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Full text of "The Tiger (student newspaper), Sept. 1911-June 1912"

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■i. 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., SEPTEMBER 14, 1911 



Vol. XIV 



Number 1 



COLLEGE OPENS FOR COLLEGE 

ANOTHER YEAR DIRECTORY 



FEW CHANGES 

IN FACULTY 



Away, away with your sword and 
gun, 
Here they come— rub-a-dub-dub. 
Looking as if they'd been out on a 
bum; 
The faculty of Colorado College, 
Oh—! 

Yes, they're here and we're here; 
the boys and girls, and the men and 
the women, and the freshmen and 
sophomores and juniors and seniors 
— all here for another year. 

The old students and the faculty 
are all glad they're back — at least 
they say so. And the freshmen are 
all glad they're starting in — at least 
they say so. There seems to be no 
reason why we shouldn't all be glad 
to be here, for we are here to start 
in on one of the biggest years that 
Colorado College has ever seen. 
There's no doubt about it. The Col- 
lege is better than ever before. You 
don't need to take our word for it- 
Ask anybody you see that knows any- 
thing at all about the College, and see 
if they don't tell you the same. The 
faculty is stronger than ever before 
,the student body is larger than ever 
before and — sh! — the prospects for 
a football championship are several 
times brighter than they were this 
time last year! So why shouln't we 
be glad we're here? 

Students, both new and old, have 
been dropping in for ten days, and 
the regular registration- began Tues- 
day. And that isn't all. There are 
more to come. It is not a certainty, 

Continued on Page 4 



Holders of College Honorary 
Offices 



The following directory of officers 
of the various important organiza- 
tions of the College will be found to 
be of immense service to old students 
as well as new, as a source of infor- 
mation regarding Who's Who in C. 
C. The lists of officers as given here 
are the results of the elections at the 
close of the last college year. A few 
changes necessarily made, however, 
on account of the fact that some of 

Continued on Page 4 



* WATCH FOR THE KINN. * 

* * 

4* The Kinnikinnik is the ♦ 

+ monthly literary paper of the * 

<• College and as such is deserv- * 

4* ing of your support. Those * 

4» who have literary ability should ♦ 

* write for the Kinn — all should * 
+ subscribe for it. One of the * 
•i" best ways of showing College 4* 
<• spirit is to support the publi- * 
+ cations of the College. The 4* 
4* old students know the Kinn * 
■> and have always been loyal •§• 
4* supporters. The freshmen * 
4» should get acquainted. Mana- * 

* ger Morse will introduce the 4* 

* Kinn next week — Watch for * 

* it * 

* * 



The usual number of changes have 
been made in the personnel of the 
faculty this year as in every other 
year. The older members of the 
college faculty are now practically all 
back in the city, some from recrea- 
tion and others from vacations of 
work and recreation. Professor E. C. 
Schneider of the department of biol- 
ogy has probably had the most stren- 
uous summer. Dr. Schneider was ab- 
sent from the college the last half 
of last year, doing special research 
work in eastern universities. This 
summer he has spent for the most 
part, on the top of Pike's Peak with 
Professors J. S. Haldane and C. G. 
Douglas of Oxford university, Eng- 
land, and Professor Yandell Hender- 
son of Yale university, engaged in 
studying the effects of altitude and 
the accompanying rarified atmos- 
phere on the human system, mainly 
with reference to the respiration, 
blood volume and the constitution of 
the blood. 

Professor William Strieby has been 
engaged in studying the fossil beds at 
Florissant. Professor Cajori has 
spent the summer at Madison, Wis., 
working in the excellent library of 
the University of Wisconsin and fin- 
ishing an article which will be pub- 
lished in the Bibliotheka Mathmetika 
of Leipsic, Germany. Professor Ca- 
jori reports many pleasant hours with 
Professor and Mrs. T. K. Urdahl. 
Professor Urdahl, now of the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, was for some 
years a member of the faculty of 

Continued on Page 3 



THE TIGER 




Y. M. C. A. OUTLOOK. 



Secretary Ware Sums Up the Situa- 
tion of the Y. M. C. A. in . 
Colorado College. 



(By F. W. Ware, General Secretary.) 

One of the great --nrovements of re- 
cent years among the college men of 
North America has been the student 
Young Men's Christian Association. 
Organized by student leaders as a 
branch of the vast Christian Associa- 
tion work of the world this enterprise 
has been fostered and carried on by 
the men of our higher institutions of 
learning to meet the deepest spiritual 
and social needs of our college and 
university life. The college men of 
America are the student Young Men's 
Christian Association. Without them 
this organization could not exist. 
Built up by and for and of men of our 
American colleges, the student Chris- 
tian propaganda can be successfully 
carried forward only as it has the 
support of the men who make up its 
constituency. 

Not infrequently a man when ap- 
proached upon the subject of mem- 
bership in the Christian Association, 
will ask, "What will I get out of it?" 
Influenced by the desire for personal 
gain which is inherent in human na- 
ture, the man's first impulse is to 
weight his own benefits in joining 
such an organization. The attention 
to one's own interest is entirely le- 
gitimate. But in looking out upon 
society a man must get the true per- 
spective, and not forget the oppor- 
tunity for service which the benefits 
of his own advantages enable him to 
render those about him. College life 
is a complex society. Men of all in- 
terests and positions in the commun- 
ity are thrown into intimate relation- 
ship with one another. Each is in- 
directly, if not directly dependent 
upon every other fellow student. 
There must be a denial here of one 
man's interest for the sake of 
another's good. One man will go 
out of his way to oblige another 
merely for the purpose of causing the 
machinery of good fellowship to run 
with perfect smoothness. enerosity 
and service to the institution and the 



individual students who compose it, > 
must alone abide. . 

Is it extraordinary^' therefore,' that' 
an agency 'ha's grown up in the coir 
leges -of the land by means qf, whiqh 
this service can be more readily ren- 
dered? Or is it an unnatural 'tffin'g ' 
that an organization has been estab- 
lished by the students themselves for 
a purely altruistic "purpose"," to serve 
their fellows in that phase of life upon 
which no other department of the 
college world touches? 

There is such an agency in Colo- 
rado College. It is here to unite al! 
students who desire to strengthen and 
extend the influence of the College; 
it is organized to develop Christian 
character and good fellowship in the 
student body; its sole cause for exist- 
ence is to serve the entire community 
in its religious, social and economic 
life. The motto of the organization, 
"Gody, Mind, Spirit," signifies the 
essence of its work. Only as the 
person develops in this threefold way 
can he attain unto the perfection of 
an all-round man. 

The Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation stands for "the best in col- 
lege." It will support athletics, pub- 
lications, and other College enter- 
prises. In turn it cordially invites 
all the men of Colorado College to 
support the activities of the Associa- 
tion and expects them to do so. A 
full-time secretary has been secured, 
and he will devote his entire time to 
the" work of that organization. The 
placing of Bible and Mission Study 
courses on the regular College curri- 
culum with credit given those who en- 
roll in them, is being considered. A 
very creditable handbook has been 
put out by the committee in charge 
of the same. A series of practical ad- 
dresses by practical men of the world, 
is the process of arrangement. 

A more adequate and far-reaching 
extension work is being planned for 
the year. A vigorous campaign for 
employment has been carried on in 
an able way by the chairman of that 
committee, and many positions have 
already been given out to the men of 
the College. The quarters of the 
Young Men's Christian Association 
will be supplied with games and read- 
ing matter, and the general appear- 
ance of the rooms will be improved. 



A definite plan tp provide frequent 
"get-togethers,-' "All-College Sings," 
"hikes'**' into the mountains, and a 
spirit of good-fellowship, is being 
carefully worked out. • 

We have a great year ahead of us. 
Let us unite as never before for one 
common end — namely, to make Colo- 
rado College the most efficient and 
prominent educational center in the 
West, and the Young Men's Christian 
Association a vital factor in this Col- 
lege growth. 



NEW Y. M. C. A. SECRETARY. 



F. W. Ware, of Minnesota U., Called 
to Fill Responsible Position. 



Last year the work of the Young 
Men's Christian Association at Colo- 
rado College was in the hands of Mr. 
Thomas L. Kirkpatrick, a senior, who 
acted in the capacity of half-time sec- 
retary. Realizing that the greatest 
efficiency in the work was not possible 
without the securing of a salaried 
officer who would give his whole time 
to the organization and management 
of the Association activities, a move 
was made on the campus to acquire 
such a leader. Considerable opposi- 
tion was met at first, on the ground 
that the expense of maintaining a full- 
time secretary would be too great for 
the student body to bear. Meanwhile 
the Advisory Board was endeavoring 
to locate a man who would fill the 
requirements of the local situation, 
should it be found advisable to call a 
secretary. 

Several men were placed under con- 
sideration and in July, at the request 
of Dean Parsons, Mr. Frederick W. 
Ware of Minneapolis, came to Colo- 
rado Springs to look over the field 
and meet the board. Upon his re- 
turn to Minnesota an invitation was 
sent him by Dean Parsons, President 
of the Advisory Board, to become 
General Secretary of the Colorado 
College Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation. Mr. Ware accepted the po- 
sition and is now at the head of the 
work here. 

Mr. Ware is a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota. During the past 
year he was president of the senior 
class of 191 1. For four years he was 
on the cabinet of the Young Men's 



THE TIGER 



Christian Association of that institu- 
tion, being vice-president of the As- 
sociation in the year 1909-10. He was 
secretary of the Minnesota Union, an 
organization of all the men of the 
University. As an officer of the 
"Masquers," the dramatic organiza- 
tion at Minnesota, he took an active 
interest in dramatic work. For six 
months Mr. Ware was secretary of 
the Board of Publishers of the "Min- 
nesota Daily." He is a member of 
the Beta Theta Pi fraternity, and of 
Gray Friars, the honorary senior so- 
ciety at Minnesota. 

The office of the Young Men's 
Christian Association is at present in 
Room 5, Hagerman Hall. The men 
of the College are cordially urged to 
call on Mr. Ware there and become 
acquainted with him. He is behind 
the men of Colorado College with 
heart and soul, and asks in return 
their respect and hearty co-operation 
in the activities of the Young Men's 
Christian Asociation. 



FEW CHANGES IN THE 
FACULTY. 

Continued from Page 1 

Colorado College. Professor F. A. 
Bushee spent the summer at Cam- 
bridge, working in the Harvard li- 
brary. The Popular Science Monthly 
of September has just published an 
article by Professor Bushee on 
"Science and Social Progress." 

Professor E. C. Hills has just re- 
turned from his summer place at 
Woodland Park, where he surrounded 
himself with a mass of Spanish- 
American poetry. He has been busy 
with the lectures on Spanish-Ameri- 
can poetry and prosody which he is 
to give as exchange professor from 
Colorado College at Harvard Uni- 
versity the first term of this year. 
Professor Hills will leave for Cam- 
bridge in about ten days. 

An addition of great value to the 
intellectual life of the College, and 
the community at large for the com- 
ing year, will be the lectures on 
American history by Professor Al- 
bert Bushnell Hart, who will come 
from Harvard university to Colorado 
College as exchange professor from 
that institution. Professor Hart will 
be at Colorado College the second 
semester, not during the first half 
year, as is the impression of some 
persons. 

President Slocum has spent the en- 
tire summer in Colorado Springs and 
vicinity, and as a result of his rather 



strenuous summer, the College enters 
upon the new year in a financial con- 
dition that is unusual among educa- 
tional institutions — the College begins 
its new year without a deficit. This 
naturally means much to an institu- 
tion that receives nothing in the way 
of municipal or state appropriations 
and is dependent upon the good-will 
and confidence of the public. 

New members in the faculty of the 
College are Dr. Thomas Lansing 
Porter, of the department of physics, 
Harold L. King, who comes to the 
chair of history, Mrs. Edith Varker, 
who is to take charge of the work in 
physical culture for the young women 
of the College, and Benjamin M. 
Woodbridge of the deparement of 
ramance languages. The instructor- 
ship in French at Cutler academy will 
be filled by Miss Elizabeth D. Wood- 
bridge. 

Dr. Porter, who has taken the place 
of Professor John Mills of the de- 
partment of physics, is a graduate of 
Northwestern university at Evanston, 
111. His postgraduate work was done 
at Clark university, Worcester, Mass., 
where he received the degrees of mas- 
ter of arts and doctor of philosophy. 
During his study at Clark university, 
from 1907 to 1910, Dr. Porter held the 
positions of reasearch assistant to 
Professor Arthur Gordon Webster, 
the eminent physisicist of the uni- 
versity. He also was for one year 
honary fellow in physics, and has 
been an instructor in Clark college 
since 1908. 

Harold L. King is. a graduate of 
Oberlin College and a son of Presi- 
dent Charles C. King of that institu- 
tion. Mr. King won high honors as 
a graduate student at Harvard uni- 
versity, where he studied for two 
years, .holding the Goodwin memorial 
fellowship during his second year 
there. Last year he held the profes- 
sorship in history at Middlebury col- 
lege, Stockbridge, Vt. 

Mrs. Varker, the instructor in 
physical culture for women of the 
College, comes from Philadelphia, 
where she has been engaged in this 
same line. She has worked a great 
deal with young people, and has 
studied her subject with some of the 
best teachers in the east. 

Benjamin M. Woodbridge, who 
takes the place made vacant by the 
resignation of Miss Yna Reinhardt, 
comes to the department of Romance 
languages fresh from two years' study 
in Europe. Mr. Woodbridge grad- 



uated with honors at Harvard college 
in 1907 and received the degree of 
master of arts from Harvard univers- 
ity the following year. He held the 
position of instructor in romance lan- 
guages in George Washington uni- 
versity, Washington, D. C, for one 
year, and has since been studying in 
Spain and the University of Paris. 
Mr. Woodbridge is a brother of Pro- 
fessor Homer E. Woodbridge of the 
department of English of the Col- 
lege. 

Miss Elizabeth D. Woodbridge, 
who takes the instructorship in 
French in Cutler Academy and will 
instruct the beginning French classes 
in the College is a sister of Professor 
Woodbridge. Miss Woodbridge is a 
graduate of Vassar college. She has 
just returned from two years' study 
in Germany, Spain and France, 
though mainly at the University of 
Paris, from which she received a 
diploma last year. She has already 
had several years' experience as a 
teacher. 



OFF FOR HARVARD. 



Every year Colorado College sends 
a number of its graduates to eastern 
universities to finish up, but of all the 
large universities in the East Har- 
vard is the favorite. A larger num- 
ber of Colorado College graduates 
go to Harvard than to any other 
single institution. Lenny Van Stone 
left two weeks ago for Boston to 
take up Medicine in the Harvard 
Medical School. About six more of 
last year's class are planning to leave 
in a few days for Cambridge. The 
party will include Robert G. Argo, 
E. B. Fowler, C. A. Woodard, H. W. 
Greenlee, D. H. Buchanan and R. 
Bruce Weirick. Argo, Fowler, Wood- 
ard and Greenlee are going to take 
up Law, while Buchanan will special- 
ize in Sociology and Weirick in 
English. 

Here's wishing them the best of 
success in their pursuit of knowledge 
in new fields. It is a source of great 
satisfaction to Colorado College sup- 
porters to note the credit which has 
in the past been reflected upon our 
institution by our former students 
who have gone to the eastern uni- 
versities for further study, and those 
of us who know the men who are 
going back there this year are enter- 
taining no doubts but that the for- 
mer record will be well maintained. 



51S18 



THE TIGER 



w. 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY. 

Continued from Page 1 

the offices will be left vacant by for- 
mer students who are not able to re- 
turn to College this year. 

Associated Students. 
President, H. G. Sinton. 
Secretary, H. A. Parkison. 
Treasurer, K. F. Weller. 
Underclass representative, 

Lindstrom. 
Manager of Debating, H. W. Rhone. 
Junior Member Athletic Board, H. R. 

Vandemoer. 
Senior Member Tiger Board, C. Don- 
elan. 
Junior Member Tiger Board, G. A. 

Bowers. 
Alumni Member Athletic Board, O. 

W. Stewart. 
Editor of The Tigei, ±1. L. Black. 
Woman's Advisory Board: 

Seniors — Katherine Constant, Flora 
Crowley, Rita Miller. 

Juniors — Carrie Burger, Marion 
Fezer. 



The Kinnikinnik. 

Editor-in-Chief, Ferguson R. Ormes. 
Business Manager, Edward P. Morse. 



The Nugget. 

Editor-in-Chief, Lloyd L. Shaw. 
Business Manager, Thomas Lynch, 
Jr. 

The Hand Book. 

Editor-in-Chief, E. E. Hedblom. 
Assistant Editor, Katherine Constant. 
Manager. D. L. Sisco. 



Apollonian Club. 

President, W. W. Johnston. 
Vice-President, H. L. Black. 
Secretary, W. C. Barnes. 
Treasurer, W. D. Ela. 
Sergeant-at-Arms, C. A. Carson. 



Pearsons Society. 

President, H. G. Sinton. 
Vice-President, E. E. Hedblom. 
Secretary, R. F. Hamilton. 
Treasurer, P. H. Clifford. 
Sergeant-at-Arms, W. L. Warnock. 



Ciceronian Club. 
President, F. R. Ormes. 
Secretary, R. W. Putnam. 
Treasurer, W. Walthers. 
Attorney on Debate, R. Klein. 
Attorney on Oration, W. H. Taplin. 
Sergeant-at-Arms, G. W. Scott. 



Vice-President, Frances Hall. 
Secretary, Mabel Wilson. 
Treasurer, Edith Vaughn. 
Factotum, Helen Rand. 



Contemporary. 
President, Marion Yerkes. 
Vice-President, Mabel Wasley. 
Secretary, Frances Eames. 
Treasurer, Dorliska Crandall. 
Factotum, Florence Pierson. 



Hypatia. 
President, Flora Crowley. 
Vice-President, Altha Crowley. 
Secretary, Bernice McCurdy. 
Treasurer, Irene Aitken. 
Factotum, Myrth King. 



Athletic Teams. 

Football. 
Captain, H. G. Sinton. 
Manager, E. S. Statton. 

Baseball. 
Captain, G. B. Seldomridge. 
Manager, J. S. Witherow. 

Track. 
Captain, H. R. Vandemoer. 
Manager, W. B. Winchell. 

Class Officers. 

Seniors, President Slocum. 
Juniors, Professor Breitwieser. 
Sophomores, Doctor Schneider. 
Freshmen, Doctor Hills. 



Y. M. C. A. 

General Secretary, F. W. Ware. 
President, E. E. Hedblom. 
Vice-President, A. J. Gregg. 
Secretary, W. C. Barnes. 
Treasurer, D. L. Boyes. 



Y. W. C. A. 

President, Katherine Constant. 
Vice-President, Letitia Lamb. 
Recording Secretary, Florence 

Youngman. 
Corresponding Secretary, Frances 

Adams. 
Treasurer, Myrth King. 

Girls' Glee Club. 

President, Lucy Graves. 
First Vice-President, Lina Merwin. 
Second Vice-President, Ora Maddox. 
Secretary and Treasurer, Gwendolyn 

Hedgecock. 
Librarian, Elizabeth Sutton. 



Minerva. 
President, Edith Stark. 



Dramatic Club. 

President, Eleanor Thomas. 
Vice-President, Dorothy Stott. 
Secretary, Ellen Galpin. 
Treasurer, Bess Knight. 
Custodian, Marie Dodge. 



Le Cercle Francais. 

President, A.'H. Rowbotham. 
Vice-President, Etta Clark. 
Secretary, Elizabeth Sutton. 
Treasurer, Netta Powell. 
Librarian, Lois Aiken. 



Der Deutsche Verein. 
President, Ferguson R. Ormes. 
Vice-President, Florence Norton. 
Secretary, Mollie Hanowitz. 
Treasurer, William F. Harder. 



COLLEGE OPENS 



Continued from Page 1 

but it seems that our ancient dream 
of a freshman class of three hundred 
students is to be realized this year. 
In our student body will be found 
representatives from almost every 
state in the Union and several from 
foreign countries. 

The dormitories on the campus 
have been rapidly filling up as well as 
the fraternity houses and boarding 
houses and boarding houses off the 
campus. And besides Colorado 
Springs always has a large delegation 
for the College. 

Even with the best of prospects, 
the best year in the history of the 
College is not positively assured. It 
is up to us. The opportunities are 
here for us to make the best of them, 
and if we fail to do it, the fault lies 
with us. This is to be a year of hard 
work, we must not fail to realize that 
fact, and the sooner we get rid of the 
idea that College is all play and no 
work, the better off we will .be. So 
we are morally obliged to jump right 
into the harness at the very first and 
keep going our best during the whole 
year if we are to make this the best 
year the College has ever known. 



GOOD LECTURES THIS YEAR. 



Professor S. EI. Clark of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago has been engaged 
by the English department of the 
College to come here next February 
to deliver a series of readings in Per- 
kins Hall. It will be remembered 
that Profesor Clark read "The Blue 
Bird'' here last year and the reading 
was enthusiastically received. It has 
not as yet been settled what readings 
will be given, but the series will 
probably include Rostand's "Chanti- 
cleer, "Les Miserables," Ibsen's 
"Peer Gynt," Shakespeare's "King 
Lear," and probably the Book of Job. 



THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 



BLUE MUD FOR RIVALS 



Football Outlook Brightest In Years 



On the eleventh of September — the 
earliest in years — Coach Rothgeb 
trotted the Tigers out this week. 
Captain Sinton, last season's All- 
Rocky Mountain end, lead out sixteen 
men on Monday, and had two full 
squads on Tuesday, with some men 
from both the first and second teams 
of last year still to report. When 
asked how the football squad looked 
to him, Sinton's face became one 
broad smile: 

"How does the squad look?" he 
said, warming up to the question. 
"Well, it takes a pretty good adjec- 
tive to express it. The best ever. 
That's the way it looks to me. With 
eight of the eleven "C" men in the 
moleskins, and a husky bunch of last 
year's freshmen to fight the old men 
for positions, C. C. bids fair to have 
a team that will make our ancient 
northern rivals sit up and take notice." 

When asked about those rivals, he 
said: "Boulder looks strong. They 
have a big bunch from their last 
year's freshmen team from which to 
pick their varsity. It never pays to 
leave Boulder out of the considera- 
tion. D. U. is making a tremendous 
effort to line up a team such as they 
had four years ago. It is hard to get 



a line on the Utah aggregation since 
they are so far away. But let 'em 
have their strong teams. The steady 
spirit for team work and fight which 
Rothy has instilled into Colorado Col- 




CAPT. SINTON 

lege athletics has shown what it can 
do in the winning of two champion- 
ships. We have 'the' "bunch, 'the' 
coach and a student body with 'the 
only' spirit to back us up. What 
more do we want? It is enough to 
say that it looks like Blue-Mud for 
Boulder on a certain looked-for clean- 
ing day." 



Witherow, Black, Hedblom, Bowers, 
Sinton, Thompson, Vandemoer and 
Heald are the eight old men who are 
back. The first six of these are all 
line men, and comprise the entire of 
last year's championship line with the 
single exception of Cook. Vande- 
moer and Heald are the only ones 
left for the backfield quartet. Vande- 
moer is the speediest man on any 
Colorado gridiron, and Heald com- 
pares more favorably with past-mas- 
ter "Tub" Morris in the art of de- 
fensive back than any man seen in 
these parts since that time. Black, 
Thompson, Floyd, LeClere and Koch 
are among those being considered to 
fill up the fullback's place. Johnny 
Herron, the 130-pound giant, and 
Putnam, a 1909 "C man are being 
tried out at quarterback. Putnam's 
experience at the pivot position ought 
to give him a slight leverage. Sum- 
mers, Harter and Koch are three of 
the new men whose very size make 
them worthy of comment for line po- 
sitions. There are hordes of smaller 
men who are just as full of pep who 
may show these old-timers a thing 
or two before the season is over. 
Heald and Vandemoer are the only 
ones from last year who are not yet 
back. They will arrive at the first of 
next week. 

The early start on a good field with 
this bunch of veterans whom he al- 



I ] [WW 




•»S1"-£Y~ 



THE TIGER 



The Weekly Newspaperof Colorado College 

HARRY L. BLACK Editor-in-Chief 

RICHARD L. HUGHES Business Mir. 

Lloyd Shaw Assistant Editor 

A. H. ROWBOTHAM Assistant Editor 

J. J. SlNTON Athletic Editor 

D. H. MAHAN Engineering Editor 

W. H. TAPLIN Forestry Editor 

Miss Glenn Styles Alumni Editor 

Miss Mary Randolph Exchange Editor 

Miss Helen Rand Local Editor 

A. W. Donovan Local Editor 

H. A. Parkison Assistant Manager 

A. L. Golden Assistant Manager 

W. L. Myers Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

F. P.Storke, H. A.Bennett, John L. Herron, G. W. 

Belsey, Miss Elizabeth Gerould, Miss Leona Stukey, 

Miss Myrth King, Miss Violet Hopper, Miss 

Frances Adams, R. G. Appel 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to TheTiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phones: Editor, Main 2550. Manager, Main 2073 

Entered at (he postoffice at Colorado 
Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



THE TIGER AND THE STU- 
DENT BODY. 



It is the usual thing at this time of 
the year for the Tiger to give itself 
an introduction to the reorganized 
student body. Do you know what 
the Tiger is? Maybe you do and 
maybe you don't. The Tiger is the 
weekly newspaper of Colorado Col- 
lege. It doesn't belong to the Tiger 
Board or to the faculty or to any 
other particular class of people in 
the College. It is the representative 
publication of the student body, the 
faculty and the friends of the Col- 
lege. It belongs to you and with you 
lies the task of making it what it is 
to be. 

It is a regrettable fact that there 
are a number of you students who do 
not show the proper interest in the 
College paper. It would make little 
difference to some of you if the Tiger 
didn't exist. Such an attitude is a 
mistake. The Tiger is worthy of 
your support or it wouldn't be pub- 
lished. There are many different 
ways for each and every one of you 
to lend your support to the paper. 

Obviously the first way is to sub- 
scribe for the Tiger and pay your 
subscription. Thereby you will help 
the manager materially. The Tiger 
can't be printed without money and 



your $1.25 is just as good as any one 
else's. Moreover each subscription 
helps to swell the circulation, and one 
of the first questions a prospective 
advertiser asks the manager is: "How 
large is your circulation?" 

Another thing: it is the business 
men of the city who advertise in the 
columns of the Tiger who make it 
possible for the Tiger to be published 
and presented to you at the price you 
have to pay for it. Therefore it is 
morally up to you to patronize those 
business men who advertise in the 
Tiger in preference to those who do 
not. 

Once more: you can assist the edi- 
tors materially by displaying a spirit 
of cooperation in getting it out. No 
matter who you are, faculty member, 
friend of the College or student, the 
columns of the Tiger are always open 
for the consideration of matter of in- 
terest to all, and it is only by the 
heartiest cooperation of the College 
as a whole that the Tiger can truly 
become the representative newspaper 
of the College. 



COBURN LIBRARY. 



Each year the old students find that 
there has been a change in the loca- 
tion of the books in the library. This 
is made necessary by the growth of 
the library an*d the desire to keep on 
the most convenient shelves the books 
most used. The bound magazines 
and general reference books increase 
very rapidly, and it is largely on this 
account that the books of Education. 
Philosophy, Psychology, Ethics and 
Logic have been put upstairs on the 
west side, and the books in general 
Science in the basement. Notices 
have been posted to this effect, and 
those in charge of the library will be 
glad to help anyone who is in doubt 
about the location o f a book. 

The books rn History have been en- 
tirely recatalogued this summer and 
the cards removed from the old case. 
This will mean the use of the new cat- 
alogue entirely for books of History. 
The classification used is known as 
the "Dewey classification," and to lo- 
cate a book it is only necessary to 
copy exactly the notation in the up- 
per left hand corner of the catalogue 
card. The work of recataloguing 
other subjects will progress slowly, 
and will mean the use of two cata- 
logues for some time to come. In 
the end, however, it is believed the 



reference work will be greatly aided 
by the use of a well made catalogue. 
The library should be of the utmost 
use to every college student. New 
students should make themselves fa- 
miliar immediately with the use of 
the catalogue, Poole's Index, with 
the the bound magazines and the lo- 
cation and use of reference books for 
special courses. The librarian and his 
assistants are glad to answer any 
number of questions, and to give all 
possible help to each student. Do 
not be afraid to ask for what you 
want. Do not go away from the li- 
brary without finding what you want, 
if it is to be had. If you are inter- 
ested in any special subject, find out 
what the library has along that line, 
and use some of your spare time read- 
ing for pleasure. You will never have 
more time, or a better opportunity 
to read than while you are in college, 
and it is for this reason that general 
reading lists are posted on the bulle- 
tin board from time to time. The li- 
brary is the place to read and study, 
not a place to loaf and talk, and it is 
hoped that this year, with the in- 
creased number of students, the order 
may be such that there will be no 
complaint on the part of students or 
faculty as to the possibility of doing 
unsatisfactory work in any part of 
the library. 



McCREERY AND RIGGS WIN 
HONORS. 



In the recent examinations for ad- 
mission to the bar Donald McCreery 
of Greeley carried off the honors of 
highest grade in a class of sixty-seven 
candidates. McCreery graduated from 
C. C. with the Class of 1908. He was 
one of the prominent men of his 
class, a leader in College activities, 
and a member of the Sigma Chi fra- 
ternity. After his graduation he took 
a law course at Harvard and came 
back to pass the examination for the 
Colorado bar which, by the way, is 
one of the hardest in the United 
States. Theodore D. Riggs, also of 
the Class of 1908, also passed the 
same examination, with exceptionally 
high marks. He was a member of 
the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity and 
was editor-in-chief of the Tiger dur- 
ing his senior year. After finishing 
at Colorado College he took a law 
course at Denver University. 



Root '13 spent several days in town 
this week on his way to Boston Tech. 



THE TIGER 



BLUE MUD FOR RIVALS 

Continued from Page 5 

ready knows will enable Rothgeb to 
make a greater success this year than 
he did when he was new last year. 
Rothy will deliver the goods. The 
team, the students and every one else 
know that. 

The first great game of the season 
— the clash with J. R. Richard's Wis- 
consin "Badgers" is barely five weeks 
o ffnow. Every man out is up on his 
toes with the determination to make 
the big trip. Manager Statton merely 
looked wise when asked how many 
extras would be taken on the trip, but 
finally came through with the infor- 
mation that there would be "plenty." 

The call for the Freshman squad 
has been issued for next Monday. 
The regular squad will be under way 
by that time and there will be plenty 
of time to give out suits to the 
youngsters. The cream of last year's 
high school teams is here to be whip- 
ped into the strongest kitten eleven 
which the Tigers have put out since 
the forming of the rule which bars 
freshmen from the regular team. The 
number of big burlies who have been 
noticed towering above the verdure is 
quite up to former occasions. 



RULES GOVERNING THE 

FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE 

SCRAP. 



LONG SEASON. 



The football season is a week 
longer this fall than last. This is due 
to the fact that Thanksgiving day 
comes on the last day of November. 
Since there are five available playing 
dates in November ,this allows a bet- 
ter arrangement of the big games, so 
that the team will not be forced into 
one hard game before they have re- 
cuperated fro mthe last. The sched- 
ule to date is: 

Colorado College vs. Wyoming, 
played here on Oct. 7. 

Colorado College vs. Colorado Ag- 
gies, played here on Oct. 14. 

Colorado College vs. Wisconsin, 
played in Wisconsin on Oct. 21. 

Colorado College vs. U. of C, 
played in Boulder on Nov. 4. 

Colorado College vs. Utah, played 
here on Oct. 11. 

Colorado College vs. Mines, played 
in Denver on Nov. 18. 

Colorado College vs. D. U., played 
in Denver on Thanksgiving Day. 

Besides these games there will 
surely be a practice game with the 
local high school, and maybe one or 
two other practice games. 



At a meeting of a committee of the 
student commission held at Palmer 
Hall Tuesday morning the following 
set of rules was drawn up for the 
regulation of the flag scrap which is 
to occur early tomorrow morning: 

1. A flag of sophomore colors shall 
be put up by the upperclassmen who 
shall use three carpet tacks to fasten 
it to the. pole. 

2. The sophomores shall defend 
the pole and the freshmen shall make 
the rush. 

3. The contest shall take place at 
the flag pole east of Cutler. 

4. The highest part of the flag 
shall not be more than twenty (20) 
feet above the ground and the lowest 
part of the flag shall no tbe more 
than fifteen (15) feet above the 
ground. 

5. There shall be no one or noth- 
ing on the pole to intercept a scaler 
other than the opposing class which 
shall be stationed on the ground be- 
low. 

6. No climbers or spikes shall be 
used. 

7. The freshmen shall make the 
rush at 6:45 a. m., Friday, September 
15, 191 1, and the contest shall con- 
tinue for fifteen (15) minutes only. 

If the flag is on the pole at the 
end of fifteen (15) minutes, the soph- 
omores shall be declared victorious; 
and if the flag is on the ground at the 
end of fifteen (15) minutes, the de- 
cision shall be awarded to the class 
which shall have the greater number 
of hands on the flag or the pieces 
thereof. The victory shall count one 
point in the contest for class suprem- 
acy. 
(Signed) Committee: 

H. G. SINTON. 

H. L. BLACK. 

G. B. SELDOMRIDGE. 

G. A. BOWERS. 

H. W. RHONTE. 

H. A. PARKISON. 



Y. M. C. A. STAG RECEPTION. 



Big Things To Happen Saturday 
Evening at the Gym. 



gether and start acquaintance pro- 
ceedings. And this is the first time 
of the -year that the freshmen and 
sophomores have the opportunity to 
get together in a friendly rivalry 
which is permitted to continue until 
Lincoln's birthday. This is the first 
display of good fellowship and demo- 
cratic spirit for which Colorado Col- 
lege is so notorious. 

The object of the reception is to 
promote an all-stag good time, and 
with this in view the Ways and. 
Means Committee of the Y. M. C. A. 
has devised the following program 
which is only a type of programs for 
similar occasions for the last 'steen 
years: 

Welcome Hedblom 

Speeches: 

President Slocum. 

Coach Rothgeb. 

Captain Sinton. 

Dr. Cajori. 

Secretary Ware. 
Boxing Exhibition. 
Speeches: 

Editor Black. 

Editor Ormes. 

Captain Vandemoer. 

Comic Artist Shaw. 

Captain Seldomridge. 

Dr. Blackinan. 

(No speaker allowed to talk more 
than two minutes on pain of being 
listened to.) 
Freshman-Sophomore Contests. 

Woodsawing Contest. 

Wrestling Match. 

Dressing Contest. 

Eating Contest. 

Hog Tieing Contest. 
Refreshments. 
Serenade. 



NEW HANDBOOK. 



As regularly as comes the opening 
days of a College term co.mes the Y. 
M. C. A. stag reception at the gym. 
This is the first time of the year for 
the old men and new men to Ret to- 



The new "Freshman Bible" which 
is being distributed by the Y. M. and 
Y. W. C. A. are the neatest thing in 
the line of handbook the College has 
ever seen. Aside from being a mem- 
orandum book it sets forth briefly a 
great amount of information that will 
prove invaluable to the new student. 
Miss Constant and Mr. Hedblom are 
to be congratulated upon the concise, 
business-like style with which they 
have gotten up the booklet. Every 
bit of material in the book is worth 
the space it occupies and everything 
that would have been superfluous has 
been eliminated, even to the extent 
of omitting advertisements. 



THE TIGER 



Fall Styles for College Men 

The Varsity and Shapemake suits, which we are show- 
ing, are made especially for young men. Smart, snappy 
models in patterns which are exclusive. $15 to $50. 

GAro-roms^ir 

Tejon at Kiowa 




SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 



PROPERTY TO BE SOLD 



FOREST AND COTTAGES AT 

MANITOU PARK TO BE 

KEPT. 



The trustees of the College have 
voted to sell the ranch and hotel 
property at Manitou Park and retain 
only those parts adapted for school 
purposes, the forest and the cottages. 

In the past the hotel has been 
leased and the ranch ran by the Col- 
lege authorities. This has proven un- 
satisfactory, consequently it has been 
decided to sell and devote the pro- 
ceeds to forming an endowment fund 
for the forestry school. 

The action was taken on the recom- 
mendation of President Slocum, who 
thought that it would be for the best 
interest of the College and at the 
same time carry out the original in- 
tention of the donors, Gen. William 
J. Palmer and Dr. William A. Bell, 
who gave the tract in the interest of 
forestry. 

The ranch lands lie along the bed 
of a small stream and are better in 
every respect than other ranches in 
that locality. They have not yielded 
satisfactory returns, however, to the 
College, as it is unreasonable to ex- 
pect a member of the faculty to make 
a good ranchman, especially when he 
must devote most of his time to 
teaching and merely make flying trips 
to the ranch. In the hands of a prac- 
tical owner they would yield good 
dividends. 

The hotel in the past has been fa- 
mous but of late years the number of 
visitors has fallen off. This is due to 
the fact that the property has been 



leased by the year and a temporary 
lessees could not be expected to spend 
the money for advertising and im- 
provements necessary in thesee days 
of numerous summer resorts. The 
location is excellent, with fine views, 
fishing and interesting rides and 
drives, and under a permanent owner 
the resort should return to its old 
popularity. 

The tract has been used as a prac- 
tical laboratory for the forestry 
school and the summer school of sur- 
veying. When the bottom lands bet- 
ter adopted to farming have been 
eliminated the school will have 
acres of good yellow Pine and Doug- 
las Fir land on which logging and 
milling are now being carried on. 
This will give the students an excel- 
lent place to study practical condi- 
tions, and at the same time its use- 
fulness for surveying will not be im- 
paired. 



FORESTRY STUDENTS DO CITY 
WORK. 



Three members of the forestry 
school, Tear, Miller and Taplin, who 
have had experience in city tree work 
in the East, have taken up this busi- 
ness in the Springs along with their 
College studies. 

The work consists of trimming, 
surgery, vitalizing, planting, and is 
much harder to do than the uninitiated 
think. This is what a city forester is 
constantly called upon to supervise 
and everyone who is looking for such 
a position should have had experience 
in the work. A practical knowledge 
of entomology, tree diseases, tree 
growth, etc., and of ways of preserv- 



ing a tree in the best of health and 
shape are essential. In the East 
where the city trees are older much 
more careful attention is given of 
surgery and its branches, plugging, 
bolting and staking. 

A hollow tree if properly filled with 
medicated cement, will in a few years 
cover the hole with a new growth of 
bark and the tree will be practically 
as strong as before. 

The cottonwood trees in front of 
Bemis Hall were plugged the first of 
this week and the work caused quite 
a bit of comment from the incoming 
students. Large limbs with a weak 
crotch, properly bolted, not chained, 
will be prevented from splitting. 
This is rather new in the West on 
account of the young trees. 

When a tree turns yellow or sends 
out merely a few small leaves most 
people, aside from giving it more 
water, let it slowly die and then re- 
place it by another tree. This is turn 
is likely to do poorly, especially when 
the tree taken out is a cottonwood. 
If a proper amount of tree fertilizer, 
or as it is called in trade "vitalizer," 
is put in the soil this trouble can be 
avoided and the tree will bear an 
abundance of healthy green leaves the 
following year. 

Taking down a large tree is an in- 
teresting bit of work, especially when 
sidewalks, ditch boxes and other trees 
must be protected from harm. If the 
work is not gone about properly it 
may mean considerable damage, if 
not injuring the workmen. 

Trimming itself, is not so easy to do 
well. Some operators "top" promis- 
cuously, cut so that the tree will rot 
or bleed, or else spoil the shape by 
careless cutting. A cut once made 




THE TIGER 9 

Square Deal Shoes 

For Young Men $3.SO and $4.00 

in heavy tan storm calf, Gunmetal Calf and Glazed Kangaroo and Patent Colt, 
all the new Fall styles now on display, high toes, short foreparts, also the flat 
N Y custom lasts. Come in and let us 
get acquainted. We'll be pleased to show 
you whether you are ready to buy or not. 



A FIT FOR EVERY FOOT 



PAYS TO Df^HL AT 
107 SOUTH TEJON STREET 




cannot be helped and much care 
should be used to prevent irreparable 
damage. 

The tree work on the College cam- 
pus is being done by this firm. All 
the trees West of Cascade Ave. have 
been cared for and the others will 
soon be put in good shape. A large 
number of trees have been trimmed 
in the past few weeks at some places 
a considerable number at a time. 



COOLIDGE WRITES FORESTRY 
"DOPE." 



During the summer two articles by 
P. T. Coolidge, Director of the For- 
est School, appeared in the principal 
forestry magazines of the country, the 
Forest Quarterly and American For- 
estry. 

The first article was on the "Silvi- 
cultural Treatment of Abandoned Pas- 
tures in New England" and was based 
on field work done by the author in 
Connecticut several years ago. It dis- 
cussed the advisability of clearing 
away undesirable species of trees 
from overgrown pastures and plant- 
ing more valuable and rapidly grow- 
ing varieties, such as White Pine, 
Norway Spruce or Chestnut. It told 
of the various methods of clearing 
away brush and gives cost per acre 
for the various kinds of forest 
"weeds." The author found that ex- 
cept in cases where there was very 
poor soil, rocky or swampy land, etc., 
clearing and planting gave a profit 
over the value of the timber left un- 
disturbed. 

The second was a "write-up" of the 
Colorado School of Forestry. The 



article was illustrated by pictures of 
Manitou Park and described the ad- 
vantages of the school in much the 
same way as stated in the catalog. 
This was a fine boost for the C. C. 
school as the magazine is of national 
circulation. 



LARGER CLASS IN FORESTRY 
SCHOOL. 



The outlook for the forestry school 
this year is extremely bright. Twice 
the number of older men are coming 
back this "year than did last fall and 
according to all indications the fresh- 
man class will exceed the number 
that came in last year. 

It is very hard to say at this time 
the exact number that will come to 
the forestry school since registration 
is incomplete. However, by letters, 
etc., the director feels sure that there 
will be somewhere between forty-five 
and fifty pupils against 30-35 here at 
the opening of school last year. The 
Forestry School is growing extremely 
rapidly, enlarging twice as fast as the 
rest of the College. Another notable 
fact is that about one-third of the 
students register from east of the 
Mississippi river, showing the 
national prestige of the school. 



STUDENTS WORK FOR GOV- 
ERNMENT. 



During the summer, several mem- 
bers of the forestry school gained 
practical experience in work on the 
ntaional forests. During the school 
year, numerous opportunities have 



been opened to the men to gain an 
insight into government work by fire 
fighting, planting, experiment station 
work, etc., but only by an extended 
vacation job on a national forest can 
the best knowledge be obtained. 

On Alt. Manitou, at the Freemont 
experiment station, Gardiner was con- 
ducting meteorological and silvicul- 
tnral observations. In addition to the 
experiments already started and men- 
tioned in previous Tigers, this sum- 
mer exhaustive tests were made on 
the proper depth for planting tree 
seeds. The deeper a seed is planted, 
the more moisture it gets, while on 
the other hand if planted too far 
down, the sprout is not vigorous. The 
proper medium was sought and tests 
were made with all the common na- 
tive species, the western yellow pine, 
Engleman spruce, and Douglas fir. 

"Tommy" Thompson was doing 
ranger work, first at Cheeseman dam 
and afterwards at the Phantom 
ranger station at West Creek, in 
Pike's national forest. He did fire 
patroling, and other work of a ranger, 
and besides collected a number of 
specimens. He had entire control of 
his district for a short time while the 
older men were away. 

Colwell was a forest student on the 
Medicine Bow national forest in 
southern Wyoming and helped make 
growth studies of Lodgepole pine. 

Donovan did surveying, estimating, 
silvicultural experiments and planting 
on the Routt national forest at 
Steamboat Springs. 

Besides these a number took up 
work along the line of surveying. 



Telephone 599 



CUT FLOWERS 



Store 1 04 N. Tejon Street 

The Pike's Peak Floral Co. 

DECORATIONS AND DESIGNS 



THE. TIGER 



FALL CLOTHES 

IN AUTHORITATIVE STYLES 

FOR MEN AND YOUNG MEN 

IF you desired to be well dressed, it is only necessary to call on us, and make an inspection 
in order to realize the value and style of these Fall clothes. And the fact that you need 
pay no more than for clothes having less merit, should appeal to you. Suits and overcoats 
$15.00 and upwards. 

WHEN your ready for a new Fall hat, better see what we have for you. We have the 
finest stock hereabouts. —.-p ______ 

HABERDASHERY of every description, cravats, shirts, gloves, HF HI R 

underwear, all of the highest quality and prices reasonable. *■ lll-i Alv/I-J 



SUMMER WORK AT MANITOU 
PARK. 

During June and July the forestry 
students were gaining field experience 
in surveying, silviculture and mensur- 
ation at Alanitou Park. 

The two courses in surveying were 
taken with the engineering students 
but in July the forestry students held 
the field to themselves. The work 
in silviculture consisted in the prep- 
aration of reports and in making im- 
provement thinnings and cutting 
markings. In mensuration the class 
learned to estimate the stand of tim- 
ber on a tract, to understand log 
rules and cord-wood measures, and 
the use of a stem analysis to find 
the volume and growth of trees and 
forests. 

Not all, however, was hard work. 
Camp Colorado has excellent facilities 
for recreation and after the studies 
were over the baseball games, fishing, 
riding, etc., kept the students in ex- 
cellent humor despite the work re- 
quired during the hot months. Good 
"feed" and comfortable tents also 
added to the enjoyment. 

The tract at Manitou Park is. ideal 
for this work. A plentiful supply of 
timber, an open valley and a good 
sized stream make it an excellent site 
for both surveying and forestry work. 
Camp Colorado was built with the 
needs of students especially in mind 
and a finer group of buildings for 
such use cannot be found. 



Somers and Monroe climbed the 
Peak Saturday night. 

Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co. 



A RANGER COURSE. 



This winter, a ranger course is to 
be given by Colorado College. The 
forestry service will supply a large 
part of the lectures, and the balance 
will be given by the faculty of the lib- 
eral arts and forestry departments of 
the college. The work is especially 
designed for men already at work in 
the forests and it was with this end 
in view that the months of December 
to February inclusive were chosen. 
At that time work is slack in the 
woods. 

Particulars of the course have not 
been definitely decided upon, but 
about three weeks of lecture work 
will be given in the Springs, with five 
to seven weeks of field work, proba- 
bly at Manitou Park. 

The lectures will be upon practical 
forestry, the elements of silviculture 
and forest mensuration, first aid to 
the injured, and two short courses in 
geology and botany. 

The field work will be in surveying, 
mapping, timber estimation, the prep- 
aration of silvicultural reports and the 
examination of timber tracts. 

Since the practice of letting men 
attend these ranger courses on pay 
has been declared illegal, probably 
the number registering will be con- 
siderably smaller than the College 
had in 1910, when the school had sixty 
members. However, th einstruction is 
thoroughly practical and it is ex- 
pected that many men looking for ad- 
vancement will avail themselves of 
this opportunity. 



THE HARVARD FOREST. 



While on their vacation in the east, 
Professors Coolidge and Baker visited 
the Harvard forest at Petersham, 
Mass. This is in many respects sim- 
ilar to the Manitou Park Forest but 
is considerably smaller, and is divided 



RRF AD For morning delivery. It's 
bread hot from the oven, 
baked from the choicest flour, and that 
would command first premium anywhere. 
That you get from us. Is always good. 

THE CHICAGO BAKERY 

Have the fellows meet you at 

Tucker's 
Restaurant 

10 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 

The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co. 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 

You can always save money if 
you will come to see our line in 
diamonds, watches, jewelry, 
guns, sporting goods, fishing 
tackle, drawing sets, musical 
instruments, trunks, valisds, or 
if you want to loan money, you 
can get it 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 

Money Loaned on Valuables 



THE TIGER 



II 



The College Book and Supply Store 

In addition to furnishing the Text Books and Engineering 
Supplies for the College students, we carry a very large 
stock of Fountain Pens, Waterman's Ideal, Conklin Self- 
fillers and College. See Our PENNANTS ane POSTERS 

Whitney & Grimwood 



Get Your Picnic Supplies 

= at : — ~ 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

The College 
Photo Studio 



Tll&SU 





Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 

CORRIN BROS. 

Suits Made To Order 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing, 

and Remodeling for Ladies 

and Gentlemen 

Work Called for and Delivered 

Phone 1922 M 107 E. Bijou Street 

Nothing Pleases Us More Than 
To Please College Students 

The Fred S. Tucker 

Furniture Co. 



into three separate tracts which com- 
plicates management. The work done 
there by Harvard College is very 
much the same as is done here on our 
own college tract, but other condi- 
tions are of course present. The two 
men had an excellent opportunity to 
compare eastern and Western condi- 
tions, and at the same time seff some 
of the work done by the Harvard 
Forestry School. 



WORK OF THE STUDENT EM- 
PLOYMENT BUREAU. 

The Student Employment Bureau 
of Colorado College is conducted 
every year under the supervision of 
the College Y. M. C. A. The work 
this year was placed in charge of H. 
A. Parkison and his success so far 
has already proven him the right man 
for the job. He and his cohorts have 
been busy for over a month, and the 
result is that almost every possible 
board job, room job, or odd job in 
the north part of the city and the 
business district has been listed with 
the bureau and a student assigned 
to it. Owing to the fact that the 
bureau has been established for sev- 
eral years and its success has always 
proven noteworthy, the task of se- 
curing work for students this year 
has not been so difficult as it has been 
in the past; but nevertheless, the fact 
that the work was easier did not 
cause the men in charge to relax their 
efforts ,and consequently the amount 
of work secured for students this 
year has been larger than it ever was 
before. 

The Employment Bureau, like 
many other things in this College, 
was originally started as an experi- 
ment, but the eminent success which 
attended the efforts of the originators 
of the movement has caused it to be- 
come, like manj- other things, a fix- 
ture in the College, and it is likely to 
endure as long as the College itself. 



MOTOR CYCLES 

Yale Emblem 

BICYCLES and Supplies 

Expert Repairing 

Colorado Springs Cycle 

Company 

DeWitt Doyle, Manager 
224 N. Tejon St. Phone Red 34 



Knight - Campbell's 

F0R PIANOS 

and PLAYER PIANOS 

STEINWAY and 20 OTHER MAKES 

We Rent Pianos 

Largest Stock Victor Talking Machines 
and Edison Phonographs 

226 N. Tejon St., after Sept. 15, 122 N. Tej.n 

The Gowdy-Sirmons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS 

Copper Plate and Steel Engravers 
Telephone 87 21 N. Tejon Street 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing a Typewriter. 

Zimmerman Supply 

/~ H .~-~_ ~_ n »--, 22 £• Kiowa St. 

Company Phone Main 374 

Established 1890 

You can save from 25 
percent to 40 percent 
on our finest Hart, 
Schaf f ner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer & 
Clothcraf t Suits and 
Overcoats 



THE TIGER 



Be Your Own Agent 

The management of the STAR LAUNDRY have 
decided to have no general agent at the College and to 
give agent's discount direct to the student sending in 
the bundle. 

Our drivers will sell you a $5.00 Coupon Book for $3.50, a dis- 
count of 30%, or you can pay in cash on the delivery of the bundle, 
taking out 30% for yourself. No bundles will be left without money 
or coupons. 

Coupons Books at this discount will be sold only to students and 
are not transferable and the coupon will not be received from other 
than students. 



Phone Main 715 328 N. Tejon Street 

THE ACACIA 

DYERS AND CLEANERS 

HERBERT BENNETT, Agent 

Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton Dairy 



419 S. El Paso St. 



Phone Main 442 



GET IT AT 

THE EMPORIUM 

AND SAVE MONEY 

1 10 S. TEJON STREET 

^THEMUELLER 

TEACHERS' AGENCY 

Conducted for Efficiency only. Services 
free to School Bnards. No enrollment fee 
for teachers. Call or write 

ANNA HI MUELLER, 450 West Uttta Street, 
Phene Main 2188 Colorado Springs, Co!o 



Deichmann & Douglas Floral 
Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER, Mar. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 

Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 



-Mian B. Crowe '13 is going to 
Columbia to finish his college course. 



Charley Friend '13 will enter Den- 
ver University this year to take up 
law . 

Willard Warnock '12 will not re- 
turn to school this year. 

Delta Phi Theta gave an enjoyable 
smoker to a number of the new stu- 
dents Tuesday night. 

Miss Etta Clark '12 has* just re- 
turned from a visit to her aunt, Mrs. 
J. B. Hall of Denver. 

Munroe '15 and Harter '15 are new 
Delta Phi Theta pledges. 



. Jacobs '14 will not be able to re- 
turn to College this fall. 

LOST — A Kappa Sigma frater- 
nity pin. Return to Oliver Hall '14. 

Wakefield '15 is an Alpha Tan Delta 
pledge. 



Walter Barnes '12 made an inter- 
esting tour of the west during the 
summer.- Among the places of inter- 
est which he visited were Yellow- 
stone Park, the cities of the north- 
west, various parts of California, in- 
cluding the Yosemite Valley, and the 
Grand Cano nof the Colorado. 

Webb '15 is pledged to Sigma Chi. 

Louis A. Dcesz, who was formerly 
a member of the class of 191 1, has re- 
turned to College to complete his 



FRESHMEN 

We Wish to Introduce 
to You 

The College Inn 

Opposite the Campus 



THE 

FIRST 

SUPPER 



AT 



McREA'S 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co. 
Groceries and 



Meats 



-«£•» 







115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Gazette Building 



THE TIGER 



15 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

"The College Favorite ' 



The Favorite Shopping 

Place for College 

People 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 



IO6V2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



W.L LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



91 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



For the "BEST IN THINGS MUSICAL" 
GO TO 

Hiltbrand's Music Store 

Phone 13 125 1 , N. Tejon St. 

Exclusive College Posters 

Unique Place and Tally Cards 

RICHARD WILLIS 

4'.. East Pike's Peak Avenue 



New Fall Shirts 

in Plain and 

Plaited 

$1.00 to $2.50 



Smart New 
Models We're 



CAPS 

The Very 

Newest 

50c to $2.50 



showing for the College Man this season are not shown 
elsewhere. A wonderful variety of handsome new weaves 
and color combinations. We cordially invite all College 
Men to inspect our new suits and overcoats. $15 to $30. 

"Specialists in College Men's Attire" 



Money 
Cheerfully 
Refunded 




Correct Dress for Men. \ 



113 East 

Pike's Peak 

Avenue 



course in electrical engineering. Dur- 
ing the two years Deesz has been 
out of school he has been employed 
by the Colorado Light and Power 
Co. in the capacity of city foreman 
of the light plant at Cripple Creek. 



The marriage of Miss Irene Waters 
to Mr. Charles E. Holden took place 
last June. Both are well known to 
College people. They are now at 
home to their friends at 117 East 
Washington Ave. 

Did you notice the improvements 
at Murray's? A big new soda foun- 
tain has been installed and the out- 
side of the place decorated with new 
electric lighted signs. 

Herb Sinton returned Saturday 
night from a tour of the northern 
part o f the state in the interests of 
the College. 



Earl Hille and Bob Hamilton at- 
tended the Sigma Chi conclave which 
was held at Pittsburg, June 26 to July 
1. 

The Delta Phi Theta has a new 
pledge button to take the place of 
the ribbon. The design is a sterling- 
silver comet with a yellow head and 
a purple tail. 



Get Acquainted at 

The 
Red Cross Pharmacy 

W LL AIMS 8 KLUSS 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 

107 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone 40 

Dern's Freshly Roasted Coffee 

will make 10 more cups to the lb. 
than Eastern roasted coffee 



29 S. Tejon Street 



Phone 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Bldg. 
118 North Tejon St. Phone Main 1701 

Res, 1211 N. Weber St. Tel. Main 956 




TOD POWELL 



Phone Main 930 



W. E. DONER 



POWELL-DONER SPORTING GOODS CO. 

1 1 2 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

"EVERYTHING FOR SPORTSMEN" 

New and Complete Stock of the Very Best of Athletic Supplies, College Pennants, Novelties, Etc. 

"ASK THE MEDICINE MAN" 



T.T~; 



16 






C.\stud 
rooters 




Id a 



r.irv 



i>py|i new young men's models that 
^po have^you try on. They come in 
lxtures, iifew tones of blue and gray 
latest idea,^ing's color, a shade of 



V| | « | | ' -. | purp. 
How about that new Fall Suit? Here are " The latest hats, shoes and shirts 

(?&4vm$$iecu>er(s 



HAUGEN, Tailor 



222 N. Tejon. 



Phone Main 296 



* 



COLORADO COLLEGE 

Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 



\ 



V 





WM. F. SLOCUM, President 




ll 


Departments — 






College of Arts anil 
Science, 
E. S. PARSONS, Dean 


II 1 


l^^i&M&iflL 


School of Engineering, 
F. CAJORI, Dean 




IMKFvti \ 1 


School of Forestry, 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 

School of Music, 

E. D. HALE, Dean 




ars, Tobacco, Pipes, Etc. 

Pool in connection but not a pool swim 
COME AND SEE 

HUGHES 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



Vol. XIV 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., SEPTEMBER 21, 1911 



Number 2 



Y. M. C. A STAG INTELLECTUAL SOPHS WIN 

RECEPTION RESOURCES THE FLAG RUSH 



SMOKELESS SMOKER FULLY 
UP TO USUAL STANDARD. 

The annual stag reception given by the 
Y. M. C. A. last Saturday evening was a 
big success. From Hedblom's opening 
talk to "Good Night, Ladies" everything 
went off with a snap and vim, which 
promises well for the work of the As- 
sociation this year. The reception was 
held this year in the basement of Hager- 
man and the program arranged by the 
committee was an interesting one. 

President Slocum opened the program 
with a short talk on the ideal man and 

Coninned on Page 7 



The President's Address at the For- 
mal Opening of Chapel on Monday. 



HOSTILITIES BEGIN EARLY 
THE NIGHT BEFORE. 



Spiritual wealth is the best that can 
come to anyone. The possession of a 
great truth is of more value than any 
material thing can be, if we only 
realized its worth. The cure for 
small-mindedness is a noble idea that 
commands us. 

No place ought to be more produc- 
tive of intellectual wealth than col- 
lege, and yet we have been told of 
■late that colleges produce much nar- 
rowness, -small talk, petty gossip, and 

Continued on Page 4 



The air was rife with conspiracies on 
the afternoon and evening of Thursday, 
September 14. There was a hushed still- 
ness among the underclasses, while the 
sophs wandered about with a malignant 
smile upon their faces, the freshmen 
wore a hopeful, long-suffffering counte- 
nance. 

While darkness was falling upon our 
little city, lurking roms could be seen 
stealthily leaving th campus and follow- 
ing the back alleys towards town. The 



Continued on Page 4 



TIGER CHAMPIONSHIP SQUAD 




THE TIGER 



Y. M. C. A. 



.{.•{.•{.************* 

•£. * 

* MEN'S MEETING IN PER- * 

* KINS THIS EVENING. * 
4. * 

* President Slocum wishes to * 

* address all the men of the Col- * 

* lege at a meeting which is to * 

* be held in Perkins Hall this * 

* evening (Thursday). The * 

* meeting is called in the inter- * 

* est o fthe Young Men's Chris- * 

* tian Association, and it is * 

* hoped that no young man will * 

* fail to be there. * 
4. * 
***** ************ 



The first sermon in the new Col- 
lege service will be preached by Pres- 
ident Slocum upon "The Imperatives 
of a Noble Life." The text will be, 
"I must be about my Father's busi- 
ness." 



FIRST WORKOUT— TONIGHT. 



During this season when athletics 
hold the boards, everyone thinks in 
signals and formations. He sees holes 
in the enemy's line in his sleep, and 
awakes in the midst of a long end 
run. One's whole mind is occupied 
with thoughts of "the game," one 
spends much time and strength in 
speculates on the outcome of the 
season. Of all the points in the game 
which are brought out, however, none 
is most emphasized than team-work. 
Indeed, the effectiveness of most of 
the individual plays depends upon the 
perfection with which the whole team 
work together. Team-work is funda- 
mental to the success of the eleven. 

This condition is not peculiar to 
football alone. The strength of any 
organization, be it an athletic team, 
a college class, a fraternity or liter- 
ary society, or the Young Men's 
Christian Association, depends upon 
the way in which its members "hang" 
together. No undertaking can be 
successfully carried out which is not 
able to command and maintain the 
support and co-operation of those 
who make up its members. 

The Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation presents a tremendous chal- 
lenge for team-work. Its activities 
will succeed only as the men of the 
College of which the Association is 



a vital part, stand back of them to a 
man. The Christian Association was 
established by the men of "C. C." It 
is their organization. Every man in 
College should play his position on 
the team all the time, and make this 
great game of comradeship and 
service a big thing. 

The first call for recruits has been 
issued by the head coach, President 
Slocum, for Thursday evening at 
eight o'clock in the "training quar- 
ters" in upper Perkins Hall. A rous- 
ing meeting with genuine "pep" is 
assured. Every man in "C. C" is 
called upon to show his loyalty to 
the game by being on the dot at this 
first meeting of the Young Men's 
Christian Association. 

The second "work-out" will occur 
on Sunday afternoon in Chapel. This 
should be well attended. 

The schedule is heavy this year, 
but with team-work and co-operation 
on the part of every player, the pros- 
pects are bright for a championship 
record. 

FREDERICK W. WARE. 



It is a good way to show loyalty 
by a cordial support of the new Col- 
lege service and also appreciation of 
the confidence placed in the students 
by not making it required. 

LARGE ATTENDANCE AT THE 
JOINT RECEPTION. 

Practically the entire student body and 
faculty was present Friday night at the 
joint Y. W. and Y. M. C. A. reception. 
It seemed good to see the old Bemis 
Common Room lighted up again for an- 
other year's program of brilliant social 
gatherings. In the receiving line stood 
Mr. Hedblom, Miss Constant, President 
and Mrs. Slocum, Dean Parsons, Mrs. 
Parsons, Miss Loomis and Secretary 
Ware. These made everyone welcome 
and then everybody proceeded to intro- 
duce himself to everybody else. Even 
the most bashful freshmen could keep 
up a conversation 011 that eventful flag 
rush. The upperclass bachelors drifted 
about sizing up the freshmen girls. The 
concensus of opinion is that this year's 
entering class runs much above the aver- 
age in feminine grace and beauty. 

At schedule time the crowd was 
herded into the dining hall to receive 
their allotment of cakes and ice cream. 
According to precedent the sophomore 
boys served and were generous in their 
allowances of three-layer ice cream and 
dainty cakes. Soon the well trained 
x\ piano started on that mournful ditty, 



"Good Night, Ladies" and the crowd be- 
gan to break away. Good-byes were said 
and as we straggled acros the campus 
we felt we were finally in the harness. 
And it felt good to feel that way. 



Y. W. C. A. RECEPTION. 



The Y. W. C. A. reception for the 
new girls was held Thursday after- 
noon in Bemis common room. The 
usual custom is to hold it in the 
Jungle, but owing to the weather, 
it was impossible. The occasion af- 
forded an excellent opportunity for 
the new and old girls to become 
acquainted. The tags which the girls 
wore with the names and class on 
them were a great help in becoming 
acquainted and also in helping the 
freshmen to distinguish between 
classes. 

Mrs. Cajori and Airs. Yarker served 
the punch, assisted by some of the 
sophomore girls. 

It will be a very attractive feature 
of Sunday on the Campus to see the 
Faculty and their families, the stu- 
dents, and the employees of the Col- 
lege and their families, and parents 
of the students, and friends of the 
College, gathered together every Sun- 
day afternoon at a regular Vesper 
service. 



LECTURES ON MODERN 
FRENCH DRAMA. 



The students of the College are singu- 
larly fortunate this year in the opportu- 
nities afforded them to hear noted read- 
ers and interpretations of modern drama. 
Madam Augusta Hellein, a dramatic 
artist and reader who has had ten years' 
experience on the French stage, is giv- 
ing a series of dramatic readings in 
Bemis Hall. The first of the series was 
given last Saturday and two more will 
be given on the remaining Saturdays in 
September. The series comprise Maeter- 
linck's "Ariane" and "Barbe Bleue," 
Richepin's "La Belle au Bois Dormant" 
and Coppee's "Le Pessant." Beside the 
readings, interpretations and criticisms 
are given. A special rate has been of- 
fered to College students and teachers 
and no student of French in college can 
afford to miss such a rare opportunity. 



Dana Reynolds '14 arrived Sundaj' 
to start College work. He was de- 
tained at his home at Canon City by 
business connected with the Fremont 
County Fair, which closed last week. 



THE TIGER 



ENGINEERS AT SUMMER 
SCHOOL. 



By far the most successful summer 
school ever held at Manitou Park 
was that completed last July. Mr. 
Martin and his assistant gave thirty 
men a good start in the use of en- 
gineering instruments. The five jun- 
ior civils carried on some of the more 
difficult portions of surveying, includ- 
ing railroad and topographic survey- 
ing, mineral land surveying and tri- 
augulation. They surveyed the road- 
way for the "Trout Creek Short 
Line," and three mining claims for 
patent. 

The freshmen learned the elemen- 
tary work in good shape. This work 
included field traverses, running lines 
around obstacles, etc. They also ran 
a line of levels from Woodland Park 
to Manitou Park to determine the 
exact elevation of Camp Colorado. 

As guests of the Denver Union 
Water Co., an inspection trip to 
Cheesman dam was made. On the 
return trip to camp, some work in 
gauging streams was done by the 
juniors. 



CHIEF GEOLOGIST OF THE U. 
S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY IS 
GUEST OF PROF. FINLAY. 



ENGINEERS* CLUB. 



The Engineers' Club invites every 
engineer in the College to attend its 
open house on Friday, September 22, 
at 7:45 in the Polytechnic library. 
Dean Cajori, President Scott and 
others will give talks, and with lots 
of good things to eat a very enjoy- 
able evening is assured. 

The freshmen engineers are espec- 
ially requested to be present. 

The Club was organized expressly 
to fill a gap. It gives the engineer 
the literary training, combined with 
some technical work that can not be 
obtained except in the Club. 

This, year many of the most prom- 
inent men in the circles of engineer- 
ing will be brought to lecture before 
the Engineers' Club. One or two 
men will be brought to give a lecture 
before the College, such as Mr. An- 
derson, who was here last June. 



JUNIOR OFFICERS. 

At a meeting of the junior class 
Wednesday noon, the following offi- 
cers were elected for the new year: 
President — Marion Haynes. 
Vice-President— W. B. Winchell. 
Secretary — Florence Pierson. 
Treasurer — Dwight Sisco. 
Historian — Mary Walsh. 



For several years Prof. Finlay has 
been engaged in the preparation of 
material for a geologic folio of an 
area of one thousand square miles in 
the Pike's Peak region. Folio publi- 
cation is one of the most important 
phases of the Geological Survey's 
work. In a folio must be given the 
exact report of the geologic condi- 
tions existing. The Pike's Peak Folio 
is one of the most important of the 
entire series because of the excep- 
tional geological conditions here and 
because this region is so well known 
as a tourist and pleasure resort. Prof. 
Finlay has been in the field almost 
every day this summer and his work 
is now ready for publication. 

Mr. Arthur Kieth, chief geologist of 
the Survey and who has direct charge 
of the publication of the government 
folios, has been the guest of Prof. 
Finlay for the past three days. He 
is now on an inspection tour of the 
West, has gone over the field with 
Prof. Finlay, and is well pleased with 
the work just completed. Mr. Keith 
has a remarkably keen mind and oc- 
cupies a high position in the geologi- 
cal world. 



THE LITERARY SOCIETIES. 



The men's literary societies of the 
College begin their year's work dur- 
ing the next two weeks. Pearson's 
Society, the Ciceronian Club, and the 
Engineers' Club hold their first meet- 
ings on Friday, September 22, and the 
Apollonian Club one week later. The 
programs given on these occasions 
will be bright and interesting and all 
new men are cordially invited to be 
present and obtain a knowledge of 
the work and aims of the societies. 
The literary clubs have a definite 
place in the intellectual life of the 
College and no man who wishes to 
get the most out of his College course 
can afford to overlook them. Every 
freshman should be present at at 
least one of these opening nights. Get 
acquainted with the societies and be- 
come a member of one of them. 



CHANGES IN COLLEGE OFFICE. 



who now becomes the chairman of 
the Finance Committee. 

Mr. Donald Tucker, who has been 
secretary of the College, left Tuesday 
for Williams College, where he will 
take up advanced work in the de- 
partment of Economics. Mr. Earl 
Stanley Alden, formerly with the 
English department, will assume 
Tucker's matronly position at Hager- 
man Hall and some of the other 
duties in the College office. 



ANOTHER EXCELLENT LEC- 
TURER SECURED. 



Mr. W. W. Postlethwaite, formerly 
secretary to General Palmer, has 
made the College treasurer. He, takes 
the place of Mr. Irving Howbert, 



The negotiations which have been go- 
ing on between the English department 
and Alfred Tennyson Dickens have end- 
ed in inducing Mr. Dickens to come to 
Colorado Colege to deliver his lecture, 
on Thursday, December 7, 1911. This is 
considered one of the best lectures that 
will be given in the United States during 
the coming winter, and the students of 
the College are very fortunate to have the 
opportunity to hear it. 

Mr. Dickens is to make his first tour 
of the United States this winter, with his 
lecture on the subject of "My Father and 
His Works." Mr. Dickens has his fath- 
er's sense of humor, and besides being 
instructive, his lecture is bound to be one 
of the most interesting ever given in Col- 
orado Springs. 

The price of admission for students 
will be placed at the ridiculously low fig- 
ure of fifty cents, PROVIDED that a 
sufficiently large number of names can 
be secured to insure covering the ex- 
penses of the lecture. A subscription 
list will be started soon, and if enough 
names cannot be secured, the price will 
necessarily be raised. 

It is still somewhat early to start talk- 
ing about these lectures, but it is not too 
early to get them before the student 
bod}'. Mention of the lectures will be 
made in The Tiger from time to time, 
and they will be talked up among the 
students, especially those of the various 
English classes. 

The heads of the English departments 
are certainly to be congratulated upon 
securing such noted speakers to come 
here as Mr. Dickens and Mr. Clark who 
ij to be here in February for a series of 
five or six lectures, as was announced 
in The Tiger last week. It is unfortu- 
nate that heretofore the interest among 
the students in good lectures has been 
so low, but with such an excellent pro- 
gram for the coming winter, it is hard 
to see how any student can fail to take 
advantage of the chance to hear them. 



THE TIGER 



INTELLECTUAL RESOURCES. 

Continued from Page 1 

inadequate views of life. Business, 
the large affairs of a mercantile 
career, it is said, make men of larger 
views than the life of a modern col- 
lege. 

Much depends upon the man him- 
self. There are small-minded people 
in business and there are small- 
minded people in college. There are 
college graduates who have very few 
intellectual resources and there are 
many who go out with what no man 
can take from them and which in- 
creases from year to year throughout 
a useful and rich life. 

It is possible to leave college 
without any great hold upon public 
questions, and with no sense of per- 
sonal responsibilities to a community, 
one's state or country. 

Much depends upon the purpose 
which brings you to college. Athlet- 
ics, the social life, fun and frolic, all 
offer much to your play-loving in- 
stinct; but none of these can satisfy 
the best that is in you. You are in 
college for hard, continuous, intellec- 
tual work. Everyone should seek the 
highest possible standards of scholar- 
ship for himself. To fail at that part 
is to wreck your college career. Per- 
sistent labor for the daily recitation 
is absolutely essential. In addition 
to this there must be the never-fail- 
ing purpose to get the most out of 
every college relationship. If you 
are after a little conception of life 
you will get it; but if you really in 
3'our heart of hearts want great and 
noble things for yourselves you will 
get them. 

Nothing is more pitiful than a life 
with no intellectual resources. There 
are men who toil all their lives for 
wealth, power, and social place, and 
when they have them, they discover 
that they have nothing in themselves 
that is of any value. Books, travel, 
public questions, opportunities for 
sorvice, mean nothing, because they 
have nothing in themselves to make 
them appreciate them. 



The people of the city will be cor- 
dially welcomed to the college ser- 
vices, and especially the parents and 
friends of the students. There is 
every reason why this service should 
be the centre of wholesome, uplifting 
influence in the life of Colorado 
Springs, and the College pulpit a 
place in which important utterances 
will be made. 



SOPHS WIN FLAG RUSH. 

Continued from Page 1 

freshmen conspirators assembled at the 
city Y. M. C. A., where they concealed 
themselves in a vacant room up next to 
the attic. Here in hushed voices they 
discussed their plans. They had been in- 
vited to a smoker at one of the fraternity 
houses but the timorous amongst them 
urged that they not attend for fear they 
should here be surprised by a sophomore 
ambush. Finally the fearful ones were 
quieted and they fortunately determined 
to accept the invitation. 

They decided fortunately, for while 
they were debating what they should do. 
the sophomore warriors had assembled 
in the alley behind the Acacia Hotel. 
And finding their foes so near at hand, 
had determined upon immediate exter- 
mination. One of their number had al- 
ready phoned the Y. M. C. A. office say- 
ing that he was President Slocum, ad- 
vocating the immediate ejection of the 
freshmen and assuring them that he 
could in no way be held responsible for 
any "d-d-damage done the b-b-building." 
But when they arrived at the Y. M C 
A. they found the freshmen had gone. 
And in courtesy to the fraternity they 
refrained from attack and promised to 
postpone hostilities until the freshmen 
had entirely left the neighborhood of the 
fraternity house. 

While the freshmen made merry, the 
sophomores were huddling together un- 
der the archway at the side of the Len- 
nox residence, for a heavy rain had now 
set in. At a few minutes before eleven 
the freshmen started back for the Y. M. 
C. A. To play absolutely safe and avoid 
the enemy they went north to San Mig- 
uel, thence east to Weber and thence 
south to — well, we'll tell you about that 
in the next paragraph. 

Forty-seven strong they marched down 
the middle of the street. They marched 
several blocks in silence and then there 
was dissension in the ranks. Part of 
them insisted on walking on the side- 
walks, the others called them babies, 
afraid to get their feet wet, and they re- 
torted that more cowardice was shown 
in taking the middle of the street like 
frightened women. The argument had 
become quite heated as they passed be- 
neath the street lamp at the Yampa cor- 
ner. Suddenly a maniacal yell burst 
through the rain. All of Yampa street 
swarmed with charging sophomores. 
The freshmen started to run, then thought 
better of it and waited, crouching in the 
rain for the onslaught of their assail- 
ants. In the distance to the south, the 
dim voice of the freshman president 
could be heard calling to the stars as he 



sped onward, "Hang together, freshmen ! 
Hang together, freshmen !" 

Th sophomores charged in pairs. The 
mud splashed high. It was the grandest 
wallow in the history of the institution. 
It was a true Waterloo. The yelling and 
splashing and squirming, now and then 
illuminated by the glare of a flashlight, 
lasted for about twenty minutes. Forty 
freshmen were tied and carried to the 
porch of the old Kappa Sigma house. 

A helpless policeman called for a pa- 
trol. So the sophs began transportation 
of the prisoners. Most of them were 
stowed in the basement of the Plaza 
when the patrol arrived. The freshmen 
were sports and told the police not to in- 
terfere, so they temporarily arrested one 
of the onlookers. 

At the Plaza it was found that three 
freshmen had escaped in transit. The 
sophomores then washed up the thirty- 
seven remaining freshies and made them 
ready for bed. They arranged some old 
mattresses, illuminated the boudoir with 
candles and red lanterns taken from the 
streets, retied each man carefully and 
waited for the morning. 

At four-thirty the auto-truck arrived 
which had been arranged for the day be- 
fore. Making three trips they carried 
the freshies to the grandstand at the 
Roswell race track. Here the shoes and 
stockings were removed and placed in 
the returning truck. Three more resh- 
men escaped here. About ten sophs re- 
mained to guard the remaining thirty- 
four, planning to hurry back on the auto 
in time to help on the finish of the fight.. 

While in the fight of the night before 
there were forty-seven freshmen to 
forty-one sophomores, in the morning 
the sides were changed. Now the sophs 
outnumbered the freshmen about two to 
one. The rush began promptly at 6:45. 
There was quite a congregation of 
townspeople assembled to see it. It was 
not very rough or exciting because of 
the uneven numbers. The lackadaisical 
smile of the two Jacksons as they indif- 
ferently hugged the pole was typical of 
the whole fight. There was good indi- 
vidual work on both sides. Perhaps the 
work of Sasano, the Japanese, who tried 
many times for the flag, was most con- 
spicuous. 

Five minutes remained when some ex- 
citement was promised by the arrival of 
the sophomore reserves, on their auto 
truck. But this only made the fight more 
uneven. 

As soon as the sophomores left the 
Roswell field, the freshmen untied each 
other and raced for a streetcar. They 
arrived at the pole only two minutes 

Continued from Page 7 



THE TIGER 




CHAMPIONSHIP TEAM TAKES 
ON SHAPE. 



When it comes to the matter of 
predictions, Coach Rothgeb refuses to 
talk. His principle, which he has ex- 
pressed on so many occasions, is to 
give the team the best he has, and for 
the team in return to give the best 
they have. He just wants every one 
to do his best and then there will be 
no fault finding. Rothgeb does not 
like to talk about what he is going 
to do with that husky bunch of 
youngsters who are trying out. 

He says, "Look 'em over. You 
ought to be able to get a line on them 
as well as I can," whenever anyone 
asks for an opinion. 

But all the time he is working hard 
to bring out the best there is in the 
bunch. He is giving them hard work, 
and at the same time he is pounding- 
enthusiasm and fight into them. 
Rothgeb's little heart-to-heart's out in 
the middle of the field do about as 
much as anything to teach the game 
and put fight into the team. 

Already during last week the team 
had scrimmage for two nights. Just 
the fundamental plays were used last 
week, but at the first of this week 
Rothgeb began on the more advanced 
tactics. Every night sees less fumb- 
ling and more team-work. 

All candidates were weighed last 
week. It looks as if the team would 



be about the same weight as last 
year's team. There will probably 
not be more than a pound difference, 
that is to say, it will be an average 
of about 160 pounds. 

The dummy has been fixed up on 
the field, and nightly is suffering from 
the onslaughts. The bucking ma- 
chine will probably be in use by the 
end of the week. 

The first game of the season will be 
a week from Saturday when the 
Tigers take the local high school 
team on a little romp. This will be 
followed by the Wyoming game and 
then the season will be on in earnest. 

Heald returned to the team Mon- 
day, but it is not likely that Vande- 
moer will be back before Saturday. 
This will complete the arrivals who 
have .been late. With these men in 
the line the team will begin to look 
more like the real thing. 



BOULDER CONFIDENT. 



Among the first news to reach us 
from the northern camps is that 
Boulder is expecting to put out 'the' 
winning team this year. They lose 
four men from their 1910 team, 
O'Brien, Carmichael, Andrus and Gil- 
ligan. Including the freshmen they 
have about seventy-five men out. AIc- 
Ladden, the fast track man and slash- 
ing halfback, captains the team this 
year. 



CLASS FOOTBALL 

FRESH-SOPH GAME SATURDAY. 

This Saturday, the freshmen are plan- 
ning to retrieve some of the honor which 
they lost in the flag-rush and at the stag 
reception, by taking the sophomores to 
a cleaning on the athletic field. The 
teams are about evenly matched. The 
freshmen will probably have a slightly 
heavier team, but the sophs will have the 
advantage of having played together for 
one year. 

The sophs have elected Herron to cap- 
tain the team. The peppery little cap- 
tain will play quarterback. They will 
have nearly the same line-up that they 
had last year. Geddes and Sloey to play 
halfbacks with Koch at full; Cary and 
Howland ends ; Winaris and Cameron 
tackles; Summers and Harter guards; 
and Ogilbee, center. Besides these, 
Lewis and Noyes have reported for prac- 
tice. Captain Herron wants all of the 
sophs who think that they can play foot- 
ball ;it all to report for this game Sat- 
urday morning, and he has promised to 
give every one a chance. 

Rothgeb has not decided whether to 
allow Koch and Herron to enter this 
game, inasmuch as they are trying out 
for the first team. He has in these two 
men a pair which he will use first among 
the reserves if they do not make the first 
team. 

Continued on Page 7 




THE TIGER 



The Weekly Newspaperof Colorado College 

HARRY L. BLACK Editor-in-Chief 

RICHARD L. HUGHES Business Mi£r. 

Lloyd Shaw Assistant Editor 

A. H. Rowbotham Assistant Editor 

J. J. Sinton Athletic Editor 

D. H. mahan Engineering Editor 

G. S. COWDERY Forestry Editor 

Miss Glenn Styles Alumni Editor 

Miss Mary Randolph Exchange Editor 

Miss Helen Rand Local Editor 

A. W. Donovan Local Editor 

H. A. Pabkison Assistant Manager 

A. L. Golden Assistant Manager 

W. L. Myers Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

F. P. Storke, H. A. Bennett, John L. Herron, G. W. 

Belsey, Miss Elizabeth Gerould, Miss Leona Stukey, 

Miss Myrth King, Miss Violet Hopper, Miss 

Frances Adams, R. G. Appel 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to THE Tiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phones: Editor, Main 2550. Manager, Main 2073 

Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



THE FIRST TIGER. 



The first issue of The Tiger for the 
year came out at chapel Friday morning, 
and as yet we have heard very little crit- 
icism as to whether it was good, bad or 
indifferent. The editorial mind is at a 
loss as to what cause to attribute this 
reticence on the part of the students. It 
may be that you haven't read The Tiger. 
There is no excuse whatever for that, 
because the first copy cost you absolutely 
nothing. It may be that you are afraid 
of hurting our feelings by giving us ad- 
verse criticism. If that is the case, just 
set yourself at ease and whisper in our 
ear wherein we might be able to improve 
the paper. Your suggestions will be re- 
ceived in the proper spirit, and thus we 
will be working together for a good and 
worthy cause. Don't be afraid to say 
what vou think. 



TIGER SUBSCRIPTIONS. 



The manager and his assistants have 
been greatly pleased with the way in 
which the subscription list of The Tiger 
is growing. The number of subscrip- 
tions that have been handed in so far 
compares favorably with the number 
handed in this time last year. But there 
still remains a large number of students 
who are not on the subscription list and 
who ought to be there. The management 



is going to initiate a close campaign for 
the purpose of obtaining a personal inter- 
view with every student in college, so 
that every one will have the opportunity 
to turn in a subscription or else a flat 
turn-down. There is to be no ignoring 
the question of whether one should sub- 
scribe for The Tiger or not. It is to be 
"Yes" or "No." And it is advisable for 
those who have not the intention of sub- 
scribing to think up some good reason 
why. 



ASSISTANT EDITORS WANTED. 



There still remain open two assistant 
editorships on the board. The editor 
and the board of control are extremely 
anxious to have these places filled. Any 
junior in good standing is eligible for 
the place. Besides furnishing an excel- 
lent opportunity for experience in edi- 
torial work, the office carries with it a 
great deal of honor and prestige. It 
might also be said that the editor-in- 
chief of The Tiger for next year will 
be chosen from among the members of 
this year's board, and that the election 
will be based upon the merits of the 
work done by the various members of 
the editorial staff for this year. 

The fact that two assistant editor- 
ships remain unfilled works a hardship 
on the rest of the board and it is to be 
hoped that a number of applications 
will be filed with the editor within the 
next few days. 



CHANGES IN THE TIGER 
BOARD. 



A number of changes have taken place 
in the personnel of The Tiger staff with 
the beginning of the new year. Two of 
the assistant editors who were chosen at 
the annual election last spring, Weller 
and Guy, were unable to return to col- 
lege this fall. The places thus left 
vacant have been filled by the appoint- 
ment of Lloyd L. Shaw and Arnold H. 
Rowbotham, neither of whom made ap- 
plication for places at the time of the 
spring election. G. S. Cowdery '14 has 
been appointed to fill the place of for- 
estry editor, succeeding W. H. Taplin, 
who has resigned to go back east to fin- 
ish his college course. 

The Tiger Board regrets very much 
the loss of these three men. During their 
short period of service on the board last 
spring, their work proved that they were 
capable of holding down their positions 
very efficiently. On the other hand the 
new men who are assuming their duties 
are not men of unknown qualifications. 
Shaw has been elected by the present 



junior class as editor of the "best An- 
nual the College has ever known." He 
has been know*n in literary circles ever 
since his freshman year, and there is no 
doubt but that he will be a strong addi- 
tion to the Tiger Board. 

Rowbotham is one of the associate 
editors of The Nugget for this year, and 
his work in the various courses of the 
English department for the last two 
years will make him another excellent 
man for The Tiger. 

Cowdery, besides being one of the 
most interested students in the forestry 
department, has had a great deal of ex- 
perience in newspaper writing, so that 
his department will be well taken care 
of. 

Miss Glen Stiles, who was last spring 
elected to the position of alumni editor, 
underwent a severe operation for appen- 
dicitis, and it is doubtful whether she 
will be able to return to college. She is 
still hoping to resume her college work 
in about a month, and the alumni editor- 
ship is being held open for her in case 
she is able to come back to college. 



THE SUNDAY SERVICE. 

It is a good thing that Colorado 
College is to have a service of its 
own on Sunday. This is another 
step that puts the institution into 
harmony with other colleges of its 
type throughout the country, and 
again it has taken the place of leader- 
ship among those in the state. 

A religious service of this kind rep- 
resents what was in the minds of its 
founders and those who have done 
most for it; but more important than 
that, it fills a very great need in the 
present life of the students. 

The fact that attendance is not to 
be required, but that the students are 
left to decide this matter for them- 
selves, is one of the very best reasons 
why everyone should show his loyalty 
by being present on every Sunday. 
It is a College service and its success 
depends upon the conscientious way 
in which everyone shows his appre- 
ciation of the trust shown in the stu- 
dent body by not following the cus- 
tom in vogue in such institutions as 
Princeton, Yale, Amherst, Williams, 
Beloit, Vassar, and many others, 
where every student is required to be 
present just as much as at other col- 
lege exercises. 

Great pains are being taken to make 
it attractive and uplifting. The Col 
lege Choir of twenty-four voices, the 
fact that leading clergymen are giv- 
ing their services, all furnish added 



THE TIGER 



reasons for constant loyalty to the 
new movement. The time has been 
so arranged as not to interfere with 
the churches in the city; but one's 
first duty is to the College on the part 
of everyone. 

The College service is to be at 
five o'clock each Sunday afternoon 
throughout the year. 

The choir for the College service 
will consist of twenty-four students 
and is being carefully trained by Mrs. 
E. E. Taliaferro. It will be a very 
distinct feature in making the services 
attractive. 



THE CARE OF COLLEGE PROP- 
ERTY. 

It would be odd indeed if any one 
with the true interests of the College at 
heart should overlook the violation of 
College tradition made by certain mem- 
bers of the sophomore class last week, 
in the matter of pasting their posters on 
the College buildings. 

One of the first things that a freshman 
learns when he comes to Colorado Col- 
lege is the traditional respect which the 
students entertain for College property. 
This respect for the College buildings, 
especially in the case of Palmer Hall, 
scarcely amounts to anything less than 
reverence. And the breach of tradi- 
tional etiquette on the part of the soph- 
omores lest week has called forth a great 
deal of merited criticism both on the 
part of members of the faculty and of 
some of the upperclassmen. 

It occasionally happens that students 
allow their enthusiasm to run away with 
them and lead them to commit certain 
acts for which they are later sorry. But 
in all things it is well for any and every 
student to bear in mind that injury to 
College property is one of the most seri- 
ous misdeeds a student can do. The 
buildings and the grounds of this Col- 
lege do not belong to us. They are 
merely held in trust for us while we are 
here and are to be passed on to classes 
ot future years. There is the Tiger 
spirit connected with this as with many 
other things. Many of the students here 
now will remember the time three years 
ago when in less than ten minutes a sub- 
scription of $50 was secured to offer as a 
reward for the apprehension of a mis- 
creant who had broken several windows 
ir> Palmer Hall. Such things as that go 
to show how students feel toward out- 
siders who violate College property, and 
u is to be hoped there is not a student 
here who in his cooler moments would do 



anything that would deface or injure 
the buildings or the grounds. If there is, 
he doesn't belong here, and the sooner 
he gets out the better we will be pleased. 
The object of all this is to impress 
upon the sophomores who were con- 
cerned in putting up the posters on the 
College buildings, that they "stepped off" 
and that their actions have met with a 
great deal of adverse criticism from the 
upperclassmen. Class rivalry is all right. 
The upperclassmen enjoy it and encour- 
age it, but they do want to see the con- 
testants hold themselves in check that 
the College will not suffer by it. 



morning on Washburn Field. 



SOPHS WIN 



FRESH-SOPH-GAME 



Continued from page 5 

Fourteen men reported on Monday, 
which was the first night of practice for 
the freshman team. Suits were issued 
and the men were weighed in. The 
team will probably average about a hun- 
dred fifty pounds to the man, or an 
average of five pounds less than the var- 
sity team. Charles Cheese, the former 
Colorado Springs High School star, has 
been selected as captain. Scott, who 
won his "C. C." on the second team last 
fall, and his "C" on the track team last 
spring, has been appointed by Coach 
Rothgeb to have charge of the training 
of the freshman team. 

There is still a great deal of competi- 
tion for places, as all of the men have 
not been definitely decided upon for posi- 
tions. Positions both in the line and the 
back-field are still open, and all fresh- 
men who ever played or have thought of 
playing football are urged to come out 
and try for the team. The fourteen 
men who reported the first night are 
Cheese, Emery, Kampf, Crysler, Mun- 
caster, Hall, Owen, Holmes, Nourse, 
Ragle, Van Stone, Banfield, James, and 
Kramer. 

DeWitt Robinson, for two years the 
manager of the "Terrors" at C. S. H. S. 
was elected by the class to manage the 
freshman team. Already he is in com- 
munication with some of the different 
high schools in his effort to arrange a 
good schedule. Robinson is a hustling 
manager, and with his early start the 
freshmen should have a better schedule 
than ever before. After the sophomore 
game they hope to have games with Col- 
orado Springs High School, Centennial 
High School of Pueblo, the Sailors' Hos- 
pital of Las Animas, New Mexico, and 
with at least one of the Denver high 
schools. 

But first of all, don't forget the game 
with the sophomores next Saturday 



Continued from Page 4 

later than their captors. They broke in 
through the crowd barefooted and 
breathless. Only three minutes re- 
mained. They fought desperately but in 
vain. Time was called and the flag still 
remained on the pole. The sophomores 
sent Cowdery up after it and they were 
declared victorious. 

The sophomore victory of the night 
before was attributable to the fact that 
a few freshmen ran, making the sides 
even and the sophomores alone carried 
ropes to tie with. When a freshman did 
put a man down it was useless, for he 
had nothing to tie him with. In the 
morning with thirty-four men out of the 
fight their cause was hopeless. 

But with it all the freshmen showed 
excellent spirit and an exceptionally 
strong class. After this experience we 
pity the class of 1916 which will have to 
suffer defeat under them next year. 



STAG RECEPTION. 

Continued from Page 1 

the work of the Association in helping to 
develop manly men. Coach Rothgeb 
and Captain Sinton followed with talks 
on football. "Rothy" emphasized the 
need of student support and warned 
everyone against overconfidence. Sinton 
gave a review of the football conditions 
in the state and appealed for the same 
Tiger spirit to back the team as was 
shown last season. 

Secretary Ware, the next man on the 
program, was given a nearty welcome on 
his first appearance before us. State 
Secretary Nipps also spoke a few words 
on the value of a college training. 

Among the other speakers were Dean 
Cajori, Mr. Patterson, who gave the stu- 
dents advice from a down town busi- 
ness man's viewpoint, and Editor Black, 
Ormes and Shaw who spoke for the col- 
lege publications. 

After the speakers came the contests 
between the sophomores and freshmen. 
Of the five, the sophs won three, the pull- 
ing, the hog-tying and the eating con- 
tests, while the freshmen won the wrest- 
ling and dressing contests. The last event 
of the evening caused great amusement, 
"Dutch" Harder's prowess in eating 
cream puffs causing the defeat of the 
freshmen. 

After the contests, refreshments were 
served by the committee and the evening 
was ended by a serenade of the girls' 
halls. 



8 THE TIGER 

The New English Cut Suits we are showing for Fall will be 
appreciated by the young men who like to be dressed well. 

The coat with more narrow shoulders, and with shorter length than last sea- 
son. Tho trousers not so loose fitting. We are <f» •« i— frrTi 
showing the models for men and you men, in suits JJ)X5 tO JbOO 



valued at 



^CANO-DCWiS* 



Tejon at Kiowa 



NEW COLLEGE TREASURER. 



A very distinct addition to the ex- 
ecutive force is the appointment of 
W. W. Postlethwaite as treasurer of 
the College, the position that has 
been held by Irving Howbert. The 
board of trustees had had his ap- 
pointment in mind for six months or 
more, and with the resignation of 
William Jackson from the chairman- 
ship of the finance board it was de- 
cided to tender the position to Mr. 
Postlethwaite. Mr. Postlethwaite ac- 
cepted during the summer, and is now 
installed in his office at the college. 
Mr. Howbert has taken the position 
as chairman of the finance committee, 
vacated by Mr. Jackson, while Mr. 
Jackson still remains a member of 
the committee. 

The special movement for the new 
year will be the attempt to secure the 
new fund of $300,000 with which to 
build a new gymnasium and enlarge 
the endowment funds. This is along 
the line of the constructive work that 
has been pushed by the administra- 
tion of the College ever since the in- 
stallment of Dr. Slocum as president 
23 years ago, namely, the creation of 
an adequate endowment fund and the 
erection of substantial and well- 
equipped buildings. More has been 
accomplished in this time in Colo- 
rado College than in many older in- 
stitutions in 100 years. The growth 
of the college and the elevation of 
its standards have pressed hard upon 
the president and the board of trus- 
tees, and last spring it was decided to 
undertake the new forward move- 
ment. 

A strong appeal has been made for 
help to the friends of higher educa- 
tion. The General Education Board 
has started the fund with a pledge of 
$50,000 conditioned on the raising of 
the whole amount by the College. 
The loss of many friends, especially 



such men as General Palmer, makes 
the movement exceedingly difficult, 
but President Slocum and the trus- 
tees are confident that the loyalty of 
every friend of the College will en- 
able them to carry the matter to a 
successful outcome, the more so since 
the people of Colorado Springs are 
coming more and more to appreciate 
the value of the College to the com- 
munity, both as a financial and a cul- 
tural asset, and to look with the deep- 
est personal intere. ct upon its future 
development. 



FRESHMEN CUSTOMS. 



At the beginning of last year the Stu- 
dent Commission drew up a set of rules 
regulating in a measure the conduct of 
the boys of the freshman class. Although 
the Commission has not yet had a meet- 
ing this year to discuss probable changes 
in the regulations, the rules laid down 
last year worked very successfully and it 
is likely that few changes or none at all 
will be made. It was the opinion of the 
committee last year that too much regu- 
l?tion should not be undertaken at the 
beginning, and only such rules were 
made as could be easily enforced. Hence 
it is not at all improbab'e that additions 
may be made to the rules if any changes 
whatever are to be made. 

Some of the rules adopted last year 
were as follows: 

1. Freshmen are not allowed to wear 
any high school insignia, such as pins, 
athletic letters, etc. 

2. Smoking is not allowed on the 
campus. 

3. Freshmen are not allowed to wear 
College colors except at intercollegiate 
contests. 

4. Freshmen are not allowed to go 
bareheaded on the campus. 

5. All freshmen shall wear the fresh- 
man cap adopted by the Commission. 
Engineers shall be distinguished by a 
green button, liberal arts by a red but- 



ton, and foresters by a purple button. 

6. The Commission hereby authorizes 
the sophomore class to enforce these 
rules. 

It was also recommended by the Com- 
mission that each of the upperclassmen 
should adopt a distinctive dress, but that 
the selection should be left to the classes 
themselves. The recommendation of the 
Commission was carried out by the 
classes, the sophomores and the seniors 
selecting a regulation hat, and the juniors 
identifying themselves by corduroy 
trousers and gray flannel shirts. 

A very small amount of opposition to 
the rules on the part of the freshmen 
appeared last year, and none at all is ex- 
pected this year since the custom has 
been well established for one year. The 
sophomores, with the moral support of 
the upperclassmen and the official sup- 
port of the Commission, will doubtless 
see that the rules are strictly enforced. 
The freshman caps were ordered some 
time ago and as soon as they arrive it 
is expected that every freshman shall 
Buy one and wear it. There is no doubt 
but the caps look a little odd at first, but 
the freshmen will soon get accustomed 
to them, and will become anxious to 
wear them as a matter of class loyalty, 
even after the rule goes out of effect 
next spring. 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 
ELECTED. 

At a short business meeting of the 
senior class held in Palmer Hall 
Tuesday noon, the officers of the 
class for the coming year were 
elected. Those who were chosen to 
pilot the class through its last year 
were : 

I 'resident — W. W. Johnston. 
Vice-President — Rita Miller. 
Secretary — Mabel Wilson. 
Treasurer — Robert Hamilton. 
Sergeant-at-Arms — Kenneth C. Heald. 




THE TIGER 9 

Square Deal Shoes 

For Young Men $3.50 and $4.00 
in heavy tan storm calf, Gunmetal Calf and Glazed Kangaroo and Patent Colt, 
all the new Fall styles now on display, high toes, short foreparts, also the flat 
N Y custom lasts. Come in and let us 

get acquainted. We'll be pleased to show a fit f or Ever ? foot" 

you whether you are read) to buy or not. | IT PAYS TO D[33l At" DEAL'S 



s gE3a ° 

107 SOUTH TEJON STREET 



MEMBERSHIP RULES. 



In order to avoid the possibility 
of confusion it will be expedient for 
the men and women of the College, 
and especially the new students, to 
make themselves familiar with the 
following rules which govern the 
membership of fraternities and 
women's literary societies. The rules 
are printed as they now stand: 

Rules Governing Membership in Fra- 
ternities. 

1. A proposed initiate to the Lib- 
eral Arts department to be eligible 
for initiation into any fraternity, rep- 
resented in this Council, must have 
received credit on the College records 
for at least twelve (12) semester 
hours' work completed in Colorado 
College, and must not be marked de- 
ficient (conditioned or failed) in more 
than one of the courses constituting 
the work of the semester immediately 
preceding his proposed initiation. 

A proposed initiate in the Engineer- 
ing or Forestry departments to be 
eligible for initiation into any fra- 
ternity represented in this Council 
must have received credit for at least 
twelve (12) semester recitation hours' 
work completed in Colorado College 
and must not be marked deficient 
(conditioned or failed) in more than 
one of the recitation courses included 
in the work of the semester imme- 
diately preceeding his proposed ini- 
tiation. He must also have passed 
and received credit on the College 
records for his laboratory work in 
the said semester, except in one 
course in which he may be marked in- 



complete or conditioned without his 
being excluded from initiation. 

2. Two weeks before any man may 
be initiated into any fraternity repre- 
sented in this Council his name shall 
be handed to the faculty members 
of the Council who shall determine 
his eligibility for initiation. 

Any man initiated in violation of 
this Council shall be dropped from 
the College and the chapter concerned 
shall be publicly reprimanded as di- 
rected by the Council. 

Rules Governing Membership in 
Women's Literary Societies. 

Only young women of the three 
upper classes shall be eligible for 
membership after having been in Col- 
lege at least one semester. 

No young woman shall be eligible 
lor membership who has failed in 
more than six hours or more than 
two courses. 

No young woman shall be eligible 
for membership who does not sup- 
port Student Government. 

During her College course a young 
woman may receive only one invita- 
tion. 



FACULTY RULING ON SCHOL- 
ARSHIP REQUIREMENTS. 

The faculty rulings regulating 
scholarship requirements for candi- 
dates for athletic teams and College 
honorary offices will be of interest to 
the new students especially, as well 
as old students who are not already 
familiar with them. The set of reg- 
ulations became operative last spring, 
taking the place of all other rulings 
formerly governing requirements of 



eligibility. 

1. No student who has passed less 
than two-thirds of the requirements 
of any semester shall be eligible to 
take part in any public game, exhibi- 
tion or entertainment given by any 
club, association or team of students, 
or occupy editorship or assistant edi- 
torship or a managership or assistant 
managership during the following se- 
mester. 

2. On the first Wednesday in No- 
vember and the second Wednesday in 
.March the Registrar's Office shall 
place in the hands of every student 
a statement of his standing at that 
time in each of his courses. Stu- 
dents who are not passing at that 
time in two-thirds of the require- 
ments of the semester shall not be 
eligible to take part in College activi- 
ties as defined in Section 1, for the 
remainder of the semester. This rule 
shall not apply to students occupying 
editorships-in-chief or managerships- 
in-chief, nor to students in athletics, 
the regulation of their standing be- 
ing governed by Conference rules. 

3. The privilege of connection 
with public exhibitions of any sort 
may be withdrawn by the Dean in 
the case of any student who is re- 
ported as falling below grade in his 
work or who in the judgment of the 
Dean may not be able to carry such 
extra work without detriment to his 
College courses. 

4. In all published announcements 
of student participation in public ex- 
hibition, the student's class numeral 
shall be the same as his classification 
in the Registrar's office. 



Telephone 599 



The 



CUT FLOWERS 



Store 1 04 N. Tejon Street 

s Peak Floral Co. 

DECORATIONS AND DESIGNS 



10 



THE TIGER 



FALL CLOTHES 

IN AUTHORITATIVE STYLES 

FOR MEN AND YOUNG MEN 

IF you desired to be well dressed, it is only necessary to call on us, and make an inspection 
in order to realize the value and style of these Fall clothes. And the fact that you need 
pay no more than for clothes having less merit, should appeal to you. Suits and overcoats 
$15.00 and upwards. 

WHEN you're ready for a new Fall hat, better see what wehave for you. We have the 
finest stock hereabouts. ____ .._._ 

HABERDASHERY of every description, cravats, shirts, gloves, Up HI |R 

underwear, all of the highest quality and prices reasonable. * lll-i KKKJmJ 



Ethel Gleason has resumed her 
work after spending a year teaching. 



Ida Wolcott will spend this winter 
it her home in Trinidad. 



-Miss Schlott enjoyed a short visit 
from her mother Sunday. 



Lillian Duer's mother spent a day 
with her last week. 

To College 
Students 
Old and New 

We Extend the Most Cordial Good 
Wishes. We've made a Specialty of 
taking care of the wants of the up-to- 
date young men and women. You'll 
find us the kind of jewelry store you'll 
like. 

The Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak 

The Davis Barber Shop 

Individual Sterilizing Cabinets 
Ray Davis, Manager 

Have Your Clothes Cleaned, Pressed and 
Kept in First-Class Repair by 

"Sam" the Gentlemen's Valet 

Also Makes a Specialty of Serving Parties 
SAM FLEMING 

114 E. Cucharrac Phone 1675 



Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co. 



Ruth Banning is at Bryn Mawr this 
year. 

Ruth Christie and Plorence Crane 
are attending the University of Chi- 
cago and Wellsely, respectively. 



Lillian Picken was at Cascade for 
the week-end visiting Mrs. John A. 
Prescott of Kansas City. 



Ramona Brady will not return to 
College this fall. 

Hazel and Ruth Davis are attend- 
ing school in Oakland, California. 



Edith Vaughn entertained at lunch- 
eon Saturday in honor of Edith 
Stark. 



Dorothy Frantz 'n entertained 
Contemporary Club Saturday after- 
noon in honor of her cousin, Miss 
McConnell of Tennessee, and Miss 
Pollen of Pueblo. The afternoon was 



very pleasantly spent with fancy 
work and delicious refreshments, 
carrying out Contemporary colors, 
were served. 



Lorraine Williams entertained a 
few of her friends at breakfast Sun- 
day morning. 



Eloise Shellabarger is back 
:hool after being away a year. 



Vesta Sharpe ex-'i2 is taking a 
course in the State Normal at Greel- 
ey. 



ilypatia enjoyed a spread after the 
business meeting Friday in Ticknor 
Study. 



Reba Hood 'to is attending the 
Colorado Teachers' College at Greel- 
ey. 



RRF AD For morning delivery. It's 
bread hot from the oven, 
baked from the choicest flour, and that 
would command first premium anywhere. 
That you get from us. Is always good. 

THE CHICAGO BAKERY 

Have the fellows meet you at 

Tucker 9 s 
Restaurant 

10 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 

The J. C. St John Plumbing 
and Heating Co 



Phone Main 48 



313 N. Tejon St. 



You can always save money if 
you will come to see our line in 
diamonds, watches, jewelry, 
guns, sporting goods, fishing 
tackle, drawing sets, musical 
instruments, trunks, valisds, or 
if you want to loan money, you 
can get it 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 

Money Loaned on Valuables 



THE TIGER 



II 



The College Book and Supply Store 

In addition to furnishing the Text Books and Engineering 
Supplies for the College students, we carry a very large 
stock of Fountain Pens, Waterman's Ideal, Conklin Self- 
fillers and College. See Our PENNANTS ane POSTERS 

Whitney & Grimwood 



Get Your Picnic Supplies 

= AT = 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. T«jon St. Phone Main 114 

The College 
Photo Studio 



rru^a / 





Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 

Phone Main 679 

CORRIN BROS. 

Suits Made To Order 

Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing, 

and Remodeling for Ladies 

and Gentlemen 

Work Called for and Delivered 



Phone 1922 M 



107 E. Bijou Street 



Nothing Pleases Us More Than 
To Please College Students 

The FredS. Tucker 

Furniture Co. 



Mattie Lendrum has been elected 
secretary of Hypatia to fill the va- 
cancy left by Bernice McCurdy. 



Alary Randolph entertained Min- 
erva at dinner at her home Friday. 

Louise Kampf has been elected 
president of Minerva, to fill the va- 
cancy caused by the resignation of 
Edith Stark. 



Miss Spaukling, Greek and Latin in- 
structor, is house-mistress at Ticknor 
Hall. 

Etta Moore gave a spread Thurs- 
day night for Miss Edith Wilcox and 
her mother of Chicago. 



Mary Walsh, house-president of 
Ticknor, and Helen Rand, entertained 
the hall at a tea Sunday afternoon. 



K. Lee Hyder 'io has embarked 
in the architectural business. He is 
at present rrecting a number of 
birldings at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Miss Lillian Duer 'u is employed 
in the Lowell school of this city. 



Miss Gertrude Ashley 'ir was down 
for the Y. W.-Y. M. C. A. reception. 



B. P. Siddons 'n has accepted the 
position of manager of the Hille, 
French Music Co. He has been 
booming the sales of "Colorado," 
"Bruin Inn" and "The Black and 
Gold" on the Campus for the past 
week. 



Claude E. Hayward 'ii passed 
through the Springs aSturday on his 
way to Pittsburg, Pa., where he has 
accepted a promising position with 
the Westinghouse company. 

W. A. Wong has entered the School 
of Mines at Golden to complete his 
course in Mining Engineering. 



MOTOR CYCLES 

Yale Emblem 

BICYCLES and Supplies 

Expert Repairing 

Colorado Springs Cycle 

Company 

DeWitt Doyle, Manager 
224 N. Tejon St. Phone Red 34 



Knight - Campbell's 

F0R PIAN0S 

and PLAYER PIANOS 

STEINWAY and 20 OTHER MAKES 

We Rent Pianos 

Largest Stock Victor Talking Machines 
and Edison Phonographs 

226 N. Tejon St., after Sept. 15, 122 N. Tejon 



The Gowdy-Simmons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS 

Copper Plate and Steel Engravers 
Telephone 87 21 N. Tejon Street 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing a Typewriter. 

Zimmerman Supply 

r , -rv*^- k ^«,r 22 E - Kiowa St - 

Company Phone Ma in 37 4 

Established 1S90 

You can save from 25 
percent to 40 percent 
on our finest Hart, 
Schaf f ner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer & 
Clothcraf t Suits and 
Overcoats 



12 



THE TIGER 




I sec you have & 




The 
pen with 



I have one too." 
Almost everybody has 
The peiv with the Clip-Cap 



The Murray Drug 
Co. 

(Opposite Compus) 

Open Every Day in the Year 
All College People Trade Here 

"MEET AT MURRAY'S" 



The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

116 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Gives 
Special Attention to Accounts of Students 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, President Ira Harris, V-f resident 

M.C. Gile Lilla B. Ensign C. E. Lynde 

Donald D. Wilfley, Setretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M. 

THE OUT WEST 

TENT AND AWNING CO. 

RECLINING CHAIRS 
PORCHES ENCLOSED 

Tents Rented for a Day or for Longer 

Stamping, Designing, R rforating, Best Hand Painted 

China. Western Branch of Mexican Pigment Paints, 

Stenciling and Materials 

Art Needlework and Art Goods 

THE HUNT AND VAN NICE 

ART SPECIALTY SHOPS 

Retail and Wholesale 

8 Pike's Peak Avenue Phone Main 2055 

STUDENTS!!^ 

The 
Pearl Laundry Co. 

respectfully solicits your pat- 
ronage. We guarantee satis- 
factory work and service and 
give you 20% discount. 

E. E. HEDBLOM. College Agent 



F. J. Hill 'u has entered Denver 
University for a post-graduate course. 

Frank Merriell '09 arrived Tuesday 
morning from Fruita to spend a few 
days at the Kappa Sigma house. 

Members of the Kappa Sigma fra- 
ternity entertained the co-eds and a 
few more friends with a very enjoy- 
able Bruin Inn party Wednesday 
evening. Professor Motten chaper- 
oned. 

Alice Hamilton and Netta Powell 
gave a tea Sunday afternoon for 
Bemis freshmen. 



Josephine Knight, from Grand 
Junction, spent Sunday with her sis- 
ter, Bessie Knight. 



Fay Templeton was operated upon 
for appendicitis at the Bethel Hos- 
pital last Monday morning. 

Miss Oetteker of the University of 
Wisconsin has entered the senior 
class this year. 



President and Mrs. Slocum enter- 
tain the senior class on Saturday 
evening at their residence in College 
Place. 



THE POPULAR 

Creams and Ices Fresh Butter 

Made Right and Delivered Promptly 

A. L. MOWRY 

Phone 1184 
115 East Cache la Poudre Street 



STOP AT 
LIGHTNING SHOE SHOP 

to get your shoes repaired. Shine 
free with every pair of soles 

Sewed Soles 75c. 28'< N. Tejon St. 



William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Lois Decker will not re-enter Col- 
lege this fall. 



E. Lin Guy will not be able to re- 
turn to College this year. He will 
spend the winter at his home at 
Redvale, Colorado. 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



THE 

Crissey & Fowler 
Lumber Co. 



Phone 101 



117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 



Ladies Sample Slippers, 
worth up to $5.00 

Ladies Sample Oxfords 
worth up to $4.00 



One line of Ladies Tan 



The Whitaker-Kester 

~?5 C Shoe Co. Welt Pump Laces and 



$1.75 



J 



1 North Tejon Street 



Button Oxfords were $3.50 



J 



THE TIGER 



13 



Student Supplies 

A Line of Stationery that is 
most complete. 

The only stock of Engineers 
Supplies in this section. 
Headquarters for fine Engrav- 
ing and Printing. 

OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

HA YNER 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 

2 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 



High-Class Printing and Binding 

The Prompt Printery Co. 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



Developing and Printing 

HARLAN 

"The View Man" 

All Kinds of View and Commercial Work 
Phone Main 2717 304 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

Seldomridge Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



CALL 2000 

When You Want Anything QUICK! 
QUICK DELIVERY 

MAIN 2000 



Edwin Crysler '15 is a new Kappa 
Sigma pledge. 

Clarence Nelson of Valparaiso 
University, is a new member of the 
junior class. 

Prospects are bright for the cham- 
pionship in the Terror camp this 
year. The high school team should 
average nearly 165 pounds. Practices 
are being held in Monument Park 
under the direction of Coach Coffin. 

Hugh Gilmore 'to has been visiting 
at the Delta Phi Theta house. 



Owing to the scarcity of men, Cut- 
ler Academy will have no football 
team this year. 



Wilson '15 is pledged to Delta Phi 
Theta. 

Elizabeth Knaus '13 could not re- 
turn to College because of illness. 



Mildred Pope, of Indiana, is a new 
member of the junior class. 



J. W. Nipps, the state student sec- 
retary of the Y. M. C. A., was down 
from Denver over Sunday. He at- 
tended the stag reception Saturday 
night and gave a very short and 
forcible address to the men who were 
present. 



Oliver Hall '14 spent Saturday and 
Sunday with his parents and others 
in Denver. 

Dick Ackley spent 5unday at the 
Kappa Sigma house. 



Louis Deesz was in Canon City 
over Sunday. 

On account of illness. Martha Phil- 
lips '13 will not return to College 
until the second semester. 



Kathryn Morehouse '13 is not back 
this year. 



Dorothy Cook '13 will not return 
to College this year. 



Bertha Price '13 is attending tin 
University of Colorado this year. 



June Musser '13 wil 
home this year. 



remain at 



Huldah Augspurger '13 expects to 
attend the University of Chicago. 



FOR THAT SPREAD 

Serve a BURGESS LUNCHEON 

We have complete Delicatessen, 
Bakery and Candy Departments 
and can prepare a most tempting 
"Spread" on short notice. 

BURGESS 

Phone Eight Three 
112-114 North Tejon Street 



Sewed Soles 75 cents 
Rubber Heels 35 cents 



AT 



PETE'S SHOE SHOP 



230 East Dale 



JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Waiting's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Stree 



Comfortable Rooms for 
Students 

Two Blocks from Corner of the Campus 

Reasonable Prices 

Newly Furnished 

Enquire at 1013 North Wahsatch Ave. 

Hunt Up 

Bissell's Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 



COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

Pike's Peak Book & 

Stationery Co. fLLSfiaSi 






14 



THE TIGER 



Be Your Own Agent 

The management of the STAR LAUNDRY have 
decided to have no general agent at the College and to 
give agent's discount direct to the student sending in 
the bundle. 

Our drivers will sell you a $5.00 Coupon Book for $3.50, a dis- 
count of 30%, or you can pay in cash on the delivery of the bundle, 
taking out 30% for yourself. No bundles will be left without money 
or coupons. 

Coupon- Books at this discount will be sold only to students and 
are not transferable and the coupon will not be received from other 
than students. 



Phone Main 715 328 N. Tejon Street 
HERBERT BENNETT, Agent 

Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton Dairy 



Helen Williams is enrolled in the 
Agricultural College at Fort Collins 
for the coming term. 



The girls of Montgomery hall gave 
a spread Saturday night. 



Charlotte Eversole did not return 
to College this year. 



Vera and Nina Stewart did not re- 
turn to College this fall. 



Eva Knight has been employed to 
teach school at Coalville, Utah, dur- 
ing the coming winter. 

Harry L. Black is a new member 
of Q. Q. 



419 S. El Pa»o St. 



Phone Main 442 



GET IT AT 

THE EMPORIUM 

AND SAVE MONEY 

1 10 S. TEJON STREET 

^theIhueller 
TEACHERS 9 AGENCY 

Conducted for Efficiency only. Services 
free to School Bnards. No enrollment fee 
for teachers. Call or write 

ANNA HI MUELLER, 450 West Uinta Street, 
Phone Main 2188 Colorado Springs, Colo 

Deichmann & Douglas Floral 
Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER, Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 

Students' Trade Solicited 

1 1 1 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1 593 



Mr. Patterson, of the D. & R. G., 
better known to College fellows as 
"Pat," and Mr. Helmuth, were among 
the guests at the stag reception Sat- 
urday night. 



Gerald Seldomridge was visiting 
friends in Denver and Boulder last 
Friday and Saturday. 



Miss Kate Boyse will not be in 
College this year. 



KAPPA SIGMA SMOKER. 

The Kappa Sigma fraternity held 
open house Tuesday night to the 
freshmen. The evening was spent in 
big small talk, athletic contests and 
music, after which refreshments were 
served. Other guests besides the 
freshmen were Secretary Ware, 
Coach Rothgeb, Captain Sinton, and 
Mr. Gustin and Mr. Carrington of 
the Evening Telegraph. 



FRESHMEN 

We Wish to Introduce 
to You 

The College Inn 

Opposite the Campus 



THE 

FIRST 

SUPPER 



AT 



McREA'S 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co. 
Groceries and 



Meats 







115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 






Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Gazette Building 



THE TIGER 



15 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

"The College Favorite ' 



The Favorite Shopping 

Place for College 

People 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

Is the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 



lr^i E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



W.L LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 

# 



91 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



For the "BEST IN THINGS MUSICAL' 



GO TO 



Hiltbrand's Music Store 



Phone 13 



125 1 2 N. Tejon St. 



Exclusive College Posters 

Unique Place and Tally Cards 

RICHARD WILLIS 

4^ East Pike's Peak Avenue 



Phoenix 
Silk Hose 
All Colors 
50c a Pair 



We're Better 
Prepared 



E. & W. 
Redman 
Collars 

15c Two for 25c 



this season than ever to supply the demands of C. C. Students, and 
invite an inspection by all of our 

New Fall Suits and O'Coats 

New Hats and a Complete Line of New Furnishings 
Suits and OToats $15 to $35. Hats $3 to $5. Shirts $1 to $3.50 



Money 
Cheerfully 
Refunded 




Correct Dress for Men. \ 



113 East 

Pike's Peak 

Avenue 



Miss Louise Strang will study art 
in New York city this winter. 



Miss Persis Kidder 'u is teaching 
in the Denver schools. 

Marguerite Seigfried will study art 
at Decatur, 111., this winter. 



Ruth Wallace ex-" 14 is in California. 



Miss Emma Whiton '09. is teaching 
again in the Pueblo high schools. 



Bert Stiles 09 is reading law in 
Pueblo. 

Ane Norton '09 has just returned 
to New York city, where he resumes 
his law studies in. Columbia law- 
school. He finishes his course there 
this year. 



Miss Hixie Rider is principal of the 
Fountain high school. 



Delta Phi Theta held an initiation 
Saturday night. Somers, Deffke and 
Wray, all sophomores, were the vic- 
tims. 

Mr. F. G. Bennett, a graduate of 
the University of Michigan and at 
present a representative of the Jessup 
Steel Co., with offices in Denver, vis- 
ited at the Kappa Sigma house Sun- 
day. 



Get Acquainted at 

The Red 
Cross Pharmacy 

WiLLAMS & KLUSS 
HUDSON'S CHOCOLATES 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 

107 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone 40 



Dern's Freshly Roasted Coffee 

will make 10 more cups to the lb. 
than Eastern roasted coffee 



29 S. Tejon Street 



Phone 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Bldg. 
118 North Tejon St. Phone Main 1701 

Res., 1211 N. Weber St. Tel. Main 956 




TOD POWELL 



Phone Main 930 



W. E. DONER 



POWELL-DONER SPORTING GOODS CO. 

1 1 2 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

"EVERYTHING FOR SPORTSMEN" 

New and Complete Stock of the Very Best of Athletic Supplies, College Pennants, Novelties, Etc. 

"ASK THE MEDICINE MAN" 



16 THE TIGER 

Come here first for your Fall Suit, your new Over- comparisons, 

coat, your supply of Winter Under Garments, that as- You will only need to this once; for you will see 

sortment of new shirts. where this store, with its careful method of buying, 

Carefully examine the style, workmanship and established system of fair dealing and binding guarantee; 

value of this entire showing — stands supreme. 

Then go where you will make the most rigid of Fall and Winter Suils $15 up. 



(JWIuiifrSfeearerG 



HAUGEN, Tailor 



222 N. Tejon. 



Phone Main 296 



* 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



% 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 



V 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



Departments — 

College of Arts and 
Science, 
E. S. PARSONS, Dean 

School of Engineering, 
F. CAJ0R1, Dean 

School of Forestry, 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 

School of Music, 

E. D. HALE, Dean 



Cigars, Tobacco, Pipes, Etc. 




Pool in connection but not a pool room 
COME AND SEE 

HUGHES 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., SEPTEMBER 28, 1911 



Vol. XIV 



Number 3 



FIRST COMMIS- BARBECUE PLANS STATE;WAITS WHILE 

SION MEETING UNDERWAY 



MUD IS FLYING 



MANY MATTERS OF IMPORT- 
ANCE DISCUSSED AT THE 
FIRST SESSION OF 
THE YEAR. 



The Student Commission held its first 
session of the year, in the Common 
room of Bemis, Tuesday evening. There 
were many matters of great importance 
to the Commission and to the student 
hody to be brought up for discussion and 
action. 

The most important matter with which 
the Board concerned itself was concern- 
ing the election which is to be held to 
till vacancies in the Board. It was voted 
that the petitions nominating one treas- 
urer of the Associated Students, a 
junior, one senior member of the Ath- 
letic Board, a senior, and one member 
of The Tiger Board, a senior, shall be 
in the hands of Secretary Parkison by 
p. m., Friday, September 29. Accord- 
ing to the constitution of the Asociated 
Students, as printed elsewhere in this 
issue of The Tiger, the petitions nom- 
inating the treasurer of the Associated 
Students and the senior member of the 
Athletic Board must be signed by fifty 
(SO) students and the petition nominat- 
ing the senior member of The Tiger 
Board shall be signed by twenty-five (25) 
students. The date of the election was 
set for one week from today, October 5, 
1911. 

The matter of the support of the 
training table for the football team was 
the next subject up for discussion. This 
proved to be a knotty problem. Last 
year the training table for the team was 
supported almost wholly by the five fra- 

Continued on page 3 



MANY NEW STUNTS TO BE 

PULLED OFF BY THE 

SOPHOMORES. 

No Bonfire, But Plenty to Eat, Drink, 

See and Hear — Barbecue To Be 

the "Best Ever." 



The ball was started rolling for the 
annual sophomore barbecue at a meet- 
'og of the sophomore class last Monday. 
And we're glad to hear that it has been 
started rolling, too, because the sooner 
the sophs get busy on the barbecue, the 
letter the barbecue is going to be, and 
the more we are all going to enjoy it 
when Hallowe'en night comes. 

At the election of the officers of the 
sophomore class for the coming year, 
winch was held last Thursday, John L. 
Hcrron, better known about the campus 
as "Mugsy McGraw," was chosen by the 
class of 1914 to manage the barbecue 
this year, nnd if McGraw shows as much 
"pep" in handling barbecues as he does 
about handling class scraps, there can't 
be the least shadow of a doubt but that 
this year's barbecue will be a warm arti- 
cle. 

Up until last year the great feature 
of the annual Hallowe'en barbecue was 
the traditional bonfire. As the years 
went on, each succeeding class did its 
best to have a bigger bonfire than the 
class before it, and one may as well ad- 
:uit, every class did have the biggest 
fire the barbecue had ever known. But 
at last the fires got so big that they 
were warping Washburn field all out of 
shape and they had to be stopped. It 
was an awful blow to Colorado College 

Continued on page 8 



DENVER AND BOULDER DELVE 

IN ANCIENT HISTORY TO 

DECIDE "WHO IS TO 

START THE FINISH." 



With Denver University and the Uni- 
versity of Colorado going back into the 
depths of shady history to rake up the 
muck of the past, and with both parties 
side-stepping the real issue to nearly the 
same degree, it seems still to be a long 
way from the settlement of athletic rela- 
tionship differences of the two schools. 
During the past week, the sporting pages 
of the Denver papers have been filled 
with charges and counter-charges com- 
ing from the students, the alumni and 
the faculties of the two institutions. Un- 
less the controversy shows a sudden and 
radical change toward a more friendly 
consideration for the mutual good, it is 
safe to say that there will be no football 
game between Denver and Boulder this 
season— or perhaps for many seasons to 
come. 

The present agitation seems to have 
originated in the effort which the Boul- 
der alumni recently put forth to bring 
the two institutions to playing terms 
during the present football season. Fol- 
lowing close upon this, Dr. Norlin, who 
is the faculty representative from Boul- 
der in the Athletic Conference, gave a 
copy of a former letter he had written to 
Professor Manley, the Conference rep- 
resentative from D. U., to the "Silver 
and Gold". The letter was an indirect 
proposal for the renewal of athletic re- 
lations, and was accompanied by a re- 
print from a further historical statement 
of Dr. Norlin. The article held that now 

Continued on page 3 



THE TIGER 



Young Men's Christian Association 



FIRST COLLEGE VESPER 
J SERVICE. 



SECRETARY WARE SUMS UP AND 
LOOKS AHEAD 

The excitement of College beginnings 
is subsiding. Three of the contests be- 
tween the freshmen and sophomores are 
events of the past, The Tiger and Kin- 
nikinnik have made their debuts, to the 
student public, the football team has set- 
tled down to a steady grind, and the 
Young Men's Christian Association has 
satisfied the internal physical longings 
of two hundred hungry souls. The in- 
troductions have been made; serious 
work must now be done. Most of the 
activities of the campus have already 
been organized for the year. Plans have 
been outlined and methods of procedure 
adopted. We are under way, and the 
success of our respective enterprises de- 
pends upon the manner in which our 
plans are carried to completion. 

If cooperation is necessary in the pro- 
cess of organization, it is imperative in 
the running of a body after it is formed. 
It takes the combined energy and sacri- 
fice of all the members of a group to 
bring about the realization of its hopes. 
Those who have pledged themselves to 
support an undertaking are expected to 
meet their obligation to it. Otherwise, 
how is the work to be carried on? 

The Colorado College Christian Asso- 
ciation is an organization of and for the 
men of this institution. Without them 
it could not exist; but for them, it 
would not have come into being. Plans 
have been laid for a year of great activ- 
ity in the association, and the men of 
the College are expected to back them 
up. The men of Colorado College made 
generous pledges to this work last spring 
in a financial way, thereby attesting their 
belief in the principles for which it 
stands. Thes pledges, many of them, 
will be due on the first of October, and 
an opportunity will be given at that 
time for the payment of the same. If 
you want to see the Christian Associa- 
tion accomplish something this year of a 
vital and practical nature for the men of 
"C. C," first, meet your financial obli- 
gation to it, then, show your interest in 
its efforts by joining the organization, 
and withal maintain a tolerant, sympa- 
thetic, and generous attitude toward all 
that it is seeking to bring to pass. 



FIRST Y. M. C. A. MEETING. 



The Misses Kampf entertained in 
honor of Edith Stark Wednesday af- 
ternoon. 



The President's Address at the Open- 
ing Meeting of the Young Men's 
Christian Association. 

A large number of students met at 
Perkins on Thursday for the first public 
meeting of the association. The subject 
of the address of the evening was, "The 
Importance of Taking a Stand," for 
whatever makes for a religious life. 

There are two tendencies in Colorado 
College which are well defined : one 
which is making for a lowering of its 
character and its reputation ; the other 
is helping to establish its intellectual and 
moral life. Every earnest man ought to 
open his eyes to these tendencies and 
make up his mind which is to dominate 
his college career. 

The social and play life has its place. 
It is always true that, "All work and no 
play makes Jack a dull boy" ; but it is 
also true that when the controlling mo- 
tive of a college career is found in play, 
one is sure to miss the end for which 
he came to college. The great end of 
life should be to fit one's self for service 
of the very best kind. This can come 
only by hard, continuous and devoted 
work. Everything which makes men 
think well, which produces power to act, 
which gives mental and moral vigor, is 
to be sought with all of one's heart and 
mind. 

The college that is not developing 
character by means of scholarship is 
making a failure. If the social life comes 
to dominate Colorado College then it 
will prove recreant to the high purpose 
which was in the minds of its founders 
and to those who have given so gener- 
ously to make it a force for right in the 
world. 

Religion is the power which should 
make for the fulfilment of the purpose 
for which God created things. Christian 
men and women in this College must 
stand with all their might for those high 
ideals which were prayed into the early 
life of the institution. This year will test 
many things in the character of our Col- 
lege. 

The new service on Sunday should be 
a rallying point for every earnest stu- 
dent. It represents in many ways that 
for which the college is supposed to 
stand. It should say to our friends 
everywhere, this is a Christian institu- 
tion, and by the support given to this 



Last Sunday afternoon at five o'clock 
the auditorium at Perkins Hall was well 
filled with both College and townspeople 
for the first of the Colorado College 
Sunday services. The idea of those in 
charge of the services, namely, to have 
a short, interesting and impressive serv- 
ice was carried out in the smallest de- 
tail. 

President Slocum delivered the ser- 
mon, on the subject, "The Imperatives 
of a Noble Life." The text was Luke 
2:49, "I must be about my Father's busi- 
ness." The announcement was made 
that Dean Parsons would Jeliver the ser- 
mon at the services next Sunday. 

The choir of twenty-four voices, 
trained under the direction of Mrs. Tal- 
iaferro, performed very creditably, and 
their part in the service did did much to 
add to its attractiveness. 

A service of this sort is just what Col- 
orado College has been waiting for for 
a long time. From the number of stu- 
dents in attendance it is quite evident 
that the effort to arrange a most con- 
venient hour and a most attractive sort 
of service has met with unqualified suc- 
cess. The sympathetic and enthusiastic 
manner in which the first service was 
received speaks well for the weekly ex- 
ercises that are to come every Sunday 
throughout the year. 

service we, as faculty and students are 
saying to ourselves and to others we will 
do everything in our power to uphold its 
standards. 

More even than this, it is for every 
Christian student to show by his schol- 
arship, by his determination to uphold 
the intellectual life of the college that 
these do hold the first place and not the 
second one. I call upon every student, 
upon every organization upon this cam- 
pus, upon the whole student body, upon 
every member of the faculty, to join 
this year is a mighty movement to hold 
Colorado College to the very highest 
ideals of work and moral achievement. 
Let no one falter, and whoever seeks in 
any way to pull down our standards is 
a traitor. 

Here is a great and noble task for this 
association. Carry the religious motive 
into the life of the College. Let it touch 
every form of activity and make for the 
creation of a college that is fulfilling the ' 
highest purpose of God. 



Shirley McKinnie entertained at a 
tin shower in honor of Edith Stark 
Thursday afternoon. 



THE TIGER 



COMMISSION MEETING 



ELECTIVE COURSES. 



MUD FLIES 



Continued from Page 1 

ternities of the College. The subject 
has been discussed by the fraternities 
already this year, and they are willing 
to undertake the training table with the 
same system that was in vogue last year, 
but they point out the fact that the bur- 
den upon them is very heavy and appeal 
for help from the rest of the student 
body. There are a large number of non- 
fraternity men and a large number of 
young women in the College who would 
be more than willing to help, if an op- 
portunity were given them to volunteer 
their assistance through the proper 
channels. There is hardly a man in 
College who would not be anxious to 
come through with a reasonable amount 
of help. 

A great many solutions to the difficulty 
were proposed, but most of them, for 
some reason or other, were either im- 
practicable or unfeasible. At last, the 
Commission hit upon the scheme that 
has been tried and proven successful in 
other College activities of previous years. 
It was determined to have Thursday and 
Friday of this week for "Tag Days." 
A number of tags were to be printed and 
sold to the students of the College at 
the price of $1.00 each, and the pro- 
ceeds thus obtained should go to help 
maintain the training table for the foot- 
ball team. The question of a training 
table is an enormous one, and even if 
every student in the College should sub- 
scribe a dollar toward it, there would 
still be a heavy burden upon the frater- 
nities. The spirit of loyalty on the part 
of the fraternities in offering to main- 
tain the training table, is something that 
cannot be overestimated. Such a thing 
has never been heard of in the state until 
our fraternities started the system here 
last fall. And the benefits that may be 
reaped from such spirit can only be seen 
in the effects of the training table food 
on the team last year. 

H. A. Parkison, Secretary of the Com- 
mission, was appointed chairman of the 
tag committee for the men, and Miss 
Marion Fezer of the Women's Advisory 
Board was appointed chairman of the 
committee for the women. The commit- 
tees are to consist of ten men and ten 
women, and it is to be hoped and it is 
firmly expected that every C. C. student 
will be wearing a tag by the beginning 
of next week. 

The date of the next College sing was 
placed for Wednesday night, from 7:30 
to 8:30. The sing was to be held on 
the steps of Palmer Hall as was the cus- 
tom last year. Arrangements for sings 



There has been this year the usual 
number of alterations in the elective 
courses. Owing to the absence of 
Professor Hills at Harvard, the 
greatest number of changes have 
been in the Romance Language de- 
partment. Spanish 5 and French 6 
are to be given only during the sec- 
ond semester, either as one or two 
hour courses. Italian 1 will also be 
given this year as a one semester 
course. In the English department 
Professor Noyes, owing to increased 
work in the sophomore and freshmen 
classes has been forced to reduce Eng. 
19 — Nineteenth Century Fiction — to a 
one semester course. Advance work 
must be done, however, and the credit 
will be four semester hours for three 
recitations. Among the new courses 
offered this year is one given by Miss 
Sahm in French, Spanish, Dutch and 
Flemish art. Tin's course which is 
known as Art 2 is scheduled for Sat- 
urday morning from 10:30 to 12 
o'clock. 

and pan pans during the first semester 
were made, and the President of the 
Commission was authorized to arrange 
for dates for the all-College affairs. 

The Commission voted to lend its aid 
to the manager of the football team in 
the matter of selling to students the sea- 
son tickets for the entire football season. 
The tickets are to be sold for the price 
or $2 and are to be good for admission 
to the four football games that are to be 
played on Washburn field this season. 
These four games are with the high 
school, Wyoming, the Agricultural Col- 
lege, and the University of Utah. This 
is a choice selection of games to be 
played here this year, and is well worth 
$2 of anybody's money. 

The matter of debating was brought 
up and discussed, but no action was 
taken. 

Before adjournment the committee 
elected yell leaders to have charge of the 
organized rooting of the student body 
during the coming year. W. B. Winch- 
ell was elected head yell leader, and 
"Babe" Statton and Lloyd Shaw were 
elected assistant yell leaders. These men 
are to have charge of and and be re- 
sponsible for yell practice and are to 
lead the rooting in any and all intercol- 
legiate contests. They are also to have 
charge of the yelling at sings and pan- 
pans during the year, as well as at the 
night-shirt parades which are to be held 
now and then during the year. 



Continued from Page 1 

it was "up to Denver." 

The Denver papers copied, and the 
war of muddy words began. Professor 
Manley replied with a little more history 
and a demand for a more direct request 
for the resumption of relations, and at 
the same time gave out a letter he had 
received from Dr. Norlin, the gist of 
which was "take our first proposal or 
none at all." Then the U. of C. alumni 
got into print with a resolution contain- 
ing some more history and declaring 
against Boulder's making further ad- 
vances toward playing. D. U. fired the 
last shot when Professor Manley pub- 
lished still more history, containing in- 
cidental digs at Boulder, and statements 
of the extreme purity of Denver Uni- 
versity's athletics. 

The University of Colorado was the 
one to originally break off athletic rela- 
tionship with Denver University. Now, 
it is the University of Colorado who de- 
sires most to have these relationships re- 
newed. Denver University probably de- 
sires the renewal, but it is no hurry 
about it. Boulder struck the first blow, 
and now that Boulder wishes to "make 
up," Denver is having her little fun 
"teasing". Denver is not waiting a hum- 
ble apology, but wants Boulder to as 
publicly and as decisively ask for the re- 
sumption of relations as it asked for the 
severance of those relations. Boulder 
is just a little too proud to do that, and 
seems to want to have the athletic teams 
get together without doing anything defi- 
nite to settle the dispute. 

In a case like the present one, the Con- 
ference ought to have power to do some- 
thing. It is true the Conference does not 
pass judgment on the past, and the past 
is about all these two belligerents seem 
to be taking stock of now, but the Con- 
ference surely ought to have some exec- 
utive powers, instead of serving only in 
its tribunal function. It is a shame that 
there is not some power to make them 
get together. 

It is natural under the circumstances 
that Colorado College bears the brunt 
of this rupture. Colorado College plays 
both of these teams, while each of them 
plays only with C. C. No just 
system of percentages can be figured out 
and the championship oan be computed 
on no practical basis. Colorado College 
stands ready to do any thing in its pow- 
er to end this disagreement, but with the 
present attitude of both parties engaged 
it seems as if no one could be successful 
as a mediator. 



THE TIGER 



Freshmen Warp Sophomores 



FIERCE BUT RAGGED CONTEST 

GIVES FRESHMEN FIRST 

TALLEY IN ATHLETIC 

SUPREMACY RACE. 



With a score of 6-0, made by one 
touchdown and goal, the freshmen edged 
out the sophomores in the annual class 
game on Washburn field last Saturday 
The lone score was made near the end 
of the first half after the sophs lost the 
ball within their twenty yard line when 
Captain Herron's punt was blocked by 
one of his team mates. Cheese got 
through the line on a cross-tackle buck 
and outsprinted his opponents to the 
goal line before he was downed at the 
corner of the field. The punt-out was 
successful and the ball sailed between 
the uprights for the only score of the 
day. 

If the sophs had showed the fighting 
spirit throughout the game that they 
exhibited during the last half, it might 
have been a different story. During the 
second half they had possession of the 
ball most of the time, carrying it for 
gains, and within the freshmen territory. 
The game was hard fought all the way, 
but especially in the latter part. There 
were several cases of wrangling over 
the decisions, but at no time did hard 
feelings get the best of enthusiastic class 
rivalry. The score was so close that 
some of the more sanguine spectators 
hoped to see-'em-mix-it. 

Neither team showed any remarkable 
team work, although it was about as 
much as could be expected so early in 
the season. The freshmen had an ad- 
vantage in that all four of their back- 
field men worked together last year on 
the Colorado Springs High School team. 
Both of the teams tried the forward 
pass a good deal with varying success. 
Cheese, the speedy halfback, caried the 
ball for the greatest gains for the fresh- 
men. Holmes and Emery were close 
seconds. Kampf ran the team with 
good judgment, and on the whole with a 
little better headwork than the soph 
team. Muncaster played a great game 
at defensive end. Cary, at half did the 
greatest and most spectacular ground 
gaining for the sophs. Moye did some 
good line plunging. Herron played a 
fighting game all the time, but was er- 
ratic at the most critical times. One of 
the features of the game was the play- 
ing of freshman Ragle. This, the first 
time he ever played a game of football, 



he proved a handful for the big husky 
Summers who was against him. With 
training he should make a great player. 

In the first quarter Cheese received 
the kick-off for the freshmen. He car- 
ried the ball back about fifteen yards. 
The ball zig-zagged back and forth in 
the middle of the field with intermittent 
punting without either team being able 
to make a first down until nearly the 
end of the quarter. Just before time 
was called the sophs succeeded in mak- 
ing their distance for the first time. 

In the second quarter the sophs came 
back strong. With a few pretty cross- 
tackle bucks and a forward pass to 
Moye they brought the ball down to the 
freshies' five-yard line. But there the 
freshies held and they lost the ball on 
downs. By a series of punting and run- 
ning the freshmen then carried the ball 
back up the field. Cheese punted one 
over the goal line which Herron at- 
tempted to run out instead of touching 



down. He was downed on the fifteen- 
yard line. It. was there that they lost 
the ball under their own goal by Her- 
ron's punt into his own men. This gave 
Cheese his one chance to score. The 
sophs received the kick-off, but were 
soon forced to punt. A series of plays 
by Emery, Kampf and Holmes brought 
ihe ball to the eight-yard line before 
time was called. 

At the beginning of the second half 
the sophomores came back with an add- 
ed amount of "pep." They kept well 
down toward the freshman goal most of 
the time. Twice Herron carried the 
ball for large gains. At the end of the 
quarter they were on the twenty-five- 
yard line. 

The sophs began the last quarter with 
a forward pass which was spoiled by 
Holmes. The play was about even dur- 
ing this quarter. Cheese skirted the 
ends several times for good gains. The 

Continued on Page 8 




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THE TIGER 



Tiger Championship Prospects 



COACH ROTHGEB ANNOUNCES 
TRAINING RULES 

Monday night Coach Rothgeb asked 
the football squad to begin strict 
training. Rothy has always been len- 
ient about setting down the strict 
rules at the first of the season, but 
now that he has announced the train- 
ing rules he expects every man to 
observe them implicitly. He im- 
pressed it on the men that it was for 
their own sakes and the sake of the 
team — and not merely to have them 
obey him — that he asked compliance 
with the rules. 



VANDEMOER MAY BE QUARTER 



FOOTBALL PROSPECTS. 



VANDEMOER ARRIVES 



The team began to look more like 
the old-time machine when ex-Capt. 
Vandemoer reported for practice 
Monday night. All of the eight men 
of last year's team who are coming 
are now back. Vandemoer is in 
nearly as good condition as any man 
on the team. He has been working 
hard with a surveying party in north- 
eastern Colorado. 



THE TEAM 

From Sinton, cu right end, across 
to Thompson, on left, there is only 
cr,e gap vvherj a last year's "C" man 
is net m the line. Cook, at right 
tackle, is the missing man. Floyd, 
first reserve from last year is ably 
filling that hole. Deess, a "C" man 
of three seasons back, is holding 
down Thompson's position while the 
latter is on the hospital list, bids fair 
to give him a run for first choice at 
the position. Witherow, at center, 
and Bowers, at tackle, are showing 
up to last fall's All-Colorado form. 
Hedblom and Black are at the guard 
positions, although there is some 
probability of moving Black into the 
backfield and substituting Wilkinson. 
Koch is being tried most at fullback, 
and is bound to make a plunger. 
Black is alternating between full, half 
and the line position. He has good 
form. Heald has his old halfback 
position, and the teams of the state 
are feeling again their old fear of his 
impenetrable defense and slashing at- 
tack. Vandy has not been seen much 
thus far, but he is always the same 
speedy whirlwind. 



On the first night after Vande- 
moer's return, Rothgeb gave him a 
try-out at the quarter-back position. 
Although there are a number of 
promising candidates trying out for 
this position, it is probably troubling 
Rothgeb more than any one position 
to decide just who will be the man. 
Putnam has the advantage of a sea- 
son's experience at the position. Her- 
ron played in that position on the 
freshman team, and is a strong re- 
minder of Reed, who worked at the 
pivot position last fall. Seldomridge 
is speedy and is a good drop kicker, 
but lie lacks that all important ele- 
ment — experience. If Vandy can be 
spared from his back position, he cer- 
tainly will make the greatest quarter- 
back the Rocky Mountain region has 
ever seen. He is the fastest man in 
the west, and can out-general any one 
now playing on a Colorado gridiron. 



THREE TIGERS OUT OF GAME 



It seems as if C. C. was getting 
more than its share of gridiron mis- 
fortune. Already there are three men 
out of the game — perhaps two for the 
remainder of the season. Howland 
and Le Gere both have broken ankles 
of a similar nature to Van Stone's 
injury last fall. Thompson has a 
twisted knee. 

Howland's accident was remarkable 
because he was not in scrimmage 
when it occurred, but was running in 
open field. The ankle let him down 
and he was unable to get up. Exam- 
ination showed broken bones. The 
cause is unknown. 

Le Clere received his injuries dur- 
ing a light scrimmage. He was 
tackled by two men at once while 
carrying the ball. His ankle was 
broken and the ligaments strained. 

Thompson's injury is of less ser- 
ious nature, and he will probably be 
back in the game in another week. 
He has a twisted knee which is pain- 
fully swollen. 



Hedblom, who has specialized in 
mathematics for the last five years, 
having recently completed Quadratic 
Equations, is now qualified to tutor 
in Math. 



How the People of Colorado Springs 

Size Up the Tigers for the 

Coming Season. 



(Editorial from the Herald-Telegraph.) 



What are the football prospects at 
Colorado College? This is a question 
that every red-blooded man and woman 
and small boy in the city has been dis- 
cussing since they tore the August leaf 
from the calendar and began to build a 
lire in the grate of evenings. Last fall 
the Tigers took the measure of the best 
teams in the Rockies and brought home 
the championship pennant. Naturally 
those interested in the autumn sport 
wonder whether they can turn the trick 
again this season. A glance at the ma- 
terial in the various colleges and univer- 
sities this fall indicates that the cham- 
pionship race will be a three-cornered 
affair with the Tigers, Boulder and Den- 
ver University occupying the corners. 
All will have strong teams and not until 
Thanksgiving night will we know which 
is tne best. 

Claude J. Rothgeb, whose successful 
system of coaching the Colorado College 
clever last fall placed him in the front 
rank of western football instructors, is 
the best authority on the chances of the 
Tigers. Coach Rothgeb is a sort of an 
optimistic pessimist (whatever that is). 
If there is anything of which he is afraid 
it is overconfidence. The we-know-we- 
can-win and we-will-win kind is all 
right, but he has a decided aversion to 
the sure-we-can-win-in-a-walk-so-what's 
the-use-of-working brand. He, better 
than anyone save the 11 men on the 
championship team last fall, knows that 
it was only by the hardest kind of work 
that the Tigers won. He knows that 
they will meet stronger teams this year, 
so he knows that they must work even 
Harder thm last fall. 

The material at C. C. this fall is 
slightly better than last year. Just slight- 
ly. There are more big men in the 
squad, but some of these men have 
shown no ability to familiarize them- 
selves with the premier college sport. 
They are too slow and rely upon their 
size rather than their work to make the 
team. By the first of next month 
Coach Rothgeb will have his material 
sized up pretty well and the fans can 

Continued on Page 9 



THE TIGER 



The Weekly Newspaper of Colorado College 

=f 

HARRY L. BLACK Editor-in- Chi e 

RICHARD L. HUGHES Business M^r. 

Lloyd Shaw Assistant Editor 

A. H. Rowbotham Assistant Editor 

J. J. Sinton Athletic Editor 

D. H. MAHAN Engineering Editor 

G. S. Cowdery Fotestry Editor 

Miss Glenn Styles Alumni Editor 

Miss Mary Randolph Exchange Editor 

Miss Helen Rand Local Editor 

A. W. Donovan Local Editor 

H. A. PARKISON Assistant Manager 

A. L. Golden Assistant Manager 

W. L. Myers Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

F. P. Storke, H. A. Bennett, John L. Herron, G. W. 

Belsey, Miss Elizabeth Gerould, Miss Leona Stukey, 

Miss Myrth King, Miss Violet Hopper, Miss 

Frances Adams, R. G. Appel 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to The Tiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phones: Editor, Main 2550. Manager, Main 2073 

Entered at (he postoffice at Colorado 

Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

— _ 1 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single C'opi t 5 



OUR FOOTBALL SEASON. 



Colorado Springs Business Men 
Size Us Up. 



It is very seldom that a case is 
found where the business men of a 
college town are willing to lend to a 
college such hearty support as the 
business men of Colorado Springs 
have given and are willing to give to 
Colorado College. The fact is most 
noticeably true in regard to athletics. 
The generous manner in which the 
merchants have gone out of their 
way to lend a helping hand to the 
cause of athletics in Colorado College 
has been no small factor in what- 
ever success the Tigers have 
achieved. And in return, it may be 
said, the members of the Tiger teams 
and the College students who are in- 
terested in them, have made every 
effort, within the past few years at 
least, to prove themselves deserving 
of the confidence reposed in them 
and the material and moral support 
given them by the business men of 
the down-town district. 

Not many years ago, this season of 
the year brought forth from the 
down-town people the disinterested 
question, "Is the College going to 
have a football team this fall?" But 
nowadays it is different. Everyone 



knows that the College is going to 
have a team, and everyone is trying 
to find out the chances for a cham- 
pionship team. There is a live inter- 
est in the Tiger football team even 
among the most dignified and sedate 
old men you can find in the city. 
They are true Tiger rooters, every one 
of them. They are as anxious for 
the Tiger team to win as the most 
enthusiastic rooter in the College. 
And they are willing to push the 
good cause along in any way within 
the bounds of reason. 

The College. 

And now, on the other hand, there 
rests an obligation on the Tiger team 
and the student supporters. If the 
business men are going to do so much 
to help us win, what are the Tiger 
teams going to do? What are the in- 
dividual members of the teams going 
to do? And what are the rest of the 
students going to do? 

THERE IS NOT A MAN OR 
WOMAN IN COLLEGE WHO 
CANNOT IN SOME WAY HELP 
TO WIN THE FOOTBALL 
CHAMPIONSHIP. 

To C. C. Men. 

Men, if you are not physically un- 
able, for the sake of your College and 
for the sake of the football team that 
is going to represent you on the grid- 
iron this fall, go and get a suit and 
get down on the field for practice. It 
isn't the efforts of one team of eleven 
men that is going to make the season 
a success. Coach Rothgeb has to 
have a second team and a third team 
to put up agains the men who are 
trying for the first team in order to 
properly coach tnem to play good 
football, ft is true that there are a 
number of men reporting on the field 
to practice against the first team can- 
didates, but there are not enough. 
Here's an excellent opportunity for 
you to help win the championship. 
Or, if you cannot put on a suit and 
practice on the field, the next best 
thing you can do is to get in shape 
for the rooting season. The yell 
master is going to issue the first call 
for yell practice in a few days and 
every man who is not playing foot- 
ball is expected to report for yell 
practice. Those of you who saw the 
send-off given the team last year 
when they left for Utah, and those of 
you who noted the results of good 
rooting at the' Kansas Aggie game 
on Washburn field, cannot fail to 
realize how much spirit good, hard 
rooting puis into the men on the 



field. 

To C. C. Girls. 

Girls (excuse us for calling you 
"girls," perhaps we should have said 
"maidens")* there is also a way for 
you to have a hand in the winning 
of the championship. All the encour- 
agement of the business men, all the 
work of the coach and the scrubs on 
the field, and all the howling of the 
men in the bleachers, will not be half 
so powerful as the help you can give 
by showing the men who are going to 
play that you are cheering for them 
and hoping that they may win. Here 
is a secret. Don't tell anyone we 
told you. It is a weakness of all 
football players' nature that he glor- 
ies in having the girls watch him 
practice. No, it's not what you call 
"playing to the grand-stand," but it 
is a lact that he will work twice as 
hard when you are watching him. 
There is another way you can help 
too. That is by assuming the duties 
of assistant coach over the men who 
are trying for the team. If you have 
a chance, see to it that they do not 
break training, and some of you will 
have the opportunity before the sea- 
son is over. Most of you know what 
is required of a football player, and 
you can do a great deal to see that 
he keeps training rules. Strict train- 
ing began last Monday, and there is 
no excuse for any man on the squad 
not taking the best possible care of 
himself. 

And the Players. 
And now for the men on the field. 
It is sure that you have a great deal 
of hard work coming to you before 
the season is over. Coach Rothgeb 
says: "Football, if it is played right, 
is the hardest work a man can do." 
And the men who played on the team 
last year know that he is right, too. 
It is gruelling work to go down on 
the field and practice for two or three 
hours every night, and it is almost 
exhaustive for a man to go his best 
for a whole game of football. It is 
admitted that you are making a great 
many sacrifices for the sake of play- 
ing football. But take a look at the 
College you are to represent on the 
field this year. Take a look at the 
business men of the town who are 
lending you every possible encourage- 
ment. Take a look at the student 
body who is behind you heart and 
soul to the very last ditch, and now, 
if you are not willing to give the very 
best there is in you from now until 
Thanksgiving night, there must be 



THE TIGER 



something wrong with you. 

And so, with all forces joined to- 
gether for a common cause, we are 
starting out next Saturday upon the 
most momentous football season in 
the history of Colorado College ath- 
letics. We are ripe to go our best 
from the opening game on Washburn 
field against the high school next Sat- 
urday to the final championship game 
in Denver against Denver University 
on Thanksgiving day. 



SHELTON HELPS THE TIGER. 

The editor of the Tiger is deeply 
indebted to Sam Shelton, who has 
very generously volunteered his 
services until football season is over. 
This arrangement will make it pos- 
sible for the editor to devote a part 
of his time to football, whereas it 
would otherwise have been impos- 
sible. Mr. Shelton was the editor-in- 
chief of the Nugget and assistant 
editor of the Tiger last year and his 
ability in this line of work has been 
proven. The whole College appre- 
ciates the spirit of enthusiasm for the 
Tiger and for the football team which 
prompts him to volunteer his valuable 
assistance. 






THE "KIN" OUT. 

The first number of the Kinnikin- 
nik appeared on Thursday morning 
and by this time should have been 
read by all. The "Kin" is the College 
literary magazine and depends for its 
life, not on the editors, not on the 
manager — although his success is 
necessary for the magazine's success 
— but on the students. It is, we all 
believe, the best college literary mag- 
azine in the West, yet we all will ad- 
mit that there is room for a great 
deal of improvement. A college with 
the scholastic standing of Colorado 
College should have a monthly mag- 
azine of the highest literary quality. 
This can only be done by the stu- 
dents putting their best literary tal- 
ents into contributions for the mag- 
azine. Don't let the editors be forced 
to rely for material entirely on Eng- 
lish One, Two, or even English Three 
themes. If you have a good idea for 
a story or an essay, obey the im- 
pulse; write it and hand it to the 
editor. The "Kin" has lots of use 
for some serious essays and there are 
plenty of people in College who have 
the ability to write well. Let us all 
get together this year and make the 
Kinnikinnik a magazine with the 
highest literary standards. 



FOOTBALL PROSPECTS 

Continued from Page 5 

begin to get a real line on the chances 
of the Tigers. 

Colorado College has the most preten- 
tious schedule of any of the conference 
teams. From an advertising standpoint 
the trip to Wisconsin is not only the 
best ever arranged by a school in the 
Rockies, but it is expected to prove of 
great value to Colorado College. The 
Tigers will put the name of their school 
on the lips of thousands of people who 
never heard of Colorado College. Last 
fall the Black and Gold eleven was 
backed by the whole city and that sup- 
port contributed in a large measure to 
the success of the season. This year 
football fans are hoping that the same 
support and then some, will be given. 



COMMISSION VACANCIES. 



TIGERS vs. TERRORS SATURDAY 

Saturday afternoon the Tigers will 
have the first struggle of the year 
when they clash with the Colorado 
Springs High School "Terrors." This 
will be the first chance of the season 
to see the C. C. pigskin chasers in 
actual play. It is an excellent chance 
to work up a preliminary excitement 
for the big games to come, and at 
the same time become acquainted 
with the men who are out working 
for the Black and Gold. 

Rothy will probably give all the 
available candidates a show in this 
practice game. The different men 
will be used in numerous positions in 
the effort to decide just what shifts 
will be necessary before choosing the 
regular line-up. 

The Tigers should have no trouble 
in romping all over the lot with the 
high school lads , although there have 
been years in the past when the Ter- 
rors have completely turned the 
tables on them. Nothing like that is 
expected this year. 

Although C. S. H. S. contributed a 
number of her best players to Colo- 
rado College's freshman class this 
year, she is putting out a team quite 
up to the usual championship stand- 
ard which she has maintained dur- 
ing the past half dozen years. Coach 
Coffin is working with the largest 
squad in the history of the school. 
It looks as if he were going to be 
able to pick out a team that will 
nearly equal the Tigers in weight. 
There is a large amount of new ma- 
terial in the school. 

Jameson '13 has entered the Uni- 
versity of Utah. 



A meeting of the student body was 
called yesterday after chapel, and the 
question of election of students to fill 
certain vacancies in the Student 
Commission, was discussed and the 
manner of such election was set 
forth. The offices to be filled, as 
they are given elsewhere in this issue 
of the Tiger, are a Treasurer of the 
Associated Students, a senior mem- 
ber of the Athletic Board, and a sen- 
ior member of the Tiger Board. 

Article 7, Section 5, of the Consti- 
tution of the Associated Students, 
covers the vacancies and reads as 
follows : 

"Section 5. If a member of the 
commission fails to attain the class 
rank prescribed for the office to 
which he has been elected, or if ab- 
sent from College for six consecutive 
weeks or is otherwise disqualified, or 
resigns, a vacancy shall be declared. 
Nominations to fill any vacancy shall 
be by petition as provided in Article 
VII, Section 1, except that nomina- 
tions shall be closed and posted five 
days before election; and provided, 
moreover, that election shall be by 
ballot at a special meeting of the 
Associated Students." 

Article VII, Section 1, which regu- 
lates nominations for offices of the 
Student Commission, reads as fol- 
lows: 

"Nominations for all student offices 
of this Commission except the Edi- 
tor-in-Chief of the Tiger, shall be by 
petition. The petition nominating 
the sophomore member of the Com- 
mission shall require the signature of 
ten (10) members of his class, those 
nominating the student members of 
the Tiger Board and the Alumni 
member of the Athletic Board shall 
require the signatures of twenty-five 
(25) students, and all others the sig- 
natures of fifty (50) students. Mem- 
bers of the Women's Advisory Com- 
mittee shall be nominated by petition 
of twenty-five (25) women students. 
Signatures of persons not qualified to 
vote shall not be counted and any 
name signed to two petitions for the 
same office shall be stricken from 
both. The nominations shall be 
closed and a complete list posted on 
the bulletin board in Palmer Hall by 
the Secretary of the Associated Stu- 
dents before 1 p. m. on the tenth day 
preceding election." 

From the foregoing extracts from 
the Constitution of the Associated 

Continued on Page S 



8 



THE TIGER 







The Hat that will be popular with the 
young men that is the "FEDORA." 

We want you to inspect the many sh'apes and shades we 
are showing you are sure to find the style you wish. 

$3.00 to $7.00 



GANO-DOmS* 



Tejon at Kiowa 



BARBECUE PLANS 

Continued from page 1 

tradition to have those bonfires stopped, 
and it was feared for a time the barbe- 
cue itself would have to go. How could 
there be a barbecue without a bonfire? 

It remained for the class of 1913 to 
solve the problem. And they did it, too. 
It was they who proved that a barbecue 
without a bonfire could be a success, and 
the way they pulled off the modern im- 
itation of the old English hunting feast 
was almost as good as the real thing. 

We haven't been able to find out what 
the sophs have up their sleeve to spring 
on us this year, and in fact we don't 
believe the sophs know very much about 
it either, as yet. But they are getting a 
good start on the way to finding out 
what they are going to do, and we are 
willing to wait until Hallowe'en night 
and give them a chance to show how well 
they can play the part of the host. Man- 
ager Herron called a meeting of the 
class Monday noon to appoint commit- 
tees on entertainment, programs and 
grub. The work of each committee was 
outlined, and plans set on foot for the 
biggest barbecue celebration in the last 
twenty-one years, during which the bar- 
becue has been an annual event in the 
history of the College. When asked by 
a Tiger reporter whom he had appointed 
on the committees, he said he didn't 
know, but he would find out tomorrow, 
so the reporter will have to wait until 
he finds the names of those on the com- 
mittees and tack them on the end of 
this article. 

It is a foregone conclusion that the 
program will follow more or less closely 
the customary program that has been 
handed down from year to year. There 
will be a speech of welcome by President 
Jackson of the sophomore class. There 
will be a speech from Prexy who will 
tell you of the barbecue as it was and 
as it is and as it shall be. Then there 
will be music by the sophomore quartet. 
And then a string of stale jokes by Dr. 
Cajori, which will be followed by a 



speech from Shaw. Some Shaw or other 
nearly always talks at a barbecue. After 
the literary part of the program you 
tramp your way down through the corn 
fodder and straw in the south grand- 
stand, and crowd out on the field to 
watch the class in Astronomy I which 
happens at this time to attempt to take 
closer observations of the heavens. And 
then you eat, and if at first you don't 
get enough, go and get some more. 
Sophomores are never stingy when it 
comes to a case of barbecue, and there is 
always more to eat than can be used. 

Those are the features without which 
the barbecue could not be complete. 
Plow much fancy work and frills the 
sophs are going to put on, and how they 
are going to do it, is still a matter of 
speculation, but just promise yourself 
that it is going to be good, and promise 
yourself that you are going to go and 
that you are going to fuss. You'll never 
regret it. 

Oh, yes. Here are those committees 
I was going to tell you about. "Mc- 
Graw" had to go and hunt up his chair- 
men to find out who were appointed on 
the committees. 

Entertainment : Cotten, Lewis, Ogil- 
bee, Miss Gasson and Miss McCreery. 

Grub : Cary, Perry, Barnes, Miss 
Green and Miss McKenzie. 

Program: Jackson, Appel, Geddes, 
Miss Graham, and Miss Littel. 



SOPHOMORES ELECT 
OFFICERS. 



At a meeting of the sophomore 
class held in Palmer Hall Thursday 
noon, the following officers were 
elected for the coming year: 
President — E. B. Jackson. 
Vice-President — Dorothy McCreery. 
Secretary — Maude Stanfield. 
Treasurer— Rovve Rudolph. 
Barbecue Manager — John Herron. 



SOPH-FRESH GAME 

Continued from page 4 

game ended with the ball on the sophs' 
twenty-five-yard line. 

The line-up : 
Freshmen. Sophomores. 

Kampf, qb Herron, qb 

Cheese, rh Wild, Cary, rh 

Holmes, fb Moye, fb 

Emery, lh Sloey, lh 

James, re Winans, re 

Ragle, Covert, rt Rose, rt 

Johnson, rg Summers, rg 

Webb, c Harder, c 

Cover, Owen, Ragle, lg Isense, lg 

Hall, It Coltrin, It 

Mnncaster, le Cameron, le 

Officials : Referee, Herb. Sinton. 
Umpire, Harry Black. Field judge, 
Glen Bowers. Head linesman, Joe Sin- 
ton. 



COMMISSION VACANCIES 

Continued from page 7 

Students, it should be clear to every 
student how the election to fill the 
existing vacancies is to be conducted. 
If there is any one who does not 
clearly understand the method of 
procedure, he should make it his 
business to find out about it, before 
the time for the election comes. 

In order to be eligible for election 
the senior member of the Athletic 
Board and the senior member of the 
Tiger Board must be members of the 
senior class and the Treasurer of the 
Associated Students must be a mem 
ber of the junior class. 



The freshman caps have arrived 
and they began to make their appear 
ance on the campus last Tuesday. 
By the first of next week there ought 
to be a skull cap on the head of every 
freshman man in the College. And 
if there isn't, look out for the sophs! 



Al Knight '12 will not complete his 
course in electrical engineering this year. 



J. B. Cooper of Detroit, Mich., was 
dispensing jewelry and conversation 
about the campus last week. 



FIRST APOLLONIAN MEETING. 



The Apollonian Club held a short 
business meeting last Friday night. 
Committees were appointed for the 
coming semester, and arrangements 
were made for the open night to new 
men which. comes next Friday night. 



ENGINEERS' CLUB. 



The first open meeting of the En- 
gineers' Club Friday night proved 
quite a treat to those attending. 
Speeches upon the organization and 
development of the Club were made 
by President Scott, Dean Cajori and 
Professor Thomas. 

A number by Mr. Love on the pipe 
organ, which on close investigation 
was found to be merely a set of test 
tubes tuned to the proper pitch, was 
the novelty. The evening was con- 
cluded with boxing matches. , 

Due probably to the fact that the 
Engineers' Club is still a young or- 



ganization, its true value in the life of 
the College is not appreciated. It 
was founded with the express idea of 
giving the engineer and student of 
science the something he couldn't get 
elsewhere in the College. It is the 
result of experiments and evolution, 
beginning with the Brotherhood of 
Engineers some six years ago. This 
changed into the Colorado College 
Chemistry Club, which still failed to 
fulfil the desired wants. Later the 
Polytechnic Society was formed, but 
it too finally perished. With the 
causes of the failures of these three 
organizations in mind the Engineers' 
Club was formed with a determination 
to steer around the snags that had 
sunk the others. Its first year ful- 
filled all its founders' dreams, and 
with the same policies and principles 
as last year it will prove more con- 
clusively than ever that it deserves 
to be ranked with the permanent or- 
ganizations of Colorado College. 



FORESTRY CLUB. 

The first meeting of the Forestry Club 
was held in the Polytechnic Library on 



THE TIGER 

Thursday evening, September 21. Very 
little business was transacted on account 
of the small attendance. Most of the 
foresters were attending the Y. M. C. 
A. reception. 

The next meeting will be held Thurs- 
day, September 28. Every man registered 
in the forestry department is invited to 
be present. 

Election of officers will take place. 



BOYNTON GETS GOOD JOB. 



"Jack" Boynton, who was graduated 
from the Forestry school last year has 
secured a position with the park board of 
Los Angeles. He will take charge of 
the tree surgery and and tree-spraying 
this winter. 



SOCIAL COMMITTEE MEETS. 

A committee composed of all the 
heads of the various social organiza- 
tions of the College conferred with 
Miss Loomis last night for the pur- 
pose of arranging a schedule of so- 
cial events for the year. The meet- 
ing was held too late for the results 
to be published in the Tiger this week, 
but the whole program will appear in 
next week's issue. 



MINERVA ALUMNAE SOCIETY 
HAS FIRST MEETING. 



The Minerva Alumnae society of 
Colorado College held its first meet- 
ing for the season in the home of 
Miss Jeannette Scholz, 1829 North 
Nevada avenue Thursday afternoon. 
The resignation of the vice president, 
Margaret Mack, having been ac- 
cepted because of her intended ab- 
sence in California, Miss Janet Kampf 
was elected o the office. 

It was decided to take up the study 
of ".European Castles; Their Archi- 
tecture, Historical and Art Interest,'' 
and the vice president of the •club 
will formulate the program and pre- 
sent it at the next meeting. The 
members of the club will picnic Sat- 
urday, September 30, in the summer 
cottage of the Rev. and Mrs. Robert. 
Bruce Wolf on Cheyenne Mountain. 




NEW 

Fall Styles 

JUST IN 

High Arch, High Toes, Short 
Vamps, Button or Lace, Velvets, 
Suedes, Patents, Gunmetels, 
Tan Russia's 

$2.50, $3.00, $3.50 
and $4.00 




^^-•^107 SwTH~¥jjow jFjgrrl — ^ 



Board $4.50 Per Week 

One front room for two. Board 

and room $25 per month for each 

222 E. DALE 

ENGINEERS' CLUB, SEPT 29. 

Music Seeley 

Electric Street Car Lighting Love 

Denver Water Supply Scott 

Extemporaneous Speech. 
Critic's Report. 



Telephone 599 



CUT FLOWERS 



Store 104N. Tejon Street 

The Pike's Peak Floral Co. 

DECORATIONS AND DESIGNS 



10 



THE TIGER 



THE NEW ALPINE HAT 

The New Rough Alpine is the Leading Hat of the Season 



It is daily increasing in popularity. We are displaying it in unusual variety 
of new autumn shades and in the best foreign and domestic makes 



Soft Crushes in the 
New Fall Shades 



$3.00 to $10.00 

$1.50 to $2.50 THE HUB 



LE CERCLE FRANCAIS, SEPT 28. 

La Musique d' aujottr'dhue, 

Mile. Lennox 

Courier de la semaine M. Storke 

Le Monde • • • ■ Mile. Sutton 

Article de Fond M. Rowbotham 

p eme Mile. Aken 

Les Evenements locaui M. Park 

Tieknor Study, a huit leures. 



To College 
Students 
Old and New 

We Extend the Most Cordial Good 
Wishes. We've made a Specialty of 
taking care of the wants of the up-to. 
date young men and women. You'll 
find us the kind of jewelry store you'll 
like. 

The Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak 

The Davis Barber Shop 

Individual Sterilizing Cabinets 

Ray Davis, Manager 

Have Your Clothes Cleaned, Pressed and 
Kept in First-Class Repair by 

"Sam" the Gentlemen's Valet 

Also Makes a Specialty of Serving Parties 
SAM FLEMING 

114 E. Cucharras Phone 1675 



Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co. 



THOMPSON-STARK WEDDING. 

On Sunday afternoon, September 
twenty-fourth, the wedding of Ed- 
mund C. Thompson to Miss Edith 
Stark was solemnized at the home of 
the bride, No. 423 N. Wahsatch St. 
Dean Edward S. Parsons was the 
officiating clergyman. 

The event was intended to be a 
quiet home affair and none but the 
immediate relatives of the bride and 
friends were present. Pink and white 
asters, with garlands of smilax were 
the principal decorations. The cere- 
mony occurred promptly at four- 
thirty and was followed by refresh- 
ments and songs by members of the 
Phi Gamma Delta fraternity and 
Minerva society, who were present. 

The bride's boquet was caught by 
Miss Octavia Hall, and the gifts 
secreted in the wedding cake were 
distributed to Miss Janet Kampf, Miss 
Shirley McKinnie and Miss Lina 
Brunner. 

Besides the parents of the bride 
and her relatives, the Misses Alpha 
and Flora Crowley, Janet, Louise and 
Cora Kampf, Octavia Hall, Addie 
Hemenway, Vesta Tucker, Lina 
Brunner, Edith Vaughn, Margaret 
Sells, Hazlett Worthing, Shirley Mc- 
Kinney, Mrs. Male, and Messrs. Carl 
Blackman, Silmon Smith, Joseph 
Floyd, Earl Bryson, Horace Hall, 
Andrew Donovan, Josiah Hughes, 
William Johnston, Paul Bailey, 
Thomas Lynch, Jr., and D. L. Boyes, 
were present. 



SENIORS ENTERTAINED. 



President and Mrs. Slocum held a 
reception to the senior class Saturday 
evening at their home at 24 College 
Place. Almost all the members of 
the class were present to enjoy their 
hospitality. Dean and Mrs Parsons 
were also among the guests. 



RRF AD For morning delivery. It's 
bread hot from the oven, 
baked from the choicest flour, and that 
would command first premium anywhere. 
That you get from us. Is always good. 

THE CHICAGO BAKERY 

Have the fellows meet you at 

Tucker 9 s 
Restaurant 

10 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 

The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heatirg Co 



Phone Main 48 



313 N. Tejon St. 



You can always save money if 
you will come to see our line in 
diamonds, watches, jewelry, 
guns, sporting goods, fishing 
tack e, awing sets, musical 
instruments, trunks, valisds, or 
if you want to loan money, you 
can get it 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 

Money Loaned on Valuables 



THE TIGER 



The College Book and Supply Store 

In addition to furnishing the Text Books and Engineering 
Supplies for the College students, we carry a very large 
stock of Fountain Pens, Waterman's Ideal, Conklin Self- 
fillers and College. See Our PENNANTS ane POSTERS 

Whitney & Grimwood 






Get Your Picnic Supplies 

= at srs 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

1 13 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 1 14 

The College 
Photo Studio 



rn%y 





Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 

CORRIN BROS. 

Suits Made To Order 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing, 

and Remodeling for Ladies 

and Gentlemen 

Work Called for and Delivered 

Phone 1922 M 107 E. Bijou Street 

Nothing Pleases Us More Than 
To Please College Students 

The Fred S. Tucker 

Furniture Co. 



WARE ENTERTAINS. 

Secretary Ware, of the College 
Young Men's Christian Asociation, 
entertains a party of representative 
College men at dinner tonight at the 
Alta Vista Hotel. The guests who 
are to participate are Messrs. H. G. 
Sinton, H. R. Vandemoer, H. A. Par- 
kison, L. L. Shaw, E. E. Hedblom, J. 
L. Herron, W. W. Johnston, E. W. 
Lindstrom, Byron Winans, K. C. 
Heald, J. B. Witherow and Thomas 
Lynch, Jr. 



KAPPA SIGMA BRUIN INN 
PARTY. 

On Wednesday evening of last 
week several members of the Kappa 
Sigma fraternity entertained a num- 
ber of friends at Bruin Inn. Among 
the guests who participated were: 
Miss Barclay, Mrs. Gerteisen and Mr. 
Motten, who chaperoned; Miss Nelle 
Estill, Miss Harriet Ferril, Miss Lucy 
Ferril, Miss Dorothy McCreery, Miss 
Hazel Bane, Miss Eleanor Ball, Miss 
Virginia Gasson, Miss Lucile Par- 
sons, Miss Hattie Clark and Miss 
Mary Walsh; Messrs. William Argo, 
and Frank Merriell. The members 
of the fraternity in the party were 
Messrs. Whipple, Morse, Hall, Baker, 
Black, Parkison, Winchell, Cotten 
and Thornell. 



DAIS OFFICERS ELECTED. 



On Monday night, September 18, 
the first regular meeting of The 
Ancient Order of the Dais was held 
at which the following officers were 
elected: 

High Mogul— Miss Rita Miller. 
Summoner — Miss Bessie Knight. 
Clerke — Miss Elizabeth Burgess. 
Franklin — Miss Margaret Watson. 
Almoner — Miss Florence Humphreys. 
Baillie — Miss Dorliska Crandall. 
Jester — Miss Mabel Wilson. 
Page — Miss Elizabeth Gerould. 

Owing to the indiscriminate 



II 

MOTOR CYCLES 

Yale Emblem 

BICYCLES and Supplies 

Expert Repairing 

Colorado Springs Cycle 

Company 

DeWitt Doyle, Manager 
224 N. Tejon St. Phone Red 34 



Knight - Campbell's 

F0R PIAN0S 

and PLAYER PIANOS 

STE1NWAY and 20 OTHER MAKES 

We Rent Pianos 

Largest Stock Victor Talking Machines 
and Edison Phonographs 

226 N. Tejon St., after Sept. 15, 122 N. Tejon 

The Gowdy-Simmons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS 

Copper Plate and Steel Engravers 
Telephone 87 21 N. Tejon Street 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing i Typewriter. 

Zimmerman Supply 

/^-k «--»-- — M — - 22 E. Kiowa St. 

Company Phone Main 374 

Established 1890 



You can save from 25 
percent to 40 percent 
on our finest Hart, 
Schaf f ner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer & 
Clothcraft Suits and. 
Overcoats 



12 



THE TIGER 



THE SEAL OF THE COLLEGE 

Embossed in Black and Gold on Eaton-Hurlbut's finest quality Swiss Chiffon Linen with 

Envelopes to match constitutes our 

Special Box of College Stationery 

We bought a large lot of this elegant paper and in order to sell it out quickly have reduced our price to 

Only SOc per Box 

This paper to be had only at JMljRRAY S Opposite the Compus 



The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

116 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Gives 
Special Attention to Accounts of Students 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, President Ira Harris, V-President 

M.C. Gile Lilla B. Ensign C. E. Lynde 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M. 



THE OUT WEST 

TENT AND AWNING CO. 

RECLINING CHAIRS 
PORCHES ENCLOSED 

Tents Rented for a Day or for Longer 

Stamping, Designing, R rforating, Best Hand Painted 

China. Western Branch of Mexican Pigment Paints, 

Stenciling and Materials 

Art Needlework and Art Goods 

THE HUNT AND VAN NICE 

ART SPECIALTY SHOPS 

Retail and Wholesale 

8 Pike's Peak Avenue Phone Main 20S5 

STUDENTS ! 

The 
Pearl Laundry Co. 

respectfully solicits your pat- 
ronage. We guarantee satis- 
factory work and service and 
give you 20% discount. 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 



Local Department 



Kampf '15 is wearing the Sigma Chi 
spike. 

Hille '11 has gone to Denver. 



There has been a fine crop of colds 
among the underclassmen as a result of 
their recent activities in the rain. 



Hamilton '15 is pledged to Sigma Chi. 



A number of Sigma Chi's and ladies 
had a very enjoyable Bruin Inn trip, 
Thursday. 



Gertrude Mullineaux gave a spread to 
t'ne Ticknor girls Saturday night. 

Many parents have been visiting dur- 
ing the Knight Templar conclave. 



Lillian Picken was the guest of Mrs. 
McLean at Palmer Lake, Saturday and 
Sunday. 



Frances Townsend returned to Col- 
lege, Sunday. 



Eliese Painter gave a spread, Sunday 
night. 



THE POPULAR 

Creams and Ices Fresh Bulter 

Made Right and Delivered Promptly 

A. L. MOWRY 

Phone 1184 
115 East Cache la Poudre Street 



STOP AT 

LIGHTNING SHOE SHOP 

to get your shoes repaired. Shine 
free with every pair of soles 

Sewed Soles 75c. 28^ N. Tejon St. 



William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Ted Strieby entertained twelve of the 
College students at a dance, Saturday 
night. 



Agnes Anderson enjoyed a visit from 
her father, Sunday. 



Colorado Spring:*, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



THE 

Crissey *Si Fowler 
Lumber Co. 



Phone 101 



117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 



Ladies Sample Slippers, 
worth up to $5.00 

Ladies Sample Oxfords 
worth up to $4.00 



One line of Ladies Tan 



The Whitaker-Kester 

95 c Shoe Co. Welt Pum P Laces and 



$1.75 



J 



1 North Tejon Street 



Button Oxfords were $3.50 



THE TIGER 



13 



Student Supplies 

A Line of Stationery that is 
most complete. 

The only stock of Engineers 
Supplies in this section. 
Headquarters for fine Engrav- 
ing and Printing. 

OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

HA YNER 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



2 S. Tojon St. 



Colorado Springs 



The Prompt Printery Co. 

MASTER PRINTERS 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



Developing and Printing 

HARLAN 

"The View Man" 

All Kinds of View and Commercial Work 
Phone Main 2717 304 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

Seldomridge Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



CALL 2000 

When You Want Anything QUICK! 
QUICK DELIVERY 

MAIN 2000 



Minerva's first open meeting was held 
last Friday. 

Lester Griswold '10 is now in Pitts- 
burg, Pa., attending the Carnegie Tech- 
nical School, where he is studying elec- 
trical engineering. 



Earl Bryson '11 left Tuesday for Chi- 
cago to take a law course in the Uni- 
versity of Chicago. 



Fred Rice '11 left Sunday night for 
New Orleans, where he has accepted a 
position with a lumber company. 



Miss Nola Hayden ex-'12 was married 
during the summer to Mr. Brown, and is 
living in this city. 



Rhoda U. Haynes and Harold De- 
Witt Roberts, both of the class of '08, 
were maried in Greeley, August 22, by 
President Slocum. They are living in 
Salem, Oregon. 



Carl R. Blackmail '10 left Monday, 
for Dayton, Ohio, to become an assist- 
ant Y. M. C. A. secretary at that place. 



Gleason C. Lake '07 left yesterday for 
Chicago, where -he will resume his stud- 
ies in the University of Chicago Medical 
School. He has received a scholarship 
in that institution. 



Silmon L. Smith '09, who is attending 
the Denver University Law School, was 
in town over Sunday. He was a guest 
at the Stark-Thompson wedding. 

Leo Lake '08 is entering McCormick 
Theological Seminary at Chicago this 
fall. 



Mrs. Lamb came down from Denver 
Friday for a short visit with her sou 
and daughter, Sydney and Letitia. 

Albert Tuck, of Greeley, a student in 
Northwestern University, was a vis- 
itor on the campus, Friday. 



Those in McGregor who gave fudge 
parties Friday night were Dorothy Mad- 
den and Rofiina Lewis, Veda Hasty and 
Letitia Lamb, Anna Copelaud, Lillian 
Catren and Myrth King, and Edna Max- 
well and Lorena Woltzen. 

Anne Baker enjoyed a visit from her 
father and mother last week. 



Helen Stoddard shared a "box from 
home" with a few of her friends, Thurs- 
day evening. 



FOR THAT SPREAD 

Serve a BURGESS LUNCHEON 

We have complete Delicatessen, 
B;key and Candy Departments 
and can prepare a most tempting 
"Spread" on short notice. 

BURGESS 

Phone Eight Three 
12-114 North Tejon Street 



Sewed Soles 75 cents 
Rubber Heels 35 cents 

AT 

PETE'S SHOE SHOP 

230 East Dale 

JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Stree 

Comfortable Rooms for 
Students 

Two Blocks from Corner of the Campus 

Reasonable Prices 

Newly Furnished 

Enquire at 1013 North Wahsatch Ave. 

Hunt Up 

BisselPs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

Pike's Peak Book & 
Stationery Co. l\L T & Si 



14 



THE TIGER 



Be Your Own Agent 

The management of the STAR LAUNDRY have 
decided to have no general agent at the College and to 
give agent's discount direct to the student sending in 
the bundle. 

Our drivers will sell you a $5.00 Coupon Book for $3.50, a dis- 
count of 30%, or you can pay in cash on the delivery of the bundle, 
taking out 30% for yourself. No bundles will be left without money 
or coupons. 

Coupon- Books at this discount will be sold only to students and 
are not transferable and the coupon will not be received from other 
than students. 



Phone Main 715 328 N. Tejon Street 



«S 






HERBERT BENNETT, Agent 

Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton Dairy 

419 S. El Paeo St. Phone Main 442 

GET IT AT 

THE EMPORIUM 

AND SAVE MONEY 

110 S. TEJON STREET 

THE MUELLER 

TEACHERS' AGENCY 

Conducted for Efficiency only. Services 
free to School Bnards. No enrollment fee 
for teachers. Call or write 

ANNA HI MUELLER, 450 West Uinta Street, 
Phone Main 2188 Colorado Springs, Colo 

Deichmann & Douglas Floral 
Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER, Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 

Students' Trade Solicited 

ill N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 



One night in the dim unknown 
regions of Bemis the following girls 
were pledged to the Dais: Etta 
Clark, Florence Oettiker, Lillian 
Picken, Margaret Sherman, Lillian 
Williams. 

Miss Josephine Knight, who has 
been visiting her sister, left Tuesday 
fot her home in Grand Junction. 



Mrs. Sutter and her sister, Miss 
Chase, visited Elizabeth Sutter over 
Sunday. 

Hughill and Heymach, old alumni 
of the Mines Beta Chapter, stopped 
;V the Delta Phi Theta house Satur- 
day en route to Denver after an auto 
trip through the state. 



Edward Koch, John Herron and 
Dana Reynolds, all of the class of '13, 
weic initiated into the Kappa Sigma 
fraternity Monday night 



Herb Vandemoer's uncle spent a 
couple of days with him the first of 
the week. 



Many College people attended the 
party tendered Miss Edith Stark Fri- 
day evening. 



Thos. Hatch '13 will not return to 
school this winter, but will remain at 
work on the irrigation project in south- 
western Canada. 

Mr. David Allan Robertson, secre- 
tary to the President, University of 
Chicago, and member of the Chicago 
chapter of Phi Gamma Delta, was a 
visitor during the past week on the 
campus. 



FRESHMEN 

■ 

We Wish to Introduce 
to You 

The College Inn 

Opposite the Campus 



THE 

FIRST 

SUPPER 



AT 



McREA'S 



THE 

Hemenway Grocer, Co 
Groceries and 



Meats 







115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Wills. Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Gazette Building 



THE TIGER 



15 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

"The College Favorite 



The Favorite Shopping 

Place for College 

People 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

s the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 

106^ E.Vike's Peak Ave. Phone Main 700 

W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 






91 N. Tejon 



Pbone Main 900 



For the "BEST IN THINGS MUSICAL" 

GO TO 

Hiltbrand's Music Store 

Phone 13 



125' , N. Tejon St. 



Artists Materials 

FRAMING 
College Posters 

The Richard Willis Art Studios 

4 l i East Pike's Peak Avenue 



Gorton's G 


ood 


Underwear. 


Union 


Suits $1 up. 


Two 


piece Suit 


50c 


Garment 


up 



YOU KNOW OUR 
REPUTATION 



Gorton's Good 

Shirts 

Plain and Pleated 

$1 to $2.50 



for furnishing the College men with goods of unquestioned style, 
quality and workmanship. You instinctive desire for good clothes 
will be most pleasantly gratified here. And we ask nothing 
further than an inspection. Suits and Overcoats $ 1 5 to $35.00. 
Stylish Fall Hats $3 to $5 



Money . 
Cheerfully 
Refunded 







Correct Dress lor Men. \ 



113 East 

Pike's Peak 

Avenue 



Fay Templeton, who was operated 
upon for appendicitis Monday, is im- 
proving. 



"Stubby" Dean 'ir is in town for 
a few days. 



Morse '15 is pledged to Delta Phi 
'1 beta. 

Krueger ex-' 13 has returned to Col- 
lege this year. 



Jack Ambler entertained his regu- 
lar customers at a free ice cream so- 
cial last Sunday. 



Howland and Le Clere, early sea- 
son football victims, are attending 
classes on three legs. 

F. B. Vrooman of Washington, D. 
C, a member of Beta Theta Pi fra- 
ternity and a graduate of Oxford and 
Columbia, was staying at the Delta 
Phi Theta house during the early 
part of last week. 



A few members of the Delta Phi 
Theta fraternity and ladies enjoyed 
an outing in North Cheyenne Canon 
on Saturday of last week. Mr. 
Thomas and Miss Gilbert chaperoned 
the party. The quests of the frater- 
nity were Miss Pedelser, Hamilton, 
Stukey, DeRusha and Dr. Porter. 



Get Acquainted at 

The Red 
Cross Pharmacy 

WiLLAMS 8 KLUSS 
HUDSON'S CHOCOLATES 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 

107 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone 40 



Dern's Freshly Roasted Coffee 

will make 10 more cups to the lb. 
than Eastern roasted coffee 



29 S. Tejon Street 



Phone 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Bldg 
118 North Tejon St. Phone Main 1701 

Res., 1211 N. Weber St. Tel. Main 956 




TOD POWELL 



Phone Main 930 



W. E. DONER 



POWELL-DONER SPORTING GOODS CO. 

1 1 2 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

"EVERYTHING FOR SPORTSMEN" 

New and Complete Stock of the Very Best of Athletic Supplies, College Pennants, Novelties, Etc. 

"ASK THE MEDICINE MAN" 



16 



THE TIGER 



Mr. Tiger Senior: your flat Brim John B. class hat No matter where you go or what you pay you will 

has arrived and is ready for you here— bands and all not find the equal in style or tailoring of these smart 

complete. Perkins-Shearer suits for fall. 

And Mr. Freshman: your little black class cap with Our new regal shoes for Fall and Winter in V\ 

with buttons of red or green or purple, has just been s j zes are due in this week, 
placed in stock, you can get these any day now. 

(Pei4uii4-S&earer6 



HAUGEN, Tailor 



222 N. Tejon. 



Phone Main 296 



* 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 



V 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



Departments — 

College of Arts and 
Science, 
E. S. PARSONS, Dean 

School of Engineering, 
F. CAJORI, Dean 

School of Forestry, 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 

School of Music, 

E. D. HALE, Dean 



Cigars, Tobacco, Pipes, Etc. 




Pool in connection but not a pool room 
COME AND SEE 

HUGHES 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., OCTOBER 5, 1911 



Vr.. XtV 



Number 4 



SCHEDULE BEGINNING SECOND SUNDAY 

OF EVENTS VICTORIOUS VESPER SERVICE 



Committee Finally Arranges Program 
For the First Semester. 



TEAM MAKES FAIRLY GOOD 

SHOWING IN OPENING 

PRACTICE GAME. 



Dean Parsons Delivers Impressive 
Sermon, 



The Social Committee, composed of 
Miss Loomis, the Dean of Women, 
and the heads of the various social 
and literary organizations of the Col- 
lege, have at last succeeded in fram- 
ing up a schedule of social events for 
the first semester that promises to 
be fairly satisfactory. On account of 
the very complicated system of or- 
ganizations here, the arrangement of 
such a schedule that should be satis- 
factory and acceptable to all, was a 
very difficult matter, and the commit- 
tee is to be congratulated upon the 
good feeling prevalent among the dif- 
ferent organizations, which has made 
the drafting of a program possible. 

The schedule as it now stands, is 
intended to be permanent as may be, 
but there were a few reservations 
made by different organizations and 
applications made for changes in 
cases where the program will not be 
thereby disarranged, may be consid- 
ered by Miss Loomis at any time. 

Following is the first draft of the 
social schedule for the first semester: 

Friday, October 6th — Dramatic So- 
ciety entertains the new girls in Cogs- 
well theatre. 

Saturday, October 7th — Fraternity 
night (1). Football game here. 

Friday, October 13th — Hypatia So- 
ciety entertains the new girls in Mc- 
Gregor gymnasium. 

Saturday, October 14th — President 

Continued on page 4 



Although the Colorado Springs High 
School team scored on the Colorado 
College team for the first time in the last 
five years in last Saturday's game, the 
Tigers got even by defeating the Terrors 
just a little worse than usual. The final 
score was 34 to 3 in the Tigers' favor. 
The score would have been much larger 
if Rothgeb had not had mercy on the 
Terrors, and put in nearly the whole 

C ntlnued on page 4 



THREE HUNDRED STUDENTS 
TAGGED. 

Chairman Parkison of the tag com- 
mittee has been calling in the sheck- 
els from an array of tagsters. All of 
the money has not yet been turned 
in, but Parkison reports that the total 
will average somewhere near three 
hundred dollars. This leaves over a 
hundred of the students who have 
not yet "paid their dollars." Some of 
these will doubtless come through 
yet, since we have another first of 
the month with us. The committee 
met with Dean Parsons, however, and 
decided not to push the matter any 
further, but to leave it to each stu- 
dent's patriotism to contribute as 
soon as he is able. 

Training table started Monday at 
the Sigma Chi House. The student 
body has shown that it is behind the 
team and we can trust it to stay there. 



The second of the series of Sunday 
vesper services was held in Perkins Hall 
last Sunday. The splendid impressive- 
nes which so distinctly marked the first 
service two weeks ago was also charac- 
teristic of the second. The -singing 
of the College choir was, if posible, bet- 
ter than it was at the first service. 

Dean Parsons delivered an effectual 
sermon upon the subject of "The Open 
Path to God." His text was taken from 
Jer. 22:16, as follows: "He judged the 
cause of the poor and needy. * * * 
Was not that to know me? saith Je- 
hovah." 

Dean Parsons spoke in part as fol- 
lows : 

"Each age must worship its own 
thought of God." A visit to an ob- 
servatory, as the Yerkes, gives a new 
realization of the sublimity of the uni- 
verse. The wonderful photographic 
plates of sun and moon, of comets and 
nebulae, the patience of the astronomer 
securing his records of today that his 
successor a hundred of a thousand years 
hence may, by comparisons with his ob- 
servations detect if there has been move- 
ment in the star or development in the 
nebula. These give the student a new 
sense of the universe of which we are a 
part. And as we link with them the 
facts which the science of geology and 
biology have taught us, we cannot fail 
to feel a new sense of awe as we re- 
member Him who is the source and 
ground of all, and realize that the things 

Continued on p»ge 8 



THE TIGER ^:. i3^ 



Y. m G. A. 



************ * *-* * 

A group of Golle^men are 
planning to climb Pike's- Peak 
on Friday night. Any other 
men desiring to take -the trip, 
be on hand at the Young 
Men's Christian Association 
ySffice in" Hagerman Hall at 9 



*:..•!>**•*•*********** 



SECRETARY WARE ENTER- 
1 %&• .1-- TAINS. 



Cn Wednesday night of last week 
Secretary Ware of the College 
Young Men's Christian Association 
entertained a number of College men 
at an elaborate dinner at the Alta 
Vista hotel. \mong those who en- 
joyed the hospitality were Messrs. H. 
G. Sinton. H. L. Black, H. R. Vande- 
moer, H. A. Parkisorr; K. C. Heald, 
E. E. Hedblom, E. W. Lindstrom, J. 
B'. Witherow, J. L. Herron, Byron 
Winans, W. W. Johnston, and Thom- 
as Lynch, Jr. 



FIRST Y. M. C. A. MEETING. 



The Y. M. C. A. held its first 
monthly meeting last Thursday even- 
ing in Upper Perkins. The Associa- 
tion this year has decided not to hold 
weekly meetings but to concentrate 
efforts, on the Sunday vesper service. 
It intends, however, to hold a meet- 
ing once a month at which prominent 
laymen will speak on various sub- 
jects of vital importance to the Col- 
lege men. President Slocum, who 
v\as the speaker on last Thursday 
evening, gave a very impressive talk 
on the original plans and the ideals 
of the College and the part that the 
present student body should have in 
helping to carry out those plans. He 
appealed strongly for a stronger 
recognition of the true proportion 
between the intellectual and the so- 
cial sides of College life. The pro- 
gram of the meeting was a bright 
and interesting one and Miss Eleanor 
Thomas' singing was greatly appre- 
ciated by those present. 



VOTING TODAY 



EfECTION PETITIONS CIRCU- 
LATED. 



Waldrich ex-'o5 of Alamosa, vis- 
ited at tile Kappa Sigma house dur- 
ing the Knights Templar conclave. 



Representative Men Nominated ~to*=- 
' v /*Fill Important Offices. 

t — v . 

After the announcements in Chapel ori- 
Wednesday "of last" week concerning the 
petitions for the nominations of candi- 
dates to fill the offices how vacant on»4he 
Student Commission, a number of peti- 
tions immediately appeared for circula- 
tion among the students boosting various 
representative students into the limelight 
of office-seekers. 

In acordance with the ruling of the 
Commision, all petitions for the nomina- 
tions of candidates were required to be 
in the hands of Secretary Parkison by 
6 p. m. Friday. The date of the elec- 
tion was set for today, Thursday, Octo- 
ber 5. The interval of five days was in- 
tended to allow the student body to look 
over the men who were nominated for 
the offices just filled, and allow each 
voter ample time to make a judicious 
selection. 

For the office of senior member of 
the Athletic Board, petitions were filed 
nominating E. P. Morse and K. C. 
Heald. One of these two men is to be 
chosen to fill the office left vacant by 
the resignation of Herb Sinton, who 
was elected President of the Commis- 
sion. 

For the office of Treasurer of the As- 
sociated Students, there are also peti- 
tions for two nominations. The nomi- 
nees for this position are A. W. Dono- 
van and A. H. Rowbotham. This office 
was left vacant by Karl Weller, who 
was unable to return to College this 
year. 

For the position of senior member of 
the Tiger Board there are three candi- 
dates in the field. Petitions have been 
filed for the nomination of Sam Shel- 
ton, Ferguson Ormes and George Whip- 
ple. This office became vacant through 
the resignation of Charles Donelan. 

All of the men who are candidates for 
offices on the Student Commission are 
too well known in the College to need 
any introduction, and for the filling of 
the offices there is not much to choose 
among the nominees. Nothing would 
please us better than to get a scoop on 
the election which was held this morn- 
ing, but since this is imposible, we will 
have to do the next best thing and make 
the full announcements of the results of 
the election in next week's issue. 



PLEDGE DAY FOR THE GIRLS' 
LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

This is the thnyiycar that the new 
rules of the girls' --Jiterary societies 
have been in force. Saturday the fol- 
lowing girls were pledged: _._ 

To Minerva — Claire Galligan, Doro- 
thy McCreery, Frances' Adamsj, Olive 
Brown," Netta Powell. . Alide Hamil- 
/ ton, Mabel Harlan, Agnes Lennox, 
Violet ^Hopper, "Virginia: vGasson, 
Helen Cassfdv. ' ■>- ^ <■• ' 

To Contemporary — Lucile Wake- 
field, Helen Graham, Helen Crutcher, 
F-llen Galpin, Maude Stanfield, Eliza- 
beth Sutton, Gladys Whittenberger. 
To Hypatia — Ruth Copeland, Lil- 
Gatren, Florence Youngmah, > 
Gladys i Wrioierr, — J-essie Sheldon." 
Louise Wilson. 

DR. NITOBE TALKS AT CHAPEL. 

- " ' - - -\ < 

Last Tuesday morning the student 
body had the very great pleasure of lis- 
tening to an interesting address by Dr. 
Nitobe, president of the National Col- 
lege of Japan. Dr. Nitobe has been 
sent to United States to deliver a series 
of lectures at several of the different 
colleges and universities of the east dur- 
ing the coming winter. In the course 
of his talk Tuesday morning, Dr. Nitobe 
spoke very clearly and very emphatically 
of the friendly and peaceful disposition 
of the Japanese official government and 
the better class of the Japanese people 
toward the United States government. 
He attribtued the greater part of the 
war talk that goes over the two coun- 
tries almost continually to corporations 
and individuals who would be interested 
in stirring up ill feeling between the 
two nations. 



APOLLONIAN OPEN HOUSE. 



The Apollonian Club gave its an- 
nual reception to the new men Fri- 
day night. A very enjoyable pro- 
gram was rendered, including a 
speech of welcome from President 
Johnston of the Club, and an address 
from President Slocum. A still more 
enjoyable feed and general jollifica- 
tion followed. A boxing match be- 
tween "Mutt" Ogilbee and "Jeff" Ca- 
jori, a blindfold hunt with a punch- 
ing bag, and College songs featured 
in the entertainment. 



Several of the Bemis sophomores had 
a spread Monday in honor of the birth- 
days of Elizabeth Sutton and Hester 
Cruchter. 



THE TIGER 



JUNIOR-FRESHMAN RECEP- 
TION. 



GLEE CLUB TRYOUTS. 



COLLEGE ATTENDANCE MUCH 
LARGER THAN LAST FALL. 



The annual junior-freshman recep- 
tion was held last Saturday night in 
upper Perkins Hall. The rooms 
were draped in purple and white. 
Cozy corners were built in all the 
rooms, which looked soft and in- 
viting but proved otherwise. In the 
receiving line stood Miss Haynes, 
President of the junior class, Presi- 
dent Harter of the freshman class 
and Miss Hall, the official chaperone. 
The committee provided everyone 
with a number and instructed them 
to find their partners for the evening. 
The numbers were so arranged that 
the freshman men drew junior ladies 
and the junior men drew freshman 
ladies, i A short program was given 
in which Mr. Horace Hall, in a droll 
costume, amused everyone with his 
quaint humor; then Shaw presented 
his two act melodrama, "Bread Upon 
the Waters;" Miss Josie Whorten 
then rendered real music at the piano. 
For refreshments pineapple, choco- 
late and vanilla ice-cream sundaes 
were served. 



LIBRARY IMPROVEMENTS. 

Important alterations are being 
made in Coburn library this week. A 
large window is being placed in the 
archway at the north end of the 
building. This alteration will be a 
great improvement as it will furnish 
light and has been badly needed. 
Eventually this window will be taken 
out and the archway will lead from 
the present building, which is only a 
wing in the original plan to the main 
structure. 

Many noteworthy additions have 
recently been made to the library 
shelves. In the biology and chemis- 
try departments a large number of 
lew books have lately been added. 
The eleventh edition of the Encyclo- 
pedia Brittanica has arrived and can 
be found on the reference shelves. 
Anpther important work of reference, 
Grove's Dictionary of Music, has re- 
cently been added to the library and 
also the first of the five annual vol- 
umes of Munro's Encyclopedia of 
Education, an Atlas containing the 
19:0 census statistics has also been 
ordered and will soon be at the con- 
venience of students. 



The final tryouts for applicants for 
the Glee Club was held Monday and 
the personnel of the Club definitely 
determined. Tlie amount of available 
material was more than double that 
of last year and Doctor Richards had 
great difficulty in making his selec- 
tions. The first tenors are Park, 
Baker, Moye, Munroe and Thomas, 
with Kampf as first substitute. Thor- 
nell, Geddes, Grimsley, Morse and 
Lewis make up the second tenors. 
Wright, McLaughlin and Atwater are 
substitutes. The baritones are Mantz, 
E. W. Barnes, Seldomridge, Allen and 
Emery. Substitutes, Ormes, Wright, 
Klahr and Atwater. Winchell, H. 
Gregg, W. C. Barnes, E. Jackson and 
R. Jackson are the basses, with 
Ormes and Atwater for substitutes. 

On account of the keen competition 
it will be necessary for each man to 
be ai every rehearsal in order to hold 
his place this year, and all those 
vhose names appear on the regular 
list are expected to be in room 11, 
Perkins, on Tuesday, October 10th, 
at 7:15 p. m. sharp for the first re- 
hearsal. 

Mr. Lloyd L. Shaw will again ac- 
company the club as reader, and the 
instrumental part of the program will 
be furnished this year by McMillan, 
R. Jackson and Seldomridge. Mr. 
Poland Jackson has been selected as 
accompanist and Mr. Vere Stiles 
Richards will be retained as director. 
T.ie club is under the supervision of 
Dean Hale, of the Music School. 

There are still two or three places 
open on the string quartet and any- 
one who has or thinks he has any 
ability to perform on the mandolin 
or guitar should apply to Dr. Rich- 
ai ds at once. 

FORESTERS' HEADGEAR. 



Claud Black '13 is a new member 
of the Apollonian Club. 



The upperclass foresters have adopted 
a distinct hat by which they may be 
known from the other classes. The hat 
is a light brown Stetson with a three- 
inch brim. 

Since the freshmen class foresters 
may be distinguished by the purple but- 
ton upon their skull caps, the sophomore 
class foresters have taken the matter 
under consideration and will decide 
manner in which they may be distin- 
guished from the other courses. They 
will either decide upon a distinct hat or 
a hat band to be worn upon the regular 
sophomore hat. 



Reports' come from over the state 
that college enrollments in general 
have fallen lower this year than last, 
because of financial stringency 
throughout the state. The freshman 
class at the school of mines is said 
to number but forty this year. Re- 
ports of decreased attendance come 
also from other institutions. Not so 
with Colorado College; the books in 
the Registrar's office show an increase 
of five per cent in our total enroll- 
ment over the enrollment at this date 
last year. Students unable to register 
at the beginning of the term are still 
dropping in as is usual each year. 
Our increase this year is mainly at- 
tributable to the phenomenal increase 
in the enrollment of this year's soph- 
omore class as compared to last 
year's. This increase is almost 
twenty per cent. Our College is 
larger this year, spirit is running high 
and we may safely look forward to 
our banner vear. 



FIRST CAMPUS SING. 

The first bottle of "pep" was un- 
corked last Wednesday night at the 
sing on Palmer steps. Everything 
was enthusiastically applauded from 
the unv clcome affinity of the sparks 
for ITexy to the appeal for the stu- 
d:nts' last dollar. The red lights and 
bonfire added to the cheerfulness of 
the occasion. 

While waiting for President Slo 
cum, the new yell-leaders started 
songs and yells, followed by a speech 
Irom Sink ti On the prospects of a 
championship football team. Presi- 
dent Slocum told of the benefits and 
advantages to be derived from a 
meeting of this kind. "Rothy," as 
usual, was greeted with great ap- 
plause, and Siddons told about the 
training-table of former times and the 
improvement of the team since the 
systematic, well-run table has been 
established. Parkison conceded the 
speechifying with a forceful plea for 
the wherewithal to conduct such j 
training-table. After singing the list 
of popular songs, the first sing broke 
up with "Good-night, Ladies," every- 
body being pleased with the starter. 



Elmer A. Terrill has re-entered Col- 
lege. Terrill spent the summer at Seven 
Lakes in the employ of a construction 
company which is building a dam for 
the city reservoir at that place. 



THE TIGER 



Wyoming Game Saturday 



Next Saturday the Tigers will play 
their first game in college class, when 
they meet the University of Wyom- 
ing. The Tiger team is partially 
crippled, but probably no more so 
than the team from Laramie. Re- 
ports say that Coach Dean has five 
of his first team men on the hospital 
list. Little can be learned directly of 
the quality of the Wyoming team this 
year. Two years ago the Tigers de- 
feated them by 44-5, .while last year 
they took them into camp to the tune 
of 23-0. This year the game should 
be closer still, although there is little 
doubt that the Tigers will have a 
easy time to keep the big end of the 
score. 

The Aggie game will come two 
weeks from next Saturday, so it is 
essential that all rooters show up at 
this Wyoming game to get into train- 
ing for the first championship con- 
test. Aside from being a little bit 
afraid of himself, Billie Winchell, the 
new yell leader, showed up in good 
form in the High School game. 



TRAINING TABLE STARTED. 

Last Monday noon fourteen from the 
football squad reported at the Sigma 
Chi house for the first meal at the train- 
ing table. This is the start of the sec- 
ond year of the training table in Colo- 
rado College, where the table is run by 
the fraternities in the various fraternity, 
and it is obvious that the scheme is a 
success. The same method will be used 
in conducting the table this year as was 
employed last year. Each of the five 
fraternities will give up their table and 
their kitchen for the use of the team 
for a periodof ten days. During that 
time the men of the fraternity will be 
sent out to various other fraternity 
houses and boarding houses — one man 
to take the place of each football man 
on the training table. These men pay 
their board at the regular rate at their 
own fraternities and the men on the 
training table pay their board at their 
own tables. The expense of running 
the training table is necessarily very 
great on account of the fact that the 
class of grub put up at the training 
table is much more expensive than the 
ordinary grade of board. Thus it is 
that the student body has been called 
upon as a whole to get back of the 
scheme and push it with material assist- 



ance. And the way in which the student 
body has responded to the appeal speaks 
well for the genuine Tiger spirit which 
is to be behind the team this year 
stronger than it ever was before. 



HOSPITAL LIST UNUSUALLY 
LARGE. 

With the beginning of each football 
season it is to be expected that a num- 
ber of players are apt to fall victims to 
more or less serious injuries in the 
course of the toughening preliminary 
work. While the Tigers are fortunate 
in having only two men injured so seri- 
ously as to put them out of the game 
for the entire season, it is noticeable that 
the number of men that have sustained 
minor injuries is unusually large. 

Le Clere and Howland are both out 
of the game for the season on account 
of fractures of the small bone of their 
legs just above the ankle. Thompson 
was the victim of a twisted knee last 
week, but is able to report in uniform 
for practice again now. Somers has 
been out of practice for a week on ac- 
count of a bad ankle which he received 
in scrimmage last week. The game 
against the high school last week lamed 
Vandemoer, Heald and Sinton with bad 
ankles and Black with stone bruises on 
his heels, but none of them have missed 
any practice work on account of their 
soreness. In practice Monday night 
"Dutch" Deesz was put on the hospital 
list for a couple of weeks from a bad 
sprain to his left ankle. 

Considering the reports from the oth- 
er colleges of the state in regard to 
\< sing some of their star men on account 
of early season accidents the Tigers may 
consider themselves fortunate thus far 
that no more serious injuries have been 
sustained by Tiger players. Small in- 
juries are a part of the training process 
and are always to be expected. After a 
week of good hard practice on the field 
and three nights of signal work in the 
gym, the team will be in fit shape to go 
up against he University of Wyoming 
team on Washburn field Saturday after- 
noon. 



Walter Jaeger '10 is State Field Sec- 
retary for the Christian Endeavor So- 
ciety. 

Lost — Gold and green enamel cuff- 
link. E. C. Sutton. 



BEGINNING VICTORIOUS 

Continued from page 1 

second squad. The principal excitement 
in the game was to keep an exact count 
of the score. 

It was only at rare intervals that the 
high school boys were able to carry the 
ball across the line of scrimmage at all. 
The backfield was new and inexperi- 
enced both as to carrying the ball and 
making interference. The Tigers seemed 
to be able to do anything they pleased 
with the line. Taylor, at left end, was 
the star of the game for the high school. 
He was in every play when playing de- 
fense, and with telling effect. With the 
aid of Fowler, he handled the forward 
pass for gains several times. 

The Tigers had possession of the ball 
nearly all of the time, and were always 
carrying it for a gain. Open play was 
used almost entirely by the Tigers. Put- 
nam seemed to have a surprising variety 
of shift plays and open formations on 
hand. Trick plays were used with good 
effect whenever tried. Interference 
work, both by the backs and the line- 
men was the feature for the College. 

The team showed no tendency toward 
erratic playing, such as fumbling, and 
balling the signals which is so often the 
case in early season games. The team 
worked together all the time. The speed 
was not what we shall expect to see 
within a few weeks more, but the team 
work was there. 

The line did not have all the charge 
that it will have, but it went fast enough 
to throw the high school backs for a 
less nearly every time they attempted to 
run with the ball. The work of the 
backs and ends in carrying the ball was 
the prettiest and most sensational of the 
day. Black certainly was a plunger and 
a fast one at that. Vandemoer, with his 
speed, played his usual brilliant game. 
Heald was up to his old form. Every 
man in the back field carried the ball 
time after time for big gains. This was 
due in a great degree to the splendid 
interference they had, but in open and 
broken field they showed good judg- 
ment and skill in getting rid of their 
opponents unaided. The ends, both Sin- 
ton and Deesz carried the ball for good 
gains on end-around plays. Both here 
and in his handling of the forward pass, 
Captain Sinton was especially successful. 
Putnam uncorked all the plays that 
Rothgeb has given out up to date, and 
pulled them successfully. His judgment 



THE TIGER 



was always good. Va.idy showed that 
he was new at the position during the 
short time he played at quarterback. 
Herron's series of forward passes were 
pulled off with the same "pep" which 
he shows on all occasions. 

The high school's single score was the 
result of a fluke. In attempting a for- 
ward pass Vandemoer juggled the ball a 
few moments and finally fumbled. Johns, 
the Terrors' left half, snatched the pig- 
skin, and with a ten-yard start raced 
toward the goal line. Vandemoer was 
after him, and after a sensational race 
of forty yards that brought the whole 
crowd to their feet, downed him on the 
two yard line. The Terrors could do 
nothing in two downs, but had no trou- 
ble in placing a dropkick over the bar. 

The line-up : 

Colorado College. C. S. H. S. 

Deesz, Bowers, le Taylor, le 

Bowers, Koch, It Worth-Eubank, It 

Hedblom, lg Moore, lg 

Witherow, c Hall, c 

Moberg, rg Bundy, R. Hall, rg 

Floyd, Summers, rt Richardson, rt 

Sinton, re Ahl, re 

Putnam, Vandemoer, Herron, qb 

Fowler, Hollenbeck, qb 

Heald, Scott, lh Johns, lh 

Vandemoer, Black, rh..Storke, Gray, rh 
Black, Koch, fb. . .Shockley, Cheese,, fb 

Referee, Parks ; umpire, Capen ; field 
judge, Coffin; time-keeper, Powell; 
time of quarters, 12 min., 12 min., 10 
min. and 10 min. 



THE AGGIES' HOSPITAL LIST. 

As a result of the game with Eaton 
High School last Saturday, three of the 
Aggie players are out of the game, one 
of them probaly for the rest of the sea- 
son. Brill, half, has the most serious 
injury. He has a broken bone in his 
ankle. Probst, the Aggies' fastest man 
and Bell, halfback, both have minor in- 
juries that will not keep them out of 
the game long. 



ALL CONFERENCE TEAMS 
VICTORIOUS. 



D. U. playing the Alumni, the Mines 
playing North Denver, and the Aggies 
playing Eaton, were all victorious last 
Saturday. D. U. defeated their alumni 
10-0. Straight football was used during 
the whole game. No open formations 
were used, and the forward pass was 
tried but twice. Duke Schroeder was 
the star of the game. 

At Golden, the Mines had it all their 
own way with North Denver. The 
Mines made their gains chiefly by a skil- 
ful use of the forward pass, and by circ- 




r Football C Wiwpi** skip'- Chapter $ 0' 



ling the ends for long runs. The score 
was 26-0. 

The Aggies did not have so easy a 
time with Eaton High School. The 
score of 17-0 was made by three touch- 
downs. The Aggies used new-style play 
with good success, and resorted only oc- 
casionally to line bucking. 



THE CONFERENCE SC EDULE 



The addition of a game between the 
School of Mines and Colorado Col- 
lege after the schedule had been made 
out last winter has necessitated 
changes in the Conference schedule. 
There may be further changes yet, 
but it is probable that the schedule 
will remain as follows: 
October 7. 

Denver University vs. Freshmen, at 
Denver. 

•"Colorado Aggies vs. University of 
Utah, at Salt Lake. 

Colorado College vs. Universit yof 
Wyoming, at Colorado Springs. 
October 14. 

Colorado Aggies vs. Utah Aggies, 
at Logan. Utah. 

*Denver University vs. University 
of Utah, at Denver. 

*Colorado College vs. Colorado 
Aggies, at Colorado Springs. 
October 21. 

Colorado College vs. University of 
Wisconsin, at Madison, Wis. 

Denver University vs. Baker Uni- 
versity, at Denver. 

Colorado Aggies vs. Fort Russell, 

Continued on Page 8 



MORMONS AMONG CHAMPS 
TOO. 

Mormons Have Been Practicing for 
Two Months. 

With a learn out and practicing for 
nearly a month and a half before any 
of the colleges in Colorado had even 
assembled, Coach Bennion's claim to 
make team-work and training make 
up for his luck of either veteran or 
heavy material is not as wild as some 
might think. Utah has a lighter 
team this year than any time since it 
has been playing the Colorado 
schools, but even then their team 
average will not be any smaller than 
was the Tigers last year and this 
year. Besides this weight handicap, 
Bt.inion is at a serious disadvantage 
due to the fact that he has only 
three men back who played on last 
year's eleven. 

At the University in Salt Lake they 
have a sod field, and for this reason 
they are able to do all of their early 
season training in track uniforms. 
Bennion has introduced the bucking 
machine into Utah for the first time. 
The Mormons hail it as a persona! 
invention, and have been working 
hard with it to gain the new advan- 
tages which it offers. 

Of the three men back, two of 
them are the halfbacks which C. C. 
learned so well to fear and respect 
last year. These are Captain Laun 
Romney and Dezlough Bennion. The 

Continued on Page 8 



THE TIGER 



The Weekly Newspaperof Colorado College 

H4RRY L. BLACK Editor-in-Chief 

RICHARD L. HUGHES Business Mgr. 

• Lloyd Shaw ..Assistant Editor 

A. H. Rowbotham Assistant Editor 

1. J. Sinton Athletic Editor 

D. H. mahan Engineering Editor 

: G. S. Cowdery Forestry Editor 

Miss Glenn Styles Alumni Editor 

Miss Mary Randolph Exchanse Editor 

Miss Helen Rand Local Editor 

A. W. Donovan Local Editor 

H. A. Parkison Assistant Manager 

A. L. Golden Assistant M inager 

W. L. Myers Assistai t M inager 

Correspondents 

F.P.Storke, H. A.Bennett, John L. Herron, G. W. 

Belsey, Miss Elizabeth Gerould, Miss Leona Stukey, 

Miss Myrth King, Miss Violet Hopper, Miss 

Frances Adams, R. G. Appel 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to The Tiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 
, College, Colorado Springs, Colo 
Phones: Editor, Main 2550. Manager, Main 2073 

Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



INFORMATION FOR THE 
"SILVER AND GOLD." 



We are always more or less interested 
in what is going on at other schools of 
the state and thus it was that while 
looking over the "Silver and Gold," the 
official publication of the student body 
at the University of Colorado, we came 
across an article on football that be- 
trayed a surprising ignorance in the 
man that wrote the article. The article 
was contributed to the "Silver and 
Gold" by an alumnus who was formerly 
an athletic editor of the University pa- 
per, and should have known better than 
to make such a break as the one to 
which we refer. In speaking of the 
probable strength of the University of 
Utah team, the writer says : 

"Colorado plays Utah at Salt Lake 
this year and a glance over the results 
of last fall when the Mormons trimmed 
the Tigers and then came to Denver for 
a trimming at the hands of the 'Varsity 
as well as a look at former exhibitions 
on their own grounds would indicate 
that Utah will be about one hundred 
per cent, stronger this year than last." 

For the benefit of the misinformed 
contributor we would say the Tiger team 
• went through its entire season last year 
without a defeat, even at the hands of 
the University of Utah, and had they 
had a chance at the University of Colo- 
rado, their record would probably have 



been just as good. However, that is a 
disputed point, and no one is more sorry 
than the Tigers that there is room for 
dispute. 

It is not our purpose to give the con- 
tributor of the "Silver and Gold" any 
grounds whatever to think that we have 
much respect for his opinion on the 
strength of the University of Utah or 
on any other football subject, but our 
desire to support the interests of Colo- 
rado College prompts us to attempt to 
correct such mistaken impressions as 
this whenever the occasion demands. 

"PEP" MEETING. 

It was surely a big inspiration to a 
number of the old-timers and a big eye- 
opener to a number of the new-comers 
to be present at the first "College sing" 
which was held on the steps of Palmer 
Hall one night last week. We have 
seen "sings" before, and good ones they 
were, too, but for spirit and "pep" and 
enthusiasm this one is the record-holder 
thus far. 

This brings us to the fact that we are 
going to have need of lots of spirit be- 
fore the on-coming football season is 
over. Only the first practice game of 
the season has been played. Next Sat- 
urday we meet the University of Wyom- 
ing on Washburn field, and then the 
season is on. It looks as if it might 
have done the student body good to have 
the privilege of supporting a champion- 
ship team last year. And from the way 
things are starting out, it looks as if 
they expect to support another cham- 
pionship team this year. But before we 
go any farther we want to say that we 
noticed that it was the upperclassmen, or 
rather a part of the upperclassmen, who 
were joining in the yells and songs. 
The absence of freshman voices was 
indeed remarkable. And now, here's the 
point, freshmen. It's time for you to 
get busy and learn those songs and yells. 
There are three more games to be played 
on Washburn field this year, and there 
are two games to be played in Denver 
and one in Boulder. You are going to 
attend all of the games here, and at least 
one, possibly more, that are to be played 
away from home. So don't let us talk 
to you any more, and don't let us fail 
to hear that freshman voice the next 
time there's any yel'ing done! 

And here's the point for you, upper- 
classmen. If you need it, take the same 
advice we've just given the freshmen 
above, and take it double! 

During the past two or three years, 
Colorado College has developed an en- 
viable reputation for spirit and support 



of the athletic teams representing the 
institution. The beginnings of this new 
year show that another year of the same 
kind of loyalty is starting, with the sin- 
gle point of difference that the spirit 
this year is going to excel all displays 
ever made in the past, and set an exam- 
ple which will be difficult for student 
bodies of other years to equal. 



NEW ASSISTANT EDITOR. 



At a meeting of the Tiger Board of 
Control held in Palmer Hall Friday 
at i2:.c, Mr. Leon C. Havens was 
elected assistant editor of the Tiger. 
Havens is a Colorado Springs man 
and a graduate of the Colorado 
Springs High School. While he has 
not had very much experience in the 
line of newspaper work, he has done 
excellent work in the various Eng- 
lish courses of the College. He is 
well and favorably known in the stu- 
dent body and will doubtless make a 
strong addition to the Tiger staff. 

The new members of the Tiger, 
Board of Control besides the new 
editor-in-chief and the new manager 
of the Tiger are Dr. Schneider, who 
takes the place of Dr. Hills, and Mr. 
Stanley Alden, who fills the place of 
Donald Tucker as alumni representa- 
tive. The next meeting will be held 
Friday, October 6. 



DR. RICHARDS IN SCHOOL OF 

MUSIC. 

The vocal department of the Colo- 
rado College School of Music is this 
year in the hands of Dr. Yere Stiles 
Richards. The employment of Dr. 
Richards adds a great deal to the 
strength of the music school. In 
connection with his regular work as 
instructor of vocal students. Dr. 
Richards will have charge of the sea- 
son's work of the Men's Glee Club. 
He reports that the outlook for the 
Glee Club is at least twice as prom- 
ising as it was last year, and that he 
expects this to be the banner year 
of the Club's history. A larger num- 
ber of men of the College have shown 
their interest in the work by partici- 
pating in the tryouts, and the stand- 
ard of work is higher on account of 
unusually keen competition. 

The Club will make a tour of he 
state as usual this year, spending 
most of the Christmas recess on the 
road. The date set for the home con- 
cert is Friday, January 19. which will 
mark the end of the season. 



I 



THE TIGER 



QUESTION; CHOSEN FOR THE 
INTER-SOCIETY DEBATE. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMS. 



The Apollonian Club has submit- 
Ud to Pearsons Society the following 
question for this year's inter-society 
debate: "Resolved. That the owner- 
ship of forest and mineral lands' now 
belonging to the United States within 
the several states and territories, 
should be retained by the Federal 
Government." 

This is a vital question before the 
government today. What shall be 
done with the public lands? There 
is a limitless amount of material upon 
this question, its issues are simple 
and direct enough to appeal to the 
least argumentative and we can there- 
fore expect one of the most interest- 
ing debates of the series this year. 

Pearsons Society has not yet 
c':osen the side it will defend, but 
we may expect this selection soon. 
Then comes the long grind and then 
the "Thirteenth Annual" with all its 
excitement. 



VACANCIES IN NUGGET BOARD 
FILLED. 



At a meeting of the junior class 
held last week, several vacancies in 
t'le Nugget Board were filled. Miss 
Helen Rand was elected art editor 
and George Statton assistant art edi- 
tor. From those that were elected 
last year the Board loses Miss 
Martha Phillips, associate editor, and 
Lynn Guy and George Bancroft from 
the art staff. Miss Phillips and Mr. 
Guy both expect to return to College 
for the second semester. 



PHILOSOPHY SEMINAR SUB- 
JECTS. 

Last week President Slocum gave out 
to his senior philosophy class a list of 
subjects upon which seminars are to be 
written. Each member of the class is 
required to select a subject and write a 
■ seminar upon it, and one recitation hour 
of each is to be devoted to the reading 
and discussion of the seminars that are 
handed in. Following is the list of sub- 
jects that has been given : Idealism, 
• Materialism, Evolution, Pessimism, Ag- 
nosticism, Heathenism, Mysticism, Free- 
J ilam- of the Will, Reign, of Law, Panthe- 
ism, Skepticism, Pragmatism, Utilitari- 
anism, -Rationalism, Dualism and Rela- 
tivity. Subjects not included in the list 
may be selected •and treated with the 
consent of Dr. Slocum. 



The Civil Service Commission has 
set the date for assistant forest dang- 
er examinations for October 23-24,, 
191 1. The U. S. Department of Ag- 
riculture estimates that 400 eligibles 
will be needed during the field season 
of 1912. Assistant Forest Rangers 
are paid an entrance salary of $1,100 
per annum. This examination is open 
to any able bodied citizen of the U. 
S. 

Some of the conditions of the ex- 
amination are as follows: 

A ranger of any grade must be 
thoroughly sound and able-bodied, 
capable of enduring hardships and 
performing severe labor under trying 
conditions. He must be able to take 
care of himself and his horses in 
regions remote from settlement and 
supplies. He must be able to build 
trails and cabins, ride, pack and deal 
tactfully with all classes of people. 
He must know something of land 
surveying, estimating and scaling tim- 
ber, logging, land laws, mining and 
live stock business. 

The examination of applicants is 
along the practical lines stated above, 
and actual demonstration, by per- 
formance is required. Experience, 
not book education, is sought, al- 
though ability to make simple maps 
and write intelligent reports upon or- 
dinary forest boundaries is essential. 

Rangers execute the work of the 
National Forests under the direction 
of Supervisors. Their duties include 
patrol to prevent fire and trespass, 
estimating, surveying and marking 
timber, the supervision of cutting and 
similar work. They issue minor per- 
mits, build cabins and trails, oversee 
grazing business, investigate claims, 
report on applications, and report 
upon and arrest for violation of forest 
laws and regulations. 

The examination is under the con- 
trol of the Civil Service Commission 
and not the Forest Service. 

Information in detail regarding it, 
including the names of places at 
which it will be held, will be sent to 
anyone applying to the United States 
Civil Service Commission, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 



Richards of Florence js a .late ar- 
rival for the cl.iss of 1915. 



HAGERMAN HALL ORGANIZES. 

At a meeting of the residents of 
' Hag'er'man Hall held last Friday night 
the following officers were elected: 
President — Arthur Brown. 
Vice-President — Henry Rhone. 
Secretary — Richard Banfield. 
Treasurer — Leon Clark. 

This year Hagei'man-is occupied al- 
most entirely by old students. This 
spealcs well" for' the ' life"" there, and 
the. itime is not far distant- when 
freshmen ; wjll find it difficult to ob- 
tain rooms at the dorm. 

The inmates are planning on mak- 
ing their "open house' this year a 
bigger success than ever before. The 
date has not, as yet, been definitely 
determined, but all are working with 
a vim and enthusiasm that bespeaks 
a grand success. 

The life at the hall will be more 
congenial this year than ever before. 
Tii..' residents are co-operating with 
the Y. M. C. A. in subscribing for 
magazines, in installing games, and 
in fixing up the common room and 
the gymnasium. 

NEW ASSISTANT MANAGER OF 
FOOTBALL. 



H. A. Parkison has been named by 
the Athletic Bo~.rd for anew asistant 
football manager for the present season. 
There are now three assistants from 
which the manager for next year will 
probably be chosen, and the competition 
for that honorable and responsible pos- 
sition is going to be keen. Manager 
Statton is to be congratulated upon be- 
ing able to secure so capable a corps of 
assistants. 



MINERS' FULLBACK OUT. 



The School of Mines suffered a seri- 
ous loss to their team last week when 
Meyers, the big candidate for fullback 
position, sustained a broken collarbone 
during practice. Arch Spring, ex-cap- 
tain and halfback, is temporarily out of 
the game with a wrenched knee. 



Mr. William Percival '01 is now in- 
structor in mathematics in East Denver 
High School. 



The Tennis Club held its annual 
meeting last week at which, time the 
officers for this year were elected. 
Mr .Florian Cajori. Jr., was elected 
president of the Club. "He started The 
immediate performance £>f life- do'tres 
by an oratorical plea tor;, mote "pep." 
Mr. Clifford was elected treasurer for 
the men and Miss Francis Adams for 
the women. Mr.. George Statton was 
elected secretary for the Club. 



THE TIGER 




Soft Hats and Derbies 
$3.00 to $7.00 



Cap Styles for Autumn 

Tne Tress and Henry Heath Caas are imported by the Gano-Bowns Co. from England. 
A variety of patters in rough and smooth effects 51.50 to £3.50. 
Heid Caps, domestic Caps of Style and Quality $1.00 and better 

CMsD-DOmS'Sr 

Tejon at Kiowa 



SECOND SUNDAY VESPER SERVICE 

Continued from page 1 

we have learned "are but the outskirts 
of this ways : 

And how small a whisper do we hear 
of Him! 

But the thunder of His power, who 
can understand?" 

But the very greatness of the concep- 
tion — Does it not remove God far away 
from us ? How can we have any per- 
sonal knowledge of a God such as this, 
,whc holds the stars in the hollow of 
His hand, whose purposes run through 
the ages. Who with infiinite patience is 
slowly bringing this thought and His 
will to pass? Can we know Him, or 
must we always think of Him as the 
One infinitely removed? 

There are still open ways to Him — 
the way through the heart and con- 
science of man, through prayer, through 
the study and following of Jesus 
Christ. The prophet suggests another 
way: "He judged the cause of the poor 
and needy : was not this to know me ? 
saith Jehovah." The prophets instantly 
join the knowledge of God to the 
passion of human justice. If we loose 
the bonds of wickedness and let the op- 
pressed go free, feed the hungry and 
clothe the naked and break every yoke, 
then we shall call and Jehovah will an- 
swer; we shall cry and He will say, 
'Here I am.' (Isa. 58:5-9.) To learn 
the needs of needy men and then with 
justice and kindness to supply those 
needs — this according to the prophets 
is to know Jehovah, the maker of heaven 
and earth. 

Only two or three elements can be 
suggested, at the present moment, in our 
judgment of the cause of the poor and 
needy. It shall be such a judgment as 
recognizes the kinship of the poor and 
the needy with ourselves. No result of 



modern social needs and social service 
is more definite than this, that God has 
made of one blood all nations and all 
classes, to dwell upon the face of the 
earth. And it shall be such a judgment 
as recognizes that the poverty of the 
poor and the need of the needy is not 
always or usually altogether or mostly 
his fault. And recognizing to the full 
the influence of environment in the lot 
of the poor and the needy, it shall be 
such a judgment as shall set its face in- 
flexibly toward a change in the environ- 
ment which shall bring justice and their 
rightful share to those who have so long 
been deprived of them. 

Some of us are neither poor nor 
needy but have in abundance the priv- 
ileges and opportunities. Why are they 
ours, and not the lot of all? Have we 
any right to them? The one answer is, 
we have a right to them only as we use 
them in such a way as to fit us for a 
completer service of this needy world in 
the midst of which we are placed. 



MORMONS AMONG CHAMPS TOO 

- Continued from page 5 

other veteran is Olson, a tackle, who 
now is the largest man on the squad. 

The men who played on the second 
team last year, and will probably hold 
their same positions this year on the 
varsity squad are Ott Romney, quar- 
terback, Gardener, center, and Pratt, 
guard. Pratt and Gardener are both 
considered "heavy" among the ma- 
terial which is out this year. It is not 
expected that there will be another 
such crucical year in Utah's football 
for some time, because all of this 
year's team are underclass and they 
are followed by a fine bunch of foot- 
ball men in the present freshman 
class. 

The Mormans will be in Colorado 



twice this season, playing D. U. and 
the U. of C. on the first trip and 
Colorado College on the second. The 
Colorado College game is to be 
played on November u. 



CONFERENCE SCHEDULE 

Continued from Cage 5 

at Fort Collins. 

School of Mines vs. University of 
Wyoming, at Laramie. 
October 28. 

Denver University vs. University of 
South Dakota, at Denver. 

♦Colorado Aggies vs. School of 
Mines, at Fort Collins. 

University of Colorado vs. Uni- 
versity of Wyoming, at Boulder.. 
November 4. 

♦Colorado College vs. University of 
Colorado, at Boulder. 

♦University of Denver vs. Colorado 
Aggies, at Denver. 

*School of Mines vs. University 
of Utah, at Salt Lake. 

November n. 

♦University of Denver vs. School 
of Mines, at Denver. 

♦Colorado College vs. University of 
Utah, at Colorado Springs. 

♦Colorado Aggies vs. LTniversity of 
Colorado, at Boulder. 

November 18. 

University of Denver vs. University 
of Wyoming, at Laramie. 

♦Colorado College vs. School of 
Mines, at Denver. 

♦University of Colorado vs. Uni- 
.versity of tUah, at Salt Lake. 
November 30. 

♦Colorado College vs. University 
of Denver, at Denver. 

Colorado Aggies vs. University of 
Wyoming, at Fort Collins. 

♦School of Mines vs. University of 
Colorado, at Denver. 

♦ — Championship games. • 



THE RUG STORE 



Is Located at 331 East 
Pike's Peak and Wahsach 



We Have the Largest Stock of Beautiful Floor Rugs 



THE LANGUAGE CLUBS. 






In the study of a modern language 
the time given to daily recitations in 
class is necessarily too short to admit 
of anything save the essentials of gram- 
mar and syntax of literature. It is nec- 
essary, however, in order to become 
proficient in any language that one 
should obtain practice in speaking and 
in using idioms of daily use. To supply 
this practice, which can scarcely be ob- 
tained in the classroom, the two lan- 
guage clubs, Le Cercle Francais and 
Der Deutsche Verein have been formed 
in the College. The French Club was 
organized in 1907 and the German Club 
a year later. Both societies are for the 
acquirement of a greater fluency in 
speaking the respective languages and 
also for the cultivation of a taste for the 
literature and a knowledge of the cus- 
toms of the countries. 

Le Cercle Francais is planning this 
year to do more work along conversa- 
tional lines. A series of programs, which 
will be interesting as well as instructive, 
have been arranged. The annual play 
which has become one of the events of 
the College year will be given early in 
the second semester. Der Deutsche 
Verein, whose first attempt at the pro- 
duction of German comedy was so suc- 
cessful last year, expects to present a 
more ambitious play this year. 

The clubs meet on alternate Thurs- 
days at eight o'clock in Ticknor Study. 
Students who wish to become proficient 
in either of the languages should be- 
come members. Anyone interested in 
the study of French and German is wel- 
come to attend the meetings. Towns- 
people are especially invited. 



FULLER GETS GOOD POSITION. 

J. E. Fuller 'n, has been temporar- 
ily appointed City Chemist and Bac- 
teriologist. The position will become 
permanent upon his passing the re- 
quired Civil Service examination. Mr. 
Fuller, while in College, majored in 
biology and chemistry, and both by 
his special work along this line and 
his general ability, showed himself 
qualified to fill such a position. 



Claud Black '13 is a new member of 
the Apollonian Club. 



THE TIGER 

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS 

Continued from Page 1 

and Mrs. Slocum entertain the fresh- 
man class at Bemis hall. Senior 
tramp. 

Friday, October 2toh — Minerva So- 
ciety entertains the new girls in Mc- 
Gregor gymnasium. 

Saturday, October 21st — Phi Gam- 
ma Delta open house. Football game 
in Wisconsin. 

Saturday, October 27th — Contem- 
porary Club entertains the new girls 
in McGregor gymnasium. 

Saturday, October 28th — Social cel- 
ebration of Insignia Day. 

Tuesday, October 31st — Barbecue 
and Pan-Pan. 

Friday, November 3rd — Dramatic 
Society gives "Cricket on the Hearth 

Saturday. Noverber 4th — Football 
game at Boulder. 

Friday, November 10th — Open date. 

Saturday, November nth — Frater- 
nity night (2). Football game here. 

Friday, November 17th — Open date. 

Saturday, November it8h — Junior 
event. Football game here. 

Friday, November 24th — Apollon- 
ian ladies' night. 

Saturday, November 25th — German 
play in Cogswell theater. 

Thursday, November 30th — Thanks- 
giving Day. Football in Denver. 

Friday, December 1st — Thanks- 
giving recess. 

Saturday, December 2nd — Thanks- 
giving recess. 

Thursday, December 7th — Dickens 
Lecture. 

Friday, December 8th — Pearsons 
ladies' night. Ciceronian ladies' 

night. 

Saturday, December 9th — Frater- 
nity night (3). 

Friday, December 15th — Dramatic 
Society gives "Eager Heart." 

Saturday, December 16th — Minerva 
Annual dance. 

Thursday, December 21st — Pan-Pan 
in Bemis. 

Friday, December 22nd — Vacation 
begins. 

Friday, January 12th — Engineers' 
Club ladies' night. 

Saturday, January 13th — Fraternity 
night (4). 




NEW 

Fall Styles 

JUST IN 

High Arch, High 7 oes, Short 
Vamps, Button or Lace, Velvets, 
Suedes, Patents, Gunmetels, 
Tan Russia's 

$2.50, $3.00, $3.50 
and $4.00 

^-<LA FIT FOft EVERY FOO'O^^" 



HOIC 



it pays to ^^ 
^•-^107 South Tejoh Stumt" 




Board $4.50 Per Week 

One front room for two. Board 

and room $25 per month for each 

222 E. DALE 



Friday, January 19th — Examina- 
tions begin. Men's Glee Club home 
concert. 

Friday. January 26th — Stag ball. 

Saturday, January 27th — Open date. 



Telephone 599 



CUT FLOWERS 



Store 1 04 N. Tejon Street 

The Pike's Peak Floral Co. 

DECORATIONS AND DESIGNS 



THE TIGER 



YOU'LL find some wonderful new fabrics here when you 
come, and a vast array of new color combinations in the 
Fall Suits we're showing. The new gray, brown and blue 
weaves are unusually beautiful. For the young fellow, the 
colors patterns and the new models which we buy especially 
for them are catching their fancy. 




ENGINEERS' CLUB, OCT. 6. 

Music — Wilkinson. 

Review of Engineering Magazines — 

Ayer. 
Debate — Resolved, That freshmen 

should be prohibited from using 

slide rules. 
Affirmative — Neuswanger. 
Negative— Nofdeen. 



To College 
Students 
Old and New 

We Extend the Most Cordial Good 
Wishes. We've made a Specialty of 
taking care of the wants of the up-to- 
date young men and women. You'll 
find us the kind of jewelry store you'll 
like. 

The Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's cak 

The Davis Barber Shop 

Indi idual Sterilizing Cabinets 
Ray Davis, Manager 

Have Your Clothes Cleaned, Pressed and 
Kept in First-Class Repair by 

"Sam" the Gentlemen's Valet 

Also Makes a Specialty of Serving Parties 

SAM FLEMING 
114 E. Cucharras Phone 1675 



Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co. 



GOLF NOTICE. 

For the benefit of those who wish 
to learn to play golf, Mr. Albright 
will be on the mesa every Wednes- 
day afternoon to offer suggestions. 
Until several regularly take up the 
game it will be well if those who wish 
his help arrange beforehand a time 
for meeting him on the links. 

The only expense connected with 
the game is that incurred in buying 
clubs and balls, which should not ex- 
ceed four dollars for the first year. 
GUY H. ALBRfGHT. 



HONOR FOR C. C. GRADUATE. 



B. M. Rastall '02, associate profes- 
sor of Economics, University of Wis- 
consni, has just received an appoint- 
ment from the city of Madison, Wis., 
to install a cost system at a salary of 
$|,coo per annum. Mr. Rastall will 
still retain his connection with the 
University. This speaks well for the 
class of men that C. C. has turned out 
and the news will be gratifying in- 
deed to the alumnae. Rastall is a 
member of the Phi Gamma Delta fra- 
ternity and the Phi Beta Kappa fra- 
ternity. 



RECEPTION FOR DEAN. 

The Delta Phi Theta fraternity 
gave a stag "feed" last Wednesday 
night for S. W. Dean '10. Dean Par- 
sons was a guest of honor on the oc- 
casion. In response for the cheers 
for "Stubby," Dean gave a short 
speech, recalling the many good 
times he had during the time he had 
been at Colorado College. He left 
Thursday for Chicago, where he has 
obtained a schorarship which will 
enable him to take Master's degree 
at the University of Chicago. 



Anne Baker enjoyed a visit from her 
father and mother last week. 



DDU AH For morning delivery. It S 
bread hot from the oven, 
baked from the choicest flour, and that 
would command first premum anywhere. 
That you get from us. Is always good. 

THE CHICAGO BAKERY 

Have the fellows meet you at 

Tucker 9 s 
Restaurant 

10 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 

The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heati g Co 



Phone Main 48 



313 N. Tejon St. 



You can always save money if 
you will come to see our line in 
diamonds, watches, jewelry, 
guns, sporting goods, fishing 
tacke drawing sets, musical 
instruments, trunks, valises, or 
if you want to loan money, you 
can get it 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 

Money Loaned on Valuables 



THE TIGER 






II 



The College Book and Supply Store 

In addition to furnishing the Text Books and Engineering 
Supplies for the College students, we carry a very large 
stock of Fountain Pens, Waterman's Ideal, Conklin Self- 
fillers and College. See Our PENNANTS ane POSTERS 

Whitney & Grimwobd 



Get Your Picnic Supplies 



AT 



SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

STUDENTS 



Remember when you 
want the Best Photos 
at moderate cost and 
courteous attention. 
Visit the old reliable. 




Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 



R. J. CORRIN 

Dry Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing 

and Remodeling for Ladies 

and Gentlemen 

Work by the Month 

Work Called for and Delivered 

Phone 2963 M 326 N Tejon Street 

Nothing Pleases Us More Than 
To Please College Students 

The Fred S. Tucker 

Furniture Co. 



BURNS OPERA HOUSE TESTED. 



The senior Civil Engineers enjoyed 
a rare treat last week in seeing some 
actual test work done on a reinforced 
concrete building of modern construc- 
tion in the new Burns Opera House. 

In the building the cantilever type 
of -construction- has been used so that 
no posts interfere with the sight as 
in the older types of opera houses. 
The floor of the balcony and gallery 
were tested under a load of equiva- 
lent to about four times the maxi- 
mum load to which the seating capac- 
ity would amount and the deflection 
in the center was only one-eighth of 
an inch. The method of testing was 
to load each seat with bags of cement 
and sand until the load was about 
4-~o pounds per seat. Then on a 
level previously placed in a position 
where it would remain undisturbed, 
rod readings were made from differ- 
ent parts of the floor and the deflec- 
tions obtained. Under only a normal 
load the deflection would be inap- 
preciable. 



AFOLLONIAN CLUB, OCT. 6. 



Speech — The Dry Farming Move- 
ment — Davis. 

Declamation — Rhone. 

Extemporaneous Speeches. 

Debate — Resolved, That Italy is jus- 
tified in the employment of armed 
force for the protection of her 
rights in Tripoli. 

Affirmative — Jackson, Bruner. 

Negative — Ogilbee, Cajori. 



Miss Jean Auld '08, who for, two years 
has been instructor in Greek and Latin 
here, is now studying art in Brooklyn, 
N. Y. The pleasing cover of The Kin- 
nikinnik was designed by Miss Auld. 

,"A1" Sherry and "Fuzzy" McOuat 
ex-'lO have been in Nome, Alaska, all 
summer and expect to return to Pasa- 
dena, Calif., this fall. 



MOTOR CYCLES 

Yale Emblem 

BICYCLES and Supplies 

Expert Repairing 

Colorado Springs Cycle 

Company 

DeWitt Doyle, Manager 
224 N. Tejon St. Phone Red 34 

Knight - Campbell's 

F0R PIANOS 

and PLAYER PIANOS 

STEINWAY and 20 OTHER MAKES 

We Rent Pianos 

Largest Stock Victor Talking Machines 
and Edison Phonographs 

226 N. Tejon St., after Sept. 15, 122 N. Tejon 

The Gcwdy-Si mens Printing Co. 
PRINTERS 

Copper Plate and Steel Engravers 
Telephone 87 21 N. Tejon Street 



Bought, Sold, Ren'ed and Raited 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remingto Visible be- 
fore Purchasing Typewriter. 

Zimmerman Supply 

C^v^,^«.^„ 22 E. Kiowa St. 

Ompany Phone Main 374 
Established 1890 

You can save from 25 
percent to 40 percent 
on our finest Hart, 
Schaf f ner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer & 
Clothcraft Suits and 
Overcoats 






THE TIGER 



THE SEAL OF THE COLLEGE 



Embossed in Black and Gold on Eaton-Hurlbut's finest quality Swiss Chiffon Linen with 

Envelopes to match constitutes our 

Special **ox of College Stationery 

We bought a large lot of this elegant paper and in order to sell it out quickly have reduced our price to 

Only 50c per Box 

This paper to be had only at IVl LJ IvIvA. I O Opposite the Compus 



The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

116 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Gives 
Special Attention to Accounts of Students 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, President Ira Hams, ['-President 

M. C Gile Lilla B. Ensign C E. Lynde 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8.00 P. M. 

THE OUT WEST 

TENT AND AWNING CO. 

RECLINING CHAIRS 
PORCHES ENCLOSED 

Tents Rented^for a Day or for Longer 

Stamping, Designing, R rforating, Best Hand Painted 

China. Western Branch ot Mexican Pigment Paints, 

Stenciling and Materials 

Art Needlework and Art Goods 

THE HUNT AND VAN NICE 

ART SPECIALTY SHOPS 

Retail and Wholesale 
8 Pike's Peak Avenue Phone Main 2GS5 



STUDENTS ! 

The 
Pearl Laundry Co. 

respectfully solicits your pat- 
ronage. We guarantee satis- 
factory work and service and 
give you 20% discount. 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 



RANGER SCHOOL. 

Every year sees the Forestry school 
gain more prominence. This year a 
course will be given to the government 
Forest Rangers of the state, which will 
teach them to be more efficient in that 
line. The Forest Rangers will be upon 
a leave of absence when here and will 
receive full payment from the govern- 
ment. 

The entire enrollment this year is 
much greater than in previous years, and 
when the Rangers school is started the 
number will be greatly swelled. The en- 
rollment to date consists of one gradu- 
ate student, one senior, seven juniors, 
eleven sophomores, and seventeen fresh- 
men. 



DR. CAJORI ON ROLLE'S 
THEOREM. 

At the eighteenth annual meeting of 
the American Mathematical Society held 
in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Dr. Cajori pre- 
sented a paper of much value on Rolle's 
theorem. Dr. Cajori has spent much 
time and study on the history of mathe- 
matics and has succeeded in removing 
all doubts that this theorem is due to 
Rolle. This theorem is one of great im- 
portance in the calculus but rose to 
prominence only after Bonnet had based 
upon it a proof of the mean value 
theorem, which in turn became the base 
of proof for Taylor's theorem. 

The book which Dr. Cajori's paper 
describes also gives solutions of equa- 
tions by the intersection of circles and 
parabolas, and a discussion of the the- 
orem that no integer of the form 4«+3 
can be the sum of two squares and that 
no integer of the form 8n-\-7 can be the 
sum of three squares. 



THE POPULAR 

Creams and Ices Fresh Bulter 

Made Right and Delivered Promptly 

A. L MOWRY 

Phone 1184 
115 East Cache la Poudre Street 



STOP AT 

LIGHTNING SHOE SHOP 

to get your shoes repaired. Shine 
free with every pair of soles 

Sewed Soles 75c. 28 % N. Tejon St. 



William P. Bonbright & Co- 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



THE 

Crissey & Fowler 
Lumber Co. 



Phone 101 



117-123 W. Vermiio Ave. 



Ladies Sample Slippers, 
worth up to $5.00 

Ladies Sample Oxfords 
worth up to $4.00 



One line of Ladies Tan 



The Whitaker-Kester 

95C Shoe Co. Welt Pump Laces and $1.75 



J 



10 North Tejon Street 



Button Oxfords were $3.50 



J 



THE TIGER 



13 



Student Supplies 

A Line of Stationery that is 
most complete. 

The only stock of Engineers 
Supplies in this section. 
Headquarters for fine Engrav- 
ing and Printing. 

OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

HA YNER 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 

2 S. TejDn St. Colorado Springs 



The Prompt Printery Co. 

MASTER PRINTERS 



14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



Developing and Printing 

HARLAN 

"The View Man" 

All Kinds of View and Commercial Work 
Phone Main 2717 304 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

Seldomridge Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Deal rs in 
Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

10S S. Tejon Street 



CA L 2000 

When You Want A y.hhg QUICK! 
QUICK DELIVERY 

MAI . 2000 



i Local Department 



Bert W. Stiles '09 has accepted a posi- 
tion in the law office of Sperry Packard 
at Pueblo. 



Wm. L. Sells ex-'13 is working in 
Denver with the Mine and Smelter Sup- 
ply Co. 

Lucile Cold '11 is teaching in the 
School of Music here. 



Addie Hemenway and Floy Estill en- 
tertained a few of their friends at tea 
Saturday afternoon. 

Vesta Sharpe ex-'12 is attending 
school at Greeley, Colo. 



A letter from T. Wynne Ross '13 
states that he is city editor of the 
Grand Junction Sentinel. He expects 
to return to College the second semes- 
ter. 



Irwin Cary '15 is pledged to Sigma 
Chi. 



Ernie Statton spent Sunday in Denver 
on football business. 

French, a Sigma Chi from Albion 
College, is visiting the local chapter. 

Harry Black spent Sunday at his home 
in Victor. 

The first meeting of the Q. Q. Club 
was held last Wednesday night. 

Miles James '15 is wearing the Kappa 
Sigma pledge pin. 

Miss Hall entertained the Montgom- 
ery girls at a tea Wednesday afternoon. 



Miss Spaulding entertained the girls 
of third floor, Ticknor, very delightfully 
Monday afternoon. 



Louise Auld entertained the members 
and pledges of Hypatia at her home 
Wednesday night. 



Letitia Lamb's and Myrth King's table 
ate supper in the Canon Tuesday. They 
were chaperoned by Miss Cannon. 



Florence Youngman and Lillian Duer 
were entertained by the Crowley's at 
dinner Sunday. 



BURGESS CANDIES 

are Simply Delicious. A dainty 

box of Burgess Chocolates will 

smooth the way wonderfully. 

Every bite a delight. 

BURGESS 

Phone Eight Three 
12-114 North Tejon Street 



Sewed Soles 75 cents 
Rubber Heels 35 cents 



AT 



PETE'S SHOE SHOP 



230 East Dale 



JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Claning, Pressing. Speci; 1 

Kates to College Students 

I Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Bonk Store 16 S. Teion Sttee 

Comfortable Rooms for 
Students 

Two Biccks f'om Corner of the Campus 

Reasonable Prices 

Newly Furnished 

Enquire at 1013 North Wahsatch Ave. 

Hunt Up 

BisselPs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

Pike's Peak Book & 
Stationery Co. Rift; £ 



14 



THE TIGER 



Be Your Own Agent 

The management of the STAR LAUNDRY have 
decided to have no general agent at the College and to 
give agent's discount direct to the student sending in 
the bundle. 

Our drivers will sell you a $5.00 Coupon Book for $3.50, a dis- 
count of 30%, or you can pay in cash on the delivery of the bundle, 
taking out 30% for yourself. No bundles will be left without money 
or coupons. 

Coupon- Books at this discount will be sold only to students and 
are not transferable and the coupon will not be received from other 
than students. 



Phone Main 715 



328 N. Tejon Street 

o 




HERBERT BENNETT, Agent 



Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton Dairy 

419 S. El Paso St. Phone Main 442 

GET IT AT 

THE EMPORIUM 

AND SAVE MONEY 

1 10 S. TEJON STREET 

^THEMUELLER 

TEACHERS' AGENCY 

Conducted for Efficiency only. Services 
free to School JBnards No enrollment fe; 
for teachers. Call or write 

ANNA HI MUELLER, 450 West U nta Street, 
Phone Main 2188 Colorado Springs, Co!o 

Deichmann & Douglas Floral 
Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER, Mar. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 

Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 



Horace E. Hall '13 has left for Rocky 
Ford to accept a position as chemist in 
the beet sugar factory. He intends to 
b!e absent the first semester. 

The following men are pledged to Phi 
Gamma Delta: Roy Muncaster '15, De 
Witt Robinson 'IS, Judson Williams '15, 
Ralph Hall '15, Hunter Cover '15, and 
Frank Waddell '15. 



May Butler, who has been ill for over 
two weeks, is attending classes again. 



Ruth Beatty ex-'12 has returned to 
Colorado Springs. 



Marian Yerkes gave a tea in honor of 
the Contemporary pledges. 



Miss Ruth Freed, of Castle Rock, vis- 
ited Lorena Woltzen and Edna Maxwell. 



Lorena Woltzen and Agnes Anderson 
enjoyed a visit from their sisters Sun- 
day. 



Dorothy Madden has been ill with 
tonsilitis. 



Miss Faith Skinner '09 and Miss Amy 
Metcalf are both attending a medical 
school in Pennsvlvania. 



Dr. Schneider gave a very interesting 
talk to a mass meeting of the men of 
the College at chapel Wednesday morn- 
ing. 



Ruth Cunningham's father attended 
the Knight Templar's Convention in 
this city. 



Ruth Cunningham and Maud Stan- 
field served tea Wednesday afternoon 



FRESHMEN 

We Wish to Introduce 
to You 

The College Inn 

Opposite the Campus 



THE 

FIRST 

SUPPER 



AT 



MCnlA'S 



THE 



Hemenway Grocery Co. 
Groceries and 



Meats 



e- " Vj ^ 

T 




115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Gazette Building 



THE TIGER 



15 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Price' 



Giddings Bros. 

"The College Favorite ' 



The Favorite Shopping 

Place for College 

People 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

s the place to go to get your barber 
. ' •■ work and baths 



106H E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods , 

Repairing a Specialty 

i . 

- 

.. ,2 



,; in 3 

-. ; ' ■ \ 



91 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



For the "BEST IN THINGS MUSICAL" 

GOTO 

Hiltbrand's Music Store 

Phone 13 i25i 2 N. TejonSt. 

Artists Materials 

FRAMING 
College Posters 

The Richard Willis Art Studios 

^i East Pike's Peak Avenue 



Gloves 

for Dress and 

Street wear 

$1 to $250 



FIGURE OUT 
THE NUMBER 



Hose 
Fancy & Plain 

Silk or Lisle 
25c to $1 pair 



of hours a day you are seen in a suit, and you will come to the con- 
clusion that it isn't wise to make the old one "do." You'll want 
something distinctive, too, "in the rut", styles won't go, because we 
don't show them. Suits and Overcoats $15 to #30. Fall Hats $3 
to $5. 



Money 
Cheerfully 
Refunded 



• 




Correct Pros tor Men 



113 East 

Pike's Peak 

Avenue 



Frank Merriell '09 who has been 
visiting at the Kappa Sigma house for 
the past week, left Tuesday for his 
home at Fruita, Colorado. 

The Contemporary Club held their 
first open meeUng Friday. They will 
study "The Modern Woman" this 
semester. 



Floy Estill entertained a few of 
her College friends Wednesday even- 
ing. 

Ramona Brady entertained the 
Contemporary Club at tea Sunday 
afternoon. 

Two Y. W. C. A. spreads were 
held in Montgomery Friday night, in 
Helen Graham's room and in Maud 
Stanneld's room. 



The college vesper service was a great 
success, and brought a greatly needed 
factor into the life of the college. The 
splendid support given by the faculty and 
the. students is ' the best promise of its 
usefulness. . 



MUSIC PUPILS. 



Dr. Richards, director of the Glee 
Club, will receive pupils at the school. 
His present hours are 9:30 to 12 Mon- 
day and Tuesday, and 1 :30 to 5 on Mon- 
day, Tuesday and Saturday. 



Get Acquainted at 

The Red 
Cross Pharmacy 

WiLLAMS 8 KLUSS 
HUDSON'S CHOCOLATES 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 

107 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone 40 



Dern's Freshly Roasted Coffee 

will make 10 more cups to the lb. 
than Eastern roasted coffee 



29 S. Tejon Street 



Phone 57S 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 



Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff B Ic't 
118 North Tejon St. Phone Main 1701 



Res., 1211 N. Weber St. Tel. Main 956 




TOD POWELL 



Phone Main 930 



W. E. DONER 



■ 



POWELL-DONER SPORTING GOODS CO. 

112E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

"EVERYTHING FOR SPORTSMEN" 

New and Complete Stock of the Very Best of Athletic Supplies, College Pennants, Novelties, Etc. 

"ASK THE MEDICINE MAN" - 



16 



THE TIGER 



• 



Mr. Tiger Senior, Junion Sophomore, Freshman; Dependable SteirkBloch, Rogers-Peet and Sam 

are you ready for your Fall Suft^* c * - _.. . _ ; , % Peck mode clothes that are perfect, in every detail of 

Here you find as clever a. grouping of smarty styled workmanship and construction, 
garments and as wide an assortment of patterns and . Clothes that you can wear in any gathering in the 

weaves as in any metropolitan showing, more exactly world, 
fitted and dollars lower. Fifteen Dollars and up. 








HAUGEN, Tailor 



222 N. Tejon. 



Phone Main 296 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



\ 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



Departments - 

College of Arts and 
Science, 
E. S. PARSONS, Dean 

School of Engineering, 
F. CAJORI, Dean 

School of ForeMrv, 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 

School of Music, 

E. D. HALE, Dean 



Cigarette Sale 



13 



Prize Cup Cigarettes were 25c a Box 
As long as they last 2 Boxes for 25c 

HUGHES 

Pool in connection but not a pool room 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



Vol. XIV 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., OCTOBER 12, 1911 



Number 5 



TIGERS WIN DOCTOR BACON'S SPECIAL ELECTION 

FROM WYOMING SUNDAY SERMON LAST MONDAY 



Colorado College Victorious in First 
College Game of Year. 









Colorado College, 29; University of 
Wyoming, 9. 

The game on Washburn field last Sat- 
urday afternoon was far more interest- 
ing and exciting than the score would 
indicate. As we prophesied, the game 
was better than the game with Wyom- 
ing last year. Considering the early sea- 
son, the playing of both teams was re- 
markably good. The game was filled 
with a great deal of spectacular playing 
on both sides. Burgess, probably the 
best quarterback now playing in the 
Rocky Mountain states, was the individ- 
ual star of the game in making long 
runs through a broken field. With the 
exception of two good gains on fake 
plays on the part of Exelby, the 190- 
pound fullback, Burgess was the only 
man on the Wyoming team who was 
alle to carry the ball for a gain. This 
phenom alone scored the whole of the 
nine points won by the cowboys. 

Nearly every man on the Tiger team 
showed up in stellar form some time 
in the game. Captain Sinton made 
gains ranging from five to forty yards 
on forward passes from Vandemoer. 
Vandemoer made his greatest gains in 
running back kicks, and in circling the 
ends. Heald was always good on cross- 
tackle or straight line bucks. Putnam 
ran the team with good judgment and 
usually gained when he carried the ball. 
Thompson made a number of good 
gains on end-around plays. Black was 
always in the interference for the other 
two backs, and carried the ball well him- 

Contlnucd on page 4 



PROFESSOR BACON PREACHES 
ON "THE VISION OF GOD." 



Heald, 



Prof. B. W. Bacon, of Yale, who is 
giving a series of lectures at the College 
this week, spoke at the vesper service 
last Sunday. The subject of the address 
was "The Vision of God." Dr. Bacon 
spoke, in part, as follows : 

It is the object of all religion to bring 
the spirit of man into contact with the 
unseen. Permanence in all forms of 
worship will depend upon whether or not 
it realizes the old idea of going up into 
the sanctuary in order to see the face of 
God. Our Puritan forefathers described 
the building which they put up for their 
house of worship as a meeting-house, 
not a place where we meet one another 
but where we meet with God. Unless 
the Church of Christ throughout our 
country can make men realize that with- 
in its walls we are brought face to face 
with him from whom we come, to 
whom we go, the Church cannot live ; 
it will not deserve to live. The idea that 
one cannot be good without being reli- 
gious is rejected by many today. We all 
know people who have conducted their 
lives according to the highest standards 
of Christian morality without the sanc- 
tions of religion. Whether this can go 
on from generation to generation is 
doubtful ; the ethical society is built 
upon the past generations who lived by 
the sanctions of religion. 

Many people have made the great mis- 
take that religion merely provides a re- 
ward for good and a penalty for evil. It 
is not so. Religion grows out of the 
deeper interests of human nature. The 

Continued on page 3 



Shelton and Donovan Chosen 
for Offices. 



Senior member of the Athletic Board, 
K. C. Heald. 

Senior member of the Tiger Board, S. 
J. Shelton. 

Treasurer of the Associated Students, 
A. W. Donovan. 

The above states the results of the 
special election held Monday morning 
after chapel. On account of the lectures 
that were given to the men of the Col- 
lege during the last few days of last 
week, the election which was to have 
been held last Thursday was postponed 
until Monday morning. 

The election showed a remarkable ab- 
sence of College politics. Very little 
electioneering was done for any of the 
men who were candidates for office, and 
there were not a few who had entirely 
forgotten that the election was to be 
held until the meeting was called. 

The men who were elected to fill the 
vacancies in the Commission are all too 
well known throughout the student body 
to need much of an introduction. Each 
of the candidates seems especially well 
qualified to fill the place to which he has 
been elected. 

K. C. Heald, who was elected to the 
position of senior member of the Ath- 
letic Board, has been prominent in ath- 
letic circles ever since he came to Colo- 
rado College in his sophomore year. He 
lias been a member of the football squad 
every fall, and this year he is considered 
one of the very best football players in 
the state. He is well acquainted with 
the status of Colorado College athletics 

Continued on P»ge 7 









THE TIGER 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION PLANS 



To Improve Hagerman Hall and Make 
It the Rendezvous of College 



(By F. W. Ware.) 

There has been some criticism in 
I he past of the spirit and conditions 
of. Hagerman Hall. Some have told 
of the "rowdy" atmosphere, others 
have charged that Hagerman Hall is 
. too "clique-y." while still others have 
looked in a "knowing" way toward 
the dormitory when the College au- 
thorities were seeking the source of 
some campus escapade. Such a feel- 
ing is unfiortunate. When a spirit 
such as appears to have existed here- 
tofore toward Hagerman Hall, pre- 
vails among the men, there can never 
be a genuine, unified college spirit. 
This may have been the fault of the 
hall itself or one or two men in the 
dormitory may have provoked this 
feeling toward the entire building. 
Or, it is possible that the sentiment 
was started from without. However, 
whatever may have been the cause of 
the remarks, these skeptical intima- 
tions ought to stop. 

Hagerman Hall should be a central 
gathering place for all the men of 
Colorado College. It should be the 
rendezvous for the College men while 
on the campus. Whatever may have 
been the attitude tow ; ard the dormi- 
tory in the past, let us establish a 
new conception of the possibilities 
which it presents as a center of Col- 
lege life on the campus. The men in 
Hagerman this year are in complete 
harmony, and are anxious to have 
those outside come to the hall at any 
time. 

A new drinking fountain has been 
recently installed in the hall. The 
Young Men's Christian Association 
has fitted up the room just to the 
right of the entrance as its head- 
quarters. A library of fine books is 
at f he disposal of the men of the 
College. The reading table is cov- 
ered with newspapers and magazines. 
Subscriptions have been sent in for 
s^ven of the leading monthly period- 
ical. They are McClure's, Every- 
body's, Technical World, American 
World's Work, the Saturday Evening 
Post, and the Inter-Collegian. These 
magazines will be on file in the Asso- 



ciation office and reading room, for 
the use of all the men of Colorado 
College. The Christian Association 
is also planning to equip its rooms 
with games popular among college 
men. 

There is a fire place in the secre- 
tary's office which is used on chilly 
nights. One evening last week 
twenty-five fellows gathered after 
supper about the crackling fire, and 
roaseed marshmallows while the}' 
sang everything from the time worn 
"Bring Back My Bonnie," to the 
latest hits from the "Pink Lady." 

We will have more times like this. 
We ought to have more College sings 
of all the C. C. men. If the men out- 
side Hagerman Hall will co-operate 
with the men who live in it, the stu- 
dents of this institution will be ce- 
mented together this year as never 
before in one unified, sympathetic, 
whole. 



BACON LECTURES ON 
ARCHAEOLOGY. 



Professor Bacon gave an interest- 
ing lecture last Saturday evening in 
Perkins Hall under the auspices of 
the Archaeological Society. The sub- 
ject was "Herod, the Hellenizer, or 
Great Monuments in the Time of 
Christ" and the lecture was supple- 
mented by stereopticon views taken, 
for the greater part, by Dr. Bacon 
when he was Director of the Ameri- 
can School of Archaeology in Jeru- 
salem. The lecturer impressed on 
his audience the fact that the com- 
mon idea of Herod the Great as 
merely a bloody tyrant, is not alto- 
gether a just one. During his reign 
the monarch introduced into Pales- 
tine and Assyria those Greek ideals 
which were to have such an influ- 
ence on future history. The stereop- 
ticon views gave a good idea of the 
great amount of Greek architecture 
existing during the time of Christ. 



SENIORS TRAMP. 



The seniors are going tramping 
next Saturday. The arrangements 
for the day have been left in the 
hands of a committee. The plans of 
the committee have not yet been 
given out, but it is understood that 
there will be plenty of tramping, 
plenty to eat, plenty to drink, and 
plenty to fuss and be fussed. 



LECTURES OF PROFESSOR 
BACON. 

Noted Yale Man Gives Interesting 
Addresses in Perkins. 



The students and the faculty of the 
College enjoyed three rare treats this 
week in the form of the three lectures 
that were delivered in Perkins Hall on 
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday even- 
ings. The noted lecturer was Professor 
Benjamin Wisner Bacon, D. D., LL.D., 
professor of the New Testament and 
exegesis at Yale University. 

Following are the subtopics and a syl- 
labus of each lecture : 

Lecture i — Monday, October 9. 

"The Evolution of Religion and His- 
toric Types of Christianity." 

I. The tendency of human progress 
in culture and enlightenment is not to 
discard religion, but to deepen and re- 
fine it. Plasticity of form a token of 
vitality. Medievalism vs. Modernism. 

II. Historically, religions may be 
classified according to the preponder- 
ance of ihe self-regarding or the al- 
truistic impulse. Nature religions and 
national religions. Christianity com- 
bines both types. Imperial persecution 
was incurred chieflly because of its so- 
cial ideal. 

III. History must furnish the criteria 
of further development. The Evolu- 
tionary principle has been applied to 
religion in general use and to Biblical lit- 
erature in particular. "Inspiration" 
does not affect the principle; for a 
Christian doctrine of scripture makes 
scripture subservient to "the manifes- 
tation of the life." Hence : 

IV. The alternative types of recon- 
structed Christianity, the ethical and 
the mystical, alike appeal to its history 
and must be judged by it. 

Lecture 2 — Tuesday, October 10. 
"Nineteenth Century Liberalism." 

1. President Eliot's "Religion of the 
future." Criticism has restored the 
portrait of the historic Jesus. But 
Christianity began as a gospel about 
Jesus, and cannot be restored by re- 
producing the gospel of Jesus. 

2. For the historic portrait the factor 
of miracle is subordinate and incidental. 
The resurrection does not belong in this 
category. Results of criticism applied to 
the Matthaean tradition of the Precepts 
of Jesus, and to the Petrine tradition 
of his career. 

3. The ideals of the gospel of Jesus 
are historically determinable, and are 
ultimate. But they constitute only the 

ContitjHtd on Page 7 



THE TIGER 



THE OCTOBER "KIN." 

Clitic Takes Plenty of Time to Con- 
Eider the Worth of the 
First Number. 



The "Kinnikinnik" opens its fourth 
year with a number which though not 
excellent is fairly creditable. It offers 
a considerable variety of material, — sto- 
ries, descriptive sketches, verse, and an 
essay, — of approximately even merit. 
The trouble is that much of this material 
is decidedly mediocre in quality. 

None of the stories is as good as the 
best that have appeared in previous 
j'ears. Mr. Black's "The Test of Love" 
is well told and has an effective climax: 
but it falls short of his most interesting 
work both in humor and in imagination. 
On the whole it is the best story in the 
number. Miss Aughinbaugh's "The 
Rescued" is cleverly planned, and shows 
skill in the use of dialogue. It is a very 
readable automobile story. Mr. Mahan's 
"The Price of Victory," another auto- 
mobile story, contains too much techni- 
cal language and fails to make clear its 
central situation. The latter criticism 
applies also to Miss Banning's "Antone 
Lanier." Why did the two men quarrel? 
The story does not tell us. "Politics and 
a Pup" is a conventional child story, 
neither better nor worse than the aver- 
age. 

The two descriptive sketches, "On the 
West Range" and "The Storm" are well 
done. The former is more individual ; 
the latter better written. "The Storm" 
is perhaps the best bit of English in the 
number. Miss Harris' essay "On Grow- 
ing Old" is thoughtful and consistent in 
its point of view. 

Mr. Donelan's doggerel verse, "On 
Sleeping in Bed" is amusing, but hardly 
successful enough to justify its position 
on the first page. Miss Akin's "The 
Sunset Sea" is a much better piece of 
work ; it is full of light and color, and 
shows some skill in the handling of 
rhymes and metre. The figurative lan- 
guage in the second stanza is slightly 
confused, but in the main the poem suc- 
ceeds in giving the impression intended 
by the writer. 

In the matter of arrangement, the 
magazine leaves something to be desired. 
Generally speaking, the strongest article 
should have the place of honor at the 
beginning. 



Prof. Bacon gave a very interesting 
address to the student body at chapel 
yesterday morning on the subject of 
"The Privileges in the World of Let- 



DOCTOR BACONS SERMON 

Continued from Page 1 

more we are limited by the restrictions 
at home and with the state situation as 
of nature around us, the more we raise 
our aspirations to God who will be our 
help in our difficulties. 

Not all ages of life and not all times 
in the world's history are equally suscep- 
tible to religious inception. We are liv- 
ing, some say, in a materialistic age. 
Success has become the ruling power of 
our time. It may be true that our age 
is an inspirational age and there seems 
to be a deeper cause than that of 
mere pursuit of wealth. It is not so easy 
today to come into relation with the per- 
sonality manifested in the universe. In 
older days God was seen in special mani- 
festations, today his power is shown by 
his beneficent will which makes the uni- 
verse one great universe of law. It is 
not easy to understand the personality of 
God or to come into contact with God. 
in an age when we begin to un- 
derstand some of the functions of 
the universe and what it means to have 
infinite care over the smallest detail of 
this universe, it is not so easy for men 
to realize the personality of God. There 
may be something also in what psycholo- 
gists tell us about the greater capacity 
of adolescence for religious motives. 
Those of us who are older look back at 
the time when it was easier for us to get 
out of our worship of God the strength 
and faith which we need, when it was 
easier for us to sympathize with the feel- 
ings .of the men who cried out after God 
"as the heart panteth after the water 
brook." It was easier to come in con- 
tact with the Father when we were 
younger. But will the time ever come 
when we shall no longer feel the motives 
that brought to the lips of those proph- 
ets of old their cry unto this God, this 
personal friend and deliverer and helper? 
In our older age something of the sense 
of the nearness of God has vanished. 
But in mature age we wish that we 
might be where we could find God. As 
we go into the shadows of life and ap- 
proach that land "from whose bourn no 
traveler returns" we think of the relation 
of the individual to the God from whom 
he comes. Such thoughts as these must 
have been in the minds of those who 
asked Jesus "Show us the Father and it 
sufficeth us." In this age also theer was 
no vision of God. It was an age that 
demanded a new revelation and the au- 
thor in this gospel attempts to give us 
this new revelation, the revelation of 
the incarnation. 

Moses asked that he might see God, 
and was told that no one could see the 



face of God and live, but that he might 
stand in the shadow of the rock and wit- 
ness God's glory. Because of the greater 
manifestations of the glory of God in 
the works of the hand of man, the old 
glory is passing away. The God who 
caused the light to shine out of darkness 
has shown himself in everything around 
us. 

The nobleness and purity shown in the 
face of Christ in Hofman's picture of the 
boy Jesus tells us of the power of God 
in heaven and on earth. It is the same 
message which comes to us when we 
have looked into the face of father or 
mother and have seen there the love and 
the self-sacrifice which are greater than 
any other things in the creation universe. 
We realize that this spiritual presence 
here upon earth is not without its crea- 
tor and its source. "He that forms the 
eye shall he not see and he that made 
the ear shall he not hear." He that gave 
father love and mother love, the hero- 
ism, the self-sacrifice, has he no heart 
that is wrung in tenderness over the 
suffering of sin or the misery of man ? 

There is no one manifestation of God 
that is greater than the manifestation of 
the prophets — it is when we find our- 
selves face to face with the great prob- 
lems of life that must be solved, and we 
find that the great problem will solve it- 
self and the answer is "He who has seen 
Me has seen the Father." "I am in the 
Father and the Father in me; he that 
hath seen me hath seen the Father." 

The speaker at next Sunday's service 
will be Dr. F. F. Kramer, of all Saints' 
Church, Denver, one of the most famous 
theologians and scholars of divinity in 
the state. 



CLASS HATS. 



The senior class lias adopted the 
same style of hat as was worn by the 
class of 191 1 last year. It is the 
regular cowboy style with a flat brim 
and a narrow black leather band with 
"Colorado College 1912" stamped on 
in gold. This hat is of a neat and 
dignified style and seems to have met 
the general approval of everyone on 
the campus. At a meeting last week 
the sophomore class decided on a 
class "headgear." It is to be a soft 
grey and white cloth hat with a red 
band and is said to be somewhat 
unique in style. With the freshmen 
wearing the regulation cap it remains 
now only for the juniors to decide 
upon some distinctive class hat. 



Miss Allen was a guest of Hazel Bane, 
Sunday. 



THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 



Tigers Off for Wiscon- Freshmen in Lamar 
sin Wednesday Saturday 



Twenty men, including Coach 
Rothgeb and Manager Statton, leave 
next Wednesday for Madison, Wis- 
consin, where they play the Univers- 
ity of Wisconsin. The University of 
Wisconsin is one of the famous "Big 
Eight" elevens of the Middle West. 
This game — no matter what the out- 
come — is a great thing for Colorado 
College. It means that Colorado Col- 
lege, and the Rocky Mountain col- 
leges in general, will be introduced 
inti the Middle West as institutions 
which must soon be seriously con- 
sidered in reckoning the athletic 
standings of the country. 

Cast fall Wisconsin went through 
a rather peculiar season. It opened 
rather inauspiciously by Lawrence 
College holding Wisconsin to a tie 
score. It was the first time in his- 
tory that Lawrence had proved a 
serious rival. Then Indiana, for the 
first time in years, defeated Wiscon- 
sin. Minnesota followed with a score 
of 28-0. Rut the Badgers came back 
::t the end of the season and defeated 
the University of Chicago 10-0. This 
was the first time Chicago had been 
beaten by Wisconsin in ten years. 

Last Saturday Wisconsin defeated 
Lawrence 15-0. Compared with the 
same game last year, this goes to 
show that Coach Richards has the 
team in better early season form than 
they were at 'this time last fall. 



Freshmen Defeat Mutes 



Last Friday afternoon the fresh- 
man team defeated the team from the 
Colorado Deaf and Blind School 29-0. 
The game was of the usual rough ar- 
ticle which the Dummies always put 
up. They have a hard time breaking 
away from the old-style rough-and- 
tumble and pull-and-haul variety of 
football. The game was called three 
minutes after the beginning of the 
last quarter, due to an excess of un- 
necessary roughness. The backfiehi 
trio, Cheese, Holmes and Emery, 
were the chief ground gainers for the 
freshies. 



Next Saturday 1915's team will go 
against the heavy Lamar High School 
team. This is the team that held C. 
S. H. S. to a 1 1-5 score last year. 
The freshmen will have to go for all 
they are worth if they expect to beat 
these heavy teams. 

A week from Saturday the fresh- 
men have another game scheduled 
with Pueblo Centennial High School 
in Pueblo. Manager Robinson has 
not made definite arrangements for 
games after this date, but is consid- 
ering offers from the Las Animas 
Sailors and the Denver high schools. 
Many other teams in the state to 
which he has written report full 
schedules. 

There is a slight tendency on the 
part of the freshmen to begin slurring 
off at about this time in the season, 
but they should remember that if 
they wish to have a successful team, 
or if they expect to get these trips, 
they must practice. The men who 
are out regularly will naturally be 
given the first preference. 



Aggies Defeated Twice 
in Utah 



The Colorado Agricultural College 
went down before the University of 
L'cah last Saturday by a score of 51-0; 
and again before the LLah Aggies on 
.Monday by a score of 27-0. In both 
games the Colorado Aggies proved 
woefully weak in all departments of 
the game. They could not hold in 
the line or tackle in open field, and 
when they got possession of the ball 
were unable to do anything with it. 
Both Utah teams were able to gain 
constantly for 5, 10, 20 and even 50 
yards. 

Considering the extremely high 
score which the University of Utah 
made against the Aggies, it looks as 
if Utah was going to have a team 
of about the same calibre as last year. 
Ctah will play against C. C. on Wash- 
burn field on November n, and pres- 
ent indications point to a hard game. 



The Tigers defeated Utah last year 
on their home grounds, but never yet 
1 as Utah been able to defeat Colo- 
rado College on Washburn field. 



TIGERS WIN FROM WYO. 

Continued from Page 1 

self. The five center men, Witherow, 
Bowers. Hedblom and Moberg, worked 
as a unit. They were impenetrable on 
defense, and ripped great holes in their 
opponents line on offense. 

The game was characterized by very 
little fumbling on either side. There 
was a good deal of time taken out for 
injured men, but was not as noticeable 
in the Tiger team as it was a week ago 
in the game with the High School. Wy- 
oming only played an offensive game 
during the first half. Both teams used 
a great variety of shift plays. Wyoming- 
was unable to make a single one of her 
several attempts with the forward pass 
successful. Colorado College used the 
forward pass a great deal, and with suc- 
cess the majority of the time. 

The Wyoming team was a very few 
pounds, if any, lighter than the C. C. 
team. The Tigers played a much stead- 
ier and more consistent game, and were 
in superior condition. During the game 
the Tigers made first down twenty-two 
times, as compared with four times by 
Wyoming. They carried the ball from 
scrimmage alone 456 yards, to Wyom- 
ing's 115 yards. Vandy's punts averaged 
about 54 yards, compared to Burgess' 47 
yards. 

Colorado College's 29 points were 
made by five touchdowns, and four goals 
after touchdowns. Touchdowns were 
made by Sinton. Black, Putnam. Heald 
and Vandemoer. Hedblom kicked the 
four goals tried, the fifth being an un- 
successful punt out. Wyoming's 9 points 
were made from one touchdown, one 
goal after touchdown and one field goal, 
all by Burgess. 

Neither team scored during the first 
quarter. C. C. received the kick off, and 
carried the ball to Wyoming's twenty 
yard line, where they were held for 
downs. After that neither team got 
inside their opponents thirty-five yard 
line. Vandy carried the kick-off back 
for thirty-five yards. Burgess brought 
one punt back forty yards. Sinton made 
one forward pass good for thirty yards. 

Early in the second quarter, the Tigers 
recovered a fumbled punt on Wyoming's 



THE TIGER 



twelve yard line. In three plays, Put- 
nam went over for the touchdown. Her- 
ri in went in for Putnam here. Soon 
after the second kick-off, Bowers was 
temporarily put out by tackling Burgess. 
On the next play Exsalby took a delayed 
pass through tackle and escaped the 
whole team. 120-pound Herron, here 
showed the greatest grit on the day, 
when he hit this 190-pound with all the 
force he had. thus saving a touchdown 
(mi the 14-yard line. He was removed 
from the game unconscious, but he had 
served his purpose. His injuries were 
not serious, but were due to the shock 
of collision with the burly. That play 
brought Wyoming near enough to make 
a field goal, in the next couple of plays. 
Soon after the next kick-off, after the 
Tigers had punted, Exelby made the 
same delayed-pass play good again, for 
twenty yards. Then after an exchange 
of punts, Burgess made the sensational 
run of the day. He received a punt, ran 
forward towards the right side of the 
held, was blocked, tourned back, circled 
around to the left, skirted both teams 
and ran eighty yards for a touchdown. 
The maneuvre was made successful by 
the "suck-in'' of the man playing on the 
outside on that side of the field. This 
put Wyoming ahead and was all thaf 
was needed to make the Tigers take a 
brace. The first time they got the ball 
after that on their own fifty yard line, 
they took it down the field in four downs 
for a touchdown. The half ended with 
the ball in the middle of the field. 

During the last two quarters Wyom- 
ing never endangered the Tiger goal. 
The closest they came was Burgess' at- 
tempt to make a field goal from the 
thirty-five yard line. The third quarter 
was marked by two steady marches of 
the Tigers down the field for touch- 
downs, interspersed with exchanges of 
punts. At the beginning of the quarter 
Putnam relieved Vandy, who had been 
working in the quarterback position since 
Herron had been put out. 

In the fourth quarter they made one 
more trip down to the goal line, and 
then Rothgeb loosened up in behalf of 
the second team. Nearly every man 
was replaced. The game ended with the 
ball in the middle of the field headed 
for the Wyoming goal. 
Colorado College. Wyoming. 

Sinton. re Jones, re 

Floyd, Koch, rt Pitz, White, rt 

Moberg, rg Leonardson, rg 

Witherow, c N. Rogers, c 

Hedblom, lg H. Rogers, lg 

Bowers, Summers, It Thompson, 

Martin, It 
Thompson, Bowers, le Fuller, le 



lleald, Lewis, lh Exelby, lh 

Black, Moye, f b Grant, fb 

Vandemoer, Black, Scott, rh 

Irish, Miller, rh 
Referee, Smith, Denver. Umpire, 
Wingender, Denver. Field Judge, SheL 
den, Denver. 1 leadlinesman, Capen, 
Colorado Springs. Time of quarters, 
12 1-2 minutes each. 
Putnam, Herron, Vandemoer, pb 

Burgess, qb 

PROF. MOTTEN CONFERENCE 
REPRESENTATIVE. 

It was officially given out at the fac- 
ulty meeting iast Friday that Professor 
Motten has been appointed by President 
Slocum tu act as faculty representative 
for Colorado College in the Rocky 
Mountain Athletic Conference. Prof. 
Motten succeeds Prof. Griswold, who 
acted for Prof. Schneider last spring. 
Prof. Griswold is not with the College 
this year. The appointment was held off 
for some time in hope that Prof. Schnei- 
der could lie induced to take his former 
position in the Conference. 

Prof. Motten is a man well fitted to 
follow the men who have so ably repre- 
sented Colorado College heretofore in 
the Conference. He has the welfare of 
the College at heart and is interested in 
every form of College activity, but 
especially inathletics. He has the good- 
will of the students. He desires to. up- 
hold the standards which the Conference 
has set in regard to clean athletic rela- 
tions. 



STATE TEAMS BEGIN 
TAKE FORM 



TO 



LINERS COMPARED WITH 
TIGERS. 

The School of Mines defeated Colo- 
rado Springs High School last Saturday 
by a score of 30-0, as compared to the 
34-3 score which Colorado College ran 
up against that team. This offers a 
rough comparison of the strength of the 
C. C. and Mines' teams, and if taken as 
such, shows that the Miners are to lie 
strong contenders for championship hon- 
ors this year. It is probably still a little 
early to get an exact estimate of their 
strength. Harper, the small lad play- 
ing quarterback, was the star of the 
game for the Golden crowd. 



CONFERENCE MEETING. 

The Faculty Athletic Conference 
will hold its first meeting of the year 
next Saturday in the Denver Univers- 
ity law building in Denver. Professor 
Motten. win i was recently appointed 
to succeed Dr. Schneider, will attend 
the conference meeting as the repre- 
sentative of Colorado College. 



College football is rapidly getting 
into such shape that it can begin to 
take account of itself. All the teams 
in the northern part of the state arc 
having championship dreams while 
they are doing their best to whip their 
material into shape. It looks now as 
if the biggest struggle was going to 
In' a three-cornered affair, with the 
University of Colorado, the Univers- 
ity of Denver and Colorado College 
as the contenders. The School of 
Mines is showing lots of spirit and 
fight and have hopes. The Agricul- 
tural College seems to be doing bet- 
ter than usual in its gritty fight 
against the usual big odds. 

The U. of C. Bunch. 
At the University of Colorado they 
have fully three squads of men who 
are trying out for first team posi- 
tions. Coaches Folsom and Castle- 
man are hoping to pick four men to 
f.ll the holes left by Andrus, Car- 
michael, Gilligan and O'Brien from 
this abundance of material. They 
seem to have seven men of nearly 
equal merit trying for the backfield 
positions. This will give them two 
good sets o! backs. Captain McFad- 
den and Rich will surely be selected, 
with Hartman, Pigg and Nelson con- 
eesting for places on the first team, 
and Teters, Listen and Wrightman 
fighting it out for first choice on the 
reserve eleven. Nelson has a great 
advantage, due to his splendid punt- 
ing ability. Vandemoer is probably 
the only man in the state that can 
come anywhere near contending with 
him in this department of the game. 
Boulder is not nearly as enthusias- 
tic about her linemen as about the 
backfield. The material is not heavy, 
and as yet there is little to say as to " 
who will hold the positions in the 
line. Davenport, at center, probably 
lias a better hold on his position than 
any other man in the line. Crouter 
and Knowles at guards, and Cooper 
and Warkley at tackles seem to de- 
serve the best mention for their posi- 
tions. Mills, of last year's team, has 
the best chance for end, with Kemp 
wurking hard to balance him on the 
other end. Certainly the line is the 
weakest point in Boulder's team. 
D. U. Aggregation. 
Denver University is getting back 
this fall nearly all the stars that made 
up her championship team in igocS. 

Continu d .in I'.iki' 8 



THE TIGER 



The Weekly Newspaper of Colorado Collet 

HARRY L. BLACK Editor-in-Chief 

RICHARD L. HUGHES Business Mjjr. 

Leon C. Hall Assistant Editor 

A. H. Rowbotham Assistant Editor 

J. J. Sinton Athletic Editor 

D. H. mahan Engineering Editor 

G. S. Cowdery Forestry Editor 

Miss Glenn Styles Alumni Editor 

Miss Mary Randolph Exchange Editor 

Miss Helen Rand Local Editor 

A. W. Donovan Local Editor 

H. A. Parkison Assistant Manager 

A. L. Golden Assistant Manager 

W. L. Myers Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

F. P.Storke, H. A.Bennett, John L. Herron, G. W. 

Belsey, Mis9 Elizabeth Gerould, Miss Leona Stukey, 

Miss Myrth King, Miss Violet Hopper, Miss 

Frances Adams, R. G. Appel 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to TheTiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo 

Phones: Editor, Main 2550. Manager, Main 2073 

Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



College Literary Work. 

In another column of The Tiger will 
be found the criticism of the first issue 
of The Kinnikinnik. This criticism 
was made by Professor Woodbridge of 
the English department of the College. 
Mr. Woodbridge is one of those critics 
who does not allow his criticism to be 
influenced by the fact that The Kinni- 
kinnik is the College literary monthly. 
If a piece of literary work is good he 
does not hesitate to say so, and if it is 
not good, hi does not try to make you 
believe it is. 

His criticism of the first issue of the 
Kin shows that there is a great deal of 
room for improvement in the standard 
of excellence of the contributions which 
have been published. Like everything 
else that has to look to the student body 
for support, the Kin's success depends 
upon the way in which the students of 
the College get behind it to help make it 
what it is. There is a capable board of 
editors at the head of the Kin this year, 
but they can's do everything that must 
be done to make the magazine a publica- 
tion of the best quality. They can't 
write all the stories, essays, critcisms 
and poetry ( ? ) which should go into a 
magazine of this sort. 

It is not at all probable that the best 
literary talent that has ever been in 
Colorado College has gone out. There 
are still a number of writers here who 
can turn out work that will come up to 



the desired standard of The Kinnikinnik. 
Some of those writers are submitting 
their work to the Kin board and some 
of tne rest are not. And those who are 
not giving the editors a chance to pass 
on their work are not doing the right 
thing by themselves or by the Kin. 

1 he fundamental purpose for which 
the Kin was founded was to exploit 
College talent. Here is offered a great 
opportunity for a student with literary 
ability and inclination to see just what 
he can do along a literary line. Here 
is an advantage that is offered in very 
few of the colleges of the country, and 
if the students of the College only real- 
ized it, they may consider themselves 
very fortunate to have the opportunity 
to offer contributions to such a maga- 
zine. Here is a chance to develop 
whatever talent you may possess. Here 
is a chance to discover whether or not 
you have any talent. Don't neglect it. 
If you can write a story, write it and 
submit it to the editor of the Kin. He 
and his assistants are qualified to judge 
whether your work deserves to appear 
in the Kin, and if it does, you may be 
sure it will be there. 



The Season is On. 

With the Wyoming game last Sat- 
urday, the Tigers began their inter- 
collegiate schedule for the season of 
1911. There has been so much said 
about every phase of football that there 
seems to be a danger of overdoing it. 
Everyone has a different opinion of the 
Tiger chances during the coming sea- 
son. And what makes it a worse mud- 
dle, everyone seems so cocksure that 
things are bound to turn out exactly ac- 
cording to his dope. 

Now. the editor of The Tiger has no 
official dope to spread. But let us tell 
you right here, that, win or lose, the 
Tigers are going to play the game and 
play it like they meant it. The student 
body has shown that it is behind the 
team, and that it is there to stay. Now 
the rest depends upon the players. It 
has taken a great deal of hard work to 
get the team to where it is now, but 
it is going to take a great deal more to 
get in shape to win the championship. 
This fact was clearly shown by the game 
last Saturday. 

The Tigers this year have one of the 
hardest schedules every undertaken by 
any Colorado team. For the first time 
in the history of athletics, a Rocky 
Mountain team is going back to play a 
game against a team of the middle west. 
The Tigers are going back to Wiscon- 
sin with the reputation of being the best 
team of the Rocky Mountain region. 
And it will be up to them to justify the 



reputation. 

And after the Wisconsin game is over 
there will still remain three hard games 
to be played. The University of Utah, 
the University of Colorado and Denver 
University all have strong teams rep- 
resenting them this year. The School 
of Mines is not so weak, and the Aggies 
have a chance to improve. 

The championship cannot be won on 
paper. It is still anybody's palm and 
the team that can put up the hardest 
and best game is the team that is going 
to win. The chances of the Tiger team 
are exceedingly bright, but we cannot 
rest on the laurels won last year. The 
battle for the championship must be 
fought all over again, and it is the fight, 
speed, teamwork and headwork that the 
Tigers are able to develop that is going 
to determine their place in the champion- 
ship race. 



Assistant Editor Resigns. 

Lloyd L, Shaw, who was recently 
elected assistant editor of the Tiger, 
has tendered his resignation to the 
Board of Control. Sha wis carrying 
an unusually heavy, course of Col- 
lege work this year, and this, to- 
gether with his other work as bio- 
logical laboratory assistant, Pearsons 
debater and editor-in-chief of the 
Nugget, makes it impossible for him 
to do justice to the Tiger. Shaw 
would have made a good man for the 
Tiger, had he been able to devote 
the time to it, and we are extremely 
sorry to lose him from the staff. 



"THE SLEEPING CAR." 

The first performance of the Dra- 
matic Society was given Friday night 
in honor of the new girls. The play, 
"The Sleeping Car," was full of 
amusing incidents and was very well 
acted. Dorliska Crandall as the 
talkative lady, kept both the "Sleep- 
ing Car" and the audience awake. 
The part of the Californian was taken 
exceptionally well by Lillian Picken. 

The cast was as follows: 

Agnes Dorliska Crandall 

Her Husband Marion Haines 

Her Aunt Marion Fezer 

Her Brother Margaret Watson 

The Californian Lillian Picken 

The Porter Carrie Burger 



REWARD OFFERED! 

President Jackson of the sopho- 
more class offers a substantial re- 
ward for well-seasoned chestnuts in 
good condition. 



THE TIGER 



DR. RICHARDS WILL CONDUCT 
GLEE CLUB. 

It appears that the Tiger was mis- 
informed regarding the notice pub- 
lished in these columns last week 
concerning the official connection of 
Dr. Vere Stiles Richards with the 
School of Music. The work of the 
College Glee Club will be in charge 
of Dr. Richards during the coming 
season, but he has not received an 
appointment to the staff of the School 
of Music as might be inferred from 
the article last week. 

Dr. Richards is very optimistic re- 
garding the outlook for the Glee Club 
this year. There is a larger amount 
of material from which to pick the 
members, and competition for places 
on the Club will be keener than it 
lias been for a number of years. 
Regular rehearsals begin tonight and 
every candidate must make a good 
record of attendance to hold his 
chance for a place. 



Christ," with equal emphasis on both 
terms, however historical criticism may 
depict the one and the psychology of re- 
ligion restate the other. 



LECTURES BY PROF. BACON 

Continued from page 2 

pre-natal form of Christianity. Histor- 
ically it is a gospel about Jesus, originat- 
ing with the resurrection as a psycholog- 
ical experience of primitive believers, 
and propagated under Greek influences. 

4. The reformed Judaism of the Jew- 
ish-Christian churches in A. D. 50-150, 
and their medieval successor Islam, are 
in line with the "liberal" ideal. 'The re- 
ligion of the future" must include the 
Pauline, Hellenistic factor, the gospel of 
"God in Christ." 
Lecture 3 — Wednesday, Cctober 11. 

"Twentieth Century Mythical Ideal- 
ism." 

1. Christianity without the historic 
Jesus. The Monists' propaganda is im- 
portant as a symptom. It indicates reac- 
tion from social toward individual reli- 
gion, and thus conforms to the real his- 
tory of Christian origins. Results of re- 
cent study by the methods of compara- 
tive religion. 

2. Personal religion may be regarded 
broadly as a product of Graeco-Roman 
cosmopolitanism ; but it did not and 
could not originate without a historic 
point of departure, any more than it can 
continue to exist without objective prec- 
edent. Peter, the associate of Jesus, an- 
tecedent to Paul in the founding of the 
church. The pre-Pauline rite of baptism 
"into the name of Jesus" as the Christ, 
"for the forgiveness of sin." 

3. Mythical idealism repeats the error 
of the docetic Gnostics. Christianity re- 
mains the doctrine that "Jesus is the 



FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS. 

The freshman class held a meeting 
at Palmer Hall yesterday noon for 
the purpose of electing permanent 
officers who were to serve for the 
remainder of the year. The success- 
ful candidates were: 
President — Charles Emery. 
Vice-President — Sam Baker. 
Secretary — Miss Harriett Ferrill. 

Treasurer — Wilifred Van Stone. 



GET BUSY! 



The professors have been asked to 
hand in the mid-semester grades on 
Saturday, November 4. Under the 
faculty regulation liberal arts and for- 
estry students who are not passing 
in twelve hours are ineligible for stu- 
dent activities for the rest of the 
semester. Now is the time to start 
making up back work, for the day ol 
reckoning approacheth apace. 



influence in all affairs that concern 
the College as a whole. 

"IN A TOY SHOP." 



A short play entitled "In a Toy 
Shop," written by Ellen Galpin, was 
given by the Bemis sophomores in 
Cogswell theater Friday night, Sep- 
tember 29th. Ellen Galpin as the 
Doll captivated the audience, both by 
her clever acting and by her dancing. 
The whole performance was very 
amusing and entertaining. The pro- 
ceeds of the play were for the pur- 
chase of coffee spoons for the dining 
hall. The cast was as follows: 

M r. McWade Marie Dodge 

Mrs. McWade Netta Powell 

Jeanne McWade, the Doll 

Ellen Gaipin 

First Monk Mai y Adams 

Second Monk Lillian Catren 

Relatives — Darmai I Inline, Alice 

Copeland 
Orchestra — Alke Alderson and Alice 

Brown. 



SPECIAL ELECTION LAST MONDAY 

Continued from page 5 

well. He loves the game for the game's 
sake, and may be depended upon to do 
what is for the best interest of athletics 
and for the hest interest of Colorado Col- 
lege in athletics. 

Sam J. Shelton, who was chosen for 
senior member of the Tiger Board, is 
especially fitted to hold the place he 
lias been elected to occupy because of 
his former connection with the Tiger 
and his intimate acquaintance with the 
affairs of the paper. East year Shel- 
ton was assistant editor of the Tiger, 
and this year he is still displaying his 
lively interest in the Tiger by lend- 
ing his very valuable assistance to the 
editorial staff. Shelton is a member 
of Delta Phi Theta fraternity and the 
Apollonian Club, and was editor-in- 
chief of the toi? Nugget. 

A. W. Donovan, the newly elected 
Treasurer of the Associated Students, 
is a junior in the department of for- 
estry. Donovan is a thorough-going 
business man and there is no doubt 
but the surplus funds belonging to 
the student body will be invested to 
good advantage. 

Besides attending to the immediate 
business of his particular office, each 
of these men will occupy a seat on 
the Student Commission, and in that 
capacity, exercise a certain amount of 



.Mi 
■ho 



Lulu Kramer 
it Ford. Colo. 



i is teaching 



Clare Phillips '10 was down from 
Denver for a visit at the Ivappa .-Sig- 
ma house Saturday and Sunday. 



Oliver 11 all is going to Denver Sat- 
urday to attend the electrical show. 

Secretary Ware has acquired a new- 
bulletin board for the use of the 
Young Men's Christian Association. 
He expects to plant it in front of 
chapel in the near future. 



, Josl yn P rinter y 



112 E. Cucharra* St. 
Phone Main 1154 



Printers & 
Publishers 



ANY KIND OF PRINTING 
WE PRINT THE TIGER 



THE TIGER 




Soft Hats and Derbies 
$3.00 to $7.00 



Cap Styles for Autumn 

Tne Tress and Henry Heath Caas are imported by the Gano-Downs Co. from England. 
A variety of patters in rough and smooth effects #1.50 to #3.50. 
Heid Caps, domestic Caps of Style and Quality $1.00 and better. 

GATO-DOmS* 

Tejon at Kiowa 



TO TAKE FORM. 



Continued from Page 5 

The usual bear stories are going the 
rounds concerning the loss of some of 
the best men, but it is not to be expected 
that the actual strength of the team will 
be materially affected. 
It is hard to prove anything against 
any of these men, and unless the 
Conference happens to throw out 
some of them, D. U. will certainly 
have a formidable bunch this year. 
The new coach, Tom Barry, is an un- 
known quantity in Rocky Mountain 
Football, but he has a reputation 
along with the best. He was coach 
of the Wisconsin team last year. Volk, 
at half, and Schroeder, at full, of an- 
cient fame, and Koonsman, half, from 
last year, are all back and will make 
one of the strongest backfields in the 
state. The quarterback question is 
troubling the Ministers a great deal. 
Walker, the large boy used last year, 
is not back, and there seems to be no 
very promising candidates to take his 
place. Fike has been shifted to cen- 
ter. Russ and Meyers of the 1909 
team are playing the ends. The guard 
and tackle positions are not yet de- 
cided upon, but there is a choice of 
about six good men for the four po- 
sitions. On looking over this combi- 
nation, is seems as if there is an 
abundance of big burlies in the back 
field while the line men are unusually 
light. Shifting may have to be re- 
sorted to. 

The Mines' Team. 

With Ted Stuart back again in the 
coaching position, and a heavier set 
of men than last year, it is thought 
that the old fighting spirit which has 
always prevailed in that institution 
will put out a team this year that will 



at least remind the state Golden is 
still on the map. Six of the 191 1 
team are back. The return of ex- 
Capt. Arch Spring has done as much 
as anything to raise the Miners' 
hopes. Both fullback Myers and half- 
back Spring are old-timers. Tolman 
is contesting with Mathewson and 
Hammond for the other half. Harper 
seems to be the only hope at present 
for quarter. On the ends of the line 
they have two fast men, Shanley and 
Wuench. Captain Calvet is at guard. 
Those trying for the other positions 
in the line are Myers, Cadot, DeLait- 
tre, Reed, Johnson and Arfsten. 

The comparative scores made on the 
Colorado Springs High School by C. C. 
and the Miners cannot be depended upon 
as a basis of comparison because the high 
school did not play the game against the 
Mines that they played against he 
Tigers. 

The Aggies. 

The Agricultural College showed 
fair form against the high school 
teams in their first practice games of 
the year, but the trimming they re- 
ceived at the hands of the U. of U. 
and the Utah Aggies on last Saturday 
and Monday respectively goes down 
to show that they will not figure 
much in the championship. The fact 
cannot be overlooked, howover, that 
the Aggies have a chance to "come 
hack" and it is possible that they will 
make the best use of that chance. 
Coach Hughes is a new man at the 
Agricultural College, and he is going 
to do his best to put out just as good 
a team as he possibly can for every 
game on the Aggie schedule, and no 
one has any right to believe that the 
Aggies are going to quit just because 
they have lost the first two games on 
their intercollegiate schedule. 



FRESHMAN GUARDIANS ARE 
APPOINTED. 



The faculty advisers have been ap- 
pointed for the men of the freshman 
class. The different groups meet 
with their advisers from time to time 
for consultation and advice. The en- 
gineers have Messrs. Martin and 
Thomas and the foresters have 
Messrs. Coolidge and Terry. The lib- 
eral art students are divided into 
groups as follows. 

Mr. Motten— Argo, Banfield, Bar- 
ney, Barnes, Booney, Bentley, Bor- 
der, Carroll, Cary, J. 

Air. Allbright — Cheese, Cover, Crys- 
ler, Emery, Forbes, Fraker, Greenlee, 
Hamilton. 

Air. Breitwieser — Harter, Holmes, 
Hopkins. Hutchison, James, Johnson, 
Kampf, Keener, Lacy. 

Mr. Noyes — Ragle, Rhinehart, Sa- 
sano, Lawhill, Smith, Sommers, 
Thomas. 

Dr. Howe — Latimer, McLain, Mc- 
Neil, Morris, Munro, Pemberton, 
Peirson. 

Mr. Woodbridge, H. E. — Taylor, 
Van Stone. Wade, Ward, Wall, Wat- 
son, Williams. Wilson. 

W. D. Bird, a Fiji from the Wisconsin 
chapter, was a visitor on the campus, 

Monday. 

After the meeting, Friday, Hypatia 
enjoyed a spread in Ticknor Study given 
in honor of the pledges. 

Wilson Graham ex-'12 is spending the 
wek at the Alpha Tau Delta house. 

A party of men from Alpha Tau Delta 
enjoyed a delightful tramp on Cheyenne 

Ann + iin /-\t-i Oct /"\Kiai- R 



Mountain on October 8. 



THE RUG STORE 



Is Located at 331 East 
Pike's Peak and Wahsach 



We Have the Largest Stock of Beautiful Floor K ugs 



THE TIGER 



ENGINEERING NEWS 



DENVER ELECTRICAL SHOW. 



The Electrical Show, which is to be 
held in Denver next week, affords an 
excellent opportunity to all members 
of the engineering classes, to follow 
the rapid progress of electricity in 
the last few years. This is the sec- 
ond annual exhibition of the Colorado 
Electrical Club, and rrom indications 
it tends to even surpass the one held 
a year ago, which was admitted by 
all to be a universal success. 

All the recent inventions of the age 
will be exhibited; everything in the 
illumination line, including the famous 
"Mazda" lamp, which has proven to 
be the most efficient and practical 
means of lighting. If possible, the 
new storage battery recently invented 
and patented by Thomas A. Edison, 
will be on exhibition to all those in- 
terested in its applications and possi- 
bilities. Wireless telegraphy appara- 
tus, the latest systems and novelties, 
will be shown by some of the most 
prominent firms in the city. 

Many other instructive and attrac- 
tive exhibits, among which may be 

COTRELL & LEONARD 

Albany, N. Y. 
Makers of 

CAPS & GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the 

Atlantic to the Pacific 

Class Contcacts a Specialty 

Deichmann & Douglas Floral 
Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER, Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 

Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Gazette Building 



mentioned a parade of the different 
electric vehicles in the city, showing 
the trend in design for the season of 
1912; an exhibition of electrical phe- 
nomena by a famous professor, etc., 
etc., tend to make the show an edu- 
cation in itself. It is sincerely hoped 
that all of the engineers, particularly 
the seniors and juniors of the elec- 
trical and mining schools, will make 
an attempt to attend this. 

It will be held in the Auditorium, 
opening Saturday evening. October 
14th, at /:,o with the parade, and con- 
tinuing thereafter every day and 
night until October 21st. 



CURTIS TO ADDRESS THE 
ENGINEERS. 



An attempt is now being made to 
secure for the benefit of the Engin- 
eers' Club, the services of Leonard 
Curtis. This will probably take the 
form of a speech to the Club on Fri- 
day evening, October 20th. Mr. Cur- 
tis is of the firm of Curtis & Hine, 
promoters of various engineering en- 
terprises throughout the West, 
among which may be mentioned the 
Central Colorado Power Co. and also 
the Colorado Springs Light & Power 
Co. 

When an engineer as busy as he is 
consents to speak before the engineers 
of some institution, it behooves all 
of those men to attend his lecture 
and sho wtheir appreciation of his 
willingness. 

A great deal of credit is due to the 
Club for its efforts to get such prom- 
inent men to talk at its meetings, and 
all should join in giving them hearty 
support. 



NEW ENGINEERS' CLUB MEM- 
BERS. 

At the last meeting of the En- 
gineers' Club, the following men were 
elected to membership: Marsh of 
1913; A. F. Rose, F. C. Dickey. C. R. 
Wilkinson, all of the class of 1914. 




NEW 

Fall Styles 

JUST IN 

High Arch, High Toes, Short 
Vamps, Button or Lace, V elvets, 
Suedes, Patents, Gunmetels, 
Tan Russia's 

$2.50, $3.00, $3.50 
and $4.00 



FIT FOR EVERY FOQil £Z^- 




_^ — -"107 South Tbjon Stw5t 



Board $4.50 Per Week 

One front room for two. Board 

and room $25 per month for each 

222 E. DALE 

THE 

Crissey ^ Fowler 
Lumber Co. 



Phone 101 



117-123 VV. Vermiio Ave. 



Telephone 599 Store 1 04 N. Tejon Street 

The Pike's Peak Floral Co. 

CUT FLOWERS DECORATIONS AND DESIGNS 



10 



THE TIGER 



/rj^ROGRESSIVE men want clothes that have a distint 
* J style. They particularly avoid those that look com- 
mon place. Right here is where the Hub's clothes 
differ from those sold elsewhere. 

Although different from most ready to wear garments they are plain and pleasing to 
the most refined taste. They meet the wants of men of advanced ideas exactly. 





To College 
Students 
Old and New 

We Extend the Most Cordial Good 
Wishes. We've made a Specialty of 
taking care of the wants of the up-to- 
date young men and women. You'll 
find us the kind of jewelry store you'll 
like. 

The Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak 



The Davis Barber Shop 

Individual Sterilizing Cabinets 
Ray Davis, Manager 

Have Your Clothes Cleaned, Pressed and 
Kept in First-Class Repair by 

"Sam" the Gentlemen's Valet 

Also Makes a Specialty of Serving Parties 
SAM FLEMING 

114 E. Cucharras Phone 1675 



Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co. 

Clem Crowley, last year's captain of 
the D. U. football game, attended the 
Wyoming game in the capacity of a 
reporter for the Denver Post. 



ENGINEERS' CLUB PROGRAM, 
OCTOBER 13. 

The Fourth Dimension — Mahan. 
The Santa Fe Demonstration Train — 

Bailey 
Good Roads and Their Making — 

Berwick 
Extemporaneous Speeches. 
Critic's Report. 

Meeting is called promptly at 7:45 
p. m. 



CURRENT CLIPPINGS. 

A new steamship now in the course 
of construction is the Aquitania, 
which is being built for the Cunard 
line. It will be over goo feet in length 
which makes it the largest in the 
world. The speed is estimated at 23 
knots, (27.5 miles). 

At present Switzerland has the dis- 
tinction of building the largest via- 
duct in Europe. The Sitter viaduct 
has a total length of 1092 feet and a 
total height of 11 30 feet. One steel 
truss is used to bridge a span of 400 
feet, the longest span in Switzerland. 
Altogether eleven arches are used, 
the piers being of masonry. 



APOLLONIAN CLUB PROGRAM. 
OCTOBER 13. 

Speech, Government Forest Reserves 
— E. W. Barnes 

Reading — Appel. 

Current Events— Strieby. 

Debate — Resolved, That the students 
of the colleges of Colorado should 
have complete control of inter-col- 
legiate athletics. 

Affirmative — -A. Gregg, Perry. 

Negative — Jones, W. C. Barnes. 



RRF AD For morning delivery. It's 
bread hot from the oven, 
baked from the choicest flour, and that 
would command first premium anywhere. 
That you get from us. Is always good. 

THE CHICAGO BAKERY 

Have the fellows meet you at 

Tucker's 
Restaurant 

10 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 



You can always save money if 
you will come to see our line in 
diamonds, watches, jewelry, 
guns, sporting goods, fishing 
tacke drw ing sets, musical 
instruments, trunks, valises, or 
if you want to loan money, you 
can get it 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 

Money Loaned on Valuabl s 



HAVE YOU A PAMTORIUM COLLEGE TICKET ? 

See Rhone, College Agent, Hagerman Hall 
30 SUITS SPONGED AND PRESSED FOR $S.OO 



THE TIGER 



The College Book and Supply Store 

In addition to furnishing the Text Books and Engineering 
Supplies for the College students, we carry a very large 
stock of Fountain Pens, Waterman's Ideal, Conklin Self- 
fillers and College. See Our PENNANTS ane POSTERS 

Whitney & Grimwood 



Get Your Picnic Supplies 

= AT = 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

STUDENTS 



Remember when you 
want the Best Photos 
at moderate cost and 
courteous attention. 
Visit the old reliable. 




«&MS7TU£, 



Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 



R. J. CORRIN 

Dry Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing 

and Remodeling for Ladies 

and Gentlemen 

Work by the Month 

Work Called for and Delivered 

Phone 2963 M 326 N. Tejon Street 

Nothing Pleases Us More Than 
To Please College Students 

The Fred S. Tucker 

Furniture Co. 



PEARSONS LECTURE. 



The new scheme of programs plan- 
ned for Pearsons Literary Society 
will be inaugurated next Friday even- 
ing when Shaw will give a lecture on 
"The Romance of the Stars." This 
lecture should prove to be a most in- 
teresting and instructive one, as we 
all know of Shaw's literary ability 
and effective ness as a public speaker. 
The student body is cordially invitetl 
to this as well as all following lec- 
tures and programs, given on Friday 
evenings at the Club house. 



SIGMA CHI DANCE. 



The Sigma Chi fraternity gave its 
first dance this year at the San Luis 
school house on Saturday night The 
guests of the fraternity were: Mr. 
and Mrs. Rothgeb, the Misses Frantz, 
McConnal, Pollen, Watson, Lila 
Haines, Allen, Randolph, Peirson, 
Gasson, Dorothy Petersen, McCreery, 
Stott, Whittenberger, Cora Kampf, 
Lillian Williams, Barnes, Anthony, 
Marion Haines, Fezer, Franklin, Car- 
ley, Mitten, Ball, Bane, and Messrs. 
Winchell, Randolph, Capin, Morrison 
and French. 



ALPHA TAU DELTA DANCE. 

Last Saturday evening. Alpha Tau 
Delta gave its first dance of the year. 
The dance was given in the fraternity 
house and the decorations were in 
accordance with the autumn season. 
Mrs. Goddard chaperoned. The 
guests were the Misses Lennox, Hedg- 
cock. True, Lucy Ferril, Harriet Fer- 
ril, McKinnie, Baker, Wright, Galli- 
gan, Walsh, Walker, Metz, Stoddard, 
Sheldon, Mr. Wilson Graham and 
Prof. Sheldon. 



A party of College men consisting 
of Miller, Pierson, Sternberg, Wilson 
and G. Barnes climbed the Peak Fri- 
day night. 



II 

MOTOR CYCLES 

Yale Emblem 

BICYCLES and Supplies 

Expert Repairing 

Colorado Springs Cycle 

Company 

DeWilt Doyle, Manager 
224 N. Tejon St. Phone Red 34 



Knight -Campbell's 

F0R PIANOS 

and PLAYER PIANOS 

STEINWAY and 20 OTHER MAKES 

We Rent Pianos 

Largest Stock Victor Talking Machines 
and Edison Phonographs 

226 N. Tejon St., after Sept. 15, 122 N. Tej.n 

The Gowdy-Si * mens Printing Co. 
PRINTERS 

Copper Plate and Steel Engravers 
Telephone 87 21 N. Tejon Street 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing a Typewriter. 

Zimmerman Supply 

fnmnonir 22 E ' Kiowa St ' 

vompany Phone Ma i n 374 

Established 1890 

You can save from 25 
percent to 40 percent 
on our finest Hart, 
Schaf f ner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer & 
Clothcraf t Suits and 
Overcoats 



<% 



12 



THE TIGER 
We are Overstocked on 

PENNANTS 



We believe we have the largest stock and best assortment in town. To stimulate the sale we 

are offering a 

Cut of 20 Per Cent from the Marked Price 



THE MURRAY DRUG COMPANY 

Opposite Compus 



The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

116 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Gives 
Special Attention to Accounts of Students 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, Preiident Ira Harris, V-Presidcnt 

M. C. Gile Lilla B. Ensign C. E. Lyndc 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M. 

THE OUT WEST 

TENT AND AWNING CO. 

RECLINING CHAIRS 
POR HES ENCLOSED 

Tents Rented for a Day or for Longer 



Stamping, Designing, R rforating, Best Hand Painted 

China. Western Branch of Mexican Pigment Paints, 

Stenciling and Materials 

Art Needlework and Art Goods 

THE HUNT AND VAN NICE 

ART SPECIALTY SHOPS 

Retail and Wholesale 
8 Pike's Peak Aven e Phone Main 2055 



Headquarters for 

COLLEGE 

FOOT 

WORK 

We Have a Complete 
Line of Foot Wear 
Especially Adapted 
for College People. 

Hi Whitaker-Kester 

Shoe Co. 
10 North Tejon Street 




ALUMNI NOTES THE POPULAR 



HYDER-BASS. 

A beautiful wedding took place at 6 
o'clock Wednesday evening when 
Miss Etta Ruth Bass, daughter of Dr. 
and Mrs. J. T. Bass, became the bride 
of Kenneth Lee Hyder, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. James D. Hyder. The cere- 
mony took place at the bride's home 
at 1083 Ogden street, Denver, and 
was performed by the Rev. H. R. A. 
O'Malley. The living room, where 
the ceremony was performed, was 
decorated with bride's roses and ferns. 
Killarney roses decked the drawing 
room and dining room, and autumn 
flowers were in the hall. 

The bride wore a tailored suit of 
white broadcloth and a large white 
hat, trimmed with white plumes. Her 
bouquet was of bride's roses. Her 
cousin, Mrs. Lunken, was matron of 
honor, and wore a pale blue broad- 
cloth suit and white hat and carried 
pink roses. Clare Phillips was best 
man. 

After Oct. 15 Mr. and Mrs. Hyder 
will be at home at Glenwood apart- 
ments, College Hill, Cincinnati. Ohio. 

Mr. and Airs. Hyder are both well 
known in Colorado College. Mrs. 
Hyder was a member of the class of 
191 1, and Mr. Hyder was a member of 
the class of 1910. Neither of them, 
however, finished here. 



Parratt '15, Morse '15 and Greenlee '15 
are new Delta Phi Theta pledges. 

Harold Johnson '15 is a pledge to Phi 
Gamma Delta. 



A party of Phi Gamma Delta and 
ladies had a beefsteak fry on the campus 
last Saturday night. 

Kramer '15 is pledged to Phi Gamma 
Delta. 



Creams and Ices Fresh Butter 

Made Right and Delivered Promptly 

A. L. M0WRY 

Phone 1184 
115 East Cache la Poudre Street 



STOP AT 

LIGHTNING SHOE SHOP 

to get your shoes repaired. Shine 
free with every pair of soles 

Sewed Soles 75c. 28 '2 N. Tejon St. 



William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty- 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 
16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



STUDENTS! 

The 
Pearl Laundry Co. 

respectfully solicits your pat- 
ronage. We guarantee satis- 
factory work and service and 
give you 20% discount. 

E. E. HEOBLOM, College Agent 



Engraving 

Function Invitations 
Programs, Place Cards 
Etc., — Out Specialty. 

OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

HA YNER 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 

2 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 



The Prompt Printery Co. 

MASTER PRINTERS 

12 and 14 E Kiowa St. Phone Main 536 

Developing and Printing 

HARLAN 

"The View Man" 

All Kinds of View and Commercial Work 
Phone Main 2717 304 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
Flour, Fe«>d, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



CA- L 2000 

When You Want Anything QUICK! 
QUICK DELIVERY 



THE TIGER 

ALUMNI NOTES 



Minerva Alumnae. 

The Minerva Alumnae held a regu- 
lar meeting at the home of Miss 
Mary Tucker at 1815 North Nevada 
avenue last Tuesday afternoon. Miss 
Jcannette Scholz read a paper on 
"Castles of Ireland and Scotland.'' 



13 



II. II. Haight'ii visited over Sun- 
day at the Sigma Chi house and in- 
cidentally attended the game between 
the Tigers and Wyoming Saturday 
afternoon. Haight is employed with 
a construction company at Rye, Colo- 
rado. 



MAIM 2000 



Mr. William Percival Nash is in- 
structor of mathematics in East Den- 
• er high school. 



Mr. Tom Hunter '06 was down 
from Cheyenne for the game Satur- 
day. 

Mr. Ray Sayre ex-' 12 brought home 
a iine deer from Wagon Wheel Gap 
as a result of a hunting trip there. 



Mr. Henry R. Hobson from San 
. A cacia. was in town a few days last 
weel . 

.Mr. ( >rrin Randolph 'c6 from the 
San Luis Valley, is in to vn for a 
couple of weeks. 

Lillian D'uer spent Sunday at her home 
in Denver. 



Hill e 'ri is in town for a few davs. 



Orrin Randolph 'c6 was a welcome 
guest at the Apollonian Club Friday 
night. 

Dick Morrison ex-'ii was a guest 
at the Sigma Chi House. 



Don't fail to hear Shaw's lecture at 
Pearsons Club House tomorrow evening 
at 8 o'clock. 



Wanted — The plans for Old Noah's 
Ark. Address Tiger A-H. 

The following men are new members 
of Pearsons Literary Society: Argo, 
Baker, Emery, Hamilton, Nourse, Car- 
roll, Foote, Grimsley, Crysler, Parratt, 
Eraker, Morse, Jeanne, Bentley, Wilson, 
I. Carey, Ragle and Munro. 



BURGESS CANDIES 



are Simply Delicious. A dainty 

box of Burgess Chocalates will 

smooth the way wonderfully 

Every bite a delight. 

BURGESS 

Phone Eight Three 
12-1 14 North Tejon S treet 



Sewed Soles 75 cents 
Rubber Heels 35 cents 



AT 



PETE'S SHOE SHOP 



230 East Dale 



JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, CI aning, Pressing. Special 
Kates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 
Over Walling'* Book Store 16 S. Teion Siree 

Comfortable Rooms for 
Students 

Two Blocks from Corner of the Campus 

Reasonable Prices 

Newly Furnished 

Enquire at 1013 North Wahsatch Ave. 

Hunt Up 

BisselFs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

Pike's Peak Book & 
Stationery Co. %£,]&„ Is 






14 



THE TIGER 



Be Your Own Agent 

The management of the STAR LAUNDRY have 
decided to have no general agent at the College and to 
give agent's discount direct to the student sending in 
the bundle. 

Our drivers will sell you a $5.00 Coupon Book for $3.50, a dis- 
count of 30%, or you can pay in cash on the delivery of the bundle, 
taking out 30% for yourself. No bundles will be left without money 
or coupons. 

Coupon- Books at this discount will be sold only to students and 
are not transferable and the coupon will not be received from other 
than stu 'eTcs. 



Phone Main 715 328 N. Tejon Street 




HERBERT BENNETT, Agent 

MilfcT^ 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton Dairy 



419 S. El Paso St. 



Phone Main 442 



GET IT AT 

THE EMPORIUM 

AND SAVE MONEY 

1 10 S. TEJON STREET 



THE MUELLER 

TEACHERS' AGENCY 

Conducted for Efficiency only. Services 
free to School Bnards No enrollment fee 
for teachers. Call or write 

ANNA HI MUELLER, 450 West Uinta Street, 
Phone Main 2188 Colorado Springs, Colo 



Local Department 



Captain Calvert, of the School of 
Alines football team, was down for 
the game Saturday. 



O. W. Hall '14 is contributing a 
number of engineering articles to the 
columns of the Tiger. 

Warnock, Wakefield and Huleatt 
are employed as chemists in the 
Love'iand sugar factory. 



Kingman Packard '14 was recently 
initiated into the Delta Phi Theta 
fraternity. 



Harry and Claud Black enjoyed a 
visit from their mother, Airs. W. W. 
Black of Victor, last Friday. 

Storke, who has been ill for the 
past week, is able to be out again. 

Bert Siddons was the official water 
boy at the game last Saturday. 



Mrs. Pope spent Sunday with her 
daughter Mildred. She will leave, Tues- 
day for her home in Indiana after hav- 
ing spent a month in Colorado Springs. 



FRESHMEN 

Try the Breakfasts at 

The College Inn 

Opposite the Campus 



THE 

FIRST 

SUPPER 



AT 



McREA'S 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co. 
Groceries and 



Meats 



-♦.♦.»» 







115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE HENRY L DWINELL HARDWARE COMPANY 



TOOLS 



BUILDERS AND GENERAL HARDWARE 
We Appreciate the College Trade 



CUTLERY 



130 N. Tejon St. 



Peone Main 439 



THE TIGER 



15 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

"The College Favorite ' 

The Favorite Shopping 

Place for College 

People 



1 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

s the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 



106' 2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



W. I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



91 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heatirg Co 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 

Artists Materials 

FRAMING 
College Posters 

The Richard Willis Art Studios 

4'; Ea=t Pike's Peak Avenue 



TOD POWELL 




CAPS 

We Have Them 
The Latest 

$2, $1.50, $1 



YOUNu MEN'S 
SMART FASHIONS 



SHIRTS 

The New Patterns 
are Here 

$2, $1.50, $1 



College men and young men generally couie to us expecting the 
best in style; it's here. The new English soft roll sacks, the new 
shape-maker; a great variety of young models, weaves, coloring are 
here. The suit $35. #30. #25. #20. 

Specialists in good clothes; and nothing else. 



Money 
Cheerfully 
Refunded 




Correct Dress for Men. \ 



113 East 

Pike's Peak 

Avenue 



Faith Gilmore ex-'i2 is studying art 
in Chicago. 

The first meeting of the Athletic 
Eoard has been announced for this 
evening. 

C. A. Corson '13 is a new Delta 
Phi Theta pledge. 

The first secret practices of the 
y;ar were held this week on Wash- 
burn field. Only the players in uni- 
forms and the managers were allowed 
inside the gates. 

. Colorado University already has 
fifty entries for the advance spring 
tennis tournament. 

D. E. Heizer and W. W. Johnston, 
senior civil engineers, are experiment- 
ing on the effects of alkali on cement 
for their theses. They will determine 
the effecL of various preparations of 
alkali on the strength of road cement 
and also its effect on the time of set- 
ting' of the cement. 



LUMP 

The most satisfacory coal on the market 

for furnace 

THE CENTRAL FUEL CO. 

Phone 578 128 N. Tejon 



Get Acquainted at 

The Red 
Cross Pharmacy 

HOT DRINKS HOT TAMALAS 

HUDSON'S CHOCOLATES 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 

107 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone 40 



Dern's Freshly Roasted Coffee 

will make 10 more cups to the lb. 
than Eastern roasted coffee 



29 S. Tejon Street 



Phone 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 
Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Bldg 
118 North Tejon St. Phone Main 1701 

Res , 121 1 N. Weber St. Tel. Main 956 



Phone Main 930 ■yV e DONER 

POWELL-DONER SPORTING GOODS CO. 

1 12 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

"EVERYTHING FOR SPORTSMEN" 

New and Complete Stock of the Very Best of Athletic Supplies, College Pennants, Novelties, Etc. 

"ASK THE MEDICINE MAN" 




16 



THE TIGER 



We have right now the strongest gather- terns or black with velvet collars or storm 

ing of smart Winter time Overcoats you'll be proof garments with high, close buttoning 

able to fine. military collar. 

Whatever style cool w r eather Overcoat 



you have in mind, it has been included in 
this showing. 

Short, medium or ankle length; light, 
medium or heavy ulsters; dressy light pat- 



Pleasing patterns in browns, grays and 
mixtures in the most durable weaves. 
And they are tailored to fit and do. 

$16.50 to 150.00 



(Per ! fei«4-S&e<u«er6 



HAUGEN, Tailor 



222 N. Tejon. 



Phone Main 296 



# 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



\ 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



Departments — 

College of Arts and 
Science, 
E. S. PARSONS, Dean 

School of Engineering, 
F. CAJORI, Dean 

School of Forestry, 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 

School of Music, 

E. D. HALE, Dean 



Cigarette Sale 



13 



Prize Cup Cigarettes were 25c a Box 
As long as they last 2 Boxes for 25c 

HUGHES 

Pool in connection but not a pool room 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



Vol. XIV 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., OCTOBER 19, 1911 



Number 6 



Christian Association Big Send Off Colorado College Has 

Does Active Work For Tiger Team A Winning Team 



THE MEMBERSHIP AND BIBLE 
STUDY CAMPAIGN TO BE 
LAUNCHED IMMEDIATELY 
AND PUSHED VIGOR- 
OUSLY. 



About thirty college men gathered 
in the reading room of Hagerman 
last Friday evening to talk over the 
plans of the Association. A light 
supper consisting of sandwiches, 
doughnuts and coffee was served and 
afterward the arrangements for be- 
ginning a membership for Bible study 
campaign were discussed. In order to 
carry on these campaigns it was de- 
cided to divide the men into two teams 
of fourteen each. Kacli team will be 
divided into two divisions, one to ob- 
tain new members and the other to 
enlist the students in the various 
Bible classes. The team obtaining 
the greatest number of names is to 
be given a "spread" by the losing 
team, and the two men gaining the 
greatest number of members will re- 
ceive a C. C. pennant. 

At the meeting the following rea- 
sons why a man should join the As- 
sociation and the Bible classes were 
adopted and approved: 
Ten Reasons for Joining the Young 
Men's Christian Association of 
Colorado College. 

(i) Stands for the complete all- 
round development: 

(a) Body. 

(b) Mind. 

(c) Spirit. 

(2) The only organization on the 

Continued on page 2 



WHOLE STUDENT BODY 
TURNS OUT TO TAKE 

TEAM TO DEPOT. 



Fireworks Light the Procession — 

Team in Tally-ho Drawn 

By Students. 



All sorts of Colorado College spirit 
was uncorked yesterday evening when 
the whole student body turned out 
to escort the Tiger football team to 
the D. & R. G. depot for the de- 
parture for Madison, where they are 
to meet the University of Wisconsin 
next Saturday afternoon. Almost 
every student in the College was on 
hand to have his share in the demon- 
stration — ■ a demonstration only 
eclipsed by the departure of the team 
for Salt Lake last fall. 

With Roman candles and sky- 
rockets and every other description 
of fireworks blazing the trail, the 
team in a tallo-ho was drawn through 
the streets of the city to the depot. 
The women did their share, too, by 
walking at the sides of the procession, 
and the streets were so filled with en- 
thusiastic, yelling students that traffic 
was almost stopped. 

The men who made the trip are 
Coach Rothgeb, Manager Statton, 
Captain Sinton, Witherow, Moberg, 
Hedblom, Bowers, Summers, Harder, 
Deesz, Vandemoer, Black, Heald, 
Herron, Putnam, Thompson, Lewis, 
Scott and Floyd. 

Every precaution is to be taken to 
get the men to Madison in good 
shape for the game Saturday, even to 



THE TEAM AS IT IS TODAY 
HAS A WANDERFUL OF- 
FENSE AND A STONE- 
WALL DEFENSE. 



Today, in mid-season, on the eve of 
the first big game of the season, and 
what will probably prove the hardest 
game of the season, the Tigers look 
to be as likely a bunch as has come 
out of this institution in a good many 
years. They are better coached, bet- 
ter conditioned, more experienced, 
and more filled with a proper, unified 
fighting spirit, than probably any 
team in the history of the College. 
Besides this, it can be said that they 
are very likely the lightest team that 
has ever come out of C. C. But 
again, they are without doubt the 
fastest. 

As shown in practice the early part 
of this week, Coach Rothgeb has de- 
veloped a remarkable football ma- 
chine in the five weeks he has been 
working with the team. The offen- 
sive play, filled with its abundance of 
mystifying, lightning-fast formations, 
shifts and spread plays, as well as its 
faultless straight-football, is far be- 
yond anything which has ever been 
developed within five weeks of prac- 
tice. The defense, with its snap and 
charge, is not only built for impene- 
trability, but to go through and throw 
their opponents for a loss. 

Continued on page 3 



taking along eighty gallons of Colo- 
rado Springs water, so that a change 
of water may be avoided. 



THE TIGER 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Continued from page 1 

campus for all the men of Colorado 
College. 

(3) Maintains a full-time secretary 
to serve the College men. 

(4) Creates genuine Christian fel- 
lowship, and presents an opportunity 
for Service and Usefulness. 

(5) Affords Bible Classes and in- 
struction on the World-wide Student 
Missionary Movement. Courses 
taught by the best men obtainable in 
the city: 

(1) Life of Christ. 

(2) Social Significance of Teach- 
ings of Jesus. 

(3) Ethics of Jesus. 

(4) Will of God and a Man's Life 
Work. 

(6) Is supporting the Sunday 
Chapel Service, and will bring other 
distinguished speakers to the College 
to address the men at mid-week meet- 
ings. 

(7) Maintains a regular employ- 
ment bureau for the benefit of the 
students. 

(8) Has given free to the students 
of "C. C." 500 Handbooks. 

(9) Will provide frequent social 
afiairs and "get-togethers:" 

(a) The City Y. M. C. A. will en- 
tertain all College men on 
Thursday night, October 26. 

(b) Magazines, books, and news- 
papers can be used at any 
time in the Association office. 

(c) The Association is consider- 
ing the putting in of a billiard 
and pool table in Hagerman 
Hall. 

(10) Helps men to meet the temp- 
tations and religious problems of 
College life. Sec. Ware is at the 
service of the men of "C. C." He 
can be seen each day during office 
hours, or at any time by appoint- 
ment. 

Ten Reasons for Studying the Bible. 

1. Forty thousand college men 
studied the Bible in higher institu- 
tions of learning last year. 

2. The Bible is the standard by 
which the world is judged, and the 
world's standard is raised in direct 
ratio to its familiarity with the Bible. 

3. The position the Bible holds in 
literature makes a knowledge of it in- 
dispensable to the equipment of the 
educated man. 

4. In order to feel at ease in cul- 
tured society, one must be familiar 
with the Bible. References to and 
passages from the Bible are being 



constantly made. 

5. The study of the life of Jesus 
Christ in the New Testament will in- 
spire and stimulate nobility of char- 
acter, whether the student accepts 
the teachings of Christ or not. 

6. A student will never have a bet- 
ter opportunity for Bible study than 
while he is in college. 

7. The determining influence of the 
Bible in the history of nations and 
upon the world's work of our day 
should make every thinking man de- 
sirous of fathoming its power. 

8. The Bible teaches of man's re- 
lation to man, man's relation to God, 
and of God Himself. In it we find 
God's message to man. 

9. Prayerful, daily, Bible study is 
a tremendous force in helping a man 
to meet the temptations and prob- 
lems of college life. 

10. The all-round development of a 
strong man must include the Spiritual, 
Mental and Physical. Bible study is 
to Spiritual growth, what the class- 
room is to intellectual development, 
and the gymnasium is to physical 
power. 



arrangements can be made he will 
address the men at seven o'clock in 
Upper Perkins. 



DR. WILSON SPEAKS IN 
CHAPEL. 



Dr. W. H. Wilson, who is attending 
the Dry Farming Congress on behalf of 
the Board of Home Missions of the 
Presbyterian Church gave an enjoyable 
talk at chapel on Monday morning. He 
discussed the farmer with relation to 
his religion and the country church as a 
factor in the life of the small farming 
communities. The farmer, he said, was 
a thoroughly religious man. The three 
most succesful types of farmers, the 
Mormons, the Scotch Presbyterians and 
the Pennsylvania Dutch, are prosperous 
because they mingle the religious life of 
the community with the social and eco- 
nomic life. Dr. Wilson ended a clever 
address with an appeal to the students 
to use their influence that the churches 
of the small country districts should not 
become narrow in their aims, but that 
they should interest themselves in the 
welfare of the community in all lines — 
social and economic, as well as moral 
and religious. 



Y. M. C. A. SPEAKER. 



Mr. Roberts, head of the county 
organization work of the Y. M. C. A., 
who will be in this city this week to 
address a meeting at the Dry-Farm- 
ing Congress, has been asked to 
speak to the men of the College. If 



HAGERMAN HALL OPEN 
HOUSE. 



At a meeting of the residents of 
Hagerman last Monday night it was 
decided to hold the annual "Open 
House" on Saturday, November 18th, 
and a committee has been appointed 
to make all arrangements. This event 
has always been one of the most en- 
joyable of the year and the committee 
promises several new stunts on this 
occasion which will make the Open 
House this year more interesting 
than ever. 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 

The student rehearsal program 
given on Tuesday afternoon included 
works by Bach, Schubert, Liszt, Rach- 
maninoff, Scarlatte, Rubinstein. Dean 
Hale gave the first of a series of il- 
lustrated conversation on the inter- 
pretation of music. 

On Friday evening Mr. Berryhill 
and Miss Thomas will give the fol- 
lowing program: 

BACH — Prelude and Fugue in D flat. 
PUCCINI — -"Voce di donna o d'an- 

gelo." from "Gioconda." 
SCHUMANN— Scenes from Child 
hood, Op. 15. 

Story of Strange Lands and People. 

Catch Me If You Can. 

Entreating Child. 

Contentedness. 

The Knight of the Hobby-Horse. 

Child Falling Asleep. 

Dreaming. 

Important Event. 
YON FIELITZ— Drei Lieder. 

"Blossoms Cover Hill and Dale." 

"Like Twilight Calm Thy Cheeks' 
Soft Blushes." 

"Rest Thy Deep Dark Orb Upon 
Me." 
MOSZKOWSKI— Etincelles. 
LISZT— Etude. 



THE CONTEMPORARY GERMAN 



Last Friday evening Ticknor study 
was gay in red and white in honor of 
the annual German which Contempo- 
rary Club gives for its pledges. The 
figures were beautifully planned and 
led by Mrs. Florian Cajori and the 
President, Marian Yerkes. Grace 
Wilson '11 and Dorothe Haynes ex-'i2 
came down from Greeley for the oc- 
casion. 



THE TIGER 

FOR A GREATER COLORADO 




College Has A Winning Team 

Continued from Pace 1 

Following are some important sta- 
tistics and estimates of the sixteen 
men who are now at the training 
table: 

Witherow ("Big") — center; second 
year of play; 172 pounds; 6 ft. 2 in.; 
22 yrs.; chosen all-Colorado center in 
1910. He rips big holes for the backs 
on offense. He goes through and 
breaks up plays before they start on 
defense. 

Hedblom ("Bloss") — right guard; 
third year; 170 pounds; 5 ft. 9 in.; 23 
yrs.; chosen all-Colorado guard in 
1910. Is a "stonewall" on defense. 

Koch ("Gotch") — left guard; first 
year; 177 pounds; 6 ft. 3-4 in.; 20 
yrs. A new man, capable of playing 
tackle or guard, or fullback. Fight- 
ing Moberg for position. 

Moberg ("Mo.")— left guard; first 
year; 161 pounds; 5 ft. 9 1-2 in.; 21 
yrs. Contending with Koch for po- 
sition. The three center men in the 
line are learning to charge shoulder- 
to-shoulder on plays which "plug" 
center, always making a large open- 
ing for the back. 

Bowers ("Fat") — left tackle; second 
year; 153 pounds; 5 ft. 9 in.; 21 yrs.; 



chosen all-Colorado tackle in 1910. 
Capable of playing both tackle and 
end. He has a "bull-headed" slash 
about his playing that sweeps every- 
thing before him. 

Floyd ("Handsome")— right tackle; 
second year; 161 pounds; 5 ft. 10 1-2 
in.; 21 yrs. Capable of playing tackle 
and fullback. He has speed for a 
lineman. He is "rangy," and always 
gets to the man with the ball. 

Thompson ("Tommy") — -left end; 
second year; 157 pounds; 5 ft. 10 1-4 
in.; 22 yrs. Chosen all-Colorado end 
in 19TO. Gets his man out of the way 
on cross-tackle buck. Hard to tackle 
when carrying the ball. Sure on de- 
fense. 

Sinton ("Herb.") — captain; right 
end; fourth year;i68 pounds; 6 ft.; 
23 yrs.; chosen all-Colorado end in 
1907, 1909, 1910. Good captain be- 
cause of field generalship. Nearly 
perfect in getting away with the for- 
ward pass. Deadly in interference. 
Opponents never get around him on 
end runs. 

Putnam ("Put") — quarterback; sec- 
ond year; 139 pounds; 5 ft. 9 1-2 in.; 
23 yrs. Used good-head at quarter. 
Elusive in carrying back punts. Nev- 
er fumbles. 

Heald ("Casey")— left half back; 



third year; 158 pounds; 5 ft. 10 in.; 23 
yrs. Chosen all-Colorado half in 
1910. Best defensive back in the 
state. Does not stop when tackled. 

Black ("Harry") — full back; second 
year; 155^ pounds; 5 ft. n 1 ^ in.; 22 
years; chosen all-Colorado guard in 
1910. Gets his man on interference. 
Unusually swift on line plunges. 
Side-steps tackier and picks hole. 

Vandemoer ("Vandy") — Captain in 
1910; right half back; 171^2 pounds; 
6 ft.; 22 years; chosen all-Colorado 
half in 1908, 1909 and 1910. Fastest 
man in the West. Best broken field 
runner in Colorado. Sure tackier in 
backfield. 

Deesz ("Dutch")— right half back; 
second year; 155 pounds; 5 ft. 10 in.; 
22 years. Never stops fighting. Cap- 
able of playing both half and end. 

Scott ("Scotty")— left half back; 
first year; 136^ pounds; 5 ft. 10 in.; 
2T, years. Can be used at full and 
half. ''I 

Herron ("Muggsy") — quarterback; 
1 19/2 pounds; 5 ft. 7 1 / in.; 19 years. 
A big bunch of grit in a small pack- 
age. 

Lewis ("Pinkey")— half back; first 
year; 151 pounds; 5 ft. 8^ in; 20 
years. Best ground gainer on the sec- 
ond eleven. 



i 



THE TIGER 



TIGERS ?— BADGERS ? 



That is the way the score stands to 
date for Saturday's game at Madison. 
Everyone is entitled to a guess, and 
at most everyone has his own. The 
exceedingly optimistic declare that 
Colorado College will win, but the 
more sober majority are not bold 
enough to hope for anything better 
than a close score with Wisconsin in 
the lead. The majority are speculat- 
ing as to what the score will be. 
Some say that Wisconsin can not get 
the better of C. C. by more than 
twelve points, others put it at twenty 
points and the very cautious or pessi- 
mistic ones say that Wisconsin is 
good for forty. The middle guess is 
probably the best one yet offered, 
but even then it still remains a guess. 

This season J. R. Richards has the 
best material in the Middle West 
from which to pick his eleven. Every 
one of the men playing at Madison is 
fast and experienced. Not only that, 
they are heavy. The line, from end 
to end, will average close to 190 
pounds, and the backfield will average 
175. That is to say, the whole Wis- 
consin team will weigh about a ton, 
as compared to a total weight of 
about 1750 pounds in the Tiger team. 

Here at Colorado College we are 
well acquainted with the type of foot- 
ball machine Coach Richards puts 
out. He puts out teams which are 
almost perfect in the defensive part 
of the game. His teams are not 
usually so highly developed on offen- 
sive playing, but he has an abundance 
of classy plays. His teams have been 
noted for their "straight football." 
They do not use "open football." 
Richards' teams have made more 
gains on the cross-tackle buck than 
all other plays put together. As we 
know, Rothgeb's style of football is 
quite different. It is full of all kinds 
of open formations, spreads and shifts. 
If a light team has any show against 
a team like the Badgers, the style of 
football which Rothgeb has taught 
the Tigers is the only kind which can 
make that showing. 

Richards has a habit of sending his 
men into the game "stale," that is, in 
such an overworked condition that 
they are unable to play their best 
football throughout the game. This 
fact has often brought it about that 
his teams, are unable to "come back" 
after their opponents once get in the 
lead. Last year proved that Roth- 
geb's teams seem to need such an in- 



centive to make them get out and do 
their best. Rothgeb's teams are al- 
ways in the best condition he can get, 
when he sends them into a game. In 
this comparative fact there lies some 
hope for the Tigers. If (the big IF) 
they can get the jump on the Wis- 
consin bunch, they may be able to 
hold them out long enough to make 
them lose their "come back," and 
then — 

Any way you figure it out, there is 
bound to be a classy and gritty brand 
of football displayed in Madison on 
October 21. The Tigers at home can 
depend upon it that every man on the 
team is giving the best he has in him 
against the big odds, and that he is 
fighting till the last whistle. 



FRESHIES DEFEAT LAMAR 



D. U.-UTAH— TIE. 



With the score 0-0, it was a hard 
fought battle last Saturday between 
Denver's bulk and Utah's speed. The 
Ministers carried the ball for a 
greater total gain than did the Mor- 
mons, but even then, the ball was in 
D. U. territory most of the time. 
The majority of Denver's gaining was 
done in the last quarter, after they 
had worn out the weaker eleven. 
Schroeder punted farther than did 
Ashton, but far less effectively. Utah 
rarely failed to run the punts back, 
but Denver was usually downed in 
their tracks or thrown for a loss. 
Taylor fumbled continuously in Den- 
ver's backfield. The bunch from Salt 
Lake were strong on running the 
ends, while D. U. kept plowing into 
the line with her heavy backfield. 

Utah outclassed the Denver eleven 
in every department of the game, 
and the tremendous handicap of 
weight was all that prevented Utah 
from winning. The Utah eleven is 
nearly all inexperienced men, while 
Denver has a bunch of veterans back. 
Both teams had repeated opportuni- 
ties to score, but were unable to de- 
liver the goods at the critical time. 
Though close, the game could hardly 
be termed a good exhibition of foot- 
ball. 



FRESHIES PLAY CENTENNIAL 



\ 



NEXT WEEK. 



Next Saturday the freshman team 
goes to Pueblo to play Centennial 
High School. The Centennial team 
should not be any more difficult to 
defeat than was Lamar, last Saturday. 



The freshman team, with Coach 
Scott as chaperone, went down to La- 
mar, Saturday, and cleaned up the 
high school team of that place to the 
tune of s to o. The feature of the day 
was a fifty-five yard run after a for- 
ward pass by Captain Cheese, which 
resulted in the only score. 



U. OF C. 



BARELY DEFEATS 
ALUMNI. 



The University of Colorado de- 
feated their Alumni by only two 
touchdowns in Boulder last Saturday. 
This is rather a poor showing for 
this late in the season against a team 
of unpracticed men. This is the first 
game Boulder has had this season, 
and perhaps this accounts in part for 
the poor showing made by the Uni- 
versity. The old-timers put up a 
great game, although they were prone 
to resort to ancient and obselete tac- 
tics at times. Captain McFadden and 
quarterback Hartman were the stars 
for the varsity team, while Bill John- 
son and Bud Knowles did the stellar 
work fo rthe Alumni. 



D. U. TO MEET BAKER. 



Baker University comes from 
Kansas next Saturday to play Den- 
ver University. Baker should cer- 
tainly put up a good game against the 
Methodists. It was only a short time 
ago that Baker held the strong Kan- 
sas University team to a tie score of 
0-0. 



Coach Rothgeb, Professor Motten, 
Parkison, Morse, Geddes, Carey, Don- 
ovan and Hall were interested spec- 
tators at the Utah-D. V. game at 
Broadway Park in Denver, Saturday 
afternoon. 



PEARSONS LECTURE. 

Perhaps the best lecture of the 
Pearsons series is to be heard on Fri- 
day, October Twentieth. Mr. Robert 
Hamilton is to lecture on "Some Ex- 
periments with Electro-statics." He 
has an excellent set of apparatus 
with which to illustrate his lecture. 
The subject is one of the most in- 
teresting in the entire electrical field. 
Everyone knows of Mr. Hamilton's 
marked ability and can be sure of an 
interesting and instructive evening. 
The entire student body is cordially 
invited to attend. 



THE TIGER 



ALUMNUS REPRESENTATIVE 

FOR ATHLETIC BOARD 

CHOSEN. 



SUNDAY SERVICE. 



It has been officially announced by 
the faculty that Dr. L. W. Bortree 
has been chosen to be the alumnus 
representative on the athletic board 
to take the place of Donald Tucker, 
who is now in Williams College. It 
is the universal opinion that Dr. Bor- 
tree is the best man who could have 
been chosen for this important and 
responsible position. After his grad- 
uation from C. C. Dr. Bortree took 
a course in medicine at Harvard, and 
he is now one of the most prominent 
physicians of the city. He has always 
manifested a keen interest in the 
affairs of the College and no one 
could have been chosen who would 
have more solicitation for the best 
welfare of Colorado College athletics 
than will Dr. Bortree. 



FRESHMEN RECEPTION. 

Last Friday evening, President and 
.Mrs. Slocum held their annual re- 
ception to the freshmen in Bemis 
Hall. In the receiving line were Dr. 
and Mrs. Slocum, and Sam Baker, 
the vice-president of the class. Every- 
body tried to get acquainted with 
everybody else and even the most 
bashful freshmen found that they 
could discuss such questions as 
the tryanny of "math," or the 
hardness of the professors' hearts. 
After the same old topics had been 
pretty well exhausted, refreshments 
were served in the dining room and 
the evening was brought to a close 
by the singing of several College 
songs. 



ATHLETIC CONFERENCE 
MEETING. 



The only schools having their eli- 
gibility lists in in time for the Con- 
ference meeting in Denver Saturday, 
were Colorado College and the Uni- 
versity of Colorado. The Conference, 
accordingly, could not transact much 
business. The men on the lists that 
were in were found to be eligible. 
Some left-over business was taken 
care of, and the eligibility lists of 
the other schools were left to be 
looked into by the individual insti- 
tutions. 



C. S. Campbell went to Denver, Sun- 
day, to visit his mother. 



The interest among the students and 
townspeople in the C. C. vesper serv- 
ice seems to be sustained. Last Sun- 
day's service was as impressive and 
beatuiful as the former ones have been. 
The strong, thoughtful address and the 
fine music, particularly the rendition of 
the well known anthem "No shadows 
yonder" were enjoyed by all present. 
Owing to an unfortunate delay, Rev. F. 
F. Kramer who was to have spoken was 
unable to arrive in time and the Rev. 
W. H. Garvin of the First Presbyterian 
Church at the last moment kindly took 
his place. Dr. Garvin took his text 
from Revelations 1 :8, "I am Alpha and 
Omega, saith the Lord God, Who is 
and Who was and Who is to come, the 
Almighty." His address was, in part, as 
follows : 

The words of the text are suggestive. 
Jesus Christ, the beginning and the end. 
The Bible itself is sealed and opened 
with Jesus. The Book was given us 
not as history but as a revelation of 
God's dealing with man and man's re- 
lation to God. The story of the Old 
Testament is but the story of man's 
search for God and of God revealing 
himself to man: True, not all the pre- 
cepts contained therein can be taken by 
us to be divine precepts, but it is God 
trying to bring his people to an acquaint- 
ance of His ways. There is only one 
key to open the mystery of its pages. 
He who seeks entry into the riches of 
the Old Testament must discover that 
the Key to it all is Jesus Christ. 

The seal was put upon the message 
of the whole Bible by John on the island 
of Patmos when he wrote the words of 
the text. 

Jesus is the Alpha and Omega, too, of 
every life that is worth while. No mat- 
ter what the culture of art may be, a 
life never knows what true blessing is 
till its baren wastes are watered by the 
river of God and no life is so barren 
but when once the river of God flows 
through it begins to revive so that the 
desert will blossom even as the rose. 
The beginning of life comes when the 
soul meets its Saviour. Somehow hun- 
ger leaves the soul when the revelation 
of God enters into it. Not only is Jesus 
the beginning and end of that racial 
movement which finds its ultimate end 
in what Saint John called the new 
Jerusalem and what Plato called the 
New Republic. 

The age needs the ideals of Jesus 
Christ; a thousandfold it needs the 
dynamic power of Jesus that helps man 
to reach those ideals. The river which 



flows from the throne of God shall re- 
fresh and vitalize and render the larger 
fruitage of our lives. Thank God, we 
can look back from this busy and mate- 
rialistic age to the Book which reveals 
the glorious ideals of Christ, Jesus the 
Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the 
end, the racial idea, the racial dynamic 
who helps us to reach at last those glor- 
ious halls of God. 



NEXT SUNDAY'S VESPERS. 



Rev. F. F. Kramer, who was to have 
spoken at last Sunday's College vespers 
but was, owing to a railroad accident, 
unable to get here in time for the serv- 
ice, has promised to speak to us next 
Sunday. Dr. Kramer has a reputation 
as a theologian which is not limited to 
Colorado. Besides being one of the best 
preachers in the state he is also a noted 
divinity scholar, having writen several 
books on biblical subjects. He is a man 
well capable of interesting college audi- 
ences and his address next Sunday will 
undoubtedly be a thoughtful and inpiring 
one. 



FRENCH CLUB RECEPTION. 



The Cercle Francais held its annual 
reception last Thursday evening in 
Ticknor study. The guests of the 
Club were the French students in the 
College and friends. The room was 
decorated with purple and white, the 
Club's colors and a short program 
was given by the members. Miss 
Wharton rendered a pianoforte solo. 
Madame Menier read in a delightful 
manner one of Daudet's short stories. 
Miss Elrick gave a resume of one of 
Alolieres plays, "Le Bourgeors Gen- 
tilhommi," which was followed by 
one of the most amusing scenes of 
that comedy given by A. H. Row- 
botham and N. R. Park. The purpose 
of the program, which was given in 
French, was to give the visitors an 
idea of the work that the society does 
at its regular meetings. After the 
program refreshments, consisting of 
ice cream, candy and cakes were 
served. 



NUGGET BOARD ACTIVE. 



The Nugget Board is saying little 
and sawing wood. The editor-in- 
chief promises the "best annual ever 
produced," but beyond that is rather 
vague. The business manager is al- 
ready considering bids, so that both 
the artistic and financial ends are 
sure to be well looked after. 



THE TIGER 



—t- 3 — ^^ — * 

The Weekly Newspaperof Colorado Collet 

HARRY L. BLACK Editor-in-Chief 

RICHARD L. HUGHES.. Business MtJr. 

Leon C. Havens Assistant Editor 

A. H. Rowbotham Assistant Editor 

J. J. SlNTON Athletic Editor 

D. H. mahan Engineering Editor 

G. S. Cowdery Forestry Editor 

Miss Glenn Styles Alumni Editor 

Miss Mary Randolph Exchange Editor 

Miss Helen Rand Local Editor 

A. W. Donovan Local Editor 

H. A. Parkuon Assistant Manager 

A. L. GOLDEN Assistant Manager 

W. L. Myers Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

F. P. Storke, H. A. Bennett, Miss Lucy Ferrill, 

Miss Elizabeth Gerould, Miss Leona Stukey, 

Miss Myrth King, Miss Violet Hopper, Miss 

Frances Adams, R. G. Appel 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to The Tiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phones: Editor, Main 2550. Manager, Main 2073 

Entered at the postorfice at Colorado 
Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



The Scrubs. 

In the enthusiasm that is apt to 
develop about this time of year for 
the excellent work of the football 
men who are to make up the first 
team, we are apt to forget the great 
service that is rendered to the mak- 
ing of the football team by the others 
— the scrubs. It is indeed a sacrifice 
for a football man to report on the 
field for practice every night, and for 
him to give up all the little pleasures 
that go to make up the most joyful 
part of his daily life. But the man 
who makes the first team reaps some 
reward for his work and sacrifice 
when the day of the game comes. 
There he is, on the field, to fight for 
whatever fame and glory he may win 
for himself individually; there he is, 
picked as one of the best, to repre- 
sent his alma mater in an intercol- 
legiate contest; there he is, entitled to 
and receiving the best respect and 
honor of the student body he repre- 
sents; and there he is, with the cheer- 
ing of his name ringing in his ears, 
and truly, that is some reward. 

But what about the scrub? What 
about the man who goes to practice 
night after night, and sometimes 
without the slightest hope of making 
a place on the team? What about the 
man who goes to practice to take a 
drubbing from the man who is going 



to make the team in order that the 
team may be better? What is the 
reward that he reaps when the day 
of the game comes? He gets none 
of the joy of being one of the men 
picked to represent his alma mater; 
he never has an opportunity to win 
individual glory and fame; he seldom 
boasts the recognition of honor and 
respect of the student body he repre- 
sents; nor does he hear the cheering 
of his name ringing in his ears. He 
is just a scrub — that's all. 

Few people realize that it is the 
scrub team that makes for the 
efficiency of the first team. The first 
team has to have something to work 
on, something to practice on. Other- 
wise the playing of a game against 
real live opponents would be a brand 
new situation for them, and the learn- 
ing of the game of football would 
have to take place entirely within the 
game. 

So let us recognize the scrub as a 
necessity to the making of a football 
team — not as an attending circum- 
stance. Men of the first team do not 
deserve a great deal more credit. Let 
us count the team not as eleven men, 
but rather as twenty-two or thirty or 
fifty — the aggregate number of foot- 
ball players. TRY. 



The Glee Club. 

In any college or university there 
are few organizations that do more 
to advertise the college or university 
than do the glee clubs. And likewise 
there are few organizations that re- 
ceive as little recognition of the work 
they do as do the glee clubs. 

The Glee Clubs that have repre- 
sented Colorado College in the past 
have been far in advance of what 
would ordinarily be expected from an 
institution of our size. And this year 
the Colorado College Glee Club is to 
be much better than it has ever been 
before. 

Every year the Glee Club makes a 
tour of the state in its itinerary which 
usually comes during the Xmas re- 
cess. The Glee Club is largely re- 
sponsible for what the people of the 
state think of Colorado College. This 
kind of advertising counts fully as 
much as that obtained through athlet- 
ic prowess, and yet these self-sacri- 
ficing men who spend their evenings 
and who never ask any financial aid 
from the sctudent body, are scarcely 
given the credit they deserve among 
the students of the College. 

And the purpose of this article is to 
recognize the spirit of self-sacrifice 



and loyalty to the College which the 
Glee Club men are making and are 
going to make before the season is 
over. We* recognize the fact that 
they spend a great deal of time and 
work in preparing for the tour they 
are to make in the interest of the 
College, and we want them to feel 
that the student body as a whole 
realize it, too. We are proud of the 
success of our Glee Clubs of the past 
and we are here to cheer on the Glee 
Club of this year as they are under- 
taking the season's work that is 
eoins to mark the "best ever." 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB. 

The Girls' Glee Club has started 
out on the third year of its existence 
more promisingly than ever before. 
Miss Viola Paulus has again been 
chosen director, and Miss Ruth Law 
accompanist. Two rehearsals have 
already been held, and the girls are 
taking a great deal of interest in the 
success of the Club, as is shown by 
the good attendance. The officers are 
trying hard to have every member 
present at every rehearsal, on time, 
and to accomplish this the system of 
fines is to be rigidly enforced this 
year. 

Miss Lucy Graves is president, 
Miss Carrie Burger, vice-president, 
and Miss Gwendolyn Hedgcock sec- 
retary and treasurer. The members 
are: First sopranos — Misses Mc- 
Laughlin, Randolph, Norton, Graves, 
Ferril, F. Hemenway, E. Burgess. 
Second sopranos — Misses Gasson, 
Marsh, Green, Crandall, Christy, E. 
Ball, Walsh. First altos— Burger, 
Maddox, Sutton, Stuntz, Yerkes, M. 
Thompson, Thatcher. Second altos — 
Auld, Hedgecock, Baxter, Wilson, V. 
Fuller, L. Thompson, Knutzen. 



SENIOR TRAMP. 

The members of the senior class 
enjoyed their annual autumn tramp 
Saturday. The party left at nine- 
thirty in the morning and the day 
was spent on the old Cripple Creek 
stage road. An elaborate picnic din- 
ner was served just above Seven 
Falls. The numerous mountains in 
the vicinity offered inviting oppor- 
tunities for excursions and climbs. 
The party returned late in the even- 
ing after having spent a most enjoy- 
able day. 



Mr. H. H. Davis is now in Calgary, 
Alberta Provine, Canada. 



THE TIGER 



ENGINEERING NEWS 



THE ELECTRICAL SHOW. 



(By O. W. Hall '14.) 






From every point of view the electric 
show was all that could be desired. The 
illumination was probably the most strik- 
ing feature of the whole exposition. 
From the ceiling were hung chandeliers 
fitted with 75-candle power Mazda 
lamps, which shed a beautiful white 
light over the hall. Every booth had a 
system of illumination all its own, both 
for service as well as for advertising 
purposes, using globes all the way from 
the old carbon style, to the mercury 
lamp with its peculiar bluish glow. With 
all in full swing the place was lighter 
than day. 

Several modern types of mining ma- 
chinery were exhibited by various con- 
cerns, among which may be mentioned 
hand and power hoists, electric and com- 
pressed air drills, pumps, etc. One of 
the companies had a huge block of gran- 
ite whereon to demonstrate the efficiency 
of their drills. 

The Edison storage battery, complete- 
ly dissembled, was shown by the agent. 
In this exhibit one is enabled to see the 
points of construction of this highly effi- 
cient cell. The regular type of lead 
storage cell was also shown. 

Without doubt, perhaps, the most in- 
teresting part of the whole show was 
the "Hall of Wonders." There, Pro- 
fessor Hylon T. Plumb gave a fascinat- 
ing series of experiments with high ten- 
sion currents, at time taking a potential 
of nearly a million volts through his 
body. Lamps were lighted without any 
apparent connection whatever ; plates 
of solid glass, an inch and a half thick, 
were pierced with ease; pieces of paper 
were lighted by merely touching with 
the finger, besides other experiments too 
numerous to mention. 

From the flame of a "singing arc 
lamp" could be heard the strains of a 
familiar tune played by a phonograph 
soine distance away. This is nothing 
more than an ordinary flaming arc sup- 
plied with direct current. 

In the next stall, an electric welder 
was in operation with which it was pos- 
sible to weld two pieces of steel three 
inches in diameter, together. Steel tub- 
ing was also joined, making a seamless 
section. 

The inventors department was replete 
with electrical novelties, among which 



were wireless telegraphy and telephony 
sets which have been in actual operation 
on land and sea. An electric fly-killer 
attracts the pests by a bright glow and 
then electrocutes them instantaneously. 
Small models of the various types of 
aeroplanes are shown, equipped with 
propellers driven by tiny electric motors. 

In the various exhibits were noted, a 
telephone switchboard (pretty operator, 
too) ; curling irons, washing machines, 
mangles, flatirons, chafing dishes, etc., 
all operated by electricity, and many 
other devices too numerous to mention. 

The show continues through Saturday 
evening, October 28th, and is well worth 
tne time and admission spent. 



CURTIS TO ADDRESS THE 
ENGINEERS. 



The Engineers' Club has succeeded in 
getting Mr. Leonard E. Curtis to speak 
on Friday evening. The interest that 
such men as Mr. Curtis taken in Colo- 
rado College can be shown in no better 
way than by their giving of their time 
for the benefit of the students. There 
are few busier men in Colorado than 
Mr. Curtis, and he is also one of the 
ablest speakers. 

Every man who fails to hear Mr. Cur- 
tis will regret it, and in order to give 
all men the opportunity the meeting will 
commence at 8:15, in the Pit, which 
gives ample time for the literary societies 
to adjourn early. 

Mr. Curtis will speak on the contro- 
versy between the General Electric Co. 
and the Westinghouse Co. The proceed- 
ings in this case have cost far into the 
millions and the books recording them 
cost a fortune. 

The chances to hear such a lecture 
as this one are indeed rare, and 
especially by such a capable man as 
Mr. Curtis. 



LETTER FROM WORCESTER 
COLLEGE. 

It always proves a matter of interest 
to us to hear from C. C. students who 
decided to finish in Eastern schools. G. 
C. Graham ex-' 12 now in Worcester 
College at Worcester, Mass., in a letter 
to Professor Cajori gives a few compar- 
isons between C. C. and Worcester Col- 
lege that are interesting. He says in 
part: 

"I was admitted here as a full junior 



without any conditions. In comparing 
the work here with that at C. C. I am 
inclined to say that the course in C. C. 
is better and more advanced, especially 
in Physics. The difference in the cours- 
es the first two years is mainly in the 
shop work. In the last two years the 
only difference is in the equipment of 
the schools. If C. C. had this school's 
equipment, no one could want a better 
school." I like the work, the school, 
and surroundings, but behind it all I 
still have a longing for old C. C. that 
will always last." 



BOARD OF CONTROL OF STU- 
DENT PUBLICATIONS. 



The following resolutions have 
been passed by the faculty in regard 
to student publications: 

"First, Be it resolved that a board 
of five members be established to be 
known as the Board of Control of 
Student Publications. 

"Second, Be it resolved that two 
of its members be appointed by the 
President from the faculty and the 
other three be elected by the student 
council from its own members. 

"Third, Be it resolved that it be the 
duty of the Board to supervise the 
finances of the Kinnikinnik and The 
Nugget and to see that the accounts 
of the managers of those publications 
are properly audited." 

The Board will be chosen in the 
near future. 



Dorothy Frantz entertained a few of 
the girls at tea in honor of Grace Wil- 
son and Dorothe Haynes. 



Mary Peterson, who was here the 
first semester last year, registered Tues- 
day and will graduate with the class of 
1912. 



•{• * 

* REMEMBER! ! ! * 
•j. . * 

* In order to get the Tiger at * 

* the reduced rate of $1.25, your * 

* subscription must be paid by * 

* November 1st. Only two * 

* more weeks. Interview the <■' 

* manager right away. * 
4> * 






THE TIGER 



FALL STYLES FOR COLLEGE MEN 




Suits with the English effects, Hart Shaffner & Mark Varsity and Shape- 
maker models, are popular models being worn this fall by college men. 

$15 to $50 

GANO-DOmS* 



HYPATIA DANCE FOR NEW 
GIRLS. 



PEARSON PROGRAM. 
October 20. 



llypatia entertained the new girls 
Friday night at their annual autumn 
spread. The gymnasium was appro- 
priately decorated with leaves, corn- 
stalks and jack-'o-lanterns. Dancing 
was the amusement for the evening 
and refreshments were served during 
an intermission. 



FORESTRY CLUB ELECTS OFFI- 
CERS AND ARRANGES PRO- 
GRAM FOR THE YEAR. 



Lecture — Hamilton. 
"Some Experiments in Electrostatics'' 
All are cordially invited to attend. 



APOLLONIAN PROGRAM, 



MINERVA PLEDGE DANCE. 



The Minerva society combined the 
party for the pledges and the officer's 
party in a dinner dance at the home 
of Marion aines last Friday even- 
ing. 



JUNIOR EVENT POSTPONED. 



At a meeting of the junior class 
last Thursday, it was decided to post- 
pone the date for the junior social 
event until early in the second semes- 
ter, owing to the short time allowed 
by the former date, Nov. 18, to ar- 
range for the entertainment that was 
being planned. 



October 20. 

Review of the speeches made by the 
President in his "Swing Around the 
Circle" C. A. Carson 

Russian Bureaucracy under Stolypin 

Beatty 

Music by the quartette. 

Debate: "Resolved, That under the 
present conditions, the great lum- 
ber and mining companies are fol- 
lowing the best system of utilizing 
our national resources." 

Affirmative — Banfield, G. Clark. 

Negative — J. Williams, H. Greeg. 



NEW ENGLAND CLUB ELEC- 
TION. 



The following officers of the New 
England Club have been elected: 
President — Fred S. Baker. 
Vice-President — -Miss Sherman. 
Sec.-Treas. — Miss King. 

The Club is planning to hold many 
enjoyable outings during the year. 



COL. ENSIGN TALKS TO THE 
FORESTERS. 

Last Tuesday morning the foresters 
enjoyed a lecture given by Colonel 
Ensign upon civil service work. 

Colonel Ensign has been in the 
civil service for a number of years 
and is one of the best authorities in 
the state upon forestry. He first 
gained prominence in Routt county 
. many years ago when he was making 
studies of soil and forestry products. 
He was the first man in that county 
to instruct the people as to the mois- 
ture in the soil. 



The Forestry Club has elected the 
following officers for the year 1911-12: 
President— J. E. Floyd. 
Vice-President— E. W. Lindstrom. 
Secretary — G. S. Cowdery. 
Treasurer— R. C. Colwell. 
Sergeant-at-Arms— A. W. Donovan. 

The Club has taken a new lease on 
life and it expects to maintain a very 
high standard in the future. At the 
last meeting there was a speech by 
Dean Sturgis. This was followed by 
Prof. Coolidge who supplemented all 
that Dean Sturgis had said. 

Prof. Terry lectured upon "Some 
Silvical Experiments," which he ex- 
pects to introduce into the summer 
school work. 

The program committee, composed 
of Donovan, chairman; Baker and 
Snyder, assisted by Dean Sturgis and 
Profesor Coolidge, submitted the 
program for the year: 

Progam will appear in another issue 



A party of men consisting of F. W. 
Ware, Golden, Miller, Banfield and 
Bentley went up to Denver, Saturday, 
in order to hear Robert E. Speer who 
was giving an address in that city. 
While there they took in the D. U.-Utah 
football game. 



Ruth Sheppard and Bernice Rossbach 
entertained last year's Montgomery girls 
Saturday night. 



THE RUG STORE 



Is Located at 331 East 
Pike's Peak and Wahsach 



We Have the Largest Stock of Beautiful Floor F ugs 



THE TIGER 



Hunt Up 

BisselFs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

Pike's Peak Book & 
Stationery Co. gi523 » 

Seldomridge Grain Co. 



TO SELL FORESTRY LAND. 



Wholesale and Relall Dealers in 

Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tc,on Street 



CALL 2000 

When You Want Anything QUICK! 
QUICK DELIVERY 

MAI* 2000 



COTRELL & LEONARD 

Albany, N. Y. 
Makers of 

CAPS & GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the 

Atlantic to the Pacific 

Class Contcacts a Specialty 

Deichmann & Douglas Floral 
Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER, Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 

Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Gazette Building 



Carrying into execution the will of 
the Board of Trustees of the Col- 
lege as expressed at their annual ses- 
sion last June, negotiations are being 
carried on between the College au- 
thorities and prospective buyers of a 
part of the College forestry lands 
in Manitou Park. It is reported that 
prospective purchasers from Texas, 
representing a big cattle company 
of that state are coming to Colorado 
Springs for the purpose of inspecting 
the land and discussing terms with 
the College representatives. 

The forestry land is located at 
iManitou Park, about twenty-five 
miles west of this city, and is the 
summer laboratory of the engineer- 
ing and forestry students of the Col- 
lege. The College is not offering 
for sale any part of its forest terri- 
tory, but only that part which is not 
needed for the work of the school. 
This part includes about 3,000 acres 
and the hotel which is located on the 
land. The forest land and the cot- 
tages are all that is needed for the 
Forestry School, and these are to be 
retained by the College. 

It has not been stated what price 
has been set upon that part of the 
land offered for sale, but it is esti- 
mated that its value should be placed 
somewhere in the neighborhood of 
$50,000. It is understood that the 
Texans are desirous of finding a 
range which will be near the Colo- 
rado market, and the College land 
will answer the purpose admirably. 

Besides the Texas company, it is 
said, there are one or two other 
prospective buyers of the land, and it 
is expected that the deal will be 
closed in the near future. 



Grimsley '14 spent Saturday and Sun- 
day in Denver. 

Developing and Printing 

HARLAN 

"The View Man" 

All Kinds of View and Commercial Work 
Phone Main 2717 304 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 




NEW 

Fall Styles 

JUST IN 

High Arch, High Toes, Short 
Vamps, Button or Lace, Velvets, 
Suedes, Patents, Gunmetels, 
Tan Russia's 

$2.50, $3.00, $3.50 
and $4.00 




Board $4.50 Per Week 

One front room for two. Board 

and room $25 per month for each 

222 E. DALE 



THE 

Crissey & Fowler 
Lumber Co. 



Phone 101 



117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 



Telephone S99 



The 



CUT FLOWERS 



Store 104N. Tejon Street 

's Peak Floral Co. 

DECORATIONS AND DESIGNS 






10 



THE TIGER 



V^(~\J J fellows who want a fall overcoat shoud be inter- 
-* v-r L/ ested in our showing of them. We've never had 
quite so many fine coats for you to choose from as we have 
now, the styles are finer than they've ever been, and the fab- 
rics are the kind you're sure to like— Raglans, full box and 
semi-fitted styles at $15.00 to $35.00 




To College 
Students 
Old and New 

We Extend the Most Cordial Good 
Wishes. We've made a Specialty of 
taking care of the wants of the up-to- 
date young men and women. You'll 
find us the kind of jewelry store you'll 
like. 

The Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak 

The Davis Barber Shop 

Individual Sterilizing Cabinets 
Ray Davis, Manager 



, Josl yn P rinter y 

112 E. Cucharras St. 
Phone Main 1154 

Printers & 
Publishers 



ANY KIND OF PRINTING 
WE PRINT THE TIGER 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Mr. George Bancroft ex-'13 is study- 
ing medicine at Chicago University. 



Miss Lucile Dilts ex-'i2 keeps the 
books in her father's store in Fort Mor- 
gan. 



Miss Rhoda Haynes '08 of Greeley 
was married on August 2nd to Harold 
Roberts '08. Since Ostober 1st their 
heme has been in Salem, Oregon. 



Miss Irene Hughes '10 is teaching 
English in Bridgetown, Maine. 



Miss Angie Kuhl ex-'02 of Brown- 
brook, New Jersey, was married on 
June 28th to Mr. Charles Southern of 
Greeley. 

Miss Ruth Lendecke ex-'14 is teach- 
ing near Georgetown. 

Miss Ruth Laughlin '09 is spending 
her winter at home in Santa Fe, New 
Mexico. 

Miss Laura McLain '11 and Miss 
Edna Woodward '11 were guests at the 
senior table on Sunday. Miss Wood- 
ward is teaching at Butte, and Miss 
McLain is at home in Manzanola. 

Have Your Clothes Cleaned, Pressed and 



Kept in First-Class Repair by 



"Sam" the Gentlemen's Valet 

Also Makes a Specialty of Serving Parties 
SAM FLEMINC 

114 E. Cucharras Phone 1675 



RRF AD For morning delivery. It's 
bread hot from the oven, 
baked from the choicest flour, and that 
would command first premium anywhere. 
That you get from us. Is always good. 

THE CHICAGO BAKERY 

Have the fellows meet you at 

Tucker's 
Restaurant 

10 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 

You can always save money if 
you will come to see our line in 
diamonds, watches, jewelry, 
guns, sporting goods, fishing 
tackel drawing sets, musical 
instruments, trunks, valises, or 
if you want to loan money, you 
can get it 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 

Money Loaned on Valuables 



HAVE YOU A PANITORIUM COLLEGE TICKET ? 

See Rhone, College Agent, Hagerman Hall 
30 SUITS SPONGED AND PRESSED FOR $5.00 



THE TIGER 



II 



The College Book and Supply Store 

In addition to furnishing the Text Books and Engineering 
Supplies for the College students, we carry a very large 
stock of Fountain Pens, Waterman's Ideal, Conklin Self- 
fillers and College. See Our PENNANTS ane POSTERS 

Whitney & Grimwood 



Get Your Picnic Supplies 

—"" AT SS 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

1 13 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

STUDENTS 



Remember when you 
want the Best Photos 
at moderate cost and 
courteous attention. 
Visit the old reliable. 




™£& 



Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 679 



R. J. CORRIN 

Dry Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing 

and Remodeling for Ladies 

and Gentlemen 

Work by the Month 

Work Called for and Delivered 

Phone 2963 M 326 N. Tejon Street 

Nothing Pleases Us More Than 
To Please College Students 

The FredS. Tucker 

Furniture Co, 



Mr. Roy McClintock 1900 is manager 
of "The Leader" in Pueblo. 



Miss Vesta McRoberts ex-'13 is teach- 
ing in Ashton, South Dakota. 



Mr. Parker ex-'lO is now employed 
by one of the banks in Delta. 



Miss Leona Thatcher '10 has a posi- 
tion in the Colorado Springs schools. 

Miss Adeline Weeks ex-T2, on her 
way home from a three months' visit 
in New York, visited at College over 
Sunday. 

Miss Clara Wight ex-'ll is teaching 
in the Loveland High School. 

Miss Grace Wilson '11 and Miss Dor- 
othy Haynes ex-'12 came down Friday 
for a short visit with College and city 
friends. 



Local Department 



The class in Geology I took its first 
field tramp up Ute Pass, Saturday morn- 
ing. 



Edyth Brewer spent the week end at 
her home in Manzanola. 



Eva Brooks spent Saturday and Sun- 
day in Denver. 



Lillian Pickens' father and mother are 
here for the Dry-Farming Congress. 



Dorothy Madden spent the week end 
in Pueblo. 



Miss Townsend, a Chi Omego of the 
State College for Women of Florida, 
was a guest of Anna Carson and Flor- 
ence Oettiker, Monday. 



MOTOR CYCLES 

Yale Emblem 

BICYCLES and Supplies 

Expert Repairing 

Colorado Springs Cycle 

Company 

DeWitt Doyle, Manager 
224 N. Tejon St. Phone Red 34 



Knight - Campbell's 

F0R PIAN0S 

and PLAYER PIANOS 

STEINWAY and 20 OTHER MAKES 

We Rent Pianos 

Largest Stock Victor Talking Machine* 
and Edison Phonographs 

226 N. Tejon St., after Sept. 15, 122 N. Tejon 

The Gowdy-Si/nmons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS 

Copper Plate and Steel Engravers 
Telephone 87 21 N. Tejon Street 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing a Typewriter. 

Zimmerman Supply 

■°,rv. M ««~«%'.T 22 E - Kiowa St - 

Company Phone Main 374 

Established 1890 

You can save from 25 
percent to 40 percent 
on our finest Hart, 
Schaf f ner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer & 
Clothcraf t Suits and 
Overcoats 



12 



THE TIGER 



We are Overstocked on 

PENNANTS 



We qelieve we have the largest stock and best assortment in town. To stimulate the sale we 

are offering a 

Cut of 20 Per Cent from the Marked Price 



THE MURRAY DRUG COMPANY 

Opposite Compus 



The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

116 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

s 
Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Gives 
Special Attention to Accounts of Student 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, President Ira Harris, V-President 

M. C. Gile Lilla B. Ensign C. E. Lynde 

Donald D. Wilflcy, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M. 

THE OUT WEST 

TENT AND AWNING CO. 

RECLINING CHAIRS 
PORCHES ENCLOSED 

Tents Rented for a Day or for Longer 



Stamping, Designing, R rlorating, Bast Hand Paintad 

China. Western Branch of Mexican Pigment Paints, 

Stenciling and Materials 

Art Needlework and Art Goods 

THE HUNT AND VAN NICE 

ART SPECIALTY SHOPS 

Retail and Wholesale 
8 Pike's Peak Aven • Phone Main 2055 



Headquarters for 

COLLEGE 

FOOT 

WORK 

We Have a Complete 
Line of Foot Wear 
Especially Adapted 
for College People. 

iy Whitaker-Kester 

Shoe Co. 
10 North Tejon Street 




A. W. Donovan motored to Denver 
Saturday with Dr. J. Allen Smith, Jas. 
P. Anthony and Mr. Wilson of the Rio 
Grande, to see the electric show and the 
D. U.-U. of U. football game. 



Mr. Mackie, a Phi Gamma Delta 
from Washington University was a vis- 
itor over Sunday. 



Wilmer Christian, a national officer of 
the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity, stopped 
over at the local chapter Friday and 
Saturday on his way back from the in- 
stallation of a new chapter at the Uni- 
versity of Oregon. 

J. Elmer Thomas, member of the Chi- 
cago Chapter of Phi Gamma Delta, vis- 
ited the College last Wednesday. 



Much interest is being aroused among 
the students by the Dry-Farming Con- 
gress which is now in session in the 
city. The headquarters of the exhibit 
are at the Temple theater at the corner 
of Nevada and Kiowa. 

The Phi Gamma Delta fraternity has 
issued invitations for its annual open- 
house. It is intended that every under- 
graduate and member of the faculty 
shall receive an invitation, and this no- 
tice is to inform any of those who may 
have been missed. 

The Girls' Limping Corps has taken 
in the following members this week : 
Lillian Picken, Mable Jacobson, Maurine 
Carle, Katherine True, Eliese Painter 
and Blanche Johnson. 



Prof. Coolidge spent the week-end 
in Denver. 



Miss Hazel Musser ex-'ll is a junior 
in the University of California at Berke- 
ley. 



THE POPULAR 

Creams and Ices Fresh Butter 

Made Right and Delivered Promptly 

A. L. M0WRY 

Phone 1184 
115 East Cache la Poudre Street 



STOP AT 

LIGHTNING SHOE SHOP 

to get your shoes repaired. Shine 
free with every pair of soles 

Sewed Soles 75c. 2& l / 2 N. Tejon St. 



William P. Bonbright & Co. 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty- 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 
16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



STUDENTS! 

The 
Pearl Laundry Co. 

respectfully solicits your pat- 
ronage. We guarantee satis- 
factory work and service and 
give you 20% discount. 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 



THE TIGER 13 

Above the High Rents Below the High Prices Walk Up Stairs and Save a $ or 2 

Retail Sample Shoe Store 

M. Q. West 
$3.50 and $5 Shoes for Men and Women, $2.50 No More, No Less 



110-112 East Pike's Peak Ave. 



Rooms 16-17-18 Midland Block 



At Head of Stairs 



Engraving 

Function Invitations 
Programs, Place Cards 
Etc., — Out Specialty. 

OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

HA YNER 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 

COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 

2 S. T«jon St. Colorado Springs 



Maude Griffith is on the sick list. 



The training table has been at the 
Alpha Tau Delta house for the past 
week. 



The Y. M. C. A. bulletin board has 
been set up near the entrance to Per- 
kins Hall. 



The College Young Women's Chris- 
tian Association holds regular weekly 
meetings every Wednesday evening at 
Bemis Hall. 



Harrison '15 is using crutches because 
ot a sprained ankle. 

Shorty Howland '14 is improving and 
hopes to dispense with his crutches 
soon. 



Among the guests at dinner, Sunday, 
at the Phi Gamma Delta House were 
Mr. George Tyler of Pueblo, Mr. T. D. 
Riggs '08 of Denver, Mr. B. W. Stiles 
'09 of Pueblo, and Mr. Ross Conklin ex- 
'i i of Delta. 



The Prompt Printery Co. 

MASTER PRINTERS 



12 and 14 E. Kiowa St. Phone Main 536 



BURGESS CANDIES 



are Simply Delicious. A dainty 

box of Burgess Chocalates will 

smooth the way wonderfully 

Every bite a delight. 

BURGESS 

Phone Eight Three 
12-114 North Tejon Street 



Sewed Soles 75 cents 
Rubber Heels 35 cents 

AT 

PETE'S SHOE SHOP 

230 East Dale 

JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Student* 
Over Willing'! Book Store 16 S. Tei«n Str«e 

A. W. Donovan went to Denver 
for the D. U. vs. Utah game and also 
to make an examination upon a ship- 
ment of Texas steers. 



THE OLD STAND 

Anybody can make Ice Cream, but takes Mueth's 
to satisfy the college students. Reference: Bob Lloyd 




Under new management 



THE TIGER 



Be Your Own Agent 

The management of the STAR LAUNDRY have 
decided to have no general agent at the College and to 
give agent's discount direct to the student sending in 
the bundle. 

Our drivers will sell you a $5.00 Coupon Book for $3.50, a dis- 
count of 30%, or you can pay in cash on the delivery of the bundle, 
taking out 30% for yourself. No bundles will be left without money 
or coupons. 

Coupon- Books at this discount will be sold only to students and 
are not transferable and the coupon will not be received from other 
than students. 



Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co. 

Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton Dairy 

419 S. El Pa»o St. Phone Main 442 

GET IT AT 

THE EMPORIUM 

AND SAVE MONEY 

110 S. TEJON STREET 

THE MUELLER 

TEACHERS' AGENCY 

Conducted for Efficiency only. Services 
free to School Bnards No enrollment fee 
for teachers. Call or write 

ANNA HI MUELLER, 450 West Uinta Street, 
Phone Main 2188 Colorado Springs, Colo 



Eliese Painter shared a birthday box 
with some of the Ticknor girls, Tues- 
day. 



Etta Moore and Edyth Brewer enter> 
tained all the Ticknor girls with a spread 
Tuesday afternoon. 



Eliese Painter was called home sud- 
denly Tuesday morning. 



Violet Hopper and Etta Moore gave a 
fudge party Saturday afternoon. 



Ruth Cunningham, Helen Graham, 
and Maude Stanfield gave a tea Sunday 
afternoon. 

Mrs. Walter S. Sullivan of Grand 
Junction spent Thursday with Laura 
Rhone. 



Helen Stoddard enjoyed a visit from 
her father and mother, Thursday. 



Lila Haines' sister was a visitor dur- 
ing the week end. 



Carrie Burger entertained at break- 
fast, Sunday morning. 



Agnes Anderson spent the week end 
at her home in Castle Rock. 



President Slocum expects to leave in 
about ten days for a trip East. 



FRESHMEN 

■ 

Try the Breakfasts at 

The College Inn 

Opposite the Campus 



TRY 

A 

SUPPER 

McRAE'S 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co, 
Groceries and 



Meats 



>«.*.«» 



m 




115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE HENRY L DWINELL HARDWARE COMPANY 



TOOLS 



BUILDERS AND GENERAL HARDWARE 
We Appreciate the College Trade 



CUTLERY 



130 N. Tejon St. 



Peone Main 439 



THE TIGER 



15 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

"The College Favorite ' 



The Favorite Shopping 

Place for College 

People 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

s the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 



106*2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



$ 



91 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 

Artists Materials 

FRAMING 
College Posters 

The Richard Willis Art Studios 

4^2 East Pike's Peak Avenue 




TOD POWELL 



SHIRTS 

Fall Styles 
Plain & Plaited 
$1.00 to $2.50 



We've Spent 
A Lot 



HATS 

New "Fuzzy" 
ones, all shapes 
$3.00 to $6.00 



A line on our young mens clothes and the time hasn.t been wasted. 
When your ready for a fall suit or overcoat, we'd like to show our 
display. We promise you'll like them — No one else can show sued 
an assortment at $15. to $35. 



Money 
Cheerfully 
Refunded 




113 East 

Pike's Peak 

Avenue 



Wm. Gilmore spent . Sunday with his 
son, Wm. Gilmore, Jr. 'IS. 



Miss Floy Estill ex-'i2 left Monday 
evening for Los Angeles, where she is 
to be the guest of Mrs. Bayliss Shep- 
herd for the winter. 



Charley Friend ex-'i3 was down 
from Denver for a few hours, Satur- 
day. 



Watson and Hopkins, both of the 
class of 1915, are new members of the 
Apollonian Club. 



A few of the men and pledges of 
the Kappa Sigma frtaernity formed 
a very pleasant party on a trip to 
Motten's cabin, Tuesday night. Those 
who participated were: Miss Lila 
Haines, Miss Marian Haines, Miss 
Allen, Miss Harriet Ferril and Miss 
Mary Walsh; Messrs. Hall. Baker, 
Raynolds, Crysler and James. Pro- 
fessor Motten and Miss Canon 
chaperoned. 

PEERLESS 
LUMP 

The most satisfacory coal on the market 

for furnace 

THE CENTRAL FUEL CO. 

Phone 578 1 28 N. Tejon 



Get Acquainted at 

The Red 
Cross Pharmacy 

HOT DRiNKS HOT TAMALAS 

HUDSON'S CHOCOLATES 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 

107 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone 40 



Dern's Freshly Roasted Coffee 

will make 10 more cups to the lb. 
than Eastern roasted coffee 



29 S. Tejon Street 



Phone 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 
Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Bldg 
118 North Tejon St. Phone Main 1701 

Res., 1211 N. Weber St. Tel. Main 956 



Phone Main 930 



W. E. DONER 



POWELL-DONER SPORTING GOODS CO. 

1 1 2 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

"EVERYTHING FOR SPORTSMEN" 

New and Complete Stock of the Very Best of Athletic Supplies, College Pennants, Novelties, Etc. 

"ASK THE MEDICINE MAN" -— - — 



16 



THE TIGER 



We have right now the strongest gather- terns or black with velvet collars or storm 
ing of smart Winter time Overcoats you'll be proof garments with high, close buttoning 



able to find. 

Whatever style cool weather Overcoat 
you have in mind, it has been included in 
this showing. 

Short, medium or ankle length; light, 
medium or heavy ulsters; dressy light pat- 



military collar. 

Pleasing patterns in browns, grays and 
mixtures in the most durable weaves. 
And they are tailored to fit and do. 

$16.50 to $50.00 



(Per4uit4-Sfeeai«er(2 



HAUGEN, Tailor 



222 N. Tejon. 



Phone Main 296 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 



V 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



Departments - 

College of Arts and 
Science, 
E. S. PARSONS, Dean 

School of Engineering, 
F. CAJORI, Dean 

School of Forestry, 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 

School of Music, 

E. D. HALE, Dean 



f 



Cigarette Sale 



13 



Prize Cup Cigarettes were 25c a Box 
As long as they last 2 Boxes for 25c 

HUGHES 

Pool in connection but not a pool room 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



Vol. XIV 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., OCTOBER 26, 1911 



Number 7 



Sophmore Wisconsin 26 Tigers Had 

Barbecue Tigers O Fine Trip 



1914 PLANNING FOR ALL-COL- 
LEGE FETE— BONFIRES TO 
BE A FEATURE. 

Those in charge of the sophomore 
barbecue have been pushing their 
plans on the quiet for the past three 
weeks and by this time their program 
for that festive occasion is pretty 
well mapped out. Of course this 
year's barbecue is, as usual, to be the 
"best ever." There never was a bar- 
becue that wasn't the "best ever." 
But the work this year is being 
planned and arranged for more in de- 
tail than in previous years and from 
the present prospects the class of 
t g r 4. seems to have a pretty good 
chance to make good the boast of 
the "best ever." 

The tickets were put on sale Tues- 
day, and from the first two day's 
sale it looks as though the crowd is 
going to be a record breaker. Even 
in the matter of putting tickets on 
sale, Manager Herron departed from 
the time-worn custom of calling a 
chapel meeting to boost the celebra- 
tion and have all the old-timers of 
the student body and the faculty tell 
the freshmen what a safe and what 
a virtuous thing it was for them to 
buy a ticket to the barbecue. Some 
of the freshmen are a little wary yet, 
but the fame of the barbecue has be- 
come so wide-spread that there are 
only a few who have been afraid to 
^pcnd their good money for tickets. 
Tome through, freshmen. This is no 
skin game. And even K it is, don't 

Continued on page 2 



TIGER TEAM TOO LIGHT TO 
HOLD BADGERS— SPECTACU- 
LAR PLAYING ON BOTH 

SIDES. 



Poor Tackling Also Helps to Defeat 
Home Team — An Uphill Fight But 
Game to the Finish. 



Four touchdowns, three goals and 
a princeton spells the size of the de- 
feat the Tigers suffered at the hands 
of the Wisconsin Badgers on the uni- 
versity field at Madison last Saturday. 
The cause of the deafeat is twofold 
— too much weight on the Badger 
team and too poor tackling on the 
Tiger team. 

On the whole the game is a great 
encouragement to the followers of 
the Colorado College football team. 
Outweighed by approximately twenty 
pounds to the man. the Tigers fought 
gamely for every inch of ground dur- 
ing the whole game. In mass plays 
and formations the great weight of 
the opponents was applied with tell- 
ing effect upon every part of the 

Continued on page 5 






* 



IMPORTANT. 



•5° Only one more week to se- 

* cure the TIGER at the re- 
's* duced price of $1.25. After the 

* first of November it will cost 

* you $1.50. 
* 



Most Pleasant Journey Ever Taken 
By a Rocky Mountain Team. 

The members of the Tiger squad 
who made the trip to Madison to 
play against Wisconsin will always re- 
member the trip as the most enjoy- 
able ever participated in by a mem- 
ber of any Rocky Mountain athletic 
team. No care or expense was spared 
by those in charge of the team to 
make the trip as easy and pleasant 
as possible. To this fact is due in a 
measure the excellent showing the 
team made against the Badgers. 

To begin with, the sendoff they re- 
ceived from the Tiger rooters upon 
their departure for Wisconsin on 
Wednesday of last week was a mighty 
force to inspire in every member of 
the squad the determination to put 
up the very best fight he could for 
the College that supported him so en- 
thusiastically. 

At many places on the way friends 
and former students of the College 
knew in advance of the coming of 
the team and were on hand to give 
a cheer of encouragement and send 
them on their way with the conscious- 
ness of another supporter to fight for. 
Reception at Madison. 

At Madison a pleasant surprise 
awaited the team in the form of a 
reception that was given them at the 
depot by the students of the Wiscon- 
sin University. As the train pulled 
in. the team was greeted by the yells 
of 1.500 cheering Badger students. 
The Tigers were loaded into tallyhos 

Continued on Page 5 






THE TIGER 



New College Song 

Words Written by Miss Lois Vir- 
ginia Stoddard '02 — Who Will 
Write the Music? 

Last year a prize of ten dollars was 
offered for the best College song 
\vi itten by a C. C. student or alumnus. 
From among those submitted the 
committee has selected the song ap- 
pearing below. The words were writ- 
ten by Lois Virginia Stoddard, a 
graduate of the class of 1902. They 
are beautiful and inspiring and 
should become popular with every- 
one. In another column will be 
found particulars of a competition 
for music to the song. Here is a 
chance for every student or alumnus 
who has musical ability to show his 
loyalty to the College and incident- 
ally to win fifteen dollars. The com- 
mittee hopes that a great many tunes 
will be submitted so that they can 
choose one which will be a credit to 
the College: 

Colorado College. 
I. 

Colorado's lofty mountains 
Towering free 'neath sunny skies 
Call our hearts to turn with gladness 
Where thy stately halls arise. 

II. 

In thy teaching is the spirit 
Of the Westland wide and free; 
All the vastness of the prairie, 
All the glories yet to be; 

III. 

Strength of cliff and depth of canyon, 
Tireless striving of the height, 
Freedom of the winds that revel 
In the gladness of long flight; 

IV. 

Dark ravines and flaming sunrise 
In thy banner black and gold; 
Sable crag and gleaming skyline, 
Do thy colors proudly hold. 

Refrain — 

Colorado ! Colorado ! 

Here's to thee, our College fair ! 

Colorado ! Colorado ! 

For that name, thy sons shall dare. 



Y. M. C. A. OPEN HOUSE. 



Tin- Colorado College Young Men's 
Christian Association and the Colo- 
rado Springs City Y. M. C. A. jointly 
invite all the men of Colorado Col- 
lege and Cutler Academy to a "Stag 
Limberup" at the City Association 
Building, tonight, from 7:30 to 10:30 
p. m. 

The program includes: 

1. Piano Solo. 

2. Boxing Match. 

3. Apollonian Quartet. 

4. Tumbling and Parallel-Bar Ex- 
hibition. 

6. Water Sports. 

7. Songs and Refreshments. 

FOURTH ANNUAL OPEN 
HOUSE. 



Cora and Louise Kampf, Miss Doro- 
thy McCreery, Miss Lila Haines, 
Miss Florence Pierson, Miss Hazlett 
Worthing, Miss Bessie Knight, Miss 
Marion Haines, Miss Margaret Mc- 
Kenzie and Miss Florence Oettiker. 



The Phi Gamma Delta fraternity of 
Colorado College gave their fourth 
annual open house Saturday from 4 
to 6 and 8 to 10 p. m., and it proved 
a most enjoyable occasion. The local 
chapter issued about a thousand in- 
vitations to the undergraduates, fac- 
uley friends and its own alumni. 

Purple and white, the colors of 
the fraternity, with flowers in profus- 
ion and pennants, assisted in the 
scheme of beautifying the home of 
the members, while an orchestra, con- 
sisting of Miss Mabel Harlan, violin; 
.Miss Ruth Law, piano, and Mr. Wil- 
helm Sheffer, cornet, rendered selec- 
tions during the afternoon and even- 
ing. 

The guests were shown through 
the house and refreshments were 
served. Favors in the form of purple 
fillets inscribed with the letters of 
the fraternity, were presented to the 
ladies who served. The ladies who 
served during the afternoon were: 
Miss Sarah Dorsey, Mrs. Henry W. 
Hoagland, Mrs. James W. Park, Mrs. 
Wilbur F. Martin and Mrs. Fred Hill. 
They were assisted by Miss Alary 
Walsh. Miss Katheryn True, Miss 
Stanfield, Miss Lillian Bateman, Miss 
Lena McGee, Miss Mary Randolph. 
Miss Gwendolyn Hedgecock and Miss 
Lucy Ferrill. 

Those who served during the even- 
ing were: Mrs. Florian Cajori, Miss 
Marianna Brown, Miss Ruth Loomis, 
Mrs. Edward S. Parsons, Mrs. Julia 
Hale and Mrs. J. Roy Armstrong, as- 
sisted by Miss Dorliska Crandall, 
Miss Eleanor Thomas, Miss Octavia 
Hall, Miss Shirley McKinnie, the 
Misses Lillian and Lorraine Williams, 
Miss Margaret Watson, the Misses 



Sophomore Barbecue 

Continued from Page 1 

we all have to be the goat sometime? 
Buy your ticket at the earliest pos- 
sible moment and be glad that it 
costs you only fifty instead of seven- 
ty-five cents as it would have, had 
you been a freshman two or three 
years ago instead of now. 

The big feature of the barbecue this 
year will be the revival of the bon- 
fire. It will not be the sky-scraping 
bonfire of the years before the cus- 
tom was abolished, but it will be a 
fire large enough to furnish a great 
deal of light and heat. In fact, there 
are to be eight bonfires, with four 
burning at a time, and they are to be 
kept going through the entire even- 
ing. 

Special attention is to be paid to 
the musical side of the program this 
year. An original song is being re- 
hearsed. The words and the music 
were written by certain members of 
the class (they won't tell who they 
are) for this very occasion, and the 
sophomores are expecting it to make 
the hit of the evening. Vocal music 
is to be furnished by a double quar 
tet of sophomore voices, and if the 
single quartet of last year is any cri- 
terion, this one ought to be twice as 
good. Special selections and accom- 
paniments are to be furnished by an 
orchestra of eight pieces. The or- 
orchestra has been having scrimmage 
practice regularly for a week, and 
should be in tip-top condition when 
the time comes for it to play. 

The management is going to spring" 
something new along the line of dec- 
orations. The nature of these deco- 
rations is being kept a deep, dark 
secret, and The Tiger reporter wasn't 
able to get the slightest clue as to 
what they were likely to be. The 
bonfires and the incandescent electric 
lights which are to be strung all 
about the field will furnish the light 
for the festivities. Souvenirs in the 
shape of little tin flasks bearing the 
class numeral are being prepared and 
they will be disposed of at a small 
cost to pay for the expense of mak- 
ing them. The blanket-tossing feat- 
ure is to be in charge of the juniors, 
and it is said that they have an un- 
usually large and inviting number of 



THE TIGER 



ascensions on their schedule. 

And last but not least, the "eats" 
are receiving no little attention from 
the committee. On account of the 
fact that the expense of the festival 
must be kept pretty low, the com- 
mittee has decided to follow the usual 
barbecue menu pretty closely and 
serve the usual "wienie" sandwiches 
and fixin's, and they are going to see 
to it that there is plenty for everyone 
present to eat all he wants. 

Following are the chairmen of the 
various committees who have charge 
of different departments: Program, 
E. B. Jackson; grub. Jack Cary; en- 
tertainment, G. S. Cowderry; souve- 
nirs, Rowe Rudolph; music, R. Jack- 
son; and orchestra, Virginia Gasson. 



Y. W. C. A. CONFERENCE. 

The Y. W. C. A. Conference of the 
West Central territory was held at 
Boulder October 20-22. with about 
one hundred and fifty delegates in at- 
tendance from the different colleges 
in Colorado and Wyoming, including 
the University of Wyoming, Colo- 
rado State Teachers' College, Colo- 
rado Agricultural College, Westmin- 
ster College, University of Colorado, 
and Colorado College. Every dele- 
gate was cordially welcomed at the 
station and warmly entertained, 
either in the sorority houses or pri- 
vate houses of Boulder. 

Among the speakers of the Confer- 
ence were Dr. Bailey of Denver; Miss 
Cross of India; Miss Kinney, Mr. 
Rail of Denver, Mrs. Kingsley and 
Mrs. Slocum. Different phases of the 
Association work were discussed and 
many useful suggestions given, but 
more important than all else was the 
inspiration and help each delegate re- 
ceived from the talks on the personal 
life of our Association members. 

After the morning session Saturday 
autos were waiting to take the guests 
for a ride over Boulder, thence to 
the Hotel Boulderado. There over 
two hundred enjoyed a delightful 
luncheon. The best fellowship pre- 
vailed, the different delegates singing 
their own college songs between the 
courses and afterwards listening to 
very interesting toasts relating to the 
Summer Conference at Cascade. Lil- 
lian Picken acted as toastmistress 
Saturday afternoon a reception was 
tendered to the delegates at the Wom- 
an's League Building. In spite of 
the cordial time given the delegates, 
those from Colorado College came 
back most enthusiastic for their own 



DENVER ALUMNI MEET. 

The Denver branch of the Colorado 
College Alumni Asociation held its 
last meeting on Friday evening at 
the home of the Misses Wilcox. 
About thirty were present and a fine 
time reported. They plan to have 
their annual banquet on the evening 
preceding Thanksgiving Day. All C. 
C. people in Denver are cordially in- 
vited to be present. 

The Association elected the follow- 
ing officers: 

President — Silmon L. Smith. 
Vice-President — Miss Irene Fowler. 
Secretary — Miss Mary Wheeler. 
Treasurer — Todd Maro Pettigrew. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE TO 
ALUMNI. 

The sixth annual banquet of the 
Alumni Association of Colorado Col- 
lege in Denver will be held in that 
city at the Shirley hotel on Wednes- 
day, November 29, at 6 p. m., prompt- 
ly. This is the night before the big 
Thanksgiving Day football game and 
All active College students are cor- 
dially invited to attend. Make ar- 
rangements to be in Denver for this 
banquet. 

MONTGOMERY R. SMITH, 
Chairman Banquet Committee. 



Miss Addie Henderson ex-'i4 is now 
attending school at Northwestern 
University. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 



The wedding of Mr. George Alle 
brand ex-'o9, now employed in Cripple 
Creek, to Miss Ruth Brigham of 1220 
N. Nevada., has been announced for 
October 31st. 



Miss Carrie Davis '09 is visiting 
friends upon the Pacific Coast, among 
whom are Mrs. H. D. Roberts '08, of 
Salem, Oregon, Mrs. "Deac" West ex-11 
of Portland, Ore., and Miss Mary 
McCreery '08 of Berkeley, Calif. 



Miss Elsie Green '11 and Miss Mar- 
tha Phillips ex-'i3 came down from 
Denver to attend the Minerva dance 
and remained over for the Phi Gamma 
Delta reception. 

school. 

Our delegation consisted of Kath- 
erine Constant, Lillian Picken, Leti- 
tia Lamb, Lucile Wakefield, Mabel 
Wilson, Flora Crowley, Marion 
Fezer, Myrth King, Carrie Burger, 
Anne Baker, Frances Adams and 
Elizabeth Sutton. 



Miss Emily Palmer '06 has pub- 
lished a pamphlet relating to the 
teaching of English. 



Messrs. H. W. Coil and Charles 
Friend are freshmen at the D. U. Law 
School. 



Miss May Wallace '11 entered upon 
her duties as an English teacher in 
the Girls' School at Assnit, Egypt on 
October 1st. She is enjoying her 
work immensely. 



Mr. T. D. Riggs '08 has a position 
in Cripple Creek in the law offices of 
Hildreth Frost. 

Mr. Charles Norton Cox '06 of 
Durango, has a baby boy three months 
old. Mr. Cox is employed' by the 
American Smelting and Refining Co. 

Mr. Chas. M. Rose '09 was elected 
president of the Denver University 
Law student body. 

Mr. Charles Hall '06 is a professor 
in the West Denver High School. 



Mr. Chester Angell is expecting his 
mother to visit him this week. 



Y. W. C. A. 



Miss Elizabeth Snow of Chicago, 
gave an unusually interesting talk 
before the Association Wednesday 
night. She had an individual humor 
and Tier bright, optimistic view of life 
was contagious. She maintained that 
we do nothing which we do not really 
want to do, and urged that if we ex- 
pect great things of ourselves we will 
be surprised to find what particularly 
pleasant people with whom we live. 



TENNIS TOURNAMENT. 



The entry card for the fall tennis 
tournament is posted on the bulletin 
board in Palmer Hall. The courts 
are being put in shape. By next week 
they will be in first class condition. 
At Boulder this fall they had fifty 
entries. We should do as well or 
better. If you know anything at all 
about tennis sign your name and get 
in the fun. Let's all get behind it 
and pull for the best fall tournament 
yet. 






THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 



The Week's Football 

All of the Colorado teams in the Con- 
ference were busy last Saturday with 
grams of more or less importance, but 
none of them were championship games. 
Colorado College lost to Wisconsin, and 
the School of Mines was defeated by 
Wyoming. Denver University beat 
Baker, the Aggies walloped the Ft. Rus- 
sell soldiers, and Boulder defeated their 
second team. 

The Game in Denver. 

The game was harder fought and 
more interesting than the game Denver 
played a week ago with Utah, but even 
then D. U. did not play up to the stand- 
ard which was expected of her. The 
final score was 5-0 in Denver's favor, 
it is a significant fact that D. U. stuck 
to straight-football during the greater 
part of the game, but that the single 
score was made by a forward pass. The 
Methodists still show lack of condition, 
and their team work is far from perfect. 
The team is made up of a number of 
very heavy men, every one of whom is 
an individual star. But in spite of this, 
the team is not what it should be, as a 
team. Baker used a simple little for- 
ward pass which kept D. U. guessing 
during the early part of the game. 
Schroeder was absent from the Denver 
team until the end of the third quarter. 
It was his pass to Brubaker that won the 
game. Denver's use of the famous 
"Wisconsin shift" as coached by Barry 
is said to be one of the greatest ground 
gainers the team has. 

The Miners at Laramie. 

The School of Mines was defeated by 
Wyoming for the first time in its history 
last Saturday, but even then the Miners' 
goal line was not crossed by their oppo- 
nents. The score of 5-0 was made by a 
drop kick of Burges in the last six min- 
utes of play and by a safety made in 
the last two minutes. Wyoming had the 
advantage throughout the game, but it 
was not until the last quarter that they 
were able to score. As usual, Burgess 
was the star for the Wyoming team. 
Arch Spring did the best work for the 
Mines. 

At Fort Collins. 

'I he Aggies had consolation in big 
1 nmches when they beat the soldiers' 
team from Ft. Russell, last Saturday. 
I his team is remembered here by its 
defeat of 55-0 two years ago. The Ag- 
gies ran up 74 points on them. The sol- 



diers had plenty of weight, but they did 
not know football, and were woefully 
slow. The game was one continual 
march up and down the field by the 
Aggies. Ft. Collins made their 74 points 
by scoring thirteen touchdowns and 
kicking nine of the goals after touch- 
downs. Paxton was the Aggies' fastest 
man, and therefore did most of their 
scoring. 

In Boulder. 
The Boulder bunch took a little more 
practice last Saturday, by playing their 
scrubs in a regular game. They were 
only able to make a score of 18-0 during 
the two fifteen-minute halves that they 
played. Both the regulars and the scrubs 
seemed to be able to carry the ball con- 
sistently, but neither of them was able 
to put up a strong defensive game. The 
'varsity used the forward pass and all 
kinds of clever plays with great success. 
McFaden and Rich were the greatest 
ground gainers. 



Save Your Money 

If you haven't begun already, begin 
now. Save your money ! What for ? 
Boulder, on November 4. Colorado Col- 
lege should be deserted on that day, and 
the entire student body should be in the 
stands at Boulder. Everybody, go. Yes, 
the girls, too. 

This is the first big game of the sea- 
son, and compares in importance only 
with the Thanksgiving Day game with 
Denver University. This is the first 
game which Colorado College plays with 
a Conference team in the championship 
struggle. Besides these points, this is 
the first time Colorado College has play- 
ed Boulder for two years. Two years 
ago, Colorado College was defeated by 
Boulder on Washburn field. This year 
C. C. expects to do the defeating in 
Boulder. Therefore, save your money, 
and be in on the big finish. 

No comparative dope is yet available 
of the Boulder team To date, they 
have played three games. These have 
been with their freshmen, with their 
alumni, and with their second team. In 
none of these games have they made ex- 
traordinary scores. Until they play Wy- 
oming next Staurday, nothing definite 
can be said about them. They have a 
large bunch of good material to pick 
from, but they are not getting the inval- 
uable experience which comes from hard 
games. They will probably defeat Wy- 



Wisconsin Praises Tigers 

The following letter was received 
by Dean Parsons yesterday from B. 
M. Rastall, an old C. C. man who is 
now an instructor in the University 
of Wisconsin. Mr. Rastall was greatly 
interested in the fortunes of the 
Tiger team at the Badger game. 

The letter is real cause for the Col- 
lege to congratulte itself on being 
able to send out a team which leaves 
behind it the impression of which 

Mr. Rastall writes: 

October 23, 191 1 
Mr. Edward S. Parsons, 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Dear Professor Parsons: 

The score does not give a proper 
basis for a judgment of the game 
here last Saturday. The Tigers were 
confronted by a team at least fifteen 
pounds to the man heavier, fully as 
fast, and better trained and condi- 
tioned — in fact much the best team 
Wisconsin has had in the field in re- 
cent years. I felt that I could see 
throughout the game that the men 
were affected serious^ by the change 
in altitude and the soft turf field. 
The luck of the game turned entirely 
against them. 

Against such overwhelming odds 
the men played superbly. At the end 
of the game they were playing 
stronger than at the start. Two of 
Wisconsin's plays, which have the 
most marvellous interference I have 
ever seen, were responsible for prac- 
tically all the long gains*, and in the 
other fields the College held its own. 
frequently outplaying the University. 

The men have left a most remark- 
able impression here. I have heard 
dozens speak of their exhibition of 
pluck and stamina as marvellous. 
The impression could not have been 
better had they actually won. 

Sincerely yours, 

B. M. RASTALL, 
*This was a quick shift and mass 
off tackle. If the left end could have 
solved it the score would have been 
about i2-o. College missed scoring 
twice by narrowest of margins. 

nniing next Saturday, but it is safe to 
say that Wyoming will give them a run 
for their money. 



THE TIGER 









Wisconsin; 26 Tigers 

Continued from page 1 

Tiger line. And it was the sheer 
weight of the opponents that told. 
There were no holes for the runners 
to plunge through. It was the superb 
strength of the smashing heavy inter- 
ference that made is possible for 
Wisconsin to advance the ball. 

In the open field was where the 
Tigers displayed their greatest weak- 
ness. The team has been weak in 
the tackling department all through 
the year, and the smashing running 
of the heavy Badger backs showed up 
this weak point all the stronger. The 
excellent interference of the Badgers 
on tackle plays and end runs was 
responsible for the greater part of 
the Wisconsin gains. 

But the Badgers did not have 
everything their own way. The 
Tigers were in the game every min- 
ute from the time the first whistle 
blew until the game was over; and 
after the Wisconsin team had won 
the game, they had to admit that the 
Tigers had put up a far better game 
than was expected before the game 
began. Time and again the lighter 
team held the heavier for downs 
and time and again the lighter team 
made their downs against the heavier. 
Four times during the game the 
Tigers broke up the Badger punts 
while not a Tiger punt was touched. 

It was only after twelve minutes 
of the fastest and hardest kind of 
playing that the Badgers were able 
to make the first score of the game. 
The second touchdown was made 
after ten minutes play in the second 
quarter. The first half ended with 
the ball on the Tiger 40-yard line. 
At the beginning of the second half 
the Tigers blocked three punts and 
an attempt at a drop-kick in rapid 
succession before Moll finally kicked 
a drop kick from the 35-yard line. 
The third touchdown came near the 
close of the third quarter and the 
fourth and last touchdown was made 
two minutes before the end of the 
game in the last quarter. 

Only twice did the Tigers endanger 
the goal of the Badgers. In the sec- 
ond quarter Vandemoer got away 
with a forward pass and sprinted to 
the Wisconsin 2-yard line before he 
was downed by Moll, the Badger 
quarterback. The Tigers lost the one 
great opportunity to score when the 
Badgers held for three downs within 
tl eir five yard line. In the third 
quarter Vandemoer attempted a drop 



kick from the thirty-five yard line, 
but the ball went wide and again the 
Tigers failed to score. 

For Wisconsin, Moll, Pollock and 
YanRiper were the stars, while for 
the Tigers, Vandemoer, Black, Hed- 
blom and Bowers played the best 
Vandemoer played his usually strong 
game both on the offense and de- 
fense. In the punting department he 
easily bested Moll, who is considered 
one of the best punters in the middle 
west. Black, Hedblom and Bowers 
were especially noted for their bril- 
liant work on defense, each of them 
making a number of sure and vicious 
tackles at critical moments of the 
game. 

Following is the line-up of the two 
teams : 
Badgers. Tigers. 

Hoefifel, le Thompson, Deesz, le 

Roberts, It Bowers, It 

Mackmiller, lg Koch, lg 

Pierce, c Witherow, c 

Neprud, rg Hedblom, rg 

Capt. Buser, rt Floyd, rt 

Lange, re Capt. Sinton, re 

Moll. Tourmey, qb. 

Putnam, Vandemoer, ql> 

Van Riper, Hayes, lhb Heald, Ihb 

Pollock, rhb . . Vandemoer. Deesz, rhb 
Tanberg, fb Black, fb 

Referee, Hemeage of Dartmouth. 

Umpire. Fleager of Northwestern. 

Field Judge, McCormick of Prince- 
ton. 

Head Linesman, White of Illinois. 



Boulder Freshmen 

1 2; Terrors O 



Local people had a chance to see the 
material which the University of Colo- 
rado will have to pick their team from 
next fall, when the Lhniversity freshmen 
ham played the Colorado Springs High 
School on Washburn field last Saturday. 
The Lhriversity has a bunch of large 
freshmen who are supposed to be the 
stars of the state's high school teams in 
1910. They were pitifully slow, showed 
poor team work and seemed to know 
very little about the modern style of 
football. They should have defeated the 
light Terror team much worse than they 
did. Carne, formerly with the high 
school, did the best work for the fresh- 
men. The Terrors, made up of small, 
inexperienced men, played a nervy and 
tricky game throughout. The material 
in the Boulder freshmen will probably 
help to make a strong University team 
next year when they get the training the 
regulars set now. 



Tigers Had Fine Trip 

Continued from page 1 

and were drawn by the university 
freshmen through the streets of Mad- 
ison to the hotel. The procession 
was headed by the university band, 
and was conducted by the university 
yell-leader standing upon the rear 
seat of an automobile at the head of 
the column. Cheer for Wisconsin 
mingled with cheer for Colorado, and 
the Colorado cheer seemed the louder 
of the two. At the hotel the yelling 
students called for and received 
speeches from Coach Rothgeb, Cap- 
tain Sinton and Vandemoer, as well 
as from Coach Richards and Captain 
Buser. 

Loyal Supporters Call. 

Soon after the arrival at the hotel 
former students of the College as 
well as friends of the members of the 
Tiger team began to call at the hotel 
to look the team over. Newspaper 
men interviewed and special editions 
told of the arrival of the Colorado 
team. Everybody — stranger or friend 
— was cordial and enthusiastic. Such 
a reception was never accorded a 
team in the middle west before. 
Looking Over the Town. 

Friday fternoon the Tigers were 
given an opportunity to inspect the 
grounds, which were all in readiness 
for the morrow's battle. The sod 
field, the fenced areas, the high grand- 
stands and the splendidly built and 
furnished dressing rooms for the ac- 
commodation of hundreds of athletes 
afforded a marked contrast with the 
facilities at home. 

Later in the afternoon the team 
dressed and went out to one of the 
local baseball parks for the last prac- 
tice before the game. 

Saturday morning an automobile 
drove the team through the city and 
out to the university campus. The 
manager of the Badgers acted as con- 
ductor of the trip and gave informa- 
tion about the various buildings and 
parts of the university that could not 
but interest every one. 

At the Game. 

At the game in the afternoon the 
team played before a crowd of about 
eight thousand persons, about five 
thousand of whom were students. 
One large section of the high, open 
grand-stands was reserved as the 
rooters' section, and into these scats 
were packed the 2,500 yelling rooters. 
On one side of the (Vd sat seven 
Tiger substitutes \ ai.ir.g for the call 

Cor ti 1 uci f < ni p^K* . 






THE TIGER 



The Weekly Newspaper of Colorado College 

MARRY L. BLACK Editor-in-Chief 

RICHARD L. HUOHES Business Mrfr. 

Leon C. Havens Assistant Editor 

A. H. ROWBOTHAM Assistant Editor 

J. J. Sinton Athletic Editor 

D. H. MAHAN Engineering Editor 

G. S. Cowdery Forestry Editor 

Miss Glenn Stiles Alumni Editor 

MISS Mary Randolph Exchange Editor 

Miss Helen Rand Local Editor 

A. W. Donovan Local Editor 

H. A. Parkison Assistant Manager 

A. L. Golden Assistant Manager 

W. L. Myers Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

F. P. Storke, H A. Bennett, Miss Lucy Feirill 

Miss Elizabeth Gerould, Miss Leona Stukey, 

Miss Myrth King, Miss Violet Hopper, Miss 

Frances Adams, R- G. Appel 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles anditemsto TheTiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo 

Phones: Editor, Main 2550. Manager, Main 2073 

Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5 c 



Why Don't They Ask for a Game? 

In the "Silver and Gold" for Octo- 
ber 18 appers an editorial urging that 
the University of Colorado have a 
better and larger football schedule. 
The editorial directs attention to the 
small number of games on Boulder's 
schedule and shows that only one or 
two of these will be hard games. It 
advocates that the university make 
arrangements for games with teams 
in the Missouri Valley which will be 
"in their class." 

It is certainly true that Boulder 
needs a better schedule. Thus far 
this year they have not played a 
game with any team outside their 
own institution. The games with 
Colorado College and the University 
of Utah are likely to be the only hard 
games they will have during the pres- 
ent season. But the matter of going 
into the Missouri Valley to find 
teams that are "in their class" we are 
reminded of a little history, and we 
feel moved to offer a suggestion. 

There was a time — still in the menT- 
ory of some of us — when the Uni- 
versity of Colorado really had a 
pretty good football team. They de- 
feated all the institutions in the state, 
and defeated them badly. Thereupon 
the university decided that "since 
they were a state university," they 
should play against teams of state 



universities, and play games that 
were "worth while." The following 
year they passed up the teams of the 
state of Colorado, and were given a 
try-out in the Missouri Valley. It 
would be almost too kind to tell just 
how they fared at the hands of the 
Missouri Valley teams, but it is 
sufficient to say that the next year 
they were quite glad to stay in Colo- 
rado and play with their near neigh- 
bors. And the humor of it is that the 
year they returned they were soundly 
defeated by both the School of Mines 
and Colorado College. 

The suggestion we would offer is 
this: Let the University of Colorado 
1 lay Denver University — FIRST; 
then, if they still wish, let them go 
eastward. We are quite sure that 
they would find Denver University 
worthy of their mettle. We feel sat- 
isfied that the game would prove in- 
teresting, and furnish as much outlet 
for their energy as all three of the 
games they have played so far this 
year. There can be no objection to 
trying out with teams from Kansas 
and Nebraska. It does them good. 
It tends to set up a better standard 
in the Rocky Mountain region. But 
Boulder should remember that there 
are a few teams "in their class" in 
Colorado. 

Let them ask for a game with Den- 
ver. That is where the trouble has 
been. Boulder is willing to play and 
Denver is willing to play. But Boul- 
der is not willing to ask for a gme, 
and it is not up to Denver to ask. 
Let Boulder ASK for a game. That 
is, REALLY ASK. 



COLLEGE SONG COMPETITION. 

On this page of The Tiger will be 
found the words for a new College 
song, which were written by Miss 
Lois Virginia Stoddard '02. The com- 
mittee in charge of the choice of a 
new College song are extremely 
anxious to have the words set to 
music as soon as possible, and with 
this end in view they have opened a 
competition calling either for music 
to the verses that have been sub- 
mitted or for new verses already set 
to music. 

The following are the regulations 
for the music competition for a Colo- 
rado College song: 

i. A prize of fifteen dollars will be 
given for acceptible music written for 
the submitted verses by a Colorado 
College student or former student in 
good standing. 



2. The use of the submitted verses 
is not obligatory; an entirely new 
composition, both words and music, 
may be submitted. 

3. Joint Authorship is permissible. 

4. All compositions may be re- 
jected and a new contest advertised. 
In this case a special prize of five 
dollars will be given for the best 
composition. 

5. The committee has the right to 
accept a composition and have it 
edited and revised, giving the credit 
to the one performing the work. 

6. Any composition accepted be- 
comes the property of the College. 

7. Compositons are to be marked 
with an assumed name and be ac- 
companied by a sealed envelope sim- 
ilarly marked containing the name 
and address of the contestant. 

8. All compositions are to be writ- 
ten in ink. 

9. All compositions are to be ac- 
companied by return postage. 

10. The contest closes at noon on 
January 12, 1912. 

11. All compositions are to be sent 
to Mrs. Bushee, Palmer Hall, Colo- 
rado College. 

The committee on decision is: F. 
Ayres Johnson, chairman; George E. 
Barton, H. H. Brown, W. B. Clark, 
Homer E. Woodbridge. 



INSIGNIA DAY POSTPONED. 



At a meeting of the senior class 
held in Palmer Tuesday noon it was 
decided to postpone the date of In- 
signia day to Friday, October 27. 
The cause of the postponement was 
the desire of the class to have the 
date of the Insignia party nearer to 
Insignia day. The date set on the 
social schedule of the Insignia party 
is Saturday, October 28, which makes 
it come on the day after Insignia day. 
The caps and gowns which were or- 
dered some time ago, arrived the first 
of the week and all is in readiness 
for the senior class to don the robes 
of their rank. It is not known, as 
usual, what sort of a stunt the juniors 
are planning to pull off, but judging 
from the numerous mysterious class 
meetings that they have been holding 
lately, it is probable that they are 
planning something 'pretty classy. 

Arrangements for the Insignia day 
party were made at a meeting of the 
senior class in Palmer yesterday. 



Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Seymour of Den- 
ver were the guests of Miss Nash at 
supper, Wednesday. 



THE TIGER 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 



The 192nd program was given on 
Tuesday afternoon. Wednesday Miss 
Ethel May Smith gave a pianoforte 
recital with the assistance of Mr. 
Vernor Clark, tenor. Her program 
consisted of compositions by Saint- 
Saens, MacDowell, Schuett and 
Moszkowski. 

Dean Hale is now giving, on Tues- 
day afternoons, after the rehearsal, a 
series of talks on the interpretation 
ox music, which are illustrated on the 
piano, and will be interesting to all 
music lovers. The students are cor- 
dially invited. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
PROCTORS. 



The day of the "squelcher" is over. 
A girl who obtains the position of 
maintaining quiet in the hall now 
bears the name of proctor. And with 
the more dignified name there is more 
responsibility. For by a vote of the 
Student Government Association, the 
Executive Board is authorized to de- 
cide on the fitness of the proctors 
who have been elected and at any 
time to demand resignations if their 
services have not been satisfactory. 
This supervision will give more dig- 
nity to the office, which is one of the 
most essential features of Student 
Government. 



FRESHMEN VICTORS 

The Tiger kittens aded another victory 
to their list last Saturday in Pueblo, by 
defeating Centennial High School, 6-0. 
The one touchdown was made in the sec- 
ond quarter, by a cleverly executed for- 
ward pass from Kampf to James, on 
right end. James ran forty yards to the 
goal. Kampf kicked the goal. The 
freshmen did not play up to the standard 
they are capable of, but at the critical 
moments they were always to be counted 
on. In the first quarter, Centennial had 
the ball on the five yard line with three 
downs to put it over, but the freshies 
held firm. The freshmen showed their 
knowledge of the game by the variety of 
forward passes and trick formations 
which they used. Emery made a spec- 
tacular run of forty-five yards to the 
goal line in the first quarter, which was 
not allowed because the freshmen were 
off-side. 

The freshman backfield played their 
usual slashing game. Cover and John- 
son did exceptional work in the line. 
Creel, of Centennial, made the greatest 
■ains for Pueblo. 



COLLEGE VESPERS. 

Dr. Harris F. Kail, President of the 
Iliff School of Theology, Denver, 
preached an eloquent sermon at last 
Sunday's Vesper Service on the sub- 
ject, "The Kingly Life." He took his 
text from Rev. I. 6. His address, in 
part, is given below: 

By the Kingly Life today, we mean 
the Christlike life. We have been 
changing our conception of King- 
ship. At one time Kingship was a 
chance of descent; at another time 
the Kingly man was the man drf 
power. We have also thought of 
him as the man of wealth. These 
ideals today are waning, these men 
are no longer Kings. The sneering 
question of Plato, "Art thou the 
King?" has been answered through 
the ages by multitudes. "There has 
been one great King and that King 
is Christ." We have a new concep- 
tion of the Kingship today. Men and 
women are looking through thrones 
into the heart of the man to ask the 
question, "Are you fit to rule?" More 
than anything else today, the church 
needs to have a new vision of the 
Kingship of Christ, of the man who 
walked his lonely way of service in a 
life so pure and spotless that wher- 
ever he went men yielded their lives 
to Him until at the last He overcame 
tyrany, prejudice and power. He was 
never so Kingly, as when on Calvary 
lie cried: "Father, forgive them for 
they know not what they do." 

There is no Kingship but the King- 
ship of character. The higher the 
place in our world today, the fiercer 
the light that beats down upon it. 
The King, needs power; there is no 
King without it. The King must be 
the man that has power over his own 
life and soul. To rule the passions, 
to master the prejudices is the great 
task of the King. Whatever power 
or skill may be, unless you have pow- 
er to rule you have failed where fail- 
ure makes you a slave and not a 
King. Sometimes, when we wonder 
at the temptations that come to us 
we shall find that God is training us 
for Kingship on earth and the very 
doubting and striving are but a part 
of the training of men. 

Whatever ambitions you shall 
achieve there will be no real success 
unless you take upon yourself the 
responsibilities of Kingship. It is an 
easy thing to try and shift the re- 
sponsibility but you must not forget 

Continued on Page 8 



Tigers Had Fine Trip 

Continued from Page 5 



to go into the game and on the other 
sat over fifty Badger substitutes wait- 
ing for the same call. A picket fence 
kept out all but those who had imme- 
diate business on the field. It was a 
noticable fact that no cheering was 
done by the university rooters except 
at times when the game was sus- 
pended. 

After the Game. 

After the game several members of 
the team were invited out to various 
sorts of entertainments, but they had 
as a team accepted the invitation of 
the manager of the Wisconsin team 
to attend a theater party at the pre- 
sentation of "The Girl I Love." Bag- 
gage had been sent to the special car 
and after the play the team boarded 
the car for the home trip. There was 
a three-hour lay-over at Chicago for 
breakfast, and then came the long 
ride back home and to the moun- 
tains. The reception upon the arrival 
home was something of a surprise, 
and it indeed seemed good to be 
back. 

A Little Appreciation. 

There is not a man on the squad 
but what wishes to speak a word of 
appreciation to the representatives of 
the three railroads over which they 
traveled on the trip. One of them is 
our own "Pat" of the D. & R. G., 
and one of the most enthusiastic root- 
ers C. C. ever had. Another was Mr. 
Hill of the U. r., to whom the team 
is obliged for much of the attention 
received on the trip. 



GERMAN PLAY UNDER WAY. 



The second annual play to be given 
by Der Deutsche Verein on Novem- 
ber 25th, has been selected, and the 
cast picked out. The play is Bene- 
dix's "Die Hochzeitsreise," a two act 
comedy. The training of the cast is 
under the direction of Prof. Howe 
and Miss Sahm. This year the plan 
to be followed will be different from 
last year. Only one comedy will be 
presented during the evening, and 
the rest of the time will be taken up 
by a trained chorus of mixed voices, 
which will render some of the best 
and most popular German songs. 

The cast of "Die Hochzeitsreise." 
will read the play before the meinbei s 
of the Club on Wednesday evenin r, 
November I, in Tickror study as the 
regular program for that :neeting. 



- 






THE TIGER 




We have just had a sample of winter, and the 
cold days are yet to come. Make your over- 
coat selection now and enjoy its comforts on 
these chilly evenings and wintery days that 
are coming .All other men's requsites for the 
cold weather. 



GANO-DOmS* 



MINERVA DANCE. 



Minerva Society gave their seven- 
teenth annual dance for the new girls 
Friday evening. The McGregor gym- 
nasium was pleasingly decorated for 
the occasion in blue and white. Blue 
butterflies hung from the ceiling and 
ornamented the posts. Miss Loomis 
and Louise Kampf, the president of 
Minerva, led the Grand March, after 
which the evening was spent in danc- 
ing. 



GIRLS' GYMNASIUM CLASSES. 

The classes of the girls' gymnastic 
work are well started and are keep- 
ing pace with the other work of the 
College — they are "the best ever.'' 

The girls show an unprecedented 
interest in the work and willingness 
to attend the classes. The physical 
culture drills consist largely in 
rythmic movements. Mrs. Varker is 
a competent and pleasant instructor 
and makes the work interesting. 



ENGINEERS' PROGRAM. 

Engineers' Club program for Oc- 
tober 27: 

Music — Seeley, Wilkinson. 
Austin Dam Disaster — Fischer. 
Good Roads nd Their Making — Gen- 
eral Discussion. 
Critic's Report. 
Meeting at 7:45 sharp. 



College Vespers 

Continued from Page 7 

that the final question of life that we 
are to decide is whether right shall 
rule or wrong and that question none 
of us may refuse. 

When we look back there seems to 
us a strange incongruity between the 
idea of Kingship, and the lives of the 



earthly Christians, yet of those men 
the words were written, "He made 
us Kings." Out of that first century 
what streams of power have come 
down to us, not from men of wisdom 
and power in Greece and Rome but 
from those who had caught the ideals 
of their Master. 

The power that is needed to link 
itself to God's is the power needed 
today, that He may come at our in- 
vitation and occupy our hearts. 
Thrones are waiting for us. We may 
gain access to same only by the 
Key of Character. Let me commend 
to you the fine motto of an Eastern 
institution, "Non ministrari sed min- 
istrare.'' That is the final secret of 
power. Names of Kings we care less 
for. The Kings of today are the 
Father Damiens and Dr. Grenfells, 
not rulers but humble servants of 
Christ. 



FRATERNITY DANCES. 

The Kappa Sigma and the Delta 
Phi Theta fraternities will hold their 
first dances of the year next Friday 
night. The Kappa Sigma party will 
be at the San Luis school and the 
Delta Phi Theta at the Plaza hotel. 
Special music and decorations have 
been arranged for at both affairs. 

FORESTRY CLUB ARRANGES 
PROGRAM FOR THE YEAR. 



At a recent meeting of the For- 
estry Club the following program for 
the year's work was submitted and 
accepted: 

Oceober 26. 
Methods of Estimating and Map- 
ping Forest Lands .A. W. Donovan 
Methods of Reconaissance of Sur- 
vey by the Forest Service. 
Methods of Disposal of Dead and 



Mature Timber on the National 

Forests F. L. Thompson 

Methods of Growth Study on the 
National Forests 

R. G. Colwell and Joseph Floyd 
November 9. 
Does the present Legislation relat- 
ing to the Public Lands cause 
hardship to bona-fide claimants? 
Is there too much red tape? 

E. W. Lindstrom 
November 23. 

Insects Joseph Floyd 

State Control vs. National Control 

of the Forests F. S. Baker 

References: 

American Forestry Vol. XVII No. 

7, p. 426. 

American Forestry Vol. XVII, No. 

8. p. 482. 

American Forestry Vol. XVII, No. 
9- P- S-'S- 
The Forest Reserves of the West 

A. E. Tear 
References: 

Forest and Water by A. Kinney, 
Chap. XII. 

December 14. 
Forestry in Europe 

C. R. Black. A. W. Donovan, H. 
C. St.inson, P. H. Snider. 
References: 

Germany — A Recent Publication 

of the Bureau of Forestry. 
France — American Forestry Vol. 

XVII, No. 0, p. 531. 
Switzerland — 
Are the Forest Service Methods as 
Efficient as Possible? Could the 
Rangers Accomplish More in the 
Time at Their Disposal? Are 
They Hampered by Red Tape? 

P. T. Coolidge 

Ranger Service Methods in the 

States for Fire Protection. The 

per-diem System in Vogue and 

Just Introduced in the National 

Forests F. L. Thompson 



THE TIGER 



Hunt Up 

Bissell's Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

Pike's Peak Book & 
Stationery Co. g£23 £ 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



CALL 2000 

When You Want Anything QUICK! 
QUICK DELIVERY 

MAI . 2000 



COTRELL & LEONARD 

Albany, N. Y. 
Makers of 

CAPS & GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the 

Atlantic to the Pacific 

Class Contcacts a Specialty 

Deichmann & Douglas Floral 
Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER, Mar. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 

Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Gazette Building 



December 21. 
The Legal Aspect for Grazing on 

the Public Lands. 
References : 

American Forestry Vol. XVII, No. 
6, p. 353 and 356. 
Grazing on the Public Lands 

II. P. Cooke 
References : 

Forest Service Bull. 62. 

Year Book Dept. of Agri. 1901, Art. 

by Rotte. 
Addresses by Killian, Oct. 3, 1909. 
Reference Index No. 20. 
The Forest as a Grazing Reserve 

F. L. Thompson 
References : 

Forest and Water by A. Kinney, 
Chaps. XIII and XL 
January 1 1. 
Conservation in Spanish-American 

Countries R. C. Colwell- 

References : 
American Forestry Vol. XVII, No. 

8. p. 474- 
American Forestry Vol. XVII, No. 

No. 9, p. Si/- . 
American Conservation, May, 191 1, 
p. 1 19 and 129. 
What We Have Done with Our 

Natural Resources R. L. Hall 

References : 

U. S. Dept. of Agri. Farmers' Bull. 
No. 327. 
Our Natural Resources and Their 

Conservation W. F. Harder 

February 1. 
Conservative Lumbering. F. S. Baker 
References: 

J. B. White address on Forest Con- 
servation. 
Art. by Zon, Year Book Dept. of 
Agri. 1907. 

Moffat Road Trip F. S. Baker 

February 15. 
Methods of Preserving Timber 

Messrs. F. L. Thompson, Roy 
Muncaster, N. E. Parrott. 
References : 

Forest Service Bull. 82. 

6. P- 3-29- 

American Forestry Vol. XVII, No. 

7. P- 383- 

American Forestry Vol. XVII, No. 

8. p. 468. 

American Forestry Vol. XVII, No. 
10, p. 373- 




NEW 

Fall Styles 

JUST IN 

High Arch, High Toes, Short 
Vamps, Button or Lace, Velvets, 
Suedes, Patents, Gunmetels, 
Tan Russia's 

$2.50, $3.00, $3.50 
and $4.00 




_^-"'107~S o uth Tejon Stwitt 



Board $4.50 Per Week 

One front room for two. Board 

and room $25 per month for each 

222 E. DALE 



THE 

Crissey & Fowler 
Lumber Co. 






Phont 101 



117-123 W. Vt-rmiio Ave. 



Telephone 599 



Store 1 04 N. Tejon Street 



The Pike's Peak Floral Co. 



CUT FLOWERS 



DECORATIONS AND DESIGNS 



10 THE TIGER 

NEWER FLANNEL SHIRTS 

You'll like our showing of flannel shirts — it's the classiest lot we've ever had. Most of 
them are made military style— soft, button through collar. 

This style collar is a great improvement over the old lay down, and its popularity is al- 
ready assured. 

New shades in tans and browns, also grays and blues. 

Prices are from $1.50 to $3.SO 




To College 
Students 
Old and New 

We Extend the Most CorJal Good 
Wishes. We've made a Specialty of 
taking care of the wants of the up-to- 
date young men and women. You'll 
find us the kind of jewelry store you'll 
like. 

The Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak 



The Davis Barber Shop 

Individual Sterilizing Cabinets 
Ray Davis, Manager 



an 



Josl yn Printer y 

112 E. Cucharras St. 
Phone Main 1154 

"Printers & 
Publishers 



ANY KIND OF PRINTING 
WE PRINT THE TIGER 



American Conservation July. 191 1, 

P. 205. 
Primer of Forestry by Pinchot, 
Part 1. p. 77 and 88. 
March 14. 
The Forest Trees of the Philippine 

Islands A. W. Donovan 

References : 

Philippine Journal of Science, Vol. 

II. No. 5. 
! hilippine Journal of Science, Vol. 

IV, No. 4. 
Philippine Journal of Science, Vol. 

IV, No. 6, p. 699. 
Annual Report Director of Fores- 
try of the Philippines. 

Philippine 1 lats G. W. Dennis 

References : 

Philippine Journal of Science, Vol. 
VI, No. 2, p. 93. 
Fish and Game on the Forest Re- 
serves .P. E. June and L. P. Morse 
References : 

Forests and Water by A. Kinney, 
Chap. XXIII. 

.March 28. 
Relation fo Forests to Stream 

Flow L. C. Sloey 

References : 

Report from Vear P>ook by J. W. 

Tou may, 1903. 
American Forestry, Apr. tgio. 
American Forestry Vol. XVII, No. 

7. P- 403. 
American Forestry, Vol. XVII, No. 

Have Your Clothes Cleaned, Pressed ;.nd 
Kept in First-Class Repair by 

"Sam" the Gentlemen's Valet 

Also Makes a Specialty of Serving Parties 
SAM FLEMING 

114 E. Cucharras Phone 1()75 



3RE A D For mornm g delivery. Its 
bread hot from the oven, 
baked from the choicest flour, and that 
would command first premii.ni anywhere. 
That you get from us. Is always good. 

THE CHICAGO BAKERY 

Have the fellows meet you at 

Tucker's 
Restaurant 

10 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 



You can always save money if 
you will come to see our line in 
diamonds, watches, jewelry, 
guns, sporting goods, fishing 
tackel drawing sets, musical 
instruments, trunks, valises, or 
if you want to loan money, you 
can get it 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 

Money Loaned on Valuablts 



HAVE YOU A PANITORIUM COLLEGE TICKET ? 

See Rhone, College Agent, Hagerman Hall 
30 SUITS SPONGED AND PRESSED FOR $5.00 



THE TIGER 



The College Book and Supply Store 

In addition to furnishing the Text Books and Engineering 
Supplies for the College students, we carry a very large 
stock of Fountain Pens, Waterman's Ideal, Conklin Self- 
fillers and College. See Our PENNANTS ane POSTERS 

Whitney & Grimwood 



Get Your Picnic Supplies 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 



STUDENTS 



Remember when you 
want the Best Photos 
at moderate cost and 
courteous attention. 
Visit the old reliable. 




TTUgf 



Corner Cascade and Kiowa Street* 
Phone Main 679 



R. J. CORRIN 

Dry Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing 

and Remodeling for Ladies 

and Gentlemen 

Work by the Month 

Work Called for and Delivered 

PJi one 2963 M 326 N Tejon Stree 

Nothing Pleases Us More Than 
To Please College Students 

The Fred S. Tucker 

Furniture Co. 



6, p. 371. 
Forest and Water by A. Kinney, 
Chaps. XIII and XXIV. 
Water Power and Its Conservation 
on the National Forests 

W. M. Varker 
References : 

American Conservation, July, igi i, 

p. 213 and 222. 
Relation of Forests to Erosion 

R. E. Miller 
References: 

American Conservation, May, 191 1, 
P. 150. 

April ii. 
Factors Contributing to the Dis- 
eases of Trees H. C. Stinson 

References : 

Diseases of Deciduous Trees by H. 

voon Schrenk, U. S. Dept. Agri. 

Bureau of Plant Industry, Bull. 

149. 

Minnesota Plant Diseases Chap. 

VII by Freeman. 
H. M. Ward, Diseases in Plants, 
Chap. XI. 
Tiie Structure and Function of a 
Woody Stem (Living Timber) 

C. M. Adams 
References : 

H. M. Ward, Timber and Some of 

its Diseases. 
G. Pinchot. Primer of Forestry, 
Part I, Chap. 1. 
The Blueing and Red Roi of the 

Western Yellow Pine..C. Stewart 
Kc k rences : 

11. von Schrenk, U. S. Dept. Agri. 
Bureau of Plant Industry Bull. 
No. 36. 
Some Diseases of Conifers 

H. R. Vandemoer 
References: 

Spaulding, U. S. Dept. Agri., Bu- 
reau of Plant Indus. Bull. 206 
and 214, Circ. No. 4. 
April 25. 
Enemies of the Forest . . S. W. Baker 
References : 

Pinchot, Primer of Forestry, Part 

I, Chap. IV. 
American Forestry, Vol. XVII, No. 



II 

MOTOR CYCLES 

Yale Emblem 

BICYCLES and Supplies 

Expert Repairing 

Colorado Springs Cycle 

Company 

DeWitt Doyle, Manager 
224 N. Tejon St. Phone Red 34 

Knight - Campbell's 

F0R PIAN0S 

and PLAYER PIANOS 

STEINWAY and 20 OTHER MAKES 

We Rent Pianos 

Largest Stock Victor Talking Machines 
and Edison Phonographs 

226 N. Tejon St., after Sept. 15, 122 N. Tejsn 



The Gowdy-Sirmons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS 

Copper Plate and Steel Engravers 
Telephone 87 21 N. Tejon Street 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Ren'ed and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remingio Visible be- 
fore Purchasing Typewriter. 

Zimmerman Supply 

^j,.,, „ „ .. . 22 E. Kiowa St. 

Company Phone Main 374 

Established 1890 



You can save from 25 
percent to 40 percent 
on our finest Hart, 
Schaf f ner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer & 
Clothcraf t Suits and 
Overcoats 









12 



THE TIGER 

WHITMAN'S CANDIES 



If you want something especially good for a "particular friend" or yourself ask for Whit- 
mans "Fussy" Chocolates, a fussy package for fastidious folks, or Whitmans Pink of Perfec- 
tion Chocolates. 

$1.00 Per Pound 

To Be Had Only At 

THE MURRAY DRUG COMPANY 

Opposite Campus 



The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

116 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

s 

Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Gives 
Special Attention to Accounts of Student 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, President Ira Harris, V -President 

M. C. Gile Lilla B. Ensign C. E. Lynde 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8 00 P. M. 

THE OUT WEST 

TENT AND AWNING CO. 

RECLINING CHAIRS 
POR HES ENCLOSED 

Tents Rented for a Day or for Longer 

Stamping, Designing, R rforating, Best Hand Painted 

China. Western Branch of Mexican Pigment Paints, 

Stenciling and Materials 

Art Needlework and Art Goods 

THE HUNT AND VAN NICE 

ART SPECIALTY SHOPS 

Retail and Wholesale 
8 Pike's Peak Aven e Phone Main 2055 



Headquarters for 

COLLEGE 

FOOT 

WEAR 

We Have a Complete 
Line of Foot Wear 
Especially Adapted 
for College People. 

JM Whitaker-Kester 

Shoe Co. 
1 North Tejon Street 




6. p. 335. 

How and Why the Leaves Fall 

W. D. W. Harrison 
References : 

Gray's Botany Text Book, Vol. II, 

p. 162. 
Annals of Botany, Vol. XXV, No. 

97. P. 5'- 
Sachs Physiology of Plants, p. ,}I9- 
May 9. 
What tin Forests Produce 

W r . M. Gilmore 
References : 

Forest Products of the U. S., 1909. 
The Ma le Sugar Industry 

N. R. Park 
References : 

Bureau of Forestry, Bull. 59. 
May 23. 
State Forestry Work in General 

P. H. Snider 
Besides these numbers, several out- 
side speakers are to be invited to ad- 
dress the Club, but no names have 
yet been decided upon. 







Klahr and Hall took a tramp over the 
high drive, Sundav. 

♦ ♦ 

Miss Bertha Price entertained all the 
C. C. girls in attendance at the Boulder 
Y. W. C. A. conference at a delightful 
tea. Saturday afternoon. 

♦ ♦ 

Lucile Wakefield. Carrie Burger, Flora 
Crowley, Marion Fezer, Mabel Wilson, 
and Myrth King were guests at dinner 
at the home of Letitia Lamb, in Denver, 
Monday. 

♦ ♦ 

Rev. A. N. Taft, rector of St. Steph- 
en's Episcopal Church of this city, will 
preach at the vesper service next Sun- 
day. 



THE POPULAR 

Creams and Ices Fresh Butter 

Made Right and Delivered Promptly 

A. L. MOWRY 

Phone 1184 
115 East Cache la Poudre Street 



STOP AT 

LIGHTNING SHOE SHOP 

to get your shoes repaired. Shine 
free with every pair of soles 

Sewed Soles 75c. 28 % N. Tejon St. 



William P. Bonbright & Co- 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



STUDENTS! 

The 
Pearl Laundry Co. 

respectfully solicits your pat- 
ronage. We guarantee satis- 
factory work and service and 
give you 20% discount. 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 



THE TIGER 



13 



Above the High Rents 
Below the High Prices 



Walk Up Stairs and 
Save a $ or 2 



M. Q. WEST 

Retail Sample Shoe Store 

$2.50 No More, No Less 



1 1 0- 1 1 2 E. Pike's Avenue, Up Stairs 
Rooms 16-17-18 



Engraving 

Function Invitations 
Programs, Place Cards 
Etc., — Our Specialty. 

OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



Fay Templeton is hack in College 
again. 

♦ ♦ 

TVIrs. Yerkes lias been visiting her 
daughter for a few days. 



FOR A SPREAD 

Serve A 

Hurgess Luncheon 

We have complete Delicates- 
sen, Bakery and Candy Depart- 
ments and can prepare a most 
tempting Spread" on short 
notice. 

BURGESS 

Phone Eight Three 
12-114 North Tejon Street 



If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

HA YNER 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 

2 S. Tvjon St. Colorado Springs 



Beatty '14 is enjoying a visit from his 
mother for a week or two. 

♦ ♦ 

Hedblom and Moberg stopped over for 
a day's visit at their home at Aurora, 
Neb., on the return trip from Wiscon- 
sin. 

♦ ♦ 

Herb. Vandemoer visited his brother 
Neil Vandemoer at Merino, Monday. 

♦ ♦ 

Jne Witlierow enjoyed a stopover visit 
at Council Bluffs with Miss Morehouse 
ex-'14. 

♦ ♦ 

Among those accompanying the team 
to Wisconsin were: "Pat," of the D. &: 
R. G. : Mr. Hill, of the Union Pacific; 
Mr. Fawcett, of the Gazette; and Dr. 
McKinney. 

♦ + 

Professor Urdahl was among the en- 
thusiastic C. C. rooters at the Wisconsin 
game. 

♦ ♦ 

Mrs. Slocum leaves, the first of next 
week, for a visit in the East. 

♦ ♦ 

Martha Phillips ex-'13 is visiting- 
Marion Haines, Cora Kampf and Alice 
McKee. 

♦ ♦ 

May Butler will not return to College 
this semester. 

+ 4 

Miss Edith Hall has returned from 
a week's visit in Denver. 



Why Not Have that 

Party at 

BRUIN INN 

Sewed Soles 75 cents 
Rubber Heels 35 cents 

AT 

PETE'S SHOE SHOP 

230 East Dale 

JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing;, (I ailing, I'rtssing. Sptcial 

K ales to t i Hi v, Studei t> 

I Do the Work of the Cc liege Sludmts 
Over Walling'? Book Store 16 S Tci. nSlier 

Developing and Printing 

HARLAN 

"The View Man" 

All Kinds of View and Commercial Work 
Phone Main 2717 304 E. Pike'. Peak Ave. 

The Prompt Printery Co. 

MASTER PRINTERS 



12 and 14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main S36 



THE OLD STAND BY 



Anybody can make Ice Cream but it takes Mueth's to ^gggg 
satisfy the College Students. Reference: Dutch Harder ^ 



Under new management 



14 



THE TIGER 



Be Your Own Agent 

The management of the STAR LAUNDRY have 
decided to have no general agent at the College and to 
give agent's discount direct to the student sending in 
the bundle. 

Our drivers will sell you a $5.00 Coupon Book for $3.50, a dis- 
count of 30%, or you can pay in cash on the delivery of the bundle, 
taking out 30% for yourself. No bundles will be left without money 
or coupons. 

Coupon- Books at this discount will be sold only to students and 
are not transferable and the coupon will not be received from other 
than stuJents. 



Everything in Jewelry 



FOUND AT 



Arcularius & Co. 

Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton Dairy 



419 S. El Paso St. 



Phone Main 442 



GET IT AT 

THE EMPORIUM 

AND SAVE MONEY 

1 10 S. TEJON STREET 



THE MUELLER 

TEACHERS' AGENCY 

Conducted for Efficiency only. Services 
free to School Bnards No enrollment fee 
for teachers. Call or write 

ANNA HI MUELLER, 450 West U nta Street, 
Phone Main 2188 Colorado Springs, Colo 



At a meeting of the Hagerman Hall 
men, Monday night, plans for the open 
house were discussed. The fellows are 
planning to show the visitors the "best 
time ever.' 

♦ + 

Thursday evening, a few of the Hag 
Hall fellows got together in the Y. M. 
C. A. Office to enjoy a social hour or 
two. Ware gave several interesting 
readings. 

♦ ♦ 

Marion Haines entertained at tea in 
honor of Martha Phillips and Elsie 
Green, Saturday afternoon. 

♦ + 

Bernice Rassbach's grandmother vis- 
ited her, last week. 



AFOLi ONIAN CLUB PROGRAM, 
OCTOBER 27. 

Speech on the Government Forest 
Reserves — Winfred Barnes. 
Extemporaneous Speeches. 
The Chinese Situation — Atwater. 
Music. 

Debate — "Resolved, That hereafter 
the federal government should retain 
all titles to mineral lands now in its 
possession and that these lands should 
be leased for limited periods only 
and in tracts not to exceed those un- 
der present claim laws." 
Affirmative — Ogilbee, Jackson. 
Negative — Rudolph, Thomas. 

Preliminaries will be held Decem- 
ber 8. 



Chili will be served at 



The College Inn 

Opposite the Campus 

Beginning Next Monday 



TRY 

A 

SUPPER 



AT 



McRAE'S 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co. 
Groceries and 



Meat; 



T 




115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE HENRY L DW1NELL HARDWARE COMPANY 



TOOLS 



BUILDERS AND GENERAL HARDWARE 
We Appreciate the College Trade 



CUTLERY 



1 30 N. Tejon St. 



Peone M^.in 439 



THE TIGER 



15 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



r? 



Giddings Bros. 

"The College Favorite ' 

The Favorite Shopping 

Place for College 

People 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

s the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 



106 1 ? E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



91 N. Tejon 



Pbone Main 900 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heati g Co 



Phone Main 48 



313 N. Tejon St. 



Artists Materials 

FRAMING 
College Posters 

The Richard Willis Art Studios 

4' 2 Ea-t Pike's Peak Avenue 




Young Men's 
Clothes 




Young Men's Clothes and Patterns; 
swagger things in English models the 
liveliest bunch of winners in town. 
Suits or Overcoats $35, $30, $25, $20 

Specialists in Good Clothes and Nothing Else 



Money 
Cheerfully 
Refunded 




Correct Dress tor Men. A 



113 East 

Pike's Peak 

Avenue 



"THE CRICKET ON 

THE HEARTH." 

A most promising cast has been 
chosen for the next play of the Dra- 
matic Club. "The Cricket on the 
Hearth, which will be presented in 
Cogswell Theater November 3rd. The 
girls of the club are taking much of 
the responsibility upon themselves 
this year, and are drilling the casts in 
large part. Rehearsals for the next 
play have been going on for some 
time, and the preparatory work for 
the production is well under way. 

Folowing is the cast of the play: 

John Perrybingle Leila Haines 

.Mr. Tackleton Dorothy Peterson 

Caleb Plummer Ruth King 

Stranger Katherine Copeland 

Dot Katherine True 

Bertha Gwendolyn Hedgecock 

Mrs. Fielding Alice Marsh 

May Fielding Cora Kampf 

Tilly Slowboy Ann Baker 



Rudolph '14 spent Saturday and Sun- 
dav at home in Pueblo. 



PEERLESS 
LUMP 

The most satisfacory coal on the market 

for furnace 

THE CENTRAL FUEL CO. 

Phone S78 128 N. Tejon 



Get Acquainted at 

The Red 
Cross Pharmacy 

HOT DRiNKS HOT TAMALAS 

HUDSON'S CHOCOLATES 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 

107 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone 40 



Dern's Freshly Roasted Coffee 

will make 10 more cups to the lb. 
than Eastern roasted coffee 



29 S. Tejon Street 



Phone 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Bid g 
118 North Tejon St. Phone Main 1701 

Res, 1211 N. Weber St. Tel. Main 956 




TOD POWELL 



Phone Main 930 



W. E, DONER 



POWELL-DONER SPORTING GOODS CO. 

1 1 2 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

"EVERYTHING FOR SPORTSMEN" 

New and Complete Stock of the Very Best of Athletic Supplies, College Pennants, Novelties, Etc. 

"ASK THE MEDICINE MAN" 






16 



THE TIGER 



You win in a sharp decisive manner, in ible. 

these smart, well fitting Perkins-Shearer suits And the cost is considerably less than you 

and overcoats. would believe from seeing the clothes. 

No matter what business proposition you ^ , , c . , , 

are up against. , The snug and loose fitting models are 

The force with which these well tailored both here in abundance of pleasing new pat- 

clothes bring out your individuality, gives e ns ' 

you a consciousness of power that's irresist- At Fifteen dollars and more. 



(?a4umS$ie<wer(3 



HAUGEN, Tailor 



222 N. Tejon. 



Phone Main 296 



f 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



Departments - 

College of Art;- and 
Science. 
E. S. PARSONS, Dean 

School of Iiiijiineerinft, 
F. CAJORI, Dean 

School ol ForeMn , 

W. C. STURCK Dean 

School of Music, 

E. D. HALE, Dean 



:-# 



Cigarette Sale 



13 



Prize Cup Cigarettes were 25c a Box 
As I rig as they last 2 Boxes for 25c 

HUGHES 

Pool in connection but not a pool room 







THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



Vol. XIV 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., NOVEMBER 2, 1911 



Number 8 



Insignia Special Train Sophomore 

Exercises To Boulder Barbecue 



Seniors in Cap and Gown — President 
Slocum Delivers Annual Address. 



The exercises in connection with 
Insignia Day took place last Friday 
morning at chapel when the seniors 
appeared in cap and gown for the 
first time.. They were escorted into 
chapel, as is the usual custom, by the 
juniors, who were all dressed in deep 
mourning. The faculty in academic 
robes, followed the seniors and the 
rear of the procession was composed 
of a bier borne by the juniors on 
which rested the hatchet of discord. 
The hatchet was buried with due cer- 
emony before the chapel exercises. 

President Slocum spoke on the 
place and meaning of academic cos- 
tumes. This address was as follows: 

To some these "caps and gowns" 
which we wear today mean little; to 
others they indicate the place which 
the college and university holds in 
the world of education. 

A uniform may stand for nothing 
or it may signify so much that the 
loss of it under disgrace has led men 
to suicide. The soldier wears it and 
the higher the station the more strik- 
ing the costume. Nothing worse can 
be said of a man in the army than 
that he has "disgraced the uniform." 
The officer and the private fulfil the 
duties of their positions better be- 
cause they are in uniform. The po- 
lice of the city are more effective be- 
cause they wear a special dress. The 
history of uniforms in the evolution 
of states and nations is a very inter- 



Hundreds of Students Plan to See 
Biggest Game of Year — Special 
Train Leaves at 8:30 Saturday. 



At a meeting of the Student Com- 
mission held at Palmer Hall last 
Thursday afternoon, Manager Statton 
of the football team was authorized 
to proceed with arrangements to se- 
cure a special train for the Boulder 
game. Accordingly a contract has 
been given to the D. & R. G. and the 
U. P. and a special rate of $3.00 for 
the round trip has been advertised. 
The train is to be run principally for 
the accommodation of the students of 
the College, almost all of whom are 
intending to go up to the game. Be- 
sides there are a great number of 
townspeople who are so deeply inter- 
ested in the fortunes of the Tigers 
that they could not afford to miss the 
game, and who are glad to take ad- 
vantage of the reduced rate. 

The train will leave from the D. 
& R. G. depot at 8:30 a. m., and on 
the return trip it will leave Boulder 
after the game at 6:30 p. m. Ar- 
rangements are being made to accom- 
modate a crowd of 500 on the special 
train. Tickets may be purchased at 
the D. & R. G. ticket office and a 
supply is on sale at the College. 

esting one. 

There is nothing that ought to 
mean so much in the wearing of spe- 
cial dress as this so-called "academic 
costume." It is closely connected 

Cdntlntftfd on Pgje S 



One More Successful Celebration — 
Speeches, Blanket-Tossing and Eats 
Furnish Delightful Hallowe'en. 

(By Lloyd L. Shaw.) 
The largest barbecue crowd in the 
history of the College, met in the old 
grandstand last Tuesday night to see 
what the sophomore class had in 
store for it. The rowdy element was 
out in full force looking for fussers 
and seeing that all hats were duly re- 
moved. Even the faculty received 
the popular reprimand for fussing 
their respective wives. 

The sophomores were all in cos- 
tume. The boys and girls were 
dressed in frontier rags, with ban- 
danas and slouch hats. This added 
much to the picturesqueness of the 
evening. The grandstand was hung 
with red and white electric lights. 
The lights were also strung out on 
poles in front of the grandstand. 
Here and there on the wire hung 
pumkin faces. The regulation plat- 
form was decorated with cohn stalks, 
pumpkins and the class colors, red 
and white. During the program one 
of the six small bonfires was burning. 
At a few minutes past eight Prexy 
arrived and the program began. 
President Jackson of the sophomore 
class opened the program with a 
speech of welcome. He convinced us 
all that we were welcome and that 
the sophomore class was still the 
most important part of the College 
His speech so pleased everyone that 

Continued on ptge 3 



THE TIGER 



Y. M. C. A. OPEN HOUSE. 

Approaching examinations and the 
thoughts of study were forgotten by 
one hundred and twenty-five College 
men last Thursday night, when they 
gathered at the City Y. ' M. C. A. 
building for a social evening. The 
entire building was thrown open to 
the use of the men and everything 
was done to make the "get-together" ' 
a success. Until the program began,, 
the pool and billiard tables were kept 
busy, and the piano worked overtime. 

The first number in the evening's 
entertainment was a violin solo by 
Mr. Wm. Berryhill. His presentation 
of the "Mocking Bird." with varia- 
tions, brought forth loud applause. 

The men then gathered about the 
piano in the billiard room and aired 
their voices on such classic pieces as 
'•'When You Look At Me," "Lindy," 
"Yama, Yama," and "Cuddle Up a 
kittle Closer," "Colorado,'' and a 
good "C-O-L-O," ended the musical 
program. 

The next event was the original 
"handshake." Three men in the 
crowd were each given a fifty cent 
piece. Every man in the room then 
shook hands with every other man. 
The twentieth fellow who shook 
hands with each of the men with the 
coin, received the slippery silver, 
l.indstrom, Charlie Johnston and A. 
C. Norton were the lucky ones. 

The remainder of the evening was 
spent in the gymnasium. Before the 
basket-ball games began, a tumbling 
exhibition was given by three mem- 
bers of the City Y. M. C. A. Then 
the freshmen and sophomores put 
their basketball teams on the floor. 
and for the next hour the gallery was 
given one of the fastest exhibitions of 
the big indoor game that has been 
witnessed here between the men of 
C. C. Twelve minute halves were 
played and the final score was 24 to 
14 in favor of the first year men. A 
second game was played later be- 
tween the winning 1915 team and an 
aggregation of "stars" picked from 
the four College classes. The fresh- 
men again won. Between halves, par- 
allel and horizontal bar exhibitions 
were put on by the City Association, 
and Bentley, a College freshman, 
punched the bag in good fashion. 
"Blind Man's Buff," with a punching 
bag, between Jack Carey and "Jud" 
Williams furnished much laughter 
during a t wo.-bout .cpntest. 

Refreshments consisting of frappe. 



apples, and a large assortment of 
cookies completed the program for 
the evening. 

The freshman team and substitutes 
included "Jud" Williams, Hamilton, 
Wall, Harter, Yarker, Keener and 
Wade. The sophomores who played 
were Lindstrom, Chas. Johnston, 
Dickey, Grimsley, Wray and Gerlock. 



PEARSONS LECTURE. 



The third lecture of the Pearsons 
series is to be given on Friday night, 
November third. Mr. Donelan is to 
lecture on "The growth of Funda- 
mental Democracy in the United 
States." Mr. Donelan is a careful 
reasoner and a witty speaker and an 
exceptionally strong lecture can be 
expected. The entire student body is 
cordially invited to attend. Pearsons 
Society wants its meeting to be abso- 
lutely open to everyone. 



NEXT SUNDAY'S VESPERS. 

Dr. F. T. Bayley, of the Plymouth 
Congregational church in Denver, 
who is to preach at the vesper service 
next Sunday afternoon, has long been 
a great favorite at Colorado College. 
He is regarded as one of the most 
interesting speakers to college stu- 
dents. In addition to his many 
friends at Colorado College, he has a 
large number throughout the city, and 
a large audience will certainly be 
present to hear him Sunday after- 
noon. 



PRESIDENT SLOCUM GOES 
EAST. 

President Slocum leaves for the 
Fast next Monday for the annual 
meeting of the "Carnegie Foundation 
for the Advancement of Teaching." 
which is held in' New York on No- 
vember fifteenth. Other members of 
the Board are Presidents Hadley of 
Yale, Lowell of Harvard, Remsen of 
John Flopkins. Schurman of Cornell, 
Jordan of Leland Stanford, Butler of 
Columbia, King of Oberlin, and Tay- 
lor of Vassar. 

Next Sunday the President will 
preach at Alount Holyoke College and 
the Sunday following at Vassar. 
Next Friday evening he makes 
an address at the annual banquet of 
the New England Colorado College 
Alumni Association, where President 
J.owell of Harvard University will be 
a guest of honor, together with Mr. 
and Mrs. Slocum. 



ECONOMIC PRIZES. 

In order to arouse an interest in the 
study of topics relating to commerce 
and industry, and to stimulate those 
who have a college training to con- 
sider the problems of a business year, 
a committee composed of 

Professor J. Laurence Laughlin, 
University of Chicago, chairman: 

Professor J. B. Clark. Columbia 
University: * 

Professor Henry C. Adams, Uni- 
versity of Michigan; 

Horace White. Esq.. New York 
City, and 

Professor Fdwin F. Gay, Harvard 
University. 

has been enabled, through the gener- 
osity of Messrs. Flart, SchafTner & 
Marx, of Chicago, to offer in 1912 
'"our prizes for the best studies in the 
economic field. 

In addition to the subjects printed 
below, a list of available subjects pro- 
posed in past years can be had on 
application. Attention is expressly 
called to the rule that a competitor 
is not confined to topics proposed in 
the announcements of this committee; 
but any other subject chosen must 
first be approved by it. 

1. Wage theories of American eco- 
nomists. 

2. Agricultural education. 

3. The influences affecting the prices 
of agricultural products. 

4 A lumber policy for the United 
States. 

5. Would public interests be sub- 
served by the amendment or repeal 
of the so-called Sherman anti-trust 
law? 

6. Capital building through corpo- 
ration savings. 

7. Control of securities of public 
service corporations. 

8. A scientific basis for tariff revis- 
ion. 

Class B includes only those, who at 
the time the papers are sent in, are 
undergraduates of any American col- 
lege. Class A includes any other 
Americans without restriction: the 
possession of a degree is not required 
of any contestant in this class nor is 
any age limit set. 

A First Prize of One Thousand 
Dollars, and a Second Prize of Five 
Hundred Dollars ?.re offered to con- 
testants in Class A. 

A First Prize of Three Hundred 
Dollars and a Second Prize of Two 
.Hundred Dollars are offered to con- 
testants in (lass B. The committee 



THE TIGER 



SOPHOMORE BARBECUE 

Continued from page 1 

they had to forgive him for the awful 
puns he insisted on springing. Then 
President Slocum in his riding suit 
and cap gave us a speech on the ''dead 
game sport" entitled, "College Fun." 
Tlie sophomore double quartet then 
sang a song written for the occasion 
and encored with a female song. It 
v. as quite a surprise after the exper- 
ience of last year that a sophomore 
quartet could really sing. Barbecue 
Cajori was next on the program. He 
even surpassed himself and made the 
speech of his career. The sophomore 
orchestra then did themselves proud 
with two good selections: "The play 
we couldn't give," was an original take 
off on the faculty, and was a new 
departure in barbecue programs, and 
a delightful one. It was a popular ap- 
peal against red tape and fossilism, 
and for co-educational dramatics and 
the inevitable junior prom. All the 
j arts were well taken but Miss Loom- 
is doubtless made the unanimous hit 
of the cast. 

As the only night for an all-College 
Fan-Pan, in the first quarter, came on 
barbecue night, the sophomores gave 
Billy Winchell fifteen minutes for a 
pep meeting for the Boulder game. 
He led several yells and made the 
announcements for Saturday's special 
train. Then Frof. Motten made a 
snappy talk about our ancient rival. 
MacMillan led us in "Hang Old 
Boulder to a Sour Apple Tree," and 
urged us to get behind the yell leader 
next Saturday. Old Timer Bert Sid- 
don's "who don't love Boulder," 
closed the program with his senti- 
ments and a strong C-O. 

Harry Black then read the blanket 
list, which was met with rounds of 
applause. Some old time aviators ap- 
peared again and a strong showing 
of new men. Ambrose appeared for 
! ositively the last time in his event- 
ful career. There was some regret 
expressed that freshman Young, the 
first choice of the committee could 
not make an ascent because of heart 
trouble. 

Nineteen fourteen showed the best 
management of the serving of its 
grub that has ever been seen in these 
parts. Two stiles were built, one on 
cither side of the platform, through 
which the grub line passed. Sopho- 
more girls filled the plates with 
apples, pumpkin pie, pickles and 
weinie sandwiches. These weinies 
were the one weak point in the barbe- 



cue. The audacity of serving boiled 
weinies and calling it a barbecue! 
And especially after Manager 
Haight's terrible mistake! Let us 
hope that it will never happen again. 
The cider was served in souvenir tin 
flasks, price ten cents. They ran on 
a i :ar with the Van Briggle Steins of 
the class of 191 1 for popularity. 

The six bonfires which the men had 
built were extinguished by the fire 
department, because of the heavy 
wind. Herioc efforts were made to 
cut the fire hose, but too late. 

Altogether the sophomores made a 
grand success with their barbecue and 
proved themselves excellent hosts. 



INSIGNI EXERCISES 

Continued from page 1 

with the history of higher education. 
Its use in the United States was 
not as general fifty years ago as in 
the universities o fEngland and the 
Continent. In 1875 Dr. Daniel Coit 
Gilman was called to the Presidency 
of John Hopkins University from the 
University of California and entered 
upon the creation of an institution 
where higher education took the form 
and ideals of the universities of the 
old world. He gave an impulse to 
university education which has never 
been lost. One of the things which 
he inaugurated was the wearing of 
academic costume at all important 
functions. Some of the older colleges 
were inclined to criticise, not to say 
sneer at the movement of the Balti- 
more University which came so rap- 
idly to the very fore-front, with its 
group of great sccholars and teachers. 
Earlier its use had been very limited 
in America. Unusually able men 
came to John Hopkins from the Uni- 
versities and Colleges of Europe and 
the United States, and soon it was 
recognized that the gown and hood 
were playing an important part in 
dignifying the life and work of the 
Maryland University. Soon those 
who sneered at what President Gil- 
man had done began to see its real 
significance and gradually college 
after college and university after uni- 
versity in the United States followed 
the traditions of olden foundations of 
learning and today there is hardly an 
institution of standing in our country 
that does not at times have its aca- 
demic procession with men and worn 
en attired in these costumes that sig- 
nify so much in the history of higher 
education. At present it is a rare 
exception when either a college or a 



university objects to its use on proper 
occasions. 

Its introduction into Colorado Col- 
lege marked a distinct dignifying of 
the academic life here. To him who 
understands its historic meaning its 
symbolizes the life and work of the 
scholar. 

And yet we must remember that it 
can be made to be only a caricature 
of that for which it has stood with 
many of the great universities of the 
world. 

This brings to us the question: 
Are we worthy to wear it? That de- 
pends upon what this College stands 
for and the standards which it is 
maintaining. If our ideals of schol- 
arship are on a low plane, if we are 
only making believe that we are stu- 
dents and scholars, then this uniform 
should be torn from us, for we are 
disgracing that which for centuries 
has stood for learning and intellectual 
achievement. If you are not worthy 
of it, do not wear it. If you are seek- 
ing to stand here in this College for 
honest and hard intellectual work; if 
you are doing all you can do to make 
the character of Colorado College 
correspond with the reputation it is 
securing, then with intellectual hu- 
mility, but with dignity and self-re- 
spect, wear it from time to time as 
occasion demands. 

It may be said that this country is 
democratic and that this dress par- 
takes of snobbery and the false class 
distinctions of the old country. Class 
distinctions there will ever be; but 
the question to be asked is on what 
are they founded? In America we 
want no artificial social standards; 
but we ought to recognize worth of 
all kinds. The only class distinction 
should be those based upon morality 
and intelligence. Every public school 
and private school, every college and 
university, emphasizes such an aris- 
tocracy. America is democratic and 
that signifies that everyone ought to 
have an equal chance to rise to a 
higher station. The test of true aris- 
tocracy is found only in the charac- 
ter of the citizen. 

It is the college and the university 
that should create a "Republic of 
Letters;" a state where men of intel- 
lectual power, of moral force, are the 
leaders and where the great privileges 
come to him who serves his fellow in 
the noblest way. 






Bill Sells '13 was visiting at the 
Fiji House Sunday and MbnrJay. 



THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 

JOE SEES BOULDER PLAY AND PROGNOSTICATES 



Boulder Game 



Next Saturday on Gamble field in 
Boulder the Tigers are going up 
against the stiffest proposition they 
will meet this year, and the outcome 
of the game they will play will mean 
more than any football game they 
have played for the last two years. 
The only comparative dope available 
is in consideration of the games 
the two teams played with Wyom- 
ing. It is significant that Colorado 
College made five touchdowns against 
this team, while Boulder was only 
abie to cross the goal line twice, but 
the fact that Wyoming did not cross 
Boulder's goal line, while a touch- 
down was scored against Colorado 
College, must be taken into account. 
Boulder did not use a single trick 
play during the whole of the Wyom- 
ing game. A simple form of the for- 
ward pass was tried four times, but 
was successful only once ,and that 
for a gain of barely five yards. 

Boulder's regular formation is ar- 
ranged for a direct pass to the backs, 
The quarterback lines up behind the 
other three backs and does not get 
into the play except when he takes 
the ball or a trick play is used. Nev- 
er does he play directly behind the 
center. The only other formation 
used is a simple shift with the backs 
in a diagonal line from tackle to full- 
back. A great number of plays were 
run from this formation and it proved 
one of the best ground gainers. 
Boulder used no intricate formations 
in order that none of the many plays 
which she has could become known 
to Coach Rothgeb and the Tigers, but 
just as certainly as these plays have 
not been tried in actual contest, they 
will have weak spots that it will be 
(oo late to remedy next Saturday in 
the game. 

Ir> defensive work Boulder excelled 
anything which the Tigers have 
shown in games on Washburn field 
this year, but it must be remembered 
that Rothy has been developing that 
defense for nearly three weeks since 
the last game played here. On the 
offense Boulder plays a very aggres- 
sive game, -but eyen.theri.it is safe to 
say that they played no better than 



the Tigers did two weeks ago. The 
line plus a tremendous amount of 
power into charging, but the backs 
fumble too often. Coach Folsom will 
probably be working hard this week 
to overcome these defects. Three 
times in quick succession Boulder 
carried the ball down under Wyom- 
ing's goal line, only to fail at the 
critical moment. Once they fumbled, 
once they were held for downs, and 
once they were penalized for holding 
in the line. 

Fullback Rich's boot, which was re- 
sponsible for six of Boulder's points 
last Saturday, is not to be so much 
feared as it might seem, unless he 
shews otttet form than he did on that 
occasion. One of the goals was from 
a fair catch, thus allowing him all 
the time he wished, and the other was 
directly in tront of the goal on the 
thirty-yard line. He missed one other 
fr mi nearly the same position. He 
probably is better th&n any kicker 
which the Tiger team has, but 
Vandy's toe is always dangerous in- 
side the thirty-five yard 1 ine, and 
Hedblom is deadly sure on Prince- 
tons close to the goal. 

Of course McFadden is counted on 
for long gains. Although he is near- 
ly a match for A^andemoer in speed, 
he is not so good in evading the tack- 
ier in open field. Rich :s hardly 
Black's equal at full, certainlv not on 
defensive work. Heald outclasses 
Nelson. Vandy is his equal in punt- 
ing. Hartman is bigger than Putnam, 
but that is all he has over him. 
Neither end on the Boulder team can 
compare with Capt. Sinton, and 
Thompson is the equal of either of 
them. Davenpor' u noted for his 
great ability a I center but Witherow 
'■as never met his match yet. The 
other linesmen will be closely 
matched, but we all know the kind 
of game the two old men. Bowers 
ami Hedblom play, and it is safe to 
bank on both Koch and Floyd. 

Following is the probable line up 
of the two teams next Saturday. The 
line men are placed opposite the men 
they -will oppose: 

S<nton, re. Kemp, le 

Koch;- rt . ; • ■ • — Workley, It 

Floyd, rg Knowles, lg 



Witherow, c Davenport, c 

Hedblom, lg Crouter, rg 

Bowers, It Cooper, rt 

Thompson, le . .Mills, re 

Vandemoer, rh Nelson, rh 

Heald, lh McFadden, lh 

Black, fb Rich, fb 

Putnam, qb Hartman, qb 

The officials have been selected and 
are: Bansbach, Stanford, Referee; 
Steele, Mines, Umpire; Coffin, Mines, 
Field Judge; Hickox, Ohio Wesleyan, 
Head Linesman. The game will be 
four full quarteis of fifteen minutes 
each. 



By Way of Forecast 

It is never safe to make predictions 
and even in a case like the present 
one the equivocable "if" must pre- 
cede the prediction. Colorado Col- 
lege has a better football team than 
the University of Colorado. They 
are close'y matched but C. C. is the 
best. A thousand and one things 
could lose the game, but here's hop- 
ing that Coach Rothgeb's machine is 
accident proof. Over-confidence 

would be a serious accident. 

Therefore, the prophecy is: If they 
play the game they are capable of, 
and if the "unexpected" does not ap- 
pear in the way of fluke, or other 
accident — the Tigers will win. 



Boulder to Much for 
Wyoming 



The University of Colorado, which 
comes next on the Tiger's list, won 
over the University of Wyoming in 
Boulder last Saturday by a score of 
18-3. The Wyoming team was quite 
up to the form they showed against 
C. C. three weeks before, and they 
used about the same style of play 
which was employed against the 
Tiger. They were unable to gain 
consistently on line plays and end 
runs. Their attempt at the forward 
pass were few, and with the excep- 
tion of one or two at the beginning 
of the game were generally unsuc- 
cessful. They were weak on defense 
most of the time, but nevertheless 
showed an ability to hold well at 



THE TIGER 



critical times. 

This is Boulder's first real game, 
and it showed a raggedness which is 
always present in an initial contest. 
Boulder's defensive play was its 
strongest point. Offensive play was 
confined strictly to straight football. 
The team was fast, .but it played out 
of form too often. 

The score was the result of two 
goals from the field, two touchdowns, 
and two goals after touchdowns. 

Until the first of the third quarter, 
when the Wyoming quarterback was 
retired on account of injuries, the 
ground gaining was a spectacular 
battle between McFadden and Bur- 
gess. McFadden had the advantage 
in having a strong line to get in the 
interference for him, but was equalled 
in running back punts by the elusive 
Wyoming man. 

About one minute after the game 
started McFadden carried the ball 
twenty-five yards for a touchdown. 
During the rest of the first quarter 
Wyoming had the best of it, keeping 
the ball in Boulder's territory prac- 
tically all of the time. Wyoming's 
score was made in the second quarter 
atfer Burgess had made a free catch 
on the 53-yard line. He made a clean 
kick, putting the ball directly over the 
bar from that point. The last three 
quarters were marked by Boulder's 
repeated marches down to the goal 
line, and then, in all except the one 
case when the second touchdown was 
made, being stopped and Wyoming 
kicking the ball back up the field for 
Boulder to begin all over again. 



South Dakota Defeats 
D. U. 



Denver University met a real foot- 
ball team last Saturday and came out 
of the game with the small end of a 
10-0 score. Their opponents were 
from the University of South Dakota. 
This is the first time that the Metho- 
dists have been defeated this fall, but 
those who have followed them thus 
lar through the season proclaim that 
their defeat has long been due. 

Denver University has a team com- 
posed of what is probably the Best 
material that there is in the state. 
"On paper" she has a team which 
should be able to defeat any team in 
the Rocky Mountain region. But so 
far, she has failed to deliver the 
goods. The eleven is lacking in 
team-work, and the men do not seem 
to be in condition. Every team D. 
U. has played, to date, has been 



lighter, but even in the first two 
games where D. U. was undefeated, 
their success was very mediocre — 
holding Utah to a tie and besting 
Baker by only five points. That is 
why they argued that the defeat at 
the hands of South Dakota was due. 

Denver used more forward passes 
than in any of the other games this 
season, and it was by means of these 
plays that the greatest gains were 
made. Dakota used shift plays and 
ran the ends, interspersing only a few 
forward passes. Coach Barry's "Wis- 
consin shift," of which so much has 
been heard since September, was 
solved and broken up in short order 
by the Dakota team. 

Meyers the speedy right end for the 
Denver team, received a broken collar 
bone, which will probably keep him 
out of the game for the rest of the 
season. He was one of the strongest 
players on the team, and his loss will 
weaken D. U. to a great extent. 



Wisconsin After 

Middle West Title 



Miners Overwhelm 
Aggies 



The School of Mines showed a 
great come-back spirit after their de- 
feat at the hands of Wyoming by 
beating the Aggies with a score of 
-7-0 in Fort Collins last Saturday. 
The Aggies were outclassed in every 
department of the game. The Mines 
had a heavier and faster team than 
the Aggies. They played a game 
more open and filled with forward 
passes. They did less fumbling. They 
carried puts back better. Taken al- 
together, it was up-to-date football 
that won for the Mines, as is shown 
by the fact that at no time were they 
able to gain consistently through the 
line. 

The Mines' twenty-seven points 
were the result of five goals from the 
field, two touchdowns and two goals 
after touchdowns. Harper was the star 
scorer of the day. He annexed fifteen 
points alone, from kicking five Prince- 
tons from varying angles and dis- 
tances. Spring carried the ball in best 
form for the Mines. Divilbliss and 
Paxton were the only ones from the 
Aggies who could gain at all. 



LeClere and Hughes took in the 
South Dakota-D. U. game in Denver 
Saturday. 

+ ♦ 

On Saturday afternoon Cora 
Kampf gave a tea in honor of Martha 
Philips. 



By defeating Northwestern 28-3 
last Saturday, the University of Wis- 
consin was put in line as chief con- 
tender for the championship of the 
Middle West Conference. It is satis- 
fying to compare Wisconsin's score 
against Northwestern with the 26-0 
score made against Colorado College 
on October 21. Coach J. R. Richards 
has the good wishes of every man in 
C. C. who knows him. We want the 
Badgers to win out. 



ADDITIONAL FRATERNITY 
NIGHTS. 



In consequence of a conference of 
the social sub-committee of the fac- 
ulty which was appointed to arrange 
dates for the social events for the 
year, called to consider a petition for 
a greater number of fraternity nights, 
the sub-committee has added to the 
list of fraternity nights a Friday night 
in each of the months of October, 
December and May. The exact date 
of the fraternity Friday night for De- 
cember has not yet been fixed, and 
the night for October was made on 
last Friday night when the Kappa 
Sigma and Delta Phi Theta fraterni- 
ties had their opening dances of the 
year. 

The fraternity men pointed out in 
the petition that the few fraternity 
nights that had already been allowed 
on the schedule together with the fact 
that there were only two acceptable 
places near the campus where fra- 
ternity functions could be held, made 
it impossible for the five fraternities 
to support any sort of social life at 
all, and the committee very gracious- 
ly granted the additional three nights 
and also the privilege of holding 
dances at the Acacia hotel in case it 
is necessary to go off the campus to 
find a place that is not engaged for 
those appointed nights. 

Under this arrangement it will be 
possible for the fraternities to keep 
up their dances as they have been 
accustomed to do in years gone by 
without the inconvenience of conflict- 
ing dates with other social functions. 



Dorothy Frantz entertained the 
Contemporary pledges at tea Sunday 
afternoon. 

+ + 

Border and Keener are new mem- 
bers of the "Apollonian Club. 






THE TIGER 



The Weekly Newspaperof Colorado College 

HARRY L. BLACK Editor-in-Chief 

RICHARD L. HUGHES Busin.ss Mtfr. 

Leon C. Havens Assistant Editor 

A. H. Rowbotham Assistant Editor 

J. J. Sinton Athletic Editor 

D. H. mahan Engineering Editor 

G. S. Cowdery Forestry Editor 

Miss Glenn Stiles Alumni Editor 

Miss Mary Randolph Exchange Editor 

Miss Helen Rand Local Editor 

A. W. Donovan Local Editor 

H. A. Parkison Assistant Manager 

A. L. Golden Assistant Manager 

W. L. Myers Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

F. P. Storke, H A. Bennett, MISS Lucy Ferrill 

Miss Elizabeth Gerould, Miss Leona Stukey, 

Miss Myrth King, Miss Violet Hopper, Miss 

Franc Adams, R. G. Appel 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to TheTiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo 

Phones: Editor, Main 2550. Manager, Main 2073 

Entered at the postorhce at Colorado 
Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5 



Saturday. 

The Tigers are going to play foot- 
ball against the University of Colo- 
rado on Gamble field at Boulder Satur- 
day. And the student body is going 
up to Boulder on the special train 
Saturday morning to see the game 
and to cheer the team on to victory. 
The game is going to be a hard- 
fought one and whoever wins will 
certainly be compelled to play the 
game from the first whistle to the 
last — every minute without a let-up. 
It is conceded that the two teams 
that are to battle for the honors Sat- 
urday are two of the strongest in the 
conference. The Wyoming games 
played by each team furnish about 
all the dope there is on the game and 
that is very unreliable. 

The fact that the two teams are 
meeting for the first time in two 
years, and that there is claimed to 
be some doubt as to which won the 
championship last year, contributes 
to make the game one of unusually 
wide interest. Furthermore it is like- 
ly that the team that loses this con- 
test, will probably be eliminated from 
the championship this year. Every- 
thing is at stake on both sides, and 
both teams are going on the field 
with plenty of good, red blood cours- 
ing where it ought to course. The 
strongest possible line-ups will face 



each other. Both teams are going to 
be in good shape and full of fight, 
and they are going to be backed by 
their respective student bodies to the 
very last ditch. 

If it would not be insulting you, 
members of the student body and 
the alumni body, we would urge you 
to be sure to buy a ticket for the trip 
on the special train and make all ar- 
rangements to go to the game, and 
make twice as much noise as you 
ever did before. Thereby you would 
be helping to beat Boulder once 
again, and then just think of all the 
alumni in all parts of the world who 
would be set to dancing by the good 
news of the victory. 



"Spring" Exams and "Cramming." 

It seems to be the concensus of 
opinion among college students that 
examinations which are given with- 
out warning are entirely unfair. It is 
quite easy to see why some people 
feel decidedly injured when they are 
treated to "spring" exams, but that 
this feeling is so universal is due to 
the fact that no thought has been 
given to the other side of the ques- 
tion. 

The main complaint against the 
"spring" exam is that the student has 
not reviewed the past work, and con- 
sequently his knowledge of the sub- 
ject is in very poor shape. But that 
seems to us to be the very point of 
merit in the "spring" exam. If a stu- 
dent understands from the beginning 
of the term that at any time he may 
be called upon to show what he can 
do with exams in his various sub- 
jects, he will be far more apt to keep 
up a constant review. But on the 
other hand, if exams are given only 
at stated times and the student is in- 
formed beforehand that exams are to 
be held at such a time, the review 
is likely to be put off until the last 
minute. 

This brings us to the question of 
"cramming," which is eliminated by 
the "spring" exam. It is a fact that 
many a student is saved many a 
"flunk" by the "cramming" process. 
Very well. If the sole aim of the 
student in college is to pass his exams 
we haven't another word to say 
against "cramming." It is the proper 
thing for him to do. But if the stu- 
dent in college aims to have his 
examinations represent fairly what he 
has gained from his courses, then 
"cramming" should have no place in 
his system of passing examinations. 

It has often been remarked that the 



college student is willing to take less 
for his money than anyone else. He 
is elated .when he gets a cut, and he is 
displeased oftentimes by feeling that 
he is obliged to go to a class. If he 
is able to convince his instructor that 
he is learning enough to pass the re- 
quirements of the course, he is satis- 
fied. His standard of excellence is a 
"D" or better. An "E" once in a 
while isn't so bad, provided they 
don't come too often. He argues that 
the minimum standard of scholarship 
is fixed high enough by the curricu- 
lum of the college ,that if he passes, 
even by barely skinning through, he 
has done very well and no one should 
ask him to do better. 

Such a student may draw his con- 
clusions logically enough, but he has 
started out with a mistaken premise. 
It is not a "D" or an "E" that should 
represent his standard of excellence. 
It should not be a question of how 
little he can do and pass, but how 
much he can do. He should not ask, 
"What does this course require?" but 
"How much does this course offer?" 

The student who "crams" simply 
goes through the process of saturat- 
ing himself with a number of mean- 
ingless, disconnected facts, which he 
squeezes out upon the examination 
paper as a matter of mere form, and 
straightway seeks to forget all about 
it. He seeks INFORMATION and 
not KNOWLEDGE. Perhaps he 
does not know the difference. IN- 
FORMATION is a passing knowledge 
or a dim conception of a truth or 
fact; KNOWLEDGE is a permanent 
knowdedge or a clear perception of a 
truth or fact. 

Altogether is seems to us that 
"spring" exams are a good thing and 
that "cramming" is a bad thing for 
a student. One should be made to 
feel that his work may at any time 
be put up to the test, for the majority 
of students need a constant stimulus 
to keep their work up. We should 
cultivate habits of good, regular con- 
scientious work up every day, and 
then we may dispense with "cram- 
ming" and welcome "spring" exams. 



Louise Willson and Jessie Sheldon 
entertained Hypatia Saturday after- 
noon at the home of the former. The 
time was delightfully spent with 
thimbles and elaborate refreshments 
were served. 

♦ ♦ 

Alice Mason's mother was a Colo- 
rado Springs visitor last week. 



THE TIGER 



ECONOMIC PRIZES 

Continued from Page 2 

reserves to itself the right to award 
the two prizes of $1,000 and $500 of 
Class A to undergraduates in Class 
B, if the merits of the papers demand 
it. 

the ownership of the copyright of 
successful studies will vest in the 
donors and it is expected that, with- 
out precluding the use of these papers 
as theses for higher degrees, they will 
cause them to be issued in some per- 
manent form. 

Competitors are advised that the 
studies should be thorough, expressed 
in good English, and although not 
limited as to length, they should not 
be needlessly expanded. They should 
be inscribed with an assumed name, 
the class to which they are presented, 
and accompanied by a sealed envelope 
giving the real name and address of 
the competitor. If the competitor is 
in CLASS B, the sealed envelope 
should contain the name of the in- 
stitution in which he is studying. The 
papers should be sent on or before 
June 1, 1912, to 

J. Laurence Laughlin, Escp, 
The University of Chicago, 

Chicago, Illinois. 

Following is a partial list of avail- 
able subjects: 

What forms of education should be 
advised for the elevation of wage- 
earners from a lower to a higher 
industrial status in the United States? 

To wdiat is the recent growth of 
American competition in the markets 
of Europe to be attributed? 

Th.e economic advantages and dis- 
advantages of present colonial pos- 
sessions to the mother country. 

A just and practicable method of 
taxing railway property. 

Will the present policy of the labor 
unions in dealing with non-union men, 
and the "closed shop," further the in- 
terests of the workingmen? 

The influence of credit on the level 
of prices. 

The cattle industry in its relation 
to the ranchman, feeder, packer, rail- 
way, and consumer. 

Should the government seek to con- 
trol or regulate, the use of mines of 
coal, iron, or other raw materials, 
whose supply may become the subject 
of monopoly? 

What provision can be made for 
workingmen to avoid the economic 
insecurity said to accompany the 
modern wage-system? 

The practical wisdom of freeing 
raw materials, essential to subse- 



quent manufactures, from custom du- 
ties when entering the United States. 

Mow far does the earning power of 
skill obtain under a regime of trade 
unions? 

A critical duty of modern commer- 
cial methods for distributing products 
to consumers. 

The development of economic 
theory since John Stuart Mill. 

To what extent, and in what form, 
are Socialistic tenets held in the 
United States? 

In what respect, and to what ex- 
tent, have combinations among Amer- 
ican railways limited or modified the 
influence of competition? 

The best methods of avoiding re- 
sort to force by labor unions in their 
contests with employers. 

Industrial combinations and the 
financial collapse of 1903. 

Causes ni" the rise of prices since 
[898. 

Should inecjualities of wealth be 
regulated by a progressive income 
tax? 

The effect of the industrial awak- 
ening of Asia upon the economic de- 
velopment of the West. 

The causes of the recent rise in the 
price of silver. 

The relation of an elastic bank cur- 
rency to bank credits in an emer- 
gency. 

The logic of Henry George's "Pro- 
gress and Poverty.'' 

•What are the ultimate ends of 
trade-unions and can these be gained 
by any application of the principles 
df monopoly? 

In view of existing railway pro- 
gress, should the United States en- 
courage the construction of water- 
ways? 

is it to be expected that the present 
and recent production of gold will 
cause a higher level of prices? 

The best scheme for uniform cor- 
poration accounts. 

Desirable methods of improving 
our trade with China. 

The proper spheres of the trust 
company and the commercial bank. 

The relations of oriental immigra- 
tion to American industries. 

The relative efficiency of American 
and European labur in manufactur- 
ing industries. 

The history of one selected railway 
system in the United States. 

The history of the rate of interest 
in the United States. 

The value of protectionism to 
v merican workingmen. 

The economic reasons for or 



against building a deep waterway 
in ni) the Lakes to the Gulf. 

German experience in taxing the 
unearned increment from land. 

The valuation of railways. 

An examination of government 
wages statistics. 

The effects of modern immigration 
in the United States. 

The \alue of organized speculation. 



ANNUAL PEACE PARTY. 

Last Saturday evening at the Golf 
Club, President and Airs. Slocum as- 
sisted the senior class in delightfully 
entertaining the juniors. The occa- 
sion was the annual hatchet-burying 
and peace conference, otherwise 
known as the Insignia party. The 
seniors furnished the evening's en- 
tertainment, the most enjoyable fea- 
tures of which were the singing of 
the celebrated Abe-Bud-Mack trio 
and the publication of an edition of 
The Tiger as it should be in 1917. 
Ice cream and cake were served for 
refreshments. Most of the members 
df both classes were present. 

THE CONTEMPORARY FANCY 
DRESS BALL. 



Contemporary Club held its annual 
fancy dress ball for the new girls in 
McGregor gym Friday night. The 
gym was canopied in red and a great 
many Contemporary pennants and 
red poppies added to the artistic ef- 
fect. The costumes were unusual and 
clever and made the dance a festive 
one. 



HYPATIA INITIATION. 



After the meeting Friday Hypatia 
held her initiation in Ticknor Study, 
after which a bancjuet was given in 
honor of the new members at the 
Acacia hotel Places were set for 
twenty-four about the large round 
table in the Dutch room. The alum- 
nae guests were Mabel Bateman, Lil- 
lian Duer, Winifred Pease and Mrs. 
Richard Aiken. 



TIGER SUBSCRIPTION $1.50. 



October 31 was the last day upon 
which advantage could be taken of 
the reduced rate of $1.25 for subscrip- 
tion for the Tiger. A great many of 
the students, faculty and alumni took 
advantage of the low rate, and those 
who have not paid subscriptions must 
pay the regular price of $r.so. 






THE TIGER 




Gadoca Clothes will improve your ap- 
pearance. Why be in the rough state when 
you can easily be a polished gem. 

These Suitsand Overcoats have a mark 
of refinement which you will not find else- 
where. 

Suits and Overcoats $ 1 5. to $50. 

GATO-DOmS* 



LAST SUNDAY'S VESPERS. 



The Rev. A. N. Taft, Rector of St. 
Stephen's Church, in this city, was 
the speaker at last Sunday's vesper 
service. The sermon was based on 
the text, "There is joy in the pres- 
ence of the angels of God," and was, 
in part, as follows: 

Our ideas of Heaven are limited to 
our own earthly experiences. If 
Heaven is Heaven it must be made 
up of kindness, generosity and the 
subordination of the material to the 
spiritual. One of the practical pur- 
poses of religion is to keep before 
our minds the question, What is 
God? We are, in a way, preparing 
ourselves here on earth for our en- 
joyment of Heaven. People with a 
low idea of friendship here will be 
lost in Heaven. Selfishness in this 
world is opposed to the idea of Heav- 
en where selfishness does not exist; 
but enjoyment of Heaven will be af- 
fected by our lives on earth. To some 
it would be a source of joy, to others 
torture. Heaven is formed out of the 
holy lives and characters of men. 

A noble word, a generous deed, 
these things make up the substance 
of the spirit and if these do not de- 
light us we cannot hope to enjoy 
Heaven. 

It has become the fashion to be 
agnostic about the future life and 
perhaps a reverent agnosticism is 
justifiable. Even St. Paul was an ag- 
nostic about the life to come. Yet, 
if there is a Heaven it must surpass 
the best we can say about it. All the 
deepest and truest in life points to it. 
We must refuse to be plunged into 
an abysss of silence regarding this 
future abode because some people 
have laughed at us as visionaries. 
Nothing is so practical as the thought 



of that place to which we shall go. 
Even in this world we come to real- 
ize the tragedy of broken law and 
shall we reject the higher laws of our 
spiritual happiness. 

Why is it some find this world full 
of friendship and happiness and 
others see only evil and ulterior mo- 
tives? To some it is a beautiful place 
and to others a dreary existence. If 
we have not added joy to our world 
we shall find in it little of happiness. 
Let us be careful not to misrate the 
vessel of our lives and bring into port 
a cargo of sand instead of the golden 
grain of truth. 



WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH 
THE ENGINEERS? 



On Friday, October 21, Mr. L. E. 
Curtis presented what is generally 
accepted by those present to be the 
best speech ever given before a Col- 
lege organization. The announce- 
ments said the Engineers' Club was 
bringing Mr. Curtis here to speak. 
Of the 42 men in the audience, three 
were members of the Club. Of the 
other 39, all but four were freshmen 
who came probably because Dean 
Cajori announced the lecture in his 
classes. 

This condition of affairs ought to 
be remedied at once. It is not doing 
justice to the Club if you absent your- 
selves from these open meetings, and 
it is certainly not right to ask men 
whose time is as invaluable as Mr. 
Curtis' to speak if you are not going 
to hear him. 

Several prominent engineers of Col- 
orado have been asked to come to 
the Club during the winter, and after 
the manner in which Mr. Curtis was 
received they could hardly be blamed 
for refusing to come. 



Every man who becomes a member 
of the Engineers' Club ought to feel 
that it is a responsibility. If he does 
not care to assume it he is not justi- 
fied in joining. Show some of your 
Tiger enthusiasm by attending these 
meetings and let the speakers tell 
each other that it is a great pleasure 
to speak at Colorado College. 



CURRENT CLIPPINGS. 



There has always been a great deal 
of trouble in keeping Standards of 
Length, such as the meter or yard, 
because the substance that the dis- 
tance is measured off on is subject 
to atmospheric changes, etc., and has 
to be kept at a proper temperature for 
reference. A British scientist has de- 
signed one of silica which expands 
but one-twentieth as much as does 
an alloy of platinum-iridium compo- 
sition, hitherto considered to be the 
best material for this purpose. It is 
hardly affected by ordinary tempera- 
ture changes and also possesses the 
advantage of not being damaged by 
exposure to air. 



A German engineer has recently 
patented an idea for blasting rock by 
means of water pressure. The water 
is allowed to fill the hole slowly and 
then suddenly the full pressure is re- 
leased all at once, breaking the stone 
cleanly and evenly. 



The millionth patent has just been 
issued by the U. S. government: It 
covers an invention for a puncture 
proof tire and was issued to F. H. 
Holt of Akron, Ohio. The first one 
issued was a process for making 
1 otash in a crucible and bears the pe- 
culiar distinction of never having been 
improved. It was issued in 1790. 



THE TIGER 



Hunt Up 

BisselPs Pharmacy 

When You Want 

Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

Pike's Peak Book & 
Stationery Co. SiSS » 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



CALL 2000 

When You Want Anything QUICK! 
QUICK DELIVERY 

MAIN 2000 



COTRELL & LEONARD 

Albany, N. Y. 
Makers of 

CAPS & GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the 

Atlantic to the Pacific 

Class Contcacts a Specialty 

Deichmann & Douglas Floral 

Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER, Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 

Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Gazette Building 



ALUMNI NOTES 

Mr. Nillson Finkbiner 'io is now in 
Salem, Oregon. 



Mrs. Hannah Johnston Ward '07 
and small daughter are visiting in 
Denver. 



Miss Mayme Scott '07 is engaged 
in Y. W. C. A. work at Pasadena, 
California. 



Miss Winifred Schuler ex-'n is 
spending the winter at her home in 
Raton, New Mexico. 

Miss Margaret Seifried '10 is spend- 
ing the winter at Decatur, Illinois. 



Miss Eunice Smith ex-'io is teach- 
ing in high school at Barry, Vermont. 



Miss Mabel Shapcott '09 is teach- 
ing English and French at Miss Har- 
ter's school. 



Miss Lula Harkey '09 is studying 
at Columbia University. 

Miss Dorothy Mueller ex-'i2 is an 
instructor in History at Cottey Col- 
lege, at Nevada, Missouri. 



Thos. Hatch ex-'i3 is with a sur- 
veying party in Alberta, Canada. 



J. S. Hazen ex-'r2 is in Chihauhau, 
Mexico with a railroad location party. 



Claire Phillips '10 spent Sunday at 
the Kappa Sigma House. 



H. N. Roe '10 is city editor of The 
Victor Dailv Record. 



Miss Marie Gashweiler '92 has just 
returned to her home in Colorado 
Springs, after a sojourn of three 
years in Europe, where she has been 
studying under some of the best mu- 
sicians in that country. She was ac- 
companied by her mother. 



Can you look out on the world and 
see anything except dollars and 
cents? 




NEW 

Fall Styles 

JUST IN 

High Arch, High Toes, Short 
Vamps, Button or Lace, Velvets, 
Suedes, Patents, Gunmetels, 
Tan Russia's 

$2.50, $3.00, $3.50 
and $4.00 



L3 
.^•^107 South Tfctow gjEjT 




Board $4.50 Per Week 

One front room for two. Board 

and room $25 per month for each 

222 E. DALE 



THE 

Crissey & Fowler 
Lumber Co. 



Phone 101 



117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 



Telephone S99 



The 



CUT FLOWERS 



Store 104N. Tejon Street 

Floral Co. 

DECORATIONS AND DESIGNS 



10 THE TIGER 

NEWER FLANNEL SHIRTS 

You'll like our showing of flannel shirts— it's the classiest lot we've ever had. Most of 
them are made military style-soft, button through collar. 

This style collar is a great improvement over the old lay down, and its popularity is al- 
ready assured. 

New shades in tans and browns, also grays and blues. 

Prices are from $1.50 to $3.50 




To College 
Students 
Old and New 

We Extend the Most Cod al Good 
Wishes. We've made a Specialty of 
taking care of the wants of the up-to- 
date young men and women. You ! ll 
find us the kind of jewelry store you'll 
like. 

The Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak 



The Davis Barber Shop 

Individual Sterilizing Cabinets 
Ray Davis, Manager 



Joslyn Press 



112 E. Cucharras St. 
Phone Main 1154 



Printers & 
Publishers 



ANY KIND OF PRINTING 
WE PRINT THE TIGER 



ALUMNI MONTHLY. 



It is announced that the second is- 
sue of the Alumni Monthly is to ap- 
pear soon. The first issue was pub- 
lished toward the end of the last Col- 
lege year by Mr. Donald Tucker who 
acted as the editorial and managerial 
staff. This year the heavy responsi- 
bilities have been assumed by Mr. 
Stanley Alden. The monthly is pub- 
lished in small pamphlet form and 
aims to give to the alumni of the 
College all the interesting news in 
condensed pellet form. It contains 
editorials. College news and alumni 
notes, and goes out as a real news 
letter to all the alumni of the Col- 
lege. The publication is unique in 
that it has no regular date of ap- 
pearance. It is simply published 
every little while, as soon as the edi- 
tor-manager has raised enough money 
to pay the printer's charges for the 
last issue. 



Y. W. C. A. 



The Y. W. C. A. mission study 
classes are well under way. Carrie 
Burger has the class on "The Con- 
servation of National Ideas,'' Agnes 
Pace on the "Negro Problem," and 
Violet Hopper on the "Daybreak in 
Turkey." 

Have Your Clothes Cleaned, Pressed and 
Kept in First-Class Repair by 

"Sam" the Gentlemen's Valet 

Also Makes a Specialty of Serving Parties 
SAM FLEMING 

114 P. Cucharras Phone 1675 



3RE AD For mormn g de| ' ve ry- its 

bread hot from the oven, 
baked from the choicest flour, and that 
would command first premium anywhere. 
That you get from us. Is always good. 

THE CHICAGO BAKERY 



Have the fellows meet you at 

Tucker's 
Restaurant 

10 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 

You can always save money if 
you will come to see our line in 
diamonds, watches, jewelry, 
guns, sporting goods, fishing 
tackel drawing sets, musical 
instruments, trunks, valises, or 
if you want to loan money, you 
can get it 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 

Money Loaned on Valuables 



HAVE YOU A PANITORIUM COLLEGE TICKET ? 

See Rhone, College Agent, Hagerman Hall 
30 SUITS SPONGED AND PRESSED FOR $5.00 



THE TIGER 



II 



The College Book and Supply Store 

In addition to furnishing the Text Books and Engineering 
Supplies for the College students, we carry a very large 
stock of Fountain Pens, Waterman's Ideal, Conklin Self- 
fillers and College. See Our PENNANTS ane POSTERS 

Whitney & Grimwood 



Get Your Picnic Supplies 

AT = 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

STUDENTS 



Remember when you want the 
BEST in Photography at moderate 
cost. Visit the Old Reliable Art 
Shop of 




^XBrrum f 



Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 41 



R. J. CORRIN 

Dry Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing 

and Remodeling for Ladies 

and Gentlemen 

Work by the Month 

Work Called for and Delivered 

Phone 2963 M 326 N. Tejon Stree 

Nothing Pleases Us More Than 
To Please College Students 

The Fred S. Tucker 

Furniture Co. 



ENGINEERS' CLUB PROGRAM. 



For November 3. 



Report on Dry-Farming Congress 

— Wilkinson 

Current Engineering — -Love. 

Debate — "Resolved, That the utiliza- 
tion of natural resources should 
take precedence over the conserva- 
tion of natural beauty. 

Affirmative — Rose. 

Negative — Seeley. 

APOLLONIAN CLUB PROGRAM. 



November 3. 

Speech — The Value and Utilization of 
Colorado's natural resources under 
Federal Control — Bennett. 

An Anecdote — Extemporaneous. 

Hen Rhone on Parliamentary Law. 

Music by the Quartet. 

Debate — "Resolved, That the recall 
should apply to the judiciary. 

Affirmative — Varker, Watson. 

Negative — L. Clark, Hopkins. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 



Among the latest additions to Co- 
burn library is a set of thirty-three 
volumes of "Romania." These books 
were procured by Prof. E. C. Hills 
and they are the standard authority 
for students of philological research 
in the Romance languages. Mr. Hil- 
dreth Frost, a former student, has 
added to the law department, forty- 
three books which are used in the 
Harvard Law School and W. B. Clark 
of this city, has also given a collec- 
tion of English and German books. 
Other notable additions are 116 vol- 
umes of the Specifications and Draw- 
ings of the U. S. Patent office and 
eighteen volumes of the American 
Ephemeris and Nautical Almanac. 

Besides these additions, the librar- 
ian is continually adding single vol- 
umes to fill up gaps made by missing 
numbers in the various sets. 



MOTOR CYCLES 

Yale Emblem 

BICYCLES and Supplies 

Expert Repairing 

Colorado Springs Cycle 

Company 

DeWitt Doyle, Manager 
224 N. Tejon St. Phone Red 34 

Knight - Campbell's 

F0R PIAN0S 

and PLAYER PIANOS 

STEINWAY and 20 OTHER MAKES 

We Rent Pianos 

Largest Stock Victor Talking Machines 
and Edison Phonographs 

226 N. Tejon St., after Sept. 15, 122 N. Tej.n 

The Gowdy-Sinrmons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS 

Copper Plate and Steel Engravers 
Telephone 87 21 N. Tejon Street 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing Typewriter. 

Zimmerman Supply 

f* _._____«_ ____ 22 E. Kiowa St. 

Company PhoneMain3 74 

Established 1890 



You can save from 25 
percent to 40 percent 
on our finest Hart, 
Schaf f ner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer & 
Clothcraf t Suits and 
Overcoats 









12 THE TIGER 

WHITMAN'S CANDIES 

If you want something especially good for a "particular friend" or yourself ask for Whit- 
mans "Fussy" Chocolates, a fussy package for fastidious folks, or Whitmans Pink of Perfec- 
tionCnDcolates. 

$1.00 Per Pound 

To Be Had Only At 

THE MURRAY DRUG COMPANY 

Opposite Campus 



The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

116 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

s 
Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Give 
Special Attention to Accounts of Student s 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, Preiident Ira Harris, I'-Presiden ' 

M. C. Gile Lilla B. Ensign C. E. Lynde 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:0 P. M 

THE OUT WEST 

TENT AND AWNING CO. 

RECLINING CHAIRS 
PORCHES ENCLOSED 

Tents Rented for a Day or for Longer 



Stamping, Designing, R rfarating, Best Hani Pai n 

China. Western Branch of Mexican Pigment Paints, 

Stenciling and Materials 

Art Needlework and Art Goods 

THE HUNT AND VAN NICE 

ART SPECIALTY SHOPS 

Retail and Wholesale 
8 Pike's Peak Aven e Phone Main 2055 



The "Little Jeff" Last Has the 

Style, Fit and Quality 







iy Whitaker-Kester 

Shoe Co. 
10 North Tejon Street 



DELTA PHI THETA DANCE. 

The Delta Phi Theta fraternity held 
an enjoyable Hallowe'en dance in the 
Plaza hotel last Friday evening. The 
ball room was decorated in autumn 
colors by the aid of grains and 
fruits in keeping with the season. 
Cider served from a hollow pumpkin 
in the witch's corner formed the re- 
freshment of the evening. Fink's or- 
chestra furnished the music. 

The guests of the fraternity were 
the Misses Heidepreim, Remy, Wil- 
son, Powell, Hamilton, King, Lamb, 
Bateman, Fezer, Stukey, De Rusha, 
Townsend, Sullivan, Stoddard, Mil- 
ler, Sundquist and Mitten; and Wil- 
liam Argo. Prof, and Mrs. Howe 
and Prof and Mrs. Martin chaperoned. 



KAPPA SIGMA DANCE. 



The Kappa Sigma fraternity held 
its first dance of the year Friday 
evening in the San Luis school house. 
The hall was beautifully decorated 
with streamers and pennants carrying 
out the idea of the Hallowe'en sea- 
son. The participants were Miss 
Florence Oettiker, Miss Hazel Bane, 
Miss Margaret Watson, Miss Morgan, 
Miss Nell Estill, Miss Martha Phil- 
lips, Miss Mary Walsh, Miss Virginia 
Gasson, Miss Marion Haines, Miss 
Harriet Clark, Miss Addie Hemen- 
way. .Miss Lila Haines, Miss Dorothy 
McCreery, Miss Helen Boyd, Miss 
Ruby Allen, Miss Mary Randolph 
Mrs. Charles Holden; Messrs. Stat- 
ton, Holden, Baker, Black, Morse, 
Seldomridge, Whipple, Parkison, 
Thornell, Winchell. Deesz, Cajori, 
Cotten, Koch, Herron, Raynolds, 
Hall, James and Crysler. Mrs. Cajori 
acted as choperon. 



On Saturday evening Esther Par- 
sons entertained a number of her 
College friends at a dinner in honor 
of lic r birthday. 



THE POPULAR 

Creams and Ices Fresh Butter 

Made Right and Delivered Promptly 

A. L. MOWRY 

Phone 1184 
115 East Cache la Poudre Street 



STOP AT 

LIGHTNING SHOE SHOP 

to get your shoes repaired. Shine 
free with every pair of soles 

Sewed Soles 75c. 2S% N. Tejon St. 



William P. Bonbright & Co 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House. London, E. C. 



STUDENTS! 

The 
Pearl Laundry Co. 

respectfully solicits your pat- 
ronage. We guarantee satis- 
factory work and service and 
give you 20% discount. 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 



THE TIGER 



13 



Above the High Rents 
Below the High Prices 



Walk Up Stairs and 
Save a $ or 2 



M. Q. WEST 

Retail Sample Shoe Store 

$2.50 No More, No Less 



1 lO-l 12 E. Pike's Avenue, Up Stairs 
Rooms 16-17-18 



Engraving 

Function Invitations 
Programs, Place Cards 
Etc., — Our Specialty. 

OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

HA YNER 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



OBSERVATORY OPEN. 

The astronomical observatory is 
open to the public every night this 
week. Prof. Albright and his as- 
sistants are on hand to show the un- 
skilled how to make the best obser- 
vations of the heavens. An especially 
fine view of the moon is to be ob- 
tained this week and many are taking- 
advantage o fthe opportunity to make 
the observation through the large tel- 
escope. 




Do you see anything to love in a 
little child? 

Will a lonely. dog follow you in the 
street? 



When You Visit "Her" 

Your Most Valuable 
Ally will be a Box of 

Burgess Chocolates 
BURGESS 

Phone Eight Three 
12-114 North Tejon Street 



Why Not Have that 

Party at 

BRUIN INN 

Sewed Soles 75 cents 
Rubber Heels 35 cents 

AT 

PETE'S SHOE SHOP 

230 East Dale 



Local Department JOHN MOFFA T 

F " UC1 "_ || FINE TAILORING 



Vesta Tucker entertained at tea in 
honor of Martha Philips' Tuesday af- 
ternoon. 

The snow did not keep the girls 
of the Y. W. C. A. cabinet from a 
grand tramp to Bruin Inn Saturday 
morning. The guests of the cabinet 
were Mrs. McLean and Miss Cross, 
who had just come from India. 

♦ ♦ 

Hairy Greenlee 'n is at the Delta 
Theta House for a few weeks. 

♦ ♦ 

E. W. Hille 'ii spent Sunday at the 



FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Kates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Waiting's Book Store 16 S. Teion Stree 



Developing and Printing 

HARLAN 

"The View Man" 

All Kinds of View and Commercial Work 
Phone Main 2717 304 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

The Prompt Printery Co. 

MASTER PRINTERS 



2S. T. 



St. 



Colorado Springs Sigma Chi house. 



12 and 14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



THE OLD STAND BY 

Anybody can make Ice Cream but it takes Mueth's to 
satisfy the College Students. Reference: Dutch Harder 




Under New Management 



THE TIGER 



Be Your Own Agent 

The management of the STAR LAUNDRY have 
decided to have no general agent at the College and to 
give agent's discount direct to the student sending in 
the bundle. 

Our drivers will sell you a $5.00 Coupon Book for $3.50, a dis- 
count of 30%, or you can pay in cash on the delivery of the bundle, 
taking out 30% for yourself. No bundles will be left without money 
or coupons. 

Coupon- Books at this discount will be sold only to students and 
are not transferable and the coupon will not be received from other 
than stuJents. 



Everything in Jewelry 



FOUND AT 



Arcularius & Co. 

Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton Dairy 



419 S. El Paso St. 



Phone Main 442 



GET IT AT 

THE EMPORIUM 

AND SAVE MONEY 

1 10 S. TEJON STREET 

THE MUELLER 

TEACHERS' AGENCY 

Conducted for Efficiency only. Services 
free to School Bnards No enrollment fee 
for teachers. Call or write 

ANNA H: MUELLER, 450 West U'nta Street, 
Phone Main 2188 Colorado Springs, Colo 



Earl Murphy ex-'i3 was a visitor 
around the campus the first of the 
week. 

♦ ♦ 

'"Jack" Boynton 'ii came in from 
Los Angeles Wednesday and visited 
around College. 

♦ + 

Loraine Williams, Lila Haines and 
Charline Billington spent the week 
end at their respective homes in 
Pueblo. 

♦ ♦ 

Anne Baker gave a spread in her 
room Friday night. 

♦ ♦ 

Miss Mamie Glazier and Miss 
Maude Leon of the Colorado Wom- 
an's College, were guests of Alice 
Mason Thursday. 

+ + 

Ida Wolcott ex-' 13 came Monday 
to attend the Barbecue. 

♦ ♦ 

There was a spread in Myrth 
King's room Monday evening in 
honor of Ida Wolcott. 

♦ ♦ 

Mrs. McLean and Miss Cross of 
India were at the College from Fri- 
day until Monday. Miss Cross spoke 
at prayers Friday evening and Mrs. 
McLean Saturday evening. 

♦ ♦ 

Beatrice Drake's mother visited 
her Sunday. 



CHILI 

Is Now Being Served at 

The College Inn 

Opposite the Campus 



TRY 

A 

SUPPER 

McRAE'S 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co. 
Groceries and 



Meats 



.*£!■ 



0k 




115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE HENRY L. DWINELL HARDWARE COMPANY 



TOOLS 



BUILDERS AND GENERAL HARDWARE 
We Appreciate the College Trade 



CUTLERY 



130 N. Tejon St. 



Peone M^in 439 



THE TIGER 



15 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

"The College Favorite ' 



The Favorite Shopping 

Place for College 

People 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

s the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 

106 1 ? E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone Main 700 

W J. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 






# 



91 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



The J. C. St. John Plumbir-g 
and Heati g Co 

Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 



Artists Materials 

FRAMING 
College Posters 

The Richard Willis Art Studios 

4' ; Ea t Pike's Peak Avenue 



Caps 

Ail Styles 
and Weaves 
$2.50 to 50c 



WE'RE MAKING 
A SPECIALTY 



UNDERWEAR 
Union and 

2 piece 
$5.00 lo 50c 



this season in Clothes for the College Man. 

Swagger styles in Suit and Overcoats in all 
the new Browns, Tans, Blue Mixtures and 
Grays. 

Overcoats in Raglans, Button through and box, $35 to $15 
Suits in all st\les $35. to $18. 



Money 
Cheerfully 
Refunded 



Martha Phillips returned to her 
home in La junta Sunday evening. 

♦ + 

T cond issue of the Kin ap- 

cars this \\ eel-:. 

♦ ♦ 

The first epidemic of exams swept 
over the College last week. No fatal- 
ties have as yet been reported. 

♦ ♦ 

Harry L. Black '12 visited at his 
home in Victor over Sunday. 

♦ ♦ 

J. J. Sinton went up to see the 
I ou der-Wyoming game Saturday. 

♦ ♦ 

Coach Rothgeb and Prof. Park 
watched the Boulder-Wyoming game 
Saturday. 

+ ♦ 

Secretatry Ware returned Monday 
from La Junta where he attended a 
conference of the Arkansas Valley 
high schools which was held in the 
interests of the Young Men's Chris- 

■ n Vsj ociation. 

♦ > 

Ray Lewis '14 spent a couple of 
days at Fowler last week. 




113 E. 

Pikes Peak 

Ave. 



LUMP 

The most satisfacory coal on t lie market 

for furnace 

THE CENTRAL FUEL CO. 

Phone 578 1 28 N. Tejon 



Get Acquainted at 

The Red 
Cross Pharmacy 

hot dr:nks hot tamalas 
HUDSON'S CHOCOLATES 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 

107 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone 40 



Dern's Candy 

Department 

I he Finest Chocolates 
The Purest Mixed Candies 



29 So. Tejoa St. 



Phon 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rccirs 201-3-4 DeCiaff Bldg 
118 North Tejon St. Phone Main 1701 

Res, 1211 N. Weber St. Tel. Main 956 




TOD POWELL 



Phone Main 930 



W. E. DONER 



POWELL-DONER SPORTING GOODS CO. 

1 1 2 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

"EVERYTHING FOR SPORTSMEN" 

New and Complete Stock of the Very Best of Athletic Supplies, College Pennants, Novelties, Etc. 

"ASK THE MEDICINE MAN" 






16 



THE TIGER 






Not if you offered us a bagful of gold, man of affairs, 
could we produce for your approval, better Clothes crafted by Stein-Bloch, Sam Peck 

clothes than these. and the Stratford System, to fit you better 

Clothes designed and tailored especially than you have have ever been fitted-and they 

for the energetic young American. do. 

Clothes that will bring out your indi- Here are snappy browns, blues, grays 

viduality, improve your good appearance and and mixtures, 
add to your prestage as a carefully dressed At Fifteen Dollars up. 



(Pei4uii4-Sfee<ji«er 6 



HAUGEN, Tailor 



222 N. Tejon. 



Phone Main 296 



f 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



\ 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



Departments — 

College of Art:> and 
Science, 
E. S. PARSONS, Deai 

School of Engineering', 
F. CAJORI, Dean 

School of Forestry, 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 



School of Music, 

E. D. HALE, Dean 



J 



We Now Have the Famous 

Norma Martmez 5c Havana Cigars 

HUGHES 

Pool in connection but not a pool room 



13 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



Vol. XIV 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., NOVEMBER 9. 1911 



Number 9 



Tigers Outplaying State U. 
Defeated by Two Field Goals 



Tigers 2; Boulder 8. 

The Tigers were beaten. Sure they 
were beaten. When they played Boulder 
off their feet all through the game, the 
question is — WHY? The same reason 
applies here as has applied to so many 
contests with that institution. "Boulder 
Luck." But the term "Boulder Luck" is 



a trite phrase in these parts. Every time 
we lay defeat to Boulder Luck, we are 
side-stepping another cause which al- 
ways has gone hand in hand with it, and 
that is "Tiger Over-Confidence." Time 
and time again, in almost every form of 
athletics the Tiger teams have had the 

Continued on page 4 



FIGURES SHOW TIGERS SUPERIOR 

NEITHER GOAL LINE CROSSED DURING ENTIRE GAME. 

The following statistics on last Saturday's game were compiled by a rep- 
resentative of the Tiger, and appeared in the Sunday Gazette. They show 
how the Tigers completely outplayed their opponents: 

TIGERS. BOULDER. 
Total 213 yards Ball carried from scrimmage Total 155 yards 

Average 5.7 yards. Average, 3.5 yards. 
Total 113 yards Kicks carried back Total 89 yards 

Average 4.3 yai ds. Average 4.4 yards. 

20 Number of punts 26 

990 yards Distance punted 1,339 yards 

49.5 yards Average punt 51.5 yards 

6 \ttempted forward passes 1 

2 Successful forward passes 

30 yards Yards gained from forward passes 

32 yards Thrown for losses 13 yards 

3.2 yards . Average loss 2.6 yards 

First quarter — 9 — Number of Scrimmages — First quarter — 14 

Second quarter — 19 Second quarter — 7 

Third quarter — 10 Third quarter — 18 

Fourth quarter — 19 Fourth quarter— 5 

3 Times held for downs 2 

7 Made first down 5 

First quarter — S l / 2 min. — Ball in territory — First quarter — 9^2 min. 

Second quarter — 4 3-4 min. Second quarter — 10 1-4 min. 

Third quarter — 8j/ 2 min. Third quarter — 6 l / 2 min. 

Fourth quarter — 4 min. Fourth quarter — 11 min. 

Total 22^ min. Total Z7y 2 min. 



DICKENS' 

LECTURE 



Son of the Famous Charles Dickens 

to Deliver Address at 

Perkins Hall. 



It is probable that no lecturer on 
any American platform has ever at- 
tracted so much attention and has 
been the subject of so many favor- 
able comment as Alfred Tennyson 
Dickens, who is to deliver his lec- 
ture on the subject of "My Father" 
and His Works" at Perkins Hall on 
December 7. This is Mr. Dickens' 
first American tour and his itinerary 
has now been completed so that it 
embraces a tour across the continent 
including all the large cities. 

Mr. Dickens arrived for his first 
visit to America the first week in 
October and his first lecture in this 
country was delivered October 9 be- 
fore a club at Lowell. His lectures 
have become very popular and there 
has been a great clamoring through- 
out the country to get him to lecture 
in cities where he has not made en- 
gagements. Mr. Dickens will start 
on his western trip within the next 
few days. Only a few nights ago he 
delivered a lecture in Boston, and at 
that time several hundred were turned 
away and denied even standing room 
because his audience was so great. 

Alfred Dickens is described as be- 
ing a "jovial, Dickensy man, rosy- 
cheeked, twinkle-eyed, with white 
hair, but not looking his sixty-five 
years." His manner is most attrac- 
tive, genial and of extreme simplicity. 

Continued on Page 3 






THE TIGER 



******'■$•{■ 4***.. * * * * 4 1 •& 
* 

* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



At seven o'clock this even- 
ing following the Bible Study 
Supper, Mr. Worley, of New 
York City, will speak to the 
men of Colorado College in 
the gymnasium in Hagerman 
Hall. All C. C. men ought to 
hear Worley tonight. 



ANNUAL STATE CONFERENCE 

OF STUDENT VOLUNTEERS 

AT DENVER. 



****** ******•£.** 



TWO BIG SECRETARIES HERE. 



Mr. C. K. Ober, a graduate of Wil- 
liams College and one of the strong 
men on the International Committee 
of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation, paid a visit to Colorado Col- 
lege yesterday. Mr. Ober is now 
spending his entire time traveling 
among the colleges of America, pre- 
senting the call of the City Associa- 
tion secretaryship to college men as 
a life work. He talked to a group 
of fellows yesterday noon in Hager- 
man hall and held a number of per- 
sonal interviews with men on the 
campus. 

Another man of influence in our 
midst this week is Mr. Worley, a 
graduate -of Ohio Wesleyan Uni 
versify, and now traveling secretary 
of the Student Volunteer Movement. 
Mr. Work}' has an attractive per- 
sonality and was one of the principal 
speakers at the recent Student Vol- 
unteer Convention in Denver. He 
arrived last evening in Colorado 
Springs and will be about College 
until tomorrow night. This noon 
he spoke to a number of men in Hag- 
erman Hall, and tonight will talk to 
those who have enrolled in Bible 
classes at a gathering in the same 
building. Mr. Worley is at the serv- 
ice of the College while he is here, 
and every man ought to take this op- 
portunity to meet him personally. 



On last Friday afternoon when the 
team went to Denver, fourteen C. C. 
men rode up in the same car to at- 
tend the State Student Volunteer 
Convention. Upon reaching Denver, 
the delegates walked up to the Ox- 
ford hotel with the football team and 
then went directly to Denver Uni- 
versity, where they secured accom- 
modations for over Sunday. 

The first meeting of the Confer- 
ence was held Friday evening in the 
main building of the University. 
Preceding the address, an informal re- 
ception was given to the delegates 
and their friends in University Park. 
Following the social hour, Chancellor 
Buchtel extended his welcome to the 
visitors, and Dean Parsons of Colo- 
rado College gave a response in which 
he stated the purpose of the Conven- 
tion. The main address of the even- 
ing was delivered by Dr. H. F. Rail, 
President of the Iliff School of Theol- 
ogy on "World Conditions of Today.' 

On Saturday morning the session 
opened at 8:30 with a devotional half- 
hour, led by P. L. Corbin, of Boulder. 
Following him, the history and pur- 
pose of the Student Volunteer Move- 
ment was presented by Mr. H. W. 
Worley of New York City, traveling 
secretary of the movement. Mrs. 
Jennie Cameron recently returned 
from China, then gave an impressive 
talk on "The Call to Service," and 
at 10:30 Mr. Worley conducted a con- 
ference on Mission Study. The last 
address on the morning's program 
was given by a leading Denver minis- 
ter on "The Basis for the Choice of 
a Life-Work." 

At noon the Colorado College dele- 
gates left the convention for Boulder. 
After the game they returned to 
Denver, but reached the University 



too late for the Fellowship Supper 
and address by Dr. John G. Inglis. 
late of China. 

The Session opened on Sunday 
morning with a short devotional 
meeting, followed by a conference 
hour with two addresses by Mr. Wor- 
ley and Mr. Nipps, State Student 
Secretary of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association. At 10:30 church 
services were held in the University 
chapel under Convention auspices, 
when several of the delegates spoke. 

The afternoon session took the 
form of a Question Box and open 
discussion of the great Student Mis- 
sionary propaganda, and of the need 
for and qualifications of a Christian 
worker on a foieign shore. From 
five to six the ladies of University 
Park served chocolate and sand- 
wiches to the delegates, and a social 
time was enjoyed. Miss Keyes, of 
China, spoke to the Convention at 
six o'clock, followed by the closing 
meeting of the Conference at 7:15. 
In this last session Dr. Wakefield, of 
Denver, addressed the delegates, and 
testimonies were given by Mr. Wat- 
son, of the Colorado School of 
Alines, John Fike, Denver U's. big 
lineman, and Miss Picken, of Colo- 
rado College, all of whom are Stu- 
dent Volunteers and expect to go to 
the Far East for service in the cause 
of Christian Missions. 

There were sixty-six college dele- 
gates in attendance upon the Confer- 
ence, and five other leaders and 
speakers, making a total registration 
of seventy-one. Of this number 
thirty-eight were Student Volunteers. 

The C. C. delegation included Abel 
Gregg, A. H. Rowbotham, E. W. 
Lindstrom, C. K. Seely, E. W. 
Barnes, Walter Thomas, Sam Baker, 
H. A. Bennett, D. L. Boyes, C. A. 
Carson. Elbert Wade, F. B. McNeil, 
, H. W. Rhone and Secretary F. W. 
Ware. 




COLORADO COLLEGE INSIGNIA PROCESSION. 



THE TIGER 



DICKEN'S LECTURE 

Continued from page 1 

He left England in 1866 when he was 
twenty years of age and went to 
Australia, where he spent the rest 
of his life. He has lived in the bush, 
and has dealt in land and in flocks, 
and lias lived the adventurous life 
'that is to be found in all new coun- 
ii ies. 

Alfred was the sixth of the ten 
children of Charles Dickens. He was 
named after his god-father, Alfred 
Tennyson, who was a great friend 
of his father. His reminiscenses of 
the home life of his father and of the 
friends who flocked about him in 
their English home will be intensely 
interesting to us. As he talks one 
has pictures of the big family of 
lively boys and girls ,and their father 
the center of their games; of their 
holiday gatherings, when Dickens 
drew about him his theatrical and 
journalistic friends, and they all made 
merry on the good old English 
fashion, with feasting and good stor- 
ies and boisterous games. Dickens 
has been called "the last cry of Merry 
England," and his son's stories of his 
boyhood makes Dickens' own family 
life seem a vivid illustration of the 
phrase. 

The English department of the Col- 
lege is certainly to be congratulated 
upon securing the lecture to be given 
here. Without a doubt it is to be the 
most popular lecture that has ever 
been given in the history of the Col- 
lege, and even now with it still a 
month off, there is a great deal of 
talk about it among the students 
and among the townspeople. Besides, 
a number of people who live outside 
of Colorado Springs have expressed 
the intention of coming here for the 
very purpose of hearing the lecture. 

Subscription blanks were circulated 
this week so that some idea might be 
gained as to the number of tickets 
that will be sold to students. The 
lecture is being brought here primar- 
ily for the students and the faculty 
and they are to be given the prefer- 
ence in case the sale of tickets be- 
comes too great, and those who have 
signed their names to the subscrip- 
tion lists that have gone the rounds 
will be given preference to others 
that may come later. So, it is ad- 
visable to place your name on the 
subscription blank in order to Jbe 
sure of best accommodation. The 
expense of bringing the lecture here 
is enormous, and Perkins Hall will 
have to be filled to the limit in order 




THE HATCHET IS BURIED. 



that the English department may be 
able to come out without a loss. 
Tickets are to be sold to the students 
and to the members of the faculty for 
fifty cents each, and to others outside 
the College the price will be slightly 
greater. 

Remember the date — December 7, 
and don't forget to get your name on 
a subscription list. 



VESPER SERVICE 

Dr. Bayley of Denver Gives Excel- 
lent Address. 



Dr. Frank T. Bayley of the Ply- 
mouth Congregational Church in 
Denver, gave the address at the Ves- 
per Services last Sunday. It is more 
than noticeable how the attendance 
has been dropping off at the services. 
The first few Sundays a good crowd 
attended, but as soon as the novelty 
began to wear off, the people began 
to stop coming. Last Sunday there 
was a fair attendance, but a large 
part of it was made up of towns- 
people who seem to appreciate Dr. 
Bayley more than do the students. 
At an address like the one Sunday, 
the hall should have been packed. 
The Vesper Services have been made 
non-compulsory, as the faculty does 
not consider compulsory church at- 
tendance to be a success, but that 
does not mean that everybody is to 
take advantage of the fact and stay 
at home or elsewhere as one sees fit. 
We should all the more get behind 
and support the service. Let's all 
come out next Sunday and show our 
loyalty. 

Dr. Bayley took as his subject, 



"What Will the Twentieth Century 
Man Do with his Dynamite?" He 
chose his text from Galatiaas 5:14: 
"Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thy- 
self." 

Dr. Bayley said in part: 

The greatest and noblest art of the 
present day is the art of living to- 
gether. It is also the most difficult. 
Man was not intended to live alone. 
The great problem is how to get 
along together? The closeness of 
mental relations has increased the 
difficulty. All progress has not in- 
creased independence but interde- 
pendence. In former days a man had 
only to avoid the stone-throw or 
bow-shot of his enemy in order to 
be safe. Now everything is far more 
complicated. Take dynamite for ex- 
ample. This power will with equal 
willingness force a road through the 
mountains or open up the treasure 
house of nature, and blow up a 
dwelling. Or consider the power of 
combination. Scarcely anyone is 
free from the effect of strikes. Wall 
Street can form a combination that 
will manipulate prices to a wonder- 
ful extent. 

There are severaj ways of turning 
this "dynamite," as-Dr. Bayley called 
the power of the 20th century indi- 
vidual, to the best good of mankind. 

One is education. In this day the 
uneducated individual is not feared to 
any great extent. On the other hand 
it is the educated crook that is feared. 
The man with brains and wits suc- 
ceeds over the stupid and poorly 
educated man. Consequently there 
must necessarily be moral education 
if the good is to result. Legislation 

Continued on Page 9 



THE TIGER 



TIGERS OUTPLAYING STATE 

Continued from page 1 

pleasure of "scaring 'em to death," and 
then been defeated. We enjoy scaring 
them, and there is always a good reason 
why we scare them. The reason is, that 
we have the best team, but the trouble 
is we know we have the best team. 
"Tiger over-confidence" has lost more 
games to Boulder than all other causes 
put together. 

Goal kicking is the only department of 
the game that Boulder can be said ti. 
have outclassed the Tigers, ana it is not 
so certain whether they would have out- 
classed them there if the Tigers had 
realized the necessity of trying . this 
method of scoring. There were a num- 
ber of times when either Sinton or Van- 
demoer could have put the ball over the 
bar, but the Tigers wanted to carry it 
over. Boulder knows, and Coach Fol- 
som himself says that they were out- 
played except for their kicking. They 
knew* beforehand that they would have 
to take every chance if they were going 
to win. They did take the chances, and 
they won. They kicked, and they made 
their kicks good — two of them. One was 
by Rich from the forty yard line after a 
fair catch, and the other by Hartman 
from the twenty-yard line during play. 
Their other points were made in the 
same way that the Tigers made their 
score, by safety. 

The third quarter was the only quar- 
ter of the game where Boulder had the 
advantage for the greater part of the 
time. It was in this quarter that they 
made five of their eight points. In the 
last quarter the Tigers played the best 
game which they played throughout the 
game. They were in Boulder's territory 
more than any other time during the 
game, and they carried the ball more. 

It was scarcely three minutes after 
the game had begun that Vandemoer 
punted to the goal line. Hartman got 
the ball, but fumbled when tackled by 
Black. The ball went across the line, 
and was recovered by McFadden, thus 
saving a touchdown against Boulder, but 
scoring a saftely for the Tigers. The 
score remained 2-0 until the end of the 
half. 

In third quarter, Nelson repated Van- 
demoer's tactics. Putnam tried to stop a 
punt which he should let go by, for a 
touchback. He fumbled and recovered 
behind the goal line, scoring a safety for 
Boulder. It was only a few plays after 
this that Vandemoer was forecd to kick 
from behind the goal line. McFaddeu 
made a fair catch on the forty-yard line, 
and with no interference Rich took his 
time and booted it over the bar. The 



score was then 5-2. 

The only other scoring was at the end 
of the last quarter after the Tiger team 
was greatly weakened by taking out 
men. A fumbled punt by Putnam en- 
abled Pigg to carry the ball to the ten- 
yard line. From this point it was a 
simple matter for Hartman to kick the 
goal. 

Only once during the game did Boul- 
der have the ball within the Tigers' thir- 
ty-five yard line. On the other hand, 
the Tigers had the ball down to Boul- 
der's twenty-five yard line at least once 
during every quarter of the game. In 
the second quarter they had the ball on 
the three-yard line, with three downs to 
put it over, but were unable to get far- 
ther than the one-yard line. Once dur- 
ing the second quarter, . Thompson got 
away with a fumble and had open field 
before him. The goal line was too far, 
and MacFadden overhauled him. Vande- 
moer had the greatest number of long 
gains to his credit. Heald gained as 
consistently as any one, and tore off one 
or two long runs. Sinton went twenty- 
five yards on one forward pass. The 
passing for forward passes was gener- 
ally poor. 

McFadden did not star. Nelson, 
Hartman, Kemp and Rich all did ex- 
ceptional work for Boulder. . Captain 
Sinton, Heald, Vandemoer, Bowers and 
Witherow did the most effective work 
for C. C. 

Play for play, the game was played 
in detail as follows: 

First Quarter. 

Captain Sinton kicked off fifty- 
three yards for the Tigers. Nelson 
caught the ball under the Colorado 
goal and returned eighteen yards. 
Rich hit left tackle for one yard and 
Colorado was penalized fifteen yards 
for holding in the line. Nelson 
punted thirty-three yards. Vandy 
fumbled but Putnam regained the 
ball. Heald went through Knowles 
for two yards and took time out. 
The Tigers tried a forward pass from 
Putnam to Sinton but the throw fell 
short. Vandemoer punted forty 
yards to Hartman, but the latter fum- 
bled and the ball bounced in the mud 
behind the goal post. Captain Mc- 
Fadden saved a touchdown by beat- 
ing three Tigers to it and fell on the 
oval for a safety, counting the Tigers 
their only score. Tigers 2, Colorado 
0. 

Rich hit the left tackle for no gain 
when the ball was brought in to the 
25-yard line for scrimmage. Mc- 
Fadden went around right end for 
six yards. Nelson punted forty-eight 



yards to Putnam, who was downed 
in his tracks by Kemp. Van tried an 
end run but Kemp came around be- 
hind and threw him after he had 
gained a yard. Black lost a half 
yard on a center plunge and Vandy 
punted forty yards. Nelson punted 
twenty-five yards out of bounds. 
Vandy tried a delayed pass but 
gained only a half yard after twenty 
yards of dodging. Black tried right 
tackle for a buck but was downed in 
his tracks. Vandy punted twenty- 
seven yards out of bounds. Hart- 
man returned four yards. Rich lost 
three yards on an attempted center 
buck. Nelson went around left end 
for no gain. Nelson punted twelve 

Continued on page 7 



DIAGRAM OF BOULDER- 
C. C. GAME 

Key to the diagram: Shows only 
the linear gains made up and down 
the field. The kick-off is at the top, 
the last play at the bottom. The 
progress of the ball is indicated by 
following the lines up and down the 
gridiron, working down the page all 
the time. The field is divided off 
by 5-yard lines. The 55 and 25-yard 
lines are marked. The quarters of 
the game are indicated by Roman 
numerals (I, II, III, and IV) at the 
side of the page. C. C. and U. C. 
(underlined) indicate the goal lines 
which C. C. and U. C. respectively, 
were defending. Each carry ball to- 
wards gc>al "which opponent defends. 
Triangle indicates kick-off; X indi- 
cates a down with the ball in pos- 
session of C. C.j O indicates a down 
with ball in Boulder's possession. 
Dotted line indicates a gain made by 
a kick. Continuous line indicates 
progress made by carrying the ball 
(both from scrimmage and carrying 
back punts). Line crossed by short 
intersections indicates the ball moved 
by an official, either as a penalty or 
to escape mud-holes. (For every 
move to escape mud, there is always 
a corresponding move back again, 
after the ball has gone up the field.) 
Waving line indicates progress of 
ball on a fumble. F indicates fumble; 
F. P. indicates an attempt at forward 
pass; D, beside X within O, indicates 
side held for downs and consequent 
change of hands by the ball; I indi- 
cates first down made by side in 
possession of ball; F. C. indicates 
fair catch. S indicates a safety (scor- 
ing two points). T indicates a 
touchback (no score). F. G. indi- 
cates a field goal (three points). 



THE TIGER 



JOE SEES ROULDER GAME AND RUMINATES 



T D> Kick- off 

X C: C &e v 
O U.C. 'Q§^ 

Ball carrteJ 

Kick 

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THE TIGER 



The Weekly Newspaper of Colorado College 

HARRY L. BLACK Editor-in-Chief 

RICHARD L. IllOHES Business Mjfr. 

Leon C. Havens Assistant Editor 

A. H Rowbotham Assistant Editor 

J. J. Sinton Athletic Editor 

D. H. mahan Engineering Editor 

G. S. COWDERV Forestry Editor 

Miss Glenn Stiles Alumni Editor 

Miss Mary Randolph Exchange Editor 

Miss Helen Rand Local Editor 

A. W. Donovan Local Editor 

H. A. Pabkiion Assistant Manager 

A. L. Golden Assistant Manager 

W. L. Myers Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

F. P. Storke, H A. Bennett, Miss Lucy Ferrill 

Miss Elizabeth Gerould, Miss Leona Stukey, 

Miss Myrth King, Miss Violet Hopper, Miss 

Franc Adams, R. G. Appel 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to TheTiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo 

Phones: Editor, Main 2550. Manager, Main 2073 

Entered at (he postoffice at Colorado 
Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



Boulder Won the Game. 

Well, what do you know about that? 
If there was any possible way to do it, 
we should try to sneak out of writing 
this editorial. But there is no such way 
and so we may as well turn about and 
face the music. 

It was certainly hard for the Tigers to 
take a beating at the hands of the Uni- 
versity team Saturday on Gamble field, 
and they showed it. It was hard for the 
Colorado College rooters who were there 
in the grandstands ready to cheer for 
the Tigers to their very last breath. It 
was hard for their supporters at home to 
hear of ther defeat Saturday evening, 
and it was hard for their alumni friends, 
and all other friends in all parts of the 
country to hear of the defeat. Any way 
you look at it it was a hard game for us 
to lose, and if the game had resulted in 
a victory for us it would have been just 
as hard for the supporters of the Uni- 
versity team to take the defeat. 

A defeat it was, but that was all it 
was. The playing of both team on the 
field was superb at all times. Every man 
on both elevens realized before the game 
began that he was there to play the 
game of his life. When one stops to 
realize how much there was at stake on 
either side, one cannot help wondering 
that the players on the field played the 
steady, aggressive, cool-headed game 



they did. To be sure there was some 
sign of nervousness on the part of some 
of the players, but the great wonder is 
that there was not more of it. It was a 
grand fight for the winning of a game 
and for the honor of the schools repre- 
sented. It was anybody's game until the 
very last minute when the referee's 
whistle stopped the contest and there 
was not a sign of giving up on either 
side. And in the defeat suffered by the 
loser of the game there is no disgrace, 
because the team played the very best 
they could and no one could ask them 
to do more. And if the University had 
been the loser, we should have to give it 
to them that they reflected great glory 
upon their institution for the battle they 
put up. The way they fought during the 
first half of the game when the. score 
was against them, and the way they came 
back in the second half and fought an 
uphill fight to the victory, is deserving of 
better things than that we should at- 
tempt to detract from the glory of their 
victory. 

To review he game critically, we must 
say that the Tigers are JUST AS 
GOOD a team as the Silver and Gold 
eleven. We must say this in spite of 
the fact that the score of the game 
stands against us. There is no one who 
will deny this fact, not even the coaches 
of the two teams. It is agreed that the 
defensive work of the two teams is about 
even. In favor of the University, it must 
be said that they have a kicker, while 
the Tigers have none; and in favor of 
the Tigers it must be said that their of- 
fense is a good deal stronger than that 
of the University. It was the ability of 
the University to kick a goal from the 
field that won the game, and if it had 
not been for this the two teams would 
probably have had to depend upon a 
break of luck to avoid a tie score. 

Both teams must be complimented 
upon their clean and manly style of 
play. There was no display of bitter- 
nes or unsportsmanlike conduct on the 
field on either side. It is gratifying to 
note that the game was free from any- 
thing suggestive of more than the most 
spirited rivalry between the contestants. 

And furthermore, we are glad to com- 
pliment the University upon the mag- 
nanimous spirit and courtesy with which 
they treated the Tigers and their sup- 
porters. The reception and the cheers 
given the Tigers at the hotel, Friday 
night, was something unheard of in the 
previous relations between the two in- 
stitutions. Our visitors were received 
with utmost courtesy on their campus 
and the students and the faculty there 
did the very best they could to make 



them feel at home. 

The unfairness in the rooting of the 
University during the game which won 
them an* unenviable reputation some 
years ago was conspicuous for- its ab- 
sence. The students stood behind their 
team with all the vim and spirit that 
could be expected, but they used only 
the fairest means of showing their en- 
thusiasm. 

Altogether the game has done a great 
deal to add to the rivalry between Colo- 
rado College and the University of Col- 
orado, and at the same time it has done 
away with a good deal of feeling of 
"muckerism" — if that is the right word 
— that has been trying to exist for a long 
time. And it is to be hoped that this 
game is to mark a new era in our rela- 
tions with the University, an era which 
is to be characterized by rivalry of a 
white heat, but by no bitter, jealous 
hatred. And if the Uni\ Tsity continues 
to show the disposition that was shown 
with the game Saturday, there is little 
to fear that such an era may be real- 
ized. 



Utah Next. 

Just because we lost the game to 
Boulder does not mean that we are 
shut out from having a chance at the 
championship. The present football 
season, while it is still very young, 
has demonstrated that almost any- 
thing may be expected to happen to 
the best of teams. What is to pre- 
vent Boulder from losing all the rest 
of the games she has on her sched- 
ule? Of course, such a thing is not 
at all likely, but it remains a possi- 
bility. The University of Utah has 
a strong team. We have our chance 
at them on Washburn field next Sat- 
urday. The fact that we have them 
on our own grounds this year is go- 
ing to be a big factor in our favor, 
for it is a well-known fact that in 
the past the Utah teams have never 
put up the fight away from home 
that they have on their home 
grounds. If they follow the prece- 
dent this year, things are going to 
work out to our advantage in two 
ways. First, they will be easier for 
us next Saturday, and second, they 
will be harder for the University of 
Colorado when they meet at Salt 
Lake November 18. 

Now it is up to the Tigers to win 
the rest of the games on their sched- 
ule and await the posibility of Boul- 
der. Utah, and Denver University 
fighting each other down to one or 
more defeats. Therein lies the chance 
for the championship, and it isn't so 



THE TIGER 



bad a chance either. 

[t is an obvious fact that the cham- 
pionship cannot be won on paper. If 
it could, we might just as well dis- 
pense with the rest of the football 
games that have been scheduled this 
season, and settle the matter of cham- 
pionship by mail. The Tigers have 
three hard games left on their 
schedule, and it is up to them to win. 
Tt is not a question of "coming 
hack." They have never been any 
place to "come back" from. They 
have been on the job all the time, 
and they are going to stay there un- 
til the season is over Thanksgiving 
Day. That does not mean that there 
is no room for improvement. There 
is, and plenty of it. And the Tigers 
know that there is just as well or 
better than anyone else. 

So, we're all off for the Utah game 
Saturday. And we're off to WIN. 



TIGERS OUTPLAYING STATE 

Continued from Page 4 

yards out of bounds. 

The remainder of the quarter was 
spent in punts and returns, the per- 
iod ending with the ball in the center 
of the field. 

Second Quarter. 

Sinton went eight yards around 
end and then Black crawled two 
yards to first down. Heald started 
to hit the line here and made two 
gains of five and six yards. Black 
and Vandy made no gain on attempt- 
ed end runs and Vandy booted the 
ball thirty-eight yards. Hartman re- 
turned three and Nelson punted 
thirty-five to Putnam, who returned 
twenty yards before he was downed. 
Black hit left tackle for four yards. 

The Tigers were penalized five 
yards for off-side. Vandy went fif- 
teen yards around left end and was 
stopped by Rich. Vandy kicked 
thirty yards and Nelson on the re- 
turn sent the ball out of bounds after 
it had traveled twenty-three yards. 
Vandy tried left end and grabbed 
five yards and Heald went over left 
tackle for five. Putnam went five 
yeards on an end run and Heald 
plunged through center for eight 
yards. 

This brought the ball to the one- 
yard line with three downs to make 
it. Vandemoer took the ball and 
fumbled. For ten seconds it lay 
where none of the players could see 
it, but Koch regained. Two more 
plunges by Heald brought the ball 
to with six inches of the white goal. 
it was Colorado's ball and no touch- 



down. 

Nelson kicked 65 yards and Put- 
nam returned but one step when he 
was dropped by Mills and Kemp. 
Heald fumbled a pass and Rich re- 
gained the ball. Hartman ducked 
around right end for 15 yards and 
MacFadden duplicated for 4 yards. 
Nelson went 15 off tackle and then 
MacFadden sprinted 6 around right 
end. Hartman dropped back for a 
forward pass and before he got the 
ball away was thrown for a loss of 
15 yards. Nelson punted 45 yards 
and Vandy returned 5. Black went 
over right guard for 15 yards and 
Vandy punted 38 yards. Heald went 
a half yard through tackle and Put- 
nam tried a forward pass which was 
grabbed by Rich. Rich went through 
center for 6 yards and then 5 through 
left tackle. A bad pass for a punt 
was grabbed by Thompson who got 
away as if for a touchdown. After 
going 28 yards he was downed by 
MacFadden. The half was over with 
the ball on the Tigers' 38-yard line 
in their own possession. Score: 
Tigers 2, Colorado 0. 

Third Quarter. 

Rich kicked off 55 yards and the 
ball went over the line. It was 
brought in to the 25-yard line for 
scrimmage. Vandy tried an end run 
and was dropped behind the line by 
Kemp. Heald went over right tackle 
for 6 yards. He took out time to 
get his wind. Vandy kicked 50 yards 
to Hartman, who returned 3. Rich 
went through center for a yard and 
Nelson punted 38 yards and Vande- 
moer returned 11. Black hit center 
and stopped and Putnam did the 
same. 

Vandy kicked 35 yards to MacFad- 
den who was downed where he 
caught the ball. Nelson went off 
tackle for 4 1-2 yards. MacFadden 
gained 5 yards on an end run. Rich 
went to first down. Nelson was 
dropped in his tracks. Hartman 
around right end for 6 yards. Nel- 
son kicked 45 yards and Putnam and 
Vandemoer fell on the ball behind 
the line for safety. Heald was 
thrown for a loss of 3 yards and 
Vandy kicked 35 yards. Hartman 
made a pretty run for 21 yards. 

Nelson went at left end for no gain 
and Kemp repeated his performance. 
Nelson kicked thirty-five yards. 
Vandy was dropped for no gain on 
the catch. Heald and Vandy both 
hit center for no gain, and Vandy 
kicked forty-one yards. Hartman 
returned 5 yards. Nelson punted 



42 yards and there was no return. 
Heald made no gain off tackle, and 
when Vandy could do no better he 
kicked again for 23 yards. MacFad- 
den caught the ball on the forty-yard 
line and signalled for a fair catch. 
Rich kicked the placement perfectly, 
making the score 5 to 2 for Colorado. 

Sinton kicked off fifty-two yards to 
Rich, who fell in the mud and returned 
but two yards. Hartman made no gain 
around left end and Nelson pnnted 27 
yards to Putnam, who fumbled the ball, 
and Black came through center for 10 
yards. Tigers were penalized five yards 
for offside. Black went off tackle for 3 
yards. 

Putnam tried a forward pass to 
Thompson, which hit the ground. Colo- 
rado's ball, and Rich made two through 
center. Hartman ran forty-five yards 
and Nelson was thrown for loss of five. 
Nelson punted 50 yards and Putnam re- 
turned ten. Heald went off tackle for 
six yards. End of third quarter, Colo- 
rado 5, Tigers 2. 

Fourth Quarter. 

The Tigers went through for first 
down. Black made no gain at center, 
and Vandy lost four yards around the 
end. Vandy kicked 55 yards to Hart- 
man, who returned 15 yards. 

Nelson went through center for 10 
yards. Koch regained the ball when 
Nelson lost it on being tackled. Vandy 
and Heald each made made no gain, 
and Vandy booted thirty yards. McFad- 
den went around end for five yards. 
Nelson punted 39 yards and Mills and 
Kemp hit Putnam together. Heald got 
a forward pass and gained 25 yards, but 
when this was tried again Nelson got 
the ball. Nelson punted 30 yards and 
Putnam returned eight. Black went five 
yards. Nelson kicked 50 yards and 
Mills recovered Putnam's fumble. Pigg 
went around left end to the 10-yard line 
for 35 yards. MacFadden made no gain 
through center. Hartman kicked a 
Princton from the 25-yard line, and the 
score was Colorado 8, Tigers 2. 

Vandy kicked off 50 yards and Mc- 
Fadden returned 20 yards. Nelson 
kicked 36 yards, Putnam returned 11 ; 
the game was over, with the ball in the 
Tigers' possession on Colorado's 37-yard 
line. Score: Colorado 8, Tigers 2. 



Mr. "Fat" Morgan is with the Park 
Commission in Los Angeles, Calif. 









Mis Jean Pattison ex-'ll is assisting 
in the library at Vassar. 

Miss Margaret Mack '08 is taking the 
training for a Y. W. C. A. secretary in 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



THE TIGER 




Gadoca Clothes will improve your ap- 
pearance. Why be in the rough state when 
you can easily be a polished gem. 

These Suitsand Overcoats have a mark 
of refinement which you will not find else- 
where. 

Suits and Overcoats $ 1 5. to $50. 

GANODO^NS^ 



State Football News 



D. U. 49-AGGIES 

The game between Denver Uni- 
versity and the Agricultural College 
was a listless and uninteresting af- 
fair. The Methodists ran over the 
Aggies by a score of 49-0. The Ag- 
gies showed real flashes of football 
only once or twice during the whole 
game. Their team was weakened by 
injuries and was not able to show 
the class which the D. U. veterans 
had. Koonsman made seven touch- 
downs for Denver Russ, the crack 
left end, made a sensational iun of 
65 yards. 



UTAH HAS STRONG TEAM 



The School of Mines put up a bet- 
ter fight against Utah in Salt Lake 
than had been expected of them. 
Utah beat them 15-0. The Mines 
team was not able to cope with that 
tremendous speed, which the Utah 
team is exhibiting this fall on all oc- 
casions. The Mines line was the 
weaker of the two. Harper, the 
famous drop-kicker of the Mines, 
failed to make his single chance good. 
Utah made their fifteen point by 
three touchdowns, but were unable 
to kick any of the goals after the 
touchdowns. Ashton, the Utah full- 
back, was the star of the game, even 
out-classing the speedy halfback, 
Romney. 

Colorado College plays the Uni- 
versity of Utah on Washburn field 
next Saturday, and the game is 
bound to be the best game which 
will be played in Colorado Springs 
this fall. Utah has met three of the 
Colorado teams already. The Ag- 
gies were badly walloped, the Mines 
were beaten by a fair score and a tie 



game was played with D. U. The 
Utah team is the nearest the Tigers' 
weight of any team they have played yet. 
They are probably the fastest team 
in the conference. The Tigers should 
win, but it will be no walk 7 away. 



With very best wishes, 
Yours, 

George Norlin. 



LINEUP OF BOULDER GAME. 

Boulder. Colo. College. 

Kemp, 1 e 1 e Thompson,, Deesz 

Workley, 1 t .1 t, Bowers 

Knowles, 1 g 1 g, Hedblom 

Davenport, c c, Witherow 

Crouter, r g r g, Floyd 

Cooper, r t r t, Koch 

Mills, r e r e, Sinton, Lewis 

Hartman, q b q b, Putnam, Herron 

MacFadden, 1 h (capt) 1 h, Heald 

Nelson, Pigg, r h b r h b, Vandemoer 

Rich, Nelson, f b f b, Black 

Bansback, referee; Steele, umpire; 
Coffin, field judge. 

DR. NORLIN PRAISES TIGERS 

Professor Park of Cutler Academy 
has received the following letter from 
Dr. George Norlin, of the University of 
Colorado. Dr. Norlin has been the Uni- 
versity representative on the Faculty 
Athletic Conference ever since the Con- 
ference was formed, and the high praise 
he speaks for the Tiger team is certainly 
worth a great deal. 

The letter reads in part as follows : 
Boulder, Colo., Nov. 6, 1911. 
My Dear Mr. Park: 

It is easy for one who has the best end 
of the score to be congratulatory. Nev- 
ertheless, please allow me to say that 
you have a magnificent team, and you 
have every reason to be proud of the 
fight they made. I feel that honors were 
even, and that the score means only that 
we have a good place kicker, and you 
have not or did not use him if you had. 



ENGINEERING NEWS. 

In many of the eastern schools of 
engineering, schools which are located 
in cities where manufacturing is the 
chief industry, there has been includ- 
ed among the regular courses, a 
course known as inspection visits. 
These courses often consume as much 
as one afternoon per week. Unfor- 
tunately Colorado Springs cannot 
offer enough plants to visit to make 
possible such a course as a require- 
ment. However, there are eight or 
ten plants in this vicinity to which 
a visit would be well worth while. 

To take the place of such a course 
the Engineers' Club has arranged 
that several of these plants should 
be thrown open to the inspection of 
the memebers. It has been planned 
that the visits be on Saturday morn- 
ing, and the night before will be used 
for general discussion of the industry 
to be visited. 

Next Saturday morning the local 
gas plant will be open to inspection 
and Friday evening's program will in- 
clude papers on production, utiliza- 
tion and other phases of the gas in- 
dustry. 

During the winter the Club will 
visit the Hydro plant at Manitou, 
which, when built (and probably yet) 
had the distinction of having the 
highest head of pressure of any 
Hydro plant in the world; the North 
End plant and probably some of the 
concentrating and cyanide mills. 

Three engineers, Heald, Scott and 
Deesz, are making good on the foot- 
ball team, besides carrying the heavy 
work of an engineering course. Scott 
also wears a "C" that he earned in 



THE TIGER 



Hunt Up 

Bissell's Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

Pike's Peak Book & 
Stationery Co. SLLB5 all 

Seldomridge Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
Flour, Fepd, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



CALL 2000 

When You Want Anything QUICK! 
QUICK DELIVERY 



MAI* 2000 



COTRELL & LEONARD 

Albany, N. Y. 
Makers of 

CAPS & GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the 

Atlantic to the Pacific 

Class Contcacts a Specialty 

Deichmann & Douglas Floral 

Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER, Mar. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 

Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Gazette Building 



track. 

It is time well spent when a stu- 
dent spends a few hours a week read- 
ing the current engineering journals. 
Begin to get acquainted with the dif- 
ferent manufacturers and their pro- 
ducts now by giving the advertising 
pages their due consideration. The 
amount of valuable information in the 
ads. alone is surprising and when 
you have once cultivated the habit of 
reading them closely, your interest 
in engineering will show a very 
marked increase. 

When you want to subscribe for 
one of the journals in the future, you 
will know which one suits your needs. 
They are all in a handy place in the 
Polytechnic library. 

ENGINEERS' CLUB PROGRAM, 
NOVEMBER io. 

Coal Gas Production Marsh 

Water Gas Production Kimball 

Gas Utilization Lloyd 

November 11, all Engineers are to 
meet at the local gas works by 10:00 a. 
m. Saturday morning, when they will be 
shown through the plant. 

MINERVA OPEN MEETING. 

Minerva Society held an open 
meeting last Friday in the Apollon- 
ian Club House. Miss Sahm gave a 
very interesting talk on Wagner, tak- 
ing up "Der Ring des Nibelungen," 
"Das Rheingold," "Die Walkure," 
"Siegfried" and "Gotterdammerung." 
Mrs. Howe played selections from the 
operas. After the program, refresh- 
ments were served. 

VESPER SERVICE 

Continued from page I 

has been suggested as the source of 
solution. But legislatures have been 
bought and judges corrupted. The 
only sufficient solution is a question 
of the disposition of the individual. 
It is, therefore, a moral, religious, 
and social question. 

As the cell is the unit of life, so 
the human life is the unit of the so- 
cial world, and it is to the individual 
we must look for the "dynamite," 
and it is in the moral education of 
the individual that the solution is to 
be found for the best use of his "dy- 
namite." 




NEW 

Fall Styles 

JUST IN 

High Arch, High Toes, Short 
Vamps, Button or Lace, Velvets, 
Suedes, Patents, Gunmetels, 
Tan Russia's 

$2.50, $3.00, $3.50 
and $ 4.00 

^^a fit roft fcvfcRv rootV^ 



rr pays to P 



the: 

El A I 

HOEC 



^^^107 SOVTM TtJOH SJjgfT 



Board $4.50 Per Week 

One front room for two. Board 

and room $25 per month for each 

222 E. DALE 

THE 

Crissey & Fowler 
Lumber Co. 



Phone 101 



117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 



Telephone 599 



CUT FLOWERS 



Store 104 N. Tejon Street 

The Pike's Peak Floral Co. 

DECORATIONS AND DESIGNS 



10 



THE TIGER 



You ought to give these Overcoats of ours at $15-$20 and $25 a lot of consideration, because 
we have been mighty careful in assembling them. We are sure you will find nothing to equal 
them in variety, smartness of design and excellence of tailoring. 

May we CONVINCE you? 




To College 
Students 
Old and New 

We Extend the Most Cordial Good 
Wishes. We've made a Specialty of 
taking care of the wants of the up-to- 
dale young men and women. You'll 
find us the kind of jewelry store you'll 
like. 

The Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak 



The Davis Barber Shop 

Individual Sterilizing Cabinets 
Ray Davis, Manager 



Joslyn P ress 

112 E. Cucharras St. 
Phone Main 1 154 

Printers & 
Publishers 



mamm 



ANY KIND OF PRINTING 
WE PRINT THE TIGER 



AN -ALUMNI HALLOWE'EN. 

In order that the Alumni and for- 
mer students of C. C. might cele- 
brate the Hallowe'en in a true Tiger 
style, Mr. and .Mrs. Packard opened 
their home on Tuesday evening. 

Besides getting acquainted, singing 
college songs and partaking of true 
Hallowe'en refreshments, the real 
work of the evening was to effect a 
terporary organization. Accordingly 
Miss Anna Strang. Miss Ethel Nor- 
ton and Mr. B. W. Stiles were ap- 
pointed on a committee to draw up 
.plans for a permanent organization, 
to be submitted at the next meeting. 

It is planned to have a meeting 
about every six weeks. Miss Anna 
Strang has kindly invited the C. C. 
people to her home for the next one. 
This will come early in December. 
Some time during the winter, it is 
planned to have a banquet. 

Some of the C. C. people now in 
Pueblo and who availed themselves 
of the hospitality of Mr. and Mrs. 
Sperry Packard '02 are: 

Roy McClintock '00«and wife, Miss 
Merle McClintock '01, Mrs. William 
Warner (Edith Abbert) '02, Mrs. 
Chas. Van Arsdale (Alvina Beyer) 
'03. Miss Lucile Alderdice '04, Miss 
Zoa Kidder '04, Mrs. Clark Gittings 
(Mae Rantschler) '06, Miss Edna 
Prevosf '08, Chas. Orr '08, Miss Ethel 

Have Your Clothes Cleaned, Pressed and 
Kept in First-Class Repair by 

"Sam" the Gentlemen's Valet 

Also Makes a Specialty of Serving .Parties 
SAM FLEMING 

114 E. Cucharras Phone 1675 



3RE AD F ° r morn ' n g delivery. It's 
bread hot from the oven, 
baked from the choicest flour, and that 
would command first premn.m anywhere. 
That you get from us. Is always good. 

THE CHICAGO BAKERY 

Have the fellows meet you at 

. Tucker 9 s 
Restaurant 

10 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 

You can always save money if 
you will come to see our line in 
diamonds, watches, jewelry, 
guns, sporting goods, fishing 
tackel drawing sets, musical 
instruments, trunks, valises, or 
if you want to loan money, you 
can get it 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 

Money Loaned on Valuables 



HAVE YOU A PANITORIUM COLLEGE TICKET ? 

See Rhone, College Agent, Hagerman Hall 
30 SUITS SPONGED AND PRESSED FOR $5.00 



THE TIGER 



II 



The College Book and Supply Store 

In addition to furnishing the Text Books and Engineering 
Supplies for the College students, we carry a very large 
stock of Fountain Pens, Waterman's Ideal, Conklin Self- 
fillers and College. See Our PENNANTS ane POSTERS 

Whitney & Grimwood 



Get Your Picnic Supplies 

AT ■■ Z= 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

STUDENTS 



Remember when you want the 
BEST in Photography at moderate 
cost. Visit the Old Reliable Art 
Shop of 




<\3<\977iynf 



Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 41 



R. J. CORRIN 

Dry Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing 

and Remodeling for Ladies 

and Gentlemen 

Work by the Month 

Work Called for and Delivered 

Phone 2963 M 326 N. Tejon Stree 

Nothing Pleases Us More Than 
To Please College Students 

The Fred S. Tucker 

Furniture Co. 



Norton '09, Miss Emma Whiton '09, 
B. W. Stiles '09, Raymond Farmer 
ex-'09, Miss Effie Miller '10, Miss 
Harriet Spencer '10, Miss Anna 
Strang "10, Miss Bettie Carpenter ex- 
10, Miss Ethel Gray '10, Miss Ida 
McMorris '11, Goeffrey Arters ex-'ll, 
Oliver Stanchfield ex-'ll, Glen Spen- 
cer ex-'12. Mrs. Alderdice, Mrs. For- 
bush, Mrs. McElfresh (Esther Dick- 
inson) Mr. Ruben Slansan, Dr. Spen- 
cer. 



Miss Edith Summers '11 is sub- 
stituting in the Denver schools this 
winter. 



E. j. Schneider (Dutch) '11 is at 
Manitou with the Hydro plant. 



Miss Mamie Detmoyer '11 is teach- 
ing the third grade in the Alcott 
school of Denver. 

A. J. Hesler '11 is teaching in 
Crawfordsville, Indiana. 

Miss Alta Harris '11 recently vis- 
ited Miss Addie Henderson ex-'14 of 
Northwestern. 



Claude Hay ward '11 is with the 
Westinghouse Electrical Co., of 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 



Ralph Boynton '11 has accepted a 
position as assistant mechanic with 
the San Luis Southern R. R., at San 
Acacio, Colo. 



Fred Rice '11 has returned to Colo- 
rado Springs to recover from a sun 
stroke which he received at New 
Orleans. 



Miss Ruth Manning is organist at 
the First Presbyterian Church in this 
city. 



Airs. Phoebe Ward Xloore enter- 
tained the Minerva alumnae on Tues- 
day afternoon of this week. 



MOTOR CYCLES 

Yale Emblem 

BICYCLES and Supplies 

Expert Repairing 

Colorado Springs Cycle 

Company 

DeWitt Doyle, Manager 
224 N. Tejon St. Phone Red 34 

Knight - Campbell's 

F0R PIANOS 

and PLAYER PIANOS 

STEINWAY and 20 OTHER MAKES 

We Rent Pianos 

Largest Stock Victor Talking Machines 
and Edison Phonographs 

226 N. Tejon St., after Sept. 15, 122 N. Tejsn 

The Gowdy-Simmons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS 

Copper Plate and Steel Engravers 
Telephone 87 21 N. Tejon Street 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing Typewriter. 

Zimmerman Supply 

Z^ 1 ____________ 22 E. Kiowa St. 

Company Phone Main 374 

Established 1890 

You can save from 25 
percent to 40 percent 
on our finest Hart, 
Schaf f ner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer & 
Clothcraf t Suits and 
Overcoats 






12 



THE TIGER 



C. C. IS GOING TO TRIM UTAH 

INSPIRE THE TEAM WITH YOUR ENTHUSIASM. 
BE LIBERAL WITH THE DECORATIONS. 
WE ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR PENNANT S, STREAMERS, ARM BANDS, ETC. 
WE HAVE AN ESPECIALLY GOOD VALUE IN A VERY LARGE PENNANT AT $1.60. 

The 20 Per Cent. Discount is still on and in addition we will include a JAPANESE CANE, FREE 
OF CHARGE, with every pennant. 

THE MURRAY DRUG COMPANY 

Opposite Campus 



The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

116 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

s 
Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Give 
Special Attention to Accounts of Student 8 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, President Ira Harris, F-PresiJen 

M. C. Gile Lilla B. Ensign C. E. Lynde 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:0 P. M 

THE OUT WEST 

TENT AND AWNING CO. 

RECLINING CHAIRS 
PORCHES ENCLOSED 

Tents Rented for a Day or for Longer 



Stamping, Designing, R rforating, Best Hnl Mi 
China. Western Branch of Mexican Pigment Paints, 
Stenciling and Materials 
Art Needlework and Art Goods 

THE HUNT AND VAN NICE 

ART SPECIALTY SHOPS 

Retail and Whole. ale 
ke's Peak Aven e Phone Main 2055 



The "Little Jeff" Last Has the 

Style, Fit and Quality 




Jh Whitaker-Kester 

Shoe Co. 
10 North Tejon Street 



Among the former College people 
at the C. C.-U. C. game were Donald 
McCreery, Clara Cheley, Ruie Aitken, 
Florence Lattimer, Faye Anderson, 
Grace Starbird, Emma Riggs Bar- 
nard, Phoebe Ward Moore, Dorothy 
Frantz, Gilbert Cary, Bert Siddons, 
Herbert Haight, Harwood Fawcett, 
"Beauty" Newhouse, Ben Stewart, 
George Allebrand, Bert Wasley, Or- 
rie Stewart, Persis Kidder. 



PEARSONS. 



Golden will give a stereopticon lec- 
ture on "Sagebrush ing Through the 
Yellowstone" next Friday evening at 
the club house. He has visited this 
great national park personally and 
has a large number of colored slides 
which he will show and explain. The 
student body is cordially invited to 
attend this lecture. Eight o'clock. 



GERMAN PLAY. 



The cast has been chosen for "Der 
Hechzeitreise," the play that the 
German Club it to produce on No- 
vember 45. Daily rehearsals are 
being held and it promises to be a 
very creditable production. Besides 
the comedy there will be a half-hour 
devoted to German folk songs. A 
chorus of twenty voices is being- 
trained especially for this, and Mr. 
H. Howard Brown, the well-known 
musical director of this city will 
probably be in charge of the chorus. 

The cast for the play follows: 
Otto Lambert, Professor in einem 

Gymnasium Ferguson Ormes 

Antonie, seine Frau 

Miss Evelyn Norton 
Edmund, sein Famulus 

W. E. Neuswanger 
Hahnensporu, Stiefelputzer 

W. F. Harder 
Guste, Hammerjunger 

Miss Cornelia Schuyler 



MOWRY'S ICE CREAM 

One Quart $0.50 

Two Quarts $0.85 

Three Quarts $1.10 

One Gallon $1.30 

One Quart Brick $0.60 

Two Quart Brick $1.00 

Wholesale Rates on Applica- 
tion. 
A. L. MOWRY, 
Phone 1184. 
15 E. Cache la Poudre. 



STOP AT 

LIGHTNING SHOE SHOP 

to get your shoes repaired. Shine 
free with every pair of soles 

Sewed Soles 75c. 28 % N. Tejon St. 



William P. Bonbright & Co 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House. London, E. C. 



STUDENTS! 

The 
Pearl Laundry Co. 

respectfully solicits your pat- 
ronage. We guarantee satis- 
factory work and service and 
give you 20% discount. 

E. E. HEDBLOM. College Agent 



THE TIGER 



13 



Above the High Rents 
Below the High Prices 



Walk Up Stairs and 
Save a $ or 2 



MEET 
YOUR FRIENDS AT 

M. Q. WEST'S 

Sample Shoe Store 

$2.50 No More, No Less 

1 1 0- 1 1 2 E. Pike's Avenue, Up Stairs 
Rooms 16-17-18 



Engraving 

Function Invitations 
Programs, Place Cards 
Etc., — Our Specialty. 

OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



THE GIRLS' LOYALTY. 



The girls' "pep" for the Boulder 
game was hot. Friday night those 
who live in McGregor and those who 
were dancing in the gymnasium had a 
"rousing pep meeting" and parade. 
The Ticknor girls popped corn over 
the grate fire Saturday evening and 
v\atched for those returning from the 
game. After the news of the score, 
the girls followed Marion Fezer's 
suggestion and dressed in their party 
clothes and sang "Colorado" and 
" . he Flack and Gold." 

Forty hall girls and a good many 
town girls went to the game. 



If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

HA YNER 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 

2 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 




Local Department 



Katharine Constant and Lillian Pick- 
en attended the Student Volunteer Con- 
ference in Denver, Saturday and Sun- 
day. 

♦ ♦ 

Miss Black of Indiana has been visit- 
ing her cousin, Dorlie Crandall. 

♦ + 

Gwendolyn Hedgecock has left Col- 
lege. 

♦ ♦ 



the Minnesota State Forest Service. 

♦ ♦ 
"Jimmie" Wilson is studying law at 
the University of Pennsylvania. 



When You Visit "Her" 

Your Most Valuable 
Ally will be a Bux of 

Burgess Chocolates 
BURGESS 

Phone Eight Three 
12-114 North Tejon Street 



Why Not Have that 

Party at 

BRUIN INN 



Sewed Soles 75 cents 
Rubber Heels 35 cents 

AT 

PETE'S SHOE SHOP 

230 East Dale 



JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, CI aning, Pressing. Special 
Kates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Waiting's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Slice 



Developing and Printing 

HARLAN 

"The View Man" 

All Kinds of View and Commercial Work 
Pbone Main 2717 304 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

The Prompt Printery Co. 

MASTER PRINTERS 



"Yota" Reed ex-'12 is working with 12 and 14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



THE OLD STAND BY 

Anybody can make Ice Cream but it takes Mueth's to 
satisfy the College Students. Reference: Ed Morse 



Under New Management 



14 



THE TIGER 



Be Your Own Agent 

The management of the STAR LAUNDRY have 
decided to have no general agent at the College and to 
give agent's discount direct to the student sending in 
the bundle. 

Our drivers will sell you a $5.00 Coupon Book for $3.50, a dis- 
count of 30%, or you can pay in cash on the delivery of the bundle, 
taking out 30% for yourself. No bundles will be left without money 
or coupons. 

Coupon- Books at this discount will be sold only to students and 
are not transferable and the coupon will not be received from other 
than students. 



Everything in Jewelry 



FOUND AT 



Arcularius & Co. 

Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton Dairy 



419 S. EI Paso St. 



Phone Main 442 



THE MUELLER 

TEACHERS' AGENCY 

Conducted for Efficiency only. Services 
free to School Bnards No enrollment fee 
for teachers. Call or write 

ANNA H! MUELLER, 450 West U nta Street, 
Phone Main 2188 Colorado Springs, Colo 

Eloise Shellabarger spent the week- 
end in Denver with relatives going to 
the game, Saturday. 

♦ ♦ 

Bessie Burgess and Etta Clark enter- 
tained Bemis freshmen at a ghost party 
last Thursday night. 



DeWitt Harrison, who has been badly 
crippled with a sprained ankle for the 
past three weeks, is slowly improving. 

♦ ♦ 

Loring Lennox was down from Vic- 
tor for acouple of days last week. 

♦ ♦ 

Arthur Hoffman ex-'ll is pending a 
few days about the campus. 

♦ + 

Willard Warnock ex-'12 was among 
the C. C. rooters at the Boulder game. 

♦ + 

A number of College people saw "The 
Sweetest Girl in Paris" at the Opera 
House Tuesday night. 

♦ ♦ 

Eliese Painter spent the week end in 
Boulder visiting friends. 

♦ ♦ 

Karl Weller ex-'13 attended the big 
game in Boulder Saturday. 

♦ ♦ 

Laura Richey treated the Ticknor 
girls to the "eats" she received in a Hal- 
lowe'en box from home. 

♦ ♦ 

Katherine True spent the week end 
at her home in Denver. 

♦ ♦ 

Lorena Woltzen enjoyed a visit from 
her father and sister, Sunday. 

♦ + 

The alumnae of Hypatia met with 
Mrs. Sanford, Wednesday. 

♦ ♦ 

Mrs. Richard Aiken entertained the 
alumnae of Hypatia, Saturday night. 



CHILI 

Is Now Being Served at 

The College Inn 

Opposite the Campus 



TRY 

A 

SUPPER 

McRAE'S 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co 
Groceries and 



Meats 







115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE HENRY L. DWINELL HARDWARE COMPANY 



TOOLS 



BUILDERS AND GENERAL HARDWARE 
We Appreciate the College Trade 



CUTLERY 



130 N. Tejon St. 



Peone M. in 439 



THE TIGER 



15 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

New reversible coats for school 
and general wear -sizes 32-34- 
36-all new colors-$20, #22.50, 
525 and $30. 

Women's and Misses garments 
2nd floor. 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

s th; place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 

106 1 2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone Main 700 

W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 

# 



91 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heati g Co 



Caps 

All colors 
and Shapes 
$2.50 to 50c 



SO MANY 
STORES 



SWEATERS 

in All Styles 

$6.50 to $3.00 



Go at the young men's clothes problem in such a half inter- 
ested way that you'll be glad to know that this store puts its 
heart and soul into the problem. We'll show you more 

young -men's clothes than anyone else. 
Suits and Overcoats $30 to $15.. 



Money 
Cheerfully 
Refunded 




Correct Dress tor Men. A 



113 E. 

Pikes Peak 
Ave. 



Phone Main 48 



313 N. Tejon St. 



Secretatry Ware returned Monday 
from La Junta where he attended a 
conference of the Arkansas Valley 
high schools which was held in the 
interests of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association. 

♦ ♦ 

All of the Dais who were not in Boul- 
der took supper at Bruin Inn, Saturday 
evening. 

♦ + 

Marjorie Wade has returned to Col- 
lege after a week's absence. 

♦ ♦ 
Contemporary held its meeting at the 

home of Mrs. Swan Friday afternoon. 
Aftre the program a dainty supper was 
served and a very pleasant evening was 
spent with music and fancy work. 

♦ ♦ 

Winifred Shuler ex-'ll is visiting her 
aunt, Mrs. Hayden. 

♦ ♦ 

Hester Crutcher, Ellen Galpin and 
Lucile Wakefield spent Saturday night 
with Gladys Whittenberger. 

♦ ♦ 

Campbell, Lynch and Boyes stayed 
over in Boulder last Saturday night to 
attend the Beta Kappa dance. 



Get Acquainted at 

The Red 
Cross Pharmacy 

HOT DRiNKS HOT TAMALAS 

HUDSON'S CHOCOLATES 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 

107 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone 40 



PAGE 5 GAZETTE 



DERN 



Artists Materials 

FRAMING 
College Posters 

The Richard Willis Art Studios 

4'i Ea-t Pike's Peak Avenue 



LUMP 

The most satisfacory coal on the market 

for furnace 

THE CENTRAL FUEL CO. 

Phone 57S 1 28 N. Tejon 



See our Candy Special 
each week 

TEA AND 
COFFEE Co. 
29 So. Tejon St. Phon 575 

Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Bldg 
118 North Tejon St. Phone Main 1701 

Res , 121 1 N. Weber St. Tel. Main 956 




TOD POWELL 



Phone Main 930 



W. E. DONER 



POWELL-DONER SPORTING GOODS CO. 

112 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

"EVERYTHING FOR SPORTSMEN" 

New and Complete Stock of the Very Best of Athletic Supplies, College Pennants, Novelties, Etc. 

"ASK THE MEDICINE MAN" 






16 



THE TIGER 



If you could have a peep at the expense ac- 
count of the well-dressed young men whom you 
meet in your daily life — 

You'd be greatly surprised at the small 
yearly amount of most of these totals. 

The service value that's woven into the 
fabrics and tailored into the garments them- 
selves accounts for the long-lived Style that's 



to be gotten out of these perfect-fitting Perkins- 
Shearer Suits at twenty, twenty-five and thirty 
dollars. 

We have an extensive showing of good Suits 
at less — and extra values at higher, prices. 

But it pays and pays big to be well dressed, 
even if it were more expensive than you will find 
it to be here. 



(Perlu«4-Sfiearer(s 



HAUGEN, Tailor 



222 N. Tejon. 



Phone Main 296 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



Departments - 

College of Arts and 
Science, 
E. S. PARSONS, Dean 

School of Engineering, 
F. CAJORI, Dean 

School of Forestry, 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 

School of Music, 

E. D. HALE, Dean 



We Now Have the Famous 

Norma Martmez 5c Havana Cigars 

HUGHES 

Pool in connection but not a pool room 



13 




THE WEEKLY NEWS PAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



Vol. \IV 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., NOVEMBER 16, 1911 



NlJMRFR 10 



Mormons 18 
C. C. Tigers 6 

Utah Team Too Fast for Tigers — 

Speed Wins Weil-Earned 

Victory. 



Putting up one of the most bril- 
liant games of football ever played 
on Washburn field, the Salt Lake 
Mormons defeated the Tigers by the 
decisive score of 18-6 last Saturday. 
The Tigers were hardly up to the 
standard during the first half of the 
game, but during the second half 
they played in as good form as they 
have showea this season. It cannot 
be said of this game, as of the one 
the week before, that the Tigers lost 
alter outplaying their opponents. 

The Utah team outclassed — or -per- 
haps better, outspeeded — the Tigers. 
The score does not indicate the rela- 
tive strength of the two teams, but 
still a comparison would give them 
the game by a few points. What 
luck there was seemed to favor Utah, 
but though luck may have had some- 
thing to do with the score, it did not 
win or lose the game. It was a bit- 
ter fight from start to finish, and 
Utah earned the victory. A different 
outcome had been expected since the 
"dope" had underrated the Utah 
team. 

Utah played a different article of 
football from anything the Tigers 
had been up against this year. Their 
team is made up of an unusually 
large proportion of individual stars, 
who were all fast, and their style of 
attack was excellently fitted for these 
men. They did not gain much on 



straight-football. Their success with 
the forward pass and other forms of 
open-play were mediocre. Nor was 
their play particularly deceptive. 
Their victory was due in the most 
part to successful execution of what 
is technically known as "loose ball." 
Utah is the only team in the west 
that plays a thorough loose-ball 
game. The style of play requires a 
team which is not afraid to let the 
ball go, and trust to luck that they 
will get it back again. It involves a 
successful use of kicking. It takes 
advantage of fumbles, and trusts to 
the short kick which ma} r be snapped 
up again and carried for long gains. 
When the two teams are compared 
side by side, it quickly simmers down 
to the fact that it was Utah's soeed 
that won for them. And speed they 
certainly had. The Tigers are prob- 
ably the fastest team in Colorado, 
but the boys from Utah had it over 
any speed the Tiger team has shown 
this fall. The weight of the two 
teams was so even as to be a neg- 
ligible quantity. During the whole 
game the Mormons did not gain as 
consistently through the line or 
around the ends as did the Tigers. 
They used no unusual or trick for- 
mation plays. Out of their six at- 
tempts they were able only to pull 
off one successful forward pass dur- 
ing the game. When the Colorado 
College was working together in the 
second half, the Utah team could not 
compare with them in team work or 
coaching, as exemplified by the classy 
set of ground gaining plays which 
were used. In short, the Salt Lake 
players could not gain as much as C. 
C. in any department of the game 

Continued on page 8 



College Sunday 
Vesper Service 

Dr. Mackenzie, President or Hartford 

Theological Seminary, Talks on 

Service — Lectures in Perkins 

Monday and Tuesday 

Evenings. 

Dr. W. Douglas Mackenzie, Presi- 
dent of Hartford Theological Semi- 
nary, was the speaker at last Sun- 
day's Vespers. The subject of the 
address was "Service" and was based 
on Matthew XX 20-27. Dr. Macken- 
zie spoke, in part, as follows: 

This passage represents one of the 
dramatic episodes of the Gospels. 
Two kingdoms are fighting against 
each other; the one shown by the 
disciples' request and other by Jesus' 
reply. He shows that their request 
is based on the old idea of kingship; 
that it is merely power. That idea is 
not dead today. We all look up *o 
the man who can command the 
obedience of other men and we de- 
sire this kind of power. The fruit of 
this kind is very apparent. It means 
all kinds of scheming and much com- 
petition without fitness. Jesus Christ 
has come to establish a kingdom 
which is in exact contradistinction to 
this. He has come to establish a 
kingdom where the king will serve all 
others and where greatness is meas- 
ured by what a man can do for 
others. Some people laugh at this 
idea and say that it is contrary to 
human nature. So it is. Rut Chris- 
tianity is not natural to man. it is a 
new law of human life, and that law 

Continued on Page 2 



THE TIGER 



SUNDAY SERVICE 

Continued from page 1 

is expressed by service. Cur human 
nature is such that we carnot see thii 
kingdom clearly. The other we 
know well but the world-wide king- 
dom where every heart quivers in 
love for others, where life is spent 
for the good of others is not so clear 
to us. Yet we understand, better 
than those disciples, a little of what 
that spirit would mean. Jesus Christ 
today is King and holds sway over 
the lives of thousands of human be- 
ings because He said that He came 
to serve men, and the whole world is 
learning to come to His feet. 

In our modern world something of 
that principle is beginning to show 
itself. Our idea of a President is that 
of a man who is at the service of th< 
whole country in its widest interests. 
The word "service" is being used to 
cleanse the word politics and into 
that pure spirit of service they shall 
put some of the spirit of Christ Him- 
self. 

This has been the animating prin- 
ciple from the beginning of the 
Church of Jesus Christ. One finds, 
perhaps, that the secular has too 
much intruded and yet, on the whole, 
there has been always a regenerate 
principle which has called the Church 
back to the spirit of Jesus and 
through the Church His kingdom is 
working. 

Today the Church is becoming more 
complicated in its relations to the 
world. People realize that all who 
are working in the name and spirit 
of Jesus Christ are representing His 
church and who will count the num- 
bers of those who are devoting their 
lives to the service of mankind? 
The church is calling young men and 
women to His service and they are 
responding. 

The first thing necessary for service 
is that our hearts hear the call of 
Christ. If we look up into the in- 
visible face of the Master we shall 
find that there is coming down to us 
the call, "Who will go for Me?" It 
is the call from the infinite Spirit of 
wisdom to a spirit of weakness giv- 
ing it strength and vision. 

Everyone should, as he looks out 
on past history and present condi- 
tions and problems, find the gleam 
that he must follow. He must know 
that there is no sin that he cannot 
fight against, no burden or suffering 
that he cannot help to bear. If he 
follow the gleam he will learn to see 
that superb light which sets on fire 



the hearts of the men who see it. 
May the great need stir men 
to give their hearts and lives to 
establish that kingdom for which 
Jesus Christ died. 



Dr. Mackenzie delivered a talk at 
chapel Monday, giving come concrete 
illustrations of the life of service of 
which he spoke at the vesper service 
Sunday. 

Monday evening, preceding his ad- 
dres at Perkins Hall, Dr. Mackenzie 
spoke at a joint meeting of the Y. 
M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A.. He 
dwelt upon the thought that it is the 
deep thinking of one's innermost life 
that gives one the inspiration for 
greatest service. 

After the talk at Bemis followed 
an address at Perkins Hall upon 
"The Spirit of the Age." The first 
principle of the spirit of the age, he 
stated, is freedom in action and 
thought. The second principle of the 
age is objectivity, the sense of value 
of facts, the worship of fact. The 
third characteristic is the principle of 
utility. This co-operates with the 
principles of freedom and objectivity. 
All these principles interact, and it is 
only when we come to realize that 
in their fullest sense, and to work 
for the future rather than the present, 
that we shall accomplish the fullest 
service. 

On Tuesday evening Dr. Macken- 
zie lectured on Ian Maclaren and his 
works, illustrating his talk with ster- 
eopticon views. 



THE PEARSONS LECTURES. 

The students who are not availing 
themselves of the opportunity to at- 
tend the series of lectures given by 
the upperclassmen of Pearsons Liter- 
ary Society are really missing some- 
thing very interesting and valuable. 

Last Friday evening at the Society 
Club House, Golden gave a stereopti- 
con lecture on "Sagebrushing through 
the Yellowstone" to a small but very 
appreciative audience.. 

He spoke in a very interesting way 
of a personal trip covering several 
weeks, through the famous park and 
illustrated his lecture with pictures 
taken mostly by himself of the noted 
geysers, pools, rock formations, etc. 
A number of colored slides portrayed 
the wonderful beauty and grandeur of 
these monuments of nature. 

It is to be regretted that so few of 
the students have attended this and 
previous lectures given by Shaw, 



Hamilton and Donelan. A new 
"block" of programs, including de- 
bates and lectures for the next three 
months, will soon be announced, and 
the Society extends a cordial invita- 
tion to all the student body to attend. 



DEAN PARSONS SPEAKS IN 
CHAPEL. 



Dean Parsons gave a short talk in 
chapel on Friday on the spirit of in- 
terscholastic relations. Referring to 
the recent game at Boulder he ex- 
pressed his gratification at the friend- 
ly reception accorded to us by the 
students of the State University. 
Speaking of the relations between the 
different institutions he said that the 
spirit should be one of strong rivalry 
and competition but not of hostile an- 
tagonism. All teams visiting us 
should be received with such courtesy 
and good will as would show them 
that we appreciate their coming and 
look upon them as friendly rivals 
rather than as enemies. 



DR. KRAMER TO SPEAK NEXT 
SUNDAY. 



Dr. F. F. Kramer, Rector of All 
Saints Church, Denver, is to be the 
speaker at next Sunday's Vesper 
service. Besides being one of the 
most impressive preachers in the state, 
Dr. Kramer is widely known as a 
divinity scholar, having written sev- 
eral books on Biblical subjects. As a 
teacher lie has had considerable ex- 
perience with college students and is 
in sympathy with the problems of 
college life. Owing to unfortunate 
accidents intervening Dr. Kramer has 
not been able to be with us before, 
but his talk Sunday will be worth 
hearing. He will speak on the sub- 
ject, "Christ in Modern Life." 



PEARSONS' LADIES NIGHT. 



Tomorrow evening the members of 
Pearsons Literary Society will enter- 
tain their lady friends at their weekly 
meeting in the Club House. A short 
but very interesting program has 
been arranged. 



The Hagerman Hall "Open House" 
which was to have taken place on 
November 18th, has been postponed 
until next semester in order to give 
the necessary time for the prepara- 
tion of an adequate program. 



THE TIGER 



MORMONS 18, TIGERS 6 

Continued trout page 1 

except in running back punts, but 
they did well enough both here, and 
in taking advantage of all forms of 
the "unexpected" — such as gathering 
in fumbles, bounding punts and wild 
forward passes — to make up for any 
deficiencies they may have shown in 
other ways. How those boys did 
go! 

An account of the game would not 
be complete without some mention 
of the weather conditions. The mer- 
cury was doing its best to stay above 
the zero mark, and old Boreas wafted 
fitful gusts bleacher-ward that pierced 
to the bone and left the shivering 
rooters feeling like solid chunks of 
ice. From the players' point of view 
it was not so bad. Aside from a ten- 
dency toward numbing the fingers 
and thus making the passes hard to 
handle, the heat of the battle kept 
the moleskin warriors at a fighting 
temperature. 

Utah's eighteen points were made 
by three touchdowns with goals. 
Colorado College's six points were 
made by one touchdown and goal. 

The team from across the Rockies 
bested the Tigers more completely 
in the first quarter than at any other 
time. Gains of all kinds favored the 
Mormons more than the Tigers in 
this period. The most spectacular 
play of the day was made five min- 
utes after the game started when 
Sutherland carried a punt back sev- 
enty-five yards through the whole 
field for a touchdown. Perfect in- 
terference made the play possible. 
Most of the play was in Tiger terri- 
tory. The Tigers got near enough 
once for Vandy to try a drop kick 
which failed to get into the air. In 
the second quarter the Tigers began 
to warm up and Utah did not have it 
quite so much her own way. The 
ball was about equally in Tiger and 
Mormon territory. Utah made their 
second touchdown in this quarter by 
recovering on the ten yard line the 
Princeton which Witherow blocked, 
and then sending Romney over. 

In the second half the Tigers did 
the most efficient work. Putnam left 
off the old straight-football which 
had netted the Tigers nothing during 
the first half, and opened up a series 
of bewildering shifts and passes that 
swept the Utah team off its feet. 
The Tigers worked slowly down the 
field from the kick-off, frequently 
exchanging punts. Every exchange 
gave them a little the better of it, 



and they were carrying the ball most 
of the time. The greater part of the 
play was in Utah's teritory. It was 
about the middle of the half when 
the prettiest forward pass of the 
game was made from Vandemoer to 
Sinton. Sinton ran diagonally the 
width of the field and made a gain of 
thirty yards, putting the ball just in- 
side the ten yard line. Heald went 
over on the second play. The quarter 
continued in much the same way, 
and the Tigers had the ball on the 
ten yard line again when time was 
called. At the beginning of the 
fourth quarter Sinton lined up for a 
drop kick but the play was a forward 
pass to Heald. Heald was free but 
the pass was short, givnig Utah the 
ball. In this last period the Tigers 
did not have as much advantage as in 
the third, but the quarter had much 
the same character. Many forward 
passes were attempted with varying 
success. Two of them, either one of 
which would have been good for long 
gains and possible touchdown, were 
dropped by Sinton. Utah scored 
their third touchdown when Hamil- 
ton snatched a long forward pass out 
of the air near the middle of the field 
and raced to the line, barely escaping 
tackling by Vandemoer. This was 
near the end of the game and com- 
pleted the scoring. 

The most brilliant star of the day 
was Captain Romney, left half back 
for Utah. Romney is a big, fast man 
and he eludes tacklers with a sur- 
prising constant persistency. He is 
followed close by a trio of team- 
mates who are nearly as speedy as 
himself, left end Bennion, half back 
Sutherland and quarterback Fitzpat- 
rick. Hamilton, who substituted for 
Sutherland, is nearly his equal. 

Though Romney's playing was bril- 
liant, Heald was the most consistent 
star in the game. He played his 
game from start to finish, and did not 
let up in the first half when the rest 
of the team seemed clogged. He 
was the same old Heald on both de- 
fense and offense. Putnam's head 
work was always of the best and he 
undoubtedly played his greatest game 
Saturday in the matter of picking 
difficult punts out of the air, and in 
getting down the field and tackling 
the man when the Tigers kicked. 
Captain Sinton played his best game 
of the season in the second half of 
this game. His breaking up of 
Utah's end runs and his handling of 
forward passes was spectacular. 



Bowers, Witherow and Hedblom rip- 
ped up the line in their usual fashion, 
throwing the Mormans for many 
losses. 

Vandemoer had much the best of 
Ashton in punting. Vandy punted 
poorly only a very few times during 
the game. His punts were less effec- 
tive than the low, short, bounding 
punt of Ashton, because of the su- 
perb ability which the Utah back field 
showed in carrying back the kicks. 
First Quarter. 
Utah won the toss and chose the 
north goal. Ashton kicked to Black, 
who returned twenty yards. Heald 
hit the line for 2 l / 2 yards. Vande- 
moer punted. Romney circled left 
end for 12 yards. Vandemoer stole 
forward pass and carried it to Utah's 
30-yard line. Sinton made three 
yards around end. Vandemoer 
punted and Ashton returned C. C. 
ball on own 40-yard line. Vandemoer 
punted to Sutherland, who ran 75 
yards to a touchdown. Ashton 
kicked goal. 

Score — Utah, 6; Tigers, 0. 
Sinton kicked off to Romney, who 
returned 15' yards. Ashton hit the 
line for 5 yards. Ashton punted to 
C. C. 45-yard line and Gardner re- 
covered. Ashton punted to C. C. 15- 
yard line. Vandemoer went through 
tackle for 5 yards. Vandemoer punted 
to Fitzpatrick, who returned 10 yards. 
Black threw Romney for a one-yard 
loss. Vandemoer stole a forward 
pass. Heald punted and Ashton 
punted back. Vandemoer blocked 
punt and Utah recovered on own 32- 
yard line. Hamilton replaces Suther- 
land at right half. Ashton punted 
and Utah recovered ball on College 
40-yard line. Utah penalized 15 yards 
for holding. Romney failed to make 
gain around end and Ashton punted 
to Vandemoer out of bounds on Col- 
lege 25-yard line. 

Vandemoer hit the line for 5 yards 
on a shift play. Vandemoer made 
2 yards around left end and then 
punted. Utah's ball on her own 50- 
yard line. Utah failed on forward 
pass . Ashton punted out of bounds 
on College 35-yard line. Vandemoer 
made 2 yards around right end. Utah 
penalized for off side. The quarter 
ended with ball in possession of Col- 
lege on her own 46-yard line. 
Second Quarter. 
Vandemoer punted out of bounds 
on the 30-yard line. College held 
Utah for downs on Utah's 35-yard 
line. Thompson gained three yards 



THE TIGER 



around right end. Vandemoer punted. 
Utah's ball on her own 20-yard line. 
Ashton punted to Putnam who was 
downed in center of the field. Col- 
lege failed on forward pass. Vande- 
moer made three yards around left 
end and then punted to Romney who 
fumbled but recovered on his 12-yard 
line. Ashton punted to Putnam. 
College ball on Utah's 15-yard line. 
Forward pass from Sinton to Hed- 
blom gained five yards. . Heald and 
Putnam hit center and made first 
down. Black made three yards 
through line. College penalized 15 
yards for holding. Vandemoer went 
around right end for 1(1 yards. Sin- 
ton made 3 yards around left end 
and Vandemoer punted out of bounds 
on Utah's 20-yard line. Romney 
circled left end for 20 yards. Ash- 
ton lost one yard on line plunge and 
then punted to Putnam who was 
downed on his own 35-yard line. 
Heald went outside tackle for five 
yards. Black failed to gain through 
tackle and Vandy punted to Fitzpat- 
rick, who was downed on his own 35- 
yard line. Ashton punted to Putnam 
on College 42-yard line. Vandy was 
thrown for a 3-yard loss. College 
failed on forward pass. Vandemoer 
punted to Fitzpatrick. Utah ball on 
her own 45-yard line. Ashton punted 
to Putnam who returned five yards. 
Vandy hit left tackle for four more 
yards. Utah holds for downs and 
Romney went around left end for 
five yards. Witherow blocked Ash- 
ton's place kick and Utah recovered 
the ball on the College 10-yard line. 
Romney carried the ball over for the 
second touchdown of the game. Ash- 
ton kicked goal. Score — Utah, 12; 
College, 0. 

Sinton kicked out to Fitzpatrick. 
Utah's ball on her own 25-yard line. 
Ashton punted to Vandemoer who re- 
turned five yards. The half ended 
with the ball in possession of the 
College on Utah's 43-yard line. 
Third Period. 
Ashton kicked off over College 
goal line. College put ball in play on 
their 25-yard line. After a series of 
plays it was College ball on Utah's 
35-yard line. Heald hit center for 
five yards. On a forward pass, Van- 
dy to Sinton, the College took the 
ball to Utah's 5-yard line. Forward 
pass failed. Heald hit tackle for six 
yards and put the ball over Utah's 
goal line. Vandy punted out to Put- 
nam who made a fair catch on the 
20-yard line. Hedblom kicked goal. 
Score— Utah, 12; College, 6. 



Ashton kicked off to Vandemoer, 
who returned ten yards after narrow- 
ly escaping being downed for a safe- 
ty. Heald plowed through the Utah 
line on a shift play for five yards. 
The Tigers just beginning to play 
their offensive game. Vandy punted. 
Utah's ball on her own 15 yard line. 
Romney gained two yards on a 
straight kick. Ashton punted to Put- 
nam who was downed on his own 30- 
yard line. Vandy made 3 yards and 
then Heald advanced the ball eight 
yards, making first down. Putnam 
gained four yards. A forward pass, 
Heald to Sinton, and the Tiger cap- 
tain put the ball on Utah's 10-yard 
line. 

But for the fleetness of Captain 
Romney the College would have 
made a touchdown. Thompson put 
the ball three yards nearer the goal 
line. On an attempted end run and a 
shift formation, Heald was thrown 
for a three-yard loss. Vandy dropped 
back ostensibly to kick and just 
then the whistle blew marking the 
close of the third quarter. 
Fourth Quarter. 
When the final period opened it 
was the Tiger's ball on Utah's fifteen- 
yard line. Sinton tried a forward 
pass, but the throw was short and the 
ball went to Utah on downs. The 
Mormons kicked out of danger. In 
this period the Tigers tried a num- 
ber of variations of the forward pass, 
only two of which were succesful. 
Utah, on an exchange of kicks, got 
the ball on her 30-yard line and 
started down the field with a rush. A 
forward pass netted 25 yards and 
took the ball to mid-field. On a line 
plunge Hamilton fumbled and the 
Tigers fell on the leather. Colorado 
College hopes went glimmering the 
next moment, however, for Hamilton 
captured a forward pass from Vande- 
moer and was off down the field for a 
45-yard run and a touchdown. Ash- 
ton kicked goal. The game ended a 
moment later with the final score 
Utah 18, Tigers 6. 

The lineup: 
C. C. Position. Utah. 

Sinton, (capt) re O. Romney, re 

Koch rt Olsen, rt 

Floyd, Black, rg Dillman, rg 

Witherow, center. ... Gardner, center 

Hedblom, lg Wimmer, lg 

Bowers, It Peterson, It 

Thompson, le D. Bennion, le 

Putnam, Herron, qb. . Fitzpatrick, qb 
Vandemoer, rh 

Sutherland, Hamilton, rh 
Heald, Lewis, lh . . Romney (capt.) lh 



Black, Deesz, fb Ashton, fb 

Officials — Smith, Brown, referee; 
Wingender, D. U., umpire; Pork, Am- 
herst, field judge; Capen, Illinois, 
head linesman. 



Mines Game Will Be A 
Hard One 



Next Saturday the Tigers go to 
Denver to play the team from the 
School of Mines. The Tigers have 
gone into every game thus far with a 
great amount of confidence, and they 
have been defeated in only two Con- 
ference games they have played. They 
will go into the Mines game without 
such a cock-sure brand of confidence, 
but more with a determination to win, 
and thus to do as much as lies in 
their power to retrieve the honors 
which they have lost. 

That the Mines will put a team into 
the game that will have all the tra- 
ditional Mines spirit and fight is cer- 
tain. If the Tigers out-fight the Min- 
ers we shall know what they have 
put up is a fight indeed. That the old 
Mines spirit is still alive is evidenced 
by the way that they held Denver 
University to a score of 9-0 last Sat- 
urday, and this in the game which is 
reported as being the hardest and 
best game which the Methodists have 
put up this fall. 

There will be no excursion to Den- 
ver, and as a result the Tigers will 
not have as much support in the 
stands as the Mines. The Mines were 
encouraged last Saturday both by the 
slight victory which D. U. won over 
them and by the way in which Utah 
defeated us. It is certain that they 
will be behind their team with all the 
old Mines enthusiasm. A different 
spirit has gotten into the Tigers dur- 
ing the last week, however, and they 
are expected to put up the same style 
of slashing, fighting game which has 
characterized their playing on other 
occasions when they have been up 
against odds and have had no back- 
ing. If they show the spirit they did 
last year in Salt Lake, or even this 
year against the great Wisconsin 
team there will be nothing to fear. 
The Mines have shown that they will 
be no snap, as some previous indica- 
tions seemed to point out. 

The Miners have proven very weak 
on offense, and their team shows no 
tendency to improve in this depart- 
ment, but it is on the defense that 
thev have made such a marked im- 



THE TIGER 



provement inside the last two weeks. 
Two weeks ago from this Saturday, 
they held the University of Utah to 
a score of 15-0 out in Salt Lake, and 
last Saturday they kept D. U. from 
crossing their goal line more than 
once, and that on a fluke play. Har- 
per, the crack little quarterback, 
made many points for his team at the 
first of the season by his drop kicks. 
Lately he has not been doing so well 
but this is due for the most part to 
the fact that the Mines have been 
playing against such superior teams 
that they have afforded the kicker no 
adequate chance to show his ability. 
It is certain that Harper's toe will 
prove deadly if he gets within the 
thirty-five yard line. 

The Tigers' varied mode of attack 
— which they showed in the last half 
of the Utah game — should be able to 
penetrate the Mines' boasted defense 
for enough points to secure them 
their first victory in the Conference. 
Depend upon the Tigers. 



Boulder and Utah 



D. U. 9 Mines 






Denver University defeated the 
School of Mines at Broadway Park 
in Denver during a worse fit of 
weather than that which was exper- 
ienced here in Colorado Springs. 
The temperature was about the same, 
but the teams were forced to play 
upon a snow-covered field. The final 
score was 9-0. 

It seems that Denver's victory was 
all 'Schroeder." Schroeder is now 
playing at end. He is reported to be 
a "bear" on defense, and not so far 
behind the other D. U. stars on 
offense. Volk and Koonsman both 
played their usual stellar roles. Nat 
Card, a new man in the back field, 
pushed them hard for the honors. 
Denver's nine points were made by a 
field goal, a touchdown and a goal 
after touchdown. 

The lack of an efficient punter was 
the Mines' greatest weakness, and it 
is claimed by many that the outcome 
of the game would have been a differ- 
ent story if they could have compared 
with the Denver team in this respect. 
Another glaring fault of the Miners 
was their inability to tackle effective- 
ly. Harper did remarkable work in 
carrying back punts through the 
heavy D. U. defense. 



The outcome of the Boulder-Utah 
game in Salt Lake next Saturday 
is of interest both because it will fur- 
ther the championship situation and 
because it may help to bear out the 
claim which Colorado College based 
on figures, that they outplayed Boul- 
der when they were defeated two 
weeks ago. After seeing the game 
which Utah put up on Washburn field 
it seems safe to say that they will 
have things their own way with 
Boulder out in Salt Lake. The Tiger 
team was first to be able to score on 
Utah in any way this fall. If the 
Boulder team is as much better than 
the Tiger team as they claim, they 
should be able to ramble over the 
Mormons for at least two or three 
touchdowns. As it is, Boulder will 
do well if she gets close enough to 
Utah's goal line to let Rich have a 
chance at scoring by the Princeton 
route. 



A Queer One 

One of the oddest freaks ever reg- 
istered in the annals of football oc- 
curred last Saturday in the game be- 
tween Princeton and Dartmouth, 
when DeWitt of Princeton made the 
only score of the day by a drop kick 
from the 47-yard line which did not 
rise over ten feet from the ground 
but went over the goal on a bounce. 
There is nothing in the rules which 
rules out a score made in this man- 
ner. 



Statie Erickson shared a "box from 
home" with some of her friends Sat- 
urday night. 



Championship Situation 

The football championship is al- 
ready beginning to be a much mooted 
question in Colorado. In the edition 
of the Silver and Gold on the Wed- 
nesday following the Boulder-Tiger 
game, Boulder laid her preliminary 
claim to the state title, but scenting 
the defeat which they are to receive 
at the hands of Utah next Saturday 
said no more than was necessary 
about the championship of the Con- 
ference. The separation of the state 
and Conference title is differentiation 
which they will wish to make in case 
they are defeated by Utah, in order 
that they may at least have some- 
thing to support them in their feeling 
of honor. 

There is no authority in the Rocky 



Mountain Conference, or in the state 
of Colorado, to decide and award the 
championship in the different 
branches of athletics. The Confer- 
ence does not decide, because it does 
not hold that the object of intercol- 
legiate athletics is to determine the 
supremacy. The nearest approach to 
an authority on this matter is in con- 
sulting public opinion, and public 
opinion is usually expressed in the 
newspapers by the experienced sport- 
ing writers. There are times when 
there is no doubt as to who is su- 
perior and one team stands out pre- 
eminently above the others, but it 
seems oftener that there is some kind 
of a tangle which gives rise to a great 
deal of controversy. Each party us- 
ually uses a different method of ar- 
riving at a particular result. Such 
controversies never get anywhere. 

It is a wrangle of this sort which 
is threatened in the Conference this 
fall. Colorado College, the School of 
Mines, and the State Agricultural Col- 
lege have been definitely removed 
from the race. This leaves Denver 
University, the University of Utah 
and the University of Colorado still 
to be considered. Boulder plays in 
Salt Lake next Saturday and this will 
do much to further the .situation. As 
it stands, since Utah and D. U. tied, 
and since Boulder and D. U. do not 
play, there is only one line of winning 
which will give any team a clean-cut 
title. If Utah beats Boulder, and C. 
C. beats Denver, this will give Utah 
the undisputed championship in the 
Conference and at the same time al- 
low Boulder to have her secondary 
title in Colorado. If Boulder should 
happen to win in Salt Lake, it will be 
necessary for the Tigers to beat D. 
U. before Boulder can hope to even 
claim the Conference honors, and still 
it will be very unsatisfactory unless 
Boulder herself actually beats Den- 
ver. Should Utah win over Boulder 
and then Denver beat C. C, this will 
plainly make a tie between the Meth- 
odist and Morman teams. Any way 
you figure it out, no one— not even 
Boulder — can reasonably claim the 
championship before Thanksgiving 
Day and there is some chance that it 
will only be a matter of individual 
opinion then. 



Harriet Ferril has moved from Mc- 
Gregor to Ticknor. 
♦ 4 
Ida Wolcott was here for the Utah 
game, on her way home after a visit 
in Denver, Fort Collins and Boulder. 



THE TIGER 




The Weekly Newspaperof Colorado College 

HARRY L. BLACK Editor-in-Chief 

RICHARD L. HUUHES Business Mrfr. 

Leon C. Havens Assistant Editor 

A. H Rowbotham Assistant Editor 

Arthur J. Allen Assistant Editor 

J.J. Sinton Athletic Editor 

D. H. mahan Engineering Editor 

G. S. Cowderv Forestry Editor 

Miss Glenn Stiles Alumni Editor 

MISS Mary Randolph Exchange Editor 

Miss Helen Rand Local Editor 

A. W. Donovan Local Editor 

H. A. Parkison Assistant Manager 

A. L. Golden Avsistan M nager 

Correspondents 

F. P. Storke, H. A. Bet nett. Miss Lucy Ferrill 

Miss Elizabeth Gerould, Miss Leona Stukey, 

Miss Myrth King, Miss Violet Hopper, Miss 

Franc Adams, R. G. Appel 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles anditemsto TheTiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo 

Phones: Editor, Main 2550. Manager, Main 2073 

Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



Rubbing It In. 

Boulder is feeling quite elated over 
the fact that they have defeated Colo- 
rado College's football team this fall. 
It is natural that they should be, 
and we cannot blame them in the 
least. But even then it would seem 
that they should keep a little more 
within the bounds of facts in their 
ubilation and process of rubbing it 
in. They cannot be blamed for de- 
siring to rub it in. But not content 
with winning the victory, and rub- 
bing it in to the degree to which 
the facts support them, the "Silver 
and Gold" has taken upon itself the 
business of vanquishing the Tigers "in 
print" to the extent that they were 
• unable on the football field, with the 
result that in the eyes of the Boulder- 
ites — and Boulderettes too — Colorado 
College has been wiped off the map. 
Of course it is fun, but even a uni- 
versity newspaper should have some 
element of sportsmanship. 

Speaking of sportsmanship at Boul- 
der, it is worth while to digress at 
this point long enough to say that 
sportsmanship at Boulder has been 
steadily increasing. There were times 
which we might speak of as the Dark 
Ages at Boulder, when a Colorado 
College team could not go to that 
town and win a game without being 
stoned out of town. Perhaps it was 



after they had decided that this was 
not altogether hospitable that they 
turned their attention to the field of 
play. It was then that they conceived 
the idea of plowing up the football 
field ,and after practicing their men 
upon it had it freshly plowed for the 
game with Colorado College. Most 
of us know their action of three years 
ago when they used siren whistles to 
prevent the Colorado College team 
from hearing the signals which the 
quarterback gave. It is ridiculous 
now when they present the absurd 
statement that Colorado College 
claims her men could not perform the 
acts of kicking and playing on ac- 
count of the noise. They know as 
well as any one else that the Colo- 
rado College team was prevented 
from even having a chance to make 
any progress on the field because they 
could not hear the signals which 
called for the execution of plays. It 
is preposterous for them to try to 
excuse themselves, especially since 
they have shown by their recent ac- 
tions that they are ashamed of them- 
selves. The sirens were noticable 
this year principally by their absence. 
Such, in brief, is the evolution of 
Boulder sportsmanship through all 
the stages from direct assault to in- 
sult. 

Now, as for the game two weeks 
ago, Boulder seems to imagine that 
the Tigers are trying to excuse them- 
selves for defeat. Colorado College 
knows as well as they do that it was 
inexcusable, but they still have the 
proof of a carefully compiled set of 
figures to show that they outplayed 
the Boulder team in every way except 
kicking. And all this, in spite of the 
fact that a Pueblo newspaper — which 
received an Associated Press account 
of the game — decided that the "Tigers 
would have won if they had more 
competent men," and that a Denver 
newspaper looked over the game and 
took a long guess as to the yards 
gained by each team and awarded the 
winning team the most. It looks as 
if Boulder wished to take away the 
credit which naturally goes to their 
kicker and divide it among the whole 
eleven. 



Football, Friends and Newspapers. 

A football team at Colorado Col- 
lege always has the most enthusiastic 
support of the citizens of Colorado 
Springs and nothing is heard except 
praise, as long as they are winning; 
but let them have a bad season, or 
even lose a single game, and the sup- 



port begins to fall off and the criti- 
cisms to pour in. It is then that we 
find out who the real friends of the 
team are, and it is disappointing to 
learn that there are not nearly so 
many as it seems. 

Reports about the team as a whole, 
about individual men, and about the 
coach, circulate and are gossiped 
about by people of the town, and are 
printed every evening in the news- 
paper. It makes no difference what 
the story is, or who starts it. If it is 
a little bit gossipy, it soon goes the 
rounds. Such wide-spread rumors 
give those who really want to know 
the truth the wrong impression. It 
hurts the team and it hurts the Col- 
lege. If these parties had as true an 
interest as they profess, instead of 
running about talking they would go 
to Coach Rothgeb, or the men them- 
selves, and find out the truth, and 
present their criticism. They should 
know the training rules which Roth- 
geb has set down and the facts of 
supposed violation, before they begin 
talking. 

People not only condemn the ac- 
tions of the team at times like these, 
but they are enthusiastic in proclaim- 
ing in an I-told-you-so that Colorado 
College never did have an athletic 
team which amounted to anything. 
The students will stand behind the 
team in all its ups and downs, but 
even they are careless at times about 
criticising the members of the team. 
They magnify and give circulation to 
things which they get on hear-say, 
until by the time it gets into the 
evening paper it makes a pretty good 
"bear story." 

It is too bad that a newspaper gets 
the idea that it has to have a big 
article with spicy headlines every 
evening about the football team. It 
is this "yellow journalism" that does 
a team no good. Athletic teams are 
not built so that you can get a new 
and startling story about them every 
day, and a paper which attempts to 
get that kind of stories inevitably has 
to fall back on "slush" to fill out their 
columns. 

It should be remembered that for 
every story which is circulated there 
is always another side — the side of 
the athlete himself. His side may 
depend upon the fact that the story 
is absolutely false, or that there are 
other conditions which enter into the 
situation. For intsance, a man is 
often accused of not training when he 
does not play up to his usual stand- 
ard in some particular game, when 



THE TIGER 



the facts of the case are that the man 
has received some injury which pre- 
vents his best work and is working 
under a strain for his team and col- 
lege. 

If you really want to help the team, 
get next to them personally and 
don't gossip about every tale that 
drifts your way. The men on the 
team work hard enough and sacrifice 
enough to be entitled to a fair con- 
sideration. It is disheartening to a 
man who has worked his best for the 
success of the team all season to hear 
some false story which is an attack at 
his loyalty. 

It should not require a plea to the 
Tiger spirit which every student has 
to make him do his best to uphold 
the reputation of the team — even 
when they are defeated. 



THE NOVEMBER KINNIKINNIK 



New Assistant Editor. 

At a meeting of the Tiger Board 
of Control held last week Arthur J. 
Allen was elected to the Tiger Board 
as an assistant editor. Allen is a 
prominent member of the junior class 
and is a member of the Apollonian 
Club and the Delta Phi Theta fra- 
ternity. He has had considerable 
experience in newspaper work, having 
held the position of city editor of the 
Grand Junction News during the last 
summer vacation. He is a capable 
man and his work will be a great ad- 
dition to The Tiger editorial staff. 



Board of Control Reorganized. 

The annual election of officers of 
The Tiger Board of Control was held 
at a meeting of the Board held at 
Palmer Hall last Thursday. Sam J. 
Shelton, the senior member, was 
elected president; Professor Wood- 
bridge, one of the faculty representa- 
tives, secretary; and Stanley Alden, 
the alumni member, controller. 

The report of the manager showed 
that The Tiger had started upon one 
of its most promising years as far 
as the business end of the publication 
is concerned. 



"EAGER HEART." 



The tryout for the choice of the 
cast for "Eager Heart" was held in 
Cogswell Theatre Tuesday afternoon. 
"Eager Heart" is the play which the 
Dramatic Society gives especially for 
the faculty. It has been suggested 
that the society give this play every 
year as the Christmas play. 



The second number of the "Kin" 
shows marked improvement over the 
first. It has its weak spots, of 
course; it includes some articles 
which certainly would have been bet- 
ter left out. The new department 
of "sketches" does not seem likely 
to add to the interest of the maga- 
zine; such wretched stuff as "The 
American Boy" is sure to reflect dis- 
credit upon the paper. We are half 
inclined to suspect the printer's devil 
of having perpetrated it as a bad 
joke on the editors. "Transitional" is 
a deliberate and conscientious but 
unsuccesful piece of fooling. It is 
hard to see why the paragraph on 
"The Mariposa Lily" should be called 
an essay, and harder still to see why 
it should be printed here. In its place 
— a diary, perhaps — it would be at- 
tractive; here it seems to have got 
lost. With these exceptions, the 
number seems to us interesting and 
creditable. The short essay "On 
Riches and Roughing It," though not 
equal to the best of its kind that have 
appeared in The Kinnikinnik, is 
pleasant reading. The stories aver- 
age much better than those in the 
last number. The verse (excepting 
the performance of the printer's devil 
already alluded to) would be credit- 
able to any college magazine in the 
country. 

Technically the best of the stories 
is Mr. Black's, "The Fortune Seek- 
ers." The plot is not new, but it is 
admirably handled. The background 
is skillfully suggested, the characters 
are interesting, and the story moves 
steadily and rapidly to its climax. 
More original and entertaining is Mr. 
Sinton's "A Lie." It has little plot 
and less climax; but these lacks are 
more than made up for by the indi- 
vidual flavor and humor of the style. 
Miss King's, "The South Lot," is the 
story of a child, rather conventional 
in plot, but sympathetically told. 
Miss Pace's, "The Moving-Picture 
Orchestra," is a realistic and vivid 
sketch, of its kind as good as any- 
thing in the number. "Red and the 
Bear"'and "How Joe Rode the Colt" 
are typically Western bits of narra- 
tive, interesting and well done. 

The quatrain "Hope" is attractive in 
rythm and diction, and gives an im- 
pression of completeness. The repe- 
tition of "night" is a flaw. Mr. 
Weirick's "Twilight" is a graceful and 
finished lyric, containing lines and 
even stanzas of haunting beauty. No 



better verse has appeared in the mag- 
azine. It is unfortunate that a mis- 
print in the first stanza should have 
changed "dying" to "dyeing"; but 
poets are at the mercy of proofread- 
ers. 

On the whole, the November num- 
ber is a good one; it has variety and 
readableness. Our chief suggestion 
is that the editors should apply more 
rigidly the principle of exclusion. 



MANY TICKETS SUBSCRIBED 
FOR. 



The subscription lists that were 
circulated last week for the benefit of 
those who wished to sign for tickets 
for the Dickens' lecture have been 
closed and from the lists it is prac- 
tically assured that the lecture is 
bound to prove a success from the 
business standpoint. 

Reserved seats may be secured be- 
ginning the first day of December, 
and those who have subscribed for 
tickets will be given the first choice 
of reserved seats. In bringing this 
lecture here, it is the aim of the Eng- 
lish department to give the students 
of the College the opportunity to 
hear it at the least possible cost. In 
other words it is not the intention of 
the English department to make any 
money on the lecture. Hence the ab- 
surdly low price of admission. In 
case, however, there is any money left 
after the expense of the lecture is 
paid, it will be devoted to the pur- 
chase of new books for the English 
department of the library. 

Mr. Dickens is still delivering his 
lecture in the New England states, 
and everywhere he goes he is being 
met with the unusual enthusiasm that 
a lecture of this sort deserves. 



SURPRISE PARTY. 



I'rof. Motten was the host at a 
very charming surprise party Mon- 
day evening given in honor of the 
birthday anniversary of H. A. Parki- 
son '13. The guests were Messrs. 
Winchell, Hall, Raynolds, F. S. Baker, 
Wild, Thornell, Sam Baker and Par- 
kison. The colors, scarlet, white and 
green of the Kappa Sigma fraternity 
prevailed in the table decorations. 



Newton C. (Tub) Morris '09, Bert 
W. Stiles '09, T. D. Riggs '08, 
"Stuffy" Chapman '06, were visitors 
at the Phi Gamma Delta house Sat- 
urday and Sunday. 






THE TIGER 

We're ready for the big game. The Clothes Game is ours, and 
the combinations we have in Men's Clothes are sure to defeat our 
nearest rivals. 

A mid-season selection enables us to offer you the newest that the 
winter styles will show. $15 to $50. 

m GANODO^MS^" 




WE HAVE A SPECIAL 




For Every Purpose 



75c Per Gallon up 

Same way with Wall Paper, Kalsomine, 
and in fact, Everything we Sell. Ask 
your neighbor, he knows. 

Paint Supply Co. 



Wholesale 



113-115 E. Bijou St. Retail 






THE TIGER 



Hunt Up 

BisselPs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

Pike's Peak Book & 
Stationery Co. JLLES £ 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealnrs in 
Flour, Fefd, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



■ 



CA L 2000 

When You Want Anything QUICK! 
QUICK DELIVERY 



MAI . 2000 



COTRELL & LEONARD 

Alba-y, N. Y. 
Makers of 

CAPS & GOWNS 

To the American Colle es from trie 

Atlantic to the Pacific 

Class Contcacts a Specialty 

Deichmann & Douglas Floral 
Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER, Mar. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 

Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Gazette Building 



Rooting at Utah Game 

Lack of ''pep'' and spirit did not 
lose Saturday's game. Tiger spirit is 
a never wanting quantity, always has 
been and always will be. Billie Win- 
chell started the great pep machine 
at Thursday chapel where he an- 
nounced the plans for Utah's enter- 
tainment, and also the plan for secur- 
ing a band for the game. Billie's 
touching appeal for a quarter each 
brought every student to his feet and 
the resulting hat collection at the 
door was more than satisfactory. 

The late arrival of the train Thurs- 
night prevented the greeting demon- 
stration planned and so to announce 
the '"dawn of a new era in inter-col- 
legiate relations" a couple of hundred 
Tigers met at Hag Hall on Friday 
ivening. The usual line of march 
was taken down town to the time of 
"C-O-L-O-R-A-D-O." The march 
was enlivened by the usual number of 
dog fights and intermittent yelling 
and singing. By the time the Alta 
\ ista was reached there was pep to 
burn. 

Winchell called the yells for the 
Utah men. Romney was called for 
but failed to appear and in his place 
the manager said that they came with 
the determination to win and that 
e\ try student left behind was with 
the team in spirit. Jackson took the 
piano and the whole crowd joined in 
the songs and yells of the College. 

At one-fifteen Saturday afternoon 
the men, led by Winchell in a suit of 
black and gold, marched down town 
where they were met by the band. 
They returned shortly before the 
game, and the yelling on the field be- 
gan. The noticeable feature of the 
day was the way the yelling contin- 
ued through every darkest moment 
of play. Never did the Tigers forget 
that though the team was losing, it 
was they who had to back it up. Be- 
tween halves the students zig-zagged 
the field and after the game no one 
left the stand until every Tiger had 
been carried off the field. 

Saturday evening the teams were 
the guests of Manager Nye of the 




NEW 

Fall Styles 

JUST IN 

High Arch, High Toes, Short 
Vamps, Button or Lace, Velvets, 
Suedes, Patents, Gunmetels, 
Tan Russia's 

$2.50, $3.00, $3.50 
an d $4.00 

7tt FOB every rooTA--^" 




Board $4.50 Per Week 

One front room for two. Board 

and room $25 per month for each 

222 E. DALE 



THE 

Crissey & Fowler 
Lumber Co. 









Phone 101 



117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 



Telephone 599 



CUT FLOWERS 



Store 1 04 N. Tejon Street 

The Pike's Peak Floral Co. 

DECORATIONS AND DESIG N 



10 



THE TIGER 



You've an idea that distinctive Overcoats and extravagant prices must go together. 
You haven't seen our stock— we'll show you Overcoats distinctive at MODERATE PEICES. 
Finest woolens and styles that are very handsome; belted back; convertible collars, Eag- 
lans and sem-fitted, any color or pattern you want. Our Overcoat displays are priced at $15 
to $35. Great values at $15, $20 and $25. 




To College 
Students 
Old and New 

We Extend the Most Cordial Good 
Wishes. We've made a Specialty of 
taking care of the wants of the up-to- 
date young men and women. You II 
find us the kind of jewelry store you'll 
like. 

The Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's *eak 



The Davis Barber Shop 

Indi idual Sterilizing Cabinets 
Ray Davis, Manager 

Joslyn Press 

112 E. Cucharras St. 
Phone Main 1154 

Printers & 
Publishers 



ANY KIND OF PRINTING 
WE PRINT THE TIGER 



JOIN THE CITY Y. M. C. A. 

And get full privileges: 

Gym, Swimming Pool, 

Game Room. 

Special work to build up the 

body. 



Opera House. The Tigers occupied 
the parquet boxes on the left,, Utah 
those 'on the right. The galleries 
were filled with fellows, and yelling 
and singing was the feature of the 
evening. Utah departed expressing 
her sentiments with the yell, "Do we 
like Tiger spirit? WELL, I GUESS." 



DR. WORLEY VISITS COLLEGE. 



H.. W. Worley, Traveling Secre- 
tary of Student Volunteer Movement, 
spent a busy two days at Colorado 
College on last Thursday and Friday. 
He agve one talk in chapel before the 
student body, spoke Thursday even- 
ing at a Bible and Mission Study 
supper in Hagerman Hall, and ad- 
dressed a group of sixteen men in 
Secretary Ware's room on Friday 
noon. In addition to this, Mr. Wor- 
ley took lunch at three fraternity 
houses and spoke before the football 
team at the training table on Friday 
night. He had sixteen personal inter- 
views with men on the campus, and 
completed his program by talking be- 
fore the women of the College in 
Bemis Hall on Friday night. 

After spending another week in 
Colorado, Mr. Worley will tour the 
colleges of Kansas, enroute to his 
headquarters in New York City. 



Mr. Mendenhall of Rocky Ford, 
and Mr. Arthur Wells of La Junta, 
were guests at the Fiji house over 
Sunday. 

♦ + 

Charline Cover ex-'i2 spent Satur- 
day and Sunday visiting friends 
around College. 

♦ + 

Cary S. Campbell '12 received a 
visit from his father Saturday. 

♦ ♦ 

Arthur Hoffman ex-'n who was 
visiting on the campus for a few 
days, has returned to his home at 
Lake City, Colorado. 



RRF" AO F° rmorn ' n g delivery. It's 
bread hot from the oven, 
baked from the choicest flour, and that 
would command first premi m anywhere. 
That you get from us. Is always good. 

THE CHICAGO BAKERY 



Have the fellows meet you at 

Tucker's 
Restaurant 

10 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 

You can always save money if 
you will come to see our line in 
diamonds, watches, jewelry, 
guns, sporting goods, fishing 
tackel drawing sets, musical 
instruments, trunks, valises, or 
if you want to loan money, you 
can get it 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 

Money Loaned on Valuabl s 



Have Your Clothes Cleaned, Pressed and 
Kept in First-Class Repair by 

"Sam" the Gentlemen's Valet 

Also Makes a Specialty of Serving Parties 

SAM FLEMING 
114 E. Cucharras Phone 1675 



THE TIGER 



II 



Whitney & Grimwood 

Headquarters for Pennants, Pillows, Books, 
Art Goods, Framed Pictures, Etc. 

See us for your CHRISTMAS PRESENTS. 



Get Your Picnic Supplies 

= AT SSS 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

1 13 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

STUDENTS 



Remember when you want the 
BEST in Photography at moderate 
cost. Visit the Old Reliable Art 
Shop of 




<\9<\977l4p l/ 



Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 

Phone Main 41 



R. J. CORRIN 

Dry Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing 

and Remodeling for Ladies 

and Gentlemen 

Work by the Month 

Work Called for and Delivered 



Phone 2963 M 



326 N. Tejon Stree 



Nothing Pleases Us More Than 
To Please College StuJen.s 

The Fred S. Tucker 

Furniture Co. 



Bert Wasley '05 is employed by 
the Albert Sechrist Electrical Manu- 
facturing" Co., of Denver. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Phildeiah D. Rice '04, a rival of 
Leland T. Powers, is on the lecture 
course at Cornell College, Iowa. 



Kento Mitchell '09 visited about 
the campus on Thursday last. 

Miss Persis Kidder '11 came from 
Denver on Friday to be present at 
the Contemporary initiation. 



Miss Marie Forhan ex-'12 spent the 
week end as a guest of Miss Watson. 

Lacey McClintock '03 has been 
spending several days in the Springs. 



Harry W. McOuat of 234 Union 
Ave., is now a partner with Albert 
E. Sherry of the same address in the 
business of "The California Tree Sur- 
geons of Pasadena, California." 

F. M. Jardine '11 and E. W. Steele 
'11 are engaged in the copper milling 
business at Phoenix, Arizona. 

Among the former College people 
at the Utah-C. C. game were Persis 
Kidder '11 of Denver, Dorothy 
Frantz '11, Winifred Schuler '11 of 
Raton, New Mexico, Lacey McClin- 
tock '03 of Grand Junction, Bert 
Wasley '05 of Denver, T. D. Riggs 
'08 of Cripple Creek, "Stuffy" Chap- 
man '06 of Pueblo, "Tub" Morris '09 
of Rocky Ford, B. W. Stiles '09 of 
Pueblo, Ben Stewart '10 of Colorado 
City, F. A. Kitely ex-'13 of Long- 
mont. 



APOLLONIAN CLUB. 



November 17. 

Music — Storke. 
Extempore Speeches: 

Italy in Tripoli. 

China's Last Move. 

Our Next President. 
Public Opinion as Expressed in the 

November Elections — C. R. Black. 
Parliamentary Drill — Klahr. 
Debate on Inter-Society Question: 

Affirmative — Robinson, Border. 

Negative — Hall, Keener. 



MOTOR CYCLES 

Yale Emblem 

BICYCLES and Supplies 

Expert Repairing 

Colorado Springs Cycle 

Company 

DeWitt Doyle, Manager 
224 N. Tejon St. Phone Red 34 



Knight - Campbell's 

F0R PIAN0S 

and PLAYER PIANOS 
STE1NWAY and 20 OTHER MAKES 

We Rent Pianos 

Largest Stock Victor Talking Machines 
and Edison Phonographs 

226 N. Tejon St., after Sept. 15, 122 N. Tejon 



The Gowdy-Si i mons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS 

Copper Plate and Steel Engravers 
Telephone 87 21 N. Tejon Street 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Ren'ed and Repaired 

Supplies of AH Kirds 

See the New Remingto Visible be- 
fore Purchasing Typewriter. 

Zimmerman Supply 

Company SaJSSS 

Established 1SSO 



You can save from 25 
percent to 40 percent 
on our finest Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer & 
Clothcraf t Suits and 
Overcoats 



12 



THE TIGER 



C. C. IS GOING TO TRIM THE MINES 

INSPIRE THE TEAM WITH YOUR ENTHUSIASM. 
BE LIBERAL WITH THE DECORATIONS. 
WE ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR PENNANT 8, STREAMERS, ARM BANDS, ETC. 
WE HAVE AN ESPECIALLY GOOD VALUE IN A VERY LARGE PENNANT AT $1.60. 

The 20 Per Cent. Discount is still on and in addition we will include a JAPANESE CANE, FREE 
OF CHARGE, with every pennant. 

THE MURRAY DRUG COMPANY 

Opposite Campus 



The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Associa ion 

116 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Give 
Special Attention to Accounts of Student 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, treiident Ira Harris, V -Prisidin 

M. C. Gile Lilla B. Ensign C. E. Lynde 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M 

THE OUT WEST 

TENT AND AWNING CO. 

RECLINING CHAIRS 
PORCHES ENCLOSED 

Tents Rented for a Day or for Longer 



Stamping, Designing, R rforating, Best Hnl »i'i 
China. Western Branch of Mexican Pigment Paints, 
Stenciling and Materials 
Art Needlework and Art Goods 

TH ] HUNT AND VAN NICE 

ART SPECIALTY SHOPS 

Retail and Wholesale 
ke's Peak Aven e Phone Main 2055 



The "Little Jeff" Last Has the 

Style, Fit and Quality 



PHI GAMMA DELTA DANCE. 




Jh Whitaker-Kester 

Shoe Co. 
10 North Tejon Street 



The members of the Phi Gamma 
Delta fraternity gave their first dance 
of the season at the San Luis school 
Saturday evening, November elev- 
enth. Many of the alumni were pres- 
ent, and the evening, although short, 
was spent in a most delightful man- 
ner. 

The decoration scheme consisted of 
a simple arrangement of pennants, 
for the most part of the College and 
the fraternity. Refreshments in the 
form of punch and purple mints with 
the Greek letters Phi Gamma Delta 
raised upon them were served. The 
music was furnished by an orchestra 
composed of Miss Mabel Harlan, 
violin, Miss Ruth Law, piano, and Mr. 
Wilhelm Sheffer , cornet. 

Among the alumni present were 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Roy Armstrong, and 
Air. J. Guay Chapman of La Junta. 
Outsiders present were Mr. Menden- 
hall of Rocky Ford, Mr. Wells of La 
Junta, Herbert Vandemoer and Coach 
Castleman of Boulder. 

The ladies present were the Misses 
Octavia Hall, Ethel Alter of Pitts- 
burg, Charline Cover of Rocky Ford, 
Imogene Franklin, Lorraine Williams, 
Margaret McKenzie, Marion Yerkes, 
Claire Galligan, Dorothy McCreary, 
Marjory Knight of Denver, Hazlett 
Worthing, Mary Walsh, Helen Wil- 
kins, Shirley McKinnie, Vesta Tucker, 
Dorlie Crandall, Margaret Watson, 
Lena McGee, Bertha Bond, Florence 
Oettiker, Maurine Carle. Marguerite 
Banta, Harriet Ferrill, Ruie Aitken, 
Florence Lattner, Mrs. Fred Hill and 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard T. Moore, who 
acted as chaperons. 



Word has been received of the en- 
gagement of Eu Fluttenberg '15 to 
Llewellyn Mullbrew '15. The wed- 
ding will take place in the near 
future. 



MOWRY'S ICE CREAM 

One Quart $0.50 

Two Quarts $0.85 

Three Quarts .......... $1.10 

One Gallon $1.30 

One Quart Brick $0.60 

Two Quart Brick $1.00 

Wholesale Rates on Applica- 
tion. 
A. L. MOWRY, 
Phone 1184. 
15 E. Cache la Poudre. 



STOP AT 

LIGHTNING SHOE SHOP 

to get your shoes repaired. Shine 
free with every pair of soles 

Sewed Soles 75c. 28 ]'i N. Tejon St. 



William P. Bonbright & Co 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs. Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



STUDENTS! 

The 
Pearl Laundry Co. 

respectfully solicits your pat- 
ronage. We guarantee satis- 
factory work and service and 
give you 20°/c discount. 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 



THE TIGER 



13 



MEET 

YOUR FRIENDS AT 

M. Q. WEST'S 

Sample Shoe Store 

HO-112 E. Pike's Avenue, Up Stairs 

Rooms 16-17-18 Midland Block 
First Stairway East of Tucker's Cafe 

The Best Shoes, $2.50 No More, No Less 



Engraving || Local Department || 



Function Invitations 
Programs, Place Cards 
Etc., — Our Specialty. 

OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

HA YNER 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 

2 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 



Bert Wasley was around the cam- 
pus several days last week. 

The Young People's League of the 
Congregational Church entertained 
some of the College people very de- 
lightfully Tuesday evening at the 
home of Dr. Ranney. 

♦ + 

Student Government proctors were 
elected last week. 

+ ♦ 

Peggy McKenzie had a birthday 
dinner Thursday night, sharing a box 
from home with some of her friends 
in her room. 

♦ ♦ 

Florence Pierson is enjoying an ex- 
tended visit from her mother. 

♦ ♦ 

Lucy Ferril received a very painful 
sprained ankle while on a tramp Sat- 
urday. 

♦ + 

Etta Moore entertained at a spread 
after the game Saturday. 

♦ -f 

Miss Knight of Denver came down 
for the game and was the guest of 
Mable Jacobson. 



the Minnesota State Forest Service. 
♦ ♦ 
"Jimmie" Wilson is studying law at 
the University of Pennsylvania. 



When You Visit "Her" 

Your Most Valuable 
Ally will be a Box of 

Burgess Chocolates 
BURGESS 

Phone Eight Three 
12-114 North Tejon Street 



Why Not Have that 

Party at 

BRUIN INN 

Sewed Soles 75 cents 
Rubber Heels 35 cents 

AT 

PETE'S SHOE SHOP 

230 East Dale 

JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cl-aning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

1 Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Slree 

Developing and Printing 

HARLAN 

"The View Man" 

A I Kinds of View and Commercial Work 
Phone Main 2717 304 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 

The Prompt Printery Co. 

MASTER PRINTERS 



12 and 14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



THE OLD STAND BY 

Anybody can make Ice Cream but it takes Mueth's to 
satisfy the College Students. Reference: L. Shaw 







* _»*-*- 



Under New Management 



14 



THE TIGER 



Be Your Own Agent 

The management of the STAR LAUNDRY have 
decided to have no general agent at the College and to 
give agent's discount direct to the student sending in 
the bundle. 

Our drivers will sell you a $5.00 Coupon Book for $3.50, a dis- 
count of 30%, or you can pay in cash on the delivery of the bundle, 
taking out 30% for yourself. No bundles will be left without money 
or coupons. 

Coupon- Books at this discount will be sold only to students and 
are not transferable and the coupon will not be received from other 
than students. 



Everything in Jewelry 



FOUND AT 



Arcularius & Co. 

Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton Dairy 



419 S. El Paso St. 



Phone Main 442 



THE MUELLER 

TEACHERS' AGENCY 

Conducted for Efficiency only. Services 
free to School Bnards No enrollment fee 
for teachers. Call or write 

ANNA H' MUELLER, 450 Wast U nta Street, 
Phone Main 2188 Colorado Springs, Coo 

Have You a Panitorium 
College Ticket? 

See Rhone College Agent, Hager- 
man Hall. 

30 Suits Sponged and Pressed For $5 



For frozen dainties, punch, fresh 
home-made candies, Phone 920, 
Noble's. 

♦ ♦ 

The largest assortment of candies 
and confections in the city. See 
Noble's. 

♦ + 

If you haven't had some of our 
famous Pineapple Ice, you've missed 
a treat. Order some for your next 
entertainment. Noble's. 

♦ ♦ 

Skirts cleaned and pressed, 50c. 
Phone Main 715. The Acacia. 

♦ ♦ 

A party consisting of Misses Wil- 
son. Fezer, Lamb, Burger and Stod- 
dard, and Hughes Lloyd, Nordeen, 
Carson and Munro took supper at 
Bruin Inn last Thursday evening. 
Prof, and Mrs. Martin chaperoned. 

♦ ♦ 

Mattie Lendrum entertains the 
Misses Bateman, Lamb and Burger 
and Messrs. LeClere, Bassler, Nor- 
deen and Hughes at a fudge party 
this evening. 

♦ ♦ 

Tuck, a Denver University Beta, 
called at the Delta Phi Theta house 
last week. 

♦ ♦ 

Saturday evening Sigma Chi en- 
joyed a call from the Sigs on the 
' "tah squad. 



CHILI 

Is Now Being Served at 

The College Inn 

Opposite the Campus 



TRY 

A 

SUPPER 



AT 



McRAE'S 



THE 

Hemenway Grocer) Co. 
Groceries and 



Meats 



.s*.b 



to* 




115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE HENRY L DWINELL HARDWARE COMPANY 



TOOLS 



BUILDERS AND GENERAL HARDWARE 
We Appreciate the College Trade 



CUTLERY 



130 N. Tejon St. 



Peone M_in 439 



THE TIGER 



15 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

New reversible coats for school 
and general wear — sizes 32-34- 
36-all new colors-$20, #22.50, 
£25 and $30. 

Women's and Misses garments 
2nd floor. 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

s the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 

106 l 2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone Main 700 



W.L LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



91 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heati g Co 



Silk Hose 

5Cc to $2.50 

Lisle Hose 

25c to 75c 




\ Correct Dress for Men ^ 



Good Under- 
wear 
Union & 2 piece 
$5.00 to $1.00 



You'll find it a pleasure to do your trading 
with Gorton's. Good Clothes, Good Service, 
Good Values. 

SUITS and OVERCOATS 

SIS-S20-S25— Better Ones at $30, $35 and $40 

113 East Pike's Peak Avenue. 



Phone Main 48 



313 N. Tejon St. 



Artists Materials 

FRAMING 
College Posters 

The Richard Willis Art Studios 

4'/ Ea t Pike's Peak Avenue 



Mr. H. Howard Brown is in charge 
of the chorus for the German songs 
which are to be rendered the night of 
the German play. 

♦ ♦ 

A number of College people went 
to F.ruin fnn Sunday night. 

♦ ♦ 

Mrs. Vandemoer and Miss Lucile 
Wilkins, of Denver, and Miss Alta, of 
Pittsburg, and Miss Marie Forhan ex- 
'12, were guests at the Sigma Chi 
house Sunday. 

-f + 

Many Boulderites, including Coach 
Castleman and several members of 
the first team were very interested 
spectators at the Utah game. 

♦ ♦ 

Mr. McDonough of Denver was a 
visitor at the Sigma Chi house last 
week. 

♦ ♦ 

Storke '13 is out of the hospital. 

♦ 4 

Kingsland and Rathvom, Betas 
from the University of Colorado, 
were at the Delta Phi Theta house 
over Sunday. 

PEERLESS 
LUMP 

The most satisfacory coal on the marke; 

for furnace 

THE CENTRAL FUEL CO. 

Phone 578 12S N. Tejon 



Get Acquainted at 

The Red 
Cross Pharmacy 

HOT DRINKS HOT TAMALAS 

HUDSON'S CHOCOLATES 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 

107 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone 40 



PAGE 5 GAZETTE 

See our Candy Special 
each week 

TEA AND 

COFFEE Co. 

Phon 575 



DERN 

26 So. Tejon St. 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 



Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Re errs 201-3-4 DeGraff Bld g 
118 North Tejon St. Phone Main 1701 



Res , 121 1 N. Weber St. Tel. Main 956 




TOD POWELL 



Phone Main 930 



W. E. DONER 



POWELL-DONER SPORTING GOODS CO. 

1 12 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

"EVERYTHING FOR SPORTSMEN" 

New and Complete Stock of the Very Best of Athletic Supplies, College Pennants, Novelties, Etc. 

"ASK THE MEDICINE MAN" 



16 THE TIGER 

There's a certain good Winter Suit await- of style, of pattern, of fabric and of fit. 
ing you here. 

In this smart showing of young men's 
bench- tailored clothes. 



That you can put right on and wear into 



any gathering on earth. 



A suit that will PLEASE YOU in every detail At Fifteen Dollars and more. 



(Peffon4-S6e<irer6 



HAUGEN, Tailor 



222 N. Tejon. 



Phone Main 296 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



Departments - 

College of Arts and 
Science, 
E. S. PARSONS, Dean 

School of Engineering, 
F. CAJORI, Dean 

School of Forestry, 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 

School of Music, 

E. D. HALE, Dean 



iHSBSBBKHH 



j 



We Now Have the Famous 

Norma Martinez 5c Havana Cigars 

HUGHES 

Pool in connection but not a pool room 



13 




THE WEEKLY N FWS PAPER OF ^OLQRADO COLLEGE 

y OL . xiV COLORAD O SPRINGS, COLO., _NOVEM BER 23, 1911 Number 11 

MEtTING^F ****** ********* TIGERS SCORE 11 

THE COMMISSION I ALUMI ™ QUET - ; AGAINST MINES 

* Don't forget the Denver, * Playing Fair Ball, Home Team Wins 

* Colorado, College Alumni ban- * Its First Conference Game. 
Report of Barbecue Manager Ac- + quet tQ be hdd at ^ Shidey 4. 

cepted— Commission Recom- ^ Hotel on Wednesday, Novem- * The Tigers did the most they could 

mends Co-educational ^ ^ er the n ig nt before * toward retrieving lost honors last 

Dramatics. $, Thanksgiving, at six o'clock * Saturday by defeating the School of 

* sharp. "Prexy" will be there. * Alilles ir " at Union Park in Denver. 
The second regular meeting of the ^ p ro f essor Cajori will respond * At no time did the team show as 

Student Commission was held at Bemis 4. to a toast. All Colorado Col- * brilliant playing as they have in some 

Hall last Thursday evening. Besides ^ j students who can be ; n 4, of their best "streaks" in other games 

the routine business of the Commission ^ Denver at that time are urged 4. but— which was much better— the?) 

there were two important matters which ^ ^ come . Plates are $1.25. * played a steady game from the first 

came up for the consideration of the ^ Students intending to attend * to the last whistle. The game was 

Council. The first was the report of + ^ CQnfer a gfeat favor upon 4, fierce throughout, but hardly rougher 

the committee which was previously ap- ^ ^ cornm i ttee if t hey send a * tllan tnis natural fierceness made it. 

pointed to audit the accounts of the ^ DOSta l t o S- L. Smith, 969 * The Ti gcrs were fighting hard to keep 

manager of the barbecue, and the second 4, L mco i n Street. Denver, Colo. * from being relegated into the list of 

was the question of co-educational dra- 4, 4. tail-enders, and the Miners were 

.•K'tics. 4. 4. 4. 4. .j. 4. 4>4.4>4.4>4.4.4>4> fighting with the dim hope they had 

A. W. Donovan, treasurer of the As- - OI forging ahead in these last games. 

SQciated Students and IT. A. Parkison, Disbursements. The game was a very one-sided af- 

secretury, who acted as auditing com- On account to the Emporium $54.31 fair— much more one-sided than the 

rpittee on the barbecue books, submitted Jn full to Chicago Bakery 12.75 score would indicate. During the 

the report of the barbecue manager in Pike's Peak Transfer Co., cartage 2.65 fi rst . second and fourth quarters the 

full. The report was duly considered Q. E. Hemenway (2 bills), in full 37.49 Alines did not once have the ball be- 

and formally accepted by the Commis- Hext Music Co., in full 7.00 yon d tne Tigers' 45-yard line. They 

sion. The report in full for the receipts Prompt Printery, on account 7.25 managed to get down to the 27-yard 

and disbursements of the manager of Kaufman's, in full 5.26 li ne> an( j there failed their only 

the barbecue were as follows: Brown Lumber Co., in full 6.00 chance for scoring when Harper 

Receipts. M. E. Strieby, for coloring solu- missed a field goal. On the other 

Stubs of sold tickets, 504 at 50c. $252.00 tion, in full 1.00 hancl the Tigers not only had pos- 

Complimentaries issued, 14. A. S. Blake, in full 45 session of the ball most of the time, 

Souvenirs sold, 455 at 10c 45.55 Continental Oil Co.. in full 2.50 Dut a l ar g e proportion of the time 

Bancroft, in full 4.00 t hey were carry j n g j t inside the Min- 

Total receipts $297.55 Prompt Printery. in full 3.50 e rs' 35-yard line. Three times besides 

Note .1 800 tickets were in the pos- Use of wagon and helper 3.50 the twice that t h e y made touchdowns 

session of the manager, but members of Lamps broken 7.00 they had the ball inside the 3-yard 

the class used the unsold tickets for Incidentals 1.00 ij ne 

souvenirs. No account given. Ball-Dickinson Hdw. Co 5.65 The fact too, that Colorado College 

Note B. The tin flasks left over were Colo. S. Light, H. & P. Co 1.50 was not forced to leave safe, straight- 

also kept as souvenirs by the members Street Car Co., breakage head- football for the more hazardous open 

of the class. Continued off pagW 3 Continued on Page 4 



THE TIGER 



Many Alumni Activities 



CALENDARS FOR XMAS. 



THE NEW ENGLAND ALUMNI 
BANQUET. 



More than fifty alumni and former 
students were present at the fourth 
annual banquet of the New England 
Colorado College Alumni Association 
held Friday evening at Brunswick 
hotel in Boston, Mass. 

The addresses of the evening were 
made by President Lowell of Har- 
vard and by our own President Slo- 
cum. Following the banquet there 
was held an informal reception, at 
which college songs were sung. At 
the business meeting, the officers for 
the coming year were elected. They 
are as follows: President, Clarence 
Lieb '08; vice-president, Miss Francis 
Montgomery '07; secretary and treas- 
urer, E. B. Fowler '11. 

Among those present were Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Slocum, President 
Lowell, Dr. and Mrs. Albert B. Hart, 
Professor Hills, Dr. J. B. Gregg, Mr. 
and Mrs. Sturgis, Mr. and Mrs. Irving 
Howbert and Miss May Howbert, 
Phidelah Rice '04, Miss Dorothea 
Beach 'OS, Miss Francis Montgomery 
'07, J. Wilson Smillie '08, John Ma- 
guire '08, William G. Lennox '08, E. 
S. Stickney ex-'08, Clarence Lieb '08, 
Miss Hattie M. Finley '10, Miss Irene 
Huse '10, Leland Pollock '10, D. H. 
Buchanan '11, Leonard Van Stone '11, 
R. G. Argo '11, Ernest Fowler '11, 
Bruce Wierick 'n, Harry Woodward 
'11, Miss Ruby Patterson ex-'12, Miss 
Lucille Buzzard ex-'12, Miss Ruth 
Packard ex-'13, Miss Anna Huse ex- 
'13, Miss Florence Crane ex-'14 and 
Miss Ruth Banning ex-'14. 



HYPATIA ALUMNI ENTERTAIN. 



The Hypatia alumni, at the home 
of their president, Mrs. Richard Mc- 
Kinnie Aitken, 1807 N. Nevada Ave., 
entertained the members of the Hy- 
patia society of the College on Sat- 
urday afternoon at a buffet high tea. 

The hostesses were as follows: Mrs. 
Richard McKir.nie Aitken ex-'o7, pres- 
ident; Mrs. Alva W. Henderson '07, 
vice-president; Miss Kathleen Roe 
ex-'i2, secretary; Miss Mabel Bate- 
man '07, treasurer; Mrs. Jasper H. 
Sanford '07, historian; Miss Ruth An- 
derson '06, Miss Winnifred Pease '07, 
Miss Vera Rogers '07, Miss Clara 
Kavanaugh ex-'o7, Miss Marie Rob- 



erts '08, Miss Ruth Bateman '10, Miss 
Fdna Woodard 'n. 



ALUMNI MONTHLY OUT. 



Volume II, No. 1, of the Alumni 
Monthly dated for the fifteenth was 
sent through the mails the first of 
the week. It contains many interest- 
ing items and also an appeal to all 
alumni to assist in making the paper 
a success by contributing little items 
concerning themselves or others. 
This issue is being sent as first class 
mail so that it will be forwarded 01 
returned. 

It is the plan of Editor Alden to 
issue the "Alumni Monthly" every 
month this year, last year only two 
numbers having been sent out. The 
issue will be between four and five 
hundred and with the accurate ad- 
dress list which Alden is preparing 
it is hoped that it will reach every 
alumnus. 



DENVER MEETING OF CON- 
TEMPORARY CLUB. 



The Contemporary Alumni Club of 
Colorado College in Denver met re- 
cently with Mrs. Max Giesecke and 
spent an enjoyable afternoon. Among 
those present were: Mrs. Max Guis- 
ecke (nee Agnes Smedley) '05, Mrs. 
Joseph Cones, Mrs. Alice Kidder Pen- 
nington '06, Mrs. R. T. Ward (nee 
Hannah Johnson) '07, Mrs. J. J. Van- 
demoer (nee Sar.th Wallace), Miss 
Cornelia Warner 04, Miss Florence 
Fezer '05, Miss Frances Sims '05, 
Miss Irma Rudd '05, Miss Mary Por- 
ter '05, Miss Irene Fowler '08, Miss 
Grace Tuck, Miss Lilyan Kidder, Miss 
Harriet Piatt and Miss Fern Mitchell. 



C. C. MAN PUBLISHES 
TREATISE. 



Mr. M. D. Hersey, C. C. '07, is now 
connected with the Bureau of Stand- 
ards in Washington, D. C. Recently 
he published an article on "Applied 
Mathematics, a Criterion for Best 
Magnitudes in Precise Measurement," 
in the Journal of the Washington 
Academy of Sciences. 



There was a Tau graduate dinner 
of the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity at 
the Shirley on Saturday. 



On Monday the last "copy" for the 
191 2 Colorado College Calendar was 
sent \o the Williamson-Haffner Co. in 
Denver, and in case there are no fur- 
there delays it will be ready by the 
first of December. The matter of 
making an entirely new calendar has 
been an extremely difficult problem 
for the committee, but the results of 
their efforts have far exceeded ex- 
pectations. Mrs. Bushee, with the as- 
sistance of Mr. Motten, has had 
charge of the work this year and to 
these two great credit is to be given. 

The pictures this year tend more to 
athletics than heretofore and are, for 
the most part, panoramic, this being 
an entirely new feature. The cuts 
will be printed on a warm sepia and 
mounted upon a rich cinnamon brown 
board. Because of the use of pano- 
ramic views the calendar will hang 
from the long side, this again being 
a variation from the calandars of the 
past two years. 

Bruce Gustin and Prof. Stewart 
have contributed a large number of 
the photographs and have made pos- 
sible the carrying out of the new art 
scheme. 

Remember that these calendars 
make the very best Christmas pres- 
ents and they will be out in plenty of 
time to be mailed from here before 
going home for the holidays. 



Mr. J. Hunter Carroll, formerly of 
Colorado College, was married in 
Pueblo to Miss Ruby Carlisle of 
Denver. Mr. Carroll is now engaged 
in business at Hartsel, Colorado. 



Mr. Lee Hyder ex-'io was married 
to Miss Etta Ruth Bass ex-'io, Oct. 
11, 191 1. Mr. and Mrs. Hyder are re- 
siding at Glenwood Apartments, Col- 
lege Hill, Cincinnati. Mr. Hyder is 
engaged in his profession as architect. 



Mr. Ray B. Shaw '06 was married 
on November 2nd to Ethel St. John. 
Mr. and Mrs. Shaw have gone to 
Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, where 
Mr. Shaw is connected with the Dry- 
Farming Congress. 



Miss Eleanor Porter ex-'o8 was re- 
cently married to Mr. Hodgins of 
Honolulu. They are at present at 
New York upon their wedding trip. 

Miss Ida McMorris '11 visited Miss 
Edith Gleason on Saturday. 



THE TIGER 



MEETING OF COMMISSION 

Continued from page 1 

lights 2.25 

Central Electric Co. 

Cash balance with class Treasur'r 117.25 

Balance due Emporium 1.40 

Tickets sold, but money not yet 
turned in, and receipts due from 
all other sources 9.84 



Total disbursements $297.55 

The above report was accepted by A. 
W. Donovan and H. A. Parkison with 
the recommendation that hereafter all 
tickets be given to the barbecue mana- 
ger by the treasurer of the Student Body 
and that an exact account be given by 
the barbecue manager in his final report, 
for every ticket in his possession. 
Respectfully submitted, 

H. A. Parkison, Secretary. 
A. W. Donovan, Treasurer, 
For the Associated Students of Colorado 

College. 

In order to secure greater accuracy 
in the auditing of the barbecue accounts 
it was voted that hereafter the treasurer 
of the Associated Students should issue 
tickets to the manager of the harbecue 
and require a strict accounting for the 
number of tickets issued. 

The question of raising funds for all- 
College affairs such as pan-pans, etc., 
was next considered. In order to help 
out the financial end of the Associated 
Students, it was voted that the treasurer 
be authorized to collect 20 per cent, of 
the profits of the barbecue, which shall 
be used for the purpose of the Commis- 
sion. There was a great deal of dis- 
cussion upon this question, and the con- 
clusion was finally reached on the 
ground that the barbecue is an all-Col- 
lege affair and therefore in the control 
of the Student Commission. It was fur- 
ther decided that this ruling go into 
effect immediately and that the treasurer 
should collect 20 per cent, of the profits 
from this year's barbecue. 

The Commission recommended that 
t'-.e representatives of the student body 
on the athletic board attempt to secure 
a raise of the athletic fee next year to 
$5.00 and have a part of the fee set aside 
for the use of the Student Commission, 
the manager of debating, and the girls' 
gymnastics. 

The report of W. T. Winchell in re- 
gard to collections an i expenditures for 
deer rations, etc., at football games, was 
considered and accept.-d. This covered 
the collections made ai chapel before the 
Utah game, and the expenditures for 
hunting, band, etc. ]n this connection it 
was voted that all students who collect 
money at chapel for any all-student af- 



fairs, should turn over those collections 
to the treasurer of the Associated Stu- 
dents and receive a receipt for the 
amount. 

A bill for the cut of the Student Com- 
mission in the 1912 Nugget was allowed. 

Bills presented by T. E. Kirkpatrick 
for the expense of the manager of debat- 
ing were allowed. 

Then came discussion of the question 
of co-eductaional dramatics. After argu- 
ments pro and con it was voted that the 
Commission recommend co-education 
dramatics. A committee of three was 
appointed by the chair to suitably pre- 
sent the plans for co-educational dra- 
matics for the consideration of the fac- 
ulty It might be said that it was not 
the aim of the Commission to enlarge 
upon the range of student activities, but 
simply to formulate a plan whereby co- 
educational dramatics could be held, as 
in the case of the Pearsons play or a 
junior play, should the "'Uiiors prefer 
to give a play rather than an operetta. 



MISSIONARY TALKS IN 
CHAPEL. 



No more interesting chapel talk has 
been given this year than the address 
by Rev. A. R. Hoare last Friday. Mr. 
Hoare is a missionary among the Es- 
quimaux in the region about Point 
Hope. Alaska. He told about the 
lives and characters of the natives of 
that region. They have, he said, no 
conception of God. While they live 
in a state of utter ignorance they are 
without the vices of the white race 
and are really nothing more than 
grown up children. He described 
the methods by which the Esquimaux 
were being taught to improve their 
condition and of the work done by 
the missionary settlement among 
them. The address furnished a good 
sample of the wonderful work done 
today by men in the foreign field in 
all parts of the world. 



CHECKER TOURNAMENT. 



Cribbage may have been "in it" in the 
good old days of two weeks ago, but 
to be fully convinced that cards will 
soon be (some already have been) 
relegated to the ash pit, one only 
needs to step into Hag hall. On the 
bulletin board is an announcement 
of a checker tournament for all "in- 
mates" complying with the rules and 
regulations. "Tiddlewinks is exciting, 
they say, but checkers is the only 



WAR! CRIME!! DISASTER!!! 

Sophs Defy Student Commission — 

Betting Odds Favor the 

Underclassmen. 

"Heads I win, and tails you lose," says 
the Stduent Commission. 

"I won't play," answers the sophomore 
class. 

And according to the latest reports, it 
hasn't played and has no intention of 
playing, and the Student Commission is 
scratching its head and trying to figure 
out how to aid its revenue officers in 
collecting the 20 per cent, barbecue tax 
And indeed, it is finding it has a knotty 
problem on hand. 

At the last meeting of the Commission 
it was voted to take twenty per cent, of 
the profits of the barbecue for the use of 
the Associated Students and the treas- 
urer was authorized to collect it from 
the sophomore class. The spohomores 
had a class meetng Monday and decided 
that they could get more fun out of 
the twenty per cent, if they used it for 
a class party than if they turned it over 
to the Student Commission, and conse- 
quently they declined to turn it over. 

Up until the time of going to press 
the sophs still have the money safe in 
the bank. The Commission has no 
means of getting at it, and are endeav- 
oring to take the rebuff from the young- 
sters as gracefully as they can, and 
meanwhile they are trying to devise 
some means of separating the sophs 
from their hard-earned barbecue money. 
The first skirmish resulted in a victory 
for the underclassmen, and the dead 
game sports of the community are wag- 
ering their all on the complete rout of 
the Commission before the war is over. 



THE AMSBARY LECTURE. 

The College is to have the oppor- 
tunity of hearing one of the most de- 
lightful lecturers in the country, Mr. 
Wallace Bruce Asmbary of Chicago, 
on Monday evening, November 27th 
in Perkins Hall. Mr. Asmbary gave 
his lecture on Kipling and readings 
from the author's work before the - 
Winter Night Club during the winter 
of iqoq-iqio and greatly delighted 
those who heard him. The next 
morning he read most entertainingly 
in chapel some of his Ballads of 
Bourbonnais. The lecture he is to 
give on Monday evening upon James 
Whitcomb Riley is considered his 
best. Student tickets are on sale at 
25c each, only half the rate for out- 
siders. They can be obtained at Co- 
burn library. All the net proceeds 
are to go to the College Y. M. C. A. 



THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 



Tigers 11; Mines 0. 

Continued from page 1 

style shows that they were not very 
hard pressed. The cross-tackle buck 
was working to perfection, and every 
time Heald took the ball on this play 
he was good for a large gain. 

Colorado College's two touchdowns 
were made in the first and third quar- 
ters. The first one was made by Put- 
nam. Only a few plays before the 
Tigers had the ball on the five yard 
line with three plays to put it over. 
Three line plunges failed. The Mines 
kicked but Putnam brought it back to 
the io-yard line, and on the next play 
while the Miners were looking for 
Heald again, Putnam took the ball 
and walked through center behind 
Witherow for the touchdown. Hed- 
blom missed the goal. The second 
score came early in the third quarter 
after Pledblom had recovered a 
blocked punt on the thirty yard line. 
On the second play Vandemoer shot 
a pass to Thompson who galloped 
thirty yards to the goal line before he 
was downed. Hedblom kicked the 
goal, adding the final tally of the day, 
n-o. 

Harper, the tiny Alines' quarterback 
was the whole life, and almost the 
whole strength of their team. His 
punting, his open field running in 
carrying back kicKs and end runs, and 
his clean cut tackling were among the 
most spectacular plays of the game. 

Heald was the usual reliable man 
for steady gains, and was the same 
mighty bulwark on defense. He is 
more surely elated for a place on the 
All-Colorado team than any man in 
the state. Putnam's head-work is no 
better than usual, but his individual 
playing was certainly the greatest 
in all his football playing. His run- 
ning back of kicks made one think of 
Burgess, the Wyoming phenom, while 
his tackling was of a deadly, slashing 
sort that stopped things short. Van- 
demoer was given little chance to 
distinguish himself. He was being 
saved for the Thanksgiving Day 
game. Whenever he did get the ball, 
he showed more style of the old 
Vandy than ever before this year. 
Deesz, new at fullback, played a re- 
markable game for a man of his size. 
His defensive work was especially 



good. The old triumvirate in the cen- 
ter of the line made one think of last 
year's team. Black, Witherow and 
Hedblom, all took their turns at star- 
ring. Bowers was as terrible as ever, 
and Koch, at the other tackle, played 
more like a veteran than ever before. 
Thompson's touchdown gave him 
enough honor for one day. Sinton 
was as impenetrable as ever on his 
end of the line, but did not have the 
chance to do any remarkable forward 
pass work. Sinton and Vandemoer 
each took a couple of tries at drop- 
kicks, but it was hopeless for the 
Tigers to think of scoring by this 
method. Yandemoer's punting was 
the same class that he showed in the 
Boulder game when he was contest- 
ing with Nelson's renowned boot. 

The Mines won the toss and Tolman 
kicked off to Sinton to the 20-yard line, 
the Tiger captain returning 10 yards. 
Deesz made two yards and Heald three 
and Vandemoer pnnted out of bounds 
on the Mines' 40-yard line. The Miners 
were unable to gain and Tolman punt- 
ed out of bounds on the 20-yard line. 
On a shift play Heald went through 
right tackle for 15 yards and Deesz 
followed with three and Putnam three. 
Vandemoer punted to the Mines' 18- 
yard line and Harper was downed in his 
tracks. Harper kicked on the third 
down to the middle of the field and 
Vandemoer returned the ball 15 yards. 
Heald went through the line for four 
and Putnam for six. Captain Calvert 
was hurt in the play and Meyers re- 
placed him at left tackle. Sinton tried 
a drop kick from the 30-yard line, but 
the ball went wide. The Mines put the 
ball in scrimmage on their 25-yard line 
and after two attempts to gain Harper 
punted to Vandemoer on the 45-yard 
line. Van fumbled when tackled, but 
Heald fell on the ball. A forward pass 
Vandemoer to Sinton failed and Vande- 
moer punted out of bounds on the Mines 
15-yard line. The Tiger punter got his 
kicks away for good distance, sending 
them out of bounds just before they 
touched the ground. The Tigers were 
over-anxious and were penalized twice 
for off-side. Mines was forced to punt, 
hut the Tigers broke through and block- 
ed the kick, Black falling on the ball on 
the five-yard line. Deesz made two 
and Heald two, but the Tigers lost the 
ball on downs on the one-yard line. 



Tolman punted to the 40-yard line and 
Putnam dodged back for 30 yards, land- 
ing the ball on the Mines' 30-yard line. 
Heald made eight yards on the shift 
play and Putnam went over on the next 
attempt for a touchdown. Hedblom 
missed goal. Score, Tigers 5, Mines 0. 

The Mines kicked off to Vandemoer 
on the goal line, and the right half re- 
turned 25 yards. The teams were lining 
up when the first quarter ended. Put- 
nam made 25 yards through center, Har- 
per downing him in the center of the 
field, but the play was called back for 
holding and the Tigers were penalized. 
Vandemoer gained on each exchange of 
kicks and Sinton tried a drop kick from 
the 20-yard line. The ball went to the 
left of the goal by several feet. The 
Mines put the ball in play 25 yards out 
and Hartman made five yards around 
the end. A forward pass from Harper 
was good for a gain of 27 yards, a hard 
tackle by Bowers nipping a prospective 
score. Hartman tried a short kick but 
Sinton got the ball on his own 40-yard 
line. Deesz and Van were each good 
for four yards and Putnam went ahead 
for five, making first down. The Mines 
captured a forward pass from Vande- 
moer on the 50-yard line. Harper made 
eight yards and then shot a pass that 
was good for ten more. Harper kicked 
to the 35-yard line and Vandemoer punt- 
ed to the 40-yard line when the half 
ended. 

Neither team changed its lineup when 
play was resumed. The Mines kicked 
off to the line and Heald returned 25 
yards. Vandemoer kicked 40 yards. The 
Alines could not gain, and when Harper 
dropped back for a punt, Hedblom broke 
through, blocked the kick and fell on the 
ball on the Mines 30-yard line. Putnam 
tried the line for no gain. Vandemoer 
shot a pass to Thompson, who ran 25 
yards for a touchdown. Hedblom kicked 
goal. Score: Tigers 11, Mines 0. 

This was the final score, and during 
the remainedr of the third period, as 
well as the last quarter, the ball was 
in Mines territory practically all of the 
time. Gregg was banished from the 
game in the third quarter for slugging, 
Johnston taking his place. In the last 
quarter the Tigers carried the ball to the 
Alines' 20-yard line. Heald, who had 
been injured twice before, was so badly 
battered that he was carried to the side 
lines and Lewis sent in at left half. He 



THE TIGER 



was unfamiliar with the signals, and 
Black was switched from guard to the 
backfield, Summers going in at right 
guard. The Tigers lost the ball on 
downs on the Mines seven-yard line, 
and Harper kicked out of danger. Van- 
demoer caught the kick on the 50-yard 
line and dashed back for 35 yards before 
being downed. The Tigers again lost 
the ball on downs. Harper punted and 
the game ended a moment later. Final 
score: Tigers 11, Mines 0. Lineup: 

Tigers. Mines. 

Thompson, le Shanley, le 

Bowers, It Calvert-Meyers, It 

Hedblom, lg Cadot, lg 

Witherow, c Young, c 

Black-Summers, rg. .Gregg- Johnson, rg 

Koch, rt De Laittre, rt 

Sinton, re Pierce, re 

Putnam, qb Harper, qb 

Vandemoer, lh Hammond, lh 

Heald-Lewis, rh Tolman, rh 

Deesz-Black, fb Robinson, fb 

Touchdowns — ■ Putnam, Thompson. 
Goals from touchdowns, Hedblom 1. 
Referee, Wingender. Umpire, Brans- 
bach. Field judge, Crowley. Time of 
quarters, 15 minutes. 



BOULDER CINCHES CHAM- 
PIONSHIP. 



port and the railroad wants your 
money; therefore, be a good sport 
and go. 



BOULDER, 9; UTAH. o. 

Directly contrary to the Tigers' 
strongest and at the same time fond- 
est expectations the University of 
Colorado defeated the LTniversity of 
Utah in Salt Lake City last Satur- 
day. The score was 9-0, from one 
touchdown and a held goal. The 
touchdown was of a flukey, yet sen- 
sational nature, made by right end 
Mills picking up a fumbled punt on 
the twenty-five yard line and racing 
across the line. The field goal was 
made by Rich after a free catch on 
the forty yard line. 

Utah was unable to show the tre- 
mendous speed which has character- 
ized her playing in previous games, 
because of the muddy, soggy condi- 
tion of the sod gridiron. But even 
then they outplayed the Colorado 
team all the way through the game. 
For instance, look at these figures; 
Utah, 304 yards from scrimmage, and 
Boulder 112 yards. We would not call 
it Boulder luck, because Boulder has 
said that she considers the term de- 
rogatory. After stating that Boulder 
has an excellent kicker we shall leave 
it to the reader to determine what 
else entered into Boulder's victory. 



After Boulder's victory in Salt Lake 
last Saturday they are entitled to the 
championship of the Rocky Mountain 
Conference. Technically they have the 
championship already, and there is only 
one thing which can occur that will pre- 
vent them from having a clean-cut title. 
That is a decisive defeat of the Tigers 
by enver University. The fact that 
Utah tied D. U. would be the thing 
which would put doubts on the minds of 
some. From Denver's showing through 
the season, and especially her showing 
against Wyoming last Saturday, it does 
not seem as if there is much chance for 
them to do any thing to spoil Boulder's 
chances on Thanksgiving Day. 

So it seems, we'll have to give it to 
'em — or rather to one Mr. Rich who 
possesses a valuable boot, the said Mr 
Rich being greatly assisted by a Mr. 
Nelson who likewise has a powerful toe. 
Mr. Rich uses his hoof to boost the ball 
between the goal posts after Mr. Nelson 
has exercised his punting propensities 
sufficiently to get the ball down under 
the shadow of the uprights. 

Both the Tigers and the Mormons out- 
played Boulder in every department of 
the game except that in which Mr. Rich 
has chosen to play the stellar role. Utah 
outplayed Boulder even more than the 
Tigers, but still they lost. Boulder's 
victories in both of these deciding games 
were surprises and contrary to the gen- 
eral dope. The dopesters were looking 
more at the mediocre article of football 
which the team as a whole puts up, in- 
stead of brilliant work of this man. 

It will be a satisfaction to have a clear 
title in the state, even if it does go to the 
University of Colorado. Might suggest, 
too, that this would be a good year for 
them to resume relations with Denver 
University. They have a better chance 
of winning this year than any time since 
that memorable defeat of 1908. 

Congratulations, friend Boulder. We 
wish you luck next spring as well. (No 
irony intended.) 



Johnny Burgess '10 is back in Colo- 
rado after an extended stay in Can- 
ada. 



THANKSKIVING GAME. 

It is high time for all loyal students 
of Colorado College to begin making 
their plans to attend the Colorado 
College-Denver LTniversity football 
game to be played in Denver on 
Thanksgiving Day. The expense will 
not be so heavy and a more favorable 
outcome to the game is promised 
than on our last excursion into the 
north. The team wants your sup- 



BURGESS HOLDS DENVER 

Molding his team steady and direct- 
ing the offense and defense with such 
skill that the Denver University foot- 
ball team could not score during the 
three periods he was in the game, 
Burgess, star quarterback of the Uni- 
versity of Wyoming covered himself 
with glory Saturday. 

Burgess was taken out of the game 
with a sprained ankle, sustained in 
the first play of the fourth period, 
and his loss was felt immediately, as 
Denver scored the only touchdown of 
the game on the very next play. Volk 
kicked goal and the score was: Den- 
ver University 6; University of Wy- 
oming o. 

The game was hotly contested 
from the start, and neither side being 
able to make consistent gains through 
the line or around the ends, resolved 
into a punting duel, in which a heavy 
wind played an important part. 

Several times Denver had the ball 
within Wyoming's five yard line, but 
could not push it across the goal line. 
The only score of the game was made 
on a forward pass, Schroeder to 
Russ. 



INTER-SOCIETY DEBATE. 



Preliminaries for the annual inter- 
society debate have been postponed 
from the eighth to the fifteenth of 
December in order that Dr. Hurrey 
may speak to the societies on the 
former night. Although Pearsons has 
not yet made public her choice of 
sides, rumor intimates that she will 
uphold the affirmative. The question 
submitted to Pearsons by the Apol- 
lonian Club last spring is, "Resolved, 
That the ownership of forest and 
mineral lands now belonging to the 
United States and territories should 
be retained by the federal govern- 
ment." 

The new debating rules, by which 
each man will have time for rebuttal 
and the decision be given by five in- 
stead of three judges, will be tried out 
for the first time in this year's debate. 
It is hoped that these rules will do 
away with the set-speech form used 
in former debates and that the in- 
creased number of judges will reach 
a decision more likely to coincide 
with the general opinion of the audi- 
ence. 



THE TIGER 



The Weekly Nevvspopeiof Colorado College 

HARRY L. BLACK Editor-in-Chief 

RICHARD L. HUGHES Business Mrfr. 

Leon C. Havens Assistant Editor 

A. H. ROWBOTHAM Assistant Editor 

Arthur J. Allen Assistant Editor 

J. J. Sinton Athletic Editor 

D. H. mahan Engineering Editor 

G. S. Cowdery Forestry Editor 

MIS9 Glenn Stiles Alumni Editor 

MIS8 Mary Randolph Exchange Editor 

Miss Helen Rand Local Editor 

A. W. Donovan Local Editor 

H. A. Parkuon Assistant Manager 

A. L. Golden Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

F. P. Storke, H. A. Bennett, MISS Lucy Ferrill 

Mis9 Elizabeth Gerould, Miss Leona Stukey, 

Miss Myrth King, Miss Violet Hopper, Miss 

Franc Adams, R. G. Appel 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to TheTiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phones: Editor, Main 2550. Manager, Main 2073 

Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5 



American Colleges vs. 
German Universities 

Dear Readers of the Tiger: 

I remember singing a pensive little 
ditty during my last three years at 
C. C, which contained the words, 
"Oh, to be a freshman, a freshman 
once more!" The wish expressed by 
these simple words has been granted 
and just seven years after my en- 
trance into C. C. as a freshman, I 
find myself here at Marburg, "a 
freshman once more.'' Like all 
freshmen I have discovered many 
things, to me at least, new and inter- 
esting and am all on edge until I find 
some unsophisticated persons upon 
whom to unload my finds. Thinking 
that the majority of the readers of 
The Tiger qualify here I offer a com- 
parison of C. C. with the University 
of Marburg. 

The administration of the two 
schools is different. At C. C. we 
have a president who teaches Philos- 
ophy and gets acquainted with peo- 
ple of wealth. Here there is no pres- 
ident. A Rector is chosen for one 
year from each "faculty'' successively 
and during that year serves as head 
of the institution. Like all things 
German, the University Administra- 
tion moves slowly. At C. C. we 
have from three days to a week after 
the opening of college in which to 



register and begin work. Here a full 
month is given. I registered on the 
second day after the opening of the 
university and was only the eighth 
student registered by that time. At 
C. C. the Dean always has advice as 
to what to take in addition to a large 
number of prescribed courses. Here 
no advice is given and no courses are 
prescribed. If you want to take two 
hours a week, well and good. If 
forty pleases you better, no one says 
you nay. . At C. C. fifty dollars a 
year is the tuition fee. Here you 
pay only for the hours you take. For 
a sixteen or seventeen hour a week 
course the fees amount to about $25 
for a half-year semester just as at C. 
C. 

The form of instruction is almost 
entirely the lecture. No recitations 
are called for, no report of attend- 
ance is kept and exams at the end of 
the semester are given only on re- 
quest. Hence of course, no diploma 
is given. This form of instruction 
results on the one hand in a class of 
men at the University who simply 
drink beer and loaf and on the other 
in a set of students who work with 
almost uncanny zeal and diligence. 
"The golden mean" which has so 
many followers at C. C. is practically 
unheard of here. 

The spirit of the institutions differ. 
At C. C. the man who earns his way 
is given every chance and if he makes 
good is the most honored fellow in 
school. Here work is looked upon 
as a disgrace. The student will starve 
before he works. One must be able 
to show that he has enough money 
to carry him through the semester 
before he is allowed to register. 
Loyalty to the college plays a big 
part in C. C. And this in large 
measure takes the form of playing 
for the honor of the college, sup- 
porting college enterprises, rustling 
students, etc. Here this loyalty is 
not in evidence. The University, as 
such, has no athletic or debating 
teams. The students play a little ten- 
nis and fight a great many duels. 
There is an instructor in fencing and 
one in horseback riding, but no other 
university athletics. There is not 
even class loyalty as there are no 
seniors, juniors or sophomores. (The 
only class distinguished by a name 
is the freshman. They are called 
Fuche — "foxes.'') There are, how- 
ever, many organizations among the 
students and these enlist their loy- 
alty. Foremost among these are the 
"Corps" which correspond to our 



"frats." Each "Corps" has its house 
or apartment and its members eat 
together. Each also has its special 
costume, al a rule made on a pattern 
from the middle ages. These are 
worn on festive occasions and are 
indeed a sight worth crossing the 
ocean to see. There are also organ- 
izations corresponding to C. C.'s Y. 
M. C. A., Student Volunteers, Liter- 
ary and Scientific Societies, etc. 

The ideal and purpose of the two 
schools is different. C. C. exists for 
the students and its aim is to make 
good citizens. Marburg exists for 
the professors (the students are a 
sort of necessary but offensive ap- 
pendage) and its aim is to contribute 
something to the fund of human 
knowledge. C. C. is for growing 
youth; Marburg is for maturer minds. 
You get a re-hash at C. C. of what 
Marburg discovered five or ten years 

ago, but it counts for more with 
you, diluted though it be, because 
you seek to apply and embody it 
while here it runs to mere theory. 
The moral is plain. Be yourselves. 
Work out your own salvation. Don't 
try to be "Harvard" or "Yale" or 
Marburg. Be C. C. and be it hard. 
Very sincerely, 
PAUL BURGESS '08. 



"EAGER HEART." 

December 15 is the date that has been 
set for the production of "Eager Heart" 
by the Dramatic Club. The play is to be 
given for the entertainment of the mem- 
bers of the faculty and their wives. 
This is the third year that the Dramatic 
Club has rendered "Eager Heart," the 
play having been given last year and 
the year before. The cast for this year's 
production was chosen last week, and 
the members of the cast are holding 
daily rehearsals and are working hard 
to make this production the best yet. 
The cast is as follows : 

Eager Heart Lucile Wakefield 

Eager Sense Lucy Ferril 

Eager Fame Dorothy Madden 

Joseph Maude Stanfield 

Mary Rofena Lewis 

Young Man Netta Powell 

Old Man Delphine Schmidt 

First King Anne Carson 

Second King Bess Knight 

Third King Helen Rand 

Shepherds. .Alice Brown and Etta Clark 
Prologue Florence Humphreys 



Lenore Pollen entertained in honor 
or Winifred Shuler ex-'n Wednesday 
afternoon. 



THE TIGER 



Y. M. C. A. TRAVELING SECRE- 
TARY COMING. 



From December 7 to 10, inclusive, the 
men of Colorado College will be given 
the privilege of entertaining Charles D. 
Hurrey of New York City. Mr. Hurrey 
is a graduate of the University of Mich- 
igan in the class of 1900, and was a 
prominent leader in the undergraduate 
activities. He is a member of the Sigma 
Chi fraternity. 

Upon graduation Mr. Hurrey was 
turned from a legal education into the 
work of the Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation.. At less than twenty-five he 
was made traveling western secretary of 
the Association movement, covering 
some two hundred colleges between In- 
diana and the Pacific coast. After a 
couple of years in this work, Mr. Hur- 
rey left on his wedding trip for Japan, 
where he spent a number of months in 
travel. Then he became National Stu- 
dent Secretary of the Young Men's 
Christian Association in South America. 
In that capacity he has remained for 
the past three years. 

In June Mr. Hurrey returned to the 
United States to become the head of 
Student Department of the Young Men's 
Christian Association of North Amer- 
ica. He is now making a tour of the 
colleges and universities of this country, 
and Colorado College may well con- 
sider itself fortunate in finding its name 
on this man's itinerary. 

It is planned to have Mr. Hurrey ad- 
dress the entire student body in chapel 
on the days he is here, and if possible, 
to use him as speaker at the vesper serv- 
ice on Sunday afternoon, December 10. 
Besides this he will have personal inter- 
views with many of the college men, 
and will speak to groups of fellows at 
various points on the campus. 

As one man who knows Hurrey said 
of him, "He is a prince," and it will be 
a pleasure to have him with us for a 
few days. 

Dr. F. F. Kramer, Rector of All 
Saints Church, Denver, was speaker 
at last Sunday's Vesper Service. His 
sermon was based on Acts II, 19, 
'And your young men shall see vis- 
ions, and your old men shall dream 
dreams." 

As we look at the industrial world 
today, he said, and consider the great 
truths of the Bible and religion; as 
we look on modern theology and note 
how it has deviated from the truths 
of our fathers; as we remember that 
men today are trying to eliminate 
some of these truths from human life, 
we stop to think and our hearts are 



fiilled with sadness. What is this 
past which has given to life such a 
wonderful possibility. It is the spir- 
itual wisdom which soars far beyond 
the sordid things of the world. In 
those days men saw visions, things 
that were beyond the earth; that were 
at the throne of God. What was it 
that drove Martin Luther from a 
monks cell into the world? A vision 
of glory, of strength and of power. 

How are the great forces of today 
to be directed for the benefit of hu- 
manity? By means of a vision of 
Christ, of God. The leaders must see 
visions. Knowledge and power are of 
no avail. Today the captains of in- 
dustry and the empire builders set the 
standard which young men and 
women try to follow. It is a false 
standard for it lacks vision. If we are 
indeed to measure success by great- 
ness, how many in this country are 
successful and what are the rest? 
Failures? According to this standard 
ninety-nine per cent of us are failures. 

To overcome the failures of life you 
must bring Jesus Christ into your life 
and without a vision of him you fail. 
Look into the faces of many today 
and you will see disappointment, sor- 
row and despair where there should 
be hope and joy. Men remember that 
they are weary with toil, and having 
no hope, they sit down and pray for 
death. 

You college students must stand 
for the leader which shall lead the 
minds of other men but without a 
vision of Christ your work will be of 
no avail and your lives will be wasted. 
Thousands of educated people have 
failed because they have lost the vis- 
ion. 

The past, rightly understood, is no 
mere past. It has been the founda- 
tion of our society and can be the 
strength of all who wish to use their 
lives for the benefit of others. The 
religion of Jesus Christ is here in or- 
der to state the principles of the 
doctrine of life. We know that the 
spirit must dominate the body and 
that before us must be the Lord 
you will not be called a failure and 
your life will be rounded out in that 
Jesus Christ; then there will be no 
need of calling men to repentance. 

Get a vision of God. Education is 
one means and imagination another. 
St. John saw a vision and a glorious 
revelation of the beauty of the heaven- 
ly life was the result. You may not 

jnq uaui }B3iS 3iij Suouib pauojpaj aq 
glorious realm where God is. 

Dr. Franklin of the First Baptist 



Church of this city will be the speak- 
er at next Sunday's Vespers. 



BIBLE AND MISSION STUDY 
PLANS. 



At a meeting of the College men held 
in Hagerman Hall last week plans were 
discussed for the Bible and Mission 
Study classes. After a supper which 
was served in the reading room, G. W. 
Worley of New York gave a short, 
forceful talk on the reason for studying 
the problem of missions. . Mr. Motten 
also spoke of the subjects which are to 
be taken up in the different mission 
study classes. 



GLEE CLUB WORKING. 



With the program complete, "Doc" 
Richards is working the Glee Club 
every Tuesday evening for the best 
that theer is in them. The Glee Club 
this year, under the direction of Dr. 
Richards and Billie Winchell, bids 
fair to be the best club the College 
has had for some time. According to 
Dr. Richards, the voices are fifty per 
cent, better than they were last year 
and in addition to this, there will be 
an extra man on each part, making a 
total of twenty voices for the trip. 

Manager Bowers has planned a trip 
to include the important towns to the 
South, East and West parts of the 
state, and is now working hard to 
"cinch" the itinerary with some good, 
solid contracts. The Club will not 
leave until the Thursday following 
Christmas and will hold ten concerts 
before returning at the close of the 
vacation. The towns to be visited 
are, for the most part, towns that 
have not been visited reecntly. 



ENGINEERS CLUB. 



Program for November 24. 
-Music — Howland. 

The Trip to the Gas Plant — Fischer. 
The Pending Disolution of the Steel 

Trust — Lippert. 
Extempore Speeches. 
Critic's Report. 

Visitors welcome. 



The Delta Phi Theta underclass- 
men entertained at Bruin Inn Thurs- 
day evening. The Misses Hamilton, 
DeRusha, Powell, Carson and Gilbert 
and Mr. Ware were guests on the 
occasion. 

♦ + 

Luella Huff entertained a few of 
her friends at tea Sunday. 



THE TIGER 

We're ready for the big- game. The Clothes Game is ours, and 
the combinations we have in Men's Clothes are sure to defeat our 
nearest rivals. 

A mid-season selection enables us to offer you the newest that the 
winter styles will show. $15 to $50. 




GANO-DOmS c ffir 



WE HAVE A SPECIAL 




For Every Purpose 



75c Per Gallon up 

Same way with Wall Paper, Kalsomine, 
and in fact, Everything we Sell. Ask 
your neighbor, he knows. 

Paint Supply Co. 

Wholesale 113-115 E. Bijou St. Retail 



THE TIGER 



Hunt Up 

Bissell's Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 



"DIE HOCHZEITSREISE." 



' 1 



COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

Pike's Peak Book & 
Stationery Co. SLLBfi 35 S 4 

Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
Flour, Fe«>d, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



CALL 2000 

When You Want Anything QUICK! 
QUICK DELIVERY 

MAIN 2000 



COTRELL & LEONARD 

Albany, N. Y. 
Makers of 

CAPS & GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the 

Atlantic to the Pacific 

Class Contcacts a Specialty 



Deichmann & Douglas Floral 

Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER, Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 

Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 

Wills, Spademan & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Gazette Building 



The annual play of the German 
Club will be given in the Cogswell 
theater on Saturday evening of this 
week. The players have been re- 
hearsing- for some weeks past very 
faithfully, and the play will undoubt- 
edly be well given. A feature of the 
evening's program that promises to 
he very attractive is the songs that 
will be sung by a chorus of over 30 
voices. The chorus has for some 
under the direction of Dr. H. Howard 
Brown, who is so well known in the 
city for his skill as a voice teacher. 

Since the first announcements of 
tin- play and songs appeared in the 
city papers, Mr. Howe and Miss 
Sahm have received many inquiries 
concerning the evening's program 
from residents of the city who are in- 
terested in German. Because of the 
large attendance last year and the in- 
terest already displayed this year it 
has therefore been decided to require 
a ticket of admission for all persons 
attending the performance. Students 
ma) r obtain tickets for themselves 
only without cost by applying to Miss 
Sahm, Mr. Howe. Miss Cornelia 
Schuyler or .Mr. Ferguson Ormes. 
For persons outside the College com- 
munity tickets will be on sale for 25c 
at the Coburn library and Whitney & 
Grimwood's book store. 

The "personen" of "Die Hochzeit- 
sreise" follows : 
.\ntonie. seine Fran 

Fraulein Evelyn Norton 
Edwin, sein Famulus 

Herr W. E. Neuswanger 
I lahnensporn, Stiefelputzer 

Herr W. F. Harder 
Guste, Kammerjungfer 

Fraulein Cornelia Schuyler 

Those in the chorus are the Misses 
Adams. Brooks, DeRusha, Drach, 
Erickson. Harriet and Lucy Ferril, 
Fuller, Hemenway, Landon, Lewis, 
McLaughlin, Madden, Parsons, Per- 
ley, Rassbach, Sheppard, Sherman, 
Speiser and Sutton and the Messrs. 
Atwater. E. W. and YV. C. Barnes, 
Border, Fraker, Hedblom. E. Jackson, 
Johnson, Lindstrom, McLaughlin, 
Ormes and Strieby. 




Manufacturers' 

Shoe Sale 

A lucky purchase enables 
us to offer you the most 
popular patterns in new fall 
patterns at a saving of 

25 to 40 per cent. 



11^ AT DEAL'S 

^^^-"107 South Tejoh ErmrrT 




Board $4.50 Per Week 

One front room for two. Board 

and room #25 per month for each 

222 E. DALE 

THE 

Crissey & Fowler 
Lumber Co. 



Phone 101 



117-123 W. Vermiio Ave. 



Telephone 599 



CUT FLOWERS 



Store 104N. Tejon Street 

The Pike's Peak Floral Co. 

DECORATIONS AND DESIG N 



10 



THE TIGER 



You've an idea that distinctive Overcoats and extravagant prices must go together. 
You haven't seen our stock — we'll show you Overcoats distinctive at MODERATE PRICES. 
Finest woolens and styles that are very handsome; belted back; convertible collars, Rag- 
lans and sem-fitted, any color or pattern you want. Our Overcoat displays are priced at $15 
to $35. Great values at $15, $20 and $25. 




To College 
Students 
Old and New 

We Extend the Most Ccr'sal Good 
Wishes. We've made a Specialty of 
taking care of the wants of the up-to- 
date young men and women. You'll 
find us the kind of jewelry store you'll 
like. 

The Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak 

The Davis Barber Shop 

Individual Sterilizing Cabinets 

Ray Davis, Manager 



Joslyn Press 

112 E. Cucharras St. 
Phone Main 1154 

Printers & 
Publishers 



ANY KIND OF PRINTING 
WE PRINT THE TIGER 



JOIN THE CITY Y. M. C. A. 

And get full privileges: 

Gym, Swimming Pool, 

Game Room. 

Special work to build up the 

body. 



ENGINEERS' LADIES' NIGHT. 

The Engineers' Club has com- 
menced work already for ladies' night, 
January 12. Last year the first ladies' 
night set a high mark, but they pro- 
pose to set a higher one this year. 
Many novel features, characteristic of 
the different branches of engineering, 
will be given. 



PROF. CAJORI'S BOOK TRANS- 
LATED. 

Professor Cajori has received word 
from European correspondents that 
his book on the "History of Elemen- 
tary Mathematics" has appeared in 
Russian translation. The peculiar 
part of this lies in the fact that the 
author was never asked permission 
to have the book translated. This is 
the second translation which has re- 
cently been made of a book by Pro- 
fessor Cajori. ft was about a year 
ago that his "History of Physics" was 
translated into Italian, due permis- 
sion having been secured from the 
author. 



CONGRESSMAN TAYLOR TALKS 
ON CANAL. 



On last Wednesday afternoon, Mr. 
Taylor, Congressman-at-Large from 
Colorado, gave a brief review of his 
trip to Panama on an inspection trip 
to the Canal Zone with a congres- 
sional committee. In the short time 
he spoke, he covered the development 
of the canal for about the last 400 
years. He told many important and 
interesting facts including why it is 
a lock canal rather than a sea level, 
why he upheld fortification of the 
canal when Congress discussed that 
phase, the probable date of opening, 
and cost of building and operation. 

It is interesting to note that the 
canal could not have been built had 
not the ingenuity of American science 
discovered a method of killing the 



3RE AD Forrnom ' n g delivery. It's 
bread hot from the oven, 
baked from the choicest flour, and that 
would command first premium anywhere. 
That you get from us. Is always good. 

THE CHICAGO BAKERY 



Have the fellows meet you at 

Tucker 9 s 
Restaurant 

10 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 

You can always save money if 
you will come to see our line in 
diamonds, watches, jewelry, 
guns, sporting goods, fishing 
tackel drawing sets, musical 
instruments, trunks, valises, or 
if you want to loan money, you 
can get it 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 

Money Loaned on Valuables 



Have Your Clothes Cleaned, Pressed and 
Kept in First-Class Repair by 

"Sam" the Gentlemen's Valet 

Also Makes a Specialty of Serving Parties 
SAM FLEMING 



THE TIGER 



II 



Whitney & Grimwood 

Headquarters for Pennants, Pillows, Books, 
Art Goods, Framed Pictures, Etc. 

See us for your CHRISTMAS PRESENTS. 



Get Your Picnic Supplies 

= AT 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

Christmas 
Photos 

The Best Styles at 
Moderate Prices 

Sit for them now at 

Emery Studio 

Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 



Phone Main 41 



R. J. CORRIN 

Dry Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing 

and Remodeling for Ladies 

and Gentlemen 

Work by the Month 

Work Called for and Delivered 

Phone 2963 M 326 N. Tejon Stree 

Nothing Pleases Us More Than 
To Please College Students 

The FredS. Tucker 

Furniture Co. 



mosquito. Americans refuse to work 
where yellow fever exists, and before 
actual work was begun it was neces- 
sary to clean up the whole zone. This 
was so effectively accomplished that 
there has been no malaria or fever 
for four years. 

Mr. Taylor was enthusiastic and 
well informed on the canal question. 
He said that every American citizen 
ought to feel proud that he belongs 
to the nation which is fast complet- 
ing the eighth wonder of the world. 



PROF. COX LECTURES. 



Bert Wasley 'OS is employed by 
the Albert Sechrist Electrical Manu- 
facturing Co., of Denver. 



Invitations were issued early in the 
week to the faculty, the seniors and a 
number of townspeople for the lec- 
tures to be given in Bemis common 
room tonight by Prof. John Cox, LL. 
D., of London. Dr. Cox entertained 
the Winter Night's Club on Tuesday 
evening and all those who have been 
given this opportunity of hearing him 
lecture upon the subject of "Count 
Rumford, Philosopher, Statesman and 
Scientist," cannot well afford to be 
absent. 

Count Rumford was one of the 
most eccentric of geniuses that this 
country ever produced. He discov- 
ered the principle upon which fire- 
places and chimneys are now built 
and also established the fact that heat 
is a form of motion. In addition to 
this he wrote extensively upon eco- 
nomics, chemistry and many of the 
other sciences. He founded one of 
the British museums. 

During a recent visit to Japan, Dr. 
Cox gathered a large collection of 
hand colored slides and he will show 
these at the close of his lecture. 



Invitations are out for an "at 
home'' to be given by Virginia Gas- 
son and Hazel Bane, Thursday after- 
noon, November 22nd. 

THE WEEK OF PRAYER. 



November twelfth to eighteenth 
was observed by the Young Women's 
Christian Association as the Week of 
Prayer. Meetings were held each 
evening at seven o'clock in Bemis. 
On Monday, Dr. Mackenzie addressed 



MOTOR CYCLES 

Yale Emblem 

BICYCLES and Supplies 

Expert Repairing 

Colorado Springs Cycle 

Company 

DeWitt Doyle, Manager 
224 N. Tejon St. Phone Red 34 



Knight -Campbell's 

F0R PIANOS 

and PLAYER PIANOS 

STEINWAY and 20 OTHER MAKES 

We Rent Pianos 

Largest Stock Victor Talking Machines 
and Edison Phonographs 

226 N. Tejon St., after Sept. 15, 122 N. Tejsn 



The Gowdy-Simmons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS 

Copper Plate and Steel Engravers 
Telephone 87 21 N. Tejon Street 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing Typewriter. 

Zimmerman Supply 

C AVMMnMT T 22 E. Kiowa St. 
ompany Phone Main 374 

Established 1890 

You can save from 25 
percent to 40 percent 
on our finest Hart, 
Schaf f ner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer & 
Clothcraft Suits and 
Overcoats 



12 



THE TIGER 



C. C. IS GOING TO TRIM THE MINES 

INSPIRE THE TEAM WITH YOUR ENTHUSIASM. 
BE LIBERAL WITH THE DECORATIONS. 
WE ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR PENNANTS, STREAMERS, ARM BANDS, ETC. 
WE HAVE AN ESPECIALLY GOOD VALUE IN A VERY LARGE PENNANT AT $1.60. 

The 20 Per Cent. Discount is still on and in addition we will include a JAPANESE CANE, FREE 
OF CHARGE, with every pennant. 

THE MURRAY DRUG COMPANY 

Opposite Campus 



The Assurance Savings and Loan 

Associa ion 

116 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Give 
Special Attention to Accounts of Student 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, President Ira Harris, V-PrrsiJm 

M. C. Gile Lilla B. Ensign C. E. Lynde 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Treasure' 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M 

THE OUT WEST 

TENT AND AWNING CO. 

RECLINING CHAIRS 
PORCHES ENCLOSED 

Tents Rented for a Day or for Longer 



Stamping, Designing, R rforating, Best Hnl >ii 
China. Western Branch of Mexican Pigment Paints, 
Stenciling and Materials 
Art Needlework and Art Goods 

th: hunt and van nice 

ART SPECIALTY SHOPS 

Retail and Wholesale 
ke's Peak Aven e Phone Main 2055 



The "Little Jeff" Last Has the 

Style, Fit and Quality 




the students on the subject of Ser- 
vice, suggesting that, in order to ren- 
der effective service for Christ, there 
must be a deep inner life lived with 
Christ. On Wednesday, Mrs. Richard 
Aitkin spoke on the College Woman 
in Social Life. 

The remaining five meetings were 
led by members of the Association. 
At these meetings news was brought 
from associations all over the world, 
and the subject of prayer was dis- 
cussed in its various phases. The 
quiet, deeply thoughtful spirit which 
was felt throughout the week, is one 
which cannot fail to continue its in- 
fluence during the year. 

PEARSONS' LADIES NIGHT. 

Last Friday night Pearsons So- 
ciety entertained its lady friends with 
an interesting program followed by 
a general social time during which 
refreshments were served. 

The program was as follows: 
Roll Call: 

Each member responded with a 

Mother Goose rhyme. 
Welcome — Hamilton. 
P>ox and Cox, a one act farce. 

Cast. 
Box Shaw- 
Cox C Butner 

Mrs. Bouncer T R. Jackson 



Jh Whitaker-Kester 

Shoe Co. 
10 North Tejon Street 



STATE TEACHERS' ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

Dean Cajori. Professors Breit- 
wieser,, Motten and B. M. Wood- 
bridge will attend the sessions of the 
State Teachers' Association to be 
held in Denver next week. Dean Ca- 
jori and Prof. Motten are members 
of the State Educational Council. 
Prof. Motten also being chairman of 
the committee of English in High 
Schools. Professors Breitwieser and 
Woodbridge have papers which they 
will present before the Association. 



MOWRY'S ICE CREAM 

One Quart $0.50 

Two Quarts $0.85 

Three Quarts $1.10 

One Gallon $1,30 

One Quart Brick $0.60 

Two Quart Brick $1.00 

Wholesale Rates on Applica- 
tion. 
A. L. MOWRY, 
Phone 1184. 
15 E. Cache la Poudre. 



STOP AT 

LIGHTNING SHOE SHOP 

to get your shoes repaired. Shine 
free with every pair of soles 

Sewed Soles 75c. 28'j N. Tejon St. 



William P. Bonbright & Co 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs. Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



STUDENTS! 

The 
Pearl Laundry Co. 

respectfully solicits your pat- 
ronage. We guarantee satis- 
factory work and service and 
give you 20 c /c discount. 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 



THE TIGER 



13 



THE BEST SHOES 

$2.50 No More, No Less 

M. Q. WEST'S 

Sample Shoe Store 

1 1 0- 1 1 2 E. Pike's Avenue, Up Stairs 

Rooms 16-17-18 Midland Block 
First Stairway East of Tucker's Cafe 

Yes, We Sell High Boots for $2.50 too 



William Argo delightfully enter- 
tained [Catherine True, Harriet Ferril 
and Sam Baker at dinner lie-fore 
Pearsons' ladies' night 



Engraving 

Function Invitations 
Programs, Place Cards 
Etc., — Our Specialty. 

OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

HA YNER 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 

2 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs 



Local Department 



Dorothy Wilkin's aunt, .Mrs. John- 
son, and her daughter, visited the 
I '.i dlege this week 

+ ♦ 

Gertrude Mullineaux and Eva 
Brooks entertained at a tea Tuesday 
afterm >< >n. 

♦ ♦ 

[Catherine True enjoyed a visit 
from her sister and some friends from 
i )en\ er Sunda} 

♦ ♦ 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacobson spent the 
week end with their daughter. 

♦ ♦ 

Sarah Jacobs gave a fudge party for 
Ticknor girls Saturday night. 
+ 4- 

A few of the upperclassmen of 
Delta Phi Theta fraternity treated 
their friends from the quadrangle to 
a breakfast in Williams Canon on 
Saturday. 

♦ + 

Golden, Lloyd, LeClere and Storke 
were among the C. C. rooters at the 
Mines game. 

♦ ♦ 

Gladys Whittenberger entertained 
the Contemporary girls at a beautiful 
luncheon Saturday. 



FOR THAT 

THANKSGIVING 
SPREAD 

Goodies from Burgess 
Delicatessen and Candy Counters 

BURGESS 

Phone Eight Three 
12-114 North Tejon Street 



Why Not Have that 

Party it 

BRUIN INN 

Sewed Soles 75 cents 
Rubber Heels 35 cents 

AT 

PETE'S SHOE SHOP 

230 East Dale 



JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, CI aning, Pressing. Special 
Kates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Siree 

Developing and Printing 

HARLAN 

"The View Man" 

All Kinds of View and Commercial Work 
Phone Main 2717 304 E. Pike'g Peak Ave. 



The Prompt Printery Co. 

M \STER PRINTERS 



12 and 14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



THE OLD STAND BY 

Anybody can make Ice Cream but it takes Mueth's to 
satisfy the College Students. Reference: L. Shaw 




Under New Management 



14 



THE TIGER 



Be Your Own Agent 

The management of the STAR LAUNDRY have 
decided to have no general agent at the College and to 
give agent's discount direct to the student sending in 
the bundle. 

Our drivers will sell you a $5.00 Coupon Book for $3.50, a dis- 
count of 30%, or you can pay in cash on the delivery of the bundle, 
taking out 30% for yourself. No bundles will be left without money 
or coupons. 

Coupon- Books at this discount will be sold only to students and 
are not transferable and the coupon will not be received from other 
than students. 



Everything in Jewelry 



FOUND AT 



Arcularius & Co. 

Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton Dairy 



419 S. El Paso St. 



Phone Main 442 



THE MUELLER 

TEACHERS' AGENCY 

Conducted for Efficiency only. Services 
free to School Boards No enrollment fee 
for teachers. Call or write 

ANNA H' MUELLER, 450 West Uinta Street, 
Phone Main 2188 Colorado Springs, Co!o 



Have You a Paniforium 
College Ticket? 

See Rhone College Agent, Hager- 
man Hall. 

30 Suits Sponged and Pressed For $5 



Skirts cleaned and pressed, 50c. 
Phone Main 715. The Acacia 

♦ ♦ 

Lloraine Williams' sister, Louise, 
visited her over Saturday and Sunday 

♦ + 

Sarah Ingersol enjoyed a visit from 
her sister, Gene, and cousin, Miss Mc- 
Laury, over the week end. 

♦ + 

Lila Haines and Gladys Christy 
have been on the sick list. 

♦ + 

The largest assortment of candies 
and confections in the citv See 
Noble's. 

♦ + 

Saturday night Hypatia was enter- 
tained by the Colorado Springs Am,,: 
nae at the home of Mrs. Richard 
Aitken. After an elaborate dinner the 
evening was spent with stunts and 
music. 

+ ♦ 

For frozen dainties, 
home-made candies, 
Noble's. 

♦ ♦ 

Virginia Gasson and Hazel Bane 
entertained at tea Wednesday after- 
noon. 

+ + 

If you haven't had some of our 
famous Pineapple Ice, you've missed 
a treat. Order some for your next 
entertainment. Noble's. 

♦ ♦ 

Miss Jean Ingersoll '05 visited her 
sister Sarah this past week. 



CHILI 

Is Now Being Served at 

The College Inn 

Opposite the Campus 



TRY 

A 

SUPPER 

McRAE'S 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co. 
Groceries and 



punch, fresh 
Phone 920, 



Meats 




115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE HENRY L. DWINELL HARDWARE COMPANY 



TOOLS 



BUILDERS AND GENERAL HARDWARE 
We Appreciate the College Trade 



CUTLERY 



130 N. Tejon St. 



Peone Main 439 



THE TIGER 



15 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

New reversible coats for school 
and general wear— sizes 32-34- 
36-all new colors-$20, #22.50, 
£25 and $30. 

Women's and Misses garments 
2nd floor. 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

s the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 



1064 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



W.I.LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



91 N. Tejon 



Pbone Main 900 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 

Artists Materials 

FRAMING 
College Posters 

The Richard Willis Art Studios 

4v East Pike's Peak Avenue 




TOD POWELL 



Phoenix Silk 

Hose Heavy 

Weight 4 Pair 

$3. Guaranteed 

3 months 



YOU'LL FIND 
0RGINALITY 



Caps 

All Shapes 

and Colors 

$2.50 to 50c 



of design here for the young men; a freshness and 
novelty in color and pattern, and tailoringing unsurpas 
sed by none. 

Suits and Overcoats 

$15, $18, $20, $25, $30 

Stylish Hats $3 and Up. 



Money 

Cheerfully 

Refunded 




Correct Dress lor Men. A 



113 E. 

Pike's Peak 

Ave. 



Octavia Hall gave a tea Thursday. 
+ + 

The Western Slope delegation will for 
the third time enjoy their Christmas 
home going in a special Pullman car, 
which will run from Denver to Grand 
Junction. Miss Marsh is making ar- 
rangements for the Midland car and Mr. 
Rhone for the Rio Grande. 



TO INSPECT CANAL. 



Since this winter will probably af- 
ford the last and also the best oppor- 
tunity for inspecting the complete 
Canal zone at Panama before water 
is turned in ("May, 19121), the Ameri- 
can Institute of Electrical Engineers 
has proposed a trip to the canal for 
next January. Shipping through the 
canal will probably not actually be- 
gin before the fall of TQ14 or spring 
of 1915, but the authorities expect to 
begin flooding Gatun Lake next May. 
They expect to take plenty of time to 
get everything perfect, and it will 
take some months to train the em- 
ployes who are to handle the locks 
to a high degree of efficiency. 



Get Acquainted at 

The Red 
Cross Pharmacy 

HOT DRINKS HOT TAMALAS 

HUDSON'S CHOCOLATES 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 

107 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone 40 



LUMP 

The most satisfacory coal on the market 

for furnace 

THE CENTRAL FUEL CO. 

Phone 578 128 N. Tejon 



Candy Special 

Page 5 Gazette 
each week 

r\trDTvr TEA AND 

I--H1«JVL^I COFFEE Co. 
26 So. Tejon St. Phon 575 

Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Bid, 
118 North Tejon St. Phone Main 1701 

Res, 1211 N. Weber St. Tel. Main 95 



Phone Main 930 



W. E. DONER 



POWELL-DONER SPORTING GOODS CO. 

1 12 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

"EVERYTHING FOR SPORTSMEN" 

New and Complete Stock of the Very Best of Athletic Supplies, College Pennants, Novelties Etc. 

"ASTHE MflDICINE MAN" 



16 



THE TIGER 



Young mani; if twenty, twenty-five or The striking new styles, the snappiest of 

thirty dollars is your price for a smart winter colorings, weaves and patterns — the lively 

suit. ideas which young men seek are shown here 

Then we are prepared to show you at your in abundance, and usually first, 

price an unmistakable proof of real clothes And the suit you select is most perfectly 

value. fitted in every detail 



(Pei4un*Sfeearer(2 



HAUGEN, Tailor 



222 N. Tejon. 



Phone Main 296 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



\ 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 



WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



Departments 

College of Arts anil 
Science, 
E. S. PARSONS, Dean 

School of Engineering, 
F. CAJ0R1, Dean 




School of Forestry, 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 

School of Music, 

E. D. HALE. Dean 



s 



We Now Have the Famous 

Norma Martmez 5c Havana Cigars 

HUGHES 

Pool in connection but not a pool room 



13 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



Vol. XIV 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., NOVEMBER 30, 1911 



Number 12 



GERMAN CLUBS SECRETARY HURREY ALL ABOARD 

ANNUAL EVENT COMES NEXT WEEK FOR DENVER 



Annual Play Most Successful Yet — 
Folk Songs by Chorus a Feature. 

Judging by the large audience pres- 
ent at Cogswell theatre last Saturday 
evening and the enthusiastic recep- 
tion of the program the second an- 
nual event of Der Deutsch Verein 
was a pronounced success. The Club 
has introduced a new feature this 
year in presenting a number of Ger- 
man national songs sung by a trained 
choir of students. Those in charge 
of the affair are to be congratulated 
both for the introduction of this form 
of entertainment and for the excellent 
way in which their plans were carried 
out. Under the able leadership of 
Dr. H. Howard Brown, for whose 
kind service the Club and the College 
are greatly indebted, the chorus ren- 
dered a number of popular airs of 
Germany in a most pleasing manner. 
In no language are the national songs 
more beautiful or more inspiring than 
in the German tongue and such well- 
loved melodies as "Die Wacht am 
Rhein" and "Die Lorelei" find a warm 
response in the heart of every lover 
of the Fatherland. The singing 
showed excellent training and con- 
scientious practice and the applause 
which followed the rendition of each 
song was well deserved. It is to be 
regretted that so few men could be 
persuaded to take part in the singing 
as the lack of men's voices appeared 
to mar the balance of parts in the 

Continued on Page 2 




ENTERTAINMENT FOR 
HURREY. 

Mr. Chas. D. Hurrey, head of the 
Student Department of the Young 
Men's Christian Association of North 
America, will come to Colorado College 
on December 7, to spend four days on 
the campus. He is a graduate of the 
University of Michigan and is a mem- 
ber of the Sigma Chi fraternity. Being 
identified with a number of undergrad- 
uate activities, he was a popular student 
at Michigan, and as an Association man, 
has lost none of his winning characteris- 
tics. College men who have heard Hur- 
rey speak at any of the summer confer- 
ences of the Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation and have had the pleasure of 

Continued on Page 3 



It Takes a Trainload to Beat Denver, 
So You Want to Come Along. 

No turkey for the Tiger until after 
the game tomorrow, but set your 
alarm clocks early anyhow for the 
train leaves at eight thirty. Take 
along two bones for the railroad com- 
pany, six bits for the game and for 
the rest just as much as you can, the 
more the merrier. Don't forget to 
have your voice in good shape and in 
case you go to Denver tonight be 
sure to meet the train about eleven 
in the morning. The big demonstra- 
tion line will lead up Seventeenth 
from the depot and D. U. plans to be 
there to meet us and help out in the 
general racket. 

Winchell says the "Pep" leaders 
have come to a full awakening and if 
things don't come off "Tiger Style" it 
won't be the fault of Billie and Stat- 
ton. Now about those tickets. 
Freshmen! Buy them tonight or in 
the morning or you'll be stung to the 
extent of a whole quarter. No tick- 
ets will be sold in Denver for less 
than a dollar. 

The rally held in Perkins last night 
was a real success and if the same 
spirit is carried to the capital tomor- 
row it will take the ball right over 
the line for more than one touch- 
down. Wear your armbands and 
colors. Let everyone know who we 
are and see such a demonstration of 
C. C.'s spirit as has never been seen 
before. 

Continued on page 3 



_ 






THE TIGER 



CAN PARTY. 



Tuesday afternoon there' occurred 
in the rest room of Ticknor hall one 
of the most unique parties that has 
been held recently. The young ladies 
of the Young Women's Christian As- 
sociation gave what they were 
pleased to call a ''can" party. AH 
the young ladies were invfted to a 
tea and each guest was expected to 
bring with her a can of vegetables or 
fruit as a donation toward a Thanks- 
giving barrel which is to be given to 
the poor. The novelty of the affair 
made it a great success and the young 
ladies are greatly pleased with the 
way in which the party was attended. 



AMSBARY LECTTJRE. 



Air. Wallace Bruce Amsbary gave 
a very interesting lecture Monday 
evening in Perkins Hall, on James 
Whitcomb Riley. Mr. Amsbary is a 
personal friend of Riley's and inter- 
preted many of his poems, chiefly na- 
ture poems. He cailed Riley the 
"Bobby Burns of America." Mr. 
Amsbary was very enthusiastically 
received by an appreciative audience. 



C. C. PROFESSORS SPEAK. 

Several of the faculty spoke at the 
meetings of the State Teachers' Asso- 
ciation in Denver this week. Prof. 
Breitwieser spoke Monday morning 
on "The Development of Sense Per- 
ception." Prof. B. M. Woodbridge 
led a discussion Tuesday morning on 
"The Study of Vulgar Latin or Prep- 
aration for the Romance Languages." 
Tt is hoped that Dr. E. H. Steiner of 
Grinnell, who has delivered several 
addresses before the Association, will 
be able to speak at chapel either this 
week or the first of next. 



GLEE CLUB POSES. 

Members of the Glee Club paraded 
the campus in full dress Monday 
noon on their way to Emery's to get 
their picture taken. Bowers is get- 
ting the advertising material out for 
the first concert which will be held in 
Old Town the Thursday before the 
Christmas vacation. 

Kemp is a new first tenor and 
Ormes, Klahr or Atwater will be 
chosen to fill the vacancy caused by 
the resignation of Everett Jackson. 



Beatrice Drach '15 enjoyed a 
from her two sisters, Sunday. 



visit 



- German Club 

Continued from page 1 

chorus. ■ The following are the stu- 
dents who took part: Frances 
AdaVns, Eva Brooks, Helen DeRusha. 
- Beatric-e Dfach.rStatie Erickson, Har- 
riett -'Ferril. Lucy Ferril, Violet Ful- 

* ler; Florence Hemenway, Emily Lan- 
don, Rofena Lewis, Berhice Rossbach, 
Ruth Sheppard, Margaret Sherman, 

• Ellen S.p'eiser, Elizabeth Sutton, Rex 
Atwater, E. ' W. Barnes, W. C. Barnes, 
C. A. Border. C. F. Fraker, E. E. 
Hedblom, E. Jackson, R. Jackson, H. 
Lindstrom, R. McLaughlin, Ferguson 
Ormes and M. Strieby. 

The remainder of the program con- 
sisted of the German comedy entitled 
"Die Hochzeitsreise"' given by mem- 
bers of the" Club. The plot centered 
round a German professor, a book- 
worm, and one whose knowledge of 
the fair sex was derived entirely from 
his acquaintance with the women of 
Homer and the"' classical writers and 
his young bride whose efforts to woo 
her husband from his bb-oks and show 
him the' advantage of feminine assist- 
ance and sympathy furnished some of 
the most amusing situations of the 
play-comgdy,r The actors are to be 
highly commended on the success of 
their efforts. Although some of- the 
action appeared a little mechanical 
and: the constant movement of the 
actors about the stage in the first act 
a triflle disconcerting to the audience, 
the work of the cast showed consid- 
erable talent as well as a great deal 
of consistent training.' The actors 
showed a good knowledge of their 
lines and there were few awkward 
pauses despite the fact that the sec- 
ond act seemed to give little oppor- 
tunity for much action. The meal on 
the stage — always a difficult proposi- 
tion — was well done. 

Of the individual actors, the two 
most prominent were perhaps Miss 
Norton and Mr. Harder, although it 
is difficult, when all did so excellent- 
ly, to choose any particular stars. 
Mr. Ormes' interpretation of the 
learned professor was well done, al- 
though lie might with advantage have 
entered a little more into the spirit 
of the part. Miss Norton made a 
charming and graceful young bride 
and her acting in some of the diffi- 
cult parts of the second act showed 
conscientious training. Mr. Harder, 
as the Stiefelputzer, had perhaps one 
of the easiest parts and made a hit 
with the audience. His disgust at the 
feminine intrusion into the quiet 
house of the professor formed one of 



the most amusing incidents of the 
play. Miss Schuyler as the Kammer- 
jungfer, and Mr. Neuswanger, who 
had the ta,sk — always difficult for ama- 
teurs — of remaining a silent listener 
on the stage at times ,both performed 
their roles in a highly creditable man- 
ner. 

With the exception of a few minor 
faults the cast worked together well 
and the different- amusing incidents 
in the comedy were presented in such 
a way that they could be understood 
even by the untrained ear of a por- 
tion of the audience. 

Those who have taken part in these 
plays can testify that it requires no 
little work to produce a comedy in 
such a satisfactory way as the one 
presented on Saturday evening and 
the cast as well as the instructors 
who gave their time for this work, 
have reason to be proud of the suc- 
cess of their efforts. The work of the 
language clubs in presenting these 
plays is of distinct value to the Col- 
lege. Not only do they stimulate in- 
terest in the respective languages but 
they also serve to keep us in touch 
with the townspeople who speak these 
languages. That they are appreciated 
by them cannot be doubted after see- 
ing the enthusiastic audience of last 
Saturday. 



WEATHER DELAYS TENNIS. 

In spite of the great interest being 
shown in this year's tennis tourna- 
ment, a combination of crowded time 
and bad weather has done its best to 
drag the playing, but with no fur- 
ther setbacks the championship will 
be decided before the end of another 
fortnight. Those who still have a 
chance for this honor are: R. Jack- 
son, Cajori, Harter, Lewis, Seldom- 
ridge, Miller, Davis, Wilkinson, Car- 
son. Thomas. Ware, McLaughlin and 
Wild. 



NO VESPERS NEXT SUNDAY. 

On account of Thanksgiving holi- 
days, ihere will be no vesper services 
held at Perkins Hall next Sunday 
evening. Special services are to be 
held at a number of city churches 
and all students are recommended 
not to miss the opportunity to hear 
them. The theme of Thanksgiving, 
which is a most enjoyable one, will 
be discussed by various ministers of 
the city in the most interesting man- 
ner. 



Secretary Hurrey 

Continued from page 1 

meeting him personally, have not for- 
gotten his contagious smile and cordial 
handshake. 

Mr. Hurrey, after acting for two years 
as International Student Secretary of 
the Young Men's Christian Association 
for the colleges of the west from Indi- 
ana to the Pacific coast, spent several 
months studying conditions in Japan. 
Later he was appointed National Secre- 
tary of the Student Association Move- 
ment of South America, in which capac- 
ity he has served for the past three 
years. 

Last spring, Mr. Hur ey returned to 
America to become th( leader of the 
Student Association wor*c on the North 
American continent. Ht is in demand 
as a speaker throughout the country and 
we are fortunate in having Colorado 
College included on his program this 
year. 

Plans have been made for Hurrey to 
come into contact with very man in Col- 
lege, and to address all the men at sev- 
eral public and group meetings. The 
purpose of his visit is to look over con- 
ditions in this institution, to discuss 
with the fellows here questions and 
problems concerning college and later 
life, and to deepen the moral and reli- 
gious atmosphre of the College. Dr. 
Bayley, of Denver, who is already well- 
known to Colorado College people, will 
be here with Hurey and assist him in 
his work. It is hoped also that Corbin 
of Boulder, Blair of Denver University, 
and Watson of the Colorado School of 
Mines, will be here At the same time, 
with J. W. Nipps, State Student Secre- 
tary of the Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation. 

The general plan as outlined for Mr. 
Hurrey's visit is as follows : 
Thursday. 
9:10 A. M. Talk in chapel. 
12:20 P. M. Lunch at fraternity house. 
4 :00 P. M. Meets with Student Com- 
mittee. 
6 :00 P. M. Supper at fraternity house. 
7:15 P. M. Address in Upper Perk- 
ins Hall. 
8:30 P. M. Attends Dickens lecture. 

Friday. 
9:15 A.M. Address, in chapel. 
12:20 P. M. Lunch at fraternity house. 
6:00 P. M. Supper at fraternity house. 
7:45 P. M. Talk, at Apollonian Club 
meeting. 

8:15 P.M. Talk, at Pearsons Society 
meeting. 

Saturday. 
9:00 A. M. All-College men's "hike" 
into Queen's Canon, with beefsteak din- 



THE TIGER 

ner at the falls. 

5 :30 P. M. Advisory Board dinner 
with Mr. Hurrey, at home of Mr. Sel- 
dom ridge. 

7:45 P. M. Men's meeting and Ques- 
tion Box, in chapel, Mr. Hurrey leading. 
Sunday. 

9:30 A. M. Talk to Mr. Seldomridge's 
Bible class at First Presbyterian Church. 

11:00 A. M. Preaches at First Con- 
gregational Church. 

1 :00 P. M. Dinner at fraternity house. 

3:45 P. M. Meeting with Student 
Committee. 

5:00 P. M. Address at College Ves- 
pers. 

6:15 P. M. Supper. 

8:00 P. M. Final informal gathering 
of College m<>n ir Polytecl ic Library, 
basement of Coburn Library. 

Mr. Hurrey, Dr. Baley and Mr. Cor- 
bin will meet any man in College who 
cares to talk with them upon any sub- 
ject. 

Changes in the above schedule will be 
posted upon the bulletin board. 



VESPER SERVICE. 



Owing to the inclemency of the 
weather, the attendance at last Sun- 
day's Vespers was not so good as 
usual. The service, which was a 
Thanksgiving service, was an im- 
pressive one and the rendition of 
Maunder's "Praise the Lord" by the 
choir was excellent. Dr. J. H. Frank- 
lin, of the First Baptist church, who 
was the speaker of the day, preached 
an eloquent sermon based on the 
text, "Whosoever would be first 
among you shall be servant of all." 
Dr. Franklin spoke in part, as fol- 
lows: 

These sentiments we need to carry 
through life with us. They will save 
us much disappointment and help us 
to greater usefulness. Most of us, 
from our youth up, have been taught 
to be hero worshippers and it is clear 
today that we become copies of the 
patterns we adopt. It is necessary 
for us to have heroes. History, how- 
ever, has pointed out as heroes those 
who have come to some distinction 
in life and we often take for our 
ideal the exercising of authority in 
the world. The world says "get" but 
the Kingdom of Christ says "give." 
The world says "save your life," 
( hrist says "lose it." The world 
says "seek authority," Christ says 
"endeavor to be servant of all." 
These principles of Christ are gain- 
ing headway slowly but surely. 
They are, after all, the great life prin- 



ciples. The man who refuses the sac- 
rificial spirit is doomed to failure and 
the world is coming to see it. Men 
are coming to see that the develop- 
ment of humanity demands this spirit 
of the Christ. 

You wish your lives to count in the 
world. I say that this must be em- 
blazoned on your escutcheons. Re- 
member when you think of what you 
"Whosoever would be first among 
shall do in life that the .Master says, 
you shall be servant of all." There 
is no genuine greatness based on sel- 
fish interests. 

Some of you may be expecting to 
follow the profession of medicine. 
Remember that noble man who is do- 
ing such a wonderful work on the 
coast of Labrador. No man is held 
in greater honor today than Dr. 
Grenfell. He has come to a first place 
because he has said, "I will try to 
serve humanity." We are all coming 
more and more to see that there is 
no true greatness apart from the 
thought of service. I congratulate 
you on beginning life at a splendid 
hour. You begin with a larger prom- 
ise of usefulness than has been pre- 
sented to the young men and women 
of any other age. If you wish for 
true success you must forget some of 
the things that the world is thinking 
of and apply yourself to the service 
of humanity. Someone asks, "How 
is this to be attained?" It is not 
enough merely to set an example be- 
fore one's self to be followed. How 
can we catch that spirit of service and 
sacrifice that is essential to true 
greatness? We must catch the spirit 
of the One to whom our lives are sur- 
rendered. If you would have the sac- 
rificial spirit you must set the Nazar- 
ene before you and some day the 
world will say you are becoming like 
Him because you surrendered your life 
to Him. It is opposed to human na- 
ture to be so unselfish but the secret 
lies in the fact that we become like 
Him to whom we surrender our lives. 
Ask this question of yourselves "How 
can I make my life render the largest 
service in the uplift of humanity?" 

Owing to the fact that the Thanks- 
giving holiday comes next week there 
will be no College Vespers next Sun- 
day. 



Allaboard for Denver 

Continued from page 1 

After the game stay and have a 
good time for the faculty has an- 
nounced that there will be no school 
Friday, and you can sleep as late as 
you please. 



THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 



THE D. U. GAME 

Dope Indicates That the Game Is To 

Be a Hard One, But the Tigers 

Are Out to Win. 

Seven Tigers — Vandemoer, Sinton, 
Heald, Black, Thompson, Hedblom 
and Putnam— will don their mole- 
skins the last time for Colorado Col- 
lege on Thanksgiving Day. Every 
one of these veterans is going to do 
his best to make the football season 
of 191 1 end in a satisfactory man- 
ner. 

The game is not an easy one. 
Either team has a chance to win. 
All the dope is in, and the game it- 
self will be over twenty-four hours 
after this is off the press. Comparing 
the teams straight through, man for 
man, Denver University has a set of 
men whose records over-top any 
team in the state. Denver University 
has assembled this year the pick of 
the different teams that have rep- 
resented that institution during the 
last few years, and has welded them 
into one team. Thus far, the welding 
has not been as successful as it was 
hoped for, but it is not safe to form 
an opinion of the team that will play 
Thanksgiving Day by looking over 
the record of that team this fall. Tom 
Barry is a coach who keeps strength- 
ening his team all through the season 
and brings them out in their full 
strength at the end of the season. 
This is the eastern method. The 
Methodists have certainly not struck 
their gait this fall. The question is: 
Will they? 

The situation of the Tiger team is 
closely analogous to the Denver 
team. Playing the best eight of the 
eleven men that won the Rocky 
Mountain championship in 1910 they 
have been twice defeated in 1911. The 
team has been lacking — just where it 
is hard to say. They have not struck 
their gait, and held it continuously 
for more than fifteen minutes of play- 
ing at any time during the present 
season. In the two hardest games 
they have played they have equalled 
their opponents and then lost, simply 
because they "let up" for a few mo- 
ments. The question here too is, 
will they hit their gait? If both of 
these teams are playing in their best 
form tomorrow, the game will be one 



of the best ever i.layed in the Rocky 
Mountain region, but if either one 
plays with the slowness which has 
characterized the playing thus far, it 
will be all over. 

Denver University has not been 
defeated by any Rocky Mountain 
team this fall... Colorado College has 
been defeated by both Boulder and 
Utah. D. U. does not play Boulder, 
but they held Utah to a scoreless tie 
in the early part of the season. Colo- 
rado College defeated Wyoming bad- 
ly early in the season, and Denver 
was barely able to win from them a 
week and a half ago. These two 
teams and the School of Mines are 
the only ones which C. C. and D. U. 
have both played. With the excep- 
tion of the Mines' games it seems 
that there is little which can be taken 
as reliable dope because of the fact that 
the games were played at such widely 
separated times during the season. 

Denver university beat the Miners 
8-0, and a week later Colorado Col- 
lege beat them 11-0. This gives C. C. 
3 margin of thiee points. Besides it 
must be taken into account that the 
Tigers crossed the Miners' goal line 
twice and th.v .he Methoc'ists only 
got across once. Yet again, the very 
tact that D. U. had a man who was 
f;ble to kick a field goal while the 
Tigers missed in the four attempts 
which they made, shows that there is 
danger from S hroeder's boot when 
close to 1 iii.* p;oai line. Besides con- 
t'dering *he matter of the score and 
the way in whi> h it was made there 
are a few other facts about the games 
which may be taken into account. 
The Mines nearly equalled the gains 
made by D. U. from scrimmage forma- 
tions, while the Tigers completely 
snowed the Mines under. Harper of the 
Mines ran back punts better than the 
men in D. U.'s backfield, but he was un- 
able to excel Vandemoer and Putnam. 
In short, the Denver sporting writers 
gave D. U. the victory on the one point 
of superior punting, and in the C. C. 
game — although. Vandy's punting equals 
Shroeder's — it was conceded that the 
Tigers outplayed the Miners in every 
department of the game. 

The Tiger line is undoubtedly strong- 
er than Denver's line, and the Tigers 
overshadow them a little on defensive 
work, but D. U. has a set of stars in 
the backfield. With these men and 



Duke Shroeder on end, Barry has built 
up a powerful offensive machine. 

Both Rothgeb and Barry have been 
working their teams hard since the 18th 
in an effort to put them in shape to play 
the article of football which they know 
them capable of. It will be two teams 
with a different spirit that meet at 
Broadway Park tomorrow and it will be 
a game well worth seeing. 



FRESHMAN TEAM 



The following review of the fresh- 
man team was written by the freshman 
manager, DeWitt Robinson. "Doc" 
Robinson is the livest manager any 
freshmen team in Colorado College has 
ever had. He has been down at the 
gym every night looking after the needs 
of the team. He has been untiring in 
his efforts to get games for the fresh- 
men and his work in this line will prob- 
ably bear more fruit in the future than 
it could this year. 

Robinson's article follows: 

FRESHMAN FOOTBALL TEAM. 

What do you know about a freshman 
team that "stays out?" It is a rare 
thing for a freshman football team to 
get out every afternoon for practice. 
Former teams have usually qiut after 
their last game. The 1915 men, how- 
ever, have shown' the good stuff in them 
by coming out for practice long after 
their last game. 

This year the freshmen have won 
every game they have played, wresting 
victories from the sophomores, the Deaf 
and Blind School, Pueblo and Lamar. 

At Lamar, as elsewhere, the freshmen 
made a very good impression. They 
boosted for C. C. all the time. In fact, 
the team itself, and its conduct both on 
and off the field, was a -mighty boost 
for Colorado College. 

Charlie Cheese of the Colorado 
Sprigns High School, played a fast game 
at right half. Cheese has the makings 
of a varsity man. We expect to see him 
line up against Boulder next year. 

Holmes, Emery and Kampf, also grad- 
uates of the local high school, played 
star games throughout the season. 
Kampf uses excellent head work at 
quarter, while Emery at left half and 
Holmes at full back, carry out the or- 
ders. Holmes is h^avy and fast and 



THE TIGER 



should win a place on the varsity team 
next year. 

The freshman line was a regular stone 
wall, Ankeny, all-star tackle last year, 
held down right tackle. He played a 
strong, consistent game throughout the 
season. Ragle from St. Francis, Kansas, 
showed more natural football ability 
than any man on the team. He never 
played a game of football until this year, 
and it is up to him to make good in his 
studies as well in athletics. 

James, at right end, Cowen at right 
guard, Johnson at center, Carey at left 
end, and Crysler put up a good fight and 
proved invincible to the opposing line. 
Muncaster and Hall will be out next 
year, but their studies kept them out of 
it this season. Harrison of Canon City 
showed up well at the first of the season, 
but he unfortunately broke his ankle and 
had to give up the game. Nourse, Ow- 
en, Van Stone, Sasano, Banfield and 
Kramer were also candidates for the 
team at one time or another. 

The success of the season was due 
largely to the nucleus of five Colorado 
Springs men. They worked and pulled 
the rest of the men into shape in a re- 
markably short time. 



ALUMNI NEWS 

HYPATIA ALUMNI SOCIETY 
ORGANIZES IN DENVER. 



The Hypatia Alumni of Colorado 
College have organized a society in 
Denver. The first meeting was held 
recently at the home of Mrs. J. S, 
Temple. Among the alumni present 
were Mrs. J. S. Temple, Mrs. Charles 
F. Carnine (nee Abbie Williams), 
Mrs. Martin P. Lipps, Mrs. Robt. M. 
Wheeler (nee Alice Meyers '07), Miss 
Jennie Thomas ex-'i2, Miss Elizabeth 
Murphy ex-'o8, Miss Marian Emmons 
ex-'n, Miss Tlizabeth McDowell '07. 
and Miss Edith Summers '11. The 
next meeting will be with Miss Mar- 
ian Emmons. Several members from 
the College society are planning to 
attend. 



HOMER SHANTZ HONORED. 

Homer Shantz, who graduated 
from Colorado College in 1901 and 
who was afterwards one of its in- 
structors in the department of bi- 
ology, was recently offered an in- 
structorship in the botany depart- 
ment of Minnesota University. The 
government promptly increased his 
salary and persuaded him to remain 



in its service. A very fine green 
house, probably one of the finest in 
the world, has been built for his 
work. 

This past summer Mr. Shantz was 
located at Hugo, Colorado, where he 
carried on experiments relating to 
dry farming. 



MR. LORING LENNOX TO 
MARRY DENVER GIRL. 



The engagement of Mr. Loring 
Lennox of this city to Miss Lucy 
Southwick Moore of Denver is an- 
nounced by Miss Moore's parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Orin S. Moore. Invita- 
tions to the wedding which will take 
place on December 14, were out 
Tuesday. 

Miss Moore is a graduate of the 
University of Denver, a member of 
the Gamma Phi Beta sorority, and a 
favorite with young society. 

Mr. Lennox, who is the son of Mr. 
William Lennox, a prominent mining 
man of the Springs, is a graduate of 
Colorado College, and is now man- 
ager of the Strong mine at Victor, a 
private corporation in which his 
father is heavily interested. 



APPOINTMENT FOR C. 
FORESTER. 



C. 



Ralph H. Boynton '11 received an 
appointment from G. H. Homans, 
Forester of California, as assistant 
forester of that state, with a salary 
of $1600 per annum and expenses 
while in the field. While in Colorado 
College, Mr. Boynton was an active 
member and vice-president of the 
Forestry Club, assistant baseball man- 
ager of baseball, and a member of the 
Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. Mr. 
Boynton's appointment to such a 
prominent position should be encour- 
aging news to the foresters in C. C. 
and will help the outside world to 
get a line on the quality of our For- 
estry School and its graduates. Suc- 
cess to Mr. Boynton. 



A short time ago Carl Hedblom '07 
received an appointment as Surgical 
Interne in the Massachusetts General 
Hospital, thus having to give up his 
special work in Physiology. 



Kento Mitchell '09 is in Denver for 
the winter. 



Albert Cobert ex-'o7 is teaching in 
the Berkeley High School, Berkeley, 
California. 



Miss Lina Brunner ex-'o9, while in 
attendance upon the Teachers Con- 
vention in Denver, will visit Mrs.^ 
Emma Riggs Barnard '09. 



James Piatt ex-'o6 who received his 
degree with the class of '11 is now 
engaged in engineering work in Mex- 
ico, where he has been for some past 
years. 



Clarence Leib '08 spent the past 
summer in Europe. He visited Ven- 
ice and other great medical centers 
and met world renowned medical and 
laboratory workers. 

Miss Charlotte Eversole ex-'i3 is 
visiting in Alpaugh, California. 



Miss Mabel Sweeney ex-'io is 
teaching in Miss Wolcott's school in 
Denver. 

Mr. Oliver C. Ralston '10 is teach- 
ing in the Leadville High School. 



Miss Anna Strang '10 visited with 
"Lorey'' Hall Saturday and Sunday. 



Miss Kate Ashley '09 took dinner 
with Dean Parsons and family Sun- 
day. 



Mr. S. S. Packard '02 of Pueblo 
has gone to Ottawa, Canada, where 
he has charge of a suit concerning 
some mining claims in the Yukon ter- 
ritory. 



Morris Hall '05 and his wife re- 
turned to Washington this last week. 
He will return next year to continue 
his experiments on the sheep para- 
sites. 



DR. INGERSOLL'S RESEARCH. 

L. R. Tngersoll, C. C. 1902, now 
Associate Professor of Physics at the 
University of Wisconsin will present 
a paper at the physical meeting held 
at Thanksgiving time in Chicago, de- 
scribing research work recently car- 
ried on by him on Magneto-optical 
theory. Dr. Ingersoll's experimental 
researches on polarization phenom- 
ena in the infra-red part of the spec- 
trum have attracted considerable at- 
tention both at home and abroad. 



Vesta Tucker gave a tea in honor of 
Anna Strang and Mabel Woolf, Satur- 
day afternoon. 

♦ ♦ 

Burgess '10 and "Dutch" Schneider '11 
were visitors on the campus, Monday. 



THE TIGER 



— — a — ^ » 

The Weekly Newspaperof Colorado College 

HARRY L. BLACK Editor-in-Chief 

RICHARD L. HUUHES Business Mir. 

Leon C. Havens Assistant Editor 

A. H Rowbotham Assistant Editor 

Arthur J. Allen Assistant Editor 

J. J. Sinton Athletic Editor 

D. H. MAHAN Engineering Editor 

G. S. Cowdery Forestry Editor 

Miss Glenn Stiles Alumni Editor 

Miss Mary Randolph Exchange Editor 

Miss Helen Rand Local Editor 

A. W. Donovan Local Editor 

H. A. Parkison Assistant Manager 

A. L. Golden A-sistani II in ager 

Correspondents 

F. P. Storke, H A. bennett. Miss Lucy Ferrill 

Miss Elizabeth Gerouid, Miss Leona Mukey, 

Miss Myrth King, Miss Violet Hopper, Miss 

Byron Winnans, Rowe Rudolph, Edwin Crysler, 

Franc Adams, R. G. Appel 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to The Tiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo 

Phones: Editor, Main 2550. Manager, Main 2073 

Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Sjbscriptions to CHE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5 



Tiger Out on Wednesday. 

Just to be doing something out of 
the ordinary so that we shall be in 
iiarmony with the unusualness of the 
week, The Tiger is making its ap- 
pearance on Wednesday this week. 
We are sure that this plan will meet 
with the hearty approval of the man- 
agers and the printers who would 
otherwise be compelled to toil away 
all the day of Thanksgiving, should 
the Tiger come out on the regular 
day. Aren't we kind? 



Manager's Report. 

The report of the manager of The 
Tiger which was made at the last 
meeting of the Board of Control 
shows that the business end of the 
publication is in better shape than it 
has been at this time of year foi 
many years. Manager Hughes is to 
be congratulated upon his success in 
lining up the city advertisers in the 
columns of The Tiger whereby it is 
possible for a paper of its high stand- 
ard to be issued. 

The manager reports also that he' 
has received a number of complaints 
from subscribers who have not re- 
ceived the paper regularly. He has 
put forth every effort to rectify the 
trouble. In a large number of cases 
the cause of the trouble lies with the 
subscribers themselves who have 



failed to supply the manager with a 
correct and definite address. With a 
reasonable amount of co-operation on 
the part of the subscribers, there 
should be no irregularity about each 
subscriber receiving his number. 



The D. U. Game. 

On Thursday of this week the 
Tigers play another of the hardest 
games on their season's schedule. 
This is to be the last, and the team 
is determined to make it their best. 
The past two weeks since the Mines 
game have been devoted to some of 
the hardest practice sessions that 
Washburn field has seen this year. 

Far from what may reasonably be 
expected, the Tigers are not so very 
down-hearted over the loss of two of 
their championship games this year. 
The teams that have been represent- 
ing the institutions of the Rocky 
Mountain region are undoubtedly the 
best that have ever played on Colo- 
rado gridirons. The team that rep- 
resents C. C. this year is one of the 
strongest the College has ever had, 
and although it lost two games dur- 
ing the season, it has been always 
in the game and playing the game to 
the finish. 

Those who have followed the team 
through the season have every rea- 
son to be proud of the work that has 
been done, and when the game with 
Denver University is called Thurs- 
day afternoon the number of support- 
ters who will be out to cheer the 
Tigers on to victory will be just as 
great and their enthusiasm will be 
just as spontaneous as if the team 
had gone through its schedule so far 
without a single defeat. 



Thanksgiving. 

Thanksgiving brings to us College 
students what we are prone to call 
a welcome relief from the monoton- 
ous routine of college work. We 
are glad to have it come, and we are 
thankful for it. We don"t have to go 
to class and we can make our plans 
for some sort of festivity. We have 
a big feed, we eat turkey, we go to 
the football game, and we try our 
best to enjoy ourselves; and some- 
times we are successful. But do we 
ever stop to think what Thanksgiv- 
ing Day really means? Do we ever 
stop to consider the historical origin 
and the intended meaning of the day 
when it was first celebrated by our 
forefathers in the Massachusetts col- 
ony in the fall of 1621? 



As a friend expressed it the other 
day, "Isn't it strange that what was 
originally set aside for feasting and 
praying should have developed into a 
day for dissipation and preying? 
What would Governor Bradford do if 
He could come to life next Thursday? 

Y. W. C. A. 

The Cascade Y. W. C. A. meeting 
of last Wednesday evening was par- 
ticularly interesting. Elizabeth Sut- 
ton lead the meeting and "Echoes 
from Cascade" were given by several 
of the delegates who attended the 
conference last summer. They told 
of the meetings, stunt day, and the 
life of the Cascade girls. 



BRUIN INN PARTY. 



Several members of the Phi Gam- 
ma Delta fraternity gave a party for 
their lady friends at Bruin Inn Satur- 
day evening. The evening was spent 
in a most delightful manner, and after 
the feed was over the merry crowd 
gathered about the fire, toasted 
marshmallows and sang popular and 
College songs. It was, without a 
doubt, the most enjoyable occasion 
of the year. Those present were the 
Misses Yerkes, Crandall, Walsh, Mc- 
Kenzie, McCreary, Harlan, Carle, 
Baker, Billington and Knight, Messrs. 
Campbell, Boyes, Lynch, Hall, Grims- 
ley, Terrill, Hughes, Ben Stewart. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hill chaperoned. 



STUDENT RECITAL TUESDAY 
EVENING. 



A recital was given Tuesday even- 
ing by several students of the Colo- 
rado College School of Music in fine 
arts recital hall. A student rehearsal 
and lecture by Dean Hale that is 
open to the public also will be given 
Tuesday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock. 
The evening program follows: 
Shepherd's Tale. Polonaise ...Nevin 

Miss Wharton. 
Rejoice Greatly (The Messiah) 

Handel 
Miss McLaughlin. 

Nocturne Mendelssohn 

Cabaletta Lack 

Miss Ritter. 
Concerto in A minor Accolay 

Miss Parsons. 
Ave Maria Bach-Gounod 

Miss Christy. 

Ktincelles Mozkowski 

Etude Chopin 

Mr. Berryhill. 






MINERVA NOTES. 

The Misses Jean and Julia Inger- 
soll entertained the members of the 
Minerva Alumnae Association of Col- 
orado College, in Denver, on Satur- 
day afternoon, Nevember nth. 

Miss Elsie Connell will entertain 
the members of this Society on Sat- 
urday afternoon, December 9th, at 
her home at 825 Washington. 

The Misses Alary and Emma 
Wheeler will entertain the members 
of this organization the second Sat- 
urday in January. The members are: 
.Mrs. Lester McLean, Jr., Mrs. Geo. 
C. Barnard, Mrs. Clyde Smedley, Mrs. 
Jane Porter Robertson, Mrs. Walter 
C. Tegtmeyer, Mrs. Harry Fontius, 
Mrs. Thomas Grierl, Jr.., Mrs.- Asa 
Hall, Mrs. Jean Diack Cole, Miss 
Cora Wilcox, Miss Stella Wilcox, 
Miss Eva Carpenter, Miss Edith Hall, 
Miss Stella Chambers, Miss Mary 
Wheeler, Miss Ethel Van Wagenen, 
Miss Bertha Webb, Miss Faye An- 
derson. Miss Clara Cowing, Miss 
Ruth Londoner, Miss Ruth Ragan, 
Miss Gertrude Amsbary, Miss Eliza- 
beth Frazer, Miss Jean Ingersoll, 
Miss Elsie Green, Miss Ada Arm- 
strong, Miss Caroline Davis, Miss El- 
sie Connell. 



The "bids" for- the Minerva function 
which takes place soon, have been is- 
sued. 



Minerva Society held its twelfth an- 
nual initiation last Friday. The ini- 
tiation was followed by a banquet 
in Ticknor dining room. The girls 
who became new members are Netta 
Powell, Alice Hamilton, Claire Galli- 
gan, Violet Hopper, Virginia Gasson, 
Frances Adams, Helen Cassidy, Ag- 
nes Lennox, Dorothy McCreery, Ma- 
bel Harlan and Olive Brown. 



FRENCH PLAY. 

The French Club hopes to present 
their annual comedy early in the com- 
ing year. A committee has the mat- 
ter of choosing the play in hand and 
they hope to decide this week what 
the Club shall give this year. The 
cordial reception given to the Moliere 
comedy presented two years ago in- 
spires them to attempt this great 
writer's plays. The committee has 
several comedies in mind which, if 
presented satisfactorily, would be no 
little achievement, as they are plays 
which require considerable skill and 
a great deal of practice. 



THE TIGER 

DICKENS BANQUETED AT 
CHICAGO. 

"That my father, after his -second- 
visit, regretted a great deal of the 
condemnation and satire thrown at 
the American people in his "Ameri- 
can Notes" and his book "Martin 
Chuzzlewit" and that he appended 
these works with notes to that effect 
is a fact that does not seem to be ap- 
preciated by Americans. Another 
thing which I hope to accomplish 
here is to bring everyone to see my 
father from a standpoint other than 
the one generally taken, to see him in 
the very zenith of his prosperity, un- 
touched by . adulation and flattery,. - 
the same genial, modest man that he 
had ever been." Such are the state- 
ments accredited to Alfred Tennyson. 
Dickens by the Associated Press ac- 
counts of the banquet given for him. 
last week in Chicago. 

Probably no foreigner visiting this 
country the last decade has been 
given such widespread attention and. 
rommendation. The large Eastern 
papers have- given him not only col- 
umns but some of them pages of 
space. and the -Associated Press is fol- 
lowing him to every lecturing point. 
It is not likely, that such. another op- 
portunity will present itself, in a col- 
lege generation, at least, as this one, 
for hearing-a great man speak. 

Alfred Tenayso.n is. not an English- 
man, but an Australian, having said 
good-bye to both father and England 
over forty years ago. He little real- 
ized at that time that.it would be so 
long before he should visit his old 
, home, nor. did. he expect -never to s.ee 
his father again. England does.- not 
appeal to him as does America, prob- 
ably because life here is more like 
his own life in Australia. 

He tells many interesting anec- 
dotes on his father's Lome life and 
methods of work. Dickens spent 
much time and money in trying to 
prevent the American pirating of his 
works but failed to win anything for 
himself, although it was as a result 
of his efforts that the International 
Copyright law came into -being short- 
ly after his death. 

Standing room has gone at a prem- 
ium at every lecture yet given in this 
country and everyone -should arrange 
for seats ' at once. The lecture will 
be given on Thursday, December the 
7th, at Perkiirs- Hall.--; Don't forget. 

Varker '15 has left College. 



PROFESSOR COX SPEAKS IN 
BEMIS. 

— 



The faculty and their friends had an 
unusual treat last Thursday evening 
in hearing Professor John Cox of Mc- 
Gill University lecture in Bemis Hall 
on the life of Count Rumford. This 
famous man was one of the most in- 
teresting characters of his time. As a 
statesman he was honored by several 
nations. He held important diplo- 
matic positions under the British and 
Bavarian governments and seemed to 
have a genius for statesmanship. Be- 
sides, this, he was was a scientist in 
a practical way and invented a num- 
,-her ; *of ..scientific appliances. He as- 
sisted, greatly in the bettering of con- 
ditions among the Bavarian peasants 
and also served the cause of science 
to a large extent in England. "His 
life,'.' said Professor Cox, "reads like 
a fairy'story" and certainly the speak- 
er la-st Thursday made his talk ex- 
tremely interesting. Professor Cox 
has that rare gift of sparkling, subtle 
humor which is so delightful to an 
intellectual audience. His talk, partly 
because it was so humorous and part- 
ly because it was so different to the 
usual address of its kind, was greatly 
appreciated by all present. 

After the address, Prof Cox, who 
has just returned from a tour around 
the world, showed a number of ex- 
quisitely colored stereopticon slides of 
Japan, which he had obtained in that 
country. 



FACULTY MEMBER OBTAINS 
LEAVE OF ABSENCE. 



Miss Sahm' has obtained leave" 'of 
absence for the second semester and 
will leave immediately after Christ- 
mas for a study tour of several 
months in Egypt, Greece, Sicily and 
Italy.. June and July will be spent.. in 
Munich, where Miss Sahm will be in 
attendance at the University. She 
will return in time for the opening 
of College in the fall. 



A number of College people saw the 
football game betwen Colorado Springs 
High School and Victor on Washburn 
field, Saturday afternoon. Playing bet- 
ter ball, than they have this year, the 
locals were able to roll up a large score 
on .the fighting visitors. 
♦ ♦ 
Sari Carmichael, last year's star full 
back on the U. of C. team, was in town 
Saturday as coach of the Victor High 
School team. 



THE TIGER 

A new shipment of Velour Hats has just arrived. 
They are made up in the newest Alpine Shape. 
Side Nutria and Black are the colors which we are 
showing and they are exceptionally. 

The Hat $5.00 

GATO-DOmS* 

At Gano-Downs Corner Tejon and Kiowa 

WE HAVE A SPECIAL PAINT 





For Every Purpose 

75c Per Gallon up 

Same way with Wall Paper, Kalsomine, 
and in fact. Everything we Sell. Ask 
your neighbor, he knows. 

PAINT SUPPLY COMPANY 

Wholesale 113-115 E. Bijou St. Retail 



THE TIGER 



Hunt Up 

BisselFs Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

Pike's Peak Book & 
Stationery Co. SLL.S2.sS 

Seldomridge Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



CALL 2000 

When You Want Anything QUICK! 
QUICK DELIVERY 



MAI - 2000 



COTRELL & LEONARD 

Albany, N. Y. 
Makers of 

CAPS & GOWNS 

To the American Colle.es from the 

Atlantic to the Pacific 

Class Contcacts a Specialty 

Deichmann & Douglas Floral 

Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER, Mar. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 

Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Gazette Building 



APOLLONIAN STAG. 

The fourth annual Stag Banquet of 
the Apollonian Club will be given at 
the Alta Vista Hotel on December 
I2th. All Alumni are invited to be 
present and it is hoped that a number 
will be here from outside points. A 
promising program of toasts and 
music has been arranged, to say noth- 
ing of the menu which will be better 
than ever before. 



PEARSONS CHOOSES AFFIRMA- 
TIVE. 

Rumor was right and finally Pear- 
sons has announced to the world that 
in the coming intersociety debate she 
will uphold the affirmative. She feels 
that the Federal Government "should 
retain all forest and mineral lands 
now in the possession of the United 
States.'" Apollo may have thought so 
at one time hut there always was a 
little doubt in his mind as to which 
was the best side and so it has not 
been at all hard for him to come to 
the conclusion that the negative is a 
sure winner. Both clubs are looking 
forward with interest to the prelimi- 
naries to be held the fifteenth of next 
month. Little but natural resources 
and allied su-bjects will be thought of 
or talked of in literary society circles 
until after the middle of February. 

PROFESSOR MOTTEN ON 
TENNYSON. 

Last Wednesday Professor Motten 
of the English department spoke be- 
fore the Women's Club on Tennyson. 
In speaking of his address one of the 
Denver papers says: 

"The finest tribute of the day to a 
single writer was paid to Tennyson 
by Professor Motten, who placed all 
lovers of that great poet under a debt 
of gratitude to him by his apprecia- 
tion of Tennyson as philosopher, 
teacher and profound student of life's 
problems. Professor Motten has the 
chair of English at Colorado College, 
and his hearers found it easy to un- 
derstand the privileges of those who 
are members of his classes." 




Manufacturers' 

Shoe Sale 

A lucky purchase enables 
us to offer you the most 
popular patterns in new fall 
patterns at a saving of 

25 to 40 per cent. 



^AWTOR EVERY FOOT*^^ 



^H AT OCAL't 

jo, ""^"^1 

^^*^107 South Tuom PnnrrT-^^ 




Board $4.50 Per Week 

One front room for two. Board 

and room #25 per month for each 

222 E. DALE 



THE 

Crissey & Fowler 
Lumber Co. 



Phone 101 



117-123 W. Vermijo Ave 



Telephone 599 



The 



CUT FLOWERS 



Store 104 N. Tejon Street 



's Peak Floral Co. 

DECORATIONS AND DESIGNS 



10 THE TIGER 

Whether your suit price be $15, $20 or $25 you'll find the best possible values 

at that price. You'll like the styles and fabrics, they were selected with a great deal of care. You'll appreciate 
the painstaking interest we show in having your suit just right. 

By selecting your overcoat now you get the choice of a full assortment of best looking, best value coats we 
have ever shown. Most remarkable values at $20 and $25. 




For A Dollar 

You can get numberless attractive 
Xmas Gifts at this store. We 
mention: 

Stick Pins, Leather Goods 

and Sterling Silver 

Novelties 

The Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak 



APOLLONIAN LADIES' NIGHT. 



The Davis Barber Shop 

Individual Sterilizing Cabinets 
Ray Davis, Manager 



Joslyn Press 

112 E. Cucharras St. 
Phone Main 1154 

Printers & 
Publishers 



ANY KIND OF PRINTING 
WE PRINT THE TIGER 



JOIN THE CITY Y. M. C. A. 

And get full privileges: 

Gym, Swimming Pool, 

Game Room. 

Special work to build up the 

body. 



Half a hundred guests enjoyed 
Apollo's forty-first Ladies' Night on 
last Friday evening. Heizer opened 
the program with the history of the 
Club from the early nineties to the 
present time. Then the quartet sang 
a few of the old selections to pre- 
pare the way for the forerunner of 
the intersociety debate. In this Ru- 
dolph upheld Apollo's right to a 
pumpkin appropriated by a neighbor- 
ing society. Jackson played the part 
of Pearsons. Dr. Finlay closed the 
program with a talk that put every- 
one in good humor for the patties, 
chocolate and ice cream which fol- 
lowed. Decorations were in the Nile 
green and purple colors of the club. 

Guests of the club were Dr. Fin- 
lay, Dr. and Mrs. Bushee and the 
Misses Adams, F. Adams, Alderson, 
Banta, Brown, Burger, Copeland, 
Dilts, Dukes, Lucy and Harriet Ferril, 
Fezer, Galligan, Graham, Johnson, 
Knight, Knutzen. Lewis, Mulaney. 
Mason, Miller, McReynolds, Powell, 
Pope, Potter, Porter, Rhone, Stan- 
field, Sheldon. Sutton, Thomas, 
Woon, Yerkes. Zellhoefer. 



Laura Richie received a short visit 
from her father, Friday. 

♦ ♦ 

The largest assortment of candies 
and confections in the citv. See 
Noble's. 

♦ + 

Skirts cleaned and pressed, 50c. 
I hone Main 71s. The Acacia 

♦ ♦ 

Miss Alexander of La Veta visited 
her sister, Margaret Alexander, Sun- 
day. 

♦ ♦ 

If you haven't had some of our 
famous Pineapple Ice, you've missed 
a treat. Order some for your next 
entertainment. Noble's. 

♦ ♦ 
For frozen dainties, 

home-made candies. 
Noble's. 



punch, fresh 
Phone 920, 



BRE AD F ° r morn ' n g delivery. It's 
bread hot from the oven, 
baked from the choicest flour, and that 
would command first premium anywhere. 
That you get from us. Is always good. 

THE CHICAGO BAKERY 

Have the fellows meet you at 

Tucker 9 s 
Restaurant 

10 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 

You can always save money if 
you will come to see our line in 
diamonds, watches, jewelry, 
guns, sporting goods, fishing 
tackel drawing sets, musical 
instruments, trunks, valises, or 
if you want to loan money, you 
can get it 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 

Money Loaned on Valuables 



Have Your Clothes Cleaned, Pressed and 
Kept in First-Class Repair by 

"Sam" the Gentlemen's Valet 

Also Makes a Specialty of Serving Parties 
SAM FLEMING 



THE TIGER 



II 



Whitney & Grimwood 

Headquarters for Pennants, Pillows, Books, 
Art Goods, Framed Pictures, Etc. 

See ns for your CHRISTMAS PRESENTS. 



Get Your Picnic Supplies 

= AT 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

1 13 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 1 14 

Christmas 
Photos 

The Best Styles at 
Moderate Prices 

m 

Sit for them now at 

Emery Studio 

Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 

Phone Main 41 

R. J. CORRIN 

Dry Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing 

and Remodeling for Ladies 

and Gentlemen 

Work by the Month 

Work Called for and Delivered 

Phone 2963 M 326 N. Tejon Stree 

Nothing Pleases Us More Than 
To Please College Students 

The Fred S. Tucker 

Furniture Co. 



Bert Wasley '05 is employed by 
the Albert Sechrist Electrical Manu- 
facturing Co., of Denver. 



Parrot '14, a freshman forester, was 
called home for a few days because of 
his father's absence in South America. 
Parrot expects to resume his studies at 
C. C. about the middle of next month. 

♦ ♦ 

The Hagerman Hall checker tourna- 
ment is moving along nicely, and from 
the present outlook will prove very ex- 
citing and interesting. Twenty-four 
contestants have entered, and five sets 
have already been played off. As yet 
no serious injuries have been received 
by the players, and strict training has 
been adhered to. Marquis-Queensbury 
rules. 

♦ ♦ 
Thanksgiving ends the training table 

which has been at the Phi Gamma Delta 
house for the last week and a half. 

♦ ♦ 

Oliver Hall rode to Denver on his 
motorcycle Saturday. , 

t ♦ 

Professor Motten has been slightly 
indisposed with a threatened attack of 
tvphoid fever for the last few days. 

♦ ♦ 

DeWitt Harrison '15, who has been 
suffering for a long time with a sprained 
ankle, has fully recovered. 

♦ ♦ 

Charlie Copeland ex-'12 is reported 
very ill with scarlet fever at the St. 
Luke's hospital of Denver. 

♦ + 

Fred Copeland '11 is at present em- 
ployed as the agent of the Copeland 
Sampling Co. at the reduction plants of 
Colorado City. 

♦ ♦ 

Professor Gile, who has been confined 
to his home on account of illness, is re- 
ported to be convalescing. He will be 
able to be out in a few days. 

♦ ♦ 

Mr. Nipps, State Y. M. C. A. Secre- 
tary, Mr. Ware, our College Y. M. C. A. 
secretary, and Messrs. Golden, Hed- 
blom, Gregg, Barnes, and Professor 
Smith of Manitou, were entertained at 
dinner at the McLaughlin home last 
Wednesday evening in honor of the 
birthday of Ralph McLaughlin '14. 

♦ ♦ 

Rowe Rudolph, Byron Winans and 
Edwin Crysler have been added to the 
list of Tiger local correspondents. 



MOTOR CYCLES 

Yale Emblem 

BICYCLES and Supplies 

Expert Repairing 

Colorado Springs Cycle 

Company 

DeWitt Doyle, Manager 



224 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Red 34 



Knight -Campbell's 

F0R PIANOS 

and PLAYER PIANOS 

STE1NWAY and 20 OTHER MAKES 

We Rent Pianos 

Largest Stock Victor Talking Machine* 
and Edison Phonographs 

226 N. Tejon St., after Sept. IS, 122 N. Tejsn 

The Gowdy-Simmcns Printing Co. 
PRINTERS 

Copper Plate and Steel Engravers 
Telephone 87 21 N. Tejon Street 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing d Typewriter. 

Zimmerman Supply 

Company Phone Main 374 

Established 1890 

You can save from 25 
percent to 40 percent 
on our finest Hart, 
Schaf f ner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer & 
Clothcraf t Suits and 
Overcoats 






12 



THE TIGER 



C. C. IS GOING TO TRIM THE D. U. 

INSPIRE THE TEAM WITH YOUR ENTHUSIASM. 
BE LIBERAL WITH THE DECORATIONS. 
WE ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR PENNANTS, STREAMERS, ARM BANDS, ETC. 
WE HAVE AN ESPECIALLY GOOD VALUE IN A VERY LARGE PENNANT AT $1.60. 

The 20 Per Cent. Discount is still on and in addition we will include a JAPANESE CANE, FREE 
OF CHARGE, with every pennant. 

THE MURRAY DRUG COMPANY 

Opposite Campus 



The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Associa ion 

116 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

Pays 4% Interest on Deposit and Give 
Special Attention to Account of Student 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, President tra Harris, V-Presiden 

M.C. Gile Lill'a B. Ensign C. E. Lynde 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary- Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M 



THE OUT WEST 

TENT AND AWNING CO. 

RECLINING CHAIRS 
PORCHES ENCLOSED 

Tents Rentedlfor a Day or for Longer 



Stamping, Designing, R rforating, Best Hnd M i 
China. Western Branch of Mexican Pigment Paints, 
Stenciling and Materials 
Art Needlework and Art Goods 

THI HUNT AND VAN NICE 

ART SPECIALTY SHOPS 

Retail and Whole. ale 
ke's Peak Aven e Phone Main 2055 



The "Little Jeff" Last Has the 

Style, Fit and Quality 

IN BLACK OR TAN 

$3- 50 




1| Whitaker-Kester 

Shoe Co. 
10 North Tejon Street 



The Misses Remy, Stukey, Hamilton 
and Galpin, and Putnam, Scott, Lloyd 
and Summers took supper in Bear Creek 
Canon Saturday evening. Miss Gilbert 
and Professor Thomas chaperoned. 

♦ ■♦ 

Postal Station No. 1, in the nineteen 
hundred block has been converted into a 
sub post office and mail will be delivered 
from there hereafter. 

♦ ♦ 

Allen recived a visit from his father 
last week. 

♦ ♦ 

Guy Hopkins' father, mother and 
brother stopped over between trains last 
Saturday. 

♦ ♦ 

Harder and Carson were initiated 
into Delta Phi fraternity Monday night. 

♦ ♦ 

Dr. Bushee addressed the Socialists 
of Colorado Springs at Carpenters hall 
Sunday night on "The Historic Devel- 
opment of Socialism." 

♦ ♦ 

Ogilbee '14 is suffering from paralysis 
of the muscles in the right side of his 
face. 

♦ + 

A number of College people are plan- 
ning to attend the Sin Lazare dance in 
Denver Saturday night. 
■f -f 

Professor Breitwieser went to Den- 
ver, Monday, to deliver a lecture to the 
annual meeting of the State Teachers' 
association. 

♦ ♦ 

Several freshmen who came to chapel 
Monday morning without the regulation 
cap were treated by the sophs to a snow 
shampoo. 

♦ ♦ 

Dr. Murphy, former quarterback of 
the Wisconsin football team, has been 
assisting- on Washburn since the Mines 
game. 

♦ ♦ 

J. J. Sylvester is up from Monte 
Vista for the Thanksgiving game. 



MOWRY'S ICE CREAM 

One Quart $0.50 

Two Quarts $0.85 

Three Quarts $1.10 

One Gallon $1.30 

One Quart Brick $0.60 

Two Quart Brick $1.00 

Wholesale Rates on Applica- 
tion. 
A. L. MOWRY, 
Phone 1184. 
15 E. Cache la Poudre. 



STOP AT 

LIGHTNING SHOE SHOP 

to get your shoes repaired. Shine 
free with every pair of soles 

Sewed Soles 75c. 28' 2 N. Tejon St. 



William P. Bonbright & Co 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House. London, E. C. 



STUDENTS! 

The 
Pearl Laundry Co. 

respectfully solicits your pat- 
ronage. We guarantee satis- 
factory work and service and 
give you 20% discount. 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 






THE TIGER 



THE BEST SHOES 

$2.50 No More, No Less 

M. Q. WEST'S 

Sample Shoe Store 

HO-112 E. Pike's Avenue, Up Stairs 

Rooms 16-17-18 Midland Block 
First Stairway East of Tucker's Cafe 

Yes, We Sell High Boots for $2.50 too 



Engraving 

Function Invitations 
Programs, Place Cards 
Etc., — Our Specialty. 

OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

HA YNER 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 

Colorado Springs 



Gladys Woollen and Myrth King gave 
a tea to Hypatia, Saturday afternoon, in 
honor of Lucile Dilts. 
♦ ♦ 

Anna Strang '10 has been visiting 
Frances Adams. 

Hypatia enjoyed a spread in honor of 
Lucile Dilts after the program, Friday. 
♦ t 

Dorothy Madden went to Denver, 
Monday, to undergo an operation on 
her tonsils. 

ANSWER THESE AND YOU ARE 
EDUCATED. 



2 S. Tejon St. 



A professor in the University of 
Chicago told his pupils that he should 
consider them educated when they 
con il say yes to every one of thirteen 
questions that lie should put to them. 
It may interest you to read the ques- 
tions. Here they are: 

Has your education given sympathy 
v ith ail good causes and made you 
espouse them? 

l-Ia it maSe you a brother to the 
weak? 

Have you learned how to make 
friends and keep them? 

Do you know what it means to be 
.1 friend of yourself? 

Can you look an honest man or 
pure woman straight in the eye? 

Can you be high minded and hap y 
in the meaner drudgeries of life? 

v re you good for anything to your- 
self? Can you be happy alone? 



13 



Miss Maude Blain and Miss Rose 
Daniels of Pueblo were the guests of 
Dorothy Madden over Saturday and 
Sunday. 



FOR THAT 

THANKSGIVING 
SPREAD 

Goodies from Burgess 
Delicatessen and Candy Counters 

BURGESS 

Phone Eight Three 
12-114 North Tejon Street 



Why 



Not Have that 
Party at 
BRUIN INN 

Sewed Soles 75 cents 
Rubber Heels 35 cents 

AT 

PETE'S SHOE SHOP 

230 East Dale 

JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, CI aning, Prosing. S|>tiinl 
Kates to College Students 

1 Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's liu >k Sure 16 S. Tejon Sucre 

Developing and Printing 

HARLAN 

"The View Man" 

All Kinds of View and Commercial Work 
Phone Main 2717 304 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



The Prompt Printery Co. 

M \STER PRINTERS 



12 and 14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



THE OLD STAND BY 

Anybody can make Ice Cream but it takes Mueth's to 
satisfy the College Students. Reference: D. Sisco 



Under New Management 



THE TIGER 



Be Your Own Agent 

The management of the STAR LAUNDRY have 
decided to have no general agent at the College and to 
give agent's discount direct to the student sending in 
the bundle. 

Our drivers will sell you a $5.00 Coupon Book for $3.50, a dis- 
count of 30%, or you can pay in cash on the delivery of the bundle, 
taking out 30% for yourself. No bundles will be left without money 
or coupons. 

Coupon- Books at this discount will be sold only to students and 
are not transferable and the coupon will not be received from other 
than students. 



Everything in Jewelry 



FOUND AT 



Arcularius & Co. 

Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton Dairy 



419 S. El Paso St. 



Phone Main 442 



Have You a Panitorium 
College Ticket? 

See Rhone College Agent, Hager- 
man Hall. 

30 Suits Sponged and Pressed For $5 

Flora and Altha Crowley gave a din- 
ner Tuesday evening for Lucile Dilts. 
-t- ♦ 

Margaret Alexander and Etta Moore 
entertained the third floor Ticknor 
girls at a delightful breakfast, Sunday 
morning, in honor of Miss Alexander 
of La Veta. 



Mr. Roy Pigg and Mr. Haley, both 
of the University of Colorado, and Doc- 
tor James of Denver, took dinner at the 
Alpha Tau Delta house, Sunday. 

♦ ♦ 

A party of Alpha Tau's and their lady 
friends had an enjoyable beefsteak fry 
in Ruxton Canon, Saturday afternoon. 

♦ ♦ 

Nipps, the state student secretary of 
the Y. M. C. A., spent Sunday on the 
campus, he was helping to make the final 
plans for Mr. Hurrey's visit. 

♦ ♦ 

The committee in charge of the ar- 
rangements for the Hurrey campaign 
met in the reading room at Hagerman 
Hall, Sunday night, to discuss final 
plans. 

♦ ♦ 

Dr. Creighton and two otner men of 
JManitou visited the College weather 
bureau last Wednesday. They are think- 
ing of starting a weather bureau at 
Manitou and wished to get a few ideas 
from ours. 

♦ ♦ 

Many students are taking advantage 
of the Thanksgiving holiday to pay vis- 
its to their homes. 

♦ + 

About twenty men will attend the 
Gospel team convention to be held in 
Denver under the auspices of the Den- 
ver University Y. M. C. A., Friday, 
Saturday and Sunday. See Ware if you 
think you can join the crowd. 



CHILI 

Is Now Being Served at 

The College Inn 

Opposite the Campus 



TRY 

A 

SUPPER 

McRAE'S 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co. 
Groceries and 






Meats 




115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE HENRY L. DWINELL HARDWARE COMPANY 



TOOLS 



BUILDERS AND GENERAL HARDWARE 
We Appreciate the College Trade 



CUTLERY 



130 N. Tejon St. 



Peone Main 439 



THE TIGER 



15 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

New reversible coats for school 
and general wear — sizes 32-34- 
36-all new colors-$20, #22.50, 
525 and $30. 

Women's and Misses garments 
2nd floor. 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

s the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 



106' > E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



91 N. Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 



Artists Materials 

FRAMING 
College Posters 

The Richard Willis Art Studios 

4 > East Pike's Peak Avenue 




TOD POWELL 



Fur Gloves 

in All Styles 

$10 to $3 



The Steadily 
Increasing 



New Holiday 

Goods 
Arriving Daily 



prestige of this store is not attributable to "luck,'' 

but is the logical sequence of intelligent merchandising. Our patrons 
are those who seek clothes os desirability— clothes of character and 
refinement. 

CORRECT IN STYLE TAILORING. 

Suits and Overcoats $35 to $15 



Money 

Cheerfully 

Refunded 




113 E. 
Pike's Peak 
Ave 



The regular chapel service this morn- 
ing took the form of the annual College 
Thanksgiving service. Reverend Ran- 
ney of the Congregational Church was 
the speaker. 

♦ + 

Eleanor Thomas entertained at a 
chafing dish supper, Saturday evening, 
in honor of Lucile Dilts. 

♦ ♦ 

President Slocum is expected back 
this week, possibly in time for the 
alumni banquet in Denver. There is a 
possibility, however, that he will not be 
able to return before December 10. 

♦ ♦ 

The girls' dormitories will be closed 
this year during the Christmas vacation, 
in order to give a better chance for 
cleaning to be done. They will close 
Saturday, December 23, and reopen 
Monday, January 8. The closing of the 
halls will make a change for the girls, 
besides the advantage of their appreciat- 
ing the halls more after they return. 

LOST — A ribbon watch fob with a 
letter panel bearing the initials "E. W. 
C." Finder please return to Edwin 
Crysler 'IS. 




LUMP 

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for furnace 

THE CENTRAL FUEL CO. 

Phone r,78 l 28 N. Tejon 



Get Acquainted at 

The Red 
Cross Pharmacy 

HOT DRINKS HOT TAMALAS 

HUDSON'S CHOCOLATES 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 

107 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone 40 



Candy Special 

Page 5 Gazette 
each week 

DFR1NI TEA AND 

*-* *-***.! ^ COFFEE Co. 

26 So. Tejoa St. Phon 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff B 
118 North Tejon St. Phone Main 1701 

Res , 1211 N. Weber St. Tel. Main 95 



Phone Main 930 



W. E. DONER 



POWELL-DONER SPORTING GOODS CO. 

1 1 2 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

"EVERYTHING FOR SPORTSMEN" 

New and Complete Stock of the Very Best of Athletic Supplies, College Pennants, Novelties Etc 

"ASTHE MP1DICINE MAN" 



16 



for* 



THE.. TIGER if 



b? 



Winter Suits agd ...Oyercoaf '^ftf- ' A >g1^prehensiye variety of pat- 
men and - young men. ^ : * terns right f frow affords an unexcelled 

Re^Iy-for-service garments which selection, 
sustain the reputation we have enjoy- Hats, Gloves, shirts and neckwear 
ed for more than a quarter of a century here are made to conform in correct- 
or excellence of materials, perfect fit ness and quality to exactly what the 
and finish and correct styles. best dressers demand. 



(ret&imSRtecuwQ 



HAUGEN, Tailor 



222 N. Tejon. 



Phone Main 296 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



Departments 

College of A rts and 
Science, 
E. S. PARSONS, Dean 

School of Engineering;, 
F. CAJORI, Dean 

School of Forestry, 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 

School of Music, 

E. D. HALE, Dean 



J 



25c- 



-13 



25c 



The Nouitas, Pocket Lighter cheapest and Best 

|3 HUGHES 



Pool in connection but not a pool room 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



Vol. XIV 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., DECEMBER 7, 1911 



Number 13 



THE OLD TIGER RETURNS 

DENVER IS VANQUISHED 



Tigers Triumph---Game Replete With Stars---Tig|ers Outplay 
Opponents---Game is Fierce---Score by Kicks and 

Touchdown 



Broadway Park in Denver saw the two best coached and strongest all-around football teams in Colorado battle 
from the first to the last minute of the hour limit on Thanksgiving Day, and for the second successive year the 
Tiger triumphed. The timekeepers raised their hands, the last whistle blew, and Captain Sinton, carrying the pig- 
skin oval which had tallied twelve points for his team and had ignored his opponents, lead a battered group of 
black and gold warriors slowly from the gridiron. The Denver champion's banner of a few years ago came flut- 
tering weakly to the ground from the great flagstaff, a proud emblem of lost prowess. The crimson gladiator had 
gone down under the Tiger, while the arena was shouting at the sight. 

It was a struggle filled with the fierceness accumulating for a whole autumn — a fierceness come from an old 
desire for revenge on one side, and from the hope to retain mastery on the other. Besides, the Tiger was 
retrieving the bitter stings of recent defeats, while the Minister was being humbled for the first time since last 
Thanksgiving Day. There was the natural roughness bred of ferocity, and the roughness bred of pain and hate. 

It was defeat for a team out-thought, out-run and out-kicked. It was a victory for a team which had lagged 
up until the last moment, and had shown its power too late to claim the title of the mighty Rockies. It was play- 
ing by football machines, such that either could have overcome the combintaion of ten men and kicker who have 
now won the championship honors. The hoary hag clipped the spinning from the wheel and laughed to her Fate sis- 
ters, while men looked in awe at what was woven into the autumn of igii. 



The great sport — even on its Turkey 
Day exit — brought forth Tiger heroes 
in great array. The veterans fought 
their last battle with a spirit and effect- 
iveness which placed them forever 
among the immortals. The unheard of 
youngsters came forth, and vieing with 
the departing ones performed deeds 
which showed that one day they will be 
worthy to enter those famous ranks. 
There was not a Tiger in the game 
whose playing did not flash forth with 
individual brilliance at some time during 
the contest. 



Foremost among the stars were the 
seven — the immortal seven — who were 
toiling on the line-marked gridiron the 
last time for Colorado College. Vande- 
moer, the old Vandy we love to tell 
about — scored six of the dozen points 
with his boot. Neither kick was easy. 
The last was from the forty-five yard 
line, at a difficult angle and against the 
wind. Vandy's running from formation 
and in bringing back kicks, showed that 
he still is the great player which he has 
been acclaimed. Thompson, who was 
early replaced, showed his grit by start- 



ing the game with a foot on which no 
man could run. Black, in his old posi- 
tion at guard, smeared the Methodists" 
play in a way that will long be remem- 
bered. Putnam's brain did not cloud 
for an instant, and the individual play- 
ing of this small man kept the Denver 
burlies guessing all the time. Heald 
clipped off the yards with amazing reg- 
ularity on cross-tackle bucks and was a 
bulwark of defense. Sinton was largely 
responsible for the poor showing made 
by the much touted Koonsman. He 
spilled him and everyone else that came 



THE TIGER 



his way. Few attempts with the for- 
ward pass were made his way, but he 
did not let the game end without one 
good gain of twenty-five yards by this 
method. Hedblom tore great holes for 
the line plungers and proved a man 
which D. U. preferred to go around 
than to go through. The seven did their 
best. 

Deesz, the terrible fighting Dutchman, 
had two ribs cracked early in the game, 
but played up into the second half, be- 
fore he was taken from the field uncon- 
scious. His was the true Tiger spirit. 
Witherow, charging irresistibly on every 
play, with his eyes open and his hands 
going surely to the runner, well earned 
his unanimous choice for All-Star cen- 
ter. He blocked the punt which gave 
C. C. her one touchdown. Bowers, 
moved to Thompson's end, smashed 
things in regular Bowers style. The 
manner in which he showed up the great 
Duke "Gravy-train" was a sight for sore 
eyes. Koch, the strong-man tackle, was 
the equal of the other linemen in the 
stonewall defense and carried the major- 
ity of the Denver team on his back for 
a few yards, every time he was called 
upon for a tackle-around play. 

When the substitutes were put into 
the game, the team did not slow up for a 
minute, but rather seemed to increase 
in speed. Summers, playing in Bowers' 
tackle was the surprise of the game, and 
played as well as any man in the line. 
His was the same style of playing as 
his classmate Koch. He was the man 
who recovered the ball for the only 
touchdown. Floyd, at fullback and 
guard, played a fiercely fighting game. 

For Denver University, Volk was the 
most brilliant player. His work in the 
backfield and in scrimmaging suggested 
in a slight way the playing of Romney, 
the Utah whirlwind. Zeilman with his 
long end-runs made some of the greatest 
gains of the day for his team. Brubaker 
was clever in his work at quarterback. 
Koonsman was unable to show the class 
which is claimed for him. Schroeder 
starred, but not in a manner which was 
a credit to his reputation or size. The 
Denver line, though heavier than the 
Tiger's was noticeably weaker. 

The first score was registered by Van- 
demoer in the second quarter, after the 
Tigers had worked the ball down to the 
twenty-yard line. From this point he 
sent over a clean drop kick. He like- 
wise scored the final three points near 
the end of the last period when he sur- 
prised himself and every one else by 
toeing the ball across the bar from the 
forty-five yard line. He scored in two 
out of his three drop-kick attempts. 



The first attempt early in the first per- 
iod fell short when he tried to boost the 
ball from the thirty-yard line. 

The touchdown came soon after the 
fourth quarter began. Schroeder 
dropped back for a punt on the twenty- 
yard line. The ball was snapped and 
the lines clashed. Schroeder's foot met 
the ball a momennt too late, for Withe- 
row was through in time to block the 
punt. The ball bounded the twenty odd 
yards back across the goal line. Both 
teams raced after it, with Volk and 
Summers in the lead. They dove in a 
cloud of dust, and when they arose, 
Summers had the ball. Hedblom easily 
kicked the goal. 

THE GAME IN DETAIL. 

Schroeder kicked off forty-five yards 
to Vandemoer, who returned 20 yards. 
The ball was given to Deesz, who went 
through left tackle on a quarterback 
run. Vandemoer was forced to punt, and 
sent it 55 yards to Volk, who returned 
10. With the ball on Denver's 30-yard 
line. Zielman smashed left end for 7, 
and Koonsman hit left tackle for 1 more. 
Schroeder punted 35 yards to Putnam, 
who was downed in his tracks. 

Heald hit left tackle for 3. Putnam 
fumbled but recovered. An exchange 
gave the Tigers the ball on the C. C.'s 
35-yard line. 

Failing to make downs, C. C. punted 
50 yards to Volk, who returned 18. 
Koonsman lost 8, and Schroeder punted 
40 yards without return. Vandemoer 
kicked 47 yards; no return. Zeilman 
took a chance at right end and got away 
for 27 yards. Koonsman made 3 yards 
through tackle. Schroeder tried a for- 
ward pass which didn't work, and punt- 
ed. Failing to make downs, C. C. kicked 
40 yards out of bounds. Volk tried a 
fake kick but was pushed back 4 yards. 
Schroeder punted, Putnam not return- 
ing. Vandemoer punted over the goal 
line and Denver put the ball in scrim- 
mage on the 25-yard line. 

Schroeder punted 25 and Vandemoer 
returned it to 20. Deesz and Putnam 
failed to gain and Vandemoer tried a 
drop kick from the 27-yard line, which 
failed. The ball was put in play on the 
25-yard line, and with a few exchanges 
of punts the quarter ended. Score, 0-0. 

Second Quarter. 

Donaldson replaced Palmer at right 
guard. Vandemoer tried a forward pass 
to Thompson, which was incomplete. 
Vandemoer punted 40 yards to Volk, 
who returned 5. Fike and Volk made 
4 apiece, and Schroeder punted 40 to 
Vandemoer, who returned it 10. A for- 



ward pass, Heald to Sinton, netted 20 
yards, bringing the ball to Denver's 36- 
yard line. • Denver got the ball on a 
fumble only to lose it the same way. 
The ball went to Denver on downs, and 
Schroeder punted 53 yards to Vande- 
moer. Heald could not gain. 

Summers replaced Thompson at left 
end. Vandy was forced to kick out of 
danger. C. C. was penalized 15 yards 
for interfering with a fair catch. Time 
out for Deesz. Card replaced Zeilman 
at left half, making 6 and 3 yards 
through tackle. Volk made 1 more, 
making downs on C. C.'s 40-yard line. 
Fike made 3, and Schroeder attempted 
a drop from the 45-yard line, but it 
failed. Putting the ball in play on the 
25-yard line, first downs were made by 
Heald on two tries at tackle. 

Both teams were playing rough ball 
at this time and Heald took time out. 
Koch and Summers made the downs 
and Vandy punted to Volk, who was 
downed back of the goal line. The ball 
was put in scrimmage on the 25-yard 
line, but Schroeder was forced to punt 
otu of danger. Denver was penalized 
10 yards for blocking, putting the ball 
on their 45-yard line. Sinton took a 
forward pass for 20 yards, Putnam and 
Vandy brought it to the 25-yard line, 
from where Vandemoer kicked a field 
goal. Score, 3-0. 

Schroeder kicked the ball over the 
goal line on the kickoff and the ball was 
placed on the 25-yard line. C. C. was 
penalized 15 yards and punted 35 yards 
to Volk, with no return. A forward 
pass, Volk to Koonsman netted 10 and 
another from Volk to Brubaker netted 
2 more, leaving the- ball on C. C.'s 15- 
yard line., when the whistle blew. 
Score, 3-0. 

Third Quarter. 

Zielman replaced Card at left half 
and Palmer repliced Donaldson at right 
guard. Schroeder kicked 45 yards to 
Heald, who returned 28. Deesz took 
the ball and broke two ribs in the scrim- 
mage. He was replaced by Floyd. C. 
C. then attempted a forward pass, 
which was interrupted by Denver, only 
to lose it a moment later the same way. 
Vandy punted out of bounds. Volk 
made a yard through tackle, and Schroe- 
der punted 1 yards otu of bounds. C. 
C. could not gain and kicked over the 
goal line from the 25-yard line. Schroe- 
der punted out of bounds to C. C.'s 50- 
yard line. An exchange of punts fol- 
lowed, when Volk was given time out. 
Denver fumbled, but Darden recovered. 
Zielman made 20 yards around right 
end, and followed it up with three more. 
Brubaker made 2 on a quarterback run, 

Continued on Page 5 



THE TIGER 



ALLUMNI ACTIVITIES 






DENVER ALUMNI BANQUET. 






The Denver Branch of the Colo- 
rado College Alumni Association held 
its Sixth Annual Banquet at the Shir- 
ley Hotel in Denver on the evening of 
the 29th of November. There were 
about fifty of the members present, 
and between songs, yells and speeches 
and bountiful menu all spent a pleas- 
ant evening. The fighting spirit of 
the Tigers, urged on by plenty of op- 
timism, was well in evidence on the 
eve of the Tiger victory. 

Silmon L. Smith '09 was toast- 
master of the evening and the fol- 
lowing responses were given: "The 
Faculty," by Dean Florian Cajori; 
"Our Alma Mater" (Mrs. Slocum) by 
Tod Maro Pettigrew '10; "Ten Years 
Out of College," by Hon. Benjamin 
Griffith '01; "College Reminiscenses" 
by Frank A. Pettibone; "The Presi- 
dent's Message" by Dean Edward S. 
Parsons. President Slocum was un- 
fortunately delayed by College busi- 
ness in the East and could not be 
with us. Dean Parsons was, how- 
ever, an excellent "Sub." Beside the 
set speeches a number of the alumni 
insisted (?) upon making ex tempore 
speeches. 

Montgomery R. Smith, Miss Cora 
Wilcox and Earle S. Hille formed the 
banquet committee, to whom thanks 
are due. Don't fail to be present 
next year and enjoy the glad event. 



MINERVA ALUMNAE OF COLO- 
RADO SPRINGS MEETS 
MONDAY. 



A regular meeting of the Minerva 
alumnae will be held Wednesday 
afternoon at 4:15 with Miss Anna Bis- 
pham, 21 1 1 N. Nevada avenue. The 
papers to be read are "Central Eng- 
land" by Miss Janet Kampf, "London" 
by Miss Mary Tucker, and "Suburbs 
of London" by Ernestine Parsons. 



Miss Bernice McCurdy ex-'i3 was 
an interested spectator at Broadway 
park Thanksgiving. 

Leo Lake '08 who was recently a 
student at the McCormick Theolog- 
ical Seminary of Chicago, has dis- 
continued his studies and is visiting 
at the Phi Gamma Delta house. 



WILL ENTERTAIN MINERVA 
SOCIETIES. 

Miss Elsie Connell will entertain 
the Minerva active and alumnae so- 
cieties of the Springs at her home, 
825 Washington street, in Denver, 
next Saturday afternoon, assisted by 
the Denver members. The Misses 
Mary and Emma Wheeler will enter- 
tain the societies at their home in 
Denver the second Saturday in Jan- 
uary. The Denver members are: 
Mrs. Lester McLean, Jr., Mrs. Geo. 
C. Barnard, Mrs. Clyde Smedley, Mrs. 
Jane Porter Robertson, Mrs. Walter 
C. Tegtmeyer, Mrs. Harry Fontius, 
Mrs. Thomas Grierl, Jr., Mrs. Asa 
Hall, Mrs. Jean Diack Cole, Miss 
Cora Wilcox, Miss Stella Wilcox, 
Miss Eva Carpenter, Miss Edith Hall, 
Miss Stella Chambers, Miss Mary 
Wheeler, Miss Ethel Van Wagenen, 
Miss Bertha Webb, Miss Faye Ander- 
son, Miss Clara Cowing, Miss Ruth 
Londoner, Miss Ruth Ragan, Miss 
Gertrude Amsbary, Miss Elizabeth 
Frazer, Miss Jean Ingersoll, Miss 
Elsie Green, Miss Ada Armstrong, 
Miss Caroline Davis, Miss Elsie Con- 
nell. 



DENVER HPPATIA ALUMNAE 
ENTERTAIN. . 



The Denver chapter of the Hypatia 
alumnae entertained visiting members 
last Tuesday evening at a dainty 
buffet supper at the home of Mrs. 
Robert Wheeler (nee Miss Alice 
Meyers '07). 

The guests were Miss Ruth Bate- 
man '10, Miss Mabel Bateman '07, 
Miss Vera Rodgers '07, Miss Lillian 
Duer '11, from Colorado Springs, 
Miss Kate Ashley '09, from Cripple 
Creek, Miss Betty Carpenter ex-'io, 
Miss Edna Prevost '08, and Miss 
Emma Whiton '09 from Pueblo. 



The members of the Minerva Alum- 
nae association of Denver have issued 
invitations to an afternoon party in 
compliment to the members of the 
Denver chapters of Contemporary and 
Hypatia alumnae to be held at the 
residence of Miss Elsie Connell, Sat- 
urday afternoon, December 9th. 



THE CO-ED. GAME. 

The most exciting game of the foot- 
ball season took place Wednesday 
night in McGregor Gymnasium, 
when the Tigers defeated the Minis- 
ters by a 37-7 score. Both teams put 
up a good game, but the D. U. war- 
riors were easily outclassed by the 
Tigers. The Colorado College cheer- 
ing was much aided by a band, which 
kept things lively all the time. The 
Denver University rooters, though 
few in number were great in spirit, 
and with their lusty yells were be- 
hind the team throughout the whole 
game. The line up was as follows: 
D. U. C. C. 

Wilson, line Adams, line 

Oettiker, C, qb Crandall, qb 

King, fb Smith,, C, f b 

Miller, hb Gerould, hb 

Referee, water-carrier, etc., Styles. 

Coach, Humphreys. 

Dr. Stewart did noble services in 
dressing the wounds of the injured. 



COLORADO COLLEGE SCHOOL 
OF MUSIC. 



Miss Vera McLaughlin 
(Pupil of Miss Viola Paulus) 
Assisted by 
Robert Berryhill, Pianoforte 
Mabel Harlan, Violinist 
Eleanor Thomas, Accompanist 
Perkins Recital Hall, Tuesday, De- 
cember 12, 8 p. m. 
Rejoice Greatly (Messiah) ... .Handel 
Che Faro Senza Euridice (Orfeo) 

Gluck 
Opus No. 26. Theme and Variations 

Beethoven 

Das Veilchen ' Mozart 

Madrigal Chaminade 

Summer Chaminade 

Opus 124: 

Romanze — 
Larghetto — 
Elfe— 
Vision — 

Schumann 

Elegie Messenet 

The May Morning Denza 

(With violin obligate) 
Students and friends of the College 
are invited to attend. 



C. C. alumni were much in evidence 
at the teachers' convention at Den- 
ver last week. 



The Observatory was open to the 
public Wednesday intsead of Thurs- 
day of this week, owing to the con- 
flict with tonight's lecture. More of 
the students should take advantage of 
these privileges and let Prof. Albright 
show you the stars. 









THE TIGER 



ATHLETICS 



All Star Teams 

Six Colorado sporting writers, in- 
cluding the best critics of the West, 
have each picked two all-star foot- 
ball elevens which they believe would 
be the best representation of the men 
playing in the Rocky Mountain 
region and of those playing only 
within the state of Colorado. 

Joe Witherow, at center, was the 
only man who was selected unani- 
mously for any position. Romney, of 
Utah, was given a backfield position 
on every team. 

Bruce Gustin, of the Colorado 
Springs Herald Telegraph, picked 
more Colorado College players than 
anyone else. He chose five for the 
Rocky Mountain and six for the 
Colorado team. His judgment was 
impartial, but no doubt differed from 
the others principally because of his 
personal knowledge of the Tiger 
players. 

Pyke Johnson, of the Denver News, 
makes the selection which will go in 
Spalding's Official Football Guide, 
and will thus be spread throughout 
the country. Johnson's selection is 
probably the best all-around judg- 
ment which has been made. It has 
been influenced by his personal opin- 
ion less than any of the other selec- 
tions. He says: 

"In making the annual selection of 
an All-Colorado eleven, the writer has 
this year made two important devia- 
tions from the methods usually fol- 
lowed by critics throughout the con- 
ference. 

"In the first place he has adhered 
rigidly to the selection of men for po- 
sitions which they have played dur- 
ing the year. In doing so the argu- 
ment advanced everywhere in the 
East that a man is not good enough 
for all-star honors unless he is good 
enough for selection in his own po- 
sition, has been accepted. 

"In the second place every coach 
in the state was asked to make an im- 
partial selection of the players whom 
he considered the best fitted for the 
honor. To these selections was added 
that of the writer and a ballot of the 
whole was taken, the result being that 
which appears in the foregoing. 

"In asking for these selections in 



each case a promise was made that All Rocky Mountain. 

in advance none of them would be Left end — Kemp, 5; Vandemoer, 1. 

published. The ballot was asked Left tackle — Bowers, 2; Schroeder, 1; 

simply to ensure the greatest possible DeLaittre, 1; Olesen, 1; Cooper, 1. 

accuracy and fairness, it being real- Left guard — Crouter, 4; Black, 1; 

ized that the coach invariably obtains Hedblom, 1. 

an inside view of the play of the Center — Witherow, 6. 

members of his own eleven impossible Right Guard — Black, 4; Cadot, 1; 

for anyone not connected with the Hedblom, 1. 

eleven to obtain." Right tackle — DeLaittre, 2 ;01esen, 1; 

His selection follows: Volk, 1; Schroeder, 1; Calvert, 1. 

ALL STAR ELEVENS OF 1911. Right end— Vandemoer, 3; Schroeder, 

All-Colorado. 1; Mills, 1; Bennion, 1. 

Schroeder, Denver R. E. Quarterback — Burgess, 5; McFadden, 

Kemp, Colorado L. E. 1. 

De Laittre, Mines R. T. Left halfback— McFadden, 3; Rom- 
Bowers, C. C L. T. ney, 1; Rich, 1; Heald, 1. 

Black, C. C R. G. Fullback — Rich, 2; Koonsman, 2; 

Crouter, C. U L. G. Romney, 2. 

Witherow, C. C Center Right halfback — Romney, 3; Vande- 

McFadden, C. U Q. B. moer, 2; Nelson, 1. 

Vandemoer, C. C R. B. All-Colorado. 

Koonsman, Denver L. B. Left end — Kemp, 5; Vandemoer, 1. 

Rich, C. U F. B. Left tackle — -Bowers, 3; Schroeder, 1; 

All Rocky Mountain. Cooper, 1 ; DeLaittre, 1. 

Schroeder, Denver R. E. Left guard — Crouter, 3; Hedblom, 2; 

Kemp, Colorado L. E. Black, 1. 

De Laittre, Mines R. T. Center — Witherow, 6. 

Oleson, Utah L. T. Right guard — Black, 4; Cadot, 1; 

Black, C. C R. G. Crouter, 1. 

Crouter, C. U L. G. Right tackle — DeLaittre, 2; Schroe- 

Witherow, C. C Center der, 1; Calvert, 1; Bowers, 1; Volk, 

Burgess, Wyo Q. B. 1. 

Vandemoer, C. C R. B. Right end — Mills, 3; Schroeder, 2; 

Romney, Utah L. B. Vandemoer. 1. 

Koonsman, Denver F. B. Quarterback — Vandemoer, 2 ; McFad- 

Following is a list of all the selec- den, 2; Hartman, 1; Harper, 1. 

tions which have been made, together Left halfback — Koonsman, 3; McFad- 

with the number of times each man den, 2; Heald, 1. . 

was selected for each place: Fullback — Rich, 5; Nelson, 1. 

SUMMARY OF THE GAME 

D. U. C. C. 

Number of touchdowns o 1 

Number of goals after touchdown o 1 

Number of successful field goals o 2 

Number of tries for field goal o 3 

Number of kickofFs 5 o 

Number of punts 21 17 

Completed forward passes 2 2 

Yards. Yards. 

Yards punted 706 670 

Average of each punt 38 39 

Kicks carried back 88 43 

Ball carried from scrimmage (line) 30 114 

Ball carried from scrimmage (end) 14 102 

Thrown for loss 5 12 

Yards penalized 15 45 

Gain with forward pass 30 40 



THE TIGER 



Right halfback — Koonsman, 3; Van- 
demoer, 2; McFadden, 1. 



ROOTING GALORE AT D. U. 



The Tiger went to Denver for 
Thanksgiving. All Denver heard him 
come and needless to say heard him 
go. Tiger spirit was never more in 
evidence than it was a week ago. 

The train load of Tigers pulled into 
Denver Union station just as the 
Mines-Boulder aggregation were leav- 
ing and were met by those who went 
up on Wednesday and also by D. U. 
loyal rooters. 

Denver showed the best of sports- 
manlike spirit. Lined up on the sides 
between the depot and the Welcome 
Arch they yelled for C. C. until the 
whole line passed out onto Seven- 
teenth. A long string of decorated 
autos led the procession; next in or- 
der of march were the Tiger rooters 
and Denver brought up the rear. 

The next display of enthusiasm was 
at the game. Winchell and Statton 
made it a point to save voices for 
the times of real need and discour- 
aged any unnecessary yelling before 
the game was called. The wisdom 
of this was clearly evident in the 
comparative rooting of the two 
stands and every man on the team 
heard C. C. yells above all others. 

Denver made a noble but futile at- 
tempt to "Twist the Tiger's tail" by 
mental suggestion, but Winchell and 
his windy ones drowned all their ef- 
forts, much to the disappointment of 
Denver's eminent psychologists. 

The team earned the victory, but 
there is no doubt that the support 
given them made the winning of it 
easier and far more satisfactory. 
The team must be made to feel that 
the College is back of it to a man. 
It is this kind of confidence that wins 
the games. Let's have still more of it 
next year. 



THE OLD TIGER RETURNS 

Continued from page 2 

and Schroeder punted 40 yards to C. 
C.'s 30-yard line. The remainder of the 
quarter consisted of punting, with no 
further scoring. Score, 3-0. 

Fourth Quarter. 

The quarter began with the ball on 
Denver's 45-yard line. Putnam made 5 
yards around right end. Black made 10 
through right tackle, and Vandy 5 more 
in the same place. Heald fumbled the 
next one, and Schroeder recovered. 
Schroeder attempted a punt, but Sum- 



mers blocked the kick, recovered and 
ran through for a touchdown. Hedblom 
kicked goal. Score 9-0. 

Wettengel was put on in place of Russ 
at left end, and Collins in place of Tay- 
lor. Schroeder kicked off over the goal 
line, and the ball was put in scrimmage 
on the 25-yard line. Putnam and Vandy 
failing to gain, Vandy punted 35 yards 
to Brubaker, who returned 10. Schroe- 
der tried a forward pass, but Black in- 
tercepted it, and gained 25 yards. Put- 
nam and Heald failed to gain, and Van- 
demoer made an onside kick, good for 
20 yards. Schroeder punted 35 yards, 
and the ball rolled out of bounds. Van- 
demoer and Heald made 3 yards. Put- 
nam got away for 25 yards on a missed 
signal, and C. C. was penalized 25 yards 
for Bowers' holding. 

Vandy punted 35 to Volk, who re- 
turned 10. Schroeder tried another for- 
ward pass, but Heald intercepted it. 
Failing to make downs, Vandy punted 
to Russ, who made a fair catch. The 
ball was kicked back and forth for a 
short time, C. C. having a little edge on 
the Ministers. When the ball was final- 
ly worked up to the 40-yard line, Vandy 
made a splendid drop kick from the 40- 
yard line. Score, 12-0. The few min- 
utes left were spent in the exchange of 
punts, and the game ended with the ball 
in C. C.'s possession on their 30-yard 
line. Final score, 12-0. 

The Lineup: 

Sinton, re Schroeder, re 

Koch, rt Fike, rt 

Black, Floyd, rg 

Palmer, Donaldson, rg 

Witherow, c Darden, c 

Hedblom, lg Sterling, lg 

Bowers, Summers, It Taylor, It 

Thompson, Bovvers, le Russ, le 

Vandemoer, rh Koonsman, rh 

Heald, lh Zielman, Cord, lh 

Deesz, Black, fb Volk, fb 

Putnam, qb Brubaker, qb 

Steele, referee; Bansbach, umpire; 
Koester. field judge; Swan, head 
linesman. Time of quarters — 15 
minutes. 



The wrecking of a train bearing a 
car load of donkeys spoiled the well 
laid plans of the Miners for their 
showing up of Boulder on Thanks- 
giving. All of them were dressed in 
true rough-neck, prospector style and 
had ordered the donkeys for a little 
touch of realism. Poor Miners, the 
fates are against you this year. 



Ice cream, ice's and frozen dainties 
of all kinds delivered to any part of 
the city. Phone 920. Nobles. 



Boulder 11; Mines 

"God bless Mr. Pigg," murmured 
Coach Folsom to Coach Castleman as 
the last whistle sounded in the Mines- 
Boulder game and Boulder had won 
n-o. "He may win a championship 
next year for the University as Rich 
has done this year. Kickers have 
been our only chance.'' 

The University of Colorado is now 
the only undefeated collegiate foot- 
ball team in the Rocky Mountains. 
They have been booted through the 
season — and booted successfully — 
by Nelson and Rich. These two play- 
ers have given Boulder the first clean 
cut championship which has been won 
in this state for a number of years. 

The game at Union Park on 
Thanksgiving Day was a struggle be- 
tween a heavier team playing the old 
style line plunging game, and a 
lighter team fighting hard, but hope- 
lessly with all the varied methods of 
open play. 

Boulder was able to penetrate in- 
side the Mines twenty-five yard line 
only three times during the game and 
was able to cross the goal line but 
once. This came after they had re- 
covered one of their punts and car- 
ried it to the sixteen yard line. On 
the next play McFadden reached the 
three yard line and three plays later 
put the ball across the line. The 
goal was missed. Rich was out of 
form and the six points from the field 
goals were scored in the last period 
after Pigg had been substituted. 
One of these was from the forty-one 
and the other from the forty-seven 
yard line. Pigg had plenty of time 
for both kicks since they were free 
kicks made after fair catches. 

McFadden played his best game of 
this season. Harper was by far the 
most brilliant player on the Mines 
team. The entire game, though hard 
fought from start to finish was played 
with but the single substitution of 
Pigg. 

It is interesting to compare this 
n-o score with the n-o score the 
Tigers made against the Mines a 
week and a half before. The Tigers 
scored two touchdowns against Boul- 
der's one. The Tigers were inside 
the five-yard line five times altogether 
and Boulder was that far but once. 
Roulder was inside the twenty yard 
line but three times and the Tigers 
were within the thirty yard line the 
majority of the game. 



THE TIGER 



— - a " s^ — ** 

The Weekly Newspaper of Colorado College 

HARRY I. BLACK Editor-in-Chief 

RICHARD L. HUUHES Business Mir. 

Leon C. Havens Assistant Editor 

A. H. ROWBOTHAM Assistant Editor 

Arthur J. Allen Assistant Editor 

J. J. Sinton Athletic Editor 

D. H. mahan Engineering Editor 

G. S. Cowdery Forestry Editor 

Miss Glenn Stiles Alumni Editor 

Mis» Mary Randolph Exchange Editor 

Miss Helen Rand Local Editor 

A. W. Donovan Local Editor 

H. A. Parkison Assistant Manager 

A. L. Golden As-sistani Manager 

Correspondents 

F. P. Storke, H. A. Bennett, Miss Lucy Ferrill 

Byron Winans, Rowe Rudolph, Edwin Crysler, 

Miss Mynh King, Miss Violet Hopper, Miss 

Francis Adams, R. G. Appel 

Miss Elizabeth Gerould, Miss Leona Stukey, 



Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles anditems to TheTiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo 

Phones: Editor, Main 2550. Manager, Main 2073 

Entered at (he postoffice at Colorado 
Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



Regulate Cheering. 

With no intention of dashing cold 
water on college spirit, properly dis- 
played, we print for the consideration 
of the readers of The Tiger the fol- 
lowing extract from an article which 
appeared in the Boston Herald for 
November 29: 

"The football season has practically 
closed and now with cool judgment 
we can again reflect on the advan- 
tages and the evils of the contests 
which stir so many thousands with 
enthusiasm and give outlet for the 
expression of loyalty to the college 
that is in the fibre of all graduates. 

"There are few who have given the 
matter real attention who do not feel 
that football games are an institu- 
tion beneficial to the nation in many 
ways. And yet withal there are some 
factors about them than can be 
changed with general advantage. 
Chief among these is organized cheer- 
ing. 

"As now practiced it is useless and 
unsportsmanlike. Real enthusiasm, 
when a team makes a good play, does 
not need a drill-master, to dictate its 
expression, and prearranged roars 
from the grand stands, drowning the 
signals, seriously interfere with the 
play of the contending elevens. 



"It is often argued that cheering 
during the game stirs and stimulates 
the players. Never was there more 
utter, arrant nonsense. The players' 
intensity and concentration is such 
that they are utterly oblivious of even 
a noise such as echoes over the field. 
They are conscious of it only when it 
prevents hearing signals and then its 
only stimulation is to a most heart- 
felt wish that everyone on the bleach- 
ers may simultaneously choke. 

"Every old player knows this, but 
still the absurd fiction of constant 
cheering 'encouraging the team' con- 
tinues. Yet the situation is so well 
known that the supporters on the side 
in possession of the ball usually re- 
frain from cheering, and every effort 
is made by players and coaches to 
suppress even spontaneous outbursts 
at such times. Meanwhile the sup- 
porters of the other team break loose 
in cheer after cheer, while the players 
leave their positions and crane their 
necks in efforts to hear the num- 
bers that designate the next play. 

"Could anything be more essential- 
ly unsportsmanlike than this? When 
rival teams meet all true lovers of 
sport desire that each should play the 
best game possible." 



THE GERMAN PLAY. 

The members of the cast of the 
German play given recently and those 
in charge of the production have rea- 
son to be gratified at the cordial way 
in which the play has been received. 
Congratulations have been pouring in 
from friends outside the College and 
it has been suggested that a second 
performance of the two comedies 
should be given. Those in charge of 
the play have considered the matter 
and have decided that, owing to the 
great amount of time required for the 
rehearsals, it would not be fair to 
those students who took part to ask 
them to give more of their time for 
a second production. 



THE HALLS IN VACATION. 

There were about fifty girls in the 
halls during the Thanksgiving holi- 
days. Wednesday night the senior 
girls had a football game in Mc- 
Gregor gym. The Dais entertained 
the juniors for Thanksgiving dinner. 
Friday and Saturday evening Miss 
Loomis pleasantly entertained the 
girls who were dressing dolls for 
Papeton. Miss Loomis read "The 
Little White Bird'' and served choco- 
late and cake. 



DICKENS TALKS TONIGHT. 

Anticipation of a crowded house 
has made* the advance sale for this 
evening's lecture by Alfred Tenny- 
son Dickens, "the mediocre son of a 
genius," as he calls himself, larger 
than was even anticipated, however, 
it is to be regretter that a large num- 
ber of students who signed for the 
reservations failed to take them. 

No definite plans for the entertain- 
ment of the eminent Englishman 
will be made until those in charge 
can consult with him and do in this 
as he desires. 

On tomorrow evening he speaks in 
Denver and will be entertained by 
the Woman's Press Club of that city. 

According to all press dispatches 
the lecturer has been heartily re- 
ceived by the American people. He 
has been lionized and banqueted in 
every state in the Union in which he 
has stopped. 

Remember that this is an opportun- 
ity of a life time and if for nothing 
more than for appreciation of the ef- 
forts of the English department, 
every student should be present. 



LECTURER COMING. 

Dr. S. H. Clark of Chicago Uni- 
versity is to be here from February 
21 to 25 to give a series of readings. 
His program is excellent, including 
"Chantecler, "Les Miserables," "Dolly 
Reforming Herself," "Everywoman," 
and "King Lear." "Dolly Reforming 
Herself is a new comedy and Dr. 
Clark reads from the manuscript. 
Wherever he has read this comedy he 
has met with great success and it is 
considered one of the best of his read- 
ings. If there is sufficient demand 
there will also be a reading of the 
Book of Job. The course tickets are 
$2.00, single entertainments being 50c. 
There will be four evening perform- 
ances, "Dolly Reforming Herself" be- 
ing given in the afternoon. 



CALENDARS. 



Owing to a delay at the printers, 
the Colorado College calendars have 
not yet been received. They are ex- 
pected in a few days and will be put 
on sale at once. 



The Misses Powell, Hamilton, Al- 
derson, Youngland, Crutcher and 
Galpin were among the guests at a 
Thanksgiving party at the home of 
Miss Townsend in Golden. 



THE TIGER 






DR. RANNEY SPEAKS IN 
CHAPEL. 

According to the usual custom, the 
chapel exercises last Wednesday took 
the form of a Thanksgiving service. 
Dr. W. W. Ranney of the First Con- 
gregational church gave the address. 
He spoke in part as follows: 

There are so many reasons for 
Thanksgiving that we have no time 
to choose between them. There is, 
however, one reason above all others 
that we ought to consider today. We 
ought to be thankful for the love that 
has been about us since our child- 
hood. We have all had the gift of 
love in some measure. Our lives be- 
gin with sacrifice and they are shel- 
tered by a love which no man can 
measure.. We are all here a priv- 
ileged class and surely a deeper sense 
of gratitude for this blessing should 
be in our hearts today. We are all 
bringing joy to parents' hearts and 
we are here to use our opportunities 
because of the love that follows us. 
1 wish there might go out today a 
special message to the parents of this 
company. The only reward these 
may get may be in our spoken word 
of thanks showing that we appreciate 
what has been done for us. Some of 
us can no longer speak these words 
but we are taught to believe that they 
are watching over us yonder. May 
we be true to them in thought, word 
and deed. 



"DAD" ELLIOTT LEADS 
MEETINGS. 



Y. M. C. A. COMMITTEE SUPPER 

The Association gave a supper on 
Monday night at the Alta Vista Hotel 
to the members of the campaign com- 
mittee and friends. About forty peo- 
ple were present, including "Dad" 
Elliot, Nipps, Blair, Watson and Cor- 
bin, members of the faculty, the sec- 
retary of the city Y. M. C. A., Rev. 
Garvin, H. H. Seldomridge and about 
thirty students. Plans were discussed 
for the week's campaign, the object 
of which is to deepen the religious 
and moral life of the College. "Dad" 
■Elliot gave a stirring talk on the 
efficiency of personal influence and 
the different secretaries present also 
spoke. Before supper everyone 
joined in singing College songs and 
the spirit of enthusiasm was shown 
which spoke well for the success of 
the campaign. 



Arrangements had been made, as 
stated in last week's Tiger, for 
Charles D. Hurrey, Student Secretary 
of the Asociation in America, to 
make a trip to Colorado this week 
in order to carry on a three day cam- 
paign here. Everything had been 
planned for a series of rousing meet- 
ings and it was a great disappoint- 
ment to those in charge when Sec- 
retary Ware received a telegram last 
Saturday from Hurrey cancelling the 
engagement. ft appears that Hur- 
rey's committee in New York have 
to raise $22,000 before the end of the 
year to cover a deficit and as Hurrey 
will be indispensable in this work 
they cannot spare him at this time. 

Under the circumstances it has 
been thought advisable to hold the 
meetings a little earlier — Tuesday 
and Wednesday — instead of the end 
of the week. We were fortunate 
enough to secure as leader "Dad" 
Elliott who ,as Western Secretary of 
the Association, is well known to 
many of the students. "Dad" is a 
forceful and stirring speaker and his 
talks are well worth hearing. He 
s; oke to the men in chapel on Tues- 
day and Wednesday and also at 
meetings on the evenings of these 
days. • Besides this he held personal 
interviews with many of the students 
on Tuesday and Wednesday. Nipps, 
and Corbin, Watson and Blair, sec- 
retaries at Boulder, School of Mines 
and D. U. respectively, were also 
with us and kindly lent their valuable 
assistance in making the meetings a 
success. 

The "hike" which was planned for 
next Saturday morning will take 
place as arranged. The Y. M. C. A. 
hopes that all the men of the Col- 
lege will turn out. It is planned that 
we take a trip up Queen's Canon 
and have a beefsteak dinner at the 
falls. Let everyone be at Hagerman 
at 9 o'clock promptly. 



NEXT SUNDAY'S VESPERS. 



Gretchen Fowler, who is now at- 
tending the State University, spent 
the Thanksgiving holidays with her 
parents in this city. 



The speaker at next Sunday's ves- 
per service will be Bishop Henry 
White Warren of Denver. Dr. War- 
ren is a bishop of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and is well known 
throughout the state. He is a force- 
ful and eloquent speaker and his talk 
will undoubtedly be enjoyed by all. 



GOSPEL TEAM CONFERENCE 
IN DENVER. 

A number of C. C. men spent last 
last week end in Denver at the gospel 
team conference. The men left on 
Thursday, attended the football game 
in the afternoon and stayed over un- 
til Sunday afternoon to take part in 
the conference. "Dad" Elliott was 
the leader and everyone who was 
present at the meetings was im- 
pressed by the spirit of the leader 
and of all who spoke. Plans were 
discussed for sending out teams to the 
different towns in the state in order 
to- interest high school students in 
Y. M. C. A. work. This system has 
been in vogue with Y. M. C. A. work- 
ers at Yale, Harvard, Princeton and 
other institutions in the East for 
years but it is introduced in Colorado 
this year for the first time. The Y. 
M. C. A. has planned to send out a 
band of fifteen C. C. students. These 
men will go into the smaller towns 
during the vacation, get acquainted 
with the young men, play basketball 
and other games with them in the day 
time and talk to them in the evening 
of the things that the Association is 
trying to teach. 

The C. C. delegation at the con- 
ference included eighteen men among 
whom were: Ware, Hedblom, Mac- 
Laughlin, Thomas, Cherung, W. G. 
and E. W. Barnes, Pierson, Rhone, 
Lindstrom, Border, Copeland, Ayer, 
Harder, Munro, Summers, A. J. 
Gregg and Wade. 

The gospel teams to be sent out 
from Colorado College will be chosen 
this week. 



DR. KRAMER CALLED TO SEA- 
BURY DIVINITY SCHOOL. 



Dr. F. F. Kramer, who gave such 
an interesting talk to the students of 
Colorado College at the Vesper 
services a few weeks ago, has just 
been called to the head of the Sea- 
bury Divinity School at Fairbault, 
Minn. The Seabury Divinity School 
is the third largest divinity school of 
the Episcopal church. In receiving 
this call Dr. Kramer has been dis- 
tinctly honored and has been given 
a worthy recognition as one of the 
foremost divinity scholars in the 
country. 















Professor Motten visited the high 
schools of Colorado City and Mani- 
tou Monday in the interests of the 
Dickens lecture. 



THE TIGER 



Mark Cross Leather Goods 



We are sole agents in Colorado Springs for Mark Cross. Many pleasing articles in leather 
novelties which will make very suitable gifts for Xmas. We also carry a large assortment of 
novelties in nickel and brass. Our stock is now complete. 



The Gano-Downs Corner 



Tejon at Kiowa 



-'S CANO-DOmS* 



WE HAVE A SPECIAL PAINT 




\ 


/ 


. 


WMm 



For Every Purpose 

75c Per Gallon up 

Same way with Wall Paper, Kalsomine, 
and in fact, Everything we Sell. Ask 
your neighbor, he knows. 

PAINT SUPPLY COMPANY 

Wholesale 113-115 E. Bijou St. Retail 



THE TIGER 



Hunt Up 

Bissell's Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

Pike's Peak Book & 
Stationery Co. gj.B& 35 s i 

Seldomridde Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
Flour, Feod, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



CALL 2000 

When You Want Anything QUICK! 
QUICK DELIVERY 

MAI . 2000 



COTRELL & LEONARD 

Albany, N. Y. 
Makers of 

CAPS & GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the 

Atlantic to the Pacific 

Class Contcacts a Specialty 

Deichmann & Douglas Floral 

Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER, Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 

Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Gazette Building 



LUMBERING CLASS TAKES 
FIELD TRIP. 



The class in lumbering is spending 
this week in field work at Fraser, 
Colorado, the headquarters of the 
Arapahoe National Forest. 

While there they will study prac- 
tical logging in the Rocky Moun- 
tains in winter. They will also in- 
spect the seed extracting plant of 
the government where the cones of 
the Logepole pine are heated and 
made to break open by artificial 
means which otherwise would not 
have occurred except in the case of 
a fire or intense heat. 

A letter received from one of the 
party states that there is much snow 
and intense cold, the week before the 
thermometer having dropped to 48 
degrees below zero. The party is 
expected to return the latter part of 
the week. 



RANGER COURSE BEGINS 
SOON. 



Word has just reached Acting 
Dean Coolidge that the Forest 
Service will co-operate with the For- 
estry School in the Ranger Courses 
to be given this year. Secretary Wil- 
son has approved the course and the 
Department of Agriculture is highly 
in favor of it. The course will open 
December 13, and continue three 
weeks through the holidays. 

Thirty-five lectures will be given 
under the direction of the Forestry 
School and these will be supple- 
mented by the same number of lec- 
tures by officials of the Forestry 
Service. The course is offered es- 
pecially for the benefit of the govern- 
ment forest rangers, but all students 
of the College are invited to attend. 

A good deal of correspondence has 
been received from different sections 
of the country with the information 
that many rangers will attend the 
course, so a good attendance is ex- 
pected. 

Six lectures on botany will be given 
by Dr. Schneider. These will be fol- 
lowed up by six lectures on dendrol- 
ogy and other forestry subjects by 
Professors Terry and Coolidge. 




Manufacturers' 

Shoe Sale 

A lucky purchase enables 
us to offer you the most 
popular patterns in new fall 
patterns at a saving of 

25 to 40 per cent. 



ZTfrfysh Every rootV-^ 




Why Not Have that Banquet 
at the 

ACACIA HOTEL 

OPPOSITE ACACIA PARK 



THE 

Crissey & Fowler 
Lumber Co. 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vermijo Av 















Telephone 599 



CUT FLOWERS 



Store 1 04 N. Tejon Street 

The Pike's Peak Floral Co. 

DECORATIONS AND DESIGNS 



10 THE TIGER 

Whether your suit price be $15, $20 or $25 you'll find the best possible values 

at that price. You'll like the styles and fabrics, they were selected with a g reat deal of care. You'll appreciate 
the painstaking interest we show in having your suit just right. ' 

By selecting your overcoat now you get the choice of a full assortment of best locking, best value coats we 
have ever shown. Most remarkable values at $20 and $25. 




For A Dollar 

You can get numberless attractive 
Xmas Gifts at this store. We 
mention: 

Stick Pins, Leather Goods 

and Sterling Silver 

Novelties 

The Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak 



The Davis Barber Shop 

Individual Sterilizing Cabinets 
Ray Davis, Manager 



Joslyn Press 

112 E. Cucharras St. 
Phone Main 1154 

Printers & 
Publishers 



ANY KIND OF PRINTING 
WE PRINT THE TIGER 

JOIN THE CITY Y. M. C. A. 

And get full privileges: 

Gym, Swimming Pool, 

Game Room. 

Special work to build up the 

body. 



A few lectures on geology and min- 
eralogy will be given by Dr. Finlay. 
Dr. Jardin will lecture on grazing 
and laws governing the range. Mr. 
Granger, who is supervisor of the 
Medicine Bow National Forest will 
deliver four lectures with the sub- 
jects as follows: 

( i ) Trails, Roads and Cabins. 

(2) Marking and Estimating 
Timber. 

(3) Fires and Fire Fighting. 

(4) Cutting and Destruction 
Waste Products. 

Dr. Dickey, the well known vet of 
the city, will lecture on horses, ani- 
mals and horseshoeing. 

Other things which will be touched 
upon are Forest Law, Management 
of Rocky Mountain Species, Planting 
and Sowing, and Instruction in 
Planting, with a one day's trip to the 
government experiment station at 
Monument, Colo. 



of 



of 



'DAD" ELLIOTT SPEAKS IN 
CHAPEL. 



"Dad" Elliott gave the first of his 
talks to the men of the College on 
Tuesday morning in chapel. He 
spoke on the subject of "The Quit- 
ters in College." 

At Northwestern University, he 
said, there is a sign above the train- 
ing quarters "No Quitters Allowed 
Here." In the college there is a 
hatred of the quitter for he is a man 
who will not put into the game what 
he has in practice been trained to do 
or lie is the man who will do the 
opposite to what he has been taught. 
In college life, however, the greatest 
quitter is not to be found on the 
gridiron, not in the physical realm, 
but in the moral and spiritual realm. 
There are two kinds, the one who 
does wrong purposely and the one 
who does nothing. There is no dis- 
tinction between them. They are 
represented in the Bible by the 
prodigal son and the rich young man. 



RRF AD For morning delivery. It', 
bread hot from the ovens 
baked from the choicest flour, and that 
would command first premium anywhere. 
That you get from us. Is always good. 

THE CHICAGO BAKERY 

Have the fellows meet you at 

Tucker's 
Restaurant 

10 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 

You can always save money if 
you will come to see our line in 
diamonds, watches, jewelry, 
guns, sporting goods, fishing 
ackel drawing sets, musical 
instruments, trunks, valises, or 
if you want to loan money, you 
can get it 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HOEHFANO ST. 

Money Loaned on Valuables 



Have Your Clothes Cleaned, Pressed and 
Kept in First-Class Repair by 

"Sam" the Gentlemen's Valet 

Also Makes a Specialty of Serving Parties 
SAM FLEMING 



THE TIGER 



II 




EUROPEAN PLAN 



ALTA VISTA HOTEL 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 

Rates $1 and Up 

Popular price cafe with cuisine and table service that has no superior. First 
class garage adjoining. Special attention to banquets and private parties. 



Whitney & Grimwood 

Headquarters for Pennants, Pillows, Books, 
Art Goods, Framed Pictures, Etc. 

See us for your CHRISTMAS PRESENTS. 



Christmas 
Photos 

The Best Styles at 
Moderate Prices 

Sit for them now at 

Emery Studio 

Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 41 

R. J. CORRIN 



Dry Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing 

and Remodeling for Ladies 

and Gentlemen 

Work by the Month 
Work Called for and Delivered 

Phone 2963 M 326 N. Tejon Stree 

You can save from 25 
percent to 40 percent 
on our finest Hart, 
Schaf f ner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer & 
Clothcraf t Suits and 
Overcoats 



Have we the two types here? The 
quitter is not that we do not know 
enough. We have a knowledge of 
what we ought to be, but we quit 
when we ought to get into the big 
game. 

''Dad'' then went on describing the 
various petty evils that exist in col- 
leges, such as gambling and swear- 
ing and in conclusion he said: 

"The other kind of quitter is the 
man who has his chance and does 
nothing. Because of this inactivity 
we are making the influence of col- 
leges harder today. People draw the 
conclusion that the big men in col- 
lege do not think much about relig- 
ion. Our college problem is becom- 
ing more and more complex along 
moral lines for this reason. If we 
wish to produce men who shall stand 
out as leaders in the nation we must 
have that kind of man in college. 
Therefore stand out and out for the 
things that are right and against the 
things that are wrong. Make your 
college such a college that you will 
always be proud of it." 



E. E. Fuller 'n passed the exam- 
inations necessary to holding the po- 
sition of city chemist, which position 
he is now filling. 

Get Your Picnic Supplies 

~" AT 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

Nothing Pleases Us More Than 
To Please College Students 

The Fred S. Tucker 

Furniture Co. 



MOTOR CYCLES 

Yale Emblem 

BICYCLES and Supplies 

Expert Repairing 

Colorado Springs Cycle 

Company 

DeWitt Doyle, Manager 
224 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Red 34 



Knight -Campbell's 

F0R PIANOS 

and PLAYER PIANOS 

STEINWAY and 20 OTHER MAKES 

We Rent Pianos 
Largest Stock Victor Talking Machines 

and Edison Phonographs 
226 N. Tejon St., after Sept. 15, 122 N. Tej.n 



The Gowdy-Sinmons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS 

Copper Plate and Steel Engravers 



Telephone 87 



21 N. Tejon Street 



TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing Typewriter. 

Zimmerman Supply 

Company gL5E£ 

Established 1890 






Ferguson Ormes is a new member 
of the Glee Club, having been chosen 
to take the place of Everett Jackson. 



2 



THE TIGER 



GOING TO BUY A KODAK FOR XMAS ? 




Don't go down town but stop in at 
THE MURRAY DRUG COMPANY 

And let us fit you out. It is to our interest to see that you ara 

pleased 



The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Associa ion 

116 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Give 
Special Attention to Accounts of Student 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, President Ira Harris, V-Presiden 

M. C. Gile Lilla B. Ensign C. E. Lyndc 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M 

THE OUT WEST 

TENT AND AWNING CO. 

RECLINING CHAIRS 
PORCHES ENCLOSED 

Tents Rented-for a Day or for Longer 



Stamping, Designing, R rf orating, Best HnrJ Pain 
China. Western Branch of Mexican Pigment Paints, 
Stenciling and Materials 
Art Needlework and Art Goods 

TH- HUNT AND VAN NICE 

ART SPECIALTY SHOPS 

Retail and Whole ale 
ke's Peak Aven e Phone Main 2055 



The "Little Jeff" Last Has the 

Style, Fit and Quality 

IN BLACK OR TAN 




Hi Whitaker-Kester 

Shoe Co. 
10 North Tejon Street 



Miss Cora Kampf spent the Thanks- 
giving holidays with Miss Margaret 
Sells of Denver. 

♦ ♦ 

Sylvester '11 is visiting at the Sigma 
Chi House. 

♦ + 

"Pat" Patterson has been sick for a 
few days. 

♦ ♦ 

Kampf, Emery, Wall and Appel took 
Thanksgiving dinner in Denver with 
Jack Cary. 

♦ + 

Charles and William Johnston, Canon 
City ; Cover, Rocky Ford ; Kramer, 
Last Animas, and Dennis, Loveland, 
spent Thanksgiving at home. 

♦ ♦ 

Dewitt Robinson and several friends 
motored to Denver last Wednesday, -to 
attend the game. 

♦ + 

Gerling and Gammon of Boulder 
were at the Delta Phi Theta House, 
Saturday. 

♦ ♦ 

LeClere '11 visited his brother, Wal- 
ter LeClere '13 last week. 

♦ ♦ 

Allan True of Denver University was 
a visitor at the College, Wednesday. 

♦ ♦ 

Burgess '10 was at the Delta Phi 
Theta House this week. 

♦ ♦ 

The Kinnikinnik will make its ap- 
pearance tomorrow. 

♦ ♦ 

Oliver Hall '14 has left College. 
He intends to enter the automobile 
business with his brother at Fort 
Collins. 

♦ ♦ 

Billy Winchell went to La Junta 
Monday in the itnerests of the Glee 
Club. 

♦ ♦ 

Mr. Stewart of Los Angeles visited 
his brother-in-law, Milton Kimball '15, 
last week. 



THE BEST AND MOST 
POPULAR 

Butter and 
Ice Cream 

IS 

MOWREY'S 

Phone 1184. 
15 E. Cache la Poudre. 



STOP AT 

LIGHTNING SHOE SHOP 

to get your shoes repaired. Shine 
free with every pair of soles 

Sewed Soles 75c. 28|< N. Tejon St. 



William P. Bonbright & Co 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St.. New Yorlt 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



STUDENTS! 

The 
Pearl Laundry Co. 

respectfully solicits your pat- 
ronage. We guarantee satis- 
factory work and service and 
give you 2Qi°/o discount. 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 



THE TIGER 



13 



THE BEST SHOES 

$2.50 No More, No Less 

M. Q. WEST'S 

Sample Shoe Store 

1 lO-l 12 E. Pike's Avenue, Up Stairs 

Rooms 16-17-18 Midland Block 
First Stairway East of Tucker's Cafe 

Yes, We Sell High Boots for $2.50 too 



Engraving 

Function Invitations 
Programs, Place Cards 
Etc., — Our Specialty. 

OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

HA YNER 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean- and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



2 S. Tejon St. 



Colorado Springs 



H. A. Parkison spent the holidays 
at his home in Glenwood Springs. 

Fred Copeland '11 took dinner at 
the Kappa Sigma house Sunday. 

♦ ♦ 

Ed. Smith of La Junta visited at 
the Kappa Sigma house, Saturday. 

♦ ♦ 

Maude Stanfield and Maude Wake- 
field spent the Thanksgiving holidays 
at Pueblo as the guests of Helen 
Graham. 

♦ ♦ 

Marguerite Stevenson ex-'i2 of 
Fort Morgan visited with College 
friends the past few days. 

♦ + 

Mr. Ela spent the week end in 
Longmont with Joe Witherow. 

♦ + 

Paul Eaton ex- '13 of Eaton, Colo- 
rado, visited about the campus last 
week. Eaton is now taking a course 
in animal husbandry at the Colorado 
State Agricultural College. 

Louis Deesz is rapidly recovering 
from the injuries he received in the 
Thanksgiving game and is able to 
be about and attend classes. 

♦ ♦ 

Ray C. Davidson ex-'it is now a 
senior at U. of C. 

•f ♦ 

The most complete line of candies 
in the city. Nobles. 



Visit Our Candy Shop 

You are invited to inspect 
our candy shop at any time. 
It is one of the most com- 
plete in the city. You will 
then see why our candies are 
so good. 

BURGESS 

Phone Eight Three 
12-114 North Tejon Street 



STUDENTS 

See me for your suits. 
Suits-to order at ready- 
made prices, $20 ar.d up. 
Discount to students. Get 
your next suit made to 
you. 

T. HOWLAND 

With Corrin, 320 N. Tejon St, 
Phone Main 2963 

Why Not Have that 

Party at 
JJRUIN^ INN 

Sewed Soles 75 cents 
Rubber Heels 35 cents 

AT 

PETE'S SHOE SHOP 

230 East Dale 

JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Students 
Over Waiting's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Stree 



The Prompt Printery Co. 

ASTER PRINTERS 



12 and 14 E. Kiowa St. Phone Main 536 






THE OLD STAND BY 

Anybody can make Ice Cream but it takes Mueth's to 
satisfy the College Students. Reference: D. Sisco 




Under New Management 



14 



THE TIGER 



Be Your Own Agent 

The management of the STAR LAUNDRY have 
decided to have no general agent at the College and to 
give agent's discount direct to the student sending in 
the bundle. 

Our drivers will sell you a $5.00 Coupon Book for $3.50, a dis- 
count of 30%, or you can pay in cash on the delivery of the bundle, 
taking out 30% for yourself. No bundles will.be left without money 
or coupons. 

Coupon- Books at this discount will be sold only to students and 
are not transferable and the coupon will not be received from other 
than students. 



Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co. 



Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton Dairy 



419 S. El Pa«o St. 



Phone Main 442 



Have You a Panitorium 
College Ticket? 

See Rhone College Agent, Hager- 
man Hall. 

30 Suits Sponged and Pressed For $5 

The checker tournament at Hagerman 
Hall is progressing slowly. No excep- 
tional "stars" have come to light. 
♦ ♦ 

The Ticknor girls had a spread Sat- 
urday evening in the parlor. A grate 
fire, popped corn and fudge were feat- 
ures of the evening. 



Templin ex-'14 spent Monday visiting 
on the campus. 

♦ ♦ 

Margaret Knutzen's sister visited her 
during the Thanksgiving holidays. 

♦ ♦ 

Laura Richey shared a box from home 
with the Ticknor Hall girls Thursday 
evening. 

■f ♦ 

Mildred Heidepriem gave a tea Friday 
evening with eats from a box from 
home. 

♦ + 

Roy Rose ex-'io paid a flying visit 
to the Alpha Tau Delta house last 
week. 

♦ ♦ 

Several members of Alpha Tau 
Delta had a little party at the 
Orpheum, in Denver, last Friday af- 
ternoon. 

♦ ♦ 

Watson, Mines Y. M. C. A. secre- 
tary, stopped at the Delta Phi Theta 
house a couple of days the first of 
the week. 

♦ ♦ 

The Y. W. C. A. Cabinet has chosen 
Florence Humphrey's chairman of the 
affiliated membership committee, which 
fills the office left vacant by the resig- 
nation of Lillian Picken. 

♦ ♦ 

Oliver Remington, University of Col- 
orado '10, now instructor in Cripple 
Creek High School, visited the Phi 
Gamma Delta House, Thanksgiving. 



CHILI 

Is Now Being Served at 

The College Inn 

Opposite the Campus 



TRY 

A 

SUPPER 



AT 



McRAE'S 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co. 
Groceries and 



Meats 



.*£!• 



•'/'ft 

top 




115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE HENRY L. DWINELL HARDWARE COMPANY 



TOOLS 



BUILDERS AND GENERAL HARDWARE 
We Appreciate the College Trade 



CUTLERY 



130 N. Tejon St. 



Peone Main 439 



THE TIGER 



15 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

New reversible coats for school 
and general wear — sizes 32-34- 
36-all new colors-$20, #22.50, 
#25 and $30. 

Women's and Misses garments 
2nd floor. 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

s the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 

I06' 2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone Main 700 



W.I.LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



91 N. Tejon 



Pbone Main 900 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heati g Co 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 



Artists Materials 

FRAMING 
College Posters 

The Richard Willis Art Studios 

4' i East Pike's Peak Avenue 



Xmas House 
Coatf and Robes 



Clearance of 
Good Clothes 



Leather Goods 
and Sets the Latest 



Adler-Rochester-Made and Gorton's Special. Twice a year, we 
make this clearence, every suit and overcoat in the house included in 
this sale. 

$40 and $35 Suits and Overcoats, #24 
%30 and $27.50 Suits and Overcoats, #19 
$22.50 and $20 Suits and Overcoats, #14 

WE MAKE BUT ONE CUT. 
Specialists in Good Clothes; and Nothing Else. 



ft f oney 

Cheerfully 

Refunded 




Correct Dress lor Men. \ 



113 E. 
Pike's Peak 
Ave 



Adaire Gee gave a house party for 
some of the Bemis freshmen at her 
home in Denver, during vacation. 

♦ ♦ 

Maliel Wilson led the Y. W. C. A. 
meeting this week. The subject was: 
"Girls: Their Faults and Ideals." 

♦ ♦ 

Reverend Munro, formerly of 
Grand Junction, is visiting his son 
this week. 

♦ -r 

Miss Cora Zelhoefer entertained in 
honor of Miss Edna Thorpe ex-'i2 
Tuesday evening. 

♦ + 

An extremely desirable Xmas gift, 
a one pound box of our assorted 
Glace Fruits. Nobles. 

4- -*- 

Guffy Arters ex-'n was up from 
Pueblo for a visit Thursday and Fri- 
day. 



H. A. Baer 'it, who has been in 
Alaska since he left College; saw the 
Tigers defeat the Ministers in Denver 
Thanksgiving. 



PEERLESS 
LUMP 

The most satisfacory coal on the market 

for furnace 

THE CENTRAL FUEL CO. 

Phone 578 128 N. Tejon 



Get Acquainted at 

The Red 
Cross Pharmacy 

HOT ORiNKS HOT TAMALAS 

HUDSON'S CHOCOLATES 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 

107 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone 40 



Candy Special 

Page 5 Gazette 
each week 

FH7D1VJ tea and 

J--T^IVl^l COFFEE Co. 
26 So. Tejon St. Phon 575 

Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff B 6 
118 North Tejon St. Phone Main 1701 

Res., 1211 N. Webtr St. Tel. Vain 95 




TOD POWELL 



Phone Main 930 



W. E. DONER 



POWELL-DONER SPORTING GOODS CO. 

1 1 2 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

"EVERYTHING FOR SPORTSMEN" 

New and Complete Stock of the Very Best of Athletic Supplies, College Pennants, Novelties Etc. 

"ASTHE MP1DICINE MAN" 






" 



16 



THE TIGER 






For Men— For Christmas. Bath and Lounging Robes, Smoking 

If you care to really and truly please them Jackets and Slippers, Hose, Handkerchiefs 

with a gift that's acceptable and new. and Suspenders, Bags, Suit Cases, or an um- 

Be sure and make your gift selection at ^ rella ' F " r Glov "\ Muffler or Collar Bag ' 

this men's store, with its Holiday array of Cravat, Cane or Belt. 

practical, useful things especially selected for Herein the splendor of their newness and 

men. most economically priced. 



(Pei«luM4-Slieai«er(s 



HAUGEN, Tailor 



222 N. Tejon. 



Phone Main 296 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



\ 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



Departments - 

College of Arts and 
Science, 
E. S. PARSONS, Dean 

School of Engineering, 
F. CAJORI, Dean 

School of Forestry, 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 

School of Music, 

E. D. HALE, Dean 



Xmas Presents for Men 



Are easily chosen if he is a smoker. We have good cigars from 50c a box up. Pipes from 25c 
up. The finest line of imported pipes are now ready for your inspection. The famous G. B D. 
firt time in America, excels them all. A few C. C inlaid pipes. We have everything that others 
have and then some. Let us help you pick his present 



13 



HUGHES 

N. TEJON STREET 



13 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



Vol. XIV 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., DECEMBER 14, 1911 



Number 14 



DICKEN'S LECTURE 
GREAT SUCCESS 



Son of Famous Novelist Delights a 

I arge Audience — Dean Parsons 

Reviews Lecture. 



With a few well-pointed introduc- 
tory remarks Dean Parsons presented 
Alfred Tennyson Dickens to the best 
filled house that greeted any lecturer 
in Perkins hall during the last year. 
The speaker met the applause with a 
request that the audience instead ap- 
plaud the "worthy Dean" who had 
made the introductory speech, stat- 
ing that he knew they wished to ex- 
press appreciation for the works of 
his father rather than anything he 
lr'mself had done for them. 

It was the wish of the son to de- 
pict the great novelist as the father, 
and as the lover of mankind. To this 
end he related a number of incidents 
of his own home life before leaving 
England at the age of twenty, at 
which time he saw his father for the 
last time. Dickens' desire to offend 
no one, not even "one of the least of 
these," appeared from the fact that 
to his dying day he answered every- 
one of the numerous letters received 
by him, in his own hand. His care in 
this direction was emphasized by the 
reading of a letter written by Dick- 
ens to a little boy, who had, in a 
letter, suggested what be done with 
the characters in a certain book 
which was at that time being writ- 
ten. The reading of this sympathet- 
ic letter was the most effective of any 
reading given by the lecturer during 
the evening. He also read "Child's 



Dream of a Star" and the "Death of 
Sidney Carton," the latter being from 
what he considered his father's great- 
est novel, "The Tale of Two Cities." 

\ letter written by Dickens to one 
of his other sons showed quite con- 
clusively that at heart he was sin- 
cerely religious and a real Christian. 
It spoke of the New Testament as 
the best Book that will ever be writ- 
ten and also emphasized the value of 
daily prayer and the truth and beauty 
of Christ. 

Like all geniuses, Dickens had his 
failings and his hobbies and his pe- 
culiarities and unlike some he was 
an untiring worker. He was very ab- 
sent minded and at one time took a 
waiter whom he met for a dignitary 
of the church. He had a dread of 
funerals and never attended them if 
he could avoid doing so. Among his 
hobbies was amateur dramatics and 
his "smallest theatre in the world" 
attracted no little attention. Dickens 
was an actor far above the mediocre 
and took most of the leading roles in 
these plays himself. 

As a worker he was systematic, 
taking time each day for recreation, 
but at the same time spending set 
hours at work and thus accomplish- 
ing a great deal. As a rule he had 
two novels under way, and at one 
time, in addition to this work, and 
that of taking personal care of all his 
correspondence he edited the Daily 
News. 

An injury to his foot in a railway 
accident was the indirect cause of his 
death, which came in 1870. His last 
words were those of an address dur- 
ing which he was seized by a fit and 
died within twenty-four hours with- 

Contitined on Page 5 



RANGERS BEGIN 

SHORT COURSE 



Ranger Course December 13, 1911- 
Feb. 21, 1912. 



The Colorado School of Forestry of- 
fers a course of ten weeks, to begin 
Wednesday, December 13, 1911, for 
rangers, guards, and others employed in 
forest work who desire to increase their 
efficiency, for those who wish to prepare 
for such work, and for cruisers, logging 
superintendents, timberland owners, and 
others who wish to acquire a knowledge 
of the general principles of Forestry. 

Instruction will be given by lectures, 
laboratory practice, and field demonstra- 
tion and practice, under the direction of 
the Faculty of the Colorado College 
School of Forestry, the Faculty of Colo- 
rado College, of which the School is a 
department, and the United States For- 
est Service. 

During the first three weeks the classes 
will meet in Palmer Hall at Colorado 
College in Colorado Springs ; the re- 
mainder of period will be spent at Man- 
itou Park, the School Forest. Manitou 
Park is reached by the Colorado Mid- 
land railway to Woodland Park, twenty 
miles, thence by stage seven miles. 
Manitou Park is in the mountains, about 
twenty-five miles northwest of Colorado 
Springs and at an altitude of about 7,500 
feet. It adjoins the Pike National For- 
est. The winters at Manitou Park, be- 
ing mild and open, are very favorable 
for field work. 

The expenses for the course will be as 
follows : 

Tuition $15.00 

Books, stationery, etc., about $5.00 

Continued on page 7 



THE TIGER 



THE DECEMBER KINNIKINNIK. 



Many a pleased chuckle lies waiting 
for the reader within the twenty -five 
pages of the December Kinnikinnik; 
and there is no serious falling off in 
interest at any point. One misses the 
added spice of variety, which some- 
thing in verse would have given; but 
with two pleasant articles of'the essay 
form and tales on very different 
themes, there is no ground for com- 
plaint. 

"The Vegetarian Coyote" is a good 
leader. The situation arouses curios- 
ity; and the climax, particularly, is a 
good little bit of writing. In matters 
of detail there are two blemishes that 
should not have escaped the editorial 
eye: "The barely unblind little coy- 
ote" is most ungraceful phrasing; and 
the final words of the tale are so 
faint an echo of II Cor., 4, 18, that 
only some of the sound and none of 
the sense of the original reaches us. 

"Dream Spirit" — whose author to 
conceal identity must choose another 
pen name — finds its best criticism in 
its own concluding words. It is a 
little incoherent, and occasionally 
choppy in style — more like a piece of 
patchwork than well-ordered thought. 
Even rambling thoughts should have 
a sequence of their own which is not 
fully realized here. The phrase, 
"dream spirit" too, seems not quite 
well chosen for either title or text. 
One doesn't know whether it means 
really "a mood" or some little elf 
that presides over dreams. But, all 
said, it is an interesting theme, one 
such as Crothers delights in, and if 
it fails to exemplify his light touch, 
the treatment is one by no means 
without its promise. 

"Ye Simple Caledonian" gives the 
critic little to cavil at. It is a good 
tale and the reader passes on hope- 
fully to "The Nemesis of a Thief." 
This also is a good tale — but the 
critics remarks savor of monotony. 
The question, however, is what "good 
tale" here means. It means that the 
author is "good" at telling "stories," 
— and this is a whopper; in fact, this 
new snake story puts the "fish story" 
to the blush. The latter must stand 
to its laurels; and still the wonder 
grows that Colorado College, espec- 
ially in the person of this writer, 
should harbor such an ungracious 
liar. However, if the thing is to be 
done, this modern Munchausen should 
have created a real climax by hatch- 
ing out the eggs inside the snake! 



Why not? It is easily possible. 

"Ditto Edith" is a fair college tale. 
The ind would be a- little better if 
that "excited bass voice" had been 
brought directly home to "milt" as 
accessory before the fact. 

"A Wind Storm" is one of the very 
best in this issue. Good vocabulary, 
good phrasing — and just the kind of 
disappointment in the issue that was 
needed for a good ending. 

"Rambling" is a very charming 
light essay whose effect is not ser- 
iously measured by a few little faults 
in detail. The beginning of "Manual 
and the Gray Lady" is much the best 
part of this story and is good. The 
two "sketches" are deficient in matter 
rather than treatment. 

ATHERTON NOYES. 



CALENDARS! CALENDARS! 



PREXY RETURNS HOME. 

The President returned from the 
East last Saturday and was greeted 
by the students in chapel Monday 
morning. 

He was at the annual meeting of 
the Carnegie Foundation, together 
with a number of other college presi- 
dents. President Lowell of Harvard 
University and he made addresses at 
the meeting of the New England 
Colorado College Alumni at Boston 
and he preached at Yassar college. 
A large amount of work was done for 
the College, the full results of which 
will be known later. 



"C'S' 



AWARDED— LYNCH MAN- 
AGER. 



At a meeting of the Athletic Board 
last Monday afternoon, the football 
"C's" for the year were awarded. Those 
who have won the honor are : Sinton, 
Vandemoer, Heald, Black, Hedblom. 
Witherow, Putnam, Thompson, Bowers, 
Floyd, Deesz, and Koch. 

The board decided to give sweaters to 
the scrubs and the freshman team, but 
the style of sweater was not chosen. 

The matter of the manager of football 
for next year was discussed and Tim 
Lynch was appointed to the position. 
Lynch needs no introduction to the stu- 
dents. He is a member of the Phi 
Gamma Delta fraternity and has had 
considerable managerial experience. He 
had charge of the barbecue of the class 
of 1913 and he is also manager of this 
year's Nugget. With Tim looking after 
the financial end we may be assured that 
the next football season — from a finan- 
cial point of view, at any rate — will be a 
success. 



The Colorado College calendars for 
J012 arrived last week and have .been 
placed on sale daily so that they 
may be obtained for use at the Xmas 
season. As was predicted, the calen- 
dar this year is the most artistic 
and pretentious the College has ever 
put out. Since the cost of producing 
the calendars has been so great it is 
necessary to place the price at 75 
cents, somewhat more than has been 
paid for the calendars heretofore. 
But e^/eii at this price the calendars 
arc welcomed with a sigh of relief 
by those who are casting about for a 
suitable Christmas present. 

The calendars are on sale in this 
city at the College office and at the 
Murray drug store. In Denver they 
may be obtained at the Denver Dry 
Goods Store and at the Herrick Book 
Store. The number of calendars that 
have been ordered is limited and so 
those who wish to obtain them will 
do well to apply early. 



APOLLONIAN INITIATION. 



Apollo wreaked wrath upon all men 
yet to run the gauntlet at a closed 
meeting held last Friday night. 
Those initiated were Black, Atwater, 
Lindstrom and Carson of '14 and 
Banfield, Thomas, Hopkins, Watson 
and Border. Robinson, Williams and 
Keener will be initiated sometime in 
the near future. 



PEARSON PRELIMINARIES. 



Pearsons Literary Society held its 
preliminaries last Friday evening and 
chose for its first team for the inter- 
society debate, Shaw, Bowers, and 
Emery. Fraker, Bob Hamilton, Ben 
Hamilton and Harder make up the 
second team. Apollonian Club holds 
its preliminaries tomorrow. 



GERMAN CLUB. 



The German Club entertained the 
members of the "Hochzeitreise" with 
a German supper at Ticknor Study 
last evening. The menu looked some- 
thing like this: Wienies and Leber- 
wurst, Pumpernickle and Swiss 
cheese, Kuchen and ginger ale. 



I.eo Lake has gone to Elbert, Colo., 
where he will take charge of the Y. 
M. C. A. and organize the Boy 
Scouts. 



THE TIGER 






ORGANIZATIONS 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 



AFOLLONIAN STAG BANQUET. 

The fourth annual stag banquet of 
the Apollonian Club given Tuesday 
evening at the Alta Vista proved to 
be by far the biggest and best yet 
held. Apollo devoured nine full sized 
courses and then sat back in. real 
comfort to listen to the extended 
toast list. W. W. Johnson did the 
toastmaster's duty and Black opened 
the program with an exposition of 
"Apollonian Fellowship," "May dif- 
ferences of opinion only cement it." 
Dr. Bushee borrowed a series of 
"views" from the future and presented 
them through the faculty stereoscope. 
They were comics for the most part 
but all of them were well worth while. 
S. J. Shelton dealt with debates and 
found there was much to be said on 
both sides. Heizer took care of "Our 
Near Friends, the Ladies," and was 
followed by H. Carin'gton, who re- 
sponded for the Alumni. W. C. 
Barnes spoke of the "Outlook," and 
told of Apollo's future. Gregg sprung 
some really new jokes and Hen 
Rhone's romantic speech, made "Apol- 
lo's New Home on Mt. Olympus," 
the new Ap club house, a reality. 
After Clark's "Reminiscenses," sing- 
ing kept the club into the wee small 
hours and they didn't "get home 'till 
morning." 



GLEE CLUB PLANS. 



Manager Bovvers has almost com- 
pleted the itinerary for the annual 
trip of the Glee Club. The first con- 
cert will be given on Thursday, De- 
cember 28, at Rocky Ford. The other 
concerts arranged up to date are as 
follows: La Junta. December 29; 
Trinidad, December 30; Walsenburg, 
January I; Monte Vista January 2; 
Alamosa. January 3; Leadville, Jan- 
uary 4; Canon City, January 5, and 
Buena Vista, January 6. Additional 
contracts are to be made later. 

Twenty-four men will make the 
trip this year, besides the manager 
and director. The men have been 
putting in a great deal of time in 
rehearsals and hope to make the trip 
this year the best ever. 



The Kappa Sigma, Delta Phi Theta 
and Sigma Chi fraternities will hold 
dances Saturday- night. 



MINERVA FUNCTION. 



The twentieth annual function of 
Minerva Literary Society was given 
at the Acacia hotel Saturday night. 

The guests were as follows: Presi- 
dent and .Mrs. Slocum, Dean and 
Mrs. Parsons, Dean and Mrs. Cajori, 
Dr. and Airs. Blackman, Messrs. 
Morse, Campbell, Cary, Seldomridge, 
Brunner, Appel, Hamilton, Thomp- 
son, Vandemoer, Bowers, Winans, 
Perry, E. Jackson, Strieby, Cajori, 
Jones. Summers, Allen, R. Hughes, 
Cowdery, Lynch, Hughes, Heald, 
Koch, McCreery, Donelan, Boyes, 
Winchell, Ware, Phillips, Smith. 

ALPHA TAU DANCE. 



A very enjoyable dance was given 
by Alpha Tau Delta last Friday night 
at the Plaza hotel. The hall was 
decorated in keeping with the Christ- 
mas season, and punch and cakes 
were served for refreshments. Those 
present were Miss Agnes Lennox, 
Willabel Lennox, Billington, True, 
Allen, Lucy Ferril, Connor, Randolph, 
Lillian Williams, Galligan, Bane, 
Shirley McKinnie, Schmidt, Ritter, 
Pierson, Haines, Metz, Stanfield and 
and Mr. Downs. Dr. James and his 
wife from Denver chaperoned. 



CONTEMPORARY. 



On Friday afternoon Contemporary 
held an open meeting for the new 
girls. After an interesting program 
in which Dorothy Stott read "The 
Sad Shepherd," by Henry Van Dycke, 
light refreshments were served and a 
social hour enjoyed. 



FRESHMAN PICNIC. 



The freshman class is making ar- 
rangements to have a picnic next Sat- 
urday. All those who intend to par- 
ticipate are asked to meet at the 
Busy Corner down town to take the 
Manitou car. The picnic will be held 
a half mile up the Cog road from 
Manitou. 



Carl Blackman '10, secretary of the 
Y. M. C. A. at Dayton, Ohio, has 
given up his work in that city, and 
returned to Colorado Springs, where 
he will remain indefinitely. 



Mr. Berryhill gives a pianoforte 
recital on Tuesday evening, the 19th. 
The students play every Tuesday af- 
ternoon at 4:30. Any College student 
who craves a bit of good music is 
very wejcome to drop in on any of 
these occasions. 

Following is the program for the 
206th recital which was given Tues- 
day evening by .Miss Vera McLaugh- 
lin, assisted by Mr. Berryhill, Miss 
Harlan and Miss Thomas. 
Handel- 
Rejoice Greatly (The Messiah) 
Miss McLaughlin 
Gluck— 

Che Faro (Orpheus) 

Miss McLaughlin 
Eeethoven — 

Theme and Variations (Op. 26) 
Mr. Berryhill 
Mozart — 

Das Veilchen 
Chaminade — 

Madrigal 

Summer 

Miss McLaughlin 
Schumann— 
Romanze 
Vision • 
Larghetto 
Elfe 

Mr. Berryhill 
Massenet — 

Elegie (With Violin Obligato) 
Denza — 

A May Morning 

Miss McLaughlin 
(Violin Obligato by Dean Hale.) 



PROFESSOR MOTTEN IS 
HONORED. 

Professor Motten of the English de- 
partment of the College has just received 
the notification of his election to the 
board of directors of the National Coun- 
cil of Teachers of English, and his ap- 
pointment as contributing editor for the 
state of Colorado to the National Eng- 
lish Journal. The board of directors of 
the council is composed of thirty men 
picked from the foremost English teach- 
ers of the country, and no state is al- 
lowed more than three representatives 
on the board. The president of the board 
is Prof. Fred M. Scott of the University 
of Michigan, and other officers are Prof. 
Harry K. Bassett of the University of 
Wisconsin and Prof. James F. Hossick 
of the University of Chicago. 






Babcock of D. U. is spending a few- 
days at the Delta Phi Theta house. 



THE TIGER 



RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 



Y. M. C. A. NOTES. 



A college education is supposed to 
have a broadening influence upon the 
student. The man in a higher insti- 
tution of learning is thrown into inti- 
mate contact with men of every creed 
and ideal. He exchanges opinions 
upon every conceivable subject, poli- 
tics, literature, science and sometimes 
religion. Youthful conceptions re- 
ceive sudden shocks in the class- 
rooms, doubts arise as to the truth 
of his home teachings, and the aver- 
age college man finds himself in a 
perilous brink .undecided as to wheth- 

189698 — El Paso Sheey Co. to 
er he ought to remain on the firm 
rock of his old convictions or throw 
himself off into the uncertainty of a 
new philosophy. While in this be- 
wilderment, he too frequently loses 
his balance and falls headlong into 
utter agnosticism. 

The college course is a period of 
expansion and readjustment. It is a 
time when a young fellow may form 
ideas which will develop into life 
standards, or when he may abandon 
everything sacred and lose himself in 
a maze of doubt or worse still, drown 
his perplexity in physical dissipation. 

In order to tide one over this un- 
certain time, and to help him selve 
these perplexing problems, the Young 
Men's Christian Association brings 
such men as "Dad'' Elliott to the 
College. Through public addresses 
and personal interviews an expert can 
face the college man's problems with 
him, and offer means of solution 
which he has found to be successful 
in hundreds of similar cases. 

When a series of meetings such as 
we have just passed through, are 
over, there is a need of a permanent 
agency through which the new de- 
cisions of men may be strengthened 
and vitallized. The discussion groups 
on the Bible and the great cause of 
world missions furnish this opportun- 
ity. 

Bible classes have been organized 
on Sunday mornings, Monday night 
and Tuesday and Thursday after- 
noons. 

Besides these classes Mr. Motten 
will begin a class on Monday after- 
noon at 5 o'clock on a study of the 
great problem of foreign missions. 



His text will be the recent book by 
John R. Mott called "The Decisive 
Hour of Christian Missions." 

All the men in College are urged 
to take advantage of these discussion 
groups and enroll in them. 



and He is oms. this is the .sweetness 
and the strength of life. 



BAYLEY SPEAKS ON PRAYER. 



Last Friday Dr. Bayley talked to 
the students on the subject of prayer. 
In part he spoke as follows: 

There is a notion of prayer that is 
a superficial one — that when a man is 
in trouble or wants anything he can 
come to God and get it. Prayer is 
the soul's intercourse with God. It 
is a sacred reciprocity. There is an 
open way between us and the Father 
and alrng it we go to Him and He 
comes to us. We might expect that 
God should tell us about Himself and 
his relation to us. He has done so 
through Jesus Christ. All the philos- 
ophy of prayer is placed in that one 
sentence of the Master's "Our Father 
who art in Heaven." 

If God is Father a filial attitude of 
obedience is owing to Him. The 
Lord's Prayer begins with the atti- 
tude of reverent submission. Through 
Jesus Christ we may know God as 
our Father. It is a sweet and fine 
thing to know Him through his rela- 
tionship if we cannot know the mys- 
tery of His divine personality. 

What does prayer include? Peti- 
tion? Yes, but petition is only a small 
part of this reciprocity. To ask Him 
for the nobler things of life is our 
privilege. How great and ennobling 
it is to the soul to come in gratitude 
to the Father. When there is deepest 
affection between two souls there is 
often absolute silence. How wonder- 
ful just to rest in His love with noth- 
ing to ask for and more and more to 
be thankful for; just to rest in the 
presence of God and open to Him 
one's soul. There will come times 
when one can jay, "I want nothing, 
God is my Father." 

To many it is appalling to look 
into the future. For a Christian it is 
one of the sweetest things to know 
that God is caring for his life. He 
will cause all things to work together 
so that we may be sure of the out- 
come of our lives if we yield them 
to Him. To know that we are His 



LAST SUNDAY'S VESPERS. 

Bishop Warren of Denver, who 
gave the address at the Vesper Service 
last Sunday, took his text from Zech. 
IV 6. "Not by might, nor by power, 
but by my Spirit saith Jehovah." 

At the times these words were 
spoken, he said, Jerusalem was deso- 
late, everything was ruined. In 606 
B. C. Nebuchadnezzar took Jeru- 
salem and gradually deported the in- 
habitants. Some of the exiled Jews 
were taken to Babylon and lived 
there seventy years until Cyrus gave 
them leave to return. They found, 
when they came back, their land in 
the hands of the Gentiles. For eight- 
een years ' they did nothing until 
Zechariah appeared. Then, through 
his inspiring words, part of which form 
our text, in three years a temple was 
built more glorious than the first. 

The course of history shows many 
such instances that can be accounted for 
only by the Spirit of God. Christ sent 
His disciples forth to found His church. 
Simple men, they had to meet the lion 
of Greek culture, the tiger of Roman 
ferocity, but they were finally to take 
possession of the earth — not by might, 
nor by power, but by the Spirit of the 
Lord. There are many instances of 
mighty victories gained in this way. Our 
nation has come to its present eminence 
by the Spirit of God. Without religion, 
American would have been an impossi- 
bility. 

This is all in accordance with our na- 
ture, for we are made subject to influ- 
ence. We are to be sensitive in mind, 
body and spirit, even to the influence of 
God. In order to come to the best re- 
lation with Him we need His gracious 
help. When St. Paul holds up an im- 
age of life so lofty that we know it is 
impossible to attain he says : , "Work it 
out, for it is God within you that 
wills." 

In regard to any of our great possibil- 
ities or powers we should say "Not by 
might nor by power, but by Thy Spirit. - ' 
Even in our mental realms we walk in 
obscurities and realms too great for us 
but Christ says "I will send you a Com- 
forter, and He shall guide you in all 
truth." Remember, there is a Spirit 
whose power is to lead you into truth. 



THE TIGER 



TENNIS TOURNAMENT. 



The tennis tournament has been 
progressing, if not rapidly, at least 
with interest, until this week, when 
Sunday's snow put a temporary stop 
to the proceedings. Of the 32 men 
who originally entered the tourna- 
ment, 25 have been eliminated. Ware 
and R. Jackson have run up to the 
semi-finals, the former taking his 
match from Wild easily in straight 
sets, and Jackson winning from Har- 
ter in straight love sets. For the 
other two members of the semi-final 
matches, Lewis looks good to meet 
R. Jackson while it is neck and neck 
between Wilkinson and Thomas as 
to which shall meet Ware. The semi- 
final matches are to be three sets out 
of five and should afford College ten- 
nis fans a rapid article of the game. 

Of all tournaments which have 
been held in Colorado College, the 
present one contains the most spec- 
tacular matches in the early and sup- 
posably interesting stages of the tour- 
nament. Eight of the sixteen matches 
in the first round went the full limit 
of three sets; and in most cases deuce 
sets were the order of the day. In 
the long match between Lynch and 
Carson, a total of 42 games was di- 
vided almost evenly between them in 
three deuce sets. In the second round 
Wilkinson, after dropping a love set 
to Carson to start with, came abek 
in the second and won out 11-9 in a 
hard contest. It is in such matches 
as this that one sees how little real 
advantage he who wins a match has 
over his opponent; for although Wil- 
kinson won out finally, of the 36 
games played, Carson annexed 19 to 
Wilkinson's 17. 

President Cajori of the Tennis As- 
sociation hopes to get the matches in 
the main tournament played off be- 
fore Christmas, and this, with the co- 
operation of those who still have 
matches to play should be pos- 
sible barring objections on the part of 
J. Pluvius. The consolation tourney 
will doubtless have to be left until 
after the Christmas holidays. 



PEARSONS' TEAM. 



The Pearsons representatives for 
the annual struggle have been chosen. 
They are Emery, Shaw and Bowers. 
They make an exceedingly promising 
team. Bowers and Shaw were on the 
winning team last year and Emery 
has had experience on high school 
debating: teams. 



DICKEN'S LECTURE 

Continued from page 1 

out ever regaining consciousness. 

In conclusion Mr. Dickens ex- 
pressed a desire to visit the College 
at some future date and he also ex- 
pressed his appreciation of the large 
audience. The indefatigable efforts 
of Professor Motteh made the lecture 
possible and the people of the Col- 
lege and of the city thank him 
heartily. 

At the request of the editor of The 
Tiger, Dean Parsons, the head of the 
English department, kindly consented 
to contribute his criticism of the lec- 
ture, which is as follows: 

Alfred Tennyson Dickens has come 
and gone and has left behind him 
varying opinions of the worth of his 
lecture. Some were deeply interested 
in it while others were apparently as 
deeply disinterested. 

The house was full, hardly a seat 
being unsold. All classes in the com- 
munity were represented, having 
been drawr together by interest in 
the works of the great novelist or by 
curiosity to see and hear his son, 
whatever he might say, or by both 
motives. The receipts were large 
enough to pay the lecturer's fee and 
i.eave a good sum in the hands of the 
linglish department with which to 
advance its work. 

Air. Dickens is not a trained speak- 
er, at least not according to our 
American standards. His voice is 
somewhat cramped, his gestures stiff 
and his general bearing lacking in 
grace. The chief fault with the lec- 
ture itself was that it did not give 
the audience enough of what they 
came especially to hear, the lecturer's 
personal reminiscences o-f his father. 
There were comparatively few of 
these. Many of the recollections 
were those of other men culled large- 
ly fro::i newspaper clippings and the 
letters which were read and had been 
previously published. Moreover the 
material which was presented lacked 
form and order. There was no skill- 
ful handling of it to leave a harmon- 
ious and vivid impression of the per- 
sonality which was the subject. The 
speaker, too, had little power as an 
elocutionist, and would have made a 
poor impresion with the selections he 
read had it not been for their in- 
herent power. There was perhaps 
also a little lack of the best taste in 
not leaving to others the care of his 
father's fame. 

But when all that can be said 
against the lecture has been said, it 



was full of interest. The subject it- 
self is one of perennial attractive- 
ness, the personality of the greatest 
of the nineteenth century novelists, 
who was first to really understand 
and depict the life of the poor, a 
most human man, full of oddities, 
with a great capacity for friendship. 
And while the recollections were not 
so numerous as they might have been 
nor so personal, they were most in- 
teresting and thoroughly enjoyed. 
The audience listened throughout the 
evening with an intensity which was 
a real tribute to the greatness of the 
theme and to its presentation. And 
some of the extracts from the pre- 
viously published material were more 
than worth repeating, notably the let- 
ter which Dickens wrote to his boy 
critic. 

The lecture was a notable event 
and it should stir a new interest in 
the novels of Charles Dickens, books 
which keep their place in the great 
literature of our tongue when the 
ephemeral stuff we are tempted to 
spend our time upon today is- utterly 
forgotten. 



PHI GAMMA DELTA CHRIST- 
MAS DANCE. 

The Christmas dance of the Phi 
Gamma Delta fraternity was given 
Friday night in the San Luis school. 
The hall was most artistically decor- 
ated with fraternity and Colorado 
College colors, and also the purple 
and white of Phi Gamma Delta com- 
bined with holiday evergreens and 
cherry blossoms. Purple mints, with 
the Greek letters "Phi Gamma Delta" 
upon them in white, were served with 
the punch. 

Dr. and Mrs. Wilber Fisk Martin 
and Air. and Mrs. J. Roy Armstrong 
chaperoned the party. The guests 
were the A'lisses Eva Fearis, Louise 
Kampf, Marian Yerkes, Lila Haines, 
Anne Baker, Hazlett Worthing, Lu- 
eile Wakefield, Virginia Gasson, Har- 
riet Ferril, Maurine Carley, Ruth 
Cunningham, Mary Walsh, Cora 
Kampf, Octavia Hall, Mable Jacob- 
son, Dorothy McCreery, Lillian 
Wright, Lorraine Williams, Irene Mit- 
ton. Marguerite Banta, Florence Oet- 
tiker, Vesta Tucker, Marian Fezer, 
Dorliska Crandall and Air. and Mrs. 
Fred Hill. 



APOLLONIAN CLUB. 



Program for December 15. 

Preliminaries for the Intersociety 
debate. Closed meeting. 



THE TIGER 



- ^ — ? CT~~J^ — * 

The Weekly Newspaper of Colorado College 

HARRY L. BLACK Editor-in-Chief 

RICHARD L. HUtiHES Business M«r. 

Leon C. Havens Assistant Editor 

A. H. Rowbotham Assistant Editor 

Arthur J. Allen Assistant Editor 

J. J. Sinton Athletic Editor 

D. H. mahan Engineering Editor 

G. S. COWDERY Forestry Editor 

Miss Glenn Stiles Alumni Editor 

Miss Mary Randolph Exchange Editor 

Miss Helen Rand Local Editor 

A. W. Donovan Local Editor 

H. A. Parkison Assistant Manager 

A. L. Golden A>sistant Manager 

Correspondents 

F. P. Storke, H. A. Bennett, Miss Lucy Ferrill 
Byron Winans, Rowe Rudolph, Edwin Crysler, 

Miss Elizabeth Gerould, Miss Leon a St u key, 

Miss Myrth King, Miss Violet Hopper, Miss 

Francis Adams, R. G, Appel 



Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to The Tiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo 

Phones: Editor, Main 2550. Manager, Main 2073 

Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



OLD FOOTBALL MAN WRITES. 

W. W. Cort '09, who is now study- 
ing at the University of Illinois, has 
written the following letter which 
gives the review of the football sea- 
son and a summary of the football 
situation in Colorado from the stand- 
point of an alumnus and a former 
member of the Tiger football team: 
Urbana, 111., Dec. 2, 191 1. 
To The Tiger: 

As I have followed the Tigers this 
year in defeat and victory a number 
of thoughts have come to me, and 
now that the season is so well ended 
by the victory over Denver Univers- 
ity, I will write them down. We can- 
not win all the time, and occasional 
defeat is necessary to make victory 
all the sweeter. I had the pleasure 
of playing in seventeen intercollegiate 
games for Colorado College. Ten of 
these were victories, one was a tie, 
and six were defeats. Victory was 
tine, but in the end I think some of 
the defeats meant more to me than 
the victories. „ 

In looking back over the past season 
I feel that Colorado College was rep- 
resented by a strong team and one of 
which we are all proud. Nothing but 
favorable comment was heard of the 



showing the team made against Wis- 
consin, and when last Saturday I 
watched Minnesota's team of giants 
defeat Illinois, and remembered that 
Wisconsin had outplayed that team, 
I did not wonder that Colorado Col- 
lege lost but that she did so well 
against such tremendous odds. The 
defeat by Boulder was hard but when 
two teams are so evenly matched it 
takes but little to turn the tide either 
way. To lose to such a team as 
Utah had this year was no disgrace 
especially after such a hard, fast 
game. There are other years com- 
ing and other chances at Boulder and 
Utah. 

Before 1 leave football, I want to 
say that we all should be proud of 
the way football has developed in 
the Rocky Mountain region. I have 
watched with much interest the foot- 
ball of this region. I believe that the 
team that represented C. C. this year 
was on a par with Purdue or North- 
western. When you compare the 
size and age of these schools you can 
see that C. C. has nothing to be 
ashamed of. Further the colleges of 
this region of the same size as Colo- 
rado College such as Knox or James 
Milliken would I believe have about 
the same chance against the Tigers as 
the University of Wyoming. 

I want to say something in criti- 
cism of the attitude toward the Uni- 
versity of Colorado. I played in 
three games against Boulder. Two 
were victories and the third was the 
famous defeat of '08 mentioned not 
long ago by The Tiger. There were 
siren whistles on the field and they 
blew while we were giving signals. 
Not these signals, but the spirit with 
which Boulder's team took advantage 
of some very raw mistakes,' defeated 
us. Now in spite of things I have 
heard to the contrary, there are some 
very decent people in the U. of C. 
In fact, I never played against cleaner 
or squarer teams. I always had the 
greatest respect for the men who 
play for Boulder and came to know 
a number of them as friends. The 
University of Colorado and Colorado 
College are natural rivals, but it cer- 
tainly ought to be the desire of both 
institutions to make the rivalry 
friendly. It is certainly to be desired 
that there should be nothing of bit- 
terness or hatred between two insti- 
tutions which have two such distinct 
places in the educational life of the 
Rocky Mountain region. Boulder has 
made mistakes in the past, but so has 
C. C, and who can say which have 



been the worst. Boulder has stains 
on her athletic record, but has Colo- 
rado College always had a spotless 
record? When we speak of the "dark 
ages in Boulder, ' we must remember 
that the standards of athletics at C. 

C. have not always been as high as 
under the present system. We resent 
criticism from Boulder, then why 
should we try to tell them what they 
ought to do? No one regrets more 
than I do that Boulder does not play 
Denver University, but will the criti- 
cal attitude of C. C. hasten the re- 
suming of these relations? Why 
should we cast a slur on the U of C. 
by suggesting that now is a good 
time to resume athletic relations with 

D. U. because they now have a good 
chance to win? 

In looking over the back numbers 
of The Tiger for this year, I find a 
number of articles in which com- 
ments are made concerning the policy 
of the U. of C. and its team which in 
my estimation gives students of that 
institution good cause for anger. An 
institution does not like to be told 
that the members of its team are all 
mediocre but their kickers. Does it 
make defeat any the less bitter to run 
down the opponents' team? Wouldn't 
it have been more dignified to state 
the facts and let the reader draw his 
own conclusions as to which team 
played the better game. I may be 
radical but I hope this opinion will 
be taken for what it is worth. It is 
my conviction that criticism of a 
neighboring institution has no place 
in a college paper, and I believe that 
it will be found to be entirely absent 
from the papers of the largest insti- 
tutions of this country. When the 
Silver and Gold publishes articles 
against Colorado College, let us ig- 
nore them. I feel sure that they will 
hurt Boulder more than they will C. 
C. Let us all work together, not to 
lessen the rivalry between the Uni- 
versity of Colorado and Colorado 
College, but to make it more friendly 
and to eliminate all bitterness. 

I want to say in closing that the 
more I see of other schools, the more 
proud I am to be a graduate of Colo- 
rado College. I hope that there will 
be space to publish this rather 
lengthy communication, because I 
believe that the opinions I have ex- 
pressed are shared by many who are 
watching the development of Colo- 
rado College with the greatest inter- 
est. 

Very sincerely yours, 

W. W. CORT, 



THE TIGER 



RANGER COURSE 

Continued from page 1 

Round-trip fare from Colorado 

Springs to Woodland Park $1.80 

Round-trip stage fare from Wood- 
land Park to Manitou Park.... $1.50 
Board and lodging in Colorado, 

Springs, per week $5 to $7 

Board at Manitou Park, per week, 

$4 to $5 

At Manitou Park, the students will 
room and board in the School buildings. 
Students are required to furnish their 
own blankets, bed linen and towels. 
There will be no charge for lodging; 
board, which will be on the cooperative 
plan, should not exceed $4 or $5 per 
week. The total expense for the ten 
weeks, after arrival in Colorado Springs 
will be $70 or $80. 

The course of studies for the Ranger 
Course is as follows : 

At Colorado Springs : 

Geology and Mineralogy. — Lectures 
and laboratory work. 

General Botany. — Lectures and labor- 
atory work. 

Meteorology and Weather Observa- 
tions. — Lectures and demonstrations by 
recorder of Colorado Springs Weather 
Bureau Station. 

Diseases of Trees. — The decay of tim- 
ber. Methods of preservative treatment. 
Lectures and laboratory work. 

Forest Entomology — Lectures and lab- 
oratory work. 

Dendrology. — Identification of import- 
ant trees and woods. Leci ..res and lab- 
oratory work. 

Timber Testing. — Lectures and dem- 
onstrations in the engineering laborator- 
ies of Colorado College. 

History of Forestry. — Lectures. 

Silviculture. — Life histories of forest 
trees. The improvement of the forest. 
Methods of cutting and thinning stands. 
Lectures. 

Under the direction of the Forest 
Service: 

Forest Law and Administration— Lec- 
tures. 

Grazing. — Range and live stock prob- 
lems. Lectures. 

Construction of Roads, Trails, Tele- 
phone Lines, Etc. — Lectures, supplement- 
ed by demonstrations at Manitou Park, 
under the direction of the School of 
Forestry. 

Forest Planting and Sewing. — Lec- 
tures. A day's trip to the Monument 
Nursery of the Forest Service, eighteen 
miles north of Colorado Springs by rail. 

Lectures on First Aid to the Injured 
will be given by a local physician. In- 
struction in English, the mathematics of 
surveying, mechanical drawing, and map 



making will be given in a few lectures 
and demonstrations to those who desire. 

At Manitou Park : 

Demonstrtaions and Field Practice — 

Surveying. — Use of instruments. 
Practical methods. 

Field Work in Silviculture. — Study 
and description of forest trees and stands. 
Marking trees for cutting. Methods of 
thinning. 

Forest Mensuration. — Log " scales, 
measurements of volume and growth of 
trees. 

Estimating and Mapping. — Sufficient 
time will be devoted to estimating to 
give students a practical knowledge of 
methods. 

Lumbering.— Methods of logging and 
nulling. The School conducts a lumber- 
ing operation on its Forest tract. 

Packing, Camping, Horseshoeing. 

All applicants must be at least 20 years 
old. Admission to the Course is with- 
out examination' or certificates.- All who 
desire to attend should notify the Direc- 
tor of the Colorado School of Forestry 
at their earliest convenience, and, if pos- 
sible, not later than December 9th, in 
order that all arrangements for taking 
care of the students may be made be- 
fore the opening of the course. 

Additonal information concerning the 
Ranger Course may be obtained on re-' 
quest. 

Address all communications to 

P. T. COOLIDGE, Director, 
Colorado School of Forestry, 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



APPOINTING CIVILIANS TO 

THE CORPS OF ARMY 

ENGINEERS. 



SKATER TAKES A BATH. 



Carl Moberg, for the past two sea- 
sons a member of the varsity base- 
ball team and the football, squad, is 
.seeking further renown in the line of' 
aquatic sports. Last Thursday, while 
skating at the Casino pond, Moberg 
located the position of an airhole by 
the accurate but r unpleasant method 
of plunging into it head foremost. As 
the water was eight or ten feet -deep, . 
the young man' position was more 
than a trifle dangerous. Fortunately 
his companion, Lester Harter,' was 
within c;. 11 , and hastened to thrust a 
pole into the hands of the involuntary 
bather. Several skaters came to the 
assistance of the pair, and Carl was 
pulled out of his unpleasant situation. 
At ], resent he is feeling wiser but no 
sadder for. his little exploit. 



Sheehan '13 is living at Hagerman 
Hall again. 



Last winter Congress passed an act 
which was signed by the President 
authorizing the commission of a cer- 
tain number of civilians each year to 
the engineering corps of the U. S. 
army. This act opens in a small way 
a new field for the young technical 
graduate, although the full effect will 
not be noticable perhaps for three or 
four years. These positions have 
heretofore been filled by appointment 
of honor graduates of West Point, 
and if is quite probable that the first 
appointments will favor the civilian 
attaches of the army engineers. 

The first examinations for the ap- 
pointments will be held January 12, 
1012, and since it is the first oppor- 
tunity of this kind it is probable that 
the interest taken will be extensive 
and wide-spread. Full particulars 
may be obtained from the war depart- 
ment by writing to the Adjutant Gen- 
eral for General Orders No. 139. 

Briefly the act is as follows: 

The appointments will be based on 
resiilts of examinations, both written 
and mental. To be eligible for the 
examinations the applicant must be a 
graduate of a technical school, un- 
married and between the ages of 21 
and 29. He must also show a certifi- 
cate of moral character and pass a 
physical examination. 

The eligibility for original appoint- 
ment as junior engineer (civil, me- 
chanical or electrical) under the en- 
gineering bureau of the war depart- 
ment is determined by the rules of 
the U. S. Civil Service Commission 
,and may be secured (1) by passing 
the examination prescribed by the 
Civil Service Commission, (2) by pro- 
motion in the engineering bureau of 
the war department, (3) by transfer 
to the bureau from some other 
service. 

Therefore to be eligible for the ex- 
amination a civilian engineer must 
first pass the examination of "junior 
engineer" and the department prom- 
ises to '"give all possible aid to anyone 
desiring to become eligible for the 
examination. 

The examinations cover a wide 
scope, equivalent to a 4-year engin- 
eering course. To pass, a mark of 
70 per cent, must be obtained in each 
subject of the written, and 80 per 
cent, in each subject in the mental 
examination. Preference will be given 



THE TIGER 



You're going home Christmas, and of course you'll want to remember "the folks at 
home" with some little gift. We have a complete stock of Mark Cross Leather Goods, also 
numerous little articles in Nickel and Brass, which will make useful gifts. 

Make your selection now, while you have a large assortment from which to make 
your selection'. 

1 GANO -DOmS* 

At Gano-Downs Corner. Tejon at Kiowa 



WE HAVE A SPECIAL PAINT 




1 




1 


1 


' ■ 





For Every Purpose 

75c Per Gallon up 

Same way with Wall Paper, Kalsomine, 
and in fact, Everything we Sell. Ask 
your neighbor, he knows. 

PAINT SUPPLY COMPANY 

Whloesale 113-115 E. Bijou St. Retail 






Hunt Up 

Bissell's Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 



COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

Pike's Peak Book & 



Stationery Co. 



27 S. Tejon St 
Phome Black 354 



Seldomrid^e Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



CALL 2000 

When You Want Anything QUICK! 
QUICK DELIVERY 

MAI . 2000 



COTRELL & LEONARD 

Albany, N. Y. 
Makers of 

CAPS & GOWNS 

To the American Colle.es from the 

Atlantic to the Pacific 

Class Contcacts a Specialty 

Deichmann & Douglas Floral 
Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER, Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 

Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Gazette Building 



THE TIGER 

to those securing the highest mark. 

The mental examinations will in- 
clude grammar, English, general his- 
tory, civics, French, German or Span- 
ish, common and international law, 
law of contracts, astronomy, descrip- 
tive geometry, topography, hydro- 
graphy, geology and mineralogy, 
theoretical and applied mechanics, 
chemistry, physics, containing sub- 
jects equivalent to physics given at 
Colorado College. 

It is also to the advantage of the 
candidate to have had at least one 
year of military training. Upon ac- 
ceptance of the candidate he will be 
appointed on probation for one year 
with the rank pay and allowance of 
a second lieutenant to a batallion of 
army engineers in the U. S. After 
one year he will again be examined 
and on passing the examination will 
be appointed to duty with the en- 
gineers, and ranked as full second 
lieutenant. 

The pay for a second lieutenant is 
$1700 per annum, plus an allowance 
for commutation of quarters. This 
pay is increased to $2000 for first 
lieutenant, $2400 for captain, $3000 
for major, $3500 for lieutenant colonel 
and $4,000 for colonel. These salaries 
are increased ten per cent, for every 
five years of active service, and ten 
pen cent, extra allowance made for 
service outside the United States, ex- 
cept in Hawaii and Porto Rico. 

EAGER HEART. 

The Dramatic Club will give Eager 
Heart Friday night in Cogswell 
Theater for the members of the fac- 
ulty and their wives. This is by far 
the most ambitious production of the 
Club. Miss Barclay and the cast have 
been hard at work for three weeks. 
Dean Hale has composed the music 
for the Angel Choir, the members of 
which are: Eleanor Thomas, Helen 
De Rusha, Alice Marsh, Louise Auld, 
Katherine Constant. Marian Yerkes, 
Gladys Christy and Vera McLaughlin. 

The cast for the play is as follows: 

Eager Heart Lucile Wakefield 

Eager Sense Lucy Ferril 

Eager Fame Etta Moore 

Joseph Maude Stanfield 




Manufacturers' 

Shoe Sale 

A lucky purchase enables 
us to offer you the most 
popular patterns in new fall 
patterns at a saving of 

25 to 40 per cent. 



^^^A Egjjgj EVERY roOT^-"" 




^ — "iOfSovrw T«jon frnw rr 






Why Not Have that Banquet 
at the 

ACACIA HOTEL 

OPPOSITE ACACIA PARK 
THE 

Crissey & Fowler 
Lumber Co. 

Phone 101 117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 



Telephone S99 



CUT FLOWERS 



Store 1 04 N. Tejon Street 

The Pike's Peak Floral Co. 

DECORATIONS AND DESIGNS 



THE TIGER 



Christmas gifts men are sure to appreciate— useful ones. You'll find them here in a 
wonderful variety. We'll show you bath robes and smoking jackets, in exclusive patterns; 
suit cases and bags, and other leather goods for traveling; umbrellas; jewelry; and haber- 



dashery in the newest effects. 



Better shop now, it will be to your advantage as well as to ours. 




For A Dollar 

Ydu can get numberless attractive 
Xrhas Gifts at this store. We 
mention: 

Stick Pins, Leather Goods 

and Sterling Silver 

Novelties 

The Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak 

■ 

l _i , 

The Davis Barber Shop 

Individual Sterilizing Cabinets 
Ray Davis, Manager 



Joslyn Press 

112 E. Cucharras St. 
Phone Main 1154 

Printers & 
Publishers 



ANY KIND OF PRINTING 
WE PRINT THE TIGER 



JOIN THE CITY Y. M. C. A. 

And get full privileges: 

Gym, Swimming - Pool, 

Game Room. 

Special work to build up the 

body. 



Alary Rofena Lewis 

i st King (power) Anne Carson 

2nd King (wisdom) Bess Knight 

3rd King (love) Helen Rand 

< >ld Alan Delphine Smidt 

Voung Man Netta Powell 

Shepherds ..Olive Brown, Etta Clark 
Prologue Florence Humphreys 



KAPPA SIGMA CELEBRATES 
FOUNDERS' DAY. 



The local chapter of the Kappa Sigma 
fraternity held a dinner at the Acacia 
hotel, Sunday afternoon, to celebrate the 
forty-second anniversary of the found- 
ing of the fraternity. Besides the mem- 
bers and pledges there were present a 
number of alumni, including Claire N. 
Phillips, Charles E. Holden, Montgom- 
ery, R. Smith, Wallis W. Piatt, E. 
Stanley Alden, Dr. G. I. Finlay, Dr. 
V. S. Richards, and Ed. Gwillim. 



FRENCH PLAY SELECTED. 



The French Club have decided to 
present two short comedies this 
year: "Les Precieuses Ridicules," by 
'Moliere; and "Son Etoile," by Scribe. 
The former is a famous satire of the 
sc venteenth century, and the latter 
is a modern farce. Both plays are 
short, but lively and witty. The 
French Club includes in its member- 
ship almost all the students of the 
various French classes and at the 
tryout fur places on the casts, which 
is to be held Tuesday afternoon at 
Palmer, there is sure to be some 
keen competition. 



NEXT SUNDAY'S VESPERS. 

Rev. Frank Hale Touret. rector of 
Grace Church, is to give the address 
at next Sunday's College Vespers. 
Mr. Touret is well known to the Col- 
li ge people, as he occupied the posi- 
tion of College treasurer for several 
\ i -ars. lie is an excellent speaker and 
well capable of interesting a College 
audience. 



BRE AD F ° r morn ' n g delivery. It', 
bread hot from the ovens 
baked from the choicest flour, and that 
would command first premium anywhere. 
That you get from us. Is always good. 

THE CHICAGO BAKERY 



Have the fellows meet you at 

Tucker's 
Restaurant 

110 East Pike's Peak Avenue 



The Hassell Iron Works 
Company 

Founders and Machinists 

You can always save money if 
you will come to see our line in 
diamonds, watches, jewelry, 
guns, sporting goods, fishing 
ackel drawing sets, musical 
instruments, trunks, valises, or 
if you want to loan money, you 
can get it 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 

Money Loaned on Valuables 



Have Your Clothes Cleaned, Pressed and 
Kept in First-Class Repair by 

"Sam" the Gentlemen's Valet 

Also Makes a Specialty of Serving Parties 
SAM FLEMING 



THE TIGER 



II 




EUROPEAN PLAN 



ALTA VISTA HOTEL 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 

Rates $1 and Up 

Popular price cafe with cuisine and table service that has no superior. First 
class garage adjoining. Special attention to banquets and private parties. 



Whitney & Grimwood 

Headquarters for Pennants, Pillows, Books, 
Art Goods, Framed Pictures, Etc. 

See us for your CHRISTMAS PRESENTS. 



Christmas 
Photos 

The Best Styles at 
Moderate Prices 

Sit for them now at 

Emery Studio 

Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 
Phone Main 41 

R. J. CORRIN 

Dry Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing 

and Remodeling for Ladies 

and Gentlemen 

Work by the Month 
Work Called for and Delivered 

Phone 2963 M 326 N. Tejon Stree 

You can save from 25 
percent to 40 percent 
on our finest Hart, 
Schaf f ner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer & 
Clothcraf t Suits and 
Overcoats 



A party of Alpha Taus and their 
lady friends enjoyed a tramp on 
Cheyenne Mountain one day last 
week. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

Miss .Nina Stewart ex-'i_|. spent the 
week end with College friends. 



Donald McCreery '08 came down 
to be present at the Minerva function. 



T. D. Riggs '08, who had a case 
before the Supreme Court in Denver 
last week, visited in the Springs Sun- 
day. 

Gleason Lake '08 has an appoint- 
ment in laboratory research work un- 
der Dr. Wells, dean of the Rush 
medical school of Chicago. During 
the summer .he will devote his entire 
time to his medical course. When he 
finishes he expects to have both his 
M. D. and Ph. D. 



Miss Mabel Lewis '08, who is with 
her mother in Denver, is very rapidly 
regaining her health. 

Arthur Harper '08 is taking a 
course in Oberin Seminary, New 
York. 



Get Your Picnic Supplies 

~*-~ at =z:' -. 



MOTOR CYCLES 

Yale Emblem 

BICYCLES and Supplies 

Expert Repairing 

Colorado Springs Cycle 

Company 

DeWitt Doyle, Manager 
224 N. Tejon St. Phone Red 34 

Knight - Campbell's 

F0R PIANOS 

and PLAYER PIANOS 

STEINWAY and 20 OTHER MAKES 

We Rent Pianos 

Largest Stock Victor Talking Machines 
and Edison Phonographs 

226 N. Tejon St., after Sept. 15, 122 N. Tej»n 

The Gcwdy-Si rmons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS 

Copper Plate and Steel Engravers 
Telephone 87 21 N. Tejon Street 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remington Visible be- 
fore Purchasing Typewriter. 



SOMMERS' MARKET Zimmerman Supply 



113 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 114 

Nothing Pleases Us More Than 
To Please College Students 

The Fred S. Tucker 

Furniture Co. 



Company 



22 E. Kiowa St. 
Phone Main 374 
Established 1890 

ad'' Elliot took dinner at the 
* Ipha Tau Delta house the other 
e \ ening. 



12 



THE TIGER 



CHRISTMAS SUGGESTIONS 

A kodak, a pennant, a pillow top, a box of College seal stationery, The Pike's Peak 
Nugget, College posters, Waterman fountain pens, perfumes, a subscription to The Saturday 
Evening Post, Ladies' Home Journal, or any magazine, toilet sets, brushes, etc., cigars 
pipes, and smokers' articles. 

THE MURRAY DRUG CO. 

Opposite Campus. 



The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Association 

116 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

Pays 4% Interest on Deposits and Give 
Special Attention to Accounts of Student 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, President Ira Harris, l r -Presiden 

M. C. Gile Lilla B. Ensign C. E. Lynde 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6:30 to 8:00 P. M 

THE OUT WEST 

TENT AND AWNING CO. 

RECLINING CHAIRS 
POR.HES ENCLOSED 

Tents Rented for a Day or for Longer 

Stamping, Designing, R rforating, Best Hand Painted 

China. Western Branch of Mexican Pigment Paints, 

Stenciling and Materials 

Art Needlework and Art Goods 

THI HUNT AND VAN NICE 

ART SPECIALTY SHOPS 

Retail and Wholesale 
8 Pike's Peak Avenue Phone Main 2055 




Cle ranee Sale of Fall and 
Winter Shoes at 

liii Whitaker-Kester 

Shoe Co. 
10 North Tejon Street 



Born, to Mr. and Mrs. George Cun- 
ningham of Loveland on December 2, 
a baby girl. MrsT Cunningham will 
be remembered as Miss Anna Lewis 
'io. 



Miss Mary Lake ex-'io was married 
September 6th, to Mr. Clyde Plank. 
They are living in Eureka, Kansas, 
where Mr. Plank is an instructor in 
the academy of that city. 



Earl Shields ex-'i4 is working in 
the First National Bank of Des 
Moines, Iowa. 



Miss Lola Bartleson '09 is an in- 
structor in the Cripple Creek High 
School. 

Miss Elizabeth Rowell '95 is tak- 
ing a year's work in Teachers' Col- 
lege, New York City. 



Miss Alice Bradford Bacon '96 was 
married on November 14th, to Mr. 
John M. Woolsey, a lawyer of New 
York City. 

Donald Tucker '06, who is in Will- 
iams College, is expected home for 
the holidays. 



Miss Edith McCreery ex-'oa has 
been visiting Mrs. Brooks (nee Nettie 
Major ex-'09) of La Junta. 



Mr. and Mrs. George Barnard will 
visit in the Springs this week end. 
Mrs. Barnard will be remembered as 
Miss Emma Riggs '09. 



Wylie Jameson '10 is taking a 
taking a course of study at the Uni- 
versity of Lausanne, Switzerland. 



H. H. Harootunian '09 was married 
recently and is now living in Van, 
Turkey-in-Asia, where he is engaged 
in teaching-. 



THE BEST AND MOST 
POPULAR 

Butter and 
Ice Cream 

IS 

MOWREY'S 

Phone 1184. 

15 E. Cache la Poudre. 



STOP AT 

LIGHTNING SHOE SHOP 

to get your shoes repaired. Shine 
free with every pair of soles 

Sewed Soles 75c. 28 )' z N. Tejon St. 



William P. Bonbright & Co 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



STUDENTS! 

The 
Pearl Laundry Co. 

respectfully solicits your pat- 
ronage. We guarantee satis- 
factory work and service and 
give you 20% discount. 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 



THE TIGER 



13 



THE BEST SHOES 

$2.50 No More, No Less 

M. Q. WEST'S 

Sample Shoe Store 

HO-112 E. Pike's Avenue, Up Stairs 

Rooms 16-17-18 Midland Block 
First Stairway East of Tucker's Cafe 

Yes, We Sell High Boots for $2.50 too 



Engraving 

Function Invitations 
Programs, PlaceCards 
Etc., — Our Specialty. 

OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. 
9-11 East Pike's Peak Avenue 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

HA YNER 

JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 
BOX 225 



COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are Always Clean and Up-to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 

2 S. Te.ion St. Colorado Springs 



The juniors of Ticknor had a 
spread Friday night in honor of the 
birthday of Katherine True. 
+ -f 
Helen Warren is suffering from a 
poisoned foot this week. 
+ ♦ 
Beatrice Drach enjoyed a visit from 
her father Saturday, 
■f *■ 
Statie Erickson enjoyed a visit 
from her father Sunday. 
f -t- 
Carrie Burger gave a spread in her 
room Monday night. 

♦ > 

Ruth Schlott entertained the girls 
of Montgomery Hall on Tuesday at 
supper. 

♦ ♦ 

Mr. Ray, Mr. Patterson, Mr. Franz 
and Mr. Watson were guests at the 
Alpha Tau Delta house for dinner 
last Wednesday night. 

♦ + 

At a meeting of Hagerman Hall 
fellows Monday night it was decided 
to have a "stunt" night before vaca- 
tion. Saturday night is the probable 
date. 

♦ ♦ 

The second number of the Alumni 
Monthly is to make its appearance 
this week. 

♦ ♦ 

Skirts cleaned and pressed, 50c. 
Phone Main 715. The Acacia. 



Visit Our Candy Shop 

You are invited to inspect 
our candy shop at any time. 
It is one of the most com- 
plete in the city. You will 
then see why our candies are 
so good. 

BURGESS 

Phone Eight Three 
12-114 North Tejon Street 



STUDENTS 

See me for your suits. 
Suits-to-order at ready- 
made prices, $20 and up. 
Discount to students. Get 
your next suit made to 
you. 

T. HOWLAND 

WtihCorrin, 3 20 N. Tejon St, 
Phone Main 2963 



Why 



Not Have that 
Party at 
B RUIN INN 

Sewed Soles 75 cents 
Rubber Heels 35 cents 

AT 

PETE'S SHOE SHOP 

230 East Dale 

JOHN MOFFAT 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

/ Do the Work of the College Student* 

Over Witling's Book Store 16 ^. Teion Stree 

The Prompt Printery Co. 

ASTER PRINTERS 



12 and 14 E. Kiowa St. 



Phone Main 536 



THE OLD STAND BY 

Anybody can make Ice Cream but it takes Mueth's to 

satisfy the College Students. Reference: D. Sisco ^^™ ^ 

Under New Management 



14 



THE TIGER 



Be Your Own Agent 

The management of the STAR LAUNDRY have 
decided to have no general agent at the College and to 
give agent's discount direct to the student sending in 
the bundle. 

Our drivers will sell you a $5.00 Coupon Book for $3.50, a dis- 
count of 30%, or you can pay in cash on the delivery of the bundle, 
taking out 30% for yourself No bundles will be left without money 
or coupons. 

Coupon- Books at this discount will be sold only to students and 
are not transferable and the coupon will not be received from other 
than si uterus. 



Everything in Jewelry 



FOUND AT 



Arculanus & to. 

Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton Dairy 



419 S. El Paso St. 



Phone Main 442 



Have You a Panitorium 
College Ticket? 

See Rhone College Agent, Hager- 
man Hall. 

30 Suits Sponged and Pressed For $5 

The checker tournament at Hagermau 
Hall is progressing slowly. No excep- 
tional "stars" have come to light. 
♦ ♦ 

The Ticknor girls had a spread Sat- 
urday evening in the parlor. A grate 
fire, popped corn and fudge were feat- 
ures of the evening. 



Sternberg '14 has moved into Hag- 
erraan Hall. 

♦ 4- 
Montgomery Smith, Claire Phillips 

and Wallis Piatt were down from 
Denver Saturday and Sunday to at- 
tend the Minerva function and the 
Kappa Sigma founders' day dinner. 

♦ ♦ 

Morse, Seldomridge and Winchell 
attended the district founders' day 
banquet of the Kappa Sigma frater- 
nity at Denver .Monday night. 

♦ -f 

\ party composed of Professor 
Mottcn. Raynolds, Crysler, James, 
Winchell, Seldomridge. Cotten. Thor- 
nell and Black had a very pleasant 
outing Sadurtay at "Wah-woop 
Podge." Prof. Motten's cabin on 
Cheyenne Mountain. 

♦ ♦ 

B. M. Woodbridge is a new rriem- 
bi r of Q. Q. 

♦ -r 

Fred McNea'l is a new Kappa 
Sigma pledge. 

♦ ♦ 

Dwight Mahan has eight entries at 
the poultry show which is being held 
at Temple Theatre this week. Last 
year Mahan took nine prizes with 
eight entries. 

♦ ♦ 

Hille, who is now in the pump man- 
ufacturing business, passed through 
n last week on a business trip to 
Kansas. 



CHILI 

» 

Is Now Being Served 

The College Inn 

Opposite the Campus 



TRY 

A 

SUPPER 



AT 



McRAE'S 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co. 
Groceries and 



leats 



.•••••« 






115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE HENRY L DWINELL HARDWARE COMPANY 



TOOLS 



BUILDERS AND GENERAL HARDWARE 
We Appreciate the College Trade 



CUTLERY 



130 N. Tejon St. 



Peone Main 439 



THE TIGER 



15 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

New reversible coats for school 
and general wear — sizes 32-34- 
36-alI new colors-$20, #22.50, 
525 and $30. 

Women's and Misses garments 
2nd floor. 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

8 the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 



I06 1 ;. E. Pike's Peak Ave. 



Phone Main 700 



W.I. LUCAS 

Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 

# 



191 N.Tejon 



Phone Main 900 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heating Co 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 

Artists Materials 

FRAMING 
College Posters 

The Richard Willis Art Studios 

4- L i East Pike's Peak Avenue 



The 

Christmas 
Store 
for Men. 



CHRISTMAS 
SUGGESTIONS 



The 

Christmas 

Store 

.for Men 



For the man. 

Smoking jackets and house robes, $4 to $12. Pajamas, 
slippers to match, $4, $5, $6. -Sweater coats, $3 to $7.50. 
Fur gloves, $3 to $10. Dress gloves, $1 to $2.50. bill book 
coin cases, $1 to $5; leather traveling sets, $1.50 to $7.50. 
Tie, sox and and handkerchief sets, $1 to $3.50. Pure silk 
sox and tie to match, $1 to $2. 



Money 

Cheerfully 

Refunded 




113 E. 

Pike's Peak 

Ave. 



Theodore Riggs, Chet Angel and 
Mr. Franklin were guests for dinner 
at the Phi Gamma Delta house Sun- 
day. 

♦ ♦ 

Donald McCreery '08 was a visitor 
at the College the first part of the 
week. 

♦ ♦ 

An extremely desirable Xmas gift, 
a one pound box of our assorted 
Glace Fruits. Nobles. 

The Apollonian Club held its an- 
nual initiation Friday night in the 
Club House. Those initiated were 
Watson, Banfield, Hopkins, Border, 
Claud Black, Atwater, Lindstrom, 
Carson. Thomas. 

W. J. Peterson, of Washington, D. 
C, special supervisor of schools in 
the Indian department, was in Colo- 
rado Springs Sunday visiting Miss 
Crandall. 

♦ + 

O. W. Hall ex-'i4 visited at the 
Kappa Sig house Saturday and Sun- 
day. 

PEERLESS 
LUMP 

The most satisfacory coal on the market 

for furnace 

THE CENTRAL FUEL CO. 

Phone 578 128 N. Tejon 



Get Acquainted at 

The Red 
Cross Pharmacy 

HOT DRiNKS HOT TAMALAS 
HUDSON'S CHOCOLATES 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 

107 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone 40 



Candy Special 

Page 5 Gazette ! 
each week 

r^¥70"M TEA A ND 

LJ JE-KXN COFFEE Co. 

26 So. Tejon St. Phon 575 



Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 



Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Bldg 
118 North Tejon St. Phone Main 1701 



Res., 1211 N. Weber St. Tel. Main 956 




TOD POWELL 



Phone Main 930 



W. E. DONER 



POWELL-DONER SPORTING GOODS CO; 



1 1 2 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 
♦EVERYTHING FOR SPORTSMEN" 









New and Complete Stock of the Very Best of Athletic Supplies, College Pennants, Novelties Etc. 

J : '. I I IV I 1 t II MAN" 



16 



THE TIGER 
ndf% \ '■''' 

Thp$*,ig Young Men's day at this store, every day is And you'll have a very large stock of them to choose 



for that : ;ynatter, but right now we've somefstiedial things from, a larger stock, in fact, than any other local store 
we want to direct to '$&j£zf young man's '■ attehji^fe ' & y, ■ can boast. 

Hereyyou will M^^yjh^ Suits an| ttreSoa^*^ $15 . 00 to $50 00 and exceptionally fine values at $20.00 



you've been' -looking for, the kind you've admired when 
others wore them, and wanted to own yourself. 



and $25.00. 



(Pei4uiJ4-Slie<ii«er(9 



HAUGEN, Tailor 



222 N. Tejon. 



Phone Main 296 



HHKg'TU— a 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



Departments 



c 


olleg 


e of Arts am 


, 




Science, 






E. 


S. PARSONS, 


Dean 


School 


of Engineering, 






F. CAJ0R1, 


Dean 


School 


of Forestry, 






W 


C. STURG1S, 


Dean 


School 


of Music, 








E. D. HALE, 


Dean 



REMEMBER 



What you want for HIM can be had: If not at Blank's surely at Hughes'. Cigars, all 
you want at 50c a box up. 

The Famous Gr. B. D. Imported Pipes are now sold exclusively by us. 

Case pipes at least 25 per cent, cheaper than others, seeing is convincing. Be sure and 
see our fine line before vou are sorry. 



13 



HUGHES 

N. TEJON STREET 



13 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



Vol. XIV 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., DECEMBER 21, 1911 



Number 15 



BOWERS 

CAPTAIN 



Scrappy All-Colorado Left-Tackle Is 

Chosen for Honor He Well 

Deserves. 

Glen A. Bowers, the fighting demon, 
was last Thursday elected captain of 
next year's football team. "Fat" is 
admirably fitted for an ideal captain. 
lie thoroughly understands the game, 
gives all he has, and is a constant en- 
couragement to his team mates be- 
cause of his constant flow of conver- 
sation. "Fat" was left end on the 
Colorado Springs high school team in 
the days when the Terrors were 
easily the champions of the state. 

Both the years he has played on 
the College eleven he has been picked 
as all state tackle. What he lacks in 
weight he makes up in grit and irre- 
sistible determination. His selection 
is popular with both players and stu- 
dents. That next year's team under 
Bower's leadership will fail to live 
up to the very best that is in it is 
inconceivable. 

Bowers is prominent in many stu- 
dent activities, a member of the junior 
class, junior member of the Tiger 
Board of Control, manager of the 
Glee Club, and for two years he has 
been chosen one of the debating team 
of Pearsons Literary Society. He is 
a member of the Sigma Chi fra- 
ternity. 



SUNDAY VESPERS. 

There will be no College vesper 
service for the next three Sundays. 
The vespers will be continued the 
first Sunday after Christmas. 



PANPAN |] "EAGER 

TONIGHT HEART" 



Enticing Program Arranged — Glee 
Clubs Sing — Speeches and Music — 
"Cox and Box" the Big Attraction. 



The Students' Commission met at 
Bemis Hall last Thursday evening to 
make the preliminary plans for the 
big Christmas panpan, which is to be 
held at Bemis Hall tonight. Presi- 
dent Sinton of the Associated Stu- 
dents appointed committees to ar- 
range for the program and the re- 
freshments. The committees have 
done their work efficiently and the 
student is promised tonight one of 
the best panpans the College has ever 
seen. In order to defray the expenses 
of the refreshments a small admis- 
sion fee of .fifteen cents will be col- 
lected at the door. 

The panpan is to begin at 7:45 
sharp. The students will gather in 
Cogswell theater where the doin's 
will be started by the singing of Col- 

Continued on page 2 

°I Ba i* fl $ Ba i a '$* a $ a, $ e *I aa $''i aa S°'i Bfl l* f $' a $ >< $ v 

* * 

* SUBSCRIPTIONS MUST * 

* BE PAID. * 

* _ •*. 

* Those who have not yet * 

* paid their Tiger subscriptions * 

* should remember to be ready * 
•J* to pay immediately after vaca- * 

* tion. If subscriptions are not + 

* paid by the end of the first * 

* semester, The Tiger will be * 

* discontinued. * 

* * 



Professor Woodbridge Contributes 

Review of Dramatic Club 

Production. 



Last Friday evening, in Cogswell The- 
atre, the Dramatic Club presented "Eager 
Heart," a Christmas mystery play. The 
cast was trained by Miss Barclay, and 
the incidental music was composed espe- 
cially for this production by Dean Hale. 
The cast was as follows : 

Eager Heart Lucile Wakefield 

Eager Fame Etta Moore 

Eager Sense Lucy Ferril 

First Shepherd Etta Clark 

Second Shepherd Alice Brown 

First King Anne Carson 

Second King Bessie Knight 

Third King Helen Rand 

Man Maude Stanfield 

Old Man Delphine Schmidt 

Young Man Netta Powell 

Mary Rofena Lewis 

Prologue Florence Humphreys 

The play is a modern one, suggested 
by the old English religious dramas; it 
borrows some features from Christmas 
miracle plays and some from the moral- 
ities. Though not especially dramatic, 
it gives opoprtunity for a series of beau- 
tiful tableaux, and it contains some 
graceful and imaginative verse. Both of 
these merits were admirably brought out 
in this presentation. The stage pictures 
were exceptionally well posed and ar- 
ranged. There was a marked improve- 
ment over the work of last year in the 
reading of the verse. All the cast spoke 
their lines well, giving the words their 
full sound-values and bringing out the 

Continued on P»je 4 



THE TIGER 



PANPAN TONIGHT 

Continued from page 1 

lege songs under the direction of yell- 
leader Winchell. The Girls' Glee 
Club and the Men's Glee Club will 
render a few numbers. Both of these 
organizations have been working on 
their repertoires for several weeks and 
will be in splendid trim to give the 
students a real musical treat. Another 
musical number will be that of the 
Seldomridge-MacMillan- Jackson or- 
chestra who will delight the audience 
with some high-brow rag-time that is 
said to be in a class all by itself. 
President Slocum and Professor Mot- 
ten have consented to furnish the 
more serious part of the program by 
giving the men and women of C. C. 
something to think about during va- 
cation. 

The concluding number of the pro- 
gram promises to be the stellar at- 
traction of the evening. Shaw and 
Butner will present for the first time 
before the whole student body their 
parlor farce entitled "Cox and Box." 
The play has been given once or 
twice before smaller gatherings of 
College men, and it is said to be 
fully as entertaining as Shaw's "trag- 
edy of lids" which was so successful 
last year. 

After the program in Cogswell re- 
freshments will be served upstairs 
and in the meantime the girls' annual 
doll show will be open and no one 
can fail to see it. 



CONFERENCE MEETING 
DEC. 28. 



CALENDARS FOR 1912. 



VACATION BEGINS. 



Tomorrow afternoon at five o'clock 
College dasses will be suspended for 
■the usual two weeks of Christmas 
holidays. Almost all of the out-of- 
town students who are able to do so 
will spend the vacation at home. 
Special rates of half fare for the 
round trip are being made at the 
local ticket offices. This rate is 
offered only to points in Colorado. 
Ticket sale for the special rate opens_ 
December 22 and 23, different days 
for different parts of the state. 



CALENDARS DISTRIBUTED. 



In accordance with the custom that 
has been in vogue here for several 
years, the College is sending out cal- 
endars to the various high schools of 
the state. The calendars are bound 
to make an excellent impression and 
the distribution of them will prove 
to be a great advertisement to the 
College. 



A meeting of the Athletic Confer- 
ence will be held in Denver Decem- 
ber 28. Several matters of import- 
ance are to come before the confer- 
ence at this time. First ,of course, is 
the arrangement of conference sched- 
ules for next fall. The schedule, how- 
ever, will be only a tentative one, 
and alterations may be made later 
until contracts are signed. It is un- 
derstood that chances for a game to 
be arranged between the University 
of Colorado and Denver University 
are very small. 

Another question which will prob- 
ably come up at this meeting is the 
matter of admitting the University of 
Wyoming to the conference. The 
Wyoming football teams have 
sufficiently demonstrated that they 
may be safely considered in the 
same class as Colorado teams, and 
inasmuch as they usually schedule 
games with most of the conference 
teams, there is much to be said in 
favor of their admission. 

Another question which may be 
considered is that of requiring repre- 
sentatives on Denver University 
teams to pass the requirements for 
a half year, instead of one semester. 
The year at D. U. is divided into 
three semesters, so that the require- 
ments for one semester are much less 
than for one semester in other col- 
leges, such as C. C. and the State 
University where two semesters con- 
stitute a college term. 



DEAN PARSONS AT FT. 
COLLINS. 



Dean Parsons spent the latter half 
of last week in Greeley and Ft. Col- 
lins. At Ft. Collins he attended the 
Boys' State conference of the Y. M. 
C. A. He spoke at the opening ban- 
quet on Friday night and gave one 
of the program addresses Saturday 
morning on "The Opportunities of 
Leadership." 



HALLS CLOSE FOR CHRISTMAS. 



The girls' halls will be closed dur- 
ing Christmas vacation this year 
in order that they can be thoroughly 
cleaned. Nearly all the girls are! 
planning to go home for the vaca- 
tion and the few that remain will be 
found accommodation at different 
houses in town. 



The new Colorado College calen- 
dars which were put on sale ten days 
ago are going fast, which goes to 
show that they are about the most 
popular things that have been put 
before the students for quite a while. 
Beyond a doubt the new calendar for 
the coming year is in every way the 
most artistic that has ever been put 
out by a college of our standing. In 
order to satisfy the anticipated de- 
mand an extra large supply was or- 
dered and they have been put on sale 
at a number of places both here in 
Colorado Springs and in Denver in 
order that they may be more easily 
obtained by those who wish them. 
In Colorado Springs they may be ob- 
tained at the following places: the 
Out West Printing and Stationery 
Company, Hardy's Book Store, Whit- 
ney and Grimwood's and the Murray 
Drug Store. In Denver the places of 
sale are Eaton, Crane & Pike Com- 
pany, Scott's Book Store, Herrick 
Book Store, Denver Dry Goods 
Store, Fisher Book Store, A. T. 
Lewis' and Daniels and Fisher's. In- 
asmuch as they represent the best 
souvenir of the College that is put 
out, the calendars are in great de- 
mand and those who are desirous of 
getting them should not be slow 
about it. 



CHRISTMAS CAROLS. 



Last Sunday morning the girls in 
the halls were especially impressed 
with the spirit of Christmas, when 
they were awakened by beautiful 
Christmas carols. Christmas hymns 
were sung in every hall by a double 
quartet. The girls who took part 
were Katherine Constant, Mary 
Walsh, Lucy Ferril, Marguerite 
Knutzen, Elizabeth Sutton, Eleanor 
Ball, Gladys, Christie and Orra Mad- 
dox. 



SONG CONTEST ENDS SOON. 



The contest which is being held for 
the purpose of securing music for the 
College song will end January 11. 
Several students are working on com- 
positions and the School of Music is 
also preparing a piece to be sub- 
mitted to the committee, and the con- 
test promises to bring forth very sub- 
stantial results. Those who are work- 
ing on compositions should remem- 
ber that the time expires January 11. 



THE TIGER 



ORGANIZATIONS 





GLEE CLUB PROGRAM. 

Last night the Glee Club re- 
hearsed for the last time before 
starting on its trip next Thursday 
morning. The first concert will be in 
La Junta and everything is ready for 
the "hit" the C. C. club is in the habit 
of making. 

Members of the club will be easily 
distinguished by the black and gold 
stocking caps which have been more 
or less prominent upon the campus 
the past two or three days. 

The concert program — one of ex- 
ceptional quality and variety — fol- 
lows: 

i. Invictus Huhn 

Glee Club. 

2. Selection of Popular Airs. 

Instrumental Trio. 

3. Schneider's Band Mundi 

The Quartets. 

4. Shaw. 

5. Cavalry Song Gains 

Glee Club. 

6. The Wind Barnby 

Glee Club. 

7. Stunt Shaw and Club 

8. Tenor Solos — - 

(a) Persian Serenade. 

(b) The Rani's Messenger. 
Dr. Vere Stiles Richards. 

9. Medley 

Quartet. 

10. Comrades in Arms Adam 

Glee Club. 



APOLLO CHOOSES TEAM. 

On last Friday evening the Apol- 
lonian Club picked Carson, Border 
and W. C. Barnes to represent it in 
the coming debate with Pearsons. 
Gregg, Bennett and Ogilbee compose 
the second team and they promise to 
give the members of the first team 
some good hard training. Apollo's 
team is entirely a new one and will 
come in for more or less "dark horse" 
work. Carson and Border are both 
fluent speakers, and Barnes has 
proved his ability as a clear and deep 
thinker, so that with two month's 
time for preparation before the de- 
bate these men should put up the 
real thing in the line of argument. 



PEARSON'S SELECTS 
ANNUAL PLAY 



FRENCH PLAY. 



Florence Pierson will spend part of the 
vacation with Gwendolin Hedgecock in 
Denver. 



Old English College Comedy Given 

This Year— Pit Scene 

Reproduced. 

The play selected by Pearsons So- 
ciety for presentation this year is 
"Gammer Gurton's Needle," one of 
the oldest of the English comedies. 
The authorship and exact date of the 
play are uncertain; it was published 
in I 57S, and there is reason for sup- 
posing that it was written as early 
as 1560. We know that it is a col- 
lege play and was first acted at 
Christ's College, Cambridge. Very 
probably it was written by William 
Stevenson, a master of arts of Christ's 
College. It is a vigorous, realistic 
farce depicting scenes from the life 
of an English village in the middle of 
the sixteenth century. It presents a 
variety of interesting characters in a 
rapid series of comic situations, 
the cast follows: 

Diccon, the Bedlam. Mr. Seldomridge 
Hodge, Gammer Gurton's servant 

Mr. J. J. Sinton 
Tib, Gammer Gurton's maid 

Mr. Bentley 

Gammer Gurton Mr. Shaw 

Cocke, Gammer Gurton's boy 

Mr. Morse 

Dame Chat Mr. Hedblom 

Dr. Rat, the Curate Mr. Bowers 

Master Baily Mr. Fraker 

Doll, Dame Chat's maid.. Mr. Wilson 
Scapethrift, Baily's servant 

Mr. Hamilton 

Pages Mr. Bowers, Mr. Emery 

The pit scene is produced every 
two years, the last time being two 
years ago. This year is will occupy 
about twenty minutes before the play 
and the time between the acts. It 
will consist of realistic scenes from 
the pit of the ancient theatres of 
England. Those taking part in the 
pit scene are: 
Leaders — Mr. Jeanne, Mr. Parkison, 

Mr. H. G. Sinton. 
Apple Girl — Mr. Sisco. 
Gingerbread Girl — Mr. Baker. 
Characters — Messrs. Golden, Morse, 
Cameron, Argo, Crysler, Foote, 
Grimsley, Harder, Munro, Hamil- 
ton, Clifford, Jackson. 



The French Club held its try-outs 
for the casts of the French plays 
when the following were chosen: 

Les Precieuses Ridicules — 

Gorgibus M. Ormes 

Madelon Mile. Sutton 

Cathos Mile. Akin 

Mascarille M. Rowbotham 

LeGrange M. W. Barnes 

DuCroisy M. Bentley 

Marotte Mile. Copeland 

Almanzor Mile MacReynolds 

Deux Laquais 

M. Storke and M. Nourse 

Son Etoile — 

M. Kerbennec M. Morse 

M. de Paimpol M. Perry 

Edouard D'Ancenis M. Dupertuis 

Hortense Mile. Powell 

Josseline Mile. Hanowitz 

Les Preciouses Ridicules is a short 
satirical comedy by Moliere. It is a 
satire on the preciosity movement 
which was in vogue in France dur- 
in gthe seventeenth century. The 
purpose of the movement was orig- 
inally for the refinement of the lan- 
guage but it later deteriorated into 
a foolish extravagance in speech and 
manners. Les Precieuses Ridicules 
is said to have dealt the cult its "coup 
de mort." Moliere, the writer of the 
comedy, is ranked with Shakespeare 
and Aeschylus as pre-eminent in dra- 
matic literature. This is the second 
time that a Moliere comedy has been 
produced in Colorado, the other oc- 
casion being the presentation of "Les 
Medicin Maigre Lui" by the club two 
years ago. 

"Son Etoile" is a short comedy 
written by Scribe, a well-known mod- 
ern French playwright. The plot in- 
volves the fortunes of a young man 
whose blind belief in his lucky star 
leads him through several amusing 
situations. 

The casts will commence work on 
the plays immediately after the vaca- 
tion. No definite date has been set 
for the presentation, but it is planned 
to give them early in the second 
semester. 



In England there are over 16,000 
regularly organized rugby clubs play- 
ing a schedule of games throughout 
the season. 



THE TIGER 



HAGERMAN HALL JOLLIFIES. 



The feeling of good fellowship 
among the fellows in the College dor- 
mitory which was so marked last 
year is again present this year. An 
evidence of. the fact that Hagerman 
Hall is no longer merely a scene of 
a continuous "rough-house" is found/ 
in the number of upperclassmen who 
are rooming at the "dorm" this year. 
The residents have been planning a 
series of social stunts which will aid 
considerably in developing this feel- 
ing of "esprit de corps." The first of 
these social events took place last 
Saturday night when the men of the 
Hall got together in the gym for a 
good time. An interesting program 
had been prepared by the committee 
and everyone was expected to take 
part. 

The first number was an original 
poem by Secretary Ware which made 
a big hit with the audience. No one 
would, at first sight, accuse our Y. 
M. C. A. secretary of being a poet 
but the occasion served to show us 
another side of his versatile charac- 
ter. After this murder of the Muse 
followed a series of contests in box- 
ing and wrestling which were en- 
thusiastically-applauded by the on- 
lookers, ending in a wildly exciting 
relay race in which Ware and Davis 
were the rival jockeys. The next 
event of interest was the "eats" which 
were served by the committee in the 
reading room. • While everyone was 
partaking of the sumptous refresh- 
ments provided, Bejach preached to 
the company in the good old camp 
meeting style. Then followed "Colo- 
rado" and other popular songs after 
the singing of which the gathering 
dispersed well pleased with the even- 
ing's entertainment. 

Several other stunts are being con- 
sidered by the men to take place in 
the near future. These stunts will 
be of an'unusual and interesting char- 
acter. 



Miss Katherine True, Miss Mary 
Walsh, Miss Virginia Gasson, Miss 
Lloraine Williams ,Miss Addie Hem- 

' en way. Miss Hattie: Clark, Miss Eliza- 
beth Sutton, Miss Mary Brecken- 
r'idge,' Miss' Gladys Christy, Miss 
II ilen Graham, -Miss Edna McRey- 

.' nokls', Miss Maude Stanfield, Miss 
, Hazel Allen, Miss Knutzen, Miss Sni- 

..• der. Miss Barclay, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles E. Holden, Professor Roger 
H. Motten, Mr. Ed. Gwillim, Mr. Ed- 
win Maynard and Mr. William Argo. 
The members of the fraternity who 
were present were Seldomridge, 
Black. Baker, Morse. Whipple, Thor- 
nell, Parkison, Deesz, Winchell, Her- 
ron, Koch, Cotten, Cajori, Raynolds, 
Alden, James, Crysler, Wild and Mc- 
Neal. 



KAPPA SIGMA DANCE. 

The Kappa Sigma fraternity held 
its Christmas dance Saturday even- 
ing at the Acacia hotel. The hall 
was tastily decorated with college 
pennants and emblems. Mrs. Cajori 
acted as chaperone. The guests who 
participated in the affair were Miss 
Florence Oettiker, Miss Charline Bill- 
ington, Miss Marian Haines, Miss 
Margaret Watson, Miss Nell Estill, 



DELTA PHI THETA CHRIST- 
MAS DANCE. 



Delta Phi Theta fraternity gave its 
Christmas dance at the Plaza Hotel 
last ■ Saturday evening. Walls and 
posts weer covered with wreaths of 
evergreen and kinnikinnik. Candles 
on the Christmas trees furnished 
light for the "Moonlight" and these 
same trees bore the toy drums, 
whistles and horns that were pre- 
sented to the ladies as favors. Jimmie 
Stevenson's orchestra furnished ex- 
ce : tionally fine music. Punch was 
served by way of refreshment. 

Guests of the fraternity were Dr. 
and Mrs. Howe, and the Misses. Lil- 
lian Williams, Yerkes, Miller, Wilson, 
Lois Smith, Eames, Lamb, Myrth 
King, Bateman, Fezer, Powell, Ham- 
ilton, DeRusha, Galpin, Townsend, 
Ormes, Sundquist, Remy, Gilpatrick, 
Borquin. Jean Smith, Rhone and the 
Messrs. Johnston, Sinton and Rhone. 



SIGMA CHI DANCE. 



The Sigma Chi fraternity gave its 
Christmas dance at the San Luis 
school Saturday night. The decora- 
tions of the hall were appropriate to 
the season. The guests of the fra- 
ternity were Mrs. Emery and Mr. 
Coolidge who chaperoned, the Misses 
Frantz, Cox, Banta, Connor, Kittle- 
man, Dierolf, Pierson, Janet Kampf, 
Ferguson, Alderson, Franklin, Bane, 
Cora Kampf, McCreery, Stott, Baker, 
Stevens, Randolph, Whittenberger, 
McConnell, Louise Kampf, Carley 
and Messrs. Wasley, Pettibone, Gala- 
ghei", Cohen, Hillc, Randolph and 
Butner, 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB. 

While not allowed to take any trips 
outside the city, the Girls' Glee Club is 
already at work on what promises to be 
an exceptionally good concert. In addi- 
tion to a large variety of songs there is 
to be an especially beautiful cantata. The 
concert will be given about the middle 
of the second semester. 

The officers are : 

President, Lucy Graves. 

Vice-Presidents, Ora Maddox, Carrie 
Burger. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Lucy Ferril. 

Members of the club are : 

First soprano, Mary Randolph, Lucy 
Graves, Lucy Ferril, Vera McLaughlin, 
Evelyn Norton, Miss Hemenway, Bessie 
Burgess. 

Second soprano, Ellen Galpin, Eleanor 
Ball, Virginia Gasson, Alice' Marsh. 
Mary Walsh, Gladys Christy. 

First alto, Elizabeth Sutton, Marian 
Yerkes, Leone Thacher, Miss Thomson, 
Miss Stuntz, Ora Maddox. 

Second alto, Miss Thomas, Miss Knut- 
zen, Mabel Wilson, Carrie Burger, Vio- 
let Fuller, Louise Auld, Leone Baxter. 

Miss Viola Paulus, the efficient in- 
structor of voice in fhe C. C. School of 
Music, is the leader this year. 



'EAGER HEART' 



Continued from page 1 

beauty of the rhythm. The gain in dig- 
nity and finish from this source alone was 
very great. In other respects also the 
production was strong and well balanced. 
The cast appeared to be letter-perfect in 
their lines ; their attitudes were for the 
most part graceful and easy; the stage 
business seemed natural and unostenta- 
tious. These things mean hard work 
and good training. . A play of. this sort 
cannot depend upon the brilliance of in- 
dividual actors ; it can succeed only if 
everything is subordinated to the gen- 
eral effect'. For its excellence in this 
respect the highest praise is due to Miss 
Barclay. 

The music composed by Dean Hale 
was thoroughly in keeping with the spirit 
of the play, and added greatly to its im- 
pressiveness. 

When the work of the whole cast was 
so good, it is hard to single out individ- 
uals for praise. Mention should be made 
however, of Miss Wakefield's "Eager 
Heart,' 'a graceful and sympathetic piece 
of acting in which the only flaw was a 
trace of self-consciousness; and of Mi ss 
Rand's "Third King," an unusually sin- 
cere and vivid impersonation. 

HOMER E. WOODBRTDGE. 



Lindstrom is a new menrber of the 
Apollonian Club. 



THE TIGER 



ALUMNI NOTES 



i, ISS FROSTS' BRIDGE PARTIES. 






Miss Hester Frost ex-'oy, of 118 E. 
Caramillo, was hostess Saturday,- the 
8th, at a most charming bridge party. 
An innovation much enjoyed by the 
guests was an invitation to the dining 
room for an early afternoon luncheon 
after which the card playing was re- 
sumed. Miss Frosts' mother, Mrs. 
Walter C. Frost, served the ice cream 
while Miss Scholz cut the cake. 

The alumni guests were Miss Jean- 
ette Scholz '03, Mrs. Aitken '07, Miss 
Ruie Aitken '08, Miss Florence Lati- 
mer ex-'o8, Miss Nell Estill ex-'o8, 
Miss Ernestine Parsons '08, Miss 
Lela Stark ex-'o8, Miss Ada Freeman 
'08, Miss Ethel Rice ex-'oo, Miss Vir- 
ginia Estill ex-'oa, Miss Mary Tucker 
C9, Miss Lina Brunner ex-'oo., Miss 
Avis Jones ex-'oo, Miss Vesta Tucker 
'11, Miss Addie Hemenway '11, and 
-Miss Alice McKinnie. 

Again Wednesday afternoon, Miss 
Frost gave a bridge party after a 
similar p. an. Alumni present were 
Aliss Ruie Aitken '08, Mrs. Frank 
Stillwell Moore '08, Mrs. Alva Hen- 
derson '07, Miss Mabel Bateman '07, 
Miss Edna Jacque*s '00, and Miss Ma- 
tilda McAllister '99. 



GOODALE '99 STUDIES MINING. 

Stephen L. Goodale '99 has been 
making a special study of safety de- 
vices in mining. An extensive article 
by him appearing in "Mines and Min- 
erals" for Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov., has 
attracted considerable attention in 
different parts of the country. Prof. 
Goodale is the author also of "Notes 
on Mining in Ned Foundland" in The 
Mexican Mining Journal for. Novem- 
ber — an article written after spending 
a summer in New Foundland. Mr. 
Goodale is professor of Metallurgy 
in the University of Pittsburgh. 



MINERVA ALUMNAE. 



The Minerva Alumnae Society of 
Colorado Springs met on Tuesday 
afternoon at 4:15 o'clock with Miss 
Avis Jones ex-'o9, of 625 N. Cascade 
Ave. Papers on "Ireland" by Miss 
Ruth Manning and "Excursion into 
Southern England" by Miss Ernestine 
Parsons '08 were read. 



C. C. SMOKER AT BOSTON. 



Prof. E. C. Hills entertained the 
Colorado College men who are in 
Boston at his rooms in Felton Hall 
on Saturday evening, December 2, at 
an informal smoker and the usual C. 
C. spirit prevailed. The men present 
were Carl Hedblom, Clarence Lieb, 
"Jack" Smillie, Leonard Van Stone 
and Harry Woodward from the Har- 
vard Medic School, "Jack" Maguire, 
L.eland Pollock, Robert Argo and 
Ernest Fowler of the Harvard Law 
School, Bruce Weirick and Buchanan 
from the Harvard graduate schools 
and Alden Root from the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology. It was 
a very enjoyable evening and after 
the men had drunk a toast to "Old 
C. C." they broke up for the evening 
by singing "Colorado." 



HYPATIA ALUMNAE. 



The Hypatia Alumnae of Colorado 
Spring's met with Miss Ruth Gilbert 
'07 on Saturday evening' for' a spread. 
Those present were Mrs. Richard 
Aitken '07, Mrs. Wheeler '07, Mrs. 
Henderson '07, Miss Vera Rodgers 
'07, Miss Mabel Bateman 07," Miss' 
Winifred Pease '07, Miss Ruth Bate- 
man '10, Mrs. Sanford (nee Florence 
Reed ex-'n) and Miss Lillian Duer 
'11. 



Miss Dorothy Frantz '11 is doing 
asistant work in the Cheyenne school. 

Bert Wasley '05 spent the week end 
in the Springs. 



Miss Ruth Bateman '11 is teaching 
in the High School at Castle Rock. 



Miss Gertrude Ashley 'n is sub- 
stituting in the Cripple Creek schools. 



Arthur Harper '08 is taking a 
course at Auburn Seminary, New 
York. 



Mis: 
her v. 

for ( 
Colk > 

Hi 
'04 \ 
Sigr 



y Breckenrid'. 
>me from ( •• 

tmas ho'.di 



I 100 1 

, for 



PUBLICATION ' NO: 5 &. 

The . C. C. Publication for Novem- 
ber, which was issued last week, con- 
tains Nos. 26, 27 and 28 of. the Language 
series, Volume '11. The first number of 
the three is a rather lengthy thesis 'by 
Benjamin Mather Woodbridge upon the 
subject of "The Supernatural in Haw- 
thorne and Poe," in which the writer 
plunges deep into the study of his au- 
thors, cites many passages in support of 
his remarks; and makes many compari- 
sons of them with other well-known au- 
thors. The other two numbers of the 
publication are by Homer E. Wood- 
bridge. One is entitled "Much Ado 
About Nothing" and Ben Jonson's "The 
Case is Altered," in which Mr. Wood- 
bridge makes a careful analysis of the 
two plays and compares them in support 
of his contention that Shakespeare had 
Johnson's play in mind when he wrote 
"Much Ado About Nothing." The other 
number is a note on "Henry V," and 
.points out the great similarity between 
Henry V's celebrated soliloquy on cere- 
mony and a passage in Montaigne's es- 
say, "Of the Inequality that is between 



COLORADO COLLEGE SCHOOL 
OF MUSIC. 



: rl 2 r\ c . 



A pianoforte recital, the 208th pro- 
gram of the Colorado College School 
of Music, will be given in Fine Arts 
Recital Hall on Friday, December 
-2. at 8 o'clock by Robert H. Berry- 
hill, assisted by Miss Vera McLaugh- 
lin, soprano, and Miss Eleanor 
Thomas, accompanist. 

The following is the program: 
Ludwig von Beethoven — 

Theme and Variations (Op. 26) 
Scherzo 

Marche Funebre 
Rondo 
.Weidig — 

"Slumber Song" 
Schubert — 

"Impatience" 
Schubert-Liszt — 

"Du bist die Ruh"' 

"Das Wandern" 

"Horeh, Horch, die Lerch'" 



r 

opin — 
I ' Fizi 

in ! -I 

d 



THE TIGER 



The Weekly Newspaper of Colorado College 

HARRY L. BLACK Editor-in-Chief 

RICHARD L. HUUHES Business Mrfr. 

Leon C. Havens Assistant Editor 

A. H. ROWBOTHAM Assistant Editor 

Arthur J. Allen Assistant Editor 

J. J. Sinton Athletic Editor 

D. H. mahan Engineering Editor 

G. S. Cowdery Forestry Editor 

Miss Glenn Stiles Alumni Editor 

miss Mary Randolph Exchange Editor 

Miss Helen Rand Local Editor 

A. W. Donovan Local Editor 

H. A. Parkison Assistant Manager 

A. L. Golden Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

F. P. Storke, H. A. Bennett, Miss Lucy Ferrill 
Byron Winans, Rowe Rudolph, Edwin Crysler, 

Miss Elizabeth Gerould, Miss Leona Stukey, 

Miss Myrth King, Miss Violet Hopper, Miss 

Francis Adams, R. G. Appel 



Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to 1 he Tiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phones: Editor, Main 2550. Manager, Main 2073 

Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



Hear Ye, Students! 

Just to get you in a good humor, 
we open this editorial by wishing you 
all a Merry Christmas and a Happy 
New Year. Now smile, and say 
"Thank you." 

We are all going home for vaca- 
tion, and once more we expect to 
spend the most enjoyable two weeks 
of the year at our homes. During 
this vacation there are a few things 
that we must keep in mind. We must 
remember that we are students of 
Colorado College, and that in our 
home towns wherever it may be, we 
are looked upon as representatives 
of our alma mater. 

We must remember that we have 
the interests of the institution at 
heart and that we, as students and 
representatives of Colorado College, 
are duty bound to do a little scien- 
tific boosting. Our faculty, curricu- 
lum, buildings, athletics, and student 
spirit are things that any body of stu- 
dents should be proud of, and when 
we go home for vacation we are 
going to tell people about them. 

A few days ago the editor read a 
letter from one of our alumni who is 
in Harvard this year, which said that 
for undergraduate work Colorado 
College is better in every respect than 



Harvard university. Even allowing 
for the prejudice that the writer may 
have had, is it not a big thing for 
one who is now a Harvard student 
'o say? 

We must bear in mind that the im- 
pressions we make upon the high 
school students at home reflect di- 
rectly upon our College. It is very 
easy to give false impressions and it 
is very easy to add to false impres- 
sions that already exist. It is easy 
for us to be more lax in our conduct 
at home than here at College. There- 
fore, in justice to ourselves and in 
justice to the institution which we 
represent, it will be well for us to 
conduct ourselves unusually circum- 
spectly while at home. Stealing ice 
cream and sign boards, and other acts 
such as burning Schneider halls, can- 
not be justified merely by the fact it 
is called a part of college life. So, 
if we have any College anecdotes to 
tell our high school friends, let us 
be careful in our selection. 

Now is the time to begin to boost 
for a bigger and better Colorado Col- 
lege for next year and there should 
be "No Quitters Allowed Here." 



THE PRESIDENT'S CHAPEL 
ADDRESS. 



"What have you to give that is worth 
giving?" was the subject of the last Fri- 
day morning address. 

This is the time when one thinks of 
gifts and above all of the gift that has 
come from God. Everyone is asking, 
"What can I give to my friends?" All 
our lives we have been receiving and 
giving things at Christmas. These things 
which we give and receive are beautiful 
just as they are tokens of our respect 
and our love for others. "Duty pres- 
ents" have no real value. Those are the 
things we pass on to some one else next 
year. 

There is something we can give which 
is better than any thing and that is our 
self, if it is worth giving. The law is 
that one gives just what he has to give. 
The things we give, if they are real gifts 
of value must be the token of what is in 
our hearts. 

The mean man gives his meanness. 
The kind person gives kindness. The 
irreverent man gives irreverence. Earn- 
estness comes from an earnest person. 
We cannot walk across the campus with- 
out giving some impression of what we 
are. In the end we are sure to give 
only that which is an outcome of our 
character. 

The best gift that ever came into the 



world is a brave, generous, large-minded 
man or woman. 

What are we giving from ourselves 
that is worth giving? We cannot play 
the hypocrite and make believe we are 
giving what we have not. The world 
will find us out. If we are true and 
direct, that will be known. Just what 
we are represents what we give. If we 
are honest and unselfish, people will 
know it. Let us not worry about our 
gift if we have within ourselves some- 
thing that is worth giving. If we have 
faith and courage, those who know us 
will receive from us that which keeps 
them from faltering and gives them faith. 

There is no place in the world where 
a person stands for just what he is more 
than in college. Again and again some 
humble-minded person who thinks ht 
counts for little or nothing is the very 
one who does most to uplift college life. 

The value of a noble life is beyond all 
human estimates. The harm of a false 
life no one but God can measure. What 
is passing out from our character into 
the life of this College? 

The world needs us at our very best. 
We are in college to prepare to give the 
largest, truest, bravest and most gener- 
ous soul to the world that can possibly 
be produced in us. 

Over against the vice, the falseness, the 
cowardice, the disloyalty, the cruelty, the 
selfishness of men and women we are to 
put ourselves, filled with all beauty and 
strength of character. This is the best 
gift we can possibly bring for Christmas 
and the New Year. 

He, who was God's gift, whose day of 
birth we celebrate with song and kindly 
words, gave himself to the world. It 
was the noblest self the world has ever 
known. The value of this gift is meas- 
ured only by the beauty and strength of 
his character. 

The value of our gift to the world 
v/ill be measured by our character. What 
have we to give that is worth giving? 



PRESIDENT TO PREACH AT 
AMHERST AND SMITH. 



President Slocum has been ap- 
pointed one of the "college preachers" 
next year both at Amherst and Smith 
colleges. He has for a number of 
years received similar appointments 
from Yale, Vassar, Wellesley and 
Mount Ho'yoke. 



Christmas spreads are popular this 
week at Bemis. 

♦ ♦ 

Addie Hemenway will leave for Cali- 
fornia, January IS. 



THE TIGER 



Y. M. C. A. NOTES 



COLLEGE MEN TO VISIT HIGH 
SCHOOL TOWNS. 

The College Christian Association 
will this year carry through an enter- 
prise which has never before been 
undertaken here. It will send out 
fifteen men during the coming holi- 
days into three of the towns of this 
state to perform social service for 
the young fellows of these places. 
The towns to be visited are Rocky 
Ford, Castle Rock and probably La- 
mar. Five men compose a team, and 
each team will spend six days in the 
town assigned to it. The towns will 
meet the expense of railroad fare 
and advertising for the visit of each 
team. The College men who go out 
will make it their business to come 
into personal contact with the high 
school boys and other young men in 
the town, by arranging "hikes," play- 
ing basketball with them, and calling 
upon them in their homes. In such 
association, the team members will 
have the opportunity of discussing lo- 
cal problems with the town fellows, 
and offer suggestions for their solu- 
tion. Meetings each evening ad- 
dressed by the College men, will pre- 
sent to the townspeople the claims of 
Christianity upon the individual and 
the community. 

The three teams to represent Colo- 
rado College in this work will be 
composed of the following men: 
Rocky Ford Team, Dec. 22-27, in- 
clusive — 

Winifred Barnes, leader; Walter 
Thomas, Kenneth Pierson, Charles 
Carson and Walter Barnes. 
Lamar Team, Dec. 26-Jan. 1, inclusive. 
F, W. Ware, leader; R. McLaugh- 
lin, Gerald Barnes, Ralph Ayer and 
Elbert Wade. 

Castle Rock Team, Jan. 2-7, inclusive. 
Abel J. Gregg, leader; Ernest Lind- 
strom, Everett Munro, Border and 
George Copeland. 



NEW MISSION CLASSES. 



Two new courses which have been 
started under the auspices of the 
Young Men's Christian Asociation, 
and which should prove popular 
among the students, are the course 
under Prof. Motten on "World-Wide 
Missions" on Wednesday afternoons 
at S o'clock, and President Slocum's 
Normal Training class at his home, 



for students who desire to learn the 
art of teaching Bible classes. 

Credit will be given for the course 
in Missions, and it is possible that 
those who take the course under Dr. 
Slocum will also receive credit for the 
work. 



LAST SUNDAY'S VESPERS. 



The Rev. F. H. Touret, Rector of 
Grace Church, gave the address at the 
College vesper service last Sunday. 
The subject of the sermon was "The 
King's Highway," and it was based 
on the text, "Prepare ye the way of 
the Lord; make straight in the desert 
a highway for our God." Mr. Touret 
spoke, in part, as follows: 

This sentence has a profound mean- 
ing. It was an old sermon when 
John the Baptist came; it had been 
preached before to an exiled people. 
It was a constructive sermon, a call 
to action. When it was first preached 
the Jews were an exiled nation, hun- 
dreds of miles from home. A mas- 
ter mind arose telling the people to 
take courage; that a new Jerusalem 
would rise out of the ashes of the 
old. 

This is the first glimpse we get of 
the idea of the Kingdom of God. 
This ideal has not yet been realized. 
It seems strange to us that the way 
of the Lord has not yet been pre- 
pared. Why is it? Perhaps there 
are two great reasons. First, we have 
tried to construct the road out of the 
wrong material. Secondly, we are 
not disturbed that the Kingdom is so 
slow in coming. It was once thought 
that the highway of the King could 
be built from a perfect church. Then 
it was thought that a perfect book, 
the Bible, would do it. The perfect 
church and the perfect book has not 
built it; nor has the perfect man. 
In looking for the perfect man to do 
this work we have been in error, we 
have yet to learn the glory of the 
imperfect. Wherever there is a de- 
sire to serve there is material for 
work on the King's highway. We are 
all needed to help, in the building of 
this highway. Cur work in life is 
essentially that of building. Life is 
necessarily constructive. We must 
learn to seek not the lives that are 
perfect but those that are serviceable. 
It is no easy task — this building — -but 
it is our job if we are Christians. We 



too often do not care. We are stop- 
1 ing progress when by our indiffer- 
ence we refuse to help the King. 

Men who follow Christ share with 
Him the redemptive work of human- 
ity. What Jacob Riis has been doing 
for New York, what Booker Wash- 
ington has been doing for the negro, 
must be done by some great prophet 
for the industrial life and for the 
home life of America. We want the 
man in office to be more brotherly 
and the man in the shop to be less 
cynical. Who shall say but that some 
of you men shall be the men that 
shall bring order out of the industrial 
chaos. In the social world the ideals 
of the young men and women alone 
will solve the social evil. We must 
kindle in the hearts of our young men 
and women an ideal of social purity 
for Christ and the Church always 
stand for social purity. 

We cannot prepare the way of the 
Lord if we wait for the perfect men. 
I dare to hope that you are going to 
make your lives count in the prepar- 
ing of the King's highway. Forget 
about your pay envelope and think of 
your work as builders. Begin where 
Jesus began and hope to end where 
He ended. We, too, can be in part- 
nership with God; we can share in 
His redemptive work even as Jesus 
did. He has gone on ahead to blaze 
'the trail. How it should make us 
.Uad t .) be interpreters of His life 
in terms of service. May God make 
us worth} of such a high privilege. 



PRIZE ESSAYS. 

The committee to whom was assigned 
the decision upon the merits of the papers 
contesting for the prizes offered by 
Messrs. Hart Schaffner & Marx, of Chi- 
cago, for 1911, has unanimously agreed 
upon the following award : 

Class A. 1. The First Prize of One 
Thousand Dollars to Harold G. Moulton, 
Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1907; In- 
structor of Political Economy in Uni- 
versity of Chicago; for a paper entitled 
"Waterways versus Railways." 2. The 
Second Prize of Five Hundred Dollars 
to Harrison H. Brace, 265 LaSalle St., 
Chicago, L.L.B., Union College of Law, 
1887; L.L.M., University of Pennsylva- 
nia, 1890; for a paper entitled "Value of 
Organized Speculation." 3. Honorable 
Mention, to DeWitt C. Poole, Jr., State 
Department, Washington, D. C. ; for a 
paper entitled "Is the American Cotton 
Monopoly Secure?" 



S. N. Seeyle has left for his home in 
Salt Lake City. 




THE TIGER 

Have you a Sweater Coat? They sure are a good protector against 
the cold. 

All wool Sweater Coats in grey, red, blue and brown. Grey coats 
with colored edging; Dr. Jaeger's Sanitary Woolen Sweater Coats; 
heavy Coats with roll neck. 

We carry a large assortment of English Knit Jackets and Vests. 



GANO-DOmS'iir 



At Gano-Downs Corner. 



Tejon at Kiowa 



WE HAVE A SPECIAL PAINT 




For Every Purpose 

75c Per Gallon up 

Same way with Wall Paper, Kalsomine, 
and in fact, Everything we Sell. Ask 
your neighbor, he knows. 

PAINT SUPPLY COMPANY 

Whloesale 1 1 3- 1 1 5 E. Bijou St. Retail 



THE TIGER 



Hunt Up 

Bissell's Pharmacy 

When You Want 
Drugs, Cigars or Stationery 

Cor. Dale and Weber Colorado Springs 

COLLEGE SUPPLIES 

Pike's Peak Book & 



Stationery Co. 



27 S. Tejon St 
Phome Black 354 



Seldomridtge Grain Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 S. Tejon Street 



CALL 2000 

When You Want Anything QUICK! 
QUICK DELIVERY 



MAI . 2000 



COTRELL & LEONARD 

Albany, N. Y. 
Makers of 

CAPS & GOWNS 

To the American Colleges from the 

Atlantic to the Pacific 

Class Contcacts a, Specialty 

Deichmann & Douglas Floral 
Company 

CARL H. HAGEMEYER. Mgr. 

Choice Cut Flowers and Plants 

Decorations a Specialty 

Students' Trade Solicited 

111 N. Tejon St. Telephone 1593 

Wills, Spackman & Kent 

Real Estate, Mortgages 
and Insurance 

Gazette Building 



Class B. 1. The First Prize of Three 
Hundred Dollars to Homer B. Vander- 
hlue, undergraduate in Northwestern 
University, for a paper entitled "Railroad 
Valuation.' No Second Prize was 
awarded. 

In deciding upon the relative merits of 
the papers, the committee is not respon- 
sible for the concrete opinions expressed 
by the contestants. 

J. Laurence Laughlin, 
J. B. Clark, 
Henry C. Adams, 
Horace White, 
Edwin F. Gay. 
Chicago, December 6, 1911. 



ENGINEERS 



ENGINEERS PREPARE FOR 
LADIES' NIGHT. 



The members of the Engineers' 
Club are already making their ar- 
rangements for their annual ladies' 
night which is to be held January 
12th, the Friday night after vacation. 
The event will take place in the 
rooms of the Polytechnic Society in 
the basement of Coburn library. 
Unique stunts in the way of decora- 
tions, program numbers and refresh- 
ments will be features of the evening. 

SHOP WORK. 



The tendency to increase the prac- 
tical value of the shop work in en- 
gineering courses has gradually been 
developing and this year Mr. Ar- 
buckle has seemingly reached a maxi- 

OH ! YOU VACATION 

How about those trunks you 
are going to have filled Xmas 
eve. Let the 

Pike's Peak Trunk 
and Storage Co. 

haul them for you. 

12 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 
Phones Main 160 and 230 




Manufacturers' 

Shoe Sale 

A lucky purchase enables 
us to offer you the most 
popular patterns in new fall 
patterns at a saving of 

25 to 40 per cent. 



^A FIT FOft EVERY FOOTS^" 




Why Not Have that Banquet 
at the 

ACACIA HOTEL 

OPPOSITE ACACIA PARK 
THE 

Crissey & Fowler 
Lumber Co. 



Phone 101 



117-123 W. Vermijo Ave. 



Telephone 599 

The Pike's 



CUT FLOWERS 



Store 1 04 N. Tejon Street 

Floral Co. 

DECORATIONS AND DESIGNS 



THE TIGER 



Christmas gifts men are sure to appreciate — useful ones. You'll find them here in a 
wonderful variety. We'll show you bath robes and smoking jackets, in> exclusive patterns; 
suit cases and bags, and other leather goods for traveling; umbrellas; jewelry; and haber- 
dashery in the newest effects. 

Better shop now, it will be to your advantage as well as to ours. 



THEiHUB 



For A Dollar 

You can get numberless attractive 
Xmas Gifts at this store. We 
mention: 

Stick Pins, Leather goods 

and Sterling Silver 

Novelties 

The Johnson Jewelry Co. 

26 E. Pike's Peak 

The Davis Barber Shop 

Individual Sterilizing Cabinets 
Ray Davis, Manager 



Joslyn Press 

112 E. Cucharras St. 
Phone Main 1154 

Printers & 
Publishers 



ANY KIND OF PRINTING 
WE PRINT THE TIGER 



JOIN THE CITY Y. M. C. A. 

And get full privileges: 

Gym, Swimming Pool, 

Game Room. 

Special work to build up the 

body. 



mum. Not more than three years 
ago the largest model made was 
about four feet long, or on a scale of 
about one inch to a foot; last year 
some models were eight feet long; 
and this year two of them are thirty 
feet long. Mr. Arbuckle secured a 
blue print of a 90 foot through truss 
highway bridge and had each of his 
classes construct one on a scale of 
four inches to a foot. The classes 
were very enthusiastic over the work 
and say that they obtained a large 
amount of practical working knowl- 
edge. 

The two bridges, one complete, the 
other rapidly nearing completion, are 
ready for inspection. They are tem- 
porarily on wooden piers between the 
wood working shop and the gym- 
nasium. 



OCTOBER PUBLICATION. 

In the Colorado College Publica- 
tion dated October, 191 1, there are 
two articles of no little interest to 
the engineering students of the Col- 
lege. The first article is an abstract 
by Prof. Thomas from theses pre- 
sented last year by the graduating en- 
gineers of 191 1. 

The consideration of the electrifi- 
cation of the Basalt division of the 
C. M. Ry. was one of great import- 
ance. The retention of smoke in the 
long tunnels, especially the Busk 
Ivanhoe, was a constant source of 
danger and annoyance; and overcom- 
ing this alone would be worth a great 
deal to the railway.. 

The work was handled with all pos- 
sible precision. Surveys were made, 
dam sites located, stream discharges 
computed, and cost of electrification 
tabulated in detail. 

It is worth much to read this article 
and get some idea of the proper 
method of preparing a report on a 
project of this size and importance! 
,The second article is by W. A. Bart- 
lett (1911) on the "Summation 
Hydrograph." He explains the use 



BREAD For morning delivery. It', 
bread hot from the ovens 
baked from the choicest flour, and that 
would command first premium anywhere.' 
That you get from us. Is always gopd'.V. 

THE CHICAGO BAKERY 

Have the fellows meet you at 

Tucker's 
Restaurant 

110 East Pike's Peak Avenue, 

The Hassell Iron Works? 
Company 



„._> -»., & 



Founders and Machinists 

You can always save money if 
you will come to see our line in 
diamonds, watches, jewelry, 
guns, sporting goods, fishing 
i-jfcti Jra« i] sets, musical 
i nstruments, trunks, valises, or 
if you want to loan money, you 
can get it 

M.K.Myers 

LICENSED LOAN OFFICE 
27-29 EAST HUERFANO ST. 

Money Loaned on Valuables 



Have Your Clothes Cleaned, Pressed and 
.,. Kept in First-Class Repair by 

"Sam" the Gentlemen's Valet 

Also Makes a Specialty of Serving Parties 
SAM FLEMING 



THE TIGER 



11 




EUROPEAN PLAN 



ALTA VISTA HOTEL 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 

Rates $1 and Up 

Popular price cafe with cuisine and table service that has no superior. First 
class garage adjoining. Special attention to banquets and private parties. 



Whitney & Grimwood 

Headquarters for Pennants, Pillows, Books, 
Art Goods, Framed Pictures, Etc. 

See ns for your CHRISTMAS PRESENTS. 



Christmas 
Photos 

The Best Styles at 
Moderate Prices 



Sit for them now at 



Emery Studio 

Corner Cascade and Kiowa Streets 

Phone Main 41 



R. J. CORRIN 

Dry Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing 

and Remodeling for Ladies 

and Gentlemen 

Work by the Month 
Work Called for and Delivered 

Phone 2963 M 326 N. Tejon Stree 

You can save from 25 
percent to 40 percent 
on our finest Hart, 
Schaf f ner & Marx, 
Kuppenheimer & 
Clothcraf t Suits and 
Overcoats 



and value of it (as shown by reports 
from the Central Colorado Power 
Co.) in power plant development. 
While this article is of most value to 
the engineer who specializes in Hy- 
dro-electric work, every engineer 
ought to know something of the use 
of the "Summation Hydrograph." 



The junior prom at the University 
of Colorado will be held the first 
week in February. 



The new Administration Hall of 
the University of Oklahoma is now 
nearing completion. The building is 
being erected in the place of the old 
administration hall which was de- 
stroyed four years ago. 

At the University of California one 
thousand blue and gold caps and 
gowns were sold to the students to 
wear to the football games. The 
rooters, also appear in blue ties and 
white shirts. 

The average weight of the football 
team at the Texas A. & M. College 
is 203 pounds. 



Mrs. Wheeler (nee Alice Meyers 
'07) has been visiting friends in the 
Springs. 

Get Your Picnic Supplies 

= AT 

SOMMERS' MARKET 

1 13 S. Tejon St. Phone Main 1 14 

Nothing Pleases Us More Than 
To Please College Students 

The FredS. Tucker 

Furniture Co. 



MOTOR CYCLES 

Yale Emblem 

BICYCLES and Supplies 

Expert Repairing 

Colorado Springs Cycle 

Company 

DeWitt Doyle, Manager 
224 N. Tejon St. Phone Red 34 

Knight -Campbell's 

F0R PIANOS 

and PLAYER PIANOS 
STEINWAY and 20 OTHER MAKES 

We Rent Pianos 

Largest Stock Victor Talking Machines 
and Edison Phonographs 

226 N. Tejon St., after Sept. 15, 122 N. Tejon 

The Gowdy-Si mons Printing Co. 
PRINTERS 

Copper Plate and Steel Engravers 
Telephone 87 21 N. Tejon Street 

TYPEWRITERS 

Bought, Sold, Rented and Repaired 

Supplies of All Kinds 

See the New Remingtoi Visible be- 
fore Purchasing Typewriter. 

Zimmerman Supply 

/^ 22 E. Kiowa St. 

company Phone Main 374 

Established 1890 

The final examinations in Miss Sahm's 
course of "The History of Art" were 
held this afternoon. 






12 



THE" TIGER 



CHRISTMAS 

A kodak, a pennant,- a pillow top, a box of College seal stationery, The Pike's Peak 
Nugget, College posters, Waterman fountain pens, perfumes, a subscription to The Saturday 
Evening Post, Ladies' Home Journal, or any magazine, toilet sets, brushes, etc., cigars 
pipes, and smokers' articles. 

THE MURRAY T>RUG GO. 

Opposite Campus. 



The Assurance Savings and Loan 
Associa'ion 

116 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

Pays i% Interest on Deposits and Give 
Special Attention to Accouns of Student 

OFFICERS AN'O DIRECTORS 

Edgar T. Ensign, President Ira Harris, V-Presiden 

M. C. Gile Lilla B. Ensign C. E. Lynde 

Donald D. Wilfley, Secretary-Treasurer 

Hours: 9 to 4. 
Saturday, 9 to 12 and 6.:3Q .to-S,00 P. M 



THE OUT WEST 

TENT AND AWNING CO. 

RECLINING CHAIRS 
POR H£S ENCLOSED 

Tents Rented for a Day or for Longer 



/-ll Kinds of Xmas Cards and Mottos, 
Pictures, China and Brass. Also 
Hand-Embroidered Goods, Go To 

THE HUNT AND VAN NICE 

ART SPECIALTY SHOPS 

Retail and Wholesale 
8 Pike's Peak Avenue Phone Main 2055 




Clearance Sale of Fall and 
Winter Shoes at 

2^ Whitaker-Kester 

Shoe Co. 
10 North Tejon Street 



Local Department 



Donovan, Vandemoer, Black and 
Snider took a short trip up the Cog 
road Saturday morning, to make a silvi- 
cultural report on white fir. 

I ♦ + 

Earl Murphy ex-'12, from San Acacio, 

Colorado, visited College friends Satur- 
day and Sunday. 

♦ ♦ 

Ben Stewart '10 will take charge of 
Chem. I and 6, during Professor Strie- 
hy's illness. 

♦ ♦ 

Leo Lake has gone to Allison, Colo., 
to enter into church work. 

♦ ♦ 

The second Masonic dance. of the sea- 
son was held December 14th. The Col- 
lege people present were Miss Clara 
Cheleyi'Miss Sater, Professor Thomas, 
Angel, Donovan, and Campbell. 

♦ t 

Orrie Stewart, instructor in chemis- 
try, has gone to San Francisco and other 
'cities on the coast to make a three weeks' 
visit. 

♦ ♦ 

'„ Sawhill '12 left last Friday for his 
home in Kansas, where he will spend his 
vacation. 

♦ ♦ 

Peggy McKenzie has returned to. her.- 
.work after 'being at home a week be- 
cause of sickness. . 



HUGHES' 

Mew Art and Embroidery Store — 
Everything Strictly New — Complete 
Line of the Artamo Specialties-Free 
Lessons in Crocheting and Em- 
broidery — Miss ' Alberta Long Will 
Have Charge. 

326^ North Tejon Street, 
Colorado Springs. 



THE BEST AND MOST 
POPULAR 



Butter and 
Ice Cream 

■■■■ ts ■ •••"■ 

MOWREY'S 

Phone 1184. 

15 E. Cache la Poudr.e. 






STOP AT 

LIGHTNING SHOE SHOP 

to get your shoes repaired. Shine 
free with every pair of soles 

Sewed Soles 75c. 28, ' 2 N. Tejon St. 



William P. Bonbright & Co 

Investments 

Members 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

High Class Electrical Securi- 
ties a Specialty 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

24 Broad St., New York 

16 George St., Mansion House, London, E. C. 



STtJbENTSi'. ," 

The 

Pearl Laundry Goi 

respectfully solicits your "pat- 
ronage. We guarantee satis- 
factory work and service and- 
give you 20 c /o discount. 

E. E. HEDBLOM, College Agent 



THE TIGER 



13 



THE BEST SHOES 

$2.50 No More, No Less 

M. Q. WEST'S 

Sample Shoe Store 






1 lO-l 12 E. Pike's Avenue, Up Stairs 

Rooms 16-17-18 Midland Block 
First Stairway East of Tucker's Cafe 

Yes, We Sell Higli Boots for $2.50 too 



i ; 



Engraving 

Function Invitations 
Programs, Place Cards 
Etc., — Our Specialty. 



i OUT WEST 

Printing and Stationery Co. ; 
3 - 11 East Pike's PeakA venue '■ 

If Its College Pins, We 
Make Them 

i HAYNER 

\ JEWELER 

24 S. Tejon Street 

BOX>225 

; COLLEGE BOYS 

We Are ;Alway? Clean and- Up^to-Date 

Campbell's Barber Shop 



2 S^ ,Tejon St., 



Colorado Springs 



Airs. Slocum spoke at Y. W. C. A., 
1 le&vj s lay night. 

♦ ♦ 

Mildred Pope will spend the holidays 
with Ruth Cunningham. 
4- ♦ 

The Japanese play that was to he give'n 
by Hypatia to the other two societies 
and the faculty ladies had to be post- 
poned because of Jessie Sheld m's illness. 

♦ + 

Agnes Lennox entertained a few 
friends informally Wednesday evening*. 
'+ + 

Ethel Rice gave a tea in honor of 
Edith McCreery, Thursday afternoon. 

♦ + 

The members of Contemporary spe'ait 
a most pleasant afternoon and evening 
at the home of Dorothy Frari'tz, Tues- 
day. The event was the annual Christ- 
mas tree party. 

♦ ♦ 

Professor Gile entertained beautifully 
at a luncheon, Monday noon. His guests 
were Frances Eames, Marian Yerkes. 
Dorothy Frantz, Florence Pierson and 
Mrs. McConnell. 

■f -f 
Miss Loomis entertained the cast of 
Eager Heart and the Angel choir, Friday 
evening, after the production. 
♦ ♦ 
While in Boston, Mrs. Slocum met 
Mrs. Maguire, a former house mistress 
of Ticknor, who has completely recov- 
ered from her recent illness. 



Visit Our Candy Shop 

You are invited to inspect 
our. candy shop at any time. 
It is one of the most com- 
plete in the city. You will 
then see why our candies are 
so good. 

BURGESS 

Phone Eight Three 
111-114 North Tejon Street 



STUDENTS 

See me for your suits. 
Suits-to-order at ready- 
made prices, $20 and up. 
Discount to students. Get 
your next suit made to 
vou. 



T. HOWLAND 

With Corrin, 326 N. Tejon St, 
Phone Main 2963 , 



Why Not Have that 

Party at 

BRUIN INN 



Sewed Soles 75 cents 
Rubber Heels 35 cents 



AT 



PETE'S SHOE SHOP 

230 East Dale 



JOHN MOFFA T 

FINE TAILORING 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special 
Rates to College Students 

1 Do the Work of the College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 S. Tejon Slree 



The Prompt Printery Co. 

MASTER PRINTERS 



12 and 14 E. Kiowa St. Phone Main 536 



You cain' t tell how good our Cakes and Pies 
are until you have tried them 




Under New Management 



THE TIGER 



Be Your Own Agent 

The management of the STAR LAUNDRY have 
decided to have no general agent at the College and to 
give agent's discount direct to the student sending in 
the bundle. 

Our drivers will sell you a $5.00 Coupon Book for $3.50, a dis- 
count of 30%, or you can pay in cash on the delivery of the bundle, 
taking out 30% for yourself. No bundles will be left without money 
or coupons. 

Coupon- Books at this discount will be sold only to students and 
are not transferable and the coupon will not be received from other 
than students. 



Everything in Jewelry 

FOUND AT 

Arcularius & Co, 

Milk 

Cream 

Butter 

The Best There Is 

The Sinton Dairy 

419 S. El Paso St. Phone Main 442 

Have You a Panitorium 
College Ticket? 

See Rhone College Agent, Hager- 
man Hall. 

30 Suits Sponged and Pressed For $5 

The checker tournament at Hagerman 
Hall is progressing slowly. No excep- 
tional "stars" have come to light. 
♦ ♦ 

The Ticknor girls had a spread Sat- 
urday evening in the parlor. A grate 
fire, popped corn and fudge were feat- 
ures of the evening. 



A number of College people have been 
taking advantage of the recent wintry 
weather by having sledding and skating 
parties. 

♦ ♦ 

Miles James will spend Christmas va- 
cation with his parents in Sidney, Iowa. 

♦ ♦ 

Ruth Cunningham had a spread in her 
room, Monday night. 

♦ ♦ 

George Williston was down from Den- 
ver for the Kappa Sigma dance, Satur- 
day night, and remained over for a few 
days to visit about the College. 

♦ ¥ 

Charles Orr was up from Pueblo for 
the Kappa Sigma dance. 

♦ ♦ 

J. D. Berwick '14 has left the College 
and is now working for the Portland 
mine at Victor, Colo, 
-t- * 

The Christmas season brings always 
the spirit of giving, but some of the stu- 
dents are rather overdoing the matter 
in their zeal for giving, when they bring 
their embroidery to their classes in order 
to have a little more time to spend on 
them. There's a saying to the effect that 
sometimes two birds can be killed with 
one stone, but the instructors look at it 
in a different light. They seem to think 
j. man, or girl in this case, cannot serve 
two masters ; they can either choose the 
class, or, if they prefer their needle- 
work, they can get out of the class. 



CHILI 

t 

Is Now Being Served 

The College Inn 

Opposite the Campus 



TRY 

A 

SUPPER 

McRAE'S 



THE 

Hemenway Grocery Co. 
Groceries and 



Meats 



-«.♦.•» 







115 South Tejon Street 
1201 North Weber St. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE HENRY L. DWINELL HARDWARE COMPANY 



TOOLS 



BUILDERS AND GENERAL HARDWARE 
We Appreciate the College Trade 



CUTLERY 



130 N. Tejon St. 



Peone Main 4-39 



THE TIGER 



15 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 




Quick and First-class Work at Moderate Prices 



Giddings Bros. 

New reversible coats for school 
and general wear — sizes 32-34- 
36-all new colors-$20, #22.50, 
£25 and $30. 

Women's and Misses garments 
2nd floor. 



College Boys Remember 

HYATT'S 

s the place to go to get your barber 
work and baths 

iO§y 2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone Main 700 

ii . ' 



W.I. LUCAS 



I 



Bicycles and Sporting Goods 
Repairing a Specialty 



# 



119 N. Tejon 



Pbone Main 900 



The J. C. St. John Plumbing 
and Heati g Co 



Phone Main 48 313 N. Tejon St. 

Artists Materials 

FRAMING 
College Posters 

The Richard Willis Art Studios 

4 1 -; East Pike's Peak Avenue 



THE 

XMAS STORE 

FOR MEN. 



That 

Real 

Xmas 



THE 

XMAS STORE 

FOR MEN. 



STORE FOR MEN AT REASONABLE PBICE?. 

Sweater coats, house coats, bath robes, gloves, fur gloves, 
pajamas, silk hose guaranteed, silk lisle hose guaranteed, 
traveling ca^es, military brushes, coin cases, bill books, card 
c?ses, umbrellas, canes, jewelry sets, suspender sets, ties and. 
hose that match, ties, hose and. handkerchiefs to match, hats 
and caps. Good clothes at clearance prices. 



Money 
Cheerfully 
Refunded 




Correct Drcas for Men 



113 E. 

Pike's Peak 

Ave. 



J. B. Thornell expects to enjoy the va- 
cation at Fort Collins. 

♦ ♦ 

Ivan Wild will spend Christmas with 
his parents at Loveland. 

♦ ♦ 

H. A. Parkison left, Monday, for his 
home at Glenwood Springs, to recover 
from an attack of grip before vacation 
is over. 



With the birds exhibited at the poul- 
try show last week, D. H. Mahan cap- 
tured a first, and two thirds. The com- 
petition was stiff, and many birds were 
valued as high as $75; one in fact was 
hatched from eggs that cost $10 each. 
Mahan expects to show at Denver, Jan- 
uary 15-20. 

♦ ♦ 

The twelve men who made their 
footcall "C's" met at Emery's studio 
Thursday noon and posed for the 
picture which will be the official one 
for this year's team. This picture 
will appear in the rule books and 
various other publications. 

♦ ♦ 

The freshman picnic laS't Saturday 
was well attended. 



LUMP 

The most satisfacory coal on the market 

for furnace 

THE CENTRAL FUEL CO. 



-hone 5T8 



1 28 N. Tejon 



Get Acquainted at 

The Red 
Cross Pharmacy 

HOT DRINKS HOT TAMALAS 

HUDSON'S CHOCOLATES 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 

107 E. Pike's Peak Ave. Phone 40 



Candy Special 

Page 5 Gazette 
each week 

DFR1NI TEA AND 

1-Hlil\.l^l COFFEE Co. 
26 So. Tejon St. Phon 575 

Dr. & Mrs. G. W. Pauly 

Osteopathic Physicians 

Registered Medical Practitioneers 

Office, Rooms 201-3-4 DeGraff Bldg 
118 North Tejon St. Phone Main 1701 

Res., 1211 N. Weber St. Tel. Main 956 




TOD POWELL 



Phone Main 930 



W. E. DONER 



POWELL-DONER SPORTING GOODS CO. 

1 1 2 E. Pike's Peak Avenue 

"EVERYTHING FOR SPORTSMEN" 

New and Complete Stock of the Very Best of Athletic Supplies, College Pennants, Novelties Etc. 

"ASTHEMEDICINE MAN" 



Watson Miss 
BevYla Hall 

16 THE TIGER 

You may not yet be th€ owner of a fine new cate the exclusive patterns and styling-, the per- 
Overcoat; if not, it's high time that you were, fection of fitting at collar and shoulders, at any 

other locsL-1 store 
The Overcoats we'll show you, right now, are W£ AR£ posm v E 0F THIS. 

the ones we know you want, and ought to have. Especially fine garments priced at $20, $25 

Values are quite unusual; you can't dupli- and $30. 



(Per&imS$ieat<er(& 



HAUGEN, Tailor 



222 N. Tejon. 



Phone Main 2896 



COLORADO COLLEGE 



Founded in Colorado Springs in 1874 



V 




WM. F. SLOCUM, President 



Departments - 

College of Arts and 
Science, 
E. S. PARSONS, Dean 

School of Engineering, 
F. CAJORI, Dean 

School of Forestry, 

W. C. STURGIS, Dean 

School of Music, 

E. D. HALE, Dean 



REMEMBER 



What you want for HIM can be had: If not at Blank's surely at Hughes'. Cigars, all 
you want at 50c a box up. 

The Famous G. B. D. Imported Pipes are now sold exclusively by us. 

Case pipes at least 25 per cent, cheaper than others, seeing is convincing. Be sure and 
see our fine line before you are sorry. 



13 



HUGHES 

N. TEJON STREET 



13 




THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



Vol. XIV 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO., JANUARY 11, 1912 



Number 16 



MUSICAL GOSPEL LIBRARY 

JOURNEY TEAMS REPORT 



Fine Concerts Given at Several 
Colorado Cities. 



The concert of The Colorado Col- 
lege Glee Club given in the Presby- 
terian church of Canon City on last 
Saturday evening was the last of the 
nine concerts scheduled for the Six- 
teenth annual tour of the Club. This 
year's tour was in many ways the 
most successful of the sixteen. The 
men were always in the best of con- 
dition and with the excellent train- 
ing of Dr. Vere Stiles Richards they 
were able to show their voices to the 
best advantage. The men of the 
College took much greater inter- 
est in the Club than heretofore with 
the result that the material with 
which the director worked was of a 
suoerior quality. 

The twenty-four men who took the 
trip left Colorado Springs the Thurs- 
day following Christmas, or met the 
Club at various points along the line. 
The first concert was given in Rocky 
Ford at the Presbyterian church and 
was more than well attended. This 
concert was the most trying but was 
so successful that many invitations 
were given the club to return the 
following season. On Friday even- 
ing La Junta was visited and on Sat- 
urday the Club appeared at the West 
theatre in Trinidad. 

The Club lay in Trinidad over Sun- 
day and on Monday afternoon left the 
Santa Fe for the D. & R. G. It was 
with this change that real excitement 
in methods of transportation began. 
The car was side-tracked in Cuchara 

Continued on Page 2 



College Y. M. C. A. Takes Up Depu- 
tation Work — First Attempt 
Meets With Huge Success. 



The test of the efficiency of any or- 
ganization is whether it is accom- 
plishing the ends for which it was 
established. If it is not, the body 
does not justify its existence. The 
fundamental idea underlying the 
work of the Young Men's Christian 
Association is service to the com- 
munity in which the organization is 
located. According to its three-folrf 
standard, its service should consist 
in ministering to the physical, mental 
and spiritual needs of the members 
which comprise its constituency. 

But the field of the College Young 
Men's Christian Association is larger 
than this. It should not only serve 
its immediate vicinity but throw its 
influence for righteousness out into 
the surrounding country. With this 
purpose in mind, the College Asso- 
ciation Movement, throughout the 
United States and Canada, has in- 
stituted a work called Gospel Team 
or Deputation Work. This consists 
of sending out groups of from three 
to six college men during the holiday 
periods or over week ends to small 
towns in the state, to "mix" with the 
high school boys there and present to 
them practical Christianity from the 
college man's standpoint. In this 
way the best influence of college life 
is brought to bear upon the younger 
fellows of the state, and an attrac- 
tive virile picture of the Christian 
life is substituted for the long-faced, 

Continued on Page 8 



The 17th Annual Report Shows the 

Growth of the Library — New 

Building Soon Necessary. 



The seventeenth annual report of 
Coburn Library recently issued by 
Librarian Manly D. Ormes shows 
a very satisfactory increase, both in 
the number of books and in the use 
of the library. During the year the 
total number of books added was 
2519 and the number of pamphlets 
945. The library now contains about 
60,000 books and 40,000 pamphlets. 
Seven years ago, when the present li- 
brarian began his work, there were 
less than 20,000 books, so that the 
library is two and a half times as 
large today as it was in 1904. This 
growth is due to generous gifts of 
friends and faculty both of books and 
of money. 

The chief sources of additions for 
the past year are as follows: 
Coburn Library Book Club. ..... .278 

Purchased (including magazines 

bound 981 

Gifts 580 

Exchanges 240 

U. S. Government 649 

Library of Congress 15 

Colorado State documents 144 

Newspapers (bound) 20 

Following are some of the most im- 
portant additions: 
International Library of Technol- 
ogy 16 

Encyclopedia Brittanica, nth edi- 
tion 29 

Inland Printer 18 

Natural Science, a complete set. 

Continued on Page 2 



THE TIGER 



MUSICAL JOURNEY 



Continued from page 1 



Junction for some four hours await- 
ing the make-up of an uncertain water 
train. The aforesaid water, train fin- 
ally got out of the Junction, but 
some four miles from Walsenburg it 
lost its drivers and decided to await 
belp from the night train. Manager 
Bowers insisted that the Club put on 
its show at Walsenburg within an 
hour, but failed to provide any means 
of transportation. The Club walked 
and carried its own baggage, Shaw's 
scenery included. 

Walsenburg was the high water 
mark of hospitality for the whole trip. 
It is rumored that the Elks were at 
the depot with a brass band and it is 
only to be regretted that the Club 
never reached the depot. Whether 
this was so or not matters little for 
the Elks appeared at the concert as 
life sized devils, red devils, and each 
devil carried his own pitchfork. After 
the concert the Club was escorted by 
these same devils to the Elks hall 
and given the best that there was 
to be had. Walsenburg did not in- 
jure its widespread reputation for 
hospitality. 

Following Walsenburg came Monte 
Vista, Alamosa, and on Thursday 
Leadville. The stay in Leadville was 
full of interest and was enjoyed by 
every member of the Club. Those 
who desired were shown through the 
famous Wolftone zinc mine. The 
work is now limited to the second 
level though at the time the Club 
was there pumps were working on 
the sixth level, which is a thousand 
feet under the surface. The day fol- 
lowing their visit the pumps were 
stopped and the lower four levels 
flooded. Pure carbonate of zinc is 
taken from this mine and is occurs 
free from any other metal. 

At Buena Vista citizens took mem- 
bers of the Club through the State 
Reformatory and extended many 
other courtesies in the way of auto 
rides and entertainment. On Friday 
all trains were late and the ride from 
Buena Vista to Salida was taken in 
a caboose. At Salida a coach was 
attached to a second freight and 
through the agency of hot boxes and 
broken beams the Royal Gorge was 
reached well after dark. 

After the concert the Club left for 
"home," reaching Colorado Springs 
about five o'clock on Sunday morn- 
ing. Further than three broken car 
windows, little damage was done to 



the propert yof the company and ad- 
jacent scenery. The trip was well 
worth while and one to be remem- 
bered by every man on the Club. 

The solo work of Dr. Richards 
was one of the features of the con- 
certs as was also the work of Shaw as 
reader and hypnotist. . Seldomridge, 
McMillan ' and Jackson added more 
than their share with their instru- 
mental work. The quartette and 
double quartette were popular every- 
where and often responded to a third 
and fourth encore. 

Thomas, Thornell, Mantz and Win- 
chell composed the quartette and with 
Park, Grimsley, Seldomridge and 
Gregg the double quartette. The 
other men on the tour were Morse, 
Emery, Lewis, Baker, W. C. and E. 
W. Barnes, Orraes, Jackson, Kampf, 
Moye, Allen, McMillan Shaw, and 
Bowers, manager. 

The home concert will be given 
Friday, January 19th, at Perkins Hall. 
The program follows: 

1. Invictus Huhn 

Glee Club. 

2. Selection of Popular Airs. 

Instrumental Trio. 

3. Schneider's Band Mundi 

Double Quartet. 

4. Reading — 

Mr. Shaw. 

5. Cavvalry Song Gaines 

Glee Club. 

Intermission. 

7. The Wind Barnby 

Glee Club. 

7. Selection — 

Mr. Shaw and Glee Club. 

8. Tenor — 

(a) Persian Serenade. 

(b) The Rani's Messenger. 
Dr. Vere Stiles Richards. 

9. A Medley — 

The Quartet. 

10. Comrades in Arms Adam 

Glee Club. 



LIBRARY REPORT 

Confinued from page 1 



PREXY TALKS AT CANON. 



President Slocum gave his lecture 
on Spitzenbergen in the Presbyterian 
church at Canon City on last Friday 
evening. The C. C. people greeted 
him with a "Rah! Rah! Rexy!'' which 
pleased the President very much. The 
lecture was under the auspices of the 
Canon City Daily Record and was 
enjoyed by a large number of peo- 
ple. President Slocum has lectured 
at several other places during the past 
vacation, 



Drawings of- U. S. Patent Office.. 278 
Journal of Speculative Philoso- 
phy 22 

"Romania" from 1872 to 1904. 

Besides these, Dx. S. L. Caldwell 
has sent about 400 volumes from his 
own and his father's library. Mr. 
Hildreth Frost and his partners have 
deposited 484 law books for the use 
of the students. Reuben Gold 
Thwartes, the noted historian, has 
given a copy of all the publications 
of the Wisconsin Historical Society 
from its organization in 1855. These 
documents are valuable as the re- 
searches of the society have extended 
beyond the confines of Wisconsin. 

Among the valuable books picked 
up at eastern book stores are Rose 
Kingsley's "South by West" and a 
volume by Eliza Greatorex. The for- 
mer contains the writer's experiences 
in Colorado Springs in the winter of 
1871-2, the first winter after its set- 
tlement and the second volume gives 
an interesting description of life in 
this city in the second year after its 
existence. 

Another very satisfactory feature 
about the library during the past 
year is the increase in the use of the 
books. Every day more than 400 
persons make use of the library; 40 
books are taken out daily for home 
use, or 9360 for the college year; 30 
volumes are taken out from the refer- 
ence shelves or 7120 during the year; 
225 reference books are taken down 
daily and consulted in the library, or 
51,600 during the year; and 120 over- 
night books are given out daily or 
162,000 in the year. 

The above figures give some idea 
of the importance of Coburn library. 
With the exception of the city library 
of Denver, it is the biggest in the 
state. At its present rate of progress, 
the building now standing will soon 
be inadequate. Even now the erec- 
tion of the main building is badly 
needed. It has been found in the 
past that many of the students do not 
make full use of the library facilities 
afforded them. The librarians are 
always ready to answer questions and 
to explain anything regarding the 
system of cataloguing and other ar- 
rangements and it is hoped that the 
students will take advantage of the 
excellent equipment we possess. 



Fred B. Copeland '11 spent the holi 
days visiting in Omaha. 



THE TIGER 



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101:30 to 12:30 


8:15 to 10:15 




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THE TIGER 



CONFERENCE ARRANGES 
SCHEDULES. 

The annual mid-winter meeting of 
the Colorado Athletic Conference 
was held in the rooms of the Denver 
Law School December 28. Several 
matters of importance were discussed 
and arranged. 

The University of Wyoming was 
admitted to the Conference on the 
same footing as the other colleges 
with the exception that they may be 
allowed to let their freshmen repre- 
sent them on their athletic teams. 

Conference teams were given per- 
mission to schedule games with the 
Utah Aggies. 

Denver University refused to sched- 
ule a game with the Wyoming foot- 
ball team as a result of a wrangle at 
their game this fall. 

Basketball was voted in as a con- 
ference game and will hereafter 
come under the control of the Con- 
ference Board. 

A resolution was passed to the ef- 
fect that there should be no such 
thing as a conference championship. 
This resolution aims to do away with 
some of the bitter wrangling that is 
apt to occur whenever there is the 
least particle of doubt as to who wins 
the Conference championship. 

The most important piece of busi- 
ness that was transacted was the 
matter of arranging for the confer- 
ence games in baseball, track and 
football for the coming year. As a 
result of the work of the Committee, 
Colorado College has one of the best 
sets of schedules for the coming year 
that it has had in many years. There 
will be four intercollegiate games of 
baseball on Washburn field this 
spring, and next fall we have four of 
the big games of the season here. 

Following is the set of conference 
schedules for Colorado College as ar- 
ranged at the meeting. It is possible 
that some changes may be made later, 
providing such changes do not inter- 
fere with the schedules of other 
schools. 

Baseball. 

April 13— Mines here. 

April 20 — Aggies at Ft. Collins. 

April 27 — D. U. at Denver. 

May 4— U. of C. here. 

May 11 — Mines at Golden. 

May 18 — Aggies here. 

May 25— U. of C. at Boulder. 

May 30 — D. U. here. 
Track. 

April 27 — D. U. at Denver, 

May 11 — Mines here. 



May 25 — U. of C. here. 

Football. 
Oct. 12 — Wyoming here. 
Oct. 19 — Aggies here. 
Nov. 2 — U. of C. here. 
Nov. 9 — Mines here. 
Nov. 16— Utah at Salt Lake. 
Nov. 28 — D. U. at Denver. 



RANGER COURSE 



PANPAN BIG EVENT. 

The magna panpan which was held 
in Bemis Hall the Thursday evening 
before vacation was one of the best 
we have had this year. The attend- 
ance was larger than usual and the 
program which was rendered was a 
most entertaining one. 

President Slocum and Prof. Motten 
made short talks to the students and 
gave out a number of pointers for use 
in the campaign work which is al- 
ready begun to swell the freshman 
class for next year. Dr. Murphy, the 
dark-horse orator, delivered one of 
the finest impromptu speeches ever 
heard on the campus. He dealt with 
college ideals. Violin solos by Miss 
Harlan, assisted by Miss Law, met 
with enthusiastic applause. The 
sketch, "Cox and Box," by Lloyd 
Shaw and Max E. Butner, was the 
mirthful feature of the program. It 
was effectually staged and played and 
caused a constant roar of laughter. 

The girls held their annual Christ- 
mas do!! show after the program, 
while chocolate and cake were being 
served by the freshmen. The dolls 
were dressed by the girls of the halls 
for Christmas presents for the chil- 
dren of the Papeton mission. 



"HEINE" BARR MARRIED. 

"Heine" Barr, the famous giant 
who played on the University of Col- 
orado football team for four seasons, 
was married December 27 to Mrs. 
Stella Sutherland of Loveland. Barr 
was chosen all-Colorado guard for 
four seasons, and was doubtless one 
of the strongest football men the 
state has ever seen. The newlyweds 
will make their home in Los Angeles 
where the groom will soon engage 
in business. 



Thompson and Bowers gave a 
dancing party at the San Luis school 
Wednesday evening. 
♦ ♦ 

Several College people saw "Get- 
Rich-Quick Wallingford at the opera 
house Tuesday night, 



Special Short Course Given For Men 
In Forest Service An Unquali- 
fied Success. 

The Rangers School has made 
splendid progress in the past three 
weeks. The first week being taken 
up by lectures on Geology and Min- 
erology by Dr. Finlay, four lectures 
on "Public Land Law" by R. D. Wy- 
att of the office of lands, District 
Office Forest Service at Denver. Sev- 
eral of the most successful lectures 
were given by Dr. Dickey, the well 
known veterinary of this city, lec- 
turing on "Care of Horses," "Horse- 
shoeing" and "Diseases of Horses." 

The second week was spent in lec- 
tures on. "Forest Mensuration," Lum- 
bering, and Surveying, supplemented 
by field work with level and transit. 

This week is devoted to lectures 
on "Grazing," by Dr. Jardine, Chief 
of Grazing of the Forest Service. 
"Grazing Law" is one of the most 
important with which the Forester 
has to deal. These lectures are open 
to the regular Forestry students and 
will take the place of the regular 
grazing course. It will be followed 
up by an examination on the sub- 
ject and one hour credit will be giv- 
en. This is a required subject and 
all that are able are requested to hear 
the lectures. Regular Forestry sub- 
jects will be omitted where conflicts 
occur. 

Friday or Saturday the school 
will be transferred to Manitou 
Park, where the course will 
be completed. Five weeks will 
be spent there in actual field work 
given over to marking and estimat- 
ing of timber, brush burning and 
mapping. 

Much comment has been made up- 
on the success of the Ranger School 
and it is thought that those taking 
the course have acquired a great deal 
of good from it. 

Eighteen men have been registered 
— one from Montana, one from Mich- 
igan, one from Germany, the re- 
mainder from Wyoming and Colo- 
rado. 



FORESTERS' CLUB. JAN 11. 



Grazing — Moye. 

Relation of Grazing to Forest Ad- 
ministration — J. T. Jardine. 
Polytech Library — Refreshments. 



THE TIGER 



ALUMNI NOTES 



ogy in the Girls' School at Assuit, 
Egypt. She enjoys Egypt very much. 



MOORE-LENNOX. 

One of the prettiest and notable 
of the Christmas weddings was that 
of Miss Lucy Southwich Moore to 
Mr. Loring Cowgill Lennox, which 
occurred Thursday evening, Decem- 
ber 21st, at the first Congregational 
church of Denver. 

The bridesmaids were Miss Kath- 
erine Smithers, Miss Willabelle Len- 
nox, sister of the groom, and Miss 
Mayme Gallup. The ushers included 
Dr. Paul Lennox, Mr. George Alle- 
brand and Mr. Donald C. McCreery. 
Mr. Luther Lennox, a cousin of the 
groom, acted as best man. A recep- 
tion for the relatives, the bridal party 
and a few close friends immediately 
followed the ceremony at the home 
of the bride's parents. Later in the 
evening the young couple departed 
for a wedding trip. 

The bride is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Orin Southwick Moore of 
816 Lafayette St., Denver. She is a 
graduate of the State Preparatory 
school at Boulder and also of Denver 
University. She is a member of the 
Gamma Phi Beta sorority. The 
groom is the son of Mr. William 
Lennox, of Colorado Springs, one of 
Colorado's wealthiest and most prom 
inent mining men. He is a graduate 
of Colorado College and of Harvard, 
and is a member of the Sigma Chi 
fraternity. He is at present the gen- 
eral manager of the famous Strong 
mine at Vitcor. 

After a short honeymoon the young 
couple will make their home at Vic- 
tor. 



COLORADO COLLEGE PEOPLE 
IN PERSIA. 



The friends of two former Colorado 
College boys who are in Persia now 
are considerably concerned over their 
status since the Russian pronuncia- 
mento against M. Morgan Shuster, 
the American collector of customs. 

Dr. Harry P. Packard, of the class 
of '08, and Mrs. Packard, also a grad- 
uate of the College, are located at 
Teheran, the capital of Persia, where 
they are engaged in medical mission- 
ary work. Thomas L. Kirkpatrick, 
who graduated from the College last 
year, is teaching in the American 



Presbyterian mission at Tabriz, the 
scene of the actual fighting between 
Russians and Persians. 



DENVER CONTEMPORARY 
ALUMNAE. 



The alumnae of the Contempo- 
rary Club in Denver entertained the 
active members who were home for 
the holidays at an elaborate luncheon 
at the Brown hotel, on Friday. 

The tables were beautifully decor- 
ated with red carnations, the Club 
flower. Mrs. E.wing, Mrs. Southerd, 
Miss Brush, Dorothy Haynes and 
Grace Wilson came down from 
Greeley for the occasion. The lunch- 
eon is an annual affair and is greatly 
enjoyed by the members. 



THARPE-DIETRICH. 

One of the many holiday wed- 
dings which interest the students of 
Colorado College was that of Miss 
Edna Tharpe of Pueblo to Mr. Mar- 
ion Dietrich of Colorado Springs. 
Both young people are well known 
to many of the upperclass students 
of the College and they have many 
friends here who will be glad to hear 
of the wedding. They will make their 
home in Seattle. 



Miss Faith Skinner '08 and Miss 
Amy Metcalf '08 are living together 
in Philadelphia. It is reported that 
Miss Skinner is the acknowledged 
leader of her class. 



Ivan C. Hall '08 spent last year in 
post-graduate work at the University 
of California in Berkeley. In the 
spring he was sent out with the Uni- 
versity Demonstration train into 
southern California as lecturer on 
"Health." This year he was ap- 
pointed on the faculty of the Uni- 
versity as assistant in Bacteriology at 
a good salary. Half of each day he 
works for the Cutler Laboratory pre- 
paring antitoxin and various vaccines 
for which he receives an excellent 
salary. His thesis was upon "The 
Transmissable Diseases of Berkeley 
with Special Reference to those of 
School Children." He is now doing 
research work on "Conglutenin." 



Miss Margaret Stevenson ex-'i2 
was married to Mr. Charles Bourk on 
Dec. 2nd at Fort Morgan. They are 
at home in Sterling, Colorado. 

Miss Mabel Bay '11 is teaching in 
the High School at Laporte, Colo- 
rado. 



Miss Matt Draper '11 is entering 
the Teachers' College of California 
this semester. 

Aliss Helen Sloane '08 who is head 
of the department of mathematics at 
Wolf Hall, spent the holidays with 
Miss Ada Freeman '08 of Colorado 
Springs. 



Mr. Judson ex-'n is married and 
living in Chicago. 



Rev. F. M. Sheldon who took his 
master's degree at C. C. in 1905, is 
now general superintendent of the 
Wisconsin Congregational Associa- 
tion with headquarters at Madison. 



Rev. Pelty '05 who also took his 
master's degree in psychology at C. 
C. and who has been located at Au- 
rora, Illinois, for some years, recently 
accepted the pastorate of the Ply- 
mouth Church at New Haven, Conn. 
Roth men at the time they took their 
degrees were pastors of churches at 
Greeley. Both are very loyal sup- 
porters of C. C. 



Miss Lois Crane ex-'o6, who plays 
in the "Get-Rich-Quick Wallingford" 
Company, was entertained at a tea 
given by Mrs. Seldomridge on Tues 
day afternoon. 



Miss May J. Wallace reports that 
she is teachnig English and physiol- 



Miss Lottie G. Bigler '08 recently 
nursed her mother, who is with her 
in Philadelphia, through a severe ill- 
ness. At present Miss Bigler is look- 
ing for an interneship. 

A paper appeared in the December 
number of the American Journal of 
Physiology under the joint author- 
ship of W. B. Cannon, Professor of 
Physiology at Harvard, and Claude 
W. Lieb '08 on "The Receptive Re- 
laxation of the Stomach." It is a 
very interesting bit of research work 
which shows how the stomach is 
prepared for the reception of food as 
it is swallowed. 






THE TIGER 



The Weekly INewspaperof Colorado College 

HARRY L. BLACK Editor-in-Chief 

RICHARD L. HUGHES Business Mgr. 

Leon C. Havens : Assistant Editor 

A. H. Rowbotham Assistant Editor 

Arthur J. Allen Assistant Editor 

J. J. Sinton Athletic Editor 

D. H. MAHAN Engineering Editor 

G. S. Cowdery Forestry Editor 

Miss Glenn Stiles Alumni Editor 

Miss Mary Randolph Exchange Editor 

Miss Helen Rand Local Editor 

A. W. Donovan Local Editor 

H. A. Parkison Assistant Manager 

A. L. Golden Assistant Manager 

Correspondents 

F. P. Storke, H. A. Bennett, Miss Lucy Ferrill 
Byron Winans, Rowe Rudolph, Edwin Crysler, 

Miss Elizabeth Gerould, Miss Leona Stukey, 

Miss Myrth King, Miss Violet Hopper, Miss 

Francis Adams, R. G. Appel 



Students, Professors and Alumni are invited to contribute 

articles and items to TheTiger. Contributions 

must be accompanied by writer's name. 

Address all communications to THE TIGER, Colorado 

College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phones: Editor, Main 2550. Manager, Main 2073 

Entered at the postoffice at Colorado 
Springs, Colo., as second-class matter 

Subscriptions to THE TIGER $1.25. Single Copies 5c 



President Slocum Opposes 
Shortening of College Courses. 



In an interview recently published 
in a Denver paper, President Slocum 
set forth his views as opposed to 
those of President James H. Baker 
of the University of Colorado, con- 
cerning the practicability of shorten- 
ing the courses of the colleges of 
America. President Baker declares 
that colleges should be able to turn 
out graduates properly equipped for 
life at least two years earlier than is 
done under the present educational 
system. President Slocum's inter- 
view is full of momentous ideas, and 
is well worth printing in these col- 
umns. 



Thorough college training is the 
corner stone of American progress, 
socially, industrially and intellectually. 
All experience shows that the most 
able men of our country are men 
who have had a thorough, four year 
undergraduate course. This training- 
promotes a balance of mind, a flexi- 
bility of intelligence indispensable in 
the present epoch of expansion. This 
nation is characterized by construc- 
tive progress; its problems are large 
and potent, and necessitate a vigor- 



ous, well-trained men for their solu- 
tion. 

Nothing is gained by forcing an 
immature boy, lacking intellectual 
discipline, into the world of profes- 
sions. It is -vastly better to invest in 
a full college course and reap the ac- 
cruing benefit of a strong effective 
and thorough-going mentality. 

Fragmentary education is baneful 
in its influence. The dominant need 
of the West is a supply of expert, 
trained men of intellectual force, be- 
cause of the aggressive problems 
which confront the frontiers of so- 
ciety. 

America will always be construc- 
tive, but it is working hand in hand 
with a keen, intellectual life. The 
genius of German education is spe- 
cialization; that of America, its 
broad, forceful universality as applied 
to specialization. 

The youth of America have vital 
problems of world-wide issue to meet 
and it is essential that they be ade- 
quately prepared. An examination or 
the "Who's Who in America" proves 
conclusively that the majority of suc- 
cessful men have had a full college 
education. 

Vocational education is desirable in 
certain cases of advanced maturity, 
but a solid and proctical foundation 
is essential. Colorado College stands 
pre-eminently for a thorough four 
years' undergraduate course. 

The great self-made men of our 
counti"3' have been men of inborn 
intellectual hardihood, suprred on by 
a mighty moral issue. 

Lincoln, for example, was unique 
in his strong, clear-cut mind. His 
was a special work, and rugged en- 
vironment only served to intensify his 
usefulness. 

The average American boy or girl 
is characterized by an open and ener- 
getic mind, but this, reinforced by 
thorough training, is capable of real 
achievement. 

Children twelve years of age vary 
widely in their degree of maturity. It 
is impossible to determine a standard 
age limit for high school entrance. 
The average student is not qualified 
to select a life profession until in 
the junior and senior years in high 
school. 



of fellow who wears the air of get- 
your-toes-out-of-the-way-if-you-don't- 
want-them-pinched. The chronic 
knocker, the fop, the snob, and other 
similar sorts are to be found on the 
campus, though perhaps not in so 
great numbers as elsewhere. The an- 
cients described these unfortunates 
by. saying that they were born under 
unlucky stars.. Modern science gives 
a specific cause — inheritance, environ- 
ment, and training. Henry Ward 
Beecher said that such men failed in 
their first duty to themselves — in get- 
ting well born. 

Let those things be as they may, 
the fact remains that college life af- 
fords the best opportunities to correct 
such faults as will be detrimental to 
one's future success and usefulness. 
Life is a strong mixture of disposi- 
tion and habit. 

These minor details of personality 
and conduct should be studied and 
observed as carefully as any branch 
of required work on the college cur- 
riculum. Disposition can be im- 
proved and habits changed. 

In striking contrast to the boor is 
that fortunate person whose unfail- 
ing courtesy furnishes a perpetual let- 
ter of recommendation to all men 
everywhere. And nowhere else is 
there such a grand opportunity to 
cultivate the habit of taking an in- 
terest in men as there is at college. 
This interest, coupled with the proper 
self-inspection, will rapidly reduce 
the number of boors, knockers, fops 
and snobs in any student body. 

To this end and to the elimination 
of such selfishness, students should 
cultivate the habit of making ac- 
quaintances. Here again disposition 
plays a prominent part. The success 
of many men in public life depends 
largely on their happy faculty of mak- 
ing acquaintances — a faculty which 
somehow seems constitutional. But 
if one lacks this faculty, he may be 
able to acquire the habit by taking 
the proper inventory and making the 
proper effort. Boorishness is selfish- 
ness on one hand and laziness on the 
other. 



DEAN PARSONS LECTURES. 



How Is Your Disposition? 

In any heterogeneous body of col- 
lege men may be found almost every 
type of human character. Among 
these we often meet the college boor. 
He is a gruff, growling, selfish sort 



Dean Parsons gave an address on 
the "American Home" to the Wom- 
an's Alliance of the Unitarian church 
of this city last Tuesday afternoon. 



Miss Marian Hoffman 'to was the' 
guest of Miss Anna Bispham during 
vacation. 



THE TIGER 



PROFESSOR HILLS RETURNS. 



DANCING PARTY AT DEAN 
PARSONS'. 



MANTELL COMING. 



Professor E. C. Hills, who has