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Full text of "A topographical and genealogical history of the County of Suffolk"

io 



of 



of 



The Estate of 
the late John Brundle 



' f 



HISTORY 



OF 



THE COUNTY OF SUFFOLK, 



TOPOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 



THE COUNTY OF SUFFOLK, 



Cmnptlrtl from &utljcnttc 



BY AUGUSTINE PAGE. 



IPSWICH : 

FREDERIC PAWSEY, OLD BUTTER MARKET, AND ALL OTHER 

BOOKSELLERS IN THE COUNTY. 

1847. 





9448 4 



SUPPLEMENT 



TO THE 



SUFFOLK TRAVELLER. 



SUPPLEMENT 



TO THE 



SUFFOLK TRAVELLER; 



OR 





COLLECTIONS, 



CONCERNING THAT COUNTY. 



COMPILED BY AUGUSTINE PAGE. 



IPSWICH : 

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY JOSHUA PAGE, 

FORE STREET, ST. CLEMENT'S. 

LONDON : 

J. B. NICHOLS AND SON, 

25, PARLIAMENT STREET. 
1844, 



ELECTRONIC VERSION 
AVAILABLE 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



The RIGHT HON. LORD CALTHORPE, Ampton Park. 
The RIGHT HON. EARL JERMYN, M.P., Ickworth Park. 
The RIGHT HON. and REV. LORD ARTHUR HERVEY, Ickworth. 
The HON. FREDERICK G. CALTHORPE, Elvetham, Hampshire. 
SIR HENRY EDWARD BUNBURY, BART., Great Barton Hall. 
The REV. SIR THOMAS G-ERY CULLUM, BART., Hardwick House. 
SIR WM. BROWNE FOLKES, BART., Hillington Hall, Norfolk. 
SIR ROBERT HARLAND, BART., Orwell Park. 
SIR THOMAS HAMMOND, K.G.C., Plumton, Whepsted. 
SIR THOMAS PHILLIPS, BART., Middle Hill, Worcester. 
SACKVILLE LANE Fox, ESQ., M.P.,/or Ipswich. 
JOHN NEILSON GLADSTONE, ESQ., M.P.,/or Ipswich. 
COLONEL ROBERT RUSHBROOKE, ESQ., M.P., Rushbrooke Park. 
HENRY SPENCER WADDINGTON, ESQ., M.P., Cavenham Hall. 



Adams, Mr. W., Ipswich. 

Aldrich, Rev. W., B.D., Ipswich. 

Almack, Richard, Esq., F.A.S., 
Melford. 

Alston, Rev. Edward Constable, 
Cranford Hall, Norfolk. 

Anders, H. S., B.A., Caius Col- 
lege, Cambridge. 

Andrews, Mr. J., Bury St. Ed's. 

Anstruther, J. H. Lloyd, Esq., 
Hintlesham Hall. 

Bacon, Edward, Esq., Ipswich. 

Baldiston, Mr. Samuel, Ipswich. 

Barnwell, Rev. Fred. H. Turner, 
F.A.S., Bury St. Edmund's. 

Bidwell, Rev. George, Stanton. 

Bosanquet, Rev. Edwin, Denham 

Brewster, Cardinal, Esq., Stan- 
way Hall, Essex. 

Bristo, Henry G., Esq., Ipswich. 

Burrell, Robert, Esq., Stoke Park 



Campbell, Wm. Frederick, Esq., 
Birkfield Lodge, Ipswich. 

Carthew, Geo., Esq., Harleston. 

Carthew, George A., Esq., East 
Dereham. 

Cartwright, R. Norton, Esq., Ix- 
worth Abbey. 

Casborne, Rev. W. I. S., Paken- 
ham New House. 

Case, P. J., Esq., Bury St. Ed's. 

Case, Rev.Isham, Metheringham, 
Lincolnshire. 

Cobbold, Walter T., Esq., Fox- 
hall House. 

Cole, Mr. William, Ipswich. 

Colville, Rev. A. A., Livermere. 

Cooke, Rev. John C., Ipswich. 

Cooke, Mr. J., Great Livermere. 

Creed, Rev. Henry, Mellis. 

Croft, Mr. John, Bury St. Ed's. 

Davers, Rev. Robert, Bradfield. 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



Davy, David Elisha, Esq., Ufford 
Deck, John, Esq., Bury St. Ed's. 
Dunthorne, Mr. E., Dennington. 

Edgar, Kev. Mileson G., Eed 
House, Ipswich. 

Evans, Kev. Edw. C., Ingham. 

Ewen, J. L., Esq., Vale Wood, 
Sussex. 

Eitch, Mr. William S., Ipswich. 

Fitch, Mr. K., F.G.S., Norwich. 

Eord, Kev. James, B.D., Nave- 
stock, Essex. 

Frewer, Mr. Wm., Bury St. Ed's. 

Gedge, J., Esq., Bury St. Ed's. 
Gilman, Mrs. S. H. L. N., Hing- 

ham, Norfolk. 
Golding, Samuel, Esq., Walsham 

le Willows. 
Gooch, Lieut. Geo., Woodbridge 

Road, Ipswich. 

Gray, Mr. W., Needham Market. 
Green, Mr. R., Framlingham. 

Harrison, Mr. Samuel, Timworth 
Harvey, Mr. Jas., Bury St. Ed's. 
Hasted, Rev. H., Bury St. Ed's. 
Hine, Kev. H.T. C.,Bury St. Ed's. 
Hollingsworth, Rev. A. G., Stow- 
in arket. 

Hubbard, Kev. Thomas, Westow. 
Hustler, Rev. J. D., Euston. 

Ingram, Rev. Geo., Chedburgh. 
Ion, J. W., Esq., Bury St. Ed's. 

Jackson, J., Esq., Bury St. Ed's. 
Jackson, Postle, Esq., Ipswich. 
Jackson & Frost, Messrs., Bury 
St. Edmund's. 

Lankester, Mr. F.,Bury St. Ed's. 
Last, Mr. W. N., Bury St. Ed's. 
Leggett, Mr. William, Ipswich. 
Lillingston, C., Esq., Chauntry, 
Ipswich. 



Lillingston, A., Esq., Southwold, 
Lloyd, Rev. John, Hindolveston, 

Norfolk. 
Loder, Mr. J., Woodbridge. 

Massy, William, Esq., Watton, 

Norfolk. 
Meadows, D. C., Esq., Little 

Bealings. 
Mills, Rev. Thomas, Stutton. 

Nichols, J. Gough, Esq., F.A.S., 
25, Parliament street, London. 

Oliver, Mr. G. I., Bury St. Ed's. 
Pawsey, Mr. F., Ipswich. 

Raw, John, Esq., Washbrook. 
Rickards, Rev. S., Stowlangtoft. 
Rodwell, J. M., Esq., Little Li- 

vermere. 

Rodwell, William, Esq., Ipswich. 
Roe, Mr. Owen, Ipswich. 
Roe, Mr. Robert, Cambridge. 

Scott, Mr., Ipswich. 
Shreeve, Mr. Thomas, Ipswich. 
Stedman, Mr. Charles, Ampton. 
Steward, Charles, Esq., Blun- 

deston. 
Stuart, Rev. James H., Ampton. 

Tollemache, John, Esq., Hel- 

mingham Hall. 
Turnor, Dawson, Esq., F.R.S., 

Yarmouth, 

Tymms, Mr. S., Bury St. Ed's. 
Tyrell, C., Esq., Polstead Hall. 

Warren, Mr. Joseph, Ixworth. 
Wells, Rev. E. C., Ixworth. 
Wilson, H., Esq., Stowlangtoft 

Hall. 

Woodward, Rev. W., Sproughton 
Woolby, Mr., Stowmarket. 
Worlledge, John, Esq., Ingham. 



ERRATA. 

Page 4, line 32, and page 29, line 38, for " Welnetham," read " Whelnethatn." 

Page 14, line 26, for " the present Peer," read " who died in 1839, when Thomas, 
his eldest son, succeeded." 

Page 16, line 37, for " Duddon," read " Derwent." 

Page 20, line 19, ARMS, add " RHYMES." 

Page 23, line 34, for " Chandler," read " Candler." 

Page 26, line 30, for " Harvey," read " Hervey." 

Page 28, line 23, for " Charles Spooner Lillingstone," read " Charles Lillingston, 
Esq., of Elmdon, Warwickshire." 

Page 50, line 26, for " Richard Norton Cartwright," read " the Rev. John Cart- 
wright, of St. Edmund's, Bury." 

Page 55, 5th paragraph, " Mr. J. Bull" was buried in Hacheston church, in Loes 
hundred. 

Page 71, line 3 from bottom, after " Ipswich," DELE the residue, and add " and 
is now the property of Charles Lillingston, Esq., of the Chauntry, Sproughton, 
late of Elmdon, Warwickshire ; who married Harriette, only daughter of the 
said Rev. Wm. C. Fonnereau." 

Page 71. NOTE. Major Michael Turner is joint lord, with Mr. Wrattislaw, of the 
manor of Tuddenham St. Martin. 

Page 222, line 1, " Philip Bacon," read " of Woolverstone." 

Page 448. NOTE, line 3, for " Suut," read " Sunt." 

Page 448, lines 6, 5, and 3 from bottom, for " Autissiners," read " Antissiners." 

Page 449, line 12, for " Autiphener," read " Antiphoner." 

Page 506, line 27, for " the Rev. J. T. Mott," read " J. T. Mott, Esq. Sir Edw. 
Kerrison is now lord, and R. K. Cobbold, Esq., patron." 

Page 531, line 34, the Rev. G. J. Haggitt is lessee of the Bishop of Norwich. 

Page 797, line 15, for " 1722," read " 1721." 

INDEX TO ARMS. " Bainard," for page " 66," read " 266." 
" Borrett," for page " 25," read " 425." 
" Dove," for page " 98," read " 598." 
" Metcalfe," for page " 55," read " 655." 



INTRODUCTION. 



SUFFOLK is one of those English Counties of which no general 
History, on a satisfactory scale, has yet made its appearance ; and 
the printed information which we possess, respecting it, must, upon 
the whole, be considered as rather scanty ; which certainly does not 
happen from any want of materials, as many able and industrious 
Antiquaries have, for several ages, employed themselves in making 
collections ; but this rather, perhaps, with a design in their researches 
to gratify their own particular taste, than to inform or amuse the 
public. 

That accomplished scholar, and profound antiquary, Sir SIMONDS 
D'EwES, Bart., of Stowlangtoft, in this county, appears to have been 
the first who did so with a view to publication, whose papers remain 
among the Harleian manuscript, in the British Museum ; among 
which are the following relative to this county : " Collections for 
the county of Suffolk ;" the original Kegister of Bury Abbey, en- 
titled " Groftis, for the Pietancer's use ;" and another Eegister of 
the same house, entitled " Werketonc." Some extracts from his 
manuscript journal were published by John Nichols, Esq., about 
1783, as the xvth number of the " Bibliotheca Topographica Bri- 
tannica." 

EGBERT KYECE, Esq., the friend and contemporary of Sir Simonds, 
may be also noticed ; he was a native of Preston, in this county : of 
whom a manuscript in the Herald's College, relating to the county 
of Suffolk, gives the following account : " In Preston, in the time 
of K. James and K. Charles, there lived Robert Eiece, Esq., an ac- 
complished gentleman, and a great preserver of the antiquities of this 
county. He was sonne of Eobert Eiece, Esq., who lived at Preston, 
in the daies of K. Edward 6, Q. Mary, and Q. Elizabeth ; and was 



IV INTRODUCTION'. 

a Justice of Peace for the county of Suffolk. Robert Eiece, Esq. 
(the subject of this article) had his education some years in the 
house of Mr. Theodore Beza, at Geneva. He set up in Preston the 
Boyall Armes of England, in a fair table, and in glasse, the names 
of the most ancient Knights and Esquires of this county, of which 
the most remain this 25th of March, 1655." 

The manuscript from which the above was extracted, is a folio 
volume, of about three hundred -pages ; and consists of church notes, 
family pedigrees, &c. Lord Thurlow presented it, in 1803, to the 
Herald's College. It is supposed to have been principally written 
by Mr. Eiece, but has some entries made since his decease, probably 
by his nephew, Eobert Appleton, who has inscribed on a page of 
the same " He (Mr. Eiece) was bountiful to the Poor, good to his 
Friends, a Christian to his Enemies, gentle to all, and to me a good 
Uncle. So I testify : Eobert Appleton." 

A collection of Suffolk Antiquities, very similar to this, and in 
many parts the same, was in the possession of the late Mr. James 
Conder, of Ipswich, the respectable author of a " Treatise on Pro- 
vincial Coins." 

Another folio volume of this gentleman's collecting, was in the 
library of the late George Nassau, Esq. ; and there is a manuscript 
in the British Museum, entitled " A Breviary of Suffolk," said to 
have been compiled by him : it is dedicated to Sir Eobert Crane, of 
Chilton Hall, in Suffolk ; signed " Eeyece," and dated 9th Feb. 1618. 
A letter that relates to Suffolk Genealogy, and addressed to Sir Si- 
rnond's D'Ewes, dated in 1636, and signed " Eobert Eyece," is also 
deposited in the same place. The other volume was formerly in the 
possession of Arthur Collins, Esq., author of " The Peerage of Eng- 
land," and afterwards of Nicholas Eevett, Esq., of Brandeston Hall, 
in this county : it was illustrated with the arms of the families of the 
county, beautifully emblazoned. 

Sin EICHARD GIPPS, of Great Welnetham, in this county, Knt., 
and of Gray's Inn, Master of the Eevels to King Charles II., was the 
writer of " Antiquitates Suffolcienses, or an Essay towards recovering 
some account of the Ancient Families in the County of Suffolk ;" a 
small work, which remains in manuscript, and of which there are 
several copies. Sir Eichard died in 1708. 



INTRODUCTION. V 

The collections of PETER LE NEVE, Esq., and " honest TOM 
MARTIN," contain much topographical information concerning this 
county ; to whom succeeded GEORGE NASSAU, Esq., of Trimley St. 
Martin ; whose attention was early directed to the elucidation of. 
the Antiquities of Suffolk, and his collections in this, his favourite 
department, were most ample, and profusely enriched with accurate 
drawings of churches, monuments, seats, buildings, &c. ; indeed a 
more choice or valuable treasure of Suffolk Topography, and of 
works in illustration of it, has been seldom or ever collected. 

Mr. Nassau died August 18, 1823 ; and in the Gentleman's Ma- 
gazine for that month, an excellent Memoir of him was inserted, 
from the pen of the Kev. JAMES FORD, B.D., Fellow of Trinity 
College, Oxford, and at that time Minister of St. Lawrence, in 
Ipswich, now Vicar of Navestock, in Essex; a gentleman to whom 
the public are indebted for much valuable genealogical information, 
respecting many Suffolk families, &c. 

In the year 1829, the library of Craven Ord, Esq., was dispersed, 
by Mr. Evans, and at the same time were sold some very valuable 
historical manuscripts ; one of the most important was " Suffolk 
Collections," in twenty folio volumes, and three volumes of indexes, 
purchased by Mr. Thorpe, bookseller, for 200 guineas. " Eegistrum 
de Bury, temp. Edw. III.," brought 126. 

There were also sold various Charters, Chartularies, Registries, &c. 
relating to this county. This auction consisted of 655 lots, including 
about 50 lots of autographs, and 120 volumes of ancient English 
manuscript ; and certainly no sale within memory, has distributed 
so extraordinary an assemblage of ancient and important MSS. re- 
lative to English history, many of which had previously belonged to 
Mr. Thomas Martin, the Thetford historian, and had been acquired 
by Mr. Ord, at a very trifling expense. A lot of Escheat Rolls, of 
Norfolk and Suffolk, of the 9th of Henry VII., brought 16 : this 
manuscript, and three others, was purchased at Martin's sale for 12s. 
It was understood that a considerable portion of the MSS. sold at 
Mr. Ord's, were afterwards added to the large collection of Sir 
Thomas Phillips, Bart., F.S.A. 

The largest collection of materials for a County History, is now 
deposited in the British Museum ; it was formed by the late HENRY 



VI INTRODUCTION. 

JERMYN, of Sibton, Esq., after whose death it was purchased by 
Hudson Gurney, of Keswick Hall, Esq., and presented by him : it 
is in upwards of fifty folio volumes. 

These are some of the materials towards a General History of this 
county, scattered, it is true, in various directions ; but if collected 
and arranged, together with the various collections made by other 
individuals, that still remain in their own possession, would be found 
amply sufficient. The various publications of a local nature, that 
have appeared at different times, will also certainly contribute greatly 
to the assistance of the future historian of the county. 

The earliest distinct work that has appeared on the topography of 
this county in general, is a small 12mo. volume, published in 1735, 
under the title of " The Suffolk Traveller ; or a Journey through 
Suffolk : in which is inserted the true distance of the roads from 
Ipswich to every Market Town in Suffolk, and the same from Bury 
St. Edmund's. Likewise the distance in the roads from one village 
to another, with notes of direction for Travellers, as to what churches 
and gentlemen's seats are passed by, and on which side of the road, 
and the distance they are at from either of the said towns : with a 
short historical account of the antiquities of every market town ; 
monasteries, castles, &c., that were in former times. Ipswich, 1 735." 

This volume is now become rare, and was the result of the labours 
of Mr. JOHN KIRBY, from an actual survey of the whole county, 
taken by him in the years 1732, 1733, and 1734 ; with which a 
small map of the county was published. Mr. Kirby was originally 
a school-master, at Orford, in this county, but at the time of making 
this survey occupied a mill, at Wickham Market. He died at Ips- 
wich, December 13, 1753 ; aged 63 years. 

A new edition of his work was published by subscription, with 
many alterations, and large additions, by several hands, in 1764. 
London : 8vo. This volume, besides a folio map of the county, 
contains engravings of the principal roads in Suffolk, on four 4to 
plates; and becoming scarce about thirty years since, frequently 
sold at from 20s. to 30s. a copy. A re-print was shortly after issued 
from Woodbridge, containing some trifling additions, which met 
with a ready sale ; and another edition, with additions, has since 
been published by Mr. Munro, of the same place. 



INTRODUCTION. Vll 

" A Topographical and Historical Description of the County of 
Suffolk ; containing an account of its Towns, Castles, Antiquities, 
Churches, Monuments, Public Edifices, Picturesque Scenery, the 
Kesidences of the Nobility, Gentry, &c., accompanied with Biogra- 
phical Notices of Eminent and Learned Men, to whom this county 
has given hirth." By Mr. SHOBERL. Illustrated with thirteen 
engravings and a map. 

" Excursions through Suffolk" differs but little from the above, 
except in the arrangement and illustrations, of which it contains 
one hundred, neat engravings. These, if we include an elegant 
volume in 4to., recently published, of " The History and Antiquities 
of Suffolk, containing Thingoe Hundred ;" by JOHN GAGE ROKE- 
WODE, Esq., F.R.S., and Dir. S.A., makes the whole that has ap- 
peared towards a General History of this county. 

The following sheets have no pretension whatever to be termed a 
History of Suffolk, although more ample than its predecessors ; the 
Compiler has neither leisure or ability for such an undertaking : but 
merely a collection of topographical and genealogical facts, relative 
to that county; for which the only credit the Editor can possibly 
hope to obtain, must arise from the accuracy with which his ma- 
terials are collected and disposed : and he is quite sure that, pursuing 
the same plan, with a more extended investigation, much more might 
be effected. 

It remains to state what has been attempted, and to point out the 
sources from whence his principal information is derived. To assist 
the etymologist, the names of the different parishes are prefixed, as 
they are written in Doomsday Book, or ancient documents. 

The manorial descents, and genealogical information, have been 
compiled from the historians of neighbouring counties, particularly 
Messrs. Morant and Blomefield. The old Peerages and Baronetages 
of Messrs. Collins, Wotton, Kimber, and Johnson, have been con- 
sulted, regarding those families since extinct ; and these authorities 
being now scarce, a more ample detail of such has been given : whilst 
the accounts of existing families of distinction, may easily be ascer- 
tained, by a reference to our modern publications on that subject, 
such as Debrett, Burke, and others. 

For the heraldic information, he is indebted to the same autho- 



viii INTRODUCTION. 

rities, and other writers on heraldry : the monastic, to " Taylor's 
Index Monasticus," for this county. 

The biographical sketches are gathered from various sources, 
amongst which the " Gentleman's Magazine," and the " Suffolk 
Garland," ought to he particularly acknowledged. The account of 
the different charities, and charitable institutions, is abridged from 
the Parliamentary Commissioners' Keport. 

It has been thought in several respects the more eligible mode to 
publish in separate parts, and the Compiler proposes to adopt that 
method ; following the order of Mr. Kirby's arrangement. The 
continuance must, however, depend upon the reception given to it 
by the public ; for although gain has no part in this production (for 
if others find that pleasure in reading which he has done in writing, 
he is repaid), nevertheless he cannot profess himself so disinterested 
as willingly to make any pecuniary sacrifice in the undertaking, did 
his circumstances permit, which is not the case. 

Mr. Hutton, the historian of Birmingham, in his preface to that 
work, observes " Although works of genius ought to come out of 
the mint doubly refined, yet History admits of a much greater lati- 
tude to the author: the best upon the subject, though defective, 
may meet with regard." 



In Domesday Book " SANFORT." 



This Hundred is separated by the Stour from Essex, on the 
South ; on the West, it abuts upon the Hundreds of Babergh and 
Cosford; on the East, it is bounded by the Liberty of Ipswich, and 
the River Orwell ; and on the North, by Bosmere and Clay don. 

In the Fifth of King Edward IV., the fee of this Hundred was 
in Sir Robert Willoughby, Knt., who died seized thereof; when 
it descended to Sir Robert, his son and heir, whose descendants 
inherited the same, until their failure in male issue, when Cathe- 
rine, the heir general of that house, brought it to the Suffolk 
Family, in the 20th of King Henry VIII., by her marriage with 
Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk. She re-married Richard 
Bertie, and by him had a son, named Peregrine, who, in his mo- 
ther s right, was summoned to Parliament as Lord Willoughby, 
of Eresby ; and was father of Robert, the first Earl of Lindsey, 
ancestor to the Duke of Ancaster. 

The present representative of this illustrious family is the 
Right Hon. Lord Willoughby de Eresby, Lord Great Chamber- 
lain of England, &c. do. : Ms mother, wife of the late Lord 
Gwydir, and daughter of Peregrine, 2>rd Duke of Ancaster, having 
succeeded to the ancient Barony of Willoughby de Eresby, on the 
demise of her brother, kth Duke, without issue, in the year 1779. 
Lord Willoughby is elder brother to the Hon. Lindsey Burrell, 
of Stoke Park, near Ipswich. 

The fee of this Hundred is now in the Crown, and the govern- 
ment in the Sheriff of the County, and his appointed officers. 

It contains the following Parishes : 



ARWERTON, 

BELSTEAD, 

BENTLEY, 

BRANTHAM, 

BURSTALL, 

CLOPTON, 

CATTIWADE, 

CHATTISHAM, 

CHELMONDISTON, 

COPDOCK, 

EAST BERGHOLT, 

FRESTON, 

HARKSTEAD, 

HIGHAM, 



And WOOLVERSTONE. 



HlNTLESHAM, 

HOLBROOK, 

HOLTON, 

RAYDON, 

SHELLEY, 

SHOTLEY, 

SPROUGHTON, 

STRATFORD, 

STUTTON, 

TATTINGSTONE, 

WASHBROOK, 

WENHAM MAGNA, 

WENHAM PARVA, 

WHERSTEAD, 



HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 



.^^ 

ARWERTON. 
ALWARTUNA, ERWARTON, EREVELTON, or EVERWARTON. 

This parish, at a very early period, became the inheritance of the 
De Anwelhyer's (or D'Avilers) family. Bartholomew D'Avilers, in 
or about 1227, left it to his son, Richard ; whose possessions, which 
laid here, and in Brome, in this county, and Shelf hanger, in Nor- 
folk, were then worth 40 per annum. 

They were held by the serjeantry of leading the foot soldiers of 
the two counties of Norfolk and Suffolk, into Wales, as often as the 
King should happen to resort into those parts with his army ; for 
which he was to have four-pence of each, for conduct money, and 
the rest of their maintenance was to be at the King's cost. 

It continued in the said house, after the above period, for four 
generations : Bartholomew^JD'Avilers being the last owner, of that 
family ; on whose death, in 1330, it passed to that of Bacon, by the 
marriage of Sir Robert Bacon, Knt., with Isabel, one of his daugh- 
ters, and co-heiresses, who held Arwerton, as her share of the 
property ; and ultimately the entire inheritance of her father de- 
volved upon this lady, her sisters, it is presumed, having died 
without issue. 

Sir Robert Bacon, and Isabel, his wife, had issue an only son, 
Bartholomew, and a daughter, Isabel ; who married Sir Oliver 
Calthorpe, of Burnham Thorp, in Norfolk, Knt. 

Sir Bartholomew Bacon, her brother, died in the 15th of King 
Richard II., 1392; and Isabel, his sister, being his sole heir, Sir 
Oliver, her husband, inherited in her right, this, and divers other 
lordships. 

Sir Oliver Calthorpe died in the latter part of the above reign, and 
Isabel, his wife, survived until the 12th of the following reign, 1411. 

Their descendants continued to inherit this property, until the 
death of Sir Philip Calthorpe, in 1549; who, by Jane his wife, 
daughter of Sir William Boleyn, of Blickling, in Norfolk, left issue 
Elizabeth, only daughter, and heiress. 



HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 

This lady became the second wife of Sir Henry Parker*, K.B., 
second son and heir of Henry Parker, first Lord Morley, of that 
house, and lady Alice, his wife, daughter of Sir John St. John, of 
Bletso, in Bedfordshire, Knt, 

By this marriage, this lordship, with considerable property in the 
county of Norfolk, passed from the Calthorpe family to that of 
Parker ; and Philip, son and heir of the above Sir Henry Parker, 
and Elizabeth, his wife, succeeded : he disposed of much of the 
Norfolk property, and settled in this parish ; where he built the 
hall, the old gateway of which still remains, as a curious specimen 
of Elizabethan architecture. 

Sir Philip received the honour of knighthood from Queen Eliza- 
beth, in her progress through this county, in 1578 ; and served the 
office of Sheriff, in 1580. His descendants continued to reside here 
for many generations; and Philip Parker, Esq., his great grandson, 
was created a Baronet, in 1661. (For further particulars concerning 
whom, consult " Wotton's English Baronets," edit, of 1727.) 

This estate appears to have devolved upon the heirs of Calthorpe 
Parker, third son of Sir Philip, the first baronet ; probably by the 
failure of male issue, in the elder branch of that family. He as- 
sumed the name of Long ; and it subsequently became the inheri- 

* PEDIGREE. PARKER OF ERWARTON. 

Sir William Parker, Knt. = Alice, daughter and heir of William, Lord 

I * Morley, juri uxoris. Ob. 1518, set. 60. 

Henry Parker, Lord Morley, juri matrix. = Alice, daughter of Sir John de St. John, 

Ob. 1556, tet. 80. j 1 of Bletsoe. Ob. 1552, set. 66. 

Sir Henry Parker, Knt., eldest son andElizabeth, daugh. and heir of Sir Philip 

heir. Ob. vita patris. \ 1 Calthorpe, Knt. 2nd wife. 

Sir Philip Parker, of Erwarton, Knt. 1578== Catherine, dau. of Sir John Goodwin. 

I 1 

Sir Calthorpe Parker, Knt., M.P. for=Mercy, daughter of Sir Peter Soames. 



Suffolk, 1640. 



Sir Phil. Parker, Bart., M.P. for Harwich = Dorothy , daughter and heir of Sir Robt. 

Gawdy, of Claxton, Norfolk. Obt. 

I -- I Jan. 14, 1638. Buried at Erwarton. 

Sir Philip Parker, Bart.=Rebecca, daughter and heir of Walter 

I -- 1 Long, of Whaddon, Wilts. 
Sir Philip Parker, Bart.=Mary, daughter of Samuel Fortrey, of 
I --- 1 Ryall Fenns, Camb., Esq. 

Sir Philip Parker, Bart. Ob. Jan. 20,_Martha, daughter of William, East, Esq. 
1741, set. 58. , -- . -- * -- , -- , 

Martha Parker. Elizabeth Parker. 

Lord Chedworth. James Plunkett. 



HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 5 

tance of the dowager lady of the Eight Hon. John Thymie Howe, 
second Lord Chedworth, who was one of the daughters of Sir Philip 
Parker Long, Bart. Erwarton Hall was sold, hy the Earl of Eg- 
mont, in 1786, to William Berners, Esq. 

Sir Henry Parker, the first Lord of that house, died in 1551, and 
Lady Elizaheth,* his widow, remarried to Sir William Woodhouse, 
of Hickling, in Norfolk, Knt. He died in 1564, leaving several 
children, the issue of that marriage ; and she shortly after took to 
her third husband, Sir Drue Drury, of Bidlesworth, in the same 
county, Kilt., hut had no issue by that marriage. 

The statement that Sir Philip Parker purchased this property of 
Sir Drue Drury, we apprehend, is not correct ; Sir Drue held it in 
right of this marriage, and it became afterwards the property of Sir 
Philip Parker, her son, by lawful inheritance. 

A branch of the noble, and very ancient family of Cornwallis, by 
marriage with that of Parker, became connected with this place ; 
several of whose descendants are interred in this parish church. 

Sir William Cornwallis, Kut, married Catherine, daughter of Sir 
Philip Parker, Knt., by Catherine, daughter of Sir John Goodwin, 
of Winchendon, in Buckinghamshire, Knt. 

He was eldest son of Sir Charles Cornwallis, Knt., Ambassador to 
King James I., and afterwards Treasurer of the Household to his 
Eoyal Highness Henry, Prince of Wales, by Elizabeth, his first 
wife, daughter of Thomas Finch am, of Fincham, in Norfolk. 

Sir William was a learned and ingenious essayist, on various 
subjects, in which he displayed much wit and judgment. 

Thomas Cornwallis, his grandson, entered into holy orders, and 

* A Portrait of this lady, engraved by Bartolozzi, is given amongst the " Por- 
traits of Illustrious Persons in the Court of Henry VIII." Published by Cham- 
berlaine, in 1/92 : and in the " Genealogical History of the House of Yvory,'' 
2 vols. 8vo., 1742, are engraved Portraits, by Faber, of 

SIR PHILIP PARKER A MORLEY, of Erwarton, in the County of Suffolk, Knt., 
son of Sir Henry Parker, Knt., eldest son and heir of Henry Parker, Lord Morley, 
and lineal ancestor to Catherine Parker, now Countess to Egmont. Knighted by 
Queen Elizabeth, 1578. 

CATHERINE, daughter of Sir John Goodwin, of Wincheudon, in the County 
of Buckingham, Knt., wife of Sir Philip Parker, Knt., brother of Sir Henry, and 
half-brother to Lord Morley. 

The Right Hon. CATHERINE, wife to John Perceval, Earl of Egmont, eldest 
daughter to Sir Philip, and sister to Sir Philip Parker Moiley Long, of Erwarton, 
in the County of Suffolk, Bart. ; the last of that family. Born, 1689 ; married, 
20tli June, 1710; now living, 1744. 



HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 

was instituted to the rectory of Erwarton, in 1686 ; and in 1687, 
he was appointed Chaplain to the Right Hon. the Earl of Warwick 
and Holland : on the 27th of June, in that year, he was instituted 
to the rectory of Bradley Parva, in this county; and on the 26th of 
September following, he married Mary, the daughter of Mr. Robert 
Cock, of Wherstead, Suffolk.* 

In the 25th of Henry III., Robert Bacun, was petent in a fine, 
and Joan, Prioress of Campsey, in this county, tenant, of 6s. 9d. 
rent here, and in Thwayt, in Norfolk, granted before by Roger 
Bacun, brother of Robert, to that Priory, and now released. 

ARMS. D'Avilers : argent, three escutcheons, gules. Bacon : 
argent, on a fess engrailed between three escutcheons, gules; as 
many mullets, or. Parker : argent, a lion passant, gules, between 
two bars, sable ; thereon, three bezants, two, and one ; in chief, as 
many bucks' heads caboshed, of the third. 

CHARITIES. Two tenements, occupied by poor persons, rent free. 
Three parcels of laud, containing together, about IA. 2R., let at 
rents amounting together to 7 9s. a year. The rents of the land 
are applied, after providing for repairs of the cottages, in the pur- 
chase of coals, which are sold to the poor at a reduced price. 



BELSTEAD PARVA. BELESTEDA, or BELSTEDA. 

Of the Goldingham family, who inherited property, Mr. Kirby 
says, in this parish, in the time of King John, or the following reign 
at the latest, we collect the following particulars : 

In 1206, William de Weston, released the lordship of Thorp 
Parva, in Norfolk, to Allen Pictaviensis, afterwards called Allen de 
Goldingham ; and in 1256, Daniel de Beccles held it of the said 
Allen, by the service of one Knight's fee. A lordship in Hethill, in 
the same county, called Goldingham's manor, was granted by Hugh 
Bigod to Allen de Goldingham, with view of frankpledge, and assize 
of bread and ale of all the tenants ; and in 1285, Alan de Golding- 
ham (probably his son) brought an action against Edmund de 
Wimundhale, and Maud, his wife (Alan's mother it is supposed), 
for waste committed in that part of this manor, which the said 

*For an account of their numerous descendants, and more ample particulars of 
this branch of the Cornwallis family, see Gents. Mag. for 1826, pp. 406, 502. 



HUNDRED OF SAMFOHD. 7 

Maud held in dower, of his inheritance. In 1315, John de Gold- 
ingham owned it ; and held part of it of the honour of Eye, and the 
other part of the Earl of Norfolk. In 1400, Kichard de Goldingham 
held it, who sold it to the Appleyards. 

John Goldingham,* Esq., Lord of Belstead Parva, died in 1518, 
and was buried with Jane, his first, and Thomasine, daughter and 
eo-heir of Kobert Listen, of Badingham, in this county, Esq., his 
second wife, in that parish church; and Weever mentions the fol- 
lowing interments there : " Margaret, late wife of John Goldyng- 
ham, Knt, died in an. 1413." "John Goldiugham, Esquire, 
son to John, dyed in an. 1420." " Elizabeth, late wife of John 
Goldingham, Esquire, died in anno 1429." 

Mr. Blomefield gives the following inscription from a brass plate 
in Narburgh church, in Norfolk : " Hereunder lyeth buried Eliza- 
beth Goldyngham, sometime the wyfe of John Goldyngham, Es- 
quire, who departed this present world the 4 Day of February, 
1556, whose Sowle God pardon." And a shield with the arms of 
Goldingham, impaling Spelman. 

The manor of Cotton, in Cambridgeshire, belonged for more than 
two centuries, to the baronial family of Engayne, and their repre- 
sentatives; and a co-heiress of Thomas Engayne, married to a 
Goldingham, who held a portion of it in the 41st of King Edw. III. 
Sir William Goldingham left two daughters and co-heirs, who 
married into the families of Chilterne and Mannock, about the 
16th of King Edward IV. 

The Pierpoints appear about this time to have had some interest 
here, for Mr. Parkin says, "Sibilla, daughter of Sir Simon Pierpoint, 
of this parish, and Henstead, in this county, married Sir Edmund de 
Ufford, who died in 1374, and was buried in Langley Abbey, in 
Norfolk. 

The family of Eeynolds appear also, to have been interred here : 
Henry Eeynolds, of Belstead, Esq., was patron of the church of 
Oxburgh, in Norfolk, in Queen Elizabeth's reign. 

The manor of Belstead now belongs to Sir Kobert Haiiand, of 
Nacton, in this county, Bart. 

John Carter, rector of this parish, and also many years minister 
of Bramford, in this county, was a native of Kent; and educated at 



* ARMS. Argent, a bend wavy, gules : with those of Liston, vert ; ten plates, 
4, 3, 2, and 1, impaling Carbouel, gules; a cross, argent, iu a bordune engrailed, or. 



8 HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 

Clare Hall, Cambridge. Although he had been often troubled for 
non-conformity, he took every occasion of exerting himself against 
popery, armenianism, and the new ceremonies ; and is spoken of as 
a man of great industry, charity, and piety. He died in 1634, and 
was buried at Belstead. There is a portrait of him in " Clarke's 
Lives of English Divines," and another engraved by Vaughan. 

CHARITIES. Charles Bedingfield, in 1749, gave by will 80; 
and Mary King, in 1754, gave 15, in addition to it; which was 
expended in the purchase of a double cottage, and 4|-A. of land, in 
Belstead, producing together an annual rent of about 15: this 
is distributed among poor persons, resident householders in the 
parish, after deducting for repairs. Mary King, in 1765, gave by 
will, the residue of her personal estate, which produces a further 
sum of 6 per annum ; and this is distributed among such poor 
industrious persons, as maintain themselves without parish relief, 
according to the will of the donor. 



BENTLEY. BENETLEIAM, or BENETLEIA. 

The Hugh Talleinache, whom Mr. Kirby says, paid a fine to 
Ipswich, for freedom from toll for himself and his villains, in this 
parish, in the time of King Henry III., was, most likely, the same 
personage who held of the Crown the lordship here, in the 25th of 
the following reign ; and, in the 29th of the same King, had sum- 
mons, among the Knights of this county, to attend his expedition 
into Scotland. 

This ancient family, which is of English extraction, has continued 
in an uninterrupted male succession, in this county, from the arrival 
of the Saxons, until the death of the late Right Hon. Wilbraham 
Tollemache, Earl of Dysart, in 1821 ; a period of more than thir- 
teen centuries. 

They were possessed of lands in this parish, long before the 
Norman conquest, where, till very lately, was to be seen, in the old 
manor house, the following distich : 

" When William the Conqueror reign'd with great fame, 
Bentley was my seat, and Tollemache was my name." 

William Tallemache gave lands in Bentley, and Dodness, to the 
Priory of Ipswich ; which were confirmed in the reign of King John. 



HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 9 

In the 29th of Edward L, William and John Tallemache, had 
also summons to attend the King at Berwick-upon-Tweed, pre- 
viously to his expedition into Scotland. This John took the Black 
Cross, and his arms are now remaining in the Minster of York. 

Sir Lionel Tallemache, of this parish, flourished in the reigns 

of Henry VI., and Edward IV. He married the heiress of 

Helmingham, of Helmingham, in this county ; by which alliance 
he acquired that inheritance, which is still the capital mansion of 
a collateral branch of the family. 

Jane, daughter of Scroop, of this parish, married Thomas 

Brews, Esq., father of Sir John Brews, of Wenham, in this county, 
and Topcroft, in Norfolk. 

There were several manors, in Bentley, viz. : the manor of 
Beutley and Bentley Church House ; Bentley Fastolfe, alias Lang- 
stones ; the manor of Dodnash and Charles : they are supposed to 
have merged into one ; and the present lord is Charles Edmund 
Keene, clerk, of Swyncombe, in Oxfordshire. 

The only CHARITY named in the Commissioners' Report for this 
parish, is a rent charge of 2 a year, upon a premises called " the 
Church House Estate," then the property of Benjamin Keene, Esq., 
and bequeathed by Talmach Duke, in 1716, to be distributed in 
bread to the poor, by the ministers and churchwardens. 



DODNASH. DODNESS, DUDENASCH, or DODENEYS. A small 
Priory in this parish, is said to have been founded by one Wymarus, 
or by the ancestors of the Earls of Norfolk, to whom the patronage 
belonged, from the time of King Edward I., until the dissolution. 

Thomas de Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, in the first of Hen. IV., 
held the advowson of the Priory of Dodnash, of our Sovereign Lord 
Eichard II., late King of England. 

By a deed dated at Doduash, the 23rd of Edward III. (in the 
possession of Mr Taylor, author of the Index Monasticus, and to 
whom we owe this information) , it appears that, in that year, Henry, 
Prior of the Church of St. Mary, of Dodnash, and the canons there, 
granted land in fee farm, to Ealph Lamburn, and Margaret his 
wife ; which was sealed by both parties, and witnessed by Hugh de 
Penna, John Copin, Richd. Curtays, and others. 

This Priory was endowed with the tythe of barley, in Fakenham, 



10 HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 

in Oolneis hundred; 320 acres of land, in Hemingston, Coddenham, 
&c. ; 280 acres, in Burstall, Bramford, &c., granted by Eoger de 
Wolveston; a house, and 39 acres of land, in Bergholt; and free 
warren, rents, and lands, in fifteen parishes. 

It was suppressed in 1 524 ; and granted to Cardinal Wolsey, to 
endow his college, at Ipswich : upon whose fall, it was re-granted to 
Thomas Alverde, in 1531. 



BRANTHAM. BRAINTHONA, or BRANHAM. 

Brantham Hall was the seat of a branch of the family of Edgar, 
of North Glemham, Suffolk. Sir Gregory Edgar was brought up 
to the law, and was chosen King's Serjeant, and Knighted by Henry 
VII. : he married Ann, daughter of Simon Wiseman, Esq., by whom 
he had two daughters; the eldest married to a son of Sir Humphrey 

Wingfield, the other to Walpole, of Norfolk. He 

died in 1506, and was buried in the church at Brantham. 

It was afterwards the seat of the Wingfields. Humphrey Wing- 
field, Esq., resided there in 1655 : he married Elizabeth, daughter 

and sole heir of Batisford, of Chesterton, in Cambridgeshire, 

Esq. He was lineally descended from Sir Humphrey Wingfield, of 
Dedham, Knt., who was Speaker to the Parliament in the time of 
Henry VIII. , and was the llth son of Sir John Wingfield, of Le- 
theringham, Knt. 

John Lancaster, of Brisingham, in Norfolk, Esq., married Eliza- 
beth, daughter and co-heiress of Sir John Braham, Knt., of Braham 
Hall, in Cattiwade, a hamlet belonging to this parish. 

By the last will of the said John Lancaster, dated in 1469, John 
and Henry, his younger sons, were to inherit his share in Boyton 
Hall manor, in the parish of Capel, with lands there, and in several 
adjoining parishes; and, after the death of the said Elizabeth his 
wife, and William, his eldest son, they were also to have his share 
of the manor of Braham Hall, in Cattiwade, to them and their 
heirs. 

The said Elizabeth lived until 1478, and, it appears, re-married 
to one Cator, for by that name she was found to die seized of the 
above estate. William Lancaster, of Cattiwade and Brisingham, 
Esq., married Elizabeth, daughter and co-heiress of William Not- 



HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. U 

beme, Esq., of in this county ; by whom he had an only 
daughter, Benedicta, who married Edward Bolton, of Boyland Hall, 
in Brisingham, about the year 1505. 

In 1551, Thomas Fincham, of Fincham Hall, in Norfolk, Esq., 
died, possessed of manors, lands, and tenements, in this parish, and 
Cattiwade, East Bergholt, Capel, and Stutton. He married Martha, 
daughter of William Yelverton, Esq., of Rougham, in Norfolk. She 
re-married, after his death, to John Heigham, Esq. 

William Fincham, Esq., their son and heir, succeeded, and died 
without issue, the 14th of Queen Elizabeth ; having previously 
conveyed some part of his inheritance to Charles Cornwallis, Esq., 
who married his sister Anne. 

ARMS. Braham : sable ; a cross flory, or. Fincham : harry 
of six, argent and sable ; a bend over all, ermine. 

Berengarius de Sap, gave two parts of his tythe in this parish, to 
the Priory of the Virgin Mary and St. Andrew, in Thetford. 

Walter de Suffield, alias Calthorpe, Bishop of Norwich, in 1256, 
gave by will, to repair the bridges in his diocese, two marks ; and to 
Cattiwade bridge, one mark. 

Thomas Tusser, one of our earliest didactic poets, and who has 
been styled " the British Varo," exchanged the life of a courtier for 
that of a farmer, and settled at Katwade (now Cattiwade), in this 
parish : here he composed his " Book of Husbandry," the first edi- 
tion of which was published in 1557. 

In 1805, Mr. John Constable, of East Bergholt, the celebrated 
artist, presented a handsome picture, measuring 7 feet by 4 feet, as 
an altar piece to this parish church : the subject, " Christ blessing 
the young Children," from the 10th Chap, of St. Mark. 

In the Commissioners' Report for inquiring concerning CHARITIES, 
no mention is made of any in this parish. 



BURSTALL, or BURGHESTALA. 

William Cage, Esq., a Portman, of Ipswich, had a country house 

in this parish, which he left to Blosse, eldest son of Tobias 

Blosse, Esq., and of the sole daughter of the. said Mr. Cage. He 
lived in the time of King James and King Charles, and served as 



12 HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 

Burgess for the Borough of Ipswich, in many parliaments. His 
estate was considered about 300 per annum. 

The Priory of Dodnash, in Bentley, was endowed with 280 acres 
of land in this parish, Bramford, &c., granted by Roger de Wol- 
veston. 



CAPEL. 

Boyton Hall manor, in this parish (not Eoitwell), appears to have 
passed as Cattiwade, in Bran th am : for we find, John and Henry, 
younger sons of John Lancaster, Esq., by Elizabeth, his wife, 
daughter and co-heiress of Sir John Braham, of Braham Hall, in 
Cattiwade, were to inherit their father's share in this lordship ; with 
lands in Capel, and several parishes thereabouts. 

In 1551, Thomas Fincham, Esq., died, possessed of lands and 
tenements in this parish, Brantham, Cattiwade, East Bergholt, and 
Stutton ; probably the same estate. 



CATTIWADE, or KATWADE. 
See BRANTHAM, of which parish this is a hamlet. 



CHATTISHAM. 

Daniel, second son of William Meadows, of Witnesham, and 
Agnes, his wife, became seated in this parish in the early part of 
the 17th century : he was a direct lineal descendant from the very 
ancient family of Meadowe, who possessed lands in Witnesham, in 
the time of King Henry II., and was ancestor of the Earls Manvers. 

Mr. Meadows was born at Eushmere, in 1577 ; and purchased of 
Sir Robert Hitcham, Knt., in 1630, the lordship of Witnesham. 
He died Sept. 7, 1651, and was buried in the nave of this parish 
church, where a latin .inscription remains to his memory. 

By Elizabeth, his wife, he had issue six sons and one daughter ; 



HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 13 

of whom, Sir Philip Meadows, the 5th son, was baptized at Chat- 
tisham, Jan. 4, 1625. He was educated at Cambridge, and became 
Latin Secretary to the Lord Protector, Knight Marshal of the 
Palace, and Knight of the order of the Elephant, of Denmark. In 
1656, he was sent Ambassador to the King of Portugal, and after- 
wards to the courts of Denmark and Sweden. He married, in 1661, 
Constance, second daughter and co-heir of Francis Lucy, of West- 
minster, Esq. ; and was succeeded by his only son 

Sir Philip Meadows, who was also Knight Marshal of the King's 
Palace: he married Dorothy, sister of Hugh Boscawen, 1st Viscount 
Falmouth. Their third son, Philip Meadows, Esq., deputy-ranger 
of Richmond Park, married, in 1 734, Frances, the only daughter of 
William Pierrepont, Viscount Newark ; only son of Evelyn, 1st 
Duke of Kingston. 

Charles Meadows, their second son and heir, on the decease of 
Elizabeth, Duchess dowager of Kingston, in 1788, succeeded to the 
estates of his uncle, William, 2nd Duke of Kingston ; and took the 
surname and arms of Pierrepont only, by sign manuel. In 1796, 
Mr. Pierrepont was elevated to the peerage, by the titles of Baron 
Pierrepont and Viscount Newark; and, in 1806, was advanced to 
the dignity of Earl Manvers. ARMS : argent ; semee of mullets, 
gules ; a lion rampant, sable. 

CHARITIES. The Rev. Thomas Warren, in 1797, gave by will, 
;200, on trust ; to apply the interest in educating poor children, at 
the charity school at Hintlesham, whose parents should be resident 
in the parish of Chattisham, being members of the church of Eng- 
land, in the principles of the Christian religion, and teaching them 
to read and write. This legacy having been invested in the 3 per 
cent, reduced annuities, the dividends are paid to the master of the 
Hintlesham school, for teaching four or five poor children of Chat- 
tisham in the manner directed by the will. 



CHELMONDISTON. 

Thomas Bedingfield, Esq., son and heir of Sir Thos. Bedingfield, 
of Darsham, Knt, had, in 1655, an estate in this parish, in right of 
his wife, Anna, daughter of Philip Bacon, of Woolverstone, Esq. 

In the time of King Edw. I., both the lordship and impropriation 



14 HUNDRED OF SAMFOHD. 

of Chelmondiston were in the Crown ; and the latter so continues, 
but the former is now the property of Archdeacon Berners. 

Dr. John Henley, commonly called " Orator Henley," was rector 
of Chelmondiston. 



COPDOCK. 

Thomas de Grey, Esq., sold this lordship and advowson to his 
younger brother, William de Grey, Esq., a lawyer of eminence, who 
was Solicitor- General to Queen Anne, und was re- appointed to the 
same office by King George I. ; constituted Attorney-General, in 
1766 ; and elevated to the Bench, in 1771, as Chief Justice of the 
Court of Common Pleas, when he received the honour of Knight- 
hood. 

Sir William resigned his judicial office in 1780, and was advanced 
to the peerage the same year, by the title of Baron Walsingham, of 
Walsingham, in Norfolk. He was succeeded, in 1781, by his only 
surviving sou, Thomas, 2nd Baron, who for twenty years filled the 
office of Chairman of the Committees of the House of Lords ; and 
was, upon his retirement, in 1814, granted a pension of 2000 per 
annum, for life. His Lordship was also Comptroller of the First 
Fruits and Tenths. 

He died in 1818, and was succeeded by his eldest son, George 
de Grey, 3rd Baron; who married, in 1804, Matilda, eldest daughter 
of Paul Cobb Methuen, Esq., of Corsham, but had no issue. His 
Lordship having been unfortunately burnt to death, together with 
lady Walsiugham, at his house in Harley Street, 26th April, 1831, 
the honours of the family devolved upon his brother, the Kev. Thos. 
de Grey, who died in 1839, when Thomas, his eldest son, succeeded. 

ARMS. harry of six, argent and azure : on a chief of the first, 
three annulets, gules. 

In Copdock lived a family of popish recusants, of the name of 
Foster ; the estate was worth about 200 per annum : which was 
sold to Sir Thomas Bedingfield, of Darsham, Knt. Henry Foster, 
of Copdock, Esq., compounded for his estate, in regard of his re- 
cusancy, for 200 6s. 8d. 

Mr. Tillotson mentions, in his " Church Notes," that in the 
church was a monument for " John Copdocke, Esq., and Richard 



HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 15 

Docket, Esq." who died, 1457 ; and Joane that " had been wife to 
either of them ." 

The Rev. Humphrey Summer, D.D., rector of this parish, with 
Washbrook, died March 23, 1814, at Cambridge. He was, in 
1797, elected Provost of King's College, in that University; and 
was son of a former Provost. Dr. Summer proceeded, A.B. in 1767, 
A.M. 1770, and S.T.P. in 1783. He served the office of Vice- 
Chancellor in the years 1798 and 1802. 



EAST BERGHOLT, or BERCOLT. 

" The men of Berk-holt, in the county of Suffolk, say, that in the 
time of King Henry, grandfather of our Lord the present King 
(Henry III.), they used to have this custom; that when they would 
marry their daughters, they used to give to the Lord, for license so 
to do, two ores, which were worth thirty-two-pence. 

" Here these ores, which were Saxon coins, are declared to be in 
value of our money, sixteen-pence a-piece ; but after, by the varia- 
tion of the standard, they valued twenty-pence a-piece. And this 
fine for the tenants marrying their daughters (profilialus suis ma- 
ritandisj was, without doubt, in lieu of mercheta mulierum, or first 
night's lodging with the bride, which the Lord anciently claimed in 
some manors." Blount's Tenures. 

Mr. Astle is of opinion that this kind of intercourse between the 
lord and his female villain never existed ; but was a fine paid by a 
sokeman, or a villain, to his lord, for a license to marry his daughter, 
to indemnify him for the loss of his property ; and in process of time, 
this composition was thrown into the aggregate sum of quit rents.* 

The family of Cardinall long resided in this parish ; and the last 
of the name of this branch, was slain at the battle of Edge-Hill 
(being in the Life Guard of Robert, Earl of Essex), in the defence 
of the Parliament, in 1042. Anne, his sister, being the heir general, 
married to Henry, second son of Sir Calthorpe Parker, of Erwarton, 
Knt. This William Cardinall married Anne, one of the daughters, 
and co-heirs of James Derehaugh, of Gedgrave, near Orford, Esq. : 
she died in 1657. 

East Bergholt L~odge was formerly the residence of Sir Richard 

* Archseologia, v. 12. 



16 HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 

Hughes, Bart., Admiral of the White ; who died there, Jan. 5, 1812, 
in the 83rd year of his age. The great length of service of this 
gallant and illustrious veteran, and his family, is remarkable; 
he was himself, above half a century, in actual employment. 

Admiral Hughes became a Post Captain in 1755, and was pro- 
moted to the rank of Admiral in 1780 ; was twice Commander-in- 
Chief on different stations, also Governor of Halifax, in Novia 
Scotia ; and during his nautical career, in every quarter of the 
globe, he had under his command, at separate periods, the gallant 
Nelson, Lord Collingwood, and several other of our most distin- 
guished naval characters. 

He was son of Sir Kichard Hughes, Bart., so created July 1 7, 
1773, by Joane, his wife, daughter of William Collyer, Esq,, Cap- 
tain in the Koyal Navy ; and succeeded his father, in 1780. 

Old Hall, in this parish, late in the Chaplin and Hankey families, 
passed to that of Godfrey; and Edward, son and heir of the late 
Peter Godfrey, Esq., now resides there. In 1833, he married Susan 
Elizabeth, Countess of Morton, daughter of Sir Francis Buller, of 
Lupton, in Devonshire, Bart., and relict of George, 17th Earl 
of Morton, who died in July, 1827. 

Highlands, in Bergholt, is now the residence of Charles Tyrell 
Oakes, Esq. ; who married Catherine Anne, the only child of the- 
Eev. William Tufnell, who formerly resided there. 

The Rectory, built by one of the Hankeys, is pleasantly situated, 
on an eminence, some distance from the church. The present rector, 
the Rev. Joshua Rowley, succeeded the Rev. Durand Rhudde, D.D., 
in 1819; he was presented to this valuable benefice by his brother- 
in-law, Peter Godfrey, Esq. ; who married Arabella, daughter of 
Sir Joshua Rowley, the first Baronet of that house, and sister to the 
above reverend gentleman, and the late Sir William Rowley, Bart., 
of Tendring Hall, in this county. 

The delightful situation of this parish, on an eminence com- 
manding beautiful and extensive prospects, has induced many other 
genteel families to settle here ; which gives the place an appearance 
far superior to most other villages in the county. This was also 
the residence of that pleasing poet, the Rev. William Banwhite 
Clarke, author of " The River Derwent." 

In the " Gentleman's Magazine," for 1788, p. 850, is an account 
of a monument, in the chancel of this parish church, to the memory 
of Edward, second son of Thomas Lambe, of Trimley, in this county. 



HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 1 7 

who died in 1617, with the following singular epitaph, engraved in 
two columns, each word beginning with the initial of his name : 

EDWARDE LAMBE 

EVER LIVED 

ENVIED LAUDABLY 

EVIL LORD 

ENDURED LET 

EXTREMITIES LIKE 

EVEN LIFE 

EARNESTLY LEARNE 

EXPECTING LEDEDE 

ETERNAL LIVERS 

EASE LAMENT 

Which a correspondent in the next month's Magazine, thinks may 
be read thus, by the alteration of one word, ledede, into he died : 

" Edwarde Lambe ever lived envied, laudably evil endured. Lord, let extremities 
like even life learn. He died expecting eternal ease. Livers lament. 

Mem. Eobert Debnam, of this parish, was one of a party of 
four, who from pious zeal, travelled from Dedham, in Essex, to 
Dovercourt, in the same county, and took from that parish church 
a famous crucifix, and burnt it. For this offence he was indicted 
for felony, convicted, and hung in chains upon Cattiwade causeway. 

CHARITIES. The Town Lands is an estate purchased about 1695, 
with part of a fund called the Town Stock, which had arisen from 
contributions in and before the time of Queen Elizabeth, for pro- 
viding victuals to be sold at a cheap rate, and for other charitable 
purposes : this consists of cottages, lands, and stock in the funds, 
producing an income of about 60 a year ; which sum, after de- 
fraying charges for repairs, and necessary outgoings, is laid out in 
the purchase of linen for clothing, and given to the poor. Edward 
Lamb, conveyed by deed, in 1589, to trustees, a school-house, and 
piece of land in this parish, part of the manor of Illarys, to the in- 
tent that a free-school should be upheld in East Bergholt ; and at 
the same time Lettice Dykes conveyed certain property in Langham 
and Colchester, in Essex, and in this parish, for a similar purpose. 
The property held under these endowments is appropriated to the 
payment of a salary to the master of East Bergholt school, and 2 
a year to a schoolmaster at Stratford, the same sum to a school- 
master at Langham, and the surplus in support of a Sunday-school, 
and a school of industry, at East Bergholt. Edward Clarke, in 
1720, bequeathed three cottages, and a rent charge of 12 a year, 
out of his estate in Tattingstone, for the use of three poor industrious 



18 HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 

widows of this parish. Joseph Chaplin, in 1725, devised, by will, 
an estate in East Bergholt, to Henry Hankey, and his heirs, to the 
intent that the rents thereof might be applied for providing coats 
and shoes for five poor men, and gowns, petticoats, and shoes, for as 
many poor women, in this parish, and such as receive no alms ; to 
be given to them yearly, but not to the same persons for two years 
successively. The charity estate producing an income of 30 a 
year, which is more than sufficient to effect the apparent intention 
of the testator, the number of its objects have been increased. 
James Mitchell gave 3 a year to be distributed in bread to the 
poor ; which property, with an allotment awarded on an inclosure, 
lets for 10 a year, and the rents are laid out in bread. 



FRESTON. 

In the time of Queen Elizabeth, Thomas Gawdy, Esq., who was 
afterwards a Knight, and Judge of the Common Pleas, was owner 
of Bond's manor, in this parish ; and also of Woolverstone and 
Tattingstone, into which parishes it extended. 

Henry Gawdy, his son, was created a Knight of the Bath, at the 
coronation of King James I. ; he married Elizabeth, daughter of 
Robert Warner, Esq., of Mildenhall, in this county. 

ARMS. Gawdy : argent ; a tortoise passant, vert. 

The manor of " Bonds," in Freston, is the property of Sir Philip 
Broke, Bart., of Nacton. 

The patroness of the Rectory, is Mrs. Bond, who resides in the 
parish ; and the present rector, is the Rev. George Murray. 

One of the most interesting objects upon the banks of the Orwell, 
is Freston Tower ; which was, in all probability, built by one of the 
Latimers. It is a strong, quadrangular building, of red brick, with 
a polygonal turret at each angle : it is six stories high, each con- 
taining one room, communicating with each other by a winding 
stair-case, on the east side; and all are of the same dimensions. 
The best apartment seems to have been on the fifth story, being 
higher than any of the others, and the windows are considerably 
larger. There being no building connected with it, there can be no 
doubt but that the object of the founder was to command the most 
extensive view upon the river. 



HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 19 

A print of this Tower was published, in 1827, in the " Architec- 
tural Antiquities of Suffolk," by Mr. Henry Davy ; and some 
beautiful lines upon this interesting object of antiquity, from 
the pen of Mr. John Hannah, of Ipswich, are printed in Clarke's 
" History of Ipswich." 



HARKSTEAD, or HERCHESTEDA. 

In the Domesday Book, Odo de Campania, Earl of Albermarle 
and Holderness, was lord of this manor ; which was afterwards 
granted to the Nunnery of Dartford, in Kent, by King Edward III. ; 
and at the dissolution of that Monastery, 31st Henry VIII., it was 
granted to Sir Percival Hart. It afterwards belonged to a family 
named Cocks, who, with the advowson and the manor house, sold 
it to Knox Ward, Clarencieux King at Arms ; whose heir sold 
it, the manor, and lands, to Thomas Staunton, Esq., many years 
M.P. for Ipswich ; and the advowson to the Rev. Richard Canning, 
who edited the 2nd edition of the " Suffolk Traveller," printed in 
1764. The property now belongs to the Venerable the Archdeacon 
Berners, of Woolverstone Park ; and his second son, the Rev. Ralph 
Berners, is now rector of this parish, and of Erwarton. 

In the 9th of King Edward I., William le Brittone, was owner of 
a lordship in this parish. 

Robert, second son of William Whettell, Gent., citizen and mer- 
chant taylor of London, and younger brother of William Whettell, 
Esq., of Ampton, in this county, married Margaret, daughter and 
co-heir of George Sampson, Gent., owner of an estate and manor in 
this parish, called Netherhall ; which property Mr. Sampson devised 
to Margaret, his wife, during the minority of George, his only son; 
who survived only six years, when it devolved to Elizabeth, Frances, 
Susan, and Margaret, his sisters and co-heirs 

Robert Whettell, and Margaret, his wife, purchased the other 
sisters' shares ; whereby they became lawfully seized of this estate 
in fee simple. He died about 1607, and his widow re-married to 
Francis Colby, Gent. Some litigation took place between the widow, 
her second husband, and William Whettell, Esq., respecting money 
transactions ; which became, at length, amicably adjusted by the 



20 HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 

sale of this Netherhall estate, in 1618, to Richard Sutton, of Acton, 
in Middlesex, Esq. 

Nicholas Locke, A.M., rector of this parish, and Uggeshall, in 
this county, was appointed, by letters patent from the Bishop of 
Norwich, in 1561, Commissary of Suffolk Archdeaconry ; and also 
Official to the Archdeacon of Sudhury. 



HIGHAM, or HEIHHAM. 

The lordship of Higham was granted by Maud de Munchensi, 
in the time of Henry III., to the Priory of the Holy Trinity, in 
Ipswich. In the 9th of King Edward I., John de Eeymes was 
owner of this lordship ; and it afterwards became the property of 
Michael de la Pole, who, being constituted Chancellor to King 
Richard II., obtained from him a special charter to hold a court 
leet in his lordship of this parish. 

The family appears to have descended from Roger de Reymes (or 
Reynes), who came into England with William I., or the Conqueror, 
and had the honour and barony of Reynes, consisting of ten knights' 
fees, in Essex, conferred on him. A branch of this house were seated 
at Overstrand (or Oxstrand), in Norfolk, for many generations. 

ARMS. Reymes : sable ; a chevron between three lions rampant, 
argent. 

From this place, it is supposed, the family of Higham did first 
take their name ; they had considerable property in different parts 
of the county, and Sir Clement Heigham was Speaker of the House 
of Commons in the time of Philip and Mary. 



HINTLESHAM, 

In the 9th of Edward I., was the demesne of John Talbot and Mar- 
garet Pypard ; and in the 31st of that reign, John Pypard paid to the 
King, amongst other things, 2s. for his relief for 06 12 rent in land, in 
this parish, held of the King by the service of one sparhawk, yearly. 
Weever, in his " Ancient Euneral Monuments," mentions inscrip- 
tions in this parish church, to the following members of the Tim- 
perley family, owners of this manor : John Timperley, Esq., who 



HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 21 

died in 1460, and Margaret his wife ; William Timperley, who died 
March 10, 1527 ; Thomas Timperley, Esq., who died in 1500, and 
Etheldred his wife, eldest daughter of Nicholas Hare, and Kathe- 
rine his wife ; also Nicholas Timperley, Esq., and Anne his wife, 
daughter and heiress of William Markham, Esq. 

In 1310, Robert de Ray don, of Raydon, in this county, had a 
charter of free warren here ; and, in 1314, the said Robert had the 
King's licence to settle it on John, his son, and Hawise, his wife ; 
in 1359, the said Hawise, then widow of John de Wysham, held 
here. It appears not long after, the lordship became vested in the 
Timperley family ; and so continued until King Charles the Se- 
cond's reign, if not later. 

The hall and manor of Hintlesham, was purchased of the Tim- 
perleys, by Richard Powis, Esq., M.P. for Orford, in 1734 ; he sold 
it to Sir Richard Lloyd, one of the Barons of the Exchequer, in 
1759 ; in whose family it continued until the death of the late Miss 
Harriet Lloyd, who .bequeathed it to Capt. Hamilton Lloyd Anstru- 
ther, who now resides there. 

Sir Henry D'Oyley, of Pondhall, in Hadleigh, married Margaret, 
natural daughter of John, Duke of Norfolk, relict of Sir John Tim- 
perley, of this parish, Knt. Sir Henry died in 1563, the 5th of 
Queen Elizabeth. 

This family descended from Thomas Timperley, of Bowden, in 
Cheshire, Esq. ; whose son and heir, John Timperley, married 

Margaret, daughter and heiress of Raydon, and inherited this 

estate in her right. They had issue, John, who married, and left 
an only daughter and heiress, Elizabeth, wife of Firmin Rookwood, 
of Weston, in Norfolk. 

Nicholas Timperley, Esq., their 2nd son, died before his father, 
and is buried in the church of Buxhall, in this county ; where he is 
said to have died in 1489. William Timperley, of this parish, Esq., 
his son and heir, died in 1527, as above; and Thomas, his son, 
married Etheldred, eldest daughter of Sir Nicholas Hare, of Bruis- 
yard, in this county, Knt. 

Nicholas was their son and heir, who married Anne, daughter 
and co-heir of William Markham, Esq., of Oakley, in Northamp- 
tonshire ; and Michael Hare, Esq., his uncle, gave by will, in 1609, 
the lordships of Colkirk and Gately, in Norfolk, to his brother, 
Thomas Hare, for life ; and then to this Nicholas Timperley, Esq., 
his nephew ; whose son, Sir Thomas, inherited the same. 



22 HUNDRED OF SAMFO11D. 

In the 10th of King Edward IV., Joan, wife of Robert Timperley, 
was found to be daughter and heir of Eobert Fitz- Simon. 

Charles Vesey, Esq., lord of a manor in this parish, formerly 
belonging to Bury Abbey, married Elizabeth, daughter of Edmund 
D'Oyley, of Shotesham, in Norfolk, and Pondhall, in Hadleigh, 
Esq., by Anne his first wife, daughter of Sir John Goodwin, of 
Wiuchendon, in Bucks. 

ARMS. Timperley : gules ; a lion party per bend, ermine and 
ermines. Vesey : ermine ; on a cross, sable, five martlets, or. 

John Fortune, blacksmith, of this parish, died for maintaining 
the doctrines of the Gospel, in Queen Mary's reign ; but whether in 
prison or at the stake, is not certain, 

In 1336, Thomas Foxtone, LL.D., was rector of this parish, 
and afterwards of Thorndon, in this county. Dr. Foxtone was also 
Chancellor of Norwich, in 1316, and of the University of Cam- 
bridge, in 1330. 

CHARITIES. A school premises, consisting of a school-room and 
play- ground, of 2R. 12p., built and given by the Misses Lloyd, of 
this parish, in exchange for other property ; and an estate, con- 
sisting of a cottage, small barn, and about six acres of land, in the 
parish of Aldham, purchased by the parishioners, with the assis- 
tance of Francis Colman, Esq., of Ipswich. The rents are paid to 
a schoolmaster, for teaching seven poor children to read, write, and 
cast accounts. 



HOLBROOK. HOLEBROC, or HOLBEBROC. 

John, Lord Latimer, who was in the rebellion called " the Pil- 
grimage of Grace," in the time of King Henry VIII., married 
first, Dorothy, daughter and co-heir of John, Earl of Oxford; and, 
secondly, Catherine, daughter of Sir Thomas Parr, Knt. ; and the 
said Catherine afterwards married King Henry VIII. 

In the 35th of that reign, John Lord Latimer, his son, had livery 
of this lordship, with Chelsworth, Walsham, and Preston, in this 
county ; with divers other manors in various counties, most likely 
through the interest of the said Catherine with her Royal consort. 

He married Lucy, daughter of Henry, Earl of Worcester, and 
died the 20th of Queen Elizabeth, 1577, without male issue; so 



HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 23 

that, by the marriage of his four daughters and co-heirs, his largo 
estate became divided. 

Katherine, married Henry, Earl of Northumberland. 

Dorothy, Thomas, Earl of Exeter. 

Lucy, Sir William Cornwallis ; and 

Elizabeth, Sir John Danvers, Knt. ; from whom is descended 
the present Duke of Leeds, Viscount Latimer. 

In this parish was the chief seat of the family of Clench. John 
Clench, one of the Judges to Queen Elizabeth, resided here : lie 
died in^lGOT, and was buried in the church, where there is a fine 
monument erected to his memory, his wife, and children. Thomas 
Clench, his son, served the office of Sheriff, for Suffolk, in 1616 ; 
and John Clench, his son, served the same office, in 1639. 

ARMS. Clench : gules ; three gemel rings, or, pendent, 2 and 1 ; 
a chief of the second. 

There is a portrait of the Judge, engraved by Hollar, published 
by Sir William Dugdale, in his " Origines Juridiciales," 1666. 

CHARITIES. A fund of 30, the amount of two benefactions of 
5 each, given for the poor, in 1662, and 20 received on the 
sale of a workhouse, at interest of 60s. a year ; this, together with 
the sacrament money, and occasional contributions, is laid out in 
the purchase of coals. 



HOLTON, or HOLETUNA, 

In the time of Henry VI., belonged to a branch of the Fastolffes, 
of Caistor, in Norfolk ; and was afterwards sold to the Mannocks, 
of Gifford's Hall, in Stoke, who sold the estate to Sir John Wil- 
liams ; it now belongs to Sir Joshua Kowley, of Tcndring Hall, 
Bart. 

This lordship became early invested in the family of Boyton, and 
William de Boyton held it in the early part of the reign of King 
Edward I. 

In 1310, Robert de Reydon, of Ray don, in this hundred, had a 
charter of free warren in this parish ; with Stratford, Hiutlesham, 
Wherstead, and Woolverstone. 

Anne Candler, a Suffolk cottager, author of a small paraphrase 
on the 5th chapter of the 2nd book of Kings, the History of Joseph, 



24 HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 

the Life of Elijah the Prophet, and several other poetical pieces, 
died in this parish, Sept. 15, 1814, aged 74 years. 

CHARITIES. Here are several small benefactions, given for the 
benefit of the poor of this parish ; and a charity school, established 
and endowed by the exertion, and through the pecuniary aid of the 
Rev. Stephen White, a late rector : 25 scholars, 16 boys and 9 girls, 
are instructed as free scholars, in reading, writing, and arithmetic ; 
and the girls are taught needle work. Mr. White conveyed, by 
deed, a piece of land, which produces a rental of Q per annum, to 
be applied towards raising premiums, to be given annually to the 
children of the said school, or persons brought up in the school, 
bringing certificates of good behaviour, in service or apprenticeship, 
under such regulations as may be judged most conducive to the en- 
couragement of honesty, industry, and Christian behaviour.* 



RAYDON, or RIENDUNA. 

This property appears to have passed as the following parish of 
Shelley, and to have continued in the same proprietary. 

A considerable part of the parish, and the manor of Raydon, be- 
longed to Sir William Beaumauris Rush, whose daughter 

married to Dr. Edward Daniel Clarke, the celebrated traveller. 

In the church of Raydon, is a tablet, against the north wall, 
erected to the memory of John Mayer, D.D., who was rector of this 
parish 35 years. He was the author of several works upon the 
English catechism, Expositions upon the New Testament, &c. He 
died March 5th, 1063, in the 82nd year of his age. 

The Rev. Richard Fisher Belward, D.D., of this parish, was 
Master of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, to which he was 
elected in 1795, having been many years public tutor of that 
society : B.A., in 1769 ; M.A., 1772 ; and S.T.P., by mandate, in 
1796. Dr. Belward assumed that name for a family estate, in 
the county of Norfolk: he died here, May 16th, 1803, aged 57 
years. 

CHARITIES. The Rev. John Nayler, D.D., in or about the year 

* This we have no hesitation in pronouncing a most judicious bequest, and 
worthy the attention of those who have the management of similar institutions, 
with a surplus fund, and demur as to the best method of applying it. 



HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 25 

1068, charged, by his will, his lands in this parish, with the pay- 
ment of 10s. a year to the minister, and 40s. a year to be laid out 
in bread, and distributed among the poor. A cottage and garden, in 
the jmrish of Higham, were given by Thomas Glanville, in or about 
the year 1725 ; the rents thereof to be divided between five poor wi- 
dows, of each of the parishes of Kaydon, Higham, and Holton. These 
premises are let at 3 a year, and the rent distributed accordingly. 



v SHELLEY. SHELLI, or SHELLEIGHE. 

The manor of Shelley belonged to the family of Tateshale. In 
the 1st of Edward L, Eobert de Tateshale died seized of it ; and in 
the time of Henry IV., John de Orby and Adam Blyston, held it of 
the King, in capite, at the annual rent of 20d., as formerly belong- 
ing to Robert de Tateshale. 

John de Ingham held a lordship in this parish, about 1272 ; of 
the barony of Tibenham, in Norfolk, the inheritance of the Tates- 
hale family. 

In the 5th of King Edward IV., John L'Estrange, of the city of 
Norwich, Esq., grandson and heir of John L'Estrange, Esq., of 
Hunstanton, in Norfolk, and Alice, his wife, daughter of Nicholas 
Bemant, of Pakenham, in this county, and of Maud, his wife, sister 
of Nicholas Pike, deceased, late of Colchester, in Essex, released 
all his right in this manor, to Sir John Howard, John Clopton, and 
others, in trust. 

He died in 1476, without issue ; and Henry L'Estrange, his 
brother, succeeded : he married Catherine, daughter of Eoger Drury, 
of Hawstead, in this county, Esq. ; and died in 1483, seized of 
manors in Pakenham and Stowlangtoft, in this county. 

In the 9th of King Edward II., the Hall was the seat of John de 
Appleby ; and afterwards it came to the Knightly family of Tilney, 
who also held considerable estates in Stonham Aspal, East Berg- 
holt, Cowlinge, and Hadleigh. Sir Frederick Tiluey was the last 
of the name in Shelley : he married a daughter of Sir Francis 
Needham, of Barking, Knt., and sold the estate, about 1627, to 
Thomas Kerrick, Esq., who married a daughter of Sir Martin 
Lumley, of Bardfield Magna, in Essex, Bart. He served the office 
of High Sheriff of Suffolk, iu 1647. 



26 HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 

It afterwards passed into the family of Rush, by purchase, and is 
now the property of Sir William B. Rush. 

ARMS. Tateshale : cheque, or and gules ; a chief, ermine. 
L 'Estrange : gules ; two lyoncels passant, argent. Tilney : ar- 
gent ; a chevron between three griffins' heads, erased, gules. 

The church was impropriatcd to the Abbey of Battle, in Sussex ; 
and, at the dissolution, the impropriation, and the lands called 
" Kernelscroft," and " Wytherseys," otherwise " Gerwayes," were 
granted to Lawrence Baskervile and William Blake. 



SHOTLEY. SCOTELEIA, or SCEUELEIA. 

The very ancient family of Visclelieu, became early seated in 
this parish, and continued here about seven generations. 

William de Visdelieu, in 1300, married Rose, sister and heir 
of Elizabeth de Shotisbroke ; by whom he left an only son, Sir 
Thomas Visdelieu, Knt., who left two daughters, co-heiresses, 
between whom his large estate became divisible. 

This lordship descended to Margaret, the eldest daughter ; who 
married Thomas Mossells, Esq., and they, having no male issue, it 
descended to their youngest daughter, Joan ; who married John 
Felton,* Esq., and he inherited the property in her right. 

John Eelton was sometimes, for his eminence as a merchant, 
termed " John de Chapman." His son, Robert Felton, Esq., mar- 
ried Margery, sister and heiress of Sir Thomas Sampson, of Play- 
ford, in this county, Knt. ; and acquired that lordship, with several 
other manors and estates in that neighbourhood, by this marriage. 

Robert Felton, who died in 1506, by his will, desired " that his 
body be buried in the chancel of the church of Shotley, as near to 
his grandfather as can conveniently be, and that a stone be laid 
over him, like that of his grandfather's." 

This estate became the inheritance of the Right Hon. John 
Hervey, first Earl of Bristol, by his marriage with Elizabeth, only 
daughter and heiress of Sir Thomas Felton, of Playford, in this 
county, Bart., Comptroller of the Household, and Privy Councillor 

* Mr. Rokewode says, " the pedigrees of Felton will generally be found incorrect." 
In the descent of Sir Thomas Felton, we have followed Mr. Blomefield's authority, 
which differs materially from that of Mr. Kirby. 



HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 27 

to Queen Anne. It still continues in that noble house, Frederick 
William, Marquess of Bristol, being the present lord and patron. 

William Talmach, rector of this parish, in 1538, and also of 
Easton, Wickhambrook, and Helmingham, all in this county, was 
appointed, by letters patent from the Bishop of Norwich, in 1527, 
Commissary of Suffolk Archdeaconry, and Official of Sudbury 
Archdeaconry. 

George Raymond, M.A., rector here, and minister of St. Law- 
rence and St. Nicholas, in Ipswich, was, in 1713, appointed to the 
same offices. He was interred in St. Nicholas churchyard, in 1725. 

The Eev. John Pretyman, D.D., was also rector of Shotley, Pre- 
centor and Archdeacon of Lincoln, Prebendary of Norwich, and also 
of Biggleswade, in Bedfordshire. Dr. Pretyman was a native of 
Bury St. Edmund's ; only brother of Sir George Pretyman Tomline, 
Bart., Bishop of Winchester, prelate of the most noble Order of the 
Garter. He died at Lincoln, June 5th, 1817. 

The present rector of Shotley, is the Rev. Samuel Forster, D.D., 
formerly head master of the grammar school, Norwich. 

ARMS. Visddieu : argent; three wolves' heads erased, gules 
(probably in allusion to their name Wolf's Face) . Felton : gules ; 
two lions passant, ermine, crowned, or. 

CHARITIES. An estate devised for six poor inhabitants of this 
parish, by Andrew Barfoot, in 1591, containing about five acres: 
yearly rent, .G Gs. ; winch is distributed annually among poor 
widows, and other poor persons. A sacrament fund of .10, the 
interest applied to the purpose of the gift. 



SPROUGHTON. 

The manor of Boss Hall, in Sproughton, was so called from 
Edward de Bordeshawe, who resided there in the time of Henry III., 
and in whose family it continued for some generations. It after- 
wards came into the family of Bull : the hall was built by Anthony 
Bull, portman of Ipswich, in the time of James I. Thomas, Ins 
son, left three daughters; one married to Benjamin Cutler, of 
Sproughton ; another, to Charles Vesey, of Hintlesham, Esq. ; and 
the other, to Serjeant Major John Moodie, of Ipswich, in 1655. It 
afterwards passed into the Broke family, of Nacton ; and was lately 



28 HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 

sold by them to the late Mr. Thomas Kersey, of Whitton ; whose 
son now resides there. 

In the llth of King Henry VI., 1433, Sir William Drowries 
held one knight's fee in this parish ; from whom it passed to Sir 
Thomas Sampson, of Playford, Knt. : this manor and advowson 
remains in the same house, as at the period Mr. Kirhy's account 
was published, Frederick William, Marquess of Bristol, being the 
present lord and patron ; having passed as the lordship of Playford. 

The Chauntry* afterwards came into the possession of Metcalfe 
Kussel, Esq.; from whom it descended to Michael, son of Peter 
Collinson, Esq., the ingenious botanist, and long an eminent mem- 
ber of the Royal Society; the intimate friend of Franklin, Lin- 
nseus, &c., and who held correspondence with eminent men in almost 
every nation of the world. 

Mr. Collinson came into possession of the said property upon 

the death of the above named Metcalfe Russel, in 1785 ; and, like 

his father, was distinguished for his knowledge in natural history, 

and the attention lie gave to botanical subjects in particular. He 

died in 1705, in the 67th year of his age, and was buried in the 

chancel of this parish church. Charles Streynsham Collinson, Esq., 

his only son, who had been long on the civil service in India, suc- 

Jea. brrnfaj ceeded; upon whose death, in 1831, this estate was purchased by 

!&**' J^ Charles Spooner Lillingstone, Esq., who is the present proprietor. 

The house formerly the residence of Admiral Sir Robt. Harland, 
Bart., has been pulled down ; but John Josselyn, Esq., has a neat 
residence for a country gentleman, situated in this parish. 

The Rev. William Layton, a gentleman who devoted much of his 
time to topographical and genealogical enquiry, especially into the 
history of his native county, was a native of this parish. 

He was the only surviving son of the Rev. Andrew Layton, A.M., 
for 28 years rector of St. Matthew, in Ipswich ; descended from a 
very ancient, and highly respectable family, in Yorkshire ; and was 
born in the rectory house here. 

At a very early age he was placed under the care and tuition of 
his uncle, the Rev. Anthony Temple, A.M., the learned and eminent 
master of the free grammar school at Richmond, hi Yorkshire ; from 
thence he was removed to St. Paul's school, London ; with an ex- 
hibition from which school he was entered a pensioner of Trinity 

*The Chauntry has been engraved in Neale Scot's "Excursions," and for 
Clarke's Pocket Book. 



HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 20 

College, Cambridge, where he proceeded to the degree of A.B. in 
1773, and to that of A.M. in 1770. In 1774 he was licensed, on 
the nomination of George William, Earl of Bristol, to the perpetual 
curacy of Playfurd, in tlu's county ; and the following year was pre- 
sented, by the Crown, to the rectory of Helraley, in the same county, 
and to that of St. Matthew, in Ipswich. 

Mr. Layton possessed a very valuable and extensive library, rich 
in works of topography, antiquities, and genealogy, to which branches 
of literature he was early and ardently attached ; and in which not a 
book is to be found that does not contain some marks of his corrective 
hand. But Ins attention was chiefly directed to the ecclesiastical 
liistory of his native county ; and in this, his favourite department, 
liis manuscript collections were most ample, and of great value from 
their extreme accuracy, and minuteness of research. 

To the 6th volume of " Illustrations of the Literary History of 
the 18th Century," published in 183.1, is prefixed the following de- 
dication : " To the Kev. William Layton, M.A., rector of St. Mat- 
thew, Ipswich ; a gentleman to whom the late Mr. Nichols was 
indebted, during a friendship of more than forty years, for much 
valuable literary assistance, this volume is respectfully dedicated, by 
his faithful humble servants, J. B. Nichols and Son." 

Mr. Layton died at his residence in St. Mary at Elms, Ipswich, 
February 19, LS31, in his 81st year; and his remains were depo- 
sited in the family vault, in the churchyard of St. Matthew, in the 
same town. Few persons ever passed a more active and useful life. 

We also meet with the following, who held the rectory of this 
parish: in 1525, William Kempe, B.D. ; who, in 1519, was ap- 
pointed Commissary of the Archdeaconry of Suffolk, by Kichard 
Nykke, or Nix, Bishop of Norwich. 

The Rev George Eogers, A.M., was a native of Bury St. Ed- 
mund's, and received the rudiments of his education at the free 
grammar school in that town, then under the superintendence of 
that accomplished scholar, the Rev. Robert Graham, A.M. From 
thence he was removed to Trinity College, Cambridge, of winch 
society, on proceeding to the degree of A.B., in 1704, he was 
elected a Fellow; and, in 1707, he proceeded to that of A.M. 

In 1766, he was presented, by Sir Charles Davers, Bart., to the 

. Ll rectory of Welnetham Parva, which he resigned on his presentation, 

by the same patron, to that of Horningsheath, both in Suffolk, in 

1767. In 1784, Mr. Rogers was presented, by Frederick, 4th Earl 



30 HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 

of Bristol, and Bishop of Derry, to the rectory of this parish, wlu'ch 
he held for upwards of half a century : he died Dec. 15, 1835, at 
the patriarchal age of 94 years. 

He was the author of several sermons, and edited those of his 
intimate friend, the Eev. Edward Evanson ; to wliich he prefixed a 
brief, hut well written memoir of the author. Mr. Rogers was well 
versed in classics and theology. A private plate was engraved, for 
the gratification of his friends, from a portrait hy W. M. Bennett. 

CHARITIES. The annual sum of .1 6s. is paid as a rent charge 
on a field in Whitton, in this county ; and the same is applied in 
furnishing hread, which is distributed among poor widows. Origin 
unknown. A double cottage, in this parish, is occupied rent free, 
by two poor widows, and is repaired by the parish : it appears to 
have been settled by Elizabeth Bull, in 1G18, for that purpose. 



STRATFORD ST. MARY, or STRATFORT. 

Sir Edward Sulyard, of Haughley Park, had a considerable estate 
in this parish ; wliich he sold, in 1657, to Major General Sir Pliilip 
Skippon*, who took a conspicuous part in the army under Oliver 
Cromwell, by whom he was appointed Governor of Bristol, and 
commanded the infantry at the Battle of Naseby, when he was se- 
verely wounded. He was also one of the Protector's Council of 
State, and had .1000 per annum, in lands, assigned to him by the 
Parliament, for his services. 

Tin's manor was vested in the De-la-Pole family, from the 7th of 
Richard II., to the 28th of Henry VI. ; and in the 31st of Henry 
VIII., it was granted to Thomas Cromwell, Earl of Essex, beheaded 
July 28th, 1540. 

In the 4th of Edward II., Robert de Reydon had a grant of free 
warren in the lordship of this parish, and of Wenliam Cornbusta, 
Hadleigh, Holton, Leyham, Hintlesham, Woolverstone, and Bad- 
ingham, in this county. 

William Dowsing, of this parish, was appointed the principal of 
the Parliamentary visitors, in 1643, to inspect and remove all su- 
perstitious images, paintings, inscriptions, &c., from the churches in 

* His Portrait was published in Ricraft's " Survey of England's Champions," 1647. 



HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 31 

this county ; wlu'ch, to the regret of all modern antiquaries, he most 
effectually did. The " Journal," of this tasteless and fanatical zealot, 
was published, in 1780, in 4to, by Mr. B. Loder, of Woodbridge. 

The author of " Magna Britannica," states that William Nichol- 
son, D.D., Archdeacon of Brecknock, and Bishop of Gloucester, 
was a native of this parish, the son of a rich clothier here. 

CHARITIES. The " poors' lands" here, consist of two acres of 
meadow in this, and the adjoining parish of Langham, in Essex, let 
at A 13s. a year, and the rent is distributed in money to the poor : 
it is not known when, or by whom, these lands were given. A 
house, yard, and garden, and two acres of land in Stratford, were 
purchased by the parishioners, about 1735; the rents of wliich, 
about .5 15s. 6d. per annum, are expended in the purchase of 
linen cloth for the poor. A house, in two tenements, and a piece 
of ground, containing about one acre, near the church, are let for 
.7 10s. a year; and the rents are applied to the reparation of the 
church, agreeable to ancient usage. A portion of White's charity 
(see East Bergholt), being .2 4s a year, is given in bread to the 
poor ; and the yearly sum of ;.5 is paid, by the occupier of lands 
in East Bergholt, of the gift of Kobert Clarke, in 1731, and applied 
in sending six poor children to a school in this parish ; and two 
other poor children are sent to school under the charity of Lettice 
Dykes, of East Bergholt, and William Littlebury, of Dedham, in 
Essex. 



STUTTON. 

The families of Braham, Lancaster, and Fincham, appear to have 
been interested here (see Cattiwade hamlet, inBrantham and Capel). 
In 1300, William de Visdelieu, of Shotley, was owner of the lord- 
ship of this parish. 

Stutton Hall was for many years the property of the knightly 
family of Jenny. John, son of Sir Isaac Jenny, resided there in 
1055, and his son, William, in 1086. It was afterwards the pro- 
perty of the Mays ; and was sold by Mr. Thomas May, to Lionel, 
3rd Earl of Dysart. 

Crowe Hall, in Stutton, formerly belonged to the Bowers ; but 
now to John Page Bead, Esq., who resides there. 



32 HUNDRED OF SAMFOKD. 

The Kectory is the seat of the Rev. Thomas Mills, M.A., situated 
upon the banks of the Stour, commanding an extensive view upon 
the river ; the grounds are studded with some of the most beautiful 
trees, and form altogether one of the most delightful spots to be 
found in this, or any other county. 
In the church are monuments for 

Lady Jane, wife of Sir Isaac Jenny, of Stutton, Knt., who died 
January 7, 1 623, aged 58. 

John, eldest son of Sir Isaac Jermy, Kiit., who died in 1062, 
aged 61. 

Susannah, wife of Richard Enock, M.A., rector of this parish, 
who died January 15, 1709-10. 

Mrs. Bridget Allan, daughter of Mr. Alexander Smyth, youngest 
son of Sir Thomas Smyth, late of this parish, who died January 18, 
1777, aged 76. 

Wilh'am Jermy, late of this parish, died Oct. 5th, 1669, aged 35. 
Sir Isaac Jermy, Knt. 

John Smythe, who died August 14th, 1530. 
Richard White, M.A., late rector of this parish, died Feb. 2, 1747, 
in the 54th year of his age. 

The Rev. Tobias Rustat, A.M., upwards of 40 years rector of this 
parish, who died Jan. 14th, 1793, aged 77. 

Sarah, wife of the Rev. Tobias Rustat, who died May 6th, 1801, 
aged 76. 

CHARITIES. A piece of land, containing somewhat more than 
one acre, lets at A 4s. a year; and the sum of .100, three per 
cent, reduced annuities, was purchased with money arising from the 
sale of a cottage, formerly belonging to the poor, and an addition 
made thereto by the parish. The rent and the dividend of the 
stock are added to the money received at the sacrament, and laid 
out, partly in bread, and partly in coals, which are distributed to 
the poor. 



TATTINGSTONE, or TADINGSTON. 

In the 9th of Edward I., this was the lordship and estate of John 
de Holbrooke, and afterwards of John, Earl of Oxford ; who was 
attainted by the first parliament of King Edward IV., and his estate 



HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 33 

became forfeited to the crown. That monarch in the llth year of 
his reign (1471), granted to his brother Eiehard, Duke of York 
and Gloucester, afterwards King Richard III., all the manors and 
lordships wliich were held by Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick ; 
among others were the manors of Tattingstone, Cockfield, Aldham, 
Preston, Lavenham, and Mendham, in Suffolk ; and at the same 
time made him Chancellor for life. 

The family of Aylmer appears formerly to have had some interest 
here. Olive, daughter of Robert Aylmer, of this parish, Esq., married 
Thomas Brampton, of Branipton, in Norfolk, who died about 1500.* 

Tattingstone Place, late in the Beaumont and White families, 
afterwards the property of Thomas Western, Esq., son of the late 
Rear Admiral Thomas Western, who died in 1815, is now the re- 
sidence of Sir George Crewe, Bart. 

CHARITIES. A house near the church, consisting of four tene- 
ments, is appropriated to the use of, and occupied by, four poor 
families ; and a cottage, in two tenements, with an acre of land 
adjoining, are appropriated for, and used, one of the tenements and 
the land, by the parish clerk, and the other, by the sexton. 



WASHBROOKE. GREAT BELSTEAD, BELESTEDA, or BELSTEDA. 

This was part of the estate and lordship of Odo de Campania, 
Earl of Champaign, in France, who was nearly related to William I. 
or the Conqueror, and partook largely of his bounty. He was made 
by him, Earl of Albemarle and Holderness. This Norman Baron 
left his large possessions to his son Stephen, and his heirs ; one of 
whose descendants gave this manor to the Abbey of Albermarle. 

The manor of Amer (or Hamer) Hall, belonged to the Abbey of 
Aumerle, in Normandy, in the time of King Henry III. ; and at 
the dissolution of the alien priories, it was, together with the im- 
propriation of the church of the hamlet of Felchurch, or Velechurch, 
granted to the Nunnery of Dartford, in Kent. 

The manor, with the rectory and advowson of the vicarage of 

* Mr. Blomefield states, that John Croftes, D.D., Deau of Norwich, was a na- 
tive of Tattingstone ; which is probably, incorrect, as we have not met with a 
statement tending to show that aoy of that family held property in this parish or 
its vicinity. 



34 HUNDRED OF SAMFOKD. 

Washbrooke, were granted to Sir Percival Hart, in the 31st of 
Henry the 8th. 

In the time of King James I., it was the property of the Beding- 
fields; and in 1058, belonged to Sir Henry Bedingfield, of Dars- 
ham, Knt. 

The family of De Grey, of Merton, in Norfolk, have, for nearly 
a century, possessed this property. Thomas de Grey, after serving 
the office of Solicitor General, in 1763, and Attorney General, in 
1706, was, in 1771, advanced to the dignity of Lord Chief Justice 
of the Common Pleas ; which place he resigned in 1780, when he 
was created Baron Walsingham, of Walsingham, in Norfolk. The 
estate still continues in the head of that family. 

The church is consolidated with Copdock ; and the Hon. and 
Rev. Frederick de Grey is incumhent, who has lately, at a conside- 
rable expense, repaired and ornamented it. 



WENHAM MAGNA, or WENHAM COMBUSTA. 

The Robert de Vallibus, or Vaux, mentioned by Mr. Kirby, gave 
all the churches and tithes of his demesne, to the Priory of the 
Virgin Mary and St. Andrew, in Thetford ; amongst which, Wen- 
ham was included. 

At the suppression of the monasteries, the Prior of Leighs, in 
Essex, held lands in Great Wenham, of the annual rent of .7 5s. 

In the 9th of King Edward I., the lordship of this parish was 
held by Petronell de Holbrooke ; also the manor of Wenham Parva. 



WENHAM PARVA. 

In 1207, Robert de Burser, of London, was concerned in this 
manor, jointly with Emma his wife ; who appears to have been one 
of the co-heirs of Roger de Holbrook. 

The earliest mention we find made of the ancient family of Breose, 
or Brews, as connected with this parish, is in the beginning of the 
reign of Henry VI. 

Sir Robert Brews, of Fressingfield, in this county, died in the 



HUNDRED OF SAMFORD, 35 



second year of the reign of that king, mid Sir Thomas Brews, his 
son, succeeded ; who is styled, of Salle, in Norfolk, and Wenham, 
in Suffolk. 

In the llth of the same reign he was found heir to Sir John 
Shardelow, who died without issue, seized of the manors of Barton 
hy Mildonhall, with the mills of Cavenham, Cowlinge, Straddishall, 
and Downham, in this county, and the advowsons of Flempton 
and Santon. 

Sir Thomas married, first, Mary, daughter of Sir Jolin Calthorpe, 
and secondly, Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Giles, and sister and heir- 
ess of Sir Gilbert Debenhom. Sir William Brews was his son and 
heir by his first marriage ; who inherited Salic and Eressingfield, 
where he died, in 1489, and was buried in that parish church. 

llobert Brews, Esq., eldest son of Sir Thomas, by his second 
marriage, appears to have possessed the property in this parish. 
He married Katherine, daughter of Sir John Wingfield, of Lethc- 
ringhum, in this county, Knt., and was succeeded by Thos. Brews, 
of Topcroft Hall, in Denton, Norfolk, and Wenham Parva. 

He married Jane, daughter of - - Scroop, of Bentley, in this 
county, and was father of Sir John Brews, of this parish, Knt., who 
was lord from 1533 to 1582 ; and in 15 90, Thos. Brews, Esq.; whose 
son, John Brews, succeeded in 1 002, being then six years of age. 

He was afterwards knighted, and married Cecily, only daughter 
of John Wilton, of Topcroft, Gent. ; and soon after, the property 
passed from this family into other hands. 

Penelope, daughter of Thomas, son and heir of Sir John Brews, 
of this parish, married here in 1014, to Sir Edmund Mundcford, 
who died in 1043, without issue. 

ARMS. ]>rews : ermine; a lion, rampant, gules. Shardelow: 
argent ; a chevron between three cross crosslcts, fitche, azure. 

Little Wenham Hall is considered as a fine specimen of Eliza- 
bethan architecture, and is by no means in a ruinous state. The 
rooms wherein this ancient family resided, are now converted into 
chambers for corn, &c. It was built by Robert Brews, as appears 
from the following inscription, carved in stone over one of the 
doors : " Cccy fait a false de Dieu Ian de Grace, 1509. R B."* 

In the church are several monuments for different branches of 
the Brews family. 

* A view of the Hall is engraved in " Davy's Suffolk Antiquities," 1827 ; and 
two views in the " Excursions through Suffolk," 



30 HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 



WHERSTEAD. QUERSTEDE, or WERVESTEDE. 

Whcrstead was for many generations vested in the family of 
Reymes. Gilbert de Keymes, who also had large property in 
Bramford and 'Sproughton, was lord of this manor in the time of 
King John ; and Hugh de Reymes held it in 1280. It afterwards 
belonged to the Butlers : and, upon the attainder of James Butler, 
Earl of Ormond and Wiltshire, in 1461, it was granted, by the 
Crown, to Sir John Howard, the ancestor of the Dukes of Norfolk. 
How long it continued in tin's family we have not the means of as- 
certaining, but in 1 G 1 9, it was the property of Sir Edward Coke, 
Lord Chief Justice of England; and continued in Ms family till 
within a few years, when it was purchased by Sir Eobert Harland, 
Bart., who built the present mansion.* 

" In an old deed, without date, to which Gerard, prior of Ipswich, 
is one of the witnesses, is mention of the monastery of Wervestede ; 
perhaps some small foundation, of short continuance, united to the 
priory of St. Peter and St. Paul, in Ipswich; to which belonged 
the church and manor, and several lands in this village." Tanner. 
The Rev. William Gee, vicar of this parish, and Bentley, in this 
county, and rector of St. Stephen's, in Ipswich, died April 19, 1815, 
aged 84 years. Mr. Gee was, for many years, steward to the cha- 
rity of Grey Coat Boys and Blue Coat Girls, in Ipswich, and trea- 
surer to the Eund for the Belief -of poor Widows and Orphans of 
^Clergymen, in Suffolk ; and was ever distinguished for a uniform 
;and conscientious discharge of the duties of his sacred profession. 



WOOLVERSTONE, or WOLFRESTON. 

In the time of King Edward I., this estate appears to have been 
crown demesne ; but in the following reign, Sir Robert de Rcydon, 
of Roydon, had a charter of free warren therein. 

Richard, eldest son of Richard Catelyn, Esq , scrjeant at law, by 
Barbara, his wife, daughter of John Spencer, of Rendlesham, in 

* A view of the Hall is engraved in Neale's " Seats." 



HUNDRED OF SAMFORD. 37 

this county, Esq., was lord of Woolverstone Hall manor. He died 
in the 40th of Queen Elizabeth. 

The dispute respecting tliis estate (mentioned by Mr. Kirby), 
after the lapse of half a century, became at length settled, by tho 
Court of Chancery; and the property was purchased, about 1773, 
by William Berners, Esq., proprietor of the street in London 
called after his name. 

In 1770, ho erected upon it the present stately mansion, and died 
in 1783. Charles Berners, Esq., his eldest son and heir, succeeded, 
who died, unmarried, in 1831 ; and Henry Denny Berners, Arch- 
deacon of Suffolk, his only brother, inherited ; who is the present 
proprietor. 

An interesting monument of filial affection presents itself in the 
park ; it is a square obelisk of free stone, ninety-six feet high, 
surmounted by a globe, encircled with rays, erected by Charles 
Berners, Esq., in 1793, to the memory of his father. 

The Eev. Frederick Wollaston, L.L.D., was rector of this parish, 
brother of Colonel William Wollaston, whom he succeeded in his 
estates of Finborough Hall, &c., in 1797; and grandson of Wm. 
Wollaston, the learned author of " The Keligion' of Nature Deli- 
neated." 

Dr. Wollaston was of Clare Hall, Cambridge ; and upwards of 
twenty years lecturer of St. James's, in Bury, which he resigned in 
1778. He was also one of his Majesty's Chaplains in ordinary, 
and a prebendary of Peterborough ; both which latter appointments 
he. resigned a short time prior to his decease, which happened 
March 0, 1801. 



DE CARLEFORDA and COLENESSE. 



The fee of these Hundreds i,s in the King, and the government 
itt the Sheriff", and his anointed officers. 

These Hundreds are bounded, on the South, by the German 
Ocean ; on the East, by the River Deben, which separates them 
from the Hundred of Wiiford ; on the West, and North, by the 
River Orwell, and the Liberty of Ipswich. 

We have continued the two Hundreds together, as in Kirby, 
and they contain the following Parishes : 



BEALINGS MAGNA, 

BEALINGS PARVA, 

BRIGHTWELL, 

BUCKLESHAM, in Colneis, 

BURGH, 

CLOPTON, 

CULPHO, 

FALZENHAM, in Colneis, 

FELIXSTOW, in ditto, 

FOXHAL, 



HASKETON, 
HELMLY, in Colneis, 
KESGRAVE, 



KIRTON., in Colneis, 

LEVINGTON, in ditto, 

MARTLESHAM, 

NACTON, in Colneis, 

NEWBOURN, 

OTTLEY, 

PLAYFORD, 

EUSHMERE, 

TRIMLEY ST. MARTIN, in Colneis } 

TRIMLEY ST. MARY, in ditto, 

TUDDENHAM, 

WALDRINGFIELD, 

WALTON, in Colneis, 

WlTNESIIAM, 



HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD & COLNEIS. 



BEALINGS MAGNA, or BELINGES. 

The principal lordship of this parish was bought of the heirs of 
the Pitts, of Crows' Hall, in Debenham, by James (not George ) 
Bridges, Esq., who resided here. The hall, some years afterwards, 
became the residence of the farmer of the estate, and was at length 
pulled down by Sir John Henniker, Bart., who at that period was 
owner of the property ; and it now belongs to the Right Hon. John 
Henniker Major, Baron Henniker, M.P. for East Suffolk, his re- 
presentative. 

The Seckford Hall estate, in this parish, became the inheritance 
of a family of that name about the time of King Edward II., and 
so continued until the death of Mrs. Dorothy Seckford, in 1C 73. 

In 1359, Sir John de Seckford resided here ; he was son of Sir 
John de Seckford, of this parish, Knt., and Joan liis wife, eldest 
daughter and co-heir of Sir William Hakeford; and who, in 1331, 
became in her right, owner of Hakeford Hall manor, in the pa- 
rish of West Herling, in Norfolk. He married Alice, daughter of 

, who kept court at West Herling, in 1372, Sir John 

de Seckford, her husband, being then dead. 

Sir George de Seckford succeeded, who possessed the said manor, 
and in 1401, settled it on Margaret his wife, daughter and heiress 
of Sir Thomas Jenny, Knt. ; who after the death of Sir George, 
re-married to Augustine Stratton, and this property passed to 
George Seckford, Esq. 

He married Alice, daughter of Thomas Rokes, of Kidlesworth, in 
Norfolk, and died in 1450 : his widow re-married Sir Henry Wing- 
field, Knt., who, in 1470, joined with her in a release of Hakeford 
Hall manor, to Thomas Seckford, Esq., lord of Seckford Hall 
manor, in this parish. He was her son by the former marriage. 

This Thomas Seckford married, first, Margaret, daughter of John 
Purrey, of Aylesham, in Norfolk ; and secondly, Elizabeth, daughter 
of . He died in 1507, leaving Thomas Seckford, Esq., 



42 HUNDREDS OF CARLFOED AND COLNEIS. 

of this parish, his heir ; who married Margaret, daughter of Sir 
John Wiugfield, of Lethcringham, in this county, Knt. He repre- 
sented the horough of Orford in several parliaments ; died in 1575, 
aged 80 ; and lies interred in this parish church, where a monument 
remains to his memory. 

Thomas Seckford, Esq., one of the masters of the Court of Re- 
quest, and surveyor of the Court of Wards and Liveries, the muni- 
ficent founder of the almshouses in Woodbridge, was second son of 
the said Thomas Seckford, Esq., and Margaret his wife. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Harlowe, Esq., relict of Sir 
Martin Bowes, of London, Knt ; died without issue, in 1587-8, 
aged 72 ; and was buried in a vault which he erected himself, in a 
chapel on the north side of the chancel of Woodbridge church. 
Erancis, his elder brother, deceased before their father. 

Charles Seckford, Esq., succeeded his grandfather, in the Seck- 
ford Hall estate, and his uncle Thomas, in the Woodbridge Priory 
estate ; and married Mary, daughter of Thomas Steyning, of Earl 
Soham, Esq., by Frances his wife, Countess dowager of Surrey, 
daughter of John Vere, Earl of Oxford. He represented the borough 
of Aldeburgh in parliament, in the 14th of Queen Elizabeth, and died 
in 1591, aged 37 ; buried at Woodbridge, as was his widow in 1596. 

Sir Thomas Seckford succeeded, and married Amie, daughter of 

Brewster: he died in 1010, leaving Thomas, his only surviving 

son, who died in 1024, at Trinity College Cambridge, aged 10, and 
lies buried in the chapel there, under a handsome monument, erected 
by his uncle, Henry Seckford, Esq. ; who, on this failure of issue 
male, of his brother Thomas, became seized of the whole property. 
He died in 1026, without issue. 

Henry Seckford, Esq., of Clerkenwell, Master of the Pavilion to 
King James, supported his claim as heir male, and sued his livery 
in the 5th of King Charles, 1029 ; he suffered a recovery, and 
being seized in fee of the entire estate, settled the same on himself, 
and Dorothy his wife, and their heirs in fee. He died in 1038, 
without issue. 

Mrs. Dorothy Seckford, his widow, was the daughter of Sir Henry 
North, Knt., and sister of Henry North, of Sternfield, in this county, 
Esq. She died at Seckford Hall, in 1073, and bequeathed that es- 
tate to Seckford Cage, Esq., the heir general of the Seckfords ; who 
sold it to Samuel Atkinson, Esq., of Croydon, in Surrey. It is now 
the property of James Morrison, Esq., M,P., by purchase. 



HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 4& 

The inscription on the church porch, mentioned by Mr. Kirhy, 
reads as follows : " Orate pro Animabus Thomas Seckeford Armi: 
ct Margarcta uxs;" and Mr. Weever gives the following memorials 
from this church: "Thomas Seckford, esquire, Elizabeth and 
Margaret his wives, which Thomas dyed xxiii. of Novemb. in an. 
1505." " Thomas Sampson, esquire, dyed the 5. of February 1507." 
(His family resided at the adjoining parish of Playford.) 

ARMS. Seckford : ermine ; on a fess, gules, tliree escallops, or ; 
and for their crest, a talbot, passant, ermine. 

The prior and convent at Woodbridge, were seized of rent in 
Bealings Magna, 5s., and Bealings Parva, 2s. 

Major Edward Moor, author of " Oriental Fragments," " Hindoo 
Pantheon," "A Suffolk Glossary," &c. has a neat seat in this parish. 



BEALINGS PARVA, or PARUA BELINGES. 

The advowson of Little Bealings belonged to Thetford Priory ; 
and at the dissolution, 32nd Henry VIII., was granted to Thomas 
Ihike of Norfolk, who sold it to the Seckford family. 

The village and its picturesque valley were little known, and sel- 
dom noticed, until Perry Nursey, Esq., began to improve lu's estate, 
and laid out the grounds in the best style of ornamental planting. 

Tlu's property, called " The Grove," Mr. Nursey sold, about the 
year 1824, to James Colvin, Esq., an active East India director; 
who has expended large sums in further improving the grounds, 
making other purchases of land, and in erecting the greater part of 
the present mansion, in addition to the original house. 

In 1372, John de Iselford was rector of this church, and ex- 
changed with Richard Ugman for the rectory of Moulton Parva, in 
Norfolk. At that period the prior of the Cluniac Monastery, at 
Thetford, was patron of this church. 



BRIGHTWELL. BRIHTEWELLA, or BRIHTOLUESTANA. 

In the 1st of King Edward II., John Cavell was seated at Bright- 
well Hall ; he left Agnes his sole daughter and heiress, who married. 



44 HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 

to Lampet, a descendant of whom is the John de Lampet 

mentioned by Kirby. 

The Jermy's were owners of this lordship in the time of King 
Henry VIII., if not earlier, and appear to have been seated here. 

Sir John Jenny, K.B. 5/ son of Edmund Jermy, of Metfield, in 
Mendham, Esq., was lord of this manor ; and purchased of Sir Thos, 
Pope, grantee, the lordships of Foxhall, Coddeiiham, Greeting, and 
Stonham, which lately belonged to the Priory at Ipswich. Sir 
Thomas Pope died in 1558, the 1st of Queen Elizabeth. 

This Sir John Jermy married Margaret, daughter of Sir Thomas 
Teye, Knt., by whom he had Francis Jermy, Esq. (the person 
whom Mr. Kirby says held this lordship in the time of the said 
Queen.) He married Elizabeth, daughter and co-heir of Sir Wm. 
Fitz- Williams, Knt., of the kingdom of Ireland, and had issue 

Sir Thomas Jenny, K.B., who married Jane, daughter and heiress 
of Edward Stuart (or Styward), of Feversham, in Cambridgshire, 
Esq., and Jane, who married Sir Henry Sidney, of Walsingham, in 
Norfolk; where they were both intened ; Sir Henry in 1612, and 
his wife in 1638. 

Sir Thomas had issue, by the said marriage, four sons : Thomas, 
Edmund, John, and William. The property about this period, 
became vested in the family of Hewett. 

Sir William Hewett, Knt., sold it to Sir Anthony Wingfield, of 
Letheringham, Bart ; and Sir Richard, his son, sold it to Thomas 
Essington, Esq., who, in 1655, was a resident here, and repaired at 
his own expense the almost ruined church*, rebuilt the steeple, and 
new seated the nave and chancel, in which is a vault, the entrance 
to the same having a marble slab, with " The Essington's Vault," 
inscribed thereon. 

The chancel also contains two small monuments of alabaster, the 
work of a German, whose ancestors were Italians. These are me- 
morials to two of the children of Thomas Essington, Esq., and 
Anne his wife, daughter of John Janson, of Ashbye Ledger, in 

* A neat view of this church and font, from a drawing by J. G. Lenny, is given 
in the Gentleman's Magazine for 1829, Part ii. p. 209 ; accompanied with some 
topographical notes from a manuscript of the time of Charles II., presented to the 
College of Arms, in 1803, by the late Lord Thurlow ; and communicated by the 
Rev. Frederick Henry Tumor Barnwell, F.R.S. and F.A.S., with some additional 
remarks from the pen of that gentleman ; from which this enlarged notice of the 
parish is principally derived. 



HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 45 

Northamptonshire, Esq. Their children, living in 1602, were 
John, Martha, and Samuel. 

The Barnardiston family succeeded that of Essington, and con- 
tinued lords here several years. Sir Samuel Barnardiston, Bart., 
so created May 11, 1063, was third son of Sir Nathaniel Barnar- 
diston, of Kedington, in this county, Knt., and Jane his wife, 
daughter of Sir Stephen Soame, of Great Thurlow, in this county, 
Knt. He married, first, a daughter of Joseph Brand, of Edward- 
stone, in this county, Esq. ; and secondly, Mary, daughter of Sir 
Abraham Keynardson, Knt., Lord Mayor of London. 

Sir Samuel died, without issue, in 1707, and the title, as settled 
by the patent, descended to Ms nephew Samuel, eldest son of 
Nathaniel, his elder brother; who also died without issue, in 1709, 
when the title descended to Nathaniel Barnardiston, another 
nephew of Sir Samuel, the first baronet, and eldest son of his 
younger brother ; who died in 1711, without issue male, and the 
title became extinct. 

This property afterwards passed to the family of Shaw ; then to 
John Vemon, of Wherstead, in this county, Esq., who died in 1818 ; 
when Sir Robert Harland, of Nacton, Bart., inherited in right of his 
wife, sister and heiress of Mr. Vernon, who is the present proprietor. 

A very curious and scarce print, from a drawing by Knyff, gives 
a bird's-eye view of the mansion here, the out-buildings, plantations, 
and a large piece of water, attached to it. About the year 1730, 
tliis mansion was taken down, on the site of part of which a farm 
house remains. 

ARMS. Jermy : argent; a leopard saliant guarclant, gules; 
sometimes emblazoned, argent ; a lion rampant guardant, gules : 
crest, a griffin passant, proper. Wingfield : argent ; on a bend, 
gules, between two bendlets, or cottises, sable, three hawks' lures, 
or wings, conjoined. Barnardiston : azure ; a fess dancette, er- 
mine, between six cross crosslets, argent. 



BUCKLE SHAM, or BUKELESHAM. 

But little is known of the early history of this parish. In the 
3rd year of Richard II., Catherine Brewse held Bucklesham, with 
many other manors in this county, of the King, in capite, and be- 



40 HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 

cause she had taken on her the habit of a nun : she held on 
the day of her profession, in her demesne, half-a-knight's-fee in 
-Foxhall, Kesgrave, and Bucklesham ; and William de Ufford, Earl 
of Suffolk, the son of Margaret, the sister of Thomas de Norwich, 
the father of the said Catherine, is her next heir.* 

Sir Philip Broke, of Nacton, Bart., is the present owner of this 
lordship, and patron of the advowson. 

In 1318, John de Northstrete de Buklesham, priest, was collated 
by John Salmon, at that time Bishop of Norwich, to the deanery of 
Thetford. 



BURGH, or BURGH. 

In the time of Charles I., the Clenches had property, amounting 
to about ;.300 per annum, in this parish; and one of the sons of 
the Judge Clench, of Holbrook, made it his chief residence. 

Maud de Lancaster, Countess of Ulster, gave the advowson of 
this church to the chauntry, which she founded in 1348, within 
the chapel of the blessed Virgin Mary, in the nunnery of Campsey, 
in this county, for five priests to pray for the health of the souls of 
William de Burgh, her first husband, sometime Earl of Ulster, and 
of the good estate of her two daughters, during their lives, and of 
their souls after their death. In 1354, this chauntry was removed 
to Eokehall, in Bruisyard. The Countess married to her second 
husband, Ralph de Ufford ; and Burgh church was given to this 
nunnery, on condition that it should find some chaplains to cele- 
brate for the soul of the said Ralph. 

Mr. Barnes, of Sotterley, who held a lordship in this parish in 
1764, purchased the same, with the advowson, from the family of 
Betts ; and his representative still owns it. 

The prior and convent at Woodbridge, were seized of 14s. lid. 
rent, in this parish. 

* The author of " Magna Britannia," makes the demesne of this parish to have 
been in Sir William de Kerdiston, who, he says, died possessed of the same in the 
35th of King Edward III. ; and was succeeded by Sir William de Kerdiston, his 
sou and heir. This is an entire mistake, and relates to Bulchamp, in Blithing 
Hundred. 



HUNDREDS OF CARLFOR1) AND COLN'EIS. 17 

June 15, 1814, died the Eev. Benjamin Dawson, L.L.D., rector 
of tliis parish, aged 85 years, and in the 54th of his incumbency. 
As a divine, Mr. Dawson was eminent for his extensive acquaintance 
with every branch of theology ; as a critic, for the correctness of his 
structures, and the perspicuity of his remarks ; and was not less 
distinguished, as a philologist, for the accuracy of his judgment, 
and the depth of his research. 

He was the author of several treatises on various subjects of the- 
ology and criticism ; but the chief work, on wliich he had been 
long engaged, and of which a small part only is published, was a 
Philological Dictionary of the English Language : a work winch 
evinces a profound knowledge of the theory of language, and which, 
so far as it is completed, has extended the bounds of philological 
science, and enriched, in no inconsiderable degree, the stores of 
etymology, 

CHARITIES. Three cottages occupied by poor persons rent free. 
Certain inclosures, containing altogether about dO acres, and 
let at the annual rent of .10 11s. Gd. This property is partly 
freehold and partly copyhold, and is situated in tliis parish, with 
the exception of IA. 2n., wliich lays in the parish of Gruudisburgh. 
The rents are applied in repairs of the cottages, repairs of the 
church, and other expenses of the churchwardens' office ; and the 
property is vested in trustees, chosen from time to time by the con- 
tinuing trustees, and the inhabitants of the parish 



CLOPTON. CLOPETUNA, or CLEFTUNA. 

The Clop ton's, of Kentwell, in Melford, derived their name from 
this village, from which they were probably very early detached, as 
there is no record of their having any possessions here. 

In the 4 3rd of King Edward III., Bartholomew deBurghershe died 
seized of a lordship in this parish ; and Edward Lord De-spencer, 
Ms son-in-law, died in the 49th of the same reign, seized thereof. 

Anne, daughter of the said Edward Lord De-spencer, who married, 
first, Sir Hugh Hastings, of Elsing, and Gressinghale, in Norfolk, 
Knt. ; and secondly, Thomas Lord Morley, of Hingham, in the 
same county, whom she survived., and died in 1426, seized of this 
manor, and also of Blaxhall, in this county. 



48 HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 

John (not Hugh) Lord Bardolf, is the person said to die 
seized of a manor here, in the 45th of the above reign, and William 
was found to be his son and heir, aged 14 years. He married Agnes, 
daughter of Sir Michael Poynings, and, in the 8th of King Richard 
II., was summoned to attend the King, with his horses and arms, 
and whole service, to march into Scotland. 

He died the following year, and Thomas Lord Bardolf, was 
found to be his son and heir, aged 17 years. He gave his vote for 
the safe custody of the late King, Richard II., in the 1st of Henry 
IV. ; and being in arms against that King, in his ninth year, he 
was attainted, and executed for rebellion. 

Sir William Bardolf, his brother, inherited the estate, with 
Scroteby, in Norfolk, Clopton, in Suffolk, &c., but not the Barony 
of Wrongey. He died in the 2nd of King Henry VI., without 
issue ; and in the following year, Joan his widow, and Richard 
Selling her husband, released the said property, for an annuity, to 
the ladies Anne Clifford, and Joan Phelip, daughters and co-heirs 
of the Lord Bardolf who was attainted. 

Anne was at that time the wife of Sir William Clifford, and af- 
terwards married Sir Reginald Cobham : Joan was the wife of Sir 
William, son and heir of Sir John Phelip, of Dennington, in this 
county, and Julian his wife, daughter and heiress of Sir William 
Clopton, Knt. 

Sir William Phelip was a Knight of the Garter, and Treasurer 
of the Household to King Henry V. ; he was also Chamberlain to 
Henry VI., who granted him the honour of Wrongey, and title of 
Lord Bardolf. 

He died in 1440, seized of this lordship, and also of Ilketshall, 
Brockley, Brundish, Cretingham, Wilby, and Dennington, in this 
county ; where his remains were interred, and in our notices of 
which parish, some further particulars of him will be given. 

ARMS. Bardolf: azure ; three cinquefoils, or. 

The Armiger's, who resided at Ottley, held lands also in this pa- 
rish, in the time of King Richard II., about 1388. 

In Ryce's M.S. History of Suffolk Families, is the following 
note: "In the church of Clopton, Sept. 10, 1657, I could not 
see any monuments, except one in the chancel, against the north 
wall, for Mr. John Causton, Bachelier in Divinity. He was of the 
School of Walsingham, and had been Fellow and President of 
Bennett College, in Cambridge ; and afterwards Rector of Ottley, 



HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 49 

and Rector and Patron of Clopton. He died 1631, in the G4th 
yeare of his age." 

At that time, in the east window of the chancel, was the ARMS of 
Touchet : gules ; a frett, or ; quartered with Revely : ermine ; a 
chevron, gules. 

CHARITIES. A messuage, in four tenements, occupied by poor 
persons rent free. Certain meadows and inclosures, containing al- 
together 14 acres, lately let for seven years, at .32 a year. The 
above premises have been held since 1489, for the repairs and 
maintenance of the parish church, and the relief of the poor. The 
"Bell Pightle," containing about l acres, let at .2 5s. a year. 
This was formerly given for the repairs of the church bells. The 
rents are applied in the reparation of the church, &c., and the sur- 
plus, when any remains, is laid out in the purchase of coals, winch 
are distributed among the poor. 



CULPHO, or CULFOLE. 

The church of Culpho was given by Wilh'am de Valoines to the 
abbey of Leiston ; and William Verdon, who married his daughter, 
confirmed the grant. 

The family of the Verdon's were seated, for many generations, at 
Brisingham, in Norfolk, from whence they removed, about 1328, to 
Martlesham, in this county. 

It afterwards was the lordship of the family of Wolferston (or 
Wolveston), who resided at the Hall. In 1594, Mr. Tillotson saw 
in glass, in the windows, the following ARMS : 

France and England, quarterly. 

argent ; a chevron, gules. 

Wolveston : sable ; a fess wavey, between three wolves' heads 
couped, or. 

argent; a fess dance, between two dragons' heads 
erased, sable. 

argent; on a fess dance (3 points), sable, between 

3 dragons' (or griffins') heads erased, of the 2nd, 5 cinquefoils, or. 

In the 19th year of Queen Elizabeth's reign, the impropriation 
was granted to Edward Grimston, of Trimley, Esq. 

In 1660, it was the property of Sir William Blois: whose de- 



50 HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 

scendant, Sir Blois, Bart., sold it, when they removed their 

seat from Grundisburgh to Cockfield Hall, Yoxford, to Brampton 
Gurdon Dillingham, Esq., in whose family the manor is now vested. 
CHARITIES. The sum of .5 a year is payable under the dona- 
tion of Sir M. Stanhope, for poor persons of this parish. The sum 
actually paid is &A 14s. ft^d., the residue being deducted on ac- 
count of land tax ; and it is distributed among poor widows and 
others, by the parish officers.* 



FALKENHAM. 

In the time of King Henry I., this lordship was held by Sir 
Kobert de Sackville, Knt., of the honour of Eye. His descendants 
were seated at Buckhurst, in Sussex, and were ancestors of the 
Dukes of Dorset and Middlesex. This manor, with divers others 
in the county, were given in exchange for the castle, manor, and 
chase of Eising, in Norfolk, to King Henry VIII., in the 3Gth 
year of his reign, by Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk, and his 
son Henry, Earl of Arundel and Surry. 

The priory of Dodnash, in Bentley, was endowed with the tythe 
of barley in this parish. The vicarage was granted to Cardinal 
Wolsey, for the endowment of his college in Ipswich, and is now 
vested in the Crown : the present incumbent is the Rev. John Edgar, 
of Felixstow ; who has lately, at his sole expense, repaired and 
ornamented the church. 

There are two manors in Ealkenham, Dodnash, and Eussells, 
formerly vested in the Barker's, of Trimley. The former is at pre- 
sent in liis Grace the Duke of Hamilton and Brandon, and the 
latter ' in Eicliard Norton Cartwright, of Ixworth Abbey, Esq. 

CHARITIES. In 1625, the Rev. John Webb devised a copyhold 
estate in this parish for the poor, not receiving parochial relief : it 
comprises three cottages, in tenements, with a garden, and about 
4 A. ]R. of land, let at rents amounting to .15 6s. a year; which, 
after deducting for quit rents and repairs, is distributed annually 
among poor persons, by the trustees and churchwardens. 



* For a more particular account of the above charity, see the parish of Sutton 
in Wilford Hundred. 



HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 51 



FELIXSTOW. FYLCHESTOWE, or FYLSTOW. 

The shore here is hold and steep, heing composed of a hard snnd, 
intermixed with shingle, and perfectly free from ooze ; and the 
marine view delightful. During the late war several martcllo towers 
were erected here, for the protection of the coast, which have since 
teen removed, and the materials disposed of. 

On the cliff, ahout three miles from Landguard Fort, is situated 
Felixstow Cottage, the residence of Sir Samuel Fludger, Bart. It 
was formerly a mere fisherman's hut, and was purchased by the ec- 
centric Philip Thicknesse, Esq., then Lieutenant Governor of the 
Fort, for ..55 ; whose taste, aided by the embellishments of his 
wife's pencil, soon converted it into a charming occasional retreat ; 
and here they resided during the summer months. 

On relinquishing his Lieutenant Governorship, he disposed of 
this cottage to the dowager Lady Bateman, for .400 : about half 
the money which he had expended upon it. The grandmother of 
the present possessor (Sir Samuel Fludger, Bart.), purchased it for 
.2000.* 

From the great number of Roman remains, such as urns, rings, 
coins, &c., that have been discovered here, it must have been a 
place of considerable importance during the time this country was 

under the Eoman yoke. In 1748-5, the Rev. Myers, then 

vicar of Walton, formed a considerable collection of nearly 4000, in 
gold, silver, and brass ; among them was a splendid brass medallion 
of Anthony and Cleopatra ; Maximinian, with the reverse " Jovi 
Co?iservatori," and Licinius, " Ubique Victoris," in gold; Denarii 
of Pescenuius Niger, Pertinax, and Albinus ; and in large and middle 
brass, from Augustus to the Constantines. At his death, his va- 
luable cabinets of coins and antiques were left by will, to the Rev 
William Brown, of Saxmimdham ; after whose decease they were 
sold, by Mr. Sotheby, of London, by auction, in 1827. 

* An engraving of the cottage, when inhabited by Governor Thicknesse, on a 
reduced scale, was inserted in the Gentleman's Magazine, for 1816, Part ii. p. 105 ; 
from a larger one, which is now become scarce, and an animated description of 
this dwelling, from the pen of Mrs. Thicknesse, is given in the same publication, 
for 1809, Part ii. p. 1012, as extracted from the " Harwich Guide ;" where also 
the present appearance of the cottage, and the beautiful marine prospects from it, 
are noticed. 



52 HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 

Felixstow of late has become a place of more general resort than 
formerly : bathing machines have been provided, and lodging houses 
erected, for the accommodation of occasional visitors, who may wish 
to enjoy its delightful and invigorating sea breezes in quiet and 
retirement. 

CHARITIES. The following property, which is mentioned in the 
parish terrier as having been anciently left for the benefit of poor 
widows, is copyhold of the manor of Walton, with Trimley, and is 
vested in trustees : a cottage, called " Squires," and a garden ad- 
joining; two parcels of land, containing together IA. 3R. ; a cottage, 
called " Knock's House," and half-an-acre of land ; a blacksmith's 
shop, and an annuity, or customer, yearly payment of 7s., out of 
land called the "Town Piece," the rents of which amount to 
;.17 6s. 6d. ; which, after deducting for repairs and necessary 
outgoings, is divided equally amongst poor widows, in quarterly 
payments. 



FOXHALL, or FOXEHOLA, 

Was formerly a distinct parish, but now a hamlet to Brightwell. 
About the time of Henry II., Hugh de Dernford gave it to the 
Prior and Convent of the Holy Trinity, in Ipswich. 

The Holbroke family had property in this parish ; and by inqui- 
sition held in the 9th year of Edward I., it belonged to John de 
Holebroke. 

The impropriation was granted, in the 36th Henry VIII., to Sir 
Thomas Pope, Knt., who sold it, with the manor, to Sir John Jenny. 

The grange, and estate called " Dernford's," situated in Foxhall 
and Nacton, belonged to the Abbot and Convent of Sibton ; and 
were by them granted to Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk. 

In 1662, the manor and patronage of the church belonged to 
Thomas Essington, of Brightwell Hall, Esq., and was afterwards 
the property of Sir Samuel Barnardiston, Bart. ; from whose family 
it passed to that of Shaw, by the marriage of Sir John Shaw, of 
Eltham, in Kent., Bart., in 1716, with Anna Maria, eldest daughter 
and co-heiress of Sir Thomas Barnardiston, Bart. ; and Sir John 
Gregory Shaw, his grandson, inherited the same. It now belongs 
to Sir Robert Harland, Bart., of Orwell Park, in Nacton. 



HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 5$ 

GRUNDISBURGH. GRUNDESBURCH, or GRUNDESBURH. 

In the time of King Edward II., Sir Robert de Tudenham was 
lord of this manor, and patron of the living ; and in the following 
reign one of his descendants gave the said advowson to Michael 
House (now Trinity College), Cambridge ; in whose patronage it 
still continues. 

In 1392, the 15th of King Richard II., Sir John de Tudenham 
was owner of this lordship, with Gorton and Lound, in the hundred 
of Lothingland. 

The family of Blois, who became seated at Grundisburgh Hall in 
the time of King Henry VII., and were owners of a good estate in 
tlu's parish, were of French extraction, and came into England at 
the conquest; first settling at Norton, in this county. Thomas 
Blois, who lived there in 1470, was father of Thomas Blois, of the 
same place, whose son Thomas, married Margery, the daughter of 
William Styles, of Ipswich, and had issue : 
Richard Blois, of Grundisburgh, died=Elizabeth, daughter of Roger Hill, of 

in 1559. j | Needham. 

William Blois, died in 1607. = Alice, daughter of William Nottingham. 



William Blois, died in 1621. = Frances, daughter of John Tye, of Ips- 

j . jj wich. 

William Blois, died in 1673. ==Cicely, daughter of Sir Thomas Wing. 

T I field, Knt. 

Sir William Blois, Knt. = Martha, daughter of Sir Robert Brooke, 

of Cockfield Hall, in Yoxford. 

He married, secondly, Jane, daughter of Sir Nathaniel Barnardiston, 
relict of John Brooke, Esq., eldest son of Sir Robert Brooke, above- 
named. Sir William died in 1675; and his youngest, and only 
surviving son, Charles Blois, Esq., succeeded ; and was created a 
Baronet, in 1686. 

Sir Charles served in Parliament, for Ipswich, in 1689, and for 
Dunwich, in 1698: he removed to Cockfield Hall, in 1693, upon 
the death of Mary Brooke, his mother's sister, the only surviving 
child of Sir Robert Brooke, and died in 1738. Brampton Gurdon 
Dillingham, Esq., purchased tin's estate of the Blois's, and resided 
here. It is now the occasional residence, and estate of Brampton 
Gurdon, of Letton, Esq. 

In the will of Walter de Suffield (alias Calthorpe), Bishop of 
Norwich, dated 1256, at the Palace of Hoxne, is this bequest: 



54 HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 

''' To Daniel de Beccles, a standing cup and 20 marks, for the 
goods lie had of Master William de Horham, all expences that he 
did about Grundeshurgh church heing deducted." 

In 1375, Cardinal de Alenconio, an Italian, was made rector of 
this parish, and Archdeacon of Suffolk, by the Pope's provisions ; 
" which now," Fuller observes, " were grown to be a general grie- 
vance to the nation, for when any bishopric, abbacy, prebend, or 
good living, was like to be void, the Pope predisposed such places, 
to such successors as he pleased. This so displeased the clergy, 
that they petitioned the Parliament against such provisors, and 
among others, against this Cardinal, who always resided at Rome, 
and expended the revenues of his preferment there., to the detriment 
of this nation." 

In 1378, Adam de Lakingheath, priest, was rector of this parish, 
which he exchanged for Banham, in Norfolk. 

In 1558, Alice Driver, of this parish, suffered martyrdom, at 
Ipswich, for her faithful adherauce to the doctrines of the reformed 
protestant religion. She had been previously placed under confine- 
ment in Melton gaol, with one Alexander Gouche, of Woodbridge ; 
who also suffered at the same time and place. 

ARMS. Tudenham: lozenge, argent and gules. Blois: gules; 
a bend, vaire, between two fleur-de-lis, argent. 

CHARITIES. The " Town Estate" here, comprises some cottages, 
and about 28 acres of land, in different closes in the parish ; and it 
appears from old writings, to have been derived under a grant from 
the Rev. John Yate, formerly of Burgh, and to have been vested in 
feoffees in the time of Henry VIII., in order that the rents and 
profits should be employed to the use and benefit of this parish, in 
such manner and form as the same had been anciently used and 
employed. The rent of the cottages and land together, appears to 
be about .35 a year, which have been applied to the reparation of 
the church. But the commissioners found some difficulty in ob- 
taining satisfactory information respecting this property, and re- 
commended the appointment of new trustees. An annual sum of 
52s. is paid, as a rent charge, issuing out of a piece of land in this 
parish ; and it is applied in furnishing Is. worth of bread weekly ; 
which is distributed at the church, among the poor. This charity 
was given by the will of Robert Thinge, who died in 1730. He 
also bequeathed an estate for the erection of a new steeple to this 
parish church, the old one having become ruinous ; which estate 



HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 55 

was sold by Mr. Thinge's executors, and the produce expended in 
the erection of the present building. John Lucock gave by will, 
out of certain monies therein mentioned, to purchase ..300, 5 per 
cent. Consolidated Bank Annuities, the dividends to be applied, in 
the sum of ..5 a year in the purchase of 3d. loaves, to be distributed 
every Sunday in the year, to poor people residing in, or belonging 
to this parish ; and 5 a year towards the maintenance of a Sun- 
day school ; the residue to be laid out in bread and coals, to be 
distributed on Christmas-eve yearly, amongst poor widows and 
widowers. The produce of this bequest are applied as the donor 
directed, .11 7s. 2d. a year. 



HASKETON. HASCHETUNA, or HASCETUNA. 

David de Fletwick was early eufeoffed in this lordship, and it was 
latterly the property of William Castle, Esq., an officer in the 
guards ; at about the same period Edmund Jenney, Esq., was pro- 
prietor of the tythes, and not the rector. 

Theobald, son of Kobert Lord Valoins, endowed the Priory and 
Convent at Hickling, in Norfolk, which he founded in 1185, with 
this parish church ; and also that of Parham, in Plomesgate hundred. 

The Prior and Convent at Woodbridge, held rents, or land, in tin's 
parish, valued at 19s. 6d. 

In tin's parish church there is yet extant, a very ancient and 
ruinous vault, under which is supposed to be deposited the relics of 
Mr. John Bull, a celebrated champion in the year 1640, and many /% cji*^^ 
years an opulent inhabitant of the same parish. It is related that $ /\ / ' 
there were inclosed within his coffin twelve swords, and as many ^ 
scabbards, with this motto, " Nunc quics. Duodecim mihi gladii, 
ct duodecim mihi vagina" 

In 1544, Thomas Thompson, domestic chaplin to John, Duke of 
Norfolk, held tliis living, with Garboldesham St. John, in Norfolk ; 
to winch he was presented, in 1539, by the said Duke, patron of 
that turn, by grant from Sir Anthony Wingfield, Knt., true patron. 

CHARITIES. A cottage, and about five acres of land, devised by 
Agnes Emme, by will, in 1488, for repairing the church, let on a 
lease, at .13 a year: the rent is applied to the general repairs of 
the church. Thomas Tymme, by will, in 1614, conveyed to eigh- 



56 HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 

teen trustees, a house, barn, and 18 acres of land, in this parish, in 
trust, for the maintenance of two of the most impotent, poor, and 
aged persons, of honest life and conversation, being inhabitants of 
the town of Hasketon ; such as the trustees for the time being, 
should think most fitting. The premises were let on lease for four- 
teen years, from 1826, at the yearly rent of .31 10s. ; which sum, 
after deducting for repairs of the buildings, is divided equally be- 
tween two aged poor women, chosen by the trustees. Some timber 
was sold off the estate many years ago, and the produce was laid 
out in the purchase of certain copyhold premises, which let for .9 
a year ; the rent is divided between the poor people. Alice Osborne, 
by will, in 1678, charged the Angel Inn, in Woodbridge (formerly 
the Black Boy), with the payment of 20s. a year; to be distributed 
at Christmas, amongst the most needy poor of this parish. John 
Eutland, by will, in 1776, charged Ins estate in this parish, with the 
payment of .3 a year, for three coats for three poor men in this 
parish. Mary Brown, who died in 1820, bequeathed the interest 
of .100, three per cent. Consols, to be given away to the selected 
poor here. 



HELMLY. HALMELEIA, or HELMELEA. 

Helmly Hall was the property of the Kev. George Drury, late 
rector and patron of Claydon, and Akenham, in this county. It 
still continues in his representative. 

The Dukes of Norfolk were formerly patrons of this advowson ; 
but since 1540, or thereabouts, the Crown hath presented. 



KESGEAVE. 

The lordship of this parish was formerly vested in the Holbrooke 
family. John de Holbrooke possessed it in the 9th of Edward I. 
It afterwards belonged to the Barnardiston's, of Brightwell. 

Kesgrave Hall was purchased about 30 years since, by William 
Cunliffe Shawe, of Singleton Lodge, Lancashire, Esq. ; and is now 
the residence of his son, Robt. Newton Shawe, Esq., a Magistrate and 



HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEI9. 57 

joint Chairman of the Woodbridge quarter sessions. The hall is 
entirely re-built, and the grounds and gardens are most tastefully 
disposed. 

Tlirough the marriage of his ancestor, Joseph Shawe, of Liver- 
pool, Esq., with Dorothy, eldest daughter and co-heir of John 
Wingfield, of Hazleborough Hall, Derby, Esq., Mr. Shawe is 
descended from Sir Humphrey Wingfield, of Brantham Hall, in 
this county ; who was Speaker of the House of Commons, and one 
of the Burgesses in Parliament for Ipswich, in the time of King 
Henry VIII. 



KIRTON. KIRKTON, KENETUNA, KALLETUNA, or KIRKETUNA, ' 

The Dukes of Norfolk were anciently patrons of this living, and 
probably owners of the lordship ; the former has been in the Crown 
since the time of King Henry VIII. 

The Rev. John Edgar, of Felixstow, is the present rector of this 
parish. 

CHARITIES. An allotment of somewhat more than four acres, 
was awarded under an Inclosure Act, passed in the 45th Geo. III., 
to the lord of the manor, the rector, churchwardens, and overseers, 
as trustees, with power to let the land ; the produce thereof to be 
distributed in coals, or other fuel, among the poor. 



LEVINGTON, or LEUESTUNA. 

This village gave birth to that great and benevolent man, Sir 
Robert Hitcham, Knt., Serjeant at Law; of whom Mr. Ryce, in 
his manuscript of Suffolk families, gives the following brief notice : 
" In Levington was born Sir Robert Hitcham, Knt., the King's 
Serjeant, who gave to good uses Framliugham Castle, together 
with the lands, and mannour, and advowson, worth neere a thou- 
sand pounds per annum. He was not borne to .200 per annum 
(nor to .20, nor to 2., in the margin), and rose to an estate of 
about .1,500 per annu. He was a passionate man, but had a 
good wit, was very learned in the lawes, and spoke to admiration. 



58 HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 

He left Robert Butts, Gent., his sister's sonne, heire to his estate 
in Levington, which had descended upon him from his ancestours. 
Mr. Butts is now living, this year 1655." 

To this may be added, that he acquired the rudiments of his 
education at the Free Grammar School of Ipswich ; and at an 
early age, removed from thence to Pembroke College, Cambridge ; 
where he directed his studies, with great success, to the profession 
of the law, and afterwards entered himself at Gray's Inn. 

In 1596, he represented the borough of West Looe, in Cornwall, 
in Parliament; in 1603, he was appointed Attorney General to the 
Queen, and became Lent Eeader at Gray's Inn the following year : 
in 1616, he was made the King's senior Serjeant at Law ; upon 
which he received the honour of Knighthood. 

In the same year he held the office of Town Councillor for Ips- 
wich ; and was chosen, in 1623, one of the representatives for 
Orford, in this county, and so continued until 1628. He purchased 
the Framlingham property in 1635, and about the same period, a 
house in Ipswich, formerly called, and well known as " Seckford 
House," or the " Great House," in St. Matthew's (now occupied by 
William Rodwell, Esq., the present proprietor), where he passed 
the remainder of his life. 

Sir Robert made Ins will in the following year, and devised his 
lordship of Burvalls, in this parish, to his nephew, Robert Butts, 
and his heirs, subject to certain payments to the testator's sister, to 
whom, and to her heirs, he also gave a certain farm, called " Wat- 
kins." He further wills, that there be presently built, after his 
decease, one Almshouse, at Levington, for six female persons, of 
the poorest and impotent of Levington and N acton ; the same to 
be built upon his tenement near the street there, and they to have 
the like allowance in all things, as the poor of Frarnlingham are 
appointed to have : to begin first with Levington, and so successively. 

His will bears date the 8th of August, 1636, and he deceased the 
1 5th of the same month and year. His remains were interred at 
Eramlingham ; and in Mr. Kirby's account of that parish, his be- 
nevolent bequests to that town are particularized. 

The advowson is consolidated with Nacton, and the patronage of 
it belongs to Sir Robert Harland, Bart. 

ARMS. Hitcham : gules ; on a chief, or, three torteauxes. 

In 1801, some men, in digging gravel, half-a-mile above Le- 
vington Creek, discovered an urn, containing some hundreds of 



HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 59 

Roman coins, of Gordian, Maximus, Postlmmus, and other Em- 
perors and Empresses of that period. 



MARTLESHAM. 

Sir John de Verdon removed to this parish in 1328, from Bris- 
ingham, in Norfolk, where his ancestors had resided for many ge- 
nerations. Sir Thomas de Verdon, his grandson, succeeded, who 
survived but a few months ; when Sir John de Verdon, second son 
of the said Sir John de Verdon, and Maud his wife, inherited. 

In 1305, the said Sir John de Verdon, settled this estate upon 
Isabel, his second wife, eldest daughter of Sir Thomas Visdelieu, of 
Shotley, in tin's county, Knt. ; and by this settlement it descended 
to their only daughter Isabel, who married Sir Imbert Noon, of 
Shelfhanger, in Norfolk, in or about 1408. 

Sir Henry Noon, Knt , succeeded ; whose son and heir, Henry 
Noon, Esq., greatly increased his fortune by his valiant exploits. 
He was the constant attendant of King Henry V., in the French 
wars, where he behaved so gallantly, that his Majesty rewarded lu'm 
with a grant of the castle, lands, and lordship, of Tonde, in Nor- 
mandy. 

He died in 1465, leaving his estate to Elizabeth his wife, during 
the minority of Henry his son, and then to him and his heirs. This 
property continued for several descents in the said family, until the 
death of Henry Noon, who married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir 
John Wingfield, of Letheringham, in tin's county, Knt.* 

ARMS. Verdon: sable; a lion rampant, argent. Noon: or, 
a cross, engrailed, vert. 

The author of Magna Britannia makes the lordsliip of this parish 
to belong to Richard Bruce. 

The Prior and Convent at Woodbridge held rents, lands, and a 
mill, in this parish, valued at 79s. 

In 1764, the Goodwin's held the lordship and advowson here; 
and it is now vested in Mr. Doughty, of Hoxne. 

Mem. January 18, 1804, the garrison of Ipswich marched from 
thence to this parish ; where they were joined by the troops from 

* For a more particular account of the Noon family, consult Blomefield's History 
of Norfolk, under the head of Shelf hanger. 



60 HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 

Woodbridge, under the command of Majors General Lord Charles 
Fitzroy, Lord Paget, and Major General Smith. The troops, 
nearly 10,000 in number, presented a front of upwards of two 
miles. 

A few years since, some labourers employed on the estate of the 
late Miss Capper, in this parish, discovered, in removing an old 
bank, a considerable quantity of ancient brass instruments, called 
" Celts," some of which are now deposited in the Museum of the 
Literary Institution, Ipswich. 



NACTON, or NACHETUNA. 

During the latter part of the Anglo-Saxon dynasty, the Danes, 
who had become a powerful people in the north, turned their atten- 
tion southward, and at various times infested these coasts, with a 
view of finally getting possession of the country. Suffolk shared in 
the general calamity, resulting from the depredatory incursions of 
these lawless plunderers. Within the space of ten years, they pi- 
laged the town of Ipswich twice ; first, in or about the year 991, 
and again in 1000. 

In the latter period, Ulfketel, desirous of restoring the fortunes 
of his degraded country, risked a battle with the Danes, at N acton ; 
but his vigorous and persevering courage proved unavailing. He 
sustained a signal defeat, and the Danish triumphs were complete. 
The whole of East-Anglia was over-run ; neither towns nor 
churches were spared, unless redeemed by the inhabitants with large 
sums of money, and the most dreadful outrages were every where 
committed. 

The Fastolf family, who were patrons of the living, and probably 
owners of this lordship, appear also to have resided here. Weever 
gives two inscriptions from this church, to members of that house, 
namely : Nicholas, son of Thomas FastalfF, Esq., who died in 1479 ; 
and Eichard FastahT, another son, who died the same year. There 
were also formerly to be seen in this church, the ARMS of Fastolf, 
of Suffolk : quarterly, or and azure ; on a bend, gules, three es- 
callops, argent ; impaling Windliam. Fastolf : and gules ; a 
chevron between ten cross crosslets, or : Kijme. Also, Fastolf : 
and per pale, sable and argent ; a lion rampant, counterchanged. 



HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 61 

In the clmrch of St. Margaret, in Ipswich, were formerly the 
same arms ; and Fastolf: and argent, three chevronels : Water- 
vile, quarterly. The Suffolk branch of the family also quartered, 
Mandevile, Bra/tain, and Tye ; and impaled Tyrrell. 

The manor and estate passed from the Fastolf family to that of 
Broke, by marriage, in the time of King Henry VIII. Tlu's family, 
which has been itself of great importance for several centuries, 
traces its remote descent to a common ancestor with the Brooke's 
of Leighton; the Brooke's of Norton (created Baronets in 1662) ; 
and the Brooke's of Mere : namely, William de la Brooke, son of 
Adam, lord of Leighton, antecedent to the reign of Henry III. 

The Philip Broke, Esq., mentioned by Kirby, as being at that 
period in possession of tlu's estate, and who had previously repre- 
sented the borough of Ipswich in parliament, was great nephew of 
Sir Eobert Broke, Bart., of this parish, whom he also mentions. 
Tin's Philip married, in 1732, Anne, daughter and co-heir of Martin 
Bowes, Esq., of Bury St. Edmund's. 

Philip Bowes Broke, Esq., his only son, succeeded. He married 
Elizabeth, daughter, and eventually heiress, of the Rev. Charles 
Beaumont, of Witnesham, in this county ; and by her, left at Ins 
decease, in 1801, 

Sir Philip Bowes Vere Broke, of this parish, K.C.B., his eldest 
son and successor ; a distinguished naval officer, who obtained a 
baronetcy, 2nd November, 1813, in consideration of the gallant 
victory he had achieved, the 1st of June previously, as Captain of 
the Shannon ship of war, over the United States frigate, of superior 
force, the Chesapeake. 

He married Sarah Louisa, daughter of Sir William Fowle Mid- 
dleton, Bart., of Shrubland Hall, in this county, and died January 2, 
1841. His eldest son and successor, Sir Philip Broke, Bart., is a 
Commander in the Royal Navy, and now inherits this estate. 

That brave English Admiral, Edward Vernon, Esq., who dintin- 
guished himself at the taking of Porto Bello, in 1739, and repre- 
sented Ipswich in parliament from 1740 to the time of his death, 
which took place in 1757, was a resident of this parish. 

He bequeathed the chief of his property to Francis Vernon, Ins 
nephew ; who re-built the house here, and enclosed the park ; and 
in 1762, was created Baron Orwell, in 1776, a Viscount, and, the 
following year, Earl of Shipbroke : he died in 1783, without issue, 
and the title became extinct. 



62 HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 

John Vernon, Esq., his nephew, inherited his estate ; who ex- 
changed the property here for Wlierstead Lodge, in Samford hun- 
dred, with Sir Robert Harland, Bart. ; who married Arethusa, 
daughter of the late Henry Vemou, Esq., of Great Thurlow, in this 
county; niece of Francis, Earl of Shipbroke, and sister of the 
above John Vernon, Esq. 

Orwell Park is now the seat of Sir Robert Harland, only son of 
Admiral Sir Robert Harland, late of Sproughton, in this county, 
Bart., so created March 16, 1771. 

ARMS. Broke : or; a cross engrailed, party per pale, sable and 
gules. Harland : or ; on a bend wavy, between two sea lions, 
sable, three bucks' heads cabossed, argent. 

John Tudenham, chauntry priest, of the chauntry of Curties, in 
the church of Necton, on its dissolution, received a pension of .6 
per annum. (Which Mr. Blomefield supposes mean this parish, 
and not Necton, in Norfolk.) 

Thomas Peacock, A.M., chauntry priest of St. Lawrence church, 
at Ipswich, and rector of tin's parish, was installed, April 23, 1554, 
Prebendary of the fourth stall in Norwich Cathedral. 

John Mole, eminent for his skill and knowledge in the science of 
algebra, died at Nacton, Sept. 20, 1827, in the 85th year of his age. 
Mr. Mole was a native of Old Newton, near Stowmarket, in this 
county. In the above science he was not indebted to any in- 
struction from others, but acquired his intimate knowledge of this 
difficult branch of arithmetic solely from himself. 

In 1788, he published "Elements of Algebra," and the reviews 
of that period expatiate largely on the merits of this treatise, and 
speak of it in terms of the highest commendation. Mr. Mole was 
also a contributor to the " Ipswich Magazine," published in 1799. 
He was, in the strictest sense of the term, a self-taught genius ; and 
in the study and pursuit of his favourite science, had deservedly 
attained considerable celebrity. 



ALNESBOURN PRIORY, or ALVESBRUNNA, is situated near 
the river, between St. Clement's, in Ipswich, and Nacton, in the 
ancient parish of HALLOWTREE, now extra-parochial, and is some- 
times written ALBORN, ALNESBURNE, and ALENSBORNE ; it was a 
small priory of Augustine, or Black Canons, a cell to Woodbridge. 



HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. G3 

The endowment consisted of the churches of Halghetree (or Hal- 
lowtree), and Carlton St. Mary, and the manor of Alveshourne and 
Nevils, in Hethcl, in Norfolk ; the revenues of tin's house were con- 
firmed to the Prior and Canons, ahout 1280. Kobert de Belsted, 
and Kohert de Twait, occur as benefactors, in 1300. 

Its history is involved in obscurity; but Albert de Neville is 
supposed to have been concerned in its foundation, and gave the 
manor of Hethel, and the advowson of Carlton St. Mary. In 1315, 
the Prior here was returned Lord, and it remained in tins priory 
till 1424, when John Duke of Norfolk, and others, purchased it r 
and the advowson of Carlton, and 298 acres of land, of John Tur- 
nour, Prior of St. Mary, at Alvesbourne, and the convent there, for 
St. Giles's Hospital, in Norwich. 

The valuation in Tax. Eccles. 1291, in Suffolk, in fourteen pa- 
rishes, .5 8s. 9^.; Norfolk, in eight parishes, .6 10s. O^d. At 
the dissolution, .7 14s. 4d. In 1541, it was granted to Sir John 
Wingfield, as part of the possessions of Woodbridge Priory : and 
in the same year John Wingfield, and Dorothy his wife, are found 
to hold the manor, &c., of Alvesburn, in tail, by the sendee of a 
knight's fee, and A 4s. lOd. rent. Sir Philip Broke, Bart., is the 
present proprietor. 



NEWBOUKN. 

In 13G5, Sir John de Verdon settled the lordship of this parish 
upon Isabel, his second wife, eldest daughter of Sir Thomas Visdelieu, 
of Shotley, in Samford hundred, Knt. ; and by this settlement, it 
descended to their only daughter, Isabel, who married Sir Imbert 
Noon, of Shelfhanger, in Norfolk, in or about 1408 ; and it pro- 
bably passed with the Martlesham estate and manor. 

The Priory of Woodbridge held Haspely manor, in this parish ; 
which was granted, at the dissolution of that Monastery, to John 
Wingfield, and Dorothy his wife. In 1764, this lordship, with the 

advowson, were vested in Western, Esq., and are now the 

estate of Sir Joshua KoAvley, Bart. 



64 HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 

OTTLEY, or OTELEIA. 

In the 9th of King Edward I., this was the lordship of John de 
Paynell, hut afterwards of Kichard Beauchamp, Earl of Worcester, 
who left it to Elizabeth, his sole daughter and heiress. She married 
Edward Neville, who in her right became Lord Bergavenny. 

They had issue two sons, Eichard and George : she died before 
her husband ; he, by the courtesy of England, enjoyed this lordship, 
and her other possessions for life, and died seized thereof, the 16th 
of King Edward IV. ; when George Neville, Lord Abergavenny 
became seized thereof, Eichard, his elder brother, having died 
without issue. 

This estate afterwards became the property of the Eebow family, 
and now belongs to General Francis Clater Eebow, of Wivenhoe, 
Essex. 

The Eectory is in the gift of the Earl of Abergavenny, and the 
present rector, the Eev. Francis Stor. 

The family of Gosnold were for many generations seated in this 
parish, and formed many honourable alliances with the Tollemache, 
Naunton, Wingfield, and other families. 

Ursula, daughter of Anthony Gosnold, of this parish, married 
Francis, second son of Gregory Pratt, by Ann, daughter and co- 
heir of William Cocket, of Besthorp, in Norfolk, Esq. Their son, 
Edward Pratt, Esq., died hi 1664, without issue. 

The ancient family of Armiger were interested here. In the 1 1 th 
of King Eichard II., Eobert Armiger held a messuage and lands in 
this parish, called " Armiger's," and lands in Clopton, in this 
county. His descendants continued to reside here for several ages. 

John Armiger, of Ottley, died in 1539 : Thomas, his son, married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Heigham, of Heigham Hall, in 
Gazely, in this county, Esq., and was father of Thomas Armiger, 
of Bury St. Edmund's, and lord of Monewden, in this county. He 
married Jane, daughter and co-heir of John Eyre, Esq., receiver of 
the revenues of King Edward VI., in Suffolk; and had issue 
Thomas, his son and heir, who resided at Tlirandeston, in this 
county. 

CHARITIES. The yearly sum of .1, given by Geofiry Pleasants, 
for the poor of this parish, is paid by the Corporation of Ipswich, 
out of the third part of a farm in Ottley, belonging to Christ's 



HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 05 

Hospital, at Ipswich, and is given away in bread to the most needy 
poor, by the churchwardens. 



PLAYFORD, or PLAGEFORDA. 

In 1227, Thomas de Blumvillo (or Blundeville), Bishop of Nor- 
wich, purchased lands in this parish ; and Harvey Fitz Peter gave 
the rent of half-a-mark, with certain homages here, to West Dereham 
Abbey, in Norfolk. Weever has this notice : " John Felbrydge 
and Margery his wief in the glasse windoo." " Thomas Sampson, 
esquyer, which dyed in anno 1439, and Margery his wief." In 
Playford church. 

The Felbrigg's of this parish were a junior branch of a family of 
that name, very early seated at Felbrigg, in Norfolk, of whom Mr. 
Parkin gives a full account, in his history of that parish ; from 
which we collect the following particulars, concerning this Suffolk, 
or younger branch. 

John, second son of Sir Roger Felbrigg (alias Bigod), and 
Cecilia his wife, was lord of Tuttington Hall, in this county, in the 
13th of King Edward III., by the gift of lu's father ; and Roger, 
his son, held the same in the 41st uf that reign. 

Sir George Felbrigg, Knt., was son of the said Roger ; he mar- 
ried, 1st, Avice (or Amy), relict of Edmund de Reedisham, daughter 
and heir of Sir Roger de Hales, by whom he had no surviving 
issue. His second wife was Margery, eldest daughter and co-heir 
of Sir John de Aspale, widow of Sir Thomas Naunton, Knt. 

In the 41st of Edward III., the King wrote to the Archbishop of 
Canterbury, his Chancellor, to pardon lu's beloved Esquire, George 
de Felbrigg, for money due to the Crown, for lands granted to him 
on forfeiture : about the end of lu's reign, he was Esquire of the 
Body to that King. 

In the 7th of King Richard II., he, and Margery lu's wife, held 
the lordships of Wortham and Ingham, in this county. He was in 
the King's army, when he marched into Scotland, in his 9th year ; 
was Knighted by him on Ms entrance into that country, and had a 
grant of .40 per annum, for life, payable out of the issues of 
Norfolk and Suffolk, by the Sheriff; was appointed one of the 
King's Proctors, in his 10th year, to conclude a league with 



HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 

William Duke of Guelderland, and Thomas, Duke of Gloucester 
and Constable of England ; and, in the 1 5th of the said King, one 
of the Lieutenants in the Court of Chivalry, to hear and determine 
the cause between the Lords Morley and Lovell. 

Sir George Felbrigg died in 1400, and was buried in St. Mary's 
church, in this parish; and Margery his wife, in 1419, who ap- 
pointed Kichard Felbrigg, her second son, executor. In a window 
of the church of Playford, which was built by Sir George, was his 
portrait, and that of his second wife, with the arms of Felbrigg, 
impaling Aspal. 

He was succeeded by Sir John Felbrigg, his eldest son and heir, 
by Margery his wife ; who, by his will, dated in 1423, was buried 
in the chancel of this parish church, in which were formerly the 
arms of Felbrigg impaling Waldegrave, probably his lady. 

Sir John left an only daughter and heir, Margeiy, who married 
Thomas Sampson, Esq. : he inherited this property, in her right, 
and died in 1489, as above. His quartered coat then was, Samp- 
son, quartering Felbrigg, and Aspal. 

This estate continued in the Sampson family, until the death of 

Sir Thomas Sampson, Knt., in . Margery, his sister and 

heiress, married Robert, son of John Felton, Esq., of Shotley, who 
inherited in her right ; and since that period it has passed the same 
as the Shotley property. Frederick William, Marquess of Bristol, 
is now lord and patron. 

The Hall, which exhibits a curious specimen of ancient domestic 
architecture, is now the residence of Thomas Clarkson*, Esq., whose 
benevolent exertions for the abolition of slavery are well known 
throughout the world. 

ARMS. Blundeville : quarterly per fess indented, or and azure ; 
abend, argent. Felbrigg: or; a lion rampant, gules, armed, azure. 
Sampson : argent ; a cross flory, gules, between four escallops, sable. 



RUSHMERE. RISCEMARA, or RYSCEMARA. 
In the time of King Edward I., this was the estate of Sir John 

* There is an excellent portrait of this gentleman, from the original, by A. E. 
Chalon, Esq., R.A., engraved by C. Turner, Esq., engraver in ordinary to bi 
JMajesty : published by Mr. Stephen Piper, of Ipswich. 



HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 67 

de Holbrooke ; but it appears to have passed for many ages, as the 
foregoing parish of Playford, and is now the estate of the same 
noble proprietor, Frederick William, Marquess of Bristol. 

A villa in this parish, called the " Roundwood," built in 1700, 
was bought by Horatio Lord Viscount Nelson, in 1798 ; and was 
the residence of Lady Nelson, and his lordship's venerable father, 
until 1800, when it was sold to Robert Fuller, Gent. It is now 
the property and residence of Frederick William Shrieber, Esq.* 

Mem. October 5, 1807, the Duke of York, accompanied by the 
Duke of Cambridge and Cumberland, with a long train of nobility 
and general officers, reviewed the troops in garrison at Ipswich and 
Woodbridge, on Rushmere heath. 



TRIMLEY ST. MARTIN, or TKEMLEY. 

Grimston Hall, in this parish, was formerly the seat of Thomas 
Cavendish, Esq., the circumnavigator, who Mr. Kirby says, was 
born here, and of whom he has given some account from Hackluyt's 
" Collection of Voyages." 

The witty and learned Dr. Fuller, in his " History of the Worthies 
of England," gives also on account of this enterprising seaman, the 
substance of which, he says, is derived from the same publication. 
A more circumstantial account of Mr. Cavendish may be found in 
the "Harwich Guide," published in 1808, which account was re- 
printed in the Gent. Mag. for 1811, Part ii., p. 606. 

Dr. Fuller's account of him is as follows : " Thomas Cavendish, 
of Trimley, in this county, Esquire, in pursuance of his generous 
inclination to make foreign discoveries for the use and honour of 
his nation, on his own cost victualled and furnished three ships 
(the least of fleets) as followeth : 1. The Desire, admiral, of 120 
tons : 2. The Content, vice-admiral, of 60 tons : 3. The Hugh- 
Gallant, rear-admiral, of 40 tons. All three managed by 123 per- 
sons, with which he set sail from. Plymouth the 21st of July, 1586. 

" So prosperous their winds, that by the 26th of August they 
had gone nine hundred and thirty leagues to the south of Africa. 

* The descent of the advowson is particularized in Mr. Kirby's account of this 
parish, and also Mrs. Catherine Cadye's bequest, in 1521, towards the erection of 
the church steeple. 



68 HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 

Then bending their course south-west, January the 7th, they entered 
the mouth of the Megellan Straits ; straits indeed, not only for the 
narrow passage, but many miseries of hunger and cold, which ma- 
riners must encounter therein. Here Mr. Cavendish named a town 
Port- famine ; and may never distressed seaman be necessitated to 
land there ! It seems the Spaniards had a design so to fortify these 
straits in places of advantage, as to engross the passage, that none 
save themselves should enter the southern sea. But God, the pro- 
moter of the public good, destroyed their intended monopoly, sending 
such a mortality amongst their men, that scarce five of five hundred 
did survive. 

" On the 24th of February they entered the South Sea, and fre- 
quently landed as they saw occasion. Many their conflicts with the 
natives, more with the Spaniards ; coming off gainers in most, and 
savers in all encounters, that alone at Quintero excepted, April 1, 
1587, when they lost twelve men of good account, which was the 
cause that the June following they purposely sunk the rear-admiral, 
for want of men to manage her. 

" Amongst the many prizes he took in his passage, the St. Anne 
was the most considerable, being the Spanish admiral of the southern 
sea, of seven hundred tons However, our Cavendish boarded her, 
with his little ship (a chicken of the game will adventure on a greater 
fowl, and leap where he cannot reach), and mastered her, though an 
hundred and ninety persons therein. There were in the ship an 
hundred and two and twenty thousand pezos (each worth eight 
shillings) of gold ; the rest of the lading being silks, satins, musk, 
and other rich commodities. Mr. Cavendish's mercy after, equalled 
his valour in the fight, landing the Spaniards on the shore, and 
leaving them plentiful provisions. 

" Surrounding the East Indies, and returning for England, the 
ship called the Content did not answer her name, whose men took 
all occasion to be mutinous, and stayed behind in a road, with 
Stephen Hare their master, and Mr. Cavendish saw her not after. 
But he, who went forth with a fleet, came home with a sliip, and 
safely landed in Plymouth, Sept. 9, 1588. Amongst his men, the 
three most remarkable were ; Mr. John Way, their preacher ; Mr. 
Thomas Fuller, of Ipswich, their pilot ; and Mr. Francis Pretty, of 
Eyke, in this county, who wrote the whole history of their voyage. 

" Thus having circumnavigated the whole earth, let his ship no 
longer be termed The Desire, but The Performance. He was the 



HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 00 

third man, and second Englishman, of such universal under- 
takings. 

" Not so successful his next and last voyage, begun the 20th of 
August, 1591, when he set sail with a fleet from Plymouth, and 
coming in the Hegelian Straits, near a place hy him formerly 
named Port-Desire, he was, the November following, casually 
severed from his company, not seen or heard of afterwards. Pity 
so illustrious a life should have so obscure a death. But all things 
must be as Being itself will have them to be." 

About this period Grimston Hall became the property of Eobert 
Barker, Esq., by purchase, who removed hither from his house in 
St. Matthew's parish, Ipswich, called " Esquire Gawdy's House,"* 
at present the property and residence of William Eodwell, Esq. 

The Barker's became very early seated at Ipswich, several of 
whom served as burgesses in parliament for that borough : in the 
35th of Queen Elizabeth, the above Kobert Barker, Esq., was 
elected to that honour. He was also made Knight of the Bath, at 
the coronation of King James I. 

John Barker, of Grimston Hall, Esq., his eldest son by his first 
marriage, was created a Baronet in the 1 9th of that reign ; and 
William Barker, of Booking Hall, in Essex, Esq., a descendant by 
his second marriage, was advanced to the same dignity in 1070, the 
29th of King Charles II. 

The descendants of Sir John Barker, Bart., continued to reside 
here until the decease of Sir Jermy, his grandson, who died un- 
married ; and the title and estate descended to his brother John, 
who married Bridget, daughter of Sir Nicholas Bacon, of Shrub- 
land, KB. 

He removed to Ipswich, and made that place again the residence 
of the family, for which borough he served in several parliaments, 
temp. Charles II. Sir William Barker, Bart., liis son and heir, 
also represented Ipswich in parliament, during the reign of Queen 
Anne, and was elected a Knight of the Shire for this county, 1727. 

Sir John Barker, Bart., his only son and heir, purchased of the 
heirs of Edward Ventriss, Esq., an estate called the Chauntry, in 
Sproughton, near Ipswich, and enlarged the mansion. His son, 
Sir John Fitch Barker, Bart., resided there : he died in 1706, without 
issue, when this branch of the family became extinct. 

* A print of this house is given in Ogilby's Map of Ipswich, anno. 1698. 



70 HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 

George Nassau, Esq., inherited, by will, his estate in this parish, 
with considerable other possessions, and for some time resided here. 
In 1805, he served the office of High Sheriff of this county, and 
died at his residence, in Charles Street, Berkeley Square, August 
18, 1823.* 

The Earl of Kochford, his half brother, inherited this estate, and 
at his decease it became the property of his Grace the Duke of 
Hamilton and Brandon. 

ARMS. Cavendish : sable; three stags' heads, caboshed, argent. 
Barker : party per fess, nebule, vert and sable ; three martlets, or ; 
a canton, ermine. 

CHARITIES. An allotment of four acres of land, set out for the 
poor on an inclosure in this parish, in 1808, lets at the yearly rent 
of .10 ; and the rent is laid out in the purchase of coals, which 
are distributed among the poor at Christmas, yearly. 



TRIMLEY ST. MARY. 

In the reigns of King Edward IV. and Richard III., this was the 
lordsliip and demesne of John, Duke of Norfolk, he being a firm 
adherent to the house of York ; but after the battle of Bosworth- 
field, when King Henry VII. obtained the crown, John de Vere, 
Earl of Oxford, whose estates had been forfeited during former 
reigns, were now restored, and, amongst others, this manor, which 
descended to his posterity. 

This parish church stands in the same churchyard with the 
church that belongs to Trimley St. Martin. The steeple now hangs 
in ruins, and is overshadowed with a luxuriant tree, forming a pic- 
turesque object. The church was probably built by Thomas of 
Brotherton, son of Edward I., for his arms are still to be seen over 
the door of the steeple. 

CHARITIES. In 1669, Ellis Kindge, by his will, devised a copy- 
hold estate, held of the manor of Trimley St. Mary, for the use of 
the poor ; it comprises a cottage in two tenements, with a garden 
adjoining; a piece of meadow ground, containing 2R. 16p., and a 

* Mr. Nassau's extensive collections in elucidation of the antiquities of this 
county, have been already noticed in the introduction to this work ; and for a more 
ample account of that gentleman, see Gent. Mag. for 1823, Part ii., p. 178. 



HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 7t 

garden of IR. 24p. ; and two fields, containing together about 9 
acres; which altogether brings a rental of ..16 12s. per annum. 
In consequence of suggestions from the Charity Commissioners,, 
and some animadversion on the part of some of the parishioners, 
the estate has since been surveyed, and a valuation made, which 
amounts in the gross to .21 5s. per annum. A piece of land 
called the " Town Pightle," containing somewhat above half-an- 
acre, and on allotment of four acres, which was set out for the poor 
on aninclosure, in 1804 : the rents, amounting together to .S 17s. 
a year, are distributed at Christmas among poor persons of the 
parish. An allotment of four acres, which was set out for the poor 
under an inclosure act, passed in 1808, let on a lease at the annual 
rent of .10 ; which is expended in the purchase of coals, which 
are distributed among the poor at Christmas. In the printed re- 
turns of Charitable Donations, made in 1786, mention is made of 
a legacy of .20, given by William Barbour, but no part of the 
money remains, and no account can be given of it. 



TUDDENHAM ST. MABTIN TUDENHAM, or TOTHENHAM. 

Hugh de Hosdene, and Maud his wife, gave to the Prior and 
Convent of Cluniac Monks, in Thetford, founded by Eoger Bigod, 
Earl of the East Angles, and Alice his wife, all their tithes in this 
parish ; and Kirby says, that Anketil de Messange, and others, 
gave the church to Trinity, or Christ Church Priory, in Ipswich, to 
which house he is named as a benefactor before 1204. 

In 1437, Sir John Clifton, of Buckenham Castle, Knt., sur- 
rendered this manor to Master Thomas Well, and his assigns, it 
having been long in contest between them. It was for many years 
in the family of Minter : in 1764, Mr. William Miuter was owner 
thereof. It is now vested in John Wrattislaw, Esq. 

The rectory and advowson of this vicarage was lately in the Eev. 
William Charles Fonnereau, of Christ Church, in Ipswich r who 
sold them to the Kev. William Burgess, of Colchester, who is now 
the patron. 



72 HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 

WALDRINGFIELD, or WALDINGEFELDA. 

The author of Magna Britannia makes the demesne of this parish 
to have been early vested in Robert Bruce ; and Mr. Kirby says, 
" all we have learnt of this little parish is, that Sir Robert Hilton, 
Knt., was patron in 1305." 

The manor and advowson were in the Barnardiston family ; in 
1704, they were the inheritance of the heirs of Sir Samuel Barnar- 
diston, of Brightwell, Bart. 



WALTON AND FELIXSTOW. WALETUNA. 

The manors of Walton, Trimley, Fakenham, with the rectories of 
Walton and Felixstow, with divers other lordships in this county, 
were given by Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk, and Henry his 
son, Earl of Arundel and Surry, in the 36th of King Henry VIII., 
to that Monarch, in exchange for his castle, castle manor, and chase 
of Rising, in Norfolk, and its appurtenances. 

This property appears to have passed as that of Bealings and 
Seckford Hall, by purchase from Seckford Cage, Esq., the heir 
general of the Seckford's, to Samuel Atkinson, Esq., of Croydon, 
in Surry. Then to the Barker's, as Grimston Hall, in Trimley St. 
Martin ; and from Sir John Fitch Barker, Bart., to George Nassau, 
Esq., the Earl of Rochford, and now Duke of Hamilton. 

Roger Bigod, first Earl of Norfolk, founded a priory here, and 
dedicated it to St. Felix. About the year 1105, he gave it as a cell 
to the monks of St. Andrew, in Rochester, and the monks here were 
called " Monks of Rochester." This gift was confirmed by King 
William Rufus. It is supposed to have been removed soon after 
the destruction of the castle, and placed near the church of Walton, 
where some ruins are still remaining. Its valuation in " Taxatio 
Ecclesiastica," in nine parishes, was .6 16s. l|-d. 

Walton is a very ancient place, formerly of great note, even be- 
fore the conquest. The tower of the church is nearly demolished, 
and the wall of a side aisle remains about a foot above the ground ; 
that part of the church which is used, is however, in good repair. 

Sir John Hayward, Knt., D.C.L., was a native of this parish. 



HUNDREDS OF CARLl'ORD AND COLNEIS. 73 

He was author of the Life of Henry IV , of England ; the Lives of 
the three Norman Kings, William I., William II., and Henry I. ; 
the Life of King Edward VI., and several other works in great es- 
timation at the time they were published. He married Jane, 
daughter of Andrew Paschale, of Springfield, Essex, Esq. He 
died Jan. 27, 1627, and was buried in the church of Great St. 
Bartholomew, London.* 

In 1641, John Novell, D.D., Fellow of Pembroke Hall, Cam- 
bridge, was vicar of tliis parish, and rector of Northwold, in Norfolk, 
and had been of Topcroft, in the same county. 

These parishes afford a rich treat to the lovers of geology, from 
the numerous specimens of saurian remains, and fossil shells, found 
in the craig deposits in the cliffs, and along the shore. A list of 
the latter was published in 1830, by the late Mr. Samuel Woodward, 
of Norwich ; who enumerates different varieties of the balanias, 
pholas, mactra, tellina, lucina, astarte, venus, cardium, pccten, 
patella, natica, murex, buccmum, cypraea, and terebratula; and 
since the book was published two splendid specimens of the rare shell, 
cassis bicatenata, have been found, which are in the possession of 
Mr. W. S. Fitch, of Ipswich. 

In 1803, the skeleton of an enormous animal was discovered by 
the falling down of a piece of the cliff on Walton shore, near Har- 
wich, supposed to belong to the mammoth species ; remains of 
which have been found in North America, Tartary, &c. Some of 
the bones were nearly as large as a man's body, and six or seven 
feet long : the cavities which contained the marrow, were large 
enough to admit the introduction of a man's arm : the bones, on 
being handled, broke to pieces. One of the molar teeth weighed 
seven pounds, was of a square form, and the grinding surface stud- 
ded with several zig-zag rows of laminae, which seems to denote 
that it belonged to a carnivorous animal. There were more teeth, 
which were unfortunately broken, one of which weighed 12lbs.f 

* A portrait of him, engraved by W. Hole, was published in one of his works, 
" The Sanctuary of a Troubled Soul,'' 1616. 

f Of this animal Buffon says, '' The skeleton of the Mammoth bespeaks an ani- 
mal five or six times the cubic volume of the Elephant." Mullen has given a 
description of the Mammoth. " This animal," he says, " is near five yards high, 
and about 30 feet in length. His colour is grey, his head is very long, and his 
front very broad ; on each side, precisely under the eyes, there are two horns, 
which he can move and cross at pleasure ; and in walking, he has the power of 
extending and contracting his body, to a great degree." 



74 

Mem. LANDGUARD FORT. April 18, 1807, a detachment of the' 
1st hatallion of the 79th, or Cameronian Highlanders, consisting in 
all of 97 persons, took their passage from hence to Harwich, in a 
small sloop, and when ahout half a mile from the shore, they were 
overtaken by a violent squall of wind, which overset the vessel, and 
shortly after she went down ; a boat from a gun brig, and one from 
the fort, saved fifteen, the rest perished. The regret which was felt 
at the recital of this dreadful catastrophe, was heightened by the 
reflection, that these unhappy sufferers had eminently distinguished 
themselves at Egypt, and were justly esteemed for uniform good 
conduct. 

CHARITIES. There has been a payment of .1 Is. a year, re- 
ceived by the overseers of the poor of this parish, described in their 
books as the rent of town-land, or " Barber's-land," from the pro- 
prietors of certain land in this parish, lately belonging to Mr. 
William Fulcher. The payment was made from the commencement 
of the oldest account book, in 1727, down to 1817 ; since which 
period the proprietor has refused payment, on the ground that it 
cannot be shown where the land is, or why the payment should be 
made by him ; and as there are no writings to be found respecting- 
the said land, or the origin of the payment, it must be lost to the 
parish. 



WITNESHAM. 

The family of Meadows were possessed of lands in this parish 
as early as the 34th of King Henry II. ; and a very full and minute 
account of the different branches of that ancient house, by an emi- 
nent genealogist, is given in the Gent. Mag. for 1824, Partii., p. 51 8, 
from which we select the following particulars : 

William Meadows, of this parish, who died at Bushmere, in 1588, 
left by Agnes his wife, two sons, namely, Daniel Meadows, of Chat- 
tisham, the ancestor of the Earl Manvers, who was born at Eush- 
mere in 1577. He purchased of Sir Robert Hitcham, Knt., in 
1630, the lordship of Witnesham, and died at Chattisham, in 1651. 

William, the eldest son of William and Agnes, born in 1559. He 
resided at Coddenham from the year 1597, to that of 1612, and 
marrying Grigil, a daughter of Mynter, of Witnesham Hall, 



HTNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 75 

purchased that mansion of his father-in-law, and made it his resi- 
dence. He died in 1637, and left issue three sons, viz. : Thomas 
Meadows, of Coddenham, who married and had issue; Daniel 
Meadows, who succeeded his father in this parish ; and Ralph 
Meadows, born in 1600. He purchased Henley Hall, of the Da- 
merons, in 16CO, and was ancestor of the late John Meadows 
Theobald, of Claydon, Esq., who assumed that name in 1776. 

Daniel, who inherited here, married Amy, the daughter of John 
Brame, of Campsey Ash, Esq., by whom he had a son and a 
daughter, Daniel and Mary. He died in 1675, and Daniel bis son 
succeeded ; who was succeeded by another Daniel Meadows, who 
resided for many years at Botesdale, but died at the family mansion 
in Wilnesham, in 1771, at the advanced age of 90 years. 

John Meadows, his only son and successor, was born in 1 726, 
nnd in 1751, he married Frances, the youngest daughter of Hum- 
phrey Brewster, of Wrentham Hall, Esq. Mr, Meadows was ap- 
pointed Coroner of the Liberty of Bury St. Edmund's, bv Rowland 
Holt. Esq., of Redgrave Hall. He died at Botesdale, in 1763, 
leaving issue two sons and two daughters. Daniel Meadows, the 
youngest son, died a Captain in the Army, in 1779, unmarried. 

Philip Meadows, the eldest son of John Meadows, and Frances 
his wife, was bred to the Jaw, and practised for many years as a 
solicitor at Botesdale, until the year 1801, when he removed to 
Witnesham. On the death of his mother, he purchased an estate 
there, of the Earl of Westmoreland, and in 1810, erected ihereon 
the present mansion, " Burghersh House ;" so named from its 
proximity to the ancient mansion belonging to the family of the 
Burghershes, of this parish. 

The Rev. Philip Meadows, B.A , of Burghersh House, rector of 
Bealings Magna, who married in 1803, Elizabeth, daughter of the 
Rev. Morgan Graves, is the present representative of this ancient 
family. Philip Meadows, Esq., his father, died Oct. 16, 1824, in 
the 73rd year of his age. 

ARMS. Meadows: quarterly: 1 and 4, sable; a chevron, ermine, 
between three pelicans, vulned proper : in a canton, a lion, seiant ; 
and in chief, a label of three points : 2 and 3 ; a chevron, ermine, 
between three etoiles, argent (for Brewster). Crest: a pelican, 
vulned, proper. 

William Latymer was instituted to tin's rectory, in 1538, on the 
presentation of Edward Latymer, Esq. ; and in the same year, the 



76 HUNDREDS OF CARLFORD AND COLNEIS. 

King appointed him Master of the College of St. Lawrence Pount- 
ney, in London. In 1547, he was Proctor for the Clergy of the 
Diocese of Noi vvich, and voted in convocation for priests' marriages. 
He resigned Witnesham in 1554, probably in order to avoid being 
turned out, for his marriage ; and appears to have retired to Ipswich, 
where he resided when the returns were made, in the following year, 
of those who received annual pensions : his was, .28 13s. 4d. 

He appears, however, to have complied with the times before the 
death of Queen Mary, .if it be correct that he was instituted to the 
rectory of Kirkton, in Colneis hundred; in 1554, on the presentation 
of Sir Thomas Felton, Knt. ; and in the return made by the Bishop 
of Norwich, to the Archbishop, in 1563, he is thus described: 
" Kirkton, Mr. Will. Lalymer rector, doctus, non residet, degit 
in Aula Regia." He probably continued to hold this rectory at 
the time of his decease, as there was no other institution before 
1583. But whether he conformed or not in the time of Queen 
Mary, he was certainly a great favourite of her sister Elizabeth, to 
whom he became Chaplain and Clerk of the Closet ; and soon after 
her coming to the Crown, was made Archdeacon of the exempt 
jurisdiction of Westminster, and Dean of Peterborough. He died 
in 1583, and was buried in Peterborough cathedral. 

In 1559, Nicholas Wendon, LL.D., rector of this parish, was 
appointed Archdeacon of Suffolk, and installed Prebend of the 4th 
stall in Norwich cathedral, in 1561. In Archbishop Parker's Me- 
tropolitical Visitation, in 1570, he was returned not to be in orders, 
although rector of Witnesham, that he lived at Lound, in Suffolk, 
and was no minister, having gone in a cloak and a Spanish rapier 
by his side ; on which he was ejected out of the prebend, but not 
from his Archdeaconry. 

Alexander Chapman, D.D., was born in Norfolk, about 1577, 
and admitted a Norwich scholar of Corpus Christi College, Cam- 
bridge, in 1592, being nominated by the corporation of that city ; 
and after taking the degree of A.B., was elected Fellow, in 1598. 
He proceeded, A.M., in 1600, and quitted his fellowship about two 
years after, for the rectory of Witnesham. He was installed Arch- 
deacon of Stow, in 1610, and Prebendary of Lowth, the same year; 
both in the diocese of Lincoln : as also Prebendary in that of Can- 
terbury, in 1618. He commenced D.D., in 1610, and deceased in 
1629; was buried in the north transcept of Canterbury cathedral, 
where an elegant monument was erected to his memory. 



HUNDREDS OF CARLFOKD AND COLNEIS. 77 

In 1776, the Kev. John King, M.A., was presented by his col- 
lege, to tliis rectory. He was a native of Kichmond, in Yorkshire, 
and received the rudiments of his education at the Free Grammar 
School in that town. From thence he removed to Cambridge, and 
entered of St. Peter's College ; where he proceeded to the degree of 
A.B., in 1760, was elected Fellow, and the same year, appointed 
Under Master of the Free Grammar School of Newcastle-upon- 
Tyne. In 1763, he proceeded to the degree of A.M. 

He removed from Newcastle to Ipswich, in 1767, having been 
appointed Master of the Free Grammar School in that town ; and 
in the same year, was chosen by the corporation the Town Preacher; 
which situation he filled for a period of 23 years. In 1798, he 
resigned the mastership of the school, and retired to a residence on 
his rectory, where he closed his earthly career, Jan. 26, 1822, in 
the 84th year of his age.* 

It has been supposed, from relics found in the vicinity of this 
parish, that some warlike encounter has happened here ; and about 
twenty years since, a human skeleton, with that of a horse beside 
it, was dug up, within six feet from the surface, with several marks 
of military accoutrements, a part of the saddle, stirrups, &c. ; which 
confirms the supposition. The studs of the saddle were of silver. 

* There is an engraved Portrait of Mr. King (a private plate), by Bond, from a 
miniature by Dunthorne. 

NOTE. As a " Supplement to the Suffolk Traveller,'" we wish to avoid, as much 
as possible re-printing what has already appeared in that work, but would rather 
refer our readers to the same ; especially when the Editor gives more ample details 
than usual, of any place, which is particularly the case in the above and the fore- 
going parish. 



Or LOSA. 



This Hundred is bounded Eastward, by that of Plomesgate ; 
on the South, by Wilford; on the West, byBosmere and Clay don; 
and on the North, by Hoxne. The lords of Framlingham for 
the time being, were seized thereof, with many ancient and ex- 
tensive privileges and immunities belonging to it ; over which 
they appointed Bailiff's, in succession. 

It is held in the nature of a franchise, and is exempt from the 
ordinary jurisdiction of the Sheriff"; originally granted from the 
Crown, with privileges for the grantee to hold Pleas, and Leets, 
or Courts of View of Frankpledge ; to enjoy the goods of felons, 
fugitives, felons de se ; and the return of writs, to appoint a 
Coroner, to have estrays, &c., within certain limits. 

This Hundred contains the following Parishes : 



BPANDESTON, 

BUTLEY, 

CAMPSEY, 

CHARSFIELD, 

CRETINGHAM, 

DALLINGHOO, 

EARL SOHAM, 

EASTON, 

EYKE, 



FRAMLINGHAM, 

HACHESTON, 

Hoo, 

KETTLEBOROUGH, 

KENTON, 

LETHERINGHAM, 

MARLSFORD, 

MONODEN, 

KENDLESHAM, 



And WOODBRIDGE. 



From the time of Roger Bigod, his successors, lords of F 
lingham, have enjoyed the above privileges, in the several pa- 
rishes within this Hundred, except Marlesford and Kenton, 
until the manors of Earl Soham, Ash, Eyke, Hacheston, Hoo, 
and Kettleburgh, were sold. 

The lord of this Hundred had the goods of William Percy, of 
Framlingham, who was hanged for felony, at Melton, in the 3rd 
and 4th of Philip and Mary : the goods of Robert Kempster, of 
Earl Soham, for flight from felony committed there, the 20th of 
Edward IV. : the goods of Roger Gilbert, afelo de se, at Easton, 
the \th of James I.; and also estrays taken at Rendlesham, the 
36/A of Henry VI., and waifs and estrays in the 23rd Henry VII. 
in other places. 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 



BRANDESTON, or BRANTESTUNA. 

The family of Dagworth held a lordship in this parish, of the Ahhot 
of St. Edmund's Bury ; and in 1253, King Henry III., granted Os- 
bert, son of Harvy de Dagworih*, free warren in the said manor. 

In the 5ih of King Edward I., Sir Thomas de Weyland, gave to 
Ralph, Prior of Woodbridge, the rectocy of this parish church, for 
the souls of Herbert Irs father, and Beatrix his mother, William 
and John bis brothers, and Anne his wife ; with a piece of meadow, 
a mill, and two shillings rent here : and the said Prior covenanted 
to find a caoon to pray for them, in his conventual church. Sir 
Herbert, Sir Thomas, Sir Nicholas, and Sir Robert de Weyland, 
were buried in the aforesaid Priory. 

In the 22nd of King Edward III., a fine was levied between Sir 
Saier de Rochford. a commissioner of the banks and sewers in Lin- 
colnshire, in the ICih of that reign, and Joan his wife, and John 
Cleymond, of Kirkton ; who conveyed lands in this parish to Sir 
Saier, and Joan his wife, in tail. He appears to have resided at 
Stivekey, in Norfolk. 

In 1565, Andrew, John, and Anthony Revet, made a joint pre- 
sentation to the church of Great Moulton, in Norfolk; and in 1570, 
John Revet, of this parish, Esq., was owner of the said lordship 
and advowson ; and John Revet, of Ipswich, presented to the same 
church, in 1581, and was buried there; Thomas Revet, of Rendles- 
ham, Gent., in 1673 : and the said estate continued in this family 
after 1689, when Thomas Revet, Esq., presented. 

Nicholas Revett was the second son of John Revett, Esq., of 
Brandeston Hall, and was born there in 1720. He was an inge- 
nuous draughtsman ; fellow traveller with James Stuart, Esq., and 
joint editor of the " Antiquities and Ruins of Athens," where they 
resided many years. 

* For a further account of this ancient family, see "Dagworth," a hamlet in 
the hundred of Stow. 



82 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

Mr. Revett also travelled through Asia Minor, &c., with Dr. 
Chandler, and published the "Ionian Antiquities," having been 
engaged for that purpose by the Dilettanti Society. He returned 
in 170G, and appears to have passed his time in preparing the 
drawings for publication, and in superintending some works of 
arcliitecture. 

Among the edifices which he designed are, at Lord le Despencer's, 
West Wycomb, the eastern and western porticos, the temple of 
Flora, and the temple in the island ; the church at Ayot St. Law- 
rence, in Hertfordshire ; and the portico to the eastern front of 
Handlinch, in Wiltshire, the seat of James Dawkins, Esq. He 
died in London, June 3, 1804, and was buried in the churchyard 
here, where an altar tomb, with an inscription, has been erected to 
his memory. 

This lordship was purchased by Andrew Revet, Esq., in 1548, 
from the Bedingfield family. 

Among the unhappy sufferers for witchcraft in Suffolk, was an 
aged clergyman of this parish, named Lowes. 

The Rev. William Clubbe, LL.B., who was forty-five years vicar 
of this parish, and rector of FJowton for the same period, was the 
second son of the Rev. John Clubbe, B.A., rector of Whatfield, and 
vicar of Debenham ; author of the " History and Antiquities of 
Whatfield," an admirable piece of irony, levelled against modern 
antiquaries. 

He died at Framlingham, Oct. 16, 1814, and was buried in the 
churchyard of this place. Mr. Clubbe was a person of considerable 
attainments, and like his father, possessed a rich fund of natural 
humour. He was the author of several publications, which are 
enumerated in the " Suffolk Garland," with his " Lamentation of 
Stephen Spink, the Brandeston Post Boy," inserted in that 
pleasing work. 

CHARITIES. A piece of land, containing about 1 acre 2 rods (of 
the donation of which, or the particular trust respecting the same, 
nothing is known), is occupied by a poor man, who holds without 
paying rent, instead of receiving parochial relief. Another piece of 
land, containing about one acre, is understood to have been given 
by a Mrs. Mary Revett, for apprenticing poor children. This land 
lets at a rent of .1, or .1 Is. a year. 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 83 

Robert Hawes, Gent., attorney- at-law, was eldest son of Henry, 
second son of Robert Hawes, Gent., cbief constable of this hundred 
in the time of King Charles I., and long afterwards ; whose family 
derive their descent from Robert Hawes, Gent., the son of Henry 
(formerly written) Hawe, by Helen his wife, daughter of Thomas 
Orapnall, of this parish : which Henry descended from the Hawes, 
of Hilgey, in Norfolk ;' where one of the same name, and bearing 
the same arms, lies interred. 

Mr. Hawes married Sarah, the youngest daughter of George 
Sterling, of Charsfield, in this hundred, Esq., and succeeded Mau- 
rice Kendall, as steward of Framlingham and Saxted manors, in 
1712. He died in 1731, and was buried in Framlingham church : 
some of his ancestors are buried at Brandeston. 

This gentleman was the industrious compiler of a history of this 
hundred ; from which the " History of Framlingham," was published 
in 4to., with additions, in 1798, by the late Mr. Robert Loder, of 
Woodbridge ; in the preface to which work, Mr. Loder gives the 
following particulars : 

" The following work, forming part of the History of the Hundred of Loes, is 
extracted from a very fair manuscript, comprising upwards of 700 folio pages, 
closely written, adorned in the body of the history and in the margins, with draw- 
ings of Churches, Gentlemen's Seats, miniature Portraits, ancient Seals, and Coats 
of Arms of the Nobility, Gentry, and Clergy, blazoned in their proper colours ; 
which was compiled by Robert Hawes, Gent., and remains in the collection of 
John Revett, of Brandeston Hall, Esq." 

Mr. Hawes presented another copy* of the same to the Master 
and Fellows of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge ; which was so well 
accepted, that they presented him with a large silver cup and cover, 
adorned with the college arms, with an honourable latin memorial 
engraven upon the same. 

ARMS. Hawes: sable; a fess humetty, ermine, between three 
griffins' heads, erased, argent. 



BUTLEY. BUTELEA, or BUTTELAY. 

This parish is situated in two hundreds; the church being in this, 
and the abbey in Plomesgate hundred, for which see an account. 

* A transcript of part of this manuscript is now before us, from which we hope 
to collect much original matter concerning this hundred. 



84 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

In a pastoral song written here in 1792, by the Eev. John Black, 
the poet celebrates the " fair Donegall ;" Barbara, the third wife of 
Arthur, first Marquess of Donegall. She was the daughter of the 
Eev. Dr. Godfrey; was married to his lordship Oct. 12th, 1790, 
and they both resided in this parish occasionally, for many years. 

The Marquess's first wife was Anne, the only daughter of James, 
Duke of Hamilton, by Elizabeth, the daughter and heir of Edward 
Spencer, of Eendlesham, Esq. ; by whom he had George Augustus, 
the present Marquess. 

Staverton Park, in Butley, has long been the property of the 
family of Barnardiston ; and Nathaniel Bamardiston, of the Eyes, 
near Sudbury, Esq., is now the owner of it. 

The Eev. John Black was for many years a resident in Wood- 
bridge, and died there, August 30, 1813, in the 59th year of his 
age. He was licensed to the perpetual curacy of this parish in 
1789, and to that of Eamsholt in 1807 ; was highly respected for 
the excellence of his understanding, and the amiable qualities 
of his heart. 

Mr. Black was a good classical scholar, and possessed a consi- 
derable share of poetical talent. The pious resignation of a Chris- 
tian supported him in the troubles and privations which it was his 
hard lot to encounter in domestic life. He published some sermons 
preached on particular occasions, and " Solitary Musings, in Verse," 
8vo. ; in 1799, "Poems," 8vo., which were honoured by a very 
large subscription, and to which is prefixed his portrait; and, in 
1801, "The Free School, a Poem;" to which is added, "An Elegy 
on the Death of Edmund Jenney, of Bredfield, Esq., and of Philip 
Bowes Broke, Esq., of Nacton," who both died in that year. Also 
" An authentic Narrative of the Mutiny on board the ship Lady 
Shore, with particulars of a Journey tlirough part of Brazil, in 
a letter dated ' Eio Janeiro, Jan. 18, 1798,' " from his son, one of 
the surviving officers of the ship. 

CHARITIES. By deed, dated in 1731, Thomas Lynd, conveyed 
to trustees, two pieces of land, containing by estimation one acre, 
in trust for the use and maintenance of the poor inhabitants of tins 
parish. This land is let at the rent of .1 5s. a year; which, with 
10s. 6d. a year, the rent of a small piece of ground, on which an 
. old town-house formerly stood, is distributed among poor widows, 
and other poor persons. 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 85 



CAMPSEY-ASH. CAPESEA, CAMPESS, or CAUMPES. 

Previous to 1195, Theobald de Valoines gave his estate in this 
parish to his two sisters, Joan and Agnes, for the purpose of founding 
a nunnery here, wherein they and other pious women might live to 
the service of God : this design having been put into execution, 
Joan de Valoiiies became the first prioress of this monastery. 

In " Valor Ecolesiasticus," 1534, the gross value is .2 13 Os. 5^d. 
It contained a prioress and nineteen nuns, previously to the disso- 
lution. The last prioress was Elizabeth 13uttry, who died in 1548, 
and was buried in St. Stephen's church, in Norwich. 

Among the annual charges upon the endowment, according to 
the wills of the founder, and succeeding benefactors, were these : 
" For three wax candles, of the weight of three pounds, on the an- 
niversary of Lady Anne Waylond, in the church of Ashe ; and at 
the mass of the blessed Virgin, in the church of Campsey, 3s. Cd." 
" For seven flagons of oil, for burning in the lamps in the chapel 
of the blessed Virgin Mary and St. Nicholas, 5s. lOd. ; and three 
flagons of wine, for celebrating masses in the chantry, 2s. 8d. per 
annum." "For annual alms to poor persons on certain days, 10s." 
The sum of .10 was annually divided between the prioress, sacrist, 
camerarius, almoner, celarer, and infirmarer; and .6 13s. 4d. 
between nuns of this nunnery, according to ancient custom. 

At the dissolution, in 1543, it was granted to Sir William Wil- 
loughby, Knt. ; who sold the lordship of this parish to Anthony 
Bull, of Ipswich, Gent. ; and the priory, with the demesne lands, 
to John Lane, Gent., who made the Abbey his residence, until Ms 
death, which happened in or about the 3rd of Queen Elizabeth. 

It continued in his descendants until the time of King Charles I., 
when Robert Lane, Esq., removed to Mendlesham, in Hartismere 
hundred, and sold this estate to Frederick Scot, Gent., a descendant 
from the Scots, of Glemsford, in this county. He resided here in 
1655, but afterwards sold the same to Sir Henry Wood, of Loudham, 
Knt., and removed to Leiston, where he died in 1662, and was 
buried there. 

From the Woods it passed to William Chapman, Esq., and was 
lately the property of Jacob Whitbread, Esq.* 

* This Chantry was probably that founded by Maud de Lancaster, and afterwards 
removed to Bruisyard, where it will be further noticed. 



00 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

ASH HIGH HOUSE was erected by William (not John) Glover, 
Esq., a retainer of Thomas Howard, Earl of Suffolk (not Norfolk), 
about the year 1600 ; and obtained its present appellation from the 
circumstance of its being four stories in height.* 

Jn or about the year 1652, William Glover, Esq., his grandson, 
sold tlu's estate to John Sheppard, Gent., a descendant of a family of 
considerable antiquity, originally seated at Mendlesham, in this 
county. The Gentleman's Magazine for 1830, at pages 398 and 
510, contains biographical notices of this respectable family, from 
which account we derive the following particulars : 

The John Sheppard who purchased this estate, and removing 
hither made it his residence, was eldest son of John Sheppard, who 
lived at Mendlesham, in the reigns of James and Charles I., by 
Elizabeth his wife, daughter of John Lane, of this parish, Gent. 
Their second son, Edmund, continued at Mendlesham. 

John, only son of John Sheppard, of this parish, died unmarried 
in 1671, and devised this property to be sold by his kinsman, 
Edmund Sheppard, jun., who thereupon disposed of it to his father, 
Edmund Sheppard, of Eendlesham, Gent., who died in 1676 ; and 
this estate descended to the above-mentioned Edmund Sheppard, 
Esq., who, removing from Mendlesham, made this his future 
residence. 

He married Anne, only daughter of Sir John Coell, of Depden, 
Knt., one of the Masters in Chancery, during the reign of King 
Charles II. ; by whom he had several children, all of whom, how- 
ever, died unmarried, excepting John, who survived him. 

He died here in 1708, and was succeeded by his son, John 
Sheppard ; who, after his father's decease, made great additions to 
his seat here, and considerable improvements. He married the 
Eight Hon. Anne, Countess of Leicester, relict of the Eight Hon. 
Philip Sydney, fifth Earl of Leicester, and one of the daughters 
and coheiresses of Sir Eobert Eeeve (alias Wright), of Thwaite, in 
this county, Bart., by whom he had no issue. He married, secondly, 
Hannah Wilmot, by whom, likewise, he had no issue. 

Mr. Sheppard died in 1747, and it appears that he was succeeded 
in his estates by his kinsman, John Sheppard, a descendant from a 
branch of 'this family, who became early seated at Wetheringset, in 
this county, and a descendant of his is the present proprietor ; a 

* A view of this house is given in the " Excursions in Suffolk.'' 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 87 

son of John Wilson Sheppard, Esq., who died in 1830, at Bury 
St. Edmund's, during his attendance at the assizes, as High Sheriff 
for the county. 

The old seat mentioned by Kirhy, as purchased of Theophilus 
Howard, Earl of Suffolk, by John Braham (or Brame), Gent., is the 
manor of Ash, a member of Framlingham manor, and parcel of Bi- 
god's ; formerly held by William de Hoo, at half-a-knight's fee ; 
and in the 2nd of Queen Elizabeth, by Lord Abergavenny : the 
same property that Anthony Bull bought, as above. It continued 
in that house for several generations, until the death of John Bra- 
ham, Esq., Banister- at- Law, in 1700; who, by Jane his wife, 
eldest daughter of Sir John Duke, of Benhall Lodge, Bart., left 
two daughters and co-heirs, Elizabeth and Jane, who in 1764, were 
residents therein. 

The advowson now is, and always was, appendant to tlu's manor. 
In 1312, the widow of Roger Bigod, last of that surname, Earl of 
Norfolk, presented to this church ; in 1361, the relict of Thomas de 
Brotherton ; in 1395, the Lady Margaret, Countess of Norfolk, the 
eldest daughter of Thomas de Brotherton; in 1447, John, Viscount 
Beaumont, in right of Lady Catherine his wife, the widow of John 
Mowbray, Earl of Norfolk; in 1506, Thomas Howard, Earl of 
Surrey; in 1533, Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk; in 1561, 
William, Lord W T illoughby; in 1607, Thomas Howard, Earl of 
Suffolk; in 1637, Theophilus Howard, Earl of Suffolk; in 1671, 
John Brame, Gent.; and in 1817, the Lord Rendlesham, whose 
descendant is the present proprietor. 

The Rev. George Frederic Tavel, rector of this parish, and Euston 
in Suffolk, died April 26, 1829. This amiable man, and accom- 
plished scholar, was a Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, and in 
1795, proceeded to the degree of A.M. In 1798, and 1800, he was 
appointed one of the Moderators, and in the latter year a Taxor of 
the University : he, for many years, filled the important office of 
Tutor in his College. In 1811, he was presented by the Society, 
to the vicarage of Kellington, in Yorkshire ; and in the same year 
he married to the Lady Augusta Fitzroy, the 4th daughter of 
Augustus Henry, 3rd Duke of Grafton, by his 2nd wife, Elizabeth, 
daughter of the Rev. Sir Richard Wrottesley, Bart., and Dean of 
Windsor. Mr. Tavel was presented to tin's living in 1817, by Sir 
Ralph James Woodford, Bait. ; on which occasion he vacated the 
vicarage of Kellington. In 1818, he was elected a Fellow of the 



88 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

Royal Society; and in 1828, he was presented by his brother-in- 
law, the Duke of Grafton, to the rectory of Euston. 

ARMS. Lane: argent; three chevronels, sable. Skot: argent; 
three Catherine wheels, sable, within a bordure engrailed, gules. 
Sheppard: sable ; a fess between three talbots passant, argent. 
Glover: sable; a fess crenelle, ermine, between three crescents, 
argent. Braham : sable ; a cross patonce, or. 

CHARITIES. The parish estate here, of which the acquisition is 
unknown, comprises a messuage, called the " Town House," in two 
tenements, with a yard and a piece of land, containing by estimation, 
two acres, which are let together at .10 a year; with a piece of 
waste, containing about an acre, unproductive, having a sand-pit 
therein. The income is, by usage, appropriated by the churchwar- 
dens to the reparation and ornament of the church, and other ex- 
pences of their office. 



CHARSFIELD. CERESFELLA, or CERESFELDA. 

In the time of Tung John, this lordship was vested in William de 
Weyland ; who fined for his villains here, and in Westerfield. It 
continued in that family until the death of Sir John de Weyland, ill 
the time of King Richard II. ; when Elizabeth, his only daughter 
and heiress, inherited this manor. She married John Harewell, 
Esq., of Warwickshire ; and Joan, their only daughter and heiress, 
married John Stretche, Esq., of Devonshire. 

This Joan Stretche, it appears, died without issue, and her pos- 
sessions devolved upon the descendants of Margaret and Catherine, 
sisters and co-heirs of the said Sir John de Weyland, grandfather of 
the above Joan. Margaret married to Sir John de Tudenham, and 
Catherine to Sir John deBotetort, lord of Mendlesham, in this county. 

In 1434, on the death of Joan Stretche, a fine was levied between 
Sir Thomas Tudenham, grandson of the above Sir John Tudenham, 
and Margaret his wife, and Sir John Knevet ; who married Joan, 
daughter and co-heir of Sir John Botetort, and Catherine Ms wife ; 
by which this manor, with Brandeston, Westerfield, and other lord- 
ships in this county, were granted to the said Sir Thomas Tudenham ; 
and the other possessions of the said Joan, in Somersetshire, &c., 
to Sir John Knevet. 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 89 

From the Tudcnlmms it passed to the Bedingfields, as in Be- 
dingfield parish ; and in the 2nd of Queen Elizabeth, Sir Edmund 
Bedirigfield held the manor of Charsfield Hall, at half-a-knight's 
fee, and paid castle guard rent to Framlingham Castle ; in the 30th 
of the same reign, Edmund Bedingfield, Esq., held the same. 

Henry Bedingfield, Esq., kept his first court for this manor in 
1591 ; he was afterwards knighted, and obtained a grant from the 
lord of the manor of Framliiigham, that the manor of Charsfield 
should riot in future be holden of Framlingham by knight's service, 
but by fealty only. In 1C 13, he sold the manor of Charsfield, 
Charsfield Hall, and the demesne lands belonging thereto, to Sir 
John Leman, Knt., and his heirs. 

Sir John Leman was Alderman and Lord Mayor of London ; was 
Knighted by King James I., in the 12th of his reign, and the same 
year kept his first court for this manor. By deed, dated Apiil 7, 
1629, he settled this estate upon William Leruan, Gent., (the eldest 
son of John Leman, Gent., eldest son of William Leman, of Beccles, 
Gent., the eldest brother of Sir John), and his heirs for ever. Sir 
John Lemaii deceased in 1032, and was buried under an elegant 
monument, in St. Michael's church, Crooked Lane, London, having 
been a considerable benefactor to that city. 

William Leman, Gent., after the death of Sir John, kept his first 
court for this manor in 1640 ; he gave the said manor to Margaret, 
his second wife, the daughter of Matthew Trot, of Hargrave, in this 
county, Gent., for life : the reversion thereof, to John Leman, his 
eldest son. He was the first of this family who resided here, and 
kept his first court in 1662 : he died in 1668 ; and his eldest and 
youngest sons, after his decease, without issue, leaving William their 
brother, who succeeded to Ms father's inheritance. 

He married Elizabeth, the only daughter and heiress of Bobert 
Sterling, of this parish, Gent. ; a family of good repute here for 
several ages, descendants of the Sterlings of Witnesham and Bran- 
deston. In or about 1735, the said Elizabeth, as widow of the 
above William Leman, Esq., inherited tin's estate, and resided 
here. 

It was soon afterwards purchased by William Jennens, Esq., of 
Acton Place, in this county ; and subsequently became the property 
of the Curson family. The Eight Hon. the Earl Howe is the pre- 
sent proprietor. 

In 1635, Robert Large, clerk, held this curacy, from which he 



90 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

was ejected about 1644, for reading the Book of Common Prayer, 
and for taking the solemn league and covenant with limitations ; 
he became afterwards in such abject circumstances, as to accept of 
an asylum in the alms-house at Letheringham, where he and his 
family obtained a constant supply of provision from the Abbey. He 
died in 1657, and was buried in Letheringham church yard. 

ARMS. Weyland: argent; on a cross, gules, five escallops, or. 
Bedingfield: ermine; an eagle, displayed, gules. Leman: azure; 
a fess between three dolphins, embowed, argent. Stirling : azure ; 
a cross pattee, between four stars of six points, or. 

CHARITIES. Tlu's parish has a share in the bequest of Joseph 
Kersey, for an account of which see Earl Soham. 



CEETINGHAM, or GRETINGHAM. 

This parish was formerly divided into two, Great and Little 
Cretingham ; but have long been considered as one village. It 
contains together four manors ; namely, St. Peter's, as belonging 
to St. Peter's Priory, in Ipswich ; to which house the church was 
also impropriated. 

2nd. Cretingham Tyes, of which manor John de Hoo was lord, 
in 1341, then the Tyes of Easton, who gave it the additional ap- 
pellation. It has since passed through the families of Phelip, of 
Dennington, the Lords Bardolf, the Viscounts Beaumont; the 
Wingfield and Kous families : it at length became vested in the 
Eevets, of Brandeston. 

3rd. Little Cretingham ; which contained a messuage, 76 acres 
of land, meadow and pasture, and .3 15s. 5d. rent, in this parish, 
Monewden, Framsden, and Helmingham. In the time of King 
Henry III., Nicholas de Gretingham was owner thereof; in the 
15th of the following reign, Simon de Gretingham occurs; and 
about 1361, this property came, either by sale or descent, to Wil- 
liam Clare, Gent. 

4th. Kettlebars manor, in the reign of King Henry III., was 
held by Eichard de Kettlebars ; who, by himself or his ancestors, 
gave name to tliis lordship, and built the manor house, encompas- 
sing it with a moat ; the seat of the family, the domain of which 
lying in that part of the parish nearest Earl Soham, contained 100 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 91 

acres of land, meadow, pasture, and wood, which were held of the 
honour of Chester. He was patron of the church of Monewden, 
and held 20 acres of land in Kettleburgh, in 1219, and 40 acres in 
Easton : he left issue John de Kettlebars, his son and heir, who 
sold the advowson of Monewden, and 18 acres of land there, in 
1263, to William Weyland, Esq. 

In 1381, Margaret de Kettlebars, after the decease of her two 
brothers without issue, did homage for her lands in Kettleburgh, at 
Framlingham Castle ; and afterwards married Thomas Mulso, Esq., 
or sold him the manor of Kettlebars, in this parish ; which de- 
scended to William his son, whose only daughter and heir, by Anne 
his wife, married Lionel Lowthe, Esq., and Margaret their only 
daughter and heir, married Richard Cornwallis, Esq., about the 
commencement of Queen Elizabeth's reign ; who in her right in- 
herited this manor. 

He was third son of Sir John Cornwallis, of Brome, in this 
county, Knt,. by Mary his wife, daughter of Edward Sulyard, Esq., 
and brother of Sir Thomas Cornwallis, Comptroller of the House- 
hold to Queen Mary, whom he greatly aided. 

In this parish church are monuments for Lionel Lowthe, and 
Margaret his daughter, relict of Richard Cornwallis, who was buried 
at Shotley, in this county ; and also memorials to some other mem- 
bers of the Cornwallis family. 

The manor of Tyes, in Cretingham, was held by a family of 
Knight's degree, of that name, for several generations; part of 
which estate afterwards passed to the Daundy's, of Ipswich. Wil- 
liam, son of Edmund Daundy, Esq., a portman of that borough 
(who erected at his own expense the market cross, in 1510, during 
his bailiwick, and founded the almshouse in Lady Lane), resided in 
this parish. 

He married Agnes, daughter of Thomas Alvard, of Ipswich, Esq., 
by whom he had issue two sons, Thomas and Arthur, steward of 
Grays Inn, and one daughter. Thomas Daundy, Gent., their 
eldest son, married Anne, the daughter of John Falstaff, of Pet- 
taugh, Gent., by whom he had issue one son, Thomas, and nine 
daughters. He died in 1580, and was buried here. 

Thomas Daundy, their only son, succeeded : he married Martha, 
the daughter of John Poley, of Badley, Esq., by whom he had 
issue four sons and five daughters. Their father removed from 
this parish to Combes Hall, in Stow hundred, where he died, in the 



92 HUNDllED OF LOES. 

reigu of King James I., and lies interred under a marble stone in 
that parish church. 

William Keene, in 1466, was instituted to the rectory of Burston, 
in Norfolk, on the presentation of the Prior and Convent, atButley. 
By his will, dated and proved in 1472, he desired to be buried in 
the chancel of this parish church. 

Robert Sayer was minister of this parish in the latter part of the 
reign of King Charles I., and expended a large sum upon the par- 
sonage house, which he almost rebuilt, and made it a very conve- 
nient habitation. He died in 1649, and was buried in this church- 
yard, a little southward from the porch, with two of his sons: 
Eobert Sayer, B.D., the eldest, was prebendary of York, and rector 
of Westley, in Cambridgeshire, he deceased in 1681 ; and William 
Sayer, the second son, was a portman of Ipswich, and died in the 
same year. 

ARMS. Mulso: ermine; on a bend, sable, three goats' heads 
erased, argent, armed, or. Lowthe : sable ; a wolf salient, argent. 
Daundy : quarterly, azure and or ; on the first, a mullet of the 
second. Sayer: gules; a chevron between three falcons, argent ; 
a chief, ermine. 

CHARITIES. The town lands of this parish were principally 
settled or given, in or about the 3rd of Queen Elizabeth, by Arthur 
Penning and William Barwick, for keeping the church in good re- 
pair, and for the general benefit of the parishioners. It consists of 
two parcels of land, containing together about 1\ acres, let at 
aG.19 5s. a year ; the Bell Inn, the acquisition of which is unknown, 
rent .13 per annum; a cottage and blacksmith's shop, rent .10 
a year ; a cottage lately erected at the expense of the parish, yearly 
rent, .6 10s. ; one double cottage, and one single ditto, rent un- 
certain. The rents are applied to the repairs of the church, and 
defraying other expenses of the churchwardens ; and the surplus is 
paid to the overseers of the poor, and applied in reduction of the 
parochial rates. In 1819, the Rev. Joseph Jefferson, late vicar of 
this parish, settled two pieces of copyhold land, containing together 
two acres, in augmentation of the glebe land belonging to the vi- 
carage, for the use of his successors; subject to the the payment of 
40s. a year, at Michaelmas, to the churchwardens and overseers, for 
the benefit of the poor. This annuity is laid out in coals, which are 
distributed among poor people. 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 

DALLINGHOO, or DALINGAHOU. 

This parish is not entirely in this hundred, but part thereof lies 
within that of Willford, known by the name of the Hamlet, and, for 
distinctions sake, Earl Dallinghoo ; but the other part, in wliich the 
church is situate, is in this hundred, and called Dallinghoo, without 
any addition. It was held of the honour of Eye, with three parts in 
four of the advowson, and Earl Dallinghoo held one turn in four, 
to the presentation of an incumbent, as of ancient right. 

It formerly belonged to the Bovils, of Letheringham ; which 
manor, with the said three parts of the advowson, partly by descent 
and partly by purchase, came through the several families of Run- 
geston, Norwich, and Carbonel, to the Wingfields ; who, by usur- 
pation, or otherwise, gained at length the whole right of presentation, j 

In the reign of King James I., Thomas Shaw, Gent., lived in good 
repute in this parish. He married Elizabeth, one of the daughters 
of Thomas Fernley, of West Greeting, in this county, Esq. Mr. 
Shaw was steward to the Earl of Suffolk, in his manor of Fram- 
lingham, and several other courts in this county. 

He died in 1622, and was buried in the chancel of this parish 
church ; Elizabeth his wife, survived, and re-married to Henry 
Dade, Esq., second son of Thomas Dade, of Tannington, in tin's 
county, Esq., and Anne Ids wife, the daughter of Richard Corn- 
wallis, Esq. 

Mr. Dade was Bachelor of Laws, and Commissary of the Arch- 
deaconry of Suffolk : he resided at Ipswich until his marriage, 
when he removed from thence, and dwelt in this parish. Elizabeth 
his wife, died in 1624, and he married secondly, Thomasine, the 
daughter of John Lea, of Coddenham, Gent., and widow of Samuel 
Sayer, Gent. 

William Churchill, Esq., purchased this estate about 1698, of 
John Dade, M.D., and made it his seat. He represented Ipswich 
in parliament in Queen Anne's reign, and married Rose, the daughter 
of John Sayer, of Woodbridge, Gent., by whom he had issue one 
daughter, Elizabeth, married to Francis Negus, Esq. It was lately 
the estate of the Earl of Rochford, and now belongs to Mr. 
Archdeckne. 

In the reign of King Edward II., Robert de Dalynghoo was 
owner of laud here, wliich he settled upon his daughter, Isabella de 



94 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

Pratt : in a window in this parish church, was sable, three escallops, 
argent; supposed to be the arms of Dallinghoo. 

ARMS. Shaw : argent ; a chevron between three lozenges, er- 
mine. Dade: gules; a chevron between three garbes, proper. 
Churchill: sable; a lion rampant, argent, debruised with abend- 
let, gules. 

CHARITIES. The church and poor lands in this parish, consist 
of seven cottages, and several pieces of land, containing together 
nearly 13 acres; the rents of which amount to ;.30 15s. a year, 
subject to land tax and quit rents. This is applied in the repairs 
of the church, and in the purchase of bread and coals for the poor. 
The sum of .8 6s. 7d. a year, is received for the poor of this 
parish, under Kersey's charity (see Earl Soham). The several 
sums of 10s., a rent charge for land the property of Andrew Arce- 
deckne, Esq., and 20s. from Mill's charity, at Framlingham, is 
distributed also in bread and coals; and 10s. is payable out of 
premises in Earl Soham, called the " Stable Yard ;" this was, 
however, withheld for several years, but whether ever resumed, we 
are not informed. 



EAEL SOHAM, or SAHAM. 

This parish in Doomsday is called Saham, afterwards Sahara 
Barres, to distinguish it from the adjacent parish of Soham,, which 
Alfricus, Bishop of the East Angles, gave to the Monastery of St. 
Edmund, whereupon it was called Monks' Soham. 

It was purchased by Hugh Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, in the time 
of King Stephen, of Hubert de Munchensi, descended from Mun- 
chensi, a Norman Baron, lord of Edwardston, in Babergh hundred, 
in the time of William the Conqueror. Gradually losing its ancient 
name of Soham Barres, and continuing, with Framlingham, parcel 
of the estates of the Earls of Norfolk and Suffolk, it acquired the 
name of Earl Soham, which it still retains. 

Koger Bigod, the founder of Thetford Abbey, and Alice his wife, 
gave to that Monastery all the right that he had in the churches of 
his demesne ; namely, that of this parish, with Kelsale, Earl Ston- 
ham, Yoxford, and the two Bradleys, with all the lands belonging 
to the same ; all which Bishop Herbert appropriated to the said 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 05 

Monastery, after their next vacancies, reserving canonical obedience 
from the clerks that should serve them. 

In the 7th of King Edward II., Thomas de Brotherton, Earl of 
Norfolk, obtained of that Monarch, licence for a market in this 
parish every Thursday ; and free warren in all his demesne lands in 
Framlingham, Hoo, Stonham, and Hacheston. He died seized of 
the manors of Earl Stonham, Hollesley, Dunningworth, and Hoo ; 
which he left to his second wife, Mary, daughter of William Lord 
Roos, and was buried in the Abbey at St. Edmund's Bury. 

A grant of this lordship from the Crown, was made to Frances, 
relict of Henry, Earl of Surry, son and heir of Thomas, Duke of 
Norfolk, in the 1st of King Edward VI. She was daughter of 
John Vere, Earl of Oxford, and re-married to Thomas Steyning, of 
Woodbridge, Esq., and afterwards of Earl Soham, by whom she 
had issue a daughter Mary, who in 1575, married Charles Seckford, 
Esq., M.P. for Aldeburgh in 1572. Mr. Steyning was steward of 
the manors of Framlingham and Saxted, from 1563 to 1577. In 
1554, he and lady Frances* presented to the rectory of this parish 
church. 

John Cornwallis, Esq., purchased of the Earl of Suffolk, the 
manor, advowson, lodge, and park, of Earl Soham, and removed to 
this parish, from Badmgham, in Hoxne hundred. He was trustee 
to Thomas Howard, only son and heir of Philip, Earl of Arundel : 
was twice married, 1st. to Catherine, daughter of John Blenner- 
hasset, of Barsham, Esq.; she died in 1584, and was buried in 
Baddingham church. His second wife was Elizabeth Wolsey, 
relict of William Tuthill, Gent., by whom he had no issue. Mr. 
Cornwallis deceased in 1615, and was buried at Cretingham,, in this 
hundred. 

Thomas Cornwallis, Esq., his eldest surviving son, succeeded. 
He was M.P. for this county in the 21st of King James I., and 
married Mary, daughter of Edward Grimstone, of Bradfield, in 
Essex, Esq., by whom he had no issue. By his will, dated in 1625, 
he devised lus estate in this parish, to Elizabeth his sister, the wife 
of Thomas Corderoy, of Hampshire, Esq. Mr. Cornwallis was 
also buried at Cretingham. Elizabeth Corderoy afterwards married 

* Her death is thus recorded in the register of Earl Soham : " Anno Domi 
1577, Ttem the Ladye Ffrancis Countys of Surrye dyed the last of June in the 
year aforesaid, and was burryed at Fframlyngham." No corresponding entry ap- 
pears in the Framlingham register of burials. 



9G HUNDRED OF LOES. 

to Edward Nyncliion, of Whittle, in Essex, who sold this estate to 
John Cotton, of London, Esq. 

He was the second son of Sir Alan Cotton, Knt, Lord Mayor of 
London in 1626, and served the office of High Sheriff for this 
county in 1644. Mr. Cotton had four wives, but had no surviving 
issue, except by the last, namely Anne, the daughter of Nicholas 
Revett, of Brandeston, Esq., by whom he had several children. He 
died in 1655, much in debt, from having disbursed large sums in 
support of the Royal cause, that were never repaid ; which obliged 
Alan, liis eldest surviving son, to sell this estate to Leicester Deve- 
reux, Viscount Hereford. 

The executors of his son, Price Devereux, Lord Viscount Here- 
ford, sold it to John Boyfield, Esq. It was lately the property of 
John Ayton, Esq., of Missenden Abbey, in Buckinghamshire. 

In the time of Queen Elizabeth, Philip, son of Robert Stebbing, 
of Kettleburgh, resided in this parish; whose descendants afterwards 
settled at Wisset and Framsden, in this county. Oliver Stebbing, a 
grandson of the above Philip, lived here in the time of Charles I., 
and took the covenant. 

The Rev. Francis Capper, M.A., died Nov. 13, 1818, at the 
rectory house in this parish, in his 83rd year, and in the 60th of 
liis incumbency. He received the early part of his education at 
the school at Westminster, from whence he was removed to Christ 
Church, Oxford. In Oct. 1759, he was presented to the rectory 
of Monks' Soham, and in December following to that of Earl 
Soham. He was highly esteemed as a sound and conscientious 
divine ; and in private life, justly endeared to liis family, his pa- 
risliioners, and his friends. 

Mr. Capper was probably the oldest incumbent in the diocese. 
He bequeathed money to purchase so much stock in the four per 
cent, annuities, as with the dividends thereof, would purchase 
twelve loaves of bread, of 3d. each, to be distributed to the poor 
every Sabbath-day. 

ARMS. Cotton: azure; a chevron between three cotton hanks, 
argent. 

CHARITIES. The parish estate here consists of two cottages, in 
five tenements, which together let for .9 10s. a year; and 46 
acres of land, lying dispersed in the parish, which a- e let to yearly 
tenants, at rents amounting to .62 4s. per annum. These are 
applied for the benefit of such poor persons of the parish as the 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 07 

trustees think most necessitous and deserving. Robert Wyard, by 
will dated in 1G77, charged his lands, called "Hersewell," in Wor- 
lingworth, with .5 a year, to bo paid as follows : For a sermon 
at Earl Soham, on the 25th Feb. 10s. ; to the poor of ditto, present 
at the said sermon, .1 5s. ; to the person who ring the bell, 5s.; 
for an entertainment to the parish officers, and ringers of the bells, 
10s. ; and a like sum to be applied in the same manner and propor- 
tions, April 23, the feast day of St. George the Martyr. Joseph 
Kersey bequeathed by will, in 1816, the sum of .800, to be applied 
in the purchase of bank stock, the yearly interest thereof to be dis- 
tributed in bread and coals, to the resident industrious poor of the 
parishes of Dallinghoo, Charsfield, Marlesford, and Earl Soham, 
for ever. The sum of .8 Gs. 7d. a year, is received, and expended 
in the purchase of coals, which are distributed to the poor ; being 
their portion of the dividends payable for tliis parish. 



EASTON, or ESTUNA. 

i 

The lordship and advowson of this parish were anciently the in- 
heritance of the family of Charles, who resided at Kettleburgh ; it 
afterwards became vested in the Wingfields, of Letheringham, in 
whose family it continued several ages, until purchased, with the 
remainder of the Wingfields' estates, by the Earl of Rochford. 

In the reign of King Henry III., Hugh Pecke resided at Martle 
Hall, in tin's parish, and by Ide his wife, had issue a daughter Mar- 
gery, who married Roger de Celtey, upon whom the said Hugh 
settled the manor of Martle Hall, with a messuage, 26 acres of 
land, 2 acres of meadow, 2j acres of wood, and 14s. rent in Ha- 
cheston and Easton, in tail. 

In 1332, Nicholas de Eston, and Alice his wife, were owners of 
messuages, lands, and rents, in this parish, and Kettleburgh ; and 
in 1364, John, the son of Nicholas Eston, occurs. 

Sir Peter de Tye, Knt., married the Lady Dyonise*, relict of Sir 
Edward Charles, of Kettleburgh, Knt., and lived in this parish 



* This lady was probably the daughter of John de Hoo, and Dyonise his wife : 
by her will, proved in the above year, she desires to be buried before the church 
door of the Holy Trinity, in Barsham. 



98 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

about the 21st of King Edward III. She survived him, and held 
his manor of Barsham, in Wangford hundred, during her life, which 
after her decease, in 1375, descended to their son, Robert de Tye, 
Esq. He left issue Robert, who married Alice, the daughter 
of Simon, the son of John Brook, of this parish, Gent., and in 
her right was owner of Kettleburgh Hall, which Alice Charles, 
lady of that manor, granted to Simon Brook, in 1451. They left 
issue, George Tye, Gent., who sold Kettleburgh Hall, about 1527, 
to William Stebbing, of that parish, Gent., and his heirs. 

In the reign of Queen Elizabeth, John Wingfield, Esq., resided 
in this parish. He was one of the sons of Thomas Wingfield, of 
Great Dunham, in Norfolk, the son of William Wingfield, Esq., 
Sewer to King Henry VIII., who was fourth son of Sir John 
Wingfield, of Letheringham, Knt. He died and was buried in this 
parish church, in 1584. 

Several junior branches of this knightly family were seated here. 
Sir Anthony Wingfield, Bart., so created in 1627, built the mansion 
called the White House, pulled down the old seat in Hoo, called 
Goodwin's, and removed hither, making this his principal seat. He 
died about 1638, and lies interred at Letheringham. 

The old mansion at Letheringham becoming ruinous, the family 
continued this as their chief place of residence, until the time of 
Sir Henry, eldest son of Sir Henry Wingfield, Bart., and Dame 
Mary his wife, daughter of Marvyn Touchet, Esq., afterwards Earl 
of Castlehaven ; who sold this and his other estates to William 
Henry Nassau, 1st. Earl of Rochford. Sir Marvyn Wingfield, 
Bart., brother of the above Sir Henry, and to whom, little more 
than the title remained, was the last male branch of this ancient 
house. 

William Henry Nassau de Zulestein, was a personage liigh in 
favour with King William III., whom he accompanied into Eng- 
land in 1688, and in consideration of whose eminent services, was 
by that Monarch, in 1695, created Baron of Enfield, in Middlesex, 
Viscount Tunbridge, in Kent, and Earl of Rochford, in the county 
of Essex. He was son of Frederick de Nassau, Lord of Zulestein, 
in the Province of Utrecht, by Mary his wife, daughter of Sir 
William Killigrew, of the county of Cornwall, Bart., and Cham- 
berlain to Queen Catherine, the Consort of King Charles II. 

His Lordship was Master of the Robes to his Majesty, and after 
his purchase of the Wingfield estate, made this parish liis occasional 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 9!) 

residence. He died at Zulestein, in 1708, and was succeeded by 
William, liis eldest son and heir, who was killed at the battle of 
Almanza, in Spain, in 1710, unmarried ; when Frederick Ids bro- 
ther, succeeded, as 3rd Earl of Eochford. 

William Henry, his eldest son, succeeded, who sold this estate to 
the Hon. Richard Savage Nassau, his brother, who made it for 
several years his constant residence. He married Anne, the 
daughter and co-heir of Edward Spencer, of Rendlesham, Esq., 
and widow of James, 3rd Duke of Hamilton. By this lady he had 
issue William Henry, born in 1754 ; who, on the decease of his 
uncle, William Henry, succeeded him in Ins honours, as 5th Earl 
of Rochford, in 1781. 

His Lordship deceased September 3, 1830, at his seat called the 
White House, in this parish, in the 77th year of his age, and dying 
unmarried, the title became extinct, and the estates were inherited 
by Alexander Hamilton Douglas, 10th and present Duke of Ham- 
ilton and Brandon. 

ARMS. Nassau: azure; a lion rampant, and semee of billets, 
or : Crest, in a ducal coronet, azure, a pair of bucks' horns, gules. 
Tye: argent; a chevron, gules. Pccke: azure; a fess, between 
two chevronels, gules. 

In 1821, died in this parish, William Cotton, Gent., the only 
surviving male branch of an ancient and respectable family, long 
resident in this county, who were of Cheshire extraction, and bore 
the same arms with those seated at Cumbermere, in that county. 
He was a lineal descendant of John, the second son of Sir Alan 
Cotton, Knt., of the foregoing parish of Earl Soham. 

On the night of the 17th October, 1820, the house of Mr. Cotton 
was broken into by four men, with their faces blacked, who with 
threats and imprecations, possessed themselves of very considerable 
property. Their sudden and terrific appearance by the bedside of 
Mr. Cotton, together with the idea of appearing against them on 
their trial, made such a deep impression upon his mind, as to de- 
press his spirits, and impair his health, that but little doubt remains 
that he was thus brought to a premature grave. 

At the ensuing assizes for this county, Samuel Grimwood, Tho- 
mas Last, and James Rozier, Avere capitally convicted of this burglary, 
and received sentence of death. Grimwood was executed at Ipswich, 
April 28, 1821 ; the others were reprieved for transportation. 



100 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

EYKE, or IKE. 

The lords of Framlingham manor, were for many ages owners of 
the lordship of this parish, and patrons of the church ; the manor 
therefore assumed, and still continues the name of Ike cum Eram- 
lingham, although the former was sold from the latter, about the 
commencement of the reiccn of King Charles I. 

In the reigns of King Richard II., and Henry IV., John Staverton, 
Esq., resided at Staverton Hall, in this parish, and was lord of the 
manors of Staverton, Chcsylford, Cotton, Newton, Skeyth, and rules 
and perquisites of messuages and lands, in Ash, Rendlesham, Blax- 
hall, and Marlesford. The manor of Chesylford he gave to the prior 
and convent at Butley, to pray for his soul and those of his ancestors. 

Several of that name and family resided at Staverton Hall long 
before his time ; it afterwards, by descent or purchase, came to 
Thomas Alvard, Gent., who in the 26th of King Henry VIII., died 
seized thereof. It subsequently became vested in the Wood family, 
of Loudham, from whom it passed to William Chapman, Esq. 

Staverton Park, which lies partly within the parish of Butley, has 
now been long vested in the Barnardiston family : Nathaniel Bar- 
nardiston, of the Ryes, near Sudbury, Esq., is the present owner. 

There is a small manor belonging to the rectory here ; and since 
the separation of the manor of Eyke from that of Frarnlingham, the 
following persons have presented to this rectory : Catherine Gurdry, 
in 1638; John Barker, of Thorndon, in 1673; Henry Boughton, 
in 1689 ; and lately, the Rev. Jacob Chilton. 

In 1329, Robert Redishall (or Redenhall), was instituted to this 
living, on the presentation of Thomas de Brotherton, Earl of Nor- 
folk. This rector, in the 32nd of King Edward III., founded a 
Chantry in this church, and endowed it with the manor of Bevants, 
in Rendlesham ; having obtained licence of Sir Thomas de Hol- 
brooke, Knt., and lord of the manor of Colvilles, wherein the former 
was held. 

This was called St. Mary's Chantry, because the priest thereof 
always officiated at St. Mary's altar, and the priest was in the pre- 
sentation and nomination of the rector for the time being. The 
first was admitted in 1351. 

Simon Saltfletus was admitted 21st September, 1355. By his 
will, made in 1380, he gave 20s. towards making the porch of the 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 101 

chancel, if the parishioners wished to have such, if not, then to 
repair the church. 

William Ward, admitted September 28, 1537. He was the last 
Chantry priest, who upon a survey of the Chantry lands by the 
Crown, had an annual pension of .6 allowed him for life ; which 
was paid him in 1555. In the 2Gth of King Henry VIII., the lands 
were valued at .8 per annum. 

In 1427, John May was instituted, on the presentation of John 
Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk. He died in 1451, and was buried in 
this chancel. He bequeathed to the fabric of a new wall on the 
west part of the church, 10 marks, and to the fabric of the church, 
and synods payments of quindismo to the King, a piece of land 
called Fen Croft, containing 4 acres, and a piece of meadow called 
Simondis Holm, containing 2 acres ; also a piece of pasture called 
Witford, in Bromeswell, for ever. He was lord of the manors of 
Dcbach and Cliffs Burgh, and resided at tlus rectory in 1449. 

Mr. Francis Pretty, of this parish*, accompanied Thomas Ca- 
vendish, of Trimley St. Martin, Esq., on his first voyage, and wrote 
the account thereof, inserted in " Hackluyt's Collection of Voyages." 

Mem. In 1821, a small Koman um, and some glass vessels, 
were discovered in removing a mound in this parish. 

ARMS. Staverton: argent; a bend, raguled, between two mul- 
lets, gules. 

CHARITIES. There are about 12 acres of land in this parish, 
and 7 acres in the parish of Bromeswell, which let at ^.28 a year ; 
and the rents are applied in the reparation of the church, &c. The 
sum of ,.10 a year is received from Sir Michael Stanhope's charity, 
and is distributed by the parish officers among poor persons, about 
Christmas (see Sutton for further particulars). Three parcels of 
land, containing together about 3 acres 2 rods, were given for the 
poor of this parish, by James and Henry Mason, in or about 1G20. 
The rents of these amount to <.6 19s. a year, and is given away 
with Sir M. Stanhope's charity. 



FRAMLINGHAM, or FRAMELINGAHAM. 

So much has already appeared concerning tlus town, that the 
* According to Fuller, but Kirby says, " lately of Ey iu Suffolke." 



102 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

subject is become fairly exhausted; and we have nothing to offer, 
but a very summary account deduced from its various historians, 
and some brief notices from other sources. 

It is distinguished for the remains of its Castle, which was said 
to have been built in the time of the Saxons. It was one of the 
principal seats of St. Edmund the Martyr. William Rufus gave 
this castle to his favourite, Eoger Bigod : subsequently, Edward I., 
gave it to his second son, Thomas of Brotherton, Earl Marshal of 
England : the next grant was made by King Henry IV., to his son, 
Henry Prince of Wales, who kept his first court here in 1404-5. 
On the attainder of the Duke of Norfolk, the castle became for- 
feited to King Henry VIII., and descended to his son Edward VI., 
who kept his first court there : he bequeathed it to his sister Mary, 
and it was soon afterwards restored to the Duke of Norfolk. In 
1G25, it was sold, with its manor, &c., to Sir Robert Hitcham, Knt., 
for .14,000 ; and he settled it on the master and fellows of Pem- 
broke College, Cambridge, who now possess it. 

In 1584, Thomas Dove, D.D., was instituted to this living, upon 
the presentation of the assignee of Philip Howard, Earl of Arundel. 
He was chaplain to Queen Elizabeth, whom she used to call " the 
Dove with silver wings." 

Euller ranks him among his London worthies, and says, " he 
was born in this city, as a credible person of his nearest relation 
hath informed me, bred a tanquam (which is a Fellow's Fellow), in 
Pembroke College, in Cambridge. He afterwards became an emi- 
nent preacher : and liis sermons, substantial in themselves, were 
advantaged by his comely person, and graceful elocution. Queen 
Elizabeth was highly affected, and anno 1589, preferred him Dean 
of Norwich ; advanced him, eleven years after, to the Bishopric of 
Peterborough. He departed this life, 1030, in the thirtieth year of 
his Bishopric, on the thirtieth of August ; who kept a good house 
whilst he lived, and yet raised a family to Knightly degree." 

Dr. Dove held this living in commendam with his Bishopric, and 
Richard Golty officiated as his curate, from 1 024 to the time of his 
death; when Mr. Golty was instituted to this rectory, upon the 
presentation of Theophilus Howard, Earl of Suffolk. 

Ryce furnishes the following account of this much persecuted 
individual: "Richard Goltie, Master of Artes, late rector of Fram- 
lingham, married Deborah, daughter of Samuel Ward, Towne- 
prcacher of Ipswich. His grandfather came from Callice, in France, 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 103 

and was afterwards of Ipswich. His estate worth .2,000. At the 
time when the engagement was pressed to be true and faithful to 
the commonwealth of England, as then established, and many able 
men were removed out of their places for not subscribing it, some 
sectaries articled against Mr. Goltie, and he refusing the engagement 
tendered him, his living at Framlingham was sequestred from him, 
and hereafter he resided and preached at Ashbocking." This was 
in 1650, when he was ejected; in 1000, Mr. Golty was restored, 
and continued rector until his death, in 1678. 

He was succeeded by Nathaniel Coga, D.D., Master of Pem- 
broke Hall, and in 1681, Vice- Chancellor of the University of 
Cambridge. Dr. Coga was the first incumbent presented by the 
Master, Fellows, and Scholars of Pembroke Hall. 

The Haberghams were a family of much repute, and acquired 
some extent of real property in this town ; two of whom, if not a 
third also, officiated as curates here, in succession, as appears by 
the following extract of baptism from the parish register : " Law- 
ranc Habbargam the son of Lawranc Habbargam and Sewssani 
his wife his grandfather was cewarret of this town by his fatheres syd, 
and his grandfather was cewarret by his mother's syd, in this town, 
so he is the youngeste of the three Larances Habargames that have 
been known in this town, and he was baptized the 14th of May in 
A.D. 1622." 

Then, as relating either to father or son, a curious entry appears 
in the churchwardens' account for 1648-9 : "Given to Mr. Ha- 
bergham a quart of Sack when he preached on a Fast-day Is. 4d." 
The senior Mr. Habergham, in his entries in the register, appears 
to have been strictly exact, as the two following will shew : " Ano 
Domene 1 622. Jhon Tybneham was buryed the 26 day of Marche, 
and he was brought, withe a pass, the 25th day of Marche, from 
Param in a cearte, by the OfFesseres of Param with a payer of 
Pothookes abouglit his necke, and he ded depart his lyff presentle 
after he was layd downe, in the yere of 1622, and his pass was to 
send him to a town whiche by the man was named Stok Ashe." 
" Edward Clarke, the base son of Anne Clarke, was baptized the 
24 Febrewary, in 1622, and yf I myght have had my mynd ye 
should have been named M ay hew e for the crestine name."* 

* To those who wish for more ample information concerning this town, we most 
cordially recommend " Green's History of Framlingham" (to which little work we 
are indebted for the above extracts) ; as being not only replete with every iuforma- 



104 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

CHARITIES. The town estate comprises about 32 acres of land, 
lying dispersed in this parish ; and has been held previous to, and 
since the time of King Edward VI., for the general or public benefit 
of the town of Frainlingham. The rents, amounting together to 
56.6! per annum, are applied by the overseers of the poor, with the 
poor rates. Sir Kobert Hitcham's* charities comprise, among 
other objects, an almshouse and school, of which the Master and 
Fellows of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, are trustees; and therefore 
the Parliamentary Commissioners did not proceed to make enquiry 
respecting them. The following is from Mr. Green's account : 
The presentation to the school is vested in the trustees, and the 
limited number is 40 boys, whose course of education is confined to 
reading, writing, and arithmetic ; and none can be admitted but 
those whose parents belong to the parish, and are members of the 
church of England. The almshouse consists of twelve comfortable 
apartments for six men, being widowers, and six women, being wi- 
dows. They are allowed six shillings a week each, with a hat and 
blue coat annually to the men, and a bonnet and gown to the 
women ; which garments have the arms of Hitcham in colours on 
the left shoulder : and they are allowed one chaldron and a quarter 
of coals each, for firing, during the winter months. In time of 
sickness they have the best medical assistance, and if necessary, a 
nurse is provided free of any expence. Thomas Millsf, in 1703, 

tion respecting Framlingham, but also as containing many interesting particulars 
respecting other parishes in that vicinity. 

* See Levingtou for some particulars concerning Sir Robert Hitcham. 
f Mr. Thomas Mills, the founder of the above almshouse, was in early life, it 
appears, apprenticed to a tailor at Gruudisburgh, after which he repaired to this 
town in search of work, when he happened to call at a wheelwright's shop, standing 
upon the very spot which afterwards became his own property, namely, the pre- 
mises where his remains were interred ; and where, until the last few years, a stable 
stood, which was originally the workshop. On seeing the master, some arrangement 
took place, and he entered bis employ ; when having, after some length of service, 
acquired a knowledge of the business, his employer ultimately gave up his trade to 
him, and it is stated left him his whole property, which enabled him to commence 
as timber merchant. He formed a connection with a congregation of Protestant 
Dissenters, of the Baptist denomination, in Framlingham, and afterwards became 
a public teacher among them, which drew upon him much displeasure and perse- 
cution. At the age of about forty, Mr. Mills married Alice, the widow of Edmund 
Groome, jun., of Petestree, Gent., by which marriage he acquired a considerable 
estate in that parish, Ufford, and Dallinghoo (part of the charity property), with 
other landed property. His other property in Framlingham, Dennington, and 
Parham, were acquired, it is supposed, by purchase. 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 105 

devised all his messuages, lands, and hereditaments, both free and 
copyhold, within the county of Suffolk, with his manor called 
Otley's, and the profits thereof in Ufford, to certain trustees, for 
the uses after mentioned ; and he devised a piece of land called 
Feak's Pightle, in Erarulingham, for the purpose of building an 
almshouse ; and an almshouse was erected thereon, and is occupied 
by eight persons, of either sex, who are allowed stipends of 5s. per 
week to each, and are supplied with coals annually, and certain ar- 
ticles of clothing, to the value of about .10, annual ; and bread is 
supplied for the poor of several parishes, in the quantities mentioned 
in his will. Iii 1701, Richard Porter gave by will eighteen two- 
penny loaves, to be delivered weekly to as many poor persons ; 
there are also eight two-penny loaves distributed weekly with the 
above, given by a person named Warner, out of an estate called 
Parham House. 



HACHESTON, or HACESTUNA. 

This parish was called Hatcheston jitsta Parham, and Parham 
Haston, as well as Hacheston : the manor was a member and parcel 
of that of Framlingham, and both were held by the same lords, from 
the time of the Norman conquest until Theophilus Howard, Earl of 
Suffolk, sold this lordship tu John Brame (or Braham), of Camp- 
sey Ash. 

The advowson was never appendant to the manor, Theobald de 
Valoins, founder of Hickling Priory, having granted it to that 
monastery ; which grant was confirmed in the 5th of King John, 
and continued in their possession until the dissolution of that house ; 
who granted a fair here on the feast of All Souls, in the reign of 
King Henry III., which is still continued. 

John Bull, Gent., was owner of Glevering Hall manor, in this 
parish, which formerly belonged to the Priory at Leiston. By 
Margaret his wife, he had a son, Anthony Bull, Esq., portman of 
Ipswich, and bailiff in 1000 ; he built Boss Hall, in Sproughton.* 
Mr. Bull died in 1015, and was buried in the chancel of tin's parish 
church, near his parents. A good house has since been erected on 
this manor, by the late Chaloner Arcedeckne, Esq.; now the resi- 

* See page 27. 



100 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

dence of his son, Andrew Arcedeckue, Esq., who in 1819, served 
the office of High Sheriff for this county. 

In the time of King Henry VIII., the family of Colman resided 
here ; and Edmund, son of John Colman, Gent., a descendant of 
the same, married Frances, daughter of Thomas Lambe, Esq., of 
Trimley, by whom he had issue three sons, and as many daughters. 
Francis Coleman, the eldest son, was a barrister, and steward of the 
manor of Framlingham. He died by a fall from his horse, in J G68, 
on Ms way to Martlesham. 

In the 14th of King Edward L, Roger Wicklow lived here, on 
an estate that belonged latterly to the Nauntons, of Letheringham ; 
and John Wicklow, Gent., died seized of the same in 1306, and in 
1362, another of the same name died possessed thereof. 

The manor of Blomvilles, in this parish, with the lands belonging 
thereto, were purchased by John Rosier, Gent., of Sir William 
Willoughby, to whom it was granted by King Henry VIII., at the 
dissolution of Campsey Priory. He married Alice, relict of Robert 
Coleman, Gent. 

Roger Rosier, Gent., their son, sold this estate in the 5th of King 
James I., to Jeffery Langrey, Gent. Frances, daughter of the said 
Roger Rosier, died in 1698, aged 82, and was buried in the nave of 
the church of St. Andrew the Apostle, in Norwich. 

ARMS. Rosier: argent; on a cross formee, sable, five stars of 
the field. Bull: argent; three bulls' heads erased, sable. Col- 
man : party per fess, argent and sable ; a cross flory between six 
mullets, all counterchanged. 

CHARITIES. By the trust deeds relating to the town lands in this 
parish, it appears that the rents and profits were to be applied in 
the repairs of the liighways, the payment of fifteenths, the relief of 
the poor, and other charitable purposes. Some of the land origi- 
nally belonging to the trust has heen exchanged for equivalent 
property. A workhouse has been erected on part of the estate, and 
the remainder of it, which comprises about 14 acres of land in this 
parish, is let for between J9.20 and .30 per annum. The rent is 
earned to the overseers' account with the poor rates, and applied 
therewith ; and out of the fund thus created, coals and clothing are 
given to the poor, by way of addition to the relief ordinarily given 
out of the poor rates. Richard Porter, by will, dated in 1701, 
directed that a schoolmaster should be appointed by the church- 
wardens, and chief inhabitants of Parham Hacheston, who should 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 107 

dwell in a cottage there (in the will described), gratis, and have 
.12 a year, to be paid quarterly out of the testator's farm and lands 
in Hacheston, for teaching twelve poor boys of the parish of Ha- 
cheston, and of the parish of Parham, to read, write, and cast ac- 
counts, whose parents should not be worth ;.30. The Earl of 
Eochford was late owner of the property charged by this will. 



HOO, or Hou. 

This manor was parcel of Hugh Bigod's barony, held of the King 
in capite, and the lords of Framlingham were owners of tliis lord- 
ship, and patrons of the church. In the 25th of King Edward I., 
Eoger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, transferred the same to the Crown ; 
it was subsequently granted by King Edward II., to his half brother, 
Thomas de Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk, who obtained a charter of 
free warren in all his demesne lands in this parish. 

He died seized thereof in the 12th of King Edward III., and 
Mary, his second wife, the daughter of William, Lord Eoss, who 
survived him, held this estate as part of her dowry. She died in 
the 36th of the same reign; and upon a division of the estate, this 
property became the inheritance of Joan, the daughter and heiress 
of Edward Montacute, by Alice, the daughter and co-heir of the 
said Thomas de Brotherton, by Alice his first wife, the daughter of 
Sir Eoger Halys, of Harwich. 

In the 20th of King Edward III., Thomas de Hoo lived in this 
parish, and was owner of considerable property here. He held the 
manor under the chief lord, and was collector of the Earl of Nor- 
folk's revenues : he had issue two sons, William and Thomas ; the 
former died seized of lands in Cransford, in 13G2, and left issue 
two sons, William and Thomas. 

Sir William de Hoo, Knt., the eldest sou and heir, married 
Eleanor, the daughter of Sir Thomas Wingfield, Knt., and left issue 
William, Thomas, and Hugo. Their father died in the siege of 
King Eichard II., seized of the manor of Cransford. Thomas de 
Hoo, Gent., the second son, succeeded to his father's estate in this 
paiish. He was a citizen and grocer of London: he died in 1413, 
and was interred in Hoo church. 

Matilda his widow, had this estate during her life, and attorned 



108 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

tenant to John Godyn, who purchased the reversion thereof in 1418. 
He was a citizen and grocer of London, and built the house in tliis 
parish (which had probably been the site of the seat of the Hoo 
family), since called Godyns. 

John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, leased the same, with the 
Hundred of Loes, to Sir Robert Wingfield ; and at length the Earl 
of Suffolk, sold the manor of Hoo Hall and Dunodens, in the time 
of King James I., to Sir Eobert Naunton, of Letheringham, Knt. 

Anthony Wingfield, Esq., removed from Letheringham to this 
parish, and was created a Baronet the 3rd of King Charles I., by 
the name of Anthony Wingfield, of Godyns ; he pulled down most 
of this house, and erected a new one near Easton church, called the 
White House, where he and his posterity afterwards resided. 
Godyns however, continued in that house until 1706, when Sir 
Hemy Wingfield, Bart., sold the same, and the residue of their 
family estates, to William Henry Nassau, 1st Earl of Rochford.* 

A lordship in this parish is mentioned amongst those given by 
Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk, and Henry his son, Earl of 
Arundel and Surry, in the 30th of King Henry VIII., to that Mo- 
narch, in exchange for the Castle Rising estate. 

In 1475, the Prior and Convent of Letheringham, obtained the 
patronage of tliis parish church, by the gift of John Mowbray, Duke 
of Norfolk, and Catherine his wife; and they petitioned Bishop 
Goldwell, that as the living would not maintain a rector, and the 
church being so near their monastery, that the cure could be well 
taken care of by one of the canons of their house ; therefore that 
he would appropriate the same to their use : which was done by his 
Chancellor, and cunfirmed by the Bishop himself, reserving an 
annuity of Cs. 8cl. to the Bishop, in lieu of first fruits, to be paid 
at the two synods : and the cure was from that time served by one 
of the canons. 

ARMS. Hoo: azure; a chevron between three escallops, argent. 

William Pitts, Gent., formerly a resident at Monewden, died here, 
June 1, 1819, in the 51st year of his age. Mr. Pitts having, very 
early in life, imbibed a fondness for mathematical studies, attained 
to great proficiency ; in consequence of which he was appointed, in 
1791, Assistant Astronomer to Mr. Gooch, in C apt. Vancouver's 
voyage of discovery. Mr. Pitts was not only conversant in the 
different branches of algebra, but was likewise complete master of 

* See Easton. 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 101) 

the direct and inverse methods of fluxions ; and from the great ve- 
neration in which he held that science, it was to be hoped that he 
had left some valuable documents, the result of many years un- 
wearied application. 



KETTLEBOROUGH. KETELBIRIA, or KETELBURGH. 

The Prior and Convent of Ely were seized of this manor before 
the conquest, with the advowson of the church ; but Alan, Earl of 
Bretaigne and Richmond, deprived them of both, which descended 
to his brothers and their posterity, until King Henry III. obtained 
the possession; which he granted by letters patent, dated May 1, 
1241, to Peter de Savoy and his heirs, then created Earl of Rich- 
mond. 

He was uncle to Queen Eleanor, and in 1257, settled on Irigeram 
de Feynes, and Isabel his wife, nine score pounds per annum, in 
tin's parish, Nettlestead, &c., and the following year they reconveyed 
them to the said Peter, with 250 marks, land, &c. In 1261, Henry 
III. says, that his beloved uncle, Master Peter de Savoy, surren- 
dered into his hands, to the use of Prince Edward his eldest son, 
the manors of Kettleburgh, Wisset, Nettlestead, and Wyke by Ips- 
wich, with the fees of A 13s. 4d. rent in Ipswich; and the King 
confirmed them to the Prince and his heirs, and so to the Kings of 
England in succession for ever ; but the Prince, with his father's 
consent, made divers grants of the same. 

Soon after tin's resignation Sir William Charles, Knt., obtained 
a grant of both the manor and advowson, with a market and fair 
here, to him and his heirs, to be held of the King in capite, by the 
service of the twentieth part of a knight's fee ; in which family it 
continued for many generations, and then passed to the Willoughbys, 
lords of Eresby, and afterwards to John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, 
and from that period it passed as Framlingham manor, until Theo- 
pliilus Howard, Earl of Suffolk, sold it to Sir Robert Naunton, of 
Letheringham : from which time that family were lords of the manor, 
and patrons of the church. 

The Charles family derive their descent from William de Jeme- 
muth (or Yarmouth). Sir William Charles, Knt., having obtained 
tin's estate, resided here, and erected a large house, as appears from 



110 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

the scite of the foundation, at the north-west end of the church. It 
was surrounded with a moat, and called Kettleburgh Hall. He was 
also patron of the church of Easton, and by Joan his wife, had issue 
Edward Charles, Esq. 

Joan, widow of the above Sir William Charles, married Sir John 
Tuddenham, Knt., who held this manor in her right, and the ad- 
vowson of this church and Easton, in 1286 ; she survived him also, 
and died in 1305 ; Sir Edward Charles, Knt., succeeded, who was 
36 years of age at his mother's decease. 

To tin's Sir Edward Charles, and Alice his Avife, Henry de Hales 
and Trista de Kettleburgh, surrendered by fine, the manor of Milton, 
in Northamptonsliire, remainder to William, their son. They had 
issue, William, Eobert, Edmund, and Edward ; and in 1309, he 
settled tliis estate to the use of himself, and Alice his wife, during 
their lives, and the reversion to his son William, and his heirs ; in 
default thereof to his son Robert, and his heirs ; and in default 
thereof, to the heirs of his other sons successively. 

Sir Edward Charles, his elder brothers dying without issue, suc- 
ceeded (according to the entail), about 1329 ; and by Dyonyse his 
wife, he had issue Robert, Edmund, and Edward. Their father died 
in 1344 ; Dyonyse his widow, re-married to Sir William de Tye, of 
Easton, Knt., and deceased in 1376. Sir Edward Charles, the 
younger brother (the two others dying without issue), died Sept. 3, 
1375, seized of this manor, and left issue one sou, Robert. 

He succeeded, and died seized of the manor, and advowson of 
tliis church and Easton, in 1401; and devised the same to Anne 
his wife, she paying .20 per annum to Thomas, his eldest son, 
and to have the education of her other son, Edward. He was 
buried in the chapel of Kettleburgh church, by the tomb of his 
father. 

Sir Thomas Charles succeeded : he married Alice, the daughter 
of Ralph Ramsey, of Kenton, Esq., by whom he had issue an only 
son, Thomas. He died in 1419, and Alice his wife, survived; who 
by virtue of a settlement made by her husband, was lady of the 
manor of this parish, and patroness of the church, and that of 
Easton ; she granted that parcel of land, whereon Kettleburgh Hall 
(now so called) stood, in trust, to Simon Brook, of Easton, Gent., 
and his heirs ; which afterwards came to Robert de Tye, of Easton, 
by his marriage with Alice her daughter; and their son, George de 
Tye, sold it to William Stebbing, of tliis parish, Gent. This lady, 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 1 1 J 

Alice Charles, lived and died in Kettleburgh, about the latter part 
of the reign of King Henry VI. 

In the above settlement no mention is made of their son Thomas, 
only that he was fifteen years of age at his father's decease. It 
appears, however, that this Thomas, and Elizabeth his wife, about 
the 20th of King Henry VI., conveyed much of their estate to John 
Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, but held here in the 6th of King 
Edward IV. 

William, son of John Stebbing, in the beginning of the reign of 
King Henry VII., was proprietor of the above, and divers other 
lands in this parish. He had two sons, William and Thomas ; and 
by his will, dated in 1500, charged a close in Kettleburgh with the 
finding of a lamp in that parish, and.Hoo chancels, called hence 
Lamp Close. 

William Stebbing, his eldest son, increased the paternal estate, 
by the purchase of New Kettleburgh Hall, of George de Tye, of 
Easton, in the 18th of King Henry VIII. He died about 1542, 
leaving two daughters, his co-heirs ; namely, Frances, who married 
Arthur Penning, and Elizabeth, who in 1560, sold her moiety of 
the estate to the said Arthur Penning, her brother-in-law. 

He resided at Kettleburgh Hall in 1556, and had issue a son, 
John, who died in 1591, unmarried, and a daughter, Elizabeth, 
who married Simon Blomfield, of Monk's Eleigh ; their mother 
deceased in 1559, and the said Arthur married Catherine, daughter 
of Brook, Gent., by whom he had six sons and seven daugh- 
ters. He died in 1593, seized of the manors of Brockford and 
Colston Hall, in Baddinghani, and was interred in the chancel of 
this parish church. 

Anthony Penning, Esq., was his eldest son by his second mar- 
riage. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Crofts, of Sax- 
ham Parva, Esq., and served the office of High Sheriff for this 
county, in 1007. He was in the commission of the peace in 1618, 
when his estate was valued at .1,500 per annum. 

Mr. Penning resided latterly at Ipswich, and, dying there in 
1630, was interred in the chancel of the parish church of St. Mat- 
thew, in that town, on the north side of which is a handsome mural 
monument to his memory, containing figures of liimself, his lady, 
and their numerous family. It bears the following inscription, 
with some commendatory verses : 

" Here lieth the body of Anthonie Penning, Esq. (sonue of Arthur Penning, of 



112 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

Ketleberge, in the county of Suffolke, Esqr.) who had issue by Elizabeth his wiffe 
(daughter of Thomas Crofte, of Saxham, in the said county, Esqr.) 14 sonnes and 
4 daughters. He departed this life the llth daie of Janvary, Ano Dni 1630, being 
of the age of 65 years." 

His descendants continued proprietors of Kettleburgh Hall until 
about 1079, when Anthony Penning, Esq., his grandson, sold it to 
Richard Porter, Gent. The manor now belongs to Andrew Arce- 
deckne, Esq., of Glavering Hall. 

The Rev. George Turner, B.A., rector of this parish and Monew- 
den, died Nov. 9, 1839, in his 73rd year. Mr. Turner was a native 
of Pulham, in Norfolk, and received the early part of his education 
at the Free Grammar School at Bury St. Edmund's, under the tui- 
tion of the Rev. Mr. Laurentz ; after which he was admitted of 
Jesus College, Cambridge, and in 1788, proceeded to the degree of 
A.B. In 1790, he married, and soon after took upon Mm the du- 
ties of this parish ; settling himself in the parsonage house here, 
which he never quitted afterwards. In 1803, he was instituted to 
the rectory of Monewden, 011 the presentation of the late Chaloner 
Arcedeckne, Esq. ; and in 1807, to that of Kettleburgh, patron the 
late Robert Sparrow, Esq., of Worlingham Hall, in this county. 

Though qualified by nature and education for any station in life, 
his habits were retiring ; and, considering " the post of honour to 
be a private station," he earnestly entered upon the duties of a parish 
priest, and never, to the end of his life, relaxed his efforts in the due 
performance of them. It is to be regretted that the only memorial 
which he has left behind of his literary attainments, is his edition 
of his friend, the Rev. Robert Forby's, " Vocabulary of East Anglia," 
to which, indeed, he was himself a large contributor. 

ARMS. Charles: ermine; on a chief, gules, five lozenges, each 
charged with an ermine spot. StebMng: quarterly; or and gules; 
on a bend sable, three bezants. Penning: gules; three stags' 
heads, caboshed, argent ; a chief, indented, ermine. 

CHARITIES. The town estate here comprises two cottages, divi- 
ded into five tenements, and 4^- acres of land ; these are let at 
yearly rents, amounting to ^.17 10s. Gd., which is distributed in 
coals and money, for the benefit of the poor inhabitants of the 
parish. There is also a double cottage belonging to the parish, let 
for A 2s. a year, which is distributed with the rents of the town 
estate. 



HUNDRED OF LOE3. 113 

KENTON. CHINCTUNE, or KENETUNA. 

It appears, from Blomefield and Parkin, the Norfolk historians, 
that about the time of King John, Sir Peter Braunch, Knt., married 
Joan, the inheritrix of a lordship within this parish, Comard, and 
Brandon, in Suffolk, held of the family of De Limesey, by knight's 
fees. It also further appears, from the same authorities, that a 
manor here passed from Half Fitz Half, who died in 1269, either 
to Eobert de Nevile, who married Mary, his eldest daughter and 
co-heiress, or to Sir Eobert de Tateshall, who married the other 
daughter and co-heiress of the said Kalf, who was a descendant of 
Eibald de Midleham, a younger brother to Alan, sumamed the 
Black, the second Earl of Kichmond. 

The advowson of this parish church was granted to the Prior and 
Convent of Butley, by William de Colvile, about 1230 ; who had it 
impropriated by Thomas de Blundevil, Bishop of Norwich ; and 
they were seized thereof at the dissolution, when it was granted to 
Francis Framlingham, of Crow's Hall, in Debenham. 

In the reign of King John, Ivo de Kenton resided at Kenton 
Hall, in this parish, was owner of the lordship, and the greater part 
of the village. Eobert de Kenton, his eldest son, died about 1240, 
and left Ivo de Kenton, a minor, who became afterwards seized of 
a messuage, and CO acres of land, in Kettleburgh, and claimed 
before the Justices in Eyre, in 1286, to have warren in his manor 
of Kenton. 

He died in 1314, and Nigel de Kenton, his eldest son, succeeded, 
being at the time of his father's decease, 40 years of age. He died 
in 1324; and by Maud his wife, left issue Nigel de Kenton, who 
married Agnes, the daughter of Adam Tastard, of Cransford, Gent., 
by whom he had issue, Loo de Kenton, who died a bachelor, or 
without issue, Eobert and John. 

He was seized of lands and rents in Bramford, Burstall, Sprough- 
ton, Hintlesham, Whitton, Broke, and Blakenham ; and, by fine, 
settled his manor of Kenton, and lands there, and in Debenham, 
Winston, and Thornham, upon himself and his wife during their 
lives, with remainder to his three sons successively, and the heirs of 
their bodies. Sir Eobert Kenton, Knt., their second son, by Alice 
his wife, had issue an only daughter and heiress, Alice, who married 
to Sir Eoger Willisham, Knt. Sir Eobert deceased in 1382. 



114 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

Sir Eoger Willisham, by the said Alice his wife, had issue Alice, 
an only daughter and heiress, who married Kalph Ramsey, Esq., "by 
whom he had issue two daughters : Alice, the eldest, married to 
Sir Thomas Charles, of Kettleburgh, Knt., and Anne, to Peter 
Gameys (or Garnish), the eldest son of Robert Garneys, of Bec- 
cles, and Heveningham, in this county : by this marriage the 
Kenton Hall estate came into the possession of the family of 
Gamey. 

This was for many ages esteemed one of the principal families in 
the county ; the junior members whereof settled in different pa- 
rishes in this county, and in Norfolk; whilst the elder branch 
continued to reside in this parish for several ages, and intermarried 
as follows : 

Thomas Garneys, Esq., eldest son of=Margaret, daughter and co-heir of Sir 

Hugh Fi-anceys, of Giffard's Hall, in 



Sir Peter. 



Suffolk, Knt. 



John Garneys, Esq., eldest son of Tho-=Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Sir John 
mas aud Margaret, died in 1524. Sulyard, Knt., died about 1527. 



Robert Garneys, Esq., eldest son of John=z Anne, daughter and co-heir of Thomas 
and Elizabeth. Bacon, Esq., of Spectishall, and Ba- 

, i consthorp, Esq. 

John Garneys, of Kenton. =Anne, daughter of Edmund Rookwood, 

t J of Euston, in Suffolk, Esq. 

Thomas Garneys, Esq., eldest son. = Frances, daughter of Sir John Sulyardr 

j of Wetherden, Knt. 
Nicholas, 4th son of John Garnish and = Anne, daughter of ..Charles Clere, of 



Anne Rookwood, inherited, and died 



about 1599. 



Stokesby, in Norfolk, Esq. 



I- 



Charles Garnish, eldest son. =Elizabetb, daughter of John Wentworth, 

Esq., sister of Sir John Wentworth, 
of Somerleyton, in Suffolk, Knt. 

He removed to Boyland Hall, in Moring-Thorp, Norfolk, and 
appears to have been the last of the family who resided here. He 
was High Sheriff for Norfolk, in 1652, and died in 1057. John 
Gameys, their son, removed to Somerleyton, after the decease of 
his uncle, Sir John Wentworth, Knt. This lordship afterwards 
became vested in the Stone family, and it now belongs to William 
Mills, Esq., of Great Saxham, in this county. 

John Parkhurst, D.D., Bishop of Norwich, married Margaret, 
daughter of Thomas Garnish, of this parish, Esq., and Margaret 
his wife, daughter of Sir Hugh Francys, of Giffard's Hall, in 
Wickhambrook, in this county, Knt. 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 115 

The Rev. James Douglas, F.A.S., vicar of this parish, rector of 
Middleton, in Sussex, and Chaplain in ordinary to the Prince 
Eegent, died Nov. 5, 1819. He was the author of various publi- 
cations : his greatest undertaking, entitled " Nenia Britannica ; or 
a Sepulchral History of Great Britain, from the earliest period, to 
its general conversion to Christianity," was commenced in 1786, 
and completed in 1793. He was also a contributor to Mr. Nichols's 
" History of Leicestershire." The Earl of Egremont presented Mr. 
Douglas to the rectory of Middleton ; but his residence, during the 
latter part of his life, was at Preston, in the same county. 

ARMS. Blanchard: gules ; a chevron between two bezants in 
cliief, and a griffin's head erased, in base, or. Wellisham: sable; 
two bars, in chief, three cinquefoils, or. Kenton : sable ; a chevron 
between three cinquefoils, ermine; Ramsey: gules; three rams' 
heads, argent, armed, or. Garneys (alias Garnish) : argent ; a 
chevron engrailed, azure, between three escallops, sable. Wareyn : 
sable ; three cranes' heads erased, argent. 

CHARITIES. A double cottage, a pightle of half- an- acre, and the 
site of another cottage, taken down in 1784, which now forms part 
of the churchyard. A messuage and six acres of land in the parish 
of Bedfield, and two closes of ten acres in the parish of Monks' 
Soham, let at .16 a year ; which is expended about the repairs of 
the church, and in defraying other parish charges. Wentworth 
Garneys*, Esq., devised by will, in 1684, a messuage, farm, and 
lands, in this parish, to the minister, churchwardens, and overseers 
of the poor of this parish and Debenham ; the rents thereof to be 
distributed amongst such poor people of the said parishes, as they 
should see fit. This property consists of a messuage, farm, and 
lands, containing about 22 acres, and a cottage, let at .31 10s. 
a year. 



* This Wentworth Garneys was eldest son of John Garneys, by Elizabeth his 
second wife, daughter of Sir Stephen Soame, of Great Thurlow, Knt., and grandson, 
of the above-named Charles Garneys and Elizabeth Wentworth, who removed from 
hence to Boyland Hall. He married, 1st., Anne, daughter of Sir Charles Gawdy, 
of Crow's Hall, in Debenham, Knt., who died in 1681 ; and, secondly, Mary, 
daughter of Sir Thomas Abdy, of Felix Hall, in Kelvedon, Essex. He died in 1685^ 
without issue, and his estates were devised between his sisters and co-heirs. 



116 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

LETHE RINGHAM, or LEDRINGAHAM, CREW, or TREW. 

This lordship, it appears, was included amongst the 220 manors' 
granted, with the honour of Eye, to Robert Malet, a Norman Baron, 
by William the Conqueror. The family of Glanville were very soon 
after enfeoffed in the same, under the Lord Malet; and the Boviles- 
held under the Glanvilles, in the time of King Henry II., with whom 
they afterwards became allied by marriage. 

They descended from Sir Philip de Bovile, who gave lands, in the 
reign of King Henry I., to the Priory of Wykes, in Essex, and 
Paul de Bovile, who lived in the following reign. In the year 
1195, William de Glanville gave 100 murks to have the custody of 
the heir of William de Bovile, until of age, with Ins lands, &c. 
This heir was, most likely, the William de Bovile who married 
Isabel, daughter and heiress of the sister and co-heiress of Jeffrey 
de Glanville, of Bacton, in Norfolk ; for in the 3rd of Edward II., 
William, son and heir of William de Bovile, and Isabel his wife, 
was impleaded for the manor of Alderton, and the church of Dal- 
linghoo, in tin's county, by William de Huntingfield, who descended 
from Emma, the other sister and co-heir, wife to John de Grey; 
being part of the possessions of the said Jeffrey de Glanville. 

In the 56th of King Henry III., a fine was levied between John 
be Bovile, querent, and William de Bovile, deforcient, of the lord- 
ship of this parish, with those of Alderton, Greeting, Dallinghoo, 
and Thorp, in this county; whereby they became conveyed to Wil- 
liam, for life ; remainder to John, and Ins heirs ; remainder to the 
right heirs of William ; which John was brother of William. In 
the 5th of Edward I., John de Bovile held these lordships of the 
honour of Eye. 

In the 7th of King Edward II., William de Bovile (probably son 
of the above John de Bovile) was lord ; and in the 1 1th of the same 
reign, a settlement was made, whereby the said William, and Joan 
his wife, were to be seized in a moiety of their estate for life, re- 
mainder to Simon Eitz Richard, and Nicholaa his wife, one of the 
daughters of the said William de Bovile. 

In the 21st of the following reign, Richard Fitz Simon, son of 
the above Simon Fitz Richard, and Nicholaa his wife, granted the 
lordship and advowson of Letheringham, with the advowson of the 
Priory there, to Sir John de Ufford, in trust, for the use of Margery. 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 117 

sole daughter and heiress of Sir John, son of Sir William Bovile, 
and Joan his wife. 

This Margery married first, to Sir John Carhonel, Knt., and 
secondly, to Thomas, second son of Sir John Wingfield, Knt., of 
Wingfield Castle, and Elizaheth his wife, the daughter and heir of 
John Honeypot, of Wingfield, Esq. ; hy which marriage the said 
Thomas Wingfield, in her right, hecame seized of the lordship of 
this parish, ahout the 36th of the same King, where his descendants 
of the elder hranch continued until the time of King William III. 

This knightly family derived their name from Wingfield Castle, 
in this county, of which they were lords, and became early divided 
into various branches, furnishing the nation with men " wise in 
council and brave in war." In the reign of King Henry VIII., 
there were, it is said, eight or nine Knights, all brothers, and two 
Knights of the Garter, of this house. 

Richard, youngest son of Sir John Wingfield, K.B., of this parish, 
was a great favourite with that Monarch, and had the chief command, 
under the Earl of Surry, of the forces sent into France, in the 14th 
of his reign : for his services performed in that kingdom he was 
made a Knight of the most noble order of the Garter. 

He was also Chancellor of the Dutchy of Lancaster, Lord Deputy 
of Calais, and one of the Privy Council to King Henry VIII. ; was 
Ambassador to the Emperor Maximilian, and was afterwards sent out 
in the same capacity to Erance, and again in the like office of honour 
into Spain ; where he died, in 1525, and was buried at Toledo. 

Sir John, the eldest son, succeeded his father here : he was High 
Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk in the 1st of King Richard III., and 
served the same office again the 8th of Henry VII. He married 
Anne, daughter of the Lord Audley, and had issue Sir Anthony 
Wingfield, who for his bravery at the battle of Spurrs, was knighted, 
and afterwards installed Knight of the Garter. He was also Vice- 
Chamberlain of the Household to King Henry VIII., and a member 
of his Privy Council ; and was appointed by that Monarch, one of 
the Council to his son, and Executor of his last will, by which he 
bequeathed him a legacy of .200. His descendant, of the same 
name, was created a Baronet in 1627, and resided at that period at 
Goodwin's, in the parish of Hoo, from whence he soon after removed 
to E as ton. 

William de Bovile gave the church and tithes of this parish, to 
St. Peter's, in Ipswich ; when a small Priory of Black canons was 



118 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

settled here, as a cell to that Monastery. The time at which this 
took place has not heen ascertained. 

The tithes of the manors of Thorpe, in Hasketon, and Lethe- 
ringham, in this county; of Bawsey, Leziat, and Custhorp, in 
Norfolk ; and the impropriation of the churches of Charsfield, Hoo, 
Letheringham or Trew, and a portion of Hasketon, belonged to this 
Priory. Its valuation in " Taxatio Ecclesiastica," 1291, in 19 pa- 
rishes, was A 6s. O^d. 

Previously to the dissolution there were 20 acres of arable land, 
30 acres of pasture, and 10 acres of meadow, attached to the site of 
the Priory, in the occupation of the prior, valued at .6 13s. 4d. 
At the dissolution it was granted to Sir Anthony Wingfield, and in 
1553, re-granted to Elizabeth Naunton, his third daughter : in the 
time of King James I., Sir Robert Naunton converted it into a good 
mansion, and resided here. 

William Naunton, the last possessor of that family, left this es- 
tate, after the death of his wife, to his next heir ; and it devolved 
upon William Leman, of Beccles, Esq. The present possessor is 
Andrew Arcedeckne, Esq., of Glevering Hall, in Hacheston. 

The old mansion was pulled down, about 1770: there was a 
picture of St. Jerome, and an original of King James I., of some 
value, the others very indifferent. The church contained some 
noble monuments, but it has been suffered to go to ruin, and the 
monuments are defaced and destroyed. 

Weever has preserved some account of them, all of which, in his 
time, he says " were fouly defaced ;" and Mr. Gough, in his " Se- 
pulchral Monuments," has engravings of plates and monuments in 
this church : he observes that " mere neglect and exposure to the 
weather, could not have reduced them to that state of complete de- 
solation in which they appeared in 1780." 

In Nichols's " Leicestershire," are two engravings of figures in 
the conventual church here; and in Cotman's " Sepulchral Brasses," 
is an etching of a brass plate upon the tomb of Sir Anthony Wing- 
field, in this parish church. The late Rev. William Clubbe had also 
collected together many fragments, from this ancient church, its 
brasses, and monuments, and of these a pyramid was erected in his 
vicaral garden at Brandeston, with appropriate inscriptions thereon, 
in Latin and English. 

ARMS. Glanville: argent; a chief indented, azure. Bovile: 
quarterly; or and sable. 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 119 

CHARITIES. Sir Robert Naunton erected in this parish an alms- 
house, of brick, one story high, for the reception of his decayed 
servants ; wherein were apartments for five persons, but there being 
no endowment, it has long since become ruinous and useless. 

Mem. In 1618, Alice Caston, of Ipswich, widow of Leonard 
Caston, Gent., for the fulfilling of his intent and desire, gave by 
will an annuity of .12, issuing out of divers lands, &c., in the 
manors of Letheringham, Hoo Godwin's, Westhall, and Sturmin's, 
in this county; with another of ten marks, out of divers other 
lands, manors, and tenements, in Saltisham, Sutton, Bawdsey, &c., 
late in the possession of the Earl of Rochford, for the founding of 
one Fellowship, and one Scholarship, in the College of Corpus 
Christi, in Cambridge ; to which she ordered those of the names of 
Caston, Clenche, Brownrigge, and Amfield, should be preferred. 



MARLSFORD, or MERLESFORDA. 

In the reign of King Edward III., William de Marlesford, Gent., 
and Margaret his wife, lived in this parish. He was owner of mes- 
suages, lands, and rents, here and in Orford, Iken, and Sudbourn. 

The manor to which the advowson was appendant, did anciently 
belong to the Sackvilles, then to the Rokes, afterwards to the 
Drurys, and latterly to Sir Walter Devereux, Knt. ; since whose 
time the advowson has been sold from the manor, and the following 
persons have presented to this church : John Mann, Gent., in 1 670 ; 
William Wright, Gent., in 1675; Sarah Aldhouse, the following 
year; and, in 1698, Stephen Newcomer, rector of Ottley, in this 
county. 

Sir Walter Devereux was the eldest son of Sir Edward Devereux, 
of Castle Bromwich, in Warwickshire, Bart., by Catherine his wife, 
the daughter of Edward Arden, of Park Hall, in the same county, 
Esq. He claimed to be Viscount Hereford, and had that title 
allowed and confirmed to him, by parliament, in 1646. By Eliza- 
beth, his second wife, the second daughter of Thomas Knightly, of 
Borough Hall, in Staffordshire, Esq., he had issue five sons : Robert, 
the eldest, with both his children, were drowned, during his father's 
life time ; and Leicester Devereux succeeded to the honour and 
estates upon the decease of his father. 



120 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

He married, first, Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Sir William 
Withipole, Knt, in whose right lie inherited the lordship of Christ 
Church, in Ipswich ; his second wife was Priscilla, the daughter of 
John Catchpole. Walter, the third son, married, but left no male 
issue : Edward and John died unmarried ; and the heirs male of 
the said Leicester Devereux, late Viscount Hereford, are long since 
extinct, whereby the honour became lost to this county. 

Sir Walter lived at Marlsford Hall*, in tliis parish, in the reigns 
of King James and Charles I., and afterwards sold his estate here 
to one Barber, a portman of Ipswich. In 1735, it belonged to 
Simon Dove, of Barharn, Esq.; and in 1764, Fynes Dove, clerk, 
was owner thereof: it now belongs to William Shouldham, Esq., 
by purchase, who resides here. 

About the latter part of the reign of King James I., William 

Alston, Gent., a descendant from the Alstons, of Hall, in 

Newton, built a house in this parish, where he afterwards resided. 
He married Avis, the second daughter of Jeffrey Pitman, of Wood- 
bridge, Esq., by whom he had issue three sons and five daughters. 
His second wife was Margaret, the widow of Henry Groom, Gent., 
by whom he had no issue. Mr. Alston died in 1641, and was 
buried in the chancel of this parish church. 

Samuel Alston, Esq., his eldest son, succeeded ; he was a ma- 
gistrate for the county, and a Major in the militia, in 1667, in the 
encounter with the Dutch, at Felixstow. He died and was buried 
at Marlsford. Samuel Alston, his only son, sold the paternal estate 
here to Sir Philip Skippon, the son of Major- General Skippon, a 
commander in the rebel army, under Cromwell ; and his descendant 
removed to Bramford, near Ipswich. 

In the reign of King Charles I., Thomas Smith, Gent., removed 
from Walsoken, in Norfolk, to this village. He married Frances, 
the eldest daughter of Simon Bloomfield, of Coddenham, in this 
county, Gent., by whom he had issue two sons, and as many 
daughters ; Frances, who married Allen Cotton, Esq., and Eliza- 
beth, John Sayer, of Pulham, Gent. 

Thomas Smith, Gent., their eldest son, succeeded ; he married 
Margaret, the daughter of Thomas Leman, of Brameshall, in We- 
theringsett, Gent., and by her had issue Thomas Smith, their only 
son. He died in 1683, and soon after, his infant son and daughter; 
and John Smith, of South Elmham, upon the death of his nephew, 
" A view of this house is engraved in Davy's " Suffolk Seats." 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 121 

inherited : he died without issue, and devised his estate in this 
parish, to the above Allen Cotton, Esq. 

He was the eldest surviving son of John Cotton, of Earl Soham, 
Esq., and held a Captain's commission in the militia, in the reigns 
of King Charles II., James, and William : at that time he resided 
at Easton, hut upon the death of his hrother-in-law Smith, removed 
to Marlsford, where he died. 

ARMS. Devereux: argent; a f ess, gules ; in chief, three tor- 
teaus. Alston: azure; ten stars, 4, 3, 2, and 1, or. Smith: 
argent ; a chevron, gules, between three cross crosslets, sable. 

CHARITIES. Sir Walter Devereux, Knt., by deed, dated the 8th 
of James I., granted a yearly rent charge of .6, out of a messuage, 
formerly called Mapes's, and the lands thereto belonging, in this 
parish, and Little Glemham, now the property of Mr. Geo. Bates, 
to the use and benefit of the poor inhabitants of Marlesford, and 
those of most need. In or about the year 1693, the yearly sum of 
52s., devised by John Smith, was charged upon a messuage, farm, 
and lands in this parish, now the property of Mr. Shouldham. These 
annuities are distributed in coals among poor families. The portion 
of dividends from Kersey's gift, to the poor of this parish, is re- 
ceived, and applied according to the donor's intention. * 



MONODEN. MONEWDEN, or MUNEGADENA. 

A moiety of this lordship was held of Framhngham Castle, by 
knight's service, and the other moiety of the honour of Lancaster, 
by the same service. It was, in the Conqueror's time, the posses- 
sion of Odo de Campania, 1st Earl of Albermarle and Holderness, 
whose wife, Matilda, was half sister, by the mother, to King Wil- 
liam I. 

When it passed from his family the Weylands became lords 
thereof; and in 1263, William Weyland, Esq., purchased the ad- 
vowson of this parish church of John de Kettlebars, Esq., to be 
held of the manor of Kettlebars : from the Weylands both the 
manor and advowson passed to the several families of Ap-Adams, 
Hastings, Eeve, Zouch, and Kingsmill, to Kichard Lord Gorges, 
of the Kingdom of Ireland, who held the manor, the hall, and the 
* See Earl Soharn. 



22 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

demesne lands for life ; but the patronage of the church was severed 
from the manor before his time. 

Near the church, towards the north-west, there was anciently a 
park, and in the reign of King Henry III., Henry de Mungehedon, 
who lived in this parish, held land here of John de Weyland, as 
lord of the manor, by military service ; which probably was this 
park, for that was not part of the demesne of the said manor. 

In the reign of King Henry VII., John Kivet, Gent., a descendant 
of Sir Thomas Ryvet, of Chipenham, in Kent, resided at Monewden 
Lodge, in this parish, and by Christian his wife, had issue Andrew 
Rivet, afterwards of Brandeston Hall, and William Rivet, LL.D., 
Archdeacon of Suffolk in the 38th of King Henry VIII. 

In the time of Queen Elizabeth, William Reve, Gent., was owner 
of this manor, and resided at the Hall. By Rose his wife, he had 
issue ten sons and five daughters. He deceased in 1567, and was 
buried in this parish church ; as was also Thomas, his fourth son, 
senior Fellow of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. He died 
in 1595, in the 35th year of his age. 

Thomas Armiger, of St. Edmund's Bury, held a lordship in this 
parish ; son of Thomas Armiger, Esq., and Elizabeth his wife, the 
daughter of Thomas Heigham, of Heigham Hall, in Gazeley, in 
this county, Esq. He married Jane, the daughter and co-heir of 
John Eyre, Esq., Receiver of the Revenues for King Edward VI., 
in Suffolk ; and had issue Thomas, his son and heir, who resided 
at Thrandeston, in Hartismere hundred. 

Monoden with Sulyards is now the manor and estate of the Lord 
Rendlesham. 

In 1375, Dionysia, widow of Sir Peter deTye, devised the manor 
of Hoo, in this parish, to Sir Robert de Tye, her son, in order to 
purchase the patronage of some church, of the value of .20 per 
annum, to appropriate it to the cathedral church of Norwich, to 
find two secular priests to celebrate for the souls of John de Hoo, 
and Dionysia his wife, William their son, and all the faithful. It 
appears this Dionysia was the daughter of John de Hoo, and that 
her first husband was Sir Edward Charles, of Kettleburgh, Knt. 

Randolph, the only son of Randolph Wyard, the eldest son of 
John Wyard, of Brundish, Esq., High Sheriff for this county in 
1658 and 1659, lived several years at the Red House, in this 
parish, formerly the seat of the Stebbing family ; who removed to 
Pettistrce, where he died in 1701. 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 123 

ARMS. Reve: gules; a chevron, wairy, between three roses, 

argent. Wyard: argent; a chevron between three roses, gules, 
barbed and seeded, proper. 



RENDLESHAM, or RENDILISHAM. 

" A remarkable place, I assure you," says Fuller, " which though 
now a country village, was anciently the residence of the Kings of 
the East Angles ; where King Redwald, a mongrel Christian, kept 
at the same time altare et arulam; the communion table, and 
altars for idols." 

There are four manors in this parish, namely: Naunton Hall, 
Caketon's, Bavent's, and Colvylle's. The advowson was formerly 
appendant to the latter, but since the time of King James I., the 
Crown has presented. 

Sir John de Holbrook, Knt., was lord of Colvylle's, and presented 
to this church in 1304; it continued in that house until about 1387, 
when Sir John Falstaff, Knt., presented, as lord of Colvylle's : in 
1558, Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk, presented, as lord of the 
same manor. 

The advowson afterwards reverted to the Crown, and King James 
presented in 1621; but this manor, with that of Bavent's, in the 
time of King Charles I., belonged to Eobert Lane, Esq., who re- 
moved from Campsey Ash, and resided in this parish : John Cor- 
rance, Esq., M.P. for Aldborough, afterwards purchased the same ; 
and William Long, of Dunston, near Norwich, who married a 
daughter and co-heiress of that house, afterwards inherited them. 

The ancient family of Naunton became seated in this parish soon 
after the Conquest, and gave name to the manor still called Naun- 
ton Hall. In the reign of King Henry III., Henry de Naunton 

married a daughter of Tye, and by her had issue two sons, 

Hugo and Richard ; the former resided here in the time of King 
Edward II. 

He married Eleanor, the daughter of Robert de Vere, Earl of 
Oxford, by whom he had issue, Hugo de Naunton, from whom de- 
scended the Letheringham branch ; Bartholomew de Naunton, and 
Sir Thomas de Naunton, Knt., who settled at Rougham, near St. 



124 HUNDRED OF LOES, 

Edmund's Bury. Sir Bartholomew, their second son, dwelt at 
Naunton Hall, in this parish, in the time of King Richard II. 

He married Joan, the daughter and co-heir of Sir John Argeiitein, 
by whom he had issue an only daughter and heiress, Margaret, who 
married Robert Bokerton; and Margaret, their only daughter, mar- 
ried Bartholomew Bacon, Esq., whose only daughter, Margaret, 
married Robert Fitz Ralf, Esq., and a daughter of Fitz Ralf married 
a Harman. 

In the reign of King Henry VII., Christopher, the son of Reginald 
Harman, of Tunstall, in tin's county, Esq., was owner of Naunton 
Hall; and in 1552, John Harman, Esq., by deed of bargain and 
sale, conveyed the said manor, with Caketon's, to James Spencer, 
lus brother-in-law, and his heirs ; who made Naunton Hall his seat. 
He died in 1567, seized of this entire estate. 

It continued in the house of Spencer, until the death of Edward 
Spencer, Esq., about 1734; when Anne,* his daughter and co- 
heiress, inherited the same. She married, 1st., James, fifth Duke 
of Hamilton, and secondly, the Hon. Richard Savage Nassau, se- 
cond son of Frederick, third Earl of Rochford. 

It descended to Lord Archabald Hamilton, the late Duke of 
Hamilton, by whom it was sold : it was afterwards purchased by 
Sir George Wombwell, Bart., and by him sold to the late Peter 
Isaac Thellusson, Esq., afterwards created Baron Rendleshani. 
The estate is now vested in his representative, Lord Rendlesham ; 
who is the principal proprietor in this parish. 

In the reign of King Edward III., Richard de Rendlesham resided 
here, and was a trustee for divers lands, vested by that King's licence, 
in the Prior and Convent of Butley. He died in 1391, and was 
succeeded by Robert de Rendlesham, his eldest son and heir, who 
deceased in 1404, without issue ; and was succeeded by Robert de 
Rendlesbam, Ins cousin and heir. 

Richard de Rendlesham, his grandson, in or about 1507, sold 
part of his estate in tin's parish, and Tunstall, to Christopher 
Harman, Esq., and his heirs, and part thereof to Thomas Alverd, 
of Ipswich, Esq., who had a considerable estate in Rendlesham, 
and its vicinity. Elizabeth, his daughter and co-heir, married 
William Bamburgh, Gent., who appears to have inherited this es- 

* Elizabeth, her sister, married in 1739, Sir James Dashwood, of Kirtliogton 
Park, in the county of Oxford, Bart., who died at her house in Grosvenor Square, 
London, April 19, 1798, in the 8 1th year of her age, and was buried at Rendlesham. 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 125 

tate in right of such marriage ; from whom it passed to Head, 
Alexander, and Holditch. 

A farm in this parish, known by the name of the Hough-Hill, 
said to have heen formerly the residence of Edward the Confessor, 
was a part of the estate of the Earl of Bristol, and sold by him to 
Mr. Thellusson. It came into Lord Bristol's family, by the marriage 
of John Lord Hervey, with Mary, daughter of Brigadier- General 
Nicholas Lepel. 

Leonard Mawe, a younger son of Simon Mawe, and Margery 
his wife, was born in this parish, in 1573; of whom Dr. Fuller 
gives the following account : " He was bred in Cambridge, where 
he was Proctor of the University, Fellow and Master of Peter-house, 
after of Trinity College, whereof he deserved well ; shewing what 
might be done in five years, by good husbandry, to dis-engage that 
foundation from a great debt. 

" He was Chaplain to King Charles whilst he was a Prince, and 
waited on him in Spain; by whom he was preferred Bishop of 
Bath and Wells, in 1628. He had the reputation of a good scholar, 
grave preacher, a mild man, and one of gentle deportment. He 
died anno Domini, 1629." 

In this parish was born, July 28, 1754, William Henry Nassau, 
Earl of Rochford, Viscount Tunbridge, and Baron of Enfield ; son 
of the Hon. Richard Savage Nassau, and of her Grace, Anne 
Duchess Dowager of Hamilton and Brandon, and daughter of 
Edward Spencer, of Rendlesham, Esq. 

John Caperon (or Capron), was instituted to this rectory in 1349, 
on the presentation of Sir Thomas de Holbrook. By his will, dated 
in 1375, he bequeathed his body to be buried in the chancel here, 
before the image of St. Gregory, and gave 40s. towards making a 
tabernacle for the said image, and 10s. for erecting a cross, at the 
division of the King's highway, between Tunstall and Rendlesham. 
An old monument in the chancel of this church, is supposed to 
have been erected to his memory. 

Lawrence Echard, M.A., Archdeacon of Stow, was instituted 
here in 1722, on the presentation of King George I. An historian 
of considerable merit : his principal work is the History of England, 
in 3 vols. folio. He died in 1730. 

Samuel Henley, D.D., F.A.S., was instituted to tlu's living in 
1782, on the presentation of King George III., and died at the 
rectory here, December 29, 1815. This eminently learned Orien- 



HUNDRED OF LOE3. 

talist, was some time Professor of Moral Philosophy at the College 
of Williamsburg, in Virginia. He was afterwards appointed one of 
the assistants at Harrow School ; and was elected F.S.A., in 1778, 
at which time he was curate of Northall, in Middlesex; and in 1805, 
presented, hy the East India Company, Principal of their then newly 
established College, at Hertford. Dr. Henley was the author of 
several learned publications. 

Mem. Some years since, on opening a rise of ground in the 
church-yard, on the north side of the church,* a great number of 
human bones were discovered, lying confusedly within three feet of 
the surface ; supposed to be the remains of persons who died of 
some contagious disease, which rapidly carried off a large part of 
the population. 

In 1830, the princely residence of Piendlesham House, f in this 
parish, surpassed by few in the kingdom, was unfortunately entirely 
destroyed by fire. It originated in the conservatory, which was 
warmed by flues that passed under a suite of rooms. The damage 
was estimated at . 100,000. No part of the property was insured. 

ARMS. Naunton: sable; three martlets, argent. Piendlesham: 
gules ; three bucks' heads caboshed, argent ; attired, or. Harman : 
azure ; a chevron between six rams accrossted, counter tripping, 
argent, 2, 2, and 2. Spencer : quarterly, argent and gules ; on 
the 2nd and 3rd, a frett, or ; over all a bend, sable : three mullets 
of the 1st within a bordure, couiiterchanged. . Corrance: on a 
chevron, sable, between three ravens, proper, as many leopards' 
heads, or. 

CHARITIES. The town estate consists of five roods of land, in 
Eendlesham, on part of which four tenements, occupied by paupers, 
have been erected ; and the remainder is let at 2s. Gd. a year. 
A piece of land, in this parish, containing JA. 2R. 26p., intermixed 
with the glebe land, for which the rector pays .1 a year. -Several 
pieces of land in the parish of Snape, containing together HA. IR. 
33p., let at .12 a year. These lands were obtained in 1615, by 
exchange with Thomas Mawe, Gent., for other lands in Rendlesham; 
and the uses then settled were, for the payment of the King's taske, 

* A neat engraving of this parish church, from a drawing by Mr. Isaac Johnson, 
is given in the Gentleman's Magazine for 1821, accompanied with a full account of 
that building, its inscriptions, rectors, &c. 

f- A view of this mansion is engraved in Davy's " Suffolk Seats," accompanied 
with a particular description of the structure. 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 



the reparation of the church, and maintenance of the poor : hut it 
has long been the custom for the overseers of the poor to receive 
and apply the rents with the poors' rate. 



WOODBRIDGE. WUDEBRYGE, VDEBRIGA, or UDEBRIGE. 

The following additional observations concerning this parish, are 
extracted from a copy of the " Suffolk Traveller," formerly belonging 
to the Eev. Thomas Carthew, A.M., and F.A.S., perpetual curate of 
Woodbridge; which are in marginal notes, principally of his hand- 
writing. 

In the second edition of that publication it is said : " Wood- 
bridge took its name from a wooden bridge, built over a hollow 
way, to make a communication between two parks, separated by the 
road which leads from Woodbridge market-place towards Ipswich. 
At the foot of the liill from this hollow way, about a stone's throw 
from where the bridge might stand, is a house, which at this day 
retains the name of Dry-Bridge." 

Mr. Carthew observes : " This silly story about the two parks, 
accounts very well for the house being called Drybridge House : 
but that an ancient town should take its name from so trifling a 
circumstance, and withal so recent, for the bridge was standing 
within a century, is a supposition too foolish even for such an 
author as the compiler of this book. 

"Were I to hazard a conjecture on a matter so obscure as the 
original of a town's name, I should think it was originally Oden, 
or Woden Burgh, or Bury, or Brigg : i. e. Woden's Town. In the 
Priory rolls, in Henry VII. time, it is still Wodebrigg, and the 
spelling in the Confessor's time, Udelsbruge, favours this etymology. 
Brigg and Burgh are synonimous. See ' Verstegan/ 212. Thus 
Felbrigg, in Norfolk, is written Felbrig and Felburgh." 

To the account of the Lime-kiln quay, where formerly the Ludlow 
man of war was built, Mr. C. adds, " and where there is still a dock 
for building of ships, wherein merchant ships to the amount of 200 
tons burthen are frequently built, besides small craft." 

''' The Priory was granted, in the 33rd of King Henry VIII., to 
Sir John Wingfield, and Dorothy his wife, but they dying without 
issue, it was, by Queen Elizabeth, regranted to Thomas Seckford, 



128 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

Esq., and after continuing 109 years in that family, it came by will, 
anno 1698, to the Norths, of Sternfield ; and from them also by 
will, about the year 1711, to the family of Carthew." 

The manor which formerly belonged to this Priory, is now the 
property of Kolla Kouse, Esq., Barrister at Law, who purchased it 
of Mr. Dykes Alexander. The lordship of Woodbridge Ufford, &c., 
is vested in the Rev. J. Worsley. 

" The church of this town, being only a bare curacy, was in 1607, 
augmented by Mrs. Dorothy Seckford, who by will did devise her 
impropriated rectory of Woodbridge, to the persons to whom she 
had devised her estate at Woodbridge, to settle an orthodox minister 
to the same during life." 

Weever has these inscriptions from this parish church : " Hie 

jacet Johannes Albred, quondam Twelewever istius ville ob. 

primo die Maij 1400. et Agnes uxor eius " " This 

Twelewever, with Agnes his wife, were at the charges (people of all 
degrees being then forward to beautify the house of God) to cut, 
gild, and paint, a rood loft or a partition betwixt the body of the 
church and the choir : whereupon the pictures of the cross, and 
crucifix, the virgin Mary, of angels, archangels, saints, and martyrs, 
are figured to the life : which how glorious it was all standing, may 
be discerned by that which remaineth." 

Eor John Kempe, who died July 3, 1459, and Joan and Margaret, 

his wives ; also for " Robert Partrich, botcher who dyed on 

Midsomer day, 1533, Mariory and Alis his wyffs - - - Mariory the 

6th of Henry VIII., Alis on their souls, their children souls, 

and all cristen souls, almighty Jesu haue mercy." 

Robert Beale (or Belus), if not a native, was the eldest son of 
Robert Beale, a descendant from a family of that name, residents 
in this parish. He appears to have been educated to the profession 
of the civil and canon law, and married Editha, daughter of Henry 
St. Barbe, of Somersetshire, and sister to the lady of Sir Francis 
Walsingham; under whose patronage he first appeared at court. 
In 1571, he was Secretary to Sir Erancis, when sent Ambassador 
to France; and himself was sent in the same capacity, in 1576, to 
the Prince of Orange. His most considerable work is a collection 
of some of the Spanish historians, under the title " Rerum Hispa- 
nicarum Scriptores :" Francfort, 1579, 2 vols., folio. He died 
in 1601. 

Jeffrey Pitman, Esq., was originally a tanner in this parish, and 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 

afterwards High Sheriff of Suffolk, at the decease of King James. 
He had two wives, Alice and Anne ; hy the first, he had seven 
children, three of which died in their infancy : William his eldest 
son, and Jeffrey his second son, were both students in the law, at 
Gray's Inn, and died unmarried, in the lifetime of their father, who 
deceased in 1G27. Anne his wife, and Mary and Avis his two 
daughters, survived : Mary married to Edmund Burwell, of Rougham, 
in this county, Esq., and Avis, to Wm. Alston, of Marlsford, Gent. 
Mr. Pitman was a liberal benefactor to the town of Woodbridge. 

Nathaniel Fairfax, M.D., who practised in this town for several 
years, was of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, and brother to 
John Fairfax, A.M., vicar of Barking, in this county, and a Fellow 
of the same College : he was of the same family as General Fairfax, 
who headed the Parliamentarians in the civil war. Dr. Fairfax was 

twice married : his first wife was Elizabeth, the daughter of 

Blackerby, of Norwich, who died in 1680 ; the second was Eliza- 
beth, the widow of Francis Willard, of Woodbridge, and daughter 
of Nathaniel Bacon, of Ipswich, Esq., who survived him. He was 
author of a whimsical treatise of the " Bulk and Selvedge of the 
World, wherein the Greatness, Littleness, and Lastingness of 
Bodies are freely handled." This was dedicated to Sir William 
Blois, Knt., of Grundisburgh Hall : published in 8vo. London, 
1 674 ; and was presented by his son Blackerby, afterwards MJX also, 
to the library of the above named college, when a student there. 

ARMS. Pitman: gules; two battle axes in saltier, or, between 
four mullets, argent. Fairfax: argent; three bars, gyronelle, 
gules ; surmounted by a lion rampant, sable, armed and languid, 
azure ; with a crescent for difference. 

NOTE. The public are indebted to the late Mr. Robert Loder, the Framlingham 
historian, for much interesting information respecting this town, contained in his 
" Statutes and Ordinances for the Government of the Almshouses, in Woodbridge ;" 
which gives a full, and correct account of that noble institution. At the end are 
prefixed notes relating to the Priory, the church, and its ancient and modern mo- 
numental inscriptions. 

In 1796, appeared his second edition, enlarged, of the " Orders, Constitutions, 
and directions, for and concerning the Free School at Woodbridge." His edition of 
the " Woodbridge Terrier, exhibiting an account of all the Charities in that Town," 
published in 1787, was followed by a second impression, in 1811, with notes and 
explanations. With this edition it was Mr. Loder's intention to have connected a 
History of the ancient and present state of the town, want of materials, however, 
obliged him to decline it. This is to be regretted, as nothing further has since ap- 
peared concerning this place. 



130 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

The following is abridged from Mr. Loder's account of Charities, 
Estates, and Town Houses, given in his " Terrier of Woodbridge," 
2nd edition. 1811. 

CHARITIES. An almshouse, and garden thereto belonging, si- 
tuate in the said town, founded in 1587, by Thomas Seckford, Esq., 
Master of the Requests, for the reception of thirteen poor men. 
Also a messuage in the said garden, for the reception of three poor 
widows, nurses to the said alms-men. For the support thereof, 
endowed by the founder with an estate in Clerkenwell, in Middlesex, 
now let on building leases, at the net annual rent of .563 10s.; 
also a piece of laud in Woodbridge, containing 2A. 3n., and a small 
tenement in the same town, called Capthall. The principal inmate 
receives .27 per annum, the twelve poor men .20 each, and the 
three nurses each .12. There is an exhibition to the minister of 
.10, to the churchwardens .5 each, and to the poor of Clerken- 
well, .10 annually. The remainder is expended in clothing, firing, 
surgery, repairs, &c. The surplus, if any, to be distributed among 
such poor and indigent people, living in Woodbridge, as do not 
receive alms of that, or any other parish. 

Since the above period the revenues of this institution have 
greatly increased, so much so, that the governors recently deter- 
mined upon the erection of a handsome structure,* for affording to 
twenty-four necessitous and decayed tradesmen, and women, a 
comfortable asylum in their old age. 

A free school founded in 1662, by indenture of five parts, between 
Robert Marryott, sen., of Bredfield, Esq. ; Francis Burwell, of Sut- 
ton, Esq.; Mrs. Dorothy Seckford, of Seckford Hall, in Great 
[Dealings, widow; Robert Marryott, jun., of Bredfield, Esq.; John 
Sayer, of Woodbridge, Gent., and others, inhabitants of the said 
town. To the three first may be attributed the establishment of 
the school ; the latter being only parties in the deed of institution, 
on behalf of the inhabitants, who, by the settlement, granted .10 
per annum from the town estate, with a grant of .5, chargeable on 
lands in Great Bealings, and a like sum on lands in Bredfield, and 
ditto on lands in Sutton, amounting together to .25, with a school- 
house, garden, &c., and 2^- acres of pasture land, in Woodbridge. 
By the ordinances of this school, the master is obliged to teach 
boys, being children of the inhabitants of the town, free ; and also 

* A neat engraving of this building, by D. Buckle, from a drawing by S. Read, 
appeared in Mr. Pawsey's Ladies' Pocket Book, for 1840. 



HUNDRED OF LOE8. 131 

any other like boy, for .1 only, since augmented to <.3, by an 
order of Chancery. 

The town lands are situate in the parish of Martlesham, and 
consist of the Lamb Farm, comprising a cottage, now in three te- 
nements, with a barn, outbuildings, and 51 A. 20p. of land, being 
copyhold of the manor of Martlesham Hall. It was given by one 
John Dodd, in the reign of King Henry VII., to be employed for 
the maintenance of the poor people of Woodbridge, and to defray 
such other charges as the town should be charged with. The Street 
Farm contains 9 A. 2n. 39p. of copyhold land, partly held of the 
manor of Seckford Hall, and partly of that of Iken cum Framling- 
ham. This was given by the will of Jeffery Pitman, in 1 027, to 
feoffees, to the intent that the rents and profits thereof, should be 
employed about the reparations and maintenance of the church. 
These together produce the yearly rent of .55. The sum of .10 
is paid to the master of the school ; the residue is paid to the 
churchwardens, in aid of a church rate. 

In 1037, John Sayer gave by will, unto the inhabitants of this 
town, his close, called Garden Close, in Melton, in the county of 
Suffolk, and the hop -ground at the lower end thereof, containing 
by estimation 10A., and his fen in Melton, and his hemp-land 
thereto belonging ; for purchasing bread and clothing for the poor. 
This estate now consists of five enclosures, containing in the whole 
ISA. 2n. 2f>p.; the rent of the land is wholly laid out in the pur- 
chase of bread, and forty-two 3d. loaves are weekly distributed, on 
Sundays, among poor persons attending the church. 

There are also several small sums paid as rent charges and ground 
rents, and a large house in Pound Street, made use of as a work- 
house ; with several houses in different streets belonging to the 
town, where poor persons dwell rent free. 



Mem. In 1066, the plague raged with great violence here, 
which carried off the minister, his wife and child, and three hundred 
inhabitants. 

In 1804, Messrs. Alexander and Co. opened a banking house in 
Stone Street, in this town. 

In 1807, February 18th, a tremendous storm, in which four 
vessels belonging to this port were totally lost, together with most 



132 HUNDRED OF LOES. 

of the crews, by which calamitous event upwards of forty persons 
resident in this place, were left widows and fatherless. A liberal 
subscription was raised for their relief. 

February 5th, 1814, the new theatre in this town was opened, 
under the direction of Mr. Fisher. 

In 1815, the sale of the materials of the barracks here, took 
place. They were erected in 1803, and were capable of containing 
724 cavalry, officers and men, and 720 horses ; and infantry, 4165 
officers and men. 

October 29th, 1818, a new organ was opened in this parish 
church : most of the respectable families attended : the sum of 
.84 was collected. 



Of the different persons appointed to the Mastership of Wood- 
bridge School, Mr. Hawes has noticed the following : 

Edmund Brome, elk., was born in the parish of Clerkenwell, 
London, in 1642, and was admitted of St. John's College, Cam- 
bridge, in 1657, where he continued until after the restoration of 
King Charles II. He was elected master of this school, in 1665, 
and curate here in the following year, and soon after was appointed 
chaplain to Mrs. Dorothy Seckford, who granted him a lease of the 
great tithes of this parish for 60 years ; and he afterwards held the 
livings of Great and Little Bealings. Mr. B. was twice married; 
by the first wife he had issue, a daughter Dorothy, who married 
Eichard Taylor, vicar of Witcham, in the Isle of Ely; and Edmund, 
President of St. John's College. By his second marriage he had 
fourteen children. 

Philip Gillet (alias Candler), a descendant from an ancient fa- 
mily of that name, resident at Yoxford, in this county. He was 
schoolmaster here about nineteen years, and married Deborah, the 
daughter of Eichard Golty, rector of Framlingham, by whom he 
had issue two sons and four daughters. He deceased in 1689 ; she 
in 1695. 

Philip Gillett (alias Candler), their eldest son, succeeded to the 
mastership of this school, and was afterwards instituted to the rec- 
tory of Hollesly, in this county. He married, first, Deborah, one 
of the daughters and co-heirs of Samuel Golty, rector of Denning- 
ton, by whom he had no surviving issue ; secondly, Mary, one of 



HUNDRED OF LOES. 

the daughters and co-heirs of John Clinch, of Miselton Hall, in 
Burgh, Gent., by whom he had issue one son and two daughters. 

[Mr. HAWES acknowledges himself much beholden to this gen- 
tleman for the perusal of the manuscript collections of Mr. ZACCHEUS 
LEVERLAND, so frequently quoted in his own ; and the ready aid 
Mr. W. S. FITCH, of Ipswich, has afforded, by the liberal use oi 
his valuable transcript from Mr. Hawes* manuscript, demands from 
us a similar acknowledgment, in closing our account of this 
hundred.] 

ARMS. Brome: ermine; a chief indented, gules. Gillct (alias 
Candler] : ermine ; on a bend engrailed, sable, three pikes' heads 
erased, argent, double brassed, gules. Crest : a pike's head erect,, 
erased, gules, double brassed, or. 



Hundred is bounded, on the South and Eastward, by 
the German Ocean ; on the North, by the Hundreds of Plomes- 
gate and Loes ; and on the West, by the River Deben, which 
separates it from Colneis. It contains eighteen Parishes, as 
follows : 

DEBACH, 
HOLLESLEY, 

LOUDHAM, 

MELTON, 

PETTESTREE, 

BAMSHOLT, 

SHOTTISHAM, 

SUTTON, 



ALDERTON, 
BAUDSEY, 
BING, a Hamlet, 

BOULGE, 
BOYTON, 

BREDFIELD, 
BROME SWELL, 
CAPEL ST. ANDREW'S, 
DALINGHOO, 



UFFORD, 



And WICKHAM-MARKET. 



The fee of this Hundred is in the Crown, and the government 
in the Sheriff', and his appointed officers. 



HUNDRED OF WILLFORD. 



ALDERTON. ALETUNA, or ALRETUNA. 

The ancient family of De Glanvile became very early interested 
here : Jeffrey, brother of William de Glanvile, was lord of this 
parish, and Dalinghoo, in the reign of King Richard I. At his 
death his inheritance became divided between his five sisters and 
co-heirs. 

Basilia, the 3rd daughter, married, and left a daughter and heir, 
Isabel, who married William de Bovile, and brought her interest in 
these lordships to him : in the reign of King Edward I., William 
de Bovile, and Isabel his wife, presented to the church of Alderton. 
From the Boviles it passed to the Latimers. 

In the 3rd of King Edward II., William, son and heir of William 
de Bovile, and Isabel his wife, was impleaded for this lordship, and 
the church of Dalinghoo, by William de Huntingfield ; who de- 
scended from Emma, another sister and co-heir of Jeffrey de Glan- 
vile, wife of John de Grey. 

In the 48th of King Henry III., William de Bovile was consti- 
tuted Keeper of the Peace, in Suffolk, by letters patent ; and the 
following year, the King's Justice Itinerant, to enquire of misde- 
meanors in the said county. It appears by the Escheat Rolls, in 
the 30th of King Edward I., that William de Bovile held seven 
fees and a half in Letheringham, Greeting, and Thorp, in this 
county, at Leys, in Essex, and elsewhere. 

This William appears to have been son of John de Bovile, who 
in the 7th of Edward II., settled the manor of Dennington on Richard 
de Wingfield, for life ; and the advowson of the same parish, on 
Roger de Wingfield, for life ; remainder to William de Bovile, son 
of the said William, entail, male ; remainder to Thomas, son of 
Thomas le Latimer, entail, male ; remainder to Simon Fitz Richard, 
and Nicholaa his wife ; remainder to his right heirs.* 

* The manor of Badiogham, iu this county, was then settled in the same way. 
See Letheringham. 



138 HUNDRED OF WILLFORD. 

The manors of Naunton Hall (or Alderton Hall), Bovile's, and 
Pechy's, were formerly vested in the Bacons, of Friston; and Hugh 
Chamberlen, Esq., M.D., hecame possessed of the same hy his 
marriage with Mary, only daughter and heiress of Nathaniel Bacon, 
Esq., of that parish. By this marriage he left three daughters, his 
co-heirs, viz.: Mary (who died unmarried), Anna-Maria, and 
Charlotte. 

Anna-Maria married that distinguished statesman, the Right 
Hon. Edward Hopkins, M.P. for Coventry, in the time of King 
William III., and Queen Anne, and Secretary of State for Ireland. 
Charlotte married Eichard Luther, Esq., of Myles, in Essex; 
and this estate continued for many years, the undivided property, 
in equal moieties, of their descendants. Sir Charles Egertou Kent, 
Bart., was lately owner thereof. It is now vested, hy purchase, in 
Andrew Arcedeckne, of Glevering Hall, Esq. 

Robert Naunton, the author of " Fragmenta Regalia," was horn 
in 1563, being the son of Henry Naunton, Esq., of this parish, 
and Elizabeth his wife, whose maiden name was Ashby. Of the 
occurrences of his early years no account remains ; the following is 
transcribed from " Fuller's Worthies of Suffolk :" 

" Sir Robert Naunton was born in this county, of right ancient 
extraction ; some avouching that his family were here before, others 
tliat they came in with the Conqueror, who rewarded the chief of 
that name, for his service, with a great inheritrix, given him in 
marriage ; insomuch that his lands were then estimated at (a vast 
sum in my judgment) seven hundred pounds a year. For a long 
time they were patrons of Alderton, in this county, where I conceive 
Sir Robert was born. 

" He was bred Fellow Commoner in Trinity College, and then 
Fellow of Trinity Hall, in Cambridge. He was Proctor of the 
University, anno Domini 1600-1, which office, according to the 
Old Circle, returned not to that College but once in forty-four 
years. He addicted himself from his youth to such studies as did 
tend to accomplish him for public employment. I conceive his 
most excellent piece, called ' Fragmenta Regalia,' set forth since 
his death, was a fruit of his younger years. 

" He was afterwards sworn Secretary of State to King James, on 
Thursday the eighth of January, 1617 ; which place he discharged 
with great ability and dexterity. He died anno Domini 1630, and 
was buried at Letheringham. " 



HUNDRED OF WILLFORD. 1 39 

Sir Robert married Penelope, the daughter and sole heir of Sir 
Thomas Perrot, Knt., by Dorothy, the daughter of Walter, Earl of 
Essex. The only surviving offspring of this marriage, was a daugh- 
ter, Penelope; who was first married to Paul Viscount Bayning, 
and afterwards to Philip Lord Herbert, fifth Earl of Pembroke. 

In 1510, George Mawer was rector of this parish, and of Dit- 
chingham and Eccles, in Norfolk: in 1512, he was Doctor of the 
Degrees, and in 1513, had a dispensation from Pope Leo, to hold 
several benefices. Dr. Mawer was also Commissary of Suffolk 
Archdeaconry. 

John Walker, S.T.P., Archdeacon of Essex, and rector of this 
parish, was installed third Prebend in Norwich Cathedral, in 1569. 

Richard Frank, D.D., rector of this parish, and of Hardwick, 
with Shelton, in Norfolk, died August 18, 1810. He was formerly 
of Trinity College, Cambridge; and proceeded, A.B., 1766; A.M., 
1769; and S.T.P., 1704. Dr. Frank was one of his Majesty's 
Justices of the Peace for this county. 

Mem. A portion of the steeple of this parish church fell down 
during divine service, Nov. 4, 1821. No actual injury, however, 
was sustained by any one of the congregation. 

CHARITIES. The charity estate consists of a house and garden, 
let at .15 a year, and two acres of land, at the rent of A 10s., 
which is laid out principally in bread, and partly in wood and coals, 
for the poor. The annual sum of <.3, is also distributed in weekly 
portions, among poor persons, under the will of Thomas Trusson, 
who died in or about 1687 : and is a rent charge out of an estate in 
this parish belonging to Mr. John Toppell. 



BAUDSEY. BAWDRESEY, or BALDESIA. 

In the reign of King Henry II., the lordship and advowson of 
this parish were vested in Ralph de Orlanville, Lord Chief Justice 
of England; who, previous to his joining the Crusades, under King 
Richard I., divided his estate between his three daughters and co- 
heiresses. A moiety of this subsequently became the estate of the 
Prior and Convent of Butley, of which he was the founder ; the 
other moiety, the inheritance of the Ufford family. 

Robert de Ufford, Steward of the Royal Household, was owner 



140 HUNDRED OF WILLFORD. 

thereof; and upon his decease it was assigned to Cicely de Valoines, 
his widow, as part of her dowry. In the llth of King Edward III., 
their son, Robert de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, obtained a grant of a 
weekly market, and an annual fair, in this his manor of Bawdresey. 

He deceased in the 43rd of the same reign, when his honours and 
possessions descended to William de Ufford, his son and heir, who 
died without issue, possessed of this lordship, in the 5th of King 
Richard II., and his estates became devisable between the issue of 
his three sisters. 

Cicely, the eldest, married John, 3rd Lord Willoughby de Eresby, 
who deceased in the 46th of King Edward III., and Robert their 
son, 4th Baron, succeeded to this estate, as nephew and one of the 
co-heirs of the above William de Ufford, upon the decease of that 
nobleman. 

It continued in their descendants until the failure of male issue, 
in William Lord Willoughby, 9th Baron ; who died in 1525, seized 
of this lordship, with those of Ufford, Bredfield, Sogenhowe, Win- 
derfelde, Woodbridge, Orford, Wykes Ufford, Parham, and Campsey, 
in this county. He was interred in the collegiate church of Met- 
tinghain, in Suffolk. 

Catherine, Baroness Willoughby de Eresby in her own right, was 
his sole daughter and heir, by the Lady Mary Salines, his second 
wife. She married, first, Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, and 
afterwards Richard Bertie, of Bersted, in Kent, Esq., a gentleman 
singularly accomplished and learned, attached to the Court of King 
Henry VIII. ; by whom she had issue the Hon. Peregrine Bertie, 
(so called from being born in a foreign country), and a daughter, 
Susanna, who married, first, Reginald Grey, 15th Earl of Kent, 
and, secondly, Sir John Wingfield, Knt. 

The Dutchess of Suffolk* and her husband, Richard Bertie, were 
eminent for their services in the cause of the reformation. Active 
and zealous in its promotion, they were obliged during the sangui- 
nary persecution of Queen Mary, to provide for their safety by 
quitting the kingdom. The hardships which they underwent during 
their exile, were so singular and severe, that they were afterwards 
commemorated, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth, in a curious 
old ballad.f 

* There is a portrait of the Dutchess, published by T. Chamberlaine, in 1792 ; 
engraved by Bartolozzi, from a drawing by Hans Holbein, 
f See " Suffolk Garland," p. 149. 



HUNDRED OF WILLFORD. 141 

Peregrine Bertie, their only son,, was 10th Lord Willoughby de 
Eresby. He distinguished himself at the siege of Zutphen, in the 
Low Countries, in 1586; and the following year was appointed 
General of the English Forces in the United Provinces : tlu's gave 
him an opportunity of signalizing himself in several actions against 
the Spaniards, one of wliich is the subject of another popular old 
ballad.* 

His lordship married the Lady Mary de Vere, daughter and 
heiress of John, 16th Earl of Oxford ; by which marriage he still 
further increased the family possessions in this county. Their son 
Robert, llth Baron, inherited, in right of his mother, the high 
office of Lord Great Chamberlain of England ; and having greatly 
distinguished himself in a mili tary career, was installed a Knight of 
the illustrious order of the Garter, and, in 1626, created Earl of 
Lindsey. His descendant in the fourth generation, was created 
Duke of Ancaster. 

The Barony of Willoughby de Eresby merged in this Earldom of 
Lindsey, and Dukedom of Ancaster, until the death of Robert, 4th 
Duke, without issue, in 1779; when the above ancient Barony fell 
into abeyance between his Grace's sisters and co-heirs, and it so 
remained until the same was terminated by the Crown,f in 1 780, in 
favour of the elder co-heir, Priscilla Barbara Elizabeth, the wife of 
Sir Peter Burrell, Bart., first Baron Gwydyr. 

The present representative of this illustrious house, is the Right 
Hon. Lord Willoughby de Eresby, 19th Baron, Lord Great Cham- 
berlain of England, eldest son of the Right Hon. Lord Gwydyr, 
and Lady Willoughby de Eresby, Baroness in her own right, 
daughter and co-heiress of Peregrine, 3rd Duke of Ancaster. 

The descent of this manor did not continue in this family 
throughout the long line of ancestry above described, but became 
vested in that of Tallemache, Earls of Dysart; from whom it passed 
to the Sheppard family. We have, however, chosen to continue the 
descent to the present period, as, after the lapse of many ages, a 
branch of this ancient house (tracing Royal descent from Edward I., 

* See " Suffolk Garland," p. 177. 

f This is one of the very ancient Baronies, created by Writ of Summons, which 
pass, being heritable by heirs male or female, at different periods into different 
families ; and sometimes remain for centuries dormant : for in the instance of 
there being no male heir, but several female, the Barony does not devolve upon 
the eldest daughter, but upon ail conjointly, and cannot, consequently, be inherited 
until there be a single heir to the whole, without the especial interference of the 
Crown. 



142 HUNDRED OF WILLFORD. 

King of England),* has recently become re-planted in our county ; 

* PEDIGREE. BURRELL, OF STOKE PARK. 

Edward I., King of England, died 1307. = Eleanor, daughter of Ferdinand III., 

I King of Castile. 
L_ _j 

Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester and=Princess Joan, of Acres. 

Hertford, died 1295. L i 

Hugh, Baron le Despencer, beheaded=Eleanor, daughter and heiress of Gilbert, 

1326. Earl of Gloucester. 



Richard Fitz Alan, Earl of Arundel,=Isabella, d. of Hugh Baron le Despencer. 

K.G., died 1375. I _, 

Sir Richard Serjeaux, of Cornwall, Knt.=Phi1ippa, d. of Richard, Earl of Arundel. 

ob. 21st Richard II. L 1 

Richard de Vere, Earl of Oxford, K.G.,=Alicia, daug. and heiress of Sir Richard 

died 4th Henry V. I j Serjeaux, Knt. 

Sir Robert de Vere, 2nd son, Govern or =Joan, dau. of Sir Hugh Courtenay, Knt. 

of Caen, slain 1450. i i 

Sir John de Vere, Knt.=Alice, daughter and heir of Sir Walter 

1 ' Kilrington, Knt. 

John de Vere succeeded, as Earl of Ox-=fElizabeth, dau. and heir of Sir Edward 

ford, 1527, died 1539. \ J Trussell, Knt. 

John de Vere, Earl of Oxford, K.G.,y Margaret, sister of Sir Thomas Golding, 

Lord Great Chamberlain of England, [ Knt. 

died anno 4th Elizabeth. ' \ 

Peregrine Bertie, Lord Willoughby de=f Mary, aunt and heir of the whole blood 

Eresby, died 1601. \ - 1 of Henry de Vere, Earl of Oxford. 

Robert Bertie, Earl of Lindsey, Baron~Elizabeth, only daug. of Edward, Lord 



Willoughby de Eresby, K.G., Lord 
Great Chamberlain of England, killed 
at the Battle of Edge Hill, 23rd Oct., 
1642. 



Montague, of Boughton. 



Montague Bertie, Earl of Lindsey, Baron Martha, dau. of Sir Wm. Cockayn, Knt. 

Willoughby de Eresby, K.G., died | 

1666. i J 

Robert Bertie, Earl of Lindsey, Baron ^Elizabeth, d. of Philip, Lord Wharton. 

Willoughby de Eresby, &c., died 1701. I 

Robert Bertie, Duke of Ancaster and=Mary, daug. of Sir Richard Wynn, Bart. 
Kesteven, Marquess and Earl of Lind- 
sey, Baron Willoughby de Eresby, &c. 
died 1723. \ - 

Peregrine Bertie, Duke of Ancaster, &c.=j=Jane, daughter and co-heir of Sir John 
died 1742. \ ' Brownlow, of Belton, Bart. 

Peregrine Bertie, Duke of Ancaster, &c.= Mary, daughter of Thomas Pauton, of 
died 1778. [ Newmarket, Esq. 

L_ _ T 

Peter Burrell, Baron Gwydyr, died 1820.yPrisoilla, BaronessWilloughbyde Eresby, 

J eldest daughter and co- heir. 



L 

Peter Robert Burrell, 
Baron Gwydyr, suc- 
ceeded as 19thBarou 
Willoughby de Eres- 
by, in!828, Lord Gt. 
Chamberlain of En- 
gland, &c. &c. 


i 
The Honourable= 
Lindsey Bur- 
rell, born 1786 


=Frances, d. 
Daniell, 


of Jas. 
Esq. 

*e v \ 


The Hon. 
Burrell 
John, 
Clare, 

\T 


Elizabeth 
, married 
Earl of 
in 1826. 


T 
I 



Robert Burrell, Esq. Sophia, dau. of F. W. 

born in 1810. Campbell, Esq. of 

1 -J Birkfield Lodge. 
Willoughby Burrell, 

Esq. bornin 1841. 



HUNDRED OF WILLFORD. 14tf 

from whose scions, we would hope, the future genealogist will be 
able to trace, for many successive generations, a long- continued 
descent, as famed for honour and valour as its predecessors. 

The Hon. Lindsey Burrell, second son of Lord Gwydyr, has 
recently purchased the estate of Stoke Park, near Ipswich ; and 
makes that charming spot his occasional residence. Kobert Burrell, 
Esq., his eldest son, lately married Sophia, only child of Frederick 
Campbell, of Birkfield Lodge, near Ipswich, Esq., and has issue 
Willoughby Burrell, Esq.* Georgiana, eldest daughter of the 
above honourable gentleman, is the wife of Hamilton Lloyd An- 
struther, Esq., of Hintlesham Hall, in this county. 

ARMS. Glanvilfe: argent; a chief indented azure. Ufford: 
sable ; a cross engrailed, or. Willoughby : or ; fretty, azure. 
Bertie: argent; three battering rams, proper, armed and rimed, or. 
Burrell: vert ; three plain shields, argent, each having a bordure 
engrailed, or. 

In 1315, a sequestration was granted to Henry, rector of this 
parish, who was Dean of the College of the Chapel of St. Mary in 
the Fields, at Norwich, and also second Prebend, or Chancellor of 
the said College. 

In 1549, Richard Denney, of this parish, presented Michael 
Dunning, LL.D., to the vicarage of Gissing, in Norfolk, as patron 
for this turn only, by grant from Thomas, late Prior of the dissolved 
house of Butley; the grant being made prior to its dissolution. 
This Michael Dunning was vicar general, and rector of North 
Tuddenham, in Norfolk, of whom some account is given in " Fox's 
Martyrs," and in " Brown's Posthumous Works." 

In 1807, died, the Rev. John Walker, vicar of this parish, and 
one of the minor Canons of Norwich Cathedral. He was formerly 
Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford ; an admirable scholar, pos- 
sessed of a very brilliant imagination, and a most refined taste, 
which rendered him highly popular as a preacher. Mr. Walker 
also held preferment in Norwich, and was vicar of Stoke Holy 
Cross, in Norfolk. 

Mem. Nov. 5, 1841, this parish church was burned to the 
ground. The accident was occasioned by two men going on the 
steeple with a turpentine ball (it being the anniversary of the gun- 
powder treason), which they set on fire ; and a part of the ball 

* Vide Pedigree. 



HUNDRED OF WILLFOED. 



falling on the thatch of the church, it immediately ignited : all ex- 
ertions to put out the fire were fruitless. 



BING. 

In the time of King Edward I., Sir John de Huntingfield held 
this lordship ; and in the 14th of that reign, a claim was made of 
a right to hold a market here every Thursday. 

It was afterwards granted to the Prior and Convent at Campsey, 
with the impropriation of this parish church ; and at the dissolution 
of that Monastery, became the inheritance of Sir Anthony Wingfield, 
as parcel of the possession of the said Priory. It is now reduced to 
a small hamlet, united with the parish of Pettistree. 



BOULGE, or BULGES, with DEBACH, DEPEBECS, or DEPEBEC. 

In the 9th of King Edward I., Queen Margaret held the lordship 
of Boulge, and Debach; and these manors and advowsons were part 
of the estate of the Seckford family, which descended to Dorothy, 
widow of Henry Seckford, Esq., who deceased in 1G38, and daughter 
of Sir Henry North, Knt. She survived until 1673, and bequeathed 
them to her cousin, Sir Henry North, of Mildenhall, Bart.; from 
whom this estate descended to Sir Thomas Hanmer, of the same 
place, Bart., and from him to the Bunbury family. 

The present owner of this property is the Rev. Osborne Shribb 
Reynolds, who is also patron and incumbent. Boulge Hall is the 
estate and residence of John Fitz Gerald, Esq., who served the 
office of High Sheriff for this county, in 1824. 

The Prior and Convent of Woodbridge were seized of 12d. rent 
in Boulge, and of lands and rent in Debach, valued at 2s. lid. 

CHARITIES. It appears from deeds respecting the town lands of 
these parishes, that part thereof was in old time settled, and held in 
trust for payment of tenths and fifteenths, for the village of Debach, 
the sustentation of the poor, the reparation of the church, and for 
the doing other charitable works in the said village ; and that other 
part thereof was purchased with money arising from the sale of the 



HUNDRED OF WILLFORD. 145 

eighth part of a ship bequeathed by Richard Francis, in 1044, upon 
trust, that the produce thereof should be laid out in land, and the 
profits of such land employed for the relief of the poor of Debach. 
The property consists of four tenements, with small gardens ad- 
joining, occupied by poor persons at low rents, and of several closes 
of land, lying in and adjoining to the parish of Debach, containing 
in the whole, by survey, 26A. 2R. 2 IP., including the gardens an- 
nexed to the cottages : the rents of which amount together to .40 
a year. These, after defraying necessary charges and outgoings, 
are applied in the repairs of the church, and in payment of other 
expences incidental to the churchwardens' office, in lieu of a church 
rate ; .1 6s. a year is paid to the teacher of a Sunday school, and 
about .G or .7 a year, on an average, is laid out in coals, which 
are given to the poor during the winter season. 



BOYTON, or BEGETON. 

The lordship of this parish was anciently the property of Sir 
Simon de Eattlesden. 

Mr. Kirby gives some account of the foundation and endowment 
of Warner's almshouse in this parish, the revenues of which have 
greatly increased since his time; so much so, that the trustees have 
been enabled to augment the number of inmates to sixteen, and 
contemplate a still further increase. 

By the last scheme approved by the Court of Chancery, the pe- 
titioners proposed to increase the annual sum of .10 to the master 
of the charity school at Stradbrook, to .15 ; and to increase the 
allowance to each of the twelve poor persons in the almshouse at 
Boyton, to 7s. a week; and to allow them .2 5s. each, per annum, 
for firing; .2 15s. a year each, for clothing; the nurse who 
attends upon them to have the same allowance. It was further 
proposed to add four poor persons (two men and two women), to 
the then number of twelve, and to put them on the same footing, 
in every respect, with the twelve, with divers additional expenditures 
consequent upon that increase, such as the erection of new, or en- 
larging the present almshouse. 

The Master was of opinion that the said scheme was proper to 



140 HUNDRED OF WILLFORD, 

be carried into effect, and that the said increased allowances should 
commence from the 10th of October, 1802. 

The indenture of bargain and sale inrolled in Chancery, for the 
endowment of this charity, bears date the 22nd June, 1736. Mrs. 
Mary Warner, of this parish, died in or about 1743, when the 
almshouses were erected. 

In the chancel of this parish church is the following inscription : 

" SAMUEL HINGESTON, A.M. 

FORTY-TWO YEARS RECTOR OF THIS PARISH, 

AND TWENTY YEARS RECTOR. OF HoLTON 

ST. PETER, 

IN THIS COUNTY, 

DIED FEBRUARY 8, 1807, 

AGED 77." 

He was second son of Kobert Hingeston, A.M., rector of Great 
TBealings, and West Greeting, in this county, and twenty-three years 
master of the grammar school in Ipswich, and Katherine his wife, 
daughter of the Eev. Samuel Buli, rector of Brarnpton, in this 
county. 

Mr. Hingeston was of Caius College, Cambridge: A.B., 1750; 
A.M., 1756. James Hingeston, his brother, was of Emanuel Col- 
lege, Cambridge: A.B., 1755; A.M., 1758: was vicar of Eaydon, 
in this county. He published, in 1771, "Discourses upon the 
Covenants," 8vo.; and died March 30, 1777, aged 44. 

Mem. A few years ago as some labourers were digging sand 
from a pit in this parish, one of them found an armlet of very cu- 
rious workmanship, in pure gold ; it was exhibited by Mr. Stothard, 
at the Antiquarian Society, and an account of it was given in the 
Transactions of the Society. 



BKEDFIELD. BREDEFELDA, or BREDEFELD. 

This property came to the Willoughbys, as part of the estate of 
the De Ufford family ; and in the latter part of the seventeenth 
century, it was the estate of the Marryotts, one of whom built the 
Hall here : it passed to the Jenneys, by their marriage with an 
heiress of the Marryott family. 

The Crown hath presented to this vicarage since the dissolution 
of Monasteries ; it having previously belonged to the Priory of 



HUNDRED OF WILLFOKD. ' 147 

Butley and Campsey, who presented alternately to the vicarage, and 
divided the impropriation. 

The family of Jenney are of French extraction, and were early 
seated at Knodishall, in Blithing hundred. They became possessed 
of this properly in 1683, by the marriage of Edmund, second son 
of Sir Kobert Jenney, of that parish, Knt., with Dorothy, daughter 
and co-heiress of Robert Marryott, Esq., of Bredfield. 

The present representative of this ancient house, and proprietor 
of the estate, is Edmund, eldest son and heir of the late Edmund 
Jenney, of this parish, Esq., and Anne his wife, daughter of Philip 
Broke, Esq., of Nacton, in this county. 

Mr. Jenney succeeded to this property upon the decease of his 
father, in 1801, and resides at Hasketon, near Woodbridge. Bred- 
field House, the family seat here, is at present in the occupation of 
Frederick Manning, Esq. 

CHARITIES. The town land here is copyhold of the manor of 
Bredfield, and consists of six acres, in four pieces, let at rents 
amounting together to 7 10s. per annum; which is applied to 
the same purpose as the money raised by a church rate. 



BROMESWELL. BROMES WELLA, or BRAMES WELLA. 

This manor was included amongst those given by Thos. Howard, 
Duke of Norfolk, and Henry his son, Earl of Arundel and Surry, 
in the 36th of King Henry VIII., to that monarch, in exchange 
for his castle, castle manor, and chase, of Rising, in Norfolk, and 
all its appurtenances. 

It subsequently became the estate of the Wood family, of Loud- 
ham, and passed as that lordship did.* 

CHARITIES. The town lands here comprise a piece of pasture 
and marsh land, in this parish, containing about SA. 2n., let at ;3 
a year. A piece of grass land, of about an acre, in the parish of 
Ufford, let at 2 2s. a year. It is not known how these lands 
were originally acquired. The rents have been applied towards the 
repairs of the church. (For Sir Michael Stanhope's gift to the poor 
of this parish, see the parish of Sutton.) The sum granted by Sir 

* In " Davy's Architectural Antiquities" of this County, is an etching of the south 
door of thia parish church, forming a specimen of the Norman style of architecture. 



148 * HUNDRED OF WILLFORD. 

Michael, is 5 a year, but a deduction being made on account of 
land tax, 4 14s. 8d. per annum is paid, and distributed among 
poor persons of the parish. 



CAPEL ST. ANDKEW, or CAPELES. 

The author of " Magna Britannia," makes Simon de Rattlesden 
owner of this manor. He deceased in the 1 7th of King Edward III., 
and probably held it of the Valences, Earls of Pembroke, as he did 
Bokenham-Ferry, and Saxlingham, in Norfolk 

The church was given to Butley Abbey, by Ranulph de Glanville, 
Lord Chief Justice of England, the founder of that Monastery, 
and was afterwards impropriated thereto. This Ranulph married 
Bertha, the daughter of Theobald de Valoins (otherwise Valence). 

This was a distinct parish, until about 1580, when the church 
became ruinous, and it has since been accounted as a hamlet of 
Butley. 

CHARITIES. The parish estate consists of a cottage, and hemp- 
land, containing, by estimation, IA. SR., in the parish of Butley, 
being copyhold of the manor of Staverton-with-Bromeswell, which 
were last surrendered upon trust, in 1754, that the trustees should 
receive and pay the rents and profits of the same, to the poor of 
Capel, towards their relief and support. It is unknown how the 
property was originally given or acquired : it is let at 6 a year, 
and the rents are carried to the account of the overseers, and applied 
for the general relief of the poor. 



DALINGHOO, or DELINGAHOU. 

That part of this parish which lies within this hundred, is known 
by the name of " The Hamlet," and, in the 29th of King Edward I., 
was assigned in dower, to Lady Margaret, sister to Gilbert de Clare, 
Earl of Gloucester, and relict of Edmund Plantagenet, Earl of 
Cornwall, whose ancestors had been owners thereof; but the said 
Earl dying without issue, it reverted to the Crown, after the decease 
of the said Lady Margaret. 



HUNDRED OF WILLFORD, 149 

In the 4th of King Edward III., John de Eltham, the second 
son of King Edward II., created Earl of Cornwall, obtained a 
grant of this hamlet, with others in Alderton and Thorndon, in this 
county; and from the De Uffords and Delapoles, Earls of Suffolk, 
being owners thereof, the manor, for distinction sake, acquired the 
name of Earl Dalinghoo ; and the lords, as of right appertaining 
thereunto, claimed one turn in four to the presentation of an in' 
cumbent to the church. 

In the 31st of King Edward III., Sir John de Norwich obtained 
a charter for free warren in all his lands in Norfolk and Suffolk, 
and amongst them are the manor of Dalinghoo. He died in the 
3Cth of the same reign, and was succeeded by John, his grandson, 
who was lord of the manor, and died in 1358. 

This estate now belongs to Andrew Arcedeckne, Esq., of Gle- 
vering Hall, in Loes hundred. 



DEBACH. DEPEBECS, or DEPEBEC. 
See BOULGE, in this hundred. 



HOLLESLEY. HOLES, or HOLESLEA. 

In the 18th of King Edward L, the demesne of this place was 
in Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, who endowed Alice, his second 
wife, with this and divers other lordships, at their marriage; which 
she held during her life, and at her decease it reverted to the Crown. 

In the time of King Edward III., Thomas de Brotherton, Earl 
of Norfolk, fifth son of King Edward I., obtained a grant of the 
same, and died seized thereof, in the 12th of the same reign. Mary, 
his second wife survived, and held this and several other estates, 
assigned for her dower. 

At her decease it passed, upon the division, to Joan, the wife of 
William de Ufford, as the heir of Alice, daughter and co-heir of the 
above Thomas de Brotherton, and wife of Edward de Montacute ; 
and so passed as the Ufford inheritance. 

It afterwards passed into the Wood family, as in the next parish 



150 HUNDRED OF WILLFORD. 

of Loudham ; and, upon the division of their estate, it came, by 
allotment under the Court of Chancery, to one of the co-heirs of 
Mary Cranmer, elder sister of Sir Henry Wood ; namely, Dorothea, 
daughter of John Chester, Esq., and wife of Sir George Eobinson, 
Bart., M.P. for Northampton, in 1774; who inherited in her right. 
We subjoin a list of the lords and ladies of this manor, from 
Edward III. to James I., under the impression that it will be in- 
teresting to our readers, from the illustrious names it contains : 
12th Edw. III. Thomas de Brotherton, the King's son, Earl of 

Norfolk, and Earl Marshall of England. 
5th Richard II. Margaret, Countess of Norfolk. 
5th Henry VI. John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, Earl Marshall. 
26th Henry VI. John, Archbishop of Canterbury, and Humphrey, 

Duke of Buckingham, Feoffees. 
2nd Edw. IV. Alionora, Dutchess of Norfolk, after the death of 

John, the late Duke of Norfolk. 
16th Edw. IV. Elizabeth, Dutchess of Norfolk. 
22ndHen.VII. Sir James Hobart, and other Feoffees, for the use 

of Thomas, Earl of Surry. 
1 6thHen.VIII. William (Warham) Archbishop of Canterbury, and 

other Feoffees, for Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, 

son and heir of Thomas, the late Duke. 
1st Edw.- VI. King Edward VI., during the imprisonment of 

Thomas, Duke of Norfolk. 
1st of Mary. Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, after his release from 

imprisonment. 
5 &6Ph.&Mary.--Thos., Duke of Norfolk, son & heir of Henry, Earl 

of Surry, the son & heir of Thos., the late Duke. 
1st Elizabeth. Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, and Margaret his 

Dutchess. 
llth Elizabeth. John Blennerhassett, Wm. Dixie, Wm. Cantrell, 

and Laurance Banister, upon lease for 1 6 years. 
27th Elizabeth. Elizabeth, Queen of England. 
2nd James I. Thomas, Earl of Suffolk, and Henry, Earl of 

Northampton, by gift of the King; who sold it, 

in the same year, to Sir Michael Stanhope, of 

Sudbourne, Knt. 

Jn 1381, Thomas Cobbe was rector of this parish; who exchanged 
it for the rector}' of Burgh, in Norfolk, with John Alberd (alias 
All-Beard.) 



HUNDRED OF WILLl'ORD. 151 

Mem. In 1804, two pieces of cannon, of a very singular con- 
struction, were picked up in Hollesley Bay, by some sweepers for 
anchors : a particular description of them is given in Mr. Shoberl's 
history of this county. 

CHARITIES. The sum of 6 a year, appropriated under the do- 
nation of Sir Michael Stanhope's gift,* is paid to the churchwardens 
of this parish, after a deduction made on account of land-tax, and 
is distributed among poor persons. 



LOUDHAM. LUDHAM, or LANEBURH, 

A hamlet of Pettistree. The family of Loudham held the lordship 
for many ages, until the death of John, son of Sir Thomas de 
Lowdham, and Maud his wife, in 1418; who left issue an only 
daughter and heiress, Joan ; she married, first, to Thomas Heveu- 
inghani, Esq., and secondly, to Ralph Blennerhassett, Esq., and he 
inherited, in right of such marriage, whose descendants possessed it 
for many generations. 

This Joan survived her second husband, until 1501, being 97 
years of age ; and John Bleverhasset, her son and heir, succeeded, 
being 77 years of age at the death of his mother. Samuel Blen- 
nerhassett resided at Loudham, in 1618; but how, or when the estate 
went from that family, we are not informed. 

It afterwards became the property of Sir Henry Wood, Knt., 
Treasurer of the Household of the Queen Dowager, Henrietta, one 
of the Council of Queen Catherine, and Clerk of the Board of Green 
Cloth ; eldest son of Thomas Wood, of Hackney, in Middlesex, 
Clerk of the Pantry. 

Sir Henry possessed considerable estates in this county, besides 
the manor and park of Loudham, where he resided. He died May 
25, 1671, and was buried in the south aisle of Ufford church. 

Mr. Gage Eokewode in his "History of the Hundred of Thingoe," 
has very fully noticed this family, in Ms account of the parish of 
Whepstead ; by which it appears, Sir Henry Wood left issue an only 
daughter, Mary, who married Charles, Duke of Southampton ; and, 
for want of male issue by this marriage, this estate devolved in 
possession upon Charles Wood, surviving son of Sir Cffisar Cranmer, 
* See the account of this charity in the parish of Sutton. 



152 HUNDRED OF WILLFORDr. 

who died without issue, in 1 743 ; and the estate descended in moi- 
eties, to the co-heirs of the two sisters of Sir Henry Wood. 

By a commission under the Great Seal of England, the 20th of 
George II., this estate was allotted to one of the heirs of Elizabeth 
Wehb, his youngest sister; namely, Susan, wife of Robert Oneby; 
whose son Eobert, died in 1753, without iss - ie, ard it became the 
inheritance of Sir John, son and heir of Sir William Chapman, 
Bart., by Elizabeth his wife, sister of Susan wife of the said Robert 
Oneby, Esq. 

It was purchased by Jacob Whi thread, Esq., after the decease of 
the said Sir John Chapman, Bart., without issue ; and is now the 
property of Carey William Jacob Whitbread, Esq., and the residence 
of Frederick White Corrance, Esq. 

ARMS. Lowdham: argent; three escutcheons, sable. Blenner- 
hassett : gules ; a chevron, ermine, between three dolphins embowed, 
argent. Wood: argent ; on a chevron, azure, between three peli- 
cans, sable, vulning themselves, proper, as many cinquefoils of the 
first. Chapman: party per chevron, argent and gules; a crescent 
counterchanged. 

Mem. In 1810, a timber oak was felled in Loudham park, 
containing altogether 705 solid feet; the body of which was drawn 
by sixteen horses, to Mr. Manthorp and Son's timber wharf, 
Woodbridge. 



MELTON, or MELTUNA. 

The Dean and Chapter of the cathedral church of Ely are pro- 
prietors of this manor and advowson. There is a curious octagonal 
font in this church, which has been engraved in the " Archasologia," 
published by the Society of Antiquaries of London. 

In this parish stood the House of Industry for the hundreds of 
Loes and Willford, which was built in the year 1768, and has since 
been converted into a County Lunatic Asylum ; the whole expence 
of which, to April 1829, was 26,881; of this sum 26,000 was 
raised by loans. 

In the year 1764, Willford Bridge being decayed, was pulled 
down, and wholly rebuilt with brick, at the cost of 175 ; and in 
the year 1798, this bridge was taken down, and rebuilt with white 



HUNDRED OF WILLFOIID. 153 

brick and stone, at a much more considerable cost. Mr. Kirby 
mentions a bequest of '20, given in 1539, by Richard Cook, of 
this parish, and other legacies named about the same period, towards 
the first erection of the said bridge, which was probably built soon 
after. 

John de Diss, rector of this parish, gave, in 1420, to the altar at 
Diss, in Norfolk, 13s. 4d.; to repair the said church, 26s. 8d.; to 
ths poor, 20s. ; and to St. Nicholas chapel, 6s. 8d. He was buried 
in Woodbridge Priory. 

Dr. Joseph White, an eminent Oriental scholar, Canon of Christ 
Church, Regius Professor of Hebrew, and Laudian Professor of 
Arabic, in the University of Oxford, was rector of this parish ; the 
hiving of which he accepted about 1790. 

He was bom in 1740, of parents of low circumstances, in Glou- 
cester, where his father was a journeyman weaver, and brought up 
his son to the same business. Being however, a sensible man, he 
gave him what little learning was in his power, at one of the charity 
schools at Gloucester. This excited a thirst for greater acquisition 
in the young man, who employed all the time he could spare in the 
study of such books as fell in his way. 

His attainments at length attracted the notice of a neighbouring 
gentleman of fortune, who sent him to the University of Oxford, 
where he was entered of Wadham College, and took his degree of 
A.M. in 1773, and about that time engaged in the study of the 
Oriental languages ; to which he was induced by the particular re- 
commendation of Dr. Moore, afterwards Archbishop of Canterbury. 
In 177o, he was appointed Archbishop Land's Professor of Arabic. 
Lord Thurlow, then Lord Chancellor, without any solicitation, gave 
him a Prebend in the Cathedral of Gloucester, which at once placed 
him in easy and independent circumstances. In 1787, he took the 
degree of D.D., and was looked up to with the greatest respect in 
the University, as one of its chief ornaments. He died at the ca- 
nonry residence at Christ Church, May 22, 1814. 

CHARITIES. The parish estate is partly freehold, and partly co- 
pyhold, and consists of six cottages, occupied by paupers, and two 
pieces of land, called Green Man Meadow, containing together 
2A. In. 12p., formerly given by one John Jenner, for the use of the 
poor. The rent of these pieces of land, at the time this report was 
made, was 5 10s. a year. An offer of 12, or .12 12s. a year, 
had been received, in 1828, for the same'. The rent is kid out in 



1 54 HUNDRED OF WILLFOKD. 

bread, which is distributed among the poor. The Church Lands 
consist of several inclosures, containing together 27 A. 3n. 17P., the 
rents of which have, from ancient time, been appropriated to the 
repairs of the church ; and several other inclosures, called the 
Charity Lands, containing together ISA. 3n. 16p., appropriated, 
under donations from persons named Halifax and Histed, for pro- 
viding fuel for eight poor persons. These lands were long held at 
36 a year, which sum has lately been increased : and the rents 
are applied, partly to the purpose of repairing the cottages, and 
partly to the reparation of the church, and the payment of other 
charges, attending the celebration of divine service ; and the re- 
mainder, generally to the amount of 17 a year, is laid out in the 
purchase of coals, which are distributed among poor persons. 



PETTESTREE. PETTISTREE, or PITEDRE. 

The lordship of this parish was anciently vested in the De Uffords, 
Earls of Suffolk. Francis, third son of Edmund Bacon, Esq., of 
Hessett, in this county, resided here. He married, first, Elizabeth, 
daughter of - - Cotton, of Great Barton, in the same county, by 
whom he had an only daughter, Elizabeth ; and secondly, Mary, 
only daughter and heiress of Sir George Blenerhaysett, of Erense, 
in Norfolk, Knt., and widow of Thomas Culpeper, Esq., by whom 
he had no issue. He died in 1580, and was buried in this parish 
church ; where figures in brass, of himself and his two wives,* with 
an inscription to his memory, still remains. Mary his wife, sur- 
vived until 1587, and was buried at Frense. 

The manor of Pestries, or Over Pestries, is now vested in Mrs. 
North, of Glemham. 

The family of Wyard were long resident here, but became extinct 
in or about 17CO. 

In 1413, this church was impropriated to the Austin Nuns, of 
Campsey; the advowson of the vicarage is now in the Crown; 
but the rectorial tithes of this parish, with the hamlet of Bing, and 
those of Wickham-Market, became in 1718, vested in trustees, by 
the will of Mr. John Pemberton, Portman of Ipswich, who be- 
queathed them for charitable uses ; namely, an annuity to poor 
* Etchings of these are given in " Cot man's Suffolk Brasses." 



HUNDRED OF WILLFORD. 155 

widows and orphans of clergymen, and the residue to the charity- 
schools of Grey- Coat Boys and Blue- Coat Girls, in Ipswich. 

The tithes above mentioned lately let at upwards of 455 per 
annum ; which sum, after deducting 50 for the above institution, 
is paid to the treasurer of the said charity. 

CHARITIES. The town estate comprises a house used as a work- 
house, and about 1 7 acres of copyhold land, which are let at a rent 
of 25 15s. a year. It is unknown upon what particular trust the 
lands were first surrendered to trustees, but the rents are applied 
conformably to old usage, in lieu of, and for the same purposes as 
a church assessment. The sum of 5 a year was charged, by the 
will of John Jessup, in 1717, on land in this parish, now the pro- 
perty of Mr. Philip Dykes; to be laid out in bread, to be distributed 
every other Sunday among poor persons attending church. The 
trustees of Mill's charity, at Framlingham, in conformity with the 
directions of the donor, send 5s. worth of bread to be distributed 
among poor persons of this parish, at the church. 



KAMSHOLT, or EAMESHOLT. 

Kobert de Vaux gave all the churches and tithes of his demesne, 
to the Priory of the Virgin Mary, and St. Andrew, in Thetford ; 
amongst which Ehamdona (or Kamsholt) was included : Eeginald 
de Peyton was also a great benefactor to that Abbey. 

This Reginald was the first we find by the name of Peyton, and 
was second son of Walter, lord of Sibton, in this county; younger 
brother to William de Malet, a Norman Baron, lord of the honour 
of Eye, in Suffolk. 

In 1135, he held the lordship of Peyton Hall, in this parish, and 
Boxford, in this county, of Hugh de Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, and 
held the office of Sewer to that nobleman. This Reginald had two 
sons, William and John ; John had issue four sons, John the elder, 
Robert, Peter, and John the younger. 

Robert was Lord Justice of Ireland, in the reigns of King Henry 
III. and Edward I. ; and being lord of Ufford, assumed that sur- 
name.* Peter continued the name of Peyton, and the manor of 
Peyton Hall, in this parish ; and by that name the surviving 
* His descent will be given in the account of that parish. 



150 HUNDRED OF WILLFORD. 

branches of this family are still known ; but it appears that issue 
male failed in his line about the time of King Edward III., and was 
continued in that of his younger brother, John de Peyton, jun., who 
sold to John, his eldest brother, all his lands which he held in Box- 
ford, and Stoke by Neyland, which their father, John de Peyton, 
and William, their uncle, anciently possessed. In Eamsholt there 
still remains the ruins of a large old building, called Peyton Hall, 
particularly the gateway, on which are the arms of Peyton. It has 
since been the property of the Earls of Oxford, Lord St. John, and 
of the family of Waller, and now belongs to the heirs of the late 
Robert Trotman, Esq., of Ipswich. 

This ancient and illustrious house were honoured with the title 
of Baronets, at the first institution of that order ; Sir John Peyton, 
of Isleham, in Cambridgeshire, Knt., being so created May 22, 161 J . 
The present representative is Sir Henry Peyton, of Doddington, in 
the same county, Bart., who in the male line, is a branch of the 
Oxfordshire family of Dashwood ; but in the female, represents the 
old Baronets Peyton. 

ARMS. Peyton: sable; a cross engrailed, or. Crest: a griffin, 
sejeant, or. 

The church is remarkable for its tower, which is round, and sup- 
ported by three buttresses, which give it a singular appearance. 



SHOTTISHAM. SHOTTESHAM, SCOTESHAM, or SHATSHAM. 

The lordship of this parish was anciently vested in the Earls of 
Norfolk; the advowson in the Glanvilles; and from the year 1480, 
in the Wing-field family, and so continued for upwards of a century. 
It is now the property of Burwell Edwards, Esq., of Suttoii. 

CHARITIES. A cottage and an acre of land in this parish, are let 
at rents amounting together to ;6 10s. per annum ; which sum is 
applied, conformably to usage, to the reparation of the church. 
In 1708, Sarah Clarke, by her will, charged her lands in Pettistree 
and this parish, now the property of Thomas Waller, Esq., with the 
payment of 2 a year, to the churchwardens of Shottisham, to be 
at their discretion distributed to and amongst poor persons of the 
town of Shottisham. 



HUNDRED OF WILLFORD. 157 

BUTTON. SUTTUNA, or SUTHTUNA. 

The demesne of this parish was anciently held by Richard de 
Glanville; and in 1764', was the estate of Nicholas Bacon, and 
William Chapman, Esqrs. 

In the time of Queen Elizabeth, the manor of Fenhall, in this 
parish, was vested in the B unveil family, until the middle of the 
last century : it is now the property of B unveil Edwards, Esq., who 
resides in the manor house. The manors of Sutton Hall, Talvas, 
Stockerland, and Campsey, are vested in H. Walker, Esq. 

In the year 1390, the church was impropriated to Bruisyard 
Nunnery ; and at the dissolution, granted to Nicholas Hare, Esq., 
it subsequently passed to Sir John Rous, Bart., and is now the 
property of his representative, the Earl of Stradbroke. 

A seal appendant to a charter of Johanna de Stanvil, to Robert, 
son of Robert Saava, of lands in this parish, undated, but supposed 
to be temp. Edward I., is engraved in the Gentleman's Magazine 
for 1794, p. 425. 

CHARITIES. Sir Michael Stanhope, by deed dated the IGtli of 
King James I., granted to trustees, in fee, certain yearly rents, 
amounting in the whole to 48, out of the demesne lands of the 
manor of Valence, lying in Blaxhall, and four other parishes in 
this county, that the same should be yearly bestowed upon the poor 
people inhabiting within certain specified towns or parishes, in this 
county. The rent-charge particularly appropriated to the poor of 
this parish, is ,4 a year, from which 16s. is deducted for land tax. 
In 1687, Susannah Burrell surrendered her lands and heredita- 
ments, held of the manor of Staverton with Bromeswell, upon 
trust, that out of the profits thereof her trustees should pay to the 
churchwardens of this parish, 5 4s. a year to buy bread, and 
weekly distribute the same among the poor of the said parish. It 
appears by the parish terrier, that a Mr. Bloss, of Belstead, gave 
the sum of 1 a year to the vicar, for two sermons, to be preached 
on St. Thomas's day and Good Friday, yearly; and also 2s. 6d. to 
be given in bread, on each of those two days, to the poor of the 
parish; and that the said payments are made by Sir Robert Harland, 
Bart., of Wherstead Hall. 



158 HUNDRED OF WILLFORD. 

UFFORD, or UFFEWORDA, 

Is a parish of eminence, as giving name to the illustrious house of 
Ufford, Earls of Suffolk ; whose possessions in this county were 
very extensive, including the castles of Orford, Eye, Framlingham, 
Bungay, Mettingham, and Haughley. 

Their descent is derived from William, Lord Malet de Greville, a 
Norman Baron, who accompanied the Conqueror ; and whose de- 
scendants in their various hranches, have ever since enjoyed opu- 
lence, rank, and influence. 

Robert, second son of John, son of Reginald de Peyton, was 
Lord Chief Justice of Ireland in the time of King Henry HI., and 
Edward I., and being owner of this lordship, assumed the surname 
of his ancestors here. He was created K.B. in the 31st of the latter 
reign. Ralph de Ufford, his second son, was also Justice of Ireland 
in the 20th of the same King. 

Robert, eldest son of the above Robert de Ufford, by Cicely de 
Valoines, was created Earl of Suffolk in the llth of King Edward 
III., and made Knight of the Garter : and for his valiant exploits 
the King soon after rewarded him with the honour of Eye, formerly 
belonging to the Malets, his ancestors. In 1536, he served under 
Edward, the Black Prince, at the memorable battle near Poictiers, 
in France, where he and the Earl of Salisbury commanded the 
rereward ; and Dugdale observes, " he was seldom out of some 
eminent action, and was much employed by his Sovereign in im- 
portant affairs of state." 

William de Ufford, his eldest son, succeeded to his honour and 
estates : he died suddenly, whilst ascending the steps to the House 
of Lords, without surviving issue ; and his inheritance became divi- 
ded between the issue of his three sisters.* 

Thomas de Ufford, K.G., and John de Ufford, were brothers to 
the said Earl ; the latter was bred at Cambridge, and took the 
degree of LL.D. He was promoted to the Deanery of Lincoln, then 
to the Chancellorship of England., and lastly, to the Archbishoprick 
of Canterbury, in which he sat but six months and six days, being cut 
off by the plague before he received either his pall or consecration, 
June 7, 1348. Dying intestate, Andrew Ufford, Archdeacon of Mid- 
dlesex, took out letters of administration to his effects, as heir at law. 

* See Baudsey. 



HUNDRED OF WILLFORD. 159 

By thus discharging these great stations and offices with ability 
and eminence, they did credit to the Courts of those Sovereigns who 
employed them ; and executing the several offices in their respective 
counties, in successive reigns, with honour to themselves and ad- 
vantage to the community, they acquitted themselves as useful 
members of society. 

This manor was lately vested in the trustees of the late Jacob 
Whitbread, Esq., and now belongs to Gordon Whitbread, Esq. 

The Chapel of Sigenhoe, in this parish, mentioned by Kirby, was 
instituted into from 1310 to 1527, upon the presentation of the 
Uffbrds and Willoughbys ; and the manor of Sigenhoe is named, 
with that of Baudsey, &c., as part of their possessions, with that of 
Windervil. 

The church Mr. Weever describes, as the most neatly polished 
little church that he saw in the diocese ; and mentions memorials 
to the family of Lamb, who were benefactors to this church, also 
for those of Brookes and Willoughby. Several monuments have 
since been erected for members of the Wood family, of Loudham.* 

Ufford Place, formerly the seat of the Hammond family, became 
vested in Francis Brooke, Esq., of Woodbridge, by his marriage 
with Anne, only daughter and heiress of Samuel Thompson, Esq. 
He deceased in 1799, and this estate devolved upon his third and 
eldest surviving son, Charles Brooke, M.A., rector of this parish 
and Blaxhall. 

He married, in 1809, Charlotte, third daughter of the Rev. 
Francis Capper, late rector of Earl Soham and Monk Soham, in 
this county, and deceased in 1836. Mr. Brooke is succeeded in 
the family estates by his only son, Francis Capper Brooke, Esq. 
This family are of remote antiquity, and became early seated at 
Aspal, in Hartismere hundred. 

ARMS. Brooke : gules ; on a chevron, argent, a lion rampant, 
sable, crowned, or ; armed and langued of the first. 

CHARITIES. The town estate, which is appropriated to the ge- 
neral benefit of the inhabitants of this parish, consists of a double 
cottage, used as a poor house, and a cottage and about 4 1 acres of 
land in this parish and Melton, which are let at rents amounting 
together to 00 a year. These rents are applied to the reparation 
of the parish church, and in payment of other expenses incident to 

* In the " Gentleman's Magazine," for 1788, p. 702, is an engraving of a stone 
coffin in this parish church, with the pastoral staff surmounted with a cross dory. 



1GO HUNDRED OF WILLFORD. 

the churchwardens' office. The Right Rev. Thos. Wood,* Bishop 
of Lichfield and Coventry, in his life-time erected an hospital for 
ancient and indigent men and women, in this parish ; and by his 
will, dated in 1690, charged his manor of Barham, in this county, 
with the payment of 30 per annum, for the support of eight an- 
cient poor men in Ufford and Wickham-Market, to he equally divi- 
ded amongst them ; each to have a gown every two years, with the 
letters H.W. upon their shoulders : and he willed that the repairs 
of the hospital, and the charges of the gowns, should he provided 
out of the said lands. The hospital in this parish contains four 
apartments, which are occupied by four poor men, belonging to the 
same parish, appointed by the feoffees. The yearly sum of ;15, 
which is paid by Joseph Birch Smyth, of Ipswich, Esq., the owner 
of the manor of Barham, is received by the poor men in the hospital, 
and they are each supplied, at Mr. Smyth's expense, with a coat 
once every two years. The hospital is kept in repair by Mr. Smyth, 
and is at present in good condition. A piece of meadow land, con- 
taining 3A. 3n., called Smock Meadow, was given to this parish by 
a Mr, Sayer, but at what time is unknown, to the intent that out of 
the rent, sixty dozen of bread should be yearly bought, and distri- 
buted to the poor ; and that the remainder of the rents should be 
applied to provide smocks for the poor of the parish. The rent is 
8 a year, which is laid out partly in buying shifts for poor women, 
and the remainder is given in bread and money among poor people. 
A rent charge of 3 a year, issuing out of three meadows in this, 
parish, containing 3A., now the property of Mr. Chas. Gross. The 
annuity is laid out in bread, and distributed to the poor. The sum 
of 40s. a year is received from the tenant of a farm at Ufford, be- 
longing to the trustees of Mills's charity, at Framlingham, and is 
laid out in bread, and given to the poor. 



WICKHAM-MARKET, or WIKHAM. 
The nuns at Campsey were formerly possessed of this parish 

* This Prelate presided over the above diocese from 1671 to 1692, and was of 
Christ Church, Oxford. He was third son of Thomas Wood, of Hackney, in Mid 
dlesex, Esq., Clerk of the Pantry, and a younger brother of Sir Henry Wood, of 
Lou-dharo, in this county, Knt. 



HUNDRED OF WILLFORD. 161 

church, with the manors of Wickham, Gelham, Harpole, and Bing: 
these were previously vested in the Ufford family. The latter, at 
the dissolution of that house, were granted to Anthony Wingfield, 
Esq., and passed as their other family estates, to the Nassaus, Earls 
of Kochford; but the advowson of the vicarage remains in the 
Crown. 

The rectorial tithes of this parish, Pettistree, and Bing, are vested 
in trustees for charitable uses.* There is a stipend of 40 a year, 
or thereabouts, charged by Mr. Sayer on his estate in this parish, 
payable to the vicar, ' for reading prayers that part of the Sunday 
when there is no sermon : it was formerly paid by Mr. Leman, to 
whom Mr. Sayer devised this estate ; and since, by Mr. Eobt Rede, 
to whom the same had been granted by his aunt Leman, the daughter 
and heiress of the Leman family. 

Gelham Hall, in this parish, is now in the occupation of Mr. 
John Blake; Harpole (or Thorple), of Mr. William Thurlow, of 
Dalinghoo. 

CHARITIES. The town lands in this parish appear, by a recent 
survey, to contain 39A. 29p., of which about one acre, called the 
Chapel Meadow, is freehold, in the parish of Hacheston, and the 
remainder is of copyhold tenure, situate in the parish of Wickham. 
The specific uses for which the Chapel Meadow was held, do not 
appear ; but of the copyhold part of the Old Town Lands, one fifth 
was anciently surrendered in trust, for the reparation of the church, 
payment of the tax of Wickham, and the support of the poor of the 
town : the other four-fifths were anciently held for the good of the 
town of Wickham, that is to say (as expressed in the writings), 
" for apprenticing one poor boy, yearly, of the said town." The 
New Town Land was purchased for 320, or thereabouts, of which 
the sum of 300 was given by the will of Mrs. Ann Barker, in 1730, 
to be laid out in the purchase of houses or lands upon trust, that 
two-thirds of the profits thereof should be yearly applied towards 
the benefit of the poor, either in a workhouse or otherwise, and the 
remainder to be applied to the teaching poor children of the parish 
to read and write. The rents of this property amount together at 
present, to 131 12s. 6d. a year. The right Rev. Thomas Wood 
erected another hospital at Clapton, in the parish of Hackney, 
Middlesex, and for the endowment of the same charged his Barham 
estate, as mentioned in the foregoing parish of Ufford, for the sup- 

* Sec: l>p. 154, 155. 



162 HUNDRED OF WILLFOHD. 

port of four poor persons in this parish. In pursuance of a decree 
of the Court of Exchequer, the yearly sum of 21 is paid as a rent 
charge, out of the estate of Barham Hall: coats are supplied, as in 
the other bequest at Ufford, and the men are at liberty to continue 
to inhabit at Wickham. The trustees of Mills's charity, at Fram- 
lingham, send 5s. worth of bread every quarter, to be distributed 
among poor persons of this parish. 



PLOMEGATA, or PLUSMESGATA. 



Hundred contains twenty-four Parishes, and two Ham- 
lets : it is bounded, on the East, by the German Ocean ; on the 
South, by the Hundred of Willford ; on the West, by Loes; and 
on the North, by Hoxne and Bly thing. It has the following 
Towns and Villages: 

ALDBOROUGH, 

BENHALL, 

BLAXHALL, 

BRUISYARD, 

BUTLEY, 

CHILLESFORD, 

CRANSFORD, 

DUNNINGWORTH, 

FARNHAM, 



FRISTON, 
GEDGRAVE, 
GLEMHAM MAGNA, 
GLEMHAM PARVA, 



HASLEWOOD, 

IKEN, 

ORFORD, 

PARHAM, 

KENDHAM, 

SAXMUNDHAM, 

SNAPE, 

STERNFIELD, 

STRATFORD ST. ANDREW'S, 

SUDBOURN, 

SWEFFLING, 

TUN STALL, 

WANTISDEN. 



The fee of this Hundred, in the time of King Edward III., 
was in Robert de Uffbrd, Earl of Suffolk, and so continued until 
the death of his son, William de Uffbrd, in the 5th of Richard II., 
without issue male, when it passed to the De la Poles. 



HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 



ALDBOROUGH, or ALDEBURC. 

The following particulars concerning this place are collected from 
** Aldborough Described," published in 1819. 

Two hundred years ago, Aldborough was a place of considerable 
importance ; but repeated incroachments from the sea reduced it to 
the rank of a small and insignificant fishing town. During the last 
century, the ocean made great ravages ; and in the recollection of 
persons yet living, destroyed many houses, together with the market- 
place and the cross. 

Depopulated and impoverished by these encroachments, it was 
hastening to complete decay ; but within the last fifteen or twenty 
years, several families of distinction, wishing for a greater degree of 
privacy and retirement than can be enjoyed in a more fashionable 
watering place, have made this town their summer residence ; and 
in consequence of this auspicious event, its appearance has been 
totally changed. 

It does not appear from any ancient records, that Aldborough 
ever contained public buildings of extent or consequence ; nor has 
there at any time been discovered vestiges, which could convey an 
idea of ancient splendor or magnificence. 

The manor and advowson, many years after the grant made to 
Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, became by purchase, the property of Sir 
Henry Johnson, Knt., and by the marriage of his grand- daughter 
with Thomas Wentworh, 1st Earl of Strafford, were carried into 
that family. They are now vested in Fred. William Thos. Vernon 
Wentworth, Esq., of Wentworth Castle, in Yorkshire, by descent 
from his great-grandfather, Fred. Thomas, 3rd Earl of Strafford. 

The former importance of Aldborough induced several Monarchs 
to grant it extensive charters ; the first of which was given by King 
Edward VI., in the second year of his reign, tliis was confirmed by 
Philip and Mary, as well as by Queen Elizabeth. James L, in the 
fourth year of his reign, granted the borough greater indulgences, 
and gave it a new constitution. 



166 HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 

The interest in this borough was long vested in the Crespigny 
family, but was disposed of by them in 1818, to Samuel Walker, 
and Joshua Walker, Esqrs. It did not send representatives to Par- 
liament until the 13th of Queen Elizabeth ; a list of which, conti- 
nued from that by Kirby, to the period when this borough became 
disfranchised by Act of Parliament, in 1832, is subjoined.* 

ARMS. Town of Aldborough: on the sea, a ship under sail; 
on the main shroud, a lion rampant. 

Thomas Pye and John Mendham, of this town, convicted of 
holding heretical opinions, were sentenced to suffer open penance, 
or scourgings, about this parish church, before a solemn procession, 
six several Sundays ; and three whippings about the market-place 
of Harleston, three principal market days ; their necks, legs, and 
feet, bare ; both of them to carry a taper of a pound weight, round 
the church and market place, each time ; which tapers, when their 
penance was finished, to be humbly and devoutly offered upon the 
high altar of the parish church of Aldborough, at the offering of 
the high mass. 

The Eev. George Crabbe, LL.B., one of the most distinguished 
poets of his day, was a native of this borough, where his father held 
a situation in the customs. Bred up to the profession of physic, 
he for some years practised as a surgeon and apothecary, in this his 
native town ; but owing, as it is believed, to older practitioners 
being already established in the place, he did not succeed so well as 
a sanguine and well-informed young man had every reason to expect. 

Disgusted, at length, with a profession which afforded him so 
small a practice, and not a little out of humour with the scene of 
his first and unsuccessful attempt, he quitted Aldborough, and re- 
paired to the Metropolis ; where he arrived without having formed 
any particular plan, but where he hoped that the exertion of his 
talents would enable him to succeed. 

Here he commenced literary adventurer ; and had he foreseen all 
the sorrows and disappointments which awaited him in his new 
career, it is probable he would either have remained in his native 
place, or, if he had gone to London at all, engaged himself to beat 
the mortar in some dispensary. He, however, gave his whole mind 
to the pursuit by which he was then striving to live, and by which 
he, in due time, attained to competence and honour. 

Mr. Crabbe, during the whole of the time he spent in town, ex- 
* See p. 168. 



HUNDRED OF PLOMKSGATE. 167 

perienced nothing but disappointments and repulses, until his cir- 
cumstances became fearfully critical ; absolute want stared him in 
the face, a gaol seemed his only immediate refuge, when he resolved 
to make one effort more, and this proved eminently successful. 

He ventured to address a letter to that eminent statesman Ed- 
mund Burke, Esq., to which the Eight Hon. Gentleman gave in- 
stant attention, and immediately appointed an hour for Mr. Crabbe 
to call upon him : the short interview that ensued, entirely, and for 
ever, changed the nature of his worldly circumstances. He had 
afterwards many other friends, kind, liberal, and powerful, who as- 
sisted him in his professional career ; but it was one hand alone 
that rescued him when he was sinking, and through his friendly 
exertions our author became introduced to some of the first cha- 
racters of the age. 

Mr. Crabbe having been admitted to Deacon's orders, became 
licensed as curate to the Eev. Mr. Bennett, rector of Aldborough ; 
he immediately bade a grateful adieu to his illustrious patron, and 
came down to take up his residence once more in his native place. 
He afterwards attended the late Duke of Rutland, as Chaplain, 
when Viceroy of Ireland; and in 1789, Lord Thurlow presented 
him to the rectory of Muston, in Leicestershire, and of West Al- 
lington, in Lincolnshire; and in 1814, he was inducted to the living 
of Trowbridge, to which he was presented by the Duke of Kutland ; 
where he died, Feb. 3rd, 1832, in the 78th year of his age. 

CHARITIES. Slauden Quay Trust Estate. This property, which 
consists of a quay or wharf, with certain coal yards, saltings, and 
other premises, situate on the river Aid, is held of the manor of 
Aldborough, under the gift or grant, as supposed, of a former lord 
of the manor, of the family of the Earl of Strafford ; but there is 
no record of the donation now extant. The premises are vested in 
trustees, for the general use of the inhabitants. The revenues of 
the charity arise from' the tolls collected for loading and discharging 
barges on the quay, which are let at about 50 a year rent; and the 
income has been applied towards the support of a school, for the 
education of the children of the poorer classes, as far as circum- 
stances will permit. In a parish terrier mention is made of a piece 
of arable land, containing about one acre, the rent of which is dis- 
tributed among the poor. The yearly rent-charge of .11, is paid 
on land called the Town Marsh, and is applied in apprenticing 
poor children; to the minister for a sermon preached on Good 



HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 



Friday ; and the residue is given, in bread and money, to the poor, 
on the same day. 

Mem. August 24, 1809. A most beautiful and novel sight 
presented itself here : it consisted of upwards of 350 ships, many 
from the Baltic, and some from Flushing, with French prisoners 
and wounded men. They anchored off this place, within a short 
distance, and remained the greater part of the day. 

November 22, 1818. Anew organ was opened in this parish 
church, built by Mr. Bryceson, of Long- Acre, London. 



Kings Reign. A.D. 
George III. 1708 

1774 

1780 
1784 
1790 
1796 
1801 
1802 
1806 
1807 
1812 
1818 

George IV. 1820 
1826 

William IV. 1830 
1831 



Members for Aldborough. 
Z. P. Fonnereau. Nicholas Linwood. 
Thomas Fonnereau. 
Thomas Fonnereau. Eichard Combe. 
Martin Fonnereau. 

Martin Fonnereau. Philip Claude Crespigney 
Samuel Salt. Philip Claude Crespigney. 
George Lord Grey. Thomas Grenville. 
Sir John Aubrey, Bart. Mich. Ang. Taylor. 

Imp. Parl. George Johnstone. 
Sir John Aubrey, Bart. John M'Mahon. 
The same. 
The same. 

Lord Dufferin. Andrew Strahan. 
Joshua Walker. Samuel Walker. 
Joshua Walker. James Blair. 
Joshua Walker. John Wilson Croker. 
Marquis of Douro. John Wilson Croker. 
The same. 



BENHALL, or BENHALA. 

In the 5th of King Eichard II. (1381), William de Ufford, Earl 
of Suffolk, was found by inquisition, to have held the Manors of 
Benhall and Thorndon, as parcel of the honour of Eye ; which 
were escheated to the King, through the failure of male issue of 
the said Earl. 

In the Gth of King Henry VIII., the Countess of Suffolk held 



HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATK. 



tliis lordship; and Sir Eobert Southwell was found to hold of the 
said Countess, the manor of Upton, in Norfolk, as of her manor of 
Benhall, in Suffolk, valued at 1G per annum. 

The Dukes, of this parish, derive their descent from a family of 
that name, who were possessed of Brampton, in this county, ever 
since the Norman conquest, and who hecame allied in marriage 
with most of the leading families in tin's part of the kingdom. 

In the time of Queen Elizabeth, Edward Duke, Esq., purchased 
this estate from the Glemhams ; and Edward Duke, his grandson, 
the first Baronet of his house, built the seat called Benhall Lodge, 
in 1G3H. The alliances of that branch of the family who became 
seated here, will appear from the following 

PK 1)1 GREE. 

George Duke, of=Anne, clau. of Sir 



Brampton, Esq. 


Thos.Blennerhas- 
set, of Frenze, in 
Norfolk, Knt. 


-Elizabeth, daught. 
and co-heir of 
AugustinCurties , 

of Honington. 

i 

= Catherine, dau. of 
Richard Braham, 

of Wands worth. 

i 

=Elizabeth, dau. of 
Robert Talmach, 
of Helmingham, 

Esq. 

i 

T I 


Edward Duke, son = 
and heir, who 
purchased Ben- 
hall, died in 1598 


=Dorothy, daughter 
of Sir Ambrose 
Jermyn.of Rush- 
brook, Knt. 

j 

=Elizabeth, daug. & 
co-heir to Barth. 

Calthorpe, Esq. 

i 

=Ellen, d. & co-heir 
of John Panton, 
of Brunslip, co. 
Denbigh, Esq.* 

Sir John Duke, r 
Bart. M.P. for 
Orford in 1640. 


I 
George Duke, 2nd- 

son, of Honiog- 
ton, in this co. 


I 
Ambrose Duke, Esq- 

son & heir, died 
1610. 


George Duke, of- 
Wandsworth. 


I 
Edward Duke, the r 

first Baronet. 

T 


Edw. Duke, M.D.= 
of Middlesex, 
3rd son. 


T 
=Elizabeth, daught. 

and co-heir of 
Edw. Duke.M.D 

t T. 



Sir Edward Duke,=Mary, d. and sole 
Bart, only son, heir of Thomas 
succeeded 1705. Rudge, co. Staf- 
ford, Esq., died 
without issue, 
25th Aug. 1732! 
when the Baro- 
netcy became ex- 
tinct- 



1st. 2nd. 3rd. 4th. 

Elizabeth Jane, m. Anne, m. Arabella, 



d. young 



John 
Brame, 

of 

Campsey 
Ash. 



Thomas m.Mau- 

Tyrell,of riceShel- 

Gipping ton, of 

Esq. Barning- 

| ham, Esq. 



Edmund 

Tyrell, of 

Gipping, 

Esq. 



Thomas 
Bokenham 
Tyrell, of 
Belstead.Esq 



* Blomcficld makes Sir Edward Duke, 1st Bart., to have married Catherine, 



170 HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 

Sir Edward Duke, Bart., died without issue, and this estate 
passed to his nephew, Edmund Tyrell, of Gipping, in this county, 
Esq., who sold it to his brother, Thomas Bokenham Tyrell, of 
Belstead, near Ipswich, Esq. ; who sold it to John Rush, Esq. : 
from him it passed, in 1767, to Samuel Rush, Esq., his only brother 
and heir; who deceased about 1784, and devised it to his nephew, 
Sir William Beaumaris Rush, Knt. In 1790, he sold it to his 
cousin, George Rush, Esq., and of him (it was purchased, in 1801, 
by the late Admiral Sir Hyde Parker, Knt., who made it his residence. 

He was second son of Admiral Sir Hyde Parker, Bart., who was 
lost in the " Cato," in 1782, and brother to the late Sir Harry 
Parker, Bart., of Long Melford, in this county. Sir Hyde was 
Knighted for his gallant services in the American war ; and died 
at his house, Great Cumberland Place, London, March 16, 1807, 
aged 67 years. 

Edward Holland, Esq., was the next proprietor, who pulled down 
the former house, and built the present.* He served the office of 
High Sheriff for this county, in 1814, and Nov. 25th, in that year, 
his seat here was the scene of gay festivity : upwards of 200 of the 
nobility and gentry were present at a splendid fete, given by that 
gentleman ; which, in point of magnificence and effect, surpassed 
any thing of the kind ever offered in this neighbourhood. 

This estate, comprising the mansion, park, with farms, containing 
1644 acres; with the manor of Benhall, the advowson of the vica- 
rage, and the impropriation of the parish, with the great or corn 
tithes thereof, were brought to the hammer, May 19, 1830, and 
knocked down at 78,000 guineas. It now belongs to the Rev. Edm. 
Holland, of Grosvenor Place, London. 

ARMS. Duke: azure; a chevron between three sterns close, 
argent, beaked and membered, gules. Parker: sable; a buck's 
head, cabossed, between two flaunches, argent. 

Writhington White, vicar of this parish, was appointed Archdeacon 
of Norfolk, October 28th, 1629. The present vicar is the Rev. John 
Mitford, the editor of Gray ; whose tasteful residence, the parsonage 

daughter of Sir Thomas Holland, of Wortwell, Knt. He probably had two wires, 
as Wotton says he had twenty-nine children, none of whom survived, except Sir 
John, his successor. 

* A view of this appears in " Davy's Seats of the Noblemen and Gentlemen in 
Suffolk ;" and in his " Suffolk Antiquities," an etching of the south entrance to this 
parish church is given, as a good specimen of the Norman style of architecture. 



HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 171 

here, contains one of the best libraries in the county, particularly 
rich in the department of old English poetry. 

In 1806, Mr. J. S. Wade, of this parish, received at the anniver- 
sary meeting of the Society of Arts, a gold medal, for planting 
onions ; and the following year he received another from the same 
society, for having planted 15 acres of osiers, between Oct. 1804, 
and May J805, 12,000 sets per acre. In November following they 
were ready for basket-making. 

CHARITIES. In 1731, Sir Edward Duke, by will, desired 1000 
to be settled by his executors, for or towards the maintenance of a 
person able to be a schoolmaster ; who should, at the town of Ben- 
hall, teach the several poor children belonging to the same parish, 
to read and write, without any reward other than the profits to arise 
from the said J61000. Part of this legacy was laid out in purchasing 
and building a school premises ; and the residue was expended in 
the purchase of stock, Old South Sea Annuities, the dividends of 
which are paid to the schoolmaster. The sum of 5 a year is paid 
to the schoolmaster here, for teaching four children of Saxmundham, 
agreeably to the bequest of William Corbold, in 1746. 



BLAXHALL. BLACTHESHALA, or BLAKESALE. 

In the 9th of King Edward I., this was the lordship and estate 
of Kichard de Weyland : and in the 23rd of King Edward III., 
Bartholomew de Berghersh obtained a charter of free warren to 
himself and Cicely his wife, and their heirs, in all his demesne 
lands in this parish. He deceased in the 43rd of that reign, seized 
thereof; leaving issue an only daughter and heiress, Elizabeth, who 
married Edward Le Despencer, and he inherited this manor and 
estate in her right. 

Anne, their daughter, married, first, Sir Hugh Hastings, of El- 
sing and Gressenhall, in Norfolk, Knt.; and secondly, Thomas, 
Lord Morley. He deceased in the 4th of Henry V. ; she survived 
until 1426, and died seized of this manor, and Clopton, in Suffolk: 
it soon after became vested in the Glemham family. 

In 1764, it was the property of Dudley North, of Glemham, Esq., 
by purchase from John Bence, Esq., who bought it of Warryn, 
Esq. 



172 IIUNDllED OF PLOMESGATE. 

Weever, in las "Ancient Funeral Monuments," has the following 
from this parish church : " John Glemham, esquyer, Anne and 
Elenor, his wyves, the which John dyed in anno 1400. Anne 
in anno 1400, and lady Elenor 1404." Some mistake in these 
dates, or they could not both have heen the wives of this John 
Glemham. 

William Bulleyn, of a respectable family of the same name in 
this county, was born in the Isle of Ely, in the early part of the 
reign of King Henry VIII. At a proper age he was sent to Cam- 
bridge, which he quitted probably alter taking his Bachelor's degree, 
and went to Oxford, where he applied himself to the study of me- 
dicine, and read the Greek and Arabian writers, in both which 
languages he appears to have been tolerably skilled. 

While resident there he made excursions through the neighbouring 
counties, paying great attention to the plants that he had found re- 
commended in the cure of diseases ; and after taking the degree of 
Doctor, he extended his excursions, travelling over the greater part 
of England and Scotland. He afterwards visited the Continent with 
the same view : on his return he was made rector of Blaxhall, 
through the interest probably of his family, and practised medicine 
there. 

There are two portraits of him, both cut in wood : the one a 
profile, with a long beard, published with his " Government of 
Health," an 8vo. volume, 1548; the other a whole length, to his 
" Bullein's Bulwork of Defence against all sickness, soarness, and 
wounds that do dayly assault mankind;" folio, 1562. His last 
work is entitled, "A Dialogue, both pleasante and pietifull; wherein 
is a goodlie Regimen against the Fever Pestilence ; with a Conso- 
lation and Comfort against Death;" 8vo., 1564. He died, Janu- 
ary 7, 1576. 

CHARITIES. Thomas Garthwaite, and Elizabeth his wife, gave 
a messuage in Woodbridge, called the Eed Cross, the rents thereof, 
after necessary repairs, to be employed for the clothing of poor men, 
women, and children of this parish ; but so as not to lessen or abate 
any sums of money which ought to be assessed and collected for the 
necessary relief of the poor. This property lets for about 18 per 
year, and is laid out in clothing, which is given to poor families of 
the parish. 



HUNDRED OB' PI.O.MESGATE. 



BRUISYARD. BURESIART, or BURISYERDE. 

The College here was originally established at Campsey-Ash, but 
was removed hither by Maud, Countess of Ulster, in 1354; and the 
priests had in the manor place here, a common refectory, dormitory, 
and a chapel dedicated to the annunciation of the Virgin Mary. At 
the instance of Lionel, Duke of Clarence, this college was surren- 
dered to the use of an Abbess and sisters, nuns minoresses of the 
order of St. Clare, in 1366; and so continued, until its dissolution. 

Pope Urban V., about 1364, permitted Maud de Lancaster, to 
enter the order of St. Clare, and to leave the order of St. Austin 
nuns, wherein she had made her profession, at Campsey, after the 
death of her husband. This lady is considered the foundress of this 
nunnery, but by some authorities, Lionel, Duke of Clarence, is 
styled the founder. 

In " Liber Valorum," 1534, gross value, 78 2s.; and to thia 
house were appropriated the churches of Bruisyard, Sutton, Bui- 
mere, Burgh, Rendlesham, and Bewenhall : the manors of Wrabnes, 
of Hargham, Winston, South Repp, Rokehall, Stanford, Holbrook, 
Tatingstone, Wilton, and Benge. 

The site, called Rokehall, with the manor, and patronage of the 
vicarage, is now vested in the Earl of Stradbroke. 

Sir Nicholas Hare, Knt., the grantee, was Master of Requests 
to King Henry VIII., and King Edward VI. ; Chief Justice of 
Chester in the 32nd of the former King ; and Master of the Rolls, 
and of the Privy Council, to Queeu Mary; Lord Keeper of the 
Great Seal, and was twice chosen Speaker of the House of Com- 
mons. He raised the greater part of the estate the family now 
possess. By Catherine, daughter and co-heir of John Bassingbome, 
of Woodhall, in Hertfordshire, Esq., he left issue four sons, who 
all died without issue male, and the principal part of his estate 
devolved upon Sir Ralph Hare, grandson of his brother John. Sir 
Nicholas died in 1557, seized of this Abbey. 

Anne, his daughter, married Thomas Rous, Esq., of Henhani 
Hall, ancestor of the present noble proprietor, who probably inhe- 
rits tliis estate in right of that marriage. 

The Rev. Matthew Scrivener, formerly of Catherine Hall, Cam- 
bridge; made an augmentation of '6 13s. 4d. to this curacy, and 
laid it as a rent charge upon an estate in this parish, to be paid 



174 HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE.. 

annually to the curate, for ever. Mr. Scrivener was minister of 
Haslingfield, about five miles south of Cambridge. 



BUXLEY. BUTTELEE, BUTELAI, Or BUTHELE. 

This parish is situate in two hundreds, the church being in that 
of Loes, but the abbey in this : concerning which we collect the 
following particulars : 

The priory and church were both dedicated to the blessed Virgin 
Mary ; here were also the chapels of St. Anne, St. Peter, and St. 
Paul, All Saints, and St. Sigismund. It was of the order of St. 
Augustine, or Black Canons ; and founded in the reign of King- 
Henry II., in 1171, by Ranulph (or Randal) de Glanville, Lord 
Chief Justice of England, and founder of Leiston Abbey, in this 
county. 

By Bertha his wife, the daughter of Theobald de Valoins, Lord 
of Parham, he held the lands called Brockhouse, on which the 
Priory was afterwards built, in frank marriage. On his removal 
from office, he joined the Crusades, and was with King Richard I. 
at the siege of Acre, having previously divided all his lands between 
his tliree daughters. 

The following table shows the descendants of the founder, who 
were benefactors and patrons of this Priory : 

Ranulph de Glanville=Bertha, d. of Theob. de Valoi0s. 

I I I 

Matilda=Wm. de Auberville. Amabilla=Ralph de Ardern. Helwisa=R. FitzRobert 

I T I L I L I I 

Hugh. William. Johanna=NicholasKyriel,Knt. Thos.de Ardern. Ralph. Robert. 



Nicholas Kyriel=Margaret, dau. of Galfridus Peche. 

In the 20th of King Henry III., William de ^Auberville, who 
married Matilda, eldest daughter and co -heiress of the founder, 
gave the advowsons of the following churches in this county, to 
Adam, Prior here: namely, Aspal, Wattisden, Capel, Benhall, 
Baudsey, and Finborough ; with the moiety of the church of Little 
Glemham, with lands in Butley and Stratford, by fine. 

The church of West Somerton, in Norfolk, was appropriated to 



HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 175 

this Priory, by John, of Oxford, Bishop of Oxford, and confirmed 
by the said William de Auberville, who gave the advowson to it : 
and in the 50th of the same reign, the lady Cassandra Baynard 
granted, by fine, to Walter, Prior here, a messuage with twelve 
acres of land, and the advowson of the church of Chatgrave, in 
Norfolk. 

It was also enriched by the contributions of various noble and 
pious persons ; besides great possessions in this county and Norfolk, 
it had interest in, or the patronage of, eleven churches in the latter 
county, twenty-three or more churches and chapels appropriated in 
Suffolk, one in Lincolnshire, two in Essex, and one in London ; 
fourteen or more manors, two rabbit warrens, and a mill at Cliil- 
lesford. 

According to the foundation deed, the appropriated rectory of 
West Somerton, in Norfolk, was charged with the annual sum of 
10, to pay and to find food for two canons, in this monastery, who 
should celebrate divine worship for the souls of the founder, and 
his father and mother, and also of all the faithful deceased. 

There was also a distribution of alms at this monastery, to a 
certain class of poor people, to the annual amount of 7 12s. Id. 

Valuations. Tax Eccles., 1291 : Suffolk, in sixty-one parishes, 
,89 5s. l^d. ; Norfolk, in six parishes, 4 19s. lO^d.; diocese of 
Lincoln, 5 12s. Od.: 99 17s. Od. Valor Ecclesiasticus, 1534: 
Clear value, 318 17s. 2^-d. 

ARMS the same as Glanville, the founder : or ; a chief indented, 
azure ; over all, in bend, a crosier ; the staff, gules ; the crook, of 
the first. 

In 1540, Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, had the grant of this Priory, 
and in 1544, William Forthe, of Hadleigh, Esq., purchased the 
same : it continued HI his descendants, until the decease of William 
Forthe, Esq., in or about 1643, when Anne, his only daughter and 
heir, inherited it. She married to Walter Devereux, Esq., the third 
son of Sir Walter Devereux, of Marlesford, Bart,, afterwards Vis- 
count Hereford. 

In 1660, he was a Burgess in Parliament for Orford, in this 
hundred: he died in 1683, and Elizabeth, their eldest daughter 
and co-heiress, inherited Butley Priory for her portion. She mar- 
ried John Clyatt, Gent., in 1684, and settled this estate upon him 
and his heirs : she died without issue. The said John Clyatt 
survived until 1691, and devised this estate to Samuel Clvatt and 



176 HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 

liis heirs, who deceased in 1693, and Frances Clyatt his widow, 
held a life interest in the same. 

In 1737, George Wright, Esq., who married the heiress of Clyatt, 
inherited this estate ; the gate-house of which monastery he fitted 
up, and converted into a handsome mansion, much of which was 
preserved nearly entire, and of which there are several illustrative 
views extant. The trustees of Lord Rendlesham are the present 
possessors, hy purchase from Lord Archibald Hamilton. 

The manor of Tangham, in Butley, was part of the possessions 
of Anne of Cleves, wife to King Henry VIII. 



CHILLESFORD. CESEFORTA, or CHESILFORD. 

In the 5th of King Richard II., William de Ufford, Earl of Suf- 
folk, died seized of a lordship in this parish. John Staverton gave 
to the Priory and Convent of Butley, a manor here ; which at the 
dissolution was granted to John, Earl of Warwick. The Marquess 
of Hertford is now lord of this manor. 

By virtue of the foundation deed of Ralph de Glanville, the 
founder of Butley Priory, certain alms were distributed to poor 
persons on seven festivals in the year, amounting to 8 16s. 8d. 
per annum, chargeable on some lands in this parish. A mill in 
this parish also belonged to the same Monastery. 

CHARITIES. The sum of 5 a year, appropriated to the poor of 
this parish, is paid, after a deduction of land tax, from Sir Michael 
Stanhope's charity (see Button), and distributed among poor 
persons. 



CRANSFORD, or CRANESFORDA. 

The lordship of Visdelieu, in this parish, was anciently held by 
Thomas Visdelieu ; and in the time of King Richard II., Robert 
de Rendlesham paid Castle-guard-rent to Framlingham Castle, for 
the said manor. In the llth of King Henry VI., Theophilus 
Shardclow did the same ; and in the 28th of King Henry VIII., 
Thomas Rons; in 1588, the 30th of Queen Elizabeth, Thomas 



HUNDRED OF 1'LOMESGATE. 177 

Riekthorn ; and Francis Warner, Gent., in the Oth of Charles I., 
1081. It was reckoned at half a Knight's fee. 

The above Thomas Kous appears to have resided in this place, 
and married Margaret, daughter of Robert Kemp, of Gissing, in 
Norfolk, Esq., by Eli/abeth his first wife. 

The manor lately belonged to Moore, Esq. The church 
was appropriated to Sibton Abbey ; and at the dissolution of Mo- 
nasteries, was granted to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk. Visdelieu 
Hall was vested in the Rev. Dr. Kilderbee. 

Anne, daughter of Richard Gardiner, of this parish, Esq., married 
Roger Castell, jun. She died in 1697, aged 21 years, and was 
buried at Raveningham, in Norfolk. 

" In this parish, about a mile and an half up the Saxmundhani 
road, is a spot which has always been called ' bloody Queen Mary's 
lane,' at the entrance to which there is a pack-gate still kept up, 
though not used, to denote the spot. The tradition is, that she 
used to walk there ; but -for the few days she remained in Fram- 
lingham this is not to be credited ; the greater probability is, that 
on leaving the castle, she proceeded in this direction, with her train 
of adherents, and men at arms, for the Metropolis. Another opinion 
has been advanced, that it was a road expressly formed to facilitate 
her escape eastward, towards the sea, in the event of her flight from 
the castle becoming necessary: this might not be improbable. "- 
Greens Framlint/ham, p. 80. 



DUNNING WORTH, or DUNIWORDA. 

The author of " Magna Britannia" states, that this was the lord- 
ship and estate of Thomas de Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk, and that 
he died seized thereof in the 12th of King Edward III., leaving 
Mary, his second wife, daughter of William, Lord Roos, surviving ; 
and that the same was assigned as part of her dowry : after whose 
decease it passed to his daughter Alice, who married to Edward 
Montacute ; by whose daughter and heir Joan, it came by marriage 
to William de UfFord, Earl of Suffolk. The manor is now vested 
in Mrs. GifTord, of Dinton, near Aylesbury. 

The advowson appears to have been attached to the manor; the 



178 HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 

church has heen long in ruins, and the parish reckoned a hamlet 
of Tunstall. The estate was latterly vested in the Woods, of Loud- 
ham ; from whom it passed to the Chapman family ; and now be- 
longs to the Sheppards, of Campsey-Ash. 

In 1509, Thomas Seman, B.D., rector of this parish, was Com- 
missary of Suffolk Archdeaconry. 



FARNHAM. 

In the reign of King Henry I., Sir Robert de Saukville (or 
Sackville), ancestor of the Earls of Dorset and Middlesex, held 
this lordship of the honour of Eye; but in the 9th of King Edw. I., 
William de Claydon held the same. 

It was purchased, with the Glemham estate, by Dudley North, 
Esq.; and in 1764, it belonged to his son, Dudley North, Esq., 
and has since passed with the Little Glemham property. 

The advowson was in Butley Priory, by the gift of Ralph Glan- 
ville, the founder. The impropriation was granted, in the 19th of 
Queen Elizabeth, to Edward Grimston, and has since belonged to 
the North and Long families. 



FRISTON. 

The lordship and advowson of this parish were vested in the 
Prior and Convent of Snape ; and since purchased by Sir Henry 
Johnson, Knt., who built Friston Hall, and resided there. It af- 
terwards passed to Thomas Wentworth, Earl of Stratford, who 
married Anne, daughter and heiress of the said Sir H. Johnson ; 
and continued in that house until the death of Frederick Thomas 
Wentworth, 3rd Earl of Strafford, in 1799, when the Earldom 
became extinct. It has since been vested in the house of Howard, 
of Stoke Poges, in Buckinghamshire. 

The Bacons, of this parish, were a distinguished branch of the 
great house of Bacon, and derived in lineal descent, from James 
Bacon, Alderman and Sheriff of London; third son of RobertBacon, 
of Drinkstone, in this county, and Isabel his wife, daughter of John 



HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 170 

Cage, of Pakonhoin, in the some county; and younger brother of 
Sir Nicholas Bacon, the Lord Keeper. He deceased in 1573. 

Sir James Bacon, Knt., of Friston, was eldest son of the above 
James Bacon, Esq. Ho married the daughter and heiress of 
Francis Bacon, Esq. (a younger son of Bacon, of Hessctt) ; and 
was succeeded by his son, Nathaniel Bacon, Esq., of this parish ; 
who married Anne, daughter of Sir Thomas le Gross, Knt., of 
Sloley, in Norfolk, by Elizabeth his wife, daughter of Sir Charles 
Cornwallis, of Broomo, in this county. 

Mr. Bacon left issue two daughters, namely, Elizabeth, married 
to Nathaniel, second son of Sir Nathaniel Bamardiston, Knt., and 
Anne, who died unmarried; also a son and successor, Thomas 
Bacon, Esq., who married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Kobert Brook, 
of Yoxford, in this county. 

He was succeeded by his son, Nathaniel Bacon, Esq., of Friston; 
who left at his decease, an only daughter and heiress, Mary Bacon, 
who married Hugh Chamberlen,* Esq., M.D., of Alderton, and 
Hinton Hall, in Suffolk ; and left three daughters and co-heirs. 

CHARITIES. In 1802, the Kev. John Lambert bequeathed to this 
parish 200 ; the interest thereof to be distributed, at Christmas, to 
poor housekeepers, that do not receive pay of the parish. This is 
invested in stock, 3 per cent, consols; and the dividends distributed 
in equal sums, as directed. 



GEDGRAVE. 

According to the foundation deed of Ealpli de Glanville, the 
founder of Butley Priory, twenty shillings each per annum, were 
assigned to two persons serving God in the appropriated church of 
Gedgravc, in this county. 

By this it appears the same was granted by the said Ralph to his 
Priory at Butley, with the lordship of this parish; which were 
granted and passed as that Monastery, through the Forthe, Clyatt, 
and Wright families ; and at length became, by purchase, the property 
of the Marquess of Hertford : it still remains in that noble house. 



' Dr. Charaberlea was a physician of London, of great eminence about the 
Court, as Physician to Queen Anue. 



180 HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 

GLEMHAM MAGNA. GLIEMHAM, or NORTH GLEMHAM. 

The tithes of this parish, and Stratford, were granted by Ralph 
Fitz Walter, and Maud his wife, to Thetford Abbey, in the time of 
King Henry I.; and in 1324, the priors and convents, manors, 
and churches, of North Glemham, Dersham, and Jokesford (or 
Yoxford), were seized upon by the King, as belonging to an alien 
Monastery. 

The ancient family of Edgar resided in this parish for some cen- 
turies, according to an ancient pedigree in the possession of the 
Kev. Mileson Gery Edgar, of the Eed House, Ipswich. The first 
mentioned is John, the son of John Edgar, of Dunwich, Esq., who 
lived at North Glemham Hall, in 1273; from whom sprang the 
different branches residing at Brantham, Combes, and Eye. 

In the parish register their names occur among the births, mar- 
riages, and deaths, from 1559 to 1699; the first was William Edgar, 
Esq., who was buried in the church, Sept. 3, 1559; and the last is 
of Elizabeth, relict of Sir Lionel Playters, Bart., who was mother of 
Elizabeth, the wife of Thomas Edgar, Esq. ; she was buried in the 
family vault, July 24, 1099. 

In 1621, Robert Buxton, of Tibenham, in Norfolk, Gent., died 
seized of a lordship in this parish, leaving Robert, his son and heir, 
nineteen years of age. The Hon. Nicholas Herbert, youngest son 
of Thomas, the 8th Earl of Pembroke, who married Anne, eldest 
sister and co-heiress of Dudley North, of Little Glemham, Esq., 
possessed the estates late the inheritance of the Edgar family, in 
this parish. He died in 1775. 

In 1237, Ralph de Blumville, Archdeacon of Norfolk, and rector 
of Thomham, in that county, a near relation, if not brother, to the 
Bishop of that name, had two carucates of land in Glemham, set- 
tled on him for life, by Stephen, Prior of Thetford ; and the year 
before, on a suit brought against him for Thornham church, he 
pleaded that he held it of the gift of Thomas de Blumville, Bishop 
of Norwich. 

The manor passed from the North family to that of Long, of 
Hurt's Hall, in Saxmundham ; but Glemham House is now the 
property of John Moseley, Esq., who resides there; and whose fa- 
mily will be noticed in the parish of Ousden, in Risbridge hundred. 
CHARITIES. The parish estate here consists of about 22 acres of 



HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 181 

land ; let for .25 a year. The rents are applied, in the first in- 
stance, to the repairs of the church : the surplus, not so required, 
used to be distributed among the poor, but of late years it has been 
appropriated to the discharge of a debt, incurred in the erection of 
a workhouse. 



GLEMHAM PARVA. 

In the 9th of King Edward I., this was the lordship and inheri- 
tance of Sir William de Kerdeston ; and subsequently the estate of 
Bartholomew, Lord Bergherst, who, in the 23rd of King Edw. III., 
obtained a grant of free warren in the same, to himself, and Cecily 
his wife. 

This parish gave name to a family that were seated here, and so 
continued till the middle of the seventeenth century; when two 
members of the same raised themselves to great eminence in their 
respective professions, as mentioned byKirby; namely., Sir Thomas 
Glemham, who defended Carlisle for King Charles I., and his bro- 
ther, Henry Glemham, D.D., afterwards Bishop of St. Asaph; both 
great sufferers in the Royal cause. Sir Thomas died in Holland, in 
1649; Dr. Henry, in 1069. Both were interred in this parish 
church. 

The earliest member of this family noticed is Sir John Glemham, 
of this parish, Knt., who married Elizabeth, daughter and co-heiress 
of John Bacon, of Baconsthorp, in Norfolk, Esq. He died in the 
29th of King Henry VIII. Christopher, their son and heir, suc- 
ceeded, and married Margery, daughter of Sir Richard Wentworth, 
of Nettlestead, in this county. He died the 4th of King Edw. VI., 
leaving Thomas, his son and heir, a minor, aged 16 years. This 
Thomas married Amy, daughter of Sir Henry Parker. 

Sir Henry Glemham appears to have succeeded, and was probably 
son of the above Thomas Glemham, and Amy his wife. He married 
Anne, daughter of Thomas Sackville, Earl of Dorset, by whom he 
had Sir Thomas, and Dr. Henry Glemham, Bishop of St. Asaph, 
above-named. 

Sir Thomas left a son Thomas, who married Elizabeth, eldest 
daughter of Sir John Knevet, of Ashwell-Thorp, in Norfolk, K.B., 
by Mary his wife, daughter of Sir Thomas Bedingfield, of Darsham, 



182 HUNDRED OF TLOMESGATE. 

in 'this county, Knt., who (Mr. Kirhy says) died seized of this estate. 
They had an only child, Thomas, who survived his parents, and was 
Captain of a company of Dragoons, under Brigadier Pepper, in 
Spain, in the service of Queen Anne. He died, unmarried, about 
1711, at Valladolid; where he was huried. 

In him the family failed of male issue ; this estate had, however, 
some years previous to his decease, passed to the North family, by 
purchase. The first possessor of this lordship being Sir Dudley 
North, Knt., third son of Dudley, the fourth Lord North, of Kirt- 
ling, in Cambridgeshire, by Anne, the daughter and co-heir of Sir 
Charles Montague, Knt. 

He was born in London, in 1641, and pursued for many years 
the highly honourable occupation of an English merchant. He 
resided for a long time in Turkey, where he realised a considerable 
fortune, and was treasurer to the Levant Company there. On his 
return to his native country, he became memorable for his city 
contests, and in 1682, was elected one of the Sheriffs of London; 
and was afterwards appointed a Commissioner of the Customs, and 
subsequently, a Commissioner of the Treasury. 

Sir Dudley deceased in 1691. By Anne his wife, daughter of 
Sir Eobert Cann, of the city of Bristol, Bart., and the relict of Sir 
Eobert Gunning, of Cold Ashton, near that city, he had issue two 
sons, namely, Dudley and Eoger. 

Dudley North, Esq., the eldest son, was born in 1684, and re- 
presented the borough of Orford in 1722. Pie married Catherine, 
the daughter and co-heir of Elilm Yale, Esq., a native American, 
who went out as an adventurer to the East Indies, and obtained the 
Presidency of Madras. By this lady he had several children, who 
died in their infancy ; and one son, Dudley, and two daughters, 
Anne and Mary, who survived him. He died in 1729. 

Dudley North, Esq., was bom in 1706 ; and in 1730, married 
Lady Barbara, the only daughter of Thomas Herbert, Earl of Pem- 
broke, by his second wife. She died, without issue, in 1755 ; her 
husband, in 1 764 ; and bequeathed, by his last will, after his legacies 
and donations to charitable uses, which were very considerable, were 
discharged, the remainder of his fortune, real and personal, to his 
two sisters, Anne and Mary. The former married to the Hon. 
Nicholas Herbert, youngest son of Thomas, Earl of Pembroke; the 
latter to Charles Long, of Saxmundham, in this county, Esq. 

Mr. Herbert inherited this estate. He represented Newport and 



HUNDRED OF 1'LOMESGATE. 183 

Wilton in many Parliaments, and was a member for the latter place 
ut the time of his death, \vhich took place in 1775. He was also 
Secretary of the Island of Jamaica. He had issue one son, Elihu, 
who died in his infancy; and two daughters, namely, Ann, who 
died unmarried, in 1751, and Barbara, who married Edward 
Stratford, the second Earl of Aldborough, by whom she had no 
issue. 

The Countess deceased in 1785: her mother survived till 1789, 
and bequeathed this estate to her nephew, Dudley Long, requesting 
him to take and use the surname and arms of North.* 

All the foregoing members of the house of North are interred in 
the family vault of this parish church, in the chancel of which re- 
mains inscriptions to their memory. 



HASLEWOOD. 

The demesne of this place was anciently in Clemence Titlershall, 
according to " Magna Britannia:" it is now considered a hamlet of 
Aldborough, as the church has been long in ruins. 



IKEN. 

In the 38th of Queen Elizabeth, Sir Anthony Wingfield held tin's 
lordship at one Knight's fee ; and in the 15th of Bang Charles I., 
1G39, Sir Richard Wingfield, Bait., held the same. It is now vested 
in the Marquess of Hertford. 

CHARITIES. The town estate consisted of a building used as a 
parish workhouse, and sundry parcels of copyhold land, dispersed in 
different parts of the parish, containing about 29 acres in the whole; 
but in 1814, an agreement was entered into by the then rector, 
parish officers, and principal inhabitants, with the Marquess of 
Hertford, that the premises should be surrendered to the use of the 
Marquess, and that he should grant a lease of the workhouse to the 
overseers of the poor, for 10,000 years, at a peppercorn rent; and 
grant a rent- charge of 36 a year to the overseers, out of certain 

* See Saxmundham. 



184 HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 

lands of the Marquesses, in this parish. The annuity of 36, is 
paid to the overseers, and applied with the poor's rates. 



ORFORD. 

This town and castle still continues the estate of the Marquess of 
Hertford, hut has ceased to send representatives to Parliament since 
1832; by an act to amend the representation of the people in Eng- 
land and Wales, passed in that year, whereby this borough became 
disfranchised. 

The Austin friars appear to have settled here about 1294, for in 
that year, Robert de Hewell gave them the ground whereupon to 
erect their convent ; and Mr. Taylor names the. following bene- 
factors : in 1313, John de Engayne; Walter de Hewell, in 1336; 
Richard Valence, and others, in 1350. Robert Lord was the 
grantee, in 1544. 

All that is known of St. Leonard's Hospital is, that in the time 
of King Edward II., A.D. 1320, such an institution existed here as 
an hospital and chapel for a master and brethren, and that it con- 
tinued till after the year 1586. 

It is said to have stood near the park, and the lands belonging to 
it are thought to be enclosed within the park, now the property of 
the Marquess of Hertford, from whence a yearly payment of 30, 
as a rent charge, is made to this town. (See charities.) 

Orford Castle stands a small distance west of the town. Neither 
the builder, nor the time of its construction, are positively ascer- 
tained ; but that it is of Norman origin seems evident, from its 
being coined, and in some places cased, with Caen stone. 

The spot whereon the castle stands was, it is said, formerly the 
centre of the town. This tradition has the appearance of being 
founded on truth, from the great quantity of old bricks, stones, and 
other remains of buildings, constantly turned up by the plough in 
the fields, west and south of that edifice : besides several of them 
retain the name of street, annexed to their denomination of field, 
such as West- street-field, and the like, all alluding to streets for- 
merly there situated ; and it is further confirmed by the charter of 
the corporation, and other authentic records. Certainly Orford was 
once a large and considerable trading town, till the sea, throwing 



HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 5 

up a dangerous bar at the harbour's mouth, it fell to decay. It is 
a -corporation and manor, although no parish, its church being only 
a chapel of ease to Sudborne. The style of the manor court is, 
" Sudborne cum capella de Or ford" 

Of the castle there remains at present only the keep ; its shape, 
a polygon of eighteen sides, described within a circle, whose radius 
is twenty-seven feet. This polygon is flanked by three square towers, 
placed at equal distances on the west, north-east, and south-east 
sides ; each tower measuring in front nearly twenty-two, and pro- 
jecting from the main building, twelve feet. They are embattled, 
and overlook the polygon, whose height is ninety feet, and the 
thickness of the walls, at bottom, twenty : at the lower part they 
are solid, but above are interspersed with galleries and small 
apartments.* 

In the year 1204, Hugh Bigod and John Fitz Robert were ap- 
pointed joint governors of this and Norwich Castle; and, upon 
their removal, in 1215, the command of both were given to Hubert 
de Burgh. In the 45th of King Henry III., the office of Governor 
of this Castle was conferred on Philip Marmion ; and three years 
afterwards, when the Barons had taken that King prisoner, at the 
battle of Lewes, they intrusted it to Hugh le Despencer. 

Sir William Dugdale says, that the descendants of Peter de Va- 
loins, who came over with the Conqueror, made the Castle of Orford 
the capital seat of their Barony ; which probably must have been 
in the time of Edward II. ; for the 4th of Edward III., Robert de 
Ufford, who married Cecilia, the daughter aud co-heir of Robert de 
Voloins, had a grant for life, of this town and castle. William de 
Ufford died seized of it, the 5th of Richard II., and it was port of 
the dowry of Isabel his wife. Upon her death, the 4th of Henry V., 
Robert, Lord Willoughby de Eresby, whose ancestor married Ceci- 
lia, daughter of Robert de Ufford, had livery of the town and castle. 
William, Lord Willoughby, died seized of the lordship of Orford, 
the 18th of King Henry VIII., and assigned it to his wife for life. 
It probably came afterwards, with the estate at Sudbourne, to Sir 
Michael Stanhope ; and descended, as that did, to the Right Hon. 
Pryce Devereux, Lord Viscount Hereford, of whose executors it 
was purchased, in 1754, by the Right Hon. the Earl of Hereford. 

* A south view of the ruins of the chancel of Orford church, i given in the 
" Gentleman's Magazine," for 1788, p. G6'7; and of the castle, in Mr. H. Davy's 
41 Architectural Antiquities of Suffolk," in two views. 



180 HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE, 

CHARITIES. The town estate consists of a workhouse, with a 
small garden, used for the reception and habitation of paupers, with 
a piece of ground near the same, let at 3 a year ; also another 
piece of ground, near the assembly room, let on a building lease, 
at the yearly rent of 40s. A piece, of marsh land, containing 
GA. IR. 20i>., adjoining Orford Quay, let at a yearly rent of 21 10s. ; 
also a rent charge, of the yearly sum of <30, paid by the Marquess 
of Hertford, in respect (as supposed) of land in his possession. 
The income derived from these sources is received by the overseers 
of the poor, and applied by them, with the funds raised by rate, for 
the general relief of the poor of the parish. There is also a pay- 
ment for poor persons of Orford, under Sir Michael Stanhope's 
charity, of 10 a year, which, subject to a deduction for land-tax, is 
distributed amontf them. 



A list of those burgesses who represented Orford in Parliament, 
from 1768 to 1832, is annexed: 
King s Reign. A. D. Members for Orford. 

George III. 1768 Francis Viscount Beauchamp. Edw. Coleman. 
Vise. Beauchamp. Hon. R. Seymour Conway. 
1774 The same. 
1780 The same. 

1 784 Viscount Beauchamp. Hon. Geo. Sey. Conway. 
1790 The same. Hon. Wm. Seymour Conway. 

Lord Robert Seymour. Hon. Robt. Stewart. 
1796 Lord H. Seymour. Francis, Earl of Yarmouth 

1801 Imperial Parliament. The same. 

1802 Lord Robert Seymour. James Trail. 

1806 Lord Robert Seymour. Lord Henry Moore. 

1807 The same. 

.1812 Right Hon. C. Arbuthnot. E. A. Macnaghtcn. 

1818 John Douglas. Edm. Alex. Macnaghten. 
George IV. 1820 Edm. Alex. Macnaghten. Charles Ross. 

1826 Sir Henry Fred. Cooke. Quintin Dick. 
William IV. 1830 The same. Spencer Horsey Kilderbee. 

1831 The same. 



ARMS. Town of Orford: a castle in an hulk, supported by 
two lions. Another coat is : a tower enclosed in a triple trench. 



HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 187 

PARHAM. 

Theobald, son of Robert Lord Valoins, founder of HickLing 
Priory, in Norfolk, in 1185,. endowed it with the churches of Par- 
ham and Hasketon, in this county. He was owner of the lordship 
of this parish, and a descendant of Peter de Valoins, a Baron, in the 
Conqueror's time. 

Cecily, the daughter of Robert de Valoins (a Baron in the reign 
of King Edward L, the chief seat of whose Barony was Orford 
Castle, in this county), and one of his co-heirs, married Sir Robert 
de Ufford, Steward of the Household to King Edward II., and in- 
herited this estate in right of such marriage. 

It continued in the house of Ufford until the decease of Wm. 
de Uflbrd, Earl of Suffolk, in the 5th of King Richard II., when it 
descended to the issue of Cicely, his eldest sister, who married John, 
3rd Lord Willoughby de Eresby, and Robert their son, 4th Baron, 
succeeded to this estate, as nephew and co-heir of the said William 
de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk. Tlu's Earl built Parham church, and 
bequeathed his body to be buried at Carnpsey Abbey, under the 
arch of St. Nicholas Chapel, behind the tomb of his father and 
mother. 

Christopher, 8th Lord Willoughby de Eresby, married Margaret, 
daughter of Sir William Jenney, of Knottishall, in this county, Knt., 
and devised this estate to his second son, Sir Christopher Willoughby, 
Knt.; who, by his last will, dated 1527, gave per annum to the 
church of Parham , in satisfaction of all tithes and offerings negli- 
gently forgotten. He resided in this parish, and married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir George Talbois, Knt. ; by whom he had issue Sir 
William Willoughby, Knt., his son and successor ; who in the 1st 
of King Edward VI., was created Baron Willoughby, of Parham, 
and in the 4th of that reign, was made Lieutenant of Calais, and 
the marches adjacent. 

He married Elizabeth, daughter and co-heir of Sir Thomas 
Heneage, and by her had Charles, Lord Willoughby, who married 
Margaret, daughter of Edward, Earl of Lincoln. Their descendants 
continued to enjoy that honour until the death of Henry, the 16th 
Baron, in 1775. 

Parham House was in the possession of the Warners in the time 
of King James I. Edward Warner, Esq., citizen and merchant of 



188 HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 

London, was the second son of Francis Warner, of this parish, Esq., 
by Mary, his second wife, daughter and co-heir of Sir Edw. Eous, 
Knt. He died in 1628, and made Francis Warner, of Parham, Esq., 
his nephew and next heir, his executor, and chief heir to his estate. 
They are derived from the ancient family of the Warners, who 
inherited Warner's Hall, at Great Waltham, in Essex, and were 
advanced to the dignity of Baronets in the reign of King Charles II., 
July 16, 1660. Sir John Warner, the 1st and only Baronet of his 
house, married Trevor, only daughter of Sir Thos. Hanmer, Bart., 
of Hanmer, in the county of Flint; and had issue two daughters, 
who both took the veil. At Sir John's decease the title became 
extinct. 

In 1699, the estate, late Sir John Warner's, Bart., was purchased 
by John, son of John Corrance, Esq., of Eendlesham ; whose father 
had previously purchased, between 1680 and 1690, Parham Hall,* 
formerly the property and residence of the Lords Willoughby. 

Mr. Corrance deceased in 1704, and was buried at Parham: 
Clement, his eldest son and heir, succeeded; who represented 
Orford in Parliament, from 1708 to 1714. He married, in 1705, 
Mary, eldest daughter of Sir Eobert Davers, Bart., of Kougham, in 
this county, and made that parish his future residence. 

He was succeeded by his eldest son and heir, John Corrance, 
Esq., of Eougham, who died in 1742; leaving, by a second mar- 
riage, an infant daughter : at whose decease, in 1747, the estates 
devolved upon Elizabeth, his sister, who married William Long, 
Esq., of Dunstan, near Norwich. 

Mrs. Long deceased in 1792, and devised her property to her 
cousin Mary, eldest daughter of Major John Corrance, and wife of 
Snowden White, M.D., of Nottingham. This lady died in 1797, 
leaving an only son, Frederick White, Esq., of Loudham Hall, in 
this county, who is the present possessor, and has lately assumed 
the name of Corrance. 

ARMS. White: argent; on a chevron, between three wolves' 
heads erased, sable, a wolf's head, or. Warner: or, a bend, en- 
grailed, between six roses, gules. 

John Tovell, Gent., an opulent yeoman, possessed of an estate of 
about 800 per annum, a portion of which he cultivated himself, 

* The gateway to Parham Hall remains tolerably entire ; an etching of the same 
is given in '' Davy's Suffolk Antiquities," and an engraving, and also a visw of the 
ancient manor house, in the " Excursions through Suffolk." 



HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 189 

was formerly a resident in this parish ; of whose dwelling, domestic 
habits, pursuits, and society, some interesting particulars are pre- 
served in the " Life of the Eev. George Crabbe," the well-known 
poet. He married Miss Sarah Elmy, the niece of Mr. Tovell, who 
resided with her uncle at Parham, some years previous to their 
marriage. 

He deceased in 1792, and his only child dying before him, he 
bequeathed the estate to his two sisters, in equal shares. One died 
unmarried ; the other, Mrs. Elmy, of Beccles, had three daughters, 
who inherited the property in three equal shares. Sarah, the eldest 
daughter, married Mr. Crabbe. 

At her decease, the Rev. George Crabbe, the present vicar of 
Bredfield, and the late Eev. John Waldron Crabbe, incumbent of 
Great and Little Glemham, his brother, succeeded to their mother's 
third share ; and the two maiden sisters, at their death, bequeathed 
their shares to them. The property is now vested in the said 
George Crabbe, and the issue of his late brother. 

The old mansion, so pleasingly described by Mr. Crabbe's bio- 
grapher, as the residence of the late Mr. Tovell, has since been 
almost re-built, in the modern style ; and what was formerly desig- 
nated " Ducking Hall," is at present known by the name of " Par- 
ham Lodge." 

Mr. Joshua Kirby, the talented author of a splendid treatise en- 
titled " The Perspective of Architecture," was a native of this parish; 
eldest son of Mr. John Kirby, author of the " Suffolk Traveller." 
Emulating the example of his father, he contributed to the illus- 
tration of his native county, by publishing a set of twelve prints, 
with an historical account of the same. 

In the 8th number of the " Biographical Anecdotes of Hogarth," 
published by Messrs. Longman and Co., a genuine memoir of Mr. 
Kirby is given, principally compiled by his only daughter, Mrs. 
Sarah Trimmer ; a lady so justly celebrated for her numerous pub- 
lications, for the religious instruction and education of young 
persons. 

By this it appears, he was born in 1716, and settled in Ipswich, 
as a house painter, about 1738. When very young he painted the 
famous sign of the White Hart, at Scole Inn, in Norfolk ; from 
which an engraving was afterwards published. Soon after the pub- 
lication of the above print he became acquainted with Mr. Gains- 
borough, whose works increased his taste for painting ; and being 



190 HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. . 

of a very studious turn of mind, he employed every leisure hour in 
the acquisition of useful knowledge ; hut the study which led him 
to eminence was that of the art of perspective, in his improvement 
of which he may almost be said to have invented a new art. 

On heing admitted to the friendship and intimacy of Sir Joshua 
Keynolds, Mr. Hogarth, and most of the other eminent artists in 
the kingdom, he quitted Ipswich, and removed to London ; where 
he was patronized by the Earl of Bute, who introduced him to 
King George III., then Prince of Wales, by whose special appoint- 
ment he was afterwards made Clerk of the Works at Kew ; and, 
under his Majesty's patronage, and by his munificent aid, he pub- 
lished, in 1761, the elegant work on perspective, above named; 
the whole of which is a masterly performance. 

In 1766, in conjunction with his brother William, then of Wit- 
nesham, attorney- at-law, he published an improved edition of their 
father's Map of Suffolk, on a larger scale, with engravings of the 
arms of the principal families in the county. 

Mr. Kirby was a member both of the Royal and Antiquarian 
Societies ; and at the first formation of the Royal Academy, he 
was President of the Society of Artists, from which that institution 
emanated. He died June 20, 1774, and was buried in Kew 
churchvard.* 



RENDHAM. RIMDHAM, or RINDEHAM. 

The author of " Magna Britannia" makes the lordship of this 
parish to have been vested in John de Brussard (or Bruseyard), of 
Shaddingfield, in Wangford hundred, who was living in 1354, and 
trustee to John de Wrotham, of Little Wrotham, in Norfolk. 

The Abbey at Sibton, held the manor of Barnes, in Rendham, 
which, at the dissolution of that Monastery, was granted to Anthony 
Denney, Esq., and afterwards became vested in Powel, Esq. 
The entire lordship now belongs to Frederick White Corrance, Esq., 
of Parham Hall. 

CHARITIES. There belongs to this parish three cottages, built 
upon waste land, formerly granted by the lord of the manor ; and a 

* There is a portrait of Mr. Kirby, in mezzotinto, by I. Dixon, from a painting 
by Gainsborough ; and an engraving, by D. Pariset, from another, by P. Falconet. 



HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATK. 191 

pightle of tliree acres, or thereabouts, purchased in 1640. The 
cottages are occupied by poor persons, one of them rent free, the 
others at low rents, which, however, are not always obtained ; and 
the land is let at i'4 10s. a year, usually laid out in the purchase of 
coals, which are sold to the poor at a reduced price. Thos. Neal, 
Esq., by a codicil, dated in 1704, charged his lands in the parish 
of Bramfield, with the payment to the churchwardens of this parish 
of ,2 10s. a year, for the support of a free school at Rendham, and 
10s. a year for books, for the children and other poor persons. This 
is duly received, and applied accordingly. 



SAXMUNDHAM, or SAXMONDEIIAM. 

In the flth of King Edward I., this was the lordship of Thomas 
de Verley. The manor of Hurts, to which the advowson is appen- 
dant, was formerly the possession of the late Nunnery at Marham, 
in Norfolk; and upon the dissolution of that Monastery, in 1535, 
it was granted to Sir Nicholas Hare, Knt. It has since passed 
through several hands, to the Long family, who purchased the same, 
and became seated here about the commencement of the last 
century. 

In the " Gentleman's Magazine," for 1829, part 1, p. 207, is in- 
serted a very full account of this family, from the pen of an eminent 
genealogist ; from which we deduce the following particulars : 

Samuel Long, Esq., is the first noticed ; who having accompa- 
nied the expedition under Penn and Venables, which conquered 
Jamaica in 1G65, as Secretary to Cromwell's Commissioners, settled 
there ; became Colonel of Horse, Chief Justice, Speaker of the 
House of Assembly, and one of the Council of the Island. He 
died in 1683, and was succeeded by his only son, 

Charles Long, of Longville, a member of the Council, and a 
Colonel of Horse, in the Island. This gentleman, coming to Eng- 
land, settled at Saxmundham, and was chosen a Burgess in Parlia- 
ment for Dunwich, in 1714. He married, in 161)9, Amy, the 
eldest daughter of Sir Nicholas Lawes, Knt., Governor of Jamaica, 
by whom he had issue one son and one daughter ; he married, se- 
condly, Jane, the only daughter and heiress of Sir Wm. Bceston, 



192 HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 

Knt., the Governor of Jamaica, and relict of Sir James Molyford,. 
Bart., by whom he had issue three sons and five daughters. 

Colonel Long deceased in 1723, and was succeeded by the eldest 
son of his second marriage, Charles Long, Esq., who married Mary, 
the second daughter and co-heiress of Dudley North, of Glemham, 
Esq., by whom he had issue two sons, Charles and Dudley. He 
died in 1778. 

Charles, the eldest, was born in 1747; and married, in 1786, his 
first cousin, Jane, the daughter of Beeston Long, of London, Esq., 
and by her had issue two sons, Charles and Dudley, who both died 
in their infancy. Mr. Long died in 1812. 

The second son, Dudley North, Esq., was educated at the Gram- 
mar School, Bury St. Edmund's ; from whence he was removed to 
Emanuel College, Cambridge. He represented the borough of 
B anbury in Parliament, from 1796 to 1806. In 1812, he was 
returned for Eichmond, in Yorkshire. On the decease of his aunt, 
in 1789, and in pursuance of her last will and testament, he assumed 
the name and arms of North; and in 1812, on the death of his 
elder brother, Charles Long, of Hurt's Hall, Esq., he took the name 
and arms of Long, in addition to those of North. 

He married, in 1802, Sophia, the eldest daughter of Charles 
Anderson Pelham, the first Lord Yarborough, by Sophia, the only 
daughter of George Aufrere, of Chelsea, Esq. Mr. Dudley Long 
North died without issue, at Brompton, near London, in 1829. 

Charles Long, Esq., partly rebuilt, and greatly enlarged Hurt's 
Hall,* the residence of this highly respectable family. He was in- 
terred in the chancel of the church of Saxmundham, where a beau- 
tiful monument, from the chisel of Nollekins, is erected to his 
memory : it consists of a sarcophagus, over which is the figure of 
an angel, seated on a rock, his right hand covering his eye, and Ins 
left holding an inverted torch ; at the bottom of the sarcophagus 
are two escallop shells. There are several other memorials to 
members of this family in Saxmundham church. 

His cousin Charles, fourth son of Beeston Long, Esq., of Cars- 
halton, in Surry, in 1826, became ennobled, by the title of Baron 
Earnborough, of Farnborough, in Kent. He was Joint Secretary 
of the Treasury, in 1800; one of the Lords of the Treasury, in 

* An engraving by J. Lambert, from a drawing by Mr. Henry Davy, of Hurt's 
Hall, in Saxmundhara, is given in his " Views of the Seats of the Noblemen and 
Gentlmen in Suffolk." 



HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 193 

1804; and subsequently, Paymaster General of the Forces. His 
Lordship was G.C.B., F.R., and A.S.; a Director of Greenwich 
Hospital, Official Lord of Trade and Plantation, a Trustee of the 
British and Huntcrian Museums, and a Commissioner for the 
Erection of National Monuments. He died in without issue. 

In 1538, Thomas Pindar, A.M., was Commissary of Suffolk 
Archdeaconry, and Official of Sudbury. He was rector of this 
parish in 1551, and of Witnesham, in this county, in 1554. 

July 17, 1816, died Mr. Samuel Burleigh, of this parish, carrier, 
at the advanced age of 93 years ; being the oldest inhabitant, and 
having seen the town renovated four times, within the period of 74 
years, of its inhabitancy. A daughter of his was then living here, 
upwards of 72 years of age. 

That remarkable character Lieutenant John Shipp, author of 
" Memoirs" of his " Extraordinary Military Career," was a native 
of this town. He was second son of Thomas and Letitia Shipp, 
born March 16, 1785. From his first entrance into the army, at 
the age of nine years, he wore the King's uniform for thirty-two 
years, and, in his almost unparalleled perils, had received six match- 
lock ball wounds ; one on the forehead, two on the top of the head, 
one in the right arm, one through the fore finger of his left hand, 
and one in his right leg, besides a flesh wound in his left shoulder, 
and others of minor consequence. 

His " Memoirs" form one of the most entertaining books for any 
reader; as full of anecdote and humour, as of interesting adventure ; 
and they bear the impress of a spirit in which loyalty and courage 
were tempered by much honourable principle, and a deep sense of 
religion as well as duty. He was also author of " The Military 
Bijou," and other works of a similar nature. He died at Liverpool, 
in 1834, aged 50 years.* 

CHARITIES. The town estate comprises the site of a cottage, 
and a piece of meadow or marsh land, in this town, containing, by 
estimation, three acres ; the rent of which is appli ed to the ordinary 
purpose of a church rate, agreeable to custom. The charity lands 
are vested in trustees ; and consist of two pieces of arable land, in 
this parish, containing about five acres, called the "Bread Land:" 
annual rent, 16 5s. This land was purchased in 1657, with some 
gift or benefaction, of 16, and with 52 paid in satisfaction of the 

* There are two portraits published of Shipp ; one engraved by B. Holl, and 
prefixed to his " Memoirs;" the other drawn by J. Buchanan, eng. by W. T. Fry. 



HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 

charity of Edmund Cutting, who, by his will, dated in 1041, di- 
rected Is. worth of bread to be distributed weekly, among poor 
persons of Saxmundham. A piece of land called the "Brook 
Meadow," containing about five acres and a quarter, and a piece of 
arable land, in this town, containing about three acres : rent, toge- 
ther about 17 a year. 5 4s. is expended in the purchase of 
bread, and the surplus has been applied in the purchase of coals, 
which are sold again to the poor at a reduced rate. In 1746, Wm. 
Corbold, by will, charged his estate in this parish and Benhall, now 
the property of Dudley Long North, Esq., with the payment of 5, 
yearly; to be laid out in the purchase of bread, to be distributed 
weekly to eight poor persons, in and belonging to the town of Sax- 
mundham, not receiving alms or collection, or chargeable to the 
parish. The testator, also, by his will, charged his said estates 
with 5 a year, for teaching four poor children of Saxmundham, 
at the school at Benhall. Stephen Eade, in 1716, gave by will, 
40s. a year out of copyhold land in Carltou, now the property of 
Edward Fuller, Esq., to be distributed to the poor of this parish, 
after divine service on Christmas-day ; and Mrs. Alice Clarke, by 
will, in 1820, gave to the poor of Saxmundham 50 ; the interest 
thereof to be distributed in coals, every New-Year's-day. 



SNAPE. SNAPES, or SNAPYS. 

In the year 1099, William Martel, Albreda his wife, and Jeffrey 
their son and heir, gave the manor of Snape, with the benefit of 
wrecks of the sea, from Thorp to Orford Ness, to the Abbot and 
Convent of St. John, at Colchester, for the purpose of founding in 
this parish, a Priory, which should be a cell to that Abbey. 

By this deed of gift it appears evident that the founder intended 
to have this design immediately put in execution, which the monies 
of Colchester delayed until 1155; at which period a Prior, and 
some Benedictine monks from that house, settled here. 

Isabel, Countess of Suffolk, and patroness of this Priory, pre- 
ferred a complaint to Pope Boniface IX., which stated that the 
Abbot and Convent of Colchester did not maintain a sufficient 
number of religious here, according to the intention of the founders;. 



HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 195 

when this house was made conventual, and exempt from subjection 
to Colchester. 

In 1 508, it was in the Crown, but by what means is not known, 
and was granted to Butley Abbey; but the Prior and Canons re- 
signed all claim to the same in the following year. It was one of 
those small Monasteries that were suppressed in 1524, and given 
towards the endowment of Ipswich College. 

It was dedicated to the blessed Virgin Mary ; and its valuation, 
in Taxatio Ecclesiastica, in thirteen parishes, is 32 12s. 7^-d., 
but in 1534, 99 Is. lld. In 1532, Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, 
obtained a grant of this Monastery : it subsequently became the 
estate of Sir Henry Johnson, and passed as the Friston property, 
to the Earl of Strafford. It was recently the possession of Richard 
William Howard Vyse, Esq. 

ARMS. The same as Colchester Abbey. Gules ; a cross, or ; 
on a border of the second, eight mullets of six points, of the first. 

CHARITIES. The Rev. John Lambert, by a codicil, dated in 1802, 
bequeathed to this parish 200 ; the interest thereof to be distributed 
by the churchwardens, at Christmas, to poor housekeepers who do 
not receive pay of the parish. This legacy is invested in stock, 
being 250 three per cent, Consols. 



STERNFIEID, or STERNESFELDA. 

The demesne of this parish was anciently in John de Mundeville, 
and afterwards became vested in the Vestries, from whom it passed 
to the Framlingham and Gaudy families ; of the latter it was pur- 
chased by Dudley North, Esq. 

The manors of Mundeville and Vestries, in this place, were lately 
the estate of C. N. Bayley, Esq. 

Mem. Margery Beddingfi eld and Richard Ringe, were tried and 
convicted at the assizes, holden at Bury St. Edmund's, March 24, 
1703, for petty treason, and murder committed on John Bedding- 
Held, of this parish, farmer; the husband of the said Margery Bed- 
dingfield, and master of the said Richard Ringe. They were both 
executed at Rushmere Heath, on the 8th of April, pursuant to their 
sentence. Ringe was about 22 years of age, and committed the 
murder at the instigation of his mistress, who was not 21. 



196 HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 

CHARITIES. The town estate here consists of two tenements, 
with gardens, let together at 5 a year : a meadow of one acre, or 
thereahouts, let at l 10s. a year; and a cottage, stahle, and ahout 
44 acres of land, of which about eight acres are in the adjoining 
parish of Friston, let at 48 a year. There are several old deeds of 
conveyance relating to different parts of this property; but they 
contain no specific declaration of trust. The earliest that contains 
any such declaration, is of the date of the 1st of Charles I.; it com- 
prises the whole of the property, and the trusts therein declared are, 
" the sole and proper use, profit and maintenance, and sustentation 
of the inhabitants of the town of Sternfield." The rents are ex- 
pended in the repairs of the church, in fuel and clothing, and pe- 
cuniary assistance for the poor inhabitants ; and in providing means 
for the education of their children. 



STRATFORD ST. ANDREW, or STRAFFORT. 

In the 9th of King Edward I., the Prior and Convent at Butley 
held some interest or share in the lordship of this parish. 

Roger, son of William de Kerdeston, and Margaret his wife, who 
was created Knight of the Bath (with Prince Edward, of Carnarvon, 
son of King Edward I.), Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, in the 5th 
of Edward III., Governor of Norwich Castle, summoned as a Baron 
to Parliament, in the 6th of that King, and deceased in the llth, 
seized of this lordship. 

Maud his wife, survived, and had this property assigned as part 
of her dowry ; which descended, after her death, to William de 
Kerdeston, their eldest son and heir, aged 30 at the decease of his 
father. In the 13th of King Edward III., he obtained a license to 
make a Castle of his manor house at Claxton, in Norfolk : he w'as 
summoned to Parliament in the 28th of that reign; and in the 33rd 
was summoned to be of Council to Thomas de Woodstock, Duke of 
Gloucester, the King's son ; Gustos of England, during the King's 
absence in France ; and died seized of this manor in the 35th of 
that reign. 

In the 26th of the said King, he designed settling this manor on 
the Master and Chaplains of the Chantry of St. Mary, in Claxton 
church ; and in the 26th of King Henry VI., a patent was granted 



HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 197 

to settle the said manor, with tenements here, for the foundation of 
a chantry there : which manor was said to be held of the Prior 
and monks of Thetford ; probably in trust for that purpose. This 
house had interest in the tithes of this parish, of the gift of Half 
Fitz Walter, and Maud his wife. 

William de Kerdeston was found to be son and heir of the above 
William, by Maud, his first wife ; but by another inquisition, John, 
son of John de Burghersh, and Maud his wife, daughter and co- 
heir of Sir William, de Kerdeston, and Margaret his second wife, 
daughter of Edmund Bacon, of Gresham, was found to be liis heir; 
and various law-suits ensued upon these inquisitions, in order to 
prove this William to be illegitimate. 

In the 3rd of King Henry VI., a fine was levied between Thomas 
Chaucer, Esq. (son of the poet), and Maud his wife, one of the 
daughters and co-heirs of Sir John Burghersh, querents, and Sir 
Thomas Kerdeston, and Elizabeth his wife, deforciants, of this 
manor, and many others, conveyed to Maud ; who, with her hus- 
band, re-settled them on Sir Thomas and Elizabeth, in tail, to be 
held of the heirs of Maud. Sir Thomas deceased in the 25th of 
the said King. 

In the escheat rolls of the 29th of the above reign, the jury find 
that Sir Thomas Kerdeston was not seized of the manors of Bui- 
champ, Henham, and Stratford, at his death ; but that William de 
la Pole, late Duke of Suffolk, and Alice his wife, as her right, en- 
tered on, and received the profits, during the life of Sir Thomas ; 
and that Alice, late wife of the said Duke, and Sir John Howard, 
were his next heirs. She was daughter and heir of the above Thos. 
Chaucer, Esq., and Maud his wife ; and first married Sir John 
Phelip, of Dennington, in Hoxne hundred. 

In 1764, this manor was vested in Dudley North, Esq., and the 
advowson is in the Crown. 



SUDBOUIiN, or SUDBURNHAM. 

This manor and advowson were appropriated to the Prior and 
Convent of Ely, by William Bateman, Bishop of Norwich, in ex- 
change for a certain Inn or Hostel, in Cambridge, with John Craw- 
dene (or Crandene), the 22nd Prior of Ely; who had bought and 



198 HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 

used it as such., for the reception of the young monks of Ely, coming 
thither to improve in learning ; and upon the site of which the 
Bishop designed the foundation of Trinity Hall ; for which purpose, 
lie afterwards permitted John de Aslakby, rector of this parish, with 
the Chapel of Orford, to resign them, and receive a pension of i'40 
per annum out of the Prior's manor, in Sudbourn : and then that 
rectory was appropriated by the Bishop, to the Prior of Ely, and a 
vicarage instituted here. 

The advowson is now in the Crown, and the lordship in the 
Marquess of Hertford; who, in 1780, expended a large sum in 
repairing and enlarging the family mansion in this parish, erected 
by Sir Michael Stanhope, in the reign of King James I. 

In 131.1, Sir Ealph de Palegrave, Chaplain to the Bishop of 
Norwich, and Chancellor, or Vicar- General, was rector of Bodney, 
in Norfolk, which he exchanged for Sudbourn cum Orford. Francis 
Mason, Archdeacon of Norfolk, in 1019, was also rector of these 
parishes, and was appointed Chaplain to King James I., who usually 
styled him " a wise master-builder in God's house." He died in 
1621, and was buried in the chancel of his chapel, at Orford. His 
learned work, entitled " Vindicise Ecclesiad Anglicanoe," has been 
translated into English, with a preface and notes by Lindsay. 

The Right Rev. Sir George Pretyman Tomline, Bart,, D.D., 
Bishop of Winchester, was also presented, by the Crown, to these 
livings in his native county, in or about 178o. 

CHARITIES. The church and poor estate belonging to this town, 
consists of a workhouse, inhabited by paupers, and a cottage and 
small garden, occupied by poor persons, rent free. 01 A. 5p. of 
marsh land, producing at present 161 2s. 3d. a year; and a rent 
charge of Q a year, secured and payable under the award of the 
Commissioners, for inclosing the common lands in this parish, made 
in 1807. The income derived from the above sources is applied to 
the reparation of the church, &c. ; and the surplus is paid to the 
overseers, and applied for the general relief of the poor. A cottage 
in two tenements, situate in the town of Orford, belongs to this 
parish : one of the tenements is occupied by a poor family, rent 
free ; and the other, with a small piece of ground adjoining, lets at 
7 a year: the rent is carried by the overseers, to their general 
account. The sum of 10 a year, land tax deducted, is paid from 
Sir Michael Stanhope's charity, and distributed among poor persons 
in small sums. 



HUNDRED OF PI.OMESGATE. 199 



SWEFFLING, or SWIFTUNG. 

The Cavendish family were interested here, previous to the grant, 
made to them of the manor of Derneford Hall, mentioned by Kirby. 
In the loth of Richard II., 1391, Roger de Cavendish held half a 
Knight's lee here, and paid castle guard rent for the same to Frain- 
lingham Castle. 

In the 4th of King Edward IV., Richard Cavendish. Esq., held 
the same, by a like payment; and in the 2nd and J4th of Queen 
Elizabeth, William Cavendish, Esq., was owner thereof. 

In 1704, William Plumer, Esq., was owner of Derneibid Hall 
manor ; and it has since been the estate of Edward Holland, Esq., 
of Benhall. 

CHARITIES. The feoffees estate, which comprises two houses, 
and six acres of land in this parish, was conveyed by Ezra Crisp, 
by deed of feoffment, in 1699, to the then rector of Sweffiing, and 
his successors, and other feoffees, for keeping in repair and order 
the church and churchyard, and for payment of other charges on 
the inhabitants of this parish. The rents, amounting together to 
,13 2s. a year, are applied accordingly. In 1568, Henry Leggett, 
Esq., by will, charged a piece of land, called " Lime Kiln Close," 
now the property of William Shouldham, Esq., with the payment 
of 4.0s. a year, to be distributed among the poor of this parish. 



TUNSTALL . TUNSTON, or TINTONA. 

In the 9th of King Edward I., this was the lordship and estate 
of the Countess de Marshal; and of Bartholomew, Lord Burghersh, 
in the 23rd of Edward III., who obtained a charter of free warren 
in the same, to himself, and Cecily his wife, and their heirs. He 
deceased in the 43rd of that King ; and bequeathed this, with his 
other large possessions, to Elizabeth his daughter, then the wife of 
Edward de Spencer. 

In 1764, the manor of Banyards, in this parish, was vested in 
Dudley North, Esq., of North Glemham. 

Robert de Vallibus (or Vaux), gave his tithes in this parish, to 
the Priory of the Virgin Mary, and St. Andrew, in Thetford; with 



200 HUNDRED OF PLOMESGATE. 

his body to be buried there : and Roger de Eufreus, two- parts of 
his tithes in Tunston, to the same Monastery. 



WANTISDEN, or WANTESDANA. 

This lordship passed as the foregoing ; had the same privilege of 
free-warren obtained for it, at the same period ; and descended as 
Tunstall did. 

In the 36th of King Henry VIII., Lionel Tallemache obtained a 
grant of this manor and advowson, as part of the possession of the 
dissolved Monastery, at Butley. It afterwards became the estate of 
Sir Henry Wood, and so passed to the Chapman family. It now 
belongs to the Sheppards, of Campsey Ash. 

Wantisden Hall, is the estate of Nathaniel Barnardiston, Esq., of 
Little Henny, in Essex. 

CHARITIES. The sum of 5 a year, appropriated to the poor of 
this parish, after a deduction on account of land tax, is paid to the 
churchwardens from Sir Michael Stanhope's charity (see Sutton), 
and distributed among poor persons of this parish. 



BLIDINGA, or BLIDIGGA. 



This Hundred is bounded, on the North, by those of Wangford 
and Mulford; on the West and South, by the Hundreds of 
Hoxne and Plomesgate ; and on the East, by the Sea. 

It -contains forty-eight Parishes, six Hamlets, and three Mar- 
ket Towns, namely: 



ALDRINGHAM, 

BENACRE, 

BLIBURGH, 

BRAMPTON, 

BLYTHFORD, 

BRAMFIELD, 

BULCHAMP, 

BUXLOW, 

CHEDDISTON, 

COOKLEY, 

COVEHITHE, 

CRATFIELD, 

DARSHAM, 

DUNWICH, 

EASTON BAVENT, 

FORDLEY, 

FROSTENDEN, 

HALES WORTH, 

HENHAM, 

HENSTEAD, 

HEVENINGHAM, 

HINTON, 

HOLTON, 

HUNTINGFIELD, 

KNOTTISHALL, 

LEISTON, 

LINSTEAD, (Great &Lit.) 

And YOXFORD. 



MELLS, 

MlDDLETON, 

NORTIIALES, 
PEASENHALL, 
RAYDON, 
RUMBURGH, 

SlBTON, 
SlZEWELL, 

SOTHERTON, 

SOUTHWOULD, 

SOUTH-COVE, 

SPECKSHALL, 

STOVE N, 

THEBERTON, 

THORINGTON, 

THORP, 

UBBESTON, 

UGGE SHALL, 

WALDERSWICH, 

WALPOOLE, 

WANGFORD, 

WENHASTON, 

WESTHALL, 

WESTLETON, 

WEST WOOD -LoDG-E, 

WISSET, 

WRENTHAM, 



The fee was in the Crown, and government in the Sheriff"; 
until King Edward /., in consideration of the reversion of the 
Castle of Warkicorth, and the Manors of Rouberic, Newburn, 
and Carbridge, entailed upon him and his heirs, by John de 
Clavering, settled upon him, among other things, this Hundred, 
to hold of the said King for life ; at whose decease it again re- 
verted to the Crown, and so remains. 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 



ALDRINGHAM. 

In the reign of King Edward II., Harao de Masey obtained a 
grant of a market and fair, to be held in his manor of Aldringham. 
Ealf de Glanville gave the impropriation to his Abbey of Premou- 
stratensian, or White Canons, at Leiston, as founder ; and at the 
dissolution of that Monastery, King Henry VIII. granted the same 
to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk. In 1764, it was vested in 
the heirs of the late Daniel Hervey, Esq., the two Misses Courtenay. 
The present patron is Lord Huntingfield. 



BENACRE. 

The demesne of this parish was anciently in Simon de Pierpoint. 
In 1577, John Whinburgh, Gent., of Norfolk, was owner of this 
lordship ; which in the time of King Charles I., became the estate 
of Henry North, Esq., by purchase ; from whom it descended to 
Thomas Carthew, Esq., who about 1743, sold it to William Gooch, 
Esq. (afterwards Sir William). 

In or about 1721, Mr. Carthew erected a handsome seat here,* 
which Sir Thomas Gooch still further enlarged and beautified ; and 
Sir Thomas Sherlock Gooch, the 5th Baronet of that house, late 
M.P. for this county, the present possessor, makes it his country 
residence. 

The family of Gooch became early seated in this county. Robert 
Gooch, of Bungay, is the first we have any particular account of; 
who left one son, William Gooch, of Mettingham, Esq. : he married 
Martha, the daughter of Christopher Layer, Esq., of the city of 

* A view of this is given in " Davy's Seats of the Nobility and Gentry of Suffolk,'' 
and in " Excursions through Suffolk." 



204 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

Norwich ; whose descendants, in the elder branch, intermarried as 
follows : 

William Gooch, Esq., who resided at=Elizabeth, dau. and heir of Richard Bas- 
Mettingham, in 1664. | poole, of St. Margaret's, S. Elraham. 

I 
Thomas Gooch, Esq., 2nd son, died in Frances, dau. and co-heir of Thomas 

1688. j Lane, Esq., of Worlingham. 

T I 

William Gooch, Esq., Lieut.-Governor Thos. Gooch, succes- Mary, (sister of 



of Virginia ; created a Bart, in 1746 ; sivelyBp. of Bristol, 
died S. P., in 1751. Norwich, and Ely. 

I- 



Bp. Sherlock.) 



Sir Thomas Gooch, 3rd Bart., died in = Anne, dau. and heir of John Attwood, 
1731. J Esq., of Saxlingham, Norfolk. 

I 
Sir Thomas Gooeh, 4th Bart., died in=Anna-Maria, dau. of William Hayward, 

1826. j Esq., of Surrey. 

Sir Thomas Sherlock Gooch, present==Marianna, dau. of Abraham Whitaker, 
Bart. Esq., of Lyster House, co. Hereford, 

aud sister of Charlotte Maria, present 

T j Countess of Stradhroke. 

Edward Sherlock Gooch, Esq., eldest =Louisa, 2J dau. of Sir George Prescott, 
son. Bart., of Theobald's Park, Hants. 

In 1786, a discovery was made here of a considerable number of 
Roman silver coins; upwards of 900, in good preservation, but 
none older than the time of Vespasian. Sir Thos. Gooch purchased 
the greater part of them. Two of them, then in the possession of the 
late Mr. Johnson, of Woodbridge, were engraved in the " Gentle- 
man's Magazine," lor the year 1788. 

ARMS. Whinburgh: per fess, indented, argent and sable, three 
bears, passant, counterchanged. Gooch : per pale, argent and sable, 
a chevron between three talbots, passant, counterchanged : on a chief, 
gules, as many leopards' heads, or. 



BLIBURGH. BLITHBERGH, BLYTHBURGH, or BLIDEBURC. 

" The state of this town," Mr. Gardner observes, "is manifest, by 
the fine Church,* the Priory, Holy-rood Chapel, and other edifices. 
It has been the residence of merchants, and good reputable persons ; 
well frequented upon account of its trade, and divers other affairs 

* A description of this church is given in the " Gentleman's Magazine," for 
1808, p. 776 ; also " Church Notes," ibid, 1813, part ii., p. 313. 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 205 

here transacted, especially the fishery ; for crayers, and other craft 
sailed, before the river was choaked, up to Walberswick bridge." 

It appears to have been falling into decay ever since the dissolu- 
tion of the Priory ; but more particularly so since 1676, when the 
town suffered severely by fire, by which, and from failure in traffic, 
the inhabitants became unable to rebuild, and settled in other 
places; until it became, in 1754, reduced to about 21 houses, and 
124 inhabitants: it has since that period, like most other places, 
been upon the increase. 

It was a Royal demesne in the time of Edward the Confessor : 
and Roger Bigot held this lordship in the reign of William the 
Conqueror; which was given, by King Henry I., to Herbert, Bishop 
of Norwich, who exchanged it with William de Cheney, for the 
manor of Thorp, near Norwich. 

It appears in the reign of King Henry II., to be again in the 
Crown ; as Maud, his mother, held it in dower : and, at her decease, 
that Monarch granted it to William de Norwich, with ample. privi- 
leges. He was sometimes called William de Cheney, Baron of 
Horsford, in Norfolk, founder of Sibton Abbey, in this county, and 
a liberal benefactor to the Priory here. 

Margaret, his daughter and heiress, married, first, to Hugh de 
Cressi, and secondly, to Robert Fitz Roger, who each inherited this 
lordship in her right. This lady had wreck at sea from Eye Cliff 
to the port of Dunwich ; and a ferry-boat there, with privilege to 
exact a half-penny for every man and horse passing over the same; 
and also customary travers for passage through Bliburgh and Wal- 
berswick; for each loaden carriage shod with iron, one penny, and 
without, a half-penny. 

This was during her widowhood. Her second husband received 
an increase to two-pence, for every wheeled carriage shod with iron, 
and loaded with corn or fish, passing through the said parishes ; 
and for every horse carrying the same, a half-penny ; also every 
carriage with wheels, not shod with iron, a half-penny. 

Margaret had, by her first husband, a son Roger, who in the first 
of King John, married Isabel, youngest daughter and co-heir of 
Robert de Rye, with whom he inherited 1 7^- fees, and the moiety of 
the Barony of Rye. 

They had two sons, Hugh and Stephen de Cressi ; the latter was lord 
here in 1262, and his brother Hugh inherited the same in 1263 ; in 
which year he died, and this lordship was afterwards in the Crown. 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

Robert Fitz Roger, the second husband of Margaret de Cheney, 
was of the de Clavering family : John de Clavering, -who obtained 
the grant for a weekly market here, in the 17ih of King Edward II., 
1324, was his son and heir. He married Hewesia, daughter and 
heir of Robert de Tiptoft, by whom he had an only daughter, 
named Eva. 

This John rendered 20 for his manor of Bliburgh ; and having 
no male issue, settled his estates upon King Edward II. King 
Edward III., in the second of his reign, settled this manor upon 
Edmund de Clavering, his brother, for life; the remainder on Ralph 
de Nevil, who married the heiress of John de Clavering. Ralph, 
his second son, in the 4th of that reign, obtained a renewal of the 
charter for the market and fairs ; and in the 1 4th of the same King, 
had a grant of free warren in this lordship. He died, seized of the 
same, in the 41st of that reign. 

Sir Robert Swillington appears to have been the next possessor; 
whose son, Sir Roger Swillington, succeeded, and held the same in 
capite, at two Knight's fees. It passed from this family by the 
marriage of Anne, his daughter and sole heir, with Sir John Hopton ; 
and their descendants inherited for several ages, until Sir Robert 
Brooke, Knt., and Alderman of London, purchased the same. 

The first court of John Brooke, Esq., held of this manor, was in 
1645. He was eldest surviving son of the above Sir Robert 
Brooke, and Elizabeth his wife ; and married Jane, daughter of Sir 
Samuel Barnardiston, Knt.; but died without issue, in 1652, 
aged 26 years. 

Upon this marriage, the manor of Blithburgh was settled in join- 
ture upon the said Jane; who re-married to Sir William Blois, 
Knt., and he held his first court here, in 1660, in her right. It 
still continues in this family, Sir Charles Blois, Bart., of Cockfield 
Hall, in Yoxford, being the present lord and patron. 

PRIORY OF AUGUSTINE, OR BLACK CANONS. Leland says, the 
Abbot of St. Osith, or Chich, in Essex, was the founder. King 
Henry I., gave the church of Bliburgh to this Priory. It appears 
to have been no otherwise subordinate to St. Osith's Abbey, than 
that the Prior was nominated by the Abbot of that Monastery. 

Richard Beauveys, Bishop of London, augmented its revenues, 
and is esteemed by Weever, a co-founder. The Prior and Canons 
of this house, held considerable possessions in the town of Dunwich. 
It was dedicated to the honour of the blessed Virgin Mary. 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 207 

Valuations in Taxatio Ecclesiasticus, 1291. Suffolk, in 37 
parishes, 32 18s. 2d Norfolk, in Great Yarmouth, 1 6s. Od. 

To Bliburgh Priory were appropriated the churches of Bliburgh, 
Bramfi eld, Wenhaston, Walderswick, Thorington, and Bliford ; and 
the chapels of Melles, in Suffolk, and Olaxton, in Norfolk. In 1528, 
Cardinal Wolscy obtained a bull for suppressing this Priory, and 
annexing its endowments to Ipswich College ; but that design not 
being effected, in 1538, Sir Arthur Hopton, Knt., of Westwood 
Lodge, obtained a grant of it, and it has continued to pass with the 
lordship of this parish. 

The Chapel of the Holy-Rood was on the north side of the main 
street in Bliburgh, leading to the bridge ; some remains of which 
were standing in 1754, when Mr. Gardner published his account 
of Bliburgh. 

The annexed transcript of an account belonging to this parish, 
of the 35th of King Henry VIII., may gratify the curious in such 
matters : 

Received of the ploughe chirch ale .... xxv g. 
Received and gathered by Lawraace Crane, on Xmas, for 

sexton's wages ...... vij s. 

Received of Thomas Martin, of two kyen for his year - iij s. 

Received for mens chirch ale ..... xxx s. 

Received and gathered upon Easter Day of the Paschal - vij s. 

Received of Thomas Smith, of thefearme of one cow this year viij s. 

Paid for washing the chirch linen - - - - iv s. 

For two new banyore stavis ..... xij d. 

For one other banyore staffe ... viij d. 
For rent for the chirch house standing in the chirchyard, 

being unpaid six yeares ---.-. vi d. 

The rent for one half of a close for six yeares - - vi d. 
An organ maker for his coming and seying, and little mending, 

of the quere organ ....... xx d. 

Candles, Xmas day, in the morning .... jj d. 

The sexton, for his wages for the whole year - - xx s. 

For wax for the Paschal - - - - - - xviij d. 

For making the Paschal and the Towell ... 

Mem. On the walks near this town, Toby Gill, a black drum- 
mer belonging to Sir Robert Rich's regiment, was executed for the 
murder of Ann Blackmore; for which he was tried at Bury Assizes, 
in August, 1750. 

CHARITIES. In 1701, Thomas Neale gave by will, 2 10s. a 
year, for teaching five of the children of the poorest parents of this 
parish, and its hamlet of Hinton, to read ; and 10s. a year for buying 



208 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

Bibles, or other religious books, for young persons. Which sums 
are applied towards the support of a Sunday school. A dole of 1 
a year, is paid as a rent charge out of land belonging to the Earl of 
Stradbroke ; it is equally divided among poor persons of this parish, 
and Bulchamp, and distributed in bread. The sum of l a year 
was given for the poor, by Matthew Walter, in 1589 : and 5 a year 
is mentioned in the returns of Charitable Donations, in 1786, as 
having been given by Benham Raymond, in 1728, for teaching 
twelve poor children ; but the payment of these charities has been 
withheld for manv Years. 



BRAMPTON, or BAMTUXA. 

The family of Duke derive their descent from Roger Duke, who 
was Sheriff of London in the time of King Richard I. ; whose son, 
Peter Duke, served the same office in the 10th of King John. This 
Peter was father of Roger Duke, who was Sheriff of London in the 
llth of King Henry III., and Mayor the next, and three successive 
years. 

Walter Duke, his son, resided in this parish in the time of King 
Edward III., and held the manor of Hale's Hall here. In the 2nd 
of the following reign, he did homage at Framlingham Castle, for 
his lands in Shadingfield, holden of the said manor by one 
Knight's fee. 

John Duke, of this parish, son and heir of Robert, son of Roger, 
son of the said Walter, married Joan, daughter and heir of 
Park, of Aslacton, in Norfolk, and of Ilketshall, in this county. 
Thomas, his son, succeeded, and William was his heir, by a second 
marriage with Margaret, daughter and heir of Henry Banyard, Esq., 
of Speckshall, in Suffolk. 

This William Duke, Esq., in the 23rd of King Henry VIII., paid 
twenty shillings aid to the lord of Framlingham manor. He married 
Thomasine, daughter of Sir Edmund Jenney, of Knottishall, in this 
county; and was succeeded by his son, George Duke, Esq. (for 
whose marriage and descent see Benhall, in the preceding hundred.) 

Their family estate in this parish became afterwards vested in the 
Wood family, of Loudham; and in 1764, William Chapman, Esq., 
was owner thereof. 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 209 

John Townsend, Esq., resided chiefly in this parish, and was 
probably owner of the lordship here. He was second son of Sir 
Roger Townsend, Knt., by Anne his wife, daughter and co-heiress 
of Sir William de Brews, of Wenham Parva, in this county. Sir 
Roger was a lawyer of great eminence in the reign of King Edward 
IV., and M.P. for Calne, in Wiltshire. In the 1st of Edward V., 
he was constituted King's Serjeant- at- Law, and the following year 
was appointed a Justice of the Courts of Common Pleas. 

Mr. Townsend married Eleanor, daughter of Sir John Heydon, 
K.B., of Baconsthorp, in Norfolk; he died in 1540, before his 
elder brother, Sir Roger Townsend, of Raineham, in Norfolk, Knt., 
who died without issue. 

Richard, eldest son of the said John Townsend, and Eleanor his 
wife, succeeded; and continued to reside at Brampton. He married 
Catherine, third daughter and co-heiress of Sir Humphrey Brown, 
Knt., of Ridley, in Chester, one of the Justices of the Court of 
Common Pleas ; and died in 1552. 

Sir Roger Townsend, Knt., his eldest son and heir, succeeded ; 
and was constituted by the above Sir Roger Townsend, his great 
uncle, heir to his estates. He was progenitor of the present noble 
representative of this house. 

ARMS. Townsend: azure; a chevron, ermine, between three 
escallops, argent. 

CHARITIES. There are, in this parish, a house let in four tene- 
ments, to poor persons, at 4 a year ; and three acres of land, or 
thereabouts, producing about 10 a year; which is distributed 
among poor persons belonging to the parish. There are also twelve 
acres of meadow, called the " Town Eenn," the present rent about 
40; which is applied to the repairs of the church, and in defraying 
all other charges of the churchwardens' office. The acquisition of 
this property is unknown. Mary Leman, in 1805, bequeathed by 
will, 600, clear of all deductions, upon trust, to invest the same in 
the purchase of 3 per cent. Consols ; the dividends to be applied 
for establishing and supporting a Sunday school in each of the pa- 
rishes of Brampton, Redisham, and Cratfield ; for instructing poor 
children belonging to, or residing within those parishes, to read : 
an equal share to be appropriated to each of the three schools. 

This lady resided at Bury St. Edmund's for many years, and de- 
ceased there February 7, 1807. She was only daughter, and sole 
heir of Robert Leman, Esq., of Wickham Market ; who served the 



210 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

office of High Sheriff of this county in 1744. Mrs. Leman be- 
queathed the bulk of her fortune, which was very considerable, to 
Naunton Thomas Orgill, Clerk, M.A., rector of this parish, and of 
Worlingham, in this county. 

This reverend gentleman was son of William Orgill, late of Bec- 
cles, Esq., by Sarah his wife, third daughter and co-heir of William 
Leman, formerly of Beccles, Esq., and of Sarah his wife, daughter 
of Thomas Leman, of this parish, Esq. ; and January 23, 1808, 
the King granted him license, that he and his issue might assume 
and take the surname, and bear the arms of Leman, out of grateful 
respect to the memory of his cousin, Mary Leman, of Bury St. 
Edmunds, spinster, deceased ; daughter, and at length sole heir of 
Robert Leman, brother of the above-mentioned Sarah Leman, the 
grandmother of the said Rev. Naunton Thomas Orgill, the pe- 
titioner. 

This gentleman was lord of this manor, and patron of the living; 
he resided in a commodious house, erected by him in 1794, in this 
parish. The Rev. George Orgill Lemaii is now lord and patron, 
and the Rev. Thomas Orgill Leman, incumbent. 



BLYTHFOKD, or BLIDEFORDA. 

About the 1st of King John, Ralph de Criketot gave this church 
to Bliburgh Priory; and in the 24th of the following reign, a fine 
was levied between Avicia de Criketot, petent, and Simon de Cri- 
ketot, tenent, of the third part of two Knights' fees in this parish ; 
as the inheritance of Ralph de Criketot, her deceased husband, 
granted her in dower. 

Hugh de Bevant, and Felicia his wife, sued for a third part of 
this manor, against Warm de Montchensey, of the inheritance of 
Simon de Criketot, her late husband, and recovered it. By this it 
appears, the Bevants inherited this estate by marriage with the 
Criketots; for Thomas Bevant, in the 9th of King Edward I., was 
owner of this lordship. 

The impropriation, at the dissolution of Monasteries, was granted 
to Sir Arthur Hopton, and passed, with the manor, to the Woods 
and Chapmans, as did the Loudharn estate. The present proprietor 
and patron, is the Rev. Jeremy Bay, of Hethersett, in Norfolk. 



HUNDRED OF BL1THING. 2 1 1 

Robert Mekylfeld, of this parish, Esq., married Margaret, daugh- 
ter of William, and sister and heir of John Irminglund, rector of 
Stivekey St. John, in Norfolk ; and relict of Richard Calthorpe, 
Esq., of Cockthorp, in the same county. She died in 1480, having 
survived her last husband ; and was buried at Cockthorp. 

Katherine, wife of Thomas Gauze (or Caus), of Hingham, in 
Norfolk, was buried in All Saints church, in this parish, in 1485; 
to which she was a benefactress. 

By the last will of Matthew Walter, of this parish, made in 1589, 
he gives and bequeaths to Margaret his wife, all his tenement, lands, 
meadows, feedings, and pastures, lying and being in Bliford, lately 
purchased of Thomas Back ; and one enclosure in Holton, con- 
taining eighteen acres, lately purchased of W. Bonett ; and also 
one meadow in Bulchamp, during the term of her natural life : 
remainder unto John Parker, his cousin, upon this condition ; that 
he, his heirs, or assigns, pay or cause to be paid, yearly, and every 
year for ever, the sum of 10, in the following manner: to the 
poor of this parish, 20s. ; the same sum to each of the parishes of 
Fersfield and Brisingham, in Norfolk ; and Halesworth, Bliburgh, 
Wangford, and South wold, in Suffolk; and 10s. each to the poor 
of Bulchamp, Reydon by Southwould, Henham, Holton, Uggeshall, 
and Stoven : and in default thereof, then the above property to 
revert to Basingbourne Parker, brother of the said John ; and if he 
makes default, then to Mr. Francis Braye, son of Mr. Saynt John 
Braye, under the same limitations. It was proved at Bliburgh, 
before Mr. Bartholomew Styles, Clerk, surrogate to John Maplizden, 
Archdeacon of Suffolk, the 4th of November, 1589. 



BRAMFIELD. 

In the 9th of King Edward I., the demesne of this parish was 
in Nicholas de Seagrave ; but soon after, in Sir Walter de Norwich, 
who in the 5th of the following reign, was made one of the Barons 
of the Exchequer, and obtained a charter of free warren in this 
parish. He deceased in the 2nd of King Edward III. 

Sir John de Norwich, Knt., succeeded ; who also obtained a 
charter of free warren for this manor, with his other possessions ; 
and dying in the 36th of the above reign, left his estate, of which 



212 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

this lordship was a part, to John, his grandson ; who died seized of 
the same, in the 48th of the same King, and left it, with his other 
estates, to Katherine de Brews, daughter of Thomas de Clavering, 
his cousin and heir. 

This lady afterwards taking upon her the hahit of a nun, William 
de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, son and heir of Robert de Ufford, Earl 
of Suffolk, by Margaret his wife, sister of Thomas de Norwich, was 
found to be her next heir. 

It appears, however, that a portion of this manor, with that of 
Brook Hall, in this parish, was, by the executors of the above Sir 
John de Norwich, Knt., Vice- Admiral of England, appropriated to 
Mettingham College, founded by him ; and at the dissolution, in 
1541, was granted to Sir Anthony Denny, and Sir Thos. Denny ; 
but shortly after became vested in the Rous family, and so conti- 
nues ; the Earl of Stradbroke being the present proprietor. 

Reginald Rabett, clerk, is the present representative of that an- 
cient family. He resides at his seat, near the church; in the centre 
of the lawn to which, stands the remains of an old oak, celebrated 
in a ballad which records the flight of Hugh Bigod from Bungay 
Castle. 

Robert Gold, B.D., rector of Thorington, had an estate here ; 
which (dying without issue) he gave to Arthur Coke, Esq., third 
son of Sir Edward Coke, Lord Chief Justice. The widow of Mr. 

Gold held it during her life, who remarried Bloss, Alderman 

of Norwich. 

In the chancel of this parish church, is an elegant monument to 
the memory of Arthur, third son of that celebrated lawyer, Sir 
Edward Coke, Knt. It is thus inscribed : 

" Here lyeth byried Arthvr Coke, Esq. Third sonnc of Sir Edward Coke, Knight, 
late Lord Chiefe Jvstice of England, & of the Privye Covnsell of Kinge James. 
Here lyeth also bvried in the same tombe, Elizabeth, davghter and sole Heire Ap- 
parent of Sir George Waldegrave, Knight, wch. Elizabeth Christianly and peaceably 
departed this life the 14th day of November, Anno Dni. 1627. And the said 
Arthvr likewise Christianly aud peaceably departed this life at Bury St. Edmunds in 
this Covnty of Suffolk, on tbe 6th day of December, 1629." 

"They had issve betweene them, livinge at their deceases, foure davghters, viz : 
Elizabeth, Mary, Winifred, and Theophila, whom Almighty God prosper aud 
protect." 

CHARITIES. Thomas Neale, by will dated in 1701, directed his 
widow and executrix to cause a town-house to be erected, and fitted 
up, in Bramfield, for the habitation of four poor persons or families, 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

so that each of the said persons or families might have a room, and 
other reasonable conveniences ; and he desired the said house to be 
employed for the habitation of four poor and aged single persons ; 
or if there should not be enough of such, then for married couples 
without children ; and that one of the persons inhabiting in the 
house, should teach six poor children of the town, to read the Bible, 
if one of them should be found capable so to do : and he gave the 
yearly sum of 3, to be employed in paying such one of the said 
persons to teach the said children : and he declared that the children 
should be those of parents who, whilst living, took constant relief 
of the parish ; or, in default of such, then of parents who whilst 
living, took relief of the parish when sick, or occasionally ; or, in 
default of such, then of parents the most poor or wicked. He also 
left the yearly sum of 10s., to buy Bibles, and other religious books 
for the children; and he charged the said sum of 3 10s. a year, 
upon his real estate, therein mentioned, in this parish ; now the 
property of Mr. Kobert Howard, by whom the rent charge is paid. 
Mary, the widow of the testator, afterwards the wife of John 
Fowle, Esq., in 1708, left by will 100, to be laid out in the pur- 
chase of land ; the rents thereof to be applied for repairing the 
almshouse, to be built pursuant to the will of the said Thos. Neale : 
and, when there should be no occasion to repair the almshouse, 
then to be distributed amongst the poor widows of the parish, or to 
be applied to put out poor children of the parish apprentice. 
Elizabeth Archer by her will, dated in 1716, gave 80, for pur- 
chasing land ; the rent of which to be applied towards teaching 
poor children of the parish to read, and to give each of them a 
Bible, when they could read it. An almshouse was erected, pursuant 
to the above directions : it contains eight rooms, inhabited by eight 
poor persons. There is also a school- room in Bramfield, appro- 
priated, or belonging to the charity, which was built at the expense 
of the parishioners. The sums bequeathed by Mary Fowle and 
Elizabeth Archer, appear to have been expended in the purchase of 
a small farm, in the parish of Metfield ; comprising a house, barn, 
and 10j acres of land ; rent 13 a year. The town estate here, is 
a cottage and two acres of land, being copyhold of the manor of 
Bramfield, and rented at 8 per annum ; which is applied in addi- 
tion to the income arising from the almshouse and the school 
charities. 



214 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

BULCHAMP. BALD-CAMP, or BULECAMPE, 

Is a hamlet of Bliburgh, and so called, Mr. Gardner thinks, from a 
severe contest maintained between the Mercians and East Angles, 
in 654, at this place ; where King Anna, and his eldest son Fermi- 
nus, were slain, and their bodies conveyed to Bliburgh, and there 
interred. Bald-Camp signifying a bold fighting, or a contest hand 
to hand. 

The family of Kerdiston became early enfeoffed of this lordship, 
which they held of the barony of Bainard Castle. 

By a deed without date, Andrew, son of Eichard de Sybeton, 
grants lands in this place to Sibton Abbey ; and Sir Fulk de Ker- 
diston then held lands here. In the 16th of King Edward I., 
William, son of Koger de Kerdiston, held two fees here, and in 
Claxton, in Norfolk : he was brother to Sir Eulk. 

At the same period, Walter de Kerdiston (probably another bro- 
ther) held two fees, one here, and the other in Aslacton, in Norfolk; 
which were assigned to William, Lord Koss, of Hamlake, and Maud 
his wife, youngest daughter and co-heir of John, son of Alexander de 
Vaux, of Holt, in Norfolk, on the partition made of her father's estate. 

Eobert de Vaux, gave all the churches and tithes of his de- 
mesne to Thetford Abbey, amongst which Belcham (or Bulkham) 
is included ; and Hubert de Montchensy is said to have given two 
parts of his tithes in the same parish, to the said Monastery. 

The lordship appears to have subsequently passed as that of 
Henham, in tin's hundred. 



BUXLOW. 

In the 30th of King Edward I., there was an exchange made 
between Eichard Page, of this parish, and Henry, son of Haman, 
of Bittering, in Norfolk ; whereby the former grants to the said 
Henry, all his tenements, with the rents, wards, reliefs, escheats, 
&c., in this parish, with the advowson of the church, and in Stern- 
field, in this county ; granting to the said Eichard Page, all his 
tenements in Bittering, with the appurtenances, and ten marks in 
his pocket. This deed is dated at Buxlow. 



HUNDRED OF BLITHINO. 215 

Since the decay of this parish church, it has been consolidated 
with Knoddishall. The family of Jenney, until very lately, held a 
good estate here ; but the advowson, and the principal part of their 
property in this place, was sold to Admiral Vernon ; from whom it 
passed to the Lord Orwell, Earl of Shipbrooke. It is now the inhe- 
ritance of Sir Kobert Harland, Bart., in right of his lady, sister and 
heiress of the late John Vernon, Esq. 



CHEDISTON. CEDESTAN, or CHESTON. 

Robert de Vallibus (or Vaux), gave certain tithes in this parish 
to Thetford Abbey, but the rectory was appropriated to the Priory 
of Pentney, in Norfolk, of which he was the founder ; and they 
presented the vicar until the dissolution of that Monastery. The 
patronage of this church is now vested with that of Halesworth, 
and belongs to Mrs. Badeley, whose husband was formerly the in- 
cumbent here. The Rev. Charles Joseph Badeley is the present 
vicar. 

In the 2nd of King Henry IV., John Godfrey was living in this 
parish ; he married Catherine, relict of Nicholas Gavel, of Kirby 

Cane, in Norfolk, Esq. In the time of King Charles I., 

Norton, Esq., was a resident here. 

In 1655, Sir John Pettus, Knt., held this lordship and estate. 
He took part with King Charles, against the Parliament, and com- 
pounded for 886 13s. 4d. About this period Richard Potter and 
Humphrey Heyward, Gents., were residents in Chediston. 

Roger Young, minister of St. Nicholas parish, in Ipswich, was 
owner of an estate in this place, worth about 60 or 70 per an- 
num, purchased by Dr. Thomas Young, his father. Chediston Hall 
is now the estate and residence of George Parkyns, Esq. 

A branch of the house of Claxton became early seated here, who 
derive from the parish of Claxton, in Norfolk. In the 20th of King 
Henry III., Walter de Claxton was interested there ; and conside- 
rable property was conveyed by William de Claxton, in that parish 
and its vicinity, to Sir Thomas de Kerdeston, Knt., who deceased 
in 1446. 

The first of this family concerned here, appears to be Stafford 



216 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

Claxton ; whose son William, of Cheston, married and had issue : 

Hamon Claxton, of this parish.=Alice, d.of JohnCocket, of Ampton,Esq. 

i * 

William Claxton, of Cheston.= Elizabeth, dau. of John Throgmorton, of 

j J Allhallows, in South Elmham. 

Mary Browne, of John Claxton, Esq.,-_Elinor, dau. of Thomas Sydney, of Wai- 
Norfolk, 1st wife [ of this parish. singham in Norfolk, 2nd wife. 

I -J 'L 1 

Hamon and Elizabeth Claxton. Thomasine Claxton. 

Hamon, second son of the above William Claxton, and Elizabeth 
his wife, resided at Great Liverm ere, in this county; in the account 
of which parish his descent will be noticed. 

ARMS. Claxton: gules; on a fess, between three hedgehogs, 
argent, an escutcheon of pretence, barry of ten, of the 2nd, azure ; 
a canton, ermine. 

CHARITIES. The town estate here is a farm, comprising a house, 
barn, stable, and about 30 acres of land, called " Cheston Town 
Farm." It has been vested in trustees since the reign of Henry VII., 
for the repairs of the church, and other charges to be imposed upon 
the town of Cheston ; and is at present let for 30 a year. The 
rent is applied as the trust directs. An alrnshouse, in three tene- 
ments, with a small piece of ground, divided into separate gardens, 
was settled in trustees, by Henry Claxton, by deed dated in 1575, 
for the use of the poor inhabitants of this parish : the premises are 
occupied by three poor families. An annuity of 20s. payable out 
of three acres of land, in Cookley, called "Bowers," and a common 
way leading from Walpole towards Harleston, was granted and 
assigned by the Rev. Thomas Sagar, vicar of Chediston, to trustees, 
to be distributed to the most needy poor of that parish on St. Tho- 
mas's day. This annuity is paid by Lord Hunting-field, the owner 
of the property charged. The annual sum received from Henry 
Smith's charity, at present varies from 15 to 20; which is given 
away to poor persons of the parish in meal, in quantities according 
to the size of their families. 



COOKLEY, or COKELEI. 

Mr. Kirby says, the same patrons presented to this church who 
presented to Huntingfield ; and among the inquisitions of the 50th 
of King Edward III., the jury find that William Lord Huntingfield, 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 217 

long before his death, was seized of this advowson, and Pettistree, 
in Willford hundred ; and he probably held the lordship of Cookley, 
late the property of Sir Joshua Vanneck, now of Baron Huntingfield. 

In 1546, Sir Anthony Heveningham settled, by fine on himself, 
and Mary his second wife, daughter of Sir John Shelton, senior, of 
Shelton, Knt., a lordship in this parish. Sir Anthony died in 1558, 
and Mary his widow, re-married to Philip Appleyard, Esq., but died 
soon after, leaving Sir Arthur Heveningham, Knt., her son and heir; 
who, about 1570, appears to have been owner of this manor. 

Mem. John and Elizabeth Smith, of this parish, were tried and 
convicted at the assizes holden at Bury St. Edmund's, March 21, 
1812, for the wilful murder of Mary Smith, an infant, aged eight 
years, the daughter of the said John Smith, by a former wife, in 
consequence of a series of starvation and cruelty. They were both 
executed at Ipswich, on Monday, the 23rd. John Smith was 39, 
and his wife 27 years of age : they had been married only four 
months. The trial at large was published by Gedge and Barker, 
Bury St. Edmund's ; also " A Sermon preached at the dying request 
of John Smith, by J. Dennant," 8vo. 

CHARITIES. The town estate, as belonging to this parish church, 
consists of two houses, a home stall, and about four acres of land, 
which are let at 19 a year ; and the rents are applied about the 
repairs and ornaments of the church, the surplus being given to the 
poor in occasional relief. Thomas Neale, in 1701, gave by will the 
yearly sum of <3, to be employed towards teaching six poor chil- 
dren, of the poorest parents of the parish, to read the Bible ; and 
the further yearly sum of 10s. to buy Bibles, or other religious 
books : and the yearly sum of 3 10s. is paid out of an estate 
charged therewith, in this parish, belonging to Mr. Saunders. 



COVEHITHE, or NORTHALES. 

This church was impropriated to the monks of Wangford Priory, 
and granted therewith, on the dissolution of that Monastery, to 
Thomas, Duke of Norfolk; in whose family it continued until 
1612, when Sir John Rous, Knt., purchased this impropriation of 
the Duke of Norfolk, together with the other Wangford estates, 
and the fee thereof still continues in that family ; but Sir Thomas 



218 HUNDRED OF BLlTHlNG. 

Sherlock Gooch, Bart., is the present impropriator, under a lease 
for 99 years ; being part of the estate purchased by his ancestor, of 
Thomas Carthew, of Benacre, Esq. The vicarage has been since 
consolidated to Benacre. 

In 1308, John de Cove, and Eve his wife, had a grant of free 
warren in their lands here. 

The lordship of this parish was vested in Simon de Pierpoint, 
and subsequently passed to the Dacres family; in which it conti- 
nued until about the middle of Queen Elizabeth's reign. Sir Thos. 
Sherlock Gooch, Bart., of Benacre Hall, is the present owner of 
the lordship. 

John Bale, Bishop of Ossory, in Ireland, son of Henry Bale, and 
Margaret his wife, was born in this parish, the 21st of November, 
1495. His parents being in poor circumstances, and encumbered 
with a large family, he was entered, at twelve years of age, in the 
Monastery of Carmelites, at Norwich, and from thence removed to 
Jesus College, in Cambridge. 

He was educated in the Koman religion, but afterwards became 
a protestant, through the instrumentality of Thos. Lord Wentworth, 
which, however, greatly exposed him to the displeasure of the 
Eomish clergy, against whom he was protected by Lord Cromwell, 
a nobleman higli in favour with King Henry VIII. On Cromwell's 
death, Bale was obliged to retire into Holland, where he resided 
eight years ; during which time he wrote several pieces against 
popery. 

On the accession of Edward VI., he was recalled into England, 
and presented to the living of Bishops Stocke, in Southampton : 
in 1552, he was nominated to the see of Ossory, in Ireland ; whence 
on the death of King Edward, he was forced to fly, and in his pas- 
sage over the sea, was taken prisoner by pirates ; after many hard- 
ships and dangers, he arrived safely in Switzerland, where he 
continued during the reign of Queen Mary. 

After her death, he returned from exile, but not to his bishopric, 
contenting himself with a Prebend in the cathedral church of Can- 
terbury, to which he was promoted in 1560 ; and in which city he 
died, in 1563, and was buried in the cathedral of that place. 

Fuller says, " One may wonder, that, being so learned a man, 
who had done and suffered so much for religion, higher promotion 
was not forced upon him ; seeing, about the beginning of Queen 
Elizabeth, bishoprics went about begging able men to receive them. 



HUNDRED OF BLITHINO. 219 

But probably he was a person more learned than discreet, fitter to 
write than to govern, as unable to command his own passion ; and 
' biliosus Balceus' passeth for his true character." 

His fame now chiefly rests on his "De Scriptoribus Britannicis ;" 
which, with every deduction that can be made from this great work, 
it must ever be regarded as the foundation of British biography. 

CHARITIES. An allotment of 40 acres, or thereabouts, which 
was set out for the poor on an inclosure, lets at 25 a year ; which 
is laid out in coals, and given among the poor of the parish, in dif- 
ferent quantities, according to the size of their families. There is 
another piece of land in this parish, which has long been appro- 
priated to the poor ; and by the report of old inhabitants, it is 
represented to contain about seven acres, but its precise extent and 
boundaries are not known : part of it is waste, and serves no other 
purpose than that of a covert for game. The sum of 2 12s. 6d. 
a year, is paid as rent, by a tenant of Sir Thomas Sherlock Gooch, 
Bart.; but it appears from the returns of Charitable Donations 
made to Parliament in 1786, that it then produced 3 15s. a year. 



CRATFIELD, or CRATAFELDA. 

The several manors mentioned by Kirby, in this parish, appear 
to have merged into one, which was held by Sir Thos. Coke, K.B., 
of Holkham, in Norfolk; who, in 1 728, was elevated to the peerage, 
as Baron Lovel, and in 1733, to the more honourable title of Vis- 
count Coke, of Holkham, and Earl of Leicester. 

They afterwards became vested in Sir Joshua Vanneck, Bart., by 
purchase from the said Earl ; and are now the estate of his de- 
scendant, Joshua Vanneck, Baron Huntingfielcl. 

The ancient and very respectable family of Smith were seated 
here. The earliest of whom we find mention, is Sir Thurston 
Smith, of this parish, Knt., who married Willoughby, daughter of 
Edward Brews, 4th son of Sir John de Brews, of Wenham, in this 
county; whose descendants inherited considerable property in this, 
and the adjoining county of Norfolk. 

Simon Smith, of Cratfield, had William ; whose son, Simon 
Smith, of Winston, in Norfolk, and Beccles, in this county, inhe- 
rited the manor of Whetacre-Burgh, with its members, in Norfolk ; 



220 HUNDRED OF BLITHINO. 

and Burgh Castle, Easton Bavent, Wisset, Kessingland, &c., m 
Suffolk. 

He married the sister and heir of William Koberts, Town Clerk 
of Yarmouth, and Attorney at Law, in Beccles; and inherited most 
of the above property in her right. Their descendants became 
seated at Winston, in Norfolk. 

In Cratfield was also seated the ancient family of Lany. John 
Lauy, Esq., the father, and John Lany, Esq., the son, both Coun- 
cellors at Law, were many years Recorders of Ipswich : the one 
succeeded the other. The elder of them died in 1633, and was 
buried in St. Margaret's church, in Ipswich ; the other, in St. Ni- 
cholas church there. Benjamin Lany, younger brother, was suc- 
cessively Bishop of Peterborough, Lincoln, and Ely, where he 
deceased in 1074. He published some sermons, and a small trea- 
tise against Hobbes. 

ARMS. Smith : barry, wavy of eight, argent and azure ; on a 
chief, gules, three barnacles, or. 

Mem. At the assizes holden at Bury St. Edmund's, in March 
1812, Edmund Thrower was capitally convicted, and received sen- 
tence of death, for the wilful murder of Thomas and Elizabeth 
Carter, father and daughter, of this parish, on the 16th of October, 
1793, by fracturing their skulls with a hammer. He was executed 
on the 23rd of March, 1812, at Ipswich. 

CHARITIES. The town estate consists of a messuage, called the 
town house, with land adjoining, containing between one ar:d two 
acres ; two farms, containing together 116 acres, in the parish of 
Cratfield; the fourth part of a manor called " Bucenhams;" and a 
messuage, and about 17 acres of land in the parish of Horham. It 
appears by a deed, of the 9th of Queen Elizabeth, that the property 
in this parish, was granted by the lord of the manor, in considera- 
tion of the sum of 70, being the money of the inhabitants ; but 
no trusts respecting the property, are declared by the deed ; and the 
fourth part of the manor was conveyed by Thomas Pooley, by deed, 
in 1710, in consideration of the sum of 181, to Edward Hobarts, 
and divers other persons, in fee, but without any declaration of 
trusts. This property produces together, a rental of about 180 
a year ; which is applied to the reparation of the church, and in 
other common uses for the parishioners ; and about 30 a year is 
expended in the purchase of coals, which are partly given, and 
partly sold at a reduced price, to poor persons of the parish. The 



HUNDRED OF BUTHING. 



portion of the dividends of the stock belonging to Leman's charity 
(of which an account is given in Brampton), is applied in payment 
to the master of a Sunday school, and in buying books for the 
scholars. 



DARSHAM. DERSHAM, or DEVISHAM. 

There were formerly four manors in this parish, namely : Darsham 
cum Yoxford (supposed to be the same held by Asceline, and 
granted, with the advowson, by William, son of Eoger Bigod, 
founder of the Priory of Cluniac Monks at Thetford, to that 
house); Abbot's, as belonging to Leiston Abbey; Austin's, and 
Gerrard's. 

The former were granted, at the dissolution of that Monastery, 
to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk ; the latter, to Charles Brandon, 
Duke of Suffolk ; and subsequently, to Thos. Denton and Richard 
Nottingham: the whole afterwards passed from the Bedingfield 
family to that of Rous, and now belong to the Earl of Stradbroke. 

The several hamlets mentioned by Kirby, as belonging to this 
place, appear to be merely different greens, that most likely, first 
obtained their names from some early inhabitant or chief proprietor, 
such as " Cheyney's Green," " Burstill Green," &c., which they still 
retain. Here was formerly a fine old manor house, called Darsham 
Hall, now reduced to a farm house. 

Darsham Hall was built by Edward Hummings, Gent., and was 
purchased by Thomas Bedingfield, Esq., of Flemming's Hall, in 
Bedingfield ; who left it to Philip Bedingfield, of Ditchingham, in 
Norfolk. Esq., his eldest son. He sold the same to Sir Thomas 
Bedingfield, Knt., his younger brother, who was a resident here in 
1655. Sir Thomas was one of the Commissioners for keeping the 
Great Seal, in the time of the long Parliament, and was a judge of 
the Court of Common Pleas, until he refused to engage to be true 
and faithful to the Commonwealth of England, as then established. 

He married Elizabeth, daughter of Charles Hoskins, of the county 
of Surrey, Esq., and sometime citizen of London ; by whom he had 
issue one son and three daughters. Sir Thomas deceased in 1660, 
and was interred near his father and mother, in this parish church. 
His only son Thomas, married Hannah, the daughter and heir of 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 



Philip Bacon, of ^ - in this county, Esq., and died without 
issue. His eldest daughter died young, and unmarried. Mary, the 
second daughter, married Sir John Knevet, of Aslrwell Thorpe, ill 
Norfolk, K.B. Dorothy, the youngest daughter, married Nevill 
Catelyne, of Kirhy Cane, in the same county, Esq.; afterwards Sir 
Nevill Catelyne, Knt. 

In " Cotman's Suffolk Brasses," is an etching from this parish 
church, of Anne, late wife of Eustace Bedingfield, Esq., of Holme 
Hall, in Norfolk, who deceased in 1C41, aged 80 years and 7 months, 
with the arms of Bedingfield impaling his wife's, and also hers in a 
lozenge. 

Towards the latter part of the 1 7th century, the family of Purvis 
hecame first seated here; who derive from William Purvis, of Abbey 
Hill, near Edinburgh, living at the commencement of that century. 
George Purvis, Esq., settled in England, arid became a Captain in 
the Royal Navy. He married at Stepney, in 1679, Margaret Berry; 
who died in 1717, and was buried at Darsham. Captain Purvis 
deceased in 1715, and was also buried there. 

George Purvis, Esq., his eldest son and successor, was Comp- 
troller of the Navy, in 1735, and M.P. for Aldeburgh, in 1732. 
He died at Islington, in 1740, and was succeeded by his eldest son, 
Charles Wager Purvis, Esq., of this parish, Rear-Admiral of the 
Royal Navy. 

Admiral Purvis, born in 1715, married in 1741, Amy Godfrey, 
niece of Dr. Mawson, Bishop of Ely; and by her, had Charles, his 
heir; Thomas, in holy orders, rector of Melton, in this county; 
and William. He died in 1772, and was buried at Darsham : she 
died at Yoxford, in 1777. 

Charles Purvis, Esq., his eldest son and heir, succeeded ; and 
served the office of High Sheriff for this county, in 1794. He 
married Elizabeth, daughter of Edward Holden Cruttenden, Esq., 
and by her (who deceased in 1816), had two sons and two daugh- 
ters. Mr. Purvis died at Bath, in 1808, and was succeeded by his 
eldest son, the present Charles Purvis, Esq., of 35, Nottingham 
Place, Regent's Park, London. 

ARMS. Purvis: azure; on a fess, argent, between three mas - 
cles, or, as many cinquefoils of the field. 

CHARITIES. There are some cottages, with a small piece of land 
in this parish ; and a cottage, and about half an acre of land in the 
parish of Thebarton, which let at rents amounting together to 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 223 

27 18s. a year. The rents are applied in repairs of the premises, 
in a payment of 4 a year towards the support of a Sunday school, 
and in the reparation of the parish church. It is unknown how the 
property was acquired. 



DUNWICH. DUNEUUIC, DENWYK, or DONEWYC. 

This " Sea-girt City," once an episcopal see, Royal residence, and 
town corporate, is now, by the violent and frequent incursions of 
the ocean, reduced to a few mean dwellings : its ancient state, and 
grandeur, has however been well described in the pages of its faith- 
ful historian, Mr. Thomas Gardner ; from whose work we select the 
following particulars. 

Its ancient splendour, as related by some, must be considered 
traditionary, and therefore doubtful ; it, however, certainly was ho- 
noured with the royal palace of some of the East Anglian Kings, 
and dignified with the first episcopal see of that kingdom. 

In Edward the Confessor's time, Edric de Laxfield held Dun- 
wich, for one manor ; and when the Conqueror's survey was taken, 
Robert Malet, a Norman Baron, held the same: but about the 
commencement of the reign of King Henry II., it became Royal 
demesne. 

This town was firmly attached to the interest of King John ; 
who, for their loyalty, in the first year of his reign, granted them a 
charter of liberty, making Dunwich a free borough, with divers 
other Royal favours; and, in the 10th he confirmed all former 
charters, adding a gild of merchants, with as ample privileges as 
enjoyed by any town in the kingdom, and honoured the Corporation 
with a Mayor; which commenced in 1216, the last year of his 
reign, and continued 130 years. In the 14th of King Henry III., 
that Monarch, for faithful services of the men of Dunwich, con- 
firmed all his father's grants, with many additional privileges. 

At this period the town appears to have attained to the height 
of its prosperity ; but in the following reign, a considerable decline 
was beginning to take place; yet it still continued to maintain eleven 
ships of war, sixteen fair ships, twenty barks, or vessels trading to 
the North seas, Iceland, &c., and twenty-four small boats for the 
home fishery. 



HUNDRED OF BLITHINO. 

But the greatest injury this town sustained, was the removal of 
its harbour, when another part was opened within the limits of 
Bliburgh, not far from Walberswick Quay, and two miles nearer 
Southwold, in the time of King Edward II. ; who, to compensate 
the town for this loss, sent his mandate to John Howard, Sheriff of 
the county, to make proclamation for all goods, merchandise, and 
fish, imported at the new port, to be put to sale nowhere but at the 
ancient market places in Dunwich, on forfeiture of goods and mer- 
chandise so vended. 

In the 20th of King Edward III., the government of this bo- 
rough by a Mayor was dispensed with, and two bailiff's only were 
elected from that period, as chief magistrates ; and in the 31st of 
the same reign, the King was graciously pleased to reduce the fee- 
farm rents to 14 10s. 9d. ; which in the time of King Henry II., 
and Richard I., was 120 13s. 4d., but had gradually been reduced 
from that period to the 4th of George I., when it was only 5; 
when processes were served upon several persons in the borough, 
for arrears of rent due to the Crown for their fee farm. 

At the same time, ten burgesses were imprisoned in Beccles gaol, 
for non-payment ; but upon trial, in consideration of their poverty, 
from the loss of lands by the encroachments of the sea. disuse of 
their port, and deprivation of all tolls, customs, and dues, formerly 
paid by Bliburgh, Walberswick, and Southwold, it was adjudged in 
their favour ; the town acquitted, and Sir George Downing, Bart., 
obtained a grant of the fee farm for 99 years, at 5 per annum. 

Dunwich became a Bishop's See by means of Sigebe:t, King 
of the East Angles ; and Felix, a Burgundian, was consecrated 
Bishop thereof by Honorius, Archbishop of Canterbury, about the 
year 636. He died in 647, and was buried here ; but his body 
was afterwards removed to Soham, in Cambridgeshire, and interred 
in the Monastery there, which was, not long after, demolished by 
the Danes. His bones were discovered, in Canute's reign, by Abbot 
Ethelstan, and removed by him, to his Abbey at Bamsey. 

After him, three others succeeded, who presided over the whole 
kingdom of the East Angles ; when the see became divided, and a 
Bishop for the Norfolk division resided at Elmham, and the Bishop 
of Dunwich presided over the Suffolk division only; until the death 
of Weremund, in 870, the fourteenth Bishop in succession from 
Felix, when it again became united with Elmham, by Wibred, his 
successor, who resided there. 



HUNDRED OF BLITHINO. 225 

In the time of Edward the Confessor, here was but one church, 
dedicated to St. Felix, hy whom it is supposed to have been 
erected ; but in the reign of the Conqueror, two more had been 
added ; and afterwards this town contained six, if not eight, parish 
churches, and three chapels ; also a church belonging to the Knights 
Templars, endowed with a considerable estate here, and the adjoining 
hamlets. 

All Saints is the only church of which any thing remains ; and 
in 1754, divine service was performed there once a fortnight, from 
Lady-day to Michaelmas, and monthly during the rest of the year: 
the minister's stipend not exceeding 12 a year, exclusive of a 
small provisional allowance for refreshment, in consideration of his 
journey thither. The ruins of this only, now remain. But it ap- 
pears the patronage of the only church now in Dunwich, and which 
is a perpetual curacy, is vested in Frederick Barne, Esq., in which 
divine service is performed every Sunday. This probably is the re- 
mains of the building mentioned by Mr. Gardner, as standing on 
the north side of the church yard of St. James's Hospital, then in 
ruins ; but supposed to have been formerly used as a chapel for the 
lepers of that hospital, and now used as the parish church. 

The religious concerned here were, the Franciscan and Domini- 
can, or Grey Friars minors, and Black Friars, or Friars Preachers. 
The former was founded by Richard Fitz-Jolm, and Alice his wife, 
and its revenues were afterwards augmented by King Henry III. ; 
but Gardner thinks the Corporation of the Borough were rather the 
founders, for they gave the Friars a place on which to build their 
Convent, in 1289, which contained seven acres. A portion of this 
Friary is converted into farm buildings, consisting of a bam and 
other offices : two of the gates remain nearly entire ; views of which 
have been repeatedly engraved. 

The Monastery of the Friars Preachers, was founded by Sir Ro- 
ger de Holishe, Knt. ; who was buried in the conventual church. 
They were both granted to John Eyre, in 1544. The Dominicans 
came into England in 1221 ; and had a convent here soon after : 
Gardner says, it was surrounded by a stone wall, but that the whole 
has long been swallowed up by the sea. 

Besides these religious edifices, Dunwich contained two hospitals. 
St. James's Hospital is mentioned as early as the reign of King 
Richard I. ; it is described in an old manuscript as " a great one, 
and a fair large one after the old fashion, and divers tenements, 



226 HUNDRED OF BLITHINO. 

houses, and lands, to the same belonging, to the use of the poor sick 
and impotant people there." The revenues, which were formerly 
very considerable, by mis-management, fell into decay ; and the 
large income it originally possessed was, in the year 1754, reduced 
to 21 19s. 8d. per annum. 

The other hospital, Donus Dei (or MaisonDieu), was also well en- 
dowed with tenements, houses, lands, and rents, but like the former, 
fell considerably into decay from various causes; so that, in 1754, 
Gardner states they amounted to no more than ,11 17s. It is in 
the patronage of the Crown, and the first mention thereof occurs as 
early as the reign of King Henry III. According to Leland, here 
was also, at a very early period, a cell of monks, subordinate to Eye 
Monastery. 

This town has sent two Members to Parliament, ever since the 
Commons of England first acquired the right of representation, in 
the 1st of King Edward I., until 1832 ; when the borough became 
disfranchised by Act of Parliament. A list of which, continued from 
that by Kirby, is annexed. 

Roman remains have frequently been discovered here : a pot, or 
urn, of about a quart measure, was taken out of the cliff at Dunwich, 
about five feet below the surface of the earth, in 1786; pieces of 
many others, of a similar, and different make, were found at the 
same time, filled with ashes, bones, &c. ; and in 1787, a pot of 
whitish stone was dug up by some labourers near Dunwich. They 
are both engraved in the Gentleman's Magazine for 1788, p. 792. 
A curious and very ancient seal, found there in 1790, is also en- 
graved in the same periodical for that year, at p. 1177 ; also an an- 
cient brass key, found in the vicinity, is engraved in the same work 
for 1806, p. 217 : a key of a similar make, but much larger, may 
be seen in Gardner's "Dunwich," plate iv. p. 96. 

The town ARMS are a Ship under sail ; in chief, a crescent and 
star; in base, three fishes, naiant. 

CHARITIES. St. James's Hospital. The Maison Dieu. These 
hospitals have now, for a long time, been consolidated as a charity, 
under the government of a master, for the support or relief of aged 
widows and poor persons of this town ; and particularly such as are 
affected by insanity, or loss of speech, or labour under any peculiar 
disorder or affLcuon. Tha lands constituting the property of the 
consolidated charity, consisted for the most part of detached pieces, 
which, taken separately, were of trifling value; but the present 



HUNDRED OF BLITHINO. 227 

master, who lias held the office for thirty years, has availed himself 
of the opportunity of exchanging several portions ; and by means 
thereof, has brought the property into a more compact state, and 
very greatly increased the income of the charity. The total rental 
of lands and tenements in Dunwich, amounts to .66 9s. per annum; 
in Haveningham, to 17; and in Ellough, to 10: total rent and 
annual value, ,93 9s. These hospitals are of great antiquity, but 
no documents concerning their origin or endowment are known to 
exist. In 1566, John Page (otherwise Baxter), by will, gave power 
to his executor to sell his estate at Carlton, to the intent that the 
yearly sum of 3 should be paid to the town of Dunwich, for the 
poor thereof; and the sum of 40s. to the town of Laxfield, for a 
like purpose. For a long period the property has been in the pos- 
session, and under the joint management, of the officers of these 
two parishes : it consists of a farm house, with outbuildings, and 
43A. 2n. 37p. of land, in Carlton Colville, and is let at 75 a year, 
subject to some deductions on account of land tax, and other out- 
goings. Laxfield receives four-ninths, and Dunwich five-ninths of 
the annual proceeds; which is carried to the general account of the 
chamberlains of the Corporation, as part of the private revenues of 
that body ; without any payment of 3 a year to the poor. 



King s Reign. A.D. Members for Dunwich. 

George III. 1768 Miles Barne. Gerard William Vanneck. 

1774 Miles Barne. Sir G. William Vanneck, Bart. 
Barne Barne. 

1780 The same. 

1784 The same. 

1790 Miles Barne. Sir G. W. Vanneck, Bart. 

1796 Snowdon Bame. Sir Joshua Vanneck, Bart. 

1 80 1 Imp. Parl. S. Barne. Josh. Lord Huntingfield. 

1802 The same. 

1806 The same. 

1807 The same. 

1812 Lord Huntingfield. Michael Bame. 

1818 Michael Barne. Wm. Adam Mackinnon. 
George IV. 1 820 Michael Barne. George Henry Cherry. 

1826 Michael Barne. Andrew Arcedeckne. 
William IV. 1830 Frederick Barne. Andrew Arcedeckne, 

1831 Frederick Barne. Earl of Brecknock. 



328 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

EASTON BAVENT. ESTUNA, or EAST-TOWN. 

Tliis parish was formerly large and well inhabited; and is reputed 
to have carried on a considerable traffic, especially in fishery. In 
most of the old wills of the ancient inhabitants, bequests are made 
of their nets and fishing tackle. 

It was situated on a cliff, separated by the river, on the north, 
from Southwold, and was the most eastern promontory in the 
kingdom; hence called Easton : it became very early vested in the 
Bevant family; hence Easton Bavent. By the encroachment of 
the sea, it has now become reduced to only one or two dwellings. 

In the 9th of King Edward I., Thomas de Bevant held the lord- 
ship and advowson of this parish ; and in the 2nd of the following 
reign, either he, or a descendant of the same name, was attached 
for taking wreck at sea, between Benacre and Snodespyche ; he 
answered, he did not know where Snodespyche was, but that he 
and his ancestors had always taken wreck in Easton. 

In the 4th of King Edward III., the said Thomas had a grant 
for a weekly market here, on Wednesday, and an annual fair on the 
eve and morrow of St. Nicholas; and in the 13th of that reign, 
Thomas de Bevant, and Alice Ms wife, settled this lordship, with 
Cheddiston, in this hundred, on himself for life ; remainder to 
William his son, and Catherine his wife ; remainder to Felicia his 
daughter, sister of William ; and the remainder to John, son of 
Thomas Ubbeston ; remainder to Hi chard, son of John, son of 
Baldwin Bavent. In the 20th of the same reign, William Bavent, 
and Robert Pavilli, were lords. 

The parish church was dedicated to St. Nicholas, the fisherman's 
patron, but has long since been demolished by the sea. Here was 
also a chapel, dedicated to St. Margaret : it was probably in being 
in 1638, when a licence was granted for two persons to be married 
there. 

The living was long held by sequestration, no clergyman choosing 
to take institution to it, until it became discharged of first 'fruits 
and tenths, in Queen Anne's time. It is now consolidated to 
Benacre. 

The manor and advowson here being appendant, the following 
list of patrons will also serve to point out the descent of the, 
lordship : 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

1237 Thomas Bavent. 1392 Heir of Sir John Sharde- 

1307 Eichard de Glosbeck. low, Knt. 

1808 Sir Thomas Bavent, Knt. 1474 Thomas Hopton, Esq. 
1361 John Argentin, Knt. 1590 William Eoberts, Esq. 

1376 Kichard Cosin. 1607 Wm.Koberds Smith, Esq. 

And, 1667 Jeffery Howland, Esq. 

In 1695, Elizabeth, only daughter and heiress of John Howland, 
of Streatham, in Surrey, Esq., married Wriothesly Eussel, afterwards 
Duke of Bedford, and the patronage continued in that family till 
Thos. Carthew, of Benacre, Esq., purchased it of the said Dutchess 
dowager, in 1719, or thereabouts : from him it passed to William 
Gooch, Esq., by purchase, in 1743, and Sir Thomas Sherlock 
Gooch, of Benacre, Bart., is the present proprietor. 

On Trinity Sunday, in 1748, divine service was celebrated in a 
barn in this parish, by the Eev. Mr. North ; when prayers, and the 
39 articles of religion, were read in due form, and a sermon preached 
in the afternoon; the declaration of the minister's assent to the said 
articles, having been subscribed. Mr. Gardner, the Dunwich his- 
torian, was present : he observes, " a chair and a little table oc- 
cupied the places of desk and pulpit ; for pews were substituted 
stools and benches ; and the want of mats was sufficiently supplied 
by a plenty of straw, that covered the area of the nave of the 
church." 



FOEDLEY, or FORLEA. 

The demesne of this parish was formerly in the De Weyland 
family, and subsequently became the estate of dame Elizabeth le 
Despenser. In the time of Queen Elizabeth it belonged to Edward 
Honings, Esq. The church has been long in ruins, and the parish 
considered a hamlet to that of Middleton : the Eev. Harrison Packard 
is the present patron and incumbent. 



FEOSTENDEN, or FROXEDENA. 
It appears the demesne of this parish was anciently in Eobert de 



230 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

Biskele (or Bixley), probably a descendant of a family of that 
name, who held, under Koger Bigot, at Bixley, in Norfolk, in the 
reign of King Henry II. 

It subsequently became the estate of the Delapoles, Dukes of 
Suffolk. In the 28th of King Henry VI., William Delapole died 
seized of this manor ; and, in the 15th of the following reign, Sir 
Edward Hungerford, John Hey don, and Humphrey Eorster, re- 
leased by deed, to John Delapole, Duke of Suffolk, his son and 
heir, and Elizabeth his wife, William Hastings, Robt. Chamberlain, 
and others, to the use of the said Duke and Dutchess, this lordship, 
with those of Bacton, and Greeting St. Olave, in this county; which 
the said Sir Edward Hungerford, &c., were seized of, to the use of 
William Delapole, late Duke of Suffolk, and the lady Alice his 
wife, deceased. 

John Delapole, created Earl of Lincoln in his father's life time, 
as his eldest son and heir succeeded to his Suffolk honours and 
estates. He was slain in the battle of Stoke upon Trent, in 1487 ; 
when Edmund, his next brother, succeeded ; who being attainted of 
high treason, was beheaded in 1513, the 5th of King Henry VIII., 
and his estates became forfeited to the Crown. The following year 
this lordship was granted to Thomas, Lord Howard, eldest son of 
Thomas, second Duke of Norfolk, of that house, by his first mar- 
riage, and Anne his wife, daughter of King Edward IV., and the 
heirs male of their bodies. 

This lady died without surviving male issue, and it again reverted 
to the Crown ; and was granted, in the latter part of Queen Eliza- 
beth's reign, to Morse, who sold it to John Glover, Esq., of 

High House, in Campsey Ash; who, about 1652, sold that estate 
to John Sheppard, Gent., and removed hither. In this family the 
estate continued for many generations. 

It afterwards became the property of Edward Hollond, Esq. In 
1830, the landed estates of that gentleman were brought to the 
hammer, and the freehold Erostenden and Wrentham estates, in- 
cluding 1,040 acres, with the manor of this parish, were sold for 
39,700 guineas. 

The Eev. William St. Andrew Vincent, of Bolney, in the county 
of Sussex, holds an estate in this parish, as tenant in chief under 
the Dean and Chapter of the Collegiate Church, St. Peter, West- 
minster, for a lease of 21 years. The Rev. Richard Gooch, the 
present incumbent, resides at Frostenden Lodge. 



HUNDRED OF BLITHINO. 281 

CHARITIES. r-The church marsh, SA. OR. 32p., with a pightle 
adjoining, 2R. 2p., let at 15 a year. A piece of arable land, 
2A. 2R. 29p., near the former, annual rent 5. Which rents are 
applied for the repairs of the parish church. An allotment of 
4A. 2R., awarded, on the inclosure, for the use of the poor, let at 
7 10s. a year : the rent is laid out in coals, which are given to 
the poor of the parish. 



HALESWORTH. HALESUUORDA, or HEALESUURDA. 

The Argenteins hecame early enfeoffed in this lordship. In 1318, 
Sir John de Argentein, Knt., was owner of the same ; and died 
seized thereof, in or about 1345. It was held of the King in 
capite, as of the honour of Chester, at one Knight's fee. 

He was eldest son and heir of Eeginald de Argentein, and Lora 
his wife, sister of Kobert de Vere, Earl of Oxford ; to whom he 
gave Keteringham Hall manor, in Norfolk, in frank marriage, 
about 1262; which they held in 1265, and Sir John, their son, 
held the same in 1315. 

He married Agnes, daughter of Sir William de Beresford, sister 
and heir of Sir Edmund de Beresford, Knt., and deceased in 1324, 
leaving John, his son and heir, being one year old. Agnes, his 
widow, re-married John de Nerford, who died in 1329; and she 
afterwards married John Mautravers, sen. ; by whom she had issue, 
Eleanor, who married John, son of John, Earl of Arundel. 

This lady Agnes deceased in 1375; John de Argentein, her son, 
being about 50 years of age : he, in 1381, settled his estates on 
Sir William his son, and Isabel his wife, daughter of Sir William 
de Kerdiston, Kut., after the death of himself, and Margaret his 
wife, who held in 1383. 

In 1390, it appears that the three daughters of the said Sir John 
de Argentein, and Margaret his wife, and their issue, were heirs ; 
amongst whom the property became divisible : and it soon after 
passed, by marriage, to the Alyngton family, with considerable 
other property in Cambridgeshire ; Horseheath, in that county, 
their chief seat, being so acquired, about 1428, in the reign of 
King Henry VI. This estate afterwards became the inheritance of 
the Betts family ; of whom the Plumers purchased, and it recently 



232 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

was vested in William Plumer, Esq., who was lord of the manor, 
and patron of the living. 

ARMS. Argentein: gules; three covered cups, argent. Al- 
lyngton : sable ; a bend, engrailed, between six billets, argent. 

John Argall, rector of this parish, an author of note in his time, 
who wrote some religious tracts in latin, was a native of London ; 
and entered a student in Christ Church, Oxford, towards the latter 
part of Queen Mary's reign. He took his M.A. degree, in 1565, 
and obtained this living. He was held in high esteem by the 
neighbouring gentry and clergy : being at a feast in the parish of 
Cheddiston, he died suddenly, whilst at the table, and was buried 
at Halesworth, October 8, 1606. 

CHARITIES. The town estate consists of certain freehold and 
copyhold property, vested in trustees, in trust, that the rents and 
profits should be disposed of for the public uses and purposes, and 
general benefit of the inhabitants of this parish. Of the original 
acquisition of part of this property, no account can be given ; but 
other parts of it have been purchased at different times, with money, 
or funds, belonging to the inhabitants. These are sometimes called 
the " Unappropriated Estates," and are, for the most part, in the 
parish of Halesworth, but partly in the adjoining parish of Holton. 
This property produces altogether a yearly rental of 210 ; part of 
which is subject to a charge of 3 a year, in respect of Neale's 
charity, hereafter mentioned; and the remainder of the clear income 
is applied to general purposes : namely, the repairs of the church, 
the payment of the salaries of the different officers belonging to the 
same, &c. ; and also for defraying the expenses of lighting the town, 
the support of some almshouses, and occasionally in the purchase 
of coals, to be sold to the ^poor at reduced prices. Here are six 
small almshouses, in a row, near the church, given by one William 
Carey ; and two other cottages in Halesworth : they are occupied 
by 14 poor widows; are kept in repair out of the rents of the above 
estate, and the inmates are supported partly by means of other cha- 
rities, after mentioned, and partly out of the poor rates. In 1611, 
Robert Lance gave by will 60, towards the purchase of a piece of 
land ; the profits thereof to be distributed to the poor of the town 
of Halesworth, where most need should require. With this legacy 
a piece of copyhold land, containing 5A. 3R. 9p., held of the manor 
of Southelmham, was purchased, which lets at 9 4s. a year. The 
sum of 60, given by John Phillips, and 30 5s., given by Richard 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 233 

Phillips, was laid out in the purchase of a messuage and lands, 
being copyhold of the manor of Mells Wenhaston, near Halesworth, 
consisting of a cottage, and HA. In. 35p. of land, which lets at 
82 6s. a year ; and the produce is expended in the purchase of 
bread, and given to the poor ; and to keep in complete repair the 
grave-stone of the Phillips, in Halesworth church-yard. Matthew 
Walter gave by will, in 1589, an annuity of 20s. to the poor of 
this parish, out of his estate at Holton ; which is also laid out in 
bread, and given away among poor people, on Sundays. In 1650, 
James Keble, devised a pightle, called " Bell's Pightle," the rents 
to be applied yearly, at or before Christmas, to buy corn, to be 
made into bread, and distributed among the poor of the parish ; 
and in 1652, John Keble devised his lands in Holton, to the relief 
of the poor of Halesworth ; half of the revenue to be employed in 
the relief of widows, and the other half to bind out poor apprentices. 
The sum of 80, given by Eeginald Burroughs, for the purchase 
of land, for the benefit of 20 poor people inhabiting in this town, 
that 20s. might be distributed unto them quarterly ; the sum of 
20, given by Matthew Mann, the interest thereof to be distributed 
in bread to the poor of the same town ; and 10, given out of the 
town stock, were laid out, in the 22nd of James I., in the purchase 
of a close, called " Quintrell's," in Mells Hamlet and Wenhaston, 
for performance of the said charitable intentions. In 1804, William 
Vincent bequeathed the residue of his personal estate, to relieve the 
necessities of the poor of Halesworth, especially in sickness : this 
residue, amounting to 100, was laid out in the purchase of 
2A. 2n. 18p. of land, in Holton. 

The property belonging to these charities consist of the following 
particulars : TA. 3n. 28p., taken in exchange for the Bell's Pightle, 
and the land purchased with Vincent's gift, rent 13 11s. 6d.; given 
in bread, and to poor persons in sickness. A house, and 4A. OR. 7p. 
of garden ground, at the yearly rent of 28 16s.; and barn, stable, 
and 19A. OR. 33p. of land, at 54 12s. a year; 3A. In. 18p. at 
17 Is. a year: one half is divided half-yearly among 20 poor 
widows, most of whom reside in the almshouse ; and the other half 
is applied in apprenticing poor boys, with premiums, usually of 15, 
or thereabouts. Two pieces of land in Mells, containing together 
SA. 3R. 26p., rent 19 14s. : this property is ascribed to Burrough's 
and Mann's charities. The sum of j3 a year is paid as interest 
upon 60, given by Thomas Neale, for the education of poor chil- 



234 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

dren of this parish ; the further sum of 10s. a year was given by 
him for Bibles, and books for the said children. A rent charge of 
17 6s. 8d. upon a farm in Halesworth, the property of Mr. Chas. 
Woolby ; one half is paid to a schoolmaster, and the other half to 
a schooldame, as directed by the will of Eichard Porter, in 1701. 
John Hutcher gave by will, in 1816, a pew upon the gallery in 
Halesworth church, the rent, which amounts to 30 a year, is paid 
to the committee of the national school in Halesworth. 



HENHAM 

Is a hamlet of Wangford, and the lordship of both was in the pos- 
session of Kalph Bainard (Baignar, or Baynard), a powerful Nor- 
man Baron, soon after the conquest. 

Jeffrey Baynard, his son and heir succeeded; whose son William, 
taking part with Helias, Earl of Mayne, and others, against King 
Henry I., lost his Barony of Bainard Castle ; his estates being 
forfeited to the Crown. 

The family of Kerdiston, about this period, became enfeoffed in 
these lordships ; probably by grant from that Monarch. It con- 
tinued in that Baronial house until the reign of King Henry VI. 
In the escheat rolls of the 29th of that King, the jury find that Sir 
Thomas Kerdiston died not seized of the manors of Henham, Bui- 
camp, and Stratford, in Suffolk ; but that William de la Pole, late 
Duke of Suffolk, and Alice his wife, as her right, entered on, and 
took the profits, during the life of Sir Thomas Kerdiston; who 
died in the 25th of that reign. 

This lady was daughter and heir of Thomas Chaucer, Esq., son 
of the famous poet of that period, by Maud his wife, daughter and 
co-heir of John Burgherst, by Maud his wife, daughter of Sir Wm. 
Kerdiston, and Margaret his second wife, daughter of Edmund 
Bacon. 

In the 3rd of King Henry VI., a fine was levied between Thomas 
Chaucer, Esq., and Maud his wife, querents, and Sir Thomas 
Kerdiston, and Elizabeth his wife, defurcients, of several lordships 
conveyed to Maud, who with her husband resettled them on Sir 
Thomas and Elizabeth, in tail, to be held of the heirs of Maud : the 
above claim appears to be made in right of such conveyance. 



HUNDRED OF BLITJIING. 235 

, In the 15 tli of King Edward IV., the Dutchess died, seized of 
this inaiior, and 'John De la Pole inherited. On the attainder of 
Edmund De l;i Pole, Earl of Suffolk, who was beheaded in the 5th 
of King Henry VIII., it became forfeited to the Crown. After this 
it was granted by the said King, to Charles Brandon, Duke of 
Suffolk. 

After his death it again became Crown property ; and Sir Arthur 
Hopton obtained a grant of this estate, as Eoyal demesne ; who, in 
the 37th of the said reign, sold it to Sir Anthony Kous, Knt., 
Comptroller of Calais. 

He was eldest son and heir of Sir William Kous, of Dennington, 
in this county, Knt., by Alice his wife, daughter of Sir John Sul- 
yard, of Wetherden, in Suffolk, Knt., Lord Chief Justice of Eng- 
land ; and from him lineally descended Sir John Kous, of Henham 
Hall, created a Baronet in 10 GO; whose descendant, Sir John Kous, 
Bart., M.P. for this county, was elevated to the Peerage in 1790, as 
Baron Kous, of Dennington ; and created, in 1821, Viscount Dun- 
wich, and Earl of Stradbroke. 

John Edward Cornwallis Kous, Earl of Stradbroke, his eldest 
son and heir, the present Peer, is now proprietor of this estate, and 
resides here : the noble representative of a long line of distinguished 
ancestors, who have continued to flourish in this county for many 
ages. 

ARMS. Bainard: argent; a fess between two chevronels, azure. 
Kerdiston: argent; a saltier, engrailed, gules. De la Pole: azure; 
a fess between tliree leopards' heads, cabosed, or. Rous: sable; a 
fess dancettee, or ; between three crescents, argent. Crest : a 
bunch of bay leaves, piled in the form of a cone, proper. 

Mem. Henham Hall was entirely destroyed by fire, in 1773 : 
the loss estimated at ,30,000. An elegant mansion* has since 
been erected ; the seat of the present proprietor. 



HENSTEAD, or HENESTEDE. 

The family of Pierpoint, who were of French extraction, became 
very early possessed of this lordship. At the time of the general 

* A view and description of this is given in " Davy's Seats of the Noblemen and 
Gentlemen in Suffolk." 



280 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

survey, in 1078, Robert de Pierpoint held the same, under William 
Earl Warren ; from whom descended Simon de Pierpoint, a person 
remarkable for his great fidelity to King Henry III., as well as for 
the extent of his possessions. 

His descendants were men of renown in their succeeding gene- 
rations ; but did not become ennobled until the reign of King 
Charles I., under the title of Earl of Kingston, and afterwards 
Marquess of Dorchester. 

This estate continued in their house until the time of King 
Edward III. John, son of Simon Pierpoint, of this parish, married 
Ela, daughter of Sir William de Calthorpe ; who settled on them 
the manor of Hurst-Pierpoint, in Sussex, on this marriage, in the 
5th of that reign, as appears by a fine. 

In the latter part of the reign of King Henry VII., it was vested 
in the Clopton family ; in Queen Elizabeth's time, the Sydnors, of 
Blundeston, held it ; and at the restoration, it was the estate of Sir 
Robert Brook, of Yoxford. Since that period it belonged to the 
family of Mildmay, from whom it passed to the Hallidays, who 
bequeathed it to John Amyas, Gent., of Beccles ; whose son, the 
Rev. John Amyas, rector of this parish, sold the same to Thomas 
Kett, Esq., of Seething, in Norfolk. Charles Barclay, Esq., who 
married the eldest daughter of Mr. Kett, is the present possessor : 
he resides at Henstead House.* 

The Rev. John Gordon, D.D., F.R.S., Precentor and Archdeacon 
of Lincoln, was rector of this parish, upon the presentation of 
Emanuel College, of which society he was a Eellow : he was highly 
distinguished by strong natural abilities, and an early proficiency 
in classical literature. 

Dr. Gordon, in 1762, married the widow of Dr. Philip Williams, 
formerly rector of Barrow, in this county. He died at Lincoln, 
January 5, 1793. 

The Rev. John Amyas succeeded : he was presented by Bevill 
Paston Chambre, Esq.; it having been previously decided that the 
right of presentation was not in Emanuel College. Mr. Amyas 
was formerly of Cams College, Cambridge : he held this lordship 
prior to his presentation to the living, and died April 19, 1810, 
aged 62 years. 

CHARITIES. The town land consists of about two acres, for 

* A view and some account of this house is given in " Davy's Seats of the No- 
blemeu and Gentlemen of Suffolk," engraved by J. Lambert. 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 237 

which a rent of i'3 a year is paid, by Charles Barclay, Esq., being 
surrounded by the lands of that gentleman, and which formerly 
belonged to the Rev. John Amyas. The sum of l a year is also 
paid in respect of a house in the parish of Rushmere. The rent of 
the land, and annuity, are applied to the repairs of the church. 
In 1599, Henry Branden gave, by will, his tenement in Rushmere; 
one half of the rents to be distributed to the poor of this parish, 
and the other half to be applied in payment of 6s. 8d. a year to the 
poor of Rushmere, and the reparation of the church of Henstead, 
and of the said tenement. The premises thus devised, being about 
three roods in extent, were demised to a person who erected a 
cottage on the ground, for which he pays a rent of 1 7s. a year, 
which is applied as the donor directed. The poors' allotment, of 
14 acres, was awarded on the enclosure of Sotterley Common, to 
the poor of this parish ; it lets at ^20 a year, and the rent is laid 
out in coalsj which are distributed among the poor people in winter. 



HEVENINGHAM, or HEUENIGGEHAM. 

This parish was the seat and estate of a family who derived their 
name therefrom, and were very honourably allied. Weever, and 
some other authorities, state, that Jeffery de Heveningham was lord 
here in 1020, in Canute's time ; which may be doubtful : but it 
appears certain that in the 9th of King Edward I., Roger de He- 
veningham held the same. 

Thomas Heveningham, Esq., was a great favourite of Richard 
Plantagenet, Duke of Gloucester, afterwards King Richard III.; 
who settled an annuity on him for life, of 1 0, out of his manor of 
Rothing-Berners, in Essex. He died in 1499. 

John Heveningham, son of the said Thomas, succeeded; and 
married Alice, daughter of Sir Ralf Shelton, the younger, of 
Shelton, in Norfolk, Knt. He died in 1530. 

Sir Anthony Heveningham, his son and heir, was made a Ban- 
neret by King Henry VIII. ; and married first, Katherine, eldest 
daughter of Sir Philip Calthorpe, Knt. In 1546, he settled, by 
fine on himself and Mary his second wife, daughter of Sir John 
Shelton, sen., of Shelton, Knt., this lordship, with those of Cookley, 
Sibton, Ubbeston, and Walpole, in this hundred. 



238 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

Sir Anthony died in 1558 : Mary his relict, re-married to Philip 
Appleyard, Esq. Sir Arthur Heveningham, Knt , was their sou 
and heir; who, about 1570, inherited all the above-named manors. 
He died in 1630; and William Heveningham, Esq., his son and 
heir, by his second wife, Bridget, daughter of Christopher, son of 
Sir William Paston, of Paston, in Norfolk, Knt., inherited. 

This William was one of the nineteen regicides that surrendered 
themselves at the restoration; and being attainted, in 1600, his 
estate became forfeited to the Crown : the year following, Mary, 
daughter and heiress of John, Earl of Dover, his second wife, 
obtained a patent from King Charles II., for most of her husband's 
estates, particularly that of this manor, and Ketcringham, in Nor- 
folk; which she enjoyed to her death, which took place in 1695-6. 

Henry Heveningham, Esq., the last of this family, was member 
for Dunwich in 1695 ; and is probably the same person who served 
the office of Mayor for Thetford in 1684, the first after the new 
charter, and who returned himself as member for that borough, the 
following year, in opposition to Sir Joseph Williamson, the Eecorder, 
who was elected by the burgesses. 

In or about 1700, it became the estate of John Bence, Esq., by 
purchase; and he, or his descendant, sold it to George Dashwood, 
Esq., who was seated here in 1735; who sold it to Joseph Darner, 
Esq., afterwards Baron Milton, and Earl of Dorchester ; of whom 
Sir Joshua Vanneck, Bart., bought it, ancestor of Lord Hunting- 
field, the present proprietor. 

The house of Vanneck are of Dutch extraction, and claim a very 
ancient and honourable descent. Joshua, second son of Cornelius 
Vanneck, Esq., paymaster of the land forces of the United Provinces, 
an eminent and opulent merchant of London, was created a Baronet 
in 1751. 

He married, in 1732, Mary Daubuz, and had issue, Gerard and 
Joshua, successive Baronets. Sir Joshua died in 1777, and was 
succeeded by his eldest son, Sir Gerard, who died unmarried, in 
1791; when the title devolved upon his brother, Sir Joshua. This 
gentleman married, in 1777, Maria, 2nd daughter of Andrew 
Thompson, of Boehamptoii, in Surrey, Esq. ; by whom he had 
issue, Joshua, present Peer, and several other children. 

Sir Joshua was created a Peer of Ireland, in 1796, by the title 
of Baron Huntingfield, of Heveningham Hall; he died in 1816, 
when Joshua, his eldest son, the present Peer, succeeded. He 



IIUND11ED OF BLITHING. i> 

married, 1st, Catherine, eldest daughter of Chaloner Arcedeckne, 
Esq., of Gleveriug Hall ; and 2nd, Lucy Anne, 3rd daughter of 
Sir Charles Blois, Bart., of Cockfield Hall. By the former lady he 
has a son, Joshua, and a daughter; and by the latter, a son, Charles 
Andrew Vanned*. 

Heveningham Hall, the residence of this nobleman, is justly es- 
teemed one of the finest seats in the county. It is of modem 
erection, having been began about the year 1778, by Sir Gerard 
Vanneck, from the designs of Sir Kobert Taylor, but finished by 
Mr. James Wyatt.* 

In a letter from Sir Joshua Vanneck, dated from Heveningham, 
September 19, 1754, and addressed to Dr. Ducarel, he observes: 
" The old house built by the family, who gave their name to this 
village, has been pulled down about forty years ago ; the present 
house being built at that time by one Squire Bence, so that nothing 
mentioned in the abstract remains, but in the old offices, where the 
name of W. H. and time of building, 1G53, are yet to be seen." 

A branch of the ancient and respectable family of Garneys were 
formerly interested here. Robert, sou of Eobert Garneys, one of 
the lords of Soham Hall manor, at Bereford, in Norfolk, married 
Catherine, daughter and heir of John Blanchard, of this parish, and 
in 1400, resided here. 

By her he had two sons. William, his second son, married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Ralph Bigod, of Stockton, Knt. ; by 
whom he had Half Garneys, Esq., who died without issue in 144G, 
and Sir Peter Garneys, his uncle, was found to be his heir. He 
married Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Ralf Ramsey, of Kenton 
Hall, in Loes hundred ; and by this marriage Kenton came into 
this family, where they continued to reside for many ages. 

Walter Fitz Robert gave the advowson of this parish church to 
the Priory of St. Neots. He deceased in 1198, probably seized of 
this manor. The advowson remains in the Crown. 

ARMS. Heveningham: quarterly, or and gules; in a bordure 
engrailed, sable, nine escallops, argent. Vanneck : argent ; a tor- 
teaux between three bugle boms, gules, stringed, or. Crest: a 
bugle horn, gules, stringed or, between two wings expanded, per 
fesse, of the second, argent. Supporters : two greyhounds, ermine ; 
collared, compony, argent and gules, lined, or. 

* An engraving and description of this splendid mansion is given in " Davy's 
Seats," and also in " Excursions through Suffolk." 



240 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

CHARITIES. The town and poor estates here, consist of five te- 
nements, in Heveningham, formerly one messuage, called the town 
or poor house, with gardens comprising about half an acre ; rents 
amounting together to 10 5s. A messuage and four acres of 
land in the same parish, rent 6 a year. A farm in the parish of 
Badingham, partly copyhold, comprising a house with outbuildings, 
and 52 acres of land, let at the annual rent of 60. It appears by 
the older writings, which are of a very ancient date, that the trusts, 
as to the Badingham estate, were for the payment of fifteenths to 
the King, the repairs of highways, the relief and maintenance of 
the poor of this parish, and such other charitable uses as to the 
feoffees should seem meet : as to the tenements in Heveningham, 
for the use of the poor ; and as to the rest of the premises, partly 
for the repairs of the parish church, and partly for the relief of the 
poor. It has long been the practice to treat the whole as one estate; 
and the rents are applied in providing for the repairs of the parish 
church, in payment of the clerk's salary, in occasional payments to 
the surveyors of the highways and constables, and in support of a 
Sunday school. 



HINTON, 

A Hamlet of Blithburgh. 



HOLTON, or HOLETUNA. 

In the time of William Eufus, Alan the Red, Earl of Bretaign, 
in France, and Richmond, who married Constance, the daughter of 
William the Conqueror, is supposed to have held this manor, as he 
then granted the advowson to the church of St. Mary, at York. 

Petronilla, relict of Sir William de Narford, and one of the 
daughters and co -heirs of Sir John de Vallibus (or Vaux), held in 
this parish. She deceased in 1326, the 19th of King Edward IL, 
and was buried in the Priory of Pentney, in Norfolk, founded by her 
ancestor. The rectory is in the patronage of the Crown. 



HUNDRED OF liLITHING. 241 

HUNTINGFIELD, or HUNTING AIELDA. 

Soon after the conquest, Roger, lord of the manor of Hunting- 
field, assumed the name of his lordship, and devised the same to 
William de Huntingfield, his son and successor ; founder of Mend- 
ham Priory, in King Stephen's reign, about the year 1140, and who 
deceased in 1155. 

Roger de Huntingfield, his son and heir, flourished in the reign 
of King Henry II. ; whose son William, was one of the Barons 
who signed Magna Charta, in the 17th of King John, 1215. He 
was Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, and an accountant with Alberic 
de Vere, Earl of Oxford, and others, for the customs of those 
counties. 

In the 14th of King Henry III., Roger de Huntingfield, his son 
and heir, purchased Huntingfield Hall, in Norfolk, of John de 
Lacy, Constable of Chester, and Earl of Lincoln, and Margaret 
his wife, it being the inheritance of Saier de Quincy, late Earl of 
Winchester. In the 19th of the said reign it was represented to 
the King that Roger de Huntingfield had sent to his assistance, in 
Gascoign, Andrew de Gayzi, his Knight, who had performed lau- 
dable service ; and the Sheriff of this county had an order, that 
the demand of 60 marks due from him to the Crown, should be 
excused. 

William de Huntingfield was his son and heir; and in the 7th of 
King Edward I., an agreement was made between this William de 
Huntingfield and John de Engaine, and enrolled, that Roger, eldest 
son of William, should many Joan, the eldest daughter of the said 
John. This William deceased about the llth of the said King. 

Roger de Huntingfield, his son, succeeded. He was one of those 
Barons who sent Pope Boniface word, that the Kingdom of Scotland 
was not of his fee ; and that he had no jurisdiction in temporal af- 
fairs over either of the Kingdoms : which was subscribed in the 
Parliament held at Lincoln, in the 30th of King Edward I. 

In the following year he held this manor of the King in capite, 
as of the honour of Eye, by the service of one Knight's fee, and the 
fourth part of a Knight's fee; and deceased about that period, 
leaving Joan, the daughter of John de Engaine, his widow. Wil- 
liam de Huntingfield, their son and heir, succeeded, and deceased 
in the 7th of King Edward II., leaving Roger his son and heir. 



242 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

about eight years of age. Sibilla, his relict, re-married to William 
do Latimer. 

In the 13th of the same reign, Walter de Norwich, a Baron of 
the Exchequer, owed 18 for the farm of the custody of the third 
part of the manor of Huntingfield, in Suffolk, which Sihilla his 
widow held in dower ; after whose decease it was in the King's 
hands, by the minority of Roger, son and heir of the said William 
and Sibilla de Hunting-field. 

This Roger de Huntingfield married Cecilia, daughter of Walter 
de Norwich, and deceased in the llth of King Edward III., seized 
of the manors of Huntiugfield, Benges, and Harham; leaving 
William, his son and heir, aged 7 years. In the 30th of that reign, 
he accompanied Edward the Black Prince into G-ascoign, and had 
letters of protection, dated the 30th of February. 

Amongst the inquisitions, in the 50th of the same King, the 
jury find that William Lord Huntingfield, long before his decease, 
was seized of certain property here, and in divers other parishes ; 
with the advowson of Huntingfield, Cookley, and Pettistree, in 
Willford hundred : and by a fine levied in the 48th of that reign, 
between William de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, querent, and the feof- 
fees of the said William Lord Huntingfield, defendants, this pro- 
perty became settled on the said Earl for life ; after the decease of 
the said William, remainder to Thomas, William, and Edmund, 
sons of the said Earl ; all of whom died without issue. 

Alice, widow of Sir John de Norwich, Knt., his kinswoman, was 
his next heir ; but did not inherit, in consequence of the above 
settlement, and the said property passed to the three sisters of 
William Earl of Suffolk, upon his decease, in the 4th of King 
Richard II. It subsequently became the inheritance of the De la 
Poles, Earls of Suffolk, and so continued until the attainder of 
Edmund De la Pole, who was beheaded in 1513, the 5th of King 
Henry VIII., when his estates became forfeited to the King. 

This manor and estate was a grant from the Crown, to Henry, 
son of William Carey, Esquire of the Body to King Henry VIII., 
by Mary his wife, daughter of Thomas Bullen, Earl of Wiltshire, 
and sister to Queen Anne Bullen ; who, in the 1st of Queen Eli- 
zabeth, was created Baron Hunsdon, and sent to convey the en- 
signs of the Order of the Garter to the King of France ; and, upon 
Ids return, was made Governor of Berwick upon Tweed. 

From his near affinity to her Majesty, and other causes, he held 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 243 

several honourable offices during her reign, and was made Knight 
of the Garter. Huntingfield Hall, when in the possession of this 
nobleman, was honoured with a visit from the Queen, who is stated 
to have here enjoyed the pleasures of the chase in a kind of rural 
Majesty, and to have shot a buck with her own hand, from a favourite 
tree in the pnrk, known by the name of " Queen Elizabeth's Oak."* 

In 1596, George, eldest son of Henry Lord Hunsdon, succeeded 
his father in the Barony, and was a Knight of the Garter. He died 
in 1603, and left issue, by Elizabeth his wife, daughter of Sir John 
Spencer, of Althorp, an only daughter and sole heir, Elizabeth, who 
married to Sir Thomas Berkeley, Knt. She died in 1635. 

Sir Eobert Coke, second son and heir of Sir Edward Coke, Lord 
Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, married Theophila, their 
daughter, and inherited the Huntingfield estate, in right of such 
marriage. 

Sir Robert deceased in 1653, without issue ; when John Coke, 
Esq., of Holkham, in Norfolk, 4th son of Sir Edward, succeeded to 
this inheritance ; and it continued in that family until Thomas 
Coke, Earl of Leicester, sold it to Sir Joshua Vanneck, Bart. ; 
whose descendant, the present Baron Huntingfield, is now pro- 
prietor. 

Ambrose Jermyn, Esq., Gentleman Pensioner to King Henry 
VIII., Edward VI., Queen, Mary, and Queen Elizabeth, deceased 
in 1575, and was buried in this parish church. He married Eliza- 
beth, daughter and co-heir of John Paston, Esq. ; Bridget, his other 
daughter and co-heir married Sir Edward Coke. 

William, eldest son and heir of Robert Howard, of Howard's 
Place, in Brockdish, Norfolk, Esq., died in 1566, seized of many 
lands in this parish, Bradfield, Cratfield, and Ubbeston. 

CHARITIES. The town estate consists of a house, four tenements, 
and homestall, containing about two acres; and a cottage adjoining, 
all in this parish, let to different tenants, at rents amounting to 
14, 15s. a year. Lands in the parishes of Heveningham and 
Ubbeston, containing together about 6|-A., rents 15 a year. These 
lands were purchased in the 5th of King Charles I., and conveyed 
to trustees. A copyhold house, and homestall of six acres, in He- 

* A description of this oak, from the pen of the Rev. Charles Davy, rector of 
Onehouse, in Stow Hundred, written in the year 1782, and inserted in the " East 
Anglian," for April 1814, Las recently been re-printed in Mr. Wooderspoon'* 
Historic Sites," p. 289, 



244 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

veuingham, called "Abbott's Land," let at 10 per annum. This 
property was given, or purchased, about the year 164.5. The rents 
-of the town estate are applied in the repair of the buildings thereon, 
and of the church, and the surplus is carried to the general account 
of the parish. In the parish terrier is the following entry : " In the 
said parish there is a small free school of four pounds a year, given 
by Mr. Berry Snelling,* deceased ; which said sum is given to the 
rector and churchwardens of the parish, for the use of schooling 
poor children : which said money is paid by Lord Huntingfield, out 
of a farm in his possession, tied for the payment of the money." 



KNOTTISHALL. NOTESHEALA, or CNOTESHEALE. 

The family of Jenney became very early enfeofled in this lordship ; 
they were originally of France, and are supposed to have assumed 
their surname from the town of Guisnes, near Calais, and probably 
came into England with the Conqueror : the manor of Haveiiand, 
in Norfolk, soon after that period being held by proprietors of the 
name of De Gisneto (De Gisne, or Gyney), which they held until 
the time of King Henry V. 

From that house, it would appear, tl^e above branched, and that 
the name in process of time, changed from Gyney to Jenney. In 
the 9th of King Richard II., Thomas, son of Sir Thomas Gyney, 
Knt., enfeoffed his manor of Gislingham, in this county, called 
" Gyney's," which had been lately purchased of John de Weyland : 
this manor still retains the name of " Jenneys." 

John, son of William, son of Edmund Jenney, of this parish, 
was a burgess of Norwich, in 1452; and by Maud his wife, daugh- 
ter and heir of John Bokill, of Friston, in this county, had issue 
Sir William Jenney, Knt., of Knottishall, one of the judges of the 
King's Bench, in 1477; and John, in holy orders, rector of Ufford, 
in Willford hundred, before 1483. 

Sir Edmund Jenney, Knt., eldest son to the Judge, succeeded ; 
and married Catherine, daughter and heir of Kobert Bois, Esq. He 
died in the 15th of King Henry VIII., and left his possessions to 

* It appears from the parish register, that " Bury, the son of Mark Snelling, and 
Mary his wife, was buried the 6th day of March, 1725," and that " Bury Snelling, 
the son of John Snelling, was born 19th of November, 1656." 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 245 

Francis his grandson, son of William Jenney, Esq., who deceased 
in the 10th of that reign, leaving the said Francis a minor. Sir 
Edmund died seized of this manor, with Theberton, Brayham, 
Lowdham, and Hustings in Middleton, all in this county. 

Francis Jenney, Esq., of this parish, married twice : first, Mar- 
garet, daughter, of Sir Eobert Peyton, Knt., of Iselham ; and se- 
condly, Mary, daughter of Kobert Brograve, Esq., of Beckham, in 
Kent. By the latter he had no issue, but by the former was father 
of a numerous family. This gentleman died in 1590, aged 80 years. 
His descendants in the elder branch intermarried as follows : 
Arthur, his heir, bora in 1533, died in=:Elye, daughter of George Jernigan, Esq. 

1604. Buried at Theberton. of Somerleyton. 

I J 

Francis Jenney, Esq., who deceased be-=Anne, daughter and co-heir of George 

fore his father. j Rede, Esq., of Thorington, Suffolk. 

I 

Sir Arthur Jenney,* Knt., succeeded hisyAnne, daughter of Sir Robert Barker. 

grandfather. J 

I J 

Sir Robt. Jenney, Knt., married in 1640,=zElizabeth, daughter of Sir John Offley, 

died in 1660. I Knt., of Madeley, co. Stafford. 

I J 

Offley Jenney, Esq., born in 1641, and=Alethea, eldest daughter of Sir Edward 

died in 1670. ! Duke, of Benhall, Bart. 

I 

Robert Jenney, Esq., of Leiston, only^Deborah, daughter of John Braham^ 

surviving child". Esq., of Campsey Ash. 

I - J 

Offley Jenney, Esq., only son, died in 
1735, unmarried. 

Eobert Jenney, Esq., of Leiston, survived until 1741, and was 
succeeded in the representation of the family by his cousin, Edmund 
Jenney, Esq., of Bredfield. (See that parish.) 

In the 21st of King Edward I., Adam, parson of the church of 
Knodeshale, and Adam Skill, of Westleton, brought an action against 
Michael Fitz John, bailiff of Dunwich, John le Folur, and Henry 
Eiugulf, because the plaintiffs delivered a writ to the defendants, 
under the seal of the Sheriff, and demanded the due execution 
thereof; when the defendants took and imprisoned the plaintiffs 
for eight days ; whereupon the defendants were found guilty, and 
the plaintiffs recovered damages, in five marks, for their trespass, 
and the liberty of Dunwich became forfeited to the Crown ; which 
was soon after re-possessed, by the payment of one mark, and half 
a mark for John le Folur, William of Cokely being surety for the 
payment of the same, Henry Eingulf being deceased. 

* Sir Arthur espoused four wives, and had issue by each. 



HUNDRED OF BLTTHING. 

Francis Vernon, Earl of Shipbroke, was formerly possessed of a 
large estate and manor in this parish, and also held the patronage 
of the advowson : the Eev. Sir Thomas Gery Cullum held the same 
by the presentation of the late John Vernon, Esq. The present 
incumbent is George Ayton Whitaker, who possessed a freehold 
estate here, with the manor, late the property of - - Ayton, Esq. 

ARMS. Jenney: ermine; a bend, gules, cotised, or. Crest: on 
a glove in fess, argent, a hawk (or falcon) close, or; belled of 
the last. 



LEISTON. LEESTUNE, or LEHTUNA. 

The lordship of this parish, at the period of the Domesday survey, 
was held by Kobert de Malet ; but in the reign of King Henry I., 
became forfeited to the Crown, by his adherence to Robert Curtois, 
the King's eldest brother, Duke of Normandy. 

Henry II. granted the same to the celebrated Justiciary, Ranulph 
de Glanville ; who, in 1182, founded a small Premonstratensian 
Canonry here, and endowed it with this manor, and also with cer- 
tain churches, which he had previously given to the canons of 
Butley, and which they resigned in favour of this Abbey. 

It flourished about 180 years, and having received considerable 
acquisition of property, was refouncled, with the accompaniment of 
a new edifice, built by Robert de Ufford, in 1363, in a more healthy 
situation, about a mile from the old site, and more remote from the 
sea; whence he removed most of the canons. This new edifice was 
unfortunately destroyed by fire, about 1389; but, being re-built, 
continued to flourish until the dissolution. 

The old house was not abandoned, but continued to be inhabited 
by a few monks until the dissolution ; in fact, legacies appear to 
have been left to "our Lady of the old Abbey" so late as 1515. 
Under A.D. 1531, in the Butley chronicle, is the following entry: 
" John Grene relinquishing his Abbacie by choice, was consecrated 
an anchorite at the chapel of St. Mary, in the old Monastery, near 
the sea." 

Pope Lucius granted this Abbey the liberty to celebrate Divine 
worship privately, in the time .of general interdiction, and absolute 
freedom in the election of their Abbot, likewise the liberty of burying 



HUNDRED OF BLITI11NG. 247 

any person who should desire to be interred in their Monastery, if 
not under sentence of excommunication : they were not obliged to 
pay tithes of their goods, privileged and granted to them ; that in 
time of a vacancy, neither he or his heirs, nor any of his officers, 
should seize upon their temporalities, nor should they be compelled 
to grant a pension to any person whatever. 

The Abbot of this house was quit of custom in the burgh of 
Ipswich, of all things growing on his own lands, and of all things 
bought for his own use. He was also entitled to wreck of the sen, 
from the port of Mensmere to the village of Thorpe, as appears by 
a roll of inquisitions in the Exchequer, in the 3rd of King Edward I. 
By this record it further appears, that he had the liberty of gallows, 
assize of bread and ale, and of a market at Sizewell ; where he took 
custom and toll to the damage of the King, and the city of Dunwich, 
to the amount of one hundred shillings annually. 

By a charter granted in 1388, King Richard II., confirmed the 
founder's gift of the manor and church of Leiston, and also the va- 
rious privileges enjoyed by the Abbot and Convent. 

Both these Abbeys were dedicated to the honour of the blessed 
Virgin Mary; and their gross value, in "Valor Ecclesiasticus," was 
210 4s. 4|d. The new Abbey, in the time of King Henry VII., 
contained an Abbot (George Carlton), and 18 Canons ; at the dis- 
solution, 15 Canons only. 

In 1536, it was granted to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk ; 
in whose family the patronage of this house had been for several 
generations ; who afterwards exchanged the site of the Abbey, and 
the manors, rectories, and lands attached to it, with the Crown, for 
Henham Hall : and the Priory remained in the Crown, till the 3rd 
and 4th of Philip and Mary, when the same was granted to Robert 
Browne, Esq., one of the Barons of the Exchequer. 

In this family, many of whom resided here, it continued until 
the 17th of King James I., when it became alienated to Henry 
Grey, the elder, Gent., and Henry Grey, Esq., his nephew; who, in 
the 3rd of King Charles, sold the same to Richard Miller, Esq., of 
London, and Alice Ms wife. 

It appears however, that King James I., in the 1 7th year of his 
reign, granted to the celebrated George Villiers, Duke of Bucking- 
ham, the Monastery, with the manors, &c., of Leiston ; and in the 
2nd of King Charles I., 'he disposed of his right in them, to the 
above Richard Miller, who, by such purchase, became the sole pro- 



248 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

prietor. He sold the same to Daniel Harvey, Eliab Harvey, and 
Matthew Harvey: Daniel survived, and in 1666, devised it to 
Daniel Harvey, Esq. 

It afterwards came into the possession of Elizabeth, daughter of 
Viscount Hinchinbroke, and grand- daughter of Lady Anne Harvey. 
She married, 1st., Kelland Courtenay, Esq., and 2nd, William 
Smith, Esq., formerly of the Theatre Koyal, Oovent Garden. This 
lady deceased in 1762, and was buried at Leiston. The estate de- 
volved to the two co -heiresses, daughters of the said Kelland 
Courtenay. 

It was soon afterwards purchased by Sir Joshua Vanneck, Bart., 
and is now the estate of Lord Huntingfield. Some interesting 
remains of this beautiful building are yet standing, and are chiefly 
converted to the purposes of various farming offices. Several illus- 
trative views have been published, by different persons, at various 
periods. 

CHARITIES. In 1722, Thomas Grimsby, by will, directed ,200 
to be paid to the churchwardens of this parish, to be put out at 
interest at 5 per cent, per annum, and the said interest to be given 
in bread every Lord's day, after Divine service, to the poor of the 
parish. The legacy has been invested in the public funds, and the 
dividends are laid out in bread. The testator, by his will, also 
devised all his freehold and charter-hold lands and tenements, in 
Westleton, towards the clothing of the poor children and widows 
belonging to this parish. The estate held under this devise consists 
of a house with outbuildings, and about 38 acres of land, let at 54= 
a year ; which is expended accordingly. 



LINSTEAD (GREAT AND LITTLE), or LINESTEDE. 

Roger, son of William de Huntingfield, founder of the Priory of 
Cluniac Monks, at Mendham, gave the church of St. Margaret, of 
Linstead, and half the church of St. Peter, to that Monastery; and 
previous to its dissolution, both these impropriations were held by 
the said Prior and monks. The present patron is the Eight Hon. 
Joshua Vanneck, Baron Huntingfield, of Heveningham Hall. Per- 
petual Curate, the Rev. S. B. Turner. 

The Abbot and Cistertian Monks of Sibton, held the lordship of 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 249 

Little Linstead; which, in 1536, two years before the act for dis- 
solving the greater Monasteries, was, together with all the estates 
belonging to that house, sold to Thomas Duke of Norfolk; and the 
same was confirmed to the said Duke, by statute, in the 31st of 
King Henry VIII. 

In the time of Queen Elizabeth, a branch of the Everard* family 
were concerned in one or both of these parishes. Eichard Everard, 
by will, dated in 1566, gave the manor of Fitton's, in St. German's 
Wigenhale, in Norfolk, to John Everard ; and by an inquisition 
taken at Hoxne, in this county, in the 15th of that reign, on the 
death of John Everard, the jury find that he died seized of it, with 
certain messuages, lands, &c., in the said parish, and Islington, in 
the same county, without issue; and that Henry Everard, of this 
parish, was his cousin and heir. 

Anne, daughter of Henry Everard, of this parish, Esq., married 
Thomas, son and heir of Edmund de Grey, Esq., of Merton, in 
Norfolk. He died in 1562. 

Agnes, daughter and co-heir of William Everard, of Linstead, 
married William, second son of Sir Edward Paston, of Appleton, 
in Norfolk. She died in 1676, aged 73 years. 

Thomas Gavell, of Kirkeby-Kam, in Norfolk, married Anne, 
daughter of Henry Everard, of this parish, Esq. This Thomas died 
in 1522, leaving four daughters and co-heirs, one of whom, Elizabeth, 
married to John Cooke, Esq. 

By this match it would appear, the Cookes might possess pro- 
perty here; for about the 31st of Queen Elizabeth, Wm. Cooke, 
sen., Gent., resided at Linstead. He married Mary, one of the 
daughters and co -heirs of Ralph Shelton, Esq., and Prudence his 
wife, daughter and co-heir of Edward Calthorpe, Esq. 

William Cooke, Esq., their son, married Mary, daughter and 
co-heir of Thomas Astley, of Melton Constable, in Norfolk, Esq. 
He was father of William Cooke, of Brome, in the same county, 
Esq., created a Baronet in 1663. 

* " On the north brink of the river, between Wisbech St. Peter and St. Mary, 
stood an ancient mansion, called White Hall, formerly the residence of a family of 
repute, of the name of Everard, settled there as early as 1300. The name of John 
Everard, Esq., occurs in certain presentments relative to straitening the river, in 
1438 ; and when King Edward VI. granted the charter to the town of Wisbech, 
Richard Everard, Esq., was therein nominated one of the ten men, his name 
standing second, and next to the brother of the then Lord Bishop." WATSON'S 
HISTORY OF WISBECH, p. 451. 



230 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

ARMS. Ecerard : argent ; a fess wavy, between three estoils, 
gules. CooJce: gules; on a fess, or, three trefoils, azure: in chief, 
a lion passant, argent. 

CHARITIES. The town estate belonging to the Chapelry of Lower 
Linstead, consists of a house, which is of copyhold tenure, with a 
small garden, and about an acre-and-half of land adjoining, let at 
9 per annum. The rents of this property have always, as long as 
can be traced, been applied by the chapelwarden, for the repairs of 
the house, the repairs of the chapel, and payment of other charges 
of the chapelwarden's office. 



MELLS, or MEALLA. 

Ebraud de Melnes gave " to God, and his church of St. Mary, 
at Thetford," two parts of the tithes of his demesne, in tin's hamlet, 
and Besthorp, in Norfolk ; for which the Prior of the said church 
was taxed at fifteen shillings. 

The lordship was formerly vested in the College of Secular Ca- 
nons, at Mettingham, in this county ; and at the dissolution was 
granted to Sir Anthony Denny, Knt. In 1541, Thomas Denny, 
Esq., was owner thereof. It is a hamlet of Wenhaston. The 
church is in ruins. 



MIDDLETON, or MIDELTUNA. 

In the 10th of King John, the Countess Gundreda, relict of 
Roger de Glanvile, Earl of Suffolk, sued Robert de Creke for a 
reasonable dower in a free tenement, &c., her late husband's, in this 
parish, Yoxford, and Bacton, in this county. Sir Robert married a 
daughter and heiress of the Glanviles. 

This Roger de Glanvile and Robert de Creke, granted the ad- 
vowson of this parish church to the Abbot and Premonstratensian 
Canons, at Leyston, in this hundred, founded by Ranulph (or Ra- 
dulph) de Glanvile, one of his ancestors. This Monastery also 
held a manor in Middleton. 

The familv of De Creke took their name from North Creak, in 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 251 

Norfolk, where they were lords, and always resided. Sir Robert de 
Creke greatly augmented his estate by his marriage with this heiress, 
by whom he had a son and heir, Bartholomew; who, in the time of 
King Henry III., gave lands to the Monastery of St. Osyth, in 
Essex, and died about the 36th of that reign. 

By Margery his wife, daughter and heir of Jeffrey de Anos, lord 
of Hillington, in Norfolk, he had three sons and a daughter, who 
all died without issue. John, the youngest, inherited after the de- 
cease of his brothers, and died about the llth of King Edward I. 

In the 18th of that reign, William, son of James de Creke, 
granted by fine to Robert, son of Hugh de Swyllington, two parts of 
a lordship in this parish, and the reversion of the third part, which 
Joan, late wife of John de Creke, held in dower, of the inheritance 
of William. This Wm. de Creke and Robt. de Swyllington were sisters' 
sons ; namely, Sara and Helewise, daughters of William de Pirnho. 
Sir Adamde Swyllington became heir to his brother William about 
the 3rd of King Edward II. : he obtained a charter of free warren 
for this lordship, and his other estates in this county, in the 4th of 
that reign. He had issue two sons, Sir Adam, and Sir Robert ; and 
Sir Adam, son of Sir Adam, in the 46th of Edward III., released to 
Sir Robert Ids uncle, this lordship, with that of Yoxford ; who was 
to hold them for life. 

The family of De Swyllington derive their name from a parish in 
the west riding of Yorkshire, of which they were lords ; but Sir Adam 
de Swyllington was a Lincolnshire Baron, and was summoned to 
Parliament as such, from the 21st of King Edward II., to the 2nd 
of the following reign. 

Some authorities state that Bartholomew Lord Burghersh pos- 
sessed this lordship in the 23rd of King Edward III., and had a 
charter of free warren therein, to himself, and Cicely his wife. He 
deceased in the 43rd of that reign, seized of the same ; wliich de- 
scended to his only daughter and heir, the wife of Edw. de Spencer. 
In the 20th of Richard II., Sir Roger de Swyllington founded a 
chantry for this Bartholomew Lord Burghersh, and all his ancestors; 
which shews some family alliance. 

The monastic property in this parish held by Leyston Abbey, was 
granted at the dissolution of that Monastery, in the 28th of King 
Henry VIII., to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk : it latterly was 
the estate of Mrs. Freake, and the impropriation now belongs to the 
Rev. Harrison Packard, who also holds the rectory. 



252 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

In " Cotman's Suffolk Brasses" is an etching from this parish 
church, to the memory of Anthony Pettow, yeoman ; who married 
Frances, daughter of Thomas Bishope, of Kelleshall, yeoman. He 
deceased in 1610, aged 54 years. 

In the time of King James I., John Woodcock was a resident in 
this parish, and was owner of an estate of about .150 per annum. 
He was Chief Constable of this hundred, and one of the feodaries 
of the patronage of Middleton, it being endowed with very little for 
the maintenance of a minister. Mr. Woodcock was lord and patron 
of Fordley. Several of his family are interred in this parish church ; 
and also the Eev. Thomas Meadows, for many years rector of Ben- 
acre and Frosteiiden; whose first wife was Frances, daughter of John 
Woodcock ; he married, secondly, Sarah, 3rd daughter of Thomas 
Ling, formerly prebend of Exeter ; and, thirdly, Elizabeth, the 
eldest daughter of Thomas Revett, of Brandeston, Gent., who sur- 
vived him. Mr. Meadows deceased in 1742. 



NORTHALES. (See COVEHITHE, COUA, or NOKHALA). 



PEASENHALL. PISEHALLA, or PESNALL. 

Ralph Fitz Norman gave two parts of his tithes in this parish to 
the Priory of the Virgin Mary and St. Andrew, commonly called 
the Abbey, in Thetford. 

In the 9th of King Edward I., this was the inheritance of Walter 
de Norwich; and in the 18th of the same reign, the lordship be- 
longed to Roger Bigod, 5th Earl of Norfolk, and first Marshal of 
England. In the 15th of the following reign, Nicholas de Segrave 
died seized of the same; who left this, with his other possessions, 
to Maud his daughter and heiress, then the wife of Edmund deBohun. 
In the 1 7th of the same King, Michael de Segrave held of him, in 
capite, the manor of Peasenhall, as of the Castle of Norwich, by the 
service of one Knight's fee. 

By letters patent, in the 8th of King Edward IV., that Monarch 



HUNDRED OF BL1THING. 

granted to John, Duke of Norfolk, and Elizabeth his wife, and their 
heirs, the return of all writs, and all bills, summons, precepts, and 
mandates of the King, within certain liberties, hundreds, and manors, 
in Norfolk and Suffolk ; amongst which the lordship of Peasenhall 
was included. 

It became afterwards vested in the Barker family ; and since, in 
that of Edgar. In 1764, Mileson Edgar, Esq., inherited it. 

In the 17th century, the family of Bermau had some interest in 
this parish. Nicholas Berman, Gent., resided here ; his only daugh- 
ter and heiress, married Sir Thomas Garrard, of Langford, in Nor- 
folk, Bart. She died in 1703, and is buried within the altar rails of 
Langford church. A daughter of theirs married Samuel Kerridge 
(or Kerrick), of Shelley Hall, in this county, Esq. 

CHARITIES. The church lands here consist of the following par- 
ticulars : a pightle of about one acre, including the site of a house, 
which was burnt down, and a garden, let at 5 15s. a year. Two 
closes in Sibton, containing about 4A., let together at 21 5s. a year. 
These were devised by Edmund Kempe, by will, in 1490. Apiece 
of ground, and an allotment of IA. 37p., made on an inclosure of 
Sibton Green, in 1809, let together at 2 per annum. The rents 
of the above are carried to the churchwardens' account, and applied 
towards the payment of such expenses as are incidental to their 
office. The town lands consist of a piece of land in this parish, 
containing somewhat above 14 acres, being copyhold of the manor 
of Bruisyard, let at 17 17s. a year, but subject to a deduction of 
l 4s. 6d. for land tax, and quit rents. This land has, from a re- 
mote period, been held in trust, for the exoneration of the inhabi- 
tants from the King's taxes ; when they should fall, for the relief of 
the poor, and other good uses and purposes. A cottage, called 
Gifford's, in Peasenhall, being copyhold of the manor of Sibton, 
rent 5 per annum. These premises Kobert Louffe devised, by will, 
in 1580, to the township of Peasenhall, to be to the use and benefit 
of the poor there ; and part thereof to the poor of Sibton : the rent 
is distributed to poor widows, in weekly allowances. Edmund Cut- 
ting gave by will, in 1639, Is. per week, in bread, among the poor 
inhabitants of this parish ; and a rent charge of 52s. a year, is re- 
ceived out of an estate in Ashfield, Peasenhall, and Sibton, and dis- 
tributed accordingly. 



254 HUNDRED OF BLTTHING. 

RAYDON, or RIENDUNA. 

This parish was of much more consideration in former times than 
at the present period, and enjoyed a market and a park ; some lauds 
here being still called the market-close, with high, low, and middle 
park pieces, and park lane. In 1684, the hall in this park was taken 
down, by Mr. Oliver Dave. 

In the time of Edward the Confessor, here were two freemen 
holding 1 6g- acres of plough land, of the value of ten shillings. The 
King and the Earl had soc for escutage. It was in length one 
league and three quarters, and in breadth one league and three 
perches, and paid geld, sixpence half-penny. At that period here 
were two churches. This account probably includes Wangford, 
alias Reydon St. Peter. The church of Eeydon, with the chapel of 
St. Margaret de Rissemere, with all their appurtenances, and the 
water mill of Reydon, with the mere or pool, and one acre of land 
lying near the mill, for the reparation of the pool, were given to the 
church of St. Peter, at Wangford, and the Convent there, byAnsered; 
and Sir Geraline de Vemun, Knt., his son, confirmed the same. 

At the request of Hugh Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, King Henry II., 
confirmed to the Cluniac Monastery of St. Mary, in Thetford, the 
church of St. Peter at Reydon, alias Wangford, with all that belong- 
ed to it ; in which church there were placed monks from Thetford. 
In the reign of King Edward I., the lordship of this parish was 
in Aymer de Valence, Earl of Pembroke, who died in 1323. The 
same has of late been in the Rous family, for several generations ; 
and Sir John Rous, Bart., in 1747, converted Wolsey's bridge into 
a sluice, to raise into pasture certain lands above it. His descend- 
ant, the Right Hon. John Edward Cornwallis Rous,. Earl of Strad- 
broke, is the present owner. 

The Playters family, it appears, were also concerned here. In 
the year 1737, Sir John Playters, Bart., built a quay here; which 
was afterwards the property of Miles Barnes, of Satterley, Esq., and 
is now vested in his representative. 

Tradition reports that Cardinal Wolsey was a benefactor to this 
parish, and its vicinity, by raising causeways, and building a bridge 
over the channel, that afterwards bore the name of the founder. 

The following extract from a letter of Mr. Le Neve's will further 
point out the descent of this lordship : " As to Reydon, I find it, 



HUNDRED OF BLITIIING. 25f> 

in the time of Henry III., held by a family called Muncheasy, of 
Robert Fitz waiter, as parcel of the Barony of Baynard ; and from 
thence (as I guess only, but am not positive) by William de Valen- 
cia, Earl of Pembroke's marriage with Joane, daughter and heir of 
Warine de Moiiclmsi, it came to that family ; and his son Aymer 
de Valencia, Earl of Pembroke, dying without issue (17th of King 
Edward II.), it came to the family of Hastings, after Earls of Pem- 
broke, by the marriage of Isabel, sister and co-heir of that Aymer 
de Valencia, with John Hastings ; from the 8th year of King Ed- 
ward I., I am sure of it being owned by Valence ; for then a fine 
was levied on the manor of Eeydon, by Wangford ; except 12 
land by the year, between Robert Fitzwalter, petentem, and William 
de Valence, tenentem, whereby it was granted to William, paying 
yearly the service of the Knight's fee, and castle guard, to Baynard's 
Castle, in London. Thence I need not repeat its possessors, for it 
had the same with Badmondesfield till llth Elizabeth. For then I 
find Charles Somerset owner thereof; and in the 15th of her reign, 
that Thomas Rous held it. At his death, the inquisition is dated 
the 20th of May, in the 15th of Queen Elizabeth. The manors 
named are Henham, cum cravens^ Reydon Bleoiles, Scarbale, South- 
erton, &c. And by his deed, dated 9th August, in the fourth of 
that Queen, granted the manor to Michael and Robert Hare, to the 
use of Ann Rous, for her jointure (who was his wife I believe and 
widow), with remainder to his right heirs. The jury say the manor 
of Bleoiles Reydon was worth i'13 14s., but not the tenure. And 
the said Baron Rous died the 20th of February, in the year afore- 
said, leaving Thomas Rous, his son and heir, twelve years old. From 
this time I think I need not trouble you with the descent of the 
manor or family ; you having descended in a direct line from the 
last Baron here mentioned. Pray sir, present my humble service to 
the Major Rous., and all persons who ask after me, being sir, your 
most humble servant, 

" Peter Le Neve Norry." 
" Great Wychingham, in Norfolk, July 12th, 1723." 

In 1827, several Roman urns were discovered in this parish; one 
of which was preserved whole : of the remains of those picked up, 
some were ornamented, all contained ashes, and shewed marks of 
fire. A quantity of human bones were also found at the same time 
and place. 



HUNDRED OF BUTHING. 

CHARITIES. Some parcels of land in this parish, containing, in 
the whole, hetween four and five acres, are let at rents amounting 
together to 7, or 8, a year ; and the same are applied in the re- 
paration of the church. An allotment of 22A.., lets at 18 a year, 
and the rent is laid out in the purchase of coals ; which are dealt 
out among the poor, residing in, and belonging to the parish. A 
dole of 10s. a year used to he paid out of property belonging to a 
Mr. Aldrich, and was given by the will of Matthew Walter, in 1589 ; 
but this has not been paid for many years. 



RUMBURGH. ROMBURC, or WANBURN. 

The lordship of this parish was held by Ralph Guadir (de Waer, 
or Wayer), Earl of Norfolk, soon after the conquest, who forfeited 
the same ; after which Ulketel, the Conqueror's Bailiff or Steward, 
seized it, and did suit of court here. It appears Alan, Earl of 
Richmond, held the same soon afterwards ; who founded the Mo- 
nastery here between 1064 and 1070. 

This house was of the Benedictine order, and dedicated to St. 
Michael, or St. Felix ; and at the above period, brother Blakere, 
and other monks, from St. Bennet's, at Hulme, in Norfolk, were 
appointed to begin a small religious establishment here, subordinate 
to that Abbey; and it was endowed with several churches and lands. 

In the time of King Henry I., this cell, with all its endowments, 
was given by Stephen, Duke of Britaign, and Earl of Richmond, 
brother of Alan, or his son, Alan the third, father of the Duke 
Conan, to the Abbey of St. Mary, at York. 

In the reign of William Rufus, William de Eschois, for the benefit 
of the soul of that King, his lord, gave to the monks of St. Mary's 
Abbey, by York walls, the advowsons of Banham and Wilby churches, 
in Norfolk ; with possessions in those parishes, and in Bawburgh, 
Cossey, Swaffham, &c. These were granted by the said Abbey, to 
their Priory, or cell in this parish ; to which they belonged until 
the dissolution. Several other churches were impropriated to this 
Monastery, with tithes in other parishes, both in Suffolk and 
Norfolk. 

John de Nerford held of the King, in capite, in the 38th of 
Edward III., 1364, the advowson of the Priory church of Rumburgh, 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 257 

and the manor of Wysete, with the appurtenances, by the service of 
one Knight's fee. 

This was one of the small Priories which were suppressed before 
the general dissolution, and was given, by the King, to Cardinal 
Wolsey, for his College, at Ipswich, in 1528. The remains of the 
Priory are converted into a farm house, which was lately, together 
with the manor, the property of Miss Jessop. Its valuation, in 
" Tax. Eccles.," A.D. 1291, in eleven parishes, was .10 12s. llfd. 

CHARITIES. The town estate here consists of the following par- 
ticulars : a messuage, called the " Bears," in the parish of St. Peter, 
Southelmham, with the buildings and lands thereto belonging ; 
containing, by estimation, 18 acres. A close, in the parish of St. 
Michael, Southelmham, called " Warpullocks," containing about 14 
acres ; an enclosure in the last mentioned parish, containing about 7 
acres ; and an enclosure called " Rumburgh Town Close," in Spex- 
hall, containing about 5 acres. These lands and premises were 
lately let at rents amounting together to 43 per annum ; which 
ore applied for such general uses, for the common good of the in- 
habitants, as the trustees think most advisable. 



SIBTON. SIBETUNA, SYBETONE, or SIBBETUNA. 

Walter, a younger brother of William de Malet, a Norman Baron, 
held this lordship, and was progenitor of the ancient and illustrious 
house of Peyton. His second son, Reginald de Peyton, being the 
personage who first assumed the name, is considered the founder of 
that family. 

This Walter de Cadomo was enfeoffed in the Barony of Horse- 
ford, in Norfolk, to be held of the honour of Eye, where he built a 
castle, and had a large park and chase surrounding it, in ancient 
deeds termed the " Forest of Horseford." Robert his son, married 
Sybilla, daughter and heiress of Ralph de Cheyney, and is often 
called Robert Fitz Walter ; by her he had issue three sons, who as- 
sumed the name of De Cheyney. William, the youngest, was lord 
of Horseford, and living in the 2nd of King Henry I. ; he was 
sometimes styled William de Norwich. 

He was founder of the Cistertian Abbey of White Monks, in this 
parish, in the year 1149 ; and endowed it extensively with manors. 



258 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

lands, and possessions, in this diocese. He gave Friers manor, in 
Shelfhanger, in Norfolk, formerly the possession of Edric the fal- 
coner, his great grandsire ; with which Kohert Lord Malet, eu- 
feoffed his brother, Walter de Cadomo. At that period this lordship 
was very small, but soon after became augmented by divers other 
grants. The revenues of this Monastery received considerable ad- 
ditions from the pious contributions of the lady Margaret de Cressy, 
the founder's eldest daughter and co-heiress ; and various other be- 
nefactors : all which donations were confirmed by charters of King 
Henry II. and Henry III. 

Clementia and Sara, the other daughters and co-heirs of William 
de Cheyney, were also benefactors to this house ; the former married 
to Jordan de Sackvilc, and the latter to Richard de Engaine. The 
ancient family of De Wyndesore, who subsequently assumed the 
name of De Senges (or Seething), were also liberal benefactors to 
this Monastery. 

In the 52nd of King Henry III., a fine was levied between Whi- 
ter de W T yndesore, querent, and Richard, Abbot of Sibton, deforci- 
ant; that whereas the Abbot was obliged to find two monks to cele- 
brate divine service for the soul's health of Hugh de Wyndesore, 
and Christian his wife, and of the ancestors and successors of the 
said Walter, in the chapel of Senges ; and to find for Walter a con- 
venient chamber in the Abbey for himself and a boy, with necessary 
diet and clothing, and competent provender for one horse, which 
the Abbot had denied him ; the Abbot hereby grants to Walter, that 
he would perform the said covenants, of finding two chaplains to 
say a mass of St. Mary, and another De Defunctis every day, in 
the said chapel, for the health of Hugh de Wyndesore and Christian 
his wife, ancestors of Walter ; and to pay Walter, eight marks per 
annum, and two boots of the price of 18d., or that sum in money : 
and Walter released all the rest. 

In 1536, two years prior to the Act for dissolving the greater 
Monasteries, the Abbot and Convent sold to Thomas, Duke of 
Norfolk, the site and all the estates belonging to this Monastery ; 
which grant was confirmed to the Duke by statute of the 31st of 
King Henry VIII. 

Sibton Abbey was granted, at the dissolution, to Thomas God- 
salve, Esq., by Thomas, Duke of Norfolk. His son, Sir Thomas 
Godsalve, died seized of it, in the time of Philip and Mary. He 
was a person of great note ; and at the Coronation of Edward VI., 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 259 

wag created Knight of the Carpet, and was afterwards Comptroller 
of the Mint.* 

The Earl of Suffolk afterwards held this property; and, in the 
8th of James I., it was purchased by John Scrivener, Esq., who 
built a commodious house, and resided here, in 1655. He was son 
of Ralph Scrivener, of Belstead, Esq., Fortman of Ipswich, Coun- 
cellor at Law, and sometime Justice of Peace. His son Thomas 
Scrivener, Gent., married Mary, only daughter and heir of William 
Bedingfield, of Fressingfield, Gent. 

In 1764, Charles Scrivener, Esq., was owner thereof; whose sister 
and heiress, Anne Scrivener, married the Rev. Thomas Freston, 
LL.E., vicar of Cratfield ; and this manor and estate passed to John 
Freston, their son and heir, who took the name of Scrivener : and 
from him, to his only daughter and heir, Dorothea Fisher, wife of 
the late Bishop of Salisbury, lately deceased. John Frederick Pike, 
Esq., who married the eldest daughter of the Bishop, by Dorothea 
Scrivener, lately assumed the surname of Scrivener ; and is the pre- 
sent owner of this property. The house is pulled down. 

In the time of King Charles I., Edmund Barker resided, and was 
owner of a good estate, in this parish. He was son of Edmund, 
son of John Chapman (alias Barker), of Sibton, Gent. It con- 
tinued in the Barker family five or six generations, and was since in 
Mileson Edgar, Esq., as heir to a Mr. Bloss, stationer, in London ; 
who purchased it of the heiress of the Barker family. It was since 
purchased by Mr. Clayton ; and is now the property, by purchase, 
of Robert Sayer, Esq., who has erected a handsome modern mansion, 
on another site, in Sibton Park. 

Engravings of some singular tiles dug up in the ruins of Sibton 
Abbey, appeared in the " Gentleman's Magazine," for 1806, p. 17 ; 
and views of the remains of the Abbey, in " Excursions through 
Suffolk," also in " Davy's Architectural Antiquities." An Hospital, 
founded probably by the Abbot and Convent, was placed at the Ab- 
bey-gate : and for the better support of the same, Simon de Walton, 
Bishop of Norwich, appropriated the church of St. Peter, at Grans- 
ford, in Plomesgate hundred. It went with the Abbey at the dis- 
solution. No traces are now remaining. 

Valuations in Tax. Eccles. 1291 : Suffolk, in 40 parishes, 113 
14s. ld.; Norfolk, in 16 ditto, 29 7s. 5d.; Cambridge, 8 8s.: 



* A portrait of him was engraved by Clamp, from a miniature in the Bodleian 
Library, at Osford. 



260 HUNDRED OF BLITHINO. 

total, 151 9s. 7d. Lib. Val. and Val. Eccles., gross value, 279 
2s. lid. M.S. Val., in the Bishop's Registry, 200 15s. 7d. 

Henry Jermyn, Esq., Barrister at Law, whose large collections, 
illustrative of the topography and antiquities of Suffolk, were pre- 
viously noticed in the introduction to this work, resided in this pa- 
rish. He deceased Nov. 27, 1820 ; in the 53rd year of his age. 

CHARITIES. This property is under the management of the 
churchwardens, and consists of the following particulars : a house 
called the Town House, with a small garden, let in four tenements, 
at rents amounting together to 12 a year; apiece of land, 1 A. In. 7p., 
adjoining the glebe, let at l 15s. a year; three pieces of land in 
Huntingfield, containing together HA. IR. 30p., these let at 17 a 
year ; a house, and three pieces of land, containing together, SA. 
SR. 24p., in Badingham, let at 7 per annum. As to this property, 
2 1 2s. a year is applied in the purchase of bread, according to a 
bequest of Edmund Cutting, in 1639; and the residue is applied to 
the general purposes of repairing the church, and defraying other 
expenses incidental to the office of the churchwardens. By deed, 
dated March 17, 1719, John Scrivener, and Dorothea Scrivener 
his sister, settled an estate in Sibton and Peasenhall to the following 
uses : viz., that one half of the rents should be paid to the vicar of 
this parish, to read morning service in the church every Wednesday, 
Friday, and holy-day in the year; and that the other moiety should 
be employed for erecting a school room in the parish of Sibton, for 
teaching poor children, whose parents dwelt within the same, and 
were not able to bear the charge thereof, in the English tongue, 
writing, and arithmetic ; and in the principles of the church of Eng- 
land, and for putting out apprentices. The property comprises a 
building used as a school-room, and 32A. OR. 32p. of land, which 
lets at 55 a year: one half of the rent is paid to the vicar, and the 
other half applied for the support of a school. 



SIZEWELL 

In Queen Elizabeth's reign contained a chapel for Divine worship, 
and anciently a considerable number of inhabitants ; but of late has 
been reduced to one farm house, and is now considered a hamlet of 
Leiston. 



HUNDRED OF BL1THING. 

SOTHERTON. 

There were anciently two manors in this parish ; one of which 
belonged to Sir William de Kerdeston, the other to Walter de Bern- 
ham, which had the advowson attached. In the reign of King Ed- 
ward IV., John Brightyeve, of Bernham Broom, in Norfolk, held 
the same; he deceased in 1497, and devised it to his daughter Ag- 
nes ; it soon afterwards became vested in the Rous family, and so 
continues ; the Earl of Stradbroke being the present lord and patron. 



SOUTHWOLD. SUWALD, SUWALDA, or SOUTHWAUD, 

Is pleasantly situated on a cliff, or point of land, near a fine bay, at 
the mouth of the river Blythe, which here discharges itself into the 
sea. From the labours of Messrs. Gardner and Wake, the early 
and modern historians of this town, we collect the following par- 
ticulars concerning the same. 

Southwold is a sea port, and town corporate, but never sent re- 
presentatives to Parliament : it has a weekly market, and two fairs 
annually. In the 5th of King Henry III., the Abbot of Bury, had 
a grant for the market, and in the llth of the same reign, he had a 
charter for a fair, upon the eve and day of St. Philip and St. Jacob. 

Alfric, Bishop of the East Angles, was possessed of this lordship; 
which he gave, with other estates, to the Abbot and Monks of Bury 
St. Edmund's ; but in the 24th of King Henry III., Theobald, 
Abbot of Leiston, laid claim to the same ; upon which an action 
ensued, when the right thereof was decided in favour of the former. 

In or about the 43rd of the same reign, a fine was levied between 
Simon, Abbot of Bury, and Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, 
on the manor of Mildenhall, in Lackford hundred, in exchange for 
this of Southwold ; who, in the following year, obtained a license 
of the said King, to make a castle of his house here. 

This estate Richard gave to his son Gilbert, who resigned the 
same, and all his other property in England, into the hands of King 
Edward I., in order to obtain Joan de Acre, the King's daughter, in 
marriage ; which being consummated, his estates were restored, but 
with an entail upon the issue of such marriage ; and in default of 



262 HUNDRED OF BLITH1NG. 

such, to her heirs and assigns, if she survived him. By the said 
Joan, he had issue Gilbert de Clare, who in 1314, was slain at Ba- 
nocksbourn, in Scotland. / 

This Joan re-married to Ralph Mor^mer, who was created by 
Edward I., Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, and had wreck of the 
sea from Easton-stone to Eye-cliff. In the 1 2th of King Edward III. 
some portion of this manor was annexed to the Priory at Wangford, 
and so continued until the dissolution of that house, when it was 
granted, with the Priory, to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk; and is now 
held, by the Corporation of Southwold, of the Earl of Stradbroke, 
who is the present proprietor of the site of Wangford Priory. 

Southwold was made a free burgh by King Henry VII., who 
granted the lordship, called Queen's Demesne Revenue, with other 
privileges ; and King Henry VIII., confirmed all his father's grants 
to this town, which gave great encouragement to trade and navigation. 

A chapel was first erected here in the time of King John, by the 
Prior and Monks of Thetford, and their dependants at Wangford, 
upon the decision of John Grey, Bishop of Norwich. This was en- 
tirely subordinate to the church of St. Margaret, at Rissemere (or 
Raydon), to which Southwold was only a hamlet, and which belonged 
to the Prior and Convent at Thetford, as patrons. This building 
was destroyed by fire about 220 or 280 years after its completion. 

The present splendid erection was probably begun soon after the 
destruction of the former, the outward work being finished about 
1460. The architectural features of this church are carefully dis- 
cussed by William Bardwell, Esq.,* the " Westminster Improve- 
ment Architect," and author of " Temples, Ancient and Modern," 
who is a native of this parish. 

This second church, or chapel, was made parochial ; and the in- 
habitants had the privileges of having the sacrament administered 
here, and of the burial of their dead ; but yet not otherwise than as 
a chapel of ease to Reydon, to be served by the vicar of that parish. 
In 1752, a deed of severance was obtained, under the provisions of 
which the church became endowed with grants from Queen Anne's 
Bounty, and is now served as a separate and distinct cure. 

In this parish register are the following entries : " 1609, July 30 ; 
Thomas Jentleman ; he lived above four-score years in perfect sight 

* This description, with an accurate plate of the church, drawn by the same gen- 
tleman, and engraved by Mr. G. Hollis, are inserted in ' Wake's History of South- 
wold," published in 1839, in 8vo. 



HUNDRED OF BL1THING. 263 

and memorie, and in his flourishing time for building of ships, and 
many other commendable parts ; he continued in his place unmatch- 
able." 

"1616. July 25. The names of those that drowned and founde 
againe. They were drowned in the haven comeing from Doiiwich 
fayer, on St. James's daie, in a Bote, by rason of one cable laying 
over warf the haven. For by rason the men that brought them 
downe was so negligent that when they were redie to come ashore 
the Bote broke lose ; and so the force of the tide carried the Bote 
against the cable, and so it was overwhelmed. The number of them 
were xxii. But they were not all founde." Then follows the names 
of those who were found, and the dates of their interment : signed 
" Ed. Yonges, Vicar and Minister," who lost a son and a daughter 
by this unhappy event. 

Mem. On the 25th of April, 1659, in the short space of four 
hours, this town suffered a most dreadful devastation by fire; which 
consumed 238 dwelling houses, with many public edifices, besides 
corn, malt, coals, and various merchandize, to the value of upwards 
of 40,000, and to the ruin of more than 300 families. 

On the 28th of May, 1672, Southwold-bay was the scene of an 
obstinate and sanguinary naval engagement, between the combined 
fleets of Great Britain and France, against the Dutch fleet, under 
De Kuyter. The commanders of the combined squadron being 
James, Duke of York, Count D' Stress, and the Earl of Sandwich. 
The total amount of the combined fleet was 101 ships of war ; hands, 
34,530; pieces of cannon, 6,018. Dutch men of war, 91 ; fire 
ships, 54 ; yachts, 23 ; total 168. Number of hands and pieces of 
cannon not known. This victory was dearly purchased by the loss 
of many brave officers and men, amongst whom the Earl of Sand- 
wich fell. 

Mr. Thomas Gardner, the author of an " Historical account of 
Dunwich," &c. published in 1754, was Deputy Comptroller of this 
port at the time of his decease, in 1769. His remains are interred 
near the south wall of the chancel of this parish church, between 
those of his two wives, with this distich : 

Between Honour and Virtue here doth lie, 
The remains of old Antiquity. 

CHARITIES. The poor and town estate consists of nearly 20 acres 
of land, situate at Keydon, near Southwold ; this land is let at the 
annual rent of 18 : a moiety of the same is received for the use 



2G4 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

of the poor, and applied with other charitable funds, after mentioned, 
in the purchase of bread and coals, which are distributed among 
poor persons and families; the other moiety belongs to the town of 
South wold. In 1810, John Sayer bequeathed, by will, the sum of 
200, 4 per cent. Consols, in trust, to pay the dividends thereof to 
the treasurer of the Burgh School, in this town ; and in case the 
said school should be discontinued, then the dividends should be 
applied among poor widows of Trinity pilots, and masters of vessels. 
The school referred to having been given up, the funds are applied 
for the benefit of poor widows, of the description above-mentioned. 
Captain John Steele gave, by will, the sum of 1 50 ; and the in- 
terest accruing from the same, is distributed annually, to the widows 
of pilots and masters of vessels. There is a sum of 144 12s. 3d., 
held by the bailiffs and commonalty of Southwold, for the use of the 
poor ; the interest upon which is applied with the rent of the poor 
land. 



SOUTH-COVE. 

In 1457, Sir Miles, son and heir of Sir Brian Stapleton, of Ing- 
ham, in Norfolk, Knt., conveyed the lordship of this parish to 
William Calthorpe, Esq., afterwards Sir William ; who married 
Elizabeth, his daughter and coheir, by Catherine his wife, daughter 
of Sir Thomas Delapole; which lordship he purchased of Ralph 
Estley, Esq. and Julian his wife. 

The above is now the property of Sir Charles Blois, of Cockfield 
Hall, in Yoxford, Bart., and the advowson belongs to Sir Thomas 
Sherlock Gooch, of Benacre, Bart. The present incumbent is the 
Rev. John Charles Gooch, of Toppisfield, in Essex; a brother of the 
Baronet. 

CHARITIES. An allotment of 12 acres, or thereabouts, set out on 
an inclosure for the poor, lets at 13 10s. per annum ; and a dole, 
or payment of 3s. 4d. a year, given by Simon Gisleham, is paid out 
of a farm in this parish : these are expended in the purchase of 
coals, and distributed to poor people belonging to the parish. 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 265 

SPECKSHALL. 

In the 38th of Henry VI., Robert Banyard, Esq., resided in this 
parish; and in 1426, John Bacon, of Baconsthorp, in Norfolk, 
Esq., married Margaret, his daughter and heir; on whom Barnard's 
manor, in this parish, was settled. 

He died in 1462, and Thomas Bacon their son, succeeded, and 
died about 1485, leaving two daughters and co-heirs, by Margery, 
daughter of John Jenny, Esq. Elizabeth, who married Sir John 
Glemham, of Glemham Parva, Knt. ; and Anne, who married Robert 
Garneys, of Kenton, in this county, Esq. 

The Bacons however appear to have retained some interest here ; 
as Robert, eldest son and heir of Richard Bacon, of Harleston, in 
Norfolk, resided in this parish. The said Richard Bacon died about 
1526, and was buried at Redenhall, in Norfolk; and in 1542, 
Thomas Tyndale, and Osbert Mundeford, Esqrs., conveyed the ma- 
nor of Holebrook (or Gawdy Hall), in Redenhall, to the said Robert 
Bacon. He married Anne, daughter of Robert Kemp, of Gissing, 
in Norfolk ; and Edward Bacon, Esq., was their son and heir. 

In the 5th of King Henry VIII., Sir William Sydney, of Wal- 
singham, in Norfolk, delivered and confirmed to Roger, eldest son 
of Sir John Townsend, Knt., Judge of the Common Pleas (to fulfil 
the will of his father), all the lands, tenement, rents, and services, 
of Scroby, Rivet's manor, &c., in this parish ; which he held jointly 
with Sir Roger, the Judge, William Gournay, and others, of the 
grant of John Hoo, of Blyburgh, and Sir John Heveningham. 

The Rev. Joseph Gunning, M.A., rector of this parish, and vicar 
of Sutton, and formerly of Christ Church College, Oxford, died at 
Woodbridge, Dec. 11, 1806. As a classical scholar, Mr. Gunning's 
attainments were of the first order, attempered with much wit and 
pleasantry, which will be long remembered by a respectable class of 
pupils, under his care at an early period of their education. 

In the time of King Charles, William Downing, Gent., resided in 
this parish; and George Downing, Gent., married Dorcas, daughter 
of William Blois, Esq., of Grundisburgh. They were members of 
a family of very ancient descent, long since seated in Essex, who 
were honoured with the title of Baronets in 1663; one of whom, 
the Right Hon. Sir George Downing, Bart., Knight of the Bath, 
was the munificent founder of Downing College, Cambridge. 



266 HUNDRED OF BLITH1NG. 

ARMS. Baniard (of Speckshall) : sable ; on a fess, between 
two chevronels, or, as many annulets united, of the field. Downing : 
barry of eight ; argent and vert ; over all, a gryphon rampant, or. 

CHARITIES. The poors' land of this parish, of which the original 
acquisition is unknown, consists of five acres of copyhold land, in 
the parish of Holton, which is let at l 1 Os. a year ; and the rent 
is given among poor people in the way of occasional relief. 



STOVEN, or STOUNE. 

The author of " Magna Britannia" makes the demesne of this 
parish to have been in Kobert de Biskele (or Bixley). In 1249, 
Sir Hugh de Jernegan held of Eoger, son of Peter Fitz Osbert, 
divers lands in Stovene and Bugges, for which he did homage to 
Eoger, son of the said Peter, in the presence of Walter de Redis- 
ham, Knt. 

The south entrance to this church contains a Norman arch of 
great beauty, of which Mr. Davy has an etching in his (< Architec- 
tural Antiquities." The present patron and incumbent is the Rev. 
George Orgill Leman. 

CHARITIES. In this parish there is a cottage called the Town 
House, let in three tenements, to poor persons, at small rents; also 
two acres of land, let at 2 a year; and a piece of ground, forming 
a way to a gravel-pit, in the former land ; for which the occupiers of 
an estate, now belonging to the Rev. Samuel Batho, have, for time 
out of memory, paid a yearly rent or acknowledgement, of 3s. 4d. ; 
which is applied, after repairing the Town House, towards the relief 
of the parochial poor, with the poor rates. The original acquisition 
of this property is unknown. 



THEBERTON, or THEWARDETDNA. 

This estate appears to have been anciently vested in the Bygods 
and Segraves, for they presented to the church, as Mr Kirby states, 
until after the year 1350 ; but soon after that period, the Abbot and 
Convent of Leiston were patrons. 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

The lordship of this parish was the inheritance of the Jenney 
family. William Jenney, Esq., of Kuotishall and Thebertou, was 
succeeded by John Jenney, Esq., his son and heir, who had issue, 
by Maud his wife, Sir William Jenney, Knt., one of the Judges of 
the King's Bench, in 1477. 

Sir William married, first, Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Cawse, 
Esq., and by her had issue four sons and as many daughters : 
namely, Sir Edmund Jenney, Knt., his successor ; Hugh, living in 
1473 ; Nicholas, of Heringfleet ; and Richard, of the same parish. 
Of the daughters, Margaret married to Christopher, Lord Willoughby 
de Eresby ; Eleanor, married, first to Sir Robert Brewse, Knt., and 
secondly, to Sir Robert Fienes, Knt. Thomasine became a nun ; and 
Catherine married to John Berney, Esq., of Gunton, in Norfolk. 

The Judge married, secondly, Eleanor, widow of Robert Ingleys ; 
but by her had no issue. He died Dec. 23, 1483, and was, with 
his first lady, interred in this parish church.* 

Theberton Hall is now the estate and residence of the Rev. Charles 
Montagu Doughty, eldest surviving son of the late Rev. George 
Clarke Doughty, of this place, vicar of Hoxne, rector of Dcnham 
and Martlesham, in this county ; of whose progenitors the following 
particulars are given in " Burke's History of the Commoners." 

The Rev. George Doughty, younger brother of the Rev. Samuel 
Doughty, rector of Martlesham, in this county, by Mary his second 
wife, daughter of Robert Park, Gent., and relict of Robert Morss, 
Gent., left at his decease, in 1724, an only surviving son, Samuel 
Park Doughty, of Martlesham, Esq. 

He married Mary, daughter of Tramell, Esq., of Kes- 

grave ; and by her had issue, Samuel, who died in infancy ; George, 
his heir; and three daughters. Mr. Doughty deceased in 1749, 
and was succeeded by his only surviving son, George Doughty, Esq., 
of Leiston, and subsequently of Theberton Hall, High Sheriff for 
this county, in 1793. He married Anne, daughter of John Good- 
win, Esq., of Martlesham Hall ; and by her had issue two sons, and 
as many daughters. 

The Rev. George Clark Doughty, his eldest son and heir, suc- 
ceeded ; who married Catherine, only daughter and heiress of Eze- 
kiel Revett, Esq., of Hoxne, and by her (who died in 1804, aged 28 
years) had three sons and three daughters; namely, George Thomas, 

* For a more particular account of this family, see the parishes of Knotiahall and 
Bre<Ifield. 



368 HUNDRED OF BLITHINQ. 

who died in 1 802 ; Chas. Montagu, his heir, as above ; and Frederick 
Goodwin, born at Hoxne, in 1800. 

At the demise of his father, in 1832, he inherited an estate at 
Martlesham, which comprises the manor and advowson of that parish ; 
and married, in 1833, Beatrice, daughter and co-heiress of Bear 
Admiral Sir Chas. Cunningham, of Oak Lawn, in Hoxne. Harriet, 
his sister, married the Rev. D'Eye Betts, who holds the rectory of 
Mendlesham, and resides at Woodbridge. 

ARMS. Doughty : argent; two bars between three mullets, sable. 
Crest: a mullet, sable. 

There is also in this parish " Theberton House," the seat of 
Thomas Milner Gibson, Esq., M.P. 



THORINGTON, or TORENTUNA. 

In 1302, King Edward I. granted to Sir John de Norwich, Knt., 
and his heirs, free warren in all his demesne in this parish ; he de- 
vised the same to his grandson, who died possessed thereof, leaving 
it to Catherine de Brews, daughter of Thomas de Clavering, his 
cousin and heir, who became a nun ; when it passed to William de 
UfFord, as next heir. 

It subsequently became the inheritance of Henry Coke, Esq., 
fifth son of Sir Edward Coke, of Mileham in Norfolk, Lord Chief 
Justice of England, by Bridget his first wife, daughter and coheir of 
John Paston, Esq., of Huntingfield Hall, in this county. Mr. Coke 
married Margaret, daughter and heiress of Richard Lovelace, Esq., 
of Kingsdown, in Kent. He died in 1661, and was buried at 
Thorington. 

He was succeeded by Richard Coke, Esq., his eldest son and heir, 
who married Mary, daughter of Sir John Rous, of Henham Hall, 
in this county Bart., and left an only son, Robert Coke, Esq.; who, 
upon the decease of his cousin, John Coke, Esq., of Holkham, in 
Norfolk, unmarried, inherited that estate ; and thus became possessed 
of the chief part of the property of his great grandfather, Sir Edward 
Coke. He married Lady Anne Osborne, daughter of Thomas, first 
Duke of Leeds, Lord Treasurer of England ; and was succeeded, at 
at his decease, in 1679, by his only son, Edward Coke, Esq., of 
Holkham. 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 269 

Thorington Hall afterwards became the estate and residence of 
Alexander, second son of Edmund Bence, Esq., of Benhall and Al- 
deburgh, by Mary his wife, daughter of Sir Francis Gallop, Knt. 
He was baptized at Benhall in 1671: was High Sheriff for this 
county in 1 733 ; and married Christian, daughter of Sir Anthony 
Deane, Knt., of London. 

Mr. Bence deceased in 1759, and left an only surviving daughter, 
Anne, of Thorington Hall; born in 1714, married in 1762, to 
George Golding, Esq., of Poslingford, in Bisbridge hundred ; by 
whom she had no issue : he died in 1803. Mrs. Golding deceased in 
1794, and was succeeded in this parish by her first cousin, the Rev. 
Bence Sparrow, rector of Beccles. 

He was second son of Robert Sparrow, Esq., of Worlingham, in 
this county, by Anne his wife, the daughter of Robert Bence Esq., 
of Henstead (a younger brother of the above Alexander Bence, Esq.), 
by Mary his wife, daughter and heir of Lawrence E chard, clerk, of 
Henstead. He assumed, by sign manuel, in 1804, the surname 
and arms of Bence, and died in 1824; when Henry Bence Bence, 
Esq., Lieutenant- Colonel in the East Suffolk Militia, his eldest son 
and heir, succeeded; who is the present possessor of the manor, and 
patron of the advowson. 

ARMS. Coke\ party, per pale, gules and azure; three eagles 
displayed, argent. Bence: argent; on a cross between four frets, 
gules, a castle of the first. 

Thorington Hall now belongs to Charles Day, Esq. 



THORP, or TORP. 

William Bygod, Steward of the Household to King Henry I., 
granted Edric of Thorp, with all his lands, men and services, in 
Thorp and Dunwich, to the Priory of the Virgin Mary and St. 
Andrew, in Thetford ; founded by Roger Bygod, his father. 

Thorp is a hamlet of Aldringham, which formerly had a chapel 
dedicated to St. Mary. It was standing sometime after the restO' 
ration, but is now in ruins. 



270 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

UBBESTON, or UURABRETUNA. 

In the 6th of King Henry IV., Edmund de Redysham, of this 
parish, and Margaret his wife, conveyed by fine, to John Clere and 
others, six messuages, several parcels of land, with a fold course in 
Castor, near Yarmouth ; supposed to be the manor of Horning Hall, 
in that parish. 

The lordship of this parish was vested in John Sone, Esq., who 
resided at Ubbeston Hall. His sole daughter and heiress Mary, 
brought it, by marriage, into the Kemp family; being the second 
wife of Robert, eldest son and heir of Sir Robert Kemp, the first 
Baronet of that house: so created March 4th, 1641. 

He removed from Gissing, in Norfolk : resided at Ubbeston Hall, 
and was Knight of the Shire for the county of Norfolk, in 1668. 
Sir Robert had issue, by this second marriage, three sons and two 
daughters ; Mary married to Sir Ohas. Blois, Bart. ; and Jane to John 
Bade, M.D., of Tannington, in this county. He deceased in 1710. 

Sir Robert Kemp, Bart., of this parish, his eldest son and heir, 
by Mary his second wife, succeeded. This gentleman married four 
times, and left a numerous issue. He died in 1734, having several 
times represented Dunwich, and twice the city of Norwich, in Par- 
liament. His eldest son, Sir Robert, M.P. for Orford, succeeded ; 
at whose decease (unmarried) in 1752, the title devolved upon his 
brother, Sir John Kemp, Bart. 

This family has been of ancient standing in the counties of Kent, 
Essex, Suffolk, and Norfolk. We meet with two very eminent 
churchmen of the name ; John Kemp, LL.D., Bishop successively 
of Rochester, of Chichester, and of London, then Archbishop of 
York, and finally Archbishop of Canterbury ; and Thomas Kemp, 
his Grace's nephew ; who was consecrated Bishop of London, in 
1449. The present representative of this house, is the Rev. Sir 
William Robert Kemp, of Gissing, the 10th Baronet, on the de- 
cease of his father, in 1804. Sir William Kemp is rector of Flor- 
don and Gissing, both in the county of Norfolk. Ubbeston Hall 
has been pulled down, and the property now belongs to Lord 
Huntiugfield. 

ARMS. Kemp: gules; three garbs, within a bordure engrailed, 
or. Porter: sable; three bells, argent. 

Edmund Porter, S.T.P., Chaplain to the Lord Keeper Coventry, 



HUNDRED OF BL1THING. 271 

was vicar of this parish; and in 1627, was installed to the fourth 
prebend in Norwich Cathedral. He was a native of Worcester, and 
became a student and Fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge. 
He became sequestered from his prebend, but was permitted to live 
quietly on a small estate of his own, till the restoration, when he 
was also restored, and lived till 1670, leaving Sir Charles Porter, 
Knt., his son, who was twice Lord Chancellor of Ireland. 

CHARITIES. The poors' estate consists of two cottages, with a 
small garden, and a blacksmith's shop adjoining; which is copyhold 
of the manor of Ubbeston. These premises are let at about 10 a 
year, and it has been usual to apply the rents, after providing for 
repairs, towards the payment of the ordinary expenses of the church- 
warden's office ; but it appears to be more in conformity to the trust, 
that it should be distributed among poor persons. 



UGGESHALL. HUGETHALE, or VGGICEHEALA. 

Eoger, son of Peter Fitz Osbert, of Somerleyton, in this county, 
was owner of this lordship and advowson. He was summoned to 
Parliament in the 22ud of King Edward I., and died without issue, 
leaving them to Catherine his wife, for life; upon whose decease they 
devolved upon Isabella, eldest sister and coheir of the said Roger, 
and widow of Sir Walter Jernegan, of Stonham Jernegan, in this 
county, Knt. 

Sir Peter Jernegan, of Somerleyton, Knt., their son, succeeded as 
coheir, on the death of his mother, to her share of the large possession 
of the Fitz Osbert family. Sir Peter was Sub-Escheator of Suffolk, 
in 1283 : in 1334, he sold this manor and advowson, to Sir Edmund 
de Sortelee, Knt. 

In the 17th of King Edward IV., Roger, son of Sir Edmund de 
Sortelee, granted the whole of this manor to the lady Joan, his 
mother, for life ; provided she claimed no dower in the manors of 
Sotterley, in this county, and Stody, in Norfolk. 

Thomas Playters, of Sotterley, Esq., died in 1479, seized of this 
lordship ; and William Playters, Esq., was his son and heir. It 
afterwards became the inheritance of Lionel Playters, rector of this 
parish ; who succeeded to the Baronetage upon the decease of his 
half-brother, Sir Thomas Playters, Bart., in 1651. 



272 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

Sir Lionel had been a severe sufferer during the civil wars, being 
sequestered of his living and property ; but at the restoration his 
rectory was restored, with the title and family estate ; which he 
lived to enjoy many years, and constantly officiated in this parish 
church, to the time of his death ; which took place in 1679. He 
was succeeded by his eldest son, Sir John Playters, Bart. 

It subsequently became vested in the Eous, family. In 1764, 
Sir John Eous, Bart., was owner; and the present proprietor is John 
Edward Cornwallis Eous, Earl of Stradbroke who is also patron 
of the living. 

ARMS. Fitz Osbert: Gules; three bars, gemelle, or; and a 
canton, argent. Jernegan : argent ; three arming buckles, gules. 
Sortelee : gules ; a fess between three round buckles, argent. 
Playters : bendy wavy of six, argent and azure. 

In 1390, John Wareyn exchanged this rectory with William de 
Thornton, for that of St. Lawrence, in the city of Norwich. Thornton 
deceased in 1401, and was buried in the chancel of St. Lawrence 
church. 

Nicholas Locke, A.M., rector of this parish, and Harkstead, in 
Samford hundred, in 1561 was appointed Commissary of Suffolk 
Archdeaconry, and Official of Sudbury. 

CHARITIES. A cottage, given by a member of the Playters fa- 
mily, is let at 2 a year. A piece of land, 4A. OR. 37p., allotted on 
the enclosure, for the poor, is let at 10 10s. a year. These rents 
are laid out in coals, which are given among the poor inhabitants of 
the parish. A dole of 10s. a year for the poor, the origin of which 
is unknown, is paid out of land in this parish, called " Gander's 
Hill," the property of Mrs. Welch; and another dole of 10s. a year, 
given by a person named Walter, was formerly paid in respect of an 
estate in the parish of Blythford, but this payment has been with- 
held since 1782. 



WALDEESWICK. WALBURISWICK, or WALD-BERIGE-WYC. 

A hamlet of Bliburgh, formerly both populous and wealthy, if 
we may judge from the size of its church, and the stateliness of its 
structure ; and was held in high esteem by, and participated in many 
favours from the Crown. As trade decreased at Dunwich, bv the 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 273 

alteration of that port, a proportionate increase took place at this 
port ; when the town grew into repute, and established commerce 
with other ports. 

It has subsequently experienced a sad reverse, principally from 
the decay of its fishery, by which the town was chiefly maintained 
before the reformation ; and also several severe losses by fire, by 
which it became so impoverished, that in 1628, the magistrates 
granted a warrant for levying weekly contributions upon certain 
individuals resident in the vicinity, for its maintenance and support. 

They became still further impoverished by maintaining expensive 
and vexatious law suits, against Sir Robert Brooke, and John, his 
son and successor, lords of this manor, concerning their quay, 
common, &c. ; a relation of which, written in 1652, is given in Mr. 
Gardner's History of this place ; by which it appears they were op- 
pressively and unjustly deprived of their legal rights and privileges. 

This state of things forms a melancholy contrast with the once 
prosperous situation of their predecessors, who erected that stately 
pile, the parish church, at their own sole expense ; now in ruins, 
and unable to repair it. 

Mr. Gardner has inserted in his work, the " History of Dunwich," 
many curious and interesting documents respecting the erection of 
this edifice ; one of which, being of rare occurrence, and singularly 
curious, is here inserted, namely : 

The Covenant fur Building Walberswick Steeple. 

"This Bille endentyd Witnessith, that on the Tewesday next after the Feste of 
Seynt Mathie Apostle ; the fourte Zeer of King Henry the sexte, a Comenaunt was 
maked byt-wyn Thomas Baugot, Thomas Wolfard, William Ambrynghale, and 
Thomas Pellyng, of the Town of Walbureswyk, on the one Partye ; and Richard 
Russel, of Donewich, and Adam Powle, of Blythtburgh, Masons, on the other Partye, 
that is to seyne. That the fornseid Richard and Adam schal make, or do make a 
Stepel joyned to the Cherche of Walbureswyk fornseid ; with foure Betraas, and 
one Vice, and tirwelse foote wyde, and sexe foote thikke; the Walles, the Wallyng, 
the Tabellyng, and the Orbyng sewtly, after the Stepil of Dunstale, well, and 
trewely, and competently ; a Dore in the West also good, as the Dore in the Stepel 
of Halesworth, and a Wyndowe of foure Dayes above the Dore, sewtly after the 
Wyndowe of thre Dayes of Halesworth. And thre Wyndowes atte nethir Soler ; 
and eche Wyndowe of two Days, and foure Wyndowes atte onerer Soler, the Wyn- 
dowe of thre Days sewtly after Halesworth. The fornseid Richard and Adam shal 
Werke, or doo Werke, on the Stepel fornseid, two Termes in the Zeer, saf the ferste 
Zeer zeerly, in the Tyroe of werkyng, of settyng, and leying ; that is to sey, bitwixen 
the Festes of the Annuncyacion of our Lady, and Seint Mychel Arcbaungel : but if 
it be other Maner consentyd on bothe Partyes, and the fornseid Thomas Baugot, 
Thomas, William, and Thomas, shal fynde alle Maner of Mateer to the Stepel forn- 
said ; that is to ay, Frestoon, Lyme, and Calyan Wat, and Send ; and alle Maner 



274 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

Thyngge that nedith to stagyng, and wyndyng, and Schouellis, and alle Maner Vessel 
that is nedefull to the Stepel fornseid. And an Hows to werke inne, to ete, and 
drynke, and to lygge inne, and to make Mete inne; and that he hadde by the Place 
of werkyng. The fornseid Richard and Adam schal take of the fornsaid Thomas 
Baugot, Thomas, William, and Thomas, for the Zarde werkyng, 40 Scheelynggs, of 
laughfull Money of Inglond. And a Cade of full Herynge eche Zeer, in Tyme of 
werkyng. And eche of hem a Gowne of lenore ones, in the Tyme of werkyng ; so 
that they scholden be gode Men, and trewe to the Werk fornsaid.'* 

The manor and advowson has always passed with Bliburgh. 



WALPOOLE, or WALEPOLA. 

In the 5th of King Edward I., this was the lordship of Walter de 
Norwich, Baron of the Exchequer, who in that year obtained free 
warren in all his demesne lands in this parish ; he was succeeded 
by Sir John de Norwich, his son and heir, who, in 1 302, procured 
from the said Monarch, another charter of free warren for this and 
other of his estates in Mettingham, Mells, Wenhaston, Shipmeadow, 
&c. John de Norwich, his grandson, succeeded. 

The church was impropriated to the Nunnery of Redingfield;. 
and, at the dissolution of that house, was granted to Robert and 
Richard Taverner. Lord Hunting-field is now lord of the manor of 
Walpoole, with Chickering. The patronage of the church is in the 
venerable Archdeacon Philpot : present incumbent, the Rev. Wm. 
Graham Cole. 

CHARITIES. The town estate has been held, from a remote time, 
in trust for the only use and benefit of the inhabitants ; part of 
which, consisting of an old town house, with yards, and a small 
piece of ground adjoining, was let to the Rev. Benjamin Philpot, 
the late rector, for a term of 40 years, from October 10, 1824, at 
the yearly rent of 7s. 6d. ; the lessee stipulating to take down the 
old town house, and erect a new one, which he has since done. 
Other part of the property, consisting of about an acre of ground, 
called the " Clink," was also let, in 1800, to the Rev. B. Philpot, 
on lease for 99 years, at the yearly rent of 1. Three acres of land, 
the remainder of the estate, let at 7 per annum. The rents are 
applied with the church rate, conformable to custom. In 1701, 
Thomas Neale gave, by will, 2 10s. a year, to be employed towards 
teaching five poor children, of the poorest parents, to read the Bible; 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 275 

and 10s. a year to buy Bibles, or other religious books; which is 
expended accordingly. 



WANGFOKD, or WANKEFORDA. Alias REYDON ST. PETER. 

This parish is chiefly remarkable for a Priory, or cell of Cluniac 
Monks, subordinate to that of Thetford, and dedicated to the Virgin 
Mary, according to Weever; but other, and better authorities say, 
to St. Peter and St. Paul. This is now the parochial church. 

It was founded, according to Leland, before the year 1160, by 
Doudo Asini, Dapifer, or Steward to the King's Household. 
Weever styles the founder Eudo Ansered, of France ; but Dr. 
Tanner questions whether he be not the same with Eudo Dapifer, 
the founder of St. John's, at Colchester. Richard Fitz William 
confirmed all the gift of his grandfather, Dodo ; and Sir Geraline 
de Vernun, Knt., those of his father, Ansered. 

Mr. Taylor, in his " Index Monasticus," questions whether the 
Doudo Asini, of Leland, and the Eudo Ansered, of Weever, cannot 
be reconciled to mean the same person with Ansered, father of Sir 
Geraline Vernun, and Dodo, grandfather of Richard Fitz William. 

Valuations in Tax. Eccles. 1291: Suffolk, in 13 parishes, .13 
lls. 8d.; Norfolk, in Carlton Rode, 6d. : gross value, &9 3s. Od. 

To this Priory were appropriated the churches of Rissemere (alias 
Reydon), with the chapels of Southwold, Covahithe (or Northales), 
Wangford, and Stoven; and portions, or pensions, of Uggeshall, 
and Easton Bavent. 

It was granted, in 1540, to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk; whose 
descendant sold it to Sir John Rous, Knt., in 1612. The Right 
Hon. John Edward Cornwallis Rous, Earl of Stradbroke, is the 
present possessor of the site, lord of the manor, and patron of the 
church. 

CHARITIES. The sum of 5 a year, paid as a rent charge, for 
the poor, out of an estate in this parish, the property of the Earl of 
Stradbroke, is distributed at Easter among poor persons. It is 
unknown by whom this annuity was given. The sum of l per 
annum was devised, in 1589, by the will of Matthew Walter, of 
Blyford : this has not been received since 1783. 



276 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

WENHASTON, or WENADESTDNA. 

The early possessors of this lordship were the same as those who 
held the manor of Walpoole, in this hundred ; and it passed in the 
same way. The family of Mikelhy had some interest here; in 1373, 
Julian, relict of John de Mikelby, of Wenhaston, in Suffolk, was 
buried in the burial-place of the Charnel Chaplains, in Norwich. 

" There are several manors in this parish, namely : Thorington 
Hall, Thorington Whimples, Bliburgh Priory, Mells, and Bramfield. 
The manor of Wenhaston Grange did formerly belong to the Abbot 
and Convent of Sibton, who sold it to Thomas Daly, of Norfolk. 
The great tithes did formerly belong to the cell of Bliburgh Priory, 
but are now in the possession of Eobert Sparrow, of Worlingham. 
The vicarage is in the Suffolk family. But the Crown has presented 
the three last turns. The Earls of Suffolk presented always before 
1772. The parish church consists of a middle and north aisle, and 
contains many monuments to the Leman family, to whom Wen- 
haston Hall (now taken down) belonged." MS. penes J. L. Ewen, 
Esq., inserted in " Wake's History of Southwold." 

CHARITIES. The town estate, which comprises a building in four 
tenements, anciently called the Guildhall, granted by the Prior and 
Convent of Blyburgh ; four acres of copyhold land, vested from a 
remote period, in trustees, for the reparation of the church, and the 
use of the poor ; and about 1 6 acres of land, formerly waste ground, 
understood to have b^en granted by the lord of the manor of Bly- 
burgh, in or about the year 1770, is let at 41 a year, and the rent 
is applied in lieu of a church rate. In 1562, William Pepyn, by 
will, gave a pightle, called " Dose Mere Pightle," to trustees, for 
the maintenance of a free school, within this parish, for the instruc- 
tion of poor children, in learning, Godliness, and virtue ; and Ke- 
ginald Lessey, by his will, dated in 1503, gave a piece of copyhold 
land, near Blyburgh, called the " School Meadow/' containing 
about three acres, for a similar purpose. By deed, dated in 1794, 
the property under Pepyn's gift, was conveyed, by the description 
of four parcels of land, with a house, called the School-house, built 
upon one of them, containing together, in the whole, SA. 2R. 26p., 
which produce a yearly rent of l 6 ; and Lessey's lets at 1 a year. 
These rents, after deducting for necessary repairs, are paid to a 
schoolmaster, for instructing poor children of the parish in reading. 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 277 

writing, and arithmetic. Mary Collen, by will dated in or about 
1680, gave a rent charge of 3 a year, out of an estate in this 
parish, towards the relief of six poor widows, resident in Wenhaston, 
as should have most need of relief ; subject to a proviso, that the 
same should cease, if the churchwardens should not keep in good 
repair the monument and ornaments which she had placed in the 
chancel of the said church, in remembrance of her husband, John 
Collen. In 1826, the Rev. Thomas Leman left, by his will, 100, 
to be given to the poor of this parish, at the discretion of the pa- 
rishioners. 



WESTHALL, or WESTHALE. 

In the 13th of King Henry III., Hubert de Burgh, Earl of Kent, 
obtained the lordship of this parish, in exchange for that of Camel, 
in Somersetshire, which he held of the grant of King John. In the 
9th of King Edward I., it was in the possession of Eobt. de Aspale, 
as lord thereof. 

In 1474, Thomas Crofts, of Westhall, in Suffolk, was buried in 
St. Mary's chapel, in St. Andrew's church, in that parish ; and de- 
vised his manor in Windham, called Stalworthy's, to be sold. He 
had probably some interest here. 

The Bohun family were possessed of this lordship from the time 
of King Henry VIII. ; of whom was Edmund Bohun, a native of 
Eingsfield, in Wangford hundred, a political and miscellaneous 
writer, living at the end of the 1 7th century, in this parish. He 
was owner of Dale Hall, in Whitton, near Ipswich, and of lands in 
Brampton. 

In 1657, Eobert Brooke, Esq., only surviving son of Sir Robt. 
Brooke, of Yoxford, Knt., was owner of Westhall Lodge ; but the 
widow of John Brooke, Esq., his elder brother, held it for life. It 
was bought by Alderman Brooke, father of Sir Eobert, of the heir 
of Sir Owen Hopton, Knt. Jacon's Hall and Fitz John were lately 
vested in George St. Vincent Wilson, Esq., of Eedgrave Hall, in 
this county. 

The patronage of tliis church was formerly in the Prior and Con- 
vent of Hulverstain, in Lincolnshire ; of whom the Prior and Con- 
vent of Norwich purchased the same ; and it now belongs to the 



278 HUNDRED OF BLITIIING. 

Dean and Chapter of that Cathedral. Edward Hatton, A.M., rector 
of Brampton, and vicar of this parish, held the second, or treasurer's 
Prebend, in the said Cathedral: installed November 28, 1604. The 
south and west doo.-s of Westhall church form good specimens of 
the ornaments and mouldings used during the period when the 
Norman style of architecture prevailed.* 

CHARITIES. In 1717, Ann the wife of the Eev. Gregory Clarke, 
desired by her will, that i 6s. a year should be paid, after her hus- 
band's decease, by his heirs, executors, or assigns, to the vicar of 
this parish ; to be by him applied to the teaching poor children to 
read. Her husband also bequeathed, in 1726, an annuity of 1 12s., 
for the same purpose. The two annuities are received, as a rent 
charge, from an estate in Westhall, now the property of Mrs. Wood- 
hall, and are paid to a schoolmistress, for teaching five poor children, 
nominated by the vicar, to read. 



WESTLETON, or WESLETDNA. 

The author of " Magna Britannia" states, that Peter de Dunwich 
anciently held the lordship of this parish. Two manors are named 
here, Westleton Grange, which belonged to Sibton Abbey, and was 
granted, in the 28th of King Henry VIII., to Thomas, Duke of 
Norfolk ; and the lordship of Westleton Cleves. 

In the 42nd of Queen Elizabeth, Anthony Bedingfield, Esq., 
resided in this parish. In the time of King James and King Charles, 
Richard Baldwin, Gent., resided at Westleton Hall ; which he inhe- 
rited from Robert Baldwin, his father: his mother was Agnes Gillet 
(alias Candler), of Yoxford. He died without issue, having pre- 
viously sold this estate, and other lands in Yoxford. 

Charles Purvis, of Darsham, Esq., has estates here; but the 
lordship belongs to Sir Charles Blois, Bart., of Cockfield Hall, in 
Yoxford. 

The hamlet of Dingle, which formerly belonged to Westleton, 
had a chapel. The church is now in the patronage and incumbency 
of the Rev. Harrison Packard. 

CHARITIES. In 1722, Thomas Grimsby gave, by will, all his 
copyhold, and customary lands and tenements, in this parish, towards 
* See Davy's etchings of the "Architectural Antiquities of Suffolk.'' 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 270 

the clothing of poor children and widows, belonging to the said 
parish. The property consists of about 12 acres of land, let at 16 
a year; which, after a deduction of 1 14s. 8d. a year, for quit-rent, 
land tax, and necessary allowances, is applied in paying for clothing 
materials for poor widows, and other poor persons in the parish. 



WESTWOOD-LODGE. 

On the south-east of Bliburgh grew West-wood, which, Mr. 
Gardner says, in process of time was reduced to a park, now called 
the Grove. Herein stood the mansion house of the lords of tlu's 
manor of Bliburgh. Charcoal, burnt straw, parched grain of divers 
kinds, bricks, stones, &c., discovered a few years ago, when the 
ground whereon it stood was cleared, gives a reasonable supposition 
that the ancient hall suffered by fire. 

The present edifice, called West- wood Lodge, was begun by Sir 
Eobert Brooke, and finished by John Brooke, Esq., his son, in 1G52 ; 
whose chief seat was at Cockfield Hall, in Yoxford. 

Sir Kobert Brooke, Knt., and Alderman of London, acquired this 
estate by purchase, of the Hopton family. Thos. Hopton, natural 
son of Sir Eobert Swillington, sen., had issue John ; who in the 8th 
of King Henry VI., by virtue of an entail made on Thomas and his 
heirs, obtained considerable property, the inheritance of the house 
of Swillington, in this and other counties. 

In the 18th of the said Bang, Sir John Gra, of South Ingleby, in 
Lincolnshire, released to him certain property he held, in right of 
Margaret his wife, heiress to the Swillingtons ; and at the same 
time, Bartholomew Whitfield, and Elizabeth his wife, relict of Eobt. 
Sampson, of Playford, Esq., who was found to be next heir, as 
daughter of Thomas, son of Eobert, son of Adam de Swillington, 
released all their right in the manors of Bliburgh, Westleton, Len- 
vale's, Eysing's, Cleydon, Weuhaston, Thorington, Westhall, Yoxford, 
and Muriel's, in this county, and other lordships in Norfolk. 

John Hopton died, seized of the above lordships, in the 8th of 
Edward IV., and William Hopton, Esq., was found to be his son 
and heir. He is frequently named in old writings, as John Swil- 
lington (alias Hopton), of Wood, in Suffolk. William his son, 
was a great courtier, Treasurer of the Household, and of the Privy 



HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

Council of King Edward IV. ; a Knight, and Sheriff of Suffolk and 
Norfolk, in the reign of Kichard III. Sir William married Margaret, 
daughter of Sir Koger Wentworth, of Nettlestead, in this county, 
and died in the ahove reign. 

Sir George Hopton, of Westwood, Knt., was his son and heir : 
created a Banneret at the battle of Stoke, in the 2nd of King Henry 
VII. He died in the 5th of that reign. William, his eldest son, 
deceased before him ; and by an inquisition taken at Woodbridge, 
in the 6th of King Henry VIII., Arthur was found to be his son 
and heir : he was of Westwood, and married Anne, daughter of Sir 
David Owen, of Cowdry, in Essex ; natural son of Owen Tudor, 
who married Catherine, Queen Dowager of Henry V. ; and was 
father of Sir Owen Hopton, Lieutenant of the Tower of London. 
It appears he alienated this estate in the latter part of the reign of 
King Henry VIII. It has since passed as the Cockfield Hall estate. 



WISSET, or WISSETA. 

This lordship was anciently vested in the Earls of Bretaign and 
Dukes of Richmond : Peter de Savoy, Earl of Richmond, uncle to 
Queen Eleanor, consort of King Henry III., obtained a grant of it, 
amongst other estates, from that Monarch, in the 25th year of his 
reign ; under the title of, " The Manor and Soke of Wischete, in 
Suffolk, to hold of the Crown by Knight's service." 

He died without issue, when it reverted to the Crown ; and in the 
1 6th of the following reign, John de Vaux died seized of the same, 
leaving two daughters and co-heirs. Upon the partition of his large 
possessions, the following year, between his daughters, Petronel, 
who married to Sir William de Nerford, had this manor assigned 
her, charged with 14= rent, per annum ; to be paid to Sir William 
de Roos, who married Maud, her sister. Sir William held the same 
of the King, in capite, as of the honour of Richmond, by the service 
of one Knight's fee. 

It continued in the Nerford family; for after the death of WilHam 
and Petronel, Johnde Nerford, and Agnes his wife, in 1328, settled 
the same on themselves, and their heirs male, intail. This Agnes 
was a Bereford, widow of Sir John Argentein ; and after Nerford's 



HUNDRED OF BLITIIING. 281 

decease, re-inarried to Sir John Mautravers, sen. She died in 1375, 
seized of this manor. 

It then passed to John, son of Peter de Brews, Knt., and Margery 
his wife, who was a Nerford. In 1383, Sir John settled it on trus- 
tees ; and the following year Sir Thomas Roos, of Hamlake, Knt., 
and Beatrix his wife, who descended from Maud, the other daughter 
and co-heir of Vaux, had it; and is the same whom Kirby says died 
seized thereof in that year. 

The family of Hoo had some interest here soon after : William, 
second son of Sir William Hoo, and Alice his wife, daughter and 
heiress of Sir Thomas St. Omer, was seated in tlu's parish. He 
married Rose, daughter of Sir John Glemham, Knt., and died about 
the reign of King Edward IV., leaving issue Wm. and Thos. Hoo. 

In the time of Queen Elizabeth, William Roberts, town clerk of 
Yarmouth, and attorney -at- law in Beccles, purchased this lordship. 
He was living in the 40th of that reign. His sister and heir brought 
it, by marriage, to Simon Smith, Esq. ; descendant of Sir Thurston 
Smith, of Cratfield, in tliis hundred, Knt. 

It continued in this family until the decease of Thomas, son and 
heir of Sir Owen Smith, Knt., in 1639; whose daughter and sole 
heiress, Frances, married Charles, son of Major-General Fleetwood, 
so well known in the usurpation ; and he inherited, in her right. In 
1648, Simon Smith, of Winston, in Norfolk, Esq., settled the entire 
estate of the Smiths, on them and their heirs. 

Smith, second son of Smith Eleetwood, Esq., and grandson of 
the above, resided at Wood Bailing, in Norfolk; -where he deceased, 
and was buried in 1726 : Elizabeth, his only child, married Fountain 
Elwin, Gent., of Thurning, in the same county; she died in 1732. 
This estate thereupon devolved upon her aunts, daughters of the 
said Smith Fleetwood, Esq. 

Wisset is now the property of Sir Edm. Cradock Hartopp, Bart., 
of Freathby, in the county of Leicester ; eldest son and heir of 
Edmund Bunney, Esq., and Anne his wife, only daughter of Joseph 
Hurlock, Esq., by Anne, the eldest daughter and sole heir of Sir 
John Hartopp. Anne Hurlock, at the decease of her parents, be- 
came heir and representative of the family of Hartopp ; and at the 
demise of her kinswoman, Mrs. Jane Fleetwood, succeeded, by be- 
quest, to the Fleetwood property. Her husband assumed, by au- 
thority, the surnames of Cradock and Hartopp ; and was created a 
Baronet, in 1796. 



282 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

This church bears evident marks of great antiquity ; the tower is 
circular, and the north and south doors are of early Norman ar- 
chitecture.* 

ARMS. Nerford: gules; a lion rampant, ermine. Hoo: quar- 
terly; argent and sable. Fleetwood: per pale, nebule, sable and 
or ; six martlets in pale, counterchanged. Hartopp : sable ; a 
chevron, ermine, between three otters, passant, argent. 

CHARITIES. The rents of a house and small garden in this pa- 
rish, of which the original appropriation for public uses is unknown, 
are applied to the repairs of the church, and other ordinary expenses 
of the churchwardens. In 1774, these premises were demised by 
two of the feoffees, by lease for 99 years, at the rent of l 5s. 6d. 
a year ; and the lease is now vested in Robert Mayhew. A large 
sum of money has been expended in building on the ground de- 
mised, by the party interested in the lease. 



WRENTHAM, or WRETHAM. 

At the period of the Doomsday survey, this lordship was held by 
Robert de Pierpoint, under the famous William, Earl Warren ; and 
that family continued interested in this parish until the time of 
King Edward III., when Sir Simon de Pierpoint, of Belstead Parva, 
and Henstead, was living. 

Sibilla, his daughter, married Sir Edmund de Ufford, third son 
of Sir Thomas Ufford, and nephew of Robert, Earl of Suffolk. Sir 
Edmund died in 1374, when Sir Robert, his son and heir, succeeded. 
He married Helen, daughter of Sir Thomas Eelton, Knt., and died 
in HOO. 

Amey, their daughter and co-heir, married Sir William Bowet, 
Knt. (probably a brother of Henry Bowet, Archbishop of York) . 
In the llth of King Henry IV., Sir William, and Amey his wife, 
resided in this parish. He died about the 10th of the succeeding 
reiga ; she survived, and re-married Sir Henry Inglose. 

The Doyleys, a Norman family of great antiquity, who became 
first settled at Oxford, built the Castle and Bridge there, in 1071, 
and new walled the city; a branch of which house, and the first 
concerned in this county, resided in this parish; namely, John, son 

* An etching of the former is given in Davy's " Architectural Antiquities." 



HUNDRED OF BLITHINO. 283 

of Robert D'Oyly, whose descendant, in about the sixth generation, 
married Anne, sister and sole heir of Thomas Legate, of Pondhall, 
in Hadleigh; and removed thither. He died in 1447. 

In the 43rd of King Edward III., Michael de Poinings died, 
seized of the manor of Northall, in Wrentham ; and in the 49th of 
the same King, Mr. Parkin states, that John (or Edward) le Dis- 
pencer, son of Ela, sister and co-heir of John Calverley, held the 
same ; probably in trust. 

In the 10th of the following reign, Richard, Lord Poinings, de- 
vised this lordship to the lady Isabel his wife, for life ; remainder to 
his son and heir, Robert ; -who died possessed of the same, about 
the 25th of King Henry VI. ; which, with his other large posses- 
sions, for want of male issue, descended to Eleanor, his cousin and 
next heir, the wife of Sir Henry Percy, Knt., afterwards Earl of 
Northumberland. This lady was the daughter of Richard, Lord 
Poinings' brother. 

" Wrentham Hall, in this parish, was the seat of the ancient fa- 
mily of Brewster, from the reign of King Edw. VI., until the year 
1797 ; when, by the sudden death of the last heir male, that vene- 
rable mansion, and the estates belonging to it, became the property 
of Mrs. Meadows, and John Wilkinson, Esq., aunt and first cousin 
of the deceased ; by whom the whole was sold, in 1810, to Sir Thos. 
Gooch, of Benacre Hall, Bart. 

" The Brewsters were gentry of consideration in this county for 
a long period ; but they appear to have attained their highest eleva- 
tion during the Protectorate of Oliver Cromwell, to whose party 
Robert Brewster, Esq., the then possessor of Wrentham Hall, was 
a warm advocate. He sat in the Long Parliament which dethroned 
the Monarch, for the borough of Dunwich, in the room of Henry 
Coke, Esq., disabled for his loyalty. The writ issued for his election, 
by vote of the house, bears date Sept. 2, 1645. 

" Among the five gentlemen of Suffolk, to whom the representa- 
tion of that county was granted by Oliver Cromwell and his officers, 
in July 1653 (the assembly commonly called Barebone's Parliament), 
appears the name of Francis Brewster. In the Parliament of the 
succeeding year, Robert Brewster, of Wrentham, sat again for Dun- 
wich ; and in that of September 1656, he was one of the ten repre- 
sentatives of Suffolk, and voted for conferring the title of King upon 
the Protector."* 

* To preserve the memory of an ancient family, and their residence, which was 



284 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

The Earl of Stradbroke is the present owner of the lordship. 
Patron, Sir Thomas Sherlock Gooch, Bart. 

William Wotton, a learned divine, was born here, in 1666 ; of 
which parish his father was rector. At the early age of ten years, 
he was admitted of Catherine Hall, Cambridge. In 1679, he took 
his first degree, and afterwards obtained a fellowship of St. John's 
College. On entering into orders, he obtained the rectory of Mid- 
dleton, and the sinecure of Llandillo, in Denbighshire. He died in 
1726. 

Dr. Wotton, published, " Keflections on Ancient and Modern 
Learning," which book was ridiculed by Swift, in his " Battle of 
Books ;" " An Abridgment of the Roman History ;" " Memoirs of 
the Cathedral of St. David's and Landau ;" and " Letter to a Stu- 
dent in Divinity." 

CHARITIES. The town estate consists of a tenement, occupied 
by poor persons rent free ; the town meadow, containing nearly 
three acres, rent 3 ; and land, called " Bull Fen," rent 3. It is 
unknown how the property was acquired. The rents are carried to 
the overseers' general account. An allotment of 25A. IR. 18p., 
awarded for the use of the poor, lets at 45 a year; and the rent is 
laid out in coals, which are distributed among the poor inhabitants. 
A rent charge of l a year, given by Robert Edgar, for the poor, 
is payable out of part of an estate in this parish, now the property 
of Edward Holland, of Benhall, Esq. 



YOXFORD. GOKESFORD, or JOCHESFORD. 

This remarkably pleasant village, in the time of King Henry I., 
was the demesne of Roger Bigod, Earl of the East Angles, and 
founder of Thetford Abbey ; who granted to that Monastery all the 
right that he held in this parish church, with all the lands belonging 
thereto; which Herbert, Bishop of Norwich, appropriated to the 
said Monastery. 

The Prior also held a manor here, which, with the church, in 
1324, were seized by the King, as belonging to an alien Priory. 

taken down by Sir Thomas Gooch, soon after he purchased the same, the above 
account was inserted in the "Gentleman's Magazine," for 1812, part i., p. 313, 
with a view of Wrentham Hall, erected in 1550. 






HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 285 

In the time of King Henry VIII., Yoxford church and impropriate 
tithes were taxed at two marks ; and the vicarage of which they 
were then patrons, at six marks and a half. 

In 1411, William Smith was licensed to settle divers messuages, 
and four acres of land, in this parish, upon the above Monastery. 

William de Pirnho held under the above Roger Bigod, at Pirnho, 
in Norfolk, in the reign of King Henry I. ; a parish from which his 
family name was derived, but long since demolished. He was a 
person of considerable account at Court, and witnessed to a charter 
of that King, to the Abbey of Ramsey, with Gilbert Fitz Richard, 
and others. 

His descendants became interested in this county, at a very early 
period. In the 24th of King Henry III., William de Pimho re- 
leased to Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, by fine, his right of fishery 
from the Mill of Cliff, and the Bridge of Bungay; and the Earl 
granted him a fishery from Bungay Bridge to the Earl's vineyard. 

Reginald de Pirnho, by deed without date, confirmed to the Monks 
of Sibton, in this county, all the land which Robert Aldred gave 
them in Stickingland, in Suffolk. This Reginald was brother of the 
said William. 

In the 34th of the same reign, it appears by a fine then levied, 
that Roger Bigod had the custody of Sara, daughter of William de 
Pirnho, deceased; which Sara married, in the 41st of that King, to 
James de Creke, and they had this manor of Yoxford conveyed to 
them by fine, from Jeffrey le Neve, and Catherine his wife; it being 
the inheritance of William de Pirnho, her father. 

In the 14th of King Edward I., Alice, daughter of William de 
Pirnho, released to John de Creke, son of James, her right in cer- 
tain messuages and lands in Yoxford, Burgh, and Grundisburgh, 
in this county. 

In the 18th of the same reign, William, son and heir of Sara 
de Pirnho, granted by fine, two parts of the lordships of Yoxford, 
Middleton, and Burgh, and the reversion of the third part, which 
Joan, late wife of John de Creke, held in dower, to Robert, son and 
heir of Hugh de Swyllington, and Helewise de Pirnho his wife, and 
his heirs. This Sara and Helewise were sisters. 

Robert de Swyllington had issue two sons ; William, the eldest, 
was lord of this parish in the 35th of King Edward I. ; and in the 
4th of the following reign, had a grant of free warren in the same. 
He died without issue, and Adam his brother, succeeded. 



286 HUNDRED OF BLLTHING. 

It continued in his descendants until the death of Sir John 
Swyllington, in the 6th of Henry V., without issue ; when this, 
with his other large possessions, passed to his sister Margaret, wife 
of Sir John Gra, of South Ingleby, in Lincolnshire ; who also died 
without issue. 

In the 6th of King Henry VI., a release of this estate, with divers 
other manors, was made to John, son of Thomas Hopton, natural 
son of Sir Kobert Swyllington ; who, it appears, from some previous 
settlement, made his claim and obtained this property. 

It continued in the Hopton family until the time of Queen Eli- 
zabeth ; when Sir Robert Brooke, Knt., and Alderman of London, 
purchased it; from whom it passed to the family of Blois, of Grun- 
disburgh, by the marriage of Sir William Blois, with Martha, 
daughter of Sir Robert Brooke, of Cockfield Hall, in this parish. 
His first court was held here in 1660. 

Charles Blois, Esq., their eldest surviving son, succeeded. He 
was created a Baronet in 1686; and upon the death of his aunt, 
Mary, the only surviving child of Sir Robert Brooke, in 1693, he 
removed from Grundisburgh to Cockfield Hall, in Yoxford. 

Sir Charles Blois, the 6th and present Baronet, married, in 1789, 
Clara, daughter of Jocelyn Price, Esq., of Camblesworth Hall, in 
the county of York, and has issue several children. He succeeded 
to the title and estates in 1810, on the decease of his father. 

BLOIS,* OF COCKFIELD HALL. 

Sir Charles Blois, 1st Bart. =j=Mary, dau. of Sir Robert Kemp, Bart., 
I ___ i of Gissing, in Norfolk. 



William Blois, Esq., left a son=pJane, daughter of Sir Robert Kemp, of 

, ___ | Ubbeston, in Suffolk. 
Sir Charles Blois, 2nd Bart., who succeeded his grandfather. 

Sir Charles Blois succeeded his nephew, as 3rd Bart. 
Sir Chas. Blois, 1st. Bart, married 2ndly=r Anne, dau. of Ralph Hawtrey, Esq., of 

T _ . _ J Riselip, in Middlesex. 
Sir Ralph Blois, 2nd son and 4th Bart. == Elizabeth, dau. of Reginald Rabett, Esq. 

Ob. 1762. T ___ 1 of Bramfield, in Suffolk. 

Sir John Blois, only surviving son, and=j=Sarah, dau. of Geo. Thornhill, Esq., of 

5th Bart. Ob. 1810. j __ ! Diddington, co. Huntington. 
Sir Charles Bloia, 6th and present Bart. 

The advowson of St. Margaret's rectory, in the city of Norwich, 
was, and still is appendant to the manor of Cockfield Hall, in this 
parish ; and by the early presentations made to that living, the said 

* For an account of the early members of this ancient family, see the parish of 
Grundisburgh, p. 53. 



HUNDRED OF 1JLITIIING. 287 

lordship appears to have been vested, at the periods affixed, in the 
following persons : In 1330, James de Yokesford was patron ; who 
sold it to John de Norwich, clerk: in 1338, Hugh Banden, of 
Yoxford, instituted at the presentation of Emma, relict of John de 
Norwich, clerk : 1349, John de Norwich, lord of Yoxford : 1352, 
the same : 1357, Sir John de Norwich le Cosyn, Knt,, who was 
lord of Yoxford: 1376, John Norwich, Esq.: in 1421, JohnDomlyn 
was presented by John Norwich, of Yoxford ; who, in 1428, gave 
this advowson to be sold, with his manor of Yoxford, as appendant 
thereto. In 1439, Sir John Fastolf, Knt., John Berney, and others, 
probably trustees : in 1459," John Hopton, Esq., and Robert Ba- 
niord ; and the presentation continued in the Hopton family, by 
themselves or trustees, until 1544, when Sir Arthur Hopton, Knt., 
presented. 

In 1580, Edward Duke, Esq., presented, as lord of Cockfield 
Hall :* and from that time the lords of that manor have totally 
neglected it. It has been served by sequestration for many years. 

An historical error, respecting the death and burial of the Lady 
Katherine Grey, is corrected by a note, copied from a manuscript 
by Reyce, now in the College of Arms, relating to Suffolk antiqui- 
ties, and inserted in the " Gentleman's Magazine," for 1823, part ii., 
p. 11; as follows : 

" There lie buried in the Church and Chancel at Yoxford, the bowels of the Lady 
Katherine, wife of Edward Seimour Earl of Hartford. She was daughter of Henry 
Grey Duke of Suffolk, and of Mary the French Queen, the youngest of the two 
daughters of King Henry VII. : of the elder, K.James and K.Charles were descended. 
This Lady Katherine had been committed prisoner to Sir Owen Hopton, Lieftenant 
of the Tower, for marrying without the Queen's knowledge, and was by him kept at 
Cockfield Hell, in Yoxford, being his house, where she died. I have been often told 
by aged people in Yoxford, that after her death, a little dog she had, would never 
more eat any meat, but lay and died upon her grave.*' 

This statement is corroborated by the following entry in the 
parish register of Yoxford : " The Lady Katheiine Gray, buried 

* An engraving of Cockfield Hall, is given in " Davy's Views of the Seats of the 
Noblemen and Gentlemen in Suffolk," and in " Excursions through Suffolk ;" also 
of the Grove, which formerly belonged to Mr. Clulterbuck, and was rebuilt by 
Eleazer Davy, Esq. (father of David Elisha Davy, Esq., the joint collector, with 
Henry Jermyn, Esq., of materials for a History of Suffolk), late in the occupation 
of Lord Manners. The house of Mr. Ingham has been rebuilt by the late proprietor, 
Mr. J. Howlett. la " Column's Suffolk Brasses" are etchings from this parish 
church, of Anthony Cooke, who deceased in 1613, and of Christian Foxe, who 
died in 1618. 



288 HUNDRED OF BLITHING. 

'2lst Feb. 1567." Most authorities state her to have died a prisoner 
in the Tower. 

Philip Gillet (alias Candler), Master of Woodbridge Grammar 
School for 19 years, who died in 1689, descended from an ancient 
family of that name, who formerly resided in this parish. Philip, 
his son, was also Master of the same school 14 years : he died in 
1739. Anne Candler, a Suffolk cottager, and authoress* (noticed 
in the parish of Holton, in Samford hundred), was a native of 
Yoxford. 

CHARITIES. There are two pieces of land in this parish, which 
by usage are appropriated to the repairs and service of the church. 
One of them, containing about an acre, adjoins the estate of D. E. 
Davy, Esq. The other, which is called the " Town Garden," and 
is opposite the Three Tuns Inn, contains about half-an-acre. An- 
nual rent together, 2 Is. In 1651, Robert Sillett, by will charged 
his close, called " Martin's Croft," in Yoxford, with the payment of 
5 a year ; to be disbursed and bestowed for needful apparel, and 
not otherwise, for the use of the poorest and most needy of this 
parish; to be payable on the 1st of November. The sum of 50, 
paid in satisfaction of a donation, by Anthony Bedingfield, of 50s. 
a year, for the poor of Yoxford, was laid out in the purchase of a 
rent charge of 50s. a year; charged by deed, dated in 1716, on two 
freehold closes in Darsham, containing by estimation, four acres ; 
to be paid on the 1 7th November, yearly. 

* See " Stanzas addressed to the Inhabitants of Yoxford, in 1787." " Suffolk 
Garland," p. 41. 



This Hundred is part of the Royal demesne. It is bounded, 
on the South, by the Hundred of Blithing ; on the East, by the 
German Ocean; on the North, by the Lake Lathing; and on the 
West, it is separated from Norfolk by the River Waveney, 
It contains only the eight following Villages : 
BARNEY, KIRKLEY, 

CARLTON COLVILE, MUTFORD, 

GISSLEHAM, PAKEFIELD, 

KESSINGLAND, RUSHMERE. 

The fee of this Hundred was anciently in Edmund de Heme- 
yrave ; but in the 2lst of King Henry VI., it was the possession 
of Sir John Tiptoft, who died seized thereof in that year. John, 
his son and heir, was soon after created Earl of Worcester : it 
appears he did not long retain it, for William de la Pole held it 
in the %8th of the above reign ; leaving it to John, his son and 
heir, who died without issue; and Edmund, his brother, inherited 
his estate. He was beheaded; and this, with his other property, 
became forfeited to the Crown, and so remains. 



HUNDRED OF MUTFORD. 



BARNEY. BARNEBY, or BARNEBEI. 

This parish has been long consolidated with Mutford, and was 
probably held by the same lords. The patronage is in Caius 
College, Cambridge. 

CHARITIES. A piece of land, containing about 13 acres, was 
allotted on the enclosure, for the poor, which lets at 9 a year; and 
the rent is laid out in coals, which are given among the poor people 
during winter. 



CARLTON COLVILE, or KARLETUNA. 

The ancient and distinguished family of Colvile,* whose ancestor, 
Gilbert de Colvile (or Colvyle), came from Normandy, as a com- 
mander in the army of William the Conqueror, became very early 
connected with this place. Lands were granted to him in this 
county, which he held under the Baron Malet, of his honour of 
Eye, in this parish, Stickerland, Kessingland, Rendlesham, Rush- 
mere, Martlesham ; and Iselham, in Cambridgeshire. 

Sir Roger de Colvile, the 5th in descent from the said Gilbert, 
was Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, in the 31st of King Henry III. 
He married Galiena Walpole ; the King having honoured his mar- 
riage by his presence. He was lord of this manor, with many pri- 
veleges and liberties, which his ancestors enjoyed. 

His successor, Sir Roger de Colvile, of this parish, married about 
1240, to Desiderata, daughter and heiress of Jeffrey de Marisco (or 
Marsh), lord of Newton, Walsoken, Tid St. Giles, &c. From the 
period of this marriage, their descendants continued to reside at 
Newton Hall, in the Isle of Ely, for a succession of above five cen- 

* For an ample pedigree of this house, and further particulars, consult " Wat- 
son's History of Wisbech." 



292 HUNDRED OF MUTFORD. 

turies; one of whom, Sir John Colvile, in 1410, was appointed 
Governor of Wisbech Castle. He built the Chapel of St. Mary, at 
Newton, and founded a College there. 

The lordship of Carlton Colvile passed from the Colviles to the 
family of Burghersh. In the 23rd of King Edward III., Bartho- 
lomew Lord Burghersh obtained a grant of free warren to himself, 
Cecily his wife, and their heirs, in all his demesne lands in this 
manor. He died seized of the same ; leaving it to Elizabeth, his 
daughter, the wife of Edward de Spencer. 

This manor and advowson became afterwards vested in the Aliens, 
of Someiieyton ; and upon the decease of Sir Thomas Allen, Bart., 
in 1794, unmarried, it passed with his other estates, to his kinsman, 
Thomas Anguish, Esq., who also died a bachelor, in 1810: he was 
succeeded by his brother, the Rev. George Anguish, M.A., who is 
the present proprietor. 

ARMS. Colvile: azure; a lion rampant, argent, collared ; with 
a label of three points. 



GISLEHAM, or GISLAM. 

In the 9th of King Edward I., the lordship of this parish was 
the property of Sir Edmund de Hemegrave, with the advowson. 
He died in 1334. The College of St. Mary, in Bailey-End, Thet- 
ford, held divers lands and revenues in Gisleham, Rushmere, and 
adjoining parishes in this county. 

In the 16th of King Edward III., Sir Ralph Bigot, son of Sir 
Ralph, sold to Roger, son of Sir Edmund de Soterley, 11s. 6d. rent 
per annum; with the rent of 1500 herrings, in this parish, Sa- 
teiiey, &c. 

In .1 764, this lordship was vested in Richmond Garneys, Esq. The 
manor of Pyes lately belonged to Lady Boston, and F. I. Irby, Esq. 
The advowson is in the Crown. 



KESSINGLAND, or KESSINGELANDA. 
In the 12th of King Henry III., a fine was levied between Rod- 



HUNDRED OF MUTFOHD. 

land, Prior of Weybourne, in Norfolk, petent, and William de Ma- 
nywaryn, tenent, of 30s. rent in this parish; which the Prior 
claimed to be given him by the said William, and which he then 
granted to the Prior, to be held of Roger de Manywaryn, William 
and Alice being to hold it for their lives ; which agreement is said 
to be made before Herbert de Alencon, then Sheriff of this county. 

The family of De Tye (or Atte Eye, viz. at the water, or island), 
had some interest here. In 1375, Dionysia, relict of Sir Peter de 
Tye, bequeathed to Edward Charles, her son, 100s. per annum, out 
of her manor in this parish ; and to Sir Robert Tye, her son, the 
manor of Hoo, in Monewden, in this county, in order to purchase 
the patronage of some church, of the value of 2Q per annum, to 
appropriate it to the cathedral church of Norwich, to find two secu- 
lar priests to celebrate for the souls of John de Hoo, and Dionysia 
his wife, William their son, and all the faithful. 

Sir Robert, son of Sir Peter de Tye, on his passage beyond the 
sea, made his will, in the 6th of Richard II., and desires his feoffees 
to enfeoff Elizabeth his wife, with the advowson of this parish 
church, the lordship of Barsham, in Suffolk, with his lands in Mut- 
ford and Wangford hundreds, for life. 

Sir John de Hoo is mentioned as his brother ; by which it ap- 
pears that Dionysia, his mother, was the relict of the John de Hoo 
above-named. 

William, Lord Montchensey, gave all his lands here, with four 
acres of pasture, to the Priory at Hickling, in Norfolk ; and in the 
1st of King Edward IV., Sir Miles, son and heir of Sir Brian Sta- 
pleton, settled a lordship in this parish upon Brian Stapleton, Esq., 
his brother. 

In the 36th of Henry VIII., that King granted a manor here to 
Sir William Woodhouse, as part of the possession of Heringby 
College, in Norfolk, founded by Hugh Atte Fenne, in 1475; Sir 
William paying a fee farm rent of 16s. 3d. for the same. 

The advowson passed, as did that of Framsden, from Sir Robert 
de Mohaut, Knt., to Queen Isabella ; who gave it, in 1346, to the 
Abbey of Nuns in the Minories, London ; and in 1359, William de 
Montague, Earl of Salisbury, by deed, renounces all right to the 
said advowson, in favour of the said Abbess and Convent. The 
Bishop of Norwich is now patron of this hiving. 

The ruins of the old church shew that it was considerably larger 
than the present structure. The former, after its suppression, being 



294 HUNDRED OF MUTFORD. 

suffered to go to decay, the roof became so ruinous in 168G, that 
the whole fell in, and the timber and seats were carried away, and 
burnt. After the performance of Divine service had been discon- 
tinued till 1694, the present church was begun, by contributions 
collected by Thomas Godfrey, and John Campe, as appears from an 
inscription in the church. 

The celebrated William Whiston was vicar of this parish ; and, 
in 1700, procured an augmentation to the living. The Rev. John 
Baron, of Ditchingham, in Norfolk, afterwards Dean of Norwich, 
held the impropriation, and tithes of about 20 per annum ; which 
he offered at eight years' purchase, in order that they might be set- 
tled on the church. Mr. Whiston exerted himself in the affair, and 
procured the purchase money, and Mr. Baron assigned it to him in 
the above year ; when the title became vested solely in him, and he 
assigned it, in 1709, to John Tanner, and others, for the vicars of 
Kessingland. 

He was the son of Josiah Whiston, rector of Norton, near Twy- 
crosse, in Leicestershire, where he was born, in 1667 ; he was edu- 
cated at Clare Hall, Cambridge. In 1694, he was appointed 
Chaplain to Dr. Moor, Bishop of Norwich, which office he held till 
1698, when the Bishop presented him to this living, with Lowestoft. 

In 1702, he resigned these livings ; being, by the interest of his 
friend Sir Isaac Newton, appointed to succeed him in the mathema- 
tical chair, at Cambridge. He went and resided at that University, 
but continuing to propagate his heterodox opinions, was expelled 
in 1710. 

In 1747, he joined the Baptists; and, after being engaged in 
various schemes, and experiencing many vicissitudes of fortune, he 
died in 1752, in London. He has the repute of a Divine of great 
abilities and uncommon learning. 



KIRKLEY, or KIRKELEA. 

In 1764, the lordship of this parish was vested in Richmond 
Garneys, Esq. : it now belongs to the same persons as Pye's manor, 
&c., in Gissleham. In 1764, the church was in ruins; it has since 
been repaired, chiefly at the expense of the Rev. John Tanner, late 
vicar of Lowestoft, then Commissary and Official in the Arch- 



HUNDRED OF MUTFORD. 295 

deaconry of Suffolk. The patronage is in the representative of the 
Garneys family. 

CHARITIES. An allotment of about 13 acres was awarded on an 
inclosure, for the use and benefit of poor persons residing in this 
parish, the rents of which amount to about 14; which is given in 
winter, in coals, to poor people of the village. 



MUTFORD, or MUTFORDA. 

This parish gives name to the hundred with which it anciently 
passed; for upon an inquisition taken here, it was found that King 
Henry II., gave to Bandeinar duBoys (de BoscoJ> in augmentation 
of his Barony of Bandemund, the manor, and a moiety of the hundred 
of Mutford ; with the advowson of the church, the hundred court, 
wreck of the sea, view of frank-pledge, gallows, tumbrel, and all 
franchises ; paying six marks and a half, called blanche firm. 

After the death of Bandemar, these lands descended to Hildeburgh, 
his daughter ; whose two daughters and heirs divided the same between 
them ; of whom, Stephen de Lunchamp, married one, and Henry de 
Vere, the other. Stephen de Lunchamp was killed at the battle of 
Bonyns, in arms against King John ; by reason whereof the King 
seized the inheritance of the wife of the said Stephen, in the moiety 
of the hundred of Mutford. 

Henry de Vere, the son of Henry de Vere, and the issue of the other 
daughter, died without children ; and thereupon, by reason that he 
had no other heirs than Normans, King Henry III. seized the manor 
of Mutford into his own hands, and gave it to Sir Thomas de Heme- 
grave; from whom it descended to Thomas de Hemegrave, his 
grandson. This grant was made in 1234, and upon his death, in 
1254, Thomas, the grandson above named, paid one hundred 
shillings as his relief, for the lands in this parish. 

He died in 1264, and Sir Edmund de Hemegrave, his eldest son 
and heir, succeeded; who in 1321, was Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, 
and Governor of Norwich Castle. He died in 1334, in the 80th 
year of his age. 

Sir Thomas de Hemegrave, the eldest son and heir, aged 40 at 
his father's decease, succeeded. He was twice married : by Isabella, 
his first wife, he had Sir Edmund de Hemegrave, and Beatrice, wife 



296 HUNDRED OF MUTFORD. 

of Sir Kobert de Thorpe, of Asbwell Thorp, in Norfolk ; whose de- 
scendants ultimately became the heirs general of the Hemegrave 
family. 

Sir Thomas died in 1349, and Sir Edmund de Hemegrave his 
son, succeeded : he was one of the Kniglits returned to Parliament 
for the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk, in the 46th of King Ed- 
ward III. He married first, Joan, cousin and heir of James de 
Cockfield ; and secondly, Alice, daughter of John de Insula, and 
endowed her with the manor of Mutford. 

Her testament is dated in 140 1, in which she styles herself " Dame 
de Mutford," and gives to the high altar of the church of Mutford 
40s. ; to the lights of our lady, in the same church, 6s. 8d. ; and to 
the repairing of the belfry of the church, 40s. His testament bears 
date in 1379 ; wherein he gives certain furniture and effects be- 
longing to his house in Mutford, to Alice his wife ; by which it 
would seem she might have made it her place of residence, after his 
decease, until her re-marriage to Sir Eichard Wychingham, of 
Wichingham, in Norfolk. 

This Sir Eichard de Wychingham held the manor of Mutford 
during the life of the said Alice ; and the reversion of the same, 
after her decease, being limited to the right heirs of Sir Edmund de 
Hemegrave, Sir Thomas, his surviving son and heir, inherited it. 

He, and Elizabeth his wife, held their first court at Hengrave, in 
this county, in the 16th of King Eichard II.; they repaired the 
churches of Hengrave and Mutford, and the font in the latter is a 
memorial of their piety. By his first marriage Sir Thomas had issue 
a son, Edmund ; on whom his father entailed the manor and moiety 
of the hundred of Mutford, in the 3rd of King Henry V. ; and upon 
the death of this son, shortly afterwards, without issue, Sir Thomas 
de Hemegrave vested his estates in trustees, for sale : the produce to 
be applied for pious uses. 

He died in 1419, and by his testament, bequeathed for the 
building or reparation of the chancel of thechurch, atMutford, 100s. ; 
for the benefit of his soul, and for the soul of Joan, his mother, who 
lay buried there, and for the souls of the faithful departed, giving 
also to the repairs of the said church, 20s., and to the parson 6s. 8d., 
and to twenty-four of his poor tenants in that parish 40s. 

Joanna, the widow of Sir Thomas de Hemegrave, shortly after his 
decease, married Eichard Vewetre, of Burnham Westgate, in Norfolk, 
and died in 1421. This lady, with the consent of her husband, 



HUNDRED OF MUTFOUD. 297 

declared her will of the manors of Mutford and Fastolffes, in Suffolk, 
and the half hundred of Mutford, with other property in Norwich ; 
but it appears that this will was executed under the influence of her 
husband, Richard Vewetre, and by constraint, and she shortly after- 
wards solemnly revoked the same. 

It has been already stated that the Thorps ultimately became the 
heirs general of the Hemegrave family. The inheritance of the 
Thorp family subsequently became vested in that of Knyvit; a junior 
branch of which family, namely, Thomas Knyvit, Esq. (upon whose 
heirs the Barony of Berners descended), resided in tliis parish. He 
was second surviving son of Thomas Knyvit, Esq., by Catherine his 
wife, fourth and youngest daughter of Thomas, Lord Burgh, of 
Gainsborough, sister and co-heiress of Thomas, Lord Burgh. 

This Thomas was baptized at Ashwell-Thorp, in Norfolk, in 1 624 ; 
and married Emme, daughter of Thomas Hayward, of Cranwise, in 
Norfolk, Gent., who survived him, and died in 1658. He was suc- 
ceeded by his only son, John Knyvet, Esq., of Norwich ; who mar- 
ried Lucy, daughter and co-heir of Charles Suckling, Esq., of 
Bracondale, in Norfolk ; and had several children, of whom two 
daughters only left issue. 

Elizabeth, the eldest, married in 1720, to Henry Wilson, Esq., 
of Didlington, in Norfolk ; and Robert Wilson, of the same parish, 
their grandson, in 1832, was summoned to Parliament, in the an- 
cient Barony of Berners, which had remained in abeyance since the 
death of Katherine, Baroness Berners, wife of Thomas (or Richard) 
Bokenham, Esq., of Market Weston, in this county, in 1743. 

William Bateman, Bishop of Norwich, appropriated the advowson 
of this parish church, to Gonville Hall, in Cambridge ; where the 
patronage of this living, consolidated with that of Barnby, still 
remains. The benefice of Barnby the College purchased of Sir 
Edmund de Hemegrave, Knt. The tithes of these parishes, with 
the glebes; money rent, 4 11s.; corn rent, wheat 6 quarters; malt, 
hall' a quarter; is paid to the college. Bishop Bateman died in 1354. 

The manor now belongs to the Rev. George Anguish, of Somer- 
leyton, Hall. 

" This parish church is remarkable for the building which appears 
at the west end of it. This is called a Galilee, and is almost a sin- 
gular instance of such an erection in this county. Here the peni- 
tents used to sit, while they waited their re-admission into the 
church ; and this may account for the name, by which such porticos 



98 HUNDRED OF MUTFORD. 

were anciently called, the Galilee. As Galilee, bordering on the 
Gentiles, was the most remote part of the Holy Land from the 
holy city Jerusalem, so was this part of the building, most distant 
from the sanctuary, occupied hy those unhappy persons, who, during 
their exclusion from the mysteries, were reputed scarcely, if at all, 
better than heathens." Millers Descript. of Ely Cathedral, p. 43. 

Northwood Place, in this parish, was the seat of the Kev. Thomas 
William Temple, D.D., rector of Kirkley, who died there in 1809. 

ARMS. Hemegrave: argent; a chief indented, gules. Thorp: 
azure ; three crescents, argent. Knevel : argent ; a bend within a 
bordure, engrailed, sable. 

Mem. Richard Powle, vicar of this parish, gave to Gonville and 
Caius College, Cambridge, about the year 1400, 12 acres of land, 
in Fouldon, in Norfolk. In 1540, Thomas Atkin, also vicar, and 
Margery Hore, of this parish, each gave to the said College 48, 
to purchase land of the value of 4 per annum. The lands which 
were bought were in Coolinge, and Cartlage, in this county, and 
Cambridgeshire. The said Thomas Atkin gave also Pain's close, 
in Worlingham, in this county, of the yearly value of 40s., for sti- 
pends for three scholars, of the diocese of Norwich, 35s. per annum. 
They are to be chosen by the Master and two senior Fellows. 

CHARITIES. The sum of 10s. a year, being the interest of a be- 
nefaction of 10, given to the poor by John King, is paid by the 
occupier of a farm in this parish, and barn, and is distributed among 
poor persons at Easter. A dole of 13s. 4d. a year, the donation of 
which is unknown, used to be paid by the proprietor of a house and 
land which belonged to one William Fiske, and was afterwards sold 
to a person named Pleasants ; but the payment has been withheld 
many years, and is probably irrecoverable. A piece of ground, 
containing 15 acres, was allotted to the poor, which lets for 13 
10s. a year; and the rent is laid out in coals, which are distributed 
among the poor belonging to and residing in the parish. 



PAKEFIELD. 

In the 21st of King Henry III., Henry Colvile had wreck of the 
sea in this parish. In the 33rd of King Henry VI., it appears that 
William Bonds, and others, conveyed to John Southwell, and Alice 



HUNDRED OF MUTFOUD. 299 

his wife, the manors of Elgh and Pakefield ; she was, it is said, his 
second wife, probably daughter and co-heiress of Sir Edmund 
Berry, and relict of Sir Thomas Bardolph, of Elgh, in this county. 

In the 29th of the above reign, John Southwell was Member of 
Parliament for Lewes, in Sussex ; and lived at Barham Hall, in this 
county. 

The manor of Rotherhall, in tliis parish, was lately vested in John 
Morse, Esq., of Norwich. The rectory was in medieties ; Sir John 
Playters had one mediety, and Mr. North the other ; the two were 
afterwards consolidated, and each presented alternately : it was sub- 
sequently in the Sparrow family only. 

CHARITIES. The town estate comprises the site of three tene- 
ments, and a piece of land, containing IA. SR., or thereabouts ; on 
part of which two tenements have been erected, and a school-room 
on the other part : the remainder is let in lots, or small parcels, to 
poor persons, at rents amounting in the whole, to 3 7s. a year ; 
which are applied to the reparation of the parish church. A piece 
of ground, of 1 5 acres, awarded on an inclosure, in trust for the 
poor, lets for about 2Q a year ; and the rents are laid out in the 
purchase of coals, which are distributed among the poor. Mary 
Selling, by her will, dated in 1687, charged her lands in this parish 
(now the property of John Machett, Esq.), with 20s. a year; to be 
given to the poor of Pakefield. Mrs. Dodd, who died in the year 
1814, by her will, desired so much money as would purchase 5 a 
year interest, might be invested in the public funds ; and that the 
same should be equally divided annually at Pakefield church, to ten 
poor aged persons, of the parishes of Pakefield and Kirkley, not 
under sixty years of age, and who should be in the habit of fre- 
quenting their parish churches every Sunday, except prevented by 
sickness or bodily infirmity. 



RUSHMEEE, or RYSCEMARA. 

In the 29th of King Edward I., the Prior of Petreston gave to 
the Priory of Westacre, in Norfolk, a messuage, and the moiety of 
a carucate of land, in this parish ; in exchange for a messuage, and 
a moiety of a carucate in Egmere, in Norfolk ; which came to the 
Priory of Walsingham, when that of Petreston became united to it. 



300 HUNDRED OF MUTFOED. 

Saint Mary's college, in Baily End, Thetford, had divers lands 
and revenues in this, and parishes adjacent; and at its dissolution, 
these revenues went to the Crown, and so continued until the 29th 
of Queen Elizabeth, who then granted them to Edward Wymark, 
Gent., and his heirs ; to be held by the rent of 3s. 4d. per annum. 

CHARITIES. A piece of ground, on Hannah's Green, not ex- 
ceeding 20 perches, given, as understood, by the lord of the manor, 
for the poor, is let at 12s. a year. The sum of 6s. 8d. a year, is 
received from the churchwardens of Henstead, in respect of Bran- 
don's charity (of which an account is given in that parish). The 
rent, as above, and the dole, are distributed amongst the poor, at 
Easter. 



LoTHINGLAND, Or LVDINGALANDA. 



In the civil government of the County, this is accounted but a 
Half-Hundred ; the other half being the district of Mutford, 
with which it was, in 1764, incorporated as one Hundred, by 
Act of Parliament, for erecting a House of Industry. 

It is a narrow tract of land, at the North-East extremity of 
the County ; having the German Ocean for its boundary, on the 
East; the River Yare, on the North ; the Waveney, to the West; 
and Lake Lothing, a beautiful and extensive sheet of water, upon 
the South. 

It was formerly an Island, the River Waveney discharging 
itself into the sea between Kirkley and Lowestoft ; but it ceased 
to be so in the early part of the last century, when the sea en- 
tirely withdrew itself from the mouth of the river, and a firm 
and narrow isthmus was formed, which is able to resist the most 
impetuous attacks from the ocean. 

It contains fifteen Parishes ; of which Lowestoft is the prin- 
cipal, and only Market-town ; and five Hamlets, namely : 



ASHBY (or HASKELY), 

BELTON, 

BLUNDESTON, 

BRADWELL, 

BURGH CASTLE, 

GORTON, 

FLIXTON, 

FRITTON, 



GORLESTON, 

GUNTON, 

HOPTON, 

HERINGFLEET, 
LOUND, 
LOWESTOFT, 
OULTON, and 

SOMERLEYTON. 



Besides the Hamlet of Flixton, above-named, there are the 
following in this Hundred : 



BROWSTON, 
BROTHERTON, 



NORMANSTON, and 

SOUTHTOWN. 



HUNDRED OF LOTHING. 



ASHBY. HASKELY, or HASKJEBY. 

The ancient family of De Inglose, who held under the De Al- 
beneys, Earls of Arundel, at Lodden, in Norfolk, in King John's 
time ; and who are supposed to derive their name from a village, or 
hamlet, of that parish, called Golosa, since corrupted to Inglose, 
became very early enfeoffed in this manor. 

Weever mentions a Kobert Inglose, Esq., who died in 1365, and 
was buried in Lowestoft church ; most likely a member of this 
family. Sir Henry Inglose, Knt, served in the wars of France, and 
in the 3rd of King Henry V. (then an Esquire), preferred a libel in 
the court of the Earl Marshal of England, against Sir John Tiptoft, 
who had retained him, with sixteen lances, several archers, &c., and 
refused to pay him ; and so he, the said Henry, declared that " He 
was ready, by the help of God and Saint George, to prove against 
the said Sir John, body to body, as the law and custom of arms re- 
quired in that behalf." 

In 1421, being then a Knight, he was taken prisoner at the 
battle of Bengy, in France, where the Duke of Clarence was slain ; 
and in the 5th of Henry VI., he being proxy for Sir John Fastolf, 
was installed a Knight of the Garter for Mm. Sir Henry married 
Anne, the daughter and heir of Kobert Gyney, of Haverland, in 
Norfolk, by Margaret his wife, daughter and heir of John Fastolf, 
Esq. His will bears date in 1451; by which he devises to Henry 
Inglose, Esq., his eldest son, the manors of Dilharu, Loddon, and 
Washingford, in Norfolk, and Ashby, in Suffolk. 

He inherited the same, and died possessed thereof, in the 8th of 
King Henry VIII., when Henry was found to be his son and heir, 
aged 18; who, upon his coming of age, appears to have disposed of 
this estate; for, in 1520, tin's manor became the property of the 
Jemegans, and has since passed as the Somerleyton estate. 

The Almoner of the Cathedral Priory at Norwich, received a 
temporal rent of 8d. from this parish. 



304 HUNDRED OF LOTHING. 

ARMS. Inglose: barry of six, argent and azure ; on a cantoii of 
the first, five billets in saltier, sable. 



BELTON, or BELETUNA. 

In the 2nd of King Richard II., Hugh Fastolf, Esq., granted 
the lordship of this parish, with Bradwell, Pakefield, and Kirkley, 
to John Fastolf, his brother ; both of whom were members of the 
illustrious family of that name ; which family became divided into 
divers branches, and shared the inheritance between them. 

The manor of Gapton, in this parish, and Bradwell, is now the 
estate of the Rev. George Anguish, of Somerleyton Hall. The ad- 
vowson is in the Bishop of Norwich. 

The west end of the nave of this parish church contains the fa- 
mily vault of the Ives', who possessed considerable property in this 
hundred ; with a memorial to John Ives, Esq., F.R. and A.S., 
Suffolk Herald Extraordinary. He was a native of Yarmouth, and 
resided during his early youth, with his parents, in this village. 

Mr. Ives was author of " Remarks upon the Garianonum of the 
Romans, the Site and Remains fixed and described," 12mo., 1774; 
also, " Select Papers relating to English Antiquities." He possessed 
a choice and valuable collection of pictures, coins, books, and ma- 
nuscripts, relating to archaeology ; these were disposed of by public 
auction, at his decease, which happened in 1776, in the 25th year 
of his age. John Ives, Esq., his father, survived until 1793, and 
was buried here. 

ARMS. Ives : argent ; a chevron between three moors' heads, 
sable. Crest : a boar passant, sable ; collared and chained, or. 

CHARITIES. The church lands consist together of about seven 
acres, the rents of which amount to 6 6s. a year, and are applied 
to the ordinary expense of the church. The parish clerk has I|-A. 
of the same, rent free. An allotment of about 9 acres, awarded for 
the poor, on an inclosure, in 1810, lets for 12 12s. a year; and 
the rent is laid out in coals, which are distributed among the poor, 
in winter. 



HUNDRED OF LOTHING. 305 



BLUNDESTON. 

The lordship of this parish, as well as the advowson, were, at a 
early period, vested in the family of Blundeston ; they after- 
wards became the property of the Pastons, who, in 1679, were 
created Earls of Yarmouth. From them they passed to the Syd- 
nors. William Sydnor, Esq., who married Bridget, one of the 
daughters of John Jernegan, Esq., of Belton, died seized of them, 
in 1613, and bequeathed them to his eldest son and heir, Henry 
Sydnor, Esq. ; whose son William possessed them, at his decease, 
in 1632. Of his descendants they were purchased by the Aliens, 
of Somerleyton ; in whom they still remain. 

There was formerly another manor in this parish, called Gon- 
vile's, which belonged to the Gonviles, of Rushworth, in Norfolk ; 
and which passed to Sir Robert Herling, Knt., of East Herling, in 
the same county, who married the heiress general of the Gonvile 
family, and Anne his daughter and sole heiress, inherited the same ; 
who, in 1474, with Sir Robert Wingfield, Knt., her 2nd husband, 
settled the same, with divers other property in Norfolk and Suffolk, 
on themselves and their trustees. The Hall and a large portion of 
land, were once the property of the Lusons, of Great Yarmouth. 

The Bacons possessed considerable property here. In 1627, Sir 
Butts Bacon, Bart., the 7th son of Sir Nicholas Bacon, of Red- 
grave, Bart., was living here, in a house on the site of which stands 
the present Blundeston Villa. He deceased in 1661 ; and his relict, 
who was the daughter of Sir Henry Warner, of Mildenhall, Knt., 
and the widow of Robert Jermyn, of Rushbrooke, Esq., deceased in 
1679 : they were both interred in this parish church. This gen- 
tleman was created a Baronet in 1627, and was the direct ancestor 
of the present Sir Edmund Bacon, of Raveningham, Bart. 

In 1703, the property of the Bacons was sold to Sir Richard 
Allen, of Somerleyton; who was created a Baronet in 1699. He 
was succeeded by his eldest son, Sir Thomas Allen ; who was She- 
riff of the county in 1730, and appointed Serjeant at Arms to the 
Treasury in 1733. He died unmarried, in 1764, and was succeeded 
by his brother, the Rev. Ashurst Allen, rector of Blundeston cum 
Flixton; who died in 1770, and left this property to his only 
daughter, Frances ; on whose decease it passed to Nicholas Henry 
Bacon, Esq., the second son of Sir Edmund Bacon, the 10th Ba- 



800 HUNDRED OF LOTHING. 

ronet, of Baveningham, in Norfolk. This gentleman rebuilt a part 
of the mansion, expended a very considerable sum in enlarging the 
grounds, and, by his extensive and judicious planting, added greatly 
to its native beauty. 

In 1831, he disposed of the whole to the present possessor, 
Charles Steward, Esq.,* a distinguished Officer in the Hon. East 
India Company's Naval Service; who married his first cousin, 
Harriet, the only daughter, by his first wife, of Ambrose Harbord 
Steward, of Stoke Park, near Ipswich, Esq. ; by whom he has an 
only son, Charles John. 

The mansion has been at different times called Sydnors,f Blun- 
deston Villa, and Blundeston House : it is a plain, but handsome 
building, situated amid grounds, groves, and scenery of great beauty. 
During the life-time of Mrs. F. Allen, this delightful spot was the 
residence of that accomplished scholar, the late Kev. Norton Nicholls, 
LL.B.; a gentleman not more distinguished for his talents and vir- 
tues, than from his being the intimate friend of the poet Gray, who 
was Ms frequent visitor here. Mr. Matthias has appended to his 
" Observations on the Character and Writings of Gray," an inte- 
resting " Memoir" of this gentleman, in which he describes this 
spot as " one of the most finished scenes of sylvan delight, which 
this island can offer to our view."J Mr. Nicholls was rector of 
Bradwell and Lound, in this hundred, to which he was presented in 
1767. He deceased on the 22nd November, 1809. 

At the end of the beautiful lake that ornaments this estate, are 
two objects which are become highly interesting, from their being 
the favourite haunts of Gray, during his occasional visits here, viz. : 
a summer house, named " Gray's Seat," and a venerable pollard, 
called " Gray's Oak." On a part of the grounds, situate in the 
parish of Flixton, Mr. Steward has placed the ancient Font, which 
formerly belonged to the dilapidated church of that village, which 

* Mr. Steward has been, for some time past, actively engaged on a " History of 
the Hundred of Lothingland ;" which, we trust, will shortly be given to the public 
in 2 vols. 4to., with numerous and highly interesting illustrations of the scenery, 
antiquities, churches, &c. &c. His collections for this purpose, enriched with nu- 
merous drawings, are well deserving the inspection of the Topographical Antiquary ; 
as is Mrs. Steward's Ornithological Collection, which comprises every known spe- 
cimen of land and water fowl, which haunt and frequent this part of the island. 

f A view of " Sydnor's," from a drawing by Mrs. Charles Steward, was given in 
" Pawsey's Lady's Repository," for 1838. 

J Sec " Suffolk Garland," p. 192. 



HUNDRED OF LOTHING. M7 

ho was so fortunate as to discover in an adjoining farm yard ; and 
which Gillingwater, in his " Historical Account of Lowestoft," de- 
scribes as " split asunder to support the two ends of a hog's trough, 
to the great offence of common decency." On it has been inscribed 
the following legend : 

HUNC. FONTEM. LUSTRALRM. 

EccLF.si.i.. DE. FLIXTON. 

Ol.l.M. CONSF.CRATUM. 
ET. DE. 8OROIUM. CONGERIE. 
IN. ACRO. VICING. EKEI'TUM. 

HlC. POM. CURAVIT. 

CAROLUS. STEWARD. 

DE. SYDNORB. ARMIGER. 

A. C. MDCCCXXXVII. 

In 1799, Mr. Nicholls entertained here the gallant Admiral Lord 
Duncan, on his landing at Yarmouth, after the memorable engage- 
ment off Camperdown ; when the trees on an island, at the extre- 
mity of the lake, were decorated with variegated lamps, and a 
brilliant display of fire- works took place. 

The Eight Hon. Lord Boston has some property here, in right 
of his wife, Eachael Ives Drake. 

ARMS. Blundcston: per pale, ermine and sable; a chevron, 
counterchanged. Paston : or ; six fleurs-de-lis, azure ; a chief, 
indented, of the field. Sydnors : argent ; a fess, nebulee, azure, 
between three crescents, jessant fleurs-de-lis, sable. Gonvile: argent; 
on a chevron between two couple closes, outwardly engrailed, three 
escallops, or. Steward: or ; a fess chequy, argent and azure ; on 
an inescutcheon of the second, a lion rampant, gules, oppressed 
with a bend ragulee, or. 

CHARITIES. The town estate comprises tliree small cottages, 
with an allotment of 20 perches ; a piece of land, called the town 
pightle, containing about l acres ; an allotment on Plough Com- 
mon, of SA. IR. 22p., and a piece of ground, of about an acre, used 
as a stack yard. The rents, amounting together to 19 a year, are 
carried by the overseers of the poor to their general account. A 
house, small bam, and hemp-lands, containing IA. 32?., are let at 
8 a year. These premises are understood to have been devised by 
one Anthony Bays, to the inhabitants of this parish, for the use of 
the poor ; but the date, or particular terms of the will, cannot be 
ascertained, and the rent has been of late applied as part of the 
poor rate. An allotment of marsh land, containing 10A. R. 34p., 



308 HUNDRED OF LOTHING. 

and an allotment of 15A. 2n. 38p. on How Heath, were awarded, on 
an inclosure, for the use of poor persons residing in this parish. 
These produce together a rent of 60 a year, which is expended in 
the purchase of coals, that are distributed to the poor. The yearly 
sum of 10s., given by the will of Elizabeth, the wife of William 
Ayton, is paid to poor widows, as a rent charge on a piece of land 
called Dale Pightle. The Eev. Gregory Clarke, in 1726, devised a 
house, and about IA. 2n. of land, in trust, to apply the rents and 
profits towards the payment of a .schoolmaster, or schoolmistress, 
for teaching so many of the poor children of the parish to read, 
write, and cast accounts, as the trustees from time to time shall 
appoint. The school property now consists of a school-house and 
school-room, with a small garden, and a piece of land containing 
A. R. 9p. ; and twelve poor children are generally taught by ap- 
pointment of the trustees. 



BRAD WELL. 

In the early part of the reign of Bang Henry III., the demesne 
oi this parish was vested in Sir Bartholomew D'Avilers ; and John 
de Odingsols, who was living in the time of King Edward II., was 
lord of the manors of Pyrington, Cavendish, and Bradwell. 

In the 36th of King Edward III., John, son of John de Norwich, 
held in his demesne, as of the manor of Wuthe, and the advowson 
of the church of Bradwell, of the King, in capite, by the service of 
paying 4s. per annum to the Castle of Norwich. 

The parish contains the manor of Caxton Hall, and a portion of 
that of Gapton Hall; the former belonged to the Prior and Knights 
of St. John, of Jerusalem ; and the latter, to the Priory of Leigh, 
in Essex. They were both granted, by Henry VIII., to the Ca- 
vendish family. 

In 1474, John Jernegan, of Somerleyton, Esq., bequeathed to 
his eldest son, John Jernegan, the manors and advowsons of So- 
merleyton, Stonham Jernegan, Horham, and Bradwell ; with the 
foundation of the house of St. Olave's : and the owners of Somer- 
leyton have continued a paramountship not only over these, but all 
the other manors in this hundred, since that period. The Rev. Geo. 
Anguish, of Someiieyton, is now lord and patron of this parish. 



HUNDRED OF LOTH1NG. 309 

Hopland Hall is situated at the south-east corner of this parish, 
the residence of John Penrice, Esq., of Yarmouth, late Captain in 
the 1 5th (or King's) Hussars ; eldest son of Thomas Penrice, Esq., 
a descendant from an ancient family of the same name in Worces- 
tershire ; the residuary legatee of John Howe, last Lord Chedworth. 
Captain Penrice married Maria Catherine, eldest daughter of Her- 
bert Newton Jarrett, Esq., of Great Bromley Lodge, in Essex. 

Robert Camell, LLJX, rector of this parish and Lound, was 
elected, in 1731, Coadjutor (or Assistant Minister) of St. Peter 
Mancroft, in Norwich. He published several anonymous tracts, 
and three Sermons preached at Yarmouth, with his name affixed. 
Mr. Blomefield, the Norfolk historian, acknowledges himself bound 
in gratitude to this gentleman, for the valuable assistance he re- 
ceived in that and various other undertakings. Mi 1 . Camell de- 
ceased in 1732. 

ARMS. Penrice: party per pale, indented, argent and gules : in 
canton, a wolf's head couped at the neck, sable. Camell: gironne 
of eight, or and sable. 



BURGH CASTLE, or CROBERSBURGE. 

The lordship of this parish was always a demesne of the Crown ; 
and Stigand, Bishop of Norwich, held it by soccage in the Con- 
fessor's time, when the whole was valued at 100 shillings. Radulph 
Balistarius was lord, at the conquest; and afterwards Roger de 
Burgh, and Ralph his son. 

King Henry I., gave this manor to Vincent, Prior of Bromholme, 
in Norfolk ; which the said Ralph, son of Roger de Burgh, held of 
him by grand serjeantry ; which serjeantry Ralph granted to Gilbert 
de Wesenham, and he afterwards re-granted to the King ; who 
confirmed the same free to the Convent, reserving the advowson to 
the Crown, and the dower to Alice, widow of Roger de Burgh, during 
her life. In consideration of this grant, the Convent released to the 
King, a rent-charge of five marks per annum from the exchequer, 
which he had granted. 

In the 14th of King Edward I., the Prior of the said house held 
the same, in capite, by the serjeantry of providing an archer to 
serve the King's army in Wales, during forty days : at this time the 



310 HUNDRED OF LOTHING. 

Prior claimed view of frankpledge, assize of bread and ale, and 
other liberties. This manor continued in the Monastery of Brom- 
holme, until the 26th of King Henry VIII., when that house was 
surrendered to the Crown; where it remained until Queen Mary 
sold this manor to Wm. Koberts, Esq., Town Clerk of Yarmouth : 
it was lately vested in Mrs. Lydia Barret, of Thwaite, in Norfolk. 

In 1764, it belonged to Joshua Smith, Esq. William Smith, of 
this parish, married Dorothy, eldest daughter of Sir Arthur Hopton, 
K.B., son of Sir Owen Hopton, Knt. This lady subsequently be- 
came the wife of Sir Nathaniel Bacon, of Stifkey, in Norfolk; who 
settled a moiety of Eccles manor, in that county, upon Sir Owen 
Smith, probably her son by the former marriage. 

The Castle here is supposed to be the Garianonum of the Ro- 
mans, where the Stablesian Horse lay in garrison, in order to 
guard the shore from the frequent inroads of the Saxon pirates. 
It, however, still remains a disputed point, whether this or Castor 
was that station; but Burgh was evidently a Roman fortress. 
A vast number of coins have been found, at different times, in and 
about these walls ; and several fragments of urns, particularly in a 
field to the east, commonly considered the burial place of the sol- 
diers. The whole building occupies 5A. 2^-n. 

In or near this Castle was a Saxon Monastery of religious per- 
sons, founded by Sigebert, fifth King of the East Angles, by the 
advice and assistance of Furseus, an Irish Monk, and Saint, about 
640. But very little is known of its history ; and it is uncertain 
how long the religious occupied it after the death of their principal 
patron, King Sigebert; but St. Furseus, soon after that event, 
quitted his retirement here, and went to France. 

St. Felix, the Bishop of Dunwich, favoured the establishment of 
this Monastery, and it was afterwards enriched by the bounty of 
King Anna and his nobles, before 654. The manor, &c. of Burgh 
Castle, was valued in the time of King Henry VIII., as part of the 
possessions of Bromholme Priory, at 19 10s. 

CHARITIES. A piece of land, containing about 9 acres, was al- 
loted for the use of the poor, and is let, by the parish officers, to 
different persons, at rents amounting together to ^614 15s. a year. 
Another allotment of about 6 acres, which was awarded on the en- 
closure, lets at 12 15s. a year. These rents are laid out in the 
purchase of coals, which are given to the poor in winter. 



HUNDRED OF LOTH1NG. 811 

GORTON. 

In the time of King Henry I., this was the lordship and estate of 
Sir Robert de Sackville, Edit. ; but the Priory of Norwich held some 
interest here in the 9th of Edward I., and William de la Pole, Duke 
of Suffolk, in the reign of Henry VI. 

In 13 GO, John de Herling, of East Herling, in Norfolk, had a 
grant of free warren in this manor ; whose son, Sir John de Her- 
ling, in 1389, settled the same, and divers other property, on his 
mother, then wife of Sir John Tuddenham, Knt., who died in 1392, 
seized thereof ; and Robert de Herling, brother of Sir John, inhe- 
rited here. 

In 1435, Sir Robert de Herling, Knt., only son of Sir John and 
Cecily his wife, daughter and co-heir of Thomas Mortimer, of At- 
tleburgh, died possessed of this estate, and Anne, his daughter and 
sole heiress, inherited. This lady married severally, Sir William 
Chamberlain, Sir Robert Wingfield, and* John, Lord Scroop, of 
Bolton. She deceased without issue, when her large possessions 
passed to Margaret, her aunt, the wife of Sir Robt. Tuddenham, Knt. 

Robert Tuddenham, their only son, inherited, but died young 
and issueless, leaving Margaret, his sister, his sole heiress ; who 
married Sir Henry Bedingfield, of Oxburgh, in Norfolk : and in 
1515, Edward Jernegan, Esq., died seized of this lordship. He 
married Margaret, daughter of Sir Edmund Bedingfield, and inhe- 
rited the same in right of such marriage. His successors, at So- 
merleyton Hall, have continued lords here ; the Rev. Geo. Anguish, 
of that parish, being the present proprietor. 

Robert Briggs, LL.D., a native of Norwich, son of Augustine 
Briggs, Esq., descended from an ancient family seated at Salle, in 
Norfolk, had a good estate in this parish ; and lies buried under the 
communion table here. He was admitted of Corpus Christi College, 
Cambridge, in 1677, chosen Fellow in 1682, commenced A.M. in 
1684, and was soon after elected Professor of Law in Gresham 
College, where he resided some years ; during which time he pro- 
ceeded LL.D., and was made a Fellow of the Royal Society: from 
ill health, he retired to Lowestoffc, and there usually lived, until the 
time of his decease, which took place December 22nd, 1718. He 
bequeathed his estate to his brother's children ; and his library to 
his nephew, Henry Briggs, D.D., rector of Holt, in Norfolk. 



312 HUNDRED OF LOTHING. 

Contiguous to this parish, eastward, formerly stood the village of 
Newton ; every part of which is now destroyed by the sea, save a 
small piece of land, which yet retains the name of Newton Green. 
The lordship appears to have passed as that of Gorton. 

Mem. In 1812, a stratum of oak was discovered here, several 
feet in thickness, about 60 feet below the surface of the cliff, and 
extending more than 200 yards in length, composed of regular 
layers of oak plank. This part of the county has also furnished 
several specimens of the mammoth ; and the curiosity of the anti- 
quary is frequently gratified by the discovery of ancient coins, 
fossils, and other productions, after a heavy tide has undermined 
the cliff. 

CHARITIES. An annuity of 1, for the purchase of bread for 
the poor, given by Robert Briggs, who died in 1718, is paid as a 
rent-charge out of a farm in this parish, the property of Thomas 
Fowler, Esq. An allotment of HA. 2R. 17p., set out on the inclo- 
sure for the poor, which let in different parcels, at rents amounting 
on an average, to 25s. per acre ; and the same is expended in the 
purchase of coals, which are given to the poor. 



FLIXTON, or FLIXTUNA, 

Is now a hamlet of Blundeston, and supposed to have received its 
name from Felix, the Burgundian, Bishop of the East Angles. It 
was formerly a parish of itself, and had a chapel, the ruins of which 
are yet visible. This edifice appears to have been dilapidated more 
than a century, for in 1704, George Burrows, chapel-warden, de- 
livered a surplice, cup, cloth, cushion, two books, and other articles, 
to Henry Green, his successor ; from which it is presumed that the 
chapel was at that time desecrated, but for what reason is not known. 
The building, however, is supposed to have received so much da- 
mage from the fatal hurricane of the 27th November, 1 703, as to 
have been rendered unfit for reparation. 

The parish register is still extant, in the possession of Mr. Wm. 
Neslen. Gillingwater, in his " History of Lowestoft," has preserved 
the names of several rectors : the last rector of this parish was Thos. 
Skeete, in 1704 ; and the last chapelwarden, was Thomas Fiske, in 
1717. The chapel was dedicated to St. Andrew. 



HUNDRED Ol 1 LOTHING. 313 

The lordship is annexed to that of Blundeston, and 1ms passed, 
since its purchase hy John Wcntworth, Esq., of John Mighells, of 
Chelmondiston, with the Somerleyton estate. 



FRITTON. FRETON, or FRIDETUNA. 

Eobert Fulcher gave lands in this parish to the Priory of Wymond- 
ham. In the year 1374, Sir John de Mautehy, son of Sir John, 
was buried before the altar of St. Mary, in the parish church of 
Fritton St. Edmund, where he lived. 

In 1413, Kobert Mauteby, Esq., enfeoffed Sir Miles Stapleton, 
Sir Simon Felbrigge, Sir William Argentien, and others, in this 
lordship ; with divers manors in Norfolk, to fulfil his will, made in 
the same year. 

This lordship afterwards became vested in the Sydnor family, 
from whom it passed to the Aliens, and subsequently became the 
estate of Richard Fuller : it was lately the possession of A. G. 
Johnstone, Esq., who resides here. 

Caldecot Hall, to which is annexed a manor, the property of the 
President and Scholars of Magdalen College, Oxford, is now occu- 
pied as a farm house. 

The chancel of this parish church, with its circular termination, 
and groined stone roof, is perhaps unique in this county. The east 
window is lancet shaped, and enclosed within a semicircular arch, 
with zigzag mouldings.* The chancel gives a perfect specimen of 
Saxon architecture, unquestionably of the highest antiquity. The 
tower, which is round, low, and unembattled, is supposed to be of 
Danish construction. 

This parish has been long celebrated for its spacious decoy, a 
fine fresh water lake, of more than two miles in length, and in some 
places of a considerable breadth : its banks, fringed with woods, 
vallies, and glades, are highly picturesque. Captain Manby, the 
ingenuous inventor of the apparatus for preserving the lives of 
shipwrecked seamen, has a neat sporting cottage on the verge of 
this decoy. 

CHARITIES. The poor's allotment here contains 14A. %n. 38p. ; 

* An etching of this church is given in Davy's " Architectural Antiquities of 
Suffolk." 



814 HUNDRED OF LOTHING. 

and the rents, 1% 12s. a year, are laid out in coals, which are 
given to the poor. 



GORLESTON, or GORLESTUNA. 

In the Confessor's time Earl Guert held here. Subsequently 
there were four manors in this parish : a paramount, a principal, 
and two mesne ; all of which the Jernegans held. There are now 
two only : the paramount manor of Gorleston, of the rights and 
royalties of which the Kev. George Anguish is lord in tail male, 
and the manor of Bacon's, within the same, which is held in fee. 

" Here I saw," says Camden, " the tower steeple of a small sup- 
pressed Fryary, which standeth the sailors in good stead for a mark; 
of which Fryary I never marked further." This was a lofty square 
tower belonging to the conventual church of St. Nicholas, and stood 
wholly within this parish ; three sides of which had, for a long time 
previous to its total demolition, completely fallen away, and left the 
eastern face quite entire to the battlements. This ponderous frag- 
ment was blown down, by a high westerly wind, February 16, 18.13. 
A fragment of the wall, which enclosed the burial ground belonging 
to this church, is still standing, in Gorleston High Street; the 
foundation to which has been traced to a considerable distance. 

Mr. Taylor, in his " Index Monasticus," says it is extremely pro- 
bable that what is said by several authorities of a house of Austin 
Friars at Gorleston, refers to that in Yarmouth Parva (or South 
Town) ; and that there were not two Friaries so near each other. 
The precinct of this Convent evidently extended into both parishes. 
The same author mentions a house for lepers here, named in the 
will book, " Heydon, AD. 1372;" but where it stood cannot now 
be correctly ascertained. In 1797, the remains of a stone cross 
were visible, a little south of this parish, but have since quite 
disappeared. 

Gorleston is a vicarage, to which there are no glebe lands be- 
longing ; but is endowed by prescription, and claims some portion 
of the great tithes. Mortuaries, and tithes of fish taken out of the 
sea, are also by custom due. 



HUNDRED OF LOTHING. 315 

GUNTON, or GABBATUNA. 

The lordship of this parish was anciently the estate of the Lowd- 
hams ; then it belonged to the Ingloses ; and Sir Henry Inglose 
by his will, dated in 1451, directs his manors of Gunton and Hop- 
ton, to be disposed of by his executors, to discharge his just debts. 
This manor became since vested in the Blomviles, Wroths, and 
Holies ; and afterwards in Sir Charles Saunders, K.B., a gallant 
Vice- Admiral, who for his distinguished services was much honoured 
by his Sovereign, and respected by his country. He died in 1775. 

Sir Charles purchased this estate in 1762, of Hewling Luson, 
Esq., who resided at the old Hall, adjoining the churchyard. It 
has subsequently been in the possession of his descendant, Eichard 
H. Saunders, M.D., who bequeathed it to his two daughters and co- 
heirs, Jane, Countess of Westmorland, and Mrs. (since Viscountess) 
Dundas ; who sold the same to Thomas Fowler, Esq., and it is now 
occupied by the Rev. Frederick Cooke Fowler. The manor, warren, 
and patronage of the rectory, are vested in the proprietor of Gunton 
Hall : a modern erection, built by Thomas Fowler, Esq. 

Mem. In 1756, Hewling Luson, of this parish, Esq., erected a 
temporary furnace upon his estate here, and succeeded in establishing 
a china manufactory, something superior to Delft ware. In the fol- 
lowing year the project was revived by Messrs. Aldred, Kichman, 
Walker, and Brown, at Lowestoft ; who established a very respec- 
table manufactory, upon a more extended scale, but it has long 
since been relinquished. 



HOPTON, or HOPPETUNA. 

This manor and impropriation anciently belonged to the Prior 
and Convent of the Holy Trinity, at Norwich ; out of which the 
Cellerer had 2 5s. 6d. per annum. At the dissolution of this 
Monastery, the Dean and Chapter succeeded ; and the living is a 
perpetual curacy, in their appointment. 

In Brothertou, a hamlet belonging to this village, is the neat re- 
sidence of James Sayer, Esq. : the grounds are very tastefully laid 
out, and planted round the estate. 



31 6 HUNDRED OF LOTHING. 

A large tract of waste land in this parish, was inclosed a few 
years since ; and Thomas Anguish, Esq., claimed extensive rights 
to commonage here, hy virtue of the manor of Gap ton Hall, with 
Belton, of which he was lord in tail male ; and also such part of 
the mill water, with the exclusive right of fishing therein, as he- 
longed to this parish ; which was admitted, and ten feet of land 
assigned him on every side, heyond the margin of the mill stream : 
this is now the property of his successor, the Rev. George Anguish. 
The mill water, so named from a mill formerly there, is an extensive 
lake, lying between Hopton, Browston, and Lound. 

CHARITIES. An allotment of 20 acres, or thereabouts, was 
awarded on an inclosure, which lets in separate parcels to different 
tenants, at rents amounting together to 25 a year ; which is ap- 
plied, with the money raised by rate, for the support of the poor of 
this parish. A rent- charge of 6s. 8d. a year, is paid out of a farm 
in this parish, belonging to Thomas Thornliill, Esq. ; which is dis- 
tributed among poor widows at Christmas. The origin of this 
charity is unknown. 



HERINGFLEET. HERLYNGFLETE, or HERLINGAFLET. 

In the reign of King Henry III., or perhaps earlier, Eoger Fitz 
Osbert founded a Priory in this parish, near the ancient ferry across 
the river Waveney, and the present bridge of St. Olave. It was of 
the clerical order of St. Augustine (or Black Canons), and dedi- 
cated to the honour of the Virgin Mary, and St. Olave, the King 
and Martyr. 

The founder of this Priory endowed it with 40 acres of land, and 
tythes, in Tibenham ; and bequeathed his body to be buried in the 
conventual church. Peter, his son, gave the advowson of Witling- 
ham, and was also buried in the priory church, in 1275 ; as was 
Beatrix his wife, in 1278. 

The Prior and Convent of St. Olave's, were rectors of Hales, in 
Norfolk, and had the tithes of 235 acres of land in that parish, be- 
longing to Langley Abbey, in exchange for the same quantity of 
land in Loddon and Heckingham, belonging to St. Olaves. The 
church of Hales was granted, in the 4th of King Edw. L, by Ralph 
de Chedgrave, and Emma his wife, to William., Prior here. 



HUNDRED OF LOTHING. 317 

In the 20th of the same reign, an agreement was made between 
Stephen de Astley, and Benedict, Prior here ; when he remitted to 
the said Prior, the third part of eight marks, annual rent in East 
Tudenham, and Tudenham Faldgate, for the souls of his ancestors. 

Oshert, son of Hervi de Dagworth, gave the manor of Dagworth, 
in Tihenham, to this Monastery; and the Prior paid 7s. Id. tax for 
it, in 1428. In 1392, King Richard II., licensed Eoger Rogers to 
grant 50 acres of land in the same parish, to this Convent ; and in 
the 16th of that reign, Sir George Felbrigg made a grant to this 
Priory. 

To this Monastery were appropriated the churches of Herringfleet, 
and a portion of the rectory and the advowson of Burgh, in this 
county; with other possessions in Cringleford, Raveningham, Thorp, 
Thurverton, Haddescoe, and Malthy, in Norfolk. 

The Fitz Osherts, and after them the Jernegans, were the prin- 
cipal benefactors ; the latter became owners of St. Olave and So- 
merleyton, as early as the year 1230, by the marriage of Sir Walter 
Jernegan with Isabel, heiress of Sir Peter Fitz Osbert, of Somer- 
leyton ; and from that year, Somerleyton was the capital seat of the 
Jernegans. John Jernegan, Esq., of that parish, and Agnes his 
wife, were buried in St. Mary's chapel, in this Priory, about the 
year 1470. 

John Reppys, of this parish, who deceased in 1473, desired to be 
buried in the chancel of Herringfleet St. Margaret. He gave two 
acres of land to the said church ; to John, his son, 20 marks ; and 
20 to his sons Nicholas, William, and Thomas : Alice his wife, to 
have her third part of the manors of Thorp-Market, and South 
Repps, in Norfolk, for life ; remainder to Henry, his son, in tail. 

The number of Canons placed here by the founder is not known ; 
but it appears that at the dissolution, it contained a Prior, and six 
or seven religious persons. The valuations in Tax Eccles., 1291 : 
Norfolk, in 13 parishes, 2 19s. lid. ; Suffolk, in 14 parishes, 12 
4s. 7fd. The clear value, in Valor Ecclesiasticus, in 1534, is 49 
11s. 7d. It was granted, in 1546, to Henry Jernegan, Esq. ; and 
Frances his wife, for the consideration of 92 8s. 6d. The ruins 
of the Priory were chiefly removed in 1 784, and except a low arched 
vault (or crypt), little of this ancient building remains. 

Near these ruins, is a bridge over the Waveney, of the original of 
which an historical description, extracted from a M.S. drawn up 
about the year 1706, by the late Bishop Tanner, author of that cele- 



318 HUNDRED OF LOTHING. 

brated work the " Notitia Monastica," is given, in the " Gentleman's 
Magazine" for 1811, part ii., p. 213, and is highly curious. Mr. 
Druery has also inserted the same in his " Historical and Topogra- 
phical notices of Great Yarmouth," &c. ; a work to which we beg to 
acknowledge ourselves much beholden in this portion of our under- 
taking. 

The lordship of this parish was anciently in the Fitz Osberts ; 
from whom it passed to the Jernegans, and so continued until the 
2nd of King James I., when Henry Jerningham, Esq., sold the same. 
Subsequently it became the estate of the Tavemers, then of Sir Ed- 
mund Bacon, of Gillingham, Bart., and others of that family ; and 
about the middle of the last century, it passed to Hill Mussenden, 
Esq., who deceased in 1772, and devised this estate to his eldest 
brother, Carteret, who had taken the name of Leathes. 

John Leathes, Esq., his son, succeeded ; who deceased in 1787 : 
his widow possessed it, and re-married to Anthony Merry, Esq. ; at 
her decease it came to John Francis Leathes, Esq., High Sheriff for 
this county, in 1827 ; who is the present proprietor. The estate 
annexed to this lordship, comprises nearly the entire parish of Her- 
ringfleet. 

The Manor House, half castellated in its appearance, stands near 
the church, and was formerly surrounded by a moat, part of which 
still remains. Blocker Hall, in this parish, is a curious old man- 
sion ; deserving notice as conveying a specimen of the domestic ar- 
chitecture, in Queen Elizabeth's time. 

ARMS. Leathes: azure; on a bend, between three fleurs-de-lis, 
or, three mullets pierced, gules. Crest : a demi griffin, rampant ; 
with wings displayed, sable. Fitz Osbert : gules ; three bars ge- 
mell, or; a canton, argent. Taverner: argent; a bend fusillee, 
sable. 

CHARITIES. An allotment of GA. 35p. was set out, on an inclo- 
sure, for providing fuel for the poor, which lets at 13 15s. a year; 
and the rent is laid out in coals, which are given to the poor, at 
Christmas. The late Mrs. Elizabeth Merry bequeathed a20 a year, 
to be applied to educate poor children in this parish : and to pro- 
vide for this annuity, a sufficient sum of money was laid out in the 
purchase of stock in the public funds ; which annuity is applied for 
the free education of twelve poor children of this parish. 



HUNDRED OF LOTHING. Mill 

LOUND.* 

The demesne of this parish was anciently in Sir Kobert de Blun- 
deston. In 1392, Sir John Tudenham, Knt., died seized of this 
lordship : it afterwards passed to Margaret, sister and sole heir of 
Sir Thomas Tudenham, relict of Sir Edmund Bedingfield, Knt., 
and niece to the above Sir John Tudenham. 

It has long since been the inheritance of the Jernegan family ; 
from whom it passed, with the Someiieyton estate, to the respective 
proprietors of that domain, and is now in the possession of the Rev. 
George Anguish, who presents to the rectory. 

In 1330, King Edward III., licensed Walter de Filby and Ed- 
mund, parson of Lound, to settle on the hospital of St. Giles, in 
Norwich, one messuage, 1 5^A. of land, 2A. of meadow, and 44 A. of 
reed-harth (or juncary), in Norwich ; and two years after, he li- 
censed Walter de Filby, Sir Thomas de Preston, rector of Colby, 
and Sir Stephen, rector of Lound, to settle a messuage, SA. of land, 
and the advowson of Mundham St. Peter, on the said hospital. 

The Eev. Norton Nicholls, LL.B., rector of tliis parish, has been 
already noticed, in the parish of Blundeston, where he resided ; and 
a copy of a letter, occasioned by his death, written privately to a 
friend, may be seen in the " Gentleman's Magazine," for 1810, 
part ii., p. 346. 

Mem. Near the water mill, some years since, on the side of this 
parish, were found several pieces of ancient armour, and various 
coins. 

CHAEITIES. An annuity of 6s. was given by John Spaldiug, for 
bread, to be distributed among the poor of this parish, quarterly. 
This is charged on a cottage, and three or four acres of land, in 
Lound, the property of Samuel Crickmer. An allotment of 20A. 
2R. 18p., was awarded, on the inclosure, for the use of the poor 
residing in this parish, which lets for about 34 a year ; and the 
rent is laid out in buying coals, which are given among the poor 
people of the parish. 



* " Lound," a Saxon word, signifying " a plain among trees." The meaning of 
the word corresponds exactly with the situation of this village. 



320 HUNDRED OF LOTHINO. 

LOWESTOFT. LESTOFFE, or LOTHNWISTOFT. 

The town of Lowestoft stands upon an eminence, commanding a 
fine and extensive prospect of the German Ocean ; and presents, in 
itself, when viewed from the sea, the most picturesque appearance of 
any town upon the eastern coast. The principal street is about a 
mile in length, and lies upon a gradual descent, from north to south, 
facing the sea ; intersected by several smaller passages or lanes, east 
and west ; and contains many handsome modern buildings, chiefly 
erected upon the old foundations. 

The custom of holding a market in this town, is mentioned as 
early as the reign of King Henry IV., as appears by Bishop Tan- 
ner's collections ; for in the registry at Norwich, it is said " that in 
that reign, the King granted to William Delapole, Marquess and 
Earl of Suffolk, one market and two fairs below the village of Low- 
estoft, in Suffolk ; which is the ancient demesne of the Crown of 
England ; and also appoints him his Steward, to hold his courts of 
market and fair ; and ordains that no Justice, Viscount, Escheator, 
Inquisitor, Bailiff, Steward of Hospital, or Clerk of Market, tax the 
said village in any manner ; and that all people holding of and re- 
siding in the said village, be free from all custom and toll of their 
goods and vendable wares, throughout the whole kingdom." 

This town as part of the King's ancient demesne, also enjoyed 
many other privileges ; such as an exemption from contributing to 
the expenses of the Knights of the Shire, during their attendance in 
Parliament, &c. These privileges, were particularly recognized and 
confirmed by writ, in the 15th of Queen Elizabeth, and again re- 
newed by King Charles I., in 1604. But through the changes ef- 
fected by time, in manners and in property, these have become 
entirely obsolete, and little more than their names remain. The 
only privilege contained in the writ of exemptions, productive of 
any real benefit to the town of Lowestoft at this period, is that of 
its inhabitants being exempted from serving on juries, either at the 
assizes or quarter sessions. 

The lordship of this town formed part of the large possessions of 
the Fitz Osberts ; from whom it passed by marriage to the Jerne- 
gans, and has ever since been dependant upon, and descended with 
the manor of Somerleyton, now vested in the Rev. George Anguish, 
in tail male. 



HUNDRED OF LOTHING. 321 

The impropriation is presumed to have been granted, by King 
Henry I., to the Priory of St. Bartholomew, in London, towards 
augmenting its endowment; which grant was confirmed to that 
house by a charter of King Henry III., in 1230. At the dissolu- 
tion, Sir Richard Rich, of Felsted, in Essex, had a grant of the 
said Priory, when it is supposed the impropriation of this church 
came to him, and was subsequently vested in his family. In 1719, 
it was the property of the Church family, and was purchased of the 
heirs of Mr. Church " by the Rev. John Tanner, then vicar of this 
parish. This vicarage is endowed with the great tithes, and is in 
the presentation of the Bishop of Norwich. 

The church is a fine structure, situated nearly half-a-mile west of 
the town ; it was erected entirely at the charges of the Priory of 
St. Bartholomew, and the expenses for keeping it in repair, were 
probably drawn from the same source. It holds the remains of 
many illustrious personages ; among whom are Admirals Utber, 
Ashby, and Mighells, celebrated naval commanders : Mr. Thomas 
Annot, and Mr. John Wilde, founders of the two grammar schools 
here. This parish can boast of several eminent divines for its pas- 
tors, viz.: Dr. Scroope, Bishop of Dromore, who died and was 
buried here, in 1491, aged nearly 100 years; Mr. Whiston, who 
succeeded Sir Isaac Newton in the Mathematical Professorship at 
Cambridge; the Rev. John Tanner, the learned editor of the 
" Notitia Monastica ;" and the learned and ingenuous translator of 
the tragedies of ^Eschylus, Eripides, and Sophocles, the Rev. Robt. 
Potter, A.M., F.R.S., and A.S., Prebendary of Norwich, who died 
in 1804, and lies buried in the church-yard. 

This town has produced many eminent naval and military cha- 
racters ; among whom may be mentioned Captain Thomas Arnold, 
a brave officer ; and Captain Sir Andrew Leake, who was knighted 
by Queen Anne, for his valour in the attack onVigo. MajorThos. 
Walker Chambers, who fell gloriously fighting at the battle of Wa- 
terloo, was also a native of this place. 

Thomas Nashe, the noted controversialist, was a native of Low- 
estoft, and was educated at St. John's College, Cambridge ; where 
he became B.A. in 1585. He wrote several pieces, among which 
was one entitled " Lenten Stuff, or the praise of the Red Herring," 
a joke upon the staple commodity of Great Yarmouth. He was a 
great favourite with the wits of his day, and it has been said, wrote 
with considerable ease, harmony, and energy, in a vein of spirited and 



322 HUNDRED OF LOTHING. 

judicious criticism, of caustic satire, and of pointed humour. He 
is supposed to have died about 1600, and is well characterised in 
" The Eeturn from Parnassus." 

" His style was witty, tho 1 he had some gall ; 
Something he might have mended, so may all ! 
Yet this I say, that for a mother's wit, 
Few men have ever seen the like of it." 

Messrs. Isaac and Edmund Gillingwater, the joint historians of 
Lowestoft, must not be left unnoticed ; who with great assiduity 
and perseverance, collected materials for the " History of Lowes- 
toft," which was published in 1790, by Mr. Edmund Gillingwater, 
who then resided at Harleston. He was also author of an " His- 
torical and Descriptive account of St. Edmund's Bury," published 
in 1804 : both highly interesting topographical works. 

These brothers resided at Lowestoft, and were equally zealous in 
the pursuit of antiquarian lore ; and never rose, or aspired to rise, 
beyond the humble occupation of country barbers, till Edmund 
removed to Harleston, and added to his stock of combs and razors, 
and wigs and blocks, a small number of books for sale. Here too 
he published his History, and here he died ; not, however, unnoticed 
or unregarded, for some of the neighbouring gentlemen urged him 
to quit his trades, both of hair-dresser and book-seller, and to study 
for the church, offering to defray the necessary expenses ; but this 
he modestly declined. Isaac died at Lowestoft, May 14, 1813, 
aged 83 years ; and his brother Edmund about two months pre- 
vious. 

Robert Reeve, Gent., must be ranked among the worthies of this 
town, son of Robert Reeve, attorney-at-law, and the last surviving 
brother of Lady Smith, wife of Sir James Edward Smith, founder 
and President of the Linnsean Society. Brought up under his fa- 
ther's roof, and treading carefully in his steps in promoting the 
comfort of those around him, guiding them in their pursuits, as- 
sisting them at once with his advice and his purse, and healing any 
differences among them. To the active pursuits of business, he 
joined those of a more refined description. In the beauties of na- 
ture he felt the keenest delights, in the productions of art he had 
almost equal gratification, but his attention was principally directed 
to. the study of numismatics and antiquity, in both of which his 
knowledge was extensive. 

Of coins and medals he left a cabinet, which, for the number and 
beauty of its specimens, might be ranked among the best in the 



HUNDRED OF LOTHING. 323 

kingdom. His antiquarian collection was in the department of 
topography. Mr. Reeve had chiefly bestowed his care upon the 
town of Lowestoft, and the adjoining hundreds of Mutford and Lo- 
thingland. For the history of the latter he left materials sufficient 
to form several volumes, accompanied by ancient deeds, drawings of 
churches, public seals, &c. 

In what concerns his native town he was still more rich ; he pos- 
sessed Gillingwater's own copy of its history, with the addition of 
three similar volumes, filled with maps, engravings, original draw- 
ings, and manuscript : the former collected by the author, the latter 
in his own hand writing. Mr. Reeve deceased January 8th, 1840.* 

CHARITIES. The poor and town estate is vested in feoffees, and 
comprises about 104 acres of land in various parcels, in the parish 
of Lowestoft, let to divers tenants, at rents amounting in the whole 
to 271 per annum; and consists of the following particulars : 
It appears that 28 acres of this land were purchased with 60, given 
by the will of William French, in 1592, to be laid out in land ; the 
rents thereof to be applied in the payment of 13d. a week to 13 poor 
persons of this town, every Sunday ; and 3s. 4d. to the churchwar- 
dens, for their pains therein : and that the rest of the property had 
been held under more ancient conveyances, in trust, for the repairs 
of the church, and other necessary uses, for the town of Lowestoft. 
In 1 584, Mrs. Ann Girling, gave by will, her barn, house, and 
tenement, to the use of the honest poor of Lowestoft; to be given 
to them in firing : and James Wild gave a house, and pightle', under 
the Cliff, in this town, to buy one dozen penny loaves ; to be given 
to the poor every Sunday, after divine service. These together pro- 
duce a rent of 9 a year, which is carried to the general charity 
fund. A piece of land, containing 2A. 3R. 24p., enclosed from the 
waste on the North Common, in 1772, lets for 8 per annum ; and 
is carried to the same fund. The Poor's Houses, which were given 
by various donors, comprise altogether 25 dwellings ; and are used 
for the residence of poor widows, and other poor persons of the 
town, who occupy them rent free : the repairs being provided for 
out of the above fund. By Indenture, dated 10th June, 1571, 
Tbos. Annott assured to trustees two messuages, called " Garbag's," 

* For a more ample and particular account of the parish of Lowestoft, consult 
the above Historian ; and the " Lowestoft Guide,'* containing a descriptive account 
of the town and its environs, by a Lady : Yarmouth, 1812. A very useful and well 
written Vade Mecum for the visitant. 



324 HUNDRED OF LOTHING. 

and " Bennett's," situate at Wheatacre (otherwise Wentacre-burgh), 
in Norfolk, in trust; to secure the payment of 20 marks a year, for 
the support of a master of a school in this town ; to be appointed 
by the Chancellor of the diocese of Norwich. This endowment was 
increased, by the heir-at-law of the donor, to 16 a year. The pro- 
perty charged with this annuity belongs to Alexander Adair, Esq. ; 
by whom the sum of 12 16s. a year is paid in respect of the charity, 
3 4s. being deducted from the account of the annuity for land-tax : 
this is carried to the general charity fund, and thereout is paid a 
certain sum to a schoolmaster, and a further sum to find the boys 
with books and stationery; amounting in the whole to about 35 a 
year. John Wilde, by will, dated in 1735, devised to the town of 
Lowestoft his dwelling houses, fish houses, yards, gardens, meadow, 
&c., in Lowestoft ; with the reversion expectant on the decease of 
Elizabeth Smithson, of all the messuages, lands, and hereditaments 
in Worlingham, therein mentioned ; and declared that the said es- 
tate, with the rents, should be applied to the use of a schoolmaster, 
to teach 40 boys to write, read, and cast accounts, and also in the 
Latin tongue. And he gave to the minister of Lowestoft, 1 Is.; 
to the clerk of the said parish, 10s.; and to the sexton, 5s. per an- 
num : the minister to preach an annual sermon, on the 23rd of 
December, upon the text " Train up a child," &c. And in case any 
overplus should arise, after the payment of 40 to the schoolmaster, 
and the above annuities, he gave the same for such charitable uses 
and purposes, as the minister and churchwardens of Lowestoft, for 
the time being, should think proper ; so as such overplus should be 
distributed every year. Under an Act of Parliament, passed in 
1791, the estate at Worliiigham was exchanged for a farm called 
" Croatfield," situate in the parishes of Laxfield, Dennington, and 
Badingham. There are several other minor charities belonging to 
this town. 



OULTON. 

In the 4th of King Richard II., 1380, Sir William Molyns, Knt., 
held this manor, by the right and inheritance of Margery his wife, 
of the King, in free soccage, as of the hundred of Luddington, by 
the service of 10s. per annum ; and Richard was his son and heir, 



HUNDRED OF LOTH1NO. 2/i 

of the age of 26 years and upwards. This Margery was one of the 
daughters and co-heirs of Edmund, son of Sir Adam Bacon, of this 
parish ; and a widow in the 10th of the ahove reign. 

This was anciently the lordship and residence of a branch of the 
illustrious family of Fastolf, who succeeded the Bacons in the manor 
and estate of Oulton High House. Weever mentions a John Fas- 
tolf, Esq., who died in 1445, and Kateren his wife, daughter of a 
Bedingfield; she deceased in 1478 : also William Bedingfield, late 
rector here, who died in 1503 : John Bomsted, Gent., who died in 
1479; and Ales, late wife of William Bomsted ; also Wm. Playters, 
Esq., and Joan his wife ; which William deceased in 1516. The 
ahove were all interred in this parish church. The Fastolfs were 
great benefactors to this church, and probably built the north tran- 
sept ; their arms appearing in many parts of the roof. 

From the Fastolfs this lordship and advowson passed to the Ho- 
barts ; and in the 20th of King Henry VIII., Sir Walter, son and 
heir of Sir James Hobart, Knt., settled them upon Henry Hobart, 
Esq., his son and heir; who was owner thereof in 1550. It after- 
wards became vested in the Keeve family ; of whom was Sir Edmund 
Reeve, of Stratton, in Norfolk, Lord Chief Justice of the Common 
Pleas; who deceased in 1647. 

From that family it passed to Gerard Van Heythuson, Esq., and 
his heirs ; and subsequently to the Anguishes, who sold the mesne 
manor to Lady Graves, then Miss Susanna Blacknell, of Norman- 
ston ; but the principal lordship remains the property of the Rev. 
George Anguish, of Somerleyton, who has the presentation to the 
living. 

Christopher, son of John Reeve, A.M., rector of Stratton, in 
Norfolk, was of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge : he succeeded 
his father in his rectory, at the restoration ; and afterwards held the 
living of this parish. He deceased in 1 704. 

ARMS. Hobart: sable; an estoil, or, between two flaunches, 
ermine. Reeve : azure ; a chevron between three pair of wings, 
conjoined and elevated, or. 

Mem. In 1764, the half hundred of Mutford and Lothingland 
was incorporated, by Act of Parliament, for the relief of the poor ; 
and about two years afterwards, a house of industry was erected in 
this parish, for their reception. 



326 HUNDKED 01- LOTHING. 



SOMERLEYTON, or SUMERLEDETUNA. 

In the time of the Conqueror the lordship of this parish was held 
by William de Warren, Earl of Surrey. It afterwards became the 
possession of the family of Fitz Oshert ; who were Lord Wardens of 
Lothingland, and held divers lordships in this county : from whom 
it passed, by marriage, to that of Jernegan.* 

Sir Walter Jernegan, Knt., of Horham, and of Stonham Jernegan, 
in this county, married Isabella, daughter, and at length heiress of 
Sir Peter Fitz Osbert, of this parish. This lady was the relict of 
Sir Henry de Walpole, Knt., and afterwards became co-heir to her 
brother, Roger Fitz Osbert ; who was summoned to. Parliament in 
the 22nd of King Edward I. Sir Walter her husband, deceased 
before the 34th of that reign. 

He was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir Peter Jernegan, Knt.; 
who, on the death of his mother, inherited the large possessions of 
the Fitz Osbert family. His maternal uncle, Roger Fitz Osbert, 
dying without issue, the inheritance devolved to Isabella, his mother, 
and to the issue of Alice, her sister, the wife of Sir John Noyoun, 
Knt. : on a division being made between the two sisters, this estate 
was settled upon Isabella. Blomefield says that the above Sir John 
de Noyoun died in the 18th of King Edward II., seized of a moiety 
of this manor ; whose son, Sir John Noyoun, Knt., deceased without 
issue, and the issue of Isabella inherited. 

From this period the manor descended through a long line of the 
Jernegans, until the reign of King James I., when Henry Jerning- 
ham, Esq., of Costessey, in Norfolk, sold it to John Wentworth, 
Esq. ; whose son, Sir John Wentworth, Knt , succeeded ; but dying 
without issue, in 1652, the estate descended to Ms nephew, John 
Garneys, Esq. ; and Thomas Garneys, Esq., his son, sold it to Ad- 
miral Sir Thomas Allin, Bart., of Lowestoft. 

Sir Thomas Allin, Knt., born in 1613, acquired the reputation of 
a brave and distinguished naval officer. He served under the Com- 
monwealth, and commanded one of the ships in that part of the 
fleet which revolted to the Prince of Wales. In 1660 he was ap- 
pointed to the "Dover;" amongst the earliest vessels commissioned 

* An excellent pedigree of this ancient and illustrious house is given in Mr. 
J. H. Druery's " Historical and Topographical Notices of Great Yarmouth ;" pub- 
lished in 182u'. 



HUNDRED OF LOTHING. 327 

by the Duke of York. In 1663, he was constituted Commander in 
Chief, as Commodore only, of the ships and vessels in the Downs ; 
and invested on that occasion with the singular privilege of bearing 
at his main-top the Union flag ; which he hoisted on board the 
" St. Andrew." The next year he was Commander in Chief in 
the Mediterranean, and soon afterwards achieved a victory over the 
Dutch fleet ; for which he received the honour of Knighthood, and 
was promoted to the rank of Admiral of the Blue. 

In 1666, he was advanced to the White; and again distinguished 
himself as Commander of the Van, or White squadron, in a decisive 
action with the French and Dutch allied fleets. In consideration of 
these, and subsequently equally gallant exploits, Admiral Allin was 
created a Baronet, on the 7th of June, 1673 ; and retired then to 
his seat in this parish. Sir Thomas was, at different periods, 
Comptroller of the Navy, Captain of Sandgate Castle, and Master 
of the Trinity House. 

He married, first, Alice, daughter of W. Whiting, Esq., of Low- 
estoft, Capt. R.N. : and by her had issue, Thomas, his successor ; 
Anne, who died single ; and Alice, who married to Edmund An- 
guish, Esq., of Moulton, in Norfolk. Sir Thomas wedded, secondly, 
Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Anguish, Esq., of Moulton, and 
sister of his son-in-law ; but had no other issue. He deceased in 
1 688, and was buried in this parish church. 

Sir Thomas Allin, his only son, succeeded ; who married, in 1672, 
Mary, daughter of John Caldwell, of London ; but dying without 
issue, in 1696, the Baronetcy expired, and this estate devolved upon 
his nephew, Bichard Anguish, Esq., of Moulton ; who subsequently 
changed his name to Allin; and was created a Baronet the 14th of 
December, 1699. He married Frances, only daughter of Sir Henry 
Ashurst, Bart., of Waterstock, in the county of Oxford ; by whom 
he had issue, Thomas, his heir ; Henry, who died unmarried ; Ri- 
chard, who died unmarried ; Ashurst, in holy orders, who became 
third Baronet ; and a daughter, Diana, who married Thomas Henry 
Ashurst, Esq., of Waterstock. 

Sir Richard died in 1725, and was succeeded by his eldest son, 
Sir Thos. Allin, Bart. This gentleman was Sheriff for this county 
in 1730, and was appointed Serjeant at Arms to the Treasury in 
1733. He deceased unmarried, in 1764; and was succeeded by 
his brother, the Rev. Sir Ashurst Allin, rector of Blundeston cum 
Flixton, who died in 1770 ; leaving a daughter, Frances, who died 



328 HUNDRED OF LOTHING. 

unmarried ; and a son and heir, Sir Thomas Allin, Bart., who died 
unmarried, in 1794; when the Baronetcy hecame extinct, and So- 
merleyton, with his other estates, passed to his nephew, Thomas 
Anguish, Esq. He died unmarried, in 1810; and was succeeded 
by his brother, the Rev. George Anguish, A.M., Prebendary of 
Norwich, now of this parish. 

Somerleyton Hall stands in a park, beautifully planted ; a fine 
grove of limes decorate it at one end, and are scattered, with other 
trees in great variety, over the whole range of this fine enclosure. 
Fuller, amongst the many "fair houses" of the gentry in this county, 
names " Sommerly Hall (near Yarmouth), belonging to the Lady 
Wentworth, well answering the name thereof: for here Sommer is 
to be seen in the depth of winter, in the pleasant walks, beset on 
both sides with fir trees, green all the year long ; besides other 
curiosities." 

The Hall, which was built by the last Sir John Jernegan, who 
was living in 1579, is a fine old mansion, exhibiting a good speci- 
men of the style of architecture used at the period of its erection ; 
and conveying a just idea of the knightly residences of our ances- 
tors. Several engravings of it are extant. 

ARMS. Jernegan: argent; three arming buckles, gules. Went- 
worth : sable ; a chevron between three leopards' faces, or. Allin : 
gules ; a cinquefoil pierced, or. Crest : a snake coiled, encircled 
with grass. Anguish: the same. 

CHARITIES. Apiece of marsh land, containing HA. IR. 27p., 
was alloted, on the inclosure, for the purpose of purchasing fuel for 
the poor. The present rent is 33 5s. a year : and a further rent 
of 2 10s. a year, is paid for the use of a ditch belonging to the 
marsh land. This land is usually let in different parcels, by auction, 
every seven years, to the highest bidders. The income is expended 
in coals, which are distributed among the poor, in winter. 



Is a small hamlet belonging to the parish of Belton. The Hall, 
sometimes called Browston White House, was formerly the seat of 
the families of Symonds and Le Grys ; and is at present the estate 
of John Parson, Esq. 



HUNDRED OF LOTIIING. 



BROTHERTON 
Is a hamlet of Hopton. (See that parish, in this hundred.) 



NORMANSTON 

Is a small hamlet of Lowestoft, and adjoins the village of Oulton ; 
in which is the seat of the late Rev. Michael Maurice ; now the 
residence of I. P. Plowman, Esq. 



Is within the jurisdiction of Great Yarmouth, but a hamlet only, of 
the parish of Gorleston ; to which the inhabitants are parochially 
assessed. It appears to have been formerly of greater importance, 
and divided into two parts, South-town and West-town ; by which 
names it is described in the documents relating to certain disputes 
with the burgesses of Yarmouth. After the termination of these 
disputes, and it was placed within the liberties of the borough, trade 
failed, and the place gradually decayed. Between thirty and forty 
years since, it was very small and inconsiderable ; until the mer- 
chants of Yarmouth, retiring from that town, began to erect houses; 
when it again emerged from obscurity. 

In the time of King Edward I., William Woderove, and Margaret 
his wife, founded a Priory in this hamlet, of Austin Friars (or Friars 
Cremites). In 1310, these Friars obtained a patent to enlarge 
their precinct ; which, from the remains, evidently extended into 
the parish of Gorleston. 

A composition was afterwards entered into, between the Pro- 
vincial of the Friars Cremites, of the order of St. Austin, in Eng- 
land and Scotland, and the Prior and Convent of St. Bartholomew, 
in London, proprietors of the church of St. Andrew, in Gorleston, 
and St. Nicholas, in Little Yarmouth ; respecting a house and ora- 
tory, in these parishes. In 1 544, it was granted to John Eyre : 
the ancient site now belongs to sundry persons. 



330 HUNDRED OF LOTHING. 

An ancient cross, similar to one found at Little Carbrook, in 
Norfolk, and described, with a figure, by Blomefield, in his history 
of that county, was found buried among the ruins of this Monastery, 
in good preservation. It was formed of lignum vitse ; and was pro- 
bably interred with some religious person, belonging to this Convent. 

The road from Yarmouth through this hamlet is accounted one 
of the best in the kingdom : ornamented on the west side by a line 
of very handsome houses, extending from Yarmouth Bridge more 
than half a mile to the south. The bank of the river on the oppo- 
site side of the road, is occupied by docks, timber wharfs, and ship- 
yards. The Koyal Arsenal, erected in 1806, by Wyatt, at the cost 
of about 15,000, is situate in this hamlet; and during the late 
war, about 10,000 stand of arms were deposited therein ; which, 
upon the peace establishment, were removed to the Tower of 
London. 




<f 




WANNEFORDA, or WAINEFORDA. 



This Hundred is divided from Norfolk on the North, by the 
Waveney ; on the South, it is bounded by the Hundred of Ely th- 
ing ; on the East, by that and Mutford ; and on the West, by 
Hoocne Hundred. It contains two Market- towns, Beccles and 
Bungay ; and the following Parishes : 

ALL- SAINTS, SOUTH ELMHAM, 

FLIXTON, 
BANCROFT, or ST. GEORGE, SOUTH ELMHAM, 

HOMERSFIELD, Or ST. MARY, DITTO, 

ST. JAMES, ST. MARGARET, ST. MICHAEL, ST. NICHOLAS, and 

ST. PETER, DITTO. 

The above Parishes are represented in old deeds as one Town- 
ship, and called " The Deanery of South Elmham" 

ST. ANDREW, ILKETSHAL, 

BUNGAY ST. MARY, and BUNGAY TRINITY, 

ST. JOHN, ST. LAWRENCE, ST. MARGARET, ILKETSHAL, and 

METTINGHAM, 

are commonly termed " The Seven Parishes of Ilketshals." The 
remaining Parishes about Beccles are as follows : 



BARSHAM, 
BECCLES, 
ELLOUGH, or WILLINGHAM 

ALL SAINTS, 
ENDGATE, 
HULVERSTREET, 
NORTH-COVE, 



EEDISHAM MAGNA, 

ElNGSFIELD, 

SATTERLEY, 
SHADDINGFIELD, 
SHIPMEADOW, 
WESTON, 
WILLINGHAM ST. MARY, 



And WORLINGHAM. 

The fee of this Hundred was in the Crown, in the time of 
Edward I. ; which that King granted, with other estates, to the 
value of 400 per annum, to John de Clavering, for life ; in 
consideration of the settlement made by the said John, upon the 
said King, of his Castle and Manor of Warkworth, and divers 
other lordships ; which at his death returned to the Crown, and 
so continues. 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 



ALL SAINTS, SOUTH ELMHAM. 

This and the eight following parishes, constitute what is termed 
the township (or deanery) of South Elmham. The manor extended 
over the nine parishes, and anciently belonged to the Barony of the 
See of Norwich ; from which it was taken by the Act of the 27th of 
King Henry VIII., 1535 ; and vested in the King, his heirs, and 
successors. 

Amongst the demesnes thus taken from the ancient revenues of 
the See, are described, the Palace, Park, and Manor, of South 
Elmham, and the advowson of St. Nicholas (a sinecure rectory, 
consolidated with All Saints) ; the rectories of St. Margaret, All 
Saints, St. James, St. Michael, St. Peter, St. Cross, and Homers- 
field ; and the appendant vicarage of Flixton ; together with two 
Knights' fees, late of Charles, Duke of Suffolk, parcel of the manor. 

The Bishops of Norwich had a Palace here from a very early 
period ; and so, in all probability, had the Bishops of Dunwich, 
before them : Felix, the first East Anglian Bishop, having given 
his name to Flixton. It is certain that a Palace was built in South 
Elmham by Bishop Herbert (who removed the Sea to Norwich, in 
1094); of which the old moated ruin in St. Margaret's parish may 
be the remains. The existing mansion, now called St. Margaret's 
Hall, was erected by some later Bishop. 

Eoger de Skerning, Bishop of Norwich, died at his manor of 
South Elmham, in Suffolk, on St. Vincent's day, Jan. 22, 1278 ; 
and was buried at Norwich. It is believed that Bishop Bateman 
resided here much. The descendants of Sir Bartholomew Bateman, 
the Prelate's eldest brother and heir, were long resident at Flixton, 
and owners of estates in the parishes. William Adair, Esq., is now 
sole proprietor of this lordship. 

The Throkmerton family appears to have been somewhat in- 
terested here. Simon, second son of John Throkmerton, of this 
parish, deceased in 1527, and was interred at Earsham, in Norfolk. 



334 HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 

CHARITIES. The estate belonging to, or held in trust, for the 
parishes in this township, or district, have during a long period, 
been vested in trustees ; that the rents and profits should be applied 
for payment of the leet fee, or common fine of the leet of the town 
of South Elmham ; and for mending and repairing the King's 
highways, and other common ways, within the town and parish of 
South Elmham, where it should seem necessary to the trustees ; and 
for other pious deeds, to be done and charged within the town and 
parish of South Elmham, where it should seem best to the trustees, 
or any three or more of them. The estate consists of a messuage, 
with a barn and outbuildings, and 27 acres of land, in the parishes 
of Aldburgh and Wortwell, in the county of Norfolk, let at ,40 a 
year; and three pieces of land, containing together about 18 acres, 
in the parishes of St. Margaret and Flixton, let at the rent of 20 
per annum. There are four reeves chosen by the trustees, who re- 
ceive the rents ; which are applied, after payment of quit-rent, and 
land tax, in the payment of the leet fee of 2 a year, to the lord of 
the manor of South Elmham (which comprises the nine parishes) ; 
and in repairs of the highways, bridges, and foot-paths, within the 
principal parishes (being all the nine, except Homersfield and Flix- 
ton) ; certain portions of the rent being applied to each parish, at 
the discretion of the trustees : and a portion of the rent, which 
since the year 1814, has been ll 11s. a year, is also set apart for 
the poor of the nine parishes ; and is distributed, a certain portion 
in each parish, among poor persons. There are, in the parishes of 
All Saints and St. Nicholas, two cottages and a piece of land, con- 
taining IA. %R., which are let by the churchwardens, at rents 
amounting together to 9 11s. 6d. a year; which sum is applied 
towards the reparation of the church, and the payment of other 
disbursements of the churchwardens' office, agreeable to long usage. 
The church of the latter parish has been entirely demolished for 
many ages. 



FLIXTON. FLIXTUNA ; or ST. MARY, SOUTH ELMHAM. 

In or about 1258, Margery, daughter of Jeffrey de Anos (not 
Hautvile), lord of Hillington, in Norfolk (from whom she derived 
the lordship of this parish, and Helmingham), and relict of Bartho- 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 335 

lomew de Creke, founded an Austin Nunnery, of the order of Fon- 
tebrault, in Flixton. Her first husband was Reginald le Clerk. 
In the 43rd of King Henry III., she levied a fine of the advowson 
of this parish church, to Alienora, the Prioress ; and the Convent 
afterwards always presented to the vicarage. She also gave the 
rectory of the church of Shipmeadow ; with divers lands and rents 
in Flixton, North Creake, and other places. 

In 1280, she granted the patronage of the Priory to the Bishop 
of Norwich. Wm. Bateman, Bishop of that diocese, and founder 
of Trinity Hall, Cambridge, was a benefactor to this house ; and 
drew up statutes for its governance. The manor of Faucons, and 
lands in Stuston, Brome, &c., were granted to this Priory in the 
45th of King Edward III. ; and a water mill here was annexed, 
valued in 1534, at 1 13s. 4d. per annum ; and a mill in Combes, 
valued at 20s. per annum. 

In the 17th of King Edward I., Beatric, the Prioress, conveyed 
by fine, her right in the churches of North Creake, in Norfolk, and 
Combes, in Suffolk, to Eoger Fitz Peter Fitz Osbert, and Sarah 
his wife, who was the daughter of Margery, and heiress of the 
Creke family ; in consideration of a grant by them of the manor of 
Flixton, with the moiety of the church, and the advowsons of the 
churches of Fundenhall and Denston, and lands in Wilby, in 
Suffolk, and North Creake : and in the 14th of the following reign, 
John, Bishop of Norwich, granted his moiety of the advowson of 
the church of Flixton, in exchange for that of Helmingham ; and 
the whole rectory was then appropriated to the Prioress. 

The foundress limited the number to eighteen nuns and a Prio- 
ress ; but it never reached that number : at the dissolution there 
appears to have been not more than six or seven nuns. It was de- 
dicated to the honour of St. Mary and St: Catherine ; and the gross 
value, in " Liber Valorem," in 1534, was 40 15s. 0d. It was 
suppressed, by the bull of Pope Clement VII., in 1528. 

In 1544, John Tasburgh, Esq., obtained a grant of this Monas- 
tery ; and William Adair, Esq., is the present proprietor of the 
site, lord of the manor, and patron of the vicarage. Some slight 
remains of this nunnery are yet visible. 

The family of Bateman became early interested here. Sir Bar- 
tholomew, of this parish, Knt., was eldest son of William Bateman, 
of Norwich, and Margery his wife, and heir to his brother, the 
Bishop, as well as his father. From him the Batemans, of Mend- 



330 HUNDRED OF WANG FORD. 

ham, in this county, are descended in a direct line ; that family 
having been seated there, and in this parish, ever since the Bishop's 
time. Sir Bartholomew was a benefactor to this nunnery, and was 
buried here. The Bishop, his brother, resided much at his Palace, 
in South Elmham ; and purchased largely in that township, and its 
vicinity. 

The Tasburgh family erected a good seat in this parish, plea- 
santly situated near the river Waveney, and not far distant from 
the site of the Abbey. It was built about 1615, by Sir John Tas- 
burgh, and is a noble structure : it was originally surrounded by a 
moat, which has been filled up for some years. The style of the 
architecture is what has been denominated Inigo Jones's Gothic.* 

This mansion and estate subsequently became, by purchase, the 
inheritance of William Adair, Esq. ; and descended to his son, 
Alexander, for many years an eminent Army Agent, conducting a 
very extensive business; who deceased in 1834, aged 95 years. 
He was succeeded at Flixton Hall, by William Adair, Esq., the 
present proprietor ; whose eldest son and heir, Robert Shafto, was 
created a Baronet in 1838, and resides there. 

ARMS. Flixton Nunnery : azure ; a St. Catherine's wheel, 
with a Calvary cross projecting from its chief, argent. Bateman : 
sable ; three crescents, ermine, in a bordure engrailed, argent. 
Adair : party per bend, or and azure ; three hands, couped at the 
wrist, gules. Crest : a Saracen's head, couped, affrontee, proper. 
Tasburgh : argent ; a chevron between three pilgrims' staffs, on 
each suspended a pouch, sable, garnished, or. 

CHARITIES. The town estate here consists of a house, and about 
six acres of land in Mendham, let at 18 a year : two closes in this 
parish, containing together about 4 acres, rent 4 a year ; and two 
pieces of land in the same parish, the precise situation and extent 
of which is unknown : for one of them the sum of 1 10s. a year 
is paid, by Mr. James Dalliston; and for the other, 10s. a year, by 
Mr. John Gower. The rents, after deducting for outgoings and 
repairs, are applied in the payment of different expenses of the 
churchwardens' office, and other public charges. William Adair, 
Esq., by his will, dated in or about the year 1782, bequeathed 
300, three per cent, consols, upon trust ; the annual dividends 
thereof to be paid to and for the benefit of the labouring and in- 
dustrious poor of the parishes of Flixton, Homersfield, and St. 
* A view of this building is given in Davy's " Architectural Antiquities." 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 837 

Cross, in the counties of Suffolk and Norfolk ; and he gave to his 
nephew, Alexander Adair, Esq., the sum of 700, and also as much 
money as should he found in his charity bag at the time of his 
death ; and he desired that the same should he by him laid out at 
interest, and that the annual produce should be, by him, or the 
owners of the testator's estate at Flixton, for the time being, an- 
nually given to such poor distressed objects of compassion as he or 
they should think proper. The dividends of the 300 are regularly 
laid out in the purchase of coals ; which are given to poor persons 
of the places named in the will. The sum of 700, and of 320 
1 3s. 7d., which was found in the testator's charity bag at the time 
of his decease, were laid out in the purchase of new South Sea 
Annuities; and the dividends thereof, 51 2s. 8d. a year, are ap- 
plied in gratuities, to proper objects of charity, the purchase of 
coals, which are sold to the poor at reduced prices, and payments 
lor the support of schools. 



SANCROFT, or ST. GEORGE, SOUTH ELMHAM. 

St. Cross, corrupted into Sancroft, from the family of that name, 
who, at a very early period, held lands in South Elmham. 

Thomas, a descendant of Sir Bartholomew Bateman, of the parish 
of Flixton, Knt., appears to have had his residence in this parish. 
By his will, dated April 8, 1485, he gives legacies to William and 
Richard, his sons ; ahd to Elizabeth and Olive, his daughters : to 
Robert, his son and heir, his manors of Newhall and Sancroft, with 
the advowson of Sancroft St. George's church, together with the 
manor of Gillingham, in Norfolk. He ordered a tomb of free- 
stone to be placed over his remains, with those of Elizabeth his 
wife, in Flixton church. 



HOMERSFIELD, or ST. MARY, SOUTH ELMHAM, or ELMEHAM. 

In 1175, John de Oxford, a great favourite with King Henry II., 
and one of his Chaplains, was consecrated Bishop of Norwich; 
sometimes called John the 1st., being the first Bishop in this dio- 



338 HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 

cese of that name. He confirmed by deed, 6 acres of land in this 
parish, to Kobert de Sandcroft, ancestor to the late Archbishop of 
that name ; which Robert Husebond, the Bishop's man, or tenant, 
gave him : and 3 J acres, which Gervase, son of Robert Husebond, 
sold to the said Robert de Sandcroft, for 4s. ; and released and ab- 
jured the same, in the Bishop's own chamber, at Homersfield :* to 
be held by the rent of 1 6d. a year, to the Bishop's manor of the said 
parish, and 5d. to every aid (or tax) laid on that town. 

In the 2nd of King Henry III., a market and a fair were granted 
here, to Pandulf Masca, Bishop of Norwich ; an Italian, by birth. 
The Benedictine nuns of Bungay, held the manor of Lymborne, in 
Homersfield ; which, at the dissolution of that house, was granted 
to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, and subsequently to John and Thos. 
Wright ; but was restored to the Norfolk family, with their other 
possessions, by Queen Mary. It came to Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy 
from the Berdewells, through his wife, Anne Wootton, the heiress 
of that family. He was succeeded by Bassingbourne Gawdy, Esq., 
his son. At present but little is known of this manor. There are 
certain freehold lands, called " Limber Lands," and " Limber Mill," 
in this parish ; which were purchased, with the Downs farm, by 
Alexander Adair, Esq., of Flixton Hall. 

Witlingham cum Walkeline's manor, after passing a long time 
with that of Rokele's, in Trowse, became joined to a manor in 
Kirby Bedon, and after, to Wadker's, in Windham ; when the style 
thereof was Witlingham (alias Wicklingham), Wadker's in Wind- 
ham, and Kirby Bedon, where the court was held ; being in the 
same lord, and held as one court. 

This manor extended into Homersfield ; and was held by the 
Hares, who were seated here in the time of King Henry VII., and 
claim to be a scion of the house of Harecourt (or Harcourt), in 
Lorrain, who were Counts of Normandy. Hugh Hare, of this 
parish, was succeeded by Nicholas, who married Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Sir Thomas de Watlingham, Knt. His descendant, Nicholas 
Hare, Esq., of this parish, was father of John, and Thomas Hare, 
LL.D., Chancellor of Norwich, and rector of Massingham Magna, 
in Norfolk, in 1506. 

John Hare, Esq., married Elizabeth, daughter of Fortescue, 

Esq., and had issue two sons, namely : Sir Nicholas, who was twice 

* The Bishop's manor of South Elmham, is sometime! called the manor of Ho- 
mersfield ; of which the above is an instance. 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 339 

chosen Speaker of the House of Commons, in the reign of Henry 
VIII., and was Master of Requests, and Chief Justice of Chester. 
He was sworn of the Privy Council, Master of the Rolls, and af- 
terwards Lord Keeper of the Great Seal, in the reign of Queen 
Mary. Sir Nicholas was of Bruisyard, in this county ; and married 
Catherine, daughter and co-heir of Sir John Bassingborne, Knt. : 
his sons deceased without issue, and the issue of his hrother John, 
who resided at Stow Bardolph, in Norfolk, inherited. Sir Nicholas 
and John Hare, Esq., were both born in this parish. 

Walter de Suffield (alias Calthorpe), Bishop of Norwich, gave 
the third part of the tithe of his demesne in this parish, to the 
Norman's Spital (or St. Paul's Hospital), in Norwich. 

Robert Downes, A.M., rector of this parish, and Stanstead St. 
James, in this county, was installed fourth Prebend of the Cathe- 
dral Church of Norwich, February 8, 1576. 

ARMS. Hare: gules; two bars and a chief, indented, or. 

CHARITIES. At a court held the 5th December, 1781, Alexander 
Adair, Esq., and others, were admitted tenants, in trust, for this 
parish, to 2 acres of copyhold land, of South Elmham manor, 
called " Sumbells," or " Westbroke," in St. Cross ; in order that 
the trusts of the will of Sir Nicholas Hare might be performed 
according to the intent thereof. The land is let at 2 10s. a year; 
which is distributed among widows, and other poor persons, at 
Christmas, in conformity with ancient usage. 



ST. JAMES, SOUTH ELMHAM. 



ST. MARGARET, SOUTH ELMHAM. 

CHARITIES. The town estate here is partly freehold and partly 
copyhold ; and comprises a house, and about 50 acres of land, in 
the parishes of St. Margaret, St. George, and Homersfield. It 
was found on inquisition, and decreed under a commission of cha- 
ritable uses, dated 23rd August, 6th of King James I., that the 
yearly rents of the premises should be applied in discharging the 
fifteenths, tenths, taxes, and other common charges of the parish- 



340 HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 

ioners ; as by the feoffees, or the greater number of them, should 
be thought necessary and convenient. The estate lets at 65 a 
year ; which is applied in disbursement of the charges attendant on 
the churchwardens' office, and the surplus is paid to the overseers 
of the poor, and carried to their general account. In this parish is 
also a cottage, with a small piece of ground adjoining, which 
is understood to have been, by some means, appropriated to the 
repairing the highways, foot-paths, and church-paths, in the parish. 
This lets at l 10s. a year; and is applied with that of the town 
estate. 



ST. MICHAEL, SOUTH ELMHAM. 

This church early became impropriated to the Cell and Priory at 
Eumburgh, in Blithing hundred ; probably by the grant of Stephen, 
Earl of Bretaigne and Richmond, who held here in the reign of 
King Henry I. 

CHARITIES. A piece of land in this parish, reputed to contain 
SA.| IR., or thereabouts, has been appropriated, from ancient time, 
to the public use of the inhabitants. This land lies intermixed with 
the property of William Adair, Esq., and its precise boundaries are 
unknown. The rent lately received has been 3 5s. a year ; and 
it is added to, and applied with the money raised by rate, for the 
church and poor. 



ST. NICHOLAS, SOUTH ELMHAM. 
The parish church has been an entire ruin for many ages. 



ST. PETER, SOUTH ELMHAM, or ELMEHAM. 

CHARITIES. An annual payment is made to the churchwardens 
of this parish, by the trustees of Henry Smith's charity, out of that 
part of the estate which is situate at Tolleshunt Darcy, in Essex. 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 34 1 

An account is rendered to the trustees, by the churchwardens, of 
the application of the money received by them (generally between 
6 and lQ a year) ; which is distributed among poor persons. 



BUNGAY ST. MARY, and BUNGAY TRINITY. BONGEIA, 

BUNGHEA, Or BONNAGAIE. 

This town stood on an island by the river Waveney, anciently 
called " Le Bon Eye," or " The Good Island." It was a borough, 
and the lordship of it belonged to the family of the Bigods, Earls 
of Norfolk ; one or more of whom erected a Castle here : which, 
during the intestine commotions in the turbulent reign of King 
Stephen, was so strongly fortified by Hugh Bigod, and stood in 
such an advantageous situation, as to have been deemed impreg- 
nable. 

On the accession of King Henry II., this nobleman, however, 
who had invariably espoused the cause of Stephen, was obliged to 
give a large sum of money, with sufficient hostages, to save this 
Castle from destruction. He afterwards joined in the rebellion of 
Henry's eldest son, against his father, and was deprived by the 
King, of this Castle, as well as that of Framlingham : but they 
were both restored, with his other estates and honours, to his son 
and heir ; whose posterity held them for several generations. Hugh 
Bigod deceased in 1225. 

In the reign of King Henry III., this Castle was demolished ; 
and in the 10th of Edward I., Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, ob- 
tained license to embattle his house, erected on the site of the 
ancient Castle. He endowed Alice, his second wife, daughter of 
John de Avanne, Eurl of Henault, with this manor ; and having 
no children, settled all his castles, towns, manors, and possessions, 
on King Edward and his heirs. The Earl deceased in 1305. 

The castle, borough, and lordship of this town, are supposed to 
have been given by that Monarch, to his fifth son, Thomas de 
Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk; and to have been carried, by the 
marriage of his daughter and co-heiress, into the family of the 
Uffords. Alice, sister, and co-heir with Margaret, daughter of the 
said Thomas de Brotherton, by Alice his first wife, daughter of Sir 
Roger Halys, of Harwich, Knt, married Sir Edmund de Monta- 



342 HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 

cute (or Montague) ; whose daughter and heiress, Joan, was born 
at Bungay, on Candlemas day, 1348 : she was wife to "William de 
Ufford, Earl of Suffolk. 

In the 2nd of King Edward III., Bardolf's manor, in Bungay 
Trinity, and ILketsal St. Lawrence, with that of Clopton, was ob- 
tained by Elizabeth de Burgh, the relict of Koger de Amorie, for 
herself, for life ; the remainder to John, Lord Bardolf, and Eliza- 
beth his wife (who was her daughter by the said Roger) ; in ex- 
change for the manors of Kennington and Frankshall, in Surry. 
Sir William Windham Calling, Bart., of Earsham Hall, in Norfolk, 
is the present owner of this manor. 

Bungay contains two parish churches, St. Mary and the Holy 
Trinity ; besides which there was formerly a third, dedicated to St. 
Thomas, which has been long since demolished. St. Mary's is a 
stately structure ; and with its beautiful steeple, containing a peal 
of eight bells, is a great ornament to the town. The market-place 
formerly contained two market crosses : the Corn Cross* has been 
taken down since 1810. 

The remains of the Convent of St. Cross are seen between the 
present churches. It was of the Benedictine order, and founded by 
Eoger de Glanville, and the Countess Gundreda his wife, about the 
year 1160; who endowed it with lands, benefices, and revenues, 
which were increased by several benefactions, at various periods ; 
and the whole endowments were confirmed to the Prioress and 
sisters, by King Henry III. 

It was dedicated to the honour of God, of the blessed Virgin 
Mary, and of the Holy Cross ; and the gross value in " Valor Ec- 
clesiasticus," is 72 19s. 3d. John de Bedingfield, Prior of Aldeby, 
in Norfolk, was appointed by the Prior of Norwich, in 1355, to take 
the confessions, to absolve, and to enjoin the penances, of the Prio- 
ress and nuns of this Priory. 

In the 1st of King Henry IV., Thomas de Mowbray, Duke of 
Suffolk, held on the day of his decease, as of fee, of our Sovereign 
Lord, Richard II., late King of England, the advowson of the 
Priory of Bungay. There were certain rents of salt, at Tyrington, 
in Norfolk, payable by divers persons there, who held of the fee of 
Sir William de Tyrington, to the Prioress of St. Cross, in this town, 

* A representation of this Cross has been engraved in the " Gentleman's Maga- 
zine," for 1810, parti., p. 425; with several town Tokens, and the Seal of the 
Convent of St. Cross. 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 343 

namely : of Walter de Marham, for one messuage, three acres and 
a half, in his croft, two combs of salt, &c. 

The sum of 12s. 4d. was annually expended in this Monastery in 
alms to the poor, on the anniversary of Gundreda, Countess of 
Norfolk, who was considered the foundress ; and also for wax lights 
to burn about her tomb, on the same day. In the time of King 
Edward I., here was a Prioress, and fifteen sisters : Cecilia Fastolf, 
the Prioress, and eleven nuns, at the dissolution ; when it was 
granted to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, A.D. 1537. The present 
possessor is Wolfran Lewis, Esq., and others.* 

Thomas de Bungeia (or Bungeye), who died about 1290, was a 
native of this town ; and being educated amongst the Franciscan 
friars, at Norwich, was sent to Oxford, and there admitted Doctor 
of Divinity ; after which he became Professor of Theology at that 
University ; being well qualified for that high employment. He 
was an eminent mathematician, and so well skilled in the secrets of 
nature and art, that he was considered by many as a conjuror and 
wizard. He succeeded John Bungeye, D.D., who appears to have 
been his brother, as Minister Provincial of England ; and published 
a work on Natural Magic, and some other things. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Bonhote, authoress of several popular works, 
" Frankley's Rambles," " Olivia," " The Parental Monitor," " Bun- 
gay Castle," &c., was the wife of Daniel Bonhote, Esq., solicitor of 
this town; whom Mrs. B. survived. She deceased June 11, 1818, 
aged 74 years. 

Thomas Miller, of this town, born in 1731, was at the usual 
period, apprenticed to a respectable grocer, in Norwich ; but a great 
fondness for reading, displayed in very early life, induced him, on 
.commencing business for himself, in 1755, to unite book-selling 
with his other trade ; and for the last thirty years previous to his 
decease, he confined himself almost entirely to his favourite line. 
Mr. Miller had his shop furnished with rare and valuable books, 
and possessed a large collection of expensive portraits, and an ex- 
tensive series of Roman and English silver and brass coins. 

In 1795, when it was the common custom for tradesmen to cir- 
culate provincial coins, he had a die cast, which was very finely 
engraved, and bore a correct profile likeness of himself. By an 
accident happening to one of the dies, when only twenty-three 

1 * There are engraved illustrations of this house : by Kirby, in 1/48 ; aud Davy, 
in 1818. 



344 HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 

pieces were struck off, and Mr. Miller declining to have a fresh one 
made, the coin became very rare, and has been known to sell at 
from three to five guineas. It is known to collectors by the name 
of " Miller's Halfpenny." 

He possessed a strong mind, and retentive memory ; but his 
cultivated abilities were hid in the confined circle in which he 
moved. During the latter years of his life, he became blind ; and, 
to the honour of Bungay, its inhabitants, who appreciated his 
worth, shewed him every kind attention. He died June 25, 1804. 

Nathaniel Godbold, inventor and original patentee of the famous 
" Vegetable Balsam," was born at, or near this town, and appren- 
ticed to a confectioner ; which trade he carried on many years, at 
Bungay, with credit. For several years of his residence there, he 
used to prepare, for applicants only, a pectoral medicine for the 
relief of recent coughs ; which was very grateful and efficacious in 
those cases, and most likely was the basis of the " Vegetable 
Balsam." 

Mr. Godbold, during the latter part of his residence in Bungay, 
speculated rather largely in the purchase and re- sale of estates ; he 
also built the present Theatre there. He retired from business, 
and established himself in London, between 1775 and 1780; and 
shortly after purchased an estate at Godalming, in Surry, which 
had belonged to General Oglethorpe; consisting of a handsome 
house in a park of about 100 acres, called " Westbrooke Place," 
the small manor of Westbrooke, and some other lands. He repaired 
and fitted up the house, and continued to reside there until his de- 
cease, which took place the 17th of Dec., 1799; and his remains 
were deposited in the south aisle of Godalming church. 

Mem. An inscription in Bungay Holy Trinity church, records, 
the decease of Captain Thomas Stanton, in 1691; formerly com- 
mander of the good ship "Return to and from Surat, in East 
India ;" who, by his indefatigable industry, made the said voyage 
in twelve months ; and in his return, he fought and beat a Dutch 
man of war, and brought the said ship, to his never dying fame, 
safe into the river Thames. It is added, " the like not done by 
any since :" but, by our late improvements in steam navigation, 
the wonder ceases. 

CHARITIES. The town lands, and certain premises here, are 
vested in, or under the management and order of the town-reeve, 
and feoffees of the town, or town-lands of Bungay ; are partly held 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 345 

iii trust, for the common benefit and general utility of the town of 
Bungay, and its inhabitants ; and are partly derived from, and 
applicable to the support of, particular charities, mentioned below. 

The Grammar School. By indenture, dated the 16th January, 
34th of Queen Elizabeth, Thomas Popeson, A.M., schoolmaster at 
Bungay, granted to the Master, Fellows, and Scholars, of Emmanuel 
College, Cambridge, a yearly rent of 4, during the life of himself 
and his wife ; and after their decease, a yearly rent of 6 : and the 
then feoffees of the town lands, thereby also granted to the said 
Master, Fellows, and Scholars, a yearly rent of Q. And in con- 
sideration thereof, the Master, Fellows, and Scholars, covenanted 
that they would allow to every scholar, placed in any of the ten 
Scholarships in Emmanuel College, of the foundation of Sir Walter 
Mildmay, Knt., therein mentioned, 4d. weekly : and that the ten 
scholars should have such privileges and advantages as therein 
mentioned. By indenture, dated 20th April, in the above year, 
reciting that the said Thomas Popeson, and the feoffees of the town 
lands, for the good of the inhabitants of Bungay, had then in part 
made, and mean'd further to make, provision for the perpetuity of a 
Free Grammar School within that town ; and certain messuages, 
land, and premises, were conveyed pursuant to the covenant in this 
deed, by indenture of feoffment, of the 26th May, 1592. The 
school premises consist of a dwelling house, containing several 
apartments, and a school-room, and small play-ground adjoining. 

Wingfield's Charity. In 1593, Thomas Wingfield devised 170 
to be laid out in the purchase of a rent- charge of 1Q a year ; and 
he directed that out of the same the following payments should be 
made : 5 a year for the help of necessitous people in Bungay, 
10s. a year for an anniversary sermon, 40s. a year for raising a 
stock to be lent in small sums to tradesmen, and 10s. a year to be 
bestowed on his funeral- day, yearly, in good cheer, for such of the 
feoffees as should be present ; and the residue to the use of two 
poor scholars in Cambridge. In 1712, Henry Webster devised his 
acre of land in Parnow Meadow, in Ditchingham, for teaching 
poor children to read and write : and Henry Smith gave a portion 
of rent, which for the year 1828, was 36 12s. 8d.; and the amount 
is distributed in bread among poor persons. Christian Wharton, in 
1577, by will, directed the persons enfeoffed of her five almshouses, 
in the parish of the Holy Trinity, to dwell therein, and take the 
profits of the same while they should dwell there. These alms- 



340 HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 

houses consist of five small tenements under one roof, and are 
occupied rent free, by poor widows. There are also church lands 
belonging to each parish, and several minor charities ; the aggregate 
amount of which, arising from various sources, is about 470 per 
annum. 



ILKETSAL. ILKETSHALL, or ILCHETELESHALA. 

There are four parishes so called, namely : St. Andrew, St. John, 
St. Lawrence, and St. Margaret ; which are here noticed generally, 
and collectively. These with the foregoing parishes, of Bungay 
St. Mary and Trinity, with Mettingham, which follows, are com- 
monly termed " The seven parishes of Ilketshal." 

Sir Gilbert de Ilketshale was lord of this manor at a very early 
period ; and according to the usage of those times, assumed his 
name therefrom. Thomas de Ilketshale was his son and heir ; as 
appears by a fine levied in the 7th of King Henry III. : Gilbert, his 
son and heir, who succeeded, in the 32nd of that reign had a charter 
of free warren in this lordship. 

In the 53rd of the same King, Sir James de Ilketshale conveyed 
an acre of land, and the advowson of the church of St. John Bap- 
tist, in Ilketsal, by fine, to the Priory of the Holy Cross, in Bun- 
gay. He married Maud, daughter of Eichard de la Rokele ; and 
was father of James de Ilketshale, who married Aliva, daughter of 
Sir Thomas de Weyland, the Judge. 

In the 6th of King Edward II., a deed was executed between Sir 
James cie Ilketshale, James his son, and Ida his wife ; whereby James 
and Ida did grant the manor of Ilketsal, in Kelling, in Norfolk, to 
Sir James, for life ; and he released to them 9 per annum, out of 
his 15 per annum annuity; which they were to pay him., and 
Aliva his wife, for the manor of Hedenham, in Norfolk. This 
document is dated at Ilketsal, where the parties probably resided at 
that period. 

How long this house continued interested here is uncertain. 
William de Ilketshale, a younger son of Sir Eobert, was living in 
the 19th of King Richard II. The will of Sir Thomas Ilketshale, 
his elder brother, was proved in 1417 ; by which it appears he left 
Philip his son and heir, and a daughter, who died soon after, without 



HUNDRED OF WANG FORD. 347 

issue ; and his sister's children became his heirs, in the 9th of King 
Henry V. Ho was probably the last of this ancient family. His 
widow re-married to William Deyvile, Esq. 

In 1309, William de la Park resided here. He married Elizabeth, 
one of the daughters and co-heirs of John, son of James de Ilket- 
shale ; and held a manor in Aslacton, late Thomas de Chambre's ; 
and the tenements, late Richard de Sething's ; with other property 
in this parish, in right of such marriage. 

Joan, sole daughter and heiress of the Park family, married first, 
John Duke, of Brampton, Esq. ; by whom she had Thomas, a son 
and heir : her second husband was John Strange, Esq., of Norwich. 
It remained in the Duke family for several descents, until purchased 
by the Richmonds. John Richmond married Anne, daughter of Wm. 
Gooch, of St. Margaret's, Ilketsal ; by whom he had Robert, only 
son and heir. John deceased in the 27th of Queen Elizabeth. 

It appears to have passed from the Richmond family to that of 
Ganieys, by the marriage of Mary, sister and heiress of William 
Richmond, with Charles Garneys, Esq., a younger branch of the 
Kenton family ; by whom she had issue Charles Garneys, Esq., of 
Mourningthorp, in Norfolk. James Calthorpe, Esq., married Eli- 
zabeth, daughter of Robert Garneys, Esq., who brought a lordship 
in Ilketsal, into that family. 

In 1474, John Bernard, Esq., of Norwich, bequeathed legacies 
to the churches of St. John, St. Lawrence, and St. Margaret, of 
Ilketsal ; he also made a bequest to Mettingham Castle. 

The several churches in these parishes were impropriated to the 
house of Benedictine Nuns at Bungay, by the gift of Roger de 
Glanville, and Gundreda his wife, founders of that Monastery. 

By letters patent, dated 18th December, 29th Henry VIII., that 
King granted to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, the site, &c., of the late 
Monastery, or house of Nuns of Bungay, then dissolved ; also the 
manors of Bungay, called the Prioress manor, Lymborne, and 
Northales ; and the advowsons of the rectories of the blessed Virgin 
Mary, of Bungay, Ilketshall St. John, Ilketshall St. Lawrence, 
Ilketshall St. Andrew, Ilketshall St. Margaret, and Metyngham, in 
Suffolk ; Roughton and Redynghall, in Norfolk ; and the advow- 
sons of the vicarages, or the churches, or rectories, to the Prioress 
of the said house of Nuns, in right of the same belonging ; and all 
other the possessions of the said Monastery ; being of the annual 
value of 02 2s. l^d. : to be held by him, and the heirs of his body, 



348 HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 

in capite, by Knight's service, at the 20th part of one Knight's fee, 
and the annual rent of 6 4s. 3d. 

The Abbot of West Dereham, in Norfolk, had a lordship at II- 
ketsal, called Lion's ; of the gift of Bartholomew, son of Peter de 
Brancaster, of Barton, in Norfolk. 

ARMS. Ilketshale : gules ; a fess between two chevronels, or ; 
a canton, ermine. Park : azure ; an eagle displayed, argent. 

CHARITIES. St. Andrew, Ilketsal. A double cottage, and about 
two acres of land ; let at l 1 10s. per annum. Seven acres of land, 
called the " Redisham Close;" rent 10 a year. One half of the 
rents are applied in the reparation of the church, and the other half 
towards defraying the various other public expenses of the parish. 

St. Margaret, Ilketsal. An annual sum is received, by the 
churchwardens, for the benefit of poor persons of this parish, from 
the trustees of the charity founded by Henry Smith, in or about 
the year 1626 ; the estates of which are situate in Tolleshunt Darcy, 
in Essex ; an account of the application of which is given, by the 
churchwardens, to the trustees. The sum generally received amounts 
to about 5 ; which is given in clothing to the poor. The town 
estate consists of a cottage, in two tenements, let at JG4 18s. a year, 
and 24 acres of land in the parish of Peasenhall, rent 24, subject 
to a deduction for land tax. The rents are appropriated to the re- 
paration of the church, and other public uses of the parishioners. 



METTINGHAM, or METINGAHAM. 

In the 5th of King Edward III., Eoger Gavel held the lordship 
of this parish. He was son of John Gavel, who lived at Yarmouth 
in the 10th of Edward L; son of Jeffrey Gavel, of the said town, 
by Alice his wife, daughter of Richard Fastolf. 

In the 17th of King Edward III., Sir John de Norwich had 
license to make a Castle of his Manor House here, and another at 
Ling, in Norfolk ; and in the 47th of the same reign, Sir John de 
Norwich, the last of that house, conveyed to certain trustees that 
lordship, with the manor of Howe, in Norfolk ; to settle them on 
his College of Mettingham ; and in the 5th of King Richard II., 
they became settled accordingly. 

This Sir John de Norwich, Knt., was Vice-Admiral of England, 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 349 

son of Walter de Norwich, and grandson to Sir John, the founder 
of Raveningham College, in Norfolk. In 1382, his executors ob- 
tained the King's license to translate the priests of that College to 
the Castle of Mettingham ; and to endow them with the said Castle, 
and with several manors in this county. This however, was .not 
fully effected until 1393 ; being retarded through opposition from 
the Nuns of Bungay. 

This College had rents and revenues in about 25 parishes in this 
county, and several in Norfolk : it was dedicated to the blessed 
Virgin Mary ; and consisted of thirteen Chaplains, at the period of 
its foundation ; and a Master, and eleven Chaplains, in 1535. Here 
were also fourteen boys, who served God, and were educated and 
supported in this College, at the annual charge of 28. Its gross 
value, in "Valor Ecclesiasticus," is ;238 3s. 10|d. 

In 1541, Sir Anthony Denny and Sir Thomas Denny, obtained 
a grant of the same ; in which family it sometime continued, but 
was afterwards purchased by the Buxtons. It has since 16G1, been 
in the families of Bacon and Hunt ; and it now belongs to the Rev. 
James Cutting Safford, vicar of this parish. 

In 1544, the roof of this College was carried to Great Yarmouth, 
and placed upon the old Guild Hall there, at the expense of the 
townsmen. The walls of the College are still standing within the 
old quadrangular Castle, and the ruins are very extensive ; several 
illustrations of them have been published. 

College Arms: per pale, azure and gules, a lion rampant, argent. 
Mettingham: or ; a chevron, partee per pale, or and gules, couped ; 
between three mullets, sable. 

John de Metingham, Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas 
in the reign of King Edward III. (a descendant of the Norwich 
family), was a native of this county, and probably born in this 
parish ; of whom Fuller observes, " it is reported, to his eternal 
praise, that when the rest of the Judges (18 Edw. III.) were fined, 
and ousted for corruption, this Metingham and Elias de Beckenham 
continued in their places, whose innocence was of proof against all 
accusations ; and as Caleb and Joshua amongst the jury of false 
spies, so these two amongst the twelve judges, retained their in- 
tegrity." 

In the 20th of the same reign, the King directed a writ to John 
de Metingham, respecting limiting the number of Attorneys at Law. 
A translation of the same is inserted in the above author, as follows : 



350 HUNDRED OF WANGFORD-. 

" The lord the King hath enjoined John de Metingham and his- 
assistants, that they, according to their discretion, provide and 
ordain a certain numher out of every county, of such persons which, 
according to their understanding, shall appear unto them of the 
better sort, and most legal, and most willingly applying themselves 
to the learning of the law, what may hetter avail for their court, 
and the good of the people of the land, &c. And it seem likely to 
the King and his Counsel, that seven score may suffice for that 
purpose. However, the aforesaid Justices may add more if they 
see ought to he done, or else they may lessen the numher." 

" Some conceive," continues our author, " this number of seven 
score confined only to the Common Pleas, whereof Metingham was 
Chief Justice. But others behold it as extended to the whole land, 
this Judge's known integrity being intrusted in their choice and 
number ; which number is since much increased, and no wonder, 
our land being grown more populous, and the people in it more 
litigious. He died anno Domini 1301." 

In the time of King Henry VI., a branch of the Banyard family 
were seated in this parish ; and subsequently the ancestors of the 
present Sir Thomas Sherlock Gooch, Bart. 

CHARITIES. The town estate is situate in tliis parish, and Ship- 
meadow; and comprises a cottage, blacksmith's shop, about 36 
acres of land, and two cattle gates on Stow Fen ; and is under the 
management of feoffees, chosen at meetings of the parishionersv 
The general purposes for which the estate appears to have been 
held from ancient time, are for the benefit of the town or parish of 
Mettingham, the payment of the public charges of the parishioners, 
and the support of the poor. The rents, which amount together to 
80 a year, are applied in the reparation of the church, and in de- 
fraying other public charges to which the parishioners are liable ; 
with a distribution of coals amongst poor people, to the amount of 
about 10 per annum. 



BAKSHAM. 

In the reign of King Edward VI., John Blennerhasset, Esq., 
acquired the lordship of this parish, by marriage with one of tho 
daughters and co -heirs of Sir Edward Itchingham, Knt., whose 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 3M 

ancestors held the same, and became early seated here. It subse- 
quently became vested in the Suckling family. 

Sir John Suckling, Knt., youngest son of Kobert Suckling, Esq., 
Alderman and Mayor of Norwich, and Elizabeth his wife, in 1620, 
devised by will an annuity of 8, to be issuing, payable, and levia- 
ble, out of his manor of Barsham, in Suffolk, to the Mayor, She- 
riffs, and Aldermen of Norwich ; to be distributed in alms to the 
poor of certain parishes in that city : and 20s. for an anniversary 
sermon ; at which he requested the Mayor, with the Sword Bearer, 
and three or four Justices of the Peace, and the Sheriffs for the 
time being, to be present. The Mayor to have 2s. 6d. ; and 7s. 6d. 
to be divided among the Justices, Sheriffs, and Sword Bearer. 

He was of Gray's Inn, and afterwards settled at Whitton, in 
Middlesex ; and was Secretary to the Earl of Dorset, Master of the 
Bequests, Receiver of the Alienations; in 1622, was one of the 
principal Secretaries of State ; and afterwards Comptroller of the 
Household to King James I., and Charles I. : to the last he was a 
Privy Councillor. Sir John deceased March 27, 1627, and was 
buried in St. Andrew's church, at Norwich. 

By Martha lus wife, daughter of Thomas Cranfield, merchant, of 
London, he had issue Sir John Suckling, the celebrated poet, who 
was nineteen years of age at his father's decease. 

This estate was purchased by Sir John Suckling, in 1613 ; and 
now belongs to the Rev. Alfred Inigo Suckling, of Winslade Rec- 
tory, Hants. He is only son of Alexander Fox, Esq., by Anna 
Maria, his wife, daughter of Robert Suckling, Esq., of Wooton, in 
Norfolk ; who on the decease of his maternal uncle, Maurice Wm. 
Suckling, Esq., without issue, in 1820, assumed the name and 
arms of Suckling. 

The family of De Tye held a lordship in this parish, and resided 
here. The will of Sir Robert de Tye (mentioned in Kessingland, 
in Mutford hundred), is dated here ; and Elizabeth, relict of Sir 
Robert de Tye, whose will was proved in 1385, desired her body to 
be interred in Barsham church, by her late husband. 

ARMS. Suckling: party per pale, gules and azure ; three bucks, 
trippant, or. Crest : a stag, courant, or ; with a sprig of honey- 
suckle in his mouth. 

Lawrence Echard, a divine, and writer of some eminence in the 
last century, was a native of this parish, whose father was minister 
here. He was bora in 1671 ; and, after receiving his education at 



352 HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 

Christ College, Cambridge, where he took the degree of A.M. in 
1695, settled in Lincolnshire. In 1699, he published the first part 
of his " Koman History;" which, in 1702, was followed by a " Ge- 
neral Ecclesiastical History;" a work which has gone through nu- 
merous editions, and which probably procured liis promotion to the 
Prebendary Stall in Lincoln Cathedral : he was also Chaplain to 
the Bishop of that diocese. His next work was a " History of 
England, down to the Revolution ;" by which he gained conside- 
rable reputation ; but the most useful of his performances, was the 
" Gazetteer, or Newsman's Interpreter:" once a very popular book, 
and the foundation of all of that class. Towards the end of his life, 
he was presented by the Crown, to the livings of Eendlesham and 
Sudbourne, in this county. Mr. Echard deceased in 1730, in his 
carriage, proceeding to Scarborough for the benefit of the waters. 

CHARITIES. The sum of 1 a year is paid to the overseers of 
the poor, as the rent of an acre of land in this parish, by Mr. James 
Adams, the occupier of an adjoining farm ; and is applied with the 
poor rates. It is not known how, or for what particular purposes, 
the land was given or appropriated. 



BECCLES, or BECLES. 

In or about the year 956, King Edwin, eldest son of King Ed- 
mund, of the Saxon race, gave the lordship of tliis parish to the 
Abbot and Convent of St? Edmund's, Bury ; and it continued in 
that house until the dissolution of Monasteries, when it was granted, 
by King Henry VIII., to William Rede, Esq. In the Confessor's 
time it yielded 30,000 herrings to the said house. 

The Redes, of this parish, were a family of respectability, and 
became early seated here. John Rede, Mayor of Norwich in 1496, 
was buried in Beccles church, in 1502. William was his son and 
heir ; whose second son, William Rede, merchant of London, mar- 
ried Anne, daughter of William Fcrnley, of West Greeting, in this 
county, by Agnes his wife, daughter of Robert Desney, of Ipswich. 
This lady re-married Sir Thomas Gresham, Knt., founder of the 
Royal Exchange, London. 

She died in the 39th of Queen Elizabeth ; and Sir William Rede 
was her son and heir, aged 50 years. He married Gertrude, daughter 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 358 

<^f Erasmus Paston, Esq. ; whose sou arid heir, Sir Thomas Kede, 
Kut., married Mildreda, second daughter of Thomas Cecil, Earl of 
Salisbury, and died without issue. 

Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Richard, son of Sir John Rede, 
of this parish, and Rougham, in Norfolk, married John Yelverton, 
Esq. ; who had by the said Elizabeth, his second wife, Sir William 
Yelverton, Judge of the King's Bench in 1444. 

This estate passed from the Redes, to the Yallops, of Bowthorp, 
near Norwich ; and subsequently to the Bence family. Lawrence 
Bence, only son of Robt. Bonce, of Ilenstead, Esq., by Mary his wife, 
daughter and heir of the Rev. Lawrence Echard, of the same parish, 
died in 1746, without issue : his youngest sister died unmarried, in 
1792; the elder, Ann Bence, married in 1740, Robert Sparrow, 
Esq., of Worlingham ; and by him, who deceased in 1 7G4, had issue 
a daughter, Mary, who married Archibald Acheson, 2nd Earl of 
Gosford ; the present owner of this manor, and patron of the living. 

The Garneys family became very early possessed of Ross Hall 
manor, in Beccles. Robert Garneys, who deceased in 1 4 1 1 ; Peter, 
in 1413; Thomas, in 1527; and Edward, in 1535; were interred 
in that parish church. 

In the time of Queen Elizabeth, this manor was in the Colby's 
(misprinted in Kirby, "Tolby") ; when see a suit in Chancery, 
between Sir Thomas Gresham, Knt., and Anne his wife, lord of the 
manor of Beccles, plaintiffs ; and Thomas Colby, Esq., lord of the 
manor of Rose Hall, defendant. 

It subsequently became vested in the Suckling family ; from 
whom it passed to that of Rich, by the marriage of Sir Edwin Rich, 

of Lincoln's Inn, Knt., with Jane, daughter of Reeve, Esq., 

of St. Edmund's, Bury, and widow of Sir John Suckling, Knt., 
Comptroller of the Household to King James I. 

He was second son of Sir Edwin Rich, of Mulbarton, in Norfolk, 
Knt. He died in 1675, and was buried in that parish church; 
where a singular inscription remains to his memory, of his own 
composition. Sir Edwin gave 200 towards the repairs of the 
roads between Wymondham and Attleburgh, in Norfolk ; where- 
upon, by an order of sessions, the Magistrates of that county or- 
dered a pillar to be placed by the road side, as a grateful remem- 
brance of this benefaction, which still remains. He also gave 100 
towards the erection of a bridge ; and 20 per annum out of this 
manor, for the relief of the poor of Thetford, his native town. 



354 HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 

Sir Edwin left no issue ; and the estate descended to Charlejs 
Rich, Esq., his younger brother, who was advanced to the dignity 
of a Baronet, the 27th of King Charles II. ; with remainder, for 
want of male issue, to Eobert, second son of Colonel Nathaniel 
Rich, of Stondon, in Essex ; who married Mary, second daughter 
and co-heiress of the said Sir Charles ; who inherited this estate in 
her right, and appears to be the first of this family who resided 
here. He deceased in 1699, aged 51 years; and was interred in 
Beccles churchyard. 

Sir Robert Rich was one of the Lords of the Admiralty, and M.P. 
for Dunwich in the reign of William III. He was succeeded by 
his eldest son, Sir Charles Rich, Bart. ; who died unmarried, when 
Robert, his brother, succeeded. He was a Field Marshal, Colonel 
of the 4th Dragoons, and Governor of Chelsea Hospital : he re- 
presented Dunwich in Parliament, the 1st of King George I., and 
sat afterwards for Beeralston and St. Ives. He married one of the 
daughters and co-heirs of Colonel Griffin, one of the Clerks of the 
Board of Green Cloth to Queen Anne ; and had issue, Robert, his 
successor ; George, who deceased unmarried ; Elizabeth, the second 
wife of George, 1st Lord Lyttelton; and Mary, who died single. 

He deceased in 1768 ; when Robert, his eldest son, succeeded : 
who, in 1756, was appointed Governor of Londonderry and Cul- 
more Fort, in Ireland ; and in 1760, made a Lieutenant General. 
Sir Robert married Mary, sister of Peter, 1st Earl of Ludlow ; and 
had an only daughter, Mary Frances, who married in 1784, the 
Rev. Charles Bostock, LL.D., of Shirley House, Hants. 

Sir Robert deceased in 1785 ; when, in default of issue male, the 
Baronetcy expired. This estate devolved upon his only daughter, 
whose husband assumed, in consequence, the surname and arms of 
Rich; and being created a Baronet in 1791, became Sir Charles 
Rich, of Shirley House, in the county of Hants. Charles Henry, 
his eldest son and heir, the present Baronet, is now owner of Rose 
Hall, in Beccles. 

The manor and principal estate was, sometime in 1801, purchased 
by Thomas Rede, Esq., of St. Mary's Hill (a house built on the 
site of the chapel mentioned by Kirby) ; and at his death, it came 
to Robert Rede, Esq., who erected a mansion in the parish of Bars- 
ham, nearly opposite the old manor house of Rose Hall. It came, 
under his will, after the decease of his widow, to his nephew, the 
Rev. Robert Rede Cooper, a younger son of the Rev. Samuel 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 350 

Lovick Cooper, of Yarmouth, by Sarah, second daughter of Thos. 
Rede, Esq. ; who has assumed, by Eoyal license, the name of 
Rede. 

In the " Gentleman's Magazine," for 1808, some enquiries are 
made respecting a portrait of Oliver Cromwell, formerly hanging at 
Ross Hall, in Beccles ; and afterwards presented to the British 
Museum ; of which the writer observes : " I am told it was always 
highly valued by the Rich family, as a most striking likeness of the 
Protector. Tis very easy to account for its finding a place amongst 
the numerous paintings formerly at Ross Hall, when we consider 
not only the great confidence and friendship which existed between 
the Rich's and Oliver, but the connexion being further united and 
confirmed by a marriage between the two families." 

The church is a handsome fabric, and, with the steeple built a 
small distance from it, a great ornament to the town. The former 
appears, from a will in the Bishop's Registry Office, to have been 
founded about the year 1369. The steeple was probably begun 
about GO years afterwards, for there is no legacy bequeathed to it 
until 1515 ; but from that time to 1547, there are various bequests 
towards the erection of the same. The arms of Bury Abbey, and 
those of the families of Garneys, Bowes, Rede, &c., mark the indi- 
viduals who contributed towards the charges of building this tower. 
The south porch is a beautiful specimen of the highly ornamented 
Gotlu'c style of architecture : this is a building of later date, the 
first legacy given towards it being dated 1455.* 

ARMS. Rede: azure ; on a bend wavy, or, three moor-cocks, 
sable, in a bordure engrailed, of the same, bezonty. Yallop : gules ; 
an orle between eight billets, or. Rich : gules ; a chevron between 
three crosslets, botonee, or. 

Mr. Joseph Sparshall died at Beccles in 1810, aged 86 years. 
He was one of the Society of Friends ; and, during the whole of 
his long life, devoted almost every moment he could spare from the 
avocations of business, to the acquirement of useful knowledge. Of 
natural history, iu its various branches, he was passionately fond ; 
but botany, chemistry, and electricity, were his most favourite 
studies. He wrote some essays on philosopliical subjects ; one of 
which, giving an account of a remarkable Aurora Borealis, appeared 
in a volume of the " Philosopliical Transactions," and procured him 

* Mr. Davy has a view of the same, and also of the church aad tower, in his 
** Architectural Antiquities of Suffolk." 



350 HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 

the offer of becoming a member of that learned body, the Royal 
Society ; an honour which he had the modesty to decline. 

Joseph Arnold, M.D. and F.L.S., was born at Beccles, in 1783, 
and was fourth son of Mr. Edward Arnold, an opulent tanner in 
that town. He was apprenticed to a surgeon and apothecary, in 
1799 ; and at the same time was placed under an eminent classical 
tutor, to receive instruction in the learned languages. At the end 
of five years he proceeded to Edinburgh, where he pursued his pro- 
fessional studies ; and in 1807, received the honour of a diploma. 

Upon leaving Edinburgh, he made several attempts to settle as a 
Physician, but in none succeeding to his wishes, he was induced to 
try the naval service, and entered as an assistant surgeon on board 
the "Victory," a flag ship, appointed to the Baltic, in April, 1808; 
and in the month of March, in the following year, he was promoted 
to the surgeoncy of the " Indostan," then under orders for New 
South Wales. After this he served on board different ships of war, 
and in various stations on the Mediterranean and the Adriatic, to 
the period of 1814, when many vessels were dismantled. At this 
crisis, he obtained an order to join the " Northumberland," a con- 
vict ship, taken up by Government for Botany-Bay. 

In this voyage he united the office of supercargo to that of sur- 
geon; but his grand object was the prosecuting his studies in na- 
tural history, and to enrich himself and his country with the 
productions of another hemisphere. On his passage from Port 
Jackson, his hopes and expectations were in a great measure de- 
feated ; for the natural curiosities which he had collected in New 
South Wales, were destroyed at Batavia, by the vessel taking fire, 
when she had nearly completed her cargo. 

In 1816, he arrived in England, and remained some months at 
his brother's, in Suffolk ; when his friend, Sir Thomas S. Baffles, 
late Governor of Java, was sent, in the year 1817, to the island of 
Sumatra ; and, upon the recommendation of Sir Joseph Banks, the 
Doctor accompanied him as Naturalist, under the patronage of the 
Honourable East India Company. 

From the date of his departure, no letters were received by his 
family ; the first intelligence they had was from Sir T. S. Baffles, 
announcing the melancholy tidings of his death ; which took place 
at Padang, on the island of Sumatra, July 26, 1818, in the 35th 
year of his age. 

Dr. Arnold published, besides his Inaugural Thesis, several de- 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 357 

tached subjects, in the Physical and Philosophical Journals ; and 
left to the Linnaean Society a large collection of fossils and shells, 
to be deposited in their museum. His abilities as an attentive ob- 
server, are best exemplified by his papers, addressed to the Linnsean 
Society ; and his industry and application, by the numerous manu- 
scripts he left behind him. 

A very elegant monument, executed by Chantery, has been placed 
in Beccles church to his memory, agreeable to the directions con- 
tained in his will. 

CHARITIES. The town lands have, for a long period, been vested 
in feoffees ; the ancient trusts or uses being, for the payment of 
tenths, fifteenths, aids, and subsidies, chargeable on the poorer in- 
habitants, and the profit and common utility of the inhabitants of 
the town ; and consists of the following particulars : A building 
called the Guildhall, used for meetings of the trustees, and for a 
national school : a small part of the site of the White Lion Inn, in 
Beccles, which is demised on a building lease, at 6 6s. a year : 
the Assembly Room in Beccles, the site whereof is demised to the 
Portreeve, Surveyors, and Commonalty of Beccles Fen, for 200 
years, at an acknowledgment of Is. a year: four tenements in 
Puddingmoor Street, used as almshouses, and occupied by eight 
poor widows : the yearly sum of 5 5s. is paid by the County 
Treasurer, as interest for the price of a piece of ground on which 
part of the House of Correction is erected : an acknowledgment of 
Is. a year is paid by the owner of a premises in Ballygate Street, 
but for what particular property or easement is unknown : sundry 
parcels of land in Beccles, containing in the whole 9 7 A. 2R. 2p., let 
to several different persons, at rents amounting together to 250 1 7s. 
a year ; and a piece of land containing 6 A. 2R. 6p. in the adjoining 
parish of Gillingham, at the annual rent of ^69. The income is now 
applied to different charitable purposes, for the benefit of the poor 
inhabitants of Beccles. 

A marsh, or pasture, containing by estimation 1,400 acres, called 
Beccles Common, or Beccles Fen, which had formerly belonged to 
the dissolved Monastery of St. Edmund's, Bury, and had been 
used by the inhabitants of Beccles for depasturing their cattle, was 
granted to the inhabitants, as a body corporate, for the same use or 
purpose, by letters patent of King Henry VIII. ; and on the sur- 
render of those letters, Queen Elizabeth granted new letters patent, 
in the 2nd year of her reign ; whereby the inhabitants were incor- 



358 HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 

porated by the name of the Portreeve, Surveyors, and Commonalty 
of the Fen of Beccles, in the county of Suffolk : and the Fen was 
granted to them for the depasturing of the cattle of the inhabitants. 

The two following charities are under the management of this 
Corporation : The Hospital Lands, which consist of certain lands 
and a chapel, since wasted, and another building, reputed to have 
been an ancient hospital, adjoining the highway from Beccles to 
Bingsfield, granted by letters patent dated the 26th of King Charles 
II., to the said Corporation ; which, by indenture of lease dated in 
1788, became leased to Thomas Kede, Gent., as the ground called 
Hospital Hill, for the term of 200 years, for the purpose of the said 
Thomas Eede building upon the premises a Mansion House, for 
the residence of himself and family, and improving the ground, by 
planting and otherwise, at the yearly rent of 13 4s. 8d., clear of 
all deductions ; the said Thomas Eede having agreed to engage, 
that at the expiration of the said term, there should be left upon 
the said premises, buildings which should then be of the value of 
200. The income arising from this property is appropriated, by 
the Corporation, for charitable purposes, for the general benefit of 
the poor of Beccles. 

Sir John Leman, Knt., by will, dated 8th July, 1631, devised to 
his executors a messuage, used for a school-room, in Ballygate 
Street, in this town ; and a messuage and lands, called Willowbye's 
and Girdler's, in Gillingham, Geldeston, &c. ; and certain parcels of 
land, containing about 30 acres, in Barsham ; with other lands in 
St. Andrew Ilketshal, Eingsfield, and Barsham, upon trust, to con- 
vey the same lands and premises to the Portreeve and Corporation 
of the town of Beccles ; to the intent that the messuage used as a 
school-house, with the garden and appurtenances, should be em- 
ployed for a Free School, for the educating and teaching 48 scho- 
lars and children, 44 of them to be of the inhabitants of Beccles, 
two of the inhabitants of Eingsfield, and two of the inhabitants of 
Gillingham, in writing, cyphering, casting accounts, and learning and 
in catechising and instructing them in the religion established in this 
realm ; every of the scholars to be eight years of age and upwards, 
and be able to read English perfectly, before he should be admitted ; 
and every scholar to continue there four years, and no longer : and 
he willed, that certain rules by him given to the said school, should 
be duly observed ; and that the Portreeve and Corporation should 
be Governors of the school, and that the rent and profit of the land 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 359 

should bo disposed of in the payment of 18 thereof yearly to the 
Usher, and the residue to the Master of the school ; and that the 
charges of repairs he deducted out of the rents and profits ; one 
third part thereof out of the Usher's part, and the residue out of 
the Master's part. The whole of the property produces a gross 
rental of ahout 196 per annum; and the same, after deducting 
expenses, and the sum of 30 a year, which is paid to the Usher, 
are retained by the Master of the school. 

Dr. Henry Falconberge, by his will, dated 3rd May, 1712, re- 
citing that he proposed to make a provision to encourage learning, 
and instruction of youth, in the town of Beccles ; devised all his 
real estate in Gorton, and the towns adjoining, after the decease of 
the persons, and subject to the life annuities therein mentioned, 
upon trust ; and so settled and conveyed the said estate, as that the 
rents and profits thereof, after reparations deducted, should for ever 
be applicable as after mentioned : and he desired, that whenever a 
person should be nominated to teach school in Beccles, being well 
learnt and experienced in the Latin and Greek tongues, so as. to 
capacitate youth fitting for the University, such person to have the 
rents and profits of the said premises, after repairs deducted, during 
his teaching school in Beccles ; and so from time to time for ever. 
The estate was conveyed or settled pursuant to the testator's direc- 
tion, and consists of a house, outbuildings, and 77A. 2R. 14p. of 
land, in Gorton, rented at 123 15s. a year; and a cottage, with 
55A. IE. 16p. of land, in Gorton and Flixton, which lets at 60 per 
annum. The rents, after deducting land tax, and the expense of 
repairs, are paid to the Rev. Hugh Owen, D.D., who was appointed 
to the office mentioned in the will, in 1815, and has since become 
rector of Beccles. 

There are two or three other minor charities for apprenticing 
poor boys, and bread doles, belonging to this town. 

Mem. In 1556, Thomas Spicer, labourer, John Denny, and 
Edmund Poole, were burnt here in the same fire, for their adhe- 
rance to the protestant faith ; and about the same period, 120 men 
and women suffered many vexatious troubles, for the same offence, 
in this neighbourhood. 

A dreadful fire happened in this town, November 29, 1586 ; 
which, besides consuming 80 dwelling houses, greatly injured the 
roof and seats in the church, though probably not the walls. 

Some curious specimens of fossils found in this vicinitv, are en- 



360 HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 

graved in the " Gentleman's Magazine," for 1804, p. 305 ; also the 
tower of this parish church, see ib. for 1817, pt. ii., p. 105. 



ELLOUGH. ELLOWE, or WILLINGHAM ALL SAINTS. 

In the time of King Edward I., this manor was royal demesne : 
it subsequently became, with the advowson, vested in the family of 
Playters; and so continued for above two centuries. Sir John 
Playters, the 7th Baronet of that house, died seized of the same, in 
1768 ; and they were soon after purchased by Kobert Sparrow, 
Esq., of Worlingham. Archibald Acheson, Earl of Gosford, is 
the present lord and patron. 



ENDGATE. 

On the south side of the town of Beccles are the ruins of this 
parish church, which was taken down by order of Queen Elizabeth, 
" For that the parishes of Endgate and Beccles had been for a long 
period so blended together, that the bounds and limits of them 
could not be known in A.D. 1419 ; when a legal agreement was 
made by the Bishop, Patron, and Sectors of both parishes, that the 
rector of Beccles should take the whole tithes, and pay the rector of 
Endgate 6 13s. 4d. yearly, in the parish church of Endgate; so 
that the inhabitants of the latter have, time out of mind, been es- 
teemed parishioners of Beccles." 



HULVERSTREET. A hamlet of Henstead. 



NOKTH-COVE. 

In the time of King Henry II., the lordship of Wathe Hall, in 
this parish, was vested in Robert de Watheby, of Westmoreland ; 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 361 

and subsequently became the inheritance of Sir Hugh (or Hubert) 
Fitz Jernegan, of Horham Jernegan, Knt., by his marriage with 
Maud, the daughter and co-heiress of Thormine, son of the said 
Kobert de Watheby. 

Sir Hubert paid a considerable sum of money into the exchequer, 
as a gift to King Henry II.; and was witness to a deed in 1195, by 
which divers lands were granted to Byland Abbey, in Yorkshire. 
He deceased in 1203 ; and the King granted the wardship of all 
his largo possessions, and the marriage of his wife and children, to 
Robert de Veteri Pont (or Vipount) ; so that he married them with- 
out disparagement to their fortunes. 

Sir John Jernegan, Knt., on the marriage of his son with Isabel, 
daughter of Sir Gervase Clifton, Knt., in 1459, settled upon him 
the manor of Horham Jernegan, and gave up to him the family 
seat at Somerleyton, retiring himself to this parish, where he was 
living in 1465. His will, which is dated in 1473, was proved in 
the following year, by the name of Sir John Jernegan, Knt., of 
Little Wirlingham, in Suffolk. The Wirlingham manor he be- 
queathed to his son Osbert, for life, as also his manor of Wathe 
Hall, in this parish. In 1515, his grandson, Sir Edward Jernegan, 
Knt., died seized thereof. 

It afterwards became the estate of the Yallop family ; and, in 
1764, was vested in the heirs of Kobert Bence, of Henstead, Esq. 
It has since passed as the Beccles estate. 

William de Cheyney gave his tenants in the parishes of Cove and 
Worlingham, to Langley Abbey, in Norfolk ; they had also a mes- 
suage, and 90 acres of land, in Barningham, in this county : and 
Robert Colvile granted them lands, and a turbary, in Lowestoft. 

The Rev. Henry Harrington, D.D., rector of this parish, with 
Willingham, deceased December 25, 1791. He was Prebendary of 
Bath and Wells, Rector of Hayneford, in Norfolk, and Assistant 
Minister of St. Peter Mancroft, Norwich. He was admitted of 
Queen's College, Oxford, where he proceeded M.A. in 1777. 

CHARITIES. A piece of land, containing IA. 2R., or thereabouts, 
is appropriated to the poor of this parish. It is intermixed with 
the estate of the Earl of Gosford, and is occupied with a farm be- 
longing to him, the rent paid for it being ^4 10s. a year ; which is 
laid out in wood for fuel, and distributed among the poor inha- 
bitants. 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 

REDISHAM MAGNA.- EEDSHAM, or KEDDESHAM. 

This was anciently the lordship and estate of a family that took 
their name from it. In the 9th of King Edward I., Kose de Redis- 
ham was owner thereof ; it afterwards became vested in Sir John de 
Norwich, who in the 31st of King Edward III., obtained a charter 
of free warren in all his demesne lands in this parish. He founded 
Raveningham College, in Norfolk, and endowed it with a manor 
here, after the same was moved to Mettingham Castle, in the 6th of 
King Richard II. 

In the 8th of King Henry V., Robert Garneys, who married Eli- 
zabeth, daughter and heir of Sir Ralph Bigot, gave by will, to Ralph 
Ms son and heir, after his wife's decease, a lordship in this parish^ 
and Barsham ; and that of Weston, to Robert his son, late Edmund 
de Redisham, and William Barsham's, which his father purchased. 
His will was proved in 1425. Robert Garneys, Esq., of Kenton, 
inherited ; who deceased in 1446, without issue. 

Margery, eldest daughter of Nicholas Garnish, of Redisham Hall, 
married Thomas, son of Simon Smith, of Winston, in Norfolk, 
Esq. ; who deceased in 1639, and was buried in the church-yard of 
Gillingham All Saints. She survived until 1656. 

In 1764, Edmund Tyrrel, Esq., of Gipping, was owner of this 
lordship ; it is now the estate of Charles Day, Esq. 

This church* was impropriated to Butley Priory, and the same 
was granted, in the 20th of Queen Elizabeth, to John Harcy, and 
John Hayward : the patronage was lately in the Bence family, and 
the present incumbent, Frederick Leathes, was presented by Mrs. 
Postle. The church of Little Redisham has been long in ruins, 
and the rectory consolidated to Ringsfield. 

CHARITIES. In 1805, Mrs. Mary Leman bequeathed, by will, 
600 clear of all deductions, upon trust, to invest the same in the 
purchase of three per cent, consols; to apply the dividends for 
establishing and supporting a Sunday School, in this parish, Bramp- 
ton, and Cratfield : and she directed an equal third part of the di- 
vidends to be appropriated to each of the three schools. The sum 
of 9 6s. 8d. a year, received for this parish, is applied to the sup^ 
port of a Sunday School here. 

* The south entrance to Great Redisham church is a good specimen of Norman 
architecture ; an engraving of which is given in Davy's " Architectural Antiquities*" 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 363 



RINGSFIELD, or RINGESFELLA. 

The demesne of this parish was anciently vested in John de Val- 
lihus (or Vaux), and the advowson, before the reformation, belonged 
to the Prior and Convent of Butley, in this county. 

By an inquisition, taken in the 38th of King Henry VIII., Simon 
Nunne, of this parish, was found to die seized of a capital messuage 
called Wryngeys, in Beeston, with lands, &c., in Norfolk ; and James 
was his son and heir, by Margaret his wife, daughter of Thomas 
Guybon, Esq.; who confirmed the same to Robert Partridge, of 
Finborough Magna, in this county, in the 6th of Queen Elizabeth. 

The principal estates in this parish lately belonged to the Mickle- 
thwaite family. Charles Day, Esq., is the present owner of the 
lordship. 

Edmund Bohun, a voluminous political and miscellaneous writer, 
of the 17th century, was a native of this parish; the only son of 
Baxter Bohun, who with his ancestors, had been lords of the manor 
of Westhall, in Blithing hundred, from the 25th of King Henry 
VIII. Mr. Bohun was admitted Fellow Commoner of Queen's 
College, Cambridge, in 1663; and continued there till the latter 
part of 1666, when the plague obliged him and others to leave the 
University. In 1 675, he was appointed a Magistrate for this county, 
and continued to fill that office until the 2nd of King James II., 
when he was discharged, but was again restored to the same office 
on the accession of William and Mary. 

Amongst his numerous publications, " Three Charges delivered 
at the General Quarter Sessions holden at Ipswich, for the County 
of Suffolk, in 1691, 1692, and 1693," 4to.; " The Great Historical, 
Geographical, and Poetical Dictionary/' London, 1694, folio ; and 
his " History of King James the Second's Desertion," are accounted 
the most popular of his works. Mr. Bohun was also the translator 
of several popular historical works. The time of his death is not 
known, but he was alive in the year 1700. 

Abraham Dawson, A.M., patron and rector of this parish, with 
Redisham and Satterly, in this county, and perpetual curate of Al- 
deby, in Norfolk ; who published, at three or four different times, 
a new translation from the original Hebrew, of several chapters of 
the Book of Genesis, with notes, critical and explanatory, deceased 
October 4, 1789. Mr. Dawson was son of a respectable dissenting 



3 64 HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 

minister, at or near Halifax, and brother of Dr. Benjamin Dawson, 
rector of Burgh, near Woodbridge. 



SATTEELEY, or SOTERLEGA. 

The family of Soterley became very early enfeoffed in this manor, 
and according to the usage of the age, assumed their name there- 
from. In the 3rd of King Edward I., Eoger de Soterley held this 
lordship ; and in the 8th of the following reign, Edmund de Soter- 
ley had a grant of free warren. He then held one Knight's fee here, 
of the honour of Chester, in which county he also held an estate ; 
and upon his decease, the jury presented that he held the lordship 
of this parish, with those of Stoke and Harthe, in Cheshire, by the 
service of finding one horseman armed, to attend the Earl of Ches- 
ter into Wales, for four days, at his own cost, during the time of war. 

In the 17th of King Edward III., Eoger, son of Sir Edmund de 
Soterley, and Joan his wife, granted the whole manor of Uggeshall, 
in Blithing hundred, to the lady Joan, his mother, for life ; provided 
she claimed no dower in the manors of Soterley, in Suffolk, and 
Stody, in Norfolk. 

In the same year, he presented to the church of Stody, and in 
the 20th of the said reign was found to hold one quarter of a fee 
there. In 1451, Sir Miles Stapleton, and others, were feoffees of 
the manor of Kollesby, in Norfolk, for Thomas Soterley, Esq., of 
this parish ; which manor he had devised to Elizabeth his wife, and 
her heirs ; she dying before him, he ordered the same to be sold, and 
the produce to be disposed of for the soul of the said Elizabeth. 

The estate continued in this family, until about the year 1471 ;. 
when in consequence of their being adherents of the Earl of War- 
wick, it was forfeited to the Crown, and was given, by King Edward 
IV., to Thomas Playters, Esq., a follower of the house of York, who 
soon after became seated here. He was son of Thomas Playters, 
Esq., of Thorndon, in this county ; and deceased in 1479, seized 
of this manor, and Uggeshall. Mr. Playters lies interred, with Anne 
his wife, sister and heir of Eoger Denny, Esq., in this parish church. 

Sir Thomas Playters, his lineal descendant in the 5th generation, 
was Knighted at Newmarket, in 1603 ; served the office of Sheriff 
for this county, in 1605, and was created a Baronet in 1623. He 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 365 

married, first, Anno, daughter of Sir William Swan, Knt., of South- 
fleet, in Kent; and, secondly, Anne, daughter of Sir Anthony 
Browne, Knt., of Elsiug, in Norfolk. His successors in the Ba- 
ronetage, until its extinction in 1832, will be seen by the following 
table : 

1st wife, Anne Swan=Sir Thos. Playters, 1st Bart.=Anne Browne, 2nd wife. 
Sir Win. Playters,==Frances, d. and heir Thomas=Mary, dau. of Sir Augustine 



2nd Bart., dec. 



of Christopher Le Palgrave, Knt., of Norwood 



in 1659. i -i Grys. I -* Berningham, in Norfolk. 

Sir Thos. Playters,=Rebecca, d. andco-h. Lionel, rect. of=Elizabeth, d. of John 
3rd Bart. of Thoa. Chapman, Esq. Uggeshall, who Warner, Gent., of 

succeeded as 4th Bart. Brandon, in Norf. 

I I 

Sir John Playters, 5th Bart. Sir Lionel, his brother= Martha, daug. of Talmash 

who was twice married, 6th Bart. Castel, Esq., of Raven- 

but died without issue. I J inghain, in Norfolk. 

Sir John Playters, = Elizabeth, daughter of John Felton, Esq., 

7th Bart, l J of Worlingham, Suffolk. 

1st, Anne Caroline, - John Playters, Esq., only sou -2nd, Elizabeth, d. of Joshua 



daug. and heir of 
John Turner, Esq. 



who died before his father. 



Lewis, Esq., Great Far- 
lingdon, Berks. 



I 1 ' 1 

Sir John Playters, 8th Sir Charles, 9th Bart., Sir Wm. John Playters, 10th 

Bart., died at of East Bergholt. Bart., died in 1832, when 

Ingatestone, in Essex. the Baronetcy expired. 

The estate had been however previously purchased of Sir John 
Playters, Bart., by Miles Barne, Esq., in 1744 ; who rebuilt the 
Hall,* and was a resident here in 1764. He represented the bo- 
rough of Dunwich in four Parliaments ; and was twice married. 
By his first wife, Elizabeth, daughter and co-heir of Nathaniel 
Elwich, Esq., of May Place, near Crayford, in Kent (formerly 
Governor of Fort Saint George, in the East Indies), he had Miles, 
his successor. 

His second wife was Mary, eldest daughter of George Thornhill, 
Esq., of Diddington, in Huntingdonshire ; to whom she bore eight 
sons, and six daughters. Mr. Barne deceased in 1780, and was 
succeeded by his eldest son, Miles Barne, Esq., M.P. for Dunwich, 
from 1791 to 1796 ; at whose decease, unmarried, in 1825, the es- 
tate devolved upon his half-brother, Michael Barne, Esq., Lieute- 
nant Colonel of the 7th regiment of Dragoons ; who is the present 
proprietor. 

Barne, and Snowdon Barne, were elder brothers of the present 

* A view of this mansion is engraved in Davy's " Seats of the Noblemen and 
Gentlemen in Suffolk." 



366 HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 

possessor ; the former sat as Member of Parliament for Dunwicli, 
from 1777, to 1790, and was afterwards a Commissioner of Taxes. 
He deceased in 1829, unmarried. The latter was also M.P. for the 
same borough, from 1796 to 181 2, Lord Treasurer's Eemembrancer, 
afterwards a Lord of the Treasury, from 1809 to 1812, and then a 
Commissioner of the Customs. Snowdon Barne deceased in 1825, 
unmarried. 

This family derive from Sir George Barne, Knt., Lord Mayor of 
London, in 1552, from a second Sir George Barne, Knt., who filled 
that office in 1586 ; and from Sir William Barne, Knt., who resided 
at Woolwich, and married Anne, daughter of Dr. Edwin Sandys, 
Archbishop of York. Colonel Barne, the present representative of 
this house, married Mary, daughter of Ascogh Boucherett, Esq., of 
Willingham and Shilling-borough, in Lincolnsliire ; and has issue, 
Frederick Barne, Esq., of this parish. 

The Tye family, of Easton, in Loes hundred, held some interest 
here. Sir Kobert de Tye, who deceased in 1415, was interred in 
this parish church. Weever also mentions an inscription here to 
" Monsieur Quier de Welyngton et dame Hawes sa femme ;" and 
Cotman has an etching of a brass to the memory of Thomazine, 
late wife of William Playters, Esq., daughter and co-heir of Edmund 
Tyrrell, of Betches, in Essex; who deceased in 1578, and was bu- 
ried here. 

ARMS. Soterley: gules; a fess between three round buckles, 
argent. Playters: bendy wavy of six, argent and azure. Barne: 
quarterly ; first and fourth, azure, three leopards' heads, argent; se- 
cond and third, argent, a chevron, azure, between three Cornish 
choughs, proper. 

CHARITIES. A rent charge of 6 a year for the poor of this pa- 
rish, was devised by Thomas Jollye, in 1616 ; and charged upon 
one moiety of the manor of Benacre, in this county, now the pro- 
perty of Sir Thomas S. Gooch, Bart. ; which is distributed among 
poor people at Easter. A cottage, in two tenements, is occupied 
by two poor persons, rent free. An allotment of five acres, set out 
for the poor on an enclosure, lets at Q 10s. a year, and the rent is 
distributed with Jollye's annuity, except about 30s. a year to poor 
persons, in casual distress. 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 307 



SHADDINGFIELD, or SCADENEFELLA. 

The lordship of this parish was anciently in Hugh de Berry, and 
subsequently the family of Cuddon became seated here ; which they 
acquired by marriage with the heiress of Francis, of Shaddingfield. 
They afterwards married with the houses of Duke, Berney, and 
Bainard ; and were a family of great distinction. Ebenezer, the 
son of Sir Thomas Cuddon, Knt., Chamberlain of London, sold the 
Hall and estate to Round, Esq., of Essex. 

Shaddingfield Hall is now the property and residence of Thomas 
Charles Scott, Esq. ; the manor belongs to the Earl of Stradbrooke, 
and the advowson was in the Earl of Bristol, but by recent returns 
Lord Braybrooke now presents to this rectory. The north entrance 
to this parish church is engraved in Davy's " Architectural Antiqui- 
ties of Suffolk," as a specimen of the Norman style of architecture. 

ARMS. Cuddon: argent; a chevron, gules; on a chief, azure, 
three bezants. Francis : argent ; a fess indented, gules, between 
three eagles displayed, sable. 



SHIPMEADOW, or SCIPMEDU. 

In the twenty fourth of King Henry III., Walter de Shipmeadow 
conveyed by fine, his right of fishing in the river Waveney, between 
the parishes of Stockton and Shipmeadow, and in the cutting of 
reed, rush, flag, &c., to Ealph Bigot, a younger son of Hugh Bigot, 
Earl of Norfolk, by Maud, eldest daughter of William Marshal, 
Earl of Pembroke. 

In the 5th of King Edward II., Walter de Norwich obtained a 
charter of free warren in this manor. He deceased in the 2nd of 
the following reign, and left his estate to Sir John de Norwich, Knt. ; 
who procured another charter of free warren here, in the 31st of that 
King. He died in the 36th of that reign, and devised the same to 
John, his grandson ; and it passed as Mettmgham manor. 

Sir John de Norwich was the founder of Raveningham College, 
which he endowed with a manor in this parish, who held the same af- 
ter its removal to Mettingham Castle, in the 6th of King Richard II. 

The manor and advowson of this parish was purchased, about 



308 HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 

1C 10, by Sir John Suckling, Knt., and now belongs to the Kev. Al- 
fred Inigo Suckling, LL.B., of Wooton Hall, in Norfolk. 

The family of Pelyt formerly resided here ; of whom was Thomas, 
son of Edward, son of John Pelyt, of Blofield, in Norfolk, and Anne 
his wife, natural daughter of Lord Segrave. This Thomas Pelyt, 
of Shipmeadow, married Jane, daughter and co-heir of William 
Cannon, of Stoke, by Ipswich ; and had issue, Robert, of this pa- 
rish ; who by Mary his wife, daughter of Edward Downes, had two 
sons, Thomas and John. John Pelyt, D.D., occurs rector of Blo- 
field, in 1455. 

CHARITIES. In 1709, Francis Warmall gave by will, to the poor 
of this parish, 1 Os. a year, to be paid out of his lands in Shipmeadow, 
now belonging to John Lincoln Bond, Esq. ; and the money is yearly 
added to, and distributed with, that collected at the Sacrament. 

Mem. A House of Industry was erected in this parish in 1765, 
for the 27 parishes of this incorporated hundred, of Wangford. 



WESTON, or WESTUNA. 

The author of " Magua Britannia" makes the lordship of this pa- 
rish to have been anciently held by Hugh de Berry ; and a branch 
of the Leman family were sometime seated here. In 1764, William 
Leman, Esq., was owner of the said estate ; which, with another 
seat in this parish, became vested in the Barne family, and which 
lately belonged to Thomas Farr, Esq. 

In the 8th of King Henry V., Robert Garneys, who married Eli- 
zabeth, daughter and heir of Sir Ralph Bigot, gave by will, to Ralph, 
his son and heir, after his wife's decease, the manors of Redisham 
and Barsham ; and that of Weston, to Robert, his son, late Ed- 
mund de Redisham, and William Barsham's ; which his father 
bought. His will was proved in 1425 ; and Robert Garneys, of 
Kenton, inherited; who died in 1446, without issue. 

Weston Hall was formerly the estate of the Redes, of Beccles ; 
and passed from them, by purchase, to the family of Barry ; from 
whom it went, in like manner, to that of Barne, of Satterley ; who 
were also owners of the estate formerly Leman's. Here was also a 
branch of the Bokenham family. 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 300 

. WILLINGHAM ST. MARY, or WERLINGHAM. 

Elizabeth Aslack, widow, daughter and heir of Thomas Bardolf, 
Esq., and Alice his wife, daughter and heir of Sir Edmund Berry, 
by deed without date, granted to Robert Clare, Robert Drury, and 
Edmund Jenney, Knts., and others, the lordship of this parish, to 
hold for the use of the said Elizabeth, for life : after to William 
Aslack, her son, and his heirs ; remainder to Thomas, her son : and 
by an inquisition, taken the 23rd of King Henry VIII., William 
Aslack was found to die seized of the said manor, in 1531; and 
Thomas, son of Christopher Playters, and Elizabeth his wife, sister 
of the said William Aslack, was his heir. 

From the Playters family it was purchased by Sir Thomas Robin- 
son, Bart., and so passed to the Sparrows : it is now the estate of 
the Earl of Gosford, having passed as the following parish of Wor- 
lingham. 

Robert Bumpstede, of this parish, died in 1480, and was buried 
in the chancel of Sotterley church, in this hundred. He appointed 
John, his eldest son, and Robert Bumstede, chaplain, another son, 
his executors ; and gave his manor in Willingham St. Mary, to 
Marion his wife. 

The Earles, who for many generations were lords of Hey don, in 
Norfolk, a family of great antiquity, that had its origin in the ad- 
joining parish of Salle, in the same county, appear to have divided 
about 1350 ; for Alexander le Erie was owner of an estate in this 
parish and Sotterley, and was seated here at that period, whilst 
William le Erie, his elder brother, continued at Salle. 

ARMS. Aslack : sable ; a chevron between three Catherine wheels, 
argent. Bumpstede: argent; on a bend engrailed, gules, three 
mullets of the field. Earle : azure ; a fess, between two bars ge- 
melles, or. 



WORLINGHAM, or WORLINGAHAM. 

Tin's estate was formerly vested in the Duke family. John Duke, 
Esq., who deceased about 1649, seized of the principal lordship of 
Diss, in Norfolk, resided here. It was afterwards the seat of John 



370 HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 

Felton, Esq., youngest son of Sir John Felton, Knt, of Playford 
Hall ; who erected the present mansion, which has been altered, en- 
larged, and improved, so as to leave hut little of the original build- 
ing.* Mr. Felton deceased here in 1703, and was interred in this 
parish church. 

His only daughter and heir, Elizabeth, married Sir John Play- 
ters, Bart., of Sotteiiey ; who sold this, with some other estates, to 
Sir Thos. Eobinson, Bart., son of Sir Lumley, and grandson of Sir 
Thomas Eobinson, Knt., Prothonotary of the Court of Common 
Pleas, of Kentwell Hall, in Melford ; who was created a Baronet by 
King Charles II., in 1681-2. Sir Thomas made this his chief re- 
sidence. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Thomas Hare, 
Bart., of Stow Bardolph, in Norfolk ; but deceased without issue, 
in 1743, when the Baronetcy expired. His remains were deposited 
in this parish church. 

After which, the estate was purchased by Kobert Sparrow, Esq., 
who died seized thereof in 1766 ; when Eobert Sparrow, Esq., his 
son and heir, succeeded ; who deceased in 1822, and devised this 
property to Archibald Acheson, second Earl of Gosford ; who in 
1805, married Mary, his only daughter. In 1835, Lord Gosford 
was created a Peer of the United Kingdom, by the title of Baron 
Worlingham, of Beccles, in the county of Suffolk. 

Here were formerly two parishes, St. Mary and St. Peter, or 
Great and Little Worlingham ; and John Jemegan, senior, by his 
will, which was proved in 1474, gave the latter manor, which he 
lately purchased of William Core, to his son Osbert, for life. John 
Jemegan resided at Worlingham, at the time of his decease. 

Sir Thomas Gooch, Bart., successively Bishop of Bristol, Nor- 
wich, and Ely, was a native of this village ; being second son of 
Thomas Gooch, Esq., by Frances his wife, daughter and co-heir of 
Thomas Lane, Esq., of Worlingham. He succeeded to the Baro- 
netcy upon the decease of his elder brother, in 1751, without issue ; 
and married Mary, daughter of Dr. William Sherlock, Dean of St. 
Paul's, and sister of Thomas Sherlock, Bishop of London ; by whom 
he had an only son, who succeeded as 3rd Baronet. He married, 
secondly, Harriet, daughter of Sir Thomas Miller, Bart., by whom 
he had issue ; his lordship married, thirdly, Mary Compton, niece 
of the Eight Eev. and Eight Hon. Henry, Earl of Northampton, 

* Mr. Davy gives a view of this mansion, iu its present state, in his " Seats of 
the Nobility and Gentry of Suffolk."' 



HUNDRED OF WANGFORD. 371 

Bishop of London, in 1675, by whom he had no child. He de- 
ceased in 1754. 

Dr. Gooch was of Caius College, Cambridge, of which he was 
Fellow, and afterwards President ; and was chosen Vice Chancellor 
of that University in 1717, and two following years ; in which time, 
by contributions, and his good management, he raised 10,000; 
which has since been expended in the erection of the present Senate 
House there. He published three Sermons, preached on different 
public occasions. 

ARMS. Robinson : vert ; on a chevron, between three bucks 
trippant, or, three cinquefoils, gules. Sparrow: ermine; three 
white roses, seeded, or. Acheson : argent ; an eagle displayed, 
with two heads, sable, beaked and membered, or ; on a chief, vert, 
two mullets, pierced of the chief. 

CHARITIES. The town estate here, of which the original acqui- 
sition is unknown, consists of the following parcels : A messuage, 
called the Guildhall, in Worlingham ; rent 5 : land, in Ellough, 
two acres ; rent 8 : marsh lands, in this parish, called Pound's 
Half Acre; rent 10s. 6d. : nine acres, in the same parish; rent 
10 : messuage and blacksmith's premises, in Worlingham, 3 A. 2 IP. ; 
rent 10. The declaration of trust is in these terms : "That the 
rents should be applied for payment of the leet fee, of the whole town 
of Worlingham ; and for repairing the buildings on the estate, and 
the parish church of Worlingham ; and for putting out the poor chil- 
dren, belonging to the said town, apprentices ; and for the teaching 
of the children of such poor people, to read English, and for in- 
structing them in the church catechism, and for such other purposes 
for the good and benefit of the said town ; provided that no part of the 
said rents should be laid out in beer, or any other liquors, at bon- 
fires, or perambulations, or on account of repairing the highways." 
Thomas Atkin, vicar of Mutford, gave Pain's Close, in this parish, 
of the yearly value of 40s., for stipends, for three scholars of the 
diocese of Norwich, in Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. 
This close is in three divisions, 30 acres : money rent, 1 6s. 8d. ; 
corn rent, wheat lj qrs. % bushels, malt 3 bushels. 



BISSOPES, or BISCOPES. 



This Hundred is bounded, on the North, by the River Waveney, 
which separates it from Norfolk ; on the East, by the Hundreds 
of Wangford and Blithing ; it borders to the South, on those of 
Loes and Plomesgate ; and on the West, it is bounded by Loes 
and Hartismere. It contains the following Parishes : 



ATHELINGTON, 

BADINGHAM, 

BEDINGFIELD, 

BEDFIELD, 

BRUNDISH, 

CARLETON, 

DENHAM, 

DENNINGTON, 

FRESSINGFIELD, 

HORHAM, 
HOXNE, 



LAXFIELD, 



MENDHAM, 

METFIELD, 

MONK-SOHAM, 

SAXSTEAD, 

SYLEHAM, 

SOUTHOLT, 

STRADBROOK, 

TANNINGTON, 

WETHERSDALE, 

WEYBREAD, 

WILBY, 

WINGFIELD, and 

WORLINGWORTH. 



Anciently called " Bishop 's Hundred :" the fee and chief ju- 
risdiction being in the Bishops of tJie East Angles, long before 
the removal of the See to Norwich. In the 3rd of Edward I., 
the Bishop of Norwich held tlie same of the King, by the annual 
rent of Us. Qd. (but it was valued at lOOs.J It is now in the 
Crown. 

By an Inquisition taken in the 21st of King Henry III., it 
was stated that this Hundred ought to repair the signal, called 
the " Bekon," standing upon Cache Cliff's, in the village of Wes- 
tleton. 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 



ATHELINGTON, or ATHELING. 

The cellarer of the Cathedral Priory at Norwich, received 2s. per 
BHiium from this parish. The Prior and Convent of Butley were 
the ancient patrons of the church, which, since the dissolution of 
that Monastery, has been vested in the Crown. 

A branch of the ancient family of Brooke, of Aspall, in Hartis- 
mere hundred, were not long since seated in this parish, and pos- 
sessed considerable property here ; several of whom are buried in 
the parish church. 

CHAEITIES. There is a piece of land in this parish, containing 
IA. SR., which is let by the overseers of the poor, and the rent is 
applied with the poors' rate. The present rent is l 16s. a year. 
There are no writings extant relative to this property, and the ac- 
quisition of it cannot be traced. 



BADINGHAM. 

In the time of King Edward I., John de Bovile, and Matilda 
Hardicheshall, held Badingham and Dennington ; formerly in the 
hands of King Stephen : and in the 28th of that reign, Kalph de 
Hardicheshall had a grant of free warren there. 

In the 7th of King Edward II., William de Bovile, who held them 
of the honour of Eye, had license to enfeoff the advowson of the 
church of Dennington, and also the manor and church of Bading- 
ham, with the manors of Wilby, Letheringham, &c. ; and the manor 
of Badingham was thereupon settled on William Bovile, his son, in 
tail male ; remainder to Thomas le Latimer, in tail male ; remainder 
to Simon Fitz Richard, and Nicholaa his wife, in tail male ; with 
remainder to his own right heirs. By virtue of this settlement, it 
ultimately became vested in Richard, the son of Simon Fitz Richard 



370 HUNDRED OF HOXNE, 

and Nicholaa; who conveyed them, in trust, for Margery, the 
daughter of William Bovile, and wife of Sir William Carbonel ; in 
which family it descended, as shewn in the following table : 

John de Bovile. 
^_ _ I - 1 

William de Bo vile = Joan. 

I -- 1 1 --- 1 

Wm. de Bovile=Mariota, d. of Mary=Thomas Latimer. Nicholaa Simon Fitz 
Sir Thos. Mosel, by Christiana his wife, d. of Sir \ Richard- 
Wm. Latiiner, and relict of Sir John Carbonel, / Richard. 
1 - 1 of Waldingfield. 

1. Sir William Margery, dau. & heiress. =2. Sir Thos. Wingfield, 2nd son of Sir 
Carbonel. J - 1 John Wingfield, of Wingfield Castle 

Sir Robert Carbonel. Obt. 23rd Rich. II. 



I - 1 
Sir John Carbonel. Obt. 1425.=Margaret. 

I - 1 
Sir Richard Carbonel. Ob. 8th Hen. VI.=Margaret, d. of Sir Thos. Tuden- 

l - 1 ham, of Oxburgh, Norfolk. 
John, died an infant. 

Sir John, son and heir of Sir Eohert Carhonel, Knt., by his tes- 
tament, proved in 1425, mentions his lordships of Badingham, and 
Saxham's manor, in Badingham, Dalingho, and Greeting; and 3 
per annum, in Cratfield, in Suffolk ; with divers others in Norfolk. 
He was buried in the church of St. John the Baptist, in this parish. 
The will of Sir Eichard Carbonel is dated in 1429 ; wherein he 
gives to Margaret his wife, several silver vessels and jewels ; and 
John his son, to have at her decease, the moveable altar, and the 
old heir-lomb, called " Caston's Bolle."* 

On failure of male issue of the Carbonels, it came to Kobert 
Lyston, Esq., who resided here in 1457J and from him, who died 
in 1484, through one of his daughters and co-heirs, Margaret, who 
married to Edward Rous, Esq., 4th son of Reginald Rous, of Den- 
nington, to that family ; in which it continued until the extinction 
of that branch, in the male bine, at the death of Lawrence Rous, of 
Badingham Hall, in 1701. Mary, the sister of this Lawrence, was 
the wife of Waldegrave Alexander. In 1764, it appears to have 
been vested in - Fynn, clerk, who also married a Rous, probably 
another sister of the above Lawrence Rous. 

Colston Hall belonged to the family of Verehaugh. Elizabeth, 
the only daughter and heir general of Thomas Verehaugh, Esq., 
married Sir Jeffrey Burwell, of Rougham, in this county, Knt., who 

* Sir Robert Carbonel married an heiress of Caston ; and most old families had 
anciently some particular vessel that passed from father to son, which was carefully 
preserved, and highly esteemed. 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 377 

left an only daughter and heiress, Mary, wife to Eobert Walpole, 
Esq., of Houghton, in Norfolk. In 1764, it belonged to Eowland 
Holt, Esq. ; and the manors of Colston Hall, and Badingham Hall, 
were then vested in Mileson Edgar, Esq., of the Ked House, near 
Ipswich. The latter is now the joint property of Sir Edward Hall 
Alderson, Knt., and his brothers. 

Upnall Hall (formerly called " Oken Hall"), in this parish, in 
1655 belonged to the Cornwallis family : Catherine, late wife of 

John Cornwallis, third daughter of Blennerhasset, is buried in 

this parish church; and William Cotton, Esq., who died in 1616, 
also Lucy his wife, daughter of Keginald Eous, Esq., of tlu's parish. 
She deceased in 1621. 

John Waldegrave, Gent., of the family of Waldegrave, of Bures, 
built a house here, and left it to his daughters and co-heirs ; one of 
whom married Samuel Borrett, Gent. The other married an Alex- 
ander, and was mother of Waldegrave Alexander, who married Mary, 
the sister of Lawrence Kous, of Badingham Hall, as above stated. 

About the year 1730, the Kev. Barrington Blomfield, D.D., rec- 
tor and patron of this living, built the parsonage house, near the 
church. In 1704, Mr. Syer held them: the Eev. Eobert Gorton is 
the present patron and incumbent. 

ARMS. Alexander: azure; a chevron between three talbots' 
heads erased, argent, collared, gules. 

CHARITIES. In 1715, Elizabeth Eous, widow, bequeathed 52, 
to the intent that six two-penny loaves of bread should be delivered 
every Sunday, at this parish church, to such of the poor of Bading- 
ham as should be present at divine service, and sermon ; and Do- 
rothy Eous, her daughter, by her will, dated in 1735, bequeathed 
150, to be added to the former legacy. These sums were laid out 
in the purchase of three pieces of land in the parish of Framling- 
ham, called " Oldway Pieces," containing about ten acres ; these 
lands produce a rental of 24 per annum, which, after a deduction 
for land-tax, is laid out in the purchase of bread, of which 8s. 6d. 
worth is distributed every Sunday, and the remainder generally on 
Whit-Sunday. A benefaction of 10, given by a person named 
Holland, appears to have been laid out, with other money subscribed 
by the inhabitants, in the purchase of a house; used for the residence 
of poor people. It is mentioned in a parish terrier, dated in 1801, 
that a sum of 50 had been devised ; of the interest of which, 40s. 
a year were for the clerk and sexton's wages, and 10s. a year were 



378 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

to be distributed every St. Stephen's day, to the poor of the parish. 
These sums have not been paid as above, for several years. 



BEDINGFIELD. BADINGAFELDA, or BADINGHEFELDA. 

Ogerus de Pugeys, a Norman Knight, came into England with 
the Conqueror, and was one of the four Knights, of the Lord Malet, 
of the honour of Eye, in this county ; and had a grant of this ma- 
nor and advowson from that nobleman ; who from this parish as- 
sumed the name of Bedingfield. 

Peter de Bedingfield, with the consent of Arnold, his son, about 
1156, granted the advowson of this parish church to the Prior and 
Convent of Snape, in this county. The lordship subsequently be- 
came vested in that house. Gerald de Bedingfield, son of Arnold, 
lived in the reign of King Richard I., when Sampson, Abbot of 
Bury, granted him lands in this parish. The family continued to 
reside here, after this, for many generations, but removed to Red- 
lingfield ; when they obtained a grant of that Monastery. 

Sir Peter de Bedingfield married Margaret, daughter of Sir Ro- 
bert Bacon. His will was proved in 1371, wherein he directs his 
body to be interred in the church-yard of Bedingfield St. Mary ; 
bequeathing money for the making of a window in that church, be- 
fore the altar of St. James, and for a new porch to be built over the 
place of his interment. This was dated at Bedingfield. 

Edmund Bedingfield, Esq., the third in descent from Sir Peter, 
married Margaret, daughter of Sir Robert, and sister and sole heiress 
of Sir Thomas Tudenham, Knt. His will is also dated at Beding- 
field, in 1451 ; and directs his body to be buried in the church-yard 
there. Her will is dated at Ereswell, in Lackford hundred, in 1474 ; 
wherein she gives to the church of Bedingfield, where her husband 
was buried, 46s. 8d., for a vestment in memory of herself and husband. 
She was buried at Ereswell. As sole heir to her brother, she died 
seized of divers lordships in this county, Norfolk, and Cambridge- 
shire ; the former inheritance of the Weyland and Tudenham families. 

Sir Thomas Bedingfield, Knt., their son and heir, deceased in 
1453, and Anne his wife, daughter and heir of John Waldgrave, 
Esq., of Waldgrave, in Northamptonshire, the same year ; and de- 
sired to be buried in the church-yard of Bedingfield, by the porch 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

Xvhich was built over the body of Sir Peter Bedingfield, Knt. This 
lady appears to have been the last of the family interred here : Sir 
Thomas, her husband, died in Northamptonshire, and was buried at 
Waldgrave, in that county. 

Edmund, their son and heir, then a minor, upon the death of 
Margaret, his grandmother, succeeded to her large inheritance. On 
the coronation of King Richard III., he was created K.B., and ob- 
tained a Royal Patent to erect a Manor House at Oxburgh, in Nor- 
folk, in 1482, from King Edward IV. He was in such high esteem 
with Henry VII., for his eminent services, that he paid him a Royal 
visit, at Oxburgh ; which has continued ever since the chief seat of 
the family. 

James Bedingfield (second sou of Sir Peter, and brother of Sir 
Thomas Bedingfield, ancestor of the Oxburgh family), who was li- 
ving in 1350, married Alice, daughter and heir of Peter de Fleming; 
by whom he acquired Fleming's Hall and manor, in this parish. 
Thomas Bedingfield, of Bedingfield, in the reigns of Henry VII. 
and VIII. (his descendant in the fourth generation), married Joan, 
daughter of Roger Busarde, of Ditchingham, in Norfolk ; and thus 
obtained that estate, where his descendant still resides. 

The manor and advowson that did belong to the Priory at Snape, 
were granted by King Henry VIII., to Cardinal Wolsey ; and in the 
following reign, to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk ; became afterwards 
vested in the above branch of the Bedingfield family, and so con- 
tinues, John James Bedingfield, Esq., of Ditchingham Hall, being 
the present lord and patron ; whose youngest son, James Beding- 
field, clerk, now holds the incumbency.* 

CHARITIES. The town estate consists of 23A. IE. 30p. of land, 
in three pieces, in the parishes of Debenham and Kenton ; which lets 
at 35 a year. It is vested in trustees, to apply the same towards 
the charges of this parish, the payment of fifteenths, and for the help 
and support of the town of Bedingfield. The rents, after the payment 
of outgoings, in land-tax, quit rents, &c., are applied to the repairs 
of the church, and other expenses of the churchwardens' office ; and 
the residue is applied with the rates. In 1547, Stephen Pake gave, 
by will, a pighde and pasture, called Denton's, in Bedingfield, con- 
taining 4^ acres, or thereabouts, which lets for 10 a year; and the 
rent is distributed among poor persons in the parish, in different 
sums, according to the size of their families. Philip Bedingfield, 

* See also parish of Darsham, in Blithing hundred. 



380 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

who died in 1673, devised the yearly rent of 3, out of his lands and 
tenements in this parish, to he paid to the vicar of Bedingfield. 



BEDFIELD. 

Baron Eohert Malet gave the lordship and advowson of this pa- 
rish, to the Priory of the Benedictine Monks of Eye, of which he was 
the founder. At the dissolution of that house, Anthony Rous, Esq., 
obtained from King Henry VIII., a grant of he same. They con- 
tinue in that family, the Earl of Stradbrook being now lord and 
patron. 

In 1655, Bedfield Hall belonged to Edward Dunstan, Gent., 
whose sole daughter and heir, Elizabeth, married to Sir Kobert Drury, 
Bart., of Kidlesworth, in Norfolk. Thomas Dunstan, of this parish, 
in 1642, for the defence of Parliament, lent 20, and Edward Dun- 
stan, the same sum, and Simon Jeffrey, of Bedfield, lent 10. 

In the 5th of Queen Elizabeth, John Chapman (alias Barker) 
was required to shew by what tide he held the manor of Bedfield. 

CHARITIES. The poors' estate here, the acquisition of which is 
unknown, comprises two houses, occupied by poor persons rent free; 
and a barn and 39 acres of land, let at 5Q a year. The rents of 
this land, after necessary deductions, and the expense of an annual 
dinner of the trustees, is laid out in coals and clothing, which are 
distributed among poor persons of the parish. 



BRUNDISH. BRUNDYSSCH, or BURNEDYSSCH. 

In Dennington, on the borders of this parish, is a large moat 
called " Runton's Moat," where it is said was formerly a mansion 
and the manor house of Brandish, which was burnt down, together 
with the court books ; since which time all the lands in Brandish 
and Tannington have been free. 

Walter de Rungeton, and John his son, were living in the 1 5th 
of King Edward I. ; and in the 7th of the following reign, William 
de Rungeton was fined to the King in two marks, to be pardoned 
for having acquired the manors of Burnedissh and Tatington, with- 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 381 

out the King's license ; and in the same year, he again paid a fine 
of 40s. for his pardon, in having obtained of William do Bovill the 
manor of Dallinghoo, and the advowson of that parish church, with- 
out the King's license. 

In the 20th of King Richard II., Sir Thomas Craven, Knt., con- 
veyed to Sir William Argentein, Knt., Edmund de Rungetou, and 
others, the manor of Frostenden, with the advowson of the church 
there, and lands in Frostenden, and adjoining parishes. The manor 
of Rungeton's, in tlu's parish, in the 15th of Queen Elizabeth, was 
the property of John Everard, Esq. 

In a niche of the wall of this parish church is the figure of a 
priest, in brass, with an inscription in old French, which has been 
thus rendered, " Sir Esmound de Burnedish, formerly parson of the 
church of Castre, lies here; may God have mercy on his soul." He 
was instituted to the rectory of Caistor in 1349, and in 1354 was 
Chaplain to the Countess of Norfolk, at Framlingham Castle. He 
was probably a native of this parish. From the situation in which 
the monument is placed, there can be no doubt of his having been 
a liberal benefactor to the church here, if not the founder of the pre- 
sent fabric. 

Sir John de Pyeshale, priest, rector of Cawston, in Norfolk, in 
1371, on the presentation of William de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, 
lord of Eye, Framlingham, and Cawston, was concerned in founding 
the Chantry here, as mentioned by Kirby ; being one of the executors 
of the noble Earl. 

The family of Wyard were seated here, and many of them interred 
in this parish church.* The family of Colby were also resident 
here ; John Colby, who deceased in 1559, and Francis Colby, with 
Margery his wife, the daughter of Lord Wentworth, were interred in 
this parish church. 

In the 7th of Edward II., Brandish, Badingham, Dennington, 
LaxfieW, Stradbroke, and Tannington, contributed to the reparation 
of the King's park pales, &c., at Eye. 

CHARITIES. The parish estate consists of a messuage, used as a 
poor-house, and four acres of land adjoining the same, let at ;6 a 
year. It is unkown when this property was settled to public uses. 
The rents of the land are applied about the repairs and ornaments 
of the church, in lieu of a church rate. Walter de Suffield (or Cal- 
thorpe), Bishop of Norwich, bequeathed to the poor of this parish 

* See page 122. 



382 HUNDRED OF HOXNE, 

ten marks, at the request of William, rector of Dennington. His 
will bears date at the Palace, at Hoxne, on Monday before Mid- 
summer day, 1256. 



CARLETON, or CARLETUNA. 

In or about 1330, John de Framlingham, rector of Kelsalc, founded 
a Chantry in this parish, for three Chaplains to pray for the soul of 
Alice, first wife of Thomas de Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk, and 
daughter of Sir Roger Halys, of Harwich, Knt. In the 36th of King 
Henry VIII., 1544, Wm. Hunnynge (or Honing), obtained a grant 
of the same, together with the lordship of Carleton. 

This family is supposed to have derived its name from a parish in 
Norfolk, so called ; and the above William Honing, Esq., was Clerk 
of the Signet in the reigns of Henry VIII., Edward VI., and probably 
Elizabeth ; and it is presumed was introduced into service at Court 
by the circumstance of his father being employed as fishmonger to 
the Royal household. In 1547, he received from King Edward VI., 
a confirmation of certain tenements in London, and Suffolk. 

He married Frances, daughter of Nicholas Cutler, of Eye, Esq. ; 
and, in 1558, during the reign of Philip and Mary, received in con- 
junction with his brother-in-law, Nicholas Cutler, Esq., a grant of 
the manor of Rishangles ; and in 1566, he acquired the manor of 
Manton's, in Hitcham, both in this county. Mr. Honing was re- 
turned to Parliament for the borough of Orford, in 1553. He died 
the 17th November, 1569, and was buried at Eye. 

Edward Honing,* Esq., his son and heir, was a Receiver of Crown 
Rents in Suffolk, sat in Parliament for Dunwich, in 1588, and for 
Eye, in 1592, 1601, and 1603. The manor of Darsham, in Bli- 
thing hundred, was granted to him from the Crown, in 1575 ; where 
he soon after erected a family mansion, and was a resident in 1579 ; 
was of Eye in 1589, and of London in 1592. He received other 
Crown grants in 1595, and 1598. 

Mr. Honings married Ursula, daughter and heir of Anthony 
Wingfield, of Sibton, in this county, Esq. ; by whom he had a nu- 
merous family. He deceased in 1 609, and was buried at Eye ; when 
Wingfield Honings, Esq., his son and heir, succeeded ; who was ad- 
* By mistake called Hammings, in our account of Darsbam. 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 383 

mitted of Gray's Inn, 1604, Receiver General of Revenues in Suffolk 
and Cambridgeshire jointly with his father, and resided at Eye. 

A curious picture, which represents the portraits of the Clerk of 
the Privy Council (Wm. Honing), and his very numerous family, 
was purchased more than fifty years ago, hy Mr. Robert Loder, of 
Woodbridge, bookseller ; and sold, shortly after, to the Marquess of 
Donegal. A copy in water colours, made by Isaac Johnson, in 1787, 
for Mr. Nichols, is now in the possession of his son, J. B. Nichols, 
Esq., F.S.A., at Hammersmith, and measures 19 inches by 13j 
inches : the original painting measures four feet four inches in 
breadth, by three feet three inches in height.* 

In 1655, Osborne, Gent., was owner of Carlton Hall, an 

estate then worth between 200 and 300 per annum ; he was a 
Kentish man, by birth. It is now the property of Edward Fuller, 
Esq., of Preston street, Brighton ; son and heir of Osborne Fuller, 
Esq., late of Carlton Hall. The advowson was part of the posses- 
sion of the Priory of Campsey. 

ARMS. Honing: quarterly, gules and vert ; a lion rampant, ar- 
gent. Cutler, of Eye : azure ; three lions' heads erased, or. 

CHARITIES. The sum of 40, given by Stephen Alcock, with an 
addition of 5, the gift of William Feveryare, was laid out by the 
last-named benefactor, in the year 1659, in the purchase of a piece 
of land, containing two acres, called " Marvin's Meadow," in the 
parish of Swelling, and half an acre of copyhold land in the same 
parish, held of the manor of Swefling Campsey, called " Starkwea- 
ther Hopper." These lands produce a rent of 6 a year ; out of 
which the sum of l is paid the rector or minister, to preach a ser- 
mon on the 5th of November, yearly, in this parish church, and the 
residue thereof is distributed in bread and money on that day, among 
the poor persons of the parish. In 1716, Stephen Eade gave, by 
will, a rent charge upon his lands in Carlton, of 4 a year, to be 
disposed of as follows : 50s. a year for bread to the poor, to be 
distributed at the church on Sundays ; 10s. a year to the minister, 
for a sermon on Christmas day ; and 20s. to be given to the poor 
on that day. This annuity is received by the churchwardens, and 
distributed accordingly. The town estate consists of a house, with 

* For a particular description of this picture, see " Collectanea Topographica and 
Genealogica, 1 ' Vol. vii., p. 394 ; also an excellent pedigree of the family of Honing 
(or Ilonings), communicated by David Elisha Davy, Esq., of Ufford ; from which 
the above account is derivedt 



384 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

out-buildings, and 36 acres of land, in this parish ; rent 46 a year. 
This is received by the parishioners at a public meeting, and is car- 
ried to the same account with the monies raised by the overseers by 
rate : this course of application has existed as long as can be ascer- 
tained. 



DENHAM, or DEHAM. 

The manor and advowson of this vicarage has passed as the Hoxne 
estate; in 1764, it was the property of Lord Viscount Maynard, 
and now belongs to Sir Edward Kerrison, Bart., of Oakley, and 
Brome, in this county. 



DENNINGTON. DONINGTON, or DINGINETUNA. 

William Lord Malet, who was with the Conqueror at the decisive 
battle of Hastings, had by Hesilia his wife, a son Kobert, to whom 
the King granted the honour of Eye, and divers manors in this and 
other counties, amongst which the lordship of this parish was in- 
cluded. This Eobert Malet was Great Chamberlain of England, 
under King Henry I. ; but in the 2nd of that reign was banished, 
and deprived of his possessions in England, for adhering to Eobert 
Curtois (or Shorthose), Duke of Normandy, that King's eldest 
brother. 

It soon after became the estate of Stephen, Earl of Bologne, af- 
terwards King Stephen, by grant from his uncle, King Henry I., 
and subsequently became vested in Henry, Duke of Lorraine ; who 
gave it to Godefrid de Warra, and it was confirmed to him in the 
10th of King John : at the same time the men of Laxfield, had 
eight score acres of arable land in the park of Dennington, the gift 
of the said Henry, and forty acres elsewhere, in the said park. 

In the early part of the reign of King Edward I., Sir John de 
Bovile died without issue, seized of this manor, with Badingham, 
Dallinghoo, Thorpe, Alderton, Greeting, Boulge, &c. ; and in the 
3rd of that reign, Joan de Bovile, probably his widow, and Maud 
de Hardichishall, held the same r in the 14th of that King, Philip 




HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 385 

do Heveningham died seized of Dennington ; and in the 25th, Ralph 
de Hardichishall had a grant of free warren in this parish, Bading- 
ham, &c. 

Sir John, the eldest son of Sir William de Bovile, and nephew of 
the above Sir John de Bovile, deceased towards the latter part of the 
above reign, without issue, seized of the said lordships ; which de- 
scended to William, the son of William de Bovile, his brother, who 
did homage in the 30th of Edward I., to that King, for his lands in 
Suffolk and Essex ; and in the 7th of the following reign, he granted 
the manors of Dennington and Badingham, with the advowson of 
those churches, to Richard de Wingfield, and Roger de Wingfield, 
for their lives. He deceased the 13th of King Edward II., 1320. 

By Joan his wife, the daughter of Sir James Creke, he left issue, 
three sons, John, William, and Joshua ; and a daughter, Margaret. 
John, the eldest, died without issue ; and Sir William de Bovile, the 
second son, inherited the paternal estates in Suffolk and Essex. 
He married Joan, the daughter of Sir Herbert Dalenson (or Dalizon) . 

Sir John de Bovile, their son and heir, married Petronel, the 
daughter and heir of Sir Robert Eckles, Kut., by whom he had an 
only daughter and heir, Margaret ; who married first, to Sir John 
Carbonel, Knt., and secondly, to Sir Thomas Wingfield, Knt. The 
Sir William Wingfield mentioned by Weever as lord of this manor, 
and patron of the church, where he was buried in 1398, was the 
youngest brother of the Sir Thomas Wingfield, above-named. That 
author also mentions a William Wingfield, Esq., buried here. He 
was son and heir of the above Sir William, and died without issue, 
in the 6th of King Henry V., 1418. Sir Robert Wingfield, who 
died in 1409, was also interred in this parish church. 

The family of Phelip became seated here in the time of King 
Richard II., if not earlier. William, son of Richard Phelip, of this 
parish, died in the 8th of the following reign, 1407 ; and William 
Phelip, Esq., sen., his son, succeeded. He married Julian, daugh- 
ter and co-heir of Sir Thomas Erpingham, K.G., by Joan his se- 
cond wife, the beautiful daughter of Sir William Clopton, of Wick- 
hambrook, in this county ; by whom he had issue, two daughters, 
and co-heirs. Catherine, the eldest, married Sir Andrew Boteler, 
Knt. : she lived to a great age, and deceased in 1460, was interred, 
by her husband, at Sudbury. Elizabeth, her sister, married John 
Clowtynge, Esq., of Laxfield. 

Sir John Phelip, Knt., of this parish, was son of John, a younger 



380 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

brother of the above-named Kicliard, and William, son of this Sir 
John Phelip, Knt., succeeded. In or before the 10th of King Henry 
IV., he married Joan, the youngest daughter and co-heir of Thomas, 
Lord Bardolf. 

Sir William was a valiant soldier under Henry V. ; and while at' 
tending the King in Normandy, was created a Knight of the most 
noble order of the Garter, at St. George's Feast, held by Humphry, 
Duke of Gloucester, the King's Lieutenant, and was installed by 
proxy : at the death of that victorious King, holding the office of 
Treasurer of his Majesty's Household, he had the chief management 
of the Eoyal funeral. 

In the 8th of the following reign, he was retained to serve the 
King in his wars in France, with 19 men at arms, and 60 archers, 
for one year ; and performed the service. In the 1 5th of the same 
reign, he founded a Chantry in this parish church, and the next year 
was appointed Lord Chamberlain of the King's Household, and had 
the title of Lord Bardolf. 

His will bears date the 1st of December, 1438, and a codicil to 
the same, the July following ; appointing by the former, that he 
should be buried with his ancestors before the altar of St. Margaret, 
in Dennington church ; and by the latter, that he should be buried 
in the churchyard there. He died on the 6th of June, the 19th of 
Henry VI. Joan, Lady Bardolf, his wife, survived until the 25th 
of the same reign. 

Her will was proved April 3, 1447 ; by which she bequeathed 
her body to be buried, wherever she might die, in the Chapel of St. 
Margaret, at Dennington. She assigns a purple gown, with small 
sleeves, to adorn the sepulchre of the Body of Christ, in the church 
of Dennington ; also she assigns to the Chantry of St. Margaret, 
at Dennington, a black bed, with eagles of tapestry work, &c. ; and 
she further wills that out of her rents, and goods, and chattels, her 
executors should buy lands, and tenements, to the value of twelve 
marks per annum, and give the same to the Master and Fellows of 
the Chantry, called Phelip's Chantry, in Dennington, in pure and 
perpetual alms, in augmentation of their revenues ; and to find a 
proper Chaplain, to pray for the souls of her said lord and husband, 
according to the ordinances and statutes of the said Chantry. 

In the 38th of King Henry VIII., the two Chantries, called Phe- 
lip's and Lady's Chantry, the capital messuage and mansion of Phe- 
lip's, two messuages and tenements, called Lion's and Book's, in 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 387 

Dennington, a close called Beccles Close, in Worlingworth, the 
closes called Salver's, in Brandeston, the manor of Glemhara Parva, 
and other lands, &c., in Dennington, Tannington, Badingham, 
Laxfield, and Brundish, also the advowson of the rectory and church 
of Glemham Parva, were granted to Sir Richard Fulmerston, and 
his heirs, of the King in capite, by the service of a fortieth part of 
a Knight's fee. 

Their only daughter and heiress, Elizabeth, married John, Lord 
Beaumont, Premier Viscount in England, and a great favourite with 
his Sovereign, who granted him for his continued services many pri- 
vileges. Wm. Lord Bardolf, devised this estate to Henry, eldest son 
of Viscount Beaumont, by Elizabeth his wife. He deceased in 1442, 
aged about 9 years ; and previous to the decease of Lady Bardolf, 
his grandmother ; at whose death William, his brother, succeeded. 

He adhered to the Lancastrian interest; was taken prisoner at the 
battle of Towton, in 1460 ; was attainted by Parliament the follow- 
ing year ; but on the accession of King Henry VII. to the Crown, 
was restored in blood. He deceased in 1507, without issue. His 
second wife, Elizabeth, survived, and re-married, John, Earl of Ox- 
ford. She held this estate in dower ; and Sir Richard Wingfield, 
Knt., in the 10th of King Henry VIII., had a grant of the reversion 
of the same, after the decease of the said Elizabeth. 

In the 17th of the same reign, Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, ac- 
knowledged that he held of the King in capite, the manor of Den- 
nington, and paid relief; and in the 34th, the said King, by letters 
patent, granted to Anthony Rous, Esq., the manor of this parish, 
with Brundish Tyes, in Cretingham, Clopton Hall, Ilketshall Bar- 
dolfs, and the advowson of Dennington church, to him and his heirs 
for ever. He died in or about 1553, and the lordship has continued 
in his house ever since ; John Edward Cornwallis Rous, 2nd Earl 
of Stradbroke, being the present proprietor. 

The ancestors of the noble Earl had been seated liere for many 
ages prior to the above grant, and derive from Peter le Rous, who 
married the daughter and heiress of John Hubbard, Esq., of this 
parish, and who appears to be the common ancestor of all the dif- 
ferent banches of this ancient and distinguished family, seated in di- 
vers places in this county. William, grandson of the above Peter 
le Rous, married Adelyne, daughter and heir of John Clowtynge, 
Esq., of Laxfield, by Elizabeth his wife, daughter and co-heir of 
William Phelip, sen., Esq., of Dennington. 



388 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

In the 37th of King Henry VIII., 1545, the above Anthony Rous, 
Esq. (then Sir Anthony), purchased Henham Hall, in Blithing hun- 
dred ; which soon after became the family residence, for in 1550, 
Thomas Bous, Esq., his eldest son and heir, is designated of Hen- 
ham Hall. 

Adam de Skaklethorp, rector of Cawston, in Norfolk, in 1348, 
and a Prebendary of Payne's Hall, in Lincoln diocese, was a very 
eminent and wealthy person, and a great benefactor towards the 
building of the south aisle of this parish church, and to the repair 
of the chapel and altar of St. Mary, at the east end of the north 
aisle, and St. Margaret's chapel and altar, at the east end of the 
south aisle here. He was buried in Cawston chancel, before the 
principal image of St. Agues. His will was proved in 1370. 

The Chantry founded by Sir William Phelip, Lord Bardolf, in 
the 15th of King Henry VI., was at St. Margaret's altar in this pa- 
rish church, for the good estate of himself, and Joan his wife, du- 
ring their lives, and for their souls after their decease ; as also for 
the souls of King Henry IV., and King Henry V., and all the faith- 
ful deceased. He appointed two Chaplains to officiate daily in the 
said Chantry, and endowed it with 20 per annum. In 1306, our 
Lady's Chantry in this church is mentioned, as of the annual value of 
about 9 ; this was at the altar of St. Mary, in the north aisle. 

He also gave to this church, after the decease of Joan his wife, a 
certain mass book, called a Gradual, a silver censer, and a legend 
for the souls of Sir John Phelip, Knt., his own, and his wife's souls; 
as also for the souls of all his friends, benefactors, and all the faithful. 
He and his lady were buried here ; the monument to their memory 
still remains, but the inscription is lost. The figures were not en- 
graved in " Cough's Sepulchral Monuments," but are described with 
tolerable minuteness. In " Kirby's Views," published in 1748, this 
description, and a view of the monument, also appears. Certain 
anonymous figures in " Stothard's Monumental Effigies," which A. 
I. Kempe, Esq., F.A.S., ascribes to William, Lord Bardolf, and his 
lady, who observes, " a more beautiful specimen of the military and 
female costume of the 15th century, than is afforded by this monu- 
ment, can hardly I think be found." 

In 1485, John Colet, Acolyte, aged 19 years, was instituted to 
this rectory, who was afterwards Doctor of Divinity, and Dean of 
St. Paul's, London; founder of the school there. Born in 1466, 
and deceased in 1519. Dr. Colet, in 1508, occurs Chaplain of the 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 38if 

free chapel of St. Margaret, at Hilburgh, in Norfolk. The income 
of this chapel is then said to bo 30 per annum, as appears from a 
rental of the Dean's estate, spiritual and temporal ; which was a very 
considerable sum in that age, and almost equalled that great living 
(as Dr. Knight, in his life of the Dean, calls it) of Dennington, 
which is there said to be 3 1 per annum. 

Eobert Wrighte, B.D., who was rector of this parish for thirty 
four years, was second son of John Wrighte, of Wrighte's Bridge, 
in Essex. He married Jane, daughter of John Butler, Esq., of 
Sheby, in the said county ; and by her had issue four sons. Mr. 
Wrighte deceased in 1624, and was buried here. Euseby, Barrister 
at Law, liis eldest son, was thrice married, but deceased without issue. 

2nd. Nathan Wrighte, a Merchant and Alderman of London, 
who purchased the manor of Cranham Hall, in Essex, whose son 
Benjamin Wrighte, of Cranham Hall, was created a Baronet in 1660. 

3rd. Sir Benjamin Wrighte, of Dennington, a Merchant of Lon- 
don, who died in Spain, leaving an only daughter. 

4th. Ezekiel Wrighte, D.D., rector of Thurcaston, who married 
Dorothy, second daughter of John Onebye, Esq., and co-heir of her 
brother, Sir John Onebye ; by whom he left at his decease, in 1688, 
a son and successor, the celebrated Sir Nathan Wrighte, who suc- 
ceeded Lord Somers in the custody of the Great Seal, as Lord 
Keeper, and continued in that elevated office until 1705, when, 
through the intrigues of the Dutchess of Marlborough, he received 
his dismissal. 

Lionel Gatford was instituted in 1642, and in 1645, the living 
became sequestered; and his successor, on the sequestration, was 
one Job Holmsted, an Irishman, and a very mean person, compared 
with Mr. Gatford. He made havoc on the glebe, sold as much 
wood and timber from it as came to 300 ; notwithstanding, he died 
so poor, that his daughter became the greatest charge to the parish 
which hath been known in it for many years. 

The advowson of this rectory was sold by Sir John Kous, 6th 
Bart., to Beeston Long, Esq., in 1776. The present patron is Ed- 
ward Daniel Alston, Esq., of Palgrave, in Suffolk, by purchase, in 
1841 : the Hon. Frederick Hotham, A.M., Prebendary of Kochester, 
was instituted to this living in 1808, and is the present incumbent. 

ARMS. Bovile (see p. 118). Phelip: quarterly; gules and ar- 
gent ; in the first quarter, an eagle, displayed, or. Bardolf: azure ; 
three cinquefoils, or. Rous: sable; a fess dancettee, or, between 



390 HUNDRED OF 1IOXNE. 

three crescents, argent. Wrighte : azure ; two bars, argent, ; in 
chief, three leopards' faces, or. 

Mem. Not far from Frostly Bridge, in this parish, a few years 
since, some human skeletons were discovered, in digging for gravel ; 
and Mr. Edward Dunthome has in his possession two very ancient 
iron spurs, a kind of halbert, and a barbed instrument, which were 
turned up by the plough in a field near the bridge. 

CHARITIES. The property here, called the Town Lands, com- 
prises the lands called Cannon's and Cobald's, containing HA. 21p., 
which appears to have been vested in feoffees previous to the year 
1483 : the rent, about ,14 a year, is employed in the necessary re- 
pairs of the parish church, and in occasionally binding out poor chil- 
dren, with such other employments for the benefit of the parish, as 
the trustees, or the major part of them, deem expedient. The name 
of the donor is not known. A workhouse and cottage, and 14A. 
%n. %P. of land, called Golding's, and Sowgate's, conveyed to trustees 
in 1606 ; annual rent about 21 ; expended in the purchase of coals, 
and distributed to the poor at a reduced price. Certain premises, 
called the Queen's Head, used as a public house, abutting south on 
the church, with 3R. 4p. of land, which appears to have been pur- 
chased by the parish, probably in part with some old benefactions 
for the poor. The rent, 20 a year, is applied for ordinary repairs, 
and in payment of the interest, and the gradual liquidation of a debt, 
incurred for repairing, and improvements of those premises. Three 
pieces of land in Kettleburgh, containing 7A. HP., were purchased 
with 102, the gift of Nathan Wrighte, Esq., and they were con- 
veyed to trustees in 1657 : rent Q 9s. a year, the whole of which 
is applied in apprenticing poor children. A close of copyhold land 
in Framlingham, called Pitman's Grove, containing 3 A. 34p., was 
purchased with 50, given by Kobert Wrighte, and Nathan Wrighte, 
to the intent that bread and clothing should be distributed to the 
poor. This land is let at 9 a year, and the rents are laid out in 
the purchase of coals, which are sold to the poor at reduced prices. 
In 1 688, John Paul gave to this parish, and Laxfield, lands in 
Cratfield, to the use of the poor people of the said towns ; the rents 
to be laid out in bread, and cloth for coats, for poor, aged, or im- 
potent men, yearly, at Christmas ; which is applied accordingly. 
The Bell Acre land produces a rent charge of 10s. annually; and 
5 a year is received from Warner's Charity, at Boyton ; and Mill's 
Charity, at Framlingham, supply five shillings worth of bread quar- 



HUNDRED OF 1IOXNE. 391 

terly ; which is distributed among poor people of Dcnnington, at 
the church. 



FKESSINGFIELD. 

In the year 1300, Edmund, Earl of Cornwall, grandson of King 
John, and lord of the Honor of Eye, died seized of fees in this pa- 
rish, Wingfield, &c., belonging to the manor of Eye, afterwards held 
therewith by the De la Poles. A manor in Fressingfield was also 
held by the Wingfields, and De la Poles, of which Alienor, wife of 
Sir John Wingfield, died seized in the 49th of Edward III. ; Michael 
De la Pole, the 13th of Richard II. ; and William, Duke of Suffolk, 
the 28th of Henry VI. 

William de Veel had Bortreming, in Fressingfield, in the time of 
Edward I. The manors of Veal's, in this parish, and Syleham, were 
granted to Henry Jerningham, the 1st of Edward VI. The manor, 
with the mansion of Veal's Hall, and demesne, lately belonged to 
Mr. Thomas Etheridge, and are now the property of the Rev. Au- 
gustus Cooper. * 

The manor of Fressingfield Hall (or rather the demesne, for it 
is supposed that no manor is existing) was part of the estate of 
William Bancroft, Esq., and afterward of his daughter, Elizabeth, 
the wife of John Wogon, Esq., and Catherine Sancroft, her sister. 
It was subsequently purchased by the Rev. Gervas Holmes, in whose 
descendant it is still vested. 

Ufford Hall manor derived its name from Robert de Ufford, who 
was lord there in the 3rd of King Edward I. It is situate in that 
part of the parish formerly the hamlet of Chepenhall, and is subor- 
dinate to that manor. In the reign of Edward I., Adam, son of Sir 
Roger le Bevant, Knt., granted and confirmed, by deed without date, 
to Henry, son of William de Sandcroft, and Margery his wife, and 
the heirs of the said Henry, a certain messuage, together with his 
houses, and buildings, in the parish of Fressingfield, in the hamlet 
of Chepenhall, with all his lands and tenements in the parish of 
Fressingfield, or in Stradbrook. From this Henry, the manor and 
demesnes of Ufford Hall descended, through Francis Sancroft, the 
father, and Thomas, the elder brother of the pious and patriotic 
Archbishop, to Francis Sancroft, Esq., who in 1695, also purchased 
the- manor of Chcvenhall (alias Chepenhall). 



392 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

The hamlet of Chepenhall, with a moiety of the church of Fres- 
singfield, belonged to the Monastery of St. Edmund's, Bury ; and 
ahout the year 1200, this manor, with those of Mildenhall and 
Southwold, were annexed to the office of Cellarer. In the 24th of 
King Edward I., it was held hy William de Chepenhale, and Ed- 
ward de Chepenhale. In the 12th of Henry IV., Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of John Winter, Esq., of Town Bemingham, in Norfolk, and 
Knight of the Shire for that county in 1409, by Elizabeth his wife, 
daughter and co-heir of William de Hetherset, released to Simon 
de Felbrigge all her right in the manor of Chepenhall, and lands in 
Fressingfield, formerly Sir Walkeline de Herteshale's. Katherine de 
Brewse, deceased the 3rd of Kichard II., seized of half a fee in Che- 
venhale, and Eressingfield. 

By letters patent, dated 23rd Sept., the 37th of Henry VEIL, the 
manor of Chepenhall was granted to Anthony Kous, Esq. ; and in 
the 10th of Queen Elizabeth, Nicholas Barber was lord: in 1690, 
William Barber held the same. In 1695, Francis Sancroft, Esq., 
was owner thereof, and upon his decease, William Sancroft, his son, 
succeeded ; after whose death, the manors of Ufford and Chepenhall 
were both enjoyed by Catherine, his widow, for life; and upon her 
decease, they passed to his daughters, Elizabeth and Catherine. 
John Wogan, Esq., the husband of Elizabeth, purchased Catherine's 
moiety, but after the death of John and Elizabeth Wogan, the pro- 
perty was all sold. 

The manor, mansion, and demesne lands of Ufford Hall, were 
purchased by Sir John Major, Bart., and are now the estate of Lord 
Henniker. The manor, mansion, and demesne lands of Chepenhall, 
were purchased by Mr. Thomas Etheridge ; who in 1827, sold them 
to Alexander Adair, Esq., of Flixton Hall. The residue of the Sand- 
croft* estates was sold to the Eev. Gervas Holmes, clerk, of Gawdy 
Hall, in Redenhall, one of the co -heirs of the family, and other pur- 
chasers. William Sancroft Holmes, Esq., of Gawdy Hall, is now 
the owner of Fressingfield Hall, and several farms. 

Witlingham manor was held in the 3rd of Edward I., by Richard 
de Brews, second son of Sir William de Brews and Maud his wife ; 
whose lineal descendant, William Brews, Esq., deceased in 1489, 
seized of this estate. By the marriage of Thomasyne, one of his 
daughters and co-heirs, with Sir Thomas Hansard, the manor of 

* For Bancroft's pedigree see Doyly's Life of the Archbishop, and the " Gentle- 
man's Magazine," for 1841, part ii., p. 23. 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 393 

Witlingham cum Wakclycrs, as it is styled; came to that family ; 
and thence, successively, to the Berners, Bakers, Hanmers, and 
Bunburys. Thomas Baker, Esq., who served the office of High 
Sheriff for Suffolk in 1 657, resided at Witlingham Hall. Elizabeth, 
his sister and heiress, married Sir Thomas Hanmer, Bart., to whom 
she brought this estate ; from whom it passed, by marriage, to the 
Bunbury family, and so continued till 183G, when it was sold by 
Sir Henry Edward Bunbury, the present Baronet, to Henry Newton 
Neale, Esq., the present possessor. 

The manor of Shelton Hall, in Stradbroke, extends into this parish. 
One moiety of this parish church in the time of Kichard I., be- 
longed to the Abbey of St. Edmund's, Bury ; the other moiety to 
the Thorpes, lords of Horham, &c. Both moieties were eventually 
appropriated to the College of St. Mary in the Fields, at Norwich ; 
the possessions of which, including the rectory of Fressingfield, and 
advowson of the vicarage, were granted by the said Abbey, to Miles 
Spencer, the last Dean. The impropriation afterwards came, by 
purchase, into the hands of the owners of the Witlingham estate, 
who take the great tithes. 

The advowson of the vicarage was purchased by Archbishop San- 
croft, and annexed to Emmanuel College, Cambridge. He also 
purchased, and endowed the vicarage, with certain fee farm rents, 
of the value of about 52 per annum ; making a reservation of 16 
per annum for the salary of the schoolmaster and parish clerk ; the 
greater part of which is payable out of the manors and demesne of 
the dissolved Priory of Mendham. 

In the 6th of King Edward II., Eobert, son of John Prykke, of 
this parish, had a grant of the advowson of the church of Titleshale, 
in Norfolk, from Sir Philip de Verley ; and in 1328, Kobert Prykke 
presented to that church. In 1332, Eobert Prykke, of this parish, 
was rector of Titleshale, presented by Ralph, rector of Thornton 
Pilcock, and Eichard, rector of Euston. By a subsequent deed, he 
revokes the former one of this advowson, and grants it to Symon 
Prykke, his grandson ; which Symon, in the 7th of Henry III., 
conveyed to Eobert, son of Henry Bole, of Euston ; and Bole, to 
Sir John de Norwood, parson of Icklingham All Saints, and William, 
his nephew, called also Eoger Peche. 

The family of Bohun were resident here during the 16th century. 
John Bohun married Ales, daughter and heir of Eobert Dalinghoo, 
of this parish ; whose son Nicholas Bohun, of Fressingfield, married 



394 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

Elizabeth, daughter of - Harvey, of Stradbrook, and Nicholas 
their son, resided here, and married Elizabeth, daughter of 
Debden, of Brampton ; whose son, Nicholas, was of Chelmondiston. 
A Nicholas Bohun, of Fressingfield, was buried at Taseburgh, in 
Norfolk, in 1572. 

In this village that eminent Primate, William Sancroft, Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury, drew his first and last breath ; and lies buried 
under a handsome table monument in this church-yard. He was 
born in 1616, and received the early part of his education at the 
Grammar School, in St. Edmund's, Bury ; whence he was removed 
to Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where he obtained a Fellowship, 
which he lost on account of his loyalty, in 1649. After the resto- 
ration he became Chaplain to the Bishop of Durham, who presented 
him to the valuable living of Houghton le Spring, and a Prebend in 
his Cathedral. In 1664, he was made Dean of York, from whence 
he removed to the Deanery of St. Paul's ; towards the rebuilding of 
which Cathedral he contributed 1,400. In 1677, he was raised to 
the highest station in the church, where he conducted himself with 
zeal and judgment. He was one of the seven Bishops sent to the 
Tower by King James II. ; but at the revolution he scrupled taking 
the oaths, for which he was deprived of his seat. He afterwards led 
a private and devout life in this parish ; where he deceased, in 1693, 
unmarried. His manuscripts were purchased by Bishop Tanner, 
who presented them to the Bodleian Library, at Oxford. He pub- 
lished a curious little dialogue in Latin, against Galvanism, called 
" The Predestinated Thief," also " Modern Politics," taken from 
Machiavel, &c., and some Sermons. 

ARMS. Sancroft: argent; on a fess, between three crosses 
patee, gules, as many martlets of the field. Hansard : gules ; 
three martlets, 2 and 1, argent. Baker: azure; on a fess, between 
three swans' heads erased, or, ducally gorged, gules, as many cinque- 
foils of the last. 

In 1808, died the Eev. Sir Henry Pix Heyman, Bart., vicar of 
this parish, and Withersdale. He was formerly Fellow of Emmanuel 
College, Cambridge, where he proceeded A.B. in 1784, A.M. 1787, 
and B.D. 1794. He succeeded to the title on the death of his cou- 
sin, Sir Peter Heyman, Bart., in 1790; being the last surviving 
male heir of a family of some note, once possessed of considerable 
estates in the county of Kent, long since alienated. Sir Henry was 
a man of modest and unassuming manners, highly esteemed by 



HUNDRED OF IIOXNE. 39~> 

those who knew him, and sincerely regretted by his parishioners, 
amongst whom ho discharged, in the most conscientious manner, 
the duties of his office. In him the Baronetcy hecame extinct. 

The Rev. Samuel Vince, M.A., F.R.S., Plumian Professor of 
Astronomy and Experimental Philosophy, in the University of Cam- 
bridge, Archdeacon of Bedford, rector of Kirby Bedon, and vicar of 
South Creak, in Norfolk, was a native of this parish, of humble pa- 
rentage, but early evinced a strong predilection and aptitude for ma- 
thematical studios ; this natural bent of his mind was perceived, en" 
couraged, and directed, by the late Mr. Tilney, of Harleston, and 
ultimately by him, brought under the notice of more opulent patrons; 
by whose kindness Mr. Vince was afterwards enabled to pursue his 
favourite science, in the University of Cambridge. 

He was originally a member of Caius College; where, in 1775, 
he obtained one of Smith's prizes, as a proficient in mathematics ; 
the same year he was Senior Wrangler, and took the degree of A.B., 
after which he became a Fellow of Sidney College ; in 1796, he was 
elected Plumian Professor ; the lectures, which are wholly experi- 
mental, comprise mechanics, hydrostatics, optics, astronomy, magne- 
tism, and electricity. Mr. Vince inserted several valuable papers in 
different volumes of the Philosophical Transactions, and published 
separately many scientific and theological works. He deceased Nov. 
88, 1821, at Ramsgate. 

CHARITIES. A messuage, called the Guildhall, with a piece of 
land, containing about one acre, adjoining, and a close called the 
Town Close, containing 7A. IR. 32P., which were conveyed by 
William Sancroft, in 1704, for the benefit of the parishioners of 
Fressingfield. The upper room in the Guildhall is used as a school 
room) and the lower part of the building, as a public house, and 
is let, with the said land, at 25 per annum ; which is applied, 
after deducting expenses for repairs, in the reparation and ornament 
of the parish church, in lieu of a church rate. Three tenements, 
with a yard adjoining, given by Edward Bohun, in the 13th of King 
Henry VII., for the residence of poor persons, rent free. An an- 
nuity, of 3 17s., which passes under the name of "My Lord's 
Dole," is laid out, with a voluntary addition usually made thereto 
by Lord Henniker, in bread, which is distributed at Christmas among 
poor persons. In 1722, the Rev. John Shepheard, by will, gave to 
his successors in this vicarage 20, to be laid out in the purchase of 
rent charge of 20s. a year, to be bestowed in the purchase of four 



300 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

Bibles, in English, bound up together with the Common Prayer 
Book, which he desired should be distributed in this parish church, 
yearly, on Good Friday, after Divine Service, to four such lads as 
should then and there give the best account of the Catechism of the 
Church of England, and of the Hymns, Besponses, and Creeds, 
used in the service of the church. This sum has not been laid out, 
but remains in the hands of the Kev. John Holmes, of Gawdy Hall, 
vicar of Fressingficld, and he provides Bibles, to the cost of more 
than 20s. a year. 



HOKHAM. HORAM, or HORAN. 

The ancient and Knightly family of Jernegan became very early 
seated here, hence called Horham Jernegan. The first upon record 
who settled here, in the reign of King Stephen and Henry, is men- 
tioned in the Castle Acre register, as witness to a deed, without date, 
by which Bryan, son of Scolland, confirmed the church of Melsombi 
to the monks of Castle Acre. He deceased about the year 1182. 

Sir Hugh (or Hubert), Fitz Jernegan, Knt., his son, succeeded. 
In 1182, he paid a considerable sum of money into the Exchequer, 
as a gift to King Henry II. ; and was witness to a deed, in 1195, 
by which divers lands were granted to Byland Abbey, in Yorkshire. 
He married Maud, the daughter and co-heiress of Thorpine, son of 
Kobert de Watheby ; in whose right he inherited the manor of Wathe, 
in North Cove. He died in 1203, and was succeeded by his son, 
Sir Hubert Jernegan, Knt. 

He aided the Barons against King John, by which he forfeited a 
considerable part of his estate : on the accession of Henry III., he 
submitted himself, and obtained his pardon ; but it appears, did not 
recover the whole of his forfeited property. Sir Hubert married 
Margery, the daughter and heiress of Sir Kobert de Herling, of East 
Herling, in Norfolk, Knt. ; by whom he had issue four sons, God- 
frey, William, Eobert, and Hugh ; and of whom Sir William suc- 
ceeded his father, who died probably about the year 1239, for in 
1240, Margery his wife, sued Hugh Jernegan her son, for lands in 
Stonham Jernegan, in this county. 

In 1243, Sir Hugh came to an agreement with his mother, and 
settled upon her, in lieu of her dower, during her life, the capital 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 397 

messuage of the manor of Horham Jernegan, with the park, wind- 
mill, and demesne lands, and the services and rents of Horham ma- 
nor, with house-bote, hey-bote, and pannage ; in consideration of 
which she released all her right in dower in two carucates of land, 
and a messuage in Stonham Jernegan, and in all her husband's other 
estates, in Norfolk and Suffolk. 

The last of this family resident here, was Hubert Jernegan, who 
died in 1239 : his son, Sir Hugh, made Stonham the chief residence 
of the family, which then received the name of Stonham Jernegan. 
Sir Peter Jernegan, in the reign of Edward III., again removed, 
making Somerleyton his principal seat, which he inherited through 
his mother, who was the heiress of the Baron Fitz Osbert. The 
Shermans appear subsequently to have held the Horham estate. 

In the 3rd of Edward I., William de Huntingfield held at Hor- 
ham, and died in the llth of that reign. William de Huntingfield, 
his grandson, died seized of the village and manor of Horham, the 
7th of Edward II., together with the manors of Mendham and Hun- 
tingfield; leaving Koger de Huntingfield, his son, then aged 7 years ; 
and Sir Walter de Norwich, Knt, of Mettingham Castle, who had 
purchased his wardship, married him to his daughter, Cecilia. He 
died seized, the 1 1th of Edward III., leaving William his son and 
heir, aged 7^- years. This last William, Lord Huntingfield, died 
without surviving male issue, in the 50th of Edward III. ; where- 
upon Sir John de Copeldike inherited the manor of Horham, as his 
kinsman and next heir ; but how does not appear. 

Horham Bradocks, late Copledike manor, was vested in a family 
of that name in the time of King Henry VIII. Leonard Copledike, 
Esq., second son of Sir John Copledike, of Frampton, in Lincoln- 
shire, and Horham, in Suffolk, married Mary, daughter of Simon 

Eichmond, of Stradbrook, and relict of Bradock ; in whose 

right he inherited this lordship. He had issue by this marriage, and 
married, secondly, Thomasine, eldest daughter and co-heir of Thomas 
Gavel, Esq., of Kirby Cane, in Norfolk ; by whom he had a son 
and heir, John Copledike, Esq. On the death of this Leonard, she 
re-married Edward Calthorpe, Esq. ; upon whose decease the said 
John inherited the lordship and advowson of Kirby Cane, aforesaid, 
and removed thither ; where he died, and was buried, in 1 593, leaving 
Thomasine, his daughter and sole heir. 

These manors, with Horharn Comitis (or Earl's manor), in 1764, 
belonged to the Earl of Leicester ; of whom they were purchased 



898 HUNDRED OF IIOXNE. 

by Sir Joshua Vanneck, Bart., together with all the other estates of 
the Coke family in this part of Suffolk. This estate now belongs 
to Alexander Donovan, Esq., of Framfield Park, in Sussex, who 
married Caroline, youngest daughter of Joshua, 1st Baron Hun- 
tingfield. 

The manor called Horham Thorpe Hall, with Wotton, lies prin- 
cipally here, and in Stradbrook, and Hoxne. It was in the family 
of Thorpe, of Ashwell Thorp, in Norfolk. Eobert Fitz John de 
Thorp, Baron of the Exchequer, in the time of Henry III., married 
Maud, niece to Kichard de Eye, rector of Fundenhall, in Norfolk ; 
who released to them all his right after the death of Sir Philip de 
Eye, his brother, in his manors and lands in Horham, Wytton, 
Hoxne, Stradbrook, &c. ; and Sarah de Sulun, Eichard, son of James 
Suddimere, nephew of Eichard de Eye, and Philip de Braseworth, 
released all their rights in Horham, Fressingfield, &c. He was 
Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk in 1274, and in 1292, Chief Justice 
of the Common Pleas. In 1282, he had charter for free warren in 
his manors of Horham, Hoxne, Wytton, and Stradbrook, and de- 
ceased in 1293. 

John de Thorpe, son of Sir Eobert, settled these manors, and the 
moiety of the church of Fressingfield, on Alice, his 2nd wife, pre- 
vious to 1314, and died in 1323. Eobert Fitz John de Thorp, their 
eldest son, died seized of Horham and Hoxne manors, in the 4th of 
Edward III.; and John, son of Eobert, held at his death, the 14th of 
that King, half the manor of Horham, as of the honour of Eye, and 
rents in Hoxne, Wotton, &c. He, dying without issue, was suc- 
ceeded by his brother, Edmund de Thorpe ; who married Joan, 
daughter of Eobert Baynard, and in 1380, made a settlement of 
these manors, and died in 1393. Joan, his widow, held them for 
her life; and on her death, in 1399, Sir Edmund de Thorpe, their 
eldest son, succeeded to the reversion of Horham cum Stradbrook, 
Wotton, and other manors, which were held for life by his brother 
Eobert. 

Tlus Sir Edmund was killed in Normandy, and left by his wife, 
Joan, Lady Scales, two daughters, his co-heiresses ; the elder, Joan, 
married to Sir Eobert Echingham, Knt., and after, to Sir John Clif- 
ton, Knt. ; and Isabel, married to Philip Tilney, of Boston, Esq. ; 
in whom, on failure of issue of Joan, the estate vested. From Fred- 
erick Tilncy, Esq., their eldest son, they came, through his only 
daughter and heir, Elizabeth (married to Sir Humphrey BoucMer, 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 309 

Knt., and afterwards to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk), to Sir John 
Bouchicr, Lord Berners ; whoso daughter and sole heir, married 
Edmund Knevett, Esq., 2nd son of Edmund Knevett, of Buckenham 
Castle, in Norfolk ; who in her right, had livery of the manor of 
Horham Thorpe Hall, and many others in Norfolk and Suffolk, in 
the 25th of Henry VIII. 

He died in 1546, having settled these manors on the marriage of 
his eldest son, in 1537, with Agnes, daughter of Sir John Harcourt. 
John Knevett died in his mother's life time, leaving Agnes, his wi- 
dow, who died in 1579. Sir Thomas Knevett, of Ashwell Thorp, 
Knt., eldest son of John, sold them. The mansion of Thorp Hall 
(now a farm house), and demesnes, are the property of the above 
Alexander Donovan, Esq. The advowson of the rectory is in the 
Kev. William B. Mack, the present rector. 

ARMS. Huntingfield : or ; on a fess, gules, three plates. Co- 
pledike : argent ; a chevron between three cross crosslets, gules. 

CHARITIES. A piece of land, containing about 4 acres, in the 
parish of Debenham, as to which no deeds or writings exist, let at 
the annual rent of 7 ; and the rents are carried, agreeable to cus- 
tom, to the general account of the overseers of the poor. The fol- 
lowing doles are paid to the churchwardens, and laid out in bread, 
which is distributed among poor persons at Christmas : the yearly 
sum of 10s., given by the will of Richmond Girling, who died in 
1658, charged on land in Stradbrook; the annual payment of 6s. 
8d., given by the will of the Eev. John Clubbe, who died in 1693, 
charged on land in Horham ; the yearly sum of 40s., given by the 
will of Lewis Hynton, who died in 1706, charged on land in the 
same parish, and paid, after a deduction of 6s. on account of land- 
tax, by Mr. Uriah Bolton, the owner and occupier. 



HOXNE. HOXON, HEGLESDUNE, or ECCLESTON. 

In 870, Inguar, a Danish chieftain, gained possession of Thetford, 
the capital of East Anglia ; \vhen King Edmund collected his forces, 
and marched to oppose the invaders. The hostile armies met near 
Thetford, and after an engagement, maintained for a whole .day with 
the most determined courage, and great slaughter on both sides, 
victory remained undecided, The pious King, was so affected by 



400 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

the death of so many martyrs, and the miserable end of so many in- 
fidels, that he retired in the night to this village. 

Hither he was followed by an embassy from Inguar, who proposed 
that Edmund should become his vassal ; the King returned for an- 
swer, that he would never submit to a pagan, but at the same time, 
out of tenderness for his subjects, he resolved to make no further 
resistance, and accordingly surrendered. Still, however, refusing to 
comply with the terms of Inguar, he was bound to a tree, his body 
was pierced with arrows, and his head severed therefrom, and thrown 
contemptuously into the thickest part of a neighbouring wood. 

Over the grave of the unfortunate King and martyr, a small 
church or chapel was raised, and dedicated to his name ; and here 
the body of this saint is said to have remained for the period of thirty 
years, when it was removed to its more splendid receptacle at Bury, 
A.D. 903. It was a rude structure, composed of trees sawed down 
the middle, and fixed in the ground, having the interstices filled with 
mud or mortar, similar to the ancient church of Greensted, in Essex. 

About the year 1101, Bishop Herbert gave this parish church, 
as also the chapel above-named, to his Priory at Norwich ; and it 
was appropriated as a Cell to that Monastery. Ralph, the Dapifer, 
rebuilt the Convent from the ground, soon after the Conquest. In 
the year 1130, Maurice de Windsor, and Egidia his wife, gave the 
chapel of St. Edmund to the house which Ralph the Dapifer had 
new built ; that therein might be placed a Convent of monks, to pray 
for the soul of the said Ralph. 

The reception for the monks was not completed until about 1226, 
when Bishop Blumville, removed the monks from the Palace at 
Hoxne, and fixed them in their Cell or Monastery there ; and in 
1267, Bishop Roger de Skerning consecrated the burial ground of 
their conventual church of St. Edmund. Their endowment was then 
very small, for in 1291, the temporalities were only estimated at 14s. 
llfd., in three parishes. Blomefield makes their clear revenues 
about a40 ; who says the monks kept a school at this Monastery, 
and that they taught and supported two poor children of this parish. 
Speed and Tanner, makes the valuation, 38th of Henry VIII., only 
18 Is. O^d. The oblations at the image and chapel of St. Robert 
here, were returned at 13s. 7d., in 1534. 

In 1546, it was granted to Sir Richard Gresham, Knt. ; when 
the endowment consisted of a manor, in Yaxley, and lands and rents 
in this parish, Denham, Thrandeston, and Horham : the chapel of 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 401 

Ringshall, with tithes, and 32 acres of land there, and tithes in Ho- 
mersfield. Here was a Prior, and seven or eight monks from Nor- 
wich : the former was nominated, and removable, by the Priors of 
Norwich, who visited this cell annually. 

The site of the Priory and estate afterwards come to the family of 
Thurston, who had their residence there in the time of Queen Eli- 
zabeth, and were a family of good repute ; they became allied in 
marriage with divers respectable families in this and the adjoining 
counties. It is now a form house, and the estate of Sir Edward 
Kerrison, Bart. 

The mention of a more ancient religious house, in the Saxon 
times, occurs in the will of Theodred, Bishop of London and 
Elmhom; wherein he bequeaths lands at Horham, &c., to the 
minister, or church, of St. ^Ethelbright, here, about the year 950. 
This early religious house was probably demolished, or deserted ; 
nothing further respecting it having yet occurred. 

It is to be observed that the above Cell was distinct from the 
possessions of the Bishop of Norwich, in this parish. To the latter 
belonged the Episcopal Palace, the manor, the rectory,* and the 
advowson of the vicarage, with various lands: the valuation of 
which in 1534, amounted to 92 19s. ; which formed part of the 
ancient revenues of the see, but became severed from it in the 27th 
of King Henry VHL, and were vested in that King's hands in 1535, 
who granted the same to Sir Kobert Southwell, Knt. 

Sir John Prescot, Knt., High Sheriff of this county in 1627, 
when he resided here, was lord and patron in 1656. Kobert Style, 
Gent., a younger brother of Sir Humphrey Style, Knt., built the 
Hall here, in 1654 ; his estate worth about 800 per annum. 

It subsequently became the inheritance of Thomas Maynard, 
Esq., who devised the same to Charles, afterwards Lord Maynard ; 
from whom it passed to Thomas Hesilrigge, Esq., who took the 
name and arms of Maynard, but on succeeding to the Baronetcy, 
resumed the name of Hesilrigge. On his death, without issue, in 
1817, the estate reverted to the Viscount Maynard, who sold the 
same to Matthias Kerrison, Esq., of Bungay; whose son, Lieut. 
General Sir Edward Kerrison, Bart., has rebuilt the mansion for- 
merly called Hoxne Hall, upon a larger scale, and more splendid 
style, and made it his residence, under the name of Oakley Park ; 

* By which it appears that Bishop Herbert's gift of the same was not confirmed 
to the monks of Hoxne. 



402 HUNDRED OF IIOXNE. 

the greater part of the park being in the parish of Oakley. The 
General, who is only son of Matthias Kerrison, Esq., was created a 
Baronet, Aug. 8, 1821 ; and is Kecorder and representative in Par- 
liament of Eye, in Suffolk. 

In 1676, Bishop Reynolds endowed the vicarage with 10 per 
annum, payable out of the great tithes. 

In 1835, on clearing the walls of this parish church, several paint- 
ings, partially obliterated, were discovered. One, represented David 
on the field of battle with Goliah, the next was supposed to be Paul 
confined in the Stocks, also the Crucifixion, and the Resurrection 
of the dead, &c. They were about ten feet high, and twelve feet 
wide. There were also several inscriptions, which no one present at 
the time of the discovery could decypher, although quite perfect. 

Bale makes Herbert Losing, the first Bishop of Norwich, to be a 
native of this county : who says, " In pago Oxunensi in Sudovolgia 
Anglorum comitatu natus :" and Fuller observes, that " on perusing 
of all the lists of towns in Suffolk, no Oxun appeareth therein, or 
name neighbouring thereon in sound and syllables," and conceives 
this to be the cause why Bishop Godwin so confidently makes this 
Herbert born in Oxford, in which the former writer has placed his 
character.* 

Nicholas Thurkell (alias Attleburgh), monk of Norwich, and the 
last Prior of the Cell at Hoxne, was made Prebendary of the 5th 
Prebend in Norwich Cathedral, by the charter, in 1538; but re- 
signed very soon, and was divorced from Jane West his wife, and 
suspended from the vicarage of Wigenhall St. Mary, for being a 
married priest. 

Thomas Sayer, a native of Norfolk, was admitted of Corpus 
Christi College, Cambridge, in the year 1583 ; and, after taking the 
degree of A.B., was elected Fellow, in 1589 ; and commenced A.M. 
the following year. He continued in his Fellowship till 1596, when 
he became vicar of this parish, where he continued 48 years ; when 
he was sequestered. Mr Sayer had then a wife and four children, 
all of them married, with an estate of fifty pounds per annum, but 
whether that was sequestered or not is uncertain. He died soon 
after, and was succeeded in this vicarage by Oliver Hall, in 1645; 
who had been a member of the same College. 

* Dr. Nuttall, the editor of " Fuller's Worthies," supposes the Doctor did not 
recollect the parish of Hoxne, in this county. But it appears the place of his 
birth still remains uncertain. 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 403 

Edward Willnn, vicar of this parish in 1651, was a native of 
Suffolk, and probably the son of Dr. Robert Willan, rector of He- 
ringswell and Stoke Ash, in thr.t county ; he was admitted scholar 
of Corpus Clirisli College, Cambridge, upon Sir Nicholas Bacon's 
foundation, in 1030 ; and after taking his A.B. degree, was or- 
dained Deacon, by the Bishop of Norwich, in 1635 ; having pro- 
ceeded A.M. the year before. 

Mr. Willan published six sonnons when he was vicar here, in 4to. ; 
also a Sermon at the Election of Burgesses, and another on the 
Crucifixion, both in 4to. London, 1661. 

ARMS. Thurston : sable ; three bugle horns, or, stringed, azure. 
Maynard : argent ; a chevron, azure, between three sinister hands, 
couped at the wrist, gules. Hesilrigge : argent; a chevron, be- 
tween three hazel leaves, proper. Kerrisoti : or ; a pile, azure, 
charged with three galtraps of the field. 

CHARITIES. There are certain fee farm rents, amounting in the 
whole to 5 3s. Gd. a year, payable in respect of sundry parcels of 
land in this parish ; which are received by the churchwardens, on 
Hallowmas, or All Saints' Day, and are applied for the reparation 
and service of the church. The town estate is vested in trustees, 
and is copyhold of the manor of Hoxne Hall. Port of it, consisting 
of some cottages, and about 4 acres of land, was purchased by the 
parishioners. Of the acquisition of the remainder no account can 
be given. It consists of a barn, and 42 acres of land, in Hoxue, 
let at 52 a year; seven acres of land in ditto, rent 15 a year ; 
houses and cottages in ditto, let at rents amounting together to 
about 14 per annum. The rents, after payment of necessary out- 
goings, are applied towards payment of the expenses of the church- 
wardens' office, in payment of the bell ringers, in occasional appren- 
ticing of children, relieving poor people in urgent need, and other 
general purposes for the benefit of the parish : an account of the 
receipt and application is exhibited yearly, at a town meeting. 
Thomas Maynard, by will dated in 1734, devises his real estate in 
this parish, to Charles Maynard, afterwards Charles, Lord Maynard, 
upon trust, that ho should lay out a sum, not exceeding 300, nor 
less than 200, upon a convenient house, for a schoolmaster and 
schoolmistress, to reside and keep school at Hoxne ; and he declared 
that such house should be kept in repair by the said Charles, Lord 
Maynard, Ms heirs and assigns ; and that he should appoint a good 
schoolmaster and schoolmistress, to reside and keep school in such 



404 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

house ; and that ho aud they should, out of the rents and profits of 
the said estates in Hoxne, pay yearly, as a salary to the master, 4.0, 
and as a salary to the mistress, 10. The school premises consist 
of a dwelling house for the master, and school-room for the boys, and 
a dwelling house for the mistress, and school-room for the girls. The 
master teaches between 30 and 40 boys of the parish, reading, wri- 
ting, and arithmetic, as free scholars ; and the schoolmistress teaches 
about 20 scholars, reading, writing, and needle-work. The salaries 
are paid, and the buildings kept in repair, by Sir Edward Kerrison, 
Bait., the present lord of the manor, and owner of the mansion and 
estates mentioned in the foundation deed ; and the children are ap- 
pointed on his behalf. A rent charge of Gs. 8d. per annum, issuing 
out of an enclosure in this parish, called Calston's Close, for the use 
of the poor of Brockdish, in Norfolk, to be paid on Nov. 1st., in 
Hoxne church porch, between 12 and 4 in the afternoon of that 
day; and another rent charge of 13s. 4d. was given to Hoxne poor, 
from the said close, to be paid on the same day and place. These 
appear to be given in 1572, by John Sherwood, late of Brockdish. 



KELSALE. KERESHALLA, or KELESHALL. 

The lordship of this parish appears included amongst the one 
hundred and seventeen manors received from King William I., by 
Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, as his share of the spoil. He was 
the founder of the Priory of the Virgin Mary and St. Andrew, at 
Thetford, and gave to that Monastery, amongst other things, 20,000 
herrings from Cheressala (or Keleshall), and ;20 rent in land; to 
be assigned when he pleased. 

It subsequently became the inheritance of Thomas de Brotherton, 
Earl of Norfolk, as part of the possession of the said Eoger Bigod, 
by grant from his half brother, King Edward II., in 1312; and as 
patron of this living, he presented John de Framlingham, founder 
of the Chantry at Carleton. It appears this Earl resided at Fram- 
lingham Castle, Annexed to the court rolls of this manor is an 
original writ, dated from thence, of which the following translation 
is given in Green's " History of Framlingham," p. 48 : 

" Thomas, son to the noble King of England, Earl of Norfolk, and Marshall of 
England, to Nicholas Bond, Seneschall of our lauds situate in the county of Suffolk, 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 405 



Health. For that complaint is made, that the cattle belonging to divers poor persons 
are stolen from out our park at Kelsale, owing to the negligence of our park-keepers 
there, to their great loss and damage. We command you at our next court to cause 
inquiry to be made in whom the fault lies, and having done this, to distrain our 
aforesaid park-keepers, and we further command you to keep such distresses in safe 
custody, until a restitution, equal to the value of the said cattle, is divided amongst 
the aforesaid poor people. Dated at Framlingham the 24th of March, under our 
privy seal, and in the 4th year." 

This lordship and advowson passed as that of Framlingham until 
the latter part of the reign of Queen Elizabeth ; and John Holland 
Esq., was in possession thereof in the following reign ; in the time 
of King Charles II., John Bence, of Ringsficld, Esq., held them. 
He was eldest son of John Bence, Esq., of Aldborough and Benhall, 
in this county, by Mary his first wife, daughter of Edmund French, 
Gent., of this parish, and probably inherited in right of his mother. 

Alexander Bence, Esq., of Thorington Hall, his nephew, and 
second son of his brother Edmund Bence, Esq., of Benhall, deceased 
in 1759, leaving an only surviving daughter, Ann, of Thorington 
Hall; who married, in 1702, to George Golding, Esq., by whom, 
who died 1803, she had no issue. Mrs. Golding deceased in 1794, 
and was succeeded in her estates by her first cousin,, the Rev. Bence 
Sparrow, rector of Beccles; who assumed, in 1804, by sign manual, 
the surname and arms of Bence. His son, Henry Bence Bence, 
Esq., of Thorington Hall, Lieut. Colonel in the East Suffolk Militia, 
is now lord and patron of this parish. Colonel Bence succeeded his 
father in 1824. The Eev. Launcelot Eobert Brown, who married 
Anne Maria, his eldest sister, is the present incumbent.* 

Kelsale Lodge was formerly vested in a branch of the Duke family ; 
in 1592, John Duke, Gent., of this parish, presented to the rectory 
of Gimmingham, in Norfolk : from them it passed to the Wakenham 
and Hobart families ; Col. James Hobart, of Mendham, was owner 
in 1655 : it is now the property of Sir Charles Blois, Bart., of Cock- 
field Hall, Yoxford. 

CHAKITIES. The estates belonging to this parish, which ore 
partly freehold and partly copyhold, have arisen under many different 
old grants and surrenders, the trusts or purposes of wluch can in few 
instances be distinctly ascertained. The copyhold parts of the es- 
tate are held of the several manors of Kelsale, Middleton, and Wes- 
tlcton ; and they appear to have been originally given, in part, for 

* The south and north doors of this parish church are engraved in Davy's " Ar- 
chitectural Antiquities of Suffolk," as flue specimens of the Normau style of 
architecture. 



400 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

the use of the town, and in part for the use of the poor of Kelsale ; 
but the first specific declaration of trust was in the year 1714, when 
that part of the estates held of the manor of Kelsale was surrendered, 
upon trust, after payment of fines and quit rents to the lord of the 
manor, and fees, for the payment of an annual sum, not exceeding 
30, to such person as the trustees should appoint, to be a school- 
master, within the parish of Kelsale ; to teach the boys of the inha- 
bitants within the parish, and no others : and the residue of the 
rents and profits, for the necessary repairs of the church of Kelsale, 
and of the several messuages and tenements upon the estates, and 
for the necessary relief of the poor and indigent inhabitants of the 
parish of Kelsale. The trustees are in possession of all the property 
known to have belonged to the charity, which produces a total ren- 
tal of about 340 per annum : it has been the custom to apply the 
rents of all the estates as one general fund, and the trustees hold an 
annual meeting, when the accounts are settled. The salary of the 
schoolmaster is now raised to 50 a year, and books are provided 
for the children at the trustees' expense. In 1827, the sum ex- 
pended in the purchase of coals for the poor, with the carnage, 
amounted to about 90, the sum of 10 was contributed to the 
clothing fund, and nearly 35 was distributed in weekly payments 
to poor widows. Edmund Cutting, by his will, dated in 1639, 
bequeathed to his nephew, Edmund Cutting, certain real estates, 
upon condition of his entering into a security for providing an an- 
nual payment of 2 12s., to be bestowed in bread; 12d. every week, 
among twelve poor persons, inhabitants of this parish. This rent 
charge is paid in respect of land at Peasenhall, the property of Mr. 
Steel, of Clopton. Stephen Eade, by will, dated in 1710, charged 
his six pieces of land in Caiiton, now the property of Edward Ful- 
ler, Esq., with the payment of 8 a year to the churchwardens of 
Carlton ; of which he directed that 40s. a year should be employed 
for the poor of Kelsale every Christmas day, after service and sermon 
at the church. Thos. Grimsby, in or about the year 1 754, gave 1 00 ; 
the interest thereof to be distributed in bread, every Lord's day, to 
the poor attending divine service. Sir Beversham Filmer,* late of 
Sutton Park, in the county of Kent, Bart., left 2 a year to the poor 
of this parish, to be distributed in bread. This money, with Eade's 

* He was grandson of Sir Robert Filmer, Bart., who married Elizabeth, daughter 
and co-heir of Sir William Beversham, Knt., of Holbrook Hall, in this county ; 
and deceased in 1805. 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 407 

charity, used to be laid out in bread, but of late has been given in 
aid of the subscription clothing fund, as being a mode of application 
more beneficial to the poor. 



LAXFIELD, or LAXEFELDA. 

This parish, in the reign of the Confessor, was possessed by one 
Edric,* who assumed his surname therefrom. He was also lord of 
the honour of Eye, and was deprived of all his possessions by the 
Conqueror; who granted the major part of them, including tin's town, 
to Eobert Molet, one of his principal Barons, who gave it to his 
Monastery of Eye, as well as the advowson ; which at the dissolution 
were granted to Edmund Bedingfield, Esq., as part of the possession 
of that Monastery. Another lordship in Laxfield, probably Stad- 
haugh, was granted to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, in the 
28th of King Henry VIII., as parcel of the property of Leiston Ab- 
bey, in Blithing hundred. 

The Wingfields were interested here. In the reign of King Ed- 
ward IV., John Wingfield obtained a charter for a weekly market 
in Laxfield. The church,t with its steeple, is a handsome edifice ; 
towards the erection of the latter, divers legacies were given about 
the middle of the 1 5th century ; and from the arms of the Wingfields 
appearing in different parts thereof, a member of that house is sup- 
posed to have been the chief contributor. The church and porch are 
considered of earlier date. Lord Huntingfield is now lord of the 
manor, and patron of the vicarage. 

The family of Bradley (alias Jacob) were long seated in this pa- 
rish ; in the church are several memorials to them : Nicholas, who 
deceased in 1628, is the earliest; and Thomas, who married, 1st 
Barbara, the youngest daughter of Sir Arthur Hoveuingham, Knt., 
and after, Mary, the eldest daughter and co-heiress of John Walde- 
grave, of Badingham, Esq., and died, without issue, in 1657, aged 
73 years. Thomas Bradley (alias Jacob), Gent., had issue two 

* In 1422, John de Laxfield was admitted Prior of Wayborn, in Norfolk ; proba- 
bly a descendant of this Edric, who is supposed to be of Danish extraction, and 
perhaps bore some relation to Edric, the traitor to King Edmund Ironside. 

t A South-west view of this church, and the west door of the same, is given in 
Davy's " Architectural Antiquities of Suffolk.'' 



408 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

sons and three daughters. He died in 1657. Nicholas Jacob, Esq., 
who deceased in 1757, is the latest memorial to the family in this 
church. 

In the time of King Charles, Henry North, Esq., was a resident at 
Bourt's Hall, in Laxfield ; son of Sir Henry North, Knt, and brother 
of Sir Eoger North, Knt., of Great Finborough. He married Sarah, 
only daughter and heiress of John Jenner, Gent. His estate worth 
about 800 per annum. They are buried in the vestry of this pa- 
rish church, with three of their children, who died young. 

In 1662, John Borrett was owner of Stadhaugh, in this parish, 
and resided there. He was a descendant, by his mother's side, of 
Serjeant Barker, and of a sister of Lord Chief Justice Coke; his pa- 
ternal ancestors were of Irish extraction. Mr. Borrett deceased in 
1673. Thomas, his son, settled at Halcsworth, and died in 1691. 
Nunn Prettyman, Gent., son of Tyrcll Prettyman, Esq., of Wether- 
den, resided here. He deceased in 1746, and was buried within the 
altar rails in this parish church. 

The manor and farm of Stadhaugh now belongs to the parish, for 
the support of a school. 

ARMS. Borrett : sable ; a bend, argent, between three garbs, or. 

Here were also resident the families of Stubbs, Jenner, and Dow- 
sing ; of which the notorious William Dowsing, of Stratford, was a 
member : and at Parkfield, resided the family of Smith. 

In 1527, Edmund Steward, LL.D., rector of this parish, was in- 
stalled Archdeacon of Suffolk ; who resigned it the following year, 
when Eichard Sampson, LL.D., succeeded. 

Mem. John Noyes, of this parish, shoemaker, was burnt here, 
Sept. 21, 1557. Certain magistrates sitting at Hoxne, issued or- 
ders to the constables to make enquiry in their parishes, if there 
were any that refused to attend mass ; whereupon the constables of 
Laxfield, took the said John Noyes, and carried him before the said 
justices, on the next day, who committed him to prison, at Eye ; 
from whence he was conveyed to Norwich, to be examined by the 
Bishop, and condemned. 

CHARITIES. The following estates are under the order and ma- 
nagement of the churchwardens for the time being : A messuage 
called the Town House, and a cottage, both occupied by poor per- 
sons : a farm in the parishes of Brandish and Wilby, comprising a 
house and 28A. 2R. 38p. of land ; let at 42 a year : a farm, com- 
prising a house, barn, and 9A. 2R. Or. of land, in the parish of 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 40D 

Wcybrcad ; lot nt 1)20 per nniium : u house, with outbuildings, and 
43A. 2n. 37p. of land, in the- parish of Carlton Colvilc, part whereof 
was an allotment made on an enclosure about 30 years ago ; this farm 
lots at 75 a year, and it has been the custom to appropriate five- 
ninths of the rents to Dunwich, and four-ninths to Laxfield : two 
undivided third parts of fourteen acres of land in the parish of Crat- 
fiold, which produces, after all deductions, 23 7s. Od. a year ; one 
third of this land belongs to the poor of Dcnnington : a piece of 
copyhold land in this parish, containing about 3 acres, lots at Q 
a year; this land was devised by John Smith, in 1718, for bread 
for the poor, to be distributed every Sunday ; and a rent charge of 
2 12s., given by one John Borrett, out of an estate in Laxfield, 
belonging to Lord Huntingfield, for the like purpose. The rents of 
these estates are applied in the reparation of the church, and the 
payment of other charges incidental to the churchwardens' office ; 
and partly in providing bread and coals for poor persons. John 
Smith, by will, dated 25th June, 1718, devised his manor of Stad- 
haugh, in Laxfield, and all his freehold lands in that parish, upon 
trusts, that the rents should first be applied in the erection of a con- 
venient school-house in the parish ; and he directed that, towards 
the endowment of the school, and for the teaching and educating of 
twenty poor boys of the parish, in reading, writing, and accounts, 
the yearly sum of 40, part of the income of the estate, should be 
paid to some learned and proper schoolmaster, who should have no 
preferment in the church or otherwise, so as to take him from his 
attendance in the school ; and that the yearly sum of 40, other 
part of the income, should be yearly applied towards putting out ap- 
prentice eight of such twenty poor children, to some good handy- 
craft trade, at 5 per head ; and the overplus of the income he or- 
dered to be preserved towards keeping the estate and premises in re- 
pair, and good heart ; and if not required for that purpose, to be 
yearly employed as an additional sum towards the preferring such 
eight poor cliildren so to be put apprentice, as aforesaid, to better 
trades and employments. Under this devise the churchwardens and 
overseers receive the profits of the manor of Stadhaugh, amounting 
to JE3 13s. 9d. a year, in quit-rents and free-rents, and some occa- 
sional fines of small amount ; and the rent of the testator's other 
property, consisting of a farm, comprising a house, outbuildings, 
and about 112 acres of land, which lets at the annual rent JE180, 
subject to outgoings for land-tax, insurance, &c v which amount to 



410 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

12 a ycar > or thereabouts. Sums for the support of a Sunday 
school, and to a schoolmistress for teacliing poor girls to read, knit, 
and sew, have been paid from these funds, and the Commissioners 
for inquiring concerning charities, recommended a further extension 
of its benefits ; which has since been adopted, in an increase of the 
number of scholars, both boys and girls. The sum of 20 a year 
is paid by the tenant of Lord Gosford, of a farm in this parish, to a 
schoolmaster, for teacliing ten boys to read and write ; and the sum 
of 10 a year is also paid off another farm of Lord Gosford, in 
Laxfield, to a 'schoolmistress, for teaching ten girls to read, knit, 
and sew. These sums were the gift, by will, of Ann, wife of Charles 
Ward, in 1721. A rent charge, given by William Garneys, in the 
time of Henry VIII., appears to have been lost or discontinued. 



MEND HAM. MEADEN-HAM, or MYNDHAM. 

Is situate on both sides of the course of the river Waveney, which 
divides Suffolk from Norfolk, and consequently lies in both counties. 
At the time of the Domesday survey the principal lordships in both 
counties belonged to the Abbey of St. Edmund, at Bury ; to which 
they were given in the reign of the Confessor, by one Alfric Moder- 
coppe, and were held by Frodo, the brother of Baldwin, the Abbot; 
whose descendants probably assumed the surname of Mendham. 

That part of the fee of St. Edmund which was situate on the 
Norfolk side is now comprised in the hamlet of Needham, and a 
large portion of the same fee in Suffolk, was subsequently established 
into the now distinct parish, or hamlet, of Metfield. At the time 
of Kichard I., and for a long period after, the whole of this fee, in 
Suffolk, was held of the Abbot, by the Vere's, Earls of Oxford ; and 
under them, by the lords of the manors into which it was divided. 

The small manor of Mendham Hall was so called from the family 
of that name, in which it remained until about 1318, when (on the 
authority of Blomefield) John de Mendham sold it to Sir John de 
Fressingfield ; and it afterwards became part of the possession of 
Mendham Priory. But this is doubtful. In the time of King 
Edward VI., the Princess Mary, afterwards Queen of England, 
resided at Mendham Hall ; and there is an inventory of the furni- 
ture, &c., used upon the occasion, in the possession of Dawson 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 411 

Turner, Esq., F.R.S., of Yarmouth. In the reign of Queen 
Elizabeth, tliis manor -was held by Richard Smart ; by whose de- 
scendant it was sold to Stephen Baxter, who was lord in 1655 : it 
has since passed with the Priory manor. The site of this manor 
was purchased in the year 1737, by the Governors of Queen Anne's 
Bounty, in augmentation of the vicarage. 

The manor of Walsham Hall, derived its style from a family 
named Do Walsham, by whom it was held of the Abbots, or rather 
perhaps of the de Veres, under them. But the Earls of Oxford 
appear to have retained it in their own hands from the time of 
Richard II., until their extinction in the male line, on the death of 
John, the last Earl, without issue, in 1526 ; when the inheritance 
of this noble family came to lu's three sisters and co-heirs. Eliza- 
beth married to Sir Anthony Wingfield, of Letheringham, Knt. ; 
Dorothy, to John Nevile, Lord Latimer ; and Ursula, Sir Edward 
Knightly : and this manor was probably soon afterwards sold. 

In 1009, it belonged to Thomas Holland, Esq., who was after- 
wards a Knight, and sold it to Robert Berney, Esq., under whose 
will it came to his widow, Mary, daughter of James Hobart, Esq., 
of Hales Hall, in Loddon, Norfolk ; and by her will, to her nephew, 
James Hobart, Esq., who made the mansion of Walsham Hall his 
seat ; and his descendants continued to reside there till 1 722, when 
Anthony Hobart sold the manor and demesnes to Thomas Bransby; 
whose brother and heir, James Bransby, in 1736, sold it to Sarah 
Wogan, sister of John Wogan, Esq., of Gawdy Hall, in Redenhall ; 
who brought, it by marriage with the Rev. Gervas Holmes, vicar of 
Fressingfield, into that family ; and his grandson, William Sancroft 
Holmes, Esq., of Gawdy Hall, is the present owner. 

A manor in Mendham (Suffolk), was granted by the Conqueror 
to one of lu's Barons, Roger, of Poicton, lord of the honour of Lan- 
caster. He also gave a considerable territory in Mendham, and ad- 
joining parishes, which had been part of the possession of Edric, of 
Laxfield, to Robert Malet, another of his great Barons ; with the 
honour of Eye. The superiority of both these possessions reverted 
to the Crown, but were held from a very early period by the family 
of De Huntingfield. 

William de Huntingfield endowed the Priory founded here by him, 
with divers lands which had been granted him by King Stephen. 
These, with the other grants by subsequent benefactors, up to the 
feign of Edward I., constituted the manor called the Priory manor. 



412 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

The following is a list of the founders, or patrons, of this family, 
from the " Monasticon :" 

William de Huntingfield, died in 1155. Sibilla. 

I l 

Roger de Huntingfield, Obt. I204.Elizabeth de Seutliz, Obt. 1200. 

I 1 

William de Huntingfield, Obt. 1220.=Isabella de Freville, Obt. 1209. 
1 1 

1. Lucia.= Roger de Huntingfield, Ob. 1252.=2. Johanna de Hobrugg. 

1 1 

William de Huntingfield, Obt. l283.=Emma, dau. of John de Grey, by Emma, 

I 1 dau. of Geoff, de Glanville. Ob. 1264. 

Roger de Huntingfield, Obt. 1302.= Joyce, dau. of John D'Engaine, Obt. 1312. 
T 1 

2. Sybil.=Wm. de Huntingfield, Ob. 1313. =1. Joan, daug. of John de Hastings, 

I 1 Lord of Abergavenny. 

Roger de Huntingfield, Obt. 1337. Cecilia, dau. of Sir Walter de Norwich, Knt., 

I 1 of Mettingham Castle. 

William de Huntingfield, Obt. 50th Edward III.^Elizabeth De Willonghby. 

On the death of the last Lord Huntingfield, the patronage of the 
Priory came to the Uffords, Earls of Suffolk ; and was afterwards in 
the De la Poles. 

The manor of Kingshall, which it is presumed derived its name 
from being in the hands of the Crown, is stated hy Blomefield to 
have been in the Veres, Earls of Oxford ; and to have passed, by 
purchase, from them to Sir John de Fressingfield, and from him to 
Sir Walter de Norwich ; and so, with his daughter Cecilia, to Sir 
Eoger de Huntingfield ; and to have been settled by another Eoger 
de Huntingfield, subsequent to 1370, on Mendham Priory. 

This is a very extensive place, if the hamlet, or chapelry of 
Nedham, situate on the Norfolk side of the river Waveney, with 
Scotford (or the part at the ford), over which there is now a bridge, 
called Shotford Bridge, be included. This for many ages had a rec- 
tor presented to it, who served in the church of Mendham, by the 
name of the rector of Shotford portion in Mendham. A portion of 
Harleston also then belonged to this parish ; and now that part of 
the town on the south side of the chapel, on which the public-house 
called " The Pye" stands, is in Mendham. 

These Mr. Blomefield has treated of in his history of that county; 
and from his, and more recent authorities, we collect the following 
particulars concerning the Monastery and parish church, which were 
both situated on the Suffolk side of the river. 

The former was founded in King Stephen's time, about 1 140, by 
'William, son of Roger de Huntingfield, with the consent of Roger, 
his son and heir; who gave the whole isle of Mendham (called 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 413 

Meadon-Ham, or the Village of Meadows), to the monks of Castle- 
Acre, on condition that they should erect a church of stone, and 
build a convent by it, and place at least eight of their monks there, 
in the place called Hurst (or Bruniggeshurst) ; being then a 
woody isle, on the Suffolk side of the river Waveney. The founder 
further directed that it should be subordinate to Castle- Acre Priory; 
and he endowed it with various churches, rents, and homages. It 
consisted of monks of the Cluniac order. 

Two charters of the founder are extant, and are printed in the 
" Monasticon." By the first, he gave to the house of Castle- Acre 
" the island of St. Mary, of Mendham," with its appurtenances ; 
and in the second, by which he enlarged the endowment, he describes 
the recipients of his bounty as " the monks of Acre, dwelling at the 
island of Bruniggeshurst." 

He made the first donation with a special agreement that, at once, 
as many brothers as should be necessary to rule the place should be 
settled in the island; and afterwards, as the place should be in- 
creased and improved, the number of monks should be augmented, 
until a Convent of monks might be placed there, to hold the order 
according to rule ; which should then be done as soon as possible. 

It was also stipulated that the same subjection which the church 
of Acre owed to the church of St. Pancras, at Lewis, in Sussex, or 
the latter to the church at Cluni, in France, the same the above- 
said island should perform to the church of Acre ; and should pay 
in acknowledgement thereof, half a mark of silver yearly. Yet, al- 
though in this subordinate state, few religious foundations, for pri- 
vileges, magnificence, and architectural beauty, could vie with the 
Priory of St. Mary of Mendham. 

The value of the estates of this Priory, at the taxation of Pope 
Nicholas, in 1291, was, in six parishes in Norfolk, 4 12s. 2d. ; and 
in eight parishes, in Suffolk, 7 3s. 7d. : total, 11 15s. 9d. At 
the dissolution it was valued as part of the possessions of Castle- 
Acre. It was granted to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, and 
by him conveyed to Kichard Freston, by deed dated at Mendham, 
on the 3rd of June, in the 28th of King Henry VIII., 1537; and 
is made to Kichard Freston in fee, charged with the payment to the 
said Duke, his heirs, and assigns, of an annual rent of 40. 

Charles Brandon appears, at the time of the dissolution, to have 
had some claim to the patronage of this Priory, in right of his 
fourth wife, Catherine, Lady Willoughby of Eresby ; she being li- 



414 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

neally descended from Cicely, wife of John, Lord Willoughby, the? 
eldest sister and co-heir of Sir William de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk ; 
on whom the same had been settled, by William, Lord Huntingfield, 
the last male descendant of the founder. 

After the decease of Sir Richard Freston, by virtue of some set- 
tlement made by him, the house and demesnes, with the manors in 
the Suffolk portion, called Mendham Priory, and Kingshall, came 
to Michael Wentworth, Esq., of Eogersthorpe, in Yorkshire ; and 
the manor of Denson's, in Norfolk, to Richard Ereston, his son. 
The Erestons were a Yorkshire family, and connected by marriage 
with the Wentworths. 

In the 37th of Queen Elizabeth, Michael Wentworth, grandson 
of the above, sold the property to Anthony Gosnold, of Clopton ; 
of whom the mansion and estate, called the Priory, were soon after 
purchased, by Edward Ward, Esq., and subsequently, from him, by 
Robert Green, Esq. ; who conveyed them to James Tyrell, Esq., his 
son-in-law. Tyrell resided at the Priory, then called Mendham 
Hall; and died there in 1656, leaving two daughters his co-heir- 
esses ; one of whom, Elizabeth, married William Rant, of Yelver- 
ton, in Norfolk, Esq. ; and through this marriage the estate came 
into the family of the Rants, in a branch of which it is still vested. 

The manors of Mendham Priory and Mendham Kingshall, were 
purchased of Gosnold, by one Lawrence ; and afterwards belonged 
successively to the Hollands, Baxters, Gardiners, and Whitakers. 
In 1803, they were sold to Alexander Adair, Esq., of Elixton; and 
his successor, William Adair, Esq., is the present lord. 

In the " Gentleman's Magazine" for 1836, part ii., p. 601, is an 
account of this property, with engravings, containing a plan of the 
Priory, and some interesting architectural portions of the original 
buildings : also some curious remains of paintings, with which the 
house was ornamented immediately after its conversion to a secular 
mansion ; communicated by J. A. Repton, Esq., from drawings ta- 
ken shortly before the removal of the buildings.* 

The mansion, formed out of the monastic buildings, in which 
were the paintings described by Mr. Repton, was probably the work 
of Sir Richard Freston ; though it is doubtful whether he ever resi- 

* A front view of the Chapter House is engraved in the " Antiquarian Itinerary/' 
1815 ; and there is a rough general view of the remains in the " Gentleman's Ma- 
gazine,'' for Nov. 1808. In Davy's "Architectural Antiquities, *' is also a view of 

these remains, 



HUNDttED OF HOXNE. 4 1 fi 

ded there, for having, in the 1st of King Edward VI., obtained a 
grant from the Crown of the manor and estate of Wliitendon (or 
Wichendon), in the Norfolk part of Mendham (late parcel of the 
possessions of the dissolved Priory of the Holy Trinity, at Ipswich), 
ho built a mansion there ; where Ms descendants resided, until the 
extinction of the family in the male line, in 1 761. This estate was 
also purchased in 1824, by Alexander Adair, Esq. 

This parish church was originally a rectory, one turn of which 
was in Sir William de Huntingfield, founder of the Priory here ; to 
which he gave it : and the other in Sir Thomas de Nedham, who 
gave it to William, Prior of the Holy Trinity, at Ipswich ; to which 
it was appropriated in 1227 ; when the vicarage was settled to con- 
sist of a messuage, and 24 acres of land, 6 acres of meadow and marsh, 
with all the alterage belonging to the church, and the tithes of the 
mills., hay, turf, and fish, and all sorts of pulse, with 10s. per annum 
rent. The first vicar here was presented by the Prior of Ipswich. 

A branch of the family of Bateman, descended from Sir Bartholo- 
mew Bateman, eldest brother of the Bishop of Norwich of that name, 
resided in an ancient seat here, called Oakenhill (probably from Ro- 
ger de Okenhull, brother of William de Huntingfield), down to the 
year 1753. The estate is now divided into two or three holdings. 

Here was also an estate called Thorpe Hall, formerly held by 
Erasmus de Heveningham, and in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, by 
a family of the name of Smith. It afterwards belonged to the Ho- 
barts, of Weybread ; from whom it came, by purchase, to the Ho- 
barts, of Walsham Hall ; from them to the Bransbys ; and from the 
co-heiresses of James Bransby, of Shottisham, Esq., to Mrs. Mary 
Wyard. It is now the property of Thomas Thornhill, Esq., of Rid- 
lesworth, in Norfolk. 

The old mansion, called Middleton Hall, was the seat of a family 
of that name for very many generations ; and Thomas Middleton, 
the last of that family, died seized of it (held as of the Dutchy of 
Lancaster) in the 20th of King Henry VII. It was afterwards the 
estate and residence successively of Henry Eeppes, Esq., and Bas- 
singbourn Gawdy, Esq., the Hernes, and the Baxters ; in which 
latter family it became united with the other manors. Henry Reppes, 
married to his second wife, Ann, daughter of John Wotton, Esq., of 
Tudenham, relict of Sir Thomas Woodhouse, whose third husband 
was Bassingbourn Gawdy. Mr Reppes died without issue. 

ARMS. Huntitigfield: or; on a fess, gules, three plates. Fres- 



416 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

ton : azure ; on a fess, or, three leopards' faces, gules. Rant : 
ermine ; on a fess, sable, three lions, rampant, or. Priory, the 
same as Castle- Acre : argent ; a cross cheque, or and azure, be- 
tween twelve cross crosslets, fitche, sable. 

CHARITIES. In 1725, William Dennington devised his lands and 
tenements, at Shimpling, in Norfolk, to William Dennington, the 
elder, and his heirs ; upon condition that he and they should, on 
the first Sunday in every month, distribute twelve penny loaves of 
good wheaten bread to twelve of the poorest people of this parish : 
and he also willed, that 2s. a year should be paid out of the same 
estate, to the sexton of Mendham, for looking after his grave, and 
that of his late wife, in that church-yard. In the Parliamentary 
Returns of 1786, mention is made of 2 a year being paid by a per- 
son named Eant, on account of a charity for apprenticing poor chil- 
dren ; but no particulars of the donation are given. The payment 
of the annuity has long ceased, and no account of the charity can 
be obtained. 



METFIELB, or MEDEFIELD. 

This was formerly considered a hamlet, and parochial chapel of 
Mendham, but is now reckoned a distinct parish. It was anciently 
of the fee of the Abbot of Holm ; of whom it was held, in the time 
of King Richard I., at half a fee, by Hugh Burd ; after which it 
became escheated to the Crown, and was granted to Thomas de 
Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk, son of King Edward I., whose first 
wife was Alice, daughter of Sir Roger Hayles, Knt., of Harwich. 

Sir John Jermy, Knt., married Joan, her sister ; and in 1 325, 
the said Thomas, conveyed to his brother-in-law, Sir John Jermy, 
two parts of this manor, and the third part to his wife, for the as- 
signment of her dower : in 1353, Sir John Jermy, Knt., held it, at 
a quarter of a fee, of the manor of Kingshall, in Mendham. In 
1385, Sir William Jermy, Knt., was buried here; Elizabeth his 
wife survived him. 

In 1428, Sir John Jermy, Knt., and Margaret Mounteney, his 
wife, were owners of this and Withersdale manors ; who also rebuilt 
the church and manor house, where he placed the marriages of his 
family in the windows ; and his arms were carved in divers parts of 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 4 17 

the roof, and in stone on the font. He deceased in 1487, and was 
interred at the north-east corner of the chancel here. 

He bequeathed legacies to this church, and those of Buckenham 
Ferry, and Hasingham, of which he was patron; he ordered 100 
marks to he distributed to the poor on his burial day ; and deposited 
in the hands of Thomas Pakefield, Abbot of St. Bennet, at Holm, 
whom he appointed one of his executors, 200 marks, as a mainte- 
nance, for a Chantry priest, to sing mass therein daily, for him and 
his family for ever. He is called Sir John Jenny, senior, Knt. 

Sir John Jermy, junior, his son and heir, married Elizabeth, 
daughter of William Wroth, of Enfield, Esq., and had two sons : 
from Thomas, the younger son, descended the Jermy s, of Bayfield, 
in Norfolk ; and John Jermy, Esq., the eldest son, continued the 
family at Metfield. He married Isabel, daughter of John Hopton, 
Esq., and lies buried in the chancel, by his grandfather. 

Edmund Jermy, Esq., his son and heir, married a daughter of 
William Booth, Esq., and left Sir John Jermy, K.B., of this parish, 
and Brightwell,* in Carlford hundred. Thomas Jermy, Esq., el- 
dest son of Sir Thomas Jermy, K.B., deceased in 1652, and was 
buried under an altar tomb at the north-east corner of the chancel 
of this parish church. 

He died without issue ; and this manor and estate came, probably 
by purchase, to Thomas Smallpiece, Esq., who was lord in 1658, 
and was afterwards of Worlingham. William Sancroft, Esq., held 
the same in 1711 ; and Walter Plumer, Esq., of Gilston, in Hert- 
fordshire, and Chediston, in Suffolk, in 1724; who was succeeded 
by William Plumer, Esq., his brother and heir. On the sale of the 
Plumers' Suffolk estates, this manor and the demesne lands were 
purchased by William Kayley, Esq., the present lord. 

The presentation to the church appears to have been in the Crown 
until the 8th of Queen Elizabeth, when it was granted, by her, to 
William le Grice, and others ; and in the 1 1th of that reign, the 
Free chapel of Metfield, otherwise called Metfield church, with the 
church-yard adjoining, was conveyed to trustees, for the inhabitants 
of the town of Metfield ; who ever since have elected the curate. 

The only remuneration to the minister originally was sundry 
small payments, out of the herbages, amounting to 9 18s. 7d. ; 
but the Kev. Samuel Chapman, rector of Thorpe by Norwich, the 
owner of a copyhold estate in the parish, by his will, dated in 1700, 

* See that parish. 



418 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

directed Ms executors to sell the same, and to lay out the proceeds 
in the purchase of a freehold estate in Metfield, with a convenient 
house, to be vested in trustees for the use of the minister of the 
town of Metfield, for the time being. A messuage and land was 
accordingly purchased, in 1704, and conveyed to trustees, according 
to the intent of his will. The minister resides in the house, and 
enjoys the estate. 

The lete of this parish belonged to the lord of MendhamKingshall : 
which manor, as well as those of Mendham Priory, and Walsham 
Hall, extended here. The Blobolds, and Godbolds, were families 
of gentry residing here in the 14th and 15th centuries. 

ARMS. Smallpiece: sable; a chevron ingrailed, between three 
cinquefoils, argent. Plumer : party per chevron flewry, counter 
flewry, gules and argent, three martlets counterchanged. Godbold: 
azure ; two bows in saltier, or ; strung, argent. 

CHARITIES. In 1556, John Welton, by will, devised as follows : 
" I give and bequeath unto William my son, my tenement called 
Lovedays, with all the lands, meadows and pastures thereto belong- 
ing, with the appurtenances, situate, lying and being in Metfield, 
aforesaid : Item, I give and bequeath to William my son, one pightle 
lying in Withersdale, containing by estimation, three acres, within 
the way, and the said William to pay and distribute to the poor peo- 
ple dwelling in Metfield, yearly, for the said pightle as much money 
as it shall be yearly worth to let : also I will, and my mind and in- 
tent is, that the heirs of the said William do see they that have my 
tenement called Lovedays, shall have the said pightle, paying yearly 
to the poor people, as long as the word shall endure, so much money 
as it shall be yearly worth to let." On account of this donation, since 
1663, the sum of l 10s. has been paid annually, by the owner of 
a piece of land lying in Withersdale, called the Poor Man's Pightle. 
Thomas Maplehead, in the 33rd of King Henry VIII., gave 6s. 
8d. a year for the repairs of the church, out of land called Book's, 
the property of John Micklewaite, Esq. ; and in the 43rd of Eliza- 
beth, James Scarlet gave to the poor of Metfield 20s. a year, out of 
land in Withersdale, belonging to Edward Freeston, Esq. : in 1762, 
Kichard Knapp bequeathed a house and lands in Metfield, for bread, 
for the poor of that parish. 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 419 



MONK-SOHAM. 

Alfred, Bishop of the East Angles, made a grant of the manor 
and advowson of this parish to the Monks of Bury Abbey, hence 
called Monk's- Soham. At the dissolution of that house, Anthony 
Rous, Esq., obtained a grant of the same, and it continued in that 
family until the 3rd of Queen Elizabeth, when it was purchased of 
Thomas Rous, Esq., by Lionel Tallemache, Esq. 

The lordship of Blomvile's, or Woodcroft-Hall, in this and ad- 
joining parishes, in 1460, was vested in John Caldwell ; and has 
lately been the estate of Anthony Deane, Esq. 

CHARITIES. The town estate here, consists of the following pro- 
perty : a messuage, called the Guild-Hall, and two cottages, occu- 
pied by poor persons, rent free ; lands in Monk- Soham, called Towes, 
containing together 20A. IR. 29p., let at 22 a year ; a close, called 
Fullgood, and a meadow, containing together 18A. SR., rent 20 
per annum ; two pightles, and a piece of land, containing together 
9A. IR. 6p., let at 10 a year. The rents are applied after the ne- 
cessary outlay for repairs, &c., in providing 2s. worth of bread, dis- 
tributed every Sunday at the church ; in the purchase of coals for the 
poor ; and the surplus, in a distribution of money among poor people, 
according to a list made out at the annual meeting of the trustees. 



SAXSTEAD, or SAXTEDA. 

This was anciently a berwite, or hamlet, to Fromlingham, and as 
such, was returned in the Great Survey, as part of the lands of Hugh 
de Abrincis, Earl of Chester, under the head " Bishop's hundred." 
It however soon afterwards was reckoned a parish of itself ; but con- 
tinued to be held as a, member of Framlingham manor, and partici- 
pates in its customs. 

To each of these manors there is appendant a Court-Lete, which 
extends through the respective parishes. The common fine for 
Framlingham lete is 6s. 8d., paid now by the churchwardens, but 
anciently by the tenents possessed of free-lands ; but the common 
fine of this parish is 3d. These are the most ancient courts of re- 



420 JIUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

cord, and were originally instituted to correct public offences, or 
crown matters, within their jurisdiction. 

The soil of Saxstead Green, which contains about 30 acres, and 
all the waste ground and ways, are the property of the lords ; but 
the benefit and feed thereof belongs to the copyhold tenants, who 
cannot take down timber without the lord's license, to whom a third 
part belongs. Where a father dies seized of copyhold lauds or tene- 
ments, holden of this manor, and leaves two or more sons living, 
the youngest son becomes heir to such lands or tenements. This 
custom is termed Borough English. 

The church has been consolidated to that of Framlingham ever 
since the time of King Edward III., and the cure thereof is, and 
always has been, served by the rector of that parish, or his curate. 
In 1328, Thomas de Brotherton presented Ei chard de Burghstede 
to the living of Framlingham, with the chapel of Saxstede annexed. 
This, though not certified or valued in Bacon's " Liber Regis," is a 
rectory dedicated to All Saints. A view of this church is engraved in 
Loder's " History of Framlingham," from a drawing by J. Johnson ; 
the walls of the tower (which fell down July 8, 1805), are therein 
described as being somewhat decayed. The old materials have since 
been used to repair the breach, as high as the roof ; the lower part 
of which is now used as a vestry, and above is the belfry. 

The following property, which is copyhold of the manor of Sax- 
stead, and vested in trustees, was given for the maintenance of this 
structure : one messuage, and nine acres of land of the demesne, 
parcel of Saxstead Went ; one acre and one rood, parcel of 38 acres 
of Saxstead Went; and one cottage, with the yards, containing eight 
perches, and to which Humphry Button, and others, were admitted 
in 1547, in trust, for this parish, who were to apply the rents ac- 
cordingly, and the overplus to the use of the poor. This gift Mr. 
Hawes states was made prior to the reign of King Edward III., but 
by whom is unknown ; the probability however is, that the parish 
had it of Thomas de Brotherton, the patron, and that the gift is 
coeval with the founding of the church. 

Mem. In 1831, some labourers, in draining lands near Saxstead 
Green, discovered not much below the surface of the soil, the re- 
mains of a human skeleton, with fragments of a wooden coffin ; near 
to which they also found a half groat of Henry VI., and a gold ring, 
weighing 2dwts. 21 grs., the face of which is divided into two com- 
partments ; on the one is engraved an emblem of the Holy Trinity, 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 421 

and on the other the Virgin Mary ; on the inside, in old Roman cha- 
racters, " de Ion cuer." This ring was lately in the possession of 
Mrs. Smith, of Saxstead. 



SYLEHAM, or SEILAM, 

Is mentioned in the Domesday survey amongst the possessions of 
Robert de Tony ; and of that family lands here, and in other places, 
were probably held by the Cliffords. In the 3rd of King Edward 
I., Roger de Clifford had bothena at Syleham. 

Herbert de Losinga (or Losing), 1st Bishop of Norwich, gave to 
Roger Bigot, or rather to the Cluniac Priory at Thetford, then lately 
founded by him, a manor, and the church of Syleham, being his own 
private property, with all that belonged to them, as the water mill, 
fishery, &c., in exchange for Tombland, and other possessions set- 
tled by Roger on the Cathedral at Norwich. This manor, called 
from the monks at Thetford, " Monk's-Hall manor," and the impro- 
priation, was at the dissolution of that Monastery, granted to Thomas, 
Duke of Norfolk. In Queen Elizabeth's time it was held by Emery 
Tilney, Esq. ; who, it is believed, granted out all the copyholds upon 
long leases, and extinguished the manor. 

The old manor house and demesne lands are now in the Wollas- 
ton family : Henry Septimus Hyde Wollaston, Esq., of South Weald, 
in Essex, being the present proprietor. 

The manors of Syleham and Esham (a hamlet of that parish), 
with the advowsons of their united churches (probably derived from 
the Cliffords), belonged, in the reign of King Edward II., to the 
family of Seymour (or St. Maur). In 1335, Sir Edmund Seymour, 
Knt., enfeoffed them in Sir John Wingfield, Knt, as trustee. Law- 
rence Seymour, parson of the churches of Syleham and Esham, and 
Ralph, his brother, released their right ; and in the next year, Sir 
John Wingfield released them to John, son and heir of Sir Edmund 
Seymour ; but they were soon after absolutely conveyed to Sir John 
Wingfield, whose widow and executrix, Alienor, settled Esham cha- 
pel, and the advowson of the church of Syleham, on the Chantry, or 
College, founded by her at Wingfield, in pursuance of the will of 
her late husband. She deceased in the 49th of Edward III., seized 
of the manor. 



422 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

It afterwards came to the De la Poles, and passed as Wingfield 
Castle ; with which it was granted, by Queen Mary, in the first year 
of her reign, to Sir Henry Jernegan, Knt. In the 21st of the next 
reign, Thomas Barrow had seizen ; but it does not appear during 
this period to have borne the name of the Earl's manor. 

The manor of Syleham Comitis, on the part of Suffolk, which 
derived its title from its ancient lords, the Earls of Norfolk, was 
sold by the heirs of Sir William Chapman, of Lowdham Hall, to 
Mr. William Mann, a flour factor here ; on whose death, the same 
was purchased from his heirs, by Mr. Dyson, a banker and brewer, 
at Diss. 

In 1642, the family of Barry were seated in this parish; and 
Captain Anthony Barry, who held the impropriation, by will dated 
the 12th of March, 1678, the same being unendowed, settled on 
the minister and his successors all the impropriated tithes of this 
parish, then worth about ^40 a year ; and also a messuage and 
close of 4 a year; and his son Christopher, who died in 1701, de- 
vised a good house for the minister, with lauds of the value of 8 
per annum. 

Lamb Barry, Esq., served the office of High Sheriif for this 
county, in 1748 : the estate upon which he resided (Syleham Hall) 
is now the seat of the Rev. Augustus Cooper, who is also patron of 
the perpetual curacy. 



SOUTHOLT. SUDHOLDA, or SOUTH-HOLD, 

Is accounted a hamlet of Worlingworth, and appears to have been 
vested in Bury Abbey, as that parish was ; and has passed as it did: 
the churches of which are also consolidated. William de Bovile an- 
ciently held this lordship, of whose grant it probably went to the 
above Monastery. 

The family of Thurston, of Hoxne, were formerly possessed of a 
manor here ; and Anthony Drury, Esq., held an estate here in 1723 ; 
of which he died possessed : it afterwards belonged to his sister, 
Catherine Drury. 

CHARITIES. The town estate here, comprises a dwelling house, 
yard, and several parcels of land, in this parish, containing together 
28A. 3R. 37p., and also 22A. 2R. 29p. of land in the parish of Bed- 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 423 

field : it is let to sundry persons, at rents amounting together to 
01. These rents are applied towards payment of the church- 
wardens' expenses, the support of a Sunday-school, the purchase of 
clothing for the poor, and the maintenance and repair of the parish 
workhouse. 



STRADBROOK. STETEBROC, or STATEBROC. 

The ancient family of Le Rus (or Rufus), was enfeofled of this 
parish soon after the Conquest. King Stephen, when Earl of 
Morton, granted to Ernald Rufus, son of Roger, the whole manor 
of Stradbrook, part of the honour of Eye, with the soke and advow- 
son of the church ; and King John confirmed the said grant to Er- 
nald Rufus, to hold as his grandfather held it, in the first year of 
his reign. 

This Ernald, in the 3rd of the said King, gave hy deed, for his 
soul's health, and that of Isabel his wife, and his ancestors, &c., in 
pure alms to God, St. Mary, and the church of Woodbridge, and the 
canons thereof, all the tithe of Northaghe and Hunteswyk, in this 
parish ; saving a pension of 4s. per annum, to be paid to the Prior 
and Convent of Eye : dated at Wytingham, in 1201. He is called 
in the register of Eye Priory, patron of Woodbridge ; and his an- 
cestors are declared founders of the Priory there. 

In the 10th of Henry III., Hugh Rufus his son, was one of the 
collectors of the fifteenths in Norfolk ; and the following year had 
the grant of a weekly Market here, and at Woodbridge ; at the former 
on Friday, and at the latter on Wednesday. 

In the 37th of the same reign, William le Rus died seized of this 
lordship, and Alice was his daughter and sole heir, aged six years. 
She married Richard, second son of Sir William de Brews, and Maud 
his wife ; and was a retainer of the Earl Marshall, Custos of the 
Peace of Norfolk and Suffolk. 

This Richard and Alice, in the 52nd of the above King, granted 
to the Priory at Woodbridge, ten marks per annum, to find a canon 
to celebrate for ever in the Priory church, for their souls ; and in 
the 56th of that reign, William de Brews granted by fine, to the 
said Richard and Alice, the manor and advowson of Akenham, with 
those of Clay don and Hemingston, in exchange for that of Bromley, 



424 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

in Surrey, and others. In the 5th of Edward I., they gave lands in 
Thurleston to the canons of St. Peter and Paul, in Ipswich. Sir 
Richard deceased in the 25th of the said King : Alice survived to 
the 29th, and Giles was their son and heir. 

He was lord of Akenham, Whitton, Clopton, and Hasketon ; and 
married Catherine, daughter of Sir Lawrence de Huntingfield, by 
whom he had no issue, hut hy a second marriage he had three sons. 
Sir Giles deceased in 1310 ; Eichard, his eldest son and heir, being 
then nine years of age ; he married Eleanor, daughter of Sir John 
Shelton, Knt., by whom he had two daughters. Sir Richard de- 
ceased in 1323, and was buried at Woodbridge Priory. He was 
succeeded by Robert, his second brother, who died in 1 325, without 
issue, and John de Brews, his brother and heir, succeeded. 

From this family the estate passed to the Wingfields ; and Elia- 
nor, the widow of Sir John Wingfield, Knt., died seized of the manor 
of Stradbrook, held as of the honour of Eye, in the 49th of Edward 
III. Michael De la Pole, and Katherine his wife, held the manor 
with the advowson; the latter was appropriated, in the 20th of 
Richard II., to the College of Wingfield, and the former now be- 
longs to Lord Huntingfield. 

A branch of the Shelton family were anciently seated in this pa- 
rish, and had a free chapel founded in Shelton's manor, at Strad- 
brook, endowed with divers lands. John de Shelton, by deed with- 
out date, tied this manor to the Prior of Butley, to excuse that 
house from all suit and service to the county courts, or hundred 
courts ; and John his son confirmed the same. This manor extends 
into Fressingfield, and in 1699, Joseph Thompson acknowledged to 
hold it in free soccage of the manor of Chevenhale (alias Chepen- 
hall). It was lately vested in W. T. Corbett, Esq. 

The manor of Buslaugh Hall, in this parish, was the property of 
Thomas Huntingfield, Gent., who deceased in 1554, leaving two 
daughters his co-heiresses; namely, Elizabeth, who married An- 
drew Revett, of Brandeston Hall, Esq., Escheator for Queen Mary 
and Queen Elizabeth, in the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk. The 
other daughter married to John Vere, Gent., by whom she had issue 
Richard Vere, Gent. 

The said Andrew Revett commenced a suit against this Richard 
Vere, his nephew, both claiming the above manor, as heirs to Hun- 
tingfield ; and the nephew, to be revenged upon his uncle, and pre- 
vent a trial at the assizes, forged a treasonable letter in his uncle's 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 425 

name, and directed it to his attorney, William Bygot; dated Feb. 10, 
1556 : part of the contents of which was as follows : 

" Also 1 pray you send me word how the Queen's grace doth, for I hear say that she 
is out of her wits, and like to die, because she hear say that King Edward was alive, 
the which I pray God it be true, for we had never no quiet since she was Queen, 
but burning, hanging, heading, and popish religion, wherefore I trust it will not 
continue long, I pray you send me word more justly, also I pray you look on this 
closely." 

This epistle was dropped in Serjeant's Inn, London ; and when 
found, was given into the hands of Nicholas Heath, Archbishop of 
York, and then Lord Chancellor ; whereupon Mr. Kevett was com- 
mitted to the Tower, where he continued fifteen weeks, but the for- 
gery being discovered, he was acquitted ; and Richard Vere for this 
crime was branded on the face with the letters F.A., for false ac- 
cuser, and stood in the pillory at Norwich, London, and Ipswich, 
when he was again remanded to prison, yet Mr. Revett could not 
obtain his pardon until the 1st of Queen Elizabeth. Mr. Revett 
died in 1572, and was buried at Brandeston. 

The vicarage, as well as the impropriation, became vested in the 
Bishop of Ely, who is now the patron ; and the manor styled " Strad- 
brook, with Stribcroft," in the Marquis Cornwallis ; and was pur- 
chased, with the Broome estates, by Mr. Kerrison, the father of the 
gallant Baronet, the present owner. 

The highly respectable family of Borrett, who were originally of 
Irish extraction, were long seated in this parish : John Borrett, Esq., 
a Master in Chancery, who married Rebecca, daughter of Thomas 
Green, of Wilby, Gent., was buried in this parish church, in 1724; 
in which are many other memorials to members of that family. 
Weever also mentions memorials to " Robart Dowe, and Elizabeth 
his wyef, doughter of John Fremyngham, esquyer ; and John Shel- 
ton, the son of Raff Shelton, esquyer, died in anno 1465." 

ARMS. Borrett: or; three boars' heads couped, sable. Crest: 
a boar, passant. 

Robert Grosseteste (or Grosthead), was a native of this parish, 
and was, says Fuller, " bred in Oxford, where he became most emi- 
nent for religion, and learned in all kind of languages, arts and sci- 
ences ; and at last was preferred Bishop of Lincoln, 1235. He 
wrote no fewer than three hundred treatitises, whereof most are ex- 
tant in manuscript, in Westminster library, which Dr. Williams (his 
successor in the see of Lincoln) intended to have published in three 
fair folio volumes, had not the late troublesome times disheartened 



42G HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

him. Thus our civil wars have not only filled us with legions of 
lying pamphlets, but also deprived us of such a treasure of truth, as 
this worthy man's works would have proved to all posterity. 

" He was a stout opposer of Popish oppression in the land, and 
a sharp reprover of the corruptions of the court of Rome, as we have 
largely declared in our ' Ecclesiastical History.' Such the piety of 
his life and death, that, though loaded with curses from the Pope, 
he generally obtained the reputation of a saint. He deceased Anno 
Domini 1254." 

That well known, singular, and eccentric character, James Cham- 
bers, the itinerant poet, breathed his last in this parish, on the 4th 
of January, 1827, after a life of 78 years of destitution and wretch- 
edness, and was buried in Stradbrook church-yard. He was a na- 
tive of Soham, in Cambridgeshire ; but at an early age, either from 
necessity or choice, left his home, never to return, and for many 
years travelled this county, selling books, and occasionally some of 
his own printed compositions : sometimes he descended so low as 
to be a vender of matches. He could read well, had read much, 
and acquired amongst the country people no inconsiderable degree 
of celebrity by composing acrostics, during the night, as he laid in 
a barn or shed. He was of mild, unassuming, and inoffensive man- 
ners, and possessed a mind strongly tinctured with a sense of re- 
ligion. His general appearance was wretched in the extreme : he 
constantly ranged about in all weathers, and seemed insensible of 
the worst, always attended by a large company of dogs, who shared 
his scanty pittance, and who watched over his repose. 

In 1810, Mr. John Cordy, of Worlingworth, very kindly inter- 
ested himself in behalf of poor Chambers, and published a statement 
of his case in the " Ipswich Journal," which induced the late Dutchess 
of Chandos, the Countess of Dysart, Lord Henniker, and others, to 
send donations to him for the use of this solitary wanderer. A plan 
was accordingly formed to make him stationary : a cottage was 
hired, at Worlingworth, and furnished, and his Poems were to have 
been printed for his benefit, but after residing there a few months, 
he set off on one of his peregrinations, and returned no more. 

When a wanderer about Haverhill, Mr. John Webb, of that pa- 
rish, wrote some verses on James Chambers, the " Suffolk Itinerant 
Poet," which the editor of the " Suffolk Garland" has inserted in 
that pleasing work, with specimens of his poetry, and a narrative of 
his life, from which the above is extracted. 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 427 

CHARITIES. In 1587, Michael Wentworth, Esq., lord of the ma- 
nor of Mendham, granted to James Grudgefield, and other parish- 
ioners of Stradbrook, the town house therein, to the following uses : 
the town chamber for a school, and the rest of the premises to the 
poor of the parish, and to the rest of the inhabitants, for children 
to be taught there. This building is used partly for a school, and 
partly for the residence of the poor. In 1599, William Grendling, 
devised his messuage and land in Westhall, in this county, to An- 
thony Warner, and other inhabitants of this parish, as feoffees, upon 
trust, to such particular and Godly uses as the town stock of the pa- 
rish had usually been theretofore employed. The property at West- 
hall, comprises a house, and 76A. 2iu of land ; which let at ^90 a 
year : a house recently built, and about 1 G acres of land at Syle- 
ham, in this county ; let at 24: per annum ; purchased with town 
stock, for the purpose of binding poor children, born in the parish, 
apprentices to trades, &c. In 1G67, Giles Borrett gave a piece of 
laud in this parish, called Doggett's Pightle ; the profits thereof to 
be given yearly to the poor of Stradbrook : this pightle contains 
3A. 2R., and lets at 6 8s. a year. The rents of the above estates 
are carried to one account, and thereout are paid yearly the following 
sums : to the minister of the parish, 3 6s. 8d. ; to the surveyor of 
highways, 3 6s. 8d. ; to the master of the school, 5 ; to the poor, 
2 ; and the remainder of the rents is now applied in the repairs 
of the parish church, and in defraying other expenses attending the 
churchwardens' office, in lieu of a church rate. John Borrett, by 
will, dated in 1698, charged his lands in this parish, called Law- 
rence Meadow, and Wallhill, now the property of Mr. Edwards, with 
the payment of 5 12s. yearly : 52s. thereof to be laid out in the 
purchase of six two-penny loaves weekly, to be given to six poor 
inhabitants of Stradbrook ; and the remainder to be laid out in 
clothes of linen or woollen, as most necessary, for the said six poor 
people receiving the benefit of the former gift; 10s. to every one of 
them ; to be given twenty days before Christmas. Henry Austin, in 
1661, devised 1 to the poor, payable yearly on Christmas day, out 
of an estate in Stradbrook, late Barfoot's, abutting on Barlow Hall ; 
and Nicholas Borrett, in 1668, devised l to the poor, payable 
yearly on Ash Wednesday, out of an estate on the north side of the 
church-yard, in Stradbrook. Richmond Girling, in 1658, gave l 
10s., to be paid yearly on Midsummer- day, to be applied for the use 
of the poor in bread. The master of Stradbrook school is appointed 



428 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

by the trustees of Warner's charity, and the parishioners. His sti- 
pend consists of 5 a year, paid out of the rents of the charity es- 
tates above mentioned; and 15 a year, paid by the trustees of 
Warner's charity.* For the former he teaches five, and for the lat- 
ter, twelve poor children, as free scholars, in reading, writing, and 
arithmetic. 



TANNINGTON, or TATINTUNA. 

The author of " Magna Britannia" makes this lordship to have 
been anciently vested in William Kington ; and, by the arms of 
Braiseworth and Playters having been formerly placed in the win- 
dows of this parish church, it would appear that certain members of 
those families were interested here. 

In Loder's account of the freeholders of the manor of Saxtead, are 
the following entries : " John Woods, holdeth freely lands in Tan- 
ington: which were John Woods', 1691; John JefFrys', 1659; Si- 
mon JefFrys', 1621 ; George Jeffrys', 1608 ; and William Peter's, 1. 
E. 6., by the annual rent of 16s." 

" James Wyard, Gen., hold the manor of Bruseworth, alias Bruis- 
yards, in Taningtou, with the lands thereto belonging, freely in soc- 
cage, by suit of Court, and paying double the rent for a relief : which 
was Philip Wyard's, Gen., 1673; John Wyard's, Esq., 1659; Sir 

Thomas Playters', in 1608 ; and Playters', Esq., 1. E. 6., by 

the annual rent of 43s. 2d." Braiseworth Hall manor now belongs 
to the heirs of the late John Meadows, of Saxstead. 

Tannington Hall was the estate of Humphrey Wingfield, Esq., 
who deceased in 1587 : and the family of Dade were seated here for 
several generations, many of whom are interred in this parish church; 
who, by the memorials still remaining, were allied by marriage with 
most of the respectable families in the county. 

Thomas Dade, Esq., of this parish, married Anne, daughter of 
Eichard Cornwallis, of Shotley, 3rd son of Sir John Cornwallis, of 
Broome Hall, Knt. She deceased in 1612; and Mary, wife of 
William Dade, Esq., and daughter of Henry Wingfield, of Crowfield, 
Esq., died in 1624 ; Elizabeth, his 2nd wife, daughter of John Ke- 
vett, Esq., of Brandeston, died in 1656. Thomas Dade, Esq., mar- 
* See Boyton, p. 145. 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 429 

ried Elizabeth, eldest daughter of John Acton, Esq., of Bramford 
Hall, in 1640. He deceased in 1685. 

This family also quartered coats with Garneys, Tilney, Soame, 
Vere, &c. Thomas Bade, Esq., of this parish, married Elizabeth, 
eldest daughter of John Vere : she deceased in 1711, and was bu- 
ried at South Pickenham, in Norfolk. Their estate here was reck- 
oned worth 1,400 per annum. It was purchased by the trustees 
of William Adair, Esq., of Flixton Hall, and still continues in that 
house. 

Sir John de Pyeshale, who founded the Chantry of the Blessed 
Virgin Mary in the church of St. Andrew, at Brundish, endowed 
the same with two messuages, 184 acres of land, 10 acres of mea- 
dow, 93 acres of pasture, 36 acres of wood, and 4 10s. rent, in this 
parish, Brundish, Dennington, and Wilby. 

CHARITIES. The town estate, which is vested in trustees, con- 
sists of 27A. IR. 8p. of land, in this parish, and Brundish ; with 
18A. 3R. 26p. of land in Worlingworth ; and a cottage and garden, 
lately given by Mr. Benjamin Dunn; the rents of which amount 
together to 60 per annum, which are applied for the repair of the 
church, and for the support of a Sunday-school : the surplus is dis- 
tributed among poor persons, in coals and clothing. There are two 
cottages in this parish, given by a person named Godbold, which 
are used for the residence of paupers. 



WETHEESDALE, or WYRESDALE. 

In the 3rd of King Edward I., Banulph de Arderne had bothena 
here; and the name of Alan de Wytheresdale occurs about the 
same period. 

In the 17th of King Edward III., Sir Oliver de Ingham died, 
seized of the lordship of this parish ; and in 1523, Thos. Gawdye, 
of Wortwell, Gent., obtained a manumission of all his lands in 
Mendham, Metfield, and Wethersdale ; held of the manors of Met- 
field Priory and Bingshall, of Simon, Prior of Mendham. 

The manor was, for many years, in the Jennys ; and passed with 
that of Metfield Hall. It is now the property of Captain Kayley, 
the lord of Metfield. Wethersdale Hall estate belongs to Mr. 
George Barham, who occupies it. 



430 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

The patronage of this parish church is held with that of Fres- 
singfield, and is vested in Emanuel College, Cambridge. 

CHARITIES. The poor's land consists of two acres, in the midst 
of an enclosure, helonging to Mr. George Barham, and is distin- 
guished hy posts. This produces a yearly rent of 3 ; which is 
distributed in winter, amongst the most necessitous poor, in various 
sums, proportioned to the size of their families. 



WEYBREAD, or WEIBRADA. 

This was part of the vast territory granted to Kohert Malet, the 
lord of the manor of Eye. In 1215, Nicholas de Shelton had 
purchased all the estate of Kohert Maloysel and Alexander his son, 
in this parish. 

In the 1 7th of Edward III., Sir Oliver de Ingham died seized of 
this lordship ; and in the 5th of Henry V., Sir Miles, eldest son of 
Sir Miles Stapleton, K.G., by Joan his wife, youngest daughter and 
co-heir of the said Oliver, died possessed of the same. Sir Miles, 
son of Sir Brian, and grandson of the above Sir Miles Stapleton, at 
his decease, in 1460, left two daughters and co-heirs, by Catherine 
his 2nd wife, daughter of Sir Thomas De la Pole, Knt. 

Elizabeth, the eldest, married William Calthorpe, Esq., afterwards 
a Knight, who inherited this estate in her right ; from whom it pas- 
sed to Francis their son ; whose son William Calthorpe, Esq., sold 
the same, in 1570, to Sir Thomas Gawdy, Knt., one of the Judges 
of the Common Pleas. Henry his son, inherited; who married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Warner, Esq., and was created K.B. 
at the coronation of King James I. He wws living in 1615. 

This property soon after passed to the Hobart family. John Ho- 
bart, Esq., of Lincoln's Inn, son of Sir John Hobart, Knt., who 
was 4th son of James Hobart, of Hales Hall, in Loddon, in Norfolk, 
was lord of the manor of Weybread Hall, and resided at the manor 
house; where he deceased in 1683, leaving an only surviving child, 
Barbara, married to Herbert Astley, LL.D., Dean of Norwich ; who 
were succeeded by their son, Hobart Astley, Esq. 

This gentleman sold the manor and demesne to Edward de Ligue, 
Gent.; and in 1703, Daniel de Ligue was lord. It was afterwards 
successively held by Orton, George Gregory, John Lucas, 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 431 

and Edmund Pepys ; whose heir, or devisee, sold it to Richard Ay- 
ton, of Lombard street, London. He took the additional name of 
Lee, and devised the manor and estate, together with another manor 
in this parish, called Irstede (or Istead) Hall, to his son, Robert Lee, 
of Walthamstow, in Essex ; who sold them both : the Weybread 
Hall manor and estate, to Jennings Booty, yeoman ; and the Istead 
manor, to William Cook, the owner of the water mill. 

In 1442, Henry de Walpole, Esq., ofHoughton, in Norfolk, gave 
by will to John his son, the manor of Irstede, in this parish ; who, 
in the 21st of Edward IV., granted the same to William Walpole, 
Esq., his brother. 

The estate called Shotford Hall, in Mendham, is partly situated 
in this parish, and was formerly the property of Nicholas Smith, 
Gent. ; afterwards of Elizabeth Drury, widow ; and Anthony Drury, 
Esq., resided here in 1 723 : on a partition between his two sisters 
and co-heiresses, this estate fell to Elizabeth Roberts, widow; who 
sold it, in 1756, to Cooke Freston, Esq. ; it has been since pur- 
chased by Alexander Adair, Esq., and remains in his successor, 
William Adair, of Flixton Hall, Esq. 

The church was granted to the Priory of Butley. In 1764, Phi- 
lips Coleman was lord of the manor of Finges, and impropriator of 
the great tithes. This manor came, under his will, to Miss Ralphe, 
who married the Rev. John Edge ; and on her death, to the Cle- 
ments, of Dovercourt. The advowson of the vicarage was given to 
John Edge, son of the late Admiral Daniel, of Ipswich, who is the 
present vicar ; but the great tithes were sold to the estate owners. 
There is a manor of Weybread Rectory, which was lately in the 
Plumer family. 

The Abbot and Convent of Sibton, in Blithing hundred, held a 
grange and manor in Weybread : the Abbot of West Dereham, in 
Norfolk, also held lands here ; and Peter Fitz Walter gave a rent 
charge of half a mark, out of his mill at Irstede, to buy wine for 
mass in the church of that Monastery, with soc, sac, tholl, and many 
other royal privileges ; and the Almoner of the Cathedral Priory at 
Norwich, for his temporal rents here, was taxed at 5s. Id. 

ARMS. Ingham : per pale, or and vert, a cross moline, gules. 
Btapleton : argent ; a lion rampant, sable. 

CHARITIES. The town land is described in the parish terrier as 
" a close in Mendham, containing by estimation, eight acres, called 
Toppys ; the rents of which are to be received by the churchwardens, 



432 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

for the use of the poor." This lets at 12 a year, which is expended 
in clothing materials, and given to the poor. Harling's 'dole is 
a payment originating under the will of a Mr. Harling, dated in 
1731, of 1 5s. a year, for the poor ; and issues out of land called 
Potter's Pitts, in Weyhread. This is laid out in the purchase of 
bread, and given to the poor. 



WILBY, or WILEBEY. 

In the first of King Edward IV., John Nevil, grandson of Thomas 
Montacute, Earl of Salisbury, having stoutly adhered to the house 
of York, with Kichard Nevil, Earl of Salisbury, his father, and his 
brother, Eichard, Earl of Warwick, had, in consideration of his 
good services, a grant to himself and his heirs, amongst other es- 
tates, the lordship of this parish, with the advowsou of the church ; 
and at the same time was created Lord Montacute. 

In the 5th of the same reign, this estate was further confirmed to 
him and his heirs ; and he was advanced to the higher dignity of 
Marquess Montacute, in 1470. He however, soon after joined with 
his brother, Eichard, Earl of Warwick, in revolt against that King, 
and was, with him, slain at Barnet, in 1471; and his estates be- 
came forfeited to the Crown. 

It subsequently became the inheritance of the Wingfield family; 
and passed, by purchase, with their other estates, to the Earl of 
Eochford; who, in 1764, was lord and patron. 

The family of Bayles were resident here in the time of Queen 
Elizabeth and King James I. ; several of whom are interred in this 
parish church. 

In the " Gentleman's Magazine" for 1821, p. 423, some enquiry is 
made respecting a Mr. Edward Calver, of this parish, of whom there 
is a scarce portrait, engraved by Hollar, which has been twice copied. 
The writer observes, about the middle of the 15th century there was 
a poet of both his names, author of several publications in verse ; 
and conjectures that the portrait above mentioned was intended for 
the said poet, and might have been fixed to some one of his poems. 
This parish register contains entries from 1539 to 1654, of the Cal- 
ver family. 
. The reputed manor of Eussel's, in this parish, which formerly be- 



HUNDRED OF HOXN'E. 433 

longed to William Stane, Esq., was lately the estate of W. T. Cor- 
bett, Esq., with freehold lands near- Russet's Green ; and now be- 
longs to the Eev. Thomas Bramston Stane, of Essex. 

Thomas John Ord, Esq., of Fornham St. Martin, and the Rev. 
Daniel Gwilt, of Icklingham, are also proprietors of estates in this 
parish. The family of Green was likewise for many generations 
seated at Wilby : the mansion in which they resided has been long 
demolished, and a fine avenue of oaks has lately followed its fate ; 
but the moat still points out the spot where the house once stood. 

They were the ancestors of the Greens, of Ipswich ; of whom was 
Thomas Green, Esq., a gentleman of considerable literary attain- 
ments, who in 1769, published a periodical work in folio, entitled 
" Euphrasy," which was extended to twelve numbers. He was also 
the author of several other publications. 

Mr. Green deceased at his residence in Ipswich, in 1794, and his 
widow, in 1819 ; they were both interred in the family vault, in the 
south aisle of this parish church. He left issue an only son, Thomas 
Green, Esq., born in 1769; who married, in 1795, Catherine, the 
youngest daughter of Thomas Hartcup, Esq., a Lieutenant- Colonel 
in the corps of Royal Engineers. He deceased in 1825, and was 
also interred at Wilby. 

An interesting " Memoir" of this gentleman,* with a critique on 
his writings, and an account of his family connections, was written 
by his intimate friend, the Rev. James Ford, B.D., then of Ipswich, 
now vicar of Navestock, in Essex ; for presentation among the more 
immediate and intimate friends of the deceased : from which work 
we select the following particulars. 

His family were in the possession of considerable landed property 
in this and adjacent parishes. On the paternal side he was related 
to Dr. Thomas Green, Bishop of Ely ; and on the maternal, nearly 
allied to two eminent and distinguished individuals, Archbishop 
Sancroft, and " honest Tom Martin," of Palgrave. Mr. Green re- 
ceived the early part of his education at the Grammar-school, Ips- 
wich ; and was afterwards under the private superintendance of 
Mr. William Jervis, an eminent dissenting minister, of that town. 
In 1791, he was admitted a member of the Inner Temple ; and after 
the usual attendance in the Inns of Court, was called to the Bar. 
Mr. Green was the author of several political and other pamph- 

* An excellent portrait of Mr. Green, engraved by W. H. Worthington, from a 
drawing by W. H. Bennett, is given in his " Memoirs.'' 



434 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

lets; but his. largest and principal work he published in 1810, 
under the title of " Extracts from the Diary of a Lover of Litera- 
ture." "A spirit of the gentleman, the scholar, and the man of 
extensive reading, pervades the whole of this interesting and enter- 
taining publication," observes the author of his " Memoirs." Since 
Mr. Green's decease, a continuation of these extracts have appeared 
in the " Gentleman's Magazine." 

ARMS. Green : party per pale, azure and gules, a chevron, be- 
tween three bucks trippant, or. Bayles : or; a lion passant, in 
fess, between three crosses formee, sable. 

CHARITIES. The town estate here, with the exception of about 
7^ acres of copyhold land in the parish of Wilby, are of freehold 
tenure ; the particulars and rental thereof being as follows : a 
house, buildings, and 27A. 5p. of land in this parish ; rent 36 per 
annum: SA. 12P. of land in Wilby; let at l 5s. a year: a house, 
buildings, and ISA. IR. 25p. of land in the same parish; rent 27 
per annum : a house, yard, and SA. 3R. 13p. of land in Bedfield 
parish ; let at 8 8s. a year : total rental, 72 13s. The rents are 
applied, after deducting for the repairs of the buildings on the estate, 
in the reparation of the church, and payment of other charges inci- 
dental to the churchwardens' office ; the repairs of the poor house, 
and the parish clerk's house, and in paying a surgeon for attending 
the poor in the parish : a sum of money is also laid out, yearly, 
from this fund, in the purchase of coals ; part of which are distri- 
buted gratis to poor widows and widowers, and other parts are sold 
to poor persons at reduced prices. 



WINGFIELD, or WYNGFELD. 

The Knightly family of Wingfield are supposed to have been 
seated here at the period of the Norman Conquest. Sir Eobert de 
Wingfield, Knt., lord of this manor, by Joan his wife, daughter of 
Sir John Fastolf, Knt., had issue Thomas, who married Alice, 
daughter of Sir Nicholas Weyland, Knt. ; by whom he had issue 
Sir John, who married Anne, daughter of John Peche, Esq. ; by 
whom he had Sir John Wingfield, Knt., his eldest surviving son 
and successor. 

He was living in the reign of King Edward II., or III., and mar- 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 435 

ried Elizabeth, the daughter of John Honeypot, of this parish, Esq., 
and left issue three sons: Sir John, the eldest, presented to the 
church of Saxmundham in 1348 ; Richard, the next brother, seated 
himself at Dennington, to which he presented in 1342; and Sir 
Thomas, the youngest, was possessed of Letheringham, by marriage 
with Margaret, sole daughter and heiress of Sir John de Bovile, 
Knt., of that parish, and relict of Sir John Carbonel, Knt. 

The above Sir John Wingfield, Knt., left an only daughter and 
heiress, Catherine, who married Michael de la Pole, the first of that 
name, Earl of Suffolk ; by which marriage this manor, and the ex- 
tensive estates attached to it, were carried into that noble family ; in 
which it continued for several generations. While in their posses- 
sion, they obtained license to convert the Manor House into a Castle, 
and to inclose and impark all the woods and lands belonging to the 
same. 

The most memorable historical character in connexion with this 
parish, is William de la Pole, the first Duke of Suffolk ; who, in- 
deed, it may be presumed, was the builder of the Castle, in the reign 
of King Henry VI. His father, the first Earl, had acquired the 
lordship as above stated ; and at this place Suffolk reigned in all his 
power. It was within his own county, at St. Edmund's Bury, he 
caused the Parliament to be assembled, in 1446 ; at which time the 
good Duke of Gloucester was arrested and murdered. The Duke 
of Suffolk suffered a death of equal violence four years after, on the 
sea, between England and Calais, by having his head struck off on 
the gunwale of a boat, and his body thrown into the sea. 

In the 4th of Edward I., Geoffrey Frumband held sixty acres of 
land in Wingfield, by the service of paying to the King two white 
doves annually ; and Katherine, the relict of the 2nd Earl of Suffolk, 
died seized, amongst divers fees, of the fee called Frumband's (alias 
Frumbaldes), in Wingfield; of which Elizabeth, one of the daugh- 
ters and co-heirs of Michael and Katherine, died seized, in the 1st 
of Henry VI. These were granted by Henry VIII., to Thomas, 
Lord Howard (afterwards Duke of Norfolk), and Anne his wife, one 
of the daughters and co-heirs of Edward IV., and the heirs of her 
body ; she however died without issue, and they reverted to the 
Crown. 

Wingfield Castle subsequently became the estate of the Catelyn 
family ; who derive from Richard Catelyn, Esq., Sheriff of Norwich, 
in 1531, and Alderman of that city, 1556. Thomas, 2nd son of 



436 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

Richard Catelyn, Esq., serjcant-at law, -was lord here in or about 
1604 ; he deceased in 1606, when Richard Catelyn, Esq., his son, 
succeeded ; who, by his second wife, Dorothy, daughter of Sir Henry 
Nevil, of Billingbere, in Berkshire, Knt , had issue a son and heir, 
Sir Nevil ; and Richard, who died without issue ; also Anne, who 
manied Thomas Leman, Gent., of Wenhaston, in Blithing hundred, 
and three other daughters. 

Sir Nevil Catelyn was Knighted by King Charles II., at Somer- 
set House, in London, in 1062, and was owner of this estate. He 
married, 1st., Dorothy, daughter of Sir Th'-mas Bedingfield, of Dar- 
sliam, in this county; his 2nd wife was Elizabeth, daughter of 
Robert Houghton, of Ranworth, Esq. ; he married, 3rdly, Mary, 
daughter of Sir William, and sister of Sir Charles Blois, Bart., of 
Cockfield Hall, in Yoxlbrd, and of Grundisburgh. Sir Nevil deceased 
in 170.2, without surviving issue, and this property passed to the 
descendants of his sister Anne, wifo of Thomas Leman, Gent. : and 
Robert Leman, D.D., rector of Pakefield, in this county, second son 
of Robert Leman, Esq., of Brampton, died in 1779, seized of this 
estate. By the will of his heiress it came to, and is now vested in, 
the family of Wilson, of Didlingtnn, and Kirby Cane, in Norfolk ; 
lineal descendant of the Lord Berners, whose family estate and title 
they now possess. 

The chancel of this parish church contains some fine monuments 
of the De la Poles, whose arms adorn the font, the east window, and 
the pulpit ; and against the south wall of the same, hangs a pedi- 
gree of that family, neatly written un parchment, with their arms 
beautifully emblazoned ; to which is prefixed the following title ; 
"An exact account of the most noble family of the De la Poles, 
from their first srttling at Wingfield, until the extinction of the 
family ; collected by William Bedford, M.A., appointed and licensed 
curate of Wingfield, April 26th, 1684. This monumental table was 
drawn and fixed up here by the said William Bedford, July 14th, 
1701, and since transcribed by Thomas Folkard, July 22nd, 1725." 

The church built of flints and stones of different colours, exhibits 
a very singular and beautiful appearance. One of the monumental 
effigies hero has been ascribed to William De la Pole, Duke of Suf- 
folk ; but this appears inci >rrect, for the three effigies in Wingfield 
church, all of which are engraved in " Stothard's Monumental Effi- 
gies," belong to other generations of the family. Here are besides, 
several brasses for other members of this family. Weever mentions 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 437 

some to Kichard and John De la Pole, sons of Michael De la Pole, 
first Eurl of Suffolk, who decoded in 1403, and 1415 ; also John 
De Ja Poh:, son and heir of WiJliam De la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, 
who died in 1491 ; and some members of the Letheringham branch 
of the family. 

1" 100 1 , William de Easthawe, of this parish, was rector of Bil- 
linglbrd, in Norfolk, where ho was buried, in L'lbS ; he made the 
lattices between the church and the chancel there. In 1713, John 
Briars. M.A., \vas appointed curate of this parish, by P>isho}> Trim- 
nel, whose chaplain he was, and rector of Diss and Billingford, in 
Norfolk; were he was buried in 17^8. Mr. Briars published a 
Sermon preached at Palgrave, in Suffolk, at the first meeting of the 
gentlemen and clergy, for encouraging the charity school lately set 
up there: London, 1711 : also a pamphlet, and several anonymous 
poems, inserted in different miscellanies. 

In the year 1302, the executors of Sir John de Wingfield pro- 
cured, in pursuance of his will, the parish church of St. Andrew, in 
Wiiigfield, t< i be made collegiate ; and at the south-west corner of 
the church-yard, they erected a College for priests, or canons. Pre- 
vious!) to this there was a Chantry here ; which was founded, a 
short time before, by Sir John and Lady Wingfield. 

It was dedicated to the Virgin Mary, St. John Baptist, and St. 
Andrew, and consisted at first of a Provost (or master), and three 
priests ; afterwards, of nine priests and three choristers : in 1405, 
another priest was added. In 1438, Henry Trevylian, rector of 
Walsokcn, in Norfolk, was Custos of this College. According to 
the ordinance oi the founder, three boys were supported here ; and 
the funds for their maintenance were valued, at the dissolution, at 
8 per ;mnum. 

It was endowed with the appropriated churches of Wingfield, Sile- 
1mm, with the chapel < i!' Esham, and Stradbrokc ; the manors of 
Benhall, Sileham, Stradbn ke, Walpole, with Chekering, and Mid- 
clleton Chekering; with lands and rents in divers other parishes. 
Its gross value in "Valor Ecclesiasticus," is 82 10s. 4d. In the 
time of King Edward VI., it became vested in the Bishop of Nor- 
wich, in exchange for other property. The site of this College, 
and the arable, meadow, and pasture lands immediately attached 
thereto, contained about sixty acres, and were valued, with the rents 
appertaining, at 8 6s. 2:\d., in 1534. 

The Bishop of Norwich is proprietor of the site, and patron of 



438 HUNDRED OF HOXNE, 

the church of St. Andrew, in Wingfield. It is a perpetual curacy ; 
which Bishop Eeynolds endowed with an additional annuity of 26 
per annum, during his life. 

Eobert Edgar, Esq., resided at this College : he deceased in 1654, 
and made Thomas Edgar, of North Glemham, Esq., his heir. Mr. 
Edgar was interred in this parish church, as was John Cornwallis, 
Esq., Justice of Peace, Deputy Lieutenant, and High Sheriff of this 
county; who deceased in 1698, the year in which he filled the latter 
office. 

The Eichard de Brews, whom Kirby says had a grant for a fair 
here in the 3rd of King Edward III., could only have held the ad- 
vowson, or probably a small manor called Old Hall ; as the Wing- 
fields were possessed of the principal one long before that period. 

The Castle* is situate about a quarter of a mile north-west of the 
church. It stands low, without any out- works for its defence. The 
south front, or principal entrance, is still entire, and is a noble gate- 
way, flanked with towers ; and an outer wall, following the inner 
line of a moat, which incloses the site of the building. The west 
side is a farm house. 

ARMS. Catelyn : per chevron, azure and or, three lions passant 
guardant, in pale, counterchanged ; on a chief, argent, as many 
snakes, nowed, sable, stinged, gules. Wilson : sable ; a wolf sa- 
liant, or : in chief, a fleur-de-lis, argent, between two bezants. 

CHARITIES. The town estate consists of a messuage, used as a 
house for the reception of the poor of the parish, with a yard and 
garden thereto belonging ; and a farm, called Towers, comprising a 
house, with out-buildings, and several parcels of land ; which lets at 
4,5 a, year. The whole of the estate contains, by admeasurement, 
35A. 34=p. ; and was devised by John Trower, in 1513. The rents 
of the farm are employed in reparations upon the estate, in the pay- 
ment of such charges as are usually defrayed by the churchwardens, 
and a small part is applied in occasional relief of poor persons. In 
1731, Harling gave a dole of ^Gl 5s. a year, to this parish, as in 
Weybread ; which is also laid out in the purchase of bread for the 
poor. 



* A view of this building in its entire state, from a drawing taken by John Snell, 
jun., of St. Edmund's Bury, is given in the " Gentleman's Magazine" for 1775, p. 
512 j and various other illustrations have appeared since that period. 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 439 



WORLINGWORTH, or WYRLINGWORTHA. 

Athulf (Adulf, or Eadulf) gave a third part of the lordship and 
advowson of this parish to Bury Abhey. He was Bishop of Elm- 
ham, in Norfolk, after the union of the sees, and constantly resided 
there. He signed King Edgar's charter to the church of York. 
Ailfric, the second Bishop of the see of that name, was also a great 
benefactor to that Monastery, and gave lands in this parish to the 
same. At the dissolution, Anthony Rous, Esq., obtained a grant 
of the said estate. 

In 1764, John, only surviving son of John Major, Esq., of Brid- 
liugton, in the county of York, was in possession of this property ; 
who represented the borough of Harborough in Parliament, and was 
advanced to the dignity of a Baronet, July 15th, 1765, by the title 
of Sir John Major, of Worlingworth Hall, in Suffolk, Bart. ; and 
his heirs male ; and in default of such issue, to his son-in-law, John 
Henniker, of Newton Hall, in Essex, Esq., and his heirs male. 

Sir John married Elizabeth, only daughter of Daniel Dale, of 
Bridlington aforesaid ; by whom he had issue two daughters, Anne 
and Elizabeth. The latter married, in 1767, Henry Bridges, 2nd 
Duke of Chandos ; and Anne, the eldest daughter and co-heir, mar- 
ried John, son of John Henniker, Esq., an eminent Russian mer- 
chant; and upon Ms decease, in 1781, was succeeded in his title, 
and a moiety of his estate, by his said son-in-law. 

Sir John Henniker, Bart., was elevated to the peerage of Ireland, 
as Baron Henniker, of Stratford-upou-Slaney, in 1800 ; and dying 
in 1803, was succeeded by his eldest son, John, as 2nd Baron ; who 
died without issue in 1821, when the honours devolved upon his 
nephew, John Minet Henniker, Esq. ; who married Mary, daugh- 
ter of the Rev. William Chafie, minor canon of Canterbury. He 
assumed the additional surname of Major in 1822, and deceased in 
1832; was succeeded by his eldest son, John Henniker Major, as 
4th Baron ; who married, in 1837, Anna, eldest daughter of Lieu- 
tenant General Sir Edward Kerrison, Bart., of Oakley and Brome. 
His lordship represents East Suffolk in Parliament, and is lord and 
patron of this parish. 

Edward Dunstan, Esq., of this parish, married Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter and co-heir of John Mayhew, of Mouk-Soham. Elizabeth, 
their sole daughter and heir, married to Sir Robert Drury, Bart., of 



440 HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 

Bidlesworth, in Norfolk, in 1660 ; and deceased in 1667 : was in- 
terred in this parish church. 

In this parish church is preserved the antique and beautiful Go- 
thic font, which once adorned the Abhey Church of Bury ; an en- 
graving of which was published in 1753, by Vertue. It was some 
years since thoroughly repaired, at the expense of Lord Henniker. 

James Goldwell, Bishop of Norwich, at his coming to the see, 
appointed his brother, Nicholas Goldwell, LL.B., who had been 
rector of Roding Alta, which he resigned for St. Alary Wolnoth, in 
London, collector of his first fruits in this diocese ; and in 1479, 
collated him to Sudbury Archdeaconry ; which he resigned in 1483, 
for the Archdeaconry of Norwich ; and that in 1497, for the Arch- 
deaconry of Suffolk ; being also rector of this parish, and vicar 
general, in 1482. 

From the churchwardens' account book of this parish, the follow- 
ing entries are selected : 

" Agd these to be ye parcell of ye expens layd out by the town for ye soldyars 
wylst ye Queue gras remayned at Framygam Castle, the xth of October, a - - - o 
dni 1553 .: 

" Imprimis payd to Wylls Maship for 7 bushels of malt s. d. 
redy grow'd ......70 

It to ye same for 3 fyrkyn of drynke - - - 23 

It to Thomas Watlyng for a fyrkyn of butter - - 10 
It to ye same for a fyikyn of ayle .... 9 

It to ye same for a shovel lost at Framygam - - 12 
It to Robt. Ancok for 4 galons of drynk - 6 

It to Robt. Adams for mendyng of a mattok - - 06 
It to Wylls Brown for a fyrkyn of drynk - 09 

It to ye same for chese ------ 4." 

Stow observes that, " when the camp broke up at Framlingham, 
victuals were of such plenty that a barrel of beer with the cask was 
sold for sixpence, and four great loaves of bread for a penny," and 
the above extract tends to confirm his statement. 

ARMS. Quarterly : first and fourth, Henniker : or, a chevron, 
gules, between two crescents in chief; and in base, an escallop, 
azure. Second and third, Major : azure ; three pillars, of the Co- 
rinthian order ; on the summit of each a ball, or. 

Mem. The day on which King George III. completed the 50th 
year of his reign, was celebrated in this parish, by Lord Henniker, 
with that characteristic loyalty and munificence that so constantly 
marked his lordship's conduct. The most prominent festivity of the 
day was an ox roasted whole, and afterwards distributed to the popu- 



HUNDRED OF HOXNE. 441 

lace, in the presence of the Dutchess of Chandos, Lord and Lady 
Henniker, and other members of that family. The number of peo- 
ple assembled to witness this display of British hospitality was es- 
timated ut between four and five thousand. Oct. 25th, 1810. 

CIL\ IIITIES. The town estate, the original acquisition of which 
is unknown, consists of the following particulars : a messuage, 
called the Guildhall, occupied by poor persons, rent free : a farm 
house, bam, &c., and 40A. !2n. 15p. of land, let at Q5 a year: 
land, called Blakeland, 7 A. ; rent 10 per annum : cottage and gar- 
den ; rent '3 a year. The above are situate in this parish. In 
Tannington is a house, barn, and GA. 2n. of land; let at 10 per 
annum : and in Bedfield, a barn lately built, and :!2A. 3n. of land; 
rent ^Q a year : also a house and four pightles, containg 4A. SB. 
24 L\; rent 7 per annum. Total ^131 per annum. The rents 
are applied in the payment of 4 to Baldry's charity, and 5 in aid 
of Godbold's charity, after mentioned ; in the repairs of the several 
buildings on the estate, and the church, and payment of the parish 
clerk's and sexton's salaries; and 7 a year in the support of a 
Sunday school, and in the purchase of coals ; which are distributed 
among poor persons of the parish. In 1689, John Baldry, by will, 
gave his copyhold messuage and lands in Monk-Soham, to the feof- 
fees of this parish, upon trust ; with the rents and profits, to provide 
a schoolmaster, to educate all such poor children as should inhabit 
in the town of Worlingworth, to read, write, and cast accounts, free 
of charge to their parents : he also devised a pightle in Bedfield, 
called Gardiner's Pightle, for the relief of the poor. John God- 
bold in 1698, gave by will, 120, for the yearly increase of the sa- 
lary and maintenance of a schoolmaster ; and he gave to the use of 
the poor of Worlingworth, two messuages, for 2s. worth of bread, 
to be distributed weekly ; and 1 Os. for a sermon on Ash- Wednes- 
day; and the overplus, if any, should be given to such poor as 
should be present at the said sermon. The income arising from 
these bequests is 64 per annum. A house for the schoolmaster 
was built in 1825, upon land belonging to the parish, at the ex- 
pense of Mr. John Corby, of Woodbridge ; for which the privilege 
was reserved to him, his executors, administrators, and assigns, of 
sending two children to the school from the hamlet of Southolt. 
The number of free scholars is 60 or 70, being for all children of 
parents of Worlingworth who occupy at rents not exceeding 10 a 
year. 



Or HERTESMERA. 



This Hundred is bounded on the East, by that of Hoxne ; on 
the West, by Blackbourn ; on the North, by the River Waveney, 
which divides it from Norfolk ; and on the South, by the Hun- 
dreds ofBosmere and Clay don and Stow. It has these parishes : 

ASPALL, REDLINGFIELD, 

B ACTON, REDGRAVE, 

BOTESDALE, RlCKINGALE- SUPERIOR, 

BREISWORTH, RISH ANGLES, 

BROOME, STOKE ASH, 

BROCKFORD, STUSTON, 

BURGATE, THORNDON, 

COTTON, THORNHAM MAGNA, 

EYE, THORNHAM PARVA, 

FlNNINGHAM, THRANDESTON, 

GISLINGHAM, THWAITE, 

MELLIS, WESTHORP, 

MENDLESHAM, WETHERINGSETT, 

OAKLEY, WICKHAM-SKEITH, 

OCCOLD, WORTHAM, 

PALGRAVE, WYVERSTON, 
And YAXLEY. 

The fee of this Hundred was granted, in tail mail, by Edward 
III., to Robert de Uffbrd, Earl of Suffolk, in the \\th year of 
his reign ; who died possessed thereof in the 4,3rd of that King ; 
when William, his son, inlierited the same ; upon whose death it 
reverted to the Grown, and subsequently belonged to the De la 
Poles. John Henry Heigham, Esq., of Hunston Hall, is the 
present lord of this fee. 



HUNDRED OF HARTISMERE. 



ASPALL. ESPALA, or ASPKLLA. 

In the 9th of Edward L, Aspall was the lordship of William de 
Butler (or Bottiller) ; and Margaret, heiress of John Felbrigge, 
held the same, and Bures, in Bahergh hundred. 

The very ancient family of Brooke were early seated in this pa- 
rish. Edward Brooke, Lord Cobham, died seized of this lordship, 
and Herdeburgh, in 1464. Kegiuald Brooke, ,brother of Edward, 
Lord Cobham, and 2nd son of Sir Thomas Brooke, Knt., Baron of 
Cobham, in the county of Kent, fixed his seat in this village. 

His second son, Robert Brooke, was Alderman of London ; who 
purchased Cockfield Hall, in Yoxford, of the Hoptons, and made it 
his residence. George Brooke, the elder brother, continued at As- 
pall Hall. George Brooke, of Aspall, Esq., in the time of King 
James, had of his own, and by his wife, about 800 per annum ; 
but a considerable part of his estate became alienated prior to his 
decease. 

The estate here continued in this house until John Brooke, Esq., 
the 7th in a direct line from Reginald, sold it to Clement Chevalier, 
Esq., of the Island of Jersey ; whose grandson, the Rev. John Che- 
valier, M.D., is the present lord, and resides here ; he has also the 
patronage, and is perpetual curate. 

This John Brooke removed to Athelington, in Hoxne hundred ; 
and by Mary his wife, daughter of George Green, Gent., of Brun- 
dish, had issue a son and two daughters : namely, George, who 
married and had issue ; Rebecca, who died single ; and Penelope, 
who married the Rev. Nathaniel Rye, of Hepworth. She deceased 
in 1741. These branches of the family are all buried in Atheling- 
ton church-yard. 

A pension of 26s. 8d. per annum was paid out of this church to 
the Prior and Convent of Castle- Acre, in Norfolk, to which it appears 
to have formerly belonged, but afterwards to Butley Abbey ; as the 
impropriation was granted as parcel of the possession of that Mo- 



446 HUNDRED OF HARTISMERE. 

nastery, to Francis Framlingham, in the 34th of King Henry VIII. ; 
and Sir Charles Gawdy settled the same upon the officiating minister^ 
for the time being, for ever. 



BACTON, or BACHETUNAM. 

In or ahout 1256, Sir Eobert de Bosco, of Fersfield, in Norfolk, 
Knt., held lands in this parish, and Newton, by purchase from Wil- 
liam de Bovile, and Joan his wife, sole daughter and heiress of 
Gilbert de Bosco, elder brother of the said Sir Kobert de Bosco ; 
and which the said William de Bovile held in her right. Sir Kobert 
de Bosco deceased in 1298. William de Bois, son of Nicholas, and 
grandson of the above Sir Eobert de Bosco, with Christian his wife, 
were residents at Greeting St. Mary, in Bosmere and Claydon hun- 
dred, in 1310. 

The lordship and demesne of this parish was a part of the posses- 
sion of the Bishop of Norwich. In 1235, Thomas de Blumville, 
Bishop there, gave to King Henry III., 100, to have this manor 
confirmed to his Bishopric, it being of right an escheat to it. 

In the 16th of King Edward IV., Sir Edward Hungerford, John 
Heydon, and Humphrey Forster, released by deed, to John De la 
Pole, Duke of Suffolk, and Elizabeth his wife, William Hastings, 
Eobert Chamberlain, and others, to the use of the said Duke and 
Dutchess, the lordship of this parish, Frostenden, and Greeting St. 
Olave's, which the said Sir Edward, &c., stood seized of, to the use 
of William De la Pole, late Duke of Suffolk, and the lady Alice his 
wife, deceased. 

On the attainder of Edmund De la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, in 1513, 
these estates became forfeited to the Crown ; and were granted (Mr. 
Kirby supposes) to the Duke of Norfolk ; which he conveyed in 
1558, to Sir John Tyrell, of Gipping, in exchange for the manor of 
Banham, in Norfolk. 

About this period a branch of the Hobart family were interested 
here. In the 20th of King Henry VIII., Sir Walter, son and heir 
of Sir James Hobart, Knt., settled a lordship in this parish on Henry 
Hobart, Esq., his son and heir; which Henry was lord in 1550. 

The family of Pretyman were seated here in the time of Queen 
Elizabeth, if not earlier ; of whom was Sir John Pretyman, Knt., 



HUNDRED OF HARTISMERE. 447 

only surviving son of William Pretyman, of this parish ; and the 
brother and heir of William Pretyman, late of Gray's Inn. Sir John 
Pretyman's father deceased in 1593, or 1594. 

Sir John was lord of the manors of B acton and Thorndon ; the 
latter he purchased of a John and Thomas Pretyman, in 1614 ; 
were it is supposed he, or his son Robert Pretyman, by his first wife, 
Dorothy, daughter of Sir Robert Drury, of Rougham, Knt., resided 
for some time, perhaps till the death of Robert; as, in 1629, Sir 
John Pretyman, for himself, and as executor to his son Robert, sold 
the Thorndon estate to a Mr. Bishop. The above Dorothy was 
buried in Bacton church, in 1607. 

He appears to have removed to Driffield Abbey, in Gloucester- 
shire, soon after the decease of his son Robert ; and to have sold 
the reversion of the Bacton property, when he left Suffolk, to a 
Henry Pretyman ; whose grandson, Henry, re-sold this estate back 
to the elder branch of the family ; a part of which was late in the 
possession of the Right Rev. Sir George Pretyman Tomline, Bart., 
D.D., F.R.S., Lord Bishop of Winchester ; devised him by the will 
of James Hayes, Esq., in 1821 ; which Mr. Hayes inherited from 
the widow of a great uncle of the Bishop, who gave the same to a 
relation of her own, the mother of Mr. Hayes. George Tomline, 
of Riby Grove, Brigg, Lincolnshire, Esq., is the owner of freehold 
lands and premises in this parish, called Bacton Reed House. 

A branch of the family of Smythe were resident here, who derived 
from a Smyth, of Cavendish : the estate, in the time of King Charles 

L, was about ^300 per annum. Roger Nuttall, second son of 

Nuttall, of Nuttall Hall, in Lancashire, was rector of this parish in 
the time of Queen Elizabeth. He married Elizabeth, daughter of 

Smythe, of Bacton. The church contains a memorial to 

Thomas Smythe, Gent., who deceased in 1 702. He married Do- 
rothy, daughter of. George and Susan Pretyman. 

In 1316, Firmanus de Lavenham was rector of this parish, and 
Archdeacon of Sudbury ; Dean of Orford Deanery in the following 
year; rector of Great Cressingham, in Norfolk, in 1324; and in 
1328, Chancellor of Norwich. 

ARMS. Pretyman : gules ; a lion passant, between three mul- 
lets, or. Smythe : argent ; a chevron, gules, between three cross 
crosslets, sable. 

CHARITIES. The town lands here are under the management of 
the churchwardens, overseers of the poor, and principal inhabitants ; 



448 HUNDRED OF HAETISMERE. 

and consist of 20 acres of land in the parish of Finningham, let 
at 4,0 a year; 11 j acres in Old Newton, rent 21 per annum; 
and 18 acres in this parish, let at 39 a year. The land at Fin- 
ningham was vested at an early period in trustees, for the sole use 
of the town of Bacton ; that at Old Newton was purchased, in or 
before the reign of James I., with 100, paid by the headboroughs 
and inhabitants ; and the land at Bacton, part of which is copyhold, 
was anciently held by trustees for exoneration from taxes, and other 
aid of the inhabitants, at their discretion. The rents are applied in 
payment of the expenses attendant on the office of churchwarden, 
and the remainder is paid to the overseers, and applied for the re- 
lief of the poor. A rent charge of 13s. 4d. a year, called Daine's 
gift, is paid out of the estate of the Right Hon. John Hookham 
Frere ; and a rent charge of 8s. a year, called Warren's Dole, is 
paid out of an estate the property of William Tomline, Esq. These 
are applied with the rent of the town lands. 

NOTE. The following old Inventories, transcribed from original documents, the 
curious in such matters may think worth preserving : 

hJ Hie Su^t Jocalia et Ornamenta pertin. Ecclesie de Baketon Vicesimo septimo 
die Mensis Mali Ano Dni Millimo CCCC Octogessimo quinto. 
Fyrst ij Chalys of Sylver wyth ij kacys longing to the same. 
Also a Senser of Sylver 4 cil gylt with a kace longing to the same. 

De dono Koberti Goche. 
Also a Shyppe of Sylver with a Spoon of Sylver longing to the same. 

De dono Agnetis Goche. 

Also ij Sensiris of Latin with a Shippe of Laton. 
Also a pyx of Laton with a Cloth of Cypres longing to the same. 
Also a Crismatory of Laton. 

Also a Cross of Copyr and gylt, with a Staff of Copyr and gylt longing to the 
same Cros. 

De dono Simonis Brawnche. 
Also iij Crossys of Laton wyth Sockets. 
And ij Stafys of Tre longing to the same Crossys. 
Also a Cros of Tre for the Sepulkyr. 
Also iij Candlestekys of Laton. 
Also a new Masse Book. 

De dono Dni Willi. Revett. 
Also ij Masse Bookys and a Pystil Book. 
"^j Also a new A/tissener. 

TVJ Also ij Olde A^tisseners without Sawters. 

Also ij Sawters, and olde Sawter. 
Also an Autissener wyth a Sawter yeryn. 

De dono pditi Dini Willi. Revett. 
Also ij newe Grayelis and an olde Grayel. 



HUNDRED OF HAH! IS ME RE. 449 



BOTESDALE, or BOTHULPHSDALE. 

Is a hamlet of Redgrave, to which church the inhabitants resort 
for their religious rights ; and the lordship has always passed with 

Also a newe F cessonary. 

De dono Thome Reynberd p filia sua F. 
Also a new Brevyat P cessoaary. 

De dono -.------.- 

Also a Quayyer wyth Commemoracioyys and the Canon yeryn and an olde 

Quayer with the Dirige and other P yers yeryn. 
Also a Legend tempall and Sco wreten the mostc pte in Sextarag wyth a 

Kalender and the Letunye and the Feryal Letanyes wythal, wreten in the 

same Book. 
Also iij old Legendes oon tempal and Sco and another tempal and another Sco 

ychebytheSelfe. 
Also a new Autiphener. 

De dono Robti Revett. 
Also a Martyloge. 
Also a Manual 
Also a Vestement of Blewe Sylke wyth brawnchis of Gold yeryn wyth alle Ap- 

parrell longing to the same. 

De dono Simonis Brawnchis. 
Also a Vestement of Sylke Grene and Blewe with all yat pteynyth to the same, 

De dono Johis Sparrowe dici quond Rectoris istius Ecclesia. 
Also a Vestement of Sylke Sangwyn and Blewe with all yat pteynyth to the same. 
Also a Vestement ij wreckelyB and a Cope of Reed velvet with Orfreys of Gold 

wyth yes yyng longing to the same, the Cope and alle of the gjfte of Robt. 

Goche for his friends. 
Also a Cope of Sylke Blewe and Whyght. 
Also ij Quer Copys of reede Sylke wythe Lecyns of Gold yeryn. 
Also a Cope of Bawdekyn grene and reede, De dono Executors Radi Deynes. 
Also a Crymgyn Vestyment with all the plen longing ther to. 
Also a seryal Vestyment of whith. 
Also j seryal Vestyment of grene. 
Also a seryal Vestyment of Motho. 
Also a Care Cloth. 
Also ix Aultyr Clothys 
Also viii Towalys. Also ij seryal Towyl. 
Also to Redelys of Sylke for the hey Aultyr. 
Also ij Clothys of Reede for to hangyn a for Aultyrs and Frontellys loagyng 

there to. Also vi Corporasys. 

Also iij feryalys Clothys for to hanging afor the Aultyrs. 
Also ij C ordlyts on and on grene. Also j Crosse Cloth of Sylke. 

Also i Crosse Cloth of Wyte. Also i Weyle Cloth. 
Also a Sepulcre Cloth and all longeth ther to. 
Also a Cloth for Corp x daye. 



450 HUNDRED OF HARTISMERE. 

that of Kedgrave. It had an early grant of a weekly market, on 
Thursdays ; now almost, if not altogether, discontinued. 

Botesdale is situate upon the great road that leads from St. Ed- 
mund's Bury, into Norfolk, Norwich, Yarmouth, &c. ; consequently 
is a considerable thoroughfare for travellers. 

It contains a Chapel or Chantry, dedicated to St. Botulph ; foun- 
ded by John Sheriff, for the benefit of his own and his wife's soul. 
It is situated eastward from the school house, and has been for many 
years used as a school-room ; but has recently, by means of sub- 

The Stuff longing to the Gyld. 

Ffirst x Platers of Pewtyr, iiij dyschess of Pewtyr, xiii Susyng dyschys of Pew- 

tyr vii Sawsers of Pewtyr ij Sallys of Pewtyr of the Gyfte of Thomas Reyn- 

bird and Margaret hys wyfe. 
It i Spete of Yryn of the gyfte of the sayd Thomas Reynbird and Margaret Lys 

wyfe. 

It ij Spetys of Yryn. It ij Cawdrowyrys of Bras. 
It j Trevet of Yryn. It on Cawdrow. 
It j Trevet of Yryn of the gyfte of Thomas Goodman. 
It ij Candelstykys of Copyr and gylte of the gyfte of William Revet for the 

Helthe of the Sowlys of Robert Revet and Mar. his wyff . 

Md. in the Zer of our Lord God 1529 Thomas Talbot and Thomas Symond 
Church Revys of the Town of Bakton have delyred to William Ptyman and to 
Thorns Deynys Elate Churcherevys of Bakton on Pentecoste Suday wythen the 
Zere above wretyn. 

Ip vij Dosejn platers and on Plater 

It xvij Doseyn Servyng dyss and vi. 

It iiij Cowtyrfete dyssys. It xxxiij Salts. 

It iij doseyn Sawsers and vi. 

It xxx new Cuppys and vii olde Cuppys 

It vi Trenchers. It iij Cawdronys n Trevets and n Spets belonging to the 

Town of Bakton. 

It i Brasse Pott of gyfte of Robt. Symond and Agnes his Wyflf and his friends. 
Also a Cloth of paysyor. Also j Audyr Cloth. 
Also a Leyton Cloth of redde 

Also j Vestyment of blake damaske of the gyfte of Thomas Reynbird. 
Itm ij fferyall Albys 

Also i kewyng for the Pyxte of the gyfte of Dame Elizabt. Wingford. 
It ij pyluys of Silke. It ix Surplies. 
A Cope Qwyzthe Damask 

A Vestyment of qwyzthe Damask of the gyfte of Robt. Reynbird. 
A Vestyment of ffusteyn of the gyfte of the said Robt. 
A Vestyment of Blewe Velvet with branchys of the gyfte of Edmund Briggett 

Clerk late Pson. 

It a Crosse of Cloth of our Ladye of the gyfte of Thomas Reynbird. 
It i peyyr of Chalys of the gyfte of oold Wyllm P tyman and Hew Revett. 
Item ij Surplyes of the gyfte of Agnes Talbot for the Legal of Roger Talbot 

the ped. iijs. iiijd. 



HUNDRED OF HARTISMERE. 



451 



scriptions from the inhabitants and neighbouring gentry, been 
thoroughly repaired, and fitted up for divine service ; besides which 
provision has been made for a salary to the master of the freo 
Grammar School, for a sermon and prayers on Sundays. 
For CHARITIES see REDGRAVE. 



BREISWORTH. BRISEWORDE, or BRISEWRDA. 

In the time of King Henry I., Sir Robert de Sackville held the 
lordship of this parish, with Cotton, and Brockford, of the honour 
of Eye ; with divers other manors in this county, Essex, and Nor- 
folk. Jordan de Sackville was his son and heir. 

This lordship in the reign of Edward I., was vested in Sir George 
de Thorp, Knt. ; and by the marriage of Alice, his daughter, with 
Sir Simon Felbrigg, Knt., it passed into that family : Sir Simon 
de Felbrigg, who was standard bearer to King Richard II., grand- 
son of the former, and K.G., bequeathed to Alana, his daughter, 
this estate. She married, 1 st, Sir William Tyndale, of Dean, in 
Northamptonshire; and in 1431, was the wife of Sir Thomas de 
Wanton. 

The families of Newton and Coleman were formerly concerned 
here : Alexander Newton, Esq., who married Anne, the daughter 
of Sir Humphrey Wingfield, Knt., and deceased in 1569, was 
interred within the altar rails of this parish church ; where a mo- 
nument remains to his memory, an etching of which is given in 
Cotman's " Suffolk Brasses." 

William Coleman, Gent., of Breisworth Hall, married Catherine, 
daughter of Edmund Bacon, of Hessett, Esq. ; whose daughter 
Eliza, married Robert, eldest son of John Green, Esq., of King's 
Lynn, in Norfolk; by whom he had Elizabeth, Katherine, and 
Susan, his co-heirs. Mr. Green deceased in 1640, and was buried 
in this parish church.* 

The lordship was a long time in the Cornwallis family, as well as 
the advowson ; both of which now belong to Sir Edward Kerrison, 
Bart., of Oakley Park. 

* A view of the entrance to this church is given in " Excursions through Suffolk,'* 
aid also in Davy's " Architectural Antiquities," and is a curious specimen of Nor- 
man architecture. 



452 HUNDRED OF HARTTSMERE. 

ARMS. Sackville : quarterly ; or and gules, a bend varry. 
Newton : argent ; a lion rampant, sable ; armed, gules ; tailed 
forked ; on his shoulder, a cross pale, of the field. 



BROOME, or BROM. 

In the 21st of King Edward I., Bartholomew D'Avilers held of 
the Crown one messuage, with a garden, and underwood, 50 acres 
of arable land, two acres of meadow, and two acres of pasture, in 
Broome, by this service : that if the King should wish to have 
Pataliam, of the towns of Norfolk and Suffolk, in his army in Wales, 
then he shall conduct the said Pataliam from the ditch of St. Ed- 
mund into Wales ; and receive at the said ditch, four-pence a head 
for their maintenance for forty days. 

In the 5th of Edward 1st, Bartholomew D'Avilers was found to 
die seized in fee of the lordship in this parish, and the advowson, 
and a moiety of the church of the said parish, which he held by the 
same tenure ; and Isabella, Margaret, and Joan, were his daughters 
and co-heirs. It afterwards passed to the Bacons, and the Calthorpes, 
as in ARWERTON (p. 3). 

Edmund de Barkley, Knt., held this manor in the 4th of King 
Eichard II., in right of his wife, formerly the wife of Sir Robert 
Bacon : Bartholomew, his son and heir, was then 30 years of age. 

It subsequently became the inheritance and seat of the noble and 
very ancient family of Cornwallis ; of whom William Harvey, Cla- 
rencieux King of Arms, in his visitation of the county of Suffolk, 
made in 1561, states that Thomas Cornwalleys, of London, merchant 
(the first of the family mentioned in the visitation), was a younger 
brother, and born in Ireland ; and that he bore the same arms which 
the house, at the time of the visitation, used. This Thomas was 
Sheriff of London, in 1378. He deceased in 1384, and was suc- 
ceeded by his son 

John Cornwallis, who added to his patrimony the lordships of 
Broome and Oakley, with other lands in this county, by his mar- 
riage with Philippe, daughter and co-heir of Robert Bucton (Buck- 
ton, or Buxton), of Oakley ; who deceased in 1408, and is buried 
in that parish church. This John represented the county of Suffolk 
in Parliament in the reign of Richard II., and deceased in 1446. 



HUNDRED OF HART1SMERE. 453 

His descendants were most honourably settled in this county for 
more than four centuries, and produced men eminently illustrious 
both in camp and court, the cloister and the senate ; but all their 
ample possessions have now passed, by sale, into other hands, and 
left us nothing but the NAME. The early descent of this family is 
fully detailed in Collin's, and other Peerages, and requires not to be 
here repeated. 

Creations. Baronet, May 4, 1627 ; Baron Cornwallis, of Eye, 
April 20, 1661 ; Viscount Brome and Earl Cornwallis, June 30, 
1753 ; and Marquis Cornwallis, Aug. 15, 1792. In 1543, Thomas, 
brother of Sir John Cornwallis, Knt., was Archdeacon of Norwich. 
Frederick Cornwallis, Canon of Windsor, Bishop of Coventry and 
Litchfield, and Dean of St. Paul's, was elected Archbishop of Can- 
terbury, Aug. 13, 1768, and deceased March 19, 1783. James 
Cornwallis, D.C.L. ; from a Prebend of Westminster he was pre- 
ferred to the Deanery of Canterbury; in which he was installed 
April 29, 1775. In 1781, he was consecrated Bishop of Litchfield 
and Coventry, and became afterwards Dean of Windsor ; which, in 
1794, he exchanged for that of Durham. 

On the decease of Charles, 2nd Marquis Cornwallis, in 1823, 
without heirs male, the Marquisate became extinct ; but he was suc- 
ceeded in the Earldom by Ms uncle, the venerable Bishop of Litch- 
field and Coventry; who deceased Jan. 20, 1824, in his 81st year ; 
and was succeeded by his only son, James Cornwallis Mann, Lord 
Brome. 

It appears by the last will and testament of John Cornwallis, 
Esq., dated the 16th of August, 1506, that his residence was then 
at Lyng Hall, in this parish. Thomas, the eldest son of Sir John 
Cornwallis, who received the honour of Knighthood at Westminster, 
in 1548, and was of Queen Mary's Privy Council, Treasurer of 
Calais, and Comptroller of her Majesty's Household, built Broome 
Hall, in or about 1550. 

This stately structure, when entire, exhibited a fine specimen of 
old English grandeur, in its dining room, with unceiled open roof, 
and oaken wainscoted walls, covered with royal and whole length 
family portraits ; and its large bay window, ornamented with stained 
glass, containing coats of the family alliances; together with its 
splendid chapel, furnished with cushions of silk, and richly em- 
broidered velvet ; and its finely carved Gothic skreen, hung with 
tapestry. 



454 HUNDRED OF HARTISMERE. 

But all these, with the illustrious inmates, have disappeared ; the 
mansion has been pulled down, and Broome now exhibits but little 
of its former greatness, except in the monumental memorials which 
the parish church contains of its former natives : of which there re- 
mains several well executed specimens. 

The church formerly contained two medieties ; the Prior of Thet- 
ford was patron of one, and the owners of the lordship presented to 
the other. In 1448, they were consolidated, and annexed to the 
manor ; and are now, by purchase, the property of Lieutenant 
General Sir Edward Kerrison, Bart., of Oakley Park. 

ARMS. Cornwallis : sable ; guttee d'eau on a fess, argent, three 
Cornish choughs, proper. Crest : on a mount, vert, a stag lodged, 
regardant, argent ; attired and unguled, or ; gorged with a chaplet 
of laurel, vert ; vulned in the shoulder, proper. 

CHARITIES. In 1683, John Goldsmith, by will, charged his real 
estate in the parish of Tivetshall, in Norfolk, now the property of 
the Earl of Oxford, with the payment of 3 a year to the poor of 
this parish, to be given away on the 21st December. Under anln- 
closure Act passed in 1808, the sum of 15 a year was charged on 
an allotment, awarded to the Marquis Cornwallis, which is now the 
property of Sir Edward Kerrison, Bart., for providing fuel for the 
poor, in lieu of the right, enjoyed by them, to cut firing on the com- 
mons ; and this annuity is laid out in coals, which are distributed 
among the poor inhabitants of the parish. 



BROCKFORD, or BROCFORT. 

Brockford has no church or chapel, but is reckoned as a member 
of Wetheringsett. A part thereof anciently belonged to Bury Abbey, 
by the gift of Athulf (Adulf, orEadulf), Bishop of Elmham, about 
963: he signed King Edgar's charter to the church of York; and 
a successor of his, Ailfric, the second Bishop of that name, surnamed 
the Black, and who deceased in 1038, gave his part in Brockford to 
the said Abbey ; of which he is supposed to have been a monk, by 
the great benefactions he gave to that Monastery. 

In the reign of Henry I., Sir Robert de Sackville, Knt., held the 
lordship of this parish, as in Breisworth ; and it most likely passed 



HUNDRED OF HARTISMEIIE. 455 

with that parish. The manor now belongs to Sir Edward Kerrison, 
Bart, of Oakley Park. 

" In Brockford Street is a great house, which long since was an 
Inne, and hung out the signe of the Swanne. It is now commonly 
called Brockford House, since the Signe was pulled down hy Tho- 
mas Revett, Esq., a Justice of the Peace for the county of SufF. in 
the time of Q. Elizabeth. Edmund his eldest sonne, sold to John 
Turner, whose son Gregory sold it to Mr. Leman, of Brame's Hall, 
now owner of it. 

" Eobert Kevett, 2nd son of Thomas B. Esq., married daughter 
of John Revett, of Bildeston, Esq. Thomas Revett, sonne of this 
Robert, lives now in a House neare Brockford Green, and is Chief 
Constable of the hundred of Hartismere this Yeare 1657."* 



BURGATE, or BURGATA. 

The lordship of this parish was formerly the estate of Sir William 
de Burgate, who lies interred under an altar monument in the mid- 
dle of the chancel of Burgate church. Under a handsome double 
canopy, with finials, are the figures, in brass, of Sir William, and 
Alianor his wife, daughter of Sir Thomas Visdelieu, Knt. : he is ar- 
med with a pointed helmet, mail gorget, plated armour and skirt, 
sword and dagger, and lion at Ms feet ; she has the veil head dress, 
with pufls of hair plaited in mat form above her ears, and a fillett of 
zig zag on her forehead ; close gown, with long mitten sleeves man- 
tle ; dog, with a collar of bells, looking up, at her left foot : round 
them this inscription : 

" William de Burgate, miles, dns de Burgate, qui obit in Vigilia Sci. Jacob! 
Apostole Anno Domini Millimo CCCC nono et Alianori uzor ejus filia Thome Vys- 
delou militis qui obit ------ die mensis - - - - - Anno dni ------." 

A shield over each figure ; paly of six, argent and azure ; im- 
paling, argent, three wolves' heads, erased, gules. 

The lordship and patronage of Burgate was vested in Sir Edmund 

Bacon, Bart. ; and James Bacon, son of Sir James Bacon, of Fris- 

ton, Knt., was rector here in the time of King Charles : he deceased 

in 1649, and was interred in the chancel of this parish church. He 

* MS. penes, Mr. W. S. Fitcb, Ipswich. 



456 HUNDRED OF HARTISMERE. 

was succeeded by Robert Pykarel, who married Spencer, daughter 
of John Towers, successively Dean and Bishop of Peterborough. 

They subsequently became vested in Eowland Holt, Esq. ; and 
the manor now belongs to George St. Vincent Wilson, of Redgrave 
Hall, Esq. In the year 1808, an Act of Parliament was passed, to 
enable the Bishop of Ely to convey the advowson of Snailwell, in 
Cambridgeshire, to John Thorp, of Chippenham, Esq., in exchange 
for this rectory ; which is now in the patronage of that see. 

Mem. In 1408, John de Lowdham, of this parish, presented to 
the church of Frense, in Norfolk. 



COTTON. COTTUNA and CODETUNA, or KODETUN. 

In the time of King Henry I., Sir Robert de Sackville held a 
lordship in this parish, of the honour of Eye. In 1266, King Henry 
III., confirmed to Robert, son of John de Thorp, free warren in his 
demesne here; and in 1389, Sir Robert de Hemenhale, Knt., re- 
leased his manors in the parishes of Cotton, Wickham-Skeith, and 
Yaxley, to Sir George Felbrigg, Knt., and other trustees ; and all 
the possessions of his father, Sir Ralf de Hemenhale. Sir Robert 
married Joan, daughter and heiress of Sir John, son of Sir William 
De la Pole, Knt., and Joan his wife. It appears he deceased prior 
to 1406. 

In the 28th of Henry VI., William De la Pole died seized of this 
lordship ; and it afterwards became vested in the Howards, Dukes of 
Norfolk. In 1558, Sir John Tyrell, of Gipping, Knt., granted all 
his right in the manors of Marshall's, at Banham, in Norfolk, with 
divers lands there, to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk; who gave him 
Cotton and Bacton manors in exchange. 

CHARITIES. The town estate consists of a house, converted into 
a workhouse, a cottage, and yard, occupied by poor persons ; and 
two closes, containing about eight acres, let to the rector, at a rent 
varying with the price of corn, being on an average 9 or 10 a 
year. The rents are applied to the repairs of the church, and ge- 
neral parochial purposes, agreeable to long usage. 



HUNDRED OF IIARTISMERE. 457 



EYE. EWYA, or EYA. 

This is said to have been a town corporate before the reign of 
King John, and in ancient deeds was designated the " Town and 
Borough of Aye," but did not send burgesses to Parliament prior 
to the 13th of Queen Elizabeth. 

William, Duke of Normandy, having presented Robert Malet, a 
Norman Baron, who had assisted him in the conquest of England, 
with 22 1 manors in this county, and 68 in Norfolk and other coun- 
ties, this nobleman, with the assent of his Sovereign, built a Mo- 
nastery upon his lordship of Eye, and conferred upon it the church 
of St. Peter, in Eye, with divers other churches, lands, liberties, and 
franchises. In 1138, King Stephen confirmed the same. 

This Monastery was originally an alien Priory, subordinate to the 
Abbey of Bernay, in Normandy; but in 1384, King Richard II. 
made it a denison, and released it from its foreign dependencies. 
The site of this house, with the court-yard, orchard, gardens, and 
houses belonging to it, contained about ten acres. 

The clear value, according to Dugdale, and " Valor Ecclesiasti- 
ous," was 161 2s. 3fd. ; but Speed, and "Valor Ecclesiasticus," 
A.D. 1534, makes the gross value to be 184 9s. 7'fd. : the amount 
of fixed charities, 14 12s. 4d., given to the poor on certain days, 
according to ancient custom : for a lamp burning in the church of 
Yaxley, 2s. annually ; and the same in the church of Laxfield, 2s. 
In 1536, Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, obtained a grant of 
the same. Several manors and lands were also granted to Edmund 
Bedingfield, Esq., at the same time, as part of the possession of this 
Priory. 

This Robert Malet, was son of William, Lord Malet, and Hesilia 
his wife ; and was Great Chamberlain of England, under Henry I. ; 
but in the 2nd of that King was banished, and deprived of all his 
large possessions in England, for his adherance to Richard Curtois, 
that King's eldest brother, and Duke of Normandy. This portion 
of his estate was given by Henry I., to Stephen, Earl of Boulogne, 
afterwards King of England ; who devised it to his natural son ; 
and he deceased without heirs, when it again reverted to the Crown. 

Richard I. granted the same to Henry, 5th Earl of Brabant and 
Lorrain ; but it appears to have been again in the Crown, in the 9th 
of King Edward II., and so continued until Edward III. gave it to 



4-58 HUNDRED OF HARTISMERE. 

John of Eltham, Earl of Cornwall, his brother ; and he deceased 
without issue, when the same King granted it to Robert de Ufford, 
Earl of Suffolk ; he deceased in the 43rd of that reign, when William 
de Ufford, his son, succeeded to his honours and possessions ; who 
deceased in the 5th of the following reign, without issue, leaving 
his inheritance to the issue of his three sisters ; when the Earldom 
became extinct in the Ufford family. 

In the 9th of Richard II., Sir Michael de la Pole, Knt., Lord 
Chancellor, was created Earl of Suffolk ; to whom the King granted 
the castle, town, manor, and honour of Eye, and to the heirs of his 
body ; with 20 per annum out of the profits of the county of Suf- 
folk, 500 per annum out of the hereditaments of William Ufford, 
late Earl of Suffolk ; for which the following property was conveyed, 
and confirmed to the said Earl : namely, the hundreds of Harris- 
mere and Stow, the manors of Combs, Haughley, Thorndon, Lowes- 
toft, and Lothing hundred ; of all of which in 1414, he died seized. 

It subsequently became the property of the Crown, and was part 
of the Queen's jointure in the time of King Charles ; and Sergeant 
Dendy purchased it when the King's lands were sold. 

The family of Honings (noticed in the parish of Carleton, in 
Hoxne hundred), several of whom resided here, were intimately 
connected with the town and borough of Eye, having represented the 
same in Parliament. Wingfield Honings, Esq., was born and bap- 
tized here, July 5, 1590 ; as also were three of his sons, viz., John, 
Jan. 15, 1621, buried here, Sept. 6, 1622 ; Edward, baptized May 
11, 1619 ; and John, July 10, 1625. 

Thomas de Hemenhale was a monk here, and afterwards removed 
to the Monastery at Norwich ; where he behaved so exemplary, that 
at the death of Ayremine, the chapter elected him Bishop, in 1337. 
This the Pope soon after voided ; but at the same time caused him 
to be consecrated Bishop of Worcester, at Rome, where he then was, 
for the purpose of soliciting the Pope to ratify his election at Norwich. 

William Gale, of this town, gave the manor of Brandstedes, for 
a priest, or two scholars, in Gonville and Oaius College, Cambridge, 
about 1540. He also gave lands in Hinxton, in Cambridgeshire. 
Humphry Bysby, LL.D., also gave money to the same College, 
towards the purchase of the manor of Woburn ; on condition that 
35s. per annum be allowed to a poor scholar, out of the school of 
Eye, or near to that place. 

William Payton, a monk of this Monastery, was burnt at Nor- 



HUNDRED OF HARTISMERE. 459 

web., for speaking disrespectfully of an image which was accustomed 
to be carried in processions here, and for saying that the Lord's 
Supper ought to he administered in hoth kinds. 

In 1583, Henry L'Estrange resided here ; and ahout the time of 
King James and Charles I., members of the several families of 
Edgar, Harvey, D'Eye, Penning, Oissing, Lomax, and others, are 
mentioned as having good estates, and being seated here. Weever 
mentions John Batysford, Esq., as buried in this parish church, in 
1406, with Mary his wife. In the chancel is an inscription to 
Henry, Lord Vaux, of Harrowden, dated 1663; and the parish 
register contains this entry : " Madam Vaux buried 16 May 1667;" 
concerning whom there are some queries in the " Gent.'s Magazine," 
for 1813, part i., p. 112, noticed at p. 310, of the same volume. 

William Heydou, Esq., 2nd son of Sir John Heydon, of Bacons- 
thorp, in Norfolk, Knt., and the last male heir of that ancient family, 
was buried here, in 1689; also Mirabella, his sister, wife of 
Laurence Lomax, Esq., who deceased in 1702. Here are also 
some early memorials of the Cutler family. 

The steeple of this parish church is a beautiful structure, and was 
probably built by the De la Poles, whose arms appear on the battle- 
ments, with those of Malet and Bigot. An etching of the same is 
given in Davy's " Architectural Antiquities of Suffolk." 

William Hoare was born here in 1705, of respectable parents, 
and received his education in a school at Farnham, in Berkshire, 
which was then in high reputation. He discovered an early dis- 
position for painting ; and gave such strong proofs of a natural 
talent for that art, that after the completion of his scholastic 
studies, his father carried him to London, and placed him under the 
tuition of an Italian master ; he afterwards went to Italy, with a 
view to professional improvement, where he resided nine years. 

Upon his return he settled at Bath, and practised portrait paint- 
ing ; and from the study of Rosalba's pictures, he added the practice 
of crayons to that of oil painting ; and carried it to a degree of ex- 
cellence, second only to the powers of that celebrated artist. On 
the formation of the Royal Academy, he was elected one of the ori- 
ginal members, and was a constant exhibitor for many years. He 
deceased in 1792, at Bath. 

In 1781, near Eye, was found a leaden pot, containing several 
hundred Roman coins, and medals, all of the purest gold ;* and not 
* They were chiefly of the Emperors Arcadius and Hooorius. 



460 HUNDRED OF HARTISMERE. 

long since, an original matrix of the seal of Ethilwald, Bishop of 
Dunwich, in good preservation. 

CORPORATION CHARITIES. The several estates mentioned in the 
general trust deeds of lease and release, are vested in trustees, ap- 
pointed by the Mayor and Burgesses of the borough ; and the rents 
are received and applied by an officer, called the Town Treasurer, 
under the direction of the said Mayor and Burgesses. Some of the 
estates are held under conveyances of very ancient date, and others 
appear to have been purchased with funds belonging to the corpora- 
tion ; the remainder of the estates having been given, or settled, by 
different benefactors, or by their direction, for specific charitable ob- 
jects. It has been the usage to carry the rents of the whole of the 
estates to one general account, and to apply the income, after pro- 
viding