(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "TK and the great work in America ; a defense of the true and ancient school of spiritual light"

Class 

Book 



COPYRIGHT DEPOSfT. 



TK 



AND 



THE GREAT WORK 



IN 



AMERICA 



A DEFENSE OF THE TRUE AND ANCIENT SCHOOL OF 
SPIRITUAL LIGHT 



BY 



SYLVESTER A. WEST, M. D, 



"It matters not who the individual may be, or what are 
the claims he makes. His actual life and conduct are the basis 
upon which he must be judged." 

— TK. 

"The man and his work must agree, thus revealing 'con- 
sistency, coordination, completeness and harmony. ' " 

—Dr. J. D. Buck. 




CHICAGO 

DR. S. A. WEST 

1918 



> 



^ 



^ 



FIRST EDITION 
COPYRIGHTED, 1918 
BY S. A. WEST, M. D, 



M&R M 1918 



©CLA494094 




TK, the ''Sole American Representative" of the "Great School' 



T 



QH 



Dedicated 

Future Generations 

and 
To all who have endured 
the blighting shadow of 
unnecessary sorrow 

and to those 



Whose hearts have been broken, 
Whose lives have been ruined. 
Who have suffered and died — 

As a result of the activities of the 
School of Spiritual Darkness. 



"All injustice is to be first examined, 
then understood, then acknowledged, then 
forgotten. A bad deed lives within us, 
or within others, till love is kindled upon 
the soul's altar, on the mount of wisdom, 
in whose flame all wrong is utterly con- 
sumed. ' ' 

* — Andrew Jackson Davis. 




the Master Masons whose primary 
consideration has been the protection 
of the Brethren of their Order 
To the Chicago Students whose 
devotion to Truth has made this work possible 
To the Host of Loyal Friends thruout America 
and in distant Lands whose appreciative letters 

have encouraged and sustained our efforts 

To the Kindly Messengers from the* Spiritual 

Realms of Light who have assisted with our 

labors these many months and 

to 

Florence Huntley 

The author's indebtedness 

is herem acknowledged. 



Note: All the documents, evidences, etc., submitted in this 
volume, together with a great amount of additional data, are 
now in the possession of and will be preserved by a committee 
composed of members of the Masonic Fraternity. 



Let ns always remember that where- 
ever there is an imitation, a sham, or a 
counterfeit, there necessarily must be a 
genuine, real and true opposite, and 
Nature being just, we are bound to find 
it, provided we do our part by living the 
life which we knoiv will lead us ever 
onward and upward to the Land of Lib- 
erty and Light. — Selected. 



INDEX 



CHAPTER 

I 

II 

III 

IV 
V 

VI 

VII 

VIII 

IX 

X 

XI 

XII 

XIII 

XIV 

XV 

XVI 

XVII 

XVIII 

XIX 

XX 

XXI 

XXII 

XXIII 

XXIV 



PAGE 

For Humanity's Sake 9 

Quotations From Recent Letters ... 15 

Fishers of Men 19 

The Friendly Light of Truth 25 

A Brief Sketch of TK's Personal 

Life 38 

The Skeptic and the Believer 42 

TK's Autobiography 51 

Masters and Masters 113 

What is This "Great School"? 119 

The Indo-American Book Co 126 

The League of Visible Helpers 148 

The Edgemoor Sanitarium 161 

The Department of Personal Instruc- 
tion 172 

The "Ethical Section" 187 

The "Technical Work" 200 

"Doctor" Richardson and the Oxy- 

donor 217 

The Sublime Order of Tacks 239 

The Illusory $25.00 250 

The Cat Came Back 262 

TK Goes to India 267 

The Attempts on TK's Life 274 

Another "Individual Preference".. 278 
"Well, Gentlemen, What Are You 

Going to Do About It?" 283 

TK Misses $500.00 by 15 Minutes. . 287 



CHAPTER PAGE 

XXV Uncle John's Hasty Marriage 289 

XXVI What Had Become of the " Great 

School"! 294 

XXVII The Explanations 298 

XXVIII Concerning the Charges 311 

XXIX The Facts Suppressed 327 

XXX The Truth Shall Make You Free. . . 331 

XXXI Harmonics of Evolution 367 

XXXII The Great Psychological Crime 372 

XXXIII The Great Work 378 

XXXIV The "Master" Consults a Medium.. 382 
XXXV The Philosophy as a Whole 390 

XXXVI Florence Huntley 402 

XXXVII The Cost to One Student 408 

XXXVIII The $40,000.00 Trust Fund 413 

XXXIX TK and Freemasonry 418 



CHAPTER I 

For Humanity 's Sake 
a foreword 

Was it ever your personal experience to start out 
somewhere, not knowing just the way to take in order 
to reach your destination? 

Was it ever your personal experience to be mis- 
directed or sent in a needlessly roundabout way — in a 
direction other than that which you wished to travel! 

Were you ever permitted by someone who knew the 
circumstances, to pass along a way or thru a country 
beset with dangers of which you had no knowledge? 
Or permitted to take an unnecessarily long and difficult 
path, when a few words would have saved you from 
your mistake and guided you into a better way ? 

Did you ever take a journey to some place in order 
to see someone or secure some thing, and find upon 
your arrival that the person or thing sought was gone 
or had never been there? 

If you have ever had any of these experiences, there 
are impressions upon your mind that will last as long 
as you live. There is scarcely any impression made 
upon the human mind that lasts and outlasts and 
remains as clear and definite and easily recalled as 
an experience of this kind. Human nature is so con- 
stituted that if we travel to some place under the 
impression and joyous expectation of obtaining some- 
thing, only to find at the end 'of our journey that we 
have been misled, we are not likely soon to forget 
either the experience or the SOURCE of those mis- 
leading impressions. 



10 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Reversing the above questions: 

Was it ever your personal experience, either con- 
sciously or unconsciously, to advise anyone to take a 
certain road or to go in a certain direction that they 
might reach a certain place — when you yourself did 
not know the way? 

Or did you ever permit anyone to pass along a road 
beset with dangers of which they had no knowledge? 
Or to take a needlessly long and difficult path when by 
a few words of advice and explanation you could easily 
have directed them into a shorter and better way? Did 
you ever permit sl person to travel toward some place 
under the impression they would secure certain things 
they felt to be essential to their welfare and happiness, 
without a word of warning, when you knew positively 
their journey would end in failure, waste of time and 
energy, disappointment and possible embarrassment 
and discouragement? 

If you have ever had any of these personal experi- 
ences, you probably still have distinct recollections and 
convictions that to whatever degree you misdirected or 
failed to give others the full benefit of your personal 
knoivledge, in just that degree you failed to do your 
duty by a fellow-traveler, and thereby and at the same 
time forfeited your right to expect the helpful service 
of those who could assist and guide you in your 
journey and save you from the consequences of your 
own possible mistakes and false impressions. 

To fail in our duty to a fellow traveler, even uncon- 
sciously, is at all times an unfortunate thing, but to 
do so consciously and intentionally is absolutely inex- 
cusable, because it is at once a violation of Personal 



FOR HUMANITY'S SAKE 11 

Responsibility — a mark of weakness, selfishness, cow- 
ardice and dishonesty. 

Suppose then, you become aware of the fact that 
some individual or association of individuals are 
traveling in a wrong direction, — that they travel under 
false impressions, — that they expect as a result of their 
journey to realize certain ideals and secure certain 
benefits which will in turn equip them for benefiting 
others: and suppose you know absolutely that they 
are being mislead and that in due time, if they pursue 
their course, they will meet with disappointment, — 
under these circumstances, could there be any doubt 
or question as to your own personal responsibility? 

If we know an individual is going even a city block 
out of his course, do we not gladly take the time to 
draw his attention to his mistake? How much more 
important it is to save a man or woman from a journey 
of a day or year or life-time under false impressions, 
than to save them from walking a few blocks out of 
their way. 



The discoveries which led so quickly and directly 
to TK's withdrawal from the " Great School" were 
known to a Board of Trustees composed of seven men 
as early as April 1, 1916. Further investigations in 
May, 1916, led to additional and unexpected dis- 
coveries, and from that time on it is our opinion that 
this Board of Trustees owed a solemn and imperative 
duty to every student, subscriber and "Friend" of 
the literature of the "Great School," to formulate 
and publish those facts in such manner, as to make it 



12 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

perfectly clear and definite to every one that what 
had for so many years been given out by TK as truth- 
ful accounts of his personal claims and experiences, 
were NOT founded upon facts and actual demonstra- 
tion, and were therefore absolutely unreliable and mis- 
leading. 

This opinion of the writer was shared also by practi- 
cally all the accredited students, both in and outside 
of Chicago, who knew the facts. To have made such 
a statement would have been merely the commonest 
kind of* courtesy, and expression of confidence and 
friendship ; but under the circumstances, it would have 
constituted, at the same time, a most valuable service 
to the student body, to the Masonic Fraternity and 
to the world of honest inquiry and investigation. 

From the time the facts were known to the Trustees, 
the writer, with several others urged at every oppor- 
tunity that such a statement be published, but up to 
the present time — nearly two years after the disclos- 
ures — no statement has been issued and no effort made 
by the Trustees to counteract the far-reaching effects 
of vague rumors and false, misleading influences and 
impressions. Had the Board of Trustees seen fit to 
make a satisfactory statement, and had they published 
what they know to be the facts, in such manner as to 
make it an authentic and reliable record, accessible to 
humanity, this volume would not need to have been 
written. 

As a result of the policy of silence on the part of the 
Trustees, a great many people have for the past twenty 
months lived under a terrible apprehension that some 
dreadful calamity had befallen, what they had been 



FOR HUMANITY'S SAKE 13 

led to imagine and think of, as a modern holy crusade 
of spiritual "science." These sincere and earnest 
men and women could have easily been saved from 
all this personal anxiety and mental torture, had the 
Board of Trustees published the simple Truth right 
at the start, instead of making every effort to suppress 
the facts. 

The truth of this latter statement is borne out from 
the effect of the early information and knowledge 
given to all Chicago students. Here were about fifty 
men and women, about half of whom had been accred- 
ited students for from ten to fifteen years. All of 
them had given freely and liberally of their time, their 
services and means. Each of them had accepted TK 
and his " authority" strictly upon his own valuation 
and their faith in his word and honor as a man. They 
believed in his honesty because they themselves were 
honest. 

It would be natural to expect that any information 
or knowledge, discoveries or disclosures bringing into 
question either the "master" or his "Work" would 
be to all these students an experience, a trial or shock 
of the most severe kind. But these men and women 
loved Truth above all else, and when they learned the 
truth they immediately accepted the facts, and set 
about to readjust their lives to the new order. They 
cheerfully met the new situation, and not one, so far 
as I know, but what is living a nobler, better and wiser 
lie than ever before. 

A word now about the methods employed in pre- 
senting the facts to be found in this book. In talking 
with a great many friends we received enuf ideas 



14 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

to cover almost every phase of the subject, including 
a large and small book, large, medium and small type, 
no illustrations — a few — many, and ' ' the more the bet- 
ter/ ■ We have, of course, been advised to treat the 
whole matter seriously, solemnly, scientifically, sadly, 
humorously, thoroughly, gingerly, and a number of 
other ways. In every instance we have followed all of 
these suggestions to the very best of our ability. 

We have told the simple truth in the clearest English 
at our command, and we are perfectly satisfied to 
let the facts take care of themselves. We are person- 
ally taking no sides and no chances, one way or the 
other. We are for the simple truth, first, last and al- 
ways. Our own personal opinions are worth no more 
and no less than yours — when you have all the data 
before you. You are to be the judge and the jury, the 
first and final Court of Appeals. All we ask is that 
you read carefully from page to page in successive 
order, and restrain yourself from any expression of 
surprise, amazement or judgment until the final page 
is turned, the evidence is all in, and Reason and Con- 
science are fully satisfied. 

In the preparation of this book, we have thot much 
of all those who have come in contact with any of the 
literature of the Great School — so-called, during the 
past fifteen years. But we have thot more of future 
generations, and we wish to leave with you, above 
every other thot, the necessity of getting the facts 
contained in this book squarely and quickly before 
every individual who has ever read any of the litera- 
ture published by TK. 



CHAPTER II 

Quotations From Recent Letters 

"I have been a i Friend of the work,' as "IK? puts 
it, for several years, and if anything has happened 
bearing on the authenticity of the teachings set forth 

in this work, then I want to know it." 

# # * # • 

"I have just been informed in a roundabout way 
that TK has given up the work. 

What does it all mean? 

Did TK give out any statement at the time he gave 
up the work, as to his plans for the future or for the 
best interests of the work? 

It seems to me that there ought to be at least one 
more copy of Life and Action setting forth a plain 
statement of the facts so as not to leave us all in the 

dark." 

# # # * * 

"I was amazed and disappointed when I heard of 
the calamity. I heard no details, and so concluded 
that Ruffians had again entered the Temple. I know 
there were people who had obtained the Harmonic 
Series, and gained power therefrom sufficient to over- 
come and rob his fellowmen. A man named G 

from Spokane, who was the best posted person on the 
philosophy I have ever met, and who professed to be 

a personal friend of Brother C , used the power 

and influence of this fact to swindle a bunch of us out 
of about $15,000.00. The experience is extremely val- 
uable. 

15 



16 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

"My letter of inquiry and application brot the news 
that the school had, in effect, disintegrated. 

I was so sincerely in earnest about the whole mat- 
ter that the news was a profound shock to me. Now 
here is what I want to ask you, and it is more directly 
to the point: 

1. To the best of your knowledge and belief, did 
TK have the spiritual powers he claimed to have, 
especially as set forth in the G. W., — the power to 
use his spiritual senses to communicate with ex-human 
beings at will? 

2. If so, did he assist others to develop the same 
powers, at least, to a large degree? 

3. If these two questions can be answered affirma- 
tively, then can I probably have the same knowledge 
passed on to me, and if so, by whom? To have that 
knowledge is to me now, at least, the greatest thing 

in the whole world." 

# # # * # 

* ' The Great World conflict may have had something 
to do with the sad ending of the Great Work in 

America. ' ' 

# # # # # 

"I am hoping your book will tell us just how many 
of the TK's class of Technical Students came thru 
victorious and made the wonderful demonstration of 

the future life. ' * 

# # * # # 

"I shall never be able to express my gratitude to 
those who are responsible for thus making it possible 
for us to receive the information some of us so greatly 
desire." 



QUOTATIONS FROM RECENT LETTERS 17 

"I was interested in this work some 12 years ago, 
and made application to the TK for admittance to stu- 
dentship. I was directed to a Mr. S , who was to 

pass on me. After relieving me of $40.00, he passed 

me on to a Mr. G who in turn passed me on to a 

Mr. P who told me my grammar was not as good 

as it should be to gain admittance to the Great School. 

# # # * # 

"I am again knocking for admission at the Door of 
the Great School. My divorce will soon be granted, and 
there will then be no one to interfere with my studies 
of the Harmonic Philosophy or in any way tamper with 
the important, secret correspondence with the school. 
# * * My husband and the children have gone to 

live with his people in ." 

# # # # # 

""I have speculated many times regarding this mat- 
ter and have had many questions asked me relative to 
the sudden and unexplained suspension of the publi- 
cation work." 

"I hope you will not close your new book until you 
are enabled to publish, all the facts to which former 
friends and students of the so-called ' Great School * 
are justly entitled. Please tell us what the letters 
'TIT and 'RA' stand for. Was Florence Huntley 

TK 's wife ? What caused her death? ' ' 

# # # # # 

"I would give many years of my life if I were back 
again to the clear, independent thinking that was mine 
before I came in contact with the 'School of Natural 
Science/ so-called." 



18 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

"Is it true the person we knew as TK absconded 
with the funds of the Great School, and also some 
woman? — and is TK now in an insane asylum? This 

is what I have just heard.' ' 

# # # # # 

"What of the philosophy, even if the personal 
claims are not true? Is it all a fraud, and had he no 
knowledge whatever of a future life? Was the pro- 
cess of development all a myth? What of those who 
claim to have made the demonstration? 

"If the Trustees do nothing to counteract the fraud 
that is evident, should this man prove to be a cheat, 
then it appears to me they are a party to it, for silence 
can never clear those who are now responsible to the 

readers of this literature. ' ' 

# # # # # 

"I wonder what the Great Brotherhood over in 
India think of this calamity? Is there really any- 
thing to it, or have we been hypnotized by all this 
talk, we have heard about it? What is the real truth 
about it? There has been so muuh mystery, so much 
air-tightness that it is all a mystery tome * * * * 
However, I presume I will get about as much from this 
letter as I have been able to get heretofore; a veiled 
and uncertain reply, that only makes you crave more 
and more for the Whole Truth, — for there is nothing 
worth a copper but Truth" 



CHAPTER III 

"Fishers of Men" 

One of the most beautiful things connected with the 
movement known as the "Great School," or "Great 
Work in America," is the fact that its activities dis- 
covered and brot into spiritual fellowship as splendid 
a body of men and women as ever exemplified the 
genial warmth and radiant sunshine of Friendship. 
Not that these Friends were privileged to meet 
and become acquainted with any great number of 
other students or readers, but where a friendship was 
achieved between even two persons, that friendship 
was founded upon a mutual loyalty and cordiality 
that made the relationship seem somehow unmistak- 
ably different from all others. 

Of these Friends, some had completed what was 
known as the "Ethical Section"; some were doing 
"Preliminary Work"; others were studying the text 
books, while still others were simply readers. All 
were friendly to what they were accustomed to hearing 
referred to as the "Great Work," and some in all 
these classes were more or less enthusiastic propa- 
gandists among their relatives, friends and acquaint- 
ances, and in fact wherever an opportunity presented 
itself for introducing the philosophy of the "Great 
School." Most of them were subscribers to Life and 
Action, purchased a great many books both for them- 
selves and others ; had distributed a great deal of ad- 
vertising matter and in numerous ways actively identi- 
fied themselves with the movement, generously volun- 

19 



20 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

teering their sympathy, time and means toward help- 
ing to carry on what they sincerely believed to be and 
hoped would accomplish a really grand and unselfish 
educational work for mankind. 

So far as these Friends had come to accept the 
moral philosophy presented in the books, most of them 
had at the same time come to believe in and accept 
the personal and fundamental claims of the man, 
woman or whatever it was who from under a seem- 
ingly impenetrable cover wrote whatever he had to 
say over the nom de plume, TK. 

They accepted him upon his own word and at his 
own valuation. They naturally assumed that he was 
essentially honest, that his personal life was identical 
with the moral philosophy which he so ably preached, 
and under the influence of this centralizing impression, 
in time, became absorbed in the fascinating belief that 
he must have demonstrated all the remarkable results 
which he boldly claims to have accomplished. This 
much once accepted, the next natural and sequential 
step was to believe that the TK was really and right- 
fully all that he so positively and persistently main- 
tains thruout all his writings — a Master. 

With this evolution of a belief there is no fault to 
find. It is a beautiful thing to believe, for belief is 
akin to faith, and Faith, if it be a thing of fire and life, 
whether founded upon fact or fiction is always a 
veritable Temple of Strength to the human soul. 

Every Intelligence when stripped naked, unfettered 
and unburdened from the gross, external, earthly 
vanities and vexations of spirit, is by nature child-like 
and pure, and being child-like delights to believe in 



'FISHERS OF MEN" 21 



the purity and honesty of other souls. Thus when 
the individual reaches a certain stage in his or her 
evolutionary progress, there is experienced from 
within a gentle drawing and tender yearning for 
something which it later on comes to recognize and 
name and love as Truth. It is this Light, this Truth 
and this love of Truth that so satisfies and delights the 
newly born spiritual mind and inspires to belief in 
the essential goodness and honesty of men. 

Nor do our beliefs seem to stop at the estate of man. 
The spirit appears always to reach outward or inward 
to an estate or condition, an inheritance or realiza- 
tion of potential psychical and spiritual possibilities 
which seems to be beyond the estate of man. Not only 
does this appear to be an actual, living and universal 
experience and conviction of every quickened spirit, 
but multiplied thousands of teachers, books and evi- 
dences in Nature the world over bear constant testi- 
mony to human intelligence that such an estate exists. 
And this testimony is to the effect that every indi- 
vidual by right of his being an individual will sometime 
inherit this estate; and that some thru a perfectly 
natural, legitimate and sure process have done so 
even while living in what to external and outward 
appearances seemed to be a purely physical body. 

It is then neither strange nor unnatural that we 
should believe in the existence, the naturalness and 
reality of an estate, or state of being, which translates 
itself to our minds as MASTERSHIP. Such an 
achievement appeals to the intelligence as reasonable, 
natural, desirable, probable and even and ever neces- 
sary to human progress. But with this conviction, 



22 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

there comes from the great world of mankind a uni- 
versal testimony to the effect that all who have 
come to humanity in the name of Truth, announcing 
and holding themselves forth as " masters/ ' were not 
what they professed to be nor did they possess the 
powers which they claimed to possess. 

Thruout religious and philosophic history there 
abound an almost innumerable number of instances in 
which by one means or another, men have established 
themselves, set up a "movement" and drawn about 
them what we have all come to designate as "follow- 
ers." In fact, we need not trouble ourselves to delve 
into the pages of history, for not one of us but this 
very minute can name from one to a half dozen widely 
advertised "movements" which originated, were de- 
veloped and made to run their course right here in 
our country and in our own day. I speak particularly 
of religious and philosophic cults, societies and move- 
ments founded upon a one-man rule and revelation, 
and which become inert and stagnant when the 
founder dies or for any reason ceases to be the active 
and directing head of the organization. 

In every instance these movements represented 
some kind of new interpretation of religion, philos- 
ophy or science. 

In every instance they attracted "followers," — some 
more, some less. 

In every instance the majority of these followers 
were just as human, just as intelligent, just as earnest, 
sincere, conscientious and honest as any of us. 

In every instance, if put to the test, these followers 
would help the unfortunate, forgive the erring, care 



•FISHERS OF MEN" 23 



for the sick and afflicted, comfort the sorrowing and 
pray for the fallen — just as cheerfully and quickly as 
you or I should do — in their own way and to the best 
of their knowledge — just as you or I would do. 

In every instance these movements had some one 
individual at their head who posed as a " master" or 
its equivalent, who was believed to possess and exer- 
cise unusual powers, and whose authority was un- 
questioned — by his particular and devoted followers. 

In every instance these disciples, or followers looked 
upon the "masters" of other than their own move- 
ment as false prophets, fakers and grafters. 

In every instance they quite naturally and humanly 
looked upon their own organization, by whatever name, 
as being fundamentally true and far superior to any- 
thing they had ever experienced up to the time of their 
then present conviction. At the same time, they just 
as naturally and humanly looked upon all movements 
or organizations other than their own, as being false, 
misleading, ridiculous, unreasonable, unscriptural or 
unscientific. 

In every instance, without a single exception, so far 
as we know, these "masters," no matter how honest, 
intelligent and worthy their efforts may have seemed 
in the beginning, in due time came to the "parting of 
the ways." Usually either an affinity scandal or some 
shady money transaction brot them into the spot- 
light of public opinion ; they were dragged from under 
their cloak of "mastership," exposed by the news- 
papers and either sent away to prison to think it over 
or were permitted to resume operations in other and 



24 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

less prosperous pastures and under less favorable 
circumstances. 

And these propositions apply not only to the one- 
man religious movements which have sprung into ex- 
istence, grown up and died with the demise, disappear- 
ance, exposure or legal prosecution of their " master,' ' 
but they apply with equal and direct force to every 
present day one-man institution of the type named, 
operating within or out of practically every city of 
appreciable size in these United States of America. 

Such is the course of evolution that there are always 
those individuals who are graduating upward out of 
previous conditions of limited light, limited experi- 
ence and understanding. Always as the even, silent 
flow of a mighty river, the evolutionary wheel of life 
moves on its way, and new souls are daily and hourly 
being born out of the conservative and old-fashioned 
religions. For these, the new religious and philo- 
sophic movements with their "new" interpretations 
of life are always waiting, and no matter how exact- 
ing, how rational or scientific any individual need 
may be, he will always find some kind of new philos- 
ophy or science that will meet him considerably more 
than half way. 



CHAPTER IV 

The Friendly Light of Truth 

Among the various philosophic movements of the 
past twenty years, nothing has appealed with greater 
or more direct and definite force to a certain analyti- 
cal, rational, logical and moral type of mind than the 
books constituting the literature of what came to be 
known to a few thousand people as the " Great School" 
or " Great Work in America." 

If you ever were or are now seriously interested in 
the "Text Books" of the above named "School," you 
will probably be able to recall very distinctly the first 
impression these books made upon your mind. And 
as time went on and you had opportunity to study the 
literature more carefully and critically, you were prob- 
ably aware of being favorably impressed with some 
one or more of the following definite suggestions : 

1. The clear appearance of honesty. 

2. The work appeared to be entirely educational. 

3. The literary style and command of the English 
language were pleasing. 

4. The plainly evident and positive self assurance 
of the authors. 

5. The clear, concise and unmistakable statements 
and standards of morality. 

6. The constant and oft repeated references to cer- 
tain "work" which had already been done, and other 
"work" which was in process of realization. 

7. The numerous interesting and definite promises 
and prophecies of what was expected to be accom- 
plished in the future. 

25 



26 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

8. The general tone of the movement, and 

9. The most definite and lasting impression of all : 
The clearly apparent cmd emphasized absence of graft 
of any and every description from the entire move- 
ment. Probably not a single man or woman ever read 
the philosophy seriously, but that at sometime ex- 
pressed the sentiment: "Here at least is a movement 
free from graft.' * 

On the face of it, not one of the impressions enum- 
erated but what appeals naturally and strongly to 
every intelligence interested in self -improvement and 
the betterment of conditions for humanity. It is not 
strange therefore that out of several hundred thousand 
readers of the books, some men and women, here and 
there felt prompted by one cause or another to make 
direct inquiry regarding the nature of the secret per- 
sonal instruction so frequently referred to and adver- 
tised all thru the Harmonic Series. 

It was perfectly natural and to be expected that 
some should wish to know the nature of this "secret 
work" and the terms upon which it could be obtained. 
And just as natural to wonder why so few people were 
ever led to make this personal inquiry; why a less 
number ever made formal application, and why a still 
less number were ever admitted to studentship. 

This latter fact, however, may be accounted for on 
the basis that no matter what the external appearance 
of honesty may be concerning any particular philos- 
ophy, there is always and inevitably that spiritual 
something at the heart of every movement, every 
leader, every book and every statement that is felt, 
either consciously or unconsciously, on every plane of 



THE FRIENDLY LIGHT OF TR UTH 27 

public opinion. And it was undoubtedly this spiritual 
something that influenced the possible two or three 
hundred thousand readers of the books to the extent 
that not more than two thousand ever even applied 
for the " secret work" in the entire nineteen years of 
the " Great School's" activities. 

But there are those who were more or less deeply 
and vitally impressed with the apparent honesty of 
the TK, and who aligned themselves either secretly 
or openly on the side of his ' i Great Work. ' ' 

It is safe to say, and one would naturally expect 
it to be so, that practically all of these were sub- 
scribers to the magazine, "Life and Action." When 
therefore we say that the number of subscribers never 
at any time exceeded 4,000, we are very near the num- 
ber of all those who were favorably impressed to be- 
lieve or at least to consider the TK's philosophy in 
any given year. When on top of this we add the very 
significant statement that only about half of the total 
number of subscribers kept their subscriptions re- 
newed from year to year, we may safely reduce the 
number of those actually and deeply converted to the 
philosophy, to about 2,000. This number would of 
course include all students, applicants, those doing 
preparatory work and all those designated merely as 
"Friends." 

If you happen to be one of the 4,000 readers of the 
former "Life and Action" magazine, you will recall 
that the last number you received was in August, 1916. 
That upon inquiry as to why the magazine did not 
reach you after that month, you learned that for some 



28 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

reason unexplained, its publication had been for the 
time at least suspended. 

As time passed and neither magazine nor explana- 
tion, apology nor refund reached you, you became im- 
pressed that something was wrong. You ordered 
books only to be told without explanation of any kind 
that they were out of print. If you were an applicant 
for the ' ' secret work, ' ' you were notified that all work 
of personal instruction had been discontinued — "for 
certain reasons which cannot now be explained. ,, If 
you sent contributions to the "League of Visible 
Helpers, ' ' they were returned to you with thanks, and 
the information that no contributions were then being 
accepted — but not a word of explanation as to why. 
If you inquired about the Edgemoor Sanitarium, you 
were surprised to learn that that institution had been 
legally closed on July 1st, 1916, but not a word of 
explanation was offered or to be had as to why. If 
you tried to reach the TK, your letter was either 
answered by someone else or returned to you with the 
information that he had withdrawn from the "Great 
School" and was no longer in any way connected with 
the movement — but not a single sentence as to the 
cause of this new and unexpected turn of affairs. 

With the passing of months, hundreds of students 
and readers continued to write asking : Why no maga- 
zine? Why no books? Why no personal instruction? 
Why no replies to former inquiries? etc., etc. Some of 
these letters were simple requests for information, 
while many bore indications of the most pitiful mental 
suffering. Almost every human emotion from simple 
disappointment thru all the progressively destructive 



THE FRIENDLY LIGHT OF TRUTH 29 

stages of fear up to and including the most frantic 
and fanatical appeals for the Truth, whatever it might 
be, were expressed in these letters. 

Some pleaded for light. Some threatened to appeal 
to the Government for investigation, imagining some- 
how that TK had been made away with and that 
those in charge were destroying the " Great Work." 
Some coaxed and wept, entreated and demanded, be- 
sought and begged, — but all to no effect. Those in 
charge had fully decided to make no reply of any kind 
to any correspondence, except where new remittances 
had to be returned, in which case it was merely stated 
that the Indo-American Book "Co." had gone out of 
business. "Say absolutely nothing," was the rule, and 
so closely was this applied to everybody and every- 
thing that as time passed, it began to look as if abso- 
lute silence was, after all, one way of successfully 
handling the situation. 

And after months of patient, painful, bitter waiting 
for some measure of light on the subject, many of these 
splendid, earnest, honest, loyal Friends are still writ- 
ing, evidently still believing in the existence of those 
human attributes known as politeness, courtesy, kind- 
ness, and the final triumph of Faith and Truth over 
silence and darkness. 

Thus for nearly two years, you have asked ques- 
tions of yourselves which no man without data could 
possibly figure out, and in patience — waited. You 
have wondered if TK is dead, if the "work" had failed 
for lack of funds, if this and if that, until hundreds 
of possibilities had suggested themselves to your mind 
— but out of it all came nothing definite or tangible or 



30 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

satisfying. Having in many ways proven your own 
confidence in the movement, you very naturally ex- 
pected some measure of confidence in return. You 
felt that you had a right to know the facts, whatever 
they might be. You felt yourself in a kind of mental 
and spiritual bondage, and that it was your right to 
demand the truth from those who had a knowledge 
of the facts. ^ 

From the very beginning of certain disclosures the 
writer with a few others has taken the open stand 
that not only every student and subscriber is by every 
possible right fully entitled to the TRUTH, just as the 
facts are known to the Board of Trustees, but thai 
every individual who has ever in any manner or degree 
come in contact with TK or his literature during the 
past nineteen years is equally entitled to the truth 
Not only this, but there is absolutely no reason why 
the present general reading public should not have 
access to the facts. There is on the other hand every 
reason in the world why the facts should be made 
accessible, not only to the present generation, bul 
particularly to future generations. 

To this end I have endeavored to bring together ir 
this book a sufficient amount of "tangible evidences ' 
and known and proven facts to enable every reader tc 
judge for himself or herself whether or not the TK 
and his movement known as the "Great School* * anc 
"Great Work" were or are justly entitled to the con 
fidence, sympathy and financial support heretofore 
placed at his command. 

In Life and Action, Bound Volume No. 4, page 252 
TK states that his "life is an open booh to all thosi 



TH E FRIENDLY LIGHT OF TRUTH 31 

who have a right to read its pages." This is a per- 
fectly fair, frank and admirable position to take, and 
to my mind, there is no one in the world who has a 
greater right to read the pages of TK's "open book" 
and know the facts, than those who have already come 
to believe in his honesty or who may sometime be 
misled by any statements or claims he has made or 
may yet make. 

Here at this point, we may profitably remind our- 
selves that over a period of more than twenty years, 
TK has published certain remarkable personal claims, 
clearly calculated to convey the impressions : 

1. That he was a " master.' ' 

2. That he was sincere and honest. 

3. That by a secret, scientific process of develop- 
ment, he had demonstrated the continuity of life after 
death. 

4. That he' had successfully and without price 
taught many students to make the same scientific 
demonstration for themselves. 

5. That he possessed absolute and unmistakable 
evidences and proofs to support all his statements 
and claims. 

6. That he possessed a very ancient, secret ethical 
formula, the working out of which would give the fav- 
ored student a moral code as definite as the science of 
mathematics. 

In this volume it shall be our aim to carefully con- 
sider, analyze, formulate and present such facts and 
observations as will help to throw a searching and 
final light upon all these personal claims, and in doing 
this it will become necessary to take into consideration 



32 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

the fact that for a great number of years TK has, as it 
now appears, knowingly and intentionally misrepre- 
sented a great many accessory facts involving the 
scope of his " Great School" movement and the extent 
of its actual influence ; the number of students, appli- 
cants and readers of his books ; the actual amount of 
real " charity" work accomplished; the number of 
free books and magazines distributed; the number of 
" technical" students; his assumed knowledge and 
treatment of insanity; the facts as to his living in 
poverty and being in need of money with which to 
carry on his "work," etc., etc. 

These are plain, frank statements of fact, but made 
as gently as I can find English in which to convey tiie 
literal letter and spirit of truth. I anticipate that they 
may come to some of you in something of the nature 
of a shock, but let me assure you that others before 
you have passed thru the same experience, and have 
come out of it all, better, stronger, nobler men and 
women than ever before. The "accredited students" 
especially have for over a year had sufficient data so 
they could judge for themselves, and fully 90% have 
long since virtually forgotten their former serious 
"beliefs" in TK, and now enjoy the great wide world 
of God's free sunshine, as should all Sons and Daugh- 
ters of Universal Light. 

In handling the above propositions involving a con- 
sideration of TK's claims and the evidence for or 
against their validity, we shall endeavor to keep strictly 
within both the spirit and literal letter of truth. What- 
ever questions are raised or phases of the situation 
are discussed, we shall endeavor to make only such 



THE FRIENDLY LIGHT OF TRUTH 33 



statements as the reader himself may, from the evi- 
dences submitted, judge to be fully established beyond 
all question or doubt. To achieve this desirable end, 
let it here be impressed indelibly upon your mind that 
the observations, testimonies, evidences and proofs 
herein presented rest upon and are fully sustained by 

1. Many living witnesses. 

2. Sworn testimony of eye witnesses. 

3. Newspapers and Public Records, such as City, 
County and State. 

4. Records of various Banks. 

5. TK's own published statements in books and 
magazines. 

6. TK's personal correspondence. 

7. Carefully kept diaries covering a period of over 
sixteen years. 

8. Photographic reproductions of letters, cancelled 
checks and other documents. 

9. TK's own failure and flat refusal to make any 
attempt to justify his record or disprove the things 
with which he has been openly and fearlessly charged. 

If, from the evidences submitted, it becomes clear to 
you that TK is not and never was what he claimed to 
be, a "master"; that his personal claims are false 
and misleading; that his "authority" was but 
assumed, and that his own morality is but empty talk, 
— then does it not devolve upon each and every one 
who has in any way helped to advertise this "move- 
ment," to come out in a clear, calm, cheerful, manly 
and womanly spirit, and from this time forward, set 



34 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

himself or herself the task of spreading a knowledge 
of the facts? 

It will then be understood from this that the writer 
feels that every soul in search of Truth, or who may 
in the course of time set out upon such a search, is en- 
titled to as much evidence as may be needed to either 
prove or disprove the claims made by TK relative to 
his "mastership" and the so-called "Great School" 
of which he claimed to be the sole American repre- 
sentative and head. This position is suggested by the 
following : 

1. The facts should be established in the interest 
of Truth, for Truth's sake. 

2. This alone will place the personal responsibility 
for the movement and its results exactly where it be- 
longs. 

3. It is due the Order of Freemasonry, because of 
certain definite misrepresentations made by TK and 
because of his personal exploitation of many members 
of the Masonic fraternity. 

4. Publishing the facts will make any revival or 
continuance of the "Work" difficult, it not altogether 
impossible. 

5. It will prevent future spiritual worship of TK 
and his unscrupulous spirit-guides as "masters" and 
"Christs." 

6. It should serve as a basis for warning the gen- 
eral public against the scheming and grafting of the 
always more or less numerous "masters" that flourish 
in all our large cities. 

7. It would seem to be the personal responsibility 



THE FRIENDLY LIGHT OF TRUTH 35 

of all who come to know the facts to do what they can 
to let these facts be freely known. 

8. The truth is due other movements and other 
teachers, many of whom are doing a most needed, valu- 
able and really wonderful educational work for man- 
kind. 

9. There are afloat all kinds of false rumors re- 
garding TK himself; to the effect that he is dead; 
that he has gone to Europe to help stop the war ; that 
he has retired to renew his youth ; that he is now in 
seclusion and poverty ; that he has a new affinity, etc., 
etc. It is therefore due him as an individual that the 
truth be made known, tho possibly TK personally 
would just as leave it should not be told. 

As to the writer's authority for compiling and edit- 
ing the evidences to be found in this volume, he holds 
that the possession of even one fact positively disprov- 
ing any one of the false impressions and personal 
claims made by TK, and especially to the effect that 
he is or ever was a "master," would constitute suf- 
ficient authority and reason for this volume. 

But the very fact that the evidences submitted for 
your consideration directly controvert not only one, 
but literally dozens of TK's false claims and impres- 
sions, makes it imperative upon the writer as a duty 
to mankind, to bind these evidences into durable form, 
that they may stand as the unimpeachable testimony 
of a duly qualified witness to Truth for such time as 
the facts may be needed by humanity. 

Before passing on to a consideration of the various 
departments and phases of the absorbingly interesting 
story that awaits us, let me here impress upon your 



36 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

mind the fact that it shall be no part of the purpose 
or mission of this book to speak in other than the 
most kindly and cordial manner of the ethical philos- 
ophy set forth in the i ' Harmonic Series. ' ' 

In so far as this philosophy can be successfully sepa- 
rated from the personal claims of TK, so that no part 
of it remains as a lure to or disguise or cloak for his 
system of deception and misrepresentation, there is 
neither excuse nor reason why any one should abandon 
the principles therein set forth. If these principles 
are principles, — as many of us know from personal 
experience that they are — they are true. And if they 
were true yesterday, they are just as true today, and 
will remain true tomorrow, and the next day and for- 
ever. 

If in your search for truth you have found enlight- 
enment, satisfaction and food for your mind in the 
ethical teachings of these books ; if you are convinced 
that the moral philosophy is sound and true, then 
there is every reason why you should continue in this 
conviction and embody these principles in your daily 
life and conduct. For principles do not change with 
the coming or going of a day, and whatever was true 
a month or day or hour ago is just as true now and in 
this blessed assurance, every soul is, by Nature, pro- 
vided with the spiritual and psychical "necessities of 
life." 

If by personal experience we know how insignificantly 
little we have thus far been able to make use of from 
Nature's great store-house of Truth, can we then at 
all imagine that this daily need and supply of the soul 
can ever become exhausted or even interrupted? To 



THE FRIENDLY LIGHT OF TRUTH 37 

think so is materialism. Shall we not rather "live by 
faith" — the same kind of faith by which we have all 
lived and been led in the past? Shall we not see the 
utter impossibility of ever confining all of Truth in one 
book or even all the books in the world; just as it is 
impossible to confine the millions and billions of cubic 
miles of atmosphere in one building or all the build- 
ings of the earth. 

In this broader view of the immensity of Truth, the 
fact that our individual supply must be renewed daily 
and that this supply will always be sufficient unto the 
day, each of us may realize the wisdom of the follow- 
ing condensed statement of fact, 

" Faith steps out on seeming void, 
And finds the solid rock." 



CHAPTER V 
A Brief Sketch of TK's Life 

This would seem to be the time and place to give the 
reader a brief sketch of TK's personal life, his early 
childhood, youth, young manhood, middle age and ad- 
vancing years ; his personal ' * sacrifices, struggles and 
labors in behalf of the Great School and Great Work 
in America." 

Because of the nature of his work in behalf of 
humanity, as he explains, he found it expedient under 
differing circumstances to assume various names and 
noms de plumes. Knowing this, you will no doubt wish 
first of all to know TK's real name. This I shall give 
you now, and later on I shall give you a detailed list 
of the names and initials by which he has been known 
to his more intimate students and friends. 

John E. Richardson, or TK, was, according to his 
autobiography, born July 20, 1853, in a log cabin on 
the South bank of the North branch of " Skunk River." 
Keokuk County, Iowa. 

He remained at home until his twentieth year, when 
he entered the Iowa State University, at Iowa City, 
Iowa. Here he was a sub-freshman for three years, 
leaving school at the close of his freshman year in 
1878. 

He was married in S , Iowa, May 19, 1880, and 

a few months later went to San Francisco, Cal. In the 
autumn of 1881 he went to Stockton. Here he worked 
as a County Clerk, read law in his spare time, and was 

38 



A BRIEF SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 39 

admitted to the practice of law Nov. 10, 1885. In the 
spring of 1886, he moved to Bismarck, N. D. It was 
here on May 7, 1887, that he first met Mrs. Florence 
Huntley. 

From Bismarck, Mr. Eichardson moved to Minne- 
apolis, Minn., in 1887. Shortly thereafter, in the same 
year Mrs. Huntley also moved to Minneapolis. 

On Dec. 1, 1888, Mr. Richardson became a partner 
in a law firm of three members, with a Mr. J. H. R. 
and a Mr. S. B. H., with offices at 740 Temple Court. 
On May 17, 1889, the third partner, J. H. R., withdrew, 
leaving the partnership to S. B. H. and Mr. Rich- 
ardson. 

In 1889 or early 1890, TK moved to Chicago. With 
the exception of about a year (1895), when he lived in 
Council Bluffs, Iowa, Mr. Richardson's home from 
1890 to 1908 was in Chicago. 

By about 1898, the various Masonic ' 'Associations' ' 
of which Mr. Richardson had been secretary, etc., hav- 
ing passed into liquidation or otherwise ceased to be 
operable, he was by his few intimate friends, supposed 
to be in straitened financial circumstances. Anyway, 
both Mr. Richardson and Mrs. Huntley, in 1891, went 
to Iowa City, Iowa ; he to take a position with a manu- 
facturing jewelry concern, and she to become the editor 
of a newspaper. Here they remained until the Spring 
of 1902, when together they returned to Chicago. 

At this time Florence Huntley took a flat at what 
was then 19 North Kedzie Ave. "TK" had his "of- 
fice" in the same building and in the same flat, but 
lived at his home about two blocks distant. It was 
under these circumstances, and with Mrs. Huntley as 



40 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

his collaborator and editor of his work, that Mr. Rich- 
ardson began writing "The Great Psychological 
Crime." 

This work continued daily for nearly two years. 
TK's only income during this time was supposed to 
be $45.00 per month. $40.00 of this was paid by a 
student for his "services" as a " bookkeeper/ ' but as 
the total time required on the books did not exceed 
twelve hours a month, it will be understood that the 
"business" part of the arrangement was merely nomi- 
nal. The truth is that this student simply assumed 
the heavy financial burden of $480.00 a year in order, 
as she was impressed to believe, to make it possible 
for the "master" to be free to "begin" his "great 
work. ' ' 

"Where did he get the other $5.00?" This was 
also contributed by a student for a little bookkeeping 
job — at about $4.50 more than the labor was actually 
worth to the student. 

At the time TK was writing the G. P. C, he already 
had one book in print, "Harmonics of Evolution/ 9 
written by Florence Huntley and published in 1899. 
With the publication, therefore, of "The Great Psy- 
chological Crime" in 1893, TK's "Great School" had 
two authoritative "text" books. These two volumes, 
with a general list of "supplemental" books became 
the nucleus of what in ten years grew into a business 
paying nearly $25,000 annually, and possessing assets 
which, at a conservative business valuation, would 
amount to several hundred thousand dollars. 

In 1908 Mr. Richardson moved his family to 215 
South Kenilworth Ave., Oak Park, 111., into a beautiful 



A BRIEF SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 41 

home bought expressly for this purpose by one of the 
then "students." 

A few months later, at TK's request, another resi- 
dence was purchased by the same student, and Mrs. 
Huntley also moved from Chicago to Oak Park. 

On Jan. 15, 1909, TK's legal wife died in Pasadena, 
Calif., and on Jan. 31, 1910, Mr. Richardson and Mrs. 
Huntley were married. Two years later, in her home 
in Oak Park, on Feb. 1, 1912, Florence Huntley Rich- 
ardson died. 

TK continued to live in Oak Park, until in Dec. 
1915, when as "General Superintendent," he became 
a resident at the Edgemoor Sanitarium, near Ocono- 
mowoc, Wis. It was while here and following certain 
disclosures in March, 1916, that he withdrew from the 
"Great Work" and severed all connections with what 
had come to be spoken of as the ' ' Great School. ' ' 

Regarding this "Great School" or TK's "master- 
ship": as you read, you will learn that in not a single 
instance did any accredited student seriously question 
any of his personal claims or see or examine any of 
his supposed credentials, evidences, records, proofs, 
etc. 

This is rather remarkable news, but in time you find 
it to be absolutely true, and the whole story, when 
heard, sounds more like a tale from the Arabian Nights 
than it does a modern occult adventure in High 
Finance and Frenzied Philanthropy. 



CHAPTER VI 

The Skeptic and the Believer 

"You say you believe that this ' Great School ' really 
exists?" 

"I not only believe it, but I know it." 

"Hoiv do you know it?" 

"Just the same as I know I am alive." 

"But how?" 

"Because I have some of their books." 

"Would that be proof?" 

"Well, I have corresponded with them too." 

"Whom do you mean by 'them'?" 

"Why, the Indo-American Book Co." 

"Is the Indo-American Book Co. the Great School?" 

"No, but they publish the books of the Great 
School." 

"Do you have any other proof of the existence of 
the ' Great School'?" 

"Yes, I know a man who has known about the 
Great School for years." 

"Has known about it?" 

"Yes, he is a student or something." 

"But what does he know?" 

"He went to Chicago purposely to meet some of 
them. He investigated the whole thing thoroughly. 
He says there can be no doubt but what there is a 
Great School." 

"Did they give him any real proofs?" 

42 




CH, %/ 




r ® 








-4K 

The Terrors on tbei>3 
Threshold. !>$ 




44 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

11 Yes. He met some of the students. He talked with 
them and questioned them closely.' ' 

"And what did they say?" 

1 i They admitted there is a Great School. ' ' 

"But how do they know this?" 

"Why they themselves are members of it, — they are 
accredited students." 



"Is this all the evidence they have?" 

"0, no. The Great School has been in existence for 
many thousands of years. They possess the oldest his- 
toric records known to man. ' ' 

"Known to man?" 

"Yes— to TK's students, I mean." 

"How do you know this?" 

"One of their students told me." 

"How does this student who told you, know that 
these records are the most ancient known to man — 
or that they exist at all?" 

"Because another more advanced student in the 
Great School, told him." 

"But how does this more advanced student know?" 

"Because it is generally understood by all the stu- 
dents." 

"Do you know of amy other positive evidences of the 
existence of the Great School ? ' ' 

"Yes, there are many evidences. Why, they have 
thousands of students scattered all over the world." 

"How do you know this?" 

"0, there must be many thousands of them." 

"What makes you think so?" 



THE SKEPTIC AND THE BELIEVER 45 

"Because it is such a big movement. ' ' 
" About how many students would you judge there 
to be?" 

"I should say at least 50,000." 

* * # # # 

"What other positive proofs are there ?" 

"They have an ethical course of personal instruction 
that is just as exact and scientific as mathematics. ■ ' 

"Do you really think it is as scientific as mathe- 
matics ?" 

"I am positive of it." 

"What are your reasons for thinking so?" 

* * I know students who are taking it. ' ' 

"Do they say it is scientific ?" 

"Every one of them. ,, 

"How do they determine this?" 

"Why every student is required to get the same 
answer to each problem that every other student gets. ' ' 

"Who decides what this answer must be?" 

"Their master.' ' 

"How does he know that a certain answer is the 
true and only answer?" 

"Because he received it from his master." 

"How did his master know he had the true answer?" 

"Because all the answers are supposed to be thou- 
sands of years old, with the exception of one which 

TK himself is supposed to have changed. 

# * # * * 

"Do you have any other proofs that the School 
exists?" 
"Yes, the Technical Work." 
"Do you think there is such a thing?" 



46 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

"Yes, positively." 
"How do you know?"' 
"I have been told there is." 
"By anyone who knows?" 
"Yes, by students themselves." 
"And how do they know?" 
"Some of them have taken it." 
"And can they talk face to face with spirits?" 
"A great many of them can." 
"How many?" 

"I can only judge from what TK himself has writ- 
ten. My impression is that he must have trained at 

least a hundred." 

# * # # # 

"Do you know any more proofs?" 

"Yes, the fact that there is a real master at the 
head of the Great School." 

"Do you think he is a real master?" 

"Why of course he is a real master." 

"How do you know he is genuine?" 

"Do you think all these students would believe in 
him if he were only faking?" 

"But do they actually know he is a real master?" 

"They are all positively sure of it." 

"What makes them so sure?" 

"Well, some of them know it, and these tell the 
others." 

"Then how do these know, who tell the others?" 

"The master himself has told them so." 

# # # # * 

"Do you believe this Great School of TK's is really 
the Parent of Modern Freemasonry?" 



THE SKEPTIC AND THE BELIEVER 47 

"I am sure of it." 

"But what proof have you?" 

"Why, it stands to reason." 

"But why do you think so?" 

"All the students say so." 

"How do they know that what they say is true?" 

"Well, Masonry must have had a beginning some- 
time, somewhere." 

"Have any of TK's students ever seen and exam- 
ined his Great School's Masonic records?" 

"Some of them must have seen the original records, 
otherwise they would not recommend the whole thing 
as they have." 



"Do you have any more proofs that this Great 
School exists?" 

"Yes, many of them." 

"But why do you say so?" 

"Because all the students say so." 

"You are sure there is no graft connected with the 
Great School?" 

"There couldn't be any." 

"Why?" 

"Because." 

"Because why?" 

"They do not take money for their teaching or any 
of their work." 

"Whom do you mean by 'they'?" 

"I mean TK, of course." 

"Perhaps he gets it just the same." 



48 



TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 




^Official 

Four-FM 



THE SKEPTIC AND THE BELIEVER 49 

" Impossible. All his students would know it if he 
did. He is a very poor man. Once he wrote 30,000 
letters in about ten years, and scarcely received so 
much as a postage stamp for reply. Would not this 
testimony prove that there is no graft connected with 
the movement ?" 



"What do you know personally of the reliability 
of their system of identifying one's affinity, or soul 
mate?" 

"Nothing, personally. But their very first Text 
book is entirely devoted to this subject. It is not a 
book of fiction or theories, but facts. By a system 
of triangles the Great School proves conclusively 
that there is one mate — and one only for every person 
born." 

"But does TK himself actually know that Nature 
furnishes one affinity — and one only — for every per- 
son?' ' 

"Yes, of course he does." 

''Why do you say so?" 

"Because in order to become a master, one has to 
accomplish his own 'individual completion/ " 

"What do you mean by ' individual completion'?" 

"It means an indissoluble union and permanent in- 
dividual association with one's true affinity upon 
every plane of being." 

"Would this 'individual completion' once accom- 
plished, be permanent thruout all eternity?" 

"Of course." 

"And has TK himself, in his own personal life, 



50 



TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



actually made this remarkable scientific demonstra- 
tion !" 

"0, yes, indeed he has — several times" 

# # * # # 

Thereupon, the inquisitive skeptic was properly im- 
pressed, and hastened to send a large check for the 
good of a "GREAT CAUSE.' , 




CHAPTER VII 

Autobiographical Sketch of the Life and Work of 
John E. Richardson, TK. 

Students of Natural Science, 
Disciples of the Great School, 
Devotees of the Harmonic Philosophy, 
Friends of the Great Work, 
Neophites in "the Order of Tacks," 
Members of the League of Visible Helpers, 

and 
Fellows of "The Old Group"; 

Beloved Friends: 

I am writing this letter, not because I believe its 
subject matter is of any real importance, but because 
some of you have repeatedly asked me, and urgently 
solicited me to do so — under the evident impression 
and earnest conviction that my identity will some day, 
in the far-away future, be a matter of very serious 
and almost vital importance to the success of The 
Great Work — in the minds of future generations. 

For thirty years — lacking a few months, I have 
labored incessantly, under assumed names, and in ob- 
scurity, as the sole, living, "Accredited Representa- 
tive* * of The Great School in this country. 

During all that time it would have been easily pos- 
sible for me to have taken the public into my confi- 
dence, and thus to have established my personal iden- 
tity beyond all possible question; but I did not do it 

51 



52 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

— and the question "WHY?" naturally arises in the 
minds of a good many of those who have not, as yet, 
been in position to study the subject in all its varied 
phases and from all its different angles. 

I have already answered the question a good many 
times orally, and to individual Students and Friends 
who, from time to time, have asked it; but I do not 
recall having ever put my answer in writing, nor in 
such form that it might be accessible for future refer- 
ence by those who might deem it a matter of some 
importance. For this reason I am going to take this 
occasion to express it in writing as briefly and con- 
cisely as possible: 

1. When I first came into conscious touch with the 
Great School, and was admitted to the ranks of its stu- 
dents, I was a practicing attorney on the Pacifiic coast 
As such, I was the legal representative of a number of 
the most important business and financial institutions 
and interests on the coast. In that capacity I was 
brought mto close personal touch with, and business 
relations, as well as intimate social acquaintance, with 
the important men of the political as well as the busi- 
ness and financial world* 



•Comparing this with the third paragraph following, we 
observe that Mr. R. was a "practicing attorney," "represent- 
ing a number of the most important business and financial 
institutions and interests on the coast," as early as the Sum- 
mer of 1883. 

As a matter of fact, the Attorneys' Register at Stockton 
shows that he was not even admitted to the practice of law 
until November 10, 1885. 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TICS LIFE 53 

2. — As a public lecturer along educational, scientific, 
philosophic, religious, economic, sociological, civic and 
political lines of thought, I was a familiar figure and 
personality from Olympia to Old Mexico; and BE- 
LIEVED that I had many loyal and warm personal 
FRIENDS in almost every village and hamlet on the 
coast. 

3. — In addition to these avenues of approach to and 
touch with the public, my ambitions had taken me ac- 
tively and aggressively into the current of political 
life where, although young in years, I had become a 
conspicuous figure. 

It was in the midst of these conditions that I found 
myself in the city of Stockton, San Joaquin County, 
California, in the summer of 1883, at the age of 30 
years. 

Then it was that the Great Master, H-N-K, came to 
me and identified himself as a "Master" and Inner 
Member of the Great School. He had come from the 
Central Temple in the fastnesses of the Himalayas, 
in far-off India. 

He offered to instruct me in the knowledge of Nat- 
ural Science, and enable me to demonstrate the con- 
tinuity of individual life beyond the incident of physi- 
cal " death* ' — provided I could, to his satisfaction, 
prove that I possessed the Discretion to make a wise 
use of that knowledge, the Loyalty to devote my life 
to the Cause of Truth, and the Humility of Soul to 
smk my personality entirely from public view, and 
there, in obscurity, carry on the Great Work, alone 
and undismayed, the balance of my earthly life, if the 
interests of the Cause demanded this abnegation. 



54 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

To make a very long and exceedingly interesting 
and fascinating subject as brief and to the point as 
possible, I accepted this offer, proved myself qualified 
for the ordeal, to his satisfaction, took up the Work 
and, under his personal instruction for thirteen (13) 
months, made the scientific demonstration, retired 
from the practice of Law, went "into the silence," 
and obscurity as completely as possible where I have 
remained for thirty (30) years — and here I am, tell- 
ing you about it. 

And now let me go back to the beginning of the 
story of my identity and, as best I can, tell it in 
chronological and sequential order. The beginning 
point of the story ought to be my birth, but that im- 
portant event falls outside the limits of my own mem- 
ory, and I must therefore, go to the only available 
source of information, which is the family bible. 

Therein it is solemnly recorded that I was born 
July 20th, 1853. My name is therein said to be " John 
Richardson," and by that name I was known through- 
out my childhood and youth, and until I was old 
enough to develop a dislike of so short a name as 
"John." When about eighteen (18) years old I took 
unto myself a middle name "Emmett" which I con- 
ceived to be an euphonious combination, and there- 
after, and to this day, I have signed my name to all 
legal documents as "John E. Richardson"; and by 
that name am I known among all my people (brothers 
and sisters). 

According to the Bible Record, my parents reared 
fifteen children— 7 boys and 8 girls— of which family 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 55 



I was the 10th child in regular order, and the 6th son 
— and was born on July 20, 1853. 

If my Father and Mother correctly understood 
their lineage, she was a mixture of German and 
Welch, and he of Scotch and English — with a strain 
of American Indian on my Mother's side. 

At the time of their marriage they moved at once 
from Indiana to Iowa — then a Territory, and inhab- 
ited almost entirely by Indians — and settled on a sec- 
tion of Government land and immediately began the 
rearing of their large family, the cultivation of a 
farm and the raising of stock. 

They located in Keokuk County, near the village of 
Lancaster — (then the County Seat) — where my Father 
entered upon his more than sixty years of missionary 
labors as a "Hard-Shelled" Baptist Minister— " Self- 
made J ' in every sense of the term. 

As a matter of principle his ministry was a "Gift" 
to his people, in that he received not so much as a 
penny for his religious labors during his entire life, — 
thus exemplifying the Spirit of the Great Work. 

If the statements of the older members of the fam- 
ily are true (and I have no reason whatever to doubt 
them), I was born in a log cabin on the South bank 
of the North branch of "Skunk River/ ' about one 
mile North of the village of " Lancaster/ ' Keokuk 
County, Iowa. 

But before the time limit of my memory, the family 
had removed from there to a farm, some three miles 
South of the "South Skunk' ' River, and about two 
miles North East of the town of Martinsburg, same 
County and State. 



56 



TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



Here it was that the experiences of my life first 
impressed themselves upon my Consciousness with 
sufficient emphasis to fix them in my memory. It was 
here that my conscious life began, and memory first 
registered. 

At the age of four (4) I became the caretaker of 
my younger brother and it was then, and in that ca- 
pacity, that I began to realize the meaning of Personal 
Responsibility. 

When seven (7) years old the family removed to 
a "River-Bottom-Land" farm between the two 
14 Skunk Rivers" and my Father (whose Ministry 
brought him no income) had to depend upon other 
lines of labor for the living of himself and family. 
As rapidly as the children became old enough, each 
was fitted into some occupation and became a "cog" 
in the family "Wheel of Economics." 




AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 57 

At seven (7) it fell to my lot to become "Sawyer" 
in a little steam saw-mill owned by my Father — 
chiefly for the accommodation of his neighbors — who 
brought their logs from a distance of three to five 
miles in every direction, to have them sawed into 
lumber of all kinds for the building of houses, barns, 
buildings of all kinds, and fences, in the heart of a 
pioneer country. 

For nine (9) years I almost lived in the little "four- 
foot-pen" that constituted the station or "post" of 
sawyer and, because of the necessities of the general 
situation, I was depended upon — and was able to — 
perform the duties of a grown man, and that, too, in 
a position of responsibility much greater than that of 
the average man of mature intelligence. 

When I was sixteen (16) years old — the older boys 
of the family — with but one exception — had either 
married and assumed the responsibilities of families 
of their own, or had gone "for themselves" into the 
big round world to fight their own battles and make 
for themselves places of their own choosing. 

This made it possible for me to " escape' ' from my 
11 sawyer's four-foot prison" and render a more im- 
portant service in charge of the farm, where I labored 
for the next two years with my older brother G. until 
I was eighteen (18) years old. 

Father was a Baptist minister — as I have before 
stated — and as such, a firm believer in the "Doctrine 
of Election," which held that the destiny of every 
individual has been determined in advance — "before 
the foundation of the world" — by Election. Some 



58 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

are " elected* ' to "go to heaven" and "sit at the right 
hand of God" forever, and all the others are "elected" 
to go to hell and, under the dominion of Satan, burn 
forever. 

But under a somewhat more generous "doctrine" 
he permitted his boys to "elect whether they would 
leave the parental roof at the age of 18, or remain 
until 21. If they elected to go at 18, they did so 
empty handed; but if they remained until 21, they 
received from him a horse, saddle and bridle and a 
suit of clothes. These were the reward of the three 
years' labor, from 18 to 21. 

For the following reasons I elected to leave at 18: 

1. Because of my usefulness in the economic sys- 
tem of the home, I had no time nor opportunity to 
obtain the kind of education I desired. 

2. During the nine years in the saw-mill and two 
on the farm, I had a never-ending day-dream that 
some time I would go to college, obtain an education 
and become a writer, a journalist, a newspaper 
writer. 

3. But as my 18th birthday drew near, I realized 
that Father and Mother were growing old and that 
in a few years more they would need the care of some 
one of us. About two months before my 18th birth- 
day, I went to my brother G. and confided to him my 
dream; but realizing that he had a far better intelli- 
gence than myself, I proposed that he go to College 
and finish his education and that I would remain and 
run the farm and help him through and at the same 
time care for the "old folks at home." 



60 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

4. But if he did not wish to do that, then I pro- 
posed that he remain and let me go unaided* 
After due consideration it was decided that I should 

go. 

The day of my emancipation came — July 20th, 1871 
— without a word to anyone but brother G. 

With $2.50 in my pocket — and a borrowed horse — 
I rode 62 miles due north into the wheat fields where 
there was a great demand for harvest hands. It was 
the happiest day of my life. I was free — free to earn 
money and go to college and take my place in the 
world. 

I found a man who needed help and the next morn- 
ing went to work — binding wheat for M. L , in 

Iowa County — at $3 per day. 

I worked 17 days, received $51 cash — my first money 
as a "man" — rode back home, went to district school 
a term, applied for a teacher's certificate, got it, 
taught school a year, took the money earned (at $40 
per month), went to Iowa City, Iowa, and in Septem- 
ber, 1873, entered the State University as a " Sub- 
Freshman. ' ' 

My college work was along the lines of an indepen- 
dent course and was finished in 1878 without degrees 
of any kind, but with a certificate from the President 

•From what has recently been ascertained, his parents mort- 
gaged their farm in order to send John E. to school, and 
thirty-five years later, a member of the family was still paying 
interest as a result of this debt — at a time when Mr. Richard- 
son was himself receiving a monthly interest of $130.00 from 
one of his investments, and when it is known he must have 
been handling hundreds of thousands of dollars. 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 61 



giving full credit for all the work done, — which cov- 
ered most of the curriculum of Law, Medicine and 
an M. A.* 
Passing over a period of two years ' desultory work, 

I was married in S , Iowa, May 19th, 1880, to Miss 

Pauline 8 (daughter of Owen and Ann S , 

old and respected citizens of Iowa), a young and 
charming woman of rare musical ability — a pianist, 
vocalist, and teacher of music — and a woman of excel- 
lent mental and moral fiber — a Presbyterian of the 
Scotch blood — who, I think, had hoped, in time, to 
lead me into the "fold*' — but failed. 

In September of that year I bade her a temporary 
good-bye, and went to San Francisco, where, in the 
political interests of General Rosecrans, I directed the 
editorial policy of the "Examiner" — Democratic or- 
gan — for one year — 1880 and 1881 and until Rosecrans 
withdrew from the race for the nomination^ 



•The records of the Iowa State University of Iowa City, 
Iowa, show that he not only entered the State University as a 
"Sub-Freshman' ' in 1873, but he remained a "Sub-Fresh- 
man" for 3 years : 1873-74, 1875-76, 1876-77. He registered 
again in 1877-78 as a Freshman. He did NOT study either 
Law or Medicine, since he was only a Freshman in the philoso- 
phic course of the Collegiate Department, and he certainly 
could not have ' ' COVERED most of the curriculum of Law, 
Medicine and M. A." 

tOn the following page, we present an exact photographic 
reproduction of a letter which tells its own story, and which 
flatly contradicts Mr. Richardson's claims in this respect. 



62 



TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



I then resigned my position on the "Examiner," in- 
tending to go direct to N. Y. City and accept the posi- 
tion of managing editor for the N. Y. Times — which 
position was offered me. 



rasittei? 



November 23,1916 



Dear Sir: 

Acknowledging your 3 of the 
I8th re one John E. Richardson. 



the writer has been connected 
with The Examiner ever since it was 
changed from an evening to a morning 
paper, October 4,1880, and the party 
referred to in your letter was never 
connected with the Editorial Department 
of thie newspaper. 



Your 




Financial 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 63 

On my way I stopped at Stockton, San Joaquin 
County, Cat., to visit a few days with Maj. P. V. 
B , then buyer for the large firm of grain mer- 
chants, Stewart and Smith, of that town. 

While there I had occasion to look up a point of law, 
concerning the probating of an estate and appoint- 
ment of a guardian for minor heirs — to accommodate 
a poor fellow whose wife had just died, leaving him 
the care of three little children. 

I stepped into a prosperous appearing "law office/ ' 
introduced myself, and asked a fine appearing gentle- 
man of 45 years, or, so, if I might examine his copy 
of the Revised Statutes of California. 

He courteously handed me the volume, and went on 
with his work, while I was looking up the point of law 
I had in mind. 

When I had finished I returned the book to him, 
thanked him and turned to leave his office, when he 
asked me if I was a stranger to Stockton, to which I 
replied in the affirmative. He asked me if I was a 
lawyer, and I replied that I had studied law, but had 
never practiced. His next question was whether I 
would care to practice if a good opening presented 
itself, and I replied that it would "depend." 

He then told me with the utmost frankness, that he 
wanted a partner, a young man of intelligence and 
ambition ; that he liked my appearance and was satis- 
fied that I was the man for the place, if I would ac- 
cept it; that without further recommendation than 
my personal appearance, he would offer me an equal 
partnership with him in an established practice that 



64 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

netted him over $25,000 annually; and closed by ask- 
ing me to consider the matter and call on him again 
before leaving the city.* 

I told him I had never contemplated practicing law ; 
that his offer was so unexpected, as well as so unpre- 
cedented, that I was not prepared to answer him off- 
hand; but that I appreciated deeply the compliment 
he had paid me, as well as the confidence his offer 
implied, and would give the matter careful considera- 
tion and see him again before leaving Stockton. 

During the next few days I made diligent inquiry 
as to this remarkable man, only to find that he was a 
man of unimpeachable character, and one of the best 
lawyers on the Coast. 

Within a week I called at his office and was cor- 
dially greeted with the inquiry: "Well, young man, 
have you come to accept my offer?" 

I replied, "Yes, if it is still open." He said it was, 
and asked when I would be ready to begin. I told 
him right away, if that was agreeable to him. He 
replied: "All right, so much the better; there is your 
desk and chair, consider yourself installed, and to- 
morrow I will draw up formal articles of co-partner- 
ship," which he did; and thus I became a practicing 
Attorney — something I had never contemplated for 

*It here appears quite clear that handsome young men 
were in great demand in law offices in Stockton at that time 
(1881). Therefore an offer of an equal partnership in a $25,- 
000 a year law practice was not an unusual inducement to be 
offered to a total stranger solely upon the recommendation of 
his good looks. Hence the truth of this paragraph is per- 
fectly evident. 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 65 



mrAit\ Psn-tim Urol offa-iZ t»»t. • 

(ft it »tty *»-«U|; J •tor/»/«cd «.t Sloc<Yf > n. > ,g'«»i v JVt.yn.iM Cjun/q. Ooj , . t© 

*f«i *i-»j!afiHj e^ mi £*i*i£ ''•»«> *»7»/»«'«>t-Ai\*«vt ©^ « gwKt-Otwii ^%«- •vntftOT* 

fnn-4 - '• «f«cn.vt..cr«<'<vt». o. f.o-d-^i^cw t^,i, Mn^i. HJ iu«.t e/«'ft> 7t*tt»Vi«j 
7,:,., tf,< fn.l o/ ^r«4 IrJMfi c7,,7 c /,-,„ 

^ attj*]*td Mvfo <■' Y"°*/ ,M " trM * ■*>*ic«mt%«j 7c.«v o^tcVfev/t-crttVit'? »«.«f. 
•J»7J ''5j *»*Mr«> n/tVn accent,©; Jir^^'... ^ *y y.ait «v«© 1/ J ~i,f>.< 

^■/V rotwrftau*!^ Mf>4«ftW in 1 fit V<rt«.i«»r '''ij) wc«v£ oi\ iwX 7, , 1 u/-r-r-»< 
^A.i7l 3 •*«* «*©-*«*«« t*^ ff,, •>«,„,/ ©^ 7«^ 5 7,,.,> m-, i^.,9 

>H«« J 7...D ^»M»^irt> J return**) K. t„«W< fo7-,.„t ^,rv,v/<rc> Turn r *'.J 
tfttllftj to 7,<wt 7,o ©#«*. «^,«. 7,» ***t3 €,£&«. a sfcn..g«. *v S*v«-I«f.~, 
4© u/i.«7, 3 *-tj»~l-t$ •*■« Mc o^f.'.maiV. , tA r.Wo<J ^ J Wfl i f. fn^d c.«i«> 
3 rfpI/.«> #ict£ J 7»r.c> 4£>at/9 Zatw Xtkt 7,ot> xtirU JVi-tieli'efd *A« «i*f «j-»«t ••".«. 
Itfflj **t\tti-vt J •vcuT.d enri t' jM-eietiVi. »f « g^-tr©" everting -pititi+hi «.tii7J, nni 3 

r»fl,ib &~t &***%&* Jtf,t»¥* 

fit iUtr% told T»tf wtiU. ilit JUh*o*£ jrctn4<,\t*t t -fjini 7.* tvriivTtd 6 •}:> « t-TM t»». rt 
ycMfi Cj »rf" «^ iTV*?7].gfi»«C "'i# ««iT>04«w» , fT-ri-f 7i^ 7«7fl9 r«y njjpi nr„„ tt nn"> v«| 
J«t.*f.'t3 tfwvf J •»<« *it •*»*«■ frrr lit f7«-*l,tf J *ve»u7^ c.tcfU |U, V/,«^ wit\,*>*± 
ifm-fi.**- rtevnvm tvie< «Ct?»r» -^a.i ttivj -)itr»mal ci']))itarnnci | 7* t «w»u7J «H|fM- •«• t •*» 

«f "«7 •J»«.»-A. •»•»). *f» »*»>£ 7^.„v tn ivm tfctW"l7.j7,ci -prait't* H,«.k -mtt.i Jiiw. »wi- 
tl-U 00 ° "»•»«% «»77y, o«B Oct* it< <i»-fti«oj ,*»» t« cr~**>n. +U* >~vJTU- mm ± 
«i«Vl7 tm /t.it« e.gaut bi^re liaving Wl C,^j 

^ Wi 7,..,» 3 7,o^ -Htvti- «<m,^«.^f>7o.*t«J 1*rcicLc4M 9 low , ff.«-t T,i. *ff%~- 
«*«• Ao \inc*jJtcfci *u *f«77 »* J* wnprtCtc/tMive) /Acvt 3 w«» -no4 •|.i-»*»<v*-t> to 
<H1VUTM 7k-w% *ff-Xnt*& j Ii L f rt«vt J a>f>]irtcicJ-t.& divftsly'lit C<m\plfn*tn.l* 7> f. /•«»«) 
1»«.i3 '«* "• ««t-W c^i fftt c<rrt^«>tncr 7«-t* •£]»*■ «n*jH,'td t on~i *v«.«i7i g^l ^1C 'MCCtri-r 
<i\rl£«1 t«w»n'OtTnt.tr.» S> iit 7,,,« ncjnm Itjv, >. 7toviVtcj S^»M<T«v 

^ M r,r>g tfil. nuf^iw Jnyj J f».«c/« <J',l. 9 t,jt /««»>..«, W fo /i u , e«r».»^«o^7i 
mim m7«f tmfrn* iictt Tit vw«»« n trio*. «^ t..„^ r nc7t«17i ftfi«r««Tii* nn ^ ^^^ «/ 

fV^rf.'r» a rrt»« 5 c«77ti nt %u *jf*it '''"i »vc.j cotc(i«77 v jptttri u^fi. H*t 
.tt^Mt'^ "Ht77 ^.«m«;it.«.tt 7,«.»,t «t«~ e «**"« to •crifVl -M.it *jyt» ?' 3 rtsfU»*4 ' 

LH,! ^ it .« iti"77 *jS;,t " >/f *«V«> ^ WW, ^ «.*»<.£ w*mJ ^cr M 7i it rt«tt^/ 
'*» l«5'« -J '^ 7,.„. r,«jJi< «ht« W ,./ H»*t wo, f.y-t«o-£7c to7,.-v Wl 1 VftTt't*/ 

•• 017 t-«*gW, »ftni>f7« tliiltt/t«-j tftfcrt 14 your dto+t '''.7* c/iau-, r«nii?ir g».*rJ«I^ 
»',,»t.77te> f "'i *Vtrt«-.Tow 3 i^# ^««r t^ frrMtoI 0.^.1711 ^ C»f «^t*j<vf "-— /•*!. 

• X,, ■«?«./«> f»«* •**«• *»"«U^ Mtvf77 »»ttj /C| »i ill tct'-^ <»n^. ?.'~*. O tVt«4V 4ljwt. 



66 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

one moment until my first meeting with him, a week 
before.* 

Our relations, both business and personal, were of 
the most pleasant and cordial nature and without a 
jar of any kind. Two years later, 1883, he withdrew 
from the firm, retired from active business life, and 
left me in full posession and ownership of a profes- 
sional practice which he had spent many years in 
building up and which netted me over $30,000 an- 
nually, f 

I continued in the active practice until the Autumn 
of 1886, at which time, for reasons which I will ex- 
plain later, I moved — with my wife and two little 
girls — to Bismarck, North Dakota — the Capital of the 
then Territory — and joined a former University class- 
mate in the practice of law. J 

But the prospect was not a pleasing one to me, and 
at the end of a year, in 1887, I removed to Minneapo- 

*Observe that this was in 1881, before TK had even com- 
menced the study of law. Also that he very significantly 
omits the full name of his generous partner. 

fThis shows that in the five years from 1881 to 1886, TK 
imagines he made something like $115,000.00 — which was 
pretty good for a young attorney's first year in actual 
practice. 

JThe reasons which he says he will explain later, but does 
not, are given by his former law partner in Stockton, that 
11 Richie " was not satisfied with his meager earnings, and 
decided to "try his luck" in Bismarck. He therefore gave up 
his $30,000.00 a year law practice and moved to the new 
location. 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICA L SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 67 

lis, Minn., and there formed a law partnership with 
another college classmate and did a good business un- 
til the Autumn of 1890, when I came to Chicago, and, 
with three of the good business men of Chicago, 
formed a business association with which I remained 
connected until 1900 ; since which time I have devoted 
my whole life and energies to the writing and publi- 
cation of books and other literature along the lines of 
Natural Science and the "Harmonic Philosophy," 
and to the work of Personal Instruction in the Great 
School and Work. 

I have, thus far, given but a very brief and prosaic 
account of the purely business and materialistic side 
of my life. It was, however, a life as far removed 
from the dull or prosy as that of any man of all my 
acquaintance. On the contrary, it has been a life full 
of the most intense activity and interest all along the 
way, from the day I left the parental home and rode 
away into the big, bright, fascinating world, as I saw 
it the morning of my 18th birthday, down to the pres- 
ent moment. 

For instance, I have said nothing of the years of 
political activities and ambitions on the Pacific coast, 
where I became a conspicuous figure, and where I un- 
doubtedly could and would have become governor of 
the great commonwealth of California, had I yielded 
to the solicitations of my many friends — and had I not 
observed the "finger of destiny" pointing eastward; 
and had not the Great Master led me up out of those 
vain-glorious conditions by the hand of love and taken 
me to the mountain top whence I could look back, 



34 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

himself or herself the task of spreading a knowledge 
of the facts? 

It will then be understood from this that the writer 
feels that every soul in search of Truth, or who may 
in the course of time set out upon such a search, is en- 
titled to as much evidence as may be needed to either 
prove or disprove the claims made by TK relative to 
his "mastership" and the so-called "Great School" 
of which he claimed to be the sole American repre- 
sentative and head. This position is suggested by the 
following : 

1. The facts should be established in the interest 
of Truth, for Truth's sake. 

2. This alone will place the personal responsibility 
for the movement and its results exactly where it be- 
longs. 

3. It is due the Order of Freemasonry, because of 
certain definite misrepresentations made by TK and 
because of his personal exploitation of many members 
of the Masonic fraternity. 

4. Publishing the facts will make any revival or 
continuance of the "Work" difficult, it not altogether 
impossible. 

5. It will prevent future spiritual worship of TK 
and his unscrupulous spirit-guides as "masters" and 
"Christs." 

6. It should serve as a basis for warning the gen- 
eral public against the scheming and grafting of the 
always more or less numerous "masters" that flourish 
in all our large cities. 

7. It would seem to be the personal responsibility 



THE FRIENDLY LIGHT OF TRUTH 35 

of all who come to know the facts to do what they can 
to let these facts be freely known. 

8. The truth is due other movements and other 
teachers, many of whom are doing a most needed, valu- 
able and really wonderful educational work for man- 
kind. 

9. There are afloat all kinds of false rumors re- 
garding TK himself; to the effect that he is dead; 
that he has gone to Europe to help stop the war ; that 
he has retired to renew his youth; that he is now in 
seclusion and poverty; that he has a new affinity, etc., 
etc. It is therefore due him as an individual that the 
truth be made known, tho possibly TK personally 
would just as leave it should not be told. 

As to the writer's authority for compiling and edit- 
ing the evidences to be found in this volume, he holds 
that the possession of even one fact positively disprov- 
ing any one of the false impressions and personal 
claims made by TK, and especially to the effect that 
he is or ever was a "master," would constitute suf- 
ficient authority and reason for this volume. 

But the very fact that the evidences submitted for 
your consideration directly controvert not only one, 
bat literally dozens of TK's false claims and impres- 
sions, makes it imperative upon the writer as a duty 
to mankind, to bind these evidences into durable form, 
that they may stand as the unimpeachable testimony 
of a duly qualified witness to Truth for such time as 
the facts may be needed by humanity. 

Before passing on to a consideration of the various 
departments and phases of the absorbingly interesting 
story that awaits us, let me here impress upon your 



36 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

mind the fact that it shall be no part of the purpose 
or mission of this book to speak in other than the 
most kindly and cordial manner of the ethical philos- 
ophy set forth in the ' ' Harmonic Series. ' ' 

In so far as this philosophy can be successfully sepa- 
rated from the personal claims of TK, so that no part 
of it remains as a lure to or disguise or cloak for his 
system of deception and misrepresentation, there is 
neither excuse nor reason why any one should abandon 
the principles therein set forth. If these principles 
are principles, — as many of us know from personal 
experience that they are — they are true. And if they 
were true yesterday, they are just as true today, and 
will remain true tomorrow, and the next day and for- 
ever. 

If in your search for truth you have found enlight- 
enment, satisfaction and food for your mind in the 
ethical teachings of these books ; if you are convinced 
that the moral philosophy is sound and true, then 
there is every reason why you should continue in this 
conviction and embody these principles in your daily 
life and conduct. For principles do not change with 
the coming or going of a day, and whatever was true 
a month or day or hour ago is just as true now and in 
this blessed assurance, every soul is, by Nature, pro- 
vided with the spiritual and psychical "necessities of 
life." 

If by personal experience we know how insignificantly 
little we have thus far been able to make use of from 
Nature's great store-house of Truth, can we then at 
all imagine that this daily need and supply of the soul 
can ever become exhausted or even interrupted? To 



THE FRIENDLY LIGHT OF TRUTH 37 

think so is materialism. Shall we not rather "live by 
faith" — the same kind of faith by which we have all 
lived and been led in the past? Shall we not see the 
utter impossibility of ever confining all of Truth in one 
book or even all the books in the world; just as it is 
impossible to confine the millions and billions of cubic 
miles of atmosphere in one building or all the build- 
ings of the earth. 

In this broader view of the immensity of Truth, the 
fact that our individual supply must be renewed daily 
and that this supply will always be sufficient unto the 
day, each of us may realize the wisdom of the follow- 
ing condensed statement of fact, 

" Faith steps out on seeming void, 
And finds the solid rock." 



CHAPTER V 
A Brief Sketch of TK's Life 

This would seem to be the time and place to give the 
reader a brief sketch of TK's personal life, his early 
childhood, youth, young manhood, middle age and ad- 
vancing years ; his personal * i sacrifices, struggles and 
labors in behalf of the Great School and Great Work 
in America." 

Because of the nature of his work in behalf of 
humanity, as he explains, he found it expedient under 
differing circumstances to assume various names and 
noms de plumes. Knowing this, you will no doubt wish 
first of all to know TK's real name. This I shall give 
you now, and later on I shall give you a detailed list 
of the names and initials by which he has been known 
to his more intimate students and friends. 

John E. Richardson, or TK, was, according to his 
autobiography, born July 20, 1853, in a log cabin on 
the South bank of the North branch of ' ' Skunk River. ' ' 
Keokuk County, Iowa. 

He remained at home until his twentieth year, when 
he entered the Iowa State University, at Iowa City, 
Iowa. Here he was a sub-freshman for three years, 
leaving school at the close of his freshman year in 
1878. 

He was married in S , Iowa, May 19, 1880, and 

a few months later went to San Francisco, Cal. In the 
autumn of 1881 he went to Stockton. Here he worked 
as a County Clerk, read law in his spare time, and was 

38 



A BRIEF SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 39 

admitted to the practice of law Nov. 10, 1885. In the 
spring of 1886, he moved to Bismarck, N. D. It was 
here on May 7, 1887, that he first met Mrs. Florence 
Huntley. 

From Bismarck, Mr. Eichardson moved to Minne- 
apolis, Minn., in 1887. Shortly thereafter, in the same 
year Mrs. Huntley also moved to Minneapolis. 

On Dec. 1, 1888, Mr. Richardson became a partner 
in a law firm of three members, with a Mr. J. H. R. 
and a Mr. S. B. H., with offices at 740 Temple Court. 
On May 17, 1889, the third partner, J. H. R., withdrew, 
leaving the partnership to S. B. H. and Mr. Rich- 
ardson. 

In 1889 or early 1890, TK moved to Chicago. With 
the exception of about a year (1895), when he lived in 
Council Bluffs, Iowa, Mr. Richardson's home from 
1890 to 1908 was in Chicago. 

By about 1898, the various Masonic " Associations' ■ 
of which Mr. Richardson had been secretary, etc., hav- 
ing passed into liquidation or otherwise ceased to be 
operable, he was by his few intimate friends, supposed 
to be in straitened financial circumstances. Anyway, 
both Mr. Richardson and Mrs. Huntley, in 1891, went 
to Iowa City, Iowa ; he to take a position with a manu- 
facturing jewelry concern, and she to become the editor 
of a newspaper. Here they remained until the Spring 
of 1902, when together they returned to Chicago. 

At this time Florence Huntley took a flat at what 
was then 19 North Kedzie Ave. "TK" had his "of- 
fice" in the same building and in the same flat, but 
lived at his home about two blocks distant. It was 
under these circumstances, and with Mrs. Huntley as 



40 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

his collaborator and editor of his work, that Mr. Rich- 
ardson began writing "The Great Psychological 
Crime." 

This work continued daily for nearly two years. 
TK's only income during this time was supposed to 
be $45.00 per month. $40.00 of this was paid by a 
student for his "services" as a " bookkeeper/ ' but as 
the total time required on the books did not exceed 
twelve hours a month, it will be understood that the 
"business* ' part of the arrangement was merely nomi- 
nal. The truth is that this student simply assumed 
the heavy financial burden of $480.00 a year in order, 
as she was impressed to believe, to make it possible 
for the "master" to be free to "begin" his "great 
work. ' ' 

"Where did he get the other $5.00?" This was 
also contributed by a student for a little bookkeeping 
job — at about $4.50 more than the labor was actually 
worth to the student. 

At the time TK was writing the G. P. C, he already 
had one book in print, "Harmonics of Evolution/ 9 
written by Florence Huntley and published in 1899. 
With the publication, therefore, of "The Great Psy- 
chological Crime" in 1893, TK's "Great School" had 
two authoritative "text" books. These two volumes, 
with a general list of "supplemental" books became 
the nucleus of what in ten years grew into a business 
paying nearly $25,000 annually, and possessing assets 
which, at a conservative business valuation, would 
amount to several hundred thousand dollars. 

In 1908 Mr. Eichardson moved his family to 215 
South Kenilworth Ave., Oak Park, 111., into a beautiful 



A BRIEF SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 41 

home bought expressly for this purpose by one of the 
then " students.' ' 

A few months later, at TK's request, another resi- 
dence was purchased by the same student, and Mrs. 
Huntley also moved from Chicago to Oak Park. 

On Jan. 15, 1909, TK's legal wife died in Pasadena, 
Calif., and on Jan. 31, 1910, Mr. Richardson and Mrs. 
Huntley were married. Two years later, in her home 
in Oak Park, on Feb. 1, 1912, Florence Huntley Rich- 
ardson died. 

TK continued to live in Oak Park, until in Dec. 
1915, when as "General Superintendent,' 9 he became 
a resident at the Edgemoor Sanitarium, near Ocono- 
mowoc, Wis. It was while here and following certain 
disclosures in March, 1916, that he withdrew from the 
"Great Work" and severed all connections with what 
had come to be spoken of as the "Great School." 

Regarding this "Great School" or TK's "master- 
ship": as you read, you will learn that in not a single 
instance did any accredited student seriously question 
any of his personal claims or see or examine any of 
his supposed credentials, evidences, records, proofs, 
etc. 

This is rather remarkable news, but in time you find 
it to be absolutely true, and the whole story, when 
heard, sounds more like a tale from the Arabian Nights 
than it does a modern occult adventure in High 
Finance and Frenzied Philanthropy. 



CHAPTER VI 

The Skeptic and the Believer 

"You say you believe that this i Great School ' really 
exists ?" 

"I not only believe it, but I know it." 

"Hoiv do you know it?" 

"Just the same as I know I am alive." 

"But how?" 

"Because I have some of their books." 

"Would that be proof?" 

"Well, I have corresponded with them too." 

"Whom do you mean by 'them'?" 

"Why, the Indo-American Book Co." 

"Is the Indo-American Book Co. the Great School?" 

"No, but they publish the books of the Great 
School." 

"Do you have any other proof of the existence of 
the < Great School'*" 

"Yes, I know a man who has known about the 
Great School for years." 

"Has known about it?" 

"Yes, he is a student or something." 

"But what does he know?" 

"He went to Chicago purposely to meet some of 
them. He investigated the whole thing thoroughly. 
He says there can be no doubt but what there is a 
Great School." 

"Did they give him any real proofs?" 

42 





e> 







A 



The Terrors on thq>y 
Threshold. Igji 





#/i 



44 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

" Yes. He met some of the students. He talked with 
them and questioned them closely. ' ' 

"And what did they say?" 

"They admitted there is a Great School." 

"But how do they know this?" 

"Why they themselves are members of it, — they are 
accredited students. ' ' 



"Is this all the evidence they have?" 

"0, no. The Great School has been in existence for 
many thousands of years. They possess the oldest his- 
toric records known to man. ' ' 

"Known to man?" 

"Yes— to TK's students, I mean." 

"How do you know this?" 

"One of their students told me." 

"How does this student who told you, know that 
these records are the most ancient known to man — 
or that they exist at all?" 

"Because another more advanced student in the 
Great School, told him." 

"But how does this more advanced student know?" 

"Because it is generally understood by all the stu- 
dents." 

"Do you know of any other positive evidences of the 
existence of the Great School?" 

"Yes, there are many evidences. Why, they have 
thousands of students scattered all over the world." 

"How do you know this?" 

"O, there must be many thousands of them." 

"What makes you think so?" 



THE SKEPTIC AND THE BELIEVER 45 

"Because it is such a big movement. ' ' 

"About how many students would you judge there 

tobe?" 

"I should say at least 50,000.' ' 

* * * # # 

"What other positive proofs are there f n 

"They have an ethical course of personal instruction 
that is just as exact and scientific as mathematics." 

"Do you really think it is as scientific as mathe- 
matics ?" 

"I am positive of it." 

"What are your reasons for thinking so?" 

1 * I know students who are taking it. ' ' 

"Do they say it is scientific ?" 

"Every one of them." 

"How do they determine this!" 

"Why every student is required to get the same 
answer to each problem that every other student gets. ' ' 

"Who decides what this answer must be?" 

"Their master." 

"How does he know that a certain answer is the 
true and only answer!" 

"Because he received it from his master." 

' ' How did his master know he had the true answer ! ' ' 

"Because all the answers are supposed to be thou- 
sands of years old, with the exception of one which 

TK himself is supposed to have changed. 

# * # * * 

"Do you have any other proofs that the School 
exists?" 
"Yes, the Technical Work." 
"Do you think there is such a thing?" 



46 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

"Yes, positively. ' ' 

"How do you know?"* 

"I have been told there is." 

"By anyone who knows?" 

"Yes, by students themselves." 

"And how do they know?" 

"Some of them have taken it." 

"And can they talk face to face with spirits?" 

"A great many of them can." 

"How many?" 

"I can only judge from what TK himself has writ- 
ten. My impression is that he must have trained at 
least a hundred." 

•f? TT ^P tP TT 

"Do you know any more proofs?" 

"Yes, the fact that there is a real master at the 
head of the Great School." 

"Do you think he is a real master?" 

"Why of course he is a real master." 

"How do you know he is genuine?" 

"Do you think all these students would believe in 
him if he were only faking?" 

"But do they actually know he is a real master?" 

"They are all positively sure of it." 

"What makes them so sure?" 

"Well, some of them know it, and these tell the 
others." 

"Then how do these know, who tell the others?" 

"The master himself has told them so." 

# # # # # 

"Do you believe this Great School of TK's is really 
the Parent of Modern Freemasonry?" 



THE SKEPTIC AND THE BELIEVER 47 

"I am sure of it." 

"But what proof have you?" 

"Why, it stands to reason." 

"But why do you think so?" 

"All the students say so." 

"How do they know that what they say is true?" 

"Well, Masonry must have had a beginning some- 
time, somewhere." 

"Have any of TK's students ever seen and exam- 
ined his Great School's Masonic records?" 

"Some of them must have seen the original records, 
otherwise they would not recommend the whole thing 
as they have." 



"Do you have any more proofs that this Great 
School exists?" 

"Yes, many of them." 

"But why do you say so?" 

"Because all the students say so." 

"You are sure there is no graft connected with the 
Great School?" 

"There couldpi't be any." 

"Why?" 

"Because." 

"Because why?" 

"They do not take money for their teaching or any 
of their work." 

"Whom do you mean by 'they'?" 

"I mean TK, of course." 

"Perhaps he gets it just the same." 



iS 



TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 




^Official 
Fbiir-Flusb 



THE SKEPTIC AND THE BELIEVER 49 

"Impossible. All his students would know it if he 
did. He is a very poor man. Once he wrote 30,000 
letters in about ten years, and scarcely received so 
much as a postage stamp for reply. Would not this 
testimony prove that there is no graft connected with 
the movement f" 



"What do you know personally of the reliability 
of their system of identifying one's affinity, or soul 
mate?" 

" Nothing, personally. But their very first Text 
book is entirely devoted to this subject. It is not a 
book of fiction or theories, but facts. By a system 
of triangles the Great School proves conclusively 
that there is one mate — and one only for every person 
born." 

"But does TK himself actually know that Nature 
furnishes one affinity — and one only — for every per- 
son?" 

"Yes, of course he does." 

"Why do you say so?" 

"Because in order to become a master, one has to 
accomplish his own 'individual completion.' " 

"What do you mean by ' individual completion'?" 

"It means an indissoluble union and permanent in- 
dividual association with one's true affinity upon 
every plane of being." 

"Would this 'individual completion' once accom- 
plished, be permanent thruout all eternity?" 

"Of course." 

"And has TK himself, in his own personal life, 



50 



TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



actually made this remarkable scientific demonstra- 
tion ?" 

"0, yes, indeed he has — several times" 

# * # # # 

Thereupon, the inquisitive skeptic was properly im- 
pressed, and hastened to send a large check for the 
good of a " GREAT CAUSE." 




CHAPTER VII 

Autobiographical Sketch of the Life and Work of 
John E. Richardson, TK. 

Students of Natural Science, 
Disciples of the Great School, 
Devotees of the Harmonic Philosophy, 
Friends of the Great Work, 
Neophites in "the Order of Tacks,' ' 
Members of the League of Visible Helpers, 

and 
Fellows of "The Old Group ,, ; 

Beloved Friends: 

I am writing this letter, not because I believe its 
subject matter is of any real importance, but because 
some of you have repeatedly asked me, and urgently 
solicited me to do so — under the evident impression 
and earnest conviction that my identity will some day, 
in the far-away future, be a matter of very serious 
and almost vital importance to the success of The 
Great Work — in the minds of future generations. 

For thirty years — lacking a few months, I have 
labored incessantly, under assumed names, and in ob- 
scurity, as the sole, living, lt Accredited Representa- 
tive" of The Great School in this country. 

During all that time it would have been easily pos- 
sible for me to have taken the public into my confi- 
dence, and thus to have established my personal iden- 
tity beyond all possible question; but I did not do it 

51 



52 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

— and the question "WHY?" naturally arises in the 
minds of a good many of those who have not, as yet, 
been in position to study the subject in all its varied 
phases and from all its different angles. 

I have already answered the question a good many 
times orally, and to individual Students and Friends 
who, from time to time, have asked it; but I do not 
recall having ever put my answer in writing, nor in 
such form that it might be accessible for future refer- 
ence by those who might deem it a matter of some 
importance. For this reason I am going to take this 
occasion to express it in writing as briefly and con- 
cisely as possible: 

1. When I first came into conscious touch with the 
Great School, and was admitted to the ranks of its stu- 
dents, I was a practicing attorney on the Pacifiic coast. 
As such, I was the legal representative of a number of 
the most important business and financial institutions 
and interests on the coast. In that capacity I was 
brought mto close personal touch with, and business 
relations, as well as intimate social acquaintance, with 
the important men of the political as well as the busi- 
ness and financial world* 



•Comparing this with the third paragraph following, we 
observe that Mr. R. was a "practicing attorney," "represent- 
ing a number of the most important business and financial 
institutions and interests on the coast/' as early as the Sum- 
mer of 1883. 

As a matter of fact, the Attorneys' Register at Stockton 
shows that he was not even admitted to the practice of law 
until November 10, 1885. 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TICS LIFE 53 

2. — As a public lecturer along educational, scientific, 
philosophic, religious, economic, sociological, civic and 
political limes of thought, I was a familiar figure and 
personality from Olympia to Old Mexico; and BE- 
LIEVED that I had many loyal and warm personal 
FRIENDS in almost every village and hamlet on the 
coast. 

3. — In addition to these avenues of approach to and 
touch with the public, my ambitions had taken me ac- 
tively and aggressively into the current of political 
life where, although young in years, I had become a 
conspicuous figure. 

It was in the midst of these conditions that I found 
myself in the city of Stockton, San Joaquin County, 
California, in the summer of 1883, at the age of 30 
years. 

Then it was that the Great Master, H-N-K, came to 
me and identified himself as a "Master" and Inner 
Member of the Great School. He had come from the 
Central Temple in the fastnesses of the Himalayas, 
in far-off India. 

He offered to instruct me in the knowledge of Nat- 
ural Science, and enable me to demonstrate the con- 
tinuity of individual life beyond the incident of physi- 
cal " death' ' — provided I could, to his satisfaction, 
prove that I possessed the Discretion to make a wise 
use of that knowledge, the Loyalty to devote my life 
to the Cause of Truth, and the Humility of Soul to 
smk my personality entirely from public view, and 
there, in obscurity, carry on the Great Work, alone 
and undismayed, the balance of my earthly life, if the 
interests of the Cause demanded this abnegation. 



54 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

To make a very long and exceedingly interesting 
and fascinating subject as brief and to the point as 
possible, I accepted this offer, proved myself qualified 
for the ordeal, to his satisfaction, took up the Work 
and, under his personal instruction for thirteen (13) 
months, made the scientific demonstration, retired 
from the practice of Law, went "into the silence," 
and obscurity as completely as possible where I have 
remained for thirty (30) years — and here I am, tell- 
ing you about it. 

And now let me go back to the beginning of the 
story of my identity and, as best I can, tell it in 
chronological and sequential order. The beginning 
point of the story ought to be my birth, but that im- 
portant event falls outside the limits of my own mem- 
ory, and I must therefore, go to the only available 
source of information, which is the family bible. 

Therein it is solemnly recorded that I was born 
July 20th, 1853. My name is therein said to be " John 
Richardson, ' ' and by that name I was known through- 
out my childhood and youth, and until I was old 
enough to develop a dislike of so short a name as 
"John." When about eighteen (18) years old I took 
unto myself a middle name "Emmett" which I con- 
ceived to be an euphonious combination, and there- 
after, and to this day, I have signed my name to all 
legal documents as "John E. Richardson"; and by 
that name am I known among all my people (brothers 
and sisters). 

According to the Bible Record, my parents reared 
fifteen children— 7 boys and 8 girls— of which family 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 55 



I was the 10th child in regular order, and the 6th son 
— and was born on July 20, 1853. 

If my Father and Mother correctly understood 
their lineage, she was a mixture of German and 
Welch, and he of Scotch and English — with a strain 
of American Indian on my Mother's side. 

At the time of their marriage they moved at once 
from Indiana to Iowa — then a Territory, and inhab- 
ited almost entirely by Indians — and settled on a sec- 
tion of Government land and immediately began the 
rearing of their large family, the cultivation of a 
farm and the raising of stock. 

They located in Keokuk County, near the village of 
Lancaster — (then the County Seat) — where my Father 
entered upon his more than sixty years of missionary 
labors as a " Hard-Shelled' ' Baptist Minister— " Self - 
made" in every sense of the term. 

As a matter of principle his ministry was a "Gift" 
to his people, in that he received not so much as a 
penny for his religious labors during his entire life, — 
thus exemplifying the Spirit of the Great Work. 

If the statements of the older members of the fam- 
ily are true (and I have no reason whatever to doubt 
them), I was born in a log cabin on the South bank 
of the North branch of " Skunk River," about one 
mile North of the village of " Lancaster," Keokuk 
County, Iowa. 

But before the time limit of my memory, the family 
had removed from there to a farm, some three miles 
South of the " South Skunk" River, and about two 
miles North East of the town of Martinsburg, same 
County and State. 



56 



TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



Here it was that the experiences of my life first 
impressed themselves upon my Consciousness with 
sufficient emphasis to fix them in my memory. It was 
here that my conscious life began, and memory first 
registered. 

At the age of four (4) I became the caretaker of 
my younger brother and it was then, and in that ca- 
pacity, that I began to realize the meaning of Personal 
Responsibility. 

When seven (7) years old the family removed to 
a "River-Bottom-Land" farm between the two 
"Skunk Rivers' ' and my Father (whose Ministry 
brought him no income) had to depend upon other 
lines of labor for the living of himself and family. 
As rapidly as the children became old enough, each 
was fitted into some occupation and became a "cog" 
in the family "Wheel of Economics" 




AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 57 

At seven (7) it fell to my lot to become "Sawyer" 
in a little steam saw-mill owned by my Father — 
chiefly for the accommodation of his neighbors — who 
brought their logs from a distance of three to five 
miles in every direction, to have them sawed into 
lumber of all kinds for the building of houses, barns, 
buildings of all kinds, and fences, in the heart of a 
pioneer country. 

For nine (9) years I almost lived in the little "four- 
foot-pen" that constituted the station or "post" of 
sawyer and, because of the necessities of the general 
situation, I was depended upon — and was able to — 
perform the duties of a grown man, and that, too, in 
a position of responsibility much greater than that of 
the average man of mature intelligence. 

When I was sixteen (16) years old — the older boys 
of the family — with but one exception — had either 
married and assumed the responsibilities of families 
of their own, or had gone "for themselves" into the 
big round world to fight their own battles and make 
for themselves places of their own choosing. 

This made it possible for me to "escape" from my 
"sawyer's four-foot prison" and render a more im- 
portant service in charge of the farm, where I labored 
for the next two years with my older brother G. until 
I was eighteen (18) years old. 

Father was a Baptist minister — as I have before 
stated — and as such, a firm believer in the "Doctrine 
of Election," which held that the destiny of every 
individual has been determined in advance — "before 
the foundation of the world"— -by Election. Some 



58 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN A ME RICA 

are " elected' ' to "go to heaven" and "sit at the right 
hand of God" forever, and all the others are "elected" 
to go to hell and, under the dominion of Satan, burn 
forever. 

But under a somewhat more generous "doctrine" 
he permitted his boys to "elect whether they would 
leave the parental roof at the age of 18, or remain 
until 21. If they elected to go at 18, they did so 
empty handed; but if they remained until 21, they 
received from him a horse, saddle and bridle and a 
suit of clothes. These were the reward of the three 
years' labor, from 18 to 21. 

For the following reasons I elected to leave at 18: 

1. Because of my usefulness in the economic sys- 
tem of the home, I had no time nor opportunity to 
obtain the kind of education I desired. 

2. During the nine years in the saw-mill and two 
on the farm, I had a never-ending day-dream that 
some time I would go to college, obtain an education 
and become a writer, a journalist, a newspaper 
writer. 

3. But as my 18th birthday drew near, I realized 
that Father and Mother were growing old and that 
in a few years more they would need the care of some 
one of us. About two months before my 18th birth- 
day, I went to my brother G. and confided to him my 
dream; but realizing that he had a far better intelli- 
gence than myself, I proposed that he go to College 
and finish his education and that I would remain and 
run the farm and help him through and at the same 
time care for the "old folks at home." 



60 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

4. But if he did not wish to do that, then I pro- 
posed that he remain and let me go unaided* 
After due consideration it was decided that I should 

go. 

The day of my emancipation came — July 20th, 1871 
— without a word to anyone but brother G. 

With $2.50 in my pocket — and a borrowed horse — 
I rode 62 miles due north into the wheat fields where 
there was a great demand for harvest hands. It was 
the happiest day of my life. I was free — free to earn 
money and go to college and take my place in the 
world. 

I found a man who needed help and the next morn- 
ing went to work — binding wheat for M. L , in 

Iowa County — at $3 per day. 

I worked 17 days, received $51 cash — my first money 
as a "man" — rode back home, went to district school 
a term, applied for a teacher's certificate, got it, 
taught school a year, took the money earned (at $40 
per month), went to Iowa City, Iowa, and in Septem- 
ber, 1873, entered the State University as a "Sub- 
Freshman." 

My college work was along the lines of an indepen- 
dent course and was finished in 1878 without degrees 
of any kind, but with a certificate from the President 

•From what has recently been ascertained, his parents mort- 
gaged their farm in order to send John E. to school, and 
thirty-five years later, a member of the family was still paying 
interest as a result of this debt — at a time when Mr. Richard- 
son was himself receiving a monthly interest of $130.00 from 
one of his investments, and when it is known he must have 
been handling hundreds of thousands of dollars. 



A UTO BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 61 

giving full credit for all the work done, — which cov- 
ered most of the curriculum of Law, Medicine and 
an M. A* 
Passing over a period of two years ' desultory work, 

I was married in S , Iowa, May 19th, 1880, to Miss 

Pauline S (daughter of Owen and Ann S , 

old and respected citizens of Iowa), a young and 
charming woman of rare musical ability — a pianist, 
vocalist, and teacher of music — and a woman of excel- 
lent mental and moral fiber — a Presbyterian of the 
Scotch blood — who, I think, had hoped, in time, to 
lead me into the "fold" — but failed. 

In September of that year I bade her a temporary 
good-bye, and went to San Francisco, where, in the 
political interests of General Rosecrans, I directed the 
editorial policy of the "Examiner" — Democratic or- 
gan — for one year — 1880 and 1881 and until Rosecrans 
ivithdrew from the race for the nomination^ 



•The records of the Iowa State University of Iowa City, 
Iowa, show that he not only entered the State University as a 
" Sub-Freshman' ' in 1873, but he remained a " Sub-Fresh- 
man* ' for 3 years x 1873-74, 1875-76, 1876-77. He registered 
again in 1877-78 as a Freshman. He did NOT study either 
Law or Medicine, since he was only a Freshman in the philoso- 
phic course of the Collegiate Department, and he certainly 
could not have ' ' COVERED most of the curriculum of Law, 
Medicine and M. A." 

tOn the following page, we present an exact photographic 
reproduction of a letter which tells its own story, and which 
flatly contradicts Mr. Richardson's claims in this respect. 



62 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

I then resigned my position on the "Examiner," in- 
tending to go direct to N. Y. City and accept the posi- 
tion of managing editor for the N. Y. Times — which 
position was offered me. 



November 33,1916 



Dear Sir: 

Acknowledging your 3 of the 
J8th re one John E.Richardson. 

The writer has been connected 
with The Examiner ever since it was 
changed from an evening to a morning 
paper, October 4,1880, and the party 
referred to in your letter was never 
connected with the Editorial Department 
of thie newspaper . 




Financial Manage 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 63 

On my way I stopped at Stockton, San Joaquin 
County, Cal., to visit a few days with Maj. P. V. 
B , then buyer for the large firm of grain mer- 
chants, Stewart and Smith, of that town. 

While there I had occasion to look up a point of law, 
concerning the probating of an estate and appoint- 
ment of a guardian for minor heirs — to accommodate 
a poor fellow whose wife had just died, leaving him 
the care of three little children. 

I stepped into a prosperous appearing "law 00106/ ' 
introduced myself, and asked a fine appearing gentle- 
man of 45 years, or, so, if I might examine his copy 
of the Revised Statutes of California. 

He courteously handed me the volume, and went on 
with his work, while I was looking up the point of law 
I had in mind. 

When I had finished I returned the book to him, 
thanked him and turned to leave his office, when he 
asked me if I was a stranger to Stockton, to which I 
replied in the affirmative. He asked me if I was a 
lawyer, and I replied that I had studied law, but had 
never practiced. His next question was whether I 
would care to practice if a good opening presented 
itself, and I replied that it would "depend." 

He then told me with the utmost frankness, that he 
wanted a partner, a young man of intelligence and 
ambition ; that he liked my appearance and was satis- 
fied that I was the man for the place, if I would ac- 
cept it; that without further recommendation than 
my personal appearance, he would offer me an equal 
partnership with him in an established practice that 



64 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

netted him over $25,000 annually; and closed by ask- 
ing me to consider the matter and call on him again 
before leaving the city.* 

I told him I had never contemplated practicing law ; 
that his offer was so unexpected, as well as so unpre- 
cedented, that I was not prepared to answer him off- 
hand; but that I appreciated deeply the compliment 
he had paid me, as well as the confidence his offer 
implied, and would give the matter careful considera- 
tion and see him again before leaving Stockton. 

During the next few days I made diligent inquiry 
as to this remarkable man, only to find that he was a 
man of unimpeachable character, and one of the best 
lawyers on the Coast. 

Within a week I called at his office and was cor- 
dially greeted with the inquiry: "Well, young man, 
have you come to accept my offer?" 

I replied, "Yes, if it is still open." He said it was, 
and asked when I would be ready to begin. I told 
him right away, if that was agreeable to him. He 
replied : ' i All right, so much the better ; there is your 
desk and chair, consider yourself installed, and to- 
morrow I will draw up formal articles of co-partner- 
ship," which he did; and thus I became a practicing 
Attorney — something I had never contemplated for 

•It here appears quite clear that handsome young men 
were in great demand in law offices in Stockton at that time 
(1881). Therefore an offer of an equal partnership in a $25,- 
000 a year law practice was not an unusual inducement to be 
offered to a total stranger solely upon the recommendation of 
his good looks. Hence the truth of this paragraph is per- 
fectly evident. 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 65 



«rAl«K fjit-tio-n nrfll offvrto ♦*•«- • 

<J}n »«»£ **•«•< J «t<r/»/»»d tct Sioc4¥twn. l &*J+ JVoyt mi CgM^v t? ^, Covt . to 

»»«tWV.»t« - 3*tivni4 ^ &»wV*l , c^ tficcfc Urn. 

J^KiTl f/^t-t-i J 7i«3 otttmmi lo 7<rirf< %*ff a -pot'ixJt #^ 7c»w rsntimug 
rfn 1«i-tW>«.?"«9 of <■••>•» £*£ii£ '''u> <>7»/o.r4.uA^e,^t of a gwKt-O.n., ^vi- ii«i.i#i- 
fiftVj - '• »*ecFWV*n»«(«v&, a ft o-tn- £tXl ovu •*-£„,« »vi&, n<*j !«•'*■£ «f*»d 7 1 ft tun g 
%.'„, f/,< fn.f of t^rlt 7ilrf« C7u7c/f-n« 

Otlf f '3j) ft*ffrd o/i»t ft^f.ror-i.,0 g«ivft«*>»««i» o^ ^0 y»ar« «1" •» «/ J »^.o"M 

CtffftMotc 7.i* ««f»y °^ ^«t "7?tvui9 Sft»ii.t.* •/ cV7i_f»«t» 

^A..7i 3 •»■«* 7o^<M^ e i*f. tft, *>««.»/ erf 7«^ 5 7,r.J «, -.^.,.5 

>Hi« 5 1>€,7> £, *.i«7tc* J r*fe.n»ra ^> too*- fo-litm **,<x«/<»e> 7,..« '*■.<) 
tfiturJ ^ 7,«x„t 7,„ «#«». «•£,«. 7,» «,**,» «^*v„, o stV««g«. ^ 5*v«-»«f.~, 

5 repT/t^ #"-l£ ^ J-**"* ^fc^ictt 7a*. Imi J,*b >•»»*♦ |M-«eIie«a ^* «»*J •^•»«t.»»% 
lytij »»Air^w J »v«ru7d cr^rj t"» ^v«etV%t »^ a good opening -p, r jf,tfr,-i Ctttlf f nno S 
rfplitb Htat it uroxCld" J^.rt-^'-t 

fit. thrt* (old -Hie Wifhilit juU*o*£ frctnH**t*» t ijmi Tic tvrifvTtd b -j>«»-|tiH'. « 

$*.fri**r fK»m«wi«J«J?»n A«n >n -^ -p tr» »r. al t t -pftt.a.rnntK i Xit. a ,»ulJ <^M- •«".« ••• 
«V'"7 -J««>-A"H-3lvf» *«a.^ 7t.i.». in cvm tvt*T>7. jl.ti ^irovtic* Htib t%*ttio Ttitt* gvu 
*Jf2.& 000 r,t%-nt «77y, "»B Oo'td lit tutting mt to CrHtil) r>*. A » >« o-ltXr- m«<L 
%tXl «ha 7imi ocjaiit btfvr* lta.vtny Ht Cvfy 

^ Wi 7-.t,* J 7,ot> Htvki' ■e<m,^t.'Hf)7o.t l t«] ■^.ctciicv.g 7c.ii/, fi«.t 7ii» +fft~- 
WNI ^o \«MC*J?tc.l , 'ei cu «%-«77 t»* Jo un prtCto/lrvA-e) /Acvt 3 wo* "Mt/l •^•r»J»ewr«> "l« 
ClUVttft^ }•••»» ej^-Xnnb , Iit-t" f^ivt ^ a>J}Jirtci cJxo dtvflyWit Cowfol .««»«.(" Tit 7.A* 
1i«ii3 i"» •»« «*/t-W c^j fftt rmf^iiut TvtJ *ff*«- vitfUt'td } Qn"a w».l^ g.vt r^ic '««it*M- 
ovrf-1 e*«w^«VTn.Y.cn« S> /it rttm «3«m ltjv>>. 7<c lvl V.g S*»c<<T»»*» 

J«n«8 *** "M-Mif^tw <*«yj J r«ci/. «i;7.gr,vt .'fi^u.ri, M<o t^ w , v^eM+tfi, 
MM «vi7if tvjtnb thcit Tic *vft« « »nn«» «^ imim^f «c7t»7»"It cv/i nrociii- rtn ^ ,^^ #/ 
*j»f Z»i*V 7ni^g«*J «m nic CcH»*-t* 

fV^H'.'rt a -rvr^ J c«77tci nt 7i«* «^»«« '''"^ W,,J c<rre<«c.17 v gnttii u^A. H*t 
,„«,<'•) "J^«7? ifwmfiitw Ttnire y»m «#t«i to mccvfU i«^ .^t* 7 J refine/ * 
I.JJ.J ^ it >* Jill <rf,,tx " */« *«& & """, "'«> «*»«3 vr^mJ *f- ^7i it ri»e«>j/ 
'*« 1'5'« -J f ^ '■""• r '9 ]| ' »»•»)'/ ftrk ' a "*' og^'o^t. 6,7,—v */l •> OfiTi'.rf 
•• 017 »-«gW, *»-»»'iif7» fttltt^M-J Vtitrt M your eltivrV ''••I) tv/.m-t-, ftmcwBir y****-**"*^ 
i'n»7?«77ti> f "'c> ^w^riM 3 v*# ,< f «w w^, ^r«,o7 ftvt»«7tJ ^ c o> ««-»>. t*i<tf "--•4««v 
ifot'rf , •>««* Hiii# 3 b«f«"n» « "proctietMy ft.ll<rr*>tii,- svmftttfj 3 7iw»«. iitin«-«««" 
* *.«»7oV«> fr»" •** •»*•»•» nU UI.-&7 .My f,»i TlietX«>9 «^-' l "* k . « «^t«* 4t,ftnrt, 



66 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

one moment until my first meeting with him, a week 
before.* 

Our relations, both business and personal, were of 
the most pleasant and cordial nature and without a 
jar of any kind. Two years later, 1883, he withdrew 
from the firm, retired from active business life, and 
left me in full posession and ownership of a profes- 
sional practice which he had spent many years in 
building up and which netted me over $30,000 an- 
nually.! 

I continued in the active practice until the Autumn 
of 1886, at which time, for reasons which I will ex- 
plain later, I moved — with my wife and two little 
girls — to Bismarck, North Dakota — the Capital of the 
then Territory — and joined a former University class- 
mate in the practice of law.j: 

But the prospect was not a pleasing one to me, and 
at the end of a year, in 1887, I removed to Minneapo- 

*Observe that this was in 1881, before TK had even com- 
menced the study of law. Also that he very significantly 
omits the full name of his generous partner. 

fThis shows that in the five years from 1881 to 1886, TK 
imagines he made something like $115,000.00 — which was 
pretty good for a young attorney's first year in actual 
practice. 

$The reasons which he says he will explain later, but does 
not, are given by his former law partner in Stockton, that 
' 'Richie" was not satisfied with his meager earnings, and 
decided to "try his luck" in Bismarck. He therefore gave up 
his $30,000.00 a year law practice and moved to the new 
location. 



r AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 67 

lis, Minn., and there formed a law partnership with 
another college classmate and did a good business un- 
til the Autumn of 1890, when I came to Chicago, and, 
with three of the good business men of Chicago, 
formed a business association with which I remained 
connected until 1900; since which time I have devoted 
my whole life and energies to the writing and publi- 
cation of books and other literature along the lines of 
Natural Science and the "Harmonic Philosophy," 
and to the work of Personal Instruction in the Great 
School and Work. 

I have, thus far, given but a very brief and prosaic 
account of the purely business and materialistic side 
of my life. It was, however, a life as far removed 
from the dull or prosy as that of any man of all my 
acquaintance. On the contrary, it has been a life full 
of the most intense activity and interest all along the 
way, from the day I left the parental home and rode 
away into the big, bright, fascinating world, as I saw 
it the morning of my 18th birthday, down to the pres- 
ent moment. 

For instance, I have said nothing of the years of 
political activities and ambitions on the Pacific coast, 
where I became a conspicuous figure, and where I un- 
doubtedly could and would have become governor of 
the great commonwealth of California, had I yielded 
to the solicitations of my many friends — and had I not 
observed the i( finger of destiny" pointing eastward; 
and had not the Great Master led me up out of those 
vain-glorious conditions by the hand of love and taken 
me to the mountain top ivhence I could look back, 



68 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

down, upon the littleness, the pettiness, the selfishness 
and unworthiness of it all. 

Nor have I told of the fascinating experiences of the 
lecture field and platform wherein and whereon I spent 
much time and effort along educational lines during 
the years of my life on the Pacific coast; nor of the 
wide range of interesting acquaintances among the 
great educators of that time. 

Nor yet have I mentioned my touch with the musical 
world, wherein I made for myself a place and a name 
as a dramatic tenor of unusual range, quality of tone 
and carrying power; nor of the temptations that lead 
men to seek fame upon the grand opera stage nor of 
my experiences as a solo violinist. 

These and many other experiences, all of which 
added color and interest to an intense life of activity 
and variety, have been omitted because of the time, 
effort and space necessary to their narration. 

My wife, who remained behind with her Father and 
Mother when I first went to the Coast, joined me in 
the Spring of 1881. 

In the summer of 1907 — after a severe spell of 
pleurisy, it was discovered that she was afflicted with 
tuberculosis. After some months of the most careful 

treatment under our own beloved "Dr. E. M. W ," 

a change of climate was recommended and she went 
to Arizona, where she had the very best care — and 
improved somewhat. But on the advice of her physi- 
cian she went on to the Pacific Coast and stopped near 
Pasadena, at a small private Sanitarium. 

In the face of her own letters telling me of her 
steady improvement I became impressed with the con- 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 



viction that she was not in a good environment, and 
when I could resist the feeling no longer, I took the 
train, and in August, 1908, 1 went to her. I found my 
conviction fully verified and although an improvement 
over her condition when she left home — I took her at 
once to the noted specialist, Dr. N. B , in Los An- 
geles, who — after a most careful examination — found 
only about one-fourth of the left lung only affected. 
He unhesitatingly said "She ought to get well. ,, * 

I placed her in the New Pasadena Hospital under 
his personal care, from which date she improved rap- 
idly and steadily. 

On Jan. 1st, 1909, Dr. B. — reported that she was 
virtually well — so 'far as he could determine. She 
had ceased entirely to cough or expectorate, had 
gained in weight until she was heavier than she had 
been since we were married, felt well and strong and 
believed herself entirely restored to health. She was 
planning to come home — to us in Oak Park, 111. — the 
following June. 

On the evening of Jan. 15, 1909, she went to bed 
in the best of spirits and was feeling well and happy. 
After seeing her carefully in bed, the nurse left her 
to go to the adjacent room. Before she reached its 
door however, she heard three sharp rings of her 

•This was in 1908, 24 years after he claims to have become 
a "master.* ' If he really possessed the power to leave his 
physical body at will, then one wonders why he should not 
have known the exact status of his wife's condition daily, pro- 
viding he was sufficiently interested to take the time to find 
out. Or, failing in this, why did he not have some of his 
"Great Masters' < obtain a reliable daily report for him? 



70 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

call-bell. She (the nurse) hurried back and found 
her in the midst of a terrific hemorrhage. In less 
than one minute she was dead. 

Dr. B., writing me the next day said: "It is one 
of the pathetic phases of our profession that we never 
can tell, with absolute certainty when the germs of 
this dread disease have all been dislodged. In her 
case, I thought she was well. She thought so. We 
all thought so. But it so happened that there re- 
mained a small area no larger than the surface of a 
finger-nail where the germs were still active. And 
stranger still, it so happened that this active area 
was directly over the wall of the "Aorta," or largest 
artery of the lung — and when they had eaten away 
until the wall of that large vessel could no longer 
stand the pressure of blood from the heart it gave 
way at that one little spot and in a minute she was 
gone. Nothing could save her."*' 

Her body was brought to S , Iowa, and laid to 

rest beside those of her two blessed and beautiful 
babies, in the family vault. 

And here ends another chapter in my own life. 

•7? *7P "J? 7$ w 

Go with me now back to the days of my childhood 
and let us travel over the pathway of my spiritual evo- 
lution together. From this journey you will learn the 
unbroken road over and along which I found my 
way to the door of the Great School, knocked, was ad- 



*This paragraph shows very plainly what "Doctor" Rich- 
ardson knows — or rather what he does not know about Anat- 
omy and Pathology. 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 71 



mitted and finally became the sole accredited repre- 
sentative of the School in this country. 

My Father's independence of mind and liberal 
attitude of soul on the subject of religion may be ap- 
preciated somewhat from the fact that not one of his 
children ever belonged to his church — nor any other, 
for that matter. 

All of us who grew to years of discretion were 
natural skeptics — agnostics. And yet, we all were in- 
terested, and desired to know the truth, but found 
ourselves unable to accept the Christian dogmas as 
then taught. 

From the time I was nine years old I loved to 
listen to Father and the " Elders' ' of his church dis- 
cuss abstruse theological doctrines, and many times 
when alone with Father I asked questions and dis- 
puted the correctness of his answers. 

My impression is that there were times when he 
was strongly of the conviction that I was a " Child of 
the Devil" — duly " elected to go to Hell by the 'air- 
line' " whenever the " Trumpet should sound"; but 
he was good enough not to say so specifically. 

At the age of 16 a most interesting event in my 
spiritual life occurred. A German, family by the 
name of Follman — fresh from the old country — con- 
sisting of father and mother (about 45 years old) 
and one daughter (about 18 years) moved into the 
village of Lancaster, some four miles from our home, 
and opened a little general store. Nobody knew them, 
and they were accepted at their own valuation. 

They had not been there long until word became 
quite generally circulated throughout the community 



72 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

to the effect that they were very strange people, and 
were called "Spiritualists." It was the first I had 
ever heard the name, and I knew nothing about what 
it meant, but from the expressions on the faces of 
those who did know, (or thought they knew) I in- 
ferred that it must have reference to something quite 
"out of the ordinary' ' and something below the ordi- 
nary in point of Morality. 

But all sorts of weird and uncanny stories were 
soon going the rounds, concerning the strange and 
unbelievable things that were constantly occurring 
in their home. Spiritual phenomena of unusual range 
and character were reported by those who had been 
there and witnessed them. 

It was not strange, under these conditions, that 
the spirit of "curiosity" soon took possession of the 
community. My two next older Brothers and I 
caught the impulse of investigation and one Sunday 
afternoon got on our horses and rode down to Lan- 
caster; went to the Follman home; inquired whether 
the things we had heard were true; were told that 
some of them were undoubtedly true; inquired if we 
could sit with them that evening; were heartily in- 
vited to do so ; and we eagerly accepted. 

When other things were out of the way for the 
evening we three boys found ourselves alone with the 
three members of the family with whom we tried to 
talk — but soon found that the daughter was the only 
one of them who could speak enough English to give 
us any information, and she found it most difficult. 
In a labored effort, however, she made us understand 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 73 

the method of procedure and our own part in the 
"sitting.' ' 

An ordinary wooden table was brought in and we 
all took our seats around it in such manner as to 
balance the sex influence as evenly as possible. I re- 
member very distinctly that they claimed to be follow- 
ing the directions of their "spiritual guides" — and 
that / sat between the Father and Daughter — he on 
my right and she on my left. 

A large coal-oil lamp sat in the center of the table, 
and when all were seated with our hands touching — 
"left hand under and right hand on top" — the light 
was turned down till the room was a deep shadow, 
but not quite dark. 

We sat quietly for a few moments and then the 
Father began humming the air of some song in which 
all joined. Before we were through the first stanza 
I could hear distinctly many, many voices in addition 
to our own, singing with us in perfect harmony. 

As we proceeded the Father's hands began vibrat- 
ing and the farther we went the more intense be- 
came the vibrations until suddenly his hands were 
torn from ours on either side and he fell back in his 
chair in a reclining position and everything became 
still. 

The daughter turned on the light until we could 
see distinctly. The "Medium" — Mr. F. — lay there 
breathing heavily, for some time, with his eyes shut, 
and his face an ashen white and entirely expression- 
less. 

Then slowly he arose, moved forward till the tips 
of his fingers rested on the table, in the attitude of a 



74 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

public speaker, his eyes still closed. Then his lips 
opened and, in a calm, dignified voice and manner, 
began to speak — in perfect English, and entirely free 
from German accent or dialect. He began something 
like this: 

" Friends, I am glad to meet with you tonight, and 
through the vocal organs of this medium tell you 
something of the spirit side of life where I now live. 
When I was on your side of the divide my name was 
Scott. I was a Presbyterian minister. My last pas- 
toral charge was in Syracuse, N. Y., where I died 
in — " giving the date, etc. 

He went on and told us then of the transition and 
of the many surprises that awaited him and many 
experiences of interest. He spoke possibly half an 
hour and then politely excused himself on the ground 
that there were several other " Spiritual friends' ' 
who wished to speak to us, and they must not keep 
the Medium under control too long lest it injure him. 
Then he said goodnight and the frame of the medium 
underwent a severe shock and straightened up again 
and began to speak. 

This time the voice was brusque, quick, short and 
emphatic and at least two full tones higher — but still 
in good English. It was a complete change of per- 
sonality. He said his name on earth was "Wilkins," 
that he was a business man, gave us his last earthly 
address, and the names of friends yet living who had 
known him, and the time, place and manner of his 
death — all of which we fully verified by letter. 

After telling us something of his life of the Spirit 
side he retired — as the former control had done-. 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 75 

Then followed a little girl's personality, and in 
rapid succession something like 15 different person- 
alities spoke to us during that first sitting — one of 
whom represented itself as our Cousin who had been 
drowned but a short time before. He told us min- 
utely of the manner of his death — and where we could 
find his pet dog that had disappeared after his death. 
This also we verified, to our entire satisfaction. 

This was the beginning of our investigation of 
"Spiritualism," or more accurately, ' ' Mediumship. ' ' 

After the first experience, which interested us in- 
tensely, we attended a number of sittings — until we 
became aware that the moral atmosphere of the place 
and the people was not good. 

It occurred to us that we had a sufficient number 
at home to form a "Developing Circle." This we 
finally accomplished — over the protests of Father and 
Mother, who seemed to feel that it was only the work 
of the Devil, and most dangerous to us all. They 
consistently held that position and refused to have 
any part in our sittings. 

We selected Sunday evenings as the time and 
mother's kitchen as the place, where we sat around 
the kitchen table. 

We were in serious earnest and followed the rules 
laid down for us — and it was not many weeks before 
we began to get results. 

One after the other the members of our group — 
or " circle' ' — yielded until we had some five or six 
partially developed mediums. 

But as for myself, I seemed to be entirely immune. 
I did my best to develop into a medium, during the 



T6 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

first years of our sittings, but never for an instant 
was I conscious of any outside influence upon me. 
The same, I believe, was equally true of my three 
brothers. 

But in due course of time I began to have a distinct 
feeling or conviction, that there was something in- 
volved in the process of control that was not right, 
was unwholesome, and even distructive and danger- 
ous to the Medium. 

After I was 18 years old and left home I was with 
the home circle only at long intervals and knew but 
little personally of what occurred — except in a gen- 
eral way, by reports from those who were there. 

But the others continued irregularly, to meet for 
several years ; but ceased to obtain any very good or 
satisfactory results and gradually the interest waned 
and they virtually disbanded; and I believe the feel- 
ing was quite general that the process was not a 
wholesome one for the mediums themselves. 

After I left home and entered the State University 
I was so bent on my struggle for an education that 
/ had little time or opportunity to continue my in- 
vestigation of psychic phenomena, except during 
vacation times when visiting at home. 

But during the years 1878-9-80 I enjoyed excep- 
tional OPPORTUNITIES DURING WHICH TIME I VISITED 
MANY MEDIUMS BOTH PROFESSIONAL AND PRIVATE AND 
WITNESSED VIRTUALLY EVERY PHASE OF PSYCHIC PHE 
NOMENA, TOGETHER WITH MUCH DELIBERATE FRAUD. 

(*See next page.) 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 77 

•Here TK volunteers the information that for three years, 
1873 9-80, he enjoyed exceptional opportunities for consult- 
ing mediums. In another place he refers to these same years : 
In 1878 he was "finishing" his education in the Freshman 
Class at the Iowa University, and of this period he says, "I 
had little time or opportunity to continue my investigations 
of psychic phenomena/ ' The years 1879-80 he calls "two 
years of desultory work" — which we assume was consulting 
mediums. 

We have TK's own word for it that he was watched over 
by his G. S. from birth. Also that from the time he was 16 
years of age, up to and including the year 1880, he was almost 
constantly monkeying with spiritual phenomena and mediums. 
He says, 

"In 1880, when I went to the Pacific Coast, I had arrived 
at a point where I was fully satisfied that the 'Subjective 
Psychic Process' — involved in both hypnotism and medium- 
ship — is destructive and that, therefore, the lines along which 
I had been studying and investigating, up to that time, were 
wrong IN EVERY SENSE OF THE WORD. Medium- 
ship was "the wrong way. 

"And I had resolved to have nothing further to do with 
'Spiritualism' — nor with 'Mediumship,' nor with Psychic 
Research along those lines. " 

Then behold ! Our hero is in Stockton in 1881, and in order 
to get into good c ' Society, ' ' the first thing he does is to join 
a developing circle for the development "of a young and 
handsome woman." 

If TK's GREAT School and GREAT Masters knew all 
this time that these practices were destructive — and they 
permitted these practices even as a part of their future rep- 
resentative's "education" — do not the whole bunch of them 
stand convicted of what TK himself calls the Great Psycho- 
logical Crime? 



78 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

I satisfied myself on a number of points, among 
which are: 

1. That I never saw an honest public medium 
during that time. 

2. That many of them, however, really were me- 
diumistic, and their controls could — when conditions 
were favorable — produce a wide range of psychic 
phenomena through them. 

3. But the desires of the mediums to make money, 
overtaxed their psychic capacities and to guard 
against poor sittings and dissatisfied patrons, they 
learned a lot of tricks which they mixed in when they 
found that their controls were unable to work through 
them and produce the genuine phenomena. 

4. That every private medium I ever visited con- 
fessed that the process was harmful. 

5v That after the first period of exultation and 
fervor (covering varying periods, from a few weeks 
to several months) there was a gradual letting down 
of the moral tone of the psychic atmosphere and in- 
fluence, from which the progress was one of steady 
retrogression. 

6. That in every instance the destructive nature 
of the subjective psychic process upon the Medium 
manifested itself in either physical, mental or moral 
degeneracy, — and often in all three directions. 

In 1880, WHEN I WENT TO THE PACIFIC COAST, I HAD 
ARRIVED AT A POINT WHERE I WAS FULLY SATISFIED THAT 

THE "SUBJECTIVE PSYCHIC PROCESS*' INVOLVED IN BOTH 

HYPNOTISM AND MEDIUMSHIP IS DESTRUCTIVE AND THAT, 

THEREFORE, THE LINES ALONG WHICH I HAD BEEN STUDY- 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 79 

ING AND INVESTIGATING, UP TO THAT TIME, WERE WRONG 
IN EVERY SENSE OF THE WORD. MediumsMp WAS " The 

Wrong Way." 

AND I HAD RESOLVED TO HAVE NOTHING FURTHER TO 

do with "Spiritualism," — nor with "Mediumship" 
nor with Psychic Research along those lines. 

It so happened, however, that on my arrival and 
location at Stockton, Cal., — I soon discovered a most 
unusual and unexpected situation and social condi- 
tion. The leading physicians, lawyers, judges and 
men and women in the very best society, were all 
members of a "Psychical Research Society" and 
were meeting regularly, and were earnestly investi- 
gating the subject of "Psychic Phenomena" along 
the lines which I had but recently abandoned. 

It was inevitable that I should meet these good 
people and become known to them as a student along 
those very lines in which they were engaged. 

I was invited to join them and did so, and soon 
became one of their active and prominent members. 

At the time I joined them, they were just entering 
upon a series of sittings for the development of a 
young and handsome woman — a Mrs. L. — the wife 
of a leading newspaper editorial writer. She was 
a woman of refinement and brilliant mentality and 
possessed a gracious and charming personality. 

In one short year this charming and brilliant 
woman became a complete wreck in every sense of 
the term — physically, mentally, morally and spirit- 
ually. She developed into one of the most remarkable 
mediums I have ever known; but at the expense of 
all that made her life worth living. 



80 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

This was the final truth that caused me to turn 
forever from everything of a subjective nature in 
psychical development. 

I notified the society of my intention to resign, but 
at the same time asked for the privilege of explain- 
ing in open meeting my reasons for so doing, which 
request was granted. 

The evening came, and I took two hours and forty 
minutes to tell them the story of my psychic inves- 
tigations and the results of my own observations and 
conclusions. 

The result was that the society then and there dis- 
banded and never held another meeting. 

I told them that I had proven beyond all ques- 
tion that the Mediumistic Process was hypnotic, sub- 
jective and destructive and called attention to the 
condition of their own Medium. 

I said I was absolutely certain that we were on 
the wrong way; that I was convinced, however, that 
there was a right way if we only knew it, but I did 
not know the method of procedure and I did not know 
anyone who did know it; but until I found someone 
who knew the Right Way — the way of Independent 
Psychic Unfoldment, I was done with psychic re- 
search and study and investigation and above all "ex- 
perimenting." If I never found an instructor in this 
life, then I would wait until I passed to the other 
life and learn it there. 

And from that day 1 put it all behind me and 
turned to my legal work with undivided attention and 
enthusiasm. I thought but little of those past ex- 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 81 

periences, save, now and then, came to me the con- 
viction that Nature must surely have made provision 
for demonstrating the continuity of Life by Construc- 
tive Methods, and that there must be those some- 
where on earth who knew all about it, if I but knew 
how and where to find them. 

This was the general attitude of my Soul on the 
subject up to the summer of 1883 when there came to 
me an experience, the like of which I had never 
before heard of, and which changed the entire course 
of my life and all my plans, purposes, aspirations 
and ambitions as fully and completely as it would be 
possible to conceive. It is of this that I will now try 
to tell you, very briefly, from necessity: — 

For some four weeks continuously, immediately 
prior to July 21st, 1883, I had been intensely engaged 
in the trial of an important will contest involving an 
estate valued at about $1,000,000.* 

As the Attorney for the contesting heirs, I was 
pitted against the ablest Attorneys on the Coast, 
(with the exception of Hon. David S. Terry) and I 
realized that, according to all the rules of logic and 
common sense, I ought to be beaten, thoroughly. 

But there was something that filled me with an 
abiding conviction that I would be given the verdict 



# The only will contest on record in Stockton for 1883 
involved about $25,000.00, which is just $975,000.00, less than 
TK's million dollar case. And any way this was two years 
before he became a practicing attorney. But note how he 
plays up his story of an imaginary "old Scotch mother 94 
years old, and two maiden sisters past 65 years." 



82 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

when the jury was through with their deliberations. 
I was absolutely certain there had been " undue in- 
fluence" on the testator that led him, in the closing 
hours of his life, to disinherit his old Scotch mother 
94 years old, and two maiden sisters past 65 years. 

After three days of argument the case went to the 
jury about 10 a. m. of July 21, 1883. 

At 2 p. m. I received word that the jury was ready 
to report and I went at once to the Court room which 
was filled with the intense partisan friends of both 
parties. 

I think if a vote had been taken of the spectators 
and Attorneys, I would have stood alone. But I was 
absolutely certain that the jury was with me. 

To the amazement of the Attorneys against me, 
the verdict was in my favor. 

It was a great triumph, for so young an Attorney — 
under all the conditions of the case, and I was ten- 
dered quite an ovation by the members of the Bar 
present. 

After the jury was discharged and the proper or- 
ders and records of the case made and entered, it was 
about 10 minutes to 3 p. m., when I reached my office, 
feeling well pleased with the world in general, and 
myself in particular. 

I opened my desk and found a large volume of 
mail and legal matters awaiting my attention. I knew 
I was nervously weary and needed rest. 

As the day was well spent I did not feel like taking 
up anything new, and was thinking about quitting, 
when I suddenly seemed to recall having an appoint- 



' AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 83 

ment to meet someone at the Grand Central Hotel, 
a distance of four blocks from my office. Without 
thinking who the party was I expected to see at 4 
p. m., — I concluded to take a long walk in the North 
part of town and return by way of the Hotel and 
keep my supposed appointment. 

I closed my desk, instructed my clerks to be on 
hand early next day, took my hat and cane and 
started for my walk. 




At the foot of the stair, however, I met a fellow 
attorney, who stopped to congratulate me and discuss 
the Will case. Some other friends joined us and in 
a few minutes quite a group had gathered, and I was 
in the midst of an impromptu ovation, there on the 
main street. 

Time passed rapidly, and the hour was consumed 
in chatting over the case. All the while however, I 
had in mind my appointment at 4, and about 10 min- 
utes of 4, I excused myself, and started for the hotel. 

On the way up Main St. I stopped a moment at 
tjie "Yosemite House," and then continued to the 



84 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

crossing of Main and California Sts., from which 
point I could see the Grand Central Hotel, two blocks 
North on California St. 

I turned North on California St. and walked about 
half a-block North, when it suddenly occurred to me 
to ask myself who it was I expected to meet at the 
hotel. I was astonished to find that I was unable to 
recall having made an appointment with any one. 

I was considerably disturbed, because it was the 
first time in my life that my memory ever played me 
such a trick, and I thought it must be the result of 
the long nervous and mental strain of the trial. 

I turned back intending to go home and rest as 
completely as possible until the next day. 

I had gone but a few steps, however, when a still 
more unusual thing occurred. Suddenly there came 
the distinct impression — "There is somebody at the 
Hotel who wants to see you." 

I seemed to hear those words with perfect distinct- 
ness. I could feel them as they were impressed upon 
my consciousness. 

I stopped, turned again and looked toward the ho- 
tel. I was puzzled. I could not understand it. It was 
a wholly new experience to me. It troubled me deeply. 
I thought it must mean that I was on the verge of a 
nervous and mental collapse. The thought was hor- 
rible. Then I mentally felt of myself and found that 
I seemed to be in good condition. 

All the while, however, I could feel those words 
beating upon my brain: "There is somebody at the 
Hotel who wants to see you" — just as if some pow- 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 85 

erful mind was repeating them over and over, with 
such force as to impress them upon my consciousness. 

I stood there for some time trying to reason out 
what it all meant. Then I realized the surest and 
quickest way to prove whether or not it was only a 
mental hallucination was to go on over to the Hotel 
and see if there was anybody there wanting to see 
me with enough intensity to make such an impression. 

I started at once toward the Hotel, and as I ap- 
proached the impression became so strong that the 
individual was in the ladies ' parlor, that I passed the 
main office entrance and went to the hallway leading 
to the ladies ' parior. 

I approached the parlor door which opened inward 
and was partly ajar. I pushed it open and stepped 
inside. I took a hasty survey of the room and saw 
at once that there was but one person in the room. 
This was a man whom I had never seen before, to my 
knowledge, and I observed at a glance that he was a 
foreigner, but of what nationality I could not have 
determined. 

He was dressed in American costume, and sat 
quietly on a small divan near the window. 

Realizing my evident mistake, I turned to leave the 
room. As I did so the man called me by my correct 
name, — "Mr. Richardson" — I turned quickly and as 
I did so he arose, stepped across the room to me, ex- 
tended his hand and said, — "I am glad you came." 

I took his extended hand in a mechanical sort of 
way, looked him straight in the eyes and replied: 
"You have the advantage of me. I do not remember 
having met you before. ■ ' 



86 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

He responded at once and with seeming frankness : 
"I know you have not; although I have seen you 
many, many times.' ' 

I expressed my surprise at his remark, to which 
he responded: "Moreover, I have known you inti- 
mately from your infancy, and have come over Oceans 
and continents to see you here and alone.' ' 

Suddenly it flashed into my mind: "This is a 
confidence man — a 'bunco' man whom I have met at 
last, after all these years of wondering what a ' bunco* 
man is like.'' 

"No, No" — he replied to my mental thought — "I 
hope you will not think so poorly of me. I am not a 
confidence man, and if you will but permit me I am 
sure I can prove to your entire satisfaction that all 
I have said is true." 

"But you must admit," I replied — "that it is most 
unusual to meet a total stranger who without an in- 
troduction, calls you by name and tells you he has 
seen you many times, in fact known you from infancy, 
and caps all this by assuring you he has come over 
oceans and continents to see you alone. You must 
admit that this is very much after the method of a 
Confidence man." 

Seeing my growing suspicion, he paused an instant, 
looked me straight in the eyes and with a most inter- 
esting expression, mixed with a smile, said: "By- 
the-way, what brought you to this hotel?" 

After an instant of silence — during which I had the 
distinct impression of falling feathers — if I only had 
some to "fall" — I replied, "You have asked me a 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 87 

difficult question. Frankly, I do not know what or 
who brought me here." 

He then said: "You have been engaged for some 
time in an* important lawsuit, have you not?" 

I said I had. 

"And at about 2 p. m., the jury returned a verdict 
in your favor?" 

Again I assented. 

"At a few minutes before three you went to your 
office?" 

I did. 

"As you sat at your desk you thought you recalled 
having an appointment to meet someone at this hotel 
at 4 o'clock?" 

"Very true." 

"And you took your hat and cane, intending to 
take a walk in the North part of town?" 




\tii&uiiiiiiflUMiuunuiitiiuiiiiiiuDiJuimtinimi»n»ticuiinuiuuiniiuiiiiminiiniiiinuniiumuiiuuiiunu\k 



"I did." 

"But you didn't do it?" 

"No." 



88 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

"At the foot of the stair to your office you met a 
fellow Attorney who stopped you, and you were 
joined by others. You passed the time at your com- 
mand in talking with them. A few minutes to 4, you 
left them, and walked down the street leading this 
way. After reaching the street leading to this Hotel 
you turned this way and walked half-a-block or more 
— when you tried to recall the person with whom you 
had an appointment, and you could not. You stopped 
and became troubled lest this breach of memory 
might indicate an illness from over work. You turned 
back intending to go home. You had gone but a few 
steps when you received an impression, strong and 
clear, that there was some one at this Hotel who 
wanted to see you; and, after further doubt and mis- 
givings, you came on to see if your impressions were 
true or merely hallucinations." 

With much greater detail than I have given it, he 
described my mental processes and conduct with per- 
fect precision, requiring me to confirm his correct- 
ness at every step of the way. 

When he had finished his narration and I had ad- 
mitted its accuracy, he looked me straight in the eyes 
and said: "Can you doubt me when I tell you that 
it was I who brought you here 1 ' 9 

I .admitted that he had made out a pretty strong 
case, and that he certainly had the advantage of me, 
although I was still somewhat skeptical, as it was the 
first experience of the kind of which I had ever been 
conscious. 

He asked me if I did not think he had gone far 
enough to entitle him to an opportunity to prove to 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 89 

me the truth of the statements he had made concern- 
ing his knowledge of my life and the purpose of his 
visit. 

I said I thought he had earned that right, and he 
asked me if I would go to his room. I assented, and 
we proceeded at once to his room. 

As we approached the door, I observed that the 
number was "13" — and mentally I said to myself: 
" Unlucky number.' ' 

Instantly he replied to my thought: — "No, it is 
the i Sacred Number' with us, and the most fortunate 
of all, and that is why I selected it." 

He unlocked the door and ushered me in. Then he 
turned and locked the door, took the key and put it 
in his pocket. 

As he did this the thought flashed into my mind 
again: "Surely he must be a 'bunco' man and is 
preparing to spring some confidence game on me!" 

Instantly he replied to my thought: "I am sorry 
you have so poor an opinion of me: for I am not 
a confidence man. My only purpose in locking the 
door was to save interruptions from the intrusion 
of the chamber-maid. ' ' 

I replied that it was a rather unusual procedure 
to be invited to the room of an entire stranger and 
then locked in; and furthermore, if his purpose was, 
indeed to prevent the maid from entering, then he had 
better put the key back into the lock, for otherwise 
there was nothing to prevent her from inserting her 
key from the outside, opening the door and walking 
in at once. 



90 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

He said that had not occurred to him; thanked me 
for telling him, put the key back into the lock, and 
then asked me to be seated. I did so and he took a 
seat facing me and not over 2 or 3 feet away from me, 
where he could look me straight in the eyes without 
special effort. 

After a moment of thoughtful silence he began 
something as follows: "I have made a number of 
statements which appear to you very remarkable, and 
you have kindly given me the chance to prove the 
truthfulness of my statements, if I can. I thank you 
for the courtesy and will proceed at once." 

"I have said that I have seen you many, many 
times; that I have known you intimately from your 
infancy ; that I have come over oceans and continents 
to see you and you alone." 

"I can think of no better way to proceed than to 
begin at the beginning and tell you the history of 
your own life. I am going to ask you, however, not 
to interrupt me till I have finished. Then I will be 
glad to answer any question or make any explanation 
you may desire." 

He then began, and his first sentence was, as nearly 
as I can recall it, as follows: — 

"You were born into this present life in a little log 
cabin on the south bank of a little stream of water 
in the state called Iowa, on the 20th day of July, (as 
you count time) 1853, at 27 minutes past 12 o'clock 
(noon)." 

This was the first time I had ever heard any living 
person tell me the hour of my birth, and also the fact 
that I was born in a "log cabin," 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 91 



From that point he proceeded with his story of my 
Life, For four hours, without interruption, he told 
me the story of my life. Many things during the 
years of my infancy I had never before heard, and 
of these I was skeptical; but to my great surprise, 
I was able to verify every incident by the older mem- 
bers of the family. 

From the time when my own memory was active, he 
related the incidents of my childhood, youth and ma- 
ture life more correctly and sequentially than I 
could have done. 

He told me of the years spent in the little old saw- 
mill and of my day-dreams of how I would go to col- 
lege, get an education and become a writer. He fol- 
lowed me into the harvest fields of the North; to 
public school; then as a teacher; thence to the state 
University, and through it; then bach into the news- 
paper world; thence to California; to San Francisco; 
and finally to Stockton, where he found me.* 

But it was the inner, soul-life, that he related with 
such a wonderful and extravagant wealth of detail 
as to startle me with his knowledge of my whole in- 
ternal life. 

He told me of my natural skepticism concerning 
the religious teachings of my father; how again and 
again I had asked Father to explain to me his "Doc- 



*Note that he says he went "thru" the State University, 
and then "back into the newspaper world. " Up to this time 
we did not know he had ever been in the " newspaper world,* ' 
as no mention is made of it until we find him imagining him- 
self editorial manager of the "San Francisco Examiner." 



92 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

trines" of "Foreordination," "Predestination," 
"Election," the "Two seed," "Salvation," "The 
Atonement," and their relation to "Personal Kespon- 
sibility ■ ' ; and of my inability to harmonize them with 
my own ideas of Consistency. 

He told of my first meeting with the German family 
of Spiritualists; of my deep interest in the old Ger- 
man Medium ; of how the low moral plane of the Me- 
dium, and finally the coarse familiarity and occa- 
sional vulgar suggestions of the Spiritual "Con- 
trols" themselves, had finally so hurt and disgusted 
us that we ceased attending their sittings; then of 
our decision to form a circle of our own ; of the many 
interesting events that followed from our "Develop- 
ing Circle," then of my drifting away from the home 
circle; and of the years of travel and investigation 
that followed the end of my college course. 

He followed with the utmost care and detail the 
experiences and the evidence from which I finally 
identified Hypnotism and Mediumship as the results 
of the same Process, and how I determined that the 
Process was psychically Subjective and Destructive 
to the Subject. 

Step by step he followed the path of my psychic 
unfoldment until I finally resigned from the Society 
in Stockton on the ground that we were traveling 
"The Wrong Way," and he said, "You were right; 
Mediumship is destructive and it is the wrong way." 

Then he told of how I had come to the conclusion 
that "There ought to be a Right Way that would be 
"Constructive," and he said, "In this also you were 
right. There is a Right Way and it is Constructive 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 93 

and also Independent. And it is because of this that 
I am here." 

"It is for this reason that I have traveled over 
Oceans and Continents, from far-off India — the 
Home of Ancient Mystery — to see you and you 
alone. ' ' 

"I have come to offer you the Personal Instruction 
that will enable you constructively and Independently 
to demonstrate the continuity of life beyond the 
Grave — provided you are in a position to receive the 
instruction and can satisfy me that you will make a 
right use of the knowledge, and can meet all the terms 
and conditions.' ' 

For four hours I had listened to the smooth, steady 
flow of his words and to his voice of wonderful rich- 
ness and sympathetic power; until he said, "And now 
I am through and you know why I am here. Have 
you any questions to ask?" 

/ had. In truth, I was almost bursting with ques- 
tions. I asked him about the School from which he 
had come, — where it was, — how old it was, — Its man- 
ner of initiation, — what were the Conditions of my 
own admittance and instruction to which he had re- 
ferred. All of which he answered fully and frankly. 

Among the conditions were: 

1. That I must arrange to give him at least 6 
hours every day, from 4 to 10 p. m. and as much more 
as I could. 

2. That I must pledge myself to devote my life to 
the Work. 

3. That I accept the instruction as a gift from 
him absolutely and in every sense. 



94 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

4. That I continue the work under his instruction 
until I had made the personal demonstration, whether 
that be 3 years or 20. 

5. That I never deviate from the pathway and 
that I exemplify the Spirit of the Work in my daily 
life and conduct — to the very best of my abilities 
henceforth. 

6. That I devote myself to the formulation of the 
Science and Philosophy of the Great School into def- 
inite statement in the English language in the sim- 
plest and most definite and exact form possible and 
publish the same in book form to be used as the mod- 
ern Text-books of the School. 

7. That I do all in my power to circulate the books 
so formulated and published and with these as a basis 
that I would inaugurate a work of personal instruc- 
tion of such applicants as could prove themselves 
ready for the work. 

8. That in all my work I should employ the Meth- 
ods of the School and go as far as conditions and my 
abilities and intelligence would permit to inaugurate 
and establish an Educational Movement of the School 
in this Western World. 

On one point I protested, and that was that I 
wanted to pay him for his time and expense. He told 
me, however, in terms that could not be mistaken, 
that he could not admit me to the instruction on any 
other conditions; that the knowledge was a gift to 
him and that it must ever and always be given in the 
same way and the same spirit; that any variation 
from that rule would be a violation of a fundamental 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 95 

principle of the Work; that "By an endless chain of 
Gifts shall the Great Work be established.' ' 

He told me to go home, think the matter over care- 
fully until the next day, and come back to him at 4 
the next day and give him my decision. 

I went home and did my best to sleep, but made 
little headway until almost daylight, when I fell into 
a deep sleep and slept a perfect sleep until almost 
9 a. m. I arose at once, ate a bite of breakfast, and 
started to my office. So skeptical was I, however, that 
I was, by that time, wondering if the whole experi- 
ence of meeting the Master wasn't a dream. So I 
concluded to go by hotel and see if he was still there. 

I went softly up stairs and along the hallway to 
No. 13. I rapped gently on the door and almost in- 
stantly it opened and there stood the same strangely 
fascinating figure and face, half smiling. He greeted 
me with "Yes, I am still here and it is not a dream. 
Go on to your work and return to me at 4 p. m. I 
will still be here.'' 

7 said not a word but saluted him, turned and went 
straight to my office and work. At 4 p. m. I was again 
at his door. On being admitted he asked me to be 
seated and his first question was: "Well, what is 
your decision?' ' 

I replied that I presumed he already knew, as he 
seemed to know about all that was passing in my 
mind. 

He admitted that he knew my decision, but said at 
once: "I want you to know that I have not in the 
least degree influenced you in that regard, for to have 



96 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

done so would have been a direct violation of the Con- 
structive Principle." 

I then told him that I had determined to accept his 
offer, provided I could know that in so doing I could 
discharge the duties I owed to my little family. He 
assured me on that point, and asked me how soon I 
would be ready to begin the work. I told him I was 
ready at any moment. 

He seemed greatly pleased and said, "Then we will 
enter upon your first lesson tonight.' ' 

That was the beginning of the most wonderful In- 
struction, Work and Experience of my entire pre- 
vious Life. His personal instruction continued from 
that evening, for exactly 13 months; during which 
time he took me, step by step, over the entire field 
of psychology covered in "The Great Work" and 
taught me how to demonstrate every point, until I 
had developed all my Spiritual Senses perfectly — 
could see, hear, sense and talk with those of the Great 
Friends on the Spiritual side of life.* 

And my final and crowning achievement, under 
his instruction, was to withdraw at will from the 

PHYSICAL BODY AND TRAVEL WITH HIM OUT INTO THE 
SPIRITUAL REALMS. 

He had told me of the School, its work, and of its 
headquarters in India, and that when I was able in- 
dependently to go with him he would take me to the 



*If this were true, then why did he continue consulting 
mediums, as he did, almost up to the time he began writing 
"The Great Psychological Crime" t 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 97 

Central Temple in India, where I would be formally 
initiated. 

There were then 32 members living on the physical 
plane. The full roster called for 33. Therefore one 
vacancy was to be filled. 

Before the end of his work with me I withdrew 
from the physical body and with him as my guide 
went to the Central Temple (an earthly Temple in 
the province of Thibet) and was there formally in- 
itiated as the 33rd, and youngest member of the 
Order. My initiation occurred August 18, 1884. 

The Great Master remained with me in Stockton 
from July 21, 1883 to August 21, 1884, during which 
time I was with him in his room No. 13 every day 
from 4 p. m. until late mto the night — usually be- 
tween one and two the next morning. As nearly as 
I can estimate, I spent 9 hours out of every 24— on 
the average — with him — receiving instruction and do- 
ing the work he laid out for me.* 

To tell what these 13 months of instruction and 
work were in detail, and what they meant to me, would 
be impossible. It would mean to give you the de- 
tailed exposition of the Science of Constructive, In- 
dependent Unfoldment and the Philosophy of Life 
based thereon, and the individual steps by which I 
demonstrated every proposition in my own personal 
experience. 

•This was the time in which it is declared positively that 
Mr* Richardson was studying law every day from 4 to 11 
p. m. and from 5 to 9 a. m., the balance of the day being 
given to his duties as Deputy County Clerk. 



98 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

For the purpose of this historic narrative, it is 
sufficient to state the facts that. I took the instruction 
as the Great Master gave it me, did the personal work 
required, and made the demonstrations; that I was 
then inducted into the active membership; was ap- 
pointed to represent the School and work in this 
country; that I accepted the responsibilities and have 
done my best to discharge them. 

But I must tell you of one experience that meant 
more to me than any other during the Master's stay 
with me: 

Toward the close of the term of my instruction, the 
GM — during one of our " Travels in the Spiritual" 
— took me to a home somewhere in the Northwestern 
part of our own Country. There was but one person 
there, a young and most beautiful woman. She sat 
at a little table and had been writing. She was rest- 
ing her head on her hand and was thinking intently. 
I knew she was troubled and I longed to help her. 

He said to me: " Study her face and eyes until 
you will know her when you meet her in the physical ; 
for you will meet her inside of three years from now, 
and she will become your Student and first real 
helper." 

He took me to her twice thereafter before he left 
me ; and on one occasion she was in a great Hall with 
many gay and brilliant people, and she was the cen- 
ter of attention and interest; but I knew her heart 
was not in the occasion. She was still troubled, but 
was covering that fact from all about her. 

I studied her carefully. I knew that I could iden- 
tify her if I should ever meet her. 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 99 

Two years later — May 7, 1887 — I met her for the 
first time in my earthly form. It was in Bismarck, S. 

Dakota, in the office of my friend, Dr. W , in the 

First National Bank building. 

The Dr. came to my Law Office, across the hall from 
his own, and called me. He said: "Come to my of- 
fice, I want you to meet a Lady-Friend of ours who is 
visiting with us for a few weeks/ ' 

I followed him to his office and there I met "Flor- 
ence Huntley ' ' — the same beautiful woman I had come 
to know in the spiritual. I recognized her at once; 
and told her I had met her before, but would tell her 
later the circumstances. 

The next day I met her again and during an hour's 
conversation I told her a little of my life and studies 
and how and where I had seen her on three different 
occasions, each of which she recognized and verified. 

This was the beginning of my acquaintance with 
my first real Student and the most wonderful woman 
I have ever known. 

In a few months thereafter I removed to Minne- 
apolis, Minn., and she soon took a position as assist- 
ant Editor of the ''Pioneer Press" and during the 
next two years we met often at the home of Dr. 
H , with whom and his wife she lived. 

Here she began her work as a Student and during 
the two years 1887-1888 made splendid progress and 
made a number of verifications. 

But a better position was offered her on the 
"Washington Post" and she went to Wash. D. C, 

where she worked under F H for 3 years, as 

his assistant Editor of the "Post" 



100 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

About the end of that time, 1891, I removed to Chi- 
cago, where she also moved in Jan. 1894. 

Here she began her first writing on the MS of 
"Harmonics of Evolution" in her room 130 of the 
Leland Hotel — (now Stratford) at the corner of 
Michigan Ave. and Jackson Blvd. 

FROM THAT TIME— JAN. 1894, WE WERE 
NEVER SEPARATED, BUT CONTINUED TO 
MEET ALMOST EVERY DAY AND WORK TO- 
GETHER FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE 
CAUSE OF THE GREAT SCHOOL AND WORK 
IN AMERICA. 

Her MS was finally completed and in 1899 was 
published. With the publication of her book "Har- 
monics of Evolution/' began the integration of a lit- 
tle group of interested Students — among whom was 

Dr. E. M. W , who, later on, became my first 

regular Student of the "Technical Work." 

As our little Group grew in numbers, it became 
necessary for us to meet often, and this we did at 
Mrs. Huntley's rooms.* 

But we began to attract attention and to enable us 
to answer questions of the "curious" without betray- 
ing our real, serious work, — we organized the "Sub- 
lime and Ill-Illuminated Order of Tacks." 

This is, perhaps, the most unique "Order" over or- 
ganized. 



•According to Mrs. Huntley's diary she lived from August, 
1894, till Oct., 1901, in ONE room, and it was in this one 
room that the "students" met. 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 101 




102 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 




lttt-«* 



ScudC* $£<*v»*»vvr: 




BK 



^o-JcfcL > t^^Ue^Ui^Q^vl . 



1*17 




tm 



W^Wi 



Tf ri T l 





^C^M^ 



_X/& 



/Iff 



/*-*?. ~'?~° 



/?«>> 




kVlfe 



^^^^fJ^/^U^ 



19: 




1T^\ » 



i 



pROMlNEt/T MEMBERS OF THE "TACK FACTORY 

Drawings by trie ~R>\^ 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 103 

It grew out of a comical little incident around which 
grew one of the most remarkable rituals of initiation 
ever formulated. In the evolution of the ceremony 
of initiation into this, the most remarkable order on 
earth, the fun-loving natures of the blessed "RA" 
and myself found full vent. 

In this order each member was given a "Tack"- 
name suitable to his or her station and character. 

Florence Huntley was "Lady Tactful' ' — the Re- 
cording Angel, — from which last designation her ab- 
breviated name of "RA" developed. 

I WAS MR. TACK, ALSO THE TACK-HAMMER, 
AND MY ABBREVIATION OF^TK" GREW OUT 
OF "TACK"— BEING THE FIRST AND LAST 
LETTERr-TK. 

The "Order of Tacks" formed the exoteric side of 
our Group meetings, and served a splendid purpose. 

Because of my desire to work quietly and avoid 
observation I found it advisable to use some nom- 
de-plume when publishing my own contributions to 
the Literature of the Great School, — I chose the 
"Tack" name that had become attached to me — and 
hence Vols. II and III of the Harmonic Series were 
published in the name of "TK." 

So also my name as Editor of "Life and Action" 
is "TK." 

In the course of our mutual acquaintances, Mr. J. 

E. M , of N. Y. City, came to know me. He gave 

me the name of "St. John" from knowing that my 
first name is "John." 

Later on, when Dr. E. M. W had become inter- 



104 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

ested actively in the treatment and cure of subjec- 
tive, psychic insanity — along the lines suggested in 
"The Great Psychological Crime/ 9 it often occurred 
that he desired to call me into consultation for the 
special purpose of having me give him my own inde- 
pendent psychic diagnosis of some new case of in- 
sanity. 

In all such cases, I desired to avoid, as far as pos- 
sible, attracting attention to myself personally, or 
arousing curiosity in the minds of the relatives and 
attendants of such patients, or prejudices in the 
minds of any of the "Kegular" members of the Medi- 
cal Profession. 

To accomplish the desired results, Dr. E. M. W 

simply "tacked" on to my new name of "St. John" 
the title of "Dr." and in all such cases introduced 
me to patients, their relatives and friends, and such 
Drs. as were interested, — as "Dr. St. John." 

The disguise worked like a charm, and saved me all 
manner of embarrassments, and at the same time 
made it possible for me to be of some help to the 

Beloved Dr. W , during the early years of his 

experience and work as an alienist, and until he had 
become able to make his own "psychic diagnosis" 
without my aid and without having to call me into 
the case at all. 

This, therefore, gives you, very briefly and imper- 
fectly, the manner in which the name "Dr. St. John" 
became attached to me, and the way in which the 
name was naturally evolved from my first name — 
"John." 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 105 

Thus the name became attached to me, and has 
served a most excellent purpose, all these years, in 
that it has enabled me to work freely in the cause of. 
suffering humanity, and without identifying me in 
the public mind, with the Great School, with the 
authorship of Vols. 2 and 3 of the Harmonic Series, 
nor with the Great Work in America. 

During the last few years, however, in my Work 
of Instruction, and as the responsible head of the 
"Men's Department" I have signed my letters to 
Students and "Friends of the Work," as well as to 
inquirers, — indiscriminately as "TK" and as "Dr. 
St. John." 

Some of them — especially those I have written 
personally, on the typewriter — I have signed simply 
TK — in type. Others I have signed the same and 
then with pen and ink have added "E. J. St. John" 
and occasionally "Dr. E. J. St. John." 

But, during the last three years — prior to this 
22nd day of Nov. 1912 — I have instructed most of 
my correspondents to address me as "Dr. E. J. St. 
John — South Kenilworth Ave., Oak Park, III. — and 
this too, while signing most of my own letters as 
"TK." 

And thus, you will observe that it has become al- 
most generally known that "TK" and "Dr. E. J. St. 
John," are one and the same person. This has been 
premeditated on my part, for the purpose of more 
easily identifying both of these names with my real 
name of "J. E. Richardson" or "John E. Richard- 
son" — when the time comes, if ever, that it would 



106 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

seem wise for the general public to know my real 
name. 

On January 30, 1910, Florence Huntley — with 
whom I had worked for almost 25 years — and I were 
married, in the home of our Beloved Friend and 
Brother — H. H , in the village of Oak Park, Illi- 
nois. 

THIS WAS THE CULMINATION OF ALL OUR 
DREAMS OF EARTHLY HAPPINESS. 

WE WERE, BY THE GRACIOUS BENEDIC- 
TION OF THE "HIGHER DESTINY," PER- 
MITTED TO REALIZE TWO FULL YEARS OF 
"THE FULFILLING OF THE LAW" IN THE 
SWEETEST AND MOST BLESSED AND BEAU- 
TIFUL LIFE OF THE SOUL, AND IN THE MOST 
PERFECT COMPANIONSHIP AND COMRAD- 
SHIP— IN THE GREAT WORK— BEFORE HER 
TASKS WERE FINISHED AND SHE RE- 
SPONDED TO THE CALL FROM ABOVE: 
"WELL DONE, GOOD AND FAITHFUL SERV- 
ANT"— AND LEFT ME HERE TO CARRY THE 
DOUBLE BURDEN AS FAR AS I CAN BEFORE 
I TOO, SHALL HEAR THE CALL TO "COME UP 
HIGHER." 

When that time shall come I pray that I may go as 
calmly, sweetly and peacefully as she did, and that 
I may leave behind me, in the Consciousness of our 
many mutual Friends and Students, some small 
measure of the Love, the Friendship, Gratitude and 
Confidence they cherish for her. 

As one more link in the chain of identification, let 



AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF TK'S LIFE 107 

me say that on the occasion of our earthly union and 
legal marriage, Jan. 30, 1910, there were present the 
following named guests, among others, who witnessed 
the marriage ceremony and participated in the joys 
of the occasion : 

(Here follows a list of names of those who were 
in attendance.) 

With a prayer for the ever-increasing success of the 
Great School, and a blessing for each and all who have 
contributed to this success, and those who are now 
contributing or who may hereafter contribute to the 
success of the movement, I hereunto subscribe my 
true, legal and correct name, and also my assumed 
names, 



'a art j 



Uoliu 6.7tu7iarc(< 

Finished and signed in my workroom at No. - 



So. Kenilworth Ave., this 23d day of Nov., A. D., 1912, 
at exactly 11 o'clock p. m. 



108 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

The Truth About TK's Alleged Thirteen Months 
of "Personal Instruction ' ' 

The foregoing autobiography is herewith printed, 
word for word, from the original, which is in TK's 
own hand writing. On page 65 is presented a photo- 
graphic reproduction of page 6 of the original, while 
on pages 63-64 you will find the same matter in type. 

So far as we know only eight copies (typewritten) 
were made and these are in the possession of some of 
the older students. 

We have given you this story chiefly because it con- 
tains the full account of his alleged meeting and asso- 
ciation with his imaginary "Hindo Master,' ' just as 
he told the tale to those of his "accepted students' ' 
whose kind of "loyalty" would never permit them to 
question, or undertake such a thing as an investiga- 
tion into his personal claims. 

Now TK states in the clearest, most definite, un- 
mistakable and unqualified terms that: 

1. A "Hindo Master" came to him in Stockton, 
Calif., on July 21, 1883. 

2. That this Hindo Master remained in Stockton 
from July 21, 1883, to August 21, 1884. 

3. That he lived at the Grand Central Hotel, occu- 
pying Room No. 13 during all that time. 

4. That he, TK, was with this "master" on an 
average of nine (9) hours every day during the thir- 
teen months indicated. 

5. That these nine hours began at 4 p. m. daily, and 
lasted "until late into the night, — usually between one 
and two the next morning." (See page 97.) 



TK'S ALLEGED "PERSONAL INSTRUCTION" 109 

Now it is clearly evident that upon the truthfulness 
or untruthfulness of these unqualified statements rests 
the existence and superstructure of his entire so-called 
" Great School.' ' This is the keystone to the arch, — 
the one single decisive, pivotal point upon which turn 
all his personal claims and pretensions. Disprove this 
decisive point, — take away this " Great Master" story, 
— show conclusively that TK's time, during these thir- 
teen months, was occupied otherwise than as he states, 
— that it was impossible for him to have spent nine 
hours daily with his so-called " Great Master," — and 
it becomes clearly impossible that there could be any 
foundation whatever for his alleged contact with and 
instruction under his " master." 

Once the untruthfulness of what he has to say on 
this one point is settled, it follows, as surely as day the 
night, that his alleged "instruction" and "training"; 
his personal experiences, claims and demonstrations; 
his assumed authority in and relationship to the Great 
School; his position as its "sole representative," — ■ 
and everything he has ever written regarding these 
personal claims is proven and established beyond all 

POSSIBILITY OF DOUBT TO BE ENTIRELY IMAGINARY, A 
MYTH, A FICTION, WITHOUT ANY FOUNDATION WHATEVER 
IN FACT. 

Now it so happens that before, during and follow- 
ing the time specified, i e., between July 21, 1883, and 
August 21, 1884, it is known definitely and has been 
established beyond all question, exactly how Mr. Eich- 
ardson's time was occupied, and that it was not occu- 
pied as he states it was. 



110 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

There is living to-day in Stockton, Calif., a gentle- 
man, a Mr. Nutter, an old resident and highly 
respected citizen of that place. He is a successful and 
prominent attorney; a man of unimpeachable char- 
acter and reputation. He has practiced law in Stock- 
ton since 1885. He worked with Mr. Eichardson daily 
for a number of years. The two studied law together ; 
took their examinations together, and following their 
admission to the Bar on Nov. 10, 1885, they formed a 
partnership and for several months thereafter prac- 
ticed law together. 

Upon* the basis of these facts, Mr. Nutter kixew Mr. 
Eichardson, knew him intimately, — as intimately as an 
association of from sixteen to eighteen hours daily 
would make possible. 

Now Mr. Nutter states unqualifiedly that Mr. Eich- 
ardson and himself were together daily during the 
entire time in which TK says he spent nine hours a 
day with his imaginary " master.' ' Mr. Nutter states 
further — and the Court records in Stockton sustain his 
testimony — that he and Mr. Eichardson were engaged 
at that time as deputy County Clerks, that in this 
capacity they worked together from 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. 
daily. Mr. Nutter further declares that from 4 p. m. 
to about 11 p. m., and from 5 to 9 a. m. daily he and 
Mr. Eichardson read law together in the latter 's home. 

In this manner there is established for Mr. Eichard- 
son an absolute alibi which proves conclusively that 
the statements which he makes regarding the matter 
of a personal instruction and "initiation" are entirely 
fictional and untrue. 



TK'S "POLITICAL ACTIVITIES" 111 

The above is, of course, the most central, important 
and vital fact to be established, and whatever addi- 
tional time may be given to an analysis of TK's auto- 
biography can be but supplementary — of interest only 
as "A Study in Psychology, ' ' — an enigma in the 
realm of human intelligence. He represents himself 
as yielding a powerful influence among the important 
men of the political, business and financial world. He 
runs for local superintendent of schools and refers to 
it as " years of political activities and ambitions on 
the Pacific Coast/ ' In a letter dated Jan. 23, 1914, he 
writes : 

1 ' There was a time in my own political life when it became 
necessary for me to determine whether I could render a larger 
service to humanity as Governor of a great Commonwealth, or 
as the obscure representative of the Great School. 

"By a chain of events, I had become the pivotal center about 
which revolved the destiny of the Democratic Party on the 
Pacific Coast, and this had come about without any desire, 
ambition or political effort on my own part; nevertheless the 
responsibility of determining the question rested upon me 
alone. I went before the convention and made a careful 
address, asking that my name be withdrawn and that of a 
young friend be substituted. This was done and by thus 
throwing all my political influence on the side of my successor, 
he was elected by a splendid majority." 

Another illustration of this " tendency' ' appears in 
Bv. 4, p. 164: 

"When the time comes, if this is before my work here is 
finished, I shall hope to give to the world some of the advanced 
methods of therapeutics known to the Great School and 



112 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Friends. It will then be for the world to answer as to 
whether these are 'better' than the methods of Christian 
Science, or Christian Metaphysics, or the Emanuel Movement, 
or Nature Cure, or the Regular Physician, or the various 
other methods now in use. In my own best judgment, the 
methods of the Great School are immeasurably superior to 
those of any or all the other systems of treatment combined ; 
but there are no doubt, many who would not trust my judg- 
ment in a matter of so much importance. / cannot blame 
them. In truth, I heartily commend them." 

From this, one would hardly imagine disease and 
sickness in TK's family. As a matter of fact, how- 
ever, TK himself for years complained almost con- 
stantly of indigestion, back ache, sleeplessness, etc., 
and resorted to drugs and medicines practically all 
the time. Few physician-students ever came to 
"know" him or even to learn of his physical disorders 
who did not furnish or prescribe for him some new 
remedies. 

We herewith present a list of the names and initials 
by which TK was known to and spoken of by his 
intimate students and friends : TK, E B, J E R, U J, 
G M, Elder Brother, Tack Hammer, Chief Tack, Uncle 
John, General Manager, Grand Master, Dr. E. J. St. 
John, Wamhas, Zanoni and Iben. 



CHAPTER VIII 

Masters and Masters 

1. What tangible evidence can you offer as to the 
existence of the Great School at the present time, and 
of its existence during the long periods you claim for 
it? 

2. What tangible evidence can you offer that it 
sent Masonry forth into the world? 

3. Where are the records which you mention, and 
how were you convinced as to their authenticity and 
great age? 

— Life and Action, Bv. 1, p. 11. 
"The only 'tangible' evidence I have to offer you at 
this time, or to any other man, is myself " 

— TK, in Life and Action, Bv. 1, p. 13. 

Speaking of pre-judging the existence of the * ' Great 
School' ' one prominent instructor wrote as follows: 

"The spirit was illustrated by the reception ac- 
corded 'The Great Work' by two clergymen to whom 
I had presented the book, both good and rather liberal 
men. One declared that if he had the knowledge sug- 
gested by the author he would ' shout it from the house- 
tops.' " The author did not so shout it, but rather 
concealed his identity (for specific reasons), ergo, he 
could not possess the knowledge. 

The other simply said he "doubted entirely the ex- 
istence of the Great School. * * * # A very 
large interest must continually turn on the question of 

113 



114 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

the existence of the Great School." — Bv. 1, No. 2, pp. 
5-7. 

Proving the Great School's Existence 

"Either such men exist, or they do not. The fact of 
their existence, if they exist at all, should be demon- 
trable. Hoiv that demonstration should or could be 
made, would be a serious question intimately involved 
with that of their existence and powers per se. 

Admitting or proving the existence of the real Mas- 
ter, the existence of the Great School becomes merely 
a question of aggregation and association.'' " 

— Bv. 1, No. 2, p. 16. 
The " Great School," A Failure All Down the Ages 

' ' They have the records of all the past ages to draw 
from. In those records may be found many forceful 
examples and illustrations wherein the best efforts of 
the Great School have resulted in failure, or in suc- 
cess of so qualified a nature as to spell 'failure* when 
compared with the original ideals and designs which 
the Great Friends have had in mind. 

"No more forceful illustration of all this could be 
found than in the life and ministry of the Master, 
Jesus." —Bv. 1, No. 3, p. 24. 

Taking No Chances this Time 

"This present and latest effort of the School was 
planned many years before its active inauguration. 
It was based upon the experiences of the past ages 
of effort, and as might readily be anticipated, every 
phase of the contemplated Movement was given the 



116 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

most careful, thotful cmd exhaustive consideration, 
cmd the methods of procedure to be followed were 
wrought out with the utmost exactness and detail" 

— Bv. 3, p. 63. 

TK Chosen 

" Through a combination of conditions and circum- 
stances which some might call fate, others luck, others 
good fortune, others destiny, but which I shall not 
attempt to name or explain, it has been a part of my 
experience to be chosen by the School of Natural 
Science to undertake a definite and specific work in 
this country." 

•— TK,inBv. l,No..3,p. 24. 

To Peotect the Wokld fbom Imposition 

" There are fifteen additional 'Marks' or 'in- 
dices' of the real 'Master' stated in the same chapter. 
They are all equally clear and unqualified. The pur- 
pose of the Great School in giving this definite and im- 
portant information to the public in this particular 
manner and form was to enable honest and intelligent 
students and inquirers to have at command the sim- 
ple and unqualified data which would enable them, at 
any and all times and under any and all circumstances : 
To determine the TRUE from the false and thus pro- 
tect themselves from imposition and from falling into 
the hands of charlatans, fakirs and frauds who adver- 
tise themselves to the innocent and the unsophisticated 
as 'Masters' and as 'Members' and 'Representatives' 
of The Great School" 

TK, in Bv, 1, No. 5, p. 23. 



MASTERS AND MASTERS 117 

Danger of Being Imposed upon and Misled 

"In these days of psychic inquiry and wide gen- 
eral awakening to the possibilities of definite knowl- 
edge in the realm of things spiritual, there are " Tea- 
chers' ' and " Instructors' ' and "Guides" and "Mas- 
ters" waiting at every turn of the road. In this age, 
as in every other, there are impostors, pretenders and 
charlatans who seek to turn the spirit of inquiry to 
their own selfish gain. And because of these impostors 
the honest inquirer and seeker after spiritual light is 
in constant danger of being imposed upon and mis- 
led." — TK, in Bv. 1, No. 5, p. 24. 

People Deceived and Exploited by Masters 

"The old saying — ' Nothing can be concealed from 
him who knows ' has not a trite, but a very deep mean- 
ing. * Occultism ' has become a fad and the very name 
raises curiosity to the highest pitch. People flock to- 
gether like a lot of gossips at a * quilting/ just burst- 
ing to hear the latest lingo or the most astonishing 
secrets, and they are told to 'Take a Mantram' as they 
would be told to 'help themselves to the preserves.' 
These people are deceived, exploited, robbed and fin- 
ally discouraged/ 9 — Bv. 1, No. 4, p. 29. 

People Pay Liberally for Being Humbugged 

"There is, moreover, at all times a 'running after* 
these teachers by the multitude, generally with the 
expectation of finding a 'short-cut,' a desire of ' climb- 
ing up some other way,' so as to avoid self-control and 
personal effort to which I have referred. It is here 



118 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

that the charlatan sees his opportunity and gets in his 
work. People pay liberally for being humbugged." 

— Bv. 1, No. 2, p. 4. 

Fakirism Past and Present 

"The middle ages were not more full of 'Soothsay- 
ers/ ' Astrologers/ 'Adepts/ 'Magicians/ and the 
like, than is the present age with 'Mediums/ 'Healers/ 
'Leaders/ and 'Official Heads/ who for a 'sufficient 
consideration' can be induced to take your money, 
'Give you a Mantram/ 'lead you into the silence/ and 
land you on the stool of repentance or in the mad- 
house, and then dodge the law by shifting, with another 
nom de plume, to another parish. They are shorter- 
lived now than formerly, on account of the newspapers 
and prying reporters; but the psychological exploita- 
tion of to-day is equally popular and successful with 
the fakirism of all the past, and the people just beg 
these fakirs to take their money. 

— Bv. 4, pp. 262-3. 

On Judging True Masters 

"There must be an absence of ambition, greed, sel- 
fishness, pride or any ulterior motive. The man and 
his work must agree, thus revealing 'consistency, co- 
ordination, completeness and harmony'." 

— Bv. 1, No. 4, p. 29. 



CHAPTER IX 

What Is This " Great School?' ' 

"It matters not who the individual may be, or what 
are the claims he makes. His actual life and conduct 

ARE THE BASIS UPON WHICH HE MUST BE JUDGED.' ' 

— TK in Bv. 1, No. 5, p. 25. 

What is this "Great School"! 

Whence came it? 

Who are its representatives? 

What is it all about? 

Has it any real existence? 

Who knows anything about it? 

What has it done? 

What has become of it? 

If you have read and remembered what TK has 
written about it, you yourself will know as much con- 
cerning its existence as anyone else, and so far as his 
personal relationship to a Great Spiritual School of 
Light, it is all a beautiful fiction. If he is a representa- 
tive of any spiritual school at all, it is the Great School 
of Spiritual Darkness. 

TK himself tells us that he came from a numerous 
family, practically all members of which were or are 
spiritualists; that many of them were mediums, and 
that he himself tried for a number of years to become 
a medium. He states also that as a result of the med- 
iumistic process one relative developed into a serious 
nervous condition, another became insane, another 

119 



120 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

obsessed, while still others were unfavorably influ- 
enced in various ways. 

Evidence exists which proves conclusively that he 
was in the habit of consulting mediums, even up to 
near the time he wrote "The Great Psychological 
Crime," — against mediumship and hypnotism. 

There can be no question but that TK himself has 
been a medium for a number of years, and subject to 
spiritual influences and impressions. Not only this, 
but the evidences in his life suggest that he was just 
the type of intelligence to readily co-operate with and 
lend himself to the direction and will of dishonest and 
unscrupulous spirit guides and controls. 

As to the origin of his " Great School,' ' it appears 
from an abundance of his letters to Florence Huntley, 
that it began in veiled hints and suggestions . to her, 
to the effect that he (TK) was in touch with a spiritual 
school of some kind. These letters bear further evi- 
dence that as she became impressed with this thot, and 
questioned him, he found it necessary to amplify the 
original hints until in the course of five or six years, 
and as their love relation grew, she came to accept 
his stories as the living truth. As time passed, in 
order to strengthen his position and prospects in her 
mind, and in order to establish his influence over her, 
he began posing as a "master." From the entries in 
her diaries, it appears that this influence and power 
which he sought to exercise was unquestionably hyp- 
notic; in other words, in order to accomplish his de- 
signs he was, either consciously or unconsciously, re- 
sorting to what all occult writers describe as Black 
Magic. 



WHAT IS THIS "GREAT SCHOOL"? 121 

In due time in the course of his letters to Florence 
Huntley, he introduced the word great, thus referring 
to his imaginary school as a GREAT School, and 
thereafter spoke of it as such. In a veiled way he 
spoke also of his "master," who in due time, became 
a Great Master, and following this, in the course of 
evolution, other imaginary "masters" came into the 
occult tales he wove into his "love" letters. 

Thus with proper suggestions, stories and hints, and 
belief in the honesty of his intentions and claims, the 
"existence" of his "Great School," his Great Mas- 
ters and his own "mastership," etc., etc., it gradually 
became impressed upon Florence Huntley's mind as a 
reality. 

In 1894, Mr. Richardson persuaded her to come to 
Chicago to live, and for several years thereafter, she 
lived in a single room in the Leland Hotel. During 
this time she wrote her "Harmonics of Evolution," 
and helped out on her living expenses by selling in- 
surance and stock offered by various Masonic Insur- 
ance "Associations" the "master" was engaged i'n 
floating from time to time. 

Under the impression from TK that she was, with 
him, destined and chosen by the "Great Masters" of 
his "Great School" to represent their interests in 
America, she readily yielded herself to the belief that 
they should inaugurate a modern metaphysical cru- 
sade of some kind. Thus it came about that Mrs. 
Huntley in her meetings with people in a business way, 
took occasion to try out certain individuals with some 
of the "spiritual" ideas which she was in the habit 
of discussing with her "master." In this way, in 



122 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

time, she succeeded in impressing two or three peo- 
ple sufficiently to get them to express a willingness or 
desire to meet the "modern master of the law." As 
a result, a meeting was usually brot about between the 
new prospect and the Great One. 

By 1899 her book "Harmonics of Evolution/' ex- 
plaining just how often and when to love wisely, "as 
well as well," — was published. By that time, thru 
Mrs. Huntley's efforts, a half dozen or so people had 
been impressed to believe that what she told them of 
TK's stories was too true to be good — that he was as 
one "born out of due time," a sure enuf, simon-pure, 
flesh-and-blood "master," and that he had not arrived 
a day too soon to save mankind from being humbugged 
by the horde of spurious "masters" already doing 
business in Chicago and elsewhere. 

Furthermore, this little group were duly impressed 
to believe that Mr. Richardson and Mrs. Huntley were 
soul-mates; that they had made this scientific demon- 
stration, and were therefore equipped by Nature, to 
become teachers and messengers to mankind. If the 
"little band" of students knew anything at all of the 
existence of Mr. Richardson's wife and child, they 
probably got the information in a way to mislead them 
as to the truth, so that they paid little or no attention 
to the true situation. 

Thus, TK's "Great School" had its beginning. He 
became the "sole representative," the center, the head, 
the tail light and speed indicator. And thus under 
the strong, swaying influences of false impressions, 
Florence Huntley innocently lent her brilliant intelli- 
gence to the domination of an unprincipled schemer. 



WHAT IS THIS "GREAT SCHOOL"? 123 

During these early years of his " Great School's" 
existence, TK got considerable practice in the role 
of a "master." He discovered many tricks of psy- 
chology, learning how to meet, handle and properly 
impress different types of men. 

In the weekly meetings which were inaugurated and 
carried on for several years, he learned things which 
later on became his stock in trade. Out of these few 
followers and such as were added from time to time, 
he evolved and tried out new hints, suggestions, stories 
and poses, until in 1909 when he launched his maga- 
zine, Life and Action, he had accumulated considerable 
"personal experience" in his new line, and a great 
many practical ideas about the "master" business. 
He had developed many new designs in psychological 
hood-winks, had invented many a new occult hook and 
had discovered and worked out as clever a line of in- 
tellectual and moral bait as ever were cast into the 
surging sea of humanity. He knew too, how to set 
and trip his own make of spiritual trap in a way that 
amazed most of his competitors. 

Thus step by step, he made his "scientific demon- 
strations," and got his spiritual eyes open to the best 
methods for carrying on the business which he so aptly 
termed his * ' Great Work. ' ' He had really reduced the 
practice of occult grafting to a science. He had ele- 
vated this science to the dignity of a profession. He 
demonstrated that the master business can be made to 
pay, purely by a system of personal impressions, based 
solely upon faith in an honesty which did not exist. 

By the time he started his magazine, TK already 
had a nice publishing business and had collected prob- 



124 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

ably a hundred thousand dollars on the side. He had 
built up an imaginary " Great School" in the minds 
of a number of his readers, and they had been im- 
pressed to look to him as the sole representative 
and proprietor. He alone possessed full power to use 
it, advertise it, clothe and exploit it; run it or ditch 
it, just as he might see fit. 

On the physical plane he had drawn about him a few 
people whose names he used in his writings as fully 
endorsing his "mastership." None of these could 
have sworn whether he was a master or a mummy, but 
they had his word for it, and believing implicitly in his 
honesty, permitted themselves to be deceived and mis- 
led. 

Instead of offering any proofs of his "mastership," 
he took the negative side of the question and left with 
those who might be interested, the burden of proving 
that he was not a ' ' master ' ' ! When any new inquirers 
asked him for evidences of the existence of his ' * Great 
School," he turned his hand and in a way not to of- 
fend human intelligence, said simply: "There are 
people whom I have admitted to studentship. They 
are students in the Great School. How could they be 
students in a Great School if there were no Great 
School? The existence of these students is proof posi- 
tive of the existence of my Great School. 

Is it not so?" 

And it was not so. 

The remainder of TK's evidence of the existence of 
his school consisted of stories, hints and suggestions. 
These stories, etc., played more or less hypnotically 
upon the susceptible imaginations of those who wished 



WHAT IS THIS "GREAT SCHOOL"? 125 

or demanded something "tangible" to believe and 
think about, and in time the objects, happenings, places 
and personages which figured in TK's spiritual tales, 
took on the nature of reality, very much as Santa 
Claus is a reality to children. 

TK was supposed to have a number of "masters" 
assisting him with the management of his "Great 
School": there was the "Great Master," the "Great 
Chinese Master," "Master Alamo," the "Beloved 
Master,' ' — for the ladies to pray to, and a host of 
lesser lights for emergencies. 

Whether TK believed what these spirit guides told 
him or not, it would be just like him anyway to brag 
on them as being GREAT ones, just as he boasts of his 
former imaginary escape from being Governor of 
California, his $30,000.00 a year income, his cats and 
other accomplishments. Anyway, he frequently de- 
scribed his masters' robes, their eyes, their whiskers 
and little mannerisms, until in time a number of stu- 
dents called them by their first names and imagined 
they could recognize them off hand if they should 
ever get an opportunity to give them the "once over." 



CHAPTER X 

The Indo-American Book Co. 

Harmonics of Evolution was published in 1899. 

The Great Psychological Crime in 1903. 

The Great Work in 1906. 

Up to 1907 it was believed by the students, and 
TK himself encouraged this belief at every oppor- 
tunity, that the Book Co., had not done so well, and 
it was during this year that plans were laid for the 
" extension of the work." 

The Plan Proposed 

"The Indo-American Book Co., is the agency thru which 
the School of Natural Science has undertaken to reach the 
world. It was organized and to-day exists solely for that pur- 
pose. This agency can be supported and its object secured. 
By aiding and supporting this agency, we may in the only 
legitimate way possible uphold the hands of the Teacher 
(TK) and further the Great Work in this country. 

"It is therefore herein and hereby proposed, that as many 
of us as can do so and desire to co-operate in the Great Work, 
and aid the School of Natural Science in its educational exten- 
sion work, agree together to purchase from the Indo-American 
Book Co., each month, one set of the three books, each (more 
or less as he feels able or inclined), and present them as a 
gift to some individual or library, or other institution where 
he believes they will do the most good." 

I now quote you a paragraph which tells the whole story 
as plain as day: 

126 



THE INDO-AMERICAN BOOK CO. 127 

"By aiding the work, we many become co-workers with the 
Teacher, in a modest and acceptable way, and so enable him 
to devote his entire time and energy to the furtherance of 
the Work. It would be a shame to offer him i charity,* in the 
ordinary meaning of that term; and he cannot accept 'remun- 
eration' nor become a 'pensioner* even upon those who would 
esteem it a sacred privilege to 'give'." 

Who, then or what was the Indo-American Book 
"Co."? The Indo-American Book "Co." was simply 
another business-name for John E. Richardson. It 
was not a "Company"; it was never incorporated. 
TK was the sole owner; he alone dictated its policies 
and grew rich on its profits. To call himself a ' * Com- 
pany" was strictly in line with his regular method of 
false-facing the various "departments" of his 
"GREAT Work." Few would suspect the above facts, 
for throughout his writings and in his personal inter- 
views and correspondence, TK always referred to the 
Book "Co." as if it were a thing separate and apart 
from himself, as for instance, (Bound Vol. 5, p. 209) : 

"It was because of this fact that I was led to rec- 
ommend to the Indo-American Book Co. (himself) the 
publication, or circulation of M. Notovich's book, 
"The Unknown Life of Jesus Christ" — after dis- 
claiming any definite knowledge on the subject. And 
while the Book "Co." (TK) has made its (TK's) 
disclaimer as suggested," etc., etc. 

This is but one example. A hundred might be 
quoted. 

In the spring of 1909, "The Indo-American Maga- 
zine" was launched. 



128 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

With its second issue (Sept. 1909), the name was 
changed to "Life and Action. " 

The three principal books published by the "Com- 
pany" were known as the "Harmonic Series.' ' The 
first of these, "Harmonics of Evolution," was pub- 
lished in 1899. Thus TK's publication work began in 
1899 and continued to April 1st, 1916. 

During all these years, TK foisted the idea, and it 
was universally accepted and believed to be true by 
all his followers intimately associated with the work 
in Chicago, that, 

1. The Book "Co." up to 1912 had never paid 
running expenses. 

2. That in 1911, the "Co." ran behind $6,000.00, 
which sum (according to report made* to the Board of 
Assessors, Cook Co., 111., April, 1912) had to be made 
up in order to keep the "Co." running. 

3. That when in 1912 the Book "Co." began show- 
ing a "small margin above running expenses," every 
dollar of the revenue therefrom was devoted to the 
extension of the "work." * 

From the very beginning, TK planted the idea, 
watered and cultivated it, both in conversation and in 
all his writings, and made it clear and definite, that 
no part of the "Great Work" would or could ever be 
used for money making or grafting of any kind. 

In Bound Vol. Ill, "Life and Action" for 1912, 
p. 59, third paragraph, TK says : 



# The "small margin' ' here referred to amounted to 
$6,000.00 in TK's favor for the year of 1912. 



THE INDO-AMERICAN BOOK CO. 129 

" However unbusiness-like it may appear, we are, 
nevertheless, not handling and selling books for the 
sake of making money. Our primary and impelling 
motive is educational." 

So clearly, regularly and persistently was the pov- 
erty idea passed around that even in the latter weeks 
of TK's program, and up to his exposure in March, 
1916, not a single student except his private stenog- 
rapher knew or even suspected but that he was living 
almost from hand-to-mouth, and in constant need of 
funds with which to carry on his "work." Not one 
would have imagined the incredibly large sums of 
money he had on deposit in various banks at that 
very time. 

Up to October, 1911, the I-A Book "Co.," besides 
publishing "their" own books, did a general book 
business. TK's income at that time, and for several 
years previous thereto, was from various sources: 

1. Publication of the "Harmonic Series," and 
several other books which he owned. 

2. The magazine, Life and Action. 

3. New Thot and other liberal books which his 
"Co." handled. 

4. Individual, regular, monthly contributions to 
pay for imaginary stenographers, office help, etc., etc.* 



♦Exactly how many " Friends'' were contributing reg- 
ularly to this graft is not known. It is known that one 
Friend sent $250.00 monthly for a long time. Another sent 
$70.00 per month. Examination of the records shows that 
still another Friend, a Mr. T-— , in 1910, sent a check for 



130 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



5. Donations to a " Gift Account Fund ' ■ from which 
books, magazines, etc., were supposed to be supplied 
free to the poor and aged. 

6. Purely personal cash gifts "for the good of the 
' GREAT CAUSE.' " 

7. Gifts — cash and otherwise — from "Friends" 
for his own "personal use." 

It has been stated that it was generally understood 
by even the most intimate students and employees 
in TK's "confidence," that up to 1912, the Book 
"Co." had failed to meet its own running expenses. 

Let us now figure with figures: 

Up to April 1, 1916, there had been published and 
sold the following number of copies of the ' ' Harmonic 
Series" in cloth binding: 

Harmonics of Evolution, 19,000 at $2.00 each, $38,- 
000.00. 

Great Psychological Crime, 16,000 at $2.00 each, 
$32,000.00. 

The great Work, 24,000 at $2.00 each, $48,000.00. 

Total number of copies, 59,000; total value, $118,- 
000.00. 

Of the above total amount, the following table 
shows the sales of the "Harmonic Series" from Jan. 
1, 1912, to Jan. 1,1917: 



$1,000.00. TK promptly suggested that this amount also be 
used in the same manner — as salary for an imaginary stenog- 
rapher. It is needless to say just how any of these contri- 
butions were really "applied." 



THE INDO-AMERICAN BOOK CO. 131 

1912 $8,589.70 

1913 7,717.99 

1914 7,412.62 

1915 8,320.61 

1916 7,597.03 



Total: $39,637.95 
Or a total of 19,682 copies in cloth binding.* 

To make these figures stand out more forcefully, let 
us call it an even 4,000 copies per year. This then 
will account for 20,000 of the total 60,000 copies pub- 
lished. 

WE NOW HAVE 40,000 COPIES ($80,000.00 
WORTH) TO ACCOUNT FOR, AND THESE 40,- 
000 COPIES COULD HAVE BEEN PUBLISHED 
AND SOLD ONLY IN THE PERIOD BETWEEN 
1899 AND JAN. 1ST, 1912. 

With this one fact alone before us, can any mind 
imagine how the Indo-American Book "Co." could 
have possibly failed to meet its running expenses up 
to 1912? 

Keeping in mind the fact that TK sold in eighteen 
years over $130,000.00 worth of the "Harmonic Se- 
ries" alone, we must not forget that this represented 



•Besides these 20,000 copies in cloth at $2.00 each, there 
were published during the five years indicated, 3,000 copies in 
morocco binding which sold for $3.50 each, and 200 copies 
of the ' ' Three-in-One " at $12.00 each, giving us an addi- 
tional sum of $12,900.00. 



132 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

but a small part of his income. We are reminded 
that his " Company, " i. e. himself, had several other 
sources of income: 

1. He published a great number of other books 
besides the " Harmonic Series." 

2. Up to September, 1911, he did a general book 
business. 

3. There were magazine subscriptions. 

4. There were generous contributions — monthly 
and otherwise. 

5. There were remittances to "Gift Account 
Funds." 

6. Checks and cash for "personal use." 

In handling contributions and contributors, TK 
had a system that so effectually covered up his opera- 
tions that in the majority of instances, practically no 
one but himself and the giver ever knew anything 
about the transaction. For instance, "gifts" could 
best be given and accepted in " confidence, ' ' and 
where a sum of any considerable amount came thru 
the Book "Co.," TK, by means of his clever "per- 
sonal' ? letters took care to "educate" the new "Friend 
of the Work" so that all future contributions for the 
"Cause" were thereafter sent to him direct, — and if 
possible in cash, if he could make them see it that 
way. This was just a little "precaution" so there 
would be no canceled checks or other means of iden- 
tifying the transaction in a way that might sometime 
"embarrass the Great School," i. e. TK. It was not 
an unusual thing for contributions in sums of $100, 
$300, $500, $1,000, to be sent to TK, and they always 
came at a time when his "Great School" was sup- 



THE INDO-AMERICAN BOOK CO. 133 

posedly u sorely in need of funds" to carry on some 
imaginary " educational ' ' project, etc., etc. 

From this it will be seen that no one may ever 
know exactly the extent of his financial operations, 
but when I tell you that those operations cost one 
man alone nearly a quarter of a million dollars in 
cash, to say nothing of over ten years of his time: 
that TK had many wealthy and generous " Friends' ' 
on his list and knew how to work them with his 
"Great Work" — who of us can imagine the number 
of hundreds of thousands of dollars he must have 
"made" out of his Great-School graft? 



Perhaps the one thing about the Book "Co.," that 
impressed more people than anything else was the 
apparent amount of "charity" work it was doing — 
especially the tens of thousands of books and maga- 
zines that were annually being distributed free to the 
poor and aged, to prison libraries, etc., etc. 

The particular hind of "charity" here represented 
was certainly a clever and original innovation. It 
illustrates a unique business sagacity that enabled the 
Book "Co." to not only get a great amount of credit 
and valuable advertising out of its "charity," abso- 
lutely without cost, but at the same time make a profit 
on its "gifts." 

To understand just how this unique system of 
"charity" worked itself out, it will be necessary for 
you to know that there were at least three known 
separate and distinct "Gift Accounts." 



RECORD OF GIFTS RECEIVED 1914 


RECEIVED PAID OUT 


May 


21 


..R.H.W 


4 














June 


a 


J.R.L. 


22 














Sept 


2 
3 
4 


H.G.C. 

F.R. 

M.D.G. 


100 

4 

10 
















8 


J.F.L. 


35 




Sepi 


9 


A.H.N, sub 


I 






II 


C.H.W. 


2 






15 


H.V.A.P. 


2 






14 


I.H.R. 


I 
















15 


E.M.P. 


3 
















18 


Mrs.M.R. 


I 
















22 


J.R. 


10 
















25 


A.H.M. 


I 
















29 


T.W.B. 


100 














Oct 


12 


L.S.L. 


I 




Oot 


19 


Sub. and 








13 


C.C.P, 


I 








Books drawn 


4 






14 


N.B.C.- 


I 
















16 


H.V.A.P. 


5 
















19 


W.N D. 


7 
















20 


Dr.B. 


10 
















21 


H.W.B. 


2 
















21 


C.E.D. 


I 
















23 


M.E.D. 


3 
















29 


Mrs, P. 


I 
















29 


L.H\ 


100 














Nov 


2 
3 
8 
10 
85 
37 
37 
30 


M.L.J. 

J.F.L. 

T.W.E. 

A.H.P. 

L.G.S. 

B.G.Co. 

T.W.B. 

H.W.W. 


20 
35 

I 

2 
10 

3 
100 

5 














Dec 


8 

10 
II 
19 


G.N. 
A.W.E. 
H.W.R. 
Cash 


15 
I 
3 
5 


50 














21 


W.F.H. 


I 




Dec 


31 


To close 
Account. . .$ 


5?8 


50 






$ 


605 


50 






1 


605 


50 


Total profit to TK from the Book Co.,for 1914, $5,500.00 


This included the above "Gift Account" fund of 598.50 


No record is given for the first five months, or up to 


Uay 21 at. 


From thle "Gift Acoounty books and magazines fere sup- 


posed to be furnished "free" to all who *ere to poor to 


pay. Total "Gift Accounffor two years $1,925.25. 

Total paid out for two yeare:$9.00. Total to Tk: $1,916. 2! 



RECORD OF GIFTS RECEIVED 1915. 


RECEIVED PAID OUT 


Jen 


13 


T.T. 


500 
















13 


M.S.F. 


I 




Jan 


15 


Sent "G/W." 






Feb 


5 
13 
I? 


A.W.U. 
J. A. 

B.B.B. 


30 
I 
3 








to M.E.S. 


3 




Mar 


5 

5 

34 


Mre.F. 
J.F.L. 
A.H.P. 


30 

30 

I 


75 












Apr. 


7 
33 


J.W.H. 
I.C.J.W. 


5 
3 














May 


3 


O.F.S. 


3 














Aup: 


II 
S3 


Mrs.E.H. 
E.D. 


3 

3 














Oct 


13 
16 
18 
18 
31 


S.P.L. 

T.W.B. 

L.H. 

Dr.E.L.H. 

A.H.P. 


3 

500 

50 

I 

6 














Deo 


10 
15 
14 
13 
14 

n 

« 

16 
n 

H 

17 

N 

18 

M 

n 
30 

a 

31 
n 

■ 
33 

R 

34 


E.M.P. 
F.K.S. 
M.C. 

o.w. 

J.A.L. 

E.M. 

F.K.S. 

Mrs. G. 

T.J.C. 

Mrs. P. W. 

M.J.C. 

J.J. 

C.H.P. 

C.P. 

G.E.S. 

A.C.E 

C.E. 

J.C.S. 

A.J.M. 

S.M.K. 

R.M.D. 

C.J.M. 

H*L.K. 

A.H.P. 

J.F. 


3 

I 

10 

10 

35 

3 

I 

3 

30 

3 

5 

10 

I 

10 

5 
I 

13 
5 
5 

30 
3 
I 
5 

10 


50 
50 














■ 


Mr.& Mrs. H.J. 


5 




Dec 


31 


To Close 








■ 


S.P.L. 


5 








Account 51. 


317 


75 






«I 


319 


75 






*j 


319 


75 


Total profit to TK from the Book Co. for 1915, §4,938.00 
This inoluded the above "Gift Aocount" fund of $1,317.75 



136 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



1. A graft "fund" — plain and original — into which 
went all remittances ''for the Gift Account.' ' This 
fund went annually into TK's pockets. For instance, 
only $9.00 worth of books were charged against this 
fund in two years, 1914-15, while $1,916.25 went into 
TK's profits. See plates for details. 

2. A fund of about $200.00 out of which books for 
certain libraries were paid for. 

3. The real and genuine "Gift Account Fund" 
provided by a noble and generous Friend, and against 
which was charged all books and subscriptions sup- 
posed to be "gifts" from the Book "Co." 

It will be seen that TK, i. e. the Book "Co.," bore 
absolutely no part of the expense connected with these 
' 'gifts," but actually made the regular profit on each 
and every "gift" book and subscription "he" gave 
away! In fact some unusual charges often went 
against this catch-all "gift account.' ' For instance 
on April 21, 1914, Dr. B. wrote the Book "Co." for 
four copies of his own book, "A Study of Man." Dr. 
B. was at the time Assistant Editor of Life and 
Action, and had held this position without salary or 
other remuneration for over five years. He had also 
contributed a half dozen or more books which had 
added many thousands of dollars to TK's bank ac- 
count, and for which not a cent of royalty was paid 
by the genial and " generous" TK. Under these cir- 
cumstances one would naturally think that any books 
asked for by Dr. B. would have been furnished with- 
out even so much as thinking of charging for 
them. But when this request for four copies came, 



THE 1ND0-AMERICAN BOOK CO. 137 

the item was promptly charged to the Gift Account, 
at full price, $6.00. 

Again, on Nov. 19, 1915, TK himself wrote from 
Pasadena, Calif., for two sets of the Text Books 
($12.00) "for my own use" — and ordered them 
charged to the "Gift Account." Can anyone imagine 
the moral deformity of a "master" who would thus 
betray, abuse and misuse the confidence of so true 
and loyal a Friend, as TK did this man who was pay- 
ing all the "charity" expenses of his Book "Com- 
pany"? 

When you study TKs' writings after knowing the 
hitherto hidden side of his nature, it seems that his 
tendency has always been to exaggerate everything, 
and to do so to such an extent that the exaggeration 
becomes what appears to be deliberate and intentional 
deception and misrepresentation. In Life and Action 
many examples of this kind are found smiling good- 
natured smiles at the real facts: 

"THE DEADLY PARALLEL." 

In 1914, TK in I. ^ i. (Bv. 5, Let us examine this "compara^ 

p. 121), says: tivel 7 sma11 faction": 

. 1. It was never TK's policy or 

"It may, perhaps, be a matter ,. , tt . nmn ,, nm + Min „ 

Ji r l ' practice to .'• give away 7 anything. 

of interest as well as information 2. In 1914, there were printed 

, , 40,000 magazines. 25,000 of these 

to our many readers, to know that . ., -. „ „ 

J ' went to subscribers, exchanges, 

during every sixty days we give etc., leaving about 15,000 for sam- 

away to the deserving Friends of P le C0 P ies ' back numbers and bait 

for selling the Bound Volumes. 
the Work who are in need, all the 3. i n the same year, were pub- 

way from 6,000 to 10,000 copies of Hshed not to exceed 15,000 books. 

4. Total number of both books 
our various publications, including and magazines for 1914,-55,000 

copies of Life and Action. copies. 



138 



TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



"This statement is made as a 
simple statement of fact, and in 
no sense in the spirit of boastful- 
ness; for this represents but a 
comparatively small fraction of 
the labors of the Great School in 
behalf of 'those who need.' " 



? How then could TK or his 
"Co." (himself) give away from 
"6,000 to 10,000 copies" during 
every sixty days? 

As an illustration of TK's keen 
sense of "humor," the following 
paragraph from the annual report 
of his Business Manager for this 
same year, 1914, is exceedingly 
illuminating. Please note the al- 
most reckless generosity with which 
these subscription blanks, price 
lists, etc., were distributed. 

"In connection with this report 
permit me to say, we have sent out 
during the year past about 60,000 
pieces of Literature, in the form 
of CATALOGS, INSERTS, SUB- 
SCRIPTION BLANKS, LOOSE 
LEAVES, PRICE LISTS, MA- 
SONIC LEAFLETS AND LEAF- 
LET OF ALL OUR PUBLICA- 
TIONS.' > 



In L. 4- A., Bv. 5, p. 314, TK 

says: 

"We cannot close this brief re- 
port without expressing our pro- 
found thanks to those splendid and 
generous souls who have made it 
possible for us to send out, free of 
all cost to the recipients, over 42>- 
000 books and magazines" during 
the last year. These books are 
constantly going to libraries, and 
to those intelligent and hungry 
souls who find themselves unable 
financially to purchase them." 



This ' ' over - 42,000 - books - and- 
magazines ' ' is the same ' ' between - 
6,000-and-10,000-copies-every- sixty- 
days" mentioned in the preceding 
paragraph. And in the light of 
the above explanation and state- 
ment of facts, TK's "42,000" be- 
gins to look pretty much like a 
shrewdly hidden hook for more 
funds for his "Gift Account" 
graft. 



THE IND0-AMER1CAN BOOK CO. 



139 



In L. 4- A., Bv. 5, p. 371 (1914), 

the "master" says: 

"We are working under many 
handicaps because of intense oppo- 
sition and antagonism, but if every 
subscriber will renew his subscrip- 
tion and if he will try to secure 
just one other subscriber," etc., 
etc. 

In L. 4- A., Bv. 5, p. 371 (1914), 
the astute TK says: 

"It may interest our readers 
and friends to know that we are 
placing a free copy of this maga- 
zine in every prison of the United 
States. It will also be to them a 
source of pleasure to know that as 
fast as we ean do so, we are plac- 
ing a copy of ' ' Harmonics of Evo- 
lution, " " The Great Psychological 
Crime" and "The Great Work" 
on the shelves of all these penal 
institutions absolutely free of 
charge to them or the State. ' ' 



Again, Bv. 5, p. 372 (1914) : 
"Besides these free gifts of 
books, we are continually giving 
to those who are crippled or aged 
and are unable (owing to financial 
reverses) to purchase copies for 
themselves. These free gifts to 
our unfortunate Brothers and Sis- 
ters sap our financial vitality to 
the utmost," etc., etc. 



This little spiel never failed to 
spur the "Faithful" into more 
speed, and was always good for a 
few extra dollars that otherwise 
might never have seen the inside 
of TK's always capacious pockets. 



1. The records show that only 
36 penal institutions were com- 
municated with. 

2. Only 14 out of the 36 ac- 
cepted the offer of books. 

3. Only 10 accepted subscrip- 
tions. 

4. The entire expense if met by 
the Book "Co."— TK, would not 
have been more than $30.00. 

5. Both subscriptions and books 
were, however, in every instance 
charged to the "Gift Account" 
and paid for at the regular retail 
rates— $94.00. 

And probably only TK himself 
will ever know how many wealthy 
bankers, brokers and business men 
and women of means were sending 
in big and regular checks to be 
used in carrying on his fictitious 
"Harmonic" penal crusade. 

Take this for what it may be 
worth to you. The "master's" 
total dividend from his Indo- 
American Book "Co." for 1914 
was just $9,301.90, without his 
turning a hand; and authentic 
Bank records show that this 
amount is less than half what TK 
spent for general living expenses 
the same year. 



140 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



Bv. 5, p. 312: This giving "as nearly at cost 

"We do, however, give to li- as possible" is the nearest TK 

braries all over the United States ever came to giving anything. But 

our books and literature as nearly even here, the books were simply 

at cost as possible." sold at half-price, $3.00, so that 

the "giving" really did not cost 
the "Co." a single cent, but even 
left a small margin of profit. In 
every instance the books were 
paid for, either by individuals, 
groups, — or, as a last resort, 
charged to the "Gift Account" 
at full price, $6.00. 

As for "libraries all over the 
United States": There are about 
6,000 all told, and so far as known, 
only 74 have the Harmonic Series. 



A few more strictly modern innovations in connec- 
tion with TK's Book "Co." and we are done: 

1. The Indo-Amencan Book "Co." is justly enti- 
tled to the great distinction of being the only "Co." 
on earth whose sole business was publishing its own 
advertising matter and actually selling that advertis- 
ing at regular book rates: cash to retail customers 
and 30 days' credit, 25 per cent discount to the trade. 
Practically every book sold advertised something, and 
that something, in its final analysis, was the " mas- 
ter/ » TK. 

The three "Text" books, or "Harmonic Series," 
announce and advertise, over and over again, in every 
conceivable manner and place, npon the slightest, or 
no apparent provocation — the new and modern "mas- 
ter" with a course of profoundly secret something- 
or-other in his poke. Literally hundreds of clever 



THE IND0-AMER1CAN BOOK CO. 141 

paragraphs and sentences in these books invite, beckon 
and challenge the honest reader to " knock* ' at the 
imaginary door of TK's " Great School" and be tried 
for a secret " personal instruction. ' ' This is particu- 
larly true of " Harmonics of Evolution' ' and "The 
Great Work." And a "knock" frequently sold more 
advertising matter, i. e., more books. 

The Lost Word Found was specifically intended by 
TK to be just what it is — an advertisement — and 
nothing but an advertisement — of "The Great Work." 
It sold for 50 cents. 

The New Avatar is an attempt to identify TK as a 
new John E.-on-the-spot diety incarnate. The book is 
simply an advertisement for TK, and naturally he 
felt justified in recommending the book to all his read- 
ers — at $1.00 per. 

"Modern World Movements" was written at TK's 
own request and was intended to be an advertisement 
to be sold to unwary Theosophists, which latter obser- 
vation probably accounts for the significantly small 
number sold. The price was $1.00, including a free 
"Introduction" by the advertising manager, TK. 

Bridging the Great Divide. This volume was in- 
tended to attract the attention of people interested 
in the work and records of the "Society for Psychical 
Research." TK bore all the expense of getting out 
this book, but to better hide the point of his hook 
while angling for members of the S. P. R., he arranged 
to have the name of another publishing concern than 
his own to appear as the publishers. 



142 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

In L. S A., Bv. 5, p. 312, TK says: 

" As our readers know, we do not advertise our books 
to the public in glaring headlines/* 

It would appear from this frank admission that 
"glaring head-lines" is a kind of advertising that 
cannot readily be sold at regular book rates. 

2. TK not only sold his advertising, but actually 
sold the same identical matter over and over again to 
the same people and — at advanced prices. 

For instance, his readers paid $1.00 for two years' 
subscription — 12 issues of the magazine. Then at the 
close of each year when the six current numbers were 
bound, many paid an additional dollar for the maga- 
zine in book form. Thus in two years, they paid $3.00 
for two chances at the same material. 

This would seem to be sufficient, but soon we dis- 
cover TK offering for sale three new and separate 
books : 

The Spirit of the Work $1.00 

The Question Box, Vol. 1 1.00 

The Question Box, Vol. II 1.00 

out of the same magazine material and actually tell- 
ing his students they should come across with another 
three " bucks.' ' 

3. In the matter of securing personal helpers: 

TK's ability, thru veiled hints and subtle sugges- 
tions and falsehoods, to mould to his will and service, 
those whom he chose, testifies to his knowledge of 
hypnotism and psychology, and his utter abandonment 
of all sense of morality, justice and right in the use 
of that knowledge. 



THE INDO-AMERICAN BOOK CO. 143 

Blinded by the impression that they were being 
" permitted' ' to assist in a " Great Work" for human- 
ity, both men and women willingly and cheerfully 
placed their time, talents, means, honor and even life 
itself at TK's disposal. Such as he could use to fur- 
ther his secret, selfish schemes, he took; and holding 
them beneath the spell of his false, crafty intelligence, 
he bent them to the task of meeting and carrying out 
his cunning plans and purposes. 

As an illustration : TK had in his employ for about 
six years, three young ladies. In 1910, one of these 
young women, believing implicitly in TK's honesty 
and that his Indo-American Book "Co." was really 
handicapped in its ' ' educational' ' work, on account of 
lack of helpers, gave up $25.00 per week, came to Chi- 
cago, and offered her services. She was not a stenog- 
rapher, but at TK's suggestion, she took the neces- 
sary training (at her own expense) and qualified for 
the position. She hurried thru the training as rap- 
idly as possible, on account of (as she was led to be- 
lieve) the great need of a stenographer, but upon 
starting to work at the Book "Co." she did not receive 
any dictation for about eight months. 

TK's "Great School" had in its possession at this 
time and just a few doors from where the "master" 
lived in Oak Park, 111., a large three-story residence. 
This building was the gift of a Friend of the "work," 
and three rooms of the ground floor were used as a 
temporary headquarters and office for the department 
of personal instruction. This arrangement left the 
house practically vacant. Under these circumstances, 
and in order to have someone on the premises all the 



144 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

time, as the "master" explained, "to guard the secret 
work," it was arranged that the three young ladies 
in his employ as stenographers, should live at "234." 
This they did from January, 1911, to August, 1913, 
under the following conditions : 

TK paid each of them $10.00 per week, and required 
each of them to pay him $9.00 per month rent. In 
addition to this rental, they were also required to pay 
the expenses of keeping up the house, as well as the 
water tax, light and gas bills, etc. They were released 
from paying rent some time in 1912, but continued to 
carry all the expense of keeping up the house. 

After nearly three years under these conditions, 
one of the girls had drawn on her savings account 
until she had just $30.00 left. It was plain they could 
not continue under these conditions which did not 
even begin to pay their living expenses. A consulta- 
tion was held and the three of them went to J. E. R. 
and told him the facts. He then requested them to 
make out a statement of the least they could live on 
and continue their work. This they did, and TK 
promised he would pay them "$20.00 per month extra 
out of his own money," but with the definite under- 
standing that it was in strict confidence, and that they 
were to tell no one. He did pay the "extra" sum, 
from time to time, but not regularly. 

Beginning with December, 1914, Mr. Richardson 
had his Indo-American Book "Co." pay each of these 
girls $15.00 per week, but with the distinct under- 
standing that they should keep an accurate and item- 
ized account of their expenditures, and at the end of 
the year if anything remained from their salaries 



THE INDO-AMERICAN BOOK CO. 145 

over their actual personal expenses, it was to be 
returned to "J. E. R." — John E. Richardson, alias 
" Uncle John," alias the " Elder Brother/ ' otherwise 
heretofore favorably known as TK. 
Kindly note in the above that 

1. The "master" paid each of these helpers the 
enormous sum of $10.00 per week. 

2. That out of this sum he collected $27.00 per 
month for rent, for rooms which would otherwise have 
remained vacant — $27.00 which would pay for a lot of 
halo polish or cream for his cats. 

3. In December, 1914, this "Elder Brother" or- 
dered the I. -A. Book "Co." (himself) to pay these 
girls $15.00 per week, but at the same time provided 
that out of this sum they should return to him at the 
end of the year all their savings above actual living 
expense. 

Briefly reviewing the TK's book "Co.," we fix in 
mind the following facts: 

1. That the Indo-American Book "Co." and TK 
are one and the same. 

2. That from Jan. 1, 1912, to Jan. 1, 1916, the total 
business of this Book "Co." amounted to $91,070.30. 

3. That over $130,000.00 worth of the "Harmonic 
Series" were disposed of between 1899 and Jan, 1, 
1916. 

4. That besides profits on his magazine and many 
thousands of copies of other books, he obtained vast 
sums of money thru various other — channels. 

5. That in one instance alone he secured sums 
which, including interest, amounted to considerably 
over $200,000.00. 



146 



TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 




My Work 

is entirely a. G\ FT.. 
It brings me no material 
reward of ^ny kind. Daring 
the last tenye&rs I have- 
vvrlttea over tkirty ttiou^ni 
letters to Inquiring men 
and Women, a.nsWering'ifceiV 
ions to the. hc:$t of mu 
^feiJity, awd in t/ie- 
very /arrest number 
of instances n>ve receive <L 
S- 3 not even sornach as a. 
kV ^posta^*e stamp for re p?u. 



QUOTED FPOM "LIFE AND ACTION" 
BOUND VOL. I, page 15. 



THE INDO-AMERICAN BOOK CO. 147 

6. That it is simply impossible to estimate how 
many hundreds of thousands of dollars he must have 
accumulated. 

7. That TK's much advertised "charity" was ac- 
tually a source of profit, a dishonest bid for "busi- 
ness" and the meanest kind of betrayal of human 
confidence. 

8. That from the inception of his Book "Co.," TK 
secured and held all his employees at, and even below 
the barest living wage. And be it remembered that 
the very nature of his work was such that he could 
not employ any but the most efficient, competent and 
trustworthy help. 

With sponging his rent, his help, and practically 
all kinds of favors and services off of three or four 
hundred unsuspecting friends, and with business, 
profits, interests and "gifts" rolling into his coffers, 
it is plain that TK's greatest "great work" was work- 
ing his workers. 

Thus he built up his business; preaching and pos- 
ing for profits — for years wringing additional profits 
out of the confidence of his helpers — and all this in 
the name of a "Great Work" and under the cloak of 
an assumed "mastership." 



CHAPTER XI 

The League of Visible Helpees 

A really beautiful name — one that suggests many- 
pictures of people clad in modest garments, going in 
and out among the hovels of the poor, carrying baskets 
of provisions and leaving everywhere words of wis- 
dom, comfort, encouragement and good cheer. And to 
those who were actually engaged in doing this needed 
work, it was, as it must always be to every helpful 
soul, a privilege and opportunity that can be under- 
stood only by those who carry the idea into practice. 

Nearly always where men and women come together 
in any kind of religious or philosophic movement, it is 
usually not long before something on the order of 
"charity" work is suggested. The energies of certain 
members appear naturally to seek and demand some 
outlet thru activities along these lines. Anyway, the 
"Great School" eventually had its "League of Visible 
Helpers," which served very well two purposes: 

1. A work of charity. 

2. A good subject on which TK could TalK. 

Next to talking on "Morality," TK's LVH proved 
to be his strongest advertising card. His direct profits 
from this organization came legitimately only thru 
the "lease" of membership pins, but as a talking 
po'mt upon which to advertise his "Great School," i. e., 

148 



THE LEAGUE OF VISIBLE HELPERS • 149 

himself, he could have found nothing better than this 
idea of a "League." And indirectly, it all brot in 
book orders, "gift" funds, checks for the good of the 
GREAT CAUSE, etc., etc. 

Since about 1899, TK was working a small * ' Central 
Group" of students in Chicago. He became quite 
prosperous as early as 1904-5. It appears as if he 
could have organized his "physical helpers" at any 
time, and commenced his "Great Work" for "poor 
orphan humanity." Evidently he was not aching to 
begin his "work" or losing any sleep over the "poor 
and needy," for not until Sept. 1, 1903, do we see any 
evidences of the plans of the GS. along these lines. 
At that time, the "Harmonic Association" was 
formed. This was a right promising youngster, with a 
"sweet tooth" already cut. It was a sort of "Copart- 
nership Firm" — a co-operative candy-making enter- 
prise. The members of the "firm" consisted of John 
E. Richardson, Florence Huntley and two students, 
one of whom was a candy-maker. TK was, of course, 
the Secretary and Treasurer. The idea was that TK 
would put up enough capital to purchase the candy 
pans and the "Harmonic Associate" with the candy- 
making disposition would do the work. 

Just to give you some idea of TK's imaginative 
sense of humor, and the remarkable "features" that 
illuminated the modest agreement which bound the 
members of this sweet alliance, we are here going to 
republish just a few of the items enumerated. 




o 

Q 



> d 

O 9 

o- o 
♦a ♦» . 

Of<4* 

* 5 a 

*- • 
«> dco 

*-« o 

O *> V 

° - ° 

O -H C 

4> o 

3 3 S 

4* (4 •*-! 
D 01 O 

a$ 4* o 

*> CD 

rt eg co 



& 



THE LEAGUE OF VISIBLE HELPERS 151 

PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT. ' 

It is hereby mutually agreed by and between the parties 
hereto, — 

1. The name of this copartnership shall be "Harmonic 
Association." 

2. Its principal place of business shall be in the city of 
Chicago, said County and State. 

3. This copartnership shall continue for the term of TEN 
YEARS from and after the date hereof, or until the same 
shall be duly and legally dissolved. 

4. The central purpose of this copartnership shall be to 
convey to humanity, as far as may be possible, a knowledge 
of the truths of " NATURAL SCIENCE," and inspire the 
students thereof with the earnest desire and unfaltering pur- 
pose to exemplify those truths in their daily lives and con- 
duct, and thereby become demonstrators of the law and 
teachers of the truth. To accomplish this purpose involves 
the accumulation and expenditure of a large amount of 
money. 

To that end the business of this copartnership shall be to 
manufacture and sell candies of all kinds, both wholesale 
and retail; to establish and maintain candy stores, parlors 
and kitchens wherever they shall deem advisable ; to establish 
and maintain restaurants, bakeries, grocery stores and gen- 
eral merchandise businesses; to engage in, establish, or main- 
tain any other business or enterprise they may deem advis- 
able; to establish, maintain and conduct libraries, schools 
and other institutions for the study and demonstration of 
Natural Science and of THE HARMONIC PHILOSOPHY; 
and finally, to purchase, lease or otherwise acquire legal title 
to or possession of such real estate and personal property as 
may be deemed necessary or desirable in the conduct of its 
business. 



152 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

All thru even these four brief articles of agreement, 
you will have no difficulty tracing the profound wisdom 
and foresight of the " Great Masters,' * and we may 
well believe that at least one entire annual Convoca- 
tion must have been devoted to planning this newest 
venture of the Great School's American Representa- 
tive in behalf of humanity. 

This "HARMONIC ASSOCIATION" did not, of 
course, cut any great figure in the business world, but 
it almost gives one a sense of awe to look down the 
miles and miles of imaginary streets, avenues and 
boulevards lined on both sides with thousands of the 
Great School's imaginary candy kitchens, factories, 
restaurants, bakeries, grocery stores, parlors, libraries, 
ice cream stations, shoe-shining stands, telephone 
booths, etc., etc. 



A year or so later, in 1904-5, when the publishing 
business began " looking up," the candy association 
gradually died away, and we hear no more of TK's 
plans for the "poor" until 1912. In 1910-11, some of 
the more active students took up some Christmas 
work among a few poor families, and the stories of 
their experiences were received, listened to and 
repeated with such interest that it gave TK an idea. 
He immediately called all his invisible and invincible 
" Great Masters" into consultation, and as near as 
they could figure it out, "the time had come"! A day 
or so thereafter, TK was fully inspired to imagine 
that, as the duly qualified American Representative of 
his " Great School," he had for "28 years" past been 



THE LEAGUE OF VISIBLE HELPERS 153 

laboring day and night to establish an organization of 
men and women to engage in charity work of this very 
kind. It is our understanding that one of the students 
really suggested the idea of organizing, but anyway, it 
was a good idea, and dressed up in J. E. R. 's evening 
dress-suit English it would all read well in Life and 
Action. 

The L. V. H. was duly organized in Oak Park, 111., 
Jan. 4, 1912, with twenty-one members. It was at first 
called the " Harmonic Association," but later was 
incorporated as the "League of Visible Helpers" 
The objects and purposes were: (1) to fraternally 
unite all acceptable persons, (2) to carry on organized 
work of charity, relief and assistance to the needy and 
distressed, (3) to promote the cause of Equity, Justice 
and Right, (4) to establish a fund, etc., etc., and to 
reserve to itself "full power to enact, maintain and 
enforce all needful laws, rules and regulations for the 
proper government of its members, and all subordinate 
groups and the members thereof" — Bv. 3, p. 134. 

These objects and purposes are all quite worthy. 
They are no different from those of all other similar 
organizations. The aims of all charity movements 
appeal to the noblest and best in human nature. They 
are meant to do so. One point, however, that shows 
TK's keen "spiritual" vision, is his provision for 
the undemocratic government of subordinate groups 
and their individual members. Nominally, this reser- 
vation of power belonged to the Central Group, but 
in reality TK was the one-man power of this group. 
He said to one come, and "he cometh"; to another 



154 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

go, and "he goeth"; to another suspend, and he sus- 
pendeth. 

In "The Great Work," p. 448 (1906) TK tells of 
the existence, on the spiritual planes of life, of a 
"Liberal League of Spiritual Helpers." Later in 
Life and Action, Bv. 3, p. 132, 2d paragraph, in refer- 
ring to this "League" of his GS, he speaks of it simply 
as a "League of Spiritual Helpers." On the same 
page, 4th paragraph, he speaks of a hope of organizing 
a "League of Physical Helpers." But behold, when 
it came to naming his new advertising idea, he called 
it the "LEAGUE OF VISIBLE HELPERS." 

Why "VISIBLE HELPERS"? It is plainly a 
"trade" upon the pleasing and attractive name of 
C. W. Leadbeater's interesting and helpful little book, 
1 ' Invisible Helpers. ' * 

You will recall that one of the objects of the LVH 
was to "unite all acceptable persons in a closer bond 
of fellowship." Now to get a definite idea of just 
what is meant by the word "acceptable," we quote 
from the "President's Annual Report." Bv. 6, p. 155: 

"Concerning the qualifications necessary for mem- 
bership in the League, your President will take this 
opportunity to say that the first and fundamental 
qualification is that the applicant must be an accepted 
student of the Philosophy of Natural Science. That 
is, he must have been accepted by the Elder Brother 
to receive Personal Instruction. ' ' 

As for "featuring" a charity scheme where indi- 
viduals give their time free to the work, there are at 
least two kinds of people who lend themselves readily 
to this idea: 



THE LEAGUE OF VISIBLE HELPERS 155 



1. Those who do such work out of a clean, pure 
heart, whether under the direction of some "move- 
ment" or on their own personal account, and, 

2. Those who are blindly supporting and working 
for some religious or philosophic grafter. 

In Life and Action, Bv. 6, p. 64, a correspondent, 
"H. D. H." says, 

"I think that the friends there at the center with 
the TK, actively engaged in the work of teaching and 
publishing, must feel, with him, a sensitiveness about 
calling for financial aid. In the midst of the frauds 
so freely perpetrated everywhere, and the general sus- 
picion resulting, they feel an unwillingness about even 
suggesting that they could do more effective work if 
they but had more financial assistance." 

Imagine TK feeling any sensitiveness about calling 
for financial aid ! 

. In the same Bound Volume, p. 68, TK suppresses 
this "sensitiveness," so acutely imagined by his dis- 
tant student, and in his campaign for money, clothing, 
shoes, etc., says: "We have fed hundreds of families 
in all parts of Chicago. ' ' Just why he made use of the 
word "we" doth not appear, for it is well known 
among his intimate associates and the members of his 
LVH that TK never went in person to visit or minister 
m any manner whatsoever to the poor and needy. 
He did use a good quality of "poor-and-needy" talk, 
when going after his readers for contributions, but so 
far as yet learned, in not a single instance did he him- 
self do anything in this connection except stir up and 
spur up his workers, — and pass the hat. 



156 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

The following table is compiled from the Annual 
Reports of the LVH:— 



B. Vol. 


Year 


Families 


Total 


Per Family 


4, P. 114 


1912 


49 


$ 642.25 


$13.10 


5, P. 134 


1913 


80 


1,000.06 


12.50 


6, P. 165 


1914 


80 


1,032.88 


11.73 


7, P. 148 


1915 


96 


664.55 


6.92 



Total number of families, 313. 

Average per family, per year, $10.66. 

Just about what it cost TK to feed and " clothe* ' 
his two cats per week. 

This table gives an entirely different impression 
from that conveyed by TK's extravagant advertising 
statement, "We are feeding hundreds of families in 
all parts of Chicago,' ' etc., etc. 

TK'S "PIN MONEY." 

In Bv. 3, p. 347, the "master" explains that he is 
obliged to sell membership pins to the members of the 
League "as nearly at cost as possible." Later in Bv. 
4, p. 59, he "explains" that these pins will not be sold 
outright to members, "but given out only on a con- 
tract of lease which leaves the legal title always in 
the League, i. e., in your foxy "Uncle John." 

At $3.50 each, about 200 pins and buttons were 
leased to members. This total income of $700.00 
"went" to TK personally, and has not yet come back, 
though many in-" visible helpers" would like to be re- 
leased to the extent of $3.50, in the currency of the 
11 Great School." 



THE LEAGUE OF VISIBLE HELPERS 157 

Again the Lively Parallel: 

I. THEORY 

In Life and Action, for Dec, 1914, TK, in drumming 
up trade for the LVH, says : 

"Each year I take an account of my material means, and 
carefully determine how many dollars I can spare for the 
help of the Great Army of the hungry and unclad. Then I 
eend the amount, in a lump sum, to the League, where I 
KNOW that it will be made to go much farther and do 
vastly greater service than I could make it do, for those who 
are in need." 

II. PRACTICE 

The following table taken directly from the Records 
of the "League of Visible Helpers," show the follow- 
ing significant i i lump sums } 9 contributed by TK to his 
pet advertising novelty, the LVH. 

1910 John E. Richardson $ 25.00 

Nov. 22,1911.... " " " (money 

advanced) 30.00 

1912 John E. Richardson 

Jan. 6, 1913 " " " 100.00 

1914 " " " 

1915 " " " 

1916 " " " 



GRAND Total $155.00 

TK's total dividends from his Book "Company" 
alone, during these five years, were about $40,000.00. 



158 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

I. MORE THEORY 

Again, Bv. 5, p. 16, TK continues : 

"And you will be glad to know that the beloved RA, who 
shared with me the glorious triumph of bringing the League 
into existence, — tho on the other side of the Great Divide — 
is still a contributor to the Fund of the League for the re- 
lief of those who need, and will continue to be, so long as the 
means she left shall last. One of my greatest earthly joys 
is that of carrying out her wishes in that regard." 

II. MORE PRACTICE 

The following taken directly from the Records of 
the LVH show contributions as stated : 
Nov. 22, 1911, Florence Huntley Richardson. . .$ 30.00 

1912 

Dec. 5, 1913, Check by John E. Richardson for 

Florence Huntley Richardson 100.00 

1914 

1915 

1916 

Total $130.00 

From the above we learn that : 

1. Either the " means' ' left by Florence Huntley 
Richardson amounted to only $130.00, or 

2. TK forgot "one of his greatest earthly joys in 
(not) carrying out her wishes, or 

3. He needed her money to buy flowers for the act- 
resses at the Warrington Theatre in Oak Park, or 

4. His talk was, after all, only beautiful bunk, — and 
why should a man contribute to his own charity game, 
anyway, so long as he could get others to pay the 
running expenses? 



THE LEAGUE OF VISIBLE HELPERS 159 

STILL MORE PRACTICE 

In the Summer of 1915, TK began calling for funds 
for his Edgemoor Sanitarium venture, and knowing 
that the Chicago LVH had some money, he set about 
to " think* ' it out of the League's bank account into 
the personal possession of one TK, the "Elder 
Brother." The result of his first campaign was that 
on Oct. 18, 1915, the League issued a check to J. E. R. 
for $1,200.00. Then after a spiritual pause of a few 
months, he went after them again. This time he 
cleaned up their "funds" completely, with a check for 
$1,948.00. 

These sums, amounting to $3,148.00, together with 
contributions from other "groups," TK called a 
"Trust Fund," and pronounced the following tender 
words over the remains : 

"Reports of the work accomplished and of the 
administration of all trust funds for that purpose will 
be rendered from time to time thru the columns of 
Life and Action. 

Your Friend and Elder Brother. TK." 

Then on April 1, 1916, the wiley EB played another 
one of those humorous pranks of his, in which he with- 
drew these trust funds from the Bank in Oconomowoc, 
Wis., and carried them away with him, on Monday, 
April 4, 1916. 

But the Chicago Group played even on July 12, 1916, 
at which time the voting members expelled the TK 
from the "League of Visible Helpers." 

On Feb. 1, 1917, the LVH was dissolved and thus 
endeth another chapter. 



CHAPTER XII 

The Edgemoor Sanitarium 

* ' Edgemoor ' ' is located about two miles northwest 
of Oconomowoc, Wisconsin. 

Oconomowoc is thirty-two miles west of the brew- 
eries "that made Milwaukee famous." 

Milwaukee is eighty-five miles north of Chicago, and 
Chicago was formerly the headquarters of TK's 
"Great School" i. e., TK. himself. 

From Chicago, TK did most of his talking about 
this GS, and what he hoped to do — when he could 
command the "means." 

Along with other melo-dramatic topics of his ' ' Great 
School," TK talked quite frequently and a great deal 
about obsession, or "Subjective Insanity.' ' On this 
subject, as on all others, he always used a good brand 
of imitation positive statements. He claimed to have 
studied medicine and to have had a very special course 
of personal instruction under a first-class "Great Mas- 
ter,' ' in the diagnosis and treatment of insanity. He 
further claimed to have had "thousands of cases" 
pass under his " observation,' ' and it was generally 
believed by all who read his literature that he could 
cast devils out of people quicker and farther and 
faster, and do it more scientifically and with less effort 
than any man before, during or since the days of the 
Master Jesus. 

161 



162 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

As early as 1903, TK publicly recommended him- 
self in the role of a "diagnoser" of, and rapid-fire pre- 
scriber for insanity. His idea was that being able to 
see spiritually, all he had to do in "treating" obses- 
sional insanity, was to open his spiritual eyes, look at 
the obsessing spirit or spirits, give them the high sign 
and a certain secret spiritual wink, rap them on the 
knuckles and tell them to go about their business. 

In a chapter "To the Physician/' p. 383-84, "Great 
Psychological Crime/' we read that as an experiment, 
TK " once-upon-a-time " went into a certain State In- 
stitution for the Insane, and out of 600 insane inmates, 
diagnosed and prescribed for 349 cases, each and every 
one of whom was cured. "Not a single failure re- 
sulted." 

Thus in 1903, he gave out the hypnotic suggestion, 
and in 1909, and thereafter, advertised, reiterated 
and emphasized the idea; until he had two or three 
thousand people believing and repeating his claims as 
gospel facts. And this too without a single item of 
evidence or proof of any kind. 

Says TK, in Life and Action, Bv. 1, No. 2, p. 25: 

"It is also hoped and expected that, in due course of time, 
a private sanitarium will be equipped for the treatment and 
cure of subjective insanity, according to the methods of the 
Great School, as indicated in Vol. II of the Harmonic Series. 
When that time comes, however, the facts will be announced 
in such manner as to leave no uncertainty in the mind of any 
who may be interested. At the present time there are phy- 
sicians in course of preparation for such a work, but the 
School is not yet in possession of sufficient material means 
to equip an institution. ' ' 

For "material means/' TK was ever on the look- 



THE EDGE MO OR SANITARIUM 163 

out, and his opportunity to put his illusory " sanita- 
rium' ' into effect came in 1915. In an almost incred- 
ibly short space of time and with an ease "that passeth 
all understanding, ' ' he turned the trick. Thru the 
simple means of a half-dozen personal, forceful, fol- 
low-up letters, which for calculating sagacity, " punch' ' 
and quick action would amaze a Philadelphia lawyer, 
your "Uncle John" succeeded in having a property 
valued at the enormous sum of $650,000.00 deeded over 
to his imaginary ' * Great School. ' ' 

But note what a beautiful, external polish he puts 
on this transaction: — 

"Thru channels that are entirely constructive, and in har- 
mony with the Spirit of the Work, the Great School has come 
into possession of a magnificent property. . . . The prop- 
erty lies two miles north from Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, in 
the most picturesque and beautiful spot that can well be im- 
agined. It consists of 28 acres of land that have been im- 
proved to the extent of over $650,000.00. "—Bv. 6, p. 235. 

Later, in Life and Action, Vol. 7, No. 1, Dec, 1915, 
in his usual masterly, misleading manner, TK gives us 
another and little more poetic glimpse of how he 
landed this property : 

" Suddenly and without warning there came to us 
as if it had dropped from the sky, a property which I 
verily believe cannot be duplicated in the entire United 
States.' ' 

It "dropped" alright, but not until TK had spread 
his net and gone after the "sky" with his smooth, 
fluidic, persuasive English. 

The acquisition of this property opened up new 
visions of profits, and TK began at once to need money 
and to need it awfully "quick and fast." 



164 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Now it so happened that the Chicago Group of 
League of Visible Helpers had on hand a considerable 
sum of money: money which had been donated by hun- 
dreds of people with the definite understanding and 
for the express purpose that it was to be used for char- 
itable work among the poor and needy. 

It was at this point that the "master," by a little 
metaphysical hocus-pocus which he affectionately 
referred to as a "Trust Fund" for the use of the 
"Edgemoor Sanitarium, ' 9 succeeded in wheedling 
$3,000.00 out of the Chicago LVH.— (L. & A., Vol. 7, 
No. 1, p. 20). This "noble" example was promptly 
used on the other Leagues and individuals here and 
there over the States, and very soon additional checks 
and drafts, money orders and currency, were going the 
way of the funds of the "Central League." 

TK humorously promised that reports of the admin- 
istration of all trust funds would be published, from 
time to time, in "Life and Action/' but somehow 
1 ' from time to time ' ' he reported not. 

The less than 4,000 readers of Life and Action read 
the "Edgemoor" announcements, but not many com- 
ments were offered one way or another. The great 
majority seemed to say: "TK has for the past ' thirty 
years' been making certain unusual claims about his 
ability to cure insanity ; he now has an opportunity to 
back up those claims with something real and tangi- 
ble." Some, long used to the "master's" boasts and 
promises, simply waited courteously, and said nothing. 
Comparatively few even of the 500 or so "accredited" 
students made any show of lively interest. Those stu- 



THE EDGEMOOR SANITARIUM 165 

dents who had completed the Ethical Work, and espe- 
cially those who were going to live at Edgemoor, or 
those who expected to be there later on, furnished all 
the enthusiasm. 

There were comparatively few inquiries for Sani- 
tarium literature, and most of these requests came, 
not from prospective patients or their relatives or 
guardians, but from "Friends" and students who 
wished to help advertise the new i ' charity. ' ■ Outside 
the limited number of readers of TK's magazine, few 
people ever even heard of this Edgemoor adventure. 

The Sanitarium was officially opened for business 
Feb. 1, 1916. The March- April No. of Life and Action 
contained a reprint of an Oconomowoc Enterprise 
article, and this was the last that subscrib- 
ers heard of the great Edgemoor " Sanitarium. ' ' As 
time passed, Friends asked what had become of little 
Edgemoor, but on this subject all was as quiet as a 
country cemetery. However, since for the past 18 
years, people have been buying TK's fiction and pay- 
ing for it at regular philosophy prices, they are now 
entitled to the truth, and we hope to be able to set 
these facts down in plain, simple, every-day English. 

1. All TK's Talk about his knowledge of, and 
experience and success in diagnosing and curing insan- 
ity is simply bluff and pretense — pure, deliberate and 
original. 

2. There is no evidence whatever to substantiate 
the tale recorded in "The Great Psychological Crime/ 7 
p. 383-84. On the contrary, it is known to be abso- 
lutely and most positively untrue and impossible. 



166 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

3. So far as can be proven, TK never at any time 
diagnosed, released or cured a single case of subjective 
or any other kind of insanity. 

4. TK never in any instance instructed or trained 
anyone so that they, as a result of his pretended teach- 
ings, could diagnose, release or cure what he termed 
subjective insanity, or obsession — his own published 
statements, and inferences to the contrary notwith- 
standing. 

5. TK was not a physician in any sense of the word. 
He did not study medicine, as he claims to have done, 
in the Iowa State University, at Iowa City, Iowa. 

6. Neither TK nor his imaginary " Great School" 
possessed any secret "formularies" for or methods of 
treating insanity, such as he falsely led his readers to 
believe he had demonstrated to his students. 

7. His suggestion that "thousands of cases of 
insanity had passed under his observation" is very 
good evidence that he can get most any kind of a "per- 
sonal experience," "record" or "proof" out of his 
imagination. 

8. Many people : students and non-students, physi- 
cians and laymen, can testify that they applied to 
TK for both diagnosis and treatment for insane cases, 
and all the satisfaction they ever got out of him was 
an excuse or dodge of some kind. In a few instances 
he was called into consultation by two or three stu- 
dents of his philosophy, Chicago physicians ; but each 
of these men now know that they knew far more about 
their cases than TK did, and that he was simply pit- 
ting his pretensions against their actual knowledge, 



THE EDGEMOOR SANITARIUM 167 



experience, and professional training and skill. These 
physicians are sincere, honest and honorable men. In 
asking TK into consultation they did so, just the same 
as they would call in any man whom they had been 
led to believe was honest and capable of rendering 
some possible service to the patients under their care. 
See "Review of "The Great Psychological Crime." 

NOW AS TO EDGEMOOR 

The Sanitarium was ' ' officially ' ' open from Feb. 1, 
to July 1, 1916. The entire move was undertaken 
purely upon belief in TK's pretensions that thru the 
exercise of certain spiritual powers, he could diagnose 
and release certain insane patients from obsessing 
spiritual intelligences. The results of the whole ven- 
ture at Edgemoor proved positively that TK did not 
possess the powers to which he pretended, and that 
he had neither the knowledge nor the ability to diag- 
nose, treat or prescribe for insanity, — or any thing 
else for that matter. 

Only five (5) patients were received at Edgemoor, 
and of this number, three (3) were "pay" patients, 
as follows: 

1. A patient from Chicago, the expense of whose 
treatment was met by the * ' Central League of Visible 
Helpers.' ' No benefit reported, other than physical. 

2. In this instance, the patient is a sister of a 
former student and ' i Friend of the Work. ' ' For sev- 
eral years she had been a patient in one of the Cali- 
fornia State Hospitals for the Insane. The relatives 
live in the State of Washington. They are honest, 



168 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

industrious and worthy people, but unable to have the 
sister cared for in a private Sanitarium. 

Having read TK 's literature for a number of years, 
and being misled as so many others have been by his 
theories regarding insanity, they concluded the sister 
was under spirit control or obsession. Thus, when 
they learned of the opening of the Edgemoor Sani- 
tarium they resolved to undertake any sacrifice in 
order to place their sister under TK's direction and 
treatment. Entirely upon their confidence in TK and 
his published statements as to his ability, knowledge 
and experience in treating insanity, they planned to 
have her removed as soon as possible. They had "the 
utmost confidence in his integrity and unbounded faith 
in his power to live and operate upon both the 
physical and spiritual planes, and also in his great 
and earnest and sincere desire to help "suffering 
humanity." 

Under these circumstances, and at very great per- 
sonal sacrifice, one of the family made the trip to Cali- 
fornia and accompanied the patient to Oconomowoc, 
Wis., — a distance of several thousand miles. The fol- 
lowing few sentences taken from a recent letter "ex- 
plains" the results: 

"My sister was in the Edgemoor Sanitarium from 
the 11th of April until the 20th of June, when to our 
almost overwhelming disappointment, we were noti- 
fied to take her away." 

Not being in position to send anyone for their sis- 
ter at the time, the family was compelled to make ar- 
rangements for her detention for the time being in a 



THE EDGEMOOR SANITARIUM 169 

private sanitarium in Chicago. Thus, time passed, 
and when finally a member of the family did come for 
the patient and had returned to Washington, the 
expenses had mounted upward to over $1,200.00, 
$300.00 of which had to be borrowed. These unfor- 
tunate victims of TK's great school "philosophy" and 
buncombe morality still have this debt hanging over 
their heads to remind them of their " treatment' ' at 
Beautiful Edgemoor," and their personal experience 
with John E. Richardson's "Great Work." 

In this case every cent of the expense connected 
with the brmging of this patient to Edgemoor and her 
removal, should have been refunded promptly, because 
the entire outlay was the direct result of published 
misrepresentations. 

In this case, kindly note the significant fact that this 
patient was received at Edgemoor on April 11, — seven 
days after the TK had quit the Sanitarium. 

This patient is reported as having received abso- 
lutely no benefit. 

3. In this instance, a young man, the main support 
of his parents' home was upon his confidence in TK's 
writings, induced to place his father in the Edgemoor 
Sanitarium. He too, believed that an immediate diag- 
nosis would be made, and there was an understanding 
that as soon as it could be determined whether or not 
the patient could be benefited or cured, the son should 
be notified. Under these arrangements, the patient 
was detained at the institution for over four months, 
at $25.00 per week, and so far as the son ever heard, 
no diagnosis of the case was ever made, altho TK and 



170 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

his " independent spiritual vision" was there all dur- 
ing the first two months of the patients' detention. 

Finally, the latter part of June, nearly eight weeks 
after TK 's exposure, suddenly and without explana- 
tion of any kind (other than that the Sanitarium was 
to be closed) the son was ordered to remove his 
father from the institution at once, or he would be sent 
home at the son's expense. 

In this case, also, the patient was not benefitted, and 
shortly after his removal from Edgemoor, was com- 
mitted to the State Insane Hospital at Elgin, 111. 

This young man and his family were victims of TK 
and his personal misrepresentations. Every cent of 
the money obtained from him should by every law of 
common honesty be refunded. 

# # * # # 

On April 1, there was a meeting of the Edgemoor 
Board of Trustees. Upon that memorable occasion, 
TK learned for the first time that for a month past 
he had been under secret surveillance, and that enough 
evidence had accumulated to relieve him from the bur- 
den of further responsibility as the "sole representa- 
tive" of his "Great Work in America.' ' 

In June, Edgemoor was legally returned to the 
donor, and on July 1, Edgemoor Sanitarium was of- 
ficially dissolved, and soon faded away into the things 
of which memory is made. 

What 20th Century Fiction! 

But with it all, Blessed be Edgemoor! For there 
occurred the beginning of the end of a time of blkid 
belief and mental darkness for several hundred souls 



THE EDGEMOOR SANITARIUM 171 

— perhaps for many thousands, in the course of future 
generations. 

Blessed be the Light! 

Blessed be the Watchers with the Independent 
Physical Vision. 



CHAPTER XIII 
The Department of Personal Instruction 

What was this instruction? Why was it a secret in- 
struction? If it was simply an instruction and train- 
ing in moral principles, why was it not published 
frankly and openly to all the world? Did it really con- 
stitute an accurate and final ethical education in such 
manner, and to such a degree, as to enable one to live 
a daily life in conscious, perfect and mathematical 
harmony with all of Nature's laws, forces and prin- 
ciples ? 

There can be no question but that "secrecy" is a 
strong psychological cord with which it is possible to 
so bind men and women that they may for years be 
held in a kind of spiritual unconsciousness to every- 
thing except the directing voice and influence to which 
they give attention. 

The one thing that made possible the integration, 
development and exploitation of those who were drawn 
into the activities of the " Great School" was secrecy. 
Back of or beyond the books, the students and every- 
thing connected with the movement, was the secret 
personal instruction. To this, all who took the philos- 
ophy seriously aspired. To this everything in the 
books directed attention. And to make it more attrac- 
tive and give it the appearance of having no strings 
tied to it, the reader was assured over and over again 
that it was FREE ; that it could not, under any circum- 

172 



DEPARTMENT OF PERSONAL INSTRUCTION 173 

stance whatsoever, be purchased or obtained upon any- 
other terms than as a Gift. 

To make it still more attractive, it was evidently 
purposely clothed in great mystery. 

1. By advertising it as a secret work. 

2. By misrepresenting its nature, its origin and 
antiquity, and, 

3. By greatly exaggerating its importance and 
value, and its possible effects upon the individual in- 
telligence. 

TK impressed certain of his readers to believe that 
what he called the " secret work," was the results of 
tens of thousands of years of study, experiment and 
demonstration; that it represented in a condensed, 
crystallized form the essence of all religion, philosophy 
and science known to man. 

This impression originally applied to the twelve 
problems comprising the "Ethical Section,' ' or Secret 
Formulary, but as time passed and " preliminary' ' and 
"supplementary" courses were added to the difficulties 
of the applicant, these too evolved to the dignity of 
secret work. In this way students of late years came 
to believe that all these steps in the process of initia- 
tion were handed down from ages long since forgotten 
of men. 

Naturally this idea is quite impressive — if you hap- 
pen really to believe it. But once you know just what 
this secret personal instruction consists of and exactly 
how it works itself out in practice — its real meaning 
and the purpose bach of it all — there is then no mys- 
tery. You begin to see from the viewpoint of a disin- 
terested spectator, and the feeling of your having been 



174 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

deprived of some great privilege that you imagined 
essential to your happiness, gently leaves you and 
fades away forever. You breathe freely once more, 
you smile softly and even congratulate yourself on 
your not having been permitted to sit at the " mas- 
ter V feet. This is especially true of all those who, in 
the face of an absorbing and profound conviction that 
this " Great School* ' possessed the only true knowl- 
edge of life accessible to humanity, — were denied ad- 
mittance to studentship. Some who were repeatedly 
denied what they imagined to be priceless spiritual 
benefits and the companionship of a " chosen* ' people, 
suffered for years as if ostracised of men and forsaken 
by their God. To these, the Light of Truth will be 
welcome, and its healing rays will awaken into new 
life some of the long unsung songs of the Soul. 



Of late years and to new comers, TK's highway to 
spiritual progress appeared to be quite elaborate. 
Back in the nineties, however, it was just a simple 
affair. Until 1903 there was but one "text" book; 
there were no preliminary questions, no "test" course, 
no examinations to pass, no references required, no 
anything, as of late years, to frighten the soul stiff 
with fear of failure. 

New experiences, circumstances, changes, interests 
and relationships are inevitable in the course of every 
life, no matter how humble or how exalted its position 
or nature may be. By this process Nature, or Uni- 
versal Intelligence appears to be forever engaged in 
growing individuals. And in making these daily and 



DEPARTMENT OF PERSONAL INSTRUCTION 175 

hourly adjustments in our lives all of us come to puz- 
zling situations; situations, questions and problems 
which put our very best intelligence to the test. Nat- 
urally then we would all like to rind and possess some 
kind of Magic Eule by which to measure off these per- 
sonal puzzles and problems, with the same ease and 
accuracy that the dry-goods merchant measures off a 
yard or five yards of cloth. We feel that if we could 
but find such a Rule, all our difficulties and lessons 
would be at an end forever. A fairy dream, perhaps, 
but its realization would no doubt put an "end" to us 
as individuals. It would immediately and effectually 
close all those glorious hours of golden opportunities 
in the "School of Life" which alone can lead us up- 
ward out of the darkness of inexperience, pain and 
discord, into the pure spiritual light of our own in- 
tellectual and moral development. Regarding his very 
secret and personal course of Ethical Instruction, TK 
represents it to be a " formulary, ' f — Nature's formu- 
lary,— a formulary discovered, demonstrated and used 
for many thousands of by-gone years ; a formulary he 
himself received out of the "ages" in all its original 
and ancient purity, etc., etc. 

But let us examine this very secret course of instruc- 
tion and see what it is, how it operates and what it has 
done, is doing, or will do for its ' ' students. ' ' 

Application for this instruction was nearly always 
by correspondence, and usually made thru the Indo- 
American Book Co. Upon receipt of inquiry or appli- 
cation, if TK concluded the writer was not "ready," 
he simply put him off with advice to secure and read a 
list of the books of his Book Co. If they showed signs 



176 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

of being already sufficiently impressed and suscep- 
tible of aligning themselves with the exoteric work of 
advertising the movement, the road to the TK's 
" South " was about as follows: 

Upon acceptance of TK's terms, a list of " Prelim- 
inary Questions' ' were sent to the applicant. These 
questions were 48 in number, and covered very thor- 
oughly the applicant's philosophic, religious, domes- 
tic and personal life, and constituted an index to the 
individual's future possible usefulness to the " Great 
School." 

The list being answered satisfactorily, the applicant 
was instructed to prepare for a rigid examination on 
the contents of the four books and booklet named. As 
an aid to this preparation, the Question Booh and Key 
were used. Upon this part of the TK's " Great 
Work," the applicant was required to spend not less 
than three hours daily, and even with this extravagant 
waste of time, it took from one to three years — in some 
cases longer — to write out the answers, and memorize 
the books sufficiently to stand an examination on their 
contents. 

Following a satisfactory written examination which 
lasted from a few months to as many years, TK 
officially accepted the candidate *s application, gave the 
official "nod" to some local group, and the applicant 
was "elected" to be admitted to the next regular step 
known as the "Test Course." 

This "course" consisted of 52 subjects of from a 
dozen to two dozen questions each, printed in imitation 
type-writer type. Besides these "official" lists, the 
"course" included sixteen supplementary lists on the 



DEPARTMENT OF PERSONAL INSTRUCTION 177 

spiritual subjects of i ' Flirting, * ' " Indolence,' ' "Luke- 
warmness, ,, " Shirking, ' ' etc., to be used at the dis- 
cretion of the "instructor" assigned. 

This "Test Course" required not less than one 
year's time, and the subjects covered constituted a 
most exacting personal quiz on all sorts of personal 
questions, the answers to which gave TK a fairly cor- 
rect estimate of the student's individual convictions, 
mode of life, ideals, aims and abilities, strong and weak 
points, and his possible usefulness to the GREAT 
CAUSE, i. e., to TK. 

These results were exactly what were contemplated 
in the preparation of this Test Course. It was not 
for the purpose of testing the applicant's spiritual de- 
velopment or possibilities, but to test his "loyalty," 
i. e., his willingness to accept the TK's rule of secrecy 
and the heel of authority which he imposed. Not but 
that some of these lists of questions comprising the 
"Test Course," might have a certain amount of in- 
terest and possible value in the analysis of a man's 
mental attitudes and activities, but in this instance 
the whole idea was put to a wrong use. Under false 
impressions as to its spiritual value, importance and 
the purpose which it was supposed to serve, several 
hundred people wasted from one to five years of all 
the time they could spare, to this "great work." 

To give you an idea of just what this Test Course 
consisted, we will here reproduce a few pages of the 
lists of questions submitted to the student. 



178 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

JEALOUSY AND ENVY 

What is Jealousy? Define in your own words. 

What destructive elements enter into it? 

Are you ever Jealous? 

Is there a cure for it? 

How do you know? 

Is Jealousy a Proof of LOVE? 

Do you believe it possible for two people who LOVE 
each other TRULY and without reservation, ever to 
be Jealous of or toward each other? 

What is the distinction between the " Jealousy" of 
the betrayed love or friendship, and the " Jealousy* p of 
Suspicion and Imagination? 

Which is the more destructive? 

What is the corrective of unwarranted Jealousy? 

What is ENVY? Define, analyze and illustrate. 

Is this a common trait of human nature? 

What is the psychological effect of Envy upon the 
one who indulges it? 

What is the corrective? 

Are you m any sense a "Money LoverV 

Do you spend money easily, or with regrets? 

How does the possession of Wealth by others affect 
you? 

Do you envy those who have more than you? 

If you had $1,000,000 of your own, what USE would 
you make of it? 

In what ways, if at all, would you Indulge your- 
self? 

Do you, IN PRACTICE, apply the Law of Com- 



DEPARTMENT OF PERSONAL INSTRUCTION 179 

pensation to Material Possessions, or only to Spiritual 
things? 

Why? 

Kindly note that after successfully asking nineteen 
questions on the subject of "Jealousy and Envy/' we 
suddenly discover the " master' ' shifting around to his 
favorite pastime of 

" Money, money, who's got the money ?" 

Which brings us again to TK's application of his 
knowledge of psychology to the problem of money. 
The "Test Course' ' consisted of 52 subjects, submitted 
weekly. The last two topics were timed for the last 
two weeks of the student's probation. He was about 
to complete a long, tiresome work. He was approach- 
ing the wonderful Ethical Section — the real instruc- 
tion. He was soon to be an "ethical student." The 
long sought, long struggled-for Secret Work was just 
coming into view. Says TK, "This is the psycho- 
logical moment," and so it was, as the following lists 
of Test questions show : 

51. MONEY 

What is Money, as you understand it? 

What do you consider its legitimate Function? 

What do you consider a legitimate income? 

What do you regard as a Surplus ? 

What do you hold to be the right Uses of a Surplus? 

Which do you enjoy most, to earn, to accumulate, 
or to hoard, Money? 

Or, does it give you greater satisfaction to spend, 
give or squander? 

Why? 



180 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Define, analyze and illustrate the individual you 
would call Economical. 

One you would call Saving. 

A Penurious person. 

A Miserly person. 

In the same way define, analyze and illustrate one 
you would call Liberal, Generous and Just? 

Also one who is extravagant and Prodigal in the 
use of Money? 

Which of these is your own Ideal? 

Among your family, do you regard your Material 
income as exclusively your OWN, to dispose of as you 
please? 

Or, do you hold it as a Trust for the benefit of all? 

Why? ' 

What, in your judgment, must be the right internal 
attitude of Soul on this subject of Money, in one who 
seeks to become a Representative of this Great School, 
and a participator in this Great Work? 

Why? 

Turn the searchlight upon your own Soul and ask 
yourself if your own attitude toward material posses- 
sions justifies the Great School in giving you further 
instruction, and justifies you in claiming fellowship 
with the Great Friends and Teachers of Humanity? 

52. THE BEST GIFT 

All things duly considered, which do you hold to be 
the more worthy and valuable Gift: (1) A gift of 
one's time, energy, personal effort, knowledge and ex- 
perience, or (2) a Gift of Money? 



DEPARTMENT OF PERSONAL INSTRUCTION 181 

According to your own view, who has made the more 
commendable Gift to a worthy cause, — the man who 
gives his life, with all its intelligent faculties, capac- 
ities and powers ; or, one who gives but a part of his 
material surplus ? 

Give me your own analysis of why it is that men of 
the world, generally speaking, seem to regard a gift 
of money as of so much greater value and importance 
than any other a man can make for humanity? 

Weighed in the balance of time, which do you think 
will count for most (for individual development) — the 
gift of one 's time, energy, knowledge, counsel and sym- 
pathy, — or money? 

For example, how would you measure values as be- 
tween the poor man's time and the rich man's money? 

Are you prepared to give to humanity out of your 
own abundance in whatever you may possess? 

If you have Time, will you give it ? 

If you have Knowledge, will you impart it? 

If you have Energy, will you expend it? 

If you have Wisdom, will you lend it? 

If you have Sympathy, will you bestow it? 

If you have Money, will you use your surplus for the 
good of mankind?* 

How? 

Two other "educational" questions that were used 
earlier in the game of the "Great School," are also 
herein reprinted : 



*That is, for TK. 



1S2 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

i. As you understand them, to what extent is it consistent 
with the principles of the Great Work, to accumulate wealth 
(surplus), when there are those who have proven their devo- 
tion to the cause that are in poverty and actual want for 
the necessities of life? 

2. Do you believe you have the moral courage to with- 
stand the temptations of wealth without growing selfish, and 
to USE all your legitimate surplus for the good of the Great 
Work and the proper help of those employed in itf 

What illuminating "spiritual" questions! 

What magnificent training! 

What lu lu hints! 

And all this is a part of the profoundly secret work 
of TK 's imaginary Great School ! 1 

What a pity that so many earnest, really beautiful 
souls have for years been kept in mental darkness, 
dreaming and hoping, struggling and suffering, plan- 
ning and praying — almost willing to crawl in the dust 
— that they might be admitted to this wonderful " wis- 
dom of the ages." All because TK cunningly made 
it a secret work and subject wholly to his pretended 
authority. 

But as this mystery veneer is ripped off you see it 
not as the efforts of a Great School of Masters, but 
as the shrewd scheme of an occult pretender and 
grafter. 

All the preliminary and test course work was tedious 
and trying. It was meant to be so, for it was simply 
a system of "stringing" both students and applicants. 
The object was to gain time; to admit only a limited 
number, ever, to the Ethical Section. Every applicant 
and accepted student wanted the more secret E S, and 
not one would have submitted to the "preliminary" 



DEPARTMENT OF PERSONAL INSTRUCTION 183 

grind and useless waste of valuable time but for the 
reason that they were given to understand that it was 
absolutely the only way they could get this MORAL 
instruction. 

TK's entire Great Scheme depended upon secrecy, 
and so firmly did he hold each student and applicant, 
that at any point along the way, and without a mo- 
ment's notice, he could "eliminate" him or her with- 
out even so much as a word of explanation. 

Where it became known that any applicant or stu- 
dent doubted TK's honesty or showed the least dis- 
position whatever to question any of his personal 
claims, his motives, manner of life, tin-horn powers 
or authority, or what he was doing with the large sums 
of money he had collected "for the good of the Great 
Cause," — that applicant or student was promptly 
"eliminated," and henceforth branded by the "mas- 
ter" as an apostate, a dangerous spy and secret enemy 
of his Great Fraud. And all students were warned to 
have nothing to do with the heretic! 

Some people imagined that when an applicant came 
to TK for his course in Morals, all the "master" had 
to do was to turn his spiritual spot lights on them or 
in the direction of their home, and in a few winks 
would know all about them. For such purposes, how- 
ever, TK would never use his * l powers. f ' And it was 
just as well, for his unique and original system of spy- 
ing on everybody connected with him in any way, was 
quite efficient. In fact, his spy system was a marvel of 
perfection ; as simple, sure and automatic as it is pos- 
sible for human intelligence to imagine. 



184 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

1. He secured a signed and dated detailed written 
history of the applicant's personal life, environment 
and past and present connections. 

2. Before being ' ' admitted, ' ' each applicant was 
required to meet at least one, sometimes several of 
the accepted students. This was for the purpose of 
judging the applicant's qualifications for " student- 
ship,' ' each student being required to submit a writ- 
ten report of his impressions concerning the applicant 
to the TK. At the same time, the applicant was re- 
quired to write out and submit to TK his own personal 
impression of each student to whom he was sent. Thus 
the GS "catched 'em agoin' an' acomin'." Thus he 
kept a cross-file on practically everybody connected 
in any way with his i i activities. ' ' 



Here the writer wishes to give some sound advice 
to every living soul who may ever be tempted to give 
his or her life history to some "master." 

Don't do it! 

You cannot afford to do it, and above all do not put 
it in writing. A real master would not need to have 
your personal secrets in writing, nor would he 
even suggest such a thing. The very fact that any man 
advertises and holds himself out to be a "master" is 
evidence enuf that he is either mistaken or he is a fake 
and a fraud. If you happen to be of that type of mind 
that simply must have a "master," then by all means 
get one — temporarily, — but do not trust him. 



DEPARTMENT OF PERSONAL INSTRUCTION 



185 




An Applt cants Idea, of TKs Spirttfta.1 Spot Ughtg 



TK in Life and Action, for Oct. 1913, says: "We now 
have a corps of some 300, or more active 'instructors/ con- 
stantly engaged." 

Again in Dec. 1914, he says: 

"To-day we have thus educated a very few thousands of 
such students in America, and they are scattered from one 
end of the country to the other." 

Again, in Bv. 4, p. 294: 

"The largest number in any one center does not exceed 
100 men and women. Then there are groups of 50, 25, 15, 
10, 5 and so on here and there in the cities and towns in all 
parts of the United States." 



186 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

If you have been under the impression that TK's 
students numbered into the thousands or tens of thou- 
sands, the following table will set you right. This 
table compiled direct from the records of " Active 
Students' ' to date of July 1st, 1916, gives you the 
exact number of students and their relation to the 
great " secret' ' work. This table covers ALL recog- 
nized students, including those " scattered from one 
end of the country to the other." 

PRELIMINARY TO ETHICAL SECTION 

Accepted 30 

Taking First General Examination 69 

Completed First General Examination 6 

Working on Test Course 151 

Completed Test Course 24 

Working on Examination for ES 9 

Completed Examination for ES 41 

Total 330 

ETHICAL SECTION 

Working on Ethical Section 129 

Completed Ethical Section 38 

On Problem After No. 12 10 

Completed Problem After No. 12 7 

Completed No. 13 73 

Marked as Official Instructors 35 

Total E S Students 292 

Both Preliminary and Ethical Students 622 



TK'S TECHNICAL WORK 201 

8. That this training constituted the first section of 
what he calls the ' ' Technical Work of Spiritual Devel- 
opment. ' ' 

9. That this process is in every sense of the word 
an "independent process/ ' and at every point under 
the complete control of the student. 

All of which seems quite proper and wonderful, and 
as it should be. 

The advertising of this so-called Technical Work 
began with the publication of "Harmonics of Evolu- 
tion" in 1899. It was continued in "The Great Psy- 
chological Crime" in 1903, and again in "The Great 
Work" in 1906. In the last named book it is meant to 
be the crowning achievement of the entire volume; in 
fact, of the entire Harmonic Series. It is the central 
idea around which everything else revolves, and up to 
which every other line of thot reaches. 

In a plausible sort of way and in a manner evi- 
dently meant to give the book an air of being scientific 
and exact, TK leads the mind, step by step, up to this 
chapter "The Technical Work." This is his final card, 
the premium, or reward, or inducement which lends 
a temporary semblance of authority to himself and his 
entire "Great Work." Take this away, and you re- 
move THE FOUNDATION OF TK*S ENTIRE MOVEMENT. True, 

such laws and principles as he assumes to elucidate, 
remain, but the "work," the "movement" itself, is 
not built upon principles, but upon a most flagrant 
violation and misuse of principles, and upon belief in 
and acceptance of TK as a " master, ' ' — an ' ' Avatar/ ' 
or Deity. 



202 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Speaking of his pseudo "Technical Work," TK, in 
"The Great Work," p. 411, says: 

1 ' 1. The Technical Formulary is secret work. 

2. Every individual who receives it is obliged to give it 
only to those who have been tried and tested, and found to 
be duly and truly prepared, worthy and well qualified to 
receive it. 

3. It can be given only in the same manner in which it was 
received, which is "from mouth to ear." 

4. The information contained in the Formulary is of such 
a nature that it might be made the basis of incalculable injury 
to the innocent if placed in the hands of the unscrupulous 
or ambitious." 

Again on pages 181, 82, 83, "The Great Work," 
TK says : 

"Every scientific formula, in order to be such, must be so 
exact and so entirely free from the possibility of interpre- 
tations, that every individual who uses it will be able to fol- 
low its directions step by step from beginning to end and 
thus prove its accuracy. 

"To bring the illustration more closely to the subject 
under immediate consideration, the formulary of the Great 
School for the demonstration of a life after physical death, 
is definite and specific. Any individual who can understand 
it and who is able to comply with its terms can prove its 
scientific value. All those who are able to follow its condi- 
tions and provisions reach the same results. What it does 
for one intelligent soul it will do for another under the same 
conditions. What it does for these two it will do for as many 
others as are able and choose to make the test in strict con- 
formity with its terms and conditions. Thus far it has opened 
the channels of spiritual sense for all those who have made 
the test under all the terms and conditions prescribed. It 
will do the same for as many more as are able to repeat the 
process in the same way and under the same conditions. 
These are the facts which stamp the formulary with the seal 
of * science \" 



TK'S TECHNICAL WORK 203 

From this last quotation one receives the distinct 
impression that this so-called Technical Work is as 
definite, reliable and scientific as mathematics. That 
the claims made for an instruction and training under 
this formulary are always sure to follow in the most 
satisfactory and systematic manner until the entire 
work of spiritual development is completed. The facts 
are, however, that Tk does not possess any Technical 
Work, such as he pretends to have. His "technical 
work" was simply a metaphysical "gold brick," an 
occult "confidence" trick. 

In plain words: 

1. TK's so-called "Technical Work of Spiritual De- 
velopment" is not what he impresses his readers to 
believe it to be, and, 

2. It has not made possible the kind and number of 
personal demonstrations which TK deliberately, inten- 
tionally and falsely tries to make his readers believe 
have been made. 

A number of people in times past asked for this 
pseudo-technical work, only to learn that it would take 
them from four to five years special training upon a 
so-called • scientific * ' Ethical Formulary, ' ' before 
they could possibly be admitted to the "technical" 
work, and even then it would be about one chance in 
a million in favor of their ever being "admitted" to 
this "instruction." To show you just how TK han- 
dled honest inquirers, I shall here quote from two let- 
ters, as follows: 



204 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



Oak Park, 111., 8-14-1912. 
C. E. L , 

"You make quite clear, in a number of your answers, the 
fact that the principal motive and purpose that impel you 
to apply for instruction in this School is your desire to make 
the scientific demonstration of another life. This motive is 
entirely worthy, and nothing would give me further pleasure 
than to guide you in that work of demonstration, if it were 
a physical possibility with me at this time. 

But you will understand that difficulties of my own posi- 
tion when I explain the fact that at the present time I am 
the only individual in this country who is authorized and 
equipped by the Great School to give what is termed the 
"Technical Work" which covers that part of the instruction 
that deals with the scientific demonstration. 

At the present time I am loaded down with the work of 
the entire Movement in such a manner that I have but a very 
small part of my time and energy that I can devote to that 
branch of the Work. And I have a list of over 400 applicants 
for that Work ahead of you. I could not possibly add an- 
other student to my own personal list until I shall be able 
to relieve myself of some of the work somewhere — which I 
do not now see how it is possible for me to do. 

For these reasons, I dare not hold out to you the remotest 
prospect that it will be possible for me to guide you over the 
"Technical Work" at all. For this reason I cannot hold out 
to you any promise that you will be able to make the demon- 
stration, because / have no Student who has gone far enough 
to qualify a\s an Instructor in that branch of the Work. A 
number have gone far enough to have demonstrated the future 
life ; but they also are men who have their responsibilities of 
families on their hands, and must devote all but a small part 
of their time to the problem of making a living and paying 
their debts." TK. 

# * # * # 

Dr. C. S. McC , 



"Question 18 is as follows: 'If you knew in advance that 
you never would have the opportunity to take up the ' ' Tech- 
nical Work," or personally make the scientific demonstration 
of a life after physical death, would you still desire to become 
a Student of this School?' Your answer is 'No.' 



TK'S TECHNICAL WORK 205 

At present I am the only individual in this country who 
is in a position to give you or any other Student the Tech- 
nical Work. I already have applications ahead for that 
Work from more than 400 Students. I do not expect to do 
more in this lifetime than to care for those who are already 
on my waiting list. Therefore, it would be virtually a misrep- 
resentation on my own part if I permitted you to enter upon 
the Work in the face of your answer, and these conditions; 
for it would be equivalent to an encouragement on my part 
to you that at some time I shall be prepared to give you that 
work. This I do not at all expect to do, for reasons stated. 

Furthermore, that Work is a most profoundly Secret 
Work, and can be given only ' ' from mouth to ear ; ' ' and this 
means that before you could even hope to receive it you would 
be compelled to put your affairs in such shape that you could 
come to Chicago where you could be in daily touch with me 
during all the time necessary — which is indefinite, depend- 
ing on the ability of the Student, but at least three years 
under favorable conditions. 

These facts and conditions seem to make further progress 
both undesirable and inexpedient on your part." TK. 

Looking thru TK's files covering a number of years, 
we find that he always had "more than 400 appli- 
cants" for his technical instruction, ahead of all other 
correspondents. As cheap as figures are, he could just 
as well have made it 4,000,000 and scared his applicant 
stiff at one single operation. 

From your remembrance of what TK has written 
on the subject of his "Technical Work," how many 
students would you judge had taken this "work" and 
made the scientific demonstration of another life? 

I have asked this question of many people and the 
replies have ranged all the way from a dozen to sev- 
eral hundred. Never once was the correct number or 
anywhere near the correct number ever guessed. 



206 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

In Life and Action, Bv. 1, No. 4, p. 8 (1910), TK 
says: 

"I was sixteen years in finding just two students who 
were sufficiently 'agonized' over the great problem of another 
life to enter upon the work of verification. These were my 
first two regular students. And during all that time my 
search was earnest and unremitting. ' ' 

In his autobiography, TK explains that in 1887 
Florence Huntley became his first regular student, and 
that Dr. E. M. W. some time about 1899 became his 
first " regular student of the Technical Work/ 9 

In Bv. 4, p. 301 (Oct., 1913), TK, in speaking of 
his Classes of Technical Students, says : 

"It is a fairly well known fact, that some of the students 
of the Central Group have been admitted to the 'Technical 
Work/ and that they have accomplished considerable along 
the line of their independent psychic unf oldment. ' ' 

Again in the same article, same page, he says : 

"In a few instances I have asked one or two of these Stu- 
dents to explain some of the instructions and their experi- 
ences — to certain of the Students to whom I desired to con- 
vey the specific information covered therein." 

From these quotations, one might imagine there 
were quite a number who had taken or were taking 
the "Technical Work." Just why TK should say, "I 
have asked one or two of these students," etc., etc., 
does not appear — but the way in which he speaks gives 
one the impression that there were more than two 
technical students. 



TK'S TECHNICAL WORK 



207 



"Do we understand you to say that TK had only 
two i technical ' students ?" 

That is exactly the truth. Just two technical stu- 
dents, and only two. 




WbewTK (THE TACK HAMMER) Delivered his 

Me-mor&ble Addrefs tb aJl h«& Technical Stu.d«*vT& 
Berth erf the™ v^ere Jsvesevft atiel listened v/itfo VAf>f attenTJ 



»nM< 



In the light of this fact, one knows not whether to 
weep or simply feel amused at the following dramatic 
"charge" made by the "master" in his memorable 
public address to what his readers must have imag- 
ined, was an extensive amphitheatre crouded to its 
ceiling with Technical Students. Says TK: 

" Those of you, my Students, who have been regularly 
admitted to the Technical Work, are charged with a doubly 
heavy burden of responsibility. For this reason, it is well 
for you to keep the fact of your advancement in the Work 
strictly a matter of confidence between yourselves and the 
School.' ' 

— Bv. 4, p. 304. 



208 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

No wonder TK urges the soft pedal on all discus- 
sions of his " Technical' ' work, as he does in the fol- 
lowing paragraphs : 

"Do not ever introduce the subject of the 'Technical 
Work/ at any Group Meeting, nor at any meeting of Stu- 
dents, or Friends of the Work, — unless you have been spe- 
cifically and definitely asked by me, or by some one of the 
Great Friends, to do so." 

"Do not ever discuss the subject with any individual who 
is not an accredited Student in good standing; nor in any 
event whatever, unless you have been specifically authorized 
by me, or by my superiors, to do so." 

"Make it a rule to avoid being drawn into any discussion 
or narration of any psychic experiences you may have had 
— unless there is some real and urgent necessity for doing 
so. Otherwise you are liable to make the impression of 
'boasting'." 

Trust your spiritual "Uncle" to anticipate and 
head off any discussions which are liable in any way 
to uncover or bring into question any of his "spirit- 
ual" pretentions. 



Speaking of the necessary steps in the development 
of the spiritual senses, TK says: 

"1. A studio must be prepared and properly equipped for 
the study of 'Spiritual Optics'." 

—Great Work, p. 394 

This is only so much horse-play with the reader's 
intelligence. He purposely leaves everything to the 
reader's imagination, with never a hint of the real 
truth. One may conjure up all sorts of "scientific" 
optical instruments : spiritual telescopes, astral micro- 
scopes, angel dark lanterns, colored lights, spirit tar- 
gets and pointers, disposition barometers, spooky sign 
boards and ghostly guide lines indicating where the 



TK'S TECHNICAL WORK 209 

technical student should look and what he should 
imagine he sees. 

There was really nothing of the kind. 

The truth is TK's ' ' technical ' 9 work was simply a 
"system" of concentration, entirely experimental, and 
not unlike similar methods employed by spirit medi- 
ums and "mystics" for thousands of years. The 
whole "instruction" can be given in five minutes talk, 
and its application does not in any way depend upon 
morality or any previous knowledge of or even inter- 
est in ethical or spiritual philosophy. The results 
were not in any way dependent upon TK's presence, 
as he misleads his readers to believe, tho they may 
have been due more or less to his use or misuse of 
suggestion, or suggestions coming from his so-called 
"Great Masters," or Spirit Guides. 

On the subject of a scientific "technical" diet, TK 
had nothing definite or specific to suggest. The stu- 
dent simply experimented: first with one negative 
food, then with another. It was the same with the 
"methods" of concentration: the student simply ex- 
perimented: first one way, then another, and the re- 
sults of ten to fifteen years of such experimenting, 
were about as "scientific" as pulling one's finger out 
of water and looking for the hole. 

I purposely do not give the "method" of concen- 
tration suggested by TK because it is unreliable and 
dangerous. It is a forcing process, and so far as the 
individual experiences anything at all, the results are 
due to an auto-inversion of the channels of physical 
sense, exactly the same as occurs in hypnotic practice. 
The results following such tampering and interference 



210 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

with Nature's laws must always and inevitably be 
indefinite and dangerous. In all such experiments, 
the experiences which come to the experimenter are 
just as uncertain and the kind of spirit guides at- 
tracted just as vague and unreliable as the results of 
any other similar process of developing mediumship. 

It was the general impression among TK's readers 
that his technical students had so far demonstrated 
the "scientific" value of his instruction as to be able 
to open their spiritual senses and converse with spirits. 
This impression is absolutely untrue. 

Both students suggest that while practicing certain 
mental exercises they at times saw various colored 
lights, and sometimes what appeared to be faces — 
either motionless, as in a picture, or forming and dis- 
solving as in clouds of constantly changing shadows. 
In a few instances when " conditions' ' seemed favor- 
able, one student saw what appeared to be pictures 
peopled with living persons, but the experiences were 
not under control of the student, to be seen at will 
and voluntarily — as in the case of thousands of gen- 
uine clairvoyants in private life, many of whom pre- 
tend to no knowledge whatever concerning their ex- 
periences. 

# * # # # 

Florence Huntley labored in behalf of TK's "Great 
School" for sixteen years. She was TK's first stu- 
dent. She wrote the first "text" book; was the author 
and originator of practically all the plans and means 
for the work of extension; she edited all of TK's writ- 
ings, and was the head of the Woman's Department 
of the GL S, She was recognized by all students and 



TK'S TECHNICAL WORK 211 

friends as TK's spiritual mate. She was accepted, and 
so announced by TK, as the only duly authorized 
Representative of his Great Work, aside from him- 
self. She died in 1912. 

Here at least it would appear that the two technical 
students would have demonstrated and proven to 
themselves, and to the Chicago students, the reliability 
of their " technical' ' training. One had been a tech- 
nical student for twelve years, the other for three 
years. In the course of their experimenting both had 
had some experiences which, at the time, they believed 
to be constructive and genuine. Under the circum- 
stances, it would seem reasonable to expect that every 
possible effort from both planes of life would be made 
whereby both of these men would be able to see, recog- 
nize and communicate with Florence Huntley face to 
face. Such a demonstration would have constituted a 
crowning achievement in support of the truth and 
value of TK's teachings. 

But what are the facts? 

Did either of the two technical students communi- 
cate with Mrs. Huntley following her death? 

Did either of them see her or otherwise recognize, 
or sense her presence, state or condition? 

Absolutely NO. 

The only word that was supposed to come from her 

THRU ANY CHANNEL CONNECTED WITH THE SO-CALLED 

g. s. was a few suggestions by TK to the effect that 
she had gone swiftly to the "8th spiritual plane" and 
was no longer subject to the law of earthly gravity. 
And considering the life TK was living at the time of 



212 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

these alleged " messages' ' we may safely assume that 
he was simply faking. 

Surely if the results of TK's "Technical Work of 
Spiritual Development' ' were as nothing under cir- 
cumstances of this kind, we may properly conclude 
that it is not what he represents it to be and will not 
do for the student what he claims for it. We may 
then safely conclude that no very valuable " scien- 
tific' ' demonstrations are ever likely to be made under 
that particular process, no matter how great or an- 
cient or well advertised it may happen to be. 

It is the opinion of the only two men who took the 
Technical Work that in addition to his misuse of 
psychological suggestions and influences, TK has been 
simply an impressional medium. This would seem to 
be borne out by the following statement made by TK 
himself relative to his Technical instruction: 

"Under certain conditions, his consciousness will slowly 
but surely respond to the play of spiritual forces and condi- 
tions. His first conscious experience of this kind may come 
to him thru any one of the five spiritual senses. It may he 
that he will first become aware of 'Presences' about him 
thru the sense of spiritual touch. Or it may he he will see 
a spiritual form or light.' ' 

This in substance reads exactly the same as one may 
find in dozens of books on mediumship, and indicates 
very clearly that his "independent process" is the 
same that "waits" for "the play of spiritual forces 
and conditions." The results may be one thing or 
another, but whatever experiences may come (if any 
come at all) they are NOT subject to the will, choice 
or control of the student or medium. 



TK'S TECHNICAL WORK 213 

Another point : If what TK professed to know and 
teach along the lines of spiritual development, and the 
influences back of him were constructive, why did some 
of his most advanced students — those closest to him 
for years — have personal experiences in which they 
"saw" what they could only describe as "Terrors" 
— reports of which were carefully and closely guarded 
from all but the most trusted inner students? 

The mere recital of these personal experiences, as 
they were reported, would be sufficient to shock the 
strongest intelligence, and for the moment, paralyze 
all his senses with an unnamable horror. 

TK "explained" that these experiences were Na- 
ture's "tests" of the individual's courage and right 
to progress in his "Great School." 

But why such soul-paralyzing, terrifying influences 
and entities in such intimate fellowship with the "mas- 
ter ' ' — a vital part of his ' l system " of " spiritual devel- 
opment ' ' ? 

It appears that whenever TK was in touch with any 
spiritual conditions at all, it was with those of the 
lower astral planes of darkness, and not the planes of 
spiritual Light. 

Many sensitives have testified that at various times 
and places they have both seen and felt these un- 
friendly influences when in the same house with TK. 

Hundreds of people testify to having been warned 
in one way or another to keep away from and to have 
nothing to do with either TK or his so-called "school." 
And we wish here to state that many of the people 
thus forewarned know that these warnings came from 
relatives and friends in the Spiritual Summer Land. 



214 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

We wish further to state most clearly and earnestly 
that what has been said in ftiis chapter applies solely 
to TK's so-called "Technical" work and to that par- 
ticular "worW only. 

Not a single word is in question of the existence of 
the spirit world, — of the continued intelligent activi- 
ties and conscious, uninterrupted individual identity 
of relatives and friends who have passed to those 
planes, nor of actual and tangible communication with 
those relatives and friends. 

Let this fact sink deeply into your soul and abide 
with you forever. 



There is a spirit world, just as there is a material 
world, — a "Summer Land," — a world of unlimited 
planes of conscious, victorious, immortal individual 
life. And those we love, and those we do not love, 
those we know and those whom we may never know: 
— thousands of millions of spirits first born upon the 
earth plane, now live in glories undreamed of, unimag- 
inable to mortal intelligence, in homes in those bright 
worlds of light and progress. The pathway, the pow- 
ers and possibilities of the soul when liberated from 
this plane are illuminated with the light of Suns and 
Sons more glorious than any possible earthly com- 
parison. 

Not only do our Beloved and the friends and com- 
panions of our earthly confidence, dwell in security 
upon the spirit side of life, but not one of us living 
this side of the Friendly, Waiting Gateway, but walks 
daily and every conscious and unconscious moment of 



TK'S TECHNICAL WORK 215 

our existence in this "Light from Above." There is 
no other light, for life and light are inseparable, and 
both are spiritual. Look into the eyes of one who has 
passed from his physical body: the "light" has gone; 
the one who was and is Life has departed. 

If we live at all, we must live in light. Light is the 
native element of our spirit, because we are spiritual 
beings. The world-beloved Teacher, Jesus of Naza- 
reth, said of some whose spiritual minds were asleep, 
"They are dead while they live." Spirits dwell in 
light according to the light awakened and developed 
within themselves. This is the ' ' Kingdom of Heaven. ' ' 
"If the light that is in you be darkness, how great is 
that darkness." 

Our Beloved not only dwell upon planes more sub- 
stantial than this changing, crumbling, uncertain, tem- 
porary earth plane, but every one of us has been as- 
sisted and is being assisted from the spirit side of life, 
by those who have preceded us to that glorious experi- 
ence. They are more interested in the great problems 
of life than ever. They see with the clearer vision; 
they realize there the meaning, the interpretation, the 
possibilities of our present life and its far-reaching 
effects more definitely than we can ever know until 
we too join them and view the path from that side. 

In this chapter we have said that no message ever 
came from Florence Huntley thru any channels con- 
nected with the so-called ' ' Great School. ' ' 

But communications have- been received from Flor- 
ence Huntley, the same individual, the same intelli- 
gence, the same Florence Huntley who lived and was 
deceived, and suffered and gave the best years of her 



216 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



life toward establishing what TK deliberately misled 
her to believe was the work of a Great Spiritual School 
of Light. 

Florence Huntley today lives consciously upon the 
spiritual planes of life. She has communicated with 
those who were her true friends upon the earth plane. 
And as she gave her earth life to what she was 
impressed by a deceiver to believe was her duty, so 
now she works just as bravely and with the same 
quality of fearless honesty and^ determination and 
nobility of spirit to undo, unmask, counteract and ex- 
pose the false, misleading claims and pretentions of 
the TK who so shamelessly represented himself to the 
world as a " master.' ' 

To Florence Huntley is due much of the credit for 
the data embodied in this volume. For months, to- 
gether with other spiritual helpers, she has labored to 
bring about this present message to mankind. Time 
after time she has made it possible to locate certain 
data and documents hidden away in places where she 
alone knew of their existence and their important 
bearing upon certain phases of the subject matter of 
this book. 

•?? ^W TT * Vp 

With all the earnestness and intensity of her soul, 
she has desired, and urged and assisted with this work, 
in order that the facts contained in these pages may 
be given to the world. 



G 



a 



s o S 

I Z J 
Sol 



o 



s 



Q 

w 
H 



3 

u 

C 
ra 

I 

C 

! 

.2 



o 

Q 

u 



« § 



3 

a 
< 







1 

S 



o 

I; 

c 
,c 
o 



CHAPTER XVI 
"Doctor" Richardson (TK) and the Oxydonor 

"OXY,"HAIL! 

A song without words, 

A cure without drugs, 

This triumph of science outleaps 

Every tonic and toner, 

All hail, Oxydonor! 

That cures a man up while he sleeps. 

P'r'aps you've not heard 

How the plant and the bird, 

And horses bowed down with the heaves, 

Were vitalized quite, 

In space of a night, 

As were cockroaches, kittens and beeves. 

Would we could inspire 

You now to inquire, 

And ask us to fully explain 

How we guarantee 

Without any fee, 

Rosy health and redemption from pain. 

F. H. 

219 



220 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

In his autobiography, TK makes record of his mov- 
ing from Minneapolis to Chicago, as follows: 

(1). " About the end of that time, 1891, I removed 
to Chicago." 

(2). "In the Autumn of 1890, I came to Chicago 
and, with three of the good business men of Chicago, 
formed a business association with which I remained 
connected until 1900." 

You will note that TK does not tell us what this 
business "association" was; also that his dates do 
not seem to be "affinities" by several months. Evi- 
dences, however, show that he was in Chicago and in 
"business" either in 1899 or in January, 1890. His 
"business" at that time was promoting the old-time, 
reliable "Oxydonor" Doctor, for which TK and his 
partner were "Exclusive General Dealers for the 
State of Illinois." 

Most of our older readers will recall the "Oxy- 
donor" craze. The instrument consisted of a hollow, 
closed metal tube, about four inches long and one and 
one-half inches in diameter, all highly nickle-plated 
and having a red cord attached to one end. It was 
widely and wildly advertised some twenty-five years 
ago, and tens of thousands of people all over the 
country went in for the red-string treatment. 

The Government finally tried one of the "oxydon- 
ors," discovered the hoax and decided the thing was a 
fraud. As a result, the inventor was denied the use 
of the mails, and his business declared fraudulent. 
This of course put an end to the local activities of all 
"Exclusive General Dealers," and so we find "Doc- 



TK AND THE OXYDONOR 221 

tor" Richardson with thousands of other representa- 
tives and agents going out of "business." 

But it is doubtful if there was another oxydonor 
agent in the country who sold the instrument more 
cheerfully or philosophically than TK. His scientific 
ethical training, his independent spiritual vision and 
hearing, his ability to withdraw from his spir- 
itual body, his love for humanity and utter disregard 
for money would naturally fit him for the business, 
and enable him to "do" everybody good. 

The following oxydonor "poems" passed between 
TK and one of his friends, a physician of the Regular 
School of Medicine. These efforts to immortalize the 
Oxydonor give us another view of the "master's" 
metaphysics. If TK's poetry should seem a bit bet- 
ter than his friend's, it is due to the fact that he always 
wrote with an "OXY" attached to his leg, and the 
"power" turned on to XXX. 



222 



TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



OXYDONOR 



TftADS Mars'* 




Cory right 1894. by Dr. H. Sanche. 

Tlie Most Wonderful Discovery Ever Made. 

Nature's own preventive and cure of Disease. 
No Drugs, no Medicines. The cheapest and 
most effective Doctor ever introduced to 
Mankind. 

No PersoD can Afford to be without It. 

We want good reliable people everywhere to 
handle and sell the Oxydonor. For territory, 
terms and all matters relating to OXYDONOR. 
write us or call at our office. 

(OVER) 



TK AND THE OXYDONOR 223 



THE "OXY." 

Whoe'er is not owner 
Of one OXYDONOR, 

Is subject to every disease. 
Howe'er he endeavor 
To live bn forever, 

He dies, sure as Fate, if you please. 

Whoever IS owner 
Of one OXYDONOR, 

Is MASTER of every disease. 
By honest endeavor 
He lives on forever, 

In spite of the Fates, if you please. 

Just one OXYDONOR 
On any sick "Jonar," 

Will cause the old "whale" of disease, 
To writhe and to vomit, 
And scoot like a comet, 

And "get off the earth," if you please. 

Whenever a "groaner" 
Buys one OXYDONOR 

From us, if it doesn't relieve 
All his aches and his ills. 
Without doctors' bills. 

He can bring it right back, if you 

[please, 
and we will do the right thing by him, 
"and don't you forget it." 

LADD & RICHARDSON, 

Exclusive General Dealers for the State of ILLINOIS, 
941 Monadnock Block, CHICAGO. 



224 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

My Dear John : — 

I've read your poem on "Oxy," 
And I think you're getting foxy, 
Or going off with Coxie, 
Just for your country 's sake. 

There's no use to bemoan her, 
But you had better disown her, 
For your old Oxydonor 
Is all a big fake. 

But Barnum he fooled 'em, 
Suggestion she schooled 'em, 
And now you have muled 'em 
Clear out of their aches. 

"Good Morning,' ' "Pear's Soap," 
"See that Hump," yes I hope 
Have each pulled a strong rope 
For the suckers to take. 

Doctors physiced, puked and bled, 
Blistered, sweated, starved and fed, 
Did other things that can't be said, 
That ended in an Irish wake. 

"Blue Grass" took a craze, 
Charmed off warts, if you "plaze," 
Hair on bald heads it would raise, 
Even cure an ague shake. 



TK AND THE OXY DONOR 225 

" Christian Science," heads or tails, 
I win you lose, it never fails. 
Faces fixed with "Madam Yales," 
Caused many, many hearts to break. 

Seen the circus, heard the band, 
Drank the waters of the land, 
Took the sunlight to get tanned, 
Played the goose and also drake. 

Carried buckeyes in their pockets, 
Stared their eyes clear out of sockets, 
Sent their money up like rockets, 
Simply playing ' i Country Jake. ' ' 

"Jo- Jo," the wild man, 
Girls that dance the "Can-Can," 
After each weVe all ran, 
That they might money make. 

We blow hot, we blow cold, 
Get our fortunes oft told, 
Then swear weVe been sold 
With our eyes wide awake. 

Howling Dervishes, Indian dances, 
Wizards, witches, girls in trances, 
Wise and foolish all take chances, 
Nothing will their belief shake. 



226 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

"Willow sticks," for digging wells, 
"Splashing spit" the secret tells, 
Throw old shoes for wedding bells, 
Fearing marriage a mistake. 

"Bad luck Friday," "Groundhog day," 
' ' Trim your corns in month of May, ' ' 
All these things have had their day, 
And still humbugs their millions make. 

Old Ireland's "Blarney Stone's" been kissed, 
Hoodooed dogs and cats been hissed, 
Chased the rain-bow, always missed 
To catch the end and get the stake. 

Poor old moon controls the crops, 
Slot-machines the nickel drops, 
Mortgages the people crops, 
And finally their sheckels rake. 

So now there is no use to fuss, 
Neither beg, nor growl nor cuss, 
Because it always has been thus, 
And your heart it will not break. 

So go ahead and do your best, 

Give old "Oxy" a fair test, 

Suckers they will do the rest, 

Since old Chicago's drained her lake. 

Your friend, 
. M. D. 



TK AND THE OXYDONOR 227 

Chicago, 111., Mar. 8, 1900. 
Friend Doc: — 

I have in my possession, 
From one of your profession 
A pitiful confession 
Of a lack of common lore. 

The author's name is 

A thorough disbeliever 

In every new achiever 

Of results he can't explore. 

The knowledge he professes, 
As he himself confesses, 
Is nothing more than guesses, 
Three times in every four. 
And yet, he keeps on guessing, 
And never stops professing 
That he's the only blessing 
This side of Singapore. 

Whenever his attention 
Is called to an invention 
Which schoolbooks fail to mention, 
Those books he will explore ; 
Then when he fails to find it 
In books which don't define it, 
He tries to undermine it 
With a loud and empty roar. 

His roar is like the lion, 
Like ' i Dowie " in his i l Zion, ' ' 



228 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Still more like "Billy" Bryan, 
Who roars the country o'er. 
It sounds like distant thunder, 
It fills our souls with wonder 
To think of such a blunder 
From such a Hellebore.* 

He howls in bleak December, 
In April and November, 
In June and in September, 
He howls till he is sore. 
He howls in every season, 
He howls without a reason, 
He howls till it is treason, — 
And then he howls some more. 

He yelps: "All men are fakers, 
"Except the undertakers, 
"Who've planted sixty acres 
With friends IVe sent before." 
With poisonous potation, 
In regular rotation, 
He keeps up emigration 
To that "Bright and Shining Shore." 

'Tis my unasked opinion, 
That he 's a low-down minion 
Of Satan, whose dominion 
Is Hades, evermore. 



'See medicinal properties of this plant. 



TK AND THE OXY DONOR 229 

Although his tragic falling 
Was something most apalling, 
He'll soon be where his bawling 
Will bother us no more. 

Concerning Oxydonors, — 
These doctors, howlers, groaners, 
Will only help their owners, 
To keep them to the fore. 
When all the people use them, 
The doctors can't abuse them, 
And none will then refuse them, 
Nor the health which they restore. 

Now, let us draw the curtain, 
For 'tis unkind to hurt an 
" Ornery Cuss" who's certain 
To scorch forevermore. 
'Tis neither wise nor witty, 
To dedicate a ditty 
To one we ought to pity 
Because he's such a bore. 

Cordially yours, 

John E. Eichardson, TK. 



230 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

"JOHNNY TACKS' 3 AND THE OXYDONOR. 

I've a notion you're a sinner, — Johnny Tacks, 
Not at all a new beginner, — on the tracks. 
You've been tramping on the earth, 
Causing trouble, and some mirth, 
A good bit more than you are worth, — Johnny 
Tacks. 

I will notify you here, — Johnny Tacks, 

That your rhymes are rather queer, — something 

lacks. 
You may waste some ink and brains, 
Singing out your short refrains, 

But they never will bring gains, — Johnny Tacks. 

< 

Now, you're fussing with the doctors, — Johnny 

Tacks, 
And you're calling them ' ' concoctors " — at their 

backs. 
But they'll get you "bye and bye," 
And they'll fix you like a pie, 
For the undertaker, spry, — Johnny Tacks. 

You may think you'll beat old Barnum,— Johnny 

Tacks, 
And you'll no doubt try to "larn 'em 1 ' — some new 

facts, 
But the fools have "cut their gums," 
Spent their money in small sums, 
Till there isn't left no "plums,"— Johnny Tacks. 



TK AND THE OXYDONOR 231 

If this Oxydonor thing, — Johnny Tacks, 
Would stop "wimmen gossiping" — at their backs, 
Bring old maids a single beau, 
Make new teeth in people grow, 
They would want them then, you know, — Johnny 
Tacks. 

There's a man called " Billy ' ' Bryan, — Johnny 

Tacks, 
To beat McKinley, he's a-dyin', — in his tracks. 
If an l ' Oxy ' ' would help him, 
Even shut off " Jumping Jim," 
It might keep him in the i * swim, ' ' — Johnny Tacks. 

Now to keep John Bull from hooking, — Johnny 

Tacks, 
Old Man Kruger keeps a looking, — in his sacks ; 
But the money isn't there, 
Nor can he get it anywhere ; 
Would an "Oxy" be to spare, — Johnny Tacks? 

Now, there's Dewey, he's a dandy, — Johnny 

Tacks, 
And he proved himself quite handy, — giving 

cracks, 
When he gave the whales a " Jonar," 
Found Manila a new owner, 
Did he use an Oxydonor, — Johnny Tacks ? 

The Filipinos, they still fight, — Johnny Tacks, 
And it's hard to say who's right, — whites or 
blacks, 



232 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Would one help them in their dickers, 

Stop the " Yanks" from selling liquors, 

Even stop the horde of kickers,— Johnny Tacks I 

Now, if Sheldon in his capers, — Johnny Tacks, 
Could just keep the other papers, — from attacks, 
Perhaps an "Oxy," it would do; 
Better tell him 'fore he's through — 
" That's what Jesus, he would do," — Johnny 
Tacks. 

Now, Carnegie, he's the fashion, — Johnny Tacks, 

Giving buildings is his fashion, — kindly acts, 

Forty millions every year, 

Lets the people see things clear, 

Is he using "Oxys," dear, — Johnny Tacks? 

Now what force is in this wonder, — Johnny Tacks ! 
Is it that which burns from thunder, our hay 

stacks? 
Makes it daylight out of night, 
Runs the street cars like a fright, 
Did "Ben" bring it with his kite, — Johnny Tacks? 

Can you tell us without joking, — Johnny Tacks, 
Is it that which comes when stroking Pussy's 

back? 
Do the telegraphers use it, 
And the lightning-rods abuse it? 
To bring fame, did Edison choose it, — Johnny 

Tacks? 



TK AND THE OXYDONOR 233 



Now I'll tell you what it is, — Johnny Tacks, 

The thing that does the "biz," — these are facts, — 

If the truth they want to seize, 

In their brains — just tell them, please — 

Lies the force that cures disease, — Johnny Tacks. 

To decide who's been outwitted, — Johnny Tacks, 
These rhymes should be submitted by two 

"Jacks," 
Call the "Tacks," both small and great, 
Let them study this debate, 
While Judge Fing-Wing sits in state, — Johnny 

Tacks. 

, M. D. 



Friend Doc: — 
I have to acknowledge the aptness and worth 
Of the poem you sent me today, 
It has all the metre, the rhyme and the mirth 
Of a poet who writes without pay — 
(for the Nonpareil.) 

Its metre is that of the song, "Baby Mine," 
But it lacks all its beautiful swing. 
The muse had a tussle to make itself rhyme, 
So it had to take "any old thing" — 
(that came along). 



234 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

As soon as I read the first verse I was struck 
With its rollicking humor and glee, 
And I said to myself, in the language of Puck, 
"What fools these mortals must be" — 
(in western Iowa). 

I got out the first one you wrote and I read, 

And then I compared it with this, 

And I said to myself "There's more than one 

head 
Mixed up in this last, or I miss — 
(my guess badly"). 

The first one has rhyme, but its metre is wrong, 
And sometimes by several feet; 
Sometimes it is short, and other times long, 
But nowhere at all does it meet — 

(the requirements of good poetry). 

The last one has metre which matches its rhymes 
So well that they neatly betray 
The work of two minds in getting the lines 
To metre and rhyme in the way — 
(that they do). 

I have no objection, so far as that goes, 
To having you call in a friend 
To help you unburden yourself of your woes, 
If only it helps you to mend — 
(your poetical diction). 



TK AND THE OXYDONOR 235 



But if ever you hope to become a good "Tack," 
And stand on your head in a chair, 
You'll have to reform " Pottawattamie Jack," 
In order to make it a "pair — 
(of Jacks"). 

I wish you would name the son-of-a-gun 
Who measured your verse into feet, 
And fixed up the metre, I'll bet it was one — 
Of those measly, unholy, dead-beat — 

(reporters on the Bee or Herald). 

And now let us turn for a moment or two, 
To the great Oxydonor again; 
For I want you to know that I'll never get through 
This "fussing," until you refrain — 
(from abusing it). 

YouVe called it a "fraud," a "humbug," a 

"slam," 
A "fake," a "snide" and a "shame," 
A "delusion," a "snare," a "joke" and a 

"sham"; 
In fact, most any old name — 

(you could find that was mean). 

Now, what does a devil-fish do when a whale 
Comes browsing along very near? 
It kicks up a muss with the end of its tail, 
And muddies the water, for fear — 

(the whale might swallow it). 



236 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Now, you are the devil-fish, "OxyV the whale. 
You see "Oxy" coming your way; 
You kick up a muss and you sputter and rail, 
In order to scare it away — 

(from Council Bluffs). 

The trick is too old, and the people are on — 
To these " Doctors and Devils and Drugs/ ' 
They'll soon come around and boost you along 
To the place where they keep all the thugs — 
(down at Fort Madison). 

I notice that you and old Dowie agree 
On the locus m quo of disease; 
But it looks to a man who is able to see, 
Of the two, most assuredly he's — 

(the more consistent practitioner). 

You both say disease is all in the mind. 
He works on the mind for a cure. 
You fill up the stomach with every vile kind 
Of poisonous, rotten, impure — 

(drugs and so-called medicines). 

Suppose it 's a corn on the top of your toe, 

Is that on your mind, or your foot? 

Then what if the tootfe-ache should add to your 

woe, 
Is that in your mind, or the root — 
(of some decaying molar?) 



TK AND THE OXYDONOR 237 

If all our diseases, our ailments and ills 
Are merely a mental conceit, 
Then why not administer doughnuts for chills, 
And chocolate creams when your feet 
(pain you?) 

If there is no sickness except in the mind, 
And there is no mind in a hog, 
Then why does the cholera kill off our swine? 
And why does an old yellow dog — 
(have the Asthma?) 

If what you have said on the subject were true, 
Then why go to medical schools? 
I wish you would tell me the reason why you 
And all other medical fools — 

(don't practice Christian Science?) 

Your logic demonstrates beyond any doubt, 
That a wheel has come loose in your head. 
You'll have to be careful, or it will come out, 
My gosh ! that would kill you so dead — 

(that even the Oxydonor couldn't resur- 
rect you). 

To end this, we'll lump all those poems of ours 
Together and call in the " Tacks," 
And let them apply their mystical powers 
In an effort to tell us who lacks — 

(the most of being a poet). 



238 



TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



If they should decide that you are the man 
To choose as their own " laureate,' ' 
I promise you now I will do all I can 
To help them to inaugurate — 

(you on the point of a tack) 
(in due and ancient form.) 

—John E. Eichardson, (TK) 




CHAPTER XVII 

The Sublime and Ill-lluminated Order of Tacks 

This Order of Tacks was the real Sanctuary or inner 
and most obscure earthly retreat of the Great School 
in America. It was a most profound Secret Order, 
consisting of only a few inner students, and deeply 
hidden away, back of or beyond or within all other 
activities of the Great School, in such manner as to 
be entirely unsuspected and unapproachable from 
without. Of the 500 or so active students, it is prob- 
able that not more than 200 ever even heard of the 
existence of this inner body of Advanced Students. 
Of a possible 200 Ethical Students, probably not more 
than 35 were ever elected to this " Order.' ' 

No candidate was ever admitted except on invita- 
tion from within the Order itself. There was but one 
pathway of approach : that was thru a course of pro- 
foundly secret instruction, a definite, rigid work of 
preparation requiring in some instances years of 
intense personal application. And only after this 
preparatory work was actually completed and the stu- 
dent tested in every particular, was his or her name 
ever proposed for advancement and membership in 
the " Order of Tacks.' » 

It was within this Order and in the presence of its 
assembled members that a great miracle was regularly 
performed: the only miracle connected in any way 
with the Great School. The writer never witnessed 

239 



240 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

this miracle, but it is said that all who were permitted 
to look upon that sublime process of transmutation 
never afterward ever doubted TK's authority, power 
or mastership. 

The esoteric, or spiritual name for the " Order of 
Tacks" was "TK's Tack Factory." There was a cere- 
mony of initiation by which "suitable raw material* ' 
— finished! ethical students were taken in off the 
"dump" and made into living "tacks." Initiations 
took place in Mrs. Huntley's "Paradise Flat" Out 
of a total membership of from 12 to 15, from seven 
to twelve members were usually present. The candi- 
dates were usually favored pilgrims from other cities. 

During initiation each new member was given a 
"new name," which in some way embodied the name 
of the sacred symbol of the Order: — a Tack. Thus: 
Tacktful, Carpet Tack, Taxi, Tack Hammer, Miss 
Attack, Locomotor Ataxia, etc. TK's official title was 
the "Chief Tack," but being accustomed to numerous 
names, he was also known as the "Tack Hammer," 
Mrs. Huntley's idea of the "Tack Hammer's" official 
business is here illustrated by another of her interest- 
ing pen sketches taken from the minutes of the Order. 

We shall now take a few quotations from the secret 
Ritual of the "Order of Tacks." 

TK — "Friends and Fellow Laborers: — 

Obedient to the Command of the ONE HI, before whom all 'good and 
lawful' Tacks delight to humble themselves, I am about to open this 
Factory for work. Let every hand be at his post, ready to Tespond. 
Lady Tactful, what is your working station?" 

A. — "At the left of the Hammer." 

Q.— "Whst are your duties there?" 



THE SUBLIME ORDER OF TACKS 



241 




A. — ''To count the tacks, keep the tactics of the tacks! and record 
tack orders." 
TK—"Thotful Cephalologist, what are your duties?" 

A. — "To see that every tack that goes out from this Factory is 
equipped with a large, well-formed and properly rounded head." 



TK — "Shocking Magnetograph, what are your duties!" 

A. — To absorb magnetism whereby to magnetize all newly made tacks 
until they shall never fail to stick to the Hammer." 

Q. — "What is the station of the Hammer?" 

A. — "Toward the rising Sun." 

Q. — "And what are his duties?" 

A. — "To drive tacks into place; to pull those that do not fit; to 
straighten the crooked; weld the broken, strengthen the weak, repair the 
imperfect: and do all this with blows so delicately measured as not to 
injure — his own thumb." 



TK — "Recording Angel, where is the Great Inspector and Judge 
whom we designate as the ONE HI?" 
A.— "Out of sight." 



242 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



Q. — ''And -what are his duties?" 

A. — "He has none. He is the inscrutable head of this establish- 
ment, in whom are exemplified all the virtues of a perfect Tk." 

# » # # » 

TK — ' ■ Having now 'been regularly refined, measured, moulded, headed, 
pointed, polished, magnetized, weighed, boxed, wrapped and labeled, I 
presume you realize that you are now a good and lawful living Tk. 
Is it not so?" 

A.— "It is." 

TK — "Nevertheless, my friend, however naturally you may have 
arrived at this conclusion it is erroneous, and it is my solemn duty to 
inform you that you are not yet a living Tk. You must first satisfy 
all present that you acknowledge with them voluntary allegiance to 
the One Hi. But before making this official salaam, it is but meet and 
proper that you should first know as much as we can tell you of the 
wisdom, the power and glory of him to whom this acknowledgement 
must be made. In order that you may the better observe the sublime 
symmetry and beauty of his noble character, we will proceed alpha- 
betically, beginning with: 

A. He is Amiable in all his Aims, Arts, Acts, Achievements, Ambi- 
tions and Animadversions. 

Eesponse by all: "He is Another." 

B. He is Benovolent in all his bounteous benefactions, and Beauti- 
ful as a blushing bride after the benediction. 

"He is a Beaut!" 

C. He is Chaste as the lily, Charitable to all his children, Courageous 
under crucial conditions and circumstances, and Courteous to all his 
critics. 

"He is a Oharmer. " 

D. He is Devoted to his Duty, Direct and Discrete in his discus- 
sions: Discriminating in his dogmas and doctrines, and Diligent in all 
his doings. 

"He is a Dandy!" 

E. He is Exemplary as an exponent of equity, equality and excel- 
lence, and an emblem to emulate. 

"He is un-Earthly." 

F. He is Faithful to friends and Friendly to foes. He is frugal, 
fearless and faultless. 

"Finer than frog's fur." 

G. He is Good as a Guru, and Gracious as a God. 
"Holy Gee!" 



THE SUBLIME ORDER OF TACKS 243 



H. He is an Honest Humanitarian, with a heart full of Hope and a 
halo of Happiness about his head. 

"He is a Hummer." 

I. He is an Independent Intelligence, and an Ideal I-opener of the 
Illuminati. 

"He is IT." 

J. He is Just in all his judgments and Judicious in all his jollities. 

"Junk the Jinx." 

K. He is Kingly in his knowledge and Knightly in his kindness. 

"Kick Him Kindly." 

L. He is a Loyal and Loving Lord and a Luminious Llama of the 
Law. 

"He is the Limit!" 

.M. He is Modest and Meek, Magnanimous and Mighty, a Midget 
Monitor of Morality, and Magnificent as a Munificent Moderator and 
Merry-Maker. 

"His name is Mud." 

N. He is a Noble Necromancer, and a Natural Nailer of Nocturnal 
Novitiates and Nebulous Neophites. 

* ' Never again ! " 

0. He is an Occult Oddity, an Opulent Optimist, an Orderly and 
Official Organizer, an Ossified Officer, and an Obvious Oversight of all 
Oriental Occultism since the Oracular Oracles of 0-M". 

"The only Oyster in the Order." 

P. He is Patient and Peaceful as a Potentate, and a Powerful 
Preacher of Purity, Perseverance and Piety. 

"Pat Him on the back." 

Q. He is Quiet and Quaint as a Quaker, quick in his quips, and the 
Quintessence of Quality. 

"To the Queen's taste." 

R. He is Richer than Eockefeller, Reliable as a Royal Revolator, 
Ready to Recognize the Rights of his Rivals, and a Race Ruler over 
Raw Recruits. 

"Rah! Rail! Rah! Richardson! Raw! Raw!" 

S. He is Safe and Sure, Silent and Serene, a Saintly 'Savant, a 
sane and Soulful Seer of all Secrets, and a Strictly Scientific Symbol 
of Self-satisfaction. 

"Some Saint." 

T. He is a Titled Tutelary, Truthful under every Test, and as a 
Tack he is a Trump Triumphant. 

"Tin is His tune." 



244 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



U. He is Unselfish, Unobtrusive, Unvarying, Utterly Upright, a 
Universal Utilitarian, and United to Uneeda. 

"Pass the crackers." 

V. He is Virtuous and Versatile, a Veritable Vishnu, and a Valor- 
ous Victum of Vulcan. 

* * Vam iMoose ! ' ' 

W. A Wild and Woolly Wizard of the West, Worthy, Winsome 
Worker of the West, Wakeful, Watchful, Wise-one, Whiskerless. 

"He is a Worrier." 

X. Xenophen, Xavier, Xerxes. 
Philosopher, priest, king. 
United virtues all lurk these 
In him whose praises we sing. 

"Xmas Xcitement. " 

Y. A Yearning, Yankee Yoga, 
In Youthful, yellow Toga, 

Yodling sweetly all the livelong year, 
Yielding to the yoke of karma, 
Yet, so meek he would not harm a 
Skeeter sitting singing on his year. 

"The Yellow Kid." 

Z. A Zinky Zymnologist of Zion, a Zonular Zealota Zany, a Zig- 
Zag Za of the Zodiac. 

"Our Zooky Zukums." 

TK — "These, my friend, are the virtues of the ONE HI, in whose 
presence we delight to humble ourselves, and to whom in token of our 
allegiance we bend the knee." 

(The Tacks here made the official salaam.) 

In the Ancient School of Natural Science, the process of initiation 
was for the purpose of developing the spiritual powers and unfolding 
the spiritual senses until the initiate is able voluntarily to look beyond 
the veil of physical material and into the realms of spirituality. This 
is one of the many rewards of his honest labors and comes as the direct 
and specific result of his own Self -Mastery. 

And so, my friend, if your work and ours to this point has been 
well done, there remains to you but this final act to open the eyes of 
the soul and bring you consciously faee to face with the tangible and 
visible presence of the ONE HI. In order that nothing may be omitted 
to insure the full realization of this splendid consummation, you will 
proceed slowly and carefully with each step as I shall direct you. 



THE SUBLIME ORDER OF TACKS 



245 



The page below ie photographed direct from the "record 
lng Angel' 8 T minutes. It ie a sample of dozens of simi 
lar pages. All members of this "Order of Tacke," had to 
be advanced students in Tk's buncombe "GREAT School".'.' 



b 4aXU 



^ 



TKi,^?oxCUi Gtfci/.lw - 



XXXIt 



tka. CC «J S**utf 



U*di. tk«- iMAU (Svu<fiitv vOLu^L JU^vW ftrK ui iy 

7X */ 




tfl 1 



Kt9\»touv.j 



^ 



GuMuaaa 




K.Yf. 



246 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

TK here instructed the candidate : 

1. Face the East. 2. Stand erect. 3. Step back. 4. Bend knee. 5. 
Face down. 6. Hands over. 7. Wave and stand. 

Upon rising, the candidate stood looking upon a 
large and much battered Japanese doll, said to be 
over a hundred years old. 

In impressive tones, TK continued: 

"Behold! the Supreme Grand Master of this sublime and inscrutable 
Order, to whom alone you have acknowledged, with us, your voluntary 
and unqualified allegiance. This is he whose virtues outnumber the 
sands of the sea-shore, or even the honest members of our Chicago City 
Council. 

"His assumed name is * FTNG-Wing, ' but we have christened him 
the 'ONE HI,' and have given him the highest place of honor — nay, 
I should say the only place of honor in this Order. 

"See the soft, sweet smile of silent serenity upon his sweet and 
soulful frontispiece. This is the smile of one who looks into the face 
of his Maker, as it were, and says, — 'I have fit the good fight, — I have 
finished the job thou sattest me to do, and now, Lord, it is up to Thee. 
Verily, it is Thy next move. Give to me my other self. Give to me 
my soul's primordial concomitant and co-efficient companion. Give me 
my Uneda\ " 

(A little Chinese Lady Doll was now placed beside the One Hi.) 

? ' And Lo, his Uneda is at his side. This is the fulfilling of the Law, 
that they shall live in perfect happiness thru all eternity." 

The candidate's attention was here drawn to a flock 
of little china sheep on a green cloth to the right of 
the ONE HI and some china goats and an empty tin 
can to the left. 

Following this impressive lesson, the TK addressed 
the candidates as follows : 

THE MIRACLE 
My Friends: — 

You have heard how it was said of old, — "And there shall be no 
©ign given but the sign of the Prophet Jonas." 

This was the reply made to the curious and skeptical who came seek- 
ing a sign of Magical Powers — the sign of the Master. 



THE SUBLIME ORDER OF TACKS 



247 



While this same admonition still holds good for all who seek but the 
visible and tangible sign of a Spiritual Universe, yet there is a wide 
difference between him who asks as skeptic or critic, condemning and 
believing not; and him who comes asking naught, but with faith in the 
power of his Master to give him the sign. 

You who are here present as initiates, have already given proof of 
your faith in the Virtues of the ONE HI, as well as in your fitness to 
enter his service. 

In the presence of such as you it delights his Sublime Inscrutableness 
to perform the wonders and the miracles that are never manifested in 
the presence of the curious, the wonder seekers, the infidel or the heathen. 



dump %y* 





% 



Jgassffi 



TK's "TACK FACTORY." Reproduced from a 
drawing by the RA. Note the two gentle- 
men looking around the corners— and the 
one on the roof: these represent three 
of TK f 6 profoundly wise spirit guides and 
associates. The two good-looking fellows 
at the sides are the "Great Master* and 
the "Beloved Master," while the super-man 
on the roof is "Elamo." According to TK, 
thie fellow "Elamo" founded the Great 
Scheme many thousands of years ago, long 
before "Unole John" took hold of the 
business and moved it to Chicago, 



248 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



"And no sign shall be given but the sign of the Prophet Jonas" — 
which we hold, by interpretation, to mean that no sign shall be given 
to any seeker, but the sign of a Personal Experience. 

When Daniel was turned loose in the lion's den, he had a Personal 
Experience in proof of the miraculous, which lasted him a lifetime. 

When the Hebrew Children passed through the Fiery Furnace with- 
out even so much as scorching a feather or singeing a gaberdine, they 
also received the sign, through the medium of a warm experience not 
likely to be forgotten. 

When Jonah was swallowed by a whale and cast up again after three 
days, in fine condition, he, too, recognized the Sign through a peculiar 
Personal Experience. 

You will also recall the most marvelous of all the miracles — that of 
multiplying the loaves and fishes into a feast for 5,000, with 12 baskets 
of scraps left over. 

You who are here at this time, seeking place as workmen in this 
Factory, have doubtless many times longed for the supreme satisfaction 
of this unmistakable Sign, the indisputable evidence of a personal 
experience. 

And just because you have refrained from the asking, and because 
by faith alone you first accepted the Veiled Master of this Sublime 
Order, and also because, having once looked upon him in all his incom- 
petency, you still have the courage to acknowledge yourself as his 
servant, you have thereby earned the right to witness some of the mar- 
vels he is able to perform. 

You have earned the right, not only to witness, but to participate in 
a miracle of far more exceeding mystery than that of the loaves and 
fishes. That ancient miracle has come to be known as the miracle of 
Multiplication; but this you are about to witness shall become renowned 
of men as the great miracle of Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, 
Division, Mastication and Deglutition. 

To you, it will be remembered, no doubt, as TEE SACRIFICE OF 
TEE CANDIDATES. 

For, within this hour, by order of the ONE HI, the workmen of this 
Factory will surround all the candidates present, and at a given signal 
from the ONE HI, each and every one of them shall disappear from 
mortal eyes. Not one shall be left to tell the tale. They shall be caught 
up — in our very midst — and one by one they shall be caused to dis- 
appear before the eyes of those who are left, until the last remaining 
one shall be no more. 



THE SUBLIME ORDER OF TACKS 249 



More marvelous yet, not one shall be taken from the floor of this 
Factory; but each and all, one by one, shall be devoured, as it were, 
by the elements — shall be changed in the twinkling of an eye, trans- 
formed, transmuted, translated, yea, verily, VANISHED. 

And marvel of marvels — though every candidate shall thus be 
annihilated, and shall disappear from mortal ken — nevertheless, so potent 
is the Mighty Magic of the ineffable ONE HI, that within this same 
hour each and every one of you shall find yourself in your place, 
exactly as you were before this marvelous miracle occurred. 

Everything now being in readiness for the final and crowning demon- 
stration of the magic power of the mystic word of Him who must be 
obeyed, — the TAOKLET will bring forth the Sacred Bowl, and prepare 
the Altar for the sacrifice. 



The candidates will rise. 

The Good and Awful will assemble about the altar. 

Let there be silence. 

The candidates will fix their eyes upon the luminous countenance of 
the Yellow Kid, the symbol of a translated Tack. 

The Workmen will fix theirs upon the Candy-Dates. 

The TACKLET will now uncover the sacrifice. 

The Workmen will prepare to do their duty. 

Ready. 

All together. 

PROCEED. (All eat.) 

The fullness of His power is not yet manifest. The Tacklet will pass 
the sacrifice to the candidates who, having partaken, will themselves 
become witnesses of the Miracle that (has been performed, and demon- 
strators of its truth, through the Sign of a Personal Experience. 

Eat, to the Glory of the ONE EI. 

In his name, Eat of those CANDY-DATES. 

Receive ye the Sign. 

Absorb its mystical meaning. 

Proclaim yourselves witnesses. 

Lift up your voice in praise of the ONE HI. 

Revere Miracles. 

Multiply your Faith. 

Seek no more Sign. 

Rejoice that you are now restored. 

And do the will of the ONE HI, to whom be the Kingdom, the Power 
and the Glory for some time! 



CHAPTER XVIII 

The Illusory $25.00 

AND 

Other Sidelights on TK's Financial Problems 

1 ' Whatever of the things of this material plane of earth we 
gather about us beyond those which answer the needs of the 
physical body for life, comfort and protection, represent 
wasted energy, loss of time and misdirected effort on our 
part. 

4 ' It is true, we may leave them to relatives and friends who 
may, or may not, appreciate them or rightly use them. But 
from the viewpoint of our own individual best good and our 
own most rapid spiritual and psychical development and 
progress, they represent less than nothing. They stand for 
a definite and specific loss. ' ' 

TK, in "The Great Work," p. 356. 

The above was published in December, 1906, and 
that very year TK relieved one student alone of more 
than $7,000.00. 

Two years later, this same "Elder Brother" had re- 
lieved the same student of $82,000.00,— for the good of 
his GREAT CAUSE, i. e., himself. 

250 



SIDELIGHTS ON TK'S FINANCIAL PROBLEMS 351 

Writing to one who had already donated many thou- 
sands of dollars to his Great Scheme, and who ex- 
pected to give many additional thousands, TK said 
(8-15-1915) : 

"And now, may I ask a special favor of YOU? It is this: 
Knowing that you do not wish your name known as the donor 
of the sums you have in mind contributing to the Work, and 
because it will enable me to gratify a personal wish that I 
might do more for the Cause than is possible, will you just 
send your contributions to ME, and designate how you wish 
them distributed, and then let them APPEAR as if coming 
from MYSELF?" 

TK Keeps His " Means" in the Form of Cash. 

The following is taken from a letter written by TK 
to one of his brothers, on January 22, 1914 : 

"Concerning the matter of a deposit of $10,000.00 or so 
with your bank, there is but one thing I see in the way, and 
that is the possibility of my wanting to use it at any time on 
short notice — or, in fact, without any notice at all. 

"The Work I am doing — or trying to do — is such that I 
may want to have every dollar of my resources available at 
once — for immediate use. With the exception of such as I 
have invested in gilt-edge Real Estate, / have kept all my 
means in the form of CASH, — and in such condition as to 
be available at any instant and without notice." 



252 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

We here present some samples of the hundreds of 
letters for which TK claims to have received "not 
even so much as a postage stamp for reply." The fol- 
lowing is one of the modest $25.00 variety : 

Edgemoor, Oconomowoc, Wis. 
January 4, 1916. 

N. M., , . 

Dear Friend: Your valued favor of the 27th ult. is just 
at hand, having been forwarded to me here, where I am spend- 
ing most of my time at present. I want to thank you for all 
that your letter contains, and especially for the spirit of un- 
selfish service therein manifest. 

But, my yonnger Brother, I hesitate to accept your gen- 
erous contribution to the Great Work we are trying to do 
for humanity — not that it is not needed, but solely because 
you have not yet been formally accepted as a student. 

If you were only a regularly admitted student, I should 
not hesitate to accept all that you felt yourself able to give. 
If, however, you can say to me in all sincerity that you wish 
to contribute to this Work and Movement quite regardless 
of your future possible studentship, and that you wish me 
to accept this contribution, and such others as you may wish 
to make in future, in trust for the general good of the Work, 
then I give you my pledge of good faith for its use where it 
will accomplish the greatest measure of good possible to the 
Cause. 

Again thanking you, and with greetings of fraternal re- 
gard, believe me, 

Your Friend and Elder Brother, 

J. E. Richardson, 

(The TK.) 



SIDELIGHTS ON TK'S FINANCIAL PROBLEMS 



253 



A Sample Ten-Dollar " League" Letter. 

12/15/1914. 
"Dear Friend and Helper: — 

"I thank you, in the name of the suffering poor who 
need, for your splendid contribution. I will also undertake 
to administer the trust you have reposed in me in such man- 
ner as to obtain the best possible results. 

"My heart aches, these days, over those who are both hun- 
gry and cold, and without means to buy either food or shel- 
ter; and every dollar that comes charged with the mission of 
relief to these sufferers brings to me a great wave of JOY. 
Again thanking you with all my heart, I am 

"Your Friend and Elder Brother." 




254 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



Investigation of TK's financial affairs, following his 
departure in April, brot out the fact that among the 
bankers and business men of Oak Park he was thot 
to be a retired millionaire. His publishing business 
was supposed to be a work of charity — a hobby with 
him. 

During the theatre season he entertained weekly, a 
party of fourteen guests (probably $50.00 per month). 
For flowers delivered regularly each week to actresses, 
his bill from one florist alone, averaged $30.00 per 
month. He purchased from $50.00 to $60.00 worth of 
perfume at a time. His limousine expenses were about 
$50.00 a month. 

And all this while he was secretly and regularly 
passing his hat among his followers, and taking all 
their spare cash. With these "collections" he was 
playing the millionaire, and actually feeding his two 
cats a quality of porterhouse and cream that many of 
his "students" and "friends" would not even dream 
of purchasing for themselves or their families. 

Traveling de luxe, his cats were, in July, 1916, ship- 
ped to him in Pasadena, The cage was 27 inches 
deep, 3 feet wide and 7 feet high, affording daily 
promenades "on the upper deck," and was supplied 
with choice salmon and all the delicacies of ethically 
cultured cats. Which was nice for the kitties, but quite 
unimaginable to the students, many of whom denied 
themselves even the necessities of life to contribute to 
the "master's" cause. 



SIDELIGHTS ON TK'S FINANCIAL PROBLEMS 



255 




256 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

The following is quoted from an article, "Physical 
and Personal Refinement/' by TK's daughter and 
published in Life and Action February, 1916. It is 
only just to explain that this portion of the article 
was written in Chicago by TK himself and sent to his 
daughter in California on September 6, 1915, with the 
suggestion that she insert it in her essay. It is also 
just to state that TK's checks to his daughter be- 
tween January 5, 1909, and October 9, 1915, amounted 
to $42,945.58. 

The accompanying photographic reproductions of 
checks, constitute $32,400.00 worth of the evidence in 
this case. The Quotation 

"For instance, social conventions are all right within cer- 
tain limitations, but they must always be adapted to the con- 
ditions of life, the wealth, health, and the understanding of 
the individual. As an instance, I know of a family who are 
said to dress regularly six times a day. This sort of conven- 
tional custom is nothing short of slavery to an ideal. It has 
neither merit nor logic. Those who are able to do so, who 
hwve the wealth with which to buy the clothes and the health 
to sustain such a convention, might very well dress twice a 
day without, perhaps, overstepping the bounds of reason, of 
logic, of the principles of the Great School, or the demands of 
utility. But even so comparatively moderate a convention 
must not be held by any of the students of the School as 
binding upon anybody but themselves, and not upon them- 
selves unless reason and conscience approve. 

"Since I have been away from home, both because of my 
limitations of health and wealth, I have been made to feel a 
subtle criticism and disappointment in the minds of some of 
our blessed students whom I love with all my heart. I do 
not mention the fact as a criticism, but merely as an illus- 
tration of what I mean." 



QP.<J 
-3 tl t<1 

co »-3 to 
o a 

CO Ch . 

w a- 

O *> M 

o ^o o 
CO s> 

www 

SHd 

M*- CO 

a no 

• n 

CO 

Q O 

525 



=#* 

CO 
CD 

O 
O 
O 

O 

o 



w w 



to 

*J o 
O -3 

w o 

Q 
•-3 » 
=3 > 

M *d 

»-3 H-t 

^< o 

w 

a 

m o 

o »-9 

CjH 

CO o 
!sS 

ao 

o n> 
r 1 

f o 
> ffi 
M W 
CO O 

v. •►*} 







i 










i ; 






H 

I 


» f 






i'i 


\ ^ 








Ss x 






n 5 
> > 

© 0) 


5 | 


;> 




r 

O P1 

l- H 






< 


^ 


H RO 

EAR! 


* 




1 


- I 






% 


H 


'0 












o 


* •• 


• •• 


3 






• 

• 
• 


• » 


* V 


*£— i 


• • 

*>< 




• • 


* 




>-f» 


• 






• • 

• 
• 


• • 

• * 

• • 




• 

• • 

• • 








• • * 


r,.".j.,' 


i 

x i 












^jg^ 


§ 












y 


i 


i 








-N 


% 


\. 






it) 


^ 


$m 


^ 








*N 


j 






^ 








| 




Sv 




o 




1 




^t 




I 

5 




* 




."V 


' / 


w 













AVEWKB ST'A'TE l£&KK 

Asro»iJi*8fcE*ri3 IIamk 

7(J y \ •!-«••• 

7<> - ii:t * 

Ave .x i : k SrraaciS: II. a w k 



SIDELIGHTS ON TK'S FINANCIAL PROBLEMS 



257 



A Bather Deadly Parallel 



September 1912 

In ''Life and Action," Bv. 3, 
p. 339, TK says: 

"Only in a purely commercial 
sense can we be termed ' poor. ' 
In every other way, I do not 
know of an individual on earth 
with whom either of us would ex- 
change places. But financially we 
are poor." 

1 • Our very poverty is a badge of 
assurance that our motives are 
pure and unselfish.' ' 



September 1912 

Monthly Eeport of TK's Indo- 
American Book "Co." 

"Oct. 2, 1912. 

"TK. 

"Dear Brother:— I desire to 
draw your attention to the en- 
closed monthly report. 

"You will kindly note that the 
net gain for the month of Sep- 
tember was $120.38, and this is 
after $1,000.00 was withdrawn by 
yourself. This gives us a total 
profit of $1,220.38 for the month 
of September. 

"Everything in the Book Co. is 
moving beautifully and the 
'Spirit of the Work/ is every- 
where evident. 

"Yours for the GREAT 
CAUSE." 



TK Loans One of His Ethical Students $25.00. 

The following financial performance took place in 
1912, at a time when TK must have had several hun- 
dred thousand dollars, which, as he explains, he al- 
ways kept in * ' CASH, ' ' and ' ' available at any instant 
without notice." 

His reference to needing this paltry $25.00 to meet 
Florence Huntley's funeral expenses shows that, in 
money matters, the " master' ' is capable of resorting 
to any effective pretext even tho it involves events 
which most people hold sacred. 

As a matter of fact, when Florence Huntley died it 
was a season of rich financial harvest for TK, because 



258 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

both students and friends everywhere "knew" him to 
be very poor, and " probably in need" of all the cash 
they could spare. TK probably received enuf dona- 
tions during that time to meet the funeral expenses of 
all his Chicago students for several incarnations to 
come. 

TK and His Illusory $25.00. 

(EXHIBIT A) 

Oak Park, 111., January 4, 1912. 

Dear Friend : 

Of course, under the circumstances, I could not refuse so 
urgent a request, even though it were the last $25.00 at my 
command. And let me say that while the amount is not large, 
it is of as much importance perhaps to me to receive it back 
within the next thirty days as it is to you to have it at the 
present time. I have no doubt after you are once with Mr. 

B you can obtain a loan from him sufficient to repay the 

amount, and I will be glad to have you handle the matter in 
that way. 

Wishing you success in the new position, and a happy and 
successful new year, I remain 

Hastily and fraternally, 

TK. 

(EXHIBIT B) 

Oak Park, 111., 2/8/1912. 
Dear Brother : 

I deeply regret that I cannot accept the note, which I am 
returning. If you will refer to my letter of January 4, in 
which I enclosed the check for the $25.00, you will note that 
I was even then anticipating the probability that I would 
need it by the end of the thirty days. But I did not then 
know how badly I should be pressed at the end of that time. 

This new and great change in my life, which I shall not try 



THE ILLUSORY $25.00 259 

to speak of in this connection, has involved me in over $200.00 
of debt, which must be cared for at mice. 

I am therefore going to ask you to return the money to me 
just as soon as the mails can possibly bring it. Borrow it from 
any available source possible, and please do not disappoint 
me. Within one week I shall have to meet one bill of about 
$150.00, and I am depending upon you to help me out to the 
extent of the $25.00. I want no interest. 

Hastily and fraternally, 

TK. 

(EXHIBIT C) 

Oak Park, 111., 2/12/1912. 
Dear Brother : 

Your letter is just at hand. Please do not stop until you 
have sent me the money; for I must have it. I am today in 
receipt of a bill for $195.00 from the undertaker, and I can- 
not afford to have it go by default. You must know what a 
position I would occupy in such an event. 

I did not try to cash your note for the reason that never 
yet, in all my business life, have I ever banked a note that 
I did not have it to pay when the time of payment came. 
You know that in order to obtain the cash on your note, I 
would have to endorse it myself, and that means that if you 
should fail to pay it at the time due, I should have to pay it 
myself. I have done that same thing not less than fifty times, 
and always have had to pay the note myself ; and the way I 
am now situated, I cannot do it. 

I let you have this money with the express understanding 
that you would borrow the money from other parties as soon 

as you got to R ; and I told you what it would mean to 

me if you failed me. PLEASE do not do it. For if you do, 
it will be a real calamity to me. 

Hastily and fraternally, 

John. 



260 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

(EXHIBIT D) 

At Home, 3/8/1912. 

My Dear : 

Please examine the inclosed check, and observe on the lower 
left-hand corner on the face of the check the pencil memo, 
"N. S. F." which means "Not Sufficient Funds." 

Very much to my annoyance, surprise and inconvenience, 
the local bank through which I cashed it, returns to me the 
check, and demands that I refund to it the full amount, which 
is proper from its point of view. 

You know, from my previous explanation, what this means 
to me. I would not have had this occur for ten times the 
amount of the check. 

I am returning the check to you, and must now insist upon 
your making it good at once, and paying the balance. 

I do not like this sort of thing, and it is not consistent with 
the Spirit of the Work. 

I explained to you fully and carefully just how I was sit- 
uated when I let you have the money, and you know how it 
would trouble me in case you failed to return it as agreed. 

And yet, according to your own letter, you let other debts 
take precedence over the one to me. That was neither honest 
nor right. 

If you have any respect whatever for your business word 
of honor, or for my friendship and confidence, you will lose 
no time in making this matter good. 

If I were able to lose the amount, I would never say a 
word; but I have to live and pay my bills, and have never 
in all my life defaulted upon any promise I ever made. I 
do not want to begin at this late date. 

Trusting you will return the full $25.00 without further 
delay, I remain, 

Hastily and fraternally, 

John. 



THE ILLUSORY $25.00 261 

(EXHIBIT E) 

At Home, 3/11/1912. 
Dear , 

Perhaps it is not your fault, but I confess that I have been 
deeply and wrongfully embarrassed by the return of the 
check for $12.00 you sent me, with a notice from the local 
bank that cashed it for me, that it had been returned to them 
with the notation, "N. S. F.," which means "Not Sufficient 
Funds." 

The local bank notifies me that I must now return to it 
the $12.00 which it advanced me on the check. You know 
what this means to me. 

The $13.00 you have just sent me will enable me to refund 
to the bank the $12.00 and leave me $1.00. 

I am returning the check to you and must ask you to take 
up the matter with the giver of the check and see that he 
makes it good at once. 

This sort of thing is not pleasant to one in my position, and 
I would not have had the check come back to my local bank 
for several times its face value. 

Please take the check to the giver of it and have him make 
good the amount and send it to me at once. 

Very hastily, 
John. 



CHAPTER XIX 
The Cat Came Back 

TK's home was decorated with an almost endless 
number and variety of cat pictures. In size these 
ranged all the way from postcard to large reproduc- 
tions of well-known paintings of cats, lions and tigers. 
But his chief interest in the feline family centered in 
two thorobred mongrels which, under his Ethical 
Formulary, developed some rather remarkable spirit- 
ual tales. One of these appears to be an entirely new 
conception, and you will perhaps be interested in its 
recital. 

In June, 1915, to a few of his most advanced stu- 
dents, TK confided a very original story to the effect 
that one day, while on his back lawn searching for 
four-leaf clovers, he observed, some few yards dis- 
tant, one of his pet cats standing with its front paws 
far apart, its tail straight up in the air and its nose 
buried in the grass. On going to the cat, he discovered 
that it had located a four-leaf clover. Upon TK's tak- 
ing the leaf, his cat immediately bounded away in 
search of another, and in a few moments its tail again 

262 



THE CAT CAME BACK 



263 



Here's one, 
Master !! 



Wo 




went up in the air and its nose into the turf. It had 
found a second four-leaf clover. This remarkable per- 
formance continued until some ten four-leaf clovers 
were discovered. By this time, TK became so excited 
that he lost the count, and the cat becoming confused 
thereby, lost its combination, and could never again 
be induced to point the little clovers. 



264 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

While living at ''Paradise Flat," Mrs. Huntley 
owned a large ethical house cat which had been named 
"Biffer." Now Biff er had had the TK's "Ethical 
CATachism" up to No. 4, but at this point he stuck 
and stuck hard. In fact, his further evolutionary 
refinement along the lines of the Great School worried 
him so that in time he took on feline scabies, and for 
about three years he was a sorry-looking cat. Upon 
the advice of the TK's "Great Masters" he was 
rubbed and oiled, massaged and doped, washed and 
anointed according to many ancient secret formularies, 
but it was no use. Finally, five "Oxydonors" were at- 
tached to the cat: one to each leg and one to his tail. 
This made him too lively for his endurance, and the 
Great Master advised his transition. 

In the following letter to Florence Huntley, October 
9, 1909, TK tells the rest of the tale : 

Chicago, 9/9/9 
Beloved : — 

Last evening I wired you that poor little Biffer was released 
from his prison house of suffering, and that he was cared for 
by the Great Friends. 

I got the materials and sent A out to fix the windows 

and told him I would be out between 4 :00 and 5 :00 to do 
what was necessary to help the poor little fellow through the 
crisis in the best way possible. 

Before I got there he had come in, and A , knowing 

how my heart ached over the little pet, took pity on both of 
us, and when I got there the only thing that remained was 
a little grave back under the bushes in the back yard. But 
A said there was not the least struggle, nor evidences of 



THE CAT CAME BACK 2G5 

Vltf . 

suffering or fright. He just went to sleep without a struggle. 

This morning I went over to get a letter that I saw on your 

center table in the hall, thinking it might be one from W , 

but found it was from C . As I approached the house, I 

beheld the most beautiful picture I ever saw. There on the 

front porch were N , L , M , N and the Great 

and Beloved Master, and in his arms L held Biffer. As 

I approached, the dear little pet leaped from his arms to my 
shoulder, and remained there during all my stay in the house. 
I took him into the library, sat in the big chair, and held him 
for some time, and he was just as happy as he could be ; and 
the most beautiful thing you ever saw. When I left I gave 
him back to L for keeping. 

And so you may know that he is cared for, and that he 
appreciates the fact that his suffering is over and that he 
still can come back. I tell you this because I know how your 
own heart has ached over him, and to comfort you. 

I hope that you received the telegram I sent, and that your 
heart will be as much relieved as mine to realize that our dear 
little "boy" is free. / expect to see him again tonight. 

Hastily, 
John. 



^r\^/, 



•^,^•.•!;C;'*y." ; '■ - 



******** 







fi vu 



CHAPTER XX 

TK Goes to India 

To excuse the absence of any ' ' signs ' ' or evidence of 
the spiritual powers which he was supposed to possess, 
TK substituted a few " occult' ' stories, the choice of 
which centered about his imaginary " Great Master.' ' 

The Levitation Tale 

In this he told how he had seen his "master" float 
out of the hotel window on dark nights far above the 
street level. TK himself did not actually see this 
"master" floating in mid-air, but he did see him go 
out of the window, disappear into the darkness, re- 
main long enuf to make an impression on the mind, 
and again come back thru the window into the lighted 
room. 

At first TK concluded that the G M had simply 
stepped out upon a fire escape or perhaps onto the 
window ledge, but upon careful investigation he was 
convinced that his G M had actually "levitated" in 
the dark air ! Once he ventured to look out, but it was 
no use. The darkness was too dark and the G M too 
invisible for him to see anything. 

267 



268 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

The Plate of Eice Story 

As TK tells the tale, the G M exhibited a plain, ordi- 
nary, unprepared, empty china plate, and asked him 
to examine it closely. This TK did, and it appeared to 
be an ordinary, mongrel-porcelain dinner plate, so far 
as he could judge. Then with sleeves rolled well back 
to the elbow, and without making any suspicious 
moves that TK could detect, the G M took the empty 
plate on the palm of his upturned left hand, and held 
it high in the air. In a few minutes he carefully low- 
ered it again, and to TK's great astonishment, it con- 
tained about seven cents' worth of perfectly nice look- 
ing rice. 

The Swift Post Card 

When TK completed his training with his G M on 
Aug. 20, 1884, the " master' ' immediately packed his 
trunk, tipped the bell boys, wished the new American 
Representative "Good Luck," and started for New 
York, on his way to India. 

Three days after he left Stockton, imagine TK's 
surprise when on going to the post office for his mail, 
he received a card from his "master" bearing the 
postmark "Rome, Italy," and dated the same day the 
GMhad left Stockton! 

TK, at the time, planned to keep the post card as 
"tangible evidence," but later it was lost. And it was 
just as well, for the story got by anyway. 



TK GOES TO INDIA 



269 




270 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Coming down now to TK's own mental activities in 
Chicago, we find him with a dozen followers holding 
weekly meetings in "Paradise Flat." It was here, 
according to TK, that unnumbered thousands of spirit- 
ual Great Masters used to gather, in a vast funnel- 
shaped amphitheatre, and watch the initiation of can- 
didates into the " Sublime Order of Tacks.' ' TK was 
the only one who actually "saw" anything but it list- 
ened well and made everybody happy. 

Among others who frequently dropped in during the 
more quiet evenings was a spirit guide whom TK 
described as always having with him a pet tiger, some 
400 years old. And sometimes, by way of variation, 
a former pet cat of one of the students was described 
as riding on the tiger's back. 

Of all TK's occult tales, his annual "Convocation 
Reports", were perhaps the best on his program. 
Every year, beginning on June 15th, his Great School 
was supposed to have all their masters come together 
and talk things over. These "masters" live in vari- 
ous countries, but to attend the "Convocation," they 
merely go to bed, slip out of their physical bodies, 
execute an idea, and "as quick as thot" they are in 
India. This was a fine arrangement for TK, espe- 
cially so because all the meetings were day sessions. 
By leaving Chicago a few seconds before ten p. m., he 
was in India by ten a. m. sharp, and after a hasty 
breakfast of astral bacon and eggs was ready for the 
spiritual business. 

In the early years his convocation tales were quite 
interesting: he led the singing, he was the center of 
interest, his reports were the most important of all, 



TK GOES TO INDIA 271 



etc. In 1915 the Chicago students expected to hear 
something about the European War, so TK had to 
spring something modern. He therefore told how a 
party of Spirits, headed, of course, by himself, went 
to Europe and stood above the firing lines over the 
battlefields. His "party" saw cities and shooting and 
camps of soldiers; trenches and trains and things; 
all of which was quite marvelous because it is so un- 
usual to see anything of this nature during war times. 

But he told the simple tale and got away with it 
nicely. Everybody seemed duly impressed and well 
satisfied, and felt that the "master" had given them 
their money's worth. 

Early in his Convocation pretensions, TK explained 
to a few of his closest students how carefully his phys- 
ical body had to be guarded while he was out of it on 
his astral tours. This was supposed to properly "im- 
press" them with the dangers of being a "master," 
that some of the risks are very real, and were it not 
for his great self-control and presence of mind, TK 
would, no doubt, many times never have lived to tell 
the story. 

He once had just such a narrow escape. It was not 
only a lesson to him, but it proved to be one of the 
most trying experiences in the lives of two of his stu- 
dents. 

It was convocation week and TK was a very "busy" 
man. On this particular night of which we write, the 
two students were occupying a room next to the "mas- 
ter's." TK had retired as usual, a little before ten 
o'clock. He had been "gone to India" perhaps a 



272 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

couple of hours, when a terrific rain storm came up 
in Oak Park. 

The heavens were furious with lightning and thun- 
der, the rain was falling in torrents and the wind was 
swaying the great trees as so many bushes. 

In his hurry to be off to the Convocation, TK had 
"slipped out of his body," and left his bedroom win- 
dow wide open. The window shade was flapping and 
the wind was whipping a flood of rain into the room. 
His rugs and furniture would be ruined! 

Here was a trying situation. 

Both students in the adjoining room were awake and 
realized that the window ought to be closed. The door 
to TK's room was unlocked; they could easily slip into 
his room and close the window. But — TK had told 
them how dangerous it was for him for any one to 
come into his room while he was "put" of his body. 
41 It might prove fatal." 

What should they do? Why had the "master" been 
so thotless, as to leave his window open? 

Finally they decided it would never do to risk going 
into the room; it would be better to let the rain rain. 

About this time they heard an unexpected sound in 
TK's room. Some one was in there! They distinctly 
heard some one closing the window. What a mystery! 

Had a miracle been performed? What could it mean? 

# # # # # 

The next morning they questioned TK about the 
matter, and with great presence of mind and magnifi- 
cent self-control, he said, "Yes. When the storm came 
up, I was in India in the midst of a very important 
session. But as the rain began beating in thru the 



TK GOES TO INDIA 



273 



window, one of the ' Great Friends ' who always stands 
guard over my body, touched my body on the shoulder, 
and this recalled me at once from India. In a few 
seconds I came back right thru the lightning and thun- 
der, and into my body. I then got up immediately 
and closed the window myself. After that, I went back 
to bed, slipped out of my body again, and in a few 
seconds was back in my seat in the Convocation Hall 
in India. " 




TK on atrip to India. 



•ids 



CHAPTER XXI 
The " Attempts' ' on TK's Life 

TK carefully cultivated the spirit of secrecy, sus- 
picion and apprehension, until as the years passed, it 
became a fixed state of mind with many of his " inner' ' 
students. This impression of fear grew on everybody 
until he had only to look sad, say that his new ice man 
looked suspicious; that his " Great Master* ' had again 
warned him or that a strange rag man or something 
had been seen in his alley — and the information was 
promptly passed along, until in due time students near 
and far felt mentally miserable under these destruc- 
tive suggestions. The faithful pined and prayed, and 
very properly felt sad and subdued for days. By and 
by, the sun began to shine and the birds to sing, and 
all grew quite happy again until TK decided that it 
was time to start another reign-of -terror tale. 

At one time his mail was being tampered with; at 
another time ' i enemies ' ' were trying to steal his secret 
formularies for living a moral life. Then came spying 
clergy trying to find out who TK was, his real name, 
where he lived, what business he was in, why he 
worked in " secret/ ' why he kept such big cats, etc. 
Every broom peddler, book agent and piano tuner that 
ventured accidentally into the building was set down 

274 



THE "ATTEMPTS'' ON TK'S LIFE 275 

as an " hereditary enemy" trying to carry off the 
Technical Work. The words persecution, antagonism, 
opposition, unscrupulous critics, spies, etc., were used 
to boost business and add ginger to the situation. 
Libraries were in league to bar his books, and even 
Protestant Churches were trying to preach morality 
without giving TK due credit! 

During the six years TK had his "office" in "Para- 
dise Flat" if any one was seen looking intently at the 
building, it was straightway interpreted to be a pos- 
sible forerunner of a raid, an attack, a bomb plot or 
something on somebody sometime. Nothing ever hap- 
pened but TK encouraged all these fears and suspi- 
cions, meanwhile, ironically drawing attention to the 
fact that as students in his * * Great School, ' ' they ought 
to cultivate the spirit of cheerfulness! 

TK walked daily the two or three blocks between his 
home and "Paradise Flat," and it was along this 
course that the early attempts were reported to have 
been made on his life. The number of these mounted 
upward until, to some students, TK confided that no 
less than twenty attacks of various kinds had been 
made on him. 

One morning, by way of variation, he came into the 
office of the Book Co. carrying an enormous cobble 
stone. It was about all he could do to hold it in his 
hands. It had been thrown at him the night before by 



TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 




One of the Seven Attempts onTKsr life 



THE "ATTEMPTS" ON TK'S LIFE 277 

some "enemy" bent on destroying the "Great Work!" 
There were no initials on the stone but judging from 
its size, the owner must have been a not too friendly 

giant. 

***** 

Upon another occasion, after he moved to Oak Park, 
he told how one evening, as he walked alone, a large 
man wearing roller skates and dressed in policeman's 
uniform, skated up behind him and attempted to 
assassinate him with a "billy." However, with quick 
presence of mind, TK promptly knocked the big fellow 
into a vacant lot, and had the great satisfaction of 
seeing him get up and scurry away, evidently glad to 
be permitted to escape with his life. 

Note: — So far as can "be determined no attempts were ever made on 
TK's life. Not one of the fifteen or so people who knew, or thot they 
knew TK intimately, ever had any evidence of any interference what- 
ever with his "business," or any designs upon his personal safety. 
Neither has any one ever had any evidence that he possessed the knowl- 
edge or power to withdraw from his physical body or to communicate 
voluntarily with the spiritual world. 



CHAPTER XXII 

Another "Individual Preference" 

About the latter part of June, 1915, the writer was 
employed by TK as manager of his publishing busi- 
ness, and until in September, had occasion to consult 
with him in his home on an average of about once a 
week. 

TK had been having sick spells for several years 
past, and in Sept. 1915, he became quite seriously ill. 
For a month previous to this sickness, his appearance 
to the few who saw him was of one mentally dull 
and drowsy; listless, indifferent and uninterested. 
Finally the collapse came, and a day later, as his con- 
dition became critical, a local physician, Dr. F. F. 

E was called. Later, his regular physician, Dr. 

E. M. W arrived, and there were then present 

the two physicians, Dr. H. H., two nurses and four 
other young women. It was in the presence of these 
nine witnesses, eight of whom were students, that TK 
made the remarkable confession that for many years 
he had been using a drug called Heroin, a morphine 
preparation. 

He explained that he had taken it for the relief of 
pain and that he did not know it was a morphine 
derivative until after the Harrison Law went into 

278 



ANOTHER "INDIVIDUAL PREFERENCE" 279 



effect. Then in a fit of madness, born of hunger for 
the drug, he plead and demanded that it be given to 
him at once. 

Here was a man who for about twenty years had 
been posing as a "master," with the following remark- 
able evidences against his "mastership": 

1. That he should have become a drug addict at all. 

2. That he did not know the drug was morphme. 

3. That he did not know what it was. 

4. That he was taking it to relieve physical pain. 

5. When he could no longer get it, he was just as 
frantic for it as any one of thousands of drug victims. 

6. He even went so far as to threaten suicide if it 
were not given him. 

# # # # # 

A third student, also a physician, was called into 
consultation. For many years these men had believed 
in TK. They were sincere, earnest, honest men, and 
out of their desire to protect what they thot to be a 
"Great Work," and their wish to assist the TK to 
overcome the habit, it was unanimously agreed not to 
report the matter. It was decided also that TK should 
be taken to the Edgemoor Sanitarium, and kept there 
until he should be completely cured of the habit. Thus 
the "master," a self-confessed and helpless victim, 
without will or power of self control, instead of direct- 
ing the proposed wonderful cures at Edgemoor, 
became himself the first patient, subject to the 
restraint of moral suasion and medical treatment of 
his physician students. 



280 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

The opinion has been passed that TK probably did 
not use any considerable amount of this drug. For 
this reason only, do we suggest that the entries in 
TK's check stubs show the following purchases: 

Sept. 1, 1913 $14.00 

Nov. 24, 1913 14.00 

March 9, 1914 21.00 

Dec. 14, 1914 50.00 

May 1, 1915. 50.00 



# # # 



It was decided that TK should go to California for 
the winter for his health. Therefore, during the first 
week in November, 1915, accompanied by his physician 
and his private secretary, he went to Pasadena. 

Once there, his health improved rapidly, but he 
grew restless, as his mind wandered back to Edge- 
moor. For days at a time he read that scientific text 
book, "Harmonics of Evolution." Especially did he 
ponder and struggle over the following passages: 

"Love is not a habit." 

"Experience by experiment, and wisdom by experi- 
ence, constitute the only path to individual self-com- 
pletion and rational happiness." 

"The important consideration is whether the lover, 
after all, is not the wisest of all experimenters." 

"The individual love relations of life are many. 
They are limited in number and value by nothing ex- 
cept the opportunities and capacities for loving." 

Like a fish he drank and swam in this wonderful 
wisdom. He recalled the scriptures which sayeth, 
that in the latter days "their old men shall see 



ANOTHER "INDIVIDUAL PREFERENCE" 281 

visions/ ' He was in his "latter days," and he was 
having visions of another and newer affinity. He felt 
again the untamed call of his "individual preference" ; 
the need of another "individual adjustment." He 
wanted more "experience by experiment." He longed 
again to travel the one and only primrose path to 
"individual self -completion and rational happiness." 
His " Great School' ' had declared that a perfect mar- 
riage IS possible — that a man can be happy tho mar- 
ried, — and why should not the sole American Repre- 
sentative make this great demonstration — again? 

Perhaps he could set his "Great School" another 
record that would beat his meat-eating stunt and his 
new solution to Ethical Problem No. 5. 

Thus meditating, he slipped in and out of his phys- 
ical body many times a day — walking first in the spir- 
itual world, then in Pasadena. He looked at the mat- 
ter with both his spiritual and physical eyes. One 
of the GM's suggested that possibly some of the stu- 
dents would not understand his courting so many 
affinities, but the Elder Brother very promptly quoted 
that gem of Natural Science: "The individual love 
relations of life are many. They are limited in num- 
ber and value by nothing except the opportunities 
and capacities for loving." 

They tried further to dissuade him, by saying how 
many were waiting for his new book, "What Science 
Knows," etc., but the resourceful "Uncle" had seen 
again that remarkable "finger of destiny" of his, and 
this time it reached right over the mountain tops and 
straight across the prairie of Nebraska and Iowa and 



282 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

on to Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, — and the Edgemoor 
Sanitarium. 

One afternoon the first week in December, about 
four weeks after his trip to California, who should 
walk into the office of the Indo-American Book Co., 
but the TK, himself. 

"Why, I thot you were going to remain in Califor- 
nia for the winter, and do some writing f " 

1 ' I did intend to, ' ' said TK, ' ' but I have now decided 
to spend the winter at Oconomowoc. ' • 

Then giving his order for a set of books to be sent 
prepaid as his gift to a certain nurse at Edgemoor, 
he returned to his big limousine, and was driven to 
his home in Oak Park. 

The next day he returned to " Edgemoor/ ' 



CHAPTER XXIII 

"Well, Gentlemen, What Are You Going to Do 
About It?" 

Upon his return to Edgemoor, TK lost no time in 
exhibiting a more than patriarchal interest in the 
spiritual development of one of the young lady nurses, 
and very shortly his "individual preference" was 
working overtime. 

But there was another young woman whom the 
"master" had deceived and misled in about the same 
manner some six years previous to the time of our 
present story. She realized that he was playing 
her false, that in her daily presence he was shifting 
his interest and attention to another woman. Her 
faith in him, as a "master," however, prevented any 
outburst, and so in silence she bore the sting of his 
neglect, and alone carried the burden of her secret 
sorrow and disappointment. 

Thus for weeks and months she struggled against 
the inevitable, remaining in seclusion in her room 
much of the time, thus hiding her pain as best she 
could. But it was a losing struggle against an unprin- 
cipled intelligence like TK's, and week by week she 
sank into a state of almost helpless despair. 

The bitterness of her mental suffering began to show 
forth in her frail form, and day by day her physical 
and mental resistance became less able to endure the 
strain and uncertainty. At times she even feared the 
loss of her reason, and at last, unable to bear the ter- 

283 



284 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

rible condition alone, she took one of her girl friends 
into her confidence. 

All this time she was under the constant care of a 
physician, but wise with that wisdom which comes 
only from long experience and love of his art, he 
knew that her condition was not due to any physical 
causes, and so advised. 

Thus far her sufferings had been due to suspicion, 
but on March 3, 1916, her suspicions were confirmed, 
and she became convinced that the man and "master" 
whom she had trusted, was misleading another young 
woman. 

Following this, she wrote out two statements em- 
bodying her charges against the TK, and giving in 
detail an account of his deception and mistreatment 
for a period of nearly six years. She prepared also 
a statement covering what she knew of TK's large 
deposits of money in Chicago banks, and these state- 
ments she immediately placed in the hands of her 
physician. 

Upon hearing the young woman's story, it was at 
once decided to set a secret watch over TK's room, 
which was done for several weeks. 



During this time TK suspected nothing unusual, 
and even went so far as to prepare certain documents 
which he expected would place the entire Sanitarium 
property and its finances in his personal charge. In 
this happy frame of mind the Unprepared One had 
something coming to him that he was not looking 
for; a surprise that not even his mighty masters or 



THE EDGEMOOR DISCLOSURES 285 



his own "independent spiritual vision" had seemed 

able to penetrate. 

# * * * # 

Saturday, April 1, was the day set for the regular 
quarterly business meeting of the Board of Trustees. 
This Board consisted of five members, but two other 
students who had been taken into confidence were also 
there. Including TK there were eight men present. 

When all had assembled, the President explained 
that before proceeding to the regular business, he 
would ask the Secretary to read a certain paper, which 

he then handed to Mr. Mc . This paper was one 

of the statements already referred to, and constituted 
serious and criminal charges against Mr. Richardson. 

From the opening sentence of this wholly unex- 
pected recital, TK sat leaning forward in his chair, as 
motionless as a figure of stone ; his eyes intently fixed 
upon the reader, his face, flushed scarlet, was hard and 
expressionless. The whole scene from beginning to 
end was one of dramatic and almost breathless sus- 
pense. 

At last when the reader ceased, there was a long 
period of strained, tense silence lasting nearly three 
minutes. This was finally broken by TK himself, who, 
in a hard, metallic tone, said: "Well, gentlemen, 
what are you going to do about it 1 ' ' 

When the President ventured to suggest that the 
charges were serious, Mr. Richardson turned to Dr. 
E. M. W. and said, "Doctor, do you believe the charges 
are true?" 

Dr. W. replied: "I am sorry that I do." 

"Then," said TK, "we can no longer work in har- 



286 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

mony, and there is nothing for me to do but with- 
draw from the work." 

He then launched into one of his customary philo- 
sophic discourses on "The Spirit of the Work/ 9 with 
never a word either to excuse, justify or deny the 
charges brot against him. 

When he finally ceased talking, his attention was 
called to the fact that he had failed even to refer to 
the charges, and he was urged many times to make 
some statement relative to them. 

His only answer was that he could make no reply 
without involving others. 

Finally, when all efforts to get a statement from him 
had failed, there was nothing left to be done, but pre- 
pare and execute the necessary documents transferring 
the assets of the " Great School" and whatever 
"authority" TK possessed, to the new Board of seven 
Trustees. 

This work was finally completed on the afternoon 
of April 3, 1916, and so closely were the proceedings 
guarded that no one, even at Edgemoor, outside the 
eight men, was supposed to have any knowledge what- 
ever of what was transpiring. Everybody felt that 
some very solemn something was going on, but 
whether the heavens were being opened or closed in 
these secret sessions, no one had the least idea. 

This "close communion" was alright for TK, but 
it cost the Trustees about $6,000. For TK, at the 
close of the first day's session, and upon a spiritual 
tip from his "Great Master," took a hurry-up ride in 
the family Ford towards the Oconomowoc Bank, and 
withdrew all the Trust Funds deposited therein. 



CHAPTER XXIV 

TK Misses $500.00 by 15 Minutes 

At the Union Station, on Monday, April 3, 1916, at 
about ten o'clock, p. m., the writer met five members 
of the Board of Trustees. They had just come from 
Oconomowoc, after the three days' session with TK. 
At that meeting, I was shown the legal documents 
which stated that TK had severed all connections with 
the " Great School' ' and had turned over to the Trus- 
tees the assets and everything pertaining to the 
" Great Work." But not the least hint was given me 

as to why TK had taken this action. 

# # # * * 

TK was still at Edgemoor, but on Tuesday, April 4, 
while waiting for the car to be cranked, he took a 
sudden notion to be off, and with guitar and hand bag, 
and without Good Byes to anyone, was seen to dis- 
appear thru the woods in the direction of Oconomowoc. 
The machine (a 1910 model) followed quickly, but 

did not catch up. 

# # * # # 

About 3 p. m., April 4, two of the Trustees came 
to the office of the Book Co., and took charge of all 
money then on deposit, about $800.00. 

They had been gone about fifteen minutes when TK 
came in, and after passing the time of day said: "By 
the way, have you got any money on hand?" 

"Why, yes, we have about $800.00 in the bank." 

"That's good. Can you let me have $500.00? I'm 
going to California. I shall need every cent I can 
get. Can you spare $500.00 from the business?" 

287 



288 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

"Why, yes, easily/ ' 

"Well, you can just let me have a check for 
$500.00."' 

I replied: "I am sorry, but Dr. H. and Mr. H. were 
just here and I turned over to Mr. H. all the money 
we have on deposit. But I shall see Mr. H. and explain 
that you need the money, and it will be all right. ' f 

"No. Never mind. Don't say anything about it. 
I think I can manage somehow without it. ' ' 

With this, he left the office and was driven toward 
his home in Oak Park. 



The next day, Wednesday, was the regular meeting 
night of the four student groups in Chicago. As it 
became known that TK had withdrawn from the 
"Great School," many of the students, and especially 
the women, manifested considerable concern. The 
whole matter was so unexpected and unexplained. No 
one knew or seemed able or willing to even venture a 
guess as to what was happening. 

That evening a Committee representing the Board 
of Trustees visited each of the four groups and read 
the TK's statement of withdrawal and the transfer 
of authority and responsibility to the Trustees. Not a 
word of explanation, however, was given, but it was 
suggested that they hoped to be able to make a state- 
ment — possibly at the next meeting. 

It was then made plain that all speculations would 
be entirely out of place, and all members were arbi- 
trarily pledged not to discuss the matter with anyone 
under any circumstances. 



CHAPTER XXV 

TK's Hasty Marriage 

Thursday about noon, April 6th, Dr. H. H. happened 
to be in Dr. E. M. W. 's Chicago office when a long dis- 
tance telephone call was announced. It was from the 
business manager of the Sanitarium at Oconomowoc, 

to the effect that Z had had a telephone message 

from TK asking her to come to Chicago at once. With 
a bundle under her arm she had left on the 8 :20 train 
that morning and would probably arrive in the city 
about noon. She had explained to the manager that 
" Uncle John" had asked her to come, but she ex- 
pected to be back in the evening. 

Dr. H. and Dr. W. hurried immediately to the Union 
Depot. Here they recognized TK's "official" limou- 
sine, and saw "J. E. R." anxiously pacing up and 
down the station platform. He, however, did not see 
them, and the train being late, the two crossed the 
street to a restaurant and ordered lunch. Later Dr. 
W. returned to the depot and down to the sheds, for 
it was about time for the arrival of the train. 

Finally the train pulled in, and just as the young 
lady stepped from the car, Dr. W. greeted her with 
the question, "Z , what does this mean?" 

Taken thus by surprise, she quickly looked about 
her, evidently expecting to see TK. Not seeing him 
for the moment, she explained that "Uncle John" 
had telephoned her to come. 

"But how did you leave the patients? When are 
you going back?" said Dr. W. 

289 



290 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

At that point TK stepped up and said, ' i She cannot 
answer that question, for I am going to ash her to 
marry me." 

At this surprising announcement, the young lady ex- 
hibited such unmistakable signs of genuine astonish- 
ment that there could be no question that this was the 
first inkling she had of our " Uncle John's' * matri- 
monial intentions. 

Together, the three now left the train platform and 
went out upon the sidewalk near the limousine, TK 
the while trying to persuade the young woman to go 
with him. Once as he took hold of her arm and 
attempted to draw her away toward the car, she 
stepped back and leaned toward Dr. W. as if for pro- 
tection. However, as TK continued to talk, he finally 
persuaded her to accompany him, and entering the 
limousine, they were driven away. 

Dr. H., coming up at this point, Dr. W. said: "Well, 
she's gone. She stands no chance in the hands of a 
man like him." 



Things were happening rapidly in the course of the 
Great School. "Harmonics of Evolution" was ten 
laps ahead of both the other "text" books. The 
affinity philosophy of the Great School was having the 
time of its life. TK wore a red tie and seemed alto- 
gether pleased with himself. Several times before in 
his life he had "completed" himself according to his 
ancient ethical formulary, but this time he said: "I 
shall set a pace for my beloved students that they 
will find hard to beat Selah! : 



j > 



TK'S HASTY MARRIAGE 291 

How he wooed and won, we have already described. 
We have now only to record that upon entering the 
limousine, the two were driven rapidly across the 
beautiful Chicago River and straight to the City Hall. 
Here facing the marriage license clerk, the " Elder 
Brother' ' — 63 years old and weighing 200 physical 
pounds, without batting an eye, gave his age as 30 
years; that of his bride as 24; his residence as Oak 
Park, 111., and his occupation as a retired attorney. 
!!!!!!! 

Things were still happening. Happening rapidly. 
Everything inside the " Great School" was moving 
along with a snap and a bang ! ! ! At about 2 p. m. TK 
stepped into Dr. W. 's office and said, * ' Gentlemen, you 
are invited to attend a wedding at 2:30 at the Court 
House.' ' When asked if the two other Trustees living 
in Chicago could be invited, the " Master' ' said: "By 
all means; also Dr. J. L., here." 

Thus five representative ethical students, including 
the two who had "taken" the famous Technical Work 
were present and witnessed the marriage ceremony. 
Some of these had witnessed TK's former "individual 
completion" on Jan. 30, 1910 at the time he married 
Florence Huntley, but his "individual completion" 
on April 6, 1916 surpassed everything one could imag- 
ine in the "completion" line. 

If the presiding judge had any suspicion he was 
marrying a man who was hourly in conscious com- 
munication with 13 spiritual planes, he did not permit 
himself to become confused thereby. 

Thus the spiritual ceremony of the "Great School" 
was nicely blended with the modern Chicago rulings 



292 



TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



in such emergencies, and TK was initiated into the 
3rd degree of marriage. 

The 3rd degree in the " Technical Work," you will 
recall, is where the student can withdraw entirely from 
his physical body and travel at will in spiritual 
realms. This has its analogy in the 3rd degree of 
marriage where the "master" is able to withdraw 
from the body of his students and travel at will seek- 
ing new sources of revenue. 

# * # * # 

The wedding is over. 

TK has given the Judge his two dollars. 

# # # # # 

There being no further reasons for prolonging the 
excitement, the Bride and Groom withdrew, leaving 
the students to apply their knowledge of Official Eth- 
ical Problem No. 5. 




TK had put one over on them. Three days before, 
he had had to sit in trial answering and dodging as 
best he could, their pertinent, personal questions about 
his kind of morality and its relation to the ancient 



TK'S HASTY MARRIAGE 293 

Ethical Formulary; but now, for the time being at 
least, they were spiritually speechless. Had they at 
this crisis thot to do so, they might have been able to 
persuade him to remain in Chicago long enuf to help 
untangle a lot of puzzling financial problems. But 
just as he lost no time — and no money getting away 
from Edgemoor, so he promptly rode away on the 
next train to Pasadena. 

* * * # * 

In November, 1915 — just five months previous to 
April 6, 1916 — this same TK had taken another trip 
to California. 

That time also it was in a private drawing room, 
but it was a different young lady, and there was no 
marriage certificate in his grip. 

He knew at that time that there was such a thing 
as the Mann Act, but that law would hardly apply to 
the "sole American Representative" of the "Great 
School," and so, as he explained, he "did not think 
anything about it." 

If TK's thots reverted to his former trip, he prob- 
ably said nothing about it to his new bride. 

Nor is it probable that he wasted any sympathy on 
the little woman of that former journey, even tho at 
that very time she lay in her home, stricken and pros- 
trate as the direct result of his deception. 



\ 



3 " V- \lr 



Vl I 



\. /' 



™ H'ltA 



laltf 



v «* 



=**. 




v 



Tke Great 
Fiction 

^e Great TB1K 



Mferaflta (, *0H |IM Wvraiiia«ii nw"t 



On April 12, 1916, following TK's departure, the 
Chicago groups met as usual. Most of the students 
had heard of the " master V marriage, but no one 
in Chicago except four trustees knew anything of the 
Edgemoor facts. Three of these four again visited 
the groups and " explained' ' that no explanation could 
yet be made. One lady student suggested she would 
never cease to pray for TK; another volunteered to 
pray for the ''women in the case," and after repledg- 
ing everybody to silence, the " Great School" was dis- 
missed. 



294 



WHA THAD BECOME OF THE "GREA T SCHOOL ?" 295 

During this time the Board of Trustees was trying 
to untangle a lot of financial problems, also wonder- 
ing if there were such a thing as a " Great School' ' — 
if TK's tales about " Great Masters" and " Great 
Friends" were fiction or fact, etc. Neither of the 
"Technical" students could see or otherwise "get" 
anything from the spiritual side of life any more than 
if they had never heard of a technical work, and alto- 
gether, it was a lovely and tangible ethical confusion. 

Finally it was decided a committee of four members 
of the Board should go to California and have a con- 
ference with the "master." Thus about May 1, Mr. 
L. H., Mr. F. T. L., Dr. H. H. and Dr. E. M. W. slipped 
away from Chicago and went direct to Pasadena 

where they arrived about 2 p. m., Thursday, May 4. 

# * # # * 

At 4 p. m., without in any way giving TK's "inde- 
pendent spiritual vision" any inkling of their pres- 
ence, these men walked up to where that gentleman 
was sitting with his family and friends upon his front 
porch. Upon seeing his "four wise men from the 
East," the "master" grew quite visibly excited and 
without further stimulation said: "Gentlemen, you 
have among you a monumental liar. ' ' 

At this re" mark of the master," all felt duly im- 
pressed, but not in any way frightened. TK, however, 
realized that these men had, in the language of his 
great H-N-K, traveled over plains and mountains "to 
see him and him alone." 

He did not know just what they wanted to see him 
about, but he knew they were in earnest and that they 
meant business. 



296 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Seeing this he invited them into his house, and the 
five soon agreed upon the conditions to govern the 
several days* sessions before them. One condition 
that TK insisted upon was accurate stenographic 
reports of every word uttered, and thus two stenog- 
raphers and a third student were invited to be pres- 
ent. 

Sessions were held on Thursday, Friday and Sun- 
day, and from the stenographic reports published 
herewith, you will readily understand the nature of 
some of the problems that these four Trustees were 
trying to solve. They were still under the impression 
that TK had probably been a " master,' ' but that he 
had somehow fallen and forfeited his mastership. But 
whether he had ever been a master or riot, they wanted 
to obtain some accounting of the several hundred 
thousand dollars they knew he had been handling. 
They wanted to know if his affinity philosophy had any 
scientific basis; if he had ever cured any insane; if 
there were anything real in any of his teachings. 
They wanted to get at the facts — not for themselves 
alone, but especially for the students and readers of 
his literature. 



At the beginning of the Sunday sessions, TK 
requested that no more notes be taken and no wit- 
nesses be admitted. This request was finally granted, 
and it was at this point that TK very dramatically 
announced that he had talked with his wife and daugh- 
ter, and that the three of them had concluded that if 
his suicide was necessary to clear up everything, he 



WHA THAD BECOME OF THE "GREA T SCHOOL f" 297 



should take his own life. Then, speaking very theat- 
rically, he asked the opinion of the Committee on the 
matter. 

"Well, now, Uncle John," said one of them, "Be- 
fore you do anything like that, won't you tell us some- 
thing more about these money matters 1" 

This took TK wholly by surprise and ended the 
performance. Later he confessed to still having con- 
siderable money in his possession, but to the question 
of how he could still be a "master" in the face of his 
record for indiscretions, his only explanation was that, 

"It is just as much of a mystery to me as it is to 
you." 

•Jr tP *jf tP tv 

The Committee of Four next visited Stockton where 
TK lived from 1881 to 1886, and where he claimed to 
have became a "master," to have cured 349 cases of 
insanity, to have made $30,000.00 a year practicing 
Law, etc., all of which they found to be untrue and im- 
possible. 

From here they went to San Francisco, thence to 
Oregon and Washington, and from there to Minne- 
apolis, arriving in Chicago about June 1st. 



CHAPTER XXVII 

TK's Explanations 

QUESTIONS ASKED BY THE COMMITTEE AT PASADENA 
IN MAY, 1916 

F. T. L.— "May I ask a question? If that statement 
were true, would these facts have caused a forfeiture 
of your Mastership ?" 

TK— "Yes." 

F. T. L. — "And if similar acts had occurred about 
the same time, would that have caused the forfeiture 
of your Mastership V f 

TK— "Yes." 

TK ON SECEECY 

TK. — "It certainly does, if you have the good of the 
Work at heart, then you certainly do not desire to 
pass on information which of its very nature must 
be a detriment to the Cause and Work." 

^ "JT TT TT TT 

TK. — "That is exactly what I had in mind. When 

our conference was held, Mr. L , as you know, 

there was a mutual agreement between us before our 
meeting was adjourned, that not a word should pass 
from the lips of any of us that concerned matters 
whatsoever in that meeting." 

F. T. L. — "No, what was said was said by myself. 
You said something about advertising it, and I said, 
'My God, we do not want to advertise the matter.' 

298 



TK'S EXPLANATIONS 299 

We had a talk between ourselves about keeping this 
matter quiet, as far as it was possible for us to do so — 
and we did as far as it was possible, and I remember 
the fact that no pledges had been given on either side." 

TK. — "In my presence, before the meeting was 
closed, either you, or some one of the other Friends, 
suggested and asked that the matter be held as a strict 
personal confidence. I said, I think that is right. ' ' 

F. T. L. — "I made the suggestion, and as far as I 
am concerned, not one person knows. 

"Now I can say this for Dr. H , — he can say it 

for himself, for that matter, that facts have come to 
us unsought, facts which have come to us unsuspected 
by us; we have learned of things, and have learned 
the fact that what was read in the paper which was 
read at the conference, had been made known to 
others ; so there is no question that other people know 

TK. — "Just that phase of the subject is what I had 
reference to. It is true that some one of your num- 
ber has not kept faith — that I am satisfied of beyond 
all question, and that is the reason why I asked Dr. 
H whether he really had the Work at heart.' ' 



L. H.— "The conference which lasted three days was 
the most important incident of my life, barring one. 
I wished at that time, and hoped at that time, that 
there might possibly be some way whereby it could be 
found to be a mistake, and I was hoping that you 
would deny it.' ' 



300 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



TK USES FOE HIS OWN PRIVATE USE, FUNDS CONTRIBUTED 
FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. 

L. H. — "I sent you a sum of money which was of 
considerable size, I thought, $2,500. You stated to me 
that you had less than $200 at that time. T do not 
know how many, but at least three people have been 
to me in the last three weeks, and have asked me how 
about the money matters, and did he make an account- 
ing of the Sanitarium funds, and was he as poor as 
he told me? Then I commenced to look over my cor- 
respondence. Information came outside of the Trus- 
tees, to the effect that you have a fairly good fortune, 
not a Rockefeller, nor were you poor ; but that it is not 
less than $75,000 to $100,000. But I do not know that 
that is true." 

TK. — "I should say you don't." 

L. H. — "Just a moment; — there should be given you 
every opportunity of showing that you didn't have 
money in the banks which was reported to us as having 
been there, and which was turned over to you for the 
Work. Now, the money I sent you was intended for 
the Work. You have probably received in the neigh- 
borhood of $15,000 to $20,000 from me. 

1 ' If it is true that you have had given to you in the 
last few years a considerable amount of money, and 
have taken that for your own private use irrespective 
of whether or not such an agreement was understood 
between the giver and the taker, then I should say that 
my responsibility would not be fulfilled to the School 
and to the coming Students, until I had learned 
whether or not you did possess, or had possessed, a 



TK'S EXPLANATIONS 301 

rather large sum of money at the time when you were 
1 penniless/ and whether or not you had accepted small 
amounts of money from people who could ill afford the 
donation. 

"Unless I might seem to be too general in my state- 
ments, I know of two cases, one a woman and another 
of a young man, who, I understand, had donated to 
you an amount of money of which you, as their friend 
over a term of years, should have known was in ex- 
cess of their ability and, therefore makes me feel that 
there is a double responsibility resting upon my shoul- 
ders." 

TK USES TRUST FUNDS FOR HIS OWN PERSONAL 
BUSINESS INVESTMENTS. 

TK. — "I loaned out of that fund, to Mr. , who 

was then representing the interests of the W-S M. Co., 
about $21,000 of Dr. H 's money.' ' 

L. H.— "That was out of the $50,000 Trust Fund. 
Did you have security on the $21,000!" 

TK. — "Nothing but the note of the company." 

L. H. — "Then, I will ask just one question. In the 
light of developments, does it seem to you that your 
act in loaning a large sum of money, — $21,000 to one 
individual, or Company, resulting in a loss to the 
Cause through your lack of understanding of condi- 
tions of the business, might hold you morally account- 
able in a personal sense for the loss of the $21,000?" 

TK.— "No, Mr. H , it does not. It is true that 

the conditions which followed the loaning of that 



302 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

money were beyond my power or my ability to know in 
advance; but the money was my own in a purely per- 
sonal sense and the investment was my own." 

F. T. L. — "In your own name?" 

TK. — "Yes, because I did the best I could under the 
circumstances and the fault was not mine." 

TK A CLEVER REAL ESTATE DEALER 

F. T. L.— "But as to using it for yourself and 
family?" 

TK. — "Whatever to me seemed necessary and 
proper. There was never any restriction, and I think 
it was understood that I had to live somehow. Out of 

the moneys received from Dr. H I returned to him 

$10,000 in payment for the property at So. Kenilworth 
Ave., and that property stands in my name." ( !) 



F. T. L. — "But the thing I wanted to say is this, 
that unless I misunderstood the TK's statement, the 
contribution of $50,000 was not made to him for per- 
sonal matters but for the purpose of the work, that 
was your understanding, was it not?" 



F. T. L. — "I want some information about the or- 
ganization of the Trust Fund. Was this Trust Fund 
organized with money that had been given by Dr. 
H ?" 

TK.-— "It was." 



TK'S EXPLANATIONS 303 



F. T. L. — "Part of the money had been invested in 
the Book Company ?" 

TK. — "Yes, the expenses that were charged against 
that, and were being paid out from the Book Co. over- 
ran the income from it, all the way from $2,000 to 
$4,000 to $5,000." 

F. T. L. — "That was practically your only revenue 
at that time?" 

TK.— "Yes," 

F. T. L. — "Were there any other funds that ever 
went into that Trust Fund?" 
TK— "No." 

L. H. — "My recollection was, TK, that you wrote 
me a letter relative to this Trust Fund and in connec- 
tion with one of my contributions. Just what do you 
presume could have been your reference to that Fund, 
if it was not to give me some impression that dona- 
tions of this kind would be received into that Fund, 
or a portion of them at least?" 



F. T. L.— "On Sept. 9, 1913, you wrote:— 
'I have established a Trust Fund and all money 
contributed to me by the Students is for this, and into 
it I placed every cent I had at the time and into it has 
gone every cent I received since that time, etc.' " 

TK. — ' * I do not recall that letter at the present time. 
Just what is the point you want to make?" ( !) 



304 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



TK TRANSFERS A ' * TRUST FUND ' ' TO HIS OWN PERSONAL 
SAVINGS ACCOUNT 

F. T. L.— "The Fund was closed out after Nov. 1914 
was it not? You said to J. C. : 'I thank you for your 
suggestions concerning the best method of dissolving 
the Trust and turning the matter into my personal 
account. I have about concluded to withdraw the bal- 
ance to my credit and thus dissolve the Trust without 
saying anything to anybody but you. 7 " 



L. H. — "Z understand that Dr. H. 's $50,000 

was the only money that had been put into that par- 
ticular Fund, and then I asked you about the letter 
which you wrote me, and in which you referred to a 
Trust Fund, and led me to believe, as the giver of 
funds, that it would be going into a Trust Fund." 



L. H.— "Were there two Trust Funds I" 

TK— "No, not specially.' ' 

L. H. — "How do you reconcile the statement that 

only Dr. H 's Funds had been put into the Fund, 

to the statement you made to me that ALL the Funds 
went into that Fund and all the moneys received from 
Students went into that Fund?" 

TK. — "My intention was to convey that all moneys 
received were in trust for the purposes of the Work." 

L. H. — "I do not want to press this question. One 
was the statement that you had placed only the 

amount which Dr. H gave you into this Trust 

Fund; and I have a letter from you stating that you 



TK'S EXPLANATIONS 305 

have a Trust Fund, and now you say that you referred 

to Dr. H 's Fund, and that you had another Fund 

in which you placed all Funds received from Stu- 
dents." 

TK AND THE EDGEMOOR TRUST FUND GRAFT. 

H. H. — "I would like to refer to the TK's promise 
at Edgemoor, during those three days of April 1st, 
2d and 3d, of this year, that he would render an ac- 
count of the funds sent to him in trust for Edgemoor 
Sanitarium. Did you not make such a statement, TK, 
at Edgemoor f " 

TK. — "Whatever statement I made had reference 
to what Mr. H placed in my hands. ' ' 

H. H. — * ' I am quite certain that you made that state- 
ment in answer to a question." 

TK. — "There were other funds turned over by the 
various branches of the League, and every dollar of 
them was turned over to the Sanitarium and all con- 
tributions including the last contribution from Mr. 

H , were turned over to W N , — except the 

fund I mentioned." 

H. H. — "But outside of the League contributions 
there were other contributions made to you according 
to your request made in "Life and Action." 

TK— "No." 

H. H, — "Did you not receive such contributions !' ' 

TK. — "I do not recall such contributions. Mr. 

C. C sent me two small checks ; Mr. C. P once 

included a remittance which he and others had ar- 



306 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

ranged to contribute at regular intervals to the Sani- 
tarium. \ ' 

H. H. — "But there were a good many others, — $100 
here, $25.00 there, $1,000.00 here, etc., a good many 
were sent to you in response to your request in "Life 
and Action," and you said, I believe, in "Life and 
Action/ ' that you would account for those moneys 
received. ' ' 

TK. — "I stated, if you will recall, that it was with 
reference to the League Funds that I would render a 
statement. ,, 

H. H. — "I took it to mean all funds.' ' 

TK. — "I made no such statement.' ' 



F. T. L. — "We have to be business-like, as Trustees 
of Edgemoor, and that matter ought to be a matter 
which is kept accurate, do you not think f" 

TK. — "Yes, as far as it can be done, I am sure." 
F. T. L. — "We are thinking of publishing a list of 
all the contributions to the Sanitarium and we be- 
lieve that so far as money matters are concerned, it 
will be our duty to be as open as possible. That is, 
we have nothing to conceal. We think it is the proper 
attitude to take, and while it is not necessary to give 
contributors small details, at the same time we feel 
that we should give a record of all contributions re- 
ceived and show where they have been paid; so you 
see it is a rather vital matter to get those matters into 
shape." 

TK.— "Yes," (!) 



TK'S EXPLA NATIONS 307 

TK SAYS FRANKLY, "i DO NOT KNOW!" 

H. H. — "I am only thinking of the responsibility 
of the fact that one or more, or some of those who have 
contributed, when they learn that you are no longer 
connected with the Work, will come to the Trustees 
and ask what has become of it, and we are not able 
to tell them, as we have no record." 

E. M. W. — "TK, in giving the money to W was 

there any record of the donor !" 

TK. — "No, it came through me, simply as a check 
from me. ' ' 

E. M. W. — * ' Is there any way of getting a record of 
the individuals who sent the money f" 

TK— "I do not know." (!) 

* # # # * 

L. H. — "I do not care so much about my money, but 
if you have in your possession, or in the possession of 
those near to you, and which belongs to the Cause, any 
considerable sum, then I think you would agree with 
me that the Cause is still entitled to it, — or at least that 
which was dedicated to the Cause. I am not thinking 
so much of my own, as I am the fact that others have 
contributed liberally, and it has gotten to me from two 
sources at least, that you had, a very short time ago, in 
the neighborhood of $96,000.00.' ' 

# # # # # 

TK TALKS OF HIS TRIP TO CALIFORNIA IN NOVEMBER, 1915. 

H. H. — "How did you travel when you and X 

traveled together ?" 
TK. — "We traveled in a drawing room." 



308 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

F. T. L.— "Was Dr. E. W in that car?" 

TK. — "No. Because I particularly inquired at 
that time, and could not have gotten any other reser- 
vation. We all occupied the room together during the 
day time." 

F. T. L. — "The reason Dr. W went out was to 

take care of you in case of any sudden changer 

TK. — "Yes, it was first thot there would be no rea- 
son why I might require any services, and Doctor 
knew at that time that no such thing was necessary. 

He later found that Mr. H made it possible in a 

financial way for him to come. I expressed my great 
satisfaction and pleasure that he could come." 

H. H. — "Then why was it necessary for X also 

to come?" 

TK. — "X came partly on my account, and 

partly to see her people whom she had not seen for 
many years." 

H. H. — "Did she know that a young lady risks her 
reputation by traveling in a drawing room alone with a 
man?" 

TK. — "I do not know. I do know this, that on the 
boats it is not an unusual thing at all. Take the Lake 
trips; I know of that fact thru an experience I had 

with . We wanted to take a trip to , 

and when I went to get reservations, — and I had gotten 
reservations, thinking that I had gotten them in sepa- 
rate state rooms — and when we arrived on the boat, 
found that I had gotten reservations in the same state 
room. I went to the purser and explained the situa- 
tion, that we were not married and wished he would 
make an arrangement to give us different rooms. He 



TK'S EXPLANATIONS 309 

said that that is something perfectly common. It is the 
same on a railroad train. One person may occupy a 
lower berth, and the other an upper. I realized, how- 
ever, that there might be a question of the propriety 

of X and I occupying the same drawing room 

alone. On the return trip the three of us occupied 
the drawing room together." 

H. H. — "Is such an occurrence not sufficient to ruin 
the reputation of a young woman ? ' ■ 

TK. — "Perhaps you are right. It is not considered 
usual." 

H. H. — "If that had become generally known, that 
the 'master' of the Great School traveled with a young 
girl-student of his, in a drawing room from Chicago 
to California — the two occupying one room — that could 
have but one effect, and have only destructive results." 

TK. — 'You are possibly right." 



TK EXPLAINS THE SCIENTIFIC VALUE OF HIS GREAT SCHOOL 's 
FIRST "TEXT BOOK" 



E. M. W. — "Is it possible, Uncle John, that you 
could be mistaken in that, instead of all these people f ' ' 

TK. — "It is hard to say, Doctor, what is in the 
range of possibilities." 

E. M. W. — "Looking from my door, from which I 
had a clear view of your door, for successive nights, 

almost without exception, Z went into your room, 

anywhere from 8:30 to 11:30 p. m. — usually about 9 
o'clock — and she did not come out until usually about 



310 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

5 :00 to 5 :30 a. m. I can safely say I was wide-awake. 
It was checked up, not only by me, but by others. Is 
it not just as possible that you should be mistaken as 
all of us?" 

TK—" Possibly." 

H. H. — "Have you told any one person or persons 
that you and Z are Soul Mates?" 

TK. — "I never have stated to any living mortal that 
I knew definitely who was mine." 

L. H. — "Did you ever state to any one that the 
RA was your Soul Mate?" 

TK— "I DID NOT. It is a subject that has come 
up, I think as many as one hundred times, from var- 
ious sources, and I have been asked various questions 
concerning affinities as well as reincarnation. I have 
said in every instance that those are matters that no 
one cam prove definitely and especially prove to any 
body else, and for that very reason I have discouraged 
all discussions of those subjects, as far as I could. 

"I have never made the statement to any living 
mortal that Florence Huntley and I were Soul Mates. 
That was a matter that I knew, however, or felt sure, 
that it was inferred by some of the Friends, by reason 
of the fact that she was the author of the statement 
of the Principle, with myself as her instructor. ' ' 



CHAPTER XXVIII 

Concerning the Charges 

The following is a reprint of a stenographic report 
of some of the statements made by Mr. F. T. L., the 
Attorney for the Board of Trustees, to Mr. John E. 
Richardson, (TK) in Pasadena, Calif., on May 5, 1916: 

Now you asked us yesterday, and got assurances 
from us — I think from all whom you asked, that satis- 
fied you that our purpose was and is to preserve this 
Work if it is possible to do so. I think that is your con- 
viction and it does not need any further assurances 
from us to that effect, but I will say again that our 
purpose is, if possible, to preserve this Work. 

I am going to ask you to put yourself in our posi- 
tion and if it is possible, thi/nh how to help us to solve 
perhaps as perplexing problems as ever faced us, or 
anybody connected with the responsibility of carrying 
on the Work. 

But, in the first place, we are all Students of the 
Work and have all come into intimate personal con- 
tact with you, and we are here now because of that 
fact, and today we are in sole and exclusive charge, 
responsibility and authority for the administration of 
this Work in this country, and it came to us unsought, 

— at least to me, at least to Mr. H , — entirely 

unexpectedly. 

I think that Dr. W and Dr. H , as two of 

311 



312 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

the older Students, had a right to expect that some 
time the responsibility of this Work would be devolved 

upon their shoulders. McC , H and I tried 

our best to avoid it, but we had learned certain les- 
sons on Personal Responsibility and when it was put 
up to us, we accepted it. We came into this work only 
partly to conduct a business enterprise; the business 
end was but a small part of it compared with the 
Spiritual work. The business end of it would not have 
tempted any of us, because other men could be found 
to handle the business end just as well as we could. 
But we had your assurance that the selection was 
made with the approval of the Great Friends and 
the Great Master, and of course that responsibility 
could not be shirked. 

We came into charge of the obligation of the main- 
taining and extension of a philosophy that, if it stood 
for anything, stood for high Moral Principles. It 
was addressed to the ''progressive intelligence of the 
age ; ' ' this meant that only the intelligent people who 
could appreciate the delicate shadings of the Morality 
it taught could be accepted. We were taught the 
ability to distinguish between right and wrong, the 
ability to detect falsehood, hypocrisy and anything 
that did not ring true. We came into charge of a 
Philosophy that taught of Mastership and held out 
as its chief object and aim, to all of the Students, 
the attainment of Mastership, or considerable definite 
progress along that road, after the Student first gained 
the knowledge of the scientific, exact Moral Principles 
and persevered in applying those things to his own 
life. 



CONCERNING THE CHARGES 313 

That Philosophy is now in our charge. It is con- 
tained in three text-books. The first was written by a 
lady who, afterwards became your wife, and is now 
dead; and it is absolutely certain you directed and 
no doubt dictated some of it. The Principles laid 
down in the first volume are simply preliminary to 
the second and third volumes. The second and third 
volumes were written by yourself. 

The second was not the real Philosophy. It is a 
sign-board warning people against the wrong way. 

So the real Philosophy is contained in the third book 
which is your book, which is a scientific expression 
of the working out of the Constructive Principle in 
Nature. Now the entire book is devoted to and revolves 
around Ethical Principles. The lesson it teaches is 
that we cannot dodge our responsibility. That honor 
and truth and justice and all those things are part 
of the scheme of exact Morality which everyone who 
becomes a Master, or attempts at mastership, must 
follow out. 

The third volume is followed by a number of volumes 
of "Life and Action/ ' to work out and explain the 
parts in the text-books which seem to need explana- 
tion, and in all those books, without a single exception, 
you have said that Personal Eesponsibility cannot 
be avoided, — that it must be met, that the Life must 
be lived in order to be a Master. And it has come 
to the knowledge of this Board in further detail, where 
Student after Student has been suspended from the 
School or Group because they did not live their lives 
in alignment with the Principles of the Great School. 
One was expelled because she was thought to aspire to 



314 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



a place to which she was not entitled, that she was 
envious and not Living the Life, etc. Once, I ashed 
you what was the chief cause of the falling from 
grace of the Students who did fall from grace, and 
you said promptly, that it was loose relations with 
the opposite sex. 

Now we naturally, with all that knowledge which 
we had obtained from the text-books, and which we 
had obtained from association with you, had very 
exalted ideas and have yet. We also had an exalted 
idea of you, and you were our Master, and every 
time we sent a book out we virtually said — "The 
founder, the central figure of this Work is a man, not 
a Principle; the TK has mastered his passions, has 
mastered his temper and is Living the Life as laid 
out in the Ethical Section. 99 And in the years to come 
this literature will hold that pictuke of the writer 
of these books, and that view of this Philosophy is 
up to us. 

I asked you yesterday if you were still a Master. 
You said, "Yes, possessing all of the powers and Liv- 
ing the Life that a Master should live ; that no portion 
of your powers had been forfeited. " I asked you 
whether the seduction of a woman, an unmarried girl, 
would lose you your Mastership, — I understood you 
to say "it would depend.' ' 

I asked you if such relations would cause him to 
lose his mastership, and you said, that "would 
depend.' ' 

Now, you see, things have come to us since we have 
assumed the responsibility of this Work. First among 



CONCERNING THE CHARGES 315 

them, the Living or the not Living of a Life. Second, 
along the money matters. Now, one of the first things 
which attracted me to this Philosophy was the absence 
of grafting. Naturally each man who comes, looks 
for the graft; and Vol. Ill was especially clear about 
the Eoman Catholic graft, and we understood graft 
to be the taking, or receiving of money for his own 
personal interest rather than the interests of the under- 
taking with which he is connected. 

I told you, yesterday, that I had a number of con- 
sultations with Mr. . I have read your let- 
ters to him, and his letters to you. I have seen Mr. 

H 's correspondence with you, etc. I have read 

certain letters that passed between you and H S. 

W about the Sanitarium. I had read certain let- 
ters from you to J L . I know that Mrs. E 

M contributed to you the sum of $100, which was 

all that she had, and which she really needed; that 
a young man gave you $25.00 which he really needed. 
I have seen the letters in which you have said you 
would not accept money that came with conditions. 
I have seen the letters in which you have said that 
you refused over $100,000 because it came with con- 
ditions, and it seemed from the tone of those letters 
that you ivould receive money without conditions, and 
the persons who received those letters responded to 
the spirit of your letter and sent money without con- 
ditions. But they said that this money is put into your 
hands to do as you wish with it. In some letters you 
say there is a Trust Fund to which every dollar of the 
money will be placed. 

Yesterday, you said there was no money placed in 



316 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

the Trust Fund except the initial deposit. I said 
there were two matters, one financial and the other, 
the Living of the Life. The financial matter came up 
on April 1st at Oconomowoc, and at the time, you 
freely said you would render to the Board of Trustees 
an accounting of the Trust Fund. The impression 
conveyed, if not in so many words, was that you would 
go straight upstairs at Oconomowoc and prepare that 
statement — that statement has not been prepared up 
to the present time. 

You told us yesterday that you could not furnish it. 
We found that the data for it was either here or at 
Oconomowoc. Now we are Trustees of the financial 
interests of this Movement and of the Sanitarium and 
we therefore, as the Eoman Church says, have charge 
of the temporalities as well as the spiritualities, and 
we can find out how much money was contributed and 
we can find out how much money was put in. But 
we would not have been preserving the interests of the 
Work had we tried first, before coming here, to see if 
you could give us an account of it. 

Now we find that $21,000 of the $50,000 went into 
an investment. That might have been an excuse from 
suspicion of wilful misuse of those funds, but it will 
not excuse it from those to whom we have to account. 
That, and $10,000 spent for your own home, which 

was afterwards returned, and paid for So. Ken- 

ilworth Ave., which was used for the needs of the 
Work, is all the account that we have thus far. I sup- 
pose that most of the payments of these Funds were 
made by check, and unless these were destroyed, you 
could have given us the data on April 1st. 



CONCERNING THE CHARGES 317 



Dr. H H has a letter in which you tell him 

you must sell So. Kenilworth Ave., and giving 

him the first opportunity to buy it. It has never been 
claimed that it was purchased for anything else than 
the Work, from the Trust Fund. 

We are business men, we are not Masters; we can- 
not stand to the Student-body or to the outside world 
in a spiritual relation; we must appeal to them, and 
do appeal to them as business conservators of their 
financial interests, and anything we pass on to them in 
a spiritual way we are understood to be passing on 

not from personal experience. Dr. E. M. W has 

made some demonstrations, Dr. H H also, but 

none of the rest. When I tell anybody I must say, "I 
do not know; TK told me so and so; — we have not 
demonstrated this, but TK has been in the spiritual 
world. He claims to have been there, and many times 
a day to confer with the Great Master, and several 
years ago he told me about that. ' ' 

But, when it comes to business, I am a lawyer and 
accustomed to tricks, and in every statement I must 
give to the Groups I would say that so much money 
came into the hands of the TK (and it comes closer to 
$300,000 than I like to think about); we must say that 
this came into the hands of the TK, and we went to 
Pasadena to get an account of it, and all we could get 
was that he could not give an accounting of it. He did 
not say he would not, but that he could not. People 

would say: "You are a fool. ,, And to Mr. : 

"You are a fool." And I want to say that a good 
many things have come out that would make it very 
difficult to convince an unbiased person; — need I men- 



318 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

tion $75.00 a month for perfume, $50.00 for taxi cabs, 
large sums of money m checks. At the time you were 

writing to Mr. H that you only had $200 in the 

bank, you had just sent two checks of $500 and $400 to 
Verna. Put yourself in our place. I want to say to 
you, my friend, and my Uncle John, that I want to 
protect you and I want to protect this Work, if it is 
a possible thing. But Personal Eesponsibility cannot 

be evaded; and we said to Mr. H : "You are a 

coward if you run away from the responsibility." 

So we cannot "duck," but we have got to work out 
this situation and this is only the beginning and only 
relates to the money ; and big as it is, it is only a small 
part of what is on our souls to work out, and we can- 
not do it by correspondence; you know it must be 
something important to bring Mr. H and me here. 

But I said that the money-matters are a small thing. 

If you were myself you would say: "If L is 

really a Master he would not dodge and take refuge 
in the fact that there was no understanding and agree- 
ment, no conditions." Why, we have a letter written 

to Mr. H only recently where you say there is 

nothing that binds you to anything. 

(Mr. L reads letter.) 

You know what you have written, you know what 
you have said ; but suppose that you were in my place 
and I in yours, and I should say, two months after I 
had agreed to make a statement in such terms as I 
had led you to believe a statement would be forth- 
coming, before you left Edgemoor, I made most of 
the payments by check in the Oak Park Bank, and 
knowing of those facts, I should talk to you in that 



CONCERNING THE CHARGES 319 

way — would you not ask yourself the question and 

would you not say to Mr. L that, "It does not 

seem to me from what I have learned about Masters 
that a Master (who has all along in the Work taught 
the Students to take nothing for granted and to be 
particularly careful about money matters) would treat 
things as you are treating these matters.' ' And I 
would say: "You are right, and I will not let a 
moment pass without making an effort to explain and 
get a satisfactory statement down to the very penny 
of the money I have received, whether it is so or not, 
and which you claim was in Trust, and which I have 
held in Trust, and out of which I have only the right to 
use (as you say in one of your letters) "but for the 
rigid economy of living." 

I understood that your calling Dr. E W a 

monumental liar was because of the talk with Z , 

and it might be a good thing for us to see what Z 

told you as a report of that conversation. 

* # # # # 

Dr. E W did not say, "I know" at any 

time, he did say we have the evidence to show and / 
know that he has the evidence, and that he had it 
at that time. 

Now the most that Dr. E W had to say about 

you and her was: "Do not let Uncle John fool you 
or deceive you, you are not the only person to whom 
he has said that he is your Soul Mate, that you and 
he are really affinities." And it is in that connection 
that he said that he had the evidence to prove it, and 

I may say that I know of formal statements, V for 

instance, from , from , and one other in which 



320 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Z said, that she had at last found her affinity; 

that he lived at Oconomowoc, or Edgemoor; that he 
was about 40 years older than she was; that he was 
tall and thin and wise; and, mark you, those state-- 
ments have come to us unsought; but I know of those 

statements, so you see that Dr. E W did have 

some evidence when he told Z that she was not 

the only person to whom you made this statement. 

Now, he also had this evidence, and that evidence 
was read in your presence on April 1st, at Oconomo- 
woc, and it was immediately after the reading of that 

statement you asked Dr. E W . You said: 

"Dr. W , do you believe these statements to be 

true?" 

And he said: "I am sorry to say, I do." 

You said: "What is the use of my making a state- 
ment, Dr. W says he believes it," and you said, 

"What good will it do to affirm or deny it?" 

Dr. H H was insistent in getting the state- 
ment, and finally I broke in on him and said, "What is 
the use of asking for a statement from Uncle John, 
he is a lawyer and knows the full effect of his RE- 
FUSAL to make a statement, if a charge such as that 
is made." 

And we went on (after I had called your attention 
to the fact that a refusal to make a statement — that 
a refusal is a confession and admission of guilt, and 
so regarded by the average man), and we proceeded to 
accomplish all that followed — we proceeded on the as- 
sumption that you were guilty. You said the wise 
thing for you to do was to withdraw from the Work, 
and the first question that was asked after that, was 



CONCERNING THE CHARGES 321 

asked by myself. You were my Uncle John all during 
the three days, and you spoke to me about it after- 
wards. I said, " Uncle John, can you leave Edgemoor, 

can Dr. E W run Edgemoor without you?" 

And you went on to say that he had knowledge to treat 
psychic cases and the medical skill, and you spoke of 
the technical work he had taken. 

And I said to X , and suggested to certain others 

of the Trustees, "Now let us he very certain that Dr. 

E W has not put up a scheme to put Uncle 

John out." We had the desire to protect our Master, 
the founder of our faith, our Uncle John, against any 
wrong attempt for personal place, revenge or spite 
on the part of anybody, — even though he might be one 
of our number, and in whom we had implicit confi- 
dence, as you had had. 

And I said to X : "I want you to look me in 

the face. How did you come to make this statement, 
was it from any suggestion or inducement from any- 
body, or did it come from you?" 

She said: "Mr. L , it came from me; I wrote 

the statement out before I mentioned it to anybody, 

except Y ." And I said, this may go as far as a 

Court because what you say, if true, intimates that 
Uncle John has committed a crime of White Slavery, 
under the Mann Act. Do you realize what this 

means ?" She said, "I do." She said, "Mr. L , I 

do not want to go into Court, but if my duty calls me, 
I will go into Court or anywhere," She said, "I 

would like to face Uncle John and want Z to be 

present." 

And this is the statement that was read under those 



322 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

conditions and it went on to tell about how you ar- 
ranged that she should live at "234' ' and "215," and 
that V was there too. 

w *Jr tt * ^ 

The whole pitiful story is in the statement, and that 
statement gives details, and I think, as a lawyer, that 
if she ever went before a jury, with her evidence, her 
statement of those facts (as they were contained in 
that statement), you would not succeed in convincing 
the jury that her statements were untrue. I think 
that as a lawyer you would agree with me that if she 
went before a jury with the story, not one juror would 
do anything else than believe her story. 

Now it was that story of those facts that you de- 
clined to make any reply to, because, as you said, if you 
made any kind of reply it would involve others that 
you did not feel you had any right to involve. 

We were all anxious to find a way out of it for you, 

and we asked you if it might be possible that X 

was insane, and you said, "No." 

Or hypnotic influence; you said, "No." 

X had made another statement, and that state- 
ment is bached up by other people, and I will now read 
this statement: 

(Mr. L now reads statement and three affidavits 

of Y , R. S and J. B .) 

I have been informed that this information of the 

various people was the evidence which he (Dr. E 

W ) had that would tend to corroborate the state- 
ment that you had been deceiving Z . 

Z , at your request, came down to Chicago, and 

met you. You had not discussed marriage up to that 



CONCERNING THE CHARGES 323 

time. She did not know, according to what you told 
us, that you had any intention of marrying her. 

Dr. E W meeting her, asked her some ques- 
tions about the Hospital; whom she left in charge of 
the Sanitarium; etc., and you said she could not an- 
swer the question as to when she would return until 
you had had a talk with her; until you asked her 
whether she would become your wife. And that is 

the way in which Z came to be your wife, and it 

happened after these things occurred which I have just 
read. 

The big thing back of all the money in the world, 
back of all the houses, back of all the lots, is whether 
a man can do the things which you are alleged to have 
done and of which we have this PEOOF; (and which, 
as a lawyer, — and say one hundred Jurors, would say 
to be true), whether those things are consistent with 
the Living of a Life and continuing to be a Master. 

That is one of the things that has brought us out 
here to see you, one of the things we want to know. 

This story is going to grow, the story is going to con- 
tinue as we cannot stop it if our feet are not planted 
upon a firm foundation and we absolutely know 
whether the Principles of this Philosophy are true or 
false. 

We may have to announce to the world, as well as 
to the Student-body, that we, the Trustees of the Great 
Work in America, have found that it is a sham and a 
lie for graft and lust, and because of that we have con- 
cluded to give this statement to the world and cease 
the activities in America. 



324 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

We are here for advice and we are here with the 
sincere purpose to conserve the Work. 

Here is a sworn affidavit. I may say that Z , 

after the conference with Dr. E W , threw her 

arms around his neck and sobbed and shook his hand 

convulsively, and Dr. S 's also. They let her sob, 

they patted her hand and comforted her. And it was 
after that, Uncle John, she wrote you whatever letter 
she wrote you which you say you destroyed, and which 

is the basis, you say, of your calling Dr. E W 

a monumental liar, because he had at that time the 

evidence for saying that Z was not the only girl 

whom you had said, or claimed, to be your Soul Mate. 

(Mr. L read another affidavit.) 

Now, Uncle John, this stuff and more has come to 
us. You have no doubt that we do not relish its com- 
ing to us. We did not ask it, we did not look for it. 
One after another these people have come. They have 
come with every impression and indication of sincerity, 
and, now, as the Trustees of this Work, we have the 
responsibility upon us and it is absolutely necessary 
for us to know the truth and what is the best thing 
to be done. 

Now, this Philosophy has become a part of the vital 
fibre of the life of every one of the men who are here 
before you. I think you have no doubt that it is the 
fundamental motive back of the personal life of every 
one of us. We would like to know for our personal 
gratification because the foundation seems to be 
crumbling beneath our feet, — we want to know both 
for our own faith and our responsibility to the other 
Students. 



CONCERNING THE CHARGES 325 

We want to know whether there is any system here, 
as you have claimed, or whether we have got to find 
some other system. But we are here as Trustees and 
conservers of the spiritual welfare of something like 
4,000 people, and we are in a position that we must 
know what kind of food we can give to others. This 
responsibility rests on us, and is it not natural we 
should know ; and we have put these statements in the 
form of sworn statements, so that you can see how im- 
portant we think they are — there are a number of other 
sworn statements. 

There are two or three ways for us to dispose of 
this matter as we see it. We can find out by publish- 
ing the facts in "Life and Action' ' and asking every 
person who ever contributed to you to let us know the 
amount as well as the circumstances, and in this way 
find out if legally as well as morally you are account- 
able. 

We can find out how much of that money has passed 
through your hands. We know the Banks in which 
your funds have been deposited. I believe a Master 
would say: "Here is my bank account, here are my 
checks ; this is the most serious crisis of my life, and 
I am ready to work with you to a satisfactory con- 
clusion of this matter, and there is in my heart no 
feeling of hostility,— I honor you for your honesty 
of purpose/ ' 

I am honest in all I have said, I believe that Mr. 

H is honest in all that he has said, I believe that 

Dr. H is honest in all he has said. But we have 

got to know. We cannot tell other people who have 



326 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

a right to know, that things are all right, when they 
are all wrong. 

If, after every opportunity that has been given, 
and after our urging as we have urged, and as we 
now urge you to clear up this situation, you do not do 
it, we will be forced to say: "Things are all wrong, 
Uncle John is all wrong, he has had the opportunity 
and he has declined to take it." 

I SAY TO YOU NOW THAT I REALIZE THAT 
EXPOSURE WILL BE THE DEATH OF THIS 
WORK, THE END OF YOUR REPUTATION AND 
PERHAPS THE END OF YOUR LIBERTY, and I 

think there is no other way than for you to tell us the 
truth, and set our feet on bed-rock, spiritually and 
financially. 

Could I do anything else, — could we have come to 
you in any other spirit than we have come, — could we 
ask you to do any other thing than we have asked you 
to do? If there is, we will be glad to know it. But as 
business men, as men whose intelligence has been 
trained, perhaps, in advance of their spiritual develop- 
ment, we feel the only thing is for you to tell us the 
facts back of this. This then is worse, or ought to be 
worse, than a criminal prosecution, for it deals with 
your soul. 



A'.id to all these serious charges, the "master's" only reply 
is that he intends to make no statement : that any defense 
he might make would be unnecessary to his friends and use- 
less to his "enemies." 



CHAPTER XXIX 

The Facts Suppkessed 

From the preceding chapters you will readily under- 
stand that by June 1st, when the Committee of Four 
returned from California, the Board of Trustees had 
accumulated considerable first-hand knowledge. They 
knew nothing about the existence of TK's " Great 
School," or his "Masters" or "Great Friends," but 
there were some 500 students who believed themselves 
students in such a school, and the question arose as 
it had arisen ever since April 1, as to what, if any, 
information and facts should be given these students. 
Should they be kept in ignorance of the true situation 
or should they be told the truth? Silence or knowl- 
edge — Bondage or Liberty — Darkness or Light? 

The majority of the Board took the stand that no 
statement whatever giving the true situation should 
be made. Some insisted that none of the facts should 
be given out — even to the Chicago students. 

1. The "work" should go on. 

2. The student body and the world should be left 
to believe that TK was a real master. 

3. That all his tales were true. 

4. That he possessed genuine spiritual powers. 

5. That his teachings and claims had been demon- 
strated. 

& That his record was clean. 

327 



328 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

TK's students and readers already believed every- 
thing he had written — believed him to be a "master." 
Let them go on believing it! Why tell them the 
Truth? Let the students reason this way: 

"These Trustees are all Ethical Students; they are 
our true Friends, they are all Masons ; as a matter of 
Principle and Personal Besponsibility, they would tell 
us immediately if everything were not all right. They 
would not leave us to believe a thing that they know 
to be untrue. If TK were not a real master, if his 
claims were not all verified and proven, — if his * ' Great 
School" were all a myth, these men would not rest a 
single day until every student is told the simple 
truth.' ' 

# # * # # 

Here the writer wishes to record that only one man 
of the entire Board of Trustees, the President, stood 
for giving a knowledge of all these facts to even the 
Chicago students. 

This gentleman took the stand and insisted from the 
beginning that not only the Chicago students, but 
every student and applicant, and every man and 
woman who had ever been a student were just 
as entitled to the truth as the Trustees. And 
regardless of all arguments and efforts on the side of 
suppressing and covering up the facts, and without the 
consent and co-operation of the Board, he called a 
meeting of all the Chicago students, immediately fol- 
lowing the return of the Committee from California, 
and gave to them a detailed and complete report of 
the whole situation. 



THE FACTS SUPPRESSED 329 



And not one student but felt profoundly grateful 
for being permitted to know the facts, and so far as 
Chicago students were concerned, the " Great School' ' 
myth vanished then and there, and in its place 
TRUTH came to open other and wider realms of 
Knowledge, Service and Love. 



But the Trustees were still left with a " Great 
School" — outside of Chicago, — students who had no 
knowledge of the situation, — who still believed; still 
toiled over the 3,800 and "57 varieties'' of "Questions 
on Natural Science," — still struggled over the "Test" 
Course and the TK's little Ethical Puzzles. 

Could the "Great Work" be carried on? 

The Text Books talked of a "master," of "Great 
Masters," "Great Friends," of "scientific demonstra- 
tions," of "records" and "proofs" and "evidences" 
— but all these had now vanished — or had they ever 
existed? 



What information, if amy, should be given to the 
students outside of Chicago! To applicants, and Sub- 
scribers 1 

Upon all these questions the President of the Board 
of Trustees persistently and faithfully maintained thai 
enuf of the known facts should be given out to enable 
all students, applicants and readers to judge the mat- 
ter for themselves and thus readjust their lives to the 
Truth. 



330 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Month after month he tried to secure the co-opera- 
tion of the Trustees, but the majority held out against 
what to him seemed to be the only right, just and 
kindly thing to do under the circumstances. 

At last, convinced that the Trustees meant to delib- 
erately suppress the facts and that they had no inten- 
tion of ever making any satisfactory statement regard- 
ing the true situation, he resigned from the Presidency 
of the Board, and at great personal expense of time 
and money, prepared and mailed to all students whose 
address he could obtain, the letter which follows ; 



CHAPTER XXX 

"The Tbuth Shall Make You Free," 

A Letter by the 
President of the Board of Trustees 

A copy of the following letter was sent to every 
"Accepted Student" in "The School of Natural Sci- 
ence" or "The Great School," so-called, as far as it 
was possible to reach them. 

Oak Park, 111. 
November, 1916. 

Dear Friend: — This letter contains information to 
which you as an accepted Student are clearly entitled, 
for the simple reason that this information is of as 
far reaching importance to you as it is to me or any 
other Student or "Friend of the Work." Because of 
this tremendous importance you owe it to yourself to 
read this letter at a time when you are free from in- 
trusion for at least an hour. 

I shall do my best to make the statements, which I 
feel I owe you, in clear and simple language, without 
exaggerations or embellishments ; and I shall give you 
every opportunity possible to investigate for your- 
self. 

Only about ten per cent of the Students had first 
hand information, but even that was only "from mouth 
to ear" and long since must have been blurred and 
dimmed. All the rest of the Students, and all the 
"Applicants" and "Friends of the Work" have re- 
ceived no official information whatsoever. Whatever 

331 



332 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

information may have come to them, must have come 
in the form of disquieting rumors, which leave the un- 
happy recipients suspended in the midst of doubt, un- 
certainty and apprehension without giving them the 
means so necessary for the re-establishment of equi- 
librium. 

That body of men, who were given the legal l ' right, 
power and authority/ - and who thereby and at the 
same time assumed grave obligations to all those who 
are as vitally interested in "The Work" as they are 
themselves (or ought to be), utterly failed in their 
duty because the majority of them, for reasons of 
their own, denied the Students "the right to know." 
It is because of their failure, as a body, to do justice 
by the Students, that this duty falls heavily upon one 
who, through personal contact and correspondence, has 
been in closest touch with the largest number of Stu- 
dents, namely, the writer of this letter. He is not 
going to shirk his duty, however severely and unjustly 
he may be criticised for discharging it. He shall face 
the storm of criticism and abuse, or worse, which is 
bound to break loose from certain quarters, with the 
serenity of mind and tranquility of Soul, which are 
the priceless and indestructible reward of an approv- 
ing conscience. 

To those who have had no warning, in the form of 
rumors or otherwise, this letter will prove a severe 
shock; for a while it may even seem to sweep away 
the very foundation from under their feet. I sincerely 
wish I could spare them this blow, or even soften it, 
but I have been unable to find a better way or a better 
method than the straight, unvarnished statement of 



"THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE" 333 

facts, which, I am satisfied will in the end prove the 
least harmful and the most constructive. 

It is more than 13 years since I first came in touch 
with "The Harmonic Series' ' and more than eight of 
those years just passed, I have devoted exclusively to 
what I believed to be "The Great Work." During 
those eight years and more, I gave, without reserve, 
of my time and material possessions and neglected my 
personal affairs and my chemical work, which I love, 
for the sake of the work of Instruction and Corre- 
spondence, for which I have no natural inclination and 
which therefore placed tremendous difficulties and ob- 
stacles in my path. But I was willing and eager to 
give the best that was in me, to the Great Cause of 
Humanity, which I believed was most ideally repre- 
sented by "The Great School" and its "Sole Repre- 
sentative," Mr. John E. Richardson, more familiarly 
known to you as the "TK," or "Dr. E. J. St. John." 

During my activities in this connection I came in 
close personal contact with hundreds of the Students, 
and through correspondence, as the head of "The De- 
partments of Instruction and Correspondence," with 
almost, if not quite, all of you. 

While that work was exceedingly difficult, for me, 
and at times almost overwhelming, I can truthfully say 
that I thoroughly enjoyed my close touch with so many 
earnest, eager and kindred souls. It is because of this 
close relationship, and because of the confidence which 
that relationship established, that I feel so keenly the 
duty which I owe to you, my Friends and Fellow Vic- 
tims, namely, to bring to your attention the facts to 



334 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

which I have been leading you and which are as fol- 
lows: 

1. During a severe attack of Pneumonia, from 
which his physician did not expect him to recover, and 
in the presence of eight or nine witnesses, one of whom 
was the writer of this letter, the TK stated that he 
had been taking "Heroin" over a period of nine years 
or more. He was at the time evidently in intense 
agony and demanded morphine injections, threatening 
to Mil himself, unless he were given relief. (Heroin 
is a Morphine derivative or a modified Morphine. 
Chemically it is Diacetyl-Morphine.) He explained the 
use of the narcotic by stating that it had been pre- 
scribed by his old college professor for intense pain 
at the base of the spine, and that he did not learn 
the nature of the drug until after the Harrison Law 
came into effect in 1915, when he immediately pro- 
ceeded to reduce the dose. 

2. On April 3rd, 1916, in the face of most serious 
charges brought against him by a young girl, the TK 
found it desirable to withdraw from all connection 
with "The Work," and whatever "authority" he had 
he then transferred to seven Trustees in due and legal 
form, to-wit: 

"KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, That, hav- 
ing found it necessary to withdraw from any further active 
participation in the Work of the Great School, or the School of 
Natural Science, so-called, in America, and wherever else 
my connections with such Work may extend; and, reposing 
full trust and confidence in the integrity and ability of 
(here follow the names and addresses of the seven trustees, 
which for obvious reasons I have omitted. — H. H.) I do freely 



"THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE" 335 

and voluntarily give, grant and turn over to said (the seven 
names are again omitted.H. H.) and each of them, equally, 
and to their, and each of their, successors, the unlimited 
and exclusive right, power and authority to manage, guide, 
control and direct each and all of the activities of said Great 
School in America, and elsewhere, as above mentioned, to the 
same extent, within the limits of their ability, as I have 
heretofore done, they to hold and exercise said powers IN 
TRUST AND AS TRUSTEES, in such manner as to them 
shall seem best and most fitting, for the sole benefit and be- 
hoof of such Great School and its Work, as aforesaid. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand 
and seal at the Village of Oconomowoc, in said County, the 
Third day of April, 1916. 

Witness : John E. Richardson, L. 5. 

H. G. S. 

Geo. E. Robinson, 

State of Wisconsin, ss. 

County of Waukesha. 

On this Third day of April, 1916, before me, a Notary 
Public within and for said County and State, personally ap- 
peared John E. Richardson, to ma known to be the same per- 
son named in, and who signed, the foregoing instrument, and 
acknowledged the same to be his free act and deed. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand 
and seal the day and year last above written. 

Geo. E. Robinson. 

Notary Public, Waukesha County, Wisconsin. My Com- 
mission expires July, 1, 1917.' ' 

This document was to be published in "Life and Ac- 
tion* ' together with an " explanation' ' written by the 
TK himself: 



336 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

THE "EXPLANATION" 
By TK. 

"To Students and Friends of the Work: 

As a brief explanation of the preceding document, let me 
add, that for more than thirty years I have labored for the 
establishment of the Great Work in America; and to-day I 
am able to realize that my efforts and those of the willing and 
earnest Students and Friends who have* been my helpers, 
have not been in vain. 

The Work is established. 

In each of the several departments, including the Indo- 
American Book Co., the- Correspondence Department, the 
League of Visible Helpers, and Edgemoor Sanitarium, trained 
and educated Students are in active charge and these are in 
every way capable of discharging to the School and the 
Work the responsibilities that shall rest upon them. 

In view of these facts and conditions it is now possible 
for me, as well as expedient, to withdraw from all further 
active participation in the management of the* Work, and 
give my remaining time and efforts to long neglected lines of 
collateral and supplemental work, which otherwise never 
could be accomplished. 

In doing this, however, it is understood that insofar as 
health and time will permit, I shall hold myself ready and 
willing to render any help possible- to the Friends above 
named who are relieving me of the. 'duties above referred to. 

To simplify the work and relieve me of added burdens, 
let me ask all who read this announcement, to address all 
communications for the instruction and correspondence de- 
partment to H H , Oak Park, 111. Those concerning 

books and other literature, to Indo- American Book Co., 5705 
South Boulevard, Chicago, 111. ; those for the League, to 
League of Visible Helpers, care President, Oak Park, 111. 
(except remittances which should go to the League of Vis- 



"THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE" 337 

ible Helpers, in care of Dr. J. L H , Treas., Chicago, 

111.) ; and those for the Sanitarium, to Edgemoor Sanitarium, 
Oconomowoc, Wis. 

I earnestly hope this disposition of the Work of the 
School will result in great good to the School and the Cause 
everywhere, and that the impulse toward success will increase 
as the years go by, and that every Student and Friend will 
have a share in that success." 

Witness: H. G. S. John E. Richardson. 

This so-called explanation was found to be entirely 
misleading and could not be published without further 
explanations, which would have called forth a flood 
of inquiry which the majority of the Trustees were 
neither prepared nor willing to satisfy. 

3. The TK is said to have had a considerable num- 
ber of "Affinities.'' 

I have seen the written statement of two girls de- 
scribing in detail their intimate relations with him. I 
have seen also the affidavits of two women and four 
men, (all students) to the effect that a third girl 
entered his room night after night between about 8 
and 10 p. m. and did not leave it until about 5 in the 
morning. 

I have repeatedly heard two " Friends' ' make the 
statement that this third girl told them that she, and 
not "R. A." was "TK's" Soul mate. 

I have it on reliable authority that a fourth woman 
made the same statement. 

I heard a fifth woman twice make the positive state- 
ment that soon after the "RA's" death she was ap- 
proached by the TK along the same (affinity) lines. 

And there are still further unmistakable indications, 
strongly pointing in definite directions, 



338 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

It is known that with one of his "Affinities" the 
"TK" traveled across the continent, occupying the 
same drawing room with her, the door of which was 
locked during the nights. When confronted with this 
charge, he tried to excuse himself by saying that such 
a thing was quite customary, and he volunteered the 
information that he and a woman whose name he 
mentioned, when traveling together to Mackinac Island, 
occupied the same state-room. 

Lest the innocent suffer because of the folly of a 
few, it would be but an exemplification of ordinary 
charity for all of us to refrain from speculating as to 
the identity of these unfortunate victims. 

Great injustice and injury already has been done 
to at least one of our young and attractive lady friends 
by the open questioning of her relations with the TK 
on the part of at least one "Friend" of her own sex. 
There is every reason to believe that this young 
Friend of ours was innocent of the implied charge, and 
there is no indication whatever for suspicion. The 
same is true in the cases of many others. 

Therefore, agam, let us be charitable toward the 
guilty and innocent alike, a/nd refram from useless and 
harmful speculation. 

4. On April 6, 1916, in the presence of the writer 
and other witnesses, but without their approval, the 
TK married a girl about 40 years his junior, in the 
Court House of Chicago, 111. 

5. His letters contain many untrue, contradictory 
and misleading statements; of which these few sam- 
ples are characteristic: 



THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE' 



339 



Letter from TK to C. B. Oct. 
19, 1914: 

"The Book Co. is now my only 
source of income and at present, 
it is only just 'paying expenses of 
the office force." 

Letter TK to W. J. C. Jan. 3, 
1915: 

"The Book Co. is the only 
source of income in all the world 
at present and that is of a most 
uncertain nature. It has a little 
more than paid expenses the last 
six months.' ' 



In a letter dated 1/22/1915, TK 
wrote: — "My income is a large 
one, over $20,000 last year" . . 

In Mr. Crane's financial report 
to the TK of the I. A. B. Co. from 
Jan. 1st 1914 to Jan. 1st 1915 we 
find this: 
' ■ Increase value of 

•books $3,801.90 

Cash dividend 5,500.00 

Total dividend .$9,301.90 

Deduct difference in Bank 

Balance of 353.39 

Leaves a dividend for 

year of 1914 of $8,948,51 

Cash dividend paid to the 

TK by the I. A. B. Co. 

during the year 1913 

was $6,000.00 

During 1915 it was $7,500.00 



Letter TK to C. L. July 20, 
1912: 

" 1 have so provided that 

all the material help from Stu- 
dents and those IN the Work is 
placed in a TRUST FUND for 
the benefit of the Great Work in 
America. To guard every point, 

Inhad Mr. , one of the ablest 

lawyers in Chicago, draw the 
Trust Agreement so that it is 
self -perpetuating in the event of 
my death.' ' 

"Every dollar that has come to 
me — including my own personal 
means — has gone into this Trust 
Fund — and it is from this that I 
am carrying forward this entire 
Movement. ' » 



The Truth in the matter is 
this: 

The Trust Agreement is dated 
Aug. 1st, 1908 and as a conse- 
quence of that agreement John 
E. Richardson deposited with the 
Savings Dept. of the Illinois 
Trust and Savings Bank, Chicago, 
111., on Aug. 4, 1908 $50,316.97 
and on Aug. 5, 1908 $10,018.49. 

After Aug. 5th, 1908 not one 
penny was added to that Fund 
outside of the regular Savings Ac- 
count interest of 3 per cent, which 
usually was promptly withdrawn 
by the TK and on July 17, 1914 
the balance of $40,000 was trans- 
ferred by the TK to his Personal 
Savings Acct. with the same bank. 



340 



TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



Letter TK to L. H. Sept. 29, 
1913: 

"I have established a trust 
Fund, under the legal direction of 
Mr. C, and ALL moneys contrib- 
uted by students and Friends of 
the Work, to me, for the Work, 
are placed in that Fund, and are 
expended only in accordance "with 
the terms of the Trust." 

"The establishment of this 
Trust Fund, however, was a vol- 
untary matter on my part; and 
into it I placed every cent I had 
at the time; and into it has gone 
every cent I have received since 
then, over and above actual ex- 
penses of living and carrying on 
the Work. I have a small balance 
in the Fund at present." 

6. While simulating poverty, he received, fivm 
1906 to 1916, in the neighborhood of $300,000. (Three 
Hundred Thousand Dollars) as far as it has been pos- 
sible to trace the " contributions to the Work." 



The "small balance" in that 
fund at that time was $40,000. 
(Forty Thousand Dollars.) 



Early in May, 1916, in the 
presence of four of the seven 
Trustees and three other Students 
the TK explained to us in detail 
how he had spent every penny of 
tihe "Trust Fund," and he stated 
most emphatically that not a penny 
of that Trust Fund was left in his 
possession. 



A few days later, in the pres- 
ence of only the four Trustees, the 
TK stated "In the nature of a 
confession" that $40,000 of that 
Trust Fund were still in his pos- 
session. This statement was found 
to be true. At that time the 
$40,000 and accrued interest were 
in the Illinois Trust and Savings 
Bank, Chicago, 111., in his Per- 
sonal Savings Acct., to which he 
had transferred that sum from 
the "Trust Fund" July 17th, 
1914, and this sum was paid over, 
to the TK by the bank in July, 
1916. 



^>>7 




TK 
His "GREAT MASTER" and his "GURU MASTER' 



Avkxi i; JSiaui Kaxk 

JO- I I .'J 

"■</<, >/ y .. - ) . 

I! .. &d%m 

AvivXI tt STA'I'K l^AZS'K 

'',//,. '///,//. ////. - ' /.0/ ■ is. '.- 

AVi«;xi r K Statj!) 15a .vk 



JrC|*-*- 14-3 



VV)^ > lATDO^AfERICA* BOOK CO. 

THE CHlC»O0 CLEARING r KjUUt-£4SCi!st. Af.tAJ.jt^CT 

^ i - ! ~ ~ £ 



V, i,r.,,iA,,i,.jfci 



THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE' 



341 



In a letter to one of the Stu- 
dents, who the TK had good rea- 
son to believe had a considerable 
"Surplus," he, the TK, in his 
subtle and effective way appealed 
to the generous impulse by stat- 
ing that his daughter lhad been 
found to be severely ill and only 
the climate of California could 
save her life. He gave the Stu- 
dent to understand that he was 
"heart broken" because he could 
do nothing to save his beloved 
daughter's life, because all he had 
was $200.00 in the Bank. The 
Friend so addressed immediately 
responded with $2,500.00. 



A number of similar letters 
written by the TK are in existence 
today and proved very profitable 
for him. 



The TK had at that time more 
than $50,000 in 2 banks. 



Among the TK's receipts and checks we find these 
illuminating items : 



The contributions to the 
"work" received by the TK from 
one Student alone, between 1905 
and 1911, aside from smaller 
items, show the following amounts : 

Dec. 26, 1905 $2,000 

Feb. 21, 1906 1,000 

Apr. 27, 1906 1,000 

June 20, 1906 1,000 

July 26, 1906 1,000 

Nov. 20, 1906 1,000 

Mch. 12, 1907 9,500 

Moh, 18, 1907 1,000 

May 1, 1907 1,000 

May 11, 1907 1,000 

June 3, 1907 20,000 

June 19, 1908 50,000 

June 15, 1911 5,000 

Totaling $94,500 



The TK's checks to his daugh- 
ter, Verna, between Jan. 5, 1909 
and Oct. 9, 1915 aggregate 
$42,945.58, among them is one of 
$28,000, — dated Jan. 21, 1913, en- 
dorsed by Verna and stamped 
"Paid" by Avenue State Bank, 
Jan. 22, 1913. 



342 



TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



In addition to the $94,500.00 according to the state- 
ments of one Bank alone, namely, the Avenue State 
Bank, Oak Park, 111., TK deposited there, between 
May 5, 1909 and Oct. 11, 1915, $123,989.68. 

7. Statements made by him at different occasions 
to Students, and in his " Autobiographical sketch of 
the Life and Work of John E. Richardson' ' are at 
variance with official records. His " Autobiography' ' 
was written in 1912 and, so far as I know, there are 
only 8 copies in existence. 

I shall place a few quotations from this "Autobi- 
ography," and the real facts as we found them, side 
by side, and then let you verify those facts and com- 
pare them with his statements : 

The records of the University of 
Iowa show that John E. Rich- 
ardson was a Sub freshman in 
1873-74, 1875-76 and 1876-77. 
"He was registered again within 
the year 1877-78 as a Freshman 
in the philosophical course of the 
Collegiate Department and made 
the following record: Freshman 
mathematics (99), Virgil (94), 
International Law, 2nd Latin 
(90), Pros. Comp. P'd, Geometry 
(100)." He left the University 
in 1878. 

The ' « Examiner ' » writes : ■ ' The 
writer has been connected with 
the Examiner ever since it was 
changed from an evening to a 
morning paper, Oct. 4, 1880, and 
the party referred to in your let- 
ter was never connected with the 
Editorial Dept. of this paper." 



"'My college work was along the 
lines of an independent course 
and was finished in 1878 without 
degrees of any kind, but with a 
certificate from the President giv- 
ing me full credit for all work 
done, 1 — which covered most of the 
curriculum of Law, Medicine and 
an M A." 



"In September of that year I 
bade her (his wife) a temporary 
goodbye, and went to San Fran- 
cisco, where in the political inter- 
ests of Gen. Rosecrans, I directed 
the editorial policy of the "Ex- 
aminer ' ' — Democratic organ — for 
one year 1880 and 1881 and until 
Rosecrans withdrew from the race 
for the nomination." 



THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE* 



343 



" — I have said nothing of the 
years of political activities and 
ambitions, on the Pacific Coast, 
where I became a conspicuous 
figure, and where I undoubtedly 
could and would have become 
Governor of the great Common- 
wealth of California, had I yielded 
to the solicitation of my many 
friends — " 



The chief of Police of Stockton, 
Oal. writes: "Mr. Bichardson ran 
for Superintendent of Schools in 
the early '80s and was beaten by 
George Ladd by one vote." This 
is corroborated by another gentle- 
man in Stockton, a Mr. B., who 
stated under oath that to the best 
of his knowledge this was the ex- 
tent of "Richie V political ac- 
tivities in Stockton. 



After describing at length how a 
successful Attorney in Stockton, 
Cal. in 1881 offered him, a total 
stranger, "an equal partnership 
with him in an established prac- 
tice that netted him over $25,000 
annually' ' which he reluctantly 

accepted, he continues: " 

and thus I became a practicing At- 
torney, — something I had never 
contemplated |for one moment, 
until my first meeting with him, a 
week before. " 

"Our relations, both business 
and personal, were of the most 
cordial and pleasant nature and 
without a jar of any kind. Two 
years later, 1883, he withdrew from 
the firm, retired from active busi- 
ness life, and left me in full pos- 
session and ownership of a profes- 
sional practice which he had spent 
many years in building up and 
which netted me over $30,000 an- 
nually. " 



The Attorney's register at the 
Court House of Stockton, Cal. 
shows that John E. Bichardson 
and a Mr. Nutter were admitted to 
the practice of Law on Nov. 10, 
1885. 

Mr. Nutter, now a prominent 
practicing attorney of Stockton, 
Cal., and Mr. B. (a former county 
clerk), both of whom knew John 
E. Bichardson personally and 
called him "Bichie," stated to 
four Trustees, that until Nov. 10, 
1885, John E. Bichardson was 
deputy county clerk and not a prac- 
ticing attorney. 

IMr. Nutter stated that after 
Nov. 10/1885 he and "Bichie" 
went into partnership, which in 
1886 was dissolved because 
* ' Bichie ' ' went to Bismarck, N. D. 
where, according to Mr. Nutter, he 
thought there was a better opening 
for a young Attorney. 



344 



TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



' ' For some weeks continuously 
immediately prior to July 21st, 
1883, I had been intensely en- 
gaged in the trial of an important 
will contest involving an estate 
valued at about $1,000,000. (One 
Million Dollars). 



"Then it was, that the Great 
Master, H-N-K, came to me and 
identified himself, as a 'Master' 
and Inner Member of the Great 
School. He had come from the 
Central Temple in the fastnesses 
of the Himalayas, in far-off In- 
dia." 

"The Great 'Master remained 
with me in Stockton from July 
21, 1883 to Aug. 21st, 1884, dur- 
ing which time I was with him in 
his room No. 13 every day from 4 
p. m. until late into the night — 
usually between 1 and 2 the next 
morning. ' ' 

* \ As nearly as I can estimate, I 
spent 9 hours out of every 24 — on 
the average — with him — receiving 
instruction and doing the work he 
laid out for me." 



This contains several misstate- 
ments. The records of the Court 
House of Stockton show that John 
E. Richardson in 1883 was deputy 
county clerk, and was not admitted 
to the practice of Law until more 
than two years later, namely, Nov. 
10, 1885. 

Furthermore, the only will con- 
test on record there in 1883, 
bears a different date and in- 
volved only about $25,000. There 
is no case on record ' ' involving an 
estate valued at about $1,000,000. ' ' 

I ihave personally seen and ex- 
amined the records. 

So far no one has been found 
in Stockton who remembered ever 
having seen or heard of an East 
Indian in that town. In such a 
small place as Stockton the pres- 
ence of a Hindoo as a guest of 
the Grand Pacific Hotel over a 
period of 13 months could hardly 
pass, unobserved and unremem- 
bered. 

In reply to the question whether 
Mr. Richardson in 1883 and 1884 
had devoted daily from 6 to 9 
hours in addition to his regular 
work, to studies of an occult na- 
ture, Mr. Nutter replied that he 
did not see how that could have 
been possible for the reason that 
he (Nutter) and "Richie" dur- 
ing that period studied Law to- 
gether in "Richie's" home ev- 
ery day from 4 to 11 p. m. and 
from 5 to 9 a. m. From 9 a. m. 
to 4 p. m. they were engaged as 
Deputy County Clerks at the Court 
House. 



"THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE" 345 

8. In "The Great Psychological Crime," on page 
383, last paragraph, we find the following statement: 

"If such should be the case, then for your especial 
benefit in this connection it is here stated, for what 
it may be worth to you, that under and in accordance 
with the exact methods of Natural Science six hundred 
examinations have been made of an equal number of 
so-called insane inmates of one of the leading insane 
asylums of the country. Of the number thus examined 
349 were found to be in a subjective, psychic condition, 
under the hypnotic domination and control of outside 
spiritual intelligences. These were treated according 
to the diagnoses in conformity with the methods of 
Natural Science. The results show 349 cures. In 
other words, out of the entire number treated not a 
single failure resulted." 

Time and again the author of that book has stated 
to Students that these cures were accomplished in the 
State Hospital for the Insane at Stockton, California, 
with the assistance or co-operation of Dr. Brown, now 
deceased, who was then Medical Superintendent of 
that Institution. 

Four of the Trustees visited that Institution in 
May, 1916, and were unable to discover any corrobo- 
rative evidence whatever. Neither the present Medi- 
cal Superintendent, Dr. Fred Clark, nor Mr. Taylor, 
who was Secretary of that Institution under Dr. 
Brown, ever heard of so large a percentage of cures, 
and the official records or statistics of that institution, 
which date back to 1851, fail to reveal a marked in- 
crease in cures of insanity at any time. 

At this point it may be well for all of us to ask our- 



346 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

selves this question: Assuming that the official rec- 
ords of the State Commission in Lunacy of California 
are correct and reliable, then the TK's statement on 
pages 383 and 384 of the G. P. C. just quoted could 
hardly be considered as based upon facts, and if one 
"exact" and scientific statement of a very definite 
nature is unreliable, to say the least ; then how much 
credence are we justified to give to any statement in 
the volumes of "The Harmonic Series"! 

9. Edgemoor Sanitarium was officially closed July 
1, 1916, and returned to the donor, for the reason 
that the revelations of the preceding months had re- 
moved the basis of its existence. 

It is but fair to the Students to know that no benefit 
worth mentioning resulted from that Institution to 
anybody except the TK. To him the generous con- 
tributions for that Institution meant a rich harvest 
financially, and he took care to withdraw his balance 
of more than $6,000.00 just before his re-marriage and 
departure for California. 

10. And now, just a few words to dispel a false 
rumor to the effect that the TK had not received a 
square deal at the hands of the Trustees. Let me say 
with all emphasis possible that no man in a position 
similar to the TK's, could have received more courte- 
ous, considerate and generous treatment than was 
accorded to the TK. The evidence was placed before 
him in the Spirit of Kindness, Consideration and 
brotherly Love and we pleaded with him to tell us his 
side of the question, assuring him, that he was among 
true and loyal Friends who would stand by him and 
help him to get back upon the narrow path of Morality. 



"THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE'' 347 

But he remained deaf to all our pleadings and de- 
nied every charge, characterizing some of them as 
11 lies' ' and some as the result of subjective conditions. 
He involved himself in many contradictory statements. 
One day he told us that he was practically penniless 
and explained in detail how he had spent every dol- 
lar of the " Trust Fund." A few days later he ad- 
mitted that he had about $18,000 in his possession: 
"That is all I have, so help me God/' Still later he 
admitted that in addition to the $18,000, he had in his 
possession $40,000 of the Trust Fund, making a total 
of more than $58,000. 

And after all the deliberate mis-statements and con- 
tradictions, at the close of our sessions with him at 
949 Galena Ave., Pasadena, Cal., early in May, 1916, 
he stated, in reply to a question, that he was still a 
"Master" of the Great School and in full and inde- 
pendent possession and control of all his spiritual 
powers, which to the best of his knowledge, he HAD 
NEVER LOST FOR ONE MOMENT since his initia- 
tion into the Great School in Aug. 1884 

Throughout the whole length and breadth of our 
sessions with him at Edgemoor and at Pasadena, and 
in his interviews and letters with other Students, his 
sole concern appeared to be to shield himself without 
showing the least consideration for, and at the ex- 
pense of, other people, especially his victims. 

He is assuming the role of a martyr, who has been 
grievously wronged by designing and ambitious men 
at the "Center," and has given Students to under- 
stand that he is going to be back in full authority 
before long. 



348 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

I understand that he has received "hundreds of let- 
ters" from students all over the country, some of 
which I have seen, full of expressions of gratitude, love 
and loyalty. The writers of those letters having had 
nothing but the most incredible rumors, acted with 
perfect consistency, and are not in the least to blame. 
The light of Truth and Knowledge alone can dispel 
the darkness, which breeds error, and protect against 
imposition. 

In the foregoing I have given to you, without going 
into unnecessary details, the essential data in such a 
manner as to enable you to use your own Reason, 
and I have studiously endeavored to avoid any expres- 
sions which might possibly cloud the issue or preju- 
dice the reader. 

The revelations which I have made to you in this 
letter did not come all at once. They were revealed 
bit by bit in the course of several months and conse- 
quently my present conclusions were not reached 
hastily but on the contrary, are the result of a slow 
evolutionary process. 

At first I thought the TK once really had been a 
" Master,' ' and at some point in the immediate past 
had given way to the pressure of evil influences; but 
slowly and reluctantly I was forced to the conviction 
that he never was a " Master,' ' such as he describes in 
"The Great Work." 

At this point will naturally arise in your mind a few 
questions such as these: If he never was a "Master," 
how can you explain his writings, which surely are a 
lucid presentation of the loftiest principles and ideals 
of the human Soul? How is it possible for any man to 



"THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE'' 349 

write "The Great Psychological Crime," "The Great 
Work," "The Spirit of the Work," the 12th chapter 
of "The Gay Gnani of Gingalee," entitled "The 
Wages of Sin Is Death," and at the same time secretly 
live the very life which he so forcefully condemned, 
and violate every Moral Principle which he so elo- 
quently preached? 

These very same questions have been turned over in 
my own mind time and again, but I have as yet found 
no conclusive answer. 

I can see but four causes leading to such a life, 
namely, paranoia, general moral depravity, subjec- 
tivity or any combination of these. 

As to the "Technical Work," I have been driven 
to the conviction that it is a subjective, psychic pro- 
cess and consequently not dependent upon Morality. 

My conviction is based upon the following experi- 
ences : 

A. In 1909, under the direction of the then only 
Student who had been doing Technical Work, I de- 
voted six days to that work, and during those days had 
the experiences described in chapter 23 of the "Great 
Work," with these exceptions : As far as I now recall 
I never saw red, orange, yellow or green, nor the in- 
tense white light following the violet. The only colors 
I ever saw were blue, indigo, violet and the ' i resolving 
color" (a smoky, reddish-brown). 

Later I continued the Technical Work alone, for sev- 
eral months, devoting to it about one hour out of every 
twenty-four, and although I had a few glimpses of 
what appeared to be individuals, the effort was so 
great and the results so meager in comparison (due 



350 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

to difficulties within myself, I was told), that I felt 
I could not afford to take the time of "The Great 
Friends' ' (a large number of whom the TK said al- 
ways assist the Student in the T. W.) without first im- 
proving myself. A few years later, in 1912, 1 earnestly 
tried again for a few months, but with even less satis- 
factory results than in 1909, in spite of the most de- 
termined efforts on my part. 

Since that time I have seen absolutely nothing worth 
mentioning outside of the purely physical, notwith- 
standing the most sincere unremitting efforts to "Live 
the Life," improve myself and serve my Fellowmen. 
At that time I ascribed my seeming lack of success in 
the T. W. to unpreparedness on my part. Whether 
the individuals I saw during the T. W. were real peo- 
ple or mere pictures projected upon my mind, or any- 
thing else, I am, of course, now unable to tell. While 
they appeared to be real and tangible, almost physical, 
/ never saw them move. At that time I accepted the 
TK's statements; now, of course I am seriously in 
doubt as to the nature of my experiences. 

B. A number of the Students, among them some 
who had not had any of the Courses of Instruction and 
just started on the First General Examination, saw 
the colors of the "Magnetic Field," and had other un- 
usual experiences; and I know that the attitude of 
Soul, of some of them was not constructive, nor were 
they "Living the Life," as was proven after "The 
Great Expose," or "The Great Awakening." 

You will ask, and with perfect justice: Why is it 
that these astounding revelations have been kept secret 
for more than eight months from me, an accepted 



"THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE'' 351 

Student, who is as vitally interested as yourself or 
any other Student, and who has sacrificed time, posi- 
tion, money and, perhaps, his happiness ; all of which 
he might have employed to greater advantage else- 
where? 

This is my answer: As one of the seven Trustees, 
and as the President of that Board, I urged from the 
very beginning that the Board send to every accepted 
Student a statement of facts sufficient to enable him 
to verify their truth and to draw his own intelligent 
conclusion. 

At first the majority of the Board refused to give 
any information whatsoever to anyone whomsoever 
outside the mere verbal statement of the fact that the 
TK had withdrawn from the work because of im- 
morality. Later a few minor concessions were made, 
and finally, under the pressure of my insistence, they 
reluctantly agreed, that a number of facts should be 
given, but only from mouth to ear. As a result, today, 
more than eight months after the first revelations came 
to our attention, only about 10 percent of the accepted 
Students have officially received the facts and seen 
some of the evidence. 

Only when I had exhausted all of my resources and 
became convinced that my usefulness as a Trustee was 
at an end did I take the next logical step and resigned 
as President and as a member of the Board, sending 
to every member a duplicate letter, which reads as fol- 
lows: 



352 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Oak Park, 111., November 1st, 1916. 

To the Board of Trustees of "The Great School" (so-called) 

and to each member thereof. 

Gentlemen: — I hereby tender my resignation as member 
and president of this Board, to take effect at once. 

My reasons for taking this step are as follows : 

1. In the light of my present knowledge I can no longer 
maintain, defend and protect with earnestness, zeal and loy- 
alty the constructive success and prosperity of the said { " Great 
Work in America" for the reason that I found it to be based 
upon fraud, 

2. The attitude and action, as well as the inaction of a 
majority of the trustees regarding the rights of the Instruc- 
tors, Students, Applicants and "Friends of the Work" in 
matters of such vital importance as the revelations of the last 
seven months, has been from the beginning and is now in 
direct opposition to the Principle of Equity, Justice and 
Right, as that Principle appears to me. More than seven 
months ago the supposed "Master" TK was exposed, and to- 
day only about one-tenth of the number of Students have 
received an authoritative statement of some of the facts. 
About nine-tenths of the Students and ail of the Applicants, 
"Friends of the Work," and readers of "the books," num- 
bering many thousands, are officially still in ignorance and 
are still sacrificing time, money, opportunity, health and hap- 
piness in the pursuit of an ideal which the TRUSTEES 
KNOW TO BE A FRAUD. 

3. At the last meeting of the trustees, August 30, 1916, 
the majority of the trustees stated that they cannot and will 
not continue as trustees and it was decided to dissolve the 
trust, close up "the Work," and with the co-operation of Mr. 
J. E. Richardson, distribute the assets. To the present day, 
November 1st, 1916, no further action has been taken. 



"THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE" 353 

I have been unable to get the trustees together for action. 

My efforts to get action through correspondence have failed 
because only one of the trustees responded. All the rest of 
them have not even found it necessary to acknowledge receipt 
of the legal documents sent them for approval or criticism. 

4. There appears to be a conspiracy on the part of a ma- 
jority of the trustees to hamper and defeat the efforts of the 
President of the Board to obtain action in the interest of 
Justice and fair play, and to force his resignation. At least, 
I can place no other construction on the facts that: 

a. Official and private communications by the President 
are completely ignored. 

b. His efforts to get the trustees together of late have 
been fruitless. 

c. When he succeeded in getting four of the remaining 
five trustees together (two having resigned), two of them 
claimed there was no " quorum" basing their claim upon a 
large written array of legal "precedents," and consequently 
nothing was accomplished. This matter of "no 'quorum,' " 
however, did not prevent three of these four trustees a short 
time later to take legal steps of a rather drastic and far-reach- 
ing nature, which throws a peculiar light upon their sense of 
proportion, justice and consistency. I have reference to the 
following incident: * 

d. In the early morning of Friday, October 6th, 1916 
(before 7 o'clock, I was told), Mr. J. C. McC, one of the trus- 
tees, in my absence and without my knowledge, took posses- 
sion of the correspondence, papers, documents, furniture, etc., 
of the department of Instruction and Correspondence at 
"234," of which I had been in charge for more than 18 
months, and placed them in storage. This strange act on the 
part of a minority of the trustees, arbitrarily closed the 
department of Correspondence and Instruction without giving 
any explanations to the Instructors, Students, Applicants and 



354 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

"Friends of the Work" and relieved me of all responsibility 
in connection therewith. 



Had I followed my personal wishes, desires and inclinations 
in the matter, I would have resigned long ago; it was only 
my sense of duty and my obligation to the many Students 
and "Friends of the Work" which kept me from doing so 
at the continued sacrifice and neglect of my personal interests 
and affairs. 

Now, however, matters have reached a point where I can 
no longer continue as a trustee and at the same time retain 
my own Self -Respect. 

Henceforth I shall pursue my own path, guided by my own 
Reason and Conscience, and in line with my own sense of 
Equity, Justice and Right. 

If I have unintentionally harmed or wounded any member 
of the Board, I sincerely ask his pardon. 

If I have been too frank and too direct in words and acts 
to be agreeable to some of the members, I hope they are big 
enough and broad enough to ignore personal feelings in the 
presence of matters of almost infinitely greater importance. 

For any courtesies extended to me by tjhe members of the 
Board I shall always remain profoundly grateful. 

The discourtesies are forgiven and, I hope, will soon be 
forgotten. 

Sincerely, 

H. H. 

To prevent, as far as possible, any misunderstanding, and 
resulting injury to members of the Board, I desire to express 
my belief that every member of that Board did the best 
according to his capacity and his knowledge of the internal 
affairs of "the Work." We all are human and full of faults, 
and it would be unfair and foolish to expect perfection of 
imperfect beings. I am seriously in doubt whether any other 



"THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE" 355 

seven students would have done better, considering the gigan- 
tic problems confronting them. 

Immediately upon the receipt of my letter of resig- 
nation by the Vice President, a meeting of the Board 
was called by him for the following morning, Sunday, 
Nov. 5th, but so far as I have heard, not being present 
myself, nothing of consequence was accomplished. 

On Nov. 17th another informal meeting of the Board 
of Trustees was held in Cincinnati at which I was 
present upon invitation, because there seemed to be a 
reasonable prospect for the carrying out of the reso- 
lutions adopted by the Board August 30th to the 
effect : 

1. That the TK be called into conference as soon 
as possible. 

2. That his written consent be obtained to closing 
up the Work so far as his and our official connection 
with it is concerned, having due regard to the wishes 
of the Students with reference to such continuance in 
the Work as they may wish to make. 

3. That either (a) a committee be mutually ap- 
pointed to adjust all claims upon the property now in 
our hands, or (b) such adjustment be sought through 
a friendly suit which should be kept as quiet as pos- 
sible, or (c) such committee adjustment to be finally 
confirmed by a court." 

At the meeting of Nov. 17th, at which were present, 
outside of myself, five members of the Board, a general 
plan of procedure was agreed upon and a committee 

composed of F T. L . L H and J. C. 

McC was appointed for the purpose of disposing, 



356 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

m a just and equitable manner, of the assets under the 
control of the Board. 

The TK refused to come to Chicago or any other 
place and finally consented to give his power of at- 
torney to one of the oldest Students proposed by Mr. 

L , whose identity I cannot now reveal for the 

reason that he is one of the most prominent Masons 
in the United States and, as far as I know, has not yet 
accepted the power of attorney. 

In the course of the past months I received a number 
of requests from Students for the return of their 
correspondence with "234." I complied with that re- 
quest in a number of instances, after urging and ob- 
taining the consent of the Board. But with several 
of such requests received on and after Oct. 6th, 1916, 
I have been unable to comply, because on that date the 
records and correspondence of the School at "234" 

were removed from there by J. C. McC with the 

knowledge and consent of L H and Dr. E. 

M. W , but without my knowledge, and placed in 

storage with the Drechsler Storage Company, Oak 
Park, 111., subject to the sole access and direction of 
j.C.McC . 

I understand that the committee of three just men- 
tioned intend to communicate with every Student and 
" Applicant' ' for the purpose of ascertaining the 
amount of his contributions to "The Work" and his 
choice as to whether his records with "The School" 
be returned to him or destroyed by fire in the presence 
of competent witnesses, and it is not quite impossible 
that you may hear from them some time during the 
coming year. 



"THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE" 357 

Any letters in connection with the former depart- 
ments of Instruction and Correspondence or any sub- 
jects not covered in this letter, also requests for the 
destruction or return of correspondence, should be ad- 
dressed to J C. McC , care Indo-American 

Book Co., 5707 South Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 

And now, my dear Friend and Fellow-Student, hav- 
ing acquainted you with the true state of affairs, I 
want you to assume that portion of responsibility 
which, I think, is rightfully and justly yours as much 
as mine. I shall embody the gist of that responsibility 
in a few questions which I ask you to consider very 
carefully. At the end of 15 days, or as soon there- 
after as you may reach a conclusion which is entirely 
satisfactory to yourself, but not exceeding 30 days, I 
shall be glad to receive your answers to these ques- 
tions, unless you decide differently. 

These are the questions: 

1. How much of the data, if any, given to you in 
this letter have the Applicants for Studentship in 
"The School" the right to know; and in what form 
or manner should such data be conveyed to them? 

In considering this question I wish you would bear 
in mind the fact that all of the "Applicants" during 
the last eight months have been making, and are now 
making, more or less sacrifice of their .time, money, 
position, opportunities and domestic relations, in their 
earnest desire and effort to qualify for Studentship. 
Many of them are giving a minimum of 3 hours every 
day to answering the 3,857 "Questions on Natural 
Science and the Harmonic Philosophy," the correct- 
ness and "scientific" value of a large percentage of 



358 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

which now must be seriously questioned by you and 
me. 

75 it right, or fair, or just, or kind of us to keep 
them in ignorance and let them continue, under mis- 
apprehensions to make sacrifices which we now know 
to be largely useless and fruitless? 

It is my personal, unfaltering conviction, that as the 
former head of the men's and women's departments of 
Instruction and Correspondence at "234" it is my 
duty to give to the " Applicants' ' sufficient informa- 
tion, regarding the matters under consideration in 
this letter, to enable them to make an intelligent re- 
adjustment of their lives. Up to Oct. 6th, 1916 I was 
prevented, by the Board of Trustees, from doing my 
duty by you and the "Applicants," and when on that 
date a minority of that Board deprived me of the rec- 
ords and correspondence, they gave me at the same 
time, and thereby, a plausible excuse for shirking my 
responsibility to the Students and the "Applicants." 
Such an excuse might be perfectly plausible and sat- 
isfactory in the eyes of the law, but it does not consti- 
tute an excuse before the tribunal of my own Con- 
science. Hence this letter. 

2. How much of the data given to you in this letter, 
if any, have the 4,000 readers of Life and Action the 
right to know; and in what manner or form should 
such data be conveyed to them? 

3. How much of the data given to you in this let- 
ter, if any, have the readers of the "Harmonic Series" 
the right to know ; and in what form or manner should 
such data be conveyed to them? 

To form an intelligent estimate as to the number of 



"THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE" 359 

readers of the " Harmonic Series" the following data 
will be of value : 

According to the records of the I. A. B. Co., more 
than 24,000 copies of the Great Work, more than 
19,000 copies of Harmonics of Evolution, and more 
than 16,000 copies of the Great Psychological Crime, 
have been sold. A number of these books have been 
placed in Public Libraries, where many people have 
access to, and are reading, them. 

It would not seem unreasonable to assume that more 
than 100,000 people have read one or more of the three 
volumes of the "Harmonic Series" and that many 
times that number are going to read those books in 
the years to come. 

While it may be true that a large percentage of 
those readers will never be seriously affected by those 
books, and that the good which they may derive from 
the Truths in those books may outweigh the possible 
harm done by any errors or deliberate misstatements, 
nevertheless it is in all human probability but a ques- 
tion of time before another "Sole Representative" 
will appear upon the scene, assume full authority, 
gather in the Faithful, instruct them in the meaning 
of a "legitimate income" and relieve them of all 
"Personal Responsibility" in connection with their 
material "Surplus." 

What is our responsibility along that line, and how 
can we prevent such a calamity and protect the pres- 
ent and future generations from imposition under the 
guise of an appeal to the highest and noblest aspira- 
tions of the human Soul? 



360 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

4. What in your judgment ought to be done with 
Life and Action? 

Should it be discontinued or should it be continued ? 
If so, how and in what form? 

5. What in your judgment ought be done with : 

a. The books now on hand at the I. A. B. Co.? 

b. The plates of the books written by Florence 
Huntley and the TK? 

c. The plates of any other books published by the 
I. A. B. Co.? 

d. The copyrights of the books written by Florence 
Huntley and the TK, of Life and Action, of the 
Courses of Instruction, etc.? 

e. The copyrights of any other books published by 
the! A. B. Co.? 

6. Is it right to continue the sale and publication 
of the "Harmonic Series' ' without explanations, or 
ought an explanation to be embodied in each and every 
volume? If so, what explanation or announcement 
would you suggest? 

7. Have you made any contributions to the TK for 
the benefit of "The Work"? (This excludes any con- 
tributions made for his personal use and benefit. It 
excludes also contributions made to the L. V. H. and 
Edgemoor Sanitarium.) 

If so, mention amounts and dates, if you care to 
entrust me with such information, which may possibly 
serve to facilitate the not too easy task of the Com- 
mittee of Three. I hardly need assure you that only 
constructive use, as far as it lies in my power, will be 
made of any such information given to me personally. 

Lest my motives for bringing this letter to your at- 



"THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE'' 361 

tention be misunderstood, I desire, with all the earnest- 
ness and emphasis at my command, to state that as far 
as I am able to determine, my Soul is free from resent- 
ment, animosity or ill will towards anyone, and that 
my sole motive of this elaborate letter is to give, as 
concisely and accurately as possible, a statement of 
facts to which you, as an " Accepted Student,' ' are 
justly entitled, and without which you are unable to 
guide your future action and your future life hence- 
forth by your own Reason and your oivn Conscience. 

In the almost certain event that any of my state- 
ments in this letter should be questioned or contra- 
dicted, I wish you would, before passing definite judg- 
ment, re-read this letter and in doing so bear in mind 
the fact that I have made every statement to corre- 
spond with my knowledge and understanding of the 
respective data, events, etc., as nearly as the limita- 
tions of words and my command of the English 
language would permit. 

When answering my questions, if you deem them 
at all worthy of an answer, I wish you would do so in 
the fewest words possible, and if you can avoid it, and 
wish to do me a real favor, do not ask me any ques- 
tions. The reason for this request, which upon the 
surface may appear unfair to you, will become clear 
and also satisfactory, I hope, when you begin to realize 
the amount of time and effort involved in the writing 
and reproduction of this letter in sufficient numbers 
to reach all who are entitled to it. It would be a very 
simple matter to have fifteen hundred or more copies 
of a letter printed in any printing establishment, but 
the contents of this letter are of such a nature as to pre- 



362 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

elude such outside help, and with that explanation you 
are now able to appreciate some of the difficulties 
which had to be overcome in order to get this letter 
before you and all the other Students. In view of this 
enormous expenditure of time and energy, I cannot 
afford a similar effort, except in matters of extreme 
importance. 

Please remember that you are but one of many hun- 
dreds, and in so remembering you will forgive me, I 
am sure, if I ask you to kindly accept this letter as a 
reply to any of your letters that may have remained 
unanswered during the past few months. Even if I had 
nothing else to do, it would be impossible for me ade- 
quately to reply to all the letters I have received. 

It is not my desire to enter into any controversy, 
and if I should not reply to any challenge, you matf 
take it for granted that I consider the contents of this 
letter an adequate reply. 

In the very nature of things, one who has occupied 
a position of Responsibility and commensurate In- 
fluence, such as I happened to occupy in this move- 
ment, is bound to become the storm center toward 
which the bulk of the attacks, abuse, and criticism are 
naturally directed. And in fact, such attacks already 
have been made, in the subtle and insinuating manner 
which recently has become so sadly apparent to us. 

But, as in the center of a storm, so here too, is calm, 
serenity and peace, born of the clear Conscience of 
duties fully performed, and no outside tempest can 
permanently affect them. 

To me, this Work was real, and I gave my best to 
its support and extension, and to the many Students 



"THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE" 363 

and Friends. As a result, my labors were not in 
vain and bore legitimate fruit in the form of intellec- 
tual and spiritual growth. 

Now, that the spiritual foundation has been swept 
away from under "The Work," the superstructure 
cannot stand and endure, no matter how many at- 
tempts be made to "prop it up." 

Can anyone who knows the facts, really and truly 
believe, down in the innermost recesses of his Soul, 
that back of such a man, as forms the main considera- 
tion of this letter, can be a spiritual organization as 
exalted and sublime as we thought he represented? 
Would you or I, or any intelligent and sane man or 
woman choose or tolerate such a representative of 
their own affairs? 

Such and similar questions every Student will sooner 
or later have to answer to his own satisfaction. I 
have so answered them for myself, and it is because of 
these answers that I am unable to continue in any 
capacity in connection with this movement, and it be- 
comes imperative for me to sever any and all con- 
nections with it as soon as 1 can do so without shirking 
responsibilities already assumed. 

This severing of all connections with this particular 
"Work," I sincerely and earnestly hope, however, will 
not result in the severing, or even loosening of any of 
the many valuable ties of Friendship formed therein. 

If I have at times, especially during the last eight 
months, and possibly in this letter, given the appear- 



364 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

ance of a lack of consideration for the feelings of 
others, I sincerely hope that those thus affected will 
pardon such seeming disregard, on the ground that 
the establishment of Truth and Justice in the interest 
of thousands of Students and Friends, is proportion- 
ately more important, to me, than the feelings of a few, 
myself not excluded. 

With this explanation I hope to maintain and 
strengthen the ties of Friendship still existing, and to 
repair those which may have been damaged. 

It may not be out of place to give here a few words 
of cheer and encouragement to those who may possibly 
be so seriously affected by this disheartening revela- 
tion, as to become utterly discouraged or lose the basis 
of their Faith. 

Whether there is such an institution as a truly Great 
School of ancient and modern wisdom and learning, 
and whether there are real " Masters,' ' I do not know, 
however great my desire for such Knowledge may be. 
But I do know that the Moral Principles elucidated by 
the TK, are not his invention; on the contrary, they 
may be found in all the sacred ivritings of the human 
race, as far as we know. Those Moral Principles, 
therefore, appear to be universal and eternal and could 
not be affected by their disregard, abuse, or violation 
on the part of one man or any number of individuals. 
Those Principles are as true today as they ever were. 
They are very simple and few in number, and among 
them are: Unselfishness, Self -Control, Personal Re- 
sponsibility, Equity, Justice and Right, Morality and 
Service. 



"THE TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE" 365 

Even though they are but few in number, they may 
be still further condensed and more simply expressed 
in the words of the simple and all-sufficient Golden 
Rule : i ' Do unto your fellow men as you would have 
them do unto you." 

// we live, think and act by that simple rule, we need 
have no fear nor apprehension as to results. Every- 
thing else will fall in line, and our Life will be rich and 
serene in the consciousness of duties fully performed 
and in "The Peace that passeth all understanding." 

Life, to me, is like a term in School ; and all the ' ' dif- 
ficulties/ ' " obstacles/ ' "misfortunes/ ' "trials," etc., 
are but valuable and necessary lessons which Mother 
Nature 'is trying to teach to her children. 

If we, Nature's children, once clearly recognize this 
seemingly undeniable Truth, then the sad experience 
through which we are now passing, instead of injuring 
or discouraging us, will only prove to be but another 
valuable lesson which we sorely needed and from 
which, if met in the right spirit, we will emerge 
"RicmV'-er in Knowledge, Experience, Wisdom and 
Power. (Excuse the gentle sarcasm; the temptation 
was too great to resist.) 

You, like myself, undoubtedly recognize the one 
great lesson which this experience contains for us all, 
but it can do no harm to mention it here and emphasize 
its value: Never again let us TAKE ANYTHING 
FOR GRANTED, and never again let us accept a self 
appointed mediator, in whatever guise and under what- 
ever name, between our Conscience and our Creator. 

Henceforth let us stand solidly upon our own feet 
instead of ' ' feet of clay, ' ' and let us carefully examine 



366 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

his credentials, and exhaustively search his records, 
before we ever again accept, at his own valuation, a 
self-styled " Master,' ' or a "Sole Representative" of 
any ancient or modern School of Wisdom and Learn- 
ing, however high sounding its name or exalted its aim. 

"Beware of false prophets, which come to you in 
sheeps' clothing, but inwardly they are ravening 
wolves." 

' * Ye shall know them by their fruits. ' ' 

But let us remember, wherever there is an imitation, 
a sham, or a counterfeit, there necessarily must be a 
genuine, real and true opposite, and, Nature being just, 
we are bound to find it, provided we do our part by 
living that Life which we know will lead us ever on- 
ward and upward to "The Land of Light and Liberty' \ 
of our dreams. 

SO MOTE IT BE! 

With malice to none and good will toward all, I re- 
main, 

Cordially and fraternally, 

H. H. 



CHAPTER XXXI 

Habmonics of Evolution 

The impressive feature of this volume is a challeng- 
ing kind of positiveness. One can easily understand 
that the author feels perfectly sure of herself at every 
step of the way. She writes as if she knew from actual 
personal experience. She is positive with that kind of 
positiveness which one justly feels when the whole 
story has been told, when all the facts are known, when 
Time has proven the truthfulness and security of the 
assumed position. 

The volume really discusses two subjects: 

1. Spiritual Development and its results. 

2. The Law of Affinity, its possibilities and effects 
upon human life. 

Introducing the subject of what constitutes spiritual 
development and what it will enable the student to 
prove, Mrs. Huntley declares : 

" There is no death. 

"Life after physical death is a fact scientifically 
demonstrable. ' 

"Life here and hereafter has a common develop- 
ment and a common purpose.' ' 

And then explaining the source of her " authority' ' 
for making these statements, she very promptly, auto- 
cratically and most unscientifically shuts off all further 
and legitimate inquiry with the following: 

367 



368 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

"Having made this statement, any further discus- 
sion as to the relation of the writer to her authority 
is obviously out of place.' ' 

Then for seventy-odd pages she proceeds to write in 
a way which leaves in the mind of the reader the 
impression that she was testifying from a personal 
knowledge based upon actual demonstrations, of what 
she herself knew of the spirit world: and that this 
knowledge was the result of a definite, technical spirit- 
ual development. 

This impression is misleading and exceedingly un- 
fortunate, because Florence Huntley made no such 
demonstrations. 

1. TK possessed no "technical" work that would 
make such demonstrations possible. 

2. TK's only two " technical' ' students were men. 

3. The foregoing being true, it follows that what she 
had to say on spiritual development was purely hear- 
say. 

4. Had she been able to see or otherwise sense the 
true situation, there is not the least doubt but she 
would have made every possible effort to extricate her- 
self from TK's domination. 

5. Florence Huntley's own personal testimony to the 
writer, and to all Chicago students, upon many occa- 
sions, was always to the effect that she had never, at 
any time, had any psychic or spiritual experiences de- 
scribed by TK as the results of a conscious, voluntary 
and independent exercise of the spiritual senses. 

It will be seen then that what she has to say on the 
subject of spiritual development is purely hearsay, and 
therefore utterly devoid of scientific value. 



HARMONICS OF EVOLUTION 369 

We now come to a consideration of the "Harmonics 
of Evolution" as a sex book, and its possible destruc- 
tive influences upon certain types of men and women 
who find themselves susceptible to " scientific' ' excuses. 

Thruout the volume the author sings a song of love 
triumphant, of the victory of love over all earthly bar- 
riers. She writes from a personal experience, as one 
who has personally demonstrated the Law of Affinity 
and found its operation true, sure, scientific and capa- 
ble of being reduced to a basis of mathematical and 
musical exactness. 

Thus the book became a "scientific" book, the first 
of the three "scientific" Texts Books of the TK's 
imaginary "Great School." 

But Time has proven that, with all the "exact" 
knowledge of the ins and outs of the Law of Affinity 
and the "scientific demonstration" which TK led her 
to believe she had made, she was grossly deceived. 

TK had simply twisted and tortured, misrepre- 
sented and misapplied the holy Law of Love in a way 
to make of it an attractive bait for his "Great School" 
and a disintegrating factor in innumerable homes 
wherever his ' ' teachings ' ' have gone. 



Nearly all occult movements dominated by a self- 
appointed "master" are saturated more or less with 
the subject of sex. Hardly a year passes that the news- 
papers do not unearth some elderly "master" with a 
lot of women, usually young ladies, attached to his 
occult household. And without exception these repro- 
bates hide behind, and try to justify themselves by 



370 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

some private interpretation and violation of the Law 
of Affinity. 

As a consequence, affinity books, pamphlets, " les- 
sons/ ' etc., both for public and private circulation, are 
to be found in nearly all these occult traps. And such 
is the nature, scope and effect of almost all discussions 
of the subject of affinity by these soul trappers, that 
it sows needless misunderstanding, discontent, discord, 
divorce, moral disease and incalculable harm wherever 
it goes. 

In almost every instance, the subject is so presented 
that some word, some paragraph or chapter gives the 
reader a mental hold so that, if need be, and he chooses 
to do so, he may torture the interpretation into a per- 
sonal excuse for his or her weaknesses and mistakes, 
use it to stimulate discontent and self-pity, and finally 
make it a justification for open or secret misconduct. 
For a certain type who do not always weigh carefully 
the responsibilities of life and value correctly the 
"Karonc" possibilities and opportunities of their en- 
vironment, the subject of Affinity nearly always leads 
into winding paths of spiritual confusion, moral weak- 
ness, unhappiness, humiliation and remorse. 
# # # # # 

In this connection and considering the number of 
books published and the years of its circulation, it is 
my honest conviction that no sex book ever published 
has caused the sorrow and irreparable injury to human 
lives, accomplished by "Harmonics of Evolution." 
This statement is based upon: 

1. A personal knowledge of the correspondence of 
the " Great School." 



HARMONICS OF EVOLUTION 371 

2. A personal knowledge of the correspondence of 
the Indo-American Book Co. 

3. Personal interviews with both students and read- 
ers who related their affinity affairs. 

4. The newspaper records of divorces and affinity 
scandals in which the "philosophy" of the "Great 
School" in general, and of the "Harmonics of Evolu- 
tion" in particular, was openly charged with being the 
primary and direct cause. 

As to the "scientific" value of the Affinity Philos- 
ophy of the " Great School," we have TK's own per- 
sonal testimony in the following statement made to 
the Committee of Four Trustees at Pasadena, Cali- 
fornia, on May 5, 1916. 

Question: "Did you ever state to anyone that the R A 
was your Soul Mate?" 

Answer by tk: "I did not. It is a subject that has come 
up, I think as many as one hundred times, from various 
sources, and I have been asked various questions concerning 
affinities. I have said in every instance that this is a matter 
that no one can prove definitely, and especially prove to any- 
body else, and for that very reason I have discouraged all 
discussions of this subject, as far as I could. 

I have never made the statement to any living mortal that 
Florence Huntley and I were Soul Mates. 

I knew, however, or felt sure, that it was inferred by some 
of the Friends, by reason of the fact that she was the author 
of 'Harmonics of Evolution' with myself as her instructor." 

In contrast with this beautiful tribute to the * ' scien- 
tific value ' ' of his affinity philosophy, there is in exist- 
ence a great stack of letters written by TK to Florence 
Huntley between 1888 and 1894, and the entire burden 
of this evidence is a crafty effort on the part of TK 
to convince Mrs. Huntley that she was his "soul- 
mate," his "affinity." 



CHAPTER XXXII 

"The Gkeat Psychological Crime" 

"The Great Psychological Crime stands for a definite 
knowledge and a definite personal experiment, experience and 
demonstration, or it stands for nothing, and is of less value 
than its material make-up." — Florence Huntley, Editor the 
G. P. C, p. 402. 

In producing the ' ' Great Psychological Crime, ' ' TK 
simply takes a single idea and by repeating the same 
thot over and over again, times without number, works 
it up into a sort of engulfing tidal wave in the form 
of an imaginary wholesale hypnotic and mediumistic 
destruction of the whole human family. All of which 
is quite in line with his other theatrical tales, so far 
as reliable and scientific data are concerned. 

The following criticism of the ' l Great Psychological 
Crime ' ' is taken from the editorial department of that 
wonderfully helpful, breezy, spiritually ozonated mag- 
azine, "The Nautilus." This comment brings up a 
subject which, in connection with the GPC, is vital 
and to the point. 

"I have read 'The Great Psychological Crime,' and I don't 
agree with it in all its conclusions. 

"The I in every human being is the citadel which cannot 
be stormed by all the suggestions of hypnotists and mediums, 
or by the devil and all his imps. (The devil himself is merely 
a personification of all the tearing-down forces in creation.) 

"Getting hypnotized is certainly no worse than getting 
drunk and befuddled on booze or cocaine, or any other drug, 

372 



"THE GREAT PSYCHOLOGICAL CRIME" 373 

and it isn't half as bad as the psychological crime of getting 
drunk on the old-fashioned hell-fire and damnation kind of 
religion. 

"THE GREATEST PSYCHOLOGICAL CRIME IN 
THIS WORLD IS TO DOPE ONESELF OR ANOTHER 
WITH FEAR. 

"What I don't like about 'The Great Psychological Crime' 
is that it fills you up with fear: fear of spirit control, fear 
of spiritualists, fear of mediums, fear of suggestions, fear of 
auto-suggestion, — in fact the book fills you up with 
psychological fear." 

There is nothing more destructive to human intelli- 
gence and its possibilities than the fear created by 
false impressions, hypnotic suggestions and mislead- 
ing conclusions. And it is just this kind of fear that 
is planted and stimulated and whipped into a sort of 
insanity by TK's " Great Psychological Crime." It 
is purely imaginary, growing out of TK's suggestions. 

Hundreds of people with indigestion, cold feet, neg- 
lected dispositions and over-responsive imaginations 
have, upon reading the GPC, straightway begun to 
imagine that either they themselves or others were 
being pursued by obsessing spirits. Some such people 
have lived in this nightmare of fear for months at a 
time, when all in the world that was the matter with 
them was the fact that they had stuffed themselves 
with TK's fear-producing, spirit-paralyzing sugges- 
tions. 

I have had "ethical students' ' confide in me that 
they frequently had to fight off obsessing spirits." It 
was summer time, and when I questioned them closely, 
I found that their secret apprehension and imaginary 
" battles' ' with " spirits' ' had no other foundation than 



374 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

a tendency to fall asleep while riding on street cars, 
or while reading, or listening to some lecture ! What 
pitiful mental bondage to an absolutely groundless 
apprehension. And these were students of TK's so- 
called "science." 

* # # # # 

TK's "Great Psychological Crime" is built entirely 
upon the theory that over 50% of all insanity is due 
directly to obsession or spirit control, and the strong- 
est statement to be found in the book — the one calcu- 
lated to command and absolutely force acceptance of 
his theory is found on page 383. But as an introduc- 
tion to that statement we will first quote the opening 
paragraph of "Mediumship and Insanity," Chapter 
XV, p. 278, as follows : 

"In one of the largest western institutions for the insane 
in the United States, six hundred diagnoses have been made 
showing with absolute certainty that in fifty-eight per cent 
of the cases thus examined the sole immediate cause of in- 
sanity was me'diumistic subjection. That is to say, these 
diagnoses showed fifty-eight per cent of those examined were 
at the time under domination and control of outside, spiritual 
intelligences. ' ' 

Again on page 383, in his statement "To the Physi- 
cian," TK says: 

"Altho it is conceded that the view here presented may 
not be, to you, professionally orthodox, nevertheless it is 
earnestly hoped that the facts recorded will be deemed suffi- 
cient to warrant at least a non-professional inquiry on your 
part along the lines indicated. 

"If such should be the case, then for your especial benefit 
in this connection it is here stated, for what it may be worth 
to you, that under and in accordance with the exact methods 



"THE GREAT PSYCHOLOGICAL CRIME" 375 

of Natural Science six hundred examinations have been made 
of an equal number of so-called insane inmates of one of the 
leading insane asylums of the country. Of the number thus 
examined 349 were found to be in a subjective, psychic con- 
dition, under the hypnotic domination and control of outside 
spiritual intelligences. These were treated according to the 
diagnoses in conformity with the methods of Natural Science, 
the results show 349 cures. In other words, out of the entire 
number treated not a single failure resulted. 

This record speaks for itself. Indeed, it speaks more elo- 
quently than all the theories, speculations, suppositions and 
assumptions combined, which constitute so large a part of the 
medical literature pertaining to the great general subject of 
insanity. This statement is made without prejudice, for the 
difficulties which surround and have accompanied the develop- 
ment of this particular branch of medical science are fully 
understood and appreciated. As far as your specialists have 
gone their work has been most creditable in every particular. 

"In view of the record, however, it would appear to the 
writer that whatever views you may entertain concerning the 
causes of insanity in the 349 cases above referred to, the 
record in itself is worthy of your thoughtful consideration. 
The simple fact that all these cases were treated upon the 
theory of hypnotic control by outside spiritual intelligences, 
and the treatment prescribed was successful in every instance, 
should be sufficient to establish in your professional mind the 
reasonable presumption that the diagnoses were correct. 
Otherwise the logic of facts is without meaning or value. ' ' 

Many people upon reading this "record" have said, 
"Here is something that seems final, something apart 
from the author's mere assertions. Here is what ap- 
pears to be an actual, tangible, reliable record of work 
done, of demonstrations made, — and under conditions 
that would make pretense and fraud impossible. ' ' 



376 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

And TK himself, in the most positive possible lan- 
guage at his command says, "This record speaks for 
itself." But why did he not publish the actual records 
of the State Institution in which these cures were sup- 
posed to have been demonstrated? Why of these 349 
cured patients did not TK produce a hundred, fifty, 
twenty-five, ten, — or even one to testify to the truth 
of his claims? Or failing in this, why did he not go 
into any one of a hundred or more hospitals for the 
insane and produce even one such cure ? 

The fact that not a single cure was performed at the 
Edgemoor Sanitarium is the answer. 

# # • # « 

In May, 1916, four members of the Board of Trus- 
tees visited the Stockton (California) State Hospital 
for the express and specific purpose of making a care- 
ful and complete investigation into these very claims 
made by TK in the GPC. The records of the Stockton 
institution are exceptionally well kept and complete in 
every detail. Every assistance was rendered the visit- 
ing committee in their efforts to make the investiga- 
tion thorough and final. And when the work had been 
concluded, not a single sentence or even a word, writ- 
ten or oral, or trace of anything of any kind had been 
found to indicate that John E. Richardson had ever 
had anything to do with the institution in any capacity 

whatever. 

# # # # # 

And in the face of his knowledge of the falsity of 
his so-called "record," TK in Life and Action, Bv. 6, 
p. 336, for August, 1915, says : 



"THE GREAT PSYCHOLOGICAL CRIME" 377 

' ' The article to which you refer in The Great Psychological 
Crime was written from the viewpoint of many years of active 
and definite experience in the fields of medicine and the 
study of Therapeutics. There is not a statement contained 
in it that is not fully justified by the known facts of Natural 
Science. ' ' 

TK here probably refers to his two years experience 
as an Oxydonor " Doctor.' ' See Chapter 16, pp. 219- 
238. 

As to the "scientific" value of "The Great Psycho- 
logical Crime," — what is there in the book to entitle 
it to the distinction of being a scientific work? Abso- 
lutely nothing except the assumed authority of its 
author. The book carries no actual records, no relia- 
ble statistics, no evidences, no proofs, no anything but 
the author's personal stories of imaginary experiences, 
experiments, demonstrations, etc., all of which so far 
as it has been possible to investigate them at all, each 
and every personal claim has been proven to be untrue 
and entirely without foundation in fact. 

As for insanity thru obsession, or spirit control, it 
has been recognized as both a possibility and a reality 
for many thousands of years, and the subject has been 
treated by many different writers, from ancient bib- 
lical periods up to the present time. But to arbitrarily 
fix upon obsession as the cause of 58% of all insanity, 
and this too upon purely fictitious demonstrations, 
records, etc., is entirely misleading and deplorably 
harmful to those who may be led to believe in this 
kind of " science.' ' It is probable that less than 1% 
would be a liberal and conservative estimate of all 
insanity caused by psychic obsession. 



CHAPTER XXXIII 
"The Great Work" 

"No greater fallacy could be suggested than to 
credit the author of this volume personally with the 
honor of having wrought out, from the recesses of his 
own brain and consciousness, the definite results here 
referred to. He would be most willing and happy to 
acknowledge such honor if he were justly entitled to 
it. Such, however, is not the case." — TK in The Great 
Work, p. 259. 

From the fact that the essays on Ethics comprising 
"The Great Work" appear to be so carefully and 
rationally worked out, coupled with the admission of 
their Author as quoted above, many people have found 
it easy to readily believe that the work was not the 
result of any one mind, but that probably it may have 
somehow been received — as a whole — complete as it 
appears — by TK from some ancient "Great School," 
as the wisdom of the ages. 

378 



THE GREAT WORK" 379 



It is true : 

1. That these principles of morality represent the 
fundamental and universally accepted standards of 
Right Living. 

2. That the ideas and ideals presented in these 
essays are to be found in the moral literature of the 
world's great teachers, and may therefore be said to 
represent the ' * wisdom of the ages. ' ' 

3. That the application of such principles to the 
* * Living of a Life ' ' inevitably results in compensatory 
spiritual and intellectual progress. 

4. That they are not the product of any one mind. 

As far back as 1899, following the publication of 
4 'Harmonics of Evolution/ ' there had begun, thru the 
efforts of Florence Huntley, the integration of a small 
group of Students. This led to the establishment of 
regular weekly meetings which were continued for 
many years. 

The men and women — a dozen or less — comprising 
this little Group were without a single exception pro- 
found and earnest thinkers and students. 

Prom my personal knowledge of and acquaintance 
with them dating back over a period of eleven years, 
I gladly testify that they constituted a body of scholars 
which for clear intelligence, clean characters, pure 
motives and earnest search of Truth for Truth's sake, 
I sincerely believe could not be excelled by an equal 
number anywhere in the world. 



380 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Now these men and women were engaged for all 
these years upon the same identical topics and work 
which comprise TK's essays on Morality, as found in 
"The Great Work." For instance, week after week 
would be given to the analysis, study and discussion 
of Consciousness; other successive weeks were devoted 
to the same critical analysis, study and discussion of 
Will. In the same careful, continuous, methodical 
manner this little Group studied the Functions and 
Primary Purpose of the Soul; the elements and prin- 
ciples of Personal Responsibility; the helps and hin- 
derances to intellectual and spiritual development, etc., 
covering in a most thoro manner all that is discussed 
and even more than appears in TK's " Great Work." 

It was both a Group and an Individual work, and 
the results obtained and conclusions reached on the 
various subjects studied, represented the combined 
work of all the members of the Group. 

From this, you will understand that TK, for a period 
of over six years had the benefit of all these meetings 
and of the study, the analysis, discussions and con- 
clusions of this zealous body of intelligent Students. 

When therefore* in 1906, the " master" came to write 
his " Great Work," covering the findings of what he 
called his "Great School," on the subjects of "What 
Constitutes Scientific Demonstration," "Conscious- 
ness," "Will and Desire," "Personal Responsibility," 
etc., could there be any reason (other than inability to 
write) why he should not be able to handle these sub- 
jects in a clear, concise and systematic manner? 

As a matter of fact he had at his command the care- 
fully kept, accumulated data, the results of six year* 



"THE GREAT WORK" 381 

of hard and earnest work on the part of all these Stu- 
dents, and there is probably not a single proposition 
or paragraph in what may be called the Ethical por- 
tion of "The Great Work," that was not thoroughly 
covered and settled by these students years before TK 
began his writing of the book. 

This being true, so far as the origin of the philos- 
ophy is concerned, John E. Eichardson (TK) is no 
more entitled to the credit for this work than any other 
individual member of that Group. 

As for "The Great Work" being a "scientific" 
work, it is no more entitled to such distinction than 
Emerson's Essays or a dozen other books on ethics. 
Its ethics will do no more for a man than the practice 
of the simple Golden Eule. 

Its "scientific" value rests solely upon TK's as- 
sumed authority, and upon the same kind of "verifica- 
tions," "records," "evidences," "proofs," "scientific 
demonstrations" and fiction, pure and simple, upon 
which are based "The Great Psychological Crime" 
and "Harmonics of Evolution." 



CHAPTER XXXIV 

The "Master" Consults a Medium 

Of all modern liberal philosophic movements, Spir- 
itualism, more than all others combined, accorded TK 
a respectful, courteous, and intelligent hearing, and 
this too up to the point of simply closing their eyes 
and blindly swallowing all his extravagant personal 
claims. But they did not close their eyes and they 
did not swallow his stories. 

Spiritualists thru nearly a century of doing their 
own thinking, have learned the value not only of hold- 
ing themselves in readiness to hear every professor 
and consider every new philosophy, but at the same 
time they have learned the necessity of demanding the 
credentials of said professor and the evidences of the 
truth of said professor's philosophy. 

Those of us who were readers of "The Progressive 
Thinker" in 1893-94 will recall that practically whole 
pages of that excellent publication were freely thrown 
open to both TK and his followers, and to all who 
chose to enter into the discussion of TK's proposi- 
tions. For months this open forum was maintained, 
and tens of thousands of readers were given every 
possible opportunity and encouragement to investigate 
TK and his so-called " school.' ' 

Such an opportunity for free advertising and propa- 
ganda work, TK could not have realized from any 
other body of intelligent, liberal, progressive students 

382 



THE "MASTER" CONSULTS A MEDIUM 383 

of spiritual philosophy in the world, but even so, his 
" Great School" made little or no favorable impres- 
sion upon these generous people, for the simple reason 
that he wrote from ambush and had no evidences or 
proofs to support his "scientific" tales. For instance 
in his "Great Psychological Crime," pp. 230-31, TK 
publishes the following "statistical facts": 

"But what of the statistical facts? Do they verify or 
disprove the principle here declared? Let us see. 

From the class of mediums whose development has been 
sufficient to establish definite and unqualified results, science 
has gathered and is able to formulate and present the fol- 
lowing verified results of the mediumistic process upon the 
medium, viz.: 

1. Seventy-three per cent, of the professional mediums 
referred to sooner or later develop abnormally increased 
and uncontrollable sexual passions, while as high as ninety- 
two per cent, show marked increase of the sexual appetite or 
desire. 

2. A fraction over sixty per cent, develop hysterical or 
ungovernable temper, while as high as eighty-five per cent, 
show marked increase of nervous irritability. 

3. Fifty-eight per cent, develop dishonesty and fraud, 
while ninety -five per cent, show lack of moral discrimination 
and courage. 

4. A fraction over seventy per cent, develop some inor- 
dinate vanity, while ninety-two per cent, become more or less 
egotistical. 

5. As high as ninety-eight per cent, develop some discov- 
erable form of selfishness, sensuous desire, emotional weak- 
ness or degrading physical appetite. 

6. In no instance does the process develop marked indi- 
vidual improvement from a moral standpoint. 

Not a word of reference is made as to where or how 
he made up this classification. Not even a suggestion 
or promise of evidence or proof is offered. TK simply 
and arbitrarily fixes the "percent" at 40, 50, 60 or 



384 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

98; sets it down as fact, dogmatically assumes that 
it is unanswerable, and lets you take his word for it, 
whether you want to or not. 

And this "scientific" method of convincing people 
of his authority as a "master," is entirely consistent 
with and characteristic of the dogmatism found in all 
his personal pretensions. As it appears to the writer, 
TK's entire movement depended upon just two fac- 
tors, in about the following proportions: 

Deceptive Suggestions, 98 per cent. 

Impressional Mediumship, 2 per cent. 

From this it will be seen that for his "success" he 
depended scarcely at all upon anything but his ability 
to impress his readers with a purely assumed, exter- 
nal cloak or veneer of sincerity and honesty. He pos- 
sessed no spiritual powers, he taught nothing new, he 
cured no insanity, he did not heal the sick. And in 
order to anticipate any means of testing him out he 
kept himself under cover and argued thus: 

I am a master, a real master. 

I possess ALL the evidences, credentials and proofs 
to back up my claims. 

I will, however, offer only one evidence. 

This is an "internal evidence." 

Morality is right. 

Do you agree with me that morality is right? 

I preach morality. 

If you agree with me that morality is right, then 
you have the "internal evidence." 

In this "sign" you have the evidence of my mas- 
tership. 
. This is the only sign I have to offer. 



THE "MASTER" CONSULTS A MEDIUM 385 



TK always guarded himself and his "school" 
against Spiritualists, sensitives and mediums, because 
he knew they would quickly detect and expose his 
fraud. On the other hand I know personally several 
people who were, thru mediums, warned by their 
friends on the spiritual planes of life to beware of 

TK's " school.' ' 

# # # * * 

In his books TK explains very definitely his ideas of 
the difference between "masters" and "mediums." 
He claims to have become a "master" in 1883-84. 
To have been in constant, conscious, independent com- 
munication with the Spirit World, and able to with- 
draw from his physical body at will, ever since that 
time. 

He explains that in 1883-84 he learned positively 
that mediumship is destructive. He then and there 
gave up all mediumistic investigations FOREVER. 

1. He was a ' ' master. ' ' He did not need a medium. 

2. For him to consult mediums would be an open 
acknowledgment that he was not a "master." 

3. It would also be to him the commission of what 
he calls a "Great Psychological Crime." 

Nevertheless, TK did consult mediums, and we here- 
with present the evidences. 

The first is an exact photographic reproduction in 
TK's own handwriting, over his own signature, of a 
statement which appears on an envelope containing a 
detailed account of a sitting the "master" had with 
one of the justly celebrated Bangs Sisters. Kindly 
note that this document bears the date of September 
25, 1898. 



386 



TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 




THE "MASTER" CONSULTS A MEDIUM 387 



* k C~ A^*«^y aftZr~*>*. , SvfU XS- -v*&ZL. tu~ *>. 

*»»■«<* o4f<W _ J' eis/ttJ VtrMCt. -rvow J-fU. -i^vuAl A^n. 

Of <M.«x>- -fru^xtts »-*y. t&t S-fairLi ■X.LcC*. if *&fl ■> 

tfu I3a.t*<fj StUis+j '•' ^y-U-crsv rr tit *U*c*. w«»j 
(«^> o *£^/ al "US? TlrtU CUc^ Si. 

J did ~1*.<A~ -i^cn* ?Uc*~ a^J *^aJ *v**> AA>i.au 

Of A~y AArkcrs, ^-" clAJLlcc~<.J Z*. 1-L. yfrefii*- J 

Cj«,e*~i &c<sJ*tJ ZeJ^ -w^C 5«^ *&. -wtft* ;"£«. 



THE ABOVE IS THE SECOND PAGE OF A FIFTEFN-PAGE 
DESCRIPTION IN TK's OWN HAND WRITING . OF A SEANCE 
HE HAD WITH ONE OF THE BANGS SISTERS, ON SEPT. 35 . 
1698 . COULD THERE BE ANY MOPE POSITIVE EVIDENCE 
THAN THIS, THAT TK CONSULTED SPIRIT MEDIUMS? 

NOTE THAT THE "MASTER" WANTED TO SEE IF HE 
COULD "GET" ANYTHING SATISFACTORY FROM ANY OF HIS 
FRIENDS ON THE SPIRIT SIDE OF LIFE. 



388 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

The second evidence submitted is also an exact 
photographic reproduction, being the second page of 
a fifteen-page description of the seance. This also is 
in TK's own handwriting over his own signature, and 
reads as follows: 

"On Sunday afternoon, Sept. 25, while Mrs. R. was away, 
I asked Verna how she would like to go with me to some 
"medium" and see if we could get anything satisfactory 
from any of our friends on the spirit side of life. 

"I took up the Sunday Times-Herald, and ran down the 
column of advertisements of 'mediums.' I came to the ad- 
vertisement of the 'Bangs Sisters,' whose residence was (and 
still is) at 654 West Adams St. 

"I did not know them, and had no idea as to their merit. 
But observing that they were the nearest to us in point of 
distance of any whose 'ads' appeared in the paper, I sug- 
gested that we try them. 

"We reached their residence about 3:30 p. m., and were 
admitted to the parlor by a young man who said the ladies 
were busy just then but would soon be at leisure. 

"We waited a few moments and an old gray-haired lady 
who said she was the mother of the 'Bangs Sisters' came in." 



It will be recalled that Florence Huntley became 
TK's first student in 1887. He had then been a " mas- 
ter' ' for three years. He was supposed to know that 
mediumship is always dangerous and inevitably 
destructive. We take it that being a " master* ' he 
must have taken great pains to explain the nature of 
mediumship and to warn his "first student' ' against 
consulting mediums or having anything to do with the 
mediumistic process. 



THE "MASTER" CONSULTS A MEDIUM 389 

But Florence Huntley's diaries contain many evi- 
dences which prove conclusively that her " master* ' 
either did not know what he claims to have known at 
that time or he failed to warn her against the process. 
The following, dated July 22, 1894 — seven years after 
her supposed studentship began — is a reprint from her 
diary : 

"July 22, 7:30 p. m. 

"At 4, I went by agreement to Mrs. M . We sat with 

Ouiji, and the results are interesting enuf to make note of. 
I shall try to put them down in dialogue form. 

Q. "Who is it?" A. "R ," 

Q. "And this is S— !" A. "Yes." 

Q. "S will you tell me how or by what force you are 

able to control this board?" A. "By spiritual influence in 
various ways." 

Q. "Who are you with most in that country t" 
A. "R ." 

Q. "Would you like to return to earthly conditions?" 
A. "No." 

Q. ' ' Can you tell us how you pass your time ? " A. " With 
R in one long dream of bliss. ' ' 

Q. "Have you any special pursuit?" A. "Yes, music 
and song." 

Q. "Can you sing now?" A. "Yes." 

Q. "With R ?" A. "Yes." 

Q. "Do you know M ?" A. "Yes." 

Q. "What?" A. "I do not approve of the money af- 
fairs. ' ' 

Q. "Why?" A. "He wronged you girls." 

Q. "How?" A. "Unequal." 

"Then, as if hurt or mean, he left or was forced away by 
something that staggered and crawled. It was horrible. The 
very motion was repulsive. We questioned — no answer. 
Again it wriggled. ' You make fun of me. Good Bye. * But 
it remained to tell us it was a murderer and begged us to 
pray for his soul's release. It disdained acquaintance, but 
repeated its cry for 'help.' It was horrible. We took our 
hands from the board until it was silenced. ' ' 



CHAPTER XXXV 

The Philosophy as a Whole 

"If the Harmonic Series is not based upon a 
definite school of Knowledge, the books fall below the 
level of speculative philosophy. They are canards, 
falsehoods, elaborated nonsense; they are not entitled 
to so much respect as T. J. Hudson's theories and 
hypotheses." 

— Florence Huntley in L. & A., Bv. 4, p. 221. 

The Harmonic Series 

Harmonics of Evolution pretends to be a reliable 
guide to finding a soul-mate. 

The Great Psychological Crime is a warning against 
hypnotism and mediumship. 

The Great Work contains a few good essays on 
Morality, Self Control, Will, Self Pity, Vanity, etc. 

However desirable it might be to have a knowledge 
of the contents of these books, even if it were all true 
(which it is not), why should these few subjects be 
taken to constitute a complete " philosophy' ' by which 
to order one's life, to the exclusion of hundreds of 
other books covering literally hundreds of other essen- 
tial phases of our existence? 

390 



THE PHILOSOPHY AS A WHOLE 391 

As to any particular utility of the Harmonic Series, 
not one of them offers what can be called definite 
instruction on any of the subjects discussed. For 
instance, TK talks about the "extension of conscious- 
ness,^ but nowhere does he tell how that extension is 
to be accomplished. He talks about Will, Self-Con- 
trol, the necessity of being able to control one's mag- 
netism, of solving economic questions, and so on with 
dozens of problems, but never a word as to any prac- 
tical methods for personal development and intelligent 
self-help. 

Many students, however, testify that their acquain- 
ance with the three books has been a source of encour- 
agement and help to them in their daily lives. And 
this is easily believable, because the same thing has 
been said and is, every day, being said of hundreds 
and thousands of other books. But while acknowledg- 
ing such help as may have been received from the 
Harmonic Series, it remains true that many people 
have been deceived into thinking, accepting and even 
passing on to others as Truth, a great deal of what 
is now known to be absolutely untrue, deceptive and 
misleading. 

For this, no one should criticise himself or feel dis- 
couraged. We are all human, and when, for a suffic- 
ient length of time we read or hear others saying and 
repeating over and over again, "the Great School/ ' 
"the Great Friends/ ' "Great Masters," "he is a real 
master," "he cures the insane," "he talks face to face 
daily with masters and spirits, " " he leaves his body at 
will," he lives in poverty," "he is the greatest," etc., 
etc., — we are not unlikely to find ourselves taking up 



392 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

and repeating the same strain of suggestions, even tho 
unconsciously to ourselves. That it is a kind of mental 
darkness and hypnotic state does not for the time occur 
to us. 

Normally we like to think well of everything and 
everybody. If our own motives are clean and pure, 
we gladly grant the same state to others. But no mat- 
ter how clear our own motives may be, this alone will 
not always save us from mental blindness. And to 
go on from day to day under false impressions is men- 
tal blindness and spiritual darkness as sure as there 
is such a state or condition. 

Some have suggested that the Harmonic Series 
must be true because they frequently find corrobora- 
tions of the teachings in other books. Why not? That 
is where a great deal of it came from. Others say 
these books contain much that is entirely new. But 
this that appears new, is new to those only who may 
not happen to know what books to read in order to 
make the necessary comparisons. Take for instance 
"Harmonics of Evolution"; practically all that this 
book contains outside of its imaginary battle with Dar- 
win and Drummond and its seventy-odd pages adver- 
tising TK's pseudo mastership, was written and pub- 
lished over half a century ago. The volume to which I 
refer is in the most wonderful English imaginable; 
the message is practical and scientific and the appeal 
is to Eeason and Conscience alone. 

Another illustration is seen in what TK has to say 
regarding India as the source of all civilization. Any 
one who reads that really wonderful book, "The Bible 
in India," will have no difficulty recognizing and iden- 



THE PHILOSOPHY AS A WHOLE 393 

tifying some of TK's " wisdom of the ages," for 
therein may be found some of his descriptive phrases 

almost word for word. 

# # # * # 

Now a few plain words as to the fruits of the so- 
called Great School philosophy and the nature of the 
spiritual influences back of and working thru TK : 

There are many items of knowledge of the most 
serious, significant and damaging nature, which tho 
known to a half-dozen or so " students/ ' are not gen- 
erally known or even suspected by the student body: 
items which, had they been permitted to become known 
would probably have so shocked the few hundred fol- 
lowers of TK that they would have been glad to wash 
their hands of the whole thing and escape from his 
occult net. 

In each of these cases the particulars were known 
usually to but three, five, seven or so individuals, each 
of whom were students, and in every instance cau- 
tioned and pledged by TK not to refer to or discuss the 
matter under any circumstances, — not even with their 
most trusted fellow students. In this beautiful exem- 
plification of the efficacy of psychological billying, the 
particulars were always hushed up, suppressed and 
sealed, so far as any harm to the " Great Work" — 
(TK) was concerned, and in time even the incident 
itself was almost forgotten. 

For instance it is not generally known that sev- 
eral suicides and attempted suicides have, during the 
past ten or twelve years occurred beneath the l ' benefi- 
cent" and "powerful protecting influences' ' of TK's 
Great School and Great Masters. In some instances 



394 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

these unfortunate experiences came to students while 
actually and actively engaged in working out the so- 
called " Ethical Section" or " Master's Catechism." 
In one instance a student who had completed this se- 
cret "spiritual" instruction and was, at the time of his 
death, one of the only twenty guides or instructors of 
other students, wandered from his home late at night, 
went to a cemetery and there committed suicide by 
cutting his own throat. 

Would this suggest that TK and his spirit guides 
are representatives of the true Great School of Light 
and Life? That his so-called ethical instruction will 
do what he claims it will do? That his so-called 
"Great Masters" and "Great Friends" are interested 
in and guarding the welfare and lives of his students 
and instructors ? That his gang of ' ' spiritual helpers ' ■ 
are the kind that men and women should pray to and 
depend upon, as TK advises? 

Why did TK suppress this knowledge, so that only 
a few even of his Chicago students ever even heard of 
the incident? The answer must be something more 
than that it was "for the good of the GREAT 
CAUSE." 

In Life md Action, Bv. 5, p. 1, TK himself in a 
vein of what he evidently intended to be humorous, 
makes record of a case in which an osteopathic phy- 
sician of Brooklyn, N. Y., after writing a letter in 
which he referred to TK and his literature, committed 
suicide. 

At one time TK found it necessary to explain pub- 
licly that certain cases of insanity were insane before 
reading his books, and not as a result of such reading, 



THE PHILOSOPHY AS A WHOLE 395 

which was an acknowledgment on TK's part, that 
such impressions and reports were m circulation and 
that TK himself knew of them. 

In another instance an accepted Ethical Student 
Tbecame mentally deranged under the blighting impres- 
sion of being unworthy and lost. From her distant 
home she was brot to Chicago for the express pur- 
pose of having TK diagnose and prescribe for her 
condition. She escaped one day from her attendants 
and attempted suicide by drowning in a lagoon in one 
of the city parks. 

When besought for help for this unfortunate stu- 
dent, TK would not even see the patient and with cold- 
blooded indifference sent word that he could do 
nothing, and that his " Great Friends" had advised 
him that it would do no good to even see the woman. 



On March 9, 1917, a year after TK's exposure at 
Edgemoor, there came into the office of the Indo- 
American Book Co., a poor soul who, in 1910, was an 
accredited Ethical Student in TK's Great School. 
Her person was neglected, and from her general ap- 
pearance, her voice and conversation, her disturbed 
vision and excited condition, it was evident that she 
was mentally unbalanced. She explained that she 
had just recently spent a few months in an asylum for 
the insane in one of our Southern States. 

She demanded to know where TK was and upon be- 
ing told that he had gone to California, she said: 
"Yon lie. He lives in Oak Park. I know where he 
lives, and I am going out there.' ' With this, she 



396 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

quickly withdrew, slammed the door and passed down- 
stairs, to where a sister was waiting for her. 

Going to where TK formerly lived in Oak Park, 
and finding both residences closed and unoccupied, 
they then went to the home of a former student. Here 
she repeated her demand to know where TK was, and 
when told he had just recently married and gone with 
his new affinity to California, she said: "You lie. He 
told me I am his affinity. She is only his physical mate, 
but I am his spiritual affinity, and he is with me spir- 
itually every day. ' ' With this she exhibited two linked, 
plain gold band rings which she declared were en- 
graved with the date of her first meeting with TK, 
and which were given to her by TK in 1910, the same 
year in which he married Florence Huntley. 

This poor woman formerly lived with her husband 
just a few doors from TK's residence in Oak Park, 111. 
She was a bright, intelligent woman at the time she 
became a * ' student, ' ' and living nearby, soon grew to 
calling almost daily at TK's home. In time, she se- 
cured a divorce from her husband, and later left 
Chicago. 

The story she told on March 9th was to the effect 
that TK himself had sent her a/way, a statement not 
difficult to believe, as the same experience happened 
to more than one woman. She further volunteered the 
information that, in time, she met and married a Jap- 
anese, whom she did not love, but even " loathed.' ' 
This she did, as she explained, because she saw some 
kind of spiritual light shining about his head, and 
heard a "voice" which she could not resist, and which 
she knew came from one of the "masters" of TK's 



THE PHILOSOPHY AS A WHOLE 397 

" Great School/ ' commanding her to marry the man 
"for a great spiritual purpose." 

She had not seen her Japanese husband since before 
entering the asylum, and upon her release, had taken 
her little Japanese baby (about one year old) and, ac- 
companied by her sister, had made their way to Chi- 
cago. She wished to find TK and make him marry her, 
as she claimed he had promised to do. 

To add to the seriousness of the situation, her sister 
also appeared to be quite as insane as she herself re- 
garding the Great School. 

Will any of those who may be interested in perpet- 
uating TK's "Great School" and its "Work," say 
that the influences following and destroying these two 
women were good influences? That the fact that one 
of the women had been an accepted ethical student, a 
close personal friend of TK and for a time an almost 
daily visitor in his home, was therefore under unusual, 
constructive spiritual guidance and protection? Such 
a thing is unthinkable and contrary to all reason and 
sense of right. It is easier to reason that she fell un- 
der the direct hypnotic influence not only of TK him- 
self, but also of his rascal band of dishonest and de- 
generate spirit guides. 

But these cases are only given as examples of the 
destructive and dangerous influences emanating from 
or working thru TK's mediumship. There are prob- 
ably many dozens of similar cases known only to TK 
and the immediate few whom in each particular in- 
stance he succeeded in either getting rid of, or pledg- 
ing to secrecy and silence. 



398 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Just this week a letter came to the writer from an 
attorney whose sister has recently been brot home 
after several months' detention in a private sanitar- 
ium. He attributes her insanity to the deceptive im- 
pressions carried in TK's literature. This woman was 
a remarkably beautiful spirit; practical, talented, in- 
telligent, and a successful professional woman. Un- 
beknown to her family, she was a " student' ' of the 
"secret" work, and had gradually come to believe in 
TK's false and pretentious claims to mastership. 



Will such as are in favor of the further publication 
and circulation of TK 's false and misleading literature 
say that these books do no harm? What is it in these 
books or that which accompanies them that has al- 
ready wrecked so many lives? Why all these suicides 
and attempted suicides, these pitiful cases of insanity, 
to say nothing of affinity scandals, divorce cases, 
money swindles, and instance after instance of the 
most vital and flagrant moral and mental degeneracy 
occurring in the very midst of TK's so-called ethical 
instruction and training? 

In one instance, where both are accredited students, 
the man openly takes his young affinity into the home 
of his legal wife, lives with her, divorces his wife 
and marries the new "mate"; in another, the wife is 
the aggressive affinity hunter, leaves her husband at 
the direction of some "spirit voice," and sallies forth 
into newspaper fame with her new mate, singing hal- 
lelujahs to the philosophy of TK's Great Scheme of 
Natural Science. 



THE PHILOSOPHY AS A WHOLE 399 

And some students of this kind of stuff, repeating 
after TK, still call it " science," "exact science," 
"moral science," as if the name has anything to do 
with it. 

Actual and active studentship in TK's " Great 
School" usually in time brot reverses of one kind or 
another : mental or physical ill-health, financial or bus- 
iness losses, loss of friends, misunderstanding among 
relatives and friends, domestic discords, disappoint- 
ments, and difficult daily problems of all kinds. Some 
students, from no apparent reason at the time, failed 
in almost everything they undertook, as if under some 
sort of spell or curse. TK explained these experiences 
as "tests" necessary to what the students imagined 
to be their "spiritual development," 

Many people, looking on from the outside and sizing 
up these unfortunate results of contact with TK's 
" Great School" and great "moral" philosophy, sensed 
the destructive spiritual influences back of it all, and 
positively and steadfastly refused to have anything 
whatever to do with any part of it in any manner, 
form or degree. 

Because of the way in which his literature is written 
and the false hopes which TK, as a prophet of dark- 
ness, holds out to sincere and earnest searchers after 
Truth, these books, in their present form, constitute a 
snare to human intelligence and a menace to mankind 
generally. 



400 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Briefly summarizing: 

1. These books appear simply to be channels thru 
which, if we may judge them by actual results, certain 
well-defined, deceiving, misleading and evil forces have 
sought to influence and operate upon human credulity. 
And to disguise the real intent and purpose of the evil 
intelligences back of these books, they are cunningly 
clothed in an external cloak of "scientific" morality. 

2. "Harmonics of Evolution" has been a source 
of wide ill-faith in the marriage relation, leading di- 
rectly and indirectly to innumerable reckless affinity 
entanglements and scandals all over the country. 

3. This literature promises what is not to be had 
FROM ITS SOURCE, and never was : exact knowl- 
edge, and the scientific demonstration of the conti- 
nuity of individual life beyond death. 

4. In their present form, these books are so inti- 
mately saturated with the false, personal claims of 
TK that, unless the facts are exposed to the clear, 
open light of Truth, the entire literature may be made 
the basis of further deception, fraud and exploitation 
for possibly hundreds of years to come. 

5. Many people have already wasted valuable time, 
from a few months to many years, neglecting, retard- 
ing and suppressing their real spiritual development, 
in a vain attempt to realize TK's promises. 

Many people, misled by TK into a false sense of 
responsibility, have in the past ten years spent a great 



THE PHILOSOPHY AS A WHOLE 401 

deal of time and money advertising, selling and dis- 
tributing TK's books. In this way they have, in many 
instances, innocently led their relatives, friends, ac- 
quaintances, and even strangers into conditions of 
mental blindness, in which they live from day to day 
under false impressions and false hopes. 

If this has been your experience, then no greater 
responsibility in this world rests upon your soul than 
to make every possible effort you can to see that these 
people get a knowledge of the Truth about these books 
and TK's whole movement. 

Once the Truth is made known, your debt of respon- 
sibility will probably be discharged, for men and 
women are no more inclined to take their mental and 
spiritual food and drink from morally unclean chan- 
nels than they are to take their physical food and 
drink from unclean vessels. 



CHAPTER XXXVI 

Florence Huntley 

Florence Huntley was the brains of TK's entire lit- 
erary success — such as it was. She was educated; she 
was a trained, talented, successful newspaper woman; 
she was by nature an altruist, a philosopher, a thinker, 
a genius for dissecting and analyzing intricate psych- 
ological problems. She alone was the enthusiast. TK 
was not a thinker. He was not a man of warmth, 
feeling or enthusiasm. But for his scheming, he was 
really a physical and mental idler; a leech upon the 
intelligence, the sympathies and confidences of other 
people. 

Florence Huntley edited everything of any merit he 
ever wrote. He produced nothing after "The Great 
Work," in 1906. He gave out the impression that he 
was one of the busiest men on earth — but doing what? 
He dictated some copy for his magazine once every 
two months; otherwise he had practically nothing 
to do. He healed no sick, cured no insane, visited no 
poor. Most of his "personal letters" were form let- 
ters written by his stenographers. Thus he lived for 
years in secret idleness, playing billiards, walking or 
riding out, hunting four-leaf clovers, etc., and occa- 
sionally spending an hour or a few hours visiting 
sociably with some out-of-town student, applicant or 
friend — talking of the "work" or any old subject, — 
just playing the part. 

402 



FLORENCE HUNTLEY 



403 



To the earnest men and women who have for years 
been denied the " great and priceless privilege" of 
meeting the " master,* ' on account of his being "busy 
and overworked," it may be some relief to know that 
for many years TK spent practically whole days at 
a time reading modern novels and light fiction as well 
as all the sporting news. 





Vandal" 
Business 



Writing to his daughter, Sept. 13, 1908, from San 
Francisco, TK said: "Sh — , don't tell anybody — but 
I saw Billy Papke knock the stuffm' out of Stanley 
Ketchel. It was immense!" 



404 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

On Jan. 30, 1910 — twenty-three years after their 
first meeting, Mrs. Huntley and Mr. Richardson were 
married. 

Upon that occasion, TK was as pale as the white- 
ness of death. 

And well he might be, for there was a young woman, 
whom just a few weeks previous to this time, he had 
secretly assured was his true soul-mate, — to whom he 
had explained that Florence Huntley was his mate in 
an intellectual sense only. 

TK knew all this, but he did not know what moment 
of that day this young woman might come in and 
before all the wedding guests declare her betrayal and 
demand an explanation of his hypocritical and crim- 
inal deception. And it was this uncertainty, this awful 
apprehension and fear that chilled his blood and 
blanched his hands and face to a sickly, chalky white- 
ness. 



Florence Huntley lived for eighteen years in a 
roseate hue of romance — an intense devotion to what 
she sincerely believed to be a great work for humanity. 

Who of us can picture her bewilderment, her piti- 
ful disappointment, her sorrow and suffering, her 
anguish and remorse when she opened her spiritual 
consciousness to discover the true situation, — to real- 
ize that her earthly life had been wasted and worse 
than wasted in an earnest, loyal, blind support of a 
scheming grafter, a man who had shamelessly and 
cruelly deceived her into becoming a party to a great 



FLORENCE HUNTLEY 405 

fraud upon human intelligence, — as she herself has 
explained from the spiritual side of life, 

A short time before her death she became aware of 
TK's real nature. And as the awful consequences of 
his destructive influences, together with her own inno- 
cent part in carrying them into the world, began to 
awaken and unfold before her mind, her soul sank 
helplessly beneath the (personal humiliation, regret 
and pain. Gladly would she have given her life to be 
able to retrace the path, to undo the wrong, to extri- 
cate herself, to recall her part in this awful tragedy 
of deception and fraud, and to put herself on record 
before all the world and especially before all who 
trusted and believed in her. 

Such was her nature, her honesty and honor, her 
sense of right and her intention, that, had time and 
circumstances permitted her to overcome the awful 
sense of personal helplessness and shock of soul, she 
would have given the truth to the world. 

But she was alone in the agony of her Gethsemane. 
She had awakened to her condition of spiritual dark- 
ness ; she had lived in this darkness for years, — in the 
belief that it was Light. The burden of her spirit, 
now crushed and bleeding, was more than the weary 
body could endure, and at last, exhausted by the fruit- 
less struggle, she fell asleep. 

The manner of her death was somewhat unusual. 
For several days she wept beneath the cross of her 
secret sorrow, and finally on Sunday afternoon, Jan. 
28, 1912, she began to experience a severe headache, 
and a few hours later lapsed into unconsciousness 



406 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

which lasted nearly four days, and from which she 
awakened in the new world of spirit. 



What of TK's first wife— 

The first martyr to his "Great Work!" 

For nearly twenty years she bore her earthly cruci- 
fixion upon the cross of poverty and neglect. She 
knew that her husband had a " soul-mate, ' ' an "affin- 
ity." She knew too who that soul-mate was. But 
there was no earthly hand to strengthen, no lips to 
comfort or encourage, no earthly ear to heed the 
piteous cry of pain of her soul. 

Thus for years she suffered alone, an absolutely 
needless, unjust and cruel mental and spiritual cruci- 
fixion : an affliction and martyrdom which by any other 
than a "modern Master of the Law," could have been 
remedied in ten minutes by the simplest application 
of kindness. 



For eight years these two women lived within thirty 
minutes ride, and for six years, within five minutes 
walk of each other *s home: one in the false belief of 
a sunshine of self-denial, self-sacrifice and romance; 
the other in the ever deepening shadows of an inward 
pain, neglect and sorrow. Both of them martyrs to 
an injustice almost unparalleled in the history of 
human relations. 



FLORENCE HUNTLEY 407 

You ask if TK knew his first wife suffered? This 
question may best be answered by quotations from 
two letters to Florence Huntley, in TK's own hand- 
writing. 

April 15, 1890. 
Beloved : 

* * * * But at present, to avoid the possibility of 
publicity, it is, perhaps best for you to write to me only when 
I have assured you it is safe. 

Let me say this much more — Mrs. R. suffers intensely, and 
her woman's love is deeply wounded by the knowledge that 
I still write to you. I never fully realized the depths of her 
affection for me until this has occurred, and though it will 
pain you as it does me, it is right for me to tell you that 
the knowledge of my love for you has been a shock to her 
which may prove fatal. Her health has failed ever since, 
and the poor girl is a physical wreck. 

This is all too brief to give you a clear idea, but your 
intuition will tell you the rest. Unless a change comes, she 
can not last long, and it is the saddest thing of my life to 
feel that it is the result of a broken heart. 

Through death and eternity, I am, your own 

Zanoni. 
* * * * * 

June 7, 1890. 
My Dearest, My Own : 

The condition of my business demands every moment of 
my time, and the continued sickness of Mrs. R. makes it 
necessary for us to break up house-keeping. She is miser- 
able, poor girl, and has given up all hope of recovery. I 
shall very likely remove her to her father's home in Iowa 
for the summer at any rate, and I trust forever. Not that 
I wish her any harm, but she can never recover, and must 
necessarily suffer all the rest of her days. And in the spirit 
of pity and compassion, I pray for her release from pain, 
which can come only with death and which it would seem 
must come ere long. 

With my whole heart and soul, now and forever, I am 
still your, Zanoni. 



CHAPTER XXXVII 
What It Cost One Woman 

When TK and Mrs. Huntley returned to Chicago, in 
1902, Mrs. H. took the second flat in a three-story 

building at Kedzie avenue. The owner, Mrs. 

M , a widow, conducted a successful dry goods 

business on the ground floor, and, together with her 
mother, occupied the first flat. 

The second flat had always rented for $30.00 per 
month, but because of her confidence in TK's proposed 
"work" for humanity, the owner reduced the rental 
to $12.50, which amount TK was supposed to pay. 

At this time, TK was thot to be without means of 
support, and to make it possible for him to write a 
certain proposed book, his landlady and benefactor 
paid him $40.00 per month for about twelve hours' 
bookkeeping. 

TK's wife and daughter lived about two blocks dis- 
tant. He had his office in Mrs. Huntley's "Paradise 
Flat/' and for six years was there practically every 
day. 

At the time Mrs. M made an asylum for the 

"work," her property was valued at $14,000.00. She 
had decided to dispose of her business and, upon her 
rentals of $130.00 monthly, was planning to retire and 
devote her entire time to the care of her aged mother 
and such work as she might do among the poor and 
needy. 

TK, however, induced her to continue with her Dry 

408 



WHAT IT COST ONE WOMAN 409 

Goods business, so as to have larger means for helping 
the " Great Work." This she did, but with the $40.00 
monthly payments to TK and the loss of rent from her 
second flat, a situation arose which she found difficult 

to meet. Finally, Mrs. M opened another store, 

but with so many claims upon her time in assisting 
with the development of TK's book business, her own 
business affairs had to be neglected, until it became 
necessary to dispose of the first store, and later the 
second. By this time she found herself practically pen- 
niless, except for the rentals from her property. This, 
too, was now very inadequate. Unbeknown to Mrs. 
Huntley, the " master" had made but one payment 
for her "Paradise Flat"; and for his book business 
(now occupying the entire ground floor), he paid prac- 
tically no rent at all, on the grounds that it was for 
the good of the "Great Cause." 

In the meantime, TK's business was growing, and 
tho he was simulating poverty, he was secretly accu- 
mulating a fortune. 

In 1902-3, Mrs. M was paying TK $40.00 a 

month charity. Now, with her business entirely gone, 
she began working for TK at a salary of $10.00 per 
week, under circumstances so difficult that by 1909 she 
broke down under the strain. Mrs. Huntley, about this 
time, moved to Oak Park, 111. 

Here, TK conceived the idea of getting his benefac- 
tor out of his way, and arbitrarily decided to send her 
and her mother to Seattle, Wash., "in the interest of 
the Work." But before her departure, TK secured 
from her a power of attorney. 



410 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Thus, as representative of the Book business and 
other interests of the " Great School," TK was sup- 
posed to continue paying her $10.00 per week salary. 
Writing April 6, 1908, TK refers to this matter of 
salary as follows : 

"I am going to assume that you will need $80.00 
per month to sustain you and care for your mother. 
You will have $30.00 rental from R, and $20.00 from 
S. This leaves $30.00 for the Book Company to pay." 

By this psychological confusion of details and tak- 
ing advantage of her confidence in him, he manages to 
pay less than half of what the monthly rental for his 
business should have been, and at the same time to se- 
cure her efficient, faithful services without paying her 
a single cent of the meager salary he had promised. 

TK was legally responsible to Mrs. M for $40.00 

per month salary and at least $100.00 per month ren- 
tals. Instead, however, of sending her this $140.00, he 
sends her only $80.00 per month, and retains the dif- 
ference of $60.00 each month. Later, he increased her 
monthly allowance to $100.00, which still relieved him 
from paying the $40.00 salary agreed upon. 

Here we have an illuminating illustration of TK's 
spiritual ethics as attorney, tenant and employer com- 
bined. 

At the end of twenty-one months, when Mrs. M 

returned to Chicago, TK's book business occupied both 

the ground floor and the second flat. Mrs. M was 

thus forced to rent an apartment elsewhere. Later 
TK planned to move his book business, and began in 
his subtle way to urge the sale of her property. When 
he had carried the suggestion far enuf, he one day 



WHAT IT COST ONE WOMAN 411 

astounded his Friend and Benefactor by asserting that 
she owed him for money spent for minor repairs on 
her property, the enormous sum of $4,300.00* 

Under pressure of care, accumulated interest on an 
original mortgage of $6,000.00, amounts borrowed on 
account of failure of rent payments, working for sev- 
eral years for practically no salary, etc., Mrs. M 

finally disposed of the property, and still believing in 
TK's integrity, handed over to him $2,000.00 in cash. 
But for the fact that her mother was entirely depend- 
ent upon her, she would probably have given TK all 
she had left. 

Later in 1915, when the " Elder Brother* ' began 
calling for funds for his Sanitarium, this same bene- 
factor, now working for a meager wage, paid TK first 
$50.00, and later on $100.00 — practically all she had 
in the world — on this alleged debt. 

To briefly review, we find: 

1. That when Mrs. M became acquainted with 

TK and his Great School, she possessed property 
valued at $14,000 and a successful business with in- 
come sufficient to nicely take care of her aged Mother 
and herself. 

2. Twelve years later when the " Elder Brother" 
got thru with her affairs, she was practically penni- 
less. 

3. In six years TK paid for Mrs. Huntley's "Para- 
dise Flat" just one payment of about $50.00. 



* The writer has before him the affidavit of TK 's Business Manager 
for the years under consideration, 1909-10-11. This gentleman personally 
looked after all repairs connected with the property, and he states under 
oath that the total amounts expended did not exceed $500.00. 



412 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

4. For six years he paid practically no rent for his 
book business. 

5. When she sold her property, he again took ad- 
vantage of her confidence in him as a " master/ ' and 
coolly extorted from her $2,000.00 in cash, upon the 
basis of a purely fraudulent claim. 

After TK's exposure and his whole " Great School' ' 

was revealed as a fraud, Mrs. M wrote to him 

asking for a refund of the $2,150.00 extorted from her. 
but received no reply. Failing in this she turned to 
the Board of Trustees. 

These seven gentlemen are all men of affairs, in 
business and professional life. Their aggregate 
wealth is probably several million dollars. As trustees 
they have in their possession some $40,000,00 — of the 
former " Great School's" funds. 

If you were one of these Trustees, what would you 
do in a case of this kind? 

Mrs. M makes no claims for the loss of her 

former business; for the six years unpaid rent for 
" Paradise Flat"; for ten years in which little or no 
rent was paid by the "Book Co."; for the years in 
which she received little or no salary; for the $40.00 
monthly charity paid to TK. 

All that she asks is a refund of this last $2,150.00, 
and this, not for herself, but for what it may mean to 
her in the care of her mother. 

The former President of the Board of Trustees has 
from the beginning taken an open stand that this and 
all just claims made against the funds of the so-called 
"Great School," should be paid promptly. 

What would you do in a case like this? 



CHAPTER XXXVIII 
The $40,000.00 Trust Fund 

About June 1st, when the Committee of Four re- 
turned from California, there was on deposit in the 
Illinois Trust and Savings Bank, in the name of John 
E. Richardson (TK) over $40,000.00. 

This sum was the remainder of a $50,000.00 donation 
made by Dr. H. H. , in 1908, with the under- 
standing that it was to be made the nucleus of a Trust 
Fund for the specific purpose of carrying on what he, 
at that time, believed to be a beneficent work of edu- 
cation for mankind. The donation was made as the 
result of Dr. H 's confidence in John E. Rich- 
ardson (TK) as a Brother Mason and upon TK's pub- 
lished and personal misrepresentations to the effect 
that he was a " master.* ' 

All the members of the Board of Trustees under- 
stood : 

1. That this $40,000.00 was the remainder of the 
original $50,000.00 donated by Dr. H . 

2. They knew that the Bank records show that John 
E. Richardson (TK) had in 1914, transferred this 
$40,000.00 from the Trust Fund to his own personal 
savings account.* 



(See pages 303-304.) 

413 



414 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

3. They knew that by the recent disclosures of 
TK's personal record, he had forfeited the right to all 
money donated for the good of his " Great Cause." 

4. They knew that when it was discovered that the 
reason for the continuance of the Edgemoor Sani- 
tarium was merely a false pretense, Dr. H was the 

first to suggest and use his personal and official influ- 
ence for the immediate return of that valuable prop- 
erty to its donor. 

Every member of this Board of Trustees is a Mason, 

and knew that Dr. H is a man whose hands and 

conscience are clean; that his honor and honesty are 
unquestioned; that as a Mason his reputation for 
Equity, Justice and Right are of the highest order. 

Under these circumstances would it not be reason- 
able to suppose that the members of this Board of 
Trustees would have taken the initiative to see that 
this sum of $40,000.00 be returned to Dr. H-— -? 
Would it not seem a matter of the simplest Fraternal 

justice for them to have gone, as a body, to Dr. H 

voluntarily, and offered their services to this end? 
With practically no effort on their part, and abso- 
lutely no personal loss or inconvenience, they could 
have done this. And there is not one chance in ten 
thousand but that the entire amount would have been 

legally transferred by the Bank to Dr. H . This 

is exactly what any body of men, making no preten- 
sions to Masonic Fraternalism or special ethical in- 
struction and training, would have done. 

In this instance, however, not a single member of 
the entire Board of Trustees ever even suggested such 
a thing. 



THE $40,000.00 TRUST FUND 415 

But what did happen? 

Dr. H informs me that when in June he con- 
templated attaching this fund, he was told by the At- 
torney for the Board of Trustees, Mr. F. T. L., that an 
attachment was entirely unnecessary. He was further 
assured that the money was perfectly safe. That the 
Bank's Attorney had been shown the legal documents 
which transferred everything from TK to the trustees 
and that the Bank would not dare to turn this fund 
over to TK without being specifically authorized by 
the Board of Trustees to do so. 

Dr. H further informs me that upon his confi- 
dence in Mr. L 's word as an attorney, a Mason, 

and a fellow student in the " Great School/ ' and be- 
cause he wished to save the other trustees from the 
publicity which an attachment would have precip- 
itated, he decided to order an attachment only as a 
last resort. 

And then what happened? 

A few weeks passed, and early in August Dr. H 

went to the Bank and inquired about the $40,000.00. 

The Attorney for the Bank informed him that the 
money was gone. 

"Gone," said Dr. H , dumfounded. 

"Yes," replied the Attorney. "It was sent to Mr. 
Richardspn in July. We received a communication 
from Mr. Richardson inclosing a letter he had received 

from Mr. F. T. L , the Attorney for your Board of 

Trustees. In this letter, Mr. L states that he had 

never at any time made any claim upon the fund, and 
did not know of any one else of the Board of Trustees 



416 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



who had ever made any such claim. Upon the strength 
of that letter, we sent the money to Mr. Richardson. ' ' 



The $40,000.00 was gone. 

It had been turned over to John E. Richardson. 

The Bank had acted in perfect good faith. They 

knew that Mr. L was the Attorney for the Board 

of Trustees, and that he had declined personally to the 
Bank's Attorney to make any claim against the 
$40,000.00. 

But, he wrote a letter to TK. 

TK sent that letter on to the Illinois Trust and Sav- 
ings Bank, and, 

Upon the strength of that letter, the Bank immedi- 
ately forwarded the $40,000.00 to John E. Richardson 
(TK) at Pasadena, California. 

We herewith submit the letter written by Mr. L 

to TK, the original of which is now in the possession 
of the Illinois Trust and Savings Bank. 

July 20th, 1916. 
Mr. John E. Richardson, 

Pasadena, Cal. 
Dear Uncle John: — 

Your recent letter is before me. In reply I have to say 
that never at any time, have I made any claim to the Illinois 
Trust & Savings Bank upon the fund there. So far as I per- 
sonally know, no one else of the Seven has ever made such 
claim. 



THE $40,000.00 TRUST FUND 417 

Just before we started for California, Dr. H and I 

went to the Bank and asked for information as to your 
account, exhibiting the transfer to us by you, which was 
intended for public exhibition. Upon the basis of that docu- 
ment, we asked if there was any money in the bank to your 
credit, and were informed by them that the account had been 
closed out. Any further information was refused us. This 
is the only transaction I ever had with the Bank, except that 
Mr. Dunbar of that bank recently called me up over the 
telephone. In that conversation, I consistently refused to 
make any claim upon the fund, and referred to the fact that 
he should carry out whatever arrangement he had with you. 

In my opinion, the bank is simply seeking for an excuse to 
hold on to your deposit. You know $40,000 is a considerable 
deposit, and bankers hate to see it go out of their bank. 

With my kindest regards, and best wishes, I am, 

Cordially yours, 



The following was dictated, word for word, from the Spiritual Side 
of Life by one who knows TK and the entire history of his present 
earthly activities. 



"TK." 

As sleek a mortal, as ever donned man's attire. 
Covetous, to the minutest degree. 
Possessed of a subtlety, that is uncanny. 
The poise, dignity, and bearing of the elect. 

A reserve so ■ ' crusted, " as to not allow of a pin hole of 
penetration to the innerself, the revelation of which 
would make man stagger, and give vent to silent furies 
and mutterings. 

Astute in manner and dealings. 

Has a way with his fellowmen, bordering upon the 
hypnotic. He plays with their thought, so to speak, 
until he brings them to his way of thinking and deal- 
ing, — the least unto the greatest. 

The roles he assumes in the Drama of Life are only 
those which have for their harvest, the fruits of gain, 
(personal gain). 

Money is his creed, his deity. 

One of the most assumptive of men, of the leech type. 

His is the lure of the hypocrite. 

With sanctimonious mien and the denominational "I" 
he journeys forth in search of ''wise" men, mostly 
"wise men of the East/' 

Being well read, he babbles fluently on borrowed tales 
and speeches. 

Men eat of his crumbs greedily, — hungeringly, until 
they stand forth at the Portal of Submission, ready 
to give their all, their life, if need be, for the ' ' cause. ' ' 

He is more sensual, than spiritual, — gratification marks 
his innermost fiber. 

His Motto— "Do Others." 

His Principle — An easy life, in the easiest way. 

His Prayer — Get thee behind me — conscience. 



CHAPTER XXXIX. 
TK and Freemasonry. 

The facts embodied in this chapter should be of the 
most immediate and vital concern to every Master 
Mason, and particularly so to every Mason who has 
in any way ever been identified with TK's so-called 
" Great School." A knowledge of these facts carries 
with it to every Mason a life-long Personal Responsi- 
bility to the Fraternity, to humanity and to himself 
to undo as far as may be possible the widely sown 
influences employed by TK in his attempts to fasten 
upon the Masonic Fraternity his many fraudulent 
claims. 

TK's fixed general attitude toward contemporary 
movements was always one of intolerance, without 
kindly interest, friendly feeling or willingness to co- 
operate in any manner whatsoever. Toward Free- 
masonry, however, he openly professed the warmest 
friendship and fraternal devotion, — the more surely 
and easily to impose upon his own Masonic Brethren, 
and those men and women outside the Fraternity who 
justly regard Masonry in a kindly light. 

On page 67, TK tells us that he came to Chicago in 
1891 and formed a business association with which he 
remained until 1900. It is quite noticeable that he 
passes over this period of ten years of his life without 
the least hint as to the kind of business he was en- 
gaged m. 

419 



420 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

It will be recalled that his first Chicago "Business" 
venture was selling ' ' Oxydonors. ' « In time the Gov- 
ernment denied that business the use of the mails, and 
we next find Mr. Richardson promoting what he called 
"The First National Masonic Savings and Loan Asso- 
ciation." This association was incorporated May 16, 
1891, with the modest capitalization of $50,000,000.00. 
For two years it appears to have done a good business 
on the original name, but on Sept. 6, 1893, the title was 
changed to the "Masonic Mutual Savings and Loan 
Association." 

Stock and insurance in both of these "associations" 
were sold in Illinois, Michigan, Ohio and other states. 
The "Masonic Mutual," however, with its $50,000,- 
000.00 capitalization, failed in 1895, and in the same 
year we find Mr. Richardson in Council Bluffs, Iowa, 
as Secretary of two more "associations": This time 
the "United States Masonic Benevolent Association" 
and the "Guaranty Fund Life Association." 

These two associations were later licensed in Illi- 
nois, but their licenses were revoked Jan. 30, 1896, 
because of failure to comply with State Laws. A re- 
ceiver for the "Guaranty Fund Life Association" was 
appointed by the Attorney General in 1897. 

The "United States Masonic Benevolent Associa- 
tion" in 1897 changed its name to the "United States 
Life Association." It continued until about 1900, 
when its business was reinsured by the "Illinois Life 
Insurance Company" of Chicago. 

Thus for a period of about ten years TK was "Sec- 
retary" and general promotor and manager of what 
might be called progressive insurance "associations." 



TK AND FREEMASONRY 



421 




v 

A NftMC. 



ILLINOIS 



SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION. I 
Certificate no. ** 



CHICAGO, 



Special * Notice 



PAYMENTS by maif must be by Bank Draft oh Chicago or 
New York, by Post Office or Express Order or by Registered Letter. 

THE ASSOCIATION will not be responsible for MONEY 
sent by mail. 

REMITTANCES to the Home Office should be addressed to 
"John E. Richardson, Secretary, 702 Phenix Building, Chicago, III." 



422 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 




TK AND FREEMASONRY 423 

He also sold both stock and insurance, and from the 
following, taken from Mrs. Huntley's diary for Sept. 
13, 1894, we may judge that he was a pretty smooth 
salesman: 

''Last night we went out in a semi-roasted condition to 
visit some people who wanted to purchase stock. What a com- 
fort it is to see the Grand Master do up shrewd, obstinate, 
old men and fat, stupid, young ones!" 

It would be interesting to know just how many peo- 
ple lost money in these various " associations/ ' but it 
is sufficient to know that TK's " Great Work" was not 
his first experience in working the Masonic Fraternity. 



In 1901 TK disappeared from the field of his for- 
mer Masonic Insurance operations. In 1902 he re- 
turned to Chicago, and went into his "obscurity." He 
now has ten or a dozen "students." These are his 
visible assets; he is their "master." He depends on 
them to vouch for his mastership, and guard his iden- 
tity and his business. Unsuspectingly they stand be- 
tween him and those whom he is planning to exploit. 

His first book was published in 1903. It closed with 
a powerful appeal "To the Master Mason," and from 
that time forward thruout all his writings he gave 
Freemasonry second place to his fictitious "Great 
School," and used the fact of his Masonic membership 
to command and hold the confidence of Brother 
Masons whom he used in every way possible to further 
his real business. 



424 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Fully 90% of all TK's students were Masons, or in 
some way connected with the Fraternity. The great 
majority became interested in his literature because, 

1. He was a Mason. 

2. He assumed the role of a Masonic scholar, his- 
torian and authority. 

3. His frequent use of familiar Masonic terms and 
phrases in connection with his " secret' ' work. 

4. His bold statement that his " Great School" was 
the parent of Freemasonry. 

5. He openly advertised that his secret instruction 
constituted the "Lost Word" of Masonry. 

# # # # # 

The 7th of the 48 "Preliminary Questions" sub- 
mitted to all applicants reads : 
7: a. Are you a Mason? 

b. If so, to what bodies do you belong? 

c. Briefly, what are your present views as to 

Freemasonry and the Masonic Fraternity? 

d. Bo you recognize it as a descendent of the 

Great School? 

e. Why? 

w * • • • 

In Life and Action, Bv. 6, p. 318, under "Questions 
and Answers," TK states publicly what he thinks of 
the 33° S. R. Masonry, as compared with his private 
"Great School." 

Question: — "Are those of your readers who are interested 
from the viewpoint of Freemasonry, justly entitled to infer 
that the Great School is only another name for the 33° in 
S. R. Masonry?" 



TK AND FREEMASONRY 425 

Answer by tk: — "Hardly so. They are, however, entirely 
justified in assuming that the Great School is an institution 
which has long ages past, demonstrated all that constitutes 
the ethical foundation of the 33° in Scottish Rite Masonry. 
They are also justified in assuming that the Great School is 
the original source from which all the degrees of Masonry 
were derived. But the Great School stamds for something 
vastly more than the 33° in S. R. Masonry." 

In The Great Work, p. 48, TK speaking specifically 
of his "Lost Word," says: 

"And so it has remained lost from that day to this. And 
so it will continue until the Masonic Fraternity shall make 
it possible for the Great School to restore to it the 'Lost 
Word ' of direct instruction. Can this be done ? It not only 
can, but will be done. Moreover, the preliminary work to 
thai end is already well under way." 

To know just what is here meant by the "Lost 
Word," you have only to recall Chapters 13, 14 and 
15. And it is this amazingly empty pretension to a 
"scientific instruction" which TK declares to be 
11 vastly more than the 33° S. R. Masonry!" 



At the head of practically every Masonic publica- 
tion in America is a thotful, intelligent, cool-headed 
Editorial Management, and to this one fact more than 
all else combined, is due the credit for the protection 
of the literature of the Fraternity. 
Take for instance TK and his "Great School." 
For a period of about fourteen years he made 
Masonry his special field of literary and financial 
operations. By an almost uncanny use of the influ- 
ences of a dozen or so men whom he had, in his way 
"convinced," he pulled every possible wire in his 



426 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



efforts to worm himself and his writings into the 
Masonic literature of the age. For years he sent out 
a constant stream of hundreds of thousands of Masonic 
leaflets, booklets, etc. But in spite of this " campaign 
of education/ ' so far as we know (outside of a few 
book reviews) the Masonic Press of the country was 
content to see and examine some of TK's "evidences," 
"records" and "proofs" before committing them- 
selves to advertising his " Great School." 

But suppose that these publications had accepted 
TK as a "real" master, — an "Avatar," or Deity 
incarnate, as one entire book tries to prove him to be. 
Suppose they had announced to the world that a "mas- 
ter" had come to restore the "Lost Word," that he 
held the key to the origin of Freemasonry, that his 
fictions had all been scientifically demonstrated, etc., 
— and in due time this same "master" was found to 
be a pretender, a charlatan and ordinary money 
grafter. Can any man measure or even imagine the 
far-reaching, disintegrating, destructive results that 
TK's pseudo "scientific" literature would have had 
upon Freemasonry, had the Masonic Press, or even 
one influential Masonic publication been thrown open 
to his "Great Cause"? 

Personally, the writer can imagine no greater calam- 
ity possible to the Masonic Fraternity than this, and 
it is our candid opinion that this very thing was the 
intent, the spirit and purpose back of TK's activities. 



TK AND FREEMASONRY 427 

The following is reproduced from a large eight-page 
folder addressed "To Master Masons." Tens of thou- 
sands of these were sent out annually advertising "the 
parent of modern Masonry. ' ' 

THE GREAT WORK 




Dear Sir and Brother: — 

We send you this leaflet because you are an honored member of the 
Ancient Craft of Free Masonry, and you also doubtless are one who is 
seeking further light. 

The GEE AT ANCIENT SCHOOL (one of whose members is the 
author of this volume) is the parent of modern Masonry. 

If you are still hungry, thirsty and unsatisfied, and are turning from 
the lifeless dogmas of the past and are seeking "Living Truths" and a 
rational philosophy, please read and study this book. 

The following quotation from one of his letters dated 
Feb. 23, 1907, will give you some idea of the extent of 
TK's Masonic advertising campaigns. 

"We have the 'Grand Lodge report' of only two states, viz.: — New 
York and Michigan. If you can give us lists of names from any other 
states, we will .appreciate every name you can send us. I want to send 
out at least 100,000 letters to Masons within the next three months and 
wijl do so just as rapidly as we can get the names. ' ' 



428 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

To many of his students, TK confided that he was 
at one time Grand Lecturer for the Grand Lodge of 
California, but the following does not bear out this 
claim. 

GRAND LODGE, F. & A. M. 
of California 

San Francisco 



JOHN WHICHER. Grand Secretary 

December 4, 1916. 



Dear Sir and Brother: 

John E. Richardson was never Grand Lecturer of our 
Grand Lodge, and he did not fill any office in the Grand 
Lodge between 1878 and 1890. 

Fraternally yours, 

(Signed) John Whicker, 

Grand Secretary. 

In an article published in " The Oconomowoc (Wis.) 
Enterprise/' for March 3, 1916, TK took special pains 
to explain that all the officers and Trustees of " Edge- 
moor Sanitarium" were "prominent members of the 
Masonic Fraternity, ' ' and in speaking of himself, said : 

"Mr. Richardson holds a life membership in all 
Masonic bodies of both York and Scottish Rites."* 

In a letter dated 3-28-1911, TK says : 

"I am as deeply and actively interested in the Cause of 
Freemasonry and its influences in behalf of 'Life, Liberty 
and the pursuit of Happiness,' as I was more than 20 years 

ago when H Lodge No. 4 voted me a 'Life Member' as 

a token of appreciation for 'Services rendered' the Cause." 



* This is untrue, as Mr. Richardson does not hold a life 
membership in the Order of Knights Templar. 



TK AND FREEMASONRY 429 




w 



1638 1639.1640 and 1641 Monadnock Block 

WMSOII OlAMO** ««« ••«!• » CUJTOH «0»»t .tfM 



Ckicafo. 



June 4th. int»4. 



United States masonic 

Beneooleht Association 



163ft (o 1641 monadnock Block 



f^K^^-lfttC 



celpt of which, we will enter the proper credits in her pass book and 
forward her certificate of stock and pass book to her address as given. 

in answer to your question cs to bow payments are to be made 
where we have no board established, the only nethod is to remit direot 
to the hone office. In this o&se it is always oe3t to reDit by either 
bank draft tff P. 0. order, and in either ease the remittance should be 
made to " John_E*_Kichard8on , Sucrotary";and in each oase, the pass book 
should accompany the remittance so that we may enter tie proper oredlt 
at this office. 

Thanking you for your favor and wishing you continued Bucoesa, 
t remain. 

Cordially and fraternally 

Secretary. 



Early in its history his home Lodge found itself in 
need of immediate funds, and to raise the amount 
needed, offered paid-up memberships for $20.00. TK 
took advantage of this situation and thus secured per- 



430 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

petual exemption from dues. This then was the " serv- 
ices rendered/ ' and some of the older members of his 
Lodge refer to these, not as "Life Memberships/ ' but 
as "$20.00 memberships. ' ' 

Now regarding Mr. Richardson's "Life member- 
ship" in the Scottish Rite bodies, we quote as follows 
from a letter dated March 15, 1910, and addressed to 
a student and Brother Mason: 

"Let me tell you in confidence something that I am sure 
will please you and will explain also some of the added stren- 
uosity of my present life. Without seeking it in the slightest 
degree, the Supreme Commander of the Scottish Rite South- 
ern Jurisdiction nominated me for the Scottish Rite Degrees. 
He makes this a complimentary and honorary gift to me and 

has appointed Brother to communicate the 

degrees to me some time in the early part of April. Then 
the 22nd of April I am to go to Nashville where the Convo- 
cation for the purpose of conferring the same degrees upon 
about seventy-five to one hundred candidates opens. 

"This is very important to Masonry in this country, I am 

sure, for Brother amd I are really working together 

for the revision of the ritualistic service of the entire Scottish 
Rite work, and you can well understand what it means inas- 
much asi my purpose in that work is to bring it into exact 
allignment with the ritualistic work of the Great School, as 
well as with its spirit and purpose/' 

We now quote from a letter to another student fol- 
lowing the convocation. 

"In strict confidence, let me tell you of something in which 
I believe you will be interested, because of its bearing upon 
the future of the Work. 

"In recognition of my own Work, the Grand Commander, 
entirely of his own motion, and to my great and pleasurable 
surprise, tendered me honorary membership in the Order. 



TK AND FREEMASONRY 431 

The degrees were communicated to me by Bro. (acting 

for the Gr. Com.) here in my own home early in April, 
requiring 10 days hard work. We then went to Nashville, 
Tenn., and for 6 days saw the degrees conferred on 87 fine 
men. Today I received my 'Patent' from the Supreme Coun- 
cil making me a 32° S. R. Mason. 

"In a way which I cannot fully convey to you by letter, 
this opens the Masonic field for my own work, in such man- 
ner as to mean vastly more to the Cause than it is possible 
for me to tell you. But you will get some idea when I tell 
you that I regard this as the most important, vital and far- 
reaching step thus far taken m this country." 

Now the facts are : 

TK was, in 1910, just entering upon a carefully- 
planned, nation-wide Masonic advertising campaign. 
For years previous to this time he had been * ' educat- 
ing" a number of men and unsuspectingly using their 
Masonic influences to further whatever schemes he 
w T ished to carry out. 

His book, "The Gkeat Work," was the bait that 
caught most of these men. 

In fact, he made it a business to get this book, in 
one way or another, into the hands of such Masons as 
he particularly wished to " convince. ' ' 

Thus it happened that a prominent and influential 
Mason, upon the word of Masons who were supposed 
to have personally investigated the whole matter, 
became interested in TK and his so-called " philo- 
sophy/ ' And just as he had deceived and used many 
another Brother Mason, so, step by step, TK deliber- 
ately deceived and misled this man, until in time he 
came to regard Mr. Bichardson as a "spiritual mas- 
ter,' \ and the head of an ancient spiritual school of 
Masonic Light. 



432 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Upon the basis of these misrepresentations, TK, in 
his subtle way, impressed the suggestion that mem- 
bership in S. R. Masonry would be very acceptable to 
himself and his " Great Cause.' ' This suggestion was 
duly carried to the Supreme Grand Commander, and 
thus upon his confidence in the one who made the rec- 
ommendation, and the published endorsements of 
Masons who were supposed to know TK, he was nom- 
inated for the Scottish Rite degrees, and received his 
Patent from the Supreme Council. 

In view of these circumstances, it is plainly evident 
that TK obtained and to-day holds his "Life Member- 
ships in S. R. Masonry upon the basis of deliberate 
and intentional misrepresentation. 



Is TK a Deity incarnate? 

Did TK knowingly and intentionally publish to the 
world that he is a Deity, a God, incarnated as a man? 

"The New Avatar," a book of 226 pages and pub- 
lished in 1911, is devoted entirely to identifying TK 
as the "New Avatar of Natural Science." 

TK himself read the manuscript of this book and 
therefore knew, before it was published, just what it 
contained. In announcing this volume to his readers, 
TK said: 

"The subject of ' Avatars' (which means 'the des- 
cent of a Deity to earth and his incarnation as a man 1 ) 
is one that is rather new to our Western mind. But 



TK AND FREEMASONRY 433 

in the Orient it is a subject of the most profound 
interest and vital importance. ' ' 

One prominent Masonic magazine in reviewing this 
book "The New Avatar,' ' said: 

"Dr. B declares that we possess in America to-day one 

who can fill all the requirements that he has pointed out, as 
related to an Avatar such as he describes, not as a reincarna- 
tion of Buddha, but as 'a Master' who has made the demon- 
stration of life after death, as a member of the 'Great School' 
initiated many years ago, and who has devoted his life to the 
service of his fellow men. ' ' 

Here is a situation in which hundreds of thousands 
of books, magazines, etc., have been distributed, con- 
veying the impression that TK is an exalted moral 
Being, an embodiment of the most lofty moral prin- 
ciples — a "master.' ' Upon these fraudulent preten- 
tions he manages to secure a life membership in S. R. 
Masonry. He even plans to secretly tamper with, 
" revise' ' and change the "ritualistic service of the 
entire Scottish Bite work." He deceives a number of 
Masons into blindly writing articles and books endors- 
ing and advertising his pretentions. And much of 
all this literature is to-day in Masonic homes and 
libraries. 

Many Masons have expressed the opinion that no 
more subtle, underhanded, far-reaching injury has 
been done Masonry in two centuries than the publica- 
tion and circulation of TK's books. The effects may 
not show plainly just now, nevertheless this literature 
will be a source of keen embarrassment to Freema- 
sonry for possibly a hundred years to come, — espe- 
cially so if the books are permitted to be republished. 
Here and there will arise other charlatans pretending 



434 



TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



to be "masters" and "sole representatives ' ' of the 
so-called "Great School,' ' and the work of deception, 
misdirection and exploitation will go merrily on. 

Already from one "Masonic" source it is announced 
that $2,500.00 has been pledged to revive and carry on 
TK's "Great Work,''— that either TK himself or 
some other "master" will in due time be on the job to 
"head" the new movement, — that TK's so-called "text 
books" are to be republished, — that his "Lost Word" 
is yet to be restored to Masonry, etc. 




TK AND FREEMASONRY 435 



The following is taken from The Builder (Masonic) of 
Anamosa, Iowa, for July, 1915. It is a clear, sane, kindly, 
fraternal comment covering TK's pretentions, and Time has 
proven the wisdom of every word used in this statement. 

''First, the Great Work professes to be an exposition of 
the teachings of an ancient School of Natural Science which 
has existed from the beginning of time, having in its keep- 
ing records reaching back beyond the days of Moses, if not 
further; which school was the inspiration of Buddhism, early 
Christianity, and Freemasonry. Surely these are amazing 
statements, and yet not one item of evidence is offered in 
support of them. 

"Second, the Great Work purports to tell us the origin of 
Freemasonry. Masonry we learn is, or was, until it turned 
out abortive; one of the efforts of the said Great School to 
instruct mankind and lead it into the light. Here again no 
evidence is set forth, but only bare affirmations of a man who 
does not even sign his name. * * * If the origin of 
Masonry is obscure that is no valid reason for accepting the 
theory of TK, which is still more obscure. 

"Some of us, because we love Freemasonry, flatly refuse 
to accept any such account of its origin when no facts are 
forthcoming to prove it. 

"Now consider! This book calmly tells us that Masonry- 
is only a makeshift substitute for something withheld by a 
mythical Great School, a faded sham, an echo, an imitation, 
if not a counterfeit — not the real truth that makes men free 
and fraternal, but a thing almost worthy of contempt along- 
side the alleged Great School. Indeed Masonry is only used 
in this book as a kind of tail to fly the kite of the Great 
School in which the author is, apparently, an instructor. 

"Seldom have we seen a book which so belittles the noble 
order of Freemasonry — not intentionally so, perhaps, but 
actually so none the less — and some of us resent it. 

"In these despites, we find Masons accepting the whole 
book as if it were a revelation. It is indeed strange. And 
this, too, without a particle of evidence save the dicta of a 
man whom they never saw and whose name they do not know. 
If this is what is meant by Masonic Research, then we might 
as well set fire to our libraries and set sail into fairyland, the 
while we make contest as to who can spin the most extrav* 



436 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



agant fancy and call it history. * * * We believe that 
the " Great Work" has done great injury to the cause of 
authentic Masonic research — not intentionally so, but actu- 
ally so in fact — in that it has started many Masons on the 
wrong track, and would, if it were accepted as a standard, 
expose the Order to just ridicule.' ' 



To appreciate why the facts disclosed in this book 
were not discovered and exposed years ago, you must 
realize that practically all of TK's public activities 
were carried on by correspondence. He "worked in 
obscurity and under assumed names." All mail con- 
nected with his "business" reached him thru his 
Book Co., or "234." Probably not more than a hun- 
dred students ever knew where he lived. Even in 
1916 he had in Chicago only 58 students. Of this num- 
ber 15 had completed the "Ethical Section" — five, ten, 
fifteen years ago. These were the ' ' Old Group. ' ' 17 
were on the ES; 11 were on the "Test Course;" 15 
were harmlessly copying answers to the 3857 ques- 
tions. 

Now about Nov. 1st each year it was the custom for 
these four groups to hold a joint meeting. At this 
time TK was present, shook hands all around, jollied 
the bunch good-naturedly; and only a few saw any- 
thing more of the "master" for another year. Some 
of the Old Group, and possibly a dozen or so others, 
met him occasionally, but only by appointment, and 
then for but a few minutes at a time. 

As for his business affairs, these were carried on 
under the same "cloak of secrecy" as everything else. 



TK AND FREEMASONRY 437 

No one except his book-keeper and manager really 
knew anything about the extent of his income from 
his publishing business, and these men were led to 
believe that all profits were used by TK to support 
various secret works of education and charity in which 
he was supposed to be engaged. 

Besides these safeguards, it must be remembered 
that the " students' ' were all active, busy people. 
They seldom met one another except in their respect- 
ive groups. It was then only to exchange hasty greet- 
ings, read or study together for an hour or so, and say 
Good Night until the next week. Thus they really 
knew very little more, and in the majority of instances 
even less, about TK and his private affairs, than stu- 
dents a thousand miles from Chicago. Outside of a 
half dozen employees it was rarely that any local stu- 
dent ever even heard of any new books, changes, etc., 
until the announcement appeared in the magazine. 

To further camouflage his "affairs" he carefully 
"educated" his students for years until in matters 
pertaining to his activities, they were psychologized 
blind, deaf and dumb to everything except his own 
suggestions. 

The following is just one example of his methods 
of "training" his students so they would not meddle 
in his "private and personal matters." This is from 
a form letter sent to all accepted students. 

"Be on guard constantly against the approach of stran- 
gers who may ask questions or seek information about any- 
thing whatsoever, outside what is contained in the books. 

"Never answer impertinent questions, even from your per- 
sonal friends. 



438 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 



"Never answer questions concerning the Authors of the 
Books personally, nor discuss the TK or RA, or Mrs. Hunt- 
ley, or Dr. St. John, with anybody. The Books are public 
property and always a proper subject of discussion or 
inquiry ; but the lives and affairs of their Authors are strictly 
private and personal matters and not proper subjects of con- 
sideration or discussion with anybody, nor at all." 



In June, 1915, the writer was employed by TK as 
manager of his publishing business. 

Up to that time I knew nothing whatever of either 
his business affairs or the extent of his " spiritual' ' 
activities except as gathered from his literature. 

Directly entering upon my duties, my whole time 
and attention was given to the production side of the 
business. In the clerical and shipping departments 
everything continued just as under the former man- 
agement. I knew 7 that TK was receiving a great deal 
of money from the Book Co., but I was told that it 
was only an insignificant amount compared with what 
he needed and was paying out for the Sanitarium. 
Thus it was that no investigations were made into 
TK's financial affairs or his business "systems" until 
after the Edgemoor disclosures in April, 1916. 

Following TK's "withdrawal" my services were 
continued by the Board of Trustees, and when, the 
latter part of May, the facts were laid before the Chi- 
cago students, it was generally understood that the 
Trustees would publish a satisfactory statement to all 
subscribers. I personally had every confidence in the 
individual members of the Board. I fully believed and 
had every right and reason to expect that all sub- 
scribers and customers would be treated fairly in 
every particular, including money matters. 



TK AND FREEMASONRY 439 



I understood that all who purchased books after the 
Trustees knew that the literature was not what it was 
represented to be, would later on be given an oppor- 
tunity to have their money refunded, if they so chose. 
It was also understood that all subscription money 
would be refunded, and it was upon these grounds 
alone that I continued my services for the Board. 

On Aug. 30, 1916, a Trustees ' meeting was held and 
a " Liquidating Committee" of three members, includ- 
ing two attorneys, elected themselves. It was now to 
be expected that everything would be settled promptly 
and justly. 

But what happened? 

Subscription money was accepted for three months 
after the magazine suspended, and the sale of books 
continued without a word of explanation to any one. 

During all this time I urged at every opportunity 
that some statement be published and that all money 
be refunded. In Feb. 1917, I resigned and thereupon 
the Book Co. was closed. 

Nearly two years have now passed and these Trus- 
tees still hold subscription money belonging to about 
3,500 people, and without a single word of explanation 
or apology. From July 1, 1916, to Feb., 1917, they 
sold over $8,000.00 worth of books to people who would 
never have purchased them had they known what the 
Trustees knew. As I recall now, only four "text" 
books were, during those months, sold to people who 
had a knowledge of the true situation, and these did 
not have all the facts. 



440 TK AND THE GREAT WORK IN AMERICA 

Only after it became clearly evident that no state- 
ment would be issued by^the Trustees, that the facts 
ivould be suppressed permanently and that all avail- 
able evidences would probably be destroyed, was the 
publication of this volume undertaken. 

Every effort has been made, as far as consistent with 
the definite establishment of the true situation, to 
save the members of the Board of Trustees and other 
Students formerly associated with these activities — 
from any and all avoidable publicity and embarrass- 
ment. 

The Trustees now have in their possession in the 
neighborhood of probably $40,000.00, — money that 
belonged to TK's former " Great School,' ' — money 
that now belongs to, and should have been refunded 
long ago to those whom TK exploited. 

With the idea of determining those contributors who 
are entitled to refunds from these assets, the " Liqui- 
dating Committee' ' last March sent out about 1,700 
requests for information. After waiting nearly a year, 
it now appears that the work of gathering this data 
was merely a "joke," and that this money after all, is 
not to be refunded pro-rata, or any other way. 
f f ? $ $ ? f ? ~f 

All of which reminds us that "$40,000.00 
is a considerable sum" and that its 
final disposition will be keenly 
watched by all the Friends 
who are interested. 

Finis 




We 
SUPPLEMENT 



a a a 



A 

Brochure 
by the 
Chevalier de B- 



IN THE LONG RUN. 

In the long run fame finds the deserving man. 

The lucky wight may prosper for a day, 
But in good time true merit leads the van, 

And vain pretense, unnoticed, goes its way. 
There is no Chance, no Destiny, no Fate, 
But Fortune smiles on those who work and wait, 
In the long run. 

In the long run all hidden things are known; 

The eye of truth will penetrate the night, 
And good or ill, thy secret shall be known, 

However well 'tis guarded from the light. 
All the unspoken motives of the breast 
Are fathomed by the years, and stand confest — 
In the long run. 

—Ella Wheeler Wilcox. 



We HARMONIAL PHILOSOPHY 
AND ITS FOUNDER 



A Tribute 
By The Chevalier De B- 



/?2?s 


o 



WRITTEN IN 1876 

N AMERICAN SOIL was born, and 
under American skies were first poured 
out, the vaticinations of a Seer, who 
stands second to no prophet, religious 
teacher, reformer, writer, or phenome- 
nal wonder-worker, that the pages of 
history have ever borne witness to. 
That seer is Andrew Jackson Davis. 

During a brief residence in America, some few years 
since, the author, being on a visit to a friend in a 
charming country-seat, found himself made free of a 
noble library of several hundred volumes. In one por- 
tion of that enchanting study, just where the beams 
of the sinking sun would fall most favorably through 
the softened lustre of the stained-glass windows, stood 
a rich ormulu table, where, in singular contrast to the 
luxurious objects surrounding them, were piled a 
large mass of plainly bound volumes, most of them 
large and evidently sufficiently popular with their pos- 
sessor, for they bore more conclusive marks of wear 
than any of the gorgeously bound volumes that the 
room contained. 



On opening, with some curiosity, the most ponder- 
ous of these books, the eye came upon the most won- 
derful elucidations of Universal Laws. Turning to 
other pages the author found astounding and deeply 
occult descriptions of God, man, creation, the Solar 
and Astral systems, the mystery of force, life, being, 
the order of creation, — in fact, eloquent, burning 
words and thots almost beyond earthly comprehen- 
sion for their sublimity, in every department of 
human possibilities." When this volume was glanced 
thru, others were opened, and hours swept on like 
seconds. 

The Author's mind beamed and glowed thru all 
those plain, cheap books — books which should have 
been bound in rubies and sapphires — and the reader 
became at last almost overwhelmed at the breadth of 
information, the intense insight into Being, and the 
majesty with which some mind more than mortal had 
swept creation, and reduced its vast research into the 
holiest and most lofty language. 

Hours passed on. The early morning that had in- 
vited the student into that choice retreat now deepened 
into the gray mists of evening, yet still the lingering 
gaze wandered thru the wonderful stack of shabby 
books. At last the master of the mansion, opening 
the library door, uttered an exclamation of surprise at 
finding the guest whose presence he had missed for 
upwards of twelve hours, still at home. 

"Who is the author of these wonderful books ?" 

"Oh, those," replied the host, with seeming indif- 
ference, "those books were all written by a poor shoe- 



maker's boy of Poughkeepsie. That one" — pointing 
to the largest, the one which had first attracted the 
attention and awakened the astonishment of the 
reader, "was written, or rather dictated, when the lad 
was about sixteen years of age ; he was too ignorant to 
have written it; he could not have even spelled the 
words'.*' 

"In what school was he brot up?" 

"Utter destitution." 

"But who taught him all this wonderful wisdom?" 

"God and the angels. He never had any human 
teachers. Of that I am a living witness." 

"But hoiv were these volumes written?" 

"At first they were taken down by a Scribe, as he 
dictated, — because, I tell you, he who discoursed of 
suns, stars, systems, astronomy, geology, physiology, 
and every other known science was too uneducated 
to be able to even write down the words he spoke, and 
then, after graduating in the spiritual schools of — 
God alone knows where — but in no seat of learning on 
this earth — he wrote the rest himself, every line of 
them." 

"But if God and the angels instructed him is there 
no record as to how he learned?" 

"Yes, one to which scores of living men and women 
will testify. As a little shoemaker's lad of the hum- 
blest and poorest condition, he became an independent 
clairvoyant." 

"Aye, indeed! God's spirit poured into the soul, 
and it becomes clairvoyant; it ascends to the spheres 
of Deific knowledge ! Why, this is ancient Magic, but 
when did any ancient Magian, any mind however 



aspiring, vast or illuminated, ever achieve such a 
height, depth and breadth of comprehension as this 
man has achieved? Can this wonder of the age exist 
and the world not know of it?" 

"The time was when these revelations startled ma- 
terialism out of its blank negations and compelled 
the attention of multitudes. ' ' 

"But surely so noble a philosophy, received thru an 
inspiration so unmistakably divine, so free from 
human bias or mortal intervention must still commend 
itself to every civilized nation of the present age." 

"Some few there are in every country where these 
plain, black volumes have made their way, who regard 
them as we do. Many even believe they are the voice 
of earth's Tutelary Angel, speaking from between the 
Cherubim and Seraphim of past and future ages, but 
they, like us, must wait until the age is more receptive 
to these sublime truths.'' 



In after years, when the author had time and oppor- 
tunity to study the vast stores of spiritual thot and 
the profound philosophy embodied in the voluminous 
writings of this great modern Prophet, the admiration 
they excited, determined him, if he ever again visited 
America, he would seek out this marvel of the age, 
even as the Disciples of classic Greece sat at the feet 
of her master spirits to learn wisdom. 

The time for the fulfillment of this cherished pur- 
pose came, and in company with an ardent disciple of 
the Harmonial Philosophy from a distant land, the 
author commenced his search. 



Few spiritualists seemed to know even of the where- 
abouts of the Poughkeepsie Seer. Surely, we thought, 
he must be at the head of some great Church, Temple, 
Synagogue, a mechanic's institute at the least, or a 
popular lecture hall; some place where spiritually 
starved souls could feed upon the Divine revelations 
of Nature as taught by one of her purest and most 
faithful interpreters! But no! the great Alchemist 
who had transmuted the Magic of early ages into the 
Gold of Spiritual Science, the Seer, Philosopher and 
greatest phenomenon of this or any age, had to be 
sought for in a little shop in an obscure street, where, 
without followers or disciples, and, to judge from 
appearances, with but very few customers — amidst 
his neat, well ordered collection of books, ranged on 
their shelves in curious little delicate curves, and 
tastefully adorned with illuminated mottoes, and 
autumn leaves — stood the great Seer — selling books 
for a livelihood. 

The placid mien and gentle tones of the unassuming 
salesman betrayed none of the pangs of grief, indig- 
nation and humiliation which two foreigners felt for 
him as with hearts too full for utterance, they made 
their silent purchase, and withdrew. 

"That man is nobler far in the quiet, cheerful dig- 
nity with which he accommodates himself to the sordid 
necessities of a petty trade, than when he stood as 
the interpreter of Angels, dictating 'Nature's Divine 
Revelations.' " Thus spoke one of the deeply-moved 
visitors. 



"The age is not worthy of him; he lives a century 
before his time," rejoined the other. 

"Aye! but his Works will live after him. The 
Truths he reveals are eternal, and their revelator will 
yet become immortal," was the reply. Even so. 
Time, the touchstone of truth, will do justice to him — 
to all ; and so, Andrew Jackson Davis, farewell ! But, 
whilst the Magic Staff — Penetralia, Stellar Key, 
Arabula, Harmonia and Divine Revelations — are in 
print, or even in memory, never let any critic presume 
to say: "Spiritism has no philosophy.' ' 

In the volumes enumerated above, it has the best, 
broadest, holiest and yet most practical philosophy 

THAT WAS EVER ENUNCIATED SINCE GoD SAID I ' ' Let THERE 
BE LIGHT, AND THERE WAS LIGHT. ' ' 

Our sketch of supermundane Spiritism would not be 
complete without this humble tribute to one who forms 
its noblest illustration — to one with whom the writer 
has never exchanged a word on earth, and in all human 
probability never will, but who rejoices to believe that 
name, so coldly slipping out of human remembrance 
and appreciation now, will be enshrined in the hearts 
of unborn generations, and in the shining role of 
immortality be held sacred as the Founder of a Divine 
and Natural Harmonial Dispensation. 




/ 




Sylvester A. West, M. D. 



mlllllllllllll!H'!i 



HIIIIII iiiiiiiiiiiiilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIH 



"When the Pilgrim arrives at the goal of Scientific Knowl- 
edge, no matter what path he may have pursued, the Angels 
bring forth and place upon his brow a Royal Diadem, which in 
these days, we call 'Common Sense.' " —Andrew Jackson Davis. 

^e Harmonial Association 

The first Harmonial Association was organized May 3, 
1881. It was a Spiritual Association and its objects were : 

1. To promote the discovery and diffusion of accurate 
scientific knowledge concerning things spiritual. 

2. Mutual improvement in Ethical Principles. 

3. To make practical the pleasant ways of Wisdom. 

4. To cultivate love and reverence for pure Truth 
wherever found. 

In brief: To encourage the harmonious growth of the 
individual character— spiritually, intellectually and so- 
c i a lly_to the end that nobler people, juster laws, sweeter 
homes, better schools and wiser governments may be 
secured, and life here and hereafter, be rendered more 
Worthy, Beneficent and Beautiful. 

It is plainly evident that TK in naming his "Harmonic Philos- 
ophy" and "Harmonic Association" simply appropriated, by^ a 
slight revision, the beautiful spiritual conceptions: Harmonial 
Philosophy and Harmonial Association, first published to the 
world by Andrew Jackson Davis nearly fifty years before the 
appearance of any of TK's literature. 

A number of the former Students and Friends of the 
"Great School" have organized a revival of THE HAR- 
MONIAL ASSOCIATION. Membership is open to 
every one who wishes to engage in the truly Great Work 
of practical self-improvement and service to humanity. 
There are no dues to pay, no arbitrary pledges of any 
kind, no authority but your own Reason, no leadership 
except your own Spirit. 

A beautiful hand illumined Membership Certificate 
(suitable for framing) with appropriate Harmonial 
Motto and your full name inscribed thereon will be pre- 
sented free of charge to all members. 

We invite you to join with us in the establishment of 
the Harmonial Dispensation. 

Address : Dr. S. A. West 
720 North May-field Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii- 



PIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM 



Great Harmonia 

A Monthly Magazine 

Devoted to the most Practical Philosophy ever presented 
to mankind. Useful 24 hours daily and applicable to each 
and every task, diversion and essential activity of Life. 
A powerful appeal to every ennobling impulse of the 
human Soul. 

The Great Harmonia is just the kind of a magazine that 
every up-to-date intelligent man and woman has been 
searching and wishing for — because we do not deal in 
speculations. We explain clearly the accurate, provable, 
scientific methods of procedure which lead directly to 
the Living of the Harmonial Life. This is the Keynote 
to a definite personal demonstration of the underlying 
Laws and Principles of Nature as taught by Andrew Jack- 
son Davis. 

The Great Harmonia will teach you how to control, 
apply and enjoy the Seven Factors of Health: — Dress, 
Food, Water, Air, Light, Electricity and Magnetism. 
How to make your Life exactly what you will it to be. 
How to overcome, re-form, re-construct every relation 
and condition of Life. The crowning achievement of the 
power of Mind over Materialism. 

A Home Section, An Open Forum, Questions Depart- 
ment, Children's Lyceum, etc., etc. 

ARE YOU WITH US? 
$1.00 per year — 12 issues. Satisfaction guaranteed or 
your money cheerfully and promptly refunded at any 
time during the year. Address : 

Dr. S. A. West, Editor and Publisher, 
720 North Mayfield Avenue Chicago, 111. 



!DIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 




v^v 




fe^ 




For Sale by 




DR 


S. A. WEST 


720 North Mayfield Ave. 


CHICAGO 



Supplemental Lists and announcements of Philosophic. 
Historic, Occult, Economic, Juvenile and Fictional 
"Books Worth While," — and personally recommended, 
will be issued from time to time. You will be glad to 
have your name on our mailing list. LET us be sure we 
have your CORRECT ADDRESS. Thank you ! 



pllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



"Books that should be bound in Rubies and Sapphires." 



Andrew Jackson Davis 

The Greatest Seer of our modern age, was born August 
11, 1826. He became an Independent Psychic in 1847, 
and from that time on, his whole life was devoted en- 
tirely to laying the foundation for the Harmonial Spir- 
itual Dispensation on the earth plane. He wrote and 
published some thirty volumes, constituting the most 
remarkable and comprehensive Library of Spiritual 
Knowledge ever given to man. 

For a number of years his books have been out of 
print, and it is rarely that any of them may be found, 
even in the largest second-hand book stores. Only after 
two years' search and at considerable expense, did we 
succeed in securing a complete set of these volumes for 
our own library. Recently, however, we learned of the 
existence of a stock of some of these books, and at once 
closed a deal for the entire lot. These are all NEW and 
in perfect condition, uniformly bound in black cloth, 
stamped in pure gold. The prices quoted are less than 
what you would have to pay for them second-hand. 



Kindly notify us of change of address, so we may send you our 
new Announcements. 



•Tiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu 



illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllN 

BEYOND THE VALLEY 

This wonderful volume satisfies a natural longing — the 
universal desire to comprehend the activities of psychic 
and spiritual principles as they manifest themselves in 
the life of a Seer. The history of Mr. Davis' life, as un- 
folded and influenced by Guardian Angels, amid the cir- 
cumstances and entanglements of human society. A 
rational and easily readable narrative filled to repletion 
with those extraordinary psychological events which 
attract and instruct every thotful reader. 

Records of many wonderful spiritual scenes, blended 
with the trials and changes in the personal life of the 
author, all of which are entirely authentic and beyond 
refutation. Six full-page engravings, illustrating the 
author's experiences while using his spiritual powers. 
Two of these illustrate most interestingly, the mode of 
separation and departure of the Soul in physical death, 
as viewed from the Spiritual side of life. 

Over 400 pages. 56 chapters. Price, $2.00. 



PENETRALIA 

Styled by the author, "the wisest book" from his pen, 
deserves to be brot prominently before the public. Ques- 
tions of the most momentous import answered from the 
spiritual plane in simple language and familiar illustra- 
tions. "Penetralia" reaches down to the very foundation 
of Nature's triune Temple, and conducts the philosoph- 
ical reader thru intellectual labyrinths innumerable. It 
sings the sweet anthemnal song of Eternal Harmony, and 
awakens aspirations toward Heavenly Wisdom, Love 
and Liberty. Over 500 pages. Price, $2.00. 

We wish to keep our Mailing List up-to-date, 
— and you will want to keep in touch with us. 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH^ 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIN 



THE REFORMER 

This volume contains Truths eminently serviceable 
in the elevation of the race. It is devoted to the consid- 
eration of "Physiological Vices and Virtues, and the 
Seven Phases of Marriage." It covers ground never 
before occupied by any reformatory writer, and teaches 
the most important truths upon the most vital ques- 
tions that can agitate any mind — those of Marriage and 
Parentage. 

It is a work that appeals first to man's consciousness, 
by a clear representation of existing evils; and next, to 
the higher faculties, by pointing out the "Highway of 
Freedom" from all these evils. Satisfying, as it does, the 
understanding, it affords valuable aid to the individual in 
rooting out bad habits. It is a safe book for youth, for 
it has not the least indelicacy of sentiment or expres- 
sion ; and it furnishes just such knowledge, and incul- 
cates such principles as are calculated to preserve the 
youthful mind from contamination, and insure the prac- 
tice of virtue. 

It is an invaluable book for the newly-married, for it 
points out the danger and consequences of extremism 
and inversionism, and imparts that information concern- 
ing the reproductive functions necessary to avoid con- 
jugal misdirections. 446 pages. Price, $2.00. 



ANSWERS TO EVER-RECURRING QUESTIONS 

A multitude of questions have been propounded to Mr. 
Davis by his numerous Readers and Students. From 
this list, those of the most permanent interest and highest 
value have been carefully selected, and the result is this 
present volume, comprising well-considered and intelli- 
gent replies to more than two hundred important ques- 
tions. Over 400 pages. Price, $2.00. 

For answers to PERSONAL Inquiries, kindly inclose postage. 
And THANK YOU for the courtesy. 



InillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllW 



llllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllH 

THE THINKER 

A progressive revelation of the Eternal Principle- 
which inspire mind and govern matter. Revealing cer- 
tain Occult phases of mind which afford prophetic gleams 
of a more natural, harmonious and perfect development 
of the triune man. 

No book extant contains any such unanswerable Logic 
as that running thru the chapters on "Immortality," or 
any such Metaphysics as those which distinguish this 
"Pantheon of Progress." 419 pages. Price, $2.00. 



THE HARMONIAL MAN 

The natural result of the Harmonial Philosophy. De- 
signed to enlarge man's mind concerning the political and 
ecclesiastical conditions of our Country. A rational con- 
sideration of scientific themes going directly and practi- 
cally to the heart of the great problem of our social and 
personal happiness. The aim is to enable men to think 
for themselves, and feel henceforth inwardly strength- 
ened and disposed to become as nearly as possible an 
exemplification of the Harmonial Life. 167 pages. Price, 
$1.25. 

THE ETHICS OF CONJUGAL LOVE 

An elucidation of the Harmonial principles pertaining 
to love and marriage, and the fundamental ideals leading 
to Spiritual adjustment and Happiness. A volume of 
Hope, Strength and Inspiration. 142 pages. Price, $1.00. 



THE PHILOSOPHY OF SPECIAL PROVIDENCES 

The author's "vision" of the harmonious works of the 
Creator is fully given in this bright little book. He illus- 
trates the chain of Special Providences which mankind 
generally attribute to the direct acts of the Deity. Price, 
75 cents. 

The Names of Your Friends who are interested in Advanced 
Thot Literature — will always be appreciated. Thank you. 



Piiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiy 



jlllllllll lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllH 

HARBINGER OF HEALTM^J^_£ 

This rare volume has been a veritable veftitjure to a 
new and glorious Temple of Life, Health and Happiness 
to many thousands of people. A rational and masterly 
elucidation of the vital subject of physical, mental, moral 
and spiritual health. 

The author's prescriptions are given in the light of the 
"Superior Condition." This book has awakened intense 
interest in the minds of the most intelligent of the Med- 
ical Profession, and it is invaluable to the general reader, 
containing as it does, information concerning methods 
of treatment hitherto unknown to the world, and impart- 
ing important suggestions respecting the Will Power and 
the Self-Healing Energies. 

A wonderful treatise, containing more than three hun- 
dred prescriptions for the treatment and cure of over one 
hundred forms of "disease," a simple guide to health 
which ought to be in every home. 428 pages. Price, 
$2.00. 

PHILOSOPHY OF SPIRITUAL INTERCOURSE 

An exposition of modern mysteries, with particular 
reference to the philosophy and utility of spiritual inter- 
course. The Author opens his discussion with this sen- 
tence, "The intelligent individual needs not to be in- 
formed that this Age is one of unparalleled mental 
activity," — and then, sweeping forward in easily readable 
and beautiful English, lays before the reader 399 pages 
of rich fields of philosophic investigations, thot and 
deductions. Price, $2.00. 

If we can, in any way, be of service to you, we shall be glad to 
hear from you. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



Deacidified using the Bookkeeper process. 
Neutralizing agent: Magnesium Oxide 
Treatment Date: Dec. 2004 

PreservationTechnologies 

A WORLD LEADER IN PAPER PRESERVATION 

1 1 1 Thomson Park Drive 
Cranberry Township, PA 16066 
(724)779-2111