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Full text of "Town Topics (Princeton), Sep. 08, 1982"

;OL.XXXVII,N0.27 



Wednesday, September 8, 1 982 



25<t At All Newsstands 



State Legislators Criticized 
By School Officials Here 

In a rousing rally-of-the-troops 
Tuesday morning, School 
Superintendent Paul Houston, 
school board president Ann 
McGoldrick and PREA president 
Bob Parsons urged Princeton's 
teachers to subject New Jersey 
legislators to some good old- 
fashioned hickory-stick discipline. 

"The most cynical, thoughtless, 
underhanded thing I've ever seen," 
Dr. Houston told the teachers, 
assembled in the John Witherspoon 
auditorium for the ritual day-before- 
school gathering. He was referring, 
as his audience all knew, to the 
Legislature's late June cut-off of 
Princeton's $524,000 in so-called 
"minimum aid". 

"We're in a death struggle with a 
bunch of clowns," the superinten- 
dentoarcf bitterly. "The outrageous 
things I've been saying in the 
newspapers are all an understate- 
ment." 

Dr. Houston laid his stick equally 
on Democrats and Republicans, 
declaring that both parties had "no 
concern for education and no con- 
cern for kids." 

"It's a fight to the finish," he told 
the teachers. "Somebody has to 
stand up and say 'It's wrong — it's 
got to stop." 

He assured the teachers that he 
and the board hoped to meet the 
challenge without RIFfing — that is, 
without Reduction in Force, or firing 
teachers. 

So far, he reported, he had frozen 
certain funds and the purchase of 
some materials, had not filled some 
positions that had become vacant 
and is now examining reserves. 

The bleak picture, he warned 
teachers, is the long view. If funds 
aie not restored, he said, there are 
orly "dire possibilities" for future 
years. 

"t's not just whether Princeton 
getsthe money it's entitled to," Mrs. 
McGoldrick told the staff. 

The fundamental questions, she 
said, are whether the state forfeits 
its responsibilities to fund educa- 
'ion, and reverts to reliance on local 
.jrcperty taxes; whether school 
Jlstricts can ever again do any kind 
>f Dudget planning — the cuts were 
male only a few days before the 
iev fiscal year and several months 
ftsr voters had passed the budgets 





THAT LAST FALL INTO FALL: Robert Bloss looks as though he's flying right out 
of summertime into autumn. Actually, he's going off the high dive at Princeton 
community Park. The pool complex closed for the summer on Labor Day. Wait'll 
next year * 

= . IMtchaais McMillan Photo) 

West Windsor Resident May File Suit to Decide 
Who Has Responsibility for Grovers Mill Pond 



Angered by what he described as 
foot-dragging on the part of West 
Windsor Township Committee over 
the problems of Grovers Mill Pond, a 
West Windsor citizen is "seriously 
considering" bringing suit against 
the Township and against Lawrence 
Dey, the owner of the dam and 
spillway. 

Mr. Dey let the water out of the 
pond last fall in response to direc- 
tives from the DEP that repairs be 
made to bring the 200-year old dam 
and spillway which he renovated in 
1932 in conformance with present 
day standards. Weedy growth cover- 
ing the 37-acre pond bottom is a 
reminder of the deteriorating condi- 
tion of the pond before it was drain- 
ed and the need for dredging and re- 



juvenation in addition to reconstruc- 
tion of the dam and spillway. 

"Grovers Mill Pond is an orphan," 
says A. Spencer Bruno who lives 
across from the pond and served on 
an ad-hoc committee in the mid 
70's, predecessor to the current 
committee appointed by the 
Township to study the pond. Mr. 
Bruno says that if he can gather 
enough financial support from other 
residents he will bring legal action 
"in order to determine who its real 
parents are." 

"Then," he says, "appropriate 
suits charging abuse and neglect 
can be brought against those 
responsible for the continuing loss 



Revised Plans for Square 
Up for Hearing Monday 

Although Collins announced in 
the summer that the "deck" con- 
cept had been abandoned in new 
plans for Palmer Square, the revi- 
sion does show a few steps here 
and there leading to a level higher 
than the street. The revised plans 
will go before the Environmental 
Design Review Committee Monday. 

The meeting will be held at 7:30 in 
the small Conference Room A, off 
the vestibule of the main meeting 
room in the Valley Road building. 

In the revised plans, as you look 
north down the present Palmer 
Square West you see in front of you 
the facades of new buildings that 
front on a new Plaza, at the foot of 
Palmer Square West. 

On the west of this new Plaza is a 
five-story, 75,000-square-foot office 
building. On the street level of this 
building is the post office, which 
means that the post office will be on 
the northeast corner of Hulfish and 
Chambers. 

Collins doesn't say, in these revi- 
sions, what will happen to the pre- 
sent post office building. 

Around the Plaza on the north and 
east are stores, with offices and 
condominiums on the floors above 
the retail spaces. These buildings 
on the north of the new Plaza are the 
ones you face as you walk down the 
Square. 

Architects have planned a two- 
level garage, partly underground, 
north of Hulfish. That "partly" is the 
cause of the higher level, reached 
by a few steps. The garage is com- 
pletely surrounded by offices, 
stores and residential buildings, 
and architects say the garage will 
be "unnoticeable" from the street. 
Its top level will be a landscaped, 
public area. 

The additional 50,690 square feet 
of retail space will go mostly along 
the north side of Hulfish, between 
Palmer Square West and Palmer 
Square East. 

The formal Plaza will change into 
this more informal area of shops 
and restaurants, extending along 
Hulfish. Mostly, according to James 
Harvie, Collins vice-president, these 
retail establishments will be what 
the professionals call "primary 
types." 

That is, Mr. Harvie's application 
tells the EDRC, apparel shops, 
camera shops, luggage stores, a 
food center with bakers, butchers 




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Grovers Mill Pond 



Connrued from Page i 

of this public treasure, not to 
mention the lowering of 
property values for those who 
live in the area " Mr. Bruno 
says he is considering action 
"on the part of the citizens of 
West Windsor whose quality of 
life has been affected by the 
foot-dragging, hair-splitting 
bureaucrats" on the West 
Windsor Township Com- 
mittee 



INDEX 




Art in Princeton 


10B 


Business 


23 


Calendar of the Week 


15 


Classified Ads 


25-40 ' 


Current Cinema 


4B 1 


Engagements 
Mailbox 


8B 

14 


Music 


6B 


Obituaries 


24 


People in the News 


20 


Senior Activities 


8 


Sports 
Theatres 


12B 
2B 


Topics of the Town 


3 



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those two extremes, $500,000. 
members need to be 
reasonably sure of the desires 
of the community. The money 
will be coming from the entire 
community through taxes, not 
just the people who live 
around the pond." 

At the mayor's request, the 
Dahl committee conducted an 
informal survey during the 
summer to find out whether 
the community suported 
restoration of the pond. Of the 
Catch-22 Situation. His wrath committee chaired by Dick 280 responses to an admittedly 

has been triggered by what he Dahl But Mr Bruno charges unscientific study, all but one 

describes as a current "Catch- u 13 ' the final report has been "?"!"* 

22" situation. Wesl Windsor held up because the Township re 

Township Committee says it Engineer has failed to look 

can't respond to the problems — — t ■ TV.™ i 



to $100. 000," he points out Mr Parsons, president of our gloves off and got into the 
"Before Township Committee the teachers' union, the streets. The one thing the 
commits even the mid-point of Princeton Regional Education Legislature understands is 
Association, announced a ral- clout. They won't see that 
ly in Trenton for October 23. clout if we sit on our hands 

"Maybe," he told his fellow here in Princeton." 
teachers, "it's time we took —Katharine H. Bretnall 



of the pond until it receives the 
report of the current ad-hoc 

(Sown (UopicB 

(ISSN 0191 70S*) 



Publiiht-d Every W«dnrid«y 

" gi"i"'»" m,i 



Donald C Stuarl 

lvl« 1981 

Dan D Coyle 

1914 1973 

Foundino Editon 

and Pubhihen 



interest 
To which Mr 
Baur remarks that "there is a 
mto^^rJc^uaTproblemrorthe ,ot of sympathy for something 
spillway as requested and lf [J. ls 7,' t e oin e to cost 
because the Recreation, anything 
Environmental and Park Mr. Bruno cites the example 
Commission boards have not of a pn vat ely -owned pond in 
met with the Dahl committee Hamilton Township which has 
after repeated requests. recently been reiuvenated 

The question of who is w,,n $1 million in state funds 
responsible for Grovers Mill aPPl'ed for and received by 
Pond has to be solved before the Township as an instance of 
the problems relating to dam what a municipality can do. 
and spillway capacity or to " 1S a Public issue," he 
eutrophicationcanbegintobe repeats, "and a shame that 
tackled Mr Bruno says that the lethargy and apathy on the 
the pond has been used for part of West Windsor officials 
public recreation for the past would go unchallenged." 
50 years, either from the 




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public park that borders a 
segment of it or from the 
Township-owned road that 
runs along the top of the dam . 

Moreover, he says that no 

taxes have been paid on the 

pond for a number of years, 

which also raises the question 

of public ownership. During 

Mr. Bruno's chairmanslhip of 

the earlier ad-hoc committee. 

West Windsor Township 

agreed to treat the pond with 

chemicals in an attempt to 

control the week growth, 

which he cites as an indication 

of assumed responsibility . 
His ire is direcected at the 

all-Republican West Windsor 

Township Committee, 

although he says he does not 

want to see the pond become a 

political issue when he views it 

as "a matter of public 

responsibility which Township k^ow whaUchooT"boards and 

officials have neglected to administrators think and she 

meet. They appoint ad hoc suggested that teachers 

committees to make studies themselves might have 

and then reject the reports," weight 

he says gloomily. « K the money isn - t restored 

soon, the next budget pro- 
mises to be a disaster," she 
declared. "Not one member of 
our board wants to dismantle 



Paul Houston 

Continued from Page i 

— and whether educational 
funding will now be a prime 
target for cutting. 

"Senator (Gerald) 

Stockman is said to be con- 
cerned about his political 
future — he should be!" Mrs. 
McGoldrick said, to applause. 

She urged teachers to write 
Governor Thomas Kean; Mat- 
thew Feldman, head of the 
joint legislative committee 
concerned with the cuts, and 
individual legislators. 



"Let them know you're 
angry over the lack of funds, 
and the impossible timing," 
Mrs. McGoldrick said. She ad- 
ded that legislators, by now, 




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Palmer fy[tmre. Princeton. XI 



Proceeding Cautiously. West 
Windsor Township Mayor 
Dough Gorrester was 



V0I ■■WII.N027 



unavailable at press time for our excellent scho01 system, 
comment, but Gus Baur, West but we can ' absorb ■' all, and 



Woflnosdny Soptombttf 



Windsor Administrator, said 
that his office was working 
with the West Windsor at- 
torney, the engineer and a title 
search company to establish 
legal ownership of the pond. 

"We're proceeding 

cautiously," Mr Baur said, 
"11 it turns out that the 
Townshin owns it then the 

question is whether to commit 

money to the pond and to the 

dam. 

"If the Township doesn't own 
it, " he continued, "then the 
question is do they want to 
own it, and once that is 
established, negotiations can 
begin The numbers that are 
being bandied about to restore 




maintain the system as we'd 
like to, I pledge that the entire 
board will do everything possi- 
ble to see that the money 
we're entitled to, is returned. I 
beg you to join us." 



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924-2561 



GRANT FOR BOROl'CH? 
Public Hearing Scheduled. 
The Borough will apply for a 
$400,000 Small Cities Com- 
munily Development block 
grant, and Council has 
scheduled a public hearing for 
next Tuesday at 8 — Council's 
regular meeting time — so 
that Borough residents may 
express their ideas. 

Council wants to use the 
money toward acquisition of 
properties on Shirley Court, 
and to complete the rehabilita- 
tion of ten units of Maple Ter- 
race public housing on 
Franklin Avenue. The 
breakdown: $240,000 set aside 
for Shirley Court and $160,000 
for Maple Terrace. 

Municipalities can apply 
either for Neighborhood 
Revitalization or Economic 
Development, and the 
Borough chose the former. 

The Witherspoon-Jackson 
Development Corporation, a 
non-profit group which buys 
properties with the goal of 
keeping modestly-priced hous- 
ing in the area where most of 
Princeton's black families 
live, would like to acquire the 
houses on Shirley Court, a 
small cul-de-sac off Withers- 
poon. 

The group already has about 
$200,000 from private sources. 
According to Council member 
Barbara Hill, this should ap- 
peal to block grant officials, 
who don't like the idea that 
towns are using the govern- 
ment to bail them out. 

The Shirley Court project 
seems in a constant state of 
limbo. 'Asked its status, one 
WJC person said "It has no 
status," Karl Light, realtor 
who serves as a WJC advisor, 
says he has been waiting since 
September 1 for a letter from 
Benjamin and Rose Kahn, 
owners of part of Shirley 
Court, stating their price. 

In December, the WJC 
entered into a six-month op- 
tion to purchase Shirley Court. 
The price at that time was 
$175,000. The option has ap- 
parently not been renewed, 
and there is now disagreement 
about price. 

Mr, and Mrs. Kahn want the 
WJC to pay $4,000 for a new 



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APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED AT NURSERY SCHOOL: 
Cordelia Hill and Denise Ramzy enjoy dressing up at 
Trinity-All Saints' Nursery School. The school offers a 
program for children between the ages of three and 
four and meets five mornings a week from 9 to 11:45. 
There is also a cooperative session for 2Vi year olds 
and an optional extended day program until 1 p.m. For 
more information call Judith Gorog, 924-4730. or Jean 
Mc Andrew, the director, at 921-2430. 



roof, which they state was in- 
stalled after expiration of the 
option; however, Bernard 
Glover, the Borough's 
building sub-code official, 
says no building permit has 
been issued this year for a new 
roof for 1-15 Shirley Court, the 
Kahn properties. No permit is 
required if repair is done on 
less than 25 percent of the 
roof, he said, 

WJC says it wants, in 
writing, a statement of the 
Kahn's price. 

In regard, to Maple Terrace, 
the Borough received money 
in 1978 from the Federal 
Department of Housing and 
Urban Development to 
rehabilitate both Franklin and 
Maple Terraces, but there was 
only enough for Franklin In 
1980, an application for more 
money was turned down. 

The Borough is not using the 
services of Charles Nathan- 
son, a grants consultant who 
outlined the Small Cities 
possibilities to Council last 
month. Instead, applications 
for the grant are being 
prepared by Gus Escher. plan- 
ner who works with 
Witherspoon-Jackson; George 
Jones of the E. Harvey Myers 
architecture firm, Borough 
Adminsitrator Mark Gordon 
and Ms, Hill. 



believe whoever started the 
fire used some of the paper 
left outside to light a fire 
against the wooden door 
Firemen had to vent the roof 
togetatthefire. 

Car Fire. The 1979 sedan of a 
Princeton Community Village 
resident caught on fire early 
Sunday evening when a 
Trenton AAA garage ser- 
viceman attempted to jump 
start the car. 

Police said that there was 
some damage to the motor 
area of the car which had 
stalled on Bunn Drive Police 
managed to extinguish the 
blaze before the arrival of 
firemen. 



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BURGLAR IS ACTIVE 

In Borough. "We have an 
active burglar in the 
Borough," commented Chief 
Michael Carnevale this week, 
after he listed break ins on 
Humbert and Madison Streets 
and attempted burglaries at 
three other Borough locations. 

Jewelry, including an 
assortmentof rings, necklaces 
and bracelets valued at $950, 
was stolen from a Humbert 
Street bedroom bureau. The 
home was entered through a 
rear bedroom window be- 
ween 1 1 : 30 Saturday morning 
snd 5 : 30 Sunday afternoon. 



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RECYCLE SHED DAMAGED A thief is believed to have 
By Fire. A fire, described by climbed a garage to enter a 
police as suspicious, caused second-floor window of a 
an estimated $1,000 in damage Madison Street home between 
last week to the cinder block 7 so and 11:30 Sunday 
recycling shed located in the evening. Missing are a por- 
corner of the Princeton table television set valued at 
Shopping Center. $170, a $250 gold bracelet and 

Police said that a young $20 in cash, 
white male in a white T-shirt Returning home at 11:12 
was seen in the area just prior P m. last week, an occupant of 
to the report of the fire at 6: 10 a Jefferson Road home called 
Friday evening. An east side police after hearing someone 
door and portions of the roof running down the cellar stairs, 
were damaged in the blaze P11 Glenn Stanton and PH. 
that was brought under Donald Dawson responded 
control in ten minutes by and checked the house but the 
twenty Princeton firemen who suspect had fled Entry was 
responded in two firetrucks. gained through a cellar 

Although the shed had been window, 
closed for the Labor Day 

weekend, police Chief An intruder forced open the 
Anthony Pinelli reported thatfront door of a Lytle Street 
papers' had been piled up home around 10 o'clock 
against the door. Police conim U edonNe„!P.o« 






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Topics of the Town 

COM,n,w.J from P>fl* 3 

Monday night and made his 
way upstairs where he opened 
a bedroom door When he 
red the occupant was 
nol asleep, police said, he fled 
from the i 

There were apparent 
repeated attempts to 
Tulane Street home Friday 
morning between 9:15 and 
11 :i<) Police report that 
basement windows in three 
locations around the house 
had their screens either 
ripped or torn loose 

Roof Entry Fails. The 

Township thief who week after 

week tries to enter a shop in 

the Princeton Shopping Center 

by way of the roof tried again 

k and failed -again 

When an alarm at Freese 

Shop sounded at 9:35 

Saturday night, an in 

tion by police revealed 

that an attempt had been 

made to tamper with a roof 

venl The alarm evidently 

scared the perpetrator off," 

uithony 

■ 



Dodge Believed Alive 
Reports from wire ser- 
vices indicate that David 
Dodge, acting president of 
American University in 
Beiru! is stitl alive U S 
diplomatic officials, who 
lined to reveal 
their sources, say they 
h information. 
The Iranian ambassador 
to Lebanon suggested last 
week, after a meeting with 
the Lebanese prime 
minister, who has been ac- 
tive in the search for Mr 
Dodge, that the American 
had been kidnapped by a 
pro-Iranian group in 
retaliation for the abduc- 
tion of an Iranian diplomat 
Mr. Dodge's family lives 
in Princeton. 



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Esther Setigmann 
9 Gordon Way, Princeton 



VICTIM HAS NO MONEY 

Attempted Robbery Fails. 

- mpted robbery of a 

\ ven ui 
weeS failed when the •> ictim 
showed his assailant he had no 

Police Said lti.il the victim, 
u. in 20*8, was approaeti(H) bj 
two black males in their 20 s 
Saturday morning at I 30 at 
the intersection of Leigh 
Avenue and John Sine! One 
ol the two brandished a knife, 
police said, and demanded 
money. 

When the victim told them 
he had no money - and showed 
them -- the assailants told him 
to go on his way, police report. 
The suspect with the knife is 
described as about six feet 
tall, wearing a red T-shirt, 
blue jeans and sneakers. 
Police have no description of 
the second suspect. 

Beer Stays, Victim (ioes. 
When a 26-year old Toms 
Kiver resident left a Nassau 
Street bar at 2 a.m. Saturday, 
he had a six-pack and sleeping 
bag in his possession -- and an 
offer of a ride by five oc- 
cupants in a car. 

As the car reached Wiggins 
Sheet, one of the occupants, 
police saut, beKan to drink the 
passenger's beer. When he 
protested, Hie occupants 
slopped on Paul Robeson 
Place .nut pushed the victim 

mi! nl the cm , minus his six 
pack sleeping bag and 
toiletries Ptl, Glenn Stanton 
Is investigating 



ItLKVlSr MASTER PLAN? 
Amendments Read} 

dozen amendments to the 1980 

Master Plan are ready for 

agrees. 
and the Planning Hoard will 

nexl Monday a' B 10 In the 
Road Building meeting 

■ H 

Imenl would 
change the Lamberl tract on 

Province lane hum op,.,. 



space-recreation to a low- 
density residential area. The 
same low-density residential 
designation would be given to 
six lots on the north side of the 
Lawrenceville Road, west of 
Stony Brook in the Bruere's 
Hill area. They are now 
designated open space- 
recreation, and are part of the 
property of J. Seward 
Johnson. 

At Princeton University's 
request, the Planning Board 
proposes to change the 
Prospect- Fit zrandolph- 
Murray Place area from high 
density residential to 
"community-institution- 
educational" facilities 

Another amendment would 
change the double-X, high- 
density residential designa- 
tion of the Bowers Develop- 
ment lots on Thanet Road 
north of Harrison Street, to 
Research-Office. 

A new designation 
"Educational-Mandatory 
Cluster" would be applied to 
parts of the Institute for Ad- 
vanced Study property, in line 
with the Township's new or- 
dinance, 

' 'Low-density residential ' ' 
would be added as an addi- 
tional land-use classification 
for sites — other than the In- 
stitute — that are allowed a 
conditional density bonus. 

Copies of the proposed 
amendments may be examin- 
ed at the Township and 

Continued on Next Page 



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1982 



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11 



( 



Topics of the Town 

Continued iiom Page 4 

Borough clerk's offices, the 
planning Board office in the 
Valley Road building and the 
public library. 

TWO ARE ARRESTED 
On Separate Charges. 

Township police this week 
arrested two men in separate 
incidents. 

Marc Coutin, 21, 206 
Riverside Drive, was arrested 
at l:10Tuesday morning at his 
home and charged with 
violating the Township's noise 
ordinance. 

Twice earlier in the evening, 
police had gone to the Coutin 
home, after receiving com- 
plaints from neighbors of 
shouting and loud and un- 
necessary noises at the ad- 
dress. Police said that a party 
was being held there. 

Coutin was later released 
and is scheduled to appear 
Tuesday in Township court 

Marvin Porter, 22, 7 
Eglantine Avenue, Pen- 
nington, was arrested Monday 

evening and charged with He, too, is scheduled to appear 
trespassing on Princeton in court here on Tuesday. 
University property. 

He was arrested in his „ ' M , 
parked car in Lot 5 off Faculty BOROUGH MAN FINED 
Road. Police were called at J n Criminal Court. In 
10:09, after University Borough criminal court last 

proctors had previously *« Judge ""ssellW^ g 30 ^ a y Suspen ^ '££££ year terms as trustees were 
warned Porter about *™2 ^J™« Br '" t0 the Mercer County WoS Mrs. Dennis C Fill. William S. 



Adventure Park Challenges School, Neighbors 

Project Adventure, the high school's new physical educa- 
tion course, is supposed to offer students a challenge It has 
done so already for school officials. 

This Tuesday, they met with Borough engineer George 
Olexa to figure a way out of the maze. Superintendent Paul 
Houston, assistant superintendent Jamie McKenzie and 
Princeton High School Principal John Sakala attended the 
meeting. 

Last week. Mr. Olexa sent the school board a "Notice of 
violation" informing school officials that the Project 
Adventure equipment was out of bounds: land use law, Mr. 
Olexa stated, prohibits any addition or expansion of a per- 
mitted conditional use — the high school — in a Borough 
residential zone. Planning Board approval and site plan ap- 
proval are both required, Mr Olexa said. 

Meanwhile, Mr. Sakala has invited unhappy neighbors of 
those "Adventure" poles and wires to hear about the pro- 
ject at an open discussion meeting this Thursday at 8 in the 
school's library conference room. The physical education 
staff will be present to answer questions. 

"I wish to extend our most sincere apology for having in- 
advertently created a strain in what has been a most con- 
genial relationship between the immediate neighborhood 
and the high school," Mr Sakala said, in a letter to Moore 
Street residents who had signed the original letter of pro- 
test. 

"We are sorry we underestimated the impact on our 
neighbors, and wish to work with you to resolve all concerns 
relating to Project Adventure and to restore mutual 
cooperation." 



traditional orientation for all 
ninth graders and all new 
Upper School students will be 
held on Monday, September 13 
at 10 a.m. An Open House for 
all new students in Grades K 
through 8 and their parents 
will also be held on Monday, 
September 13, but at 2:30 p.m. 

Sanford B. Bing. former 
Head of the Upper School, will 
serve as acting headmaster 
for the 1982-83 academic year, 
Mrs. Alan D. Williams, in 
addition to being director of 
programs and scheduling, will 
serve as acting head of the 
upper school, assisted by 
Donald A Roberts, a teacher 
of upper school English. 
James W Walker, a teacher of 
mathematics, will serve as 
acting dean of students. 

Mrs. Ernest Schwiebert and 
Herbert Jaques Jr. will 
continue to head the lower and 
middle schools, respectively. 

The school's board of 
trustees, at its annual meeting 
in June, elected its officers for 
the 1982-83 year Re-elected 
were Mrs. Thomas W. Eglin 
as chairman; John D. 
Wallace, vice chairman; and 
Mrs. Richard de J Osborne, 



CARVEL 

ICE CREAM STORE 

'(%M\ KI"9«on Mall 

*(Aoul« 27 and Raymond hot 



924-7287 



Marsh & Co. 

168Na«MU 924-4000 

Montgomery Center 



charges of harrassment, 

posession of a controlled 

dangerous substance under 25 s j ecre < ar y- John J Southwick 

grams and preventing a , of Hone .vbrook Drive was 

lawful arrest elected treasurer, succeeding 

William Wynder, 118 ^K^GipsJr. 
Witherspoon Street, received 



Elected to their first three 



trespassing on the campus 



Tadlock, 
each o 



29 Green Street, $15 
n three separate 



THINK FALL 

When a Suit 

is More 
Than a Suit... 



By its very nature, a suit must 
be more than current Moving 
easily from the conference 
room to the theatre is essen- 
tial The tine suit is a reflection 
of classic good taste and 
hence, is almost timeless. 



YOU WILL FIND 
SUITS, COATS & 
DRESSES by 
FAMOUS DESIGNERS. 

recognize the make. All items discounted 
on arrival. Do stop by. 

#1 DESIGNERS 

2978 Ht 1 , Lawrencevllle • 896-1 1 21 




_-.)ty Work „ 
House and a year's probation Gree "berg, and Ira Silver- 
for preventing a lawful arrest man ' a " ,rom Princeton and 
while Newell Thompson' Parents of students in the 



Glenmoore Farm, Hopewell 



school 



was fined $25 for malicious 
damage under $500. 

LIBRARY SEEKS FRIENDS 

Township Court. In Township A"" Additional Support. The 

court last week, Judge Sydney Friends of the Princeton 
Souter placed Dea Rick, 21 Public Library are beginning 
Harris Road, on one year's ,neir annual membership 
probation for trespassing. The drive. The current economic 
sentence was conditioned on climate makes this year's 
the defendant obtaining drive especially important, 
professional counseling ap- Tne Library operating 
proved by the court. budget as determined by the 

Maurice C. Oldham Jr.. 16 governing bodies of Princeton 
Clay Street, was fined $23 for Township and Borough has 
speeding, $15 court costs and become increasingly under 
$10 for failure to appear. For pressure as a result of in- 
careless driving, Gail E. Nation and the cap law. Only 
Kohn. 34 Puritan Court, was once in the last several years 
fined $40. has the operating budget 

increased by the CAP 

maximum of 5 percent. 

14 NEW TEACHERS Consequently inflation has 
At PDS. Fourteen new ' a „ ke " a " ever increasing toll 
teachers and staff members Zmt „ v '? T","" 6 
will join the Princeton Day *! *T * T" Ca J effeCt ° n 
School faculty when th ^' h e materials and services 
school's 18th year commences °"ered by the Library, 
next week. 



Grades 5-12 (middle and 
upper schools) will begin 
school on Tuesday, September 
14, while kindergarten 
through grade 4 ( lower 
school) will begin on Wed- 
nesday, September 15. The 



The traditional role of the 
Friends has been to supply the 



HOME DECOR 

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Deluxe Standard (2) • 

45" x 38" Pillow Cases 20.98 17.98 



Deluxe King (2) 

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2198 18.98 



24.98 21.98 
27.98 24.98 



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tings; plant growth or to accent a 
feature in your home. This con- 
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available in 2. 4, 6. 8 or 12 toot, 
lengths Just attach a miniature lam- 
pholder at any place on the track 
and put light exactly where you 
want it. 

Available in many colors - white, 
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bronze Also available in many sizes ' 
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Added Feature - Portable Adapter 
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Luttman n's Luggage 

S&ms-^ <>a//c'st- ■£?oxrc6> 
New Jersey's Finest Quality Luggage and Leather Goods Store. 

Where can you find a fine selection 
of quality handbags? 

Luttmann's, of course 

We carry, in stock, over 
500 quality handbags. 

• Coach bags & accessories 

• Dooney & Bourke 

• Original Ghurka (in all leather & leather & twill) 

• Kiefro (our direct import from W. Germany) 

• Morris Moskowitz 

• Koret 

20 Witherspoon Street 924-0735 Princeton, N.J. 

/lows. Mondev through Saturday 10-6 Friday IO-8 




* Topics of the Town 

g COftt<nuMfromP*gr$ 

"extra materials and services 
*not normally funded by the 
u municipal budgets. But now in 
E the face of shrinking operating 
t! funds, the Friends must ac- 
ti cept more responsibility for 

* the more standard services 

■ Currently membership in 
a the Friends totals slightly 
3 over J. 000. Since ap- 
5 proximately 7 percent of the 
i Princeton community uses the 
. library as evidenced by the 
j 17,000 library card holders, 
[ the 1982-83 membership goal 

; has been set at 2,000 - a goal 
; the Friends feel is reasonable 
; and attainable and necessary 

* if the quality of the Library is 

■ to be maintained. 

' Memberhsip forms are 
; available at the Library 



THEFT REPORT 
Three Robes Stolen. Three 
Christian Dior wool flannel 
robes valued at $100 each were 
shoplifted Friday afternoon 
from a woman's apparel shop 
on Palmer Square 

Two women whoenteredthe 
store are suspects in the theft 
which is being investigated by 
Sgt. William Fitch 

A child's bicycle with 
training wheels and a stroller 
were taken early Friday 
morning from a front porch of 
a Stanworth area home-they 
were valued at $ I fill and a $10 
patio chair was stolen between 
12 and 7:30 Saturday morning 
from a Spruce Street front 
porch. 

Three poor boxes in St, 
Paul's Church on Nassau' 
Street were pried open 
Monday between 2:30 and 5 
p.m. Police report the boxes 
contained about $30, 

When a Philadelphia 
resident paid for a sandwich in 
a Nassau Street restaurant on 
Monday, he left his wallet on 
the counter When he returned 
to claim it, it was gone, HHost 
$70. 

A Princeton resident 
became a theft victim last 
week when his $178 bicycle, 
chained to a railing behind the 
Engineering Quadrangle, was 
stolen. 

Police report there was an 
attempt to steal three blkea 
chained to a post on the side < »f 
a Chestnut Street home 
According to Chief Michael 
Carnevale, the thief stepped 
on one of the bicycles and 
attempted to break the chain 
by using brute force Although 
unsuccessful, he damaged the 
rear wheel and gears of the 
bike, causing $75 in damage 

Both license plates, in- 
surance card and registration 
were stolen overnight from a 
car parked in a lot on Franklin 




Maui Street. AJIentown^ and 
John and Patncia ^Lyon^ , « 
Madison Gardens. Old Bridge, 
all on September 2 

READINGS RESUME 

At Library. "Readings Over 
Coffee' with Dr Donald 
Ecroyd will return to the 
Public Library on Wednesday. 
September 15. at 1030am 

Dr Ecroyd will begin this. 
the 20th year of Readings. 
with The Light in the 



PRINCETON 
ART ASSOCIATION 

Rosedale Road 
921-9173 



BELLOWS 

Women s & Children s Ap pa , e i 

210 Nassau Street 



BACK-TO-SCHOOL 

TYPEWRITERS 



CBM 



CENTER BUSINESS MACHINES 



I0J NASSAU ST 



924 2243 



Continued on NCi 



THE SENATOR AND THE INTERNE: As an Interne this 
summer In the Washington office of Senator BiM 
Bradley Bill Sapoch of Hawthorne Avenue worked on 
legislative correspondence relating to the tax 
package. He will be a junior at Dickinson College this 

fall. . 

Avenue. The victim, a D avid and Joan Galicki, 850 
Burlington County resident. East D ™e. Bordentown, all 
reported the theft Saturday °" September 2; 
morning Sons were Dorn t0 Tbomas 

A White Pine Lane resident and Jean Gent '- 296 Extonville 
told Township police last week R° ad . Allentown, August 27, 
that a Canon 35 mm camera Michael and Julie Odell, 139 
valued al $570 is missing from Western Avenue, Trenton; 
his car. Police said that the John and Peggy Glover, 307 
car had been parked in Magnolia Street. Highland 
numerous locations in the Park, both on August 31; 
Township during the week the 



theft is believed to have oc- 
cured. 

ir> BIRTHS LISTED 

By u.-ilit ..I Center. In the 
week ending September 2, 
there were eight girls and 
seven boys born at Princeton 
Medical Center. 

Daughters were born to 
James and Mary Lou 
Woodwell, 169 Princeton 
Arms, East Windsor; William 
and Roberta Wells, 1309 Lee- 
way, Forked River, both on 
August 27; George and Belli 
Kniti, 27A South Minn Street, 
Allentown, August 28; Howard 
and Sara Melnick, 5 Darby 
Circle. Ml. Holly; Stephenand 
Linda Thompson, 109 Orchard 
Road, Hightstown. both on 
August 30; 

Also to Raymond and 
Petrlna Sites, 1520 Joseph 
Street. North Brunswick, 
August 31, Lawrence and 
Jane Sost, 187 Dak Creek 
Road, East Windsor, l.uuis 
and Elizabeth Krefski. 1005 
Quinton Avenue, Trenton, and 



Also to Frank and Marjorie 
Pisauro, 221 Milford Road, 
East Windsor, September 1; 
Jav and Emilv Benzieer. 155 
Texas Avenue. Lawrence- 
vllle; Thomas and 

Julie Hathaway, 91 South 



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September 11 & 12 

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between Princeton & Lawrenceville 
.Sun. 10-4 924-5770 




FOR UNITED WAY: G. Gerald Donaldson, Hun School headmaster, with customers 
of the Unlversity-NOW Day Nursey, a Way agency. Mr. Donaldson, head of the 
private education division of the Way campaign, has a $9,360 goal. Last year, con- 
tributions came from every private institution — employees and students as well 
as the school itself. Hun's Student Council, for example, has given $100 two years 
in a row. Mr. Donaldson's companions in this picture are Maria Helena Ochoa, 
Warren Lord and David Maynard-Kerachsky. 

T* _ ■ i-.i «, September 16. from 4-6 and 8- 

lopiCS Of the Town 9 :30 at Princeton High School Herman Ward * m tea f ch 

com.noed iron. p*ge 6 Courses range from three to 10 course entitled 
Forest," Conrad Richter's weeks and are held at Prin- Ll 
tale of the white boy raised by ceton Hi g h School 
the Lenni Lenape who does not Discounts are i 
want to go home to the senior citizens and students 
strangers in Pennsylvania under 18. All residents of 
who are his family. This is a Princeton and neighboring 
free program sponsored by communities may enroll, 
the Friends of the Library and The fal1 offerings combine a 
all are welcome. mixture of cultural enrich- 
ment, musical and artistic 

FALL COURSES listed sk j Ils - lan | u . a 8 e graining. 

By Adult School. Back-to- S 1 rt in ?2 adv,c H e ' h0W ; t0 
school bells are ringing for *T g recreation 

adults as well as children, as 
the Princeton Adult School 



Irish 

Sister 
Dorothy Holmes, R.S.C.J., 
bTscounirare'available for wi!l discuss southern writers 



m 'The Past in the Present: A 
Study of Modern Southern 
Literature." 

Current world trade 
diplomacy will be the subject 
of "What Makes the Japanese 
Tick : Behind the Scenes of the 
Trade Friction" by Steven B. 
Schlosstein. Frederick Ger- 
stell will survey the glorious 
years of the British Empire in 
"Imperial Noonday." Other 
aspects of British life will be 
reviewed by E.D.H, Johnson 
in "Reflections of the Social 
Scene in British Painting." 

Donald N. Wilber will 
discuss "Rugs from the 
Middle East," and Dr Ken- 
neth S. Gould will offer "An 
Introduction to 

Psychoanalysis." 

This term's offerings in the 
culinary arts department are 
Japanese Cooking (Nobuko 
Manabe) , Indian cooking 
(Tehmina Alphonse) and 
Chinese cooking (Yung-chi 
Chen). Bob Levine offers 
"Introduction to Wine 
Appreciation." 

The Adult School is offering 
"Christmas Crafts Workshop" 
with Mitzy Savini, "Quilting" 
with MayeveTate, "Spin Your 
Own Yarns' ' with Linda Berry 
Walker, "and "Knitting for 
Beginners," taught by 
Patricia Chowins. 

Courses in the visual arts 
are represented by "Painting 
in Oils and Acrylics" with 
Helen Schwartz, "Painting 
with Watercolor" by Joanne 
Augustine, "Designing" with 
Thomas George, and "Italic 
Calligraphy" with Fran 
Nimeck. In addition, Ed 
Brozyna will once again offer 
"Introduction to the 

Continued on Next Page 



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Free Parking 

Open til 8:30 p.m. Fri. 

Visa & Mastercard Accepted 

Princeton Shopping Center 
N. Harrison St. 
Princeton, N.J. 

Path 924 - 0110 

"Take the Shoe Path to walk your way" with 
famous and affordable brands for the enure 
family. 




"Our 



unveils its fall program of Pinp , anrt „ 
more than 70 courses. 

Courses will begin Thur- 
sday, September 30, and 
Tuesday, October 5 Course 
descriptions and registration 
information are contained in 
the Adult School Booklet. 

which has been mailed to p ,,,.. and Th c 

res>dents of Princeton and airland, Jr . wll) continue 

and 



New Jersey 
with Lee Merrill, 
professor of natural resource 
policy at Rutgers, will include 
a field trip to the area. Erling 
Dorf will lead a course on 
"Geologic Processes." 
Veterinarian J.C. Blumenthal 
will teach "Cats and Cat 



K 



neighboring communities 
Additional booklets are 
available at the Princeton 



his series, "Finding 

Identifying Birds." 

Public Library or by calling ™e ™ of food is the 

883-5675 weeknighte from 7 to JJgtaL Jeanne M Hos^ 

"Contemporary Topics in 

„. ,, ,. „ , . .. Nutrition" and "Cooking With 

The Adult Schoo urges the chemistry." The latter is not a 

ihhi' In unn.lt oarl*7 rt\r mi 1 1 1 ... 

cooking class, but a lecture 
and demonstration of the 



public to enroll early by mail, 
as many classes are limited in 

S5JWSSS L^fif^ S^KT" "involved 



made in person on Thursday 



cooking. 



^S 



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Everything you always wanted 

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PRESENTS <^Cj> 






CLUB MED NIGHT? 



n 



Fox Run Clubhouse • Plainsboro, N.J. 
SATURDAY, SEPT. 18, 1982 



Film and Presentation from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. 
Beer, Wine and Hot Dogs Served 




W 



BY RESERVATION ONLY 

Contact 

Ceuc Z %n,el 

Windsor Plaza 
Princeton-Hightstown Road 
Princeton Jet., N.J. 08550 



79 9-3800 

52 BORA B( 



^ 



I ■■■■III! -T— ~~ ~— ~ "" ~~^ TVirwwi nf the Town Joseph Kolator w '" ,cach 

Top, Z°l* e J? ^t*£%£.zr 

The Adult School is also 
offering a smoker's quit clinic, 
high school equivalency 
programs in math and social 
studies and a first aid and 
CPR course (taught by the 
Red Cross). 



Information Provided by Senior Resource Center. 
Spruce Circle, 9247108 

Wadnmday. September 8: 10 a.m.: Free Blood 
Pressure Screening; Senior Resource Cenler, Redding 
Center and Holly House. 

10:30 a.m.. MCCC course on Biblical Heritage; Mt. 
Pisgah Church, 

2-3 p.m.: Free Health Screening, Borough Hall. 
Thursday, September 9: 10-Noon Grand Opening of 
the Food Coop; Paul Robeson Cenler basement $1 
registration for seniors 60 and over and lor disabled. 
For information call 924-7108 or 924-5761 
Monday. September 13: 9 20 am MCCC course in 
Pop Culture; Jewish Center 

10:30 a.m : MCCC course in Biblical Heritage; Mt 
Pisgah Church 

1:30 p.m.: Senior Citizens Club Meeting, Chestnut 
Street Firehall. 

Tuesday, September 14: 1 pm MCCC course in 
drama; Senior Resource Cenler 

8 p.m.: Writers Talking, Joyce Carol Oales; Public 
Library 

Wednesday, September 15: 1030 am MCCC 
course in Biblical Heritage; Mt. Pisgah Church 

10:30 a m : Readings Over Coffee, Conrad Richler's 
"Light in the Forest," Public Library 
Thursday, September 16: 1 0-Noon Food Coop open, 
Paul Robeson Cenler basement 

1 p.m.: Pottery, Redding Circle 

For reservations to luncheon, Saturday at Senior 
Resource Cenler provided by All Saints' Church, call 
Mary Uvari, 924-4198. 



Darkroom" and "Introduction 
to 35mm Photography " 

Computer interest continues 
to run strong, and Martin 
Schneiderman and Steven 
Gingo will present 

"Introduction to Computing," 
while Toni Nielsen will teach 
"Advanced Microcomputer 
Programming." Those with 
financial concerns may wish 
to consider "Financial 
Planning and Investments," 
taught by Robert F Rohr and 
Chris Tarr, or "Do Your Own 
Income Tax Returns," with 
William Volk 

Courses on personal skills 
include "Fiction Writing," 
taught by Elizabeth Starr Hill, 
"Bridge Skills," taught by 
Princeton High School 
Principal John Sakala, and 
courses on upholstering 
(Albert Domotor), accounting 
(Margaret W. Migliorei and 
typing (Gloria E. Seitz and 
Mary Perpetual. For those 
studying for the licensing 
exam for boiler operator. 



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got a difficult decision. Which \ 
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it smoothly, quietly, and wonder of 
wonders in a diesel, quickly. 

Do you want a Volvo GL wagon? 
A wagon as finely appointed as many 
fine luxury sedans. 




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wagon? It's our lowest pneed 
wagon. But hardly economizes 
on amenities. Offering stan- 
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assisted steering. Power 
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Topics of the Town 

Coniinued from Page 8 

For those interested in 
improving their musical 
abilities, the Adult School is 
offering an array of courses 
for recorder, guitar and piano. 
Harol Morris will teach 
"Beginner's Classic Guitar" 
and "Jazz Guitar," while 
Caroline Moseley will offer 
three levels of "Folk Guitar." 
"Beginning Recorder" and 
"Recorder II" wiU be taught 
by Jennifer Lehmann. "Piano 
Study for Adult Beginners" 
will be taught by Marianne 
Lauffer at the Westminster 
Choir College. 

For those who would rather 
listen than play, there is 
Jenneke Barton's course, 
"What's in a Song?" 

This semester's recreation 
schedule includes a new en- 
try: "Play Tai-Chi and 
Relax," taught by Dr. 
Leonard Hollander. A course 
on "International Folk 
Dancing" will be presented by 
Gerry Kaplan. Other dancing 
classes are "Square Dancing 
for Beginners," taught by 
Betsey Gotta, and beginning 
and intermediate classes in 
"Ballroom Dancing," 
presented by the Dance 
Spectrum. 

Margaretha Maryk will lead 
a class in "Swedish Gym- 
nastic Exercise" and Mike 
Wilson will teach "Golf: 
Fundamental to Advanced." 

The language arts program 
will present courses in 
"Spanish I" (Ronald Surtz), 
"Spanish in Review" (Roger 
Brink), "Italian I" (Lyn 
Richardsi, "Italian II" 
(Alessandra Mazzucato) and 
"Italian in Review" 
(Alessandra Mazzucato). 
Four French courses will be 
offered: "French I" (Fran- 
coise Rollmann and Virginia 
Rauch). "French II" 
(Francoise Rollmann), 
"French III" (Mrs. H.N. 
Archer), and "Advanced 
French Review and Con- 
versation" (Regine Lamy 
Hirsch). 

Other language instruction 
will be offered in "German I" 
(John Schwartzburg), 
"German II" (Erich 
Woisetschlaeger), "German 
in Review" (Herbert 
Hagens); and "Modern 
Greek" ( Virginia Rauch >. 




Joyce Carol Oates 



AUTHOR TO SPEAK 
At Public Library. Joyce 
Carol Oates will speak at the 
Public Library on Tuesday. 
September 14. at 8. Miss 
Oates, who has been receiving 
critical acclaim for her 
numerous books since 1963, 



presses, will speak Saturday 
night. Center instructors will 
lead workshops in fiction, 
nonfiction, playwriting and 
poetry on Saturday morning 
and will collectively run a 
unique hands-on workshop on 
Sunday. 

For those interested, each 
morning will begin with a 
session of movement to music, 
led by Linda Fitch Artist 
Edith Kogan will be on hand 
with art materials for those 
who want to explore yet 
another dimension. The total 
cost for the Retreat is $235, 
which includes room, board 
and tuition. 

The Center's regular 
workshops in fiction, non- 
fiction, poetry and playwriting 
will begin the week of Sep- 
tember 20. Poet Laurie Sheck, 
an instructor at Rutgers, will 
teaches creative writing at j om Pwc thjs fall t0 | ea( j tne 
Princeton University. poetry workshop Playwright 

She is a writer of great and center instructor Dan 
versatility, whose published Fne dman will offer advanced 
work includes novels, short p| aywr jting as well as an 
stories, poems, essays and introductory course PWC's 
plays. Her most recent novel c(M jirectors. Hanna Fox and 
is "A Bloodsmoor Romance." F | ora rj av j S , will lead the 
Other recent books are, ict j on anc j nonfiction 
"Invisible Woman," "Angel of wor kshops 
Light," and "Bellefleur " 0n September 12, Gertrude 

Miller, formerly head of a 

Questions for Miss Oates major stu dio's story depar- 

may be submitted in advance tment wi n discuss "Screen- 
at the Library or by phone, pla> . wnting: From Idea to 
924-9529 Copies of her books Hollywood," in the first of the 
may be brought to the lecture center's Sunday afternoon 
for autographing. seminars On October 31 

Miss Oates is the first in this Virginia Stuart, past vice 
year's series of "Writers president of the New Jersey 
Talking" at the library, presswomen, will moderate a 
George Ball, author of "The pane | discussion on "Public 
Past Has Another Pattern" Relations: How to Prepare 
will speak on November 16. p ress Releases, Brochures, 

and Newsletters." 

The November 14 seminar 
PROGRAMS LISTED will be on "Genre Writing: 

By Writers' Center. The Romance Fiction. " with Carol 
Princeton Writers' Center will 
introduce an expanded fall 
season with an open house on 
Wednesday evening, Sep- 
tember 8. from 8 to 10 at 10 
Nassau Street. 

In October. PWC will offer a 
weekend Writers' Retreat 
held at an inn on the ocean in 
Spring Lake The retreat will 
provide a chance for area 
writers to meet editors and 
authors. From Friday night. 
October 15, through Sunday 
afternoon, October 17, there 
will be guest speakers, 
workshops on the craft of 
writing, and a seminar on 
"Breaking into Print" 
featuring magazine and book 
editors anda literary agent. 

Mary Morris, author of 
"Vanishing Animals and 
Other Stories," will be the 
guest speaker at dinner 
Friday night. Bill Henderson, 
founder of The Pushcart Press 
and an authority on the small 



Sturm Smith, author of three 
romance novels, and there 
will be a special seminar on 
November 20, "Fiction 
Workshop for High School 
Students." with Sally Bran- 
non. feature writer 

Coffee-house readings at 
Cafe-au-Lait will become a 
regular PWC feature this fall 
The Monday night writers' 
group which meets on the first 
and third Mondays of the 
month, will resume on Sep- 
tember 20at7:30. 

Enrollment for all events is 
limited: some scholarships 
are available. For further 
information and registration 
write to Princeton Writers' 
Center. 10 Nassau Street, or 
call 924-3511. 



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: • .•.■:■.•. :■>.■ 



7 Topics of the Town 

n 

" ROAD REPAIRS. SEWERS 
* On Township Agenda. 
S Meeting this Wednesday after 
§ a three-week recess, Town- 
£ ship Committee will lake up a 
jjj number of road and sewer 
«> repair ordinances. The 
>■" meeting will be at 8 in the 
§ Valley Road Building meeting 

8 room. 

g Three ordinances will 

w receive public hearings. One 

. prohibits parking on the east 

~> side of Province Line Road 

z . from Pretty Brook Road to 

g Audubon Lane; another 

*- regulates amusement games 

u and electronic devices in 

- business establishments and 

a. the third authorizes funds for 

o>" repair work to the Pretty 

j Brook Sewer collector system 

o In new business, Committee 

^ is expected to introduce bond 

j ordinances authorizing cul-de- 

g sac repairs to Crooked Tree 

Lane and Woods Way and to 

make drainage improvements 

to the Snowden Lane and 

Overbrook intersection. 

Sewer repair priorities, a 
concern of those who live 
along Harry's Brook, will be 
addressed in the work session 



Phone Rates Up 
Residential and business 
telephone rates, operator- 
assisted calls and installa- 
tion charges will be raised 
for New Jersey Bell 
Telephone customers 
following approval last 
week by the State Board of 
Public Utilities. Although 
the company has asked 
that new rates begin 
September 17, they will not 
take effect until the BPU 
hears comments on the 
design of the rate struc- 
ture. 

For households, the basic 
service will increase 15 
cents a month Installation 
charges will be raised from 
$30 to $38.75, if the installa- 
tion requires a service 
representative. 

Bell has said it hopes to 
raise money to modernize 
its equipment and remain 
competitive with other 
companies. 



FLOWERS ON FRIDAYS 

French Market Resumes. 
The French Market sale of 
flowers by The Garden Club of 
Princeton will resume this 
week. 

Every Friday through 
October 22, from 8 15 to 11, 
Garden Club members will 
supply the stands in the mini- 
park opposite TOWN TOPICS 
with asters, dahlias, 
marigolds, chrysanthemums, 
roses, fruits and vegetables 
from their own gardens Small 
flower arrangements will also 
be featured again this fall 
Free parking is available 
along the south side of the 
mini-park. 

Proceeds from this market 



will continue to help provide 
books on garden topics for the 
Public Library, support for 
Marquand Park and the Shade 
Tree Commission as well as 
contributions to other state 
and area conservation and 
botanical organizations 

VOLUNTEERS SOUGHT 
By Historical Society The 
Historical Society of Prin- 
ceton is launching a drive to 
recruit volunteers to sup- 
plement its active volunteer 
staff 

The Society is largely 
dependent upon its volunteer 
organization to keep Bain- 
bridge House open for visitors, 
to conduct tours of Princeton 
and to work on all of its 
educational programs. 
Volunteer positions available 
include: guides for in- 
terpreting Bainbridge House; 
Princeton tour guides and 
navigators; book and gift shop 



RIDER FURNITURE 

Antique and Fine Furniture 

Hosl, :■ .-1 • H,.|lurllH .iik! H<i Minim 

Hand Stripping • Canlna • Ru 




Antkrua Oak DtMMr $225 

Oak Sland Up D.ili $650. 

Oak Tabl— and Chair* alao qvallabl 

H..,., ol 75 Main Si. 
(Hi. 271 
Kingston, N.I. 



Iabl«| 



924-0147 



committee; hospitality, 
exhibits; and graphic design 
for special events. 

The time commitment for 
all of these positions is one 
year, but the weekly schedules 
are flexible and tailored to fit 
the needs of the individual 
volunteer. 

Currently the Volunteer 
Staff is comprised of about 50 
men and women of varying 
ages and occupations who 
have a common interest in 
local history In addition to the 
many hours served at the 
Society, the volunteers are 
also involved in monthly trips 
and tours arranged ex- 
clusively for them Special 
meetings this fall will include 
a trip to Buccleuch Mansion , a 
visit to a private 19th century 
home near Stony Brook and an 
architectural and historical 
tour of the Seminary. 

Training sessions this fall 
will be held in late September 
For further information 
contact Diane Unruh, coor- 
dinator of volunteers and 
programs, Monday through 
Friday. 9 to 1.921-6748 

TWO ARE NAMED 
To Boycholr Trustees. A 
Henry Mosle, 7 Castle Howard 
Court, and Jay Vawter, 92 
Stockton Street, have been 
elected as members of the 
board of trustees of The 
American Boychoir School. 

Mr Mosle is president of 
Sound Powered Com- 
munications Corporation in 
Trenton. He is the parent of 
Douglas, a 6th grader who is 
beginning his third year at 
The Boychoir School Mr 
Mosle was chosen by The 
Parents Association as one of 
the three parent represen- 
tatives to the board. 

Mr. Vawter, a partner with 
Stein, Roe and Farnham. in 
New York City, claims no 
musical ability but a love of 
music and a wife and 
daughters who are active 
amateur musicians. An elder 
of the Nassau Presbyterian 
Church, Mr Vawter's more 
active interest in The 
Boychoir was kindled several 
years ago upon hearing the 
choir at a local performance 

HOOKS SOUGHT 

For Rocky Hill Fair. The 

Kocky Hill Community Group 

seeks donations of used books 

for the Rocky Hill Community 



G00DSP0RTS 

BACK TO SCHOOL 

SPORTING SPECIALS 




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Topics of the Town 

Continued (torn Page 10 

Fair, which will be held on 
Saturday, October 2. 

The Community Group 
suggests that what one reader 
has read and no longer wants 
may be just the book another 
reader is looking for Books to 
be donated may be brought to 
the Mary Jacobs Library on 
Route 518, Rocky Hill, in 
advance of the Fair so they 
may be sorted and arranged 
for Fair Day. 



REGISTRATION FRIDAY 

For YWCA Courses. The 

Princeton YWCA announces 

the commencement of its fall 

session for 1982. 

Special programs include a 
Saturday Spotlight for 
educable mentally retarded 
and learning disabled teens. A 
four day "Learn to Swim" will 
be offered September 13-16 for 
adults who do not know how to 
swim. It is offered free to 
Princeton YWCA members 
and at a nominal fee for non- 
members. A "Follow Up to 
Toma" on October 9 will 
present workshops dealing 
with many aspects of drug and 
alcohol abuse. 

The Adult Department is 
featuring three fall excursions 
to places of local interest. 
Skills training workshops for 
professionals include a 
Communication Workshop for 
Managers, Counseling Skills, 
and Report and Letter Writing 
for Professionals. In language 
and literature Rare Books, 
Short Stories as a Way to 
Explore Your Roots, Con- 
versational Chinese, German, 
and English as a Second 
Language are being offered 

For those with creative 
interests Beginning Piano, 
Popular Music Choir, Design 
Knitting, Quilting, Fiber Arts, 
Cooking for a Healthy Heart, 
Wine and Dine for Less, and 
The New American Cooking 
are samples of class offerings. 
In the areas of adult education 
and personal growth, the adult 
department is presenting 
Careers with Computers, 
Monthly Women's Forum, 
Effective Parenting, Learning 
to Live with Dying, Under- 
standing Relationships, and 
Women and Stress. 

The Health, Physical 

Education and Recreation 
Department continues its wide 
variety of popular classes for 
adults and children. These 
include Mother-Toddler 
classes, Tumble Tots, 
Gymnastics, Ballet, 
Kleinkinderturnen, Jazz, Tap 
Dance, Aikido, Aerobics, Pre- 
natal and Post-natal Exercise, 
and Total Body Conditioning. 
For those who enjoy outside 
activities, biking, hiking and 
canoeing are offered. 

Aquatics programs include 
parent-toddler classes, 
progression skills classes for 
youth and adults, and 
American Red Cross classes. 
A special Swim for Fun for 
Little Squirts will provide both 
pool and arts & crafts time for 
pre-schoolers. 

Special features of the youth 
department for pre-school 
children this fall include Mom 
& Me - Not For Artists Only. 
Morning in the Park, Toddler 
Cooking, Morning Medley, as 
well as the Toddler Fun Club 
programs in Princeton, 
Kendall Park and West 
Windsor. 

Grade school children can 
participate in The Play Shop, 
Beginning Ceramics, Sign 
Language for Children, Once 
upon a Quilt, Video Taping, 
and mask and costume 
making classes. 

Registration for these and 
other classes will take place 
Friday, September 10 (pre- 
school only) 9-1, Saturday. 
September 11, 9-12:30, and 
Monday, September 13, 9-7 
p.m. 



For more information, call 
the YWCA at 924-5571. 



SUNDAY IS START 
Of Carnegie Boat Races. 

The fall racing season of the 
Carnegie Sailing Club begins 
on Sunday, and sailors of 
Sunfish and Lasers are invited 
to participate. 

Membership fees - which 
cover the cost of trophies, 
picnics in the fall and spring, 
and after-racing refreshments 
- are nominal. There is a $15 
initiation fee and a $10 annual 
fee. Emphasized is the fun of 
racing, comeraderie, and the 
ways of the wind on Lake 
Carnegie. 

Club officers for 1982 are 
Dan Mazzarella, commodore; 
Peter Grosz, vice- 

commodore; Christine 
Bethune, secretary; and Joel 
Johnson, treasurer. All in- 
terested sailors are invited to 
join. Contact any of these 
officers concerning mem- 
bership. Bring your boat to the 
boathouse at the foot of Shady 
Brook Lane about 1:30. 
Racing starts at 2. 

STORYTELLERS DUE 
At Public Library. Barbara 
Freeman and Connie Regan, 
known professionally as "The 
Folktellers," will make a 
special appearance at the 
Princeton Public Library on 



Thursday, September 23, at 
3:30 

The program is open to 
adults and children in first 
gradeandup. Free tickets are 
now available at the library, 
65 Witherspoon Street, or by 
calling 924-9529. 

The Folktellers are a 
storytelling duo from 
Asheville, N.C. They speak to 
audiences of all ages with a 
blend of humor, mountain 
tales and contemporary 
stories. They have appeared 
at the National Storytelling 
Festival in Jonesboro. Tenn.. 
the 24th Annual International 
Folklore Festival in England, 
as well as festivals in 
Philadelphia, Washington. D. 
C, Atlanta, Chicago and 



Winnepeg. Canada. 
They have performed on 
National Public Radio as well 
as before university and 
library audiences. The two 
folktellers, who are firs' 
cousins, have traveled over 
100,000 miles since they began 
their free lance approach to 
the age old art of storytelling 
seven years ago. 

This program is the second 
in a series on the American 
Oral Tradition to be presented 
this year by the Library in 
cooperation with the public 
libraries of East Brunswick, 
Maplewood, Piscataway, and 
Wayne. Funds for the 
program are being provided 

Continued on Next Page 



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924-1052 



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What's In A Name? 

History, tradition, pride. 



Now, the pride of family heritage 

joins the pride of master craftsmanship 

in a most SPECIAL EVENT. 

An Exhibition Of Hand-Engraving Of 
Heraldic Signet Rings 



a 



Thursday. Sept. 23; Friday. Sept. 24; Saturday. Sept. 25 



Master Engraver, Timothy Buchanan, will be on the 
premises to personally assist you in your Signet 
Ring selection, and hand-engrave on your choice— 
your ancestral Coat-of-Arms, Family Crest, or 
Initials. The Romance of Heraldry lends its tradi- 
tions perfectly to the artist in metal-- 
and to the discriminating seeker 
of the unique Christmas gilt. 






.»• 




With the purchase of a 14K or 18K gold Signet 
Ring, the engraving fee will be specially priced 
during this SPECIAL EVENT, as well as the cost for 
researching your family geneology, with artwork 
and certification, for the Coat-of-Arms emblem. 



If you do not have a certified Coat-of-Arms, we urge you to place your Researching 
request now to be in time for the Exhibition engraving. Contact Event Coordinator, 
MICHAEL JOACHIM at 609-924-0624 to ensure delivery for the Holidays. 



What's in a Name? Our September SPECIAL 
EVENT is an opportunity to have the hands of an 
artist help create the answer for you, in the 
fashionable and timeless elegance of an excep- 
tional piece of jewelry certain to become a 
cherished family heirloom. 





54 Nassau Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 
(609) 924-0624 

Thursday and Friday Evenings Until 8 30 PM 

MASTER CARD ft VISA ACCEPTED 



Topics of the Town 

■ . . 

'■ by the New Jersey State 
i Library and The Friends of 
i Princeton Public Library. 
I For further information, call 
i the library at 924-9529 

CRAFT WORKSHOP 
At Rocky Hill Library. The 
I Mary Jacobs Library in 
! Rocky Hill will have a craft 
i workshop for adults on 
! Monday, at 10. Dina Roth of 
J the Somerset County Library 
i will teach "Beginning Patch 
| work." 

; This program is free and 
j open to the public. Par- 
I ticipants are asked to register 
\ for the workshop by calling 
I the library at 924-7073. 



UNIFORMS SOUGHT 
By Girl Scouts. The Prin- 
ceton Girl Scout troops are 
back in swing after a summer 
break. Many of the new 
Scouts, and those moving up 
from Brownie, will need 
uniforms. 

The Girl Scouts are 
requesting persons who have 
Brownie and Girl Scout 
uniforms that are no longer 
being used bring them to the 
Methodist Church on Nassau 
Street and Vandeventer 
Avenue. 

These uniforms will then be 
made available, free of 
charge, to any girl who wishes 
one. Any other Girl Scout 
gear, such as sashes, socks, or 
turtlenecks, will also be 
welcome. 



Ricchard's 

shoes for (he discriminating 







■ OtDMAINf ■ | 

trotters 



■•'-^i 



Mabel MS. 
grey, khaki 
& rust suede 



Walk softly In a suede casual 

slip-on moccasin with a pampering, 

easy-going wedge and sole ol 

shock-absorbing crepe. 

Pari ol the Walking Lady Collection 

from Old Maine Trotters, 



150 Nassau Street 
Princeton. N.J. 924-6785 



Mon.-Frl. 9»-6 
Thur. 9-8 - Sat. 9-5 



ENGLISH OFFERED 

At Adult School. English for 
Speakers of Other Languages 
(ESOL) will be offered by the 
Princeton Adult School for ten 
weeks from September 30 to 
December 16. 

Non-native students at any 
level, from complete beginner 
to advanced, are welcome. 
Classes will be held in Prin- 
ceton High School on Thur- 
sdays from 8 to 10 p.m. 
Required in-person 

registration will be on 
Thursday, September 16, from 
8-9:30 p m in the High School 
cafeteria. 

Students will be placed in 
classes according to their 
level of English, after a brief 
interview. Since class space is 
limited, students are en- 
couraged to arrive early on 
registration night. 

Teachers will be Lee 
Brewda, Barbara Greenfeldt, 
Libby Shanefield, Karin 
Steinhaus, and Elinor 
Williams Classes emphasize 
conversation and practical 
grammar, and some reading 
and writing is assigned each 
week. 

The class fee is $25, plus 
textbooks. Limited scholar- 
ship help is available. 

SAT CLASSES PLANNED 

In Rocky Hill. The Rocky 
Hill Community Group will 
hold SAT/PSAT preparation 
classes beginning Monday, 
September 27, and continuing 
through Thursday, October 21. 

Students will study Greek, 
Latin, and Anglo-Saxon roots, 
prefixes and commonly con- 
fused words. Special emphasis 
will be on test-taking techni- 
ques and reading comprehen- 
sion SAT test-takers will have 
an additional two classes to 
prepare for the test of Stan- 
dard Written English, which is 
given with the SAT, but not 
with the PSAT. 

Classes meet at the Rocky 
Hill Community Group House, 
Route 518, Rocky Hill, from 
7-9 Call instructor Joan Car 
ris, 921-6206, after 5 for infor- 
mation and registration. 



ANNUAL OUTING SET 
By Princeton C ol C. The 




BACK TO SCHOOL! 

Here's Your Checklist... 



D 3-ring binders □ filler paper 
and indexes □ slide rules, pro- 
tractors D rulers, drawing sets 
D spiral notebooks, pads 

□ book bags, briefcases 
D pens □ pencils □ pencil 
cases □ markers and marker 
sets □ desk lamps □ bulletin 
boards D waste paper baskets 

□ graph paper □ book covers 

□ index cards, file boxes. 



HINKSON'S 

82 Nassau Street Princeton, N.J. 





Chamber of Commerce of the 
Greater Princeton area will 
hold its 18th annual gold and 
tennis outing next Thursday, 
Sept. 16. at the Hopewell 
Valley Golf Club 

Golf starts at 12:30 and a 
tennis round-robin begins at 
1 30 A featured prize will be 
$2,500 for a hole-in-one. Gifts, 
prizes, cocktails and dinner 
are included in the day's 
activities For further in- 
formation, call Ellen Hodges 
at 924-7676. 



Polly's Fine Candy 
63 Palmer Square W. 
Princeton 

924-5635 



ACaCDode 

BOUTIQUE 

1 5 Witherspoon Street 

Princeton. N.J. 



vesuVio ! 

PIZZERIA s RESTAURANT I 

yl Urr Mfcoupon | 

258 Nassau St 

921-2477 



Julius H. Gross, Inc. 

Professional Painting and Paper-hanging 



Interior and Exterior 
Call 924-1474 for a Free Estimate 

A Princeton Business 
tor Twenty-Five Years 





The Finest Prime 

Meats in the Area 

Are Available Here!! 



Corn Fed Beef - Milk Fed Veal 

Spring Lamb - Young Tender Pork 

Smoked Hams - Fresh Ground Beef 

Fresh Poultry - Canned Hams 

All our meat is cut to order, so please call 
your order in at least three hours in advance. 



Discover Our World of Imported and Domestic Cheese*. 



TOTO'S MARKET 

74 Witherapoon St. Princeton 609-824-0788 

Hour,: Mon 6 Tu« 8 am 10 5:30 pm: Thui, 6 Fri 8 am io 6 30 Dm Wad E» Sat. 8 am tot prr 



I For Your Table Since 19121" 




MAKE LV/H/FC With the NIKE Oceania: 

NIKF nnh r f 7 *^" y ° U,]1 make a bi § S P lash - 

shoe Sf ™»t popular features into one Jreat 
ny on uppers set off in a choice of colors. With sizes for 
fcKdST "^ W ° men - And OUie and Olivia Ocea^ 
fora5uIs? eaniabyNIKE:take 'emout 




HULIT'S SHOES 



140 Nassau Street 



Mon.-Fri. 9 - 5:30; Sat. 9 - s 



924-1952 




wssSm 



Supermarket 



"For Friendly Service, Quality and Value." 

172 NASSAU ST.. PRINCETON 

STORI HOURS: »o. l„.i w.d • Sol » o m Klip. - IMin lorn ,,i. m .nig. HI! 



U.S.DA Choice Boneless Beel 

Sirloin Tip uiDa $009 

Roast «")i b . 



seer 

*2< 



US DA Choice Boneless Beef 

Sirioin Tip UDa 
Steak &s>m. 



*2 



79 




Fresh Gov't Insp. Boneless, 
Skinless Breast 

Chicken 
Cutlets 




U.S.D.A. Choice 

Boneless 
Beef Roast 



> Bottom 
Round 

• Shoulder 

• Chuck 



U.S.DA Choice Boneless Beet 

Top Round , 5sBi; $009 
Roast 



*2 ( 



U.S.D.A. Choice Boneless Beel 

Rump figs, 
Roast wa) 



?ei 

$21° 



Fresh Govt Insp. With Thighs 

Chicken 

Legs ib 



Firm & Fresh 

Chicken 
Livers 



FROZEN FOOD SAVINGS 



79*] 
59* 



9 Slice 

Elite's 
Cheese Pizza 



24 Oz 

pitq. 



*1 



99 



79* 



99 



Gia2ed or Jelly oi/ e0 

Morton Donuts pkg 

Beet with Brown Grow. lurkev Ham & 

Cheese or Reuben 7 oz ^ — 

Pepperidge Farm Deli pkg *1 

Ronzoni o rt7 AA . 

Fettucine Alfredo pkg 99* 

Minute Maid 

Orange Juice 

Baby Watson 

Cheese Cake 

Rich's 

Coffee Lighfener pkg 

Mrs Paul's 

Fried Clams pkg. 

Birds Eye 8 , _ i-k , 

COOl Whip con. 79* 



59* 



60Z 
can 

16oz.$«49 
Pkg y * 

1602 30* 

oz$li9 



DAIRY SAVINGS 



Save More 

Minute Maid 
Orange Juice 



'/2gal 
cont. 



n 



29 



!-■ go* 

Pint QQ* 



Light N Lively 

Cottage Cheese 

Breakstone 

Sour Cream com 

Assorted Flavors t% oz cm 

Chambourcy YogurtOcups » I 

Regualr Quarters . Ctf\t 

Parkay Margar- 

Borden Yellow or White 



U.S.D.A. Choice Boneless Beel 

Top Round us6a 
Steak 



*2 



79 



r 



Family Value Pack Savings- 



U.S.DA Choice Boneless Beet 

Shoulder ^ 

Steak -sm 



»er 

«2 



59 



Fresh Gov t Insp. With Ribs 

Chicken 
Breasts 1 



*l 



29 



Hoi or Sweet 

Italian 
Sausage 



«i 



v> 



3 lbs. or more 



Fresh Gov't Insp 

Chicken 
Drumstick 



89' 



Fresh Gov't Insp 

Chicken 
Thighs 



99< 



US D A Choice Beel Loin 

f hel ! ma 

Steak CK0CI 



*3 



99 



U S DA Choice 8eet Round 

Cubed fijjK, 
Steak l<m> ib 



«2 



79 



GROCERY SAVINGS- 



Water Added Smoked c.oro 

Center Cut Pork Chops ib'Z 



Creamy or Chunky 

Skippy 
Peanut Butter 



18 oz. 

jor 



n 



39 



Save Mote 

Geisha Chunk 
Light Tuna 



Crushed or Tomato Puree 

Redpack 
Tomatoes 



28 02 
can 



69* 




Green Giant 

Niblets 

COm can 



39 s 



Glad 

Sandwich 
Bags 



150 in 
Pkg 



89* 



Nabisco 

Cheese 
Nips 



15 oz 

pkg 



99 



Cherry Apple or fiaspoetri 



Jolly Rancher 7QC 
Candy P kg/Tr 



>|0 



Soiled or Unsalted Dry Roasted 16 OZ CAI 

Planters Peanuts ','{■' *Z 

Lea&Perrins 10oz«130 

Worcestershire Sauce wi 'I 

Lea&Perrins 5oz Qfte 

Steak Sauce mi. qt 

Camplire I6oz7A« 

Marshmallows pkg /y 

Save More _ 16ozsi69 



Parkay Margarine pkg 59' 

Borden Yellow or White 12oz<179 I Do'nti Tnln 

Skim American pkg 5 1 79 V. Pe P sl Cola 



Borden Cremora 'VoT'l' 

Bath Size White or Pink J75oi ZAt 

Dove Soap pkg ' 



69* 



OT 59« 



jar 



99 



Red or White Golds 

Horseradish 

Foodtown Random Weight c A 

Swiss Stix ib *2 

Fcodlown Random Weiohi No Salt Added caco 

Swiss Stix ib *3 5V 
HEALTH & GOURMET 



! 

I Regular^ Diet or Light 6 pack SI 99 

IPepSI Cola 12 oz cans' I 



Coca Cola. Tab or 

Diet Coke 

Yahrzeit 

Memorial Tumblers 

Assorted Nature Volley light Br. Crunch v 

Snack Bars 

Furniture Polish 

Endust 

Gilnetters 

Blueback Salmon 

Caramia Marinated 

Artichoke Hearts 

Carnation Assorted Varieties 

Granola Trail Bars 



6 pack SI 99 
12 oz. cans I 

3.0*1 

ooz.S|69 

pkg I 
6oz.C|59 

can I 

' J '-°z$|99 
can I 

^89* 

Pk°gH 29 



DELI SAVINGS 



BAKERY SAVINGS 



imported <iom Conoaa Chiven Old 

Snollsn I2 0ZC139 

Marmalade jar *l 

Crosse & Blackwell Red !3ozOO« 

Consomme Madrilene con OY 

Crosse & Blackwell Clear 1 3 oz AAt 

Consomme Madrilene c° n OTf 

Crosse & Blackwell 13 02 . 

Vichysoisse Soup can 



Oscar Mayer 

Sliced Bacon 

. $949 

pfcg ■ 



Foodtown Hamburger or 

Hot Dog Rolls 



12 In 

_£ka. 



69* 



89* 



Oscar Mayer Meat or Beet 

Sliced Bologna 

Meat or Beet 

Ball Park Franks 

Oscar Mayer Sliced 

Hard Salami pkg 



pg»l" 

8oz$219 



QQ* 



foodtown Pumpernickel or Sarx 

Rye Bread pkg 

Foodtown Chocolate or ]q ol 

Sugar Donuts pkg ot i6 

White, Whole Wheat or Onion 12 oz. C AC 



99* 



in mo, in iui7 111 icrui vi \si nut r 

Toufayan Pita Bread 



pkg 



mini coupon mini imimcouponmim mini coupon mini 



■i Save More 

c MINUTE MAID 
2 ORANGE 



O 



JUICE ccX? 



99*| I 

O o 
v 



Regular Quarters 

PARKAY 
MARGA 
RINE 



So 



lb., 

pkgj 



39* I * 



wnw no cowon and an adoitonai $7 &o 

Ot WOK PtJiCHAM. Coupon good al any 
Oo>«»e-n'i Sup#«r>of»et. thru Jepi II. t«i 
LimB one coupon per tanHy. 

No 2 ™ S 



OO 
3 v 



89' 



O 

o 



mini geesee mini mini Easscsmmi mini EsmSGH mini 

Prices effective Monday. Sept. 6 thru Saturday Sept. 1 1 . 1 982. Not responsible lor typographical errors. We reserve the right to limit auonlffles. 



S l 



69 



Krauss Cry O Vac 3 Ib pkg 

Beef Griddle Franks 

Frozen Chopped & formed Pott, tyme 

22? i m 2dozQ099 

Steak Burgers pkg 'Z 

Frozen Pant tyme i00% «i Beef o , H -»,- 

Beef Burgers pkg $ 3 39 

F'o;enCtiopDed & Formed Pottt T, rr .^ 

2ioz$i99 



Veal Patties 

Fresh Seafood Savings 

5049 

lb A 



Fresh 

Flounder Fillet 

Fresh Calico 

Bay Scallops ib*3 

Fresh cioo 

Cod Steaks b 5 I 99 

Fresh cioo 

Cht /stone Clamsdozen'l 

Fresh Pan Ready t11a 

Bluefish or Whiting b s l 79 
PRODUCE SAVINGS 



Delicious, Red Blushed Sweet n' juicy 

California 
Nectarines 

49* 



Cteamy Smooth 

Bartlett 
Pears 



3 ib 
bag 



99 



US #1 Extra Fancy Washington State 

Red Delicious *>Q^ 



Apples 



Super Select 

Cucumbers 

Fresh 

Green Beans 

Crisp 

Green Cabbage 

US. #1 Fancy Golden 

Sweet rams 

Chicory or 

Escarole 

US *1 Mild 

Yellow Onions 

Save More 

Red Onions 

New Crop Butternut or 

Acorn Squash 



5,oH 
,b59* 
,bl9* 
b29* 
b39* 

bagO w 

b39* 
b29* 



APPETIZER SAVINGS 



Sliced To Order 

Imported 
Danish Har 



'/2H8 



ishHam 



*i 



29 



Save More 

VERIFINE 
APPLE 
SAUCE 2 IV 

WITH IHii COUPON AND AN AX>OnONAL i? SO 
OB MORI PUtCHAU Coupon oood ot any ! 
OawOion't Supermortet Ktrv Mpl IX IM2 ' — 
t'mti on* coupon p«t tomtty ^p 

No. 2 ^_ 



Sliced To Order Yellow or White crreeie 

Dorman's 
American »ib 

Sliced To Order SI 69 

Armour Hard Salami .ib *l 

Sliced to Ota*' imported Cheese cm j. o 

Austrian Swiss - ^ it> * I 

Sliced ToOrder $119 

Hay du Cooked Salami 2io7l 

Cut fo Order Importer Danish SI 69 

Creamy Havarti vaib. ■ 

Sliced To Order SI 29 

Mother Goose Liverwurst - > 3 ib . * I 

Sliced fo Order Polty-0 Slicing 

Mozzarella < 

Sliced To Order Carando A/C 

Genoa Salami 

Cut To Order imported 

Swedish Fontina 

Fresh 

Potato Salad 

Fresh 

Health Salad 

Hormel Beet 

Lumberjack Roll 



149 



ilb 

hfc*l 
b*l 89 
b«l 69 

,b69* 
e 69* 
b*l 49 

Color Film Processing — » 

'2 C107 ?4 S^49 

Exposure roii ' I Exposure ran *%> 

20 S#M . Each ^ 

Expotuwroii»2 99 Reprint \9y 



MAILBOX 



£ 1-95 Decision 

» To the Editor of Town Topics : 

> Following is the text of a 

2 letter I have written to Drew 

S Lewis, Secretary of Tran- 

§ sport at ion, Washington, DC. : 

j" I know that you have many 

.difficult decisions to make - 

-» decisions that profoundly 

* affect various areas of our 

g country. But please take a 

j- moment to consider what I 

ofeel strongly moved to say 

5 about one such decision you 

a. must make - whether to build 

withe 23-mile stretch of Inter 

^state Route 95 between 

oHopewell and Franklin 

2 townships in New Jersey 

3 I confess that my concern 

Cover this matter is personal : I 

live in Princeton Township -- 

one of the old New Jersey 

towns that will be directly 

affected by your decision to 

build or not to build And while 




wm 



FRMCHON DECORATING SHOP 

35 Palmar Square Wail 
924-1670 



I can muster many arguments 
to support my position, 1 am 
speaking from direct persona! 
concern, as is nearly everyone 
else, I suspect, who takes a 
strong stand on the 1-95 
question 

Please consider very 

carefully the option NOT to 
build this stretch of highway 
and, if at all possible, to apply 
the funds saved to other more 
worthy projects - mass 
transit, highway main- 
tenance, or other building 
projects with clearly 
established merit 

I strongly believe that it 
would be a grave mistake to 
continue to concentrate 
residential, industrial and 
transportation development 
on a major scale in central 
New Jersey. As you know, this 
is the most heavily populated 
and industrialized state in the 
nation 

It already has more 
development than it can 
properly sustain, so that 
building this stretch of 1-95 
would put a very heavy 
burden on the region's en- 
vironmental resources and 
their ability to support more 
population and industry. 

Moreover, the highway is 
scheduled to be built through 
one of the last remaining 
relatively undeveloped - and 
still very beautiful - pieces of 
countryside in this state and in 
the urbanized Northeast 

Those who argue in favor of 
the highway do so in theshort- 

J sighted belief that all in- 
dustrial development in- 



Closed For Carpeting 
The Public Library will 

be closed from noon 
Wednesday. September 15. 
through Saturday, Sep- 
tember 18. for carpet work. 
The Library is replacing 
a major portion of its 
original carpet installed in 
1966 Books and other 
materials may be returned 
through the bookdrops 
while the Library is closed. 



creases the quality of life for 
the people, but often the op- 
posite is true Witness the 
industrial blight that has 
settled on much of New Jersey 
near to New York City and 
Philadelphia: the very parts 
of the state with the most 
highways, industrial plants, 
and people Surely there are 
far better uses for the hun- 
dreds of millions of dollars 
that this 23-mile stretch of 
highway will cost. 

I hope that you will decide to 
devote those funds to other 
purposes and thereby avoid 
both the destruction of some of 
this state's finest farmland 
and countryside and the over- 
development of an already 
heavily populated and in- 
dustrialized region of the 
United States 

NELSON R. TRENNER JR 
100 Hunt Drive 



through our collection''" asks 
a library administrator The 
attitude implied in the word 
"pawed" is also conveyed in 
the library's closed door 
policy 

My guess is that abuse of 
library books is due more to a 
few students than to towns- 
people 

The guards and gates newly 
installed in Firestone Library 
have transformed a pleasant 
lobby into an odious one The 
community should insist that 
the library reopen its doors to 
the public If the library 
wants to make money from 
the deal let it charge 
something reasonable, say, 35 
cents a day 

JOSHUA MILLER 
26 Chestnut Street 



W 



FRESH BLUEBERRIES 

and FRESH PEACHES 

in Danish 

—Coffee Cake— 



VILLAGE BAKERY 

ZQordonAv* 896-0036 Uwr*nc««lll» 






Hra.: Wad 9 a.m. -6 p.m.; Th A Frl 7 a.m.-7 p.m. 
Sat 7 a.m. -0 p.m.; Sun 8 a.m. -4 p.m. 

\ Best to order ahead. 



m& 




helps you brighten next Spring 

with Spring flowering bulbs 

from Holland 



Tulips 

Narcissus 

Daffodils 

Hyacinth 

Crocus 



In all, over 

100 varieties of Holland Bulbs 

ready for planting - plus bulb 

planting instructions and supplies. 



Orders of over lOO bulbs of any one variety dis- 
counted 20%. 

Ask about Kale's Landscape Services 

KALE'S NURSERY & LANDSCAPE SERVICE 
133 CARTER RD . PRINCETON • NJ 08540 

DIRECTIONS FROM PRINCETON SOUTH ON RT 206 

TO CARTER RO TURN RIGHT. LOCATED 1 '/. Ml ON LEFT 

MON-SAT 9-5. SUN 10-4.921-9248 



Jewels 
by Juliana 

16 Wllherspoon St. 

921-7233 



^ J . 1 ; k i4A^^^^^^ 



| 358 Nassau 609-924-2086 

Hours 10-5 30 Mon -Sal 



FALL BLOOMING *£. 

MUMS 

IN BUD • AVAILABLE NOW 

MlZURlURSERr 

rsS! 265 Bakers Basin Rd. 587-9150 ,^^ 
Lawrenceville [ VISA J 




Mon.-Fn.. 9-4. Sal. 9-12 






For an Open Library. 
To The Editor of Town Topics: 

I just returned from a fine 
two week visit to a friend who 
lives in California. One of the 
pleasures of the trip was 
working every day in the 
University of California 
libaries 

Both graduate and un- 
dergraduate libraries are 
open to the public, and 
although the stacks of the 
graduate library are closed, 
everyone can request books 
for day use and the reference 
and periodical rooms as well 
as other rooms are open to all. 

I think it is a shame that the 
Princeton University library 
is now closed to the public 
except to those who pay an 
exorbitant fee. "Why should 
the public be allowed to paw 



. Tm/uon-i/br t/ic ■ /»//• 7ryrf/r 



SIZE 16 AND ABOVE AND HALF SI2ES 
/- EXPERT ALTERATIONS 

Slilfial'V. ^ 215-794-5770 




FALL FASHIONS 

M>% (DIFIF 

THURSDAY. FRIDAY. SATURDAY 

SEPTEMBER9TH. 10TH. 11TH 

(Prior Sales Nol Included) 

HIIIIV.1IHH< SOIIAHI ROUTE 202 L AH ASK A PE NNSYLVANIA 18931 

10 i MONDAY THRU THURSDAY AND SATURDAY 10 » FRIDAY 12 SSUNOAY RAHKING Al THE DOOR 




^-=J 



UNTIL YOU READ THIS... 

don't clean 
your clothes 

... a// coin-op cleaning 
is not the same 



• the solvents we use are the same as those used by 95% of 
professional cleaners 

> ...therefore articles and labels which advise avoiding petroleum 
solvents and coin-op cleaning do not apply to us 

• our equipment is the same as that used by professional 
cleaners; in most cases, cleaning is done in 1 V2 hours 

- leave your clothes with attendant; we will clean them for you 
at no extra charge 

our bulk cleaning method is 70% cheaper than by the piece 

• wrinkle-free and odor-free; many piece's need no pressing 

• big washers for big loads, small washers for small loads 



1 CLEAN THE COIN OPERATED WAY AND SAVE 



COIN WASH 

Open 24 Hours a Day 

259 Nassau Street 921 -9785 

Behind Viking Furniture 



CALENDAR 

Of The Week 



Wednesday, September 8 
Princeton Schools Open 

1:15 p.m.: Orientation for 
freshmen and new students; 
Princeton High School. 

2-3 p.m.: Free Health 
Screenings for colorectal 
cancer, diabetes and blood 
pressure, Princeton Health 
Department; Borough Hall 
basement. 

2-3 p.m. : Orientation meeting. 
Contact of Mercer County; 
Windsor Chapel, 401 Village 
Road East, Princeton Jun- 
ction. 

7:30 p.m.: Democratic 
Platform Hearing, Mercer 
County Democratic Com- 
mittee; James Kerney 
Center, Mercer County 
Community College, North 
Broad and Academy Streets, 
Trenton. 

8p.m.: Township Committee; 
Valley Road Building 
meeting room. 

8-10 p.m.: Open House and 
Registration, Princeton 
Writers' Center; 10 Nassau 
Street. 

Thursday, September 9 
7:30-9:30 p.m.: Forum on 
Resource Recycling, "Solid 
Waste: What Does It Mean to 
You?" Mercer County 
League of Women Voters; 
Lawrence High School 
auditorium, 2525 Princeton 
Pike, Lawrenceville. 
7:30 p.m : Princeton Squares 
Mainstream Plus Dance; 
Community Park School. 
Rounds 7 : 30, Squares 8-10: 30 

8 p.m .: Borough Council 
Agenda Session, Borough 
Hall. 

Friday, September 10 
8:15-11 am.: French Market 
sale of flowers, The Garden 
Club of Princeton; mini-park 
opposite TOWNTOPICS. 
Nassau and Mercer Streets. 

Saturday. September 11 

9 am -Noon: Donations for 
Hospital Rummage Sale 
accepted at Princeton House 
Storage Facility; Herron- 
townRoad. 

10 a.m. -5 p.m : 9th Annual 
Arts and Crafts Festival, 
sponsored by Historic 
Chester Business 
Association; Main Street, 
Chester. Also on Sunday. 

10-11 a.m.: Orientation 
briefing on Contact of 
Mercer County ; First United 
Methodist Church, 60 South 
Main Street, Pennington. 

Sunday, September 12 

9 a.m.: Birdwatching walk in 
Rutgers University's Hut- 
cheson Forest with or- 
nithologist Charles Leek; 
meet at entrance of the 
woods, Amwell Road, Route 
514, Franklin Township, east 
of East Millstone. 
Noon-4 p m : 20th annual 
Antique Auto Festival; 
Middlesex County 

Fairgrounds, Cranbury 
Road, East Brunswick. 
1-5 p.m.: An Art Affair, 
festival of visual and per- 
forming arts presented by 
McCarter Theatre and the 
Princeton Art Association; 
McCarter Theatre, 91 
University Place, and at Ettl 
Farm, Rosedale Road. 
1:30-4:30 p.m.: Princeton 
Writers' Center Seminar on 
"Screenplay Writing: From 
Idea to Hollywood," Ger- 
trude Miller, former head of 
a studio story department , 10 
Nassau Street 

Monday. September 13 

2-3 p.m: Orientation Briefing 
for Contact of Mercer 
county; Trinity Church, 33 
Mercer Street 

7:30 p.m.: Environmental 
Design Review Committee; 



Conference Room A, Valley 
Road Building. 
8 p m : Planning Board Public 
Hearing on adoption of 
amendments to the Master 
Plan; Valley Road Building 
meeting room. 

Tuesday. September 14 

7:30 p.m : International Folk 
Dancing, Princeton Folk 

Dance Group; Riverside 

School Beginners welcome, 

instruction provided, 
8 p.m.: Borough Council; 

Borough Hall. 
8 pm : School Board business 

meeting high school library. 
8 p.m. : Joyce Carol Oates will 

speak at Princeton Public 

Library, first in Writers 

Talking Series 
8 p.m.: Princeton Nuclear 

Freeze Referendum 

meeting, all welcome; 

Trinity Church 

Wednesday, September 15 

10:30 a.m.; Readings Over 
Coffee with Dr Donald 
Ecroyd, professor of speech, 
Temple University, "The 
Light in the Forest," by 
Conrad Richter; Princeton 
Public Library 

8 p.m.: Township Committee; 
Valley Road Building 
meeting room. 

8 p.m.: Overeaters 
Anonymous; Princeton 
House, Herrontown Road 

Thursday, September 16 
7:30 p.m.: Free Square 



Dancing, Princeton Squares 
Quakerbridge Mall, Bam- 
berger's downstairs All 
invited. 

I p.m .: Borough Zoning 
Board; Princeton Com- 
munity Housing; Borough 
Hall 
8-9:30 p.m: Princeton Adult 
School Registration, Prince- 
ton High School. 

Friday. September 17 

31st annual Antiques Show and 
Sale; National Guard 
Armory. Western Avenue. 
Morristown Also on 
Saturday and Sunday 

Noon-10 p.m.: 27th annual 
Antiques Show and Sale; 
Hunterdon Art Center, 7 



Center Street, Clinton Also 
on Saturday from Noon to 10 
and Sunday from noon to6 
8:15 a.m. -II a.m. : French 
Market sale of flowers, The 
Garden Club of Princeton; 

n VnDi n r<; rk °PP° site TOWN 
- Lvr'^»Nassau and Mercer 
Streets. 

Saturday, September 18 

9 to noon: Donations for 
Hospital Rummage Sale 
accepted at Princeton House 
Storage Facility, Herron- 
town Road. 

Noon: Free square dancing 
with Princeton Squares; 
Palmer Square Green. No 
rain date, all invited. 



Training the Young Voice 

Bi-weekly classes designed to bring out the 
full beauty of the child's vocal instrument 
Boys and girls ages 7 to 1 1 
1st Semester (15 Weeks) $67.50 

Cheryl Sabetta-Moya 924-8873 

twsstmmslar CrxMr Cofcga g/aduet*, 

5 Lincoln Court, Prlnc.ton (jj block oH N»»«u St.) 




VILLAGE PAINT & WALLPAPER I 

Rt. 206 Rocky Hill, Village Shopper, 921 7120 



PITTSBURGH & MURALO PAINTS 

FINE WALLCOVERINGS 

at discount prices! 



Now Open Sundays' 
wooaoooooooeoooosoeoosocoeesoooss 




La Cuisine 

A Cookshop 

Our Customers' Comments: 

"Your food is of the highest quality " 

We ve loved everything we've gooten here You' dishes 

are so unusual " 

"You're a God-send'" 

183 Nassau St. 924-7687 

Tues.-Sat. 9-7; Sun. 9-5 




RE-ELECT 
GEORGE ADRIANCE 




PRINCETON TOWNSHIP COMMITTEE 



Current Responsibilities: 

• Elected to Township Committee in 

1979 



Regional Planning Board of Princeton 
since January, 1980. This board is 
charged with the responsibility for chart- 
ing future direction for Princeton Town- 
ship & Boro in areas of land use, roads, 
sewers, open space, community facili- 
ties, etc.; also hears allmajor develop- 
ment applications. 

Prior Community Service: 

Chairman-United 



President & Budget 
Way of Princeton 

Treasurer - Princeton Chamber 
Commerce & Civic Council. 

President. Kiwanis Club 



ol 



Joint First Aid & Rescue Squad Com- 
mittee - instrumental in working out a 
sound basis for continuing municipal 
support. 

Finance Committee Chairman. Prince- 
ton Twp Comm -responsibile for gen- 
eral oversight of Township finances, 
including investment of surplus funds 
and supervision of borrowing programs. 
Joint Hazardous Route Busing Com- 
mittee 



Member of Environmental Committee 
of Princeton 

Warden - Trinity Church 

Lambert Community Service Award 

Has lived and worked in Princeton for 25 
years. 



GEORGE ADRIANCE - PROVEN LEADERSHIP FOR PRINCETON 



i 



J 



LET'S f 
TALK I. 
ABOUT <t*^*- 

WHY FEEDING??? 
with Sam DeTuro 

Woodwinds 
Associates 

LOOK at your trees and 
shrubs' Do tney nave a healthy 
glow, good sized unmarked 
leaves, solid healthy bark? Is 
there any dieback on the ends 
ot the branches' 1 Are there 
large dead limbs in any ot your 
trees'' is the size ot your trees 
and shrubs diminulllve In com- 
parison to their age? Has your 
property got perfect soil so that 
all nutrients can get right to the 
roots? It you can answer yes to 
all ot the above, then very 
possibly your property is not a 
candidate tor deep-root 
feeding We at WOODWINDS 
suggest feeding ot trees and 
shrubs to help give your plants 
and trees the health and vigor 
that all living things need to sur- 
vive 

FEEDING helps promote root 
development, root growth It 
also helps promote structural 
strength so vital when violent 
storms strike, assists In im- 
proving fhe metabolism of 
plants and trees to overcome 
natures' diseases and pesi at- 
tacks Comparatively speak- 
ing, If human beings do not gel 
the proper nourishment, we 
become prone lo disease and 
become sickly This also hap- 
pens lo our trees and shrubs 
As we all put a groat deal ot 
time and energy into our 
gardens, we should find the 
besl preventative medicine to 
Insure tho most healthy Irees 
and shrubs possible 
Call WOODWINDS (924-3500) 
and ask about our annual 
maintenance program We're 
sure you'll be pleased 




Topics of the Town 

Continued *fom Pag* <2 

A NEIGHBORLY DAY 

On Rollingmead. If they've | 
moved away, they come back. 
If there are grown children, 
they come. too. If they've just I 
moved onto the block, they're | 
warmly welcomed. 

Everybody, in fact, who | 
lives on Rollingmead ap- 
parently comes, most of them > 
bringing potato salad and stuf- 
fed eggs, hamburger and 
beer... the classic props of a , 
Labor Day picnic. 

Every Labor Day afternoon j 
since 1950. Rollingmead 
neighbors have gathered and I 
they did so again this year. 
About 50 came to the shady, 
rolling mead behind David WHEN ROLLINGMEAD GATHERS: Every Labor 
and Barbara Thompson's Day for the past 32 years, families on Rollingmead 
house, including the Thomp- have gathered Labor Day for a genial afternoon of 
son's son — also David — and refreshment, good food and re-acquaintance. Top: 
daughler-m-Iaw, Wendy n0S ( David Thompson chats with neighbors 

The newcomers this year charlotte and Stuart Robson while below, Betty 
were George and Janet Mor- and Jjm whelan wait for supper with Dave Thomp- 
ren and son Carl Among the , daughter-in-law, Wendy, 
alumni, back for this reunion. 
were Florence Kopper and 
Judy Churchill, and there 
were probably others 

Although it wasn't a special 
year — a 32nd anniversary is 
neither 30 nor 35 — it seemed 
as though everyone wanted to 
reminisce, and to slake out a 
claim for the party as the 
oldest living block party in f 
Princeton. Independently of ,^ 
each other and almost £ 
unanimously, everyone seem- 
ed to remember the first block 
party when Dr William 
Pollard, then a resident of the 
street, brought a smoked 
turkey on a silver platter. 

This year's menu included 
hamburgers and hot -dogs. Dr. 
Pollard didn't come, but he'd 
have been welcomed, with or 
without the turkey. 



^* CAM DIES 

KlVAlPfttWACY 

PENNINGTON 

SHOPPING CENTER 

Route 31 Pennington 

LeoS B'ummeIRP 

Daily 9 10 9. Sal. 9lo5:30 

Sunday 9 lo 1 

phOM '37-0800 



the music cellar 

records • tapes 

Princeton-Shopping Center 
9212 550 

WeJC tl 
unlimited 

BOOKSELLERS 

montgomery center 
Princeton shopping center 



(PuVJaatfumeii fceruicE 
PRINCETON HARDWARE 

princeton shopping center.. . 924-51 55 



(ytte/i.CD. 




Albertson was active for also has conducted a weekly 



FOLK SINGING 

In New Brunswick. Folk 



many years as a teacher of 
speech arts, oral in- 
terpretation, theater arts and 
folklore, and as an actor and 
director for community 



singing will be featured at the theater pro jects. He served as 
South Brunswick Public dirc , ctor of Haves House, a 
Library this Sunday at 3 p.m 



Jim Albertson will 



community service program 
sponsored by several chur- 



folk music radio show and was 
a member of a folk music 
group known as The Bottle 
Hill Boys. In addition, he 
directed some of the annual 
South Jersey Folk Music 
Festivals and has coordinated 
folk music programs in New 
Jersey. 

This program is free and 
open to the public and is part 
of "Always on Sunday," a 
continuing program series co- 
sponsored by the South 
Brunswick Cultural Arts 




ELL CHOSEN DEPENDABLE MENS WE 



Established 1867 



Sensible Shoe 
Selection 



^7 




NUNN BUSH 

Value Product 

*44-*50 
NETTLETON 

All leather 
quality domestic 

»65-'100 



ALDEN 

Americas finest 
traditionalist 

>99-M25 
QUODDY 

Hand sewn 
moccasins variations 

*47- $ 58 



Each offers a nice selection of styles at 

a price-quality level with which you'll 

be comfortable. 

OUR POLICY 

2nd pair 25% 

3rd pair 33% 

From stock or ordered 



All Rl 


1 8. Texas Ave 


» Lake Lawrence Plaza 




Lawreru 


eville 




Daily 10-9 • Sal 


jrtlay 10-5:30 


VISA 


FWD ChR • Mas 


ler Cd • Am Express 



*3 



00 

All " ^9 FF 

ARMSTRONG 
COLLECTORS 

S0LARIAN 

Ai*3pe,sq FLOORS, 
yd off. you save $60 on a 12 xl5 room' 

Choose fiom four b< 
signs in 17 differeni colors 
Collectors Solanan will 
home foi , 

vinyl construction and Mtrabond 
■ ■ 

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 
. -i 




Reg. 

M8.95 

Sq Id. 



SALE 



Collectors Solarian floors are available exclusively at 
Floor Fashion Center stores like ours. 



k i I \A 



Discount Center 



Capitol Pta, Shopp™u!rt Jr - O.de'n & PrinSSl, Ave' Trenton" 

Phone 392-2300 Mon.-Thurj.-Frl. 9 A.M. to t P.M. 

w Tues. a Wed. 1 to 6 . Sal. 1 to 5 



PRINCETON 

ADULT 

SCHOOL 

FALL 1982 



MAIL REGISTRATION 
NOW UNDERWAY 

IN-PERSON REGISTRATION 

SEPT. 16 

(details below) 



CLASSES BEGIN 

THURS. SEPT. 30 
TUES. OCT. 5 

(10-week courses 

or as noted) 

PRINCETON HIGH SCHOOL 



Lectures 



• REFLECTIONS OF THE SOCIAL SCENE IN 

BRITISH PAINTING 
E D H Johnson 

Tuesday 8-9:30 p m 
WOTt. 5-uvdi louric Oel J-W» 2 

• RUGS FROM THE MIDDLE EAST 

Donald N Wilber 
Tuesday. 8-y p m 

VOre fi-vivck COUrSC <ki , NOi « 

• IMPERIAL NOONDAY 

Frederick Gerstell 
Thursday, 8-9 p m 

• IRISH LITERATURE 

Herman M. Ward 
Tuesday, 8-9 p m 
■ THE PAST IN THE PRESENT: A STUDY OF 
MODERN SOUTHERN LITERATURE 
Sister Dorothy Holmes, R. S.C.J. 

NOTE S-week rour». Sept Kt-Det 2 

- INTRODUCTORY GEOLOGY: GEOLOGIC 

PROCESSES 
Erhng Dorf 
Thursday. 8-9 p m 

• OUR NEW JERSEY PINELANDS 

Leland G Merrill . Jr 
Thursday. 8-9 p m. 
SOTl i-hxiuna one Held trip. Stpt WCk-i :s 

• WHAT MAKES THE JAPANESE TICK: BEHIND THE 

SCENES OF THE TRADE FRICTION 
Steven B Schlossiein 
Thursday. 8-9 p m 

\l <TI l-totxl count SffN "<■< U 14 

• AN INTRODUCTION IO PSYCHOANAL1 Sis 

Kenneth S Gould. M D 

Thursday. 8-9:30 p.m. 

VOre 4-week count Styi I 

- f VIS AND CAT PEOPLE 

J C Blumemhal. D V M. 

Tuesday. 8-9 p.m. ■ 

VOTE 1 I S.Noi _■ 

• FINDING AND IDENTIFYING BIRDS 

.mas C Souiheriand Jr. 
von 

i 

■CONTEMPORARY rb?K SIN NUTRITION 
M Hosktn Ph D 
Tuesday, 8-9 p m 

■ weel count: Oct S-jV<m : 

- COOKING WITH( HI MISTRY. 

Jeanne M Hoskin, Ph.D. 
da> . 8-9 p.m. 

VOn • i ■ . m .. vo« 



Visual and Performing Arts 

•WHAT'S IN. A SONG' 
Jenneke Barton 
Thursday, 8-9 p m 

VOn J-wciraum On 21 2t Vu. 4. IS 

• BEGINNERS CLASSIC GUITAR 

Harold Janio Moms 

Thursday. 8-9 p m 
•JAZZ GUITAR 

Harold James Moms 

Thursday. 9-10 p.m. 

• BEGINNING RECORDER 

Jennifer W Lehmann 
Thursday, n 30-8:00 p m 

• RECORDER II 

Jennifer W Lehmann 
Thursday. 8-') JO p m 

• FOLK GUITAR I 

Caroline Mosele) 
Tuesday. 8-9 p m 

• FOLK GUITAR II 

Caroline Mosele) 
Tuesday. 9-10 pm 

• FOLK GUITAR III 

Caroline Mosele) 
Tuesday. 7-8 p in 

• PIANO STUDY FOR ADULT BEGINNERS 

Marianne Lauffer 



Thursday. 7 30-8 30/8:30-9:30 p.m. 


S48 


NOTE C7aw< held at Wctmintm < hou College in tht ,-■ * 




Princeton Hill dormitory 




■ CHRISTMAS CRAFTS WORKSHOP 




Mitzi Savim 




Tuesday. 8-10 p m S2f> unci 


materials 


SOTl f-weti ,..ur^ Oct f-No* 9 




• DRAWING 




Thomas George 




Thursday, 8-10 pm 




NOTt S-wetk count Oct 14-16 




• PAINTING IN OILS AND ACRYLICS 




Helen Schwartz 




Thursday. 8-10 pm 


$30 


• PAINTING WITH WATERCOLORS. 




THE HAPPY ME DM M 




loaniie ■Xiiuuslint: 




Tuesday 8-10 p m 




•CALLIGRAPHY Italic 1 




Fran Nimech 




Tuesday. 6:45-8:15 p.m 


S25 



BROCHURES AVAILABLE AT 
PRINCETON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



• DESIGNING AND REPRODUCING YOUR ART 

Fran Nimeck 
Tuesday 8:30-10 p.m. S25 

• QUILTING 

Mayeve Tate 
Thursday 8-10 p m J35 

• SPIN YOUR OWN YARNS 

Linda Berry Walker 

Tuesday. 8-10 pm $25 unci materials) 

NOTt ! week count Ocl S-No. 1 

• KNITTING FOR BEGINNERS 

Patricia Chowms 

Tuesday. 7-9 p.m. $35 

• INTRODUCTION TO THE PHOTOGRAPHIC 

DARKROOM 
Ed Brozyna 

Tuesday. 8- 10 p m 

Thursday, 7:30-9:30 p.m $50 (incl lab fee] 

VOn .' •vponrc coonti 

• AN INTRODUCTION TO 35MM PHOTOGRAPHY 

Edward A. Brozyna 
Tuesday, 6:30-7:45 p m $27 



Special Skills 



■ INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTING 
Martin Schneidemian and Steven Gingo 
Tuesday. 6-8/8-10, Ocl. 5-Nov 2 
6-8/8-10. Nov. 9-Dec 7 

s, ITS. i tepantt (ivt-weck courser 
• ADVANCED MICROCOMPUTER PROGRAMMING 
WORKSHOP 
Toni Nielson 

Thursday, 7-9 p m 



123 mill materials) 



S30 



• l-RESH START: A PROGRAM TO STOP SMOKING 

t II ! \RETTES 

Tuesday and Thursday. K-10 p.m. S2s 

V07] ftce* ,..i;r.. tivice .i net* Ocl 1 ' 12, M 
Refund tiler attending thlie ,o,„,ii, 

• BLACK SEA1 I OW I'KI SSURE HOILtR LK I ssl 

PRE PARATION 
Joseph Kolaior 

1 uesday 7 -ln p m S54. 

• BRIDGE SK1LUS 

John Sokala 

rhursda) S^IO 
II in WRITING 
Elizabeth surr Hill 

Thursday 8*10 p.m. 526 

• DO YOUR OWN INCOME TAX RETURNS 

ii. Volk 
ruesday 8-10 p m 

Mill S ».<l ...urx s,„ :-<u 

• FINANCIAL PLANNING AND INVESTMENT 

knhcn F Ruhr and Chris ! iii 
Thursday 8-10 p.m til 

VOTi i »w» course Oct 2H Nn\ i In f',, - 

■ 81 i. INNING TYPING 
i iluria E Seitz 

Thursday 8-9/9-10 p m SIS 

-•I HI : tepome counci 

■ REFRESHER TYPING 

Mary Pcrpetua 

ruesdaj B-9/9-10 p m *'* 

■ til GINNING ACCOUNTING 

Margaret W Migliore 
Tuesday 8-10 p.m S28 

• STANDARD FIRST AID AND PI KM INAI III', AND 

CARDIO-PULMONAK'T Rl MSI 1 1 \IION i( T'Rl 

Tuesdav 8-10 p m No Fee 

It,,, count will be held at il„ i;„,.,-i„„ 

i ,,, \„i Squad Building 

257 VortB NaihfOO -Si l/trflia 

• UPHOLSTERING 

Alht-n Domotor 
Tuesday 8-10 p.m 

Thursday 8-10 p.m. 540 

NOTI :,„,■,',„ ,<•»';• 

■ HIGH SCHOOL EOUIVALI-NCY PROGRAM 
MATH AND SOCIAL STUDIES 

ruesday 8-9 p.m Malhematu sin 

ruesday 9-10 p.m Social Studies $10 

Recreation and Fitness 

• PLAY TAI-CHI AND Rl I \\ 

Leonard Hollander, M l» 
Thursday 8-9 p.m 

• INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING 

iii. kjplari 

ruesday 8-10 p.m. 

• si.il \RI DAN( ING FOR UK. ISM Rs 

Betsey („.tij 
Wednesday 7 30 9 M p m Ko 

befittiSept 29 C/auci "ill be Acid ■ School 

■M'll FUNDAMENTAL TO ADVANt I II 
Mike Wilson 

Tuesday 7:30-8 !0/8 K) 9 10 p m $21 

VOn wtel ,iws Ocl i Vi 
lit coonet 

■- ' I ■ „tc S,lh.,| (.,,„ 

. Vca : 

• BALLROOM DANCING 

Instructor provided hs Dante Spcurum 
ruesday 8-9/9-10 Oct 5 - Nov 2 Beginnet 
B '' p in Nos 9 Dec 7 Beginnet 
'/-lilpm Nm 9 Do I Intermediate $13 

' IIC (iwiv, 

• SWEDISH GYMNASTIC I \1 K( IS! 

Margaretna Marsk 
Tuesday 6-7 p.m 'le.s 
rhunday 6-7 p m (more vigorous! $19 



Language Arts 

• MODI k-s. GREEK 

\ ifeima Rauch 

ruesday 8-10 p.m J38 

• SPANISH I 

Ronald L Sun/ 

Tuesday K-10 pm 

Thursday 8-10 pm $38 

NOT>. .* tepjfair ,„ u „c, 

• SPANISH IN REVIEW 

Roller l> Brink 
Tuesday 8- 10 p m $38 

• ITALIAN 1 

Lyn Rithards 
Tuesday 8-111 p m $38 

■ ITAI IAN II 
Alessandra Mazzucato 
Tuesday 8- 10 p in $38 

• ITALIAN CIVILIZATION 

Alessandra Ma//ueat.i 
Thursday 8- 10 pm $38 

• FRENCH I 

Francoise Rnllinann and Virginia Rauch 
ruesday >* io pm. 
Thursday 8-10 p.m. $38 

NtlTh ' \efurjl, , i 

• FRENC H II 

Francoise Rollman 
Thursdav 8-10 p m $38 

• I Ft! Sc H III 

Mrs H N Archer 
Thursday 8- III p m $38 

• S.DVANI in FRI M H REVIEW AND 
CONS1 K\ Mil l\ 

Regine I ,iiiii Mi-., I 
ruesday 8-10 p m $38 

•i,i RMAN I 
i,.iin \ 
mursda) ! 10 $38 

•i,l RMAN II 
lris.li Woiselschiaeget 
Thursdas B-10 i $38 

■ i,l RM SN IN Rl 

Herbert O Haeens 

lliur,!. $38 

• ENGLISH ink SPI \M ks ill OTHER 

I \M. 

I ec V Hi, ii, 1. 1 Barbara I ireenfeldl Ltbbj shai 
K.ir hi Steinhaus l linoi ' Vi illiams 

linn . 

Culinary Arts 

■ i VPANI si ■ i ii 'MM, 

Nobuko Manabc 
, da) 8 10 p ri 

• INDIAN i OOKING 

kniiiiii. i vlphonsi 
Tuesday B 10 p m 

.sun ■ 

■ i mini si i OOKING 

\ .me Chi Chen 
I hursday B 10 p.m 

• INTRODUI HON rOWINI M'PRF.CIATION 

, in,' 

lucsdn '" I in > I materials! 

■■ i,t, . FWJ 



srs [incl materials] 



28 i incl malenalsi 



$56 tine 



REGISTER BY MAIL to ensure a place in the course of 
your choice. An admission receipt will be mailed to you. 
MAIL REGISTRATION: Send name, address, phone 
number, course, time and check (payable to Princeton 
Adult School) to Princeton Adult School. P.O. Box 701. 
Princeton, N.J. 08540. 

IN-PERSON REGISTRATION: Thurs. Sept. 16, Princeton 
High School caleteria, 4-6 and 8-9:30 p.m. INFOR- 
MATION: call 609-883-5675, Mon.-Fri. 7-9 p.m. The 
Princelon Adult School Is non-profit sell-sustaining, and 
open to all residents of Pnnceton and neighboring com- 
munities. Classes are held at Pnnceton High School 
through the cooperation of the Regional Board of Educa- 
tion. 



Mail to: 

PRINCETON ADULT SCHOOL 

P.O. BOX 701, Princeton, N.J. 08540 

Make checks or money orders (NO CASH) 
payable Io PRINCETON ADULT SCHOOL. 



(Please print or type) 

Course 

Hour p.m. 

I Fee$ 



_Tues. 



_Thurs. 



Name 



I 

I 

| Address 

1 Town 



-Zip 



_Tel. 



TAKE A FRIEND 
TO LUNCH 
OR DINNER 

AT 

THE PEACOCK INN 

20 BAYARD LANE 
92*1707 



Topics of the Town 

Continue*) Tom P»o* •' 

Commission and the public 
library Pre-registration will 
be necessary, to register call 
the library at (201 1 821-8224 



A $200 best-in-show pur 
chase award will be made, 
and there will be other pur- 
chase awards as well. The 
juror is Donald P. Lokuta 
associate professor 



embroideries. Fantasia 
needlearts is a shop where 
embroiderers and woulb-be- 
embroiderers may find 
assistance in developing their 
of embroidering techniques. 



Mary Watts 
Store 

Groceries. Gasoline 
Fireplace Wood. 

Kindling. 

Charcoal Briquets 

Open every day 

and evening 

Route 206. State Road 

Tel. 921-9868 




CANCER UNIT TO GAIN 

From Sale of Cookbook. The 
Mercer County Unit of the * 2a2i 
American Cancer Society is 
offering a cookbook entitled 
"Fresh From the Garden 
State ." 

The cookbook features over 
300 recipes from Cancer Socie- 
ty volunteers throughout New 
Jersey It will be available 
Friday, September 17, from 10 
to 2 at the Trenton Farmers 
Market and again on Satur- 
day, September 18, from 9:30 
to 12:30, also at the Farmers 
Market. The cost is $6, and the 
proceeds support the 
American Cancer Society 
programs of research, 
education and service to 
patients 



photography at Kean College Shop hours w, 11 be 
Pictures selected for the show Tuesday s from 1 1 - 8 Wed- 
will be exhibited from October nesday through Saturday 
[ne from 10 - 4 An instruction 



15 to November 7 



Additional information may 
be obtained by calling 
771-2652 



schedule is available, 
information call 448-4808. 

BUSINESS. BREAKFAST 
At KIOOC. "Business Over 
Breakfast." a monthly series 
sponsored by Mercer County 
Community College, will start ' 
September 21 at the college's 



coAofb 

#^1 limntitrr Stanasona 

Rout* 206 • BMm M.»d 
■74 J3»3 



ENTER PHOTOS 

In County Contest. If you 

live, work or go to school in 
Mercer County, you're eligible 
to enter the Mercer County 
Photo Exhibition at Trenton 
State College Entries will he 

.icii'plcil in the colleges 

Holman Hall gallery on Sun- 
day and Monday, September 
26 and 27 from 1 to 3, and on 
Friday, October i from 12 to 3 
Photographers may submit 
a maximum of four matted 
and-or dry-mounted 

photographs in color or black 
and white Entries must be 
hand-delivered on the dates 
given above The entry fee is 
$8 per person, and the contest 
is open to anyone over 18. 



FOUNDATION GRANT SET 
For Chemistry Library. 
The Ira W DeCamp Foun- 
dation has granted Princeton conference center. Old Tren 
University $500,000 toward the t on Road, West Windsor 
expansion and renovation of a Breakfasts will be held the 
combined chemistry and third Tuesday of each month, 
biochemistry library Up to w j tn a keynote speaker and a 
$500,000 in additional funds q Ue stion-and-answer session, 
will be provided by the -p ne f irs( four scss j ns will 
foundation, matching dollar- De devoted to international 
for-dollar contributions made tra( j e The September 21 topic 
by other donors toward the w ,n De "identifying Foreign 
renovation of the Henry C Markets." followed by 
Fnck Chemistry Laboratory "Developing Foreign Mark- 
Improvements to Fnck ets - (October 19l ."Letters of 
Laboratory, built in 1929, will credit" (November 16) and 
include an enlarged and "Freight Forwarding" 
modernized space for the (December 21 1 
existing chemistry library. The fee for eacn seS sion is 
whose collections will be „„ or $35 for lne four 
joined by those of the Registration may be made by 




If you haven't Iried it yet, 
ask someone who hazs. 



dagen-Dazs 



We Cater Parties 

delicious ice cream cakes and pies to order 

Open HI 1 1 weeknights • Fri & Sat "til midnight 
33 Witherspoon St. • 921-1160 i 




Biochemistrj hepcirtment. In 
addition, research and 
leaching laboratories will be 
expanded and equipped to 
meet enhanced safety and 
instrumentation standards. 

The Ira W. DeCamp Foun 
dation, created under the will 
of Elizabeth DeCamp 
Mclnerny, supports health 
care and life sciences 
facilities as well as medical 
research and education The 
foundation has also provided 
support for the construction of 
Princeton's Biochemical 
Sciences Laboratory, erected 
adjacent to Krick Laboratory 
in 1979, 



THAT OLD-T1MK STEAM 

Antique Equipment Show. 
Steam and gas tractors, gas 
engines, old-time farm and 
home equipment like butter 
churns and hay balers will be 
exhibited in Washington 
( tossing State Park on Satur- 
day and Sunday, September 18 
and 19 HO a.m. until dark) 
when the Delaware Valley Old 
Time Power & Equipment 
Association displays its 
wares. 

There will be parades, 
crafts and food. The exhibit 
will also have displays of 
threshing wheat, making 
shingles and milling flour. 

On Sunday, the Association 
will sponsor an Amateur Two- 
man Cross-cut Saw competi- 
tion. Antique cars and trucks 
will also be on display. 

Admission is free, although 
a $1 parking donation is re- 
i]iu'sied, Exhibitors are 
welcome and may obtain in- 
formation bv calling 
201-859-2741. 



NEEDLEARTS KEATl'REl) 

\\ est Windsor Shop. 
Fantasia needlearts shop will 
open on Tuesday. September 
14, at 1720 Old Trenton Road, 
at the Edinburg Cross Roads. 
A reception is planned Sun- 
day, September 18, from 2-4 

Shop is owned and 
managed by Karin Cermele 
and Margaret Kens The shop 
features counted thread 
designs and imported fabrics, 



calling Terrv Stoy. 586-9446. 
ext. 294. 



SIERRAS ARE TOPIC 
Of South Brunswick Talk. 

The South Brunswick Public 
Library will offer a program 
on "Hiking and Mountain 
Climbing in the Sierras" on 
Tuesday, September 21 at 8. 

James Zeek, an experienced 
outdoorsman, will offer a slide 
talk and presentation on the 
necessary equipment, 
preparation, common pro- 
blems, scenic areas and en- 
joyments as well as dangers 
and more daring attempts. 

Interested persons should 
call the library at (201) 
821-8224 to register for this 
free event. The program will 
be subject to cancellation if 
registration is insufficient. 




csSHT 

Baclc-To-School 



Branded bi 



■ 

. Genui i 
■ Genuine Lee Ride. 

-. 

■ Genuine Lee RidQi ' ' " ,n L '" 

■' 

PRINCETON ARMY-NAVY 

Reasonable Prices 

14Vi Witherspoon SL 924-0994 



Join our 

Landscape 
Tour 





Sec what others have 
done and what you can do 

Practical ideas that you can use 

on design, plant materials, 

and construction. 



Departure Time: 

Saturday, 

September 18 

at 10 a.m. 




AMBLESIDE for more details 
Rare Plants 'Creative Landscaping* Patio Shop 

AMBLESIDE 

Gardens & Nursery 

Rt. 206. Bene Mead, N.J. . 201-359-aMA . Closed Mondays 




, 



Palmer Square 

Continued Irom Page 1 

green-grocers. Mostly, he 
says, these shops will be own- 
ed and managed by individual 
entrepreneurs and owners. 

Behind the retail shops, will 
be 140 condominium 
townhouses which Collins will 
offer for sale They will be 
three and four stories high, 
each with its own entrances 
leading from both deck and 
street. The condos will be one- 
bedroom and two-bedroom, 
with a few three-bedroom 
units. Each will be about 1,140 
square feet. 

Working with the Arts Coun- 
cil, Collins has decided that 
there should be several areas 
within the Square where 
culture and entertainment - 
or even both — will be at 
home. The covered, year- 
round open space shown in the 
earlier plan, has been 

Behind the retail shops, will 
be 140 condominium 
townhouses which Collins will 
offer for sale. They will be 
three and four stories high, 
each with its own entrances 
leading from both deck and 
street. The condos will be one- 
bedroom and two-bedroom, 



Leaving Collins 
John Williams, with Col- 
lins Development's Palmer 
Square project for less than 
a year, said this week that 
he is resigning. 

"Differences over the 
way the project was to be 
run" are at the root of his 
decision, Mr. Williams 
said. An engineer with ex- 
tensive experience in 
development, and contrac- 
ting, he has had the title of 
Project Director. 

He said he'd like to "see 
a little more action" in the 
development of Palmer 
Square and expressed 
unhappiness at the empty 
stores, still without 
tenants. Like treading 
water when you want to 
swim, he suggested. 

He declined to say 
whether he thought other 
Collins staff might follow 
him. Rumors of the depar- 
ture of James Harvie, Col- 
lins' chief spokesman, have 
been around town for 
several months, but they 
have always been denied. 



Dr. Leon C. Nurock 

Optometrist 

84 Nassau St. 
Princeton 

For an appointment 
call 924-0918 



THE 
COUNTRY PETALER 

lions t-plants- gifts 

FLOWERS BY WIRE i.iafs, 

921-1030 

61 Main St. 
Kingston 

Tue-Sat 10-5 30 




with a few three-bedroom 
units. Each will be about 1,140 
square feet. 

Working with the Arts Coun- 
cil, Collins has decided that 
there should be several areas 
within the Square where 
culture and entertainment — 
or even both — will be at 
home. The covered, year- 
round open space shown in the 
earlier plan, has been 
eliminated. 

Instead, Collins' architects 
now propose a "great variety 
of happenings and events" in a 
public square. Behind the 
Nassau Inn and probably 
under Inn management, will 
be another "cultural" area. 

In front of the Inn, the pre- 
sent lawn will be a village 
green for what Mr. Harvie 
calls "major civic events," 
The lantern building, always 
proposed to balance the pre- 
sent post office building, is 
planned as a backdrop for 
these events. 

As before, an addition to the 
Nassau Inn is shown on the 
strip of land along Palmer 
Square East. Collins plans 140 
more rooms, and a 
rehabilitated main building. 




Ideally Suited 




Parachute Nylon or Galeforce 9 Sailweave 



LeSdortsac 



26 Witherspoon St^ 



924-6060 



The revision is a refine- 
ment, Mr. Harvie has explain- 
ed. Total square footages and 
the general location of 
buildings remain the same. 
— Katharine H. Bretnall 

Topirs of i In- Town 

Continued Irom Preceding Page 

REGISTRATION SET 

For Language Arts Clinic. 
The Rider College Reading of 
Language Arts Clinic for 
youngsters is now accepting 
registration for the fall 
semester. Two course 
programs are being offered - 
one a diagnostic program; the 
other instructional. 

Under the direction of 
reading specialist Dr. Susan 
Mandel Glazer, Rider 
professor of graduate 
education, the two programs 
will run from Oct. 4 to Dec. 9. 
Children will meet teachers 
once a week after school for 
two-and-one-half hours per 
session. 

The diagnostic program 
assesses youngsters' reading, 
writing, listening and 
speaking abilities. It will 
prescribe the best in- 
structional procedures for 
children to learn these skills. 

A full diagnostic battery is 
used, including an intelligence 
test, plus reading, writing and 
other language arts 
assessment instruments. This 
program is recommended for 
children who seem to be 
achieving at levels below their 
acknowledged potential. The 
cost of the diagnostic services, 
which includes the eight 
sessions, is $150. 

Meanwhile, the in- 
structional program is geared 
to help children improve 
reading, writing, listening and 
speaking skills. Children who 
are gifted, average as well as 
remedial learners can benefit 
from activities in this area 

Screening tests will be held 
on Saturday. Sept. 11 from 9 
a.m. - noon for admission into 
this program in the Maurer 
building. The cost of these 
screening tests is $35 with a 
Sept. 3 deadline. The overall 
costs for 11. two-and-one-half 
hour session is $200. 

Certified reading teachers 
and specialists will serve as 
instructors. Children will 
work in small groups of ap- 
proximately six to foster in- 
terraction among themselves 
to aid in producing oral as well 
as written compositions. 

For more information, 
contact the Rider Reading- 
Language Arts Clinic at (609) 
896-5316 or write to the Clinic 
at P.O. Box 6400, Lawren- 
ceville. N.J. 08648. 

DRAMA COURSE OFFERED 
For Senior Citizens. 

introduction to Drama" is 
being offered at the Princeton 
Senior Resource Center for 
the fall season The course, 
sponsored by Mercer County 
Community College, will be 
taught by Professor George 
Ingenbrandt and will include 
films, slides, records, and 
discussion. 

The course which runs from 
August 31 to December 14 will 
begin with Greek tragedy and 
continue to present with plays 
by Arthur Miller and Ten- 
nessee Williams Some of the 
plays to be read and discussed 
include "Iphigenia in Aulis;" 
' The Frogs," "Volpone;" 
■ After the Fall," and "The 
Glass Menagerie." 

All senior citizens 62 years 
snd older are invited to 
register for this free course at 
the Princeton Senior Resource 
(enter located at Spruce 
( irde Registration must be 
made in person Deadline for 
tegistering is August 13 For 
further information call 924- 
7108. 






JUassau 
Otoe ^m 



27 Palmer Sq. West 
921-7298 



PRINCETON WINE .1 

& IIQUOR Pi] 

174 Nassau St. 

924-0279 — 



— H 



K 



6V> Chamb«r> it 
9214410 



ISMET 

■ounoOT 



MICIIAKL f>. ROSENTHAL M.H.W., Kit.lJ. 

:rsonal PfiOflLtM Career and Educational COuNtit ino 
Individuals and Small Group* 



Pennington Professional Center 
65 S Main St Bloc A Suite 23 
Pennington New Jer^et 08534 



(«OB) 737-2230 



WHO SAYS YOU CAN'T 
TAKE IT WITH YOU? 




KAY PRO II 

A TRULY PORTABLE COMPUTER 

STANDARD EQUIPMENT 

• FULL SIZE 80 COLUMN SCREEN 

• T WQPQ U gUEp|N|ITY DISK DRIVES (400K MEMORY) 

• SPREAD SHEET PLANNING PROGRAMS 



CLANCY 
I PA UL I 

1111. I'KINl'KTON 



WIS I »»H »:«"«?* 



Fits under an airline seat 

Weighs only 28 lbs 

Invaluable for salespeople-use as a 

terminal 



$1795.00 



Call 
609 683-0060 



The Princeton Shopping Center, Princeton 




SOMLTHINQ old or new to sell? Try o 
TOWN TOPICS classified Call 924 7200 

100*11 



Visit our Showroom 

The Village shopper • Rte. 206 

(Just north of Rl. 518) 
_ Rocky Hill, New Jersey 

1 (609) 924-3884 



Thel 



•joor 

T CENTER 



|L I (609) Slt-JOOt l = H 



PEOPLE In The Newt 




related to banking and in- 
vestments 

Mr McGee'S task force is 



Manitowoc, homeported at the 
Naval Amphibious Base, 
Little Creek. Norfolk, Va His 
ship is supporting the 800-man 
U S Marine element of the 
multinational force currently 
in lieirut to assist in the 
evacuation of the Palestine 
Liberation Organization from 
Lebanon 

A 1976 graduate of West 
Windsor Plainsboro High 



charged specifically with School, and a 1980 graduate of 
identifying ways to eliminate University of Notre Dame 



overlap, duplication and non- 
essential administrative 
activities and to increase 
management effectiveness 
The focus is not on policy 
issues such as whether given 
programs should be carried 
out bul rather on the systems 
and procedures for im- 
plementing them. The work of 
the Cost Control Survey will 
progress Ihrough the summer 
and fall, with a final report to 
be submitted to the President 
by late 1982. 



Notre Dame, Ind .. Lt Baan 
joined the Navy in May 1980. 




FITTING 
REALTY 

New Hope. PA 
(215)862-9122 



KROESEN REALTY 

Mm 

45 West Broad St 

Hopewell, N.J. 08525 

E09-466-1224 



CASH 
PAID 

FOR TOY TRAINS 



■Sfca:--. 




call Rich (609)466-3225 



I. Wood von Seldeneck Jr. 

of Princeton has been elected 

senior executive vice 

lent ol Heritage Bank. 

N A . the lead bank of 

Heritage Bancorporation He Alan Y. Medvin, of 165 Ber- 

formerl} held a position with trand Drive and a partner in 

Heritage Bank, N.A. of Cherry the Newark law firm of 

Hill Horowitz. Bross. Sinins. Im- 

Mr von Seldeneck, who perial and Medvin, was 

recently moved to Princeton elected second vice president 

from Philadelphia, joined the of ATLA-NJ at the associa- 

Heritage organization in 1974 tion's annual convention in 

investment officer of Hershey, Pa. ATLA-NJ is the 

Heritage Bancorporation. He New Jersey affiliate of the 

Robert Hillier. president residents also participating in WM eteQle(l vjce president in Association of Trial Lawyers 




HALS STEREO 



Princeton Area's Largest Selection of High 
Quality Audio and Direct to Disc Records 



U.S. Rt. 1 at Texas Ave., Lawrenceville 

(609)683-6338 
M-W-F 1 0-9; Tu & Th 1 0-6; Sat 1 0-5:30 

featuring Mcintosh, yamaha, 
b&o. nakamichi, klipsch 



Two other Princeton 



of The Hillier Group, has been 
named to the board of 
directors of Beneficial Cor 
poration 

Beneficial Corporation is ;i 
Delaware- based financial 
services holding company 
with a number of subsidiaries, 
including Harbour Island, 
Inc., of which Mr. HiIIh-i is 
also a board member. Other 
boards on which he serves 
include the First National 
Bank and Mercer County 
Community College Foun- 
dation. 



President Reagan's Private 
Sector Survey on Cost Control 



1976 and vice president and f America, an organization 
secretary of the holding dedicated to the preservation 



,n the Federal Government _ jm m ]97? , n , 979 he rf ^ advwsarv system and 

are James E. Burke CMir- ^^ M , mm VK . ( . prpsjden , th protectjon f tne rights of 
man of the board and chief am , ;issls]iinl l(l lh(1 presi dent 
,-xwulive officer of Johnson & ()( Mmtage Bank _ N A „ and 
Johnson, a resident of Con- wag L , k , ( , l( , d f . xt . cu , IV( . vice 



stitution Hill, and his 

assistant, Graham Brush, of 

Russell Road Mr Budte and 

Mr Brush are part of a task 

force assigned the operations 

i.l the Department of Defease , |( . ;jsl)r( , r 

as their area of cost control 

study 



president of the bank in 1980 

Mr von Seldeneck is a 
graduate of Wesleyan 
University and was a vice 
and assistant 
if First Penn- 
sylvania Bank, Philadelphia, 
before joining Heritage 



Katherlne K. Hummel of 
Monroe Lane has received B 
B.S. degree in management 
from Guilford College, 
Greensboro, N.C. 



John T. McGee, 2M Dodds 
Lane, vice president of the 
Securi ties I ndustry 

Automation Corporation has 
been appointed to serve on 
President Reagan's Private 
Sector Survey on Cost Control 
in the Federal Government, 

Mr 
one of 35 task forces organized 
to study the operations of 
Executive Branch depart 
ments, agencies and functions 
with the aim of finding ways to 
reduce waste and inefficiency 
The task force will rev lev 
boards and commissions 



Richard l>. Loverlng of 54 Mildred Stephens, division 
Hillside Avenue has received director of finance at 
a BS degree in summer Educational Testing Service, 
graduation ceremonies a' has been elected national vice 
James Madison University, president by the National 
Harrisonburg, Va. Association of Accountants at 

its international conference in 

Dominica Sanntno of 16 ^".l 1 ™: ? C She iS th6 
Oakland Road has completed 
the course in cardio- 
pulmonary resuscitation at 
Mercer County Community 

( 'olli-ge 



the protection 
the consumer. 

Mr. Medvin. who is certified 
as a Civil Trial Specialist, has 
served as a member of ATLA- 
NJ's board of governors, state 
delegate to the national ATLA 
and, as a member of the 
ATLA-NJ seminar committee, 
chairman of two programs on 
the practice of trial law. He is 
a frequent lecturer at Bar 
Association meetings 

throughout the country 



m nam awici tin 

REDDING'S 

PLUMBING and HEATING 
924-0166 

CONDITIONING Jfe '"Tl^ 

X ^^V^ License No BI05300 

234 NASSAU STREET 
pRIWCETOW. NEW JERSEY 08540 






sixth woman, and the first 
black, to become a national 
officer of this organization. 

A resident of Ewing 
Township, she is a member of 
the Trenton Chapter of the 
National Association of 
Accountants. 



Navy Lt j.g Andrew G 
Baan. son of George and Anna ^ 

Ha. in ol 2 VVoodmeadow Lane, ,viarK p ", Drdnon Jr -- m i LJ 

Princeton Junction, is serving has been elected to fe owship 
with the \ s Naval m tne American College of 
Amphibious Task Force Physicians Dr. Branon is a 
currentlvopcratmgolf Beirut, socialist »n gastroenterology- 
I (>i n noii internal medicine with offices 

' He ^ an officer assigned to pnWltherspoon Street He wiU 
th.- i.mk landing ship USS be honored during the ACP 
convocation in April 

A 1971 graduate of 
Georgetown University 
Medical School, Dr. Branon is 
on the staff of Princeton 
Medical Center and Rutgers 
University Medical School. He 
trained at Pacific Medical 
Center. Rutgers University 
and the Mayo Clinic 

Election to fellowship in the 
American College of 
Physicians signifies that a 
physician has been recognized 
by his colleagues as having 
attained a level of medical 
scholarship and achievement 
in internal medicine. 



Gail M. Harrje, daughter of 
Mr, and Mrs David T. Harrje 
of Autumn Hill Road, 
graduated from The Penn- 
sylvania State University with 
a B.S. in agricultural 
education 

She was president of the 
World Agriculture Society, an 
officer in both The Future 
Farmers of America and 
Alpha Tau Alpha, the 
professional fraternity for 
Agricultural Education 
students and was named 
outstanding senior in her 
major. 

Continued on Ne»t Page 




CUT FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Baby congratulations • Birthdays • Anniversaries 
Speedy Recovery • Funerals 

Flowers by wire anywhere in the U.S. or Canada* 

PERNA'S 

PLANT AND FLOWER SHO? 

189 Washington Rd. • V 3 mile east ot fit. 1 • 452-1383 
M-F 8:30-6; Sat. 8:30-4; Sun. 9-4 



OPT 

1 383 . I 

a] 



SALE 

ON SIMMONS 

HIDE-A-BEDS 

with Beautyrest Mattress 

for no extra charge 



tir* 




2>5oC>CUTi 








Starting 

at $ 499 

NASSAU INTERIORS 206 

Montgomery Center 
Rt. 206 & 51 8, Rocky Hill 921-6696 

OPEN MON. -SAT. 10-6 




Jnst 



'•-. Harriet 
Hurwiti ol 122 Nassau Street 
w ill be on * iew September y 
ibet 23 al the 
Blaine Stat kman Gains 
West Broadway, New York 
•C«>.. 



ruction 

Jr-cLTislcition, 
Ontcrt>re.ti.rtq 

classes for cRiUren cxnoi CLoCvcCts 
flighty otcafified Tiative.tea.cfi.ers 
Conversational, BrusA-u/o cfasses 
U tera turn classes, intensive Courses 
aCC CeveU , tutoriny jorogr-ccm. 



-roister rtpyv 

Call (609) 924-2252 
jfv and 924-9335 ^ 





People in the I\eus 

Continued 'torn Preceding Paga 

Four area students were 
among those named to the 
Dean's List at Bucknell 
University for the second 
semester of the 1981-S2 
academic year. They are 
Gobert N. Cottone Jr.. 1515 
Law renceville Road, 
Lawrenceville. a senior; 
Elizabeth A. Jones, a junior; 
Evelyn B. Tuska, Tilus Mill 
Road, Pennington, a 
sophomore; and Amy A. 
Pettibone, 2 Toth Lane, Rocky 
Hill, a junior. 



Three area high school 
students have received the 
1982 Rensselaer Medal, 
awarded annually to high 
school juniors for outstanding 
achievements in the study of 
mathematics and science. 
They are John T. O'Neil of 124 
Heather Lane, a student at the 
Lawrenceville School; Mark 
Siegel of 8 Ardsley Road, Belle 
Mead. Hillsborough High 
School; and Robert Garzotto, 
105 Lawrenceville-Pennington 
Road, Lawrenceville, 
Lawrence High School 

The awards are made by the 
Renssleaer Polytechnic 
Institute of Troy, New York. 

Kenneth A. Spitz of Princeton 
and Jeffrey V. Pirone of 
Lawrenceville were among 
those receiving degrees at the 
June commencement of 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
and State Uinviersity in 
Blacksburg Mr. Spitz earned 
a master of science in 
psychology. Mr, Pirone 
received a bachelor of Science 
in accounting. 




Marine Pvt William M, 
Mount, son of Ward and Rita 
Edridge of 40 Dublin Road, 
Pennington, has completed 
recruit training at the Marine 
Corps Recruit Depot, Parris 
Island, S.C. 



Niels E. Nielson son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Niels H. Nielsonof99 
Moore Street, was named to 
the Dean's List for the spring 
semester at Cornell 
University where he is a 
senior honoring in Intellectual 
Historv. 



Charles Bryan of Hopewell 
Township has been appointed 
to the board of managers of 
the New Jersey Agricultural 
Experiment Station at 
Rutgers University's Cook 
College. His appointment runs 
through June 30, 1985. 

Mr. Bryan will represent 
Mercer County on the board of 
managers, which serves as an 
advisory group to the director 
of the Experiment Station. 
The Experiment Station is the 
agricultural and en- 
vironmental research arm of 
Cook College and the only 
facility of its kind in the 
Garden State. 

Mr. Bryan owns and 
operates a dairy farm and 
grows alfalfa, corn, soybeans 
and wheat. He is currently 
president of the Mercer 



Brion Midland, son of Mr. 
and Mrs Bernt Midland of 1 
Rumford Way, Princeton 
Junction, has returned from 
the island of Borneo where he 
served in the Peace Corps for 
27 months. He was working 
with the government of 
Malaysia to establish a 
business school- 
Mr. Midland left for 
Malaysia after receiving a 
master's degree in in- 
ternational management at 
the American School for 
International Management in 
Phoenix, Ariz He spent three 
months learning the language 

County Board of Agriculture 
and a member of the board of 
directors of the New Jersey 
Farm Bureau. 

He is also a member of the 
Princeton Agricultural 
Association and the E.B. 
Voorhees Society. He received 
the Mercer County Con- 
servation Award for Out- 
standing Farmer in 1974. 

Jane Lewis of 279 Ewing 
Street was named to the 
Dean's List at Bowdoin 
College in recognition of her 
scholastic achievement 
during the spring semester. 
She is a member of the Class 
of '82 at Bowdoin. James E. 
Dennison Jr., 103 East 
Prospect Street. Hopewell, a 
member of the Class of '83, 
also was named to the Dean's 
List at Bowdoin. 



For the best in Scandinavian 

See Our Exciting 

Contemporary Designs 





FURNITURE 



259 Nassau Street, Princeton 924-9624 

Our Only Location 
Open Mon.-Sat. 9:30 to 5:30; Wed. Eve. til 9 
FREE PARKING AT OUR DOOR 



and customs before traveling 
throughout Malaysia to visit 
small businesses and assess 
their needs. Subsequently he 
worked with the government 
to begin construction of a 
school for 100 students, in- 
cluding dormitory and eating 
facilities, classrooms and 
recreation space. 

He also hired the teachers, 
developed the curriculum, 
established admission 
procedures, and trained 
Malaysian personnel to run 
the school. The school was 
completed and in progress by 
the time he left. 



Timothy Pinkham of 349 
Walnut Lane and Frank 
Delneso. 132 Jefferson Road, 
have been named to the 
Dean's List and the Honors 
List, respectively, at 
Fairleigh Dickinson 
University, Florham-Madison 
campus, for the spring 
semester. 

The Dean's List includes 
students who have earned a 
grade point average of 3.2 or 
better, the Honors List 3.5 or 
better, on the University's 4,0 
system. 



Sunday L. Watson, daughter 
of Nancy Watson, 55 Redding 
Circle, has enrolled at 
Messiah College, Grantham, 
Pa., for the 1982-83 school 
year. 

Miss Watson, a graduate of 
Princeton High School, plans 
to major in family studies 



IF YOU UVE outside of Princeton and 
are regularly buying TOWN TOPICS a! 
a newsstand, a mall subscription can 
save you time ano money Call 924 2200 
today 



f WE'LL FIX YOUR 
| FAVORITE ^ 

pipe ^rt" 

John David Ltd. 
TOBACCONIST 

Montgomery Shopping Center 



Rt. 206 



-924-8866 



RUMMAGE SALE 

October 2 and 3 

Princeton House Storage Facility 

Herrontown Road (off Route 206) 

9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 



All proceeds 

to the 

Medical Center 

at Princeton 

Information: 
924-5872 

or 
924-7607 



RECEIVING ONLY: Storage Facility 

Saturdays, Sept, 4,11,18, 25; 9-1 2 noon 

Thurs . Sept, 30 & Fri., Oct. 1 ; 9-5 





\ 


a 




BARBARA HILL 

DEMOCRAT FOR 
PRINCETON BOROUGH COUNCIL 




Port tor by me Hill Re-£iec!ion Campaign Com- 

minee. Ricnaro MagHI, I'easuiei tai westcon 
B0 Pnncaign N J 08540 



• President of Borough Council 

• Police Commissioner 

• Chairman - Public Safety Committee 

- Personnel Committee 

• Liaison - Housing Authority 

- Commission on Aging 

- Local Assistance Board 



Barbara has a B.A. from the College of William and Mary. 
She has been a university administrator and a Princeton 
resident for 10 years. Barbara and her husband live on 
Hawthorne Avenue. 

RE-ELECT BARBARA HILL 

"She Gets the Job Done" 



Summertime... 

and the Shopping is Easy. 



Casual, friendly atmosphere 




Princeton University tradition 




The finest shopping in unique stores 



Come Shop in Princeton 




Ask any of these co-operating merchants to put 
card. Each stamp is worth 25 cents toward your 
parking fines this simple way. 



Applegate Floral Shop 

Harry Ballot. Clothier 

Borg's Custom Tailors 

Brophy's Shoes 

HP Clayton's 

The Country Squire 

Cousins Company 

Crabtree & Evelyn 

Edith's 

The English Shop 

First National Bank of Princeton 

Hulifs Shoes 



Kalen's Fine Arts 

Karelia 

Kopp's Cycle Shop 

Lahiere s Restaurant 

La Jolie Coiffure 

Landau's 

Langrock's 

La Vake's Jewelers 

Luttmann's Luggage 

G R. Murray. Inc 



a stamp on your parking 
parking fee. You'll avoid 

Nassau Inn 

Nassau Interiors 

Nassau Shoe Tree 

Polly's Fine Candy 

Princeton Bank 

Princeton Decorating Shop 

Princeton Musk Center 

Revere Travel 

The Silver Shop 

The Town Shop 

Urken Supply c Inc 



Two convenient 
Park & Shop lots: 

• corner of Chambers and Hulfish 

• Palmer Square North lot 



R4RK 
Slfe)P 



BUSINESS 

In Princeton 



SHOW IN KINGSTON 

Of Antiques and Collec- 
tibles. The Kingston Business 
and Professional Association 
will sponsor an Antiques, 
Dolls and Collectibles Show 
this Saturday from 10 to 5 on 
Main Street, Kingston. The 
raindate will be Sunday. 

Among the antique and 
collectible dealers will be 
Alice Albert with perfume 
bottles and china; Vincent 
Kobatsch, collectible pottery 
and pocelain; Ed Ebert, 
steamer trunks; Roan Pony 
Antiques with toys and tools, 
Janet Swartz, Chinese por- 
celain and enamels, Seaph, 
country furniture; 

Also, Val Metelsky, prints, 
Myron Howe, antique toys; 
Richard Hutchinson, antique 
photography; Geri Piccirillo, 
carnival glass, Louis Crouch, 
driftwood collectibles; Mary 
Colborn, Kitchen tools, and 
Red Linsay, brass shore birds. 

Among the doll exhibitors 
are Pat Azzinarri with push 
and wooden toys as well as 
handcrafted dolls; ' Jane 
Sikora, miniatures of all sorts, 
including bread dough 
flowers; Doris Price, 
collectible dolls and the Doll 
Trunks, dolls from 1930 to 
1980. 

The day will include singing 
by the Sweet Adelines and 
food served by the Main Street 
Luncheonette and a bake sale. 
For further information call 
Mary Etta Owen at 921-7164. 

RECORD EARNINGS 

Reported by Atlas. Atlas 

Corporation more than tripled 
its earnings in fiscal 1982, 
posting record income of 
$27,068,000, or $9.14 per share, 
compared to $8,042,000, or 
$2 72 per share, the previous 
year. 

In the 12 months ended June 
30, the earnings of the 
diversified company were "by 
far the highest in Atlas' more 
than 50 year history," Edward 
R Farley, Jr., chairman and 
president, said. Revenues for 
the year amounted to 
$112,115,000 compared to $93, 
356,000 for. the prior fiscal 
year. 

"We expect our fiscal 1983 
year to also be another good 



year for Atlas," Mr. Farley 
said. "It is probable that the 
first half of fiscal 1983 will be 
even slightly better than the 
first half of 1982, when the 
company earned $19,104,000, 
or $6 45 per share. 

"Our performance for the 
second half of 1983 will be 
determined by the extent to 
which currently depressed 
markets and prices for 
uranium and vandium im- 
prove and by our ability to 
obtain new sales contracts for 
these products, as well as by 
the success of an acquisition 
program on which we are now 
embarked and the extent to 
which our domestic economy 
recovers from the present 
recession." 

Mr. Farley attributed the 
improvement in the com- 
pany's fiscal 1982 financial 
results to record earnings by 
Atlas' Minerals Division and 
its Brockton Sole & Plastics 
Division. 



FOR SMALL BUSINESS 
Workshops. Small business 
firms in Mercer County are in- 
vited to send staff to 
workshops at Mercer County 
Community College which 
were originally developed for 
medium-size and large com- 
panies. 

MCCC will offer workshops 
selected from the Manage- 
ment Development and Train- 
ing Program produced by the 
Institute for Management Im- 
provement in cooperation with 
Exxon. 

Classes will be held on 
MCCC's West Windsor cam- 
pus Tuesdays from 6 to 10 p.m. 
There will be three series, 
each one consisting of four 
four-hour workshops. 

The Management Practices 
Series (Sept. 14, 21, 28, Oct. 5) 
will offer Leading, 
Motivating, Communicating 
Feedback and Problem Solv- 



Management Procedures 
(Oct. 12, 19, 26 and Nov. 2) will 
present Clarifying Roles and 
Expectations; Delegating, 
Improving Employee Perfor- 
mance and Performance Ap- 
praisal. 

Management Skills (Nov. 9, 
16, 30 and Dec. 3) will offer 
Managing Time, Conducting 
Meetings. Managing Conflict 
and Managing Stress. 

Employers may send 
employees to any of the 
workshops, to a complete 
series or to workshops in all 
m ~ 



three series. Instructors will 
use videotapes, group discus- 
sion, role-playing, exercises 
and case studies. The fee is $50 
per workshop. Additional in- 
formation is available from 
Walter A. Meyer, 586-4800, ext. 
279. 

PERSONNEL NOTES 

Patricia C. Headley had 

been named to the marketing 
and sales staff of Direct 
Airway, an aircraft charter 
broker. 

Mrs. Headley, a lifelong 
Princeton area resident, was 
associated with Revere Travel 
of Princeton and Trenton and 
more recently with Princeton 
Airways. 




George R. Morris 

George R. Morris, of 

Stanworth Drive, a 20-year 
veteran of the Princeton 
University staff, has been 
named catering manager in 
the University's Department 
of Food Services. 

In his new assignment, Mr. 
Morris will be responsible for 
scheduling special functions, 
menu planning, purchasing, 
food preparation, and 
presentation of the events. 
Among the annual Princeton 
special events for which he 
will coordinate all of the Food 
Service Department functions 
are Staff Day in October, 
Alumni Day in February, and 
Alumni Reunions in June. 



operations vice president in 
1980 and was named executive 
vice president by Mr. Landis 
in May of this year. 



Fulmer, Bowers & Wolfe, 

Architects have announced 
that Richard C. Row of New 
Hope. Pa , and Robert A. Piatt 
of Holland, Pa,, have been 
named associates of the firm. 

Mr. Row will be associate in 
charge of office ad- 
ministration and will have day 
today oversight of assignment 
of personnel to projects and 
management of manhour 
budgets for projects. 

Mr. Piatt will be associate in 
charge of technical ad- 
ministration. He will see that 
procedures are followed with 
respect to office practice, 
codes, standards and record 
maintenance Both men will 
have supervisory roles in the 
office and will be available to 
all designers and draftsmen to 
assist them in completing 
their projects. 

Mr. Piatt and Mr. Row have 
been with the Bowers 
organization for 37 years and 
27 years respectively. 



The Princeton Medical 
Group has announced the 
retirement of Dr. William E. 
Pollard. 

Dr. Pollard is a founding 
member of the Princeton 
Medical Group and is retiring 
after 36 years of service in 
obstetrics and gynecology. He 
will continue as a consultant to 
thePMG. 



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Mark Landis, 101 Lafayette 
Road. President of Scottish & 
York International Insurance 
Group has announced his 
resignation. 

President since 1975, Mr. 
Landis made the change in 
order to pursue more fully his 
long time interest in 
acquisitions, mergers and 
public offerings. He will join 
Kroll Associates in New York 
City, a business consulting 
firm specializing in corporate 
intelligence, as managing 
director and partner. Mr. 
Landis stated that he, "ex- 
pects major consolidations in 
the insurance industry," and 
anticipates that his position at 
Kroll will intensify the firm's 
activities in this field. 

Mr. Landis will be suc- 
ceeded by William C. Wren, 48 
Welling Avenue, Pennington, 
who joined Scottish & York as 
claims vice president in 1977. 
He became technical 



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pro fes sion - al, 

a. I. of. engaged in, or worthy of high standards of, a 
profession. 
2. having mueh experience and great skill in a specified role. 



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servicing automobiles is. ..professional. Thoroughness and 
expertise make dealing with Z & W a rewarding experience. 

The Z & W sales staff sells only the best automobiles made 
today. .HONDA and MAZDA. And we're different, because 
we don't overcharge and we don't advertise discounts on 
inflated prices. 

At Z & W we give you first rale service. Our service 
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standards to maintain • Z & W's and their own. 

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(609) 924-9330 

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Open; 9-8, Ports & Service 8-6 
Sal. 9-4, Portt 9-1 

Rt.206 Princeton NJ, 



RELIGION 

In Princeton 



Elementary school children Fellowship in Israel, Greece 
i have Wednesday choir and Italy during the Holy 
rehearsals Students ages 4 Spirit Conference in 1974 She 
through 8th grade attend part has also ministered at many 
of the 11 am Sunday worship Full Gospel Businessmen's 
service with their families and breakfasts across the country- 
then proceed to age-level and been their luncheon 
church school classes, which speaker at international con- 

S HOMECOMING' PLANNED end at 12:15. ferences in Spokane and Seat- 

\i Nassau Church. Nassau Yvonne MacDonald directs tie. Wash 

,: Presbvtenan Church will the childrens' and teen choirs All are invited to come for 

< celebrate an old-fashioned Her goal is to encourage aneveningof singing, worship 

8 "Homecoming and Supper on singers to grow both musically and teaching There will also 

z the Grounds'' on Sunday. The and spiritually. be a special time of prayer 

g tradition is one borrowed from Choir rehearsals begin this and personal ministry led by 

S the South where even the Wednesday for elementary Ms Sizemore during the 

_i smallest church has a Sunday children. Grades 1 to 3 meet meeting. For further informa- 

z'to welcome members back from 4 to 5 and grades 4 tion call 921-0267 or 799-5385. 

± from summer vacation and to through 6 meet from 5 to 6. 

o invite former members and Cherub choirs meet during The Jewish Singles of the 

W less than active members to Sunday church school Windsors will meet Thursday, 

z return for the festivities For 7th through 12th September 16, for a rap ses- 

= During the 10a m serviceof graders, the first rehearsal is sion at 8at Congregation Beth 

""- worship, 60 people will be this Sunday, from 5 to 6 p m. Chaim, Village Road and Old 

8 recognized as members who Youth Club begins the Trenton Road, Route 535, West 

ghave been part of the following week. Windsor, 

t- congregation for over 50 Admission is $3 and 

z years. After the service, a fair Church School for all ages, refreshments will be served 

§ displaying different aspects of including adults, begins on All single and resingle adults 

P the church's life and mission September 19. The church 25 years and over are invited 

will take place in the school overnight will be For more information call 

Assembly Room Friday, October 1 448-7075 or 799-9401 

For information, call the 

A hymn sing will begin pastors, the Rev James 

about 12 with requests and old Harris and the Rev Carol 

favorites, followed by "Supper Brandt, at the church office, 

on the Grounds'' in the church 924-2613 between 9 and 1. Or, 

parking lot Fried chicken, call Jane Jacobs, 921-0516 for 

corn on the cob, salads, cake details on Christian education 

and home-made ice cream programs and Yvonne 

will be served to the MacDonald, 799-0443, for 

congregation for $2 50 for information on music 
programs. 



OBITUARIES 



adults and $1 .50 for children 

In case of rain, the supper 
will be cancelled and home- 
made ice cream and cake will 
be available in the Assembly 
Room. If transportation is 
needed, members are en- 
couraged to call the church 
office at 924 0103 



NEW ADDITION TO MUSIC 
At Nassau Church, Sue 
Ellen Page has joined the 
music 'i il Nassau 

Presbyterian 
director of children 
She wi i- a pre- 

school musi 
beginning with threi 
olds. 
Ms. Page received her 



TO HONOK SECRETARY 



The guest preacher at the 
concluding service of the 
summer series in the Prin- 
ceton University Chapel this 
Sunday at 10 will be the Rev. 
Donald Macleod, Francis L 
Patton Professor of Preaching 
and Worship at Princeton 
Theological Seminary. 

Dr. Macleod, an alumnus of 
Dalhousie University, 
Halifax. Nova Scotia, and of 
the University of Toronto, is 
the author of seven books in 



At Jewish Center. Helen his field, was the founder and 
Schlaffei secretary of the firsl president of t he 



Jewish Center, will he honored 



American Academy of 



bachelors ,„, ai 



or 20 years of service at a Homi i etics He is serving nis 

luncheon ponsored.by the fmh (crm as a mcmbcr of the 

liivision on Monday advjsory councU of the 

11 ' " University Chapel. His ser- 

! '' r . T™ mo" topic "will be "On Top of 

I enter in 1962 tne \i, , 

temporary 
he Center has 

The Princeton United 
hurch, Nassau 
I information 
material lor the rabbi, ad 

,,, irlncipal and ichedule this Sunday when the 



a | s0 worship service will be held at 

responsible for the H am. There will also be a 

degrees at Wcstiiiinslcr Choir ' ' , , ,, . , Welcome D,,l PV,,,„„H 

/•„ii„„„ ,..,ii, .Li., i.. dis n bu ion ii the news etter welcome Back Church 



College with additional study 

at the Orff Institute in Nil/ , 

burg, Austria from which she l»lp manage the office. 

holdsa specialist diploma She Reservations lor the In 



has taught all grade leveli ol 



and quarterly bulletin and School" program held this 
Sunda> 
The Adult Study Class will 
cheon, which will feature ""' ' 'be following week at 



music In public and private Je * ls £ ha " dcr ?"*; i?,?* b , e 

schools. She is a composer of made by calling 2m ) 329-2751 . 

children's music and ,s well The donation ,s $10 per person, 

known as a clinician and '""' h >' "lenu will include 

conductor of children's choir < l ul 1 <: nc ' salad bo 

festivals across the United »n"beverage. 
States. 



Benny Hinn, a young 
evangelist with a healing 
desserts ministry, ^\lll be at Nassau 
Christian Center this Sunday 
through Wednesday, Sep- 
tember 15. He will preach 
BULLETIN NOTES Sunday at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 

p.m., and Monday through 
The Princeton United Wednesday at 7 30 each 
Methodist Church, Nassau evening. All denominations 
Street and Vandeventer andagesare invited 
Avenue, will hold its annual Mr Hum was born in Israel 
school, elemenfary, and youth Street Craft Fair on the front of Greek Orthodox parents 
choirs, as well as handbell lawn ol the church on Satur- and educated in Roman 
choirs for youth and adults, day. September 11, from 9 to 5 Catholic schools His family 
and an adult choir. The Refreshments, handmade immigrated to Canada in 1968 
community is invited to crafts, fresh vegetables and and he began a full-time 
participate in any of these baked gmxls will he sold to ministry in 1973. 



Since 1978, Ms. Page has 
taught at Westminster Choir 
College as a faculty member 
in the church music depart- 
ment and on the voice faculty 

The music progi. 
Nassau Church includes pre- 



programs at no cost. 



benefit the church. 



YOUTH PROGRAMS SET 
At Methodist Church 

Programs designed for 



For more information call 
Pastor Jesse Owens at 921- 
The Sunday School Depart- 0981. 

menl ol the First iiaptisi 

Church, John Street and Paul 
children and youth ages 3 to 18 Kobeson Place, will sponsor a . '** Pr " (:e "' Pea « 
begin this week at Princeton fish and chicken fry on Satur- L , u '*»' "" l ^ url ' h °" H 'g»<- 
United Methodist Church, day, September 11. from li:S0 s ,S m R 5f„ ln Pr,n . ce °, n 
Nassau Street and Van to 4:30 on the lower leveloffhe Jum "°" will resume its fall 
deventer Avenue Families church. schedule lhls Sunday Sunday 

from Princeton and Fish and chicken sand- *"°°' /or »B« kindergarten 
surrounding communities are wiches will be sold for $3 '« adult will meet at 9:45. the 
encouraged to participate in apiece For additional infor- pfe-schoolers will meet and 
activities which provide op- mation or advance tickets, ["LT,".''" 8 worshlp wiD be 
portunities for Christian call Samuel Schutz ,,., , , . ., . 

education. music. and superintendent, or Hettie regularly scheduled 



fellowship 

Junior and senior high 
activities, scheduled for 
Sunday evening Youth Club, 
include choir practice, supper, 



recreation time and study meeting of The Gospel 
time. Fellowship of Plainsboro 



Dean. Jamie Reed, or Valerie ac " v '"« "*}"** «<e weekly 

le meetings of the senior-hi 

youth group Sunday evenings 

Darlene *' ? ' antl llw ™ ulh and adu " 
choirs on Wednesday at 7 and 
B (i m respectively. 
Mrs Marilyn Roessler will 



Smith, teachers. 

Evangelist 
Sizemore will minister al 



sonex 



Saturday, September 11. at 8 L '! i t i", Ue f , , h b l ' be sup ? ri "' 

p.m. at the Holiday Inn. Route 'f"^,""' 'm Sunda > ^ ho "' 

1 J and vicar Margaret Payne 

Me «.*._. „ u will leadthe vouthgroups For 

pines, Hong Kong, Canada. 799 . 1753 or 7w ., 7g3 Everyone 

. She jj ue i come (0 lnc scr vi C e or 

ens Aglow the programs 



Mexico and the U S She 
HOWwMngtonStWoOy-MIIH represented Won, 



Prof. Gregg Dougherty, a 
longtime faculty member of 
the chemistry department at 
Princeton University, died 
September 6 at home after a 
long illness He was 89 years 
old and lived at 95 Library 
Place 

Prof. Dougherty was born in 
Stubenville. Ohio He attended 
Phillips Exeter Academy and 
was graduated from Prin- 
ceton University with the 
Class of 1917. While at 
Princeton, he was a member 
of Cottage Club and was 
elected to Phi Beta Kappa He 
received his Ph D. degree in 
chemistry from Princeton in 
1921 and that year began 
teaching at Princeton. 

For 36 years, until his 
retirement as a full professor 
in 1957, he taught organic 
chemistry as a member of the 
Princeton chemistry 
department During World 
War I he served in the U.S. 
Army chemical warfare 
service as a first lieutenant. 

Prof. Dougherty was a 
member of Nassau 
Presbyterian Church, the 
Nassau Club and the Old 
Lyme, Conn., Beach Club. He 
was a former member of 
Pretty Brook Tennis Club and 
the Century Association of 
New York . 

Husband of the late Grace 
E. Bassett Dougherty, who 
died in 1952, he is survived bv 
two sons, James G. Dougherty 
Jr. of Chevy Chase, Md., and 
Robert E. Dougherty of 
Princeton; and two grand- 
sons, Gregg E. and James M. 
Dougher 

A memorial service will be 
held Thursday at 1 in the 
Princeton University Chapel. 
The burial service will be 
In lieu of flowers, 
contributions may be sent to 
the Princeton First Aid and 
Rescue Squad or the Medical 
Center at Princeton. 



Joseph II. Bedson Jr., 55, of 
Stonicker Drive, Lawrence^ 
ville, died September 3 when 
the moped he was riding was 
si nuk by an automobile, 
automobile. 

A lifelong Lawrenceville 
lit, Mr. Bedson was a 
graduate of the Lawrenceville 
School and Lehigh University 
He was a U.S. Navy veteran of 
World War II and was a senior 
technical advisor with Goodall 
Rubber Co. 

He was a member of the 
Lawrence Road Presbyterian 
Church, the American 
Chemical Society and the 
Philadelphia Rubber Group 
He was also an assistant 
scoutmaster of Boy Scout 
Troup No. 28 for many years. 
Husband of Edythe Muller 
Bedson, he is also survived by 
Ihree sons. Joseph H. Ill of 
Phoeniz, Ariz., John A. of 
Mercerville and Gordon E. at 
home; a daughter, Patricia A 
of Red Bank, and three grand- 
children. 

A service will be held this 
Wednesday at 8 p.m. at 
Poulson & Van Hise, 650 
Lawrence Road, 

Lawrenceville. the Rev. Nor- 
man S Kindt, pastor of the 
Lawrence Road Presbyterian 
Church, officiating Friends 
may call Wednesday from 7 to 
9 p.m. at the funeral home. A 
service will also be held 
Thursday at 10 at the funeral 
home with burial following in 
the Fountain Lawn Memorial 
Park. 

Memorial contributions 
may be made to the Lawrence 
Township Emergency First 
Aid Squad. P.O Box 5539. 
! awrenceville D8G48 



Charles T. Harrison. 52. Of 
175 Johnson Avenue. 
Lawrenceville, died 

September 2 at Presbyterian 
Hospital. Philadelphia. 

Mr Harrison was born in 
Skillman and was a lifelong 
area resident He was 
employed by the Forrestal 
Research Center and by 
Princeton Medical Center He 
was a US. Air Force veteran 
of the Korean War and a 
member of the Second 
Calvary Baptist Church where 
he served in the choir. 

He was a past master of 
Aaron Lodge No. 9 F&AM of 
Princeton and had been a 
member of King David 
Chapter No 6 of the Royal 
Arch Masons, Douglas Com- 
mandery No. 10 of Knights 
Templar and Khufu Temple 
No. 120 He was also a former 
member of the Lawrence 
Township special police force. 

Surviving are his wife, 
Rachael Driver Harrison; 
four sons, E-3 Wayne of 
Charleston, S.C., Naval Base, 
Airman Bruce of Loring Air 
Force Base, Portland, Maine, 
Charles H. and Todd, both of 
Trenton; four daughters, 
Denise Dickerson, Pamela 
Campbell, Jo-Ann and Lor- 
raine, all of Lawrenceville; 
his mother, Annie, of 
Skillman; 

Also, four brothers. Archie 
of Ewing. Nelson of Tucson. 
Ariz., William of Trenton and 
Master Sgt. Herbert of Hamp- 
ton. Va.; three sisters, Lil 
Campbell of Ewing, Eleanor 
Waldron of Lambertville and 
Jackie Smith of Skillman; and 
eight grandchildren. 

The service was held at Sec- 
ond Calvary Baptist Church in 
Hopewell, the Rev. Ronald 
Owens officiating. Burial was 
in Ewing Cemetery. 

Katherine McClintock Ellis, 

86. died September 2 in a 
nursing home in Needham, 
Mass.. where she had lived for 
the past seven years. 

Mrs Ellis was born in 
Pittsburgh, Pa., and lived in 
Washington, D.C. before 
coming to Princeton in 1935. 
She lived here, most recently 
on Wilton Street, for 40 years. 
She was a 1913 graduate of the 
Holton Arms School in 
Washington. D.C , and had 
studied piano and music 
literature extensively at the 
Peabody Conservatory, 
Baltimore Md. 

She worked on the ad- 
ministrative staff of the 
Juilliard School in New York 
City from 1946 to '71 and was 
for many years director of its 
pre-college division. She was a 
longtime member and former 
president of the Present Day 
Club, a member of the 
Princeton University Concerts 
Committee and of Trinity 
Church. 



Her marriage to the late 
Franklin H. Ellis ended in 
divorce. Surviving are two 
sons. Dr F. Henry Ellis Jr. of 
Brookline, Mass., and 
Garrison M. Ellis of Millwood. 
Va.; eight grandchildren and 
three great-grandchildren. 

A memorial service was 
held in Christ Church. 
Needham. Mass. Memorial 
contributions may be made to 
the Protestant Episcopal 
Church of the U.S for work in 
missions. 815 2nd Avenue, 
New York City. 

Charles F. Burton. 96, of 14 
Burton Avenue, Hopewell, 
died September 1 in the 
Foothill Acres Nursing Home 
in Neshanic. 

A native of Hopewell, Mr. 
Burton was a retired 
cabinetmaker and stair- 
builder. He was a member of 
the Carpenter's Union No. 31, 
and the oldest member of the 
Hopewell Methodist Church. 

Husband of the late Sadie 
Voorhees Burton, he is sur- 
vived by a son and daughter- 
in-law, John and Polly Burton 
of Devon, England, and 
several nieces and nephews. 

The service will be held this 
Wednesday at 2 in the 
Hopewell Methodist Church, 
the Rev. Michael Smith, 
pastor, officiating. Burial will 
be in Highland Cemetery. 
Memorial contributions may 
be made to the Hopewell 
Methodist Church. Blackwell 
Avenue. Hopewell. 08525. 

Sonia Tomara Clark. 85, of 
892 Princeton-Kingston Road, 
died September 7 in Princeton 
Medical Center. 

Born in Petersburg, Russia, 
she was the wife of the late 
Judge William Clark. Sur- 
viving are a brother, Alexis 
Tomara of Moscow, a sister. 
Irene Tomara of Princeton, 
and a nephew, Claude Bassine 
of South Ackwith, N.H. 

The service will be held 
Friday al 1 in the Marquand 
Transept of Princeton 
University Chapel, the Rev. 
John Turkevich officiating. 
Burial will be in Arlington 
National Cemetery. 






The 

KIMBLE 
FUNERAL HOME 

One Hamilton Avenue 
{609)924-0018 



Edwin L. Kimble 
R- Btrchalt Kimble 
Claude M. Crater 



A Princeton Family 

Owned and Operated 

Funeral Home 

Since 1923 



Benny Hinn 

"The Voice of Healing 
in America Today" 

Sunaav, September 1 2 , o :3 o am & 6'30 p m 

Monday. September 13 7 30 p m 

Tuesday. Septembers 7 30pm 

Wednesday Sep.ember 15 7 30 p m 







NASSAU CHRISTIAN CENTER 

26 Nassau St., Princeton • 921-0981 

"I Am The Lord That Healelh Thee" 



FREE ROOM AND BOARD exchanged FOR SALE ■ 1976 VOLVO Model 7*1 
(or VH hours dolly household garden Burgundy. S3. 000 or best offer Call 
help Flexible hours Very quiet, non {6091446 4693 
smoking person Mandarin or French 
speaker preferred 934 1665 



I 75 31 



ROOM TO RENT: Male StuOent without COMp ANION TO ELDERLY WOMAN, 



■. bike or hike to University. Laundr. 
and some kitchen privileges. S140. 934 
5849 



FOR SALE - Upholstered chair, 4 
mahogany ladder back chairs, coffee 
table, 971 6*70 



SMALL FURNISHED ROOM FOR 
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students especially welcome Deposit 
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SMITH CORONA OFFICE MANUAL 
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of drawers, S30 Queen size brocade 
double bedspread (35, Large desk $30 
Metal shelves 5)5 Two large bulletin 
boards SI5 each Pair of red single 
studio couch covers SIS. Crock pot S13 
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CHARMING FRONT ROOM. 3 blocks to 
University Kitchen privileges S160 
month 93) 6537 or 896 1171 



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October 1st 931 6631 



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for any site electrical |Ob 

1 31 M 



LARGE PASSPORT PICTURES visas, H|RE CREATIVE WOODCRAFTS INC «HGLI|M L1SSOMS ftXAWH 

applications Visit our newshop Pryde to do the 100) odd |ob»noon4itt»« w#nt» t«*cn*r of EnginV> io foretywrt «**, -, 
Brown Photographs. 17 Chamber* (carp^iry, boofcc****. window c*r«, English lesson* 6*th H«rr«» •■ 

Street 934 9793 outside and ln»ld« worfc, tfcJ VValnul L*r*. Pr.nct-Km. H J MS4b n t 

7 " M Reference* Call anyllm* 609 S»t3>» »0? X 

b 4 4t ttr -j 



FRENCH LESSONS Beginner, 

Intermediale, Advanced Conversation 
— Grammar — Reading Fall term 
Native teacher (6091 931 0493 

9 1 31 



LARK STRING QUARTET. Celebrate 
with us Music sets the mood Wed 
dings. reception*. birthdays, 
engagements, anniversaries, or just 
listening 934 6037.397 4267 



FOR SALE BOYS BLUE 10 Speed Ross 
bicycle, needs work but runs Likes 
children. S3Sor best offer 934 9553 



TUDOR HOUSE IN PRINCETON to 
share with neat business woman 
Available September I On bus line 
S32S month includes kitchen and 
utilities, WD. Phone 934 0804 or 934 



PIANO TUNING 

Expert piano tuning 

regulation and repair 

Reasonable priced 

KENNETH B WEBSTER 
■96-0526 



Y.ibadabadoo' 



EATERY AMULETTE 



197) MUSTANG FASTBACK 3S1C 
•engine, very good condition S), 400 93! 
7745 9 1 31 



FLOOR SANOINO, STAINING 
tREFINISHINO 



BEST FLOOR CO 



CHERRY HILL NURSERY SCHOOL '■* 

Will begin accepting ape>iC«tior>* fe -g 

the 19S3 84 *chool ftar on Scpfcmtwr m 

1983. Pleas* call I20I>3S9 3H3 Z 

I 35 ~> 



7474. 



FILING CABINETS! Come and see our 
metal filing cabinets for office or home 
Grey, tan, olive. 3 or 4 drawer Also 
typing tables Hlnkson's, 87 Nassau 

6 10 tf - 



Coffeehouse 



Ridge Road. Monmouth Junction 



(20)1 329-7777 
(Local Call) 



70 VW BUG, rebuilt engine, new i 
and muffler, runs beautifully 
mpg, S950 or best offer 683 0843 



ROOM FURNISHED: bath, parking 
Best location, walk to University New 
listing Call 93d 0536 

8 35 3t " 



NEW LISTING 



SHIATSU - A Japanese massage for SCULPTOR. 35, in Princeton for one West Side Princeton, 5 bedroom 
deep relaxation and the symptoms Of vear seeks work living space in return 2y b , h co | onia | New k | tc hen 
stress Based on Chinese acupuncture '°r hoosesitllntj end or rent Laur- 
Steele ,921 3347 home 452 766) work 



Certified 



983t 



OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE SEPT. I. 
approx 475 so. ft at 240 Nassau Street 
Call934 5700 611 St 



newly decorated inside and out 
Large heated swimming pool 



Asking $220,000 



BMX REDLINE MXII Irame and fork 
Almost new $100, Mongoose Irame and 
forks Brand new, never used $110 Call 
737 0652 8-11-tf 



HOUSECLEANING AND BABYSIT. 



HENDERSON 

HOUSES 



FLY TO NANTUCKET in 6 seat cabin 
YELLOW UPHOLSTERED ARM class IFR twin sharing expenses wf~ 
CHAIR with ottoman, good condition, 
S50 Chest of drawers with bookcase 
$100 Call 924 8058 



Airline Transport 

flight instructor S125 to about S18C 

person (6091921 3867 



REALTORS 
|(fte 33 WITHERSPOQN ST.. PRINCETON. N J 



(609)921-2776 




MORTGAGES 

AVAILABLE TO 

QUALIFIED BUYERS 



Weichert 



ASKABOUTOUR 
EQUITY ADVANCE £> 
PROGRAM fel 



"When the people of New Jersey think Real Estate.. .they think Weichert" 




PRINCETON 
ADDRESS 

GRIGGSTOWN— This newly listed 3 
bedroom, 2 bath Ranch enhances your 
lifestyle with many quality features In- 
cludes heat-o-lator fireplace in family 
room, Andersen windows, central air and 
vac and more. $1 1 9,500. PR-821 1 . 




COUNTRY CLUB 
LIVING 

MONTGOMERYTWP— Walkto nearby 
Pine Brook Country Club and enjoy golf or 
swimming from this elegant 4 bedroom 
Georgian Colonial offering central air, 
fireplace in family room, eat-in kitchen, 
2V* baths and a sensationally landscaped 
brick patio. S1 27.000. PR-8187. 




ATTRACTIVE 
MORTGAGE 

MONTGOMERY TWP— of $87,000, 2 
points below current rate for straight 30 
years, is available to the qualified buyer of 
this gracious, 4 bedroom Colonial on a 2 
acre cul-de-sac Features include a fenced- 
in, in-ground pool, family room fireplace, 
brick patio and more. Owner will rent for 
$850. $11 5.000. PR-8193. 



PRIVATELY 
WOODED 

LAWRENCEVILLE - ...set- 
ting surrounds this spacious 
and tastefully decorated 
townhouse. Designed for 
elegant comfort, a lovely 
foyer leads to a paneled fam- 
ily room or a dramatic living/ 
dining area Boasts 3 bed- 
rooms and 2 baths on the 
upper level. $86,900. 
PR-821 2. 



BRAND NEW 
COLONIAL 

SO. BRUNSWICK— Prestigiously located 

in a quiet executive neighborhood, this at- 
tractive 5 bedroom Dutch Colonial boasts 
2'/2 baths, large, step-down Irving room, 
stone fireplace and HO. W. 1 0-year protec- 
tion plan. Tastefully decorated $142,500. 
PR-8188. 




BELOW RATE 
MORTGAGE 

PLAINSBORO— is available to the 
qualified buyer of this Beechtree Lane, 
center hall ColoniaL Nestled in a desirable 
and convenient area, this home boasts 4 
bedrooms, 2Vi baths, fireplace, family 
room and kitchen with picture window. 
$187,900. PR-8210. 



ATTRACTIVE 
MORTGAGE 

MONTGOMERY TWP.-Up to 90% 
mortgage at below rate, isavailable to the 
qualified buyer of this 3 bedroom home 
set on 1 .3 acres. Nestled in a desirable 
area, this home offers a raised hearth fire- 
place in living room, large screened porch, 
new roof and more. $ « 04,500. PR-8 1 45. 

6% MORTGAGE 

EAST WINDSOR— An assumable mort- 
gage of $20,000, for 1 6 years, is available 
to the qualified buyer of this newly listed 
home. Offers elegance and comfort thru- 
out with 4 bedrooms, 2'h baths, living 
room fireplace, central air and private 
backyard with patio. $98,500. PR-8204. 

Princeton Office 609-683-0300 
Offices Open 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. 



Weichert 

Realtors 



• 45 Offices Throughout N.J. 

All offerings are subject to errors and omissions I 



SAJtfPit OUH SOUPIK SOUPS K>r FOR SALt CLASSIC MUSTANG IMS. 



Irom trt« Footfwlnktl T*h* 
<som« « quirt tonight u Chtmbtn 



£ isom* • Quart ti 



good condition, tint operating con 
ditton. n»rd top with radio and heater 
Cailttl visitor unusual pricing 

91 It 



1 housekicpcr. Fun. Part time or 
3»v*posJlionw*ntW Phone3»*tM7 



- CLARINET FOR SALE BuncJy model 
< >n gooo condition wim case Si IS Phone 
3 ■:>■ i» 



O »M« MM LENS and wide angle II mrr 
S} ten*. Eitceitent condition Call 7?»^^M^ 



PIANO FOR SALE: PretTy Washburn 
spinet end matching bench S350 Call 
<S- S*»3o»ys cWi W J' evenings 



YARD SALE 4? Markham Road, 
Princeton, 9 3 Saturday. September II 

Sewing machine, playpen, curtains, 
clothing and many other miscellaneous 
items reasonably priced 



RUMMAGE SALE: Saturday. Sep 
lember II Princeton First Aid & 
Rescue Squad. Harrison Street (ne«t to 
Acme Princeton Shopping Center) t 
am to 4 pm 

9«?1 



MOVINOT 

NEEDATRUCKt 

CALL HUB TRUCK RENTAL 

Alt Route No I. Lawrencevllte, N.J 
Across from Lafayette Radio 

■a km 



THREE YEAR OLO portable Kit 

cnenelde dismvasher. Siis Kenmore 
automatic dryer, I» 924-09M 

»«3t 



RESTORE VITALITY AND JOY to your 
life by tapping your greatest resource 
your own energy The WELLSPRING 

Ming Bodyshop is sponsoring two week 

end workshops at Kenilworth by the 

Sea. Spring Lake, New Jersey. 75 It77 F-2M 4 by 4. 63.000 miles. S43O0 934 

minutes from Princeton. October I. 9. 09*3 

10 — October M. 33, 14 Indian Summer 9 S 31 

at the ihore means aerobics on the 

beach. Yoga on the lawns, jogging on 



STONE •••STONE 



FOR NATURAL LANDSCAPING 



The one real "center" tor a" your iforte 

needs 

A variety o* flagstone, slate, decorative 

gravels! garden boulders Featherock. 

Cobblestones & railroad ties 

Stone hearths & mantel pieces 

Retaining wall stone & Building Stone 



Custom Cutting Oellvery Anywhere 



DELAWARE VALLEY 
LANDSCAPE 
STONE. INC 



Nassau Hobby 
and Crafts 

142 Nassau Street 
924-2739 



Thompson Land 

-Manor 

IK Nassau Street 

Princeton. N J. 

<M9)9Z1-7SS5 



Dlv of Delaware Quarries 



the boardwalk, reflexology In the SUMM , T TREE SERVICE - Trimming Rlve ' *°* a Lumbtrv.il.. PA 



parlor, with emphasis on breetl 
properly all the while Veggie and non 
veggie menu All for S14S Limited 
enrollment Unicorns, druids and 
satyrs welcome For reservations call 
Gloria Nouri, Oirector, Bedens Brook 
Road, Sklllmen, New Jersey. 08551 
(409)466 3559 



Removal - Topping, Stump Grirt 3'5-797 (133 
ding — Land Clearing Ed, stl 6649 — 
Deve(I1S)945!t6l Also 

«■»■*» LANGHORNE STONE 
COMPANY 



James Irish 
Tree Experts 

Tree & Stump Removal 
Tree • Shrub • Hedge 
Pruning and Topping 

resMental • commercial 

924-3470 

* fully Intuirod * 




25 LANGUAGES 
Native teachers and trans 
lators Instruction (or children 
and adults All levels Intensive 
courses 'or travelers and 
business people Tutoring 
Translations 

Call (609) 924-2252 
or 924-9335 



TAO SALE BY TRIO. Saturday. Sep 
temper II. I9S3. 12 3pm, II Woods Way, 
Princeton N J Lovely household in 
eluding blond Kimbalette Spinet, wing 
back chairs, chrome etegere. nka 
bedroom furniture, complete workshop 
with rotary saw. apartment sue chest 
freeier, adding machine, filing 
cabinets, whelping box, ski equipment, 
loads books, clothing, and brie a brae 
Huge basement content*, etc A nice 
sale Directions in Princeton, Nassau 
Street to Snowden to end. right on 
Herrontown Road, first left on Crooked 
Tree Lane, then right to Woods Way 
(first house on letl) (609) M3 3535 or 
[6091 IK 1I64INOCHECKS) 



FOR SALE: Schwlnn 19;. 10 speed bors 
bicycle. 1100 Boys Stingray, ISO 
BenfemlJO Cail6«3 0B76 



FINISHED APARTMENT FOR RENT 
on. bedroom with kitchen, living room, 
separate entrance Use municipal 
parking lot Prefer single person Gas 
and electric not Included 1300 per 
month Extra 1300 ai a deposit See 
inside after 6 pm at 7'i Sergeant Street 



TENNIS PLAYER WANTED - Division ot Delaware Quarries 
9121 Womens weekly indoor game Monday Routf 1 Supe rhlghway 
evenings at 5 pm, seeking additional 

intermediate player Call 931 V71. 921 Langhorne, PA 

j| )7 215 757 2201 215 757 2209 

Rebuilt engine, new 9 i tf 



1970 VW BUO 

brakes, new muffler, runs beautifully, 
21 31 mpg, 11700 Call 613 0*43 

175 21 



ROOM FOR RENT • Sklllmen area S200 
month, non smokers only Phone 466 
0731 

91 3t 



HOUSE FOR RENT: Fully furnished, 3 
bedrooms. In Princeton Walk to center 
of town Suitable for couple or small 
family U7) per month plus utilities 
Available immediately 934 1534 after 
5. 30pm 

91 3t 



CARPENTRY SERVICE AVAILABLE: 
for home remodeling, additions, 
repairs, end other miscellaneous |obs. 
25 years experience Free estimates 
Call 609 466 79SO 

9-8-M 



JACK OF ALL TRADES - We will clean 
your house, apartment or business, do 
your yard work or errands, serve and 
clean up at parties, and simplify your 
life In any other way we can Don't do It 
yourself call us! Fully insured, local 
I Princeton) references 215 598 3409 

9 a tf 



BEOINNCRS NEEDLEPOINT: 17 per 
session at my home Begins Tuesday, 
September 21 Classes meet once every 
week for 10 weeks Please contact Mrs 
J F Cook, 931 6195 



LIGHTEN UP: Too many posesslons? 
Can't bear to throw anything away? If 
you'd like to lighten your load, but are 
overwhelmed at the thought, here Is a 
practical workshop to help you clear 
out the excess In your life to make room 
tor living if For infocail (6091 996 0618 
8 3S3t 



FOR RENT 

In Princeton Apartment with living 

room, kitchenette, 2 bedrooms and bath 

FURNISHED 

Available immediately No children or 

pets Couple or 2 men preferred. S525 per 

monlh plus electric 

STEWARDSON OOUGHERTY 
REALTORS 

921 7784 




J» BOARD F«ET of 2" cherry, air dryed 
6 years, 1500 934 0983 

983t 



9 8 3t WE BUY USED BOOKS all sub|ects but 

pay better for literature, history, art, 

hildrens theology, and P*""^ KAWASAKI KO 100 lor sale Excellent 



Good condition a must Call Micawber 
Books, 108 Nassau Street. Princeton. 
921 8454 



condition, S3S0 Call John 921 3250 



.■■■4.'-. <-.*•-'" 

SYLVAN MOUNTAINVIEW 

Tall trees, azaleas, rolling lawns. A red brick ranch, white 
clapboard, custom built and lovingly cared tor Living room and 
dining room oft the front slate foyer, family room with fireplace 
and glass doors, fully equipped eat-in kitchen, pantry, laundry 
In the rear, a screened patio The bedroom wing offers 3 
bedrooms. 2 full baths Polished oak floors, paved drive, 2 car 
garage with electric door M 14 000 

W S BORDEN 

R ea«or 609-883-1900 



OnlUQi 



;. i s 



21 



CARNEGIE REALTY, Inc. 

Each Olllce Is Independently Owned and Operated 
PRINCETON CIRCLE AT RT. 1 

921-6177 452-2188 

J5i 




PRINCETON - Desirable SHADY BROOK area 

Elegant Colonial Split. Spacious 4 Bedroom in 
Park-like setting - Large trees and flowering 
shrubs Excellent floor plan for Active Family 

$175,000 





CARTER BROOK ROAD. Above Kingston Lovely 
neighborhood on cul-de-sac Spacious 4 bedroom 
2V4 bath ranch Fireplace, patio, underground 
utilities, Princeton address $1 , 4 900 



JOHN STREET COLONIAL 



$69,900 



ERDMAN AVENUE RANCH - Owner will Assist 
Financing for Qualified Buyer $88,500 

KINGSTON - Immaculate - Renovated 3 bedroom 
Colonial -New Kitchen $82,500 

LAWRENCE EXECUTIVE RENTAL - 5 Bedrooms. 
Family Room with fireplace $850 month 



West Windsor rancher in parklike setting. Low 
maintenance exterior of brick and aluminum. 20 x 20 
redwood deck overlooking fenced yard and pool. 
Double-sided fireplace can be enjoyed from living 
room or dining room. Game room in basement A home 
to enjoy for $ii9,uuo 



Better-than-new university line colonial tastefully 
decorated in neutral tones. Three bedrooms, 2^ baths, 
brick fireplace. On a corner lot with fenced yard and 
patio. Excellent Plainsboro location. Priced far below 
new construction at SU5.9O0 





Handsome colonial coupled with one of the prettiest 
settings in Griggstown Four bedrooms, full bath and 
powder room, hardwood floors, central air; two-car 
garage and full basement Mature shade trees and 
flowering shrubs provide complete privacy $106,500 



Federal I 
with clas 



use in historic Lambertville restored 

ails, onginal random plank floors and 

four fireplaces Updated with modern conveniences in 

kitchen and baUis In-ground pool, small guest cottage 

and magnificent gardens A unique property offered at 

$115,000 

164 Nassau Street, Princeton, N.J. 

609-921-2700 

ITOWN AND COUNTRY SPECIALISTS SINCE 1915| 



Wallcoverings 

Always Discounted 

2929 Rte. 1 883-2056 



iiadt and Super Sandwiches 
at COX'S 



Fresh (lowers, stone animal planters 
Bagels, cotlee and more. more, more 



coxs 

IBO Nassau Street 



m 






FOR SALE: 1977 two horse Hartmann 
trailer Excellent condition No rust, 
goivi floorboards. 11500 Call Wl 2337 

9 1 3t 



NOBODY W flN TS A NUCLEAR WAR A 
nuclear war between the US and the 
U s.S.R would kill as many as 350 
million people in a single day Vole YES 
tor a mutual US- soviet nuclear 
weapons Freeze Nov 3 



IF YOU LIVE outside ot Princeton ana 
are regularly buying TOWN TOPICS at — 

a newsstand, a ma. I subscription can CLASSIC GUITAR LF „ nM , 
save you time and money Call 934 7200 
today 



given by 
internationally acclaimed concert 
guitanst Alice Artzt Serious students 
ot all levels Call M* 1568 



TWENTY NASSAU OFFICE SPACE 

3,430 square feet in the heart of Princeton with 7 radiators, 4 
sinks, 3 bathrooms. Needs renovations to suit the tenant. 
Single office suites facing Nassau Street and campus. Sunny, 
bright, newly decorated. 

Call 924-7027 



TWIN RIVERS TOWN CENTER: From 
S363 SO Furnished and unfurnished 
Leases as short as 3 months. £n|oy the 
Intimacy and superb service ottered by 
our 29 executive style studios and one 
bedroom apartments In the midst of the 
desirable Twin Rivers professional and 
business community All units en|oy 10 
or 28 foot balconies individual air 
conditioning systems, great views 
through sliding glass doors, unlimited 
parking facilities, private carpeied 
second floor laundry, tree use of u 
tennis courts <6 lighted), 4 swimming 
pools, 3 basketball courts, 3 handball 
courts Contemporary total electric 
kitchens, marblelied vanities, com 
muter bus service to NYC, complete 
shopping facilities at your door Total 
city comfort in the country Situated on 
Route 33 less than 1 mile from turnpike 
exit 6 (Hightstown) Phone 409 448 3430 
or 609-393 3063 7 31 4t 



LIGHT HAULINO - Moving 300 ml 
radius Call 931 9330, 5 8 weekday 
anytime weekends 6 3 



"FURNISHED ROOM TO RENT: Share 
bath, no cooking or laundry, $140 a 
month plus security Call 934 6B79 
before lOp.m 



Got A Leak? 




a 

* 



Call 



Roofing by Williamson 



921-1184 

Rooting, Insulation, 
Builders 



♦ 



^AIDREYSHORT 

163 Nassau Street, Princeton, N.J. 921-9222 
2431 Main St., Lawrenceville, N.J. 896-9333 




Attractive bi-level in Hamilton Township. Move-in condition $79,900 




A spacious split level in Princeton Township, excellent condition. 
Available immediately $185,000 




A sunny ranch in Hopewell Township with lots of land 



$85,000 



An investment property in Hopewell Borough This conveniently 
located two family duplex offers good financing to qualified buyer. 

$118,500 



'r=X 



CROSSROADS realtor 

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 

NT SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 12-1 TO 3 P.M. 

C 




45 VANDEVENTER AVE. 



PRINCETON BOROUGH. Queen Anne Victorian restored to re- 
tain its character and charm, but renovated to offer all modern 
conveniences. There are three condominium units from 
$119,900. Each offers: 

• One floor living 

• Private parking 

• Private gardens 

• Open deck or balcony 

• Fireplace or Wood 
burning stove 



All new kitchen 
Central air conditioning 
Hardwood floors 
One block from 
Palmer Square 
Plus many extras 



68 LOVERS LANE 
ELEGANT CONDOMINIUM IN A 19TH CENTURY MANSION 

next to Marquand Park. The richly ornamented formal rooms 
combined with modern kitchen and skylights won Guernsey Hall 
2 awards from the American Institute of Architects. 
PRINCETON $225,000 



CALL FOR DIRECTIONS 



Princeton Crossroads Realty, Inc. 

342 Nassau Street [Coiner Harrison! Princeton 

PARK IN OUR LOT 
CALL ANYTIME (609) 924-4677 OPEN 7 DAYS 



Firestone °Real ^Estate 



169 Nassau Street 

Carol Caskey 
KavConnikie 



REALTORS 



Joan Galiardo 
Jane Jacobs 



Mary McManus 
Donna Reichard 



(609) 924-2222 

Gail Firestone 

Jim Firestone, Broker 




,ru ioi s \i< inlUAN in DEI IGHTI ' i 
PENNINGTON Haven't you always dreamed of really 
enough space for the family combined with the 
yesteryear charm of a small town' Now we offer that 
special opportunity to own one of the most desirable 
homes in Pennington, just minutes away from 
Princeton Ideal (or entertaining and warm family liv- 
ing this six-bedroom home offers lots of extra 
features: a recently-remodeled gourmet kitchen, cen- 
tral air conditioning, low heating bills, intercom, and 
lots more! Offered at »''*••<"' 




A HOUSE IN TIIK WOODS IN PRINCETON'S KlVF.lt 

SIDE. Ideal for a muth level deck overlooking the 
brook. Four generous bedrooms, family room and 
study Come get a sneak preview before the open 
house »'™ 500 




AN ELEGANT BRICK FRONT COLONIAL. Close to 
Princeton. Front-to-back living room with French 
doors opening to a glass-enclosed sun porch, formal 
dining room, large eut-in kitchen with pantry, natural 
cedar-paneled vaulted family room with fireplace and 
access to an elevated deck overlooking the woods. Four 
delightful bedrooms in all including a master suite. 
Many fine details including sunned hardwood floors, a 
slate foyer, crown moldings, in short a superb offering 

$184,900 



A PRIME PRINCETON INVESTMENT 



1 




1 



PRINCETON— HALF OF A NASSAU STREET OF- 
FICE building for sale. 1,000 sq. ft. approximately 
on each floor— fully rented for the next two years. It 
practically breaks even at these high interest rates 

1175.000 
WHY BUY IT? LOCATION. LOCATION 

1. You get a 15-year life to depreciate a great tax 
shelter of over 6,000 per year. 

2. Low maintenance— it's just been totally rebuilt 
and will need lift 1 '- upkeep 

3. Appreciation- I whole block is rising in value 
and luxury housing is protected in the rear. 

4. Office rentals are doubling in Princeton. 

5. Financing terms are excellent. 

Only 125.000 down 



\N EXQUISITE WILLIAMSBURG CAPE COD IN A 
PRIVATE SETTING IN PRINCETON. Enter through 
a welcoming foyer to the formal living room with 
fireplace, separate dining room with chair rail and 
large sunny kitchen - family room opening onto a love- 
ly patio Master bedroom suite with French doors to 
the patio, and two other family bedrooms For the 
future, expansion possibilities could include two more 
bedrooms and a bath upstairs, and/or a finished game 
room in the basement Offered at $189,900 



\ SPECIAL FRENCH PROVINCIAL HOME ON A 
OUIET CUL-DE-SAC IN WESTERN PRINCETON. 

This five-bedroom home is close to town yet on a 
private picturesque Hi acre manicured lot Superb in 
every way from the living room with bow window and 
fireplace, dining room perfect for a holiday buffet and 
even a guest wing near the greenhouse. Below is a 
panelled game room, wet bar. family area with powder 
room and much more. Excellent craftsmanship and at- 
tention to detail throughout. 1350,000 




LOVELY PRINCETON RANCH IN CONVENIENT, 
ATTRACTIVE NEIGHBORHOOD. From the living 
room with brick fireplace and picture window to the 
kitchen-family room area with Jenn-aire range and 
Pella windows, this delightful home with additions 
designed by Andrew Sheldon says "special ' ' Three full 
bedrooms and two baths. Lovely lot, private, and with 
deck overlooking it 1128,000 



THIS DELIGHTFUL RANCH in Princeton's Riverside 
in pristine condition features a living room with bay 
window, formal dining room, eat-in kitchen and family 
room with fireplace. Three bedrooms in all including a 
master suite. Surrounded by a sylvan canopy of trees 
and just walking distance to school and bicycling 
distance to the University. $172,500 




A SPECIAL LITTLE RANCH RIGHT IN 

PRINCETON. Insulc you'll find a good size living room 
wiili fireplace, an eat-in kitchen with knotty pine ceil- 
ing, two ample bedrooms with closet space, and a full 
bath Outside a small private yard of your own, but 
you're In a park-like setting. Call Firestone today 

170,000 



CLOSE TO THE MARVELOUS PLAYGROUNDS OF 
PRINCETON'S RIVERSIDE SCHOOL. A versatile 
four-bedroom home ideal for an in-law arrangement 
with a master bedroom suite and family room with 
fireplace at ground level. Upstairs are a living room 
and dining room with vaulted ceiling leading to a 
treetop deck, a good eat-in kitchen and three family 
bedrooms There's also a huge activity room for family 
projects, cub scouts, etc Bicycling distance — even 
walking distance — to town and gown 1164,500 




WEST OF PRINCETON. In the Lawrence' 
custom built Cape Cod, in a truly pretty setting 
overlooking a brook, featuring a large living room with 
fireplace, a comfortable country' kitchen, master 
bedroom on the ground floor and 2 more family 
bedrooms upstairs $178,500 



PRINCETON TOWNSHIP — Close to town and shopp- 
ing center, a three bedroom. 14 bath half -duplex with 
living room, dining area and kitchen downstairs and a 
private nicely landscaped yard outside. See it before 
the open house $85,000 




A SUPERB LISTING - A MONTGOMERY DUTCH 
COLONIAL WITH SIX BEDROOMS, three baths, cen- 
tral air and a super floor plan Living room with 
fireplace & large terrace off the kitchen Fully land- 
scaped on one beautiful country acre near the high 
school Newly reduced 101139, 900 



ASSOCIATES 
REALTY 

162 Natuu StrMt 

609-924-6501 

F Procacclnl, Broker 



ARTISTIC HAIRDRESSERS 

All phases of beauty services from head 
to toes Walk In service and bv ap 
point menl 



« Wltherspoon Street 

«<-4l7S 



SPECIAL OF THE MONTH 

Expert work done on the premises 
Bring your loose beads or pearls lor 
restnnging and repair 

Plain 16" necklace Sa 

Pearls iknotted In between) Slj 

(50 beads] 



CREATIVE DRAPERIES 

Upholstering 
Slipcovers 

75 Main St. Kingston 
9213569 201828-7144 



WANTED GUNS, SWORDS, military 
items, decoys Licensed, collector 
dealer will pay more Bert Call 924-3800 
days 3 . 14 .„ 



IMS CORVAIR CORSA t door, 4 car 
Curators, needs battery and more, S400 
or best otter Call 21S493-4719 after 4 



J.17-H Need other jewelry repair work' 
Juliana for special care & serv 

quahty work and reasonable prices 



JEWELS BY JULIANA 
14 Wltherspoon St Ml 7233 



FRED'S HOME IMPROVEMENTS 
Rooting, siding, storm doors and 
windows, porches, pallos, paneling, 

remodeling chimneys, all type mason 
work, internal ana external repairs, 
pole barns, alt type fences Call 609 7 S8 
JS16 l?4rf 



FOR RENT 3' > room apartment, S480 
monthly, heat furnished only No pets 
or children Available trom September 
1st Apply 140 Spruce Street, or call 924 
4093 between S and 9pm 9 B tf 



PROFESSIONAL EDITOR 

AVAILABLE for freelance work, (609) 
924 1 289 




FROM AMERICA'S OLDEST AND LARGEST 
FINANCIAL SERVICE COMPANY 

—Since 1935— 

The equity In your home can ba used for — 

• tax shelters 

• educational trusts 

• investments 

• home purchases 

• home improvements 

• other worthwhile purposes 

YEGEN OFFERS — 

• prompt professional service 

• flexible terms 

• VERY competitive rates 

• Credit Life Insurance 

For more information call 

YEGEN HOME EQUITY 

Princeton Service Cntr, 3490 US Rt.i, Princeton, N.J. 

(609) 452-7071 



YEGEN ASSOCIATES 




HOUSE OF THE WEEK 




CUSTOM BUILT BRICK RANCHER in convenient 
Hopewell Township location on a cul-de-sac. Two 
bedroom, two bath with formal living-dining rooms. 
Quaker Maid kitchen with dinette, sliding doors to terrace. 
Full basement. Two zone gas hot water heat and air. Two 
car garage. Expansion second floor. $110,000 



JOHNT 



CHENDER§ON 



/,vr 



REALTORS 

Route 31 and W. Delaware Avenue, Pennington 
(609) 737-3980 



HOUSE RENTAL - Charming newly 
remodeled, unlurnisned house very 
near the University, overlooking lake 
Two bedroom, study, separate dining 
new kitchen appliances, quiet 
Gardener provided Ref and deposit 
required Single person or couple only 
No pets or children S850 monthly, Sept 
May, plus utilities Call 974 Oti! 

9-1 3t 



GtC BY CAICO: Live doves and 
rabbits Reasonable rates 301 381 IMS 



CHELSEA CRIMPERS 

a Spring Street, Princeton, N J 
<*0») H4-1B24 

Tues. 8>Thurs. 9-8 

Wed a Frl. ?-* 

Sat 9-4:30 

distinctive hairstyling 
tor men and women 



OET AWAY FROM IT ALL 

Rent a secluded one bedroom New 
Hampshire cabin on tour private wooded 
acres, located on a lovely, clear lake 

Sailfish and canoe available tor use. golf 
and tennis nearby. 



NASSAU AIRPORT TAXIS - Service to 
and Irom all airports Telephone Ml 
7339 

4-28-M 



ELECTRIC APPLIANCES 3 

Fridgidalre and Caloric ranges, very ) 
good condition. Harvest Gold 40Gallon 
water heater used 6 months changed 
togas, must sacrifice 159 4171 

9 I 31 



TELEPHONE TOLL CALLS • II mon 
thiy tolls total $75 plus savings ot 25 
percent — 40 percent are possible Call 
974 0959 for details if you called before, 
call again, new cities have been added 
9 1 21 



KINGSTON ANTIQUES 



It 




Aunt Sallies 
Barn 

A BARN FULL OF FURNITURE 

Unusual mahogany cabinet 
wilh heavy brasses • Large i 
Oak Desk with swivel chair • 

Round table and chairs * 
Maple Drop Leaf Pine Hutch • 



924y„02 

Tues, -Sat. 12-S 

and by aprK 





Furniture Repair 



Have been on a Buying Trip 
and brought back more new 

furniture, porcelains and 

jewelry, priced astonishingly 

low and with the "oide tyme" 

quality that* s no longer 

extant 

OORO -it H CPPfcNhEIM 
Rei..6C9i924 3923 



43 Main St. • Kingston • 924-0332 



* I A I rSJ * * I *' * I * T * I J* I <£ I » T * I iS I *1* Arl* Aftlf J_rlr X nl 




5B5BF 



STEWARDSON-DOUGHERTYf 

'Pea/ Eitate ■ Associates, Incorporated 

366 !\assau Street, Princeton, .'\rw Jersey 08540 

•Thine: 6ou-QJi -7784 




> - - 



1 



HEATHCOTE FARM 

Be one of only four owners to share this exquisite country estate located 
near, the village of Kingston only three miles from Princeton and within 
walking distance to New York City bus and ten minutes to rail commuta- 
tion. 

Conversion of the Historic Mansion to four condominium apartments is 
near completion. High ceilings, decorative moldings, oak parquet floors, 
and fireplaces all have been retained. Individual gas heat, central air 
New kitchens. Elevator. Private outdoor terraces. One, two or three 
bedroom units. All on five acres with rolling lawns, formal gardens, 
swimming pool, classic gazebo, lovely protected country views Priced 
from $220,000. Brochure on request. 



FOR THE 



Claire Burns 
Anne Cresson 
Sharon Davidson 
Julie Douglas 



TO PRINCETON REAL ESTATE CALL: 

921-7784 
Robert E. Dougherty 




Betsy Ford 
Georgia Graham 
Pam Harris 
Cathy Johnson 



Toby Laughlin 
Sylvia Nesbitt 
Emma Wirtz 
Valerie Young 



William E Slewarasonll93S 19721 

Realtors 

Representing Previews Executivp Home Ser-ch 



'T VTTTV IV TTTT T 



, PHI NCI TOM SMALL ANIMAL 

■ tfSCL'I HAGUE 

• SAV.I. 

c WEEKDAYS TO CLAIM OR ADOPT A 

C PET. CALL MRS GRAVES. I 4 P M 

£ SATURDAY, 111 AM, FOR AN AP 

I POINTMENT (mghts and wMkfMs. 

*t report lost and found or Inlured animals 

\ . thtpo l)ct 

^ Rmrt lost ana found pets 

< Kkittun a twenty four hour period 



OLDS STABFIRE SX 11. N«w tires and 
exhaust Lowmlleag* V». AC. PS, AM 
FM Stereo. * speed s: 000 Call 91* rt40 
after 7 pm 



YOUNG LADY WOULD LIKE TO BE A 
MOTHERS HELPER, good With 
children infant care Call after 6 pm, 
695 56*4 



SAVE cares tor the worlds neediest 
cases, wont you care by having your c»> 
and dog spa ved now, please?? 

iv» ye*"" old female spayed pore Bred 
Standard Poodle, cream color, has 
aaoers 

vtale Beagie hound 

Altered male, I year old Cocker Coin*, 
cog f«ir medium tile 
1 year old male Oobermen 
Female young Pointer dog 
Female. 1 year old Collie Shepherd, 

[ Black and white, good with children 

■ Altered male, l") year old Standard 

| Schnauier. good with children 

' Female spayed Collie Shepherd, en 

' cellentwetchdog 

' Pure bred J year old Irish Setter, good 

! wtth children 

•Aaie? months old German Shepherd 
Female 3 year old Cairn Terrier 
-emale spayed 3 year old Shepherd 
Husky type dog 

Female 4 months Old Shepherd Husky 
^og 

,-Aale I '^ year old Spaniel typr- dog 
Small l"i year old female spayed 
Terrier type dog. excellent with children 
■ year old temale spayed pure bred 
Golden Retriever, excellent temperment 
5 year old, female spayed Golden 
Retriever Lab dog 

Call us about our kittens and young cats 
HI-ftM 



BUY OF THE MONTH - New to the 
market Br<cklront Colonial. West 
Windsor. S bedrooms. M baths. 3 car 
garage, large lot on quiet street, walk to 
train station immaculate condition 
Executive transferred Must sen 
Asking S137.M0 Gloria Nllson Realtors 
(6091 44a 8600 Ask lor Mr Stefterson 



HOW MUCH IS ENOUGH' The 
warheads on a single Poseidon sub 
marine can destroy every ma|or 
Russian city The U S has 37 Poseldons 
and is planning Trident submarines 
with an even greater capability Vote 
YES for a Nuclear Weapons Freeie 
Nov I 



YARD SALE: Saturday, September II, 
9 ll am Rugs. 3 speed bicycles (I 
men's, i girl's), typewriter, twin box 
spring and mattress, and more 47) 
Alexander Street (Across from Rusty 
Scupper) 



CHARMING CARRIAGE HOUSE 

APARTMENT between river and 
canal, near New Hope S3S0 monthly 

plus utilities Call 20? 54> 5795 till 



HOUSE FOR RENT in Princeton 
Partially furnished duplex on 
Wltherspoon Street 3 bedrooms, 
suitable for students or professionals 
Lease required Available >m 
mediately S400 plus utilities Call «l 
i;iJafter6pm 9 8 7t 



FULLY FURNISHED, 

apartment Availebli 
Month to month 1 bed 
large living room, dir 
private garden, patio, 
off street parking Near 
una Philadelphia buses 
1051. 



first flook 
October I 
rooms, study, 
ilng, kitchen, 
(mall garage, 
shopping, NY 
SIOO Call 974 
9131 



PIANO INSTRUCTION: Princeton grad 
student with B M Juliiard School Most 
advanced techniques, results assured 
All levels Write to Adrian Cerr. It 
Dickinson Street. Room ?3, Princeton 
08540 9 8 31 



FOR RENT from January through June, 
large 5 bedroom fully furnished house 

on Quiet street m Princeton Pleasecall 



9 1 7t 



9 i :t 



RECORDER LESSONS: Learn the 
Basics of music by playing recorder 
Private and group lessons Age 6 and 
up Call 971 1690 

9 1 4t 



STUOENT MOVERS 

EXPERIENCED 

All Types Furniture 
Local or Long Distance 
-Reasonable Rates" 

No Job Too Small 
Call Kirk. 609 *43 5*46 
or Don. 609 393 3540 



^.S Qtone 

f J tore for o*5 tct, 
Come m ana Drowse 
Montgomery C«nt«f 
BOuK.206g.5tB RockyH.» NJ -?■ R$30 



plumbing. Reasonable. You Bet! Call 
Philip Plumbing Serving the Prin 
cetons. the Windsors and surrounding 
area 443 33AS 

9 1 St 



WE BUY USED BOOKS all sublects, but 
pay better for literature, history, art. 
children's, theology, and philosophy 
Good condition a mutt Call Mtcawber 
Books. 108 Nassau Street. Princeton, 
971 8454 



MEN'S ALTERATION on clothing by 
expert tailor either purchased here or 
elsewhere Princeton Clothing Co, " 
Wltherspoon St , Princeton 934-0704 6 



ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS of Prln 
ceton For immediate help with a 
drinking problem, call 609 974 7597 For 
information, write Princeton P O Box 
S3* Meetings every night in Princeton 
or surrounding area 9 10-tf 



HIGHEST PRICES 
PAID FOR 

OaMSHnr 

Dlamonda Antkjuat 

J.C.T. GALLERY 

2M( S. Broad St, 

Tronton, N.J. 
(609)888-2301 

Mon-S.1 M:30; Wad M 



PHOTOGRAPHY 

JOHN SIMPSON 
924-8497 



Wt 



Walter B 

owe- 



Insurers • Realtors 
Established 1885 

1 000 Herr ontown Rd. 

Princeton 

609-924-0095 



PRINCETON BORO 

Stucco and slate roof center hall colonial. 
Living room with fireplace, dining room, 
den, heated sun room. Master bedroom with 
bath. Three additional bedrooms and two 
baths on second floor. Additional storage 
rooms and baths on 3rd floor. $315,000 



^^REAL ESTATE V 



V 



10 NASSAU STREET 
PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08S40 

Phone: 16091 921 1411 

, S. Serge Rizzo ™ 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 



PRINCETON TOWNSHIP 
Three bedroom, 2V 2 bath Ranch house. 
Foyer, living room/dining room, country 
kitchen, family room and screened porch. 

$167,000 

WEST WINDSOR 

Custom built stone Cape Cod on one acre. 
Center hall, front to back living room with 
fireplace, dining room, eat-in kitchen. 
Three bedrooms, 1' 2 baths, immaculately 
maintained — ready for immediate oc- 
cupancy. $115,000 

RENTAL 
FURNISHED ONE BEDROOM, one bath 
condo with balcony. Twin Rivers. 

$415 per montt 




REA L 
ESTATE 



KM 

LIGHT 



SALES ASSOCIATES. 



Karl Light 
Realtors 



247 Nassau St. 



Broker 

(609) 924-3822 



Constance Brauer 
John Cartwright 
Friederike Coor 
Marcy Crlmmlns 
Cornelia Oielhenn 

Lawrenceville 
Specialists 



Vonnie Hueston 
Shirley Kinsley 
Derry Light 
Stuart Minion 
Laura Procaccino 

Marge Dwyer 
Gladys Wright 




ONE QUEENSTON PLACE 

Perfect in-town location, small 2 bedroom col- 
onial. Fireplace divides living room, dining room 
Interesting financing possibilities Now $1 47,500 




a,u.luMdlMku. J*m|i juUtlfclj J( ';i|! 

27 VANDER VEER 

Beautifully maintained Lawrence ranch in Univer- 
sity Park Three bedrooms, 2 baths, new carpeting 
— excellent condition. $99,500 

ATTRACTIVE 
FARMHOUSE COLONIAL 

Offers lovely old wide pine floors, no maintenance 

stucco exterior, 5 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2Vi acres. 

Now $169,500 



HARD TO FIND - 

a house small in number ot rooms, but large in liv- 
ing space We tound one tor you in this no 
maintenance contemporary in lovely Edgers- 
lounei Flagstone entry, spacious living room with 
stone fireplace and raised hearth, dining and study 
areas - all with cathedral ceilings, roomy master 
bedroom with tiled bath, second bedroom and 
bath, kitchen and laundry rooms Partly air- 
conditioned A really interesting home - on a 
beautifully landscaped acre, and new on the 
market at $225,000 

BUILDING TIME! 

A rare find 1 Small in-town lot on Moore Street, 
Princeton Township. Approximately 18 acre, 
public water and sewer, all utilities Approved tor 
building Mature trees, some plantings. Owner 
financing available for qualified buyer. 

Reduced to $43,500 



INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY 

West Windsor tarmhouse on 3'/; plus acres Cur- 
rently used as 2 tamily unit ot 3 bedrooms each. 
Guest house with sleeping loft, barns, garages 
Brand new on the market at $235,000 



ca 

REALTOR 



Princeton Real Estate Group 
Multiple Listing Service 




IMMACULATE 

Three bedroom Princeton colonial in attractive 
neighborhood near University. Living room with 
fireplace, dining ell. good kitchen, inviting screen- 
ed porch overlooking lovely grounds. Freshly 
painted inside and out. Ottered at $1 27,500 




: ■^'iHiimltuBMisiiipi 

Wlr la iity i M III«u*».. ;««»^,ui,ni»..jir*«UIUBi»l. 

ATTRACTIVE CAPE 

Near transportation. Fine home with three or four 
bedrooms. 2'/ 2 baths. Large living room with 
heatolator fireplace, dining room, excellent kit- 
chen, large panelled family room with wet bar. 
Priced right at $147,500 



ROOM FOR RE 
central Nassau ! 

:o*o 



BLACK AND WHITE TV., Recllner 

(Walnut Green), Air conditioner (6,000 
BTU). Kenmore portable dishwasher 
(nearly newi Call Wi 3353 between 6 8 



n 



LOOKING FOR LOT. 318 beautiful 
wooded, gently sloping acres a 
leisurely IS minute from downtown 
Pnnceton Call (609) 693 6074 

9 8 tf 



CAT AVAILABLE FREE: A beautiful 
grey and white altered 3 year oio male 
cat is looking tor a new home Not good 
with young children Call 934 5888 



«MMMMMn 



Th. 

FOOD WINKEL 

Gourmat Luncheon Service 

14 Chambers Street 
(609)921-0809 



Computer Encounter 

Princeton North 

Shopping Center 

924-8757 



a 



Wm. B. May Co., Inc. 

Real Estate 



ESTABLISHED I8S6 

Sergeantsville, N.J 08557 609-397-1907 



ASK MR FOSTER 



FOR SALE 1974 BLUE FORD Pinto 

Station-wagon, 33,400 miles. S1S00 Call 
911 8139 



(formerly Welcome Aboard Travel) 



8a, m 530pm 
Monday Friday 



41 Wlthenpoon Street 

« 1.33 so 



FURNISHED BEDROOM FOR RENT 
with private bath, very quiet neigh 
borhood, private entrance, parking 
facilities, gentleman only Call 911 1608 



DRIVEWAYS CONSTRUCTED 
PAVING, ASPHALT OR STON6 



BACK HOE WORK 
septic systems, etc. 

EXPERT LANDSCAPING 

Sod, Seeding and Shrubs 
Commercial and-or Residential 

Free estimates 
Call M« 17 is 



. MOVING DAY SALE - Sept 10 11th 
Electric organ, $7S. kitchenware. 
books. I tie cabinets, etc 9 4 p.m 64 
Mason Drive. Princeton 



FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: To 
share two bedroom Nassau St apar 
Iment Neat, easy going, graduate 
student or professional Non smoker 
S315 per month, including heat 931 
8543 



WOODEN STORM DOOR: Painted 
white. 33'i" x80" x 1", glass or screen 
exchangeable panels, with latch har 
aware Wooden door, white, 30" x BO" x 
W'i 3 glass panels, lock and key 
closure Needs painting Very 
reasonable prices Call 931 3735 



I 

A 



!" 



WHO WANTS PRINCETON 
CUSTOMER ST 

Some business firms do and some don't 
these days How to find the ones that do? 
1400 of them, both out of town and local, 
offer their services through the 
classified pages of your Princeton 
Community Phone Book 9 33 tf 



RUBBER STAMPS 

School or college address, 

Home, business zip-code 

Rubber stamps of all kinds and 

sizes made to your order at 



ANTIQUE SATIN DRAPES Off white, 2 
pair I pair 115" wide, 1 pair 100" wide, 
both 93" long Extremely reasonable 
Call 931 37 35 



THREE SPEED ENGLISH LADIES 
BIKE: Excellent. M" English 3 speed 
boys bike, excellent S85 each Child's 
desk, vinyl easy chair, slanting board, 
runner, table lamp, JtOeaGh Ladles 3 
drawer desk, t40 Six dining room 
chairs. S7S Antique office Chair. 130 
Black and white TV, S50 Floor lamp, 
SI 5 934 5948 



D3 



J^ 



REAL ESTATE 

Anne S. Stockton, Broker 

SI CHAMBERS STREET 

PRINCETON, N J 0i5*O 

• 0t>- 924- I4lt 



Barbara P. Broad Cornelia W. Reader 

Clotllde S. Treves 

Newell B. Woodworth, III 



LOTS 

Two beautiful building lots in Lawrence 
Township. Just over the Princeton line One 
with 4,463 acres, the other with 2.156 acres 
— both with satisfactory perc tests. Owner 
financing negotiable with qualified buyer 
4 463 acres at $100,000, 2,156 acres at 
$75,000. Together at $165,000 




Princeton Township: 3 wooded acres off Mount 
Lucas Road. $75,000 



Beautiful Early American farmhouse on 4 acres. 
On Cranbury Road. West Windsor Township 
Hou^se in very good condition. Immediate oc- 
cupancy $280,000 

PRINCETON TOWNSHIP 

Small cottage, within easy walking distance of 
shopping and bus, on a beautiful lot. Owner finan- 
cing to qualified persons. $62,000 



Hlnkson's 
83 Nassau 



RARE DOWRY BLANKET CHEST 

circa 1760, Ball and claw, Chippendale, 
two drawer mahogany, gadrooned top, 
original brasses, excellent condition, a 
real gem! AsklngS1S50 924 0987 



FILING CABINETSI Come and see our 
rnetai tiling cabinets for office or home. 
Grey, tan, olive, 3 or 4 drawer Also 
typing tables Hlnkson's, 83 Nassau 6 
fO tf 



SALE-MUST BE OUT BY THE ISth. 
Outdoor furniture, beautiful furniture 
and antiques and rugs must go Come to 
533 Mercer Road. Thursday, Friday 
and Saturday from 13 to 7 934 5109 



LANOSCAPING 

by Martin Blackman 

Creative Designs 

Reasonable Rates 

Call evenings 201 B74-3173 

{ Local call from Princeton) 



THE PERFECT ROOMMATE - Male, 
female, non smoke wanted to share 
house with graduate student, owner 
Pennington charm. 3 bedroom, natural 
woodwork, stained glass windows, 
lireplace. back yard, colonaded front 
porch Garage, washer dryer. Heat and 
hot water included 15 minutes to 
Princeton Call 737-14)32 



NOW RENTING 
PRINCETON ARMS 

Luxury Apartments 
1 and 2 Bedrooms 

From $325 Per Month 

Features: 

Wall-to- Wall carpeting over 
concrete in 2nd floor apts. 
all utilities except Electric 
Individually controlled heat 
2 air conditioners 
Private entrances 
K alk-in closets 
Individual balconies 
Storage room within apt. 
Laundry Booms 
Superintendent on site. 

Open Mon. — Fri. 

9a.m. -5:00p.m. 

609-448-4801 



flMnffl»lllllftf"™ — "'"1ll1ll ffll Hf| l *' — ~ i ~" , ~ — **~~~™'~~~~~'"~"- l ™ -J — -' """■■'"» mmmx 



1 



Rendall-Cook & Company 



Realtors 



350 Alexander Street 



LAKE VIEW 



60<l-924-0:$22 



Princeton 



LOVELY LOT 








mm 


v. • J«- 


.1 m» ---*- 


I. 1 ' i T 



A five bedroom, four bath house overlooking Lake 
Carnegie on a spacious 1 Vi acre lot. Library, large 
dining room, third floor family room for children. 
Central air, alarm system, detached two-car 
garage $400,000 

GREAT POSSIBILITIES 



Towering trees, rhododendron & azaleas on a two 
acre lot. Open, contemporary living with lots of 
glass to let the outdoors in. Four bedrooms, two & 
one half baths A really good buy at only $1 75,000 

HISTORIC HOUSE 





This spacious tour bedroom colonial has a family 
room and a den. Raised living room overlooks a 
nice dining room with parquet floor Full acre lot 
(mostly fenced) convenient to schools and shopp- 
ing. A good buy at $124,900 



Built in 1 860 when the canal dominated our area 
This charming house would delight anyone. Total- 
ly modern while retaining its integrity Charming 
cottage on the property Excellent financing 

$199,000 



DEMPSEY AVENUE: Pristine' Excellent house for a professional couple with numerous expan- 
sion possibilities Charming lot convenient to everything, A must at only $104,500 

DORANN AVENUE: Needs a little TLC but offers great potential in a lovely neighborhood. Fou 
bedrooms and a bath Full basement and attached garage $96,000 



OOFRICR IANDSCAPES 

. m.h.j C'Hitt.utmti 

9 Got dun Ave 
L.twrenccvillc 

924-1221 



£ J CosmttKS and Fragrances^ 

*[The Dorothea Shop J 

5 ' flOWS of London Fragrances ' 



• <30 Thompson Cowii 
Tum.-S«1 10 am - i 10 pm 

H1-1S41 



FOR SALf mi Dftfwn «02 Turbo. T "AUTIFUL RUO FOR SAL6: « by 1 

root, silver. urtftr rww car warranty. »•«., ()os "' ' *< Purchaied ne* 

r»w condition inslt* and out. JU.300 J*»wv '« *» 3W3 after S pm 

Call We 356* , 



ROOM FOR RENT (or non smoking 

FOR RENT- FirV door apertmrnt two erotMS.onal or business gentleman 
bedrooms, two bathrooms, spacious 



Parking available CailOT«S6H 




• FABRICS 

• DP APERIES 

• SLIPCOVERS 

• FURNITURE 
REPAIRS 

DEWEY'S 

Upholstery Shop 
6-8 Station Drive 

Princeton JunctlonQ 

79*1778 



FOR RENT Second lloor apartment, 
central location, large living room, 
kitchen, two bedrooms, heat, water and 
gas included CaM3W7*7« 



1*7) bmw BAVARIA, classic. 4 speed, 
1*250 Days 734 5701. evenings and 
weekends, 921 «7S 



GARAGE SALE Records, small ap 
piiances. dishes, pottery, crystal 
stemware, sterling serving pieces. 
toys, misc housenoid items Also iv«o 
Takara 10 speed bicycle Saturday, 
September nth. lam 6pm, i7g 
Terhune Road. Princeton 



40 ACRES Small stream Colorado' 
Near mountains SI 4,500 J 165 flown 130 
payments Of J16S "A Mile And A Half 
High in The Colorado Skyl" Owner 
ISM) 376 8690 



YARD SALE Three generations ol 
miscellaneous household items for sale 
Saturday. September Mtn. 45 
Hawthorne Avenue 



ROOM FOR RENT, very near campus 
ana Palmer Square, marvelous 
location, separate entrance, no kitchen 
privileges. i!60 per month, 921 8597 



MOVING YARD SALE- September 11 
17th, 9 30 '2 30. 284 Mercer Road. 
Princeton Books, record, a little of 
everything 



FOR SALE Twm box spring J15; corner 
bookcase no youth chest S30. wbite 
metal outdoor table and 3 benches ISO, 
recliner 150, upholstered chair 125. 
ping pong table 17S, sofa free, you 
haul, 12011359 0075 



AGENCY 

eSS. Main SI 
Partington, N.J. 

737-1330 



EB 



f"sT(7LLMAl7rU^NiTufrE" 



Used Furniture, chests, dressers 
unfinished bookcases, etc. 

SPECIAL OF THE WEEK: Pair of 

mahogany leather-topped step tables; 
mahogany drop-leaf table. 

212 Alexander St.. Princeton Bflffl 

Mon-Fh 9-5: Sat 9-1 924-1 881 SSQ 



GARAGE SALE 309 Snowden Lane. 
Saturday, September 1Mb, 9am 3pm 
Twofemilies. good fhinps 



FOR RENT: Rossmoor, October I 3 
bedroom, l »tory unlurmsned apart 
ment Short term lease 1600 per month 
Call 45? 1354 



GARAGE SALE: Saturday. September 
11, 9 to 1 51 Clover Lane. Princeton 
Furniture, curtains, carpet, chlldrens 
and adults clothes, infant seat, toys, 
mtchenware, much more 



em 

Plentiful 
Acres 




GARAGE SALE 15 Mason Drive (OH 
WoodsiOe Lane near Riverside School), 
sat Sept 11, 10 * - Bed. Books, 
Bicycles, Toys Mlcronauts, Atari VCS, 
Models. Silver. Luggage. Household 
items, and more 



LAWN MOWER, excellent condition 

1100, Lawn Boy solid state Ignition 
Teak extension table S125 Trundle bed 
with 7 mattresses 1300 Beautiful steel 
desk (gold) complete with Hie drawers 
1125 Swivel chair 175 3 bikes 150175 
Oriental throw rug 1150 Raltan 
headboard 135 Aquarium tank 110 
Paintings, lithographs, lamp shades 
andothcrmlsc Items Call924 79o; 



OARAOE SALE. Saturday 12 noon to 3 
p m , no earlier no later Some antiques 
and other furniture, kitchen cupboards. 
solid old wooden doors Hod brand and 
European boys clothes ages 4 6, also 
boys shoes Books, lamps, lee cream 
maker, 154 Library Place Rain date 
Saturday 18th 



OPTIMUM LOCATION 
FOR YOUR OFFICE 

One minute walk from Post Office, 

Bus Slop, Stationers, Restaurants 

Bank, Legal, Accountants, 

within building 

will sublet one or two of my spaces 

Ml 3111 



Klngiton location 

Country Meats 

921-7811 

Fresh Fish: 921 -1508 : 

Bayberry Florists 

924-9002 

M-Th10-6 

Frit 0-7 

Sat 10-6 

Closed Sunday 



MOVING SALE, varied Items, lawn and 
farm equipment Saturday and Sunday 
9am on, rain or shine Titusviiie 
Rood, Pennington 



MATURE ADULT BABYSITTER 
available for days, woeks, ovonlngs, or 
woekends References, please call 
Nancy at: 921 2413 



FOR RENT: Princeton Small, char 
mlng two bedroom house Private yard, 
porch, patio, garage Excellent 
location No children or pets 1645 
monthly Available anytime alter Sept 
15Cell(201)232 6MScollec1 



Cll 



MOTORCYCLE FOR SALE: Honda 
1975, CB 500 T, 3,900 miles, brown tank 
and seal. 1750, priced to sell Call 974 

6524 



FOR RENT: Large furnished room In 
private home Call 921 3616 after 5 pm 
9-1-31 



PREGNANT7 Prepare with Lomaie 
childbirth classes, small private 
classes taught by nationally certified 
childbirth educators, in Mercer. 
Middlesex, Somerset, Monmouth 
County Please call early for most 
comploto selection 609 924 2040 
Princeton Aroa ASPO Lamaie 

HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S 
bedroom. 2 bath condo Pool, 
tennis, walk to beach Many extras 
1319 1399 per wcok 609 924 8315 

9 1 51 



Constitution 
Hill 

The Ease 

of 

Unburdened 

Living 



Settle here on the celebrated 

Morgan estate, 47 acres of natural 

beauty in the midst of Princeton. 

Artfully clustered individual houses 

surround the mansion offering the 

ease of condominium living. 

A full time staff offers meticulous 
maintenance of your landscaping 
and residence (Sunny growing 
space provided for ambitious 
gardeners). The houses are pre- 
wired with burglar and fire alarm 
systems and on premises security 
affords your property protection 
in your absence. 

Your personal touch will 
individualize the 1, 2 or 3 bedroom 
homes designed to echo the 
graceful architecture of the Morgan 
mansion and offering contemporary 
conveniences and energy efficiencies. 




Priced from $268,000, 

Sales office open everv da> 10-5 
or hv appointment. 

Broker Cooperation 
Innovative Financing 




RoMdale Road 
Princeton, Ntw Jersey 08540 
Constitution Hill <6i») 921-2190 



MORTGAGES 

AVAILABLE TO 

QUALIFIEO BUYERS 



Weichert 



. \ 

PflOi rfl " 



Whf ii the people of New Jersey think Real Estate. .they think Weicherf 




BRUNSWICK HEIGHTS 
NORTH 

SOUTH BRUNSWICK-Elegant. new tradi- 
tional homes are being quality crafted in a very 
desirable area Available in sizes up to 5 bed- 
rooms, superbly appointed and representing a 
remarkable value at pnees from $1 09.900 




DESIRABLE AREA 

PRINCETON-Walk everywhere from this 
charming, mint condition Colonial thaf s just 2 
block from Nassau St Has 4 bedrooms, new 
kitchen, baths and efficient gas heating sys- 
tem Too good to be true at $136,500 
S&O050 




HIDDEN LAKE 

NORTH BRUNSWICK- is the line setting 
for this 5 bedroom, custom Colonial with a 
double deck overlooking the landscaped, 
wooded lot. Finished basement, wet bar in 
family room, many extras. $184,500 
SB-0041 



jfl 






GREAT SETTING 

EAST WINDSOR- Set on line property in 
Cranbury Manor is this immaculate Cape Cod 
Otters 3 or 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, workshop in 
lull basement and entertaining patio. Beamed 
living room ceiling adds character S79 900 
SB-0017 



South Brunswick Office 
201-297-0200 

All offerings are subject 10 eirors and omissions 



Offices Open 



9 a.m.-9 p.m. ■ 



Weichert 

Realtors 



OHicJilhmujhouin j ■ 




HiLr 



Custom Homes By 
William Bucci Builders. Inc. 

JUST 6 LOTS LEFT! 

Dogwood Hill is o unique residential enclave on the west 
side of Mount Lucas Road in Princeton Township 

The site is naturally rolling and covered with native 
dogwoods and large shode trees 

Eleven custom homes will be built on lots of at least three 
quavers of an acre, in a cluster plan with seven acres of 
common open space. 

William Ducci Builders, Inc.. are local builders with a tine 
record of building quality custom homes in the Princeton area. 
They will build from their plans or yours. All lots are fully 
developed with public water, sewer and underground utilities 
of electric and gas. 

For more information, call: 

K.M. Light Real Estate Stewardson - Dougherty 

R#allor » Real Estate Associate.. Inc. 

S ° 9 - 9 "- 3822 609-921-7784 



jaiu A i A i » ' . ESS j u ijlljlljll. 1 5roTOCIII3ro j S BE3SI332S^^E ^^ 5 S 5St 



5 



3 




STEWARDSON -DOUGHERTY 

T^tfZ Estate Associates, Incorporated 

366 Nassau Street, Trinceton, ^(ew Jersey 08540 

T'hone: 609-92 1 -7784 




NEW LISTING 

Picturesque barn with all the pre-requisites for conversion to a marvelous 
house. Original hand-hewn pegged beams, large open spaces, garage, 
and two large horse stalls on the lower level; fieldstone foundation and 
entry ramp All on 2061 acres with mature trees and lawns. Located in 
Montgomery Township just across Cherry Valley Road from Princeton 
Township, Easy driving distance to PDS, Stuart, and town, $1 75,000 





GRIGGSTOWN 

Built in 1 751 and lovingly restored since, authentic Colonial in pictures- 
que village. Through center hall, living room, library, dining room, 
modern kitchen and breakfast room, screen porch, four or five 
bedrooms, two and one halt baths Four fireplaces, wide pine floors, anti- 
que mantels, decorative mouldings and arches, corner cabinets, fan win- 
dows. All on two high acres overlooking the Delaware-Raritan Canal. 

$260,000 



ROLLING HILL ROAD 

An uncommon Colonial, not an antique, but just old enough to have a 
certain classic charm and many of the features so sorely lacking in its 
cousins being built today. To wit: plaster walls, random oak floors, slate 
roof, and rich architectural detail throughout. Spectacular living room 
with stone fireplace and high ceiling framed in massive hand-hewn oak 
beams; dining room with bay window and French doors to a stone ter- 
race, big, sunny modern kitchen; pine panelled study with fireplace; 
ground floor bedroom, bath and lavatory. Three twin bedrooms and two 
full baths on second Attic, basement, and two-car garage. On over two 
beautiful acres adjoining Bedens Brook Country Club. More land 
available. $340,000 




SKILLMAN 

Comfortable Victorian with some very pleasant surprises Well propor- 
tioned living and dining rooms, kitchen and half bath on first; three 
bedrooms, full file bath on second Now some surprises - a unique third 
floor family room 27 x 27 with woodburning Franklin stove, a large sturdy 
two-story barn, and a two-story garage One and one quarter landscaped 
acres OWNER ANXIOUS TO SELL. REDUCEO TO $89,900 



LAND 



PRINCETON TOWNSHIP. Office building site. Only one and one half 
miles from Princeton center and University. Public transportation at the 
door. Approximately 1 2 acres. Sewer and water at the site. Approx- 
imately 62,000 square foot building permitted, $28,000 per acre. 

MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP. Approximately 1 30 acres of open land, 
zoned residential, one acre minimum $10,000 per acre. 

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP. Two adjoining tracts of land with a total of ap- 
proximately 200 acres, zoned residential, $3,000 per acre. 

MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP. Almost 3 acres at the corner of Hollow 
and Camp Meeting Roads $19,800. 



PRINCETON BOROUGH. Approved 20.000 square foot lot with 1 25 feet 
of frontage. $98,500 

MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP. Approximately 1 58 acres with connection 
for electric, water and sewer, $95,000 

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP. Approximately 1 81 acres, corner lot $59,500 

PRINCETON TOWNSHIP. In the Rosedale Road area, three building lots 
surrounded by decorative white fencing. All lots are two acres or more 
and have city water and sewer available Priced from $78,000 



Claire Burns 
Anne Cresson 
Sharon Davidson 



Julie Douglas 

Betsy Stewardson Ford 

Georgia Graham 



Robert E. Dougherty, Broker 
REALTORS 

William E. Stewardson (1935-1972) 



Pam Harris 
Cathy Johnson 
Toby Laughlin 



Sylvia Nesbltt 
Emma Wlrtz 
Valerie Young 



- 

s 






- 

r 

- 



r 



.- 



f lvlvlv p ; .i v ivivn- T vr%-nrr^ 



DELCAMPE 

LOCKSMITHS 



BUNKER HILL 
\LANDSCAPING 

Landscape Design 
Plaiting • Patios 

201-359-3742 




FOR SALE IV OWNER 

Princeton Borough 
Two bedroom townhoui* (nail of a 
duplex), withm walking d lit* nee of 
umvfrvty *no Central Sunnesi 
Oniric) First o*aroomna» three cio»H 
one walk m Second bedroom 
CUfTMIflv lunction* a* home office, with 
ouiit m bookshelves and desk space, 
sleeping loff with velox skylight 
Oownstairs are living room, and dining 
kitchen area, with Caloric oven and 
range, built in counter, many cup 
boards, and matching filing and desk 
space Dry basement contains Maytag 
watner and dryer and laundry tub All 
windows err Andersen, triple glared 
with Levelor blinds Efficient gas fired 
heat with hot water baseboard clr 
culation Spacious deck off kitchen 
overlooks intimate backyard enclosed 
by stockade fence No parking but 
arrangments can be made with nent 
door neighbors Recently renovated D/ 
Princeton architeel Plerrr Coutln this 
low maintenance home Is ideally suited 
for the busy professional couple or 
person M0,000 

CalliOfWl JJ7J 



FOR SALE: Approximately ISO old 
Elude magazines (some duplicates, 
some with without covers) spanning 
the years from 1899 1v5! Will sell m 
divlduaiiy or as a collection Phone 97* 
0530. 



FARRINGTON'S MUSIC 

LESSONS 

SALES 
RENTALS 
REPAIRS 



N. C. JEFFERSON 

PLUMBING— HEATING 
CONTRACTOR 

BrWWM $•*««• wnen ir i Needed 
jQ#J CHERRv VAutYflO 



GOOD TIME CHARLEY'S 

Lunch Mon Hm c " 

Dinner? days a wee* 

Music every night 

Banquet and Meeting Rooms 

40 Main St Kingston 934 7 400 

4 lOt 



JEWELS BY JULIANA 

Expert watch & iewelry Repair 

Design & Re mounting 

16 WllherspoonSt 

Wt-713) 



DATSUN -74, I60Z, 7 


Duo m 


les. or 


glrtal 


owner, 4 speed 


Af 


radia 


s and s 




AM FM, J2.S00 


CBl 


457 4438 day 


n i 


WMOevenings 








v i ;t 



ANTIQUE QUILTS * LACE. 
Daguerrotypes, Crocks, Documents. 
Carpets, Tools, at Full House AntlQues. 
37 Main Street, Kingston 934 4040. 
13 30 If 



FULLER BRUSHES 

BEN. D. MARUCA 

1 75 Redwood Ave 

Tel 888-1254 
Trenton. N J 08610 



OFFICE SPACE 
RESEARCH PARK 

noi sw R-a. p. »»« . "J 
$4.00 per square fool net, net 

Areas up to 30,000 square feet 



427,000 square feet in Park 
Occupied by approximately 50 Tenants 

Princeton Mailing Address 
and Phone Number 

CALL: Research Park 
609-924-6551 



ADLERMAN CLICK 




RED CARPET 

"Coast to Coast" 




IMMACULATE 4 bedroom home in lovely area of 
Princeton. Large living room with fireplace, formal 
dining and a very attractive family room. Private 
wooded lot with flagstone patio. Central air, of course. 
In the 1140,000't 

EXCELLENT PROFESSIONAL LOCATION ■ 4 acres ■ 
West Windsor Twp adjoining park Col Ranch w/5 
B/R's, 3 1 ! Baths, Family Room w/fireplace, 20' x 20' 
professional room, full basement. 




MAINTENANCE-FREE 4 B/R home in Princeton 
Township. Living room with fireplace, eat-in Quaker 
maid Kitchen, jalousied porch, full basement with 
Gameroom and Bar, and 2-car garage. $ 110.000 

WILL BUILD TO SUIT - Your plans or ours - Your lot 
or ours. Free consultation - mortgage and construction 
advice available Many superior homes have been built 
by our exclusive builder in the area. Call for details 

CUSTOM FIVE BEDROOM HOME in Washington 
Township 2 fireplaces, wet bar, tennis court, sauna in 
basement, 2 car garage Owner financing available to 
qualified buyer $164,900 

LAWRENCEVILLE CONTEMPORARY. 4 bedrooms. 
2^2 baths on lovely wooded acre. $139,900 



15 Spring St., Princeton 
Realtors & Insurors 



924-0401 ■ 586-1020 
Since 1927 For All Area Listings 




JUST REDUCED! Gracious older Colonial on treed 
corner lot in Lawrenceville. Living Room w/fireplace, 
D/R, Library, Family Room w/fireplace, 7 B/R's and 
4' 2 Baths 6 Zone Gas Heat All draperies, washer, 
dryer & refrigerator/freezer included. $149,900 

CLEARBROOK ADULT CONDOS - Many models 
available with many extras Carefree living. 

From $74,500 to $98,000 



Joan Alpori • Marilyn Magnea • Dan Faccim • Marlene MofOviU • Jane LamDerty • Edyce Rosenlhale • Joan LoPr.nci • Nalaire Kal? • Murray Hardiman 
Phylln Leyln • Edna Aions • Saran Laracn • Rosary O'Neill • Sukl Lewln • Eslher Pogreorn • Doroihy Kramer • Elaine Haibersiaoi 

Members: Multiple Listing Service, Princeton Real Estate Group 



COMMERCIAL AND LAND 

1'HINCETON SHOPPING CENTER • 22,000 sq. ft. 
building in prime location. Excellent financing for 
qualified buyer 90% leased Parking for 60 cars 

Now S850.0O0 
A MOST INTERESTING land listing on Washington 
Road with Princeton address. 4 acres. All utilities 

$250,000 
COMMERCIAL BUILDING with approximately 3,000 
sq. ft. Parking for approximately 3CM0 cars. New 
Egypt area. Rent at $675 per month or buy at $98,500 

LAND — OWNERS RETIRING TO FLORIDA - Farm 
at attractive terms! 60+/- acres with 5 bedroom 
owners home, cottage and outbuildings. Wooded and 
open. Excellent frontage Good income. Suitable for 
horses, farming, subdivision, investment - 10% mor- 
tgage if qualified. E Windsor & Millstone $199,000 
RESTAURANT WITH LIQUOR LICENSE! Seats ap- 
proximately 300 Excellent building, good business. 
Washington Township 

MUST CLOSE ESTATE. 23 industrial acres with 
truckers' garage, all utilities, R R siding 
CLARKSVILLE ROAD. 20 acres zoned ROM-4, 
suitable for offices or industrial park. Also, 64.35 acres 
across road from above, zoned R-l. Available at 

$18.O0O& $12,000 per acre 
EXCELLENT INVESTMENT. 11.2 acres in East Win- 
dosr 530' frontage on Route 571 zoned industrial of- 
fice. $85,000 
GET IN ON THE GROUND FLOOR in valuable, ex- 
plosive area with minimum investment! Commercial 
on Route 1 "Princeton" address Incredible location 4 
exposure Handsome, level l'~ acres in West Windsor 
Township with restored farmhouse, etc. Suitable for 
restaurant, professional offices, etc $180,000 

4.5 ACRES IN KINGSTON — Zoned residential. Pro- 
fessional office use allowed in dwelling. $65,000 

RENTALS 

PRIME OFFICE space in center of Hightstown Close 
to N.J Turnpike & Rtes 130 & 33 Warehouse space, 
shop area and dock available Very reasonable rent! 

ui.ooo SQ. FT. of newly refurbished office space on Rte 
130 in Washington Township Will subdivide 

STORE & first FLOOR office space avail in 
Hightstown Excellent terms 

RENTAL ■ 2 bedroom townhouse in Princeton Borough 
$565 per month 




ATTRACTIVE 5 bedroom townhouse in heart of 
Princeton featuring a large living room with fireplace, 
lovely dining room, big kitchen, den and 3' 2 baths 
Very good condition JUST LISTED! $168,500 

OLD FARM HOUSE + 29 ACRES - Millstone 
Township Eight bedrooms, two kitchens, two baths 
Workers bungalow, eggroom and garage. Owner mor- 
tgage for qualified buyer with 15-20 percent down 

$125,000 
TO CLOSE ESTATE - Victorian with 6 apartments 
and office space on 3 4 acres in Hightstown Excep- 
tional financing available to qualified buyer Substan- 
tial price reduction! $179,900 

COUNTRIFIED LIVING in Roosevelt 3 bedroom 
ranch, living room, eat-in kitchen, front and rear por- 
ches, and attached garage $58,900 

BEAUTIFULLY DECORATED TOWNHOUSE with 
finished basement JUST LISTED in East Windsor 3 
bedrooms. 2" 3 baths Move-in condition $;.i,500 



— — 



OUR COMPETENT STAFF CAN SHOW VOL ANY PROPERTY IN THE AREA - CALL ANYTIME. 



^^■■■■^■KSiSSS 




ton 

ASSOCIATES 

246 NASSAU STREET • PRINCETON NEW JERSEY 



609 - 737-9550 

REALTORS 
609-921-1550 



■?.*-*£ 



"»VY 



- \*t» 



v^^pr* 



A«jU 



fr/^ 






PRINCETON TOWNSHIP. A very special property, lovely trees and sweep- 
ing lawn. The house, with 4 spacious bedrooms, has a very attractive living 
room with fireplace, den or study, dining room and great modern kitchen, 
plus large patio, full basement and 2-car garage $1 81 ,000 



PRINCETON BOROUGH. The perfect 3 bedroom, 2 full bath house with 
wonderful features such as custom kitchen, garden room, fireplace, 
special lighting and more. $139,900 




PRINCETON TOWNSHIP This Wilson Road contemporary has been 
redone from top to bottom — painted, carpeted and vacant for immediate 
occupancy. We have even reduced the price on this 4 bedroom, 2 bath 
gem. Super location at only $1 39,000 



NEAR ROCKY HILL IN MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP. A 3 or 4 bedroom 
house. Cathedral height living room with fireplace, dining, completely 
modern kitchen and large carpeted family room, plus central air condi- 
tioning and attached garage, make this an outstanding value at $105,000 




YOUR OWN SMALL PIECE OF PARADISE on the western side of 
Pnnceton A one story with great big windows overlooking a delicious back 
garden w„h 'iving room, dining room, family room, study, kitchen, .replay 
in an ideal location. This is truly a great value *i 39.™" 

PRINCETON BUILDING LOT - $42,000 




PENNINGTON BOROUGH. An m-town house with parking. The addition of 
a new driveway area will make this especially desirable Ten rooms, plus 
porch and 2-car garage Wonderful living areas, modern kitchen. You must 
see this $131,500 



PRINCETON TOWNSHIP. A very large and historic property with 3 
floors of living space. Living room, sitting room with fireplace, study or 
guest room with full bath, huge modern eat-in kitchen, 3 bedrooms and 
bath, plus huge master bedroom/sitting room and private bath $127,000 




WESTERN SECTION, PRINCETON TOWNSHIP. A traditional center hall 
kind of house. There is a great big front-to-back living room with fireplace, a 
large formal dining room, modern kitchen, paneled den which could be a 
4th bedroom, full basement, 2-car garage. All in a most ideal location next 
to the Battlefield Priced to sell at $155,000 



NEAR PENNINGTON IN HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP. A completely redone 
country house on 2 acres. Three large bedrooms, living room, dining 
room, beautiful country kitchen/family room. All this plus garage, base- 
ment and other features at a price of $1 39,500 




IF YOU ARE PINING FOR THE TREE STREETS, this may be just the lire 
for you. Charming two story shingle house — living room with fireplace, dn- 
ing room, kitchen. 3 corner bedrooms, full basement and attractive in-town 
yard and wonderful possibilities. Offered at an asking price of $1 25,000 



Member Mercer MLS 

246 Nassau Street 

Princeton 609-921-1550 



MEMBER CONFEDERATION OF INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE 
Specializing In quality residential properties in the United States and abroad 



Tod Peyton, Broker 



Member Somerset MLS 

134 South Main Street 

Pennington 609-737-9550 



*U«*l*M*0 HOOM TO HINT: Share 

* t^th t» cooking c.r laundry, 1W0 * 

; N call «* *«7» 



MUURE PROFESSIONAL MAN. SS 

ton smo*.er no pets. »op local 

•ffrc-ccs i-M?cr itnced properly 

.tww villi houses-* and assume entire 
C«r«c* your property tW 9}1 MOO. * 

t :t 



FREE ROOM AND BOARD m*vchanoe 
for chilotare and helping around house 
during family rush hours Musi like 
children and be reliable Drivers 
license necessary Can *S2 BISl 
evenings * * it 



. ANTIQUE STOVE FOR SALE Usedtor 

3C heal and cooking burns coal or wood, 

2 SMO, or best offer Call after 6pm W< 

lU 3130 »i 3t 



q. WIDE BOARD flooring, rare, ex 
j traordinarly beautiful 7" JO" wide 
q pumpkin pine "Kings Planks" (both 
r son and hard pine l Call (iOII 647 MIS 



ROOFINO: All type* Of roots (new and 
repalril. leaders, flutters, chimney 
flashing Fast service Work guaran 
teed Over 30 years In business 10 
percent discount to senior cltliens 
Belle Mead Roofing 924-2041 or 101 359 
59« J n " 



SPECIALIZING IN HOME WINDOW 
AND STORM WINDOW CLEANING 
inside and out S3 SO each Free 



guaranteed 3*3 31SJ 



OVERHEAD OARAOE DOORS 
electric Operators Factory to you Over 
the counter or lull service, certs end 
repairs Ceil for Iree information 800 
(73 rtiO. Ridge Ooor, West New Road. 
Monmouth Junction 1 '* tf 



BUILOINO REPAIRS ■ Roofs (Metal. 
Shingle. Slate, Tar), Chimneys, 
Gutters. Spouts, Flashing. Walls, 
walks. Patios, Garages. Porches. 
Steps, Driveways, Fences. Hauling, 
Demolition. Carpentry, Painting. 
CaulMng, Glazing, Stucco Masonry. 
Pointing Patching, inspections. 
violations. Guaranteed and Insured 
CellWl H34 J3" 



WHO'S WHO 



ROOFING 

SHiETMETAL WORK 

J C EISENMANN A CO 

All Types Ol ROOtmg 

(including not "•'•' "0 ' 
Free EstifTintes G -■■' 




fij; JOHN HOUGHTON 
REALTOR 




SRUIOIS WKS'I W1NDSOH Township 
Colonial designed for family living. Liv- 
ing room, separate dining room, family 
room with brick fireplace, study or sixth 
bedroom, five bedrooms and 2'k baths. 
Central air conditioning, covered deck 

I with gas grill for modern entertaining. 

| An ideal home for the active family. 

(139,500 




A CHARMING COLONIAL in a choice 
location - CASTLE HOWARD COURT - 
Princeton Township. A family designed 
home with 5 bedrooms. The master 
bedroom has its own fireplace. 3V4 baths, 
living room with fireplace, separate din- 
ing room, modern kitchen, family room. 
This is a super home that must be se°n to 
be appreciated. $26i.ooo 

John H. HOUghtOn, Licensed Real Estate Broker 

228 AJexander Street i Sou' h Entrance I 

Princeton. New Jersey 08540 



LB 



[6091924-1001 



AMPLE FREE PARKING 



CONSUMER 
BUREAU 



oo 



OFFICE SPACE, CENTRAL NASSAU 
STREET, recently decorated, low rent 
available now, telephone and recep 
tlonltl service 974 4300 33H 



LAMP SHADES: Lamp mounting and 
lamp repairs Nassau interiors. 16i 
Nassau St * ' *' 

HOUSE TO SHARE near Princeton Call 
799 1 38} evenings and weekends 8 * 5t 



in responsible Consumer Service? 

The local business people listed below are all Consumer Bureau 
Registered, which means they have not even one valid* un- 
satisfied customer complaint in Consumer Bureaus tiles By 
advertising on these "Who's Who pages, they help finance 
Consumer Bureau's continuing consumer information and 
assistance service and they cordially invite your patronage 



REGISTERED 

—Symbol 

of responsible 

consumer service 



• Advertising * Outdoor: a»D««i». n.*™...-.*. 

RC MAXWELL CO 396812. Since IBM •BOOkS, DlSCOUDt. 

Need We Say Mora 1 P O Bo. 1200 NOVEL SALES COMPANY 1030 Bruns 



Trenton 0860ft 



wick Av.Trn 3966311 



• Exterminators: 



• Air Freight & Express: 

AIR X We snip anylhinn any size ft 
weight anywhere' 3S70 Quskerbndge 
Rd . Tran 566 1633 



IBook Stores: 



COOPER PEST CONTROL Graduate 
Entomologist All pests exterminated 
(local call! 799-1300 



• Alarm Systems: 

ADT SECURITY SYSTEMS Fire 
Burglar. Holdup, Closed Circuit TV 
cmmrcl A radii 229 Lawionce Rd 



• Antique Dlrs; Auctioneers: 

CURVIN E MILLER Specializing in 
antiques Will arrange public auction 
Will buy ft sail estates Ham Sg 
Me -0798 

LESTER * ROBERT SLATOFF Inc 
Auctioneers Dealers Appraisers 
Leciurers. Antiques, Households 
Estates, Silver Jewelry; China, 
Glass. Bought A Sold. 777 West 
Slate. Trenlon. 3934846 



CRANBURY BOOK WORM Used books 
bought & sold Also rare & out -of 
print 54 N Mam. Cranbury 655- 

1963 llocall 

MICAWBER BOOKS Libraries bought A 
sold New, used & rare books Also open 
Sun 11-4 108 Nassau, Prn 9218454 



• Feed Stores: 

ROSEDALE MILLS All kinds ol teed 
for animals & pets, larm supplies 
274 Alexander SI , Prn 924-0134 



• Boutiques: 



• Fireplaces & Accessories: 

BOWDEN'S FIRESIDE SHOP EVERY 
THING For Your Fireplace 1731 Notting- 
ham Way. Trenlon 586-3344 



• Heating Contractors: 

WM G LOWE HTG A AIR CON 
Hopewell. 466-3705 
NASSAU OIL Sales A Service 

800 Slate Rd.. Prn 924-3530 



• Hi-Fi, Stereo Sales 
& Service 

ABSOLUTE SOUND 

3 Spring Slreel, Princelon 683-0210 
HALS CUSTOM SOUND For quality' 

and service Rle 1 A Texas Av. 

Lawrnvl 883-6338 (local call) 



Princelon 921-8410 



• Building Contractors: 

WILLIAMSON CONSTRUCTION 

Residenllal, commercial, renovations, 
additions Free estimates 921-1184 
NICK MAURO A SON. BUILDERS, INC 

Custom homes; additions, alterations, 
nie 924-2630 



• Florists: 

LAWRENCE ROAD FLORISTS 1365 
Lawrencevltle Rd 882-6345 



• Antiques: 

KINGSTON ANTIQUES Fine Jewelry & 
Antiques 43 Main. Kingston 924-0332 
ft 924 3923 

• Appliance Repairs: 

AUST'S GAS APPLIANCE SVC A IN 
STAL Tm 585 2511 

• Auto Body Repair Shops: 

BODY SHOP By Harold Williams 
Specialising m Fiberglass, Corvette 
An domestic A loroign cars Rle 206. 
Prn 9218585 

GRIFF'S AUTO BODY Auto Sales 
Repairs Towing 56 Troy Avo T<c 



• Building Materials 
& Lumber: 

BELLE MEAD Lumber, Inc. • lor 

aualltyi Serving Princelon area Reading 
Ivd Bel Md [local call] 201-359-5121 
GROVER LUMBER CO Everything tor 
Builders & Homeowners 194 Alexan 
der, Pin 924-0041 
HEATH LUMBER CO. Complele Home 



• Floor Covering Contractors: 

TILE DISCOUNT CTR. Vinyls, Ceramics. 
Carpeling, Capitol Plaza Shop Clr . Tren 
(15 mm from Prn ) 392 2300_ 

• Food Markets: 

THE VILLAGE STORE Plamsboro Rd , 
Plalnsboro 799-8576 (local call). 



• Fuel Oil & Oil Burners: 

LAWRENCEVILLE FUEL Fue 

pimbg, htng, air cond & energy i 

IfcAIH LUWdtM i-U. oompieie norms icfin.rtnnAu 1 rnrul fttMUmi 

Building Center 0el.verySarv.ee 1560 N £^° V V S a\e 5 ft Service 



• Hospital Beds: Equipment: 

DELCREST MEDICAL PRODUCTS Hospll 
al equipmenl tor the home 2100 Notting- 
ham Way, Hamlin Twp 586 1679 

• Insulation Contractors: 



• Insurance Agents: 

G R MURRAY INSURANCE CO 

Complele Insurance Service 
1 Palmer Sq. W . Prn 924-5000 



• Jewelers: Jewelry Shops: 

BAILEY BANKS A BIDDLE Est 1832 

Quaker Bridge Mall, upper level. Law- 
rence Twp 799-8050 (local) 



N Olden Av Trm 392-1161 



Slate Rd., Prn 924-3530 



► Kitchen Cabinets: 



> Candy: 



• Furniture Dealers: 

GASIOR'S FURNITURE A ACCESSORIES MILLNER^LUMBeR 58 ^ 15 ?)^ 
2152 Ale 206. Belle Mead 201 874-8383 MILLNER LUMBEF 



MERCER AUTO BODY Body repairs on 
all makes A modal* 56 Model Ave. 
Hopewell (10 mln Irom Prn local call) 
4660217 



• Auto Dealers: 

AUDI A PORSCHE Sale* 



Rd 



Pa 7 i 



«2S 



• Carpet Dealers: 

WL HARRIS Furniture Colonial A 

Traditional furniture & carpets Rt 130 

Cranbury 443-3200. 
LOTH FLOORS A CEILINGS Karasian. 

Blgelow, Lee, others 20S Sanhican Dr 

Trn 393-9201 
RUG A FURNITURE MART, Inc. Pin 

Shop Ct , N Hamson SI 921 9292 



3 2890 
AUDI PORSCHE Auth Sales A Service. 

QUAKERBRIDGE PORSCHE -AUDI, 

Route 1. Prn 452 9400 
CAOILLAC Auth Sales A Service - 

Colonial Cadillac. Inc. Mercer 

County s only authorized Cadillac 

dealer"' 1655 Nodh Olden Av. Tren 
' Ion Sales 8833500. Service 683-4220 

(local call) 
CATHCART PONTIAC 

1620 N Olden Av, Trenlon 3925H1 
DATSUN Sales A Service SOLOMON 

OATSUN. Rle 130. Highlslown 448 

1310 
HAMILTON Chrysler Plymouth 

Auth Seles A Service Plymouth. 

Chrysler, Imperial 1240 Route 33, 

Hamilton Square 486-2011 
JEEP JEEP Sales, service, pans, 

accessories REDNOR A RAINEAR. Inc 

2635 So. Broad, Trenton 688 1800 



• Caterers: 

ANGELONI'S Catering. Banquet A 
party fac miles lor over 600 1445 
Wnnehorse Mercrvl Rd . Hamilton Sq 
586-4100. 



• Ceramic Tile: 

ARIES TILE INC 
P.O. Box 11247 

Yatdv.lle. N.J 695-6877 
TERRA COTTA Handmade ceramic tl.es 
from Mexico A Europe Hamilton Av, 
Hopewell 466-1229 

• Cleaning: Home & Office: 

MARVIN HARRIS JANITORIAL SERVICE 
Complele residential A commercial 

cleaning Fully insured 8622251 



GROSS, JULIUS. Inc. ASID. Inierlor 
Design Service Fine lurnilure, lamps, 
accessories 683 Rosed ale 924 1474 

WL HARRIS Furniture Colonial ft 
Traditional furniture A carpels Al 130 
Cranbury. 443-3200 

RUG A FURNITURE MART, Inc. Prn 
Shop Clr , N Harrison, Prn. 921 9292 

SPIEGEL HERMAN Fine Furniture US 1 
& Allen La , Lawrence Twp. (next lo 
Lawrence Drive-ml 882 3400 (local call! 

VIKING FURNITURE FROM SCANDIN 
AVIA. Accessories. A I O Design ser- 
vice 259 Nassau, 924 9624 



• Furniture Unpainted: 

ERNEY'S UNFINISHED FURNITURE Over 

5.000 pieces ol unpamted furniture* 
104 Mercer Mall. Rle 1 and Quaker 
Bridge Rd.. Lawmcvl 452-8404. 

• Garbage & Trash Removal: 

HIGGINS Disposal Service Resdnll, 



AAS 

kitchen cabinels, paneling 600 Artisan. 
Tren 393-4204 

• Landscaping Contractors: 

DOERLER LANDSCAPES Landscape 

Designing Shade Trees; fences, patios 
2281 Brunswick Pike, Lrncvl 896-3300 

PRINCETON GARDENING A LAND- 
SCAPING Lawn Maintenance, Shrub- 
bery, Tree Removal, Top Soil 921-2744 

PRINCETON LAWN SERVICE Beautiful 
lawns built A mainlained Free es- 
timates ft lawn analysis 92V8440. 

TREESCAPE Tree care A landscaping 
Landscape design Installation A main- 
tenance Patios A wood decks 201-846- 
0251 A 609-466-2415 



► Laundries: 



id, indslrl 
40 cu yds Cons 
121 Laurel Ave., ki 

• Gift Shops: 



conla.i 
icin A Demoltn Debris 
<lngs1on 921-8470 



• Auto Parts Dealers: 

LENTINI AUTO SALVAGE 

Hid U ningoos i201) 7624440 
THUL AUTO SUPPLY CO American 

A Foreign Pads Ries 206 A 518 

Rocky Hill SI 
TRENTON AUTO PARTS Hundreds ol 

thousands ol new. rebuilt and used 

auto parts tor anylhing on wheels 



667 Southard St , Tren 



194 5281 



• Cleaning & Pressing: 

BLAKELY LAUNDRY All types ol laundry 
service, dry clng , rug cfng 156 Bruns 
wick Ave . Trenton 8969235 (local call) 

CRAFT CLEANERS Rug Cleaning ft 
Drapery Cleaning 225 Nassau Prince 
ton 924-3242 

LAM LAUNDRY Dry cleaning by the 
pound Prn No Shop Ctr |Rte 2061 
^24 2902 



• Gourmet Shops & Foods: 

FIDDLER'S CREEK FARM Country smoh 
ed bacon, turkeys ft capons Mall Order 
flD 1, Tllusville 737-0685 (local) 



• Lawn, Garden & Farm 
Supp. & Equip: Repairs: 

SIMPLICITY Lawn, Garden & Snow Equip- 
menl Irom 3VS lo 20 hp Complete 
service center JOSEPH J NEMES — 
SONS. Rle 206, Prn 9244177 

• Lighting Fixtures: 

CAPITOL LIGHTING — WATCHUNG 
Complele lighting services sales A 
design, U.S. Hwy 22. No Plainlield (35 
mm trom Prn ) 201-757-4777 



'Hardware Stores: 



f Lightning Rods: 



LUCAR Paint, hdwre. loots, plumbing 
A elec suppl; houswrs Open eves Pin 
Htsln Rd . Prn Jnctn (local call) 799- 
0599 



• Auto Radiators: 

ROY'S ARCO T 



• Auto Repairs & Service: 

AAMCO TRANSMISSIONS Free low 
ing, one-day service 1459 Princeton 
. Tren 599 3990 



• Limousine Service: 

WILLIAMS CAR HIRE SERVICE Theatres 
LUXE FRENCH DRY CLNG Pick-up S ^'"l^ ^ "«0W*BE Everything loi Airports, Weddings. Shopping Trips, elc 
delivery 205 Wilhtsnn Prn Q?i.nfi<n Mome & Garden, paint, nswrs, window p fn 921-0513 

shades, tools, plumbing, elec supl 

Prn. Shop Clr 924-5155 



delivery 205 WUhrspn Prn 921-0893 



• Clothing - Furniture: 

10.000 sq It ol clothing furniture bric- 
abrac etc SALVATION ARMY THRIFT 
STORE. 436 Mulberry SI Trn 599 



• Liquor Stores: 

TOWNE Wine A Liquor A complete 
iquor slore serving Prn area Monig 



• Health Clubs: 

PRINCETON NAUTILUS FITNESS 
CENTER, INC Princeton's total Illness 

' Shapinq ^ Lt^TlT*? Sr'n VARSITY LIQU0RS Wines - >--q««9. 
^n P rS «,Io^ ,e °' E " e ' CI5e Pr " F'eePfn Oehve.y 234 Nassau Pr, 



Shop Ctr 921*985 



ROYS ARCO E 
repairs, road serv , accessor 
Alexander, Princelon 924 8288 

SPORTS A SPECIALIST CARS, INC 
Expert rprs on all foreign cats 16X1 N 
Olden Av , Tren (local call) 882 7600 



-.- •Delicatessens: 

THE VILLAGE STORE Cold cuts salads 
dairy, barbecued chickens Rainsboro 
Ad.. Plamsboro 799-6578 



• Banks: 

new jersey savings bank 180 •Electrical Contractors 

Nassau Street, Princeton 924-8434 



• Bath & Bathroom 
Remodeling & Accessories: 

AARON BATH CENTER American 
Standard. Jacuzzi. ThermaSoi Steam 
Baths. Solar Industries 10 Industrial 
Dr New Brunswick 2012474506 



HAHN lic No 4419 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING 
Need a good electrician for any size 

13*3 ,0b? Ffee eS ' (,OCal ' 466 

NA¥ MAUL A SON INC Hi 130 Dayton 
Stallation mamt 
Industrial docai 



Power 

repair Residential 

call) 201-329-4656 



* OUR PROMISf 10 PRINCETON CONSUMERS: 

4*Cj^ IF YOU HAVE A COMPLAINT , 

ZSanda Consjm«, Bureau . 

ancrr*aul« ir^n ,i taj i, w wllM)nd 




FSMaiJ5M£0 i»«! 



*o= 



.OU C«N CHEW .,»««»„,,„,. 
i hrni to* name a Consume, 6u>Nu Review) 






Before you deal with a stranger - Check with us' 



y 




JOSEPHINE WEBB. Executive Director of Consumer Bureau, broadcasting a Consumer Bureau an- 
nouncement Mrs. Webb personally investigates consumer complaints received by Consumer Bureau 
and m most cases she Is able to resolve them to the satisfaction of all concerned. (For what happens to 
unresolved consumer complaints, see below.) 

» Micro Computer — Retail: 



COMPUTER ENCOUNTER Micfo Com- 
puters tor ihe Home 8 Small Business. 
Apple, Atari, Texas Instrument. Hewlett- 
Packard Contact Carolyn Cochrane or 
Pa! Varada 924-8757. 



• Motels: 



• Moving & Storage: 

BOHREN'S Moving & Storage. Local 
& long distance moving & storage. 
Umled Van Lines Auth Agt Princeton 
452-2200. 

RICHMOND MOVING CO. 

wn Rd., Allenlown 259-2828. 



• Printers: 

LOH PRINTING UNLIMITED 

- Complete Printing Service 924-4664 
Otlset Printing Fast Service - Color 
Printing, Typesetting, Bond Copies, 
Rubber Stamps, Notary Service 1101 
State Rd (U S 206) Blrjg. B, Pro. 

MASTERGRAPHX Quality Printing, Type- 
Mechanicals & Artwork ri 206 
& 518 Rky Hill 924-0460 

THE PRINTING CENTER Sears, Quaker- 
bridge Mali Resumes instant copies 
invitations business cards, stationery 
& forms. Open every day including Sun- 
Jay 

REPLICA Lowest prices, immediate ser- 
vice. Ollset printing 8. Xerox 10 So 
Tuidne (around corner from Anne>i Prn 
924*869 

Triple A Reprographics Ollset printing, 
camera stats Fast service & com- 
petitive prices 759 State Rd , Pin 
924-8100 



• Mufflers: 



MIGHTY MUFFLER CTR. 

(Formerly Scotti Muffler Ctr i Div ol J J. 
Nemes 4 Sons, Inc Mulders for Foreign 
8 American cars 100 percent guarantee. 
Rte 206, Prn 921-0031. 



• Office Furniture & Equip. 
Dirs: 

HINKSON'S Complete line of office furn- 
iture & supplies 82 Nassau, Princeton 
924-0112 

STATE SALES OFFICE EQUIPMENT New 

& Used office furniture bought & sold. 
694 S Broad, Tren 392-8066 



• Office Machine, Calculator & 
Typewriter Dealers: 

THE PRINCETON UNIVERSITY STORE 

Electronic calculators lor gifts 36 
University PI, Prn 921-8500 



•Organ Dealers: 

NOLDE S PIANOS & ORGANS, ll 

Hunlerdon Shop Ctr. Rte 202, Flemu 
ton (30 mm from Prn .) 201-782-S4OO 



• Painting: 



• Painting & Paper Hanging: 

GT BENWARD Interior & Exterior 

pamtmg A wallpapering 201-359-4455 
DANNY'S PAINTING. Exterior-interior. 

Fully insured. Free estimates Water 

Pressure Washing. 921-7835 
GROSS, JULIUS H. Interior & Exterior 

painting; paper hanging. Decorating. 

683 Rosedale Road, Princeton 924-1474 

M & D PAINTING Interior S, exterior 

I paper hanging. Fully in- 

466-1497 & 466-3251 (local 

£ RICH Painting & Roofing Free est. 

lutly insured. Inter . exler. 15 yrs exp. 

en disc 882-7738 evenings 

•Pharmacies: 

r ORER PHARMACY Prescriptions 160 
. on, Prn 921-7287 



• Photo Equipment & Service: 



• Piano Dealers: 

CHOPIN PIANO & ORGAN CO 

Home ol Sleinway Pianos 
'001 N Olden Av.Trn 695-7456 
NOLDE'S PIANOS A ORGANS, Inc. 

hunierdon Shop. Ctr. Rte. 202. Flem- 
£9ton [30 min. from Prn) 201-782- 

• Picture Framing: 

OUEENSTOWN SHOP Custom work. 151 
•'Delaware Ay. Pngtn 737-1876 

•Pizza Restaurants: 

MERCER MALL PIZZA 

HODOLFO PIZZA Montgomery Shop Ctr. 

VI&&2"' 924 - 1813 
1 N a < S P'ZZERIA Past service 86 
M4-5515 

•Plumbing & Heating 
Contractors: 

J f?"N C- NIX Plumb.ng, Heating 4 A,r 
^onioning. License No 6032 921 



• Siding Contractors: 

CONTEMPORARY ALUMINUM Checkouf 
prices belore you decide" Free est 
Trenton %:'.< 

STATE ROOFING & SIDING All type 
siding, storm windows & doors, gutters, 
downspouts Free est 448-2354 (local 
call). 



• Sporting Goods: 

FOOTWORKS Athletic shoes & sports- 
wear. 24 Wltherspoon St Pr n. 924-6259 

• Storm Windows & Doors: 



• Real Estate Agents: 

QUAKER STATE REALTY, Inc, Special- 
izing In Bucks County properties, 40 S 
Main, Yardley, 215-493-1891 



• Stoves, Wood & Coal: 

BOWDEN'S FIRESIDE SHOP Featuring 

Glacier Bay stoves & inserts, 
Thermograle inserts, Maiestlc, 
Kerosun 1731 Nottingham Way, 
Trenton. 586-3344 



• Records & Tapes: 

PRINCETON RECORD EXCHANGE 

Bought, sold, traded New. used, disc, 
20 Nassau St Prn 921-0881 



• Restaurants: 

THE ALCHEMIST & BARRISTER Lunch 
eons, Dinner, Cocktails Open 7 days 
28 Wltherspoon, Prn 924-5555 

LIEGGI'S EWING MANOR 234 W Upper 
Ferry Rd Trn 882 1150 

PEACOCK INN LunctvDInner-CocklailS 
New Adult Cocktail Bar 20 Bayard Lane 
(just otl Nassau). Princeton. 924-1707 

Prlncetonlan Diner Restaurant New 
ownership & new management Open 24 
hrs Larger salad bar, daily specials 
Rte 1. Prn 452-2271 

TRIVENI EXOTIC INDIAN CUISINE 
Lunch 11.30 AM to 2 30 PM. 
Dinner 5 to 10 PM 201-249-6496 

V6SUVIOS PIZZERIA & RESTAURANT 
Fast service 258 Nassau, Prn 921- 
2477 



• Surgical Supply & Equip. 
Dealers : 

FORER Pharmacy Sales Rentals 
Sickroom equip 160 Wilherspoon. Prn . 
921-7287 



• Swimming Pool Repairs: 

WILLIAMSON POOL SERVICE Special 
Izing In concrete swm pool. rprs. 
337 Wltherspoon, Prn 921-1184. 



• Tire Dealers: 



JOSEPH J NEMES & SONS BF 

Goodrich-Dunlop-Pie'elli-Michelln 
All sizes. Amer & foreign cars. Rims 
available Rte 206 Prn 924-4177 
PRINCETON CITGO. Firestone tires 
for American, compact & Foreign Cars 
Princelon Shopping Clr 921-6682 



• Transmissions: 



• Reupholstering 

MACK DINETTE WORKS INC. Kitchen 
Chairs reupholstered 2340 Rt. 33, 
Robbinsville, 587- 6606 

• Rigging & Trucking: 

NICHOLAS FENELLI RIGGING 4 
TRUCKING, 42 years expert I 
Hiliman Ave,. Trenlon 882-0455 



LEE MYLES Free Check 11, Free 
Towing. Coast to Coast Warranty, 
Foreign & Domestic 859 US Hwy 130, 
East Windsor. 448-0300, 



► Travel Agencies: 



• Roofing Contractors: 

CHR1STENSEN ROOFING New shingle 
rools, chimney & flashing repairs 184 
Carter Rd, Pin 921-1277 4 924-7737 

COOPER 4 SHAFER, INC. Est 1930 

New rools & lepairs Fully insured 
63 Moran Ave , Prn 924-2063 

THERIAULT & BROKAW Roofing * Car- 
pentry All types ol new roots & 
rprs gutters & downspouts Free 
estimates (local) 466 1 259 4 4662742 

WILLIAMSON Roofing. New rools and all 
repairs. Slate, tar, metal, shingle. 921 
1184. ' 



• Salvage Services: 

RESCUE MISSION Our truck will pick 
up Clothing, used appliances & furniture 
98 Carroll St Trn 695143*.. 

• Savings & Loan Assns: 

SECURITY SAVINGS 4 LOAN ASSOC. 
132 Nassau. Prn 924-0076 Lawrence- 
| i Main, 896- 1550 < !■> 

• Sewing Machine Dealers: 

AMERICAN SEWING 4 VACUUM CTR 

Prn Shop Ctr . 921-2205. 
Singer Quaker Bridge Sewing Ctr. Sale*. 

serv We still make house calls. 

799-8170 



AMERICAN EXPRESS TRAVEL 

Don't Leave Home Without Us 

10 Nassau Street 

Princeton .921-8600 

Ask Mr. Foster Travel Services (For 

merly Welcome Aboard) Never a service 

tee Mon Fn 8 5 30 41 Wltherspoon, 

Prn. 921-3350. 
DELUXE TRAVEL BUREAU. INC. Person 

allzed travel service. 219 Nassau, 

Prn 924-6270 
KULLER TRAVEL CO 

Complete travel arrangements 

109 Nassau Street, Princeton. 9 24-2550 



• Tree Service: 

JAMES IRISH TREE EXPERTS fiesiden 

Hal tree, shrub 4 hedge maintenance. 

Princeton 924-3470- „„„...- 

ROBERT WELLS TREE 4 LANDSCAPE 

Professional arbonsts 924-0983. 
SHEARER Tree Suigeons Estab 1930 

Professional tree care Phil Alspach, 

prop 206 Wash Rd.. Prn 924-2800 



► Tree Surgeons: 



SCHERER TREE SERVICE N J 

Certified Tree Expert Spraying, tree 
4 Stump removal, pruning; shrub care, 
cabling; msec! 4 disease control, 
Insured. Pengtn 737-9600. 



• Vacuum Cleaner Dealers: 



► Shoe Repair Shops: 



JOHN'S SHOE SHOP Expert repairs ol 
shoes .ncl orthopedic 4 ainlet.c shoes 
18 Tulane, Pm 924 5596 

NASSAU SHOE REPAIR Orthopedic work 
Athletic shoes repd Shoe dyeing. 180 
Nassau (rear) Prn 921-7552 



• Water Conditioning: 

CULLIGAN Water Conditioning ol 
Nassau, Inc FREE water analysis 
PO Box 49. Prn 921-8800 



• Women's Wear Shops: 

TALL FASHIONS BY ELIZABETH Every 
thing roi ihe tall girt. Gift ceit 
1905 Rt 33 Hmitn Sq 587 7777 



Chances are we know something about them! 



TOWN TOPICS 
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 

$.1.00 for 25 word 
insertion, 5 cents for each 
additional word liox 
number ads 50 cents extra 
Payment of ad within six 
after publit 
50 cents billing 
charge 

Cancellations musl be 
made by 5 p.m. Monday: 
reorders by 5 p.m. 
Tuesday, the week of 
publication 

Ads may be called tn, 924 
2200. mailed to P.O. Box 
664, Princeton, or brought 
to the Town Topics office. 4 
Mercer Street. 



QUILT. BOOKCASE, rug. ta&iev Chin, 
lamps, picluret. iron board, tllvtr, 
chine, glass, art "-. 
piano bench. Mtctien things, hign chair, 
stroller, one a brae '97 30ft* 



fOUNG PROFESSIONAL WOMAN 
■»p*C'OUS 

nous* with urn* Common 
kittnen. tormat d 

Privet* 
tvOroom at SJS0 or 1335 pi , 
Garden Parking No ewf. Ni 
From Sept IS with year'» i««m Can 
Tem 931 -1039, after 6 p. m 



E'psrt WorVmanthip 

■ 
180 Nimu St (ratr) 
921-7552 



PORCH SALE: Saturday. Sept 11, 10 1 
p m Charlton, corner William Book 
cases. 8 ft garage snetf unll boo*-, 
plants, etc 



FORER PHARMACY 

160 Wilherspoon St. 

Pharrnace'. 
Orthopedic Supplies 
921-7287 



PRINCETON APARTMENT FOR 

RENT One Bedroom, kitchen, living 
room, bathroom Center ot town S400 
month, includes heat and hot water 
Call Frank Proccacini at 974 4S01 



CORN, CORN. CORN, wonderful sweet 
corn, picked fresh dally at Terhune 
Orchards. 30 cents an ear >3 a doien, 

$13 for lOOears Have corn for dinneror 
freeze corn for next winter 934-3310. 



WOMAN 



UNLIMITED 



Hun- 



development program for women who 
»'<• ready to discard self Defeating 
limitations and develop their own 
powerful resources For info call (6091 
894 061 S 

6 35 3t 



DID YOU KNOW? 

That We Clean Some ol 
The Most Unusual Things? 




FRENCH DRY CLEANING 

IULANE STREET PWMCETON. MJ W4t 



LB HILTON 

REALTY CO. OF PRINCETON, INC 





SPACIOUS FRENCH COLONIAL HOME: Heated swimming pool with a 
Cabana that has a kitchen for pool parlies The home has many extras, 
including a finished game room $275,000 





IN HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP a 3 bedroom, \Vi bath rancl 
maintenance free exterior. Low taxes and low heating costs. In a-quiet 
neighborhood with nice lawn and garden, $85,000 

WOODED LAND IN PRINCETON TOWNSHIP, zoned residential . 
trees and brook. 1 6 acres with 1 750 ft. frontage. $1 1 0,000 

3,000 SQ. FT. INDUSTRIAL BUILDING for sale in Jamesburg. Ideal for 
manufacturing, construction contractor, etc. Trailer overhead door 

$85,000 

THREE BEDROOM BRICK 2 STORY in excellent condition. Large living 
room with fireplace, dining room and a modern kitchen. Convenient to 
bus transportation $104,000 

RENTALS: NASSAU ARMS North Harrison Street, Princeton Borough 

Apartments available immediately 



921-6060 

194 Nassau Street 

Hilton Bldg.. 2nd floor 



RENTALS: HOUSES AND APARTMENTS 
Mercer and Somerset County MLS 
Princeton Real Estate droup 
Affiliated Independent Broker 
(Nationwide Referral Service) 

EVENINGS & WEEKENDS CALL: 
William Schuessler. 921 -8963 Anthony Tevere. 466-0925 

Harvey Rude, 201 -359-5327 Emma King. 799-1 694 

Asa Mowery, 395-1 671 Russ Edmonds. 201 -449-9357 



SSSS«SSS»sS«=!t^«5SS3SSSS5 



CJ. Skiman Co. 

Furniture Repaaing 
Upholstery 



J4-0221 



State Roofing b Siding 

Siding • Roofing • Storm 

Windows • Gutters 

Down Spouts 

Sattsfactton* Rettabitity Savings 

448-2354 (local call) 



Hahn Electrical Contracting 

Have an electrical engineer 
solve your electrical needs. 



industrial/Commercial 

* 

iance 

• OS h a 

• Control Design 

Princeton/Skillman 



Residential 

• Complete Wiring Service 

• increased C a\ . 

• Pool and Patio .'. 

• Additional Outlets 

609-466-1313 



Medicare Forms Confusing? 

Maior Medical. Blue Cross/Blue Shield hospital and 
doctor pills all a big mess 9 We clear up the problems. 
till out medical insurance claim forms lor your signature, 
obtam the required xero* copies and have everything 
ready for you to mail to the proper agency We prepare 
an medical insurance claim (orms "Insuranca 
Assistance." 



Ann Johnson 
466-1065 



Julia Aborger 
737-2364 



Sand Inquiry tBW Broad St.. Hopawatl. N.J 08525 




Dutch Boy Points • Benjamin Moore Palnta 
Martin Sanour Williamsburg Paints 
Wallcoverings & Art Supplies 
200 Nassau SL 924-0056 



Old Established Household 

PUBLIC AUCTION 

Harrison Ettenger & Others 
245 S. Chancellor - Newtown, Pa. 

Tues., Sept. 14-9 A.M. 

(Rain Date Next Day) 

6 rifles & flintlocks, 3 arrow plank; slipper & rush chairs; 
1880 Windsor, carpet bag & child shaker rockera; cuckoo 
clocks, 1810 cherry stand; towel rack; Vict, marble table & 
wash stands; nice oak ladles desk; trestle table; old upright 
Vlctrola & records; doll cradle; Wm. & Mary dining aet; 
maple living & bedrooms, Etc. I Lota cut, old glass & china; 
wash bowl & pitcher; floral crocks; lamps; Bristol vases; red 
souvenir pitchers; lots brlc-a-brac; linens; unseen attic con- 
tents; new 5 speed bike; Etc. I Good Full Sale! 

Lester & Robert Slatoff 

AUCTIONEERS 
Trenton, N.J. 609-393-4848 



Collectors Household 

PUBLIC AUCTION 

Est. - Valentine Redens & Others 
DeCou Firehouse - Trenton, N.J. 
Ruskin Ave. (oft 2900 S. Broad) 

Thurs., Sept. 16-8 A.M. 

15 old mantel & wall clocks; Jacobean & Wm. & Mary style 
tables, chests, chairs, etc.! Old dry sink; 1800 pine panel 
corner cupboard; drop leal tables & stands; old rush « 
plank chairs; targe old church pew; leather club chairs. 
nice pine cabinet desk; Boston rocker; Vict, plant stand; 
acorn bed; line old blanket chest; trestle table & chairs; 
nice Vict, book case; lots custom turnlshlnos; wrought iron 
chandeliers. Etc.! Lovely sterling. Jensen compote; Lenox; 
Staffordshire, old |ugs S crocks; vases; lanterns; bell col- 
lection: paperweights: lots glass; brlc-a-brac; prints; pain- 
tings; copper « Iron palls; old lamps; mirrors; Etc' A Good 
Full Sale! 
Sold 6 A.M. • power tools & tools; ladders Etc ! 

Lester & Robert Slatoff 

AUCTIONEERS 
Trenton, N.J. (609) 393-4848 



Employment Opportunities 

Throughout the Princeton Area 



BABYSITTER NEEOED; I * m b< 

t> m Monday turough Friflay at 
Community Village for one and a naif 
ttar oio loonier and 7 month old baby 
Can bring your own child to worn 
English not needed S« a wee* Call 
evenings, W* two 



MUSIC TEACHER NEEDED: One 

morning a week (or established 
cooperative nursery scnooi in Prince 
ton Send resume in confidence to 
Director. Cherry HIM Nursery Scnooi, 
Of 206 and Cherry Hill Rd . Princeton. 
N J 06540 

9 8 Jt 



PART TIME 
SECRETARY BOOKKEEPER 

Reasonable Saul's required 

PART TIME DRIVER NEEDED 
97* 1072 or 911 0020 



INEXPERIENCED GIRL FRIDAY 

Flexibiehours (201)921 «94 



USHERS NEEOED: McCarter Theatre 
Company. (5 travel stipend per evening 
tor most events and see McCarter 
events IS or older (A09> *s: 6125 As* 
tor Mr Harris 



CHILDCARE For three month old in 
my home 6 hour day. S day week 
asap Paid vacation Hours otten less 
at full pay Own transportation and 
recent references On busline, 
Gnggstov/n area (201 1 874-4372. 9-8-21 



WAITRESSES-WAITERS 

Experienced only. Apply in person. 
Holiday Inn, Princeton 



SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR: Per 

manent part time. days, evenings, 
small Nassau Street ofiiee 924 2040 



DELI CLERK 

PART TIME 

Starting wage "S 30 per hour 

Musi be 1 8 or over 

See Mr Funk 

at 

DAVIDSON'S MARKET 

172 NASSAU Street 



BABYSITTER NEEDED >or Princeton 
Tennis CluO, Monday through Friday, 
approximately 9a m to 3 p m Call 924 
001 S 



HELP WANTED - Saturdays anc 
Sundays, Pernas Plan' and Flowei 
Shop. 189 Alexander Road. 452 1383 9 1 



FINANCIAL SECRETARY 

BOOKKEEPER For Nassau 

Presbyterian Church m Princeton. 
Professional background in 

bookkeeping required Responsibilities 
include all bookkeeping, overseeing 
and preparing payroll, periodic 
financial reports, participation in 
budget preparation, all banking, IRS 
reports, and special protects as needed 
Atlr active salary and benefits Starting 
'.1982 Send resumes to Or 
Wallace M Alston, al Nassau St , 
9 1-31 



SMALL PRIVATE SCHOOL near 
Princeton needs very special person to 
•Chart midday 8 10 hours a 
week Occasional additional hours Call 
609 446 2989 

8 2S 31 



SALES HELP - Full and part lime 
needed at Ricchards selling ladles 
Apply ISO Nassau Street 

8 25 3t 



TYPIST RECEPTIONIST Permanent. 
full time position with an established 
research organization In Pnnceton 
Must ttove excellent typing skills, 
pleasant personality and good 
telephone manners Excellent fringe 
benefits, pleasant working surroun 
dings Call Personnel 60* 924 3i» to 
arrange interview 



WRITERS: S2S0 lor 14,000 word love 
romance stories Details (201 ) 539 
6993 

9 8 3t 



S'OO PER WEEK Part time at home. 
Webster. America's popular dictionary 
company needs home workers to up- 
date local mailing lists All ages, ex- 
perience unnecessary Call I 716 642 
6000. Ext 7703 

98 3t 



Looking for a Career? ' 

Do you sometimes feel thai your imbitions are undirected'' 
Professional assistance can De ne.pful This office provides a 
counseling service thai includes 

• Testing of intereats and aptitudes 

• Clarification of values 

• Realistic Information on 600 careers 

• Personal Counseling 

• Resume preparation 

For more information, call 921-6638 

Anna WjlHngham. MA M.S.W. 

20 Nassau Street, Princeton 



I 
I 

I 
I 
I 

I 

■a 



SECURITY GUARD: Part time, steady 
hours, 13.75 per hour, I? or older Must 
md enjoy 
■ . 
Company, I609) 442 6125 AsK for Mr 
Harris 



TICKET TAKER CONCESSIONAIRE & 
BARTENDER, pari tlmi 

SO per hour. 17 or older. Musi 
be'pleas.iM trust WOrlhy and en|oy 
serving pvople McCarter Theatre 
Company. (609) 4J2 6I2S AsK for Mr 
Harris 



WANTED CLEANING WOMAN to 


work mornings In Princeton. Own 


transportation needed Please call 924 


97J4 





NOTICE 

In compliance wtlh a 
ruling of Ihe Stale 
Supreme Court, all 
newspapers must 
ascertain that em- 
ployment ads do not 
discriminate Between 
sexes 

For example, titles 
such as "Salesman," 
"Nurse" and "Girl 
Friday." should be 
replaced, respectively, 
by "Salesperson," 
"Nurse (M/W)" and 
"General Office Work 
M.'W TOWN TOPICS 
has a copy of ihe 
Division of Civil Rights 
booklet, A Guide for 
Employers to Ihe New 
Jersey Law against 
Discrimination, and will 
provide assistance in the 
wording of all such ads 
upon request Ad- 
vertisers cooperation is 
sought in meeting the re- 
quirements of the law 



SALES POSITION 

We are currently stalling our new 
Princeton olllce 6*cellenl opporunity 
lor a car,"" al products 

Including hie insurance Complete 
trainino program and welfare Benefits 
Must have above average background 
with 5 years business experience Future 
management opportunity High income 
potential yvith Incentive starting Income 
1OSS0.000 

II you like to help people, have a sales 
aptitude and a desire to achieve, this 
may be your chance tor above average 
rewards 

Send resume to BOk T 79 
c oTown Topics 



PARENTS- HELPER NEEOED Busy 
lamlly ot live needs childcare and help 
around house Monday Friday, , vpm 
Must like children and be reliable Own 
transportation necessary Call ,52 6251 



PART TIME CASHIER Tuesday and 
Thursday, S °p m Friday SlOpm and 
Saturday Call 709 OroSor7yvOS30 9 I 3t 



POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

PART TIME 

AM AND PM 

CASHIERS 

See Mr. Funk 

AT DAVIDSONS 

172 NASSAU STREET 



Joir 



Jo l Us at TOWN 1 OPICS q 



PART TIME DISCOVERY TOYS: Use 

your education and experience with 
children as a consultant to parents, 
teachers, and community child care 
professionals Demonstrate 

educational materials and discuss their 
use in meeting developmental and 
academic goals ideal for mothers and 
leactiers seekmu a flexible independent 
business 1604)896 1341 o I Jt 



COOKS AND CLERKS Gourmet take 
out shop in Princeton Daytime, 
weekends, and some evenings. 20 40 
hours per week Interest In creating 
fine foods, and helping customers 
essential Paid commensurate with 
proven ability on |ob 924 76B7 or 924 
4JJ6 84t) 






5 Palmer Square West 
Princeton. New Jersey 



SUBSTITUTE 
SCHOOL NURSES 

NJ school nurse certificate or 
substitute school nurse cer- 
tificate required Wilt assist in 
obtaining certificate if you 
possess a valid state nursing 
license Apply m person or call 

PRINCETON 
REGIONAL SCHOOLS 

25 Valley Road 
Princeton. N.J. 08540 
609-924-5600 Ext. 220 



We have a position open in our advertising department 
to handle display advertising accounts, many of them 
long-time contract advertisers. Copy-writing, layout 
and selling of new accounts involved, Previous ex- 
perience in advertising and/or sales helpful, but not 
essential -- we can provide necessary training for 
someone who enjoys working with our advertisers. 

Hours: Friday, Monday and Tuesday, Car essential - 
wm we pay mileage. Salary open. Remuneration includes 
- annual Christmas bonus, participation i: 

sharing plan, and two-weeks' paid vacation. 

Call 924-2200 for an interview appointment, 
brief resume. 

SENIOR PROGRAMMER/ANALYST 

Immediate opening (or senior staff in the systems 
software group Requirements: 

Systems: BS/MS (E E Comp Sci , Phy . Chem 
or Math) 5 plus years experience in realtime pro- 
gramming and operating systems Realtime data 
display and manipulation Knowledge of hard- 
ware/firmware Micro-processor experience 
(6800. 68000) DEC RT-1 1 or RSX-1 1 and 
MACRO-1 1 Structured design and high level 
languages 

Position requires highly motivated professional 
who enjoys working in a small group atmosphere, 
can work independently as well as provide 
guidance to others. Must have excellent oral and 
written skills. 

Our company otters an informal work environ- 
ment Principals only need apply Send resume 
and salary history to Dr E J Makuchowski 

PRINCETON GAMMA-TECH, INC. 

1200 State Rd. 
Princeton, N.J. 08540 







nil MONZA. IS. 000 miles Manual 
transmission, excellent running con- 
dition $1445 Call 799 3079 



KINGSTON RETAIL OR OFFICE 
SPACE 1500 sq M low price. $700 per 
month Good for any type retail or 
office, sunny, pleasant and visible 
Plenty of parking Call Jim Firestone, 
riAiin Realtor 



PRINCETON NASSAU STREET, Retail DM* COURSE 

office space. 600 sq ft in off street 
location No visibility, good for radio, 
TV repair, locksmith, watch clock 
lewelry repair, upholstery repair or 
lurnishings services Call Jim 
Firestone 924 2222 Realtor 



GIRLS three speed schwin 
W4 6S17 after6pm 



self mastery and 
creating what you want In life 
Powerful S week program lor our 
times Princeton. Tuesday evening 
Sept u Oct II. registration deadline 
September 6 Call Sr Cert Instructor 
Wl 396ftor92l 1523 

8IS3t 



LOST ON FRIDAY August 17 | 



APARTMENT FOR RENT: Centrally 
.ving between Mt Lucas and Bayard ££? *#'££ lmmedia ' e| v Co" 
(Rt 306) Small box containing various " ,er 3pm "' 3200 

loose pieces oi glasses, cups and 

saucers Of no real worth only great 

sentimental value Please call 921-0534 FOR SflLE: *udl Fox 1974, automatic, 
Reward AM FM stereo, new tires, new battery, 

$1200 Call 683- 11 36 or 452 4549 



FOR THE UNUSUAL If 

DECORATIONS. Furnishings. Gift 
and Jewelry Visit the Gullded Lion. 
Chambers Street. Princeton Daily 11 -i 
pm (609) 914 6350 



HOUSEKEEPING POSITION 

DESIRED by experienced woman 
References and own transportation 
Phone 393 68)5 after 5 pm 

9-8 « 



AMELIA SURF AND RACQUET CLUB 
oceanfront luxury condo for rent on 
Amelia Island. Florida Beautiful 
beach, pool and free Harthru tennis 27 
hole golf course and excellent fishing 
nearby Easy access by car or plane 
For more information call 924 7072 
evenings 

98 alt 



FOR RENT: 3 bedroom, V t bath 
townhouse 15 minutes from Princeton 
Fully carpeted, air conditioned, washer 
& dryer, fenced m back yard S6S0 per 
month, plus S35. recreation fee and 
utilities CallaMer5pm6O99746903 



197] BUICK LE SABRE, price - best 
Offer 73,000 miles, 8 track stereo, AM 
FM radio, air conditioner. Brand new 
muffler, battery, hoses, excellent 
running 452 5986. 215 838 8012 

Iweekends) 



WANT EXTRA INCOME? A temporary 
or part time iob may be the answer 
Read the Help Wanted ads in this issue 
ut TOWN TOPICS for a varied selection 
ol opportunities open to you 



FRAME IT NOW 
at the 



EYE FOR ART 

6 Spring St 



Schwinn 

New and Used Bicycles 

Sales, Service 

Parts and Repairs 

KOPP'S CYCLE 

4] Wltherspoon Street 

924-1052 



ANTIQUE 


OAK LIBRARY 


TABLE. 


elegant c 


irved legs and corners Ideal 


focal pom 


1 for home or office 


1575 Call 


924 8058 




9 8 21 


CARPET 


Finest quality, light brown. 


IB 1 i It « 


11' j ft plus runner 


lift x 40 


in burlap backing. 1 year old 


excellent 


condition 


Call9246524 





PRINCE CHEVROLET 

The All New Chevrolet 

OK USED CARS 

ROUTE 20* 

924-3350 

opp the airport 



specially designed, handmade 
FURNITURE AND CABINETWORK 



in the Princeton 
area smce 1962 



PIANOTUNINO 

Registered Craft iman 

Piano Technicians Guild inc 



Robert H. Halllei 



OO IT YOURSELF 
LEGAL KITS 



Divorce, Wills. Bankruptcy. Separation. | 
Incorporation, NameChange 



201 782 S540 
ANYTIME 



E. BAHADURIAN & SON 



PflEVENT 
MILDEW 
DAMAGE! 




CLEAN » STORE 

YOUR RUGS 

WITH US 

FOR THE SUMMER 



Nationally Advertised Bfoadioom Carpets 
New and Used Oriental R u gs»Rug Cleanmg»Repairing 
15% Discount on all cash and carry rug cleaning 



Cleaning done on location and here in 

883 State Road-Princeton, N.J. •609-924-0720 
Plant Hours: Mon.-Frl. 8 am to 5 pm, Closed Saturday 



Are You Selling? Are You Insuring? 

Furniture • China • Glass 

Art Objects • Silver • Jewelry 




AUCTIONEER 

Antique Dealer • Appraiser 
777 W. State St. 393 4848 Trenton, IM.J. 




J rinceton Jfforizon 



. what OQi 



m erica is comma 



to/ 




Country condominiums just north of Princeton in Kingston, New Jersey. Gracious living on a gently 
rolling slope. Convenient to everything. A New York bus at the door or drive just six miles for easy 
commuting to New York or Philadelphia. The Princeton area is a marvelous place to live. It has 
everything! 



PRICES START AT $59,990 

One bedroom, living room, dining area, full bath 

One bedroom, den, living room, dining area, 1 Vi baths 

Two bedrooms, den, living room, dining area, 2 full baths, sold out in section 1 

• All units have balcony or patio, energy-saving features 
ATTRACTIVE FINANCING TO QUALIFIED BUYERS 



$59,990 
$69,990 
$79,990 



13 1 /2% Fixed rate 30 year mortgage 



COME VISIT US AT PRINCI N HORIZONS SALES OFFICE (609) 924-6739 

(Route 27 just north of Princeton in Kingston, N.J. 1 0:30 to 6:00) Or call us at 33 Witherspoon in Princeton 
for an appointment for all the details. (609) 921-2776. Be sure to ask for Mark Hill Thanks 



JOHN! 



^HENDERSON 

DCAI TADC ^— ' 



INI 



REALTORS 



33 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08.vJ0 («0i», ))2l-2776 



29^ 



N.T.Callaway^ 

REAL ESTATE ^ 

4 NASSAU STREET PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08540 
921-1050 



Judy McCaughan 
Terry Merrick 
Anne Gallagher 
WillaStackpole 
Eleanor Young 
Charlotte McLaugnlin 
PatCahill 
Linda Hofl 
Barbara Rose Hare 



Mary Ann Sares 
Kay Wen 
Tip Blount 
Ann Brower 
Ned Scudder 
Zelda Laschever 
Catherine Geoghan 
Diane Bleacher Pro Mgml. 
Pete Callaway, Broker 




CLEVELAND LANE 

Charming smaller contemporary in a convenient, private setting. Large 
toyer. the living room with fireplace, dining room and breakfast room all 
open out to a redwood deck Rosewood panelled study/guest room with 
wet bar Master bedroom opens out to deck overlooking lovely yard 
Modern kitchen, breezeway to 2 car garage Beautifully landscaped, 

$240,000 




WOODLANE ROAD 

Large enough lor two generations and visitors tool In a popular 
neighborhood off Cold Soil Road, extra closets and non-slandard 
amenities distinguish this attractive new listing. Quarry file entry; living 
and dining rooms; eat-in kitchen and laundry. Family room with fireplace; 
five bedrooms, 3Vi baths, plus a fully finished lower level — everything 
to please an active lamily $165,000 




SPRINQDALE ROAD 

Inviting Colonial in a convenient, completely private setting. Center hall, 
spacious living room with marble fireplace and large bay window 
overlooking brick terrace and lovely yard Large dining room opens out 
to terrace, Butler's pantry and kitchen. Library with fireplace, bookcases 
and built-m cabinets. Powder room, large closets. Four bedrooms, four 
baths, sewing room or fifth bedroom, three cedar closets on the second 
floor Two car garage. Terrace with fountain, rose garden, beautiful trees 
and shrubs $325,000 




SPRINGDALE ROAD 

Large, beautifully landscaped corner lot provides an attractive setting for 
this well built Colonial. Center hall, living room with fireplace and dining 
room graced by Walertord chandelier. Bookcases and bow window 
enhance the den which opens out to pafio. Kitchen, small breakfast room 
and powder room. Four bedrooms, 3 bafhs on the 2nd floor. Wide plank 
floors and lovely moldings throughout. $320,000 




MOORE STREET 

A much sought-after location and solid construction are offered in this at- 
tractive Colonial. Currently used as a dwelling with income-producing 
2nd floor apartment, it is easily converted to 4 bedrooms and 2 baths, 
with pleasant living room, sun porch, and dining room Finished base- 
ment play room, 2 car garage. $225,000 




- 



NELSON RIDGE ROAD 

Appealing Cape Cod situated on a large, professionally landscaped lot. 
Center hall, large living room with fireplace, dining room and library 
Modern kitchen, screened porch and flagstone terrace First floor master 
bedroom and bath; two second floor bedrooms, bath and storage. 
Tasteful decor and well-arranged rooms 2 car garage $195,000 



Pt<n -elon area rep/esentofjve tor 

SOTHEBY PARKE BERNET 
INTERN VTlONAl. REALTY COKHOKATION 



Audree 
Society 



Estey Steps Down as Head of Princeton Ballet; p 
Plans to Honor Her with Gala Party in October ! 




got more pupils. Then Bill 
Dorman wanted to get rid of 
his frozen food space, so we I 
took that over, too. That was - 
in September, and by June, we 
were going five and six days a 
week in both studios. It was, I 
think, in '67 and '68 that we 
took over the other studio. 

"It's an exciting thing. 
We've grown because we've 
had so many caring people. 
We choose teachers, of course, I 
because of their professional 5 
skill, but also because they | 
love children and working ■ 
with them. And the parents of ^ m 
children have been wonderful, 
too. 



RECESSION GOT YOU DOWN? 

Princeton's Most Popular 
Hairstudio Makes Looking Good 
AFFORDABLE 

4IRSTYLING i/ 

Ottoman ^ 

362 Nassau Street Princeton {609)924-7733 



U h/iip: 

, xntwi 

^362Nassac 

[_$_1_0 



HAIRSTYLES FOR THE FAMILY 

Monday-Thursday (with this ad) 



r; Cut and Blow Dry ■ : 

i C With all • PERMANE NTS J r 

• FROSTING & COLORING I \ 

B 3 
MONDAY-THURSDAY (with this ad) 



Audree likes to talk about 
the ballet school perfor- 
mances at McCarter. 

"Not a recital, but a perfor- 
mance with professional 
lighting and performing. The 
talented kids carried it, of 
course, but every student was 
\ in it. 

i "Then, in the early 1960s, we 
im ,« began 'The Nutcracker' every 

IN THOSE DAYS :ln a photograph taken sometime in the early 1950s, Audree year with McCarter. The first 

cstey (center) makes plans — for what, is not quite certain — with Princeton Ballet act is always done by the 
Society colleagues. Left to right they are Margaret Halcombe, Anne Tomlinson, school, and the second act by 

Jean Dilley and Mary Sarett Barrle. the Princeton Ballet Com- 

'Parents' in the produc 



""She's never 'marked it' — 
Audree has never 'marked' 
anything. She's always done 
everything 'full out'". 

With deep, quiet affection 
and admiration, Wendell ° ce ? n now 



town for brief visits. Sum- 
mers, they are in their beloved 
house in Maine, in Stonington 
on Deer Isle. 



pany 

tion are actual parents and 
in Winnipeg — she was friends of students in the 
marvelous, looked just like a school." 
queen! —but I found out later, Audree s expanding 



n looktng out at the ^f was ' he worst teacher in energtes brought about „ 

regional company and later, a 



it's beautiful! 



("Bud") Estey used dancer's 
language to describe his wife's 
dynamic and unceasing 
dedication to dance and to the °^ ean 
Princeton ballet organizations 
she founded. 

He explained that when 
dancers want to save 
themselves in performance, 
they are said to be 
it." To do anything 



Audree exclaimed, at the start 



-professional company. The 

of a telephone conversation. dreadtuLhnln^but^a't' U*"™ 8 I!?', '° S ener ?!„ au " 
"WeYe ten miles „„t into the dr ? a(lf . ul , technique, but great rhences, the functions of these 



potential. And he made me go 



on the other hand, is to give it 
everything you've got. 



It s our 32nd year in right back t0 the beginning 

Maine - you know, we did and star , a „ over in 

ballet for 22 years at Le Chalet M champion was nis 

Francais - and people call us dau%hieT< you ^^ Then , 

here all the time. When the stu died with Theodore Kosloff, 

phone rings, its sure to be a tne Russian teacher, in Los 

marking young dancer! Angeles. 

fullout," „._,__„, _„,.,. .,._.. "So Doug MacNeil got me 18 



The Country Mouse announces. . . 

CANDLE SALE 



Dinner Candles 
6" and Baroque 
All Decoratives 



25% off 
50% off 
25% off 



TEE-SHIRT SALE 

Boynton Designs 
and more 50% off 

KITE SALE 

Nylon and Plastic 
Designs 25% off 

The 




Country Mouse 

164 Nassau Street • Princeton • 921-2755 

Store Open Mon. - Sat. 9:30-6 



Began During World War II. or 19 ns and b the end of 
Studios in Pnnceton, New ^ we ^j 60! He was 

Brunswick and Cranbury very very inf | U ential in form- 
Retiring? Well, no, I'm not designation by the mayor of ing the Princeton Ballet Socie- 



really retiring because 
course I'll be a consultant. 



of 



ty. 



New Brunswick of the New 

Brunswick State Theatre as ■'yn ia i r ve always cared 

"home" for the Princeton most about is the best educa- 

Ballet, citation as an "honor tjon for ^ whet her they are 

and then "major" company dancing for pure joy, or plan- 



But officially, Audree 
retired on September 1 as 
director of the Princeton nationwide -all these seem „j ng a professional career 



Ballet Society, which she remote mdeed fro ™ thc J™ 

founded. The new director is y " n e dancers Audree had Many Homes Here ^ the 

Judith Leviton, who has been wh « n sne sl *'' ted . , ° '«f cn Ballet Society grew, it shed 

associate director for the past Dallet during World War II one space a(ter anot her until 



two years. 



Sometime in the fall — pro- 
bably in October - the Ballet Bud taui 
Society will honor Audree with "f,™ 
a gala Gala. 

Bud says that because 



Audree always did everything stu ^f U.J ;,_ 
"full out," the time had come 
for her to stop. 

"At the end of the seasons, 
she would be completely worn 
down, and she really did have 
to stop," he said. "I told her, 



It was Saturday mornings, today me tist looks like a 

using the Alumni Study at the catalog f old Princeton: 

Lawrenceville School, where Rose Co ttage, now razed, on 

English and the grounds of the old Borough 

. Hall, also no longer standing; 

I started the Pnnceton the old YWCA on what used to 
Ballet Society to help - 



m ,y be Avalon Place and is now 



she said. "1 Paul Robeson Place; the 

remember that Douglas garage of the J. Robert Op- 

MacNeil - he was a big penheimers and, somewhat 

balletomane in Princeton and sur p r j s ingly, a contemporary 

there weren't many in building: the Unitarian 

Princeton back in the '50s — church 



was interested, and in fact, he 



We were in the basement 
look, you just can't do this was the first president of my of McCarter Theatre, too, 1 
my more. 



"That's why we moved to 
Sarasota, Florida — we were 
there last year for the first 
time on an extended basis." 



board. He called me and asked Audree remembers, "and 
began doing a lot with them. 
We put the floor in that rehear- 
sal room! But we made such 



my background 

"Well!" she laughed, "he 
called Ernest Belcher in 
California and checked me 



out. I'd auditioned for Belcher i eav ^ 



noise, they had to ask us to 



TteEsteyTrToTonger'havea after I came to California 
house in Princeton, but they from Winnipeg I d caughtthe 
will clearly be stopping in 



"Then to Alexander Street, 



dance bug from Madame Zink wherc we are now It was the 
worst looking place! This was 



OPEN 

SUNDAYS 

12 to 5 

NASSAU LIQUORS 

M Kiiuu St. 924-0031 

Parking Behind the Store 
9 a.m. to 9:45 p.m. Mon. -Sat ■ Free Delivery 



in '63. It had been a feed mill, 
the Community Players were 
there for a time, and I think an 
auto parts place. 

"Bill Dorman — he was the 
owner — said 'Nobody has 
ever made a go of it here, and 
I refuse to let you sign a lease ' 
No, we don't own that 
building It's the biggest 
mistake we ever made, not 
buying it. 

"I didn't want to move 
there It's so far out! I said 
nobody will ever want to come 
this far! " and she laughs, call- 
ing to mind, as she sits at her 
Maine window, the 1982 traffic 
and busyness of Alexander 
Street 

"But with more space, we 




French 
Wine Values 

FEATURING OVER 50 FRENCH WINES ON SALE 



Cuvee Blanc de Blanc 
Le Grande Cheneau Macon Villages 
Laboure Roi Cotes de Rhone '81 
Clerc Blanc -litre 



boltla 

2.99 
5.99 
3.99 
3.99 



32.10 
64.69 
43.10 
43.10 



also - LIQUOR & JUG WINES ON SALE 

Picnic Baskets & Platters by Order 

5000 Wines - 6600 sq. ft. - 65 free parking spots 

85 Imported Beers - 5000 cases of cold beer to go 

Large Cordial & Liquor Selection 

€llsworfh'5 

Princeton-Hightstown Road-(609)799-0530 

(1 st left over the bridge from Princeton) Mon.-Fri. 9-9; Sat. 9-8 



McCarter Switches 'Blithe Spirit' to Opener; 
Anna Russell Will Star in Noel Coward Work 











v rUmte< will be a movie star 

j well-known by the under-25 

a crowd, the opener will be a 

2 blithe NoeJ Coward comedy 

i with a surprise Big Name 

U> star, and major renovations 

^ may be announced as Mc- 

< Carter begins its fourth season . 

<0 under the guidance of Nagle | 

z Jackson, Artistic Director for I 

8 the theatre 

S If you remember vour | 

j '82- '83 announcement, you'll 

z recall that the season closed 

z'with "Blithe Spirit" No 

2 longer 

g "We'd always closed with a 

z big comedy," Mr. Jackson 

J pointed out in a pre-season In* 

(fl-terview, "but we decided to 

y switch, and open with a big 

o comedy instead. So our open- 

H ing night will be Friday, Oc- 

| tober 1 with Noel Coward's 

o 'Blithe Spirit.'" 

*~ Building the scene like the 
shrewd director he is, Mr. 
Jackson listed the leading 

man (TV actor Paul Shenar, „ ,_ _.„.._ . 

who played Orson Welles ,n THE PLAY'S THE THING: Nagle Jackson, Artistic 
the movie about "War of the Director of McCarter, looks happily ahead to a new 
Worlds"); the leading lady season with Shakespeare, Noel Coward, Edward 
(Christine Baranski, now in Albee, Chekhov — and a new play In premiere. 

li-^nh ? P ' ay '" g A "m H na '" bably best known for her con- world," the director says 




Music to make your party go.. 
Sandy Maxwell / Music 
(609)924-1983 




Joseph Papp's "A Midsum 
mer Night's Dream") and the 
director (William Woodman, 
whom Princeton audiences 
remember from "Moby Dick 
Rehearsed") before he an- 



densation of Wagner's "Ring" simply 
operas into about two minutes "There has been no major 

of playing time. production recently, and for 

She will also bring her me, I felt it was the right time 

musical satires to McCarter in to do it, I've done 'Macbeth,' 

February on her regular con- 'Lear' I've put it off until I 

nounced that be has a BIB Star „_, „•,„,. , ** taU , k „ A ' \ , , . 

for "Blithe Spirit " schedule felt I had a real point of view, 

"I wanted someone like An- ., „, . [ " ,. , and now I do. 
na Russell for the nart nf Nagle Jackson is particular- I see Hamlet as the 

m«aSSiLo7T a!.J Z i Jy excited about the "Hamlet" Romantic Hero, the person 

£*S Z £se • Why nol A^ y he M direct ' for an 0ctober who breaks ™'«- ^ifcfhave 

BWmflT J caijed I iwr W . opening : For one thing ' il had double with Hamlet from 



9& Vrhwvion Mallei Society 

. 1 . / l< 




School off Ballet 

^^r announces ^H 
^m the opening of the 1982- 1983 season ^M 

W Classes begin September 16th 1 






New students should register in person at the Princeton 1 
Studio. 262 Alexander Street, the Cranbury Studio, 
The Old School. Main Street, or the New Brunswick 
Studio 103 Church Street, on September 8. 9. 10 
between 2 00-6.00 pm Former students should be 
registered by September 7 




BALLET*MODERN DANCE 
JAZZ* DANCE EXERCISE 

For men, women, and children at all levels 
beginner through professional. 


For more inloimation and birxhute. please coniaci 

The Princeton Ballet Society 

262 Alexander Street. Princeton New Jersey. 08540 

or telephone 

Princeton Studio 609 921-7758 10 am 5 pm 

Cranbury Slodlo 609395-0711 - Mon -Thur 2 6 pm 

NcwBrunewIck 201 249- 1254 2-6 pm 

Or P-<*ttton Balm Socnty n a "on p.ol.r rdutaforai otaa^iaKor, momrofnfng <h, 

S<hool el Ba»tl o-tf lh» P-.nettar, B-i"ti Company Tht P'inct'o- Be'lti Company 

had b*tr> dtua,naltd a moyo- rompann b v iht National Auofation to- RtgionaJ Ballln 



llnTh, ooirtc h fl H i i will be set in the 18th century 
agent, who said BMG played ^ .. -, ... , ,. J 

the part before and would love £ or a . m ^ ", w, " star " arr >' 
to doit again " H «™™ '" „ l * e lead ' n * "£• 

years old 



Continued on Next Page 



'He's 30 



t again 
Referred to by one critic as „ 
"the funniest woman in the ^if.'^.^Sf.J^H. 
world." Ms. Russell is nro 



C 0MM 



Casting 

for 
The Fantasflcks 

by Jones and Schmidl 

Sept 14. 15, & 16. 
8 to 10 30 p m 



at the PCP Playhouse 

171 Broadmead Princeton 

An appointment to audition 

is necessary Please call 



movie-star well-known to 
young people, and we were 
very lucky that he was 
available." 

Hamlin has made five films, 
including "Clash of (he 
Titans" with Laurence 
Olivier, and "Making Love." 
Mr, Jackson had known him at 
the American Conservatory 
Theatre in San Francisco, 
where Hamlin played in 
"Equus" for two years, and 
says with pleasure, "He has 
all the classical training I 
need." 

It is Mr Jackson's happy 
thought that Harry Hamlin 
will attract young audiences 
who might otherwise groan at 
the thought of "Hamlet." In 
fact, all student matinees for 
this "Hamlet" are sold out 
already, so teachers are ap- 
parently excited, too 

Why "Hamlet"? 

"It's the greatest play in the 



MODERN DANCE 

taught by Joy Vrooman 

SEPT. 15 - NOV. 17 - WEDNESDAYS 7-8:30 P.M. 

COMMUNITY ARTS CENTER 

102 Witherspoon St., Princeton 

for Information & registration please call: 
—921-8579 evenings after 8:30 p.m.— 



flPHK 



4^ 






Aparri Ballet School 



Miia Gibbons 

and 

International Faculty 



Classic Ballet lor children and adults, beginners to profes- 
sional - Producer ot the Princeton Ballet Festival - Registration 
at me school, Tues and Thurs . Sept 7. 9 and 1 4 trom 4 to 6 
p m or py appointment - 21 7 Nassau Si . Princeton Tel 



-I 




Sunday, September 12 1-5 p.m. 



A Festival of Visual and Performing Arts presented by 
McCarter Theatre and the Princeton Art Association 



McCarter Theatre Company's 
Open House III 

91 University Place 

Princeton, New Jersey 

Be the lucky winner of a rare, 

handpainted porcelain doll of Ebeneier 

Scrooge and/or a walk-on part in our 

popular Holiday production of 

A Christmas Catol 

Back by popular demand' Auction of 

unusual theatre memorabilia 

Backstage tours 

Only opportunity to Sign-up youngsters 

for A Christmas Coro' auditions 

Stage lighting and sound demonstrations 

Special children's events 

Face painting 

Jugglers, mimes and magicians 

Be the first in line tor the Box Office 

1982-83 reopening 

Visit the Company Store 

Get the inside scoop on the season's 

activities 

Refreshments and Free Balloons'" 



Princeton Art Association's 
Open House 

Ettl Farm 

Rosedale Road 

Princeton, New Jersey 1 
Sale of prints, drawings and paintings 
Bake sale 

Meet the PAA faculty 
Discuss classes and registration 
Special events and fun for the kids 
Exhibition of faculty, students and 
members works 
Full afternoon of demonstrations 
including sketching, portraiture, 
watercolor. printing and children's 
workshops 
Food and refreshments available 






Open to the public free of charge 



— u ' uYm.u 



1 ■ ■ ■ » ■ . »■'■ IM I H-IIIIII f ! 



PAA and McCarter Plan Open House 

Come to "An Art Affair" this Sunday from 1 to 5, dividing 

your time and affections between McCarter Theatre Com- 
pany's Open House III at the theatre, and the Princeton Art 
Association Open House at the Association's headquarters 
on Rosedale Road. 

You might win a walk-on part in "A Christmas Carol,'* if 
you're the lucky winner at McCarter. You can sign up your 
youngster for an audition for "Carol," and THIS IS THE 
ONLY TIME YOU CAN, so don't forget. 

There will be an auction of theatre memorabilia, tours of 
backstage with demonstrations of stage lights and sound 
and even face-painting. 

Jugglers, mimes and magicians — of course. Free 
balloons, of course. Refreshments you pay for, of course. 

At the PAA, you'll be able to buy prints, drawings and 
paintings — and baked goods. Demonstrations of sketching, 
portraiture, watercolor, printing and the kinds of things 
kids do in workshops, are designed to lure you into a PAA 
class. 

Food and refreshments at the PAA, too. And the faculty 
will be there to talk about registration. 

No charge for admission, anywhere. 



News of the Theatres 

Continued 1'om Preced nn Paae 

the very first. But he makes 
perfect sense AFTER 
Rousseau, AFTER the French 
Revolution. He is the instinc- 
tive rebel — dissatisfied with 
the political order, he wants 
the natural order of man. He's 
a bit of a fanatic at the begin- 
ning, but we watch him 
mature and at the end he says, 
'the readiness is all. ' A kind of 
mature existentialism." 

Because, in the Jackson 
view, Hamlet makes better 
sense after Rousseau, the Mc- 
Carter production will be laid 
in the 18th century. And there 
is more: 

"In the late 18th century, 
Hamlet can stand out in con- 
trast to the rest of the court. 
The problem with 
Shakespeare set in 
Elizabethan times, is that au- 
diences get confused because 
everybody looks the same, 
and they're not sure who is 
who in the cast. Dress codes of 
that day were extremely 



severe and showed certain 
social distinctions. 

"But we'll have Hamlet 
already in full trousers — 
thought to be an imitation of 
the peasants — surrounded by 
the Frenchified courtiers in 
knee-breeches." 

And Mr. Jackson points to 
the antiquity of the Hamlet 
story: "it is never played in 
the period it actually comes 
from." 

Incidentally, for the first 
time McCarter will have a 
design team which will do the 
entire season of plays: a set 
designer, costume designer 
and lighting expert. The 
"Hamlet" set will be a simple 
one, whose ingenuity has yet 
to be revealed. Mr. Jackson 
wants the audience to wait and 
see. 

After "Hamlet", of course, 
"A Christmas Carol" with 
Herb Foster back as Scrooge. 

Then the new play. 

This year, it will be "The 
Day They Shot John Lennon." 
It's by James McCIure, whose 
"1959 Pink Thunderbird" will 
be recalled by McCarter au- 



Jienr.s. The new play was 
read last year in the 
Playwrights at McCarter 
series, and Mr. Jackson is 
"happy that we can move it up 
to its first staging." 

The play is about the people 
who took part in the unplanned 
vigil at the Dakota apartment 
house in New York on the day 
Lennon was shot. 

"The people are a 
microcosm of those affected 
by the Beatles : the aging ones 
who were at Woodstock and 
who sold out to Wall Street; 
the very young who had just 
gotten in tune, and found it all 
taken away, two Vietnam 
veterans from McClure's play 
'Private Wars' and a wonder- 
ful character — an old Jewish 
resident of the neighborhood, 
so upset because he thinks it 
was Jack Lemmon who was 
shot, and who makes friends 
with a young black. 

"It's killingly funny, like all 
of McClure's things, with a 
sharp edge underneath." 

The director will be Robert 
Lanchester, who is directing 
the current Great Lakes 
Shakespeare Company pro- 
duction of "Nicholas 
Nickleby" in Cleveland. 



had been scheduled to start, 
with Edward Albee's "A 
Delicate Balance." No direc- 
tor chosen for this production, 
either, but it won't be mounted 
until March 30. 

Fiscally, McCarter is in 
good shape. 

"We're scrambling much 
less," Mr. Jackson smiles, 
although he wants everyone to 
know the theatre will always 
need generous funding sup- 
port. 

Subscriptions are already at 
the 10,000 mark, compared to 
9,000 at this time last year and 
8,000 in 1980. With 16 or 17 per- 
formances for a 1,000-seat 
house, there is no need to add 
performances to accom- 
modate all the subscribers. 

Those exciting renovations 
won't be revealed in detail un- 
til later. "A major announce- 
ment later in the season." is 
the way Mr. Jackson puts it. 

But architects are at work. 

"We're planning a theatre 
that is comfortable to sit in, 
easy to breathe in, possible to 
hear in, more intimate. We're 
now in the blueprint stage, and 
the feasibility stage regarding 
funding." 

The choice of "a classic" As Artistic Director. Mr. 

has been made, and it will be Jackson is particularly 

Chekhov's "The Three delighted that he will have. 

Sisters". (It could have been once again, a "company 

either "Cyrano" or "Saint season" with familiar faces on 
Joan"). No director yet. 

The season will end where it continued on Next page 



Piano Instruction Program 

Designed to develop music appreciation, buHd 
performance skills and motivate through the 

rewards of music making. 

Program Includ** 

mwiir,)/ o/oup mwltr cttM IpreK I A H 

.y«er maga^ne levettt £ II 

I ii'i .'ii'yrnai rrunueclals" 

FoHTtai Spf'ifl Peci«i 

Scheduling begins Sept 8th 

For more information call 924-8873 

Wwrminsiet Oo« College GraduatoConservaicry Teacn-n^ £«ot- ^-^« 



The ALEXANDER TECHNIQUE 

Esther A. Seligmann 

Certified Teacher 

American Center for fhe Alexander Technique 

For information and scheduling of lessons. 

write or call 

59 Gordon Way. Princeton, N.J. 08540 / (609)921-1780 



CREATIVE 

THEATRE 

UNLIMITED 



Registration endsSept.20 
924-3489 



Join us for a season of spectacular entertainment. 

The kind that brings superlatives to your heart and mind. 

This is theatre the way it's supposed to be — 

magnificent, entertaining, inspiring — 

the kind that stays with you long after the final curtain . . 

Opening September 29 — 

A SEASON OF THEATRICAL MASTERPIECES! 



■~zEr 



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DOLLS & 

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Saturday, Sept. 11 

[Raindate, Sept. 12] 

10 am to 5 pm 

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(Route 27) 

Kingston 




Sponsored by the 
Kingston Business * Professional Association 




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THAT'S ONE PLAY ABSOLUTELY FREE! 



new 
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It's easy to order — 

call our new Subscription Office number today 

for your free brochure or 

charge your subscription 

► (609) 452-4242 



VISA, MASTERCARD & AMERICAN EXPRESS WELCOME 
ARTfR THfATRF COMPANf 91 UNl.tK '■ 



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Golden Mushroom 

ORIENTAL GROCERY 
and 
Chinas* Food Take-out at Lunch Time 

3S4 Nliuu SI Princeton 924-6653 



/fit**. #*<■, <5~«— »*-, dcwk. <&/. 4. 

, .. /tST •— \ 

"A LITTLE JEWEL ON THE DELAWARE" 

NY TIMES 



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NATURAL FOODS 

you'll taste the difference! 

• 

fresh salads 

daily lunch & dinner specials 

homemade desserts 

• 

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• 179 N»W|. Willi • IL1NIIIIN < 



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CURRENT CINEMA 

Titles and Times Subject to Change 

GARDEN THEATRE. 924-0263: Theatre I. Diner (R). Wed 
& Thurs. 1, 7:20. 9:30; Fri. & Sat. 1, 5:45. 7:45, 9:45; Sun. 
1:10. 3:15, 5:20. 7:25. 9:30; Mon-Thurs 1. 7:20. 9:30; 
Theatre II. Slar Wars (PGl. Wed & Thurs. 1, 7:20, 9:25: 
I Fri. & Sat. 1. 5:30, 7:45, 10. Sun. 1, 3:10, 5:20. 7:30. 9:40; 
Mon-Thurs 1,7:20, 9:30. 

PRINCE THEATRE. 452-2278: Theatre I, World According 
toGarp (R), Wed 4 Thurs 7, 9:35; may be replaced by Go- 
ing all the Way (R) Friday, call theatre; Theatre II. Road 
Warrior (R), Wed. & Thurs 7:30, 9:20; may be replaced 
Friday, call theatre; Theatre III, Zapped (R), Wed. & 
Thurs. 7:30. 9:20; Fri. 4 Sat 6:30, 8:20. 10:10; matinee Sat 
1. Sun 2.3:50,5:40,7:30.9:20; Mon -Thurs. 7:30, 9:20. 

MERCER MALL CINEMA. 452-2868: starting Friday. 
Cinema I, Porky's <R), daily 1:50. 3:50. 5:50, 7:50. 9:50; 
Cinema II, Rocky III (PGl. daily 1:50. 3:50. 5:50. 7:50. 9:50; 
Cinema III, Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (R). daily 
1:45,4:15,7,9:30. 

AMC QUAKERBRIDGE FOUR THEATRES. 799-9331: 
Theatre I. Fast Times at Ridgemont High (Rl; Theatre II. 
E-T (PG); Theatre III, Annie <PG); Theatre IV, The 
Soldier (R); call theatre for times. 

LAWRENCE ERIC THEATRES. 882-9494: Eric I, 
Beastmaster (PG). Wed & Thurs 1, 7:20, 9:30; Fri & Sat 
1. 5:45, 8:10, 10:15; call theatre (or Sunday times; 
Mon-Thurs 1, 7:20, 9:30; Eric II, An Officer and a 
Gentleman (R), Wed 4 Thurs. 1, 7:20, 9:35; Fri. 4 Sat. .1, 
5:30. 7:45, 10; Sun. 1, 3:10, 5:30. 7:30, 9:45; Mon-Thurs. 1, 
7:20,9:45. 




[ehmiiui fllnhonscs 

'CURRIES n SPICr 

Indian & International Cuisine 
Menu Changes Daily 

924-4575 

Reservations Accepted 
Ample Free Parking 

Closed Monday 

Major Credit Cards 

55 Mam Street 

Kingston 







£££ 



Taco Grande 



^ 



restdurante 



j2l 



y 



MONTGOMERY THEATRE. 924-7444: The Chosen. 
7:20. 9:20, with added early show Sunday at 5:20. 



daily 




EROTIC 
INDIAN 
CUISINE 



News of the Theatres "'" ie *£ ','^ ses ,i n r( S' ade f 

/ one through three in 

Contra irom Preced ing Page P n nceton and four through 

stage, and he thinks audiences six in CTU's Trenton studio, 
will like this, too. CTU will offer 12 classes, 

For example, the pivotal pre-kindergarten through 
role of the maid in "Blithe tenth grade, at the Princeton 
Spirit" will be played by studio. Classes are also given 
Penelope Reed, whom au- in Montgomery, East and 
diences responded to warmly West Windsor and Trenton. In 
last season. "It is luxury younger classes, students are 
casting, to be able to have encouraged to use their own 
her," Mr Jackson remarked, ideas and improvise their own 

This "company" feeling, is stories. In the upper level 
closer to what he had in his classes, they learn acting 
first two seasons, and had to techniques and all aspects of 
abandon because of the play production, with the em- 
specialized casting needs of phasis on the creative process, 
last year's musical. Registration in all classes is 

"But I don't want to imply limited. Deadline for registra- 
that McCarter won't do a tion is September 20. and 
musical again," he emphasiz- classes start September 28. 
ed. "I love them!" Detailed information is 

Scrambling much less for available from CTU at 
money, excited about in- 9 24-3489. 
novative productions, hoping 
that renovation will be feasi- 
ble, McCarter looks out into 
the new season. 

—Katharine H. Bretnall 



Offenna, the Tex Me x flavor of the 

southwest m a casual, relaxed atmosphere 

Reservations not necessary 

Bring your own wine or beer 

Open Mon-Thur until 9pm 

Friday A Saturday until 10 pm 

CALL 587 4552 FOR TAKE OUT 

University Plaza 

QUAKE»B«IDGL AMD FUXK HOaOS MfcttCEfMiLE 
(Near me Howard Savir^s Bank) 



GREAT WAU -J. jbfc 

CHINESE RESTAURANT *^* /7 A. 

Peking, Hunan & Szechuan Cuisine 

TAKE OUT SERVICE 

Banquet Menu ... Round table seating for 10-14 
people with special Chinese courses. 



Weekday Luncheon Special ... Only $2 99 in- 
cludes soup, rice, tea and main dish. 



Princeton Shopping Center 
921-7605 or 924-9643 



Open 7 Days 
11:30 a.m. • 10 p.m. 



Choose from our wide selection 

of Indian cooking prepared to 

viuir taste. ..mild, medium or hot. 



(201)249 6496 

908 Livingston Ave. 

North Bmnswicli 




7 nights a wMkl 

Choose Irom an ever changing vatiety ol tempting entrees 
Super Saver Dinner includes Choice ol Glass ol Wine Mug ol 
Beer or soda. Charley's Salad. French Bread, Choice ot Special 
Super Saver entree. Vegetable ol ihe Day, Chocolate Mousse 
Cottee or Tea 

Scaled-down prices An Inllatlorvtighling bonus lot out lun- 

tovlng Mends Fine lood Great service Generous cocktails 

Reservations suggested Not valid with $5 or $6-ott coupons 

•11 Extra for Queen Cul ol Juicy Prime Rib 

never a dun night for those who love life at 



CHARLEYS 
BROTHER 

S54 Ifonmerty 518 Spur) 

JUSt Off Rt J1 

MOT -IV 



L Just Oft 
H0C7W 



C HA RLEY'S 

OTHXR 
BROTHIR 

Route 537 (Just Off rt 206) 

Mount Hotty, n.j. 

f09-261-1S5S 



■ :■:•:-:-:•. ;-. ■HWMH 



MOTMBnBHBBH 



THAT'S MEl ON TAPE! 
In CreaUve Theatre Class. If 

you're seven years old or over, 
and you take a class with 
Creative Theatre, you'll be 
able lo see yourself on 
videotape, because teachers 
are going to tape works in pro- 
gress 

If you're older - in seventh 
to tenth grades - you may 
take a ten-week course called 
"Video Workshop" in which 
you'll write short scripts, 
make storyboards, run the 
camera, create the set, direct 
and act for tape. 

Creative Theatre Unlimited 
has two new faculty members 
this semester One is Veronica 
Brady, publicity manager for 
McCarter Theatre who pro- 
duced the theatre's 
Shakespeare Summer '82 
(remember "A Midsummer 
Night's Dream" out at the 
Battlefield'' ), and was Artistic 
Director and founder of 
NewStage at Theatre Intime. 
The other newcomer is 
Vanessa Crawford, former 
actor-dramatist with the 
South Carolina State Arts 
Commission who has been 
with the Living State Theatre 
Company in Washington, and 
on the staff of Mercer County 
Community College's summer 
theatre program. Tomato 
Patch 

Ms Brady will run an acting 
lab. for grades eight through 
ten at CTU's Princeton studio 
(33 Mercer) and Ms Crawford 



THE SEARCH FOR 
TRULY FINE 

BANQUET DINING 
ENDS HERE: 




Princeton 



. tr^m^ liCOn " Pr " 1Ce r° n - We can make >" our nex < banquet affair 
a tremendous success. From start to finish 

withvr,,?'!^ ,H d ° Ur mW* manager wi " a™^ to meel 
™ Jl ,h ?? her i: WC "u he 'P cus '°™e your affair and work 
SLh. I f ' V F T th f b,g S«' lo the small "t- And with a 
■fever 1 \ proS.^ * '° 25 ° ^ ^ enough ™° m is 

,v pi!;,!! y T re loo ^ ing [ or banquet dining wiih su P erb food. 

excellent ^emce and sophisticated ambience, your search is 
over For further information call us today! 

Scanticon-Princeton 

Executive Conference Center and Hotel 
(609?4K-7800 $,al Cemer ' Prince,OT - New J ? rs ey 08540 



© 



tV**V-A43 > i! L vv\S.\3Gv^W^^ 



Alldree Estey fund-raising from its board of 



Continued from Page IB 

companies seem to overlap 
and there is often confusion 
about which company is what, 
but this is the way they are to- 
day: 

The Princeton Regional 
Ballet that Audree formed is 
no longer called that. It is now 
Princeton Ballet II. It is a non- 
professional company of about 
40 students, drawing its 
dancers from the Ballet Socie- 
ty and other dance schools 
within a 50-mile radius of 
Princeton. 

The Princeton Ballet Com- 
pany, founded five years ago, 
is a professional company of 
about a dozen dancers, 
rehearsing in the New 
Brunswick studio. Dancers 
have a 20-week contract, open- 
ended for a possible 30 weeks. 
The company was started with 
a $135,000 18-month CETA 
grant, and is sustained now by 



directors. 



Chances for Talented Kids. 

"We started the Regional 
Ballet because talented kids 
needed more chances to per- 
form. If you want to go on, pro- 
fessionally, you've got to get 
up on that stage and PRO- 
DUCE. Otherwise, you just go 
on taking classes forever, and 
that's not good." 

Since 1971, the Regional 
Ballet has been designated an 
"Honor" company be the 
Northeast Regional Ballet 
Association. Even before the 
ballet became the professional 
Princeton Ballet Company, it 
received the "Major" 
designation by the Associa- 
tion. There are only seven 
"Major" companies in the 
country. 

"Every year we auditioned, 
we were chosen for the 
Association's 'Gala'," Audree 
says proudly. 



MEXICAN 
VILLAGE II 

Superb Mexican Cuisine 

42 Leigh Ave. 
Princeton 

(1 block from Wirherspoon) 

BYOB 




Reservations 

609-924-5143 

Luncheon SC Dinner 
Tuesday thru Sunday 



NORTH CHINA RESTAURANT 

36 Wftherspoon St, Princeton 



Delicious 
Mandarin 
Dishes 




Open Mon -Thurs 1 1 30-3; 5-1 
Friday and Sat. 11:30-3; 5-11 

Sunday 1 30- 10:00 



924-5640 
Carry Putt Catering 



(jf^W Music Every 
^£j^ Night At 

MGoodTime 
JL Charleys 

40 Main St., Kingston. New Jersey 
(2 miles north ot Princeton) 



TUESDAY WEDNESDAY 



J& J 

Dance Party 

with 

John & 

Jamie DJ's 



THURSDAY FRI & SAT 



LINDA LEE 
and Co. 



BRICKS 
MORTAR 
Rock-Roll 



PYGMY 



LAMPLIGHTERS 

18 pieces 

Big Band 

Sounds 



J & J 

Dance Party 

with 

John & 

Jamie DJ's 



DOWNSTAIRS LOUNGE 




&ROLL 

with 

Sept. 10 & 11 

KICKS 

proper dress required 



CHARLEYS BROTHER 

Route 654 (formerly 518 Spur) just off Rl. 31 . 

Hopewell. N.J. 609-466-01 10 



Then, there is Cranbury. 

"The Old School in Cran- 
bury was about to be razed, 
and a group of citizens ap- 
proached us, and asked us if 
we'd like to give classes there. 
We took it to our board, and 
they agreed. We've done very 
weLl there. 

"In New Brunswick, they're 
re-building the whole town. 
Well, I went there, two or 
three years ago. and looked 
around. Then 'New Brunswick 
Tomorrow' was interested, 
and we talked with them. 
Well, in 20 minutes we decid- 
ed! It was a place with 5,000 
square feet! 

"'How much will it cost to do 
it over?' we asked, and they 
said $25,000. 

"We didn't have the money. 
But New Brunswick Tomor- 
row — that's the 'idea' arm — 
and DEVCO, the New 
Brunswick Development Com- 
pany that actually does the 
work, did it for us. 

"We have the whole second 
floor on Church Street, and 
about 250 students, and we ex- 
pect expansion. And that old 
theatre, now the New 
Brunswick State Theatre, is 
where our professional com- 
pany rehearses" 

1.000 Students Enrolled. The 

Society now has about 1,000 
students, in all sizes, ages and 
degrees of expertise. 

Throughout the growing 
years of the Estey ballet 
enterprises, Bud has been 
backbone. As an English 
teacher specializing in drama, 
he brought to the Society a 
valuable backstage ex- 
perience and outlook, Audree 
points out. Occasionally, he 
has appeared onstage in a pro- 
duction of "The Nutcracker." 

The Esteys have two 
children. Larry is minister at 
the Episcopal Church of the 
Redeemer in Baltimore and 
father of 13-year-old grand- 
daughter Sarah, who studied 
dancing with the Society last 
summer in Princeton. 
Daughter Carol is understudy 
with the national tour of 
"Peter Pan," stand-in for 
Peter himself. 

So it's hard to imagine 
Audree Estey in retirement. 
The Esteys chose Sarasota 
because it has a lively theatre 
and concert life, and Audree 
thinks she might do some 
guest teaching. 



One evening at a Sarasota 
concert, Bud was idly scan- 
ning the names of donors on a 
program and saw the name 
"Mrs. Lewis Webster Jones." 

"We wondered — could that 
be OUR Barbara Jones? Her 
husband had been president of 
Rutgers, you know, and she 
had been on our board. So we 
called her up — and it was our 
Mrs. Jones! That's what we 
like about Sarasota. And we 
have our little boat, and we go 
boating.... 

"It's been a wonderful life! 
It's just so wonderful to see all 
the kids grow, and to know 
that the Society is in the hands 
of caring people who will go 
ahead. Judy has been with us 
14 years — she even met her 
husband in our classes — and 
it's wonderful to know she's 
there, as director. 

"It's a family, you 

know " 

-Katharine H. Bretnall 




NOT FAST FOOD 
~ SERVICE! 

lilt? *hai *•■..■■ been 
doing all these yean 
That's why we're to 
good at it 

Joyce — 16 yean 
Ruby — IS years 
Hilda — 9 years 
Alio? — 16 years 
Willy — 2 yean 
, Tony — 8 years 

, That's "9 staff yean of 
service So your order will 
■h you in minutes' 



Pancake House i 



154 Nassau Street Princeton. S] 9 2 -* - 1 S S 3 




THE TERRACE 

Where the Best of Two Worlds Meet 



from she West 



, . r Dinner 

from the East 

Tempura *tf jj. $8 .95 Francais Chicken $7 95 Shrimp $8.95 

Assorted tempura of shrimp and Dipped m a light egg batter and sauteed 
light dipping Wlt h a touch of lemon and chabliv 

$7 95 Seafood Strudel $8.95 

Assorted seafood in cream sauce encased 
Kakiage 6* ? ff> $8.95 m Dufl pastry shell 

A variation of tempura made with julienne Spinach Salad $5 95 

cut onions, shrimp and carrots, etc Fresh spinach topped with bacon, eggs. 

$7 95 mushroom, chic peas, cheese and 



vegetables, served with 

sauce. 

Uegefonan Assortment 



Vegetarian Assortment 



Chicken Teriyaki j?^{5L*Jrj. $8.95 

Juicy boneless chicken char broiled and 
served with tenyaki sauce 

Negimaki ^V $8.°S 

Thinly sliced beefsteak rolled with 
scallions, broiled and served with teriyaki 



sprouts 



>pped 



Sushi J^ $895 

Flavored nee topped with raw tuna, 
■poached shrimp, eggs, etc Served tepid in 
an aesthetic arrangment. 

Maki-sushi ^ V* ? $7 95 

Rolled sushi with a sea leal filled with a 
mosaic of colorful ingredients such as 
crabmeat, cooked luna. greens and eggs 

Th* tfiov* MiacOo/ts are "- 
Jiptntso cmnchy tip wr; 



) loop, rfce antf 



/egetanan Delight 

Melted Swiss over a mound 


$5.95 

ol lightly 


sauteed vegetables 






rfte aoo.e ittocuona •/• served with 


MM 


•«0 DrM 


Desserts 






Cheesecake 

oul famoua velvety smooth 

Carrot Cake 

DtlHou* with emm cheeae Idng 




»1 50 
Sl.M 


Chocolate Mousse 

served with ■ pirouette cookie 

Pecan Pie 

Baked wllh the purr Ingredients 

"French Fried Ice Cream" 

Not fried al all lo* cream of your 


tl.SO 
SI. SO 
Sl.M 


Strbr, Choc., or Butter Almond) < 


>Ued In a crunchy 


coating and hot fudge with a sprinkle 


ol amort. 


F.F.I. Flambe 

above In flaming rum 




SS.7S 



Hours 

Lunch: Monday - Saturday 11:30 • 5:30, Dinner; Thursday and Friday 5:30 9:30 
Our Specialty: At The Marketplace, Routes 27 and 518 Taki Out 

Catering (201)821-8822 Service Available 




Fresh Local Produce Daily 

Very Sweet Jersey Melon* Red Raspberries 

Silver Queen White Corn«N.J. Tomatoes 

White Eggplant and more. 

Fresh Cut Flower Specials 

every day! Beautiful flowers from around the world 




Poppy Seed Cake 
Lemon Cake 



The Home of 
Natural Grain Breads 



6 ft. Runner's Crossword Puzzle 

and 

Gourmet Cook's Crossword Puzzle 

— Eraseable Posters — 



Homemade Rugelach 



Quiche • Brownies • Sandwiches • Salads 

Yummy Desserts • Interesting Gifts • Beautiful Flowers 

Newspapers • Magazines • Fresh Roasted Peanuts 



coxs 




180 Nassau Street • Princeton 



Hours: Mon.-Thurs. & Sat. 6:45am - 7pm; Friday 6:45am - 8pm; Sunday 6:45am • 2pm 




pearance; and Eden and niversary ol his successful program, parents may enrol) 



Tamir, duo-pianists. publishing venture and his 

"Chamber Masterworks" life-long dream to conduct the 

(Series II) will see the return Mahler 2nd Symphony 

of the Beaux Arts Trio, the 

Emerson Quartet with Walter 

Trampler, violist, the 

Gramercy Ensemble with Jan 

de Gaetani. soprano, and the 

MuirString Quartet. 
All concerts will be held on 



KINDERMUSIK OFFERED 
At Choir College. Kin- 
dermusik, a music program 
for pre school and kin- 
dergarten children developed musical marionettes 
in West Germany, will be part 



for a semester at a time 
Semesters are sequential, 
each being a pre-requisite for 
the next Ms Herrington has 
created Marjorie's Music for 
Children, incorporating Orff. 
Dalcroze and Eurthmy em- 
phasis on creative movement, 
and she has also created 



ft SUBSCRIPTIONS READY 

* For Concert Series. The 88th 

► season of the Princeton Monday evenings at 8 p m 

a University Concerts will again Subscriptions are available of the curriculum of the IF you like town topics, iwmm 
u, present two series of four until September 30 at the Westminster Choir College woy toihow your appreciation is to 
g concerts each in McCarler University Concert Office in Conservatory Division this ">«<nw>iiio<nir»,jvems«rs 

3 Theatre Woolworth Center, Princeton 'all Conservatory classes 

. Subscriptions are available University, 08544 or by calling begin September 16 , 

3 until Monday, September 30, 452-4239 Kindermusik has children 

* and the remaining seats will listening and moving to music 

gbe allocated on a first-come to learn coordination, con- 

U first-served basis The sub TO PERFORM MAHLER centration, body rhythm and 
inscription rates are kept at a Under Publisher's Baton, the fact that music is a part of 
|minimum, with large The 200-voice Westminster life The program also teaches 
a. discounts to students, and they Symphonic Choir, Joseph the basics of music notation, 
goffer savings over single Flummerfelt, conductor, will vocal production and in- 
gticket prices have a busy season singing strumental ensemble, 

o with the American Symphony The classes in Kindermusik 

z "Virtuosi in Recital," Orchestra, the Philadelphia at Westminster Choir College 
j formerly Series I. will offer a Orchestra, the New York will be held in the college's 
Ovariery of soloists, including Philharmonic, the Atlanta newly expanded conservatory 

Bella Davidovich. the Russian Symphony, the New Jersey facilities and also in the 
pianist in a return Symphony, and the Los Cranbury School extension 
engagement, Claude Grank, Angeles Philharmonic facility Kindermusik will be 

The first performance of the taught by Hilary M Rosen- 
year is, perhaps, the most blum, a New England Con- 
unique in the 48-year history of servatory-trained musician 
the Choir's collaboration with w ith experience with children 
major orchestras The Choir and class programs 
will be a part of a per- For more information call 
formance of Mahler's Sym- the conservatory at 924-7104 
phony No. 2 (the Resurrec- 
tion) with the American 
Symphony Orchestra con- 
ducted by Gilbert Kap;an for 
an invitation-only audience in 
Avery Fisher Hall this 
Jtandy iweaMuj Thursday 

Mr. Kaplan is the 41-year 
old founder, president, and 
editor-in-chief of Institutional 
Investor, a financial 
magazine. The performance 
will celebrate the 1 5th an- 




beckandcau 

the ossistonte group of princeton 

call (609) 924-7651 



9f Town Shop 



«7 Palmer Souar* 

924-3687 

Fine Gifts 



CONSERVATORY 1 



pianist with the Solisti New 
York, a chamber orchestra 
under the direction of Ransom 
Wilson; Jorge Bolel, a pianist 
in his first Princeton ap- 




WMJMM 



Creative 
'Piano Lessons 



MA, Ed M 
Columbia Umverjitu 

PRINCETON STUDIO 

924-9497 



Beginning Second Decade 
Smash Season 

OKLAHOMA 

Nov. 14, 1982 at 5 p.m. 

CARMEN 

May 1, 1983 at 5 p.m. 
War Memorial Auditorium 

$8, $12. $16, $20 

Single perf. tickets also available 

$5, $7.50, $10, $12.50 

TRENTON CIVIC OPERA CO. 

2685 Princeton Pike 
Trenton, N J 08646 
Phone 609-392-2433 



CLASSES OFFERED 
In Music For Young 
Children. Marjorie B. 

Herrington will offer musical 
instruction for young children 
in Princeton and in Rocky Hill 
this fall. 

Classes will be held at the 
Arts Center, 102 Witherspoon 
Street, Mondays at 10:30, 2:30 
and 3:30 and at the Rocky Hill 
Community House on 
Tuesdays at 2:30. Registration 
is at the first class this 
Monday, and the first 
semester will end by January. 
Second semester registration 
starts the week of January 10. 

Children play soprano 
glockenspiels, xylophones, 
metallophones and simple 
percussion instruments to 
create an instrumental en- 
semble There is also lots of 
singing, movement, dance, 
games, clapping, walking, 
running and skipping and play 
acting to help give children a 
feeling of the music, Ear 
training and listening exer- 
cises are also stressed. 

Although the program is a 
four semester, two-year 



Special Music Classes 

for Children and Adults 

Instruction In 

Piano 

Organ 

Voice 

and most instruments. 

All ages and stages of development 

For a catalog and registration information contact . . 

THE WESTMINSTER CONSERVATORY DIVISION 

Hamilton Avenue at Walnut Lane 
Princeton, New Jersey 08540 
(609) 921-7104 & 924-6359 

FALL TERM begins SEPT- 16th 



PRINCETON UNIVERSITY -1982-83 



iTtWIK 



I. Virtuosi in Recital 
II. Chamber Masterworks 



atMcCarter 



Tuition TcM-ln T^iLSic covers 



fta» 



ju JoSlf 



^T^ KnimbwiKr 



MUSICA ALTA 

\w$it'Lor\s -for 

•Siyr, for sotevxt wi cn^mbL- (ix-vthb uur) 

r LmjCTS jj- zirlu ulstrumcnU 

•rltyin of rnoiVn mtrumvti i^» ua i, t, [^n, te plju . ^ 

<*rkj Wtruwnr (VtoU^ 1im b a ..r^orJ, rAn J ^^ 

"^lUitioos $yt, 7-16 
Syn-up sb«k At Vooluortl, Cwfc, 2ni )LMr 
for information call (609) 452-4241 



■ioX» I 



I. Virtuosi in Recital II. Chamber Masterworks 



1 Eden & Tamir, Duo-fwintsts 

Th. iv.irlj s top duo- pun. i tvam in .1 
pr.igr.im ol Kr,.hm. fch hmanin..tt 
IVhu-v ..ndS.ra.mskv 

Monday, October 18, 1982 

2 Bella Davidovich, Pumo and 
Dimitry Siikovctsky, Violin 

Mm,- DJiidovkh in ., rvturn unftMenwiil. 
this iime m .. sonata rvrninit, h Hh h.'i son 
th.' brillunl Russian violmiM 
Monday, January 10, 1983 

3 Claude Frank, Pianist with 
Solisti New York, Ransom 
Wilson, Conductor 

I Ml CKARLFS 5 KOBissii\ mi VK'KIAI I'ON 
A mperb -.mall orchestra -nth Ihc 
international I) iccliimcd pi*nn soluist 
Monday, January 24, 1983 

•1 Jorge Bolet, Pianist 

THF PADEKEWSKI FOUNDATION CONCER1 
A dtuRng mum ,.i the pUno in hit First 

Monday, March 21, 1983 



1 The Beaux Arts Trio 

Th,' lam.. us i,„, rv.urns to ,h,. I'r 



Monday, October 11 1982 

2 Emerson String Quartet with 
Walter Trampler, Viola 

One .il thi' t.ip Amitu.in o,uarkls >«Hh Ihtf 
pr^n.nr virtuoso.. I thv viola 

Monday, November 1, 1982 

3. The Gramercy Ensemble with 
Jan DeGaetani, MezzA-soprano 

Thi' U autilul sound ol strings n ood» inds 
Jnd vuKV in a program nl Brahms Dvorak 
Sihum.'nn. .ind B.mok 

Monday, April 4, 1983 
4 Muir String Quartet 

Winner ol iho 11H1 \aumhur£ Auard. t\e 
-<fi pn.ud io intiuducv this Firw ensvmWe to 
our Mdkncvs 

Monday, May 9, 1983 



Day pti,.n,' _ 



Total amount enclosed $_ 



_ New subscriber. 





Regular 


Non-trnun>d (acuity 
Pnncrton *U(f 
<bi-<»c*kly) 


Student 




Same seats 
Prefer 


1, Virtuosi 
in ReciUl 


Msltl *■ $J7 
l«U ft. J12 


wait .., ijj 
xat» ... J27 


_ «« 


• 417 

• SI* 


II Chamber 
Masterworks 


*r*r» ... SJ5 


KMi - 130 

wan ■■ (2<. 


S«-it, Lit li.tmrr 
.ut-vnbrrs nill 
h) held nil 


Both Series 

<dis<T)Untr 


•can o. $« 

vii. ■ JS7 


■Mil SS- 


«Mb 

srar* 


■ SJ7 

i $27 


ataibblr till 
Seplrmbcr X>h 



Hll-addreunJrnxlope hi ( 
TMtta mailed in Sep««mt>ri 



Pruiteton UnorrniTty Concrrtj KU.I.hr.k t 



Inlormalion: Concert Office. Woolworth Center 
'609, 152-4239. weekdays 






Music in Princeton 

Coollnueo from PrecwJIno Page 

FIDDLER TO PLAY 
For Folk Society. Johnny 
Cunningham, fiddler in the 
Scottish and Irish tradition 
will play this Friday at 8 in the 
YWCA. Paul Robeson Place, 
under the auspices of the 
Princeton Folk Music Society 
Admission is $4 for adults 
$3.50 for students. $3 for 
members of the society. 

A fiddler from the age of 
seven, Cunningham is a foun- 
ding member of "Silly 
Wizard," the Scottish tradi- 
tional folk group He has per- 
formed widely in Great Bri- 
tain, Canada, Europe and the 
United States. 



vited to audition - there is no women, and his "Tegenstell- 
fee required for orchestra ing (Order and Chaos)" is a 
members Information can be dance for seven men inspired 
obtained by calling (212) 581- by an Escher print. 
59: j? Dancers will be Janell 

Since 1963 the Youth Byrne. Ira Demery, Mark 
Symphony Orchestra has Brown, Susan Guerrera- 
brought together the most Hanna, Ellen Inkellis Mac- 
gifted young musicians from Donald, Steve Myers Ron 
the metropolitan New York Brooks. Kraig Patterson 
ai 63 «» M ,V SiC u Director David Laurie Zornermaand and 
Alan Miller has promised an Gerry Yost. Music is in charge 
amoitious season, which will f Ira Demery, Nancy Wilson 
include three Carnegie Hall and George Bassett Michael 
concerts, "community" Byrne has designed the 
concerts in the Bronx, lighting 

Brooklyn, and Queens, and a _J 

new chamber music program. 



AT CROSSROADS 

Fn New Brunswick. Six 

SINGERS INVITED plays have been chosen for the 

To Sing in County Group, coming season by Crossroads. 

The Mercer County Chorale the black professional theatre 

will welcome new members at i n New Brunswick, and the 

VIOLINISTS soi ipht ? e War Memonal Building. sea son will open this Friday. 

R „ «.„. '""juuiii Trenton, on Monday evenings, The theatre is at i?n Memorial 

Co"egu a m ber rsc C um T „ e f fff * ^ V "J* ^ ■KSS 
Princeton has opening in Us n ^ "IT, lnfo ™ atlo , n ' be made and subscription in- 
„^,;„„_ J .,.r.T. emns ts call Wes Melvin, Chorale formation obtained by calling 

Manager, at 771-0416. 201-249-5560. 

"Meetings," a comedy by 

lyetVS OJ the iheatres Mustapha Matura will be the 

„ , „ nnenino nmrinplinn ^ol in piui. 

Connnueo from Page 5 B 



violin and viola sections. 

The Collegium is a small 
chamber orchestra which 
performs regularly in the 
Trinity-All Saints' concert 
series and gives guest per- 
formances in the surrounding 
area. 

For further information call 
921-8732 or 921-2478. 



ROMANTIC COMPOSERS 
In Rider College Course. 



opening production. Set in con- 

temporary Trinidad, 

DANCF' "Meetings" is about a middle- 

r„ uri„„.r r... class couple in an island 

gr^ A^h^rS g^/ ^ ■** *™<* 

scenery, a dance inspired by a _ 

tennis party in the 1920s and a .. st of , h Bh d pj „ 

?he C pVo g r r S aTwre n n W ^e d n <™ " ' f^ ^ 
"Romance 6=3^3 SSST by" '5S&- ™S£, Sffi f^ 
Their Music," a non-credit choreographers is presented 0ctober 22 t0 November 21. 
course ,n Rider Colleges TftS Acting StudT 185 ™»P Hayes Dean is the 
School for Continuing Studies, Nassau playwright, 

will be offered this fall at the "Mixed Doubles" will be "Raisin," a musical based 
Lawrence Township institu- played Thursday Friday and on** stage play, "A Raisin in 
don Saturday, September 23 24 theSun - will open December 

Di\ Carl Schwartz, and 25 at 8 p m 
associate professor of music. Choreographers are Geulah 
has designed the course with a Abrahams, Mary Pat Robert- 
focus on Chopin, Liszt, son and John Watson Stewart 

Mendelssohn and 

Tschaikowsky. Classes will Ms. Abrahams has 
meet Tuesdays from 130 to choreographed a duet with 

3:30 between September 28 stage set, to a percussion •■""•"»»«'«"'"■■» V . 

and October 26 The fee is $45. score by John Cagfand Lou Lo " a "!% 1 Han s°erry - she 

Harrison. It's called "Double wr ° t f, Raisln ™ * e Sun ~ 

Music." She will also present "■"* prese "f i Jan " a 7 '? 

"Currents " danpoH tV> p., to February 13 to mark Black 

AUDITIONS PLANNED currents, danced to Per- .„...^ 

For New York Youth sian drumming, a Varese flute 

Symphony. In preparation for s ° l0 . , an . d mus,c ^ . Peter 

its 20th Carnegie Hall season, ^"J?^"^^ P ' an °. . 

the Youth Symphony " Doubles, a quintet. 

Orchestra of New York will fl a ' ennls P ar( y in 

hold auditions on September Fra?<* m . the 20 *' where ten 



...11 open _- 
10 and will play through 
January 2. Crossroads is bill- 
ing it as a holiday event for the 
whole family. 

"To Be Young, Gifted and 
Black," a collage of the life 
and works of black playwright 



hold auditions on September ^ance in the '^, where ten- crossroads' stage from 

1519 to choose iK 1QB901 nis isn't the only game being i," K ™ ,. ? „ ' T. 

nrrh« r» 2 ' 83 Played. Music is by French Je"™ 1 ? 25 through March 



History Month. The adapta 
tion is by Robert Nemiroff. 

"The Blood Knot," by Athol 
Fugard. is set in South Africa, 
and has played in Africa, Lon- 
don and New York. It will be 
Crossroads' stage from 



orchestra. i" a j^. »"^'v u» uy c 

Auditions will be held in com P° sers of the period 
Manhattan, Long Island, New „ „. — ~ _ „ 
Jersey, and Westchester, by Mr - 
appointment only 



Cheap' 



appointment only ~'"=">f •"=> "»"• uiaiugue 

Experienced players between and dance Hls " Six Pack " is a 
the ages of 12 and 22 are in- set of three duets aooul 



HAIR & SKIN Cf.R€... 



PRODUCTS 

NATUrie AND 6ARTH UNIT6D UUITH SCI€NC€ 

• flSSUR€ • TH6RAPP6 • 6X/OIL • 6NSUR6 

• HUM€CTR€SS • K6flflpHIX • RLO6/RI0 

• HRIR SPRRV • 8IOTIN CR6M6 • SIOTIN 
SHAMPOO • HRIR fOOD SUPPL6M6NT 

• V€U/€T • R€NRISSRNC€ FACIAL MRSOU€ 

• FIAMAPIC-Xj MRSOU€ • SUBDUC- MASQUC- 

• SUP€RIOR PROTC-IN • MRXI 8 • ROTRNOIL 
• VITRMIN C • 6PITOM6 



LATEST IN COIFFURE FASHIONS 



PERSONALIZEO WIG 
CONSULTATION ROOMS 

Precision haircuts 

Permanent waves 

Haircolormg 

Manicures 

Pedicures 

Facials 



"The Trials and Tribula- 
i«'toth dialogue ^f of ,S|fggerlee Booker r 
a Hic»civD«i,"l, Brown," by Don Evans, will 
have its world premiere at 
Crossroads and will bring the 
season to a close with perfor- 
mances April 8 to May 8. Mr. 
Evans' works have been per- 
formed frequently by 
Crossroads. 

The theatre plays 
Wednesdays through Sundays, 
with matinees Saturdays and 
Sundays and previews the 
first Wednesday and first 
Thursday with opening night 
the first Friday. 




JLa rfo&e Coiffu 



Owner: Jolie Vardanega 
924-3983 69 Palmar Square Watt 



THE AMERICANS 

Not Shakespeare. The New 
Jersey Shakespeare Festival 
has assigned the month of Oc- 
tober to a pair of American 
playwrights : Thornton Wilder 
and Tennessee Williams, with 
a symposium to tie them 
together. 

"Our Town", Wilder's 
classic, will be given from Oc- 
tober 1 through 17 on Tuesdays 
through Sundays under the 
direction of Paul Barry. 

"Cat on a Hot Tin Roof," 
from Tennessee Williams, will 



ARTS & CRAFTS 
9th FESTIVAL 82 

CHESTER, NJ 

On Main Street (Roule 24) 

Jusl East of Roule 206 

OVER 200 ARTISTS 

S CRAFTSMEN 

WILL DISPLAY 

I DEMONSTRATE 

THEIR SKILLS 

10AM TO 5 P M 

SATURDAY & SUNDAY 

SEPT. 11 &12 

Ram Date Sam IB A 19 



be presented October 19 
through 31. Tuesdays through 
Sundays Mr Barry is again 
directing. 

On Sunday, October 10 at 4, 
Festival actors will join Janet 
F. Fishburn in "Our Town: 
Changing Social Mores in 
Everytown, U.S.A." 

Reservations may be made 
by calling 201-377^1487. 

SOMETHING old or new to MM' Try o 
TOWN TOPICS classing Call m 2300 
today 





^Pffin'c FORMAL WEAR 
J. 1UU O AND TAILORING 

Prom, Wedding, Cruise, Dinner Wear 

Don't Buy a New Suit ... 

Let Pino remodel your old one! 

Tailoring • Alterations • Dry Cleaning 
Custom-made Clothing • Monogramming 

YES! We are the professionals. 



30% OFF ALL 
I "" DRY CLEANING 

'-'' I VAU0THR0UGH SEPTEMBER«R0CKY HILt STORE ONLY 



The Village Shopper*Route 206»Rocky Hill, NJ 
(609) 924-6277 




1141 Hamilton Ave., Trenton 
(609)392-2188 



Yardley Shopping Center 
<215M93-1452 



SHH 



I NURSERY STOCK 
SALE 

SAVE UP TO 50% 
ON MANY ITEMS 




10-6-4 
50% ORGANIC 

2 for 

'8.99 each 

Each bag covers 5,000 sq. ft 



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QANIC I 

M7 



*V 



MIX 'N MATCH PLANTS o o 

— : -i "*>^ 



AZALEAS'HOLLY»JUNIPER»MORE 



3 for *1 2 00 ('4.49 ea.) 



^ 




1 /2 BARREL 
PLANTERS 

'10.99 each 

2 for $ 20 




HARDY 

MUMS 

'2.99 each 

4 for MO 

IN BLOOM 



* BUY IN BULK AND SAVE • 
Topsoil • Stone • Mulch ^-" 



SUMMERTIME 



BY FINKEl 




48" Table 

4 cushion chairs 

Reg. "705 

«449 



-•',;%, 




GENUINE REDWOOD 
4 pc. SEATING GROUP 

Includes cushions — choice ot colors 
Regular »242 I 39 unasser. 



CARKHUFF'S GARDEN CENTER 

Rt. 1. So. Brunswick (Opp. Flagpost Inn) (201) 297-2626 
Grecnbrook (Across from Arthurs) (201) 968-3096 



Open 7 Days a Week 

Not Responsible for Typographical Errors 



£-z :•• 



Lamp Shad •% 
Cu»tom-mada Lamp* 

NASSAU INTERIORS 




Academy and Colorado Col nm r""°" "««« »«»«»»««»«"««'« »«»« 



THE slo« for 

hn*us*d clothing 

sine* 1944 



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Carved Oak Servers 


- 


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o 


Oak Chairs 


a. 


1800s Blanket Chest 


t- 


45 Main St. 


* 


Kingston. NJ 


K 


924-6266 




Tues-Sat 11-5 



We have the finest 

COFFEE 

BEANS 

from all over 
the world 

Sumatra 

Kenya 

Brazil 

plus ten more 

and our well known 
Swiss decaffeinated 



ENGAGEMENTS 
McCabe - Grey. Sheila S 
McCabe, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Edward J. McCabe Jr. of 
Herrontown Road, to Henry N. 
Grey, son of Mr. and Mrs 
Schuyler E Grey Jr. of 
Denver. Col The wedding is 
planned for December 18. 

Miss McCabe is an alumna 
of Stuart Country Day School 
and expects to receive her 
bachelor of arts degree from 
Denver University in March 
Her fiance, who is with the 
Northwestern Mutual Life 
Insurance Company in 
Denver, was graduated from 
the University of Colorado. 



Mill' i i. rum Barbara 

Miller, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs Robert R Miller of 
Titusville, to Augustine J. 
Gentilucci, son of Mr and 
Mrs Joseph A Gentilucci of 
Aiken, S.C. 

Miss Miller is a graduate of 
Hopewell Valley Central High 



School and is employed by 
Centennial Savings and Loan 
in Pennington Her fiance, a 
graduate of Lafayette College 
with a B.S. degree in chemical 
engineering, is an engineer for 
Mobil Research & Develop- 
ment Corp in Pennington. 
A May wedding is planned 



WEDDINGS 

Peters-Campbell. Elizabeth 
M Campbell, daughter of Mr 
and Mrs. Hugh D. Campbell of 
Waitsfield, Vt, to Eric L. 
Peters, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Landon Peters of Knoll Drive 
and Edgartown, Mass ; 
August 21 in the Federated 
Church, Edgartown, the Rev 
John Schule officiating 

The bride teaches English in 
the Middle School of the Col- 
orado Academy in Denver, 
Col She was graduated from 
Concord Academy and Mid- 
dlebury College. 

Mr. Peters, an alumnus of 
the Governor Dummer 



lege in Colorado Springs, ex- J 
peels to receive a law degree 
in May from the University of 
Denver College of Law 

The couple will live ;n 
Denver, Col. 

Welch-Sattler. Cynthia M. 
Saltier, daugher of Mr. and J 
Mrs Peter Sattler of 96 
Princeton-Hightstown Road. 
Princeton Junction, to Brian o 
J Welch, son of Mr and Mrs 
Fredrick Welch of Mahopac, 
NY.; August 21 in St Paul ^ 
Church, the Rev Douglas Her- ^ 
mansen offiating 

Mrs. Welch is a student at 
Mercer County College and is 
employed by East Island 
Management Corp in White ; 
Plains, N.Y Her husband, a 
graduate of Westchester Com- 
munity College who is current- 
ly attending Pace University, 
is employed by Pepsico Inc. 

The couple is living in 
Mahopac after a wedding trip 
to St Thomas. 



Our 

Fabulous 

Fall Line 

of 
Jewelry 

has 

Arrived! 

EARRINGS 
NECKLACES 
BRACELETS 
BELTS 





173 Nassau St. 
921-0554 



m »t) 5«8»tnm»»88»»8 Ti wmv m rmpnrtj 




a 55a u ^/nterior5 

SUMMER 

FURNITURE 

SALE 

Savings to 50% 



20% Reductions on all 
Special Orders 



Due lo the nature ol this sale, all transactions are final, sola as is, ana a modest delivery 
charge will be required on all Items reduced more than 20% 

VISA AND MASTERCARD ARE WELCOME 



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eriord 



1 1 4 Nossou Street $ LANDAU 
Princeton. N.J. %hwceton.kj. 



924-3494 
Mon.-Sat. 9:30-5 



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924-2561 



Princeton, N.J. 



Functional and beautiful woolens from around the world. 




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INTERIORS 



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txt. of Carter 8d — Just 4 Miles from Princeton 



Mrs. Kenneth R. Mischner 



Visit The Dandeline Shop 
on 

CRANBURY DAY 

Saturday. Sept. 11 



£fV 



Weddings 

Continued from Preceding Page 

Mandell-Ragany. Jean 
Ragany, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs John Ragany of Old 
Road, to Martin J. Mandell, 



PRINCETON 
CLOTHING CO. 




Shirts by 

Arrow • Van Heusen 

17 Wit her spoon Si. 

924-0704 

U.ni ,.„ , „ ■■ , li 



son of Mr. and Mrs. Allen 
Mandell Sr. of North Bergen; 
September 4 in Saint 
Ladislaus Church, New 
Brunswick, the Rev. Julian 
Fuzer officiating. 

The bride is a graduate of 
South Brunswick High School 
and Rutgers College where 
she earned her B.A. She is 
assistant credit manager with 
Tubesales of Cranbury. Her 
husband, a graduate of North 
Bergen High School, is a 
fireman with the Town of 
North Bergen. 

After a wedding trip to Can- 
cun, they will live in Kendall 
Park. 

Mischner-Elden. Jennifer L. 

Elden, daughter of Mr. and 



n 



Kate M Gaydos A SID 

Interior D«signer Art Consulranr 



Complete Decorating Services 
Residential • Commercial 



By appointment 
737-1010 




At Chelsea Crimpers we finger-paint 
for soft, sunny highlights brush paint 
for gentle, golden sunlights ... & foil 
wrap for total sunshiny dimensions. 
Ask us about our wizardly tricks to 
make your hair shine like the sun Call 
us today: 924-1824. 

Distinctive personal service in a friend- 
ly atmosphere. 



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Chelsea 



Tues & Thurs 9-8 
Wed & Fr. 9-6 



14 SPRINO STREET 
PRINCETON. N J. 



(eo»924-1824 



Mrs Richard E. Elden of 357 
Dodds Lane, to Kenneth R. 
Mischner, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Jack Mischner of New York; 
September 4 in Edith 
Memorial Chapel, The 
Lawrenceville School, the 
Rev. Russell Davis of River- 
side Church, New York City, 
officiating. 

The bride, who retains her 
name, was graduated from 
Douglass College and Rutgers 
University Graduate School. 
Mr. Mischner was graduated 
from The Lawrenceville 
School, Yale University and 
the University of Chicago Law 
School. He is international 
counsel of ASARCO Incor- 
porated. 

The couple will live in New 
York City. 

Rossi-Kroeper. Judith 
Kroeper, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. John Kroeper of Kendall 
Park, to Gary P. Rossi, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Rossi 
of Lawrenceville; September 

4 at St. Ann Church, 
Lawrenceville, the Rev. John 
Dermond officiating 

Mrs. Rossi was graduated 
from South Brunswick High 
School and Glassboro State 
College with a B.A. Degree. 
She is a graduate student at 
Trenton State College and is 
employed as a physical educa- 
tion teacher at the New Jersey 
Neuro-Psychiatric Institute. 
Her husband, a graduate of 
Lawrence High School and 
Seton Hall University, is 
employed at the First Na- 
tional Bank of Princeton. 

The couple will make their 
home in Lawrenceville after a 
honeymoon in Hawaii. 

Gore-Vandegrift. Deborah 

5 Vandegrift, daughter of 
Mrs. Verna Vandegrift of 
West Windsor and James 
Vandegrift of Mercerville, to 
Edward R Gore 3rd, son of 
Mr. and Mrs Edward R. Gore 
Jr. of Hamilton Township; 
September 4 at the First 
Presbyterian Church of Dutch 
Neck, the Rev Floyd Church 
and the Rev Daniel Cahill of- 
ficiating. 

Mrs. Gore is a graduate of 
West Windsor-Plainsboro 
High School and Glassboro 
State College. She is employed 
by Princeton Graphic 
Systems. 

Her husband, a legislative 
assistant to Congressman 
Christopher Smith, is a 
graduate of Anthony High 
School and St Joseph College 
He holds a master's degree in 
public administration from 
Rider College 

Following a honeymoon 
cruise to Bermuda, the couple 
will live in Hamilton 
Township. 



Perone-Parrotta. Lidia R. 
Parrotta, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs. Danny Parrotta of 
California, formerly of 
Lawrenceville, to John M. 
Perone, son of Mr. and Mrs 
John Perone of 495 Ewing 
Street; August 21 in St. Paul 
Church, the Rev. Ralph 
Stansley officiating. 

Mrs. Perone was graduated 
from Trenton State College 
and the Fashion Institute of 
Technology. She is employed 
as a sales manager for Macy's 
in New York. Her husband is a 
research technician for the 
David Sarnoff Research 
Center 

The couple is living in 
Plainsboro after a honeymoon 
trip to Puerto Vallarta, 
Mexico 



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Our streets will be filled with ^ 

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63 North Main Street 
Cranbury. N.J 



Special Details are. 



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X^v 609-9247100 ,/ ' 



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ART 

//i Princeton 




ART BV TEENS 

In Trenton Exhibit. Pain- 
tings, photographs, prints and 
sculptures by students m 18 
New Jersey counties are 
featured in the Teen Arts Ex- 
hibit on view through October 
4 at the New Jersey State 
Museum . 

Works were .chosen from the 
549 that were exhibited at 
Rutgers University in June in 
the 13th annual New Jersey 
State Teen Arts Festival The 
state's Teen Arts Program is 
designed to encourage teen- 
agers, both in and out of 
school, to continue the 
development of their talents 

A public reception honoring 
the artists will be held Sunday, 
October 4 from 2:30 to 3:30 in 
the gallery where the works 
are on view. The reception will 
be followed by a Teen Arts 
Revue in the museum 
auditorium, featuring student 
performances 

DRAWINGS, AT RUTGERS 

From Ashmolean. Approx- 
imately 1 15 drawings from Ox- 
ford University's Ashmolean 
Museum representing artists 



from Durer to Cezanne, will be Cook in her studio on 
exhibited starting this Sunday Thursdays from 7 to 9 p.m ; 
at Rutgers University lo mark beginning drawing on Satur- 
the expansion of the Universi- days from 930 to 11 by Anne 
ty Art Gallery into the Jane Bevan. 

Voorhees Zimmerli Art 

Museum. Intermediate and advanced 

The exhibit celebrates the drawing will be given by Ms. 
300th anniversary of the Bevan on Saturdays from 1 1 to 
Ashmolean. thought to be the 12:30; painting outdoors on 
world's oldest public museum Saturdays from 9:30 to noon 
More than 50 artists are by Ms. Shore and painting for 
represented, including Rem- children on Mondays from 4 to 
brandt, Rubens. Watteau, 5:30 by Ms. Shore, a class 
Boucher, Gainsborough, designed for children eight 
Turner, Monet, Manet, Degas, and over ($24). 
Durer and Grunewald. The Information may be obtain- 
works span 500 years of art in ed by calling Ms. Shore at 
France, Germany, The 448-8967. 
Netherlands and Great Bri- 
tain, and encompass a variety 

of subject matter: landscape. QN looking at ART 
genre, portraits and themes NomCrcdit Course offered. 
drawn from the Bible, history „ How to Vjew Works of m ~ 
and mythology a non<rec jit course in Rider 

The exhibit "Durer to Co „ . g Scnoo , of Cont i n uing 
Cezanne: Northern European studies w , n be f fe red this 
Drawings from the fa]l 

Ashmolean Museum." will re- Man | yn Levitt, assistant 
main at Rutgers through Oc- professor of arti Wll | teach the 



T 
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Hopewell Frame Shop 

Hopewell House Square 

'ttf\0\ »*fi-n*M 7 

"Cater to your Imagination" 
Tues.-Sat. 10-5 



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Studio Galley 

Handcrafted 
Porcelain 
Pottery 
Tues-Fri . 10-6; Sat 



H 



10-5 

200 Washington St. (Rt. 518) 
Rocky Hill. N.J 924-6394 




tober 24. It will then be sent to 
the Cleveland Museum of Art. 



guild gallery. 

In th* montgomcry ctmttw • rocky MM 

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course, explaining the impor- 
tance of color, light, texture 
_. , . and space. The class will meet 

The exhibit is '<> 'he fron / 7 t0 9 pm . Wednesdays, 
Voorhees Hall gallery which Sep tember fa 0ctober 6 a nd 
was renovated over the sum- 13 F The fee is $30 per person, or 
mer A 8-million addition f famj , members 

which will quadruple the Addllional informatlon m ay 
museums space ,s now under obtained by cal | jng 

construction behind Voorhees ^^ 

Hall, at the corner of George *>*r™ is 

and Hamilton Streets The 
new wing is scheduled for 
completion in February. 

The gallery changed its 
name in July to the Jane 

Voorhees Zimmerli Art and Lee Sta^HaTr will beTn 
Museum in honor of Mrs. Zim- view startjng tnjs Saturday at 
merli whose son and the Cranbury Corner Gallery 
daughter-in-law donated a B N Main stree( Cranb ' 
major part of the cost Mrs. Tne sn whjch ^„ > 
Zimmerli died August 7. through September, marks 

Admission to the museum is the „ , s fjrs| am]iver 
free Hours are 10 to 4:30, sary Hours are Tuesda 
Mondays, Tuesdays, Saturday 10.5 

Thursdays and Fridays; noon 

to 5 Saturdays and Sundays. 
The museum is closed 
Wednesdays 



IN CRANBURY 

Paintings. Portraits. "Part- 
ners Show," paintings and 
portraits by Barbara Burdell 



Reopening Sale 



25% 



r OFF 

ALL POSTERS 

Framed and Unframed 



Tfye tyssau Gallery, Inc. 



20 Nassau Street 



SMALL TOWN AMERICA' 
In Paint. On Film. A 
symposium on sma 
America will be the final event 
in the exhibit, "Small Towns 
and Villages : An Exhibition of 
Paintings and Photographs 



BY MCCC ALUMNI 

Works on View. Many 
graduates of the visual arts 
program at Mercer County 
Community College are now 
professional artists, and 
». "? MCCC will exhibit their work 
in the seventh annual alumni 
show, opening this Friday and 
continuing through Friday 



1850-1982," now on view at the 0ctober ' ^exhibit is in the 

Hunterdon Art Center, Clin- newly-remodeled Library 

ton The symposium, to be £ a 'L ery on MCCC s Wesl 

held this Saturday from 9 to 4 Windsor campus 



is open to the public without 
charge, but telephone reserva- 
tions are requested 



Artists are members of such 
area groups as the Princeton 
Art Association and the Tn- 




Appraisal Services 

For an authoritative and 
up-to-date assessment of your fine 

jewelry and silver. . . 

Let La Volte's registered jewelers 

provide a complete wri lien 

description . . . whether for a 

single piece or an entire 

collection. 

Members of the American Gem Society 

Jewelers er.o Sitvertmtths Since 1BT7 

M Nmmi SUM. Prlncaton. Now J«...» 0SS40 

l(Ot) »14-0ej4 

ThurMty ■"> FrMay f*«nlogi Until a 30 FM 




Visa/mastercard accepted 



(201-735-84151 During lunch Count y Ar > Assocation, and 

break, rides will be offered MCCC will be exhibiting about 

through Clinton on an antique M arlls <s The show will in- 

fire engine. clude paintings - figurative 

and abstract - drawings, 

Speakers will be Richard Drints ' photographs, ceramics 

Lingeman, executive editor of g |a ssware, sculpture and tex- 

The Nation and author of '''es- 
"Small Town America;" 

facuTty W o"Rut'gm ? School'o, IPlWIIlIu^^ 
Regional and Urban Plan- 
ning, Ed Rusch. industrial 
archeologist and Matthew 
Baigell. art historian. 

The audience will be en- 
couraged to participate, and 
dialogue amon g members of 
the audience is one of the aims 
of the symposium. 



Summer 

Safe 



FALL CLASSES START 
In Hlghtstown. Classes will 
start the week of September 27 
under the auspices of the Tri- 
County Art Association, at 
Hightstown High School Most 
classes are $50. $40 for 
members. 

Painting at all levels will be 
given Tuesdays from 7 : 30 to 10 
by Elizabeth Shore; water- 
color at all levels on 
Wednesdays from 12 ; 30 to 2 30 
by Barbara Cook (in artist's 
studio); and "Expanding the 
horizons of water-based 
media" on Fridays from 9:30 
to noon by Joanne Augustine 
($55 and $45 in artist's studio) 
Sculpture at all levels, will 
be taught by Stephanie 
Mandelbaum Thursdays from 
7:30 to 10; beginning and in- 
termediate watercolor by Ms. 



DCow S7/7 ^Progress 

SAVE 20 to 50% 

THE RUG & FURNITURE MART 

and 

IVY MANOR SHOWROOMS 

Princeton Shopping Center 921 -91 of) or 921 -8292 

"Beautiful Things for Gracious Living" 

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News Of 

Clubs and Organizations 



The Princeton Business and 
Professional Women's Club 
(BPW) will meet Monday, 
September 13. at the Nassau 
Inn with cocktails beginning 
at 6 and dinner at 6:30. Anne 
Knudson-Fitzpatrick, man- 
ager ot the Princeton Nautilus 
Fitness Center, will discuss 
"Fitness for the Working 
Woman." 

Ms. Knudson-Fitzpatrick is 
a competitive champion skier, 
winner of the 1982 Grand 
Marnier Cup, a nationwide 
event held in Steam Boat, 
Calif., and an all-around 
athlete whose college com- 
petition included diving, 
swimming and gymnastics. 
She plays soccer three times a 
week. 

The meeting is open to the 
public. The cost of the dinner 
is $11 and must be paid for in 
advance. Checks may be 
made payable to Princeton 
BPW, c-o P. Kornicker, 141 
Dorchester Drive, East 
Windsor, 08520. 

Those unable to attend 
dinner are invited to hear Ms. 
Knudson-Fitzpatrick speak at 
7:30 p.m For further in- 
formation, call Cree 
McDougal at 921-0895. 

The Mercer County Chapter 
of the American Diabetes 
Association will hold a 
general meeting Wednesday, 
September 15, at 8 in Hamilton 
Hospital basement cafeteria, 
Whitehorse-Hamilton Square 
Road, Trenton. 

Following a short business 
meeting, Myrna Soriano, M.D. 
wilJ speak on differences in 
treatment between insulin- 
dependent and non-insulin- 
dependent diabetics. Dr. 
Soriano received her M.D. 
degree from the University of 
the Philippines and interned 
at Helene Fuld Medical 
Center. She obtained her 
feliowship of endocrinology at 
Rutgers University and her 
diabetes fellowship from Tem- 
ple University. She is working 
on a study of glucagon 
response to hypoglycemia in 
diabetics. 



The Dogwood Garden Club 

will meet this Thursday at 11 
at the home of Mrs. Marshall 
Schmidt Thomas C 
Southerland Jr. of Princeton 
Nature Tours and an or- 
nithologist, will be the speaker 
at 1. Mrs. Schmidt will be 
assisted by Mrs William 
Boyd. 

Princeton Chapter 459, 
American Association of 
Retired Persons, will meet 
Thursday, September 16 at 2 
at the YM-YWCA, Paul 
Robeson Place. The Lark 
String Quartet, with Joan 
Mills and Ann Deutsch on 
violins, Ruth Fisher, viola, 
and Rae Nickel, cello, will 
entertain. 

Refreshments will be serv- 
ed. 

The monthly discussion 
group of the Single Profes- 
sionals of Princeton will meet 
Tuesday at 8 at 349 Walnut 
Lane. 

Dr. Joan Goldstein, a senior 
research scholar in the 
sociology program of the 
Graduate Center of the City 
University of New York, will 
speak on "The Pineys: Myths 
and Facts Behind the People 
of the Pine Barrens" Dr. 
Goldstein has served on the 
governor's Pinelands Review 
Committee. She is the author 
of "The Politics of Offshore 
Oil" which will be published in 
the fall, and she has been ap- 
pointed to the White House 
technical advisory committee 
on offshore oil. 

After the presentation there 
will be a discussion and social 



hour. There is a small charge 
for admission. For reserva- 
tions call 924-9403. 

The Central Jersey Business 
and Professional Christian 
Women's Council will meet 
Thursday, September 16, at 7 
for dinner at Coach and Four 
Restaurant, Route 33, 
Hightstown. 

The theme for the dinner is 
"Country Craft Fair Time 
Dinner," and the speaker will 
be Jo Jerrehian of Melvern, 
Pa. The cost of the dinner is $8 
and reservations may be 
made by calling 452-2692. The 
deadline is Tuesday. 

The Princeton Weavers' 
Guild will meet this Thursday 
at 7:30 at the First National 
Bank of Central Jersey, Route 
518, Rocky Hill. Ulla Nass will 
discuss "Harness Lace." She 
is an expert on Central and 
South American weaving and 
has published a book on 
Harness Lace. 

Guests are welcome. For 
more information call Grace 
Evans at (201) 874-8668, or 
Barbara Lemme, 448-4533. 

The Mercer-Middlesex 
Chapter of the New Jersey 
Association of Women 
Business Owners will meet 
Wednesday, September 8, at 
Good Time Charley's 
Restaurant, 40 Main Street, 
Kingston. Cocktails will be 
available at 6, dinner at 7. 

Women business owners and 
those guests interested in 
attending should contact 
Kathy Moutner at (201) 251- 
0011. 



Breastfeeding and 
mothering will be the theme of 
a series of discussions at the 
Family Resource Infant 
Center beginning next Wed- 
nesday, September 15. 
Princeton LaLeche League 
group leaders will lead the 
informal discussion groups 
which will meet the third 
Wednesday morning of each 
month at 9: 30. 

Getting started breast- 
feeding, breastfeeding and the 
rest of your life as well as 
weaning and the introduction 
of solid foods will be 
discussed. 

The Family Resource Infant 
Center is located in the 
Princeton Methodist Church 
on Nassau Street at Van- 
deventer Avenue. For more 
information, call Lyn 
Hamilton, 921-2923, or Peggy 
Killmer. 921-8254. 

The Central New Jersey 
Chapter of the American 
Association for Public Opinion 
Research (AAPOR) will meet 
on Tuesday, September 21, at 
7:30 p.m. at Prospect House 
on the Princeton University 
Campus. 

A brief business meeting 
will be followed by a panel 
discussion on the subject of 
"Survey Research And 
Journalism: Responsibilities 
and Ethical Considerations " 
The discussion will examine 
some of the issues related to 
news coverage of a recent 
survey conducted for Atlantic 
Richfield Corporation (AR- 
CO) by the Eagleton Poll at 
Rutgers University 

Panelists will include 
Clifford Zukin, director of the 
Eagleton Poll; Thomas 
Curran, editor of the Trenton 
Times, which gave front-page 
coverage to the original 
release of survey results; 
Richard Hughes, Deputy 
Managing Director of the New 
Brunswick Home News and a 
member of the New Jersey 
Press Association; and Harry 
O'Neill, president of Opinion 




physics at Princeton 
University, had predicted the 
existence of three-degree 
background radiation from 
the Big Bang The meeting is 
open to the public. 



JAMES V. TAMASI 

Plumbing A HMtfng 

Contractor 

Princeton Junction, n.j 

799-1494 



Turner-Russo 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

63 Princeton Ave.. • Hopewell, NJ 08525 
609-466-2222 



—to 



REPUBLICANS PLAN PICNIC: Getting ready for the an- 
nual fall Republican Association picnic are, from left, 
Borough Councilman Dick Woodbridge, picnic chair- 
man Ellen Souter and son Jeffrey, Township Commit- 
teeman George Adriance and Borough Council can- 
didate Hank Abernathy. The picnic will be held Sun- 
day, September 1 2, beginning at 4 at the home of Alex 
and Carol Wojciechowicz, 7 Herrontown Road. Local 
and county Republican candidates will be on hand, 
and all are invited, regardless of political party. The 
charge is $5 per adult and $2 per child or a maximum 
of $15 per family. For further information call Ellen 
Souter at 924-3105. 

Research Corporation, vice The Amateur Astronomers- 
chairman of the Council of Association of Princeton will 



American Survey Research 
Organizations and secretary- 
treasurer of the National 
Council of Public Polls. 



meet on Tuesday, at 8 in 
Princeton University's Peyton 
Hall. 

Dr. Robert Dicke will discuss 
the shape of the sun. Dr. 
For further information Dicke, who is a professor of 

about the meeting, or about 

CNJ AAPOR, call Diane 

Schrayer at Response 

Analysis Corporation, 921-3333 

or Rosi Schwarz at Opinion 

Research Corporation, 924- 

5900. Reservations for dinner 

preceding the meeting must 

be made through Ms. Schwarz 

at Opinion Research Cor- 
poration no later than 3 p.m. 

on Friday, September 17. 



The Women's Division of 
The Democratic Party of 
Mercer County will hold its an- 
nual fall dinner show on Tues- 
day, September 21, at 6:30 at 
Roman Hall, Trenton. Tickets 
are $20 per person. 

Entitled "That's Entertain- 
ment," the affair will be stag- 
ed by Victoria Production, a 
group of professional per- 
formers. The evening's enter- 
tainment will consist of music, 
dance and a fashion show. 

Marie Tighue and Gail 
Cimino are in charge of the 
event. For further information 
and tickets call Terry Bolla at 
394-9285 or Mary Ann 
Weischadle at 587-3245. 



The South Central Jersey 
Chapter of the National 
Alliance of Homebased 
Businesswomen (NAHB) will 
hold a panel discussion on 
"Your Image as a Business 
Owner" on Tuesday, 
September 21, at the E.I.C. 
building, Route 1, Perms Neck. 
There will be a business 
meeting at 9 a.m., followed by 
the panel discussion at 9:30. 

For additional information 
call Kera G Herzog at 924-0308 
or Joan Lechner at 924-7545. 

The September meeting of 
the Princeton area Alumnae 
Club of Alpha Chi Omega 
national sorority will be held 
Monday evening at 8 at the 
home of Dottie Woodbury, 2 
Benford Drive, Princeton 
Junction. New members in the 
Princeton -Trenton area are 
encouraged to attend the first 
meeting and social hour as 
programs for the coming year 
will be discussed Additional 
information is available from 
president Woodbury at 799- 
3372 



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lEsnc 



I Dartmouth Seen as Favorite for 1982 Ivy Football Title; 
i Princeton, Cornell and Yale Could Challenge for Top Spot 



veteran offensive 



league play has become more ^ind 

important, because the Ivy | inc 

teams are finding themselves Reaver positions are up 



together, the most 
1960-67 Winning records were 
taken for granted 
Says. 



, ... , ... , . , That win gave the Orange 

In the four years that head B|ack a share of lhe , vy „. 

coach Frank Navarro has us- Ue me , asl t , me it has achiev- „ 

■H , f^thJhl. ed that distinction, and the one , nC reasingly outclassed by f orgrabs as are most spots on 

PF ^ ^J^T^i^ S major goal still to be attained their non-league opponents def | nse where on |y two 

aiiompiisneo several goais Th ?j :as , capture< j the Princeton has dropped six of slarlers end Greg Burkus and 

sea^ C ha^rC e n M sZI lea ^ cr0WnOUtngh, ,' n J 9M Ci * hl ""'"J* "l 1 *"* lhe monitS' back Jim Campbell 

? »i?EL in. V^«. «mc! Wlth Cosmo IacavaM ' leadin 8 league in the last three years. return Ya , e tas led the league 

,,! them to an undefeated season Overall in 1981. the eight Ivy in defen se for the past 10 

those ln lhe last lhree years ' membe rs managed just six seasons but its effectiveness 

Princeton is second only to victories in 24 games, and half lnis year wU1 depend on a 

Yale with the best league f those were won by Yale. | argc numD er of newcomers. 

.. mark, 14-6-1, but has had to There won't be much improve- 

, In 1961, the Tigers won their f bridesmaid status ment this fall. Corne l, After three first 

o7u,e g fi^me smceT^ * ach time M fa " "„ jUS ' „ k ™ Heague finishes in a 

Ind^lWenciTY^'sstnlSl m-ssed making ,t to the altar Navarr0 obviously would be row , the Big Red faltered last 
o u/JLh :vict « Tha* a 1717 tle w " h " arva !; d happy to beat h.s non-league scason , finishing 2 . 5 , and 3-7 
of 14 straight victoies inat |j|(romsnarlng t he . , bt ne constantly „ The return of 40 let- 

SnTtT^nc^nTam Ktle "»' Dartmouth and str esses the higher priority of ^t, Tdu^the sUrting 
" Vale the league match-ups. And backfie i d and both ends, 

why not, considering the con- shou |d put Cornell back in the 
straints placed on Ivy football race 

teams The cry for a resump- I( he stays free of 
tion of spring practice has jnjurv i mior tailback Derrick 

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If anything. 



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Derek Graham Out for Season 

Princeton's all-Ivy wide receiver, junior Derek Graham, 
separated his shoulder in the first week of practice, and will 
not play this season. 

The injury occured before the team even put on pads, dur- 
ing a simple "dive-and-roll" drill Graham completed the 
rest of practice, but sought medical attention when the 
shoulder began to swell. Dr Joseph Zawadsky returned 
from vacation and performed minor surgery last Friday. 

In his sophomore year last season, Graham was plagued 
by a hamstring injury that kept him sidelined for the first 
five games. However, he was healthy for the Yale game, 
and caught 15 passes for 278 yards, in the memorable upset 
of the Elis, 

He is weighing the possibility of taking a year off from 
college and returning next year as a junior, so as not to miss 
a full season of football. In the meantime, his replacement 
will be senior Brad Urschel, who has also been injury-prone 

In Saturday's scrimmage against Merchant Marine 
Academy, the Tigers won 21-10 in five quarters of football 
Quarterback Brent Woods played four of the five quarters, 
but did not look particularly sharp, completing just 13 of 34 
passes for 214 yards He also ran 10 times for 34 yards, in- 
cluding a one yard run for a touchdown. 

The Tigers gained 224 yards on the ground, with Karris 
Curry rushing for 67 of those on 14 carries Roland Warren 
caried 19 times -or 61 yards Kevin Gutherie led the 
receivers with se' tt receptions for 116 yards. Chris Price 
booted a pair of 2. yard field goals 

The Tigers limited the small-sized visitors to just 13 yards 
net rushing, A second scrimmage for the second and fourth 
units will be held at 4:30 this Friday on the same field in 
front of Jadwin, Wilkes will be the opponent. As those who 
went Saturday found out, the starting times for these scrim- 
mages are always tentative, and subject to change without 
notice. 



but 



Harmon, the 1981 Ivy 



ne sophomore of the year, should 
have a good fall, matched with 



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been getting louder 
nobody is listening 
places where it counts 

What is difficult for Navarro '~~,~ finback' Mark Miller 
now is that he has raised the Sen[or quarte rback Jeff Ham- 
level of expectation among mond has his ups and downs 
football fans here But it gets asapasser , and must improve 
very tough at this point to t0 keep Cornell a contender, 
raise or even maintain the Aboul half of the starting 
Tigers' position defensive unit returns, with 

most of the rebuilding needed 

Teams More Balanced. The ln tne seC ondary Cornell 
competition in the league ap- cou | d be vulnerable here, if 
pears more balanced this fall, newcomer s don't fill the gaps 
with Yale set to fall a peg or adequately 

two and Columbia and Perm 

both a little stronger. Harvard. The Cantabs are 

Dartmouth is the preseason n0| going t0 improve much, 
favorite here to capture the ti- because they do not have a 
tie, after sharing it with the take-charge quarterback of 
Ehs in 1981 with a 6-1 mark. above average ability. The 
Although not as powerful as Crim son ended 1981 with a 
last year, the Bulldogs will two . qU arterback system, 
still be a contender. because neither senior Don 

Aliard or Ron Cuccia could 

Cornell and Princeton also nandle lh e job alone, 
fall into that category, and 
those four teams should com- 
prise the league's upper divi- 
sion by the end of play in 
November. Brown and Har- 
vard don't appear to have 
quite enough to challenge 
Dartmouth seriously; and 
although both should improve, 
Columbia and Penn will bring 
up the rear again. 

Following is a thumbnail 
sketch of the other Ivy teams. 



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of all the players 
who've ever played 
college football, which 
one set more records 
than anyone else in 
history'* The answer: 
At Portland State from 
1977 through 1980, 
quarterback Neil 
Lomax set the in- 
credible total of 90 
different NCAA 

records! , , No other 
player has ever come 
close to holding that 
many records ... Among 
his all-time records are 
such things as most 
total completions. mo>t 
TD passes, most 400- 
yard passing games, 
most passes in a 
quarter, etc. 

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since the Associated 
Press began ranking 
roMn'r football teams 
each week, starting in 
liUli, onl\ 1 learns have 
ever been ranked No. 1 
from the start of a 
season to the finish of 
that same season The 
ONLY teams that have 
been ranked first all 
year were Notre Dame 
in 1943 Army in 1945 
... Nebraska in 1971 ... 
And Souther Cal in 1972 
... You'd think it would 
have happened more 
often, but it hasn't. 
+ + + 

Which current head 
coach in the National 
Football League has his 
own son as a full-time 
assistant coach on the 
team? ... Answer is 
Bum Phillips, coach of 
the New Orleans Saints 
... Bum's son. Wade 
Phillips, is the defensive 
line coach with New 
Orleans. 

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Dartmouth. Ten of 11 
players on the offensive unit 
that tore through Princeton 
for 32 points last year, and 
most of the rest of the league 
as well, are back. Only flanker 
Shaun Teevens is gone. 

That leaves junior quarter- 
back Frank Polsincllo, who 
won five of six games after 
taking over for the injured 
Kick Stafford, leading rusher 
Sean Maher and fullback Rich 
Lena. 

On the other hand, only 
linebacker Dave Neslund 
returns as a starter on 
defense, leaving coach John 
Yukica much rebuilding work 
to be done. Here, the schedule 
may work heavily in favor of 
the Big Green. It will open at 
home with Penn, one of the 
weaker Ivy opponents, and 
then play three consecutive 
non-league foes, before facing 
Harvard at home a month 
later, That gives plenty of 
time to get the defense in gear. 

Yale. This is the year 1982 
A. D. (After Diana) in New 
Haven; quarterback John 
Kogan and standout receiver 
Curt Grieve are also gone; the 
heart of the Elis offense. But. 
don't cry for Carm Cozza, the 
most succcessful coach in 
Yale history. 

The Bulldogs' ability to 
dominate the league for the 
last decade has rested on a 
steady stream of 

replacements for graduated 
seniors, that has kept the 
talent level high. Senior 
quarterback Joe Dufek played 
in Rogan's shadow most of 
last year, but did well in spot 
duty and saved the Cornell 
game. Junior running backs 
Paul Andne, John Rogers and 
Jeff Bassette should do well 



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Bill Cirullo Hoping to Make "Smart Decisions" to Make 
PHS Football Team Contender for Colonial Valley Title 




His best game last year was 
against Notre Dame when he 
completed 9 of 19 for 170 
yards. "He had five dropped 
passes on the money which 
would have made a dif- 
ference," recalled Cirullo of 
the 37- 19 loss to the Irish. 

Behind Phox, is Jason 
Petrone, a 5-11, 175 pound 
junior. Strong and still 
growing, Petrone drew some 
defensive assignments last 
year, but his passing in jayvee 
games "was a little rough 
around the edges. He's going 
to be big." noted Cirullo. 
' 'We'll see how he works out at 
quarterback." 

A Problem Surfaces. In the 

Continued on Page 1SB 



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PHS FOOTBALL TRl-CAPTAINS: Captains of the 1982 Princeton High School foot- 
ball team are from left: fullback Chris Gabrielsen, 5-11, 180; guard Alec Hoke, 6-2, 
230 and quarterback Torrance Phox, 6-0, 175. Story on the Little Tigers appears 
this page. 

everything we get. It's never 
easy." Cirullo sees the fact 
this year's team is not set as a 
plus. "One thing going for us is 
there should be keen com- 
petition for offensive and 
defensive positions. That 
should be very healthy," he 
commented. 

22 of 24 Touchdowns. 

Wingback Lamont Fletcher, 
the team's speedy, "big-play" 
runner last year, scored ten 
touchdowns for the 1981 Little 
Tigers. Fullback Larry 
McKellar added eight and 
tailback Wayne Davis con- 
tributed four. The trio ac- 
counted for all but two of 
Princeton's 24 TDs. All have 
graduated. 

The lone returning back is 
quarterback Terry Phox. With 
Fletcher and Davis supplying 
the offense, Phox didn't have 
to pass much last fall. This 
year, the burden will be 
greater 

"I expect some good things 
out of Phox this year," said 
Cirullo. "He's an integral part 
of the offense. We're going to 
have to look to Terry to do 
some throwing and running. 



Last year, when Bill Cirullo 
took over as head coach of the 
Princeton High School football 
team for Jim Beachell, who 
lost his job when he was 
blindsided by a shrinking 
school enrollment and 
economic constraints, the 
former PHS tailback, initially, 
was not concerned about how 
his team would do in the up- 
coming season. 

He was concerned about 
playing at all. With only a 
week to go before the start of 
practice, Cirullo had himself 
and one assistant . There was a 
time when he thought he 
would have to scuttle the 
freshman and jauvee teams - 
and possibly the entire foot- 
ball program. 

Cirullo did manage to 
scrape together a staff in 
time, and the early problems 
were largely forgotten after a 
basically set first team which 
he inherited from Beachell 
won five of the first six games. 

Injuries to several key 
starters hurt the team in the 
stretch, however, and the 
Little Tigers dropped their 
last three to end with a 5-4 
record. The final 20-0 loss to 
Trenton marked the first time 
a PHS football team had failed 
to score in four years. 

Now a new season is about 
to start. Cirullo has a full staff 
ready to go and time to think 
about how the 1982 Little 
Tigers will do in the Colonial 
Valley Conference, which he 
predicts "will be a really tight 



PHS opens its season 
September 25 against Not- 
tingham High, a newcomer to 
the league this year. Next 
year Steinert and Hamilton 
will join the league, bringing 
the number of football 
members to ten - and with the 
influx, possible scheduling 
problems. 

PHS Competitive. "I see 

ourselves as competitive in 
the league," said Cirullo. I 
think we have a chance to win 
it -- if all the pieces fall 
together. * 

"Last year the line, back- 
field and defense were pretty 
.much set. This year I feel we 
have a legitimate shot, but 
wre'll have to play good foot- 
ball. We're going to need a lot 
of support from arriving 
football players. 

How well those "arriving" 
football players perform is 
what Cirullo feels will be 
critical to the team's success. 
"That's the key." he said. 
"How well each player can 
support the one next to him. 

"I'm optimistic. We'll go at 
it game by game and we're 
going to have to work for 



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It's Division 1 AA Now 

To gain more control 
over the lucractive 
revenues from television, 
the big football schools got 
together and kicked many 
colleges including almost 
all inthe Ivy League out of 
Division 1-A last winter 

So this fall members of 
the Ancient Eight, who 
naturally stuck together, 
will be playing in Division 
I-AA The Ivies did not like 
the idea, but were outvoted 
in the matter. 

It could have an adverse 
effect on their recruiting, 
of top flight players, which 
is difficult enough already, 
when matched against 
other colleges 

Of more immediate con- 
cern here, at least, should 
be the dwindling number of 
spectators turning out for 
games in Palmer Stadium 
Last fall's six game home 
schedule saw just 58,669 
paying customers in the 
stands, an average of 
slightly more than 9,700 per 
contest. That is close to an 
all-time low. 

Poor crowds were 
understandable when the 
team consistently lost 
more than it won during the 
70's, but Frank Navarro 
has turned things around. 
Is it possible that the Ivies 
have de-emphasized fool 
ball so much that fewer 
people care anymore, win 
or lose 



Sports in Princeton 

Continued Irom Poqo !?B 

What kept Harvard in con- 
tention last year was record- 
breaking running back Jim 
Callinan, and he has 
graduated. Coach Joe Elastic 
must look for a replacement 
for him, as well as new 
receivers. Three-fourths of the 
interior line returns 

On defense, all-Ivy corner- 
back Rocky Delgadillo is gone 
from a unit that returns six 
starters. The secondary is 
young and inexperienced, and 
will be tested throughout the 
season 

Brown. After eight con- 
secutive winning seasons in 
Providence, things fell apart 
for coach John Anderson last 
year. The Bruins should im- 
prove on their 3-7 mark, but 
not much. 

The outlook would be 
brighter if junior Hank 
Landers, last year's starting 
quarterback, had not signed a 
pro baseball contract in the 
spring. He will not be back, 
and neither will tailback Vince 
Stephens, who is taking a year 
off from school. Added to that 
is the loss of all-Ivy tight end 
Steve Jordan, who graduated. 

If capable replacements can 
be found in the backfield, 
Brown should do better, 
because most of the offensive 
line returns The defense, a 
largely inexperienced unit last 
fall, will be stronger. 

Penn. The Quakers have 
plenty of starters returning, 
but it is doubtful how far this 
will take them. Senior 
quarterback Gary Vura will 
be on his own. now that Doug 
Marzonie has graduated. All 
the running backs return as 
well, but none is particularly 
outstanding 

Junior Karl Hall, the 
leading receiver last year 
returns, promising that Penn 
will once again have a wide- 
open offense. Most of the in- 
terior line is back on defense, 
but the secondary was hard hit 
by graduation. 

Penn should win more than 
once this fall, but three times 
appears tops. 

Columbia. The Lions won 
the annual battle with Penn to 
stay out of the Ivy league 
cellar last year, and appear 
capable of winning it again. 
Just who else they'll defeat 



along the way is uncertain. 

Led by junior quarterback 
John Witkowski, the best since 
Marty Domres, the entire 
starting backfield returns If 
Witkowski continues to im- 
prove, the Lions will be a 
strong candidate to pull off an 
upset or two. 

The two top receivers are 
among the seven starters on 
offense returning, the defense 
is less set, with all-Ivy Vince 
Pelini gone, and just four 
starters back. One big plus for 
the Lions is the return of 
second team alt-Ivy place 
kicker Miro Lovric, who set 
Columbia season and career 
marks last fall His toe could 
make the difference in a tight 
game. 

It's no easy road for the 
Tigers, especially having to 
open their season in Ithaca. 
That game will be key to the 
Tigers' Ivy hopes. 

As for non-league op- 
ponents, Princeton may beat 
Lafayette at home, but will be 
an underdog against 
Delaware and Army Both of 
the latter two have plenty of 
talented personnel returning 

The schedule : 
Sept .18 at Cornell 1:30 

Sept. 25 at Delaware 1 :30 
Oct. 2 Brown 1:30 

Oct. 9 at Columbia 1:30 
Oct. ii, Army 1:30 

Oct. 23 Harvard 1:30 

Oct. 30 Pennsylvania 1:30 
Nov. 6 Lafayette 1:30 

Nov. 13 at Yale 1:30 

Nov. 20 Dartmouth 1:00 

FALL CLASSES TO START 
In Tennis. Fall tennis 
classes will begin Monday. 
Offered through the Princeton 
Community Tennis Program, 
junior, adult and senior citizen 
classes are available to in- 
terested players. 

The following Monday, 
September 20, the PCTP's 
winter tennis classes will 
begin at the Princeton Indoor 
Tennis Center on Washington 
Koad. Those wishing to enroll 
in both scries may join the 
winter session at the end of 
October when fall classes 
conclude at a special pro- 
rated price The winter series 
runs through March 26. 

Registrations are being 
accepted at the tennis office, 
71 University Place, for all 
classes. For specific class 
times and locations, call 924- 
4343 

A special advanced class 
will be offered this winter for 
juniors who have a MSTA- 
NJTA ranking or who play on 
their high school viirsity team. 
Registrations are limited. 

REGISTER SATURDAY 
For Fall Soccer. 

Registration for the fall soccer 
season of the Princeton Soccer 
Association will be held 
Saturday, at the Dinky Station 
on University Place from 9 to 
I. 

Registration forms have 
been mailed to those who 
played during the spring 
season, and may be returned 
either by mail or in person. 



Regular league play will begin 
next Saturday at the Fete 
fields on Washington Road 

Girls and boys in grades one 
through eight are eligible to 
play The fee is $15 As always, 
volunteer coaches are needed 
at all levels. For further in- 
formation, call 921-0221 or 924- 
8631. 

Tryouts for the 1973 
travelling team will also be 
held this Saturday at 9 at the 
soccer fields on Washington 
Road 



HALF-MARATHON SET 

For September 26. The 13 1 

mile Princeton Half- 
Marathon, sponsored by the 
Greater Princeton Jaycees 
and supported by the First 
National Bank of Princeton 
and Princeton Nautilus Fit- 
ness Center will be held on 
Sunday, Sept. 26 Proceeds 
will benefit the Princeton 
YMCA and the Princeton First 
Aid Squad. 

Entry forms may be ob- 
tained at the First National 
Bank, Footworks on 
Witherspoon Street, or 
Princeton Nautilus in the 
Princeton Shopping Center. 
The fee is $6 until Sept 15, $7 
thereafter. 

Prizes will be awarded to 
first-place finishers in all age 
divisions. A three-mile-run 
will be held the same time as 
the marathon. For additional 
information, call Princeton 
Nautilus at 921-6985. 



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Sweet Jersey Corn, the 
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to Hector's A's of Red- 
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tourney standings Sweet 
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PHS Football 

Continued from Paget 38 

power I formation favored by 
Cirullo "the tailback is your 
horse," he said. When the heir 
apparent, senior Kyle Stevens 
decided not to come out this 
year to devote full time to his 
studies, it created, a problem. 

One candidate is junior 
Albino Nini, the starting 
tailback in last year's opener 
with South Brunswick. "He's 
good," said Cirullo of the 5-10, 
170-lb. back. "He's strong and 
fast, a very nice running 
back." 

Another will be sophomore 
Tom Hagge:ty, a 180-lb. 
sophomore who was a relay 
runner on Princeton's fine 
track team. Described by 
Cirullo as "strong as an ox and 
quick, a fine ball player," 
Haggerty may alternate 
between fullback and 
tailback. 



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Two seniors, both returning 
lettermen, are vying for 
starting wingback. WHHe 
Whittaker was a starting 
cornerback on defense and did 
not see much offensive action 
because the sterling Fletcher 
was a fixture there. 

"Our offense was Fletcher 
because he could break open a 
game at any time, but 
Whittaker is a better 
■blocker," observed Cirullo. "I 
expect good things out of 
Willie. He's one of the core 
players I can't do without. At 
175. Whittaker has put on 
weight over the summer. 
"He's 'thicker', more meaty," 
said Cirullo. 

Ed Rice, a 5-10, 1651b. 
senior, got in for a few plays 
on offense last year at 
wingback, but played a lot of 
defense toward the end of the 
season. He gained his 
wingback experience on the 
javvee team. 

Where Rice will end up — 
and the future role of a 
number of candidates — will 
depend, commented Cirullo, 
on four pre-season scrim- 
mages against New Brun- 
swick, Princeton Day School, 
Delaware Valley High and 
Freehold Borough. The first 



with New Brunswick will be 
held next Wednesday, Sept. 8, 
at the PHS field. 

Two other players that may 
end up seeing some action at 
wingback are two juniors, 
Mickey Carnevale and Dwight 
Coleman. Both are on the 
small side. 

"I may let Carnevale run 
some counterplays and block 
for us," said Cirullo. If not on 
offense, both may end up on 
the defensive unit, Carnevale 
as a linebacker, Coleman a 
cornerback. 

Because he has a smaller 
squad this year - Cirullo says 
he will be lucky if he hits 40 -- 
proper placement will be 
vital. "With a smaller squad 
you've got to be smarter 
where you play people," he 
said. "You've got to guard 
against wearing some out." 

Gabrielson at FB. One 
player he is going to have to be 
smart about, Cirullo said, is 
fullback Scott Gabrielsen, one 
of the team's tri-captains this 
year along with Phox and 



lineman Alec Hoke 
"Gabrielsen speaks for 
himself, a fine athlete," said 
Cimllo. 

Last fall, Gabrielsen was 
headed for an outstanding 
year as a linebacker when he 
injured his knee in the fourth 
game against Hightstown and 
was lost for the rest of the 
campaign - one reason why 
the team began to self- 
destruct as the season went 
on. 

"Gabe," says Cirullo, "has 
a nose and eye for football. 
He's tough, agressive and 
very smart. He picks his holes 
well; he just isn't a bulldozer - 
he can't be, he's not that big. 

"He's a fine blocker, a great 
high school fullback. Ver- 
satile. He can do it all. 

"On the other hand ... sighs 
Cirullo, "he's an outstanding 
defensive player ..." Where 
he plays, is one of the "smart" 
decisions Cirullo is going to 
have to make. 



A backup is senior Anthony 
Turner, who at 180, 5-9, U not 
that big for the position. "We 
don't have a 6-2, 21 5-1 b 
fullback like we did last year 
in Larry (McKellar), said 
Cirullo. 

Asked to sum up the back- 
field, Cirullo conceded there is 
a little less varsity experience 
- except at quarterback -- 
and, collectively, it is not as 
fast as others in the past. 

"We may not break as many 
long ones," concluded Cirullo, 
but Nini and Haggerty are not 
slowpokes. They can fly 
Haggerty is not two steps 
behind Davis •- and that's a 
high accolade. And he's more 
powerful. Nini is no slowpoke, 
either. 

"We have some nice hard- 
nosed kids in the backfield. 
Gabe, Phox .. just about all 
are good, hard, tough kids. I 
think we have a considerable 
amount of talent there " 

—Preston Eckmeder 
Next Week: The line. 



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Home Phone 



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