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Full text of "Towers"

3S1 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/towers1954unse 



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uvula University College of Commerce Chicago, 111 



LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 

COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

820 N. Michigan Ave. 
Chicago III. 



Office of the Commerce Student Council 



Dear Commerce Student: 

The Commerce Student Council takes great pleasure in presenting 
your 





QU/eK 




AWgdiM 



,i j 



VERY REV. JAMES T. HUSSEY. S.J. 
President, Loyola University 



My congratulations to the Student 
Council of the College o{ Commerce and 
to the stati on the enterprising publication 
of the 1954 Towers. 

Yearbooks can serve a worth-while 
purpose. Basically they are a pictorial 
record of people and events o/ impor- 
tance. For years they serve as reminders 
of triendships made, and experiences un- 
dergone during college days. 

It is to be expected that many will 
treasure the volume throughout their liie- 
time. 

It is my wish that the students of the 
College of Commerce Jmow now and re- 
member in years to come that the admin- 
istration and faculty of Loyola University 



is now, and always will be, interested in 
the spiritual, social and economic Hie of 
each of its students and each oi its 
graduates. 



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the DEAN of the COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 



our guiding hand and friend 



It is with great pride and pleasure that we, the 
Class of 1954, dedicate the 1954 Towers to Dean J. 
Raymond Sheriff. We salute him not only as a Dean, 
but also as an outstanding personality, scholar and 
Catholic gentleman. 

Our College is indeed fortunate to have a person 
of such high caliber as its Dean. It is largely through 
his efforts that the College of Commerce has pro- 
ceeded in such a progressive manner. 

We honor him not only for the interest he has 
shown in us as students, but for his concern about 
us as individuals. We respect the manner in which 
he has attempted to steer us along the course of 




educated Christian gentlemen, so that we may carry 
these principles of ethics and fair-dealing into our 
everyday activities. We know it is his desire that, as 
a result of this training, we will exhibit to the com- 
mercial world the attitude of upright, honest and 
God-fearing businessmen. 

To him goes our sincerest appreciation for all 
that he has tried to do for us. It is obvious that we 
would have to go far and wide to find his equal. 

Being a Dean is no easy task. It is a position 
that requires ability, understanding, and an earnest 
desire to aid the student in every way. The posses- 
sion of these necessities and of a "plus" personality 
is evident from our everyday dealings with him. 

When we stepped out of line he was there to 
guide us back to the right path. Sometimes the 
going was rough but we can see now and will 
realize even more fully in later life how his foresight 
will have saved us from many pitfalls. He was also 
present to extend the "glad" hand of congratulations 
when our work was meritorious. 

Experience is sometimes an expensive lesson, 
but we must thank God for His prudence in placing 
this responsibility in the hands of such a capable 
teacher as Mr. Sheriff. 

We are particularly grateful for the cooperation 
he has shown to the student body in all its under- 
takings. As Moderator of our Student Council he 
has offered valuable aid and advice, without which 
many of its projects might have failed. His interest 
in these extra-curricular matters has caused us to 
work just that much harder. Our efforts are merely 
a manifestation of his good example. 

As we enter the business world we shall always 
remember what he has tried to do for us. We hope 
that this dedication will serve as a sort of Thank 
You, as though we could ever thank him enough, 
for the wisdom he has displayed in guiding us as 
students and as men. 

We, the Class of 1954, thank you, Mr. Sheriff, 
and ask that God will always Bless You in your role 
as Dean and in the wonderful service that you are 
offering to humanity, so that you may continue to 
assist others just as you have aided us. 



MR. J. RAYMOND SHERIFI 
Dean, College of Commera 









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...HIGHLIGHTS (IF THE VIMII 



Before we review this year, we would like 
to insert a few notes about the book. Our cover, 
duotoned with the school colors, is an original 
design depicting an ancient ship of Commerce 
sailing towards our Towers. The vessel pic- 
tured there is representative of the type used for 
many centuries in old world trade. Its forerun- 
ner, the galley, is believed to have been orig- 
inated by the inhabitants of the country of 
Phoenicia. On the shore are modern structures 
representing present-day commerce. Our 
galley of commerce sailing towards this shore 
signifies the trend to carry over into modern 
day business, the fine traditions set many years 
ago. 

Since this is the Marian Year, we have 
made Mary the patroness of our book. It is 
in her honor that we have used Madonna Blue 
throughout this work. It is our hope that she 
will be our patroness not only for this book, but 
also, for the rest of our lives. 

And now on to 1 954! 

To most of us it will always be more than 
just another year. To some it was the begin- 
ning of a college career, while to others it 
meant the last phase of that career. It also 
represented an advance in a quest for educa- 
tion to other students. But these are not the 
only reasons why we shall remember this year. 

Now, as it draws slowly to a close, let us 
go back and try to pin-point the events which 
caused this to be a bonus year. 

Our story of 1954 began in September with 
the hustle and bustle of registration. We found 
ourselves in the mad scramble of filling out 



forms, changing sections, racing from station 
to station and trying to purchase books. Our 
free moments were spent greeting friends 
whom we had not seen all summer. The long 
summer vacation was now over and we had 
to settle down and get used to the routine of 
college once more. 

By the end of the first week everyone 
seemed pretty well adjusted. The wanderlust 
created by summer was now gone and had as 
its substitute the weariness caused by the 
burning of the midnight oil. We were deluged 
with studies, lectures and school work of all 
types. This tidal wave caused many to para- 
phrase Shelley's famous line to read, "If Sep- 
tember comes can June be far behind?". 

Soon after, the contest for Miss Varsity was 
announced. Various fraternities began combing 
the campus for co-eds to represent their organi- 
zations. The voting took place for one week 
and attracted almost every student. On No- 
vember 6, the Fall Frolic was held. That event 
brought the magic of this honor to Miss 
Kathleen Friend. The Union House, filled to 
capacity, rocked as the crowd roared its 
approval. 

Gaiety was soon forgotten for the following 
week presented the student body with Mid- 
Semester examinations. In evidence was the 
usual finger-nail biting, the last minute cram- 
mings, and the nervous tension that usually 
accompanies such ordeals. 

With these safely under our belts, we be- 
(Continued on Page 36) 



"Good to the last drop" 



Good to the Last Word 





Admin 



REV. JEREMIAH J. O'CALLAGHAN, S.J. 
Academic Vice-Piesident 



My dear Commerce students: 

At this time I wish to take occasion to congratulate the 1954 graduates of the College of Com- 
merce of Loyola University. 

We believe that these young men can be proud of the principles by which their University 
is directed. As a University, Loyola is dedicated to the preservation, communication, and the ex- 
pansion of man's knowledge of the truth. As a Catholic University it is keenly aware that the grace 
of Christ must support nature. As a realistic University it realizes that man is an economic and 
commercial animal and therefore we need professional students of commerce and finance who 
will provide justice and opportunity in these fields. 

May you live by the principles of your University and may you benefit society by bringing 
these principles to the market place. 

Sincerely yours in Christ, 



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t r ii I i ii ii 



REV. LAURENCE J. LYNCH, S.J. 
Dean of Students 




Room 804 houses the offices of the Dean of 
Students, Reverend Laurence J. Lynch, S.J., the 
Dean of Women, the Director of the Loyola 
Union, and the directress of student lodging. 

As Dean of Students, Father Lynch is 
Chairman of the Committee on Student Activi- 
ties and Welfare and of faculty representation 
to the Loyola Union. The nature and dates of 
all student activities are cleared through his 
office. Father Lynch also regulates the affairs 
of all student organizations. 

Mr. Harry McCloskey as Assistant Dean of 



Students coordinates the Union activities in the 
most beneficial manner to the student body and 
to the University. 

Miss Mariette Le Blanc, our Dean of 
Women, promotes programs which are of gen- 
eral interest to women students, acts as an ad- 
visor and directs the foreign student program. 

The lodging of the out-of-town students is 
the responsibility of Mrs. Margaret McGrew; 
she is also the custodian of the Loyola Univer- 
sity Calendar. 






MR. HARRY McCLOSKEY 
Assisfanf Dean of Students 



I 



MISS MARIETTE LE BLANC 
Dean of Women 





Mr. Arnold N. Schorn, Mr. Robert A. Meier, Mr. Clifford T Fay, Jr., Mr. Henry T. Chamberlain, Chairman. 



Accounting 
Department 



Recognizing the need for qualified per- 
sonnel in the accounting profession, this de- 
partment, since its founding back in the early 
20 's has striven to maintain the highest stand- 
ard of education. Its basic objective, through 
the use of thorough and comprehensive 
courses, has been to familiarize the student 
with approved methods and afford adequate 
preparations for C.P.A. examinations, while 
orientating him to the other fields of Commerce. 
This department presents courses in theory, 
practice, managerial techniques, costs and 
taxation. 

Under the guidance of Mr. Henry T. Cham- 



berlain, Accounting Department Chairman, it 
has endeavored to offer suitable tutelage to 
C.P.A. candidates. In this respect, the C.P.A. 
Review offered at Loyola is regarded as one of 
the finest in the country. 

Aside from the C.P.A. aspect, Accounting 
has become such an integral part of today's 
business that a knowledge of it is a "must" for 
the modern day businessman. 

Whether it is studied as a preparation for 
the C.P.A. profession or just general knowl- 
edge, the Loyola Acounting Curriculum offers 
the progressive student one of the finest foun- 
dations for success in the commercial world. 




Mr. John Parkany, Mr. Ernest M. De Cicco, Dr. Joseph O. Englet, Dr. Sylvester M. Frizol, Dr. Theodosi A. Mogilnitsky, 
Chairman. Mr. Alfred S. Oskamp, Dr. Theodore V. Purcell. S.J.. Dr. Helen C. Potter. Dr. Edward J. Taaffe. 



Economics- 
Finance 

Department 



The Department of Economics and Finance, a 
very vital one in the School of Commerce, has been 
under the direction of Dr. T. A. Mogilnitsky since 
1948. In addition to Dr. Mogilnitsky the staff of this 
department consists of eight full-time members. 

The Department of Economics and Finance is 
organized as one department, but it functions as two 
separate fields of concentration. The only distinction 
which can be made between the two fields is that all 
finance falls under the category of economics, but 
not all economics can be classified as finance. 
Thus, finance is a slight deviation from economics, 
and, therefore causes the two to be offered as sepa- 
rate fields of concentration. 

Because the development in any specialized 
field in commerce is dependent upon its supply of 
analytical reasoning from an economic point of view, 
this field is the foundation and catalizer, or necessary 
stream of knowledge, which makes way for an un- 
derstanding of any phase of the business world. 

In addition to being the foundation for the other 



commercial subjects, Economics has a life of its own, 
too. Its advanced courses give the student a more 
comprehensive and operative understanding of 
economy than do the required basic courses. This 
knowledge is an integral part in the student's prepa- 
ration for the professional world. It will be of assist- 
ance to him in practically any field he may choose. 

Economics not only prepares the individual for 
his vocation in life, but also gives him an under- 
standing of the economy in which he lives. This 
factor contributes to his betterment as a citizen and 
enables him to exercise more completely his abilities 
and rights as an inhabitant of the community. It 
also affords the opportunity for an individual to in- 
tegrate economics with ethics, thus giving him an 
intellectual basis to fight the materialism of today. 

Knowledge and understanding of economics is 
truly an outstanding characteristic of an educated 
person, and the Department of Economics and Fin- 
ance fulfills this standard to the utmost. 



13 



Marketing 
Department 



The Department of Marketing was intro- 
duced into the School of Commerce in 1948 by 
Dr. Kenneth B. Haas. Since that time, through 
the addition of new courses and the constant 
increase in enrollment, it has become one of 
the outstanding departments in the University. 

Dr. Haas, still with the department, is now 
the Chairman and has four other men on his 
staff. 

Marketing as a field has a wide variety 
and diversification of interests from which a 
student may choose. The jobs available are 
so varied and offer such unlimited opportuni- 
ties that they appeal to any student whose in- 
terests lie in the field of business. It is impos- 
sible to begin to enumerate all the occupations 
for which the field of Marketing offers prepara- 
tion; a few can be mentioned however. The 



first is that of individual ownership which is a 
vast and unrestricted field. Secondly, the in- 
dividual may elect to work for another person 
or company. At his disposal are positions in 
advertising and display, selling, merchandis- 
ing, marketing research, sales management 
and supervision, wholesaling and warehous- 
ing. 

The department is organized in such a way 
as to instill into the student the ability to make 
the transition from the storehouse of knowledge 
to the area of action. It also enables the 
student to gain the greatest quantity of in- 
formation, data, facts, while giving him an 
appreciation of time, space, and the basic 
inter-relationships of individuals, institutions, 
and groups. Last of all, it is synthesized to 
assist the student in the logical development of 
problem-solving techniques. 



fa. Lloyd C. Allen, Dr. Orange A. Smalley, Dr. Kenneth B. Haas, Chairman, Dr. Wayne F. Caskey, Mr. Harry L. McCloskey. 




Management 
Department 



The Department of Management, under 
the direction of Dr. P. T. Swanish, is a very- 
progressive department in the School of Com- 
merce. In addition to this, Dr. Swanish main- 
tains high standards in this Department 
through the quality of his teaching staff. There 
are, in addition to him, three full-time staff 
members. These men combine their efforts to 
set forth the objectives of the Department, 
which are: to develop ability to make decisions 
on the higher levels of management authority 
and responsibility; cultivation and application 
of the understanding that when management 
relates itself to man, human values and spiritual 
values come before material values; and cul- 
tivation of the understanding that only when 
virtues of charity, unselfishness, and justice set 



straight the hearts of men will the minds of 
men set straight the world of business. 

The Department prepares the student for 
many managerial fields such as: personnel, 
administration, production, and the one field 
which is so vitally needed in our economy, in- 
dustrial relations. 

The Department of Management, in addi- 
tion to intellectual development and progress in 
the classroom, stresses student participation in 
extra-curricular activities so as to facilitate per- 
sonal and social adjustment. Functions such as 
these not only help the student to understand 
the human and the social forces in the opera- 
tion of business enterprise, but also help to 
develop the student intellectually, spiritually, 
and socially, according to Jesuit principles. ~~ 



Mr. Joseph V. McCullough, Dr. Peter T. Swanish, Chairman, Dr. Theodore V. Purcell, S.J., Dr. Walter H. Peterson. 




Youth in the Classroom 



"It worked last time." 

"Take the High Ground.' 

Need we say more? 



Statistics and the machine age 
"Boy, that is a good question." 





• SENIORS 

• JUNIORS 

• SOPHOMORES 

• FRESHMEN 




THE 1954 



JOHN J. McKENNA, B.S.C., President 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; Blue Key National Honor 
Fraternity 4; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3, 4; Fusiliers 2, 3, 
4; Knights' Club 1, 2, 3; Loyola News 3; Union 
Carnival Committee, Raffle Chairman 4; Presi- 
dent Student Council, Senior Class; Loyola 
Union Congressman 3, 4; Rifle Team 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Drill Team 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 2, 3, 4; Dean's 
Key Winner; Leadership Award 3, 4; Field of 
Concentration — Marketing. 



THOMAS L. BORRELLI, B.S.C.. Vice-President 

Delta Sigma Pi 3, 4; Blue Key National Honor 
Fraternity 4; Wasmann Biological Society 1; 
S.A.M. 2, 3, President 3; Accounting Club 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 4; Commerce Yearbook Co-Editor 4; 
Vice-President Senior Class, Student Council 4; 
Intramural Football 3, 4; Dean's Key Winner; 
S.A.M. President's Medal Winner 3; Leadership 
Award 3, 4; Field of Concentration — Account- 
ing. 



JOHN E. ZIMMERMAN. B.S.C.. 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; Blue Key National 
Honor Fraternity 4; Marketing Club 3, 4; Com- 
merce Yearbook Co-Editor 4; Secretary-Treas- 
urer Senior Class, Student Council 4; Dean's 
Key Winner; Leadership Award 4; Field of 
Concentration — Marketing. 



SENIOR CLASS 




Once again, this June, several hundred 
Loyolans will don caps and gowns and file 
down the center aisle of the Granada Theatre. 
They will march to the lordlike beats of Elgar's 
"Pomp and Circumstances" as rendered by Dr. 
Salvador. Tense will be the hearts as they 
listen for their names to be called. Then the 
proud moment will come, when, up to the stage 
they will go to receive that long-sought-for 
piece of sheepskin. This is the reward so 
highly treasured; the culmination of four years' 
academic activities. 

It seems almost incredible that such a 
comprehensive span could pass so quickly. 
Yet these were months filled with learning; all 
types of learning. Some came from textbooks, 
some from the people around them, and some 
from within themselves. They were taught 
not only Accounting and Economics and Eng- 
lish, but also those other two and probably 
more important lessons, i.e., learning to get 
along with others, and learning to live with 



God. Every day brought new experiences, new 
fields to be conquered, people to meet and 
things to do. They grew in wisdom academi- 
cally, socially and spiritually. 

Pictured on the following pages are the 
people who are going to take that short but 
all-important walk down that carpeted path 
this June. If you were to ask, most of them 
would reply that it seems that it was only last 
September that they penned their names to the 
brown registration forms for the first time. It 
was then that they attended their first class to 
initiate this consequential phase of their life. 
Four years of college pass quickly; all too 
quickly it seems. What remains now is the 
future with all its mysteries and surprises. 

And now, as they make ready to step out 
into the commercial world, let us remind them 
that the world will look upon them and judge 
them as Loyolans. Let us pray that they will 
never forget this and that they will always be 
able to uphold the tradition of Loyola Men. 



The list of prospective graduates is posted 
"Want Ads — Job hunting" 



"How much?" 
"You flunk!" 




The 1954 Senior 



STEVEN P. ALEXANDER, B.S.C. JOAN G. AREND, B.S.C. 



Marketing Club 3, 4, S.A.M. 3, 
4; Field of Concentration — 
Management. 



Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Marketing 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding 
Secretary 4; Field of Concen- 
tration — Marketing. 



CHARLES O. BACON, B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration — Eco- 



JAMES J. BIRCH, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 1, 2, 3, Social 
Chairman 4; Knights' Club 1, 2, 
3; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola 
Union Congressman 2; Field of 
Concentration — Management. 



RICHARD G. 

BORNHOFEN, B.S.C. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 3,4; Account- 
ing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Rifle Team 4; 
Intramural Basketball 3, 4; 
Field of Concentration — Ac- 
counting. 



JOSEPH F. BOWENS, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4, Secretary 
4; S.A.M. 2, 3, Vice-President 3; 
Loyola Union Congressman 3; 
Field of Concentration — Man- 
agement. 



Steven P. Alexander Joan G. Arend Charles O. Bacon 

James J. Birch Richard G. Bornhofen Joseph F. Bowens 

Charles E. Bracken Thomas C. Bresnan Francis G. Bush 




CHARLES E. BRACKEN, B.S.C. 

S.A.M. 3, 4; Field of Concentra- 
tion — Management. 



THOMAS C. BRESNAN, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 3, 4; Intramur- 
als 2, 3; Field of Concentration 

— ■ Accounting. 



FRANCIS G. BUSH, B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration — Mar- 
keting. 



Mass 



EDMUND M BUTLER, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 3; Gold Torch 
2; Field of Concentration — Ac- 
counting. 



MARTIN J. CAIN, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 2; Field of 
Concentration — Accounting. 



JAMES F. CALDBECK, B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration — Eco- 




Edmund M. Butler Martin I. Cain 

Robert S. Cernok Ernest J. Chapleau 

Donald S. Clem, Jr. Terrence B. Colleran 



James F. Caldbeck 

John J. Cleary 
Robert E. De Celles 



ROBERT S. CERNOK, B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration — ■ Man- 
agement. 



ERNEST J. CHAPLEAU, B.S.C. JOHN J. CLEARY, B.S.C. 



S.A.M. 3, 4; Field of Concen- 
tration — Management. 



Marketing Club 4; Economics 
Society 2; Field of Concentra- 
tion — Marketing. 



DONALD S. CLEM, JR., B.S.C. 

Gold Torch Club 1, 2; R.O.T.C. 
Commission 2; Field of Concen- 
tration — Marketing. 



TERRENCE B. 

COLLERAN, B.S.C. 

S.A.M. 3, 4; Field of Concentra- 
tion — Management. 



ROBERT E. DE CELLES, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Knights' Club 1, 2; Gold Torch 
1, 2, 3, 4; Fusiliers 3, 4; Intra- 
mural Football 3, 4; Field of 
Concentration — Economics. 




Edward G. Denten 
William E. Durack 
Edward R. Egloff 



John R. Devereux 
James L. Durkin 
Arthur W. Frasik 



William C. Dineen 

Thomas J. Edmunds 

Thomas W. Foley 



T h e 



EDWARD G. DENTEN, B.S.C. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Treasurer 4; Intramural Basket- 
ball 1, 2, 3; Field of Concentra- 
tion — Accounting. 



JOHN R. DEVEREUX, B.S.C. 

S.A.M. 3, 4; Field of Concentra- 
tion — Management. 



WILLIAM C. DINEEN, B.S.C. 

S.A.M. 3, 4; Field of Concen- 
tration — Management. 



WILLIAM E. DURACK, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Intramural 
Basketball 1; Field of Concen- 
tration — Marketing. 



JAMES L. DURKIN, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; Fusi- 
liers 3, 4, Vice-President 3, 
President 4; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3, 
4; Loyoia News 3; R.O.T.C. 
Rifle Team 1, 3, 4; Accounting 
Club 2, 3; Loyola Union Con- 
gressman 3, 4; Leadership 
Award 3; Field of Concentra- 
tion — Accounting. 



THOMAS J. EDMUNDS, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 3; Field of 
Concentration — Accounting. 



EDWARD R. EGLOFF, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 3, 4, President 
4; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3; Fusiliers 
3; Yearbook Staff Photog- 
rapher; Field of Concentration 
— Marketing. 



ARTHUR W. FRASIK, B.S.C. 

American Marketing Associa- 
tion 4; Marketing Club 4; Gold 
Torch 1, 2; Fusiliers 2; Loyola 
News 4; Sodality 4; Intramural 
Basketball 2, 3, 4; Field of Con- 
centration — Marketing. 



THOMAS W. FOLEY, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 3, 4; Intra- 
murals 2, 3, 4; Field of Concen- 
tration — Accounting. 



22 



19 5 4 Senior Class 



ROBERT A. FULLER. B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration 
keting. 



WILLIAM M. GARDNER, B.S.C. ARTHUR S. GOODMAN, B.S.C. 



Mar- S.A.M. 3, 4; Field of Concentra- 
tion — Management. 



Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; Account- 
ing Club 2, 3, 4; Pre-Medical 1; 
Field of Concentration — Ac- 
counting. 



FRANCIS E. GOODMAN, B.S.C. ROBERT A. GORNIAK, B.S.C. 



Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; Ac- 
counting Club 2, 3, 4; Field of 
Concentration — Accounting. 



Accounting Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Field 
of Concentration — Account- 
ing. 



HERBERT J. 

GOSEWISCH, B.S.C. 

Gold Torch 2, 3, 4; Fusiliers 3; 
Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3; 
Field of Concentration — Man- 
agement. 



ERNST D. GREGORY, B.S.C. 

S.A.M. 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Mar- 
keting Club 2; Field of Concen- 
tration — Management. 



Robert A. Fuller William M. Gardner Arthur S. Goodman 

Francis E. Goodman Robert A. Gorniak Herbert J. Gosewisch 

Ernst D. Gregory Thomas V. Groff Donald R. Hand 



THOMAS V. GROFF, B.S.C. 

Fusiliers 3; S.A.M. 3, 4; Eco- 
nomics Club 3, 4; Scholarship 
Award 3, 4; Field of Concen- 
tration — Management. 



DONALD R. HAND, B.S.C. 

Alpha Delta Gamma 2, 3, 4, 
Treasurer 3; Gold Torch 1,2, 3, 
4, Secretary 4; Accounting 
Club 2, 3, 4; Fusiliers 3, 4; Ca- 
dence 4; Loyola News 3; Loyola 
Union Congressman 3, 4; Intra- 
mural Basketball 2, 3, 4; Field 
of Concentration — Account- 
ing. 




The 1954 Senior 



WAYNE E. HEALY, B.S.C. 

Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Field of Concentration — Mar- 
keting. 



ERNEST T. HENNINGS, B.S.C. 



NICOLAS R. JANS, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Intramural 
Basketball 1, 2, 3; Field of Con- 
centration — Marketing. 



Field of Concentration 
agement. 



Man- 



WILLIAM J. JOHNSTON, B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration — Mar- 
keting. 



BETTY A. HOZIAN, B.S.C. 

Pi Gamma Mu Honor Society 3, 
4; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treas- 
urer 4; Sodality 1; Marketing 
Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4; Vice- 
President Junior Class, Student 
Council; Women's Intramural 
Volleyball 3, 4, Captain 4; Lead- 
ership Award 3, 4; Scholarship 
Award 1, 3, 4; Field of Concen- 
tration — Marketing. 

LAWRENCE J. 

KATZENBERGER, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 2, 3, 4; Union 
Poll Committee 4; Intramurals 
2, 3; Field of Concentration — 
Marketing. 



Wayne E. Healy 
Nicolas R. Jans 
John R. Keating 



Ernest T. Hennings Betty A. Hozian 

William J. Johnston Lawrence J. Katzenberger 
Robert A. Keenley Dennis J. Keeshan 




JOHN R. KEATING, B.S.C. 

S.A.M. 4; Field of Concentra- 
tion — Management. 



ROBERT A. KEENLEY, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 2; Curtain 
Guild 2; Marketing Club 3, 
Chairman 4; Loyola Union Re- 
search Committee 4; Field of 
Concentration — Marketing. 



DENNIS J. KEESHAN, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 3, 4; S.A.M. 2; 
Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Field of 
Concentration — ■ Management. 



Mass 



DAVID P. KELLIHER, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; R.O.T.C. 
1, 2; Intramural Football 3, 4; 
Field of Concentration — Ac- 
counting. 



JOHN A. KERZAN, B.S.C. 

Economics Club 3, 4; Field of 
Concentration — Management. 



THOMAS F. KLINGER, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4, President 
4; Blue Key Honor Fraternity 3, 
4, Vice-President 4; Pi Gamma 
Mu Honor Society 3, 4; Ac- 
counting Club 3, 4; Queen of 
the Most Holy Rosary Sodality 
1, 2; Loyola Union Congress- 
man 3, 4; Leadership Award 
3, 4; Scholarship Award 3; 
Field of Concentration — Ac- 
counting. 





s 



fc iJtJmLk i . 




David P. Kelliher 
Robert M. Kneisel 
Roger D. Kutina 



John A. Kerzan 
George J. Kunzmann 
Robert B. Latousek 



Thomas F. Klinger 
Richard F. Kusek 
Joel H. Le'Cuyer 



ROBERT M. KNEISEL, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; S.A.M. 
1, 2; Field of Concentration — 
Management. 



GEORGE J. KUNZMANN. B.S.C. RICHARD F. KUSEK, B.S.C. 



University Club 2, 3, 4, Presi- 
dent 3, 4; Blue Key Honor Fra- 
ternity, Executive Council 3; Pi 
Gamma Mu 3, 4; Marketing 
Club 2, 3, 4; Sodality 3; S.A.M. 
2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, 3, President 
4; Young Republicans 3; Loyofcr 
News 1; Loyola Union Con- 
gressman 2, 4, Executive Sec- 
retary 4; Intramural Basketball 
1, 3; Leadership Award 4; 
Scholarship Award 1, 3, 4; 
Field of Concentration — Mar- 
keting. 



Accounting Club 2, 3, 4, Secre- 
tary 4; Marketing Club 2; 
Scholarship Award 3, 4; Field 
of Concentration — Account- 
ing. 



ROGER D. KUTINA, B.S.C. 

Student Marketing Club 3, 4; 
American Marketing Associa- 
tion 3, 4; S.A.M. 3, 4; Field of 
Concentration — Marketing. 



ROBERT B. LATOUSEK, B.S.C. JOEL H. LE'CUYER, B.S.C. 



Delta Sigma Pi 3, 4; S.A.M. 2, 
Vice-President 3; Loyola Union 
Congressman 2, 3; Intramurals 
2, 3; Field of Concentration — 
Management. 



Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4; Sodality 
1, 2, 3, 4; Accounting Club 2, 3; 
Gold Torch 1, 2, 3; Field of 
Concentration — Accounting. 



25 




Robert E. Lesker 
Paul C. Lolakos 
Gerald J. Marth 



William Le Vitus 

Robert E. Long 
Francis B. Martin 



John S. Litton 

Joseph M. Madden 

James C. Martin 



T h e 



ROBERT E. LESKER, B.S.C. 

American Marketing Associa- 
tion 3, 4; Field of Concentration 
— Marketing. 



WILLIAM LE VITUS, B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration — Mar- 
keting. 



JOHN S. LITTON, B.S.C. 

Varsity Track 3; Field of Con- 
centration — Management. 



PAUL C. LOLAKOS, B.S.C. 

University Club 2, 3, Treasurer 
4; Accounting Club 3, 4; Eco- 
nomics Society 3; Field of Con- 
centration — Accounting. 



ROBERT E. LONG, B.S.C. 

Intramurals 3, 4; Field of Con- 
centration — Marketing. 



JOSEPH M. MADDEN, B.S.C. 

Alpha Delta Gamma 2, 3, 4; 
Loyola News 3, 4; Intramural 
Basketball 2, 3, 4; Field of Con- 
centration — Management. 



GERALD J. MARTH, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4, Treas- 
urer 4; Accounting Club 2, 3; 
Knights' Club 2; Fusiliers 3, 4; 
Gold Torch 1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola 
Union Congressman 3, 4; Field 
of Concentration — Account- 
ing. 



FRANCIS B. MARTIN, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 2; S.A.M. 3, 4; 
Fusiliers 2, 3, 4; Field of Con- 
centration — Marketing. 



JAMES C. MARTIN, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Gold 
Torch 2, 3, 4; Intramural Basket- 
ball 1, 2, 3, 4; Field of Concen- 
tration — Marketing. 



19 5 4 Senior Class 



CLEMENT A. MAWICKE. B.S.C. 



Field of Concentration 
keting. 



Mar- 



THOMAS A. 

MONTGOMERY, B.S.C. 

Intramural Basketball, Football 
and Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Field of 
Concentration — Marketing. 



THOMAS J. 
McNICHOLAS, B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration 
counting. 



Ac- 



HARRY J. MORAN, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; Intra- 
mural Basketball, Baseball and 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Field of Con- 
centration — Accounting. 



GERALD C. MEYERS, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 1, 2, 3, 4, Sec- 
retary 2, 3, Vice-President 4, 
President 4; Knights' Club 1, 2; 
Gold Torch 2, 3, 4; Marketing 
Club 2; Fusiliers 3, 4; Secre- 
tary Junior Class, Student 
Council; I. F. Council 2, 4; 
Leadership Award 2, 3; Award 

— Commerce Council Key; 
Field of Concentration — Man- 
agement. 

JOSEPH A. MORAN, B.S.C. 

Gold Torch 1, 2, 3; Fusiliers 2, 
3, 4; S.A.M. 2, 3, 4, Vice-Presi- 
dent 4; Field of Concentration 

— Management. 



Clement A. Mawicke Thomas J. McNicholas Gerald C. Meyers 

Thomas A. Montgomery Harry J. Moran Joseph A. Moran 

Robert B. Murphree Daniel J. Murphy Edwin S. Naganuma 



ROBERT B. MURPHREE, B.S.C. 

Sigma Lambda Beta 2; Alpha 
Kappa Psi 3, 4; Accounting 
Club 3, 4; Field of Concentra- 
tion — Accounting. 



DANIEL J. MURPHY, B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration — Man- 
agement. 



EDWIN S. NAGANUMA, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 3, 4; Field of 
Concentration — Accounting. 




The 1954 Senior 



PHILIP J. NASH. B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration 
agement. 



DONALD B. NELLESSEN, B.S.C. BURTON E. NELSON, B.S.C. 



Man- Delta Sigma Pi 3, 4; Marketing 
Club 2, 3, 4; Intramural Foot- 
ball and Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Field of Concentration — Mar- 
keting. 



American Marketing Associa- 
tion 3, 4; Field of Concentration 
— Marketing. 



ROLAND M. 
NEUMANN, JR., B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 3, 4, Treasurer 
4; S.A.M. 4; Intramural Basket- 
ball 3, 4; Field of Concentration 
— Management. 



WILLIAM T. NIHILL, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; Intra- 
mural Football and Basketball 
3, 4; Field of Concentration — 
Accounting. 



WALTER J. NOBLE, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 3, 4; Accounting 
Club 2, 3, 4; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3; 
Field of Concentration — Ac- 
counting. 



Philip I. Nash Donald B. Nellessen Burton E. Nelson 

Roland M. Neumann, Jr. William T. Nihill Walter I. Noble 

Dennis M. O'Brien Richard B. O'Reskie Sam J. Partipilo 




DENNIS M. O'BRIEN, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4, Vice- 
President 4; Accounting Club 2, 
3; Marketing Club 2; Gold 
Torch 2, 3, 4; Loyola Union 
Congressman 3, 4; Intramural, 
Winner Football Accuracy Con- 
test 4; Leadership Award 3; 
Scholarship Award 3; Field of 
Concentration ■ — Accounting. 



RICHARD B. O'RESKIE, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4; Market- 
ing Club 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 3, 
4; Field of Concentration — 
Marketing. 



SAM J. PARTIPILO, B.S.C. 

Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Field of 
Concentration — Accounting. 



Mass 



JAMES D. PAULY, B.S.C. 

Knights' Club 1, 2; I.M. Board 4; 
Yearbook Staff 4; Varsity Bas- 
ketball Mgr. 1; Intramurals 1, 2, 
3, 4; Field of Concentration — 
Management. 



WILLIAM M PHELAN, B.S.C. 

Intramural Football and Bas- 
ketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Field of Con- 
centration — Accounting. 



RONALD F. PLUSK, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 4; S.A.M. 4; 
Gold Torch 1, 2, 3, 4; Fusiliers 
2, 3, 4; Intramural Basketball 2; 
Field of Concentration — Ac- 
counting. 




James D. Pauly William M. Phelan Ronald F. Plusk 

James B. Power Elmer S. Praser Arthur P. Rapacz 

Melvin C. Richards Richard L. Riley Donald P. Ripoli 



JAMES B. POWER. B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Intramural 
Basketball 4; Field of Concen- 
tration — Marketing. 



ELMER S. PRASER, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 4; Field of 
Concentration — Accounting. 



ARTHUR P. RAPACZ. B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 3, 4; Field of 
Concentration — Accounting. 



MELVIN C. RICHARDS, B.S.C. 

Phi Mu Chi 3, 4; Field of Con- 
centration — Marketing. 



RICHARD L. RILEY, B.S.C. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4; Loy- 
ola Union Congressman 1; In- 
tramural Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Director 4; Scholarship Award 
4; Field of Concentration — 
Marketing. 



DONALD P. RIPOLI, B.S.C. 

Sigma Pi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Treas- 
urer 2, 3, 4; Accounting Club 3, 
4; Marketing Club 2; Field of 
Concentration — Accounting. 



29 




Edward L. Rolfsen 

Nicholas R. Rubino 

John J. Scherer 



James J. Rondoni 

John R. Ryan 
Alfred J. Schmidt 



James D. Robb 
Edward A. Salerno 
Philip H. Sheridan 



T k e 



EDWARD L. ROLFSEN, B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration ■ — Mar- 
keting. 



JAMES J. RONDONI, B.S.C. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 3, 4; Eco- 
nomics Society 3; S.A.M. 3, 4; 
Field of Concentration — Man- 
agement. 



JAMES D. ROBB, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 2, 3; Intramur- 
als 2, 3, 4; Field of Concentra- 
tion — Accounting. 



NICHOLAS R. RUBINO, B.S.C. JOHN R. RYAN, B.S.C. 



Sigma Pi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Ac- 
counting Club 3, 4; Vice-Presi- 
dent 4; Field of Concentration 
— Accounting. 



Field of Concentration 
agement. 



EDWARD A. SALERNO, B.S.C. 

Man- Delta Sigma Pi 3, 4; Economics 
Society 3; Intramural Basket- 
ball 3, 4; Field of Concentration 
— Finance. 



JOHN J. SCHERER, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Fusi- 
liers 3, 4; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Intramural Football 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Varsity Basketball 1, 2, 3; Field 
of Concentration — Marketing. 



ALFRED J. SCHMIDT, B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration — Eco- 



PHILIP H. SHERIDAN, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Field of 
Concentration — Marketing. 



30 



19 5 4 Senior Mass 



PETER G. SIMIGIS. B.S.C. 

Economics Club 2; Marketing 
Club 4; Field of Concentration 
— ■ Marketing. 



WILLIAM J. SHEEHAN. B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 3, 4; Economics 
Society 3; Field of Concentra- 
tion — ■ Finance. 



WILLIAM L. SHEFFIELD. B.S.C. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4, Field 
of Concentration — Manage- 
ment. 



JAMES M. SMITH, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 4; Intramurals 
4; Field of Concentration ■ — ■ 
Marketing. 



KENNETH F. SPALE, B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration — Mar- 
keting. 



EDWARD F. STOGINSKL B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 2, 3, 4, Presi- 
dent 4; Field of Concentration 
— Accounting. 



CAROL A. 

STROMQUIST, B.S.C. 

Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; S.A.M. 3, 
4, Secretary 4; Field of Concen- 
tration — Management. 



Peter G. Simigis 

James M. Smith 

Carol A. Stromquist 



William J. Sheehan 
Kenneth F. Spale 
Chester A. Strzalka 



William L. Sheffield 

Edward F. Stoginski 

Daniel I. Sullivan 



CHESTER A. STRZALKA, B.S.C. 

S.A.M. 3, 4; Fusiliers 2, 3; Gold 
Torch 4; Field of Concentration 
— Management. 



DANIEL J. SULLIVAN, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; Loyola 
Union Congressman 3, Board 
of Governors 3, 4; Varsity Bas- 
ketball 1, Intramural Basketball 
3, 4; Leadership Award 3, 4; 
Field of Concentration — Man- 
agement. 




The Ml .1 I Senior Clan 



JOHN J. SULLIVAN, B.S.C. 

Intramural Basketball 
Field of Concentration - 
keting. 



CHRISTIAN J. FRANK R. TRANKINA, B.S.C. 

1, 2; " "' ' ' Intramural Baseball and Foot- 

- Mar- Accounting Club 4; Field of ball 1, 2; Field of Concentration 

Concentration — Accounting. — Marketing. 



WILLIAM J. TRINEN. B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Pledgemaster 4; Marketing 3, 
4; Leadership Award 3; Field of 
Concentration — Marketing. 



NORBERT A. VALLEE, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4, Vice- 
President 3, President 4; Ac- 
counting Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 
3; Leadership Award 3; Field 
of Concentration — Account- 
ing. 



RICHARD T. VLCEK, B.S.C. 

SAM. 3, 4; Fusiliers 2, 3; Field 
of Concentration — Manage- 
ment. 



John J. Sullivan Christian I. Sweary. Jr. Frank P. Trankina 

William J. Trinen Norbert A. Vallee Richard T. Vlcek 

Francis E. Wall Richard H. Wehman Joseph E. Wallace 



FRANCIS E. WALL, B.S.C. 

Wall Street Journal Award; 
Field of Concentration — Fi- 




RICHARD H. WEHMAN, B.S.C. 

Monogram Club 2, 3, 4, Presi- 
dent 4; Dolphins 3, 4; Market- 
ing Club 2, 3, 4; Economics 
Society 3; President Freshman 
Class; Vice-President Sopho- 
more Class; Treasurer Student 
Council 1; Loyola Union Con- 
gressman 3, 4; Varsity Swim- 
ming 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 3, 4; 
Leadership Award 1, 2; Most 
Valuable Swimmer Award 4; 
Field of Concentration — Mar- 
keting. 



JOSEPH E. WALLACE, B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration — Fi- 



CHARLES C. WIXOM. B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Marketing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Knights' Club 1, 2, 3, 
Treasurer 1, 2, President 3; Student Council Secretary 2; Intra- 
mural Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Leadership Award 1, 2; Field of Con- 
centration — Marketing. 

GERALD J. ZANKE, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Fusiliers 3, 4; Gold 
Torch 1, 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 4; Rifle Team 3, 4, Captain 4; 
Intramural Baseball 3; Leadership Award 3; Field of Concen- 
tration — Marketing. 





Charles C. Wixom 



Gerald J. Zanke 



No Photograph 



THOMAS C. EACH, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 4; Varsity Basketball 1, 2, 3; 
Intramural Football 2, 3; Field of Concentration 
— Marketing. 

CHARLES B. KOLOSEIKE, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 4; Gold Torch 3, 4; Intramural 
Football 2, 3, 4; Field of Concentration — Mar- 
keting. 



DANIEL A. FARRELL. JR., B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration — Management. 



EDWARD J. MOONEY, B.S.C. 

Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3, 
centration — Management. 



Field of Con- 



Graduates of February, 1955 



PETER H. BERGMAN 

CHESTER BIELATOWICZ 
ROBERT BRENNAN 



PERRY BRONSON 
JOHN BURKE 
DAVID CLAIRE 



CHARLES DAMBROSIO 
LE ROY DOLACINSKI 
JOHN DWYER 




Graduates of February, 1955 




DONALD FORBES 
PETER FOX. JR. 



ROBERT KWASNIEWSKI 
KENNETH LOH 



HARRISON FRIESTEDT 
WARREN T. GOLLEHON 



SUZANNE McKENNA 
LYLE O'CONNOR 



GERALD G. GOTSCH 
LAWRENCE A. HARDING 



WALTER ODENKIRK 
FRANK PIERRI 



RAYMOND HORAN 
GERALD JOYCE 






ROBERT SHERRY 
JEROME SHEAHAN 



BEN KAPLAN 
JOHN KELLEY 







RICHARD SOHN 
JOHN TRECKER 




JAMES B. KOLTER 
KENNETH F. KORTAS 



JOHN WHITE 




am*} 




The Senior Mass 



"Take the next 100 pages." 

Test next period 

AT EASE 



A Commerce student gets clipped 

MU fl 1 1"' 



BANGI 

'Don't take school so seriously.' 

"He got a 100." 




The 

Junior Class 




a /,•■/ 

Peter N. Carey, Donald Gralen, Charles T. Walsh. 



OFFICERS 

Donald Gralen President 

Vice-President, Student Council 

Peter N. Carey Vice-President 

Charles T. Walsh Secretary-Treasurer 



The I9S4 £twii (continued] 

gan to come out of our shells and look for the 
brighter side of life once more. Thanksgiving 
Day would soon be upon us. This little recess 
was just what the doctor ordered; it was an 
excellent opportunity to get those term papers 
finished. It also afforded us the chance to rest 
awhile. Also scheduled for this week-end was 
the Float Parade which opened the 1954 Bas- 



ketball Season. The Ramblers, in tune with the 
festivities of the day, obliged the student body 
by really ripping Ripon. 

The days were really flying by now; it was 

December already. This month held many 

things in store. It brought with it the Holy 

Season of Advent and also the Feast of the 

(Continued on Page 40) 



36 



John Anagnost 
Theodore Donald Ander 
Stanley G. Balcer 
James Thomas Barrett 
Joseph M. Barry 
Paul Cullen Barry 



Jerome J. Baumhart 
Hugh George Begy 
Richard Edward Boerger 
Robert Charles Boie 
Thomas E. Brogan 
James William Burke 



p ft ,o p. ft ft 

a ft ft » ft 



Peter Noth Carey 



Jack Edward Carpenter 

Jerome Francis Compernolle 

Edward W. Condon 

John M. Connolly 

Donald R. Crews 

Walter G. Crist 



Harry Allen Cristol 
Donald James Crowder 
John D. Devine 
Robert G. Difano 
Anthony A. Drabanski 
Anthony Albert Drzymala 



Eugene O. Duban 
Arnold Dubren 
Donald Richard Duiiy 



ft ft ft ft 




Roland Ludwig Eckste 



Vernon David Ellars 
William Anthony Enyart 
Daniel Patrick Finley 
Edward James Fitzmauric 
Nancy Anne Foster 
Edmond Peter Geraty 



Lowell H. Goone 
John C. Gordon 
Thomas F. Gorman 
Donald John Gralen 
Herman Lee Greenberg 
Joseph Frank Grgula 



ft. 
ft 


ft ft ft ft ft; 

ft ft ft ft' ft 


ft 


P ft ft i% ft 

ft ft ft ft p 



The Junior Mass 




n*;V« 




Sft ft ft 

0*\ /^\ ^* |F^ 

|?l ' ' <JL^ ^.J f^t^ 

\ &■ - ' \ ' - 

■ ; ' JC*? fv ^tfJ 

ft ft ft ft 

ft ft ft ft 

0*i O ft 

k 1 ,*> 




v. 



iHB'i 







rut 




Theodore Charles Gulino 

William B. Hanley 

James Michael Hartnett 

Thomas Leo Hayden 

William F. Hearty 

Donald H. Heffernan 



Raymond Fred Heiden 
Francis G. Higgins 
James E. Hogan 
John Francis Houlihan 
Warren Allen John Ireland 
Conrad James Irving 



J. Kenneth Eallas 
John Earas 
Stephen R. Kennedy 
Frank S. Kerzan 
Thomas Peter Koconi; 
Richard Joseph Krai 



Francis Xavier Kuhn 
Les John Lambert 
Thomas Leen 
Thomas Joseph Lento 
Joseph N. Leo 
Joel H. Levin 



John J. Lynch 
James Francis McCarthy 
James William McMahon 
Frank G. McKay 
James V. Mills 
James Thomas Moran 



Michael Joseph Morgan 
Edward C. Morgan 
William M. Nolan 
Joseph Michael Noonan 
David Emmett O'Connell 
Edward T. Orchowski 



Ronald H. Osowski 
Robert M. Padrta 
Michael Joseph Parisi 
William G. Pieiffer 
Andrew Michael Pinkowski 
Ronald Robert Reading 



Donald Frank Reinhardt 
Joseph Luke Ruane 
Cornelius Michael Ryan 
Leo Vincent Sage 
Leo Joseph Samborski 
Benedict Anthony Scalzitti 



William Allen Schumacher 
Thomas Michael Shaughnessy 
William Sinacore 
lames Walter Singer 
Robert C. Sittinger 
Joseph William Slater 



John Neil Rice 
George Thomas Talbot 
William Clark Tangney 
John Thomas Thiede 
Eugene Francis Tomaszek 
Andrew Joseph Tuszynski 



Kathleen Elizabeth Uedelhofe 
John H. Valente 
Robert J. Vavra 
Frank J. Vlack 
George William Voitik 
Raymond Edward Voros 



Charles T. Walsh 
Joseph A. Weber 
Bertram Weiss 
James Whiting 
Matthew? F. Youngmann 
Michael E. Zacher 




39 



*atw 




"The way I see it . 
The Office Staff 



"Who'll take the next case?" 
INSPECTION 



Ike I9S4 £tcrij (continued) 

Immaculate Conception, a key date in the 
Marian Year. Special devotions were soon 
begun to suitably commemorate this Holy Year. 

"All aboard", was the call on December 12, 
as students boarded the buses for Purdue. 
What a swell way to get that real college feel- 
ing. Each traveler returned from this jaunt 
with a lot of fine memories. 

It was just about this time that your Stu- 
dent Council secured permission to publish a 
yearbook. Assemblies were called and the 



idea was presented to the student body. 
Pledges were signed and work on this project 
was immediately undertaken. This book be- 
came the subject of discussion for several days. 

Snow lay on the ground now and everyone 
could feel Christmas in the air. It won't be long 
now we told ourselves as we eyed the gayly 
decorated homes and stores. We were soon 
faced with the shopping problem. What should 
I get for mom and dad, what for Aunt Sue, and, 
oh yes, what would be something special for 
that certain person. Christmas cards had to 



40 



T h e 

N ii |i li (i iimi r i 1 01 ass 




John L. Cutler, James P. Savage, E. Peter Fox. 

OFFICERS 

James P. Savage President 

Treasurer, Student Council 

John L. Cutler Vice-President 

E. Peter Fox Secretary-Treasurer 



be sent. "Let's put Christ back into Christmas" 
was our motto as we chose our greetings. 

How glad we were when the last class day 
before Christmas recess arrived. There was 
the usual hub-bub of the parties in the lounge; 
the dancing and singing. There were the hur- 
ried calls of "Merry Christmas" and "Happy 
New Year". Christmas was on its way; no 
classes for two whoie weeks. It seemed every- 
one referred to the old facetious stand-by of 
"See you next year!" 

The Aragon Ballroom set the scene for the 
annual Winter Frolic. Then four days later, 



the Blessed Day came and swelled the glory of 
this Holy Season. 

A soft snow fell and blanketed the earth. 
It was wonderful to go to Midnight Mass with 
the family and then come home to the enjoy- 
able task of opening presents. Old friends 
dropped in to see us. And how good that 
Christmas Day dinner tasted. It was Christ- 
mas and wasn't it wonderful to be alive we 
thought. This was really putting Christ back 
into Christmas. 

A few days later Loyola made its basket- 
(Continued on Page 46) 



41 



The Sophomore Mass 



1 » g$f 



\ 



« B it ' . > » < ' 





r*w ^*^f '^tj 

t 8ut**ll 4lfc* A^^ 

f-^. •"- 'jKT? Qn%*- : (Jt^f^" '"-'••"■' (p« ^¥ 

^*\ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^^ 

mm \ t 
^-5 |3 R 

ft P fl ^ fi P, 

j^[ jMk jBt ^ B h 

r\ f"! jlj jtu 

*.<M**v Til - %i 




John T. Ahem 
Waller J. Ahern 
Fuad D. Alwattar 
John C. Ambrose 
Richard A. Amen 
John O. Andersc 



Lucien R. Battialo 
Gerald A. Bodmer 
Thaddeus J. Bojanowski 
Edward T. Boyle 
Charles K. Bradford 
David A. Brichetto 



George R. Brucks 

Richard C. Bryant 

Joseph J. Buriane! 

John T. Burman 

Robert M. Burns 

Rose Marie Bui 



James C. Byrne 
James E. Byrne 
Donald J. Carar 
Joseph B. Cari 
Paul F. Ca 
Grace T. Castagna 



James P. Cole 
John V. Coleman 
Raymond J. Collins 
William P. Corliss 
Richard L. Cosentino 
Jerome P. Croke 



James M. Cullinan 
John L. Cutler 
John A. Degnan 
Thomas J. Delaney 
Bruno I. DeMaertelaere 
Donald M. De Salvo 



Arthur W. de St. Aubin 
John R. Dillon 
William F. Donahoe 
Richard O. Donovan 
John H. Dore 
Richard B. Duffner 



William J. Duffy 
George H. Dunlap 
John P. Dunne 
Fred R. Egloff 
Jerome A. Evertowski 
Thomas J. Fagin 



13 j 



Joseph Bernard Feeney 
Eugene Peler Fox 
Andy Frain 
Sam John Fralinardo 
Earl J. Frawley 
Robert E. Galassini 



lohn H. Goodsell 
William E. Grow 
lames I. Haberkorn 
John P. Haggerty 
Richard W. Hall 
Norberl B. Harriot 



lenneth R. Hanley 
Thomas W. Hanley 
Thomas E. Haupt 
Stephen B. Hautzinger 
Richard C. Hawkins 
Martin P. Healy 



Robert J. Hedges 
Wayne A. Helget 
Robert G. Hornof 
Richard A. Honquest 
James V. Hurley 
H. Ray Jacauez 



Edward K. Janis 
John L. Johnston 
John E. Katzenberge 
Guy F. Keefer 
Robert W. Kelly 



Walter T. Koziol 
Donald J. Kristol 
Chester J. Kulikowski 
Richard P. Lake 
Jean A. Lange 
Patrick J. Larkin 



Joseph C. La Rocco 

Thomas D. La Rocca 

William C. Laurie 

Gerald P. Lucey 

John J. Malesic 

Santino J. Mariottini 



Joseph J. Marr 
Chester S. Mazurkiewicz 
James J. McDermott 
James B. McGuire 
William F. McNally 
John J. McNamara 



CH) <£ <^T' C^ 







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MMTd Life 
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t 








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Ji4i 



it 



The Sophomore Class 




Joseph E. McNamara 

Thomas L. McRaith 

Richard V. Merica 

James J. Mikolitis 

Michael A. Moran 

Ronald F. Muno 



Cliliord P. Murphy 
John H. Murphy 
William F. Murphy 
Thomas J. Naughton 
Jacqueline D. Newman 
Jerome J. O'Callaghan 



Cornelius A. O'Brien 
William I. O'Connell 
David D. O'Connor 
J. Alan O'Connor 
Michael J. O'Grady 
Patrick J. O'Shea 



Edward T. Ossman 
Clarence J. Pedersen 
Mary L. Phelan 
Raymond S. Prang 
Dennis J. Price 
John T. Prim 



Lawrence A. Quinlisk 
Eugene F. Rados 
Bernard W. Rausch 
Thomas R. Redden 
Ray M. Restivo 
Michael J. Revane 



Carl A. Rossini 
Thomas R. Rusk 
Joseph J. Ryan 
Robert F. Salmon 
James P. Savage 
Enrico R. Scala 



Thomas A. Schermerhc 
Sally A. Schrieber 
Andrew N. Sloyan 
Robert G. Somers 
Raymond J. Spink 
George C. Stoy 



George D. Strickland 
Elmer S. Stringham 
William R. Strong 

James A. Thielen 
Robert S. Tres 



Dominic L. Valenle 
W. Daniel Wallon 
lames E. Wilte 
Gerald F. Wockner 
Thomas J. Wozniak 
Marvin J. Yales 



Robert J. Zivko 



Before I start the movie ..." 




ft O & f*S tt 



r 



)r. Helen Potter and advisee 




The 

Freshman Class 




Arthur W. Herman, Charles Sexton, Rosella Dunn. 

OFFICERS 

Charles Sexton President 

Secretary, Student Council 

Arthur W. Herman Vice-President 

Rosella Dunn Secretary-Treasurer 

Thomas V. Kuhn Secretary-Treasurer 



7ke I9S4 Stwif (continued) 

ball debut on television by opposing John 
Carroll University. After the game the phone 
lines were humming with the familiar question, 
"What are you doing New Year's Eve?" Suits 
had to be pressed and dresses bought. No 
matter what channel we picked we saw the 
man reminding us to make the last one for the 
road — coffee. 



The First came and brought with it those 
New Year's Resolutions. How many did we 
keep? 

Classes again resumed and we were on 
our way once more. Elections for our Union 
Congressmen were held this week. It was just 
a few days until final exams. 

(Continued on Page 68) 



James E. Ackormann 

Charles P. Andorfer 

John F. Belluso 

Robert Bordelon 

David C. Bear 

Tames D. Benson 



enard V. Bodner 
Gerald S. Bohn 
John F. Breield 
John J. Calderini 
John A. Canar 
John H. Carney 



Donald L. Colier 
Michael J. Conrad 
Gerald F. Cuny 
John P. Deasey 
Edward B. Dillmann 
Donald R. Dolniak 



William J. Donahoe 

Joseph E. Doody 

Roberl V. Downe: 

Rosella J. Dunn 

James A. Durki: 

John L. Dyer 



Al Ehman 
Virginia F. Farley 



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rirginia r . rariey !*▼ H IS 1 -sfr •«. ^ ^S| 

Patrick M. Finnegan ™ *• * ^ 

James E. Gavin - 

Raimund G. Gerules 
Thaddeus T. Gissel 



Robert C. Guynn 
Thomas J. Hass 
Richard L. Hallste 
Donald T. Ha 



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ftfh ft 

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1 



ft\ ft 



G. Hayes - . I ;\ 

etta L. Hartman 



Raymond J. Healy 
Brendan Heintz . Jf%^ f <»^_f 7 

Eugene E. Henricks 
Arthur P. Herman 
Kenneth J. Hill 
Dorothy J. Hollman 



homes E. Hogan 
Ronald M. Hrubecky 
Frank X. Huss 
Patrick J. Hughes 
Ralph H. James 
Jesse P. Jendrzej 







s 



tUi 




The Freshman Mass 

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Thomas D. Eakuska 

Peter J. Kanikula 

Richard J. Eapolnek 

Thomas P. Keane 

Thomas F. Kelly 

Thomas I. Kelly 



Donald J. Kempinski 

Robert E. Klamerus 

Phillip R. Kobeski 

Diana J. Konarski 

Wayne R. Krase 

Sarkis Krikorian 



lorm I. Krull 
Donald M. Sullivan 
George F. La Buda 
Robert M. Lear 
William M. Lombardi 
Daniel A. Lydon 



Sylvester J. Madura 
Frank G. Maska 
John T. McAvoy 
John P. McDonnell 
Gordon T. McHugh 
Thomas E. McKevett 




Frank P. Monahan 
Jay P. Monberg 
Dennis H. Mongoven 



James A. Moran 
Philip A. Moran 
Philip R. Moran 
Walter J. Morawczynski 
Max T. Muchowicz 
Ronald F. Muellner 



Robert S. Mulvey 
Richard P. Nagle 
John B. Nichele 
Thomas P. Norris 
Eugene B. Nowotarski 
Thomas J. O'Connor 



John J. O'Leary 
John E. O'Malley 
Joseph J. Pasierb 
Donald G. Perreault 
Betty A. Petta 
Thomas W. Plordresher 



Joseph F. Piro 
John V. Pizzato 
Joseph F. Polera 
John J. Powers 
Donald F. Pruess 
Lester J. Przybyla 



Paul D. Puccini 
William A. Quill 
John D. Rahoy 
Curl J. Richler 
Richard A. Ripoli 
Michael J. Riley 



Jerry P. Riordan 
Robert H. Roach 
Edward M. Rostenkowski 
Michael A. Ryan 
Michael F. Ryan 
Robert A. Ryan 






M 



J. Scalon 
Raymond M. Scannell 
Donald L. Schillo 
Herman G. Schmidt 
Alfred J. Schulz 
James A. Sebesta 



Charles L. Sexton 

Joseph R. Shanfeldt 

Frank D. Sheehan 

William J. Siebert 

Victor F. Slana 

Robert M. Smith 



lavid A. Smoron 
Frank M. Sottile 
Richard J. Spillane 
Richard E. Stoffel 
Thomas A. Kuhn 
Joseph R. Sullivi 



Frank H. Szwedo 
Robert J. Thielen 
William T. Tietz 
Paul C. Tobin 
Anthony J. Tummin. 
Thomas R. Tuohy 



George F. Voris 
Richard J. Wagner 
John H. Walsh 
Thomas J. Walsh 
James J. Ward 
Norman A. Was 



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The 




Freshman 

fa fa fa fa 



Class 



William C. Waters 
Richard £. Weidner 
Charles W. Weise 
James E. Wiedemann 
Donald F. Wilbur 
Richard E. Woodward 




"Wonder 

what his 

research essay 

is about." 



"I'd be happy to 

change your block 

schedule." 



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l 





THE MOST IMPORTANT ONE 






• FRATERNITIES 

• CLUBS 

• ORGANIZATIONS 




Kneeling: T. Borrelli, J. Zimmerman. 

Siding: E. Ralph Egloff, F. Trankina, M. Phelan. J. Lange, B. Petta, J. Whiting, S. Madura. 

Standing: C. Richter, W. McNally. R. Lake, J. Pauly, B. Rausch, L. O'Connor, J. Burke. 



The 1954 Towers 



STAFF 

CO-EDITORS 

Thomas L. Borrelli, Production 
John E. Zimmerman, Finance 

COPY 

Loretta L. Hartman, Chairman 
Betty Ann Petta, Ass't Chairman 



Klinger, 
Madura, 



Sullivan, 



Joel H. Le'Cuyer, Thomas F. 

Richard P. Lake, Sylvester 

Bernard W. Rausch 
SPORTS 

James D. Pauly, John W. 

Francis R. Trankina 
SPECIAL DETAILS 

Jean Anne Lange, Mary L. Phelan 
ART WORK 

Thomas R. Rusk, Chairman 

Joan League, Artist 
PHOTOGRAPHY 

Joseph P. Brausch, James G. Burke, 

E. Ralph Egloff, Curt J. Richter. 
FINANCE 

Rose Marie Burns, Peter J. Kanikula, 

James E. Whiting. 
ADVERTISING 

Lyle F. O'Connor, Chairman 

Charles A. D'Ambrosio, William F. 

McNally, Michael A. Moran, James 

E. Smith. 



Listed on this page are the persons who 
have produced the 1954 Towers. To them 
go the thanks for our book. These are the 
folks who have put in long hours and have gra- 
ciously donated their time for one prime pur- 
pose, i.e., to provide the Commerce School with 
a fine yearbook and to serve as a basis for the 
return of an all-University book. 

A new form of organization was initiated in 
this project. Instead of appointing several edi- 
tors as normally done, it was decided to have 
just two editors. Tom Borrelli and Jack Zim- 
merman were appointed to fill these positions 
in the capacity of co-editors. From there it was 
broken down into various committees, with the 
chairmen of these committees responsible to 
the editors. 

Borrelli became production editor and was 
in charge of all committees pertaining to this 
phase, i.e., the actual content of the book, while 
Zimmerman, finance editor, handled the re- 
sponsibility for committees dealing with this 
aspect. 

This committee idea functioned very 
smoothly and eliminated the necessity for a 
large number of staff meetings. It also left room 
for personal initiative and gave the staff the 
opportunity to work at their leisure. 

It was hard work, but we feel that the ex- 
perience gained and the personal satisfaction 
derived from such an endeavor far outweigh 
the tedious tasks involved in such an under- 
taking. 

The staff thanks you and hopes that their 
efforts have helped to make 1 954 a memorable 
year of your college career. 




in Varsity 

_/\ a tli lee ii ^jrriend 



The 1954 Commerce Council 




Seated: Charles Sexton, Donald Gralen, Rosella Dunn, Mr. I. Raymond Sheriff, Moderator, 

John McKenna, James Savage. 
Standing: Peter Carey, Charles Walsh, E. Peter Fox, John Zimmerman, Arthur Herman, John 

Cutler, Thomas Borrelli. 



OFFICERS 

John J. McKenna President 

Donald J. Gralen Vice-President 

James P. Savage Treasurer 

Charles E. Sexton Secretary 



Although the Loyola Union is the major student 
government organization, there is, within each college, 
an intermediate body. These groups are known as 
the Student Council. It is the purpose of these councils 
to develop self-government by organizing and syste- 
matizing student activities on an all-college basis, 
to stimulate inter-class relations, and to foster such 
other matters which will benefit the college as a whole. 

In our school this governing body is known as The 
Student Association of the College of Commerce, or 
more informally as the Commerce Student Council. 
Through its work with its Moderator, Dean J. Raymond 
Sheriff, it strives to maintain a close relationship be- 
tween the administration and the students. 

The membership of the council is composed of the 
elected officers of the four classes. The officers of the 
Council, as determined by its constitution, are the four 
class presidents. The President of the Senior Class be- 
comes, ex officio, the Council .President, the Junior 
President becomes the Vice-President, while the posi- 
tions of Treasurer and Secretary go to the Sophomore 
and Freshmen Class Presidents respectively. The 
Council also has six congressmen who act as their 



representatives to the Loyola Union. Council members, 
usually, are not congressmen. 

As was mentioned above one of its purposes is to 
organize and develop student activities. In line with 
this, the council is constantly driving to present a big- 
ger and better student program. Among its projects 
this year was the reviving of a student directory. It 
also fostered this publication, the 1954 Towers, which it 
hopes will serve as the basis for the return of an all- 
University yearbook. For the first time in Council his- 
tory it held an off-campus Formal Ball, and a Senior 
Dinner Dance. In addition to these functions it con- 
tinued to sponsor its two mixers, a Variety Show and 
actively supported the Union Carnival. 

On the academic side the Council conducts a series 
of Freshmen Orientation lectures which have proved 
most beneficial to the incoming freshmen. 

Remember that when your Council prospers, YOU 
prosper. With this firmly in mind, you may always 
rest assured that the Student Council will continually 
endeavor to make life in the School of Commerce a 
more beneficial one and to offer the finest programs to 
its student body. 



54 



OFFICERS 

Gerald Meyers President 

Jerry Zanke Vice-President 

Jerry Marth Treasurer 

John Lynch Secretary 

James Kolter Master of Rituals 



Alpha Kappa Psi 



Alpha Kappa Psi, professional commerce fraternity, 
was founded in October, 1904 at New York University. 
Since that date over eighty collegiate chapters have 
been established in accredited schools of commerce. 

On the petition of one of the school's outstanding 
fraternities, the Gamma Iota chapter was installed at 
Loyola in March, 1952. Since that date the chapter has 
risen in membership and in achievements, internally 
and externally. 

Among the professional activities of the chapter are 
speakers, movies, and tours. The most interesting tour 
taken this year was through the Inland Steel Com- 
pany's Indiana Harbor Plant. 

In service to the school, Gamma Iota has under- 
taken research for the College of Commerce. The pro- 
jects this year were the following: "The Scheduling of 
Final Exams", and "Jobs While Attending Loyola". Be- 



sides conducting research projects, the chapter spon- 
sors, in conjunction with the College of Commerce, a 
"Career Day Conference" for those sophomores who are 
about to select their field of concentration. Prominent 
businessmen in the fields of concentration offered in 
Loyola's College of Commerce address this group. 

Recognizing the need for social activity, the chapter 
annually sponsors five gala affairs; the Halloween Hay- 
ride, a New Year's Party, the St. Patrick Day Party, a 
Golf Outing, and a summertime picnic. 

In November and again in April of the past year, 
the members of the chapter were united at Mass, with 
Fr. Evett, Chaplain, officiating. 

Religiously, professionally, and socially, Gamma 
Iota promotes the welfare of Loyola, Alpha Kappa Psi, 
and its individual members. 



First Row: Jerry Marth, Jim Kolter, Jerry Meyers, Jack Lynch, Jack McKenna. 

Second Row: Bill Murphy, John Burman, John Ambrose, Dennis Price, Joe Carini, Bill Trinen, 

Harry Moran, Jim Haberkorn. 
Third Row: Jim Whiting, Dick Lake, Jim p urke, John Thiede, Ted Bojanowski, Jim Hogan, 

John Egan, Frank Goodman, Norb Vallee, Art Goodman. 
Fourth Row: Bob De Celles, Jerry Zanke. Joe Weber, Lyle O'Connor, Dan Finley, Bill McNally, 

Bill Donahue, Ken Loh, Tom Naughton. 
Filth Row: Jack Zimmerman, Les Lambert, Don Crews, Lou Battiato, Tom Brogan, Dave Kelli- 

her, Ed Condon, Mike Moran. 










Delta Sigma Pi 



OFFICERS 

Thomas Klinger President 

Dennis O'Brien. Senior Vice-President 

Charles Wixom Vice-President 

Joseph Bowens Secretary 

Ronald Neumann Treasurer 



Delta Sigma Pi is a Professional fraternity in the 
field of commerce and business administration. The 
Gamma Pi Chapter was installed at Loyola University 
in September, 1950, largely through the efforts of How- 
ard Wilson, the first moderator of Gamma Pi Chapter. 

Since its inception, the Chapter has consistently 
adhered to the principles set forth in the Preamble to 
the National Constitution of the Fraternity. These prin- 
ciples stress scholarship, social activity, and the asso- 
ciation of students for their mutual advancement. 

In keeping with the professional aspect of its 
make-up. Gamma Pi conducts tours for the members of 
the Chapter, both in and out-of-the-city, and procures 
and shows movies dealing with current business topics. 
Also speakers from all fields of business are contacted 
to address the members, 

The Chapter sponsors a "Rose of Delta Sig" contest 
annually to choose a candidate for the National Fra- 



ternity Contest. Gamma Pi's "Rose" for 1954 is Miss 
Margaret Ann Shannon. 

Delta Sigma Pi has always been a "fraternity first" 
and it is in keeping with this spirit that it recently 
obtained a "Key Club" room in which to house all its 
social and professional functions. This organization is 
the first of any Loyola undergraduate fraternities ever to 
have taken such an important step towards the ultimate 
goal of obtaining a fraternity house. 

Gamma Pi Chapter has provided the University 
with many fine student leaders and this and other 
factors have caused it to be recognized as an outstand- 
ing professional fraternity, socially, spiritually and 
academically. 

The members of Gamma Pi Chapter of Delta Sigma 
Pi are thrice blessed in having as their moderator Dr. 
Frizol. He succeeded Howard Wilson in February, 1952. 
Gamma Pi will never forget his unselfish attitude where 
the good of the Fraternity and Chapter is concerned. 



Fiist Row: Dr. S. M. Frizol. Moderator. R. Neumann, D. O'Brien, T. Klinger. C. Wixom, 

J. Bowens. 
Second Row: T. Rusk. I. Birch, S. Balcer, G. Joyce. P. Fox. Ir., E. Salerno, W. Schumacher. 

R. Boerger, D. O'Connell, C. Irving, T. Borrelli. R. Kenny. C. D'Ambrosio, I. Brausch. 
Third Row: W. Pfeiffer, C. Pedersen, I. McNamara, J. Noonan, S. Hautzinger, C. Rossini, 

D. Nellessen, R. Kneisel. D. Keeshan. I. Le'Cuyer. 
Fourfh Row: D. O'Connor, L. Dolacinski. T. Redden, W. Noble. E. Frawley, G. Haney. 

R. Bryant, J. Goodsell, A. B. Cross. 








BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

Seated: C. Combiths, C. Noel, I. Cahill. Miss Mariette Le Blanc. Moderator, B. Hozian, 

I. Johnston. 
Standing: B. Brausch, V. Urbanek, M. Trotti, J. Vaccaro, C. Cannataro, K. Friend, S. Franklin, 

M. Conroy. 



OFFICERS 

Joan Cahill President 

Joan Vaccaro Vice-President 

Betty Trotti Secretary 

Betty Hozian Treasurer 



Co-ed Club 



In the spring of 1949, a group of women 
students who realized the necessity of an or- 
ganization for the women students of the day 
schools met with Miss Julia O'Malley, then 
Dean of Women and formed the present Co-ed 
Club. 

The first official meeting was held in April 
of 1949. At this eventful meeting the purpose 
of the Co-ed Club was defined as primarily 
social. 

Its first undertaking was a picnic in May of 
that year, whose success was definite proof to 
its founders that its existence was wanted by 
the majority of women students. 

In carrying through the idea of a social 



group the Club annually sponsors a Card Party 
and Fashion Show. It also holds "Big Sister" 
parties to welcome incoming freshmen women 
to Loyola. Aside from its annual mixer it also 
conducts teas throughout the year. 

The success of the Co-ed Club throughout 
its years at Loyola can be directly attributed 
to the unselfish efforts of leaders, backed by the 
wonderful support of its members. Its success 
is also a manifestation of its value to the women 
students and to Loyola University. The Co-ed 
Club is now a well established social organi- 
zation. 

Its moderator is Miss Mariette Le Blanc. 



ft c$ 



«* g ^> r^ ^ e> 




First Row: Tom Murray, Tom Bushold, Dick Colsant. Pete Carey, Rev. Jules Toner, S.7., George 

Lane, Steve McGann, Larry Leaveck, Bud Singer. 
Second Row: Joe Madden, Tom Conley, Carl Fischer, Jerry Blake, Larry Cahill, John Conley, 

Don Hand, Don Crowder. 
Third Row: Jerry Hartnett, Bert Seng, Bernard Grothaus, Herb Pinkus, John Malone, Tom 

Hartnett, Tom Fagin, Dick Hawkins, Tom Kane, Bill Watson. 
Fourth Row: Jim Marotta, Joe Biesinger, Cam MacArthur, Dick Henry, John Toomey, Herb 

Cleveland, Dick Considine, Tom Rivera, Tony Riggio, Thomas J. McDonnell, John 

Houlihan. 



Alpha Delta Gamma 



OFFICERS 

Peter Carey President 

Thomas Bushold Vice-President 

George Lane .... Recording Secretary 

Thomas Murray Cor. Secretary 

James Singer Treasurer 

Larry Leaveck Pledge Master 



From its founding on the Lake Shore 
Campus of Loyola in 1924, the Alpha Delta 
Gamma Fraternity has constantly progressed 
and expanded. A nucleus of fourteen Loy- 
olans, desiring to spread their ideas, initiated 
early in the Fraternity's history an expansion 
program. This program produced the first na- 
tional Catholic social fraternity in Catholic 
colleges and universities. Today eleven chap- 
ters extend from Washington, D. C, to Los An- 
geles, California, and three more chapters are 
expected to be added within the year. 

The activities of the Fraternity are regu- 
lated to include all phases of student life at 



Loyola. Primarily a social fraternity, Alpha 
Delta Gamma actively encourages academic, 
religious, cultural, and athletic endeavors. 
These play an integral part in the development 
of its members. Memorial Masses, Commun- 
ion breakfasts, weekly Rosary gatherings, 
parties, intramurals, study sessions, and 
business meetings are all enthusiastically sup- 
ported. The great majority of activities are 
coordinated between the officers and the mod- 
erator, Rev. Jules J. Toner, S.J., with the purpose 
of the Fraternity kept in the forefront, namely 
the development of true Christian manhood, 
centered around Catholic ideals and friendship. 



OFFICERS 

Louis Minella President 

John Suerth Vice-President 

Joseph Zyblski Cor. Secretary 

Darcy Dorigan . . Recording Secretary 
Joseph Eraci Treasurer 



Phi Mu Chi 



Phi Mu Chi is the oldest social fraternity at 
Loyola University. It was founded at the Uni- 
versity of Chicago in 1922, and in the same 
year Beta Chapter was organized at the Lake 
Shore Campus of Loyola. 

The primary end of this fraternity is to 
further brotherly feeling and co-operation 
among its members, past and present. The 
attitude of Christian and brotherly co-operation 
is carried on not only within the fraternity but 
in the social and scholastic extracurricular 



activities of Loyola as well; the ideas being not 
only to further the primary end of the frater- 
nity, but also to further the well-being of the 
university. 

Every year, this fraternity sponsors several 
dances open to all members and their friends. 
Annually it presents the "Easter Queenship 
Ball" which features the crowning of a co-ed 
as queen as part of the evening's festivities. 
It also holds a number of closed parties in keep- 
ing with its tradition of a social fraternity. 



First Row: E. Job, D. Dorigan, J. Suerth, L. Minella, J. Zyblski, J. Eraci, G. Hoeftel. 
Second Bow: J. Baker, J. Leech, R. Feldner. R. Polizzi, R. Vitacca, R. Burke, E. Brophy. 
Third Row: D. Wehling, P. De Gregorio, A. Spika, A. Fiascone, W. Burke, I. Simonaitis, I. Bach, 
E. Koeller. 




Pi Alpha Lambda 



OFFICERS 

John Tuohy President 

Donald Seeberg Vice-President 

John Joyce Pledgemaster 

Robert Fuller Secretary 

Paul Stinneford . . . Assistant Secretary 

Edward Denten Treasurer 

Thomas Drews .... Sergeant-at-Arms 
Patrick O'Mara Historian 



In 1924, with the assistance and guidance 
of its first moderator, Reverend James J. Mertz, 
S./., Pi Alpha Lambda was founded on a plane 
of high and distinctive ideals. 

In following its aims to promote the inter- 
est of Loyola, Pi Alpha Lambda has been 
closely associated with the growth and comple- 
tion of Father Mertz's dream, the Madonna 
della Strada Chapel. 

In October, 1950, Reverend John A. Kemp, 
S./., the present moderator, succeeded the Rev- 
erend Laurence Henderson, S.J., and has car- 
ried on the excellent work of his predecessors 
by injecting a religious atmosphere into the 
fraternal life of the members. 



In September, 1947, the fraternity, taking a 
big step in uniting the organization within the 
entire University, gained permission to pledge 
students in the School of Commerce. Today, 
the Commerce school holds equal membership 
privileges with the School of Arts and Sciences. 

Following the Jesuit tradition of developing 
the whole man, morally, socially, physically, 
and intellectually, the fraternity sponsors its 
annual closed retreat at the Jesuit retreat house, 
at Barrington, Illinois, in addition to its numer- 
ous other religious and social functions. 

The highlight of the fraternity's social year 
is the summer formal dance, which is held in 
early June, at the modern Tam-O-Shanter 
Country Club. 



Fiist Row: Jim Ryan, Bill Enyart, Dick Bornhofen, Bob Fuller, Don Seeberg, John Tuohy, John 

Joyce, Ed Denten, Paul Stinneiord, Bill Brander, John Dunne. 
Second Row: Bill Binzer, John Garrity, John Messitt, George Van Der Bosch, Pete Fox, Linton 

Mustakis, Jim Schurr, Jack Egan, Tom Hogan, Bill Hanley, George Cocomia, Marv 

Yates, Joe Castro. 
Third Row: Jack Sullivan, Jim Fitzgibbon, Tom Christensen, Bill Tangney, Bob Rigney, Tom 

Schermerhorn, Bill Koehler, Ray Mayer, Gerry Wockner, Ed Rolisen, Jim Rondoni, 

Leo Finn, Gene Duban, Dick Duffner. 
Fourih Row: Marty Ward, Ed Claffy, Ron Muno, Don Duffy, Don Donahue, Bill Duffy, Dan 

Kennedy, Gary Christensen, Jim Burden, Charles Bradford, Dick Walsh, Mike Cava- 

naugh, Leo Tarpey, Don Gralen, Jack Cutler. 



P PJ nO r > n 



.f& f^t 






f% "% 



A '^ "1 A#vO/fS 



Ck 




■ i ■ 



r 1 




First Row: R. Lesley, D. Scavone, R. Donatelli, L. Sage, E. Janis, T. Connelly. 
Second Row: K. Kortas, G. Sbarboro, S. De Salvo, R. Kieier, F. Sheen, A. Shaeffer. 
Third Row: T. Cullinane, I. Lavezzorio, S. Lucchesi, D. Winke, I. Ruane, I. Poet. 



.OFFICERS 

Robert Donatelli President 

Daniel Scavone Vice-President 

Walter Koziol Pledgemaster 

Thomas Connelly Cor. Secretary 

Leo Sage Recording Secretary 

Edward Janis Treasurer 

Ronald Lesky Sergeanf-ai-Arms 



Sigma Pi Alpha 



In 1933, this local social fraternity was or- 
ganized for the purpose of uniting Loyola stu- 
dents of Polish extraction. In 1947, however, 
membership in this organization was opened 
to all male students regardless of creed or na- 
tionality. 

Sigma Pi Alpha was founded in order to 
promote intellectual and social interest among 
its members, and to provide opportunities for 
their development, both morally and physi- 
cally, in an atmosphere of friendship and co- 
operation. 

An outstanding attraction of Sigma Pi's 
pledge program is that physical hazing is made 
useful. Last year this fraternity established a 
new tradition and cleaned up the grounds of 
the campus as part of this program. This won- 



derful phase of the period will continue as long 
as their services are needed. 

Throughout the year Sigma Pi Alpha 
sponsors many social functions including 
smokers, socials and mixers. The most impor- 
tant affair on their social calendar, which is 
open to the entire university, is the annual 
"Fraternity Man of the Year" Ball which is held 
on the last school day of the second semester. 
This year it will be held on May 28 in the Lake 
Shore Union House. At this dance a trophy 
is awarded to the male student who has proven 
himself as the most valuable man to his fra- 
ternity. 

Sigma Pi Alpha is determined to continue 
as one of the outstanding fraternities on cam- 
pus and keep up their tradition of offering a 
high spirit of brotherhood. 



6! 




First Row: T. Stasiak. E. Moll, J. Levin, D. Masserman. 

Second Row: M. Dore, J. Garrett, B. Goldsmith, F. Zabielski, M. Ellin. 



Tail Delta Phi 



OFFICERS 

Joseph Levin President 

James Murphy Vice-President 

Marvin Aspers Secretary 

John Carbery Treasurer 



Tau Delta Phi, a national social fraternity, 
was founded in 1910 in the city of New York. 
This organization is proud to boast a member- 
ship of over five thousand members in its twen- 
ty-eight chapters located from coast to coast. 
Tau Eta, the chapter which is located at Loyola, 
was founded in 1949 through the efforts of Mr. 
Hy Krane. At present Tau Eta has eighteen 
active members, most of whom are pre-medical 
students. 

The purpose of Tau Delta Phi Fraternity is 
to give students of the Jewish faith a voice in 
university affairs. Its membership is open to 
persons of other beliefs, also. 

Since its founding, this chapter has main- 
tained the highest scholastic rating of any fra- 
ternity located at Loyola. 

In keeping with the spirit of social frater- 
nity, Tau Delta Phi sponsors many social 



functions throughout the year. This year at its 
second annual Mixer it introduced its candidate 
for Miss Varsity, Miss Patricia Bauer. Last 
August, the Loyola Chapter played host for the 
fraternity's national convention held in Chi- 
cago. 

On the Athletic side, the Tau Delts have 
distinguished themselves in the intramural 
competition. Tau Eta has always been one of 
the top competitors in the Olympic Week 
Games. 

One can readily see after reviewing these 
two aspects of their fraternal activities that 
Tau Eta's participation in university activities 
is of both a diverse and universal nature. De- 
spite these fine advances since its inception, 
Tau Eta will never stop striving in its attempt 
to make Tau Delta Phi one of the finest of 
Loyola's fraternities. 



62 



OFFICERS 

Jean Yosepian President 

Helen Butkowski Vice-President 

Sally McGuire Cor. Secretary 

Marge Murphy . . Recording Secretary 

Rosemary Fuerst Treasurer 

Marie Raymond Pledgemistress 



Theta Phi Alpha was initiated on the cam- 
pus of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor 
in 1912 under the guidance of Bishop Edward 
D. Kelly of Detroit. 

Bishop Kelly, then Auxiliary Bishop of that 
city, realized the need for a Catholic women's 
group to promote the religious, educational 
and social aspects of campus life. The ties of 
a common religion allowed to flourish in a 
home atmosphere provided by a chapter house 
could advance the interests of young women 
not only on the campus but would continue 
their Christian ideals after college days. 

In 1918, the sorority begun on the Ann 
Arbor campus became the Alpha Chapter of 
Theta Phi Alpha. Soon after, Theta Phi was 
accepted for membership in the National Pan- 
hellenic Conference. Today, it is one of the 
thirty-one members of the N.P.C of women fra- 
ternities founded on the campuses of accredited 
universities and colleges throughout the nation; 
the chapter roll of Theta Phi Alpha numbers 



Theta Phi Alpha 



twenty-two. Upsilon Chapter of Theta Phi was 
established at Loyola on March 7, 1943. 

The year's schedule of Theta Phi activities 
at Loyola traditionally begins with a Sunday 
Mass and Breakfast in September. Three rush- 
ing parties are hosted by the actives each 
semester before new rushees are accepted as 
pledges. The three month pledge period ended 
last semester with a formal initiation of nine- 
teen girls at the Edgewater Beach Hotel. Each 
Christmas, the Philanthropy committee of the 
sorority sponsors a campus-wide food and toy 
drive. On March 6, 1954, Upsilon chapter cele- 
brated their eleventh anniversary at Loyola 
with a birthday party. One of the outstanding 
events of the sorority calendar was the annual 
White Rose Ball held on April 24 at the Sherry 
Hotel. The highlight of Theta Phi's activities 
was Founder's Day which was celebrated on 
the feast of St. Catherine of Sienna, patroness 
of the sorority, on April 30. 



First Row: J. Welman, R. Fuerst, D. McCarthy, J. Yosepian, Miss M. Le Blanc, Moderator, Mrs. 

E. Martin, National Vice-President, V. Urbanek, B. Brown, J. Krygier, I. Cahill. 
Second Row: B. Brausch, H. Quinlisk, G. Michaels, C. Lucy, H. Marvin, B. Sjada, K. Daly, 

P. Reschke, I. Backus, M. Schulte, E. Felichowski, Sally McGuire. 
Third Row: M. J. Kelly, C. Bellon, K. Friend, L. Mugan, M. J. Collins, C. Bielatowicz, B. Trotti, 

H. Butkowski, M. Raymond, J. Ryan, I. Vaccaro. 
Absent: Rita Bakewell, I. Corbett, M. Murphy. L. Kwod, M. I. Seavers, G. Philbin, P. Kempl, 

C. Lemm, C. Cowperthwait, K. De Grazio, C. Noel. 




The 
University Club 



OFFICERS 

George Kunzmctnn President 

Dennis Quinlan Vice-President 

Daniel Behnke Secretary 

Paul Lolakos Treasurer 



Founded in 1938 on the Lake Shore Cam- 
pus, the University Club began chiefly as an 
athletic organization. After a few years the 
Club was organized as a social fraternity, and 
now its members consist of students from Lake 
Shore and Lewis Towers. 

Under the capable guidance of Father 
Cletus Hartman, S./., Moderator, the University 
Club has adopted a year-round social program 
extending through the summer. The Club spon- 
sors at least one activity monthly and high- 
lights the year with the Harvest Hop, held be- 
fore Halloween. This year the Harvest Hop 
consisted of a square dance, which is a unique 
event for Loyolans. 

The University Club has always attempted 
to afford its members with a varied schedule of 
activities. The Jazz Concert was one of the many 



social events which the U-Club brought to 
Loyola. Activities during the school year in- 
clude sleigh rides, picnics, group outings, and 
closed parties. Last year a week-end outing 
was held at Fox Lake before the comprehensive 
and final exams. This year outings were held 
during the Easter holidays in Michigan. Sum- 
mer activities consist of picnics, week-end out- 
ings, and facilities for spending the entire sum- 
mer together at a summer cottage. Thus the 
policy of the University Club is to promote new 
activities and enable members to enjoy a year- 
round social program. 

The officers of the U-Club combine their 
efforts in having the pledges perform many 
services and benefits to Loyola and to Chi- 
cago such as counseling and instructing at 
the C.Y.O., and making their services available 
to Loyola when needed. 



Kneeling: Dan Cota, Tom Vasti. 

Seated: Mr. John A. Zvetina, Ed Kuehn, Bill Lane, George Kunzmann, Dennis Quinlan, 

Dan Cahill. 
Sfanding: Phil McGuire, Marty Conley, Marty Stumpf, Dan Behnke, Paul Shiman, Tom Dyba, 

Dave Parmalee. 





Seated: Mary Ellen McGoorty, Constance Riley. 

Standing: Loretta Hartman, Mary Ann O'Mara, Suzanne McKer 



Eleanor Raveret. 



OFFICERS 

Mary Ellen McGoorty President 

Arlene Gardner Vice-President 

Loretta Hartman. Recording Secretary 
Suzanne McKenna . . Cor. Secretary 
Constance Riley Treasurer 



Kappa Beta Gamma 



Kappa Beta Gamma is the first Jesuit 
Sorority to be inaugurated at Loyola. It was 
founded in 1920 when a group of women stu- 
dents banded together to form the first chapter 
of Kappa. Since that date it has grown and 
prospered and now has several chapters lo- 
cated in Midwestern Jesuit universities. The 
Epsilon Chapter is located at Loyola. 

Open to all races and creeds, this organiza- 
tion has as its purpose the furthering of both 
social and educational achievements. Its prime 
educational objective is to familiarize the fe- 
male student with the various phases of learn- 
ing. 

Kappa Beta Gamma deems itself fortunate 
to have as its moderator the Reverend Richard 
E. Tischler, S.J., Associate Dean of the College 
of Arts and Sciences. It was largely through his 
excellent judgment and guidance that Epsilon 
Chapter was able to experience such success 
during its initial semester at Loyola. 

The main topics on the agenda for Kappa's 



first semester were the drafting of a constitution 
and the operation of a successful pledge pro- 
gram. 

Pledging consists of a vigorous five-week 
period. During that time a prospective mem- 
ber is given the opportunity to prove herself 
deserving of membership in this sorority. A 
complex final examination, followed by the 
formal initiation is the culmination of pledging 
activities. 

As part of its social program Kappa has 
made arrangements to offer its services to the 
University whenever they are needed. It also 
plans to make Easter baskets for orphans, send 
gifts to needy families at Christmas time, and 
volunteer aid to the C.Y.O. 

Through these philanthropic endeavors 
Kappa hopes to instill in its members the im- 
portance of helping your neighbor. Their phil- 
osophy can be summed up in one word — 
Fraternalism. 



Accounting Club 




Fiist Row: S. Balcer, R. Voros, D. Crews, W. Ireland. D. Ripoli. 

Second Row: L. Lambert. E. Stoginski, Mr. C. T. Fay. Jr., Moderator, Mr. A. N. Schorn, Advisor, 

N. Rubino, T. Bresnan. 
Third Row: C. Ryan, R. Rausch. J. Ruane. T. Borrelli, J. Thiede, R. Bornhofen. 
Fourth Row: F. Kuhn, F. Goodman, A. Goodman, D. Hand, R. Plusk. 



Since its founding in December, 1949, the Loyola 
University Accounting Society has been one of the most 
active organizations in the College of Commerce. To 
meet the society's general purpose of furthering the 
study in and promoting the advancement of the field 



of accounting, leaders in the accounting profession are 
brought in as guest speakers. Field trips are promoted; 
group and individual study of problems and theory of 
accounting are discussed among the group which in 
turn stimulates their interest. 



Economics Society 




First Row: H. Moran, J. Burke, J. Brausch, J. Noonan, J. Bowens, S. Alexander. 
Second Row: A. Rapacz, T. Shaughnessy, J. Slater, Dr. T. A. Mogilnitsky, J. Devine, W. Noble. 
Third Row: E. Denten. D. Gralen, R. Krause. J. Litton, I. Madden, A. Cross, R. Bornhofen, 
T. Klinger. 



Since the re-organization of the Economics Society 
of Loyola University in 1946, it has striven to maintain 
new projects for the club at all times. The club not 
only encourages the students in the College of Com- 
merce to join, but also extends its membership to the 
Arts Students as well. 



They have fulfilled many of their aims during the 
year, such as sponsoring mixers in the Lewis Towers 
Lounge, and private parties for new members. On the 
academic side, the club has round-table discussions 
with other colleges, and they also show weekly movies 
of economic interest. 



S. A, 




Firs! Bow: I. Devereux, J. Moran, Dr. Peter T. Swanish, Moderator, C. Stromquist, G. Kunz- 

mann. President, C. Bracken. 
Second Row: W. Dineen, W. Strzalka, E. Chapleau, T. Colleran, K. Loh, T. Groff. R. Vleck, 

W. Gardner. 



The Society ior the Advancement Chapters con- 
sists of businessmen in all fields and student members 
from schools and businesses all over the country. 

Loyola's Student Chapter was formed in 1951; 
students from all the major fields in the College of 
Commerce are members as well as Management majors. 



The Society gives the members the opportunity for well- 
rounded development in the field of management, not 
only by taking what the Society has to offer, but also 
by contributing their own ideas. Through its meetings, 
speakers, publications (Advanced Management) and 
tours of various business establishments it attempts 
to accomplish this objective. 



Marketing Club 




Kneeling: F. Pierri, E. Rolfsen, I. Zimmerman, E. Condon, J. McNamara. 

Seated: L. O'Connor, R. Wehman, B. Hozian, E. Ralph Egloff, J. Arend, R. Keenley, President, 

J. Cleary. 
Standing: R. Boerger, P. Simigis, F. Egloff, Mr. Lloyd G. Allen, Moderator, C. Wixom, 

B. De Maertelaere, R. Fuller. 



The object of the Marketing Club, as in other or- 
ganizations, is to create and maintain interest in the 
group. The Marketing Club creates interest for its 
members by planning field trips to major industries, 



and learning how they function in production, promo- 
tion and distribution. 

Four years have gone by since the founding of this 
ambitious Club and now they are a junior member of 
the American Marketing Association. 




7he I9S4 £tcrif (ccHtihued) 



Then began the last minute rush of com- 
pleting term papers, turning in back homework 
and cleaning up other important details. Add- 
ing to the confusion was registration for the 
second semester. We had problems trying to 
take care of our problems; it seemed as if there 
weren't enough hours in the day. 

Exam week came. The library was jammed 
with people reviewing for that big one. Frus- 
tration, nervousness, staying up late and the 
inevitable guestions of, "How can I remember 
all this stuff?", shown in everyone's face. 

"He won't ask that", we said to ourselves 
as we underlined a sentence in our notes. It 
was a good thing we did underline it, because 
he did ask it. 

Soon the tests were over; what a relief! 
Another seventeen hours were safely tucked 
away. 

Naturally, once the heat was off, everyone 
decided to go out and celebrate the event. It 
seemed that quite a few people thought the 
Sno-Ball, the Commerce Council's first Off- 
Campus formal dance, was the ideal way to 
take care of this. Johnny Palmer and his Or- 
chestra set the beat for the merry-making. No 
one will ever forget how beautiful the girls 
looked as they swirled around in their ball 
gowns over the multi-color lighted dance floor. 
What a perfect end to a semester. 

The winners of the yearbook contest were 
announced that night; first place went to Joe 
Weber for his winning entry, The Towers. 

During the week in between semesters 
everyone planned to attempt to recouperate. 
Not very many people were successful in this 
endeavor, however. 

School re-opened on February 1, and the 
consensus of opinion was that we were glad to 
return so that we could get back to normal 
again. This week saw the usual rush of look- 
ing for class rooms and book-swapping. Pay- 
ments for the yearbook were due, and, wow!, 
how some hated to part with the moolah. 

Union elections were held and Donald 
Gralen took over as prexy. 

Headlines announced the coming Loyola 

(Concluded on Page 84) 



S.A.M. members eye convention notice. 

Students chat with guesl speakci after lecture. 

"Loyola Rides Again." 

"Gee, I hope this is the right line." 

Ticket chairman — and assistants?? 



Loyola I ii in ii 




BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

Seated: lames McCarthy, Treasurer, Colette Flynn, Donald Gralen, President, Mrs. Genevive 

Savage, and L. O'Connor, Vice-President. 
Standing: Thomas Hartnett, Donald Duffy, George Kunzmann, Executive Secretary, James 

Simpson, Daniel Cota, William Angus and John Scullion. 



Student government at Loyola is based on the all- 
university as well as college and school level. The 
first regular meeting of the Loyola Union, known until 
then as the Interdepartmental Committee, was called to 
order December 11, 1928. The organization functioned 
until the United States' entry into World War II. 

In 1946, at the request of the President of Loyola 
University, the Loyola Union was reorganized. The 
purpose of the present Union is seen in the preamble 
of the constitution. 

"To unify the student body of Loyola University, 
to promote student unity in each school and college of 
the university, to provide liaison between the student 
body and the university, to support the religious pro- 
gram of the university, to encourage student academic 
and social societies, to govern the student body ac- 
cording to sound principles of self-government, to form 
and uphold traditions, to voice student opinion, to cre- 
ate wholesome relations among student organizations, 
to enlarge university life for succeeding generations of 
students, to meet the needs of a greater Loyola Student 
Body and of a greater Loyola University, to prepetuate 
the Loyola Union of Loyola University ..." 

All Students who have registered and are in aca- 
demic residence in any of the schools and colleges of 
Loyola University are members of the Loyola Union. 

There is a permanent and representative body 
which is called the Congress and which meets in Feb- 



ruary, April, October and December in regular session, 
at the call of the President of the Union. It is composed 
of Union members selected in the month of January to 
serve from the February session of that year until the 
February session of the succeeding year. The mem- 
bers of the congress are known as congressmen. 

There is selected by the student body of each 
school and college, in whatever manner determined 
by each, not less than two nor more than six union 
members. 

Annually in the regular February meeting, the con- 
gress elects a board of governors, and such offices as 
a board member enjoys on the board will ipso facto 
establish him in the same office both of the congress 
and in the Union. The board meets regularly in each 
month from September through May and in special 
meeting at any other times of the calendar year at the 
call of the President. 

The purpose of this organization is to foster the 
mental, moral and physical development of the students 
of the various colleges, to support student activities 
and to develop friendly relations between students 
and faculty. 

Each year the Union sponsors a Fall Frolic, at 
which Miss Varsity is crowned, and the Winter Frolic, 
which is usually held off-campus. This year, for the 
first time in its history, it conducted a Fair and Frolic, 
which was used to raise funds to be used by the 
Loyola Union. 



Deans Keys 




X. 
Thomas L. Borrell 



lohn E. Zimmerman 




Accounting Department Key 
Donald R. Hand 



Academic Awards 





Management Department Key 
Carol Stromquist 




^^V 




Marketing Department Key 
Betty A. Hozian 



Wall Street Journal Award 
Francis E. Wall 



70 



Fraternity Keys 




THE ALPHA KAPPA PSI KEY 
George J. Kunzmann 



THE DELTA SIGMA PI KEY 
Thomas F. Klinger 




lliiiiiiii Scholarship Key 

Awarded to 
GEORGE J. KUNZMANN 



An important date on the social calendar 
of the College of Commerce is the Honors Day 
Banquet sponsored by the Student Council. At 
this annual affair, certain awards and keys are 
presented to students who distinguish them- 
selves for outstanding scholarship and leader- 
ship. Only graduating seniors are eligible for 
keys, but leadership and scholarship certifi- 
cates may be awarded to underclassmen. 

Dean's Keys are given to seniors who are 
conspicuous for their loyalty, self-sacrifice, and 
achievement in extra-curricular activities. This 
is perhaps the most highly esteemed of lead- 
ership awards. 

To the student who has the highest aver- 
age in courses in his field of concentration go 
the various department keys. The Wall Street 
Journal Award is presented to the senior who 
merits the best grade average for courses in 
the Department of Finance. The Alumni 



Scholarship Award is a gold key given to the 
student with the highest scholastic average for 
his entire college course. 

Delta Sigma Pi and Alpha Kappa Psi, pro- 
fessional fraternities in the field of commerce, 
also present keys to students of scholastic ex- 
cellence. These keys are awarded by the fra- 
ternities' moderators. 

The scholarship certificate is designed to 
serve as an acknowledgment of high scholas- 
tic performance in the past and to offer incen- 
tive for its continuation in future years. To 
students who have distinguished themselves as 
outstanding participants and leaders in student 
activities go certificates of leadership. 

The idea of an Honors Day Banquet was 
instituted by Jerome Janiec, Council President 
1952-53, and promises to remain as one of the 
most important events in a student's career in 
the College of Commerce. 



Scholarship Certificate Winners 



Walter Ahern 
Peter Bergman 
Chester Bielatowicz 
Thaddeus Bojanowski 
John Coleman 
Edward Egloff 
Earl Frawley 
Donald Gralen 
Thomas Groff 
William Grow 
Norbert Hamet 
Thomas Haupt 
Roland Eckstein 



Betty Hozian 
David Kelliher 
Thomas Klinger 
Donald Kristoff 
George Kunzmann 
Robert Kwasniewski 
Richard Kusek 
Gerald Lucey 
Clement Mawicke 
James Mills 
Michael A. Moran 
William Nihill 
Dennis O'Brien 



Bernard Rausch 
Thomas Redden 
Edward Stoginski 
Carol Stromquist 
George Strickland 
William Strong 
William Tangney 
Dominic Valente 
Raymond Voros 
Alfred Walsh 
Daniel Walton 
Marvin Yates 



Leadership Certificate Winners 



Thomas Borrelli 
David Brichetto 
Thomas Brogan 
Peter N.Carey 
John Cutler 
Donald Duffy 
Rosella Dunn 
Donald Forst 
Eugene Peter Fox 
Peter Fox Jr. 
Donald Gralen 
Donald Hand 
Loretta L. Hartmann 



Arthur Herman 
Bette Hozian 
Robert Keenley 
Thomas F. Klinger 
Jim Kolter 
Kenneth Kortas 
Thomas Kuhn 
George Kunzmann 
James McCarthy 
John McKenna 
William F. McNally 
Gerald Meyers 
Michael Moran 
Joseph Noonan 



Lyle O'Connor 
Dennis O'Brien 
Dennis Price 
Leo V. Sage 
James Savage 
Charles Sexton 
Edward Stoginski 
Daniel Sullivan 
John W. Sullivan 
Norbert Vallee 
Charles T. Walsh 
Richard Wehman 
John Zimmerman 




• BASKETBALL 

• TRACK 

• BOWLING 

• SWIMMING 



Loyola Teams 




1. Basketball 



First Row: George Ireland, Coach, Ken Howard, Art Schalk, Dick Clark, 
Warren Inniss, Rev. Cletus Hartmann, S.J., Athletic Director. 

Second Bow: Bill Palka, Ron Fagin, Charles Bradford, Joe Hawrysz. 

Third Row: Dick Walsh, Manager, Jerry Lyne, Ed Stube, Vince Gagliano, 
Manager. 



2. Track 



Fiist flow: Terry Shaughnessy, Dick DufJner, P. Wall, Phil Moran. 
Second Row: John Egan, Vernon Ellars, Tom Feit, Max Muchowicz. 



:!. Bowling 



First flow: G. Risner, J. Ovnik, C. Greenstein, D. Forbes, D. Scavonne. 
Second Row: F. Banich, C. Ulbert. 



4. Swimming 



First Row: John Dunne, Al Wagner, Dick Wehman, Captain, Don Ververka, 

J. Oldershaw, George Voris. 
Second Row: Robert Bobowski, Larry Leaveck, Joseph Doody, Jim Allen, 

John Sullivan, Dick Troy, Mgr. 




I 



SiH ^ 


^B ''::»-■.■■ ■:^ fr " 


JEXlil 


: 

• * * * > 



R i tie Team 




Firsf Row: J. McKenna, R. Bornhofen, R. Sherry, J. Zanke, Captain. 

Second Row: J. Lincoln, R. Meiners, R. Lear, Sgt. Davis, Moderator, J. Durkin, J. Goodsell. 



Drill Team 




First Row: T. Anderson, R. Meiners, R. Dillon, C. Irving, Comm. E. Frawley, A. Waldack, 

R. Boerger. 
Second Row: R. Polcyn, G. Bodmer, R. Pawl, B. Dentzer, J. Shanfeldt, R. Healy, J. Lincoln. 



Loyola University llaskeiball Team 



Ramblers 

Captain: Richard Clark 



As the last buzzer had sounded, the final 
tally sheet showed that the Loyola University 
basketball team, coached by George Ireland, 
finished the season with a record of eight wins 
and fifteen losses. Lack of experience, as well 
as height, handicapped the squad throughout 
the season. 

The team as a unit scored 1652 points for 
a 71.8 average while their opponents scored 
1691 points for a 73.5 average. Percentage-wise 
the Loyola team beat their opposition 36.9% 
to 34.9%, but their opponents took two hundred 
twenty more shots than the Ramblers, scoring 
on forty-five of them. 

Of the fifteen games lost, seven were by 
a margin of one to nine points, and thirteen 
between one to sixteen points. This difference 
was due largely to the height advantages of 
the opposition. 



No doubt the best games played this year 
were the three games at the Chicago stadium 
in which Loyola lost by a close margin to 
Dayton, Manhattan, and Notre Dame. 

In the Dayton game the teams set a Sta- 
dium record, scoring a combined total of 164 
points, breaking the old mark of 162 points set 
by the same two schools in 1952. It was in this 
game that Captain Dick Clark, who scored 
twenty-four points, played the best game of 
his college career. 

Scoring honors went to Sophomore Bill 
Palka, who scored 295 points in 23 games and 
had a 12.8 average. He was pressed closely 
by Art Schalk, the Captain elect for the 54-55 
season, who scored 291 points in the same 
number of games and had a 12.6 average. 

With this combination plus George Ireland 
as next year's mentor Loyola will spring back. 



INDIVIDUAL RECORDS 1953-54 



Players 


Yr. 


G 


Q 


FGA 


FG 


% 


FTA 


FT 


% 


PF 


PTS 


AV. 


Re'b 


AV. 


Bill Palka 


so. 


23 


89 


265 


112 


42.2 


122 


71 


58° 2 


76 


295 


12.8 


199 


8.6 


Art Schalk 


jr- 


23 


84 


289 


98 


34.2 


128 


95 


74.2 


71 


291 


12.6 


162 


7.0 


Jerry Lyne 


so. 


23 


89 


214 


78 


36.3 


116 


94 


81.0 


82 


250 


10.8 


58 


2.5 


Dick Clark 


sr. 


23 


86 


246 


91 


36.9 


74 


51 


68.9 


76 


233 


10.1 


169 


7.3 


Ken Howard 


so. 


22 


80 


166 


67 


40.5 


110 


68 


68.0 


36 


202 


9.1 


74 


3.3 


Ed Stube 


so. 


22 


63 


152 


52 


34.2 


79 


54 


68.4 


31 


158 


7.1 


83 


3.7 


C. DeGrangf 


3 so. 


11 


24 


40 


13 


32.5 


37 


18 


48.6 


14 


44 


4.0 


25 


2.2 


W. Inniss 


sr. 


11 


21 


45 


12 


26.7 


30 


18 


60.0 


21 


42 


3.8 


45 


4.4 


Ron Fagan 


sr. 


13 


20 


24 


11 


45.8 


10 


7 


70.0 


13 


29 


2.2 


7 


0.5 


Joe Hawrysz so. 


2 


2 


3 


1 


33.3 


2 





.0 





2 


1.0 


1 


0.5 


extra 








95 


34 


35.8 


54 


38 


70.4 


44 


106 


4.6 


56 


2.4 


Total (Loyola) 


23 


92 


1539 


569 


36.9 


762 


514 


66.4 


464 


1652 


71.8 


879 


38.2 


Opponents 








1759 


614 


34.9 


700 


463 


66.1 


505 


1691 


73.5 
















SCORES 


BY GAMES 














Loyola 


74 




Ripon 


39 






Loyc 


>la 


81 




Great 


Lakes 


76 


Loyola 


93 




Elmhurst 


45 






Loyola 


67 




Detroit 




66 


Loyola 


90 




N. Dakota 


85 






Loyola 


78 




Daytor 


i 


86 


Loyola 


54 




Wisconsin 


75 






Loyola 


79 




W. Michigan 


56 


Loyola 


70 




Purdue 


82 






Loyola 


70 




St. Francis 


86 


Loyola 


65 




Notre Dame 


81 






Loyola 


60 




Seton Hall 


72 


Loyola 


68 




W. Michigan 80 






Loyola 


55 




Washington 


59 


Loyola 


58 




Michigan 


89 






Loyola 


81 




Manhattan 


82 


Loyola 


91 




J. Carroll 


74 






Loyola 


82 




Marquette 


88 


Loyola 


65 




B. Green 


79 






Loyola 


65 




Notre Dame 


71 


Loyola 


83 




Drake 


92 










1652 








1691 


Loyola 


63 




Marquette 


69 




















Loyola 


60 




Washington 


59 








WON 8 




LOST 15 





77 



LOYOLA UNIVERSITY SWIMMING TEAM 



During the last five years, emphasis has 
been placed on rebuilding Loyola's reputation 
as a swimming power here in the Chicago-land 
area. The efforts were culminated this year as 
the mermen annexed the Chicago Intercolle- 
giate Championship and the coveted Mid-west 
Intercollegiate Title. In duel meet competition 
the Rambler squad suffered only one loss, to the 
University of Illinois, as against eleven victories. 
This achievement resulted from the skillful tute- 
lage of coach Don Chalmers, and the spirited 
leadership of captain Dick Wehman. 

The success of this year's team may be 
accounted for by its overall balance and the 
enduring strength of the members who some- 
times had to swim three events in a single 
meet. Captain Wehman and John Oldershaw 
were consistent rivals, each winning his share 
of 50-yard and 100-yard free-style sprints. 
Larry Leaveck very adequately swam the 220 



and 440 distance races, losing only two races 
all year. John Dunne repeated his previous per- 
formances by being a steady winner in the 200- 
yard backstroke race. 

Newcomers, Joe Doody, Al Wagner, Don 
Ververka, and Bob Bobowski added their sup- 
port toward balancing this contingent. Doody 
quickly adjusted himself to the winning habit 
in the 150-yard individual medley. Wagner 
changed his affiliation from the basketball floor 
to the tank room. At the Chicago Intercolle- 
giates, Al eclipsed the school 200-yard breast 
stroke record with the time of 2:35.9. Jim Allan 
and Nonowski add depth and support to the 
breast stroke and distance departments. Ver- 
verka improved steadily all season and will be 
a strong contender in the backstroke depart- 
ment next year. Jack Sullivan rounds out this 
winning formula with his fancy diving efforts. 



LOYOLA UNIVERSITY RIFLE TEAM 

Thomas Leen 
Robert Lear 
James Lincoln 
John McKenna 
Richard Meiners 



Richard Bornhofen 
James Durkin 
John Goodsell 
Brian Halpin 
Robert Latousek 

WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST R.O.T.C. RIFLE MATCH 

FIRED JANUARY 15, 1954 

RANKED 32ND OUT OF SIXTY TEAMS 



James Mills 

John Nilles 

Donald Schillo 

Robert Sherry 

Gerald Zanke (Captain) 



FIFTH ARMY R.O.T.C. RIFLE MATCH 

FIRED JANUARY 15, 1954 
RANKED 8TH OUT OF SIXTY TEAMS 



DRILL TEAM SEASON RECORD 



Loyola 


1815 


Marquette 


1768 


Loyola 


1850 


U. of Michigan 


1882 


Loyola 


1846 


Kansas State 


1794 


Loyola 


1846 


Notre Dame 


1836 


Loyola 


1812 


Ripon 


1822 


Loyola 


1932 


Air Force & Army 
R.O.T.C. 








Kansas State 


1874 



Loyola 


1928 


Temple 


1920 


Loyola 


1841 


Penn. State 


1887 


Loyola 


1852 


Mich. State 


1832 


Loyola 


1867 


Temple 


1802 


Loyola 


1857 


North Carolina 


1862 


Loyola 


1867 


Penn. State 


1858 



WON 7 



LOST 5 



LOYOLA R.O.T.C. DRILL TEAM 

Platoon Leader Conrad J. Irving 1st Lieutenant 

Platoon Sergeant Richard J. Dillon Master Sergeant 

Ass't Platoon Sergeant. .Francis M. Balogh. First Sergeant 

Messenger James W. Lincoln Corporal 

FIRST SQUAD SECOND SQUAD 

Theodore D. Anderson. . . .First Sergeant Richard E. Boerger 

Joseph R. Shanfeldt Private Ronald P. Pawl 

Richard F. Meiners Private Bernard Dentzer 

Raymond J: Healy Private Albert C. Waldack 

Robert E. Polcyn Private Sam L. Svalina 

Earl J. Frawley Sergeant Gerald A. Bodner 



Columbus Day Parade 

October 12, 1953 

Father and Son Night 

November 17, 1953 



1953-54 SCHEDULE 

Purdue U. Competition Meet 

December 12, 1953 

(Second Place) 



Exhibition, Loyola Gymnasium 

February 1, 1954 

Exhibition, Chicago Stadium 

February 27, 1954 




1f 









"Net 
Results . . 



"The Champ" 



"Placing 
the 



"Tag 'im, 
Clyde!" 



"Casey" 




Lewis League 

1. Rough Guys 

2. Pi Alphs 

3. Alpha Delts 

4. Dillon — Ks 



Varsity League 

1. Angels 

2. Sigma Pis 

3. Alpha Kapps 

4. Wolves 



I ii I mi iii ii r ii I n 



Tower League 

1. Devils 

2. B.V.D.s 

3. Loafers 

4. Delta Sigs 



Recognizing that sane physical development is an 
integral part of a well-balanced system of education 
and that participation in athletics is essential to physi- 
cal and moral training, the intramural program of ath- 
letics for all students has been inaugurated by Loyola 
University. The Intramural Board has been organized 
to conduct these athletics along safe and sane outlines 
which have been set forth in the Loyola Intramural 
Constitution. 

This year the Intramural Board was composed of 
Dick Riley, Jim Pauly, and Hugh Hamill, under the 
supervision of the faculty moderator and physical 
training instructor, Mr. Leonard Zimny. 

The following contests were run this year: touch 
football, football accuracy throw, table tennis, turkey 
trot, volleyball, freethrow contest, basketball, horse 
shoes, badminton, outstanding Softball player contest, 
and softball. 

There were twelve teams entered in Loyola Intra- 
murals. These teams were divided into three leagues. 

1954 was a record-breaking year over at the Chi- 
cago Avenue Armory. In the first contest Denny 
O'Brien of Delta Sigma Pi tied the IM record of 42 
points set last year by Tom Greenan in the football 
accuracy throw. 

Bill Strong of the Rough Guys retained his IM 
table tennis singles title by defeating Dick Stoffel 
21-16; 25-21; 21-18. 

Sponsored by the Loyola Union, the Second An- 



nual IM turkey trot was run along a % mile slippery, 
wind-blown lake front route from the Oak Street Beach 
to the Chicago Avenue Armory. Bill Hayes of the 
Rough Guys took first place. 

In touch football, the Rough Guys won the title 
by defeating the B.V.D.s by a 12-6 score. This marks 
the first time since the beginning of intramurals that a 
team other than the Angels has won the IM Touch Foot- 
ball Tournament. 

The first week of November was set aside as 
Olympic Week. Both Lake Shore campus and Lewis 
Towers competed against each other in swimming, 
track, free throw contest, handball contest, and basket- 
ball. The Lake Shore stars beat the Lewis Towers stars 
by a 49-41 score. 

Dick Bryant of Delta Sig won the Delta Sigma Pi 
trophy as the outstanding Olympic week athlete. 

The Rough Guys captured the volleyball title. 

The basketball crown was taken by the B.V.D.s. 
The B.V.D.s paced by Sam Partipillo who scored 23 
points, rolled over the Rough Guys by a 85-30 score. 
This B.V.D. team has been said to be the greatest in- 
tramural basketball team ever seen at Lewis Towers. 

The free throw basketball title ended in a four-man 
deadlock. Jim Pauly, Charlie Fox, Dick Stoffel, and Don 
Hand each hit 21 out of 25 free throws. In a play-off, 
Fox won by hitting 23 out of 25. 

At the writing of this book, there still remain a few 
contests. However, it is still apparent that 1954 was a 
very successful year for Lewis Tower athletes. 



Intramural Champions 

"ROUGH GUYS" 

Kneeling: William Strong, Joseph La Rocco, William 

Hayes. 
Standing: Dennis Price, Walter Morawczynski, Joseph 
Carini. 



Intramural Board 
Richard Riley, James Pauly, Hugh Hamill. 








Despite the fact that the College of Commerce is 
mainly a professional school, it considers the social 
aspect as one of equal importance. In keeping with 
this philosophy, the school as such, endeavors to spon- 
sor a sufficient number of social functions in order to 
derive a favorable balance of these two phases. 

The professional fraternities, Delta Sigma Pi and 
Alpha Kappa Psi, together with the four professional 
clubs attempt to provide a full social calendar. Being 
cognizant of the fact that students in the Commerce 
School want activities of an all-College nature, the 
Student Council, through its many offerings seeks to 
satiate this desire. 

Amongst the Council's undertakings for the year 
are the following: a Mixer each semester, an Off-Cam- 
pus Formal Dance, a Variety Show, an Honors Day 
Banquet, and a Special Event during Senior Week. 
The council also lent its whole-hearted support to the 
Carnival which was sponsored by the Loyola Union. 

Through the correlation of social and professional 
functions, this school seeks to attain that paramount 
goal of the -well-rounded man. 



SNO-BALLIN 



m 




.*-:. 



Ike I9S4 £tcrii (concluded) 



Carnival. On February 21, the big kick-off 
dance was held. 

Not too much happened for a while; every- 
one was too concerned with school work. March 
came in like a lion and brought with it the 
usual March Winds. 

The black stain of ashes on peoples' fore- 
heads told us that Lent was here, and reminded 
us of the meaning of this 40-day period. Usual 
lenten resolutions were made as evidenced by 
the decrease in candy, cigarette and movie 
show sales. Despite the fact that there were 
two Masses every morning, the Chapel was 
filled to capacity. The number of daily com- 
municants reached an all-time peak, as every- 
one vowed to make this a real Lent. 

St. Patrick's Day blew in, and, Shure and 
begorah!, we saw the wearing of the green. 
All the colleens had a spot of green in their hair, 
and for one day everybody was Irish. 

All the lads and lasses had just about lost 
their Irish accent when we discovered that it 
was time for mid-terms. As usual the book- 
store's supply of midnight oil was rapidly de- 
pleted. During this week the lounge took on 
the atmosphere of the County Morgue. Card 
playing was at a minimum and textbooks be- 
came the center of attraction. Some students 
were awed when the binding on the books 
cracked as they opened them for review. 

Bulletin boards normally are very informa- 
tive, but one morning we noticed a rather 
unigue notice. There upon the cork panel ap- 
peared a note requesting talent for the Variety 
Show. Would be Mario Lanzas, Milton Berles, 
and Liberaces began dusting off the old rou- 
tines. 

Tryouts and rehearsals soon passed and 
the night of the big production presented itself 
all too quickly. Playing to a standing room 
only crowd, our troupe kept the audience on the 
edge of their seats all evening. 

March went out like a lamb and April 
showers began irrigating the thirsty soil. 
Trees were in bloom and little flowers began 



poking their petaled heads through the ground. 
It was spring, and the young men's fancies 
lightly turned to what the girls had been think- 
ing about all winter. 

It's a shame but scuool and spring mix 
like oil and water. We soon found ourselves 
opening windows and jaunting out to the Water 
Tower to lounge on the soft green grass. Spring 
zephyrs are not very conducive to good study 
habits we discovered. 

Holy Week was soon upon us. Good Friday 
saw a nation stop and recall the crucifixion of 
a Man Who died to save the world. Following 
this period was the gala day of Easter. Every- 
one was decked out in their finery despite the 
threatening skies above. 

For the first time in Loyola's history we had 
an Easter recess. Many utilized this ten-day 
break to traipse down to Florida and soak up 
some of that glorious sunshine. It wasn't hard 
to tell who had been there, for the fortunate 
ones displayed their golden tans. 

April 30 was a day filled with mixed emo- 
tions. The S.E.A.T. exam was given and this 
day marked the opening of the very successful 
Loyola Carnival. For three days, the grounds 
were filled. Two lucky persons are now the 
owners of new Crestline Fords. Congratula- 
tions to everyone who helped make it a success. 

The College of Commerce took time out on 
May 5 to honor its student leaders at the Senior 
Dinner Dance and Honors Day Banquet. The 
long-awaited day had arrived. The scholars 
were rewarded for their efforts with keys and 
scholarship certificates, while the extra-curricu- 
lar participants were presented with Dean's 
Keys and leadership awards. 

Another school year was almost over. 
Final exams were slowly creeping up on us. 
For the Seniors this was their last set. On June 
2nd, the big day arrived. A B.S.C. degree was 
presented to eager hands; a fitting finish to a 
grand and glorious college career. 

That's the story of 1954, our niche in an- 
other memorable year as Loyola Men. 



84 





Before we close the cover on another year let us 
review just what this year has meant to us. We always 
want the memory of these events to remain fresh in our 
minds. The Editors and the Staff of this book hope 
that it will prove to be an indispensable tool in accom- 
plishing this end. The 1954 Towers is much more than 
just a history of a year at Loyola, it is a heart-warming 
and sentimental review of the days and hours spent 
with our many friends at the Towers. It is a reminder 
of the laughs we had and the heart-aches we encoun- 
tered; the good times we enjoyed and the hard work 
and study that had to be done. It is the intangible 
happiness of the many hours and days spent in class. 
Yes, it is more than just a history of a school year, it 
is the story of each and every student. 

We would like, at this point, to thank all the people 
who helped make this annual possible. Without their 
assistance our book may never have reached the 
presses. 

First of all, we salute the staff who put in so many 
hours unselfishly. To them goes out heart-felt appre- 
ciation. Thanks to Mr. Ray Langen of Campus Service, 
our printer, whose valuable advice, assistance, and 
persona/ interest helped make this more than just 
"another yearbook". We also want to acknowledge 
the close assistance offered by Mr. Arthur Hauschner 
of Daguerre Studios. Our appreciation is extended to 



Rev. Laurence J. Lynch, S./., Harry McCloskey and Dr. 
Norbert Hruby for their enthusiasm and encouragement. 
Recognition is given to Dean J. Raymond Sheriff whose 
deep concern and interest in our endeavor added in- 
centive to our work. A special note of gratitude is ex- 
pressed to Mr. Daniel Cahill, Loyola Publicity Director, 
who supplied us with photographs and other informa- 
tion unobtainable elsewhere. We laud him for his 
generous spirit of co-operation which helped to make 
our job a little easier. 

Our greatest thanks, however, go to the student 
body and the faculty who requested the book. We 
thank you for the opportunity to serve you. 

With the completion of the 7954 Towers it is the 
fond dream and desire of your editors that those who 
are to follow us will have the same enthusiasm and 
spirit that we tried to put into our book. 

And now as we turn the final page of 1954, let us 
always remember that we're all mates on this vessel 
of Commerce and ship of Life. With the Almighty 
Helmsman at the tiller and guided by our compass Star, 
the Blessed Virgin, we know that our craft is on the 
right course for the shores of Eternal Reward. Let us 
hope that we will prove to be good sailors and that the 
unceasing cry of the crew will always be — AD 
MAJOREM DEI GLOR1AM. 



CONGRATULATIONS TO 



THE CLASS OF 1954 



from the 



FACULTY 



of the 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 



Compliments of 



^Jhe cJLouola lA* 



r 



nil on 



Compliments of 



Carlos A. Spiess 



87 



Ashland-Addison Florist 

FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 



* 



"Scry It with Flowers" 



3613 N. Ashland Ave. 

Buckingham 1-3920 

S. Roy Sheffield Chicago, 111 



DYNELL SPRINGS 

For the Finest in 

DINING AND DANCING 

Visit the Exciting New Sabre Room 

8900 W. 95th St. GArden 2-9775 




BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1954 
from the 

PAUL E. LE'CUYER FAMILY 

Clifton, Illinois 



BIRCH OPTICAL SERVICE 

1229 N. Ashland Avenue 

Henry J. Birch Dennis H. Birch 

Phone ARmitage 6-0998 Chicago 22, Illinois 



89 



Commercial & Industrial 



Board of Trade Bldg. 



oLanqe C^naineerina K^ompanu 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 



Al Lange, Pres. 



HAmson 7-7373 



OH-HENRY BALLROOM 



Dancing Every Wed., Fri., Sat. and Sun. 



8900 W. Archer Ave. 



Willow Springs, 111. 



Congratulations to the Class of 1954 
Make Use ot Your Education 

We Specialize in Placing College Graduates 
in any of the Major Fields 
ACCOUNTING - MARKETING 
MANAGEMENT - FINANCE - ECONOMICS 

Take Advantage of Our Professional Counseling Service 
K^yolleqe ana QJlerknq Qyersonnel 




55 E. Washington St. 



l 9 

Suite 1036 



ANdover 3-6240 



Phones HArrison 7-0863-0864-0865 

Compliments o/ 

STANDARD CYCLE COMPANY, Inc. 

Factory Distributors 

MONARCH AND HERCULES BICYCLES 

WHIZZER MOTOR BIKES AND PARTS 

GOODYEAR AND U.S. TIRES AND TUBES 

BICYCLES, PARTS, AND ACCESSORIES 

1470 S. Michigan Ave. Chicago 5, 111. 



MAY 1954 ALWAYS REMAIN FOND IN YOUR MEMORIES 



Commerce Student Council 



2)a 



studio 



auerre 

Official Photographer of 

"THE 1954 TOWERS" 



SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS 



209 S. State St. 



Chicago 



WAbash 2-0526 



PATRONS 



Mr. Peter J. Arena! 
Mr. Peter Bodner 
Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Boerger 
Mr. and Mrs. James V. Borrelli 
Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Buckelly 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph B. Carini 
Mr. John M. Cole 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Denten 
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander J. Durkin 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Edmunds 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Enyart 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Le'Cuyer 
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. McKenna 



Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Merica 

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis M. O'Brien 

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. O'Connor 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard G. O'Connor 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael A. Rausch 

Mr. and Mrs. C. P. Richter 

Mr. William J. Ryan 

Mr. and Mrs. Emilio Scalzitti 

Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Trecker 

Mrs. Marie A. Uedelhofen 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred E. Vlcek 

Mr. and Mrs. George J. Zanke 

Mr. and Mrs. John K. Zimmerman 



SPONSORS 

Alpha Delta Gamma Fraternity 

Alpha Kappa Psi Fraternity 

The Coed Club of Loyola University 

International Fraternity of Delta Sigma Pi 

Office Staff of The College of Commerce 

Loyola Union 

Pi Alpha Lambda Fraternity 

Student Association of The College of Commerce 

Tau Delta Phi Fraternity 

Theta Phi Alpha Sorority 



92 



Produced by 

CAMPUS SERVICE 

Chicago, 111.