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Full text of "Towers"

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PUBLISHED BY 

THE COMMERCE COUNCIL 
COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 
LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 

820 N. MICHIGAN AVi. 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



'T/t 



(iNtV 




DEDICATION 

The class of 1957 takes great pride and 
pleasure in dedicating the 1957 Towers 
to Mr. J. Raymond Sheriff in ackno\\'ledge- 
ment of his success as Dean of the College 
of Commerce. We will long remember all 
he has done to assist in both our curricidar 
and extra-cinricular activities, Mr. Sher- 
iff is more than the Dean, he is a friend 
who has never forgotten that the student 
as an individual is an important concept. 
1 here are not enough words to adequately 
express om- gratitude but we hope that this 
dedication Avill in some ^vay sho^v oiu" ap- 
preciation for his efforts. May God keep 
him steadfast in his beliefs and works. 



CONTENTS 





Curricular 9 

ADMINISTRATION 10 

FACULTY 13 

SENIOR CLASS 17 

JUNIOR CLASS 1. 28 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 34 

FRESHMAN CLASS 40 

Extra-Curricular 47 

COMMERCE COUNCIL 48 

LOYOLA UNION 49 

FRATERNITIES, SORORITIES 50 

ORGANIZATIONS 69 

R.O.T.C. 79 

TOWERS STAFF 82 

bports ol? 

BASKETBALL 86 

SWIMMING 91 

TRACK 92 

SENIOR DIRECTORY 94 




PROLOGUE 



The 1957 Towers presents Commerce life 
at Loyola. Even though it is not possible 
to present the entire picture, ^s'e are 
certain that yoiu" college life will contin- 
ue to live on ^vithin the pages of this an- 
nual. Through the past four years the 
doors of I.e^vis To'wers have opened for 
you many new experiences, acquaintances, 
and friendships. Now, in a short while, 
these doors will close behind you, leav- 
ing only the memories of your days at 
Loyola. Thus the To^vers captures in 
Avords and pictures these memories so that 
they may not fade. We now invite you to 
turn the page and relive the days when 
Lewis To'ivers meant yoin- life as a Loyola 
Commerce Student. 



!>ii&(S&. 




Wordless Workshop 





Olummkr 



ADMINISTRATION 




\'er\ Re\ . James F. Maguiie, S. J. 



Before coming to Loyola, Father Maguire, 
our 20th president, was for six years the 
president of Xavier University. He is a 
native of Chicago and a graduate of St. Ig- 
natius High School. We are honored to 
have Father Maguire as president and are 
certain that his presence here ■^\dll mean a 
great physical expansion and cultural im- 
provement for Loyola. 



i 




Re\. Jcremiali J. 0'C;allaghaii. S. J. 

Excculivc Vice-l'iesiclciU 

Mr. Thomas I'. Hawkins 

Vice- President and Business Manager 



Father O'Callaghan has served as the chair- 
man of the Philosophy Department, Exe- 
cutive Secretary of the Alumni Association 
and Academic Vice-President. He received 
his Ph.D. from the Medieval Institute at 
the University of Toronto. 
Mr. Hawkins, who received his CPA at 
Northwestern, is the Business Manager for 
Loyola. He is also the chairman of the 
Mandel Loan Fund Grants Committee. 



As the recently appointed Dean of Stu- 
dents, Mr. McCloskey is the Chairman of 
the Committee on Student Activities and 
Welfare and Moderator of the Loyola Un- 
ion. It is through his office that all student 
activities are coordinated in the most bene- 
ficial manner to the student body and the 
Unversity. 



Miss LeBlanc, as Dean of Women, is the 
Secretary of the committee on Student Ac- 
tivities and Welfare, the Foreign Student 
Advisor, Director of the Women's Dorm 
and Modei-ator of the Coed Club and Intra 
Sorority Committee. But above all she acts 
as an advisor to all the Coeds in the Univer- 
sity. 



Miss Maviellee I.eBlant 
Dean of Women 



Mr. Harry L. McCloskey 
Dean of Students 




Mr. Sheriff, a native ol Clieyenne, Wyom- 
ing, lias been Dean of die College of Com- 
merce since 1949. He received his under- 
graduate education at Notre Dame Univer- 
sity, a MA from Northwestei^n University, 
and his JD from Loyola. Except for a leave 
of absence during World War II, when he 
served in the Arnry Air Force ^vith the 
rank of Major, Mr. Sheriff has been at Loy- 
ola LTniversity since 1 925. The achieve- 
ments of the College of Commerce are dtxe 
in a great part to Dean Sheriff's efforts 
to^vard the constant improvement of oiu" 
education. 




^tr. J. Raymond Sheriff 
Dean, College of Commerce 



Picttn-ed below is the staff of Room 306. 
It is only through them that the College 
of Commerce and the University College 
are able to fimction so well. Their's is a 
job that cannot be calctilated in hours of 
work. They not only have the duty of hand- 
ling the correspondence and student files 



for both the colleges but they also serve the 
students and help solve any of their prob- 
lems that arise. Their help to the students 
and to the University is immeasurable and 
their cordial attitude enlighting. To them 
—our heartfelt thanks for a special job 
done so well. 




The Dean's Staff: Sliirley Dill- 
man, Beverly Chandler, Manet- 
ta Calkins, Rosellen Perry, Don- 
alda MacLean. 



FACULTY 



The College of Commerce, in accordance 
\vith its main objectives: to pro\'i(le a 
sound general education in accordance 
with the objectives and traditions of Loy- 
ola University, to give a general business 
education to all students, to provide a spe- 
cialized training in one field of business, 
is divided into fi\e major departments. 
The Department of Business La^v provides 
the student ^vith a kno^vledge of the var- 
ious branches of Commercial Law. This 
department develops the mind and analy- 
tical skills of the student by the case meth- 
od so that he will be able to recognize in 
his later business life a legal problem and 
have some concept of its solution in terms 
of law. It is not the aim of the course to 
develop students to be lawyers or act as 
such. It is more important that they be 



abje to recognize a legal problem so that 
proper steps may be taken at the inception 
to protect their legal rights and prevent 
unnecessary losses. 

Recognizing the need for qualified per- 
sonnel in the Accounting pi^ofession, this 
department has striven to maintain the 
highest statidard of education. Its basic ob- 
jective has been to familiarize the student 
with approved methods and afford ade- 
cjuate preparations for C.P.A. examina- 
tions, while orientating him to the other 
fields of Commerce, This department pre- 
sents coinses in theory, practice, manager- 
ial techniques, costs and taxation. Account- 
ing has become such an integral part of to- 
day's business that a knowledge of it is a 
must for the modern day businessman. 



THE ACCOUNTING DEPAR7MENT: Mr. Adam P. Stach, Mr. Richard F. 
Kusek, Mr. Alexander Eulenberg, Mr. Thomas J. McCracken, Mr. Robert A. 
Meier. Acting Chairman. 





THE BUSINESS LAW DE- 
PARTMENT: Mr. John A. Zve- 
tina-Chairman, Mr. John D. 
O'Malley. 



The Department of Economics and Fi- 
nance is organized as one department, but 
it functions as two separate fields of con- 
centration. Because the development in 
any specialized field in commerce is de- 
pendent upon its supply of analytical rea- 
soning from an economic point of view, this 
field is the foundation ^vhich makes way 
for an imderstanding of any phase of the 
business world. In addition, its advance 
coiu'ses give the students a more compre- 
hensive and operative understanding of 
economy. This knowledge is an integral 
part in the student's preparation for the 
professional -^vorld and will assist him in 



practically any field he may choose. 
The Department of Management, through 
its teaching staff, is a very progressive de- 
partment. Its objectives are: to develop 
ability to make decisions on the higher 
levels of management authority and re- 
sponsibility; cultivation and application 
of the understanding that ^vhen manage- 
ment relates itself to man, human values 
and spiritual values come before material 
values; and cultivation of the understand- 
ing that only ^vhen virtues of charity, im- 
selfishness and justice set straight the 
hearts of men will the minds of men set 
straight the world of business. 



THE ECONOMICS-FINANCE 
DEPARTMENT: Standing: Mr. 
Robert N. Taaffe, Rev. Theo- 
dore Purcell, S. J.. Dr. Joseph O. 
Englet, Mr. Alfred S.' Oskamp. 
Seated: Rev. Raymond C. Jan- 
causkas, S. J., Dr. Helen C. Pot- 
ter, Dr. Theodosi A. Mogilnit- 
sky-Chairman. Dr. Sylvester M. 
Frlzol. 




The Department of Management not only 
stresses intellectual development but also 
encourages participation in extra-curricu- 
lar activities for through these the student 
will understand the hinnan and the social 
forces in the operation of business enter- 
prise. 

The Department of Marketing, through 
the addition of new courses and the con- 
stant increase in enrollment, is one of the 
outstanding departments in the university. 
Marketing as a field has a wide variety and 
diversification of interests from which a 
student may choose. The jobs available are 
so varied and offer such unlimited oppor- 
tunities that they appeal to any student 
whose interest lie in the field of business. 
The department is organized in such a ^vay 
as to instill into the sttident the ability to 
make the transition from the storehouse of 
kno^vledge to the area of action. 
The students of Marketing are taught to 
become Marketing executives who can 
deal with policy problems and make de- 
cisions: who analyze conditions and trends 
and make satisfactory recommendations as 
to appropriate action. This is accomplished 
by training the students in the study of 
marketing research, the history of market- 
ing, and problems of distribution. 




VHV. MA^AGl•.^n^^■ r liEPARIMENX: Dr. Pcler 1. 
Swanish-Chairman, Dr. Walter H. Peterson. Mr. Joseph V. 
MtCiilloiigh. 




THE MARKETING DEPART- 
MENT: Dr. Hugli A. Weiss. Mr. 
Lloyd G. Allen. Dr. Kenneth B. 
Haas-Chairman, Mr. Ralph L. 
Wagner. 




James A. Sebesta, President 

"Sebbie" is a perfect example of excellence 
in a college student. In his four years of 
college he has proven himslf to be one of 
the outstanding student leaders at Loyola. 
In addition to his activities Jim has also 
maintained a hisjh academic average. 




Edward J. Walsh, ]'ice-President 

"Big-Ed" had his college life interrupted 
with a fivo year stretch in the Army, spend- 
ing most of that time in Alaska. Since re- 
turning to Loyola, Ed has been one of the 
most active people in student affairs and 
student government, holding many offices 
in various organizations. 



■<m~-'n 




Cieorge F. LaBuda, Secretary-Treasurer 

"Frenchie" is another of the outstanding 
leaders at Loyola. Highly popular, he has 
gained a reputation as one of the most 
active workers in school activities. George 
has been highly active in many organiza- 
tions and a leader in each. 



SENIOR CLASS 



Once again, this June, several hundred 
Loyolans will don caps and gowns and file 
down the center aisle of the Granada 
Theatre to receive that long-sought-for 
piece of sheepskin. It is almost incredible 
that such a comprehensive span could pass 
so quickly. Yet these were months filled 
with learning; all types of learning. Some 
came from text books, some from tlie 
people around them, and some from ^vith- 
in then^selves. They were taught not only 
Accounting and Economics and English, 
but probably more important lessons, i.e., 
learning to get along with others, and 
learning to live ^vith Ciod. Everyday 
brought ne^v experiences, ne-^v fields to be 
conciuered, people to meet and things to 
do. They grew in wisdom academically, so- 



cially and spiritually. 

Pictured on the following pages are the 
people who are going to take that short but 
all-important walk down that carpeted 
path this June. If you were to ask, most of 
liieni ^vould reply that it seems that it \\'as 
only last September that they registered 
for the first time. 1 he years of college pass 
quickly: all too quickly. What remains 
now is the fiuine wkh all its mysteries and 
siu'prises. 

And now, as they make ready to step out 
into the business ^vorld, let us remind them 
that the world will look upon them and 
judge them as Loyolans. Let us pray that 
they \\'ill never forget this and that they 
^\'ill always be able to uphold the tradition 
of Loyola Men. 





f!f lif' 














\J 






SENIORS 









Chillies P. Andorfer, BSC 
Accounting 

John F. Belluso, BSC 
Finance 

Gerald S. Bohn, BSC 
Management 




John F. Brefeld, BSC 
Accounting 

Joseph V. Bugos, BSC 
Alaiketing 

Patrick H. Carr, BSC 
Marketing- 



Donald L. Golfer, BSC 
Marketing 

John A. Comiskey, BSC 
Marketing 

Gerald F. Cuny, BSC 
Accounting 



John P. Deasey, BSC 
Marketing 

Marilyn A. Derwent, BSC 
Accounting- 
Edward B. Dillman, BSC 
Finance 



Donald R. Dolniak, BSC 
Management 

Eleanor A. Dombrowski, BSC 
Accounting 

Michael H. Eischen, BSC 
Accounting 



Elmer H. Eisenberg, BSC 
Accounting 

Charles R. Engle, BSC 
Marketing 

Sr. St. Eugene of Rome, S.M 
BSC 

Accounting 



Patrick M. Finnegan, BSC 
Finance 

William W. Fritts, BSC 
Management 

Ronald J. Garotolo, BSC 
Management 



Thomas M. Garvin, BSC 
Accounting 

Thomas H. Geier, BSC 
Marketing- 
Edmund G. Gerides, BSC 
Marketing 




^ p^«*«»»w««p!ff«f^ «iw*.wwi pptwf '«pippitw'<ii|iii!wi«i*u«jj|j|| Robert J. Giczewski, BSC 

Management 

Edward M. Glavin, BSC 
Management 

Richard W. Hall, BSC 
Marketing 




Stephen P. Hart, BSC 
Marketing 

William G. Hayes, BSC 
Marketing 

Fred R. Hermes, BSC 
Accounting 



Patrick J. Hughes, BSC 
Accounting 

Frank X. Huss, BSC 
Accounting 

James C. Jacksack, BSC 
Marketing 



Ralph H. James, BSC 
Marketuig 

Jesse P. Jendra/cjewski, BSC 
Management 

Thomas D. Kakuska, BSC 
Accounting 



Richard J. Kapolnek, BSC 
Accounting 

Timothy f. Kavanaugh, BSC 
Accounting 

Thomas F. Kelly, Jr. BSC 
Marketin" 



Thomas J. Kelly, BSC 
Accounting 

John J. Kcogh, BSC 
Economics 

Thomas M. Kern^ BSC 
Economics 



Robert E. Klamerus, BSC 
Accounting 

Sarkis Krikorian, BSC 
Management 

Norman J. Krull, BSC 
Accounting 



George F. La Buda, BSC 
Marketing 

William C. Laurie, BSC 
Marketing 

Robert M. Lear, BSC 
Marketing 




SENIORS 





David C. Leis, BSC 
Maiketing 

^Villiam M. Lombardi, BSC 
Marketing 

Frank G. Loversky, Jr., BSC 
Accounting 



James F. Luech, BSC 
Accounting 

Roy B. Lynch, BSC 
Manaoement 



Sylvester J. Madma, BSC 
Accounting 



Salvatore D. Malpede, Jr., BSC 
Accounting 

Philip E. McGee, BSC 
Economics 

Thomas E. McKevett, BSC 
Marketing 




u 




SENIORS 



Richard F. Meineis, BSC 
Management 

Dennis H. Mongoven, BSC 
Accounting 

James A. Moran, BSC 
Management 



Philip R. Moran, BSC 
Marketing 

Philip A. Moran, BSC 
Marketing- 
Walter J. Morawczynski 
BSC ■ 

Management 



John F. Morrissey, BSC 
Accounting 

Bernard N. Mullen, BSC 
Management 

Harold J. Murphy, BSC 
Accounting 



Hilary J. Naborowski, BSC 
Marketing 

Richard P. Nagle, BSC 
Economics 

John B. Nichele, BSC 
Finance 



Thomas P. Norris, BSC 
Marketing 

John F. O'Toole, BSC 
Accounting 

John R. Ovnik, BSC 
Finance 





^1 




Dcno J. Pappadimitriou, BSC 
Management 

Anne M. Pa^vlowska, BSC 
Finance 

Donald C. Perreault, BSC 
Marketing 



Joseph F. Piro, BSC 
Marketing 

John V. Pizzato, BSC 
Accounting 

William A. Quill, BSC 
Accounting 



fames A. Qinnlan, BSC 
Economics 

Chester Rozanski, BSC 
F'inance 

Edward L. Revers, BSC 
Marketing 



Michael J. Riley, BSC 
Accounting 

Jeremiah P. Riordan, BSC 
Finance 

Richard A. Ripoli, BSC 

Marketing 



Alljcrt A. Rothengass, BSC 
Management 

Michael A. Ryan, BSC 
Marketing 

James J. Sampey, BSC 
Accoimtino' 



SENIORS 




James A. Sebesta, BSC 
Management 

Charles L. Sexton, BSC 
Accounting- 
David J. Sheehan, BSC 
Marketing 



William J. Siebert, BSC 
Management 

Victor F. Slana, BSC 
Management 

Arlene N. Slawinski, BSC 
Management 



J. David Smith, BSC 
Economics 

Richard J. Spillane, BSC 
Marketing- 
Richard E. Stoffel, BSC 
Marketing 





SENIORS 






NFartin R. Stein, BSC 
Accounting 

John A. Stone, BSC 
Finance 



Michael F. Sullivan, BSC 
Accounting 



Robert J. Theilen, BSC 
Marketing 

William T. Tietz, BSC 
Accounting 

Michael J. Timlin, BSCl 
Economics 



-orge V. Tyharst, BSC 
Management 

Edward J. Walsh, BSC 
Marketing 

Gerald S. Walsh, BSC 
Accounting 



William C. Waters, BSC 
Marketing 

William M. Webb, BSC 
Management 

Richard E. Weidner, BSC 
Accounting 



Ronald J. Wilkes 
Accounting 

Lyle L. Witt, BSC 
Economics 

Peter J. Wrenn, BSC 
Finance 



Chester I. Wright, BSC 
Marketing 

Peter M. Wuertz, BSC 
Economics 

Robert J. Zacks, BSC 
Accounting- 




Denis J. Conlon, BSC 
Economics 



Raimund G. Gerules, BSC 
Marketing 

Joseph R. Shanfeldt, Jr., BSC 
Management 

Norman A. Wasz, BSC 
Management 



— Also 





Harold Fiemgen, President; 
Thomas Split, Secretary-Treas- 
urer; Henry Grannan, Vice- 

I'rcsident. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



It is ahvays a difficult task to enumerate 
specific activities that an individual class 
has accomplished throughout the school 
year because it is the class duty to foster the 
activities of the Council that will benefit 
the College as a ^vhole. However, the class 
held a party on February 1st that was one 
of the outstanding social successes of the 
year. This party was ■\vell attended and a 
good time had by all. 

One of the major projects of the class 
has been the possibility of bringing to Loy- 
ola "Who's Who in American Colleges" '. 
If this project is successful, this publica- 
tion will bring to the students the possi- 
bility of national recognition for their 
scholastic and extra-curricular activities. 

This class has been outstanding in its 
academic, social and religious achievements 
and their coming senior year promises to 
be even more beneficial. 



Stan Szydlik, (extreme Iclt) 
acquaints a group ol Juniors 
with the procediac of rehears- 
ing lor a radio program. 



Stan explains how practice ses- 
sions can be cuhninated into 
a tape recording before be- 
ing used over tire air. 





Just to show you what a smile 
can do. 



We have dates . . . Now we 
need money. 



What every woman wants hi 
her home. 



i 



JUNIORS 



Prot delay — Happy day. 



Survey's sliow — One out ol 
every seven uses Ponds. 





Has something new been add- 
ed? 



Up from the lounge for a 
breath of fresh air. 



The service is poor but the 
floor shows are areat. 



i 




Pictured above is the beauty spot of 
Loyola, the Lewis To-wer Lounge. In this 
den of smoke, stale air and coffee cups can 
be found the typical student. The base- 
ment of the "Tall Tower of Mr. Lewis" 
is also the scene of major politics where 
different factions attempt to out fox each 
other by applying the principles of Poli- 
ticking 101. Our lounge, together with 
tables, lack of chairs and excess litter, is 
the scene of many educational classes. Held 
here are the many courses in the art of 
cutting class, the skill of hearts, the sci- 
ence of Pinochle, and the translation of 
Bridge — ^vith an occasional break for a 
sand^s'ich. Yes, this is our lotmge. and 
judging by the amount of time Ave spend 
there we show that ^ve appreciate even this. 




Roljerl Buckley. Secretary-Treas- 
urer; Gene Wright. President; 
Charles l^arrish, Vice-President. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



The Sophomore year is an important 
one for at its end the student must select 
his major field of concentration. In line 
with tliis, a Sophomore Career Day is held 
and businessmen are invited to speak on 
the advantages of their fields. This Career 
Day has proved to be of great help to the 
students. 

Although very busy with studies, there 
^vas always time for the social aspects of 
college life. The Mixers and the Sno-Ball 
^vere occasions to meet new people and en- 
joy old friendships. One of the highlights 
of the year was the Sophomore Class Party 
which was very successful and through 
which greater class imity was established. 

The Sophomore Class as a unit, has 
been very helpful in promoting and en- 
couraging the activities of the Commerce 
Coimcil. It is oiu" hope that their coming 
year ^vill be as successful. 



34 



Do you really think that lu 
will count that test? 



This is high tidelity? 




35 




. . . and only seven knights a 
week. 



Maybe you don't know what 
good sleep is. 




— They speak lor themselves. 



i 



SOPHOMORES 



Just waiting!!! 



O.K. "You're all dispensed." 





Close as pages in a book. 



Hey Jim, are you sure the bus 
stops here? 




Can YOU profit by their mis- 
takes? 



SOPHOMORES 



Where were you on the even- 
ing of January ninth? 






Martin Corrigan, Vice-President; 
Wayne Lowe, President; Evelyn 
Ncmlalia, Secretary-Treasurer. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Usually the time of the Freshmen Class 
is spent in getting acquainted with college 
life. But this year's class has proven itself 
to be one of the school's most outstanding 
freshman classes. 

This was the first class to enter a float- 
in the annual parade. It took many long 
nights of work but by working together 
they created an outstanding float. 

Another example of the cooperation 
and unity within this class was the Class 
Party which proved to be one of the year's 
social highlights. 

This class has sho^vn an amazing 
amount of enthusiasm by members partici- 
pating not only in immediate class activi- 
ties but in the activities of the school. We 
hope that they will continue to work as a 
class and that their spirit of cooperation 
will continue on throughout their days at 
Loyola. 



40 



Stiandccl on seven, "Lots ol 
Luck." 



McNamce Specialists 




I 




Mmmmm boy, look at that 
scenery. 




Three medium — rare sirloins 
]3leasc. 



42 



FRESHMEN 



Loyola's new escalator saves 
thousands of steps each day. 



57 varieties. 





Products of the Do-it-yourseif 
era. 



Gentlemen . . . have you 
reached a verdict? 



44 



FRESHMEN 



Are you sure that the July 
issue of "MAD" is at LSC? 



There's gold in them hills 





Three star control 



i 



iExtra-durnritkr 



47 




[vjj^^^g Standing: Gene Wnght — Tieasuiei Charles I'anish, Wayne Lowe — Secietan 
.'^^,i.^,&d^ Henry Giannan Ruber t Buckle) Echvard Walsh. Martin Corrigan Seated L\ehn 
Nemlaha. James Sebesta — President, George LaBuda. 



COMMERCE COUNCIL 



In the College of Commerce, the student 
governing body is known as the Commerce 
Council. Dean J. Raymond Sheriff serves 
as its Moderator, The Council's purpose 
is to develop self government by organi- 
zating and systematizing student activities 
on an all-college basis: to stimulate inter- 
class relations; and to foster such other mat- 
ters which will benefit the college as a 
whole. The membership of the Council is 
composed of the elected officers of the four 
classes. The presidents of each class fill the 
various offices of the Council itself. Again 
this year the Council provided the student 
body with many services, activities and a 
well rounded social calender. Among these 
were: the first Mixer of the year, the off 
campus Sno-Ball, the Variety Show, a com- 
bined student directory, a special Fresh- 
man Orientation, active support of the Un- 
ior Fair, the Honors Day Dinner Dance, 
and this publication — the 1957 Towers, 
Truly the Commerce Council is one of the 
outstanding student government organi- 
zations at Loyola. 



Council members planning 
the Sno-Ball: James Sebes- 
ta — President, Harry Frem- 
gen — Vice-President, Tho- 
mas Split. 




The many schools and colleges of Loy- 
ola University are united by one student 
governing body, the Loyola Union. All stu- 
dents ^vho have registered and are in acad- 
emic residence in any ol the schools or col- 
leges of the Uni\'ersity are members of the 
Loyola Union. 

The purpose of the Union is to loster 
the mental, moral and physical develop- 
ment of the students ol the various colleges, 
to support student activities, and to de- 
velop friendly relations bet^veen the stu- 
dents and the faculty. 

Each year the Union sponsors the Fall 
Frolic, at ■which Miss Varsity is cro^vned, 
and the Mardi Gras Dance both of which 
^\'ere held off-campus. This year the Union 
sponsored the first Charity Day ^vhere the 
students lent their free services to various 
charitable services in Chicago. Again this 
year, the Union sponsored the annual Fair 
on the Lake Shore Campus. The purpose of 
this event was to raise funds for use by 
the Union in improving student facilities 
on all campuses. The activities of the Un- 
ion are many and ^'aried and aie under- 
taken to fill the needs and desires of the 
students. 




Phil Brankin conducts a 
Union Interfraternity 
Comnimittec meeting. 



LOYOLA 

UNION 






The Union Congress convenes to cUscuss some 
important Constitutional changes. 




Robert Gialeii I'hil Houaid, John 
Done hue, Fiank Co\e), and James 
Sebesta. 



BLUE 
KEY 



Charles Sexton President 

Ronald Pawl Vice-President 

C. Philip Andorier Secretary-Treas. 

James Dempsey Corresponding Sec. 



Standing: Pbi Howard, William Tansey, Richard Holland, Ken Printen, Frank 
Covey, Paul Gerding. .Seated: Gerry Boyle, Ronald Pawl, Charles Sexton, Dr, 
Kenneth Jackson, Moderator, C. Philip Anclorfer, Curl Richter, 







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The Blue Key National Honor Fra- 
ternity was founded at the University of 
Florida in 1924. Since that time its growth 
has been phenomenal and it has come to 
be accepted as the leadership equivalent of 
scholarly Phi Beta Kappa. The member- 
ship now totals more than 35,000 and every 
state of the Union boasts one or more ot 
its 100 chapters. The Loyola Chapter of 
Blue Key was established in 1926 and has 
functioned for many years as an honorary 
leadership organization. Many of the Uni- 
versity's most distinguished alumni and 
faculty are members. 

Two years ago the local Chapter under- 
went a reorganization. It reorganized as a 
service group designed to assist the admin- 
istration and faculty and to encourage and 
help lead all student organizations. The 
success of this experiment has been out- 
standing. 

Membership in Blue Key is by invita- 
tion only. Pledges are accepted during their 
junior or senior year. Students eligible are 
those men of required scholastic standing 
who have been most active in extracurric- 
ular activities and have maintained a con- 
tinous record of tuiselfish service to the 
University and its student body. 




C.eorge Tvhu 
John Ennis. 



Top: Curt Ricliter, Ron Paul. Charles Sexton. Jim 
Dempsev, Phil Andorfer. Bottom: Richard Spillane. Gerry 
Boyle. 





De\erieu\. lon\ DiBenedetto, Jim kilev, Joe Ia\lui. Lai- 
ry McDonald, Jack Kiley. Seated: John Drossait. Don 
McGuire, Beinie Schroder, Mike Harrington. 



ALPHA 
DELTA 
GAMMA 



Since its inception at Loyola University 
in 1924, Alpha Delta Gamma Fraternity 
has gro'^vn to be the largest national Catho- 
lic Fraternity, with chapters from coast to 
coast. This year is a very special one for 
the Alpha Chapter, for the national con- 
vention will be held in Chicago in the 
latter part of August. 

Though it is primarily a social organi- 
zation, its members are sti'ongly encourag- 
ed to participate in all the activities of 
the University regardless of whether they 
be social, academic, cultural, or religious. 
The policy of the fraternity is one of ftill 
participation in school affairs. This in- 
disptUable fact can be evidenced by the 
ntniierous positions held by the brothers 
in the different organizations at Loyola. 

Besides active participation in school 
affairs. Alpha Delta Gamma has striven to 
promote the name of the University by 
sponsoring such an activity as the Annual 
Loyola Orphan's Day. It is a day set aside 
by the fraternities and sororities at Loyola 
in Tvhich they demonstrate their true bond 
of fraternalism ^vith those less fortunate. 
The fraternty looks for-^vard to cooperating 
more fully Tvith the Sttident Lhrion's new 
ideas and developments in the ftuure. 




SiaiuliiiH R.i\ Olii.m.i. I'.ill I'tikisdii. I.cc Rim, Dick 
•Spillanc, liill Diittic. H;iii\ 15u«i<i. 1 ciiu Rusuk. |(ic 
Fenetti, Ed Dovle. Scnled: 15111 Dexine. Don Feeley, joe 
Eiwin, Larry Loughlin. 



Michael Harrington President 

Bernie Schroeder Vice-President 

Robert Lane Treasurer 

William Pederson Secretary 

Kenneth Printen Pledge Master 



I he Alpha Dell's phis big 
brother at the annual Orphans 
Dav Party. 




Mike Harrington, Rav Dcver- 
eaux. Frank Koniaek, Ken Print- 
en, Larry McDonnell. Jack 
Owens, Herb Cygan. 





Front: )esse Jendrejev.ski. Bob 
Mullen. \'inle Benti\enga. Rear: 
Harry Kujjsi. Ed Swain, Chuck 
Caufield. 



One of the many social 
events of the year. 



Robert Mullen President 

Vinle Bentivenga Vice-President 

Jesse Jendrejewski Secretary 

Chuck Caufield Treasurer 

Edward Swain Master of Rituals 



Sealed: Hank Grannan. Dean Dolan. Bol) Murril. John 
Texcnan, CMiutk Parrisli, Don Bucker. Standing: Harold 
Fremgen, George LaBuda. Bob Cunningham, Bill Hayes, 
Bob Niesen, Bill Casey, Gene Croisant, Dick Urchell. John 
Danihesel. 



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j(f^l O 



Alpha Kappa Psi, oldest professional 
fraternity in the lield ol business admin- 
istration, was fomided in 1904 at New York 
University. Gamma Iota Chapter was in- 
stalled at Loyola in 1952 as the seventy- 
fifth chapter of the national fraternity. 

In keeping with its high ideals of fur- 
thering the interests of its members, the 
chapter is primarily concerned ^vith pre- 
senting the latest available information on 
practices and theories in the business field. 
Conseqtiently, this year speakers have dis- 
cussed such topics as the national debt, 
business and politics, and new tax legisla- 
tion, ^\'hile industrial tours and short mov- 
ies have helped to broaden the members' 
scope of business. Fiuthermore, Alpha Kap- 
pa Psi, in the belief that it shovild improve 
the position of commerce in the present 
world, sponsored a Career Day in April 
for the Commerce sophomores. 

The chapter also pro\'ides for the social 
interests of its members. Such events as the 
New Year's Eve and St. Patrick's Day part- 
ies help increase the bond of fellowship 
between the members and provide them 
with relaxing entertainment. The climax 
of the social calender takes place with the 
annual Golf Otiting in Jtnie. 

In helping to develop Ignatius Loy- 
ola's "whole man". Gamma Iota Chapter 
sponsors a communion breakfast for mem- 
bers and their fathers while attending Mass 
in a body. 



ALPHA 

KAPPA 

PSI 



Seated: Jack Smyth, Don Connelly, John \Visniewski, \VaI- 
ly Nicpon. Joe I'anaiele, Ed Elhot. Standing: Bob Fuesel. 
Andy Schumi. Dick Claahsen, \Vally \alteis. Cliff Stephen, 
Don Skriija, Dick Janowicz. Dick Vetter. 






Seated: Ed McGiath. John MiiiusseN [dim LaMieh, Jim 
Sampey, Mike Rilev. liob Gic7euski, Bob Goodsell Stand- 
ing: Gene Wright. John Lenait, Ed Geuiles, Bob Zacks, 
Rai Gerules. Bol) Zordani, Jolin Ten\. Mike SulUvan, 
Bob Quill. Jim Ga\in. Marty Fowler, Bill Kurz. John 
Hess. 



DELTA 
SIGMA 
PI 



Delta Sigma Pi is a professional fra- 
ternity in the field of Commerce and Busi- 
ness Administration. Deltasigs from 96 un- 
dergraduate chapters and 36 alunmi chapt- 
ers will celebrate the 50th anniversary of 
the fraternity's founding at the national 
convention to be held in Ne\s^ York this 
sunnner. The Gannna Pi Chapter ^vas in- 
stalled at Loyola in September. 1950. 

The purpose of Delta Sigma Pi is to 
foster the study of business in universities; 
to encourage scholarship, social activity, 
and the association of students for their 
miUual advancement through research and 
practice: to promote a closer affiliation be- 
tween the commercial Tvorld and students 
of commerce; to further a higher standard 
of commercial ethics and culture, and to 
promote the civic and commercial ^velfare 
of the community. 

In accord with its professional aspect, 
Delta Sigma Pi offered many tours, speak- 
ers, and movies on business and industry 
to its members and other students of the 
university. 

A highlight of the year ■was the annual 
Rose of Deltasig Contest in which ten Loy- 
ola coeds took part. This year's Rose, Miss 
Dottie Rosenbeck ■tvas crowned at the an- 
nual Rose Mixer. 





% » 



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A, 



Sealeil: I'hil I'ape, HiiRikl Miiipliv, I'aC FinnegLUi, \'U 
Slaiia. Joe Slianfeldt, Merrill Sauriol. Tom Split. Standing: 
I'at Sharkey, Joe Schwartzbaiier, Ed Hunter. Tom Hanson, 
Ed I'aivlowski, Bob Lear, Bill Lintzenich, Jim Roniinski, 
Steve Streamski, Mike Rvan. Ed Bovle, 



C. Philip Andorfer President 

John Nichele Vice-President 

Thomas Kelly Vice-President 

Joseph Zahaitas Secretary 

Dennis Moneoven Treasurer 



One of the feature acts of the 
Variety Show. 



John Nithele. Joe Zahaitas. Phil 
.Andorfer. Dr. S. M. Frizol. Mod- 
erator. Tom Kelly, and Denny 
Nronp;o\en. 








A Rusliing Tea for new pros- 
pects. 



Pat Dunphy, Mary Pat Gibbon, 
Maureen O'Hara, Mary Anne 
Coyne. Gina Burke, Jonna Sayre. 



Patricia Dunphy President 

Maiueen O'Hara Vice-President 

Nancy Lyons Recording Secretary 

Joann Jurisic Corresponding Secretary 

Viro'inia Burke Treasurer 



Carol Koenig, Eileen Peifer, Joan CJensler. Mary Fran 
Jacobson, Maureen O'Hara, Laverne Jugehar, Mary Mc- 
Clatcbie. Louis Dulessandro. Nancy Fraser, Mary Pat Gib- 
bons. 




Kappa Beta Gamma is a national social 
soi'ority founded at Marquette in 1917. 
The Epsilon Chapter is located at Loyola 
University. 

When looking back over the past year, 
the Kappas have many pleasant memories. 
First, there ^vas the rushing, a vital part 
of every sorority. Throughout the year the 
date parties provided much fun, especially 
the Bermuda Short Party held on the cold- 
est night of the year. The Dinner Dance, 
the Spring Formal, the Mother-Daughter 
Day, the Sorority parties and picnics filled 
out the cro^vded social calendar. 

Undoubtedly, the highpoint of the year 
was the National Convention held at the 
Palmer House at \\hich the Loyola Chapter 
^vas hostess. The social events of the con- 
vention included a Reception Tea, a lunch- 
eon, a dance and a Communion Breakfast. 
Amidst all this activity there somehow re- 
mained enough time to schedule the all 
important business meetings. 

This is a year the actives of Kappa Beta 
Gamma can point to with pride and with 
pleasure, having the assurance that even 
greater thinos lie in the future. 



KAPPA 
BETA 

GAMMA 






Mary Ann Coyne, Terry Lesiak, Julie Bell, Betty Ann 
Petta. Arlene S|awin«ki. Pat Dunphy, Marcie Gould. \'ir- 
sinia Hurkc. Imn |niisec, Joan Cnmliiths. 




PI 

ALPHA 
LAMBDA 



Pi Alpha Lambda, ^vith seventy-nine 
members in its thirty second year, is pre- 
sently the largest social fraternity at Loy- 
ola. Under the guidance of its moderator, 
Dr. Paul Hinnmert, they follow their 
ideals of promoting Christian morals and 
high scholastic standards so as to foster the 
aims and interests of Loyola. 

The Pi Alphs have maintained many 
annual social and religions activities. Each 
year the members of the fraternity attend 
a closed retreat at Barrington. Illinois. 
Holy Week Services and a Family Com- 
munion Simday are among the other re- 
ligious activities ^vhich the fraternity spon- 
sors. 

Among its social activities, the fratern- 
ity features monthly closed parties for its 
members, formal dances and an open mix- 
er. 

Last December the fraternity sponsored 
the first Intercollegiate Dance in the 
schools's history, to which many Midwest- 
ern Colleges and Universities were invited. 
The affair proved to be a success and ^vill 
probably become an annual attraction. 

This Intercollegiate Dance and the Pi 
Alpha Lambda Yearbook are an indication 
that the fraternity is expanding in ideas as 
the University itself is expanding. 



Seated: Phil Moian. Ron Burton, Greg Langelots. Ray 
\'an De Walle, Mike Burke. Connie Rodgers. Marty Stan- 
ton. Frank Hogan, Bolj Brown. Standing: John Rupke, 
Bill Fogarty. Brian Van Vlierbergen, Dave Lynch. Jim 
Hannon. Bob Dougherty. Jerry Jacobsen, Ervie Lippe, 
ni(k Butler. Warren Rnsenow, Tonv Strak. 



/^ 




r\ 



r 









Bob Varallo, Tim Sch- 
neider, Tony Merges, Ben 
Brady, Jerry Boyle, Jerry 
Bohn, Xort Flanaajan. 




Ben Brady President 

Anthony Merges Vice-President 

Timothy Schneider Secretary 

Gerald Bohn Treasurer 

Geiald Boyle Pledgemaster 



Seated: Dick Wright. Gene Callahan, Tim Schneider, 
Tony Merges, Ben Brad), Jerry Boyle, Jerry Ben Bradv, 
Jerry Boyle, Jerry Bohn, Bob Varrallo, Nort Flanagan. 
Standing: Jack Lagershausen, Bill Laurie, Steve Mrvicka, 
Mike Ryan, Dave Burden, Dick Wainwright, Al Sebehar, 
Don Gerniata, Mike C.urran, Frank Smith. 








TAU 

DELTA 

PHI 



Tail Delta Phi, a national social fra- 
ternity founded in 1910 at New York, es- 
tablished Tan Eta Chapter at Loyola in 
1950. Although it contains the smallest 
membership of any of the fraternal organ- 
izations at Loyola, it proudly boasts some 
of the year's most outstanding accomplish- 
ments. 

The Tail Delts opened the school year 
with the first "Freshman W^elcoming 
Dance". This was followed by another mile- 
stone, the establishment of an annual Fac- 
ulty Cocktail Party". But the Tau Delts 
greatest accomplishment thus far has been 
the opening of the first and only under- 
graduate fraternity house at Loyola in a 
great many years. Their house not only 
pro\'ides a residence and meeting place 
but also has been the scene of many social 
events as: the "Treasure Hunt", the part- 
ies after the basketball games, the Home- 
coming Party, and the carbaret style Ne^v 
Years E.\e Party. 

Quoting the Loyola News, "Tau Delta 
Phi has established ^vhat may ^vell prove 
to be the biggest and most forward moving 
step since undergraduate fraternities \vere 
founded at Loyola. Through the initiative 
and ideals of these 18 men, a ne^\" con- 
cept of fraternal life has at last made its 
welcome appearance." 



62 




Howiird Jennings, E\cict l-llin, lUuion Siegel. Karl Dot- 
son, Ron Garofolo, Moit Mnltack, Bob Mrock. 



Icny Herr. Mr. Dion J. VVil- 
hcliiii. Moderator, Ed Walsh, 
l)a\e Smitli. Jerry Epstein. 



Edward J. Walsh Pi-esident 

Gerald V. Herr Vice-President 

Gerald Epstein Treasurer 

Morton Segall Secretary 

J. David Smith __, House Manager 



Loyola's o n 1 y undergraduate 
undergraduate Fraternity House. 





An informal Business Meeting 



Ronald P. Pawl President 

Curt J. Richter Vice-President 

Paul S. Cxerding Secretary 

Richard H. Cham bliss Treasurer 

Anthony F. Spina Pledgemaster 



Tony Sjjina. Beinie Dentzcr. 
Ron I'awl. Curt Richter. Marty 
Cr.r.\L-\. Paul Ccrtlin". 



Loyola's Epsilon Kappa Chapter oi Tau 
Kappa Epsilon national fraternity is in its 
first year on the campus. Formerly the Uni- 
versity Club, this organization ^vas initiated 
May 13, 1956 as the 132nd chapter of Tau 
Kappa Epsilon, one of the three largest so- 
cial fraternities in the coimtry. 

TKE has enjoyed a position in school 
affairs pre-eminent among many active or- 
ganizations at Loyola. They sponsored the 
first "'Ugly Mixer" and its corresponding 
"Ugly Man of the Year Contest", the first 
annual inter-fraternity greased pig contest, 
the first annual Coed Tea, and the tradi- 
tional University Club St. Patrick's Day 
Dance. This chapter has contributed to the 
support of all school functions. , 

It is the policy of the Tekes to promote 
new activities and enable its membei"S to 
enjoy a year-round social program ^vhich 
is carried on not only -(vithin the fraternity 
but in the social and scholastic extracur- 
ricular activities of Loyola as well. 



TAU 

KAPPA 

EPSILON 



Top: M. Conley. F. Baicy. r, Mustaii, T. Spina. R. Foil- 
man, G. Eckstein. D. liober, D. DeFiguredo. G. Lemplie. 
A. Schaid, G. Kollintzas. Middle: C. Ricluer. T. Strubble, 
T. Magan, J. I'arker. L. Brouzia. J. Dentzer. J. Klop. F. 
Lancaster, C. Loner. R. Pawl, R. Chambliss. M. Gora. 
Bottom: B. Dentzer, J. Stokes, J. Samist. S, Ltizbatek. F. 
Gorecki, R. Kulik, R. \\ ilkus. R. Dooley, J. Diebold, P. 
McCJiiire, P. Gerding. 



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O 



P p 



if 



V >r 



IV ^ 




Top: Pat Linnane, Lorraine Grandep, Sin: ktlh. Culetle 

Gorey, Fran Kanapak. Wanda Malezewski, Anne Leathers, 

Cathy Marik, Greata Olson, Connie Novak Mary Kate 

Daud. 

Middle: Cam Marschall, Nancy Sch\s'ind. Gay Lee Liihrs, 

Gloria Javan. Tessie Ce:mak. 

Front: Bobette Monisjlian. Lenore Stanke. 



THETA 

PHI 

ALPHA 



Theta Phi Alpha was founded in 1912 
on the campus of the University of Michi- 
gan at Ann Arbor under the guidance of 
Bishop Edward D. Kelly. The sorority was 
founded to advance the education, religious 
and social interests of its members. In 1951, 
the sorority was accepted into full member- 
ship of the National Panhellenic Confer- 
ence whose goals are the fiuthering of the 
ideals of sorority life among its member so- 
rorities. Upsilon Chapter was initiated at 
Loyola in March of 1942. 

Upsilon's moderator is Miss Mary Lou 
McPartlin, head of the Home Study De- 
part. Upsilon's Chaplain is Father Lester 
Evett, S. J. 

This year Thela Phi has won t^vo co^'et- 
ed a^vards. "Scene in Siam" ^vas a^varded 
the best organization act trophy at the An- 
ntial Arts and Commerce \^ariety Sho^v. 
The chapter also received a citation as the 
organization having tlie highest scholastic 
average at Loyola. 

Some of Thelas annual events include 
the Foreign Student Tea. the Thanksgiving 
Day Food Drive and the "White Rose Ball. 




Standing: Joan Stines. Idni shia. I mv R().li;^■l^, |n(l\ Wnll 
gram. Mary Lou Shriver. 

Seated Lucille Ferrara, Barbara Lindhulni, Joanne Krop. 
Sheila Sullivan, Lmily Malezzi. 



Carolyn Marschall President 

Barbara Lindholm Vice-President 

Mary Kate Doud Corresponding 

Secretary 

Collette Gorey Recording Secretary 

Catherine Marik -^ Treasurer 



Standing; Colette Gorey, Judith 
Hammer. Mary Kate Daud. 
Seated: Cam Marschall, Barbara 
Lindholm. Cathy Marik, Greta 
Olson. 





SIGMA 

PI 

ALPHA 



Sigma Pi Alpha is an undeigraduate so- 
cial fraternity, which was founded in 1932 
by Louis Potempa. At that time its mem- 
bership was restricted to men of Polish ex- 
traction; ho-^vever, in 1948 Sigma Pi Alpha 
removed this restriction and offered mem- 
bership to all qtialifying male students. 

This fraternity sponsors a variety of 
events. Each year the members assemble 
for a closed retreat and later in the year, on 
Memorial Day, they offer a Mass for their 
deceased alumni. 

On the social side. Sigma Pi Alpha pre- 
sents stich affairs as a dinner-dance, mixer, 
parties and smokers. Its most celebrated 
event is its off-campus Spring Nocturn 
Dance. This welcomed occasion is high- 
lighted by the presentation of the "Frater- 
ni Man of the ^'ear" award to Loyola's out- 
standing student fraternity leader. 




Officers and Committee Heads: Seated: Joseph 
Murphy, President; James Del Giorno. Vice- 
President; Thomas Hynes, Pledge Master. 
Second Row: Leo Finiey, Jr.. Gerald Tarsitano, 
Jolni Saletta. John KoUer. 

Tiiird Row: Don Pro%enzale, Thomas Quinlan, 
Robert Donohue. 
Back Row: Bill Egan. 



llie Coed Club is the largest ^vomen's 
organization at Loyola. Its membership in- 
cludes women from the Colleges of Arts 
and Sciences, Nursing and Commerce. 
This Club serves the University through 
its many ftuictions as the Freshman Wel- 
come Tea and the Senior Farewell Banquet 
which are open to all University women. 

In the fall ,the Coed Club sponsors a 
card party and fashion show, organized by 
the members to finance the activities for 
the remainder of the year. Following this 
was the highlight of the year — the Christ- 
mas Formal. 

In the spring, the officers of -the Club 
are elected. Together ^vith the moderator, 
Miss Mariette LeBlanc, they form the 
Board of Governors. 

For the past several years, the most otit- 
standing feature of the Club has been the 
"Big Sister" plan. This plan aids women 
students in adjusting to college life. 




Mill) Whalcn. SecicUiiv; M:ii\ I'at (.ih- 
bons, Ticasuier; Miss LeBlanc, Mod- 
erator; Greta Olson. Vice-President; 
i^at McGrady. President. 



COED 
CLUB 



Officers and mfmliers of the Coed C;hd) at one of tlieir 
meetings. 



r 



MARKETING CLUB 



The Marketing Club's activities this 
year have included periodic meetings ^vith 
speakers ■^vho are experts in the field of 
Marketing, field trips to locations of inter- 
est, and "Kaffe Klatches " ^siiere the mem- 
bers of the faculty and the Marketing Club 
meet to discuss their problems. Through 
these activities the Marketing Cltib pro- 
\'ides its members with the exceptional op- 
portunity for personal contacts ^vith other 
in(li\iduals engaged in similar study of 
marketing problems. The guest speakers 
actjuaint the members with the current 
ideas and needs of marketing and give them 
a concept of their future in a marketing 
career. 

To enable its members to learn the 
function of marketing processed in produc- 
tion, distribution, and promotion, the Mar- 
keting Club arranges field trips to firms en- 
oaofed in one or more marketing: activities. 



These field trips also stimulate the interest 
of members by gi\ing them the opportun- 
ity to see marketing functions in actual 
operation. 

During the past year, the Marketing 
Club with the aid of Dr. Kenneth B. Haas, 
Chairman of the Department of Market- 
ing, sponsored its "Kaffe Klatch ". This was 
a splendid opportunity for the members 
and the faculty to meet over a cup of cof- 
fee and discuss their problems and ideas in 
regard to the Marketing Department and 
marketing in general. 

Through its affiliation \\'ith the Amer- 
ican Marketing Association, the club en- 
deavors to acquaint its members further 
^\•ith current happenings in the field. Each 
member receives the official publication of 
the association, the '"Marketing Newslet- 
ter". 



^[embers of the Marketing Club assemble to discuss the 
])i)ssil)iHty of a field trip. 





Olficers <][ llic I'lofessioiial CUiI)s 
discuss sdiiic of llicir comnion 
prclileins. 




Donald Colfer. Corresponding 
Secretary; William Hayes, Vice- 
President; Chester Wriglit. 
Treasurer; Connie Novak. Pub- 
licity Chairman; Mary Lou 
Shriver. Recording Secretary. 
Seated: Ricliard Spillane, Presi- 
dent. 



Dr. Seymour Banks speaks to the Marketing Club on some cur- 
rent marketing prol^lems. 





1 



Accounting Cl'.ii) nunihcis listen ti) a talk iin the leciuire- 
ments and c)i>|>!i! tnnilics in Accounting'. 



ACCOUNTING 
CLUB 



Hank Blazej. Ticastner: Tom Nol- 
an, Conniicice Cotnicil Representa- 
tive; Charles Sexlon, President. 




The Loyola University Accounting 
Club was founded in 1949 and since that 
time has broadened both the scope and 
quality of its activities to appeal to each 
student of accounting. 

The Accounting Club is very acti\'e 
through the academic year and is dedicated 
to accjuainting the students of accounting 
with the practical application of accounting 
principles. The seventy members compris- 
ing the club have heard speakers on the 
follo^ving subjects: Airline Accounting. In- 
dustrial Accounting and the path to an exe- 
cutive position, the GAO, Air Force Audit- 
tin, and the Electronic Computer. 

In No\'ember, the senior members of 
the club enjoyed a very informative tour 
through the Chicago offices of Ernest & 
Ernest, a large national public accounting 
firm. 



ECONOMICS 

FINANCE 

CLUB 



^^^kLiM& 


-pn 


K 


1— ?! 


HB 


Ij^LUn^^i. ^ 



Staiuliiig. [cii\ Rimd.iii. I'lLsidunt; Ijl 
Dillman. Vice-I'iesidcnt; Dick N'agle, 
Treasurev; Steve Strempski. Secretary. 
Seated: Dr. Tlieodcsi A. Mogilnitsky. 
Chairman of Kcoiioiiiics — Finance De- 
pai tmeirt; 



W^iih the rcHMganizaiion ol ihc Eco- 
nomics Society in 1946, and the merger 
with the Finance Department in 1956, The 
Economics — Finance Club has grown 
al9ng with the tremendous advances made 
by Loyola University. This cltib is affiliat- 
ed with the National .\merican Finance 
Association and lias obtainetl national re- 
cognition. 

Dr. Sylvester M. Frizol serves as faculty 
moderator for this cltib. 

Disctissions on the present socio-eco- 
nomic evils and practical business problems 
were presented by the club to further the 
advancement of the students in their major 
fields of concentration. 

This year, the activities of the cIlUj ha\e 
been greatlv expanded. Field trips and 
guest speakers, including a series of lec- 
tures, were pro\'ided for the benefit of all 
commerce students. These activities have 
led to a better trnderstanding of the prob- 
lems in the fields of Economics and Fi- 
nance. 



Tile Economics 
year. 




Finance C^lub mcndjcrs discnss plans for the comini 




Ed«ai(l Cl.iMii IiL.is\nei; Odiiaia Lip- 
kin \ ite-l'iLMilent. Ro\ Lynch, Presi- 
dent, Donald Dolniak Conesponding 
Secietai>. James Lusbem. Recording 
Secietan 



MANAGEMENT CLUB 



The Society for Achancement of Man- 
agement, the recognized national profes- 
sional organization of management in in- 
dustry, commerce, government and educa- 
tion, and the pioneer in management phi- 
losophy has been dedicated to the promo- 
tion and advancement of the art and sci- 
ence of management ever since the original 
Taylor Society was established in 1912. 

This year has been a partciularly good 
one for the Loyola Chapter of SAM. In ad- 
dition to having had several top ranking 
business men from the Chicago area speak 
before the group, they have toured many 
of the large industrial plants in the Middle 
West. 

The program of the Lo)ola Chapter has 
been developed to ftunher the growth of 
all students of their academic major by 
stimtilating their thinking and ■widening 
their knowledge. If the past can be taken as 
being indicative of ■ivhat is yet to come, 
next year will be truly otustanding. 



SAM business meetings jsroxide the memliers willi the chance ol: dis- 
cussino pnililems, policies and iiicihnds nl iTidnstr\ and management. 





Joe Donnelh Iieasuiu M ,i i Sulln ...i. I'km.Ic iii. |u.!v W nlloram. Sec- 
letai). Sue Sheiicldii Sccietai^, Sue Cliomctli, Sccictai\; Culette Gorey, 
Secietai), Pat Culhane Retiung Union Representative: \Va\ne Lowe, 
Union Repiesentative 



The Historical Society is the largest 
undergraduate organization at Loyola. 
Membership is open to both the Commerce 
and Arts Colleges. Under the able direction 
of its moderator, Dr. Kenneth Jackson, the 
society has grown both in size and prestige. 

Most prominent of the organization's 
many activities during the school year ^vere 
the excellent speeches given by various 
public figures. The Society heard such dis- 
tinguished persons as Father Harold Rig- 
ney. Senator Everett Dirksen, and Dr. 
Walter Johnson of the University of Chi- 
cago. In sponsoring these programs, the So- 
ciety considered not only the interests of 
stuclents of history, but the interests of all 
students. 

Because of the Hungarian crisis, the So- 
ciety also sponsored a Hungarian Folk 
Dance and donated the profits to the Hun- 
a:arian Relief Fund. 



HISTORICAL 
SOCIETY 




Dancers entertain the large 
group at the Society's Christmas 
Program. 




Officers: Mary Ella Greayhegan. 
Mary Hereley. Dr. Frank Cizon. 
Moderator, Mary Jane Bieszczat, 
Joseph Donnelly, Nancy Pannier, 
Barbara Loutz. 



HUMAN 

RELATIONS 

CLUB 



The Human Relations Club, formally 
organized in June, 1956, has conducted a 
series of programs dealing \s'ith Trumbull 
Park, narcotics, labor-management, and 
juvenile deliquency. 

Although organized under the sponsor- 
ship of the Sociology Department, its mem- 
bership is open to all students interested in 
analyzing and understanding the society in 
^vhich he lives. Its programs are compre- 
hensive and Tvell rotmcled in keeping ^vith 
this goal. 

This Club sponsored discussions by 
such persons as Mr. Saadat Hasan, head of 
the Arab Information Center: Mr. Frank 
Mitchell, head of the British Information 
Btneati: Mr. Isaac Daniel Urra, Vice-Con- 
sulate of Israel; Mr. Lloyd Davis, director 
of the Catholic Interracial Coiuicil of Chi- 
cago; and Fr. J. B. Gremillian, pastor of St. 
Joseph's Parish in Shreveport, Louisiana. 
In addition, the Club ^\'as represented by 
an act in the Variety Show. 



Human Rclalions C:hib members and guests pictured at a 
recent speaker's meeting. 





1 lie MdiKioraiii (liib incmlicis discuss phins lui thcii 
annual All-Sptuls Iia!K|uet. 



The Monogram Club at its annual 
Communion Breakfast held at the Loyola 
Hall initiated fifteen new members. This 
no^v brings the number of "L" ^vinners to 
the total of thirty. 

Again this year the Monogram Club 
sponsored their annual All-Sports Banquet 
^vhich was held in the Dormitory Hall. At 
this Banquet, Varsity Letters and Fresh- 
man Numerals ^vere given in basketball, 
track, swimming and golf. These a^vards 
were presented by the respective coaches. 

The officers have provided the leader- 
ship which has been responsible for the suc- 
cess of the Club Bob Varallo serves as 
President, Bob Saddler as Vice-President 
and Bob Walsh as the Secretary-Treasurer. 
Rev. Cletus artmann, S. J., the University 
Athletic Director, serves as Moderator for 
the Monogram Club. 



MONOGRAM 
CLUB 



SODALITY 




l-.iiliti Hcigan; lather Garvey; 
Eileen Peifer. C.o-I'refect; James 
Dempsey, Prefect. 



The Sodality at Loyola is a religious 
body aiming at fostering in its members an 
ardent devotion, reverence, and filial lo\e 
toward the Blessed Virgin Mary. Through 
this devotion its members are sincerely 
bent on sanctifying themselves and their 
neighbors, and in defending the Church of 
Jesus Christ. 

Some of the main acti\'ities of the So- 
dality are the meetings held every Friday 
after Mass in Room 201 of Le^vis To^vers 
and the monthly Sunday meetings. These 
meetings, open to the entire student body, 
provide the opportunity for partaking in 
discussions and hearing talks intended to 
increase devotion to our Blessed Mother 
and her Son. 

ThroughotU the school year, the Sodali- 
ty office. Room 319, is open for Sodalists to 
spend their free time or to consult •(vith 
Father Hogan. Another feature of Room 
319 is the Curbstone Confessional. 

Rev. Joseph Hogan, S. J., is the student 
Counselor and moderator of the Sodality at 
Le^vis Towers. He also holds the rank of 
Lieutenant Colonel in the Army Reserve 
and serves as the Chaplain for Loyola's 
R.O.T.C. Unit. 




Father Houan chat.s with suiiie o£ the sttidents in the Sodality Office 



The Army Reserve Otlicers' rraining 
Corps, brought lo Loyola in 1948, has 
steadily grown, and is presently the second 
largest Senior ROTC Unit in the State of 
Illinois. 

The primary pmpose of the ROTC is 
to produce commissioned officers for the 
Organized Reserve Corps. The Reserve Of- 
ficers' Training Corps provides the train- 
ing which enables Loyola's gi'aduates to 
take their rightful place in the delense of 
their country. This cotu^se affords a prac- 
tical laboratory where students learn to re- 
ceive and to give orders, to organize, to co- 
operate, to handle men, and to make deci- 
sions. This training develops these basic 
personal ciualificalions which are as essen- 
tial in peace as in actual war. 

Sinnmer Camp is the concentrated lab- 
oratory course in military science and tac- 
tics ^vhich usually follows completion of 
the first year of the advanced course. 
Marches, bivouacs, map problems, demon- 
strations, and use of bayonets, rifles, tanks, 
mortars and machine guns are among the 
various types of training. 

Thus, the ROTC Training provides its 
graduates with the broad education neces- 
sary for them to take their place as leaders 
in the community, in the service of their 
country, and in civilian life. 



RESERVE 

OFFICERS 

TRAINING 

CORPS 



Lt. Col. McCrorey instructs a squad on picci 



The ROTC Company practices drilling in preparation 
for the President's review and the Federal Inspection. 




Gold loicli Officers: Standing: 
Joseph Slianfeldt. Ticket Man- 
ager; Norman Krull. Secretary; 
Edward Dillmann. Steward; Wil- 
liam Waters. Sargent-at-Arms; 
Jeremiah Riordan, Treasurer. 
Sealed: Richard Ripoli, Vice- 
President; Lt. Col. McCrorey, 
Moderator; Dick Spillane, Presi- 
dent. 




Tlie Loyola I'nixcrsity Drill 
Team ])ractices precision drill- 



Fti^^* 



\\ % ; '^ 



^^ff *^ \, 




^1^ 



ifl 



Dick Spillane. Piesident of ihc Gold Touh Cluh, outlines pl.ins foi 
the Military Ball at a icnid.ii ]lu^^da\ alteinoon meeting 



. - HIT 









THE GOLD TORCH CLUB 



The Gold Torch military-social Club, 
moved for^vard this year by taking extra- 
curricular R.O.T.C. groups into its or- 
ganization such as the Drill Team and the 
Rifle Team. 

Highpoint of the Gold Torch's activi- 
ties this year was the annual Military Ball 
held on February 22nd in the Grand Ball- 
room of the Shoreland Hotel. Music was 
provided by Johnny Gilbert and his band. 

In a queenship contest held in connect- 
ion with this Ball. Miss Mary Rohner. a 
student of Mtmdelein College, was crown- 
ed Queen. Miss Rohner received the rank 
of honorary Colonel in the Corps. She ^vas 



escorted by Cadet Colonel Ronald Pawl, 
Student Commander of Loyola's R.O.T.C. 
Regiment. 

Among the dignitaries present at the 
Ball this year ^vere the Very Rev. James 
F. Maguire, S. J., president of Loyola Uni- 
versity, and Brig. General Hiram D. Ives, 
Chief of the Illinois Military District. 

Late in the year, a ne^v constittition for 
the organization ^vas dra^vn up and rati- 
fied. The internal structure ^vas changed 
to accommodate the club's gi^owth and 
more meetings of the entire membership 
^vere planned for next year. 



The P.iflc Te?in: Top: R. Croisant. R. Atein- 
ers, Captain, D. Veverka, F. ^Vagner. 
Bottom: W. Benard. R. Kehoe. T. Tarpey, 
]. CV-.iw. J. ^Vlcll. 



"W 



vm 



The Heavy \\'eapons Team: Standing: Robert 
Bart, Edward Engle, David Harmon. Kneeling: 
David Lynch, Donald \'everka. Commanding 
Officer, Carmen Speranga. 




TOWERS 
STAFF 




Dick Lisk ami Bolj Lear work on the layout of 
a page. 








Ed \Valsh and Da\e Smitli check copy for the year- Mike Ryan and Joe Zaliaitas look over the pro- 

lidok. diictioir schetiiile. 

Editor-in-Chief Bob Leav 

Coordinating Editor Dick Lisk 

Promotion George LaBuda 

Advisory Editor Jim Sebesta 

Finance Charley Sexton 

Hank Grannan Tom Nolan 

Bob Dougherty Frank Pa^vlo 

John Lenart 
Production Editor Ed Walsh 

Bob Bracken, Alt Tom Split, Sports 

Roque Anderson, Art Joe Zaliaitas 

Dave Smith, Seniors Mike Ryan 

Jerry Herr, Captions 

82 



The 1957 TOWERS is the fourth of 
a series oi yearbooks published by the Com- 
merce Council for the students ol the Col- 
lege of Commerce. It is a publication for 
the students, produced by the students. A 
Commerce yearbook has become a tradi- 
tion and is an example of the initiative and 
the leadership of the students of the Col- 
lege of Commerce. 

The staff of this year's yearbook has 
been very fortunate for they ^vere able to 
benefit from the experience of the last 
three yearbooks. Using this experience, we 
have attempted to make tliis the best year- 
book yet. 

Some of the main changes this year 
^vere: the changing of the underclass mug- 
pictures to informal group pictures taken 
at various locations at Lewis Towers. An- 
other big change ^vas in the layout of tliis 
publication. The various organizations 
^vere given more space and pictures ^vere 



taken on a more informal basis. All in 
all, it was the purpose of this book to show 
this year's activities in an informal way. 

Listed on these t^vo pages are the peo- 
ple ,who produced this 1957 TOWERS. 
It was through their time and effort that 
we ■were able to provide the Commerce 
College, and you the students of that Col- 
lege, with this yearbook. To this staff we 
extend our thanks for having spent long 
and tedious hours in compiling this book. 
We hope that their efforts ^s'ill ser\'e as the 
basis for further achievements in produc- 
ing future yearbooks. 

This yearbook was a hard job, but the 
staff feels tlrat the personal satisfaction de- 
ri\'ed from such an endeavor is a sufficient 
reward for their efforts. We sincerely hope 
that the efforts of all the people concerned 
has helped to make 1957 a memorable year 
for the students of the College of Com- 
merce. 



The TO^VERS Staff: Dick Wright, Arleiie Slawinski, Cicorge La Biida. Gina 
Burke, Dick Lisk, Honore Zenk. Harry I'lemgeii. Bob Dougherty. 





Alt ^IcZier of Loyola holds tight to ball in a scramble 
against Aviniiina Oklahoma y\&jM in Stadimn game. 



H>«*^ 




/, 



B>p0rts 




I'aul Rnickcr. Guard 



Paul Sheecly, Guard 



Jim DeWull, Center 



\ii \It/it,. I. 



Loyola s cage leani finished out tlie 
season Avith four consecutive ^vins to give 
tlie Ramblers their best season in five years 
with a record of 14 wins and 10 losses. 

These victories at the close of the year 
lifted the team from a five-game losing 
streak and lead to a new scoring record, 
\shich ^vas accomplished in the season's 
finale against John Carroll. 

In the final analysis Loyola defeated 
some teams ^vhich they did not figure to 
beat and lost games to teams which seemed 
to be easy prey for Coach Ireland's five. 
The fact that the Ramblers ^vere able to 
rise to the occasion against such teams as 
Santa Clara, Marquette, Omaha, and Wash- 
ington is due to hustle and spirit that was 
exhibited by the inexperienced but game 
Loyolans. 

Alumni Gym was the site of 10 of the 
^•ictories. The Ramblers ^vere able to ^\'in 
only two out of six at the Staditim and 
two out of eight on the road. 

The highlight of the season ^s'as the 
double defeat of Marquette, Loyola's tra- 
ditional rival. Marquette meet the Rambl- 
ers at Mihs^aukee Arena and fell before 
the high-spirited, hustling Chicagoans in 
a bitterly contested battle. 



LOYOLA 
RAMBLERS 




The second meeling was played 
at the Stadium and found Loyola 
trailing at the intermission, only to 
bounce back and hand the Warriors 
their second defeat o£ the season 
at the hands of Loyola. 

Loyola scored a total of 1788 
points for a 74.5 average while the 
opponents averaged 73.4 points in 
24 contests. The Ramblers' field 
goal percentage was 36.1 per cent, 
compared to 37.3 per cent for its 
opponents. From the free throw line 
Loyola outdealt the opposition with 
a 67.6 percentage to 66.4 per cent 
for the opposing teams. In the re- 
bound department the Ramblers 
pilfered 721 offensively and 836 on 
the defensive boards for a total of 
1557 or an average of 42.4 rebounds 
per game. 

Loyola ovushot its opponents 
from the floor in 1 3 of the 24 games 
and split even in free thro^v shoot- 
ing. The Maroon and Gold led their 
opponents at half time and went 
on to win in 12 of the games as 
compared to no losses after holding 
the lead at the intermission. 

Paul Krucker led the team in 
scoring with 377 points for a 15.7 
average. Krucker's 83.5 per cent on 
the free throw line was tops for the 
team and among the top t^venty in 
the nation in this department. 




Jtrank Gretkouski (5) of St. Atichaels 
and Art McZier (20) of Loyola fight 
for rebound as Lovola's Jim DcWulf 
and Paul Sheedy (11) «aith. 



Al \or\ille. Forward 



Ron Reals. Forward 



Ray Stopa, Center 



Mrk\icka. Center 





Loyola 


77 


Loyola 


94 


Loyola 


88 


Loyola 


48 


Loyola 


76 


Loyola 


72 


Loyola 


89 


Loyola 


61 


Loyola 


71 


Loyola 


57 


Loyola 


71 


Loyola 


62 


Loyola 


86 


Loyola 


76 


Loyola 


69 


Loyola 


58 


Loyola 


63 


Loyola 


75 


Loyola 


64 


Loyola 


65 


Loyola 


91 


Loyola 


81 


Loyola 


88 


Loyola 


106 



Ripon 58 

North Dakota St. 61 

Kalamazoo 57 

San Francisco 67 

Santa Clara 67 

Los Angeles St. 58 

North Dakota St. 72 

Minnesota 84 

Drake 78 

Weatern Michigan 55 

Marquette 69 

Kentticky 81 

St. Michael's 75 

Notre Dame 90 

Washington 50 

Oklahoma A R: M 68 

Providence 85 

Bowling Green 83 

Notre Dame 96 
Kentucky 115 

Omaha 69 

Marquette 79 

Western Michigan 66 

John Carroll " 80 



Jiilin O'Brien, Forward 



Frank Hooan. Guard 





Jim DeW'ulf tips Ijall to awaiting Art McZier as 
second half of play begins in game against Ken- 
tucky. 



Bob Vaiallo. Manager 




PLAYER G FGA FG % FTA FT fc PF PTS AV 

Krucker 24 362 130 38.6 110 117 83.5 53 377 15. 

Norville 24 361 92 35.2 103 70 67.8 69 254 10. 

Sheedy 24 244 84 34.4 136 78 57.3 57 246 10. 

McZier 24 246 75 30.4 107 74 63.5 55 224 9. 

DeAVulf 24 151 61 40.3 95 77 81.1 78 199 8. 

Beals 24 191 71 37.1 86 52 60.5 30 194 8. 

O'Brien 23 82 46 56.1 23 12 52.2 18 104 4. 

Hogan 24 .34 13 38.2 31 20 64.5 15 46 1. 

Stopa 17 36 10 27.8 23 14 60.9 20 34 2. 

Mrkvicka 13 29 13 44.8 13 4 30.8 15 30 2. 



REBS 


7 


169 


5 


239 


9 


157 


3 


325 


9 


290 





123 


5 


77 


9 


38 





44 


3 


32 



89 




FRESHMAN 
BASKETBAL 
TEAM 



In.iu R..U K..11 SiliHiiit;eii \i DcuLirheii, lljll ILul^Ikiu 1 <I \liMn Tom O'Connoi Back 
Rnw Leii Williams GieE> (.iittin |im t.oim.m Bob Muellt: Mike McCann Bill Sha\, Coach 



Jeannie Krug, Mai\ Kav Ball. Josie "^Vall. Rita Hoi an. ^ral■cia 
Dopke, Marianne I.unn. F.iken Peifer. Captain. 



LOYOLA'S 
CHEER- 
LEADERS 





Don Veverka and Bnh 
Bielinski are swimming in 
the 200 yard backstroke. 



SWIMMING 
TEAM 



The s^vimming team for the 1956-57 
season was a team which was of very high 
quality but of very low quantity. In the 
final count the swimming team had only 
15 members. 

The teams record for the year was, 4-9, 
which is far below their usual successful 
season. The reason that the team was on 
the losing end of a number of matches \vas 
that they were only strong in two events, 
breaststroke and free style. 

Led by Co-Captains Ray VanDeWallc, 
Don Veverka and Bob Walsh, the team 
lost a number of close meets and yet de- 
feated some of the top teams in the s\vim- 
ming circuit. 

One accomplishment was that Jtmior 
breast stroker Ray Van De\Valle u'as in- 
vited to swim in the NCAA National comp- 
etition in North Carolina. 




Bob Walsh, team co-captain, 
about to take the plungs. 




Two mile relay team: Lou Kujawinski, Bob Saddler, Brian Shutts, 
Mike Burke. 



One of the hardest ^vorking teams at 
Loyola is the Track Team. They are ample 
proof that hard work pays off for they 
have had a very successful season. 

In the Central AAU Meet Loyola was 
^'ery successful. Lou Kujawinski paced the 
Ramblers in ^vinning the 1000 yard race. 

The mile relay team, of whom Loyola 
has been very proud in the last few years, 
has had some bad breaks. In the Daily 
Ne-^v's Relays the team was disqualified be- 
cause of miscalctilations in passing the ba- 
ton. This years mile relay team was com- 
posed of Co-Captains Pete Wall and Bob 
Saddler, Dick Lahart and Jack Kiley. Dur- 
ing the season the team set two new rec- 
ords but were seriously handicapped when 
Mike Burke iniured his ankle. 



TRACK 
TEAM 



Doll (.ritfith clears hurdle and 
is on his wav lo the finish line. 




The loss of Burke will leave Jerry Wie- 
land, track coach, "svithout the use of a 
fourth man for the mile relay squad. Thus 
Wieland will be hoping that Burke ■will 
be ready to go when the oiudoor season 
opens. 

Probably the best performance of the 
year ^vas in the Cleveland Knights of 
Columbus Meet in ^vhich the Harriers 
finished second to some of the track world's 
toughest competition. 

The outdoor season opens late in April 
against Bradley. Coach Wieland's high op- 
timism in Saddler and Kujawinski and 
hopes that next years team, boasted by un- 
derclassmen, will be a tough team to defeat. 








t-.'^X^. 



Saddler leads in the nve. mile rcla 



Brian Sliutts crosses finish line just ahead of Pat Hudgins 



93 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 



CHARLES P. ANDORFER 

Accounting 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 2,3,4, 
Secretary 2, Vice-President 3, 
President 4; Blue Key National 
Honor Fraternity 3,4, Secretary- 
Treasurer 4; Gold Torch Club 1, 
2.3; Intramurals 2,3,4; Leadership 
Award 3; ROTC American Le- 
gion IVledal; Veterans of Foreign 
Wars IVIedal 2; Military Order of 
World Wars IVIedal 3. 

JOHN F. BELLUSO 

Finance 

Society for the Advancement of 
Management 3; Economics and 
Finance Society 2,3,4; Marketing 
Club 4. 

GERALD S. BOHN 

Management 

Pi Alpha Lambda Fraternity 2,3, 
4. Treasurer 4; Society for tlie 
Advancement of Management 4; 
Intramurals 2,3,4. 

JOHN F. BREFELD 

Accounting 

Accounting Club 2,3,4; Society for 

the Advancement of Management 

3. 

JOSEPH V. BUGOS 

Marketing 
Marketing Club 3,4. 

PATRICK H. CARR 

Marketing 
Marketing Club 3,4. 

DONALD L. GOLFER 

Marketing 

Marketing Club 3,4; Society for 

the Advancement of Management 

4. 

JOHN A. COMISKEY 

Marketing 
Marketing Club 4. 

DENIS J. CONLON 

Economics 

Economics and Finance Society 
3,4; Society for tlie Advancement 
of Management 3.4. 

GERALD F. CUNY 

Accounting 
Accounting Club 3,4. 

JOHN P. DEASEY 

Marketing 

Marketing Club 3,4; Secretary 4. 

MARILYN A. DERWENT 

Accounting 

Accounting Club 3,4; Historical 
Society 2; Loyola Scholarship 
Award 1. 

EDWARD B. DILLMAN 
Finance 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 1,2,3,4; 
Alumni Secretary 4; Economics 
and Finance Society 3,4, Vice- 
president 4; Gold Torch club 2,3, 
4. 



DONALD R. DOLNIAK 

Management 

Gold Torch 3; Society for the Ad- 
vancement of Management 3,4. 

ELEONER A. DOMBROWSKI 

Accounting 

Kappa Beta Gainma Sorority 3,4; 
Coed Club 2,3; Accounting Club 
3,4, Secretary 4; Loyola Scholar- 
sliip Award 3. 

MICHAEL H. EISCHEN 

Accounting 

Accounting 2,3,4; Veterans Club 

4. 

ELMER H. EISENBERG 

Accounting 

Society for the Advancement of 

Management 3,4; Accounting Club 

3,4. 

CHARLES F. ENGEL 

Marketing 

Marketing Club 3,4; Human Re- 
lations Club 4; Intramurals 3,4. 

SR. ST. EUGENE OF ROME S.M. 

Accounting 
Accounting Club 3,4. 

PATRICK M. FINNEGAN 

Finance 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 1,2,3,4; 
Economics and Finance Society 
3,4; Senior Gift Committee 4. 

WILLIAM W. FRITTS 

Marketing 

Historical Society 3; Society for 

the Advancement of Management 

3. 

RONALD J. GAROFALO 

Management 

Tau Delta Phi Fraternity 4; So- 
ciety for the Advancement of 
Management 3,4; Lewis Towers 
Sodality 4. 

THOMAS M. GARVIN 

Accounting 
Accounting Club 3,4. 

THOMAS H. GEIER 

Marketing 
Marketing Club 3,4. 

EDMUND G. GERULES 

Marketing 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 3,4; 

Marketing Club 3,4; Intramurals 

3.4. 

RAIMUND G. GERULES 

Marketing 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 3,4; 
Marketing Club 4; Historical So- 
ciety 4; Intramurals 4. 

ROBERT J. GICZEWSKI 

Management 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 4; So- 
ciety for Advanceinent of Man- 
agement 4; Economics and Fi- 
nance Society 4. 



EDWARD M. GLAVIN 

Management 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 3,4; 
Society for the Advancement of 
Management 3,4, Treasurer 4; 
Lewis Towers Sodality 2,3,4. 
RICHARD W. HALL 
Marketing 
Marketing Club 1. 
STEPHEN P. HART 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 3,4; Intramurals 
3. 

WILLIAM G. HAYES 
Marketing 

Alpha Kappa Psi Fraternity 3,4; 
Marketing Club 3,4, Vice Presi- 
dent 4; Loyola Union Congress- 
inan 3,4; Intramurals 1,2,3,4. 
FRED R. HERMES 
Accounting 
Veteran's Club 4. 
PATRICK J. HUGHES 
Accounting 
Accounting Club 3,4. 
FRANK X. HUSS 
Accounting 
Accounting Club 3,4. 
JAMES C. JACKSACK 
Marketing 

Alpha Kappa Psi Fraternity; 
Marketing Club 3,4; Society for 
the Advancement of Management 
2,3; Sodality 1; Legion De Fusil- 
iers Finance Officer 2. 
RALPH H. JAMES 
Marketing 

Historical Society 4; Marketing 
Club 4. 

JESSE P. JENDRZEJEWSKI 
Manageinent 

Alpha Kappa Psi Fraternity 3,4; 
Society for the Advancement of 
Management 3,4; Intramurals 1,2. 
THOMAS D. KAKUSKA 
Accounting 
Accounting Club 3,4. 
RICHARD J. KAPOLNEK 
Accounting 
Accounting Club 3.4. 
TIMOTHY J. KAVANAUGH 
Accounting 

Accounting Club 3,4; Intramurals 
4. 

THOMAS F. KELLY, JR. 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 3,4; Gold Torch 
Club 3. 

THOMAS J. KELLY 
Accounting 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 3,4, 
Vice-President 4; Accounting 3,4; 
Intramurals 1.2,3,4. 
JOHN J. KEOGH 
Economics 

Gold Torch Club 3,4; Economics- 
Finance Society 4; Intramurals 3, 
4. 





AROUND 






OUR 


V 
E 






R 


C 




T 


A 




I 


M 




C 


P 




A 


U 




L 


s 




THOMAS M. KERN 

Economics 

Economics and Finance Society 
3,4; Society for tiie Advancement 
of Management 4; Veterans Club 
4. 

ROBERT E. KLAMERUS 
Accounting 

SARKIS KRIKORIAN 
Management 

Society for tlie Advancement of 
Management 3,4. 
NORMAN J. KRULL 
Accounting 

Alplia Delta Gamma Fraternity 
1,2,3,4; Gold Torch Club 3,4, Sec- 
retary 4; Accounting Club 3,4; 
Intrainurals 1,2. 
GEORGE F. LaBUDA 
Marketing 

Alpha Kappa Psi Fraternity 3,4, 
Assistant Pledge Master 3,4, In- 
terfraternity Council Representa- 
tive 3,4; Marketing Club 3,4„ 
Steward 4; Historical Society 3,4; 
Senior Gift Committee 4; Variety 
Show Publicity Chairman 4; Tow- 
ers Staff 4, Promotion Editor 4; 
Class Secretary - Treasurer 4; 
Commerce Council 4; Loyola Un- 
ion Congressman 3,4; Loyola Fair 
Dance Chairman 4; Intramurals 
1,2,3,4; Loyola Leadership Award 
4. 

WILLIAM C. LAURIE 
Marketing 

Pi Alpha Lambda Fraternity; 
Monogram Club 1,2,3,4; Market- 
ing Club 3,4; Track Team 1,2,3,4. 
ROBERT M. LEAR 
Marketing 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 2,3,4; 
Blue Key National Honor Frater- 
nity 4; Curtain Guild 2,3,4, Pub- 
licity Director 3,4; Marketing 
Club 3,4; Fine Arts Club 4; Gold 
Torch Club 2,3,4; Sodahty, Lewis 
Towers 1,2; Senior Gift Commit- 
tee 4; Towers Staff 4, Editor-in- 
Chief 4; Loyola Union Congress- 
man 4; ROTC Rifle Team 2,3,4; 
Intramurals 2,3,4; Leadership 
Award 4. 
DAVID C. LEIS 
Marketing 
Marketmg Club 3,4. 
WILLIAM M. LOMBARDI 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 3,4; Loyola Fair 
Committee 4; Intramurals 1,2,3,4. 
FRANKLIN G. LOVERSKY, JR. 
Accounting 
Accounting Club 3,4. 
JAMES LUECK 
Accounting 
Accounting Club 3,4. 

ROY B. LYNCH 

Management 

Society for Advancement of Man- 
agement 3,4, President 4; His- 
torical Society 4. 

RICHARD A. RIPOLI 

Marketing 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 1,2,3,4; 



Marketing Club 3,4; Loyola Un- 
ion Congressman 2,3. 
SYLVESTER J. MADURA 
Accounting 

Accounting Club 3,4; Basketball 
Team Statistician 3,4. 
SALVATORE D. MALPEDE 
Accounting 

Pi Alpha Lambda Fraternity 3,4; 
Accounting Club 3,4; Intramurals 
3,4. 

PHILLIP E. McGEE 
Economics 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 3,4, 
House Chairman 4; Lewis Towers 
Sodality 2,3,4; Economics-Finance 
Club 4; Intramurals 3,4. 
THOMAS E. McKEVETT 
Marketing 

JOHN T. McMANUS 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 3,4; Veteran's 
Club 4. 

RICHARD F. MEINERS 
Management 

Society for the Advancement of 
Management 3,4; ROTC Drill 
Team 1,2,3,4, Co-Captain 4; ROTC 
Rifle Team 1,2,3,4, Captain 3,4; 
Bronze Medal-Military Science 
Proficiency Award. 
ANTHONY J. MERGES 
Marketing 

Pi Alpha Lambda Fraternity 3, 
4, Vice-President 4; Marketing 
Club 1,2,3,4. 

DENNIS H. MONGOVEN 
Accounting 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 1,2,3,4, 
Treasurer 4; Accounting Club 3,4 
Economics and Finance Society 3 
Intramurals 1,2,3,4. 
JAMES A. MORAN 
Marketing 

Alpha Delta Gamma Fraternity 
1,2,3,4; Fine Arts Club 3,4; Mar- 
keting 3,4; Towers Staff 4; Intra- 
murals 1,2,3,4. 
JAMES T. MORAN 
Management 

Society for the Advancement of 
Management 4; Economics and 
Finance Society 4. 
PHILIP A. MORAN 
Marketing 

Pi Alpha Lambda Fraternity 3,4; 
Marketing Club 2,3,4; Monogram 
Club 3,4; Loyola Track Team 1,2, 
3,4; Intramurals 1,2,3,4. 
PHILIP R. MORAN 
Marketing 
Marketing Club 3,4. 
JOHN F. MORRISSEY 
Accounting 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 4; Ac- 
counting Club 3,4; Lewis Towers 
Sodality 3,4. 

BERNARD N. MULLEN 
Management 

Society for the Advancement of 
Management 3,4; Economics and 
Finance Society 4. 
HAROLD J. MURPHY 
Accounting 



Accounting Club 3,4. 
HILARY J. NABOROWSKI 

Marketing 

Tau Delta Phi Fraternity 4; Mar- 
keting Club 2,3,4; Loyola Histori- 
cal Society 2,3,4; Veterans Club 4. 
RICHARD P. NAGLE 
Economics 

Economics and Finance Society 3, 
4, Secretary-treasurer 4. 
JOHN B. NICHELE 
Finance 

Delta Sigma Pi 1,2,3,4, Vice Presi- 
dent 4; Economics-Finance Socie- 
ty 3.4. 

THOMAS P. NORRIS 
Marketing 

Society for the Advancement of 
Management 3; Marketing Club 
3,4; Veteran's Club 4. 
EUGENE B. NOWOTARSKI 
Accounting 

Sodality, Lewis Towers 1,2,3,4; 
Spiritual Chairman 3; Intramur- 
als 3,4. 

JOHN F. O'TOOLE 
Accounting 
Accounting Club 3,4. 
JOHN R. OVNIK 
Finance 

Bowling Team 1,2. 
DENO J. PAPPADIMITRIOU 
Management 

Society for the Advancement of 
Management 3. 
ANNE H. PAWLOWSKA 
Finance 

Economics and Finance Society 
4; Accounting Club 1,2. 
DONALD C. PERREAULT 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 3,4; Intramurals 
1,2,3. 

JOSEPH F. PIRO 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 4; Intramurals 3, 
4. 

JOHN V. PIZZATO 
Accounting 
Accounting Club 3,4. 
WILLIAM A. QUILL 
Accounting 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 2,3,4; 
Accounting Club 3,4. 
EDWARD L. REVERS 
Marketing 

Marketing Club 2,3.4; Society for 
the Advancement of Management 
4; Veterans Club 4; Lewis Tow- 
ers Sodality 4; Human Relations 
Club 4. 

MICHAEL J. RILEY 
Accounting 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 2,3,4; 
Accounting Club 2,3,4, Vice- 
President 4; Gold Torch Club 1,2, 
3,4; Intramurals 2,3,4. 
JEREMIAH P. RIORDAN 
Finance 

Alpha Delta Gamma Fraternity 
2,3,4, Historian 3; Economics-Fi- 
nance Club 1,2,3,4, President 4; 
Gold Torch Club 2,3,4, Treasurer 
4; Golf Team 1,2,3,4. 



MISS VARSITY 




Jean Krug ^v'as cro^vned Miss Varsity 
at the annual Fall Frolic Dance. Jean was 
sponsored by Pi Alpha Lambda and was 
chosen by popular student vote. She ^vas 
chosen not only as a beauty queen but as 



a true representation of the best in Loy- 
ola's coeds. Jean served as the official repre- 
sentative of the Union at all school activi- 
ties dtiring the year. 



ALBERT A. ROTHENGASS 

Management 

Lewis Towers Evening School 2, 
3,4, Prefect 4; Loyola Union Con- 
gressman 3,4; Loyola Sodality 
Gold Key 3. 
CHESTER ROZANSKI 
Finance 

Society for the Advancement of 
Management 2,3,4; Economics and 
Finance Society 3,4; Veteran's 
Club 4. 

MICHAEL A. RYAN 
Marketing 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 2,3,4; 
Lewis Towers Sodality 1,2,3; Loy- 
ola Union Congressman 3,4; Tow- 
ers Staff 4. 

JAMES J. SAMPEY 

Accounting 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 3,4; 

Accounting Club 3,4; Intramurals 

3,4. 

JAMES A. SEBESTA 

Management 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 1,2,3,4; 
Blue Key National Honor Frater- 
nity 3,4; Alpha Sigma Nu Nation- 
al Jesuit Honor Society 4; Socie- 
ty for the Advancement of Man- 
agement 3,4; Economics and Fi- 
nance Society 1; Towers Staff 1, 
2,3,4; Advisory Editor 4; Histori- 
cal Society 3,4; Class Vice Presi- 
dent 2; Class President 3,4; Com- 
merce Council 2,3,4; Loyola Un- 
ion Congressman 1,2,3; Chairman 
Fall Frolic 4; Intramurals 1,2,3,4; 
Cheerleader 4; Loyola Leadership 
Award 2,3,4; Senior Gift Commit- 
tee 4; Lewis Towers Chairman. 

CHARLES L. SEXTON 

Accounting 

Alpha Delta Gamma Fraternity 
1,2,3,4; Blue Key National Hon- 
ary Fraternity 3,4, President 4; 
Historical Society 3; Society for 
the Advancement of Management 
3; Illinois Conference of Account- 
ing Clubs 3,4, Secretary 3,4; Ac- 
counting Club 3,4, President 4; 
Class President 1,2; Commerce 
Council 1,2, Secretary 1, Treasur- 
er 2; Loyola Union Congressman 
3; Loyola Union Board of Gov- 
ernors 4; Leadership Award 1,2,4; 
Towers Staff, Busines Manager 4. 

DAVID J. SHEEHAN 

Marketmg 

JOSEPH R. SHANFELDT 

Management 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 1,2,3,4, 
Chancellor 3; Debating Society 1; 
Choral Society 1; Gold Torch 
Club 1,2,3,4; ROTC Drill Team 1, 
2,3; Intramurals 1,2,3,4; Loyola 
Scholarship Award 1,2,3; ROTC 
Scholarship Award 2. 

WILLIAM J. SIEBERT 

Management 

Society for the Advancement 
Management 3,4; Scholarship 
Award 3. 



VICTOR F. SLANA 

Management 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity, His- 
torian 3; Society for the Advance- 
ment of Management 3,4, Record- 
ing Secretary 4; Intramurals 2. 

ARLENE N. SLAWINSKI 

Management 

Kappa Beta Gamma Sorority 3,4; 
Coed Club 3,4; Society for the 
Advancement of Management 4: 
Towers Staff 4. 

J. DAVID SMITH 

Economics 

Tau Delta Phi Fraternity 3,4, 
Treasurer 3, House Manager 4; 
Economics and Finance Society 
4; Curtain Guild 1; Committee on 
Family Taxation 3,4; Public Rela- 
tions Co-Chairman 3,4; Lewis 
Towers Sodality 3,4, Social Chair- 
man 4; Veterans Club 4; Senior 
Gift Committee 4; Towers Staff 
4; Senior Editor 4; Intramurals 3; 
Loyola Sodality Gold Key 3; Tau 
Delta Phi Scholarship Award 3. 

RICHARD J. SPILLANE 

Marketing 

Alpha Delta Gamma Fraternity 
1,2,3,4, Sergeant-at-A r m s 2,3, 
Pledgemaster 4; Blue Key Nation- 
al Honor Fraternity 3,4; Loyola 
Union Congressman 4; Loyola 
Union Treasurer 4; Marketing 
Club 1,2,3,4, President 4; Gold 
Torch Club 1,2,3,4, Treasurer 3, 
President 4; Loyola Historical So- 
ciety 3,4; Fine Arts Club 3,4; 
Commerce Council 2,3,4, 

RICHARD E. STOFFEL 

Marketing 
Intramurals 1,2,3,4. 

MARTIN R. STEIN 

Accounting 
Accounting Club 3,4. 

JOHN A. STONE 

Accounting 

Society for the Advancement of 
Management 3,4; Economics-Fi- 
nance Society 4. 

MICHAEL S. SULLIVAN 

Accounting 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 3,4; 
Lewis Towers Sodality 2,3,4; Ac- 
counting Club 2,3,4. 

ROBERT J. THIELEN 

Marketing 

Marketing Club 3,4; Society for 
the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4. 

WILLIAM T. TIETZ 

Accounting 

Pi Alpha Lambda Fraternity 1,2, 
3,4; Accounting Club 3,4; Bowl- 
ing Team 2; Intramurals 1,2,3,4. 

MICHAEL J. TIMLIN 

Economics 

Alpha Delta Gamma Fraternity 3, 
4; Intramural Manager 4; Eco- 
nomics and Finance Club 4; In- 
tramurals 3,4. 



GEORGE V. TYHURST 

Management 

Society for the Advancement of 
Management 3,4, Vice-President 
4; Historical Society 4; Loyola 
Union Congressman 4. 

EDWARD J. WALSH 

Marketing 

Tau Delta Phi Fraternity 3,4; 
Corresponding Secretary 3, Vice 
President 4, President 4, Con- 
gressman 4; Lewis Towers Sodal- 
ity 2,3,4; Publications and Pam- 
phlet Chairman 2,3,4; Usher 2,3, 
4; Public Relations Officer 2,3,4; 
Senior Gift Committee 4; Com- 
merce School Chairman 4; Tow- 
ers Staff 4, Production and Copy 
Editor 4; Marketing Club 4; Vet- 
erans Club 4; Variety Show, Busi- 
ness Manager 4; Class Vice Presi- 
dent 4; Commerce Council 4; Loy- 
ola Union Congressman 3,4; Loy- 
ola Sodality Gold Key 3; Loyola 
Leadership Award 4; Tau Delta 
Phi Fraternity Leadership 
Awards 3, 4; Committee on Fam- 
ily Taxation 3,4; Public Relations 
Co-chairman 3,4. 

WILLIAM C. WATERS 

Marketing 

Alpha Delta Gamma Fraternity 2, 
3,4, Steward 3; Marketing Club 
3,4; Gold Torch Club 2,3,4; Ser- 
geant-at-Arms 4; Loyola Union 
Congressman 2,3,4; Intramurals 1, 
2,3,4; Commerce Leadership 
Award 2. 

WILLIAM M. WEBB 

Management 

RICHARD E. WEIDNER 

Accounting 

Accounting Club 2,3,4; Gold Torch 

3,4. 

RONALD J. WILKES 

Accounting 

LYLE L. WITT 

Economics 

Lewis Towers Sodality 3,4; Eco- 
nomics and Finance Club 3,4; So- 
ciety for the Advancement of 
Management 3,4 Human Rela- 
tions Club 4. 

PETER J. WRENN 

Finance 

Marketing Club 4; Society for the 
Advancement of Management 4; 
Economics-Finance Society 4. 

CHESTER I. WRIGHT 

Marketing 

Marketing Club 3,4; Treasurer 4. 

PETER M. WUERTZ 

Economics 

Gold Torch Club 3,4; Economics- 
Finance Society 3,4; Intramural 
Teams 2,3,4. 

ROBERT J. ZACKS 

Accounting 

Delta Sigma Pi Fraternity 1,2,3,4; 

Accounting Club 3,4. 



4iy 



^ 



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W^ 



i^ V 



On Friday of each ^veek, all Clatholic stu- 
dents of the College attend holy Mass at the 
Holy Name Cathedral near Lewis Towers. At 
these weekly Masses, students have the oppor- 
tunity to receive the sacraments, to benefit from 
a University sermon, and to maintain their in- 
terest in the missions. 




The Chapel of the Sacred Heart, 
Room 801, is open on all class days for 
private decotions. A student Mass is of- 
fered daily and Holy Communion is dis- 
tributed at times convenient for the stu- 
dents. Confessions are heard daily. 



With Best Wishes for Continuing Success 


THE LOYOLA UNION 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


Robert Mullen, President 
^ Philip P. Brankin, Vice-President 

Patrick J. Culhane, Executive Secretary 
Maureen A. Marley, Recording Secretary 
Joseph J. Zahaitis, Treasurer 


BOARD MEMBERS 


Jerry A. Horan Richard E. Wynn 
Patricia McCarter Thomas M. Sullivan 
Glenn J. Teske Patricia Dunphy 
Gerald Lucey Jack Ov^ens 
John P. Brennan 


Gold Coast Barber Shop 


The 


58 E. Chicago Ave. 




RUSH INN 


Interlude Cocktail Lounge 


743 N. Rush 


806 N. Rush Street 




Near North Guild 




56 E. Chicago Ave. 


1/2 Block South of Chicago Ave. 



New — TEXTBOOKS — Used 
Bought — Sold — Exchanged 

BECK'S 
BOOK STORE 

22 E. Chicago Ave. 
WHitehall 4-7685 

STORE HOURS — 8:30 A. M. — 10 P. M. 



The Platter Shop 



EVERYTHING IN RECORDED MUSIC 



Mention This Ad for A Special 
Discount 

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Phone DE 7-9892 



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Finest Cantonese and American Cuisine 

AIR CONDITIONED DINING ROOM 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

PRIVATE BANQUET ROOM 

115 E. Chicago Ave. 

Opposite Old Water Tower 

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De Mar's Grill 

64 E. Chicago Ave. 



Lenart's Club 

12400 Halsted St. 



Ha! & Frieda Miller 

N'lEN'S & WOMEN'S WEARING 
APPAREL 

9145 Commercial Ave. 



GOOD LUCK 
FROM 

THE CLOVERLEAF 



HAMILTON'S 
LOUNGE 



WHERE 



GOOD 



FRIENDS 



GATHER 



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Phone GArden 2-9457 

STEVE'S 
SHELL SERVICE 

Mofor Tune-Up and Brake Service 

VVashIng and Expert Lubrication 

WE SPECIALIZE IN GENERATORS 
AND STARTERS 

Trailers For Rent 
7901 S. Harlem Ave. Oaklawn, li 



Compliments of 

Fred Nelson's Men's Store 

I I I 1 6 S. Michigan 

Club Superior 

5 West Superior 

Emerald Tailor & Cleaners 

719 W. 123rd Street 

Mr. & Mrs. John Lenart 

Mr. & Mrs. Leo J. Kurz 

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Printed and Bound 



by 



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104 







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