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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

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http://www.archive.org/details/towers1956unse 



[^TOWERS 

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 
College of Commerce 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 







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THE COMMERCE COUNCIL 
COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 



LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 



820 NORTH MICHIGAN AVENUE 



CHICAGO I I, ILLINOIS 




Dean 
J. RAYMOND SHERIFF 

COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 



Dedication 



Our Dean has devoted his life to help us ot the College of 
Commerce achieve our goal — an education which will benefit 
both our spiritual and temporal lives. We have little to oiler him 
in return except this yearbook, the product oi our hearts, minds, 
and hands. Therefore, as a measure of our appreciation and 
gratitude for his labor on our behalf, we, the students of the Col- 
lege of Commerce, dedicate the 1956 TOWERS to our Dean, Mr. 
]. Raymond Sheriff. May God continue to bless him in his work. 



Foreword 



The pages of this 1956 TOWERS do not tell the whole story of 
Commerce life at Loyola; no yearbook, no matter what its size, 
could, for college life has a different meaning for each one of us, 
depending on what we have individually experienced. But 
there are some experiences which we all have shared in com- 
mon and which will remain in our memories long after we have 
walked through the entrance of Lewis Towers for the last time. 
By capturing these events in word and picture, the TOWERS 
hopes to give a glimpse of the college life we have all known — 
a glimpse that will serve as a reminder of our college life through- 
out our future years. As you leaf through the following pages, 
may you again relive the experiences and renew the friendships 
and acquaintances which have been so meaningful to your life 
as a Loyola Commerce student. 




CONTENTS 




Our Minds 



ADMINISTRATION . 

FACULTY AND ORGANIZATIONS 

SENIOR CLASS . 

JUNIOR CLASS . . . . 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

FRESHMAN CLASS 




Our Bodies 



BASKETBALL 
TRACK 
SWIMMING 
INTRAMURALS 





Our Activities 



10 
12 
22 

40 



54 
58 
60 
61 



COMMERCE COUNCIL 










66 


LOYOLA UNION 










67 


TOWERS STAFF 










70 


R.O.T.C. . 










72 


FRATERNITIES 










76 


HISTORICAL SOCIETY 










96 


SODALITY 










97 





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STUDENT MASS AT HOLY NAME CATHEDRAL 




Our Minds 



"A true university . . . will educate the minds that 
give direction to the age, it will be a nursery of ideas, 
a center of influence . . . that which is strongest in 
man is mind, and when a mind truly vigorous, 
open, supple, and illuminated reveals itself, we fol- 
low in its path of light." — Bishop Spaulding. 






VERY REV. JAMES F. MAGUIRE, S.J. 
President 



To the Commerce graduates of 1956: 

I am pleased that the editor of your Year- 
book has given me this opportunity for a few- 
words of congratulation. Believe me, I do sin- 
cerely wish only the very best for each of you. 
It is my hope that the memory of your years 
at Loyola will always remain with you and 
that you will treasure your B.S.C. degree as a 
sacred trust. Through the years, may Almighty 
God grant you the wisdom and strength to 
judge the right and to follow it always. May 
He give you grace to grow saintly in your ex- 
ample to others and may you serve Him con- 
stantly by devoting yourself unselfishly to the 
welfare of all mankind. 

James F. Maguire, S.J. 

President 



University 



My dear Commerce students: 

It is a pleasure to extend congratulations 
to the 1956 graduates of the College of Com- 
merce of Loyola University. 

The field of business is an area of the com- 
mon good intimately connected with the na- 
tional and international welfare of our citizens. 
The wise and prudent promotion of this common 
good reguires knowledge of principle trans- 
latable into specific practice. Adeguate applica- 
tion of sound principles to business requires 
activity graced by charity. Your University 
has endeavored to equip you with both gifts 
of nature and of grace. 

You have our blessings on your efforts to 
promote this common good and our prayer for 
its success. 

Sincerely yours, 

Jeremiah J. OGallaghan, S.J. 

Executive Vice-President 




REV. JEREMIAH J. OGALLAGHAN, S/ 
Executive Vice-President 



Mr. Harry McCloskey holds the responsible 
position of Acting Dean of Students. Since 
Father Lynch, S.J., who is the Dean of Students, 
became ill in the latter part of 1954, Mr. Mc- 
Closkey has been fulfilling the tasks required of 
the Dean. 

All Loyola Union affairs, the largest being 
the Loyola Fair held in the spring, are under 
the watchful eyes of their moderator. Besides 
this, all other activities of student organizations 
are cleared through this office. Mr. McCloskey 
assists, regulates, and moderates, but allows 
the students to formulate their own plans, poli- 
cies, and activities. Out-of-town students also 
receive assistance in securing lodging through 
the efficient office of the Dean of Students. 



administration 




MR. HARRY McCLOSKEY 
Acting Dean of Students 




All the coeds of Loyola University have a 
close friend in Miss Mariette Le Blanc, Dean of 
Women. As the Dean, she promotes many 
activities which are of interest and importance 
to women students. 

Miss Le Blanc personally interviews all 
freshmen and transfer coeds upon entering this 
University in order to acquire their friendship 
and to fully understand their individual prob- 
lems. Another responsible endeavor in which 
she engages is being advisor to all the students 
in our University from foreign lands. She now 
assists approximately fifty students in this ca- 
pacity. Miss Le Blanc is also moderator of 
the Coed Club. 



MISS MARIETTE LE BLANC 
Dean o/ Women 




Mr. Sheriff has been Dean of the College of 
Commerce since 1949. He was born in Chey- 
enne, Wyoming, and received his undergradu- 
ate education at Notre Dame University, a M.A. 
from Northwestern University, and his J.D. from 
Loyola. Except for a leave of absence during 
World War II, when he served in the Army 
Air Force with the rank of major, Mr. Sheriff 
has been at our University since 1925. 

The College of Commerce ranks among the 
finest business colleges in the nation as wit- 
nessed by its acceptance last year into the 
American Association for Collegiate Schools of 
Business. This achievement has been in great 
part due to Dean Sheriff's efforts toward the 
constant improvement of our education. 



MR. J. RAYMOND SHERIFF 
Dean, College ol Commerce 



Dean's Office 



Working hand in hand with Dean 
Sheriff of the College of Commerce and 
Dean Matre of University College are 
the girls of the office staff in Room 301. 
Their job is not a simple one since the 
efficient operation of the two schools 
requires voluminous correspondence 
and the accurate recording of informa- 
tion in student files. But these girls 
really show their colors at registration 
time, working long hours at the often 
tedious task of making sure that every 
student is registered correctly. 

Throughout the school year, the 
office staff always remains cordial and 
happy to help students by giving them 
information or arranging appointments 
with the Deans. V/e wish to thank 
them for a job well done. 




THE DEANS' STAFF: Rosellen Perry, Patricia Grady, Marietta Calkins, 
Barbara Kasten, Beverly Chandler. 



Every day the modern businessman is confronted by legal problems in the 
operation of his business. It is essential therefore, that every alert businessman 
have a knowledge of the law which governs commercial transactions so that 
he may conduct his business intelligently. To meet this need, Business Law 
was organized in the College of Commerce in 1925. 

The Department of Business Law, a separate department since 1948, 
provides Loyola business students with a knowledge of the various branches 
of commercial law for two purposes. The primary purpose is to integrate the 
study of business law with other cultural studies by showing the role which 
common law, supplemented by statute, has played, and still plays, in the 
development of Western, Christian civilization. This purpose is in agreement 
with the Jesuit aims of education which stress the training of the full man for 
his cultural, material, and spiritual well-being. 

The second purpose of this department is to enable students to recognize 
legal problems so they may take the proper steps to protect their legal rights 
and prevent needless losses. This is accomplished by use of the case method 
which develops the mind and analytical ability of the student in ascertaining 
legal problems and gives him some concept of their solution in legal terms. 
However, the aim of the business law courses is not to develop students to be 
lawyers or act as such. 

Currently, three courses in business law are offered by the department in 
the day Commerce School. All students are reguired to take two courses: 
Contracts, Agency, Partnerships; and Corporations, Bailments, Sales, Negotia- 
ble Instruments. The third course, Property, Insurance, Surety and Guaranty, 
Bankruptcy, is reguired of all students majoring in accounting. 

Mr. John A. Zvetina is Professor and Chairman of the Department of Busi- 
ness Law. Assisting him are Dean J. Raymond Sheriff, Associate Professor, and 
Mr. John D. O'Malley, Assistant Professor. 



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Seated: Mr. J. Raymond Sheriff, Mr. John Zvetina, Chairman. 
Standing: Mr. Nicholas Limperis, Mr. John Breen, Mr. Claude Dollahan. 



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Accounting Society 



The present school year has seen the Accounting Society become one of 
the most active organizations in the School of Commerce. Under the leader- 
ship of its president, Richard Amendola, and its other officers, it has sponsored 
a series of meetings at which men from almost every branch of accounting 
have spoken about the opportunities and requirements for accounting positions 
in their fields. Furthermore, these speakers have supplemented the knowledge 
of Accounting Society members by explaining various methods and techniques 
which cannot be covered in the limited accounting class periods during the 
academic year. 

Moreover, the Accounting Society has participated in an association of 
accounting organizations from colleges and universities in the Chicago area, 
sponsored by the Illinois Society of Certified Public Accountants. Discussions 
at these association's meetings have resulted in co-operation between our or- 
ganization and those of other schools which has led to joint meetings such as 
that held at De Paul University in December. Another important activity was 
the "Accounting Career Day" this February which took place at Loyola. Our 
members as well as those from other schools had the opportunity to meet and 
talk to men from public accounting firms and private industry to get a picture 
of the future in the field of accounting. 

All these activities are in keeping with the purposes of the Accounting 
Society — to enable accounting students to broaden their knowledge of the 
field, to stimulate interest in the problems facing accountants, and to afford 
student aid in choosing a branch of accounting as a vocation. 

The officers, Richard Amendola, president; Norman Risoya, vice-president; 
Thomas Redden, secretary; Richard Hoffman, treasurer; and members of the 
Accounting Society wish to thank most appreciatively Mr. Clifford Fay and the 
members of the Accounting Faculty for their help in this most successful year. 



DICK AMENDOLA points out to Mr. Robert Meier that 
pleasure can be mixed with business. 



DISCUSSING THE ACCOUNTING REVIEW with mem- 
bers of the Accounting Society are Mr. Arnold Schorn 
and Mr. Thomas McCracken. 





Mr. Arnold N. Schorn; Mr. Robert A. 
Rev. Dumas McCleary, C.S.V. 



Meier, Vice-Chairman; Mr. Thomas J. McCracken; 



The importance of accounting as the medium of commercial communica- 
tion in the business world of today cannot be overstressed, for businessmen, 
investors, and the government depend upon accounting statements and re- 
ports to present them with a clear picture of the operations and financial con- 
dition of business enterprises and governmental units. Realizing the faith which 
these groups place in the accountant's work, Loyola's Accounting Department 
has achieved and maintained the highest standards in accounting instruction 
so that students concentrating in this field receive an adequate preparation for 
their accounting careers. 

Since the certified public accountant has achieved a high professional 
status and consequently has assumed greater responsibilities, the main objec- 
tive of the accounting curriculum is to equip students aspiring to this vocation 
with the necessary accounting knowledge and technical skill. As an aid to 
candidates for the C. P. A. examination, the Accounting Department offers 
the C. P. A. Review Course, organized by Mr. Chamberlain, Accounting De- 
partment Chairman. This Review Course has been recognized as one of the 
finest in the nation. 

For those who wish to work as accountants in private business concerns, 
the accounting courses offered by the department give a thorough understand- 
ing of the accounting principles and procedures to be followed. Similarly, all 
Commerce students receive a knowledge of basic accounting in the elemen- 
tary courses taken in their sophomore year. This fundamental knowledge is 
a "must" for anyone contemplating a business career. 

The Chairman of the Accounting Department and Professor of Accounting 
is Mr. Henry Chamberlain. Mr. Robert Meier, Professor of Accounting, is Vice- 
Chairman of the department. The other faculty members are: Mr. Clifford Fay, 
Assistant Professor; Rev. Dumas McCleary, C.S.V. , Assistant Professor; Mr. 
Thomas McCracken, Assistant Professor; Mr. Arnold Schorn, Instructor; and Mr. 
Eberhard Blanck, Lecturer. 



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PRESIDENT JAMES CULLINAN opens the first meeting 
of the Economics-Finance Society. 



DR. HELEN POTTER provides the music for the Eco- 
nomics-Finance Society's group singing. 



Economics-Finance Society 



From 1946, when the Economics Society was reactivated, until this year, 
the Economics-Finance Department has had an organization mainly for those 
students majoring in economics. This year, however, it was felt that with the 
increasing number of students majoring in both fields, and the many areas of 
overlapping interest, a club composed of students majoring in both economics 
and finance would be better able to have a wider range of speakers, as well as 
give the student an opportunity for an exchange of ideas between their fields. 
It was felt that the organization could better fulfill its aim as an affiliate of a 
national organization, so in October, the organization applied tor membership 
in the National American Finance Association, and was accepted. 

The Economics-Finance Society is primarily an organization run by and for 
students majoring in economics or finance. Through the organization, stu- 
dents are helped to develop their abilities in planning activities, organizing 
projects, and directing meetings. To accomplish this aim, the club is run with 
a minimum of faculty supervision. Our faculty moderator, Dr. Frizol, offers 
advice on the activities of the club, but he neither instigates nor directs such 
activities, feeling that students have more interest in an organization in which 
they take the primary role by directing their own activities. 

After the first organizational meeting was held in September, student com- 
mittees were busy until spring getting well-known speakers and organizing 
student projects to be presented to the club. Speakers included Father Jan- 
causkas, S.J., who spoke on "The Federal Reserve Flow-of-Fund Accounting 
System" and Mr. Parker of Moody's who lectured on "Growth Stocks". At the 
last meeting of the fall term students held a symposium on "The Prospects 
for Business in 1956". Activities during the spring semester included guest 
speakers, a field trip, and another symposium. 



The Department of Economics and Finance is organized under one chair- 
manship, but functions as two fields of concentration. Dr. Mogilnitsky has been 
the chairman of this department which consists of nine full-time members, since 
1948. 

Economics is considered vital for the individual student because it gives 
him an understanding and insight into the dynamic economy of which he is a 
member. With this background the student has the proper tools to be a better 
citizen of the community in which he lives. It will also prove invaluable as a 
preparation for his career in the professional business world. 

Finance falls under the category of economics because with the back- 
ground in this field the student is eguipped to understand the internal functions 
of a business organization. Economics, on the other hand, usually consists of 
studies of the external forces that affect a commercial organization, and ulti- 
mately, our whole economic system. 

The study of economics cannot be divorced from ethics and must be inte- 
grated into the curriculum of this social science. For this reason the depart- 
ment is constantly alert to present to the student for analytical discussion some 
present socio-economic problem. The student is reminded and urged to keep 
abreast with current economic problems which confront the world today. Only 
with this knowledge will the educated man be able to ward off the materialism 
that is encroaching upon us. 

Theodosi A. Mogilnitsky, Ph.D., is Chairman of this department. Other 
members are Sylvester M. Frizol, Ph.D., Professor, Finance; Helen C. Potter, 
Ph.D., Finance; Joseph O. Englet, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Statistics; Rever- 
end Raymond C. Jancauskas, S.J., Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Economics; Alfred 
S Oskamp, M.B.A., Assistant Professor, Finance; Reverend Theodore V. Pur- 
cell, S.J., Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Industrial Relations; Edward J. Taaffe, Ph.D., 
Assistant Professor, Economic Geography; Ernest M. DeCicco, A.M., Instructor, 
Economics. 



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Dr. Joseph O. Englet; Rev. Raymond C. Jancauskas, S.J.; Dr. Sylvester M. Frizol; Dr. Theodosi 
A. Mogi'nitsky, Chairman; Dr. Helen C. Potter; Dr. Edward J. Taaffe, Mr. Ernest M. De Cicco. 




The Society for the Advancement of Management is the recognized, na- 
tional, professional organization of management personnel in industry, com- 
merce, government, and education. 

The Society was founded in 1936 by the merging of the Taylor Society, 
which was organized in 1912 to forward the ideas of Frederick W. Taylor and 
his associates, and the Society of Industrial Engineers, formed in 1917. A third 
organization, the Industrial Methods Society, merged with S. A. M. in 1946. 
Since the merging twenty years ago, the Society has built up a large and 
effective national organization of fifty-eight chapters with some 7000 senior 
members. 

The student chapter of S.A.M. was founded here at Loyola in 1950 under 
the guidance of its present moderator, Dr. Peter T. Swanish, Chairman of the 
Department of Management. We and the other eighty-two student chapters 
of S.A.M. throughout the country comprise a total student membership of nearly 
1700 members. 

The three-fold goals which have been set for the Loyola chapter are as 
follows: 

1. To bring executives in business and students of business closer 
together. 

2. To serve as a medium for the exchange and dissemination of informa- 
tion on the problems, policies, and technigues of industry and management. 

3. To provide the opportunity for participation in the organizing, planning, 
directing, and controlling of the activities of an organization dedicated to the 
advancement of management. 

The officers for the school year 1955-56 have been Gerald White, president; 
George Stoy, vice-president; William Hebel, treasurer; Robert Klovstad, re- 
cording secretary; Guy Keefer, corresponding secretary. 



MEMBERS OF S. A. M. view a film on the latest techniques of industrial management with Dr. Peter Swanish. 





Dr. Walter H. Peterson; Dr. Peter T. Swanish, Chairman; Mr. Joseph V. McCullough. 



The Department of Management, directed by Dr. Peter Swanish, has been 
a most progressive department in the College of Commerce. The management 
faculty has constantly endeavored to carry out the objectives of the department 
to train men and women who will become the industrial and commercial lead- 
ers of the future. The purposes of the management curriculum in the College 
of Commerce are to develop ability to make decisions on the higher levels 
of management authority and responsibility, to cultivate and apply the under- 
standing that when management relates itself to man, human values and 
spiritual values come before material values, and to cultivate the realization 
that only when the virtues of charity, unselfishness, and justice set straight 
the hearts of men will the minds of men set straight the world of business. 

The courses offered by the Management Department are designed to cover 
every field of business considered essential for today's executive. Included in 
the curriculum are the managerial fields of personnel, administration, produc- 
tion, and the vital area of industrial relations. The emphasis in these courses 
is to give the student a thorough knowledge and understanding of the basic 
principles of business management which may be applied to meet the ever- 
complex and varying problems of the commercial world. 

In addition to classroom instruction, the Management Department encour- 
ages students to participate in extracurricular activities to facilitate personal 
and social adjustment. Partaking in such functions enables the student to 
develop an understanding of the human element and social forces which op- 
erate in a business enterprise. 

The Chairman of the Management Department is Dr. Peter Swanish, Pro- 
fessor of Management. The other very able faculty members are: Mr. Melville 
Bowen, Lecturer; Mr Joseph McCullough, Assistant Professor; Mr. Walter Peter- 
son, Assistant Professor; and Rev. Theodore Purcell, S.J., Assistant Professor. 



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MR. LLOYD ALLEN, moderator, discusses a humorous 
topic with members of the Marketing Club. 



PLANS FOR ACTIVITIES during the year are prepared 
by president Joe Burianek with the help of some of the 
members. 



Marketing Club 



The Marketing Club's activities this year have included periodic meetings 
with speakers who are experts in the field of marketing, field trips to locations 
of interest, and "Kaffe Klatches" where the members of the faculty and the 
Marketing Club meet to discuss their problems. Through these activities 
the Marketing Club provides its members with the exceptional opportunity for 
personal contacts with other individuals engaged in similar study of marketing 
problems. The guest speakers acquaint members with the current ideas and 
needs of marketing and give them a concept of their future in a marketing 
career. 

To enable its members to learn the function of marketing processes in pro- 
duction, distribution, and promotion, the Marketing Club arranges field trips to 
firms engaged in one or more marketing activities. These field trips also stimu- 
late the interest of members by giving them the opportunity to see marketing 
functions in actual operation. 

During the past year, the Marketing Club with the aid of Dr. Kenneth B. 
Haas, Chairman of the Department of Marketing, sponsored its "Kaffe Klatch". 
This was a splendid opportunity for the members and the faculty to meet 
over a cup of coffee and discuss their problems and ideas in regard to the 
Marketing Department and marketing in general. 

Through its affiliation with the American Marketing Association, the club 
endeavors to acquaint its members further with the current happenings in the 
field. Each member receives the official publication of the Association, the 
"Marketing Newsletter". 

The officers of the Marketing Club for this year are: Joseph Burianek, 
president; Robert Hedges, vice-president; David O'Connor, treasurer; and 
Walter J. Ahem, secretary. The club wishes to thank Mr. Lloyd Allen for all 
of his efforts and help as moderator. 



20 



Because of the extensive growth in the importance of marketing and the 
complex problems that business has, and is, meeting in the distribution of 
goods and services, the necessity for such a direct field as marketing is evident. 
The constant rise of the general living standards of this country's citizens have 
also led to increased demands for an efficient marketing system. The solution 
to this problem is falling more and more upon new business leaders from the 
college classes who have been trained to solve these problems of distribution. 

Loyola's College of Commerce is indeed proud of its Marketing Department 
which has greatly expanded its offerings since the department was introduced 
in the College in 1948. Today the Marketing Department offers studies ranging 
from small retail business operations to the dynamics of international trade. 
Students in this field of concentration study the phases of commodity and serv- 
ice distribution both from the point of view of procurement and of sales. The 
requirements in this marketing curriculum also include such studies as adver- 
tising, research, marketing, management and administration, and a study of 
existing problems in the field. 

Piloted by its Chairman, Dr. Kenneth B. Haas, and assisted by Dr. Orange 
A. Smalley, Dr. Edward J. Taaffe, Mr. Harry McCloskey, Mr. Lloyd G. Allen, and 
Mr. Ralph Wagner, these faculty members combine their knowledge and experi- 
ences to give their students a complete and realistic understanding of the com- 
plexities of marketing as a most essential part of business. 

The students of marketing are taught to become marketing executives who 
can deal with policy problems and make decisions, who analyze conditions 
and trends and make satisfactory recommendations as to appropriate action. 
This is accomplished by training the students in the study of marketing re- 
search, the history of marketing, and problems of distribution. 



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Mr. Lloyd G. Allen; Dr. Orange A. Smalley; Mr. Harry McCloskey; Dr. Kenneth B. Haas, Chairman; Mr 
Ralph L. Wagner; Dr. Edward J. Taaffe. 



Sen/or 




Officers 



FRED R. EGLOFF, B.S.C., President 

Blue Key National Honor Fraternity 3, 4; Pi 
Gamma Mu National Honor Fraternity 3, 4, 
President 4; Marketing Club 2, 3, 4, President 3; 
President of Senior Class; Commerce Student 
Council President 4; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3, 4; Ad- 
visory Council 4; Loyola Union Congressman 
2, 3; Loyola Fair Committee Advertising Chair- 
man 4; Yearbook 4; Loyola News 2, 3, 4; 
Cadence Magazine 2; Historical Society 4; 
Leadership Award 3, 4; Scholarship Award 4; 
Dean's Key; Field of Concentration — Market- 
ing. 



DENNIS J. PRICE, B.S.C., Vice-President 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 2, 3; 
Blue Key 3, 4, President 4; Commerce Student 
Council 1, 3, 4; Vice-President of Freshman 
Class, President of Junior Class, Vice-President 
of Senior Class; Vice-President of Commerce 
Council 3; Loyola Union Representative 2, 3, 4; 
Treasurer of Loyola Union 4; Editor-in-Chief of 
the Commerce Yearbook 4; Accounting Club 
3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Golf Team 3, 4; Lead- 
ership Award 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean's Key; Field of 
Concentration — Accounting. 



RICHARD J. THORPE, B.S.C., Secretary 

Delta Sigma Pi 3, 4; Blue Key National Honor 
Fraternity 4; Marketing Club 3, 4; Member of 
Commerce Council 4; Secretary of Senior 
Class 4; Society for Advancement of Manage- 
ment 3; Chairman of Arts-Commerce Variety 
Show 4; Yearbook 4; Leadership Award 4; Field 
of Concentration — Marketing. 



22 



SENIOR AWARDS 

Honors Day, May 5, 7956 



Dean's Keys 

Awarded for outstanding loyalty, self-sacrifice, and achievement in extracurricular activities to: 
Fred Egloff Norman Risoya Dennis Price 

Alumni Scholarship Key 

A gold key awarded to the senior with the highest scholastic average for the four-year course. 

Norman Risoya 

Departmental Awards 

Awarded by Departments of the College of Commerce to seniors who have excelled in their 
field of concentration. 

WALL STREET JOURNAL AWARD 
(Finance) 

James Cullinan 

ECONOMICS KEY MANAGEMENT KEY MARKETING KEY 

Edward Ossman James Hurley Alan Rooth 

ACCOUNTING KEYS 

Norman Risoya 
Donald Kristof 



Fraternity Awards 

Awarded annually by the professional business fraternities in the College of Commerce for 
scholastic excellence. 

ALPHA KAPPA PSI KEY DELTA SIGMA PI KEY 

Norman Risoya Norman Risoya 



23 



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SENIOR 



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JOHN T. AHERN. JR.. B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Intramurals 3, 4; Field 
of Concentration — Marketing. 

WALTER J. AHERN, B.S.C. 

Blue Key National Honor Fraternity 3, 4; 
Alumni Secretary 4; Marketing Club 3, 4, Ex- 
ecutive Secretary 4; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3, 4; Union 
Board of Governors 3, 4; Chairman of Fair 
Dance Committee 4; Scholarship Award 2, 3; 
Leadership Award 4; Field of Concentration — 
Marketing. 

FUAD AL-WATTAR, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; Loyola Fellowship 
Club 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Variety 
Show 2, 3, 4; Field of Concentration — Man- 
agement. 

JOHN C. AMBROSE, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Field of Concentration — Accounting. 

RICHARD A. AMENDOLA, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; Accounting Club 3, 4, 
President 4; Sodality 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 2, 3, 4; 
Leadership Award 4; Field of Concentration — 
Accounting. 

JOHN G. ANAGNOST, B.S.C. 

Society for the Advancement of Management 
2, 3, 4, President 3; American Management 
Association 4; Accounting Club 4; Leadership 
Award 3; Field of Concentration — Marketing. 

JOHN D. BACHMANN, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 2, 3; Field of Concentration 
— Accounting. 

FRANK M. BALOGH, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3, 4; 
Drill Team 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 1, 2, 3, 4; Intra- 
murals 1,2, 3, 4; Fair Committee 4; Scholarship 
Award 2; Field of Concentration — Manage- 
ment. 



PAUL C. BARRY, B.S.C. 

Alpha Delta Gamma 2, 3, 
tration — Marketing. 



Field of Concen- 



LUCIEN R. BATTIATO, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; Accounting Club 2, 3; 
Intramurals 2, 3, 4; Field of Concentration — 
Accounting. 



CLASS 



GERALD A. BODMER, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 3, 4; Drill Team 1, 2, 3, 4; Field 
of Concentration — Accounting. 

THADDEUS J. BOJANOWSKI, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4, Assistant Treasurer 4; 
Accounting Club 2, 3; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Scholarship Award 2; Field of Concentration — 
Accounting. 

CHARLES K. BRADFORD. B.S.C. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4; Monogram Club 3, 
4; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3, 4; Chairman of Float 
Parade 4; Varsity Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Field of 
Concentration — Accounting. 

JOHN F. BRODERICK, JR., B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 4; Field of Concentration — 
Accounting. 

RICHARD C. BRYANT, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Intramurals 2, 3, 4; Field of Concentration — 

Management. 

JOSEPH J. BURIANEK, B.S.C. 

Wasmann Biological Society 1; Gold Torch 1, 
2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 4, Treasurer 3, Presi- 
dent 4; Economics Club 4; Leadership Award 
4; Scholarship Award 4; Field of Concentration 

— Marketing. 

JOHN T. BURMAN, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Eco- 
nomics-Finance Society 3, 4; Gold Torch 1, 4; 
Scholarship Award 4; Field of Concentration 

— Finance. 



ROBERT M. BURNS, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4; Field of Concentration — 
Accounting. 

ROSE MARIE BURNS, B.S.C. 

Coed Club 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Accounting 
Club 3, 4; Sodality 2, 3, 4; Field of Concentra- 
tion — Accounting. 

JAMES C. BYRNE, B.S.C. 

Society for the Advancement of Management 
4; Field of Concentration — Management. 





SENIOR 



JAMES E. BYRNE. B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 4; 
Marketing Club 3, 4; Historical Society 4; Year- 
book 3; Fair and Frolic Committee 2, 3, 4; Field 
of Concentration — Marketing. 



MARIO J. CARANI, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 3, 4; Field of Concentration — 
Accounting. 



JOSEPH B. CARINI, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4, Master of Rituals 4; 
Management Club 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Field of Concentration — Management. 



JOHN E. CARPENTER, B.S.C. 

Monogram Club 3, 4; Varsity Basketball 1, 2, 
3, 4; Field of Concentration — Marketing. 



PAUL F. CARRANO, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 3, 4; Field of Concentration 
— Accounting. 



ROBERT E. CHAMBERLAIN. B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 3, 4; Field of Concentration — 
Accounting. 

RAYMOND J. COLLINS, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Gold Torch 1, 2; Fair 
Program Committee 4; Intramurals 3; Scholar- 
ship Award 3; Field of Concentration — Mar- 
keting. 



EDWARD L. CONDON, B.S.C. 

Society for the Advancement of Management 
4; Field of Concentration — Management. 



RICHARD L. COSENTINO, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 4; Intramurals 1, 2; Field of 
Concentration — Accounting. 



JEROME P. CROKE, B.S.C. 

Economics Society 3, 4; Gold Torch 3, 4; Intra- 
murals 1, 2; Field of Concentration — Eco- 
nomics. 



CLASS 



JAMES M. CULLINAN. B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; Vice-President of 
Junior Class; Commerce Council 3; Union Con- 
gressman 4; Economics-Finance Society 4, 
President 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Leadership 
Award 3, 4; Scholarship Award 3, 4; Blue Key 
National Honor Fraternity 4; Wall Street Jour- 
nal Award; Field of Concentration — Finance. 

JOHN L. CUTLER. B.S.C. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 3, 4; Economics Society 3; 
Union Congressman 3; Vice-President of Sopho- 
more Class; Commerce Council 2; Intramurals 
1, 2, 3, 4; Leadership Award 2; Field of Con- 
centration — Economics. 

HARRY T. DALLIANIS. B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Historical Society 3, 4; 
Committee on Family Taxation 3, 4, Secretary 
4; Field of Concentration — Marketing. 

THOMAS J. DELANEY. B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4, President 4; Accounting 
Club 4; Intramurals 2, 3, 4; Leadership Award 
4; Field of Concentration — Accounting. 

BRUNO DE MAERTELAERE. B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; Alumni Chairman 4; 
Marketing Club 2, 3; Management Club 2, 3, 4, 
Publicity 3, 4; Cadence 2, 3; Loyola News 1, 
3, 4; Gold Torch 1, 2, 3, 4; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Counselor 3; Field of Concentration — Man- 
agement. 

DONALD M. DE SALVO, B.S.C. 

Sigma Pi Alpha 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Field of Concentration — Accounting. 

ARTHUR W. DE ST. AUBIN, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Intramurals 3; Field of 
Concentration — Marketing. 

JEROME M. DEVANE, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 4; Field of Concentration — 
Marketing. 

JOSEPH G. DILLON, JR., B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; Economics-Finance So- 
ciety 4; Field of Concentration — Finance. 

ROBERT J. DREYER, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 3, 4; Society for the Advance- 
ment of Management 3, Executive Vice-Presi- 
dent 3; Field of Concentration — Marketing. 





SENIOR 



RICHARD B. DUFFNER. B.S.C. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4; Monogram Club 2, 3, 
4; Varsity Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Field of Concentration — Accounting. 



DAVID F. DUHIG, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 2; Economics-Finance 
ciety 4; Field of Concentration — Finance. 



So- 



GEORGE H. DUNLAP, B.S.C. 

Alpha Delta Gamma 2, 3, 4, Steward 3, Presi- 
dent 4; Marketing Club 4; Leadership Award 4; 
Field of Concentration — Marketing. 

JOHN P. DUNNE. B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Pi Alpha Lambda 1, 2, 3, 
4; Monogram Club 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; 
Gold Torch 1, 2, 4; Swimming Team 1, 2, 3, 
4, Captain 4; Loyo/a News 1; Field of Concen- 
tration — Marketing. 

JEROME A. EVERTOWSKI, B.S.C. 

Gold Torch 1, 2, 3, 4; Accounting Club 1, 2, 3; 
Field of Concentration — Management. 

NANCY A. FOSTER, B.S.C. 

Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Beta Gamma So- 
rority 3, 4; Society for the Advancement of 
Management 1, 4; Loyola News 1, 2; Historical 
Society 1; Field of Concentration — Manage- 
ment. 

EUGENE P. FOX. B.S.C. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; 
Monogram Club 2, 3, 4; Accounting Club 3, 4; 
Track Team 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Captain 4; Commerce 
Council 2; Secretary-Treasurer of Sophomore 
Class; Leadership Award 2; Field of Concen- 
tration — ■ Accounting. 

EARL J. FRAWLEY, JR., B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4; R.O.T.C. Drill Team 
1, 2, 3, 4; Economics-Finance Society 4; Gold 
Torch 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 2, 3, 4; Finan- 
cial Editor Yecrbook 4; Scholarship Award 1, 2, 
3, 4; Leadership Award 4; R.O.T.C. Scholarship 
2; Field of Concentration — Finance. 

EDWARD M. GERRITY, B.S.C. 

Knights Club 1,2; Society for the Advancement 
of Management 3; Track Team 1; Field of Con- 
centration — Management. 

EDWARD F. GIERZYNSKI, B.S.C. 

Society for the Advancement of Management 3; 
Field of Concentration — Management. 



CLASS 



JOHN R. GOODSELL, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4; Society for the Advance- 
ment of Management 2, 3; Field of Concentra- 
tion — Management. 



WILLIAM E. GROW, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; Economics-Finance So- 
ciety 3, 4; Debating Club 1; Scholarship Award 
2, 4; Field of Concentration — Economics. 



JAMES J. HABERKORN, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; Field of Concentra- 
tion — ■ Accounting. 



NORBERT B. HAMOT, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Scholarship Award 2, 3, 4; 
Field of Concentration — Marketing. 



KENNETH R. HANLEY, B.S.C. 

Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Field of Concentration 
— Accounting. 



THOMAS E. HAUPT, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 2, 3; Field of Concentration 
— Accounting. 



STEPHEN B. HAUTZINGER, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 
dality 2, 3, 4; Field of Concentration — 
keting. 



I; So- 

Mar- 



WILLIAM J. HEBEL, B.S.C. 

Society for the Advancement of Management 
3, 4; Field of Concentration — Management. 



ROBERT J. HEDGES, B.S.C. 

Gold Torch 1, 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 4, 
Vice-President 4; Field of Concentration — Mar- 
keting. 



DONALD H. HEFFERNAN, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 2, 3; Field of Concentration 
Marketing. 





SENIOR 



WAYNE A. HELGET, B.S.C. 

Gold Torch 1, 2; Intramurals 2, 3, 4; Field of 
Concentration — Management. 

RICHARD F. HOFFMANN. B.S.C. 

Sigma Lambda Beta 1, 2; Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; 
Accounting Club 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Field of 
Concentration — Accounting. 

ROBERT G. HORNOF, B.S.C. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 4; 
Intramurals 1,.2, 3, 4; Field of Concentration 
— ■ Marketing. 

JAMES V. HURLEY. B.S.C. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4; Society for the Ad- 
vancement of Management 3, 4; Intramurals 
2, 4; Scholarship Award 2, 3, 4; Management 
Key; Field of Concentration — Management. 

EDWARD K. JANIS, B.S.C. 

Sigma Pi Alpha Fraternity 2, 3, 4, Pledgemaster 

2, Treasurer 3, President 4; Gold Torch 1; Mar- 
keting Club 3, 4; Intramurals 2; Yearbook 4; 
Leadership Award 4; Field of Concentration 

— Marketing. 

EDWARD J. JANOSKEY, B.S.C. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 3, 4; Society for the Advance- 
ment of Management 3; Intramurals 4; Field 
of Concentration — Marketing. 

JOHN E. KATZENBERGER. B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi Fraternity 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 

3, President 4; Leadership Award 4; Society for 
the Advancement of Management 4; Field of 
Concentration — Management. 

GUY F. KEEFER. JR.. B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; Society for the Advance- 
ment of Management 4, Secretary 4; Intramur- 
als 3, 4; Field of Concentration — Management. 

DANIEL R. KENNEDY, B.S.C. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 1, 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 
4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Field of Concentration 

— Marketing. 

JAMES P. KIRK, B.S.C. 

Society for the Advancement of Management 
4; American Management Association 4; Field 
of Concentration — Management. 



CLASS 



ROBERT J. KLOVSTAD, B.S.C. 

Society for the Advancement of Management 4, 
Recording Secretary 4; Field of Concentration 
— Economics. 



WALTER T. KOZIOL, JR., B.S.C. 

Sigma Pi Alpha 2, 3, 4, Pledgemaster 2, Ser- 
geant-at-Arms 3, Vice-President 4; Gold Torch 
1, 2; Accounting Club 2, 3, 4; Blue Key 
National Honor Fraternity 4; Field of Concen- 
tration — Accounting. 



DONALD J. KRISTOF, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 2, 3; Scholarship 2, 3, 4; Ac- 
counting Key; Field of Concentration — 
Accounting. 



RICHARD P. LAKE. B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 4; 
Gold Torch 1, 2, 3, 4; Yearbook 3; Intramurals 
2, 3, 4; Fair and Frolic Committee 3; Field of 
Concentration — Marketing. 



JEAN A. LANGE, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Coed Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Sodality 1; Commerce Yearbook 2, 3, 
Assistant Production Editor 3; Union Congress- 
man 4; Field of Concentration — Marketing. 



THEODORE P. LA PORTE, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 4; 
Field of Concentration — Marketing. 

PATRICK J. LARKIN, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 3, 4; Field of Concentration — 
Accounting. 



THOMAS D. LAROCCA, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 3, 4; Field of Concentration 
— Accounting. 



JOSEPH C. LA ROCCO, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 
Field of Concentration — Marketing. 



3, 4; 



MICHAEL E. LEBAN, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 3, 4; Scholarship Award 4; 
Field of Concentration — Accounting. 





SENIOR 



ROBERT J. LIS, B.S.C. 

German Club 1, 2; Field of Concentration — 
Management. 

GERALD P. LUCEY. B.S.C. 

Debate Team 1, 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Gold Torch 
1, 2; Scholarship Award 2; Field of Concentra- 
tion — Accounting. 

JOSEPH J. MARR. B.S.C. 

Society for the Advancement of Management 1 ; 
Economics-Finance Society 3, 4; Loyola Union 
Congress 4; Field of Concentration — Eco- 
nomics. 

CHESTER S. MAZURKIEWICZ, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 1; Marketing Club 3, 4; Gold 
Torch 1, 2, 3, 4; Field of Concentration — Mar- 
keting. 

JAMES J. McDERMOTT, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 2, 3; Field of Concentration 
— ■ Marketing. 

WILLIAM F. McNALLY, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4, Master of Rituals 3; 
Gold Torch 1; Yearbook Committee 2; Fair 
and Frolic Committee 2; Marketing Club 3, 4 
Union Congressman 2, 3; Intramurals 2, 3, 4 
Scholarship Award 4; Leadership Award 2, 
Field of Concentration — Marketing. 

JOHN J. McNAMARA. B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Gold Torch 
1, 2, 4; Field of Concentration — Accounting. 

JOSEPH E. McNAMARA, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4; Gold Torch 1; Society 
for the Advancement of Management 1; Mar- 
keting Club 2; Intramurals 2, 3; Scholarship 
Award 3; Field of Concentration — Manage- 
ment. 



JAMES S. McNICHOLS, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 3; Field of Concentration — 
Accounting. 

THOMAS L. McRAITH, JR.. B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Intramurals 3, 4; Field 
of Concentration — Marketing. 



CLASS 



JAMES J. MIKOLITIS. B.S.C. 

Economics-Finance Society 3, 4; Field of Con- 
centration — ■ Economics. 



IGNATIUS N. MOMOSE, B.S.C. 

Economics-Finance Society 3; Field of Concen- 
tration — Finance. 



RONALD F. MUNO. B.S.C. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 3, 4; Intramurals 3, 4; Field 
of Concentration — Management. 



JOHN H. MURPHY, B.S.C. 

Gold Torch 3, 4; Accounting Club 3; Field 
of Concentration — Accounting. 



WILLIAM F. MURPHY, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3; Gold 
Torch 1, 2, 3, 4; Field of Concentration — 
Accounting. 



RONALD T. MURRAY, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 4; Intramurals 3, 4; Field of 
Concentration — Accounting. 



THOMAS J. NAUGHTON, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 1, 2, 3, 4, Historian 2, 3, 4; 
Economics-Finance Society 3, 4; Intramurals 1; 
Field of Concentration — Economics. 



EUGENE B. NOWOTARSKI, B.S.C. 

Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 3, 4; Sodality 
Key 2; Field of Concentration — Accounting. 



CORNELIUS A. O'BRIEN, B.S.C. 

Gold Torch 1, 2; Marketing Club 3, 4; Intra- 
murals 1, 2, 3, 4; Field of Concentration — 
Marketing. 



DAVID D. O'CONNOR, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4; Blue Key National Honor 
Fraternity 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 4; 
Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 4; Marketing 
Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Leadership Award 4; Field of Concentration — 
Marketing. 





SENIOR 



DENNIS E. O'DWYER. B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; Society for the Advance- 
ment of Management 4; Union Congressman 
4; Field of Concentration — Management. 

EDWARD T. OSSMAN, B.S.C. 

Economics-Finance Society 3, 4; Scholarship 
Award 3, 4; Economics Key; Field of Concen- 
tration — Economics. 

ROBERT D. O'TOOLE, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Field of Concentration — 
Marketing. 



B.S.C. 

3, 4; Coed Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Field of Concentration — 



MARY L. PHELAN 

Marketing Club 2, 
Yearbook Staff 2, 3 
Marketing. 

RAYMOND S. PRANG, B.S.C. 

Debating Society 1, 2; Economics-Finance So- 
ciety 3, 4, Vice-President 3; Gold Torch 1, 2; 
Pi Gamma Mu National Honor Society 4; Schol- 
arship Award 3, 4; Field of Concentration — 
Finance. 

EUGENE F. RADOS, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; Pi Gamma Mu Na- 
tional Honor Society 4; Field of Concentration 
— Marketing. 

BERNARD W. RAUSCH, B.S.C. 

Pi Gamma Mu Honor Society 3, 4; Society for 
the Advancement of Management 3; Yearbook 

2, 4, Copy Editor 4; Scholarship Award 2, 3, 4; 
Field of Concentration — Economics. 

RONALD R. READING, B.S.C. 

Wasmann Society 1; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4, Presi- 
dent 4, Apostolic Chairman 2, Publicity Chair- 
man 3, Spiritual Chairman 4; Marketing Club 3, 
4; Board of Governors 3; Union Congressman 2; 
Co-Chairman Loyola Red Cross Blood Drive 2, 
3; Sodality Keys; Field of Concentration — 
Marketing. 

THOMAS R. REDDEN, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Blue 
Key National Honor Fraternity 3, 4; Accounting 
Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Economics-Finance 
Society 3, 4; Sodality 2, 3, 4; Society for the Ad- 
vancement of Management 2; Intramurals 1, 2, 

3, 4; Scholarship Award 1, 2, 3; Sodality Key; 
Field of Concentration — Accounting. 

DONALD F. REINHARDT, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 3, 4, Chancellor 4; Intramurals 
2, 3, 4; Scholarship Award 4; Field of Concen- 
tration — Management. 



CLASS 



RAYMOND M. RESTIVO. B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 2, 3, 4; Society for the Ad- 
vancement of Management 3, 4; Scholarship 
Award 4; Field of Concentration — Marketing. 

MICHAEL J. REVANE. B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 2, 3; Field of Concentration 

— Accounting. 

ROBERT F. RIEFKE. B.S.C. 

Society for the Advancement of Management 
2, 3; Intramurals 2; Field of Concentration — 
Management. 

NORMAN J. RISOYA, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4; Blue Key National Fra- 
ternity 4; Accounting Club 3, 4, Vice-President 
4; Historical Society 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, Vice- 
President 4; German Club 2, 3, President 3; 
Sodality 2, 3, 4; Cadence 4; Production Editor 
of Yearbook 4; Union Congressman 4; Scholar- 
ship Award 1.. 2, 3, 4; Leadership Award 3, 4; 
Dean's Key; Accounting Key; Fraternity Keys; 
Alumni Scholarship Key; Field of Concentration 

— Accounting. 

ALLAN B. ROOTH, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 3, 4; Marketing Key; Scholar- 
ship Award 4; Field of Concentration — Mar- 
keting. 

CARL A. ROSSINI, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4; Field of Concentration 

— Accounting. 

ALBERT A. ROTHENGASS, B.S.C. 

Sodality 3, 4; Knights Club 3; Representative 
to Student Union 4; Field of Concentration — 
Management. 

ROBERT F. SALMON, B.S.C. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 
2; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Leadership Award 1; 
Field of Concentration — Marketing. 

DONALD E. SAUER, B.S.C. 

Economics-Finance Society 2, 3; Field of Con- 



centration 



Economi 



THOMAS A. SCHERMERHORN, B.S.C. 

Pi Alpha Lambda Fraternity 1, 2, 3, 4, Treas- 
urer 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Field of Concen- 
tration — Accounting. 




*t*kk 





SENIOR 



SALLY A. SCHRIEBER, B.S.C. 

Kappa Beta Gamma Sorority 3, 4; Society for 
the Advancement of Management 4; Coed Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Loyola News 1; Commerce Yearbook 
4; Field of Concentration — Management. 



MATTHEW M. SELFRIDGE. B.S.C. 

Intramurals 3; Field of Concentration — Mar- 
keting. 



EDMUND S. SHEDLARSKL B.S.C. 

Society for the Advancement of Management 3, 
4; Field of Concentration — Management. 



VYTO A. SHUKIS. B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; Society for the Ad- 
vancement of Management 4; Field of Con- 
centration — Management. 



LAWRENCE I. SMITH. B.S.C. 

Historical Society 3, 4; Accounting Club 3, 4; 
Sodality 3, 4; Field of Concentration — Ac- 
counting. 



GEORGE C. STOY, B.S.C. 

Management Club 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 3, 
Vice-President 4; American Management Asso- 
ciation 4; Economics Society 3, 4; Field of Con- 
centration — Management. 

GEORGE D. STRICKLAND, B.S.C. 

Bowling Team 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 3, 4; Scholar- 
ship Award 2, 3; Field of Concentration — 
Marketing. 

ELMER S. STRINGHAM, B.S.C. 

Delta Sigma Pi 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Field of 
Concentration — Management. 

WILLIAM R. STRONG. B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 2, 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Scholarship Award 2, 3, 4; Field of Concentra- 
tion — Marketing. 



MICHAEL F. SULLIVAN. B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 3, 4; Field of Concentration 
— Accounting. 



CI ASS 



r 



JAMES E. SWIECA, B.S.C. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 3, 4; Marketing Club 2, 3, 4; 
Gold Torch 1, 2; Golf Team 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; 
Loyola Fair and Frolic Advertising Committee 
4; Field of Concentration — Marketing. 

JAMES R. THOMPSON, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 3; Field of Concentration — ■ 
Marketing. 

JOHN F. TOBIN. B.S.C. 

Economics-Finance Society 3, 4; Field of Con- 
centration — Economics. 

ROBERT S. TRES. B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 3, 4, Secretary 4; Union Con- 
gressman 
counting. 



3; Field of Concentration — Ac- 



DOMINIC L. VALENTE, B.S.C. 

Accounting Club 3, 4; Scholarship Award 2, 4; 
Field of Concentration — Accounting. 

JOHN A. VALENTE, B.S.C. 

Marketing Club 2, 3, 4; Society for the Ad- 
vancement of Management 4; Field of Con- 
centration — Marketing. 

WILLIAM C. WATSON. B.S.C. 

Alpha Delta Gamma 2, 3, 4, Assistant Pledge- 
master 2, President 3; Drill Team Captain 1; 
Marketing Club 3, 4; Intramurals 2, 3, 4; Inter- 
fraternity Orphans' Day Chairman 4; Leader- 
ship Award 3; Field of Concentration — Mar- 
keting. 

GERALD R. WHITE, B.S.C. 

Society for the Advancement of Management 
3, 4, Vice-President 3, President 4; Field of 
Concentration — Management. 

JAMES E. WHITING, B.S.C. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; 
Marketing Club 2, 3, Secretary 3; Spanish Club 
3, 4; Union Congressman 3; Loyola Fair Com- 
mittee 4; Fall Frolic Co-Chairman 4; Gold 
Torch 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2; Leadership Award 
4; Field of Concentration — Economics. 

ROBERT J. WILLEMS, B.S.C. 

Economics-Finance Society 3, 4; Field of Con- 
centration — Economics. 





SENIOR CLASS 



JAMES E. WITTE, B.S.C. 

Pi Alpha Lambda 2, 3, 4; Pi Gamma Mu 3, 4; 
Gold Torch 4; Marketing Club 2, 3, 4; Fair and 
Frolic Committee 3, 4; Field of Concentration 
— Marketing. 

ROBERT E. WOJCIECHOWSKI, B.S.C. 

Society for the Advancement of Management 3, 
4; Field of Concentration — Management. 

THOMAS J. WOZNIAK, B.S.C. 

Society for the Advancement of Management 
3, 4; Field of Concentration — Management. 

MARVIN J. YATES, B.S.C. 

Pi Alpha Lambda Fraternity 2, 3, 4; Blue Key 
National Honor Fraternity 3, 4; Economics-Fi- 
nance Society 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Pi Gamma 
Mu National Social Science Honor Society 3, 4; 
Union Congressman 4; Intramurals 2, 3, 4; 
Scholarship Award 2, 3, 4; Field of Concen- 
tration — Finance. 



Not Pictured 



THOMAS J. FAGIN, B.S.C. 

Alpha Delta Gamma 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; 
Gold Torch 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Marketing 
Club 3, 4; Loyola News 2, 3, Business Manager 
3; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Field of Concentration 
— Marketing. 

EDMOND P. GERATY, B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration — Economics. 

MARTIN P. HEALY, B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration — Accounting. 



WILLIAM F. HEARTY, B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration — Finance. 

SARKIS KRIKORIAN, B.S.C. 

Society for the Advancement of Management 
3, 4; Field of Concentration — Management. 

JAMES J. SHOOK, B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration — Accounting. 

WILLIAM H. ZEGERS, B.S.C. 

Field of Concentration — Management. 



The last bell in Lewis Towers has tolled us to our final class, and we, the 
seniors, have taken our leave. Our souls, minds, and bodies have been tem- 
pered for four years by the master process of Jesuit education. 

From the time we entered the Towers as freshmen in September, 1952, each 
day brought new adventures in scholastic achievements, athletics, and social 
activities. We aimed high in everything we did and tried to live up to the high 
standards of a Loyola education. We will always remember our instructors 
whose patience, understanding, and devotion to our education assured the 
success of our class. 

Reluctantly, we bid farewell to the Towers. But we will all seek to attain 
goals that in some measure will express our sincerest gratitude to God for ex- 
tending to us the manifold benefits of an education at Loyola. 



38 



HONORS DAY AWARDS 

Scholarship Awards 

Certificates awarded to seniors for their scholastic achievement. 



George Brucks 
Joseph Burianek 
John Burman 
Lawrence Cahill 
James Cullinan 
Walter Crist 
Fred Eglcff 
Earl Frawley 
William Grow 
Norbert Hamot 
James Hurley 
Donald Kristof 
Michael Leban 



William McNally 
Michael O'Grady 
Edward Ossman 
Raymond Prang 
Bernard Rausch 
Raymond Restivo 
Donald Reinhardt 
Norman Risoya 
Alan Rooth 
Gerhard Ruys 
William Strong 
Dominic Valente 
Marvin Yates 



Leadership Awards 



Certificates awarded to undergraduates for outstanding participation in extra- 
curricular activities. 



Walter Ahem 

Richard Amendola 
Charles Andorfer 
Robert Buckley 
Joseph Burianek 
Charles Caufield 
James Cullinan 
Thomas Delaney 
Robert Doherty 
William Dolan 
George Dunlap 
Fred Egloff 
Earl Frawley 

Jack Katzenberger 
Thomas Kuhn 



John Lenart 
Gay Lee Luhrs 
Robert Mullen 
David O'Connor 
Patrick O'Connor 
Edward Pawlowski 
Dennis Price 
Norman Risoya 
James Sebesta 
Larry Seres 
Richard Spillane 
Thomas Split 
James Thorpe 
James Whiting 
Joseph Zahaitas 



39 




Richard Spillane, Secretary-Treasurer; James Sebesta, President; Thomas Kuhn, Vice-President. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Upon reaching the junior year of our college career, our plan for life is 
quite generally outlined for us. We have chosen our field of concentration and 
are earnestly in its pursuit. 

The junior year was quite important socially also. Most of its members 
are known to each other, thereby creating a more friendly atmosphere. It is a 
well known fact that college friends are usually life-long friends. 

Our junior year was marked by many religious, educational, and social 
advancements. Last fall our class attended its third annual retreat together, 
this year at St. Ignatius of Loyola Church. A retreat is only as good as the 
benefits derived by the individual, and we believe it was very beneficial for 
many. 

At this point in our college life, we have passed the half-way mark, and 
the end is in sight. It became very evident this year that a college education 
was not too easily achieved, but well worth the effort. 

This year's social calendar was very full. It was marked by almost weekly 
mixers and many dances, such as the Fall Frolic, the Sno-Ball, and the Spring 
Fair Dances. Our junior year was very important, interesting and enjoyable. 
Let us now hope our senior year will prove as beneficial. 



Andorfer, Philip 
Arkewberg, Thomas 
Baur, Donald 
Blazej, Henry 
Bohn, Gerald 
Bolger, Albert J. 



Bordelon, Robert 
Brefeld, John F. 
Bristol, Donald B. 
Bugos, Joseph 
Canar, John 
Capocy, John S. 



Carr, Patrick 
Casey, William 
Cavanaugh, Kenneth P. 
Coco, Alfred A. 
Coffman, John 
Colfer, Donald 



Comiskey, John A. 
Conlon, Denis J. 
Cuny, Gerald F. 
Czapla, Edward 
Deasey, John 
Derwent Marilyn 



Detman, Frank J. 
Devlin, William J. 
Dillmann, Edward B. 
Dolniak, Donald 
Dombrowski, Eleanor 
Eguchi, Susumu 



Eischen, Michael H. 
Eisenberg, Elmer H. 
Engel, Charles R. 
Finnegan, Patrick M. 
Forrest, W. Thomas 
Fritts, William 



Garofalo, Ronald J. 
Garvin, Thomas M. 
Geary, Thomas F. 
Geier, Thomas H. 
Gerules, Ray 
Giczewski, Robert J. 



Hayes, William 
Hlavacek, Eugene L. 
Hogan, Thomas E. 
Hughes, Patrick 
Huss, Frank 
Jacksack, James G 



Jackson, James A. 
James, Ralph H. 
Jendrzejewski, Jesse 





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.fli fK 



^ I 



Jerling, Don 
Kakuska, Thomas D. 
Kapolnek, Richard 
Kavanaugh, Timothy J. 
Kelly, Thomas F. 
Kelly, Thomas J. 



Keogh, John 
Klamerus, Robert 
Koehl, Harry 
Kolb, Richard 
Krewer, Paul E. 
Krull, Norman J. 



Kuhn, Thomas A. 
Kurz, William L. 
La Buda, George F. 
Lear, Robert 
Leis, David C. 
Loversky, Franklin G. 



Madura, Sylvester J. 
Moloney, Thomas 
Malpede, Sal 
McDonnell, John 
Meiners, Richard F. 
Mines, Thomas F. 



Mongoven, Dennis 
Moran, James 
Moran, Philip A. 
Moran, Philip R. 
Morawczynski, Walter 
Morrissey, John F. 



Mullen, Bernard 
Murphy, Harold J. 
McCue, Bernard J. 
McGee, Phillip E. 
McHugh, Gordon 
McManus, John T. 



Naborowski, Hilary J. 
Nagle, Richard P. 
Nichele, John 
Nitto, Joe 
Norris, Thomas P. 
Oechsel, Herbert M. 



Oik, Benedict A. 
O'Malley, John E. 
O'Reilly, Robert E. 
O'Toole, John F. 
Ovnik, John R. 
Paldauf, Norman J. 

42 





Pappadimitriow, Deno J. 
Patrick, Donald J. 
Perreault, Donald C. 
Piro, Joseph F. 
Pizzato, John 
Quill, William 



Rayburn, Richard A. 
Riley, Michael J. 
Riordan, Jeremiah 
Ripoli, Richard A. 
Rooney, Patrick 
Roth, John 



Rozanski, Chester 
Ryan, Michael 
Salerno, Eugene J. 
Sampey, James 
Sawko, Victor 
Scannell, Raymond M. 



Schiessle, Michael 
Sebesta, James 
Sexton, Charles L. 
Shanfeldt, Joseph R. 
Shaughnessy, David 
Siebert, William 



Slana, Victor F. 
Slawinski, Arlene 
Smith, Robert M. 
Spillane, Richard J. 
Stein, Martin 
Stoffel, Richard 



Stone, John 
Stopa, Raymond 
Tennes, Joseph F. 
Thielen, Robert J. 
Teitz, William T. 
Timlin, Michael J. 



Tyhurst, George 
Voris, George F. 
Walsh, Edward J. 
Walsh, Gerald S. 
Walsh, Thomas 
Wasz, Norman 



Waters, William C. 
Webb, William M. 
Weidner, Richard 
Wilkes, Ronald J. 
Witt, Lyle 
Zacks, Robert 

43 




William Dolan, Secretary- Treasurer; Robert Mullen, President; Thomas Split, Vice-President. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



As we come to the end of our sophomore year, we find that we have con- 
cluded our two years of basic study. Upon entering into junior year we have 
a decision to make — that of selecting a major field of concentration. To help 
us in this decision a "Career Day" was held for all sophomores. Businessmen 
from all walks of life were present and talked of their respective fields. This, 
along with our first two years of study, has helped us to decide which field of 
concentration we plan to enter. 

But not all of our time was spent in wrestling with studies. Activities and 
clubs, as well as fraternities, have provided an atmosphere for cultivating our 
special interests and talents. Our social life was also very active. In addition 
to attending the many college dances and parties this past year, the sophomore 
class had its own very successful party in which greater class unity was estab- 
lished. 

As we leave our sophomore year, we may lose some old friends and may 
gain new companions; we are forewarned, and forearmed for the coming ad- 
ventures of life; we are desirous of spiritual as well as material happiness. 



Adams, John J. 
Almquist, Bruce 
Arbor, Patrick H. 
Baeckelandt, Werner 
Black, William 
Blank, Stephen J. 



Bonneay, John 
Borowski, Norman M. 
Brackan, Robert L. 
Braden, David Lee 
Bradley, Eugene J. 
Burke, Virginia 



Burmeister, George 
Cambora, Robert J. 
Carnegie, William J. 
Caufield, Charles F. 
Ciaciura, John 
Claahsen, Richard 



Connelly, Donald 
Coombes, Richard 
Coyne, Philip 
Cunningham, Robert 
Curran, Michael 
Cusick, Thomas 



Damhesel, John 
Delahanty, John P. 
Devitt, Donald F. 
De Wulf, James 
Dolan, Dean B. 
Dolan, William J. 



Doyle, Thomas J. 
Dombrowski, Roman L. 
Donohue, Robert M. 
Duffy, William M. 
Elliott, Edward D. 
Fox. William E. 



Fremgen, Harold 
Frey, George R. 
Frigo, Angelo 
Fuesel, Robert R. 
Galvin, Thomas 
Giannini, Anthony A. 



Giovenco, John 
Gorman, Thomas D. 
Grannan, Henry 
Gruenewald, Herbert 
Hallinan, John J. 
Harrington, Michael P. 



Hartler, Alexander 
Hastings, James 
Hau, Thomas C. 
Helt, Robert 
Hermes, Fred R. 
Hudgin, Ralph P. 




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Hughes, John M. 
Hunter, Edward A. 
Hyland, Joseph F. 
Illian, Richard J. 
Janowicz, Richard 
Kaider, Donald 



Kalusa, Raymond F. 
Keefe, James 
Kehoe, Richard E. 
Kelly, James G. 
Kelly, Robert W. 
Kiley, John E. 



King, William 
Kobos, Eugene R. 
Kollins, William 
Kunzer, Charles 
Kupski, Harry R. 
La Famboise, John D. 



Larocca, Robert J. 
Lavrich, John 
Lenart, John V. 
Lintzenich, William J. 
Lipkin, Donald 
Liszka, Joseph R. 



Lueck, James 
Lukes, Ronald 
Lussem, James J. 
Lynch, Roy B. 
Lyons, John 
Machnik, Eugene J. 



Maffia, Paul 
Maksymiak, Ronald L. 
Moloney, Lawrence P. 
Marowally, John 
Morse, Donald 
Motto, Robert 



Mulchrone, Joseph 
Mullen, Robert J. 
Murnan, John A. 
Murrin, Robert L. 
McKay, Richard 
McZier, Arthur 



Neglia, Erminio 
Nicpon, Walter 
Nolan, John W. 
Nolan, Thomas P. 
Norris, Richard 
Nosek, Terrence 



O'Connor, Patrick J. 
O'Connor, Ward 
O'Donnell, Patrick 
O'Grady, Michael 
Oshiro, Wallace S. 
Ovaert, Walter A. 

46 






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4*U^h ViKl 




Panarale, Joseph 
Panebianco, Sam 
Pankowiak, Edward 
Pape, Phil 
Pasierb, Joseph J. 
Paulo, Frank N. 



Petta, Betty Ann 
Pierce, Fred 
Piikkila, Viljo 
Potempa, Richard A. 
Prang, Giles N. 
Roti, Bruno F. 



Roti, Frank 
Ryan, James W. 
Santoni, Dennis 
Sauriol, Merrill 
Scanlon, Maurice 
Scaro, John R. 



Schumi, Andrew 
Schwarzbauer, Joseph 
Seebauer, Edmund J. 
Serrao, Molly 
Skriba, Donald A. 
Slattery, John 



Smith, James D. 
Smyth, Jack H. 
Sokley, Clayton E. 
Sokol, John C. 
Split, Thomas E. 
Stateler, Donald 



Stensrud, Ray C. 
Stephan, F. Clifford 
Stremski, Steve D. 
Swain, Edmund 
Tackes, Robert 
Tetens, Arnold 



Tomazin, James 
Tomei, Davide 
Urchell, Richard 
Valters, Walter J. 
Van Guilder, John 
Wainwright, Richard C. 



Weitzel, William B. 
Wendelin, Frieder 
Werbiski, Phil 
Williams, Joseph 
Winchell, Walter 
Wisniewski, John 



Wolfe, Edgar 
Wright, Chester I. 
Wright, Richard 
Wuertz, Peter M. 
Zahaitis, Joseph J. 
Zenk, Honore 




Lawrence Seres, Secretary-Treasurer; Gay Lee Luhrs, President; Robert Buckley, Vice-President. 



Freshman Class 



Our first task as incoming freshmen was to adjust ourselves to the strange- 
ness of college life. It took a while to become accustomed to the courses, 
teachers and our fellow students, but in a short time we became a vital part of 
Loyola life. This year's freshman class has proven itself to be most active 
since we have done our best to give our support to the activities of the Com- 
merce Council and of the University. 

Our class officers have provided the leadership which has been responsible 
for our success. Bob Doherty, who was elected president last fall, was called 
to active duty with the Marine Corps after completing his first semester. In 
that time he demonstrated his ability as a capable class leader. Gay Lee Luhrs 
succeeded Bob as president, becoming the first coed class president in the 
College of Commerce. She also served as secretary to the Commerce Council. 
The vice-presidency was ably handled by Bob Buckley, and Larry Seres 
conscientiously fulfilled the job of secretary-treasurer. 




Adamo, Joseph 
Alkovich, Dan 
Applegate, Lee 
Atkinson, Dan 
Beals, Ronald 
Becker, Robert 



Berry, George 
Berry, Thomas 
Besler, Ray 
Biritz, Bernard 
Boyle, Edward 
Broderick, William 



Bruozis, Lawrence S. 
Buckley, Robert L. 
Budz, Joseph 
Buker, Donald F. 
Burke, Joseph M. 
Burke, Michael J. 



Camden.Thomas 
Cawley, Thomas 
Cenek, Stephen G. 
Cholewinski, John R. 
Conlon, James R. 
Connolly, Walter W. 



Cowhey, Terry 
Croisant, Eugene 
Czarnik, Gregory 
Dahlquist, Edward S. 
Daleiden, James 
Damski, Henry 



Davis, William 
DeBartolo, Frank 
Delgiorno, James 
Devine, William J. 
D'Onofrio, Jerome 
Dotson, Earl 



Dowd, Thomas 
Drury, Thomas J. 
Dwyer, Patrick 
Dwyer, Robert 
Eck, William 
Fitzgerald, Connie 



Fitzpatrick, John F. 
Fogarty, William 
Foley, James T. 
Fowler, Edward M. 
Freeman, Robert 
Gerules, Edmund 



Ginnane, Martin J. 
Goodsell, Robert G. 
Graham, Joseph 
Grant, Dan 
Graver, Robert F. 
Hanson, Thomas 



Herr, Gerald 
Hess, Robert J. 
Hesse, Jack E. 
Huff, Raymond 
Javor, Gloria 
Jedloe, Robert 




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Joe, Chandler T. 
Kane, Robert 
Kean, Thomas 
Koziol, Stanley J. 
Kramer, Richard 
Kristufek, Robert W. 



Kuhn, Robert M. 
Kulik, Robert E. 
Kummer, Daniel 
Lesniak, Benjamin 
Littay, John F. 
Luhrs, Gay Lee 



Lupori, Jerold V. 
Lyons, James P. 
Mancilla, Alonso 
Martin, John L. 
Meersman, John 
Melka, Richard F. 



Mellett, Patrick 
Merritt, Robert 
Migacz, Delphine 
Miller, Richard A. 
Moreno, Joseph P. 
Mueller, Clemens F. 



Muldowney, William 
Muljack, Norton 
Murphy, Charles 
Murphy, Harold 
Murray, Frank 
McCurdy, Daniel 



McDivit, Virginia Am 
McGovern, Ronald 
McGowan, Patrick 
McGrath, Edmund J. 
McGrath, James T. 
McLean, Daniel 



McNamara, Frank J. 
Nagela, Dennis E. 
Neary, John W. 
Neville, John A. 
Nolan, William F. 
Novak, Connie 



Nugent, Claude C. 
O'Brien, John 
O'Connor, George R. 
O'Grady, James 
O'Sullivan, Neil 
Owens, John J. 



Palmer, Ronald 
Parrish, Charles 
Pontius, Ronald M. 
Raniere, Robert 
Rauhoff, Cledys 
Riso, Charles 












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Rominski, James A. 
Rossini, Vincent J. 
Rubel, Thomas 
Ruks, Emmett 
Russell, William 
Ryan, Michael 



Ryan, Ronald W. 
Salerno, Michael 
Saletta, John T. 
Salvino, Vincent D. 
Sandner, Bernard 
Sansonetti, Giovanni 



Sarbieski, Ronald 
Scanlan, John 
Scholl, Edward T. 
Schwind, Nancy 
Scullion, Patrick J. 
Sebastian, Joseph 



Seres, Lawrence 
Sharkey, Patrick M. 
Shive, Owen G. 
Shriver, Mary Lou 
Smith, Frank 
Smith, James 



Smith, Thomas W. 
Spaaragaren, Roy A. 
Stefan, Steve 
Stephansen, Charles J. 
Strak, Tony 
Swatek, Robert 



Tagliola, Anthony 
Terry, John J. 
Tevenan, John C. 
Thomsen, Raymond 
Triggs, Thomas 
Van Arsdale, Nancy 



Vicek, Thomas 
Vitaioli, Nicholas R. 
Vivrito, Cosmo 
Vruble, Benedict 
Walsh, Jerry 
Walsh, John 



Walsh, Michael 
Walsh, Vincent 
Wentland, William 
Westberg, Michael 
Weymouth, James 
Yetter, Richard R. 



Zenere, Frank 
Zic, Rocco R. 
Zimmermann, James 
Zmina, Michael 
Zordani, Robert 
Zumbakis, Paul 

51 




ur Bodies 



"It must never be forgotten that the subject of Chris- 
tian education is man "whole and entire, soul 
united to body in unity of nature, with all his facul- 
ties natural and supernatural, such as right reason 
and Revelation show him to be." — Pope Pius XL 







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Seated: J. Shirk, P. Krucker, K. Howard, Captain J. Lyne, E. Stube, C. Bradford, P. Werbiski. 
Standing: Coach Ireland, A. McZier, S. Mrkvicka, G. Burmeister, J. Carpenter, J. De Wulf, 
Managers D. Walsh and B. Varallo 



Ramblers 



There was an optimistic feeling around the 
campus last September that this year would 
produce a big winner for Loyola's Ramblers. 
But as the season progressed the jubilant spirit 
disappeared as losses began mounting. 

After winning their first two games rather 
handily, the Ramblers headed for Notre Dame 



full of confidence and certain that an upset 
was in the making. This game was one of the 
most heartbreaking ever played by the Loyola 
Basketball team. Notre Dame managed to 
squeak out a one-point overtime victory that 
seemed to deflate the spirit of the whole team. 
They then lost successive games to Ohio State, 
Purdue, and Western Michigan. Purdue's vie- 



tory over the Maroon and Gold was by one 
point in the last few minutes of game time. 

Getting their confidence back, the Ram- 
blers won three straight and seemed on the 
victory path once again. This time, however, 
Drake came from behind to win in the last min- 
ute of play, and a six-game losing streak began. 
Inexperience and inability to rebound appeared 
to be the major defects in the play of the team 
during this losing streak. 

Then came the highlight of the season. 
Sparked by Jack Carpenter's 29 points, the 
Ramblers obtained sweet revenge as they upset 
the "Fighting Irish" of Notre Dame 71 to 65 be- 
fore some 8,000 spectators in the Chicago 
Stadium. 

Ed Stube was the second star performer at 
the Stadium that victorious night in the last 
five minutes of the encounter. Four layups, al- 
most simultaneously, clinched the game for the 
Ramblers. 



Loyola 


85 


Ripon 


53 


Loyola 


74 


S. Dakota U. 


68 


Loyola 


84 


Notre Dame 


85 


Loyola 


72 


Ohio State 


90 


Loyola 


68 


Purdue 


69 


Loyola 


52 


W. Michigan 


89 


Loyola 


88 


N. Dakota St. 


73 


Loyola 


77 


Bowling Green 


68 


Loyola 


77 


S. Dakota St. 


63 


Loyola 


74 


Drake 


80 


Loyola 


59 


Marguette 


68 


Loyola 


63 


Washington 


71 


Loyola 


72 


E. Kentucky St. 


76 


Loyola 


81 


Youngstown 


87 


Loyola 


37 


Dayton 


75 


Loyola 


71 


Notre Dame 


65 


Loyola 


67 


Seton Hall 


75 


Loyola 


75 


Iona 


74 


Loyola 


68 


W. Michigan 


62 


Loyola 


74 


Miami 


76 


Loyola 


65 


Creighton 


64 


Loyola 


73 


Marguette 


80 


Loyola 


82 


Drake 


66 


Loyola 


68 


John Carroll 


69 



ALL-OUT TRY is made by Art McZier in game against 
[ohn Carroll University. 



MARQUETTE PLAYER seems to pray during one of the 
high points of the game. 




Loyola's team was inspired from beginning 
to end against the foe from South Bend, as they 
set out to prove themselves superior. They 
showed real teamwork and spirit which seemed 
to have been lacking previously. Their victory 
will long be remembered by Loyolans since this 
marked the first time in 41 years that the Ram- 
blers had defeated the Irish on the basketball 
court. 

The team finished the season by winning 
four of their remaining eight games and had an 
overall record of 10 wins and 14 losses. 

Jack Carpenter led the scoring with 309 
points. He also led in rebounds, had the high- 
est scoring average, and committed the most 
personal fouls. Jerry Lyne, the Rambler Cap- 
tain, led the team in free throws with 101 al- 
though he only played in 20 games due to 
injury in the early part of the year. 



G 


PLAYER 


B 


FTM 


TP 


24 


Carpenter 


121 


67 


309 


24 


Stube 


97 


56 


250 


20 


Lyne 


60 


101 


221 


23 


De Wulf 


73 


67 


213 


23 


McZier 


49 


50 


148 


13 


Shirk 


51 


38 


140 


23 


Howard 


48 


41 


137 


14 


Burmeister 


54 


19 


127 


17 


Krucker 


36 


28 


100 


13 


Mrkvicka 


10 


12 


32 


13 


Werbiski 


3 


16 


22 


5 


Bradford 


2 


3 


7 



PAUL KRUCKER made this valiant attempt during game 
last year at the Stadium. 



KEN HOWARD outjumps opponent during game at the 
Alumni Gym. 





: CARPENTER was the Ramblers' top CAPTAIN JERRY LYNE led the team in ED STUBE was second highest scorer with 

r with 309 total points. free throws made. 250 total points. 



« t 



Hey! Hey! Take It Away!' 




A CHEERFUL ATTRACTION to the Ramblers' games were our cheer leaders, 
shown here during a rehearsal. 



Track 



After completing a successful season, 
members of Loyola's track team could con- 
clude that hard work pays off. Their constant 
practice at the Chicago Ave. Armory has re- 
sulted in a most successful showing this year. 

Perhaps the outstanding event of the 
year was the mile relay held at the Michigan 
AAU on February 3. The team, composed of 
co-captain Jack Egan, Max Muchowitz, Bob 
Saddler and Pete Wall, gave Loyola an easy 
victory. The following week, with Jack Egan 
replacing Muchowicz, the trio won its sec- 
ond straight event by taking the mile relay 
at the Michigan State Relays by 20 yards. 




TENSED FOR ACTION is Jack Egan, co-captain of the 
Maroon and Gold harriers. 



Seated: Coach J. Weiland, M. Muchowicz, D. Stateler, J. Egan, P. Fox, R. Saddler, P. Moran. 
Middle flow: D. Lahart, H. Gay, P. Hudgin, P. Stokes, L. Kujawinski, D. Griffith, R. Horton. 
Top flow: B. Schutts, H. Burke. M. Curran, R. Boyle, W. Dolan, T. Nosack. 



mm 







On February 18, Loyola met Bradley and 
Northwestern in a triangular meet at McGaw 
field house, with the Ramblers winning sec- 
ond to a strong Northwestern team. Our har- 
riers took scoring places in ten out of eleven 
events including five firsts. 

Kujawinski, Horton, and Hudgin of the 
Maroon and Gold placed one, two and three 
respectively in the two-mile run. In the 880, 
Saddler, Fox and Shutts placed two, three, 
and four, while Kujawinski took first in the 
one-mile run and two-mile event. Co-cap- 
tain Jack Egan also came up with a first by 
winning the 440 with a time of 51 seconds. 

Don Stateler accomplished what Egan al- 
most did by setting a record in the broad 
jump for the triangular meet. His jump of 22 
feet was a new mark for the event although 
he has jumped 22.9 feet. 

The Ramblers' other first place was in 
the mile relay in which Muchowicz, Egan, 
Pete Wall, and Mike Burke, won their third 
straight college mile. Loyola's weak point in 
the meet was in the field events in which the 
team could take only two places. 

In addition to the above meets, the har- 
riers participated in the Daily News Relays, 
the Cleveland Knights of Columbus Meet, 
and the Milwaukee Journal Relays, in which 
they placed second. 

Led by co-captains Pete Fox and Jack 
Egan, the Maroon and Gold track team has 
had an outstanding season. Its outlook for 
next year is very promising due to the bright 
prospects who will replace this year's gradu- 
ates. 



FLEET-FOOTED Jack Egan and Pete Fox warm up at 
the Armory. 

AT A FAST CLIP go Stateler, Horton, Lahart and Shutts. 

A FEW YARDS to go and the day's practice session 
will be over. 




y 








Seated: B. Walsh, J. Stokes, J. Dunne, J. Allen, R. Van De Walle. 

Standing: T. Gilmore, D. Veverka, J. Stack, J. Van Wormer, Coach D. Chalmers. 



Swimming 



Habits are hard to break. This fact was 
demonstrated again this year as Loyola's 
swimming team found themselves the victors 
of the Chicago Intercollegiate Champion- 
ship. This was the fourth time in a row that 
the Rambler tankers won the crown. 

Sparked by John Van Wormer's record 
performance and the work of co-captains 
John Dunne and Jim Allen together with Ray 
Van De Walle, John Stokes, Jim Veverka and 
Joe Doody, the team came out of this year's 
competition with a championship and a win- 
ning record. 

The team, excellently coached by Don 
Chalmers, will see the return of many regu- 
lars next season, which will insure another 
year of success. 



INTO THE DRINK go the team and their opponents 
during a meet. 

CO-CAPTAIN JOHN DUNNE practices his backstroke 
in the Gym pool. 



60 




Intramurals 



The Chicago Avenue Armory buzzed with 
activity this fall as Lewis Towers' intramural 
football got underway. The championship 
contest saw Alpha Kappa Psi take first place 
with the BVD's in the number two spot. The 
hardest fought games were those between 
Alpha Kappa Psi and Pi Alpha Lambda. Smart- 
ing from a 6 to defeat by the Pi Alphs in their 
first contest, the AKPsi gridders got their re- 
venge by winning the return game 14 to 6. 
From then on, such players as Joe Carini, John 
Ambrose, Dennis Price, and Bob Bordelon had 
no difficulty in sparking the AKPsi victory drive. 

Although unsuccessful in their champion- 
ship bid on the gridiron, the BVD's fought hard 



against their opposition on the Armory court to 
take first place in the intramural basketball con- 
test. The teamwork of Brett, Buckley and 
Kraemer proved to be an insurmountable ob- 
stacle to the other Lewis Towers' teams. As 
fine as the Armory basketball playing was, 
however, the All-Star quintet from Lewis Tow- 
ers was no match for the All-Star team of the 
Lake Shore campus, for the northsiders were 
victorious in the intramural basketball All-Star 
Game by a sizeable score. 

The other major intramural contest this 
year was the volleyball tournament in which 
Delta Sigma Pi won first place while Alpha 
Kappa Psi occupied the second spot. 



INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL reached its climax at the All-Star Game at the Alumni Gym where the Lake Shore 
Campus was victorious. Athletic interests turned to Softball as spring weather returned to Chicago. 





MISS VARSITY 
Pat Blaney 



62 




Our Activities 



"The true Christian does not renounce the activities 
of this life, he does not stunt his natural faculties; but 
he develops and perfects them with the superna- 
tural. He thus enobles what is merely natural in 
life and secures for it new strength in the material 
and temporal order, no less than in the spiritual 
and eternal." — ■ Pope Pius XI. 




11 





Seated: James Thorpe; Fred Eglofl, president; Dean Sheriff; Gay Lee Luhrs, secretary; Dennis Price. 
Standing: James Sebesta, vice-president; William Dolan; Robert Buckley; Richard Spillane; Thomas Kuhn; Robert 
Mullen, treasurer; Thomas Split. 



Commerce Council 




President 
Fred Egloff 

Vice-President 
James Sebesta 

Secretary 

Gay Lee Luhrs 

Treasurer 

Robert Mullen 



Your student governmental body in the College of Commerce is 
the Commerce Council composed of elected class officers. Presidents 
of each class fill the various offices on the Council itself. As its 
moderator, Dean J. Raymond Sheriff is a constant source of inspira- 
tion and assistance. 

This year's Council provided the student body with a well- 
rounded social calendar. Its first mixer in September served as a 
kick-off for a successful school year. On the last day of final exams 
in January, it sponsored the Sno-Ball, one of the greatest social suc- 
cesses at Loyola this year. A fitting conclusion to the year was 
provided by the Honors Day Dinner Dance on May 5th. 

Striving to be of service to students, the Council conducted a 
special freshman orientation for the new students. It instituted a 
combined student directory and sponsored a job clinic to provide 
information on job getting techniques. The 1956 TOWERS, which 
you are now reading, was another of the Council's major projects. 
On an all-University level the Council co-sponsored the Variety Show 
and actively supported the Union Fair. 

During this year the Commerce Council established itself as the 
outstanding student governmental body in the University. This was 
due to your discreet selection of representatives and the wonderful 
support which you gave them. 



66 



Loyola Union 



The several schools and colleges of Loyola 
University are united by the student governing 
body, the Loyola Union. All students who 
have registered and are in academic residence 
in any of the schools and colleges of the Univer- 
sity are members of the Loyola Union. 

The mainstay of the Union is the Congress. 
It is composed of congressmen selected in Janu- 
ary to serve from the first session in February 
of each school year until the same month of the 
following year. The Congress is a permanent 
body which meets regularly in February, April, 
October, and December; other meetings may be 
held at the call of the president. Each division 
of Loyola elects not less than two nor more 
than six members to Congress; fraternities and 
social and academic organizations are entitled 
to send one member each. Annually in the 
regular February meeting, the Congress elects 



a board of governors, which is the policy formu- 
lating segment of the Union. 

The purpose of the Union is to foster the 
mental, moral, and physical development of 
the students of the various colleges, to support 
student activities, and to develop friendly rela- 
tions between the students and the faculty. 

The activities of the Union include the Fall 
Frolic at which Miss Varsity is crowned and the 
Winter Frolic which is usually held off-campus. 
Again, this year, the Union sponsored the 
annual Fair on the Lake Shore Campus. The 
purpose of this event is to raise funds for use by 
the Union in improving student facilities on all 
campuses. To many students at Loyola, it is the 
climax of the year's social activities and calls 
for the greatest amount of effort and co-opera- 
tion to insure its success. 




HANDSHAKES AND SMILES are given by the newly elected Union officers — Jack Donahue, president; Carol 
Urbanus, executive secretary; and Charles Caufield, vice-president. 



67 



Moments to remember . . . 




;! • 






59 




1956 



DESIGNING A PAGE of this 
year's TOWERS are Earl Frawley, 
Norm Risoya, and Curt Richter. 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF . 
PRODUCTION EDITOR . 
PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR 
FINANCIAL EDITOR 
ASSISTANT PRODUCTION EDITORS 

PRODUCTION STAFF . 



PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF 

SPORTS 

ART . 



Dennis Price 

Norman Risoya 

Curt Richter 

Earl Frawley 

Bernard Rausch 
James Thorpe 

Charles Caufield 
Barbara Lindholm 
Sally Schrieber 
James Sebesta 
Don Skriba 

James Dennett 
Fred Egloff 

Dean Dolan 
Thomas Split 

Fred Egloff 



70 



owers 



Staff 



The 1956 TOWERS is the third of a series 
of yearbooks published by the Commerce 
Council for the students of the College of Com- 
merce. A Commerce yearbook has almost be- 
come a tradition; the staff of this year's 
TOWERS hopes that this book will prove to be 
a highlight of this tradition. Benefiting from 
the experience of the last two yearbooks, we 
set out this year to produce a book which 
would cover more thoroughly every aspect ot 
our life at Lewis Towers. To achieve this end, 
we have enlarged the size of the TOWERS, im- 
proved the photography by using more pictures 
and using photos taken expressly for TOWERS' 
use, and devoted greater coverage to sports 
and Commerce School activities. 

Dennis Price served as editor-in-chief of the 
TOWERS and had the responsibility of over- 
seeing and co-ordinating the operations of the 
other staff members. As production editor, 
Norman Risoya was in charge of planning the 
layout of the TOWERS, obtaining the necessary 
photographs and copy, and working with our 
publisher, Ray Langen of Campus Service. 
Curt Richter, editor of photography, did an ex- 
cellent job by providing the majority of pictures 
himself, and obtaining the others from several 
Loyola photographers. Finances were under 
the direction of Earl Frawley whose main task 



was collecting payments for subscriptions made 
at the beginning of the school year. Without 
the co-operation of the other members of the 
staff listed on the opposite page, production of 
the TOWERS would have been impossible, for 
they provided ideas and did work which were 
essential to a good yearbook. 

Our Dean, Mr. J. Raymond Sheriff, gave us 
all possible aid and was always a source of 
inspiration and encouragement when days 
were dark. We are grateful for these words 
which he has written: 

There is much that might be said in 
apology for any college yearbook, and the 
TOWERS ot 1956 will not prove to be excep- 
tional in that regard. It has been produced 
by a small group o( devoted workers laboring 
without a tradition of long standing — laboring 
even without the advice of a faculty moderator. 
It is solely their volume both in plan and in 
execution. I hope it is as good as their patient 
and persistent labors deserve — which is con- 
siderable. What has been accomplished in the 
face of a crescendo of discouragements is a 
tribute mainly to Dennis Price, Norman Risoya, 
and Fred Egloff. The College of Commerce 
should be proud of their achievement — even 
if that achievement should fall short of the edi- 
tors' dream of perfection. 



TOM SPLIT checks the files for items of interest aided by HARD AT WORK on production of the TOWERS are Dennis 
Bernie Rausch and Dean Dolan. Price, Fred Egloff, Sally Schrieber, and Jim Thorpe. 
















[|J| 








n to \ £ 

It vl l-*-- JHbB 


4. «$U 


■^*w 










. " "*> 



R. O 



LOYOLA'S R.O.T.C. BAND 
stands at attention before 
rehearsing a new selection. 



Lt. Col. Charles Nowe, the present Com- 
mander of the R. O. T. C. unit at Loyola Uni- 
versity, founded the band in 1954 as an im- 
provement on the drum and bugle corps which 
has formerly provided the marching music for 
Loyola's men in khaki. 

Sgt. Duffy and Dr. Salvatore provide fac- 
ulty supervision and musical direction for the 
new band while cadet Sgt. Dick Kimbal is the 
man responsible for putting the band through 
its paces on the field. 

Throughout the year the band is acutely 
conscious of two special performances in the 
month of May, the President's review and the 
Federal Inspection. Last year, with less than a 
year of experience to draw from, the band 



played in both these parades and performed 
admirably. 

The Loyola University rifle team was or- 
ganized in 1949. It is composed of a volunteer 
group of cadets from all four of the Military 
Science classes. 

The team's first range was located in the 
basement of the Lake Shore Armory. A new 
range was opened in 1952 with a view to pro- 
mote and better the achievements of the squad. 
.In 1952, the team placed high in the William 
Randolph Hearst Match and the Fifth Army 
Match and compiled an eight and ten record 
for the season. The 1953-1954 and the 1954-1955 
seasons saw more improvement. They placed 



Bottom: R. Lear; J. Lincoln; 
R. Meiners, Captain of 
Rifle Team; E. Bula. 

Top; J. Cleary, E. Pawlow- 
ski, J. Wren, T. Tarpey. 




c. 



A PRECISION DRILL per- 
formed by several members 
of the team. 




eighth in the Fifth Army Match and had suc- 
cessful season records of 14-5 and 15-3. 

The team is under the guidance of M/Sgt. 
Davis. 

The Loyola University Drill Team, a volun- 
teer group organization composed of students 
from all four classes of Military Science, was or- 
ganized in February 1952 and entered intercol- 
legiate competition in 1953. 

In both 1953 and 1954 the team has been 
awarded trophies at the Purdue University In- 
vitational Drill Meet in platoon competition with 
drill teams from colleges throughout the eastern 
and midwestern states. One of the outstanding 
features of the 1954 Drill Team was the award of 
first place to Cadet Ronald P. Pawl for his 



performance in individual drill competition. 

In April of 1955 the drill team was awarded 
first place for its excellent performance at the 
Senior R. O. T. C. Drill Meet. This meet was 
held in the Chicago area and is sponsored by 
the Cook County Chapter of the Reserve Offi- 
cers Association of the United States. 

In addition, the team has given exhibitions 
in the Chicago Stadium, on television, and on 
special occasions by request of various organi- 
zations. 

At the present time, Cadet Gerald A. Bod- 
mer is the drill master. The drill team schedule 
for the coming season includes Purdue Univer- 
sity Invitational Drill Meet and the Reserve Offi- 
cers Association Senior R. O. T. C. Drill Meet. 




Bottom: F. Balough; G. Bod- 

mer, Captain of Drill 

Team; E. Frawley. 
Middle: R. Meiners, E. Paw- 

lik, P. Calhoun, J. Dentzer, 

G. Pierce, B. Dentzer, J. 

Schwarzbauer, M. Saw- 

riol, C. Robb. 
Top: J. Lincoln, J. Tomsic, 

B. Agnigni, R. Pawl, J. 

Shanfeldt, S. Croisant, 

D. Smith, R. Freeman, 

V. Intrivici. 



73 



Moments to remember . . . 





75 





President George Dunlap 

Vice-President Tony Di Benedetto 

Secretary James Herman 

Treasurer Charles Sexton 

Pledge Master '. . . Richard Spillane 




73 




Bottom Row: B. Duffy, C. Gormely, S. McGcrnn, H. Cygan, B. Purkus, L. Loughlin, M. Sullivan, M. Timlin. 

Second Row: J. McDonald, W. Waters, G. Dunlap, T. Di Benedetto, R. Spillane, J. Riordan, C. Sexton. 

Third Row: P. Dyra, J. Herman, T. Fagin, L. McDonald, J. Tennis, R. Richele, J. Williams, J. Biesinger, J. Macdonald, 

J. Bizon, N. Krull. 
Top Row: K. Printen, J. Rice, R. Colsant, W. Watson, J. Bellini, M. Harrington, J. Kiley, J. Erwin, B. Lane, F. Paolo, 

J. Moran, B. Liston. 



Alpha Delta Gamma 



From its founding on the Lake Shore Campus of Loyola in 1924, the Alpha 
Delta Gamma Fraternity has constantly progressed and expanded. A nucleus 
of fourteen Loyolans, desiring to spread their ideas, initiated early in the fra- 
ternity's history an expansion program. This program produced the first na- 
tional Catholic fraternity in Catholic colleges and universities. Today these 
chapters extend from Washington, D. C, to Los Angeles, California. 

The activities of the fraternity are regulated to include all phases of student 
life at Loyola. Primarily a social fraternity, Alpha Delta Gamma actively 
encourages academic, religious, cultural, and athletic endeavors. These play 
an integral part in the development of its members. The great majority of 
activities are co-ordinated between the officers and moderator, Rev. Mulligan, 
S.J., with the purpose of the fraternity kept in the forefront, namely, the devel- 
opment of true Christian manhood, centered around Catholic ideals and friend- 
ship. 

Throughout the year, all aspects of student life are emphasized among the 
members. Part of its projects is an increased interest and participation in the 
extracurricular activities which are offered by both fraternal and non-fraternal 
organizations of the school. This includes, primarily, active participation 
in the intramural affairs on the Lake Shore and Lewis Towers campuses. 

Made up of almost equal membership from the College of Arts and Sciences 
and the College of Commerce, members of Alpha Delta Gamma may be found 
in all parts of student government, doing a job that is a credit to Loyola. 



77 







President Jcck Katzenberger 

Vice-President James Whiting 

Secretary Robert Tres 

Treasurer John Burman 

Master of Rituals Joseph Carini 





bottom Row: N. Risoya, G. Rados, J. Jacksack, R. Tres, 

V. Bentivenga, D. Price, Mr. J. McCullough. 
Middle Row: J. Ambrose, W. Murphy, J. Haberkorn, V. Shukis, W. Valters, R. Amendola, W. McNally, E. 

Grow, R. Lake, J. Whiting, T. Naughton, W. Morcrwczynski, C. Caufield. 
Top Row; J. Cullinan, L. Moloney, E. Elliot, H. Grannan, H. Kupski, G. La Buda, J. Byrne, F. Al Wattar, L. Battiato, 

R. Janowicz, R. Mullen. 



Katzenberger, J. Burman, T. Bojanowski, J. Jendrzejewski, 

Swain, W. 



Alpha Kappa Psi 



Alpha Kappa Psi, founded at New York University in 1904, is the first pro- 
fessional fraternity in the field of business administration in the United States. 
Gamma Iota Chapter, founded at Loyola in 1952, was the seventy-fifth to join 
the national fraternity which today consists of ninety-six chapters throughout 
the country. 

Dedicated to promoting the interests of the business profession, the mem- 
bers of Alpha Kappa Psi sponsor each year in April a Career Day for sophomore 
Commerce students. For its own members, the fraternity provides an insight 
into the operation of business with speakers, movies, tours, and discussions of 
current topics. 

Socially, it cannot be said that Gamma Iota Chapter is deficient. Members 
take part in a number of social events throughout the year, such as the Hal- 
loween Hayride, and the New Year's Eve and St. Patrick's Day parties. The 
culmination of the Chapter's social life takes place each June at the annual 
Golf Outing in Wisconsin. 

The religious welfare of the members is developed by a program of 
spiritual activities. Twice a year the members and their fathers attend Mass 
offered by Father Lester Evett, the fraternity chaplain; afterwards they meet for 
a Communion breakfast. In addition, a majority of the members make a closed 
retreat each year. 

In its brief existence at Loyola, Alpha Kappa Psi has become a valuable 
asset to the College of Commerce. Much of its success is due to the aid and 
counsel of its moderator, Mr. Joseph V. McCullough, and the Chapter would 
like to thank him for a job well done. 



79 








President Dennis Price 

Vice-President James Alesia 

Secretary David O'Connor 

Treasurer Phillip Howard 

Alumni Secretary Walter Ahem 




60 




Seated: J. Cadwell, N. Risoya, Mr. H. McCloskey, R. Bardis, J. Cullinan, S. Szydlik. 
Middle Row: A. Cusenza, R. Reading, R. Barry, J. Egan, C. McKiel, W. Koziol, J. Burianek. 
Top Row: R. Troy, E. Kolodziej, R. Siewert, P. McGuire, J. Donahue, E. Fox, R. Rowden. 



Blue Key 



The Blue Key National Honor Fraternity was founded at the University of 
Florida in 1924. Since that time its growth has been phenomenal and it has 
come to be accepted as the leadership equivalent of scholarly Phi Beta Kappa. 
The membership now totals 35,000 and every state of the Union boasts one 
or more of its ninety-six chapters. The Loyola chapter of Blue Key was estab- 
lished in 1926, and has functioned for many years as an honorary leadership 
organization. Many of the University's most distinguished alumni and faculty 
are members. 

During the last year, however, the fraternity underwent a reorganization 
and reorientation. The Chapter was reorganized as a service group designed to 
assist the administration and faculty, and to encourage and help lead all stu- 
dent organizations. The success of the experiment has been outstanding. The 
men of Blue Key have been appointed permanent student marshalls for all 
registrations and commencement exercises. They have helped officiate at 
numerous University functions such as the celebration of the 400th anniversary 
of the founding of the Society of Jesus. Likewise, their two subsequent initiation 
dinners have been significant and distinguished social successes. 

Membership in Blue Key is by invitation only. Pledges are accepted during 
their junior or senior year. Students eligible are those men of required 
scholastic standing who have been most active in extracurricular activities 
and have maintained a continuous record of unselfish service to the University 
and its student body. 




# 

ft toom'^i- j "mm* ■„*, 

i -— «- 

President Mary Jean Kelly 

Vice-President (LT) Rosemarie Burns 

Vice-President {LSC) Joan Pozdol 

Secretary June Kennedy 

Treasurer Marie McCahey 






OFFICERS AND MEMBERS of the Coed Club at one of their meetings in the Law School Auditorium. In the first 
row are: Joan Combiths, membership chairman; Marie McCahey, treasurer; June Kennedy, secretary; Pat McGrady, 
social chairman; Rose Marie Burns, vice-president; Mary Whalen, Big Sister chairman; Mary Jean Kelly, president; 
and Carol Koenig, Union representative, directly behind Miss Kelly. 



Coed Club 



Following its organization in the spring of 1949 under the direction of Miss 
Julia O'Malley, then Dean of Women, the Coed Club has become a most active 
social group at Loyola University with a membership of over 270 coeds from 
the undergraduate schools of Arts and Sciences, Commerce, and Nursing. An- 
swering the need for a unifying organization among the women students, this 
club sponsors a series of diversified social activities each year. 

This year's social program began with a Welcoming Tea for all new women 
students of the University. Following the first few weeks of school a "Big Sister" 
dinner was given as a warm greeting to all new members of the club. Early 
in November the annual Card Party-Fashion Show was held. The Christmas 
formal dance at the Lake Shore Club of Chicago proved to be a high point 
on the club's social calendar. In the second semester, a dinner was held for 
the coeds and their parents at which the Very Reverend James Maguire, S.J., 
President of Loyola University, was the guest speaker. 

Today the Coed Club is a well-established social group which is an asset 
both to the women students and the University. Although primarily social, the 
club aims also to integrate and adjust its members to college life by giving its 
support to the various activities of Loyola organizations including those spon- 
sored by the Loyola Union. 

For guidance in all of its activities, the Coed Club is fortunate to have 
as its moderator, the Dean of Women, Miss Mariette Le Blanc. 



83 





President Thomas Delaney 

Vice-President C. Phillip Andorfer 

Vice-President Al Stringham 

Secretary Eugene Salerno 

Treasurer Thomas Redden 




Bottom Row: W. Kurz, 
E. Gerules, Dr. S. Fri- 
zol, P. Andorfer, A. 
Stringham, T. Kelly. 

Middle Row: J. Goodsell, 
J. Lenart, E. Glavin, 
J. McNamara, H. Bla- 
ze j, H. Gruenwald, W. 
Lintzenich. 

Top Row: S. Hautzinger, 
J. McNamara, P. Finne- 
gan, D. Mongoven,, 
P. McGee, E. Frawley, 
R. Burns. 



Bottom Row: D. O'Con- 
nor, J. Shanfeldt, T. 
Redden, T. Delaney, 
G Salerno, J. Sebesta. 

Middle Row: V. Slana, 
J. Thorpe, M. Ryan, 
G. Bodmer, M. Riley, 
J. Zahaitis, E. Dillman, 
R. Scannell, E. Paw- 
lowski, W. Quill. 

Top Row: J. Schwartz- 
bauer, R. Zachs, C. 
Rossini, P. OGonnor, 
T. Split, J. Nichele, E. 
Hunter, R. Bryant, 
R. Ripoli. 




Delta Sigma Pi 



Any society or organization comprised of a rank and file has a goal or 
objective that it strives to achieve and which is the very purpose for its exist- 
ence. Delta Sigma Pi is an organization, a professional fraternity, which has a 
specific objective toward which all of its endeavors are directed. That purpose 
is to foster the study of business in universities, to encourage scholarship, social 
activity, and the association of students for their mutual advancement through 
research and practice; to promote a closer affiliation between the commercial 
world and the students of commerce; to further a higher standard of commercial 
ethics and culture, and to improve the civic and commercial welfare of the 
community. 

Next year Delta Sigma Pi will celebrate its golden anniversary in New 
York City where its bi-annual national convention will take place. At that 
convention a representation from ninety-three undergraduate chapters as well 
as from thirty-six alumni associations will be anticipated. Presently the frater- 
nity has over 36.000 businessmen and college students enjoying membership 
in Delta Sigma Pi. When we consider these few facts and statistics and observe 
the successful careers of our alumni, we cannot help but feel that our fraternity, 
Delta Sigma Pi, has achieved, and is continuing to achieve its purpose for which 
so many men have been brought together under a fraternal bond and have 
made our world a better place in which to live. 




President Mary Pat Gibbons 

Vice-President Judy Erengis 

Recording Secretary Maureen O'Hara 

Corresponding Secretary Carol Koenig 

Treasurer Mary Fran Jacobson 





Bottom Row: C. Lambrecht, P. Dunphy, M. Jacobson, M. Gibbons, M. O'Hara, C. Koenig, V. Burke. 
Middle Row: T. Beland, D. Carter, E. Dombrowski, F. Garski, B. Lecture, M. Nolan, J. Bell, J. Jurisic, S. 
Top Row: M. Flanagan, L. Dallessandro, B. Petta, M. Giles, R. Slawinski, M. Revell, S. Giometti. 
Not Pictured: N. Foster, M. Leabeater, N. Lyons, K. Shannon, L. Zugehar. 



Kappa Beta Gamma 



Although Kappa Beta Gamma has existed as a national, social sorority 
since 1920, it remained virtually unknown to Loyola University until the Epsilon 
Chapter was founded here in 1953. All of the chapters are located in Catholic 
colleges, but girls of all creeds and all races are welcome. 

Although in its infancy, the sorority has already inaugurated several func- 
tions which have become traditional; such as the party given the "actives" by 
each pledge class, Founders Day, and the informal and formal initiation of 
pledges which follows their six-week pledge period. Climaxing the social ac- 
tivities are the dinner dances held at the end of each semester. 

No fraternal organization, however, can afford to keep all of its functions 
entirely within its own membership. With this in mind, Kappa Beta Gamma 
has endeavored to participate in such activities as the Float Parade, the Fair 
and Frolic, the Variety Show, and other events requiring the co-operation of 
the entire University. In an effort to promote Loyola spirit, the sorority itself 
sponsored a cheering contest during the basketball season. 

In August the attention of all chapters of Kappa Beta Gamma will focus on 
Loyola as the Chicago Chapter will be host at the bi-annual national conven- 
tion. This is the first time this convention will be held at Loyola and provides 
a welcome opportunity to introduce the school to the visiting sisters. During 
the coming years the sorority will strive, as it has in the past, to "foster and 
perpetuate loyal support of college, university, and alma mater, of God and 
country." 






President Donald La Varre 

Vice-President E. Peter Fox 

Secretary Thomas Christensen 

Treasurer Thomas Schermerhom 

Pledge Master Thomas Hogan 





„. 



Bottom Row: J. Ennis, J. Cutler, T. Christensen, T. Hogan, Dr. P. Hummert, D. Lavarre, E. Fox, T. Schermerhorn, 

C. Bradford, D. Kennedy, R. Muno. 
Second Row: D. Mulligan, M. Wynn, R. Varallo, R. Gralen, A. Merges, J. Hannon, S. Malpede, F. Mongovin, D. Duffy, 

T. Flanagen, V. Hurley, J. Rupkey, G. Bohn. 
Third Row: B. Ward, G. Boyle, J. Sneider, R. Malone, D. Mecci, J. Schneider, B. Thies, C. Rodgers, G. Bryer, J. Zurla, 

M. Yates, J. Kane. 
Top Row: J. Lagershaussen, R. Burton, J. Egan, P. Werbiski, R. Walsh, R. Wainwright, W. Tietz, M. Curran, J. Dunne, 

G. Higgins, N. Flanagan. 



Pi Alpha Lambda 



Pi Alpha Lambda Fraternity was founded in 1925 by Reverend James J. 
Mertz, S.J., on the ideals of promoting Christian morals and high scholastic 
standards so as to foster the aims and interests of Loyola. Presently, under the 
guidance of its moderator, Dr. Paul Hummert, the Pi Alphs continue in this 
purpose by active participation in the academic, social, athletic, and spiritual 
functions of both the school and fraternity. 

Academically, every year several members distinguish themselves schol- 
astically, ranking high on the honor rolls of all the colleges of the University. 

Aside from sharing in the social functions of the school the members par- 
ticipate in several fraternity affairs, namely, monthly closed parties, an open 
mixer, and two formal dances. 

With regard to athletics, Pi Alpha Lambda is particularly proud of its in- 
tramural teams which consistently achieve honors in the intra-school program, 
and also of the fact that it has more monogram winners in its membership than 
any other fraternity. 

On the spiritual side, the members attend an annual closed retreat, sponsor 
Holy Week services, and conduct a fraternal Family Communion Sunday. 

Looking to the future, Pi Alpha Lambda is planning a more diversified 
program for the fraternity with the hope of complementing the ideal of develop- 
ing the whole man, morally, socially, physically, and intellectually in the true 
Jesuit tradition. 




President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer .... 
Pledge Master 



. . . Joseph Murphy 
. . . Donald Kenah 
James McCormick 
. James Dempsey 

. . . . William Egan 




I 

A 



Bottom Row: G. Zeman, J. Murphy, G. Herdrick, J. Duffin, J. Dempsey. 

Second Row: P. McGuan, E. Alwin, G. Facchini, W. Koziol, }. McCormick, D. Kenah, J. Daddino. 

Third Row: R. Kiefer, J. Martin, R. Biedrzycki, L. Rout, W. Egan, E. Parker, R. Donahoue. 

Top flow; B. Egan, E. Janis, C. Speranza, J. Malek, T. Qainlan, J. Koller. 



Sigma Pi Alpha 



Sigma Pi Alpha Fraternity was founded by a former Loyolan, Louis V. 
Potempa in October, 1932. Twenty-four years later the original objectives of 
promoting the intellectual and social interests of its brothers and providing 
the opportunities for their development, both moral and physical in an atmos- 
phere of friendship and co-operation, are still adhered to. In keeping with the 
intention of the first brothers, Sigma Pi Alpha has consistently refused to affili- 
ate with any national fraternity. It is sincerely held that the ideals and interests 
of its brothers can best be forwarded only through this policy. The brothers 
of Sigma Pi Alpha can be found in all divisions of the University. 

Originally intended for men of Polish extraction, Sigma Pi Alpha opened 
its membership to all students of Loyola University in 1948 regardless of race, 
religion or national origin. Prospective pledges are introduced to the fraternity 
at one of its semi-annual smokers. They then embark on a period of pledging, 
strictly supervised, during which time they are screened so that only those of 
the highest caliber are permitted to become brothers. When their pledging 
is completed they are formally initiated into the fraternity. 

Each year is complete both spiritually and socially, for Sigma Pi Alpha 
is the sponsor of numerous activities. There is an annual closed retreat at 
New Mellerey, and an Alumni Memorial Mass and breakfast. Socially, several 
closed parties are held, and an annual dinner dance, a mixer, and on the last 
day of school, the "Fraternity Man of the Year" award is presented by the fra- 
ternity at its annual Spring Nocturnal Dance, open to the entire University. 




I Sis 

^ — *ir25 

AO/7 

President . . Thomas Dyba 

Vice-President Curt Richter 

Secretary Phillip McGuire 

Treasurer Paul Gerding 

Pledge Master '. . Richard Chambliss 





Bottom Row: B. Dentzer, F. Lancaster, J. Bishop, P. McGuire, C. Richter, T. Dyba, P. Gerding, R. Pawl, W. Carlin, 

T. Strubbe. 
Middle Row: J. Diebald, M. Conley, E. Engel, M. Stumpf, K Bochat, D. Cota, D. Quinlan, G. Kolintzas, J. Healy, G. 

O'Grady, P. Sheeman. 
Top Row: D. Parmalee, E. Kuehn, J. Sipanski, D. De Figuredo, R. Kortas, F. Novak, G. Polus, C. Loner, C. Bober, R. 

Chambliss. 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 



This has been the most important year in the history of the University 
Club since its foundation at Loyola University in 1938. This local fraternity 
became an affiliate of Tau Kappa Epsilon, one of the largest national fraterni- 
ties in the United States. At the end of the 1955-56 academic year, Tau Kappa 
Epsilon numbered over 130 undergraduate chapters throughout the country, 
with numerous graduate chapters in the major cities. 

The University Club was officially installed as a chapter of Tau Kappa 
Epsilon in late May of this year. Because of the affiliation with a nationally 
renowned fraternity, it received the largest pledge class in the history of the 
organization. Members of Tau Kappa Epsilon are drawn from both the College 
of Commerce and the College of Arts and Sciences. Many graduate members 
are in the other divisions of the University. 

Most successful of this year's social activities in Tau Kappa Epsilon was the 
St. Patrick's Day Dance, held at the Morrison Hotel. The "Tekes" also managed 
a booth at the 1956 Loyola Fair. Their basketball team placed fourth in this 
year's intramural fraternity league. 



Moments to remember . . . 

.A 





Historical 
Society 



HISTORICAL SOCIETY'S 
OFFICERS together with 
moderator Dr. Kenneth 
Jackson listen to a report 
irom Valerie Urbanek. 



The Loyola Historical Society is one of the University's most active organi- 
zations. Though an academic organization, the scope and interest of the His- 
torical Society is not limited to one department or to one school. It boasts of 
being one of the truly University wide groups, having as active members stu- 
dents from the College of Commerce, College of Arts and Sciences, and the 
University College. 

During the last year, the Historical Society has sponsored meetings of in- 
terest to all the students, not just those interested in history. In co-operation 
with the History Department, the Society helped present the Toynbee Sym- 
posium in November. They presented their annual Christmas party prior to 
the Holidays. In the spring, the Historical Society presented a lecture by Dr. 
K. C. Wu, former governor of Formosa. These are only a few of the programs 
offered this year by the group. 

The officers of the Loyola Historical Society for the year were Raymond 
Siewert, president; Norman Risoya and William Zumbar, vice-presidents; Arvid 
Johnson, treasurer; James Alesia, Union representative; and Kathleen Cum- 
mings, Rosemary Fuerst, and Valerie Urbanek, secretaries. The faculty mod- 
erator was Dr. Kenneth Jackson. 



CHRISTMAS CAROLS from Ukrania entertained the large group at the Society's Christmas Program this year. 

' »!' > -*Uffv ■• ■ ■ •» .>..;jga- Jflllllllllll— WI^— B—— Bl ■II I I I IIII IMHH II IMH I II i-ii i — ■■ ■ ■ 




Sodality 



FATHER HOGAN ad- 
dresses a meeting of the 
Sodality on the purposes 
of the Sodality way of 




The Sodality at Loyola through devotion 
to the Virgin Mary seeks to make the faithful 
gathered together under her name good Catho- 
lics, sincerely bent on sanctifying themselves, 
each in his state of life, and zealous, as far as 
their conditions in life permit, to save and sanc- 
tify their neighbor and to defend the Church of 
Jesus Christ. 

One of the main activities of the Sodality 
is the meetings held every Friday after Mass in 
Room 201 of Lewis Towers. These weekly meet- 
ings, open to everyone, provide the opportunity 
for partaking in discussions and hearing talks 



intended to increase devotion to our Blessed 
Mother and her Son. Breakfast is also served 
at these friendly, informal gatherings to ac- 
commodate those who have received Holy 
Communion. 

Throughout the school year, the Sodality 
room on the third floor of Lewis Towers is open 
for Sodalists to spend their free time or consult 
with Father Hogan, Sodality moderator. Serv- 
ing also as student counsellor and chaplain 
of Loyola's R. O. T. C. unit, Father Hogan is 
always willing and able to help students with 
their problems and helped many of us during 
our retreat last fall. 



STANDING ROOM ONLY is often the rule at the popular, enjoyable meetings in Room 201. 




Sno-ballin' 
at the Tarn 



THIS YEAR'S SNO-BALL at 
Tam O'Shanter on Jan. 27 
was the most successful so- 
cial event of the first semes- 
ter. The music of Johnny 
Palmer helped to relieve the 
tension left from final 
exams. 



CORSAGES AND SMILES 
were the uniform of the day. 



TAKING A BREATHER dur- 
ing an intermission are sev- 
eral members of the Com- 
merce Council and their 
dates. 





Just 



mixin 



ENJOYMENT AND RE- 
LAXATION ore the keynote 
of the Friday mixers held at 
the Union House on the 
Lake Shore campus. 



COOL DANCING at the 
Commerce Council mixer in 
the Union House. 



SIDESHOW at one of the 
mixers in the first semester. 



Moments to remember . . . 



'tiHn'ft 





101 



April Highlights 





Honors Day! 

Finale to a 
great year 



DEAN SHERIFF receives a 
gift for his "39th" birthday 
from Fred Egloff. 



DEAN'S KEYS are pre- 
sented by Mr. Sheriff to 
Dennis Price, Fred Egloff, 
and Norman Risoya. 



4» MELLOW DANCE MUSIC 
was provided by Paul 
Carrano and his combo. 



103 



Thank You 



The Commerce Council and Staff of the 1956 TOWERS wish to extend 
their thanks to everyone who made this yearbook possible. 

First, we owe our gratitude to Dean J. Raymond Sheriff for the solid support 
he has given us in continuing with the traditional Commerce yearbook. Mr. 
Raymond Langen of Campus Service, our publisher, deserves our gratitude 
for his valuable advice, assistance, and personal interest in our efforts to make 
the 1956 TOWERS a technical success. We would also like to acknowledge 
the aid offered by Mr. Merrill Chase and the staff of Merrill Chase Studios, 
which produced our student portraits. For his interest and help in our under- 
taking, Mr. Daniel Cahill will always be remembered by the editorial staff. 

We would also like to thank the members of the fraternities and organi- 
zations who provided us with the information and photographs necessary to 
give them adequate representation in the TOWERS. To the faculty and student 
body we wish to extend our thanks for all of the co-operation and support we 
have received. 



ALPHA DELTA GAMMA 

ALPHA KAPPA PSI 

BLUE KEY NATIONAL HONOR FRATERNITY 

COED CLUB 

COMMERCE COUNCIL 

DELTA SIGMA PI 

GOLD TORCH 

KAPPA BETA GAMMA 

LOYOLA HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

LOYOLA UNION 

PI ALPHA LAMBDA 

SIGMA PI ALPHA 

SOCIETY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF MANAGEMENT