard-earned insignia. 



Conference Champions — read about it 
in the Holiday Tiger. 



HAIL! MANAGER FOWLER. 

Manager Ernest Fowler has proven 
the best football manager the College 
has had in some years. Fowler has 
the enthusiasm, the keep-at-it quality 
needed in his line of business and his 
management of all the wearisome de- 
tails of his office has proven a decided 
benefit in helping the team. A splen- 
did schedule was provided, no crowds 
were disappointed, the finances were 
handled as they should be — systemat- 
ically. Too bad Fowler graduates. 



THE TIGER 



MORAL VICTORIES; 
ALSO CHAMPIONSHIPS. 

The Tigers won the Rocky Moun- 
tain championship for 1910 and won it 
by a sensational record of victory 
after victory, but what sounds almost 
as good is the fact that the team was 
cleanly trained, and every man was 
eligible from the word "go." The 
high standards of scholarship and 
training which the Tigers held during 
the football season were a feature 
well worth remembering. Not a man 
was kept out of a game because of 
his studies and every man was cleanly 
eligible. 



BANQUETS AND BASKETBALLS 



HEALD ELIGIBLE 
FOR 1911. 

Kenneth Heald, the tower of 
strength of the Tiger defense, will be 
eligible to don the Tiger colors next 
fall, according to Dean E. S. Parsons. 
Word has been received from New 
Mexico University that Heald played 
but one year at that place which gives 
him another year here. Heald had a 
brother on the New Mexico team and 
this fact caused the trouble over his 
eligibility. 



UTAH WANTS MORE RULES. 



The University of Utah athletic 
committee is planning to suggest 
some more stringent rules regarding 
the eligibility of men for football 
teams of the conference. They claim 
that the rule has been stretched too 
far this year, and to keep in the spirit 
of the conference the rule should be 
made explicit and that it not be brok- 
en. It is probable that more rules 
will be passed before next year. 



HAG. VS. Y. M. C, A. 



The Hagerman Hall basketball 
team, by loose playing, lost their 
first game of the season to the city 
Y. M. C. A. Reds by a 35-10 score 
last Friday evening. To the credit 
of the team, it should be said that 
they braced up in the last half and 
managed to score ten points to their 
opponents' fourteen. Although poor 
team work was showed, the game re- 
vealed some good individual players 
who can make a strong bid for the 
College team. The following men 
represented the Hall: Forwards: 
Wakefield. Wild, Dennis. Center: 
Hand, Taplin. Guards: Dawson, 

Carson, Lindstrom, Howland. 



TIGERS LOSE NO PLAYERS 
FOR 1911 TEAM. 

The entire Tiger team, champions 
of the Rocky Mountain region, will 
be eligible and ready for the football 
season in 191 1. Not a man graduates, 
not a man has played over his limit 
and every man is planning to be on 
hand. This is an exceptionally bright 
outlook and speaks well for the 
Tigers, as well as the fact that only 
eleven men played through the sea- 
son. Both facts are well worth re- 
membering. But there are some 
strong men coming into their eligibil- 
ity next year and there will be a pret- 
ty race for positions. Our slogan — 
"Another championship in 191 1." 



BASKETBALL. 

With every institution in the state 
hard at work for winning basketball 
teams, the time is ripe for C. C. to 
organize a team. We have the mate- 
rial without a doubt, material that 
would give other teams a run for 
their money, but nothing has been 
done. Coach Rotgeb has had consid- 
erable experience with basketball and 
he is strong for a team if proper facil- 
ities for practice can be secured. 
There are at least twenty men ex- 
perienced in the game in college who 
would like to try for the team. The 
Athletic board has decided to leave 
the matter to the students and if it is 
successful, a manager will be selected, 
a hall procured, games obtained and 
things rushed. 



McFadden Captain at Boulder, 



John McFadden, all-state football 
player from Boulder, was elected cap- 
tain for 191 1 at a meeting of the team 
last Saturday. McFadden is one of 
the ablest athletes in the state and 
captained basketball last year. 



Romney Heads Utah Team for 191 1. 



Lon Romney, star halfback and one 
of the greatest players in the Rocky 
Mountain region, has been elected to 
captain the Mormon eleven in 191 1. 
His election was unanimous. Rom- 
ney has played on the varsity team 
for two years. 



Place your orders with the manager 
for the Holiday Tiger. 



BANQUET JOYOUS OCCASION 

Continued from Page 1. 

table and said it was a big factor in win- 
ning the championship of the Rocky 
Mountain region. 

Dean Parsons who presided, was loud 
in his praise of the work of the team, 
the high standards which were main- 
tained throughout the season and the 
splendid spirit shown by all. He also 
stated that the conference rules would 
be made better and clearer next season. 

Vandemoer thanked the business men 
and the students for their loyal sup- 
port of the team. 

J. E. Mclntyre, clubman and football 
enthusiast, characterized the autumn 
game "as the greatest sport in existence." 
He was one of the most entertaining 
speakers of the evening, delving into the 
ancestry of Rothgeb, Vandemoer, Coffin 
and Cheese, and producing roars of 
laughter by his witticisms. 

Coach Roy Coffin of the Terrors said 
that his team has stood for the highest 
things throughout the season and de- 
clared that never had he seen such a 
fine crowd of young men. Captain 
Cheese thanked the Terrors for the sup- 
port they have given and expressed the 
team's appreciation of the manner in 
which they had been honored by the city. 

Dr. W. W. Ranney, pastor of the 
First Congregational church, eulogized 
football. He said that it was the de- 
termination to win despite personal cost 
that made it such a fine game for young 
men and that this spirit, coupled with 
the exhibition of skill and brawn, is the 
thing which makes it so popular. 

Dr. Samuel Semple, of Titusville, Pa,, 
a Princeton graduate, was one of the 
most entertaining speakers of the even- 
ing. Although not familiar with the 
local football situation, he discussed 
eastern football in a humorous vein, and 
paid his respects to football as the great- 
est college game. 

Chairman Kent paid a tribute to the 
football teams of the two schools. He 
also expressed his appreciation of the 
support given the movement by the busi- 
ness men of the city. 

The program closed with a strong ap- 
peal from J. W. Park of the C. C. ath- 
letic board for the continued support of 
the townspeople. He spoke of the great 
work of the scrubs and said that if there 
was anything that he admired is was the 
courage and grit of a man like Putnam 
who said, "If I can't be the regular quar- 

Continued on Page 13 



THE IM G E R 



-^=:^ — > 

Th« Waekly Newspaper ol Color ado Colleijc 

A. E BRYSON Editor-in-Chief 

S. WILKIE DEAN Business ManaiJer 

Sam J.Shelton Assistant Editor 

Richard L. Hughes Assistant Editor 

Habry Black Assistant Editor 

T. Wynne Ross Athletic Editor 

ROBERT M. COPELAND Engineering Editor 

FRED S. BAKER Forestry Editor 

Helen Canon Alumni Editor 

MAMIE C. Detmoyer Exchanse Editor 

Edith I.. Summers Local Editor 

J. A. ROOT Local Editor 

RAY H. Saybe Assistant Manager 

E. E. Hedblom Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

A W. Donovan, C.E. Hayward. Bruce Weirick, William 

Lloyd, Joe Sinton, Elsie Greene, Lillian Duer, Grace 

Wilson, Dorothy Cook, Dorothy Stott 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

irticlel tnditemltoTHETlGER. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Aldresi all communications to THE TIGER, Colorad. 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phones: Editor, Main 1975. Manager. Main 2073 

Entered at th» postoffict at Colorado 
* Springs, Colo., as lecond-claii matter 

Subscription, to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



The Conference. 

Since Its formation two years ago, the 
Colorado Athletic Conference, now the 
Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference, 
has been the subject of volumes of 
comment and no small part of this 
has been decidedly adverse. 

The Conference is yet in a somewhat 
formative stage and, it must be ad- 
mitted, needs cnanging in some respects 
in order to give it a dominant position 
and to inaKe its mandates of such force 
as to cause them to be autliontive. 

Ihat the Conterence has done much 
to Clean up athletics must be admitted 
by the most pronounced of its opponents. 
1 he day of tne ringer and the man in 
college for athletics and that alone has 
passed. Whereas, before the formation 
of the Conference, the state was notable 
for its doubtful athletics, it is now rap- 
idly coming to the front as the champion 
of the best in this important phase of 
college activities. 

One of the greatest weaknesses of the 
constitution of the Conference is its 
"glittering generality," phrasing in re- 
gard to eligibility, of players. It pro- 
vides that if a student shall discontinue 
his college work before the end of the 
year for certain stated reasons or "for 
equally good cause." he shall still 
be eligible. This is a loop-hole that 
will be taken advantage of as long as it 
exists in its present form, and it is prob- 
able that any leave-taking that is done 
by valuable athletes will be found to be 
for some "good cause." 



Another failure of the Conference has 
been its inability to patch up some of 
the "estrangements" that have existed 
between members of the Conference — 
the petty quarrel that has continued be- 
tween Boulder and D. U. as the most 
notable example. The quarrel had 
some justification in its beginning but 
when its cause was removed, it would 
seem that the Conference, as a mediator, 
could have smoothed the difficulties 
away. 

So let the critics vent their spleen 
against the Conference if they desire, 
but let its good work continue and its 
weaknesses be remedied. 

An Injustice. 

The discontinuance of athletic rela- 
tions between Denver University and 
Boulder for the past two years, has per- 
haps caused less inconvenience to either 
of the two participants in the quarrel 
than it has to a third party — Colorado 
College. It has been necessary for the 
Tiger team to meet every other institu- 
tion in the Conference, that is, to play 
five games, whereas both Boulder and 
D. U. are required to play only four 
games. The result of this has been that 
both Boulder and D. U. avoid one of the 
hardest games of the year while the 
Tiger team must play both Boulder and 
D. U., and in order to win the cham- 
pionship, must defeat both, whereas both 
of the up-state teams need only to defeat 
the Tigers — provided, of course, that the 
Tigers have been successful up to their 
meeting with these teams — to lay claim 
to championship honors. 

The people of the state generally, and 
of the colleges of the state in particular, 
are tired of Boulder's continued refusal 
to meet D. U. The argument of "pedes 
frigides" so freely advanced by the Boul- 
der adherents in regard to the refusal 
of the Tigers to meet them in a post- 
s.eason game is more applicable to their 
refusal to meet the Methodists. 

It is to be hoped that the "challenge 
evolved in the night" for the winner of 
the D, U. -Tiger game is an indication 
of the willingness of the holier-than- 
thou dictators to resume athletic rela- 
tions with the Ministers and thus inci- 
dentally remove the present unjust 
handicap that is placed on Colorado Col- 
lege. 

The Holiday Tiger. 

Following the precedent established by 
last year's staflf, the Christmas number 
this year will be a special holiday num- 
ber, which in addition to the regular 
news will also contain a review of the 
football season and a supplement of in- 
formation about the College. 



HONOR SYSTEM CONSTITUTION 

Continued from Page 1. 

surveillance is exercised, and under 
which the student body, through its 
committees, controls investigations 
concerning dishonesty in examina- 
tions. 

ARTICLE II. 

Section i. Each student must in 
order to make his examination or any 
other written work done on paper in 
the class-room valid, sign the follow- 
ing statement: 

"I have neither given nor received 
aid in this examintaion (or exercise)." 

Sec. 2. The instructor shall remain 
in the examination room long enough 
to answer questions and may be pres- 
ent for the remainder of the time if 
he desires. 

Sec. 3. During the examination, 
each student shall have perfect free- 
dom of action and conversation, pro- 
vided he does not annoy others or in- 
terfere with their work. 

Sec. 4. Violations of the honor sys- 
tem shall consist in any attempt to 
receive assistance from written or 
printed aids, or from any person -or 
his paper; or any attempt to give as- 
sistance, whether the one so doing 
has completed his paper or not. This 
rule shall hold within and without the 
examintaion room during the entire 
time in which the examination is in 
progress. 

ARTICLE III. 

Section i. There shall be two com- 
mittees who shall represent the stu- 
dent body and deal with all cases in- 
volving violation of the honor system. 

Sec. 2. The committee for dealing 
with cases that may arise among the 
men shall consist of the men of the 
Student Commission, excepting the 
Alumni Athletic Representative, with 
the addition of one man of the fresh- 
man class elected by the freshmen 
men. 

Sec. 3. The committee for dealing 
with cases that may arise among the 
women shall during the first semester, 
consist of the Women's Student Gov- 
ernment Board with the addition of 
one woman of the freshman class 
elected by the freshmen women, this 
representative to serve during the 
first term only. During the second 
semester, this committee shall consist 
of the Women's Student Government 
Board. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Section i. In case of reported 
fraud in an examination, any student 
who observes another cheating-, or 



THE TIGER 



otherwise violating the honor system, 
is under a moral obligation to his or 
her fellow students to report the cir- 
cumstance promptly to such members 
of his class as he or she may desire 
to call in consultation. Tliis self-con- 
stituted committee shall make a sec- 
ret investigation of the circumstances. 
If the inquisition seems to develop a 
self-evident case this committee shall 
call upon the suspected student for 
an explanation. Should this explana- 
tion prove satisfactory, there is an 
end of the case. Should the explana- 
tion be not satisfactory, the accused 
is given the choice of quietly with- 
drawing from the College or standing 
a trial before the Honor Committee. 

Sec. 2. If in the first offense, the 
student is proved guilty, the commit- 
tee shall use its discretion in meteing 
out justice. 

Sec. 3. If a student is convicted of 
a second offense, the penalty shall be 
a recommendtaion to the faculty of 
his separation from the College. 

Sec. 4. A vote of seven of the nine 
committee members shall in all cases 
be necessary for conviction. 

ARTICLE V. 
Section i. Every student in the 
College shall be expected to lend his 
aid in maintaining this constitution. 

ARTICLE VI. 

Section i. The committee shall 
make provision for interpreting the 
honor system to all new students 
within three weeks after the opening 
of the first term of each year. 

Sec. 2. This constitution shall be 
published in second issue of The 
Tiger each year. 

Sec. 3. The committee shall pro- 
vide printed copies of this constitu- 
tion to all students at least one week 
before the first formal examination of 
the college year. 

By-Laws. 

I. In all examinations, the men 
shall be seated in one section of the 
room and the women in another; 
wherever feasible, students shall oc- 

' cupy alternate seats. 

II. In case of the presentation of 
an examination paper without the 
signed "honor statement," the in- 
structor shall notify the student, who 
shall sign the paper in his presence. 
Otherwise, the paper shall be counted 
a total failure. 



Send One to Your Friends— The Hol- 
iday Tiger. 



"TYCOON" WINS APPLAUSE 

Continued from Page 1 

As a mirth maker, Campbell, as Gen- 
eral Knickerbocker, came second only to 
Seldomridge. His make-up was per- 
fect and his acting spirited. Incidentally, 
Campbell also acted as manager of the 
production and is deserving of great 
credit for his excellent management and 
particularly for the stage settings, which 
were probably the best that have ever 
been set up in Perkins. 

Of the other parts, IVIiss Kampf made 
a charming Dolly Dimples; W. W. 
J(5hnston carried an exceedingly difficult 
prirt very well. His words were remark- 
ably few, but a great deal of action was 
required and Johnston made an excel- 
lent "lud." Gregg as Teddy Hamilton, 
the Zeta Psi pledge, was very much 
alert and though his singing was per- 
haps not of the Caruso type, is was 
well done, his Colorado song was 
one of the hits of the evening. 

The smaller parts were well handled 
and did not show any of the neglect 
that is often apparent in amateur produc- 
tions. Hamilton as the butler was truly 
a model of his kind. 

The choruses showed careful training 
and rendered their pieces very well. 
Their costumes were very pleasing, the 
scene in which they appeared in Japa- 
nese costume being particularly pretty. 

The Juniors may with justice feel that 
tleir production was successful and that 
it had added a bright feature to the 
year's functions. Dr. Richards is deserv- 
ing of great credit for the results of his 
efforts. Miss Hedgecock and Miss Al- 
i right added materially to the produc- 
tion by their abilities on the piano and 
violin. 

A synopsis of the plot of the operetta 
is as follows : 

General Knickerbocker, a wealthy, re- 
tired army officer, takes his daughter 
Violet on a sea voyage to escape Alvin 
Barry, a young college man, with whom 
she is in love, and who is bent on mar- 
rying her in spite of her father. Alvin 
turns up on the ship with his college 
chum, Rufus, and several of his brother 
Zeta Psi's and a pledge, Teddy Ham- 
ilton. General Knickerbocker lias 
picked out as a suitable match for Violet 
a certain Lord Dolphin, whom Violet 
greatly dislikes. To change the General's 
mind, or, at least, to secure by some 
means his consent to Alvin as a son-in- 
law, a number of expedients are tried. 
Rufus. the Zeta Psi's, with Dolly and 
the Pi Alpha's, disguised as hobgoblins, 
bear the General off, presumably to the 
hold, just as he is about to lock Violet 
up unless she consents to marry Lord 
Dolphin. The plan falls through, and 



Alvin, disguised as Lord Dolphin, almost 
succeeds in escaping with Violet. Gen- 
eral Knickerbocker unfortunately re- 
turns at the wrong moment and frus- 
trates the plan. An attempt on the part 
of Rufus and his friends, disguised as 
brigands, is likewise unsuccessful. Final- 
ly, Alvin, as the Great Tycoon, wins the 
General's consent, which is given the 
more willingly because of Lord Dolphin's 
hasty exit from the scene due to the ar- 
rival of his mother, the Marchioness of 
Pullimback. 

A minor plot, appearing at intervals 
through the operetta, has to do with the 
troubles of Ted Hamilton, the Zeta Psi 
pledge, and a certain Pi Alpha pledge, 
Mary Ann by name, whose continual 
eating is a source of considerable 
worry to the Pi Alpha's. 

The cast was made up of the follow- 
ing : 

Alvin Barry J. B. Thornell 

Later the Great Tycoon. A young 
college man in love with Violet. 

Rufus Readdy Gerald Seldomridge 

An ingenious young man, a college 
chum of Alvin's and a brother Zeta 
Psi. Later, Gull Gull, interpreter to 
the Great Tycoon. 
General Knickerbocker ..C. S. Campbell 
One of the real old stock, and a 
truly stern papa. 

Lord Dolphin W. W. Johnson 

General Knickerbocker's choice for 
Violet. 

Teddy Hamilton A. J. Gregg 

A pledge to Zeta Psi, who is com- 
pelled to play many parts by his 
prospective brothers. He finds Mary 
Ann a help in the last one. 

Montgomery Robt. Hamilton 

The butler — a model of his kind. 

First Officer E. E. Hedblom 

Of the Customs House Service. 

Second Officer S. Ha;!en 

Of the Customs Flouse Service. 
Miss Huiricane ..Miss Eleanor Thomas 
A spinster of a very excellent dis- 
position and a love of whales which 
never is satisfied. Chaperone to Vio- 
let and her friends. 
Miss Dolly Dimple.. Miss Louise Kampf 
A college friend of Violet's. A be- 
liever in hilarity. 
Lady Dolphin ....Miss Frances Fames 
Marchioness of Pullimback. A very 
overpowering person who only ap- 
pears once, but mana.ges, neverthe- 
less, to overthrow the General's plan 
thereby. 

Mary Ann Miss Dorlie Crandail 

A pledge to Pi Alpha, with a tre- 
mendous hunger. Later a maid in 
Violet's service. 

"Pickles" Miss Marion Yerkes 

Another college friend of Violet's. 



THE TIGER 




A special showing of fine cravats selected in New York by 
Mr. Gano, expressly for the holiday trade, lustrous satins 
and silks in the fashionable weaves, patt'erns and colorings, 
many exclusive effects, many shown for the first time in 
Colorado Springs. 
The choicest assortment of neckwear that we have ever offered at 50c, 75, $1, 1.50, 

2.00, 2.50 and 3.00. Fancy Christmas boxes furnished free of charge with cravats priced 

at $1.00 or more. 

Colorado Springs, lO N. Tejon St. 



TheShackleford-Henley 
Leather Goods Co. 

18 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 
Makers of 

Trunks and Leather Goods 



We Carry the Most Complete Line of 
Traveling Goods, Ladies' Hand Bags, 
Pocket Books and All Sorts of Leather 
Goods in Colorado. 



DEXTER & HUDSON 

EXCHANGE BARBER 
SHOP 

Room 307, Third Floor 
Exchange Bank Building 



The Dentan 

Printing Company 

No. 9 So. Cascade Auenue 

FIRST-CLASS PRINTING 
at REASONABLE RATES 

Telepnone Main No. 602 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co. 



Phone Main 48 



313 N. Tejon St. 



Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 



Out West Building 



A lover of a certain article of food, 
and self-constituted guardian of 
Mary Ann. 

Violet Miss Mary Randolph 

A true Knickerbocker, with a will 
of her own. In love with Alvin 
Barry. Later the Little Tycoon. 

Chorus of College Maids and Men. 



MINIATURE BRIDGES NEARING 
COMPLETION. 



Freshmen Shop Models Ready for 
Paint. 



Some six types of bridge construction 
are represented in the work of the join- 
ery shops now being actively carried on 
under the direction of Mr. Arbuckle. 
The common highway bridge is a favor- 
ite. Six men are building one of these 
with three spans, Howe truss, each fifty- 
four inches long, on a scale of one inch 
to the foot. Two models of span eighty 
inches truss are under way. 

The class of work now being elimi- 
nated by the railroads is shown by two 
models. One of these is a trestle on a 
reverse curve. The total length is 
about six feet and for this ten bents are 
necessary. The other is also a trestle 
but upon a very steep slope so that the 
short bents are about six inches high 
and the series of eight gradually in- 
crease to three feet high. 

The most popular work last year was 
railroad bridge building in metal, closely 
seconded by roof trusses. This year 
has to its credit ;. single roof built upon 
two trusses of five fcit ---pan. Howevt-r, 
;in entirely new model has entered the 
field. A new design is being tried and 
promises to be -vvbolly different. It is 
essentially the tower? for a short span 
suspension briiUre^ The cables will be 
added and th^ entire bridge developed, 
but the chief point of interest lies in the 
discussion of prni.cr tcjwers. It is rather 
commonly the case for small, suspension 
bridges, as foot bridges across stream', 
in the state, to have cver> appearance of 



speedy downfall on account of the 
towers. The mental activity promoted 
by such a model is far superior to tlie 
possible mechanical execution of a bridge 
from existing diawings. 



EAGER HEART. 



The Christmas mystery play, Eager 
Heart, is to be given by the Dramatic 
Club, Friday evening, at eight o'clock, 
in Cogswell Theater. The faculty are 
to be the guests. Although the seat- 
ing capacity is limited, the men of the 
College, who are intereested, are cor- 
dially invited to attend. 



Pan Hellenic Meeting. — The regu- 
uar monthly meeting of the Pan-Hel- 
lenic council was held last Monday 
evening. The matter of interfrater- 
nity basketball was discussed and re- 
ferred back to the fraternities for ac- 
tion. A card system, somewhat sim- 
ilar to that used by the athletic teams 
was recommended as a means of 
keeping a better record of the schol- 
arship of the fraternity men. 



BOOKS 

Stationery, Pictures and 
Novelties at 

The Pike's Peak Book & Stationery Co. 



27-27'/7 South Tejon Street 



Peone Black 354 



The Central Electric Co. 

Engineering, Supplies, Fixtures 

208 N. Tejon Street Phones Main 812, 830 

Lowell-Meservey Hdw. Co. 

Dealers in Paints, Oil, Glass, Every- 
thing in Hardware 



106 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springs 



THE TIGER 



The New Bull Pup Shoe 



in Patent Colt and Tan Russia Calf. The 

new Bull Pup last is made with a full round 
high toe, high heel and arcn and with extreme short forepart. Strictly a young ladies' shoe. 
There's nothing more indicative of true refinement than neatly-fitted footwear, and there's 
no better place to buy it than right here. Step in and let us fit you with a pair of our new 
Bull Pup shoes at $4.00 the pair. 



We Combine Both 
QUALITY AND PRICE 



FIT row EVERY rooT?-- ^ 




EXPERT 
SHOE FITTING 



Deichmann & Douglas 
Floral Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER. Msr. 



Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 

Students' Trade Solicited 



1 1 1 N. Tejon St. 



Telephone 1593 



Your 
Christmas 
At Home 

will include, of course, rememberiDg your family 
and your friends with a gift. You will be sur- 
prised at the number of things, ideal for gifts, 
that are sold most reasonably here. 



Johnson Jewelry Co 

26 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

' 'Satisfactory Jewelry 

Store" 



SAY!! 

Why not send your laundry to 

The Pearl Laundry Co.? 

We have the newest, best equipped 
plant in the city and guarantee our 
work to be of the best quality. A 
trial will convince you. 20 per cent 
discount to students. 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 
23 W. Bijou Street Phone Main 1085 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



DO YOU WANT 

a large airy room with plenty of sun- 
shine, where everything is homelike? 
You will find what you are looking 
for at 215 E. Monument St, 



CHAPPEL TALK. 



Rev. Fayette L. Thompson, father 
of "Tommy" Thompson, one of our 
football stars, and secretary of the 
Methodist Brotherhood, spoke in an 
interesting manner to the students in 
chapel last Monday. "The things 
which you are now doing," said he, 
"are the things which determine your 
future actions. We often find upon 
investigation that the 'luck' we hear 
of coming to a person is only the re- 
ward for years of hard work. The 
one who does best at his task is the 
one who enjoys doing his task best. 
We have heard it said that the aver- 
age man does not have the chance 
that he had a few years ago. That," 
he said emphatically, "is not true. 
There is nothing in life that we can 
not have by paying for it the price of 
princely service." In commenting 
upon the beauty of our natural sur- 
roundings and their value as a source 
of inspiration, he quoted a poem in 
which the nation is personified as 
Columbia calling for men to match 
the beautiful scenery, and offering to 
such men unbounded reward. The 
speaker concluded by urging us to 
make the most of our present oppor- 
tunities, and thus to lay a firm foun- 
dation for the future. 



No Tennis Tournament. — Owing to 
the poor condition of the courts and 
the rapidly approaching vacation sea- 
son, the fall tennis tournament has 
been postponed and will probably be 
held next spring. The enthusiasm in 
this sport abated considerably during 
football season, but the Tennis Club 
has prospects for a large membership 
and a classy tournament in the 
spring. The courts will be prepared 
and made ready for a hard set of 
games. 



Antlers 

Turkish Baths 

(Opposite Elks Club) 
Open Day and Night 

BATHS OF ALL KINDS. Also Chiro- 
pady and Swedish Massage. Treat- 
ment at Residence by Appointment. 

CARL J. WENBERG, Prop. 

Graduate Swedish Masseur 



Phone Red 33 



14 E. Bijou Street 



FOR 

Christmas Shopping 



GO TO 



THE MAY CO 

23 North Tejon Street 



lOfo Discount to Students 



I Whitaker-Kester 

f SHOE CO. 

^ Immense Variety in 
I Fall Shoes 



We crowd into our shoes all the style 
and good wear that only the best shoe 
makers can give us. Every Whitaker- 
Kester patron knows that this state- 
ment may be accepted in the fullest 
sense. We are showing a greater 
range of designs than ever before. 
All the best and most popular leathers 
in the smartest, dressiest and best 
fitting shoes at J3.50, $4.00 and $5. 

132 N. Tejon St. 



10 



THE TIGER 



^^ 




In Selecting a Full Dress or a Tuxedo Suit 
a Man Must Exert the 

keenest judgment, because he is about to make an investment of 
no small amount of money and he expects the suit to last him a 
considerable length of timer "Benjamm" Full Dress clothes are 
not extremely high-priced, but they are as correctly styled and as 
painstakingly made as any custom tailor's. Full Dress Suits $40 
to $55. Tuxedo Suits $35 to $50. 

Liberal Discounts to Students 



MANHATTAN SHIRTS 
STETSON HATS 



FOWNES GLOVES 
PERRINE GLOVES 



Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton-Rustic Home 

Do No. 419 South El Paso St. 
airy a) Phone Main 442 

Photography 

In All Its Branches 

Clark 

112 South Tejon St. 

Special Discount to All Students 

Shoe Repairing. Clothes Cleaned and Pressed. 
Second-Hand Shoes a .d Clothing 

J. H. PERKINS 



IVz^. Cascade 



Colorado Springs 



PRATT, The Barber 

Is At the Alta Vista Hotel 

He Solicits the Patronage of the 
College Boys 



COMMISSION HAS BUSY SES- 
SION. 



Accounts to Be Audited — Basketball 

to Be Pushed — Honor System 

and Campus Rules Up for 

Action. 



One of the busiest Coitimission meet- 
ings of the year occurred last Monday. 
Plans for the coming Pan-pan were dis- 
cussed and a committee consisting of 
Weirick, Crow, Miss Suinmers and Miss 
Ashley appointed to have the affair in 
charge. 

The report of the Barbecue auditing 
committee was accepted and another 
committee appointed to audit the ac- 
counts of the Junior operetta and one 
to audit McMillan's accounts. 

Basketball came up for discussion aujj 
sentiment seemed to be in favor of a 
College team. To this end, a petition 
signed by the men of the, Commission 
was drawn up and presented to the fac- 
ulty for their action. 

It was pointed out that Campus rules 
are being disobeyed by both freshmen 
and the men of the other classes. 
Though no action was taken it was the 
sentiment of all that these rules 
should be rigidly enforced. 

A new departure for this 3'-ear was the 
presence of the Woman's Advisory 
Board. The board was present in a 
body and since their duties are purely 
advisory, they sought to improve their 
time by bringing their knitting. A mo- 
tion for an appropriation for the knitting 
club was lost for want of a second. 



WINDOW SLEEPING TENTS 



THE OUT 


WEST 


TENT AND AWNING CO. 


1 13-2 NORTH TEJON STREET 





Phone 917 



GEO. R. BERGEN, 0. D. 

MANF'G OPTICIAN 
Eyes Tested 611-12 Exch. Nat. Bank BIdg. 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold^ Rented 
and Repaired 

Supplies of AH Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing a Typewriter. The 
New No. 10 Model Has All Latest 
Improvements 

Zimmerman Supply 

Company 



22 E. Kiowa St. 
Phone Main 374 



Established 1890 



WILIIAMJON 
HArrNDRCD 

MOFAVERJ-PRINTBRS 




1XE>NVI>K. COl/Q 



The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 



THE TIGER 



11 



See Our Window for Xmas Combinations, 

New and Saves You Money 



Something 



HUGHES 

North I *J Tejon 



Gel Your Picnic Supplies 

AT =' 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER. Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Notary Public 

A. J. LAWTON 

Real Estate, Loans and Insurance 
IQYi E.Pike's Peak Ave., Colorado Springs 

Suggestions for Xmas 

A Kodak 

A Waterman Pen 

A C. C Pennant 

A C. C. Pillow Top 

A College Calendar 

A Box of Whitman's Famous 

"Fussy Chocolates" 

A Box of Fine Cigars 

A Box of Stationery 

A Manicure Case 

Perfumes, Toilet Articles, 

Atomizers, etc. 

MURRAY'S 

(Opposite Campus) 



SIGMA CHI DANCE. 



Th Sigma Chi fraternity gave a 
Christmas dance Saturday night in 
the San Luis. The hall was dec- 
orated with C. C. pennants and a large 
Christmas tree. The guests of the 
fraternity were the Misses Eversole, 
Breckenridge, Mack, Ruth Wallace, 
Willabel Lennox, Grace Wilson, 
Weir, McKenzie, Walsh, 
Pierson, Hedgecock, Cora 
Whittenberger, Rheinhart, 
Stott, True, May Wallace, 
^icBride and Moore and iMr. Seldom- 
ridge. 



Frantz, 
Yerkes, 
Kampf, 
Alusser, 



APOLLONIAN LADIES' NIGHT. 

The members of the Apollonian Club 
delightfully entertained their lady friends 
at the Club house last Friday evening 
with an especially arranged program, 
followed by delicious refreshments. The 
noteworthy features of the program 
were a one-man debate by Bryson upon 
the question ; "Resolved, That the Apol- 
lonian ladies are welcome," and a com- 
plete, up-to-date minstrel show in which 
Bartlett, Friend, Hesler, Newman and 
Crow were the black face artists. Frank 
Hill ga\e a humorous Jew monologue 
and the musical end was well taken care 
o^ by Friend who sang a solo and Hill 
who played a mandolin solo. Refresh- 
ments were served consisting of sand- 
wiches, chocolate and fruit frappe. 
About forty guests were present. 



Children's Party. 

The little girls of ]\Iinerva and 
Contemporary spent last Saturday 
afternoon playing with the little Hy- 
patians in Ticknor Study. The room 
was decorated with Christmas greens. 
,A.fte " the games, Santa Claus ap- 
peared and presented each guest with 
a toy. 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



The Spalding 
Trade-Mark 




Is^ Known Throughout 
the Woild as a 

GUARANTEE OF 
QUALITY 



are the Largest Manu- 
facturers in the World of 

OFFICIAL EQUIPMENT 

for All Athletic Sports and 
Pastimes 

If Ymi ^'^ interested in 
11 lUU Athk-tic Sport you 
should have a copy of the 
Spalding Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyoiopedia of 

What's New iu Sport 

and is sent free on request. 



Learn about your college from the 
Holiday Tiger. 



A. G. SPALD NG & BROS. 

1616 Arapahoe Street, Denver, Colorado 

We can sell you solid gold rings, set 
with nice genuine diamond $5.50. 
We have one small lot of 14k:. solid 
gold gents' and ladies' rings, differant 
designs, set with nice white diamonds. 
Other jewelers get $20 to $25 for 
the same thing. Our price $12.50 
and $14, and we have a big selection 
diamond scarf pins from $3.50 up, 
diamond studs from $8.50 up. Big- 
gest selection of gents' and ladies' 
watches in new and unredeemed, at 
way down prices, and hundreds of 
other articles at 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 

27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 

Money Adnanced on All Valuabhs 



Watch the Caps You Meet 

You won't need an intro- 
duction to the HEIDCAP. 
It is not a mere head cover- 
ing. It has character. It 
gives character to the wear- 
er. It is made of exclusive 
English cap cloths. It is a 
thoroughbred. Try on a 
HEIDCAP. 



12 



THE TIGER 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co 
Groceries and 



Meats 



.«A*A 







115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



MUETH'S 

The Place Where the Stand- 
ard Is Never Lowered. High 
Class Goods at Reasonable 
Prices. Ice Cream, Hot 
and Cold Drinks. 

Lunches and Afternoon Teas 
Ask Any Old Student 

CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 



5 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs 




Cox Sons & Vining 

262 Fou'th Ave., New York 

Gowns and Caps 

Silk Faculty Gowns and 
Hoods. Lowest Prices 
Best Workmanship. 



The D. Y. Butcher Drug Co. 

DRUGS, KODAKS, SUPPLIES 

Free and Prompt Delivery 
Cor. Opposite P. 0. Phones 90 and 750 



NEW ENGLAND 

ALUMNI BANQUET. 



To the Editor of toe liger: 

C. C. students two tnousand miles 
from home don't often have a real 
ihanksgiving dinner, with fellow stu- 
dents at the sides and father and mother 
Prexy at the ends of a long table. We, 
the transplanted faculty, alumni and ex- 
members in New England, are lucky. 
On the Friday night after Thanksgiving 
thirty-eight of us got together in the 
Brunswick hotel in Boston. To start 
the dinner right, Toastmaster Hedblom 
'07, read telegrams, one from the Den- 
ver alumni, wishing us a good Thanks- 
giving, the other from the head of the 
Denver University, giving us cause for 
thanksgiving by announcing the foot- 
ball victory of C. C. 

Hedblom compared the gathering to 
a C. C. ranch round-up. Lawrence Lunt, 
Harvard '09, the "maverick," and Donald 
McCreery, C. C. '08, the "double brand- 
ed" or "dub," responded to toasts. Dr. 
LeBaron R. Briggs, the "boss" of the 
Big H outfit, also President of Radcliffe 
and Dean of Harvard College, was the 
speaker of the evening. He said he con- 
sidered that we are in danger of having 
too many universities, since the number 
of institutions which can be cosmopoli- 
tan enough is limited. It is much bet- 
ter to have a strong college than a weak 
university. Colorado College, he 

thought, is one of the strong western 
institutions which is able to distinguish 
between the idea of a college and a uni- 
versity. 

Prexy, our own boss, spoke last. He 
made clear the stronger bond which is 
coming to exist between the eastern 
and western institutions, of the place of 
the modern student in life, and gave us, 
too, facts concerning the growth of the 
College. Prexy and Mrs. Slocum seem 
like Pike's Peak, monuments and sym- 
bols of the College which abide while 
student generations come and go. With 
a good C-0, the session adjourned to the 
parlor, where an hour was spent in con- 
versation and gossip. 

The affair was the largest and most 
successful yet held. Most of the success 
is due to Hedblom, the untiring enthusi- 
ast. Officers were elected for the year 
as follows : President, W. G. Lennox 
'09; Vice-President, Alice Clement, ex- 
'0^; Secretary-Treasurer, Clarence Lieb, 
'08. The following were present : Pres- 
ident and Mrs. W. F. Slocum, Prof, and 
Mrs. F. H. Loud, Prof, and Mrs. Smith, 
Mrs. Mary Ahlers, Miss Mary Noyes, 
Mrs. Phidelah Rice, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 
G. Lennox, Misses IMaryMcCreery 'o8, 
Hall '06, Alice Clement ex-'OS, Winifred 




Lallie's Improved Ball Bearing 
Clipper Reel for Long Tapes 
Best Tape and Reel Made in America 

Lallie Surveying Instru- 
ment and Supply Co. 



1622 Arapahoe St. 



DenTcr, Colo 



No More Wrinkles 

I have a remedy that will speedily eradicate 
any case of wrinkles— no matter how bad or 
what the cause. It makes old faces look 
young, removes all lines and wrinkles, 
corrects flabby or withered skin, makes thin 
faces plump, fills out hollow cheeks, will 
develop any part of the body round and full 
without any massaging. Call at my parlors 
and I will explain fully and convince you. 

Miss N. E. Jolinsoii 



Phone 687 



324 N. Tejon Street 



JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Stree 

The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Gives 
Special Attention to Accounts of Students 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, President Ira Har ■ V-President 

M. C. Gile Wm. F. Richards 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M. 

Hunt Up 

Bissell's Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

COLLEGE SEALS 

We have just had made for us 
a handsome College Seal Sticker 
that is just the thing for your 
stationery, etc. Put up 24 in a 
package for only lOc. Just the 
thing for your Xmas packages. 

Whitney & Grimwood 



THE TIGER 



1» 



GIFTS 

Are you wondering what to 
get your friend that will 
be appreciated? Our store 
should be visited at once. 
Our line of leather goods, 
pennants, fine stationery 
will give you just what you 
want at pleasing prices. 

OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



HAYNER 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



12 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Spring* 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



Phone Main 2055 



Art Needle Work 



THE HUNT & VAN NICE 
Art Specialty Store 

Stamping, Designing, Perforating, Linens, 

Lawns, Best Hand-Psunted China 
8 Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 

Flour, Fe(>d, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 

Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co. 



Shuler ex-"10, Packard ex-'12, Helen 
Noyes, Helen Laughlin ex-'12, Frances 
Montgomery '07, Nina Eldridge ex-'08, 
Parsons ; Messrs. C. A. Hedblom '07. 
Lawrence Lunt, James McGuire '08, Car- 
rol Dunham ex-'08, Wm. Jackson ex-'lO, 
Clarence Lieb '08, Archie Beard ex-'08, 
Donald McCreery '08, Rice ex-'H, Le- 
land Pollock '10, Walker '10, A. Stick- 
ney ex-'08, S. Stickney ex-'08, Wilson 
SmilHe '08, Francis Loud '04, Banfield 
ex-'12. 

W. G. LENNOX. 



BANQUET JOYOUS OCCASION 

Continued from Page 5 

ter then I will be quarter for the second 
eleven." He eulogized Coach Rothgeb 
and Coach Coffin and laid much of the 
credit for the manner in which the play-' 
ers trained at the door of the two 
coaches who trained with their men and 
required nothing that they did not exact 
of themselves. 

To the Business Men. 

The business men of Colorado Springs 
are as 'good friends as the Tigers and 
the College have. They have boosted, 
subscribed for various stunts and to cap 
the climax of their appreciation for the 
team, banqueted them in most royal 
style. 

Numerous business men have re- 
marked, "It was the liveliest football 
season in the history of the College — it 
livened us to see the demonstration of 
spirit and we are behind the team." 

College spirit has taken a boom this 
year that looks like a permanent one. 



SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 



Forest Specimens Sent to Harvard. 



Last week Prof. Cooledge sent a large 
number of Alnus tenuifolia, the common 
alder of this region, to Prof. I. W. 
Bailey of Harvard, for use in the study 
of plant morphology, especially in com- 
parison with alnus mollis, an eastern 
species of alder. Specimens of this 
tree were sent showing wounds in small 
seedlings, section of larger trunks show- 
ing wounds, and besides unwounded 
vigorous shoots. The specimens were 
found in plenty in Ute Pass by the stu- 
dents who undertook the collection. 



At North Dakota Aggie, the R. L C. 
Club has undertaken to improve the 
looks of a few of its individuals. No 
celleloid or rubber collars are to be per- 
mitted. The hair must be worn fairly 
short and fairly well combed. 



II Local Department || 



The members of the football team in 
Alpha Tau Delta entertained the frater- 
nity at an informal smoker Saturday 
night as a recognition of the service of 
the training table. 

Dr. James and Dr. Ong, two Phi Del- 
ta Theta alumni from Denver, visited 
the Alpha Tau Delta house Sunday. 



Prof. Cooledge went to Manitou Park 
last Saturday to mark timber. Mr. 
Law has quite a large gang at work cut- 
ting and is working the saw mill pretty 
steadil}', turning out about 50,000 feet 
last month. 



Miss Pollen '09 gave a card party in 
honor of Miss Alillicent Campbell last 
Wednesday evening. 

Tonuuy Thompson's father visited the 

ZEHNER'S 

UN. Tejon St. 

Jewelers and Opticians 

See Our Window Display of 
Holiday Goods 

Your Choice, $2.00 



A Box of 

BURGESS CANDY 

Is a Bundle - 
of PURE JOY 

'You'll Like the Burgess Store" 



112-114 North Tejon St. 



SATAN 

arose and said unto himself, 
"Hades is getting lonesome 
since the people are getting such 
good soles from 

PETE'S 

230 East Dale 



14 



THE T I G E B 





Phone 

Main 1288 



It's A Dog-Gone Shame 

that you don't realize that 
we turn out the best work 
in town. 

Pressing for Students, $1 per month 
Skirts thoroughly cleaned and 

pressed - - - $ .75 
Jackets thoroughly cleaned 

and pressed - - .75 

Kid Gloves cleaned, all lengths .10 



218 North 
, ^ench ^yers ^ejon Street 
'and Cleaners, 



For Best and Quick Delivery 

SEE 

The Monument Coal Co. 

28 East Kiowa Street 

William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



THE 

Crissey Si Fowler 
Lumber Co. 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 



Chafing Dishes 



Tinware 



For a Square Deal 

A. S. BLAKE 

Is the Man to See 

107 North Tejon Phone 465 

Nickle Ware Cutlery 

Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

Remember We Handle Nothing but the 

BEST GRADES OF FUEL 
"EVERY LUMP A LUMP OF HEAT" 

The Central Fuel Co. 

1 28 N. Tejon Street Phone 1101 



Springs the iirst of tlie week. He gave 
a delightful talk in chapel Monday and 
also spoke twice in the city Sunday. 



The Alpha Tau Delta fraternity en- 
livened the campus and various frater- 
nity houses Saturday night, by a "full 
paid up" sing. 



Ern. Station's father visited at the 
Sigma Chi chapter house Saturday and 
Sunday. 



Two too fresh freshmen were shown 
the error of their ways last Thursday and 
this Monday immediately after chapel. 



Minerva enjoyed the presence of many 
guests at her open meeting last Friday. 

A Complete Review of the Foo'-ball 
Season in the Holiday Tiger. 



Miss Loomis entertained the Bemis 
freshmen Saturdav. 



Elizabeth Gerould enjoyed a visit 
from her father one night last week. 

Laura McLain is ill with tonsilitis. 

May Green has entered school as a 
freshman from Denver University. 

Matt Draper gave a card party Sat- 
urdav in honor of Carrie Davis, 



Melicent Campbell has been visiting 
friends in the Springs. 



Dramatic Club held its regular busi- 
ness meeting last Thursday afternoon. 

"Fuz" McOuat ex-'lO has gone to 
San iM-an.cisco. presumably to form a 



Broken Lenses 
Duplicated 



Phone Black 2>^J' 
Colorado Souvenirs 



C. B. LAUTERMAN 

Jeweler and Manufac- 
turing Optician 

121 N. TEJON STREET Colorado Springs 



10c STORE AND MORE! 

THE ElVIPOmUlM 

1 10 S. TEJON STREET 



College Inn 

Freshmen!! 

Tiiis Is the Place for 

GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



Fine Watch Work 



Diamond Setting a Specialtr 



H. E. Kapelke 

Watchmaker ana Jeweler 
130 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 

Grand Union Tea Co. 

Importers of Fine Teas and 
Coffees 

Phone Main 2678 220 N. Tejon St. 



On liand as usual 
but just a little better 
equipped for serving your 
needs — 



The 

WATERMAN 

PRESS 

PRINTERS 



THE TIGER 



15 



WANTED /f 



Student Furns^ce Attendants 

to get our attractive side money 
proposition. Give address. Write 
C 59, care Colorado Springs Gazette 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at M'oderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

'The College Favorite ' 



The Favorite Shopping 

Place for the College 

Woman 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 

10612 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone Main 700 



* 



Star 
Laundry 



The College Laundlry 

The ONLY Laundry which a,clvei:tises jn 
The Tiger. We give 20% discount to you. 
The best work in the state for as low a 
price as any. - , 

J. B. DICKSON, Agent Phone Main 342 



W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting. Goads ^ 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



119 N. Tejon 



Pbooe Main 900 



Clearance Sale 

Gorton's Good Clothes 

Made exclusive for Gorton's good trade by Adler- 
Rochester. Beautiful browns, tans, grays patterr.s 
blues and blacks. 

$40, $35, $30 Suit or Overcoat $24 
$27.50, $25 Suit or Overcoat $19 
$22.50, $20 Suit or Overcoat $14 

Gorton Makes Only One Reduction, This Is the One 



'% 



Money Cheerfully 
Refunded 



^ 




E. Pike's Peak 
113 



Correct Dress for Men. ^ 



trust with "Fat" Morgan in the tree-sur- 
gery business. 

Martha McLeod ex-'i3 spent the 
week end at the College. 

Miss Marjorie MacBride of Denver 
visited Katherine True Sunday. 

,.-_ Persjs Kidder gave a tea in her room 
Sunday afternoon.. 

Anne Baker entertained a number of 
friends Simday evening. 

Ruth Copeland entertained friends 
from Denver Sundav. 



Mpntgomerv had a jolly reunion Fri- 
day eVehmg:' 

driver ,.Cuok has - recqfvered r from a 
sev'erQ'tJflt'tacK of tnnsiUtis which kept 
li!ni''tiu''fiis ratyin for; a week after foot- 
balP ,sl'a.^on. -'.iv- 



Pay tkat little "bet" you lost by going 
to Noble's, Qor. Bijou and'Tejon. 



Miss Shirley McKinnie entertained a 
' few 'fr'ifends 'very' "pleasantly ^ last Satur- 
day evening". 



Ed Jacobs will be out of the hospital 
in about three weeks. 



Carl Blackman '10 left last Tuesday 
fdr New Mexico where he will take 
charge of some minhig property owned 
by Littell Bros. 



Harry Howes '14 has returned to 
school after an enforced visit to his 
home in Topeka, Kansas. 



Dern's Freshly Roasted Coffee 

will make 10 more cups to the lb. 
than Eastern roasted coffee 



29 S. Tejon Street 



Phone 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 



Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Building, 118 
North Tejon Street. Phone Main 1701. Resi- 
dence. 1211 N. Weber Street. Phone Main 956 



The College 
Photo Studio 




^K^iSTJifa i/ 




Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 



FOR CHRISTMAS 

There is nothing finer, more appropriate 
or of more lasting value than Engraved 
Visiting Cards or Monogram Paper. 
We make these. 

The Gowdy-Simmons Printing Co. 



Phone 87 



21 N. Tejon Street 



16 



THE TiaER 



Puzzling over what Christmas pres- $2, $10, $12, $20 or more. 



ent would be most acceptable by a 
loyal Tiger? 

From the most modest gift of cravat, silk or silk lisle 
hose, suspenders, silk or linen handkerchief or sleeve 
buttons at 50c up to more pretentious presents at $1, 



You 11 find an alluring variety of new, useful thin 
designed especially for men of good taste. House coa 
lounging robes, gloves, cravats, athletic coat sweate 
linen handkerchiefs in undressed leather cases, 'kerchi 
hose, cravat perfectly matched in color, neatly boxed a 
in suede leather fold cases. Shop here, early this ye; 



8 N. Tejon Street 



(PerivimSiie^iper 6 



28 E. Pike's Pec 




•1 ^ 

t; o 

_ o 

■« c 

-a j3 

"So -c 



E 

u 
o 



o 

z 



in 

CO ^ 



CO 




r 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 

Departments — CoWege of Arts and 
Science, E. S. PARSONS, DeaD. 

School of Engineering, F. CAJORI, Dean 
School of Forestry, W. C. STURGIS, Dean 
School of Music, E. D. HALE, Dean 



Manitou Park, — Field Laboratory 
of the School of Forestry 



The Football Season Is Over, but the Season for Browns Is Just at Hand. The 

Biggest Selection in the City 

GEO. J. GA TTERER 

10 Per Cent Discount to Students 
216 North Tejon Street Telephone Main 1247 



fyyipyf^^!i^wrCT^ewpff!?w^»y^?!T gM i . ' . g j i' %, ' 'v- ' i*»!h-riv*it/j ^ ^ ' 'i Mi. ' n-. ' .m-u '" , ' . ■ . ' ■Ji. ' H i «' ' .i»j i j i . i . ii , i» , i! ;^ 






[:;. 



linmm [ I I ii .]. i ..l).i. i ' i . i .l.l.. iii . i y i .l..J 



,n,!.i ' '.'.I. {.■><<. •^<t.,.' I- 1 III 111 



,.,1.1.1. ..I I lU. 



"I iiipjiiiii 1 1 











Phone 
Main 1288 



Our Hands 

throughout our entire estab- 
lishment are experts. Try us 
for your fancy cleaning or dying 
of gloves, ostrich feathers, furs, 
fancy evening and party gowns 

Out Prices are 25 fo Off to Col- 
lege Students 



218 North 
ffench^yers Tejon Street 
and Cleaners, 



For Best and Quick Delivery 

SEE 

The Monument Coal Co. 

28 East Kiowa Street 

William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Spring*. Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 Georc* St., Mansion Hoiua, London, E. C. 



THE 

Crissey & Fowler 
Lumber Co. 



Phone 101 



117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 



Chafing Dishes Tinware 

For a Square Deal 
A. S. BLAKE 

Is the Man to See 

107 North Teioo Phone 465 

Nickle Ware Cutlery 

Patronize TIGER Advertisers 

Remember We Handle Nothing but the 

BEST GRADES OF FUEL 
"EVERY LUMP A LUMP OF HEAT" 

The Central Fuel Co 

1 28 N. Tojon Streat Phono 1101 



If You Want To Look 
Well In the Annual 

SEE 

BINGHAM 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

18 S. Tejon St. Telephone 678 

Discount to Student: 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Out West Building 



The Dentan 

Printing Company 



No. 9 So. Cascade Auenue 

FIRST-CLASS PRINTING 
at REASONABLE RATES 

Telepnone Main No. 602 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heatii g Co. 



Phone Mab 48 313 N. Tejon St. 



Broken Lenses 
Duplicated 



Phone Black 2 
Colorado Souveni 



C. B. lAUTERMAN 

Jeweler and Manufac- 
turing Optician 



121 N. TEJON STREET 



Colorado Sprin. 



10c STORE AND MORE 

THE Eil/IPORiUM 

lies. TEJON STREE- 



College Ini 

Freshmen!! 

TLis Is the Place for 

GOOD THINGS TO EA' 



Fine Watch Work 



Diunoni] Settinf > Sped* 



H. E. Kapelke 

Watchmaker ana Jeweler 



130 E. Pike's Paak Ave. 



Colorado Sprin 



Grand Union Tea Co. 

Importers of Pine Teas an 
Coffees 

Phone Main 2678 220 N. Tejon £ 



444411 



#reeting0 

To the Students of C. C. 



Lese Ttygnehitv Evabe Aqutily. Him 

nipatorzed slougenery so evah how 
stundets hoset ginkthan of thodme 
tshi skate Esspr Tamwrane Het fo 
Nawmater b Hurtar Potygrapber Het 



To the First Studtnt stnding us a 
>Corraet answer to the abov* bit* 
of Printsr's "Pi," ws will giva a hun- 
drad of our bast visiting cards s s 




Vol. XIII 



THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., DECEMBER 15, 1910 



Number 14 




HOLIDAY NUMBER 






Colorado College-Its Past, Present and Future 



THE PAST A RECORD OF 
ACHIEVEMENTS 



Colorado College was founded in 
1874, two years before Colorado was 
admitted r.s a state. It is now, and 
always has been^ free from denomina- 
tional or political control. The pur- 
pose of the founders, which has been 
strictly adhered to, is shown by their 
official declaration made at the time 
of the founding of the College: "The 
College is under no ecclesiastical or 
political control. The Congrega- 
tionalists undertake to build the Col- 
lege, not as a Congregational college, 
but as Colorado College. At no time 




The First Building of Colorado College. 

will the special doctrines or policies 
of any religious denomination be 
taught." 



"It is the purpose of the Trustees 
to build a College in which liberal 
studies may be pursued under positive 
Christian influences. .... 
Members of the different churches 
are on its Board of Trustees. 
The character which is most desired 
for this College is that of thorough 
scholarship and fervent piety, each 
assisting the other, and neither ever 
offered as a compensation for the de- 
fects of the other." 

A grant of land had been made in 
advance of the organization of the 
College, in 1873, by the Colorado 
Springs Company, the founders of the 
city of Colorado Springs. The Rev. 

Continued on Page 3 





l-"*' 






•<«-f * ' '«f 



A B;rdseye View of the Present Campus. 



THE TIGER 



fessor and executive officer. The 
first president, the Rev. James 
Dougherty, was elected in 1875, and 
was succeeded in the following year 
by the Rev. E. P. Tenney. From 
1885 to 1888 there was no President, 
but the work of teaching was carried 
on without interruption. At this 
time there was only one building on 
the campus, now known as Cutler 
Academy, erected in 1880. 

The first fifteen years of the Col- 
lege's existence were years of 
struggle for life. The country was 
new. The need for higher education 
was slight, and the early history of 
Colorado College reads much like the 
early history of Harvard or Yale, but 
during the last twenty-two years of 
its life the College has made steady 
and uninterrupted progress, and there 
are few institutions. East or West, 
that can show such substantial, natur- 
al and healthy growth for the last 
score of years as has marked the de- 
velopment of Colorado College from 
a humble beginning to its present po- 
sition among the great institutions 
of the West. 

In 1888 William Frederick Slocum 
was elected President. The faculty 
was at once enlarged, the courses re- 
organized, and Cutler Academy in- 
corporated as an associate prepara- 
tory school, in which students have 
since been trained, not only for Colo- 
rado College, but for the leading in- 
stitutions of the United States. A 
residence for the President was pur- 
chased Within two years $100,000 
was given toward an endowment, en- 
tirely from within Colorado. Hag- 
erman Hall was built in 1889. In 
the same year thee Woman's Educa- 
tional Society was organized and 
built Montgomery Hall. 

The following buildings have been 
erected since that time: The N. P. 
Coburn Library, 1894; the Henry R. 
Wolcott Observatory, 1894; Ticknor 
Hall, 1897; Perkins Fine Arts Hall, 
1900; McGregor Hall, 190,^; Palmer 
Hall, 1903; Bemis Hall, 1908. The 
President's residence was remodeled 
and enlarged in 1903. 

In 1903 a School of Engineering, 
with Dr. Florian Cajori as Dean, was 
opened to meet the increasing de- 
mand in the Rocky Mountain region 
for instruction in applied science. 
The first class was graduated in 1906. 

Through the generosity of General 
Palmer and Dr. Bell, who in 1905 
presented to the College a tract of 
13,000 acres of timber land called 



Manitou Park, the foundation was 
laid for a School of Forestry. The 
School opened in 1906, with Dr. Will- 
iam C. Sturgis as Dean. 

Colorado College has a total en- 
dowment fund of $979,171.75. This 
is larger than that of any institution 
in the Rocky Mountain region, the 
University of Utah ranking second 
with $550,000. Its total income is 
more than $75,000, which places it on 
a par with the leading colleges of the 
country. 

IiT a campaign which ended Jan- 
uary I, 1908, $512,171.75 was raised 
and added to the existing endowment. 
Up to December 13, 1907, $375,000 had 
been raised, conditional upon the 
completion of $500,000 by January i. 
Within these seventeen days, in the 
midst of the financial panic, there 
was raised in Colorado, and mostly 
in Colorado Springs, $137,000. The 
$500,000 mark was passed December 
27 ■ — • fourteen days after the cam- 
paign begun. By January i, it had 
been oversubscribed by over $12,000. 
Subscriptions came in from every 
class of people. Nothing could 
speak more eloquently than the suc- 
cess of this campaign of the faith 
the people of Colorado have in the 
future of Colorado College. 

The Present a Period of Prosperity. 

The present flourishing condition 
of Colorado College has not been 
brought about by a sudden burst of 
enthusiasm on the part of its friends 
and founders, nor has it had a forced 
growth sustained by the millions of 



wealthy patrons. On the contrary, 
it was founded thirty-three years ago 
by men jvho saw so clearly the future 
greatness of this State, and the in- 
evitable necessity for just such a col- 
lege as this, that they worked with 
the certainty that the means would 
be forthcoming to build on the foun- 
dations they then laid. 

That their dreams of the future 
have been realized perhaps more than 
they imagined they would be, is evi- 
dent when one views the splendid 
campus, beautifully parked and lo- 
cated, and the many handsome and 
substantial buildings that stand as 
monuments of earnest endeavors. 

But it is not the Campus or the 
buildings that give the satisfied feel- 
ing of the present, it is more the 
men of recognized ability who are 
working for its welfare; it is the pres- 
ent student body gathered from, 
every corner of the nation; and again 
it is the great group of loyal alumni 
who though they have gone forth 
from the College halls still cherish 
the memories of the past and still use 
their efforts to promote the present 
substantial position of the institution. 

That the present is the time when 
the College has come into its own in 
point of standing in the educational 
world is best evidenced by the un- 
solicited statements of thoughtful 
men, such as are printed elsewhere 
in this edition. 

The Future — One of Promise. 

From the past and present some- 
thing can be known of the probable 
future of Colorado) Colege. Situ- 




A View of Coburn Uibrary and Perkins Fine Arts Hall. 



THE TIGER 



Colorado College Possesses Unusual Advantages of Location 




OLORADO COL- 
LEGE is fortunate 
in its location and 
in its environment. 
It is so situated geo- 
graphically that it 
commands the en- 
tire Rocky Moun- 
tain Region, and 
because of certain 
characteristics pecu- 
liar to this particu- 
lar location it is en- 
abled to draw its 
student body from 
practically every state in the Union. 

When General William J. Palmer, 
with the prophetic vision of an empire- 
builder, saw in the barren prairie at 
the foot of Pike's Peak, the future Colo- 
rado Springs, this same insight told him 
that the community which he was to 
found and to build would become the 
home of a great educational institution, 
and his plans for a town and a college 
were linked together. The same factors 
which gave Colorado Springs its individ- 
uality determine in no small measure 
the distinctive position which Colorado 
College occupies among the institutions 
of the West. 

If, in all the territory between the 
Mississippi River and the State of Cali- 
fornia, there is to be one pre-eminent 
college, a study of the map will show 
why Colorado College bids fair to as- 
sume that position. In a general way, 
it is situated at a latitude the same as 
that of Washington ; it occupies almost 
the exact geographical center of the 
trans-Mississippi country; it lies where 
mountain meets plain, in the land of 
sunshine and invigorating climate. 




Springs is blessed has drawn to this city 
thousands of persons broken in health 
and has given back to them strength and 
life. I his is a factor of no less signifi- 
cance in drawing to Colorado College 
scores of students from every section of 
the country, _ students who may come 
here to pursue a course of studies as 
high as that of the eastern college and 
at the same time to enjoy the invigorat- 
ing tonic of Colorado's pure air and 
liright sunshine. 

Colorado Springs is unique among 
western cities ; it is a community of a 
distinctive life; pre-eminently a city of 
hemes, of culture and refinement, a city 
whose people have come from the ends 
of the world that they may enjoy here 
superior advantages. It is but natural 
that Colorado College should in a meas- 
ure reflect this spirit and that it, in turn, 
should be one of the most imtortant fac- 
tors in perpetuating the dominant char- 
acteristics of Colorado Springs. Colo- 
rado College has often been called an 
eastern college with a western environ- 
ment. In many ways, it is also enabled 
to combine the advantages of the small 
college town with those of a metropol- 
itan character. 

Certain departments which are coming 
to play a more and more important part 




i.T^i^ss*'* 



The climate with which Colorado 



ill the life of Colorado College, enjoy, 
by reason of the geographical location 
of Colorado Springs, most favorable ad- 
vantages. Forty miles from Colorado 
Springs is the world's greatest gold 
mining camp ; three miles from the 
campus are the mills which treat this 
ore. Three miles in another direction 
are large coal mines, and nearby are 
modern power plants. Within a radius 
of 200 miles are lands upon which the 
science of irrigation has been carried to 



its highest state ; mountain streams 
whose waters are being harnessed for 
irrigation and for electric power ; great 
deposits of iron, and immense steel 
mills. Radiating to the westward are 
railroads whose construction involved 
the most trying of engineering prob- 
lems. These are the factors which give 
the School of Engineering located in 
Colorado Springs pronounced advan- 
tages. 

The problems of forestry, too, are vital 
to the entire nation. Within six mile? 
of Palmer Hall are the boundaries of 

Nature's Beauty Spots. 
one of the most important of the United 
States national forests while the private 
reserve of the Colorado School of For- 
estry at Manitou Park is only twenty 
miles distant. This is the reason that 
the Forestry School draws its students 
from the farthest corners of the country 
and ranks among the foremost in the 
land. 

There pre other reasons for the 
eni-ipble position which Colorado Col- 
lecre l^ns attained among the higher 
institntion=; of learning in the United 
Stntc^. hilt the object of this article 
is to noint out onlv those which have 
to do with location. The map says 
th?t there i« to be at this place a 
erent educational institution. 



COLORADO COL'EC'-ITS PAST, PRESENT 
AND FUTURE 

Continurd from Paee 1. 

Jonathan Edwards was the first pro- 
fited, as it is. in the most strategic 
point iri nil the West, it has natural 
advantages which are the envy of 
the other four collefres and universi- 
ties of the ."^tate. Colorado Springs 
is the center of all wealth, refine- 
ment and culture of the Rocky Moun- 
tain Region, as Denver is the center 
of the business interests. The 
natural facilities for the practical 
study of engineering and forestry are 
unDaralleled in the entire State. 

Colorado College has grown up in 
response to an urgent need. That 
need is increasing yearly, and there 
is every reason to believe that it will 
continue to increase until it has made 
Colorado College one of the great 
institutions of the land. The fresh- 
man class this year was just double 
the size' of the class of a few years 
ago, and from present indications, 
there will be a still more remarkable 
increase next fall. 



THE TIGER 



Impartial Views of Colorado College 



The high standing of Colorado Col- 
lege in the educational world is not 
confined to Colorado College or the 
Rocky Mountain region alone but is 
recognized throughout the country 
by men of recognized standing. The 
result of this has been that Colorado 
College, instead of being confined to 
the state alone as its field, draws 
from almost every state in the Union 
and on several foreign countries as 
well. 

The standing of Colorado College 
is placed on a par with that of Am- 
herst, Williams, Dartmouth, or any 
of the other of the best eastern col- 
leges. Its work is accepted for full 
credit at practically every institution 
in the land, and its graduates have 
shown the thoroughness of their 
training by the large number of prizes 
and scholarships that have been 
awarded them in their advanced work 
in the eastern universities. 

For the information of those not 
in touch with the work of the Col- 
lege, a few sayings of men whose 
word counts, the following words 
about Colorado College, its work, its 
standards, and its standing are given: 

"Colorado College is rapidly forg- 
ing ahead as one of the very best and 
most popular colleges in the United 
States and its students are exception- 
ally brainy, ambitious and earnest." 
— T. M. Patterson, ex U. S. Senator 
from Colorado. 

"The founders and promoters of 
Colorado College are prophets with 
whom I am more than glad to be 
identified in spirit." — Lyman Abbott. 

"Having spent a month in this 
place, and having seen a good deal of 
the splendid organization and magnifi- 
cent work of Colorado College, I 
wish to add my testimony to the 
claim of Colorado College upon the 
interest of all friends of Christian 
education at the present time. It 
is the oldest institution of its kind 
in the State. It is broadly, wisely 
and soundly administered. Its Trus- 
tees are the leading business and pro- 
fessional men of the community. Its 
Faculty are men of high scholarship 
and earnest devotion. Its course of 
study is thorough and progressive. 
Its students are sturdy, industrious 
young men and women, representing 
a wide territory. The College stands 
for the highest ideals of religious 
character, intellectual training and 
public service." — Wm. DeW. Hyde, 



Prominent Educators and 

Newspapers Loud in Their 

Praises of Merit 



President of Bowdoin College, in the 
Outlook. 

"After visiting almost every college 
in the United States, I say that it is 
unquestionably true that Colorado 
College is more like an Eastern col- 
lege than any other institution in the 
State, or in the Rocky Mountain 
Region." — Chas. D. Hurley, Interna- 
tional Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 

"It is a matter of profound con- 
gratulation, not only to the State of 
Colorado, but to the Nation, that the 
President and generous supporters of 
Colorado College have so clearly seen 
the great place which scientific train- 
ing and research are to play in the 
future. It is evident that Colorado 
College is to do its part in the great 
work of the application of science to 
life, in the development and extension 
of the great scientific spirit, and in 
the advancement of knowledge." — 
Chas. R. Van Hise, President Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 

"Colorado College is already be- 
come a university. The spirit of the 
university, the spirit and zeal of de- 
votion, of beauty-loving and truth- 



fearing, which is in Colorado College 
today will make the university an ac- 
complished fact. . . . Certain 
genuine attributes of the true uni- 
versity we may clearly see in Colo- 
rado College." — David Starr Jordan, 
President of Leland Stanford Univer- 
sity. 

"I was very much pleased with the 
College and firmly believe it is a per- 
manent institution with a very prom- 
ising futvire. It is handsomely lo- 
cated and is pervaded by the proper 
spirit." — Vice President Charles W. 
Fairbanks. 

What the Papers Say. 

"Its (C. C.'s) standards of scholar- 
ship have gained the respect and con- 
sideration of all the educators and 
bodies that have to do with things 
educational. Few institutions so 
splendidly epitomize the spirit of the 
West, and that is why the student 
body is so finely representative of 
western manhood and will continue 
to be increasingly." — George Creel in 
the Denver Post, June 17, 1910. 

"All social and moral influences of 
the city are distinctly accentuated by 
the existence of an institution which 
by its very nature, makes for earnest- 
ness and consecrated manhood and 
womanhood, and any community is 
fortunate in having expressed within 
it the highest ideals of life and work 




A View of the Campus from Cutler. 



THE TIGER 



as they are expressed in the life and 
work of Colorado College." — Colo- 
rado Springs Gazette, September 13, 
1 9 10. 

"It has ever been President Slo- 
cum's ambition to make the college 
hold as high a standard of scholar- 
ship as any in the country. To this 
end he carefully selected his faculty, 
taking only men of highest attain- 
ments and proven ability in teach- 
ing. In fifteen years he has built up 
from very small and hampered be- 
ginnings an institution whose high 
importance and solid scholarship are 
recognized not only in the West, but 
m the East as well, as was shown 
by the recent action of the National 
Council of the Phi Beta Kappa So- 
ciety, which admitted the college into 
its ranks unanimously." — Editorial in 
Denver News, December 5, 1904. 

Colorado Springs is a famous health 
resort, and families are constantly 
coming to it with their children from 
every section of the country. East- 
ern parents and institutions are be- 
ginning to realize that students who 
break down in other climates, can 
come to Colorado Springs and con- 
tinue mental training at the same 
time that they are recruiting physical 
strength. Students sometimes leave 
Eastern institutions for a year and 
come to Colorado College, going back 
at the end of the year restored in 
health and entering the classes they 
left, without any loss of time." — The 
Congregationalist. 

"There are only five well-estab- 
lished forestry schools in the coun- 
try, and at present they cannot any- 
thing like supply the demand for for- 
esters in the Rocky Mountain Region 
alone. With its splendid advantages 
of location, the Colorado School of 
Forestry is certain to become the 
best of all." — Editorial Colorado 
Springs Gazette, Feb. 2, 1907. 

"Colorado is one of the colleges of 
the rank of Bowdoin, Williams and 
Amherst, and in a very short time it 
has developed a great deal of the cul- 
tural quality which has always given 
the education of these institutions a 
certain distinction." — The Outlook, 
Dec. 31, 1904. 

"It is doubtful if any money has 
been applied to a better purpose in 
our State than the money that has 
gone to Colorado College since Dr. 
Slocum took charge of it." — Editorial 
in Denver Republican, Dec. 5, 1904. 



Colorado College Has One of the Ablest Presidents 

In the Land 




President William Frederick Slocum. 

For twenty-two years, Dr. William 
F. Slocum has directed the affairs of 
Colorado College. After receiving his 
degree of A. B. at Amherst, in 1874, he 
took his divinity course at Andover, 
Mass., where he received the degree of 
B. D. in 1878. In 1883, he was called 
to the Presidency of Colorado College, 
from the pastorate of the First Congre- 
gational Church at Baltimore, Maryland. 
From that day to this he has devoted the 
whole power of his great talents and 
the enthusiasm of his entire life to the 
upbuilding of Colorado College. Repeat- 
edly has he been called to other institu- 
tions, notably to the University of Illi- 
nois and Oberlin College. He has also 
been waited upon by committees from 
the University of Wisconsin, Beloit 
College, Iowa College, Pomona College, 
Amherst College, the University of 
Ohio, and the University of Kansas, 
asking if he would accept the presidency 
of these institutions. All these he has 
refused, and has never swerved from 
the task he has made his life work, 
namely, the upbuilding and development 
of Colorado College. 

In 1893, Amherst College conferred 
upon him the degree of L.L.D., in 1894, 
the University of Net>raska honored him 
with the same degree. In 1901, Beloit 
conferred on him the degree of D.D., 



and in 1904, he was again honored with 
an L.L.D. from Illinois College. After 
tne death of President Harper, of the 
University of Chicago, President Slo- 
cum was elected to fill the vancancy thus 
caused in the Board of Control of the 
Carnegie Foundation Fund for the Ad- 
vancement of Teaching. President Slo- 
cum returned about a week ago from 
the annual meeting of this board. 

Dr. Slocum did not found Colorado 
College nor was he its first president, 
but he is the man who is responsible 
for the Colorado College of today. In 
■ 1888, he came to a struggling so-callel 
college represented by Cutler Hall and 
abi:)iit twenty-five students most of 
wlium were taking preparatory work. 
"And now he's the head of this wonder- 
ful show" : a college whose standard of 
scholarship is second to none in the 
West, and on a par with that of Am- 
herst, Williams, Bowdoin and such col- 
leges ; one of the four institutions west 
of Lincoln, Nebraska, to be honored 
with a chapter of the Society of Phi 
Beta Kappa and by participation in the 
benefits of the Carnegie Foundation 
Fund for the Advancement of Teaching; 
a college which represented by the 
"ligers," is the athletic master of the 
Rocky Mountain region. All this and 
more has President William F. Slocum 
brought us by that untiring energy and 
exceptional executive ability which have 
made him to be recognized as one of the 
ablest and most progressive college pres- 
idents in the land. 




THE TIGER 



Colorado College Has a Faculty of Exceptional Worth 




UR institutions o f 
higher education in 
the United States 
may be divided into 
two distinct types, 
those in which the 
emphasis is put on 
teaching and those 
in which research- 
work is of the 
greatest importance. 
In the hrst class tiie 
professors are se- 
lected by reason of 
their abihty to give 
inspirational courses of study, which 
shall train the students and at the same 
time stmiulate tliem to more advanced 
work, in these institutions the teaching 
of students is of the tirst importance, 
and tne professors throw themselves into 
this worK with zeal and enthusiasm, in 
tne second class of institutions the pro- 
tessors are selected primarily for their 
snill in research work, and it may matter 
little whetner they have ability as teach- 
ers or not. in tact, in some universities 
where tne emphasis is put on research 
the protessors are notoriously poor 
teachers and some of them have even 
been known to say openly that they be- 
grudged the time given to teaching and 
would De happier if they could get rid 
of their students entirely with the excep- 
tions of tnose needed for assistants. 

Colorado College is primarily a col- 
lege and not an institution of research. 
Some of the most distinguished profes- 
sors in the college give their whole time 
to' teaching and reading, and would be 
quite unwilling to take time from this 
work and give it to the writing of books. 
Others, while giving loyally of their 
time to teaching and personal work 
among the stduents, have published 
works of great value. Below is given a 
list of the more important of these pub- 
lished works, although the list is neces- 
sarily incomplete. A considerable num- 
ber of articles that have appeared in 
magazines and reviews are not included 
in the list : 

Dr. William Frederick Slocum, Pres- 
ident and Professor of Philosophy: 

Articles. 

Dr. William Frederick Slocum, Presi- 
dent and Professor of Philosophy : 
Articles, a considerable number, among 
which are the following: The Ethical 
Problem of the Public Schools, in Atlan- 
tic Monthly, 1894; The World's Fair as 
An Educative Force, in The Outlook, 
1904; The Nation's Guarantee of Per- 
sonal Rights, in Colorado College 



Works Published By Mem- 
bers of Faculty 



Studies, 1910; and a large number of 
editorial contributions on ethical, philo- 
sophical and educational topics. 

Dr. Edward Smith Parsons, Dean and 
Professor of English : Books : Milton's 
Minor Poems, 1900; Social Message of 
Jesus, in press ; and several articles. 

Dr. Florian Cajori, Dean of the 
School of Engineering and Professor of 
Mathematics: Books: The Teaching 
and iiistory of Mathematics in the 
United States, 1890; A History of Math- 
ematics, 1894; A History of Elementary 
Mathematics, 1896; A History of Phys- 
ics, 1899; introduction to the Modern 
Theory of Equations, 1904; A History 
of the Logaritnmic Slide Rule, 1909 ; ar- 
ticles, a large number, of which the lat- 
est are: Solution of Numerical Equa- 
tions, in Colo. Coll. Studies, 1910; His- 
tory of Attempts to improve the Teach- 
ing of Geometry During the Past Two 
Hundred Years, in North-American 
Mathematic Monthly 1910. 

Dr. W. C. Sturgis : The Carpologic 
Structure of the Collemaceae and Allied 
Groups, Boston, 1890; Reports of the 
Vegetable Pathologist, Connecticut Ag- 
ricultural Experiment Station, New Ha- 
ven, 1891-1900; The Myxomycetes of 
Colorado, Colorado Springs, 1908; var- 
ious other articles in Botanical Journals. 

Dr. F'rederick A. Bushee, Professor of 
Economics and Sociology. Books : The 
Growth of the Population of Boston, 
1899; Ethnic Factors in the Population 
of Boston, 1903; Chapters in The City 
Wilderness, and Americans in Process, 
1889 and 1902. Articles: Italian Immi- 
grants in Boston, The Arena, 1897 ; The 
Declining Birth Rate and Its Cause, 
Popular Science Monthly, 1903; Com- 
munistic Societies in the United States, 
Political Science Quarterly, 1905 ; The 
American University, The American 
College, 1910. 

Ernest Brehaut, Professor of History, 
of Geology, Mineralogy and Paleontol- 
ogy: Book: Colorado Springs, a guide- 
book to the rock formations, 1906. Arti- 
cles : Geology of San Jose district, Ta- 
niaulipas, Mex., in N. Y. Acad. Sci. ; 
Calculation of the norm in igneous rocks, 
in Journal of Geology ; Occurrence of 
corundum and dumortierita near Canon 
City, Colo., in Journal of Geology ; and 
others. 

Dr. Elijah Clarence Hills, Professor 
of Romance Languages: Books: Bardos 
Cubanos, 1901 ; Hills-Ford Spanish 



Grammar, 1904; Spanish Tales for Be- 
ginners, with notes and vocabulary, 
1909; Hills-Reinhardt Spanish Short 
Stories, 1910; and Hills-Morley Spanish 
Lyrics, in press ; each having a histor- 
ical introduction, notes ahd vocabulary. 
Articles : Canadian, French, Phonology, 
Morphology and Vocabulary, 1902, and 
New-Mexican Spanish, Phonology, Mor- 
phology and Vocabulary, 1906, both in 
Publications of the Modern Language 
Association; The Evolution of Maeter- 
linck's Dramatic Theory, in Colo. Coll. 
Studies, 1907 ; and others. 

Dr. George Maxwell Howe, Professor 
of German. Books : German Prose 
Composition Based on Storm's im- 
mensee, 1904; edition of Eeichendorff's 
Aus dem Leben eines Taugenichts, with 
notes and vocabulary, 1906; A First 
German Book, 1907. Article : The Arti- 
ficial Palate, in the Journal of English 
and Germanic Philology, 1902. 

Dr. Frank Herbert Loud, Professor of 
Astronomy and Mathematics, Emeritus : 
Book : A Geometry ; many articles on 
astronomy and meteorology. 

John Mills, Professor of Physics and 
Electrical Engineering: Books: Milli- 
kaii and Mills, Electricity, Sound and 
Light, 1908: Introduction to Thermo 
Dynamics (for Engineering students), 
1910; several articles. 

Dr. Edward Christian Schneider, Pro- 
fessor of Biology : A considerable num- 
ber of articles on scientific subjects, of 
which the following are the most recent : 
Plant Succession on Gravel Slides in the 

icinity of Pike's Peak, in Colo. Coll. 
Studies, 1909; Nutritive Value of the 
Apple Marc, 1910. 

William Strieby, Professor of Chemis- 
try and Metallurgy : Articles : Origin 
and Use of Natural Gas at Manitou, 
Colo., 1904; Prehistoric Lake at Floris- 
sant, Colo., 1908; and others. 

Joseph V. Breitwieser, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Philosophy : Articles : Key 
Resistance in Reactions, in the Psycho- 
logical Review, 1909; Attention and 
Movement in Reactions, in Archives of 
Psychology, in press. 

Edward Royal Warren, Director of 
the Museum : Book : The Mammals ot 
Colorado, 1910; many scientific articles 
in Bird Lore, The Auk, and The Con- 
dor, of which the most recent are: 
Northwestern Colorado Bird Notes, in 
The Condor, 1908; Notes on the Birds 
of Southwestern Montrose County, Colo., 
in The Condor, 1909; Some Central 
Colorado Bird Notes, in The Condor, 
1910; Bird Notes from Salida, Colo., 
1910. 

Dr. George Irving Finlay, Professor 



THE TIGER 



Colorado College Has Pleasant and Distinctive Student Life 



Colorado College has all the advan- 
tages of the small college in regard to 
its student life. The social side is al- 
ways subordinate to the more important 
phases of college work, but most cer- 
tainly is not neglected. 

Aside from the large number of social 
affairs given by organizations of the 
college, such as those of the fraternities, 
the annual ' banquets and smaller func- 
tions of the literary and scientitic soci- 
eties, and the many class and private 
affairs, there are a number of college 
affairs. 

In its comparatively short history, the 
college has built up a splendid life with 
many events, traditions and annual cus- 
toms that have come to be an integral 
and recognized part of the college life. 
Yet it is true as was noted in an edi- 
torial in the Denver Post last summer, 
that "The chief characteristics of the 
College — the thing that has driven it 
through obstacles to success, as a bullet 
pierces butter — is its freedom. 

"Its atmosphere is one of courage and 
honesty, and the education that it gives 
is a real thing, intimate in its relation 
to life. There is an alertness then, not 
aloofness — open minds and open eyes, 
and instead of the cloister effect that 
tradition decrees, the wind of the world 
blows through the College. From end 
to end, there is not a trace of dry rot, 
or sign of traditional stupidities that 
make prejudice master of acceptance 
and rejection." 

There are numerous all-College func- 
tions which go to bring the student body 
together and make stronger the bonds 



of fellowship and loyalty. The football 
season of the present year has been 
characterized by a spirit of "boost" that 
has never been excelled in this region. 
"The College first" is the, motto that 
pervades the campus. 

Hallowe'en Barbecue. 

Of all the College affairs, the first 
of importance is the Hallowe'en Barbe- 
cue. 1 his affair was started nineteen 
years ago and every year it has come 
to mean more and more to the student 
body. Its success has been so great 
tnat it has been copied by other state 
mstitutions. 

Junior Operetta. 

Next in order of tune comes the 
Junior Operetta, with its catchy music, 
Its pretty girls, its humor and best of all, 
iti unifying effect on the class, itself. 
I his affair is but two years old, yet its 
future is assured by the success of these 
two productions. 

Insignia Day. 

The day when the seniors put on their 
hard-earned robes of scholarship for the 
first time, is made memorable by the 
events of Insignia day. Putting aside 
th.eir dignity for a short time, the seniors 
frolic about amusing themselves and the 
spectators by their childish games. The 
juniors, too, play an important part in 
the exercises of the day. 

December and January are devoid of 
all-College affairs and the time given 
over to preparations for mid-year exam- 
inations. With these over, joyousness 
auain breaks forth in the 




Montgomery Hall. 



Annual Stag Banquet. 

An occasion notable for its hilarity. 
All the men of the College gather to- 
gether in every imaginable costume and 
the joy-lid is loosed with a bang. 

Colonial Ball. 

The women, too, have an annual ball 
no less stupendous than the Stag Ball 
given on Washington's Birthday of each 
year. The ball is under the direction 
of the women of the sophomore class, 
and is held in Bemis Hall. After a 
Washington supper, the remainder of 
the evening is given over to dancing. 
Y. W. C. A. Circus. 
The women have a splendid life of 
their own m the dormitories. All out- 
of-town women are required to live in 
tlic halls, and the life that has grown 
up is distinctive of Colorado College, 
and its pleasures are not to be found in 
any other institution of the West. 

The Y. W. C. A. circus is one of the 
most enjoyable of these numerous oc- 
casions. The affair is a typical circus 
in all details, from the red lemonade to 
the bare-back riders. 

High School Day. 

Once a year, it is the pleasure of the 
College to throw open its doors to the 
high school students of the state. Aside 
from the most important event, the in- 
terscholastic track meet, which is rap- 
idly coming to be the most important 
meet of its kind in the state, the visitors 
are entertained by an all-College recep- 
tion and by smaller affairs given by the 
fraternities and other organizations. 

May Festival. 

May-day in Colorado College is the 
occasion of a May Festival, a combina- 
tion of all the joys of the old-time cele- 
bration of the day, together with many 
new and more modern features. The 
women provide the may-pole dance, 
while the men provide the athletic 
events. 

Commencement Week 

Is a week of festivities, full up of re- 
ceptions, parties, class-day exercises, 
Senior Play, Alumni Banquet, and final- 
ly, the graduating exercises. 

Magna Pan-Pan. 

Throughout the year, there are held, 
occasionall_\', "all-College nights," when 
the entire student body gather together 
for sings, speeches, refreshments, and 
consideration of student questions. The 
Pan-Pans are a comparatively recent in- 
novation, but their place is apparent and 
their results cannot help but build up a 
greater unitv within the College. 



THE TIGER 



Twelve Substantial Buildings on Fifty Acre Campus 



Colorado College is as well equipped 
with buildings for academic purposes as 
any college or university in the state. 
The steady growth of the College has 
been marked from time to time by the 
erection of new and needed buildings on 
the fifty-acre campus in the north-end 
residence section of the city. The new- 
est as well as the most elaborate of these 
buildings are Palmer Hall, given over 
to general sciences and Bemis Hall, a 
young women's residence hall. There 
are on the campus five dormitories and 
six buildings devoted to administration 
and instruction, which, together with the 
president's residence, make a total of 
twelve buildings, all of which are of 
stone except the mechanical laboratories. 

Buildings of Administration and In- 
struction. 

These are Palmer Hall, Perkins Fine 
Arts Hall, Coburn Library, Wolcott Ob- 
servatory, the Mechanical Laboratories, 
and Cutler Hall. 

Palmer Hall, completed and dedicated 
in 1904, is a large stone building de- 
voted to pure and applied sciences, con- 
taining also many recitation rooms, be- 
sides the administration rooms of the 
College. Erected and equipped at a cost 
of $327,000, it is acknowledged to be 
the largest and most completely equipped 
building of the kind in the West. Real- 



izing what the addition of such a build- 
ing meant to the life of the College and 
to the cause of education in the West, 
prominent educators from all over the 
country came to take part in, or to wit- 
ness, the exercises of dedication, which 
took place on February 21st, 22nd and 
23rd. Such men as President Jordan, 
President Van Hise, Dr. Moore of Har- 
vard, and others were unanimous in ex- 
pressing congratulations to the College 
upon the success of its efforts and the 
spirit manifested, believing, as we all do, 
that the completion and occupancy of 
such a building marked the beginning of 
a new era in Colorado College. The 
first floor contains the physical and elec- 
trical laboratories, the assay laboratory 
with twelve double-muffle furnaces, 
three pot , furnaces, and laboratories for 
quantitative and qualitative analysis in 
chemistry, and a large demonstration 
room for illustrated lectures. The sec- 
ond floor contains the executive offices 
for the President, Treasurer and Dean, 
several large lecture rooms, and a large 
laboratory for general chemistry. The 
third floor is given to the departments 
of Biology and Geology, with their lec- 
ture rooms and laboratories. On this 
floor also is the large display room for 
the museum. An important part of the 
museum is the collection which was for- 
merly on exhibition at Coronado Beach, 



California, ^and which was obtained by 
Mr. Stratton at a cost of $33,000, and 
given to the College. It contains a large 
collection of mammals and birds, a 
superb collection of minerals, rare and 
commercial, and a collection of casts 
and restorations of fossils. The C. E. 
Aitkin collection of Western birds has 
recently been presented to the College. 
This collection is the most complete of 
its kind ever made. It consists of about 
five thousand specimens, and includes 
almost all recorded varieties of the birds 
of Colorado. In Palmer Hall, also, are 
draughting rooms well lighted by sky- 
lights. 

Another building which is of special 
credit to the institution is Perkins Fine 
Arts Hall, given by Willard B. Perkins, 
of Colorado Springs, and completed in 
1900 at a cost of $37,000. The ground 
floor contains the chapel, capable of 
seating nearly seven hundred people. In 
the second story, are the lecture rooms 
and equipment for the study of fine arts. 

The Library, named after its donor, 
N. P. Coburn, of Newton, Mass., was 
erected in 1894. It is of Colorado "peach 
blow" sandstone, and cost $50,000. In 
the basement are the engineering library 
and the rooms of the Colorado Polytech- 
nic Society. The library proper con- 
tains about 53,000 volumes. 

The Astronomical Observatory, an- 




Palmer Hall. 



THE TIGER 



other valuable additions, was given in 
1894 by Henry R. Wolcott, of Denver. 
It is well equipped for astronomical 
work, containing besides the dome room, 
a lecture room, a transit room and a 
photographic dark room. 

The Mechanical Laboratories are in 
connection with the power house which 
furnishes steam heat and electric light 
to all the buildings on the campus. 
These are well equipped for the use of 
the engineering department. 

Cutler Hall, the first home of Colo- 
rado College, is the oldest building on 
the campus having been erected in 1880. 
It is at present devoted to the use of 
Cutler Academy. In the minds of the 
college students, old Cutler is most 
strongly associated with the historic 
bell which for many years has pro- 
claimed the victories of the Tigers. 

Residence Halls. 

The steadily increasing enrollment is 
shown very clearly by the history of the 
Young Women's Dormitories. All wo- 
men whose homes are not in the city, 
are required to live on the campus. For 
this reason it has been found necessary 
since Montgomery Hall was erected in 
1891 to build three more dormitories 
for young women, Ticknor, McGregor, 
and Bemis. 

Bemis Hall, social center and home 
of the senior girls, was completed and 



dedicated in November, 1908. Its cost 
was about $60,000. It contains a Com- 
mon Room where many student gather- 
ings and receptions are held, and a 
large dining room which accommodates 
all the young women of the College. 
Cogswell Theater, the home of the Girls' 
Dramatic Club, is in the basement of 
Bemis. 

The History of Hagerman Hall goes 
back to the early days of the College. 
It was built in 1889, when the only other 
building on the campus was Cutler. 
What a magnificent structure was old 
"Hag" then! and what a history!! In 
those days there was a kitchen in the 
basement of Hagerman and the large 
room, sometimes called reading room, 
recreation room, or rest room, but more 
appropriately "rough-house" room, was 
used as a dining room, where all the 
fellows were accustomed to meet three 
times a day. This room is now being 
fitted with gymnastic apparatus. 

The five fraternity houses and the fact 
that many of the men room in the city 
explain how one men's dormitory has 
met the needs of our large enrollment of 
men. 

The President's Residence. 

The residence of President Slocum is 
at 24 College Place, at the northwest 
corner of the campus. This is a large 



stone house, which was purchased by 
the trustees and remodelled especially 

for the president. 



VALUABLE COLLEGE PROPERTY 



The total value of the College prop- 
erty at present may be conservatively 
estimated at something more than twc 
million dollars. The generous gifts of 
the late General Wm. J. Palmer, J. J. 
Hagerman, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Bemis, 
and many others, have helped materially 
in making Colorado College what it is. 

Among other notable contributions is 
th.at of $50,000 to the permanent endow- 
ment received from the fund of the Gen- 
eral Educational board endowed by 
John D. Rockefeller. To the already 
rich estate of Colorado College it may 
be expected confidently that there will 
be added in the near future $100,000 in 
shape of a modern and well-equipped 
gymnasium. 

The value of the College property is 
divided as follows : 

Endowment Fund $900,000 

Buildings 750,000 

Campus 350,000 

Manitou Park 169,000 

Other Equipment 115,000 

Total $2,284,000 








Scene at Chapel. 



10 



THE TIGER 



All Departments Show Advancement 




SUALLY, "Inspec- 
tion trip to the 
West" is included in 
the curriculum in 
Engineering in the 
schools of the Mid- 
dle States. Certain 
institutions in the 
far East require stu- 
dents in mining to 
Jake vacation trips to 
the Rocky Mountain 
Region. What lies 
almost at the very- 
doors of a western 
school, can be reached by an eastern boy 
only after a heavy expenditure of time 
and money. Of western college towns 
Colorado Springs is specially favored. 
Free from the objectionable features of a 
mining town, possessed of the culture 
and refinement of an eastern community, 
blessed with a climate and beauty of 
scenery unsurpassed in Switzerland, 
Colorado Springs at the same time offers 
the very things so essential in engineer- 
ing education, namely, easy access to 
great engineering establishments. Says 
a recent writer on engineering educa- 
tion : "As travel is a desirable comple- 
ment to both geography and history, so 
are visits of inspection to class room and 
laboratory work in engineering." In 
Colorado Springs a student can take an 
afternoon of recreation by visiting great 
electrical engineering plants, including 
the hydro-electric plant in Manitou, 
known throughout the country as having 
well-nigh the highest head ever devel- 
oped in hydraulic engineering. He can 
take a stroll into the mountains, and ac- 
quaint himself with €uch unique railroad 
construction as the Short Line and the 
Pike's Peak Cog Road, and with the 
several mountain reservoirs of the Colo- 



Engineering School Possesses 
Many Unusual Advantages 



rado Springs Water System. He can 
take a street car ride and come within 
ten minutes' walk of some of the great- 
est plants for the reduction of ore that 
exist in the West. 

The coal mines just north of Colorado 
Springs afford a iine opportunity for 
practice in underground surveying. 
R'lanitou Park, the seat of the Colorado 
College School of Surveying, combines 
the delights of a mountain summer re- 
sort with exceptional facilities for th'e 
instruction in practical surveying. On 
Saturdays the student can board a morn- 
ing train and before noon reach "the 
world's most famous mining camp" — 
Cripple Creek — with its deep mines, its 
great drainage tunnel, its high tension 
transmission of electric power. Or he 
can travel south to Pueblo and visit its 
smelters and its steel and iron works, 
employing thousands of men. 

When we think of these and other 
opportunities the query naturally arises, 
where in this broad land is there a local- 
ity which combines to the same degree as 
does Colorado Springs all the great es- 
sentials for the seat of a school of en- 
gineering? 



LIBERAL ARTS DEPARTMENT. 



The department of liberal arts and 
sciences has this year attained the 
highest standard of efficiency in the 
history of the College. The most 
important factor which makes for suc- 
cessful instruction is the method em- 
ployed by the faculty by which it is 



possible to give the individual student 
the most personal attention. For 
this purpose all the classes, and es- 
pecially the freshman class, have been 
broken up into as many sub-divisions 
as the schedule will permit. For 
example, the English department di- 
vides the freshman class into six sub- 
divisions and it goes without saying 
that the fewer members there are in a 
class and the clsser they can come 
in personal contact with the instruc- 
tor, the greater will be the results 
of the course. 

Again, the German department has 
divided the freshman class into sub- 
divisions which meet once a week for 
review and grammar drill under the 
direction of upper-class students who 
are specializing in German. The 
plan is an experiment this year and 
so far it has proven so successful that 
it is to be hoped that it will become 
permanent. It is a method which 
mutually benefits both the beginners 
and the upper-class students. 

It is a very noticable thing that the 
teaching force of the liberal arts de- 
partment is composed mostly of old, 
experienced instructors whose worth 
and ability have been proven beyond 
a doubt. The sterling quality of 
their instruction and the close per- 
sonal attention they are able to give 
to the students of a college of our 
comparatively small size, has brought 
our scholarship up to its present high 
standard. The very fact that our 
registration is no larger than it is, 
brings a great benefit to the College 
as a whole. The following table 
represents the classification of stu- 
dents in the liberal arts: 




Class. 


Men. 

Women. 

Total. 


Senior 


24 29 53 


Junior 


13 43 56 


Sophomores 


54 59 113 


Freshmen 


54 88 142 


Special 


5 27 32 


Total 


150 246 396 




Bemis Hall. 



THE TIGER 



11 



Forestry School One of the Best Equipped In the Land 




h 



k 



^ HEN the Colorado 
seven students. 
The School, al- 
though still small, 
is gaining in num- 
bers more rapidly 
than the College as 
a whole. A large 
proportion of the 
students have come 
from Eastern states 
School of Forestry 
began the College 
year, it had an en- 
rollment of thirty- 
for the School has recognized advan- 
tages. It is a department of an institu- 
tion which has high standing in schol- ' 
arship and general tone and in the 
character and ability of its graduates. 
Forest lands are easily reached from 
Colorado Springs and the work on the 
National Forests can be readily in- 
spected. ; ': 

Work in the Field. 

The policy of 
the School is 
to carry the 
instruction as 
much as possi- 
ble into the 
field, for the 
place to teach 
Forestry is in 
the woods rath- 
er than the lec- 
ture room. In 
the fall of 1909 
the senior class 
made a trip in- 
to the Lodgepole Pine woods on the 
Arapahoe National Forests, where they 
saw Forest Service timber sales and ex- 
tensive logging operations. This fall, 
the trip was made to the Yellow Pine 
region included in the San Juan Na- 
tional Forest and to the Lodgepole Pine 
region at the north end of the Cochetpah 
National Forest. 

Work at Manitou Park. 

.■\gain, in the spring, other field trips 
have been instituted: Forest nursery 
work at the Monument Nursery on the 
Pike National Forest, short excursions 
near Colorado Springs for silvicultural 
studies, and most important, the six 
weeks' field work of the seniors. Last 
year this work was carried on at Man- 
itou Park, the students making an esti- 
mate, map and practical Working Plan 
for the School's forest tract. Next 
spring, the work will probably be carried 
on in a National Forest or on some 




lumbering tract, the purpose being to 
give the students opportunity to see tim- 
ber somewhat different from what they 
are already familiar with. 

Summer Courses. 

During the summer, courses in Men- 
suration, Surveying and Silviculture are 
conducted o n 
the Manitou 
Park tract. The 
value of this 
tract of 10,000 
acres of timber- 
land owned by 
the School, 25 
miles from 
Colorado 
Springs, for 
purposes of in- 
struction, can- 
not be esti- 
mated. 

Dean Sturgis Back. 

Dean Sturgis returned early in the 
fall, and although the active administra- 
tion of the School has been under Pro- 
fessor Coolidge, who has been given the 
position of Director, Dr. Sturgis has 
been most valuable in his suggestions 
and interest in the school's progress. He 
will give the course on Diseases of 
Trees in the second semester. It is ex- 
pected that an assistant professor will 
be appointed in January. 

Changes in Curriculum. 

Some changes have been made in the 
curriculum. A two-year course leading 




to the degree of Master of Forestry is 
offered. The instruction in Forestry has 
been postponed almost entirely to the 
junior and senior years of the four-year 
Undergraduate Course, in order that 
students by specializing in their last two 
years may be able to prepare themselves 
for efficient work after leaving college. 
Summer Ranger Course. 

On account of the decision of the at- 
torney general, that the cooperative ar- 
rangement of the Forest Service last 
last year with educational institutions for 
instruction of rangers was illegal, no 
ranger course will be given this winter. 
It is possible that a ranger course may 
be given at Manitou Park next semester. 
Aim of the School. 

The aim of the School is to train men 
for efiicient work in Forestry and enable 
them to secure good positions in the 
Forest Service, or as state or city for- 
esters, or as foresters for lumber compa- 
nies. Forestry instruction involves not 
only proper training but also the teach- 
ing of conditions covering a large num- 
ber of subjects. The man who has been 
trained simply to estimate timber is no 
better than the old-fashioned cruiser, 
and is not fitted to undertake the 
constructive work which is necessary 
to bring about conservative methods 
of using the forests of the nation. 
Such constructive work requires not 
only scientific methods and spirit, 
but also scientific knowledge. The 
policy of the school is to teach tech- 
nical Forestry as well as field meth- 
ods. 




Work in the Field. 



12 



THE TIGER 



Every Phase of Student Life Represented 



The Associated Students. 

The most important body is the 
Associated Students which embraces 
all registered students of the College, 
and which has control of every 
branch of student activity in which 
the interests of the College at large 
are concerned. The powers of this 
body are vested in the Student Com- 
mission, a body of ten, consisting of 
the President and Vice President of 
the Associated Students, the Editor- 
in-chief of the Tiger, the Manager of 
Debating and the senior member of 
the Athletic Board, seniors; the Sec- 
retary and the Treasurer of the As- 
sociated Students and the junior 
member of the Athletic Board, jun- 
iors; an underclass ,. rtepresentative 
from the sophomore class and an 
Alumni member. There is also a 
women's advisory board of six mem- 
bers who attend meetings but have 
no vote. Of these officers, all but 
the Editor-in-chief and the under- 
class representative are elected by 
the Associated Students on a regula'' 
election day in May. The sophs 
elect their representative and the 
Editor-in-chief is chosen by the 
Tiger board of Control. The Com- 
mission meets every two weeks. 
Any petition bearing the signatures 
of forty per cent, of the student body 
must be acted upon at the first regu- 
lar meeting of the Associated Stu- 
dents. The gatherings, called Magna 
Pan-Pans are held two or three times 
a semester and in them are discussed 
any matters of interest upon which 
the Comission may want an expres- 
sion of opinion. 

Women's Student Government. 

The Student Government Associa- 
tion embraces all women students re- 
siding on the Campus, and has for its 
function the supervision of the hall 
life. It acts through an Executive 
Board consisting of a President 
elected from the senior class, one 
member from each of the three upper- 
classes, and one member from each 
hall. In the second semester a 
freshman representative, who does 
not have a vote, is added to the 
Board. There is also an appointed 
Advisory Board consisting of a mem- 
ber from each of the three upper- 
classes and one from each of the 
girls' literary societies. A law 

must pass the Executive Board and 



then be submitted to the Association 
at large for ratification. 

Pan Hellenic Council. 

The Pan-Hellenic Council consists 
of two members from each fraternity 
and the deans of the Schools of En- 
gineering and Liberal Arts. It was 
organized for the raising of the schol- 
astic standards of fraternity men, and 
for the forming of closer friendly re- 
lations among the fraternities. Cer- 
tain rules governing the number of 
college credits required to make a 
pledge eligible for initiation have been 
passed by this body and have been 
found to raise the average grade of 
the fraternity man considerably. An 
annual inter-fraternity smoker given 
under the auspices of this organiza- 
tion does much to promote closer ac- 
quaintance among the men of the dif- 
ferent fraternities. 

Literary and Scientific Clubs. 

There are three men's literary so- 
cieties: Apollonian, Pearsons and 
Ciceronian, and three of young wo- 
men: Minerva, Contemporary and 
Hypatia. Apollonians and Pearsons 
own their club houses and meet in an 
annual debate that is one of the events 
of the year. Each society gives an 
elaborate banquet once a year. There 
are also two technical organizations 
that partake of the nature of literary 
societies — the Engineers' Club and the 
Forestry Club. They meet once a 
week for the discussion of matters of 
interest to their special departments. 

Language Clubs. 

The students of French in the 
college have formed Le Cercle 
Francais, and the students of German 
have organized Der Deutsche Verein. 
These clubs, which give programs in 
their respective languages twice a 
month and plays once a year, have 
proved to be of great benefit in the 
acquiring of fluency in these lan- 
guages. At present there is some talk 
of organizing a Spanish club for the 
same purpose. 

Glee Clubs. 

The Glee Club under the direction 
of Dean Hale of the School of Music 
gives several fine programs in the 
course of the year, and is preparing to 
start on its annual Western Slope trip 
this week. There is also a Girls' Glee 



Club in whose annual program con- 
siderable interest is taken. 

Dramatic Club. 

The Dramatic Society embracing 
all the dramatic talent of the young 
women, gives occasional fa;rces in 
Cogswell theatre. Elsewhere in this 
number is a criticism of Eager-Heart, 
rendered by this society last week. 

Sectional Clubs. 

The New England Club is a social 
organization composed of patriotic 
New Englanders in the College. It 
is the newest society in college, but 
one that already means much to its 
members who are so far from home. 
Students from several towns in Colo- 
' do have formed clubs for students 
from those towns. 

Religious Organizations. 

The Young Men's and Young Wo 
men's Christian Associations and Stu- 
dent Volunteers have been dealt with 
elsewhere in this issue, being of too 
much importance to be passed over 
lightly. 

So large a field of choice certainly 
gives each person an opportunity to 
find his place, and there are but few 
students that do not take an active in- 
terest in at least one phase of stu- 
dent life. The finest feature of these 
organizations is the splendid spirit 
with which they co-operate in boost- 
ing for the college as a whole. 




THE TIGER 



15 



Colorado College Has Five Fraternities 



STQDENT PUBLICATIONS. 



All Occupy Their Own Homes 



There are at present three national 
and two local fraternities in Colorado 
College. Their history dates from 
the installation of the Beta Omega 
chapter of Kappa Sigma in the spring 
cf 1904. A year later the Beta Gam- 
ma chapter of Sigma Chi was granted 
to a petitioning local fraternity, and 
in 1908 was installed the Chi Sigma 
chapter of the Phi Gamma Delta. Of 
the' locals Delta Phi Theta was 
founded in 1906, and Alpha Tau Delta 
in 1909. Both of these organizations 
are preparing to petition national fra- 
ternities of high rank. 

Phi Gamma Delta owns its house 
at 1122 North Cascade, the other 
fraternities live in rented houses; 
Kappa Sigma at 930 North Weber; 
Sigma Chi at 1125 North Nevada; 
Delta Phi Theta at 831 North Cas- 
cade and Alpha Tau Delta at 20 East 
San Rafael. These houses are all 
located conveniently near the cam- 
pus, and in the finest residence part 
of the city. Each has its private 



table, and it is characteristic of the 
spirit the fraternities have shown that 
during the past football season each 
gave up in turn its table to be used 
as a training table by the team, and 
its members boarded for the time at 
the other houses. 

Forty-three per cent, of the men 
in college belong to fraternities and 
their average is higher than that of 
the non-fraternity men. This condi- 
tion, unknown in many colleges, is 
explained by the strict requirements 
for initiation, and their enforcement 
by the Pan-Hellenic Council, an or- 
ganization composed of representa- 
tives from each fraternity and the 
Deans of the Schools of I^iberal Arts 
and Engineering. 

There is no tendency on the part 
of fraternity men to form cliques, 
and there has been much comment 
on the friendly feeling existing 
among all the college men, and on 
the splendid spirit with which they 
lay aside their individual rivalries to 
promote the best interests of the Col- 
lege. 



Besides the Y. M. C. A. Handbook, 
which is given to every freshman upon 
his enternig C. C, there are three col- 
Itge publications, each for a different 
purpose, and under a different manage- 
ment. 

The Tiger is the newspaper in which 
is recorded the details of college life 
from week to week. Its editorial and 
managing staff is elected by a board of 
control in which are represented faculty, 
students and alumni. The editor-in-chief 
and the business manager are seniors, 
the assistant editors juniors and the re- 
mainder of the staff may be underclass- 
men. 

The Kinnikinnik is a monthly maga- 
zine in which is published the best lit- 
erary effort of the students and alumni. 
Its editor-in-chief and manager are sen- 
iors, who with the rest of the staff elect 
their successors. After the appearance 
of each number, a careful criticism by 
some member of the faculty is published 
in Tlie Tiger. 

On the first of each May appears the 
Pike's Peak Nugget, the C. C. Annual. 
Its entire staff are juniors chosen by 
their classmates. This book presenting 
a resume of the whole college year, is 
carefully bound and handsomely illus- 
trated, and is a type of the best the col- 
lege can produce in its line. 




Tick nor — Perkins — Hagerman. 



14 



THE T I G E K 



Colorado College Stands for Christian Manhood 
and Womanhood 



Cutler Academy Shows 

Steady Advancement 



Colorado College was founded on a 
broad Christian basis and during its 
thirty-six years of existence it has never 
swerved from the purpose of its 
founders. It has sought to inculcate 
into the students the ideals of Christian 
manhood and womanhood. 

The organizations which stand out 
most prommentiy m this important phase 
of the College work are the Christian 
Asociations and the Student Volunteers. 
The work of the Y. M. C. A. is carried 
on through students' committees cooper- 
ating with a paid half-time secretary, 
Mr. Thos. L. Kirkpatrick. Mass meet- 
ings for the men are held every other 
Sunday afternoon. These meetings are 
addressed by prominent men of the state. 
The meetings up to the present have 
been addressed by such men as Presi- 
dent Slocum, W. M. Vories, C. C. '04, 
and now engaged in Y. M. C. A. work 
in Japan, Judge Van Cise of Denver, 
Guy V. Aldrich of New York, Dr. 
Frank T. Bayley of Denver and George 
Creel of Denver. 

Aside from the religious metings the 
Y. M. C. A. is conducting Bible study 
and mission study classes that have a 
large influence in the lives of the men 
engaged in this study. The Y. M. C. 
A. is also doing splendid extension work 
in some of the outlying districts, particu- 
larly in Papetown, and is now discussing 
the advisability of sending out at least 
one gospel team of four men to some 
Colorado town during the week of the 
Christmas vacation. 

Another important phase of the Y. M. 
C. A. is the work of the Employment 
Bureau. The student self-help is an 



important feature in Colorado College 
ana to this end the Y. M. C| A. has 
bougnt to make itself useful by con- 
(iuctnig an employment bureau under the 
direction of an employment secretary, 
Abel J. Greeg '12. ihe present year 
has been a remarkably successful one 
m tnis branch of the Y. M. C. A. work 
and tne report from the secretary shows 
tiiat a total of auout $12,UUU worth of 
work was secured for the men of the 
College. 'ihe Y. W. C. A., through its 
religious services held Friday nignt of 
eacn week and through its Bible study 
and Mission study classes, serves the 
same purpose among the women that the 
Y. M. serves among the men. 

The Student Volunteers have a 
branch of that organization in Colorado 
College. Colorado College has always 
furnished its quota of men and women 
to go out into the world as missionaries 
and at the present time has fourteen of 
its former students in foreign lands, 
three in Korea, two in Persia, one in 
India, two in China, one in Japan, three 
in 1 urkey, one in Hawaii, and best of 
all is supporting one of its students in 
South America as the representative of 
Colorado College in Buenos Aires. This 
calls for a subscription of $800 yearly 
from the student body, friends and 
alumni. 

In addition to the work of these or- 
ganizations, President Slocum delivers 
weekly ethicals every Friday at the reg- 
ular chapel services. In addition to this, 
vesper services are held occasionally and 
the President also conducts a helpful 
series of Sunday addresses during the 
Lenten season. 




Assay Laboratory. 



Although entirely independent of the 
College in its class-room work and in 
its student life. Cutler Academy is under 
the control of the board of trustees and 
the president of Colorado College. 

It occupies Cutler Hall, the first build- 
ing to be erected for the use of Colorado 
College in 1880, where the recitation 
rooms and laboratories are located. Last 
summer the building was thoroughly 
overhauled and put in perfect repair, and 
much new equipment was added to the 
laboratories. Cutler Academy is for- 
tunate in being situated on the campus 
of Colorado College, where many advan- 
tages of the College, including the use 
of Coburn Library, are at the disposal 
of the students. 

The Faculty. 
The president of Cutler is Dr. Slocum. 
Directly in charge of the work of the 
Academy is Head Master J. W. Park, 
formerly instructor in Public Speaking 
in the College, with whom is associated 
M. Clement Gile, Head Professor of 
Classical Languages and Literatures in 
Colorado College. In addition to these 
there are six instructors, most of whom 
are connected with the College. 

Courses and Enrollment. 
The object of the Academy is not only 
to provide a thorough preparation for 
any college in the United States, but 
also to meet the requirement of students 
who do not propose entering upon col- 
lege work. Classical and scientific 
courses are given, in each of which the 
work covers four years. The total num- 
ber of students enrolled is about 125, 
more than half of whom are taking the 
scientific course. 

Athletics. 
Cutler Academy athletic teams have 
always been an important factor in 
southern Colorado interscholastic cham- 
pionship races. Cutler is always espe- 
cially strong in baseball. Her football 
team had to be given up this fall on ac- 
count of the late opening of school. 
Track is not her specialty, but she usual- 
ly manages to take a few points. 

Literary Societies. 
There are two literary societies in the 
Academy, the Hesperian for the boys 
and the Philo for the girls. These so- 
cieties afford opportunity for practice in 
public speaking and debate. The high 
standard of the work is attested by 
those graduates of the Academy who 
were members of these societies and who 
upon entering Colorado College joined 
one of its similar organizations. 



THE TIGER 



15 



The Greatest Need of Colorado College— A Gymnasium 




ONG AGO, in the 
"good old days" 
which our fathers 
knew, education 
was given accord- 
ing to the princi- 
ple of the three 
"R's" ; today the 
principle of three 
is still retained, 
but it has changed 
its wording to 
"mental, social and 
p h y s i c a 1." We 
have included all 
of the old and added the new. Colorado 
College is striving to give the broadest 
education possible and is succeeding. 
The recognition granted us by institu- 
tions of this country and of Europe 
speaks for the mental training given 
here. In a social way the students have 
the very best. They have been given 
all that could be desired in a broad Chris- 
tian institution. And so we may say 
that in the first two points of this three- 
fold education Colorado College has es- 
tablished a high standard. 

For the physical education of our 
young men we have striven against 
great odds. We have worked for years 
in a ramshackle building that passes for 
a gymnasium and have turned out ex- 
cellent teams. This year we took one 
great step in advance and secured an 
athletic director who has not an equal in 
this State. He has shown what can be 
done through careful training. This sets 
us to thinking what might be done for 
the physical development of our young 



men if we only had a gymnasium worthy 
of the name. 

The greatest need of Colorado College 
today IS not increased endowment, not 
more recitation halls, not better dormi- 
tory facilities, not a larger library; but 
a gymnasium, one which shall be the 
equal in every respect of the splendid 
buildings which we now have, one which 
shall help to keep up the high standards 
of Colorado College, one which shall 
give our young men the best that can be 
given in this line. 

What greater memorial could a man 
want than to have a hall, dedicated to 
the upbuilding of young manhood, named 
after him ! Surely this ought to be suffi- 
cient to give a man a place in "Who's 
who." Is there not somewhere a friend 
of the College, deeply interested in our 
young men, who will come forward and 
supply this great need and gain for him- 
self the everlasting gratitude of a loyal 
student body? Many of the old friends 
of the College, as General Palmer, have 
gone. Many of the warm personal 
friends of our President, who have 
helped so loyally to make Colorado Col- 
lege what it is, have gone, and now the 
younger friends must take their place. 

We have been waiting for a number 
of }ears and hoping and planning. We 
know what we want, if we only had the 
nione}-. The President has been working 
on plans for some time and knows just 
about what we need. The idea is to have 
a large building which shall be not only 
a gymnasium but also a "commons"' 
building. There is to be a large reading- 
room where mav be found all the athletic 




magazines and other periodicals, a room 
large enough to accommodate rallies and 
other college gatherings. There are to 
be rooms for the different teams and 
offices for the director, managers and 
various athletic committees. Then in 
addition to the gymnasium proper there 
:f to be the trophy room, the locker 
room, a hot room, rubbing rooms, a drier 
room, shower baths and swimming pool. 
The gymnasium is to be equipped with 
all the best and most modern apparatus 
and in every way be up to date. 

As an indoor gymnasium, no matter 
how perfect, cannot provide outdoor con- 
ditions and as outdoor training should 
play an important part it is planned to 
have an outdoor gymnasium as well, one 
which can be used in stormy weather 
and one in which baseball and track 
work can be carried on in the winter 
with the accompanying advantages of 
outdoor conditions. 

Briefly we have outlined what we 
hoped to have in our new gymnasium, 
but it is the old difficulty that confronts 
us — we have not the money. Other in- 
stitutions of this State have gone ahead, 
realizing the needs of our young men, 
;nid have erected buildings suitable for 
gymnasium purposes. The University 
of Denver has just opened its new gym- 
nasium, built by the alumni at a cost 
of $50,000. Are we to go behind the 
other institutions of the State in this one 
uspect or are we to go ahead as usual? 
Cannot some friend be found who will 
place this building on the campus? If 
not, there is only one solution — faculty, 
aiumni, and students must begin work 
at once and place here this new building, 
the greatest need of Colorado College. 

•It has been suggested in a previous 
number of the Tiger that the students 
begin a campaign similar to the Ewing 
campaign and secure the necessary 
funds. We suggest that the alumni and 
faculty be included and that work begin 
in the near future. In the meantime we 
should be glad if some friend would save 
all that trouble and donate the necessary 
funds. Let us stop talking and go to 
work. Let our slogan be, "A new gym- 
nasium inside of a year." 



View.' in College Park — "The Jungle." 




16 



THE T 1 a E R 



Football-— Successful 1910 



By defeating Denver University by 
a score of 6 to 5 Tlianksgiving Day, 
Colorado College wrestled the Rocky 
Mountain championship away from 
the Ministers after they had held it 
two years, and have a clear title to 
it for 1910. The Tigers won every 
game this year, won from the Kansas 
State Aggies, one of the strongest 
teams of the Middle West Confer- 
ence, and played the game with 
eleven players, only one man being 
substituted during the entire season. 

The success of the Tiger team was 
striking because of the lack of exper- 
ience of several players and the com- 
parative small weight of the men. 
Black, Bowers, Cook and Acker had 
had no college football experience 
worthy of mention and the heaviest 
man on the team, Hedbloom, weigh- 
ing 17s pounds. The Tiger line 
averaged 163 pounds and the back- 
field T5.S pounds, which was smalle; 
than the averages of almost every 
team with which the Tigers clashed. 
Reed, the plucky quarterback, 
weighed but i.^o pounds. 




Vandemoer, Football Captain, 1910. 



The fact that sporting writers 
picked all but four Tiger players for 
all-state positions is one which shows 
the strength of the individual men. 
Witherow, at center, was picked by 
every writer, Vandemoer was picked 
by every writer for the position of 
end and halfback; Sinton was the 
choice for end in three out of four 
papers; Hedbloom received the same 
for guard; Bowers and Black, at 
tackle and guard respectively, were 
the choice of two writers. Colorado 
College had more all-state men than 
any other Rocky Mountain team. 

Strengthened by Coach Claude G. 
Rothgeb, formerly with the Aggies, 
and several promising sophomoreis, 
although weakened by the loss of .ex- 
captain Cary, Sherry and Wilson, 
prospects for a winning team for 
Colorado College were excellent as 
the season opened. Practice started 
about September 18 when two full 
squads of players turned out in addi- 
tion to the freshmen, and things went 
along merrily. The team, which 

played every game of the season and 
which received C.'s was as follows: 
Captain Vandemoer, right half back; 
Heald, left half back; Acker, full 
back; Reed, quarterback; Witherow, 
center; Hedbloom, left guard; Black, 
right guard; Bowers, left tackle; 
Cook, right tackle; Sinton, right end; 
Thompson, left end. Van Stone 
was in a C|uarter the first half of the 
Wyoming game but sustained a frac- 
ture of a bone in his right leg. ^''an 
Stone gave promise of- being one of 
the best quarters in the state. 
".Shorty" Steele was injured in prac- 
tice to such an extent that he could 
not be in the .game during the re- 
mainder of the season, thus keeping 
the Tigers from playing an especially 
strong tackle. These were the only 
injuries of the 3'ear. 

The Terrors Terrified. 

The first game, a practice contest 
with the Terrors, resulting in a 23 to 
victory for the Tigers was merely 
a stepping stone. The locals 

changed their lineup several times 
and "just practiced." When Wyom- 
ing came, football critics were ready 
to judge how the Tigers would play 
this year and they were agreeably 
surprised at another 23 to score. 





IME ROCKY MGl 

Back Row — Manager Fq-w 

Second Row — Heald. Thompson. Vai 

Front Row — Bowers, Hedblom, V\ 



the Tigers playing a brilliant game 
and demonstrating the chances of the 
forward pass and open phn^ a la 
Rcthgeb for the season. 



Cowboys Crushed. 

Tigers 23, Wyoming o tells the tale 
cf the clash between these two teams. 
At no time were the visitors danger- 
(Uis, and Rothgeb allowed practically 
the entire second squad to go up 
against the Wyoming lads in the 



THE TIGER 



17 



Reviewed — Prospects for Spring 



1 ■ ■ 1 

1 




j I 
J i- 







UrAIN CHAMPIONS— 1910. 

, Coach Rothgeb. 

noer, Sinton, Acker, Reed. 

ercw, Black, Cook. 



fourth quarter. Wyoming is to be 
complimented on her season this 
year, however, and gives promise of 
becoming a most important factor in 
Rocky Mountain athletics in the 
years to come. 

The Mormons "Mussed." 

According to Coach Rothgeb. the 
Salt Lake game with the Morman 
team, and all incidents connected 
with the game and the send-off, were 



the big factors in some of the follow- 
ing victories for the Tigers. When 
the entire student body cut classes 
all morning to escort the team to the 
train and the men pulled the tally-ho, 
the Tigers saw the spirit that was 
behind them and played the game of 
their lives at Utah. The Tigers 
were outweighed and Utah's spirit, 
while they were winning, was good, 
but the Tigers "came back" in the 
second half with so much fight and 
spirit that they won. Score 2\ to 
17. Here was the beginning of the 
real Tiger spirit of 1910. 

The Miners Mangled. 

The Mines, our old enemies, came 
next on the list for an 8 to o victory 
for C. C. The game being the only 
championship contest played in Colo- 
rado Springs w^as probably the best 
attended for the last two years on 
Washburn field and there was spirit 
to bu:n. The Tigeis did not play 
up to form and fumbling of punts 
and poor headwork when the ball 
was close to the line lost several 
touchdowns. The Mines substituted 
four men, whereas the Tigers used 
the same lineup through the contest. 
The demonstration of C. C. spirit be- 
tween the halves, in which the mon- 
ster Tiger and the pet Tige lead the 
piocessiiin. worked a new departu.e 
in fnotball — college spi.it. 

Farmers Floored. 

"The strongest tc;:m nf the Mid- 
dle West!" the Kansas State Aggies, 
a team which outweighed and out- 
experienced the Tigers a great deal. 
came November 5, confident of vic- 
tory. Here was the best football 
game played on Washburn field for 
yeas, from all standpoints. Versa- 
tility of plays, grit and endurance 
shov\n by men who vi'ere outweighed 
almost 20 pounds to a man, a "come 
back" spirit and Tiger vim and fiery 
attack, will always put the Tiger-K. 
A. C. game above the rest. The 
Sunflower Farmers put a touchdown 
over the first four minutes of play 
and did it in seven straight football 
downs. Then the Tigers "came 
back." Captain Vandemoer, Sinton 
and Heald were the stars here. 



Boulder Saved by Intervention of 
Providence — Aggies Annihilated. 
Then Boulder got the smallpox 
and the game for November 12 was 
cancelled, causing considerable incon- 
venience in our schedule. However 
the Aggies agreed to play in Fort 
Collins on that date and the Tigers 
won by a score of 24 to o. Accord- 
ing to members of the team the score 
should have been about 40 to o. The 
Tigers fumbled too consistently and 
did not play up to their regular stand- 
ard. The Aggies had a hope when 
we played them and when Boulder 
scored their 44 to o victory the Farm- 
ers were out of the running and 
played with a "don't care" spirit. 
Denver Downed. 
After ten days without a game, in 
which Rothgeb had the men hard at 
work night after night, the champion- 
ship game with Denver U. at Broad- 
way park, Denver, was played. Wit- 
nessed by a crowd of 8,000 people, 
in which the enthusiasm' was pitched 
higher than for several years as a 




Sinton, Football Captain, 1911. 



IS 



THE TIGER 



championship was based on the issue, 
the game proved to be the greatest 
nerve racking contest in the history 
of Colorado football. Neither team 
was able to score in the first half in 
an evenly divided contest, the 
Tigers fumbles proving disastrous on 
several occasions. The only thing 
of mention was a So yard run by 
Crowley which was stopped by Reed, 
who in addition to getting the fast 
Denver back, smashed the interfer- 
ence and stopped a touchdown. The 
third quarter showed a demonstration 
of football seldom seen in Colorado. 
Koonsman, the giant fullback of the 
Ministers, caught a forward pass in 
the center of the field and raced 60 
yards to a touchdown. Vandemoer 
almost caught him, 'nuff said. Ham- 
mil missed the goal. Then the Tig- 
ers started things and gained with 
their true spirit. Heald and Vande- 
moer proved the most aggressive and 
soon on a punt fumbled by Crowley 
and recovered by Acker, the Tigers 
got on the five yard line of the 
enemy. Heald went across for a 
touchdown and Hedbloom m'issed 
goal — but wait — a Denver man was 
off-side and the husky flaxen haired 
guard had his nerve this time and 
won the championship of the Rocky 
Motmtain region. 

Tigers Treated. 
A theater party at the Auditorium, 
in Denver; a banquet by the business 
men at the Antlers; a banquet given 
by Dr. A. A. Blackman, followed by 
theater party at "The Beauty Spot," 
and a smoker for all the team, were 
part of the honors shown the Tigers 
following the close of the season. 



The Championship Squabble 



THE SEASON'S GAMES. 



Tigers 23; C. S. H. S. 0. Octobe 



r «, 



Tigers 23; Wyoming o. October 
IS, here. 

Tigers 2T ; Utah 17. October 22, 
Salt Lake. 

Tigers 8; Mines 0. October 29, 
here. 

Tigers iS; Kansas A. C. 8. No- 
vember s, here. 

Tigers 24; Colorado Aggies o. No- 
vember 12. Fort Collins. 

Tigers 6; D. U. 5. November 24, 
Denver. 

Totals: Tigers 120; Opponents 30. 



Colorado College Has the Best Claim 



(.By Bruce A. Gustin.j 



iiiere la bat one sane anu just metnoa 
OL ueciuiiig a cuaiiipiousiiip 111 coiicgiatc 
aciiicLics aiiu uiat ib not Dy luc cuiiipara- 
iivc bcore bybLcm. JJaseuaii aaaiitLcai_> 
lo Uic greaccbt tcam-spurc kuowu auu 
ucibcuau ciiaiiipiuiibiiips are setuea evcry- 
wiierc oil a pcrceiicage oasis. Vv acn yuu 
"i'y^y t"^ peiccacage iiiciiioa to tne v^oio- 
1 auo aiiLi ivocivy iviouutani lootDaii cnam- 
pioijbuipa lur ii-iu, tne titie goes to C C 
jjuiu Lue 1 igcrs and liouiuer liave a per- 
ctiAagc 01 i,uuU out tne lormer piayea 
uiic more game tUan tne latter. it 
v/uuiu oe uiaiuiesciy unlair lor tne 
ciiainpiuiisnip to oe awaraecl to liouicier, 
or lor It to oe aeclarea a tie, wneii sue 
nas not taKen as many cnaiices as tae 
i igers, aunougn eacii lias a periect score. 

Jjoulder claims tne 1910 title for two 
leasoiis — because sue maae better scores 
in some cases tnan did C. C. wliere tliey 
met tae same teams, and because slie 
says sne liasn t been deleated since wm- 
lung tlie conterence cnampionsmp sev- 
eiat years ago. iliis ttimg o± one col- 
lege team a aiming a cuampionstiip year 
alter year because it has not been de- 
feated is the worst kind of rot. A team 
mignt wm one season and then reluse 
tj play tor 20 years and still claim the 
title. Granting the fairness of the argu- 
ment, however, Boulder's claim is 
worthless. Two years ago she was beat- 
en by D. U. and since that time has re- 
fused to play the Ministers. Surely she 
cannot have held a championship since 
1907, according to her own arguments. 
If Boulder's comparative score argument 
is any good, she lost the conference title, 
if she ever held it, last year, for she beat 
the Tigers, 9 to 0, and D. U. beat them 
29 to 6. 

Consider this comparative score argu- 
ment. Boulder beat the Aggies by big- 
ger scores than did C. C. but the Tigers, 
playing their first game, beat Wyoming 
23 to 0, while Boulder's score against 
the same team was 14 to 3. The 21 to 
17 score of C. C. against Utah looks 
every bit as good and even better than 
the 11 to of Boulder against Utah in 
Denver. The Mormons have never 
been known to play their best game away 
from home. Utah beat Denver 20 to 0, 
and according to all the dope of the 



comparative score fiend, C. C. should 
have defeated the Ministers by at least 
as large a score. Instead, the Tigers 
nosed out by one point, 6 to 5, and there 
goes your comparative score arguments. 

Perhaps tiie most potent factor in de- 
termining tUe strength of the two teams 
IS overlooked by the average fan. Tlay- 
mg an undefeated team that is spurred 
on by hopes of a championship is a dif- 
lerent proposition from meeting a team 
tnat has been whipped so badly that 
everyone knows it hasn't a chance to 
win anything. Utah met her first defeat 
at the hands of C. C, and her second at 
the hands of Boulder. The Tigers were 
the second team to whip the Miners and 
Boulder was the fourth. Boulder did 
not play a team this season that had not 
been put out of the running by the 
Tigers. C.C. had a game every Saturday 
during the season with the exception of 
the Saturday before , Thanksgiving. 
Boulder had a two weeks' rest because 
of smallpox and did not play what could 
be called a hard game all season. 

Looking at the situation in an unbi- 
ased manner, I do not think that Boul- 
der has near so good a claim for the title 
as C. C. The U. of C. must beat Denver 
U. before she has any right to demand a 
game from C. C. The unprejudiced fan, 
who has made a careful study of the 
1910 season, cannot find a single reason- 
able argument that can be advanced in 
favor of the Silver and Gold claim for 
the Colorado or Rocky Mountain titles. 



X 




A "Pe-rade.' 



THE TIGER 



aj9 



WE WANT ROTHY. 

Rcimors are afloat that negotiations 
are pending whereby other schools wish 
to secure the services of Claude Roth- 
geb, football mentor of the Tigers, who 
by showing that he had the goods, is the 
best football coach in Colorado. Roth- 
geb developed from a bunch of material 




!?»^x '* *. oAi^. >i*y>fo.*itf4^*i 



Coach Rothgeb. 

that was not considered strong by stat.' 
football experts, a team, which for speed, 
versatility of playing and knowledge of 
the intricate new game of football, sur- 
passed any collection of football players 
in the state. Colorado College was most 
fortunate in securing Rothgeb as athletic 
director and with the record which he 
has made and the confidence which 
everybody puts in him, it is the undivided 
sentiment that Rothgeb should be with 
us next year. It is said that D. U. and 
the University of Illinois, Rothy's alma 
mater, are after him. Here's hoping 
they do not get him. 



COLORADO CAPTAINS FOR 1911 
ON THE GRIDIRON. 



Mines — Clarence Calvert, tackle — 
two years. 

Denver University — Mark Volk, 
half back, three years. 

Aggies — Balmier, center — two years. 



THE FOOTBALL SEASON. 



From the Manager's Standpoint. 



Colorado College — Herbert G. Sin- 
ton, end — three years. 

University of Colorado — John C. 
McFadJen, half back — three years. 



The past football season here in 
Colorado College has been the biggest 
success in its history for three rea- 
sons. In the first place, the God- 
dess of Fortune sent us the best 
coach in the whole Rocky Mountain 
region. By his development of very 
mediocre material, his varied and in- 
tricate style of offense, his ability to 
get men in condition and keep them 
there, and most of all, his strong per- 
sonality which made every man on 
the squad willing and an,xious to do 
anything and everything that was 
asked of him, Coach Rothgeb made a 
most enviable record in his first year 
at C. C. 

In the second place, there developed 
a true Tiger spirit among the mem- 
bers of the team. At no time in the 
year was there friction or hard feeling 
between any two men. The men 
were always playing for the College, 
and not for some clique or smaller 
organization. As a result, the Tigers 
were always fighting. Not once in 
the whole season did they give up 
because of difficulties. When a team 
scored upon the Tigers, it was sure 
to repent of it, for when the Tigers 
were on the small end of the score, 
they played with all the fierceness of 
their ancestors in the jungles of India. 
This fighting spirit won them the 
championship of the Rocky Moun- 
tains. 

In the third place, the weather 
man was in good spirits. Every Sat- 
urday afternoon the sun smiled upon 
the Tigers and the wind blew else- 
where. As a result, the season was 
a financial success. For very good 
reasons, it was decided not to publish 
any figures concerning the financial 
standing of the Athletic Association 
at the close of the season. Suffice 
it to say that we lost money on the 
Wyoming and Colorado Aggie games, 
and made money on the other games. 
The game in Denver on Thanksgiving 
Day was especially lucrative. 

I want to take the opportunity, 
through the pages of The Tiger, to 
thank certain men in College and in 
Colorado Springs who have done a 
great deal to help the team and the 



manager at all times. Mr. Gustin of 
the Telegraph and Mr. Overholt of 
the Gazette can not be praised too 
highly for their conscientious and sin- 
cere support. It is due to their 
efforts that the citizens of not only 
this town, but of many other towns, 
were always correctly informed and 
favorably impressed with the afTairs 
on Washburn Field. 

Mr. D. G. Patterson deserves the 
highest possible praise for his gen- 
erous aid. On all the trips, at every 
game, and every day during the week, 
"Pat" was always trying to figure 
out if there was not something else 
that he might be doing in order to 
help out the team. Such loyal sup- 
porters as "Pat" are seldom found. 

"Gil" Cary as successor to New- 
house gave entire satisfaction and 
his even disposition was in strong 
contrast to that of the terrible 
"Beauty." 

The assistant managers, Seldom- 
ridge Statton and Gregg did their 




Fowler, Football Manager, 1910. 
work faithfully and conscientiously 
throughout the season. They are de- 
serving of a large amount of praise 
for much of their work was tedious 
and I know that they did far more 
than most people realize. 

It certainly has been a pleasure to 
myself to manage such a team, and 
to be connected with such a loyal 
bunch of workers. My only regret 
is that I do not have another year in 
which to enjoy such a privilege. 
Respectfully, 
ERNEST B. FOWLER,' 
Manager. 



TENNIS NEXT SPRING. 

The Tennis Association, although 
accomplishing little beyond organiza- 
tion this fall, has planned an enthusi- 
astic tournament next spring before 
the baseball and track sports start. 
The courts will be remodelled and 
from the present outlook, about 30 
tennis sharks will beat the ball around ' 
the white lined plot of ground for the 
championship of the College. 



20 



THE TIGER 

The Men Who Played the Game 




VANDEMOER— The speedy captain- 
hah'back of the Tigers, was the football 
star cit Colorado during the last season. 
.\o: only did his field generalship prove 
:: 'ji a most valuable asset to the Tigers 
j:vj tj Coach Rothgeb, but his experi- 
ci.cj and coolness was a virtue most val- 
uable as a leader of a team. Vande- 
moer's punting, true, well placed and 
dangerous to the man who caught the 
ball, was as good as football fans in 
Colorado saw last season. Vandemoer 
ras anorner year with the Tigers, and 
with his experience, in football, track 
and baseball, he is today considered the 
Lest all-around athlete in the Rocky 
Mountain region. All-state player for 
three vears. 




5IXTON — Captain-elect. All-state 
■r:.d. This rangy end played a game this 
year that was worthy of an all-state place 
iind sporting writers claim, that he was 
t':t best end in the new game in tht 
state. Sinton was especially strong in 
his handling of the forward pass, his bas- 
ket ball experience proving a valuable 
asset. He made more ground on the 
forward pass than any other player in 
tne state. He will make a good leader 
fir the Tigers next year. 



Dickson, halfback ; Haight, guard ; 
LeClere, tackle ; Jardine, quarterback, 
etc., were of the stuff that real Tigers 
are made of and plugged hard night after 
night, giving the Tigers the training and 
getting all the knocks. 




WITHEROW — Who never lost a 
football game. All-state center on every 
selection. "Big" was the logical all-state 
center because of his passes if nothing- 
else. Never once did a pass go wrong. 
VVitherow played a strong game on tht 
defensive. 




HEDBLOM— All-state guard. Who 
kicked 7 goals out of 7 trials. Hedblom 
was a better defensive player than of- 
fensive, but he played a good offensive 
game. Bloss could be depended upon. 




through the line at opportune times and 
played his first }'ear of college football 
well enough to lie given an all-state po- 
sition by several of the papers. A valu- 
able man. 



PUTNAM— Sub Quarter. 
hard-working Real Tiger. 



A 



FLOYD— Sub Fullback. A sub to be 
depended upon and a good gainer when 
given a chance. 




///-y///' 



COOK— Tackle. With his bull-like 
strength proved to be a formidable 
player on his side of the line and al- 
though it was his first year of college 
football he promises to be one of the 
state' star tackles. What he lacked in 
spjcd he made up in strength. 




BOWERS— An all-state choice. Bow- 
ers played a slashing game at tackle that 
will never be forgotten, especially his 
work against the husky Kansan who out- 
weigl:ed him 20 pounds. Bowers' tackl- 
ing was the kind that stopped the ma:; 
with the ball. Bjwers made good at the 
oft'ensive game. 




REED — Quarterback. Yota, although 
weak in his handling of punts, was a 
valuable asset to the team. The "pep" 
lie put in them; the speed he got out of 
them and the plays he worked with them, 
were big factors in the success of the 
Tigers. 



THE TIGER 



21 




Bright Outlook for 1911 Athletics 



HEALD — "The lion of the Tiger de- 
fense." Heakl was the man who scoreu 
the touchdown against D. U. and won 
the game. His defensive work in that 
game was marvelous. When Heald hit 
a man the man stopped. Heald was a 
consistent grovmd gainer and although 
slower than his running mate, Vand_\-, 
could plug holes in the line, find holes 
in the line, — in fact, he pla_\ed the very 
deuce with the line. 







ACKER— Fullback. Had no football 
experience before college and certainlv 
developed info a football player who with 
another's year's expei"ience will be amoiig 
the topnotchers.' Although' slow on hii 
feet, Acker could find a hole and wriggle 
into it and out of if, generally 'with n 
good gain. He was one of the surest 
men on the team to recover a ball and 
ricver failed on defense. 



THOiMPSON— End. "Tommy" got 
down under punts faster than any man 
on the team. He "loped" after them, and 
never failed to get his man. His work 
with the forward pass was consistent, 
and his recovery of punts was just about 
right. A good mate for Sinton. 



\\'ith the baseball championship of 
1910 securely locked up out of the way 
of any of the "champions a-la-dope," and 
tl'.e Rocky Mountain football champion- 
sl:ip annexed without a doubt, athletic 
experts of the college are now putting 
down baseb.iH, track and football cham- 
pionships for 1911. An unusual amount 
of exceptionally brilliant material for all 
three branches of athletics is ready for 
the call of THE coach, Rothgeb, and 
the closer the season's approach, the bet- 
ter it looks. 

BASEBALL — Under the leadership 
of Lenny Van Stone, the best College 
pitcher ever produced in the state and 
vvho is feared l)y every batsman in Colo- 
rado, the gentle game of baseball prom- 
ises to have a great impetus next spring. 
The old men who will be back are : 
Friend, second base; Bancroft, third 
base; Sinton, first base ; Thornell, right 
lield; Moberg and Vandemoer, left 
field; Dickson, pitcher and utility man: 
and Van Stone. New material which is 
promising and which will make a hard 




Van Stone, Baseball Captain, 1911. 

fight for the places are Hughes, who 
piayed in 1509; Lewis, an infielder from 
Cutler academy ; Yota Reed, catcher ; 
and a number of strong freshmen. A 
good schedule is being arranged by ex- 
Captain-Catcher Bert Siddons and train- 
ing under Rothgeb will commence about 
the first of March. Rothgeb is undoubt- 
edly the best baseball coach in Colorado 
and has had more experience in this 
line than any other. 

In addition to coaching the Aggie team 
Rothgeb played with the Washington 
.•\merican league baseball club and man- 
aged the semi-professional team from 
Fort Collins two years ago, which an- 
nexed the state championship. Roth- 
geb's strength as a coach of baseball is 
his knowledge of the "inside" game, 
wliich has been somewhat lacking to the 
Tigers for some time. With the mater- 
ial which he has a team should be whip- 
ped into shape that should not lose a 
game-. .• • 




Siddons, Baseball Manager, 1911. 

TRACK — With stars who hold 
state records already having college ex- 
perience and the addition of several 
high school men who hold records which 
beat college records, track looks perhaps 
a little better than baseball next spring. 

The following material is to be out 
anxious to represent the black and gold : 

Captain, Fowler, 440-yard dash ; relay. 
Vandemoer, 100 and 220-yard dashes, 
state record-holder in both, also broad 
and high jump. Ex-Captain Jardine, 
half-mile state record-holder, also mile 
run. Johnston, record-holder in the pole 
vault. Black, long distance and relay 
runs, and a runner of ability and ex- 
perience. Terril, relay and high jump. 
H. Sinton, high jump. Warnock, hur- 
dles. All these players have track C's 
and are to be relied upon for points. The 
r.ew material is the strongest that has 
entered the college for some time. Rob- 
crson, broad jump, who holds the state 
college and high school record for his 
feature; and Koch, individual point win- 
r.cr at the C. C. high school meet last 
year, in the weights, who looks good for 
his department's points. All these in 
addition to the number of men who have 
not been given a chance to show up. All 
promise points. In fact, track next year 
looks better than for many moons. The 
long distance department is the only 
place where the Tigers are weak in the 
least. And there are some husky looking 
men around college who could run if 
tliev would. 



Football igii. — As the season has 
just closed and much has been written 
about the gridiron chances for 1911 it 
will suffice to say that with the entire 
team eligible, and a number of promising 
players ready, the Tigers certainly "look 
good." The men who will be back are: 
Captain-elect Sinton at end ; ex-Captain 
Vandemoer at half; Heald at half; 
Witherow at center; Reed at quarter; 
Thompson at end ; Cook, Bowers, at 



22 



THE TIGER 



tackle ; Black, Hedblom, at guards, and 
Acker At fullback. Acker is not sure of 
returning, as he is planning to enter the 
University of Pennsylvania to study 
medicine. In addition to these men, 




Copeland, Supervising IVlanager of Spring 
Atliletics, 1911. 



Waalen, a Minnesota giant ; Harter, 
Jacobs, Sommers, Herron, Koch, How- 
land, J. Cary, and several other new men 
will have a chance at the team. 



WHO'S WHO IN C. C.'S ATHLET- 
IC HONORS. 

Athletic director — Claude Rothgeb. 

■Football captain 1910, Herbert Van- 
demoer; iqii Herbert Sinton. 

Baseball captain 1910, Albert Sher- 
ry;, 1911, L. M. Van Stone. 
'"Track captain 1910, Floyd Jardine; 
19TI Ernest Fowler. 
' Manager cf football 1910, Ernest 
Fowler. 

, Manager of baseball 1910, H. W. 
McOuat; 1911 B. P. Siddons. 

Manager of track 1910, Fred Cope- 
land. 

Supervising manager of spring 
athletics 1910, Clare Phillips; 1911 
Fred Copeland. 




THE NEW TRAINING TABLE. 

A new departure from the regular 
one-meal-a-day training table which 
is in vogue with many state teams and 
which has been in use in Colorado 
College for several years, was made 
this season, when the fraternities of 
the College took over the table for 
three meals a day. The meals were 
prepared with special care and in 
addition to the grub, the men who 
got to eat on the tables simply "lived 
football." Coach Rothgeb has stated 
that the training table system used 
this last fall was a very prominent 
factor in the winning of the cham- 
pionship — everybody always in condi- 
tion for every game. The fraternity 
men themselves in eating at the other 
houses gained by the system and a 
better and closer relationship between 
the different Chapters was estab- 
lished. 



FRESHMAN TEAM. 



BASEBALL CHAMPIONS ALSO. 

Two championships for the year 
1910, with a strong chance for the 
third — the track championship — with 
excellent prospects for three in 1911 
is something to look upon with pride. 
The Tigers clearly won the baseball 
championship last spring by defeating 
the only close contender, the Univer- 
sity of Colorado, by a score of 10 too. 
Van Stone, the leader of the Tigers 
baseball squad in 1911 was the stellar 
performer of the entire season, his 
pitching proving a stumbling block 
for many a young aspirant for batting 
honors. The Tigers lost one game, 
that the first one to Boulder, score 3 
to 2. The team was as follows: Van 
Stone, pitcher; Siddons, catcher; Sher- 
ry, captain, shortstop; Friend, second 
base; Bancroft, third base; Sinton, 
first base; Moberg, Vandemoer, left 
field; Wilson, center field; Thornell, 
right field. Friend and Siddons 

batted over the 300 mark and there 
were several hovering near the 295 
mark when the official batting list 
closed. 



BASEBALL C.'S ARRIVE. 

Members of the 1910 state champion- 
ship baseball team are wearing some 
"nifty" new style sweaters ornamented 
with the regulation baseball C. The 
sweaters are among the handsomest 
ever presented an athlete in the school. 



The freshman team this year was not 
what you would call a success, mainly 
on account of the lack of spirit. Only 
four or five showed up for practice at 
the first of the year and an entire team 
was not gotten together until about a 
week before the annual freshman-soph- 
omore game. Then Herron was elected 
captain and Cary manager. With a little 
hard work and the assistance of Profes- 
sor Griswold's coaching they got into 
shape to give the sophs a good scare. 
The score resulting 9 to 6 in favor of 
the later. This somewhat encouraged 
them, so a game with Colorado Springs 
High School was arranged, which was 
lost by a score of 8 to 0, because every- 
one did not get out for practice. A 
game was then scheduled with Centen- 
nial High, of Pueblo. Everyone prac- 
ticed hard for this game, but it was lost 
to a lighter, faster team. After this, the 
team broke up, five staying out the full 
year and winning their numerals. 

Although they were defeated every 
game they played exceptionally good ball 
considering the amount of practice. The 
scores indicate this. Then, too, the sea- 
son was not altogether a loss, for it 
helped to get in touch with the new rules 
and thereby prepare them for next year. 
This is a good thing, because several of 
the men look like good material for the 
varsity. The regular line-up for the 
year was as follows: 

Center, Sanderson; R. G., Summers; 
L. G., Harder; R. T., Cameron; L. T., 
Koch; R. E., Howland; L. E., Cary; 
quarter, Herron (captain) ; F. B., Jac- 
obs; R. H. B., Geddes; L. H. B., Sloey. 

Other good men were Ogilbee, Daw- 
son, Long, Jackson, Wray, and Lewis. 




Vandemoer, Carey and Thompson 
Dean Parsons, Conference Representative, were in Denver Saturday and Sunday. 



The Tigers Score. 




REGULAR SECTION 



DRAMATIC CLUB 
PRESENTS 
"EAGER HEART" 



COGSWELL THEATRE HAS CA- 
PACITY AUDIENCE TO 
WITNESS CHRISTMAS 
PLAY. 



Tableaux and Stage Effects Skilfully 

Managed — Players Played Parts 

With Feeling. 



Last Friday evening in Cogswell 
Theatre the Girls' Dramatic Club pre- 
sented "Eager Heart," a modern imi- 
tation of the religious plays of the Mid- 
dle Ages. In some respects it is not a 
successful imitation. It is inferior to 
the best of the old plays, such as the 
Towneley "Second Shepherds' Play" and 
"Everyman," both in structure and in 
characterization. It contains many long 
and dramatic speeches exceedingly diffi- 
cult to deliver effectively on the stage. 
The characterization is crude, and often 
is entirely neglected. Let me quote two 
short passages to illustrate what I mean. 
In "Eager Heart" one of the shepherds 
complains of the inequality among men, 
thus : 
"Hunger and Riches divide the land, 

like great uncleanly birds. 
Gloating on offal. Half the world is 

full; 
Fat with excess; the other half naked." 
In the Towneley "Second Shepherds' 
play (dated about 1450), one of the 
shepherds makes a similar complaint, 
thus: 
"Such servants as I, that sweats and 

swinks (labors). 
Eats our bread full dry. 
We are oft wet and weary, while mas- 
ter men winks (are asleep) ; 
Both our dame and our sire 
When we have run in the mire, 
rhey can nip at o'ur hire (dock our 
wages), 
And pay us full lately." 
The medijeval shepherd speaks in 



character, using the language of his 
class ; the modern one does not. 

"Eager Heart" is thus weak dramat- 
ically ; btu it has considerable poetic 
merit, and it depends for its interest 
upon this and upon the sincerity of its 
religious appeal. It demands of the 
actors sympathetic sincerity and the 
power to speak the lines well, so as to 
bring out the poetry. 

Considering the difficulties of the play, 
the actors and the manager deserve 
great credit for its comparative success. 
The tableaux and other stage effects 
were skilfully managed. The play moved 
smoothly, and almost all the cast played 
their parts with genuine feeling. In this 
respect Miss Graham as Eager Heart, 
Miss Detmoyer as the old shepherd, and 
Miss Landon as the Third King, de- 
serve high praise. Miss Morehouse as 

Continued on Page 28 



GLEE CLUB LEAVES. 



On Extensive Western Slope Tour 

Accompanied by Shaw as Reader 

and a String Quartette. 



The Glee Club will leave tonight for 
its regular Christmas vacation tour. 
Tomorrow evening it will give a con- 
cert in Alamosa, Saturday in Monta 
Vista, Monday in Durango and Tues- 
day in Telluride. Three more concerts 
are to be given, the next two are not 
yet scheduled, but the last one will be 
in Grand Junction, Friday evening, De- 
cember 23d. 

The following is the make-up of the 
club : Second basses, Winchell, Belsey, 
VVarnock ; first basses, Kirkatrick, Bart- 
lett, Dowling, Mantz; second tenors, 
Weller, Guy, Tanner, Geddes ; first ten- 
ors, Kessler, Baker, Wright and Park. 
Shaw will be reader for the trip; Sid- 
dons is manager, with Bowers as assist- 
ant. A string quartette composed of 
Schneider, Seldomridge, Hall and Mc- 
iNJillan may accompany the club. 



SCOOP 

SCOOP 

SCOOP 



MAGNA PAN PAN GREAT SUC- 
CESS. 



Song Sandwich of Athletic Hash 

Proves Rare Treat — Freshmen 

Waiters a Feature. 



The Sigma Chi pledges had a party 
at the vaudeville, Thursday evening. 



Never in the history of Colorado Col- 
lege has a more invigorating and enjoy- 
able Magna Pan, Pan been arranged than 
the one which takes place tonight in 
Bemis Hall. From the opening features 
of the Boys' Glee Club through the vari- 
ous athletic concoctions, to the final 
"exit in applause" of the Girls' Glee 
Club, everything combined to make the 
evening one long to be remembered in 
the annals of Magna Pan Pandom.. 

Mr. Van Stone opened the program 
with a short and fitting address con- 
cerning the origin and history of the oc- 
casion, in which he paid due tribute to 
the great inventor of Magna Pan Pan 
(since in Honolulu), Mr. Glen Shaw; 
and in which he also related some of the 
stirring events of preceding Pan Pan 
history. 

It was amid vociferous and enthusi- 
astic applause that the Glee Club next 
arose and "dared" for their first laurels 
before a more than friendly audience of 
their fellow students. Insistent and con- 
tinued encores greeted them, until at last 
in sheer desperation, they grabbed their 
suit cases and escaped, leaving the stu- 
dents to send them rejoicing on their 
Christmas trip with a "good rousing C- 
O," and a "Merry Christmas to You" in 
return, thrown back as they hurried to 
catch the train. 

Friend was next, and if there remain- 
ed in any one's mind the slightest doubt 
as to the inextinguishable efficacy of our 
last year's baseball team, he had that 

Continued on Page 30 



24 



THE TIGEE 



THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT. 



President Slocum Speaks to the Stu- 
dents on the Dangers of a Life 
of Selfishness and Urges Them 
To Embrace the Higher 
Conception of Living as 
Exemplified by Christ. 



The expression "Social Service" 
has come into quite common use in 
many of the colleges of the country 
that are standing for the highest con- 
ceptions of true manhood and woman- 
hood. It implies that true men and 
true women cannot live unto them- 
selves; that the selfish life is false 
and unworthy. Everyone is part of 
the community in which he lives and 
owes something to the higher life of 
that community. This is true in the 
life of a college. Every student has 
something in himself wliich he can 
and ought to contribute to the good 
of the college. 

Nothing is more important than the 
realization of the truth that it is the 
larger good of the many for which 
the individual must work. The 
clergyman who gives himself unsel- 
fishly to the upbuliding of his church 
forgets the burdens which otherwise 
^eem heavy and unendurable. There 
are a thousand things which one ac- 
cepts and endures when he forgets 
himself in his consecration to the 
good of others. It is in fact the nnly 
way in which one can possibly live 
and not be ove-whelmed by the things 
which harrass and annoy. .A,gain 
and again one does the thing which 
makes for neace, ignores as best he 
en that which hu-ts. for the sake of 
the lareer good. Others may mis- 
construe his moti\-es; imply that he 
is doing things for unworthy and sel- 
fish reasons; that he is even unjust 
to others, when he knows that all 
these charges are unt-ue; and then he 
p^oes his way. often with pain, silently 
bearing all this for the sake of the 
larger good. Forgetting those things 
wh'ch rre behind he p-esses on to- 
wards the high call of God which is 
'n the teaching of Jesus, who li'^'cd the 
life of noble self-forgetfulness, bear- 
inq- I'll the many slights, miscon- 
structions ;'nd motiA'cs, and indigni- 
ties, for the sake cf the great work 
to which he had been called of God. 

This is the serret of life. Me that 
would save his life for the noblest 
ends, must lo^•e it. must learn how to 
forp-et and to bear for the larger good 
of the many. 



This is the truth that Christmas 
emphasizes. Jesus came with the 
purpose of giving Himself to the na- 
tion in which He lives; to the world 
of which He was a part. He extab- 
lished a new conception of human life. 
It is the only one that can possibly 
bring peace, joy and gladness to men 
and women everywhere. The life of 
selfishness is sure to produce disap- 
pointment, bitterness, and sense of 
failure. It is responsible for all the 
hatred, cruelty and hardness among 
men ;uid women. 

There is no place in which one can 
better begin to learn the great lesson 
of the subordination of the individual 
to the larger life of the community 
than in college. Here it is that 
everyone can live for the larger life 
of the college and discover what the 
true spi it of Christ really means. 



INSOIGNIA DAY ADDRESS 



THE BATTLE IS ON. 



Pearson and Apollonian Lined Up 

Against Each Other for Annual 

Tilt in Which all Students 

Are Interested. 



Last Monday night, at a postponed 
meeting, the Pearsons Literary Society 
selected a debating team which the mem- 
bers of that organization believe is a 
combination of oratory, eloquence, and 
persuasion sufficiently strong to over- 
whelm the followers of Apollo, in the 
twelfth annual intersociety debate to be 
held some time in February. This team 
consist of Fowler, Shaw, and Bowers. 
Fowler has been a member of the Pear- 
sons team for three years : this is the 
fourth. Sliaw and Bowers are sopho- 
mores, but Shaw made the team in his 
freshman year and will -probably equal 
the record of Fowler. If Bowers shows 
the "pep" in debating that he showed 
during the football season, he can be 
courted on as a strong man. 

."V second team was chosen consisting 
of Donelan, Buchanan, and Meyers, all 
of whom put up strong debates and were 
close contestants for first team posi- 
tions. 

"The fireworks have started," and 
from now on a great deal of interest 
will certer upon the outcome of the 
Pearsons- Apollonian debate. 

The Apollonian team, chosen about a 
month ago, consists of Bryson, Friend, 
and Crow. 



The College and Its Influence Upon 
National Unity Is the Theme of 
The President's Address to 
Seniors in Which He De- 
fined Responsibilities of 
Graduates. 



Mr. W. B. Sheldon, instructor in West 
Denver Fligli, spent Friday, Saturday 
and Sunday at the .\lpha Tau Delta 
House. 



President Slocum delivered the An- 
nual Insignia Day address in chapel 
Wednesday, the seventh. He spoke in 
part as follows : 

One hears much of national unity in 
different countries. This is true in Ger- 
many, especially since the Franco- 
Prussian war ; but as one talks with 
thinking people in that country he finds 
that there are many things which show 
that the unification of the "Fatherland" 
is not altogether accomplished. Bavaria 
is jealous of Prussia, Saxony still feels 
its loss of independence, and all other 
states dislike the domination of Prussia 
and the force with which the central 
government maintains this unity. 

In the United States if there is na- 
tional unity, it is not the result of mili- 
tary power, or the arbitrary authority 
of a central government. Unity must 
depend upon the way in which certain 
ideas have laid hold of the national con- 
sciousness. There are certain principles 
which ever since we first declared our 
independence, have drawn the various 
peoples together, and which have been 
defined in that memorable document, 
"The Constitution of the United States." 

There have been various conceptions, 
however, which have made for disinte- 
gration, such as the idea of "state- 
rights," as conceived by some people ; 
but as time has gone on larger divisions 
than that of states have awakened a 
new consciousness. There has come a 
"sectional consciousness," growing out 
of the special interests of the various 
sections of our country. One man with 
pride says, "I am a Southerner." An- 
other, "I am' a New Englander." Now 
this consciousness is well if it ever rec- 
ognizes the larger conception which 
holds us all together as citizens of the 
country as a whole. The consciousness 
which comes when one says, "I am a 
citizen of the United States," should 
dominate all else. 

It is a fair question, however, "How 
are the ideas which are to hold us to- 
gether as a people to be taught and im- 
pressed upon the whole country so that 
a real unity will prevail and dominate 
the nation as a whole." 

Toda.\' the nation is turning towards 
the colleges to furnish its leadership. 

Continued on Paee 29 



MORE DRAMATICS. 



THE TIGER 

THE NEW CALENDAR. 



25 



YOUNG WOMEN FEAST. 



Pearsons Society to Give "The Hon- 
orable History of Friar Bacon 
and Friar Bungay," on 
March First. 



Another dramatic treat is in store 
for Colorado College. This time it 
is tire "Honorable History of Friar 
Bacon and Friar Bungay," and the 
production is offered by Pearsons 
Literary Society, to be staged the 
first of March. 

The plaj' was written by Robert 
Greene, an English dramatist who 
lived between 1560 and 1592. It is 
a comedy, interweaving with the tale 
of Friar Bacon and his wondrous 
doings the story of Prince Edward's 
love for the Fair Maid of Fressing- 
field, brimful of amusing action and 
genial fun, and containing a dramatic 
love story of unsurpassed freshness 
and brightness. 

It will be remembered that Ben 
Johnson's "Silent Woman" given by 
Pearsons last year was one of the 
greatest successes of the year. As 
was done last year, every effort: will 
be made this year to have the stage 
settings as well as the costumes cor- 
respond with that of the time in 
which the play was first produced. 



PROGRESS OF EWING FUND 
CAMPAIGN. 



Splendid work has been shown in 
the campaign for the Ewing Fund 
the past two weeks. .The campaign 
in general has closed, however, there 
are a number of students, alumni and 
faculty, who have not been solicited. 
This work will be taken up imme- 
diately after vacation and there is no 
reason why we should not raise the 
$800.00 as pledged. To date $476.25 
has been pledged. The faculty $95.00, 
alumni $27.00, seniors $97.00, juniors 
$46.00, sophomores $91.50, freshmen 
$89.15 and Cutler Academy $30.00. 

We appreciate the splendid spirit 
of the freshmen in bringing up their 
proportion and the report shows that 
the juniors, who do things, should 
not neglect this important obligation. 
Tell your parents about the campaign 
while at home; see if you cannot 
make a subscription when you return. 
Turn subscriptions to Miss Ashley, 
]\Iiss Kidder, Mr. Dean, :Mr. Hedblom 
or Mr. Gregg. 

A. J. H., Treas. 



i he C. C. calendars for 1911 are now 
on sale, iacy are issued by Mrs. iJusnec 
and iJonald i ucKer, unuer tne auspices 
01 the faculty, and contaui an entirely 
new set of pictures and designs, ihe 
cover is of dark brown stock and the 
leaves are of a lighter brown with artis- 
tic date pads and pictures appropriate 
to the season represented, liacli piiase 
of college life is given a place in this cal- 
endar, whicli would make a highly ac- 
ceptable Christmas present for friends 
of this institution. 1 he calendar with a 
mailing envelope, sells for sixty cents, 
and copies may be secured at the office, 
111 chapel or at Murray's. 



BARNES PASSES RHODES 
"EXAM." 



W. C. Barnes '12, one of the con- 
testants for the Rhodes Scholarship, 
has received word that he was suc- 
cessful in the preliminary examina- 
tions held about a month ago in Den- 
ver. 

This entitles Barnes to enter the 
final examinations which will be held 
early in 1911. 

Barnes is a junior and is in his 
first year in Colorado College, having 
spent the first two years in Lafayette 
College. He is a member of the 
Apollonian Club. 



Foresters' Club. 

Last Thursday evening the Foresters' 
Club held a very interesting meeting in 
Polytechnic Library. F. H. Rice and C. 
D. Pierce gave interesting talks on their 
lumbering trip in and about Pagosa 
Springs. 1 he timber there is as fine as 
any in Colorado and up-to-date processes 
are in general Use although the cutting 
is more wasteful than need be. Logging 
is done with a narrow-gauge track sys- 
tem and in the mill sawdust is utilized 
for fuel and the slabs are used for laths, 
shingles and the last parts for kindling 
\v(jod. Rice also gave a very interesting 
talk on eucalyptus growing in California. 

The next year's programs promise to 
be very interesting and will be more gen- 
erally entered into by the students, the 
next meeting being the first under the 
new regime. 



JUNIOR JUNK. 

I^^ast Tuesday the junior boj'S wore 
the distinctive junior costume for the 
first time. The outfit, consisting of 
corduroys with black leather cuffs, 
aixl soft flannel shirt, is the most 
elaborate class costume yet adopted. 



Girls of Glee Club Banquet at Alta 
Vista and Celebrate First Anni- 
versary of Organization. 



Last Monday evening, at the Alta 
Vista tlotel, the Girls' Glee Club cele- 
brated the first anniversary of their or- 
gaiii.iation with a banquet in the private 
dining room. Every member of the club 
was present, and the affair was one long 
to be remembered for its good time and 
enthusiasm. The president. Miss Mary 
Randolph, presided as toastmistress, and 
the following toasts were responded to : 
"Whiit the Glee Club has done the past 

year" Miss Eleanor Thomas 

"What the Glee Club will do the com- 
ing year," Miss Gwendolyn Hedgecock 
"To our Director". .. .Miss Lucy Graves 
"What the Glee Club can do for C. C." 
Miss Ruth Law 
After the banquet, the club was enter- 
tained with a fine musical program in 
tlie hotel parlors, and as the company 
broke up, each one felt that she was a 
member of an organization of which the 
college might well be proud and one 
which, before many months, would make 
people "sit up and take notice." 

Since the departure of Mrs. Taliaferro, 
Miss Viola Paulus has been directing 
the club, and regular rehearsals are be- 
ing held each week. The members of 
the club are : Misses Graves, Haupert, 
Kirkman, McLaughlin, Merwin, Phil- 
lips, Randolph, Amsden, Butler, Galli- 
gan, Gasson, Marsh, Sharpe, Walsh, 
Bay, Burger, Law, Maddox, Poinier, 
Sutton, Thomas, Auld, Constant, Crow- 
ley, De Rusha, Hedgecock, and Hemen- 
way. 



ANOTHER GRADUATE IN THE 
FOREIGN FIELD. 



Many College people will be interested 
in knowing that Mr. John Y. Crothers, 
who graduated from C. C. in 1905, is 
now in Korea under the Presbyterian 
board. Letters have been received from 
him telling of his first experiences in 
the East. 

These letters disprove the old idea 
t'nat a missionary must be a long-faced 
hlack-f rocked gentleman, for they tell in 
a very humorous way of the vicissitudes 
of getting settled, caused, not by oppos- 
ing natives with spears and clubs, but by 
a'l insignificant looking, $18 bargain-sale 
mule. 

If an}' especially interested in the 
work of Mr. Crothers wish to see the 
reports from him, they can get the letters 
from Mr. Kirkpatrick. 



26 



THE TIGER 



Tha Waekly Newspaperof Colorado College 

A. E BRYSOIN Editor-Jn-Chlef 

S. WILKIE DEAN Business Manager 

tAM J. Shelton Ajsistant Editor 

Richard L. Hughes Assistant Editor 

Hakry Black Assistant Editor 

T. Wynne Ross Athletic Editor 

Robert m. Copeland Engineering Editor 

FRED S. Baker Forestry Editor 

Helen Canon Alumni Editor 

Mamie C. Detmoyer Exchange Editor 

Edith I.. Summers Local Editor 

J. A. Root Local Editor 

Ray H. Saybe Assistant Manager 

E. E. Hedblom Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

A. W. Donovan, C.E. Hayward. Bruce Weirick, William 

Lloyd, Joe Sinton, Elsie Greene, Lillian Duer, Grace 

Wilson, Dorothy Cook, Dorothy Stott 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to TheTigeb. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Miitf all communications to THE TIGER, Colorads 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phones: Editor, Main 1975. Manager, Main 2073 

-■mBi^iafc^ ^ Entered at th» postoffice at Colorado 
^^S^^^^ Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



BOOSTl 

At this season of the year, Tiger 
editors for the past several years 
have taken occasion to remind the 
student body of a few of their holi- 
day obligations toward the College. 
Following this excellent idea, this ar- 
ticle has been evolved. 

An excellent opportunity is offered 
every student of the College to do 
some real boosting during the coming 
week. No phase of the College life 
counts as much with prospective 
freshmen as the students of the Col- 
lege themselves. Consequently, i^t 
behooves every student to remember 
when he makes his reappearance in 
his home town that he is not merely 
John Jones or any other individual 
but that he is Colorado College. 

The same spirit of boost that has 
characterized these first months of 
College should continue with renewed 
force during the vacation days — talk 
Colorado College, act Colorado Col- 
lege, live Colorado College, however 
that may be accomplished. 
That Gymnasium. 

Incidentally in your boosting, do 
not forget that Colorado College 
needs a gymnasium. It may be that 
by presenting facts concerning the 
College forcibly enough to one of 
your millionaire friends you can 
persuade him that it is his moral 
duty to make his name immortal 
among the alumni and students of 



Colorado College by presenting them 
with a gym. 

Somewhere in this wide world there 
is an individual just waiting for such 
an opportunity, the question is — who 
is going to locate him? If you, Mr. 
Booster, should happen to meet him, 
you would share somewhat in the 
glory if you were the agent that 
manipulated the transfer of capital. 
Colorado College. 

In this issue, an attempt has been 
made to give a small idea of the many 
advantages and good features of Col- 
orado College. It is not in a spirit 
of boast that the present edition is 
run off but rather with a feeling of 
justifiable pride in its numerous at- 
tractions and a feeling of regret that 
a more elaborate edition, one more 
truly representative of its splendid 
features, could not be compiled. 
Given an institution with the superb 
equipment, the able president, the 
scholarly faculty, the advantages of 
location and climate, the loyal alumni, 
and the earnest student body drawn 
from every section of the country, 
such as Colorado College possesses, 
it would be peculiar if it had not come 
10 occupy its present high place in the 
educational world, and it would be 
more peculiar if it did not come to 
fill that place in the future even more 
prominently than it has in the past. 

Colorado College was created to fill 
a need, it has met that need, and the 
future gives promise of an increasing- 
ly important place among the better 
institutions of the nation. 



The Football Season. 

The football season of 1910 will go 
down in the annals of the College as 
an unusually eventful one, not alone 
because the championship of the 
Rocky Mountain Region was clearly 
and cleanly won, but because of the 
splendid spirit that prevailed, on the 
team, among the students and among 
the townspeople and business men 
wlio supported the College. 

To attempt to add further details 
to the many articles that have been 
written on tlie sul^ject would be super- 
fluous, but it is enough to say that 
Colorado College may well be proud 
of the Tigers — they fought a clean, 
consistent game, though outweighed 
in several games, their better coach- 
ing and training turned the trick. 
Colorado College may well be proud 
of the support of its students during 
the season. "It was the finest dem- 
onstration of loyalty that I have ever 



seen in any institution," said one of 
our professors. Finally Colorado 
College may be proud and grateful for 
the splendid support of the business 
men. They were "boosters" in the 
real sense and did much to bring 
about the triumphant season of 1910. 



A HISTORY OF THE SOLUTION 
OF NUMERICAL EQUATIONS. 



Dean Cajori Researches on Great 
Analytical Problem. 



The two latest College publications 
are devoted to a treatise concerning 
the pioneers in the field of approxima- 
tion to the roots of numerical equa- 
tions and their methods. In these 
it appears that in Arabia and India 
the mathematicians could compute 
square roots and cube roots in very 
early times. With a considerable 
explanation, Dean Cajori traces the 
advance in methods, the difficulties, 
the unsatisfactory processes which 
afl'ected the problem until recent 
times, (mathematically). It may 
come as a shock to many that Horner 
did not use Horner's method as we 
do and that Newton's method was 
never developed in usable form by 
Newton and it required a third man 
to make the developed process one of 
certain approximation. 

The bulletins are clearly written, 
prefaced profusely, and form in a 
convenient size a highly condensed 
history of one of the most interesting 
problems under the consideration of 
mathematicians. 



LIKE TO STAR-GAZE? 



Although no classes are given in 
General Astronomy and the work of 
the Civils in Field Astronomy does 
not require the use of the Observa- 
tory, the College has, for some time, 
been opening this building to the pub- 
lic Thursday nights at half past seven. 
At the present time a number of in- 
teresting objects are visible at a con- 
venient time. Saturn, the Great 
Nebula of the Orion, and even on the 
face of the Moon, are phenomena of 
the sky that tax ones awe and imagi- 
nation. The sflendid weather for 
observing, the accessibility of the ob- 
servatory and the opportunity of see- 
ing how huge a universe we study 
ought to counterbalance the trifling 
discomfort of getting ready before 
and thawing out ears, fingers and 
noses afterward. 



THE TIGER 



27 



We Want You to See Our New Display of the Leather Novelties, .^ 
Direct from the Mark Cross Company c| 

Oross IMonOgrams — There is something in the sound of our own voice which does not dis- 
please us. There is no ornament so attractive to the eye as one's own initials entwined in a monogram 

Cross Photograph Ca.ses — An excellent arrangement for preserving a panoramic view of 
any one person. 

Cross Desk and Traveling Watches — Excepting the Cross timepiece, the best 
watch we know of is the one kept by a loving wife on her husband. 




<^ -^ 



MINERVA FUNCTION. 



On Tuesday evening Minerva cele- 
brates her nineteenth anniversary, at the 
Acacia hotel As usual, the progressive 
dinner was the feature of the evening. 
The tables were decorated with white 
carnations and smilax. In the receiving 
line were Miss Vesta Tucker, President 
and Mrs. Slocum, Mrs. Cajori and Mrs. 
Parsons. Those present were, President 
and Mrs. Slocum, Dr. and Mrs. Parsons, 
Dr. and Mrs. Cajori, Mrs. Hale, Miss 
Dora Jones, and Misses Tucker, Vesta 
Tucker, Weir, Greene, Helen Canon, 
Draper, Matt Draper, Lucile Parsons, 
Octavia Hale, Templeton, Walsh, Hem- 
enway, Frances Hall, Bispham, Kampf, 
Louise Kampf, Cora Kampf, Alice Mc- 
Kinnie, Rule Aitken, Rice, Phillips, Ran- 
dolph, Mabel Wilson, Marian Haines, 
Vaughn, Nell Estill, Floyd Estill, June 
Musser, Edith Stark, Watson, Avis 
Jones, and Messrs. Bryson, Kirkpatrick, 
Dean, Jardine, Weller, Clarke, Thornell, 
Cotten, Heald. Everett Jackson, Roland' 
Jackson, Hall, Phillips, Hazen, Boynton, 
Hensler, Hamilton, Hesler, Roberson, 
Randolph, Hamilton, Moore, Guy, Al- 
den, Argo, Whipple, Sisco, Hughes, 
Blackman, Shepherd, and Tucker. 

TheShackleford-Henley 
Leather Goods Co. 

18 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 
Makers of 

Trunks and Leather Goods 

We Carry the Most Complete Line of 
Traveling Goods, Ladies' Hand Bags, 
Pocket Books and All Sorts of Leather 
Goods in Colorado. 



DEXTER & HUDSON 

EXCHANGE BARBER 
SHOP 

Room 307, Third Floor 
Exchange Bank Building 



KAPPA SIGMA DANCE. 

The Kappa Sigma fraternity gave 
one of their most enjoyable dances 
last Saturday night. The colors of 
the organization, green, red and 
white were artistically carried out 
with evergreens, poinsettias and crepe 
paper. Fink's orchestra played and 
punch and wafers were served all the 
evening. 

Mrs. Florian Cajori and Mrs. R. S. 
Edmunds chaperoned and among 
other guests invited were Miss Ruth 
Loomis, Miss Persis Kidder, Miss 
Elsie Connell, Miss Addie Hemen- 
way, Miss Tammen, Misses Nell and 
Floy Estill, Misses Hazel and Ruth 
Davis, Miss Lucile Parsons, Miss 
Mary Walsh, Miss Gwendolyn 
Hedgecock, Miss Dorothy Frantz, 
Miss Helen Graham, Miss Cora 
Kampf, Miss Dorothy McCreery, Miss 
Martha Phillips, Miss Edith Baker, 
Miss Marie Zenda, Miss Katherine 
True, Miss Marie McCoombs, Miss 
Avis Jones, Miss May Wallace, Miss 
Gertrude Ashley, Miss Dorothy 
Haines, Miss May Weir, Miss Irene 
Waters, Miss Edna Biggs, Messrs. 
James Biggs, S. W. Dean, E. B. 
Fowler, Roland Jackson and Florian 
Cajori, Jr. 



NO BASKET BALL TEAM. 



Faculty Puts Quietus on Fans' As- 
pirations. 



The faculty have notified the Student 
Commission that their petition for a bas- 
ket ball team cannot be favorably acted 
upon for several reasons, the first and 
most important being their desire that 
there should be a few. months during the 
winter when the college work should re- 
ceive the entire attention of the student 
body ; secondly, that an investigation of 
the matter shows that the men who 
would participate in this sport are much 



the same individuals who have been en- 
gaged in athletics during the past foot- 
ball season and those who would indulge 
in Spring athletics, etc. 

It is probable that a Campus League 
composed of Hagerman Hall and the 
five fraternities will start a little rivalry 
in the winter game after vacation. 



MINERVA MEMORIAL. 



On Friday afternoon, December 9th, 
the Minerva society with her honorary 
members and friends, met in the Com- 
mon Room at Bemis to dedicate a mem- 
orial to two of her most loved members 
who have died in the past few years — 
Kathrina Hayden and Jean Whipple. 
The memorial is a marble bust of a 
young woman, called "The Princess," 
and was made by an Italian artist, Lar- 
km Mead, the brother of the famous 
architect in New York. The service was 
very simple, consisting of the singing of 
a hymn, a short talk by Mrs. Slocum, 
and the unveiling of the bust; but all 
was most expressive of the high regard 
in which these two young women were 
held both by the society and by the col- 
lege as a whole. 



If your Tider has a BLUE CHECK 
MARK on it, your subscription Is 
'NOT PAID. The Board of Con- 
trol recommends that subscriptions not 
paid by February I ,' I 1 , be discontinued 



HAGERMAN TROUBLES. 



The gym apparatus, so long expected 
liy the Hag. Hall men, arrived last week, 
but in such unsatisfactory condition that 
it had to be returned. When the gym 
is finally in shape, we may expect the 
long delayed "smoker." 



Contemporary Christmas Tree. — 
Contemporary enjoj'ed a Christmas tree 
party at the home of Lenore Pollen in 
Manitou, Saturday, Dec. 10th. 



7 28 



THE TIGER 



Christmas Giving 



is doubly pleasurable when you realize that the gift is something the 
recipient really wants or needs. The sensible, useful gift not only 
serves as a pleasant reminder, but is of real value to the receiver. Why not remember "the man or the woman in 
the case" with THE SQUARE DEAL. SHOE. A pair of stylish, perfect fitting and comfortable shoes 
is the literal definition of "Peace on Earth." 



Ladies' and Men's Slippers 
50c to $3.00 



FIT FOft EVERY FO01^^=^ 



IT PAYS TO Dl^^ ^ll AT DEAL'S 

107 South Tajow Srwgrrr--^... ^^ 



Men's and Ladies' Shoes 
$2.50 to $5.00 



Deichmann & Douglas 
Floral Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER, Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 

Students' Trade Solicited 



1 1 1 N. Tejon St. 



Telephone 1593 



Your 
Christmas 
At Home 

will include, of course, remembering your family 
and your friends with a gift. You will be sur- 
prised at the number of things, ideal for gifts, 
that are sold most reasonably here. 

Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

"Satisfactory Jewelry 

Store" 

ARE YOU 

particular about the appearance of 
your linen? Send it to 

The Pearl Laundry Co. 

and it will come back just as you 
want it — sweet and spotless. 

20 Per Cent Discount to Students 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 
23 W. Bijou Street Phone Main 1085 



Patronize TIGER Advertisers 



DO YOU WANT 

a laree airy room with plenty of sun- 
shine, where everything is homelike? 
You will find what you are lookincr 
for at 215 E. Monument St. 



DRAMA lie CLUB PRESENTS EAGER HEART 

Continued from Page 23 

the First Shepherd also did excellent 
work. 

In the matter of speaking the lines 
well, tile work of the cast was less sat- 
isfactory, bntil I saw the text of the 
play after tiie performance, I supposed 
that most of it was written in prose. 
One of the secrets of reading verse well 
i:> a close attention to the rhythm; in 
particular, it is necessary to give the full 
value to the long vowel sounds. Almost 
all of the cast clipped their words short, 
and thus spoiled the effect of the verse. 
From this I should except Miss Landon, 
who spoke her lines admirably through- 
out. People sitting near me in the audi- 
ence attributed her success to the excel- 
lence of her voice; but it was really due 
chiefly to the fact that she spoke with 
attention to the^ rhythm. Clipping the 
words short and crowding them together 
as in ordinary conversation will spoil 
the best verse ever written, as anyone 
may hear at a performance of Shakes- 
peare. 

Miss Graham also spoke her lines 
creditably, though her work in this re- 
spect was less even than Miss Landon's. 

In conclusion, let em express the hope 
that the Dramatic Club may present 
more of these serious poetic plays. Even 
though the success may be only partial, 
the earnest attempt is more profitable 
than the successful production of light 
modern farce. 

HOMER E. WOODBRIDGE 



TICKNOR PARTY. 



Ticknor Study was the scene of an old 
fashioned Christmas party, Monday ev- 
ening. The girls living in Ticknor spent 
the evening in dancing and roasting 
chestnuts before an open fire. The ap- 
pearance of Santa Clans made the even- 
ing's merriment complete. 



Minerva ti^ntertained. — Saturday af- 
ternoon the Minerva society, including 



Antlers 

Turkish Baths 

(Opposite Elks Club) 

Open Day and Night 

BATHS OF ALL KINDS. Also Chiro- 
pady and Swedish Massage. Treat- 
ment at Residence by Appointment. 

CARL J. WENBERG, Prop. 

Graduate Swedish Masseur 



Phone Red 33 



14 E. Bijou Street 



FOR 

Christmas Shopping 



GO TO 



THE MAY CO 

23 North Tejon Street 



10% Discount to Students 



THE ® 

Whitaker-Kester I 

SHOE CO. f 



Immense Variety in 
Fall Shoes 



We crowd into our shoes all the style 
and good wear that only the best shoe 
makers can give us. Ever}' Whitaker- 
Kester patron knows that this state- 
inent ma}' be accepted in the fullest 
sense. We are showing a greater 
range of designs than ever before. 
All the best and most popular leathers 
in the smartest, dressiest and best 
fitting shoes at $3.50, $4.00 and $5. 

1 32 N. Tejon St. 



r 



THE TIGER 

TH0KIUB 

In Selecting a Full Dress or a Tuxedo Suit 
a Man Must Exert the 

keenest judgment, because he is about to make an investment of 
no small amount of money and he expects the suft to last him a 
considerable length of timer "Benjamm" Full Dress clothes are 
not extremely high-priced, but they are as correctly styled and as 
painstakingly made as any custom tailor's. Full Dress Suits $40 
to $55. Tuxedo Suits $35 to $50. 

Liberal Discounts to Students 



MANHATTAN SHIRTS 
STETSON HATS 



FOWNES GLOVES 
PERRINE GLOVES 



Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton-Rustic Home 

rv • o No. 419 South El Paso St. 

JUairy a) Phone Main 442 

Photography 

In All Its Branches 

Clark 

112 South Tejon St. 
Special Discount to ^11 Students 

Shoe Repairing. Clothes Cleaned and Pressed. 
Second-Hand Shoes a d Clothing 

J. H. PERKINS 



lYz S. Cascade 



Colorado Springs 



PRATT, The Barber 

Is At the Alta Vista Hotel 

Me Solicits the Patronage of the 
College Boys 



active, ahinini and honorary members, 
was entertained by Mrs. Cajori and Mrs. 
Howe, at the home of Mrs. Cajori. A 
most enjoyable program was given, con- 
sisting of several violin numbers by Mrs. 
Howe, and vocal selections by Mrs. Sel- 
domridge. Following the program de- 
licious refreshments were served. 



INSIGNIA DAY ADDRESS 

Continued from Page 24. 

Graduates of Harvard are found in 
every state in the Union, and these men 
have brought certain conceptions of 
morals, of loyalty, of what a true citi- 
zen should be and do. These ideas have 
a certain similarity because these men 
were educated in that institution, or bet- 
ter because there, as in other colleges, 
they were trained to think and given 
certain conceptions of truth and duty. 
The same is true of Yale or Princeton, 
Amherst, Williams, and many other col- 
Jeges. The college graduate, if he is 
worthy of the opportunities which he 
has had, enters the service of his coun- 
try to stand for those things which 
create the true life of the nation. 

On a day like this, by means of these 
historic emblems and insignia the fact 
that Colorado College, its students and 
its faculty, are part of the larger aca- 
demic life of the country. We too have 
our mission and our opportunity in the 
citizenship of the nation. If this cap 
and gown mean what they should, they 
stand as the badge of our consecration 
to the service of our country, as true 
and deyoted citizens. We are becoming 
part of those who are holding our nation 
true to the ideas of truth and righteous- 
ness which must ever be the basis of 
stable and real unity. 



29 



WINDOW SLEEPING TENTS 



THE OUT 


WEST 


TENT AND AWNING CO. 


113'-' NORTH TEJON STREET 





Phone 917 



GEO. R. BERGEN, 0. D. 

MANF'G OPTICIAN 
Eyes Tested 611-12 Exch. Nat. Bank Bjdg. 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented 
and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing a Typewriter. The 
New No. 10 Model Has All Latest 
Improvements 

Zimmerman Supply 

Company 



22 E. Kiowa St. 
Phone Main 374 



Established 1890 



WILIIAMJON 
HAFrNDRCD 

ENGRAYDRJ-PRINTBRJ 




DET^VBK. COI/O. 



The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 



30 



THE TIGER 



REMEMBER 
HUGHES 

For Your Xmas Smokes 

North I O Tejon 



Gel Your Picnic Supplies 

■"^ AT ^= 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. T«jon St. Phone Main 114 

The Acacia Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

W. O. BRINKER. Mgr. 

Especially Equipped for Handling 
College Functions 

Dutch Room, Banquet Room, Ball Room 

Notary Public 

A. J. LAWTON 

Real Estate, Loans and Insurance 
10>^ E. Pike's Peak Ave., Colorado Springs 

Suggestions for Xmas 

A Kodak 

A Waterman Pen 

A C. C Pennant 

A C. C. Pillow Top 

A College Calendar 

A Box of Whitman's Famous 

"Fussy Chocolates" 

A Box of Fine Cigars 

A Box of Stationery 

A Manicure Case 

Perfumes, Toilet Articles, 

Atomizers, etc. 

MURRAY'S 

(Opposite Campus) 



SCOOP, SCOOP, SCOOP 

Continued from Page 23 

doubt finlily and linally removed before 
our most excellent second baseman re- 
sumed his seat. He reviewed the season 
with vigor and warmth, and in a final 
burst of brilliant oratory brought the 
audience to its feet to cheer the Cham- 
pions of 1909. 

After this feeling reception, it seemed 
but child's play for Professor Park to 
keep up the "pep," and it was a scene 
long to be remembered, when he pre- 
sented the undefeated champions with the 
official awards of their success. The 
baseball sweaters presented were unusu- 
ally luxurious this year, being handsome 
black wool with orange C's, of course. 
The men who received sweaters and C's 
were : Sherry, captain ; Bancroft, 
Friend, Moberg, Siddons, H. Sinton, J. 
Thornell, Vandemoer, Van Stone, and 
Wilson. 

To conclude the excitement of this 
athletic feast, our most excellent foot- 
ball coach and athletic director, Mr. 
Rothgeb, treated the audence to one of 
his best. We have known for some time 
that our coach could talk as well as 
coach, but it was with unexpected pleas- 
ure that we found that he could talk as 
well as he can coach. He spoke of the 
successful football season just past, and 
paid to his "fighting Tigers" the highest 
tribute he knew hovfr to pay when he 
said they were the scrappiest and most 
gentlemanly and manly set of athletes it 
had ever been his privilege to come in 
contact with. He also called our good 
Captain Vandemoer "the best captain in 
the West," and said that never in his ex- 
perience had it been his pleasure to be 
associated with a team where better 
spirit prevailed, and where there was 
such a feeling of enthusiastic and friend- 
ly unity as was the case with our own 
Tigers. He said it was a downright 
pleasure to coach them, and that with 
such a team and such a spirit behind the 
team as there was this year, he would 
guarantee to whip anything from Utah 
to Yale. We believe he will do it! 

He then went on to speak of the work 



A. G. SPALDING S BROS. 



The Spalding 
Trade-Mark 




Is^ Known Throughout 
the World as a 

GUARANTEE OF 
QUALITY 



are the Largest Manu- 
facturers in the World of 

OFFICIAL EQUIPMENT 

for All Athletic Sports and 
Pastimes 

If Yrtll ^'^ interested in 
11 lUU Athletic Sport you 
should have a copy of the 
Spalding Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyolopedia of 

What's New iu Sport 

and is sent free on request. 



A. G. SPALD NG & BROS. 

1616 Arapahoe Street, Denver, Colorado 

We can sell you solid gold rings, set 
with nice genuine diamond $5.50. 
We have one small lot of 14k. solid 
gold gents' and ladies' rings, differant 
designs, set with nice white diamonds. 
Other jewelers get $20 to $25 for 
the same thing. Our price $12.50 
and $14, and we have a big selection 
diamond scarf pins from $3.50 up, 
diamond studs from $8.50 up. Big- 
gest selection of gents' and ladies' 
watches in new and unredeemed, at 
way down prices, and hundreds of 
other articles at 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 

27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 

Money Adnanced on All Valuables 

Watch theCapsYouMeet 

You won't need an intro- 
duction to theHEIDCAP. 
It is not a mere head cover- 
ing. It has character. It 
gives character to the wear- 
er. It is made of exclusive 
English cap cloths. It is a 
thoroughbred. Try on a 
HEIUCAP. 



THE TIGER 



31 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co 
Groceries and 



Meats 






w^ 




115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



MUETH'S 

The Place Where the Stand- 
ard Is Never Lowered. High 
Class Goods at Reasonable 
Prices. Ice Cream, Hot 

and Cold Drinks. 

Lunches and Afternoon Teas 
Ask Any Old Student 

CHAS. P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance 

5 Pike's Peak Ave. Colorado Springs 



Cox Sons & Vining 

262 Fourth Ave., New York 

Gowns and Caps 

Silk Faculty Gowns and 
Hoods. Lowest Prices. 
Best Workmanship. 



The D. Y. Butcher Drug Co. 
DRUGS, KODAKS, SUPPLIES 

Free and Prompt Delivery 
Cor. Opposite P. 0. Phones 90 and 750 




at hand, and of the two championships 
needful to round out our year well, and 
uf the things each loyal student can do 
to make the Tiger teams what they al- 
ways have been — first-class, — and spoke 
optimistically of our chances for a triple 
championship year. Here's to you, Mr. 
Rothgeb, we're with you heart and body, 
and we'll all be there in the shouting, as 
well as ia the preparation for it ! 

The Girls' Glee Club then very fit- 
tingly and sweetly finished off the pro- 
gram with two delightful selections, after 
which an appreciative and satisfied audi- 
ence adjourned to the parlor and dining 
room for "gab and grub," as Newhouse 
would say, and on the chiming of the 
ten o'clock, the party went home, more 
firmly convinced than ever that Colorado 
College is the best place on earth, and 
that Christmas will be all the more en- 
joyable for having spent the last even- 
ing before, at Magna Pan Pan, 



II Local Department 



Mr. and Mrs. Graham came up from 
Pueblo to see Eager-Heart Fridav even- 



Dorothy Frantz enjoyed a visit from 
her father and small sister over Satur- 
day and Sunday. 



Ruth Wood is ill with tonsilitis. 



Mrs. Skelton began her Sunday after- 
noon teas again this week. Tea was 
served in Mr. Skelton's studio, and the 
guests had the pleasure ot seeing all his 
late sketches, made while he was in 
Venice on his recent trip. 



Do you like good candy? Stop in at 
Noble's and get some of those delicious 
Christmas Chocolates. Cor. Tejon and Bijou 

Alice Brown gave a fudge party Sat- 
urday evening. 

Dorlie Crandall has been ill with ton- 
silitis. 



Bernice McCurdy has been serious