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Full text of "Tools, Equipment and Machinery Adapted for the Vocational Education and Employment of Handicapped People"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/toolsequipmentma02john 



• r 



LISTENING 

Cassette Indicator 378 

Infrared Listening System 330 

Personal Sound System 382 

Phonic Ear Personal FM Systems 334 



377 



CASSETTE INDICATOR 




Photograph courtesy of 
American Printing House 
for the Blind 



378 



CASSETTE INDICATOR 



DEVELOPER 

Manufactured by: 
American Printing House 
for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, KY 40206 



CONTACT PERSON 

Ralph E. McCracken 
American Printing House 

for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville. KY 40206 
(502) 895-2405 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Listening 
Reading 

















PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
visual impairment 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

U.S. Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 



FOR SALE 

American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, KY 40206 

$.30 





FIELD 


TESTED ] 


information 


not available 



HOW IT WORKS 

The Cassette Indicator consists of an 
aluminum cylinder 3/8" in diameter and 
approximately V' long. One end of the 
cylinder has been cut away so that three 
equally-spaced prongs remain. These 
prongs are rounded on the ends and are 
approximately 1/8" long. The other end 
of the cylinder has one rounded pro- 
jection the size and shape of a braille 
dot. The purpose of this device is to 
indicate if the tape is moving or has 
stopped. To obtain this information, 
the three-pronged end of the indicator is 
inserted in one of the cassette sprocket 
holes; then by placing the finger on the 
braille dot, it may easily be determined 
whether or not the tape is moving. This 
device can be used only on open-faced 
cassette machines. 

(Information based on American Printing 
House for the Blind literature.) 



379 



INFRARED LISTENING SYSTEM 




ipillBHW l lliil ii ■pillillUl l il l I l i ij i il l llllip i ii Wl i Wllil l lUJI i gMl i ll p I Hi I WH . ,, 

* * ^ ^ * * * ^ ^ * * <, ^ , ^ .1 

^ * * « Jl f « ^ ^ 




Infrared Light Emitter 




Hearing Aid Adapter 



Headset 



Photographs courtesy of 
Sound Associates, Inc. 



380 



INFRARED LISTENING SYSTEM 



DEVELOPER 

Sennheiser Electronics 
West Germany 



CONTACT PERSON 

Rose Jaffe 

Sound Associates, Inc. 
424 W. 45th Street 
New York, NY 10036 
(212) 757-5679 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Listening 









PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

hearing impairment; eliminates space 
between speaker and listener as sound 
goes directly to the ear 







FIELD TESTED 

yes 


West 


Germany 











REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

yes 



FOR SALE 



Sound Associates 
424 W. 45th Street 
New York, NY 10036 



HOW IT WORKS 

This system consists of an infrared light 
emitter and individual receivers. The 
infrared light emitter is mounted on a 
wall bracket near a stage or podium then 
plugged into a 110 volt outlet and into 
an audio line of the existing public 
address amplifier. The emitter sends 
infrared light containing audio signals 
throughout the room. Individual head- 
sets or hearing aids worn by the user 
receive the audio signal and volume is 
individually controlled. The electronic 
parts of Sennheiser* s headset are in a 
plastic housing worn under the chin and 
supported by two acoustical tubes. It 
operates on a rechargeable battery. The 
Sennheiser hearing aid adapter is 
designed for people needing high ampli- 
fication. Signals from the light 
emitter are fed to a small induction 
loop, (rather than driving an earphone), 
which hooks behind the user's ear next 
to the regular hearing aid. This 
system is only for indoor use. 
A component for home use is also 
available. 

(Information based on Sound Associates, 
Inc. brochure.) 



381 



PERSONAL SOUND SYSTEM 



Photograph not available 



382 



PERSONAL SOUND SYSTEM 



DEVELOPER 

Dr. B. Leshowitz 
Audio Device, Inc. 
4702 E. Calle del Medio 
Phoenix. AZ 85018 
(602) 959-6927 



CONTACT PERSON 
Same as Developer 



WHERE IT 


IS 


USED 


Listening 













PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

hearing impairment; suppresses back- 
ground noise found to destroy speech 
intelligibility received through a con- 
ventional hearing aid 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

sound systems employing infrared light 
transmission have been marketed by 
Sennheiser for a number of years 



REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


no 









WARRANTY PROVIDED 


yes 





FOR SALE 

Audio Device, Inc. 
4702 E. Calle del Medio 
Phoenix, AZ 85018 



HOW IT WORKS 

The Personal Sound System consists of a 
transmitter and a receiver. The trans- 
mitter converts the audio signal of a 
TV, radio or other source into an infra^ 
red light beam. The transmitter oper- 
ates from an electrical outlet or a 
rechargeable battery. The portable 
receiver, worn by the listener, is 
battery operated. The receiver con- 
verts the light signal from the trans- 
mitter back into sound which drives an 
earphone. 

Applications include: personal hearing 
aids; public address system for people 
who are hard of hearing; and wireless 
reproduction of home TV and stero 
sound. 

(Information provided by B. Leshowitz, 
Audio Device, Inc.) 



383 



PHONIC EAR" PERSONAL FM SYSTEMS 



441 T teacher microphone/transmitter 




445FI student FM receiver witti 
AT 163 teleloop lor use wltl^ 
induction coil hearing aids 



r 



w 



^ 




442ft student FM receiver 

w/fh Phonic Ear® ssoaudio 

input hearing aid 



Photographs courtesy of 
HC Electronics, Inc. 



384 



PHONIC EAR"^ PERSONAL FM SYSTEMS 



DEVELOPER 

R R 

Phonic Ear /Phonic Mirror 
HC Electronics, Inc. 
250 Cam i no Alto 
Mill Valley, CA 94941 
(415) 383-4000 



CONTACT PERSON 

Same as Developer 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Communication 
Listening 















PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

environments in which competing room 
noises and or reverberation impedes 
speech discrimination by hearing aid 
users 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

Federal Communications Commission 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 


yes 





FOR SALE 

Phonic Ear /Phonic Mirror^ 
HC Electronics, Inc. 
250 Camino Alto 
Mill Valley, CA 94941 



HOW IT WORKS 

•p 
The Phonic Ear Personal FM Systems con- 
sist of three main components: two dif- 
ferent FM receivers and a microphone/ 
transmitter. 

The microphone/transmitter is a minia- 
ture wireless FM transmitting station 
designed to transmit the speaker's voice 
at a constant sound pressure level to 
the 442R receiver or the 445R receiver 
worn by the hearing impaired person. It 
can be worn lavalier-style or on the 
belt with a small lapel mike. Trans- 
mitting on one of many frequencies, the 
speaker's voice is only received by 
wearers having the proper matching RO 
(receiver oscillator) plugged into their 
receivers, eliminating spillover from 
other transmitters. The 442R receives 
the transmitted voice of the speaker and 
provides this signal to the wearer's 
hearing aid for amplification. The 
hearing aid connects to the receiver 
with an audio input cord for audio input 
hearing aids, or with an AT 163 Teleloop 
for hearing aids without audio input 
capabilities. 

The 445R receiver functions like the 
442R receiver. In addition, it has a 
built-in environmental microphone for 
hearing aids that have a telecoil (T) 
position but not a microphone/telecoil 
(M/T) position. This allows the wearer 
to receive the speaker's transmitted 
voice and monitor their own voice or 
have conversation with people in close 
proximity. The environmental mike can be 
turned off at the wearer's discretion. 

(Information based on HC Electronics, 
Inc. literature.) 



385 



MACHINE TRADES 

Audible Signal Device, Lathe Work 

Alignment 388 

Drilling Jig for Improved Accuracy . . 390 

Grinder Modification I 392 

Grinder Modification II 394 

Hold Down and Push Stick for Upper 

Extremities Prosthetic Design . . . . 396 

Levels 398 

Location Jig 400 

Measuring Device for Woodworking: 

Dadoing 402 

Measuring Device for Woodworking: 

Shelf and Paneling Measurement . . . 404 

Measuring Devices for Woodworking: 

Table Saw Guide 406 

Micro Computer Drill Press Multi- 
Axis Interface for Cerebral Palsy 

and Quad Persons 408 

Optical Projection Equipment 410 

Protractor, Lathe Set-Up 412 

Radial Arm Assistive Device for 

Hand Held Tools 414 

Saw, Automated Radial Arm 416 

Slide Hammer 418 

Spindle Drilling Fixture 420 

Stanley Combination Square 422 

Stanley Drill Guide 424 

Starrett Micrometers 426 

Three Axis Crimper 428 



387 



MACHINE TRADES (cont.) 

Tool Adjusting Block, Lathe 

Operation 430 

Triangle, Lathe Set-Up 432 

Visual Process Inspection Station . . 434 

Wire Brush Cleaning of Small Parts . . 436 



387a 



AUDIBLE SIGNAL DEVICE, LATHE WORK ALIGNMENT 




Photograph courtesy of 
Jeff Hamm, WVSC 



388 



AUDIBLE SIGNAL DEVICE. LATHE WORK ALIGNMENT 



DEVELOPER 

Jerome Golner 
Golner Precision Products 
354 Cottonwood Avenue 
Hartland, WI 53029 



CONTACT PERSON 

Same as Developer 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Machine Trades: Lathe 
Operation 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

aligning work accurately on a lathe when 
one cannot see 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

used in one factory by one blind 
employee 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

no 



FOR SALE 

no 



HOW IT WORKS 

The audible signal device can be used as 
a warning for carriage travel or to 
indicate parts in a four- jaw chuck. To 
use it, adjust the microswitch so that 
the actuating button contacts the work 
to be aligned, rotate the work and 
advance across slide until a signal is 
heard on one segment of the part. 
Adjust the jaw until no signal is heard. 
Repeat the sequence until a signal is 
heard all around the diameter of the 
work. 

(Information based on personal communi- 
cation with Jerome Golner.) 



389 



DRILLING JIG FOR IMPROVED ACCURACY 



MM''^. 



r^ 








Photograph courtesy of Cali- 
fornia Department of Reha- 
bilitation 



390 



DRILLING JIG FOR IMPROVED ACCURACY 



DEVELOPER 

Charles Eckles 
Independent Contract 
Consultant 
(213) 360-4180 



CONTACT PERSON 

California Department of 
Rehabilitation 
830 "K" Street Mall 
Sacramento, CA 95814 
(916) 322-8500 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Machining 

















PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

See: HOW IT WORKS 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 





REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not 


applicable 















WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not 


appl 


icable 





FOR SALE 

May be made at a minimal cost. 



HOW IT WORKS 

This jig assists in positioning parts 
for accurate drilling of holes on a 
drill press. It is made with a simple 
angle iron support to keep it level and 
a fixed stop to assure the hole will be 
drilled in the same place at the same 
angle each time. 

(Information based on A Handbook of 
Workshop Production Aids , California 
Department of Rehabilitation.) 



391 



GRINDER MODIFICATION I 




Photograph courtesy of 
A.R. Colby 



392 



GRINDER MODIFICATION I 



DEVELOPER 

Pratt & Whitney Aircraft 
Group 
Manufacturing Division 
400 Main Street 
East Hartford, CT 06108 



CONTACT PERSON 

A.R. Colby, Manager 
EED Program 

Pratt & Whitney Aircraft 
Group 
Manufacturing Division 
400 Main Street 
East Hartford, CT 06108 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Manufacturing 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

inability of someone who is legally 
blind to adjust a typical grinder 
machine quickly and accurately 









FIELD TESTED 

yes 


used 


by 


one 


employee 








^ 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

information not available 



FOR SALE 

For information about obtaining a 
closed circuit TV camera and viewing 
screen, contact: 

Visualtek 

1610 26th Street 

Santa Monica, CA 90404 



HOW IT WORKS 

The grinder operator pictured opposite 
is legally blind (20/200 vision or less 
when wearing glasses). He can operate 
5-6 pieces of milling and grinding 
machinery. To accommodate him, Pratt & 
Whitney obtained a few special aids. 
The grinder operator uses a conventional 
BOX microscope to check pieces for chips 
or other flaws. He uses a couple of 
double magnifying lenses to check the 
"Last Word" indicator of his grinder. 
He also uses a closed circuit television 
camera and viewing screen made by 
Visualtek to check his work (p. 582). 
The Visualtek camera can be seen in the 
upper left corner of the picture and is 
positioned directly on his work. The 
viewing screen can be seen just behind 
his right shoulder. 

(Information provided A.R, Colby,) 



393 



GRINDER MODIFICATION II 




Photographs courtesy of 
A.R. Colby 



394 



GRINDER MODIFICATION II 



DEVELOPER 

Pratt & Whitney Aircraft 
Group 
Manufacturing Division 
400 Main Street 
East Hartford, CT 06108 



CONTACT PERSON 

A.R. Colby, Manager 
EED Program 

Pratt & Whitney Aircraft 
Group 
Manufacturing Division 
400 Main Street 
East Hartford, CT 06108 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Manufacturing 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

inability of someone who is legally 
blind to adjust a typical grinder 
machine quickly and accurately 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 
used by one employee 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

information not available 



FOR SALE 

information not available 



HOW IT WORKS 

This set of magnifiers is used by a 
legally blind employee to check the "Last 
Word" indicator of his grinder. See 
Grinder Modification I, (p. 392) for a 
description of the other job aids used 
by this employee. 

(Information provided by A.R. Colby.) 



395 



HOLD DOWN AND PUSH STICK FOR UPPER EXTREMITIES PROSTHETIC DESIGN 



i 



/ 






Photograph courtesy of 
Philip Wineland 



396 



HOLD DOWN AND PUSH STICK FOR UPPER EXTREMITIES PROSTHETIC DESIGN 





DEVELOPER 


Philif 


3 Wineland 


Alber 


Drive 


State 


Technical Institute 


Plainwell, MI 49080 | 


(616) 


664-4461 







CONTACT PERSON 

Same as Developer 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Benchwork 

Cabinetmaking 

Construction 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

potential safety hazard experienced by 
someone with an arm prosthesis when 
using a jointer or table saw 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

no 



WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


no 





FOR SALE 

no 



HOW IT WORKS 

Person is able to hold down a peice of 
wood and push it over a jointer or 
through a table saw with more control 
and less danger of injury. 

(Information provided by Philip 
Wineland.) 



397 



LEVELS 



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Photographs courtesy of 






American Foundation for the 




Blind L 






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398 



LEVELS 



DEVELOPER 



CONTACT PERSON 

Alex H. Townsend 
American Foundation for 

the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 
(212) 620-2169 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Benchwork 
Construction 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impairment 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

by panels of blind and visually impaired 
persons 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 



FOR SALE 

American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 



Carpenter's Level 
Electronic Level 



$35.00 
$96.00 



HOW IT WORKS 

The Carpenter's Level determines if a 
horizontal surface is level. A steel 
ball rolls in a 6V' V- trough. The screw 
at one end changes the level V' per 
revolution. A retaining rod keeps the 
ball from falling out. It is nickel 
plated. The Electronic Level provides 
accurate horizontal or vertical leveling 
comparable to spirit levels used by 
sighted workers. This aluminum level, 
2' long, provides an audible signal for 
both horizontal and vertical measure- 
ments. The audible tone stops when unit 
is level or vertically aligned. 

(Information based on American Foundation 
for the Blind literature.) 



399 



LOCATION JIG 




3- 



x4"- 



(not drawn to scale) 



Diagram courtesy of Bob 
Warren, redrawn by Terrl 
Bleck, WVSC 



400 



LOCATION JIG 



DEVELOPER 

Bob Warren J. A. 
United Cerebral Palsy of 
Akron 

318 Water Street 
Akron, OH 44308 
(216) 376-6041 



CONTACT PERSON 
Same as Developer 



WHERE IT IS USED 
Machine Trades 



J \ 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

lack of persistent control and grasp 
strength 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 
United Cerebral Palsy - Akron, OH 



FOR SALE 
no 







REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not 


appl 


i cable 

















WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not 


appl 


i cable 





HOW IT WORKS 

The location jig is designed to attach 
to the work table of a drill press, 
utilizing pre-cast slots in the table. 
The jig with its V-design makes location 
of the casting easy and positive. The 
casting can only be located in the 
correct position due to an offset in the 
jig which only accommodates the casting 
in the correct position. The V-design 
also makes loading easier because it 
helps keep extraneous movement to a 
minimum, and alignment positive. A kick- 
out lever is attached to insure quick, 
positive removal of the casting after 
drilling by simply moving the lever to 
the right. 

( Information provided by Bob Warren, UCP.) 



401 



MEASURING DEVICE FOR WOODWORKING: DADOING 




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//' 






Photograph courtesy of 
Russ Gage 



402 



MEASURING DEVICE FOR WOODWORKING: DADOING 



DEVELOPER 

information not available 



CONTACT PERSON 

Russ Gage 

4820 South 20th Street 
Milwaukee. WI 53221 
(414) 281-0076 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Carpentry 

Sheet Metal Working 

Woodworking 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

difficulty experienced by a blind person 
when making precise cuts in wood or 
other materials 









FIELD 


TESTED 

yes 


used 


by 


one 


blind 


person 





REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not 


applicable 













WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not 


applicable 





FOR SALE 

no 



HOW IT WORKS 

Each piece in this set is 6" in length. 
They are used to line up a saw or a 
router. The thickness is the unit of 
measurement. The smallest is 1/8" thick; 
the next is 2/8" or 1/4" in width, and 
so on up to 1". (Eight pieces of metal 
are fastened together to make the 1" 
piece.) The grooves running across each 
piece allow a blind user to make sure he 
or she is using the desired size. (Four 
grooves equals 4/8" or 1/2", etc.) If 
you must dado a board to a depth of, 
say, 3/8" you can set the 3/8" unit nut 
to the table saw blade and raise or 
lower the blade to the desired height. 

(Information provided by Russ Gage.) 



403 



MEASURING DEVICE FOR WOODWORKING: SHELF AND PANELING MEASUREMENT 





wm 







Photograph courtesy of 
Russ Gage 



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I 




404 



MEASURING DEVICE FOR WOODWORKING: SHELF AND PANELING MEASUREMENT 



DEVELOPER 

William Peters 
508 8th Avenue 
Sterling, IL 61081 



CONTACT PERSON ] 


Russ Gage 
4820 South 
Milwaukee, 
(414) 281- 


20th 
WI 
D076 


Street 
53221 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Cabinetmaking 

Carpentry 

Sheet Metal Working 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

difficulty a blind person has when 
measuring paneling, shelving or drywall 









FIELD TESTED 

yes 


used 


by 


one 


blind person 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

no 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

no 



FOR SALE 

no 



HOW IT WORKS 

This item is a slide measuring device 
made from %" by 3" paneling. The length 
of each piece can vary to meet the needs 
of the user. The longer board has a %" 
groove in the center. The groove is 
several inches long. The shorter board 
also has a k" groove running nearly its 
entire length. Two carriage bolts and 
wing nuts are used to hold the two 
boards together. By loosening the wing- 
nuts you can adjust this "slide rule" to 
measure the width of a shelf for a book- 
case, or closet, or find the distance 
between studdings. Tightening the wing- 
nuts holds the measurement until you can 
use it to score the board you are going 
to cut. This is very handy when measur- 
ing paneling and drywall for electric 
switch openings and outlets. 

(Information provided by Russ Gage.) 



405 



MEASURING DEVICES FOR WOODWORKING: TABLE SAW GUIDE 




rmwi 



\ 



Photograph courtesy of 
Russ Gage 



406 



MEASURING DEVICES FOR WOODWORKING: TABLE SAW GUIDE 



DEVELOPER 

William Peters 
508 8th Avenue 
Sterling, IL 



CONTACT PERSON 

Russ Gage 

4820 South 20th Street 
Milwaukee, WI 53221 
(414) 281-0076 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Cabinetmaking 

Carpentry 

Sheet Metal Working 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

difficulty experienced by blind persons 
when attempting to cut wood and other 
materials precisely 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

no 



FOR SALE 

no 









FIELD TESTED 

yes 


used 


by 


one 


blind person 











REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


no 









HOW IT WORKS 

This device is made of plastic water 
pipe. The pipe was cut into different 
lengths, from V to 8" in length. A 
3-sided file was used to mark the size of 
each: 4 inches was four grooves, etc. 
These pieces are used to measure the 
length, or especially the width of a 
board to be cut with a table saw. You 
put the end of the proper size of pipe 
against the saw blade, then move the 
saw's fence up to the other end of the 
pipe. You then can cut the size needed. 
If you need a size which is larger than 
8", you can tape the proper combination 
of tubes together with masking tape. 
(The width of the plastic pipe is 3/8" 
inside diameter and 1/2" outside dia- 
meter.) 

(Information provided by Russ Gage.) 



407 



MICRO COMPUTER DRILL PRESS MULTI-AXIS INTERFACE FOR 
CEREBRAL PALSY AND QUAD PERSONS 



Photograph not available 



408 



MICRO COMPUTER DRILL PRESS MULTI-AXIS INTERFACE 
FOR CEREBRAL PALSY & QUAD PERSONS 



DEVELOPER 

Clinical Convenience 

Products 
Contracting Serv. Div. 
2070 Helena Street 
Madison, WI 53704 
(608) 251-2882 



CONTACT PERSON 

Don Warren 
2070 Helena Street 
Madison, WI 53704 
(608) 251-2882 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Machine Trades 
Structural Work 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

limited control of hand and arm move- 
ments 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

prototype only at Clinical Convenience 
Products - Madison, WI 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

information not available 



FOR SALE 

Clinical Convenience Products 
Contracting Service Division 
2070 Helena Street 
Madison, WI 53704 



HOW IT WORKS 

The Autocom developed by the TRACE Cen 
ter, Madison, Wisconsin (see p. 154), 
is connected to the drill press con- 
trols by means of an electronic switch 
ing box. This box also contains a 
series of small lights, one of which 
lights each time a drill press func- 
tion is activated using the Autocom 
cell programmed to perform that func- 
tion. That is if the user selects the 
"on" cell on the Autocom, the drill 
press turns on, and a little light on 
the switching mechanism box goes on. 
Another light comes on if the user 
choses the Autocom cell which lowers 
the drill press, raises it, adjusts 
the press table, and so forth. This 
visual feedback from the lights allows 
the user to verify the choice made. 
It also allows a little more leeway 
to change the choice if it is 
incorrect. 

(Information provided by Ricardo Cerna 
Rehabilitation Engineering Specialist, 
Wisconsin Division of Vocational Reha- 
bilitation, and Don Warren.) 



409 



OPTICAL PROJECTION EQUIPMENT 





^llitf 



Reversible support arm and horizontal 
lens system on grinder 



Reversible support arm over work 
spindle 




Mounted with tool holder as Presetter Mounted on glass forming lathe 



Photographs courtesy of Stocker 
& Yale, Inc. 



410 



OPTICAL PROJECTION EQUIPMENT 



DEVELOPER 

Manufactured by: 
Stocker & Yale, Inc. 
133 Brimbal Avenue 
Beverly, MA 01915 
(617) 927-3940 



CONTACT PERSON 

Michael A. Lavey 
Stocker & Yale, Inc. 
133 Brimbal Avenue 
Beverly, MA 01915 
(617) 927-3940 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Benchwork 
Machine Trades 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impairment 



FIELD TESTED 
yes 
standard industrial product 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


yes 









FOR SALE 

Stocker & Yale, Inc. 
133 Brimbal Avenue 
Beverly, m 01915 

Quotation given on price, depending on 
model and application. $3,000 - $5,000 
range. 



411 



HOW IT WORKS 

In order to align, inspect, gauge, fit 
or measure machine parts, a screen, 
lenses (lOx, 20x, 31.25 or 50x), illum- 
ination and related accessories project 
a magnified image on the screen making 
measurement and inspection easier. The 
operator can view and work on a part 
without removing it from the machine. 
The system can be adapted to various 
machines, (machine tool cutter, surface 
grinder, lathe, miller), using a rever- 
sible arm support or an extension boom 
arm. The mounting can be over the work 
spindle, directly to the work table, 
over the wheel spindle or on the base 
of the machine. 

(Information based on Stocker & Yale, 
Inc. literature.) 



PROTRACTOR, LATHE SET-UP 






^jP' 




J J J J J J J 




Photograph courtesy of 
Jeff Hanim, WVSC 



412 



PROTRACTOR, LATHE SET-UP 



DEVELOPER 

Jerome Golner 
Golner Precision Products 
354 Cottonwood Avenue 
Hartland, WI 53029 



CONTACT PERSON 

Same as Developer 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Machine Trades: Lathe 
Operation 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

setting and or measuring specific angles 
when one cannot see 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

used in one factory by one blind 
employee 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


no 









FOR SALE 

no 



HOW IT WORKS 

The holes in the square bar each repre 
sent one degree. The hole closest to 
center is one degree. The next hole out 
is two degrees, etc. The holes in the 
plate represent a set of degrees. The 
first set is from 1-10, the second from 
11-20, third from 21-30, etc. To arrive 
at 45", the pin is placed in the fifth 
hole on the bar. It will then engage 
only holes that represent 5, 15, 25, 35 
45, 55, 65, etc. As the user counts the 
holes it meets, the first would be 5°, 
the second 15°, the third 25% the 
fourth 35°, and the fifth set 45°. 

(Information based on personal communi 
cation with Jerome Golner.) 



413 



RADIAL ARM ASSISTIVE DEVICE FOR HAND HELD TOOLS 



• HEIGHT ADJUSTER 






Photograph and diagrams 
courtesy of John H. Leslie, 
Jr. 




DETAIL OF REMOVABLE TOOL HOLDER 
FOR RADIAL ARM DRILL 



r//.^^f 







414 



RADIAL ARM ASSISTIVE DEVICE FOR HAND HELD TOOLS 



DEVELOPER 

Rehabilitation Engineer- 
ing Center 
2021 North Old Manor 
Wichita, KS 67208 
(316) 688-1888 



CONTACT PERSON 

Leonard Anderson 
Rehabilitation Engineer- 
ing Center 
2021 North Old Manor 
Wichita, KS 67208 
(316) 688-1888 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Machine Trades 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

difficulty locating and holding a drill 
in a given position to provide a per- 
pendicular hole 



FIELD TESTED 




yes 




Center Industries Corporation 


- Wichita 


KS 





REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not provided 





WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not 


applicable 





FOR SALE 
no 



HOW IT WORKS 

This device was designed and constructed 
to provide a means of holding a drill or 
powered hand tool perpendicular to a 
work surface while still giving the 
operator complete freedom of movement. 
It provides rigidity and perpendicu- 
larity so that the user can drill accu- 
rate holes or utilize a riveter accu- 
rately. This tool holder converts a 
hand drill or hand tool into a radial 
arm device. The radial arm is not 
limited to any arch of movement and has 
in and out travel of approximately 24 
inches. The drill fixture is mounted on 
slide with a vertical movement of 
approximately 7 inches. This unit is 
not a true radial arm drill as it only 
assists the user in positioning and 
holding the tool. A carriage was con- 
structed to allow instant change of 
tools. Each tool is mounted on a tool 
holder and is secured to the holder by a 
worm gear clamp. The tool holder fits 
into a receptacle on the carriage. 

(Information provided by John H. Leslie, 
Jr., Rehabilitation Engineering Center) 



415 



SAW, AUTOMATED RADIAL ARM 



Photograph not available 



416 



SAW, AUTOMATED RADIAL ARM 



DEVELOPER 

Clinical Convenience 
Products 
Contracting Serv. Div. 
2070 Helena Street 
Madison. WI 53704 
(608) 251-2882 



CONTACT 


PERSON ] 


Don Warren 
2070 Helena Street 
Madison, WI 53704 
(608) 251-2882 




J 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Safety 
Sawing Lumber 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

allows individuals to feed stock lumber 
into a preset (length) saw with 
accuracy and speed while allowing the 
individual to operate at a safe dis- 
tance from the cutting blade 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


no 









FOR SALE 

Clinical Convenience Products 
2070 Helena Street 
Madison, WI 53704 

Price dependent upon equipment 
requirements. 



HOW IT WORKS 

Radial arm saw was modified using 
pneumatic cylinder arms and clamps that 
would position board to be cut by hold- 
ing a board against the preset stop 
guide, the table and the saw guide. 
Once board is in place the radial arm 
automatically operates, cutting the 
positioned board. After the saw 
returns, the clamps release the board 
and the cut off part is automatically 
ejected and sets saw for next operation 
cycle. 

(Information provided by Ricardo Cerna, 
Rehabilitation Engineering Specialist, 
Wisconsin Division of Vocational Reha- 
bilitation, and Don Warren.) 



417 



SLIDE HAMMER 




Photograph courtesy of 
John Gugerty, WVSC 



418 



SLIDE HAMMER 



DEVELOPER 

Jerome Golner 
Golner Precision Products 
354 Cottonwood Avenue 
Hartland, WI 53029 



CONTACT PERSON 

Same as Developer 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Machine Trades: Screw 
Machine Operation 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

possibility of self injury to a blind 
employee when tightening and loosening 
inner collect on a hand screw machine 
or when performing many other pounding 
tasks 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

used in one factory by one blind 
employee who also has no right wrist 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

no 



FOR SALE 
no 



HOW IT WORKS 

The blind employee places the pointed 
end of the slide hammer in one of the 
indentations of the inner collet, puts 
one hand through the hollow ring, and 
uses the sliding weight to transmit the 
force needed to tighten or loosen the 
collet. 

(Information based on personal communi- 
cation with Jerome Golner.) 



419 



SPINDLE DRILLING FIXTURE 



PNEUMATICALLY DRIVEN. 
POWER FEED DRILL 

LEVER CLAMP 



ADJUSTABLE 
END STOP 



V BLOCK 




PLASTIC SHIELD 



THREE-WAY 
AIR VALVE 



Photograph courtesy of John 
H. Leslie, Jr. 



420 



SPINDLE DRILLING FIXTURE 



DEVELOPER 

Rehabilitation Engineer- 
ing Center 
2021 North Old Manor 
Wichita. KS 67208 
(316) 688-1888 



CONTACT PERSON 

Leonard Anderson 
Rehabilitation Engineer- 
ing Center 
2021 North Old Manor 
Wichita, KS 67208 
(316) 688-1888 



WHERE IT IS USED 
Machine Trades 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

fine motor positioning required to posi 
tion a cylinderical part in correct 
relationship to the drilling operation 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

Center Industries Corporation - Wichita, 
KS 





REGULATORY APPROVAL 


OSHA 











WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not 


applicable 











FOR SALE 
no 



HOW IT WORKS 

The drill fixture was designed so that a 
cylinderical part, in this case a 
spindle, is positioned at a 45° angle to 
the work surface. The spindle was 
supported in the fixture by V-blocks and 
by an adjustable end stop. The 45* 
angle positioning allows the spindle to 
slide against the adjustable end stop 
for the accurate drill position. During 
the drill operation, a simple lever 
clamp holds the spindle securely in the 
V-blocks. To drill the spindle, the 
spindle is placed in the drill fixture 
and is automatically located due to 
gravity which positions it against the 
end stop. The lever holding the clamp 
is secured and the drill operation is 
activated by a three way air valve. The 
pneumatically powered drill sequences 
through the drill and retract opera- 
tions. The lever clamp is released and 
the spindle is removed from the drill 
fixture and set aside for inspection. 
This device could be used to drill any 
cylinderical part accurately and in a 
short period of time. One handed capa- 
bility is all that is necessary to 
operate the device. 

(Information provided by John H. Leslie, 
Jr., Rehabilitation Engineering Center.) 



421 



STANLEY COMBINATION SQUARE 



. i 




Photograph courtesy of 
American Foundation for 
the Blind 



422 



STANLEY COMBINATION SQUARE 



DEVELOPER 



CONTACT PERSON 

Alex H. Townsend 
American Foundation for 

the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 
(212) 620-2169 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Benchwork 
Construction 















PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impairment 





FIELD TESTED 




yes 


by panels 
persons 


of blind and visually impaired 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 



FOR SALE 

American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York. NY 10011 

$21.00 



HOW IT WORKS 

This tool combines the equivalent of 
several tools. It can be used as a 
straight edge rule (by removing the 
handle), an outside tri-square, an inside 
tri-square, a mitre square, a depth 
gauge and a marking gauge. There is a 
single raised dot every 1/8", double 
raised dots at every V' and three raised 
dots at every 1" for the entire length 
of the scale. It includes a level and a 
scriber, the scriber being kept in the 
bottom of the handle. 

(Information based on American Foundation 
for the Blind literature.) 



423 



STANLEY DRILL GUIDE 







^ 


Photograph courtesy of 
American Foundation for 
the Blind 





424 



STANLEY DRILL GUIDE 



DEVELOPER 



CONTACT PERSON 

Alex H. Town send 
American Foundation for 
the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 
(212) 620-2169 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Benchwork 
Construction 
Machining 
Structural Work 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impairment 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

by panels of blind and visually impaired 
persons 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 



FOR SALE 

American Foundation for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 

$7.50 



HOW IT WORKS 

This device has 13 set positions to per 
mit the user to drill an accurately- 
centered hole perpendicular to any sur- 
face. Ideal for work on metal , wood or 
plastic. It has a non-slip base for more 
accurate gripping and the handle has a 
drill bit storage compartment. 

(Information based on American Foundation 
for the Blind literature.) 



425 



STARRETT MICROMETERS 




Standard Starrett Micrometer 




Starrett Depth Micrometer 




P 


^ 


«9= 


J 



starrett Inside Micrometer 



Photographs courtesy of 

American Foundation for the Blind 



426 



STARRETT MICROMETERS 



DEVELOPER 



CONTACT PERSON 

Alex H. Townsend 
American Foundation for 
the Blind 

15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 
(212) 620-2169 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Benchwork 

Construction 

Machining 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impairment 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

by panels of blind and visually impaired 
persons 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

information not available 



FOR SALE 

American Foundaton for the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 

$105.00 to $120.00 



HOW IT WORKS 

The Standard Starrett Micrometer has 
been adapted for tactual reading. Gradu- 
ations have been deepened and raised 
dots have been added. The .100" gradua- 
tions appear only over the zero line. 
The .050" markings are carried below 
the zero line, while the .025" and .075' 
markings appear above the zero line. 
Thus an operator can quickly determine 
in which .025" division the measurement 
falls and can then determine the final 
measurement to within a thousandth of 
an inch. There are no numeral markings, 
The Starrett Depth Micrometer features 
interchangeable rods providing 0" to 3" 
measurements. It incorporates the same 
system described above. 
The Starrett Inside Micrometer provides 
precise measurements of interior dimen- 
sions and has a barrel similar to that 
of the Standard and Depth Micrometers. 

(Information based on American Founda- 
tion for the Blind literature.) 



427 



THREE AXIS CRIMPER 






A JL, 








/ 9 


r 


X^, HYDRAULIC CYLINDERS 




/ " 


|i 






/ S 




^ 


\ OiruiAllTnUATCn CTCCniWR 




/ 


IT ^ ▼ 


/ 

fi 


/ \ 


3EVICE 

PNEUMATIC VALVE 




f^\^ 


L^ 


:i 


^ 




W^' 








THREE AXIS CRIMPER 







Photograph and Diagram cour- 
tesy of John H. Leslie, Jr, 



428 



THREE AXIS CRIMPER 



DEVELOPER 

Rehabilitation Engineer- 
ing Center 
2021 North Old Manor 
Wichita, KS 67208 
(316) 688-1888 



CONTACT PERSON 

Leonard Anderson 
Rehabilitation Engineer- 
ing Center 
2021 North Old Manor 
Wichita, KS 67208 
(316) 688-1888 



WHERE IT IS USED 
Machine Trades 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

fine motor tasks related to materials 
handling and parts positioning are 
eliminated 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

Center Industries Corporation 
Wichita, KS 





REGULATORY APPROVAL 


OSHA 









WARRANTY PROVIDED 

not applicable 



FOR SALE 
no 



HOW IT WORKS 

The device is designed to crimp a 
cylinderical tube at 120° intervals. A 
semiautomatic feeding device was de- 
signed in order to feed the operator 
one tube at a time to alleviate mate- 
rials handling problems. An additional 
semiautomatic feeding device was also 
developed that would position the tube 
over the forming mandrel and remove it 
after forming. To operate the machine, 
the operator places the tube in a cradle 
of the feeding device, activates a 
pneumatic valve and disposes of the tube 
after forming. The activation of the 
pneumatic valve begins the process with 
electronic hardware sequencing the 
feeding, forming and retraction opera- 
tion. 

The parts feeder mechanism could be 
used wherever cylinderical tubing is 
utilized. 

(Information provided by John H. Leslie, 
Jr., Rehabilitation Engineering Center.) 



429 




'^■^% 



t ; 



: i^i 







^^^^^0 



--fb 



Q 



o 



o 



OTooI 
Holder 




^ Tee Slot 



Photographs courtesy of 
Jeff Hamm, WVSC, diagram 
redrawn by Terri Bleck, 
WVSC 



430 



TOOL ADJUSTING BLOCK. LATHE OPERATION 



DEVELOPER 

Jerome Golner 
Golner Precision Products 
354 Cottonwood Avenue 
Hart! and, WI 53029 



CONTACT PERSON 
Same as Developer 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Machine Trades: Lathe 
Operation 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

moving a lathe's tool holder precisely 
when one cannot see 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

used in one factory by one blind 
employee 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

no 



FOR SALE 

no 



HOW IT WORKS 

The tool adjusting block can be clamped 
at the side of a tool holder and 1/4-20 
screw can be advanced or retracted to 
give accurate tool holder movement. For 
example, to move the tool holder .050 to 
the right, clamp the tool adjusting 
block next to the tool holder, turn the 
1/4-20 screw until it touches the holder. 
Loosen the tool holder, advance the 1/4- 
20 screw one turn, and retighten tool 
holder. 

(Information based on personal communi- 
cation with Jerome Golner.) 



431 



TRIANGLE, LATHE SET-UP 





















v/^' 

i 


^^--'^-^^^^i^^''-^ 


WWf^f; ^ ' 






% 










;*-/ "■■•■ 










# 


• ♦ \ 










_.,.„^^^**' 








-«^*.<6^«*'^ 










1 










1 










■-^»» 


— "^ 


•m^ 




Photograph courtesy of 






Jeff Han 


m, WVSC 









432 



DEVELOPER 

Jerome Golner 
Golner Precision Products 
354 Cottonwood Avenue 
Hartland, WI 53029 



CONTACT PERSON 

Same as Developer 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Machine Trades: Lathe 
Operation 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

lining up the compound on a 10" lathe 
when one cannot see 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

used in one factory by one blind 
em pi oyee 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


no 





FOR SALE 

no 



HOW IT WORKS 

The triangle is made to line up the 
compound on a lathe (10" South Bend in 
this case). If the "tee slot key" is 
inserted in the lath's compound "tee 
slot", the edge of the triangle can be 
brought up against the lathe's chuck, 
thus either aligning it at zero degrees 
30 degrees, or 90 degrees. Another 
triangle is used for other angles, such 
as 15 degrees, 35 degrees, 45 degrees, 
etc. 

(Information based on personal communi- 
cation with Jerome Golner.) 



433 



VISUAL PROCESS INSPECTION STATION 











Photograph courtesy of John 
H. Leslie, Jr. 



434 



VISUAL PROCESS INSPECTION STATION 



DEVELOPER 

Rehabilitation Engineer- 
ing Center 
2021 North Old Manor 
Wichita, KS 67208 
(316) 688-1888 



CONTACT PERSON 

Leonard Anderson 
Rehabilitation Engineer- 
ing Center 
2021 North Old Manor 
Wichita, KS 67208 
(316) 688-1888 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Machine Trades 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

examining plates with numbers upside 
down and backwards; difficulty handling 
materials 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

Center Industries Corporation 
Wichita, KS 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

not applicable 





WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not 


applicable 





FOR SALE 

no 



HOW IT WORKS 

License plates were manufactured and, 
after processing, were disposed on a 
conveyor line upside down and backwards. 
In order to allow a severely handicapped 
person to inspect the plates, a mirror 
was installed at an approximate 60" 
angle in front of the person. This 
allowed the inspector to look at the 
mirror image of the license plates 
rather than the upside down and back- 
wards configuration coming out of the 
punch press process. The mirror was 
tilted at an angle such that the inspec- 
tor could view the tag comfortably while 
seated in a wheelchair. An air jet 
under the control of the inspector was 
directed across the line perpendicular 
to the direction of the motion of the 
conveyor line. A scrap metal container 
was located on the opposite side of the 
line from the air jet to receive the 
rejected product. The air jet was con- 
trolled by means of an electrically 
operated solenoid valve. This allowed 
the inspector to inspect the quality of 
the license plates and to reject them 
by pushing a button activating the air 
solenoid. 

(Information provided by John H. Leslie, 
Jr., Rehabilitation Engineering Center.) 



435 



WIRE BRUSH CLEANING OF SMALL PARTS 



'.h 



•^m. 



■•? . 



^r^~:^:% 




■ ■4!nim^'W^'^ 



Photograph courtesy of Cali- 
fornia Department of Reha- 
bilitation 



436 



WIRE BRUSH CCEANING OF SMALL PARTS 



DEVELOPER 

Charles Eckles 
Independent Contract 
Consultant 
(213) 360-4180 



CONTACT PERSON 

California Department of 
Rehabilitation 
830 "K" Street Mall 
Sacramento, CA 95814 
(916) 322-8500 



WHERE IT IS USED 
Cleaning 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

See: HOW IT WORKS 



FIELD TESTED 
information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

not applicable 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

not applicable 



May be made at 


FOR SALE 

a minimal 


cost. 











HOW IT WORKS 

Wire brushing by hand is not a practical 
method for cleaning such materials as 
containers of tile grout, as pictured on 
the opposite page. A motorized wire 
brush and rotary positioning table, 
shown in the photo can be used for 
brushing, cleaning and finishing the 
tile samples. The fine strand wire wheel 
brush is attached to a bench mounted 
motor. The tiles are then fixed on a 
turntable and moved by hand under the 
brush for as long as necessary to do the 
finishing job. 

(Information based on A Handbook of 
Workshop Production Aids , California 



Department of Rehabilitation.) 



437 



MAINTAINING BALANCE 

Adult Stand-in Table 440 

Foot Harness 442 

LaBerne Gear Lift Stand-in Table .... 444 

Levo™ Stand-Up™ Wheelchair 445 

"Mainstream" Elevating Wheelchair ... 443 

Portable Standing Frame 450 

Standing Platform 452 



439 



ADULT STAND- in TABLE 




Hydraulic 




Electric 



Photographs courtesy of 
Hausmann Industries 



440 



ADULT STAND-IN TABLE 



DEVELOPER 

Hausmann Industries 
130 Union Street 
Northvale, NJ 07647 
(201) 767-0255 



CONTACT PERSON 

Rose Rowan 
Advertising Manager 
Hausmann Industries 
130 Union Street 
Northvale. NJ 07647 
(201) 767-0255 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Any job that requires 
sustained standing 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

confinement to a wheelchair 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 




FOR SALE 



Hausmann Industries 
130 Union Street 
Northvale, NJ 07647 



HOW IT WORKS 

Designed for adult use, the table top 
surface, 32" x 42" with an 18" cut-out, 
is made of stainproof heavy gauze 
plastic. The top can be raised or 
lowered electrically and automatically 
to any desired height from 40" to 60" 
while the user is held securely in a 
standing position by the rigid back 
panel. The table also has a backrest, 
an adjustable knee support, parallel 
bars and an inclined sure-grip rubber 
matted platform. A hydraulically 
operated model is also available. 

(Information based on Hausmann catalog.) 



441 



FOOT HARNESS 



"j^imm^mm 




Photograph courtesy of Consumer 
Care Products ^ inc , 



442 



FOOT HARNESS 



DEVELOPER 

Terrand B. Grail 
Route 3 

Sheboygan Falls, WI 5308! 
(414) 467-2393 



CONTACT PERSON 

Sue Windeck - Light Foot 
School 

111 First Street 
Sheboygan Falls, WI 53085 
Sue Persch - Curative 
Workshop of Milwaukee 
Milwaukee, WI 53226 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Sedentary Work 





PROBLEM(S) 


IT 


OVERCOMES 


foot 


positioning 







FIELD TESTED 

yes 

Light Foot School - Sheboygan Falls, WI 
Curative Workshop of Milwaukee-Mil., WI 





REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not 


applicable 











WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


yes 









FOR SALE 

Consumer Care Products Inc. 
Sheboygan Falls, WI 53085 

or 
Achievement Products 
P.O. Box 547 
Mineola, NY 11501 
$57.00 a pair as of January. 



1980 



HOW IT WORKS 

Each harness has three parts: a leather 
toe strap with "velcro fasteners"; a 
leather ankle-heel strap with "velcro 
fasteners" and a laminated foot pad 
with attachment bar, bolts and wing 
nuts. It is available in three sizes - 
1%" - 2V' wide x 3%" - 6" long; 2%" - 
3h" wide x 6" - 9%" long or 3?g" - 4%" 
wide x 93^" - 12%" long. The user can 
strap a foot in using one hand. It can 
be used with or without a shoe. 

(Information based on Consumer Care 
Products, Inc. literature.) 



443 



LABERNE GEAR LIFT STAND-IN TABLE 




LABERNE GEAR LIFT STAND-IN TABLE 



DEVELOPER 

W. E. Berne 
P.O. Box 9245 
Columbia, SC 29290 
(803) 776-1115 



CONTACT PERSON 

Same as Developer 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Any job that requires 
sustained standing 



PROBLEM(S) 


IT OVERCOMES 


confinement to a 


wheelchair 







FIELD TESTED 

yes 

in use in physical therapy departments 
all over U.S.A. and abroad 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

yes 



FOR SALE 

LaBerne Manufacturing Co., Inc. 
P.O. Box 9245 
Columbia, SC 29290 

$895.00 F.O.B. Columbia, SC 



HOW IT WORKS 

The table is designed for people who 
have extremity paralysis. It has a hip 
and back harness, adjustable padded 
knee and chest supports and an adjust- 
able back support. The top measures 
29"x29"x43" and has a cut-out. 
A harness is placed around the user who 
is lifted from the wheelchair to a 
standing position by turning the gear 
crank which automatically locks the 
user into the standing position. The 
user is returned to the chair in the 
same way. It is made of tubular steel 
and uses an enclosed worm gear. An 
electric model is also available. 

(Information based on LaBerne catalog, 
September, 1978.) 



445 



LEVO™ STAND-UP™ WHEELCHAIR 




Photographs courtesy of American 
Stair-Glide Corporation 



446 



LEVO™ STAND-UP™ WHEELCHAIR 



DEVELOPER 

American Stair-Glide 
4001 E. 138th St. 
Grandview, MO 64030 
(816) 763-3100 



CONTACT PERSON 

Sales Section 
American Stair- Glide 
4001 E. 138th St. 
Grandview, MO 64030 
(816) 763-3100 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Any job that requires 
sustained standing 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 


confinement to a wheelchair 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 


7" 


yes 


V 







FOR SALE ? 

American Stair-Glide Corporation 
4001 E. 138th St. 
Grandview, MO 64030 

Price quoted by dealer. 

Contact American Stair-Glide for locatioi 

of nearest dealer. 



HOW IT WORKS 



,TM 



LEVO"" is a manual wheelchair with a lift- 
ing device activated by 10 D-cell nickel 
cadmium batteries. At the touch of a 
constant-pressure switch located in the 
armrest, the user is lifted to the de- 
sired height up to a standing position, 
and returned to a sitting position. 
A velcro-fastened chest strap and a 
padded leg support with a belt and 
buckle, secure the user while standing. 
The chair is designed to support up to 
200 lbs. It folds for storage and 
transport. 

(Information based on American Stair- 
Glide Corporation literature.) 



447 



'MAINSTREAM" ELEVATING WHEELCHAIR 




M<^'^J.^ 



Photographs courtesy of 
Siimmit Services 




448 



■MAINSTREAM" ELEVATING WHEELCHAIR 



DEVELOPER 

Summit Services 
535 Division Street 
Campbell, CA 95008 
(408) 378-1251 



CONTACT PERSON 

William Redmond 
Glenn Brown 
Summit Services 
535 Division Street 
Campbell, CA 95008 
(408) 378-1251 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Manufacturi 
Technical 


ng 















PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

inaccessibility of many educational and 
work environments; this wheelchair 



FIELD TESTED 
yes 





REGULATORY APPROVAL 


FDA 









WARRANTY PROVIDED 

yes 



FOR SALE 

Summit Services 
535 Division Street 
Campbell, CA 95008 

approximately $3,000.00 



HOW IT WORKS 

The following information was provided 
by Robert N. Brown, Chairman, Division 
of Technology and Engineering, Chabot 
College: By using this device, you 
adapt the person to any environment. At 
Chabot College it would have cost 
$15,000.00 to just adapt our machine 
shop, not to mention our chemistry, 
biology, physics and photo labs. How- 
ever, with a few of these chairs on 
campus we adapt each wheelchair user to 
any environment. The chair is comfort- 
able, safe, easy rolling and electri- 
cally controlled as to up and down. The 
purpose of the device is to allow per- 
sons to train on normal equipment and in 
normal labs so that they can go easily 
out into industry or business and assume 
high paying jobs. The "Mainstream 
Elevating Wheelchair" is manually oper- 
ated with handwheels (same manner as 
conventional wheelchairs) but the seat, 
handwheels and footrest electronically 
elevate 18 inches above conventional 
wheelchair height. This design feature 
permits the occupant to be "fully mobile" 
at any height they wish or need to be to 
perform functions the same as a standing 
person. 

This wheelchair is extremely stable at 
all heights and its maneuverability is 
excellent in small areas because it is 
no wider than conventional wheelchairs 
but in the full-up position it is 6 
inches shorter due to the fact that the 
footrest tucks under the seat as it 
rises. 

(Information provided by Robert N. 
Brown . ) 



449 



PORTABLE STANDING FRAME 






4 



Photographs courtesy of 
Arthur L. Castor 




In folded position. 



450 



PORTABLE STANDING FRAME 



DEVELOPER 

Arthur L. Castor 
1409 W. 156th Street 
Compton, CA 90220 
(213) 637-0891 



CONTACT PERSON 

Same as Developer 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Any job that reauires 
sustained standing 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

Standing with needed support 





FIELD TESTED 

yes 






Veterans 


Administration - 


Brooklyn, 


NY 








^ 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 


yes 



FOR SALE 

Arthur L. Castor Company 
1409 W. 156th Street 
Compton, CA 90220 



HOW IT WORKS 

Security belts strap the person to the 
frame and an adjustable board provides 
a work surface. The unit folds up for 
transport and storage. 

(Information based on Castor Company 
literature.) 



451 



STANDING PLATFORM 



^^w^^ 
^p"^'"-^'' 






^W||||||BL^ 



.:,;'.« 



Photographs courtesy of 
Jayfro Corporation 



l,#^*^. 





w^mmmmmmmMM^MM 



^*f^ 




452 



STANDING PLATFORM 



DEVELOPER 

Jayfro Corporation 
P.O. Box 400 
Waterford, CT 06385 
(203) 447-3001 



CONTACT PERSON 

Jim Bliss 

Jayfro Corporation 
P.O. Box 400 
Waterford, CT 06385 
(203) 447-3001 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Standing 

















PROBLEM(S) 

Standing balance 



IT OVERCOMES 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 
Seaside Regional Center 



Waterford, CT 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 


yes 





FOR SALE 

Jayfro Corporation 
P.O. Box 400 
976 Hartford Turnpike 
Waterford, CT 06385 

$263.00 with knee support pad 
F.O.B. Waterford, CT 



HOW IT WORKS 

Designed in consultation with recreation 
and physical therapists, the unit is 
designed to assist standing balance 
without limiting use of the upper 
extremities. It is made of lightweight, 
heavy-duty aluminum with a footplate to 
prevent slipping and a knee support pad 
for those unable to maintain positioning 
while weight bears on the lower extrem- 
ities. Both the padded back rest and 
knee support have straps and are height 
adjustable. 

(Information based on Jayfro Corporation 
catalog.) 



453 



MATHEMATICS 

Calculator, Expanded Keyboard .... 456 

Calculator Guide 458 

Calcu-Tac 460 

Canon Electronic Calculator with 

Printout, Display and Voice .... 452 

Graphic Aid for Mathematics 454 

Keyboard Guard 466 

Scientific Calculator Braille .... 468 

Speech Plus Talking Calculator ... 470 



455 



CALCULATOR, EXPANDED KEYBOARD 




Illustration courtesy of 
Carol Schaeffler 



456 



CALCULATOR, EXPANDED KEYBOARD 



DEVELOPER 

Carol Schaeffler 
John Mauro 

United Cerebral Palsy 
622 Foster Avenue 
Brooklyn, NY 11230 
(212) 859-8850 



CONTACT PERSON 

Carol Schaeffler 
United Cerebral Palsy 
Rehabilitation Engineering 

Department 
622 Foster Avenue 
Brooklyn, NY 11230 
(212) 859-8850 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Mathematics 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

it allows individuals who lack fine 
motor skills to operate commercially 
available calculators 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

in process at United Cerebral Palsy, 
Inc. 



REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


no 









WARRANTY PROVIDED 

no 



FOR SALE 
no 



HOW IT WORKS 

Using the basic circuitry of a commer- 
cially available calculator, an enlarged 
keyboard measuring 16x18 inches was 
constructed. The keys are one inch in 
diameter, widely spaced and recessed. 
Slight pressure on a key actuates the 
desired function. The display readout 
was enlarged to % inch symbols and re- 
located on top of the keyboard to 
facilitate viewing the readout. 

(Information provided by Carol 
Schaeffler.) 



457 



CALCULATOR GUIDE 



"^^f^m"^ ^ 



Calculator guide with side stands 




Calculator guide in place on calculator 



458 



CALCULATOR GUIDE 



DEVELOPER 

Dan Golden 

CETA Welding Instructor 
Wisconsin Indianhead 
Technical Institute 
New Richmond Campus 
1019 South Knowles Ave. 
New Richmond, WI 54017 
(715) 246-6561 



CONTACT PERSON 

Jeanette M. Richardson, 

Supervisor 
Office & Marketing 

Education Department 
WITI-New Richmond Cgmpus 
1019 South Knowles Ave, 
New Richmond, WI 54017 
(715) 246-6561 



WHERE IT IS USED 

When using calculator 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

limited hand dexterity and control 







Fl 


ELD TESTED 
yes 


in 


use 


at WITI 


- New Richmond 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

no 



WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


no 









FOR SALE 

May be made at a minimal cost 



HOW IT WORKS 

When the guide is placed exactly over 
the keys of the calculator, screws, 
in the guide, are used to attach it 
to the calculator. (Holes were 
previously drilled into the calculator.) 
The guide makes it possible to 
accurately press the intended keys, 
eliminating the problem of depressing 
the wrong key or two keys because of 
limited control. Side stands allow the 
guide to be held off of the calculator. 

(Information based on personal inter- 
view.) 



459 



CALCU-TAC 




© 



CJCDCD 

CDCJC3 

CDCDCJ 

CJCDC 3 

'C5D OD CS 

CZD (XJ IX) 

CDCSGD 



□ CD 

ZUCJ 
CDCJ 



Illustration courtesy of 
Science for the Blind 
Products 



460 



CALCU-TAC 



DEVELOPER 



CONTACT PERSON 

Tom Benham 

Science for the Blind 

Products 
Box 385 

Wayne, PA 19087 
(215) 687-3731 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Mathematics 

















PROBLEM(S) 


IT 


OVERCOMES 


visual impairment 







FIELD TESTED 
information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 



FOR SALE 

Science for the Blind Products 

Box 385 

Wayne, PA 19087 

$895.00 



HOW IT WORKS 

The Calcu-Tac is an electronic calcula- 
tor with a braille printout. Calcu- 
lations are performed on an electronic 
calculator. Whenever a printout is 
required, a "print" button is pressed 
and the braille printer prints all the 
numbers in the display in proper se- 
quence including decimals. 

(Information based on Science for the 
Blind literature.) 



461 



CANON ELECTRONIC CALCULATOR WITH PRINTOUT, DISPLAY AND VOICE 



^ i 




^ii3'HSB183d II 



'^^ A» 



CaiKm canofa SP!2Ba-D 



^m;^ 



>^K» 



^^8 ^M 



"^§^m... 






*^L Wik " fM f ^Mk 




Photograph courtesy of 
Canon, U.S.A., Inc. 



462 



CANON ELECTRONIC CALCULATOR WITH PRINTOUT, DISPLAY AND VOICE 





DEVELOPER 


Canon 


, U.S.A., Inc. 


Head 


Office 


10 Nevada Drive, | 


Lake 


Success 


Long 


Island, NY 11042 


(516) 


488-6700 



CONTACT PERSON 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Bookkeeping 
Mathematics 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

inability to see calculated numbers 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

yes 
Underwriters' Laboratory 



WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


yes 









FOR SALE 

see distributor list in appendix 
suggested list price $399.00 



HOW IT WORKS 

In addition to a visual printout and 
display, this calculator has the 
following capabilities: 

- Voice synthesizer calls out key- 
board entries 

- A key vocally repeats the steps of 
calculations 

- A key automatically produces any 
number of duplicate printouts 

- Simple reentry of individual data 
items for quick error correction. 

The unique voice synthesizer calls out 
numerals and functions as they are 
keyed in, or reads out data stored in 
the memory. The voice snythesizer is 
available in English, French, German 
and Japanese languages. Two switches 
control the speed and volume of the 
sound verification. 

(Information reprinted with permission 
from Canon literature.) 



463 



GRAPHIC AID FOR MATHEMATICS 



N < 






Photograph courtesy of 
American Printing House 
for the Blind 



464 



GRAPHIC AID FOR MATHEMATICS 



DEVELOPER 

Manufactured by: 
American Printing House 

for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, KY 40206 



CONTACT PERSON 

Ralph E. McCracken 
American Printing House 

for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, KY 40206 
(502) 895-2405 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Education 

















PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impairment 



FIELD TESTED 
information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

U.S. Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 



FOR SALE 

American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, KY 40206 

$21.00 



HOW IT WORKS 

This consists of an 18"xl9"xl" cork 
composition board, 3 flat spring wires, 
14 plastic-headed pushpins and a supply 
of rubber bands. These are used in the 
construction of geometrical and other 
mathematical figures necessary for study 
of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, trig- 
onometry and calculus. 

(Information based on American Printing 
House for the Blind literature.) 



465 



KEYBOARO GUARD 






r 




Diagram courtesy of Ken 
Hagmann, redrawn by 
Terri Bleck. WVSC 



466 



KEYBOARD GUARD 



DEVELOPER 


Ken Hagmann 
Opportunities, Inc. 
925 Jefferson Street 
Ft. Atkinson, WI 
(414) 563-6691 





CONTACT PERSON 

Same as Developer 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Communicating 

Mathematics 

Typing 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

motor control problems when using a key- 
board 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 



^ 


REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not 


applicable 





WARRANTY PROVIDED 

not applicable 



FOR SALE 

no 



HOW IT WORKS 

The removable grid is constructed out of 
1/16" diameter brass rod with soldered 
joints. It can be made for calculators, 
typewriters and push button phones. 
This particular type was made to fit 4 
calculators in our facility and to be 
easily switched from one to another, 
(commercially available ones are not). 

(Information provided by Ken Hagmann.) 



467 



SCIENTIFIC CALCULATOR BRAILLE 




m 




^';--. 



•''^1, 




-^^M^: 

'"•-%:ii"^ 



n 




Photograph courtesy of J.C, 
Swail 



468 



SCIENTIFIC CALCULATOR BRAILLE 



DEVELOPER 




J.C. Swail 




National Research 


Council 


M-50 




Dee R182 Montreal 


Road 


Ottawa Ontario 




Canada 




KIA 0R8 





CONTACT PERSON 
Same as Developer 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Education 
Mathematics 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impairment 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

Canadian N'tl Institute for the Blind- 
Edmonton; Service Converto Braille Hall- 

i, Proviri^e of ouebgc, Canada 





REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not 


applicable 











WARRANTY PROVIDED 
not applicable 



FOR SALE 
no 



HOW IT WORKS 

A standard calculator is placed in a 
unit which presents braille symbols 
through a combination of touch and sound. 
There are no moving parts. The same 
readout can be interfaced to any digit 
output. 

(Information provided by J.C. Swail, 
N.R.C.) 



469 



SPEECH PLUS TALKING CALCULATOR 





_ ^^ 




\ 


F 




■ 


^^^^^^■H 


ft^AXlllkJii:flirJill^H 










* ^ ^ w \ 





Photograph courtesy of Tele- 
sensory Systems Inc. 



470 



SPEECH PLUS TALKING CALCULATOR 



DEVELOPER 

Telesensory Systems, Inc, 
3408 Hill view Avenue 
Palo Alto, CA 94304 
(415) 493-2626 



CONTACT PERSON 

Gayle Bruglar 
Telesensory Systems, 
3408 Hi 11 view Avenue 
Palo Alto, CA 94304 
(415) 493-2626 



Inc 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Bookkeeping 
Education 
Home Economics 
Mathematics 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

blindness 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

yes 



FOR SALE 

Telesensory Systems, Inc 
3408 Hi 11 view Avenue 
Palo Alto, CA 94304 

$445.00 



HOW IT WORKS 

The Speech Plus Calculator brings the 
speed and efficiency of calculator 
computation to blind people. The 
calculator's 24 word vocabulary, pro- 
nounced in clear electronic speech, 
provides verification of every key- 
stroke and the results of computations 
The Speech Plus Calculator is avail- 
able in English, French, German and 
Arabic speaking models. People using 
the Speech Plus Calculator as a tool 
in mathematics curriculum find mathe- 
matics far more useful. Adults use 
the calculator to better manage busi- 
ness enterprises and personal 
finances. 

(Information reprinted with permission 
from Telesensory Systems Inc. litera- 
ture.) 



471 



MEASURING 

Braille Rulers 474 

Cutting Lengths of Yarn 476 

Cutting Material to Length 478 

Rulers 480 

Wire Measuring System with 

Voice Feedback 482 



473 



BRAILLE RULERS 




Photograph courtesy of 
American Printing House 
for the Blind 



474 



BRAILLE RULERS 



DEVELOPER 

Manufactured by: 
American Printing House 

for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, KY 40206 



CONTACT PERSON 

Ralph E. McCracken 
American Printing House 

for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, KY 40206 
(502) 895-2405 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Mathematics 
Measuring 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
visual impairment 



FIELD TESTED 
information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

U.S. Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 



FOR SALE 

American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, KY 40206 

English Measurement Ruler - $1.65 
Metric-English Ruler - $1.70 

APH Glue-down Rule- $ .50 



HOW IT WORKS 

The 1-foot English measurement ruler 
(A) is made of molded black plastic. 
Inches and fractions are indicated by 
raised lines, and braille figures are 
located at the inch divisions. A caliper- 
slide is included for determination of 
measurements. The 1-foot Metric-English 
Measurement Ruler (B) is also made of 
molded black plastic. The 1- and ^- 
centimeter intervals are indicated on 
the scale opposite the English-measure 
ment scale. Braille numbers indicate 2 
centimeter marks. The APH Glue-Down 
Rule (C), is made of a brass strip h" 
wide, .01" thick and 12" long. Raised 
lines indicate the divisions of the rule. 
Rule may be bonded to sewing machines, 
band saws, foot shears, cutting or 
drawing boards, etc. Epoxy glue is 
recommended. 

(Information based on American Printing 
House for the Blind literature.) 



475 



CUTTING LENGTHS OF YARN 







Photograph courtesy of Cali- 
fornia Department of Reha- 
bilitation 



476 



CUTTING LENGTHS OF YARN 



DEVELOPER 

Charles Eckles 
Independent Contract 
Consultant 
(213) 360-4180 



CONTACT PERSON 

California Department of 
Rehabilitation 
830 "K" Street Mall 
Sacramento, CA 95814 
(916) 322-8500 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Measuring 

















PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
See: HOW IT WORKS 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 





REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not 


applicable 













WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not 


applicable 











FOR 


SALE 




May 


be made 


at 


a minimal 


cost. 















HOW IT WORKS 

This device aids in cutting yarn in 
different lengths for packaging. A 
large wheel -type spoked frame, mounted 
on a tripod, is used. The flat exterior 
rim has a 15-foot circumference, which 
is the length of the shortest piece of 
yarn to be cut. Six strands of different 
yarns are pulled from a spool supply 
rack through a series of guides that 
feed the yarn onto the exterior rim of 
the wheel as it is turned. For other 
lengths of yarn, the operator can refer 
to a chart to determine the number of 
turns required for each length. As the 
proper length is reached, the yarn is 
cut in that spot. 

(Information based on A Handbook of 
Workshop Production Aids , California 
Department of Rehabilitation.) 



477 



CUniNG MATERIAL TO LENGTH 




/] 



" "-^-M ■^,- 1 



i %:^. 




^*S: 




Photograph courtesy of Cali- 
fornia Department of Reha- 
bilitation 



478 



CUTTING MATERIAL TO LENGTH 



DEVELOPER 

Charles Eckles 
Independent Contract 
Consultant 
(213) 360-4180 



CONTACT PERSON 

California Department of 

Rehabilitation 
830 "K" Street Mall 
Sacramento, CA 95814 
(916) 322-8500 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Measuring 

















PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
See: HOW IT WORKS 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

not applicable 





WARRANTY 


PROV 


DED 


not 


applicable 







FOR SALE 

May be made at a minimal cost. 



HOW IT WORKS 

The equipment pictured here is for cut- 
ting many pieces of the same material at 
one time to a fixed length. Commercial 
equipment for measuring and cutting off 
electrical wire, lengths of rope, cord, 
hose, cable or similar stranded forms of 
material can be used and is relatively 
inexpensive. Accessory equipment for 
coiling lengths of measured material to 
various sized coils for packaging is alsc 
commercially available. The circumfer- 
ence of the pick-up reel is made to equal 
the length of material required. Approx 
imately 50 wraps of material can be made 
on the winding wheel before it is to the 
top. The material is then cut along a 
comnon line and removed from the reel. 

(Information based on A Handbook of Work' 
shop Production Aids , California Depart- 
ment of Rehabilitation.) 



479 



RULERS 




Ruler 







The Rotomatic Rule 




The Telescopic Click Rule 



Photographs courtesy of 
American Foundation for 
the Blind 



480 



RULERS 



DEVELOPER 



CONTACT PERSON 

Alex H. Townsend 
American Foundation for 
the Blind 

15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 
(212) 620-2169 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Benchwork 
Clerical 
Construction 
Machining 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impairment 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

by panels of blind and visually impaired 
persons 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

information not available 



FOR 


SALE 






American Foundation 
15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 


for 


the 


Blind 


$1.75 to $40.00 








^ 









HOW IT WORKS 

The rulers are made from plastic, wood, 
steel, aluminum or brass. Most have 
raised lines or dots to indicate each 
increment of length. Some use slots or 
notches for this purpose. Units are 
available with scales in English, metric 
or both. 

The Rotomatic Rule consists of a 6" 
aluminum rod threaded at 16 threads per 
inch. One side of the rod has been 
milled flat and the opposite side has 
tactile markings every h" - 
The Telescopic Click rule is an ano- 
dized aluminum rule which clicks at each 
1/16" and has raised graduations at each 
J^". Six inches from the starting end 
is a shoulder which allows inside mea- 
surement. Depth measurements and out- 
side measurements can also be taken 
accurately to 1/16". 

(Information based on American Founda- 
tion for the Blind literature.) 



481 



WIRE MEASURING SYSTEM WITH VOICE FEEDBACK 




.4- ■<^-... »'.V, 



M 



Photograph courtesy of Don 
Warren and Rlcardo Cerna 



482 



WIRE MEASURING SYSTEM WITH VOICE FEEDBACK 



DEVELOPER 

Clinical Convenience 
Products 
Contracting Serv. Div 
2070 Helena Street 
Madison, WI 53704 
(608) 251-2882 



CONTACT 


PERSON 1 


Don Warren 
2070 Helena Street 
Madison, WI 53704 
(608) 251-2882 




J 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Measuring 

















PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impairment; length of wire can 
be measured through vocal read out 




REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 


yes 



FOR SALE 

Clinical Convenience 
2070 Helena Street 
Madison, Wisconsin 53704 

price range - $600 - $1900, subject 
to requirements 



HOW IT WORKS 

System measures wire up to 3/4 inch 
diameter. Device can be programmed for 
length of wire to be measured and for 
the number of pieces to be cut. Once 
program is set, start button is pressed, 
wire is inserted into encoder and pulled 
through. Device speaks out the length 
of the wire being measured with a "STOP 
command at end point. Operator inter- 
rogates system for status of both foot- 
age and number of pieces remaining to be 
measured. 

(Information provided by Ricardo Cerna, 
Rehabilitation Engineering Specialist, 
Wisconsin Division of Vocational Reha- 
bilitation, and Don Warren.) 



483 



MOBILITY 

Aud-A-Yator 486 

Auditory Maps 488 

Light Probe 490 

Memco Audible Light Meter 492 

Mowat Sensor 494 

Sonlcguide 496 

Soniguide 498 



485 



AUD-A-VATOR 



ZLCWATOR 



I 2 3:^ Mr5 



ooo«o[ 




T-30 



<%^S. 




Illustration courtesy of 
Science for the Blind 
Products 



486 



AUD-A-VATOR 



DEVELOPER 



CONTACT PERSON 

Tom Ben ham 

Science for the Blind 

Products 
Box 385 

Wayne, PA 19087 
(215) 687-3731 



WHERE IT IS USED 

With elevators 



PROBLEM(S) 


IT 


OVERCOMES 


visual impairment 







FIELD TESTED 
information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 



FOR SALE 

Science for the Blind Products 

Box 385 

Wayne, PA 19087 

Price estimated between $100 and $200 
per car plus installation. 



HOW IT WORKS 

The Aud-A-Vator is an elevator floor 
signaling device that indicates the 
floor at which the elevator stops by 
emitting a series of beeps. Installed 
easily on the roof of the elevator car by 
regular service personnel. It is ideal 
for buildings with 10 floors or less and 
useful up to 20 floors. 

(Information based on Science for the 
Blind literature.) 



487 



AUDITORY MAPS 



Photograph not available 



488 



AUDITORY MAPS 



' 


DEVELOPER ] 


Bruce B. Blasch, Ph.D. 
Karen M. Todd 
Waisman Center 
Mobility Training Project 
1500 Highland Ave. 
Madison, WI 53706 
(608) 263-5916 



CONTACT PERSON 

McBurney Resource Center 
75 Bascom Hall 
Madison, WI 53706 
(608) 263-2741 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Orientation to specific 
travel areas or within 
buildings 



PROBLEMfS) IT OVERCOMES 

disorientation of a visually Impaired 
traveUer 1n an unfamiliar environment 



FIELD TESTED 
yes 
University of Wisconsin-Madison 



FOR SALE 
no 





REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not appl 


i cable 













WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not appl 


i cable 











HOW IT WORKS 

The University of Wisconsin-Madison 
Mobility Training Project's auditory maps 
(recorded on cassette tapes), provide 
visually impaired persons travelling on 
campus, who are fully trained in the use 
of the cane or a guide dog, with a verbal 
description with which to orient them- 
selves to a specific travel area. or with 
step-by-step instructions which will 
guide them to specific buildings or to 
particular rooms within campus buildings. 
The maps emphasize cues, such as cardinal 
directions, landmarks, texture changes in 
surfaces, inclines, declines, distance 
judgments, and environmental sounds, 
used by visually impaired persons who 
travel independently. Reference systems 
used in constructing the maps consist of 
ego-centric, topo-centric, cartographic 
and or polar-centric. The maps are re- 
corded on cassette tapes for portability. 
Maps to any travel area or buildings can 
be made using the orientation cues 
described above. 

(Information provided by Bruce Blasch 
and Karen M. Todd, University of Wiscon- 
sin-Madison.) 



489 



LIGHT PROBE 











4 




' 


^^ 


Photograph courtesy o 
American Foundation f 
the Blind 


f 

or 





490 



LIGHT PROBE 



DEVELOPER 

The Smith- Kettlewell 
Institute Rehabilitation 
Engineering Center 
2232 Webster Street 
San Francisco, CA 94115 



CONTACT PERSON 

Alex H. Townsend 
American Foundation for 
the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 
(212) 620-2169 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Wherever there is a light 
source 



PROBLEM(S) 


IT 


OVERCOMES 


visual impairment 







FIELD TESTED 

yes 

by panels of blind and visually impaired 
persons 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 



FOR SALE 

Manufacturer: San Francisco Lighthouse 
for the Blind 
745 Buchanan Street 
San Francisco, CA 94102 
$40.00 

Distributor: American Foundation for the 
Blind $50.00 



HOW IT WORKS 

This small, lightweight probe has 
different audible pitches to distinguish 
the reflectivity of a surface. It can 
detect the presence of print and light 
and can therefore be used in occupations 
such as typing and switchboard work, as 
well as in detecting the on and off 
position of light. Adjustable sensitiv- 
ity control allows for more flexible and 
reliable use. 

(Information based on American Foundation 
for the Blind literature.) 



491 



MEMCO AUDIBLE LIGHT METER 




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^ 


mm ^y--^w'' 


> 


m^ki '^^ '^ 




^lii^^ 


H 



Photographs courtesy of 
Applied Rehabilitation Systems 
Inc. 



492 



MEMCO AUDIBLE LIGHT METER 



DEVELOPER 

Marchak Engineering & 
Manufacturing Co. 
6609 North Lamar 
Austin. TX 78752 



CONTACT PERSON 

Applied Rehabilitation 
Systems Inc. 
3902 Idlewild 
Austin, TX 78731 
(512) 459-8935 



WHERE IT IS 


USED 


Detecting light 


sources 







PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

difficulty experienced by blind persons 
when monitoring their environments 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
information not available 



FOR SALE 

Applied Rehabilitation Systems Inc. 
3902 Idlewild 
Austin, TX 78731 



$69.50 plus tax 




HOW IT WORKS 

Developed as a spinoff from NASA Aero- 
space Research and Development, the 
Audible Light Meter is a portable light 
detection system which can let the blind 
person know when electric lights are on 
or off, when indicator lights on auto- 
matic appliances are on, when stock 
supplies are not on display correctly, 
when commercial coffee pots need to be 
refilled, when it is daylight or dark 
outside, and when colors of items are 
different. It can assist with mobility. 
Doorways, room parameters, halls, and 
windows can be detected from a distance. 
The small, hand-held device activates an 
accoustical signal of varying frequencies 
when pointing toward a source emitting 
or reflecting light. The tones vary 
with the amount of light reflected (as in 
colors of clothing) or emitted on the 
light detection system. 

(Information based on company literature.) 



493 



MOWAT SENSOR 



> < 




Photograph courtesy of 
Sensory Aids Corporation 



494 



MOWAT SENSOR 



DEVELOPER 

Wonnald International 
Sensory Aids, Ltd. 
Christchurch, New Zealand 

and 
Sensory Aids Corporation 
Bensenville, IL 60106 



CONTACT PERSON 

B. Blasch 

Sensory Aids Corporation 
205 W. Grand 
Bensenville, IL 60106 
(312) 766-3935 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Travel 









PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
visual impairment; hearing impairment 



U.S.A., 


FIELD TESTED 
yes 
Australia, New Zealand, England 







REGULATORY APPROVAL 
information not available 



WARRANTY 


PROV 


DED 


yes 







FOR SALE 

Wormald International Sensory Aids 

P.O. Box 10014 

Christchurch, New Zealand 

$435.00 

See appendix for availability in 

Australia and Europe, all other 

countries use above address. 



HOW IT WORKS 

This is a hand-held unit which uses high 
frequency sound to detect objects within 
a narrow area. When an object is 
detected, the entire unit vibrates. It 
is used in conjunction with a long cane 
or guide dog. 

The user can set the sensor to respond 
to objects less than one meter away or 
up to four meters away. The range 
settings are controlled by a sliding 
thumb switch on top of the case. To 
determine direction of an object, the 
user scans the area as a sighted person 
scans with a flashlight. 
The unit, measuring 150mm x SOram x 25 
mm, operates on a rechargeable battery. 

(Information based on Wormald Interna- 
tional Sensory Aids, Ltd. brochure.) 



495 



SONICGUIDE 






^^' 



Photographs courtesy of 
Sensory Aids Corporation 



496 



SONICGUIDE 



) r 



DEVELOPER 

Wormald International 
Sensory Aids, Ltd. 
Christchurch, New Zealand 

and 
Sensory Aids Corporation 
Bensenville, IL 60106 



CONTACT PERSON 


B. Blasch 

Sensory Aids Corporation 

205 W. Grand 

Suite no 

Bensenville, IL 60106 

(312) 766-3935 



WHERE 


IT IS 


USED 


Travel 















PROBLEM(S) 


IT 


OVERCOMES 


visual 


impairment 







FIELD TESTED 

yes 
U.S.A., Australia, New Zealand, England 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
information not available 



WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


yes 





FOR SALE 

Sensory Aids Corporation 
205 W. Grand 
Suite no 
Bensenville, IL 60106 

$2195.00 

See appendix for availability outside 

U.S.A. and Canada. 



HOW IT WORKS 

Users can judge direction, distance and 
surface qualities of objects in their 
travel path. Sensors are built into a 
spectacle frame so that the user 
develops similar head movements and 
posture to a sighted person. 
In the center of the spectacle frame is 
a transmitter which radiates ultrasound 
in front of the user. The ultrasound 
hits an obstruction, is reflected to the 
aid, converted into electrical signals 
by the receiving microphones and then 
into audible sounds by the earphones in 
the temples of the frame. Small tubes 
direct the sound to the ear. 
Sounds will be louder in the ear nearest 
the object. The pitch will vary with 
the distance of the object. A small 
control box which can be carried in a 
pocket, at the belt or on a shoulder 
strap, contains the aid's electronics. 

(Information based on Wormald Interna- 
tional Sensory Aids, Ltd. brochure.) 



497 



SONIGUIDE 













-^ 


Photograph courtesy of 
American Printing House 
for the Blind 





498 



SONIGUIDE 



DEVELOPER 

Manufactured by: 
American Printing House 

for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville. KY 40206 



CONTACT PERSON 

Ralph E. McCracken 
American Printing House 

for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, KY 40206 
(502) 895-2405 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Assembly 

Improve mobility and 
independence 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
visual impairment; multiple handicaps 



FIELD TESTED 
information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

U.S. Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
yes 



FOR SALE 

American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, KY 40206 

$142.50 



HOW IT WORKS 

This device consists of a master unit 
containing all the electronics, speaker 
and power, and the remote unit contain- 
ing only a speaker and the cord. On/off 
volume control knob plus frequency and 
pulse-rate controls are located on the 
master unit. Each unit bears a "response 
switch" which makes the Soni guide dif- 
ferent from other sound devices. Empha 
sis can be placed on tracking, localizing 
and responding to sound, balance and 
posture, arm positioning for independent 
travel, or cane travel. Because of this 
"response switch", repetition in learninc 
experiences needed by the multi-handi- 
capped is built into the whole system. 
Thus it could be helpful in repetitious 
assembly-line tasks where constant 
verbal prompts are not possible. 

(Information based on American Printing 
House for the Blind literature.) 



499 



> r 



MONEY EXCHANGE 

Paper Money Identifier 502 

WWRC Vacuum Wand 504 



501 



PAPER MONEY IDENTIFIER 






Photographs courtesy of 
Applied Rehabilitation Systems 
Inc. 



502 



PAPER MONEY IDENTIFIER 



DEVELOPER 

Marchak Engineering & 
Manufacturing Co. 
6609 North Lamar 
Austin. TX 78752 



CONTACT PERSON 

Applied Rehabilitation 
Systems Inc. 
3902 Idlewild 
Austin, TX 78731 
(512) 459-8935 



WHERE 

Business 
Marketing 
Office 
Sales 



IT IS USED 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

Inability of a blind person to easily 
distinguish denominations of paper money 



FIELD TESTED 
information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
information not available 



FOR SALE 

Applied Rehabilitation Systems Inc, 
3902 Idlewild 
Austin, TX 78731 

$189.50 plus tax 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 


yes 



HOW IT WORKS 

Developed as a spinoff from NASA's Aero 
space Research and development efforts, 
the Paper Money Identifier (PMI) is an 
instrument for distinguishing the 
various denominations of paper money frorr 
each other. The back side of each bill 
has a characteristic sound pattern 
corresponding to the shades of color on 
the bill. Lighter colors emit a dis- 
tinguishing higher pitched sound than do 
darker colors. 

The instrument incorporates a light that 
shines on a photoelectric cell. When 
the bill is passed under this beam, 
various amounts of light are reflected 
onto the photocell. These amounts 
correspond to the configurations printed 
on the bill. The light variations change 
the voltage which causes changes on the 
sounds emitted as the bill is moved 
through the PMI. 

(Information based on company literature^ 



503 



WWRC VACUUM WAND 



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if 










>^i 



u 



rs^j>-^.>. ^ *^-' 



Photographs courtesy of 
David F, Law, Jr, 




504 



WWRC VACUUM WAND 



DEVELOPER 

Woodrow Wilson Rehab. Ctr. 
Rehabilitation Engin. Dept 
Fishersville, VA 22939 
(703) 885-9724 











' CONTACT PERSON 

David F. Law, Jr. 
Woodrow Wilson Rehab. Ctr. 
Rehabilitation Engin. Dept. 
Fishersville, VA 22939 
(703) 885-9724 


- 


WHERE 

Clerical 

Sales 

Service 


IT IS USED ' 











PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

inability to handle individual pieces of 
paper money 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 
Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center 



REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


no 









WARRANTY PROVIDED 




no 





FOR SALE 
no 



HOW IT WORKS 

A compact unit supplies vacuum to a small 
suction cup on a cock-up splint. This 
provides relatively strong prehensile 
force, and can be used easily by a quadri 
plegic person to manipulate currency. The 
vacuum is controlled either by sip and 
puff or by a compression bulb under the 
arm pit. By using a pneumatic control, 
no electrical components ever contact 
the individual. 

(Information provided by David F. Law, 
Jr.) 



505 



PACKAGING 

Accurate Packaging of Dry Bulk 

Material 508 

Applying Labels to Bottles 510 

Carrousel Type Packaging Conveyor . . 512 

Coiling Flexible Plastic Tubing ... 514 

Coiling Hose for Blister Packaging . 516 

"Counting Aids" 518 

Fixture to Package Small Items . . . 520 

The Modification of a Handheld 

Heat Sealer 522 

Multiple Parts Packaging Station . . 524 

Net Weight Packaging of Small 

Items 526 

Packaging for Uniform Appearance . . 528 

Packaging Small Quantities of 

Metal Parts 530 

Shaker Table for Bulk Product 

Packaging 532 

Shutter Packager 534 



507 



ACCURATE PACKAGING OF DRY BULK MATERIAL 







Photograph courtesy of Cali- 
fornia Department of Reha- 
bilitation 



508 



ACCURATE PACKAGING OF DRY BULK MATERIAL 



DEVELOPER 

Charles Eckles 
Independent Contract 
Consultant 
(213) 360-4180 



CONTACT PERSON 

California Department of 

Rehabilitation 
830 "K" Street Mall 
Sacramento, CA 95814 
(916) 322-8500 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Packaging 











PROBLEM(S) IT 


OVERCOMES 


See: 


HOW IT WORKS 





FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not applicable 











WARRANTY 


PROV 


DED 


not 


applicable 















FOR SALE 

May be made at a minimal cost, 



HOW IT WORKS 

This piece of equipment is designed to 
measure out and bag a fixed volume of 
sand. The sand pours from a hopper 
into a wheel with four sections, each 
section holding a fixed volume of sand. 
When one section is filled, the hopper 
stops pouring. The wheel is then 
rotated by hand into the funnel, from 
which the sand is poured into a bag 
placed below the funnel. As the wheel 
rotates, sand flows into the next 
section and the process repeats itself. 
A wire extension from the bag is an 
expander to keep the bag open to reduce 
the possibility of spill. 

(Information based on A Handbook of 
Workshop Production Aids, California 
Department of Rehabilitation.) 



509 



APPLYING LABELS TO BOTTLES 




Photograph courtesy of Cali- 
fornia Department of Reha- 
bilitation 



510 



APPLYING LABELS TO BOTTLES 



DEVELOPER 

Charles Eckles 
Independent Contract 
Consultant 
(213) 360-4180 



CONTACT PERSON 

California Department of 
Rehabilitation 
830 "K" Street Mall 
Sacramento, CA 95814 
(916) 322-8500 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Applying labels 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

See: HOW IT WORKS 



FIELD TESTED 
information not available 



REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not applicable 


^ 









WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not 


applicable 















FOR 


SALE 




May 


be made 


at a minimal 


cost. 













HOW IT WORKS 

This simple positioning jig aids in 
applying labels exactly where they 
belong on small bottles. The roll of 
lables is held in position directly in 
line with a slot that holds the bottle. 
The labels are threaded through the slot 
and come out in exactly the right place 
for application to the bottle. Improvec 
quality and a highly increased rate of 
production results from use of this jig 

(Information based on A Handbook of 
Workshop Production Aids , California 
Department of Rehabilitati on . ) 



511 



CARROUSEL TYPE PACKAGING CONVEYOR 



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€xkU'- 





'■-m, 



jM 



Photograph courtesy of Cali- 
fornia Department of Reha- 
bilitation 



512 



CARROUSEL TYPE PACKAGING CONVEYOR 



DEVELOPER 

Charles Eckles 
Independent Contract 
Consultant 
(213) 360-4180 



CONTACT PERSON 

California Department of 
Rehabilitation 
830 "K" Street Mall 
Sacramento, CA 95814 
(916) 322-8500 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Packaging 









PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
See: HOW IT WORKS 



FIELD TESTED 
information not available 





REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not 


applicable 













WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not 


applicable 





FOR SALE 

May be made at a minimal cost, 



HOW IT WORKS 

This is a unique type of packaging 
conveyor suitable for gathering small 
light weight parts. Suspended clip- 
boards hang from a motor driven belt 
and rotate around the work table. At 
the first work station, plastic bags are 
clipped to the board. Each successive 
worker then adds his or her particular 
item to the bag and the last worker 
removes the bag and seals it. One 
advantage to this carrousel type 
conveyor is that the motor speed (RPM) 
is controllable by regulating the 
voltage and therefore adaptable to the 
work pace of those using it. One 
person may be able to place only one 
item in the bag, while another might 
be able to handle three or four. 

(Information based on A Handbook of 
Workshop Production Aids , California 
Department of Rehabilitation.) 



513 



COILING FLEXIBLE PLASTIC TUBING 



N I 







^W-'-'^k'- 



K,., 




Photograph courtesy of Cali- 
fornia Department of Reha- 
bilitation 



514 



COILING FLEXIBLE PLASTIC TUBING 



DEVELOPER 

Charles Eckles 
Independent Contract 
Consultant 
(213) 360-4180 



CONTACT PERSON 

California Department of 
Rehabilitation 
830 "K" Street Mall 
Sacramento, CA 95814 
(916) 322-8500 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Packaging 









PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
See: HOW IT WORKS 



FIELD TESTED 
information not available 



'' 


REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not 


applicable 













WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not 


applicable 









FOR 


SALE 




May be made 


at 


a mi 


nimal 


cost. 













HOW IT WORKS 

This device simplifies the job of 
wrapping small diameter plastic tubing 
onto a form for packaging. A hand- 
cranked grinder is converted into a 
winding machine by removing the 
grinding wheel and adapting the shaft 
to hold a six-inch winding hank. The 
grinder is geared so that one and one- 
half turns of the handle winds an 
18-foot length of tubing onto the hank 
form which can then be slid off of its 
holder pegs ready for packaging. 

(Information based on A Handbook of 
Workshop Production Aids , California 
Department of Rehabilitation.) 



515 



COILING HOSE FOR BLISTER PACKAGING 




Photograph courtesy of Cali- 
fornia Department of Reha- 
bilitation 



516 



COILING HOSE FOR BLISTER PACKAGING 



DEVELOPER 

Charles Eckles 
Independent Contract 
Consultant 
(213) 360-4180 



CONTACT PERSON 

California Department of 
R§habilitation 
830 "K" Street Mall 
Sacramento, CA 95814 
(916) 322-8500 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Packaging 



See: 


PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

HOW IT WORKS 







FIELD TESTED 
information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

not applicable 



WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not applicable 





FOR SALE 

May be made at a minimal cost. 



HOW IT WORKS 

This device simplifies the coiling 
of plastic hose to a required size to 
fit a blister pack. A winding reel, 
that is cranked by hand, is used: one 
flange of the wheel contains a notch 
to hold the end of the hose in 
position while coiling the strand 
around the core. With the uniform 
coils of hose, blister packaging 
becomes a simple process. 

(Information based on A Handbook of 
Workshop Production Aids , California 
Department of Rehabilitati on . ) 



517 



"COUNTING AIDS" 















/ ^ 




*•— 


11 


i 




_J_ 


^■1 ws^a 


1 


.J- 






r:!! — 


1 


_.! 




! 

1 


1 
i 


\^^ 




L^ 


V 




w 


PlfitURE A 








FIGURE B 



Diagrams courtesy of 
Susanne Wynkoop 



518 



"COUNTING AIDS" 



DEVELOPER 

Dieter A. Papke 
555 Fern Street 
Westwood, NJ 07675 
(201) 664-3173 



CONTACT PERSON 

Susanne Wynkoop 
Associated Craftsmen/ 

Easter Seals 
15 Emerald Street 
Hackensack. NJ 07601 
(201) 342-5739 



WHERE IT IS USED 



Benchwork 
Packaging 





PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES ^ 


difficulty in packaging materials 
correctly when the packager has diffi- 
culty counting accurately 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 
Associated Craftsmen/Easter Seals 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

no 



FOR SALE 

May be made at a minimal cost. 



REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


no 









HOW IT WORKS 

Since 15 to 20% of our workshop popula- 
tion cannot count, we developed a non- 
numerical system. Cartons arrived at our 
plant in cases of 200 units. We were to 
unpack the cartons, bundle them into sets 
of 10 units, and repack them. In order 
for "non-counting" workers to complete 
this task I constructed cardboard racks 
of ten shelves. They were instructed to 
place one carton on each shelf and when 
the rack was full to remove the cartons 
and bundle them with a rubber band. A 
rack can be constructed in about 1& min- 
utes. Cardboard boxes make excellent 
frames. You tape, staple, or glue flat 
cardboard sheets into the frame to create 
the number of shelves you desire (see 
Fig. "A"). Figure "B" illustrates the 
type of jig we used for dividing cases of 
jar caps into sets of eighteen units. 
Here, using a stencil with spray paint, I 
painted 18 circles (with circumference 
equal to that of caps) onto a piece of 
white cardboard. The disabled worker was 
instructed to place one cap on each 
circle of the board. When all the cir- 
cles were covered they placed the 18 caps 
into a plastic bag which was then sealed. 
Even our numerically able workers used 
this counting jig because it allowed them 
to converse while performing a task which 
would ordinarily require silent counting. 
This in turn lowered our error rate and 
the amount of downtime due to worker 
socialization. Individual work speed and 
quality improved with the incorporation 
of this jig. 



(Information provided by Susanne 
Wynkoop.) 



519 



FIXTURE TO PACKAGE SMALL ITEMS 




Photographs courtesy of 
Mark Stephenson 



520 



FIXTURE TO PACKAGE SMALL ITEMS 



DEVELOPER 

Mark Stephenson 
Occupational Services, 
Inc. 
17 Redwood St. 
Chambersburg, PA 17201 



CONTACT PERSON 



WHERE 


IT IS 


USED 


Packaging 







PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

difficulty experienced by some persons 
with cerebral palsy in reading, grasping, 
placing, or holding items 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

not applicable 



FOR SALE 
no 





Fl 


ELD 


TESTED 


information 


not 


ava- 


lable 





WARRANTY 


PROV 


DED 


not 


applicable 















HOW IT WORKS 

One person usually performs this job. In 
this case the job was divided. The board 
was designed to reduce the movements of 
reaching, grasping, placing and holding 
to reaching and pushing item into funnel. 
The person at the other end of the opera- 
tions inserts instruction sheet into the 
poly bag, places poly bag on funnel, re- 
trieves it and staples it shut. 

Materials: 4" X 18" X 1/4" Plexiglas, 
18" X 36" X 1/4" AC grade plywood, funnel 
from 2 litre Pepsi bottle, acrylic latex 
caulk, paneling nails 18-1/2" woodscrews 
18-washers, polyurethane varnish. 

Equipment: Heat strip for bending plastic 
(acquired from Plastic Distributor/Manu- 
facturer in area $9.00), hand drill, 
sabre saw. 

Instructions: Cut hole in plywood 
according to size of funnel. Nail funnel 
to board, line union with acrylic latex 
caulk. Varnish when caulk is dry. 

Length of Plexiglas depends upon: length 
of the funnel and length of poly bag. 
Overall length of Plexiglas should in- 
clude distance from fastening to board, 
and distance from V in Plexiglas to end 
of funnel to allow for the materials to 
leave the funnel completely and the poly 
bag to remain on the funnel with packaged 
items, 

(Information provided by Mark Stephenson, | 



521 



THE MODIFICATION OF A HANDHELD HEAT SEALER 






liiiJi*' 



















iiiil 







Photograph courtesy of Albert 
E. Swarts, P.E. 



522 



THE MODIFICATION OF A HANDHELD HEAT SEALER 



DEVELOPER 

Albert E. Swarts, P.E. 
Richard L. Biddy, Dir. 
Vocational Industrial 
Center - (Houston) 
Donald R. Smith, PH.D. 
Texas A & M University 
(College Station) 



CONTACT PERSON 

Albert E. Swarts, P.E. 
Vocational Industrial Ctr. 
Institute for Rehabili- 
tation and Research 
2809 Main Street 
Houston, TX 77002 
(713) 797-1440 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Assembly 
Benchwork 









PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

use of only one hand; lower extremity 
weakness 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

not applicable 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

not applicable 





FOR SALE 




May 


b6 made at a minimal 


cost. 



HOW IT WORKS 

A hinge is attached to a hand heat 
sealer so that it can be swung down on 
a definite line when clamped to a table 
top. This is accomplished by mounting 
an extra plate to the back of the 
sealer to provide the extension needed 
to mount the hinge. 

(Infomation based on Examples of Jig 
and Fixture Design as Applied to the 
Severely Disabled Functioning in a 
Sheltered Workshop , Biddy, Smith and 
Swarts.) 



523 



MULTIPLE PARTS PACKAGING STATION 



5hV '{. 





Photograph courtesy of Albert 
E. Swarts, P.E. 



524 



MULTIPLE PARTS PACKAGING STATION 







DEVELOPER | 


Albert E. 


Swarts, P.E. 


Richard L 


. Biddy, Dir. 


Vocational 


Industrial 


Center - 


(Houston) 


Donald R. 


Smith, Ph.D. 


Texas A & 


M University - 


(College 


Station) 







CONTACT PERSON 

Albert E. Swarts, P.E. 
Vocational Industrial Ctr 
Institute for Rehabili- 
tation and Research 
2809 Main Street 
Houston, TX 77002 
(713) 797-1440 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Assembly 
Benchwork 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

use of only one hand; lower extremity 
weakness: reach limitations 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 





REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not 


applicable 





WARRANTY PROVIDED 

not applicable 



FOR SALE 

May be made at a minimal cost, 



HOW IT WORKS 

A system of gravity feed bins was de- 
signed to store a considerable volume 
of parts while being constantly within 
reach of the worker. The smooth area 
in front of the user permits easy 
counting of the parts. The packages 
for the parts are held in a bind under 
the chute used for loading them. The 
chute holds the package open while it 
is being loaded. After the package is 
loaded and stapled closed, it is 
dropped into a delivery chute which 
carries it to the shipping container. 
A grate on the chute is equipped with 
a counter to record the number for a 
constant quantity in each container. 
This simplifies customer billing and 
piece rate payment. 

(Information based on Examples of Jig 
and Fixture Design as Applied to the 
Severely Disabled Functioning in a 
Sheltered V^orkshop , Biddy, Smith and 
Swarts . ) 



525 



NET WEIGHT PACKAGING OF SMALL ITEMS 



N ( 




Photograph courtesy of Cali- 
fornia Department of Reha- 
bilitation 



526 



NET WEIGHT PACKAGING OF SMALL ITEMS 



DEVELOPER 

Charles Eckles 
Independent Contract 
Consultant 
(213) 360-4180 



CONTACT PERSON 

California Department of 
Rehabilitation 
830 "K" Street Mall 
Sacramento, CA 95814 
(916) 322-8500 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Packaging 

















PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
See: HOW IT WORKS 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

not applicable 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
not applicable 



May be made at 


FOR SALE 

a minimal 


cost. 











HOW IT WORKS 

This jig simplifies the job of pack- 
aging small pellets in individual 
envelopes. Using a bulk measuring 
scoop to pre-establish approximate 
net weights is a great time saver in th( 
packaging of small items. The pellets 
are scooped up by the dipper and 
emptied into a paper cup placed on a 
balance- type scale. The exact net 
weight can then be adjusted by adding 
or removing the necessary amount of 
material from the cup. 

(Information based on A Handbook of 
Workshop Production Aids , California 
Department of Rehabilitati on . ) 



527 



PACKAGING FOR UNIFORM APPEARANCE 







1 


^. 






_ 


// .:' 



Photograph courtesy of Cali- 
fornia Department of Reha- 
bilitation 



528 



PACKAGING FOR UNIFORM APPEARANCE 



DEVELOPER 

Charles Eckles 
Independent Contract 
Consultant 
(213) 360-4180 



CONTACT PERSON 

California Department of 

Rehabilitation 
830 "K" Street Mall 
Sacramento, CA 95814 
(916) 322-8500 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Packaging 











PROBLEM(S) IT 


OVERCOMES 


See: 


HOW IT WORKS 





FIELD TESTED 

information not available 





REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not 


applicable 













WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not 


applicable 











FOR SALE 

May be made at a minimal cost. 



HOW IT WORKS 

This jig simplifies the difficult task 
of preparing a jump rope for packaging. 
A simple wooden jig and a frame with 2 
dowels is all that is needed to hold the 
rope in position. The jump rope handles 
are placed on either side of the dowels 
and the rope is wrapped around them. 
The coiled rope can be lifted out 
exactly as required to fit into a 
packaging wrapper. 

(Information based on A Handbook of 
Workshop Production Aids , California 
Department of Rehabilitation.) 



529 



PACKAGING SMALL QUANTITIES OF METAL PARTS 




Photograph courtesy of Cali- 
fornia Department of Reha- 
bilitation 



530 



PACKAGING SMALL QUANTITIES OF METAL PARTS 



DEVELOPER 

Charles Eckles 
Independent Contract 
Consultant 
(213) 360-4180 



CONTACT PERSON 

California Department of 
Rehabilitation 
830 "K" Street Mall 
Sacramento, CA 95814 
(916) 322-8500 



WHERE 


IT IS 


USED 


Packaging 













PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

difficulty picking up nails by hand 
from a bulk container 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

not applicable 





WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not 


applicable 





FOR SALE 

May be made at a minimal cost. 



HOW IT WORKS 

This device simplifies the job of pick- 
ing up nails by hand from a bulk con- 
tiner and repackaging them into smaller 
boxes. An electro-magnet, which can be 
obtained from an automobile air condi- 
tioner clutch, is fitted with a handle 
and powered by an inexpensive battery 
charger. With the power on, the magnet 
lifts a fixed quantity of nails from 
the bulk supply. The lifting power of 
the magnet can be adjusted to pick up 
the desired quantity of nails by weight 
through varying the charger's output 
voltage. The lifting unit is then 
positioned over a funnel , the power 
interrupted and the nails drop through 
into the package. The exact weight of 
this package is adjusted by adding to 
or removing nails by hand. 

(Information based on A Handbook of 
Workshop Production Aids , California 
Department of Rehabilitation. 



531 



SHAKER TABLE FOR BULK PRODUCT PACKAGING 
















Photograph courtesy of Cali- 
fornia Department of Reha- 
bilitation 



532 



SHAKER TABLE FOR BULK PRODUCT PACKAGING 



DEVELOPER 

Charles Eckles 
Independent Contract 
Consultant 
(213) 360-4180 



CONTACT PERSON 

California Department of 
Rehabilitation 
830 "K" Street Mall 
Sacramento, CA 95814 
(916) 322-8500 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Packaging 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

difficulty in packaging the proper 
amount of bulk material into a snug con 
tainer 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 





REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not 


applicable 













WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not 


applicable 





FOR SALE 


^ 


May be made at a minimal 


cost. 







HOW IT WORKS 

This jig simplifies difficult packag- 
ing jobs where the space provided does 
not seem large enough to hold the pro- 
duct. In these cases, the volume can 
often be reduced by vibrating the pro- 
duct to compact it in its container. 
For this kind of packaging job, the 
shaker table was developed. It is a 
plywood table supported on a rubber 
cushion over a box. A 1/5 h.p. motor 
is mounted inside the box, with a belt 
drive to a vertical shaft outside 
which has an off-center eccentric 
bearing on top. As the drive shaft 
rotates, the package is jiggled back 
and forth shaking its contents deeper 
into its interior. 

(Information based on A Handbook of 
Workshop Production Aids , California 
Department of Rehabilitation.) 



533 



SHUTTER PACKAGER 




roe pLrtT£: 

SUPES TO lOROP 



IT^MS PROP 
INTO B^G 



Sketch provided by Steve 
Spudlch 



534 



SHUTTER PACKAGER 



DEVELOPER 

Malcolm Eaton 



CONTACT PERSON 

Steve Spudich 
Association for the 
Handicapped 
219 E. Spring Street 
Freeport, IL 61032 
(815) 235-7181 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Packaging 









PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

inability to count; use of only one hand 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

information not available 



FOR SALE 



Association for the Handicapped 
219 E. Spring Street 
Freeport, IL 61032 

May be made at a minimal cost. 



HOW IT WORKS 

Openings are cut in a plate to conform 
to the size of the items to be 
packaged. The number of openings de- 
pends on the number of items to be 
bagged or boxed. After all openings 
are filled, the top plate is slid to 
allow the items to fall through the 
opening in the bottom plate and drop 
into a bag or box attached to the 
spout. 

(Information provided by Steve Spudich, 
Association for the Handicapped.) 



535 



I r 



REACHING 

Gustavsberg Extended Arm 538 

Multipurpose Utility Stick 540 

Reaching Aids 542 



537 



GUSTAVSBERG EXTENDED ARM 



^ ( 




Photograph courtesy of AB 
Gustavsberg 



538 



GUSTAVSBERG EXTENDED ARM 



DEVELOPER 

AB Gustavsberg 
S-134 00 Gustavsberg 
Sweden 
0766-391 00 



CONTACT PERSON ] 


Mr. Agu 
S-134 00 
Sv/eden 
0766-391 


Kriisa 
Gustavsberg 

00 







WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Reaching 

















PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

limited reach range 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

information not available 



FOR SALE 

AB Gustavsberg 
S-134 00 Gustavsberg 
Sweden 

Maddak, Inc. 
Pequannock, NJ 07440 
(product listed as Universal Reacher) 



HOW IT WORKS 

These tongs are fitted with a pistol -type 
grip which can be operated with a 
straight wrist. It has a support arm 
allowing the arm to rest and taking the 
weight off the wrist. A loop and wrist 
link is available in place of the support 
arm for people with strong wrists. Three 
fingers using low pressure can operate 
the pressure key. The grab claw can be 
turned 360* locking automatically at the 
desired angle when the pressure key is 
depressed. On one leg of the claw is a 
magnet for picking up small metal objects. 
The gripping device can grasp flat and 
round objects and is fitted with a hook 
that makes lifting heavy objects easier. 
The gripping device is lightweight and 
lined with patterned rubber. 

(Information based on Gustavsberg 
brochure.) 



539 



MULTIPURPOSE UTILITY STICK 



w^^i^-/'iir,m7^'( 






Photograph courtesy of Hausmann 
Industries 



540 



MULTIPURPOSE UTILITY STICK 



DEVELOPER 

Hausmann Industries 
130 Union Street 
Northvale, NJ 07647 
(201) 767-0255 



CONTACT PERSON 

Rose Rowan 
Advertising Manager 
Hausmann Industries 
130 Union Street 
Northvale, NJ 07647 
(201) 767-0255 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Reaching 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

restricted motion of upper extremities; 
joint damage 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
yes 



FOR SALE 

Hausmann Industries 
130 Union Street 
Northvale, NJ 07647 



HOW IT WORKS 

The following items can be attached to 
an anodized aluminum master shaft 24" 
long with a wrist strap at the end: 
shoe horn, comb, magnet, reaching hook, 
mop sponge and grasping clip. 

(Information based on Hausmann catalog.) 



541 



REACHING AIDS 



^ ( 





Light Switch 
Extension Handle 



Power Grip Tongs 




Photographs courtesy of 
Maddak, Inc. 



Maddak Universal Reacher 



542 



REACHING AIDS 



DEVELOPER 

Manufactured by: 
Maddak, Inc. 
Pequannock. NJ 07440 
(201) 694-0500 



CONTACT PERSON 

Fred M. Joslyn 
Maddak, Inc. 
Pequannock, NJ 07440 
(201) 694-0500 



WHERE IT IS USED 
Reaching 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

limited arm movement; confinement to a 
wheelchair 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 





REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not 


applicable 











WARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 



FOR SALE 

Maddak, Inc. 
Pequannock, NJ 07440 

Power Grip Tongs (21" long) $39,00 

Power ^r1p Tongs C36" long) $49,50 

Light Switch Extension Kandle $ 3,75 

Maddak Universal Reacher $43.50 



HOW IT WORKS 

The Power Grip Tongs are a heavy duty 
all plastic tool for increasing the 
arms' reach and providing great mechani- 
cal advantage in the gripping claw. 
Maximum opening of claw is 2^". The 
Light Switch Extension Handle is a 
molded plastic adapter which fits all 
standard toggle type wall electric 
switches. It is easily installed by re 
moving the existing switch plate, and 
using the same screws, mounting the ex- 
tension handle. The operating handle 
extends 17" below the switch. The 
Maddak Universal Reacher is a function- 
ally designed "extended arm", light and 
well balanced. The full hand trigger 
creates a quick and positive grip with a 
straight wrist position. The support 
arm contacts the user's forearm, reliev 
ing the wrist of stress. The grab claw 
can be rotated a full 360*, but locks 
into position when the trigger is 
pressed. It is suitable for flat or 
round objects and has hooked ends for 
heavier loads. 

(Information based on Maddak Catalog No 
479, 1979.) 



543 



READING 

A7 Speech Controller 546 

APH Variable Speech Control™ 

Module 548 

Dottran - Braille Translation 

Program 550 

Dual Image System 552 

Fishburne Alphabet for the Blind . . 554 

Illuminated Magnifier 556 

Kurzweil Data Entry Machine .... 558 

Kurzweil Reading Machine 560 

Magazine and Bookholders 562 

Model 2C Electronic Visual Aids . . 564 

Optacon Print Reading System .... 566 

Page Turner 568 

Page Turner 570 

Page Turners 572 

Portareader Electronic Visual Aid . 574 

Variable Speed Control™ 

Listening Adapter 576 

Vari speech II Recorder 578 

VersaBraille System 580 

Video Visual Read/Write System ... 582 

Voyager 584 

VSi Masterlens Systems 586 



545 



A7 SPEECH CONTROLLER 




Photograph courtesy of Variable 
Speed Control Corporation 



546 



A7 SPEECH CONTROLLER 



DEVELOPER 

Variable Speed Control 
Corporation 
185 Berry Street 
San Francisco, CA 94107 
(415) 495-6100 



CONTACT PERSON 

Grady Hesters 
Variable Speed Control 
Corporation 
185 Berry Street 
San Francisco. CA 94107 
(415) 495-6100 



V7HERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Listening 
Reading 









PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

learning problems of the visually 
handicapped; improves clarity of slowed 
speech; used to give audio instructions 
at a pace which matches the skill of 
the worker 



VA, universities 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 



REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


UL for Model A7g 










FOR SALE 



Variable Speech Control 

185 Berry Street 

San Francisco, CA 94107 

Also see dealer list in appendix. 
$295.00 



HOW IT WORKS 



The A7 Speech Controller has all the 
features of an ordinary cassette tape,™^ 
recorder plus Variable Speech Control . 
This patented technology pitch corrects 
recorded speech from 60% to 250% of 
original recorded speed. A simple 
movement of the VSC rate-control lever 
adjusts speed of playback and simul- 
taneously corrects pitch so that high- 
speed "chipmunk" and low-speed "grumble" 
effects are eliminated. The result is 
that a listener can audit a one-hour 
spoken word cassette in 30 minutes or 
less and understand ewery word, a 
person can listen at up to 400 words 
per minute. 

(Information provided by Irene Gilbert 
Mattei, VSC.) 



547 



APH VARIABLE SPEECH CONTROL™ MODULE 




Photograph courtesy of 
American Printing House 
for the Blind 



548 



APH VARIABLE SPEECH CONTROL™ MODULE 



DEVELOPER 

American Printing House 

for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, KY 40206 



CONTACT PERSON 

Ralph E. McCracken 
American Printing House 

for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, KY 40206 
(502) 895-2405 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Listening 
Reading 

















PROBLEM(S) 


IT 


OVERCOMES 


visual impairment 







FIELD TESTED 
information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

U.S. Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 


yes 



FOR SALE 

American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, KY 40206 

$97.50 



HOW IT WORKS 

The APH Variable Speech Control Module 
allows recorded speech to be increased 
or decreased without pitch distortion. 
It operates on 120 volts AC and has a 
power amplifier and speaker. Other 
features are a rate control, volume con- 
trol, earphone jacks and off/on switch. 
It was designed to work with GE Cassette 
Recorder and the APH Talking Book Repro- 
ducer, but may also be used with any 
machine with a variable speed capacity. 

(Information based on American Printing 
House for the Blind literature.) 



549 



DOTTRAN - BRAILLE TRANSLATION PROGRAM 



Photograph not available 



550 



DOTTRAN - BRAILLE TRANSLATION PROGRAM 



DEVELOPER 

ARTS Computer Products 
80 Boylston Street 
Suite 1260 
Boston, MA 02116 
(617) 482-8248 



CONTACT PERSON 

Peter Duran 

ARTS Computer Products 

80 Boylston Street 

Suite 1260 

Boston, MA 02116 

(617) 482-8248 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Education 

Information Retrieval 
Reading 



PROBLEM(S) 


IT 


OVERCOMES 


visual impairment 













FIELD TESTED 

no 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 



FOR SALE 

ARTS Computer Products 
80 Boylston Street 
Suite 1260 
Boston, MA 02116 

$6,000 for complete unit 



HOW IT WORKS 

Dottran is a computer program consisting 
of a set of algorithms that translates 
text into Grade II Braille. It has an 
unlimited vocabulary therefore the trans- 
lation is based on the rules of the 
algorithms rather than a print character 
to dot pattern direct correlation. 
What users purchase will depend on what 
they have already. The Dottran Unit 
consists of the Dottran software stored 
in PROMs on an 8080 microprocessor. It 
is possible to purchase a binary tape of 
the software separately. 

(Information based on ARTS literature.) 



551 



DUAL IMAGE SYSTEM 




DUAL IMAGE SYSTEM 



DEVELOPER 

Apollo Electronic Visual 
Aids 

6357 Arizona Circle 
Los Angeles, CA 90045 
(213) 776-3343 



CONTACT PERSON 

Dennis Allen 

Apollo Electronic Visual 
Aids 

6357 Arizona Circle 
Los Angeles, CA 90045 
(213) 776-3343 



WHERE IT IS USED 
Magnification 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impairment 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 





REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


UL, 


OSHA 














FOR SALE 




Apollo Electronic Visual 
6357 Arizona Circle 
Los Angeles, CA 90045 


Aids 


As of 1/1/80 
$3,850.00 






^^ 







HOW IT WORKS 

The Dual Image is a two camera, one 
monitor integrated system. The 17" 
monitor features a built-in split 
screen generator that permits the 
scenes from both cameras to appear 
on the monitor at the same time. The 
magnification of two pieces of work 
make it possible for the user to refer 
ence and transcribe information at the 
same time. It has been used in con- 
junction with a typewriter, a calculator 
and assembly materials. The size of 
the equipment makes it possible to use 
in the home or the office. 

(Information based on Apollo Electronic 
Visual Aids product literature.) 



553 



FISHBURNE ALPHABET FOR THE BLIND 








Embosser 


f ' ' 




H 




^IM^flK 


^m 


M 


H^^iTf^ffTjj 


N 


1 


^V^ 


/ ^11 


B 


ky||0 



Telephone Number Ftle Cards 

Photographs courtesy of S,B. 
Fishburne 



. 


« 


* * 




* « 


* 

\ 


/ 


II 


* * 


* < 


1 


1 




II 


w 


— 


, 


zr 




zz 


— ' 


— 




z: 


^ 


/ 


/ 


// 




// 


/ 


/ 




y/ 


// 


« 










* 1 



Thermoform Master 



Labeling Canned Goods 




554 



FISHBURNE ALPHABET FOR THE BLIND 



DEVELOPER 


S.B. Fishburne 
4243 Warren Avenue 
Sacramento, CA 95822 
(916) 442-3368 





CONTACT PERSON 

C.C. Fishburne 
Fishburne Engineering 
221 N. Gordon Drive 
Winston-Salem, NC 27104 
(919) 765-2928 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Communication 

Labeling 

Reading 

Recording Information 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impairment and inability to use 
Braille 



FIELD TESTED 

Sacramento Society for the Blind 
Sacramento, CA 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
no 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

information not available 



FOR SALE 

Fishburne Engineering 
221 N. Gordon Drive 
Winston-Salem, NC 27104 

Magnetic Training Alphabet $4.60 

Embosser $21.00 

Audio Cassettes #1, 2, 3 $3.50 each 



HOW IT WORKS 

This alphabet system of dots, dashes and 
slashes can be used by those who do not 
read Braille. Although its uses are 
limited, it gives the person a way to 
record such things as addresses, tele- 
phone numbers, labels, cassettes, etc. 
The system uses embossed characters 
which are very easy to feel and learn. 
Cassette tapes are available for self 
instruction. 

A thermoform master of the embossed 
alphabet characters is used as a train- 
ing aid. The horizontal lines are 
called "Guide Lines." Each line is 
named for the first letter of the line 
there is an "A" line, a "G" line, an "M 
line, etc. 

Letters are also used as numbers. 
Embossed single letters, mounted on mag 
nets are used for spelling and writing 
words. A lightweight metal slate serves 
as a surface for the letters. An 
embosser has been engineered by Mr. 
Henry Sleeper of Sacramento, for Fish- 
burne. Letters are embossed on h" wide 
Dymo tape, which is cut into 1" long 
strips, prior to embossing. Inch long 
strips already cut with a tab for easy 
removal of adhesive cover, are avail- 
able. Also available is a cutter that 
holds a 12' roll, and uses a trigger to 
cut and score 1" strips. 

(Information based on Fishburne litera- 
ture.) 



555 



ILLUMINATED MAGNIFIER 



Photographs courtesy of 
Stecker & Yale, Inc. 



*# ^% 




2x magnification 



4x magnification 



m-. 




556 



ILLUMINATED MAGNIFIER 



DEVELOPER 

Manufactured by: 
Stocker & Yale, Inc. 
133 Brimbal Avenue 
Beverly, MA 01915 
(617) 927-3940 



CONTACT PERSON 

Michael A. Lavey 
Stocker & Yale, Inc. 
133 Brimbal Avenue 
Beverly, MA 01915 
(617) 927-3940 



WHERE IT IS USED 
Magnification 



PROBLEM(S) IT 


OVERCOMES 1 


visual impairment; rectangular lens 
easy on eyes, prevents fatigue and 
nausea 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

standard industrial product 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY 


PROV 


DED 


yes 













FOR SALE 

Stocker & Yale, Inc. 
133 Brimbal Avenue 
Beverly, MA 01915 



HOW IT WORKS 

A 6"x8" ground lens providing 2x or 
4x magnification is coupled with a 4 
watt fluorescent light. Adjustable 
9"x9" arms with friction swivels and 
clamp or screwbase allows a 7" 
working distance. Operates on 115v. 
60 cycle AC. 

(Information based on Stocker & Yale 
Inc. literature.) 



557 



KURZWEIL DATA ENTRY MACHINE 




S>'-'|^'''^-''^ 





Photographs courtesy of 
Rurzweil Computer Products, 
Inc. 



558 



KURZWEIL DATA ENTRY MACHINE 



► , 



DEVELOPER 

Kurzweil Computer Prod- 
ucts, Inc. 

33 Cambridge Parkway 
Cambridge, MA 02142 
(617) 864-4700 



CONTACT PERSON 

Michael Hingson 
Kurzweil Computer Prod- 
ucts, Inc. 

Print to Braille Dept. 
33 Cambridge Parkway 
Cambridge, MA 02142 
(617) 864-4700 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Reading 
Transcribing Braille 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impairment 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


no 









WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


yes 









FOR SALE 

Kurzweil Computer Products, 
33 Cambridge Parkway 
Cambridge, MA 02142 



Inc. 



HOW IT WORKS 

Printed material is converted into Grade 
II Braille by this system which incor- 
porates the Kurzweil Data Entry Machine, 
a computer based Braille translator and 
a Braille embosser. The printed text is 
read by the Data Entry Machine and con- 
verted into standard computer code. It 
is then converted from computer code 
into Braille code by the Braille trans- 
lator and then interfaces with an em- 
bosser to produce a Braille printout. 

(Information based on Kurzweil Computer 
Products, Inc. literature; verbal ex- 
planation provided by Ron Myren, Wiscon- 
sin Vocational Studies Center.) 



559 



KURZWEIL READING MACHINE 




- i-^/^m^^^jpiiiiiB^ip^ 




Photographs courtesy of 
Kurzwell Computer Products 
Inc. 



560 



KURZWEIL READING MACHINE 



DEVELOPER 

Kurzweil Computer Prod- 
ucts, Inc. 

33 Cambridge Parkway 
Cambridge, MA 02142 
(617) 864-4700 



CONTACT PERSON 

JoAnn Giudicessi 
Reading Machine Dept. 
Kurzweil Computer Prod- 
ucts, Inc. 

33 Cambridge Parkway 
Cambridge, MA 02142 
(617) 864-4700 



WHERE 


IT IS 


USED 


Reading 













PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
Visual impairment 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

National Federation of the Blind; Bureau 
of Ed. for the Handicapped; Rehabilita- 
tion Services Administration; VA 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

no 



WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


yes 









FOR SALE 

Kurzweil Computer Products, 
33 Cambridge Parkway 
Cambridge, MA 02142 

$29,800 



Inc. 



HOW IT WORKS 

KRM consists of a desk top reading unit 
with scanner, an electricicontrol unit 
connected to the scanner by a flexible 
cable, and a speaker. Material to be 
read is placed face down on the glass 
surface of the desk top reading unit. 
The control unit is activated by the 
user commanding the machine to perform 
various functions. The first line of 
the text is automatically located by the 
scanning mechanism and an electronic 
voice reads the material. With the con- 
trol unit the user can adjust the readinc 
rate and voice tone, have lines repeated 
have words spelled out and have words or 
phrases marked for later reference 
(analogous to underlining). A hand 
tracking option allows the user to man- 
ually scan a page and determine the 
location of columns of type, pictures 
and diagrams. Users can quickly switch 
back and forth between automatic and 
manual tracking. The keyboard of the 
reading machine can be converted into a 
talking calculator performing the stan- 
dard functions and all scientific 
functions. The KRM can also be used to 
convert English text from a computer or 
CRT terminal into speech. 

(Information based on Kurzweil Computer 
Products, Inc. brochure.) 



561 



MAGAZINE AND BOOKHOLDERS 




562 



MAGAZINE AND BOOKHOLDERS 



DEVELOPER 

Carl H. Beil 

5435 N. Artesian Avenue 

Chicago. IL 60625 



CONTACT PERSON 

Same as Developer 



WHERE 


IT IS 


USED 


Reading 







PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
limited hand or arm movement 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

informally at Mines Veteran's Hospital 
and the Rehabilitation Institute of 
Chicago 



'' 


REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not 


applied for 











WARRANTY PROVIDED 

yes 



FOR SALE 

C. Beil Designs 

5435 N. Artesian Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60625 

F. Sammons Co., Inc. 

Box 32 

Brookfield, IL 60513 



HOW IT WORKS 

Attach to furniture or equipment for 
support. Holds any size hard or soft 
cover book up to 8" x 11". Pages may 
be turned by hand or with the use of 
a mouth or head stick. 

(Information provided by Carl H. Beil, 
C. Beil Designs.) 



563 



MODEL 2C ELECTRONIC VISUAL AIDS 




Photograph courtesy of Apollo 
Electronic Visual Aids 



564 



PAGE TURNER 



DEVELOPER 

Possum Controls, Inc. 
n Fairacres Industrial 
Estate 
Windsor, Berkshire 
England 



CONTACT PERSON 

Ann F. Gurr 
Possum, Inc. 
P.O. Box 451 
Midwood Station 
Brooklyn, NY 11230 
(212) 243-1658 



WHERE 


IT IS 


USED 


Reading 







PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

inability to turn book pages 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 



Britain 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 



FDA 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

yes 



FOR SALE 



Possum, Inc. 
P.O. Box 451 
Midwood Station 
Brooklyn, NY 11230 

$625.00 + shipping 



HOW IT WORKS 

This battery operated machine turns the 
pages of common size books. It can be 
operated pneumatically or with light 
pressure microswitches. (See Possum 
Input Controls (p. 312) for types of input 
switches.) A page retainer holds the 
book flat. Adjustment can be made to 
accommodate paper quality and thick- 
ness and desired bookrest angle. 

(Information based on Possum Controls, 
Inc. literature.) 



569 



PAGE TURNER 




570 



PAGE TURNER 



DEVELOPER 

WTB, Inc. 

1259 Millikin PI., N.E. 
Warren, OH 44483 
(216) 372-6316 



CONTACT PERSON 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Reading 

















PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

inability to turn pages without assis- 
tance 





FIELD TESTED 










yes 








sold tc 
U.S.A. 


hospitals 
and Canada 


and 


indivi 


duals 


across 















REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

yes 



FOR SALE 

WTB, Inc. 

1259 Millikin PI., N.E. 

Warren, OH 44483 

$535.00 



HOW IT WORKS 

After the book is set in the turner at 
the position-line and the book's 
covers taped down, the user presses the 
switch to activate the weighted rollers 
The roller will move to the edge of the 
page, lower itself, reverse and lift 
the page, winding until the page is 
taut and will peel off and be turned. 
The pages are held down by a thin 
nylon line. The unit can be used flat 
or at a 45° angle. It holds books or 
magazines up to 9"xllVxlJs". 

(Information based on WTB, Inc. litera- 
ture.) 



571 



PAGE TURNERS 




Automaddak Page Turner 



^p 



^^*'^ 



|W|-- 




,x 



Page Turner - Hand Held 



^^"■ 



Page Turner - Mouth Held 



Photographs courtesy of 
Maddak, Inc. 



572 



PAGE TURNERS 



\ r 



DEVELOPER 

Manufactured by: 
Maddak, Inc. 
Pequannock, NJ 07440 
(201) 694-0500 



CONTACT PERSON 



Fred M. Joslyn 
Maddak, Inc. 
Pequannock, NJ 
(201) 694-0500 



07440 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Reading 









PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

manipulation difficulty 



FIELD TESTED 
information not available 



REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not applicable 









WARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 



Maddak, Inc, 
Pequannock, 

Automaddak 
Page Turner 
Page Turner 



FOR SALE 



NJ 07440 

Page Turner 

- Hand Held 

- Mouth Held 



$471.00 
$ 14.50 
$ 4.50 



HOW IT WORKS 

The Automaddak Page Turner accommodates 
any size book or magazine. Each page is 
turned automatically at the reader's 
command. The book or magazine is posi- 
tioned against the back panel with both 
covers held in place by adjustable 
plastic clips. Operation of the Page 
Turner is controlled either by a breath 
switch which is sensitive to a puff of 
breath through a mouthpiece, or a small 
sensitive touch bellows control which 
responds to slight pressure on a plastic 
pad by any paft of the body. The Page 
Turner can be adjusted from horizontal 
to almost vertical . The Page Turner - 
Hand Held is a curved polycarbonate 
tapered strip with foam rubber tip for 
easy flipping of pages (even heavy 
coated paper). The Page Turner - Mouth 
Held is made of light weight plastic 
with a serrated rubber tip for good 
paper contact. The upper end is heart 
shaped and flat with medium-soft rubber 
plates adhered to the surface for easy 
grip and comfortable contact with teeth. 

(Information based on Maddak Catalog No. 
479, 1979.) 



573 



PORTAREADER ELECTRONIC VISUAL AID 




i 



Photograph courtesy of Apollo 
Electronic Visual Aids 



574 



PORTAREADER ELECTRONIC VISUAL AID 



DEVELOPER 

Apollo Electronic Visual 
Aids 

6357 Arizona Circle 
Los Angeles, CA 90045 
(213) 776-3343 



CONTACT PERSON 

Dennis Allen 

Apollo Electronic Visual 
Aids 

6357 Arizona Circle 
Los Angeles, CA 90045 
(213) 776-3343 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Magnificati 


on 







PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impairment 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 





REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


UL, 


OSHA 











WARRANTY PROVIDED 

yes 



FOR SALE 

Apollo Electronic Visual Aids 
6357 Arizona Circle 
Los Angeles, CA 90045 

As of 1/1/80 

PortaReader $1,550.00 

Del uxe Po rta Reader $1 , 650 . 00 



HOW IT WORKS 

The PortaReader EVA is a portable, 
lightweight device consisting of a CRT 
viewing monitor mounted on a collapsible 
stand together with a video camera, zoom 
lens, and illuminator. The heavy gauge 
anodized aluminum platform is supported 
by three integrated retractable legs 
which easily fold into a compact carry- 
ing handle. There is ample work space 
beneath the lens. The PortaReader makes 
viewing of any ink printed material, 
photos, material across the room, or 
seeing what is being typed easier. It 
is possible to: 1. isolate one line 
(or more) of print at a time, 2. com- 
pensate for camera positioning so image 
is not upside-down or inside-out, and 
3. select black-on-white (positive) or 
white-on-black (negative) images. 
It has magnifying capabilities of 4X to 
45X. Also available is the Deluxe Porta- 
Reader, which has a special zoom lens 
which allows ease in focusing. 

(Information based on Apollo Electronic 
Visual Aids product literature.) 



575 



VARIABLE SPEED CONTROL™ LISTENING ADAPTER 




Photograph courtesy of Variable 
Speed Control Corporation 



576 



VARIABLE SPEED CONTROL™ LISTENING ADAPTER 



DEVELOPER 

Variable Speed Control 
Corporation 
185 Berry Street 
San Francisco, CA 94107 
(415) 495-6100 



CONTACT PERSON 

Grady Hesters 
Variable Speed Control 
Corporation 
185 Berry Street 
San Francisco, CA 94107 
(415) 495-6100 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Listening 
Reading 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impairment; improves clarity of 
slowed speech 







FIELD TESTED 

yes 






tested 
the Bl 
Blind, 


by 

ind; 

and 


VA; Arkansas Enterpr 
American Foundation 
others 


•ses 
for 


for 
the 







REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


UL 


on 


AC component 














FOR SALE 



Variable Speed Control Corporation 

185 Berry Street 

San Francisco, CA 94107 

Also see dealer list in appendix. 

$95.00 



HOV7 IT WORKS 

This device is designed to use with the 
Library of Congress (LOC) C-76, C-77 
and later model 4-track cassette players. 
The listener can speed up a cassette on 
the LOC player, then pitch correct the 
"chipmunk" sound at up to 2.5 times 
faster than the recorded speed. It has 
braille markings and large print and 
braille instructions. Two permanently 
attached cords are designed to plug 
directly into the LOC player. One cord 
carries the high pitched speeded speech 
to the adapter, the other returns pitch- 
corrected speech to the player where it 
is heard through the player's speaker. 

(Information provided by Irene Gilbert 
Mattei, VSC.) 



577 



VARISPEECH II RECORDER 




Photograph courtesy of 
Lexicon, Inc. 



578 



VARISPEECH II RECORDER 



DEVELOPER 

Lexicon, Inc. 
60 Turner Street 
Waltham, MA 02154 
(617) 891-6790 



CONTACT PERSON 

Jack Letscher 
Lexicon, Inc. 
60 Turner Street 
Waltham, MA 02154 
(617) 891-6790 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Listening 
Reading 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impairment 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



FOR SALE 

Lexicon, Inc. 
60 Turner Street 
Waltham, MA 02154 

$595.00 F.O.B. Waltham, MA 




HOW IT WORKS 

Varispeech II is a recorder and a speech 
time compressor and expander which 
utilizes advanced digital processing 
techniques. It allows you to play back 
recordings at h to Ih times the speed of 
the original, and preserves the speaker's 
original pitch and tonal qualities. It 
works like any other conventional cas»5 
sette recorder, and requires no special 
training to use. The only nonconven- 
tional control is the speed factor knob 
which is calibrated and turned clockwise 
or counterclockwise to increase or 
decrease listening speed. Special 
options are available which allow use 
with the Library of Congress 4-track 
tape formats. 

(Information provided by Nancy 
Greenfield, Lexicon, Inc.) 



579 



VERSABRAILLE SYSTEM 




Photograph courtesy of Tele- 
sensory Systems Inc. 



580 



VERSABRAILLE SYSTEM 



DEVELOPER 

Telesensory Systems, Inc. 
3408 Hill view Avenue 
Palo Alto. CA 94304 
(415) 493-2626 



CONTACT PERSON 

John Beard, Manager 
North American Marketing 
Telesensory Systems, Inc. 
3408 Hi 11 view Avenue 
Palo Alto, CA 94304 
(415) 493-2626 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Education 

Filing 

Reading 

Recording Information 

Writing 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

blindness; storage and retrieval of 
braille materials 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

yes 



FOR SALE 

Telesensory Systems, Inc. 
3408 Hillview Avenue 
Palo Alto, CA 94304 



HOW IT WORKS 

The VersaBraille system is an electronic 
braille information system which records 
braille in electronic impulses on 
cassette tape and displays braille on a 
twenty character line of electromechan- 
ical cells. The VersaBraille system is 
a quiet and efficient writing, reading 
and notetaking system, and a compact 
way of storing brail led text. 
It is also an audio tape recorder which 
can record sound and braille on the same 
tape, and can provide an index and auto- 
matic retrieval system for both braille 
and audio materials. Attachment to 
computers, typewriters, or teletype- 
writers will increase the system's 
utility in many vocational settings. 
Various options are available at an 
additional cost. 

(Information reprinted with permission 
from Telesensory Systems Inc. litera- 
ture.) 



581 



VIDEO VISUAL READ/WRITE SYSTEM 




RS Series 




M1n1 viewer 



Commuter 



Klcroviewer 



Photographs courtesy of Visual- 
tek 



582 



VIDEO VISUAL READ/WRITE SYSTEM 



DEVELOPER 

Visualtek 
1610 26th Street 
Santa Monica, CA 90404 
(213) 829-6841 



CONTACT PERSON 

Hank Cunningham 
1920 E. 87th Street 
Bloomington, MN 55420 
(612) 854-6098 

or Marc Stenzel 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Reading 









PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impainnent in reading and writing 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 
throughout U.S. and Canada 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

Department of Building and Safety 
Los Angeles, CA 



FOR SALE 

Visualtek 

1610 26th Street 

Santa Monica, CA 90404 



V\/ARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


yes 









HOW IT WORKS 

The system utilizes a closed circuit TV 
camera, zoom lens and television monitor 
to magnify printed material and 
electronically enhance its brightness 
and contrast. User adjusts magnifica- 
tion, brightness and whether to view it 
as white on a black background or black 
on a white background. Some types of 
models are: RS - provides large field 
of view, higfTcontrast levels and 60X 
magnification; RS-7 Typing Aid - by 
flicking a switch user can alternately 
view material in the typewriter and 
material being copied or simultaneously 
view these materials, used with either 
moving-platen or fixed-platen IBM 
selectric typewriters; Miniviewer- 
portable with all components recessed 
for protection while in transit, pro- 
vides 4X to 45X magnification, can 
accomnodate over-sized materials; 
Commuter - small, portable with up to 
15X magnification; Micro viewer - added 
to an RS series or mini viewer, user can 
simultaneously view the magnified micro- 
fiche and his/her own note taking on a 
split screen. Also available is a 
drafting camera base and aids for view- 
ing computer display terminals, see 
Cathode Ray Tube Viewing System. 

(Information based on Visualtek litera- 
ture.) 



583 



VOYAGER 





Photograph courtesy of 
Vlsualtek 



584 



VOYAGER 



DEVELOPER 

Visual tek 
1610 26th Street 
Santa Monica, CA 
(213) 829-6841 



90404 



CONTACT PERSON 

Hank Cunningham 
1920 E. 87th Street 
Bloomington, MN 55420 

or Marc Stenzel 
Visualtek 
(213) 829-6841 



WHERE IT IS USED 




Reading 









PROBLEM(S) 


IT 


OVERCOMES 


visual impairment 







FIELD TESTED 

yes 

States of California, Ohio, New York. 
Florida, Maryland, Illinois, Texas, 
. Pennsylvania 



REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


approval pending 









WARRANTY PROVIDED 

yes 



FOR SALE 

Visualtek 

1610 26th Street 

Santa Monica, CA 90404 



HOW IT WORKS 

This is a portable zoom- lens reading 
system which has a large screen with a 
12" diagonal CRT providing 3x to 45x 
magnification. The control knobs, 
tactual ly different, are on the front 
panel . The system features a preset 
aperture allowing instant setting of the 
optimum lens opening which can also be 
manually changed. This unit has type- 
writer capabilities. A swivel mirror 
doubles as a built-in lens cover when 
Voyager is not in use. The user can 
adjust the image to be black on white or 
white on black. Support legs recess 
inside the unit for ease in travel. 

(Infonnation based on Visualtek 
literature.) 



585 



VSi MASTERLENS SYSTEMS 




Photograph courtesy of 
EdnaLlte Corporation 



586 



VSi MASTERLENS SYSTEM 



DEVELOPER 

EdnaLite Corporation 
200 N. Water Street 
Peekskill, NY 10566 
(914) 737-4100 



CONTACT PERSON 

Corinne Cohen 
Manager, Vision Systems 
Division 

EdnaLite Corporation 
Peekskill, NY 10566 
(914) 737-4100 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Fine hand work 
Reading 



PROBLEM(S) 


IT 


OVERCOMES 


visual impairment 







FIELD TESTED 

yes 

user satisfaction expressed in letters 
to EdnaLite 





REGULATORY APPROVAL 


UL 









WARRANTY PROVIDED 

yes 





FOR SALE ^ 


EdnaLite Corporation 
200 N. Water Street 
Peekskill, NY 10566 


$197.00 + 


shipping 


^ 





HOW IT WORKS 

VSi PT is a portable table model optical 
system made from a homogeneous optical 
glass measuring 6"x8". It is designed 
for expansive viewing and working with 
both eyes open. When the curved side is 
up, the lens can be used for relaxed 
reading allowing free head movement. 
When the flat side is up, the lens can 
be used to concentrate on a central 
working area permitting hand manipu- 
lation of items under the lens. 

(Information based on EdnaLite Corpora- 
tion borchure.) 



587 



» r 



RECREATION 

Bowling Ball Guide 590 

Card Holder 592 

The Game Center 594 

Precision Wheelchair Equipment .... 595 



589 



BOWLING BALL GUIDE 




BOWLING BALL GUIDE 



DEVELOPER 

Dan Golden 

CETA Welding Instructor 
Wisconsin Indianhead 
Technical Institute 
New Richmond Campus 
1019 South Knowles Ave. 
New Richmond, WI 54017 



CONTACT PERSON 

Dan Golden, WITI 
or Ron Zacharski, 
Activity Director 
St. Croix Health Center 
New Richmond, WI 54017 
(715) 246-6991 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Recreation 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

inability to perform movements necessary 
to bowl in traditional manner 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

located and used by the St. Croix 
Health Center - New Richmond, WI 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

no 





WARRANTY 


PROV 


DED 


not 


applicable 















FOR SALE 

May be made at a minimal cost 



HOW IT WORKS 

The guide is positioned at the back 
of the bowling alley - close to 
where one would release the bowling 
ball. The individual using the guide 
would then roll his or her ball down 
the decline. It is important that 
the two parallel rods are the "right" 
distance apart or the ball will drag. 

(Information based on personal 
interview.) 



591 



CARD HOLDER 




592 



CARD HOLDER 



DEVELOPER 

Dave Bates 

Northern Wisconsin Center 

for the Developmental ly 

Disabled 
Box 340 

Chippewa Falls, WI 54729 
(715) 723-5542 



CONTACT PERSON 

Same as Developer 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Recreation 



orga 


PROBLEM(S) 

nization 


IT 


OVERCOMES 











FIELD TESTED 

yes 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

not applicable 





WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not 


applicable 











FOR 


SALE 




May 


be 


made 


at a minimal 


cost. 















HOW IT WORKS 

The board was designed to assist blind 
students playing a solitaire game 
called Cover the Pairs. The braille 
cards are placed in the individual 
spaces according to the card game being 
played. They remain in piles that are 
reasonably easy to locate. 
(The grooved rectangular piece of wood 
to the left of the card holder, is used 
to make uniform lengths of yarn when 
rug hooking.) 

(Information based on personal inter- 



593 



THE GAME CENTER 




Photograph courtesy of Tele* 
sensory Systems Inc. 



594 



THE GAME CENTER 



DEVELOPER 

Telesensory Systems, Inc. 
3408 Hill view Avenue 
Palo Alto, CA 94304 
(415) 493-2626 



CONTACT PERSON 

Gayle Bruglar 
Telesensory Systems, 
3408 Hi 11 view Avenue 
Palo Alto, CA 94304 
(415) 493-2626 



Inc 



WHERE 


IT IS 


USED 


Recreation 







PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impairment 



FIELD TESTED 

information not avail ble 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 


yes 





FOR SALE 

Telesensory Systems, Inc. 
3408 Hill view Avenue 
Palo Alto, CA 94304 

$995.00 



HOW IT WORKS 

The Game Center is a series of eight 
electronic games relying exclusively 
on auditory cues. It uses a micro- 
processor to generate electronically 
synthesized speech and other audible 
cues that provide all needed game 
information. The Game Center offers 
contests of chance, reaction time, 
memory, strategy and ear-hand coordina- 
tion. 

The playing surface of the Game Center 
is a numerical keyboard arranged in 
a push-button telephone format, with 
a series of easy to remember command 
keys. All of the keys give spoken 
verification when pressed. A brief 
initial orientation is all that is 
needed to play any of the games. 

(Information reprinted with permission 
from Telesensory Systems, Inc. litera- 
ture.) 



595 



PRECISION WHEELCHAIR EQUIPMENT 




.^*- 




Basketball Chair 



Chair in Collapsed Position 



Track Chair 



Photographs courtesy of 
Production Research Corp. 





\ 


^— JBJ 



596 



PRECISION WHEELCHAIR EQUIPMENT 



DEVELOPER 

Production Research Corp. 
10217 Southard Drive 
Beltsville, MD 20705 
(301) 441-2332 



CONTACT PERSON 

Same as Developer 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Sports 

Wheelchair mobility 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
maneuvering a wheelchair 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

by users in competition and everyday use 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
information not available 



V\/ARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 



FOR SALE 

Production Research Corporation 
10217 Southard Drive 
Beltsville, MD 20705 

or call for location of nearest dealer 



HOW IT WORKS 

Wheelchair parts that are durable, light 
weight and compatible with standard 
wheelchairs, have been designed to im- 
prove use of existing wheelchairs. Some 
parts are made for use in sports. Front 
caster wheels, 5" and 8" are made of 
precision sealed bearings for basketball 
racing and everyday usage. An 8"xl^" 
caster wheel and tire assembly is made 
of a lightweight, strong plastic, using 
a sealed bearing and internal spacer 
unit to minimize play and flutter. The 
tires are a high pressure type for easy 
rolling. This is designed for use every 
day, in track and in marathons. Some of 
the basic features of the track and 
basketball chairs are that they are of 
lightweight design, (under 30 lbs.), have 
a single piece footplate, built-in 
cambered rear wheels for easy pushing 
and quick turning, a take-apart and 
collapsing system which gives the user 
portability and a seat set at a tilt with 
adjustable sitting positions. 

(Information based on Production Research 
Corporation literature.) 



597 



SAFETY 

Alarms and Buzzers 600 

Vibrating Pager 602 

Visual Security Alarm System 604 

Visual Smoke Detectors 606 



599 



ALARMS AND BUZZERS 




The Sound/Off Alarm 




Photographs courtesy of 
Maddak, Inc. 



The Puff n Buzzer 



600 



ALARMS AND BUZZERS 



DEVELOPER 

Manufactured by: 
Maddak, Inc. 
Pequannock, NJ 07440 
(201) 694-0500 



CONTACT PERSON 

Fred M. Joslyn 
Maddak, Inc. 
Pequannock, NJ 07440 
(201) 694-0500 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Communication 
Safety 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

alerting someone of danger or that help 
is needed 



FIELD TESTED 
information not available 





REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not 


applicable 











WARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 



FOR 


SALE 




Maddak, Inc. 
Pequannock, NJ 


07440 




Sound/Off Alarm 
Puff'n Buzzer 






$48.00 
$60.00 











HOW IT WORKS 

The Sound/Off Alarm is a safety must in 
monitoring critical life support equip- 
ment such as respirators and oxygen gen- 
erators. It is also useful in alerting 
staff of power failure in testing and 
monitoring equipment. The audible alarm 
(85 dB) blares twice per second for up 
to 500 hours. It can be used with any 
piece of electrical equipment by simply 
plugging alarm into wall socket and 
plugging equipment into alarm. The 
Puff'n Buzzer is a breath operated call 
signal which replaces the customary push 
button signal used to call a nurse or 
attendant. A standard telephone-type 
plug-in-jack terminates a coiled retrac- 
tile cord which connects to an aluminum 
housing. The housing contains a breath 
operated switch which the operator 
actuates by puffing into a small mouth- 
piece connected by tubing to the breath 
switch. 

(Information based on Maddak Catalog No 
479, 1979.) 



601 



VIBRATING PAGER 



ni 




Photographs courtesy of 
Motorola Radio, Inc. 



602 



VIBRATING PAGER 



DEVELOPER 

Motorola Radio, Inc. 
1309 E. Algonquin Road 
Schaumburg, IL 60196 



CONTACT PERSON 

R.S. Menchel 

NCED/NTID 

One Lomb Memorial Drive 

Rochester, NY 14623 

(716) 475-6544 (TTY or 

Voice) 



WHERE 


IT IS 


USED 


Communicating 
Safety 





PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

communicating with someone who is deaf 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
yes 



FOR SALE 

your local Motorola Radio, Inc. dealer 

$400 

$15.20 monthly rental fee + charger 



HOW IT WORKS 

This pager is clipped to the belt or 
another article of clothing. It is 
used to inform a deaf person working 
alone in a laboratory that evacuation 
of building is required. The person 
is notified through security by send- 
ing radio wave to pager. Strong vibra- 
tion is felt by wearer. 

(Information provided by R.S. Menchel 
and Max Bentley.) 



603 



VISUAL SECURITY ALARM SYSTEM 





i: 




^/.4 4 /4 4 /x 


^ 






'',(f,, />/., 


^_.i^ 









Photograph courtesy of 
Howard M. Haines 



604 



VISUAL SECURITY ALARM SYSTEM 



DEVELOPER 

Nationwide Flashing 
Signals System 
P.O. Box 6146 
Silver Spring, MD 20906 
(301) 593-2755 



CONTACT PERSON 

Howard M. Haines 
Nationwide Flashing 
Signals System 
P.O. Box 6146 
Silver Spring, MD 20906 
(301) 593-2755 (voice) 
(301) 593-2566 (TTY) 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Home Economics 
Homemaking 
Manufacturing 
Safety 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

security hazard posed by inability to 
hear suspicious noises 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

yes 



FOR SALE 

Nationwide Flashing Signals System 

P.O. Box 6146 

Silver Spring, MD 20906 

complete set $325.00 





REGULATORY APPROVAL 


UL 









HOW IT WORKS 

The Magnetic Switch Set is mounted on 
parting edge of window or door and is 
wired to the transmitter, which is 
plugged into nearest electrical outlet. 
Several Switch Sets may be used on one 
transmitter. Transmitter sends a viola- 
tion signal to control center when pro- 
tected door or window has been opened. 
If the Control Center has been turned on 
it locks on to the signal from the Trans- 
mitter, waits 10-15 seconds, and then 
transmits an alarm signal to trigger all 
alarms. This happens even if the door 
has been quickly closed. The delay gives 
the homeowner time to disarm the Control 
Center before the alarms sound. Other 
features include: 

- A 30-60 Second Exit Delay during 
which time the Control Center 
ignores all violations. This 
allows homeowner to exit without 
triggering alarms. 

- An In/Out Switch for deleting the 
exit and reentry delays so that all 
the alarms will sound immediately 
upon the opening of a secured door 
or window. 

- A Violation Light that comes on 
whenever a protected opening is not 
closed. It warns against arming 
the system before the building is 
secured. 

- An Automatic Reset feature whereby 
the system will rearm itself if the 
door or window violated is subse- 
quently closed. 

(Information based on Nationwide Flash- 
ing Signals System literature.) 



605 



VISUAL SMOKE DETECTORS 




606 



VISUAL SMOKE DETECTORS 



DEVELOPER 

Nationwide Flashing 
Signals System 
P.O. Box 6146 
Silver Spring, MD 20906 
(301) 593-2755 



CONTACT PERSON 

Howard M. Haines 
Nationwide Flashing 
Signals System 
P.O. Box 6146 
Silver Spring, MD 20906 
(301) 593-2755 (voice) 
(301) 593-2566 (TTY) 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Home Economics 
Homemaking 
Manufacturing 
Safety 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

inability of a hearing impaired or deaf 
person to hear an auditory smoke alarm 



FIELD TESTED 
yes 





REGULATORY APPROVAL 


UL 




^ 





WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


yes 





FOR SALE 

Nationwide Flashing Signals System 

P.O. Box 6146 

Silver Spring, MD 20906 

$47.50 - $95.00 



HOW IT WORKS 
These smoke detectors are photoelectric. 

Switched Receptacle 

- Plugs into household receptacle 
(120 volt AC) 

- Power is applied to outlet during 
alarm. 

- Lights are plugged into this receiver 
(up to 300 watts). 

- Intended for installation in bedroom. 

- Can be moved from room to room. 

Smoke Detector Transmitter 

- Plugs into household receptacl e 
(120 volt AC). 

- Detects dangerous levels of smoke. 

- Sounds loud penetrating alarm. 

- Transmits continuous signal to 
receiver- alarm. 

- Automatically resets (alarm ceases 
when smoke clears). 

- Use as many detector transmitters 
as necessary to protect your home. 

Horn (not shown in photo) 

- Plugs into household receptacle 
(120 volt AC). 

- Sounds a loud alarm (85db at 10 ft.) 

- Intended for installation in your 
neighbor's house to alert him while 
you are away or on vacation. 

- Can be moved from room to room. 

(Information based on Nationwide 
Flashing Signals System literature.) 



607 



SEWING 

Bernina Sewing Machine 610 

Magnifier for Sewing Machine 612 

Sewing Machine, Chest Operated .... 614 

Sewing Machine Puff and Sip Control 

System for Paraplegic 616 

Viking Sewing Machine 618 



609 



BERNir^A SEWING MACHINE 




Bobbin Holder 




Handwheel Key 



Needle Finger-Guard 




Dials 



Presser-Foot Lifter Speed Regulator 



Photographs courtesy of Fritz 
Gegauf Limited 



6ia 



BERNINA SEWING MACHINE 



DEVELOPER 

Fritz Gegauf Limited 

Seestrasse 

8266 Steckborn 

Switzerland 

(054) 8 29 21 



CONTACT PERSON 

Hans Boiler 

Fritz Gegauf Limited 

Seestrasse 

8266 Steckborn 

Switzerland 

(054) 8 29 21 



WHERE 


IT IS 


USED 


Sewing 













PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

difficulty operating standard sewing 
machine due to visual impairment, hand 
or foot strength 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 
Sweden & Switzerland 





REGULATORY APPROVAL 


UL 










FOR SALE 

See importers list in appendix. 
Priced at retail dealers' discretion. 



HOW IT WORKS 

Model 830H has several features to allow 
easier operation- of the machine. A 
holder can be used to remove and insert 
the bobbin and the bobbin hook is non- 
jamming. Turning a lever with one hand 
locks the handwheel; by applying light 
pressure to a large key, it can be 
released and retightened. Using a 
centering block places the needle in the 
correct position. A large handled 
screwdriver is used on the needle holder 
screw. A finger-guard on the needle is 
available. Threading of the machine 
can be done with one hand putting the 
thread through the slots; no eyes have 
to be threaded. A needle with a slot 
to the eye is an available accessary. 
Width, length, needle position and 
buttonhole dials are a non-slip design 
which rotate by pushing the large knob 
projections. Markings for width and 
length can be felt. A knob with large 
projections is used to raise and lower 
the feed-dog. An elongated lever is 
used for stitch selection; these mark- 
ings can also be felt. The presser- 
foot snaps on and off. An adjustable 
guide can screw into the back of the 
presser-foot or base of the machine. 
The presser-foot is raised and lowered 
with an elbow or knee operated lever. 
The sewing speed regulator can be oper- 
ated by foot, elbow, knee or chin, and 
a lock can be placed on it limiting it 
to two speed positions. 

(Description based on Bernlna literature; 
verbal explanation provided by Hans 
Neunschwander, Hans Sewtng Center - 
Madison, WI.) 



611 



MAGNIFIER FOR SEWING MACHINE 







-^ 




^^ap' ' " - in 




Photograph courtesy of 
American Foundation for 
the Blind 







612 



MAGNIFIER FOR SEWING MACHINE 



DEVELOPER 



CONTACT PERSON 

Alex H. Townsend 
American Foundation for 
the Blind 
15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 
(212) 620-2169 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Sewing 

















PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
visual impairment 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

by panels of blind and visually impaired 
persons 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 







FOR 


SALE 


American 
15 West 
New York 


Foundation 
1 6th Street 
. NY 10011 


for the Blind 


$2.75 

















HOW IT WORKS 

This flexible plastic device attaches to 
the side of a sewing machine to help 
guide the thread into the needle. 

(Information based on American Foundation 
for the Blind literature.) 



613 



SEWING MACHINE, CHEST OPERATED 





Photograph courtesy of 
David F. Law, Jr. 



614 



SEWING MACHINE, CHEST OPERATED 



DEVELOPER 

David F. Law, Jr. 
Woodrow Wilson Rehab. Ctr 
Rehabilitation Engi- 
neering Department 
Fishersville, VA 22939 
(703) 885-9724 



CONTACT PERSON 

Same as Developer 





WHERE IT IS USED 


• 


Sewing 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

inability to operate a sewing machine 
well enough to be employed 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 
Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
no 



WARRANTY 


PROV 


DED 


no 













FOR SALE 
no 



HOW IT WORKS 

The variable speed control of a com- 
mercially available sewing machine was 
mounted at chest level of the operator. 
This allows "hands-free" operation and 
very good control. Mounting arm is 
removable to allow normal usage. 

(Information provided by David F. Law, 
Jr.) 



615 



SEWING MACHINE PUFF AND SIP CONTROL SYSTEM FOR PARAPLEGIC 




f*'*4...J. 



Photograph courtesy of Don 
Warren and Rlcardo Cerna 



616 



SEWING MACHINE PUFF AND SIP CONTROL SYSTEM FOR PARAPLEGIC 



DEVELOPER 

Clinical Convenience 
Products 
Contracting Serv. Div. 
2070 Helena Street 
Madison, WI 53704 
(608) 251-2882 



CONTACT 


PERSON 1 


Don Warren 
2070 Helena Street 
Madison, WI 53704 
(608) 251-2882 




J 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Benchwork 
Home Economics 
Homemaking 
Sewing 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

unable to operate foot control of an 
industrial sewing machine. 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

North Central Technical Institute 
Wausau, WI 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 


yes 



FOR SALE 

Clinical Convenience Products 
2070 Helena Street 
Madison, WI 53704 

$600 - custom modifications upon 
request 



HOW IT WORKS 

The foot control of an industrial sewing 
machine was modified with a puff and sip 
control that provides linear speed con- 
trol; i.e., the harder the person puffs 
on the tube the faster the sewing 
machine will run. 

When the individual sips on the tube the 
presser foot rises. Once desired speed 
is achieved by puffing, speed is main- 
tained by blocking tube with the tip of 
the tongue. (Does not require constant 
puff to keep machine running.) 

(Information provided by Ricardo Cerna, 
Rehabilitation Engineering Specialist, 
Wisconsin Division of Vocational Reha- 
bilitation, and Don Warren.) 



617 



VIKING SEWING MACHINE 



Photograph not available 



618 



VIKING SEWING MACHINE 



DEVELOPER 

Husqvarna AB 

Pack 

S-561 81 Husqvarna 

SWEDEN 



CONTACT PERSON 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Sewing 









PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

difficulty operating standard sewing 
machine due to visual impairment and 
physical strength 



FIELD TESTED 
information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 



FOR SALE 

Viking Sewing Machine dealers 



HOW IT WORKS 

Several features make operation of the 
machine easier. A cassette and braille 
summary of the instruction book are 
available. Threadi ng of the machine is 
done following open guides. The needle 
is slotted and enclosed by a finger guard 
The thread tension knob has a rubber ring 
to make gripping easier. Notches in the 
presser foot and the needle plate groove 
are used to locate the needle , A large 
knobbed screwdriver is used on the needle 
holder screw. A lever on the presser 
foot pressure adjustment knob, makes it 
easier to alter the pressure settings 
when needed. The different settings are 
labeled with raised markings. The presser 
feet can be clipped on and off. The 
nonjam shuttle has a projecting finger 
grip on the door. Tongs are used to 
remove and insert the bobbin. Stitch 
selection dials have protruding levers 



for easy turning, are color coded to the 
stitch indicator and have braille symbols. 
The reverse button can be pressed with 
the finger, thumb or palm, A convex knob 
for the feed dog button can be operated 
with one finger. A rubber ring around 
the hand wheel eases gripping and turning, 
A protruding gear shift lever makes it 
easy to engage the slow speed gear. When 
the bobbin is placed on the gear shift 
spindle, the needle mechanism automatical 
ly disengages. The sewing speed control 
pedal is large and has a heel rest. 
Controls that can be knee, hand, or arm 
operated are also available, 

(Information based on Viking brochure,) 



619 



SHOPPING 
Grocery Shopping Cart 622 



621 



GROCERY SHOPPING CART 













Photograph courtesy of 
Safeway Stores, Inc. 



622 



GROCERY SHOPPING CART 



DEVELOPER 

Kermit Berge 
c/o Mel McCall 
Safeway Stores, Inc. 
4990 Stockton Blvd. 
Sacramento, CA 95820 



CONTACT PERSON 

Felicia del Campo 
Safeway Stores, Inc. 
Oakland, CA 94660 



WHERE 


IT IS 


USED 


Shopping 













PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

unable to use a conventional shopping 
cart from a wheelchair 



FIELD TESTED 
yes 
Safeway stores - Washington, D.C, 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 



FOR SALE 

Not for sale until mid 1981. 



HOW IT WORKS 

The cart hooks to a wheelchair freeing 
the user's hands. On the left rear 
side of the cart is a telescoping arm 
that folds down. On the end of the 
arm is a "U" shaped piece that fits to 
the bar on the rear of the wheelchair 
armrest. Another "U" shaped piece then 
slides forward to fit the front arm- 
rest brace and locks into place. The 
cart will stay directly in front of 
the wheelchair rolling along with it on 
four swivel wheels. Once the user is 
familiar with its use, it takes only a 
few seconds to hook up. 

(Information provided by Kermit Berge 
and Felicia del Campo, Safeway Stores, 
Inc.) 



623 



TRANSPORTATION 

Car Controls 626 

Driving Controls 628 

Left Foot Gas Pedal Control for Car . . 630 



625 



CAR CONTROLS 




Diagram courtesy of 
Kroepke Kontrols , Inc. 



626 



CAR CONTROLS 



DEVELOPER 

Kroepke Kontrols, Inc. 
104 Hawkins Street 
Bronx, NY 10464 



CONTACT PERSON 

Walter Kroepke 
Kroepke Kontrols, Inc. 
104 Hawkins Street 
Bronx, New York 10464 
(212) 885-1547 



WHERE IT IS USED 
Transporation 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

inability to operate car controls with 
lower extremities 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 



company has had 27 years of experience 
manufacturing driving controls 





REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


VA 


approved 











WARRANTY PROVIDED 

yes 





FOR SALE 




1 


Brake Control 

Single Lever Gas and Brake 

Control 
Spinner Knob 
Headlight Dimmer Switch 
Hand Parking Brake 


$ 99.50 

139.50 
27.50 
14.50 
15.50 


^ 






J 



HOW IT WORKS 

The Brake Control works with a lever 
action involving the brake only. 
The Single Lever Gas and Brake Control 
involves both the brake and gas oper- 
ations in one lever. 
The Spinner Knob is a ball bearing con- 
trol for improved control of the steer- 
ing wheel . 

The Headlight Dimmer Switch is a hi-lo, 
back and forth type motion. 
The Hand Parking Brake is for cars with 
foot control emergency brakes. 

(Information based on company's bro- 
chure.) 



627 



DRIVING CONTROLS 




'' k 






"^^'i 


\, 




^J 


) 


\ 

\ 


^^ 


^ 




Parkir^ Brake Handle 



Illustrations courtesy of 
Lehman Drug and Surgical 
Supply, Eau Claire, WI and 
Wells Engberg, Rockford, XL 



628 



DRIVING CONTROLS 



DEVELOPER 

Wells Engberg 
P.O. Box 6388 
Rockford, IL 61125 
(815) 397-6208 



CONTACT PERSON 

Same as Developer 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Transportation 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

inability to operate existing car 
controls 





FIELD TESTED 




yes 


VA 









REGULATORY APPROVAL 

it meets VA, DVR and DOT Wisconsin 
standards 




FOR SALE 

Contact Wells Engberg in Illinois for 
state-wide distributors. 

In Wisconsin contact: 
Mobility Unlimited 
7741 W. National Avenue 
P.O. Box 14427 
Milwaukee, WI 53214 



HOW IT WORKS 

The Left-Foot Gas-Feed allows use of 

the acceleration pedal without use of 

right leg. 

The Parking Brake Handle allows a 

person with limited leg movement to 

operate a parking brake. The handle 

folds forward to permit easy entrance 

and exit. 

The Left and Right Hand Drive Controls 

allow operation of a vehicle by a 

person with limited mobility. 

(Information based on product brochures.) 



629 



LEFT FOOT GAS PEDAL CONTROL FOR CAR 




Diagram courtesy of Kroepke 
Kontrols, Inc. 



630 



LEFT FOOT GAS PEDAL CONTROL FOR CAR 



DEVELOPER 

Kroepke Kontrols, Inc. 
104 Hawkins Street 
Bronx, New York 10464 



Walter Kroepke 
Kroepke Kontrols, Inc. 
104 Hawkins Street 
Bronx, New York 10464 
(212) 885-1547 



WWfR^ IT VSr USE-D* 
Transportation 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

inability to use right foot in driving 
a car 



FIELD TESTED 

company has had 27 years of experience 
manufacturing driving controls 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
VA approved 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
yes 



FOR SALE 

left foot gas control - $50.00 



HOW IT WORKS 

The left pedal is similar in shape, 
size, and location on the floor of the 
car to the right gas pedal. The left 
gas pedal is attached to a device which 
applies pressure to the right gas pedal. 
The device is secured at the steering 
column. 

(Information based on company's brochure 



631 



TYPING 

Electric Typewriter 634 

IBM Audio Typing Unit 636 

Manual and Electric Typewriter ... 638 

Numeric Key Lock 640 

Perkins Brailler 642 

Reverse Indexing Typewriter 644 

Talking Word Processing System ... 646 

Touch-N-Type™ Stick 648 

Typewriter Control Systems 650 

Typewriter Guard 652 

Typewriter Mask Aid 654 

Typewriter, One Hand, with Shield . . 656 

Typewriter "Shift Easy" Shift Bar . . 658 

Typing, One-Handed 660 



633 



ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER 




Photograph courtesy of Olympia 
USA Inc 



634 



ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER 



DEVELOPER 

Olympia USA Inc 
Route 22 

Somerville, NJ 08876 
(201) 722-7000 



CONTACT PERSON 

Michael S. Pahuta 
Asst. Manager 
Marketing Services 
Olympia USA 
Route 22 

Somerville, NJ 08876 
(201) 722-7000 



WHERE 


IT IS USED 


Typing 









PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

limited hand and arm muscle control 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 



UL 



WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


yes 









FOR SALE 

Olympia USA Inc 

Route 22 

Somerville, NJ 08876 

price of Standard Typewriter plus 
$250.00 



HOW IT WORKS 

A standard electric Olympia typewriter 
is equipped with a continuous feed 
paper attachment; a paper cutter for 
separating completed typing from the 
paper roll; a cushioned arm rest and 
an elevated keyboard mask for guiding 
fingers to the proper keys. 

(Information based on Olympia litera- 
ture.) 



635 



IBM AUDIO TYPING UNIT 



•N ( 




Photographs courtesy of 
IBM Corporation 




636 



IBM AUDIO TYPING UNIT 



DEVELOPER 

IBM Corporation 
400 Parsons Pond Drive 
Franklin Lakes, NJ 07417 
(201) 848-1900 



CONTACT PERSON 


J.G. Cesarlo 


Program Manager 

IBM Corporation 

400 Parsons Pond Drive 

Franklin Lakes, NJ 07417 

(201) 848-1900 





WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Typing 

















PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

a blind person's inability to proof 
typed material without assistance from a 
sighted person 



FIELD TESTED 

no 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

yes 





REGULATORY APPROVAL 


UL 









FOR SALE 

Local Office 

Office Products Division 

IBM Corporation 

$170/rent; $150/lease; $5300/purchase 



HOW IT WORKS 

The IBM Audio Typing Unit consists of an 
audio keypad, an audio console, and an 
optional headset. To be operational it 
must be attached to one of four host 
typewriters: the IBM Mag Card II, the 
IBM Mag Card/A, the IBM Memory Type- 
writer, or the IBM Memory 100 Typewriter. 
The IBM Audio Typing Unit produces 
synthetic speech with an unlimited vocab- 
ulary. The synthetic speech can be heard 
in character, word, or line modes at 
operator discretion. 

(Information based on IBM Corporation 
literature.) 



637 



MANUAL AND ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER 







Photograph courtesy of Olympia 
USA Inc 



• 



638 



MANUAL AND ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER 



DEVELOPER 

Olympia USA Inc 
Route 22 

Somervine, NJ 08876 
(201) 722-7000 



CONTACT PERSON 

Michael S. Pahuta 
Asst. Manager 
Marketing Services 
Olympia USA 
Route 22 

Somerville, NJ 08876 
(201) 722-7000 



WHERE 


IT IS USED 


Typing 





PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impairment 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 





REGULATORY APPROVAL 


UL 





WARRANTY 


PROV 


DED 


yes 




-'' 









FOR SALE 

Olympia USA Inc 

Route 22 

Somerville, NJ 08876 

Price of Standard Typewriter plus $57.50 



HOW IT WORKS 

A standard manual or electic Olympia 
typewriter is equipped with a braille 
keyboard; left and right braille 
margins; a braille margin scale and a 
braille scale on the bail roll shaft. 

(Information based on Olympia litera- 
ture.) 



639 



NUMERIC KEY LOCK 




Photographs courtesy of 
David F. Law. Jr. 



640 



NUMERIC KEY LOCK 



DEVELOPER 

Woodrow Wilson Rehab. Ctr. 
Rehab. Engineering Dept, 
Fishersville, VA 22939 
(703) 885-9724 



CONTACT PERSON 

David F, Law, Jr. 
Woodrow Wilson Rehab, Ctr 
Rehab, Engineering Dept. 
Fishersville, VA 22939 
(703) 885-9724 



WHERE 


IT IS 


USED 


Typing 













PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

difficulty in manipulating the regular 
shift key lock of a typewriter 



FIELD TESTED 



yes 



Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



FOR SALE 

Rehabilitation Engineering Department 
Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center 
Fishersville, VA 22939 

$15,00 



V\/ARRANTY 


PROV 


DED 


no 













HOW IT WORKS 

I.B.M, 29 or 129 key punch machine does 
not have a shift key lock, so a Plexi- 
glas lock is attached to the machine. 
It allows quadriplegics using mouthsticks 
and hemiplegics to type upper case 
letters. 

(Information provided by David F. Law, 
Jr.) 



641 



PERKINS BRAILLER 






z^- 




H: 



1 



§h 



^fea^^ 



m i 



Photograph courtesy of Howe 
Press 



642 



PERKINS BRAILLER 



DEVELOPER 

David Abraham 
Manufactured by: 
Howe Press of Perkins 
School for the Blind 
175 N. Beacon Street 
Watertown, MA 02172 
(617) 924-3490 



CONTACT PERSON 

Harry J. Friedman 
Howe Press of Perkins 
School for the Blind 
175 N. Beacon Street 
Watertown, MA 02172 
(617) 924-3490 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Braining 









PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impairment 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 



UL; Canadian Standard Association 
(for electric model) 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

yes 



FOR SALE 

Howe Press of Perkins 
School for the Blind 
175 N. Beacon Street 
Watertown, MA 02172 

$215.00 manual 
$360.00 electric 





FIELD TESTED 


- 


yes 


by users 





HOW IT WORKS 

User inserts a sheet of heavy paper 
(measuring up to H"xnV)^ through a 
slot at the back of the machine. With 
the six keys the user produces the 
braille dot code. This model is used 
widely around the world as the braille 
code is adaptable to many languages. 
Various models of the Brail ler have been 
designed to meet special needs of the 
user. There is a unimanual for persons 
who can only use one hand and one with 
straight extension keys for persons 
needing a mechanical assist due to 
limited arm strength. For descriptions 
of other models available contact Howe 
Press. 

Other products available from Howe Press 
include slates, stylus, measurement and 
math materials, and Braille-Vision books 

(Information based on Howe Press liter- 
ature.) 



643 



REVERSE INDEXING TYPEWRITER 




Photograph courtesy of David F. 
Law, Jr, 



644 



REVERSE INDEXING TYPEWRITER 



DEVELOPER 

Woodrow Wilson Rehab. Ctr 
Engineering Dept 



Rehab. 

Fishersville, VA 
(703) 885-9724 



22939 



CONTACT PERSON 

Randy Hinegardner 
Brown's Business Machines 
Staunton, VA 24401 
C703) 886-3602 





WHERE 


IT IS 


USED 


Typ 


ing 















PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

inability of quadriplegics to index 
paper up or down when using a mouth- 
stick 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center and 
Market Area 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 



UL 



WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


yes 









FOR SALE 

Brown's Business Machines 
1617 W. Beverley St. 
Staunton, VA 24401 

$970.00 (price subject to change without 
notice.) 



HOW IT WORKS 

T) 

An IBM Selectric self-correcting type- 
writer was adapted with an externally 
motorized platen to give up and down 
indexing. This worked well, but modifi- 
cations were expensive and endeavors to 
have it commercially available were un- 
successful. A Royal 5000CR was then 
selected, and through cooperation of a 
local distributor, internal modifications 
were made to add on this feature. This 
machine is also equipped with a paper 
inserter and mouthstick operable margins 
and tabs. Complete new units with modi- 
fications are available from the above. 
People who are quadriplegic may have 
varying degrees of upper trunk stability. 
By elevating the back of the typewriter 
the quadriplegic can more easily view 
the typed materials. 

(Information provided by David F. Law, 
Jr.) 



645 



TALKING WORD PROCESSING SYSTEM 




646 



TALKING WORD PROCESSING SYSTEM 



DEVtlOPER 

Maryland Computer Ser- 
vices 

502 Rock Spring Avenue 
Bel Air, MD 21014 
(301) 838-8888 



CONTACT PERSON 

Phyllis Barnes 
Maryland Computer Ser- 
vices 

502 Rock Spring Avenue 
Bel Air, MD 21014 
(301) 838-8888 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Typing 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

visual impairment 



FIELD TESTED 
information not provided 





REGULATORY APPROVAL 


UL 










FOR SALE 

Maryland Computer Services 
502 Rock Spring Avenue 
Bel Air, MD 21014 



HOW IT WORKS 

This (TWP) system stores all text in 
memory which allows the user to add, 
edit or print a document, adjust the 
format of a printed page, fetch a sec- 
tion of text, replace one section of 
text with another, insert or delete 
lines or characters. To check what has 
been entered, the user presses a key 
which tells the unit to speak any or 
all characters entered. A document can 
be proofed, corrected and edited using 
the audio indicator. Only corrections 
are entered to replace errors. The 
speech box has full word synthetic 
speech called Speak Easy. All text 
also appears on the visual display. An 
option of the TVfP enables the system to 
automatically transcribe and emboss 
documents in American Standard Braille. 
The user enters the document on the key- 
board and the command to translate and 
emboss. Any braille embosser can be 
used with this system. 

(Information based on Maryland Computer 
Services literature.) 



647 



TOUCH-N-TYPE™ STICK 




Photograph courtesy of Gilbert L, 
Fink, Therafin Corporation 



648 



TOUCH-N-TYPE™ STICK 



DEVELOPER 

Therafin Corporation 
3800 S. Union Avenue 
Steger, IL 60475 
(312) 755-1535 



CONTACT PERSON 

Gilbert L. Fink 
Therafin Corporation 
3800 S. Union Avenue 
Steger, IL 60475 
(312) 755-1535 



WHERE 


IT IS 


USED 


Communication 




Computer 


Processing | 


Typing 







PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

loss of hand or finger muscle control 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 



FOR SALE 

Therafin Corporation 
3800 S. Union Avenue 
Steger. IL 60475 

$3.25 each 



HOW IT WORKS 

This device is a 12" rod covered with 
plastic and with a Plastisol no-slip 
tip. It has an adjustable loop that can 
be raised, lowered or shortened for 
individual use. It can also be used as 
a mouthstick. The stick can be used to 
operate typewriters, telephones and 
computer keyboards. 

(Information based on Therafin Corpora- 
tion brochure.) 



649 



TYPEWRITER CONTROL SYSTEMS 



N ( 




Foots kate 




Heavy Duty Foot Switch 



^ 



%^^ 




^ > 



Splint 




Joystick 




Overdeck Conversion 



Photographs courtesy of Possum 
Controls, Inc. 



6^0 



TYPEWRITER CONTROL SYSTEMS 



DEVELOPER 

Possum Controls, Inc. 
11 Fairacres Industrial 
Estate 
Windsor Berkshire 
England 



CONTACT PERSON 

Ann F. Gurr 
Possum, Inc. 
P.O. Box 451 
Midwood Station 
Brooklyn, NY 11230 
(212) 243-1658 




PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

unable to use typewriter in conventional 
manner 



Britain 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 





REGULATORY APPROVAL 


FDA 





WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


yes 





FOR 


SALE 


' 


Possum, Inc. 
P.O. Box 451 
Midwood Station 
Brooklyn. NY 11230 






Price dependent on 
requirements $3,500 


individual 
- $8,600 


system 
range. 



HOW IT WORKS 

Made to use with IBM, Smith Corona and 
Brother typewriters, systems are oper- 
ated with 1,' 2, 4 or 8 microswitches. 
Type 1A/5 A - operated by a single or two 
inputs, gives a speed of up to 10 words 
per minute (w.p.m.), supplied with an 
illuminated visual indicator. 
Type 8A - operated by 8 inputs, cannot 
be mouth operated. Switches are oper- 
ated in sequence giving a typing speed 
of up to 40 w.p.m., no reaction time 
limit. 

There is also a Type 6A and Type 3A. 
Input Controls are trolley mounted, 
continuous stationery of up to 250 
sheets is provided. Types of inputs: 
Joystick - small movement into any of 8 
slots arranged around the Joy Stick act- 
ivates microswitches which control the 
typewriter. Footskate - fine foot con- 
trol used to select up to 8 micro- 
switches with a 'skate' input. Splint - 
microswitches mounted on a splint oper- 
ated bv' flicker in a finger. See 
Possum™ Input Controls (p. 312) for other 
inputs. Mini Keyboard - by means of a 
stylus, a miniature keyboard can be used 
to operate a typewriter. Possum 
Expanded Keyboard - enlarged keyboard 
is connected to a typewriter, keys are 
spaced out and recessed. It gives a 
speed of 5 to 12 w.p.m., a delay can be 
introduced for use by those with a 
severe tremor. Overdeck Coversions - 
placed over existing keys, removal of 
the overdeck enables typewriter to be 
used in conventional manner. 

(Infcrmatlon based on Possum Controls, 
Inc. literature.) 



651 



TYPEWRITER GUARD 



"' , ^- 


'-^?f^r ' 




1 







■•vtaiiiiaiiite 



<^*fi>^lW^J>*>H;l;|, 



^■iiV 




Photographs courtesy of 
Dan Golden 



652 



TYPEWRITER GUARD 



DEVELOPER 

Dan Golden 

CETA Welding Instructor 
Wisconsin Indianhead 
Technical Institute 
New Richmond Campus 
1019 S. Knowles Avenue 
New Richmond, WI 54017 
(715) 246-6561 



CONTACT PERSON 

Jeanette M. Richardson 
Supervisor 

Office & Marketing Edu- 
cation Department 
WITI-New Richmond Campus 
1019 S. Knowles Avenue 
New Richmond, WI 54017 
(715) 246-6561 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Typing 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

limited hand dexterity and control 









Fl 


ELD TESTED 

yes 




in 


use 


at 


WITI 


- New Richmond, 


WI 



REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


no 









WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


no 





FOR SALE 

May be made at a minimal cost. 



HOW IT WORKS 

When the guard is placed over the keys 
of the electric typewriter, snapping 
into place, it serves to guide the 
typist to strike the correct key. 

(Information based on personal Inter- 
view.) 



653 



TYPEWRITER MASK AID 



fl 







Photograph courtesy 
Smith- Corona 



of 



654 



TYPEWRITER MASK AID 



DEVELOPER 



CONTACT PERSON 

Arthur P. Wales 

Smith-Corona 

SCM Corporation 

Consumer Products Div, 

65 Locust Avenue 

New Canaan, CT 06840 

(203) 972-1471 





WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Typ 


ing 









PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
lack Of hand control 











FIELD TESTED 

yes 


in 


use 


for 


8- 


-10 years 















REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not 


applicable 











WARRANTY PROVIDED 

no 



FOR SALE 

Smith Corona 
National Service Store 
46 Elm Street 
Cortland, NY 13045 

$27.50 



HOW IT WORKS 

The Mask Aid is available in the form of 
a kit for installation on a standard 
typewriter (available only on the SCM 
Model 2200). This auxil lia ry keyboard 
mask attaches flush or slightly above the 
keys. It prevents those persons with 
poor hand guidance control from tripping 
more than one key at a time. The Mask 
supports the hands so that a finger can 
locate the desired holes in the Mask to 
depress the desired key. A cover plate 
over the space bar also supports the 
hand to prevent accidental character 
spacing. An opening in the cover allows 
a finger to enter the opening to operate 
the space bar. 

(Information based on Smith-Corona 
literature.) 



655 



TYPEWRITER. ONE HAND, WITH SHIELD 




Photograph courtesy of 
Typewriting Institute for 
the Handicapped 



656 



TYPEWRITER, ONE HAND, WITH SHIELD 



DEVELOPER 

Typewriting Institute 
for the Handicapped 
3102 W. Augusta Avenue 
Phoenix, AZ 85021 
(602) 939-5344 



CONTACT PERSON 

Kenneth Diamond 
Typewriting Institute 
for the Handicapped 
3102 W. Augusta Avenue 
Phoenix, AZ 85021 
(602) 939-5344 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Typing 









PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

difficulties experienced by a one 
handed typist using a standard keyboard 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 




FOR SALE 

Typewriting Institute for the Handi 
capped 

3102 W. Augusta Avenue 
Phoenix, AZ 85021 

Typewriter $450 + shipping 
Shield $45 



HOW IT WORKS 

Typewriter - These are electric compact 
office-size portables with a 12 inch 
carriage. The typewriters are avail- 
able in right hand or left hand models. 
The frequently used letters are con- 
centrated in the center. This elimi- 
nates muscular contortions and strenuous 
reaches. On the standard keyboard, the 
left-hand typist does 43% of the type- 
writing with the little finger. The 
Dvorak One-Hand Typewriter Keyboard for 
left hand assigns only 15.3% of the 
typewriting load to the little finger, 
18.3% to the ring finger, 29.7% to the 
middle finger, and 36.7% to the index 
finger. The right-hand keyboard pro- 
vides almost identical distribution of 
the finger load. Shift keys are oper- 
ated with little finger or thumb. A 
special training manual has been pre- 
pared for both the right and left-hand 
typist using the Dvorak One-Hand Key- 
boards. It can be used either as a 
home study course or as a classroom 
text. It is included with every Dvorak 
One-Hand Typewriter sold by the Insti- 
tute. 

Shield - For those with a dexterity pro 
blem. Typewriting Institute has avail- 
able a shield which is easily attached 
to the Dvorak One-Hand Typewriter or 
their standard typewriter. The shield 
helps the typist avoid striking adjoin- 
ing keys. In addition, the shield is 
helpful to the handicapped typist who 
must rest his or her hand on the type- 
writer for support. The shield is also 
used when the typist must type with a 
hand, head or mouth stick. 

(Information based on company litera- 
ture.) 



657 



TYPEWRITER "SHIFT EASY" SHIFT BAR 




Photograph courtesy of Smith 
Corona, Inc. 



658 



TYPEWRITER "SHIFT EASY" SHIFT BAR 



DEVELOPER 

Typewriting Institute 
for the Handicapped 
3102 W. Augusta Avenue 
Phoenix, AZ 85021 
(602) 939-5344 



CONTACT PERSON 

Kenneth Diamond 
Typewriting Institute 
for the Handicapped 
3102 W. Augusta Avenue 
Phoenix, AZ 85021 
(602) 939-5344 



WHERE 


IT IS 


USED 


Typing 







PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

shifting for capital letters when 
typing 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 




FOR SALE 

Typewriting Institute for the Handi 
capped 

3102 W. Augusta Avenue 
Phoenix, AZ 85021 

$45.00 



HOW IT WORKS 

Typewriting Institute for the Handi- 
capped has developed a new optional 
shift key bar, the "Shift-Easy." Up 
until now, shifting for capital letters 
has been difficult for the one-hand 
typist where the typist is unable to 
use his or her other hand to depress 
the regular shift key. With Shift-Easy 
the one-hand typist can shift with the 
thumb or palm of the typing hand with- 
out going off home position. Shift- 
Easy is easily attachable and detach- 
able from the Dvorak One-Hand Type- 
writer. No screws or tools are needed. 

(Information based on company litera- 
ture.) 



659 



TYPING, ONE-HANDED 



Photograph not available 



660 



TYPING, ONE-HANDED 



DEVELOPER 

Susanne Wynkoop 
Associated Craftsmen 

Easter Seals 
15 Emerald Street 
Hackensack, NJ 07601 
(201) 342-5734 



CONTACT PERSON 

Same as Developer 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Typing 

















PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

difficulty keeping one's hand properly 
positioned on the keyboard 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 
Associated Craftsmen/Easter Seals 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

not applicable 



FOR SALE 



not applicable 





WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not 


applicable 











HOW IT WORKS 

The Office Skills Program has evolved a 
rather simple method of teaching typing 
to people with the use of only one hand. 
They use standard electric typewriters 
and standard typewriting textbooks. 
Masking tape is applied to the A and F 
keys for right-handed people and to the 
J and semicolon keys for left-handed 
people. The difference in texture 
becomes a guide to proper finger place- 
ment. The hand hovers about one-half 
inch over the keys. 

Although a company has invented a one- 
handed typewriter, the Office Skills 
Program feels it is impractical to assume 
that people will bring their portable 
typewriter to employment interviews and 
later to the job. Further, it is felt 
that the use of a "special" typewriter 
classifies them as "different" or 
"inferior" and emphasizes the negative 
aspects of a person's disability. 
Indeed, people have reported that when 
they used a standard typewriter and on 
the job achieved office typing speed 
levels with one hand, they were made to 
feel "special" and "superior" and this 
produces a sense of accomplishment in the 
disabled worker. 

(Information provided by Susanne 
Wynkoop.) 



661 



I r 



WORK TABLES 

Desk, Twin-Turntable 664 

LaBerne Work Tables 666 

Table, Adjustable Height 668 

Tables 670 

Universal Desk 672 

Work Table 674 



663 



DESK, TWIN-TURNTABLE 







. *=^4.. , 






i 








...fc.., ' 




^v 
















*'^»siit: 




,^ 


'>V 





Photograph courtesy of 
Arthur Heyer 



664 



DESK, TWIN-TURNTABLE 



DEVELOPER 

Arthur Heyer 
Extensions for Indepen- 
dence 

P.O. Box 3754 
Downey, CA 90242 
(213) 862-2704 



CONTACT PERSON 

Same as Developer 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Education Settings 
Office Settings 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

difficulty reaching for and moving books, 
typewriters, or other office machines 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

three years of personal use; also used 
by over forty other quadriplegics in 



Dy over to 
. the U.S.A. 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

yes 



FOR SALE 

Extensions for Independence 
P.O. Box 3754 
Downey, CA 90242 

Twin-Turntable desk, medium $715.00 
Twin -Turn table desk, executive $795.00 
Single turntable desk $595.00 



HOW IT WORKS 

This desk has two revolving surfaces 
which can be easily rotated with a hand 
or a mouthstick. One rotating surface 
may be used for reference materials and 
files, while the other may contain type- 
writer, tape recorder, etc. The desk is 
of tubular frame construction and has 
detachable legs. The revolving surfaces 
are supported by a precision balanced 
system of ball bearings. A central 
opening, two inches in diameter, is in 
each turntable to allow electrical cords 
to run through. The top is finished in 
woo dg rain formica. 

(Information based on Extensions for 
Independence literature.) 



665 



LABERNE WORK TABLES 






#t* 



Adjustable Work Table 



■^ i 



'y„„^M'MMmM0M& 




Cut-Out Work Table 



i 



Photographs courtesy of 
LaBeme Manufacturing Co. , 
Inc. 



Cut-Out Work Table 



666 



LABERNE WORK TABLES 





DEVELOPER ^ 


W. E. Berne 
P.O. Box 9245 
Columbia. SC 29290 
(803) 776-1115 




J 



CONTACT PERSON 
Same as Developer 



WHERE IT IS USED 
General Use 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
unable to use standard height table 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

in use in physical therapy departments 
all over U.S.A. and abroad 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 


yes 





FOR SALE 

LaBerne Manufacturing Co., Inc. 
P.O. Box 9245 
Columbia, SC 29290 

Adjustable Work Table $520.00 
Cut-Out Work Table (Adult) $195.00 
F.O.B. Columbia, SC 



HOW IT WORKS 

The adjustable work table is made of 
telescopic tubular steel mounted on 3" 
rubber tire casters with locks. It 
adjusts in height from 28" to 38" with 
the use of a hand crank. The top is 
hinged from the front and adjustable to 
a 45° tilt. It measures 32"x36" and has 
a front cut-out. The cut-out work table 
also has tubular steel legs. The top is 
24"x36". The table adjusts in height 
from 22" to 35". 

(Information based on LaBerne catalog, 
September, 1978.) 



667 



TABLE, ADJUSTABLE HEIGHT 





4w0\ 






'A>-^ f 



""iJim 




^ 



Photograph courtesy of 
Brodhead Garrett Co. 



668 



TABLE, ADJUSTABLE HEIGHT 



DEVELOPER 

Brodhead Garrett Co. 
4560 East 71st Street 
Cleveland, OH 44105 
(216) 341-0248 



CONTACT PERSON 

Same as Developer 



WHERE IT IS USED 




General Use 





PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

difficulty experienced by wheelchair 
users in attempting to use common desks 
and tables 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

yes 



FOR SALE 

Brodhead Garrett Co. 
4560 East 71st Street 
Cleveland, OH 44105 

Model No. HL-3060 $645.00 
Shipping Weight 232 lbs. 



HOW IT WORKS 

Adjustable height table is a suitable 
work area in the classroom for the 
student in a wheelchair. The table is 
adjustable by a pull out fold down 
handle. It adjusts from 28" to 38" high 
Top surface is 1%" thick covered with 
laminated plastic, size 30" x 60". 

(Information based on Brodhead Garrett 
Co. literature.) 



669 



TABLES 



/ 


/, ' y/^'M'X^^ 


'Mmwf - 


'V 




ifT- 




\ 


V 




i 




% 



Adjustable Height Tilt Top Work Table 






^^^A*;' 



.■-^t: 



t 



Mobile Adjustable Height 
Wheelchair Table 



Photographs courtesy of Bailey 
Manufacturing Co. 




Individual Cut Out Table 



670 



TABLES 



DEVELOPER 
Bailey Manufacturing Co. 
118 Lee Street 
Lodi, OH 44254 
(216) 948-1080 



CONTACT PERSON 

Adelle 

Bailey Manufacturing Co. 

118 Lee Street 

Lodi, OH 44254 

(216) 948-1080 



WHERE IT 


IS 


USED 


General 


Use 







PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
unable to use standard height table 



FIELD TESTED 
information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 



information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

infonnation not available 



FOR SALE 

Bailey Manufacturing Co. 
118 Lee St. 
Lodi. OH 44254 

School Desk - $199.00 
Tilt Top - $275.00 



!SSU?d51flSl''i' 



, $360.00 
- $130.00 



HOW IT WORKS 

Several table models are available. The 
Adjustable Height School Desk adjusts 
from 24" to 34". It has a 9" x 14" cut 
out, a bookholder is on the right under- 
side of the table top. It has plastic 
adjustable glides for uneven floors. The 
Adjustable Height Tilt Top Work Table 



adjusts from 25" to 29". The top tilts 
up to 45°. The Mobile Adjustable Height 
Wheelchair Table adjusts from 26" to 37". 
The top tilts up to 45°. It moves on 
swivel lock casters. The Individual Cut 
Out Table adjusts from 21" to 33". It 
has a 7" x 10" cut out, (other sizes 
available on request). It can be used 
in a sitting or standing position with 
the standing stabilizers. The door 
swings out or down and locks in place. 

(Information based on Bailey Catalog No. 
0583 April 1, 1979.) 



671 



UNIVERSAL DESK 



p ^^i^'-"* 




Photograph courtesy of 
Maddak, Inc. 



672 



UNIVERSAL DESK 



DEVELOPER 

Manufactured by: 
Maddak, Inc. 
Pequannock, NJ 07440 
(201; 694-0500 



CONTACT PERSON 

Fred M. Joslyn 
Maddak, Inc. 
Pequannock, NJ 07440 
(201) 694-0500 



WHERE IT 


IS 


USED 


General Use 







PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
confinement to a wheelchair 



FIELD TESTED 
information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
not applicable 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 



FOR SALE 

Maddak, Inc. 
Pequannock, NJ 07440 

$420.00 



HOW IT WORKS 

The Universal Desk is totally adjustable 
for all body sizes and types of work 
through stepless height adjustment. It 
accommodates all kinds of seats and many 
accessories are available. The worktop 
adjusts from 23.6" high to 43.3" maxi- 
mum. Angle adjustment is from horizon- 
tal to 85" (almost vertical). It can be 
used from a sitting or standing posi- 
tion. All corners are rounded and have 
plastic edge strips. The desk is sup- 
plied with a front adjustable stopper 
bar to hold papers while tilted. 

(Information based on Maddak Catalog 
No. 479, 1979.) 



673 



WORK TABLE 




Electric 



/.■^.i^/y/'H 




Hydraulic 



Photographs courtesy of Hausmann 
Industries 



674 



WORK TABLE 



DEVELOPER 

Hausmann Industries 
130 Union Street 
Northvale, NJ 07647 
(201) 767-0255 



CONTACT PERSON 

Rose Rowan 
Advertising Manager 
Hausmann Industries 
130 Union Street 
Northvale, NJ 07647 
(201) 767-0255 



WHERE IT IS USED 

General Use 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

unable to use standard height table 



FIELD TESTED 

information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



V\/ARRANTY 


PROV 


DED 


yes 













FOR SALE 



Hausmann Industries 
130 Union Street 
Northvale, NJ 07647 



HOW IT WORKS 

A heavy-duty work table with an H-type 
center column, it allows for the close 
approach of wheelchairs and can accom- 
modate up to 6 people standing or 
sitting. The electric model is oper- 
ated with a Hi -Low actuator controlled 
with a one button switch. The hydrau- 
lic model is controlled with a foot 
operated hydraulic lift release. The 
table height can be adjusted from 29" 
to 44". The Economy Hydraulic Work 
Table is not of heavy-duty construction. 
The table top height can be adjusted 
from 28" to 36" using a foot pedal 
control to operate the hydraulic base. 

(Information based on Hausmann catalog.) 



675 



WRITING 

APH Signature Guide 678 

Easy Grasp Pencil 580 

Keitzer Check Writing Guide 682 

Raised-Line Checkbook 684 

Signature Guide 686 



677 



APH SIGNATURE GUIDE 




Photograph courtesy of 
American Printing House 
for the Blind 



678 



APH SIGNATURE GUIDE 



DEVELOPER 

American Printing House 

for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, KY 40206 



CONTACT PERSON 

Ralph E. McCracken 
American Printing House 

for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, KY 40206 
(502) 895-2405 



WHERE IT IS USED 
General Use 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
visual impairment; writing difficulty 



FIELD TESTED 
information not available 



REGULATORY 



U.S. Department of Health 
and Welfare 



APPROVAL 

Education 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 



FOR SALE 

American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, KY 40206 

$2.25 



HOW IT WORKS 

The signature guide is designed for use 
by blind people able to sign their names 
in script, but in need of a device to 
help them write on a straight line. It 
is made of annodized, natural -colored 
aluminum, with a rubber backing to help 
hold it in place when writing. A piece 
of rubber elastic stretched across the 
open frame gives a guideline for writing, 
at the same time permitting dropping 
below the line of writing for the lower 
ends of such letters as "j", "f", "g", 
etc. To use the frame, it should be 
placed in position with the rubber 
elastic running along the line of writ- 
ing. Writing should be done by a pencil 
or ball -point pen. 

(Information based on American Printing 
House for the Blind literature.) 



679 



EASY GRASP PENCIL 




EASY GRASP PENCIL 



DEVELOPER 

Don Maurer 

Northern Wisconsin Center 

for the Developmental ly 

Disabled 
Box 340 

Chippewa Falls, WI 54729 
(715) 723-5542 



CONTACT PERSON 

Same as Developer 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Benchwork 
Bookkeeping 
General Use 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

inability to grasp articles 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

information not available 









FOR 


SALE 




May 


be made 


at 


a minimal 


cost. 















HOW IT WORKS 

The pencil holder increases the area to 
be grasped and its shape allows a diff- 
erent graspdng action. The large part 
of the holder fits into the palm of the 
hand. A shorter pencil is more manage- 
able than a longer one. 

(Information based on personal interview.) 



681 



KEITZER CHECK WRITING GUIDE 




^ 



ISZ ID 



:3[ 



vx"^ / 



z 



KEITZER CHECK WPXTiN a GuroE 



PAT6MT WO. '^OoatH^ 



LftKE UXMES.FLoPXDPi 3355-3 



Illustration courtesy of 
Mrs, Betty Jo Keltzer, 
redrawn by Terrl Bleck, WVSC 



682 



KEITZER CHECK WRITING GUIDE 





DEVELOPER 


John and Betty Jo 


Keitzer 


1129 Peninsula Drive 


Lake Wales, FL 33853 


(813) 676-1805 



CONTACT PERSON ] 


Mrs. Betty Jo \ 
1129 Peninsula 
Lake Wales, FL 
(813) 676-1805 


(eitzer 
Drive 
33853 







WHERE IT IS USED 
Writing checks 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

writing difficulty; visual impairment 



FIELD TESTED 
yes 



FOR SALE 

Mrs. Betty Jo Keitzer 
1129 Peninsula Drive 
Lake Wales, FL 33853 

$7.00 



REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


no 










HOW IT WORKS 

A plastic template guide has cutouts 
corresponding to the spaces on a 
standard end stub check for date, payee, 
amount, written amount and signature. 
A base plate holds the guide steady 
while in use. Guides are available in 
right and left handed models. 

(Information based on Keitzer litera- 
ture.) 



683 



RAISED-LINE CHECKBOOK 




•Collars 



Photograph courtesy of 
American Printing House 
for the Blind 



684 



RAISED-LINE CHECKBOOK 



DEVELOPER 

Manufactured by: 
American Printing House 

for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, KY 40206 



CONTACT PERSON 

Ralph E. McCracken 
American Printing House 

for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, KY 40206 
(502) 895-2405 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


General 


Use 



















' 


PROBLEM(S) 


IT 


OVERCOMES 


vi 


sual impairment 







FIELD TESTED 
information not available 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 

U.S. Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 
information not available 



FOR SALE 

American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville, KY 40206 

$6.00 per book 



HOW IT WORKS 

The raised- line checkbook is printed with 
raised print lines on regulation check- 
book paper which are interleaved with 
plain braille paper for stub record- 
keeping. The cover is made of regular 
bankbook stock and the entire booklet 
bound in perfect binding. The checks 
are perforated for easy detachment. 
There are 50 each of the checks and stubs 
per book. 

(Information based on American Printing 
House for the Blind literature.) 



685 



SIGNATURE GUIDE 






Photograph courtesy of Sped 
Publications 



686 



SIGNATURE GUIDE 



DEVELOPER 



CONTACT PERSON 

Billie Taylor 
Sped Publications 
2010 Eagle View 
Colorado Springs, CO 

80909 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Signing checks or other 
documents 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
visual impairment 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

Colorado School for the Deaf and the 
Blind 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

information not available 



FOR SALE 



Sped Publications 
2010 Eagle View 
Colorado Springs, CO 

$1.00 



80909 



HOW IT WORKS 

The guide is a plastic template with a 
rectangular cut out which is placed over 
the area to be signed. 

(Information based on Sped Publications 
brochure.) 



687 



Bibl iography 



The following is a listing of titles used in the catalog text. Other 
titles of interest to the reader will be found in Appendix E, Publica- 
tions. 

Biddy, R.L., Smith, D.R., & Swarts, A.E. Examples of jig and fixture 
design as applied to the severely disabled functioning in a 
sheltered workshop . Houston, Texas: Texas Rehabilitation Engi- 
neering Center, 1976. 

Bonner, W., Eckles, C, & Stern, A. A handbook of workshop production 
aids: Jigs, fixt u res, tooling . Sacramento, California: Department 
of Rehabilitation, Facilities Development Section, 1974. 

Clark, C, & Chadwick, D. Clinically adapted instruments for the 
multiply handicapped: A sourcebook . Westford, Massachusetts: 
Modulations Co., 1979. 



689 



APPENDIX A 
Modifications to the Work Environment 



In a publication such as this which concentrates on describing 
individual products, it is sometimes difficult to visualize how a 
product could be integrated into a work setting. To address this problem. 
Appendix A contains examples of nine different worksites which could be 
modified to aid not only employers who have sensory or lower body 
limitations but also able bodied employees. More specific modifications 
may still be required in order to make Worksite One and Worksite Two 
suitable for a particular disabled individual. 

Worksite One and Worksite Two were developed by James Mueller of 
the Job Development Laboratory, George Washington University Rehabilitation 
Research and Training Center, 2300 Eye St, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20037, 
and are part of the publication entitled Designing for Functional 
Limitations . This publication was supported in part by HEW/RSA Grant 
No. 16-P-56803/3-15, and was completed in September, 1979. Reprinted 
with permission of the author. (Also see: Publications.) 



691 




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DENTAL TECHNICIAN WORKSITE 




Photograph courtesy of the 
Innovative Services Office, 
Portland, Oregon 



694 



DENTAL TECHNICIAN WORKSITE 



DEVELOPER 

Dept. of Human Resources 
Vocational Rehab. Div. 
Innovative Services Office 
2125 S.W. Fourth, Telco 
Bldg. 
Portland, OR 97201 



CONTACT PERSON 

James Mueller 
Job Development Lab. 
The George Washington 
University 
2300 Eye St., N.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20037 
(202) 676-3847 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Health 









PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

mobility impairment due to spinal cord 
injury 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
information not available 









FIELD TESTED 
yes 


used 


in 


one 


lab 







WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not 


appl 


i cable 









FOR 


SALE 


not 


applicable 















HOW IT WORKS 

Previously the work surface was above 
a cabinet which extended from the floor 
to the top of the work surface. The 
main modification was to remove the 
cabinet except for the drawer. This 
allows the technician's wheelchair to 
fit under the work surface, permitting 
the worker to reach his or her work 
easily. 

(Information provided by James Mueller.) 



695 



FISH PROCESSING: PREPARATION LINE 



■N ( 




Photograph courtesy of the 
Innovative Services Office, 
Portland, Oregon 



696 



FISH PROCESSING: PREPARATION LINE 



DEVELOPER 

Dept. of Human Resources 
Vocational Rehab. Div. 
Innovative Services Office 
2125 S.W. Fourth, Telco 
Bldg. 
Portland, OR 97201 



CONTACT PERSON 

James Mueller 
Job Development Laboratory 
The George Washington Univ. 
2300 Eye St,, N.W. 
Washington, D,C, 20037 
(202) 676-3847 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Fish Processing 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 
reach impairment and weak grasp 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

not applicable 









FIELD TESTED 

yes 




used 


in 


one 


fish processing 


plant 















FOR SALE 


not applicable 









HOW IT WORKS 

Previously, the work surface consisted 
of small individual chopping blocks. 
These were replaced by large chopping 
blocks which allow the fish to slide 
easily. A mechanical reacher (see 
catalog entries) was also used by the 
disabled employee, 

(Information provided by James Mueller. 



697 



INSURANCE CLAIMS ADJUSTER HOME WORKSITE 




Photograph courtesy of the 
Job Development Laboratory 



698 



INSURANCE CLAIMS ADJUSTER HOME WORKSITE 



DEVELOPER 

Job Development Laboratory 
The George Washington Univ, 
2300 Eye St., N.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20037 
(202) 676-3847 



CONTACT PERSON 

James Mueller 
Job Development Laboratory 
The George Washington Univ. 
2300 Eye St., N.W, 
Washington, D.C. 20037 
(202) 676-3847 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Business Office 
Professional 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

mobility and strength impairments due to 
spinal cord injury 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 
used for one claims adjuster 



REGULATORY APPROVAL 
information not available 



WARRANTY PROVIDED 

not applicable 





FOR SALE 


not applicable 









HOW IT WORKS 
Major changes here include: 
1) a lever added to the dictabelt machine 



4) 



in order to make the buttons easier 

to use; 

a Luxo arm addition to the phone; 

two separate work heights, one to 

clear the wheelchair, and the other 

to hold the equipment; 

a desktop filing system. 



(Information provided by James Mueller.) 



699 



PERSONNEL STATISTICIAN 




PERSONNEL STATISTICIAN 



DEVELOPER 

Pratt and Whitney Air- 
craft Group 

Manufacturing Division 
East Hartford, CT 06108 



CONTACT PERSON 

A.R. Colby 

Manager of EEO Programs 
Pratt and Whitney Air- 
craft Group 

Manufacturing Division 
East Hartford, CT 06108 



WHERE 


IT 


IS 


USED 


Personnel 









PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

dexterity and mobility problems caused 
by arthrogryposis 







Fl 


ELD 


TESTED 


not 


appl 


i cable 

















REGULATORY APPROVAL 

not applicable 





WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not 


applicable 











FOR SALE 

no 



HOW IT WORKS 

On the job, this employee has little 
more trouble functioning than employees 
without disabilities. A few devices, 
such as those shown on the facing page, 
are simple, but mean the difference 
between the ability to work and unem- 
ployment. Because the "hold" button on 
his telephone is spring loaded and thus 
more difficult to push down than the 
other buttons, the company has provided 
the simple leverage device attached, 
allowing him to handle several calls as 
they come in. He has devised a simple 
scissors like tool (not shown) he uses 
for everything from picking up things 
he's dropped to straightening piles of 
paperwork on counters just out of his 
reach. When he first came to work at 
P&WA, he found it difficult to reach 
items placed on the counter by job 
applicants. The company installed a 
chute to ease the difficulty. Now, he 
has gotten to the point where he 
doesn't need the chute, although it is 
a convenience. 

(Information based on literature pro- 
vided by A.R. Colby.) 



701 



PHOTOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT 



Photograph not available 



702 



PHOTOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT 



DEVELOPER 

Prof. Cava! li ere Ketchum 
Art Department 
University of Wisconsin- 
Madison 

6271 Humanities Building 
Madison, WI 53706 
(608) 262-6598 



CONTACT PERSON 

Same as Developer 



WHERE IT IS USED 

Photography 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

limited reach; limited hand and arm 
movement 









FIELD TESTED 
yes 


used 


by 


one 


student 





REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not 


applicable 













WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not 


applicable 













FOR SALE 




May 


be made at a minimal 


cost. 









HOW IT WORKS 

Professor Ketchum has modified various 
pieces of photographic eqiupment. To 
adapt an enlarger for a student who has 
limited arm and hand movement and reach 
range, he replaced the focus and adjust 
ing knobs with a toggle nut with a 
tapered end. A handle was made by 
cutting down a golf club and attaching 
the top of a ratchet wrench to it. He 
also found that a towel hook with a sue 
tion cup could be used as a tripod. A 
small hole was drilled at the top of 
the towel hook for a screw. The towel 
hook easily goes onto any surface and a 
camera can be mounted atop the project- 
ing screw. 

By working with his students who need 
adaptations. Professor Ketchum has 
devised several simple and inexpensive 
changes for them. He is willing to 
explain the modifications he has made 
and to help others make adaptations for 
their own needs. 

(Information based on personal inter- 
view.) 



703 



TELEPHONE SURVEY CLERK WORKSITE 




Photograph courtesy of The 
Job Development Laboratory 



704 



TELEPHONE SURVEY CLERK WORKSITE 



DEVELOPER 

Job Development Laboratory 
The George Washington Univ. 
2300 Eye St., N.W. 
Washington, D.C, 20037 
(202) 676-3847 



CONTACT PERSON 

James Mueller 

Job Development Laboratory 
The George Washington Univ. 
2300 Eye St., N.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20037 
(202) 676-3847 



WHERE IT IS USED 
Office Settings 



PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

weakness resulting from muscular 
dystrophy 









Fl 


ELD TESTED 

yes 


used 


in 


one 


offi 


ce 







REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not 


appl 


icable 













" 




WARRANTY 


PROV 


DED 


not 


appV 


icable 









FOR SALE 


not applicable 









HOW IT WORKS 

The main modifications in this work 
site include: 



3) 



a height-adjustable work surface; 

a phone suspended under the work 

table so that the buttons can be 

reached more easily; 

a Luxo arm for the telephone 

receiver. 



(Information provided by James Mueller.) 



705 



WORK AREA 




WORK AREA 



DEVELOPER 

Group Effort by Some 
Wisconsin Indianhead 
Technical Institute 
New Richmond Staff 

1019 South Knowles Ave. 

New Richmond, WI 54017 

(715) 246-6561 



CONTACT PERSON 

Jeanette M. Richardson, 

Supervisor 
Office & Marketing 

Education Department 
Address and Phone Number 

Same as Developer 



WHERE 


IT IS 


USED 


Work Site 













PROBLEM(S) IT OVERCOMES 

extra space for wheelchair 



FIELD TESTED 

yes 

in use at WITI - New Richmond 





REGULATORY 


APPROVAL 


not 


applicable 













WARRANTY 


PROVIDED 


not 


applicable 











FOR 


SALE 


not 


appl 


i cable 







HOW IT WORKS 

This is an example of how a few 
extra inches in a work site area make 
available space for a wheelchair, yet, 
does not effect the usefulness or 
esthetic value of the room. 

(Information based on personal 
interview.) 



707 



Appendix B 
Additional Available Resources 



In this appendix is a suggested listing of resources where the 
reader can obtain information on other available products. 
Please be aware that this is not an exhaustive list. 



Art 

Art Studios 
927 E. Oakton Street 
Elk Grove, IL 60007 
(312) 593-6060 

A Handicapped Potter's Wheel is available which was developed 
by Pottery Equipment, Inc., Silt, CO 81652, (303) 876-2935. 



AUTOMOTIVE HAND CONTROLS 

Blatnik Precision Controls 
1523 Cota Avenue 
Long Beach, CA 90813 
(213) 436-3275 

Braun Corporation 

1014 S. Monticello 

Winamac, IN 46996 

(219) 946-6157 

other offices: 13710 49th Street North 

Clearwater, FL 33520 

(813) 576-2737 

3651 Sausalito Street 
Los Alamitos, CA 90720 
(714) 891-4305 

Creative Controls, Inc. 
1354B Combermere 
Troy, MI 48084 
(313) 585-0985 

Company has wheelchair restraints and servo (remote operation] 
hand controls. 

Die-A-Matic, Inc. 
4004 Fifth Road North 
Arlington, VA 22202 
(703) 522-3838 



709 



Company handles the System Franz controls for the Volkswagen 
Rabbit and handles and installs Gresham Driving Aids. 

Drive-Master Corporation 
16 Andrews Drive 
West Paterson, NY 07424 
(201) 785-2204 

Ferguson Auto Service 
1112 N. Sheppard Street 
Richmond, VA 23230 
(804) 358-0800 

Handicaps Inc. 
4335 S. Santa Fe Drive 
Englewood, CO 80110 
(303) 781-2062 

Manufacturing and Production Services 
4664 Mercury Street 
San Diego, CA 92111 
(714) 292-1423 

Mobility Products and Design, Inc. 
709 Kentucky Street 
Vallejo, CA 94590 
(707) 642-8967 

Mobility Systems 
715 S. 5th Avenue 
Maywood, IL 60153 
(312) 344-2705 

Nelson Medical Products 
5690 Sarah Avenue 
Sarasota, FL 33583 
(813) 924-2058 

Smith's Hand Control 
1420 Brookhaven Drive 
Southhaven, MS 38671 
(601) 393-0540 

Trujillo Industries 
5040 Firestone Boulevard 
South Gate, CA 90280 
(213) 564-7943 

Only manufactures steering assists. 



710 



CLOTHING 

Amputee Shoe and Glove Exchange 
Dr. and Mrs. R.E. Wainerdi 
1635 Warwickshire Drive 
Houston, TX 77077 

A free information exchange to pair people who need the opposite 
shoe or glove and are of the same age, size and have similar taste. 

Promote Real Independence for the 

Disabled and Elderly 
Fashions by PRIDE 

Sew With PRIDE 
1159 Poquonnock Road 
Groton, CT 06340 
(203) 447-7433 

Clothing patterns are available which have been designed and tested 
for children and adults. Available on loan from P.R.I.D.E. is a 
Travel Trunk show. This is a trunk containing 150 garments which 
have been custom designed or altered in some way to meet a special 
need. Sew With PRIDE is a manual of sewing skills for changing 
store bought clothing. Step-by-step instructions in large type 
are accompanied by sketches. (Also see: Classroom Material.) 

Vocational Guidance and Rehabilitation Services 

Wings of VGRS 

2239 E. 55th Street 

Cleveland, OH 44103 

(216) 431-7800 

In the catalog. Wings of VGRS are sketches, descriptions and 
ordering information on adapted clothing for women and men. 
Items can be custom ordered. 



COMMUNICATION AIDS 

FM Atlas 
4515 Avenue E 
Kearney, NE 68847 
(308) 237-7953 

This electronics mail order company supplies equipment for an 
FM subcarrier signal. Circuits are available to tune into 
SCA (Subsidiary Communications Authorization, in Canada SCMO), 
a signal used for such programs as talking books and medical 
news. 



711 



COOKING 

Amana Refrigeration, Inc. 
Amana, lA 52204 
(319) 622-5511 

A Braille Kit has been designed for Radarange Ovens, (models RR-8B 
and RR-7B). The kit includes Braille-marked polyester overlays 
that fit over the timer and power level dials. It also includes 
audio cassette tapes which are voice indexed to the information, 
A "Use and Care Manual", general cooking guidelines, instructions 
for preparing frozen and convenience foods and recipes are 
recorded on the tapes. 

P.R.I.D.E. Foundation 
1159 Poquonnock Road 
Groton, CT 06340 
(203) 447-7433 

Special tools and devices have been developed and tested to assist 
people with food preparation and general home management. (Also see: 
Classroom Materials.) 

Rival Manufacturing, Co. 
36th and Bennington 
Kansas City, MO 64129 
(816) 861-1000 
Telex 42-4126 

The "Crock-Pot" slow cooker features easy to turn phenolic knobs of 
a no heat quality. Available is a 11 1/2" x 11" Braille edition of 
the "Crock-Pot" cookbook. It is made available through a volunteer 
project of: Braille Committee, Beth Shalom Sisterhood, 8831 Emsley 
Lane, Leawood, KS 66206, (816) 531-4535 

Schwab Rehabilitation Hospital 
1401 S. California 
Chicago, IL 60608 
(312) 552-2010 

The following suggestion was found in "Rehab Bits", a set of cards 
with independent living tips, no longer available. Place a large 
mirror at a 45 degree angle above the stove. A person in a wheelchair 
can then check the progress of cooking food by looking up into the 
mirror. 



ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS 

Fidelity Electronics, Ltd. 
8800 N.W. 36th Street 
Miami, FL 33178 
(305) 888-1000 



712 



Maddak, Inc. 
Pequannock, NJ 07440 
(201) 694-0500 

Medical Equipment Distributors, Inc. 
1701 S. First Avenue 
Maywood, IL 60153 
(312) 681-2828 

Two environmental control systems are available from MED, the MED 
Quad System and the Micro-Dec. 



INDEPENDENT LIVING AIDS 

FashionAble 

Rocky Hill, NJ 08553 

(609) 921-2563 

Many self help items are available through their mail order catalog. 
FashionAble does not manufacture products. 

Grayline Housewares 
1616 Berkley Street 
Elgin, IL 60120 
(312) 695-3900 

Company has space saving items useful at home and at work. Items 
include carrying caddies, stackable baskets and dish racks. Most 
of the products have a vinyl finish. 

Help Yourself Aids 

Box 15 

Brookfield, IL 60513 

J. A. Preston Corporation 
71 5th Avenue 
New York, NY 10003 
(212) 255-8484 

Their catalogs of equipment for health care and rehabilitation and 
the special education catalog contain items under such categories 
as perceptual motor, self help aids, communications, wheelchairs 
and 1 ifters. 

Lamson and Goodnow Manufacturing Company 
Shelburne Falls, MA 01370 
(413) 625-6331 

Company manufactures a pronged knife which can serve as both knife 
and fork. 



713 



Oxford Regional Health Authority 

"Equipment for the Disabled" 

Department H.A.I. 

Foredown Drive 

Ports! ade 

Brighton BN4 2BB England 

In the series are included the following topics: communication, 
clothing and dressing for adults, home management, personal 
care, leisure and gardening, housing and furniture, hoists and 
walking aids, wheelchair and outdoor transport, writing and 
reading aids for the paralyzed. 

P.R.I.D.E. Foundation 
1159 Poquonnock Road 
Groton, CT 06340 
(203) 447-7433 

A variety of items are available to assist the user with food 
preparation, cleaning and grooming. (Also see: Classroom 
Material .) 

Worcester Manufacturing Company 
111 W. Timonium Road 
Timonium, MD 21093 
(301) 252-0055 

Company has wire made products useful at home and at work. 
Items include study stands, letter trays and hangers. 



MECHANICAL "REACH ASSISTERS" 

Fred Sammons, Inc. 
Box 32 

Brookfield, IL 60513 
(312) 971-0610 



OPTICAL 

American Thermo-Ware Company 
16 Warren Street 
New York, NY 10007 
(212) 267-1126 

Several types of magnifying glasses are available through ATCO. 

Bausch & Lomb 
Magnifiers Catalog 
P.O. Box 478, Dept. 3219 
Rochester, NY 14602 
(800) 828-1430 
NY (800) 462-4893 

714 



Catalog gives an explanation of each type of magnifier as well 
as a glossary of terms. 

Designs for Vision, Inc. 

Optical Aids for the Partially Sighted 

120 E. 23rd Street 

New York, NY 10010 

(800) 221-3476 

(212) 674-0600 

Telex 238413 DVI UR 

The catalog gives a general explanation of each type of optic 
and explanation of fitting and lists the powers available. 

Franel Optical Supply Co. 

Gadgets and Things for the Optical Trade 

P.O. Box 96 

Maitland, FL 32751 

(800) 327-2070 

Orlando (305) 831-4000 Florida (800) 432-3770 

This catalog, though geared for the "optical trade", contains 
a section on vision aids including magnifiers and prisms. 

Keeler Optical Products Inc. 

456 Parkway 

Lawrence Park Industrial District 

Broomall, PA 19008 

(800) 523-5620 

(215) 353-4350 

North Central Sales Office 
909 Chippewa Circle 
Carpentersville, IL 60110 
(800) 523-5620 
(312) 428-0440 

Company has Low Vision Aids. 

ORGANIZERS 

Grayline Housewares 
1616 Berkley Street 
Elgin, IL 60120 
(312) 695-3900 

Company has vinyl finished products such as stackable baskets 
and caddies useful at home and at work. 



715 



Worcester Manufacturing Company 
111 W. Tlmonium Road 
Timom'um, MD 21093 
(301) 252-0055 



Company has wire made products such as desk trays, book rests 
and copyholders useful at home and at work. 

READING 

Dialogue with the Blind 
3100 S. Oak Park Avenue 
Berwyn, IL 60402 
(312) 749-1908 

Dialogue developed mailing containers for cassettes and open reel 
tapes which they sell. They also sell rubber stamps, mailing 
labels and cassette storage boxes obtained from other sources. 
Dialogue Magazine is published by this organization. (See: 
Publications.) 

General Hardware Manufacturing Co., Inc. 
New York, NY 10013 

An inexpensive, ($1.49, Stock no. 385), page turner for persons 
who do not have manipulative use of their fingers, but can grasp 
or attach a pencil-like device to any holder and have limited arm 
movement. Attach paper clips to side edges of pages in a sequential 
staggered pattern, for use with a magnetic pickup tool, shaped like 
a pencil. Idea from Wisconsin's PVR Newsletter , April, 1980. 

Pelco Sales, Inc. 
351 E. Alondra Boulevard 
Gardena, CA 90248 
(213) 321-5591 

The Pelco Electronic Visual Aid is a protable television system 
which enlarges images 7 to 43 times their original size. 

Touch Turner 
443 View Ridge Drive 
Everett, WA 98203 
(206) 252-1541 

Page turning devices which operate on batteries are available for 
hardback and paperback books. 



716 



SCIENCE 

Conco Industries, Inc. 
30 Water Street 
West Haven, CT 06516 
(203) 934-5271 

Company has designed a portable science station for physically 
handicapped people. 



SENSORY AIDS 

American Foundation for the Blind 
Sensory Aids for Employment of Blind and 

Visually Impaired Persons: A Resource Guide 
15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 
(212) 620-2000 

This guide, compiled by Sensory Aids Foundation and published 
by AFB, is available in print and braille. It contains photo- 
graphs, descriptions and vendor addresses of products modified 
for people who are visually impaired. (Also see: Classroom 
Material; Organizations.) 

Deutsche Blindenstudienanstalt 

Aids for the Blind 

D-3550 Marburg 1 

Am Schlag 8 

P.O. B. 1160 

Germany 

64 051 

This catalog, available in German and English, describes various 
products designed for people who are blind. Products include 
printing presses, typewriters, drawing instruments and recording 
equipment. 



TACTILE AND BRAILLE SIGNS 

Diversified Enterprises 
5584 Willow Highway 
Grand Ledge, MI 48837 
(517) 627-3137 

Company has plates with individual raised and or braille letters 
and numerals, and plaques, directories and signs. 

Scott Plastics Company 
P.O. Box 2958 
Sarasota, FL 33578 
(813) 355-5171 

717 



Company has developed fonts with individual braille characters 
on each font called Brailletters . They also carry individual 
raised letters for use indoors and outdoors. 

TELEPHONE AIDS 

AAL Communications, Inc. 
Box 365 

Urbana, IL 61801 
(217) 367-7373 

Company manufactures and distributes a stationary teleprinter. 

Acoustic Couplers are available from: 

Applied Communicatons Corporation 
P.O. Box 55 
Belmont, CA 94002 
(415) 592-1622 

Phone-TTY, Inc. 
14-25 Plaza Road 
Fair Lawn, NJ 07410 
(201) 796-5414 

SACCO-Silent Aids Communication Corporation 
P.O. Box 1727 
Washington, DC 20013 

Fred Sammons, Inc. 
Box 32 

Brookfield, IL 60513 
(312) 971-0610 

Infolink Corporation 
1925 Holste 
Northbrook. IL 60062 
(312) 291-2900 

Available from this company is an electrowriter. 

Interpretive Systems Corporation 

6950 Oslo Circle 

Suite F 

Buena Park, CA 90621 

Company manufactures and distributes a device that provides 
printed copy on standard paper. 



718 



Krown Research 

1917 Greenfield Avenue 

Los Angeles, CA 90025 

Company manufactures and distributes a Porta-Printer. 

Local Bell Telephone 

Many standard services already meet special needs. There are 
also services developed to help people who have a hearing, 
sight, speech or motion impairment. Description of services 
contained in booklet Services for Special Needs . 

Magsat Corporation 
180 Roberts Street 
Hartford, CT 06106 
(203) 525-4238 

Company manufactures and distributes portable teleprinters. 

Phonics Corporation 
814 Thayer Avenue 
Silver Spring, MD 20910 
(301) 588-8222 

Company manufactures and distributes a TV Phone which is a 
semi -portable unit. 

P.R.I.D.E. Foundation 
1159 Poquonnock Road 
Groton, CT 06340 
(203) 447-7433 

Telautograph Corporation 
8700 Bellanca Avenue 
Los Angeles, CA 90045 
(213) 641-3690 

Available from this company is a telepen. 

Teletype Corporation 
90 Clinton Road 
Fairfield, NJ 07006 
(201) 575-8240 

Company manufactures and distributes a teletypewriter, 

TYPEWRITERS 

International Business Machines Corporation 
Modifications to the I.B.M. Mag Card Selectric Typewriter 

and 2741 Communication Terminal for Braille Translation 

and Embossing by N.C. Loeber (1976) 

719 



This booklet describes an experimental device that can simply and 
directly produce a document in either braille or inkprint. I.B.M. 
equipment is used to transliterate braille code to English (or 
other languages) and vice versa. This process provides the means 
for a two-way written communication between the visually impaired 
and sighted communities. 



WRITING 

Boston-Parkway Lions Club 

81 Corey Street 

West Roxbury, MA 02132 

The Banks Pocket Braille Writer, distributed world wide by Lions 
Clubs, prints braille on a narrow paper tape using a six key key- 
board. 



720 



Appendix C 
Organizations 



People who are handicapped are served by many organizations in 
various capacities. This appendix lists some of these organi- 
zations and their functions, (It is not an exhaustive list.) 
Some of the national organizations have state chapters. Chapter 
information can be obtained from the national office. State, 
regional or local offices may be listed in your city phone book. 



Accent on Information (AOI) 
P.O. Box 700 
Bloomington, IL 61701 
(309) 378-2961 

AOI is a computerized retrieval system of information on products 
and devices which assist disabled persons in such areas as grooming, 
furniture, home management, mobility, written and oral communica- 
tion. Two types of information are available: references to 
publications, including sources, and brief descriptions of equip- 
ment with addresses of manufacturers and distributors. For a fee, 
searches of the AOI system are made on specific topics. AOI also 
produces publications providing information on new products. 
(See: Publications.) 

Alexander Graham Bell Association 
for the Deaf, Inc. 
1537 35th Street, N.W. 
Washington, DC 20007 
(202) 337-5220 

American Association for the Advancement 
of Science (AAAS) 

Project on the Handicapped in Science 
1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. 
Washington, DC 20036 
(202) 467-4400 

AAAS Project on the Handicapped in Science (PHS) promotes opportu- 
nities in science for people who are handicapped. PHS is an 
advocacy and information resource service for professionals and 
students of science who are handicapped. (Also see: Classroom 
Material; Publications.) 

American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) 
15 W. 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 
(212) 620-2000 



721 



AFB 

1660 L Street, NW 
Washington, DC 20036 
(202) 467-5996 

AFB 

500 N. Michigan Avenue 
Chicago, IL 60611 
(312) 321-1880 

AFB 

100 Peachtree Street 
Atlanta, GA 30303 
(404) 525-2303 

AFB 

1860 Lincoln Street 
Denver, CO 80203 
(303) 861-9355 

AFB 

760 Market Street 

San Francisco, CA 94102 

(415) 392-4845 

AFB has consultant staff who work in the areas of children and 
youth; rehabilitation, orientation and mobility; employment; 
low vision; aging; radio information services; special popula- 
tion groups and recreation. Their headquarters are in New York 
and Washington, D.C. in addition to the four regional offices 
listed above. (Also see: Additional Available Resources; Class- 
room Material.) 

American Parkinson Disease Association 
147 E. 50th Street 
New York, NY 10022 

(212) 421-5890 

American Speech and Hearing Association 
10801 Rockville Pike 
Rockville, MD 20852 
(301) 897-5700 

Amyotrophic Laterial Sclerosis 
Society of America 
15300 Ventura Blvd., Suite 315 
Sherman Oaks, CA 91403 

(213) 990-2151 

Arthritis Foundation 
211 Park Avenue South 
New York. NY 10003 
(212) 677-5790 



722 



Association for Children with Learning 
Disabilities (ACLD) 
4156 Library Road 
Pittsburgh, PA 15234 
(412) 341-1515 

A national organization of parents and professionals. ACLD's 
vocational committee studies and promotes vocational needs of 
people who are learning disabled. 

Association for the Education of the Visually 
Handicapped 
919 Walnut Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19107 
(215) 923-7555 

Provides materials and information for people who are visually 
handicapped. 

The Association for the Severely Handicapped (TASH) 
Information Department 
1600 W. Armory Way 
Seattle, WA 98119 
(206) 283-5055 

Information and materials requests on all aspects of education 
and services for people who are severely handicapped are answered 
by TASH's Information Department. TASH maintains a library of 
resource materials. The Information Department also conducts 
surveys of integrated schools and parent needs. 

Center for Labor Research & Studies 
Job-Related Physical Capacities 

Research Project (JRPC) 
Florida International University - 

Tarn i ami Campus 
Miami, FL 33199 
(305) 552-2768 

JRPC comparison system, is an interactive computer system used 
in conjunction with already existing computerized career informa- 
tion. A person uses the system to explore interest areas and in 
addition is evaluated by a physician using a JRPC format to analyze 
the individual's physical capacities for 98 different activities, 
e.g. walking, lifting, reaching. Ratings on these capacities are 
then fed into the computer. Jobs in which the individual has 
expressed an interest, (or all jobs meeting the person's physical 
specifications), are produced on the screen or print-out. The jobs 
are described in the same terms as the physical capacities which 
the physician rated. The kind of information a person receives 
includes a listing of the physical capacities necessary for the 
performance of a job, the percentage of people working at that 
job, (from JRPC field sample), who say that his or her capacities 



723 



would be sufficient, number of hours per day one might expect 
to use that capacity and aids which are easily available to 
help overcome a specific functional handicap at the worksite. 
(Also see Publications.) 

Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) 
1920 Association Drive 
Reston, VA 22091 
(800) 336-3728 
(703) 620-3660 

CEC is a professional association interested in the educational 
needs of all exceptional children. CEC operates the Educational 
Resources Information Center, (ERIC) Clearinghouse on Handicapped 
and Gifted Children. The Clearinghouse has bibliographies and 
abstracts in such areas as program accessibility for handicapped 
students. Brochures are available describing the association's 
services and publications. 

Electronic Industries Foundation (EIF) 
Project With Industry 
2001 Eye Street, NW 
Washington, DC 20006 
(202) 457-4913 

EIF has developed a program to train people who are handicapped 
to work in the electronic industries. Rehabilitation resources 
and industries work together to identify, train and place potential 
employees. Currently area EIF offices are located in Los Angeles, 
San Francisco and Massachusetts. 

Epilepsy Foundation of America 
1828 L Street, N.W. 
Washington, DC 20036 
(202) 293-2930 

Handy-Cap Horizons, Inc. 
3250 E. Loretta Drive 
Indianapolis, IN 46227 
(317) 784-5777 

A travel club which arranges group tours around the world for 
handicapped and elderly people. 

Helen Keller National Center 
for Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults 
111 Middle Neck Road 
Sands Point, NY 11050 
(516) 944-8900 



724 



Industrial Home for the Blind operates the Center to provide 
evaluative and rehabilitative services to deaf-blind youths 
and adults in a residential setting. Reprints of articles of 
research on sensory aids conducted by the Center' are available 
to inquirers. (Also see: Publications.) 

Impart 

Impart Demonstration Center 

Bexar County Easter Seal Center 

2203 Babcock Road 

San Antonio, TX 78229 

(512) 699-8988 

Texas Rehabilitation Commission 
118 E. Riverside Drive 
Austin, TX 78704 
(512) 447-0100 

Innovative Matching of Problems to Available Rehabilitation Tech- 
nology (Impart), has engineers who help handicapped individuals 
make use of advanced technology. Engineers are located at the 
Texas Rehabilitation Commission and the Southwest Research Insti- 
tute Applied Rehabilitation Engineering Center in San Antonio. 
Impart helps people to overcome difficulties encountered at the 
worksite and at home by locating existing adapted technology or 
creating new items. This service is available to any person who 
is vocationally handicapped and to individuals and agencies working 
with handicapped people. 

International Association of Laryngectomees 
American Cancer Society 
777 Third Avenue 
New York, NY 10017 
(212) 371-2900 

International Association of 
Parents of the Deaf 
814 Thayer Avenue 
Silver Spring, MD 20910 
(301) 585-5400 

Just One Break (J.O.B.) 
373 Park Avenue South 
New York, NY 10026 
(212) 725-2500 

J.O.B. is a job placement agency for people who are physically 
disabled. Free of charge, J.O.B. applicants receive skill testing, 
vocational evaluation and a 90 day follow-up after placement. 
These services are available to potential employees and employers 
in the N.Y.C. metropolitan area. In addition, J.O.B. conducts 
research and demonstration projects, provides training seminars 
and distributes printed material. 



725 



Library of Congress 
Division for the Blind and 
Physically Handicapped (DBPH) 
Washington, DC 20542 
(202) 287-5100 

The library maintains a collection of reading matter in braille 
and recorded form which is loaned free of charge to individuals 
unable to hold, handle or read conventional printed matter. Listen- 
ing equipment, including attachments such as speed controls, are 
also loaned to eligible individuals. DBPH produces two publica- 
tions which announce new books released, have feature articles 
and give information on library programs. The publications are 
Talking Book Topics , available in print and flexible disc, and 
Braille Book Review , available in print and braille. Reference 
circulars, available from DBPH, provide information on subjects 
relevant to blindness and physical handicaps. (See: Publications.) 
The Library of Congress works with a network of cooperating local 
libraries to distribute reading material and equipment. Many 
local libraries maintain their own special materials collection. 
Contact your local library for more details. 

Mainstream, Inc. 
1200 15th Street, NW 
Washington, DC 20005 
(800) 424-8089 also for TTY 
(202) 833-1136 

This organization provides information on federal laws and regula- 
tions concerning employment and education of handicapped people. 
Their hotline, equipped with a TTY, is answered by people who will 
provide information to questions on compliance with affirmative 
action regulations. If unable to answer questions, a confidential 
referral is made to the appropriate federal office. Mainstream 
produces a series of publications and sponsors conferences on 
issues regarding rights of handicapped persons. 

Muscular Dystrophy Associations 
of America, Inc. 
810 Seventh Avenue 
New York, NY 10019 
(212) 586-0808 

Myasthenia Gravis Foundation, Inc. 
15 E. 26th Street 
New York, NY 10010 
(212) 889-8157 

National Amputation Foundation 
12-45 150 Street 

Whitestone, Long Island, NY 11357 
(212) 767-8400 



726 



National Association for Retarded Citizens 
2709 Avenue 'E' East 
Arlington, TX 76011 
(817) 261-4961 

National Association for Visually Handicapped (NAVH) 

305 E. 24th Street 

New York, NY 10010 

(212) 889-3141 

and 

3201 Balboa Street 

San Francisco, CA 94121 

(415) 221-3201 

NAVH provides publications (see: Publications); adult and youth 
services including group programs, counseling to families and 
programs for the elderly; parent discussion groups; professional 
and public education; field testing of optical aids in coopera- 
tion with manufacturers and information and referral to community 
services. 

National Association of the Deaf 
814 Thayer Avenue 
Silver Spring, MD 20910 
(301) 587-1788 

National Braille Association 
85 Godwin Avenue 
Midland Park, NJ 08432 
(201) 447-1484 

Recorded, large print and braille materials are available through 
this association. 

National Easter Seal Society 
for Crippled Children and Adults 
2023 W. Ogden Avenue 
Chicago, IL 60612 
(312) 243-8400 

National Federation of the Blind 
1800 Johnson Street 
Baltimore, MD 21230 
(301) 659-9314 

National Labour Market Board 
Sundbybergsvagen 9 
S-171 99 Solna 
Sweden 

In connection with the International Year for Disabled Persons, 
the National Labour Market Board is planning to compile a 
catalog of solutions to various vocational problems. For 
further information write to the above address. 



727 



National Multiple Sclerosis Society 
205 E. 42nd Street 
New York, NY 10017 
(212) 986-3240 

The National Rehabilitation Information Center (NARIC) 

4407 Eighth Street, N.E. 

The Catholic University of America 

Washington, D.C. 20017 

main office (202) 635-5826 

Information Specialist (202) 635-5822 

TTY (202) 635-5884 

NARIC is funded by Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) 
to improve information delivery to the rehabilitation community 
by: 1) supplying copies of research reports and audio-visual 
materials prepared with RSA funding, as well as journal articles, 
conference proceedings, and other types of publications; 2) pre- 
paring bibliographies tailored to specific requests; 3) helping 
you locate the answers to factual questions such as dates, places, 
names, addresses, or statistics. Pathfinder is published by NARIC 
six times a year, (see: Publications.) 

National Society to Prevent Blindness 
79 Madison Avenue 
New York, NY 10016 
(212) 684-3505 

National Spina Bifida Association 
of America 
343 S. Dearborn 
Chicago, IL 60604 
(312) 663-1562 

National Spinal Cord Injury Foundation 

369 Elliot Street 

Newton Upper Falls, MA 02164 

(617) 964-0521 

Office of Special Education and 
Rehabilitative Services 
Department of Education 
400 Maryland Avenue, SW 
Washington, DC 20202 
(202) 472-3740 

The function of this office is to develop and implement educational 
policy to fulfill the mandates of Part B, Education of the Handi- 
capped Act (P.L. 91-230) as amended by P.L. 43-380 and P.L. 94-142, 
Education of All Handicapped Children Act of 1975. 



728 



Office of Technology Transfer (OTT) 
Veterans Administration 
252 Seventh Avenue 
New York, NY 10001 
(212) 620-6659 

OTT operates under the Rehabilitation Engineering Research and 
Development Service to transfer research results into clinical 
practice. This is accomplished by information dissemination on 
new devices and techniques developed in the rehabilitation engineer- 
ing program through their publications. OTT maintains a reference 
collection on rehabilitative engineering available to anyone for 
use, but primarily helpful to those in medical, allied health and 
engineering fields. (Also see: Publications.) 



REHABILITATION ENGINEERING CENTERS 

These centers offer various forms of engineering services. 
(Alphabetized by State.) 

Rancho Los Amigos Hospital 
7601 East Imperial Highway 
Downey, CA 90242 
(213) 922-7167 

Rehabilitation Engineering Center 
Children's Hospital at Stanford 
520 Willow Road 
Palo Alto, CA 94034 
(415) 327-4800 

Rehabilitation Engineering Center 
Smith-Kettlewell Institute of 
Visual Sciences 
2232 Western Street 
San Francisco, CA 94115 
(415) 563-2323 

In addition to rehabilitation engineering research, the 
Center produces publications. (See; Publications.) 

The George Washington University 
Medical Rehabilitation R & T Center 
2300 Eye Street, NW 
Ross Hall, Room 714 
Washington, DC 20037 
(202) 676-3801 

Rehabilitation Engineering Center 

Northwestern University 

345 E. Superior Street 

Room 1441 

Chicago, IL 60611 

(312) 649-8649 

729 



Rehabilitation Engineering Center 

University of Iowa 

Orthopedics Department 

Dill Children's Hospital 

Iowa City, I A 52242 

(319) 356-1616 

Cerebral Palsy Research Foundation 
of Kansas, Inc. 
4320 E. Kellog Street 
Wichita, KS 67218 
(316) 683-5627 

The Foundation produces a publication describing it's 
research, Tech Briefs . (See: Publications.) 

Rehabilitation Engineering Center 
Children's Hospital Medical Center 
300 Longwood Avenue 
Boston, MA 02115 
(617) 734-6000 

Tufts University 

Medical Rehabilitation R & T Center 

171 Harrison Avenue 

Boston, MA 02111 

(617) 956-5625 

Rehabilitation Engineering Center 
University of Michigan 
225 Viest Engineering 
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 
(313) 764-1817 

University of Minnesota 

Medical Rehabilitation R & T Center 

860 Mayo Building 

Minneapolis, MN 55455 

(612) 373-8990 

National Institute for Rehabilitation Engineering 
97 Decker Road 
Butler, NJ 07405 
(201) 838-2500 

New York University 

Medical Rehabilitation R & T Center 

400 E. 34th Street 

New York, NY 10016 

(212) 679-3200 

In addition to rehabilitation research, the Center produces 
publications. (See: Publications.) 



730 



Rehabilitation Engineering Center 
Case Western Reserve University 
2219 Adelbert Road 
Cleveland, OH 44106 
(216) 368-2000 

Rehabilitation Engineering Center 
Krusen Research Center 
Moss Rehabilitation Hospital 
12th Street & Tabor Road 
Philadelphia, PA 19141 
(215) 329-5715 

The University of Tennessee 
Department of Orthopedic Surgery 
1248 La Paloma Street 
Memphis, TN 38114 
(901) 525-2531 

Texas Institute for Rehabilitation 
and Research 
1333 Mousund Avenue 
Houston, TX 77025 
(713) 979-1440 

Applied Rehabilitation Center 
Southwest Research Institute 
2203 Babcock Road 
San Antonio, TX 78229 
(512) 699-0386 

Rehabilitation Engineering Center 
University of Virginia 
P.O. Box 3368 
University Station 
Charlottesville, VA 22903 
(804) 924-0311 

University of Washington 

Medical Rehabilitation R & T Center 

cc 814 RJ 30 

Seattle, WA 98195 

(206) 543-3600 

Rehabilitation Engineering Center 

Under Secretary of State for Rehabilitation 

Ministry of Social Affairs 

Mugamaa Building, Tahrir Square 

Cairo, Egypt 

Rehabilitation Engineering Center 

Institute of Orthopedic Surgery and Rehabilitation 

Acadeiny of Medicine 

Dzierzynskiego 135, 61 545 Poznan 

Poland 

731 



Rehabilitation Engineer Center 
University of Ljubljana 
Department of Electrical Engineering 
61001 Ljubljana, Trzaska 25 
Yugoslavia 

Rehabilitation Engineering Society 
of North America 
1701 S. First Avenue 
Suite 504 
Maywood, IL 60153 

The Society is made up of consumers, therapists, counselors, 
manufacturers, providers and engineers who develop and provide 
technology to disabled people. 

Rehabilitation International 

Information Service 

Stiftung Rehabilitation 

P.O. Box 101 409 

D-6900 

Heidelberg 1, Federal Republic of Germany 

Stiftung Rehabilitation maintains a computerized system of available 
modified products. 

San Francisco Lighthouse for the Blind 

1155 Mission Street 

San Francisco, CA 94103 

(415) 431-1481 

Schwab Rehabilitation Hospital 
Departments of Vocational Services and 

Occupational Therapy 
Technical Aids Evaluation, Training and 

Demonstration Laboratory for the Physically 

Disabled 

1401 S. California Boulevard 
Chicago, IL 60608 
(312) 522-2010 

The Technical Aids Laboratory is designed to give disabled individuals 
and social service specialists easy access to and information about 
technical aids for people who are handicapped. Evaluation of 
equipment and training in the use of aids are among the services 
offered. 

Science for the Handicapped Association (SFHA) 

SSS 201 

University of Wi scons in-Eau Claire 

Eau Claire, WI 54701 

(715) 836-4164 



732 



Association members include science educators of students who 
are emotionally, mentally, physically or socially handicapped. 
The association was formed to promote science for all handi- 
capped students in the schools. This is done through infor- 
mation dissemination at national conferences, publications 
and a bibliography on science for handicapped students. SFHA 
recently became an Associated Group of the National Science 
Teachers Association. 

Swedish Engineering Employment Association 

Box 5510 

S-114 85 Stockholm 

Sweden 

468 631750 

Telex 170 45 

This association has formed a computer-based central informa- 
tion system called "Miljobanken" which contains solutions to 
various work environment problems. Members of the Swedish 
Engineering Employers' Association can join the "Miljobanken" 
system free of charge, nonmember firms and institutions can 
join for a fee. 

Telephone Pioneers of America 

30-C 1847 

195 Broadway 

New York, NY 10017 

The Telephone Pioneers of America is the world's largest voluntary 
association of industrial employees. It is composed of men and 
women in the United States and Canada who have served 18 or more 
years in the Bell System Companies, certain Canadian Telephone 
Industry Companies and Rochester Telephone Corporation. Working 
through 94 chapters in 48 states and Canada, Pioneers devote their 
free time to a wide range of conmunity service activities. Pioneers' 
basements become workshops for the repair of recording machines for 
the blind and the manufacture and design of "talking toys" for 
autistic children. Special preschool programs have tested thousands 
of children for vision and hearing problems; older Americans have 
been screened for glaucoma and hypertension. To contact the 
Pioneer chapter in your area, consult the local city telephone 
directory. 

TRACE Research and Development Center 
for the Severely Conmunicatively Handicapped 
314 Waisman Center 
1500 Highland Avenue 
Madison, WI 53706 
(608) 262-6966 



733 



The TRACE Center works in cooperation with the Communication Aids 
and Systems Clinic of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, to 
study and develop techniques and aids which augment existing 
vocal skills of the clinic patient. Information on corrmunication 
aids and techniques is collected, documented and disseminated by 
the Center through publications and a computer data base. (Also 
see: Publications.) 

United Cerebral Palsy Assoc, Inc. 
66 E. 34th Street 
New York, NY 10016 
(212) 481-6300 



People to People Committee for the Handicapped 
Directory of Organizations Interested in the Handicapped 
1522 K Street, N.W. Room 1130 
Washington, D.C. 20005 
(202) 638-2487 

This directory lists the names, addresses, phone numbers and 
officers of 118 organizations of or for handicapped persons. 
Each listing also describes the structure and purpose of the 
organization, its principal programs, major publications, 
newsletters and journals. 



734 



Appendix D 
Post Secondary Education 



At universities, colleges and vocational schools across the United 
States, changes are being made to meet the needs of students who are 
handicapped. In this appendix the changes at some institutions are 
described. All institutions could not be included in the appendix. 
Information on a school's program may be listed under several titles. 
Often a good place to start is with the office of the Dean of Students, 



The Hadley School for the Blind 
700 Elm Street 
P.O. Box 299 
Winnetka, IL 60093 
(312) 446-8111 

The Hadley School for the Blind, often called the "University of 
Courage," is the world's only correspondence school for blind 
students. Over 4500 students in every state in the U.S. and 55 
foreign countries are currently enrolled, and over 125 brail led and 
or recorded correspondence courses are offered, tuition free. 
These college level courses are made available through cooperation 
with the Universities of Indiana, Wisconsin, California and Loyola. 
The Hadley School is supported entirely by gifts, grants and 
bequests from foundations, corporations, service groups and indi- 
viduals. 



HLMDC 

Audio- Visual Center 
Indiana University 
Blooming ton, IN 47405 
(812) 337-1511 

The Handicapped Learner Materials Distribution Center (HLMDC) 
is a part of the Special Materials Project established by Indiana 
University. HLMDC loans free of charge, (except for return 
postage), selected media materials such as films, videotapes, 
kits, games and adaptive devices pertaining to the general special 
education population. Materials are divided into three collections 
represented by three separate catalogs: 1) teacher training materials 
in the area of special education and media production consisting 
mostly of 16 mm films; 2) handicapped learner collection consisting 
mostly of classroom curricular materials primarily for examination 
and evaluation; 3) videotapes that are duplicated into other formats 
at cost. These services are available to anyone in the U.S.A. 
involved with educating a handicapped learner. 



735 



Handicapped Student Services 
University of California, Riverside 
11321 Library South 
Riverside, CA 92521 
(714) 787-4538 

The University of California, Riverside provides extensive services 
to students with disabilities. The relatively flat terrain makes 
on-campus travel easy for the mobility impaired student. A tactile 
map is also available to assist visually impaired students in learning 
the campus layout. UCR is 95% accessible and existing barriers are 
continually being identified and corrected. The Handicapped Student 
Services Office offers preadmission counseling to potential students 
with disabilities to help determine academic qualifications and to 
discuss financial, personal and mobility resources needed for 
independence. 



Physically Limited Program 
De Anza College 
21250 Stevens Creek Blvd. 
Cupertino, CA 95014 
(408) 996-4753 

The Physically Limited Program of De Anza College, begun in 1972, 
now operates year round and enrolled more than 500 students in the 
academic year 1978-79. It provides many of the support services that 
enable people to participate in the wide range of educational and 
self enrichment programs on campus. The level of involvement with 
the Physically Limited Program is dependent on the individual's 
need and desire. 



Southern Illinois University 
Specialized Student Services Office 
Carbondale, IL 62901 
(618) 453-5738 

Southern Illinois University has tried to fully integrate disabled 
students into the University community by 1) removing physical 
barriers and 2) helping students adapt their abilities to the 
on-going University conmunity. Students with varying disabling 
situations including those who are wheelchair-bound, semiambulatory, 
visually impaired, hearing impaired or learning disabled are enrolled 
at SIU. It is stressed that the handicapped student not be separated 
from the University as a whole. 



736 



Appendix E 
Publications 



The following is a listing of periodicals and publications which 
may provide further information to the reader. For a listing of 
titles used in the catalog text see Bibliography. 

PERIODICALS 

Accent on Living . Bloomington, Illinois: Accent on Information, Inc. 

This is a quarterly magazine of services and information on daily 
living and equipment for persons with disabilities. For further 
information, write: Accent, P.O. Box 700, Bloomington, IL 61701. 
(Also see: Organizations.) 

American Rehabilitation . Washington, DC: Rehabilitation Services 
Administration. 

This is the official bimonthly publication of the RSA. For further 
information, write: Superintendent of Documents, P.O. Box 1533, 
Washington, DC 20402. 

Area Development Sites & Facility Planning . New York, New York: Halcyon 
Business Publications, inc. 

The January, 1978 edition of this magazine contains two feature 
articles concerning handicapped people. Terrance Moakley wrote 
the first article, entitled "It's Easy and Inexpensive to Install 
Facilities for the Handicapped." The second article, "What Companies 
Are Doing About Hiring Handicapped" was prepared by the magazine 
staff. For further information, write the above publisher at 
432 Park Avenue South, New York, New York 10016. 

Bulletin of Prosthetics Research . New York, New York: Veterans Administration, 

This is a biannual report on research and development in rehabilita- 
tive engineering. For further information, write: Office of Tech- 
nology Transfer, Veterans Administration, 252 Seventh Avenue, New 
York, NY 10001. (Also see: Organizations.) 

Bulletins on Science and Technology for the Handicapped . Washington, DC: 
American Association for the Advancement of Science. 



737 



This is a quarterly publication. For further information, write: 
Project on the Handicapped in Science, AAAS, 1776 Massachusetts 
Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20036. (Also see: Classroom Materials; 
Organizations.) 



Canadian Rehabilitation Council for the Disabled. Let's get technical . 
Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Canadian Rehabilitation Council for the 
Disabled. 1-8, 1978. 

This book is a compilation of Let's Get Technical Bulletins 
reprinted from Rehabilitation Digest , the journal of the 
Canadian Rehabilitation Council for the Disabled. 



Capitol Publications, Inc., Suite G-12, 2430 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, 
Washington, DC 20037. 

An independent national news service which publishes fourteen 
different specialized newsletters for the education coirmunity. 
These publications provide current news regarding federal legisla- 
tion, policies, trends, research, funding and practices concerning 
the education of handicapped students. Capitol Publications also 
offers workshops, seminars and books. 



Cerebral Palsy Research Foundation. Problem solving with rehabilitation 
engineering: Tech brief . Wichita, Kansas: Cerebral Palsy Research 
Foundation of Kansas, Rehabilitation Engineering Center. 

Published quarterly, Tech Briefs contain articles describing 
solutions to vocational problems found by the Rehabilitation 
Engineering Center. Potential products and concepts are dis- 
cussed in the publications. Past issues have articles on a work 
station for a quadraplegic cerebral palsy typist; a reach instrument; 
a scanning calculator; a floor sweeping collector and a one-handed 
punch press. For further information, write: Cerebral Palsy 
Research Foundation of Kansas, Inc., 4320 E. Kellog Street, 
Wichita, KS 67218. (Also see: Organizations.) 

Communication Outlook . East Lansing, Michigan: Michigan State University. 

This is a quarterly newsletter on the application of technology 
to the needs of persons who experience communication handicaps due 
to neurological or neuromuscular conditions. For further informa- 
tion, write: Artificial Language Laboratory, Computer Science 
Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824. 



Dialogue with the Blind. Dialogue Magazine . Berwyn, Illinois: Dialogue 
Publications. 



738 



Published quarterly, this magazine is available in recorded, 
large print and braille editions. It is available from Dialogue 
with the Blind, regional libraries and the Library of Congress. 
For further information, write: Dialogue with the Blind, 3100 S 
Oak Park Avenue, Berwyn, IL 60402. (Also see: Additional 
Available Resources.) 



Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults. Nat- Cent 
News . Sands Point, New York. 

This magazine, printed in large type for visually impaired readers, 
is published quarterly. It includes news and feature articles of 
interest to deaf and blind people. For further information, write: 
The Helen Keller National Center, 111 Middle Neck Road, Sands 
Point, New York 11050. (Also see: Organizations.) 



Informer . Hot Springs, Arkansas: Arkansas Rehabilitation Research 
and Training Center. 

This is a quarterly publication which disseminates and promotes 
the utilization of new research, training, knowledge and technology 
resulting from the Special Centers Program of the National Insti- 
tute of Handicapped Research. For further information, write: 
Arkansas Rehabilitation Research and Training Center, P.O. Box 1358, 
Hot Springs, AR 71901. 



International Commission on Technical Aids, Housing and Transportation. 
ICTA multi-lingual manual on technical aids and index . Bromma, 
Sweden: ICTA, 1964-1973. 



Journal of Rehabilitation . Washington, DC: National Rehabilitation 
Association. 

This is the quarterly publication of the NRA, a private nonprofit 
corporation dedicated to the rehabilitation and well being of 
handicapped persons. For further information, write: NRA, 1522 
K Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005. 



Library of Congress. Reference circular . Washington, DC: National 

Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, Reference 
Section. 

Some of the circulars produced by the library are: Reading , 
Writing, and Other Communication Aids for Visually and 
Physically Handicapped Persons; Braille Instruction and 
Writing Equipment ; National Organizations Concerned with 
Visually and Physically Handicapped Persons . These circulars 
are available free from the National Library Service for the 
Blind and Physically Handicapped, Library of Congress, 
Washington, DC: 20542. (Also see: Organizations.) 

739 



National Association for Visually Handicapped. In Focus New York. 
New York: NAVH. 

Ibid. Seeing Clearly . New York, New York: NAVH. 

These newsletters are printed in large type. In Focus is for 
children. Seeing Clearly for adults. NAVH prepares and dis- 
tributes large print books. For other services they provide 
see Appendix C, Organizations. For further information on 
publications write: National Association for Visually Handi- 
capped, 305 E. 24th Street, New York, NY 10010. 



National Institute of Handicapped Research, REHAB BRIEF . Gainesville, 
Florida: University of Florida, Rehabilitation Research Institute. 

REHAB BRIEF, (Bringing Research into Effective Focus), is pre- 
pared by the University of Florida for NIHR. Each issue is devoted 
to different vocationally related topics such as vocational evalu- 
ation or a particular disability. These publications are dis- 
tributed by the University of Florida, Rehabilitation Research 
Institute, Gainesville, FL 32610. Braille and taped editions 
are available from regional service libraries. 



NARIC. Pathfinder . Washington, DC: National Rehabilitation Informa- 
tion Center. 

Published six times a year providing information on resources and 
technology in rehabilitation. It is available in both print and 
braille. For further information, write: NARIC, 4407 Eighth 
Street, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20017, 



(Also see: Organizations 



•f 



Paraplegia News . Washington, DC: Paralyzed Veterans of America. 

This is a monthly publication of news concerning civilians and 
veterans who are paraplegic and wheelchair bound. For further 
information, write: Paraplegia News , 5201 N. 19th Avenue, Suite 
108, Phoenix, AZ 85015. 



Rehabilitation Gazette . St. Louis, Missouri: Rehabilitation Gazette. 

This is an annual international journal of independent living 

for the disabled. For further information, write: Rehabilitation 

Gazette , 4502 Maryland Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63108. 



Rehabilitation Literature . Chicago, Illinois: National Easter Seal 
Society for Crippled Children and Adults. 



740 



This is the monthly interdisciplinary journal of the National 
Easter Seal Society. For further information, write: Rehabilita- 
tion Literature , 2023 W. Ogden Avenue, Chicago, IL 60612. 



Rehabilitation World, The US Journal of International News and Informa- 
tion . New York, New York: Rehabilitation International U.S.A. 

This is the quarterly publication of Rehabilitation International 
U.S.A. For further information, write: Rehabilitation World , 
20 W. 40th Street, New York, NY 10018. 



SAVI Update . Berkeley, CA: Science Activities for the Visually Impaired, 
University of California. 

A newsletter on curriculum materials and education programs for the 
visually impaired student in science classes. Available from SAVI, 
Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 
94720. 



PUBLICATIONS 



Accent on Living Buyer's Guide . Bloomington, Illinois: Cheever Pub- 
lishing. Inc. 

This is a list of devices and sources of special products and their 
manufacturers. For more information, write Accent, P.O. Box 700, 
Bloomington, IL 61701. (Also see: Organizations.) 



American Association for the Advancement of Science. A research agenda 
on science and technology for the handicapped. Washington, DC: 
AAAS, 1979. 

This is a report of a project which identified priority research 
needs in the area of science and technology for the disabled. For 
further information, write: Office of Opportunities in Science, 
AAAS, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20036. (Also 
see: Classroom Materials; Organizations.) 

Anderson, E. Art for all the children: A creative sourcebook for the 
impaired child . Springfield, Illinois: Charles C. Thomas, 1978. 

Adaptations for various art activities such as weaving and photo- 
graphy are presented with directions for making the adaptations. 
In the book are sections on art and learning disabilities, behavior 
disorders, hearing impairments, visual impairments, mental retarda- 
tion and physical disabilities. 



741 



Antenucci, B. & Corthell , D. Rehabilitation engineering: A counselor's 
guide . Menomonie, Wisconsin: Research and Training Center, Stout 
Vocational Rehabilitation Institute, University of Wisconsin-Stout. 

This document is a report from a study group of the Sixth Institute 
on Rehabilitation Issues, June 5th to 8th, 1979. The group was to 
develop resource material on engineering as it relates to the rehabili- 
tation process and the vocational options of handicapped people. 
Applications of engineering technology, legal issues and assessing 
a person's needs are some of the topics the publication addresses. 

Athelstan, G., Bower, A. & Crewe, N. Employment after spinal cord injury . 
Minneapolis, Minnesota: University of Minnesota, 1978. 

This book offers many new ideas about the employment options avail- 
able to quadriplegics and paraplegics. Personal experiences were 
collected from more than 100 spinal cord injured men and women. 
They describe how they found their jobs, the kinds of problems they 
faced, and the solutions they found. They discuss their duties and 
the satisfactions and frustrations of working. 

Bell, T.E. Technologies for the handicapped and the aged . Washington, 
DC: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Technology 
Transfer Division , July, 1979. 

This booklet contains brief descriptions of NASA technology which 
has been incorporated into projects for people who are handicapped 
or elderly. It is written in nontechnical language. 

Botterbusch, K.F. A guide to job site evaluation . Menomonie, Wisconsin: 
Materials Development Center, Stout Vocational Rehabilitation Insti- 
tute, University of Wisconsin-Stout. 

This book explains how to use different types of job site evaluations, 
how to set up a job site and evaluate the client. Included are sample 
evaluation forms. 



Bruwelheide, K.L. Assisting the physically handicapped: An identification 
and development of apparatus for laboratory sho|3 phase I . Bozeman, 
Montana: Montana State University, Department of Agricultural and 
Industrial Education, 1979. Through the Montana Office of Public 
Instruction. 

This is a report of a research project which was conducted to design, 
develop and test apparatus that will permit physically handicapped 
individuals to properly, safely and independently use shop tools and 
equipment commonly identified in industrial arts and vocational agri- 
culture curriculum guides. A set of working drawings of the appara- 
tus is included. This publication also contains a model for teacher 

742 



assessment of physically handicapped students to determine their 
capabilities and limitations. 



earner, M.N., Otten, P., & Reich, N. Clothing for handicapped people, an 
annotated bibliogra[ 
sity of Arizona, 19> 



annotated bibliography and resource list . Tucson, Arizona: Univer- 
~' ^~^^' 179. 



This bibliography provides information related to clothing for handi- 
capped people. In addition, it identifies product sources. The 
bibliography has been compiled for handicapped people, organizations 
that assist them, professionals, paraprofessionals and students 
interested in this topic. It is the authors' intention to review 
and update the publication every three years to permit additions and 
deletions when necessary. 

Coons, M. & Milner, M. (Eds.). Creating an accessible campus . Washington, 
DC: Association of Physical Plant Administrators of Universities 
and Colleges, 1978. 

Of particular interest to readers are the chapters discussing devel- 
oping an accessible science laboratory, descriptions of instructional 
aids and funding sources. 

Copeland, K. (Ed.). Aids for the severely handicapped . Richmond, England: 
Sector Publishing Ltd., 1974. 

Do it yourself again . New York: American Heart Association, 1969. 

This booklet describes self-help devices for people recovering from 
a stroke. A wide variety of aids are pictured and described. These 
aids are designed to help stroke patients achieve self care skills 
and independence. Available through your local heart association. 

Gault, et. al . Manual of methods for construction of inexpensive rehabili- 
tation equipment for use in "Activities of Daily Living" in hospitals 
and homes . Ryukyu, Hawaii: University of Hawaii Postgraduate Medi- 
cal Education Program, 1971. 

Geist, C.S. & McMahon, B.T. Region V short term training conference on 
job modification, job restructuring and job engineering for severely 
disabled persons . Chicago, Illinois: Illinois Institute of Technology 
Proceedings, April 16-17, 1979. 

This manual fully describes the conference on job modification, job 
restructuring and job engineering for severely disabled persons. The 
publication includes the workshop agenda, an annotated list of the 
films shown at the conference and copies of the speeches delivered 



743 



at the conference. The manual also contains conference evaluations 
and resource materials. 



Green Pages Rehab SourceBook . Winter Park, Florida: SourceBook Publi- 
cations, Inc., 1979. 

A directory of products and services for the disabled grouped by 
service categories and states. 



Haggerty, J. Spinoff 1979 . Washington, D.C.: National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration, Technology Transfer Division, February, 1979. 

In this publication, written for the general public, are descrip- 
tions of products used in everyday life which are derived from NASA 
technology; there is a list of NASA Field Centers, Applications 
Centers and Application Teams. 



High, E.C. A resource guide to habilitative techniques and aids for 
cerebral palsied persons of all ages . Washington, DC: The George 
Washington University, Job Development Laboratory, 1979. 

This book describes numerous aids, equipment, treatment programs 
and treatment techniques. In addition, each section of the book 
provides a preliminary text and an extensive reference list to 
help the reader select appropriate resources. Subject areas in- 
clude treatment techniques, and advice to parents in position- 
ing and seating, feeding, dressing, hygiene and household and 
community involvement. 



Hohenshil, T.H. & Maddy-Bernstein, C. Resource guide: Vocational 
counseling for the handicapped . Blacksburg, Virginia: Virginia 
Tech University, College of Education, 1980. 

This guide is designed to assist educational personnel to expand 
and increase the effectiveness of their vocational guidance and 
counseling programs for the handicapped. The guide includes 
information about books, articles, research reports, A-V materials 
staff training materials, organizations and directory lists. 
Topics include counseling, education, job placement, career edu- 
cation, legislation, counseling families of the handicapped, 
organizations, and multi-media materials. 



Information Exchange Program. Publications and audiovisual aids direc- 
tory of the rehabilitation research and training centers . Hot 
Springs, Arkansas: Arkansas Rehabilitation Research and Training 
Center, 1978. 



744 



This directory combines two documents that have previously been 
published separately. Part I contains a bibliography of 2,054 
publications resulting from research supported by the Rehabilita- 
tion Research & Training Centers. Part II is devoted to a current 
listing of audio-visuals developed or used by R&T Centers in their 
training programs. 



Institute for Information Studies. Rehabilitation engineering source 
books . Falls Church, Virginia: Institution for Information 
Studies, 1979. 

This document is designed to serve as a source book, or reference 
work, for day-to-day use by rehabilitation practitioners whose 
clients find themselves barred from certain activities by functional 
limitations resulting from a disability. Here, the user may learn 
whether a similar problem has elsewhere been found to have a tech- 
nological solution. It is a practical aid which chronicles actual 
rehabilitation problems which have been successfully resolved 
through the use of technology, especially applications from the 
field of rehabilitation engineering. 



International Labour Office. Documentation vocational rehabilitation . 
Geneva, Switzerland: International Labour Office, 1975. 

This publication, written in English, French and Spanish presents 
a list of I.L.O. (International Labour Office) documents. 
The list includes documentation of technical experience, legis- 
lation and research in the field of social integration and voca- 
tional rehabilitation of the handicapped. This list can be a 
useful aid for increasing the effectiveness of services to handi- 
capped persons. 



International Nickel Company. Design for the disabled . New York, New 
York: International Nickel Company, 1979. 

This booklet presents colored photographs and descriptions of 
furniture, plumbingware (faucets) and hardware products that have 
been designed for the disabled. The basic physical actions of 
reach, grasp, force and movement are associated with the products 
for visual appeal and durability. 

Jamison, S.L, (Ed.). Computing careers for deaf people . New York, New 
York: Association for Computing Machinery, Inc., 1976. 

This manual contains the verbatim proceedings of the National 
Conference on Computing Careers for Deaf People . Topics addressed 
at the conference included: perspective on deaf people, perspec- 
tive on computing careers, educational opportunities in computing 
special programs, placement problems and solutions, on the job 
problems and solutions and success factors in employment. 



745 



Johnson, M.D., Quarve, J., & Stanton, J. Product inventory of hardware , 
equipment and appliances . Minneapolis, Minnesota: National 
Handicapped Housing Institute, 1978. 

Products used in the home are evaluated for their potential ease 
of operation by people with all types of handicaps. In the cata- 
log a list of appropriate considerations exists for each type of 
product. Different manufacturer's products were then evaluated 
(yes, no) using the list of considerations, (e.g. is there large 
easy to read signage on a kitchen range). Each evaluation page has 
on it manufacturer's address, and phone number, price, model number, 
photo and comments. Available from National Handicapped Housing 
Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 



Kernaleguen, A. Clothing designs for the handicapped . Canada: 
University of Alberta Press, 1978. 

Brief instructions for adapting various pieces of clothing are 
given in this book. 



King, M.F. Barrier free design equipment and aids catalogue . West 

Bloomfield, Michigan: Michigan Center for a Barrier Free Environ- 
ment, 1979. 

This publication describes over 100 products to aid handicapped 
people. The descriptions include pictures and product source 
information. In addition, this manual contains a list of manu- 
facturers and suppliers and a list of other sources. 



Klinger, J.L. Mealtime manual for people with disabilities and the 
aging. Camden, New Jersey: Campbell Soup Company, 1978. 

This book describes numerous shortcut techniques and suggestions 
for performing basic kitchen tasks. All are kitchen tested and 
adapted for disabled and elderly cooks. In addition, the book 
contains recipes, menus and information about good nutrition. A 
list of helpful references, agencies and product sources is included 
at the end of the book. 



LaRocca, J. & Turen, J.S. The application of technological developments 
to physically disabled people . Washington, D.C.: The Urban Insti- 
tute, 1978. 

This paper attempts to assess the impact of technological advances 
and rehabilitation technologies on disabled people. The degree to 
which these technologies have helped disabled people overcome the 
effects of their disabilities is also assessed. The focus of this 
paper is on blind, deaf and wheelchair bound individuals. 
Included in this paper 1s a discussion of the effect of public 



746 



policy, and the research, manufacturing, marketing, training and 
funding problems associated with the development and application 
of advanced technology. Future potential as well as the current 
limitations of employment, housing and transportation are considered, 



Lowman, E. & Klinger, J.L. Aids to independent living: Self-help for 
the handicapped . New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company. 

This book contains a comprehensive compilation of devices in 
the categories of tasks of daily living, ambulation, housing, 
furniture, homemaking, communications, vocations, recreation, 
transportation and travel, education, and speech. Each chapter 
has a bibliography pertaining to that activity category. At 
the end of the book is a listing of equipment sources. 

Mallik, K. & Yuspeh, S. Job development and enhanced productivity 
for severely disabled persons . Final Report R.S.A. Grant No. 
16-P-56803/3. July 1979. Washington, DC: Job Development 
Laboratory, 1979. 

The purpose of this project was to develop a model for placing 
severely disabled persons in competitive employment. The goal 
was to increase employment and placement of severely disabled 
persons by increasing their capacity to perform a wider range of 
the physical tasks ordinarily associated with information handling 
jobs. 



McCullough, H.E. & Farnham, M.B. Kitchens for women in wheelchairs . 
Urbana, Illinois: University of Illinois, 1961. 

This publication contains pictures, descriptions and blueprint 
drawings of kitchen arrangements adapted for persons in wheel- 
chairs. Included are specially designed work and storage units 
and suitable commercial appliances. This manual can be obtained 
from Small Homes Council-Building Research Council, One East 
Saint Mary's Road, Champaign, Illinois 61820. 



Meers, G.D. (Ed.) Handbook of special vocational needs education . 
Gaithersburg, Maryland: Aspen Systems Corp., 1980. 

This is a book of readings about special vocational needs edu- 
cation. Topics covered include the identification and charac- 
teristics of disadvantaged students, identification and charac- 
teristics of handicapped students, curriculum modification and 
instructional practices, work experience and cooperative place- 
ment programs, teacher strategies for counseling special needs 
students, parents' roles, administrative and supervisory 
functions, and program evaluation. 

747 



Mueller, J. Designing for functional limitations . Washington, DC: 
The George Washington University Rehabilitation Research and 
Training Center, Job Development Laboratory, 1979. 

Mueller has designed office and industrial worksites that provide 
functional environments for the handicapped worker. This manual 
presents illustrations of the worksites, along with suggested 
modifications to make the worksite usable, This resource does 
not deal with architectural accessibility per se. The focus is 
usability, to enable the disabled worker to function independently. 
(Also see: Modifications to the Work Environment.) 



Office for Handicapped Individuals. Resource guide: Rehabilitation 
engineering and product information . Washington, D.C.: Author, 
1980. 

Resources included in the guide provide information on sensory, 
mobility, and communication technology which assist handicapped 
individuals in daily living, educational, recreational, voca- 
tional, and transportation activities. Contents include: 
1) federal and private sources of information; 2) general infor- 
mation sources; 3) financial assistance and loans for aids and 
equipment; 4) funding guide; 5) publications; 6) future infor- 
mation sources on engineering products. 



Phelps, L.A. & Batchelor, L.T. Individualized education programs (lEPs): 
A handbook for vocational education . Columbus, Ohio: National 
Center for Research in Vocational Education, 1979. 

This 38 page monograph (Information Series No. 188) describes the 
following aspects of lEP development and implementation: descrip- 
tion of the lEP, cooperative planning, levels of lEP development, 
and an lEP process model. The model covers referral of students, 
informal data collection, sharing of assessment information, making 
placement decisions, developing and writing the lEP, implementing 
and monitoring the lEP, and evaluating the lEP. A sample lEP is 
also included. 



Rehabilitation Engineering Center. Controls: Reference catalog to aid 
physically limited people in the operation of assistive devices . 
Palo Alto, California: Children's Hospital at Stanford, Rehabili- 
tation Engineering Center, 1980. 



Robinault, I. P. (Ed.). Functional aids for the multiply handicapped . 
New York: Harper and Row, 1973. 

Information in this resource manual will aid people with multiple 
disabilities to function more independently. The book answers 
questions of what to use, where to buy it, or how to construct it, 



748 



The content is grouped into four parts: transfer, travel, and 
mobility; personal care; communications and learning; and recrea- 
tion. 



Saunders, F.A. Rehabilitation engineering aids and devices for persons 
with impaired hearing . San Francisco, California: Smith-Kettlewell 
Institute. 

This catalog lists devices for the hearing impaired along with 
descriptions and addresses for further information. This publica- 
tion contains both currently available devices and those under 
development. Readers can join the mailing list and receive current 
updates of the catalog. (Also see: Organizations.) 

Shaw, A.M. & Stevens, C (Eds.). Drama, theatre, and the handicapped . 
Washington, DC: American Theatre Association, 1979. 

A collection of essays intended to reinforce awareness and increase 
knowledge of issues, needs and problems related to fostering the full 
participation of individuals who are handicapped into drama and 
theatre activities. The first section looks at ways drama and 
theatre relate to handicapped individuals as an art form, an educa- 
tional process, a therapy, a career. In the second section ways of 
eliminating barriers to full involvement are presented, including 
suggestions for on stage, behind the stage and in front of the stage 
accessibility. Drama programs by, for and with handicapped people 
are described in section three. An annotated bibliography is found 
in section four. 



Skurnick, L.S. & Seigel, D.H. A partially annotated bibliography of job 
related physical capacities . Miami, Florida; Center for Labor 
Research and Studies, 1979. 

This bibliography includes materials related to the following topics: 
job analysis, tests and testing, matching job demands and physical 
abilities, work evaluation and guidance, and bibliographies and legal 
references. (Also see: Organizations.) 



Special education materials made available through the BEH marketing 
program . Westerville, OH: LINC, 1980. 

An annotated collection of products, distributors and publications 
compiled by LINC Services, Inc. LINC is a corporation organized 
to link new resources produced through research and development with 
dissemination resources. 

Steps Toward Campus Accessibil ity . Washington, DC: Association of 

Physical Plant Administrators of Universities and Colleges, March, 
1979. 

749 



Programs which have been successful im making various college 
campuses accessible to students who are handicapped are described 
in this publication. 

Strebel , M. Adaptations and techniques for the disabled homemaker (fifth 
edition)"; Minneapolis, Minnesota: Sister Kenny Institute, 1978. 

Many suggestions for modifications of the work space are given as 
well as descriptions of available products useful to a person who 
is disabled. Some of the homemaking areas covered are storage 
space, selecting appliances, food preparation and sewing. There is 
also a list of additional reading. 



Vanderheiden, G. & Grill ey, K. Non-vocal communication techniques and 
aids for the severely physically handicapped . Madison, Wisconsin: 
Trace Research and Development Center, 1975. 

This publication is based upon transcriptions from the 1975 Trace 
Center National Workshop series. Development of communication in 
the non-vocal physically handicapped child (or adult) was the topic 
presented at the workshop. The subject matter includes definitions 
of the problem and descriptions of the tools that can be employed to 
develop an effective supplementary channel of communication for a 
non-verbal physically handicapped child. Programs demonstrating 
the application of some of the tools are also described. (Also 
see: Organizations.) 

Vanderheiden, G.D. Non-vocal communication resource book . Madison, 
Wisconsin: Trace Research and Development Center. 

Illustrations and descriptions of communication aids for non- 
vocal individuals are presented in this book. Included in this 
publication are descriptions of custom communication boards, charts 
and lap trays. (Also see: Organizations.) 

Vieceli, L. (Ed.). Guidelines for the selection, training, and place- 
ment of blind persons in information service expediting . Carbondale, 
Illinois: Southern Illinois University, 1975. 

Information Service Expediting (I.S.E.) is an occupational area 
which provides an ever-increasing number of job openings for blind 
persons. Jobs in this field utilize the telephone and other tele- 
communications equipment to provide agencies and businesses with 
explanations and information referrals. This manual presents 
guidelines for the selection, training, placement, and job restruc- 
turing for blind persons in I.S.E. 



750 



Appendix F 
Classroom Material 



The reader will find in this appendix some materials which may 
be helpful in teaching students who have special needs. This 
appendix contains a sampling of available material, not an 
exhaustive listing. 

Adams, Gary H. (compiled by). Science for the physic ally handicapped 

in higher education: A guide to sources of information . Washington, 
DC: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Environ- 
mental Data and Information Service. 

This guide provides brief descriptions of organizations who 

can provide information, assistance, and modifications in 

the science fields for students who are physically handicapped. 



American Association for the 
Advancement of Science 
Office of Opportunities in Science 
1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. 
Washington, DC 20036 
(202) 467-4400 

Redden, M.R., Davis, C.A., & Brown, J.W. Science for handicapped 
students in higher education: Barriers, solutions and recomifnen - 
dations . Washington, DC: American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science, 1979. 

Handicapped persons who wish to enter careers in science encounter 
numerous barriers. The authors of this report gathered data 
from several sources in order to identify barriers to post- 
secondary science education and to look at methods for over- 
coming them. (Also see: Organizations, Publications.) 

Resource directory of handicapped scientists . Washington, DC: 
American Association for the Advancement of Science. 

This directory contains a listing of scientists who are handi- 
capped and are willing to consult on a variety of science 
related subjects. Information on each individual listed 
includes their names, scientific discipline, most recent 
position, nature of handicap, and expertise and consulting 
interests. (Also see: Organizations; Publications.) 



751 



American Foundation for the Blind 
15 W. 16th Street 
New York, MY 10011 
(212) 620-2000 

Materials can be borrowed at no cost from the N.C. Migel 
Memorial Library. It contains a collection of literature, 
films and educational programs. (Also see: Additional 
Available Resources; Organizations.) 



Argus Kommunikation 
Verlag fuer Lehr-und 
Lernmittel GmbH 
Postfach 1948 
Ortenberger Str. 7 
D-7600 Offenburg 
West Germany 

In the 1980 catalog, the careers section has various materials 
useful for career awareness and vocational information at 
different grade levels. 



Calhoun, M.L., and Hawisher, M.F. Teaching and learning strategies 
for physically handicapped s^ 
University Park Press, 1979. 



for physically handicapped students . Baltimore, Maryland: 
- ■ - If-- 



This book is for teachers of students with physical disabilities. 
The text is designed to help school personnel develop thoughtful, 
well researched guidelines for establishing new programs and 
Improving existing ones. In the book, the practical issues of 
setting up a classroom program, finding appropriate assessment 
techniques, developing teaching materials, and working with 
other professionals are discussed within the framework of the 
current research on the educational needs of the physically handt 
capped population. 



Capital Area Career Center. Adapting vocational education for handi- 
cappers . Mason, Michigan: Author, 1980. 

This is a series of 37 manuals which identify the physical skills 
and working conditions required in each of 34 occupations. The 
manuals also provide a method for comparing a student's physical 
abilities to the physical requirements of occupations, so he or 
she can choose a vocational program. In addition, they provide 
guidelines for making adaptations in the vocational classroom to 
help the student function in the program he or she chooses. 



752 



Chabot College 
25555 Hesperian Boulevard 
Hayward, CA 94545 
(415) 786-6700 

Brown, R.N. Development of curriculum for a non-traditional machine 
tool technology program accessible to the physically handicapped . 
Hayward, California: Chabot College, South County Community 
College District, 1979. 

This manual describes the program and curriculum for Computerized 
Numerical Control in the Machine Tool Technology area. This 
program evolved from two forces. The first force was the 
increase of computer run machines in industry. The second was 
legislation mandating that college level programs be accessible 
to the physically handicapped. 



Developmental Learning Materials 
7440 Natchez Avenue 
Niles, IL 60648 
(800) 621-5809 

Distributors outside U.S.A.: 

PMB Industries, Ltd. 
1220 Eleesmere Road 
Units 15-17 
Scarborough, Ontario 
Canada MIP 2X5 

DLM Japan, Ltd. 
7th Floor Shibyua Building 
1 Naito-cho, Shinjuku-ku 
Tokyo, Japan 

Juan Suarez, Inc. 

1762 Ponce de Leon Avenue 

Santurce, Puerto Rico 00909 

Argus Communications 
Plumpton House 
Plumpton Road 
Hoddesdon, Herts 
ENll OLB 
England 



Driver Training Program 
Rehabilitation Institute 
261 Mack Boulevard 
Detroit, MI 48201 
(313) 494-9813 



753 



Persons who are handicapped are evaluated and trained as 
drivers and assisted in selecting adaptive devices to help 
them as motorists. Driving instruction, (which is individu- 
ally programmed), is provided by a driver trainer who is 
also an occupational therapist. Any physically handicapped 
person is eligible for an evaluation of his or her driving 
potential through this program. 



experience education 

Project Discovery Catalog 

Southwest Iowa Learning Resources Center 

401 Reed Street 

Red Oak, I A 51566 

(712) 623-4913 

Project Discovery is a hands-on career exploration package. 
The catalog lists the jobs for which packages are available, 
Each package consists of a vocabulary book, ("First Look 
Book"), student instructions and the equipment needed for 
the exploration activities. 



Hadary, D.E. & Cohen, S.H. Laboratory science and art for blind, 
deaf, and emotionally disturbed children: A mainstreaming 
approach . Baltimore, MD: University Park Press, 1978. 

A series of lessons used in mainstreamed classes. 



Heller, J. How to master touch typing step-by-step (with one hand) 
Wantagh, New York: Special Education Step-by-Step, 1966. 

Jack Heller has developed a program to teach handicapped 
persons to type as effectively as nonhandicapped persons. 
Individuals who have missing fingers learn to type by using 
a mouthstick, head pointer, elbow pointer, toe, one hand or 
even a few fingers on one or both hands. The materials 
developed by the author include a teacher's guide, keyboard 
charts and books of typing drills and exercises. The charts 
which illustrate finger positions on the keyboard can be 
reproduced without prior written permission. The author 
has also developed typing programs for legally blind, learning 
disabled and bilingual students. 



754 



Hubbard 

Special Education Materials 

P.O. Box 104 

Northbrook, IL 60062 

>^ Media materials are available on several topics including train- 
\ ing regular classroom teachers to work with students who are 

mainstreamed, the law and education, behavior problems and 

planning Individualized Educational Programs. 



Human Resources Center 
Albertson, Long Island, NY 11507 
(516) 747-5400 

Yuker, H.E., Feldman, M.A., Fracchia, J.F. and Younng, J.H. The 
modification of educational equipment and curriculum for 
maximum utilization by physically disabled persons: Educa- 
tional and school equipment for physically disabled students . 
Albertson, New York: Human Resources Center ^ 1967. 

This publication provides information pertinent to the edu- 
cation of severely physically disabled children. The mono- 
graph discusses school equipment that is nonlimiting in the 
sense that it presents no barriers and or removes any barriers 
which might be encountered by a student with a physical dis- 
ability. In addition, it offers a guide to modifying and 
selecting equipment for maximum utilization by disabled students 



Ken Cook Educational Systems 
12855 W. Silver Spring Drive 
P.O. Box 207 
Butler, WI 53007 
(414) 466-6060 

Ken Cook has available audio-visual learning packages for 
individual work stations. Some of the subjects are: Small 
Engine Technician, Diesel Generator Technical Course, Marine 
Engine Technician, Careers in Welding and Communicating for 
Careers. 



Maryland Vocational Curriculum Production Project 
Western Maryland Vocational Resource Center 
P.O. Box 5448, McMullen Highway 
Cresaptown, MD 21502 
(301) 777-5886 



755 



Mangano, R.M., Foster, P.R., Hafen, S., DeGrey, 6., Buxton, R. 
Vocational curriculum resources for handicapped students: A 
guide to print and nonprint instructional materials . College 
Park: University of Maryland, Maryland Vocational Curriculum 
Research and Development Center, 1979. 

This guide consists of an instructional checklist for each 
resource. The checklist indicates evaluative comments on 
usability and suitability, information on readability, for- 
mat, (instructional, non-print, etc.) and intended use. 
Topics covered include agriculture, auto body repair, auto 
mechanics, basic math skills, basic reading skills, business 
education, career education, carpentry, cosmetology, custo- 
dial and maintenance, data processing, electricity, electronics^ 
food industries, graphics, health occupations, home economics, 
needle trades, life skills and consumer education, safety, 
welding and professional resources. 



National Association of the Deaf 
814 Thayer Avenue 
Silver Spring, MD 20910 
(301) 587-1788 



Edwards, G.A. (Ed.). Teacher/counselor guide to: Is science a 

possible career for you ? Philadelphia, PA: Research for Better 
Schools, 1978. 

Lesson plans for a science career development program designed 
for students who are deaf. It addresses the questions "Why con- 
sider a science career"?, "What do people in science do"? and "How 
do you find out if science is a career for you"? A filmstrip is 
also included in the program materials. 



National Science Foundation-H Project 
"Adaptation of Science Learning Experiences 
for Visually Impaired Students" 
St. Mary's Junior College 
2500 S. 6th Street 
Minneapolis, MN 55454 
(612) 332-5521 

At St. Mary's, a Project Coordinator works with teachers and 
students to adapt science classes. An information sheet has 
been written explaining the process used to adapt general 
science classes, suggestions for adapting the science labora- 
tory and examples of adaptations for the biology laboratory. 
Suggestions include techniques in labeling, measuring, dia- 
granming and carrying out an enzyme experiment. 



756 



New Jersey Institute of Technology 

323 High Street 

Newark, NJ 07102 

(201) 645-5369 or 645-5371 

Cochin, I. & Herman, H. The macrolab: A center for the handicapped 
at New Jersey Institute of Technology . Final Project Report. 
Newark, NJ: New Jersey Institute of Technology, 1979. 

The goal of this program is to aid handicapped individuals to 
achieve their career and educational objectives. The report 
describes the process used to help handicapped participants 
develop skills, methods and devices to enable them to over- 
come barriers arising from their handicaps. The report 
includes descriptions of devices developed. Among these are 
a spectrometer, electronic breadboard, meter reader, pan 
balance, and vibration demonstration device for participants 
with visual, hearing, or physical disability. 



New York University 

Medical Rehabilitation R&T Center 

400 E. 34th Street 

New York, NY 10016 

(212) 679-3200 

Hunt, G., Judson, J., Kristeller, E., Rush, H., and Zimmerman, M. 
A manual for training the disabled homemaker. Rehabilitation 
monograph VIII . New York, New York: New York University 
Medical Center, 1970. 

The information contained in this manual will aid instructors 
and those who set up disabled homemaker training programs. 
The topics presented in the manual include simplifying work, 
conserving energy, and performing certain necessary skills. 
In addition, the manual provides descriptions of disabling 
conditions. (Also see: Organizations.) 



P.R.I.D.E. Foundation 
1159 Poquonnock Road 
Groton, CT 06340 
(800) 962-0707 
(203) 447-7433 

Kennedy, E.S. A curriculum for advanced level of in-service training 
for the homemaker home health aid for the State of Connecticut . 
Groton, Connecticut: P.R.I.D.E. 

This guide consists of a variety of one hour lesson plans for 
18 different modules including communication, home management 
and practical nursing. (Also see: Additional Available 
Resources.) 



757 



Recording for the Blind, Inc. 
215 East 58th Street 
New York, NY 10022 
(212) 751-0860 



Taped educational books are lent at no cost to visually and 
physically handicapped students. 



Ridley, A.F. Space and equipment for teaching independent living 
skills to the handicapped . Tallahassee, Florida: Florida 
Department of Education, 1975. 

This manual provides information about teaching independent 
living skills to the handicapped in both the public secondary 
schools and special facilities. Included in the manual are 
numerous photographs and descriptions which show various 
uses of space and equipment. The publication can be useful 
in planning new facilities, renovating or remodeling present 
facilities and in adding small and large equipment. 

Sped Publications 
2010 Eagle View Drive 
Colorado Springs, CO 80907 

Taylor, B. Basic introduction to typing . Colorado Springs, Colorado: 
Sped Publications. 

A basic typing course consisting of 12 cassette tapes, (24 
lessons), a Teacher's Manual and a head set for the tape 
recorder. The course covers the complete keyboard, numbers, 
symbols, centering, simple manuscript typing, letter formats 
and envelope addressing. This course, compiled for students 
with a visual impairment, can also be used by students who 
are slow learners, emotionally disturbed, mentally retarded 
or have low reading skills. The course is designed for 
students to progress at their own rate. 



Studley, V. Left-handed calligraphy . New York, New York: Van 
Nostrand Reinhold Company, 1979. 

Some of the problems the author's students encountered in 
calligraphy were solved by forming the letters in the reverse 
direction of the usual way of forming them. 



758 



Tombaugh, D. Biology for the blind . Euclid, Ohio, Euclid Public 
Schools, 1973. 

This manual presents extensive information on how to teach 
biology to the blind student. The first three chapters 
discuss class orientation, laboratory assistants and class- 
room procedures such as tests, homework and laboratory 
reports. Chapter four contains information about the texts 
and equipment that are available. Chapter five describes 
techniques which enable the blind student to participate 
in class activities. 



University of Iowa 

Office of Services for Handicapped 

Iowa City, lA 52240 

(319) 353-6967 

Office of Services for Handicapped. Serving handicapped students: 
A faculty/staff handbook . Iowa City: University of Iowa. 

This 20 page booklet contains information designed to help uni- 
versity faculty instruct disabled students more appropriately. 
Topics covered include attitudinal considerations and techniques 
to help students with various disabilities; hearing Impairments, 
visual impairments, speech impairments, motor impairments, 
epilepsy, diabetes mellitus, learning disabilities, and emotional 
disorders. 



University of Wisconsin-Stout 
Menomonie, WI 54751 

Draemer, D.6. Driver education for the handicapped manual . Menomonie; 
Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin-Stout, 1976. 

This manual was prepared as a curriculum and aid for driver 
educators and handicapped students at the University of 
Wisconsin-Stout. Fifteen lessons for teaching basic behind- 
the-wheel driving skills are included. In addition, the 
manual offers useful suggestions and information relevant 
to driver education for the handicapped. 

Wisconsin Vocational Studies Center 
1263 Educational Sciences Building 
1025 W. Johnson 
Madison, WI 53706 
(608) 263-4151 



759 



Tindall, L.W., Gugerty, J.J., Crowley, C.B., Getzel , E.E., Sal in, J., 
& Fessenden, P.K. Puzzled about educating special needs students?: 
A handbook on modifying vocational curricula for handicapped stu- 
dents . Madison, Wisconsin: Wisconsin Vocational Studies Center, 
1980. 

This handbook contains practical suggestions and strategies 
for the vocational training of handicapped students. Chapters 
cover the following topics: working with other professionals, 
emotional impairments of learning, learning disabilities, 
mental retardation, visual impairments, hearing impairments, 
physical impairments, vocational assessment -- both formal 
and informal -- and models of service delivery. 



Ibid. Puzzled about educating special needs students?: Annotated bib- 
liography . Madison, Wisconsin: Wisconsin Vocational Studies 
Center, 1980. 

This annotated bibliography contains descriptions of 496 items. 
These items have been arranged into several categories. An 
individual citation was listed in two or more categories if 
appropriate. The categories include: comprehensive programming, 
administration, curriculum modifications, career education and 
employment, counseling and supportive services, individualized 
education programs , inservice and preservice training, legisla- 
tion and litigation, mainstreaming, resources and bibliographies, 
specific disability areas, and assessment issues. 



Ibid. Puzzled about educating special needs students?: User's guide 
for the handbook on modifying vocational curricula for handi- 
capped students . Madison, Wisconsin: Wisconsin Vocational Studies 
Center, 1980. 

The user's guide describes ways to organize and conduct inservice 
training in the major topics covered in each chapter of the hand- 
book described above. In addition, the user's guide contains a 
chapter on the mechanics of organizing and conducting inservice 
meetings. 



760 



Appendix G 
Distributor Outlets 



Some of the products appearing in the catalog are available for sale at 
several locations. When a developer provided a listing of these locations, 
the For Sale section refers the reader to this appendix. 



Bernina Sewing Machine (pg. 610) 
Contact importer for nearest 
dealer 

Swiss Bernina Inc. 
534 W. Chestnut 
Hinsdale, IL 60521 

Larson Bernina Corporation 
2017 E. 38th Street 
Minneapolis, MN 55402 

Bernina Sewing Machines 
Co., Inc. 
70 Orchard Drive 
North Salt Lake, UT 84054 



Touch Fone Adapter (pg. 204) 
Distributors 

Buckeye Telephone & Supply 
1250 Kinnear Road 
Columbus, OH 43221 
(614) 488-0655 

GTE Automatic Electric 
400 N. Wolf Road 
Northlake, IL 60164 
(312) 562-7100 

Midwest Telephone Supply 
P.O. Box 1319 
Appleton, WI 54911 
(414) 734-5632 

North Supply Company 
10951 Lakeview Avenue 
Lenexa, KS 66215 
(913) 888-9800 

Sterling Products Co. 
1575 Wyoming 
Forty- Fort, PA 18704 
(717) 288-7471 



Mowat Sensor (pg. 494) 

Australia 

Wormald International Sensory Aids 
Ltd. 
P.O. Box 2231 
North Parramatta 
NSW 2151 
Australia 

Europe 

Wormald Interantional Sensory Aids 

7 Musters Road 

West Bridgford 

Nottingham 

NG 2 7 PP 

England 

Sonicguide (pg. 496) 

Australia 

Wormald International Sensory Aids 
Ltd. 
P.O. Box 2231 
North Parramatta 
NSW 2151 
Australia 

Europe 

Wormald International Sensory Aids 

7 Musters Road 

West Bridgford 

Nottingham 

NG 2 7 PP 

England 

All other countries 



Wormald International Sensory Aids 
P.O. Box 10014 
Christchurch, New Zealand 



761 



Canon Electronic Calculator with 
Printout, Display and Voice 
(pg. 462) 

U.S.A. 



Canon U.S.A., Inc. 
10 Nevada Drive 
Lake Success 
Long Island, NY 11042 

Canon U.S.A. , Inc. 
140 Industrial Drive 
Elmhurst, IL 60126 

Canon U.S.A., Inc. 

123 Paularino Avenue East 

Costa Mesa, CA 92626 

Canon U.S.A., Inc. 
6380 Peachtree Industrial 
Boulevard 
Norcross, GA 30071 

Australia 

Canon Australia Pty. Ltd. 

22 Lambs Road 

Artarmon 

Sydney, N.S.W. 2064 

Australia 

Canada 



Canon Optics & Business 
Machines Canada, Ltd. 
3245 American Drive 
Mississauga, Ontario L4V 1N4 
Canada 

Canon Optics & Business 
Machines Canada, Ltd. 
5900 No. 2 Road 
Richmond, B.C. V7C 4R9 
Canada 

Central and South America 



Canon Latin America 
Sales Department 
P.O. Box 7022 
Panama 5 
Rep. of Panama 



Inc. 



Canon Latin America, Inc. 
Repair Service Center 
P.O. Box 2019 
Colon Free Zone 
Rep. of Panama 

Europe, Africa & Middle East 

Canon Amsterdam N.V. 
P.O. Box 7907 
1008 AC Amsterdam 
the Netherlands 

Japan 

Canon Inc. 

11028 

Mita 3-chome 

Minato-ku 

Tokyo 108 

Japan 

Southeast Asia 

Canon Hong Kong Trading Co., Ltd 

5th Floor 2-6 

Fui Yiu Kok Street 

Tsuen Wan 

New Territories 

Hong Kong 



Large Letter Computer Print-Out (pg. 226) 
(Printronix printer) 
Distributors 

Gentry Associates, Inc. 

2109 W. Clinton Avenue 

Room 130 

Huntsville, AL 35805 

(205) 534-9771 

TWX: 810-726-2220 

Oem Specialties 
6900 E. Camel back Road 
Scottsdale, AZ 85251 
(602) 941-5646 

Printronix 
17421 Derian Avenue 
P.O. Box 19559 
Irvine, CA 92713 
(714) 549-8272 
(TWX: 910-595-2535 



762 



Group III Electronics 
7263 Engineer Road 
Suite D 

San Diego, CA 92121 
(714) 292-0525 

Group III Electronics 
542 Lakeside Drive, Suite 6 
Sunnyvale, CA 94086 
(408) 245-4392 

Group III Electronics 
2615 Manhattan Beach Boulevard 
Redondo Beach , CA 90278 
(213) 973-7844 

Par Associates 
10515 E. 40th Avenue 
Suite 103 
Denver, CO 80239 
(303) 371-4140 
TWX: 910-931-0409 

Gentry Associates, Inc. 
7527 Currency Drive 
Orlando, FL 32809 
(305) 859-7450 
TWX: 810-850-0136 

Gentry Associates, Inc. 
9800 Grimes Bridge Road 
Roswell, GA 30075 
(404) 998-2828 
TWX: 810-766-0805 

Computer Services 
875 Waimanu Street 
Suite 614 

Honolulu, HI 96813 
(808) 531-5267 

Dytec/Iowa 
P.O. Box 2148 
Iowa City, lA 52244 
(319) 683-2282 

Dytec/Central 

315 W. University 

Arlington Heights, IL 60004 

(312) 394-3380 

TWX: 910-687-2267 

Dytec/Central 
25 Beechway Drive 
Indianapolis, IN 46224 
(317) 247-1316 



Dytec/South 
8245 Nieman Road 
Suite 123 
Lenexa, KS 66214 
(913) 888-0215 

Gentry Associates 
1799 Stumpf Boulevard 
Bldg. 2, Suite 4B 
Gretna, LA 70053 
(504) 367-3975 

S&S Electronics, Inc. 
80 Stedman Street 
Lowell, MA 01851 
(617) 459-2578 

Mesa, Inc. 

16021 Industrial Drive 

Gaithersburg, MD 20760 

(301) 948-4350 

TV/X: 710-828-0231 

Lowry & Associates, Inc. 
8163 W. Grand River 
Brighton, MI 48116 

(313) 227-7067 
TWX: 810-242-1519 

Lowry & Associates, Inc. 
3902 Costa N.E. 
Grand Rapids, MI 49505 
(616) 363-9839 

Dytec /North 

1821 University Avenue 

Room 163 N 

St. Paul, MN 55104 

(612) 645-5816 

Dytec/South 

11657 Adie Road 

Creve Coeur, MO 63141 

(314) 731-5400 

Dytec/South 

11657 Adie Road 

Maryland Heights, MO 63043 

(314) 569-2990 

Gentry Associates 
428 Alamance Road 
Burlington, NC 27215 
(919) 227-3639 
TWX: 510-921-5751 



763 



Technical Marketing Associates 
2460 Lemoine Avenue 
Ft. Lee, NJ 07024 
(201) 224-6911 
TVIX: 710-991-9710 

BFA Corporation 
1704 Moon, S.E. 
Suite 7 

Albuquerque, NM 87112 
(505) 292-1212 
TWX: 910-989-1157 

BFA Corporation 
Corner of Hadley & 
Motel Boulevard 
Las Cruces, NM 88001 
(505) 524-9693 
TWX: 910-983-0543 

Naco Electronics Corp. 

P.O. Box 276 

North Syracuse, NY 13212 

(315) 699-2651 

™X: 710-541-0439 

Lowry & Associates, Inc. 
1440 Snow Road, Suite 216 
Cleveland, OH 44134 
(216) 398-0506 
TWX: 810-427-9421 

Lowry & Associates, Inc. 
2194 Hewitt 
Dayton, OH 45440 
(513) 435-7684 
TWX: 810-450-2672 

Usdata Associates, Inc. 
Box 33043 
Tulsa, OK 74135 
(918) 252-9646 

Pacific Northwest Electronics 
2035 S.W. 58th 
Portland, OR 97221 
(503) 297-8056 

Denco Data Equipment Co. 
25 Skippack Pike, Suite 106 
Ambler, PA 19002 
(215) 542-9876 
TWX: 510-661-0638 



Lowry & Associates 
Seven Parkway Center 
Suite 455 

Pittsburgh, PA 15220 
(412) 922-5110 
TWX: 710-664-3080 

Gentry Associates, Inc. 
Greengate Park, Suite 302 
Greenville, SC 29607 
(803) 271-8543 

Usdata Associates, Inc. 
8701 Shoal Creek Boulevard 
Bldg. 1, Suite 104 
Austin, TX 78758 
(512) 454-3579 

Usdata Associates, Inc. 
14241 Proton Road 
Dallas, TX 75234 
(214) 661-9633 

Usdata Associates, Inc. 
4120-A Directors Row 
Houston, TX 77092 
(713) 681-0200 

Par Associates 
1167 N. Deerfield Drive 
Centerville, UT 84014 
(801) 292-8145 

Pacific Northwest Electronics 
2020 116 NE 
Bellevue, WA 98004 
(206) 454-0150 

Canada 

Adhearn & Soper 
31 Enterprise Road 
Rexdale, Ontario, 
Canada M9W 1C4 
(416) 245-4848 
TLX: 06-965-770 

Puerto Rico 

Computec Systems Corp. 

GPO Box 1429 

San Juan, Puerto Rico 

(809) 781-7880 

™X: 325-2326 



764 



A7 Speech Controller (pg. 546) 
Variable Speed Control™ Listening 
Adapter (pg. 576) 
Dealers 

Educational Products 
Div. of Ebsco Ind., Inc. 
1230 First Avenue No. 
Birmingham, AL 35203 
(205) 252-1212 

and 

2714 Government Boulevard 
Mobile, AL 36606 
(205) 479-9441 

NVS Systems Inc. 
4609 Business Park Boulevard 
Anchorage, AK 99503 
(907) 279-5571 

Audio Graphic Supply, Inc. 

P.O. Box 177 

Lake Havasu City, AZ 86430 

(602) 855-3983 

(800) 352-1425 

and 

2105 South Hardy, Suite #3 
Tempe, AZ 85281 
(602) 894-2148 

and 

P.O. Box 50446 
Tucson, AZ 85703 
(602) 297-9574 

Fairview Audio-Visual Co. 
3520 West 69th Street 
Suite 102 

Little Rock, AR 72209 
(501) 568-7446 

E.I. S.I. 

Instructional Systems 
Div. of Educational 
Industrial Sales, Inc. 
2225 Grant Road, Suite #3 
Los Altos, CA 94022 

McCurry A/V Co. 
13th and Kay Streets 
Sacramento, CA 95814 
(916) 444-6080 



Audio Graphic Supply, Inc. 
810 Waterman Avenue 
P.O. Box 986 

San Bernadino, CA 92402 
(714) 888-1395 

and 

4130 Park Boulevard 
San Diego, CA 92103 
(714) 299-9660 

and 

15207 Marquardt Avenue 
Sante Fe Springs, CA 90670 
(213) 921-0707 

and 

P.O. Box 1937 
Ventura, CA 93001 
(805) 643-3343 

Sound Resources/Karpenter 
Shop 

1830 Navajo Trail 
Woodland Park, CO 80863 
(303) 687-2590 

Training Services, Inc. 
2501 Silverside Road 
Suite # One 
Wilmington, DE 19810 
(302) 478-4063 

Fidelity Sound Co. 
1200 18th Street NW 
Suite #105 

Washington, DC 20036 
(202) 296-9110 

U.S. Recording Co. 
1347 S. Capitol Street 
Washington, DC 20003 
(202) 488-3900 

Syscom 

5089 NE 12th Avenue 

Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334 

(305) 771-0714 

Brandon's Inc. 
1027 Mary Street 
Jacksonville, FL 32203 

Southern Photo & News 
1515 Marion Street 
Tampa, FL 33602 
(813) 228-8594 



765 



Academics Hawaii 
1414 Dillingham Boulevard 
Honolulu, HI 96817 
(808) 847-5012 

Visual Craft Inc. 
4820 West 128th Place 
Alsip, IL 60638 

and 

17 West 715 Butterfield Road 
Suite B 

Oak Brook, IL 60523 
(312) 932-8500 

and 

890 East Higgins Road 
Suite #158 
Schaumburg, IL 60195 

and 

Capitol City Shopping Plaza 
3107 S. Dirksen Parkway 
Springfield, IL 62703 
(217) 529-3646 

Burke Audio Visual Service 
2716 St. Charles Road 
Bell wood, IL 60104 
(312) 544-2220 

AVC Corporation 
2702 Applegate Street 
Indianapolis, IN 46203 
(317) 783-6167 

Pratt Educational Media 
200 Third Avenue, SW 
Cedar Rapids, lA 52404 

Kunz, Inc. 

207-209 E. Patapsco Avenue 
Baltimore, MD 21225 
(301) 243-3300 

Crimson Camera Technical 
Sales 

60 Lansdowns Street 
Cambridge, MA 02139 
(617) 868-5150 

Harrison Harries, Inc. 
499 Montgomery Street 
Chicopee, MA 01020 
(413) 536-2650 



Newnum Visual Education, Inc 
1001 Pipestone Road 
Benton Harbor, MI 49022 
(616) 925-5421 

and 

134 Manchester Avenue 
Detroit, MI 48203 
(313) 868-4120 

and 

400 32nd Street SE 
Grand Rapids, MI 49508 
(616) 243-3300 

and 

2518 South Cedar Street 
Lansing, MI 48910 
(517) 485-1746 

Hart Audio Visual 
112 W. First Street 
Duluth, MN 55802 
(218) 722-6219 

Blumberg Photo & Sound Co. 
525 N. Washington Avenue 
Minneapolis, MN 55401 
(612) 335-1271 

Kansas City Audio Visual 
3242 Holmes Street 
Kansas City, MO 64109 
(816) 931-8940 

Bowie and Fergus, Inc. 
459 Highway 51 
Ridgeland, MS 39157 

Northern School Supply Co. 
Second Street South 
Great Falls, MT 59101 
(406) 453-4373 

Henkle Audio-Visuals 
3296 Hoi dredge Street 
Lincoln, NE 68503 
(402) 467-3558 

Northeast Audio Visual 
Donald Street at Route 114 
Bedford, NH 03012 
(603) 668-5511 

New Jersey Audio Visual, Inc 
518 Main Street 
Boonton, NJ 07005 
(201) 335-2342 



766 



Educational Media 
1517-C Girard Boulevard, NE 
Albuquerque, NM 87106 
(505) 256-3507 

A.V. Sales & Service 
1666 Western Avenue 
Albany, NY 12203 
(518) 456-5060 

Visual Education Equipment 
1539 Hertel Avenue 
Buffalo, NY 14216 
(716) 836-2672 

Visual Aid Equipment Corp. 
707 First Street 
Liverpool, NY 13088 
(315) 457-4727 

Sonocraft Corporations 
29 West 36th Street 
New York, NY 10018 
(212) 760-9300 and 
(516) 466-9698 

Northern School Supply Co. 
17 North 8th Street 
Fargo, ND 58102 
(710) 293-3210 

Cavalier Audio Visual 
12119 Princeton Road 
Cincinnati, OH 45246 
(513) 671-6100 

Mid-America Audio Visual 
1392 E. Weber Road 
Columbus, OH 43211 
(614) 268-3300 

W.G. Johnston Co. 
663 E. Aurora Road 
Macedonia, OH 44056 
(216) 467-3175 

Audio Visual Media 
174 S. Mulberry Street 
Mansfield, OH 44901 
(419) 524-2512 

Fairview Audio Visual Co. 
4040 N. Pennsylvania Avenue 
Oklahoma City, OK 73112 
(405) 521-0031 



Fairview Audio Visual Co. 

(continued) 
4923 S. 8L3rd East Avenue 
Tulsa, OK 74145 
(918) 664-8020 

Moore's Audio Visual 
234 SE 12th Avenue 
Portland, OR 97214 
(503) 233-5621 

J. P. Li 1 ley ?i Son, Inc. 
2009 N.. Third Street 
P.O. Box 3035 
Harrisburg, PA 17105 
(717) 238-8123 

Rosensaft Computer Systems 
123-125 S. 39th Street 
Suite A 

Philadelphia, PA 19104 
(215) 387-9377 

J.E. Foss Co., Inc. 
3603 Library Road 
Pittsburgh, PA 19104 
(412) 881-2840 

Robert J. Walsh Assoc, Inc. 
402-404 Broadway 
Scranton, PA 18505 
(717) 344-0535 and 
(717) 343-0159 

Sound Systems 
RFD #4 Albion Road 
Lincoln, RI 02865 
(401) 333-0509 

Carolina Audio Visual Co. 
2517 Devine Street 
Columbia, SC 29205 
(803) 254-0361 

Consolidated Media Systems, Inc 
322 4th Avenue S. 
Nashville, TN 37201 
(615) 244-3933 

Heffernan School Supply 

3701 Apollo 

P.O. Box 6177 

Corpus Christi, TX 78411 



767 



Heffernan School Supply 

(continued) 
211 W. Avenue 
P.O. Box 5309 
San Antonio, TX 78210 
(512) 732-1136 

Hoover Bros., Inc. 
2930 Canton 
Dallas, TX 75226 
(214) 241-4527 

Texas Video Systems, Inc. 
10217 Piano Road 
Dallas, TX 75238 
(214) 341-1771 

Telespond 
5842 Paisley 
Houston, TX 77096 
(713) 721-6809 

Lubbock Audio Visual Co., Inc 
110 Texas Commerce Center 
1305 Avenue "L" 
Lubbock, TX 79408 
(806) 744-2559 

Evans Supply 

509 W. 300 North 

Salt Lake City, UT 84116 

(801) 521-3420 

George Orsa & Assoc. 
6001 Arlington Boulevard 
Suite #810 
Falls Church, VA 22044 

Audio Fidelity Corp. 
3930 E. Princess Anne Road 
Norfolk, VA 23502 
(804) 857-7487 

and 

7212 W. Broad Street 
Richmond, VA 23229 
(804) 285-8781 

and 

3032 Tr inkle Avenue 
Roanoke, VA 24012 
(703) 366-8831 

Larrabee and Assoc, Inc. 
Sea First Bldg., #3618 
Seattle, WA 98111 
(206) 623-2521 



Mo en Media 

1820 West Avenue South 
Lacrosse, WI 54601 
(608) 784-7180 

Photoart Visual Service 
840 N. Plankinton Avenue 
Milwaukee, WI 53203 
(414) 271-2270 

Outside the United States 

Premier A/V Sales, Ltd. 

32a Howden Road 

Scarborough, Ontario, 

Canada 

HTR 3E4 

(416) 755-1148 

Queale Electronics 

1004 N. Part Street 

Victoria, British Columbia, 

Canada 

V8T 106 

(604) 388-6111 

Rahola, Inc. 

1006 Ponce De Leon 

Santurce, Puerto Rico 00908 

(809) 724-6377 and 

(809) 722-0165 



768 



Index 



A7 Speech Controller ' 546 

TM 

Accru-Hook 334 

Accurate Packaging of Dry Bulk Material 508 

Adapter, Telephone 194 

Adaptor, Touch Fone 204 

Adjustable Height Table 668 

Adult Stand-in Table 440 

Alarm Clock/Sleeper Timer, Visual 210 

Alarm System, Visual Security 604 

Alarms and Buzzers 600 

Aligning a Handsaw HO 

Alphabet for the Blind, Fishburne 554 

Am-Com I (TTY) 152 

APH Signature Guide 678 

TM 

APH Variable Speech Control Module 548 

Applying Labels to Bottles 510 

Assembly of Electrical Conduit Wiring, A Table-Fixture 

for the 146 

Assembly of Valve Handles, Workstation and Associated 

Fixtures for the 148 

Atlases and Maps, Braille 282 

Aud-A-Level , Professional 72 

Aud-A-Meter 48 

Aud-A-Mometer 358 

Aud-A-Simpson 294 

Aud-A-Val 360 



769 



Aud-A-Vator 485 

Aud-A-Zilch 296 

Audible Signal Device, Lathe Work Alignment . 388 

Audicator with Accessories 336 

Audio Typing Unit, IBM 636 

Auditory Maps 488 

Autocom 154 

Automated Radial Arm Saw 415 

Awakening Device for Hearing Impaired 155 

B Back Preserver Tools 325 

Bags, Jig for a Stand That Holds Heavy 122 

Beater, Bicycle Grip Bilateral 50 

BEJED Pioneer Light Probe 158 

BEJED Pioneer Sound Probe 150 

Bernina Sewing Machine 510 

Bicycle Grip Bilateral Beater 50 

Bookholders, Magazine and 552 

Bookshelf, Sliding 338 

Bowling Ball Guide 590 

Braille Atlases and Maps 282 

Braille Device, Model BD-3 264 

Braille Rulers 474 

Braille, Scientific Calculator 458 

Braille Translation Program, Dottran 550 

Brailler, Perkins 642 

Brush or Pen Holder 52 

Bulk Product Packaging, Shaker Table for 532 

770 



Calculator Braille, Scientific 468 

Calculator, Expanded Keyboard 456 

Calculator Guide 458 

Calculator, Speech Plus Talking 470 

Calculator with Printout Display and Voice, Cannon 

Electronic 462 

Calcu-Tac 460 

Caliper Rule, Stanley 144 

Camera Holding/Operating System for Hemiplegic Photographer ... 54 

Canon Communicator 162 

Canon Electronic Calculator with Printout, Display and Voice . . . 452 

Car Controls 626 

Card Holder 592 

Card Reader and Cassette Recorder, Voxcom Slow-Speed 290 

Card Reader for the Visually-Handicapped, Talking and 

Keypunch 236 

Card Reader with Tactile or Voice Output, I.B.M 224 

Carrousel Type Packaging Conveyor 512 

Cassette Indicator 378 

Cassette Recorder, Voxcom^ Slow-Speed Card Reader and 290 

Cathode Ray Tube Viewing System 214 

Cerebral Palsy and Quad Persons, Micro Computer Drill Press 

Multi-Axis Interface for 408 

Char-Mag Syringe Magnifier 362 

Check Writing Guide, Keitzer 682 

Checkbook, Raised-Line 684 

Circular Lazy-Susan for Looseleaf Notebooks 34O 

Coiling Flexible Plastic Tubing 514 

Coiling Hose for Blister Packaging 516 



771 



Collapsible Lap Tray 342 

Combination Square, Stanley 422 

Combs and Brushes 246 

Comfort and Communication Control Systems 305 

Communication Aids and Environmental Control Systems, 

Electronic 2gg 

Communication Control Systems, Comfort and 3Qg 

Communications Module (MCM/D), Manual I74 

Communications Module/Printer (MCM/P), Manual 27g 

Communicator jg4 

Communicator and Telecommunication Devices, SSI System 100 .... ^34 

Communicator, Canon Ig2 

Communicator, Detachable Lap Tray which Contains an 

Electronic Talking Ig3 

Communicator (SYMTIC), Symbolic Tufts Interactive 186 

Communicator, Tactic 188 

Communicator, Tufts Interactive 206 

Communicator, VIP 208 

Computer Drill Press Multi-Axis Interface for Cerebral 408 

Plasy and Quad Persons, Micro 

Computer Flowchart Symbol Stamps 216 

Computer Interface (TCI-1), Typing and 240 

Computer Print-Out, Large Letter 226 

Computer Printout Reader/Reviewer, Mouthstick Operable 230 

Computer Programmer Station for Single Key Stroke Entry 2I8 

Computer Terminal, Total Talk Full Speech 238 

Conduit Wiring, A Table-Fixture for the Assembly of Electrical . . 146 

Control Systems, Du-It Wheelchair 308 

Counting Aids 518 



772 



Crimper, Three Axis 428 

Crimping Parts in Position 88 

CRT Tracking Guide 220 

Cutting Lengths of Yarn 475 

Cutting Material to Length 473 

Data Entry Machine, Kurzweil 553 

Dadoing, Measuring Device for Woodworking 402 

Deburring Drilled Holes in Brass Blocks, A Holding Fixture for , . hq 

Deburring Holes in Bolt Heads, A Holding Fixture for 120 

Desk, Twin-Turntable 664 

Desk, Universal 672 

Dictaphone Switch for Use by a Paraplegic 252 

Dictation System, Modified 254 

Directory, Talking Telephone 190 

Display Board, Portable Magnetic Graphics 286 

Doorbell /Phone Signal, Visual 314 

Dottran-Braille Translation Program 550 

Drafting Table Modifications, Paraplegic 66 

Drill Guide, Stanley 424 

Drill Jig 112 

Drill Press Multi-Axis Interface for Cerebral Palsy and Quad 

Persons, Micro Computer 408 

Drilling Fixture, Spindle 420 

Drilling Jig for Improved Accuracy 390 

Driving Controls 628 

Drum Frame, Hand 60 

Dual Image System 552 

Du-It Wheelchair Control Systems 303 

773 



Earth Puncher and Spacer 328 

Easicorder (RED-1) 256 

Easy Grasp Pencil 680 

Electric Fry Pan Handle 318 

Electric Typewriter 634 

Electric Typewriter, Manual and 638 

Electrical Conduit Wiring, A Table-Fixture for the Assembly of . . 145 

Electronic Calculator with Printout Display and Voice, Canon , . . 452 

Electronic Communication Aids and Environmental Control 

Systems 166 

Electronic Test Equipment, Speech Adapters for 300 

Electronic Visual Aid, Portareader 574 

Electronic Visual Aids, Model 2C 564 

Embossed and Bold Line Graph Sheets 284 

(Embossed Device, Line), LED-120 262 

Embosser Model ISE-1 (The Interactive Strip Embosser) 222 

Engine Tuneup Meter with Auditory Output 100 

Environmental Control P.S.U. 4 310 

Expanded Keyboard Calculator 456 

Extended Arm, Gustavsberg 538 

Extensions, Telephone 198 

File Tray, Quad-Operational 344 

Fishburne Alphabet for the Blind 554 

Fitting Parts Together, Press 92 

Fixture for Deburring Drilled Holes in Brass Blocks, A Holding . . us 

Fixture to Package Small Items 520 

Fixtures for Holding Tape Cartridges 114 

774 



Fixtures for the Assembly of Valve Handles, Workstation and 

Associated 148 

Flowchart Symbol Stamps, Computer 216 

Foot Harness 442 

Foot Pick 56 

Franz Electric Metronome 58 

Fry Pan Handle, Electric 318 

Full Speech Computer Terminal, Total Talk 238 

G Game Center, The 594 

Gauge, Tire I04 

Gauges, Modified I02 

Graph Sheets, Embossed and Bold-Line 284 

Graphic Aid for Mathematics 464 

Graphics Display Board, Portable Magnetic 286 

Grasp Pad 90 

Grinder Modification I 392 

Grinder Modification II 394 

Grocery Shopping Cart 622 

Gustavsberg Extended Arm 538 

H Hand Held Tools, Radial Arm Assistive Device for 414 

Handheld Heat Sealer, The Modification of a 522 

Handivoice , Phonic Mirror 178 

Hammer Aimer 116 

Hammer, Slide 418 

Hand Drum Frame 60 

Handsaw, Aligning a 110 

Heat Sealer, the Modification of a Handheld 522 

775 



Heavy Bags, Jig for a Stand that Holds 122 

Heyer-Abadie "Talking" Mouthstick 346 

Hoe, Modified 330 

Hold Down and Push Stick for Upper Extremities Prosthetic Drum . . 396 

Holding Fixture for Deburring Drilled Holes in Brass Blocks, A . . 118 

Holding Fixture for Deburring Holes in Bolt Heads, A 120 

I IBM Audio Typing Unit 636 

I.B.M. Card Reader with Tactile or Voice Output 224 

Illuminated Magnifier 556 

Impedance Bridge 298 

Infrared Listening System 380 

TM 

Input Controls, Possum 312 

Inspection Station, Visual Process 434 

J Jig, Drill 112 

Jig for Improved Accuracy, Drilling 390 

Jig for a Stand that Holds Heavy Bags 122 

Jig for Driving Set Screws, A 124 

Jig for Removing Screws from Terminal Blocks, A 126 

Jig, Location 400 

Jig, Sanding 138 

Jig to Hold Wood 128 

K Keitzer Check Writing Guide 682 

Keyboard Guard 466 

Keypunch and Card Reader for the Visually-Handicapped, Talking . . 236 

Kitchen Aids 320 

Kitchen Aids 370 



776 



Kurzweil Data Entry Machine 558 

Kurzweil Reading Machine 560 

L LaBerne Gear Lift Stand-in Table ' 444 

LaBerne Work Tables 666 

Lap Tray, Collapsible 342 

Lap Tray, Detachable, which Contains an Electronic Talking 

Communicator 168 

Large Letter Computer Print-Out 226 

Large Print Video Terminal (LPVT) 228 

Lathe Operation Tool Adjusting Block 430 

Lathe Set-Up Protractor 412 

Lathe Set-Up Triangle 432 

Lathe Work Alignment Audible Signal Device 388 

LED-120 (Line Embossed Device) 262 

Left Foot Gas Pedal Control for Car 630 

Levels 398 

Levo™ Stand-Up™ Wheelchair 446 

Light Meter, Memco Audible 492 

Light Probe 490 

Light Probe, BEJED Pioneer 158 

Light Signal Device for the Hearing Impaired 170 

Lightwriter 172 

(Line Embossed Device), LED-120 262 

Location Jig 400 

Loom and Accessories, Rehabilitation 74 

M Magazine and Bookholders 562 

Magnetic Graphics Display Board, Portable 286 

Magnifier for Sewing Machine 612 



777 



Magnifier, Illuminated 556 

"Mainstream" Elevating Wheelchair 448 

Mallet, Foot Operated 130 

Manual and Electric Typewriter 638 

Manual Communications Module (MCM/D) 174 

Manual Communications Module (MCM/P) 176 

Maps, Auditory 488 

Maps, Braille Atlases and 282 

Masterlens Systems, VSi 586 

Measuring Device for Woodworking: Dadoing 402 

Measuring Device for Woodworking: Shelf and Paneling 

Measurement 404 

Measuring Devices for Woodworking: Table Saw Guide 406 

Memco Audible Light Meter 492 

Metal Parts, Packaging Small Quantities of 530 

Metronome, Franz Electric 58 

Micro Computer Drill Press Multi-Axis Interface for Cerebral 

Palsy and Quad Persons 408 

Micrometers, Starrett 426 

Model BD-3 (Braille Device) 264 

Model 2C Electronic Visual Aids 564 

Modification of a Handheld Heat Sealer, The 522 

Modifications to a Standard Paper Cutter 132 

Modified Dictation System 254 

Modified Gauges 102 

Modified Hoe 330 

Mouthstick, Heyer-Abadie "Talking" 346 

Mouthstick Operable Computer Printout Reader/Reviewer 230 



778 



Mowat Sensor 494 

Multiple Parts Packaging Station .' 524 

Multipurpose Utility Stick 540 

Music Rack for Partially Visioned 62 

N Nail Clippers 248 

Net Weight Packaging of Small Items 526 

Numeric Key Lock 640 

O Offset Press Model No. 319 266 

One Hand Typewriter with Shield 656 

One-Handed Typing 660 

Optacon Print Reading System 566 

Optical Projection Equipment 410 

Orator Talking Terminal, The 232 

P Package Small Items, Fixture to 520 

Packaging Conveyor, Carrousel Type 512 

Packaging for Uniform Appearance 528 

Packaging of Dry Bulk Material, Accurate 508 

Packaging of Small Items, Net Weight 526 

Packaging Shaker Table for Bulk Product 532 

Packaging Small Quantities of Metal Parts 530 

Packaging Station, Multiple Parts 524 

Page Turner (Possum) 568 

Page Turner (WTB) 570 

Page Turners 572 

Pager, Vibrating 602 

Paint Holder 64 



779 



Paper Cutter, Modifications to a Standard 132 

Paper Money Identifier 502 

Paraplegic Drafting Table Modifications 66 

Pen Holder, Brush or 52 

Pencil, Easy Grasp 680 

Perkins Brail ler 642 

Personal Sound System 382 

Phonic Ear Personal FM Systems 384 

R TM 

Phonic Mirror Handivoice 178 

Pick, Foot 56 

Pick Glove 68 

Pick, Spiral Finger 82 

Plate Processor Model No. M60 268 

Plates and Cups 276 

Portable Magnetic Graphics Display Board 286 

Portable Standing Frame 450 

Portareader Electronic Visual Aid 574 

TM 

Possum Input Controls 312 

Potato Peelers 322 

Potter's Wheel 70 

Potter's Wheel Stand, Sit-Down 80 

Precision Wheelchair Equipment 596 

Prehensile Hand 348 

Press Fitting Parts Together 92 

Professional Aud-A-Level 72 

Protractor and Saw Guide 134 

Protractor, Lathe Set-Up 412 

780 



Puff and Sip Control System for Paraplegic, Sewing Machine .... 616 

Quad Persons, Micro Computer Drill Press Multi-Axis Interface 

for Cerebral Palsy and -. 408 

Quill, Sensory 78 

Radial Arm Assistive Device for Hand Held Tools 414 

Radial Arm Saw, Automated 416 

Raised-Line Checkbook 684 

Random Access Tape Recorder (Audio Message Playback System) . . . 180 

Reaching Aids 542 

Reading Machine, Kurzweil 560 

Recorder (Audio Message Playback System), Random Access Tape . . . 180 

Recorder, Varispeech II 578 

Recorder, Voxcom Slow-Speed Card Reader and Cassette 290 

Rehabilitation Loom and Accessories 74 

Removing Screws from Terminal Blocks, A Jig for 126 

Reverse Indexing Typewriter 644 

Rug Hooking Holder for the Wheelchair 76 

Rulers 480 

Rulers, Braille 474 

Sanding Block 136 

Sanding Jig 138 

Saw, Automated Radial Arm . 416 

Saw Guide, Measuring Devices for Woodworking: Table 406 

Saw Guide, Protractor and 412 

Scanning Aid 96 

Scanning Machine Model No. 1100, Electronic 260 

Scientific Calculator Braille 468 

Screws, A Jig for Driving Set 124 

781 



Sealer, The Modification of a Handheld Heat 522 

Security Alarm System, Visual 604 

Sensor, Mowat 494 

Sensory Quill 78 

Set Screws, A Jig for Driving 124 

Sewing Machine, Bernina 610 

Sewing Machine, Chest Operated 614 

Sewing Machine, Magnifier for 612 

Sewing Machine Puff and Sip Control System for Paraplegic .... 616 

Sewing Machine, Viking 618 

Shaker Table for Bulk Product Packaging 532 

Shift Bar, Typewriter "Shift Easy" 658 

Shutter Packager 534 

Signature Guide 686 

Signature Guide, APH 678 

Simple Hand Tools Improve Operation 140 

Sit-Down Potter's Wheel Stand 80 

Slide Hammer 418 

Smoke Detectors, Visual 606 

Sonicguide 496 

Soniguide 498 

Sound Probe, BEJED Pioneer 160 

Sparr Telephone Arms 182 

Speech Adapters for Electronic Test Equipment 300 

Speech Computer Terminal, Total Talk Full 238 

TM 

Speech Control Module, APH Variable 548 

Speech Controller, A7 546 

782 



Speech Plus Talking Calculator 470 

Sphygmomanometer with Stethoscope 364 

Spindle Drilling Fixture 420 

Spiral Finger Pick 82 

Spotwelder Holding Fixture, A 142 

Square, Stanley Combination 422 

SSI System 100 Communicator and Telecommunication Devices .... 184 

Stand-in Table, Adult 440 

Stand-in Table, LaBerne Gear Lift 444 

Standing Frame, Portable 450 

Standing Platform 452 

Stand-Up™ Wheelchair. Levo™ 446 

Stanley Caliper Rule 144 

Stanley Combination Square 422 

Stanley Drill Guide 424 

Starrett Micrometers 426 

Stencil Duplicator Model No. 460s 270 

Stethoscope, Sphygomomanometer with 364 

Symbolic Tufts Interactive Communicator (SYMTIC) 186 

Synthetic Speech Terminal 234 

Syringe Magnifier, Char-Mag 362 

Table, Adjustable Height 668 

Table-Fixture for the Assembly of Electrical Conduit 

Wiring, A 146 

Table Saw Guide, Measuring Devices for Woodworking 406 

Tables 670 

Tactic Communicator 188 



783 



Talking Calculator, Speech Plus 470 

Talking Keypunch and Card Reader for the Visually-Handicapped . . 236 

"Talking" Mouthstick, Heyer-Abadie 346 

Talking Telephone Directory 190 

Talking Terminal, The Orator 232 

Talking Thermometer, Thermo Voice 366 

Talking Voltmeter 302 

Talking Word Processing System 646 

Tape Cartridges, Fixtures for Holding 114 

Tape Deck Modification 84 

Tape Recorder (Audio Message Playback System), Random Access . . . 180 

Telecommunications Devices, SSI System 100 Communicator and . . . 184 

Telenote 192 

Telephone Adapter 194 

Telephone Arms, Sparr 182 

Telephone Attachments 196 

Telephone Directory, Talking 190 

Telephone Extensions 198 

Tele-Tac 200 

Teletrym 202 

Terminal, Total Talk Full Speech Computer 238 

Test Equipment, Speech Adapters for Electronic 300 

Thermoform Brail on Duplicator 272 

Thermovoice Talking Thermometer 366 

Thermometer, Thermovoice Talking 366 

Three Axis Crimper 428 

Tire Gauge 104 

784 



Tool Adjusting Block, Lathe Operation r 430 

Torque Wrenches 106 

Total Talk Full Speech Computer Terminal 238 

Touch Fone Adaptor 204 

Touch-N-Type™ Stick 648 

Tray, Collapsible Lap 342 

Triangle, Lathe Set-Up 433 

(TTY), Am-Com I 152 

Tufts Interactive Communicator 206 

Tuneup Meter with Auditory Output, Engine 100 

Typewriter Control Systems 650 

Typewriter, Electric 634 

Typewriter Guard 652 

Typewriter, Manual and Electric 638 

Typewriter Mask Aid 654 

Typewriter, Reverse Indexing 644 

Typewriter "Shift Easy" Shift Bar 658 

Typewriter with Shield, One Hand 656 

Typing and Computer Interface (TCI-1) 240 

Typing, One-Handed 660 

Typing Unit, IBM Audio 636 

U Universal Desk 672 

Utensils 278 

Utility Stick, Multipurpose 540 

V Valve Handles, Workstation and Associated Fixtures for the 

Assembly of 148 

TM 

Variable Speech Control Module, APH 548 

785 



Variable Speed Control™ Listening Adapter 576 

Vari speech II Recorder 578 

VersaBraille System 580 

Vibrating Pager 602 

Video Terminal (LPVT), Large Print 228 

Video Visual Read/Write System 582 

Viking Sewing Machine 618 

VIP Communicator 208 

Vis-I-Con 288 

Visual Aid, Portareader Electronic 574 

Visual Aids, Model 2C Electronic 564 

Visual Alarm Clock/Sleeper Timer 210 

Visual Doorbell /Phone Signal 314 

Visual Process Inspection Station 434 

Visual Security Alarm System 604 

Visual Smoke Detectors 606 

Voice Feedback, Wire Measuring System with 482 

Voice Synthesizers, VS-6 and ML-I 242 

Voltmeter, Talking 302 

Voxcom Slow-Speed Card Reader and Cassette Recorder 290 

Voyager 584 

VS-6 and ML-I Voice Synthesizers 242 

VSi Masterlens Systems 586 

W Washing Machine and Dryer Handle 374 

Wheelchair Control Systems, Du-It 308 

Wheelchair Equipment, Precision 596 

Wheelchair, Levo™ Stand-Up™ 446 

786 



Wheelchair, "Mainstream" Elevating 448 

Wheelchair Tray (Bailey) 350 

Wheelchair Tray (Hausmann) 352 

Wheelchairs, Width Varying Device for 354 

Width Varying Device for Wheelchairs 354 

Wire Brush Cleaning of Small Parts 436 

Wire Measuring System with Voice Feedback 482 

Wiring, A Table-Fixture for the Assembly of Electrical Conduit . . 146 

Word Processing System, Talking 646 

Work Table 674 

Work Tables, LaBerne 666 

Workstation and Associated Fixtures for the Assembly of 

Valve Handles 148 

Wrenches, Torque 106 

WWRC Vacuum Wand 504 



787 •!^ U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1980—750-619 



^ 



6/29/2012 

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